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REVIEW 



Department of Geology 




JNIVERSITY OF 
C. 

Song: 

Jncovering 
Secrets of the 
nner Core 



Assistant Professor Xiaodong 
ong has done groundbreaking 
rark using seismic data to better 
inderstand the Earth's core. Song 
ecently came to the Department 
if Geology at Illinois from the 
,amont-Doherty Earth 
)bservatory of Columbia 
Iniversity, where he had been 
esearching and teaching for three 
ears after earning his Ph.D. in geo- 
ihysics from the California Institute of 
echnology. His Ph.D. research investi- 
,ated the properties of the Earth's core 
nd lowermost mantle. His work at 
.amont provided observations proving 
hat the Earth's solid inner core rotates 
t a faster rate than the rest of the 
ilanet. This finding was listed as one 
if the most important scientific discov- 
ries of the century in Discover maga- 
:ine and one of the most important 
ireakthroughs of the year in Science. 

It has long been theorized that the 
nner core, which is solid, may move 
eparately from the rest of the Earth- 
ike a beach ball in water. In fact, the 
Earth's magnetic field is explained by 
he convective motions in the fluid 
ore. This idea is known as the 
)ynamo Theory. According to this the- 
iry, electromagnetic force generated by 
he interaction of the magnetic field in 



LLINOIS AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN 




the outer core and the conducting 
inner core causes the inner core to 
rotate a few degrees per year. These 
few degrees translates to about 10 kilo- 
meters per year —clearly the core rota- 
tion is very fast in the context of geo- 
logic time. However, until Song's work, 
no one had been able to observe or 
prove this hypothesis. 

"With this kind of speed, we 
should be able to observe the move- 
ment," says Song, "but the trick was 
figuring out how to do it." Song took 
advantage of his Ph.D. research con- 
cerning the anisotropy of the inner 
core. Seismic waves that go through 
the Earth go at different speeds and 
directions, depending on the composi- 
tion of the part of the Earth it's travel- 
ing through (see image). In his 
research, Song had found that the 
inner core is not homogeneous and 
that seismic waves go faster along a 
roughly north-south axis than along 



This diagram illustrates how the 
fastest path through the Earth's 
solid inner core has shifted over 
time, showing that the core moves 
at a faster rate than the rest of the 
Earth. Xiaodong Song's findings 
have been hailed as one of the 
most important discoveries of the 
century by Discover magazine. 

any other. As luck would have 
it, however, the inner core is not 
exactly symmetric around the 
north-south axis. The fastest 
path was found to be tilted 
about 10 degrees off the pole 
and the wave speed changes lat- 
erally in the inner core. 
Song and his Lamont colleague, 
Paul G. Richards, were able to observe 
the inner core's movement by review- 
ing seismic data over the course of 
about 10 years. They found that if they 
took measurements from the exact 
same station (relative to the mantle) 
and used earthquakes from the exact 
same point, they could observe a 
change in seismic speed with time, 
thus proving the core had rotated. 

Song's next step is to use similar 
seismic data to understand the proper- 
ties of the inner core. It is unclear 
whether the anisotropy of the inner 
core is caused because the core is a 
single giant anisotropic crystal or that 
there are different phases of iron in the 
core or even a transition zone within 
the inner core. Song hopes there are 
further clues about the composition 
and motion of the core in the seismic 
data he has collected. 



Greetings 



Our "Year in Review" 




The year 1999 
has seen a 
number of 
H changes in the 
g Geology 
Department. 
We are delight- 
ed to welcome 
two new facul- 
ty members to 
the department. Professor Xiaodong 
Song, a seismologist, came to Illinois 
from Cal Tech, via the Lamont- 
Doherty Geological Observatory. His 
research focuses on understanding the 
nature of the Earth's interior. Already, 
his work demonstrating that the core 
does not spin at the same rate as the 
mantle has garnered international 
headlines. Professor Craig Lundstrom 
joins us from the University of 
California, Santa Cruz, via Brown 



University. He is an isotope geo- 
chemist and has been setting up a new 
mass spectrometry lab in the Natural 
History Building. Professor Tom 
Anderson, on our faculty for 32 years, 
retired at the end of the fall semester. 
Fortunately, Tom will continue his 
research as an emeritus professor. We 
look forward to adding two more new 
faculty members to our roster during 
the next year, for we are now in the 
midst of searches for a geomicrobiolo- 
gist and for a new R.E. Grim Professor 
in either mineral science or sedimenta- 
ry geology. We've clearly entered a 
growth mode and are excited about 
building new and educational 
opportunities in the department. 
At the beginning of the fall, 
Professor Jay Bass, who energetically 
guided the department for the past 
two years, dove back into his research 



Contents 



New Faculty: Xiaodong Song 
Greetings from the Department Head 
New Faculty: Craig Lundstrom 
Department News 
Tom Anderson Retires 
Undergraduate Activities. 
Geology Long Ago 
Annual Report 
News from Alumni and Friends 



1 

3 
4 
5 
9 

14 
16 
20 



and teaching program. We all owe Jay 
a hearty thanks for his efforts on our 
behalf! I have become the department 
head. Though I've been teaching 
structural geology, geotectonics, and 
field geology at Illinois since 1983, this 
is my first experience with administra- 
tion, so this fall was an intense learn- 
ing experience. I've really enjoyed the 
opportunity to meet with our alumni 
and have been warmed by the contin- 
uing enthusiasm that alumni have for 
the activities of the department, and 
for the financial support that alumni 
provide through GeoThrust. 

You may have noticed that, in 
honor of the new millennium, we've 
gone from publishing two alumni 
newsletters a year to publishing one 
Department of Geology "Year in 
Review". You'll find that this review, in 
addition to popular news about 
departmental and alumni activities, 
also contains a record of research and 
teaching activities in the department. 
We hope this information helps to give 
a sense of the scientific and education- 
al mission of the department. 

Please enjoy this publication and 
stop by if you're in the area — NHB is 
having a bit of a face lift, with new 
paint and new lights in public spaces. 
Otherwise, look for your departmental 
friends at the receptions we sponsor at 
the AAPG and GSA meetings. 

— Stephen Marshak 



Year in Review is published once a year by the Department of Geology, University of 
Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, to summarize the activities and accomplishments within 
the department and news from alumni and friends. 

Department Head: Stephen Marshak (smarshak@uiuc.edu) 
Staff Secretary: Barb Elmore (b-elmore@uiuc.edu) 
Editor: Deb Aronson 

Produced for the Department of Geology by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 
Office of Publications; designer: Pat Mayer. 

http://www.geology.uiuc.edu |; ,,| „ College of Liberal Arts and Science, 

I UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN 



ULULUbT LI! 



New Faculty 



A. Adjacent to Interface 



Lundstrom 
Looks at 
Magmatic 
Processes 



Craig Lundstrom recently joined the 
Geology Department as an assistant 
professor after completing a post-doc 
at Brown University. He is a geo- 
chemist who received his B.A. in 
chemistry from Colorado College and 
his Ph.D. in Earth Sciences from the 
University of California, Santa Cruz. 
Lundstrom uses uranium-series 
(U-series) disequilibria to study mag- 
matic processes on the Earth. U-series 
isotopes have much shorter half lives 
than more conventional isotope sys- 
tems such as Sr. The half lives of the 
isotopes Lundstrom studies (radium, 
thorium and protactinium) range from 
1,600 -350,000 years and thus can be 
used to study geologically short- 
timescale processes. Using new tech- 
niques of mass spectrometry, 
Lundstrom can measure samples as 
small as one femtogram (10' 15 grams), 
just a few million atoms. 

Recently, Lundstrom has been 
studying U-series isotopes in basalt 
samples taken from mid-ocean ridges. 
He is striving to understand the rate at 
which the mantle melts and to charac- 
terize the amount of partial melting 
that occurs in the mantle beneath the 
ridge axis. So far Lundstrom has found 
that the melt (basalt) starts to rise as 
soon as it comprises one part per 
thousand of the mantle, and that melt 
rises at a rate quicker than the solid 
mantle (peridotite). In addition, 
Lundstrom found that mantle flows at 
the same rate as the ridge spreads, 
thus confirming that the sea-floor 




Top: Back-scattered 
electron images of 
peridotite shows clear 
differences between 
melt and mineral 
modes of "A" the 
region closest to the 
basanite-peridotite 
interface and "B" the 
region farthest from 
the interface. 

Bottom: Craig 
Lundstrom sitting at 
his newly assembled 
mass spectrometer. 



spreading is a passive process. These 
findings were published in Earth and 
Planetary Science Letters in 1998. 

In a related area of inquiry, 
Lundstrom has conducted experimen- 
tal studies on the interaction between 
basalt and peridotite. He wants to 
understand how the melt interacts 
with the mantle. Can basalt, for exam- 
ple, re-equilibrate with the mantle as it 
ascends? Lundstrom found that as the 
basalt interacts with the peridotite, 
sodium and alkali elements from the 
basalt rapidly diffuse into the peri- 
dotite. The diffusion of sodium into 
the peridotite triggers further partial 
melting. Instead of 10 percent of the 
solid melting at a given pressure and 
temperature, the solid melts at 20 per- 
cent. So, as melt rises through peri- 
dotite, it generates more melt. 
Previously it was believed that basalt 
doesn't interact at all with peridotite 
as it ascends. Lundstrom's work 
shows that the peridotite can melt 
without an increase in temperature. 
The results of this research — which he 
conducted using a piston cylinder 
apparatus similar to the one he has 
just built at Illinois— was reported in 
the February 3 edition of the journal 
Nature. 




Lundstrom now plans to move 
out of the mantle, on to the Earth's 
surface. He hopes to use the U-series 
disequilibria approach to look at the 
formation ages of carbonate rock. 
Results of such work can be used for 
looking at the evolution of landscape 
(including such processes as uplift and 
erosion) and evolution of the environ- 
ment. 



DEPARTMENT NEWS 



Two Faculty 
Searches Underway 



After losing several faculty mem- 
bers to retirement, the Geology 
Department has begun to grow again. 
Two faculty searches are now under- 
way. One seeks a geomicrobiologist, a 
person who can study the role of bacte- 
ria in the earth system. Like other sci- 
ences, geologists have begun to explore 
new interdisciplinary opportunities. 
This person would combine expertise 
in biology with expertise in geology. A 
person with this background could 
attack many important topics ranging 
from the origin of life, to bioremedia- 
tion of contaminated aquifers, to the 
maturation of petroleum, to the nature 
of the carbon cycle. Many of these sub- 
jects have important applications in the 
environmental or petroleum industries. 
So far, the search has identified many 
outstanding candidates, several of 
whom were interviewed during the first 
weeks of February. The position is 
being partially funded by the 
Environmental Council, a campus orga- 
nization that works to foster interdisci- 
plinary research and teaching that 
addresses environmental issues. 

The other search seeks a candidate 
to fill the R.E. Grim Professorship, a 
position that has remained vacant since 
the retirement of Richard Hay in 1997. 
This search will try to draw candidates 
in either mineral science or sedimenta- 
ry geology. As it is an endowed posi- 
tion, the successful candidate will be 
hired at either the associate or full pro- 
fessor rank. Thus, the department is 
focusing on applicants with strong 
track records in research and teaching. 



The department's hydrogeology 
program was recently ranked as 
eighth in the nation by U.S. News 
and World Report. 




Leighton Receives 2000 Alumni 
Achievement Award 



The Department is delighted to announce that 
Morris (Brud) Leighton, B.S. '47, has been awarded 
the 2000 Alumni Achievement Award from the 
Department of Geology. This is the Department's 
highest honor, and is presented to recognize a 
career of accomplishment. Leighton's original con- 
nection to the University of Illinois and to geology 
came through his father, who was chief of the 
Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS). Leighton 
originally considered other fields before he returned 
to geology and a highly successful career. Leighton 
spent the first 30 years of his career in oil explo- 
ration, primarily with Exxon (then called Esso), 
with whom he held various posts, including chief geologist for Latin America. 
During his time in the industry, he played a key role in developing major oil 
plays in the North Sea and Australia, among other places. From 1983-1994 
Leighton returned to Champaign-Urbana, serving as chief of the ISGS. "Brud 
continues to contribute to the Geology Department, both as a GeoThrust mem- 
ber and as an adjunct professor," says Steve Marshak, department head. "In our 
petroleum geology course, Brud gave an outstanding overview of world petrole- 
um promises and of how an oil company develops an important play. This 
teaching could only have come from someone with many years in the industry." 
Congratulations, Brud! Leighton's award was presented at the Annual Geology 
Department Awards Banquet, which was held April 28. 



Mega-Project At the Top of the World 



Professor Wang-Ping Chen is beginning a large-scale project to investi- 
gate active mountain building across the Himalayan-Tibetan zone of the 
India/ Asia continent-continent collision. The project, called HI-CLIMB 
(Himalayan-Tibetan Continental Lithosphere During Mountain Building) is 
an international collaboration involving researchers from the U.S., China, 
Nepal, Germany, and France. The group will examine the effects of the colli- 
sion through the entire thickness of the lithosphere. Professor Chen, who 
will be directing much of the project, will focus his attention on obtaining 
high-resolution seismic data from an instrument array that records energy 
from natural earthquakes. He is particularly interested in the nature of deep 
earthquakes. 



Department News 




Tom Anderson— Great Teacher, Researcher— Retires 



After 32 years at the 
Department of Geology, Thomas 
F. Anderson retired January 1 . 
But retirement for Anderson 
won't mean he'll disappear from 
the department. He plans to 
spend much of his time writing 
up research he hasn't had time 
to publish over the last few 
years. "I'm keeping all the parts 
of my job I love and letting the 
rest of it go," he says with a 
smile. "I'm really looking for- 
ward to doing research at my 
own pace." 

It won't be all work and no 
play for Anderson, however. He 
and his wife, Nancy, will be 
traveling extensively over the 
next several months. So far they 
have trips planned to the Caribbean, 
England, Switzerland and Jerusalem. 

Although he is an isotope geo- 
chemist, Anderson also has spent much 
of his career in oceanography. This 
grew out of his graduate school experi- 
ences at Lamont Geological 
Observatory (now Lamont-Doherty 
Earth Observatory) at Columbia 
University, which is one of the princi- 
pal oceanographic centers in the coun- 
try. "I learned oceanography by osmo- 
sis," he says. "I've pretty much been 
the resident oceanographer for the last 
25 years." 

Anderson also has spent many 
years doing research that began with 
his Ph.D., which determined rates at 
which oxygen atoms move in crystals. 
Because calcium carbonate is common- 
ly used for determining radiocarbon 
dates, Anderson wanted to see if there 
was significant exchange between the 
C0 2 and the calcium carbonate, which 
could throw off radiocarbon dates. He 
broadened the study to include oxygen 
isotope exchange. 




"I'm keeping all the parts of my job I love 
and letting the rest of it go," he says with a 
smile. "I'm really looking forward to doing 
research at my own pace." 



Although Anderson started out 
being primarily interested in isotope 
exchange reactions involving carbon- 
ates, this work led him to also look at 
the oxygen exchange in feldspars and 
micas. By using isotopes as tracers 
Anderson became involved in the geo- 
chemistry of light stable isotopes, a 
developing field in the mid-60s, espe- 
cially the isotopic record of sedimenta- 
ry carbonates. 

About 20 years ago Anderson 
began to study the isotope geochem- 
istry of sulfur in coal. The goal was to 
understand how sulfur gets in coal in 
order to get it out. Building on this 
experience, Anderson and his students 
initiated a number of studies on the 
sulfur, carbon and iron geochemistry 
of organic-rich marine sediments. "A 



Tom Anderson and his wife, 
Nancy, talk with friends at 
Anderson's retirement dinner. 



return to the oceans," he 
quipped. One of the rocks he 
continues to work on is the 
Oxford Clay of England. "It's a 
treasure trove of well-preserved 
vertebrate and invertebrate fos- 
sils, as well as nearly pristine 
organic matter. It's been lots of 
fun to work on that," says 
Anderson. 

Anderson, who joined the 
department in 1967, developed 
four courses during his tenure: 
Geology 117, "Oceans;" 
Geology 118, "Earth and 
Environment;" Geology 360, 
"Geochemistry;" and Geology 433, 
"Isotope Geology." Anderson also 
helped develop Geology 130, "Illinois 
and Changing Earth Systems," which is 
team taught with faculty from 
Geography and Atmospheric Science. 
Anderson likes to introduce rele- 
vant modern and cutting-edge research 
into his courses. "It makes it fun for 
me and more interesting for the stu- 
dents," he says. His impact has been 
long lasting. "One of the first courses I 
took as a graduate student was Tom 
Anderson's isotope geochemistry 
course," says James Kirkpatrick, Ph.D. 
'72, professor of geology and executive 
associate dean in the College of Liberal 
Arts and Sciences. "This was a new 
field then, and there was no textbook. 
We read and discussed research papers 
and had to make a comprehensive pic- 
ture out of widely dispersed informa- 
tion. Although 1 did not become an 
isotope geochemist, the experience of 
doing this had a profound influence on 
my entire career. Tom is a great 
teacher. " 



New Faces 



Visiting Scholars, Post-Docs Collaborate With Department Faculty 



Bonheyo: Origins of 
Early Life in Ancient 
Hot Springs? 



Post-doctoral researcher 
George Bonheyo is working with 
Assistant Professor Bruce Fouke 
to understand the modern and 
ancient microbial populations of 
the travertine-depositing hot springs of 
Mammoth Terrace in Yellowstone 
National Park. This work will expand 
our knowledge of modern microbial 
diversity and origins of early life on 
Earth. In addition, Bonheyo's project 
will help identify microbial fossils and 
biomarkers. These data may be used to 
identify signs of early life elsewhere in 
the solar system. 

Bonheyo, who received his B.S. 
from Bucknell and his M.S. and Ph.D. 
in microbiology from the University of 
Illinois, is studying the hot spring sys- 
tem in order to develop a model to 
identify the microbial species present 
during the active precipitation of 
travertine. The microbes, which encom- 
pass all three domains (archaea, bacte- 
ria and eukaryotes) are dependent 
upon the geochemistry of the spring for 




life and, in turn, create by-products 
that affect the geochemistry of the 
spring. These changes affect crystal 
growth morphologies and perhaps crys- 
tal chemistries within the hot spring. 
Microbial species are 
identified based on their signature 
lb S rRNA gene sequences. Those 
species are then associated with meta- 
bolic processes that alter the spring 
geochemistry. Bonheyo's work will cor- 
relate microbial populations, spring 



Bonheyo has been awarded a prestigious 
Earth Sciences Postdoctoral Research 
Fellowship from the National Science 
Foundation. His project is titled: 
"Geochemistry and Molecular 
Microbiology of Travertine." Only 10 of 
these awards are granted nationwide. 



Scene from the Yellowstone hot 
springs where Bonheyo seeks 
clues to the origins of life. 

geochemistry, and carbonate 
precipitation chemistry, fabrics, 
and rates. 

Bonheyo also is using the 
contemporary "depositional 
facies model" to study ancient 
travertine deposits and try to 
interpret the fossil record. Microbial 
cells get trapped within carbonate 
travertine deposits in the hot spring 
system. Cells may be trapped either 
between crystals or within crystal fluid 
inclusions. Fluid inclusions 10 to 50 u 
in diameter occur in great abundance 
in Mammoth travertine, and a majority 
contain dark organic masses that may 
be microbial remains. It is possible 
then that these entombed cells (and 
their associated DNA) then have a 
high probability of being preserved. 
However, the mechanisms, time frame, 
and preservation potential for DNA in 
travertine carbonate is not understood. 
Bonheyo is screening ancient carbon- 
ate crystals for diagenetic alteration 
prior to removing and identifying fossil 
DNA entombed in fluid inclusions. 



From Paris to Brazil, 
Whittington Traverses the 
Globe 



Alan Whittington, a post-doctoral 
research associate working with Steve 
Marshak, received his Ph.D. from the 
Open University, in the U.K., and his 
undergraduate degree from 
Cambridge. He did his Ph.D. field 
work in the Himalaya Mountains of 
Pakistan. Prior to coming to Urbana- 
, Champaign, Whittington spent two 
years as a post-doctoral researcher in 



Orleans, France, and at the Institut de 
Physique du Globe in Paris. 

Whittington is working with 
Marshak on two different projects. 
They are investigating the develop- 
ment and longevity of the Ozark 
Plateau of the southern mid-continent 
and its relationship to the New Madrid 
Seismic Zone. The plateau exposes 
basement rocks which are buried to 
more than 3 km deep in the adjacent 
Illinois basin, and may be a result of 
rigid block tectonics resulting from 
far-field stresses associated with 
Paleozoic orogeny at the continental 
margins. 



The other project concerns 
Paleoproterozoic tectonics in Brazil, 
and will combine structural, metamor- 
phic and geochronological investiga- 
tions to ascertain the sequence and 
style of orogeny and orogenic collapse 
preserved in the Transamazonian oro- 
gen. 

Prior to coming to the University, 
Whittington was involved with under- 
standing the viscosity, heat capacity, 
and other physical/chemical properties 
of magmas as a function of composi- 
tion, temperature and water content. 



New Faces 



Si 




Kalinichev 
Visiting from 
Russian 
Academy of 
Sciences 



Visiting scholar 
Andrey Kalinichev is 
working on computer 
simulations of the molecular behavior 
of geochemical systems, including 
aqueous fluids and mineral/fluid inter- 
faces. Kalinichev 's background is in 
molecular and chemical physics, but 
he's been involved in molecular com- 
puter simulations of the properties of 
geochemical materials for about 20 
years. 

Most chemical reactions near the 
Earth's surface and in the crust involve 
a fluid phase or occur at fluid/mineral 
interfaces, but in many fundamental 
respects these reactions remain poorly 



understood at the molecular level. 
Computer simulation techniques enable 
researchers to realistically model prop- 
erties of complex, many-body systems 
on an atomistic microscopic scale using 
a limited number of approximations, 
the crucial ones being intermolecular 
potential functions. Provided one has a 
reliable way to calculate potentials of 
intermolecular interactions, the simula- 
tions can lead to molecular-level infor- 
mation on a wide variety of properties 
(thermodynamic, structural, kinetic, 
spectroscopic, etc.) of the systems 
under study. 

Kalinichev, collaborating with Jim 
Kirkpatrick's research group, is focus- 
ing on geologic systems that affect the 
Earth's carbon dioxide budget. This 
project involves experimental and com- 
putational studies of dissolved anionic 
species interacting with mineral sur- 
faces which develop pH-dependent 
anion exchange capacity or have per- 
manent anion exchange capacity due to 
isomorphic substitution. Kalinichev and 



Kirkpatrick are now mainly focusing 
on carbonate species, but other geo- 
chemically significant species such as 
chloride and nitrate are also being 
studied. 

One application of this research 
would be in controlling global warm- 
ing. In order to limit global climate 
change caused by excess CO2 (primar- 
ily man made) , the CO2 must be cap- 
tured and stored, perhaps underground 
or in the ocean. However, deep-well 
injection of CO2 could significantly 
change local groundwater chemistry. 
Understanding the molecular mecha- 
nisms controlling the properties of 
water-carbon dioxide-based fluids and 
their interaction with mineral surfaces 
is necessary before large-scale CO2 
storage can take place. 

Kalinichev is head of the physical 
research laboratory at the Institute of 
Experimental Mineralogy at the 
Russian Academy of Sciences. He 
received his Ph.D. in chemical physics 
from the Russian Academy of Sciences. 



Schilling Looking at 
Elasticity of Glasses and 
Minerals 



Visiting scholar Frank R. Schilling 
came to the Geology Department from 
GeoForschungs-Zentrum Potsdam as a 
Heisenberg Fellow and is scheduled to 
be here for one year. By understanding 
in more detail the relationship 
between structure and physical prop- 
erties of glasses and minerals, 
Schilling hopes to be able to relate the 
influence of pressure and temperature 
on their elastic properties. Ultimately 
he would like to examine the elastic 
properties of hydrous minerals, which 
are not clearly understood and are 
important to understanding subduc- 
tion processes and earthquake mecha- 
nisms. 



Schilling is collaborating with 
Professor Jay Bass and Visiting 
Assistant Professor Stas Sinogeikin in 
an investigation of the elastic proper- 
ties of basaltic glass samples. This 
work, which uses Brillouin spec- 
troscopy, will help explain how mag- 
mas rise. The data show how changes 
in chemical constituents affect the 
density, velocities and elastic proper- 
ties in a highly systematic way. 

In another project, Schilling is 
investigating the thermal transport 
properties of minerals. Temperature 
contrasts are one of the fundamental 
driving forces within the Earth, so pre- 
cise measurements of thermal trans- 
port properties, which are strongly 
related to the structure of the miner- 
als, are key to understanding how the 
Earth system works. 

Schilling is involved in a third 
project that concerns the physical 
properties of partially molten crustal 
rocks. He is conducting laboratory 



experiments to make quantitative 
interpretations of the data from large 
mountain belts such as the central 
Andes. Schilling is working to measure 
electrical conductivity, elastic proper- 
ties and thermal transport properties 
of partially molten rocks under defined 
conditions. 

A fourth project Schilling is 
involved in concerns the quantitative 
interpretations of geophysical observa- 
tions. This is a collaboration with sev- 
eral German colleagues and two col- 
leagues in China. He and his col- 
leagues study the interrelationship 
between various physical properties 
and the amount of partial melt, in 
order to understand the chemical com- 
position of the Andean crust. 
Ultimately he would like to quantify 
fluid flow through the convecting 
mantel wedge. The results may help to 
explain the origin of intermediate- 
depth earthquakes. 7 




Herrstrom Connects 
With Geoscience 
Educators 



Eileen Herrstrom, teaching special- 
ist, attended the "Third International 
Conference on Geoscience Education," 
in Sydney, Australia, last January. The 
conference enabled her to connect with 
other geoscience instructors and discuss 
common interests and concerns, such 
as the effective and appropriate use of 
technology, results of educational 
research, and what students learn 
when teachers teach. Instructors from 
elementary through college level attend- 
ed the conference, as well as museum 
educators and others in related fields. 

Herrstrom gave a poster at the con- 
ference about part of the National Parks 
course (Geology 104) given last spring 
in which she replaced the final exam 
with a poster project. Students were 
required to summarize the geology of 
one park on two sheets of poster board, 
display their posters during the final 
exam time, and review others' posters. 
Her goal was to have students concen- 
trate on a single area, rather than try to 
memorize the whole United States (this 
addresses a common criticism of the 
U.S. curriculum in general, "that it cov- 
ers too many topics in too little detail.") 
The exercise also provided another 
means of assessing students besides a 
multiple-choice, computer-graded exam, 
because some students perform poorly 
in this format. Finally, the project gave 
students a taste of how scientists 
exchange information and ideas at pro- 
fessional meetings. Herrstrom's presen- 
tation was well received at the confer- 
ence, with several people indicating that 
they would try the idea in their own 
classes and others suggesting ways to 
improve the project and to evaluate its 
effectiveness. 

The conference also gave Herrstrom 
some very specific ideas that she will 



"Three Sisters," a formation of erosional 
remnants form the Triassic Sandstone of 
the Sydney Basin. This photo was taken 
from Echo Point, in the Blue Mountains of 
Australia, by Eileen Herrstrom. 



try in the future. One was to have stu- 
dents create a portfolio of breaking sci- 
ence news, summarize each article and 
then analyze which articles were the 
most interesting and why. A second 
project involved building a polarizing 
microscope from items normally thrown 
away, including a film canister and the 
lens of a disposable camera. The person 
who demonstrated the project had used 
this idea with junior high school stu- 
dents, who made their own individual 
microscopes for looking at thin sec- 
tions. A typical polarizing light micro- 
scope costs $5,000, whereas this ver- 
sion cost under $5. 

Herrstrom, who joined the depart- 
ment five years ago as an academic 
professional, is responsible for assign- 
ing TAs to courses, supervising 100- 
level labs, and lecturing for introducto- 
ry courses. Geology is a popular option 
for non-majors at the University of 
Illinois seeking a science course, which 
is one reason Herrstrom was hired. 
Prior to her arrival, the faculty had 
developed several new entry-level 
courses, and the department now offers 
about 10 per semester. More recently, 
the largest class (Geology 100- Planet 
Earth) expanded from two to three lec- 
ture sections, which can accommodate 
900 students. Total enrollment in 100- 
level classes is about 3,000 students per 
year. 



Geology Department 
Participates in 
Engineering Open 
House, Again 



This year geology students 
once again prepared geology dis- 
plays for an "open house" in 
conjunction with the Engineering 
Open House (EOH). The EOH, an 
annual event, attracts thousands 
of school-age students to campus 
to learn about various aspects of 
science and engineering. Two 
years ago, the geology display 
was moved up to a more central 
area in the Engineering College. 
Now thousands of students visit 
the display. In the past, the dis- 
plays have covered topics ranging 
from dinosaurs, volcanoes, floods 
and earthquakes. This year stu- 
dents also will put together a dis- 
play of field and laboratory 
equipment from the beginning 
and the end of the last century. 

Eileen Herrstrom served as 
the advisor for the Geology Open 
House this year. She says she'd 
like to see geology students doing 
even more community outreach. 
Last year Herrstrom participated 
in National Earth Science week 
by creating a display for the 
Champaign Public Library. She 
has been investigating having 
geology students teach elemen- 
tary classes about earth sciences. 
"After all," she says, "the best 
way to learn is to teach. Geology 
is such a natural for drawing 
kids' interest, I'd like to see our 
students get out into local class- 
rooms," says Herrstrom. 



A 



Undergraduate Activities 



High-Caliber Research Is the Norm... for Undergraduates 



Undergraduates in the geology 
department are— in some cases— going 
to the ends of the Earth to gain valu- 
able research experience. Junior Anna 
Sutton went with research programmer 
Steve Hurst on a trip last March to 
study the fast-spreading oceanic crust 
exposed at the Hess Deep Rift. They 
traveled on the R/V Atlantis, which is 
owned by the Navy and operated by 
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. 
Using side-scanning sonar, ARGO (a 
remotely operated vehicle) and ALVIN 
(a three-person submersible), the sci- 
entists on the expedition (16 
researchers from almost as many insti- 
tutions) studied the sea floor and out- 
crops about 1.5 miles below the water 
surface. The team worked for one 
month, made 15 ALVIN dives, and 
took about 80,000 photographs with 
ARGO. 

The Hess Deep Rift is located 101 
degrees west and 2 degrees north, 
which is almost due south of Mexico 
City. It marks a spot where four tec- 
tonic plates, the Pacific, Nazca, Cocos, 
and the Galapagos, interact. The tec- 
tonic activity has resulted in a magnif- 
icent submarine chasm, providing 
great views of oceanic crustal structure 
at the East Pacific rise. The area is not 
well studied. Two other expeditions to 
the area logged only nine dives. Hurst 
was on a 1990 expedition to the area. 
The cruise last year was a follow up to 
that original one nine years ago. 

"It is really special to be an under- 
graduate and to see something almost 
no one else has ever seen," says 
Sutton. "It was a great opportunity for 
me and a wonderful addition to my 
undergraduate career." Sutton put up 
with a little sea sickness (actually five 
days; three solid ones in bed!) and 
chunky milk (when it thawed out the 
globs of fat got all chunky), but 



SOU km 



PACIFIC 
PLATE 



Galapagos 
Microplate 



e?-f 



-30°S 




beyond that the experience was nirvana. 
"I love being outside, I love being in the 
field," says Sutton. 

"Being in the ALVIN itself is a little 
like being in a cave, although not as 
scary," says Sutton. "You have to shrink 
down your reality and create a really small 
mental world, which takes some mental 
agility. Even just living on the ship for one 
month took that agility. Ping Pong became 
very important," Sutton said. 

The cruise occurred in the middle of 
the spring semester, forcing Sutton to miss 
four weeks of class and do some creative 
class planning, but it was worth it. "Going 
to sea fundamentally rearranges your 
entire view of the universe," says Sutton. 
"For that entire month the ship was always 
moving, it made me feel more connected 
to the rest of the world. I really sensed the 
passage of time." 

Sutton, who was looking for a 
research project but hadn't settled on any 
particular topic, was thrilled with her 
ALVIN experience. For her senior thesis 
she is characterizing the uppermost crust 
in the extrusive section to understand the 
geologic processes involved. Much of her 



The Hess Deep Rift 
marks the spot where four 
tectonic plates interact. 



work will be based on 
the samples collected 
and outcrops pho- 
tographed during the 
expedition, and subse- 
quent image processing 
primarily involving pho- 
tomosaicking. 
"Working with Steve has 
been great," says 
Sutton. "He's really 
smart and he expects a lot from me, 
which is good. It really pushes me." 

Another faculty member who 
has received kudos from his under- 
graduate students is Jay Bass. 
Supported by supplementary grant 
money from the National Science 
Foundation's Research Experiences 
for Undergraduates Program, Bass 
helped several undergraduates over 
the last several years conduct origi- 
nal research. The University recog- 
nized his efforts recently by award- 
ing him the Campus Award for 
Excellence in Guiding 
Undergraduate Research. 

Two other juniors are being 
supported by the NSF's Research 
Experience for Undergraduates 
Program in Professor Wang-Ping 
Chen's lab. Frances (Frannie) 
Skomurski and Laura Swan are 
helping Chen and his graduate stu- 
dent, Mike Brudzinski, understand 
earthquakes beneath the Himalayas 
and the Tonga-Fiji islands. 



Undergraduate activities 



LO 



Swan is looking at digital data col- 
lected over the past 20 years regarding 
the Himalayas and Tibet, where earth- 
quakes in the mantle portion of the 
continental lithosphere were discov- 
ered by Chen and his colleagues in 
1979. A large amount of high-resolu- 
tion, digital data collected in the past 
two decades make it possible to carry 
out a systematic study of these puz- 
zling earthquakes. Swan is looking par- 
ticularly at the depth at which the 
earthquakes occur, whether they are in 
the mantle or the lower crust, for 
example. "We hope these results will 
advance our understanding of how 
mountains are built and how the 
Indian craton is being destroyed in the 
process," says Chen. 

Skomurski is looking at outboard 
earthquakes, a unique type of deep 
earthquake west of the Wadati-Benioff 
Zone of Tonga. Subduction along the 
Tonga Trench is exceedingly fast (more 
than 200 millimeters per year), with 
some of the oldest and coldest slab 
going down. "Outboard quakes are 
fairly rare, they don't occur at every 
subduction zone," says Skomurski. 
Skomurski modeled the rupture 
process of the biggest outboard earth- 
quake to date using waveform inver- 
sion. She successfully modeled two 
major sub-events with changing fault 
plane solutions (this refers to a 
schematic way to define the orientation 
of a fault), as well as a precursor 
event. The results showed that the out- 
board earthquake shared characteris- 
tics with deep earthquakes, such as 
having multiple sub-events, changing 
fault plane solutions, relatively fast 
rupture speeds (as far as earthquake 
propagation goes), and a substantial 
source volume. 

However, outboard earthquakes do 
not show down-dip compression, 
which is a characteristic of the Wadati- 
Benioff Zone. Instead, there seems to 
be a pattern among the outboard earth- 
quakes that gradually changes from 
north-south compression to extension 




over a distance of several hundred kilo- 
meters. "This suggests that we may be 
dealing with a large piece of coherent 
slab material that is experiencing 
deformation on a regional scale," says 
Skomurski. 

"I was looking at different schools 
with good geology programs and I 
knew the University of Illinois had 
good research opportunities," says 
Skomurski of her decision to come to 
the University. "After my freshman 
year I talked to Mike Brudzinski— he's 
the best teaching assistant ever— about 
the chance to do research. A week 
later he asked me, 'how do you feel 
about earthquakes?'" 

Skomurski signed on to work in 
Chen's lab and hasn't regretted it yet. 
"Both Laura and I have had lots of 
one-on-one contact with Mike and 
Professor Chen. It's really cool," she 
says. Skomurski presented her work at 
the fall annual meeting of the 
American Geophysical Union last 
December. 

"What Frannie and Laura is doing 
is quite unusual, very high-level stuff, 
the real deal," says Brudzinski. "They 
are doing graduate-level work that 
could be part of a Ph.D. project." 
Brudzinski knows high quality: He was 
the first recipient of the Texas- 
Louisiana Fellowship from the depart- 
ment in recognition for his outstanding 
achievements as a graduate student. 
Senior Kristine Mize is working 
with assistant professor Bruce Fouke to 
understand the diagenesis of 
Yellowstone hardgrounds and the sedi- 



Junior Frannie Skomurski is looking at 
outboard earthquakes with Professor 
Wang-Ping Chen 

mentology of the Chicxulub impact on 
the Yucatan Peninsula. Fouke also has 
an astrophysics major and three molec- 
ular biology majors doing projects in 
his lab. 

In addition to working with Fouke, 
Mize has done two internships at the 
Illinois State Geological Society (ISGS), 
during which she has helped Hannes 
Leetaru study Benoist sandstone of 
south-central Illinois. Although it pro- 
duces oil, the Benoist sandstone has 
not been very well studied. Mize and 
Leetaru are working on a regional map 
of the area that will help fill in the geo- 
logical framework of the Illinois Basin. 

"What Frannie and Laura is doing is quite 
unusual, very high-level stuff, the real 
deal," says Brudzinski. "They are doing 
graduate-level work that could be part of 
a Ph.D. project." 

Mize, who transferred here as a 
junior, spent part of last summer work- 
ing with Fouke on the Yellowstone 
samples. She learned about using the 
cathodoluminescence petrography 
technique. She and Fouke found an 
unusual formation of travertine that 
exhibits a bright cathodoluminescent 
character. However, instead of being a 
primary precipitate it may be a sec- 
ondary product of diagenetic alteration. 
This finding is important for under- 
standing how the hot spring water cre- 
ates both physical and chemical 
changes in the travertine. 

This spring Mize will begin help- 
ing Fouke with a project concerning 
the giant comet or asteroid that hit the 
Yucatan Peninsula and is thought to 
have caused the extinction of the 
dinosaurs. The impact left a crater five 
miles deep and 250 miles in diameter. 
The vapor clouds formed on impact 



s 



Undergraduate Activities 






were very hot and full of water and 
gas. As they cooled, particles stuck to 
the water droplets in the atmosphere 
and formed marble-sized pebbles, 
known as lapilli. These pebbles are 
one of the few pieces of direct evi- 
dence of what happened in the atmos- 
phere following the meteorite's impact. 
(For more on Fouke's research, see the 
Spring 1998 issue of Geosciences) . Mize 
is working with Fouke to get a better 
understanding of the geological 
processes involved in that event. 

"This research has given me a 
sense of what I want to do in the 
future," says Mize, who has been inter- 
ested in geology since the beginning of 
high school. "It makes me feel more 
involved in what 1 want to do as 
opposed to just going to classes. And 
Bruce is really dedicated to his stu- 
dents and to his research at the same 
time. He is a really good motivator. " 

Susan Riggins is another under- 
graduate who has gained research 
experience at the ISGS. Riggins is 
working with Drew Phillips of the ISGS 
and Associate Professor Steve Altaner. 
Her project is being supported by a 
Special Undergraduate Research 
Experience grant from the 
Environmental Council, a campus 
group of 12 faculty from a cross-sec- 
tion of the sciences that works to pro- 
mote an interdisciplinary approach to 
all scientific research. Riggins' senior 
thesis concerns the vertical fades 
changes in the sediments of the 
American Bottoms Floodplain. Her 
core sample is from St. Clair County in 
Illinois. By studying the vertical fades 
Riggins hopes to uncover potentially 
significant horizontal heterogeneities. 
"I'd like to both determine how this 
region was formed and understand 
what that implies for groundwater flow 
and possible remediation efforts," says 
Riggins of her project. 



Rocks Are More Interesting 
Than People Think... 



Just about any time 
of day a visitor wander- 
ing into the geology 
department lunch room 
will find a conglomerate 
of geology students hang- 
ing out, doing home- 
work, or chatting over a 
snack or cup of coffee. 
Geology undergraduates, 
of which there are about 
50, are a tight-knit group. 

"There is a core of 
undergraduates that hang 
out together," says junior 
Anna Sutton. "Field trips 
more than any other activi 
ty brings us together." 

Most geology majors 
share an interest in the out- 
doors and the environment and bond 
over field trip experiences and long 
hours spent in lab together. 

"Among geology majors, there's 
an understanding that we share the 
same interest, we're all excited about 
rocks (which makes other people 
look at us funny), and we share 
respect for the earth and wanting to 
be part of it," says sophomore Laura 
Swan. 

Sutton agrees, "Rocks are more 
interesting than most people think. 
They tell stories, you just gotta learn 
to listen." 

"All the geologists I came in con- 
tact with were really neat, and I liked 
the idea of being a geologist." adds 
sophomore Frances Skomurski. "I've 
been interested in dinosaurs since 
kindergarten, and once I got into 
junior high school I became very 
interested in environmental issues. I 
want to use geology as a tool within 
the environmental field." 




Junior Laura Swan is working 
with Professor Wang-Ping 
Chen to understand earth- 
quakes in the mantle and 
how they might contribute 
to mountain building. 



Swan's interest in 
geology was encour- 
aged by her family 
trips out west, mainly 
to national parks. "I 
thought the geology 
of those areas was 
really cool." 
Likewise, senior 
Kristine Mize knew 
she was interested in 
being a geologist in 
part because of her 
travels and her inter- 
est in rock collecting. 
"We'd go on family 
trips and I always 
enjoyed learning 
about the formations 
we were seeing," she 
said. "Then I realized, hey! I can do 
this for a living!" 

Another thing that appeals to 
many majors is the one-on-one inter- 
actions they get from faculty and 
graduate students. Many point to 
those experiences being the best part 
of their University of Illinois educa- 
tion. 

Skomurski, for example, says 
she has gotten enormous amounts of 
help and guidance from both her 
advisor, Wang-Ping Chen, and grad- 
uate student Mike Brudzinski, who 
also is in Chen's lab. 

Sutton points out that the rela- 
tionships geology students have with 
their professors is very different from 
that in other departments. "After 12 
hours of hard work in the field, you 
put up tents, start fire and drink 
beer. It's time to relax. This is when 
you see another side of your profes- 
sors. That's not true of other depart- 
ments." 



II 



Undergraduate Activities 



Field Camp — the Tradition Continues 



Most pre-1988 alumni fondly 
remember the Geology Department's 
field camp based in Sheridan, 
Wyoming, which operated from 
1955-1988. Beginning in 1989, the 
department switched the camp's 
venue, and joined forces with four 
other schools to operate the Wasatch- 
Uinta Field Camp, based in Park City, 
Utah. Our colleagues in the camp 
include the University of Iowa, the 
University of Wisconsin, Michigan 
State University, and the University of 
Minnesota, Duluth. The 1999 summer 
field camp session marked the 10th 
anniversary of Illinois' participation in 
the Wasatch-Uinta Camp. 

"Although there was a huge affec- 
tion for the Sheridan field camp, the 
expense of such a solo operation 
required us to find an alternative," 
says Department Head Steve Marshak. 
"Fortunately, the tradition of excellent 
field camp experiences continues with 
the Wasatch-Uinta camp." 

In spite of the location change, the 
key essentials of field camp remain the 
same — students work exceedingly 
hard, learn a heck of a lot, and devel- 
op lifetime friendships. Today's camp 
still focuses on the basics. Students 




Taking a dip in the Great Salt Lake. 



learn how to interpret field relations, 
how to do geologic mapping, how to 
take field notes and make field 
descriptions, and how to construct 
cross sections and stratigraphic 
columns. On a typical day, everyone 
heads to the field by 7:30 a.m. and 
maps until 5 p.m. After dinner, stu- 



12 




If you're visiting Sheridan, Wyoming, 
in the near future, take a close look at 
the new Grinnell Street Mall. One of 
the bricks in the Mall pavement com- 
memorates the University of Illinois 
Geology Field camp, which was 
based in Sheridan from 1955 through 
1988. Norb Cygan (B.S. '54, M.S. '56, 
Ph.D. '62) spearheaded the effort to 
buy and inscribe the brick. In addition 
to his long affiliation as a student in 
the geology department, Cygan 
taught at the field camp between 1955 
and 1969. Thanks, Norb! 



dents draw their office copies of maps 
and prepare geologic histories. And 
the obstacles— rattlesnakes, cow dung, 
cliffs, and cactus — still add excitement 
to every traverse. Some exercises cover 
hot terrain in desert-like conditions, 
while others involve taking students to 
10,000-foot-high ridges, well above 
tree line. During the July 4 weekend, 
the camp takes a four-day regional trip 
up to the Grand Tetons. Not surpris- 
ingly, students still think of field camp 
as being a highlight of their college 
experience. They metamorphose from 
being geology students into being 
geologists. 

At Park City, students stay at the 
Chateau Apres, a ski lodge that 
becomes a dorm in the summer. The 
students sleep three to a room, and eat 
cafeteria style in the lodge's dining 



A textbook example of a box fold near 
the crest of Bountiful Peak, Utah. 



Undergraduate activities 




room. Accommodations aren't posh, 
but Park City is a fun place to be. A 
boom of building in anticipation of the 
Winter Olympics provide many places 
to visit on a Saturday night, and the 
scenery in the surrounding mountains 
is a marvel. 

One bonus with the Park City pro- 
gram is that Illinois geology students 
get to meet many students from other 
geology programs — the Wasatch-Uinta 
camp has had between 55 and 85 stu- 
dents per year. The mix lets some stu- 
dents build professional relationships 
that will last their entire career. In 
addition, students have a chance to 
meet a broad selection of faculty and 
ideas. 

"One of the things I liked best 
about field camp is that you meet all 
sorts of people," says graduate student 
Judd Tudor. Tudor attended field camp 
as an undergraduate and served as 



The view from Bountiful Peak. 



teaching assistant for two years. 
"When you see someone you first 
knew from field camp there is a very 
intense bond. It was great to see field 
camp friends at a GSA meeting. Some 
of my best memories of college come 
from field camp," says Tudor. 

Though field camp is a great 
experience, it can be expensive for the 
students. Recognizing this, Ed Franklin 
(B.S. '56) established a generous 
endowment which will provide schol- 
arships to help students defray the 
cost of the camp. Other GeoThrust 
funds also are used to help students 
out. The start of field camp can also 



Left: The University of Illinois contingent 
takes a break for a photo shoot. 

Right: Judd Tudor climbing the Frontier 
Formation at Chalk Creek, Utah. 



be a bit intimidating to students. To 
help remedy this problem, Marshak 
created a new class, called Review of 
Field Techniques (Geology 397), to 
help students get ready for field camp. 
In the class, students get practice with 
compass use, rock description, and 
map interpretation. They also discuss 
pointers about mapping techniques. 




13 



Windows into the Past 



Geology in the Early Years of 
The University of Illinois 



by Ralph Langenheim 

Although it was not an indepen- 
dent department at the start, geology 
was part of the University curriculum 
from its very founding in 1868. During 
the very first year of the "Illinois 
Industrial" University's existence, the 
Department of Science, Literature and 
the Arts taught mineralogy, and by the 
second year, the "Natural History 
Curriculum" included several geology 
courses (e.g. Principles of Geology; 
Lithological Geology; Paleontology, 
Historical and Dynamical Geology, and 
Geology of Illinois). By 1872 the 
University had been divided into four 
colleges; Agriculture, Engineering, 
Natural Science, and Literature and 
Science. Each college was subdivided 
into schools. Most geology courses 
were administered by the School of 
Natural History, but mineralogy was 
offered by the School of Chemistry 
(both schools were part of the College 
of Natural Science). 

Don Carlos Taft, the first official 
geology professor, was hired in 1870 as 
Professor of Zoology and Geology in 
the College of Natural History. Since 
geology was taught only to third- and 
fourth-year students, the first classes 
would have been taught in 1870-71. 
Because these early years were a time 
of flux, we have three choices of birth- 
dates of geology at Illinois. It could be 
argued that the first year, 1868-69, was 
the beginning but that might better be 
thought of as the conception. The next 
year, 1869-70, with Taft in residence 
but no courses being taught, might be 
thought of as gestation. 1870-71, when 
the first classes were taught, was the 
birth year of geology. 




14 



Taft was a colorful, independent- 
minded eccentric. As a young man, he 
suddenly decided that he had to make 
something of himself. He worked his 
way through Amherst College and 
Union Theological seminary, and upon 
graduation, became a Congregational 
minister and teacher in an academy at 
Elmwood, Illinois. Soon his sermons 
proved too liberal for the church and 



Taft, for example, was found with his 
pants rolled up and mopping the floor 
in his laboratory when the Regent 
brought a new Trustee around to intro- 
duce the staff (Solberg, 1968). 



he was reduced to teaching geology in 
the local high school. Taft was brought 
to Illinois by Regent John Gregory. He 
quickly established a reputation as a 
good teacher and gained popularity 
with the students. Taft was well known 



Don Carlos Taft, the first professor of 
geology at the University, was an eccen- 
tric and colorful character in the history 
of the department. 



for entertaining students in his home 
and for his determinedly unkempt con- 
dition. He took so much pride in pay- 
ing little attention to clothing and 
grooming, that students nicknamed 
him the "great uncombed." 

Regent Gregory was eventually 
forced to resign, in large part because 
of his lenient administrative style. His 
replacement, Selim Peabody, was a 
stern disciplinarian with higher acade- 
mic expectations. Peabody called on 
the Board of Trustees to evaluate the 
geology program and, after the report 
was in, Taft was granted a leave of 
absence to visit England and his chair 
was declared vacant. Taft claims that 
he resigned to save Peabody embar- 
rassment over his (Taft's) eccentricities. 
Taft, for example, was found with his 
pants rolled up and mopping the floor 
in his laboratory when the Regent 
brought a new Trustee around to intro- 
duce the staff (Solberg, 1968). A direc- 
tory published after Taft resigned stat- 
ed that he had left the University to 
join a religious community in Kansas 
where he was training to become a 
missionary to Africa. However, a note 
in the University archives from Taft's 
son, Lorado (creator of the "Alma 
Mater" statue among other works of 
art) , states instead that Taft had 
become a banker in Kansas. 

Interestingly, John Wesley Powell, 
the famous one-armed explorer who 




Professor Emeritus Don Henderson 
("Hendy") adds this contribution: 
Geology was first organized as a 
department in 1919 and stayed that 
way up to 1934. At that point it was 
combined with geography to become 
the Department of Geology and 
Geography. This arrangement lasted 
until 1947, when Geology was once 
again made a separate department. 



was the first to lead an expedition 
through the Grand Canyon, almost 
joined the University as its first geol- 
ogy professor. Powell had solicited 
the Illinois Industrial University in 
1867 for $500 in return for speci- 
mens from his forthcoming scientific 
expedition to the Rockies. One bene- 
fit of the association with Powell is 
that J.T. Burrill, of Burrill Hall fame, 
accompanied Powell on this expedi- 
tion, collecting plants that became 
the beginning of the University 
herbarium. Then, in March, 1868, 
the Board of Trustees unanimously 
elected Powell to the professorship of 
Natural History, "his term of service 
to commence at such time as may be 
agreed upon between himself and 
the Committee on Faculty and 
Courses of Study." (111. Indust. Univ., 



1st Ann. Rep. Trustees, 1867-68, p. 
127). Powell's salary was set at $600 
and, at his own request, he was sent to 
conduct his second expedition to the 
Grand Canyon, on the understanding 
that he would be representing Illinois 
Industrial University. However, on his 
return from his first Colorado River 
expedition (March 1869) Powell 
resigned his professorship ... never 
having taught a course. Powell went 
off to fame and glory, shaping the 
USGS into a premier research organiza- 
tion, and serving as director of the 
Bureau of Ethnology, leaving geology 
at Illinois Industrial University to fend 
for itself. We can only wonder what 
might have happened had Powell's 
energy and guile been devoted to the 
cause of geology at Illinois. 



15 



Annual Report for 1999 



Faculty 

Stephen P. Altaner, associate Professor 
Thomas F. Anderson, professor; Emeritus as of 

January, 2000 
Jay D. Bass, professor 
Craig M. Bethke, professor 
Daniel B. Blake, professor 
Chu-Yung Chen, associate professor 
Wang-Ping Chen, professor 
Bruce W. Fouke, assistant Professor 
Albert T. Hsui, professor 
Thomas M. Johnson, assistant professor 
R. James Kirkpatrik, professor and executive 

associate dean 
Craig C. Lundstrom, assistant professor 
Stephen Marshak , professor and head 
Alberto S. Nieto, professor 
Xiaodong Song, assistant professor 

Visiting Faculty 

Spencer Cotkin, visiting assistant professor 
Michael J. Handke, visiting assistant professor 
Laura Wasylenki, visiting assistant professor 
John Werner, visiting assistant professor 

Academic Staff, Post-Docs, 
Visiting Scholars 

Debby Aronson, yearbook editor 
George Bonheyo, post-doctoral researcher 
David Finkelstein, visiting teaching lab specialist 
Richard Hedin, research programmer 
Mitchell Herbel, post-doctoral researcher 
Eileen Herrstrom, teaching lab specialist 
Stephen Hurst, research programmer 
Andrey Kalinichev, visiting scholar 
Lalita Kalita, research programmer 
Alexander Kisliuk, post-doctoral researcher 
Ann Long, visiting teaching lab specialist 
Peter MichaJove, assistant to the head 
Jieyuan Ning, visiting scholar 
Dawn Sandone, program coordinator 
Stanislav Sinogeikin, visiting scholar 
Frank Schilling, visiting scholar 
Ester Soriano, research programmer 
Melinda Tidrick, visiting teaching lab specialist 
Tiffany Tsou, resource and policy analyst 
Raj Vanka, resource and policy analyst 
Alan Whittington, post-doctoral researcher 

Emeritus Faculty 

David E. Anderson 
Albert V. Carozzi 
Carleton A. Chapman 
Donald L. Graf 
Arthur F. Hagner 
Richard L. Hay 
Donald M. Henderson 
George deV. Klein 
Ralph L. Langenheim 
C. John Mann 
Philip A. Sandberg 



Adjunct Faculty 

Keros Cartwright 
Heinz H. Damberger 
Leon R. Follmer 
Feng Sheng Hu 
Dennis Kolata 
Morris W Leighton 
John McBride 
William Shilts 
M. Scott Wilkerson 

Library Staff 

Sheila McGowan , chief library clerk 

Lois Pausch , librarian 

Diana Walter , library technical specialist 

Staff 

Barbara Elmore, staff secretary 

Eddie Lane, electronics engineering assistant 

Brenda Polk, chief clerk 

Pamela Rank, account technician II 

Sue Standifer, clerk II 

Graduate Students 

Oswaldo Araujo 
Michael Brudzinski 
Dylan Canavan 
Andre Ellis 
Stephanie Gillain 
Keith Hackley 
Yoshie Hagiwara 
Michael Harrison 
Roberto Hernandez 
Xiaoqiang Hou 
Qusheng Jin 
Dmitry Lakshtanov 
Serena Lee 
Christopher Mah 
Peter Malecki 
Christopher McGarry 
Jungho Park 
George Roadcap 
Joseph Schoen 
Jian Tian 
Judd Tudor 
Richard Wachtman 
Matthew Wander 
Jianwei Wang 
Matthew Woltman 
Aubrey Zerkle 
Limei Zhou 



Courses Taught in 1999 



16 



Geol 100 


Planet Earth 


Geol 101 


Introduction to Physical 




Geology 


Geol 104 


Geology of the National Parks 




and Monuments 


Geol 107 


General Geology 1 


Geol 108 


General Geology II 


Geol 110 


Planet Earth — Lab/Field 


Geol 111 


The Dynamic Earth (Honors) 


Geol 116 


Geology of the Planets 


Geol 117 


The Oceans 


Geol 118 


Earth and the Environment 


Geol 143 


History of Life 


Geol 250 


Geology for Engineers 


Geol 301 


Geomorphology 


Geol 311 


Structural Geology and 




Tectonics 


Geol 315 


Field Geology (field trip to the 




Rio Grande Rift) 


Geol 317 


Geologic Field Methods, 




Western United States (Field 




Camp) 


Geol 320 


Introduction to Paleontology 


Geol 332 


Mineralogy and Mineral Optics 


Geol 336 


Petrology and Petrography 


Geol 340 


Sedimentology and Stratigraphy 


Geol 350 


Introduction to Geophysics 


Geol 351 


Geophysical Methods for 




Geology, Engineering, and 




Environmental Sciences 


Geol 352 


Physics of the Earth 


Geol 360 


Geochemistry 


Geol 370 


Oceanography 


Geol 380 


Current Problems in 




Environmental Geology 


Geol 397 


Field Methods in Geological, 




Geotechnical, and 




Geoenvironmental Exploration 


Geol 401 


Physical Geochemistry I 


Geol 415 


Advanced Field Geology 


Geol 432 


Sedimentary Geochemistry 


Geol 433 


Isotope Geology 


Geol 450 


Principles of Engineering 




Geology 


Geol 451 


Practice of Engineering Geology 


Geol 489 


Geotectonics 


Geol 493A1 


Graduate Student Seminar 


Geol 493E4 


Biomineralogy 


Geol 493K2 


Geodynamics 


Geol 493Q1 


Recent Developments in Thrust 




Tectonics 



s 



Research Grants Active in 1999 



AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY 
PETROLEUM RESEARCH FUND 

A Time-Series Process Model Of Carbonate 
Diagenesis And Microbial Genetic 
Preservation In Hot Spring Travertine, 
Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, And 
Gardiner, Montana. 
Principal Investigator: Bruce Fouke 

Origin, Architecture, & Thermal State of the 
Lackawanna Syncline, Pennsylvania. 
Principal Investigator: Stephen Marshak 

CENTER FOR ADVANCED CEMENT-BASED 
MATERIALS 

NMR And MD Investigations of Chloride 
Sorption and Transport in Portland Cement 
Systems. 
Principal Investigator: R. James Kirkpatrick. 

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 

Molecular Dynamics Modeling of Sorption on 
Mineral Surfaces. 
Principal Investigator: R. James Kirkpatrick. 

MD Modeling of the Thermodynamics and 
Material Properties of Water-Carbon 
Dioxide Fluids at High Pressures and 
Temperatures. 
Principal Investigator: R. James Kirkpatrick. 

WILLIAM AND FLORA HEWLETT 
FOUNDATION 

Collaborative Research: Imaging Seismic 
Structures of the Crust and Upper Mantle 
Beneath China. 
Principal Investigator: Xiaodong Song. 

ILLINOIS COUNCIL ON FOOD AND 
AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH 

Estimation of Dentrification Rates in the 
Shallow Groundwater Flow Systems of Big 
Ditch Watershed, Illinois - Isotope 
Assessment. 
Principal Investigator: Tom Johnson 

INSTITUTE OF GEOPHYSICS AND 
PLANETARY PHYSICS, LOS ALAMOS 

Timescales of Crustal Level Differentiation: U- 
Series Measurements and Geophysical 
Monitoring at Arenal Volcano, Costa Rica. 
Principal Investigator: Craig Lundstrom. 

NASA 

Core Angular Momentum and the 
International Earth Rotation Service 
Coordination Center/ Sub-Centers Activity 
for Monitoring Global Geophysical Fluids. 
Principal Investigator: Xiaodong Song. 



JET PROPULSION LABORATORY 

Geochemistry of Carbonate Ejecta from the 
Cretaceous-Tertiary Chicxulub Impact 
Crater. 
Principal Investigator: Bruce Fouke. 

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION 

Transport of the Isotopes "He, 36 C1, And 40 Ar, 
and the Relationship of the Distribution of 
these Isotopes to Groundwater Age. 
Principal Investigator: Craig Bethke. 

Seismic Reflection Profiles in Southern Illinois 
(funded through the Mid-America 
Earthquake Research Center). 
Principal Investigators: John McBride, 
Stephen Marshak, and Wang-Ping Chen. 

A Seismic Study of the Mantle Transition 
Zone and Subducted Lithosphere. 
Principal Investigator: Wang Ping Chen. 

Characterization of Seismic Sources in and 
Around the New Madrid Seismic Zone 
(funded through the Mid-America 
Earthquake Research Center). 
Principal Investigators: Wang-Ping Chen 
and John McBride. 

Tectonics of the AraAuai/Ribeira Orogenic 
Tongue of Southeastern Brazil and its 
Significance to the Assembly of West 
Gondwana. 
Principal Investigator: Stephen Marshak 

Selenium Stable Isotopes as Indicators of 
Selenium Transport. 
Principal Investigator: Tom Johnson 

Constraining the Structure and Rotation of the 
Inner Core. 
Principal Investigator: Xiaodong Song 

Windows into MORB Petrogenesis: Measuring 
U-series Disequilibria in MORB From 
Transforms. 
Principal Investigator: Craig Lundstrom 

Proximal Carbonate Ejecta and Breccias from 
the Cretaceous-Tertiary Chicxulub Impact: 
Ballistic Sedimentation and Brecciation, 
87 Sr/ 86 Sr Chronology and Diagenetic 
Alteration. 
Principal Investigator: Bruce Fouke 

The Asteroid (Echinodermata)Trichasteropsis 
from the Triassic of Germany: Its 
Taxonomy, Phylogeny and Paleoecologic 
Significance. 
Principal Investigator: Daniel B. Blake 

Paleoecological Setting of Eocene 

Echinoderms at Seymour Island, Antarctic 

Peninsula. 

Principal Investigator: Daniel B. Blake 



Elasticity of Mantel Minerals Under High 
Pressures and Temperatures. 
Principal Investigator: Jay Bass 

Poiyamorphism and Structural Transitions 
During Glass Formation. 
Principal Investigators: Jay Bass and Jay 
Kieffer 

Experimental NMR and MD Investigations of 
the Structure and Dynamics of Anionic 
Species in and Sorbed onto Mixed-Metal 
Layered Hydroxides. 
Principal Investigator: R. James Kirkpatrick 

U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY 

Mapping of the Pittston 7.5" Quadrangle, 
Pennsylvania. 
Principal Investigator: Stephen Marshak 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS CRITICAL 
RESEARCH INITIATIVE 

Geological, Microbiological, and Biochemical 
Mechanisms of Microbial Fossilization: A 
Template for Interpreting the History of 
Life. 

Principal Investigators: Bruce Fouke, A. A. 
Salyers, J. Sweedler. 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS FACULTY 
FELLOWSHIP 

Imaging the Earth's Converging Tectonic 
Plates 

Principal Investigators: Wang Ping Chen 
and Ulrich Kruse 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS RESEARCH 
BOARD 

Simulation of Mantle Dynamics: To Simulate 
Mantle Flows to Understand the Deep 
Interior of the Earth as Revealed by 
Seismic Tomography. 
Principal Investigator: Albert T. Hsui 

Acquisition of a Single Collector Thermal 
Ionization Mass Spectrometer. 
Principal Investigator: Craig Lundstrom. 



17 



List of Publications for 1999 



This list includes only peer-reviewed articles, 
chapters, or books. 

Jackson, J.M., Stanislav, S.V., and Bass, J.D., 
1999, Elasticity of MgSi0 3 orthoenstatite: 
American Mineralogist, 84: 677-680. 

Blake, D.B., Hagdorn, H., and Tinitori, A., 
1999, Echinoderm taphonomy of the 
Zorzino Limestone (Norian, Late Triassic), 
p. 35-38. In: S. Renesto (ed.). Third 
International Symposium on Lithographic 
Limestones, Bergamo, Italy. Rivi sta del 
Museuo Civico di Scienze Naturali 20 
(supplement), 136 p. 

Finkelstein, D.B., Hay, R.L., and Altaner, S.P., 
1999, Origin and diagenesis of lacustrine 
sediments of the Oligocene Creede 
Formation, southwestern Colorado: 
Geological Society of America Bulletin, 111: 
1175-1191. 

Sinogeikin, S.V. and Bass, J.D., 1999, Single- 
crystal elasticity of MgO at high pressure: 
Physical Review B 59: 14141-14144. 

Bethke. CM., Zhao, X., and Torgersen, T., 
1999, Groundwater flow and the 4 He distri- 
bution in the Great Artesian Basin of 
Australia: J. of Geophys. Research, 104: 
12,999-13,011. 

Sinogeikin, S.V., and Bass, J.D., 1999, 
Elasticity of chondrodite and implications 
for water in the Earth's mantle: Phys. 
Chem. Minerals, 26: 297-303. 

Webster, G.D., Hafley, D.J., Blake, D.B., and 
Glass, A., 1999, Crinoids and stelleroids 
(Echinodermata) from the Broken Rib 
Member, Dyer Formation (Late Devonian, 
Famennian) of the White River Plateau, 
Colorado: J. of Paleontology, 73: 461-486. 

Bethke, CM., van der Lee, J., and Schmitt, 
J.-M., 1999, The chemistry beneath our 
feet: Modeling reacting flow in the Earth's 
crust. In: C. Jablon, ed., Scientific Bridges 
for 2000 and Beyond, Academie des 
Sciences, Paris, 1-11. 

Chen, W.-P, Chen, C.-Y., and Nabelek, J.L., 
1999, Present-day deformation of the 
Qaidam basin with implications for intra- 
continental tectonics: Tectonophysics, 305: 

165-181. 

Nowack, R. L., Ay, E., Chen, W.-P., and 
Huang, B.-S.A., 1999, Seismic profile of the 
upper mantle along the southwestern edge 
of the Philippine Sea plate using short- 
period array data: Geophys. J. Int., 
136: 171-179. 



Ozalaybey, S., and Chen, W.-P., 1999, 

Frequency-dependent analysis of SKS/SKKS 
waveforms observed in Australia: Evidence 
for null birefringence: Phys. Earth Planet. 
Interior, 114: 197-210. 

Nowack, R. L., and Chen, W.-P., 1999, Source- 
receiver reciprocity and empirical Green's 
functions from chemical blasts: Bull. 
Seismol. Soc. Am., 89: 538-543. 

Jackson, J.M., Sinogeikin, S. V., and Bass, 
J.D., 1999, Elasticity of orthoenstatite: Am. 
Mineralogist, 84: 677-680. 

Toohill, K., Siegesmund, S., and Bass, J.D., 
1999, Elasticity of cordierite and implica- 
tions for lower crustal seismic anisotropy: 
Phys. Chem. Minerals., 26: 333-343. 

Johnson, T.M., Herbel, M.J., Bullen, T.D., and 
Zawislanski, P.T., 1999, Selenium isotope 
ratios as indicators of selenium sources and 
oxyanion reduction: Geochimica et 
Cosmochimica Acta, 63: 2775-2784. 

Macedo, J., and Marshak, S., 1999, The geom- 
etry of fold-thrust belt salients: Geol. Soc. of 
America Bulletin, 111: 1808-1822. 

Kriven, W.M., Palko, J.W., Sinogeikin. S., Bass, 
J.D., Sayir, A., Brunaer, C, Boysen, H., 
Frey, F., and Schneider, J., 1999, High tem- 
perature single crystal properties of mullite: 
J. European Cer. Soc, 19: 2529-2541. 

Yu, P., Kirkpatrick, R.J., Poe, B., McMillan, P., 
and Cong, X.-D., 1999, Structure of calcium 
silicate hydrate (C-S-H): Near-, mid- and 
far-infrared spectroscopy: J. Am. Ceram. 
Soc, S2: 742-748. 

Paulsen, T, and Marshak, S., 1999, Origin of 
the Uinta recess, Sevier fold-thrust belt, 
Utah: Influence of basin architecture on 
fold-thrust belt geometry: Tectonophysics, 
312: 203-216. 

Wu, L.-R.. and Chen, W.-P, 1999, Anomalous 
aftershocks of deep earthquakes: Geophys. 
Res. Lett., 26: 1977-1980. 

Lundstrom, C.C., Sampson, D.E., Perfit, M.R., 
Gill, J., and Williams, Q., 1999, Insights 
into MORB petrogenesis, U-series disequilib- 
ria from the Siqueiros Transform, Lamont 
Seamounts, and East Pacific Rise: J. of 
Geophys. Res., 104: 13,035-13,048. 

Pope, K.O., Ocampo, A.C, Fischer, A.G., 
Alvarez, W., Fouke, B.W., Webster, C.L., 
Vega, F.J., Smit, J., Fritsche, E., and Claeys, 
P., 1999, Chicxulub impact ejecta from 
Albion Island, Belize: Earth and Planet. Sci. 
Letters, 170: 351-364. 



Hong, S.-H., Young, J. F, Yu, P., and 

Kirkpatrick, R. J., 1999, Synthesis of anor- 
thite by the Pechini process and structural 
investigation of the hexagonal phase: J. 
Materials Research, 14: 1828-1833. 

FitzGerald, S. A., Neumann, D. A., Rush, J. J., 
Kirkpatrick, R. J., Cong, X., and Livingston, 
R. A., 1999, Inelastic neutron scattering 
study of the hydration of tricalcium silicate: 
J. Materials Research, 14: 1160-1165. 

Yu, P, and Kirkpatrick. R. J., 1999, Thermal 
dehydration of tobermorite and jennite: 
Concrete Science and Engineering, 1: 
185-191. 

Kirkpatrick, R.J., Yu, P., Hou, X., and Kim, Y., 
1999, Interlayer structure, anion dynamics, 
and phase transitions in mixed-metal lay- 
ered hydroxides: Variable temperature 
35 C1 NMR spectroscopy of hydrotalcite and 
Ca-aluminate hydrate (hydrocalumite): Am. 
Mineralogist, 84: 1186-1190. 

Marshak, S., van der Pluijm, B.A., and 

Hamburger, M., (eds.), 1999, The Tectonics 
of Continental Interiors: Tectonophysics 
(special volume) 305, 417 p. 

Zhang, CM., Zhu, L.R., Song, X.D., Li, Z.X., 
Yang, M.L., Su, N.Q., and Chen, X.Z., 1999, 
Predictions of the 1997 strong earthquakes 
in Jiashi, Xinjiang, China: Bull. Seism. Soc. 
Am., 89: 1171-1183. 

Damberger, H. H., and Godwin, P. (eds.). 1999, 
Proceedings of the Illinois Mining Institute 
1998: Illinois Mining Institute, 241 p. 

McBride, J.H., and Kolata, D.R., 1999, Upper 
crust beneath the central Illinois basin, 
United States: Geol. Soc. of America 
Bulletin, 111: 375-394. 

Marshak, S., 1999, Deformation way back 
when: Thoughts on the contrasts between 
Archean/Paleoproterozoic orogens and 
modern ones: J. of Structural Geol, 21: 
1175-1182. 

Andrews, A., Coale, K., Lundstrom, C.C., 
Palacz, Z., Nowicki, J., and Cailliet, C, 
1999, Application of a new ion-exchange 
separation technique and thermal ionization 
mass spectrometry to 226 Ra determination 
in otoliths for the purpose of radiometric 
age determination in long-lived fishes: 
Can. J. of Fisheries and Aquatic Sci., 56: 
1329-1338. 

Huff, W D., Muftuoglu, E., Kolata, D. R., and 
Bergstrdm, S. M., 1999, K-bentonite bed 
preservation and its event stratigraphic sig- 
nificance: Acta Universitatis Carolinae - 
Geologica, v. 43: 491-493. 



s 



1 \d 



Colloquium Speakers 



McBride, J.H., and Nelson, W.J., 1999, Style 
and origin of Mid-Carboniferous deforma- 
tion in the Illinois Basin, USA Ancestral 
Rockies deformation?: Tectonophysics, 305: 
249-273. 

Hu, F.S., Hedges, J.I., Gordon, E.S., Brubaker, 
L.B., 1999, Lignin biomarkers and pollen in 
postglacial sediments of an Alaskan lake: 
Geochim. et Cosmochim Acta, 63: 
1421-1430. 

Duvall, M. et al. including Hu, F.S., 1999, 
Paleoenvironmental Atlas of Beringia: A 
regional data synthesis presented in an 
electronic form: Quaternary Research, 
52: 270-271. 

Bergstrdm, S. M., Huff, W. D., Koren, T., 
Larsson, K., Ahlberg, P., and Kolata, D. R., 
1999, The 1997 core drilling through 
Ordovician and Silurian strata at Rostanga, 
S. Sweden: Preliminary stratigraphic assess- 
ment and regional comparison: Geologiska 
Fdreningens i Stockholm Forhandlingar, 
121: 127-135. 

McBride, J.H., and England, R.W., 1999, 
Window into the Caledonian Orogen: 
Structure of the crust beneath the East 
Shetland Platform, United Kingdom: Geol. 
Soc. of America Bulletin, 111: 1030-1041. 

Hedges, J. I., Hu, F.S., Devol, A.H., Hartnett, 
H.E., Tsamakis, E., and Keil, R.G.. 1999, 
Sedimentary organic matter preservation: A 
test for selective oxic degradation: Am. J. 
of Science, 299: 529-555. 

Hu, F.S., Slawinski, D., Wright, H.E. Jr., Ito, 
E., Johnson, R.G., Kelts, K.R., McEwan, 
R.F., and Boedigheimer, A., 1999, Abrupt 
changes in North American climate during 
early Holocene times: Nature, 400: 437-440. 

Palsson, C, Bergstrdm, S. M., Huff, W. D., 
Larsson, K., Kolata, D. R. 1999, Ordovician 
stratigraphy of the Rostanga 1 drill-core, 
Scania, southern Sweden: Acta Universitatis 
Carolinae - Geologica, 43: 59-60. 

Carozzi, A.V., 1999, Les theories de l'origine 
des montagnes primitives de Louis Jurine, 
1797 et 1804: In: Sigrist, R., et al, eds. 
Louis Jurine, Chirurgien et Naturaliste 
(1751-1819), Bibliotheque d'Histoire des 
Sciences 2, Editions Georg, Geneve, 
351-376. 

McBride, J.H., 1999, Without firing a shot: 
Seismic exploration of the Illinois Basin: 
Geotimes (May, 1999): 19-23. 



Spring 1999 



January 19 Lianxing Wen Carnegie Institute 

Seismology: New Technique, Fine Structures & New Insights into Earth's Dynamics 
January 22 Peter Reiners Caltech 

(U-Th)/He Dating & Thermochronometry of Shallow Crustal Processes 
January 25 James Farquhar University of Calif. 

What do oxygen & sulfur isotopes tell us about the Martian atmosphere & its interactions 

with the planet's surface? 
January 27 Veli-Pekka Salonen Finland 

Use of Gypsum in rehabilitation of Eutrophied lakes 
January 29 Craig Bethke U of I 

Groundwater flow and the 4He distribution in the Great Artesian Basin 
February 1 Stephen Zatman UC-Berkeley 

High Frequency Geomagnetism: The changing state of the earth's deep interior 
February 8 Stuart Rojstaczer Duke University 

Hydrology of Yellowstone's Geysers 
February 9 Xiaogong Song Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory 

Structure & dynamics of the earth's core fromseismic body-waves 
February 10 Kevin Mandernack Colorado School of Mines 

Stable isotopes as indicators of microbial activity 
February 15 Paul Earle UCLA 

Small-scale structure of the mantle & core from observations of high-frequency scattered energy 
February 17 Jan Amend Washington University 

Unraveling geochemical bioenergetics in hydrothermal systems-A computational- 
experimental-analytical approach 
February 19 Feng Sheng Hu U of I, Plant Biology 

Climate change & ecosystem response in Alaska: Snapshots of the last 12,000 years 
February 22 Ruth Blake Yale University 

Oxygen isotope systematics of Microbial phosphate metabolism 
February 26 Mihai Ducea Caltech 

Vertical composition of continental arcs and the origin of batholiths 
March 4 Youngsook Huh MIT 

Climate & weathering evidence from the rivers of eastern Siberia 
March 26 Kelly Warner USGS 

Lower Illinois river basin-analysis of arsenic & pesticides in ground water 
April 9 Karen Haverholm University of Wisconsin 

"What Are the National Science Education Standards and Why Should We Care?" 
April 16 Peter Keleman Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute 

April 30 Cassandra Coombs Charleston College 

Volcanoes & resources of the Moon and Mars 



September 9 Michael Manga University of Oregon 

Microstructure in magmatic materials 
September 17 Alan Whittington U of I 

Ancient histories of a young orogenic belt-Polymetamorphism in the Himalayas 



Moscow St. University 

University of Missouri Columbia 

Mo records of oxygen-deficient sedimentary systems: 



September 24 Alexander Alekseev 

Upper carboniferous of Moscow basin 
October 1 Tim Lyons 

Recent advances in the S-isotope, Fe & 

Examples from Precambrian to recent 
October 8 Dan Blake U of I 

The evolution of starfish & the impact of climate decline on Antarctic invertebrate faunas: 

Paleobiology at Illinois 
October 15 Robert Wintsch Indiana University 

Subduction & Ascent of Sanbaqawa Blueschist, SW Japan 
October 22 Tom Hickson University of Minnesota 

Petrographic & textural constraints on deep-water sandstone deposition: They're not all 

turbidites anymore or: How to go blind doing point counts 
November 2 Mark Cooper AAPG 

Oil & gas fields associated with inverted extensional faults: A global review 
November 5 Christina De La Rocha Harvard 

Silicon isotope Biogeochemistry: Rivers, diatoms, & oceans, Present & past 
November 12 Jim Walters University of N. Iowa 

Permafrost degradation caused by a warming climate in interior Alaska 
November 19 Louise Hose Westminster College 

Geomicrobiological processes in a hydrogen sulfide-rich Karst environment 
December 3 Steven R. Bohlen USGS-Virginia 

Federal science funding & the future of the Earth Sciences 



1" 



Alumni News 



Obituaries 



Gerald Keith Anderson, B.A. '49, was 

killed in a car accident Dec. 22, 1998, in 
Midland, Texas. He was 73. Mr. 
Anderson taught geology at Miami 
University of Ohio and then was 
employed as a geologist by the Ohio Oil 
Company (now Marathon Oil). At the 
time of his retirement from Marathon Oil 
in 1986, Mr. Anderson was the chief 
geologist for the Yates Field in West 
Texas. He was a member of the 
American Association of Petroleum 
Geologists (AAPG) . He is survived by 
three children and three grandchildren. 

Terry W. Offield, M.S. '55, died Feb. 5, 
1999, from complications following 
heart surgery. He was 65. In 1961 Mr. 
Offield joined the U.S. Geological Survey 
(USGS), working on regional geology 
and mineral resources of the outer 
Himalayas and on mineral surveys in 
northeastern Brazil. He went on to work 
in the USGS Branch of Astrogeology, 
serving as an advisor for lunar orbiter 
missions. Author of more than 100 sci- 
entific publications, Mr. Offield received 
the Department of the Interior's 
Meritorious Service Award and helped 
start the Geological Society of America's 
Congressional Science Fellow Program. 

Donald J. Colquhoun, Ph.D. '60, died 
June 4, 1999. 

Lois Kent, who taught in the depart- 
ment from 1955-1956, died last 
September in Champaign. Ms. Kent was 
a senior fellow in the GSA and a charter 
member of the Paleontological Research 
Institute in Ithaca, N.Y. From 1941-1945 
she was a junior geologist and assistant 
geologist for the USGS in Washington, 
D.C. and from 1956-1985 she was a 
geologist emeritus for the ISGS in 
Urbana. 



Class News 



SIXTIES 



FIFTIES 



20 



Richard M. Winar, B.S. 'S3, M.S. '55, 

writes "Greatly enjoyed the articles 
about Harold Wanless. It was indeed an 
honor to know him ... Thanks for the 
fun of recalling him more clearly." 
Richard also has a new e-mail address: 
E-mail: rmwinar@aol.com 

Bruce W. Nelson, Ph.D. '55, retired in 
June as professor of Environmental 
Sciences at the University of Virginia. In 
his 25-year career at the University, 
Bruce served as dean of continuing edu- 
cation, associate provost, professor ... 
and now professor emeritus! Bruce trav- 
eled to Malaysia and Mauritius in the 
1980s on two separate Fulbright grants 
and attended a meeting in Beijing last 
September, which he followed with a 
trip through Souteast Asia. He writes, "I 
have enjoyed the newsletter and learning 
that U of I Geology is an active and vital 
place. Also, the recent articles on "old 
timers" are warm reminders of people I 
have known!" 
E-mail: bwn@virginia.edu 

Barbara J. (Schenk) Collins, Ph.D. '55, 
is still teaching biology at California 
Lutheran University and thoroughly 
enjoying it. She now has a website with 
more than 550 color images of wildflow- 
ers of the chaparral in southern 
California. These are indexed according 
to common and scientific names at 
http:// wwl. clunet.edu/wf 
Note that this is wwl and not www. 

Lorence G. Collins, Ph.D. '59 (and 
Barbara's husband), has been retired 
from California State University 
Northridge since 1993 and spends his 
time studying myrmekite and the origin 
of some granite bodies by K-metasoma- 
tism. He now has 35 articles on a web- 
site: http://www.csun.edu/ ~ vcgeo005. 
He maintains another site in opposition 
to creation science at 
http://www.csun.edu/ ~ vcgeo005/cre- 
ation.html. This includes an article 
about a bogus Noah's Ark in Turkey. 
E-mail: lorencec@cs.com 



Margaret S. Leinen, B.S. '69, is the new 

assistant director for Geoscience at NSF. 
She assumes her duties at NSF after 
serving as provost for Marine Sciences 
and dean and director of the Graduate 
School of Marine Sciences at the 
University of Rhode Island. 

John D. Sims, B.S. '62, retired from the 
U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in 
January, 1999, to enjoy the restoration of 
his circa 1785 stone farm house near his- 
torical Harpers Ferry, W.Va. "The restora- 
tion is well underway with my partner, 
Jim Tower, and I doing almost all the 
work," John writes. Eventually, Willow 
Spring Farm, as it is named, will be a 
small bed & breakfast. John also is prin- 
cipal in a consulting firm specializing in 
earthquake hazard evaluation. He is cur- 
rently working on three projects for the 
USGS. 
E-mail: jsims@ix.netcom.com 

Ira Edgar Odom, M.S. '58, Ph.D. '63, 
worked at American Colloid Co. until 
December of 1999, as a research scien- 
tist. "It was an enjoyable 19 years," he 
writes. "1 have become a bit of an expert 
on silica minerals in clays. I discovered 
that silica minerals in dusts, from ben- 
tonite and other dry clay processing are 
clay encapsulated. MSHA, OSHA and 
NIOSH believe this is very significant 
and explains why clay plant workers sel- 
dom, if ever, have silicosis. Before work- 
ing for American Colloid, Ira taught at 
Northern Illinois University until 1981. 
"A wonderful experience!" Ira currently 
is a full-time consultant. "I'm going 
strong and looking forward to full-time 
consulting," he writes. 

Paul L. Plusquellec, M.S. '66, Ph.D. 
'68, retired from CNG Producing Co. in 
1996 where he was vice president of 
exploration and development. These 
days he is enjoying golf, cooking and 
traveling from his base in Montgomery, 
Texas. 
E-mail: pbplusque@aol.com 



Alumni News 



/*] 



SEVENTIES 



James W. Granath, B.S. 71, M.S. 73, 

has become a consulting structural geol- 
ogist in Houston. He was previously a 
structural specialist for Conoco Advance 
Exploration in Houston. 

William Ausich, B.S. 74, has stepped 
down as chair of the Department of 
Geological Sciences at Ohio State. "I look 
forward to life as a professor," he writes. 
E-mail: ausich.l@osu.edu 

John C. Steinmetz, B.S. '69, M.S. 75, 

has become the director of the Indiana 
Geological Survey and Indiana state 
geologist, Bloomington, Ind. He was pre- 
viously director and state geologist of the 
Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology 
in Butte, Mont., and adjunct professor of 
geology, University of Montana, 
Missoula. 

Tim Rynott, B.S. 79, served as general 
chair of the Gulf Coast Association of 
Geological Societies annual convention. 
The 49th Annual GCAGS Convention 
was held in September, 1999, in 
Lafayette, La., where Tim has been 
working as a petroleum geologist for the 
past 19 years. He is a past president of 
the Lafayette Geological Society and con- 
siders himself very fortunate to have 
been able to spend his entire career in 
one "oil town." "Lafayette, the heart of 
Cajun Country, is one of the best kept 
secrets in the South," he writes. He 
invites fellow alums to come experience 
the "joie de vivre. " 
E-mail: rynott@worldnet.att.net 



EIGHTIES 



Jim Cobb, B.S. 71, Ph.D. '81, was 

appointed the 12th State Geologist of 
Kentucky and director of the Kentucky 
Geological Survey on October 1. 
E-mail: cobb@fido.mm.uky.edu 

M. Scott Mansholt, B.A. '82, works for 
Texaco in Bakersfield, Calif., as an envi- 
ronmental coordinator, primarily dealing 
with waste management, remediation, 
water issues, property reviews and Web 
page management. 
E-mail: manshms@texaco.com 



Dean Rose, B.S. '83, has found a new 
career crafting metalwork. Based in 
Champaign, Dean was recently the sub- 
ject of a feature article in the News- 
Gazette. Dean taught himself the craft by 
finding information at libraries and visit- 
ing museums and other places with fine 
examples of metalwork. His company, 
which he founded in 1992 after leaving 
the gas and oil business, is called 
Working Metal Customized Decorative 
Ironworks. Visit his website at 
www. soltec. net/blacksmith . 
E-mail: artsmith@soltec.com 

William C. Dawson, B.S. 74, Ph.D. '84, 

has been awarded the 1999 Levorsen 
Award by the Gulf Coast Association of 
Geological Societies for a paper he pre- 
sented at the 1999 Annual Meeting. The 
paper was titled "Top Seal Character and 
Sequence Stratigraphy of Selected Marine 
Shales in Gulf Coast Style Basins." 

Stephen E. Laubach, Ph.D. '86, and co- 
author Eloise Doherty received the 
"Jules Braunstein Memorial Award" from 
the AAPG for the best poster presenta- 
tion at the 1999 annual AAPG meeting 
in San Antonio, Texas. The paper was 
titled "Natural Fracture Analysis Using 
Drilled Sidewall Cores." The award was 
presented at the 2000 AAPG meeting in 
New Orleans, April 15-20. Stephen, a 
structural geologist, is a senior research 
scientist in the Texas Bureau of 
Economic Geology, at the University of 
Texas, Austin. 

NINTIES 

Rich Poskin, B.S. '91, has earned a mas- 
ter's degree in zoology and is now on 
the faculty of Wabash Valley College in 
Mt. Carmel, 111. He teaches biology and 
geology. 

Steven J. Hageman, M.S. '88, Ph.D. 
'92, has been designated a distinguished 
lecturer by the Paleontological Society. 
Each year the Paleontological society 
identifies six distinguished lecturers who 
are available to speak to a wide range of 
groups. Steven is a professor of geology 
at Appalachian State University. 
E-mail: hagemansj@appstate.edu 



Ming Kuo Lee, M.S. '90, Ph.D. '93, just 
received tenure and promotion at 
Auburn University. 

Bruce Miller, B.S. '94, M.S. '95, has 

become a Field Service Manager for 
Schlumberger, based in Louisiana. Bruce 
and his wife, Laura, are enjoying parent- 
hood with their first child. 

Steven Sroka, B.A. '80, Ph.D. '96, 

writes to say that he is now the park 
manager (equivalent to a director) of the 
Utah Field House of Natural History 
State Park Museum in Vernal Utah. The 
museum is devoted to natural history, 
especially paleontology, of the Uinta 
Basin and Uinta Mountains. The muse- 
um is 20 miles away from Dinosaur 
National Monument and is currently 
undergoing a major fund-raising drive 
for a much needed revitalization. The 
museum has over 130,000 visitors a 
year. All current and past alumni (and 
their families) are welcome to stop by. 
E-mail: nrdpr.ufsp@state.ut.us 

Crystal Lovett, B.S. '97, just completed 
her master's degree in environmental 
management at Duke University. She is 
working one year for the Environmental 
Defense Fund in Raleigh, N.C. Her pro- 
jects involve developing policy for 
forestry practices on private lands in 
North Carolina. In August of this year 
she'll attend University of Virginia 
School of Law. "I love getting the 
newsletter," she writes. "I like seeing 
how things change (or stay the same) 
and what people I knew are up to." 
E-mail: cgl2@duke.edu 

Tim Paulsen, Ph.D. '97, recently joined 
the faculty of the Geology Department at 
the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh. He 
also is an adjunct assistant professor at 
Ohio State University. Tim, a structural 
geologist, conducts research in the 
Transantarctic Mountains. His research is 
part of a six-nation study that could 
shed light on future changes in the 
world's climate. 



21 



Alumni News 



Former Faculty News 



Ronadh Cox, former visiting professor of 
sedimentary geology, and her husband, 
Mark, announce the arrival of their son, 
Owen, who was born January 4 at 8 
pounds 15 ounces. "All three of us are 
now home, doing well, and having fun!" 
she writes. Ronadh is now at the depart- 
ment of geology at Williams College. 
E-mail: Ronadh.Cox@williams.edu 

Don U. Deere, a geologist and engineer 
and former faculty member, received the 
first Ralph B. Peck Award at the Third 
National Conference of the Geo-Institute 
of the American Society of Civil 
Engineers. Don is a member of the 
National Academy of Science and the 
National Academy of Engineering. 

Bob Reynolds, an adjunct professor in 
the Geology Department from 1985-1998 
while based at Dartmouth, won the 
Roebling Medal this year from the 
Mineralogical Society of America. The 
Roebling Medal is the highest award of 
the Mineralogical Society of America "for 




scientific eminence as represented pri- 
marily by scientific publication of out- 
standing original research in mineralogy.' 

Frank Rhodes, who was a postdoctoral 
fellow, visiting lecturer, and professor at 
the University of Illinois from 1950-1956 
gave the featured talk at the AAPG con- 
vention. The talk was titled "Summit on 
Early Science Education." The conven- 
tion ran from April 15-20 in New 
Orleans. Frank was president of Cornell 
University for many years, and is now 
chair of the National Research Council. 



Hans Laubscher, who was a visiting 
professor here in the 1960s, won the 
GSA Division of Structural Geology and 
Tectonics Career Contribution award for 1999. 
Steve Marshak, professor and department 
head, was chair of the division and presented 
Laubscher with the award. 



Correction: 

Elizabeth Brouwers, M.S. 77, associate 
regional geologist with the USGS in 
Denver writes to correct our mistake in 
the last issue of the newsletter. In the 
profile of Alex Glass, recipient of the 
Sohl award, we stated that Sohl spent 
most of his career with the Smithsonian 
Institution. Brouwers writes "Norm Sohl 
is proudly claimed by the U.S. Geological 
Survey, which he worked for his entire 
career ... in the early days of the 
Paleontology and Stratigraphy Branch of 
the USGS, staff were housed in the same 
building as the natural history staff of 
the Smithsonian, but this was always as 
the USGS." Thank you Ms. Brouwers! 




George B. Grim (left; shown here with Jay 
Bass), nephew of the late Professor Ralph E. 
Grim, visited the Department to unveil a dis- 
play case, donated by Mr Grim, containing 
some of Prof. Grim's several awards. Ralph 
Grim was a distinguished researcher in clay 
mineralogy. 



Albert V. Carozzi, professor emeritus, was awarded the Prix Wegmann 
of the Societe Geologique de France. The prize was awarded June 7 in Paris 
at the society's annual meeting. This honor, which is one of the highest 
awards the organization gives, was based on Carozzi's lifelong contribution 
to the history of geology. 

Since 1960, Carozzi has translated and annotated more than 20 books on 
the history of geology. He has translated works from German, Latin and 
French, most of which were written in the 18th century. 

"Basically, I make the publication or manuscript available in an English 
translation, often with the original text side by side. Then I annotate it in 
terms of what the work meant in the context of its time and in a modern 
context," says Carozzi. 

Carozzi often travels to Europe to check the formations mentioned in the 
works. "I go in the field and try to re-check their observations," he says. "Of 
course sometimes those outcrops are now in the city dump or the city has 
grown onto it, but generally the outcrop is there. It can be something of a 
thrill to come upon the same outcrop discussed 200 years ago." 

The history of geology was really a secondary interest for Carozzi, who 
taught and did research in carbonate petrography in the University's 
Department of Geology from 1955-1989. Upon retiring, the history of geology 
became his major field of research. 



22 



A. Look Back 




Key to UofI Geology Faculty, Staff, 

Graduate Assistants 

Photograph April, 1952 west entrance NHB 

Row 1 

1. Rosa Nickell * 
Executive Secretary 

2. Secretary 

3. William M. Merrill 

Assistant Professor, stratigraphy 

4. Secretary 

5. Donald M. Henderson 
Assistant Professor, mineralogy 

6. Jack Luin Hough * 

Associate Professor, oceanography, 
engineering geology 

7. Bernhead Kummel * 
Associate Professor, paleontology 

8. Frank C? Foley 

Visiting Prof, Kansas State Geological 
Survey 

Row 2 

9. Harold R. Wanless * 
Professor, stratigraphy 

10. Harold W. Scott * 
Professor, micropaleontology 

11. Carleton A. Chapman 

Professor, petrology 

12. Ralph E. Grim * 

Research Professor, clay mineralogy 



13. Frank DeWolf * 

Professor emeritus, Head Geology 
and Geography 

14. George W. White * 

Professor, Geomorphology; Head 
Geology 

15. J. V. Harrison * 

Visiting Professor; Reader, Oxford 
University 

16. Arthur F. Hagner 

Associate Professor, mineral deposits 

17. Paul R. Shaffer 
Professor, geomorphology 

18. William D. Johns 
Graduate Assistant 

Row 3 

19. James Fisher 
Graduate Assistant 

20. Vincent Shepps * 
Graduate Assistant 

21. Graduate Assistant 

22. John B. Droste 
Graduate Assistant 

23. Forest D. Etheredge 
Graduate Assistant 

24. Jane Gray 
Graduate Assistant 

25. Leonard Schultz 
Graduate Assistant 

26. John Wehrenberg 
Graduate Assistant 



27. Graduate Assistant 

28. Graduate Assistant 

Row 4 

29. 

30. Norman Sohl 

Graduate Assistant 
31. 
32. 
33. 

34. Ronald (Mike) Lloyd 
35. 
36. 

37. Robert Doehler 
Graduate Assistant 

Row 5 

38. John C. Hathaway 
Graduate Assistant 

39. John Chapman ? 
Graduate Assistant 

40. Wilford F. Weeks 
Graduate Assistant 

41. Edwin Tooker 
Graduate Assistant 

42. 
43. 
44. 
* deceased 

This photograph and identifications were 
generously provided by Don (Hendy) 
Henderson. 



23 



UNIVERSITY OF ILUN0I3-UHBANA 



3 0112 047107518 



Let's Keep in Touch 



Please take a few minutes to let us and your classmates know what you've been doing. Send your news to the 
Department of Geology, 245 Natural History Building, 1301 West Green Street, Urbana, Illinois 61801; 
fax 217-244-4996; e-mail geology@uiuc.edu 



Name- 



Address- 



(indicate if changed) 



Home phone- 
E-mail 



Degrees from Illinois (with year). 



J| ILLINOIS 

Department of Geology 

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 
245 Natural History Building 
1301 W. Green St. 
Urbana, IL 61801 



Non-Profit Organization 
U.S. Postage 

PAID 

Permit No. 75 

Champaign, IL 61820 



Aooo 



Year 



Review 



j^artment of Geology 

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 



GeoScience 2005: 

The Next Era of Excellence 



With bundles of fall-colored bal- 
loons, festive table decorations, down- 
home southern barbecue, and an enor- 
mous cake, the Geology Department 
kicked off its GeoScience 2005 
Campaign on Oct. 14 — Homecoming 
weekend. 

Department head Stephen Marshak 
made a short speech stressing the 
importance of the campaign and its 
specific fundraising goals, after which 
everyone got down to some serious vis- 
iting and eating. The party, which was 
held in the Natural History Building, 
was attended by almost 100 alumni, 
students, faculty, staff and friends. 

The campaign has been launched 
to establish an endowment that will 
help the department continue to main- 
tain its stature and expand into new 
and productive fields of research, 
Marshak explained. The campaign's 
title, "GeoScience 2005: The Next Era of 
Excellence," reflects this goal. 

"Endowments are a critical buffer 
for departments like ours that receive 
state support," said Marshak at the 
gathering. He noted that state support 
often fluctuates. In addition it often is 
not enough to cover the cost of new 
equipment and facilities needed to 
attract and retain the best and the 
brightest. By establishing an endow- 
ment, the department can benefit from 
donations for eons! 

Before the campaign was launched, 
the department's endowment was about 
$3 million. The decision was made— 



with the help and support of the 
University, the Foundation and the 
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences' 
Office of Development and External 
Relations— to double this amount by 
launching a $3 million campaign over 
the next five years. 

The funds raised will support new 
professorships, student stipends, 
updated teaching and laboratory 
equipment, undergraduate student 
research, programs in field geology 
(including field camp and field trips), 
acquisition of new library materials 
and support of the colloquium series, 
which brings in respected experts to 
stimulate the synapses of students and 
faculty alike. 

"We're off to a great start, with 
the establishment of the Johnson 
Professorship in memory of Hilt 
Johnson (see sidebar); the Franklin 
fund, established by Ed Franklin B.S. 
'56, for field camp; and the Wanless 
fund, established by Jim Baroffio, 
Ph.D. '64," said Marshak. 

Keep an ear out for regional 
events in the coming years. These 
events will give you a chance to catch 
up with old chums, to learn more 
about department news, and get 
details about the campaign. 

For more information, call 
Stephen Marshak, department head, 
at 217-333-7705 or Pam Christman, 
assistant dean for development at the 
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, 
at 217-333-7108. 




New professorship created 

Reprinted with permission from UofI Foundation 

A gift in excess of 
$500,000 from Eric and 
Katherine Johnson of 

Los Altos, Calif., will 
create the W. Hilton 
Johnson Professorship 

in Geology in the Department of 
Geology, College of Liberal Arts and 
Sciences, at Urbana-Champaign. 

The W Hilton Johnson 
Professorship honors Eric's father who 
was professor in geology at Urbana- 
Champaign and a research affiliate with 
the Illinois State Geological Survey. 

Over a 30-year career at the U of I, 
Hilt Johnson was well known for his 
research and teaching, and for running 
the University of Illinois Geology Field 
Camp in Wyoming. His research inter- 
ests included geomorphology, quater- 
nary stratigraphy and glacial geology. 

Professor Johnson, who received his 
master's and doctoral degrees from the 
University of Illinois, made important 
contributions to understanding the ice 
age history of the Midwest and was a 
popular teacher in his research disci- 
plines, as well as in introductory geology 
and field geology. He served for a time 
as acting head of the Department. 

Hilt's wife, Joyce, has recently 
established the W. Hilton Johnson 
Geologic Field Study Fund. It will sup- 
port student geologic field work in the 
Department of Geology. 

Hilt's son, Eric, received a master's 
degree in computer science from the U 
of I in 1989. He is a software engineer 
with Nortel Networks. Katherine, a certi- 
fied public accountant, is a community 
volunteer. 



HATH 5 * 




Greetings 



Our "Year in Review" 



The year 2000 has been an eventful 
one for the Department of Geology. 
Let's start with exciting new develop- 
ments concerning support from alumni 
and friends. The family of the late 
Professor Hilton Johnson has been par- 
ticularly generous. Eric and Kathy 
Johnson (Hilt's son and daughter-in- 
law) established an endowment for the 
W. Hilton Johnson Professorship in 
Surficial Geology. Their gift ensures that 
we will be able to continue the out- 
standing tradition of teaching and 
research established by Hilt over his 
three decades at the University of 
Illinois. Hilt's wife, Joyce, has estab- 
lished the W. H. Johnson Field Geology 
Fund, which will make it possible for 
our students to continue benefiting from 
the field experiences that Hilt so delight- 
ed in offering. We encourage friends 
and colleagues of Hilt to help this fund 
grow. This field geology fund, along 
with other funds, like the Franklin Field 



Camp fund established by Ed Franklin 
(B.S. '56), will allow the Department to 
help defray the rising costs of field work 
for our students. These funds are the 
beginning of Geoscience 2005, a cam- 
paign to double the size of the 
Department's endowment. 

Thanks to strong support and 
encouragement from the College of 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, this year has 
been very active on the recruiting front. 
We are continuing our searches for the R. 
E. Grim Professor and a geomicrobiolo- 
gist and we are now engaged in the 
search for the W H. Johnson Professor. 
With these additions and more beyond, 
we anticipate that the Department will 
grow by at least 30 percent in the near 
future. 

This past year has also been notable 
for the awards and recognition that peo- 
ple affiliated with the department have 
achieved. Professor Craig Lundstrom won 
the Clarke Medal of the Geochemical 



Contents 



GeoScience 2005 

Greetings from the Department Head 

Alumni Achievement Award: Sharon Mosher 

Senior Faculty Going Strong 

Geomicrobiology Advances 

Faculty Activities 

Non-majors Getting Great Introduction to Geology 

Nieto Retires 

Alumna, Emeritus Faculty Honored at GSA 

Windows into the Past 

Alumnus Steve Sroka Putting Vernal, Utah, on the Map 

News from Alumni 

Honor Roll of Donors 

Annual Report 



1 

2 

3 

4 

7 

8 

10 

12 

13 

14 

16 

17 

19 

20 



Year in Review is published once a year by the Department of Geology, University of 

Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, to summarize the activities and accomplishments within 

the department and news from alumni and friends. 

Department Head: Stephen Marshak (smarshak@uiuc.edu) 

Staff Secretary: Barb Elmore (b-elmore@uiuc.edu) 

Editor: Deb Aronson 

Produced for the Department of Geology by the 

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Office of 

Publications; designer: Pat Mayer. 

http://www.geology.uiuc.edu 



j College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN 



Society and Professor Jay Bass has been 
made a Fellow of the Mineralogical 
Society of America. In 2000, GSA hon- 
ored Emeritus Professor George Klein 
with the Sloss Award in sedimentary 
geology, Emeritus Professor Richard Hay 
with the Rip Rapp Award in archaeologi- 
cal geology, and alumna Susan Mahlburg 
Kay with the Distinguished Service 
Medal. In addition, alumna Sharon 
Mosher has become president of GSA. 

Within the Natural History Building 
things are changing too. We are under- 
taking over $600,000 worth of laboratory 
space renovations in the building, includ- 
ing construction of a laboratory for 
research in geomicrobiology. Professors 
Craig Lundstrom and Tom Johnson have 
set up a mass spectrometer in the depart- 
ment, and Craig has also set up a high- 
pressure petrology laboratory. Faculty are 
also actively developing field projects in 
exotic places. For example, Wang-Ping 
Chen is directing a multi-disciplinary 
study of the Himalayas in Tibet, Dan 
Blake completed an expedition to 
Antarctica, Steve Hurst visited the floor 
of the Atlantic Ocean in AJvin, and I've 
been investigating Precambrian Geology 
in Eastern Brazil. Our teaching program 
is evolving as well, with Steve Altaner 
offering a new course in natural hazards 
and Xiaodong Song offering a new 
course in seismology. Also, Adjunct 
Assistant Professor Hannes Leetaru 
taught Petroleum Geology for a second 
time. 

I could go on but space won't permit 
it. So please enjoy the details by reading 
our Year in Review and learn even more 
by visiting the department's receptions at 
APG and GSA. And most important, 
please let us know what you're up to by 
sending in the form on the back page. 

I wish you all the best for the com- 
ing year! 

— Stephen Marshak 



Alumni Award 




Sharon Mosher Receives Alumni Achievement Award 



Sharon Mosher, B.S. 73, Ph.D. 78, 
has been awarded the Geology 
Department's Alumni Achievement 
Award for 2001. 

Mosher, Wilton Scott Centennial 
Professor of structural geology at the 
University of Texas, Austin, primarily 
studies past plate tectonic movement in 
order to understand similar processes 
today. In the course of her research she 
has done field work as close as Texas' 
Llano Uplift and as far away as Tierra del 
Fuego. Mosher also has been appointed 
president of the Geological Society of 
America (GSA). 

For much of the last decade, Mosher 
has worked in the Precambrian of Texas, 
studying an ancient plate boundary. 
"About 1.26 billion years ago, a vol- 
canic arc formed on the southern 
margin of the North American con- 
tinent," says Mosher. "Then much 
later, at about 1.05 billion years 
ago, an exotic island volcanic arc 
and another continent collided with 
North America forming a major 
mountain belt." 

Most recently, Mosher and her 
students have been studying an 
active plate boundary between the 
Australian and Pacific plates. This 
area has a very complex deforma- 
tion history. Mosher estimates that 
40 million years ago this was a 
spreading plate boundary, with 
magma coming up to form new sea 
floor. At 33 million years the boundary 
began pulling apart obliquely and by 
about 10 million years ago the plates 
were moving almost parallel to each, 
making a transform fault. Today this 
boundary is one of the most active in the 
world. 

"This is the only place in the world 
with a record of both spreading plates 
and transform faults," says Mosher. 

Mosher's research will help her 
understand how plate boundaries behave 



as they go from spreading to transform 
faulting; what chemical or mechanical 
properties influence the translation from 
one process to another; and whether the 
changes occurred sequentially or whether 
some occurred simultaneously. Ultimately, 
Mosher wants to understand the mecha- 
nisms behind changing from one type of 
plate boundary to another. 

In addition, Mosher hopes to under- 
stand the processes involved when mag- 
matism shuts off. 

"We know a lot about spreading 
ridges, but we don't know much about 
how spreading stops," she says. 

What Mosher learns about the 
behavior of this particular plate boundary 




Sharon Mosher and friends visit on Macquerie Island. She is 
using data from the island to field check marine geophysical data. 

she hopes to apply to other boundaries 
around the world. 

Mosher and her students also have 
been able to conduct field investigations 
on a tiny island, Macquerie (ma-qwair- 
EE), which is on the boundary between 
the Australian and Pacific plates. The 
island, which is about 4 km wide and 
34 km long, is about halfway between 
Antarctica and New Zealand. A piece of 
rock jutting out from the boundary got 
lifted up as the plates slid past each other. 



creating Macquerie. The island is part of 
the ocean floor that was uplifted and pre- 
served. 

Macquerie is home to millions of 
penguins and about 100,000 elephant 
seals ... and not much else. In fact, 
Mosher estimates that only about one 
dozen geologists have ever made it to the 
island. She and her students were the 
first non-New Zealanders and the first 
structural geologists to visit the island. 

"We can use the geology of the 
island to field check our marine geophys- 
ical data," says Mosher. "You can see 
great geology on the island. There are 
sea mounts, lava hills and fault topogra- 
phy, all of which are cut by faults that 
occurred in our lifetime. " 
In addition to these research 
activities and teaching responsi- 
bilities, Mosher has taken on 
the presidency of the Geological 
Society of America (GSA) . 
Mosher had previously served 
as vice president of GSA where 
she became involved in finding 
ways for members to become 
more effective in influencing 
public policy. Prior to this role, 
Mosher served three years as 
annual program chair and over- 
saw the reorganization of the 
Annual Meeting program. 
As president, Mosher envisions 
GSA working to help members 
become more effective at influ- 
encing public policy, to facilitate the 
interaction of scientists across disciplines, 
and to join forces with other geoscience 
societies to concentrate resources when 
addressing similar problems and goals. 
"GSA has the potential to make an 
impact in professional development, pub- 
lic outreach and public policy," asserts 
Mosher. 



Faculty Profiles 



With Almost a Century of Combined Research 
Experience, Four Senior Faculty Going Strong 



The four most senior Geology 
Department faculty— Daniel Blake, R. 
James Kirkpatrick, Albert Hsui, and 
Wang-Ping Chen — have all been at the 
Department for at least 20 years and 
none of them is showing any signs of 
slowing down. 



Daniel Blake 



Blake, who has been on the facul- 
ty since 1967, currently has a National 
Science Foundation (NSF) grant to 
study molluscan evolution associated 
with climatic change on Seymour 
Island in the Antarctic Peninsula. This 
project is the continuation of research 
he has conducted with Rich Aronson, 
a marine ecologist at the Dauphin 
Island Sea Lab. 

In 2000, Blake and his team took a 
reconnaissance trip that lasted five 
days. In 2001, he'll go down for five 
weeks. The Seymour Island formations 
are important because they are the 
only Cenozoic fossil records in 
Antarctica. Blake hopes that this 
record, which brackets the period dur- 
ing which the Earth cooled dramatical- 
ly, will help researchers understand 
how individual animals, communities 
of animals, and community structure 
change when the environment 
changes. 

"In the contemporary world, it has 
been argued that global warming can 
disrupt water currents and lead to 
cold-water upwelling," says Blake. 
"Cooling in the early Cenozoic can be 
used to suggest possible biological 
impacts resulting from cold upwelling 
events." 

John Werner, a post-doctoral fel- 
low who specializes in mollusks and 




Blake and the rest of the team relax during an arduous day. Pictured, from left to right, are 
Linda Avany, John Evans, Alex Glass, Dan Blake, and Rich Aronson. 



statistical applications in paleontology, 
will conduct the statistical analysis, 
and Syracuse University geologist 
Linda Ivany will conduct the geochem- 
ical analysis. Aronson also is joining 
Blake on this project. Both Aronson 
and Blake have been to Antarctica 
before. Blake conducted research in 
Antarctica in 1986 and 1994. Blake's 
graduate student Alex Glass also went 
on the expedition. 

"It's very important for students to 
go on such field expeditions," said 
Blake. "In addition to the adventure, 
they can learn an aspect of geology 
that they just can't learn in the labora- 
tory." 

Glass agrees. "I got to see new 
types of geology I'd never seen and I 
learned a lot about bivalves and gas- 
tropods. It was an awesome experience 
for me," he said. 

Glass notes that he'd like to return 
next year with Blake, but having 
undergone a rigorous medical exami- 



nation, he knows that he'd have to get 
all four wisdom teeth extracted in order 
to be allowed to return to Seymour 
Island. He has about a year to decide if 
the trip is worth the pain. 

Although Blake is the most senior 
faculty member in the department, he 
is not slowing down one iota. Blake 
also remains excited about his teaching 
responsibilities. He feels a strong need 
to pass his very specialized knowledge 
on to younger scientists. Being able to 
see evolutionary change in starfish is a 
very detailed and specialized knowl- 
edge that can't really be taught through 
books. It takes untold hours of looking 
at starfish to start to discern morpho- 
logical differences that others with less 
experience would overlook. 

"You need a lot of time to look at 
lots of fossils," says Blake, who also 
received NSF funding to spend the 
summer of 1999 in Germany, Italy, and 
the Netherlands studying Triassic 
starfish, crucial to the derivation of 
modern starfish. 




R. James Kirkpatrick 



Kirkpatrick, who is second-most 
senior to Blake, received his Ph.D. from 
the University of Illinois in 1972 and 
joined the faculty in 1978. He has been 
using NMR spectroscopy since the early 
1980s. He is one of the few geologists 
in the country to use this technique, 
which can reveal both how atoms are 
arranged and the speed and kinds of 
motion of those atoms within crystals, 
glasses and aqueous solutions. 

Shortly after beginning to use this 
technique, Kirkpatrick shifted from 
igneous petrology (his original field of 
expertise) into the geochemistry of low 
temperature and hydrous systems. 
These systems have traditionally been 
difficult to study, but are well suited to 
NMR approaches. In the course of his 
career, Kirkpatrick has worked with 
clay minerals, glasses and melts, basic 
mineralogy, man-made cement, and 
industrial minerals. 

"Science changes and you always 
need to be open to changing the prob- 
lems you work on," says Kirkpatrick, 
explaining his wide range of projects. 

Most recently, Kirkpatrick has been 
looking at what can be done about the 
increase of carbon dioxide in the 
atmosphere, the major cause of global 
warming. His goal is to see if "seques- 
tering" carbon dioxide by injecting it 
deep into the ocean or an underground 
aquifer is a feasible way to remove that 
excess carbon dioxide in the atmos- 
phere. 

In collaboration with senior 
research scientist Andrey Kalinichev, an 
expert in modeling molecular behavior 
in hydrous systems, Kirkpatrick is 



working to understand the physical 
and chemical properties of water and 
carbon dioxide solutions and how they 
interact with their surroundings. By 
creating molecular dynamics models 
of carbon dioxide and other chemical 
species as they dissolve in water, as 
well as models of that water-carbon 
dioxide solution as it interacts with 
mineral surfaces, Kalinichev and 
Kirkpatrick hope to determine if it will 
be safe to sequester the carbon diox- 
ide. These simulations are being run 
on the National Center for 
Supercomputing Applications SGI 
Origin2000 supercomputer. 



Kirkpatrick, surrounded by his research 
team, investigates all kinds of molecular 
modeling. 



create a quantitative, dynamic model 
to explain trench curvatures. 
Subsequently, working with Stephen 
Marshak and his students, Hsui also 
developed models for the curvature of 
mountain ranges. 

In recent years, his research inter- 
ests have focused on the effects of 
crystallization within dynamic fluid 
systems. This study has direct applica- 
tions to magma chamber dynamics and 
formation of igneous rocks, as well as 
in the solidification of the liquid outer 
core and the growth of the solid inner 
core. In addition, he has examined the 
effects of variable buoyancy within 
planetary interiors. His investigation 
suggests that dynamic layering is possi- 
ble within the icy mantle of Europa, a 
Jovian satellite, if its mantle is indeed 
operating at a near freezing state, as 




Hsui also has 
used modeling 
(mathematical, in 
his case) extensively 
and in a wide range 
of projects, from 
basin history model- 
ing to understand- 
ing the behavior o 
seismic waves with 
in the Earth's interi 
or and comparing 
the structure of 
Earth to its sister 
planet, Venus. Hsui 
who joined the fac- 
ulty in 1980, is an expert in geody- 
namics ("the mother of all geology," 
as he likes to say). He was the first to 



Hsui's web site for "Geology of the Planets" 
gives students an interactive way learn the 
material. 



Faculty Profiles 



strongly implied by recent 
NASA observations. 

Hsui incorporates this and 
other NASA data in his class- 
es, and is taking a web-based 
approach to teaching and 
learning. For example, he cre- 
ated an elaborate web site for 
Geology of the Planets, a 100- 
level course with about 55 
students. Using the web site, 
students can learn the course 
materials with abundant 
images from various NASA 
missions, and also can submit 
homework, which is then 
automatically graded to pro- 
vide instant feedback. Hsui 
has also started to incorporate collabo- 
rative learning in the web site, since 
some students prefer to learn in 
groups. He has created website pages 
for Introduction to Geophysics 
(Geology 350) and Geophysical 
Methods for Geology, Engineering, and 
Environmental Sciences (Geology 351). 

"It's harder these days, since we 
have many different types of learners," 
says Hsui, "but I'm trying to accom- 
modate the different learning styles 
into how I teach." 

Hsui emphasizes that class time is 
still key to the course. 

"This type of web site doesn't 
replace face-to-face contact, especially 
since that's a big part of the college 
experience," says Hsui, "but I see the 
web site as just another way to help 
students learn the material." 

The feedback from students has 
been, for the most part, positive. Of 
course, there have been the usual 
hardware glitches as the sites were 
first put up. 

"We've had our share of growing 
pains," says Hsui, with a smile. 







Wang-Ping Chen 



Chen, who has been at the 
University of Illinois since 1981, is 
directing an international project to 
study mountain building along the 
Himalayan-Tibetan zone of continent- 
continent collision. Funded by the 
National Science Foundation over a 
five-year period starting in 2001, 
Project Hi-CLIMB (Himalayan-Tibetan 
Continental Lithosphere during 
Mountain Building) is a multi-discipli- 
nary effort to integrate results from 
seismology, geophysics, metamorphic 
and igneous petrology, structural geolo- 
gy, geochronology, magnetotellurics, 
gravity and geodesy. Participants come 
from a dozen institutions in the United 
States, Nepal, China, France and 
Germany. 

The project will address a number 
of key issues in continental dynamics, 
including lithospheric deformation dur- 
ing orogeny, the fate of the Indian 
shield and crustal evolution, and 
crustal/mantle delamination and man- 
tle dynamics. 



Chen at Kun-Lun pass in 
northern Tibet— elevation 
4,767 meters. 



Large-scale deformation 
is known to involve 
both the crust and the 
upper mantle, but cur- 
rently there are several 
hypotheses about how 
these two layers deform 
during mountain build- 
ing. Each hypothesis 
suggests different mech- 
anisms of coupling 
between the upper crust 
and the uppermost 
mantle. The Himalayan- 
Tibetan collision zone is ideal for 
addressing these issues because "there 
is strong evidence that both thin- 
skinned and mantle-involved deforma- 
tion are occurring," says Chen. "By 
studying active orogeny along this col- 
lision zone we hope to understand the 
dynamics of continental convergent 
zones in general," he adds. 

The proposed field experiments 
will be the first to extend investiga- 
tions along a complete profile from 
the foreland where the deformation 
front is located, across both the Lower 
and the Higher Himalayas, then onto 
the central Tibetan Plateau. Dense 
spacing— about five kilometers apart — 
of the broadband, high-resolution seis- 
mic array will provide unprecedented 
resolution for imaging deep-seated 
structures, particularly those in the 
enigmatic lower crust, below the 
Moho, and throughout the transition 
zone of the mantle. These structures 
are likely to be key elements for 
understanding the dynamics of build- 
ing the Himalayas and the Tibetan 
plateau, says Chen. 



RESEARCH 




Departmental Advances in Geomicrobiology 



Several department members 
reported advances in geomicrobial 
studies at the GSA meeting in Reno, 
Nevada, last November. Graduate stu- 
dent Qusheng Jin and Craig Bethke, 
professor of geology, 
announced a new, uni- 
fied theory of microbial 
kinetics. Bruce Fouke, 
assistant professor of 
geology, announced new 
findings regarding micro- 
bial transport in hot 
springs at Yellowstone 
National Park. 

Bethke has been 
studying the rates at 
which microbial popula- 
tions metabolize in the 
natural environment. 
That work has been lim- 
ited by the lack of a general theory 
about those rates. Bethke and Jin have 
derived a rate law that is based on the 
internal mechanisms of microbial res- 
piration. This rate law accounts for the 
thermodynamics of the metabolization 
process and the energy required to 
produce ATP. Bethke and Jin also take 
into account the abundance of 
microbes and the concentrations of 
substrate species and reaction prod- 
ucts in solution. 

"The growth of microbial popula- 
tions can have profound effects on the 
chemistry of groundwater, from acid- 
mine drainage in the West to arsenic 
poisoning in Bangladesh," said Bethke. 
"The bulk of the world's microbial 
biomass operates by eating rocks — 
taking inorganic chemicals and using 
them to produce energy. By construct- 
ing quantitative models of that reac- 
tion process, we might find more 



"The growth of micro- 
bial populations can 
have profound effects 
on the chemistry of 
groundwater, from 
acid-mine drainage in 
the West to arsenic 
poisoning in 
Bangladesh..." 



effective solutions and control mea- 
sures to groundwater problems." 

In other microbial research, Fouke 
and post-doctoral fellow George 
Bonheyo have looked at the relation- 
ship of microbes to their 
environments and how 
they might travel between 
environments. Working at 
Mammoth Hot Springs in 
Yellowstone National Park, 
the team, which also 
includes microbiologist 
Abigail Salyers and stu- 
dents Beth Sanzenbacher 
and Janki Patel, has col- 
lected water, rock and air 
samples. They then used 
the polymerase chain reac- 
tion (PCR) technique on 
microbial lh Sr RNA to 
detect the presence and type of 
microbes. The next step is to deter- 
mine where the microbes 
came from and how they 
got there. 

"Hot springs are com- 
plex ecosystems of inter- 
acting microbes, geochem- 
istry and mineralogy," 
says Bonheyo. "The source 
of the microbes, and the 
means by which they colo- 
nize new springs, has 
remained unknown." 

Bonheyo points out, 
for example, that bacteria 
that exist at 73 degrees 
centigrade cannot simply 
travel across open land to 
another spring. This obser- 
vation led him to wonder how bacteria 
travel. 

The rapid precipitation of calcium 
carbonate in hot springs often results 



Bonheyo points out, 
for example, that 
bacteria that exist at 
73 degrees centigrade 
cannot simply travel 
across open land to 
another spring. This 
observation led him to 
wonder how bacteria 
travel. 



in shifting flows, the sealing off of 
some springs, and the eruption of new 
vents. Last year, the researchers got a 
chance to investigate five new springs 
that erupted at Angel Terrace, part of 
the Mammoth Hot Springs complex. 
The team did find bacteria in the new 
springs. They theorize that while some 
bacteria got there via the subterranean 
water system, others hitched a ride on 
the steam rising from surrounding 
springs. 

"When we witnessed the birth of 
those new springs, the water flowing 
through the ground from the new 
springs initially was only 45 degrees 
centigrade," says Bonheyo. "And the 
only bacteria initially detected by PCR 
in the new spring waters were those 
that we normally find living in cooler 
sections of mature springs. But after 
about 18 hours, the temperature had 
risen to 73 degrees, where it has 

remained. And as the tem- 
perature rose, new bacte- 
ria were detected that are 
found only in the hotter 
regions of the mature 
springs." 

Bonheyo suggests that this 
second group of bacteria 
that need warmer temper- 
atures to survive probably 
traveled by steam from a 
mature spring, but further 
study is needed to prove 
this conclusively. 
This research was funded 
by a University of Illinois 
Critical Research 
Initiatives grant and the 
American Chemical Society Petroleum 
Research Fund. 



RESEARCH 



Hurst Participates in Undersea Discovery 



Stephen Hurst, 
research programmer in 
the Department, was 
part of a group of scien- 
tists to discover a field 
of hydrothermal vents 
with "chimneys" of car- 
bonate and silica that 
are nearly 200 feet 
tall— the tallest ever 
found. This finding was 
reported extensively in 
newspapers and televi- 
sion during December 
2000. 

Hurst, a structural 
geologist, studies fast- 
spreading ocean crusts 
exposed at the Hess 
Deep Rift. Using side- 
scanning sonar, ARGO 
(a remotely operated 
vehicle), and Alvin (a 
three-person sub- 
mersible), scientists like 
Hurst study the seafloor 
and outcrops almost 
two miles below the 
water surface. This was 
Hurst's third voyage on 
board the Atlantis, a 
research vessel owned 
by the U.S. Navy and 
operated by Woods 
Hole Oceanographic 
Institute. 

This particular 
expedition's goal was to 
study the Atlantis Massif, an excep- 
tionally high, flat-topped mountain 
east of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The 
massif is a mass of mantle rock thrust 
up by faulting high above the Atlantis 
transform fault and Mid-Atlantic Ridge 

"The massif appears to have simi- 
lar features and probable genesis to 
mountain chains in our western states 




Photomosaic of an inactive, 
eight-meter-tall carbonate chim- 
ney in the eastern portion of the 
Lost City Field. The calcite, 
aragonite, and brucite chim- 
neys form delicate yet massive 
pinnacles that reach up to 60 
meters (180 feet) in height. 



called 'metamorphic 
core complexes,' that 
are due to extension of 
the crust," says Hurst. 
Hurst looked for evi- 
dence that would help 
identify the timing and 
geologic history of the 
mountain formation. 
He gathered and inter- 
preted high-resolution 
side-scan sonar data 
and electronic images. 
The latter were collect- 
ed using the ARGO II 
remotely operated 
vehicle. Hurst also 
went on three Alvin 
dives that collected 
samples and structural 
data on the massif. 
The chimneys, the 
most surprising finding 
of the expedition, were 
found at the very top 
of the mountain, a 
very unlikely place for 
these formations. In 
addition, the chimneys 
are made of carbonate 
and magnesium miner- 
als rather than sulfur- 
and iron-based miner- 
als, and the water 
spewing from them, 
while scalding, is far 
cooler than that found 
at other chimney sites. 
The structures also were found miles 
west of what would be the normal 
heat source for such vents. 

"The size and extent of the field of 
the chimneys (there are at least 20 and 
possibly many more) suggests that 
they have been around a long time — 
tens if not hundreds of thousands of 
years," says Hurst. 




Lundstrom, Hu 
and Bass Honored 

Craig Lundstrom, 

assistant professor 
of geology, has 
won the RW. 
Clarke Medal of 
the Geochemical 
Society. The 
Clarke Award is a major award made 
annually at the V. M. Goldschmidt 
Conference to an early-career scientist 
for a single outstanding contribution to 
geochemistry or cosmochemistry, pub- 
lished either as a single paper or a 
series of papers on a single topic. 
Lundstrom has won this award for his 
groundbreaking work in the under- 
standing of magmatic processes at 
mid-ocean ridges. 

Feng Sheng Hu, assistant professor of 
plant biology and an adjunct professor 
of geology, received the prestigious 
Packard Fellowship. The $625,000, 
five-year award will support his work 
on global climate change. Hu studies 
how ecosystems and biogeochemical 
processes are affected by global 
change over a long-term, geologic 
time-scale. In addition to studying 
such indicators as pollen and the 
chemical composition of sediments, 
Hu is helping to develop a new area of 
study, called molecular paleoecology. 
This technique uses molecular genetics 
to help identify plant species repre- 
sented by the pollen grains found in 
sediments. Hu was among 24 U.S. 
researchers named 2000 Packard 
Fellows in science and engineering. 
Packard grants are given by the David 
and Lucile Packard Foundation. 

Professor Jay Bass has been inducted 
as a "Fellow" of the Mineralogical 
Society of America in recognition of 
his achievements in mineral physics. 



In the Field 




Top: Students clamber over desert terrains to learn the 
geology of the American Southwest during the spring 2000 
offering of Geology 315/415, led by Professor Steve 
Marshak. 

Left: Students in Geology 315/415 wading to get a closer 
look at a geological feature during a field trip to Curacao 
led by Professor Bruce Fouke in December, 2000. 



Geochemist's Workbench Software Program Used 



A computer software program 
written by Professor Craig Bethke and 
his research team has taken the geo- 
chemistry field by storm. 

The Geochemist's Workbench, 
which has been described as 
"Mathematica for geochemists," makes 
quick work of chores such as balanc- 
ing reactions, calculating equilibrium 
constants, constructing Eh/Ph dia- 
grams, and tracing even very compli- 
cated reaction processes. The software 
works graphically, so users can solve 
problems on their PCs and then paste 
the resulting diagrams directly into 
their documents. The latest release, 
version 3.2, also solves microbiological 
problems. 

"We needed this software to do 



our own work," says Bethke, who stud- 
ies geochemical questions concerning 
remediation of contaminated groundwa- 
ter, safety of injection wells, effects of 
microbes on groundwater quality, and 
the mobility of heavy metals in acid 
mine drainage, among other things. "By 
making the software available to others 
we could hire professional programmers 
to continue to develop and refine it." 

The program is clearly filling a 
strong need. Researchers, in countries as 
diverse as Brazil, South Africa, Egypt, 
Israel, India, China, Taiwan, Japan, 
Korea, Australia, New Zealand, and even 
Slovenia, have licensed the software. 
The program is applied extensively in 
the energy, mineral and environmental 
industries. Bethke is particularly gratified 



that many university departments use the 
software for teaching subjects such as 
environmental science, "green chemistry" 
and geology. 

"People are using the software for 
applications we never even imagined, like 
designing longer-lasting roadways," says 
Bethke. 

The Geochemist's Workbench also is 
being adopted as the standard software at 
most national labs, such as Sandia and 
Lawrence Livermore, as well as govern- 
ment agencies such as the USGS and EPA. 

The first line of Geochemist's 
Workbench was written in 1978 when 
Bethke was a undergraduate student. The 
completed program was first made avail- 
able in 1991. It has been updated periodi- 
cally ever since. 



In the Field 



Hands-On Course fop Non-Majors Is a Success 




10 



Geology 110: Exploring Planet Earth 
in the Field is a field-based course for 
non-majors. It appears to be wildly popu- 
lar among those that take it. The course, 
which has been taught by Steve Altaner 
for the past few years, has an average 
enrollment of about 30-40 students. 

The one-credit course includes a 
three-day camping trip to the Ozarks in 
southeast Missouri and a one-day trip to 
the Starved Rock area of northern Illinois 

"This course has everything that 
geology can offer," says Altaner. "We go 
to very scenic areas in Missouri and 
Illinois; the geology in both places is 
extraordinary; and we start very simple 
and work our way to increasingly com- 
plex concepts." 

The three-day camping trip is the 
high point for many students. 

"Everyone helps, we set up tents, 
cook together, and sit around the camp- 
fire together. Very close friendships grow 
from this," says Altaner. 

"The most important part of this 
course was that the class actually got to 
know each other by name, something 
that is extremely rare in a University 
course," one student wrote in an evalua- 
tion. 



Altaner's goal, in addition to teach- 
ing basic geological concepts to non- 
majors, is to get students to apply scien- 
tific methods in the field. The students 
first make observations, then they inter- 
pret those observations, (i.e., if there is 
sandstone then perhaps the area was 
once a beach), and then pull all the 
observations and interpretations together 
into a geologic history of the area. 

"For me it's remarkable that more 
than 90 percent of the students get it. I 
don't get anywhere near that success rate 



Here Comes the Fun! Students gather for a 
group shot during their Ozark camping 
trip. The African-American student at front, 
center wearing the knit cap is Terrell 
Washington, who plays on the defensive 
line of the football team. Luckily, the fall 
camping trip is always scheduled for the 
only non-football weekend in the semester, 
so Washington could take the course. 
Washington, a St. Louis native, would 
occasionally stop to sign autographs for 
youngsters in the campground. 

Students examine a textbook example of 
an intrusion at Johnson Shut-Ins in the 
Ozark Mountains. Photo courtesy of 
Claudette Roulou. 



in other 100-level courses," says Altaner, 
who also teaches Geology 100: Earth and 
Geology 118; Environmental Geology, as 
well as several upper-level courses. 

During the Ozarks trip students get 
to see the Johnson Shut Ins— a narrow, 
steep-walled canyon— where they can see 
stratigraphy, intrusions, and other geolog- 
ic features. Here they begin to learn to 
interpret what they see. During the 
Starved Rock trip, students get to see 
some fantastic gorges and try to under- 
stand how they may have been formed. 
In addition to Starved Rock itself, stu- 
dents go to Matthiesson State Park, which 
has 100-foot cliffs of pure sandstone; and 
Buffalo State Park, an old strip mine. 

Altaner said over the years a few stu- 
dents have changed their major to geolo- 
gy as the result of taking Geology 110, but 
perhaps even more satisfying is how 
many education majors have taken his 
course. Those students that go into edu- 
cation have a very good basic geology 
education after having taken Geology 110, 
says Altaner. 



In the Field 




Honors Students Get Introduction to Earth Sciences 



Faculty in the Department of 
Geology are striving to introduce all 
undergraduates, not just geology 
majors, to the basics of earth sciences. 
Just as Geology 110 gives non-majors 
an introduction to geology, so Geology 
111 gives students in the honors pro- 
gram the same opportunity. 

The Campus Honors Program 
(CHP) is a small program within the 
university for exceptional students 
looking for a more individualized and 
challenging undergraduate experience. 
Classes are generally limited to about 
18 students. From more than 10,000 
applicants to the University each year, 
the honors program accepts only 125 
new students. They are expected to 
fulfill some general education require- 
ments with honors courses, which are 
typically small, seminar-sized classes 
that rely more on interacting with one 
another than on a large lecture format. 

"It has been a real pleasure, the 
students are highly motivated and 
quite smart," says Jay Bass, professor 
of geology, who has taught Geology 
111: The Dynamic Earth twice so far. 

The course includes a lab and a 
three-day (camping) field trip to the 
Ozarks where students can see geolog- 
ical formations first hand. Bass notes 
that the students have a wide range of 
majors, from music to astronomy. The 
course has proved quite popular with 
those who've taken it. 

"The best part of the class was the 
field trip to Johnson Shut Ins (in the 
Ozarks), says senior Kara Barnes. "We 
were exposed to many of the geologic 
structures that we had talked about in 



the class. Although I haven't taken 
another geology course, Professor Bass 
was one of the main reasons I chose 
the ceramic engineering specialization 
in my major (materials science & engi- 
neering)." 

"The way that I judge a good class 
is by how much material I remember 
after all of the tests are over," says 
junior Valerie Funk. "I still find myself 
looking at the layers in the outcrops 
along the interstate, and my family got 
more than a little tired of my geologi- 
cal comments on our trip to the Grand 
Canyon. Overall, the class was an 



extremely positive learning experi- 
ence, and I have highly recommend- 
ed it to my friends in the Campus 
Honors Program." 

A department that wants to offer 
an honors course has to apply to the 
CHP, give a sample talk and provide 
a syllabus for the proposed course. 
Only a fraction of CHP course pro- 
posals are accepted, and the selec- 
tion process is very competitive. 
Courses need to have some innova- 
tive aspects, and must be taught by 
an experienced faculty member. 



Alumnus David Johnston Remembered on 
Mount St. Helens Anniversary 



The year 2000 marked the 20th anniversary of the eruption of Mount 
St. Helens, which flattened 230 square miles of forest with the force of 
5,000 tons of TNT, making this one of the strongest volcanic eruptions in 
the history of the nation. 

David Johnston, B.S. 71, was manning a United State Geological 
Survey (USGS) post five miles northwest of the mountain when the volcano 
erupted. He sent the now-famous radio transmission to the world announc- 
ing the eruption. 

At 8:32 a.m. on Sunday, May 18, 1980, Johnson called, "Vancouver! 
Vancouver! This is it." 

Those were his last words. 

Johnston, who specialized in volcanoes, was one of 61 people killed in 
the eruption. Though only 30 years old, Johnston had become one of the 
world's experts on explosive composite volcanoes. The USGS has named 
several of its properties after Johnston, including the post at which he 
stood watch during the eruption. 

Many articles have been written about the eruption and Johnston's 
role, most recently in the C-U News-Gazette and in National Geographic 
magazine. More information about Mount St. Helens is available at 
www.nationalgeographic.com 



Department News 



Alberto Nieto, 
Engineering 
Geologist, 
Retires 



"Engineering geologists are a very 
interdisciplinary breed and provide sup- 
port to engineering projects that is 
essential," says Alberto Nieto, an engi- 
neering geologist who retired from the 
Department last September. "I have 
been primarily concerned with solving 
engineering problems that involve 
slopes, underground excavations, dams 
and mines." 

Engineering geologists learn to take 
into account factors that can't always 
be put into equations, such as the 
degree of weathering, fractures and per- 
meability in soil and rock. Their contri- 
butions are particularly important in 
projects such as dams, tunnels, and 
mines, where taking geological factors 
into an engineering project is critical to 
a project's cost and safety. 

Nieto, who taught at the University 
for 26 years, started out as a petroleum 
geologist. After earning his master's 
degree in geology from Washington 
University in St. Louis, he worked for 
an affiliate of Esso for several years, pri- 
marily in South America. In the course 
of that work, Nieto became interested 
in some of the practical aspects of engi- 
neering geology. He became particularly 
concerned for the victims of natural 
and man-made disaster, in countries 
such as Peru, where he is originally 
from. 

Nieto has contributed to a wide 
range of projects throughout his career. 
He has examined deep-well injection 
sites for liquid hazardous waste, stud- 
ied the stability of mines and slopes, 



and helped design various damsites 
both in the U.S. and in Mexico and 
South America. Nieto's skills are much 
in demand in these major building pro- 
jects. His clients have included the U.S. 
Army Corps of Engineers, as well as 
governments in other countries and 
several private companies. 

In addition, Nieto has provided a 
key link between the departments of 
civil engineering and geology. 

"Alberto really made major contri- 
butions linking engineering with geolo- 
gy in his teaching," says Edward 
Cording, professor of civil 
and environmental engi- 
neering at the University 
and a member of the 
National Academy of 
Engineering. "He has often 
encouraged civil engineer- 
ing students to go on to 
take other geology courses, 
such as structural geology, 
groundwater geology or geomorpholo- 
gy. And he's done a good job taking 
students into the field, teaching them 
how to map geological features and 
learn what these characteristics mean to 
the stability of a given project." 

"Professor Nieto is really popular 

Alberto Nieto in Cinque Terre, Italy, where 
he was investigating landslides. 



...Nieto has 
provided a key 
link between the 
departments of 
civil engineering 
and geology. 



with the students," says Todd Cole, B.S. 
'92, M.S. '94, who studied with Nieto 
for his bachelor's, master's and now 
doctorate degrees. "He's also very 
enthusiastic about his field. He's a real- 
ly good teacher. Professor Nieto is also 
very friendly and likes to spend time 
with graduate students even outside of 
class." 

Although he is now retired, Nieto 
plans to continue teaching part time in 
the department of civil and environ- 
mental engineering and continue his 
consulting work. Nieto also would like 
to do more traveling. Recently 
he returned from a four-month 
trip to eastern Europe. While 
based in Bratislava, Slovakia, he 
traveled to Italy, Romania, the 
Czech Republic, Hungary and 
Austria, where he did some lec- 
turing and pro-bono consulting. 

Nieto would also like to 
work on some research projects 
of particular interest to him. One is the 
development of structural units for con- 
struction that would be comparable in 
strength to concrete, but less expensive. 
He hopes this would provide third- 
world countries, where concrete is very 
expensive, a safe, alternative building 
material. 



12 




DEPARTMENT NEWS 



Alumna, Emeritus Faculty Honored at GSA Meeting 




_ Two professors 
I emeriti and an 
alumna of the 
department were 
honored for their 
contributions at 
the annual 
Geological Society 
of America (GSA) 
meeting in Reno, 
Nevada. Richard 
Hay, professor emeritus in the 
Department of Geology, received the 
Rip Rapp Archaeological Geology 
Award. The award, given by the 
archaeological geology division of GSA, 
honors Hay's work from 1962-2000 at 
two important archaeological sites: 
Laetoli and Olduvai Gorge in East 
Africa. Hay's work helped define the 
stratigraphy of these sites, which are 
important because they contain the 
earliest known hominid remains. The 
award, established in 1983, honors out- 
standing career contributions to the 
interdisciplinary field of archaeological 
geology. 

Hay served as the Ralph Grim 
Professor of Geology at the University 
of Illinois from 1983-1997. While at 
Illinois, he made significant contribu- 
tions to the understanding of auto- 
genic feldspar formation and taught 
popular courses in petrology. Hay and 
his wife, Lynn, now live in Tucson, 
Arizona, where Hay continues his 
work in geology. 

Suzanne Mahlburg Kay, B.S. '69, 
M.S. 72, professor of geology at 
Cornell University, was awarded the 
GSA Distinguished Service Award for 
her work as GSA Today science editor 
from 1996-1999. Faith Rogers, manag- 
ing editor at GSA, said in her citation 



that Kay, "with her record of achieve- 
ment in working where logistics are 
challenging (the Aleutians and the 
Andes) accomplished the nearly 
impossible — getting authors with inter- 
esting stories to put those stories into 
readable form, with eye-catching 
graphics and submit them in time to 
be reviewed, revised, and edited for 
the next issue of GSA Today. ... We are 
fortunate that she accepted the chal- 
lenge of fitting GSA Today editorial 
tasks into her already packed life." 

Emeritus professor 
George D. Klein 

won the Laurence 
L. Sloss award for 
Sedimentary 
Geology from the 
Geological Society 
of America. Klein 
is only the second 
winner of this 
annual award. 
The Sloss award was established to 
celebrate those who emulate the out- 
standing achievements of Laurence 
Sloss in the field of sedimentary geolo- 
gy and in exemplary service to GSA. 
Kathleen M. Marsaglia, B.S. 79, M.S. 
'82, delivered the citation. 

Klein, who was on the faculty 
from 1970-1993, is best known and 
most widely cited for his work in tidal 
processes and facies, having published 
two books and more than 30 journal 
articles on tidal processes and modern 
and ancient tidalites, a term he coined. 
Tidalites are sediments deposited by 
tidal currents and associated processes. 
More recently, he has made significant 
contributions to the literature on the 
origin of cyclothems and the tectonics 
of sedimentary basins. 




Klein has been a very active mem- 
ber of the GSA. He has attended and 
presented papers at approximately 30 
GSA annual meetings, edited two GSA 
Special Papers, published nine articles 
in the Bulletin, and eight articles in 
Geology. Klein also served as the 
founding chair and past-chair of the 
GSA Sedimentary Geology Division. 
During his service as chair, member- 
ship jumped from 5 to 1,500, making 
this the fourth largest division within 
GSA. 

In his acceptance speech, Klein 
said, "I tell all of you very frankly that 
if it weren't for the fact that I accepted 
a faculty appointment at the University 
of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, I 
would not be accepting the Laurence 
L. Sloss Award today. I want to thank 
the University of Illinois for having 
offered me a position on its faculty 
because in certain respects, that uni- 
versity is a very unique place. First, the 
administration there knew how to fos- 
ter, encourage and facilitate faculty 
research. Second, I had some great col- 
leagues there, including one with 
whom I wrote several research papers. 
Third, the University of Illinois has 
what I call "institutional momentum." 
I discovered that wherever I went in 
the USA and the world and whenever I 
introduced myself as a professor of 
geology at the University of Illinois, 
doors opened, access was provided, 
appointments were scheduled and met, 
opportunities were opened up to me, 
and opportunities to do things were 
accepted." 



13 



Windows into the Past 



Geology Moves on at Illinois: 



Benjamin C. Jillson and Charles Wesley Rolfe 



By Ralph Langenheim, Emeritus Professor 



Regent Peabody's removal of Don 
Carlos Taft as professor of Geology and 
Zoology in 1881 (see article in the 1999 
Department of Geology Year in Review) 
set off an extended search for a replace- 
ment. Stephen Forbes, then at Normal 
(now Illinois State) , was the first offered 
the position but declined because 
arrangements could not be made to 
transfer the State Laboratory of Natural 
History and the State Entomologist's 
Office, headed by him, from 
Bloomington to Urbana. (In 1884 these 
were transferred to Urbana, at which 
time Forbes accepted the professorship 
in zoology and went on to a distin- 
guished career.) 

Peabody's next offer went to David 
Starr Jordan, a prominent ichthyologist 
then at Indiana University. Jordan also 
declined, saying he "was very little 
pleased with the (University's) sur- 
roundings, geographically speaking ..." 

Peabody's third choice, Benjamin C. 
Jillson, accepted the professorship of 
zoology and geology in 1882. Jillson 
had an M.D. from the University of 
Nashville and a Ph.D. from Lafayette 
College. He also had attended the 
Sheffield Scientific School and had pub- 
lished at least one geologic paper, 
Geology of Allegheny Co., Pa., 1886, 
Trans. Med. Soc. Pa., vol. 4 No. 2, p. 42- 
46. Jillson's main contribution to 
University of Illinois geology was initiat- 
ing laboratory instruction, the lack of 
which had been one of Peabody's rea- 
sons for "evicting" Taft. 

However, Jillson was not well 
respected by the students. In spring, 
1883, an anonymous student publica- 
tion declared, "'Blasted Crank' Jillson 
ignorant of the subjects he taught" and 
suggested that a "change of climate 
would be good for his health." Whether 




Charles Wesley Rolfe was an energetic 
administrator and teacher. 

related to this or not, Jillson retired in 
1884 ... to become an Army surgeon. 

Peabody then appointed Charles 
Wesley Rolfe, a member of the 
University's first graduating class (1872) 
and a student of Taft's. After graduating, 
Rolfe had worked for a year as "Assistant 
in the Natural History Department" and 
then held positions in several Illinois 
public and private schools. 

In 1881 Rolfe returned to the 
University. For three years, he taught 
mathematics and assisted Thomas 
Jonathan Burrill. Burrill, one of the 
three original members of the faculty, 
taught algebra, natural history, botany, 
and horticulture. In 1884, Rolfe was 
appointed assistant professor of natural 
history, and was responsible for teach- 
ing geology and many other courses. He 
remained head of the geology program 
until his retirement in 1917. 



From 1897 until his death, Rolfe 
lived in Taft's former house at 601 E. 
John St., which he had purchased from 
Taft's son, Lorado. More recently, the 
house was moved to 1401 S. Maryland 
Ave., near Mt. Hope Cemetery, to make 
way for the Swanlund Administration 
Building. Still standing, the Taft/Rolfe 
house now is used by the 4-H 
Foundation and the College of ACES 
(Agricultural, Consumer and 
Environmental Sciences). 

Rolfe was an energetic administra- 
tor and teacher. In the early years of his 
tenure, he taught, with some assistance, 
all of the geology courses then offered, 
including (in modern terms) physical 
and historical geology, paleontology, 
mineralogy, geomorphology, field geolo- 
gy, structural geology and economic 
geology. In addition, he taught physiolo- 
gy, veterinary science, and bookkeeping, 
and, for several years, was the 
University librarian. When President 
Draper persuaded the Trustees to fund a 
project to domesticate the squirrels on 
campus, Rolfe added the post of "squir- 
rel master" to his list of responsibilities. 

As head of the geology program, 
Rolfe eventually presided over a staff of 
three professors— William S. Bayley, T.E. 
Savage, and John Rich — each of whom 
were or became prominent national fig- 
ures in their respective fields. In addi- 
tion, a series of assistants included 
several who became prominent 
national figures in geology. Thus, the 
Department of Geology had evolved 
from a strictly undergraduate, largely 
service organization to an embryonic 
graduate program with an active 
research program. 

Rolfe published five scientific 
papers between 1889 and 1908 and one 
in 1931. His first paper was a 16-page 



14 



1952 Group Photo Revisited 



comment on the characters of distrib- 
ution of brachiopods. This was fol- 
lowed by two papers on hydrogeology 
and an additional two on the geology 
of clays and the distribution of paving 
brick material in Illinois. Rolfe's final 
paper was an historical account of 
geologic studies in Illinois prior to 
establishment of the present State 
Geological Survey. In 1892, the tireless 
Rolfe also created a model of the 
topography of the state, county by 
county. The plaster relief model, 
which was displayed at the Chicago 
World's Fair of 1893, took him 18 
months to complete. 

Rolfe also was instrumental in 
initiating the university's program in 
ceramics, actively promoting legisla- 
tion to establish the program and 
serving for eight years as the first 
head of what later became the 
Department of Ceramic Engineering. 
He facilitated the development of an 
active research program in ceramic 
engineering. 

From 1894 on, Rolfe advocated 
establishing the present Illinois State 
Geological Survey (ISGSJ and was a 
significant participant in negotiations 
toward that goal, which was achieved 
in 1905. Rolfe also pushed to locate 
the ISGS on the Urbana campus. 

Even when retired, Rolfe 
remained on campus, maintaining 
contact with the University until his 
death in 1934 at the age of 83. At the 
time of his death, Rolfe was the oldest 
living faculty member and one of a 
handful of survivors of the 
University's first graduating class. He 
can, perhaps, be seen as the true 
"father" of the Illinois Geology 
Department's programs in clays, 
groundwater and, perhaps Pleistocene 
geology and geomorphology. 





We have had many responses to the photo we published in the last Yearbook with sev- 
eral people contributing more identifications. 

Jack Burgess, B.S. '49, writes that no. 29 is Frank Staplin and no. 31 is Byrd Berman. 

Robert Doehler, B.S. '51, M.S. S3, Ph.D. '57, writes, "I feel certain that no. 27 is 
Patrick Byrne, who worked in clay minerals with Professor Grim. No. 36 is Eugene 
Williams, who was the graduate assistant in optical mineralogy when I took the course. 
No. 42 is Robert Fox and no. 43 is Robert Fuchs. 1 believe, though I'm not 100 percent 
certain that no. 21 is lack Shelton and no. 35 is Bob Brockhouse. ""Please convey my 
thanks to Professor Henderson for supplying this photo along with the identifications. 
Here's hoping that one day soon it will be completed." 

Lyle Eberly, M.S. '57, (number 28 in the photo) writes that no. 21 is John Shelton, no. 
27 is Patrick Byrne, no. 28 is himself, no 31 is Byrd Berman, graduate assistant, no. 32 
is Charlie Hardie, graduate assistant, no. 33 Eugene Frund, graduate assistant, no. 35 
Robert Brockhouse, no. 36 Eugene Williams, graduate assistant, no. 42 Robert Fox, no. 
44 John Burgener, graduate assistant. 

Lou Putler, Ph.D. '69, writes, "the 1952 photo of the faculty is grand ... Hough, 
Wanless, Scott, Chapman, Grim and White ... but most memorable is ROSA NICKELL!!" 
(Editor's note: Rosa Nickell (number 1 in the photo) was the Geology Department leg- 
endar\i secretary for many years in the mid-20th century. In fact, most would say that 
she ran the department!) 

John W. Shelton also added some identifications to the group photo. In addition to 
those listed above, Shelton identified no. 39 as John Chapman. Shelton also provided 
the following photograph from the 1950 Field Camp at Ft. Lewis A & M College, 
Hesperus, CO. Those who would like to fill in the blanks, please do so! 

Leonard Schultz 
Hal Wanless 
Warren Ziebell 

Spangler 

Wade McCormick 
Charlie Hardie 
Stuart Grossman 
John Hathaway 
Dr. Wanless 
Dr. Mervil 
Don Baird 
Don Sprouse 
Sellards ?? 




Boh Zirkle 
John Shelton 
Andy Seslak 



1^ 



Alumni News 




a 



Steve Sroka in Dinosaurland 



Vernal, Utah, population 7,000, is 
tucked in the northeastern corner of 
Utah, but Steve Sroka, Ph.D. '96, aims 
to make it a magnet for people interest- 
ed in the geology and paleontology of 
the Uinta Basin. 

"Our goal is to be the interpretive 
center for the entire Uinta basin and 
mountain region with an emphasis on 
the geology and paleontology of the 
area," says Sroka, director of the Utah 
Field House of Natural History in 
Vernal. 

The museum staff is in the process 
of raising money to enlarge the muse- 
um's exhibit space from 14,000 to 
22,000 square feet and to improve the 
exhibits so that anyone interested in the 
natural history of the region will know 
to come to the Field House. The muse- 
um averages about 115,000 visitors 
annually and also houses the 
Northeastern Utah Visitor Center where 
information on other area attractions is 
given out. 

As director, Sroka is responsible for 
general administration tasks, including 
budgets, funding, public relations and 
marketing. He also oversees the inter- 
pretive programs and collection work, 
including redesign of the collections to 
make them more relevant and interest- 
ing to visitors. Sroka supervises a staff 
of three full-time employees and five 
seasonal workers. 

One way Sroka is working to make 
the Field House the best regional muse- 
um is by forming partnerships with 
other institutions. For example, Sroka 
has established a partnership with 
Dinosaur National Monument, which is 
just 20 miles to the east. Sroka, along 




Steve Sroka on top of the 
Salt Wash dip slope with 
Brushy Basin Member in 
the background. 



with museum curator Sue Ann Bilbey, 
are working with monument scientists on 
joint research projects involving 
dinosaurs from the Morrison Formation. 
In addition, the monument and museum 
staff are planning a combined state-of- 
the-art curation facility. This facility will 
be a repository of specimens excavated at 
the monument, as well as other federal 
land. The museum may also be a place 
where specimens collected at the monu- 
ment could be displayed. This is the first 
such partnership for both the monument 
and the field house. 

Sroka also is in the process of creat- 
ing a summer program for college teach- 
ers, in conjunction with colleague Russ 
Jacobson (a.k.a. "Dino Russ"), acting 
head of the Coal Section of the Illinois 
State Geologic Survey. One program 
would involve field work in vertebrate 
and invertebrate paleontology. Ultimately 
Sroka and Jacobson hope to have a quar- 
ry setting where teachers and students 
can gain hands-on dinosaur excavating 
experience. Sroka and Jacobson have run 
such digs for the past decade in South 
Dakota and Wyoming. 

The second type of program is a tour 
of the "Dinosaur Diamond," an area in 
eastern Utah and Colorado demarcated 
by Grand Junction, Moab, Price and 
Vernal. The tour would look at both the 
dinosaurs and the geology of the region 
and is open to both teachers and stu- 
dents. Sroka and Bilbey also are working 
to expand the geology curriculum of the 
Utah State University campus branch at 
Vernal, ultimately establishing a field pro- 
gram based in Vernal. 

Although it is not part of his official 
duties, Sroka gets out the field about 



16 



once a month. Currently Sroka is exca- 
vating what he thinks is a bipedal camp- 
tosaurus and Bilbey is working on a 
brand-new species of sauropod. 

"Vernal is a geologist's and paleon- 
tologist's dream area," says Sroka. I can 
go out to the field, be back for lunch 
and have seen 13 geologic units in that 
time. " 

Sroka credits the University of 
Illinois with giving him a great experi- 
ence. 

"I came to Illinois to study with 
Dan Blake, who is one of the world's 
leading paleontologists and an excellent 
advisor." 

While here, Sroka worked in the 
Natural History Museum helping with 
the collections and some computer 
work. He also worked at the Illinois 
State Geological Survey in the coal, oil 
and gas sections. After getting his doc- 
torate, working for about a year as an 
associate editor for the Journal of 
Paleontology, and helping with the 
department's paleontology collections, 
Sroka headed to the Grand River 
Museum in South Dakota. He worked 
there for nearly two years helping the 
community establish a brand-new 
museum. 

After his stay in South Dakota, 
Sroka was hired as the director for the 
Field House. Sroka is the first paleontol- 
ogist with museum experience and a 
Ph.D. to be director of the museum. 
Because the Field House is part of the 
Utah state park system, prior directors 
have been law enforcement officers. 
"I'm the first director who hasn't had to 
go through formal law enforcement 
training," says Sroka. 

Sroka urges all alumni, faculty, stu- 
dents and staff to visit Vernal. "It's basi- 
cally on the way to field camp," he 
notes. "Everyone is welcome." 



Obituaries 



Alumni News 



Prasada C. Rao, Ph.D. '70, a 

student of Albert Carozzi's, died in 
September, 1999. He was 62. Rao 
was born in India and studied at 
the University of Mysore. He then 
moved to Illinois where he 
received his Ph.D. His dissertation 
concerned the microfacies and sta- 
tistical petrography of carbonates 
from the Ste. Genevieve Formation 
(Mississippian of Illinois). After 
working for two years at the 
Illinois State Geological Survey, 
Rao joined the Department of 
Geology at the University of 
Tasmania, Hobart, where he rose 
to the rank of Professor. Rao 
worked on both modern and 
ancient carbonates in a variety of 
environments. He is perhaps best 
known for his work on cold-water 
periglacial carbonates related to 
Permian Gondwana glaciations in 
Australia and Tasmania, and for 
his work on modern cold-water 
carbonate sediments in the Tasman 
Sea. In addition to publishing 
scholarly papers, he published two 



books: A Colour Illustrated Guide to 
Sedimentary Textures: Cold Cool Warm 
Hot, and Modern Carbonates: Tropical 
Temperate Polar. 

Margaret Frances Harper Lehde, 
B.S. '34, died November 9, 2000. Lehde 
taught geology at the University of 
Illinois and worked for the Illinois State 
Geological Survey. She was a member 
of the University of Illinois Geology 
Department Alumni Association and the 
University of Illinois Alumni 
Association. 

Lehde, who was born Margaret 
Frances Harper, was married in 1939 to 
Arthur W. Lehde, the first blind student 
to graduate from the University of 
Illinois. The two met when Arthur 
Lehde took a geology course Margaret 
Lehde was teaching in the University's 
Department of Geology.. 

In 1943, Lehde established, with 
her husband, a very successful insur- 
ance agency. They worked together in it 
until Lehde's husband died in 1988. 

Lehde never lost her love of geolo- 
gy. She enjoyed telling friends and fami- 



ly of her experiences on geology 
field trips with Dr. Harold Wanless, 
especially to the Black Hills of South 
Dakota; of her years studying and 
teaching geology at both Smith 
College and the University of 
Illinois; and her experiences at the 
Illinois Geological Survey. Even 
while gardening she kept a sharp 
eye out for interesting rocks. 

Lehde's children, Anthony 
Lehde and Neva Lehde Fulton, 
wrote, "Mom had many warm mem- 
ories of the University of Illinois and 
the Department of Geology and 
never lost sight of the impact both 
had on her life." 

Maxwell Gage, a visiting pro- 
fessor in the Geology Department in 
1952-53 died on June 1, 2000. He 
was living in New Zealand. His wife, 
Molly Rose, died in 1999. 

Paul Shaffer, geology professor 
from 1947-1965, died last November 
at his home in Marysville, Ohio. He 
was 90 years old. 



Class News 




Margaret Leinen, B.S. '69, has been named 
the head of the National Science Foundation 
(NSF) geosciences directorate. She began this 
position in January 2000. Leinen, who was dean 
of the Graduate School of Oceanography and vice 
provost for Marine and Environmental Programs 
at the University of Rhode Island, will be respon- 
sible for coordinating environmental science and 
engineering programs within NSF, and for environ 
mental cooperation and collaborations between NSF and other federal agen- 
cies. She will manage an annual budget of approximately $470 million. 

Leinen is a well-known researcher in paleoceanography and paleoclima- 
tology. Her work focuses on the historv of biogenic sedimentation in the 
oceans and its relationship to global biogeochemical cycles and the history o 
eolian sedimentation in the oceans and its relationship to climate. Leinen 
replaced Robert W. Corell, who held this position since 1987. 



Leinen in the field circa 1967 



Seventies 



Owen L. White, Ph.D. '70, has edit- 
ed a book, titled Urban Geology of 
Canadian Cities, with P.F. Karrow, who 
is also a graduate of the department. 
Contributors to the book include depart- 
ment graduates John S. Scott and E.A. 
Christiansen. White has been retired 
from the Ontario Geological Survey since 
1991. E-mail: owen.white@sympatico.ca 



Eighties 



Jim Haslett, B.S. '81, has moved to 
back to Flagstaff from southern 
California. He is self-employed, working 
as an environmental consultant to com- 
panies in Arizona and California. "I get 
to work out of my home, and I'm only 
minutes from the greatest geology on 



17 



Alumni News 



Awards and Degrees 



Earth," he writes. E-mail: 
geologygod@aol.com 

Lee Hirsch, B.S. '81, is now 

embarking on a two-year volunteer 
assignment teaching physics for the 
Peace Corps in Tanzania. "Tanzania is a 
really beautiful country and I am very 
excited as 1 begin this adventure," he 
writes. Lee's mailing address is: c/o 
Peace Corps Tanzania, 36 Zambia Road, 
Box 9123, Dar es Salaam, TANZANIA 

Kathleen M. Marsaglia, B.S. '79, 
M.S. '82, is now assistant professor at 
the department of geological sciences at 
California State University, Northridge. 
She was previously senior reservoir 
petrologist/geologist at Westport 
Technology Center International in 
Houston. 

After 25 years as geologist at the 
Illinois State Geological Survey in 
Champaign/Urbana, Janis Treworgy, 
Ph.D. '85, and her husband, Colin, have 
moved to St. Louis. Treworgy has joined 
the faculty at Principia College in Elsah, 
111. "This is an exciting new opportunity 
for the whole family!" she writes. 
E-mail: janisdt@principia.edu 

Nineties 

Alex Glass, B.S. '98, has returned 
from The Ohio State University (where 
he earned his master's degree) to contin- 
ue his paleontological work on brittle- 
stars and starfish with Dan Blake. While 
at Ohio, Glass studied with Bill Ausich, 
B.S. 74. "Bill was a great advisor, he 
was very enthusiastic about sharing his 
knowledge and love for crinoids with 
me," says Glass. 

Jennifer Jackson, B.S. '98, a math 
education major and a geology minor, 
has returned to the Department for her 
doctoral program. Jackson went to Notre 
Dame for master's degree. While there 
she worked with Peter Burns (who was 
a visiting professor at the University of 
Illinois from 1996-97). Jackson is work- 
ing with Professor Jay Bass. 




Seniors Frannie Skomurski (center) and Megan Elwood are pictured receiving departmental 
awards from Stephen Marshak, department head, last spring. Skomurski received the Estwing 
Award and Elwood received the Geology Alumni Award for Outstanding Senior. Senior Laura 
Swan also received the Midwest Research Scholarship Award last spring. In addition, several 
graduate students received awards. Joe Schoen received outstanding teaching assistant, Aubrey 
Zerkle and Jennifer Jackson were named outstanding woman graduate students, and Serena Lee, 
Mike Harrison, Tony Gibson, and Zerkle received Morris M. and Ada B. Leighton Memorial Fund 
awards. 



Degrees Conferred in 2000 



Bachelor of Science Degrees 

January 

David John Beedy 
Andrew Michael Collins 
Steven Michael Rick 

May 

Rebecca Henszey Ashton 
Kelcey Emma Dalton 
Jolene Elizabeth Einhouse 
Megan Erica Elwood 
David Michael Kulczycki 
Lisa Marie Noe 
Christy Marie Palmer 
Susan Gardner Riggins 
Yuki Jamie Shinbori 

August 

Philip Michael Johanek 
Kristine Lynn Mize 



Master of Science Degrees 

January '00 

Roberto Hernandez, Geometry and Kinematics of 
Thrust-Related Deformation Between the Petrolea and 
Aguardiente Structures, in the Catatumbo Subbasin, 
Colombia (Stephen Marshak) 

Christopher S. McGarry, Regional Fracturing of the 
Galena-Platteville Aquifer in Boone and Winnebago 
Counties, Illinois: Geometry, Connectivity and 
Tectonic Significance (Stephen Marshak) 

May '00 

Dylan Pierce Canavan, Early Meteoric Calcite 
Cementation in Pleistocene Sands of the Banner 
Formation, Mahomet Valley Aquifer, Central Illinois, 
USA (Bruce Fouke) 

August '00 

Yoshie Hagiwara, Selenium Isotope Ratios in Marine 
Sediments and Algae - A Reconaissance Study (Tom 
Johnson) 

Judd Sun Tudor, Regional Deformation Analysis in 
the Devonian Catskill Formation Surrounding the 
Lackawanna Synclinorium, NE Pennsylvania 
(Stephen Marshak) 



Honor Roll of donors for 2000 



The following is a list of friends and alumni of the Geology Department who have donated to the University during the calendar year 2000. 
We regret not publishing a similar list in the 1999 "Year in Review." We hope to make this a regular feature of all future annual newsletters. 



Glen P. Anderson 
Thomas F. Anderson 
Franklin Andrews 
Robert F. Babb II 
Rodney J. Balazs 
Debbie E. Baldwin 
Mr. and Mrs. James E. 

Bales 
Margaret H. Bargh 
Dr. and Mrs. David K. 

Beach 
William M. Benzel 
Craig M. Bethke 
Abigail E. Bethke 
Marion E. Bickford 
Heidi Blischke 
Bruce F. Bohor 
Eugene W. Borden Sr. 
Joseph E. Boudreaux 
James C. Bradbury 
Mr. and Mrs. Allen S. 

Braumiller 
Annette Brewster 
Mr. and Mrs. Ross D. 

Brower 
Robert L. Brownfield 
Glenn R. Buckley 
Susan B. Buckley 
Mr. and Mrs. Edwin F. 

Bushman 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard J. 

Cassin 
James W. Castle 
Dr. and Mrs. Thomas L. 

Chamberlin 
Charles J. Chantell 
Mr. and Mrs. Lester W. 

Clutter 
Lorence G. Collins 
Barbara J. Collins 
Virginia A. Colten-Bradley 
Michelle M. Corlew 
Thomas E. Covington 
Lucinda E. Cummins 
Norbert E. Cygan 
George H. Davis 
Ilham Demir 
Mr. and Mrs. M. Peter 

deVries 
Richard E. Dobson 
Sophie M. Dreifuss 
William W. Dudley Jr. 
Mohamed T. El-Ashry 
John S. Esser 
Harold H. Falzone 
Kenneth T. Feldman 
Mr. and Mrs. Dale C. 

Finley Jr. 
Gary M. Fleeger 
Richard M. Forester 
Jack D. Foster 



Robert E. Fox 

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin H. 

Franklin 
Gordon S. Fraser 
Barry R. Gager 
James C. Gamble 
John R. Garino 
Theresa C. Gierlowski 
Richard A. Gilman 
Robert N. Ginsburg 
Hal Gluskoter 
Charles J. Gossett 
Dr. and Mrs. Albert L. 

Guber 
Tom Guensburg 
Latif S. Hamdan 
Brian T. Hamilton 
Edwin E. Hardt 
Catherine L. Harms 
Richard L. Hay 
Daniel O. Hayba 
Darrell N. Helmuth 
Mark A. Helper 
Lee M. Hirsch 
Henry A. Hoff 
Mr. and Mrs. Mark F. 

Hoffman 
Eric J. Holdener 
John C. Home 
Mr. and Mrs. Glen A. 

Howard 
Arthur M. Hussey II 
Roscoe G. Jackson II 
Joseph M. Jakupcak 
Steven F. Jamrisko 
Martin V. Jean 
John E. Jenkins 
William D. Johns Jr. 
Bruce A. Johnson 
Donald 0. Johnson 
Mr. and Mrs. Eric M. 

Johnson 
Kenneth S. Johnson 
Edward C. Jonas 
Dr. and Mrs. Frank R. 

Karner 
Suzanne Mahlburg Kay 
George H. Keller 
John P. Kempton 
Mark L. Kerasotes 
Dr. and Mrs. John D. Kiefer 
R. James Kirkpatrick 
Theodore A. Koelsch 
Christopher P. Korose 
Paul Kraatz 
Robert F. Kraye 
Thomas E. Krisa 
Mr. and Mrs. Scott R. 

Krueger 
Jean B. Kulla 
Willard C. Lacy 



Richard W. Lahann 
Michael B. Lamport 
Rik E. Lantz 
Steven W. Leavitt 
Stephen C. Lee 
Rebecca M. Leefers 
Hannes E. Leetaru 
Margaret Frances Lehde 

Estate (DEC) 
Morris W. Leighton 
Margaret Leinen 
Russell B. Lennon 
Robert W Leonard 
William D. Lieb 
Walter A. Locker Jr. 
Crystal G. Lovett 
Michael T. Lukert 
Bernard W. Lynch 
Rob Roy Macgregor 
Mr. and Mrs. John W. 

Marks 
Stephen and Kathryn 

Marshak 
James L. Mason Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Alan R. May 
Robert S. Mayer 
E. Donald McKay III 
Cheryl B. Miller 
James A. Miller 
Linda A. Minor 
David B. Mitcheltree 
Laurie D. Benton 
John D. Mitchler 
John S. Moore 
Prof, and Mrs. Wayne E. 

Moore 
Sharon Mosher 
Ernest H. Muller 
Robert E. Murphy 
Haydn H. Murray 
Robert E. Myers 
Mr. and Mrs. Mike S. Nash 
Howard R. Naslund 
Bruce W Nelson 
W John Nelson 
Mr. and Mrs. Brian D. Noel 
Charles H. Norris 
William A. Oliver Jr. 
Phillip G. Orozco 
Edmond G. Otton 
Mrs. Lucile F. Otton (DEC) 
Michael R. Owen 
Roderick J. Padgett 
Norman J. Page 
Katherine A. Panczak 
Dr. and Mrs. Richard R. 

Parizek 
Corinne Pearson 
Russel A. Peppers 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. 

Pflum 



Mr. and Mrs. Bruce E. 

Phillips 
Dr. and Mrs. Jack W. Pierce 
Dr. and Mrs. Robert I. 

Pinney 
Paul L. Plusquellec 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard J. 

Powers 
Raymond W Rail 
Elizabeth P. Rail 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard K. 

Rapp 
Paul J. Regorz 
Donald 0. Rimsnider 
Robert W. Ringler 
Mr. and Mrs. George S. 

Roadcap 
Nancy M. Rodriguez 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward L. 

Rosenthal 
Jeffrey A. Ross 
Mark D. Russell 
Suzanne J. Russell 
Tim Rynott 
Gayla F. Sargent 
Michael L. Sargent 
Jay R. Scheevel 
Mark H. Scheihing 
Detmar Schnitker 
Dr. and Mrs. Leonard G. 

Schultz 
David C. Schuster 
Franklin W Schwartz, PhD 
Diana P. Schwartz 
Martha G. Schwartz 
Paul R. Seaber 
Dr. and Mrs. John W. 

Shelton 
Jack A. Simon 
D. Leroy Sims 
Roger A. Sippel 
Stephen A. Smith 
Eric P. Sprouls 
Gary D. Strieker 
Daniel A. Textoris 
Dr. and Mrs. J. Cotter 

Tharin 
David S. Thiel 
Mr. and Mrs. Jack C. 

Threet 
Edwin W Tooker 
Kenneth M. Towe 
Mark J. Triebold 
John B. Tubb Jr. 
Robert G. Vanderstraeten 
Robert W. Von Rhee 
Dr. and Mrs. F. Michael 

Wahl 
Harriet E. Wallace 
James G. Ward 
Michael R. Warfel 



Carleton W Weber 
W F. Weeks 
Jack L. Wilber 
William W Wilson 
Paul A. Witherspoon Jr. 
Ramil C. Wright 
Roland F. Wright 
Lawrence Wu 
Mary Yarnell 
Valentine E. Zadnik 
William B. Zartman 
Robert A. Zebell 

Corporations 

AlliedSignal Inc. 
American Chemical Society 
BP Amoco Foundation 
Charitable Gift Fund 
Chevron Matching Grants 

Program 
Chevron Petroleum 

Technology Company 
Dominion Resources 

Services, Inc. 
The Elizabeth Morse 

Charitable Trust 
ExxonMobil Foundation 
GeoCrown, Inc. 
H. H. Murray & Associates, 

Inc. 
Harris Bank Foundation 
Hewlett-Packard Company 
Idaho National Engineering 

and 
National Semiconductor 

Corporation 
Orion International Limited 
Pacific Geology 

Consultants, Inc. 
Peoples Energy 

Corporation 
Petroleum Research Fund 
PG&E 
Shell Oil Company 

Foundation 
Tetra Tech EM Inc. 
Texaco Foundation 
Texaco Incorporated 
Union League Club of 

Chicago 
Union Pacific Resources 

Group Inc. 
USX Foundation Inc. 



19 



Annual report for 2000 



Faculty 

Stephen P. Altaner, associate professor 

Jay D. Bass, professor 

Craig M. Bethke, professor 

Daniel B. Blake, professor 

Chu-Yung Chen, associate professor 

Wang-Ping Chen, professor 

Bruce W. Fouke, assistant professor 

Albert T. Hsui, professor 

Thomas M. Johnson, assistant professor 

R. James Kirkpatrick, professor and executive 

associate dean 
Craig C. Lundstrom, assistant professor 
Stephen Marshak, professor and head 
Xiaodong Song, assistant professor 

Visiting Faculty 

Richard Beane, visiting assistant professor 
Michael J. Handke, visiting lecturer 
John Werner, visiting assistant professor 

Academic Staff, Post-Docs, 
Visiting Scholars 

Deb Aronson, yearbook editor 
George Bonheyo, post-doctoral researcher 
Marguerite Carozzi, research associate 
Richard Hedin, research programmer 
Eileen Herrstrom, teaching lab specialist 
Stephen Hurst, research programmer 
Andrey Kalinichev, senior research scientist 
Lalita Kalita, research programmer 
Joanne Kluessendorf, research associate 
Ann Long, visiting teaching lab specialist 
Hiroaki Noma, visiting scholar 
Stanislav Sinogeikin, visiting scholar 
Frank Schilling, visiting scholar 
Frank Tepley, post-doctoral researcher 
Raj Vanka, resource and policy analyst 
Alan Whittington, post-doctoral researcher 
Xinong Xie, visiting scholar 



Library Staff 



Emeritus Faculty 



David E. Anderson 

Thomas F. Anderson 

Albert V. Carozzi 

Carleton A. Chapman 

Donald L. Graf 

Arthur F. Hagner 

Richard L. Hay 

Donald M. Henderson 

George deV. Klein 

Ralph L. Langenheim 

C. John Mann 

Alberto S. Nieto (beginning August 2000) 

Philip A. Sandberg 



Adjunct Faculty 



20 



Keros Cartwright (ISGS) 

Heinz H. Damberger (ISGS) 

Leon R. Follmer (ISGS) 

Feng Sheng Hu (Plant Biology) 

Dennis Kolata (ISGS) 

Morris W. Leighton (ISGS) 

John McBride (ISGS) 

William Shilts (ISGS) 

M. Scott Wilkerson (DePauw University) 



Sheila McGowan (Chief Library Clerk) 
Diana Walter (Library Technical 

Specialist) 
Greg Youngen (Acting Head Librarian) 

Staff 

Michelle Campbell (Clerk) 
Barbara Elmore (Administrative 

Secretary) 
Eddie Lane (Electronics Engineering 

Assistant) 
Pamela Rank (Account Technician II), 

until June 2000 
Michael Sczerba (Clerical Assistant) 
Sue Standifer (Clerical Assistant), until 

November 2000 

Graduate Students 

David Beedy 
Peter Berger 
Michael Brudzinski 
Kurtis Burmeister 
Dylan Canavan 
Amanda Duchek 
Andre Ellis 
Michael Fortwengler 
Anthony Gibson 
Stephanie Gillain 
Alex Glass 
Keith Hackley 
Yoshie Hagiwara 
Michael Harrison 
Xiaoqiang Hou 
Jennifer Jackson 
Qusheng Jin 
Dmitry Lakshtanov 
Serena Lee 
Christopher Mah 
Peter Malecki 
Jungho Park 
George Roadcap 
Joseph Schoen 
Xinlei Sun 
Jian Tian 
Tai-Lin Tseng 
Richard Wachtman 
Matthew Wander 
Jianwei Wang 
Xiaoxia Xu 
Zhaohui Yang 
Aubrey Zerkle 
Juanzuo Zhou 



Courses Taught in 2000 



Geol 100 - 


Planet Earth 


Geol 101 - 


Introduction to Physical 




Geology 


Geol 104 - 


Geology of the National Parks 




and Monuments 


Geol 107 - 


General Geology I 


Geol 108 - 


General Geology II 


Geol 110 - 


Planet Earth - Lab/Field 


Geol 116 - 


Geology of the Planets 


Geol 117 - 


The Oceans 


Geol 118 - 


Earth and the Environment 


Geol 143 - 


History of Life 


Geol 233 - 


Earth Materials and the 




Environment 


Geol 250 - 


Geology for Engineers 


Geol 311 - 


Structural Geology and 




Tectonics' 


Geol 315 - 


Field Geology (field trip to 




Arizona abd California) 


Geol 317 - 


Geologic Field Methods, 




Western United States (Field 




Camp) 


Geol 320 - 


Introduction to Paleontology 


Geol 332 - 


Mineralogy and Mineral Optics 


Geol 336 - 


Petrology and Petrography 


Geol 340 - 


Sedimentology and Stratigraphy 


Geol 351 - 


Geophysical Methods for 




Geology, Engineering, and 




Environmental Sciences 


Geol 355 - 


Introduction to Groundwater 


Geol 360 - 


Geochemistry 


Geol 380 - 


Current Problems in 




Environmental Geology 


Geol 397 - 


Field Methods in Geological, 




Geotechnical, and 




Geoenvironmental Exploration 


Geol 401 - 


Physical Geochemistry I 


Geol 415 - 


Advanced Field Geology 


Geol 432 - 


Sedimentary Geochemistry 


Geol 433 - 


Isotope Geology 


Geol 440 - 


Petroleum Geology 


Geol 451 - 


Practice of Engineering 




Geology 


Geol 458 - 


Geochemical Reaction Analysis 


Geol 493A1 - 


Graduate Student Seminar 


Geol 49311 - 


Current Topics in Paleobiology 




and Earth History 


Geol 493K1 - 


Continental Lithosphere 


Geol 493K3 - 


Interior of the Earth 


Geol 493R1 - 


Data Analysis in Geosciences 


Geol 493V1 - 


Geochronology 



Research Grants Active in 2000 




American Chemical Society Petroleum 
Research Fund 

A Time Series Process Model of Carbonate 
Diagenesis and Microbial Genetic 
Preservation in Hot Spring Travertine, 
Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, and 
Gardiner, Montana. 
Principal Investigator: Bruce Fouke 

Development of Selenium Isotope Ratios as 
Indicators of Sedimentary Paleo- 
Environments. 
Principal Investigator: Thomas Johnson 

Origin, Architecture, & Thermal State of the 
Lackawanna Syncline, Pennsylvania. 
Principal Investigator: Stephen Marshak 

Department of Energy 

Computational & Spectroscopic Investigations 
of Water-Carbon Dioxide Fluids & Surface 
Sorption Processes. 
Principal Investigator: R. James Kirkpatrick 

Illinois Council on Food and Agriculture 
Research 

Estimation of Dentrification Rates in the 
Shallow Groundwater Flow Systems of Big 
Ditch Watershed, Illinois - Isotope 
Assessment. 
Principal Investigator: Thomas Johnson 

Institute of Geophysics And Planetary 
Physics, Los Alamos 

Timescales of Crustal Level Differentiation: U- 
Series Measurements and Geophysical 
Monitoring at Arenal Volcano, Costa Rica. 
Principal Investigator: Craig Lundstrom 

NASA 

Core Angular Momentum and the 
International Earth Rotation Service 
Coordination Center / Sub-Centers Activity 
for Monitoring Global Geophysical Fluids. 
Principal Investigator: Xiaodong Song 

National Science Foundation 

Elasticity of Mantle Minerals Under High 
Pressures and Temperatures. 
Principal Investigator: Jay Bass 

Polyamorphism and Structural Transitions 
During Glass Formation. 
Principal Investigators: John Kieffer and 
Jay Bass 

Development of Laser Heating for Sound 
Velocity Measurements at High P & T 
Principal Investigator: Jay Bass 

Global Climate Change & The Evolutionary 
Ecology of Antarctic Mollusks in the Late 
Eocene. 
Principal Investigator: Daniel B. Blake 



The Asteroid (Echinodermata) Trichasteropsis 
from the Triassic of Germany: Its 
Taxonomy, Phylogeny, and Paleoecologic 
Significance. 
Principal Investigator: Daniel B. Blake 

A Seismic Study of the Mantle Transition 
Zone and Subducted Lithophere. 
Principal Investigator: Wang-Ping Chen 

Seismic Reflection Profiles in Southern Illinois 
(funded through the Mid-America 
Earthquake Research Center). 
Principal Investigators: John McBride, 
Stephen Marshak, and Wang-Ping Chen 

Proximal Carbonate Ejecta and Breccias from 
the Cretaceous-Tertiary Chicxulub Impact: 
Ballistic Sedimentation and Brecciation, 
87 Sr/ S6 Sr Chronology and Diagenetic 
Alteration. 
Principal Investigator: Bruce Fouke 

Selenium Stable Isotopes as Indicators of 
Selenium Transport. 
Principal Investigator: Thomas Johnson 

Development of Cr Stable Isotopes for Cr 
Transport Studies and Other Geoscience 
Application. 
Principal Investigator: Thomas Johnson 

Investigation of Mineral Structure & 
Dynamics. 
Principal Investigator: R. James Kirkpatrick 

NMR Quantum Chemical Computational 
Study of Silicate-Based Materials. 
Principal Investigator: R. James Kirkpatrick 

Measuring Trace Element Partition 

Coefficients Between Minerals and Basaltic 

Melt. 

Principal Investigator: Craig Lundstrom 

Windows into MORB Petrogenesis: Measuring 
U-Series Disequilibria in MORB from 
Transforms. 
Principal Investigator: Craig Lundstrom 

Tectonics of the Aracuai/Ribeira Orogenic 
Tongue of Southeastern Brazil and its 
Significance to the Assembly of West 
Gondwana. 
Principal Investigator: Stephen Marshak 

Constraining the Structure and Rotation of the 
Inner Core. 
Principal Investigator: Xiaodong Song 

Office of Naval Research 

The Role of Shipyard Pollutants in Structuring 
Coral Reef Microbial Communities: 
Monitoring Environmental Change and the 
Potential Causes of Coral Disease. 
Principal Investigator: Bruce Fouke 



State Of Illinois Board Of Higher Education 

Evolution of the Martian Surface: A 

Cooperative Learning Module for General 

Education in Science. 

Principal Investigator: Albert Hsui 

U.S. Geological Survey 

Mapping of the Pittston 7.5" Quadrangle, 
Pennsylvania. 
Principal Investigator: Stephen Marshak 

University Of Illinois Critical Research 
Initiative: 

Geological, Microbiological, Biochemical 
Mechanisms of Microbial Fossilization: A 
Template for Interpreting the History of 
Life. 

Principal Investigators: Bruce Fouke, A. A. 
Salyers, J. Sweedler 

University Of Illinois Research Board 

Acquisition of a Single Collector Thermal 
Ionization Mass Spectrometer. 
Principal Investigator: Craig Lundstrom 



Geothrust Members (op 2000 



J. William Soderman - Chair 
M.S. '60, Ph.D. '62 

James R. Baroffio 
Ph.D. '64 

David K. Beach 
B.S 73 

Marion "Pat" Bickford 
M.S. '58, Ph.D. '60 

Lester W. Clutter 
B.S. '48, M.S. '51 

James C. Cobb 
B.S. 71, Ph.D. '81 

Norbert E. Cygan 

B.S. '54, M.S. '56, Ph.D. '62 

Edwin H. Franklin 
B.S. '56 

John R. Garino 
B.S. '57 

James W. Granath 
B.S. 71, M.S. 73 

Morris W. Leighton 
B.S. '47 

Patricia Santogrossi 
B.S. 74, M.S. 77 

Jack C. Threet 
A.B. '51 






21 



List of Publications for 2000 



22 



This list includes only peer-reviewed articles, 
chapters, and books. 

Lundstrom, C.C., 2000, Rapid diffusive infiltra- 
tion of sodium into partially molten peridotite: 
Nature. 403: 527-530. 

Kao, H., and Chen, W.-R, 2000, The Chi-Chi 
earthquake sequence: Active, out-of-sequence 
thrust faulting in Taiwan: Science, 288: 2346- 
2349. 

Carozzi, Albert V, 2000, Manuscripts and 
Publications of Horace- Benedict de Saussure 
on the Origin of Basalt (1772-1797): 769 pp. 
Editions Zoe. Geneva. 

Ylagan, R.F., Altaner, S.P., and Pozzuoli, A., 
2000, Reaction mechanisms of smectite illiuza- 
tion associated with hydrothermal alteration 
from Ponza Island, Italy: Clays & Clay 
Minerals, 48: 610-631. 

Finkelstein, D.B., Altaner, S.P., and Hay, R.L., 
2000, Alteration history of volcaniclastic sedi- 
ments in the upper Oligocene Creede 
Formation, southwestern Colorado: in Bethke, 
P.M. and Hay, R.L. eds., Ancient Lake Creede 
- Its volcano-tectonic setting, history of sedi- 
mentation, and relation to mineralization in 
the Creede Mining District, Colorado: 
Geological Society of America Special Paper 
346: 209-232. 

Song, X.D., 2000, Joint inversion for inner core 
rotation, inner core anisotropy, and mantle 
heterogeneity: J. Geophys. Res., 105: 7931- 
7943. 

Blake, D. B., Janies, D.A., and Mooi, R. J., 2000, 
Evolution of starfishes: Morphology, mole- 
cules, development, and paleobiology 
(Introduction to the Symposium on Starfishes) : 
American Zoologist, 40: 311-315. 

Sinogeikin, S.V., Jackson, J.M., O'Neill, B., Palko, 
J.W., and Bass, J.D., 2000, Compact high-tem- 
perature cell for Brillouin scattering measure- 
ments: Rev. Sci. Instruments, 71: 201-206 

Carozzi, Marguerite, 2000, H.-B. de Saussure: 
James Hutton's Obsession: Archives 
Scientifique Geneve, 53: 77-158. 

Huff, W. D., Bergstrom, S. M., and Kolata, D. R., 
2000, Silurian K-bentonites of the Dnestr 
Basin, Podolia, Ukraine: Journal of the 
Geological Society of London, 157: 493-504. 

Song, X.D. and Li, A.Y., 2000, Support for differ- 
ential inner core superrotation from earth- 
quakes in Alaska recorded at South Pole sta- 
tion: J. Geophys. Res., 105: 623-630. 

Edwards, M.E. et al. including Hu, F.S. 2000, 
Plant-based biomes for Beringia 18,000, 6,000, 
and l4 C yr B.P.: Journal of Biogeography, 27: 
521-554. 



Berger, A. and Bethke, CM., 2000, A process 
model of natural attenuation at a historic min- 
ing district: Applied Geochemistry, 15: 655- 
666. 

Blake, D. B., 2000, An Archegonaster-\ike somas- 
teroid (Echinodermata) from Pomeroy, Co. 
Tyrone, Northern Ireland: Irish Journal of 
Earth Sciences, 18: 89-99. 

Fouke, B.W., Farmer, J.D., Des Marais, D.J., Pratt, 
L., Sturchio, N.C., Burns, P.C., and Discipulo, 
M.K., 2000, Depositional facies and aqueous- 
solid geochemistry of travertine-depositing hot 
springs (Angel Terrace, Mammoth Hot Springs, 
Yellowstone National Park, USA): Journal of 
Sedimentary Research, 70: 565-585. 

Bethke, CM. and Brady, P.V., 2000, How the Kd 
approach undermines groundwater cleanup: 
Groundwater, 38: 435-443. 

Brueckner, H.K., Cunningham, W.D., Alkmim, 
F.F., and Marshak, S., 2000, Tectonic implica- 
tions of Precambrian Sm-Nd dates from the 
southern Sao Francisco craton and adjacent 
Aracuai and Ribeira Belts, Brazil: Precambrian 
Research, 99: 255-269. 

Blake, D. B„ 2000, The class Asteroidea 

(Echinodermata): Fossils and the base of the 
crown group: American Zoologist, 40(3): 316- 
325. 

Scott, R.W., Fouke, B.W., Schlager, VV„ and 
Nederbragt, A.J., 2000, Are Mid-Cretaceous 
eustatic events recorded in Middle East car- 
bonate platforms?, Middle East models of 
Jurasic/Cretaceous carbonate systems: SEPM 
Special Publication, 69: 77-88. 

Bethke, CM., Torgersen, T, and Park, J., 2000, 
The "age" of very old groundwater: Insights 
from reactive transport models: Journal of 
Geochemical Exploration, 6970: 1-4. 

McArthur, J.M., Fouke, B.W., Donovan, D.T., and 
Thirlwall, M.F., 2000, Strontium isotope 
stratigraphy in the Jurassic: Early Toarcian-Late 
Pleinsbachian timescale revision and its impli- 
cations: Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 
179: 269-285. 

Kavner, A., Sinogeikin, S.V., Jeanloz, R., and 
Bass, J.D., 2000, Strength and equation of 
state of natural majorite: J. Geophys. Res., 105: 
5693-5971. 

Jackson, J.M., Sinogeikin, S. V., Bass, J.D., and 
Weidner, D.J., 2000, Sound velocities and elas- 
tic properties of A-Mg,SiO., to 873 K by 
Brillouin spectroscopy: Am. Mineralogist, 85: 
296-303. 

Brudzinski, M. R., and Chen, W.-P, 2000, 
Variations of P-wave speeds and outboard 
earthquakes: Evidence for a petrologic anom- 
aly in the mantle transition zone: J. Geophys. 
Res., 105: 21,661-21,682. 



McBride, J. H., 2000, Geophysical signatures of 
Caledonian and Variscan deformation in the 
North Atlantic realm, in Diaz Garcia, E, 
Gonzalez Cuadra, P., Martinez Catalan, J., 
Arenas, R., eds., Basement Tectonics 15, A 
Corufia, Spain, Program and Abstracts, 
Universidad de Oviedo, Spain: 13-16. 

Sinogeikin, S.V. and Bass, J.D., 2000, Single crys- 
tal elasticity of pyrope and MgO to pressures of 
20 Gpa by Brillouin scattering in the diamond 
cell: Phys. Earth Planet. Interiors, 120: 43-62. 

Brady, P.V. and Bethke, CM., 2000, Beyond the 
Kd approach: Groundwater, 38: 321-322. 

Sinogeikin, S.V., Schilling, F.R., and Bass, J.D., 
2000, On the Bulk Modulus of Lawsonite: Am. 
Mineral., 85: 1834-1837. 

Johnson T. M„ Roback, R. C, Mcling, T. L., 
Bullen, T. D., DePaolo, D. J., Doughty, C, 
Hunt, R. J„ Murrell, M. X, and Smith, R. W„ 
2000, Groundwater 'Fast Paths' in the Snake 
River Plain Aquifer: Radiogenic isotope ratios 
as natural groundwater tracers: Geology, 28: 
871-874. 

Herbel, M.J., Johnson, T.M., Oremland, R.S., and 
Bullen, T.D., 2000, Fractionation of selenium 
isotopes during bacterial respiratory reduction 
of selenium oxyanions: Geochim. Cosmochim. 
Acta, 64: 3701-3709. 

Blake, D. B., Tintori, A., and Hagdom, H„ 2000, 
A new asteroid (Echinodermata) from the 
Norian (Triassic) Calcare di Zorzino of north- 
ern Italy: its stratigraphic occurrence and phy- 
logenetic significance: Rivista Italiana di 
Paleontologia e Stratigrafia, 106:141-156. 

Kalinichev, A. C, Kirkpatrick, R. J., and Cygan, 
R. X, 2000, Molecular modeling of the struc- 
ture and dynamics of the interlayer and surface 
species of mixed-metal layered hydroxides: 
Chloride and water in hydrocalumite (Friedel's 
salt): Amer. Mineral., 85: 1046-1057. 

Johnson, T. M., Bullen, X D., and Zawislanski, 
P. T. 2000, Selenium stable isotope ratios as 
indicators of sources and cycling of selenium: 
Results from the northern reach of San 
Francisco Bay: Env. Sci. Technol., 34: 2075- 
2079. 

Katz, A., Brought, X, Kirkpatrick, R. J., Struble, L. 
J., and Young, J. F, 2000, Effect of solution 
concentration on the properties of cementitious 
grout wasteform for low level nuclear waste: 
Journal of Nuclear Technology, 129: 236-245. 

McBride, J. H. and Nelson, W. J., 2000, Origin 
and style of middle-to-late Paleozoic deforma- 
tion beyond the Appalachian foreland. Central 
USA, in Diaz Garcia, F, Gonzalez Cuadra, P., 
Martinez Catalan, J., Arenas, R., eds., 
Basement Tectonics 15, A Corufia, Spain, 
Program and Abstracts, Universidad de Oviedo, 
Spain: 129-132. 



A 



Colloquium Speakers 



Lundstrom, C.C., 2000, Models of U-series dise- 
quilibria generation in MORB: the effects of 
two scales of melt porosity: Physics of the 
Earth and Planetary Interiors, 121: 189-204. 

Marshak, S., Karlstrom, K., and Timmons, J.M., 
2000, Inversion of Proterozoic extensional 
faults: An explanation for the pattern of 
Laramide and ancestral Rockies intracratonic 
deformation, United States: Geology, 28: 735- 
738. 

Kirkpatrick, R. J., 2000, Nuclear magnetic reso- 
nance spectroscopy, in Ramachandran, V. S., 
and Beaudoin, J. J., eds., Handbook of analyti- 
cal techniques in concrete science and technol- 
ogy: 205 - 230. 

Gates, W. P., Komadel, P, Madejova, J., Bujdak, 
J., Stucki, J. W, and Kirkpatrick, R. J., 2000, 
Electronic and structural properties of reduced- 
charge montmorillonites: Applied Clay Science, 
16:257-271. 

Fischer, M. P., and Wilkerson, M. S., 2000, 
Predicting the orientation of joints from fold 
shape: Results of pseudo-three-dimensional 
modeling and curvature analysis: Geology, 
28(1): 15-18. 

Chen, W.-R, and Kao, H., 2000, Evidence for 
dual, out-of-sequence thrust faulting during the 
Chi-Chi (Taiwan) earthquake sequence of 
1999: Int. Workshop on Annual 
Commemoration of the Chi-Chi Earthquake: 
71-81. 

Hou, G., Kirkpatrick, R. J., and Kim, Y., 2000, l5 N 
NMR study of the structure and dynamics in 
hydrotalcite-like compounds (HTs) : Amer. 
Mineral., 85: 173 - 180. 

Zhou, L.-M., Chen, W.-R, and Ozalaybey, S., 
2000, Seismic properties of the central Indian 
shield from broadband P-SV conversions at 
Hyderabad: Bull. Seismol. Soc. Am., 90: 1295- 
1304. 

Leetaru, H.E., 2000, Sequence stratigraphy and 
economic resources of the Aux Vases 
Sandstone: A major oil producer in the Illinois 
Basin: AAPG Bulletin, 84 (3): 399-422. 

Lundstrom, C.C., Williams, Q, and Gill, J., 2000, 
A geochemically consistent hypothesis for 
MORB generation: Chemical Geology, 162: 105- 
126. 

Hou, X., and Kirkpatrick, R. J., 2000, Solid state 
77 Se NMR and XRD study of the structure and 
dynamics seleno-oxyanions in hydrotalcite-like 
compounds (HTs): Chemistry of Materials, 12: 
1890-1897. 

Montgomery, S.L., and Leetaru, H. E., 2000, 
Storms Consolidated Field, Illinois Basin: 
Identifying new reserves in a mature area: 
AAPG Bulletin, 84 (2): 157-173. 




Spring 2000 



Jan. 28 Tom Guensburg, Rock Valley College 

Environmental change & the emergence of the Paleozoic Evolutionary Fauna 
Feb. 2 Todd Anderson, University of Massachusetts 

The natural attenuation & engineered bioremediation of benzene in petroleum-contaminated 

aquifers under anaerobic conditions 
Feb. 4 Richard Beane, Tucson, Arizona 

Tracking the evolution of a geothermal system 
Feb. 7 Hailiang Dong, Princeton University 

Bacteria-solid surface interactions: implications for microbial Fe reduction & bacterial transport 
Feb 9. John Coates, Southern Illinois University 

The microbiology, biogeochemistry and bioremediation potential of (per)chlorate-reducing bacteria 
Feb. 14 Ena Urbach, Oregon State University 

Bacterioplankton ecology: New molecular approaches 
Feb. 16 Volker Bruchert, Max Planck Institute, Germany 

What controls the stable sulfur isotopic fractionation during bacterial sulfate reduction: Rate, 

phylogeny or bioenergetics 
Feb. 25 Frank Schilling, U of I, Department of Geology 

Fluid transfer from a downgoing slab: Insights from the Andes 
Mar. 1 Peter C. Burns, University of Notre Dame 

The Importance of mineralogy to the disposal of nuclear waste 
Mar. 3 Larry Braile, Purdue University 

Science education: Why should we care? 
Mar. 28 Kevin Bohacs, AAPG Distinguished Speaker 

1. Sequence stratigraphy of lake basins or 2. Lake-basin type source potential & hydrocarbon 

character 
April 7 Mousumi Roy, University of New Mexico 

Evolution of fault systems at a strike-slip plate boundary: A viscoelastic model 
April 14 Sherilyn Fritz, University of Nebraska 

Environmental dynamics on geological & ecological time scales in lakes of the northern Great Plains 
April 21 John Parise, SUNY Stony Brook 

Some new mineralogy: Solutions using tools available at national facilities 
April 28 Shun-ichiro Karato, University of Minnesota 

Voyage au Centre de la Terre: Anisotropy & dynamics of Earth's inner core 



Fall 2000 



Sept. 1 Steve Marshak, U of I, Department of Geology 

Precambrian deformational styles and the tectonic assembly of west Gondwana: The view from 

the Sao Francisco Craton (Brazil) 
Sept. 8 Ray Russo, Northwestern University 

Slabs, continental roots and upper mantle flow 
Sept. 15 Robert Bodnar, Virginia Tech 

Fluid inclusions in meteorites: Evidence for water in the solar system & implications for 

extraterrestrial life 
Sept. 22 Jay Stravers, Northern 111. Univ 

Quaternary marine geology of fjords in southern Chile & the eastern Canadian Arctic; 

Interhemispheric correlations for the last deglacial cycle 
Sept. 29 Craig Bethke, U of I, Department of Geology 

The paradox of groundwater age 
Oct. 12 John Warme, AAPG Distinguished Lecturer 

Anatomy of an anomaly: Catastrophic Devonian Alamo impact breccia, Nevada 
Oct. 13 Martin Schoonen, SUNY Stony Brook 

Fooling around with fool's gold: Surface chemistry and reactivity of pyrite 
Oct. 20 Page Chamberlain, Dartmouth College 

Reconstructing the paleotopography of mountains from isotopes of clay minerals 
Oct. 27 Crawford Elliott, Georgia State University 

Clay mineralogy, K-Ar & stable isotope data of illitic clays in the Kupferschiefer: Implications for 

genesis of Cu-Ag mineralization 
Oct. 31 Lee Krystinik, AAPG Distinguished Lecturer 

Sequence stratigraphic variability in foreland basins: An example from the Cretaceous western 

interior seaway of North America 
Nov. 17 Emile Okal, Northwestern University 

Recent advances in tsunami studies: Papua, New Guinea, 1998 and the role of underwater slumps 
Dec. 1 Charles Gammie, U of I, Department of Astronomy 

The formation of planets 
Dec. 8 Everett Shock, Washington University 

Abiotic organic synthesis in hydrothermal systems, volcanic gases, meteorite parent bodies and 

the solar nebula 



r 



Meet Us In Denver! 




The Geology Department caters a 
private party at each annual AAPG 
and GSA meeting. At the last GSA 
meeting the room was packed for 
most of the evening. It's a great 
chance to catch up with class- 
mates, professors, and other alum- 
ni. You can also hear about the 
latest departmental activities. 

Next Gatherings: 

• AAPG Meeting, June 3-6, 2001, 
in Denver, Colo. 

• GSA Meeting, November 5-8, 
2001, in Boston, Mass. 

Let us know if you're coming! 
E-mail Barb Elmore at 
b-elmore@uiuc.edu or call her 
at 217-333-3542. 



Let's Keep in Touch 

Please take a few minutes to let us and your class- 
mates know what you've been doing. Send your news 
to the Department of Geology, 245 Natural History 
Building, 1301 West Green Street, Urbana, Illinois 
61801; fax 217-244-4996; e-mail geology@uiuc.edu 



Name 



Address (indicate if changed) 



City 



State Zip 



Home phone 



E-mail 



Degrees from Illinois (with year) 



Notes 



Q ILLINOIS 



Department of Geology 

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 
245 Natural History Building 
1301 W. Green St. 
Urbana, 1L 61801 



Non-Profit Organization 
U.S. Postage 

PAID 

Permit No. 75 

Champaign, IL 61820 



2 1 YEAR I 



ucuLUUY LIBRARY 



Review 



Department of Geology 

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 
C. 

Faculty nnake Scientific Advances in 2001 




In 2001 , department faculty were 
involved in a wide range of research pro- 
jects, from understanding the significance 
of groundwater age near the Earth's sur- 
face to investigating the nature of 
anisotropy in the Earth's core. Here are a 
few examples of what researchers have 
been up to. 

Recent work by Professor Craig 
Bethke and Assistant Professor Thomas 
Johnson shows that groundwater in 
aquifers is generally older than one might 
expect, if one were to estimate age based 
only on the velocity of flow. These find- 
ings have important implications in situa- 
tions where hydrogeologists use radiomet- 
ric methods to estimate the sustainable 
yield of a water supply, or to predict the 
rate at which a contaminant will migrate 
through the ground. 

Groundwater tends to flow through 
aquifers that are constrained by layers of 



less permeable rock called aquitards. 
Hydrologists commonly figure that a 
groundwater's age reflects the time it takes 
to migrate along the aquifer. But water 
molecules don't see an aquifer as a pipe. 
Some water mixes between the aquitards 
and aquifers, and the water in aquitards is 
generally very old. 

Bethke and Johnson have shown that 
the effect of aquitards on the age of 
groundwater depends only upon the ratio 
of water mass in aquitards to that in 
aquifers, not on the mixing rate. At low 
mixing rates, very old water is supplied to 
the aquifer, but the water in the aquitard 
remains old. At high mixing rates, less-old 
water is supplied to the aquifer, because 
younger water is moving into the aquitard. 
While mixing increases the age of water in 
aquifers, it also has the counter-balancing 
effect of decreasing the age in aquitards. 
The two effects exactly cancel. 



Another faculty member, Assistant 
Professor Xiaodong Song, has collected 
new evidence that may solve a long-stand- 
ing mystery of the Earth's inner core. The 
data offers new support for a layered inner 
core model, with an isotropic upper inner 
core overlying an anisotropic lower inner 
core. Song and Professor Don Helmberger 
of Caltech proposed this layered inner core 
model in 1998. For a decade, researchers 
have observed that seismic waves travers- 
ing the solid inner core along a north- 
south path have a much smaller ampli- 
tude and a more complex waveform than 
those waves that travel east- west. Song 
suggests that the layered inner core struc- 
ture is the cause. Because the anistropy in 
the lower inner core is aligned in the 
north-south direction, seismic waves trav- 
eling this path speed up and spread out, 
resulting in smaller amplitudes and com- 

(continued on page 4) 



Jackson Studies Earth's Interior 




When the three intrepid explorers in Jules Verne's science-fiction classic, 
Journey to the Center of the Earth, set off on their adventure, they carried crow- 
bars, pick axes, ropes and hatchets. In the absence of being able to take such a 
trip, geologists instead focus on the behavior of various minerals at the Earth's 
interior under different conditions of temperature and pressure. Graduate student 
Jennifer Jackson, B.S. '99, for example, has been focusing on orthoenstatite, an 
orthopyroxene, since it is believed to be abundant in the crust and upper mantle. 
Jackson is investigating the elastic properties of orthoenstatite at high tempera- 
ture. Her high-temperature experiments were conducted using the department's 
Brillouin spectroscopy lab with a high-temperature furnace. Jackson was able to 
make measurements of temperature dependence on elasticity up to 800° C, the 
highest temperature achieved for such studies. 

(continued on page 23) 


Graduate student Xinlei Sun won 
an Outstanding Student Paper Award 
for her presentation at the 2001 fall 
meeting of the Tectonophysics section 
of the American Geophysical Union. 1 
Sun is working with Assistant 
Professor Xiaodong Song to understand 1 
the structure of the Earth's core. Sun 1 

used seismic wave data and looked in 1 

i 

particular at subtracting out possible 1 
effects of the lowermost mantle srruc- 1 
ture to get a clearer picture of the 1 
structure of the core. 1 




Greetings 



Our "Year in Review" 



Welcome to our "Year in Review" for 
2001. This was a busy year for the 
Department in a variety of ways. 
The pace of research activity in the 
Department has been picking up— in fact, 
the amount of external grant money 
received by faculty tripled in 2001, as 
compared with 2000! Such research 
funds are used primarily to support grad- 
uate student research assistants, post- 
doctoral associates, and their projects— 
they keep the climate active. As described 
on page 1, departmental research projects 
have yielded exciting new results. We've 
also been maintaining our high level of 
teaching, with literally thousands of stu- 
dents taking our classes every year. 
Several of our staff are routinely listed on 
the "'list of teachers rated excellent by 
their students." And, our new course in 
Natural Hazards has been catching on. 



The Department's facilities have also 
been undergoing renovation year by year. 
In the past few years, we've redone the 
mineralogy/petrology teaching laboratory, 
transformed an old lab into a new class- 
room with built-in computer technology, 
and spruced up a number of hallways and 
offices. New laboratories in mass-spec- 
trometry and experimental petrology have 
been constructed. And this year, we have 
been building a new geomicrobiology 
research facility, complete with incubator 
rooms and cold rooms. The Department 
continues in its efforts to hire new faculty. 
We've been searching in the areas of surfi- 
cial geology, geobiology/low-temperature 
geochemistry, and mineral science. 
Hopefully, we'll have some new faces to 
introduce next year. All this helps to keep 
the Department at the forefront of teach- 
ing and research. 



Contents 



Michael Sczerba Joins Department 

Ann Long Appointed 

Lura Joseph Is New Geology Librarian 

Annual Fall Field Trip 

Oil Industry Recruits Successfully at Illinois 

Revised Course Is A Big Hit 

New Geomicrobiology Laboratory Under Construction in NHB 

Departmental Banquet— An Elegant Affair 

Harriet Wallace, Geologist And Librarian 

Illinois Alumni in Top Positions of GSA 

Fond Memories of Geology 41 5 

Murle Edwards and Pat Lane: Where Are They Now? 

Geology Entrepreneurs Make Champaign-Urbana Home Base 

Illinois Faculty are Authoring Books 

Franklins Make Major Bequest 

Obituaries (Anderson, Domenico, Wood) 

Ralph Langenheim's Departmental History 

News From Alumni 

Honor Roll of Donors 

Annual Report 



4 
4 

5 

6 

6 

6 

7 

7 

8 

8 

9 

9 

10 

11 

11 

12 

14 

16 

19 

20 



Year in Review is published once a year by the Department of Geology, University of Illinois at 

Urbana-Champaign, to summarize the activities and accomplishments within the department 

and news from alumni and friends. 

Department Head: Stephen Marshak (smarshak@uiuc.edu) 

Administrative Secretary: Barb Elmore (b-elmore@uiuc.edu) 

Editor: Deb Aronson (debaronson@nasw.org) 

Produced for the Department of Geology by the 

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Office of Publications: designer: Pat Mayer. 

http://www.geology.uiuc.edu 







College of Liberal Arts & Sciences 



Generous support of alumni and 
friends of the Department have continued 
to bolster our optimism for the future. 
This year, we are very pleased to 
acknowledge the incredibly generous sup- 
port of Ed and Alison Franklin, who have 
made a large six-figure bequest to the 
Department's endowment, as part of our 
GeoScience 2005 endowment campaign. 
This gift will help the Department to con- 
tinue to grow by providing a recurring 
source of funds for obtaining teaching and 
research resources. The Franklins have 
already established themselves as major 
benefactors of the Department by endow- 
ing our field camp scholarship fund, 
which already has helped immensely in 
making the cost of field camp attainable 
by our students. The GeoScience 2005 
campaign is well on its way towards 
reaching its $3 million goal. 

2001 , of course, has also had its 
down side. The tragedies of September 11 
stunned the Department. As in most insti- 
tutions, the shock led to a very somber 
time. In the immediate aftermath, we 
cancelled some classes, but faculty and 
teaching assistants did their best to make 
sure that students were able to keep up 
with their work, and deal with the emo- 
tions of the day. The Department was also 
saddened to hear of the deaths of three 
popular emeritus faculty. The economic 
downturn that has taken hold in recent 
months has also had an impact, in that 
the University's budget has decreased sig- 
nificantly, a stunning change of affairs 
considering the sizable increases that we 
have seen in recent years. But, the struc- 
ture of the University remains sound, and 
we anticipate that our long-term prospects 
remain positive. 

I hope you enjoy reading about the 
goings-on in the Geology Department 
today, as well as hearing about what for- 
mer members of the Department are up 
to. All the best for the coming year! 

—Stephen Marshak 



UEULUuI UiDiiruM 



Alumni Award 




Jack C.Threet Receives Alumni Achievement Award 



Jack C. Threet, B.S. '51, has received 
the 2002 Department of Geology Alumni 
Achievement Award. Threet devoted his 
entire 36-year career to Shell Oil 
Company. He entered the oil business at 
a time of great expansion and became a 
key player in Shell's search for and pro- 
duction of oil and gas, rising in 26 years 
from junior stratigrapher to vice president 
and head of exploration, which was wide- 
ly recognized as the industry's premier 
exploration outfit. 

"The Department is proud to have 
played a role in starting Jack Threet into 
his prominent career in geology," says 
Steve Marshak, professor and head of the 
department. 

Threet became interested in geology 
after his older brother, Dick, got his 
master's degree in geology from the 
University of Illinois. Threet became par- 
ticularly interested in fossils, which led 
him to the late Professor 
Harold Scott's door. 

"Harold Scott was a 
fine professor," says 
Threet. "I really looked to 
him as a mentor." 

In the spring of 1951, 
Threet, newly married to 
Katy Hall of Tolono, began 
work on his master's 
degree with Scott. But later 
that year Threet took what 
was supposed to be a sum- 
mer job with Shell. That 
summer position blos- 
somed to full-time employ- 
ment and he rose quickly 
through the managerial 
ranks, from district to divi- 
sion to area exploration manager at sever 
al locations, then upward to general man- 
ager and vice president. He never did go 
back for his master's degree. 

"I have no regrets," says Threet. 
"Shell convinced me that time on the job 
was more important." 




"I readily credit whatever 
success I've had to my 
wife, Katy, of 51 years, 
my family, friends and 
professional colleagues, 
my solid education in 
the basics at the 
University of Illinois, my 
faith in God and lots of 
good luck along the 
way." 



In the course of his career, Threet 
moved his family (which soon included 
daughters Linda and Judy J more than 30 
times, living everywhere from Australia 
to Canada, Holland to North Africa, and 
New York City to Los Angeles. His last 
assignment was in 
Houston, where for 10 
years until his retirement 
in 1987, he was vice pres- 
ident and head of explo- 
ration. 

In the course of these 
assignments he led Shell 
Oil Co. in the discovery of 
major oil and gas fields, 
the most notable of which 
were in the deep water 
Gulf of Mexico— where 
for many years Shell 
held world water-depth 
drilling records— the 
northwest shelf of 
Australia, onshore Syria, 
and offshore Malaysia, 
Cameroon and Brazil. 

During his long career, Threet served 
actively in various professional organiza- 
tions. He is a member of the American 
Association of Petroleum Geologists, and 
chair of the board of the AAPG 
Foundation. He was a member and direc- 



tor of the National Ocean Industries 
Association and was vice chair of the 
Offshore Technology Conference for sev- 
eral years. He has served on special 
committees of the National Academy of 
Sciences and the National Science 
Foundation. Threet also is on the board 
of trustees of the American Geological 
Institute Foundation, where he chairs a 
committee to raise $2 million for K-12 
education in earth science. 

Ten years ago, Threet renewed his 
interest in the Geology Department at 
the University of Illinois and became an 
active member of the GeoThrust com- 
mittee, co-chairing a small group which 
four years ago raised $300,000 for the 
Texas-Louisiana graduate fellowship 
endowment fund. Last year, Threet and 
his brother Dick established the Jack C. 
and Richard L. Threet endowed profes- 
sorship in sedimentary geology in honor 
of Harold Scott. 

"I have really fond memories of my 
time at Illinois," says Threet. "In addi- 
tion to Professor Scott, I remember so 
many other professors, like Dr. White 
and Dr. Henderson, who inspired me, as 
well as my brief period in graduate 
school with Haydn Murray and John 
Shelton." 

Threet has come a long way from 
his humble beginnings and is an inspira- 
tion himself to many. He has been listed 
in the Who's Who in America for the 
last 12 years and is very active in his 
community, both in Houston and in 
Pagosa Springs, Colo., where he and 
Katy spend their summers. 

"I readily credit whatever success 
I've had to my wife, Katy, of 51 years, 
my family, friends and professional col- 
leagues, my solid education in the basics 
at the University of Illinois, my faith in 
God and lots of good luck along the 
way." 



Faculty Make Scientific Advances in 2001 



(continued from page 1) 

plicated waveforms. Based on this 
new data, it appears that the 
anisotropy in the lower inner core 
is much higher than previously 
believed, about 8 percent rather than 
the 2 or 3 previously suggested. 

In other work concerning the 
Earth's interior. Professor Jay Bass 
and Research Scientist Stanislav 
Sinogeikin, Ph.D. '99, have obtained 
the first elasticity measurements of 
the very high-pressure phase of 
olivine (the spinel phase) at high 
pressures and high temperatures. This 
enables them to determine how fast 
seismic waves travel through this 
mineral in the transition zone 
between the upper and lower mantle 
of the Earth. Their results strongly 
suggest that the composition of the 
transition zone is not the same as that 
of the upper mantle. 

Back on the Earth's surface, 
Professor Dan Blake's Antarctic 
research continued with another field 
season at Seymour Island. Antarctic 
weather unfortunately was bad this 
year, and much time was spent in 
tents. However, important collections 
were made and ongoing research is 
documenting significant changes in 
molluscan faunas and faunal struc- 
tures correlated with Cenozoic global 
cooling. Results have implications for 
current concerns on global warming. 
Blake also finished papers on the late 
Paleozoic-Mesozoic transition in 
starfish evolution. Extinction events 
eliminated Paleozoic-type starfish, 
and groups very different from those 
of the Paleozoic evolved. Interestingly, 
life habits do not appear to have 
changed significantly through the cri- 
sis. Blake has now turned his atten- 
tion to Early Devonian and more 
ancient intervals in starfish evolution. 

Professor Steve Marshak, work- 



ing with Post-Doc Alan Whittington 
and two Brazilian colleagues, con- 
ducted fieldwork in the remote high- 
lands of eastern Brazil during the 
past two summers. They have dis- 
covered that the mountain range 
which formed between Brazil and 
Africa at the end of the 
Precambrian, as Gondwana assem- 
bled, effectively collapsed under its 
own weight during the final stages 
of orogeny. This process, known as 
"extensional collapse," has been 
observed in younger mountain 
ranges, such as the Himalayas. 
Collapse of the Brazilian example 
produced new fabrics in the rocks of 
the orogen, and decompression 
accompanying collapse probably 
triggered crustal melting, which pro- 
duced large quantities of granitic 
magma. 

Professor Wang-Ping Chen, and 
graduate students Michael 
Brudzinski, Tai-Lin (Ellen) Tseng, 
and Zhaohui Yang, continue to 
investigate the interaction between 
subducted lithosphere, the transition 
zone of the mantle, and deep earth- 
quakes. Chen's interests have also 
taken him to the other side of the 
planet, where his project Hi-CLIMB, 
an international effort to understand 
the lithospheric deformation of the 
Himalayas and Tibet, is in full 
swing. Hi-CLIMB is complemented 
by a collaborative project between 
Honn Kao (Ph.D. '93) and Chen to 
study the nascent Taiwan orogen. 
Closer to home, adjunct Professor 
John McBride, graduate student 
Amanda Duchek, and Chen also 
have been working on seismic- 
reflection profiles across the Cottage 
Grove fault system of southern 
Illinois. 



Faculty Serve Many 
"Extra-Curricular" Roles 

Since the summer of 2001, Craig 
Bethke has served as a "subject matter 
expert" in geochemistry and hydrogeolo- 
gy on the Department of Energy (DOE) 
peer panel. This panel is writing the 
report to Congress about the technical 
suitability of the Yucca Mountain site. 
Since the DOE has shifted its focus from 
using geologic barriers to keep the spent 
waste from migrating from the site, it is 
now looking at the feasibility of man- 
made containers that would not fail with- 
in 10,000 years. In order to determine 
possible causes of corrosion to the "engi- 
neered barrier," panel members needed 
to learn about the chemistry of the local 
groundwater, which Bethke provided. 
"The fun part was that, while they 
learned a little geochemistry, I learned a 
lot of corrosion chemistry," says Bethke. 

During the fall of 2001 Dan Blake 
served as acting director of Spurlock 
Museum while director Douglas Brewer 
was on leave. During that semester he 
worked with the other museum staff to 
prepare the museum for its official open- 
ing in September, 2002. Because the 
building had just been completed, Blake's 
role included overseeing the calibration of 
the building's cooling system and other 
basic tasks. Blake also helped direct the 
fabrication of exhibit cases and other 
items related to the building's mission. 



Jay Bass has been named as Center 
for Advanced Study (CAS) associate for 
fall semester 2002 and Bruce Fouke has 
been named CAS fellow for the same 
semester. The Center brings together 
scholars from diverse disciplines and 
backgrounds, encouraging and rewarding 
excellence in all areas of academic 
inquiry. Fellows and associates are tem- 
porary appointments and are selected in 
an annual competition. 



New Faces 




Lura Joseph is New Geology Librarian 

The next time a department member is 
having trouble finding information, they can 
turn to the new geology librarian, Lura 
Joseph, for help. Joseph, who became the 
librarian on August 1, is both a librarian and a 
geologist— in this regard, she follows in the 
footsteps of Harriet Wallace (see related article 
on page 8). Joseph served as the physical sci- 
ences librarian at North Dakota State 
University for six years before coming to Champaign-Urbana. 

Joseph has been a great addition to the department, says Steve 
Marshak, professor and department head. "Lura has been wonder- 
fully interactive with the faculty in making us aware of opportuni- 
ties to improve the collection, and she is an excellent resource for 
locating research and teaching materials available on the web." 

Part of the reason that Joseph understands the research needs 
of geology faculty and students is that before she became a librari- 
an, she spent many years as a geologist herself. After receiving her 
bachelor's in anthropology at the University of Oklahoma and her 
master's in geology from the same place, she worked in the petrole- 
um industry for 15 years. Because of the fluctuations in that indus- 
try, she got a master's degree in psychology (at University of Central 
Oklahoma) while working full time. In the course of working 
toward that degree, Joseph realized that what she really liked was 
working with information, so she headed for a library degree 
(MLIS) at the University of Oklahoma. 

"I like to be a helpful person, to link people up with the infor- 
mation that they need, whether those information sources are texts 
or other people," says Joseph. "I love geology and I love finding 
information." Information retrieval is a kind of a science, says 
Joseph. It takes two kinds of logic, one looking for forests and the 
other looking for trees. What makes being a geology librarian so ful- 
filling is having a love of and interest in both geology and informa- 
tion retrieval, says Joseph. Joseph would not be nearly as satisfied in 
her work if she worked in the business or law libraries, for example. 

Joseph particularly likes stepping in to help with complicated 
questions. "Academic librarians really don't fit the librarian stereo- 
type," says Joseph. "We are really information specialists. Geology 
blends over into so many disciplines," says Joseph. "Having that 
geology background helps me figure out where to go for informa- 
tion." 

As part of her information specialist role, Joseph has worked 
extensively on the geology library web site to expand links to vari- 
ous research tools. Within the library site, Joseph has created a link 
titled "Geoscience Information Resources on the Internet," which 
lists links to everything trom "Afghanistan Geology" to 
"Volcanology" and "Weather." 

Joseph sees three major projects for the coming year: preparing 
to shift material to various storage facilities; helping to migrate to a 
new system-wide on-line catalog; and determining how to make her 
shrinking budget dollars stretch as far as possible. 




Michael Szerba hikes 
with stepdaughter 
Robin in Forest Glen 



Michael Sczerba Joins 
Department 

Michael Sczerba, clerical assistant, 
has the kind of behind-the-scenes 
responsibilities that are easy to take for 
granted but that are critical to a smoothly 
functioning department. He sorts mail; 
hands out and keeps track of department 
keys; organizes, keeps track of and orders 
supplies; produces many exams for pro- 
fessors; makes and mails posters publiciz- 
ing visiting speakers, especially for the 
weekly colloquium series; makes travel 
arrangements for colloquium speakers; and "most critical of 
all," he orders pizza and cookies for the weekly colloquium. 

Outside the halls of the Natural History Building, 
Sczerba juggles even more activities. He is on track to finish 
his dissertation in music composition with an ethnomusicol- 
ogy minor spring 2002, he has hosted a weekly Music of 
India program on WEFT Radio for the last 12 years, and he 
is an avid hiker. Sczerba's dissertation focuses on the work 
of composer Stefan Wolpe (1902-1972). He also has com- 
posed jazz and what he calls "contributive new music" 
works for several ensembles. Several of his works have been 
published. 

Ann Long Joins Department 
in Permanent Position 

Ann Long has been promoted from visit- 
ing to permanent teaching specialist in 
the department. Long, who has been at 
the department since 1999, supervises 
undergraduate labs in some of the larger 
lecture courses. From 1987 until she came 
to Urbana-Champaign, Long held a teach- 
ing position at Colchester Institute in England. 

Long brings a combination of geology and teaching 
expertise to the department. She received a B.S. from the 
University of Reading in geography, which included geology 
courses in geomorphology and hydrology as well as plan- 
ning, surveying and cartography. She also earned a post- 
graduate certificate of education in geography and in 1981 
she received a master's degree in education. 

Long also has done research on the vegetation and geo- 
morphology of moraines of the Okstindan Glacier in 
northern Norway. 

Long moved to Champaign-Urbana with her husband, 
Stephen, a professor at the University of Illinois, who does 
research on the impact of rising ozone and carbon dioxide 
levels in the atmosphere on plant productivity. 




DEPARTMENT NEWS 



Field Trip 










Steve Altaner and other members 
of the field trip at Thornton Quarry 



Since 1993, the 
department has held 
an annual fall field 
trip to several inter- 
esting sites within 
Illinois and Indiana. 
The field trip, orga- 
nized and led by 
Steve Altaner since 
1996, typically 
includes one bedrock 
and one glacial stop. 
In 2001 the group 
went to Thornton 
Quarry near Chicago 
and Indiana Dunes 

National Lakeshore. This year, the trip was particularly 
memorable since it included pouring rain, lightning and 
thunder at Thornton Quarry. Typically 30-35 people partici- 
pate. In addition to undergraduates, graduate students and 
faculty, ISGS geologists often join the trip. The previous 
year, Altaner took the group to Kentland Quarry, a mete- 
orite impact site in western Indiana; and Kickapoo State 
Park. Other trips have included Starved Rock State Park 
and the National Coal Museum in southern Illinois, and 
Cagle's Mill Spillway, Turkey Run State Park and 
Montezuma, all in Indiana. 



Oil Industry Recruits 
Successfully at Illinois 

Although geology graduates work in an ever-broadening 
range of fields, the traditional fields of oil and gas continue to 
attract many students. Over the last few years, several oil compa- 
nies have successfully recruited many Illinois geology graduates. 

In 2001 alone, four students were hired by oil companies: 
Richard Wachtman, M.S. '01, is working for ExxonMobil in 
Houston; Anthony Gibson, M.S. '01, is working for Mervin Oil 
Co. in Ulny, 111.; Serena Lee, M.S. '01, is working for 
Schlumberger in Houston; and Hugo Gonzalez, B.S. '01, is 
working for Schlumberger in Rock Springs, Wyo. 

Schlumberger has clearly been finding Illinois to be a fruit- 
ful recruiting ground. Judd Tudor, '00. Andrew Collins, '99, 
Megan Potter, '99, and Bruce Miller, B.S. '94, M.S. '95 also work 
for Schlumberger. Miller is now based in Norway, while the oth- 
ers are in the United States. 



Revised Course 
is a Big Hit 

Enrollment in Geology 118 has doubled and many other 
interested students had to be turned away, thanks to some fine 
tuning by Steve Altaner. Originally called Earth and the 
Environment, the course had a stagnant enrollment between 50- 
60 for about 10 years. 

"I never could understand why it didn't take off. Natural 
disasters are extremely relevant to people and society, and 
they're interesting," says Altaner. In an effort to boost interest, 
Altaner revised the course and re-titled it Natural Disasters. The 
course is now more focused on natural disasters and includes 
meteorological factors like floods, severe weather and astronom- 
ical factors like meteorite impacts. 

Natural Disasters is targeted for non-majors fulfilling a gen- 
eral education/science requirement, and represents another 
effort by members of the department to introduce non-majors 
to geologic principles. In addition, students majoring in Earth 
and Environmental Sciences, which is a sub-major within 
Geology, take the course. 

"The class has been a lot of fun, nobody is asleep, there 
are lots of questions and the attendance rate is much higher 
than in Geology 100" (the other introductory course Altaner 
teaches) , says Altaner. 

Altaner has been able to use the University's computer- 
linked classrooms to add visual images to the class. For exam- 
ple, in his discussion of meteor impacts, he can show an ani- 
mation of a meteorite impact. To illustrate the speed that a 
meteorite travels, in terms students would understand, Altaner 
points out it would take a meteorite nine seconds to travel from 
Champaign to Chicago. This elicits some oohs and aahs. He 
uses a lot of humor, including cartoons, to encourage participa- 
tion, and gently pokes fun at himself to encourage students to 
feel comfortable participating and asking questions. In addition 
to conventional teaching tools like video and overhead projec- 
tion, Altaner makes use of an overhead microscope in the lec- 
ture hall, which enables him to show geologic samples to the 
whole class without having to pass them around the room. 

Altaner talks to the students about the scientific principles 
behind each disaster: its causes, possible locations, frequency, 
ability to predict and how to mitigate damage and death. He 
also discusses case histories, trying to use examples relevant to 
Illinois when possible. 

Enrollment in the course will continue to grow, as the class 
will move into a larger lecture hall next year. The natural haz- 
ards course is one of several appealing general education cours- 
es offered by the Department. Together, they introduce over 
3,500 students per year— 10% of the University's student 
body— to the wonders of the Earth. 



New Geomicrobiology 
Laboratory Under 
Construction in IMHB 



A new state-of-the-art geomicrobiolo- 
gy lab is being built in the basement of the 
Natural History Building. Construction 
began in November and will be completed 
by the summer of 2002. The new labora- 
tory will include not only micro-drilling 
apparatus and other typical geology equip- 
ment, but also gel electrophoresis stations, 
"PCR" machines (PCR stands for "poly- 
merase chain reaction," a way to amplify 
gene sequences in order to study them), 
and autoclave sterilizers, equipment that is 
normally found in a microbiology laborato- 
ry. These facilities will enable researchers 
in the Department of Geology to undertake 
analytical methods, such as polymerase 
chain reaction amplification of 16 S rRNA, 
to map the distribution and composition of 
microbial communities and understand 
their interactions with geologic processes. 

One of the prime users of the new 
facility will be Bruce Fouke, assistant pro- 
fessor of geology. Fouke conducts work 
that integrates molecular microbiology 
with sedimentary geology and hydrogeolo- 
gy. For example, one of Fouke's current 
projects investigates whether study of 
ancient microbes found entombed in 
ancient limestone deposits can yield infor- 
mation about ancient environmental con- 
ditions. 

Fouke's work, and other work to be 
carried out in the lab, is part of an exciting 
new field, known as geobiology. 
Geobiologists study the interplay between 
biological and geological processes that 
have shaped the Earth and all its life 
forms. By examining this interplay, geobi- 
ologists address questions concerning the 
origin and evolution of life, the way in 
which environmental conditions influence 
life, and the way in which life influences 
environmental conditions. The field has 
many practical applications as well, mainly 
in the area of environmental geology, for 
microbes play an important role in digest- 
ing contaminants. 



2001 Departmental Banquet 
An Elegant Affair 



The 2001 Geology Department ban- 
quet was held April 27, in the Colonial 
Room at the Illini Union. About 100 peo- 
ple attended. After dinner. Professor 
Bruce Fouke presented a slide show of 
the Geology 315/415 field trip to Curacao. 
Then, Professor and Department Head 
Steve Marshak presented awards. 

Sharon Mosher, B.S. 73, Ph.D. 78, 
received the alumni achievement award. 
Steve Marshak cited Mosher for her 
research contributions in structural geolo- 
gy and tectonics (see 2000 Year in Review 
for related story) and her national service 
role as past president of the Geological 
Society of America (see story p. 8). 

In addition to the alumni achieve- 
ment award, numerous student awards 
also were presented: 

Adam Gibbons, Brandon Haist and 
Andrew Parrish each received a Franklin 
Field Camp Scholarship. The scholarship 
fund, created by Ed Franklin, enables the 
department to provide partial financial 
support to students attending summer 
field camp. 

Parrish also received the Estwing 
Award— a classic Estwing rock pick— that 
is donated by the Estwing Company to an 
outstanding undergraduate student. 



Frances Skomurski received a 
Brunton compass as the Outstanding 
Senior Award. 

Kurt Burmeister, Michael 
Fortwengler and Alex Glass received the 
Morris M. and Ada B. Leighton Award. 
This award, established by Brud 
Leighton, B.S. '47, was established to 
honor his parents and supports student 
research in geology. 

Alex Glass and Chris Mah received 
the Norman Sohl Memorial Award in 
Paleontology. The Sohl award was 
established to honor the late Norman F. 
Sohl, B.S. '49, M.S. '51, Ph.D. '54. Sohl 
was chief of paleontology at the USGS 
and was a leading authority on 
Cretaceous gastropods and biostratigra- 
phy. 

Jennifer Jackson was named 
Outstanding Woman Graduate Student. 
She received a cash award. The award 
was established by an anonymous 
donor in order to encourage women to 
pursue studies in geology. 

Two students were named out- 
standing teaching assistants. Dave 
Beedy received the award for the Spring 
2000 semester and Alex Glass received 
the award for the Fall 2000 semester. 



Students scramble over formations during a recent Geology 415 field trip to 
west Texas and southern New Mexico. 




Looking Back 



Illinois Alumni in 
Top Positions of 
GSA 

Illinois alumni have been 
very well represented in the lead- 
ership of GSA in the last several 
years. In 2001 Sharon Mosher, 
B.S. 73, Ph.D. 78, was presi- 
dent, Dave Stevenson, Ph.D. 
'65, was acting executive director 
and Suzanne Mahlburg Kay, 
B.S. '69, M.S. 72, served on the 
GSA council. In addition, Brud 
Leighton, B.S. '47, served as 
president of the Board of Trustees 
of the GSA Foundation (a sepa- 
rate and independent entity) . 

"It gave me great pride to 
notice such a good representation 
of Illinois alumni at those levels 
at the GSA meeting in Boston last 
November," said Leighton. "It 
pleased me to see participation in 
the society, which is one of the 
leading scientific societies for the 
profession." 

GSA was founded in 1888 by 
James Hall, James D. Dana and 
Alexander Winchell in New York. 
As a descendent of the American 
Association for the Advancement 
of Sciences, GSA is the first 
enduring society for the geo- 
sciences in America. It has been 
headquartered in Boulder, 
Colorado, since 1968. GSA has 
more than 16,000 members 
worldwide. 

Mosher's term as president 
ended in December, and 
Leighton, who had served as 
foundation president of the board 
for four years, and Stevenson 
stepped down from their respec- 
tive positions. Kay continues to 
serve on the GSA council. 



Harriet Wallace, Geologist and Librarian 



Harriet Wallace, librari- 
an emerita, served in the 
Geology Library in the 1960s 
and 70s. Wallace received 
her bachelor's degree in geol- 
ogy from Northwestern in 
1936 and a master's degree 
in teaching from Columbia 
University's Teachers College. 
In spite of Wallace's out- 
standing teaching creden- 
tials, teaching jobs were hard 
to find. 

Eventually Wallace managed to get a 
position at the mining division of Allied 
Chemical and Dye Company. While in that 
position she attended the first GSA meet- 
ing held after World War II. 

At first, Wallace worked at a private 
consulting company that advised mining 
companies about various mineral deposits 
in Illinois. Wallace did literature searches 
for the owner, and wrote research papers 
for him. The company eventually was 
closed down and Wallace decided she'd 
like to become a librarian. 

"I really liked doing literature 
searches— this was before computers!" 
says Wallace. "I didn't want to clerk in a 
dime store, so I went to library school. I 
thought any job in a library would be bet- 
ter than that." 

Wallace got her master's in library 
and information science from the 
University of Illinois in 1962 and was 
immediately hired as the geology librarian. 

"I hadn't thought about working full 
time." says Wallace, "but with all my 
background it would have been stupid not 
to take the job. So I came over and went 
to work." 

While many aspects of librarianship 
haven't changed over the years, there are 
some differences. For example, Wallace 
remembers having lots of money to spend, 
in part because the Geology Library, hav- 
ing recently split from the Geography 




Library, was considered a 
new library unit. 

"We had lots of 
money, we spent it as 
fast as we could," 
Wallace says. 
The library also had a 
separate budget for rare 
geology books. Of course, 
the biggest difference 
was computers, which 
were first used in the 
Geology Library in 1978, just before 
Wallace retired. In Wallace's day, 
records were all kept on index cards. 
Indexes were bound every year, which 
meant to do a thorough search on a sin- 
gle topic, one had to go to that subject 
in every issue of each bound index. The 
position of librarian, both in Wallace's 
day and today, is a tenure-track position, 
so librarians are expected to publish 
papers in their professional journals. 

During her tenure, Wallace worked 
to get topographic and geological maps 
transferred from the main library to the 
Geology Library. Previously, the Geology 
Library had no maps. 

In 1965 Wallace also was a found- 
ing member of the Geoscience 
Information Society (GIS), a national 
organization which facilitates the 
exchange of information in the geo- 
sciences through cooperation among sci- 
entists, librarians, editors, cartographers, 
educators, and information profession- 
als. GIS is still in existence and is a 
member society of the AGI. 

Wallace retired as full professor in 
1979. "I had a very satisfying, and ful- 
filling career," says Wallace. Wallace 
continues to live in the Champaign- 
Urbana area and still occasionally visits 
the Department. She generously donates 
funds to the Department to help women 
who wish to pursue careers in geology. 



Looking Back 



GEOLOGY 415 — Then and Now 



Geology 415, the Department's grad- 
uate-level field course, has been in exis- 
tence for more than 50 years. During this 
time it has undergone some dramatic 
changes, but it still serves the goal of 
allowing students to synthesize their geo- 
logic knowledge to create a geologic 
image of a region. In recent years, there 
are three versions of the course, all run 
jointly with Geology 315, allowing both 
undergraduates and graduates to benefit 
from the experience. Jim Kirkpatrick 
runs the course in west Texas and south- 
ern New Mexico, Steve Marshak takes 
the group to Arizona and southern 
California, and Bruce Fouke teaches on 
islands in the southern Caribbean. In the 
1940s, '50s and '60s, on the other hand, 
the course entailed many weekends of 
driving in four-van caravans throughout 
Wisconsin, Indiana and the western 
edges of Missouri. For many years, 
Professor Harold Wanless, a distin- 
guished sedimentary geologist, ran the 
course, and trained the students well. 



"What did I learn?" says Bill 
Soderman , M.S. '60, Ph.D. '62, of 
Geology 415. "It was the most compre- 
hensive way to assimilate the recent and 
ancient elements of what makes the 
Midcontinent what it is today. There's 
just an enormous variety of rock types, 
depositional environments and structural 
situations visible within a day's drive of 
campus. We could see it, and argue 




A sample drawing from Bill Soderman's 
Geology 415 notebook. 



about it. I also learned a lot about 
Harold Wanless, and how observant and 
patient he was. The field trips were 
kind of a slide show of the things 
Wanless and learned and observed and 
deciphered throughout his many years 
of fieldwork and teaching at Illinois. 

"And the camaraderie between stu- 
dents and staff during the trips just 
made it feel even more like Illinois was 
a great place to be. Geology 415 was one 
of the high points of my education." 

Soderman's notes from the trip fill a 
book over 100 pages long. The pages 
include detailed stratigraphic columns, 
cross-sections, and outcrop sketches, as 
well as carefully worded rock descrip- 
tions. By covering a broad region in the 
course, it was possible for students like 
Soderman to see regional correlations 
and patterns. 

Regardless of the decade that it was 
taught, Geology 415 was a course worth 
remembering. 



Where Are They Now? 




Those who were 
in the Geology 
Department in the 
1980s and 90s 
might be wonder- 
ing whatever hap- 
pened to Pat Lane 
and Murle 
Edwards, staff 
members who 
played a key role 
in everyone's inter- 
actions with the Department and 
University. Well, both are enjoying their 
retirement and using their time to travel 
extensively. 

Pat and her husband Eddie, have 
taken many long trips in their motor 
home. Last summer they traveled the 
AL-CAN (Alaska-Canada) Highway. 



Pat Lane 



n 



Along the way they passed through 
Sheridan, Wyoming, a place many geol- 
ogists have fond memories of because 
the Department's field camp used to be 
headquartered there. That trip was 
"proof that two people really could live 
in a 25-foot motor home on a long trip 
and still be compatible," says Lane. The 
Lanes continue to use Champaign as a 
base, in part because Eddie now works 
part time for the Engineering Continuing 
Education program. 

Murle, who served in the depart- 
ment as chief clerk from 1977-1998, has 
also traveled extensively since her retire- 
ment. Many of her driving trips have 
been undertaken because she is national 
chair of the historic landmarks and 
memorials committee of the National 
Society Daughters of the American 
Colonists. Thai committee works to 



place markings and plaques at places of 
historical significance throughout the 
United States. During these trips and 
many others, 
Murle has 
enjoyed many of 
the breathtaking 
geological for- 
mations of the 
country, and has 
indulged her 
interest in histo- 
ry and geogra- 
phy. "A special 
thrill to me was 
my trip to Point 

Barrow. Alaska, north of the Arctic 
Circle," says Murle. "1 continue to use 
my residence in southeast Urbana as my 
home base." She sends her "best person- 
al regards to all." 




Murle Edwards 



Alumni News 



Geology Entrepreneurs Make Champaign-Urbana Home Base 



We tend to think of geology-based 
entrepreneurs as living in Houston or 
Denver, but two major success stories 
prove this assumption wrong. Some 
entrepreneurs have remained in town 
and have found the local 
environment to be sup- 
portive of their efforts. 
For example, two compa- 
nies founded in 
Champaign-Urbana by 
geology department alum- 
ni, while vastly different, 
are both thriving. 
Applied Pavement 
Technology, co-founded 
by Margaret (Maggie) 
Broten, B.S. '85, grew 60 
percent last year alone, 
and Isotech Laboratories, 
founded by Dennis 
Coleman, Ph.D. 76, 
grew 30-40 percent in the 
last year in both sales and 
staff. 

Applied Pavement Technology, or 
APTech, was founded by Broten, Kathryn 
(Katie) Zimmerman and David Peshkin 
in 1995. It is one of fewer than a dozen 
companies worldwide that specializes in 
pavement engineering. Pavement engi- 
neering pertains to both highway and air- 
port pavements and involves evaluation, 
design, pavement management, training 
and research. 

Broten, who is a vice president and 
principal, received a joint degree in geol- 
ogy and civil engineering, as well as a 
master's in civil engineering. She has 
worked in the field of airport pavement 
management most of her career. 

"Pavement engineering is a very sta- 
ble field," Broten notes. "Although just 
now airports are funneling more of their 
money into security, safe pavements are 
critical both to highways and airports." 

While Broten's day-to-day responsi- 
bilities (which include about 12 days of 




Maggie Broten 



— 



travel per month) don't always rely on 
her geology background, that program 
did provide a "wonderful balance" to her 
civil engineering program. 

"Engineering involved big classes, 

very tense students 
and a focus on 
numbers and 
equations," says 
Broten. "Geology 
involved smaller 
groups, I felt that I 
knew everyone, 
and some of the 
classes involved 
extensive writing. 
The communica- 
tion skills I learned 
through geology 
have been very 
helpful in commu- 
nicating what our 
company does and 
in actually getting 
contracts." 
Although the company has moved to 
larger quarters, its headquarters have 
always been— and always will be— based 
in Champaign-Urbana. Zimmerman, pres- 
ident of the company, has strong personal 
ties to Champaign-Urbana. Peshkin, vice- 
president and principal, grew up in 
Champaign-Urbana and his late father 
was on the University faculty. Both 
Zimmerman and Peshkin have civil engi- 
neering degrees from the University of 
Illinois. The multimillion dollar company 
has 30 employees (many of them 
University of Illinois graduates) and has 
branch offices in Downers Grove, 111., 
Burlington, Vt., and Reno, Nev. 

"You'd be surprised how many 
employees choose to work in this office," 
says Broten. "Champaign-Urbana is a 
nice community." 

Broten also notes that she and others 
at the company benefit from their rela- 
tionship with the university and the abili- 



10 



ty to use its outstanding library facilities. 

Coleman's company, Isotech, grew 
out of the Ph.D. research he did at the 
University of Illinois with Tom 
Anderson, now professor emeritus. His 
thesis included using isotopic analysis to 
identify natural gas that had leaked from 
underground gas storage fields. Coleman 
found that natural gas has an isotopic 
"fingerprint" not unlike a DNA finger- 
print. The isotopic composition of 
methane, for example, can tell whether 
the gas was thermogenic or microbial, 
which can help determine whether it is 
naturally occurring or has leaked from 
an underground storage area. 

That work led to several consulting 
contracts, particularly with gas compa- 
nies. Because Coleman was a full-time 
employee of the ISGS, he could only 
consult with companies outside Illinois. 
By the early 1980s, the demand for his 
services demonstrated the need for a 
commercial laboratory, so he and three 
colleagues bought equipment and set up 
an independent lab, which they named 
Isotech Laboratories. 

Isotech very quickly established 
itself for the quality of its data. By 1991, 
the group had enough steady work that 
they could hire full-time staff. Coleman 
has worked full time at Isotech since 
1995, when he took early retirement 
after 25 years at the ISGS. Today there 
are 19 people on the payroll, including 
three of the original founders. The 
fourth founder opted to remain at the 
ISGS. 

Until recently about one third of the 
company's business was with oil com- 
panies, one third was gas companies 
and one third was environmental. Now 
the major oil companies make up more 
than half Isotech's business. The compa- 
ny had over $1.6 million in sales in 
2001. 

Isotech also was recently in the 
news for an innovative packaging sys- 




tern. Much of the company's business 
requires sending and receiving highly 
flammable mud-gas samples. The com- 
pany developed a long, thin metal pipe, 
dubbed IsoTube, that made it easier to 
collect samples, and was reusable and 
less expensive. Previously, 10,000 gas 
samples (about the number Isotech 
analyzes per year) generated 10,550 
pounds of waste. With the IsoTube™ 
system, the same number of samples 
generates 675 pounds of waste. Isotech 
recently was one of 17 Illinois compa- 
nies that received the Governor's 
Pollution Prevention Award. 

Coleman is happy to be based in 
Champaign, although the avid out- 
doorsman loves being in the moun- 
tains. Overhead cost in Champaign- 
Urbana is low and, like Broten, 
Coleman values the good association he 
has with both the university, as well as 
the ISGS in his case. While it has been 
difficult to recruit people to Urbana- 
Champaign, he has been able to hire 
many good chemists and other 
scientists from University of Illinois 
graduates. 

"The quality of the people is a 
significant factor for staying here," says 
Coleman. 



GeoScience 2005— Well on Its Way! 

Last year, the Department initiated a five-year, $3 million endowment cam- 
paign, because increasing our endowment is essential if we are to maintain our 
prominence as a teaching and research 
institution in geoscience. We're pleased to 
announce that the campaign has gotten off 
to a great start! We have received several 
lead gifts so far, and would like to highlight 
a few of these. Ed and Alison Franklin have 
endowed the Franklin field-camp fund, and 
have made a bequest for the Franklin 
Geology Development Fund. Eric and 
Kathy Johnson have endowed the W.H. 
Johnson Professorship of Surficial Geology, 
Jack and Richard Threet are endowing the 
Threet Professorship of Sedimentary 
Geology in honor of Harold Scott, Bill 
Soderman is endowing the Bluestem 
Graduate Fellowship, Brud Leighton is sub- 
stantially increasing the funding of the 
endowment for the Morris and Ada 
Leighton Research Fund, Jim Baroffio has 
established the endowment for the Wanless 
Fund for graduate-student support, and 
Joyce Johnson has endowed the W.H. 
Johnson field fund. We are also pleased to 
announced that funds donated by friends 
of Norman Sohl a number of years ago 

have grown sufficiently to endow the Sohl Endowment to support graduate-student 
research in paleontology. In the fall of 2001 , Steve Marshak and Bruce Fouke trav- 
eled to Houston to meet and visit with alumni. During that visit Fouke gave a talk 
to alumni on the future of geomicrobiology, a growing field. We wish to thank our 
benefactors profoundly, and encourage all alumni and friends of the Department to 
participate in building our future through GeoScience 2005. 



Illinois Faculty are Authoring Books 

In recent years, faculty in the Department of Geology have directed some of their 
efforts into writing books or chapters in books. For example, Craig Bethke published 
Geochemical Reaction Modeling, Concepts and Applications with Oxford University 
Press. Jim Kirkpatrick wrote the chapter on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy 
for the Handbook of Analytical Techniques in Concrete Science and Technology, and Jay 
Bass wrote the chapter on Elasticity of Minerals, Glasses, and Melts for the Handbook 
of Physical Constants. Steve Marshak's introductory geology textbook, Earth: Portrait of 
a Planet, published by W.W Norton, appeared in 2001. This is Marshak's third text- 
book. He's working on second editions of the other two {Basic Methods of Structural 
Geology, published by Prentice-Hall, and Earth Structure, an Introduction to Structural 
Geology and Tectonics, published by McGraw-Hill). 



Ed and Alison 
Franklin Make 
Major Bequest 

Ed and Alison Franklin 
have made a bequest of 
$800,000 to the Department of 
Geology as part of the 
GeoScience 2005 campaign. 
The Franklin Endowment, 
when established, will provide 
funds to support the teaching 
and research goals of the 
Department. This gift is on top 
of their already amazingly gen- 
erous donation of $200,000 to 
support our field camp. The 
Franklins are truly friends of 
the Department, par excel- 
lence! Ed Franklin received his 
B.S. in 1956. 



In Memory 




Pat Domenico 



Pat Domenico, a 
faculty member 
from 1967-1982, 
died August 1 , 
2001 , near his 
summer home 
in Montana. 
Domenico 
joined the 
Department 
shortly after 
completing his doctorate at the 
University of Nevada in 1967. In 1982 he 
moved to Texas A&M University, where 
he became the David B. Harris Professor 
of Geology. He retired in 1988. 
Domenico received numerous awards, 
including the GSA's O.E. Meinzer 
Hydrogeology Award; the Basic Research 
Award of the U.S. National for Rock 
Mechanics; the Excellence in Science 
and Engineering Award from the 
Association of Ground Water Scientists 



and Engineers; and the Distinguished 
Teaching Award College of Geosciences 
at Texas A&M University. President 
George H. Bush appointed Domenico to 
the U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review 
Board. 

Domenico contributed basic research 
in areas of consolidation resource opti- 
mization and mass and energy transport. 
His work was inventive, provocative, 
eclectic and often pioneering. It com- 
monly featured the elegant application of 
analytical mathematics to explore physi- 
cal and chemical processes. Domenico 
was the author of two major textbooks: 
Concepts and Models in Groundwater 
Hydrology and Physical and Chemical 
Hydrogeology. He participated actively at 
GSA's annual meetings and in numerous 
Penrose Conferences, he served as the 
Birdsall Distinguished Lecturer and con- 
tributed to the Decade of North American 
Geology series. 



Domenico served in the Navy and 
enjoyed hunting and fishing. As a profes- 
sor, he helped educate many outstanding 
students who went on to be leaders in 
their various fields. 

"Pat had very high standards," says 
Tom Anderson, professor emeritus. "But 
he didn't have a stuffy academician's 
demeanor. He used to tell me, 'Teaching 
sure beats working for a living!'" 

Those who know Pat well will miss 
his keen sense of humor and wry obser- 
vations on the state of our science and 
humanity. Through the years he helped 
to shape the direction of modern hydro- 
geology. Many individuals were touched 
in a personal and special way by Pat's 
life and career. 

Based on an article by F.W. Schwartz, Ph.D. '72, 
that appeared in The Hydrologist, newsletter of 
the hydrogeology division of GSA 




Dave Anderson 



12 



Dave Anderson, 
professor emeri- 
tus, died June 
29, 2001. He 
was 63 and 
had been 
suffering from 
Alzheimer's dis- 
ease. Anderson, 
a native of 
Australia, was 
professor of geology at the University 
from 1967 until he retired in 1996. He 
was department head from 1983-1988. 
As department head, Anderson hired 
several of the faculty who are still in the 
Department today. As a teacher, he 
taught courses in petrology, thermody- 
namics, structural geology, field geology, 
and introductory geology. 

Anderson came to Illinois after com- 
pleting a post-doctoral position with 
James B. Thompson at Harvard 
University. He was an expert in nonequi- 
librium thermodynamics as applied to 
metamorphic rocks. Anderson mentored 



many students, both undergraduate and 
graduate, and played a major role in 
steering students into successful careers. 
Sue Mahlberg-Kay, B.S. '69, M.S. 72, pro- 
fessor of geology at Cornell University, 
credits Anderson with instilling in her an 
excitement for geology. 

Sharon Mosher, B.S. '73, Ph.D. 78, 
Scott Professor of Geological Sciences at 
the University of Texas, Austin, and for- 
mer President of the Geological Society of 
America, says, "Dave's understanding of 
diffusion and the effects of nonequilibri- 
um thermodynamics was way ahead of 
his time. He instilled in his students a 
deep appreciation for geologic processes, 
and the insights we learned from him 
have been invaluable. He, more than any- 
one else, is the person who inspired me 
to continue for a Ph.D., and to return to 
theU. of I." 

Chuck Simonds, M.S. '69, Ph.D. 71, 
remembers gathering for long discussion 
sessions in Anderson's office in the base- 
ment of the Natural History Building or 
the cafeteria in the Illini Union. 



"Dave was a risk taker and passed 
that instinct to his students," says 
Simonds. 

Anderson also had a reputation for 
excellence in field work, and was an 
instructor at the University of Illinois 
Summer Field camp in Sheridan, Wyo., 
during the summers of 1967, 1968 and 
1970. During the summer of 1972, 
Anderson taught at the University of 
Illinois field camp in northern Scotland. 

As anyone who has participated in 
field work knows, sometimes these trips 
don't always go as smoothly as they 
could. Professor Wang-Ping Chen remem- 
bers co-leading a structural geology field 
trip with Anderson in the early 1980s. 
The group, including 54 students, went 
to the upper peninsula of Michigan in 
late September. They were greeted with 
snow and sleet at their campsite. The 
next morning Anderson and Chen real- 
ized four students were missing and they 
combed the campsite. They almost 
tripped on a heap of canvas on the 

(continued on next page) 



In Memory 





Dennis Wood, a well-known and 
highly respected geologist from North 
Wales died on April 20, 2001. Wood was 
a professor at the University of Illinois 
from 1967-1980. 

At Illinois, Wood carried out insight- 
ful research into the process of slaty 
cleavage formation, the development of 
strain in rock, and issues of global tec- 
tonics. He also collaborated with Fred 
Donath, professor of geology, whose lab- 
oratory-based experiments in rock 
mechanics perfectly complemented 
Dennis' enthusiasm and flair in the field. 
Together with Wood's eloquent class- 
room lectures and epic field courses, this 
provided a heady cocktail that inspired a 
generation of Illinois students. Many stu- 
dents inspired by Wood now occupy 
senior positions around the world— in 
industry as well as in academia. 

In 1980 Wood returned to Britain as 
Chief Scientist with Robertson Research 
and remained there until 1990. In 1993, 
he served as chair of the Earth Science 
Committee for NERC (Britain's equiva- 
lent for NSF). In the last few years, 
Wood was extensively involved in geo- 
logical conservation, becoming Chair of 
the Gwynedd and Mon RIGS Group, 
where he exercised his manv talents in 



conserving, recording and developing 
sites for use by the general public, 
researchers and schools. Such was 
Woods' ability to convey enthusiasm for 
his subject, that he was in huge demand 
with academic audiences and amateur 
groups alike. 

Throughout his career, Wood's inter- 
ests bridged both industry and acade- 
mia. While working in industry, for 
example, he accepted an Honorary Chair 
at the University of Wales, taught for a 
period at Aberystwyth and lectured at 
Bangor. He was an inspiring teacher who 
loved working with students, especially 
in the field, and was unstinting with his 
time and energy. 

"I think it's true to say he brought a 
breath of fresh air to the department in 
the late sixties," says Alex Maltman, 
M.S. 71, Ph.D. 73. "He had charisma 
and brought inspiration to many. He 
made geology FUN." 

Wood's interests ranged well beyond 
geology. He was an accomplished organ- 
ist and held passions for cricket, rugby, 
and genealogy. He also loved parties 
both at home and in the field. According 
to Maltman, "The parties at his house 
were legendary. Even Francis Crick, the 
DNA Nobel laureate, attended one." 

In 1970, Wood began teaching a 
summer field course in the United 
Kingdom. These trips also became leg- 
endary, mostly for the geology, and part- 
ly for their raucous good fun— they 
attracted students from all over the 
United States. Logistics on these trips, 
however, did not always go as planned. 
On the first trip, Wood's little red MG 
sports car became submerged by the 
incoming tide as the party visited a tidal 
island. But all in all, the trips were a 
wonderful geological experience and pro- 
vided outstanding training, founded on 
Wood's great breadth and depth of geo- 
logical knowledge. 

At his funeral, in Bangor, North 
Wales, one of the eulogists remarked 
that no one could pretend that Dennis 
was a saint. But no one could denv that 



he was a great teacher in his day, an 
inspiration to many. 

"I know practicing geologists who 
today readily acknowledge that their 
having followed that profession was due 
to one man, the cultivated yet wild 
Englishman who sadly died at his adopt- 
ed home in Wales last year," says 
Maltman. 

Sharon Mosher, B.S. 73, Ph.D. 78, 
and recipient of the 2001 Distinguished 
Alumni award, says, "Dennis taught me 
far more than academics; he taught me 
how to be a professional, everything 
from how to supervise students to how 
to present my research to the larger sci- 
entific community. He was a major influ- 
ence on my early career; he was a true 
mentor." 

Wood died of a heart attack on 
stage while accepting applause for a 
public lecture. In recognition of Wood's 
achievements, the Welsh RIGS move- 
ment is planning to place a plaque at his 
favorite field site, Rhoscolyn, in 
Anglesey. 



Anderson 

(continued from previous page) 

ground. "Some irresponsible people left 
the extra tents here," said Dave as he 
bent to pick the tent up. Then Dave 
burst into laughter— there were four 
warm bodies, still sound asleep, under 
what was a collapsed tent soaked with 
freezing rain. 

Professor Steve Marshak remem- 
bers going to Scotland with Anderson to 
field check the thesis work of two grad- 
uate students. Together, they rented a 
small dinghy with an outboard motor 
and traversed a stormy loch. Then they 
climbed a small mountain called the 
Stack of Glencoul, in the pouring rain. 
"At the top, Dave gave me a superb 
tour of a classic exposure of deformed 
worm burrows. I still remember him, 
radiating delight in a geologic discover)', 
despite the rain," says Marshak. 



13 



Windows into the Past 



At the Turn of the (20th) Century- 
Research and Graduate Education Become the Focus 



At the turn of the 
20th century, the president 
of the University of Illinois 
was Andrew Sloan Draper, 
and the head of the 
Department of Geology (a 
unit which included geog- 
raphy) was Charles 
Wesley Rolfe. The climate 
of the University, in those 
days, did not support 
research. In fact, accord- 
ing to W. Solberg's (2000) 
history of the University, 
Draper "disparaged disin- 
terested research and made no signifi- 
cant contribution to its development on 
campus." This was epitomized by 
Draper's assigning Rolfe the duty of 
domesticating campus squirrels. Thus, 
when Draper quit in 1904 and returned 
to public school administration, it had 
to be good news for the Geology 
Department. Edmund J. James became 
President of the University in 1905. 

James immediately began upgrad- 
ing faculty in "weak" departments, 
such as geology. Rolfe remained as 
head (and also served as a consultant 
to the State Geological Survey in clay 
investigations), but was joined by 
William Shirley Bayley and Rufus 
Matthew Bagg. Both of these geologists 
held Ph.D. degrees from Johns Hopkins 
University. A Yale doctoral candidate, 
Thomas Edmund Savage, also joined 
the Department. Thus, a 19th-century 
department of one professor, devoted 
almost entirely to undergraduate 
instruction, suddenly became a 20th- 
century department of four professors, 
with interests in research and graduate 
education. The list of graduate degree 
recipients began to increase steadily— 
14 between 1905 and 1919, 15 master's 




degrees and two doctorates were grant- 
ed in fields such as stratigraphy, eco- 
nomic geology, Quaternary geology, 
paleontology, and petroleum geology. 

Before coming to Illinois, Bayley 
had taught at Colby College for 16 
years, and since 1SS7 had an affiliation 
with the United States Geological 
Survey. Bayley was author or co-author 
of 63 publications, as well as a three 
textbooks {Elementary Crystallography, 
1910); Minerals and Rocks, 1915; and 
Descriptive Mineralogy, 1916). He 
worked primarily on the geology of iron 
ore deposits, particularly in Minnesota 
and Michigan, but late in his career, he 
also studied kaolin deposits in North 
Carolina, presaging later specialization 
in the Department of Geology. 

T E. Savage, appointed as an assis- 
tant professor in 1906 and, concurrently, 
as a "geologist" in the Illinois State 
Geological Survey, came to Illinois from 
Leander Clark College in Toledo, Iowa. 
He was also assistant state geologist of 
Iowa from 1904 to 1907. Savage contin- 
ued graduate study as he began teach- 
ing at Illinois, and finished a doctorate 
at Yale in 1909. Between 1910 and 1919, 
Savage, under the auspices of the ISGS, 



! did quadrangle 
i mapping and strati- 
graphic reports. 
; Savage remained 
with the 
Department of 
Geology and the 
Survey until his 
retirement in 1934. 

Rufus Bagg 
came to Illinois as 
an instructor after 
having held posi- 
tions at Colorado 
College and the 
New Mexico School of Mines. He also 
spent a year as "Honorary Mineralogist" 
in charge of an exhibit of sulfide miner- 
als at the Paris Exposition in 1900. Bagg 
published extensively on fossil and liv- 
ing foraminifera and in economic geolo- 
gy and mineralogy. He left Illinois in 
1911 to join the faculty of Lawrence 
College in Appleton, Wisconsin. When 
Bagg left, John Lyon Rich came to 
Illinois as an instructor. While he was 
at Illinois, 1911 through 1918, he pub- 
lished more than twenty papers in a 
wide diversity of geological fields. His 
experimental study of the physical prop- 
erties of ice was a 'first' in its field, but 
Rich is remembered mostly as a stratig- 
rapher-sedimentologist and petroleum 
geologist. After leaving Illinois, Rich 
went on to national fame as professor 
at the University of Cincinnati. 

The World War I era also saw the 
hiring of Francis M. Van Tuyl, who 
joined the Department of Geology 
briefly, as an instructor from 1914 - 
1917. Tuyl completed his doctorate at 
Columbia University in 1915, and dur- 
ing the summer of 1916 he was a mem- 
ber of the University of Illinois Hudson 
Bay Exploring Expedition led by Savage. 



In 1917 he left for the Colorado School 
of Mines. 

When Rolfe retired in 1916, Elliot 
Blackwelder succeeded to the headship. 
Blackwelder only stayed at Illinois for 
three years, for he resigned in 1919 to 
join the faculty at Stanford. Blackwelder 
was a very prominent geologist at a 
national level, as recognized by his 
appointment to the National Academy of 
Sciences, the presidency of the 
Geological Society of America (1940), 
and the presidency of the Seismological 
Society (1947). 

In addition to senior staff, Illinois' 
Department of Geology in the early 20th 
century hired a number of junior staff 
members— as many as four in any given 
year. University records list 20 "assis- 
tants" in the Department between 1906 
and 1919. One of these assistants even- 
tually received a graduate degree from 
the Department, but most appear to 
have been at Illinois for teaching purpos- 
es only. 

At the time of Blackwelder's depar- 
ture in 1919, as the world recovered 
from World War I, all of the professors 
in the Department had their Ph.D.s, 
even though some had been hired while 
still working on their doctorates. In addi- 
tion, all of these faculty had gained their 
doctorates at universities other than 
Illinois, reflecting President James and 
Dean Kinley's prescription for reforming 



the University, and all were active in 
research, publishing in national jour- 
nals. The Department was actively 
granting graduate degrees. The 
Department's first Ph.D. went to Merle 
Louis Nebel in 1917, for his study of the 
contact metamorphism in the iron-bear- 
ing rocks next to the Duluth gabbro in 
Minnesota. Nebel was appointed as a 
professor of geology in West Virginia 
University, but sadly died in 1918. Our 
second doctorate, granted in 1919, went 
to Clarence Samuel Ross, whose 1919 
dissertation also was a study of contact 
metamorphism near Duluth. Ross went 
on to a long and distinguished career in 
the U. S. Geological Survey. 

The Geology Department entered 
the "roaring 20's" as a vital, active 
teaching and research program, already 
boasting prominent alumni, and already 
contributing new information on a vari- 
ety of geologic issues. 

References 

Scott, Franklin W. 1918, The Serai-Centennial 

Alumni Record of the University of Illinois, 

University of Illinois. 1147 p. 
Solberg, Winton U., 2000. University of Illinois, 

1894-1904. The Shaping of the University, 

University of Illinois Press, Urbana and 

Chicago, 415 p. 
Annual Report of the Trustees of the University 

of Illinois; University of Illinois Annual 

Register. 
Files for Bayley, Rolfe, Savage, held by the 

Department of Geology in the University of 

Illinois Archives. 



Flash from the past: 



172 and Dan Blake 
t the Badlands. 





Wmm^ 




Degrees Conferred in 2001 



Bachelor of Science Degrees 

January 

David Cecil Lampe 

May 

David Andrew Fike 
Sean Paul Fisher-Rohde 
Kristin Ann Gazdziak 
Hugo Gonzalez 
Erin E. Gutierrez 
Kristen M. Hasenjager 
Stacey Day Kocian 
Bryan J. Luman 
Jill Erin Pine 
Frances Nakai-Skomurski 
Anna Lee Sutton 
Laura Elizabeth Swan 

August 

Tyler Patrick Jones 
Erik Nicholas Schultz 

December 

Adam Robert Gibbons 
Brandon Craig Haist 

Master of Science Degrees 

May 

Joseph Matthew Schoen (teaching of earth 
science degree) 

Anthony Charles Gibson, Three-dimensional 
Geometries and Porosity Trends of Subsurface 
Ooid Shoal Hydrocarbon Reservoirs in the 
Mississippian Ste. Genevieve Formation of the 
Illinois Basin. USA (Bruce Fouke) 

Serena Lee, Physical and Chemical Controls 
on Carbonate Precipitation in Surficial Hot 
Springs and Subterranean Cold Springs (Bruce 
Fouke) 

Richard J. Wachtman, Sedimentology, 
Stratigraphy, and S ?SR/ S6 SR Geochemistiyi of 
KT Ejecta Deposited in Central Belize 485 KM 
from the Chicxulub Crater (Bruce Fouke) 

Aubrey Lea Zerkle, Microbial and 
Environmental Influences on Black Band 
Disease in Scleractinian Corals of Curacao, 
N.A. (Bruce Fouke) 

October 

Matthew Carlton Fredrick Wander, 
Development and Implementation of An 
Isotopic Model for Quantifying Groundwater 
Denitrification (Thomas Johnson) 

Doctor of Philosophy Degrees 
December 

Xiaoqiang Hon. Structure and Dynamics of 
Layered Double Hydroxides (R. James 
Kirkpa trick) 



15 



Obituaries 



Alumni News 




Editor's Note: Although Paul Shaffer died 
in 2000, we were unable to include a com- 
plete obituar)' in the 2000 issue of the 
newsletter. The following is a more com- 
plete description of his life and achieve- 
ments. 

Paul Shaffer died 
November, 2000, 
at his home in 
Maryville, Ohio. 
He was 90 years 
old. Shaffer, a 
professor of geol- 
ogy from 1947 
until 1968, was 
an expert in 
glacial geology 
and geomorphol- 
ogy. His research focused on a series of 
glacial deposits in Iowa and Illinois. Most 
notably, he demonstrated conclusively 
that an early Wisconsin ice sheet 
advanced much further west than former- 
ly supposed, and dated the time of this 
advance. Shaffer also wrote a book on 
rocks and minerals for laymen, published 
by Simon & Schuster. It was the preemi- 
nent book in the field and gained him a 
national reputation. 

Shaffer received his bachelor's 
degree from the college of Wooster in 
1935, his master's and doctorate from The 
Ohio State University in 1937 and 1945, 
respectively. Prior to coming to the 
University of Illinois, Shaffer was chair of 
the geology department at Ohio Wesleyan 
and served as chief geologist at Ranney 
Water Collector Corporation. His success 
in developing huge underground water 
supplies essential for wartime use was 
well known at the time in the profession. 

Shaffer met George White, later 
department head and professor at Illinois, 
when they were both at The Ohio State 
University. Shaffer was there as a student 
and White was on sabbatical from the 
University of New Hampshire. When 
White came to the University of Illinois, 
he brought Shaffer with him. 



White described Shaffer as, "utterly 
and absolutely honest, both intellectually 
and personally. This deep sense of integrity 
is not flaunted, but it is always present. 
People like to work with him and for him, 
he is generous in giving credit to his associ- 
ates for successful performance of joint 
operations." 

In addition to his academic and admin- 
istrative duties at the University, which 
included serving as associate provost and 
acting department head, Shaffer cared 
deeply and was very involved in undergrad- 
uate education. In addition, he was an 
active member of the Association of 
Geology Teachers. He served as vice presi- 
dent of that organization from 1946-47 and 
president from 1951-52. 

Shaffer was a natural organizer, of both 
people and space and his skills were on 
demand by many organizations. He was 
selected to organize and lead a group of six 
U.S. teachers on a trip to Nigeria in 1962 at 
that country's request. Also in the 1960s he 
was asked to help NSF organize an intera- 
gency program in international science edu- 
cation, focused primarily in India. His ser- 
vices also were used by the National 
Association of State Universities and Land 
Grant Colleges, where he served as director 
of the International Programs office. In 1964 
Shaffer received the Orton Award from The 
Ohio State University. This award honors a 
distinguished geology alumnus. 

In 1968, Shaffer resigned from the 
University to pursue international science 
education full time. 

W.A. (Bill) Meneley, Ph.D. '64, died 
in 2000. Dr. Meneley was born in 
Saskatchewan, Canada, in 1933. He earned 
his bachelor's degree in geological engineer- 
ing and master's degree in geology from the 
University of Saskatchewan. He worked at 
the Research Council of Alberta as a 
groundwater hydrologist before enrolling at 
the University of Illinois for a Ph.D. in geol- 
ogy. Following his doctorate, Meneley 
joined the Saskatchwan Research Council 
where he was in charge of the groundwater 
hydrology program. In 1976 he established 
W.A. Meneley Consultants Ltd. He 



retired in 1991. "Bill will be remembered 
for his clarity of thought and expression, 
his unabated interest in science, and his 
love for the application of science to 
engineering practice," writes his col- 
league, Earl A. Christiansen, Ph. D. '59. 

(This information contributed by Philip 
Sandberg, faculty member from 1965 to 
1995) 

Yang Baoxing, a postdoctoral 
research associate in the Department of 
Geology from 1983-85 died July 14 of 
cancer. Dr. Yang worked with Professor 
George Klein during her time at the 
University. Dr. Yang was on the faculty of 
the Chengdu College of Geology (now 
known as the Chengdu Institute of 
Technology) from 1960-2001. She served 
as host for the summer lecture visits 
from professors Tom Anderson in 1987, 
Philip Sandberg in 1988 and Dan Blake 
in 1989. 

In addition to being a successful 
geologist she was a talented dancer and 
singer, especially in her youth. She was a 
charming, good-humored individual 
given to animated conversation and 
strong championing of her geological 
views, backed up by extensive experi- 
ence in the field and laboratory. Her 
work in sedimentary geology was very 
broad temporally, lithologically and geo- 
graphically, ranging from the extreme 
northwest of China to the South China 
Sea. She worked in sedimentary geology 
and hydrocarbon reservoir geology in 
many part of China, including Tarim 
basin, Xinjiang Province, and the 
Changqing gas field (the largest gas field 
in China) . 

"Thinking about Baoxing evokes 
vivid memories of our times with her in 
China, including a trip by train across 
the loess plains of northern China from 
Beijing to Xian, where we saw the 
Terracotta Army," writes Philip Sandberg, 
now dean of the College of Natural 
Sciences at Dakota State University. 
"Those of us who had the good fortune 
to know Baoxing will miss her greatly." 



lo 



Class News 



Alumni News 



M <rr- 



1930s 



Last July Willis (Bill) M. Decker, 
B.S. '39, spent a week with 17 of his fam- 
ily at the Gulf Shore of Alabama, and in 
October he attended the sixth reunion of 
VPB 23 (a Navy Patrol Bomber 
Squadron) . Bill retired from the Navy as 
commander in 1945, spent 39 years with 
Cities Service Oil Co., and five years as 
Vice President of Exploration with Jet Oil 
Co. in Tulsa, Oklahoma. 



1950s 



Haydn H. Murray, B.S. '48, M.S. 
'50, Ph.D. '51, attended the 12th 
International Clay Conference last August 
in Bahia Blanca (on the Argentine coast 
in Buenos Aires Province) . At the opening 
ceremonies he was presented with an 
Honorary Doctorate from the Universidad 
Nacional Del Sur. "1 knew about this 
about a month before the conference, but 
I didn't tell my wife or my 10 former stu- 
dents who were in attendance, so it was a 
very great surprise to them when this was 
presented," writes Haydn, who is emeri- 
tus professor at Indiana University 
Department of Geological Sciences. The 
Haydn Chair in Applied Clay Mineralogy 
has been endowed at Indiana University. 
Haydn writes that they hope to have the 
position filled by September of 2002. 




Haydn Murray (center) accepts honorary doctorate from Dr. 
Edgardo Giiichal, vice chair of the Universidad Del Sur. On 
the right is Dr. Eduardo Dominguez, general chair of the 
12th International Clay Conference and chair of the geology 
department at the Universidad Del Sur. 



Robert N. Grinnell, B.S. '51, M.S. 
'52, writes that he and his wife are still 
dividing their time between the Texas Hill 
country and Jackson Hole, while trying to 
keep up with 12 grandchildren. 

Robert E. Fox, M.S. '53, has 
received the Distinguished Lifetime 
Achievement Award from the American 
Institute of Professional Geologists. The 
award recognizes Fox's decades of inter- 
national pioneering oil exploration, pro- 
duction and consulting. In 1960 Fox sur- 
veyed and recommended the Libyan con- 
cession area. The area proved to be the 
largest oil field in Africa. Fox also con- 
tributed to the discovery and develop- 
ment of the first offshore gas field in the 
Netherlands. He received an Honorary 
Doctor of Science degree from the 
University of Edinburgh, Scotland, for his 
contributions to the international oil 
industry. Fox is now president of TERM 
Energy, Oil and Gas Corporation, which 
operates primarily in West Virginia. He is 
based in Lexington, Kentucky. 

Hal Rasmussen and John D. Shafer, 

both 1954 graduates, had not seen each 
other for 44 years until they met up at the 
Department of Geology homecoming cele- 
bration (that kicked off the Geoscience 
2005 campaign) in October 2000 (see 
cover story in Geoscience 2000 newslet- 
ter). Rasmussen lives in Acme, Mich., and 
Shafer lives in Olney, 111. 
Both are still active in 
business. They are trying 
to track down a class- 
mate, Ron Mink, who 
worked for 30 years in 
South America. 



Milton Langer, B.S. '53, 
M.S. '55, writes to say 
he was saddened by the 
death of Professor Paul 
Shaffer (see obituary in 
this issue). "Paul Shaffer 
was my first geology 
professor in 1949 (physi- 
cal geology 101 ) and he 
served as my master's 



thesis advisor. . . I found him to be a 
very understanding, excellent, dedicated 
and always supportive person." Langer 
retired in 1992 after more than 30 years 
of teaching geological and various physi- 
cal science courses at 10 different col- 
leges, mainly at the junior college level. 
At the very beginning of his career he 
worked for five years in the oil fields. 
Langer also served as a colonel in the 
Army Reserves, from which he retired in 
1995. Since retiring, Mr. Langer, who 
lives in Morton Grove, 111., has been 
involved in politics and many communi- 
ty activities, including the local historical 
society and the forest preservation soci- 
ety. "With my current activities, I do not 
understand how I ever had time to be 
employed." Both of Langer's sons live in 
Oklahoma: Erich is an environmental 
ecologist and Marcus is a high school 
teacher of history and English. 

1960s 

Karl R. (Dick) Krauss, B.S. '62, is 

semi-retired, co-principal at DiMa-Med 
Corporation. Krauss wonders, "Do you 
still have a summer course in Sheridan, 
Wyo.? I attended summer of 1960. Norb 
Cygan was one of the instructors. We 
also had classes with Dr. White, Dr. Hay 
and Dr. Henderson. I believe Hilt 
Johnson ran that camp, or perhaps 
several labs I was in. ..." 
Editor's note: The Department still runs 
a summer geology field camp, but it's 
now based in Park City, Utah. See stor)> 
in the 1999 Year in Review newsletter, 
page 12. 

Chris Heath, M.S. '63, Ph.D. '65, is 

running for vice president of AAPG. He 
is an independent researcher, having 
spent his career with Caltex and Amoco 
and later as an honorary professor at the 
University of British Columbia, Canada. 
Heath, a native of England, has been a 
member of AAPG since 1966. He 
received the AAPG Distinguished Service 
Award in 1992 and the Certificate of 
Merit in 1997. 



Alumni News 




Douglas Anderson (left) and David Miller at 
the Kingdome site the morning before the 
implosion. 

Douglas A. Anderson, B.S. '69, is a 

senior consultant with Schnabel 
Engineering Associates, Inc., where he is a 
demolition expert. He has been working 
on blast vibration and fragmentation since 
1980. His most enormous project so far 
has been to help demolish Seattle's 
Kingdome. The Kingdome's roof was the 
world's largest thin-shell concrete dome 
structure. Now that it no longer exists, the 
largest unsupported roof is the University 
of Illinois' Assembly Hall. Although there 
was enormous concern about the impact 
on neighboring structures as the Kingdome 
fell, the demolition was very successful. 
Final result: only five broken windows and 
a lot of dust. The resulting rubble pile was 
expected (and required by contract) to be 
less than 70 feet and it ended up being 
only 23 feet high. Anderson likes to work 
on predictive models for vibration and 
fragmentation for "those projects that are a 
bit out of the ordinary," he writes. 

John Steinmetz, B.S. '69, M.S. 75, 

was been elected treasurer for the 
Association of American State Geologists. 
He is state geologist and director of the 
Indiana Geological Survey in Bloomington, 
Ind. 

1980s 

Scott R. Krueger, M.S. '85, lives 
with his wife, Kimberly, in Sugar Land, 
Tex. Scott is Senior Geologist for Duncan 
Oil, Inc. in Houston. 

Stephen E. Laubach, Ph.D. '86, 

senior research scientist at the Bureau of 



Economic Geology, University of Texas, 
Austin, is serving in the AAPG Education 
Department Visiting Geologists Program 
(VGP). The goal of the VGP is to provide 
better communication among students, 
faculty, university administrators and 
geology professionals. Laubach's talk is 
titled Targeting Natural Fractures: 
Opportunities for the Domestic Petroleum 
Industry. Laubach also is an instructor f 
or AAPG's Fractured Reservoir 
Characterization and Modeling School. 

1990s 

M. Scott Wilkerson, Ph.D. '91, and 

his wife Beth, are the proud parents of 
Benjamin Scott Wilkerson, who was bom 
November 16, 2001. Benjamin has a big 
brother, Zachary, who is four. Wilkerson 
just received tenure and promotion to 
associate professor at DePauw University, 
and will become chair of their 
Department of Geology in the Fall. He 
also recently published an article on fold- 
thrust belts that was the cover story of 
the AAPG Bulletin, and is editing an 
upcoming special issue of the Journal of 
Structural Geology. Wilkerson also is an 
adjunct professor in our Department of 
Geology . 

Sharon (Horstman) Qi, B.A. '89, 
M.S. '93, stopped by the University in 
December. She was in town to teach a 
short course for the USGS office in 
Urbana. Sharon works at the USGS in 
Denver, primarily with GIS data. She 
commutes from Fort Collins, where her 
husband is an engineer with Hewlett- 
Packard. Sharon and her husband have 
two children and enjoy the mountain 
views. 

Melinda Legg Ylagan, M.S. '94 and 
Robert Ylagan, Ph.D. '96, announce the 
birth of their son, Renan Robert Ylagan. 
He arrived January 4, 2001 . They recently 
moved to Rochester, New York. 

Eric Holdener, M.S. '91, Ph.D. '97, 

is the proud father of Chase Alexander 
Holdener, who was born on August 9, 
2001, in Mount Vernon, Ohio. Eric writes 
that "Chase is cute and (so far) very well- 



behaved. Mother (Judy) and baby are 
both doing well. I am just amazed." 
Steve Schimmrich, 93-98, and his 

wife Jennifer are the proud parents of 
twins: Lucas Michael and Emily Joanne, 
born on February 5, 2001. Steve teaches 
geology at a community college in the 
Hudson Valley of New York. 

2000s 

David Fike, B.S. '01, is spending 
the academic year 2001-02 at the Scott 
Polar Research Institute at Cambridge's 
Churchill College. Fike is in Cambridge 
on a prestigious Winston Churchill 
Foundation Award. These scholarships, 
which provide tuition, fees, living 
expenses and travel, support 10 stu- 
dents per year for graduate study in 
engineering, math and science. Students 
are chosen from 57 universities and col- 
leges nationwide. 

Fike's goal is to join in the search 
for life on Mars. The polar regions are 
the most similar Earth environments to 
the surface of Mars. Fike, who triple 
majored in geology, engineering physics 
and astronomy, studied microbial popu- 
lations in Yellowstone's hot springs for 
his undergraduate thesis. Fike spent the 
summer of 2001 at the NASA Ames 
Astrobiology Academy, which accepts 12 
students each year to work on research 
projects and learn about NASA. 

Faculty 

George D. Klein, emeritus 
professor, was elected by the Houston 
Geological Society to the House of 
Delegates of the AAPG. The House of 
Delegates is the governing legislative 
council of the AAPG. Dr. Klein's consult- 
ing company, SED-STRAT Geoscience 
Consultants, Inc., is thriving. 

Mike Hanke, visiting professor 
1998-2000, and his wife have a new 
addition to their family: Madeline Anne 
was born June 5, 2001. "Madeline has a 
full head of dark brown hair and is so 
beautiful and sweet that we can hardly 
contain ourselves," writes Mike. 



HONOR ROLL OF DONORS FOR 200T 



s-m 



The following is a list of friends and alumni of the Department of Geology who have donated to the department during the calendar year 2001. 



Thomas F. Anderson 

Franklin Andrews 

Robert F. Babb II 

Rodney J. Balazs 

Debbie E. Baldwin 

Robert S. Barnard 

David K. Beach 

Craig M. Bethke 

Jean M. Bethke 

Marion E. Bickford 

Ronald E. Black 

Heidi Blischke 

Joseph E. Boudreaux 

James C. Bradbury 

Mr. and Mrs. Allen S. Braumiller 

Annette Brewster 

Mr. and Mrs. Ross D. Brower 

Robert L. Brownfield 

Glenn R. and Susan B. Buckley 

Dr. and Mrs. Thomas L. 

Chamberlin 
Charles J. Chantell 
Mr. and Mrs. Lester W. Clutter 
Lorence G. and Barbara J. Collins 
Susan E. Collins 
Virginia A. Colten-Bradley 
Michelle M. Corlew 
Norbert E. Cygan 
Dr. and Mrs. Richard N. 

Czerwinski 
George H. Davis 
Ilham Demir 
Richard E. Dobson 
Bruce E. Dollahan 
Garnett M. Dow 
Sophie M. Dreifuss 
James L. Eades 
Mohamed T. El-Ashry 
Gary M. Fleeger 
Gary R. Foote 
Richard M. Forester 
Jack D. Foster 
Robert E. Fox 

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin H. Franklin 
Gordon S. Fraser 
Mr. and Mrs. Max Paul Fritzel 
Barry R. Gager 
Sandra L. Jacob 
John R. Garino 
Theresa C. Gierlowski 
Richard A. Gilman 
Robert N. Ginsburg 
Mr. and Mrs. Albert D. Glover 
Hal Gluskoter 
Erika L. Goerich 
Dr. and Mrs. Stuart Grossman 



Catherine L. Harms 

Michael J. Hasek 

Richard L. Hay 

Darrell N. Helmuth 

Mark A. Helper 

Sharon Mosher 

Lee M. Hirsch 

Henry A. Hoff 

Mr. and Mrs. Mark F. Hoffman 

Judy A. Holdener 

John C. Home 

Mr. and Mrs. Glen A. Howard 

Stephen R. Hunt 

Roscoe G. Jackson II 

Joseph M. and Janet B. Jakupcak 

Martin V. Jean 

Bruce A. Johnson 

Robert R. Johnston 

Edward C. Jonas 

Suzanne Mahlburg Kay 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald A. Reefer 

George H. Keller 

John P. Kempton 

Mark L. Kerasotes 

Dr. and Mrs. John D. Kiefer 

Stephen H. Kirby 

Dr. and Mrs. R. James Kirkpatrick 

George D. Klein 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert F. Kraye 

Mr. and Mrs. Scott R. Krueger 

Willard C. Lacy 

Richard W. Lahann 

Michael B. Lamport 

Joseph R. Lane 

Wyvona A. Lane 

Rik E. Lantz 

Christopher T. and Nancy S. 

Ledvina 
Stephen C. Lee 
Rebecca M. Leefers 
Hannes E. Leetaru 
Morris W. Leighton 
Margaret Leinen 
Russell B. Lennon 
Robert W. and Joan E. Leonard 
Crystal G. Lovett 
Bernard W. Lynch 
Rob Roy Macgregor 
Mr. and Mrs. John W. Marks 
Stephen and Kathryn Marshak 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard F. Mast 
Alan R. May 
Robert S. Mayer 
Melisa M. McLean 
Bruce P. Miller 
Cheryl B. Miller 



Linda A. Minor 

John S. Moore 

Dr. and Mrs. Wayne E. Moore 

Robert E. Murphy 

Dr. and Mrs. Haydn H. Murray 

Don H. Neeley 

Bruce W. Nelson 

W. John Nelson 

Mr. and Mrs. Brian D. Noel 

Ronald L. Norris 

William A. Oliver Jr. 

Phillip G. Orozco 

Norman J. Page 

Kathenne A. Panczak 

Cormne Pearson 

Thomas E. Krisa 

Russel A. Peppers 

Charles E. Pflum 

Dr. and Mrs. Jack W Pierce 

Paul L. Plusquellec 

Raymond W and Elizabeth P. 

Rail 
Paul J. Regorz 
William D. Rice 
Donald 0. Rimsnider 
William F. Ripley 
Nancy M. Rodriguez 
Dean M. Rose 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward L. 

Rosenthal 
Linda R. Rowan 
Suzanne J. Russell 
Bobbie Scaggs 

Mr. and Mrs. Jay R. Scheevel 
Dr. and Mrs. Detmar Schnitker 
David C. Schuster 
Dr. and Mrs. Franklin W. 

Schwartz 
Dr. and Mrs. John W. Shelton 
Jack A. Simon 
D. Leroy Sims 
Roger A. Sippel 
J. William Soderman 
Mr. and Mrs. Eric P. Sprouls 
John E. Stone 
Gary D. Strieker 
Thomas R. Styles 
Susan M. Taylor 
Dr. and Mrs. J. Cotter Tharin 
David S. Thiel 
Mr. and Mrs. Jack C. Threet 
Edwin W Tooker 
Kenneth M. Towe 
John B. Tubb Jr. 
Robert G. Vanderstraeten 
DeWitt C. VanSiclen 



Dr. and Mrs. F. Michael Wahl 

Harriet E. Wallace 

James G. Ward 

Michael R. Warfel 

Carleton W Weber 

W.F. Weeks 

John E. Werner 

Harold T. Wilber 

Jack L. Wilber 

Jennifer A. Wilson 

Roland F. Wright 

Lawrence Wu 

Mary Yarnell 

Corporations 

Charitable Gift Fund Fidelity 

Investments 
Chevron Matching Grants Program 
Chevron Petroleum Technology 

Company 
Conoco Inc. 

Dominion Resources Services, Inc. 
Dominion Foundation 
ExxonMobil Foundation 
Harris Bank Foundation 
Hewlett-Packard Company 
Idaho National Engineering and 

Environmental Laboratory 
Illini Technologists Working Metal 
Mobil Foundation, Inc. 
Mor-Staffing 

Orion International Limited 
Peoples Energy Corporation 
Pepsico Foundation Inc. 
Petroleum Research Fund 
Phillips Petroleum Foundation, 

Inc. 
SED-STRAT Geoscience 

Consultants, Inc. 
Shell Oil Company Foundation 
Sims Consulting, Inc. 
Tetra Tech EM Inc. 
Texaco Foundation 
Texaco Incorporated 
USX Foundation Inc. 
Whiting Petroleum Corporation, 

an Alliant Company 



\" 



Annual Report for 2001 



Faculty 



Adjunct Faculty 

Leon R. Follmer 
Dennis Kolata 
Morris W. Leighton 
John McBride 
William Shilts 
M. Scott Wilkerson 

Library Staff 

Lura Joseph (Librarian) 
Sheila McGowan (Chief Library Clerk) 
Diana Walter (Library Technical 
Specialist) 

Staff 

Shelley Campbell (Staff Clerk) 

Barb Elmore (Administrative Secretary) 

Eddie Lane (Electronics Engineering 

Assistant) 
Michael Sczerba (Clerical Assistant) 

Graduate Students 



Stephen P. Altaner (Associate Professor) 

Jay D. Bass (Professor) 

Craig M. Bethke (Professor) 

Daniel B. Blake (Professor) 

Chu-Yung Chen (Associate Professor) 

Wang-Ping Chen (Professor) 

Bruce W. Fouke (Assistant Professor) 

Albert T. Hsui (Professor) 

Thomas M. Johnson (Assistant Professor) 

R. James Kirkpatrick (Professor and Executive 

Associate Dean) 
Craig C. Lundstrom (Assistant Professor) 
Stephen Marshak (Professor and Head) 
Xiaodong Song (Assistant Professor) 

Department Affiliate 

Feng-Sheng Hu (Assistant Professor) 

Academic Staff, Post-Docs, 
Visiting Staff 

Deb Aronson (Yearbook Editor) 
George Bonheyo (Post-Doctoral Researcher) 
Jorge Frias-Lopez (Post-Doctoral Researcher) 
Richard Hedin (Research Programmer) 
Stephen Hurst (Research Programmer) 
Andrey Kalinichev (Senior Research Scientist) 
Lalita Kalita (Research Programmer) 
Ann Long (Teaching Lab Specialist) 
Stanislav Sinogeikin (Research Scientist) 
Frank Tepley (Post-Doctoral Researcher) 
Raj Vanka (Resource and Policy Analyst) 
John Werner (Visiting Assistant Professor) 
Alan Whittington (Visiting Assistant 
Professor) 

Emeritus Faculty 

Thomas F. Anderson 
Albert V. Carozzi 
Carleton A. Chapman 
Donald L. Graf 
Arthur F. Hagner 
Richard L. Hay 
Donald M. Henderson 
George deV. Klein 
Ralph L. Langenheim 
C. John Mann 
Alberto S. Nieto 
Philip A. Sandberg 



Father of Marine Geology 

Francis Parker Shepard (1897-1985) was featured in the December 2001 issue of GSA 
Today in the "Rock Stars" section. Shepard, who taught at the University of Illinois from 1922- 
46, is considered the father of marine geology. While at the University of Illinois, Shepard 
advised two of the leading marine geologists from the United States, Kenneth 0. Emery, B.S. 
'35, M.S. '39, Ph.D. '41, and Robert S. Dietz, A.B. '37, M.S. '39, Ph.D. '41. 



Will Beaumont 
David Beedy 
Peter Berger 
Michael Brudzinski 
Kurtis Burmeister 
Dylan Canavan 
Scott Clark 
Amanda Duchek 
Andre Ellis 
Michael Fortwengler 
Anthony Gibson 
Alex Glass 
Keith Hackley 
Michael Harrison 
Xiaoqiang Hou 
Jennifer Jackson 
Qusheng Jin 
Matthew Kirk 
James Klaus 
Dmitry Lakshtanov 
Chuntao Liang 



Serena Lee 
Christopher Mah 
Peter Malecki 
Jungho Park 
George Roadcap 
Joseph Schoen 
Eric Sikora 
Xinlei Sun 
Anna Sutton 
Jian Tian 
Tai-Lin Tseng 
Richard Wachtman 
Matthew Wander 
Jianwei Wang 
Jingyun Wang 
BlaineWatson 
Xiang Xu 
Xiaoxia Xu 
Zhaohui Yang 
Aubrey Zerkle 
Juanzuo Zhou 



COURSES TAUGHT IN 2001 



Geol 100 - 
Geol 101 - 

Geol 104 - 



Geol 107 


Geol 108 


Geol 110 


Geol 116 


Geol 117 


Geol 118 


Geol 143 


Geol 233 


Geol 250 


Geol 280 


Geol 311 



Geol 317 



Geol 320 - 


Geol 332 - 


Geol 336 - 


Geol 340 - 


Geol 350- 


Geol 351 - 


Geol 355- 


Geol 360 - 


Geol 381 - 


Geol 397A- 


Geol 397B- 


Geol 401 - 


Geol 431- 


Geol 455- 


Geol 459- 


Geol 491- 


Geol 49312- 


Geol 493 K4 


Geol 493K7 


Geol 493J1- 



Planet Earth 

Introduction to Physical 

Geology 

Geology of the National Parks 

and Monuments 

Physical Geology 

Historical Geology 

Exploring Planet Earth in the 

Field 

Geology of the Planets 

The Oceans 

Natural Disasters 

History of Life 

Earth Materials and the 

Environment 

Geology for Engineers 

Environmental Geology 

Structural Geology and 

Tectonics 

Geologic Field Methods, 

Western United States (Field 

Camp) 

Introduction to Paleontology 

Mineralogy and Mineral Optics 

Petrology and Petrography 

Sedimentology and Stratigraphy 

Introduction to Geophysics 

Geophysical Methods for 

Geology, Engineering, and 

Environmental Sciences 

Introduction to Groundwater 

Geochemistry 

Modeling Earth and 

Environmental Systems 

Introduction to Field Methods 

Introduction to Seismology 

Physical Geochemistry 

Structural Mineralogy 

Hydrogeology 

Isotope Hydrogeology 

Graduate Student Seminar 

Special Problems in 

Paleontology 

Center of the Earth 

Earth's Interior 

Analytical Geochemistry 



20 



Research Grants Active in 2001 




American Chemical Society Petroleum 
Research 

A Time Series Process Model of Carbonate 
Diagenesis and Microbial Genetic Preservation 
in Hot Spring Travertine, Yellowstone National 
Park, Wyoming, and Gardiner, Montana. 
Principal Investigator: Bruce Fouke 

Development of Selenium Isotope Ratios as 
Indicators of Sedimentary Paleo- 
Environments. 
Principal Investigator: Thomas Johnson 

Origin, Architecture, & Thermal State of the 
Lackawanna Syncline, Pennsylvania. 
Principal Investigator: Stephen Marshak 

Department of Energy 

Computational & Spectroscopic Investigations of 
Water-Carbon Dioxide Fluids & Surface 
Sorption Processes. 
Principal Investigator: R. James Kirkpatrick 

Federal Highway Administration 

Predicting Aggregate Reaction Based on 

Chemistry and Nanostructure of Alkali-Silica 

Gels. 

Principal Investigators: Leslie J. Struble and R. 

James Kirkpatrick 

Illinois Council On Food And Agriculture 
Research 

Estimation of Dentrification Rates in the Shallow 
Groundwater Flow Systems of Big Ditch 
Watershed, Illinois— Isotope Assessment. 
Principal Investigator: Thomas Johnson 

Institute Of Geophysics And Planetary Physics, 
Los Alamos 

Timescales of Crustal Level Differentiation: U- 
Series Measurements and Geophysical 
Monitoring at Arenal Volcano, Costa Rica. 
Principal Investigator: Craig Lundstrom 

NASA 

Core Angular Momentum and the International 
Earth Rotation Service Coordination Center / 
Sub-Centers Activity for Monitoring Global 
Geophysical Fluids. 
Principal Investigator: Xiaodong Song 

National Science Foundation 

Polyamorphism and Structural Transitions During 
Glass Formation. 

Principal Investigators: John Kieffer and Jay 
Bass 

Development of Laser Heating for Sound Velocity 
Measurements at High P & T. 
Principal Investigator: Jay Bass 

Sound Velocities & Elastic Moduli of Minerals 
Mantle Pressures and Temperatures with Laser 
Heating. 
Principal Investigator: Jay Bass 



Workshop on Phase Transitions and Mantle 
Discontinuities. 
Principal Investigator: Jay Bass 

CSEDI: Collaborative Research: Composition and 
Seismic Structure of the Mantle Transition 
Zone. 
Principal Investigator: Jay Bass 

Global Climate Change & The Evolutionary 
Ecology of Antarctic Mollusks in the Late 
Eocene. 
Principal Investigator: Daniel B. Blake 

The Asteroid (Echinodermata) Trichasteropsis 
from the Triassic of Germany: Its Taxonomy, 
Phylogeny, and Paleoecologic Significance. 
Principal Investigator: Daniel B. Blake 

A Seismic Study of the Mantle Transition Zone 
and Subducted Lithophere. 
Principal Investigator: Wang-Ping Chen 

Seismic Reflection Profiles in Southern Illinois 
(funded through the Mid-America Earthquake 
Research Center). 

Principal Investigators: John McBride, Stephen 
Marshak, and Wang-Ping Chen 

A Seismic Study of the Taiwan Orogen. 
Principal Investigator: Wang-Ping Chen 

Collaborative Research: Lithospheric-Scale 
Dynamics of Active Mountain Building Along 
the Himalayan-Tibetan Collision Zone. 
Principal Investigator: Wang-Ping Chen 

Proximal Carbonate Ejecta and Breccias from the 
Cretaceous-Tertiary Chicxulub Impact: Ballistic 
Sedimentation and Brecciation, 87 Sr/ 8S Sr 
Chronology and Diagenetic Alteration. 
Principal Investigator: Bruce Fouke 

Development of Cr Stable Isotopes for Cr 
Transport Studies and Other Geoscience 
Application. 
Principal Investigator: Thomas Johnson 

Collaborative Research: Field Investigation of Se 
Oxyanion Reduction & Se Sources in Wetlands: 
Application of Se Isotopes. 
Principal Investigator: Thomas Johnson 

Measuring Trace Element Partition Coefficients 
Between Minerals and Basaltic Melt. 
Principal Investigator: Craig Lundstrom 

Windows into MORB Petrogenesis: Measuring U- 
Series Disequilibria in MORB from Transforms. 
Principal Investigator: Craig Lundstrom 

Observational Constraints on Melt-Rock Reactions 
During Melting of the Upper Mantle. 
Principal Investigator: Craig Lundstrom 

Tectonics of the Aracuai/Ribeira Orogenic Tongue 
of Southeastern Brazil and its Significance to 
the Assembly of West Gondwana. 
Principal Investigator: Stephen Marshak 



Structure and Dynamics of Earth's Core and 
Lowermost Mantle. 
Principal Investigator: Xiaodong Song 

Constraining the Structure and Rotation of the 
Inner Core. 
Principal Investigator: Xiaodong Song 

Office of Naval Research 

The Role of Shipyard Pollutants in Structuring 
Coral Reef Microbial Communities: Monitoring 
Environmental Change and the Potential 
Causes of Coral Disease. 
Principal Investigator: Bruce Fouke 

State of Illinois Board of Higher Education 

Evolution of the Martian Surface — A Cooperative 
Learning Module for General Education in 
Science. 
Principal Investigator: Albert Hsui 

University of Illinois Research Board 

X-Ray Diffraction on Minerals of the Earth's 
Interior. 
Principal Investigator: Jay Bass 

Seed Money for Research Initiative in Aquifer 
Microbiology. 
Principal Investigator: Craig M. Bethke 

Airbrasive Unit for Paleontological Research. 
Principal Investigator: Daniel B. Blake 

Geology of Precambrian Fault Systems in 
Southern Norway: A Pilot Study. 
Principal Investigator: Stephen Marshak 

Structure of Crust and Mantle beneath China 
From the New Chinese Broadband Digital 
Seismic Network. 
Principal Investigator: Xiaodong Song 



Geothrust Members for 2001 



J. William Soderman — Chair 
M.S. '60. Ph.D. '62 

James R. Baroffio, Ph.D. '64 

David K. Beach, B.S 73 

Marion "Pat" Bickford, M.S. '58, 
Ph.D. '60 

Lester W. Clutter, B.S. '48, M.S. '51 

Norbert E. Cygan, B.S. '54, M.S. '56, 
Ph.D. '62 

Edwin H. Franklin, B.S. '56 

John R. Garino, B.S. '57 

James W. Granath, B.S. '71, M.S. 73 

Morris (Brud) W. Leighton, B.S. '47 

Patricia Santogrossi, B.S. 74, M.S. 77 

Jack C. Threet. A.B. '51 



21 



List of Publications for 2001 



Kalinichev. A., Wang, J., Kirkpatrick, R. J., and 
Cygan, R. T., 2001, Molecular dynamics simu- 
lation of layered double hydroxides, in 
Cummings, ed., Foundations of Molecular 
Modeling and Simulations: AICliE Symposium 
Series No. 325, 97: 251-255. 

Kelley, D.S., Karson, J. A., Blackman, D.K., Frith- 
Green, G„ Gee, J., Butterfield, D.A., [Alley, 
M.D., Olson, E.J., Schrenk, M.O., Roe, K., 
Lebon, G., Rizzigno, P., Cann, J., John, B., 
Ross, D.K., Hurst, S.D., and Sasagawa, G., 
2001 (July 12 issue), An off-axis hydrothermal 
vent field near the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 30° 
N: Nature, 412: 145-149. 

Marshak, S., 2001, Earth: Portrait of a Planet: 
WW Norton & Co., New York, 745 pp. 

Hsui, A. T., and Riahi, D. N., April 3, 2001, Onset 
of thermal-chemical convection with crystal- 
lization and its geological implications: 
Geochem., Geophys., & Geosys., 2, Paper no. 
2000GC000075. 

Occhietti, S., Parent, M., Shilts, W W, Dionne, J- 
C, Govare, E., and Harmand, D., 2001, Late 
Wisconsinan Glacial Dynamics, Deglaciation, 
and Marine Invasion in Southern Quebec, in 
Weddle, T. K., and Retelle, M. J., eds., 
Deglacial History and Relative Sea-Level 
Changes, Northern New England and Adjacent 
Canada: Geol. Soc. Amer. Special Paper 351: 
243-270. 

Schilling, F.R., Hauser, M., Sinogeikin, S.V., and 
Bass, J. D., 2001, Compositional dependence 
of elastic properties and density of glasses in 
the system anorthite-diopside-forsterite: 
Contrib. Min. Petrology, 141: 297-306. 

Wang, J., Kalinichev, A., Hou. X., and 

Kirkpatrick, R.J., 2001, Molecular modeling of 
the structure and energetics of hydrotalcite 
hydration: Chem. Materials, 13: 145-150. 

Alkmim, F.F., Marshak, S., and Fonseca, M.A., 
2001 , Assembling West Gondwana in the 
Neoproterozoic: Clues from the Sao Francisco 
craton region, Brazil: Geology, 29: 319-322. 

Aronson, R.B., and Blake, D.B. 2001. Globai cli- 
mate change and the origin of modern benthic 
communities in Antarctica. (Society for 
Integrative and Comparative Biology 
Symposium 2000 Antarctic Marine Biology): 
American Zoologist, 41: 27-39. 

Fouke, B.W., 2001, Depositional fades and aque- 
ous-solid geochemistry of travertine-depositing 
hot springs (Angel Terrace, Mammoth Hot 
Springs, Yellowstone National Park, USA)- 
REPLY: Journal of Sedimentary Research, 71: 
497-500. 



22 



Riahi, D. N„ and Hsui, A. T., 2001, Finite ampli- 
tude thermal convection with variable gravity: 
Int. .'. Math, and Math. Set, 25 (3): 153-165. 

Sinogeikin, S.V., Bass, J.D., and Katsura, T, 2001, 
Elasticity of g-(Mg.Fe) : Si0 4 at High P and T: 
Implications for the 520 km discontinuity: 
Geophys. Res. Lett., 28: 4335-4338. 

Wu, L.-R., and Chen, W.-P, 2001, Rupture of the 
large (MW 7.8), deep earthquake of 1973 
beneath the Japan Sea with implications for 
seismogenesis: Bull. Seismol. Soc. Am., 91: 
102-111. 

Kirkpatrick, R. J., Yu, P., and Kalinichev, A., 
2001, Chloride binding to cement phases: 
exchange isotherm, 35 C1 NMR and molecular 
dynamics modeling studies: in Skalny, J., ed.. 
Calcium Hydroxide in Concrete, Am. Ceram. 
Soc. Materials Science of Concrete Special 
Volume, p. 77-92. 

Song, X.D., 2001, Comment on "The existence of 
an inner core super-rotation questioned by 
teleseismic doublets": Phys. Earth. Planet. 
Inter., 124: 269-273. 

Chen. W.-P., and Brudzinski, M. R., 2001, 

Evidence for a large-scale remnant of subduct- 
ed lithosphere beneath Fiji: Science, 292: 2475- 
2479. 

McBride, J. H., and Nelson. W.J., 2001. Seismic 
reflection images of shallow faulting, northern- 
most Mississippi embayment. north of the 
New Madrid seismic zone: Bull. Seismol. Soc. 
Amer, 91: 128-139. 

Xie, X., Bethke, CM., Li, S., Liu. X.. and Zheng. 
H, 2001, Overpressures and petroleum genera- 
tion and accumulation in the Dongying 
depression of the Bohaiwan basin, China: 
Geofluids, 1: 1-15. 

Hu, F.S., Ito, E., Brown, T. A., Curry, B. B., and 
Engstrom, D. R., 2001, Pronounced climatic 
variations during the last two millennia in the 
Alaska Range: Proceedings of the National 
Academy of Sciences, 98: 10552-10556. 

Yu. P.. and Kirkpatrick, R. J., 2001, 35 C1 NMR 
relaxation study of cement hydrate suspen- 
sions: Cement and Concrete Research, 31: 1479 

-1485. 

Palko, J.. Sinogeikin, S.V., Kriven, W, and Bass, 
J.D., 2001, Elasticity of Y 2 3 at High 
Temperature: J. Appl. Phys., 89: 7791-7796. 

Hu, F.S., Finney, B., and Brubaker, L. B., 2001, 
Effects of Holocene Alnus expansion on aquat- 
ic productivity, nitrogen cycling, and soil 
development in southwestern Alaska: 
Ecosystems, 4: 358-368. 



Brubaker, L.B., Anderson, P.M. and Hu, F.S., 2001, 
Vegetation ecotone dynamics in Southwestern 
Alaska during the Late Quaternary: Quaternary 
Science Reviews, 20: 175-188. 

Chen. C-C, Lin, D-D, Liu, L-G, Sinogeikin, S.V., 
and Bass, J.D., 2001, Elasticity of single-crystal 
calcite and rhodochrosite by Brillouin spec- 
troscopy: American Mineralogist, 86: 1525- 
1529. 

Kaufman, D. K., Manley, W F, Wolf, A. P., Hu, F. 
S., Preece, S. J., Westgate, J. A., and Forman, 
S. L., 2001, The last interglacial to glacial tran- 
sition, Togiak Bay, southwestern Alaska: 
Quaternary Research, 55: 190-202. 

Roback R. C, Johnson, T. M., McLing, T. L., 
Murrell, M. T, Luo. S., and Ku, T.-L., 2001, 
Uranium isotopic evidence for groundwater 
chemical evolution and flow patterns in the 
eastern Snake River Plain aquifer, Idaho: Geol. 
Soc. Amer. Bull, 113: 1133-1141. 

Finkelstein, D.B., Hay, R.L., and Altaner, S.P., 
2001 , Origin and diagenesis of lacustrine sedi- 
ments upper Oligocene Creede Formation, 
southwestern Colorado: Reply: Geol. Soc. Am. 
Bull, 113: 541-544. 

Karson, J.A., Klein, E.M., Hurst, S.D., Lee, C.E., 
Rivizzigno, P.A., Curewitz, D., Morris, A.R., 
and Hess Deep '99 Scientific Party, 2001 , 
Structure of Uppermost Fast-Spread Oceanic 
Crust Exposed at the Hess Deep Rift: 
Implications for Subaxial Processes at the East 
Pacific Rise, G-CUBED (http://g-Cubed.org/). 

♦Song, X.D., 2000, Time dependence of PKP(BC)- 
PKP(DF) times: Could it be an artifact of poten- 
tial systematic earthquake mislocations?: Phys. 
Earth. Planet. Inter, 122: 221-228. 

Wilkerson, M. S., and Dicken, C. L., 2001, Quick- 
look techniques for evaluating 2-D cross sec- 
tions in contractional settings: AAPG Bull, 85 
(10):1759-1770. 

Kolata, D. R., Huff, W. D., and Bergstrbm, S. M. 
2001, The Ordovician Sebree Trough - Oceanic 
Passage to the Midcontinent United States: 
Geol. Soc. Amer. Bull, 113 (8): 1067-1078. 

Fouke, B.W., and Rakovan, J., 2001, An integrated 
cathodoluminescence video-capture microsam- 
pling system: Journal of Sedimentary Research, 
71: 509-513. 

Brough, A. R., Katz. A., T. Sun, G. K., Struble, L. 
J., Kirkpatrick, R. J., and Young, J. F, 2001, 
Adiabatically cured alkali activated cements 
containing high levels of fly ash: formation of 
zeolites and aluminum-substituted C-S-H: 
Cement and Concrete Research, 31: 1437-1447. 

*This publication was inadvertently left off last 
year's list. 



jr- 



Colloquium Speakers for Spring and Fall 



Spring 2001 



Jan. 19 Michael Wysession, Washington University 

Investigating (deep) North American mantle structure with a broadband seismic array 
Feb. 9 Steve Ingebritsen, USGS, 2000-2001 Birdsall-Dreiss Lecture 

Land subsidence in the United States 
Feb. 16 Joseph DiPietro, University of Southern Indiana 

Geology and metamorphism of the Indian plate hinterland in Pakistan and tectonics of India- 

Kohistan collision, NW Himalaya 
Feb. 23 Stephen Hasiotis, Indiana State 

The invertebrate invasion and evolution of Mesozoic soil ecosystems — The antiquity of soil 

engineers and their innovations 
Mar. 9 Arild Andresen, University of Oslo 

Syn- or post-collisional orogenic collapse in the East Greenland Caledonides? 
Mar. 30 Mary Elliot, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory 

Millennial-scale climate oscillations during the last glacial, links between Northern 

Hemisphere ice sheet instabilities and the Dansgaard-Oeschger cycles 
Apr. 6 Charles Onasch, Bowling Green University 

Paleozoic seismicity in the eastern Midcontinent: Evidence from the sedimentary record 
Apr. 13 Bruce Rittman, Northwestern University 

Adaptation of anaerobic communities to chlorinated aromatics 
Apr. 20 Daniel Hausermann, Argonne National Laboratory 

HPCAT at the Advanced Photon Source: A new national facility for high-pressure research 
Apr. 27 Sharon Mosher, University of Texas, Austin: University of Illinois Distinguished 

Alumni Award Lecture 

Death of a spreading ridge: transition of the Pacific-Australian plate boundary from a diver- 
gent to transform margin along the Macquarie Ridge Complex 



Fall 2001 



Sept. 7 Katrina Edwards, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution 

Microbial rock and mineral transformations: Implications for carbon cycling 
Sept. 14 Sam Panno, ISGS 

Late Pleistocene and Holocene climatic effects on speleogensis in southern Illinois based on 

the age of redeposited glacial sediment in Fogelpole Cave 
Sept. 21 Robert Nowack, Purdue University 

Imaging of seismic attributes with application to the 3-D tomography experiment at Mt. 

Vesuvius, Italy 

Sept. 28 Diane McKnight, University of Colorado 

Humic substances as electron acceptor: An important feedback in aquatic ecosystems 
Oct. 5 Andre Pugin, ISGS 

Imaging glacial basins in 2-D and 3-D using water- and land-based shallow seismic reflection 

examples from the Alps, Canada, and Illinois 
Oct. 12 Ho-Kwang (David) Mao, Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institute of 

Washington 

New windows on the Earth's deep interior 
Oct. 19 Alexis Templeton, Stanford University 

X-Ray spectroscopy investigations of bacteria-mineral-metal interactions 
Oct. 26 Lupei Zhu, St. Louis University 

Raising the Tibetan plateau 
Nov. 2 Jean-Francois Gaillard, Northwestern University 

Heavy metal blues: Chemical speciation in contaminated sediments 
Nov. 9 Pat Bickford, Syracuse University 

Are the Paleoproterozic rocks of central Colorado accreted arcs or melt products of rifted 

older crust?: Implications for the southward growth of Laurentia between 1.8 and 1.6 Ga 
Nov. 30 Jim Walker, Northern Illinois University 

HFSE depletions in central Nicaragua 
Dec. 7 Guillaume Fiquet, University of Paris VI 

High-pressure synchrotron measurements and composition of the deep Earth 



Jackson 

(continued from Page 1) 

Jackson, in collaboration with 
Professor Jay Bass and Research Scientist 
Stas Sinogeikin (Ph.D., '99), and gradu- 
ate students Dima Lakshtanov and James 
Palko, also has looked at volume 
changes that orthoenstatite undergoes at 
high temperatures. Jackson notes that 
previous studies of thermal expansivity 
have been inconclusive since values 
ranged widely. The team did thermal 
expansion measurements at the Cornell 
High Energy Synchrotron Source (Cornell 
University). Jackson presented the high- 
temperature elasticity and thermal 
expansion measurements at the 2001 
AGU meeting in San Francisco. Her find- 
ings have implications for understanding 
the chemistry of the upper mantle. 

In another project, Jackson is collab- 
orating with researchers at the Advanced 
Photon Source of Argonne National 
Laboratory in Chicago, to investigate a 
new technique, called nuclear resonance 
inelastic X-ray scattering (NRIXS) to 
measure the density of states of an iron- 
bearing magnesium-silicate pervoskite 
(pervoskite is perhaps the dominant min- 
eral phase in the Earth's lower mantle) at 
lower mantle pressures. Findings from 
this study may have major implications 
for understanding the chemistry of the 
Earth's lower mantle. 



23 



Let's Keep in Touch 



Please take a few minutes to let us and your classmates know what you've been 
doing. Send your news to the Department of Geology, 245 Natural History Building, 
1301 West Green Street, Urbana, Illinois 61801; fax 217-244-4996; e-mail 
geology@uiuc.edu 



Name 



Address (indicate if changed) 



City 



State Zip 



Home phone 



E-mail 



Degrees from Illinois (with year) 



Notes - 




You're invited 

Alumni are invited to a 
tour of Dinosaur Ridge and 
barbecue on October 27, 
2002, which will be held in 
conjunction with the GSA 
meeting in Denver. The 
tour is scheduled to 
begin at 1:30 p.m. and the 
barbecue at 4 p.m. Look 
for a postcard in July with 
more details. 



Q ILLINOIS 



Department of Geology 

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 
245 Natural History Building 
130LW. Green St. 
Urbana, IL 61801 



Non-Profit Organization 
U.S. Postage 

PAID 

Permit No. 75 

Champaign, IL 61820 



GEOLOGY LIBRARY 



2002 YEAR 



REVIEW 



Department of Geology* 



a 



of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 



XI 3 2X lracL 

proiessor Susan Kieffer Joins Faculty 



The Department of Geology is pleased 
to announce that Dr. Susan Werner Kieffer 
has been hired as Walgreen Chair and 
Professor of Geology at the University of 
Illinois. She is the first to hold this presti- 
gious position. 

Kieffer, who describes her primary 
research interest as geological fluid dynam- 
ics, has had a widely varied research 
career. She developed a theory for predict- 
ing the thermodynamic properties of min- 
erals, work that earned her the 
Mineralogical Society of America's award 
for distinguished work 
in mineralogy. Later, 
she started to look at 
geysers as analogs for 
volcanoes. When gey- 



sers were discovered 

on Jupiter's satellite, 

lo, she applied her 

earthbound research 

to interpret those phenomena. For many 

years, Kieffer studied rapids on the 

Colorado River in the Grand Canyon. She 

has also studied the eruption of Mount 

Saint Helens and developed a theory of the 

devastating lateral blast. 

"I had to teach myself rocket nozzle 
theory to explain the tree-blow-down pat- 
tern that we observed at the mountain." 
says Kieffer. 

More recently, she has focused on the 
'5-million-year-old Chicxulub (Mexico) 
npact crater and the 1.8 billion-year-old 
udbury (Canada) crater. Using shock- 
'ave theory, Kieffer and colleagues 
ypothesize that the former was formed by 
i asteroid impact and the latter a comet. 
II these projects involve understanding 
'ocesses that can occur at very high 
ieeds — sometimes even supersonic — 



"My geologic interests parallel my 
music interests," Kieffer has said. 
"When I had to practice as a kid, I 
skipped the slow movements and 
went right for the scherzos." 



compared to most geological processes. 
"My geologic interests parallel my 
music interests," Kieffer has said. "When 
I had to practice as a kid. I skipped the 
slow movements and went right for the 
scherzos." 

Culminating with a Ph.D. from Cal 
Tech. Kieffer holds degrees in physics, 
math, geological sciences, and planetary 
sciences. This background gives her the 
technical expertise to pursue any ques- 
tion that catches her eye. While some 
questions may appear to others to be 

unrelated to what she's 
been working on, 
there's usually a 
unifying thread. 
"My career could be 
summarized by saying 1 
look at complex and cat- 
astrophic events," says 
Kieffer. 
Keiffer feels that UIUC is a good fit 
for her interests. "When I visited Urbana- 
Champaign, the possibility for interac- 
tions among geology and several other 
campus departments was wonderful." 
Kieffer's professional accomplish- 
ments are reflected in part by her various 
high-level honors and achievements. For 
example, she is a recipient of the John D. 
and Catherine T. MacArthur Fellowship 
(the prestigious "genius award"), a mem- 
ber of the National Academy of Sciences, 
a recipient of the Spendiarov Award from 
the USSR Academy of Sciences (the sec- 
ond American ever to receive this honor), 
and recipient of the Day Medal from the 
Geological Society of America. 

Over the years, Kieffer has served 
several institutions including the U.S. 
Geological Survey, Arizona State 

Continued on page 3 





/ 



d 



The Walgreen Chair — 
A Mark of Distinction 

The Walgreen Chair, now held by 
Susan Kieffer in the Department of 
Geology, is a major honor at the 
University of Illinois, not just for the fac- 
ulty member who receives it, but for the 
Department that hosts it as well. Any 
department on any of the three 
University campuses can compete to host 
the position by submitting nominees. 
There are only two Walgreen Chairs in 
the entire University— the second current 
Chair holder is in the Law School. 

Funding for the Chair comes from 
the Charles R. Walgreen Jr. Endowment 
fund, established by Charles R. Walgreen 
Jr., the retired chairman of the board of 
the Walgreen Drug Store company. Mr. 
Walgreen stipulated that candidates for 
the Chair must display intellect and 
accomplishment that places them among 
those most distinguished people in their 
field. This distinction must be affirmed 
by such recognition as Nobel or Pulitzer 
Awards or by evidential works. Among 
her other accomplishments, Kieffer has 
won the MacArthur "genius" award. 




2002 has been a year of change in 
the Department and in the University as 
a whole. We have been fortunate to 
have Prof. Susan Kieffer (Ph.D., Cal 
Tech), joins our ranks as the Walgreen 
Chair. Sue brings great distinction to the 
Department, for she is world renowned 
for her work in geological fluid dynam- 
ics, and has received many significant 
honors, including election to the 
National Academy of Sciences, and a 
MacArthur "genius" award. Already, Sue 
has been building links between the 
Department and other units across cam- 
pus. As this issue goes to press, another 
new faculty member, Prof. Jackie Li 



(Ph.D., Harvard), has also joined us. She 
will begin teaching mineralogy in the fall, 
and will be building a lab for high-pres- 
sure mineral research. We have also been 
growing by the addition of research scien- 
tists to our staff. Andrey Kalinichev and 
Stas Sinogeiken are immersed in their 
studies of mineral science, and by next 
fall, Holger Hellwig will commence 
research in crystallography, while Rob 
Sanford will join the geomicrobiology 
group. The Department has been fortu- 
nate to see the completion of a state-of- 
the-art laboratory in geomicrobiology and 
carbonate sedimentology, under the super- 
vision of Prof. Bruce Fouke. And . . . our 






Contents 



Margaret Leinen Receives Alumni Achievement Award 

Jay Bass Elected to COMPRES 

Chromium in Groundwater Studied 

Albert Hsui Develops New Course 

National Geographic Visits Department 

Wang-Ping Chen Does Field Work in Nepal 

Steve Marshak Heads to Antarctica 

Students Re-Establish Geology Club 

Graduate Student Follows in Wanless Footsteps 

Graduate Student Does Groundbreaking Research 

Departmental History 

Former Faculty, Alumni Receive Major Awards 

News From Alumni 

Annual Report 

Degrees granted 

Honor roll of donors 

Department personnel 

Courses taught 

Active research grants 

Geothrust committee 

2002 publications 

Visiting speakers 

Recent Activity in Petroleum Geology 



3 
4 
4 
4 
4 
5 
6 
6 
7 
7 
8 
9 
10 

9 
11 
12 
12 
13 
14 
14 
15 
15 



Year in Review is published once a year by the Department of Geology, University of Illinois at 

Urbana-Champaign, to summarize the activities and accomplishments within the department 

and news from alumni and friends. 

Department Head: Stephen Marshak (smarshak@uiuc.edu) 

Administrative Secretary: Barb Elmore (b-elmore@uiuc.edu) 

Editor: Deb Aronson (debaronson@nasw.org) 

Designer: Pat Mayer 

http://www.geology.uiuc.edu 



Construction of the new geomicrobiology facil- 
ity is now complete and the lab open for busi- 
ness. Carved out of former office space in the 
basement of the Natural History Building, the 
2000-square-foot geomicrobiology lab enables 
researchers to conduct DNA and RNA analy- 
ses of microbial communities in order to 
understand their interactions with geologic 
processes. Students and postdocs from the 
Fouke, Bethke, Johnson, and Lundstrom 
research groups in the department are now 
actively engaged in conducting research in the 
facility. Rob Sanford will also be using this 
facility when he joins the department next fall. 

GeoScience 2005 endowment campaign 
also continues to charge ahead — we are 
well on the way toward our $3 million 
goal! 

But the good news is tempered with 
the not so good. The University of Illinois, 
like most state universities across the 
country, has been hit hard with budget 
cuts in response to deficits at the state 
and federal levels. As a consequence, the 
rate of growth that we have enjoyed in 
the past few years will be slowing, and 
the Department will face new challenges 
in the coming year. But with continued 
support of alumni and friends, we hope 
to continue on a positive track, providing 
outstanding education for undergraduates 
and graduates, and contributing new 
ideas to the broadening field of geo- 
sciences. 



6E0L0GY LIBRARY 



Alumni Award 



Leinen Receives Alumni Achievement Award 



Margaret Leinen, B.S. '69, assistant 
director of the National Science 
Foundation for Geosciences, has been 
awarded the Outstanding Alumni 
Achievement Award in the Department of 
Geology. 

Leinen, who has been at NSF since 
2000, administers all NSF programs in 
earth, atmosphere and ocean sciences. She 
is also in charge of a new interdisciplinary 
program in environmental research and 
education. In this role, she works with 
people from such diverse disciplines as 
biology, chemistry, engineering, and social, 
behavioral, and economic sciences to fash- 
ion environmental research programs. 

Prior to taking a senior position 
at NSF, Leinen was a professor of oceanog- 
raphy and dean of two colleges (the 
Graduate School of Oceanography and the 
College of the Environment and Life 
Sciences) at the University of Rhode 
Island. In addition, she served as vice 
provost, with the responsibility of coordi- 
nating marine and environmental pro- 
grams for the entire university. 

Leinen 's own research has focused on 
paleoceanography, paleoclimatology and 
the present-day processes that are respon- 
sible for the formation of the sedimentary 
record. She has had a very active sea- 
going research program, having been on 
24 research cruises, including three cruises 
of the Ocean Drilling Program. She has led 
two ALVIN diving expeditions to the Juan 
de Fuca Ridge and Mariana back-arc envi- 
ronments to study the sedimentation from 
hydrothermal vents and has published 
widely on the record of biological sedi- 
mentation in the oceans. 

In addition to her bachelor's degree 
from the University of Illinois, Leinen has 
a master's in geological oceanography 
from Oregon State University in 1975, and 
a Ph.D. in geological oceanography from 
the University of Rhode Island in 1980. 




...it was muddy and it was cold, and 
they were right there with us. So 
when we were all freezing on the out- 
crop, they were freezing on the out- 
crop...! had never had that type of 
relationship with a scientist or with a 
teacher. They were actually doing the 
same thing I was doing. It was very, 
very exciting." 

Leinen has very fond memories of 
geology at Minos. She had come intend- 
ing to be a biochemist, but those classes 
were so large they were alienating. The 
only class smaller than 400 students was 
Leinen's geology class, with an enroll- 
ment of 100. 

"I actually got to know the faculty 
member and I got to know the graduate 
student who was assisting." Leinen 
recalls. "And they took us out on field 
trips on the weekend. We all went out 
and our professor was there, and five or 
six graduate students were there to keep 
us all in line. It was fall term, it was win- 
ter in Illinois, and it was snowing, and it 



was muddy and it was cold, and they 
were right there with us. So when we 
were all freezing on the outcrop, they 
were freezing on the outcrop. When we 
were all sitting in the bus huddled with 
our lunches, they were right there with 
us. I had never had that type of relation- 
ship with a scientist or with a teacher. 
They were actually doing the same thing 
I was doing. It was very, very exciting. " 

Leinin will return to the Urbana- 
Champaign campus during the Fall of 
2003 to receive the award. 



Susan Kieffer 



Continued from page 1 



University, Cal Tech, and the University of 
British Columbia. Just prior to coming to 
Illinois, she ran her own consulting firm in 
Canada, S.W. Kieffer Science Consulting, 
Inc., to develop nonlinear data analysis 
and prediction techniques. She also has 
founded the Phoenix-based Kieffer 
Institute for Development of Science-Based 
Education, which focused on teaching sci- 
ence to at-risk 7th to 12th graders. 

Recently, Kieffer has been concerned 
about issues of sustainability and the role 
of Earth sciences and Earth scientists in 
getting our planet through the next 50 
years in a healthy condition. She hopes to 
teach a course in this area. 

"We scientists tend to be relatively 
ineffective politically," says Kieffer, "so I 
was thrilled when asked to become an 
affiliate in the Institute for Government 
and Policy Affairs on this campus. We are 
discussing how we can bring issues of nat- 
ural sciences to the table with lawyers, 
political scientists, economists, and social 
scientists." 

Kieffer's passion for research and 
teaching will benefit our students and the 
university community as a whole. The 
Department is delighted to welcome Susan 
and her husband, Charles Harwood, to the 
Urbana-Champaign community. 



DEPARTMENT NEWS 



Albert Hsui Develops 
New Course 

The Geology Department is offering a new course for 
non-majors. Geology 103 (Planet Earth-Quantitative 
Reasoning) will use the study of geology as a vehicle to 
introduce mathematics and computers to non-science stu- 
dents and to show them how quantitative reasoning can 
be used to understand and describe natural phenomena. 
The course was designed to fulfill a new University 
requirement. 

The course will be taught by Prof. Albert Hsui in the 
spring 2003. In addition to the two lectures students 
receive a week, they will have one session per week in a 
new state-of-the-art computer lab. Using the facilities of 
the lab, they will work with geologic data using spread 
sheets and graphing programs. Geologic problems provide 
an excellent base for teaching quantitative reasoning, 
because they are very tangible and intuitive. 

Bass Elected as First 
President of COMPRES 

In May of 2002, the National Science Foundation 
launched the Consortium for Materials Properties Research in 
Earth Sciences (COMPRES), a community infrastructure orga- 
nization for Earth science research and education, focusing 
on high-pressure experiments designed to understand Earth 
and planetary interiors. Jay Bass, professor of geology, was 
elected as the new consortium's President, a full-time salaried 
job. The offices of the consortium are housed at SUNY Stony 
Brook, so Bass took a one-year leave of absence for the 2002- 
2003 academic year and is shuttling back and forth between 
Stony Brook and Champaign-Urbana. 

"It is very exciting, and quite an honor to be chosen to 
get the consortium off the ground in its first year," said Bass. 

The goal of the consortium is to facilitate high-pressure 
research in Earth and planetary sciences using advanced 
instrumentation at centralized facilities, education and out- 
reach, and connections with other Earth science subdisci- 
plines. COMPRES will identify and address common research 
needs, present a unified vision of the high-pressure Earth sci- 
ences, work to provide access to synchrotron beamlines and 
other community facilities, coordinate the management of 
large centralized facilities, and advocate the field of high-pres- 
sure research within the broader Earth and planetary sciences 
community. The consortium hopes to determine, as a com- 
munity, where multi-million dollar research resources can 
most wisely be placed and used. 



Chromium in Groundwater 
Studied 

Professor Tom Johnson and graduate student Andre Ellis 
have developed a way to monitor the mobility of chromium in 
groundwater. Chromium, a heavy metal commonly used in 
industrial applications such as electroplating and leather tanning, 
is the second-most abundant inorganic groundwater contaminant 
at hazardous waste sites. The oxidized, hexavalent state of Cr, Cr 
(VI) , is toxic and soluble, so it can move easily in groundwater. 
The reduced state, Cr (III) can form a solid, precipitating out of 
solution, thus limiting its mobility. Also, Cr (III) is less toxic, and 
is a nutrient at low levels. 

Johnson and Ellis's new work relies on measurements of the 
53 Cr/ 52 Cr isotope ratio— to determine this ratio the researchers 
had to develop new laboratory techniques. They found that the 
"Cr/ 52 Cr ratio increases systematically as Cr (VI) is reduced. 
Their observation was published in the March 15, 2002, issue of 
Science, and has captured the attention of consultants trying to 
characterize chromium-contaminated sites. 

National Geographic Visits 
Geology Department 






M 



v 



y 




S-P 



Bruce Fouke's 
research on black 
band disease, which 
is a bacterial infec- 
tion in coral, caught 
the attention of the 
National Geographic 
Society this year. 
Writers for the maga- 
zine first contacted 
j| him last spring, hav- 
^ ing surfed the web 
for researchers working on coral disease. An underwater photo- 
graph of diseased coral taken by the Fouke research group was 
published in the map insert of the September 2002 issue of the 
magazine. The writers and a film crew then visited Urbana- 
Champaign last fall where they were given a full tour of the 
department's new geomicrobiology lab facility. A documentary is 
now being assembled describing the newly emergent field of 
geomicrobiology and the work being done in the Fouke lab on 
the hot springs of Yellowstone National Park and the coral reefs 
of the Caribbean and Indo-Pacific. Fouke's research is funded by 
the Office of Naval Research Environmental Toxicology and 
Genetic Markers program and by the National Science 
Foundation Biocomplexity in the Environment program. 




Project "Hi-Climb" Rises in 



Professor Wang-Ping Chen spent two and a half months in late 
2002 installing 75 seismometer stations throughout Nepal as the first 
phase of Project HI-CLIMB kicked in. (see Geoscience 2000 for 
details on Chen's research). Ultimately, the project will collect data 
from 250 stations throughout Nepal and Tibet. 

HI-CLIMB examines how the lithosphere deforms over its entire 
thickness during orogeny; specifically how the upper crust couples 
with the mantle portion of the continental lithosphere. Chen's project 
will provide the first complete profile of the Himalayan-Tibetan colli- 
sion zone, extending from the the deformation front across both the 
Lower and the Higher Himalayas, then onto the central Tibetan 
Plateau. Dense spacing— about five kilometers apart— of the broad- 
band, high-resolution seismic array provides unprecedented resolu- 
tion for imaging deep-seated structures, particularly those in the 
enigmatic lower crust, below the Moho, and throughout the transi- 
tion zone of the mantle down to depths of about 1,000 km. 

Installing seismic arrays is back-breaking work. By the end of 
his stay in Nepal, Chen lost about 15 pounds and his work pants 
were in shreds— he ultimately cut them into shorts, then tossed 
them. Setting up a single station took a team of three or four people 
at least one day. The group had carry all the instruments (including 
two or more 50-pound batteries) over rugged ground. Then, they dug 
an enormous pit to bedrock, laboriously leveled both the pit and the 
instrument, installed and insulated the instrument, and dug a 
drainage ditch. Finally, they covered everything back up with ply- 
wood, tarp and dirt. 

For each station, Chen also had to get permission from the gov- 
ernment and to negotiate with whoever owned the land. One time 
Chen and his party walked into a village entirely controlled by 
Maoist insurgents. Luckily, the Nepali scientists on the team man- 
aged to extricate the group. 




Professor Chen with undergraduate Nathan VanHoudnos at 
site H0230, elevation 7,500 ft. 

"We skipped that site. We were just happy to be alive," 
notes Chen. 

The project has been successful, for the stations are con- 
tinuously recording ground vibrations, and will accumulate 
several terabytes of information in three years. That data is 
assembled in Katmandu, sent to a dedicated machine at the 
University of Illinois to be processed by two of Chen's stu- 
dents, Tai-Lin (Ellen) Tseng and Zhaohui Yang. Chen plans to 
go to Tibet in the spring of 2003 to continue the installations. 

"We're either incredible heroes or incredible fools," said 
Chen, with a grin. 





\%m 







The 2002 annual banquet featured, for the 
first time, a poster session by geology 
students. Over 25 students presented 
posters describing their research, during 
the cocktail hour. In this photo, Chuntao 
Liang asks a question, while Ellen Tseng 
smiles for the photographer. 



Department News 





Winter "Break" in Antarctica 

A second faculty member (Dan Blake is the first) has 
crossed the Antarctic Circle in the past two years. Steve 
Marshak visited Antarctica during the 2002-2003 winter break 
as part of a research group led by Tom Fleming of the 
University of Southern Connecticut. Their purpose was to study 
the emplacement of the Ferrar Dolerite, an extensive system of 
184 million-year old dikes and sills. In addition to Marshak and 
Fleming, the group included Alan Whittington (a former post- 
doc in the Department, now an assistant professor at the 
University of Missouri), a professional mountaineer, and two 
undergraduate students. The Ferrar 
Dolerite, a system of sills and dikes 
formed in association with the break up 
of Pangaea, was first recognized during 
Captain Scott's ill-fated trip to the South 
Pole in the early 20th century. 

"The outcrops we studied were in 
the Transantarctic Mountains, a 2- to 4- 
km high range that divides the conti- 
nent into East and West Antarctica," 
says Marshak. "We were flown in a 
small plane from McMurdo Station (the main American base) to 
a site on a glacier at the boundary between the Polar Plateau 
and the Mountains. There, we set up a six-person tent camp. 
We had to keep rebuilding snow walls to keep drifts from bury- 
ing our camp, but otherwise it was reasonably comfortable." 

The group used snowmobiles and sledges to get to nearby 
outcrops, where the mountaineer helped them climb, set ropes 
and avoid crevasses. For outcrops far from camp the group had 
helicopter support. The helicopter would drop them at a site, 
and would then hopefully return about eight hours later. One 
time the helicopter was grounded in McMurdo by bad weather 




Geologists' tent camp on a 
glacier, with a nunatak (isolated hill) 
in the background. 

and the group was stuck on an out- 
crop so long that they had to open 
their survival bags to get food. 

Overall, the weather was rea- 
sonable, with temperatures hover- 
ing between 10° and 15°F (it was 
summer, after all!) so field work 
could progress. But wind chill was 
a challenge, and in mid-January, a 
large storm moved in, creating 
white-out conditions that forced the 
group to remain in their tents for 
five days straight. 
Marshak points out that "many people think that 
Antarctica is completely covered by snow and ice. But there are 
good exposures in the Transantarctic Mountains, and there's no 
vegetation to hide the rocks, so it's possible to see contacts 
quite clearly. Exposures are good, but getting to them can be 
difficult. Working in Antarctic conditions turns any field work 
into an adventure." 




Geology Club 
Re-established * 

The Geology Club has 
been re-established by 
undergraduates Amy Luther 
(president) and Roger 
Bannister (vice president and 
treasurer) . This past semester 
undergraduate Meghan Ward 
joined the club as secretary. The club is 
both academic and social and is intend- 
ed for "any student with a thirst for 
knowledge about the planet Earth and 
the impact geology has on our every- 
day lives," says Bannister. It encourages 
interactions between faculty, graduate 
students and undergraduates. 

The club sponsors weekly talks by department professors 
that are presented at a more relaxed and less intimidating level 
than the Friday colloquium lectures. The group has organized a 
rock climbing field trip. Future plans include camping trips and 
helping at the Science Olympiad. 



Jim Granath, Ted 
Labotka and Dianne 
Moore cooking break- 
fast, Monument Valley, 
UT, 1971 Geology Club 
field trip. 



Graduate Student Following in Wanless' Footsteps 



Kurt Burmeister, a 
Ph.D. student in struc- 
tural geology under 
the supervision of 
Prof. Stephen 
Marshak, is following 
in some mighty big 
footsteps. He is study- 
ing the along-strike 
relationships between 
changes in the relative 
thickness and strength 
of stratigraphic units 
involved in deforma- 
tion and transitions in 
the geometry of struc- 
tures in fold-thrust 




Left: Harold Wanless (first on leff) with his work party (1920) standing in front of Mrs 
Schmnen's Lodging and Boarding House on Main Street in Rosendale. Right: (left to 
right) Professor Russell Waines of SUNY, New Paltz, Dietrich Werner, President of the 
Century House Historical Society, and Kurt Burmeister standing in front of the same 
building, which is now a cigar making company (2002). 

belts. As part of this research, Kurt 



mapped a region in the Appalachian fold- 
thrust belt of eastern New York State his- 
torically known as the Rosendale natural 
cement region. This region is famous 
because of its dolomitic limestone, which 



was a primary source of high-quality nat- 
ural cement from 1850s-1950s. Rosendale 
natural cement, which is much stronger 
than Portland cement, lines the Panama 
Canal, forms the pedestal of the Statue of 
Liberty, and supports the wings of the US 



Capitol building. 
Coincidentally, this 
region is where the leg- 
endary Prof. Harold 
Wanless conducted 
some of his earliest field 
studies. In the early 
1920s, Wanless wrote a 
voluminous master's 
thesis on the stratigra- 
phy of the Silurian and 
Devonian strata of the 
Rosendale area. 
Wanless' thesis includes 
numerous photographs 
of many of the long- 
abandoned cement 
quarries that have since become over- 
grown. Burmeister has had fun identify- 
ing sites from Wanless's old photos— in 
some cases, the photos show critical geo- 
logic relationships that are no longer 
exposed and thus are of great help. 



Important Discoveries by Jin and Bethke 



Graduate student Qusheng Jin and 
Professor Craig Bethke have developed 
an important new equation to predict 
how fast bacteria can degrade contami- 
nants in natural environments such as 
groundwater. Their work was published 
in the Biophysical Journal. 

"If you want to predict how fast a 
common groundwater contaminant can 
be degraded, you could run an experi- 
ment in the lab. But the experiment 
would not necessarily indicate how fast 
the reaction would occur in nature. I am 
trying to answer the second question 
with my work," says Jin. 

The new equation allows laboratory 
data to be extrapolated to explain phe- 
nomena in real-world environments by 
taking into account the fact that in real- 
world environments there is not always 
an abundant energy supply available for 
bacterial metabolism. To develop the 



equation, they had to take into account 
geochemical reaction mechanisms, 
chemiosmotic theory, and non-equilibri- 
um thermodynamics. Chemiosmotic the- 
ory explains how respiration proceeds in 
microorganisms, and non-equilibrium 
thermodynamics how reaction rates are 
controlled by the amount of energy that 
is available. 

"The thermodynamic part is very 
important because energy availability is 
a key difference between lab and natural 
environments," notes Jin. 

Jin and Bethke were able to test 
their theory by predicting reactions that 
could be compared with data sets col- 
lected in nature. Since publishing the 
paper, Jin has received numerous tele- 
phone calls from researchers interested 
in applying the equation to specific envi- 
ronmental conditions. Jin and Bethke 
have several additional papers scheduled 



for publication in which they show how 
the equation can be applied. 

Work on this project was a major 
change in research direction for Jin, 
who originally came to Illinois intending 
to work on traditional groundwater 
modeling. But with Bethke's encourage- 
ment, Jin took extra classes in biochem- 
istry, civil engineering, and microbiolo- 
gy. These classes have allowed him to 
undertake groundbreaking interdiscipli- 
nary research projects. He also took 
advantage of the diversity of faculty on 
the UIUC campus and found people in 
several departments with whom he 
could discuss his research. 

"I was helped by many professors 
on this campus," says Jin, "especially 
Robert Sanford in Civil Engineering and 
James Imlay in Microbiology. They 
encouraged me and spent hours talking 
to me. Their help was indispensable." 




Windows into the Past 



The First World War profoundly 
affected geology at Illinois. Both staff 
and resources were diverted to the war 
effort, checking growth in the 
Department's programs. In fact, five 
faculty (J.L. Rich, H.F. Crooks, L.E. 
Kennedy, F.M. Van Tuyl, and C.W. 
Tomlinson) undertook war-related 
work, and some of these left the 
University to do so. On the home front, 
Departmental staff members were 
assigned to teach military training 
classes. For example, before leaving to 
join the Marine Corps air service, 
Tomlinson co-taught "Military Mapping 
and Reconnaissance" with Eliot 
Blackwelder. Blackwelder, who was 
Head of the Department, also offered 
"War Issues" and "Map Reading and 
Navigation." Tomlinson did not return 
after the war. but joined the Gypsy Oil 
Company and went on to a distin- 
guished career in industry, ultimately 
becoming president of AAPG. 

Unfortunately, the war, coupled 
with stiff competition for new staff, 
crippling college regulations, and anti- 
German and anti-Bolshevik bias, 
blocked Blackwelder from building the 
Department he wanted. In one case, a 
professional Chinese Geological Survey 
geologist was denied admission as a 
graduate student simply because he 
had not taken prescribed liberal arts 
courses. Frustrated, Blackwelder wrote 
a strongly worded letter of resignation 
to the President of the University, and 
left the Department at the end of the 
8 1919 spring term. Two years later he 



World War I, Crisis for Geology at 
Illinois, and T.T. Quirke 



By Ralph Langenheim 



was Head of the Geology Department at 
Stanford. 

With Blackwelder's resignation, the 
Department had to find a new leader 
on short notice. Amadeus W. Grabau, 
a prominent geologist at Columbia 
University, voiced an interest, but, per- 
haps because of his reputed pro- 
German sentiment, the University did 
not reply. Grabau went on to Peking 
University where he became a promi- 
nent researcher in tectonics. Finally, in 
November 1919, the University trustees 
re-organized the Department as a com- 
mittee. They then appointed Terence 
Thomas Quirke chairman and associate 
professor. 

Quirke, led the Department for the 
next 10 years. He was born in England 
but emigrated to the United States, 
where he received university training in 
North Dakota and Chicago. He then 
became a geology professor at the 
University of Minnesota, a position he 
held for four years. After joining 
Illinois, Quirke spent 15 summers 
working in the field for the Geological 
Survey of Canada. His research on the 
Huronian, Grenville and Killarnian 
proved essential to unraveling the 
Precambrian history of North America. 
Quirke also contributed papers on min- 
eralogy and on the origin of granite, 



and wrote two introductory geology 
textbooks. Together, Quirke and fellow 
faculty member William Bayley built a 
strong program in "hard rock" geolo- 
gy" at Illinois, balancing Savage's 
strong program in stratigraphy and 
paleontology. 

The Department began a period 
steady growth and enhancement after 
the Great War. In 1920, the Department 
had a staff of nine (professors Bayley, 
Rolfe and Savage; associate professor 
and chairman Quirke; assistant profes- 
sor M.M. Leighton (later, Chief of the 
ISGSJ; instructors Yeaton and Hanson; 
a laboratory helper and a stenograph- 
er), and the annual budget was only 
$21,500, including salaries. But 
between 1923 and 1930, the staff grew 
to 21 people. But even though the War 
was a shock to the Department, stu- 
dents continued to work towards their 
degrees and between 1905 and 1922 
the Department granted 15 master's 
degrees (11 of them directed by 
Savage) and three doctorates. After the 
war, student numbers increased, so 
that between 1923 and 1930, 23 
received master's degrees and two 
received Ph.D.s. Throughout these 
years, the Department covered both the 
disciplines of Geology and Geography. 



Haydn Murray Elected to National Academy 
of Engineering 

Haydn Murray, B.S. '48, M.S. '50, Ph.D. '51, has just been elected to the 
National Academy of Engineering. Colleagues consider Murray a pioneer in the 
area of clay mineralogy. The election recognizes Murray's "important contribu- 
tions to engineering theory and practice," specifically his "pioneering work on 
the mineralogy and industrial applications of clays. " Election to the academy is 
one of the highest honors an engineer can achieve. Congratulations Haydn! 



Former Faculty 
and Alumni 
Receive Major 
Awards 

Frank Harold Trevor Rhodes received 
the Ian Campbell Medal, the AGI's most 
prestigious award. The medal, presented at 
the GSA Presidential Awards Ceremony in 
Denver, October 27, 2002 is awarded to a 
person who exemplifies the accomplish- 
merits and widespread influence of that 
remarkable geoscientist. 

Rhodes was a post-doctoral fellow 
Fulbright Scholar at the University of 
Illinois from 1950-51, assistant professor 
from 1954-55 and associate professor from 
1955-56, when he moved to the University 
of Wales. From Wales, he moved to the 
University of Michigan, and then Cornell, 
where he served as President for 18 years. 
He has published widely in the fields of 
geology, paleontology, evolution, education 
and the history of science. His publications 
include Fossils: An Introduction to Pre- 
Historic Life and The Creation of the Future: 
The Role of the American University. He 
also has been a participant in the BBC tele- 
vision series. The Planet Earth and the BBC 
radio series, Science, Philosophy and 
Religion, has served as Chair of the 
National Research Council, and a director 
of the General Electric Corporation. 

At the AAPG meeting in May, 2003, 
three Mini geologists will be honored. Prof. 
Emeritus Albert Carozzi will be recognized 
as a Distinguished Educator, alumnus Jack 
Threet, who received the geology depart- 
ment's alumni achievement award in 2002, 
will receive the Robert Dott Sr. Award, and 
alumnus Norb Cygan will be honored for 
distinguished service. 

During his tenure at the University of 
Illinois, Carozzi was recognized by stu- 
dents and the geoscience profession as an 
outstanding and inspirational educator, 
researcher, and mentor. He supervised 34 
Ph.D. and 16 M.S. thesis projects, and his 
research resulted in the publication of more 




Norb Cygan (left) presents the Ian Campbell 
medal (AGI's highest honor) to Frank Rhodes at 
the GSA annual meeting last October. 

than 300 articles in scientific journals, 
and 19 textbooks. In recent years, Prof. 
Carozzi has focused his energy on writ- 
ing books concerning the history of geol- 
ogy. He is known throughout the inter- 
national petroleum industry for excel- 
lence in teaching and research on car- 
bonate microfacies. 

"The continuing professional suc- 
cess of his former students is a clear 
tribute to Dr. Carozzi's exceptional abili- 
ties and dedication to the advancement 
of geoscience education," says William 
Dawson, B.S. 74, Ph.D. '84, senior 
research geologist at ChevronTexaco. 

Threet, who spent his entire 36-year 
career with Shell Oil Company, led 
exploration and discovery efforts in the 
deep water of the Gulf of Mexico, the 
northwest shelf of Australia, onshore 
Syria and offshore Malaysia, Cameroon 
and Brazil. He eventually became Vice 
President of the company. The Robert H. 
Dott, Sr., Memorial Award honors and 
rewards Threet for original articles pub- 
lished by the AAPG. Threet recieved last 
year's Alumni Achievement Award. 

Cygan's generous service to AAPG 
spans 35 years. Over the last 25 of those 
he has been particularly dedicated to 
AAPG educational activities. For a num- 
ber of years, he worked to develop an 
AAPG teachers and students program at 
annual AAPG conventions. The first of 
these took place in 1990, with the first 
Teachers/Students Educational and Field 
Trip program. This program, as well as 
several others Cygan has organized, has 
continued ever since. Cygan was hon- 
ored with the AAPG Certificate of Merit 
in 1990 and 2001, and in 1995 was pre- 
sented with the Public Service Award for 
his contribution as an AAPG member in 
Public Affairs. 



Degrees Conferred in 2002 



Bachelor of Science Degrees 

May 

Adrienne Jay Gandhi 
Andrew Russell Parrish 
Deanna Marie Warkins 

August 

James Sophocles Cokinos 
Brian Robert Hacker 
Scott William Lepley 

Master of Science Degrees 

May 

David John Beedy (Teaching of Earth Science 
Degree) 

Dylan Pierce Canavan (Teaching of Earth 
Science Degree) 

Peter Raymond Malecki (Teaching of Earth 
Science Degree) 

Michael Russell Fortwengler— Distribution and 
Frequency of Black Band Disease and Partial 
Mortality of Diploria Strigosa on Curacao, 
Netherlands Antilles (Bruce Fouke) 

Dmitry Leonidovich Lakshtanov— Experimental 
Investigation of High-Temperature Acousto- 
Elastic Properties of Natural Crystalline Silica 
(SjOJ (Jay Bass) 

Xinlei Sun— PKP Travel Times at Near Antipodal 
Distances: Implications for Inner-Core 
Anisotropy and Lowermost Mantle Structure 
(Xiaodong Song) 

Xiaoxia Xu — Evidence for Inner Core Super- 
Rotation from Time-Dependent PKP Travel 
Times Observed at Beijing Seismic Network 
(Xiaodong Song) 

October 

Amanda Beth Duchek— Geophysical 
Investigation of the Cottage Grove Fault 
System, Southern Illinois Basin (Wang-Ping 
Chen) 

Doctor of Philosophy Degrees 

May 

Keith C. Hackley— A Chemical and Isotopic 
Investigation of the Groundwater in the 
Mahomet Bedrock Valley Aquifer: Age. 
Recharge and Geochemical Evolution of the 
Groundwater (Thomas F. Anderson) 

October 

Michael R. Brudzinski — Seismic Studies of 
Subducted Lithosphere Beneath Fiji: Evidence 
for a Petrologic Anomaly (Wang-Ping Chen) 

Michael Joseph Harrison — Origin. Architecture. 
and Thermal State of the Lackawanna 
Synclinorium, Pennsylvania: Implications for 
Tectonic Evolution of the Central Appalacliians 
(Stephen Marshak) 



Alumni News 



CORRECTION: 

The picture on page six of the 2001 Year in 
Review is incorrectly labeled as Thornton 
Quarry. It was in fact Kentland Quarry. 



Obituaries 



Richard F. Mast, B.S. '57, died June 
22, 2002, after a valiant struggle with can- 
cer. Mast was born in Chicago and served 
in the U.S. Army. He was a pioneer in oil 
and gas resource assessment, working as a 
geologist for the Illinois Geological Survey 
from 1957-1973 and the U.S. Geological 
Survey from 1973-1995. He served the 
USGS as the chief of the Branch of Oil and 
Gas Resources and as Regional Geologist of 
the central Region. He coordinated the 
USGS 1992 National Oil and Gas Resource 
Assessment for which he received the 
Department of Interior Distinguished 
Service Award. He is survived by his wife, 
Joyce Ablinger Mast, B.S. '57, five children 
and four grandchildren. 

Richard M. Winar, B.S. '53, M.S. 

'55, died September 6, 2002, of esophageal 
cancer. He was 71 . Winar was a geologist 
and environmental engineer who worked 
most recently at the Oakland County Road 
Commission of Michigan. He was a mem- 
ber of the AIPG and a veteran of the U.S. 
Army. A memorial service was held 
September 15. Winar is survived by his 
wife of 49 years, Lois Winar, and his 
daughters, Susan Winar, Gail Winar and 
Nancy Winar Cracknell, as well as four 
grandchildren and a brother. 

Dick Benson, M.S., '53, Ph.D. '55, 
Senior Scientist and Curator of Ostracodes 
at the Smithsonian NMNH, passed away in 
February, 2003, from an apparent heart 
attack. Dick had a profound impact upon 
our conceptualization and understanding of 
ostracodes and, as those of you who knew 
him, was an incredible character on many 
levels. He will be greatly missed. 



1940s 

Allen F. Agnew, A.B. '40, M.S. '42, 
writes "I am happy to see the continued 
excellent quality of programs and people in 
our department. At age 84, nostalgia has 
replaced my cutting-edge fervor, but I do 
make one geologic meeting each year (AAPG) 
and take vicarious pleasure in the activities of 
all of you who truly are at the cutting edge of 
your subfields! What a marvelous issue of the 
"Annual Review" of the Department this is! 
Thanks, Deb and Steve!" 



1950s 

Norb Cygan, B.S. '54, and his wife, Royann, 
met up last September with Bob Leonard (B.S. 
'55) his wife Joan ('56) at the Roosevelt 
Rendezvous in Yellowstone Park. "We enjoyed 
seven-mile hikes, rides, etc. to view and study to 
flora, fauna and geological phenomena of 
Yellowstone Park (just before the first snow). Lots 
of bear, bison, birds, wolves, and volcanics. Bob 
seemed to have some problems controlling his 
horse, Widdermaker, while 1 had no problem with 
Pokey!" 

Carl Davis, B.S. '59, wrote us a note remi- 
niscing about field camp in the summer of '58. "It 
was a great experience for me ... a once-in-a-life- 
time event," he writes. Davis remembers getting 
caught in a thunderstorm while he was in a 
canyon and taking cover under an overhanging 
bank with his feet still in the stream. Lightning hit 
about a half-mile away, based on the time 
between flash and sound. He got the shock at the 
exact time of the stroke. "I think I got about 400 
volts but only a small amount of current. So that 
was an interesting experience." During the same 
storm Davis remembers Martin Jean coming face- 
to-face with a brown bear. "I heard the scream a 
mile away." 

1960s 

Bruce M. Nichols, B.S. '68, is living in 
Mermaid Waters, Australia, where he is develop- 
ing a high-grade limestone resource in N.S.W., 
and "loving life." 

1970s 

Andrew M. Gombos Jr., M.S. '73, is work- 
ing in Abu Dhabi where he is a geophysicist 
working on the Bu Hasa field, a large rudistid 
reef. He can be reached at agombos@adco.co.ae 

Patricia A. Santogrossi, B.S. 74, M.S. 77, 

has become chief geologist at Knowledge 
Reservoir, Houston. Prior to that she was chief 
geologist at Chroma Energy in Houston. 

1980s 

Dr. Stephen Laubach, Ph.D. '86, a senior 
research scientist at the University of Texas 
Bureau of Economic Geology, completed a nation- 
al speaking tour of university geology departments 
and an AAPG Hedberg Research Conference as 
part of the AAPG Visiting Geologist program. 

Karen Fryer, M.S. '82, Ph.D. '86, is chair of 
the Ohio Wesleyan department of Geology and 
Geography. She attended the GSA geology depart- 
ment cocktail during the GSA meeting in Denver 
last October with her son, Gavin, and her hus- 
band Cameron Begg. Cameron ran the microprobe 
lab here and is doing similar work at Ohio State 
University. 

Dave Watso, M.S. '88, is now working as a 
senior geologist at Unocal and lives in the 
Houston area. 



II) 



1990s 

University of Texas Bureau of Economic 
Geology Research Fellow Dr. Linda Bonnell, 
Ph.D. '90, has been named as an AAPG 
Distinguished Lecturer for 2003-2004. The title 
of her presentation is "Diagenetic Effects on 
Fracture Development." Linda is one of the 
principals of Geocosm, an Austin-based reser- 
voir consulting group. 

Christine Clark McCracken, M.S. '97, 

successfully defended her thesis in June. She 
has headed to Ypsilanti, Michigan, where she 
is assistant professor of mineralogy and petrol- 
ogy at Eastern Michigan University. She ran 
into Doug Tinkham, M.S. '97, at the Geologic 
Association of Canada/Mineralogical 
Association of Canada meeting last spring in 
Saskatoon. Doug is a post-doc in Calgary. 

Shayne Pasek, B.S. '98, married Erick 
Staley last September. Erick was a UC Berkeley 
student who spent a semester at the University 
of Illinois studying with Bruce Fouke. The cou- 
ple first met on a field trip to Bonaire led by 
Fouke. Shayne and Erick are living in Portland, 
Oregon. 

Sharon (Horstman) Qi , B.A. '89, M.S. 
'93, and her family are moving to Oregon, 
where she will continue to work for the 
U.S.G.S. 

2000s 

Judd Tudor, B.S. '97, M.S., '00, is getting 
married in western Scotland in July '03. He is 
still working for Schlumberger Wireline as a 
field engineer and was recently transferred to 
Edinburg, TX. 

Anthony (Tony) Gibson, M.S. '01, has 

returned to Olney, 111., and has joined his fami- 
ly-owned oil company, Murvin Oil, as execu- 
tive vice president and petroleum geologist. 
Tony is the third generation of his family to 
work at the company. In 2002, Tony also 
established Gibson Supply, Inc. to provide 
local access to oilfield equipment and supplies. 

Former Faculty News 

Peter Burns, who was a visiting assistant 
professor in Geology at UIUC from 1996-1997, 
has been appointed Massman Chair of the 
Department of Civil Engineering and Geological 
Sciences at the University of Notre Dame. He 
was also promoted to professor in November. 
While at Illinois, Peter taught courses in 
mineralogy, geology of the planets, and 
oceanography. 

John McBride, who was an adjunct fac- 
ulty member since 1997, has moved to Utah to 
teach at Brigham Young University. "Leaving 
Champaign was not an easy decision," he 
writes. John has developed some new courses 
and purchased equipment to support a geo- 
physics program at BYU. John can be reached 
at john_mcbride@byu.edu or (801) 422-5219. 



Honor Roll of Donors for 2002 



The following is a list of friends and alumni of the Department of Geology who have donated to the department during the calendar year 2002. 



Mr. Stephen V. Adams 

Mrs. Terrie P. Adams 

Prof. Thomas F. Anderson 

Dr. Robert F. Babb II 

Mr. Rodney J. Balazs 

Ms. Debbie E. Baldwin 

Mr. James E. Bales 

Mrs. Laura S. Bales 

Ms. Abigail E. Bethke 

Dr. Craig M. Bethke 

Dr. Marion E. Bickford 

LTC Ronald E. Black (RET) 

Mrs. Phyllis 0. Boardman 

Dr. Richard S. Boardman 

Mr. Joseph E. Boudreaux 

Mr. Allen S. Braumiller 

Mrs. Patsy L. Braumiller 

Mrs. Annette Brewster 

Mrs. Carolyn Brower 

Mr. Ross D. Brower 

The Reverend Robert L. Brownfield 

Dr. Glenn R. Buckley 

Mrs. Mildred F. Buschbach 

Dr. Thomas C. Buschbach 

James W. Castle, PhD 

Mr. Richard A. Castle 

Dr. Thomas L. Chamberlin 

Dr. Charles J. Chantell 

Mr. Lester W. Clutter 

Mrs. Virginia K. Clutter 

Mrs. Earl C. Cockrum 

Dr. Barbara J. Collins 

Dr. Lorence G. Collins 

Mrs. Susan E. Collins 

Virginia A. Colten-Bradley, PhD 

Ms. Michelle M. Corlew 

Mr. Thomas E. Covington 

Mr. Chris C. Cummins 

Mrs. Lucinda E. Cummins 

Dr. Norbert E. Cygan 

Mrs. Royann Gardner Cygan 

Mrs. Wendy Ann Czerwinski 

Mr. George H. Davis 

Dr. Ilham Demir 

Ms. Kathryn L. Desulis 

Mrs. Joy A. I. deVries 

Mr. M. Peter deVries 

Mr. Richard E. Dobson 

Mr. Bruce E. Dollahan 

Dr. Garnett M. Dow 

Dr. William W. Dudley Jr. 

Dr. James L. Eades 

Dr. Mohamed T. El-Ashry 

Mrs. Patricia R. El-Ashry 

Dr. Frank R. Ettensohn 

Mr. Joseph P. Fagan Jr. 

Mr. Kenneth T. Feldman 

Mr. Gary R. Foote 

Richard M. Forester, PhD 

Mr. Jack D. Foster 

Mrs. Alison Franklin 

Mr. Edwin H. Franklin 

Mr. Barry R. Gager 



Mr. John R. Garino 
Ms. Theresa C. Gierlowski 
Mrs. Carmen L. Gilman 
Dr. Richard A. Gilman 
Mr. Robert N. Ginsburg 
Mr. Albert D. Glover 
Mrs. Mildred B. Glover 
Mr. Charles J. Gossett 
Mrs. Harriet S. Grossman 
Dr. Stuart Grossman 
Dr. Albert L. Guber 
Mrs. Nancy Anderson Guber 
Mrs. Catherine L. Harms 
Dr. Henry J. Harris 
Dr. Richard L. Hay 
Mrs. Alice M. Helmuth 
Mr. Darrell N. Helmuth 
Dr. Mark A. Helper 
Mr. Mark F Hoffman 
Mrs. Maureen F. Hoffman 
Dr. Eric J. Holdener 
Dr. Judy A. Holdener 
Mr. Glen A. Howard 
Mrs. Tracy Howard 
Mrs. Cathy S. Hunt 
Dr. Stephen R. Hunt 
Dr. Roscoe G. Jackson II 
Dr. Janet B. Jakupcak 
Mr. Joseph M. Jakupcak 
Mr. Steven F. Jamrisko 
Mr. John E. Jenkins 
Dr. William D. Johns Jr. 
Dr. Allen H. Johnson 
Bruce A. Johnson 
Dr. Donald 0. Johnson 
Dr. Kenneth S. Johnson 
Mr. Robert R. Johnston 
Mr. Roy A. Kaelin 
Dr. John P. Kempton 
Mrs. Shirley M. Kennedy 
Mr. Virgil John Kennedy 
Dr. Stephen H. Kirby 
Dr. R. James Kirkpatrick 
Mr. Robert F Kraye 
Mr. Thomas E. Krisa 
Dr. Richard W Lahann 
Mr. Robert R. Lamb 
Mr. Michael B. Lamport 
Mr. Rik E. Lantz 
Mr. Stephen C. Lee 
Mrs. Rebecca M. Leefers 
Dr. Hannes E. Leetaru 
Dr. Morris W Leighton 
Dr. Margaret S. Leinen 
Mr. Bernard J. Lindsey Jr. 
Mr. Scott D. Lockert 
Ms. Crystal G. Lovett 
Mr. Bernard W. Lynch 
Mr. Rob Roy Macgregor 
Mrs. Kathryn G. Marshak 
Prof. Stephen Marshak 
Mr. James L. Mason Jr. 
Mr. Alan R. May 



Mrs. Hope Elsbree May 

Dr. Murray R. McComas 

Mrs. W. E. McCommons 

Mr. Marvin P. Meyer 

Mrs. Cheryl B. Miller 

Ms. Linda A. Minor 

Mrs. Ethel P. Moore 

Mr. John S. Moore 

Mr. Wayne E. Moore 

Dr. Sharon Mosher 

Joseph C. Mueller 

Mr. Robert E. Murphy 

Dr. Haydn H. Murray 

Mrs. Juanita A. Murray 

Mr. Robert E. Myers 

Mr. Bruce W Nelson 

Mr. W. John Nelson 

Mr. Brian D. Noel 

Mrs. Lynn E. Noel 

Mr. Ronald L. Norris 

Dr. William A. Oliver Jr. 

Donald E. Orlopp, PhD 

Michael R. Owen, Phd 

Dr. Norman J. Page 

Ms. Katherine A. Panczak 

Mr. Howard L. Patton 

Mrs. Margaret L. Patton 

Mr. T. Ray Peale 

Mrs. Corinne Pearson 

Dr. Russel A. Peppers 

Mrs. Betty R. Pflum 

Mr. Charles E. Pflum 

Mr. Bruce E. Phillips 

Mrs. Sarah Phillips 

Dr. Jack W. Pierce 

Dr. Robert I. Pinney 

Dr. Paul L. Plusquellec 

Mr. Richard J. Powers 

Dr. Elizabeth P. Rail 

Mr. Raymond W Rail 

Mr. Paul J. Regorz 

Dr. David W. Rich 

Mr. Donald 0. Rimsnider 

Mr. William F. Ripley 

Dr. Nancy M. Rodriguez 

Mr. Dean M. Rose 

Mr. Edward L. Rosenthal 

Mrs. Hilary R. Rosenthal 

Mr. Jeffrey A. Ross 

Dr. Linda R. Rowan 

Mr. Jay R. Scheevel 

Dr. Detmar Schnitker 

Mrs. Julia Schnitker 

Leonard G. Schultz Estate (DEC) 

Dr. David C. Schuster 

Mrs. Diane P. Schwartz 

Dr. Franklin W Schwartz 

Dr. John W. Shelton 

Dr. Fredrick D. Siewers 

Mr. Jack A. Simon 

Mr. D. Leroy Sims 

Mrs. Martha K. Sippel 

Mr. Roger A. Sippel 



Dr. William B. Size 

Mr. Norman J. Slama 

Mr. Stephen A. Smith 

Mr. Robert D. Snyder 

Dr. J. William Soderman 

Mr. Eric P. Sprouls 

Mrs. Linda S. Sprouls 

Mrs. Beryl D. Sternagle 

Dr. John E. Stone 

Dr. Gary D. Strieker 

Dr. Susan M. Taylor 

Dr. Daniel A. Textoris 

Mrs. Catherine Threet 

Mr. Jack C. Threet 

Dr. Edwin W Tooker 

Dr. Kenneth M. Towe 

Dr. John B. Tubb Jr. 

Mr. Robert G. Vanderstraeten 

Mr. William L. Vineyard 

Mr. Robert W Von Rhee 

Mr. Richard H. Voris 

Dr. F Michael Wahl 

Ms. Harriet E. Wallace 

Dr. James G. Ward 

Mr. Carleton W Weber 

Dr. John E. Werner 

Mr. Jerry T. Wickham 

Mrs. Susan S. Wickhan 

Mr. Don R. Williams 

Dr. Eugene G. Williams 

Mr. William W Wilson 

Dr. Paul A. Witherspoon Jr. 

Ms. Elaine R. Witt 

Mr. Roland F. Wright 

Mr. Lawrence Wu 

Corporations 

Amoco Foundation 

Centennial Geoscience, Inc. 

Charitable Gift Fund 

ChevronTexaco 

ConocoPhillips Corporation 

Detroit Edison Foundation 

Dominion Foundation 

Exxon Mobil Corporation 

ExxonMobil Foundation 

Idaho National Engineering and 

Environmental Laboratory 

Illini Technologists Working Metal 

Isotech Laboratories, Inc. 

Mobil Foundation, Inc. 

Mor-Staffing, Inc. 

Peale Brewing Company, Inc. 

Peoples Energy Corporation 

Phillips Petroleum Foundation, Inc. 

Sck.Cen 

Shell Oil Company Foundation 

Smis Consulting, Inc. 

Whiting Petroleum Corporation an 

Alliant Company 



Annual Report for 2002 



Faculty 



Stephen P. Altaner (Associate Professor) 

Jay D. Bass (Professor) 

Craig M. Bethke (Professor) 

Daniel B. Blake (Professor) 

Chu-Yung Chen (Associate Professor) 

Wang-Ping Chen (Professor) 

Bruce W. Fouke (Assistant Professor) 

Albert T. Hsui (Professor) 

Thomas M. Johnson (Assistant Professor) 

Susan W. Kieffer (Walgreen Professor) 

R. James Kirkpatrick (Professor and Executive 

Associate Dean) 
Craig C. Lundstrom (Assistant Professor) 
Stephen Marshak (Professor and Head) 
Xiaodong Song (Assistant Professor) 

Department Affiliate 

Feng-Sheng Hu (Associate Professor) 

Academic Staff & 
Research Staff 

Deb Aronson (Yearbook Editor) 
George Bonheyo (Post-Doctoral Researcher) 
Jorge Frias-Lopez (Post-Doctoral Researcher) 
Richard Hedin (Research Programmer) 
Xiaoqiang Hou (Post-Doctoral Researcher) 
Stephen Hurst (Research Programmer) 
Andrey Kalinichev (Senior Research Scientist) 
LaJita Kalita (Research Programmer) 
Ann Long (Teaching Lab Specialist) 
Laura Rademacher (Post-Doctoral Researcher) 
Stanislav Sinogeikin (Research Scientist) 
Frank Tepley (Post-Doctoral Researcher) 
Raj Vanka (Resource and Policy Analyst) 
John Werner (Visiting Assistant Professor) 
Alan Whittington (Post-Doctoral Researcher) 

Emeritus Faculty 

Thomas F. Anderson 
Albert V. Carozzi 
Carleton A. Chapman 
Donald L. Graf 
Arthur F. Hagner 
Richard L. Hay 
Donald M. Henderson 
George deV. Klein 
Ralph L. Langenheim 
C. John Mann 
Alberto S. Nieto 
Philip A. Sandberg 



Adjunct Faculty 

Leon R. Follmer 
Dennis Kolata 
Morris W Leighton 
Hannes Leetaru 
William Shilts 
M. Scott Wilkerson 

Library Staff 

Lura Joseph (Librarian) 

Sheila McGowan (Chief Library Clerk) 

Diana Walter (Library Technical Specialist) 

Staff 

Shelley Campbell (Staff Clerk) 

Barb Elmore (Administrative Secretary) 

Eddie Lane (Electronics Engineering 

Assistant) 
Michael Sczerba (Clerical Assistant) 

Graduate Students 



COURSES TAUGHT IN 2002 



Will Beaumont 
David Beedy 
Peter Berger 
Sarah Brown 
Kurtis Burmeister 
Dylan Canavan 
Scott Clark 
Amanda Duchek 
Andre Ellis 
Michael Fortwengler 
Alex Glass 
Brian Hacker 
Keith Hackley 
Chris Henderson 
Fang Huang 
Jennifer Jackson 
Qusheng Jin 
Matthew Kirk 
James Klaus 
Dmitry Lakshtanov 

Congratulations 



Craig Lundstrom and his wife, Lara, 
are the proud parents of Nathaniel Powell 
Lundstrom, who was born December 18th 
at Carle Hospital. He weighed 8 lbs., 3 oz. 
at birth. Nathaniel also has a big brother, 
Evan, who is four. 

Barb Elmore, administrative secretary, 
announces the arrival of her fifth grand- 
child. Tyler Christopher Junkins was born 
on November 4. Tyler's parents (Barb's son 
and daughter-in- law) live in Ashkum, 111. 



Chuntao Liang 
Christopher Mah 
Peter Malecki 
Brent Olson 
Jungho Park 
George Roadcap 
Eric Sikora 
Xinlei Sun 
Anna Sutton 
Jian Tian 
Tai-Lin Tseng 
Jianwei Wang 
Jingyun Wang 
Jackie Welch 
Xiang Xu 
Xiaoxia Xu 
Zhaohui Yang 
Juanzuo Zhou 



Geol 100 - 


Planet Earth 


Geol 101 - 


Introduction to Physical 




Geology 


Geol 104 - 


Geology of the National Parks 




and Monuments 


Geol 107 - 


Physical Geology 


Geol 108 - 


Historical Geology 


Geol 110 - 


Exploring Planet Earth in the 




Field 


Geol 116 - 


Geology of the Planets 


Geol 117 - 


The Oceans 


Geol 118 - 


Natural Disasters 


Geol 143 - 


History of Life 


Geol 233 - 


Earth Materials and the 




Environment 


Geol 250 - 


Geology for Engineers 


Geol 311 - 


Structural Geology and 




Tectonics 


Geol 315 - 


Field Geology 


Geol 317- 


Geologic Field Methods, 




Western United States (Field 




Camp) 


Geol 320 - 


Introduction to Paleontology 


Geol 332 - 


Mineralogy and Mineral Optics 


Geol 336 - 


Petrology and Petrography 


Geol 340 - 


Sedimentology and 




Stratigraphy 


Geol 350 - 


Introduction to Geophysics 


Geol 351 - 


Geophysical Methods for 




Geology, Engineering, and 




Environmental Sciences 


Geol 352 - 


Physics of the Earth 


Geol 355 - 


Introduction to Groundwater 


Geol 360 - 


Geochemistry 


Geol 381 - 


Modeling Earth and 




Environmental Systems 


Geol 415 - 


Advanced Field Geology 


Geol 433 - 


Isotope Geology 


Geol 440 - 


Petroleum Geology 


Geol 452 - 


Geodynamics 


Geol 454 - 


Physics of the Earth's Interior 


Geol 489 - 


Geotectonics 


Geol 491 - 


Current Research in 




Geoscience 


Geol 493K6 - 


Chemistry & Petrology of the 




Mantle 


Geol 493Q3 - 


Practical Petrology 



12 



/* 



Research Grants Active in 2002 



American Chemical Society Petroleum 
Research 

Development of Selenium Isotope Ratios as 
Indicators of Sedimentary Paleo- 
Environments. 
Principal Investigator: Thomas Johnson 

Department of Energy 

Field-Constrained Quantitative Model of the 
Origin of Microbial 
Principal Investigator: Craig M. Bethke 

Computational & Spectroscopic Investigations 
of Water-Carbon Dioxide Fluids & Surface 
Sorption Processes. 
Principal Investigator: R. James Kirkpatrick 

Federal Highway Administration 

Predicting Aggregate Reaction Based on 

Chemistry and Nanostructure of Alkali-Silica 

Gels. 

Principal investigators: Leslie J. Struble and 

R. James Kirkpatrick 

Illinois Council On Food And Agriculture 
Research 

Estimation of Denitrification Rates in the 
Shallow Groundwater Flow Systems of Big 
Ditch Watershed, Illinois - Isotope 
Assessment. 
Principal Investigator: Thomas Johnson 

Institute Of Geophysics And Planetary 
Physics, Los Alamos: 

Timescales of Crustal Level Differentiation: 
U-Series Measurements and Geophysical 
Monitoring at Arenal Volcano, Costa Rica. 
Principal Investigator: Craig Lundstrom 

NASA 

Core Angular Momentum and the International 

Earth Rotation Service Coordination Center 

/ Sub-Centers Activity for Monitoring Global 

Geophysical Fluids. 

Principal Investigator: Xiaodong Song 

NSF 

Polymorphism and Structural Transitions 
During Glass Formation. 
Principal Investigator: Jay Bass 

Development of Laser Heating for Sound 
Velocity Measurements at High P & T. 
Principal Investigator: Jay Bass 

Sound Velocities & Elastic Moduli of Minerals 
Mantle Pressures and Temperatures with 
Laser Heating. 
Principal Investigator: Jay Bass 

Workshop on Phase Transitions and Mantle 
Discontinuities. 
Principal Investigator: Jay Bass 



CSED1: Collaborative Research: Composition 
and Seismic Structure of the Mantle 
Transition Zone. 
Principal Investigator: Jay Bass 

Consortium for Material Property Research in 
the Earth Sciences. 
Principal Investigator: Jay Bass 

Collaborative Research: Elasticity Grand 
Challenge of the COMPRES Initiative. 
Principal Investigator: Jay Bass 

Global Climate Change & The Evolutionary 
Ecology of Antarctic Mollusks in the Late 
Eocene. 
Principal Investigator: Daniel B. Blake 

A Seismic Study of the Mantle Transition Zone 
and Subducted Lithosphere. 
Principal Investigator: Wang-Ping Chen 

Seismic Reflection Profiles in Southern Illinois 
(funded through the Mid-America 
Earthquake Research Center) . 
Principal Investigators: John McBride, 
Stephen Marshak, and Wang-Ping Chen 

A Seismic Study of the Taiwan Orogen. 
Principal Investigator: Wang-Ping Chen 

Collaborative Research: Lithospheric-Scale 
Dynamics of Active Mountain Building along 
the Himalayan-Tibetan Collision Zone. 
Principal Investigator: Wang-Ping Chen 

Proximal Carbonate Ejecta from Cretaceous- 
Tertiary Chicxulub Impact Crater: 87 Sr/ ss Sr 
Chronology, Ballistic Sedimentation, & 
Diagenetic Alteration. 
Principal Investigator: Bruce W Fouke 

Geobiology & The Emergence of Terraced 
Architecture During Carbonate 
Mineralization. 
Principal Investigator: Bruce Fouke 

Development of Cr Stable Isotopes for Cr 
Transport Studies and Other Geoscience 
Applications. 
Principal Investigator: Thomas Johnson 

Collaborative Research: Field Investigation of Se 
Oxyanion Reduction & Se Sources in 
Wetlands: Application of Se Isotopes. 
Principal Investigator: Thomas Johnson 

Measuring Trace Element Partition Coefficients 
between Minerals and Basaltic Melt. 
Principal Investigator: Craig C. Lundstrom 

Observational Constraints on Melt-Rock 
Reactions During Melting of the Upper 
Mantle. 
Principal Investigator: Craig C. Lundstrom 



Windows into MORB Pedogenesis: Measuring 
U-Series Disequilibria in MORB from 
Transforms. 
Principal Investigator: Craig Lundstrom 

Collaborative Research: Investigating the 
Processes and Timescales of Andesite 
Differentiation: A Comprehensive 
Petrological and Geochemical Study of 
Arenal Volcano, Costa Rica. 
Principal Investigators: Frank J. Tepley III 
and Craig C. Lundstrom 

Collaborative Research: Emplacement of the 
Ferrar Mafic Idneous Province: A Pilot Study 
of Intrusive Architecture and Flow 
Directions in Southern Victoria Land. 
Principal Investigators: Stephen Marshak 
and Alan Whittington 

Tectonics of the Aracuai/Ribeira Orogenic 
Tongue of Southeastern Brazil and its 
Significance to the Assembly of West 
Gondwana. 
Principal Investigator: Stephen Marshak 

Structure and Dynamics of Earth's Core and 
Lowermost Mantle. 
Principal Investigator: Xiaodong Song 

Constraining the Structure and Rotation of the 
Inner Core. 
Prinicpal Investigator: Xiaodong Song 

ONR 

The Role of Shipyard Pollutants in Structuring 
Coral Reef Microbial Communities: 
Monitoring Environmental Change and the 
Potential Causes of Coral Disease. 
Principal Investigator: Bruce Fouke 

State Of Illinois Board Of Higher Education 

Evolution of the Martian Surface — A 

Cooperative Learning Module for General 

Education in Science. 

Principal Investigator: Albert Hsui 

University Of Illinois Research Board 

Seed Money for Research Initiative in Aquifer 
Microbiology. 
Principal Investigator: Craig M. Bethke 

Airbrasive Unit for Paleontological Research. 
Principal Investigator: Daniel B. Blake 

Structure of Crust and Mantle beneath China 
from the New Chinese Broadband Digital 
Seismic Network. 
Principal Investigator: Xiaodong Song 



13 



List of Publications for 2002 



Ellis, A. S., Johnson, T. M, and Bullen, T. D., 
2002, Cr isotopes and the fate of hexavalent 
Cr in the environment: Science: 265, 2060- 
2062. 

Hu, F.S., Lee, B.Y., Kaufman, D.S., Yoneji, S., 
Nelson, D.M., and Henne, P.D., 2002, 
Response of tundra ecosystem in southwest- 
ern Alaska to Younger Dryas climatic oscilla- 
tions: Global Change Biology, 8: 1156-1163. 

Bethke, CM., and Johnson, T.M., 2002, Paradox 
of groundwater age: Geology, 30: 385-388. 

Hou, X., and Kirkpatrick, R.J., 2002, Structure 
and Dynamics of CIO4- in Layered Double 
Hydroxides: Chemistry of Materials, 14: 
1195-1200. 

Wilkerson, M.S., Fischer, M.P., and Apotria, 
T.G. (editors), 2002, Fault-related folds: 
Transition from two dimensions to three 
dimensions, special issue of the Journal of 
Structural Geology: 24(4). 

Song, X.D., 2002, The Earth's Core, 

International Handbook of Earthquake and 
Engineering Seismology (Lee, W.H.K., 
Kanamori, H., Jennings, P.C., and Kisslinger, 
C, eds.), Volume 1, Chapter 56, Academic 
Press, San Diego. 

Blake, D.B., 2002, Evaluation of the 
Mississippian asteroid (Echinodermata) 
Compsaster formosus Worthen and Miller: A 
Paleozoic homeomorph of the post-Paleozoic 
Asteriidae: Paleontologische Zeitschrift, 
76:357-367. 

Park, J., Bethke, CM., Torgersen, T., and 
Johnson, T.M, 2002, Transport modeling 
applied to the interpretation of groundwater 
36 C1 age: Water Resources Research: 38, 1-15. 

Wilkerson, M.S., Apotria, T.G., and Farid, T.A., 
2002, Interpreting the geologic map expres- 
sion of contractional fault-related fold termi- 
nations: Lateral/oblique ramps versus dis- 
placement gradients: Wilkerson, M.S., 
Fischer, M.P., and Apotria, T.G. (ed.). Fault- 
related folds: Transition from two dimensions 
to three dimensions, special issue of the 
Journal of Structural Geology: 24(4), 593-607. 

Kalinichev, A.G. and Kirkpatrick, R.J., 2002, 
Molecular dynamics modeling of chloride 
binding to the surfaces of Ca hydroxide, 
hydrated Ca-aluminate and Ca-silicate phas- 
es: Chemistry of Materials, 14: 3539 - 3549. 



Song, X.D., and Xu, X. X., 2002, Inner core tran- 
sition zone and anomalous PKP(DF) wave- 
forms from polar paths: Geophys. Res. Lett., 
29(4): 10.1029/2001GL013822. 

Apotria, T.G., and Wilkerson, M.S., 2002, 
Geometry and kinematics of a fault-related 
fold termination: Rosario structure, 
Maracaibo Basin, Venezuela: Wilkerson, 
M.S., Fischer, M.P., and Apotria, T.G. (ed.), 
Fault-related folds: Transition from two 
dimensions to three dimensions, special issue 
of the Journal of Structural Geology, 24(4), 
671-687. 

Jin, Q., and Bethke, CM., 2002, Kinetics of elec- 
tron transfer through the respiratory chain: 
Biophysical Journal: 83, 1797-1808. 

Song, X.D., 2002, Three-dimensional structure 
and differential rotation of the inner core: 
AGU monograph on Core Dynamics, Structure 
and Rotation (Dehant, V.M., Creager, K.C, 
Zatman, S., and Karato, S., eds.). 

Kao, H., Liu, Y.-H., Liang, W.-T., and Chen, W- 
P., 2002, Source parameters of regional earth- 
quakes in Taiwan (1999-2000) including the 
Chi-Chi earthquake sequence: Terr. Atmos. 
Ocean. Set: 13, 279-298. 

Bethke, CM., and Johnson.TM., 2002, Ground 
water age: Ground Water, 40: 337-339. 

Blake, D.B., and Kues, B. S., 2002, 
Homeomorphy in the Asteroidea 
(Echinodermata): A new Late Cretaceous 
genus and species from Colorado: Journal of 
Paleontology: 1007-1013. 

Tandarich, J. P., Darmody, R.G., Follmer, L.R., 
and Johnson, D.L., 2002, Historical develop- 
ment of soil and weathering profile concepts 
from Europe to the USA: Soil Science Society 
of America Journal 66: 335-346. 

Dong, F., Hsui, A.T., and Riahi, D.N., 2002, A 
stability analysis and some numerical compu- 
tations of thermal convection with a variable 
buoyancy factor: J. of Theoretical and Applied 
Mechanics, 32 (2): 19-46. 

Frias-Lopez, J., Zerkle, A.L., Bonheyo, G.T., and 
Fouke, B.W., 2002, Partitioning of bacterial 
communities between seawater and healthy, 
black band diseased, and dead coral surfaces: 
Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 68 
(5): 2214-2228. 



Sun, X.L.. and Song, X.D., 2002, PKP travel times 
at near antipodal distances: Implications for 
inner core anisotropy and lowermost mantle 
structure: Earth Plant. Set Lett, 199: 429-445. 

Fouke, B.W., Zerkle, A.L., Alvarez, W, Pope, 
K.O., Ocampo, A.C., Wachtman, R.J., Grajales- 
Nishimura, J.M., Claeys, P., Fischer, A.G., 
2002, Cathodoluminescence petrography and 
isotope geochemistry of KT impact ejecta 
deposited 360 km from the Chicxulub crater at 
Albion Island, Belize: Sedimentology, 49: 
117-138. 

Hou, X., Kalinichev, A. C, and Kirkpatrick, R. J., 
2002, Interlayer structure and dynamics of Cl- 
-L1AI2 layered double hydroxide: ,5 C1 NMR 
observations and molecular dynamics model- 
ing: Chemistry of Materials, 14: 2078 -2085. 

Killey, Myrna M., and William W. Shilts, 2002. 
Introduction: Influence of Geology and Soil on 
Ecosystem Development. Big Muddy River 
Area Assessment, Volume 1: Geology. Illinois 
Department of Natural Resources, p. 1-6. 

Herbel, M.J., Johnson, T.M., Tanji, K. K., Gao, 
S„ and Bullen, T.D., 2002, Selenium stable 
isotope ratios in California agricultural 
drainage water: Journal of Environmental 
Quality: 31(4), 1146-1156. 



Geothrust Members for 2002 



J. William Soderman— Chair, 
M.S. '60. Ph.D. '62 

James R. Baroffio, Ph.D. '64 

David K. Beach, B.S '73 

Marion "Pat" Bickford, M.S. '58, 
Ph.D. '60 

Lester W. Clutter, B.S. '48, M.S. '51 

Norbert E. Cygan, B.S. '54, M.S. '56, 
Ph.D. '62 

Edwin H. Franklin, B.S. '56 

John R. Carino, B.S. '57 

James W. Granath, B.S. '71, M.S. '73 

Morris (Brud) W. Leighton, B.S. '47 

Patricia Santogrossi, B.S. '74, M.S. '77 

Jack C. Threet, A.B. '51 



14 



Colloquium Speakers for Spring and Fall 2002 




Spring 2002 



Jan. 25 Miguel Goni, University of South Carolina 

Compound Specific Stable Carbon Isotopic Analysis to Trace Organic Matter 

in Ocean Margin Sediments 
Feb. 1 Edwin Schauble, California Institute of Technology 

Predicting the Stable-Isotope Geochemistry of Heavy Elements 
Feb. 8 Todd Ehlers, California Institute of Technology 

Climate, Tectonics, and Topographic Evolution of the Washington Cascade 

Mountains 
Feb. 12 Timothy Ku, University of Michigan 

New Insights into Tropical Shelf Carbonate Preservation and Authigenic 

Clay Formation: Evidence from Sediment and Pore Water Geochemistry 
Feb. 15 Jonathan Stock, University of California, Berkeley 

Valley Incision by Debris Flows: Evidence for a Widespread Topographic 

Signature and the Form of a New Erosion Law 
Feb. 19 Timothy Rozan, Simon Fraser University 

Trace Metal Speciation in Freshwaters: Organic Versus Inorganic 

Complexation. Part I. Multidentate Metal-Organic Complexation Part II. 

The Role of Reduced Sulfur 
Feb. 22 Andrew Jacobson, University of Michigan 

Silicate Versus Carbonate Weathering in Uplifting Orogenic Belts 
Feb. 25 Gerd Steinle-Neumann, Carnegie Institution of Washington 

Earth's Deepest Secrets — Iron in the Inner Core 
Feb. 28 Jie Li, Carnegie Institution of Washington 

Experimental Constraints on the Earth's Core 
Mar. 4 Sang-Heon Shim, University of California at Berkeley 

Phase Diagram and Equation of State of MgSiOj Perovskite in Earth's 

Mantle 
Mar. 11 Guoyin Shen, University of Chicago 

Experimental Approaches Towards an Understanding of Earth's Mantle and 

Core Materials 
Mar. 26 Susan Kieffer 

Geologic Nozzles: Old Faithful Geyser, Mount St. Helens, the Rapids of the 

Colorado River... and Other Shocking Phenomena! 
Apr. 5 Holger Hellwig, Carnegie Institution of Washington 

Nonlinear Optical Studies of the Relationship Between Structure and 

Properties 
Apr. 8 Jonathan Tomkin, Yale University 

Quantitative Testing of Bedrock Incision Models, Clearwater River, WA 
Apr. 10 Elizabeth Hearn, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Space Geodetic Studies of Active Crustal Deformation: Moving from "How" 

to "Why" 
Apr. 12 Hong Wang, ISGS 

Millennial and Centennial Scale Climate Changes in the Middle Mississippi 

Valley During the Last Glaciation 
Apr. 15 Gwen Daley, University of Wisconsin, Madison 

Why Paleoenvironment Matters: Evolutionary and Paleoecological Examples 

from the Ordovician and Pleistocene 
Apr. 18 Charly Bank, University of British Columbia 

Teleseismic Investigation of the Moho Beneath Canada and the Upper 

Mantle Beneath the Archean Slave Craton in NW Canada 
Apr. 19 Wang-Ping Chen, UIUC Department of Geology 

Project Hi-CLIMB: An Integrated Study of the Himalayan-Tibetan 

Continental Lithosphere during Mountain Building 
Apr. 22 Julie Maxson, Gustavus Adolphus College 

Reconstructing Rivers: Answering Big Questions About Life, Death, 

Tectonics, and Climate 
May 2 John Werner, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 

Creeping into the Icehouse: Morphological Change in Gastropods of the 

Eocene La Meseta Formation (Seymour Island. Antarctic Peninsula) in 

Response to the Onset of Cenozoic Cooling 
May 6 John Dawson, University of Iowa 

The Morphology and Evolution of the Azooxanthellate Coral Genera 

Anomocora and Asterosmilia 



Fall 2002 



Sept. 6 Tom Johnson, UIUC Department of Geology 

Chromium Isotopes and the Fate of Hexavalent Chromium in the 

Environment 
Sept. 13 Andrey Kalinichev, UIUC Department of Geology 

Molecular Modeling of Geochemical Fluids and Fluid/Mineral Interfaces 
Sept. 20 Ken Lepper, Los Alamos 

Luminescence Dating: A Light From the Past Brightens the Future of 

Quaternary Geochronology 
Sept. 27 Meenakshi Wadhwa, Field Museum of Natural History and 
University of Chicago 

Time Scales of Planetesimal Accretion and Differentiation Based on the 

Mn-Cr Chronometer 
Oct. 4 Aldo Shemesh, Weizmann Institute, Israel 

Holocene Climate Change Inferred From Oxygen Isotope Records of 

Lacustrine Biogenic Silica 
Oct. 11 Charlie Werth, UIUC Environmental Engineering 

Analysis of Nonaqueous Phase Liquid Volatilization in Heterogeneous 

Porous Media 
Oct. 18 Louise Kellogg, University of California, Davis 

Journey to the Center of the Earth: Structure and Dynamics of the Deep 

Mantle 
Nov. 8 Renata Wentzcovitch, University of Minnesota 

First Principles Thermoelasticity of Mantle Materials 
Nov. 15 James Conder, Washington University, St. Louis 

Across-Axis Mantle Flow and Asymmetric Melt Production at the East 

Pacific Rise 
Dec. 4 Libby Stern, University of Texas, Austin 

Geochemical and Ecological Evidence of Massive Central Texas 

Holocene Soil Erosion 
Dec. 13 Georges Poupinet, LGIT-CNRS, Grenoble, France 

Seismic Tomography Beneath Stable Tectonic Regions and the Dual 

Origin of the Continental Lithosphere 



Recent Activity in Petroleum 
Geology at Illinois 

Back in 1998, Hannes Leetaru, Ph.D. '97, a geologist at 
the ISGS and an adjunct faculty member in the Department, 
joined with Prof. Steve Marshak to establish a new course in 
petroleum geology. Five years later, the course is still going 
strong and is continuing to grow in enrollment. Because of 
Marshak's other teaching responsibilities, Leetaru now runs the 
entire course, bringing to bear his many years of experience 
working in the industry- Not only do students learn how to 
interpret seismic-reflection profiles and well logs, but the course 
includes exercises that involve Landmark™ computer software, 
one of the principal programs used by the petroleum industry 
for modelling geologic features in three dimensions. 

This past fall, students interested in petroleum geology 
had the added benefit of being able to attend the eastern sec- 
tion meeting of the AAPG, which was hosted by the ISGS and 
took place in Champaign-Urbana. At the meeting, students 
attended talks, met with recruiters and industry representatives, 
and saw exhibits of software and geophysical companies. Prof. 
Bruce Fouke and his group presented research at the meeting. 
Fouke also hosted an open house for meeting participants to 
visit the new geomicrobiology lab in the Department. 



15 



m^^^^^^ww^^nn^^^^ra 



S a 



- 






Join us in Utah! 

Come join Geology Department 
friends and colleagues at a special 
reception Monday, May 12, at the 
AAPG meeting (in Salt Lake City). 
The reception will honor three 
Illini — Albert Carozzi, Jack 
Threet and Norb Cygan — who 
have received major AAPG 
awards. Details will follow soon! 




Professor Craig Lundstrom organized a raft trip down the Colorado River, in the Grand 
Canyon. Here Professors Craig Bethke and Tom Johnson (second and third from left) 
enjoy a quieter moment on the river. 



ILLINOIS 



Department of Geology 

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 
245 Natural History Building 
1301 W. Green St. 
Urbana. IL 61801 



Non-Profit Organization 
U.S. Postage 

PAID 

Permit No. 75 

Champaign, IL 61820 



GEOLOGY LIBRARY 



2003 YEAR IN REVIEW 



Department of Geology 



2003 



y of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 




Professor Jie Li Joins Department 



The Department has added a new miner- 
al scientist to the faculty by hiring Jie 
Li (JEE-uh Lee) , as an assistant professor. 
Li received her Ph.D. from Harvard— as 
did Emeritus Professor Don Henderson, 
who taught mineralogy at Illinois from 
1948-1989. After finishing at Harvard, Li 
held a post-doctoral research position at 
the Carnegie Institution in Washington. 
She arrived on campus in March 2003 
with her husband, Holger Hellwig (see 
related story on page 5). This fall, she 
taught Geology 332 (Mineralogy). 

Li conducts experiments to investi- 
gate the nature and dynamics of the 
Earth's core. These experiments involve 
measurements at extremely high pressures 
and temperatures, which can only be 
achieved using diamond anvils and lasers. 
While everyone agrees that most of the 
Earth's core consists of iron, there are 
many theories about what makes up the 
non-iron part. Li has been looking at the 
melting relations in the Fe-O-S iron-alloy 
system. This work will help determine 
whether this system is an accurate model 
for the core composition. 



Li's research lab is in the northeast 
corner of the Natural History Building 
(NHB) basement. In order to meet 
modern building codes, the lab had to 
be completely renovated and new air 
conditioning, plumbing, and electricity 
had to be installed. 

"Most of NHB is quite old, but you go 
into the new space and suddenly you are in 
a different world— it's all modern!" says Li. 

She is particularly pleased with the 
lab's light-blue tile floor, not because of its 
appearance, but because she works with 
extremely small samples. 

"It's like carrying a speck of dust in 
your hand," says Li, of her samples. 
"Once, as a postdoctoral researcher, I was 
carrying a sample to a colleague's office, 
only to have it fall from my hand onto a 
shag carpet. I spent hours on my hands 
and knees, looking through the carpet inch 
by inch, but 1 never found it," says Li. 
"The sample had taken untold hours to 
prepare. Since then, I dreamed of having a 
light-colored, smooth floor without a 
pattern, so if you drop a sample, you can 
find it easily." 



Kirkpatrick Receives 
Dana Medal 

R. James Kirkpatrick, professor of 
geology and executive associate dean of 
the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, 
has been awarded the Dana Medal from 
the Mineralogical Society of America 
(MSA). 

The Dana Medal, which was first 
awarded in 2000, recognizes continued 
outstanding scientific contributions 
through original research in the mineralog- 
ical sciences by an individual in the midst 
of their career. The award is named in 
honor of the legendary contributions by 
James Dwight Dana (1813-1895) and 
Edward Salisbury Dana (1849-1935) to the 
science of mineralogy. Kirkpatrick, who is 
only the fourth recipient of the honor, will 
be recognized at an awards session during 
an MSA meeting in Copenhagen, 
Denmark. The recipient of the Dana Medal 
receives a bronze, engraved medal and 
gives a special scientific presentation that 
is published in American Mineralogist. 

Kirkpatrick was recognized for being 
among the first to apply kinetic theory in 
igneous petrology. His studies of the kinet- 
ics of crystallization are the classic papers 
in this field. In more recent years, he 
established a preeminent lab (with Eric 
Oldfield in the Chemistry Department) for 
applying "magic-angle spinning NMR 
spectroscopy" to the study of earth materi- 
als such as glass and clay. His work on the 
internal ordering of minerals again was at 
the forefront of the field. Most recently, he 
has worked to understand the natural 
chemical reactions that occur on mineral 
surfaces and to bridge the gap between 
Earth science and materials sciences. 
This work involves a variety of materials, 
including clay, glass, and even concrete. 




Greetings 



Letter From The Head 



■ s each year passes, we see new and 
exciting growth in the Department of 
Geology. During 2003, we have added a 
new professor, Jie Li, in mineralogy, two 
new research scientists, Holger Hellwig 
and Rob Sanford, and a lecturer, Michael 
Stewart. Prof. Li and Dr. Hellwig have 
moved into a new state-of-the-art lab for 
the study of mineral properties at high 
pressures in the lower level of the 
Natural History Building. Dr. Sanford 
works in the area of environmental 
microbiology, a fast-growing discipline 
in geoscience. Dr. Stewart, an igneous 
petrologist and geochemist, teaches 
large-enrollment introductory courses, 
and also contributes to graduate courses 
in tectonics. 



But the passage of time also means 
retirements, and 2003 has, unfortunately, 
also seen Prof. Dan Blake, a prominent 
paleontologist, leave the faculty after 36 
years of outstanding scholarship and 
teaching. The good news is that Dan is 
staying in town, and will continue his 
research. 

We are also developing in a new 
academic direction at Illinois. 
Specifically, the Geology Department is 
involved in a joint search with the 
Department of Atmospheric Science and 
the Department of Geography to bring in 
new faculty who have interests in the 
role of water in the Earth system. This 
search is part of an effort to explore the 
creation of an alliance among the three 
departments, perhaps in the form of a 



new School of Earth and Environment 
on campus. 

We are now entering the final 
phase of our endowment campaign, 
GeoScience 2005, and we're approaching 
our goal of raising $3 million, the 
income from which will help ensure that 
the Department continues on a positive 
trajectory. We hope that the many alums 
and friends of the Department can 
help play a role in the future of the 
Department by becoming involved in the 
GeoScience 2005 effort. 

Please feel free to stop by for a visit, 
and see some of the renovations in NHB, 
or join us at our receptions at GSA and 
AAPG. I wish you all the best for the 
coming year. 



Research Highlights 



Professors Craig Lundstrom and Tom 
Johnson are pleased to report that they have 
placed an order for a new isotope ratio mass 
spectrometer. The $700k instrument is funded 
mostly from the National Science Foundation, 
with matching funds provided by the depart- 
ment and the university administration. It will 
be used to measure isotope ratios of strontium, 
uranium, lead, chromium, selenium, mercury, 
calcium, and many other elements. The data 
will be used in studies involving age dates of 
rocks, chemical reactions affecting the mobility 
of contaminants in water, the processes 
involved in magma generation and ascent, 
chemical reactions in sedimentary environ- 
ments, and a variety of other geoscience areas, 

Fouke took 15 students from the 
University of Illinois to the Caribbean during 
winter break. They visited Curagao, in the 
Netherlands Antilles, to study the formation of 
carbonate rocks and the geology of coral reefs. 
Students worked both offshore and onshore, to 
see all the steps involved in forming reefs, and 
eventually transforming them into limestone. 



Prof. Wang-Ping Chen is supervising a multinational 
research project in the Himalayas and Tibet. The pro- 
ject, known as HiCLIMB, is designed to understand 
the geologic evolution of the highest mountain range 
on Earth, and the crust beneath it. and to determine 
the cause of earthquakes in the region. He has been 
setting up seismic arrays in Nepal and China. 

Prof. Jay D. Bass has been conducting research in 
mineral physics at the Ecole Normale Superieure de 
Lyon (France), working with their high-temperature 
Raman spectroscopy group. This collaboration is part 
of the CNRS-UIUC Partnership, a link that connects 
UIUC to maior institutions in France. Prof. Bass is 
also establishing connections with universities in 
Prague and Budapest. 

Over spring break, a group of students will travel to 
northern Scotland as part of a field course run by 
the University of Leicester (UK). There they will study 
the rocks and structures in the birthplace of geology. 
They will visit many of the classic rock outcrops at 
which the fundamental principles of geology were first 
established. 



Prof. Xiaodong Song is working with research 
groups in China to understand the crustal struc- 
ture of eastern Asia. 

Prof. Craig Lundstrom is conducting research 
on volcanoes in Costa Rica. He recently spent 
time in the field sampling volcanic rocks, which 
he then melts in his laboratory at the 
Department to understand the controls on the 
chemical composition of the rock. 

Prof. Susan Kieffer, Walgreen Professor of 
Geology, is working on the dynamics of geother- 
mal systems in New Zealand. She recently 
spent six weeks in New Zealand conducting 
measurements in geothermal wells. 



Year in Review is published once a year by the 

Department of Geology, University of Illinois at 

Urbana-Champaign. to summarize the activities and 

accomplishments within the department and news from 

alumni and friends. 

Department Head: Stephen Marshak 

(smarshak@uiuc.edu) 

Administrative Secretary: Barb Elmore 

(belmore@uiuc.edu) 

Editor: Deb Aronson (debaronson@nasw.org) 

http://www.geology.uiuc.edu 



GEOLOGY LIBRARY 



Alumni Award 



Hayden Murray Receives Alumni Achievement Award 



| aydn Murray, B.S. '48, M.S. '50 and 

Ph.D. '51, has received the 2003 
Department of Geology Alumni 
Achievement Award. 

Murray, a highly regarded clay mineral- 
ogist and sedimentologist, split his career 
between the Indiana University and the 
Georgia Kaolin Company. Murray, who has 
made important contributions to mineralo- 
gy and industrial applications of clays, first 
taught and did research at Indiana from 
1951-56. Then he was hired away by 
Georgia Kaolin where he worked from 
1957-73. At that point, Indiana University 
asked him to return to campus as professor 
and chair of the geology department. 
Murray served as chair until 1984, then 
continued to teach and do research for 
another 10 years, when he retired. 

In recognition of his achievements, 
Murray was elected last year into the 
National Academy of Engineering. In addi- 
tion, he has received the lifetime achieve- 
ment award from the Professional 
Geologists of Indiana and an honorary doc- 
torate from the University of the South, in 
Bahia Blanca, Argentina. In the spring of 
2004 he will receive an honorary degree 
from Indiana University. 

Murray also has been very active in 
various professional organizations, serving, 
at various times, as president of the Clay 
Mineralogy Society (of which he was also 
one of three founding members), the 
Ceramic Association of New Jersey, the 
Society for Mining, Metallurgy and 
Exploration, American Institute of 
Professional Geologists and the 
International Association for the Study of 
Clays (AIPEA). 

Murray came to the attention of 
Georgia Kaolin because of his dissertation 
work on kaolinite. The company, which 
was having problems with the flow proper- 
ties of kaolin from one of their sites, asked 
Murray if he could determine which deposit 
was causing the problem. After he did so, 
they offered him a full-time position. 




"Georgia Kaolin tried to hire me start- 
ing in 1953," says Murray. "Once their 
salary offer became three times my salary 
at Indiana I decided to take the leap." 

But another reason Murray took the 
job was to see whether he could "make 
it" in industry. In fact, Murray was quite 
successful, ultimately moving from direc- 
tor of applied research all the way to 
executive vice president and COO. While 
working for Georgia Kaolin, Murray con- 
tinued to research and write papers, so 
the shift back to academia in the 1970s 



was not a difficult transition. "It was an 
easy move," he says. "We both (he and 
his wife, Juanita) liked Bloomington 
(Indiana) very much. It was easier to 
shift also because of my management 
experiences at Georgia Kaolin. I also 
found that the graduate students 
migrated toward me because of my 
practical experience." 

Born and raised on farm near 
Kewanee, 111., Murray thought he might 
be a mining engineer. After serving as 
an officer with the Army Corps of 
Engineers in the South Pacific, he 
enrolled at the University of Illinois. 
There, he discovered he enjoyed the 
geology courses more than the engi- 
neering. He also found several wonder- 
ful mentors and advisors within the 
Department, including Harold Wanless, 
Ralph E. Grim, and Carleton Chapman. 

"Dr. Chapman was the best teacher 
I ever had and Dr. Grim, who was con- 
sidered the father of clay mineralogy, 
was the most ethical and the best clay 
mineralogist I ever met. I had a really 
good experience at the University of 
Illinois." 



emen receives awa. 







Margaret Leinen (center) receives the 2002 Alumni Achievement Award. Pictured here with Leinen are 
(from left), Professor Susan Kieffer. Professor Dan Blake, Bill Sullivan, director of the Environmental 
Council, Leinen. Professor R. James Kirkpatrick, Don Wuebbles, head of the Department of 
Atmospheric Sciences, and Professor and Department Head Steve Marshak. 



Department News 



Undergraduate 
Research 

~ ne of the advantages of being an 

undergraduate at a research university 
is the opportunity to participate in active 
research programs. The experience of 
two of our seniors this year illustrates 
this point. 

Amy Luther, who graduated in 
December 2003 with a B.S. in geology, 
collaborated with Prof. Dan Blake and 
John Werner, a former visiting assistant 
professor, on a project using computer 
analysis to see if Antarctic bivalves 
changed shape during the Eocene, a 
time of dramatic climate change. 

"I was interested in working with 
fossils to see what paleontologists do," 
said Luther. "Plus, I learned how to write 
a scientific paper, do research, and had 
the opportunity to go to professional 
meetings. I saw how the process works." 

Roger Bannister, a senior, worked 
with Ph.D. student Kurt Burmeister (see 
Year in Review 2002) and Prof. Stephen 
Marshak on a project involving the 
development of structures in the 
Appalachian fold-thrust belt of New 
York. In particular. Bannister is looking at 
microscopic deformation in sandstone by 
documenting the amount of finite strain 
that has developed in association with 
folding. Using photomicrographs and a 
computer program, he measures subtle 
changes in the distances between the 
centers of neighboring grains to see if 
grains have been preferentially stretched 
in a given direction. 

"It's really neat to quantify deforma- 
tion," says Bannister. "On field trips, stu- 
dents are used to hearing professors ask, 
'Do you see the fold?' But to learn how 
folding affects rock at the grain scale 
makes the whole process more interest- 
ing." 

Both Luther and Bannister are plan- 
ning to begin graduate work in geology 
next year. 




Sue Kieffer, Dean Jesse Delia, and Chancellor Nancy Cantor at Kieffer's investiture 
as Walgreen Professor. 



Bethke Elected AAAS Fellow 

raig Bethke, professor of geology, has been elected to the rank of Fellow in 
the Division of Geology and Geography of the American Association for the 
Advancement of Science. This honor is bestowed on AAAS members who have made 
distinguished efforts on behalf of the advancement of science or its applications. 
Bethke was selected for his fundamental discoveries in the forces that drive brines 
across sedimentary basins, migration of petroleum reserves, the thermodynamics of 
reacting geochemical systems, and microbial metabolism. 

Founded in 1848 to represent all disciplines of science, AAAS is the world's 
largest scientific society. The organization's tradition of electing fellows began in 
1874. This year, only 13 members were honored by promotion to fellowship in the 
Geology-Geography Division. 

Bethke obtained his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois in 1985, and has been 
on our faculty ever since. He received the Presidential Young Investigator Award in 
1986, the Lindgren Award from the Society of Economic Geologists in 1987, and the 
Meinzer Award from the Geological Society of America in 1992. 



Four Faculty Receive Tenure 

e are delighted to announce that last year saw the granting of tenure to four of 
our faculty. Bruce Fouke, Tom Johnson, and Xiaodong Song have become asso- 
ciate professors of geology, and Feng-Sheng Hu has become an associate professor of 
plant biology and geology. Tenure review is a very high bar to cross at the University 
of Illinois; the process of evaluation takes place at the Department, College, and 
University levels. Success in achieving tenure emphasizes the vigor of teaching and 
research efforts of our faculty. The Department congratulates our newest associate 
professors! 



Research Scientists Strengthen Department 



R 



esearch scientists are vital to the 
growth of the Department. With 
the hiring of Holger Hellwig and Rob 
Sanford, the Department now has 
five research scientists on staff. In 
addition to Hellwig and Sanford, 
they include George Bonheyo 
(geomicrobiology), Andrey 
Kalinichev (molecular dynamics), 
and Stanislav Sinogeikin (mineral 
physics) . 

Research scientists focus entirely 
on research, and their positions are 
supported entirely by research 
grants. Thus, they add to the vitality 
of the Department and provide addi- 
tional expertise. Also, the overhead 
component of grants that they obtain 
contributes significantly to covering 
the cost of Departmental operations. 

"We can focus entirely on 
research," says Sanford. "With a 
pool of research scientists, the 



amount of research and the number of 
papers coming from the Department 
increases. Our productivity raises the insti- 
tution's visibility." 

Sanford, a geomicrobiologist, is work- 
ing on two projects funded by the 
Department of Energy. One is in collabora- 
tion with Craig Bethke, professor of geolo- 
gy, and looks at the microbiology of 
aquifers. The other is looking at possible 
microorganisms that can be used to neu- 
tralize uranium. In Spring 2004, he is also 
teaching a course in "Laboratory Methods 
for Geomicrobiology," which is a boon for 
students wanting to work in the growing 
field of geomicrobiology. 

Holger Hellwig arrived on campus, 
with his wife, Jie Li, in March of 2003 (see 
cover story). Hellwig, a mineral physicist, 
traces his interest in crystals to playing 
with Legos as a child. 

Right now, Hellwig is "playing" with 
high pressure, diamond-anvil cell tech- 



niques. Since arriving at the 
University of Illinois, he has begun to 
focus on the properties of water under 
high pressure. The use of a diamond 
anvil cell "opens the window into cer- 
tain properties of the material we 
couldn't look at before," he says. 

Another project Hellwig has 
worked on is high-pressure behavior 
of tin dioxide. Tin dioxide acts as a 
proxy for silica, which is an important 
component of the Earth's interior. 

Hellwig completed his Ph.D. in 
his native Germany, then went to the 
Carnegie Institution in Washington 
D.C. where he did projects relating to 
nitrogen, and met Jie Li, the newest 
assistant professor in the Department 
of Geology. At Illinois, Hellwig is 
building a lab for laser crystallogra- 
phy, and is teaching an upper-level 
course in X-ray crystallography. 



Michael Stewart Joins Department 



Michael Stewart, Ph.D., joined the 
Department of Geology last August 
as a lecturer. Stewart earned his B.S. 
and M.S. degrees from Indiana 
University. He then worked for three 
years as an environmental geologist in 
Chicago, before going to Duke 
University for his Ph.D. At Duke, 
Stewart investigated volcanic systems 
along mid-ocean ridges and how they 
related to the construction of the ocean- 
ic crust. 

Stewart's position is designed to 
address teaching needs in the 
Department, and has him in front of a 



class for much of his time. In the fall 
semester Stewart taught two classes: 
Geology 103, a course that teaches quan- 
titative methods in the context of intro- 
ductory geology; and Geology 117, an 
introductory oceanography course for 
non-science majors. In the spring, 2004 
semester, Stewart is teaching three 
courses: Geology 100 (Introductory 
Geology); Geology 108 (Historical 
Geology); and Geology 489 
(Geotectonics). 

"1 really like teaching and dealing 
with students," says Stewart. "I only 
interviewed for positions with a large 
teaching component." 



Stewart adds that he is very glad to 
be part of the Geology Department. 

"This is an excellent department 
with a history of important contributions 
to geologic sciences," he says. "Also, the 
University continues to impress me, with 
its recent and past Nobel Prize winners, 
and the quality of students, among other 
things." 

Stewart and his wife, Carol, and 
two-and-a-half-year-old son, Maxwell, 
came to Champaign-Urbana from 
Durham, North Carolina. Both he and 
Carol are from the Midwest, and they 
are glad to be closer to family. 



DEPARTMENT NEWS 



Susan Kieffer Teaches a Sustainability Seminar 



During spring semester 2004, 
Susan Kieffer is offering a new 
300-level course, titled "The 
Challenge of a Sustainable Earth," 
that has attracted both undergradu- 
ate and graduate students from both 
Geology and other departments. 

"First we'll review the state of 
the world," says Kieffer, Walgreen 
Chair and Professor of Geology. 
"What does sustainability mean and 
what is the difference between that 
and sustainable development?" 
Kieffer and the students are 
exploring the current and future 
states of crucial resources such as 
water, soil, energy, minerals and the 
ecosystem. They begin by examining 
the concept of an "ecological foot- 
print," which is a quantitative way 
to talk about the number of acres of 
land per person the world would 
need to support the number of peo- 
ple on the planet. It turns out that if 
the entire world consumed as much as 
most North Americans, the world 




Prof. Kieffer (shown here with several Galapagos Island 
school children) spent six weeks in the Galapagos Islands, 
working with teachers and developing materials for a new 
seminar on "Sustainability" that she is teaching this spring 



would need to be three times its current 
size. This discussion uses the pre-history 
of the Easter Islands as a microcosm for 
the world. On this small, remote island, 



the original inhabitants used up 
all the resources and descended 
into warfare and cannibalism. 
The students also will be looking 
at inequities from a geographical 
perspective and an intergenera- 
tional one. Kieffer points out that 
current generations are harvesting 
the most easily accessed 
resources, leaving the difficult, 
expensive ones for later genera- 
tions. 

"This course is unique within the 
University in the way it weaves 
the study of Earth systems — par- 
ticularly geology — with ethics, 
economics, philosophy, religion 
and ecology," says Kieffer. Kieffer 
has wanted to teach a course like 
this for quite a while, and is 
pleased to be able to present it as 
her first course at Illinois. She 
feels that attaining sustainability is the 
challenge facing everyone, and we must 
address it not only with science, but with 
values and moral perspectives. 



Hu Leads Climate Study 



(This article is based on information from 
the University of Illinois News Bureau) 

I research project led by Feng Sheng 
Hu, associate professor of geology 
and plant biology, suggests that varia- 
tions in the Sun's intensity have affect- 
ed climate and ecosystems over the last 
12,000 years. The findings were report- 
ed in the September 26, 2003, issue of 
the journal Science. 

The data, from geochemical and 
biological evidence collected from 
Alaskan lake sediment, help to explain 
past changes on land and in freshwater 



ecosystems in northern latitudes and 
may provide information to help project 
the future. The scientists identified 
cycles lasting 200, 435, 590 and 950 
years during the Holocene Epoch. The 
pattern of environmental variations they 
found also matches nicely with cyclic 
changes in solar irradiance and the 
extent of sea ice in the North Atlantic 

"We found natural cycles involving 
climate and ecosystems that seem to be 
related to weak solar cycles, which, if 
verified, could be an important factor to 
help us understand potential future 
changes of Earth's climate," Hu said. 



"Will changes in solar irradiation in 
the future mitigate or exacerbate global 
warming in the future? They may do 
both," Hu notes. "A period of high solar 
irradiance on top of high levels of 
greenhouse gases could result in 
unprecedented warming. Naturally, the 
big question is whether human activity 
is causing the current warming." 

While the study can't answer that 
question directly, it provides baseline 
information on natural climatic variabil- 
ity that will allow researchers to pursue 
a variety of climate-related questions in 
the future. 




% Retires 



D 



an Blake, professor of paleobiology, 
retired in 2003. Blake, who received 



his B.S. from the University of Illinois in 
1960, his master's from Michigan State in 
1962, and his Ph.D. from Berkeley in 
1966, has been a member of the depart- 
ment since 1967. On April 9, 2004, 
Professor Blake gave a valedictory collo- 
quium, after which the Department host- 
ed a reception in his honor. During his 
nearly four-decades-long career , Blake 
became the world's expert on starfish fos- 
sils, and for many years has served as 
editor of the discipline's leading journal. 
In recent years, he has also played a 
major role in the University's Spurlock 
Museum. Blake has also left a legacy of 
appreciative students. 

Dennis Kolata, Ph.D. 73, Blake's first 
doctoral student and now principal geolo- 
gist with the Illinois State Geological 
Society, said: "What impresses me about 
Dan is the life-long bond that he has 
forged with his students. For many of us, 
Dan's role in our life has evolved from 
teacher and mentor to friend and col- 
league to brother-like bond. His serious, 
quiet demeanor belies an inner warmth, 
humor, and down-to-earth manner." 

"It is fair to say that I wouldn't be a 
paleontologist if it were not for Daniel B. 
Blake," writes Danita Brandt, B.S. 78, 
now a senior academic specialist in the 
Department of Geological Sciences at 
Michigan State University. "Invoking 
Edward Lorenz's 'butterfly effect' of his- 
torical contingency: if not for Dan I 
wouldn't have gone to Cincinnati for grad 
school, which led to Yale, which led to 
meeting my husband, and eventually, to 
two great kids as well as a professional 
involvement in paleontology. So Dan's 
impact on my life has been profound, to 
say the least! Dan mentored many grad 
students, but I count myself as especially 
fortunate to be among the more exclusive 
group of undergraduates that came under 
his tutelage. In the summer of 1975 Dan 
was looking to hire a lab lackey, and I, 



just having completed freshman year, got 
the job. I also got a tiny office in the 
"catacombs" (a maze of underground 
student offices) a pair of "older-brothers- 
in-paleontological-training" (Ed Snyder 
and Tom Guensburg), an extended fami- 
ly of Dan's former students (Dennis 
Kolata, Jim Risatti, Bill Ausich, Frank 
EttensohnJ, as well as a mentor. For the 
remainder of my undergraduate days, my 
academic and social life centered on my 
paleontological family. When it came 
time to think about grad schools, it was 
Dan who suggested that I apply to the 
University of Cincinnati and work with 
Dave Meyer. At the time, I did not know 
there WAS a university in Cincinnati. 
Dan's intuition was right— Cincinnati 
and I were a good fit, and from there it 
was on to Yale and the rest of my life, 
which, happily, has included a steady 
and cherished correspondence with my 
first mentor and long-time friend." 
"When I originally came to the 
department in the mid-1980s, my plan 
was to get a master's and then move on 
to another school," writes Steve 
Hageman, M.S. '88, Ph.D. '92, now on 
the faculty of Appalachian State 



University. "I stayed at Illinois for my 
Ph.D. because of Dan. I knew that for my 
needs, 1 could not find a better advisor, 
mentor and ultimately friend. Over the 
years Dan's professional demeanor has 
delighted his graduate students. All are 
impressed by his encyclopedic knowledge 
of his field and his high personal and pro- 
fessional standards." 

"Dan was a wonderful, helpful, and 
generous advisor," says Janis Treworgy, 
Ph.D. '85, now on the Earth Science fac- 
ulty at Principia College in Elsah, 111. "He 
accepted my dissertation one chapter at a 
time and gave me feedback, and then he 
turned around the entire dissertation in 
less than a week. He knew I was under a 
deadline that wouldn't wait — I was eight 
months pregnant with my first child at 
that point. He knew I wanted to finish 
before the baby came if at all possible. He 
was super in helping me meet that goal!" 

Though Dan has technically retired, 
his commitment to research and mentor- 
ing continues unabated. Dan is currently 
supervising three graduate students, has 
an active research program in Antarctica, 
and is working on a monograph concern- 
ing the evolution of starfish. 



Microbes Thriving in Slag Dumps 

This article is courtesy of a GSA press release 

Sometimes the most extreme environment for life isn't at the bottom of the ocean or 
inside a volcano. It's just south of Chicago. Illinois groundwater scientists, including 
several Geology Department members, have found microbial communities thriving in 
the slag dumps of the Lake Calumet region of southeast Chicago. The water there can 
reach extraordinary alkalinity of pH 12.8, which is comparable to caustic soda and floor 
strippers and far beyond known naturally occurring alkaline environments. The closest 
known relatives of some of the microbes are in South Africa, Greenland, and in the 
alkaline waters of Mono Lake, California. 

George Roadcap, along with Professor Craig Bethke, Research Scientist Rob 
Sanford, Qusheng Jin (a graduate student of Bethke's now a post-doc at Berkeley) and 
Jose Pardinas (formerly of the university's biotechnology center), came upon the 
microbes while studying contaminated groundwater created by more than a century of 
industrial iron slag dumping in southern Illinois and northern Indiana. 



Windows into the Past 



Illinois Geology Roars Ahead in the Jan Age 



Ralph L. Langenheim 



TThe "Roaring Twenties" saw the 
Illinois Geology Department rise to 
national stature. Illinois was ranked 13th 
among 39 existing geology doctoral pro- 
grams by the first American Council of 
Education evaluation of doctoral pro- 
grams. This report, published in 1925, 
was based on the opinions of 68 "distin- 
guished American scholars." Ten years 
later, the Council's second survey rated 
Illinois 11th among 55 geology doctoral 
programs. 

Illinois' reputation grew from gradu- 
ate programs established prior to 1920 by 
William S. Bayley and T. E. Savage in, 
respectively, igneous and metamorphic 
geology and stratigraphy-paleontology. In 
1919 Terrence T Quirke added strength in 
hard-rock geology. During the Jazz Age 
other notable faculty joined the depart- 
ment. These included Morris M. 
Leighton, who served as an assistant pro- 
fessor from 1919 to 1923, before leaving 
to become a full-time member of the 
State Geological Survey, of which he ulti- 
mately became the chief; Arthur Bevan, 
who joined the staff in 1921 as an assis- 
tant professor specializing in stratigraphy 
structural geology and geomorphology 
and later joined the Virginia Geological 
Survey; and Arle Sutton, a stratigrapher- 
paleontologist who came in 1927. 

Francis Shepard, who would become 
on of the world's preeminent marine 
geologists, came to Illinois in 1922 after 
receiving his Ph.D. from Chicago. 
Shepard started out teaching engineering 
geology, but soon turned his attention to 
marine geology, studying the sediments 
of the continental shelf and the nature of 
submarine canyons. Happily, Shepard's 
father owned a Boston-based shipping 
line and Shepard used his father's yacht 
as a research base. He began conducting 
research at the Scripps Institution of 
Oceanography at La Jolla, California, in 



1933 and in 1937 took a leave of absence 
to move to Scripps whilst retaining his 
position at Illinois. Shepard worked at 
Scripps through World War II and finally 
resigned from Illinois in 1946. Historians 
of geology view Shepard as the father of 
"marine geology," a discipline conceived, 
gestated, and born at land-locked Illinois! 
The arrival of Harold Rollin Wanless, 
a Princeton Ph.D., proved pivotal in estab- 
lishing a strong sedimentary geology pro- 
gram at Illinois. Wanless, who arrived in 
1923 as an instructor, started out teaching 
vertebrate paleontology. He also was 
appointed an associate in the Illinois State 
Geological Survey, and, with a young 
Ph.D. from Chicago, Marvin Weller, began 
a comprehensive study of the 
Pennsylvanian System in Illinois. Wanless 
undertook detailed mapping in the 
Western Illinois coal field while Weller 
embarked on statewide stratigraphic and 
paleontological studies. Recognizing 
cyclicity in Pennsylvanian rocks through- 
out the Illinois Basin they proposed that 
the strata recorded widespread, repeated 
rise and fall of sea level; the "Cyclothem 
Theory. " Weller ascribed the cycles to 
repeated depression and uplift of the 
earth's crust. Wanless, however, in con- 
junction with Shepard, proposed world- 
wide fluctuation of sea level caused by 
repeated episodes of continental glacia- 
tion. The nature of cyclothems and their 
explanation became a dominant theme in 
Carboniferous stratigraphy for decades, 
and Wanless' views eventually dominated. 



Waldorf Vivian Howard, appointed 
instructor in 1926, became a nationally 
known pioneer in the new discipline of 
carbonate petrology and porosity. Howard 
also was an early investigator of the origin 
of oil. After achieving prominence in car- 
bonate studies, he left the Department in 
1936 for work in industry. 

Forty-two graduate degrees in geology 
were granted at Illinois between 1920 and 
1934. Savage advised 16 candidates in 
stratigraphy, paleontology and mapping — 
approximately one every year. Between 
1926 and 1934 Howard supervised 12 the- 
ses on limestones, about one and one-half 
per year. Thus, excepting two projects in 
Precambrian crystalline rocks, one on tec- 
tonics and one on marine geology; gradu- 
ate research at Illinois from 1920 through 
1934 dealt entirely with sedimentary 
rocks. 

Quirke remained chairman through 
1928, when William S. Bayley became 
head of the Department. In 1931, Bayley 
retired and was replaced by Frank 
Walbridge DeWolf. DeWolf, chief of the 
Illinois State Geological Survey, had previ- 
ously directed successful oil exploration 
programs in Texas and Louisiana. 

In 1920, the Department comprised 
five senior staff geologists — Rolfe, 
Bayley, Savage, Quirke, and Leighton. The 
total budget stood at $31,100. In 1934 
there were seven senior staff; DeWolf, 
Savage, Quirke, Howard, Shepard, Sutton 
and Wanless, and the budget had essen- 
tially doubled. 



Bruns Named Assistant Development Director 



David Bruns is the new assistant director of development for the College of 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, responsible for building relationships with alumni and 
friends that will help secure financial support for the Department of Geology. "It 
is an absolute privilege for me to work with the alumni of the department to 
ensure that this legacy continues for future generations of geology faculty and 
students for many years to come," he says. 




GeoScience 2005 Update 



The Department's GeoScience 2005 
endowment campaign is approaching 
its goal, but we still have a way to go. So 
far, we have raised $ 2.7 million of the $3 
million target. Once completed, the cam- 
paign will help fund new professorships, 
graduate fellowships, facilities and equip- 
ment, field-trip and field-camp support, 
student research support, the geology 
library, and the geology colloquium series. 
We're pleased to announce that gen- 
erous contributions from many alums to 
the Wanless Fund, initiated by Jim 
Baroffio (Ph.D. '64), has allowed the fund 
to grow enough to warrant a match from 
the University and become a full graduate 
student fellowship. We're also pleased to 
announce that Roscoe Jackson (M.S. 73, 
Ph.D., 75) has established a new fund for 
the support of graduate research. Shell Oil 
Company made a donation to the depart- 
ment in 2003 for research support. The 
Department has been chosen as one of 
a select group of geology departments 
across the country that Shell plans to 
support. 



"One of the most gratifying things 
about the campaign has been the large 
number of alumni, friends, and faculty 
that have been donating," says Stephen 
Marshak, professor and department head. 
"The level of support that our department 
receives sets us apart from almost all 
other departments in the LAS College." 

2005 is fast approaching, and it 
would be wonderful if we could reach 
our target. We're hoping that alumni and 
friends who have not contributed previ- 
ously will consider doing so, and that 
those who have might consider increas- 
ing their gift in the spirit of the campaign. 
If you are interested in helping to estab- 
lish the financial foundation that the 
Department needs to continue remaining 
strong in the 21st century, please take 
advantage of the form in the back of 
this Year in Review and of the enclosed 
business reply envelope. We have listed 
various specific funds, if you wish to 
direct your support to a specific goal. 
Thank you! 



Roscoe Jackson Establishes Research Fund 



R' 



oscoe Jackson, M.S. 73, Ph.D. 75, 
has established a graduate student 
research fund as part of the GeoScience 
2005 campaign. 

Jackson wanted to establish a fund 
for students who might need a little extra 
support, students who might otherwise 
have to get a second job or get a loan 
from mom or dad. 

"I'm not interested in buildings or 
bricks," says Jackson. "But I know bud- 
gets are tight. I always felt that one prob- 
lem a lot of graduate students have was 
getting money for miscellaneous expens- 
es that are so important to their research, 
things like field research and going to 
meetings, for example." 

Jackson remembers a time in his 
school career when such a fund would 
have helped him a lot. It involved using 
a flume for his study of sediment flow in 



the Wabash River Valley. The department 
head of civil engineering was happy to lend 
Jackson the flume and technical support, 
but he needed to supply the sand and pay 
for the electricity to run the flume. He just 
didn't have the funds and had to abandon 
the idea. 

Jackson, who taught at Northwestern 
University for several years, returned in 1981 
to his native Kansas to help run his family's 
small oil and gas production business. 

Some of his best memories of Illinois 
involve his adviser, George Klein. "George 
was very sharp and very professional. To his 
everlasting credit, he was supportive of me 
and of my idea of a thesis project even 
before I had really figured out what it was I 
wanted to do." 

The fund that Jackson has established 
will be available for students starting in 
2004. 



In Memoriam 

Carleton Chapman, an igneous, 
metamorphic penologist who was on 
the faculty from 1937-1977, died in 
September 26, 2003. He was just two 
weeks short of his 92nd birthday. 
Chapman received his master's and 
doctorate degrees from Harvard and 
wrote more than 60 journal articles 
on petrography, structural geology, 
and the geochemistry of igneous 
rocks. "His meticulous attention to 
petrographic detail was a hallmark of 
his work," remembers Ralph 
Langenheim, emeritus professor. 
Haydn Murray, B.S. '48, M.S. '50, 
Ph.D. '51, a former student of 
Chapman's, agrees. "Carleton was a 
meticulous geologist, a very respect- 
ed igneous petrologist, and an excel- 
lent teacher, but he also liked to play 
pranks on people. Marlon Billings 
once told us that Carleton would put 
smelly things, like Limburger cheese, 
on radiators when he was a graduate 
student at Harvard!" Marion "Pat" 
Bickford, M.S. '58, Ph.D. '60, says, 
"The most important thing Carleton 
did for me was to teach me to write 
clearly. He did this by patiently 
going through every word of every 
sentence I wrote, pointing out how I 
could clarify what I was saying. This 
is a real gift from teacher to student, 
for it is really the only way to learn 
proper scientific writing. I have tried 
to do this for my own students for 
the last 40 years, often sharing with 
them what Carleton did for me." 
Bickford remembers Chapman's 
humor as slightly more subtle. 
"Carleton loved puns," says 
Bickford. "I can remember him 
standing by the window in April say- 
ing, 'April is such a sad time. All the 
trees are leaving.'" 



Alumni News 



Raymond Charles Gutschick, M.S. '39, Ph.D. '42, died October 22, 2003. He was 89. 
Raymond received the Moore Medal in 1992 for "excellence in paleontology" from SEPM. 

Paul Robert Seaber St., Ph.D. '62, died August 23, 2003. Paul was a hydrogeologist who 
began his career with the U.S. Geological Survey's Alaska terrain and permafrost section in 1955. 
From 1987-1990 he was senior hydrologist and head of the groundwater section for ISGS. He 
worked all over the world, including Oman, Kuwait and Pakistan. He was senior hydrologist and 
head of the Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research when Iraqi forces invaded the country in 1990. 



1940s 

Allan F. Agnew, A.B. '40, M.S. '42, 

writes, "Your 2002 Year in Review is another 
winner ... to hire Susan Kieffer is superb! 
{see 2002 Year in Review} T.T. Quirke was an 
exciting lecturer for us soft-rock people. He also 
taught us how to build a canoe in the north 
woods of Canada!" 

"One thing I'll never forget is how those 
floors in the Natural History building 
squeaked," remembers Charles Summerson, 
B.S. '38, M.S. '40 and Ph.D. '42. "They have 
not changed in 50 years. I'd like to come over 
and hear them one more time." Charles also 
remembered sneaking into the mineralogy labs 
after the building was closed to study with fel- 
low student K.O. Emery, who died in 1998. 
"We had keys because we did drafting for some 
of the professors," he confesses. "We'd go into 
the labs, sit our chair on top of the lab bench 
and a tray of specimens in our lap and toss 
them to one another. If you couldn't identify 
the specimen by the time you caught it you 
weren't up to snuff." Charles remembers 
Emery as a very fine person. "He was extreme- 
ly competitive but he'd turn right around and 
help you any way he could." 

1950s 

Norb Cygan, B.S. '54, gained two more 
grandchildren in 2003. Grandson Colin Reid 
Gardner was born in Castle Pines, Colo., and 
granddaughter Lauren Nicole Butler was born 
in Ottawa, KS. Now he has six grandchildren. 

1960s 

Since he retired in 1993, Bill Soderman, 
M.S. '60, Ph.D. '62, has become quite involved 
in various community projects. Those include 
an educational program about wetlands for 
fifth-grade students and a scholarship program 
for students leaving junior college and heading 
for their final undergraduate years at a major 
university. Bill also is involved in two projects 
relating to the Texas coastline. One, for which 
an NSF grant proposal has been submitted, 
involves studying the subsidence in the 
Houston ship-channel area, which has been 
caused by water withdrawal from an aquifer. 
The second project involves serving on an 
advisorv council of the Coastal Texas 2002 ini- 



tiative. That initiative is looking closely at the 
impact and possible solutions of dramatic beach 
erosion, rising sea levels, increased shoreline 
development, as well as natural threats posed by 
hurricanes and tropical storms. Bill also is enjoy- 
ing traveling. He and Mina have recently been to 
Utah and Arizona and have plans to spend time 
on the Pacific Coast, as well as Florida's Gulf 
Coast. And, of course, he continues to serve on 
the Department's GeoThrust committee and is 
dedicated to helping the Department meet its goal 
of $3 million by 2005. "It is a good feeling to give 
something back to the school where I completed 
my formal geologic education," Bill says. 

1970s 

In addition to the three alumni receiving 
awards at the 2003 AAPG meeting (see Newsletter 
2002), Dag Nummeda], Ph.D. 74, Institute for 
Energy Research, Department of Geology and 
Geophysics, University of Wyoming received the 
Jules Braunstein memorial award for the best 
poster at the meeting. His poster was titled, 
"Reservoir Characterization of the South 
Timbalier 26 Field: The Importance of Shelf 
Margin Deltas as Reservoirs in the Gulf of 
Mexico." 

John Steinmetz, B.S. '69, M.S. 75, has 

been elected president by the Association of 
American State Geologists. Steinmetz is state geol- 
ogist and director of the Indiana Geologic Survey. 

1980s 

Bob Babb, Ph.D. '81, and Laurie Hartline 
Babb, M.S. '81, have moved to Pleasanton, Calif. 
Bob works for ITC and writes. "I keep getting fur- 
ther from my geological roots, but I'm still work- 
ing for an oil company (ChevronTexaco). ITC is 
the computer support for the company. Laurie 
has worked part-time as a contractor for 
ChevronTexaco doing geologic and engineering 
stuff." 

The Coal Geology Division (of the GSA) 
Management Board includes alumni Steven Greb, 
B.S. '82, of the Kentucky Geological Survey, as 
chair and Russell Jacobson, M.S. '85, of the 
ISGS, as member-at-large. 

John Rakovan, B.S. '88, is an assistant pro- 
fessor of mineralogy at Miami University (OH). 



Don Von Bergen, Ph.D. '88, is in his third 
year at Kansas State University in Salina, KS. He 
is the department head of the Arts, Sciences and 
Business Department at the College of Technology 
and Aviation. In addition to his administrative 
duties, Don teaches an introduction to geology 
course. Don and his family enjoy riding horses in 
their spare time on their ranch in rural Kansas. 

1990s 

Linda M. Bonnell, Ph.D. '90, president and 
scientific adviser of Geocosm LLC of Austin, 
Texas, is a domestic Dean A. McGee 
Distinguished Lecturer. Her topics are: "Sealed, 
Bridged or Open — a New Theory of Quartz 
Cementation in Fractures;" and "Reservoir 
Quality Prediction in Deep Water to Tight Gas 
Sandstones Using a Process/Stochastic Modeling 
Approach." 

Jennifer Wilson, B.S. '92, stopped by the 
Department to visit. She is in geologic consulting 
in Pennsylvania, and is working on her 
Professional Geologist certification. 

Laura Becker, B.S. '94, is working as the 
regulatory coordinator for the New York State 
Department of Environmental Conservation 
(DEC) , Division of Air Resources in Albany, NY. 
She coordinates New York State air pollution reg- 
ulations between DEC staff, the Governor's Office 
of Regulatory Reform and the New York State 
Department of State. 

Theresa Croak-Mueller, B.S. '96, lives in 
Naperville, III, where she is a consultant for BP 
and a real estate agent. She and her husband, 
Keith Mueller, are proud parents of Stefan Denni, 
who was born Nov. 1, 2003. 

Doug Tinkham, M.S. '97, received his 
Ph.D. from the University of Alabama, and is a 
post-doc at the University of Calgary in Canada. 

Crystal Grace Lovett-Tibbs, B.S. '97, mar- 
ried Aaron Tibbs on September 20, 2003, in 
Fredericksburg. Virginia. University of Illinois 
alumni in attendance were matron of honor 
Melanie Choate (nee Meads) (attended '92-'96 
FAA) and Jennifer Klomans ('96 COM). Crystal 
graduated from the University of Virginia School 
of Law in 2003 and has been admitted to the 
Missouri Bar. She is currently serving as a federal 
law clerk to the Honorable Henry Coke Morgan, 
Jr. in the United States District Court for the 
Eastern District of Virginia. She and Aaron live in 
Virginia Beach with their three cats, Sara, Nala, 
and Tia. 

Joel Johnson, M.S. '98, finished up his doc- 
torate at Oregon State University. He got married 
in September, and had a quick little honeymoon 
in the San Juan Islands offshore Washington. "I 
am mostly working on the tectonic controls on 
seafloor gas hydrate stability these days and still 



10 



Honor Roll of Donors for 2003 






making good use of the structure and the fold 
thrust belt stuff I learned from Steve Marshak, 
as I have been working in the accretionary 
wedge offshore Oregon for about 5 years 
now." 

2000s 

James Cokinos, B.S. '02, received the 
outstanding new staff member award from 
ISGS. James is a geologist/GIS specialist at 
the Illinois State Geological Survey in the oil 
and gas section. He works on using GIS and 
improving oil recovery in the Illinois Basin. 
This work involves designing and coordinat- 
ing multiple databases, and overseeing the 
input of historical and recent waterflood data 
for more than 2,000 waterflood units dating 
back to the 1940s, among other things. 

Former Faculty News 

Alan Whittington, former postdoctoral 
fellow, and his wife, Angela Speck, announce 
the arrival of their first child, a son named 
Xander Alan Kaj Whittington-Speck. Xander 
was born on Friday, the 13th of February, 
2004. Arriving about six weeks early, he was 
5 pounds, 10 ounces. Everyone is doing fine, 
Alan (now assistant professor at the 
University of Missouri) reports. 

George D. Klein, emeritus professor, 

has been selected by the Society of 
Independent Professional Earth Scientists 
(SIPES) as a "distinguished lecturer" for the 
year 2004. He will talk about "The Sequence 
and Seismic Stratigraphy of the bossier Play 
(Tithonian) , western part of the East Texas 
basin." Klein also has been awarded the 
Rising Star Award from the Houston 
Geological Society (HGS) for his tireless work 
as technical program co-chair for the HGS 
International Explorationists Committee, as 
well as his service and encouragement as a 
mentor to students and colleagues. 



We'd love to hear 
from you 

Send us your personal 

and professional 

updates by emailing us at 

geology@uiuc.edu or 

Department of Geology 

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 

245 Natural History Building 

1301 W. Green St. 

Urbana, IL 61801 

Please include degree(s) earned and year, 
along with your current affiliation. 



The following is a list of friends and alumni of the Department of Geology who have donated to the 
department during the calendar year 2002. 



Prof. Thomas F. Anderson 
Dr. Robert W. Andrews 
Dr. Robert F. Babb II 
Mr. Robert S. Barnard 
Dr. David K. Beach 
Ms. Gail M. Beach 
Dr. William M. Benzel 
Dr. Craig M. Bethke 
Dr. Marion E. Bickford 
LTC Ronald E. Black 

(RET) 
Ms. Heidi Blischke 
Dr. Bruce F. Bohor 
Mr. Eugene W. Borden Sr. 
Mr. Joseph E. Boudreaux 
Mr. Allen S. Braumiller 
Ms. Patsy L. Braumiller 
Ms. Annette Brewster 
Ms. Margaret R. Broten 
Ms. Carolyn Brower 
Mr. Ross D. Brower 
The Reverend Robert L. 

Brownfield 
Dr. Glenn R. Buckley 
Dr. Susan B. Buckley 
Dr. Thomas C. Buschbach 
Ms. Susan C. Chamberlin 
Dr. Thomas L. Chamberlin 
Dr. Charles J. Chantell 
Mr. Lester W. Clutter 
Ms. Virginia K. Clutter 
Dr. Barbara J. Collins 
Dr. Lorence G. Collins 
Ms. Susan E. Collins 
Ms. Michelle M. Corlew 
Dr. Norbert E. Cygan 
Mr. George H. Davis 
Dr. Ilham Demir 
Mr. M. Peter deVries 
Mr. Richard E. Dobson 
Mr. Bruce E. Dollahan 
Mr. James D. Donithan 
Dr. Garnett M. Dow 
Ms. Stephanie Drain 
Ms. Sophie M. Dreifuss 
Dr. William W. Dudley Jr. 
Dr. James L. Eades 
Dr. Mohamed T. El-Ashry 
Ms. Patricia R. El-Ashry 
Dr. Frank R. Ettensohn 
Mr. Joseph P. Fagan Jr. 
Ms. Inez Fagin 
Mr. Kyle Marshall Fagin 
Dr. Harold H. Falzone 
Mr. Gary M. Fleeger 
Ms. Marian F. Ford 
Dr. Richard M. Forester 
Mr. Jack D. Foster 
Ms. Alison Franklin 
Mr. Edwin H. Franklin 
Mr. Barry R. Gager 
Ms. Carol E. Garino 
Mr. John R. Garino 



Ms. Sharon Geil 
Ms. Christine M. Griffith 
Dr. Stuart Grossman 
Dr. Albert L. Guber 
Ms. Nancy Anderson 

Guber 
Dr. Tom Guensburg 
Mr. Edwin E. Hardt 
Ms. Catherine L. Harms 
Dr. Henry J. Harris 
Ms. Joyce T. Harris 
Dr. Richard L. Hay 
Mr. Darrell N. Helmuth 
Dr. Mark A. Helper 
Mr. Mark F. Hoffman 
Ms. Maureen F. Hoffman 
Ms. Cathy S. Hunt 
Dr. Stephen R. Hunt 
Dr. Roscoe G. Jackson II 
Mr. Steven F. Jamrisko 
Mr. Martin V. Jean 
Dr. Allen H. Johnson 
Mr. Bruce A. Johnson 
Dr. Donald O. Johnson 
Dr. Kenneth S. Johnson 
Mr. Robert R. Johnston 
Dr. Edward C. Jonas 
Mr. Roy A. Kaelin 
Dr. Suzanne Mahlburg 

Kay 
Mr. Donald A. Keefer 
Ms. Laura L. Keefer 
Dr. John P. Kempton 
Mr. John N. Keys 
Dr. John D. Kiefer 
Ms. Martha M. Kiefer 
Dr. R. James Kirkpatrick 
Mr. Christopher P. Korose 
Mr. Robert F. Kraye 
Mr. Thomas E. Krisa 
Mr. Michael B. Lamport 
Mr. Rik E. Lantz 
Dr. Stephen E. Laubach 
Dr. Steven W Leavitt 
Mr. Stephen C. Lee 
Dr. Hannes E. Leetaru 
Dr. Morris W. Leighton 
Mr. Bernard W. Lynch 
Mr. Andrew S. Madden 
Ms. Megan Elwood 

Madden 
Mr. John W. Marks 
Ms. Kathryn G. Marshak 
Prof. Stephen Marshak 
Ms. Joyce C. Mast 
Ms. Kathryn R. Mayer 
Mr. Robert S. Mayer 
Dr. Murray R. McComas 
Mr. Kendall W. Miller 
Ms. Linda A. Minor 
Ms. Ethel P. Moore 
Mr. John S. Moore 
Mr. Wayne E. Moore 



Dr. Sharon Mosher 
Mr. Robert E. Myers 
Mr. Bruce W. Nelson 
Mr. William A. Newton 
Mr. Brian D. Noel 
Ms. Lynn E. Noel 
Mr. Charles H. Norris 
Michael R. Owen, Phd 
Ms. Katherine A. 

Panczak 
Dr. Walter E. Parham 
Mr. Howard L. Patton 
Ms. Corinne Pearson 
Ms. Elaine L. Peppers 
Dr. Russel A. Peppers 
Ms. Betty R. Pflum 
Mr. Charles E. Pflum 
Mr. Bruce E. Phillips 
Ms. Sarah Phillips 
Ms. Beverly A. Pierce 
Dr. Jack W. Pierce 
Dr. Robert I. Pinney 
Ms. Vonna B. Pinney 
Dr. Paul L. Plusquellec 
Richard J. Powers 
Dr. Elizabeth P. Rail 
Mr. Raymond W. Rail 
Mr. Paul J. Regorz 
Mr. Donald O. 

Rimsnider 
Mr. David P. Ripley 
Dr. Nancy M. 

Rodriguez 
Dr. Linda R. Rowan 
Dr. Richard P. Sanders 
Ms. Bobbie Scaggs 
Mr. Jay R. Scheevel 
Dr. Detmar Schnitker 
Ms. Julia Schnitker 
Dr. David C. Schuster 
Dr. Franklin W. 

Schwartz 
Dr. John W. Shelton 
Dr. Charles H. Simonds 
Mr. D. Leroy Sims 
Ms. Martha K. Sippel 
Mr. Roger A. Sippel 
Mr. Stephen A. Smith 
Dr. Edward M. Snyder 
Dr. J. William 

Soderman 
Dr. Ian M. Steele 
Dr. Ronald D. Stieglitz 
Dr. John E. Stone 
Dr. C. H. Summerson 
Ms. Catherine Threet 
Mr. Jack C. Threet 
Ms. Linda J. Tollefson 
Dr. Edwin W. Tooker 
Mr. Robert G. 

Vanderstraeten 
Mr. William L. 

Vineyard 



Mr. Robert W. Von 

Rhee 
Dr. F. Michael Wahl 
Ms. Harriet E. 

Wallace 
Ms. Jeanette G. 

Walters 
Mr. Carleton W 

Weber 
Dr. John E. Werner 
Mr. Jerry T. 

Wickham 
Ms. Susan S. 

Wickhan 
Mr. Harold T. Wilber 
Mr. Jack L. Wilber 
Mr. Don R. Williams 
Ms. Jennifer A. 

Wilson 
Ms. Elaine R. Witt 
Mr. Roland F. 

Wright 
Dr. Valentine E. 

Zadnik 

Corporations 

BP Amoco 

Foundation 
ChevronTexaco 
ConocoPhillips 

Corporation 
Dominion 

Foundation 
DTE Energy 

Foundation 
ExxonMobil 

Foundation 
Harris Bank 

Foundation 
Idaho National 

Engineering and 

Environmental 

Laboratory 
Marathon Ashland 

Petroleum 
Northwestern 

University 
Peoples Energy 

Corporation 
Shell Oil Company 
Shell Oil Company 

Foundation 
Sims Consulting, 

Inc. 
Tetra Tech EM Inc. 
Whiting Petroleum 

Corporation, an 

Alliant Company 



Annual Report for 2003 



Faculty 

Stephen P. Altaner (Associate Professor) 

Jay D. Bass (Professor) 

Craig M. Bethke (Professor) 

Daniel B. Blake (Professor) 

Chu-Yung Chen (Associate Professor) 

Wang-Ping Chen (Professor) 

Bruce W. Fouke (Associate Professor) 

Albert T. Hsui (Professor) 

Thomas M. Johnson (Associate Professor) 

Susan W. Kieffer (Walgreen Professor) 

R. James Kirkpatrick (Professor and Executive 

Associate Dean) 
Jie Li (Assistant Professor) 
Craig C. Lundstrom (Assistant Professor) 
Stephen Marshak (Professor and Head) 
Xiaodong Song (Associate Professor) 

Department Affiliate 

Feng-Sheng Hu (Associate Professor) 

Academic Staff, Post-Docs, 
Visiting Staff 

Deb Aronson (Yearbook Editor) 

George Bonheyo (Research Scientist) 

Jorge Frias-Lopez (Post-Doctoral Researcher) 

Richard Hedin (Research Programmer) 

Holger Hellwig (Research Scientist) 

Xiaoqiang Hou (Post-Doctoral Researcher) 

Stephen Hurst (Research Programmer) 

Andrey Kalinichev (Senior Research Scientist) 

Ann Long (Teaching Lab Specialist) 

Laura Rademacher (Post-Doctoral Researcher) 

Marc Reinholdt (Post-Doctoral Researcher) 

Bidhan Roy (Post-Doctoral Researcher) 

Rob Sanford (Senior Research Scientist) 

Stanislav Sinogeikin (Research Scientist) 

Michael Stewart (Lecturer) 

Raj Vanka (Resource and Policy Analyst) 

Carine Vanpeteghem (Post-Doctoral Researcher) 

John Werner (Visiting Assistant Professor) 

Emeritus Faculty 

Thomas F. Anderson 
Albert V. Carozzi 
Carleton A. Chapman 
Donald L. Graf 
Arthur F. Hagner 
Richard L. Hay 
Donald M. Henderson 
George deV. Klein 
Ralph L. Langenheim 
C. John Mann 
Alberto S. Nieto 
Philip A. Sandberg 



Adjunct Faculty 

Leon R. Follmer 
Dennis Kolata 
Morris W Leighton 
Hannes Leetaru 
John McBride 
William Shilts 
M. Scott Wilkerson 

Library Staff 

Lura Joseph (Librarian) 

Sheila McGowan (Chief Library Clerk) 

Diana Walter (Library Technical Specialist) 



Shelley Campbell (Staff 


Clerk) 


Geol 143 - 


Barb Elmore (Administrative Secretary) 


Geol 233- 


Eddie Lane (Electronics 


Engineering 




Assistant) 
Michael Sczerba (Clerk) 




Geol 250 - 
Geol 280 - 


Graduate Students 


Geol 311 - 
Geol 315 - 


Will Beaumont 


Chuntao Liang 


Geol 317 - 


Peter Berger 


Christopher Mah 




Jon Brenizer 
Sarah Brown 


Jorge Marino 
Lei Meng 


Geol 332 - 


Kurtis Burmeister 


Brent Olson 


Geol 336 - 


Scott Clark 


Jungho Park 


Geol 340 - 


Andre Ellis 


George Roadcap 


Geol 350- 


Alex Glass 
Brian Hacker 


Tom Schickel 
Eric Sikora 


Geol 351 - 


Chris Henderson 


Xinlei Sun 




Fang Huang 


Anna Sutton 




Jennifer Jackson 


Jian Tian 


Geol 352- 


Qusheng Jin 


Lisa Tranel 


Geol 355- 


Matthew Kirk 


Tai-Lin Tseng 


Geol 358 - 


Jacquelyn Kitchen 


Jianwei Wang 


Geol 360 - 
Geol 381 - 


James Klaus 
Man Jae Kwon 


Jingyun Wang 
Xiang Xu 


Dmitry Lakshtanov 


Zhaohui Yang 




Qiang Li 


Juanzuo Zhou 


Geol 415- 


Yingchun Li 


Zuihong Zou 


Geol 401- 

Geol 458 - 
Geol 489- 


George and Asta Bonheyo's little bundle 


Geol491- 


of joy, Alyssa Ardickas Bonheyo, was born 


Geol 493K1 


Tuesday, February 17th, 7:12 am. She 


Geol 493K8 


weighed 7 lb. 1 oz. George Is a research 


Geol 493K9 



COURSES TAUGHT IN 2003 


Geol 100 - 


Planet Earth 


Geol 101 - 


Introduction to Physical Geology 


Geol 103 - 


Planet Earth (QR 11) 


Geol 104 - 


Geology of the National Parks 




and Monuments 


Geol 107 - 


Physical Geology 


Geol 108 - 


Historical Geology 


Geol 110 - 


Exploring Planet Earth in the 




Field 


Geol 111 - 


The Dynamic Earth (Honors) 


Geol 116 - 


Geology of the Planets 


Geol 117- 


The Oceans 


Geol 118 - 


Natural Disasters 


Geol 143 - 


History of Life 


Geol 233- 


Earth Materials and the 




Environment 


Geol 250 - 


Geology for Engineers 


Geol 280 - 


Environmental Geology 


Geol 311 - 


Structural Geology and Tectonics 


Geol 315 - 


Field Geology 



scientist with Bruce Fouke's group. 



Geologic Field Methods, Western 
United States (Field Camp) 
Mineralogy and Mineral Optics 
Petrology and Petrography 
Sedimentology and Stratigraphy 
Introduction to Geophysics 
Geophysical Methods for 
Geology, Engineering, and 
Environmental Sciences 
Physics of the Earth 
Introduction to Groundwater 
Introduction to Seismology 
Geochemistry 
Modeling Earth and 
Environmental Systems 
Advanced Field Geology 
Physical Geochemistry 
Geochemical Reaction Analysis 
Geotectonics 

Current Research in Geoscience 
Continental Lithosphere 
Topics in Seismic Imaging 
Modern Experimental Methods in 
High Pressure Mineral Physics 



12 



Research Grants Active in 2003 



American Chemical Society Petroleum 
Research Fund 

Development of Selenium Isotope Ratios as 

Indicators of Sedimentary Paleo- 

Environments. 
Principal Investigator: Thomas M. Johnson 

Department of Energy 

Field-Constrained Quantitative Model of the 
Origin of Microbial and Geochemical Zoning 
in a Confined Fresh-Water Aquifer. 

Principal Investigator, Craig M. Bethke 

Computational & Spectroscopic Investigations 
of Water-Carbon Dioxide Fluids & Surface 
Sorption Processes. 

Principal Investigator: R. James Kirkpatrick 

Department Of Transportation Federal 
Highway Administration 

Illinois Council On Food And Agriculture 
Research 

Estimation of Denitrification Rates in the 
Shallow Groundwater Flow Systems of Big 
Ditch Watershed, Illinois - Isotope 
Assessment. 

Principal Investigator: Thomas M. Johnson 

NASA 

Multicomponent, Multiphase H20-C02 
Thermodynamics and Fluid Dynamics on 
Mars. 

Principal Investigator: Susan W Kieffer 

National Science Foundation 

Development of Laser Heating for Sound 
Velocity Measurements at High P & T. 
Principal Investigator: Jay D. Bass 

Sound Velocities & Elastic Moduli of Minerals 
Mantle Pressures and Temperatures with 
Laser Heating. 

Principal Investigator: Jay D. Bass 

Workshop on Phase Transitions and Mantle 

Discontinuities. 
Principal Investigator: Jay D. Bass 

CSEDI: Collaborative Research: Composition 
and Seismic Structure of the Mantle 
Transition Zone. 

Principal Investigator: Jay D. Bass 

Consortium for Material Property Research in 

the Earth Sciences. 
Principal Investigator: Jay D. Bass 

Collaborative Research: Elasticity Grand 
Challenge of the COMPRES Initiative. 
Principal Investigator: Jay D. Bass 

Polymorphism and Structural Transitions 

During Glass Formation. 
Principal Investigator: Jay D. Bass 

Global Climate Change & The Evolutionary 
Ecology of Antarctic Mollusks in the Late 
Eocene. 

Principal Investigator: Daniel B. Blake 



A Seismic Study of the Taiwan Orogen. 
Principal Investigator: Wang-Ping Chen 

Collaborative Research: Lithospheric-Scale 
Dynamics of Active Mountain Building along 
the Himalayan-Tibetan Collision Zone. 

Principal Investigator: Wang-Ping Chen 

Geobiological & The Emergence of Terraced 

Architecture during Carbonate 

Mineralization. 
Principal Investigator: Bruce W. Fouke 

Collaborative Research: Field Investigation of 
SE Oxyanion Reduction & Se Sources in 
Wetlands: Application of Se Isotopes. 

Principal Investigator: Thomas M. Johnson 

Quantification of Cr Reduction in Groundwater 

Using Cr Stable Isotopes. 
Principal Investigator: Thomas M. Johnson 

Acquisition of Multicollector Inductively 
Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer. 

Principal Investigators: Thomas M. Johnson 
and Craig C. Lundstrom 

Experimental Investigations of Solid-Liquid 

Boundary in the Earth Core. 
Principal Investigator: Jie Li 

Measuring Trace Element Partition Coefficients 

Between Minerals & Basaltic Melt. 
Principal Investigator: Craig C. Lundstrom 

Observational Constraints on Melt-Rock 
Reactions During Melting of the Upper 
Mantle. 

Principal Investigator: Craig C. Lundstrom 

Collaborative Research: Investigating the 
Processes and Timescales of Andesite 
Differentiation: A Comprehensive 
Petrological and Geochemical Study of 
Arenal Volcano, Costa Rica. 

Principal Investigator: Craig C. Lundstrom 

Collaborative Research: Emplacement of the 
Ferrar Mafic Igneous Province: A Pilot Study 
of Intrusive Architecture and Flow Directions 
in Southern Victoria Land. 

Principal Investigator: Stephen Marshak 

Structure and Dynamics of Earth's Core and 

Lowermost Mantle. 
Principal Investigator: Xiaodong Song 

Office of Naval Research 

The Role of Shipyard Pollutants in Structuring 
Coral Reef Microbial Communities: 
Monitoring Environmental Change and the 
Potential Causes of Coral Disease. 

Principal Investigator: Bruce W Fouke 

University Of Illinois Research Board 

Anatomy of a Continental Collision Zone: 

Exploring New Views in Seismic Imaging. 
Principal Investigator: Wang-Ping Chen 

Poloidal-Toroidal Energy Partition and Rotation 

of Surface Plates on Earth. 
Principal Investigator: Albert Hsui 



U.S. Department Of Interior / U.S. 
Geological Survey 

Geologic Mapping of the Rosendale Natural 
Cement Region, a Portion of the Northern 
Appalachian Fold-Thrust Belt, Ulster 
County, New York. 

Principal Investigator: Stephen Marshak 



Bachelor of Science Degrees 

December 2002 

(Due to an editorial oversight, these students 
were not recognized last issue. We apologize.) 
Alec Michael Davis 
Andrew George Louchios 
Tarak Narendra Patel 

May 

Nikki Lynn Blight 
Denelle Melissa Bourgeois 
Amy Elizabeth Eisin 
Catherine Colleen Haffner 
Daniel Bryan Walker 
Bracken Tyler Wimmer 

August 

Meghan Elizabeth Ward 

December 

Andrew Christian Anderson 
Nicole Kristen Bettinardi 
John Robert Kaineg 
Scott Patrick Koenig 
Amy Lynn Luther 
Christopher B. Majerczyk 
Richard Joseph Pyter 

Master of Science Degrees 

August 

Will Capper Beaumont - Denitrification in a 
Subsurfaced Drained, Agricultural Watershed 
in Central Illinois (Thomas Johnson) 

December 

Chuntao Liang - Uppermost Mantle Velocity 
and Mono Depth Beneath China from PN- 
Tomography (Xiaodong Song) 

Anna Lee Sutton - Trace Element Partitioning 
Between Melilite and Cai Melt: An 
Experimental Study (Craig Lundstrom) 

Juanzuo Zhou - Isotope Geochemistry of 
Speleothem Records from Southern Illinois 
(Craig Lundstrom) 

Doctor of Philosophy Degrees 

October 

Qusheng Jin - Kinetics of Microbial Respiration 
(Craig Bethke) 

May 

Andre Savio Ellis - Selenium and Chromium 
Stable Isotopes and the Fate of Redox-Active 
Contaminants in the Environment (Thomas 
Johnson) 



13 



List of Publications for 2003 



Brudzinski, M. R., and Chen, W.-R, 2003, A petrologic 
anomaly accompanying outboard earthquakes 
beneath Fiji-Tonga: Corresponding evidence from 
broadband P and S waveforms. J. Geophys. Res.: 
108(B6): 2299-2318, doi:10.1029/2002JB002012. 

Sinogeikin, S.V., Bass, J.D., and Katsura, T., 2003, 
Single-crystal elasticity of ringwoodite to high pres- 
sures and high temperatures: Implications for the 
520 km seismic discontinuity. Phys. Earth Planet. 
Inter:. 136 (1-2): 41-66. 

Hu, F.S., Kaufman, D., Yoneji, S., Nelson, D., 
Shemesh, A., Huang, Y.S., Tian, J., Bond, G., Clegg, 
B., and Brown, T., 2003, Cyclic variation and solar 
forcing of Holocene climate in the Alaskan subarctic. 
Science: 301: 1890-1S93. 

Lundstrom, C.C., Hoernle, K., and Gill. J., 2003, Major 
and trace element and U-series disequilibria in 
Holocene volcanic rocks from the Canary Islands: 
The role and mechanism of lithospheric melting. 
Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta:67: 4153-4177. 

Marshak, S„ Nelson, W.J., and McBride, J.H., 2003, 
Phanerozoic strike-slip faulting in the continental 
interior platform of the United States: Examples from 
the Laramide Orogen, midcontinent, and ancestral 
Rockies: in Storti, R, Holdsworth, R.E., and Salvinie, 
R, eds., Intraplate Strike-Slip Deformation Belts. 
Geological Society, London, Special Publications 210: 
171-196. 

Li, J., and Fei, Y., 2003, Experimental constraints on 
core composition, in Treaties on Geochemistry, 
Holland, H.D., and Turekian, K.K.,eds.VoI. 2 of The 
Mantle and Core, Carlson, R.W., ed., Elsevier: 521- 
546. 

Nambi, I. M., Werth, C.J., Sanford, R.A., and Valocchi, 
A.J., 2003, Pore-scale analysis of anaerobic 
halorespiring bacterial growth along the transverse 
mixing zone of an etch silicon pore network. 
Environmental Science Technology: 37: 5617-5624. 

Hou, X., Bish, D. L., Wang, S.-L., Johnston, C. T, and 
Kirkpatrick, R. J., 2003, Hydration, expansion, struc- 
ture and dynamics of layered double hydroxides. 
American Mineralogist: 88: 167-179. 

Jin, Q. and Bethke, CM., 2003, A new rate law 
describing microbial respiration. Applied and 
Environmental Microbiology: 69: 2340-2348. 

Johnson, T. M„ and Bullen, T. D., 2003, Selenium iso- 
tope fractionation during reduction of Se oxyanions 
by Fe(II) + Fe(lII) hydroxide-sulfate (green rust). 
Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta: 67: 413-419. 

Frias-Lopez, J., Bonheyo, G.T., Jin, Q., and Fouke, 
B.W., 2003, Cyanobacteria associated with coral 
black band disease in Caribbean and Indo-Pacific 
reefs. Applied and Environmental Microbiology: 69 
(4): 2409-2413. 

Hellwig, H., Hemley, R.J., and Cohen, R.E., 2003, 
Micro-Brillouin investigations of relaxor ferro- 
electrics: (in) Davies, P.K., and Singh, D.J., (eds.) 

Fundamental Physics of Ferroelectrics: American 
Institute of Physics: 65 - 74. 

Song, X.D., 2003, Inner core superrotation: Recent 
observations and future challenges. Global Tectonics 
and Metallogeny: 8: 107-108. 

Hou, X., Kirkpatrick. R.J., Struble, L.J., Shin, J.-H., 
and Monteiro, P.J.M., 2003, The structure of ASR gel 
and its relationship to C-S-H. In D. Lange, ed., 
Engineering Conference on Advances in Cement and 
Concrete IX: Volume Changes, Cracking, and 
Durability, Copper Mountain, Colorado. 



Chen, W.-R, and Brudzinski, MR., 2003, Seismic 
anisotropy in the mantle transition zone beneath Fiji- 
Tonga. Geophys. Res. Lett.: 30: 1682-1686. 

Nicholas, J.D., Youngman, R.E., Sinogeikin, S.V., Bass, 
J.D., Kieffer, J., 2003, Structural changes in vitreous 
boron oxide. Physics & Chemistry of Glasses: 44(3): 
249-251. 

Hu, F.S., and Shemesh, A., 2003, A biogenic-silica 
dl80 record of climatic change during the last 
glacial-interglacial transition in southwestern 
Alaska. t Quaternary Research: 59: 379-385. 

Lundstrom, C.C., 2003, Uranium series disequilibria in 
mid-ocean ridge basalts: Observations and models of 
basalt genesis, in Bourdon, B., Turner, S., Henderson, 
G., and Lundstrom, C, eds., Reviews in Mineralogy 
and Geochemistry volume #52: Uranium Series 
Geochemistry: 175-214. 

Li, J., Hadidiacos, C, Mao, H-k, Fei, Y, and Hemley, 
R.J., 2003, Effect of pressure on thermocouples in a 
multi-anvil apparatus. High Pressure Research: 23 (4): 
389-401. 

Lee, S.K., Stebbins, J.R, Weiss, C.A., and Kirkpatrick, 
R.J., 2003, 17 and 27 A1 MAS and 3QMAS NMR 
study of synthetic and natural layer-silicates. 
Chemistry of Materials: 15: 2605-2613. 

Ellis, A. S., Johnson, T. M., Bullen, T. D., and Herbel, 
M. J., 2003, Selenium isotope fractionation by natural 
microbial consortia in unamended sediment slurries. 
Chem. Geo/.: 195: 119-129. 

Oswald, WW, Brubaker, L.B., Hu, F.S., and Kling, G., 
2003, Climatic and geomorphic controls on Holocene 
vegetational changes in the Arctic Foothills, northern 
Alaska. Journal of Ecology: 91: 1034-1048. 

Song, X.D., 2003, Three-dimensional structure and dif- 
ferential rotation of the inner core, in Earth Core: 
Dynamics, Structure, Rotation, Dehant, V.M.. 
Creager, K.C., Zatman, S., Karato, S., eds.: 
Geodynamics Series, American Geophysical Union: 31 : 
45-63. 

Sung, Y, Ritalahti, K. M., Sanford, R.A., Urbance, J.W, 
Flynn, S.J.. Tiedje, J.M., and Ldffler, RE., 2003, 
Characterization of two tetrachloroethene-reducing, 
acetate-oxidizing anaerobic bacteria and their 
description as Desulfuromonas michiganensis sp. 
nov. Applied Environmental Microbiology: 69: 2964- 
2974. 

Dai, S., Hou, X., Ren, D., Tang, Y, 2003, Surface analy- 
sis of pyrite in the No. 9 coal seam, Wuda Coalfield, 
Inner Mongolia, China, using high-resolution time-of- 
flight secondary ion mass-spectrometry. International 
Journal of Coal Geology: 55(2-4): 139-150. 

Brudzinski, M.R., and Chen, W.-R, 2003, Visualization 
of seismicity along subduction zones: Toward a phys- 
ical basis. Seismol. Res. Lett.:74: 731-738. 

Oswald, WW, Anderson, RM, Brubaker, L.B., Hu, F.S., 
and Engstrom, D.R., 2003, Representation of tundra 
vegetation by pollen in lake sediments in northern 
Alaska. Journal of Biogeography: 30: 521-535. 

Wang, J., Sinogeikin, S.V., Inoue, T, Bass, J.D., 2003, 
Elastic properties of hydrous ringwoodite. American 
Mineralogist: 88: 1608-1611. 

Hellwig, H., Goncharov, A.F., Gregoryanz, E., Mao, H.- 
K., and Hemley, R.J., 2003, Brillouin and Raman 
spectroscopy of the ferrelastic rutile-to-CaC^ transi- 
tion in Sn02 at high pressure: Physical Review B: 67: 
174110-3 - 174110 -7. 



He, Q., and Sanford, R.A., 2003, Characterization of 
Fe(III) reduction by chlororespiring 
Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans. Applied 
Environmental Microbiology: 69: 2712-2718. 

Bourdon, B., Turner, S., Henderson, G., and 
Lundstrom, C.C., 2003, Introduction to U-series geo- 
chemistry: in Bourdon, B.. Turner, S., Henderson, G., 
and Lundstrom, C. C, eds., Reviews in Mineralogy 
and Geochemistry volume #52: Uranium Series 
Geochemistry: 1-21. 

Schilling, F.R., Sinogeikin, S.V., Hauser, M., and Bass, 
J.D., 2003, Elastic properties of model basaltic melt 
compositions at high temperatures. J. Geophys. 
Res.:108 (B6): An. No. 2304. 

Wang, J., Kalinichev, A.G., Amonette, J., and 
Kirkpatrick, R. J., 2003, Interlayer dynamics in Cl- 
hydrotalcite: Far-infrared spectroscopy and molecular 
dynamics modeling. American Mineralogist: 88: 398- 
409. 

Lundstrom, C.C., 2003, An experimental investigation 
of the diffusive infiltration of alkalis into partially 
molten peridotite: Implications for mantle melting 
process. Geochem., Geophys. Geosys: 
doil0.1029/2001GC000224. 

Dai, S., Ren, D., Hou, X., Shao, L, 2003, Geochemical 
and mineralogical anomalies of the late Permian coal 
in the Zhijin coalfield of southwest China and their 
volcanic origin. International Journal of Coal 
Geology: 55(2-4): 117-138. 

Tinner, W, and Hu, F.S.. 2003, Size parameters, size- 
class distribution, and area-number relationship of 
microscopic charcoal: Relevance for fire reconstruc- 
tion. The Holocene: 13: 499-505. 

Oswald, WW, Brubaker, L.B., Hu, F.S., and Gavin, D., 
2003, Pollen- vegetation relationships at the landscape 
scale in Arctic Alaska. Journal of Ecology: 91: 1022- 
1033. 

Dai, S., Ren, D., Zhang, J., Hou, X, 2003, 
Concentrations and origins of platinum group ele- 
ments in Late Paleozoic coals of China. International 
Journal of Coal Geology: 55(1): 59-70. 

Jackson, J.M., Palko, J.W, Andrault, D., Sinogeikin, 
S.V., Lakshtanov, D.L., Wang, J., Bass, J.D., and Zha, 
C.-S., 2003, Thermal expansion of natural orthoensta- 
tite to 1473 K. European J. Miner:15 (3): 469-473. 

Xu, X.X., and Song, X.D., 2003, Evidence for inner core 
super-rotation from time-dependent differential PKP 
travel times observed at Beijing Seismic Network. 
Geophys. J. Int.: 152: 509-514. 

Schilling, F.R., Sinogeikin, S.V., and Bass, J.D., 2003, 
Single-crystal elastic properties of lawsonite and their 
variation with temperature. Phys. Earth Planet. Inter.: 
136 (1-2): 107-118. 

Hou. X., Struble, L.J., Shin. J.-H., Monteiro, P.J.M., and 
Kirkpatrick, R.J., 2003, The structure of ASR gel and 
its relationship to C S H, in Advances in Cement and 
Concrete, Lange, D.A., Scrivener, K.L., and Marchand, 
J., eds. University of Illinois Press: 365-376. 

Kaufman, D.S., Hu, F.S., Briner, J.R, Werner. A., 
Finney. B.R, and Gregory-Eaves, I., 2003. A 30,000- 
year record of environmental change from Arolik 
Lake, Ahklun Mountains, Alaska. Journal of 
Paleolimnology: 30: 343-362. 

Fouke, B.W., Bonheyo, G.T., Sanzenbacher, E., and 
Frias-Lopez, J., 2003, Phylogenetic diversity and dis- 
tribution of bacteria in travertine depositional fades 
(Angel Terrace, Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone 
National Park, USA) . Canadian Journal Earth 
Sciences: 40:1531-1548. 



Colloquium Speakers for Spring and Fall 2003 



Jan. 


24 


Jan. 


31 


Feb. 


7 


Feb. 


14 


Feb. 


21 


Feb. 


28 


Mar 


7 


Mar 


14 


Apr. 


2 



Apr. 4 
Apr. 11 

Apr. 25 
May 2 

May 9 



Rob Finley, ISGS 

Oil Trade and Prices: Megatrends for the Coming Decades 

Doug Wiens, Washington University 

Seismological structure and mantle flow patterns in subduction zones 

Karl Mitchell, Lancaster University 

Recent volcanic activity on Mars? 

Bruce Fouke, University of Illinois (Joint Geology /Microbiology 

Seminar) 

Geobiology: Microbial Life in a Geological Context 

Marc Hirschmann, University of Minnesota 

Pyroxenites in the source regions of oceanic basalts 

Don Wuebbles, University of Illinois 

Potential Climate Changes for the Midwest during the 21st Century 

Xiaodong Song, University of Illinois 

Seismology at the Center of the Earth: Evidence for an Inner Core 

Transition Zone 

Paul Knauth, Arizona State University 

Environmental Conditions on the Early Earth 

Jerry Schuster, University of Utah (Special Wednesday 

Colloquium) 

Imaging Colluvial Wedges and Ancient Earthquakes with Seismic 

Tomography 

Barbara Bekins, USGS, JOI/USSAC Distinguished Lecturer 

The Subduction Squeegee 

Marcelo Garcia, University of Illinois 

Turbidity Currents: arquitects of submarine canyons and 

hydrocarbon reservoirs? 

Rich Aronson, Dauphin Island Sea Lab 

The Destruction of Coral Reef Ecosytems 

Jane Gilotti, University of Iowa 

Crustal melting, leucogranite formation and extensional exhumation 

of gneiss complexes in the Greenland Caledonides 

Wolfgang Schlager, Vrije University 

Orders, fractals and chaos in sequence stratigraphy 



Awards Presented at the 2003 Banquet 

Andrew Anderson, Roger Bannister, Chris Henderson, Scott Koenig, 
Amy Luther, Meghan Ward: Franklin Field Camp Scholarships. 
Fund created to help support students attending summer field camp. 

Kurtis C. Burmeister, Alexander Glass, Matthew Kirk, James Klaus: 

Morris M. and Ada B. Leighton Award. Established to support student 
research. 

Alexander Glass: Norman Sohl Memorial Award in Paleontology. 
Fund established in memory of Norman Sohl. 

Outstanding TA Award: 
Spring 2002— Matthew Kirk 
Fall 2002— Jacquelyn Welch 

Roger Bannister: Estwing Award honoring an outstanding undergraduate 
student. Student receives an Estwing Pick donated by the Estwing 
Company. 

Meghan Ward: Outstanding Senior Award - Cash Award. 

Tai-Lin (Ellen) Tseng: Harriet Wallace Award. A cash award to encourage 
women students in geology. 

Margaret Leinen: Alumni Achievement Award 



Please accept my contribution in support of Geology 
Programs at the University of Illinois 

□ $500 D$250 Z$100 ~$50 Z Other 

(Please print] 

Name(s) 



Address 



Sept. 5 

Sept. 12 

Sept. 19 
Sept. 26 
Oct. 3 

Oct. 17 



Oct. 


24 


Nov. 


7 


Nov. 


14 


Dec. 


5 



David Furbish, Vanderbilt University, Walgreen Lecture 

Theory and observations of flow and bedform dynamics in gravel- 
bed rivers 

Dr. Margaret Leinen, National Science Foundation, Alumni 
Achievement Award Recipient 

Complex Environmental Systems: Science for the 21st Century 
Andy Freed, Purdue University 
Evidence of Powerlaw Flow in the Mojave Desert Mantle 
Bruce Buffett, University of Chicago 

The origin and evolution of methane clathrate below the seafloor 
Carrine Blank, Washington University 

Using the geochemical record to date divergences on the bacterial 
and archaeal trees— reconstructing microbial communities on the 
Archean Earth 

Russell Shapiro, Gustavus Adolphus College 
Fossilized Bacteria From Methane Seeps As An Analogue For An 
Extraterrestrial Fossil Record 
Craig Lundstrom, University of Illinois 
Dynamics of Magma Generation and Transport 
Gabe Filipelli, IUPUI 

The effects of climate on terrestrial nutrient cycling and ecosystem 
development 

Lars Stixrude, University of Michigan 
Physics of Iron in the Earth's Interior 
Craig Bethke, University of Illinois 
M. King Hubbert and the rise of Quantitative Hydrogeology 



City 



Zip 



Please indicate how you would like your gift used. 

I GeoThrust (unrestricted) • 776641 

□ Geology Library Fund - 332463 

□ Harold R. Wanless Graduate Fellowship Fund - 773786 

□ Kansas-Oklahoma Alumni Fund - 772424 

□ Geology Midwest Alumni Fund - 772722 

□ Texas-Louisiana Alumni Fund - 773720 

J W. Hilton Johnson Memorial Field Fund - 772408 

Please make check payable to: 

University of Illinois Foundation 

Mail to: 

Department of Geology 

c/o University of Illinois Foundation 

PO Box 3429 

Champaign, IL 61826-9916 

Or to make a gift by credit card, you may do so 
online at http://www.uif.illinois.edu/ 

T1 5M9DS 

Thank 76641 



15 





Professor Steve Marshak (farthest left) and Tom 
Johnson, associate professor (third from left), 
pose with the 2003 graduating class. 



Sophomore Alene Echevarria goes for 
broke at the Upper Limits Climbing Gym 
in Bloomington, III. The Geology Club 
sponsored its second rock-climbing trip 
there in November, 2003. Ten club mem- 
bers took a two-hour rock-climbing class 
that covered everything from how to put 
on a harness, tie knots and belay, to how 
to communicate between the climber and 
the ground. 




Support the Geology 
Club— Buy A T-Shirt! 

This year the geology club 
printed t-shirts for all its members. 
Club president, Roger Bannister, 
also arranged to print a few extras, 
thinking some alumni might get a 
kick out of owning one! So, if 
you are interested, there are 
some available. Email Roger at 
geoclub@hercules.geology.uiuc.edu 



Students studying sedimentary structures near 
the Salton Sea, California. 



H ILLINOIS 

Department of Geology 

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 
245 Natural History Building 
1301 W. Green St. 
Urbana, 1L 61801 



Non-Profit Organization 


U.S. Postage 


PAID 


Permit No. 75 


Champaign, IL 61820 



2004 YEAR IN REVIEW 



Department of Geology 




I'-^a^XnlrDa 



3 



y of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 



Gary Parker Appointed as W. Hilton Johnson Professor 



The Department of Geology is delighted 
to announce that Gary Parker will 
assume the title of the W. Hilton Johnson 
Professor of Geology beginning with the 
Fall, 2005 term. The Johnson 
Professorship was made possible through 
a generous endowment provided by Eric 
and Kathy Johnson, in memory of Eric's 
father Hilt Johnson, who was a much 
admired professor of geomorphology at 
the University of Illinois for many years. 
Prof. Parker describes himself as a 
"hybrid," a scientist with research pas- 
sions in both geomorphology and civil 
engineering. In recognition, he will hold 
appointments both in the Department of 
Civil and Environmental Engineering 
(CEE) and the Department of Geology. 
He comes to the U of I from the 
University of Minnesota, where he was a 
professor and the Director of the St. 
Anthony Falls Laboratory. 

This past January, during a break 
between delivering a Geology/CEE Joint 
Colloquium ("Effect of Post-Glacial Sea 
Level Rise on Large Rivers") and visiting 
Department of Geology faculty and staff, 
Parker explained how he blends geology 
and engineering. 

"For me, the connection between the 
two disciplines has always been there. 
On my geology side I'm a geomorpholo- 
gist. On my engineering side, I'm a river 
engineer. Those are just different words 
for very similar things. In my entire 
career the applied and the basic sides 
have always interacted strongly. " 

For example, Parker cites the dual 
role of engineering and geology in river 
restoration, one of his research special- 
ties. "I will say that as time has pro- 
gressed that, at least with surface process 
geologists, they used to disdain the idea 




of prediction. They were not trained to do 
it. However, with all the recent interest in 
river restoration, where people actually 
have to predict what would make things 
better if we did this or that to a stream, I 
find that geomorphologists in general are 
becoming more predictive. So in a sense 
the differences between civil engineering 
and geology are ameliorating with time." 

Parker's many research activities 
include: the computational study of 
downstream fining and floodplain deposi- 
tion in large, low-slope sand-bed rivers; 
density stratification effects due to sus- 
pended sediment in rivers; and theoreti- 
cal and experimental research on cyclic 
step formation in cohesive and noncohe- 
sive sediment. His research articles have 
appeared in many journals and popular 
magazines, including GSA Today, Journal 
of Glaciology, Science, and Nature. 
Teaching is also one of Parker's passions. 
"I love to teach," he says. He will be 
teaching four courses at Illinois. 

While contemplating his next career 
move Parker said the U of I had exactly 
what he needed. "I do a fair amount of 
my research in a laboratory and one of 
the few universities around the country 



that has a laboratory that can compete is 
here at the U of I with the Ven Te Chow 
Hydrosystems Laboratory. So, I am walk- 
ing into an environment where certain 
things that I value and am already com- 
fortable with are on the table. " 

"Gary's appointment instantly puts 
the University of Illinois on the map both 
in fluvial geomorphology and in issues 
concerning sedimentary transport," says 
Department of Geology Head Steve 
Marshak. "He is absolutely one of the top 
researchers and teachers in these fields, 
and we are very proud to have him join 
the faculty as the W. Hilton Johnson 
Professor. " 

Civil Engineering Professor and 
Director of the Ven Te Chow Hydrosystems 
Laboratory IVTCHL) Marcelo Garcia, said 
Johnson's appointment is a like a home- 
coming. "Gary is a worldwide leader in his 
field but most important he is a continu- 
ous source of ideas and help to younger 
people. We are extremely fortunate for 
having him in our faculty. There is no 
question that he will provide an interdisci- 
plinary bridge among our departments and 
throughout campus. 

"On a different note, in the late 
1980s, together with Gary Parker we pub- 
lished a paper in Science. As it turns out, 
Sue Kieffer, Walgreen Chair and Professor 
of Geology, was the person that handled 
the review process. At the time she was 
working on hydraulic jumps in the Grand 
Canyon of the Colorado River and our 
paper had to do with hydraulic jumps but 
in oceanic turbidity currents in submarine 
canyons many of which rival their sub-aer- 
ial relatives in size. Interestingly, we are 
all here now: Sue Kieffer, Gary Parker, and 
me. It does not get much better than this." 




Greetings 



Letter From The Head 



t 



ereetings from the Department of 
Geology! As always, many things hap- 
pen during the course of a year, and it's 
hard to keep track of everything. The fac- 
ulty continues to evolve. This year we will 
see the retirement of Prof. Albert Hsui 
after a quarter century of dedicated ser- 
vice to the Department and its students. 
Albert has been a kingpin in the geo- 
physics curriculum, teaching a great range 
of courses ranging from Introductory 
Geology, the Geology of Planets, to 
Exploration Geophysics and Geodynamics, 
and all the time continuing research on 
flow in planetary interiors and related top- 
ics. Albert, you will be missed! We are 
fortunate to see a new faculty member 
arrive. Gary Parker, one of the world's 
leading researchers in fluvial geomorphol- 
ogy and sedimentary transport, will be 
joining the Department as the first W.H. 



Geology Professor Wins University-Wide 
Teaching Honor 

Congratulations to Associate Professor Stephen P. 
Altaner who was awarded this past year with the 
College-Level and Campus-Level Awards for 
Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching. Steve has 
been teaching popular courses in introductory geolo- 
gy, natural hazards, and environmental geology 

Rob Finley is New Adjunct Professor 
Rob Finley has joined the Department as adjunct 
professor. Rob has been at the Illinois State 
Geological Survey (ISGS), Champaign, Illinois, since 
February, 2000, where he is Director of the Energy 
and Earth Resources Center. He works with state 
agency heads as part of the Governor's Energy 
Cabinet, developing energy market analyses from the 
perspective of a consuming state, and works on 
expanding ISGS' energy research programs. 

Illinois Geology Students Return to Scotland! 

For many years, in the 60's through the early '80s, 
the late Prof. Dennis Wood took students on leg- 
endary field trips to Scotland. (Rumor has it that it 
wasn't just the geology that was legendary.) In 2004, 
a group of Illinois geology once again journeyed to 
the 'birthplace of geology" and spent two weeks with 
a class from the University of Leicester, studying 



Johnson Professor. Gary will hold a joint 
appointment with the Department of Civil 
and Environmental Engineering, and thus 
will provide a key link between our 
department and the Engineering College. 
He will be setting up an incredible experi- 
mental apparatus for studying turbidity 
flows, among other problems, at the 
University's Hydrosystems Lab. 

Our faculty and students continue to 
be recognized. Craig Bethke has been 
made a Fellow of the American 
Association for the Advancement of 
Science, Steve Altaner has won the two 
highest teaching awards on campus, and 
Joannah Metz is enjoying her year at 
Cambridge as a Gates Scholar. 

This year also saw additional steps in 
the development of a School of Earth, 
Society, and Environment at UIUC. This 



Highlights 



structure and petrology in Scotland. Highlights included 
the Moine thrust, the Isle of Skye, and rocky coast of 
Durness. To prepare for the trip, Prof. Steve Marshak 
organized a short seminar on the geology of the UK. 

Sarah Brown, a graduate student in structure and 
tectonics, said, "The trip was wonderful. We saw a lot of 
amazing geology in a relatively short time. And working 
with a different set of teachers and students was 
enlightening." 

Field Work and International Studies 

Recent trips have taken Department of Geology stu- 
dents and faculty around the world and back again. For 
example. Prof. Bruce Fouke took students to Curagao 
where they studied carbonate rocks and the geology of 
coral reefs. Prof. Wang-Ping Chen continued his seis- 
mological research high in Tibet. Prof. Sue Kieffer 
trekked to New Zealand to examine geothermal sys- 
tems, Prof. Jay Bass worked at the mineral physics lab 
in Lyons, France, and Prof. Xiaodong Song collaborat- 
ed with colleagues in China. 

Seismology Briefs 

Graduate student Zhaohui Yang's work was the topic 
of a report that appeared in Science Times, a weekly 
publication of the Chinese National Academy of 
Science in her homeland. The report highlighted her 
recent work on rheology of the continental lithosphere 



School, if it comes into existence, will be 
an alliance between the Departments of 
Geology, Geography, and Atmospheric 
Science on this campus. It will not only 
make Earth-related studies at UIUC (and 
thus the Geology Department) more visi- 
ble, but can be an anchor for new interdis- 
ciplinary studies and majors. 2004 also saw 
us approach the end of the GeoScience 
2005 endowment campaign. All signs are 
pointing to the success of the campaign in 
achieving its $3 million goal— many thanks 
to the GeoThrust Committee, under the 
chairmanship of Bill Soderman, for their 
help with this endeavor. 

I hope you enjoy this "Year in 
Review. " Read on, to find out more about 
research, teaching, student activities, and 
alumni news. Please keep in touch ! 

Best regards, 

—Stephen Marshak 



that was published in June of 2004 in 
Science. 

Undergraduate students Nathan 
VanHoudnos and Trale Bardell spent the 
summer working in the Himalayas and Tibet 
for Project Hi-CLIMB, a large-scale geophysi- 
cal experiment directed by Dr. Wang-Ping 
Chen. The Research Experience supports 
both students for Undergraduates of the 
National Science Foundation. 

The devastating earthquake and associated 
tsunami on December 26, 2004, impacted the 
lives of many at U of I. In response, the cam- 
pus set up a special web site for this event, 
with a summary of scientific background on 
earthquakes and tsunami written by 
Wang-Ping Chen. 

Year in Review is published once a year by the 
Department of Geology, University of Illinois 
at Urbana-Champaign, to summarize the 
activities and accomplishments within the 
department and news from alumni and friends. 
Department Head: Stephen Marshak 

(smarshak@uiuc.edu) 
Administrative Secretary: Barb Elmore 

(belmore@uiuc.edu) 
Editor: Stephen J. Lyons (sjlyons@uiuc.edu) 
http://www.geology.uiuc.edu 




j 


^ 5 


•- 




3 





DEPARTMENT NEWS 



Graduate Student on Her Way to the Big Easy 



Red beans, rice and a plum Shell Oil Co. 
internship await Kelly Zimmerman this 
summer. The first-year graduate student 
from Camp Point, Illinois, whose area of 
study is carbonate sedimentology and 
sUatigraphy, will spend 12 weeks this sum- 
mer in New Orleans as a paid geology- 
based intern with the giant energy compa- 
ny. She found ample support throughout 
the interview process from both Shell and 
from the U of I. 

"Every step of the interview process 
was laid out ahead of time," Zimmerman 
said. "A lot of the interview had very non- 
traditional interview questions. They want- 
ed to know about my experience here at U 
of I and they asked about my graduate 
studies. They also wanted to know person- 
al accomplishments that I've achieved 
either through my geology coursework or 
outside of academia. I've worked at the 
Illinois State Geological Survey and Dot 
Foods Inc., so they wanted to know about 
some projects I managed. 



"The only unknown I had was what 
the scenario question would be." 

The situational scenario question is 
an attempt by the company to determine 
how well a student can think on her feet. 
In Zimmerman's case Shell asked how 
she would allocate resources in a college 
if she was a dean facing budget cuts. 

"I think the company wants to see 
how you think on your feet and if you 
can think of all the angles of a problem 
or if you are simply going to proceed 
down only one path. 

"They really emphasize that at Shell 
you might come in with a geology back- 
ground but you're going to be working 
with people with a chemistry background 
or an engineering background and they 
want to see if you can encompass the 
whole scope of the science industry." 

Zimmerman also had some ques- 
tions of her own for Shell. "Even though 
I'm interested in working in the oil indus- 
try for a while after I graduate, I'd even- 



tually like to move into renewables. 
Environmental geology really interests 
me. I wanted to know if I would be able 
to move through the company and 
change positions to end up on its 
renewable side. They have a very strong 
solar power area in California. 

"I wanted to make sure that if I 
came in as a geologist in the oil field 
that there has been and would be future 
opportunities to switch over." 

Shell will expose Zimmerman to 
many different aspects of a geologist's 
role in the exploration and recovery of 
oil. Her time in the bayou country will 
also include several days on an oil plat- 
form in the Gulf of Mexico. But the best 
part is still to come. As she noted the 
majority of Shell interns are offered 
full-time positions... after they graduate, 
of course. 



Joannah Metz: A Gates Scholar 



Joannah Metz (B.S. '04) was one of 31 
U.S. students to receive the prestigious 
Gates Cambridge Scholarship, funded by 
an endowment from the Bill and Melinda 
Gates Foundation, in 2004. The award 
covers the full cost of studies at Cambridge 
University in England, as well as of travel 
and living expenses. 

As an undergraduate at Illinois, Metz 
completed three majors (including geolo- 
gy), and gained research experience work- 
ing with Prof. Bruce Fouke. As the accom- 
panying letter shows, she is taking full 
advantage of her year in Cambridge. 

Metz will return to the United States 
to pursue a doctorate in planetary science 
and geology at MIT. From there, she hopes 
to become an astronaut and eventually 
undertake fieldwork on Mars. 




Letter from Cambridge 

By Joannah Metz 

Walking the hallowed streets of Cambridge as a graduate student at the University of Cambridge 
is a bit different from strolling along the streets of Champaign-Urbana; for one thing, the 'new' buildings 
in Cambridge are 500 years old. I love attending a university with so much history, where I can be 
inspired knowing that I'm attending lectures in rooms Newton and Darwin frequented. Partaking in such 
Cambridge traditions as rowing, spring balls, and formal halls has helped to give me the flavour of life in 
Cambridge. 

In more academic pursuits, I'm pursuing a one-year M.Phil in Polar Studies. My dissertation 
research involves looking at the glacier-influenced continental margins of the polar North Atlantic using 
various marine geophysical methods; and more specifically, I'm looking at iceberg scouring along the 
continental margins of Greenland, Iceland, and Labrador/Baffin Island. I've already learned so much 
about Earth's polar regions from all of the knowledgeable researchers in my department, and I look for- 
ward to learning much more before I finish my course in June. I was also fortunate enough to be 
awarded the Gates Cambridge fellowship, which is funding my studies in Cambridge. There is a great 
community of Gates scholars and we have many interesting lectures by ambassadors, scientists, and 
foreign policy advisors as well as other opportunities such as trips which all help to broaden our experi- 
ence at Cambridge. 

This has been a fantastic year thus far, and one that has given me not only much knowledge 
about the coldest regions on Earth, but also has given me many friends and memories. 



• t,.W 



Alumni Award 



Mohamed El-Ashry Receives Alumni Achievement Award 



We are very proud to 
announce that Dr. 
Mohamed El-Ashry, Ph.D. '66, 
is the 2004 Department of 
Geology Alumni Achievement 
Award winner. Dr. El-Ashry 
came to the University of 
Illinois from Cairo University, 
and completed his dissertation 
under the direction of Harold 
Wanless on the photointerpre- 
tation of coastal changes. 
Starting from this foundation, 
he gained vast experience 
over the years in many 
aspects of environmental geol- 
ogy. Specifically, he has 
focused on issues pertaining 
to water-resources issues and 
contamination due to mining. Ultimately 
he applied his knowledge to addressing 
the environmental impacts of interna- 
tional development, and has held high- 
level posts in the diplomatic world. In 
the course of his career, he published 
over 200 articles and 3 books. 

Currently, Dr. El-Ashry is a Senior 
Fellow at the United Nations Foundation. 
Prior to that appointment, he served as 
Chief Executive Officer of the Global 
Environment Facility (GEF). Under El- 
Ashry's leadership, from 1991 to 2003, 
GEF grew from a pilot program with less 
than 30 members to the largest single 
source of funding for the global environ- 
ment with 173 member countries. The 
Global Environment Facility has allocat- 
ed over $15 billion for more than 1,000 
projects in over 140 countries. 




James D. Wolfensohn, President of 
the World Bank, said of El-Ashry's 
tenure at GEF: "The GEF, as we know it 
today, is the product of Mohamed El- 
Ashry's vision, leadership, dedication, 
and hard work. He has made a signifi- 
cant contribution to the global environ- 
ment and sustainable development." 

El-Ashry came to the GEF from the 
World Bank, where he was the Chief 
Environmental Advisor to the President 
and Director of the Environment 
Department. Prior to joining the World 
Bank, he served as Senior Vice President 
of the World Resources Institute (WRI) 
and as Director of Environmental Quality 
with the Tennessee Valley Authority. In 
recent years, he has also held appoint- 
ments as the Senior Environmental 
Adviser to the UNDP, a Special Adviser 
to the Secretary General of the 1992 U.N. 



"The GEF, as we know it 
today, is the product of 
Mohamed El-Ashry's vision, 
leadership, dedication, and 
hard work. He has made a 
significant contribution to 
the global environment and 
sustainable development." 



Conference on Environment and 
Development (UNCED), and as a mem- 
ber of the World Water Commission. 
Earlier in his career, he held teaching 
and research positions at Cairo 
University, Pan-Americas-U.A.R. Oil 
Company, the Illinois Geological 
Survey, Wilkes University, and the 
Environmental Defense Fund. 
El-Ashry is a fellow of the 
Geological Society of America and the 
American Association for the 
Advancement of Science, and a mem- 
ber of the Third World and African 
Academies of Science. He is listed in 
"American Men and Women of 
Science" and "Men of Achievement," 
and his biography has been featured in 
Geotimes. He is also the recipient of 
numerous international awards and 
honors. 



GEOLOG 




Albert Hsui Retires 




"I feel good when I run into alumni 
and they tell me that the things I 
taught them years ago are very useful 
and that they finally understand why 
they had to learn them. Those are the 
types of encounters that keep me 
going. You hope that you teach things 
that help your students be creative 
and productive." 



pril 21, 2005, was declared "Albert 
Hsui Day" and the retiring profes- 
sor of geology and associate head of 
the department presented a valedic- 
tory talk on "Geodynamics: Mother 
of All Geological Processes." After 
his talk, Hsui was the guest at a din- 
ner in his honor, during which his 
contributions since arriving at UIUC 
in 1980 were toasted. Hsui moved to 
the department after completing a 
Ph.D. at Cornell and a post-doc at 
MIT — when he arrived, the 
Department's geophysics program 
was in transition. 

Hsui is modest about his 
accomplishments. "I feel good when 
1 run into alumni and they tell me 
that the things I taught them years 
ago are very useful and that they 
finally understand why they had to 
learn them. Those are the types of 
encounters that keep me going. You 
hope that you teach things that help 
your students be creative and pro- 
ductive." 



It was the lure of the supercom- 
puters that initially brought Hsui to 
UIUC, because much of his research 
relies on computer simulation. Over 
the years, Hsui has made discoveries 
concerning mantle convection and its 
relationship to plate tectonics, the 
process of plate subduction and its 
implications to island-arc magma gen- 
eration and deep seismicity, the evolu- 
tion of map-view curves in trenches 
and mountain belts, and the thermal 
evolution of other planets. Hsui has 
investigated the constancy of the uni- 
versal gravitational constant, which 
has implications to the possible exis- 
tence of a fifth force of nature. 

Teaching is a passion for Hsui, 
and increasingly, computers have been 
playing a role in his classes. "Today's 
students are much more visual, so 
looking at equations alone is not 
something that they are accustomed to 
doing. They understand the meaning 
of an equation much better if you have 
them use a computer to simulate what 
the equation shows. For example, in 
my 'Geology of the Planets' class, we 
simulate the Moon orbiting the Earth, 
and show how the its orbital velocity 
relates to its distance from the Earth." 

Two years ago, Hsui developed a 
new introductory geology course that 
fulfills the university's quantitative rea- 
soning course requirement. To make 
this course possible, Hsui had to write 
a new lab book that gives students the 
opportunity to use math in the context 
of solving geological problems. 
Enrollment in this class has been 
growing steadily. 

"Retired" just means moving on 
to the next endeavor, Hsui says. "After 
25 years I feel that I've reached a junc- 
ture where if I want to do something 
different I better do it now, while I am 
still young and energetic." 



Department News 



Serendipity and good science lead to the discovery of a starfish living at the ocean's depths. 



geology graduate student Chris 
D Mali's discovery of a new species of 
starfish reads like a good-old fash- 
ioned detective story. The mystery 
began eight years ago off the coast of 
Palau in the 400-feet depths of the 
central Pacific, a place only "dive 
nuts" equipped with mixed gas re- 
breathing units dare to tread. It was 
in this murky realm, where, according 
to diver-scientist Patrick Colin, one 
finds "a world of white, blue, and 
black," where "sediment flows off the 
shallow reefs... like snowfall." Colin 
was collecting marine animals in the 
hopes of discovering new anticancer 
agents from nature. His dive permitted 
only six hours underwater and, with 
less than 10 minutes left before his air 
supply was exhausted, he surfaced 
with an orange and brown starfish 
that he later dubbed the "combread 
star. " 

Enter U of I paleobiologist and 
starfish researcher Mah, who studies 
the diversity and evolution of marine 
invertebrates. The drawers of his lab 
in the basement of the Natural History 
Building overflow with every imagin- 
able shape and size of starfish, but 
none looked quite like the 40-cm 
example sent from Palau. Months 
after Mah received the sample, he was 
visiting the Bishop Museum in 
Honolulu and, by chance, just hap- 
pened to notice a second specimen 
stored almost as an afterthought in a 
5-gallon bucket that was holding up a 
fan. This specimen had been collected 
at Enewetak Atoll at 420 feet. 






Astrosarkus idipi 



"It was collected 15 years ago," Mah 
says. "Ironically, it was Colin who had col- 
lected that sample, too, but the opportunity 
to properly examine the specimen never 
emerged." 

Several years later, Mah discovered a 
third sample of cornbread star on a dusty 
shelf in a Belgium marine lab. "It had just 
been sitting there for probably a decade, 
after it was collected from the Indian Ocean 
in 1982. With a critical mass of starfish 
material in hand I proceeded with a formal 
description." 



Mah, whose research results 
were published last year in the 
Bulletin of Marine Science, named the 
starfish Astrosarkus idipi. Astrosarkus 
means "star-shaped flesh,' and idipi is 
in honor of David K. Idipi, Sr., former 
director of the Palau Bureau of 
Natural Resources and Development. 
The naming was front-page news in 
the Tia Belau, the newspaper of 
record for Palau. 

"The species represents some- 
thing very distinct, and very new, and 
very different from previous known 
animals," Mah says. "It's a bizarre 
animal to put it mildly. It lives in a 
region just below conventional scuba 
dive range and in an area too deep 
and too jagged for trawler nets. That 
probably explains why it's never been 
discovered." 

So much remains a mystery 
about Astrosarkus idipi. Mah still 
doesn't know what it eats or how old 
any of the specimens are. "Starfish 
can reabsorb calcite. They don't really 
show consistent growth patterns." 

Presently there is a global effort 
at the moment to save and conserve 
biodiversity. Mah says many unde- 
scribed species remain to found and 
each new species represents hope. 
"The question that comes out of this 
is, 'If we can still find an animal that 
big — pumpkin-sized — in the populat- 
ed Tropics, then what else is there to 
be discovered?' You can't understand 
what's being lost if you don't know 
what's there in the first place." 

Mah is finishing his Ph.D. in 2005, 
under the supervision of Prof. Emeritus 
Dan Blake. 




Mount St. Helens: 25 years later 




Twenty-five years ago, Mount St. Helens 
erupted in Washington state, prompt- 
ing U. of I. geology graduate David 
Johnston, of the U.S. Geological Survey, 
to report "Vancouver, Vancouver, this is 
it" from inside his monitoring-station 
trailer. Johnston's body and trailer were 
never found; he was among 57 fatalities 
that day. 

"The neighbor asked what we had been 
doing recently, and when we replied 
'working at Mount St. Helens' we were 
told, 'Oh, it really blew up this morning!"' 
she recalled. "After recovering from the 
shock, we packed and headed back to the 
mountain that afternoon." 



Susan W. Kieffer, now the Charles 
R. Walgreen Jr. Chair in the U. of I. 
Geology Department, had been on site 
that March and April as part of a U.S. 
Geological Survey team studying earlier, 
smaller eruptions of the long dormant 
volcano. On the Sunday morning of May 
18, 1980, Kieffer was visiting a neighbor 
in Flagstaff, Arizona. 

"The neighbor asked what we had 
been doing recently, and when we replied 
'working at Mount St. Helens' we were 
told, 'Oh, it really blew up this morn- 
ing!'" she recalled. "After recovering from 
the shock, we packed and headed back 
to the mountain that afternoon." 

An official observer, Johnston, who 
had earned a bachelor's degree in geolo- 



gy from Illinois in 1971, had been 
camped on a high ridge, about 10 kilo- 
meters north of the summit of Mount St. 
Helens. The ridge on which he died, 
shortly after 8:32 a.m., is now named 
Johnston Ridge, and is the site of a per- 
manent Webcam that broadcasts images 
every five minutes of the mountain. 

"The mountain today can look so 
peaceful on a sunny morning, but the 
knowledge of how violent it turned 
makes it a very uneasy peace, even 
though now it is a relatively safe place," 
she said. "I had met David in the March- 
April work, and we enjoyed a tremen- 
dous comradeship. David was much 
more experienced with volcanoes than 
me, and because of his work with the 
explosive and dangerous Augustine 
Volcano in Alaska, he knew, and respect- 
ed, the power of St. Helens probably 
more wisely than any of the rest of us." 

Today, scientists have a lot more 
understanding of what happened that 
day, and Kieffer currently is part of a 
team using supercomputers to further 
analyze what happened and why. 



"At the time of the 1980 eruption, we did- 
n't have supercomputers." Kieffer said. 
"Now, we have not only the computational 
power for the models, but the visualization 
capabilities of the NCSA (National Center 
for Supercomputing Applications), and 
we're hoping to really understand and 
visualize these events." 



Susan Kieffer at work in her helicopter flight 
suite on Mount St. Helens in 1980. 

The expanding steam and gases in 
the magma during the 1980 Mount St. 
Helens eruption propelled fragmented 
rock and glaciers over 500 square kilome- 
ters of land, ripping up and destroying 
about 4 billion board feet of timber along 
the way, and causing nearly $1 billion in 
economic damage. 

"These eruptions have been 
described as 'ash hurricanes,' " Kieffer 
said. 

Kieffer mapped the directions of 
blow-down of the trees and reconstructed 
the dynamics of the blast using rocket- 
engine theory. She proposed that the flow 
within the most highly damaged area was 
moving so fast that gravitational forces 
couldn't act to divert the flow of the "ash 
hurricane" down the valleys. 

Kieffer is working with Illinois col- 
leagues S. (BalaJ Balachandar, professor 
and associate head of the department of 
theoretical and applied mechanics, and 
Andreas Haselbacher, a research scientist 
at the Center for Simulation of Advanced 
Rockets, to use supercomputing capabili- 
ties and the university's Apple Turing 
Cluster computer to improve the under- 
standing of the volcano's eruption. 

"At the time of the 1980 eruption, we 
didn't have supercomputers," Kieffer said. 
"Now, we have not only the computation- 
al power for the models, but the visual- 
ization capabilities of the NCSA (National 
Center for Supercomputing Applications), 
and we're hoping to really understand 
and visualize these events." 



Windows into the Past 



Geology at Illinois 1931-1946 



by Ralph L. Langenheim 



Frank DeWolfe took over as head of the 
Department of Geology and 
Geography in 1931, at the height of the 
Great Depression. DeWolfe served until 
1946 and held the Department together 
through the Depression, the New Deal, 
and World War II. He was the only 
department head to reach retirement in 
office. When he came to the University 
of Illinois, DeWolfe had a reputation as 
an outstanding explorationist and admin- 
istrator. His resume included terms as 
Director of the ISGS (1911 to 1923), as 
Chief Geologist for the Humphreys 
Corporation (1923-1927), and as Vice 
President of the Louisiana State Lands 
Corporation. In Louisiana, he introduced 
seismic profiling, leading to the discov- 
ery of many salt domes. 

DeWolfe entered a department in 
which intense feuds, some of a personal 
nature, divided the faculty. In 1936, an 
investigative committee chaired by the 
Dean of LAS reviewed the Department, 
suggested some staffing changes, and 
emphasized the need for stronger leader- 
ship and scholarship. As problems dissi- 
pated, enrollments grew and the depart- 
ment granted 53 masters and 21 doctor- 
ates between 1931 and 1946. World War 
II did take its toll— no degrees were 
granted in 1943 and 1944. 

Staff and students of the mid-20th 
century concentrated overwhelmingly in 
sedimentary geology, and Illinois came 
to be known as a leading "soft-rock" 
department. For example, the record 
shows 23 theses in paleontology, 16 in 




stratigraphy, 13 in sedimentology, 8 in 
marine geology, 5 in petroleum geology, 
6 in coal geology, and 3 in subsurface 
geology. All other disciplines together 
yielded only 7 theses. The Department 
reached its highest-ever position (11th) in 
the American Council of Education's 
ranking of graduate programs in geology. 

In addition to DeWolfe, Terrence 
Quirke, Harold Wanless, Harold Scott, 
Waldorf Howard, Francis Shepard, and 
Arle Sutton formed the core of the 
Geology Department staff. Continuing 
activity on the part of emeritus professor 
Savage supplemented their efforts, and 
Carleton Chapman and Robert Sharp 
joined the staff before leaving for military 
duty. In addition, G.H. Cady, a distin- 
guished coal geologist from the ISGS for 



which GSA's Cady Award was named, 
was appointed as an adjunct professor. 

Shepard and Wanless developed 
wide reputations for research and 
teaching. Shepard helped found the 
study of submarine geology, and some 
of the students that he supervised at 
Illinois went on to achieve fame in 
their own right. These included Robert 
Dietz (Ph.D., 1941) and K.O. Emery 
(Ph.D., 1941). In 1937, though retain- 
ing his status as an Illinois faculty 
member, Shepard relocated to the 
Scripps Institution of Oceanography; he 
resigned from Illinois in 1946. Wanless 
began a lifetime of research on Late 
Paleozoic cyclothems and pioneered 
the use of aerial photographs in geolog- 
ic mapping. He was also an extremely 
popular teacher— a course that he 
developed on the geology of Illinois 
became so popular, considering the 
state's burgeoning petroleum industry, 
that its field trips required use of a bus. 
Quirke continued research in hard rock 
geology and began instruction in engi- 
neering geology, Howard led a research 
program in carbonate geology, Scott 
helped to establish conodont biostratig- 
raphy as a major correlation tool, and 
Sutton made contributions in sedimen- 
tary and petroleum geology. 

All in all, as the WW II came to a 
close, the Illinois geology department 
was ready to play a leading role in geo- 
logic research and education during the 
post-war period. 




Late last January, while most people 
were battling winter's cold and 
snow, structural geologist Stephen 
Hurst joined a team of scientists, 
engineers and technicians who set 
sail from Easter Island to explore the 
Pito Deep, a rift in Earth's crust near- 
ly 6,000 meters deep. 

Funded by the National Science 
Foundation, the expedition had as its 
goal to probe the ocean crust, and 
gain a better understanding of how it 
was created. 

"Pito Deep is one of the few loca- 
tions where such investigations can 
be made," Hurst said. "The rift is on 
the boundary between the Easter 
Island microplate and the Nazca 
plate, in an area where tectonic 
movement is pulling the crust apart." 

Unlike rifts caused by sea-floor 
spreading, at Pito Deep there is no 
fresh magma obscuring the chasm. As 
a result, the crust is exposed like a 
split watermelon. The naturally occur- 
ring cross-section offers scientists an 
opportunity to study the structure of 
the ocean crust and how it formed. 

Hurst rendezvoused with the rest 
of the scientific team on Easter Island. 
While awaiting final preparations, he 
had an opportunity to explore the 
quarry where most of the island's 
famous stone heads, or Moai, were 
carved. 

"The quarry is spectacular," 
Hurst said. "There are approximately 
300 Moai scattered throughout the 
quarry area, in various stages of com- 
pletion. Some are 40 feet long." 



When all was made ready, Hurst 
and the others boarded the Atlantis 
(host ship for the deep-sea submersible 
Alvin) and began the 24-hour cruise to 
Pito Deep, which is about 350 miles 
north and slightly east of Easter Island. 

Having participated in six similar 
cruises, Hurst was involved with many 
technical operations of the expedition, 
from preparing bathymetric maps to 
analyzing photographs to diving in 
Alvin. 

The floor of Pito Deep lies about 
1,500 meters deeper than Alvin can 
safely dive, but this was not a problem 
for the researchers. "The bottoms of 
these canyons are usually filled with 
sediment and debris from rockslides," 
Hurst said. "For our studies, we want- 
ed to collect rocks from the steepest, 
not the deepest, part of the chasm." 

The descent takes nearly two 
hours. The pilot and two "observers" 
spend the time talking, listening to 
music or rechecking the equipment. 
During the dive, the water temperature 
falls from about 80 degrees Fahrenheit 
at the surface to close to freezing at 
depth. Separating the sub's occupants 
from the cold water is 2 inches of tita- 
nium hull, which also offers protection 
from the crushing pressure. 

"Because of the enormous pres- 
sures we experience, it's not uncom- 
mon to find Alvin's hull festooned 
with net bags filled with Styrofoam 
cups and mannequin heads at the 
beginning of a dive," Hurst said. "The 
water pressure squeezes them to a tiny 
fraction of their original size, making 
neat souvenirs of the dive." 







Geology Department's Stephen Hurst with 
the deep-sea submersible "Alvin." 

The researchers have about five 
hours to explore the abyss and collect 
rock samples from the cliff face before 
Alvin's power runs low and they must 
float to the surface. 

Although data analysis will take 
many months, Hurst said the expedi- 
tion's preliminary results are positive. 

"We discovered that Pito Deep 
has a sort of layer cake geology," 
Hurst said. "Like frosting on a cake, 
the top layer consists of horizontal 
lava flows. Beneath that is a layer of 
vertical dikes - the conduits through 
which the lava flowed. Beneath that is 
the now solid magma chamber at the 
base of the ocean crust. And beneath 
that lies the mantle." 



Alumni News 



Jack Pierce, B.S. '49, M.S. '50, retired chairman of the Department of Paleobiology of the 
Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History, and professor at George 
Washington University, died on February 11, 2004. He was 77 years old. Pierce served in the 
Pacific Theater in WWII. After the war, he attended the U of I, where he received his bache- 
lor's and master's degrees. He received a Ph.D. from the University of Kansas. He then 
moved to George Washington University as a professor of sedimentology and marine geolo- 
gy. In 1965, Pierce began his tenure at the Smithsonian Institution's Museum of Natural 
History as a research scientist and curator. He founded the museum's sedimentology depart- 
ment. During the course of his career, Pierce conducted research in Argentina, Belize, Italy, 
Spain, France, and coastal South America. He was a member of the Sigma Xa, and a fellow 
of AAPG. SEPM, GSA, IAS, and GSW. 

Frank Larry Doyle, Ph.D. '58, passed away on February 26, 2005, in San Antonio, Texas. A 
professional groundwater hydrologist with an internationally renowned career spanning 
more than 50 years, Larry served the U.S. Chapter of the International Association of 
Hydrologists from 1980 to 1988 as Secretary/Treasurer and Chairman. Larry began his career 
with the USGS in 1960 and worked in Arizona and Colorado. During his career he taught at 
St. Mary's University in San Antonio, the State University of New York, and the University of 
Connecticut in Storrs. Larry also had associations with the Geological Survey of Alabama, 
Dames and Moore, Metcalf and Eddy, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the U.S. 
Department of the Interior Office of Project Review, and the MITRE Corporation. He carried 
out geologic and hydrologic investigations in Panama, Nicaragua, Algeria, and Spain. 

Bruce Dollahan, B.S. '59, passed away February 1, 2005, in Little Rock, Arkansas. Bruce 
retired from Sears in 1989 after 30 years of employment. He then worked for three years at 
Dillard's in Overland Park, Kansas. Among his survivors is his wife, college sweetheart Nora, 
who he wed in 1959. 



1940s 

Rob Roy Macgregor, B.S. '40, wrote from his 
home in Woodstock, Connecticut after read- 
ing the late Prof. Harold W. Scott's book, The 
Sugar Creek Saga: Chronicles of a Petroleum 
Geologist. Reminiscing, Rob writes that he 
took a job as a "shooter's helper" with the 
Carter Oil Company in Oklahoma. The com- 
pany then transferred him to Mattoon, 
Illinois, to work as a clerk. "It became appar- 
ent to me that to get ahead in geology I 
would need a degree in it. Working in 
Mattoon provided me an opportunity to con- 
tinue to work for Carter part time and to 
attend the U of I part time, taking enough 
geology courses to acquire a degree. " Rob 
fondly remembers classmate Bernard Curvin 
(B.S. '39). 

Howard L. Patton, B.S. '46, M.S. '48, wrote 
to the Department in which he remembered 
his friend and U of I colleague Jim Pearson 
('42), who died in 1944 behind enemy lines 
during WWII. Howard writes, "I had the good 
fortune to be Jim's field partner, and our 
Spring course headquartered in the Rose 
Hotel in Elizabethtown [IL] on the Ohio has 
provided many pleasant memories. I rode his 
coattails then... Jim was personable, sensitive, 
meticulous, and thorough, and he always 
seemed to be in control of his studies when 
most of us were laboring mightily... He was a 
true hero and should be remembered as such 
by the Department of Geology." 



1950s 

At the 2005 AAPG Convention in Calgary Jack 
Threet AB'51 was one of several AAPG mem- 
bers who was honored with a Distinguished 
Service Award recognizing their "singular and 
beneficial service to AAPG." Jack, whose long 
career included service as Vice President of 
Shell Oil, has received the Department's alumni 
achievement award. 

Paul Karrow, Ph.D. '57, was awarded the title 
Distinguished Professor Emeritus by the 
University of Waterloo in 2002. He retired from 
UW in 1999. Presently, Paul is an adjunct pro- 
fessor in the Department of Earth Sciences and 
continues to teach and supervise graduate stu- 
dents. A day-long symposium was held at the 
Geological Association of Canada's annual meet- 
ing to recognize Paul's work in quaternary geol- 
ogy. Most importantly, Paul is now a grandfa- 
ther of eight. 

1960s 

John Hawley, Ph.D. '62, now directs Hawley 
Geomatters in Albuquerque, New Mexico. He is 
the winner of a 2005 New Mexico Earth Science 
Achievement Award. The award recognizes indi- 
viduals who have made outstanding contribu- 
tions to advancing geoscience in areas of educa- 
tion, research, public service, and public policy 
in New Mexico. 



Bill Soderman, M.S. '60, Ph.D. '62, received 
the 2004 U of I College of Liberal Arts and 
Sciences' "Quadrangle Award" in recognition of 
his many important contributions to the UIUC 
campus and for his efforts to help establish the 
GeoThrust Committee and for guiding it over 
many years. The award was presented at a lav- 
ish banquet hosted by the Dean of the College. 

At the 2005 American Association of Petroleum 
Geologists (AAPG) Convention in Calgary 
Christopher C. M. Heath, MS'63, Ph.D.'65, was 

one of three recipients of the Honorary 
Membership Award. The award goes to those 
"who have distinguished themselves by their 
accomplishments and through their service to 
the petroleum profession." 

For more than 30 years. Douglas Mose, B.S. 

'65, has been a professor of geochemistry at 
Virginia's George Mason University, where he 
directs the Center for Basic and Applied Science, 
a faculty-student research corporation. Douglas 
is also the president of an environmental (air- 
water-soil) testing company. He says, "I most 
fondly remember Harold Wanless for the goals 
he created in my mind when I listened during 
and after classes. I was fortunate to be his dri- 
ver for one year on field trips and, in later 
years, I realized he became a model for me as a 
teacher and scientist." Mose earned his Ph.D. at 
University of Kansas. 

1980s 

The Geological Society of America elected 
Kathleen Marsaglia, M.S. '82, a GSA Fellow on 
April 25, 2004. Kathy is a professor at California 
State University, Northridge, where she teaches 
and carries out research in sandstone petrogra- 
phy and works on paleogeographic and paleo- 
tectonic reconstructions. She has been ship- 
board scientist on several ODP legs. 

Linda Rowan, B.S. '86, is now at the American 
Geological Institute as Director of Government 
Affairs. She was a senior editor with the journal 
Science. 

1990s 

Catherine A. Hier Majumder, B.S. '97, finished 
her Ph.D. in computational geophysics at the 
University of Minnesota and then worked as a 
post-doc at Los Alamos National Lab. She is 
now beginning a post-doc at Carnegie, in 
Washington. D.C., where she will be working 
on projects pertaining to the NASA mission to 
Mercury. 

Doug Tinkham, M.S., '97, will become an 
assistant professor at Laurentian University 
(Sudbury, Ontario) in the fall of 2005. Doug did 
his masters with Steve Marshak before complet- 
ing a Ph.D. at Alabama and a post-doc at 
Calgary. Doug, Dee and their daughter Cydney 
Alicia will be moving at the end of the summer. 



Honor Roll of Donors for 2004 



Crystal G. Lovett-Tibbs, B.S. '97, was hired 
last September as an associate attorney in 
Husch & Eppenberger, LLC, in the firm's 
Environmental & Regulatory Practice Group. 

Joel Johnson, M.S. '98, will become an 
assistant professor at the University of New 
Hampshire. Joel did his master's with Steve 
Marshak before moving to Oregon State for 
a Ph.D. and a post-doc at the Monterey Bay 
Aquarium. Joel and his wife will be heading 
from the beaches of the West Coast to those 
of the East Coast this summer. 

2000s 

David Beedy, B.S. '00, M.S. '02, lives in 
Denver, Colorado, where he is a 9th grade 
advisor in the Mapleton School District. 

Roberto Hernandez, M.S. '00, was promot- 
ed to the position of Chief Geologist at 
Ecopetrol, in Colombia. Roberto completed a 
thesis in structural geology while at UIUC. 

Michael Brudzinski, Ph.D. '01, has accept- 
ed a position of assistant professor at Miami 
University of Ohio. He will begin his 
appointment in the fall of 2005. Mike 
worked with Wang-Ping Chen in seismology. 

Qusheng Jin, Ph.D. '03, has accepted a 
position as an assistant professor at the 
University of Oregon. He and his wife Rose 
will move to Eugene for the Spring 2006 
term. Jin worked with Craig Bethke in 
hydrogeology and geomicrobiology at UIUC, 
before becoming a post-doc at Berkeley. 

News from Former Faculty 

Emeritus professor George Klein was 

appointed Chairman of the Matson Award 
Committee for the 2006 annual meeting of 
the American Association of Petroleum 
Geologists (AAPG). In addition to his contin- 
uing work with SED-STRAT Geoscience 
Consultants, he has published a novel. 



We'd love to hear 
from you 



Send us your personal 

and professional 

updates by emailing us at 

geology@uiuc.edu or 

Department of Geology 

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 

245 Natural History Building 

1301 W. Green St. 

Urbana, IL 61801 

Please include degree(s) earned and year, 
along with your current affiliation. 



Buckley Lecture Series Launched 

Glen and Susan Buckley have generously endowed a series of lectures in the Department. The 
Buckley Lecture Series will bring to our weekly colloquial series engaging speakers who will address 
a broad range of issue with an environmental-geology theme. The inaugural talk in the series will be 
by Glen Buckley, who will speak on water crises in Texas.. 

The following is a list of friends and alumni of the Department of Geology who have donated to the 
department during the calendar year 2004. 




Prof. Thomas F. Anderson 
Dr. Robert F. Babb II 
Mrs. Laura S. Bales 
Mrs. Margaret H. Bargh 
Mr. Douglas S. Bates 
Dr. Craig M. Bethke 
Dr. Marion E. Bickford 
LTC Ronald E. Black (RET) 
Mr. Joseph E. Boudreaux 
Mr. and Mrs. Allen S. 

Braumiller 
Ms. Annette Brewster 
Ms. Margaret R. Broten 
Mr. and Mrs. Ross D. Brower 
The Reverend Robert L. 

Brownfield 
Dr. Susan B. Buckley 
Dr. Glenn R. Buckley 
Mr. James W. Castle 
Dr. Thomas L. Chamberlin 
Dr. Charles J. Chantell 
Mr. and Mrs. Lester W. Clutter 
Dr. Dennis D. Coleman 
Dr. Lorence G. Collins 
Dr. Barbara J. Collins 
Mr. and Mrs. Randolph M. 

Collins 
Dr. Virginia A. Colten-Bradley 
Mrs. Lucinda E. Cummins 
Dr. Norbert E. Cygan 
Dr. Richard N. Czerwinski 
Dr. Ilham Demir 
Mr. M. Peter deVries 
Mr. Bruce E. Dollahan (DEC) 
Mr. James D. Donithan 
Dr. Garnett M. Dow 
Ms. Stephanie Drain 
Dr. Mohamed T, El-Ashry 
Dr. Frank R. Ettensohn 
Mr. Joseph P. Fagan Jr. 
Mr. Kenneth T Feldman 
Dr. and Mrs. Ray E. Ferrell Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Dale C. Finley Jr 
Mr. Gary M. Fleeger 
Dr. Richard M. Forester 
Mr. Jack D. Foster 
Mr. Robert E. Fox 
Mr. and Mrs. Edwin H. 

Franklin 
Mr. Barry R. Gager 
Mr. James C. Gamble 
Mr. and Mrs. John R. Garino 
Ms. Theresa C. Gierlowski 
Mr Robert N. Ginsburg 
Ms. Erika L. Goench 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. 

Gossetl 



Dr. and Mrs. Stuart Grossman 

Dr. Albert L. Guber 

Mrs. Catherine L. Harms 

Dr. Richard L. Hay 

Dr. Daniel 0. Hayba 

Dr. Mark A. Helper 

Mr. and Mrs. Mark F. Hoffman 

Mr. and Mrs. Glen A. Howard 

Dr. Roscoe G. Jackson II 

Mr. Steven F Jamrisko 

Mr. Martin V. Jean 

Dr. William D. Johns Jr. 

Dr. Allen H. Johnson 

Dr. Kenneth S. Johnson 

Mr. Robert R. Johnston 

Mr. Roy A. Kaelin 

Dr. Robert E. Karlin 

Dr. and Mrs. Frank R. Karner 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald A. Keefer 

Dr. John P. Kempton 

Mr. John N. Keys 

Dr. and Mrs. John D. Kiefer 

Dr. and Mrs. R. James 

Kirkpatrick 
Mr. Robert F Kraye 
Mr. Thomas E. Krisa 
Mr. Michael B. Lamport 
Dr. Stephen E. Laubach 
Dr. Steven W. Leavitt 
Mr. Stephen C. Lee 
Dr. Hannes E. Leetaru 
Dr. Morris W. Leighton 
Dr. Margaret S. Leinen 
Ms. Crystal Lovett-Tibbs 
Mr Bernard W. Lynch 
Mr. Rob Roy Macgregor 
Mr. and Mrs. Andrew S. 

Madden 
Mr. John W. Marks 
Prof, and Mrs. Stephen 

Marshak 
Mrs. Joyce C. Mast 
Dr. Murray R. McComas 
Mrs. W. E. McCommons 
Mrs. Cheryl B. Miller 
Mr James A. Miller 
Ms. Linda A. Minor 
Mr. John S. Moore 
Mr. and Mrs. Wayne E. Moore 
Dr. Sharon Mosher 
Mr. Joseph C. Mueller 
Mr. Robert E. Murphy 
Dr. and Mrs. Haydn H. Murray 
Mr. Bruce W. Nelson 
Mr. W. John Nelson 
Mr. and Mrs. Brian D. Noel 



Mr. and Mrs. William A. 

Oesterling 
Dr. William A. Oliver Jr. 
Donald E. Orlopp 
Michael R. Owen 
Dr. Norman J. Page 
Mrs. Corinne Pearson 
Dr. and Mrs. Russel A. 

Peppers 
Mr. Charles E. Pflum 
Mr. Bruce E. Phillips 
Mrs. Beverly A. Pierce 
Dr. and Mrs. Robert I. 

Pinney 
Dr. Paul L. Plusquellec 
Mr. Raymond W. Rail 
Dr. Elizabeth P. Rail 
Mr. Paul J. Regorz 
Mr. William D. Rice 
Mr. Donald 0. Rimsnider 
Mr. Dean M. Rose 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward L. 

Rosenthal 
Mr Jeffrey A. Ross 
Dr. Richard P. Sanders 
Mr. Michael L. Sargent 
Mr. and Mrs. Jay R. 

Scheevel 
Dr. and Mrs. Detmar 

Schmtker 
Dr. David C. Schuster 
Dr. and Mrs. Franklin W. 

Schwartz 



Ms. Yuki J. Shinbori 
Dr. Charles H. Simonds 
Dr. Brian J. Sinclair 
Mr. Roger A. Sippel 
Dr. J. William Soderman 
Mr. and Mrs. Eric P. 

Sprouls 
Dr. Ian M. Steele 
Dr. Ronald D. Stieglitz 
Dr. John E. Stone 
Dr. Gary D. Strieker 
Mr. Thomas R. Styles 
Dr. Susan M. Taylor 
Dr. Daniel A. Textons 
Dr. and Mrs. J. Cotter 

Tharin 
Mr. and Mrs. Jack C. 

Threet 
Dr. Edwin W. Tooker 
Dr. F Michael Wahl 
Ms. Harriet E. Wallace 
Dr. James G. Ward 
Dr. W. F. Weeks 
Mr. Jack L. Wilber 
Mr. Donald R. Williams 
Ms. Jennifer A. Wilson 
Mr. John J. Wilson 
Mr. Matthew W. Woltman 
Mr. Roland F Wright 
Dr. Wang-Hong A. Yang 
Dr. and Mrs. Valentine E. 

Zadnik 



Corporations 

BP Amoco Foundation 

ChevronTexaco 

ConocoPhillips Corporation 

Dominion Foundation 

DTE Energy Foundation 

ExxonMobil Biomedical Sciences, Inc. 

ExxonMobil Foundation 

ExxonMobil Retiree Program Mobil Retiree 

Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund 

Harris Bank Foundation 

Idaho National Engineering and Environmental 

Laboratory 
lllini Technologists Working Metal 
Lockheed Martin Corporation Foundation 
Marathon Ashland Petroleum 
Shell Oil Company 
Shell Oil Company Foundation 
Whiting Petroleum Corporation an Alliant Company 



II 



Annual Report for 2004 



Faculty 

Stephen P. Altaner (Associate Professor) 

Jay D. Bass (Professor) 

Craig M. Bethke (Professor) 

Chu-Yung Chen (Associate Professor) 

Wang-Ping Chen (Professor) 

Bruce W. Fouke (Associate Professor) 

Albert T. Hsui (Professor) 

Thomas M. Johnson (Associate Professor) 

Susan W. Kieffer (Walgreen Professor) 

R. James Kirkpatrick (Professor and Executive 

Associate Dean) 

Jie Li (Assistant Professor) 

Craig C. Lundstrom (Assistant Professor) 

Stephen Marshak (Professor and Head) 

Xiaodong Song (Associate Professor) 

Department Affiliate 

Feng-Sheng Hu (Associate Professor) 

Academic Staff, Post-Docs, 
Visiting Staff 

George Bonheyo (Research Scientist) 
Jorge Frias-Lopez (Post-Doctoral Researcher) 
Justin Glessner (Geochemistry Specialist) 
Richard Hedin (Research Programmer) 
Holger Hellwig (Research Scientist) 
Eileen Herrstrom (Teaching Specialist) 
Xiaoqiang Hou (Post-Doctoral Researcher) 
Stephen Hurst (Research Programmer) 
Ingmar Janse (Post-Doctoral Researcher) 
Roy Johnson (Research Scientist) 
Audrey Kalinichev (Senior Research Scientist) 
Michael Lerche (Post-Doctoral Research 

Scientist) 
Ann Long (Teaching Lab Specialist) 
Xinli Lu (Post-Doctoral Researcher) 
Stephen Lyons (Newsletter Editor) 
Padma Padmanabhan (Post-Doctoral 

Researcher) 
Maik Pertermann (Post-Doctoral Researcher) 
Marc Reinholdt (Post-Doctoral Researcher) 
Bidhan Roy (Post-Doctoral Researcher) 
Carmen Sanchez- Valle (Post-Doctoral 

Researcher) 
Rob Sanford (Senior Research Scientist) 
Stanislav Sinogeikin (Research Scientist) 
Maoshuang Song (Post-Doctoral Researcher) 
Michael Stewart (Lecturer) 
Raj Vanka (Resource and Policy Analyst) 
Carine Vanpeteghem (Post-Doctoral 

Researcher) 
Jianwei Wang (Post-Doctoral Researcher) 
Zhaofeng Zhang (Visiting Scholar) 
Jianming Zhu (Visiting Scholar) 



Emeritus Faculty 

Thomas F. Anderson 
Daniel B. Blake 
Albert V. Carozzi 
Donald L. Graf 
Arthur F. Hagner 
Richard L. Hay 
Donald M. Henderson 
George deV. Klein 
Ralph L. Langenheim 
C. John Mann 
Alberto S. Nieto 
Philip A. Sandberg 

Adjunct Faculty 

Robert J. Finley 
Leon R. Follmer 
Dennis Kolata 
Morris W. Leighton 
Hannes Leetaru 
William Shilts 
Wolfgang Sturhahn 
M. Scott Wilkerson 

Library Staff 

Lura Joseph (Librarian) 
Sheila McGowan (Chief Library Clerk) 
Diana Walter (Library Technical 
Specialist) 

Staff 

Shelley Campbell (Staff Clerk) 

Barb Elmore (Administrative Secretary) 

Eddie Lane (Electronics Engineering 

Assistant) 
Michael Sczerba (Clerk) 

Graduate Students 

Min Jeoung Bae Dmitry Lakshtanov 



COURSES TAUGHT IN 2004 



Peter Berger 
Emily Berna 
Nicole Bettinardi 
Jon Brenizer 
Sarah Brown 
Kurtis Burmeister 
Bin Chen 
Scott Clark 
Melissa Farmer 
Theodore Flynn 
Lili Gao 
Alex Glass 
Chris Henderson 
Fang Huang 
Jennifer Jackson 
Matthew Kirk 
Jacquelyn Kitchen 
James Klaus 
Man Jae Kwon 



Qiang Li 
Yingchun Li 
Christopher Mah 
Jorge Marino 
Lei Meng 
Brent Olson 
Jungho Park 
George Roadcap 
Tom Schickel 
Xinlei Sun 
Jian Tian 
Lisa Tranel 
Tai-Lin Tseng 
Jianwei Wang 
Jingyun Wang 
Xiang Xu 
Zhaohui Yang 
Kelly Zimmerman 



Geol 100 


Planet Earth 


Geol 101 


Introduction to Physical Geology 


Geol 103 


Planet Earth (QR II) 


Geol 104 


Geology of the National Parks and 




Monuments 


Geol 107 


Physical Geology 


Geol 108 


Historical Geology 


Geol 110 


Exploring Planet Earth in the Field 


Geol 116 


Geology of the Planets 


Geol 117 


The Oceans 


Geol 118 


Natural Disasters 


Geol 143 


History of Life 


Geol 233 


Earth Materials and the 




Environment 


Geol 250 


Geology for Engineers 


Geol 280 


Environmental Geology 


Geol 301 


Geomorphology 


Geol 411 


Structural Geology and Tectonics 


Geol 317 


Geologic Field Methods, Western 




United States (Field Camp) 


Geol 432 


Mineralogy and Mineral Optics 


Geol 336 


Petrology and Petrography 


Geol 340 


Sedimentology and Stratigraphy 


Geol 452 


Introduction to Geophysics 


Geol 351 


Geophysical Methods for Geology, 




Engineering, and Environmental 




Sciences 


Geol 470- 


Introduction to Groundwater 


Geol 360 


Geochemistry 


Geol 397A1 


The Challenge of a Sustainable 




Earth System 


Geol 397C 


Paleobotany 


Geol 455 


Hydrogeology 


Geol 481 


Modeling Earth and 




Environmental Systems 


Geol 489 


Geotectonics 


Geol 531 


Structural Mineralogy 


Geol 591 


Current Research in Geoscience 


Geol 493F1 


Environmental Microbiology 


Geol 493K11 


Experimental Simulation of 




Earth's Interior 


Geol 493R2 


Data Analysis in Geosciences 


Geol 593K1 


Continental Lithosphere 



12 



r 



rch Grants Active in 2004 



Center for Advanced Cement-Based 

Materials 

R. James Kirkpatrick — Pore Solution-Solid 
Interactions in Cement Paste: Molecular 
Modeling of Fluids in Nanospaces 

Department of Energy 
Jay D. Bass — Consortium for Material 
Property Research in the Earth Sciences. 

Craig M. Bethke — Field-Constrained 
Quantitative Model of the Origin of 
Microbial and Geochemical Zoning in a 
Confined Fresh-Water Aquifer. 

R. James Kirkpatrick— Computational & 
Spectroscopic Investigations of Water- 
Carbon Dioxide Fluids & Surface Sorption 
Processes. 

Robert A. Sanford — Towards a More Complete 
Picture: Dissimilatory Metal Reduction by 
Anaerobacter Species 

Michigan State University 

Robert A. Sanford — Growth of Chlororespiring 

Bacteria to High Cell Densities for Use in 

Bioaugmentation 

NASA 

Susan W. Kieffer— Multicomponent, 

Multiphase H ; 0-CO: Thermodynamics and 

Fluid Dynamics on Mars 

National Science Foundation 
Jay D. Bass — Development of Laser Heating 
for Sound Velocity Measurements at High P 

&T. 

Jay D. Bass — Sound Velocities & Elastic 
Moduli of Minerals Mantle Pressures and 
Temperatures with Laser Heating. 

Jay D. Bass — Workshop on Phase Transitions 
and Mantle Discontinuities. 

Jay D. Bass — CSEDI: Collaborative Research: 
Composition and Seismic Structure of the 
Mantle Transition Zone. 

Jay D. Bass — Consortium for Material 
Property Research in the Earth Sciences. 

Jay D. Bass— Collaborative Research: 

Elasticity Grand Challenge of the COMPRES 
Initiative. 

Jay D. Bass — Polymorphism and Structural 
Transitions During Glass Formation. 

Daniel B. Blake— Global Climate Change & 
The Evolutionary Ecology of Antarctic 
Mollusks in the Late Eocene. 

Wang-Ping Chen— Collaborative Research: 
Lithospheric-Scale Dynamics of Active 
Mountain Building along the Himalayan- 
Tibetan Collision Zone. 

Bruce W. Fouke — Geobiological and the 
Emergence of Terraced Architecture during 
Carbonate Mineralization. 



Thomas M. Johnson — Collaborative Research: 
Field Investigation of SE Oxyanion 
Reduction & Se Sources in Wetlands: 
Application of Se Isotopes. 

Thomas M. Johnson— Quantification of Cr 
Reduction in Groundwater Using Cr Stable 
Isotopes. 

Thomas M. Johnson and Craig C. Lundstrom 

— Acquisition of Multicollector Inductively 
Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer. 

Thomas M. Johnson and Craig C. Lundstrom 

— Technical Support for the New MCTCP-MS 
Laboratory at University of Illinois at 
Urbana-Champaign 

Jie Li — Experimental Investigations of Solid- 
Liquid Boundary in the Earth Core. 

Craig C. Lundstrom — Observational 

Constraints on Melt-Rock Reactions during 
Melting of the Upper Mantle. 

Craig C. Lundstrom— Collaborative Research: 
Investigating the Processes and Timescales 
of Andesite Differentiation: A 
Comprehensive Petrological and 
Geochemical Study of Arenal Volcano, Costa 
Rica. 

Stephen Marshak — Collaborative Research: 
Emplacement of the Ferrar Mafic Idneous 
Province: A Pilot Study of Intrusive 
Architecture and Flow Directions in 
Southern Victoria Land. 

Xiaodong Song — Structure and Dynamics of 
Earth's Core and Lowermost Mantle. 

Xiaodong Song — CSEDI Collaborative 
Research: Observational and Theoretical 
Constraints on the Structure and Rotation of 
the Inner Core. 

Xiaodong Song — Probing the Earth's Core and 
Lowermost Mantle 

Office of Naval Research 

Bruce W. Fouke— The Role of Shipyard 
Pollutants in Structuring Coral Reef 
Microbial Communities: Monitoring 
Environmental Change and the Potential 
Causes of Coral Disease. 

University of Illinois Research Board 
Wang-Ping Chen — Anatomy of a Continental 

Collision Zone: Exploring New Views in 

Seismic Imaging. 

Albert Hsui — Poloidal-Toroidal Energy Partition 
and Rotation of Surface Plates on Earth. 

R. James Kirkpatrick — A Large Volume NMR 
Sample Probe for Chemical and Geochemical 
Research 

Xiaodong Song— Acquisition of Portable 
Broadband Digital Seismometers 



U.S. Department of Interior / 

U.S. Geological Survey 

Stephen Marshak - Geologic Mapping of the 
Rosendale Natural Cement Region, a Portion 
of the Northern Applachian Fold-Thrust 
Belt, Ulster County, New York. 



Degrees Conferred in 2004 



Bachelor of Science Degrees 

May 

Roger A. Bannister 
Michelle Ann Cox 
Kellie Lee Eaker 
Joannah Marie Metz 
Charles R. Mitsdarfer 
Leslie Nicole Savage 
Michael S. Schwartz 
Michael Patrick Welch 
Kelly Marie Zimmerman 

August 

Charles Schlesinger 

December 

Benjamin R. Escutia 
David J. Kim 

Master of Science Degrees 

May 

Brent V. Olson— [Craig Bethke) 

Eric R. Sikora — Fractionation of Chromium 
Isotopes by Microbial Cr(Vl) Reduction, 
(Thomas Johnson) 

Jingyun Wang— Elastic Properties of Hydrous 
Rmgwoodite at Ambient and High- 
Pressure Conditions, (Jay Bass) 

August 

Matthew F. Kirk— Bacterial Sulfate Reduction 
Limits Arsenic Concentration in 
Groundwater from a Glacial Aquifer 
System, (Craig Bethke) 

Xiang Xu— NMR Investigation of'Cs + and Cl- 
Complexation with Suwannee River 
Natural Organic Matter, (James 
Kirkpatrick) 

Doctor of Philosophy Degrees 

May 

George S. Roadcap — Geochemistry' and 
Microbiology of Extremely Alkaline 
(PH > 12) Ground Water in the Calumet 
Slag-Fill Aquifer, (Craig Bethke) 

Jianwei Wang— Molecular Structure. 
Diffusion Dynamics and Hydration 
Energetics of Nano-Confined Water and 
Water at Mineral Surfaces, (R. James 
Kirkpatrick) 



13 



List of Publications for 2004 



14 



Johnson, T.M., 2004, A review of mass- 
dependent fractionation of selenium 
isotopes and implications for other 
heavy stable isotopes. Chemical 
Geology: 204: 201-214. 

Daniel, I., Bass, J.D., Fiquet, G.. Cardon, 
H.. Zhang, J.Z., Hanfland, M., 2004, 
Effect of aluminum on the compress- 
ibility of silicate perovskite. Geoplys. 
Res. Lett.: 31: Art. No. L15608. 

Cygan, R.T., Liang, J. -J., and Kalinichev, 
A.G., 2004, Molecular models of 
hydroxide, oxyhydroxide, and clay 
phases and the development of a gen- 
eral force field. J. Physical Chemistry: 
B, 108: 1255-1266. 

Li, J., Struzhkin, V.V., Mao, H.K., Shu, J., 
Hemley, R..J., Fei, Y., Mysen, B., Dera, 
P.. Prakapenka, V., and Shen, G., 
2004, Electronic spin state of iron in 
lower mantle perovskite. P. Natl. Acad. 
Set USA: 101(39): 14027-14030. 

Kirk, M.F., Holm, T.R., Park.J., Jin, Q., 
Sanford, R.A., Fouke, B.W., and 
Bethke, CM., 2004, Bacterial sulfate 
reduction limits natural arsenic conta- 
mination of groundwater. Geology: 32: 
953956. 

Kim, Y., and Kirkpatrick, R. J., 2004, 31P 
NMR investigation of phosphate 
adsorbed on high-surface-area Al-oxy- 
hydroxide phases. Euro. J. Soil Science: 
55: 243-251. 

Chen, W.-R, 2004, What's so special 
about the Himalayas? Lets Go India 
and Nepal: 794. 

Dong, F.,D., Riahi, N., & Hsui, A.T., 
2004, On similarity waves in compact- 
ing media, (in) Horizons in World 
Physics: 244: 45-82, Nova Science 
Publishers, Inc., New York. 

Stevens, M. M., Andrews, A.H., Cailliet, 
G.M., Coale, K.H., and Lundstrom, 
C.C., 2004, Radiometric validation of 
age, growth, and longevity for the 
blackgill rockfish (Sebastes melanosto- 
mus), Fisheries Bulletin: 102: 711-722. 

Nicholas, J., Sinogeikin, S.V., Kieffer, J., 
Bass, J.D., 2004, A high pressure 
Brillouin scattering study of vitreous 
boron oxide up to 57 GPA. J. Non- 
Crystalline Solids, 349: 30-34. 

Frias-Lopez, J., Klaus, J., Bonheyo, G.T., 
and Fouke, B.W., 2004, The bacterial 
community associated with black 
band disease in corals. Applied and 
Environmental Microbiology: 70: 5055- 
5062. 

Keune, W., Ruckert, T., Sahoo, B., 
Sturhahn.W, Toellner, T.S., Alp, E.E., 
and Rohlsberger, R., 2004, Atomic 
vibrational density of states in crys- 
talline and amorphous Tblx Fex alloy 
thin 1ms studied by nuclear resonant 
inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS), 
J.Phys.: Condens. Matter. 16: S397. 

Johnson, T.M. and Bullen, T.D., 2004, 
Mass-dependent fractionation of sele- 
nium and chromium isotopes in low- 
temperature environments, (in) 
Geochemistry of Non-Traditional 
Stable Isotopes. Rev. Mineral: 55: 
Mineral. Soc. Amer., Washington, 
D.C., 289-317. 



Foit, F.F., Gavin, D.G., and Hu, F.S., 
2004, The tephra stratigraphy of two 
lakes in south-central British 
Columbia, Canada and its implica- 
tions for the mid-late Holocene vol- 
canic activity at Glacier Peak and 
Mount St. Helens, Washington, USA. 
Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences: 
41: 1401-1410. 

Tinkham, D.K., and Marshak, S., 2004, 
Precambrian dome-and-keel structure 
in the Penokean orogen near 
Republic, Upper Peninsula of 
Michigan: (in) Gneiss Domes in 
Orogeny: Geological Society of 
America Special Paper: 380: 321-338. 

Kieffer, S.W., 2004, From Yellowstone to 
Titan, with sidetrips to Mars, Io, 
Mount St. Helens and Triton, (in) 
Volcanic Worlds, 207-231, Praxis Press, 
London. 

Jackson, J.M., Sinogeikin, S.V., 
Carpenter, M.A., Bass. J.D., 2004, 
Novel phase transition in orthoensta- 
tite. American Mineralogist: 89: 239- 
245. 

Janse, I., Kardinaal, W.E.A., Meima, M., 
Snoek, J., Zwart, G., Fastner, J., 
Visser, P., 2004, Toxic and nontoxic 
Microcystis colonies in natural popu- 
lations can be differentiated on the 
basis of rRNA-intemal transcribed 
spacer gene diversity. Applied and 
Environmental Microbiology: 70(7): 
3979-3987. 

Chen. W.-P. and Chen, C.-Y. 2004, 
Seismogenic structures along conti- 
nental convergent zones: from 
oblique subduction to mature colli- 
sion. Tectonophys.: 385: 105-120. 

Wang, J., Kalinichev, A. G.. and 
Kirkpatrick, R. J.. 2004. Molecular 
structure of water confined in brucite. 
Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta: 68: 
3351-3365. 

Lin J.-F, Struzhkin, V., Mao, H.-K.. 
Hemley, R. J., Chow, P., Hu, M. Y, 
and Li J., 2004, Magnetic transition in 
compressed Fe3C from x-ray emission 
spectroscopy. Physical Review B: 70: 
212405. 

Fei Y, Li J., Hirose, K., Minarik, W„ Van 
Orman, J., Sanloup, C. Westrenen, 
W.V.. Komabayashi, T, and 
Funakoshi K.A., (2004) Critical evalu- 
ation of pressure scales at high tem- 
peratures by in-situ X-ray diffraction 
measurements. Phys. Earth Planet. 
Int.: 143-144, High Pressure Mineral 
Physics Special Volume, 515-526. 

Sinogeikin, S.V., Lakshtanov, D.L., 
Nicolas, J., and Bass. J.D., 2004, 
Sound velocity measurements on 
laser-heated MgO and A1203. Phys. 
Earth Planetary Interiors: 143-44: 575- 
586. 

Fei, Y, Van Orman, J., Li J., Westrenen, 
W. V, Sanloup, C, Minarik, W, 
Hirose, K., Komabayashi, T, Walter, 
M., and Funakoshi, K., 2004, 
Experimentally determined postspinel 
transformation boundary in Mg2Si04 
using MgO as an internal pressure 
standard and its geophysical implica- 
tions. J. Geophys. Res: 109 (B02305), 
doi:10.1029/2003JB002562. 



Harrison, M., Marshak, S., and McBride, 
J., 2004, The Lackawanna synclinori- 
um, Pennsylvania: a basement-con- 
trolled salt-collapse structure, partially 
modified by thin-skinned folding. 
Geological Society of America Bulletin: 
116: 1499-1514. 

Wang, H., Ambrose, S.H., and Fouke, 
B.W., 2004, Evidence of long-term 
seasonal forcing in rhizolith isotopes 
during the last glaciation. Geophysical 
Research Letter. 31: L13203, 1-4. 

Marshak, S., 2004, Arcs, Oroclines, 
Salients, and Syntaxes — The origin 
of map-view curvature in fold-thrust 
belts: (in) McClay, K.R., (ed.), Thrust 
Tectonics and Petroleum Systems: 
Am. Assoc, of Petroleum Geologists 
Memoir 82: 131-156. 

Wright, HE., Stephanova, I., Tian, J., 
Brown, T.A., and Hu, F.S. 2004, A 
chronological framework for the 
Holocene vegetational history of 
northwestern Minnesota: The Steel 
Lake pollen record. Quaternary 
Science Reviews: 23: 611-626. 

Nicholas, J.D., Sinogeikin, S.V., Kieffer, 
J., and Bass, J.D, 2004, Spectroscopic 
evidence of polymorphism in vitreous 
B203. Phys. Rev. Lett.: 92 (21): 
215701(4). 

Harrison, M., Marshak, S., and Onasch, 
C, 2004, Stratigraphic control of hot 
fluids on anthracitization, 
Lackawanna synclinorium, 
Pennsylvania: Tectonophysics: 378: 
85-103. 

Song, X.D., 2004. A review of Pn tomog- 
raphy of China, in The advancement 
of the seismology and the physics of 
Earth's interior in China (Y.T. Chen 
and C.Y Wang. Eds.). Seismology 
Press, Beijing. 

Song, X.D., Li, ST., Li, Y.C., Zheng, 
S.H., and Xie, X.N., 2004, Structure 
of lithospheric mantle and its implica- 
tions for major basins in China (in 
Chinese). Earth Sci.-J.China Univ. 
Geosci.: 29(5): 531-53S. 

Liang, C.T., Song, X.D., Huang, J.L., 
2004, Tomographic inversion of Pn 
travel-times in China, J. Geophys. 
Res.: 109: B11304. 

Sinogeikin, S.V., Zhang, J., and Bass, 
J.D. , 2004, Elasticity of Single Crystal 
and Polycrystalline MgSi03 Perovskite 
by Brillouin Spectroscopy. Geophysical 
Research Letter: 31: L06620. 

He, Q. and Sanford, R. A., 2004, Acetate 
threshold concentrations suggest 
varying energy requirements during 
anaerobic respiration by 
Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans. 
Appl. Environ. Microbiol,: 70: 6940- 
6943. 

Johnson, T. M. and Bullen, T. D. 2004, 
Selenium, iron and chromium stable 
isotope ratio measurements by the 
double isotope spike TIMS Method, in 
, P. DeGroot, ed., Handbook of Stable 
Isotope Analytical Techniques, Elsevier 
Science, Amsterdam. 29, 623-651 

He, Q. and Sanford. R. A., 2004, The 
generation of high biomass from 
chlororespiring bacteria using a con- 
tinuous fed-batch bioreactor. Appl. 



Microbiol, and Biotech.: 65: 377-382, 
2004.X-Sieve: CMU Sieve 2.2. 

Nelson, D.M., Hu, F.S., Tian, J., 
Stefanova, I., and Brown, T.A., 
2004, Response of C3 and C4 plants 
to middle-Holocene climatic varia- 
tion near the forest-prairie ecotone 
in Minnesota. Proceedings of the 
National Academy of Sciences USA: 
101: 562-567. 

Stewart, M.A., and Spivack, A. J., 
2004, The stable-chlorine isotope 
compositions of natural and anthro- 
pogenic materials. Review in 
Mineralogy and Geochemistry: 55: 
231-254. 

Hou, X., Strable, L. J., and Kirkpatrick, 
R.J., 2004, Formation of ASR gels 
and the roles of C-S-H and port- 
landite. Cement and Concrete 
Research: 34: 1683-1696. 

Sturhahn, W, 2004, Nuclear resonant 
spectroscopy. J. Phys. Condens. 
Matter: 16: S497. 

Tseng, T.-L., and Chen, W.-R, 2004, 
Contrasts in seismic waves speeds 
and density across the 660-km dis- 
continuity beneath the Philippine 
and the Japan Seas. J. Geophys. 
Res.: 109: (12 pp.), B04302. 

Leu, B.M., Zgierski, M.Z., Wyllie, 
G.R.M., Scheidt, W.R., Sturhahn, 
W, Alp, E.E., Durbin, S.M., and 
Sage, J.T., 2004, Quantitative 
Vibrational Dynamics of Iron in 
Nitrosyl Porphyrins. 
J.Am.Chem.Soc: 126:4211. 

Kieffer, S.W., 2004, COMMENT on 
Debris-fan reworking during low- 
magnitude floods in the Green River 
canyons of the eastern Uinta 
Mountains, Colorado and Utah. 
Geology, on-line forum. 

Papandrew, A.B., Yue, A.F., Fultz, B., 
Halevy, I., Sturhahn, W, Toellner, 
T.S., Alp, E.E., and Mao, H-K, 2004, 
Vibrational modes in nanocrys- 
talline iron under high pressure. 
Phys.Rev. B: 69, 144301. 

Frias-Lopez, J., Bonheyo, G.T., and 
Fouke, B.W., 2004, Identification of 
differential gene expression in bac- 
teria associated with coral black 
band disease using RNA-arbitrarily 
primed PCR. Applied and 
Environmental Microbiology: 70: 
3687-3694. 

Sturhahn, W, L'abbe, C, and Toellner 
T.S., 2004, Exo-interferometric 
phase determination in nuclear res- 
onant scattering. Europhys. Lett.: 66: 
506. 

Lynch, J. A., Hollis, J.L., and Hu, F.S., 
2004, Climatic and landscape con- 
trols of the boreal-forest fire regime: 
Holocene records from Alaska. 
Journal of Ecology: 92: 477-489. 

Lin, J-R, Fei, Y, Sturhahn, W., Zhao, 
J., Mao, H-K., Hemley, R.J., 2004, 
Magnetic transition and sound 
velocities of Fe3S at high pressure: 
implications for Earth and planetary 
cores. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett.: 226: 
33. 



Struzhkin, V. V., Mao, H-K, Mao, W. L., 
Hemley, R. J. Sturhahn, W, Alp, E E., 
L'ahbe, C, Hu, M. Y., and Errandonea, 
D., 2004, Phonon Density of States and 
Elastic Properties of Fe-based Materials 
under Compression. Hyper ne Int.: 153. 

Wang, J., Kalinichev, A. G., and 

Kirkpatrick, R. J., 2004. Molecular mod- 
eling of the 10 A phase at subduction 
zone conditions. Earth and Planetary 
Science Letters: 111: 517-527. 

Shen, G., Sturhahn, W., Alp, E.E., Zhao, J., 
Toellner, T.S., Prakapenka, V.B., Meng, 
Y., Mao , H.-K., 2004, Phonon density of 
states in iron at high pressures and high 
temperatures. Pays. Chem. Minerals: 31 : 
353. 

Zhang, C.L., Fouke, B.W., Bonheyo, G.T., 
White, D., Huang, Y, and Romanek, 
C.S., 2004, Lipid biomarkers and carbon 
isotopes of modern travertine deposits 
(Yellowstone National Park, USA): 
Implications for biogeochemical dynam- 
ics in hot-spring systems, Geochimica et 
Cosmochimica Acta: 68: 3157-3169. 

L'abbe, C., Meersschaut, J., Sturhahn, W. 
Jiang, J.S., Toellner, T.S., Alp, E.E., 
Bader, S.D., 2004, Nuclear Resonant 
Magnetometry and its Application to 
Fe/Cr Multilayers. Phys. Rev. Lett.: 93: 
037201. 

Lin, J-F, Sturhahn, W., Zhao, J., Shen, G., 
Mao, H-K, and Hemley, R. J., 2004, 
Absolute temperature measurement in a 
laser-heated diamond anvil cell. 
Geophys. Res. Lett.: 31: L14611 

Kobayashi, H., Kamimura, T., Alfe, D., 
Sturhahn, W, Zhao, J., and Alp, E. E., 
2004, Phonon Density of States and 
Compression Behavior in Iron Sulfide 
under Pressure. Phys. Rev. Lett.: 93: 
195503. 

Zhao, J., Sturhahn, W, Lin, J-F Shen, G., 
Alp, E. E„ and Mao, H-K., 2004, Nuclear 
Resonant Scattering at High Pressure 
and High Temperature. High Pressure 
Research: 24: 447. 

Wilkerson, M.S., Wilson, J.M., Poblet, J., 
and Fischer, M.P., 2004, DETACH: an 
Excel spreadsheet to simulate 2-D cross 
sections of detachment folds. Computers 
& Geosciences: 30(9-10): 1069-1077. 

Pope, K.O.. Kieffer, S.W., and Ames, D.E., 
2004, Empirical and theoretical compar- 
isons of the Chicxulub and Sudbury 
impact structures. Meteoritics and 
Planetary Science: 39 (1): 97-116. 

Kieffer, S.W., 2004, An earth and environ- 
mental science perspective on creativity. 
Report to The Higher Education 
Academy's Imaginative Curriculum pro- 
ject, co-author with 11 Earth and 
Environmental Science teachers. 

Wang. J., Kalinichev, A. G., and 

Kirkpatrick, R. J., 2004, Molecular mod- 
eling of the 10 A phase at subduction 
zone conditions. Earth and Planetary 
Science Letters: 222: 517-527. 

Janse, 1., Bok, J., and Zwart, G., 2004, A 
simple remedy against artifactual double 
bands in denaturing gradient gel elec- 
trophoresis. J. Microbiol. Methods: 57: 
279-281 



Tepley F. J. , Lundstrom, C. C, Sims, 
K., and Hekinian, R., 2004, U-series 
Disequilibria in MORB From the 
Garrett Transform and Implications 
for Mantle Melting. Earth and 
Planetary Science Letters: 223: 79- 
97. 

Chen, W.-R, and Yang, Z.-H., 2004, 
Earthquakes beneath the Himalayas 
and Tibet: Evidence for strong 
lithospheric mantle. Science: 304: 
1949-1952. 

Kaufman et al., including Hu, F.S., 
2004, Holocene thermal maximum 
in the western Arctic (0 to 180° W). 
Quaternary Science Reviews: 23: 
529-560. 

Kirkpatrick, R. J., Kalinichev, A., 
Wang, J., Hou, X., and Amonette, J, 
2004, Molecular modeling of the 
vibrational spectra of surface and 
interlayer species of layered double 
hydroxides and other layer-structure 
materials, in The Application of 
Vibrational Spectroscopy to Clay 
Minerals and Layered Double 
Hydroxides. CMS Workshop 
Lectures; Kloprogge, J. T, Ed.; The 
Clay Minerals Society: Aurora, CO, 
2004; 13: 239-285. 

Brown, D. E., Toellner, T. S„ Sturhahn, 
W, Alp, E.E., Hu, M., Kruk, R., 
Rogacki, K. and Can, PC ., 2004, 
Partial Phonon Density of States of 
Dysprosium and its Compounds 
Measured Using Inelastic Nuclear 
Resonance Scattering. Hyper ne Int. : 
153: 17. 

Ellis A. S., Johnson T. M„ and Bullen, 
T. D., 2004, Using chromium stable 
isotope ratios to quantify Cr(VI) 
reduction: lack of sorption effects. 
Env. Set Technol: 38: 3604-3607 

Jackson, J.M., Zhang, J., and Bass, 
J.D., 2004, Sound velocities of alu- 
minous MgSi03 perovskite: 
Implications for aluminum hetero- 
geneity in Earth's lower mantle. 
Geophysical Research Letters: 31(10): 
Art. No. L10614. 

Hurst, S. D., Karson, J. A., 2004, Side- 
scan sonar along the north wall of 
the Hess Deep Rift: Processing, tex- 
ture analysis, and geologic ground 
truth on an oceanic escarpment. J. 
Geophys. Res.: 109. 

Blackman, D. K., Karson, J.A., Kelley, 
D.S., Cann, J.R., Fruh-Green. G.L., 
Gee, J.S., Hurst, S.D., John, B.E., 
Morgan, J., Nooner, S.L., Ross, 
D.K., Schroeder. T.J., & Williams, 
E.A., 2004, Geology of the Atlantis 
Massif (Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 30fte 
N): Implications for the evolution of 
an ultramafic oceanic core complex. 
Marine Geophysical Researches: 23: 
443-469. 

Song, X.D., 2004, A review of Pn 
tomography of China, in Advances 
(in) Seismology and Physics of 
Earth's Interior in China. 
Seismological Press, Beijing, 321- 
345. 



Colloquium Speakers fop Spring and Fall 2004 



Andre Pugin, ISGS 

Architecture of tunnel-channels and buried valleys in 

previously glaciated areas, hydrogeological implications 
Eric FerreC, Southern Illinois University 

Magnetic anisotropy of mantle peridotites: example of the Twin 

Sisters Dunite, Washington State 
Przemek Dera, Carnegie Institution of Washington 

Structural aspects of pressure-induced phase transitions 
Steve Van der Hoven, Illinois State University 

Radiogenic ' He as a Tracer for Hydrogeologic Processes in 

Buried Valley Aquifers 
Jorge Frias-Lopez, University of Illinois 

Microbiology of coral diseases: The ecology of black band disease 

[BBDj 
Basil Tikoff, University of Wisconsin, Madison 

Fabric and flow in the mantle and mountain building 
Nicole Gasparini, Yale University 

Modeling Erosion in Mountain Rivers 
Linda Bonnell, AAPG Distinguished Lecturer 

Sealed, Bridged, or Open - A New Theory of Quartz 

Cementation in Fractures 
Linda Ivany, Syracuse University 

The ABCs of Paleobiology: Insights from the Geochemistry of 

Accretionary Biogenic Carbonates 
Dan Blake, University of Illinois 

Penguins, Sea Stars, and Moss Animals 
Jeff Post, Smithsonian Institution 

Manganese Oxide Minerals: Soils to Synchrotrons 
Jim Kirkpatrick, University of Illinois 

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Molecular Modeling Studies 

of Minerals and Mineral-fluid Interactions 
James W. Kirchner, University of California, Berkeley 

A Spectral View of Watershed Processes 
Thome Lay, University of California, Santa Cruz 

Earth's Hidden Boundary Layer: Mysteries at the Base of the 

Mantle 
Marc Reinholdt, University of Illinois 

Clay minerals: synthesis, structural spectroscopic characteriza- 
tions and clay/polymer nanocomposites elaboration 
Suzan van der Lee, Northwestern University 
Seismic constraints on thickness, rigidity, temperature and 

composition of the lithosphere and underlying mantle 
Eric Calais, Purdue University 

Continental Deformation in Asia: New Insights from GPS 

Measurements and Deformation Models 
Jim Best, University of Leeds 

The geomorphology and sedimentology of a big braided river: 

flow, form and management issues in the Jamuna River, 

Bangladesh 
Jennifer Roberts, University of Kansas 

Guess who's coming to dinner - The consequences of nutrient- 
driven silicate weathering by microbial consortia 
Ann Budd, University of Iowa 

Species boundaries in reef corals: Insight from the fossil record 
Jeremy Fein, University of Notre Dame 

Quantifying bacteria-water-rock adsorption reactions using a 

surface complexation approach 
Feng Sheng Hu, University of Illinois 

Drought History of the Midwest 
Jeff Catalano, Argonne National Laboratory 

Probing Uranium Speciation in Contaminated Sediments and at 

the Mineral-Water Interface 
Haydn Murray, Indiana University 

Kaolin Occurrences, Genesis and Utilization 
Raymond Arvidson, Washington University, St. Louis 

The Mars Exploration Rover Mission 
Robert W. Howarth, Cornell University 

Human Alteration of the Nitrogen Cycle at Regional Scales: 

Causes, Consequences, and Steps towards Solutions 




15 



Students Jared Frieberg, 
Emily Berna, Nicole 
Bettinardi, Ted Flynn, and 
Josh Carron on Utah's 
San Juan River. The trip 
capped oft Professor Craig 
Lundstrom's Geology 
415/515. "Geology of the 
Southwest" class. 




The Department's new state- 
of-the-art Inductively Coupled 
Plasma Mass Spectrometer 
(ICPMS) was installed in 
December of last year. One 
of only 50 in the world, the 
ICPMS was purchased with a 
grant from the National 
Science Foundation and will 
be used for various geo- 
chemistry analyses. Pictured 
behind the spectrometer are, 
from left to right; Scott Clark. 
Craig Lundstrom, Justin 
Glessner, Tom Johnson and 
Emily Berna. 



Count me in! 



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DXolriSut TY 0F Illinois at Urbana 
006 V 

School of Earth, Society, and Environment 



During the Fall term of 2005, the facul- 
ties of three departments, Geology, 
Geography, and Atmospheric Science, 
voted in favor of establishing an alliance 
which will be called the School of Earth, 
Society, and Environment. This new 
School will be a component of the 
College of Liberal Arts & Sciences and 
will not replace the Departments—each 
department will continue to exist and 
each will have a Head, an independent 
major, and its own graduate program. 
The purpose of the School is four- 
fold. First, it increases the leverage of 
each department in the competition for 
campus resources. Significantly, the 
three Earth-related departments are the 
only science departments on campus 
that are not currently part of a school— 
the School structure is well established 
at UIUC, and works quite well. Second, 
by developing an alliance, there will be 
opportunities for new collaborations, 



new research centers, and new interdis- 
ciplinary programs to develop. As an 
example, the Center for Water as a 
Complex Environmental System, has 
already been established, and involves 
faculty from all three departments. 
Third, the School can serve as a basis 
for coordinating course offerings, and 
for anchoring an interdisciplinary major. 
This major will be in addition to exist- 
ing majors, and may appeal to a broader 
group of liberal arts students. Finally, 
the School will provide students with a 
larger community of peers with whom 
to interact while they are at Illinois — 
this will increase social opportunities. 
Many steps still need to happen 
before the School becomes formally 
established, but we are optimistic that it 
will make UIUC an even better institu- 
tion at which to study the Earth. If 
things go as planned, the School should 
be in place by the end of 2007. 



Champaign 

New Endowments 
for Geology: 

Highlights of the GeoScience 
2005 Campaign 

Five years ago, the Department embarked 
on an ambitious campaign, GeoScience 
2005, to build the Department's endow- 
ment. These funds prove essential for the 
Department to not only maintain existing 
services and programs, but to flourish. 
The campaign effort was greatly assisted 
by the GeoThrust Committee, under the 
Chairmanship of Bill Soderman (M.S. '60, 
Ph.D. '62J. The other members of the 
Committee are: Jim Baroffio (Ph.D. '64), 
David Beach (B.S. 73), Pat Bickford (M.S. 
'58; Ph.D. '60), Les Clutter (BS. '48), Norb 
Cygan (B.S. '54; M.S. '56; Ph.D. '62), Ed 
Franklin (B.S. '56), John Garino (B.S. '57), 
Jim Granath (B.S. 71; M.S. 73), Brud 
Leighton (B.S. '47). Tricia Santogrossi (B.S. 
74; M.S. 77), and Jack Threet (A.B., '51). 

(continued on page 2) 



Overhead Dollars Brought to the University by Geology Faculty 



Department of Geology faculty, as part of their job, seek research 
grants from sources outside the University. These grants, which 
come from agencies such as the National Science Foundation, the 
Department of Energy, and NASA, support the salaries of graduate 
students and hourly undergraduates, provide funds for the purchase of 
; laboratory equipment and for field expenses. Significantly, 52 percent 
of the budget of the University comes from grants to faculty (vs. 17 per- 
p cent from the State of Illinois). Put another way, faculty research grants 
.. provide three times more money to the University than does the State, 
* and more than twice as much as does tuition. About a third of each 
grant is "overhead" that is paid directly to the University — only two- 
thirds can be used by faculty for research activities. In the past five 
years, the amount of overhead that geology faculty have generated has 
increased by a factor of four, even though the number of faculty has 
decreased by 25 percent. The graph shows this growth. 



700- 



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Greetings 



Letter From The Head 



As this Year-In-Review goes to press (a lit- 
tle on the late side, this year— sorry!), 
we've come to the close of a very busy 
season that bodes well for the future. 
There are a number of significant changes 
on the horizon, some of which we discuss 
in this newsletter. Perhaps the biggest 
change will be the establishment of the 
School of Earth, Society, and Environment. 
Right from the start, I wish to emphasize 
that the School does not replace the 
Department! The Department of Geology 
will continue to exist, with its current 
structure, its traditions, its major, and its 
graduate program. The School is simply an 
alliance of three departments to create an 
entity that has greater visibility and lever- 
age on campus, and will set the stage for 
interesting new research and teaching col- 



laborations. We have already benefited from 
the School development process by receiv- 
ing authorization for new faculty searches 
that probably would not have happened 
otherwise. The title of the School reflects 
some of the common interests of the three 
departments, but does not imply that the 
Department of Geology is abandoning its 
traditional strengths. For example, our last 
two hires have been prominent sedimentary 
geologists. (Dr. Jim Best, the most recent 
hire, will become the first Threet Professor 
of Sedimentary Geology in August, 2006.) 
With these hires, our Department has 
reestablished one of the most prominent 
sedimentary programs in the country. This 
development is timely, considering the 
increased interest that oil companies have in 
hiring our graduates, in the wake of an 



upturn in exploration. Other positive devel- 
opments that you will read about in this 
issue include the success of the GeoScience 
2005 Endowment Campaign. Jay Bass 
suggested the campaign in 1998, when 
he was Head. The campaign formally began 
in 2000, and ran through 2005, ultimately 
raising over $3.1 M dollars. I have greatly 
enjoyed working with all who participat- 
ed! Also, student numbers have been 
increasing (with a 75% increase in the past 
couple of years), grant dollars have been 
increasing (with a four-fold increase since 
2000), and the number of faculty is increas- 
ing. There's even some face-lifting in the 
Natural History Building— the halls are 
getting new paint and new lighting, even 
though the floors still creak. Please read on, 

to learn more. 

—Steve Marshak 



New Endowments fop Geology (continued from page u 



The committee set a goal of raising 
S3 million. With the assistance of staff 
from the University of Illinois Foundation 
(especially Natalie Handley), and the 
LAS Advancement Office (especially, 
Paul Osterhout, Pam Christman, David 
Bruhns, and Patrick Hayes), we succeed- 
ed in raising more than $3.1 million — the 
campaign was indeed a success! We are 
very grateful to all who participated— 
there were hundreds of individual gifts. 
Thank you! 

Here are examples of some of the 
generous gifts we received: 

• Ed and Alison Franklin have set up an 
endowment to support field camp and 
other field experiences. A bequest of 
funds in the future will help with 
many other needs as well. 

• Eric and Kathy Johnson established 
the W Hilton Johnson Professorship 
of Geology, in memory of Eric's 
father, the late Prof. Johnson. Prof. 
Gary Parker is the first to hold this 
honor. Joyce Johnson, Hilt's wife, also 
established a field fund to support 
field trips. 



The Jack C. and Richard L. Threet 
Professorship of Sedimentary Geology, 
spearheaded by Jack Threet, has been 
established. The first Threet Professor 
will be James L. Best, who will join 
the Department from the University of 
Leeds (UK) in August, 2006. 
Bill Soderman (M.S. '60, Ph.D. '62) 
has endowed two graduate fellow- 
ships, the Bluestem Fellowship and the 
Evergreen Fellowship. These will allow 
us to continue attracting strong stu- 
dents to our graduate program. 
Brud Leighton has continued to build 
the Leighton endowment to support 
research activities of graduate stu- 
dents. The bestowing of Leighton 
awards has become a much appreciat- 
ed annual event. 

Thanks to a generous lead gift by Jim 
Baroffio, and gifts from many others, 
the Department can now offer the 
Wanless Fellowship, established in 
honor of the late Prof. Harold Wanless, 
to outstanding graduate students. 
Roscoe Jackson (M.S. 73, Ph.D. 75) 
has continued to build a strong 
endowment for the support of gradu- 



ate students and graduate research. 
Roscoe's generosity helped several stu- 
dents complete research projects. 
• Glenn and Susan Buckley established 
an endowment to bring in outstanding 
guest speakers to the department in 
environmental geology. We have now 
hosted two Buckley Lecturers, so far. 
Prof. Jim Kirkpatrick has also estab- 
lished an endowment to support visit- 
ing colloquium speakers. 
These gifts and many others— we 
wish we had space to list them all- 
demonstrate the continued loyalty of our 
alumni and friends. To all who con- 
tributed—at all levels— please accept the 
Department's sincere gratitude. 



Year in Review is published once a year by the 
Department of Geology, University of Illinois 
at Urbana-Champaign, to summarize the 
activities and accomplishments within the 
department and news from alumni and friends. 
Department Head: Stephen Marshak 

(smarshak@uiuc.edu) 
Administrative Secretary: Barb Elmore 

(belmore@uiuc.edu) 

Editor: Stephen J. Lyons (sjlyons@uiuc.edu) 
http://www.geology.uiuc.edu 



DEPARTMENT NEWS 



Investiture Ceremony Honors R. James Kirkpatrick and Gary Parker 



On October 13, 2005, R. James 
Kirkpatrick was invested as the R.E. 
Grim Professor, and Gary Parker was 
invested as the W.H. Johnson Professor 
in a ceremony that was attended by 
Dean Sarah Mangelsdorf and by Provost 
Jesse Delia, as well as by many faculty 
and students from throughout the 
campus. 

Illinois alumnus R. James 
Kirkpatrick (Ph.D., 72) became an assis- 
tant professor in the Department of 
Geology in 1977. He moved through the 
ranks, and served as Head of the 
Department from 1988 to 1997. 
Currently, he is the Executive Associate 
Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and 
Sciences. Kirkpatrick continues his 
active research program in many aspects 
of mineral science, studying a variety of 
materials ranging from clay, to igneous 
glasses, to concrete, using NMR spec- 
troscopy and molecular dynamics calcu- 
lations. Most recently, his research group 
has investigated the structure and 
dynamics of water and ionic species on 
the surface of minerals. He is the author 
of more than 200 research papers and 
the editor of three books. Prof. 
Kirkpatrick has won the Dana Medal of 
the Mineralogical Society of America, 
and the Branauer Award from the 
American Ceramic Society. 

The R.E. Grim Professorship in 
Geology was established in 1977 
through the generosity of the late Prof. 




From left to right: Department Head Stephen Marshak, R. James Kirkpatrick, Gary Parker. Katherine 
Johnson. Eric Johnson, Dean Sarah Mangelsdorf, Provost Jesse Delia 



Grim and his wife Frances. Prof. Grim 
was renowned around the world for his 
work in clay mineralogy and industrial 
mineralogy. Prof. Richard Hay, who 
passed away in February, was the first 
holder of the professorship. 

Professor Gary Parker came to UIUC 
in 2005, after serving many years on the 
faculty at the University of Minnesota. 
He holds joint appointments between 
the Department of Geology and the 
Department of Civil and Environmental 
Engineering, recognizing his ties to both 
areas. Prof. Parker's research interests 
focus on fluvial geomorphology, and on 
the process of how flowing water inter- 
acts with sediment. This research has 
many practical applications and has 
been used to analyze disposal of mine- 



Geology Majors on the Rise At UIUC 



I 



n the last three years, the number of majors in the Department of Geology has 
increased from the mid-30s to over 60. This is fortunate, because according to a 



recent article by the Associated Press, recruiting on U.S. campuses for geologists 
has begun to increase. We expect that there will be increasing demand for our grad- 
uates. Total U.S. geoscience degrees approached 10,000 annually in the early 1980s, 
but then crashed to about one-third of that number by 1991. Last year, about 2,400 
undergraduate and 1,500 graduate degrees were granted nationwide. 



derived sediment, to access the risk of 
pipelines to damage by submarine debris 
flows, to determine how river channel 
migration can affect the design of water 
intakes, and to predict the consequences 
of dam removal on rivers. Prof. Parker 
has rapidly put UIUC at the forefront of 
such work by organizing a major inter- 
national conference that was held on 
campus last fall. 

The W. Hilton Johnson Professorship 
in Geology was established in 2000 and 
supports the research and teaching of 
faculty in the Department. The professor- 
ship was created through a generous gift 
by Professor Johnson's son and daugh- 
ter-in-law, Eric M. and Katherine J. 
Johnson. It recognizes the service of 
Prof. Johnson [M.S. '61, Ph.D. '62) to the 
department over many years. Prof. 
Johnson was a faculty member from 
1963 to 1995, specializing in the areas of 
geomorphology, quaternary geology and 
glacial geology. He was Director of the 
University Geology Field Camp for sever- 
al years and was acting Head of the 
Department in 1995. Hilt passed away in 
1997. The Department was delighted to 
welcome Eric and Katherine, and Joyce 
Johnson. Hilt's wife, to the investiture 
ceremony. 



ISGS Centennial Series Brings All-Star Speakers to Campus 



As part of the Centennial 
Celebration of the Illinois State 
Geological Society, several interna- 
tionally recognized scientists and 
science writers came to Urbana- 
Champaign during the 2005-2006 
academic year to make public pre- 
sentations and interact with the 
ISGS staff and with Department of 
Geology students and faculty on 
the University campus. 

The list of distinguished 
speakers included: Dr. Harrison 
Schmitt, the only geologist to have 
walked on the Moon; Kevin 
Krajiick, author of Barren Lands, a 
study of the search for diamonds in 
Canada; Richard Alley, a paleoclimatolo- 




Dr. William Shilts, Chief of the ISGS, and 
Adjunct Professor, presents Harrison Schmitt 
with an ISGS Centennial Issue rock hammer. 



gist working in Antartica; Paul 
Hoffman of Harvard University, 
a leading proponent of the 
snowball Earth hypothesis; 
Scott Tinker, Director of the Texas 
Bureau of Economic Geology, 
Patrick Lehey, Acting Director of 
the USGS; and Simon Winchester, 
author of The Crack at the Edge 
of the World. 

The talks attracted not only 
ISGS and Department of Geology 
staff and students, but also the 
general public. The level of 
understanding of Earth-related 
issues in the Champaign-Urbana com- 
munity increased substantially as a 
result of this series. 



Around the Department 



Professor Sue Kieffer has been 
appointed as professor in the Center for 
Advanced Study, one of the highest 
forms of recognition the U of I campus 
bestows on faculty members for out- 
standing scholarship. The 24 CAS pro- 
fessors, are selected from throughout 
the campus. They continue to serve as 
full members of their home departments, 
while participating in a variety of formal 
and informal activities organized by the 
center. Kieffer is a member of the 
National Academy of Sciences and a fel- 
low of the American Academy of Arts 
and Sciences. Other honors she has 
received include a MacArthur "Genius" 
Fellowship, and the Geological Society 
of America's Day Medal. 

Professor Craig Bethke has won the 

American Association of Petroleum 
Geologist's "Division of Environmental 
Geology Research Award." This award 
recognizes Craig's accomplishments in 
understanding groundwater environmen- 
tal issues, such as arsenic contamina- 
tion. Craig was also installed as a U of I 
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 
Romano Fellow. 



Professor Wang-Ping Chen will be serving 
a three-year term (until June 2009) on the 
Advisory Committee of COMPRES 
(Consortium for Materials Properties 
Research in Earth Sciences). This commit- 
tee plays a major role in guiding research 
on the Earth's interior. Professor Jay Bass 
served as President of COMPRES two 
years ago. 

Department Head and Professor Stephen 
Marshak hosted Cameroonian geologist 
Dr. Jean Pierre Tchouankoue to examine 
similarities in the Precambrian crust in 
Brazil and Africa. Tchouankoue was 
delighted to have access to essential tech- 
nology that are taken for granted at UIUC 
but don't exist in Africa. 

Geochemistry Specialist Justin Glessner 

and his wife announce the arrival of their 
second son, Leonardo James Glessner, 
born on November 3, 2005, weighing 8 lbs. 
4 oz. and measuring 21" long. 

Adjunct Professors Rob Finley and 
Hannes Leetaru received a $19 million 
grant to work on carbon sequestration at 
the Illinois State Geological Survey. 

Geology senior Brittany Guzzo received 
an NAGT/USGS fellowship, based on her 
performance at field camp. The fellowship 



provides employment at the USGS in 
Reston. 

Professor Chu-Yung Chen has taken on 
the responsibilities of Associate Head of 
the Geology Department. In this capacity, 
she oversees the academic programs in 
the Department. 

Jennifer Jackson (Ph.D. 2005) has 

accepted a tenure-track faculty position 
in geophysics at Cal Tech. Jennie worked 
with Professor Jay Bass. 

Letter from retired Department 
Professor Albert Hsui 

I am having a great time here in Hong 
Kong. I have a lot of time to do things 
that I never had time to do before. I visit- 
ed my father's home village in the PRC 
last week. It was nice to be able to trace 
my roots. At the same time, I learned 
how devastating the cultural revolution 
was. After the visit, we had a global 
reunion of my high school. Hong Kong is 
such a magnet that everyone seems to 
come through here. I met a lot of friends 
whom I have not seen for decades. It 
was great to reconnect with my past. 

In addition, I am doing research to 
help people here to evaluate earthquake 
and tsunami potential. 




Grad Student Combines Biology and Geology (and a little Chopin) 




Emily Wisseman 



Geomicrobiologist 
Emily Wisseman 
laughs when she 
describes a typical 
field trip with her 
more geology-minded 
colleagues. 
"When we're out in 
the field the geologists 
always start by look- 
ing at the rocks. 'Hey look at this cool rock.' 
OK, so there is a plant over there, too. But 
look at this rock!' 

"I come at it saying, "Hey, look at this 
cool plant! Look at what all these microbes 
are doing to the rock.' It's getting at the 
same idea but from a different perspective." 
The graduate student from Champaign 
comes to geology by way of a bachelor's of 
science in biology from Illinois Wesleyan, a 
four-month stint as a science teacher at 
Normal Community West High School and 
18 years of classical piano training. (She 
plays Chopin when she can't sleep.) 



But it was while doing some research 
for Associate Professor Bruce Fouke that 
Emily caught the geology bug. While at U 
of I she has worked on Fouke's 
Yellowstone project. "We looked at how 
the different sediments you see in 
Yellowstone build up and how microbes 
interact with them." 

For her master's thesis she will travel 
to Curacao to study coral reefs. (Oh, she's 
an experienced diver, too.) Emily is quick 
to say that coral reefs are basically big 
rocks: calcium carbonate. "Corals are a 
really important geologic formation." 
Under the guidance of Fouke, Emily will 
look at the deadly black-band disease that 
affects this planet's corals. 

"The Department is pretty flexible 
about letting me incorporate some biology 
classes and some geology ones. I'm taking 
biochemistry and sedimentology and, 
oddly enough, they do have overlaps. 
They both tie into what I want to do. 
Geology is really getting in my system. 



I like the science that lets you go out and 
see it." 

Emily says she sees a fascinating 
connection between biology and geology. 
"When you mix them together you get 
the bigger picture. Geologists remind me 
to look very carefully at the rock systems, 
which are the basis for the biology you 
have on top of that. And I'm like, 'Hey, 
look at what's going on that's affecting 
the rocks.' The idea that biology affects 
geology is really a newer idea, and incor- 
porating microbiology into geologic 
processes and thinking about that is a 
new and upcoming field. 

"Geology is very interdisciplinary so 
it almost helps you to come at it with a 
completely different background. It's like 
learning a whole new vocabulary. 1 really 
like the big picture science. Geologists 
look at large rock formations and try to 
understand how they came to be. Some 
of the answers may come form studying 
what takes place in a Petri dish." 



Internship at ISGS Pays Dividends For Undergraduate 




m 



rien Jared 
Freiburg arrived 
at his final semester 
in the Department 
of Geology he didn't 
know exactly what 
he was going to do 
upon graduation. 
Then he called 
Hannes Leetaru 
(Ph.D. '97), a 
Project Scientist at the Illinois State 
Geological Survey and Adjunct Associate 
Professor in the Department of Geology. 
Jared admits his timing was perfect. 
Hannes said, "Wow! I just got a grant 
and I need someone," so Jared went in 
for an interview and landed the job. 

Leetaru is involved in the CO, 
sequestration project underway at the 



Jared Freiburg 



ISGS. Researchers are looking into ways 
to pump the CO, into old oil wells so it 
stays out of the atmosphere, and 
decreases the rate of global warming. 
The porous rock traps the CO, below the 
ground surface. Jared's role during his 
internship was to digitize old well-log 
data. Once in digital form, the data can 
be used by sophisticated computer pro- 
grams to produce sub-surface structure- 
contour and isopach maps. 

Jared's work at the ISGS led to the 
production of a senior thesis entitled, 
"Structural Symmetry of Subsurface 
Folds in the Southern Illinois Basin." 
Leetaru and Department of Geology 
Head Steve Marshak are co-advisors. 
This work discusses the relationship 
between the geometry of sub-surface 
folds and the geometry of faults whose 



motion led to the formation of the folds. 

Jared credits the internship at ISGS 
with his landing of a full-time job as a 
field assistant with the Connecticut- 
based mining company, Unimin. The 
company is involved in similar de-gasifi- 
cation projects, so the interviewers were 
impressed with Jared's background. 

"I'll actually be based out of 
Champaign Urbana. Unimin has an 
office in Ottawa, Illinois and they will fly 
me to all the base sites," Jared says. 

Jared recommends all students in 
the Department of Geology look carefully 
at internship opportunities at the ISGS. 
"There's a wealth of knowledge of geolo- 
gy over at ISGS and experts who are 
reallv willing to work with students." 



Professor Xiaodong Song Confirms Super-rotation of the Earth's Core 




|n the 2003 sci- 
I ence fiction flick 
The Core, a team 
i^j of scientists drills 
— - to the center of 
_J the Earth in an 

attempt to restart 
the Earth's core, 
which has myste- 

Xiaodong Song riousl y stopped 
spinning, altering 
the planet's magnetic field and setting 
off catastrophic— if unrealistic— results. 
The reality of how the Earth's inner 
workings rotate is indeed much more 
fascinating than any cinematic version. 
No wonder the public's interest in the 
subject soared recently with the resolu- 
tion of a nine-year debate regarding the 
speed of the core. 

Prof. Xiaodong Song of the 
Department of Geology was one of the 



investigators that first presented evi- 
dence, in 1996, that the Earth's 
inner core rotates 0.3 to 0.5 degrees 
per year faster than the rest of the 
planet. Since then, some seismolo- 
gists suspected that flaws in the 
data were responsible for the pur- 
ported movement, and argued that 
"super-rotation" of the core did not 
really happen. The doubt has now 
disappeared. 

"Extraordinary claims require 
extraordinary proof," says Song. 
"We believe we now have that 
proof." 

That proof came when Song 
and his students at UIUC, along 
with colleagues at Lamont-Doherty 
Earth Observatory of Columbia 
University, compared records of 
seismic waves from recent earth- 
quakes in the South Sandwich 



Islands to those of earthquakes that 
happened 35 years ago. 

"Seismic waves that passed 
through the inner core show system- 
atic changes in travel times and wave 
shapes when comparing events sepa- 
rated in time by several years," Song 
says. "The only plausible explanation 
is a motion of the inner core . . . The 
interaction of the magnetic field gen- 
erated by flow in the outer core caus- 
es the inner core to spin, like the 
armature in an electric motor. " 

Response to this new proof has 
been impressive. News outlets around 
the world featured the story. In fact, 
The New York Times, National 
Geographic, The Washington Post, 
CNN, ABC, the BBC, and The. 
Bangladesh Times are just a few of 
the media outlets that have ran sto- 
ries. 



Missouri's Taum Sauk 
Reservoir Fails 

A popular destination for 
Department of Geology field trips, the 
50-acre Taum Sauk Reservoir in southern 
Missouri emptied out in 12 minutes 
when a stone retaining wall collapsed 
just before daybreak on December 14, 
2005. A billion-gallon torrent of water 
washed away at least two homes and 
several vehicles, and critically injured 
three children. Water and debris rushed 
down the mountain, cutting a swath 
through the forest, and then drained 
through Johnson Shut-Ins, covering the 
outcrop with mud. It appears that auto- 
mated instruments pumped too much 
water into Taum Sauk, so the water 
overtopped the reservoir's wall, and 
caused a section to give way. 




Students at the 2005 geology field camp cluster on a peak in the Wasatch 
Mountains to hear a briefing before heading off to map. Illinois runs the camp in 
association with four other Big Ten universities. Our students receive generous 
scholarships from an endowment set up by Ed and Alison Franklin. 



Gary Parker Studies Methane Rivers On Titan 



Recent evidence from Cassini 
Mission's Huygens Probe suggests 
that the largest moon orbiting Saturn, 
Titan, features methane rivers that 
sculpt channels into that moon's conti- 
nents of ice. Surface images from the 
probe show gravel-sized pieces of river 
ice similar to stones found in Earth's 
dry riverbeds. 

But with a surface temperature of 
minus 179°C and an atmospheric pres- 
sure one-and-a-half times that of Earth, 
could river processes on Titan be any- 
thing like those on Earth? Gary Parker, 
the W. H. Johnson Professor of 
Geology and a professor of civil and 
environmental engineering at the 
University of Illinois, has explored this 
question and his results have been fea- 
tured in news articles published global- 



ly. He has now extended his insight 
gained from years of studying rivers on 
Earth to the amazing new imagery of 
other planets and moons that has 
recently become available. 

"The idea that rivers of methane 
moving chunks of ice on Titan ought to 
obey the same rules as rivers on Earth 
is not what you would assume at first," 
says Parker. "Only three parameters dif- 
fer significantly between Earth and 
Titan: First is the acceleration due to 
gravity— on Titan, it is about one-sev- 
enth the value on Earth. Second is the 
viscosity of flowing fluid — the viscosity 
of liquid methane on Titan is about 
one-fifth that of Earth's water. Third is 
the submerged specific gravity of sedi- 
ment—the value on Titan is about two- 
thirds of that on Earth. 



"What this 
means is that for 
the same dis- 
charge of liquid 
methane as to 
water, the chan- 
nel characteris- 
tics on Titan 
should be 
remarkably simi- 
lar to those on 
Earth," Parker 
says. "However, because of the 
smaller acceleration due to gravity, 
channel slopes on Titan should be 
wider, deeper and less steep than 
those on Earth." As new satellite 
images become available, Parker will 
be testing this idea further. 




Gary Parker 



Rare Volcanic Plumes Create Uncommonly Dangerous Ash Flows 



Three unique photographs of a 
recent volcanic eruption in a 
remote part of Ecuador show an ash 
and gas plume unlike any previously 
documented, and hint at a newly 
recognized hazard, says Susan 
Kieffer, who holds the Walgreen 
Chair in geology. 

"The usual volcanic plume con- 
sists of a stalk capped with an 
umbrella, and resembles the mush- 
room of an atom bomb blast, but the 
umbrella on this plume was wavy, 
like the shell of a scallop." 

In a recent paper in Geophysical 
Research Letters, Kieffer, theoretical 
and applied mechanics professor 
Gustavo Gioia, and graduate student 
Pinaki Chakraborty explained what 
might have caused the umbrella to 



J**. 




scallop, a task made more difficult by 
the scarcity of information. 

"We had never seen a scalloped 
umbrella before," said Kieffer. "Unusual 



conditions must have existed in the 
volcanic plume that formed this 
umbrella." 

Volcan Reventador— Spanish for 
"one that explodes"— lived up to its 
name on the morning of November 3, 
2002. Following seven hours of seis- 
mic activity, the summit cone explod- 
ed and sent and erupted hot ash. 
This ash heated the surrounding air, 
which became buoyant and rose to 
form a volcanic plume, carrying ash 
with it. 

Our analysis suggests that the 
Reventador plume collapsed rapidly, 
forming new and especially danger- 
ous ash flows," says Kieffer. 
Originating far from the summit cone, 
these new ash flows helped spread 
the damage caused by the eruption. 



Windows into the Past 



Illinois Geology on the Launching Pad 



by Ralph L. Langenheim 






uring World War II, the geology pro- 
gram at Illinois almost collapsed, for 



military demands stripped men from the 
campus. Full-time faculty decreased to 
four, geology majors went from 31 to 
seven, and no graduate degrees were 
granted in 1943 and 1944. The only two 
master's degrees granted in 1945 went to 
our first women graduate students, 
Dorothy Johnson and Elizabeth Livesay, 
who studied micropaleontology with 
Harold Scott and later obtained positions 
in petroleum geology. At the War's end, 
students first trickled, then cascaded back 
to Urbana-Champaign, so that 14 mas- 
ter's degrees and four doctorate degrees 
were granted in 1949. However, it was 
not until 1955 that Illinois produced its 
first woman Ph.D., Barbara Collins, a stu- 
dent of Ralph Grim. 

The post-war Department of Geology 
burgeoned during the last years of Frank 
DeWolfe's tenure as chairman, and con- 
tinued with Harold Wanless serving as 
chairman of an administrative committee 
until the arrival of George Willard White 
in 1947. White would lead Illinois' geol- 
ogy for the next 18 years. 

A consummate administrator, White 
was well suited for his leadership role 
during academia's rapid expansion after 
World War II. Born the son of a minister 
in North Lawrence, Ohio in 1903, the 
highly precocious White was treated 
almost as an adult from early childhood. 
He graduated from Otterbein College at 
17, and completed his master's (1925) 
and doctorate (1933) at Ohio State 
University. Then, he became an instruc- 
tor at the University of Tennessee, and, 
later, at the University of New 
Hampshire. In New Hampshire, White 
rose to professor and acting Dean of the 



Graduate School and led the New 
Hampshire department to grow into one 
of the largest among New England state 
universities. Incidentally, here he also 
became acquainted with Carleton 
Chapman as a student. In 1941, White 
moved to Ohio State University as a pro- 
fessor and as the State Geologist of Ohio. 

Once at Illinois, White immediately 
began to increase the number of staff to 
generate new graduate programs of dis- 
tinction, and to polish the department's 
national and international reputation. 
He initiated and expanded programs in 
Pleistocene geology, geomorphology, clay 
mineralogy, hydrogeology, engineering 
geology, electron microscopy and field 
geology. Also, with White's encourage- 
ment, the UI Geology Library grew to 
world-class status, reputedly ranking 
third after the USGS Library, the New 
York Public Library, and Harvard 
University. He was particularly interested 
in the history of geology, and urged the 
purchase of rare books. 

In addition, White aggressively pub- 
licized Illinois geology, recruited students, 
expanded contacts for graduate-student 
placement and recruited outstanding 
staff. Of note, White asked senior staff to 
visit major graduate and undergraduate 
programs around the country. Indeed, 
University planes flew groups of profes- 
sors to attend national meetings and lec- 
ture at larger schools. I well remember 
such a "barnstorming tour" or flying cir- 
cus at Berkeley that featured lectures by 
Harold Scott and George White. We 
Berkeley alums were at first amused, but 
became quickly convinced that the geolo- 
gy program at Illinois was substantial. 
White, and his wife Mildred, regularly 
traveled overseas, where they sought con- 




George White 

tacts and recruited graduate students 
and candidates for visiting professor- 
ships. 

During the White era, the faculty 
line in structural geology was kept 
open for a visitor. Between 1950 and 
1964, the annual overseas visitors 
were: Christoffer Oftedhl (Norway), 
J. V. Harrison (Oxford), Maxwell Gage 
(Canterbury), Rhodes Fairbridge 
(Western Australia), J. M. Carr 
(Cyprus), Albert Carozzi (Geneva), 
Kingsly Dunham (Durham), lies 
Strachan (Birmingham), Derek Ager 
(Imperial College), Hendrik Zwart 
(Leiden), Poul Graf-Petersen 
(Copenhagen), Heikki Ignatius 
(Helsinki), Hans Laubscher (Basel), 
and Hans Holtedahl (Bergen). So far as 
I know, the foreign visiting professor 
program was unique and a major fac- 
tor in Illinois' retention of its ranking 
amongst the top twenty American 
graduate programs in geology. 



Alumni News 



John W. Hawley Receives Alumni Achievement Award 



We are very proud to announce that 
John W. Hawley, Ph.D. '62, is the 
2006 Department of Geology Alumni 
Achievement Award winner. Hawley, who 
lives in Albuquerque, New Mexico, has 
authored or co-authored more than 100 
publications on environmental geology, 
hydrogeology, and geomorphology of arid 
and semi-arid lands in western North 
America, including the Great Basin, 
Chihuahuan Desert and Rio Grande rift 
areas of the Basin and Range province, and 
the Southern High Plains-Pecos Valley 
region. 

After more than 35 years of public- 
sector professional activity, Dr. Hawley 
formed HAWLEY GEOMATTERS in 
December 1997. This consulting service 
deals primarily with environmental and 
groundwater geology of the New Mexico 
region, with emphasis on assessing and 
mitigating impacts of water- and mineral- 
resource development, and waste disposal 
in fragile arid and semiarid environments. 




The company does substantial pro-bono 
work for Native American residents of 
New Mexico. 

Dr. Hawley has received honors for 
his published research and scientific-com- 
munity service including the Kirk Bryan 
Award for desert soil-geomorphic research, 
and the Engineering Geology Division 
Distinguished Practice Award from the 
Geological Society of America. He has 



also received the Certificate of Merit for 
Arid Zone Research from the American 
Association for the Advancement of 
Science, and the New Mexico Eminent 
Scholar from the State of New Mexico. 
Hawley is the co-dedicatee of the 
Society's 50th Annual Field Conference 
Guidebook and has received the 
Hanover College Alumni Achievement 
Award; Honorary Membership in the 
New Mexico Geological Society, the 
American Institute of Professional 
Geologists Presidential Award of Merit, 
and the New Mexico Earth Science 
Achievement Award. 

In addition, Dr. Hawley has served 
as President of the New Mexico 
Geological Society and President of the 
New Mexico Section American Institute 
of Professional Geologists. 

"John Hawley's career illustrates 
the wonderful impact that a geologist 
can have on society," noted Department 
Head Steve Marshak 




V-; Richard L. Hay. 

R.E. Grim 
Professor of 
Geology 
Emeritus at the 
University of 
Illinois, died 
from pulmonary 
fibrosis February 10, 2006, at his 
home in Tucson, Arizona at the age 
of 79. Dr. Hay had a long and distin- 
guished career in sedimentary geolo- 
gy, mineralogy, and archaeological 
geology. He is best known for pro- 
viding the geological context of two 
of the most important hominid-bear- 
ing sites known in East Africa 
(Olduvai Gorge and Laetoli). He also 
made fundamental contributions to 
the understanding of important min- 
erals such as clays and zeolites. 

Born in Goshen, Indiana on April 
29, 1929, Dr. Hay obtained both his 
bachelor's and master's degrees from 
Northwestern University in 1946 and 



Obituaries 



1948 respectively, and earned his Ph.D. 
from Princeton in 1952. In 1957, Dr. Hay 
became assistant professor of geology 
and geophysics at the University of 
California, Berkeley, where he eventually 
obtained the rank of full professor. In 
1983, Dr. Hay moved to the University of 
Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, as the first 
R. E. Grim Professor in the Department 
of Geology. In addition to his academic 
career, Dr. Hay also served as a geologist 
for the U.S. Geological Survey. 

Dr. Hay was Fellow of the American 
Association for the Advancement of 
Science, the Geological Society of 
America, the Mineralogical Society of 
America, and the California Academy of 
Sciences. He received the Kirk Bryan 
Award in 1978 and the Rip Rapp 
Archaeological Geology Award in 2000 
from the Geological Society of America, 
and in 2001 was also the recipient of one 
of the most distinguished awards in the 
field of human origins, the Leakey Prize. 
Dr. Hay's 1976 monograph, Geology of 



the Olduvai Gorge, still stands as a 
model for archaeological geology 
research. A dedicated teacher and 
mentor, he guided many students into 
distinguished careers. Dr. Hay also had 
a lasting impact on his peers as well, 
and was uniformly known by his col- 
leagues as a modest, unassuming man 
with a ready smile and gentle nature, 
who was always open to discussion. 
Dr. Hay and his wife Lynn moved 
to Tucson in 1999, after his retirement 
from the University of Illinois, where 
he continued geological research as an 
adjunct professor at the University of 
Arizona. Dr. Hay is survived by his 
wife of 32 years, Lynn Hay, who 
resides in Tucson, Arizona; his son, 
Randall Hay, of Fort Wayne, Indiana; 
his two granddaughters; and his two 
stepsons, George Uricoechea, of 
Urbana, Illinois, and John Uricoechea, 
of Springfield, Virginia. Dr. Hay is also 
survived by his brother, Robert E. Hay 
of Tucson. 



Alumni News 



10 



Obituaries 



Arthur Hagner died December 13, 2005. He was 94. Art earned his bachelor's 
degree from New York University and his doctorate from Columbia University. 
He worked on military development programs for the government during 
World War II. He was a professor of geology at the University of Illinois at 
Urbana-Champaign until his retirement after more than 25 years of service. 
Hagner was known for his work in economic geology, ore mineralogy, clay 
mineralogy, and petrology. He also contibuted articles on geological edudcation 
and on the philosophy of geology. Prof. Hagner conducted research in 
Wyoming, New York, Mexico, and Texas. Recognized in Who's Who in America 
in Science, Art moved to Stamford, Connecticut, after retirement and lived there 
for 30 years. Art was a member of the U.S. Geological Survey and enjoyed clas- 
sical music, art and collecting minerals. 

James L. Eades, Ph.D. '62, passed away January 21, 2006, in Gainesville, 
Florida. He was 83. James was a student of Ralph Grim. They worked on the 
chemistry associated with the lime stabilization of soils. He was a National 
Lime Association Research Associate in the department for several years before 
he left Illinois to come to the University of Florida as an associate professor in 
geology. He later became chair and was active in the department until he 
retired in 2000. 

Jack Simon, M.S. '46, died December 17, 2005. He was 86. Jack served in the 
Army Air Forces during World War II before earning his master's degree in 
geology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1946. He 
worked with the Illinois State Geological Survey. Jack was well known for his 
work in soil geology. In 1974 he became Chief of the ISGS, a post he held until 
his retirment in 1982. He was a member of Sinai Temple in Champaign and 
Exchange Club at the U of I. 

Clarence Vernon Crow, B.S. '51, died September 9, 2005 in Decatur, Illinois at 
the age of 87. After graduation from Lawrenceville, Illinois High School he 
served in the U.S. Navy during WWII. This included 16 months of sea duty in 
the Atlantic. He received his bachelor's degree in geology from the U of I and 
did graduate studies at the University of Michigan and Illinois State University. 

After graduation Clarence worked in the exploration and development of 
underground gas storage fields for a consulting firm in Urbana, Illinois. He was 
underground gas storage geologist for Illinois Power Company for 23 years, and 
then spent 12 years as a consultant in underground gas and air storage through 
the United States. He was involved in the exploration and development of 12 
underground gas storage fields and one air storage field. His active career 
spanned a period of 43 years. 

Clarence was a founding member and past president of the Midwest Gas 
Storage Section of the Society of Petroleum Engineers and a senior member of 
the American Association of Petroleum Geologists. 

Ernest H. Muller, M.S. '49, Ph.D. '52, died October 20, 2005, at the age of 82. 
Ernie was a Second Lieutenant and Airways Weather Forecaster for the U.S. 
Army Air Force during World War II. Ernie subsequently completed his B.S. in 
Geology at Wooster College, Ohio, and received his Master's and Doctorate in 
Geology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He worked for 
the US Geological Survey before accepting a faculty position at Cornell 
University in 1954. Ernie subsequently taught for 30 years at Syracuse 
University, and worked, studied, and taught in Alaska, Iceland, Chile, New 
Zealand, and India. He is widely published and a member of numerous profes- 
sional societies. Ernie was known for his integrity, discernment, and ability to 
enjoy the subtle and simple aspects of life. 



1950s 

Jordan. Paul Karrow (Ph.D. '57) was 
awarded the title Distinguished 
Professor Emeritus by the University of 
Waterloo in 2002. He retired from UW in 
1999. Presently, Paul is an adjunct pro- 
fessor in the Department of Earth 
Sciences and continues to teach and 
supervise graduate students. A day-long 
symposium was held at the Geological 
Association of Canada's annual meeting 
to recognize Paul's work in quaternary 
geology. Most importantly, Paul is now a 
grandfather of eight. 

1970s 

Jim Granath (B.S. '71, M.S. 73) has 
been promoted to senior explorationist 
for Forest Oil International in Denver. 

James C. Cobb (B.S. '71, Ph.D. '81) is 
treasurer of the American Geological 
Institute's Executive Committee. Jim is 
director and state geologist at the 
Kentucky Geological Survey at the 
University of Kentucky. 

Christopher Ledvina, (B.S. 74) is cur- 
rently a professor at Northeastern 
University. He and his wife Janet 
announce the birth of a daughter, 
Julianna Helen, born April 23, 2004. 
Julianna is their fourth child. The other 
children are 8-year-old triplets, 
Carrianne, Rachel and Daniel. 

1980s 

Brian N. Popp (M.S. '81, Ph.D '86) was 
elected a Geochemistry Fellow by the 
Geochemical Society and the European 
Association for Geochemistry. The title 
is "bestowed upon outstanding scien- 
tists who have, over the years, made a 
major contribution to the field of geo- 
chemistry." Brian is a Professor in the 
Department of Geology and Geophysics 
and graduate faculty in the Department 
of Oceanography at the University of 
Hawaii. He lives there with his wife 
Jan Reichelderfer (M.S. 1985) and their 
daughters Jennifer and Nicole. 

Marcia K. Schulmeister (B.S. '85) is 
an assistant professor in the Earth 
Science Department of Emporia State 
University in Emporia, Kansas. 




Steve Altaner (Ph.D. '85) and his wife 
Judy (M.S. '98) adopted a baby girl, 
Marissa Kate. Marissa was born on Dec. 
19, 2005. Steve is an associate professor 
in the Department. 

Istvan Barany, who was a student here 
from 1987 to 1991, is a Project 
Geophysical Advisor for Anadarko 
Petroleum Corporation in Houston, 
Texas. 

Alan Singleton (B.S. '88) is a patent 
and business law attorney in 
Champaign, Illinois. 

1990s 

Ming-Kuo Lee (M.S. '90, Ph.D. '93) was 
recently promoted to full professor of 
Hydrogeology in the Department of 
Geology & Geography at Auburn 
University. 

Robert (Ph.D. '96) and Melinda (M.S. 
'94) Ylagan announce the arrival of 
their second son, Elliot Peter Ylagan, 
born May 23, 2005, weighing 8 lbs. 8 oz. 
Elliot was welcomed home by his big 
brother Renan. 

Stephanie Drain (B.S. '95) currently 
works as a Field Engineer, Midwest 
Region of SemMaterials, L.P., in Terre 
Haute, Indiana. 

Theresa (Croak) Mueller (B.S. '96) 
opened her own real estate brokerage 
( www.TheresaMuelier.com) . She lives 
with her husband Keith and two-year- 
old Stefan in Naperville, Illinois. 

Catherine A. Hier-Majumder (B.S. '97) 
married geophysicist Saswata Hier- 
Majumder. Catherine received her Ph.D. 
from the Unviversity of Minnesota. She 
works as a MESSENGER fellow at the 
Carnegie Institute of Washington. MES- 
SENGER is a NASA mission currently on 
its way to Mercury. Catherine's husband 
is a professor at the University of 
Maryland in College Park, 

Geoscientist, scientific data visualization 
specialist, public domain activist, and 
blossoming linguist Maitri Venkat- 
Ramani (B.S. '98) has a fascinating blog 
devoted "to reporting on the aftermath 
of 2005's Hurricane Katrina and its 
impact on my area. You can find the 
blog on Maitri's website, 
www.vatul.net/bio.html. 



2000s 

Stacey Kocian (B.S. 01) and Bryan 

Luman (B.S. '01) announce the birth of 
a son Simon Rhys Luman. Simon was 
born on October 7, 2005, weighing 6 
lbs. 11 oz. The family lives in Kenosha, 
Wisconsin. 

Mike Harrison (Ph.D. '02) and his wife 
Diane are proud parents of identical 
twin boys Patrick and Philip (weighing a 
total of 15 lbs). They were born April 3, 
2006. Mike is a professor at Tennessee 
Tech University. 

Chris Majerczyk, (B.S. '03) works in 
Bloomington, Illinois, for a small envi- 
ronmental consultant called Concord 
Engineering. 

After successfully defending his thesis, 
Roger Bannister (B.S, '04) begins 
working in Blacksburg, Virginia, in 
September 2006 as a hydrogeologist for 
Environmental Systems and 
Technologies. 

From our Mailbox 

Letter from U of I Alum Charles J. 
Hoke (A.B. '37) 

7 was so pleased to receive the '2004 
Year in Review.' The article about 
Professor Frank DeWolfe was of particu- 
lar interest since I am a graduate of 
Illinois, class of 1937. I had the great 
pleasure and honor to take Geology 101 
from professor DeWolfe and to work 
with him as well as the other professors 
mentioned in the article. Also, Dr. K.O. 
Emer)' and Dr. Robert Deitz were class- 
mates. Two other persons I worked with 
were Dr. James Schopf and Dr. G.G. 
Cady, with whom I did microspores of 
Illinois Coal #6. 

"After graduation I took a job in the oil 
fields of south Arkansas from Phillips 
Petroleum and after 10 years I took a 
job as Chief Geologist with Murphy Oil 
Corporation. [I] retired in 1975 as Vice 
President [of] Production and 
Exploration and member of the Board 
of Directors. Since that time 1 have been 
a consultant which I retired from on 
September 1, 2005. I have now had my 
90 th birthday. 

"I will always cherish the time at 
University of Illinois and the training 
and instruction 1 received there. " 



Following Hurricane Katrina: Letter 
from U of I Alum and Tulane 
Professor Nancye Dawers (M.S. '87) 
Sent from New Orleans on March 27, 
2006: 

"Tulane has handled this remarkably 
well, considering big problems still 
exist in terms of rebuilding the med 
school. The university sustained 
between 150-250 million $$ in dam- 
age (they are still trying to estimate 
it), and so far nothing received from 
FEMA or insurance. Once we get a 
handle on the total undergrad enroll- 
ment for fall, and also survive the 
fast-approaching hurricane season. 
Tulane should be relatively stabi- 
lized. I've been hearing rumors of 
some possible major lay-offs at the 
state universities (like LSU and 
UNO), but no more lay-offs are 
expect here, at least in terms of facul- 
ty. Our dept is actually looking to 
hire three to four faculty in the next 
two years. 

"Things are actually fine in this part 
of town, but you go just a couple of 
miles away and it is total devasta- 
tion and it looks much the same as 
it did in the early fall. House repairs 
are slow, and really just beginning; 
contractors are basically over- 
whelmed. Fortunately we could tem- 
porarily solve our leaky-roof problem 
with a big blue tarp. " 




Alumnus Hani Khoury (left) and U of I's 
R James Kirkpatrick at a conference in 
Switzerland. Hani (Ph.D., 79) is a pro- 
fessor at the University of Jordan and 
gave an invited talk on the geology of 
natural cement deposits in 



Annual Report for 2005 



Faculty 

Stephen P. Altaner (Associate Professor) 
Jay D. Bass (Professor) 
Craig M. Bethke (Professor) 
Chu-Yung Chen (Associate Professor and 

Associate Head) 
Wang-Ping Chen (Professor) 
Bruce W. Fouke (Associate Professor) 
Albert T. Hsui (Professor and Associate Head) 
Thomas M. Johnson (Associate Professor) 
Susan W. Kieffer (Walgreen Professor) 
R. James Kirkpatrick (Grim Professor and 

Executive Associate Dean) 
Jie Li (Assistant Professor) 
Craig C. Lundstrom (Associate Professor) 
Stephen Marshak (Professor and Head) 
Gary Parker (Johnson Professor) 
Xiaodong Song (Associate Professor) 

Department Affiliate 

Feng-Sheng Hu (Associate Professor) 

Academic Staff, Post-Docs, 
Visiting Staff 

Panakkatu Babu (Post-Doctoral Research 

Associate) 
Alessandro Cantelli (Post-Doctoral Research 

Associate) 
Justin Glessner (Geochemistry Specialist) 
Richard Hedin (Research Programmer) 
Holger Hellwig (Research Scientist) 
Eileen Herrstrom (Teaching Specialist) 
Stephen Hurst (Research Programmer) 
Ingmar Janse (Post-Doctoral Research 

Associate) 
Roy Johnson (Research Scientist) 
Andrey Kalinichev (Senior Research Scientist) 
Michael Lerche (Post-Doctoral Research 

Associate) 
Ann Long (Teaching Specialist) 
Xinli Lu (Post-Doctoral Research Associate) 
Stephen Lyons (Newsletter Editor) 
Michael Martin (Post-Doctoral Research 

Associate) 
Padma Padmanabhan (Post-Doctoral Research 

Associate) 
Maik Pertermann (Post-Doctoral Research 

Associate) 
Jean-Phillipe Perrillat (Post-Doctoral Research 

Associate) 
Marc Reinholdt (Post-Doctoral Research 

Associate) 
Bidhan Roy (Post-Doctoral Research Associate) 
Carmen Sanchez-Valle (Post-Doctoral 

Research Associate) 
Rob Sanford (Senior Research Scientist) 
Stanislav Sinogeikin (Research Scientist) 
Maoshuang Song (Post-Doctoral Research 

Associate) 
Michael Stewart (Lecturer) 
Rajeswari Vanka (Resource and Policy Analyst) 
Zhaofeng Zhang (Visiting Scholar) 
Jianming Zhu (Visiting Scholar) 



Emeritus Faculty 

Thomas F. Anderson 
Daniel B. Blake 
Albert V. Carozzi 



COURSES TAUGHT IN 2005 



Donald L. Graf 




Geol 100 


Arthur F. Hagner 




Geol 101 


Richard L. Hay 




Geol 103 


Donald M. Henderson 








Geol 104 


Albert T. Hsui 






George deV. Klein 




Geol 107 


Ralph Langenheim 




Geol 10S 


C. John Mann 




Geol 110 


Alberto S. Nieto 




Geol 111 


Philip A. Sandberg 




Geol 116 


Adjunct Faculty 


Geol 117 


Robert J. Finley 




Geol 118 


Leon R. Follmer 




Geol 143 


Dennis Kolata 




Geol 333 


Morris W. Leighton 






Hannes Leetaru 






William Shilts 




Geol 3S0 


Wolfgang Sturhahn 




Geol 411 


M. Scott Wilkerson 




Geol 415 


Library Staff 




Geol 432 
Geol 436 


Lura Joseph (Librarian) 




Sheila McGowan (Chief Library Clerk) 


Geol 450 


Diana Walter (Library Technical Specialist) 


Geol 451 






Geol 454 


Staff 




Geol 460 


Shelley Campbell (Staff Clerk) 


Geol 481 


Barb Elmore (Administrative Secretary) 
Ed Lane (Electronics Engineering 


Geol 497AE1 


Assistant) 






Michael Sczerba (Clerk) 


Geol 511 


Graduate Students 


Geol 51 5 
Geol 553 


Min Jeoung Bae 


Dmitry Lakshtanov 


Geol 560 


Peter Berger 


Qi Li 




Emily Berna 


Qiang Li 


Geol 563 


Nicole Bettinardi 


Yingchun Li 


Geol 571 


Charles Bopp 


Christopher Mah 


Geol 591 


Jon Brenizer 


Jorge Marino 


Geol 593F2 


Sarah Brown 


Lei Meng 




Kurtis Burmeister 


Jungho Park 




Shane Butler 


Alan Piggot 




Bin Chen 


David Robison 


Geol 593J2 


Scott Clark 


Thomas Schickel 




Joshua Defrates 


Xinlei Sun 




Melissa Farmer 


Jian Tian 


Geol 593KS 


Theodore Flynn 


Lisa Tranel 




Lili Gao 


Tai-Lin Tseng 


Geol 593K12 


Alex Glass 


Ivan Ufimtsev 




Chris Henderson 


Huan Wang 




Fang Huang 


Jingyun Wang 




Adam Ianno 


Wei Day 




Jennifer Jackson 


Emily Wisseman 




Meijuan Jiang 


Kevin Wolfe 




Michael Kandianis 


Zhen Xu 




Jacquelyn Kitchen 


Zhaohui Yang 




James Klaus 


Kelly Zimmerman 





Planet Earth 

Introductory Physical Geology 

Planet Earth QRII 

Geology of the National Parks 

Physical Geology 

Historical Geology 

Exploring Geology in the Field 

The Dynamic Earth - Honors 

The Planets 

The Oceans 

Natural Disasters 

History of Life 

Earth Materials and the 

Environment 

Environmental Geology 

Structural Geology and Tectonics 

Field Geology 

Mineralogy and Mineral Optics 

Petrology and Petrography 

Physics of the Earth 

Methods in Applied Geophysics 

Introduction to Seismology 

Geochemistry 

Earth Systems Modeling 

The Challenge of a 

Sustainable Earth System 

Advanced Structural Geology 

Advanced Field Geology 

Chemistry of Earth's Interior 

Physical Geochemistry 

Analytical Geochemistry 

Geochemical Reaction Analysis 

Current Research in Geoscience 

Current Topics in 

Geomicrobiology and Microbial 

Ecology 

Molecular Modeling of Water & 

Interfaces 

Current Literature in Earth's 

Deep Interior 

Active Deformation of the 

Lithosphere 



12 



m?r- 



Research Grants active in 2005 



Air Force/University of Wisconsin 

Xiaodong Song — Characterizing High-Resolution 
Seismic Velocity and Attenuation Structure of 
Yunnan-Sichuan Region, Southwest China 
Using Seismic Catalog and Waveform Data. 

Center for Advanced Cement-Based Materials 
R. James Kirkpatrick— Pore Solution-Solid 
Interactions in Cement Paste: Molecular 
Modeling of Fluids in Nanospaces. 

Critical Research Initiative 

Richard L. Weaver and Xiaodong Song- 
Correlation of Stochastic Seismic Waves: 
Theory and Application. 

Department of Energy 

Craig M. Bethke — Field-Constrained Quantitative 
Model of the Origin of Microbial and 
Geochemical Zoning in a Confined Fresh- 
Water Aquifer. 

R. James Kirkpatrick— Computational & 

Spectroscopic Investigations of Water-Carbon 
Dioxide Fluids & Surface Sorption Processes. 

Department of Energy 

Robert A. Sanford — Towards a More Complete 

Picture: Dissimilatory Metal Reduction by 

Anaeromyxobcter Species. 

Robert A. Sanford — Biomolecular Mechanisms 
Controlling & Radionuclide Transformations in 
Anaeromyxobcter Species. 

Michigan State University 

Robert A. Sanford — Growth of Chlororespiring 

Bacteria to High Cell Densities for Use in 

Bioaugmentation. 

NASA 

Susan W. Kieffer — Multicomponent, Multiphase 

H2O-CO2 Thermodynamics and Fluid 

Dynamics on Mars. 

National Science Foundation 
Jay D. Bass — Development of Laser Heating for 
Sound Velocity Measurements at High P & T. 

Jay D. Bass — Sound Velocities & Elastic Moduli 
of Minerals Mantle Pressures and 
Temperatures with Laser Heating. 

Jay D. Bass — Workshop on Phase Transitions 
and Mantle Discontinuities. 

Jay D. Bass— CSEDI: Collaborative Research: 
Composition and Seismic Structure of the 
Mantle Transition Zone. 

Jay D. Bass— Consortium for Material Property 
Research in the Earth Sciences. 

Jay D. Bass — Collaborative Research: Elasticity 
Grand Challenge of the COMPRES Initiative. 

Jay D. Bass— Polymorphism and Structural 
Transitions During Glass Formation. 

Daniel B. Blake— Global Climate Change & The 
Evolutionary Ecology of Antarctic Mollusks in 
the Late Eocene. 



Wang-Ping Chen — Collaborative Research: 
Lithospheric-Scale Dynamics of Active 
Mountain Building along the Himalayan- 
Tibetan Collision Zone. 

Bruce W. Fouke — Geobiological & The Emergence 
of Terraced Architecture during Carbonate 
Mineralization. 

Thomas M. Johnson — Collaborative Research: 
Field Investigation of SE Oxyanion Reduction 
& Se Sources in Wetlands: Application of Se 
Isotopes. 

Thomas M. Johnson — Quantification of Cr 
Reduction in Groundwater Using Cr Stable 
Isotopes. 

Thomas M. Johnson and Craig C. Lundstrom — 

Acquisition of Multicollector Inductively 
Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer. 

Thomas M. Johnson and Craig C. Lundstrom — 

Technical Support for the New MC-ICP-MS 
Laboratory at University of Illinois at Urbana- 
Champaign. 

Jie Li — Experimental Investigations of Solid- 
Liquid Boundary in the Earth Core. 

Craig C. Lundstrom— Collaborative Research: 
Investigating the Processes and Timescales of 
Andesite Differentiation: A Comprehensive 
Petrological and Geochemical Study of Arenal 
Volcano, Costa Rica. 

Stephen Marshak — Collaborative Research: 
Emplacement of the Ferrar Mafic Igneous 
Province: A Pilot Study of Intrusive 
Architecture and Flow Directions in Southern 
Victoria Land. 

Xiaodong Song— Structure and Dynamics of 
Earth's Core and Lowermost Mantle. 

Office of Naval Research 

Bruce W Fouke— The Role of Shipyard Pollutants 
in Structuring Coral ReefMicrobial 
Communities: Monitoring Environmental 
Change and the Potential Causes of Coral 
Disease. 

Bruce W. Fouke — Microbiological, Physiological, 
and Toxicological Effect of Explosive 
Compounds on Coral Health. 

University of Illinois Research Board 

R. James Kirkpatrick— A Large Volume NMR 

Sample Probe for Chemical and Geochemical 

Research. 

Xiaodong Song— Acquisition of Portable 
Broadband Digital Seismometers. 

U.S. Geological Survey 

Stephen Marshak— Geologic Mapping of the 
Rosendale Natural Cement Region, a Portion 
of the Northern Appalachian Fold-Thrust Belt, 
Ulster County, New York. 



Degrees Conferred in 2005 



Bachelor of Science Degrees 
May 

Matthew Borkowski 
Alene Echevarria 
Adam Ianno 
Adam Nolen 
Amanda Raddatz 
John Ralston 
Ashley M. Ravestein 

August 

Michelle Kondich 

December 

James Depa 
Christopher Heren 
Christopher Mead 

Master of Science Degrees 
May 

Lei Meng — (Craig Bethke) 

Yingchun Li — Constraining Inner Core 
Rotation From a Worldwide Search of 
Waveform Doublets, (Xiaodong Song). 

August 

Sarah Brown — Ozark Plateau, 

Midcontinental North America; Insights 
into Thermochronology Using Apatite 
Fission Track Analysis. (Stephen 
Marshak) 

December 

Lisa Tranel — Subsurface Structure and 
Tectonic Subsidence Across the Illinois 
Basin and Ozark Dome Boundary, 
(Stephen Marshak). 

Doctor of Philosophy Degrees 
May 

Kurtis C. Burmeister— Aspects of 
Deformation and Strain in the 
Appalachian Fold-Thrust Belt (New York) 
and the Shear Zones of the 
Sveconorwegian Orogen (Norway), 
(Stephen Marshak) 

Jennifer M. Jackson — The Effect of Minor 
Elements on the Physical and Chemical 
Properties of Lower Mantle Minerals at 
High-Pressure, (Jay Bass) 

Christopher Leat Mali— Cladistic Analysis of 
the Goniasteridae (Asteroidea; 
Valvatoidea): Phytogeny, Evolution, and 
Biodiversity. (Daniel Blake) 

Jian Tian — Varve Chronology. Proxy 
Calibration, and Holocene Climate of 
Minnesota. (Thomas Anderson and Feng 
Sheng Hu) 

December 

James Klaus — "The Microbial Ecology of Reef 
Corals: Diversity. Disease and the 
Environment." (Bruce Fouke) 



13 



List of Publications for 2005 



Brudzinski, M.R., and Chen, W.-R, 
2005, Earthquakes and strain in 
sub-horizontal slabs, J. Geophys. 
Res.: 110, (11 pp.), B08303, 
doi: 10. 1029/2004JB003470. 

Zhang, H.J, Thurber, C. H. and Song, 
X.D., 2005, High-resolution seismic 
velocity and attenuation structure 
of the Sichuan-Yunnan region, 
Southwest China, using seismic 
catalog and waveform data, (in) 
Proceedings of the 27th Seismic 
Research Review: Ground-Based 
Nuclear Explosion Monitoring 
Technologies, LA-UR-05-6407, 266- 
275. 

Zhang, J., Song, X.D., Li, Y.C., 
Richards, P.G.. Sun, X.L., and 
Waldhauser, E, 2005, Inner core 
differential motion confirmed by 
earthquake dou, blet waveform 
doublets. Science: 309, 1357-1360, 
doi:10.1126/science.H13193. 

Clegg, B.F., Tinner, W, Gavin, D.G., 
and Hu, F.S. 2005, Morphological 
analysis of Betula (birch) pollen 
and paleoecological application. 
The Holocene: 15: 229-237. 

Gavin, D. G., and Hu, F.S. 2005, 
Bioclimatic modelling using 
Gaussian mixture distributions and 
multiscale segmentation. Global 
Ecology and Biogeography: 14: 491- 
501. 

Korotky, A.M, et al, including Hu, F.S. 
2005. Characteristics of the 
Holocene environmental history of 
the Sikhote-Alin Range (Primorskii 
Krai) from lake sediments, (in) 
Pages from Quaternary History of 
Northeast Asia (V.Ye. Glotov, ed.), 
70-86. 

Oswald, WW., Anderson, P.M., 
Brown, T.A., Brubaker, L.B., Hu, 
F.S., Lozkin, A.V., Tinner, W., and 
Kaltenreider, P., 2005. Effects of 
samples size and type on radiocar- 
bon dating of arctic and subarctic 
lake sediments. The Holocene: 15: 
758-767. 

Tian, J., Brown, T.A., and Hu, F.S., 
2005. Comparison of varve and 
14C chronologies at Steel Lake, 
Minnesota. The Holocene: 15: 510- 
517. 

van Westrenen W, Li J., Fei Y, Van 
Orman J., Minarik W., 
Komabayashi T, and Funakoshi 
K., 2005, Thermoelastic properties 
of magnesiowustite Mg^^Fe,, , fer- 
ropericlase based on in situ x-ray 
diffraction to 26.7 GPa and 2173 K. 
Physics of the Earth and Planetary 
Interiors: 151, 163-176. 



Parker, G. and Perg, L., 2005, 

Probabilistic formulation of con- 
servation of cosmogenic nuclides: 
effect of surface elevation fluctua- 
tions on approach to steady state. 
Earth Surface Processes and 
Landforms: 30(9), 1127-1144. 

Lamb, M., Toniolo, H. and Parker, G., 
2005, Trapping of sustained tur- 
bidity currents by intraslope mini- 
basins. Sedimentology: doi: 
10.HH/j.1365-3091.2005.00754.x, 
1-14. 

Violet, J., Sheets, B., Pratson, L., 
Paola, C. and Parker, G., 2005, 
Experiment on turbidity currents 
and their deposits in a model 3D 
subsiding minibasin. Journal of 
Sedimentary Research: 75, 820- 
843. 

Cui, Y, Parker, G., Lisle, T. E., 
Pizzuto, J. E. and Dodd, A. M., 
2005, More on the evolution of 
bed material waves in alluvial 
rivers. Earth Surface Processes and 
Landforms: 30, 107-114. 

Taki, K. and Parker, G., 2005, 

Transportational cyclic steps creat- 
ed by flow over an erodible bed. 
Part 1 . Experiments. Journal of 
Hydraulic Research: 43(5), 4SS- 
501. 

Sun, T. and Parker, G., 2005, 

Transportational cyclic steps creat- 
ed by flow over an erodible bed. 
Part 2. Theory and numerical sim- 
ulation. Journal of Hydraulic 
Research: 43(5), pp. 502-514. 

Wright, S. and Parker, G., 2005, 
Modeling downstream fining in 
sand-bed rivers I: Formulation. 
Journal of Hydraulic Research: 
43(6), 612-619. 

Wright, S. and Parker, G., 2005, 
Modeling downstream fining in 
sand-bed rivers II: Application. 
Journal of Hydraulic Research: 
43(6), 620-630. 

Cui, Y and Parker, G., 2005. 
Numerical model of sediment 
pulses and sediment-supply dis- 
turbances in mountain rivers. 
Journal of Hydraulic Engineering: 
131(8), 646-656. 

Lundstrom, C.C. , Chaussidon, M., 
Hsui, A.T., Kelemen P., and 
Zimmerman, M., 2005, 
Observations of Li isotopic varia- 
tions in the Trinity Ophiolite: 
Evidence for isotopic fractionation 
by diffusion during mantle melt- 
ing, Geochim. Comochim. Acta: 
69, 735-751. 



Kokfelt, T.F., Lundstrom, C. C, 
Hoernle, K„ Hauff, F, and 
Werner, R., 2005, Plume-Ridge 
Interaction studied at the 
Galapagos Spreading Centre: 
Evidence from 226Ra-230Th-238U 
and 231Pa-235U Isotopic 
Disequilibria, Earth Planet Sci. 
Lett.: 234, 165-187. 

Zhou, J., Lundstrom, C.C, Fouke, B. 
W., Panno, S., Hackley, K., and 
Curry, B., 2005, Geochemistry of 
speleothem records from southern 
Illinois: development of 
(234U)/(238U) as a proxy for 
paleoprecipitation, in press, 
Chemical Geolog}': 221, 1-20. 

Andrews, A.H., Burton, E.J., Kerr, 
L.A., Cailliet, G.M., Coale, K.H. , 
Lundstrom, C.C. and Brown, 
T.A., Bomb radiocarbon and lead- 
radium disequilibria in otoliths of 
bocaccio rockfish (Sebastes pau- 
cispinis): a determination of age 
and longevity for a difficult-to-age 
fish, in press, J. Mar. Fresh. Res. 

Lundstrom, C.C, Boudreau, A., and 
Pertermann, M., 2005, Diffusion- 
reaction in a thermal gradient: 
Implications for the genesis of 
anorthitic plagioclase, high alumi- 
na basalt and igneous mineral lay- 
ering. Earth Planet Sci. Lett.: 237. 
829-854. 

Sinogeikin, S.V., Jackson, J.M., 

Lakshtanov, D.L., Zha, C.-S., and 
Bass, J.D., 2005, Thermal expan- 
sion of Mj50Py50 majoritic garnet. 
Accepted and In Press: Physics 
and Chemistn' of Minerals. 

Mattern, E., Matas, J., Ricard, Y, 
and Bass, J.D., 2005, Lower man- 
tle composition and temperature 
from mineral physics and thermo- 
dynamic modeling. Geophysical 
Journal International: 160 (3): 
973-990. 

Jackson, J.M., Sturhahn, W, Shen, 
G., Zhao, J., Hu, M. Y, 
Errandonea, D., Bass, J.D., and 
Fei, Y, 2005, (Mg,Fe)Si03 per- 
ovskite up to 120 GPa using syn- 
chrotron Mossbauer spectroscopy. 
American Mineralogist: 90 (1): 
199-205. 

Lakshtanov, D., Vanpeteghem,, C.B., 
Jackson, J. M., Bass, J. D., Shen, 
C, Prakapenka, V, Litasov, K., 
and Ohtani, E., 2005, The equa- 
tion of state of Al-H-bearing Si02 
stishovite to 58 GPa. In press, 
Phys. Chem. Minerals DOI 
10.1007/S00269-005-0016-3. 



Bass, J.D., (2005) A Vision for High- 
Pressure Earth and Planetary 
Sciences, Elements 1, no. 3, 179. 

Sanchez-Valle, C, Sinogeikin, S.V., 
Lethbridge, Z.A.D., Walton, R.I., 
Smith, C.W., Evans, K.E., Bass, 
J.D., 2005, Brillouin scattering 
study on the single-crystal elastic 
properties of natrolite (NAT) and 
analcime (ANA) zeolites. J. 
Appl. Phys: 98, paper 053508. 

Sinogeikin, S.V., Lakshtanov, D.L., 
Nicholas, J.D., Jackson, J.M., 
Bass, J.D., 2005, High 
Temperature Elasticity 
Measurements on Oxides by 
Brillouin Spectroscopy with 
Resistive and IR Laser Heating. J 
European Ceramic Soc. 25: (8): 
1313-1324. 

Jackson, J.M., Zhang, J., Shue, J., 
Sinogeikin, S.V., and Bass, J.D., 
2005, High-pressure sound 
velocities and elasticity of alumi- 
nous MgSi03 perovskite to 45 
GPa: Implications for lateral het- 
erogeneity in Earth's lower man- 
tle. Geophys. Res. Lett.: 32., 
L21305, doi: 
10.1029/2005GL023522. 

Klaus, J.S., Frias-Lopez, J., Bonheyo, 
G.T., Heikoop, J.M., and Fouke, 
B.W., 2005, Bacterial communi- 
ties inhabiting the healthy tis- 
sues of two Caribbean reef 
corals: interspecific and spatial 
variation: Coral Reefs: 24, 129- 
137. 

Fouke, B.W, Schlager, S., 

Vandamme, M.G.M., Henderiks, 
J., Van Hilten, B., 2005, Basin-to- 
platform chemostrigraphy and 
diagenesis of the Early 
Cretaceous Vercors carbonate 
platform, SE France. 
Sedimentary Geology: 175, 297- 
314. 

Zhou, J., Lundstrom, C, Fouke, 
B.W., Panno, S., Hackley, K., and 
Curry, B., 2005. Paleoclimate and 
paleohydrologic record of the 
Midwest from a speleothem in 
Southern Illinois. Chemical 
Geology: 221:1-20. 

Pope, K.O., Ocampo, A.C, Fischer, 
A.G., Vega. F.G., Fouke, B.W, 
Wachtman, R.J., King, D.T., 
Kletetschka, C, and Ames, D.E, 
2005, Chicxulub impact ejecta 
deposits in southern Quintana 
Roo, Mexico, and central Belize. 
In Kenkman, T, Hoerz, H., and 
Deutsch, A. (eds.) Large Meteor 
Impacts III. Special Paper — 
Geological Society of America: 
384: 171-190. 



14 



Colloquium Speakers for Spring and Fa 



HONOR ROLL OF DONORS 



Jeroen Tromp, California Institute of Technology 

Seismic Tomography, Adjoint Methods, Time Reversal, and 

Banana-Donut Kernels 
Gary Parker, University of Minnesota 

Effect of Post-Glacial Sea Level Rise on Large Rivers 
Gordon Grant, U.S. Forest Service/Oregon State Univ. 

A River Runs Underneath It: Geological Control of 

Hydrogeomorphic Regimes in the Oregon Cascades and 

Implications for Climate Change 
David Archer, University of Chicago 

100 KYR-Timescale Impacts of Fossil Fuel Combustion 
Christian Teyssier, University of Minnesota 

Flow of Crust and Paleoelevation of the North American 

Cordillera 
Fabien Kenig, University of Illinois at Chicago 

Indicators of Biological Processes in Aging Basaltic Crust and 

Very Ancient Sediments: Lipids in Modern Hydrothermal 

Fluids and Archaean Sediments 
Yingwei Fei, Carnegie Institute of Washington 

Phase Transformations and Chemical Composition of the 

Earth's Mantle 
Michael Loui, Former Associate Dean, Graduate College, UIUC 

Authorship and Plagiarism: True Tales of Real Cases 
Grant Garven, Johns Hopkins University 

Hot Fluids, Sea Floor Hydrogeology, and Formation of the 

World's Largest Zinc Deposit at Red Dog, Alaska 
Raymond Torres, University of South Carolina 

Ecogeomorphology of a Salt Marsh Landscape 
Cliff Frohlich, University of Texas at Austin 

What Mother Never Told Me About Deep Earthquakes 
Albert Hsui, UIUC Department of Geology 

Geodynamics: Mother of All Geological Processes 
Glenn Buckley, UIUC Department of Geology Alumnus 

Water Crisis Management, Texas Style: The Good, The Bad, 

and The Ugly 
Frank Richter, University of Chicago 

CAIs: Present at the Creation (Conditions in the Protoplanetary 

Disk as seen by Ca- Al-rich Inclusions in Primitive Meteorites) 
Rob Sanford, UIUC Department of Geology 

Bacterial Mediated Metal Reduction and Other Novel 

Biogeochemical Processes: the Anaeromyxobacte Case-Study 
Jim Van Orman, Case Western Reserve University 

Chemical Exchange between Earth's Core and Mantle 
Kathy Nagy, University of Illinois at Chicago 

A New Atomic-Scale Picture of In-Situ Sorption of Ions on 

Mica Taken with the X-Ray Reflectivity Camera 
Mark Brandon, Yale University 

The Roles of Climate and Orogeny on Accelerated Late 

Cenozoic Erosion Rates 
Tracy Gregg, State University of New York at Buffalo 

Loki Patera, lo: A Mid-Ocean Ridge without Plate Tectonics 
Xiaodong Song, UIUC Department of Geology 

Earthquake Doublets, Inner Core Rotation, and ARCTIC 

Experiment 
Harry Green, University of California at Riverside 

Potential Trigger Mechanisms for Deep-Focus Earthquakes 
Russell Vreeland, West Chester University 

On Pillars of Salt: The Survival of Microbes and DNA in 

Ancient Salt Crystals 
Keith Koper, St. Louis University 

Fine-scale Heterogeneity Within Earth's Inner Core 
S. Balachandar, UIUC Department of Theoretical and Applied 
Mechanics 

Scalar and particulate Gravity Currents— Modeling and Large 

Scale Simulations 
Jeff Dorale, University of Iowa 

Strong Contrasts in Mid-Continental Flooding Regimes Among 
Holocene, Last Glacial, and Last Interglacial Climates 



The following is a list of friends and alumni of the Department of Geology who 
have donated to the Department during the 2005 calendar year. 



Prof. Thomas F. Anderson 
Dr. Robert F. Babb II 
Mr. Rodney J. Balazs 
Ms. Debbie E. Baldwin 
Mrs. Laura S. Bales 
Mr. Robert S. Barnard 
Dr. and Mrs. James R. 

Baroffio 
Dr. and Mrs. William M. 

Benzel 
Ms. Jean M. Bethke 
Dr. and Mrs. Marion E. 

Bickford 
LTC Ronald E. Black (RET) 
Mrs. Heidi Blischke 
Dr. Bruce F. Bohor 
Mr. Eugene W. Borden Sr. 
Mr. Joseph E. Boudreaux 
Mr. and Mrs. Allen S. 

Braumiller 
Ms. Annette Brewster 
Mr. and Mrs. Ross D. 

Brower 
Dr. Glenn R. Buckley 
Dr. Susan Buckley 
Mr. and Mrs. Steven P. 

Burgess 
Dr. Thomas C. Buschbach 
Mr. and Mrs. Terry L. Carius 
James W. Castle, PhD 
Dr. Thomas L Chamberlin 
Dr. Dennis D. Coleman 
Mrs. Diana Colvin 
Ms. Michelle M. Corlew 
Ms. Patricia V. Crow 
Mrs. Lucinda Firebaugh 

Cummins 
Dr. Norbert E. Cygan 
George H. Davis Estate 

(DEC) 
Mr. and Mrs. M. Peter 

deVries 
Ms. Stephanie Drain 
Ms. Sophie M. Dreifuss 
Ms. Amanda B. Duchek 
Dr. Mohamed T. El-Ashry 
Dr. Frank R. Ettensohn 
Mr. Kenneth T. Feldman 
Dr. Peter Fenner 
Mr. Max C. Firebaugh 
Mr. Gary R. Foote 
Mr. Jack D. Foster 
Mr. Robert E. Fox 
Mr. and Mrs. Edwin H. 

Franklin 
Mr. Barry R. Gager 
James C. Gamble, PhD 
Mr. John R. Garino 
Ms. Sharon Geil 
Dr. Richard A. Gilman 
Mr. Albert D. Glover 
Mr. Hal Gluskoter 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. 

Gossett 
Dr. and Mrs. Stuart 

Grossman 
Mr. Edwin E. Hardt 



Mrs. Catherine L Harms 

Dr. Henry J. Harris 

Dr. Richard L. Hay (DEC) 

Dr. Mark A. Helper 

Mr. Henry A. Hofl 

Mr. and Mrs. Mark F. Hoffman 

Mr. and Mrs. Glen A. Howard 

Dr. Roscoe G. Jackson II 

Mr. Joseph M. Jakupcak 

Mr. Steven F. Jamrisko 

Mr. Martin V. Jean 

Mr. Bruce A. Johnson 

Dr. Edward C. Jonas 

Dr. Robert E. Karlin 

Dr. Suzanne Mahlburg Kay 

Mr. Donald A. Keefer 

Dr. John P. Kempton 

Mr. John N. Keys 

Dr. and Mrs. John D. Kiefer 

Dr. R. James Kirkpatrick 

Mr. George J. Klein 

Dr. Paul Kraatz 

Mr. Robert F. Kraye 

Mr. Scott R. Krueger 

Mr. Michael B. Lamport 

Mr. Rik E. Lantz 

Ms. Mary K. Latendresse 

Mr. Stephen C. Lee 

Dr. Hannes E. Leetaru 

Dr. Morris W. Leighton 

Mr. Duane M. Loofbourrow 

Mr. Rob Roy Macgregor 

Mr. David L. Macke 

Dr. Megan E. Elwood Madden 

Prof, and Mrs. Stephen 

Marshak 
Mr. Robert S. Mayer 
Dr. Murray R. McComas 
Mr. and Mrs. Hugh S. 

McMullen 
Mr. and Mrs. Kendall W. Miller 
Dr. Haydn H. Murray 
Mr. Don H. Neeley 
Mr. W. John Nelson 
Mr. Walter I. Nelson 
Mr. Bruce Nims 
Mr. Brian Donald Noel 
Mrs. Evelyn B. Norns 
Mr. Ronald L. Norris 
Dr. Norman J. Page 
Ms. Katherine A. Panczak 
Mrs. Corinne Pearson 
Dr. Russel A. Peppers 
Mr. Charles E. Pflum 
Mr. Bruce E. Phillips 
Mrs. Beverly A. Pierce 
Ms. Sue A. Pilling 
Dr. Paul L. Plusquellec 
Dr. David W. Rich 
Mr. Donald 0. Rimsnider 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward L. 

Rosenthal 
Dr. Linda R. Rowan 
Mr. Stephen C. Ruppel 
Dr. Richard P. Sanders 
Dr. Gayla F. Sargent 
Mr. Michael L. Sargent 



Mr. Jay R. Scheevel 
Dr. and Mrs. Detmar 

Schnitker 
Dr. David C. Schuster 
Dr. and Mrs. Franklin W. 

Schwartz 
Dr. and Mrs. John W. Shelton 
Mr. Ned R. Siegel 
Dr. Charles H. Simonds 
Dr. Brian J. Sinclair 
Mr. and Mrs. Roger A. Sippel 
Mr. John F. Smith 
Mrs. Mary R. Snoeyenbos 
Mr. Robert D. Snyder 
Dr. J. William Soderman 
Dr. Ian M. Steele 
Dr. Ronald D. Stieglilz 
Dr. John E. Stone 
Dr. Gary D. Strieker 
Mr. David S. Thiel 
Mr. and Mrs. Jack C. Threet 
Dr. Edwin W. Tooker 
Dr. John B. Tubb Jr. 
Mr. Robert G. Vanderstraeten 
Mr. Robert W. Von Rhee 
Dr. F. Michael Wahl 
Ms. Harriet E. Wallace 
Dr. James G. Ward 
Mr. Carleton W. Weber 
Dr. W. F Weeks 
Ms. Patricia A. Wiegers 
Mr. Jack L. Wilber 
Mr John J. Wilson 
Mr. Roland F. Wright 
Mr. Robert G. Zirkle 

Corporations 

BP Foundation 
Chevron 

ConocoPhillips Company 
ConocoPhillips Corporation 
Dominion Foundation 
ExxonMobil Biomedical 

Sciences, Inc. 
ExxonMobil Foundation 
ExxonMobil Retiree Program 
Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund 
Global Impact/Hewlett 

Packard 
Isotech Laboratories, Inc. 
Kerr-McGee Corporation 
Lockheed Martin Corporation 

Foundation 
Mor-Staffing, Inc. 
PG&E Corporation 

Foundation 
The Schwab Fund lor 

Charitable Giving 
SemGroup. LP 
Shell Oil Company 
Shell Oil Company 

Foundation 
Telra Tech EM Inc. 
Whiting Petroleum 

Corporation an Alliant 

Company 
World Reach, Inc. 



15 



We'd love to hear 
from you 



Send us your personal 

and professional updates by e-mailing us at 

geology@uiuc.edu or by regular mail to: 

Department of Geology 

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 

245 Natural History Building 

1301 W. Green St. 

Urbana, IL 61S01 



Please include degree(s) earned and 
year, along with your current affiliation. 




Late-Breaking News! 
New Faculty hired in Geology! 

Stay Tuned! 



Count me in! 



Please accept my contribution in support of Geology 
Programs at the University of Illinois 

I $5,000 □ $1,000 D$500 D$250 D$100 D$50 □ Other. 



(Please pnnt) 

Name(s) _ 
Address _ 



City. 



State, 



Zip. 



Please indicate how you would like your gift used. 

□ GeoThrust (unrestricted) - 776641 
[J Geology Library Fund - 332463 

J Harold R. Wanless Graduate Fellowship Fund - 773786 

□ Kansas-Oklahoma Alumni Fund - 772424 
Midwest Alumni Geology Fund - 772722 

□ Texas-Louisiana Alumni Fund - 773720 

_ W. Hilton Johnson Memorial Field Fund - 772408 
Z Other 

Please make check payable to: 

University of Illinois Foundation 

Mail to: 

Department of Geology 

c/o University of Illinois Foundation 

PO Box 3429 

Champaign. IL 61826-9916 

Or to make a gift by credit card, you may do so online at 
http://www.uif.illinois.edu/ 

Thank You! 



5M9DS 
76641 



O ILLINOIS 



Department of Geology 

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 
245 Natural History Building 
1301 W. Green St. 
Urbana, IL 61801 



Non-Profit Organization 


U.S. Postage 


PAID 


Permit No. 75 


Champaign. IL 61820 



2006 YEAR 



REVIEW 



Denartment of Geology 

Z<*2Tnlr2(i ty of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 

0O(p „ 

Beuer than Ever: Sedimentary Geology and Surface Processes 




The Department of Geology has a long, 
rich tradition as a national leader in 
sedimentary geology and surface process- 
es. The program's roots extend back at 
least to what many alumni fondly call 
"the Wanless Era," named for Prof. 
Harold Wanless, who made fundamental 
contributions to sedimentary geology. 
Over the years, major figures in sedimen- 
tary geology and geomorphology have 
populated the halls of NHB. Graduates of 
our programs have gone on to distin- 
guished careers in industry, academia, 
and service. 

During the 1980s and '90s, however, 
a generation of distinguished senior facul- 
ty in these fields retired. The retirements 
coincided with a period during which the 
College slowed the rate of hiring, and 
thus we were not able to rebuild the pro- 
grams instantly. During the past several 
years, however, the tide has turned and 
the Department has once again become 
established as a leading research and 
teaching center in sedimentary geology 
and surface processes. Now, our sedi- 
mentary geology program includes: Bruce 




Fouke who specializes in the geology 
and geomicrobiology of carbonate rocks; 
Sue Kieffer (the first Walgreen Chair) 
who specializes in geophysical fluid 
dynamics; Gary Parker (the first WH. 
Johnson Professor) who specializes in 
fluvial geomorphology and abyssal fans; 
Jim Best (the first Threet Professor) who 
specializes in clastic sedimentology; 
Alison Anders who specializes in geo- 
morphology and surface processes; 
Jonathan Tomkin (Associate Director of 
SESE) who specializes in geomorphology 



and geodynamics; Bruce Rhoads (an 
affiliate professor) who specializes in flu- 
vial geomorphology; Marcelo Garcia (an 
affiliate professor) who directs the 
Hydrosystems Laboratory for modeling 
sedimentary environments; and Feng 
Sheng Hu (an affiliate professor) who 
specializes in Quaternary paleobiology 
and paleoclimate. It is highly likely that 
next year a new paleobiologist will be 
joining the University. 

(continued on page 3) 



Meet the Newest Members of the Geology Department 



The Department has grown signifi- 
cantly in the past year, with the 
appointments of Jim Best, Alison 
Anders, and Jonathan Tomkin. 

Jim Best 

Jim Best came to Illinois in the 
fall of 2006 through the Faculty 
Excellence Hiring Program, which 
creates an opportunity for depart- 



ments to bring in senior faculty. Prior 
to his arrival at UIUC, he was the 
Professor of Sedimentary Processes at 
the University of Leeds, where he ran a 
huge program for studying sedimentary 
phenomena. At Illinois, he holds 
appointments both as the "Threet 
Professor of Sedimentary Geology," a 
position made possible through the 
generosity of Jack and Richard Threet, 
and as a professor of geography. 



Professor Best, as one of the pre- 
mier process sedimentologists in the 
world, brings instant attention to the 
University. Along with others now on 
our staff, the University is rapidly 
becoming a major player in the field of 
water-sediment interactions. He is 
making a strong commitment to the 
synergy that has developed at UIUC in 
the interdisciplinary field of water- 
related research. Jim conducts research 
I continued on page 3 ) 




AUG 7 2007 



Greetings 



Letter From The Head 



he Department 
is back in 
growth mode! 
We've seen a num- 
ber of positive 
signs in the last 
year that give the 
sense that the 
Department clearly 
has a promising 
future. In no particular order, consider 
some of the changes: 

We have succeeded in bringing in 
new faculty with world-class reputa- 
tions, so the total number of faculty 
has grown for the first time in years. 
Our most recent hires — Sue Kieffer, 
Gary Parker, Jim Best, Alison Anders, 
and Jonathan Tomkin — have put the 
Department back on the map in the 
general area of sedimentary systems 
and surface processes. Both Gary and 
Jim now hold endowed professorships 
and have won major international 
career-achievement awards, and Sue 
is a member of the National Academy 
of Sciences. 

The Department is now well connect- 
ed to a number of strong programs 
across campus — we are no longer an 
isolated, small unit. Our faculty have 
joint or affiliate appointments in Civil 
and Environmental Engineering, the 
Institute for Genomic Biology, the 
Materials Research Center, the 
National Center for Supercomputing 
Applications, the School of Integrative 
Biology, the Center for Water as a 



Year in Review is published once a year by the 
Department of Geology, University of Illinois 
at Urbana-Champaign. to summarize the 
activities and accomplishments within the 
department and news from alumni and friends. 
Department Head: Stephen Marshak 

(smarshak@uiuc.edu) 
Administrative Secretary: Barb Elmore 

(belmore@uiuc.edu) 

Editor: Stephen J. Lyons (sjlyons@uiuc.edu) 
http://www.geology.uiuc.edu 



Complex Environmental System, the 
Department of Geography, the 
Department of Atmospheric Sciences, 
and the Department of Physics. 
The number of students has grown — 
we have passed 70 majors, double 
what we had 3 years ago, and with the 
largest incoming class of graduate stu- 
dents in many years, our grad student 
program has enlarged. Classes that 
just a few years ago almost couldn't 
run because of too few students now 
are having to open up new sections, 
and we are sending almost twice as 
many students to field camp. And 
with over 3,000 students taking our 
introductory general education classes, 
we are teaching a sizable proportion of 
the University's entire student body. 

1 Faculty are offering new courses — geo- 
logical fluid dynamics, geomorphology, 
geodynamics, sedimentary processes, 
continental lithosphere, sustainability, 
and others are now available, and with 
the help of a generous gift from Shell 
Oil Company, our famous (infamous) 
415/515 field trip is able to expand its 
offering. In addition to trips to the 
southwestern USA and Curacao, we 
will be offering a trip to study the sedi- 
mentary basins of Ireland. 

• Our endowment has doubled in the 
last 5 years. With the generosity of 
our distinguished alumni, we will soon 
have 6 graduate fellowships to offer, as 
well as support for graduate research, 
field camp scholarships, visiting lectur- 
ers, and other important causes. 
We are seeing a surge in corporate 
recruitment of our students, with some 
companies hiring several a year. And 
for the first time in anyone's memory, 
recruiters have shown up at field camp 
to recruit students right out of the 
camp. 

The Geology Club has been very visi- 
bles and has sponsored many activi- 
ties, including open-house exhibits, the 



first "Earth Fear Film Festival" (where 
students enjoyed learning the science 
and non-science behind Hollywood 
productions), and sponsorship of the 
Science Olympiad. The Graduate 
Student Council has been busy run- 
ning the 6th Annual "Earth Research 
Review" which has evolved into a 
major event where students present 
posters describing their research 
accomplishments, in a fun atmosphere 
of a wine and cheese party. 

Of course the biggest change is the 
development of the School of Earth, 
Society, and Environment. The School 
becomes official this summer, and we 
have already enjoyed such benefits as 
better business operations, better comput- 
er support, and new collaborative 
research and teaching opportunities. The 
next step will be the renovation of our 
old friend, the Natural History Building, 
to become a better facility for 21st centu- 
ry teaching and research. 

I'll be on sabbatical all of next year, 
so you won't hear from me for a while. 
But enjoy this issue and read more about 
how your Department is changing and, 
hopefully, growing. 

Best regards, 
Steve Marshak 



Shell Oil Company is now generously 
supporting the Department's Geology 
415/515 field trips. The 2005 trip (led by 
Craig Lundstrom) rafted the San Juan 
River; the 2006 trip (led by Steve 
Marshak) went to southern Arizona and 
California; the 2007 trip (led by Bruce 
Fouke) went to Curacao; and the 2008 
trip (to be led by Jim Best) will go to 
western Ireland. 







GEOLOGY LIBRARY 



Meet the Newest Members 

(continued from page 1) 

both in the lab, using flume tanks, on 
the computer, and in the field. He has 
recently undertaken studies of large 
rivers in Canada and Bangladesh, using 
ground-penetrating radar and precise 
surveying techniques. 

Jim, his wife Mary, and their chil- 
dren, will soon be moving into a vin- 
tage house on Elm Boulevard. 

Alison Anders 

Alison Anders 
comes to the 
Department as 
Assistant Professor 
of surficial process- 
es, after completing 
a post-doc at Yale 
and a Ph.D. at the University of 
Washington. She combines studies of 
geomorphology with studies of climate 
to understand the interaction between 
weather systems and landscape evolu- 




tion, and has been developing innova- 
tive techniques for characterizing rain- 
fall distribution in mountain ranges. 

Alison will teach geomorphology 
and other aspects of surface processes 
at both the undergraduate and gradu- 
ate levels, courses which have not 
been fully staffed since the retirement 
of Hilt Johnson. Alison will be 
involved in the Center for Water as a 
Complex Environmental System, and 
hopes to build linkages between geolo- 
gy and atmospheric sciences. 

Alison is not new to the Midwest, 
as she grew up in Minneapolis and 
attended Carlton College as an under- 
graduate. She has moved to C-U with 
her husband, Jonathan Tomkin. 



Jonathan Tomkin 



MJ& 



Jonathan Tomkin 
received his Ph.D. 
from the Australian 
National University, 
and then completed 
a post-doc at Yale 



University before taking a faculty posi- 
tion at Louisiana State University. His 
undergraduate background was in 
physics, but he saw the light and went 
into geosciences as a graduate student. 
Jonathan works in surficial processes 
from a geodynamic perspective — he's 
interested in understanding the tecton- 
ic processes that lead to uplift and 
evolution of mountain landscapes, as 
well as in the erosional processes that 
tear them down. 

Jonathan holds two appointments 
at UIUC. He is the new Associate 
Director for Academic Affairs of the 
School of Earth, Society, and 
Environment. He will also be a 
Research Assistant Professor in the 
Geology Department, where he will be 
teaching graduate courses in geody- 
namics and tectonic geomorphology. 

Unlike his wife, Alison Anders — a 
Minnesota native — Jonathan, who 
grew up in Melbourne, Australia, 
found the winter weather of C-U to be 
a bit on the chilly side. 



Better than Ever 

(continued from page 1) 

The faculty are award-winning 
researchers. Sue Kieffer has received a 
Macarthur "genius award" and is a mem- 
ber of the National Academy of Sciences; 
Marcelo Garcia received the Hans Albert 
Einstein Award from the American 
Society of Civil Engineers; Gary Parker 
has won the Lifetime Achievement 
Award of the International Association of 
Hydraulic Engineering; and Jim Best has 
won the Warwick Award of the British 
Geomorphological Society. 

Our researchers are able to conduct 
state-of-the art simulations of deposition- 
al and erosional environments at the 
11,000 square-foot Ven Te Chow 
Hydrosystems Laboratory, one of the 
world's best facilities for flume tank and 
wave tank studies. Recent work in the 



lab has focused on examining bed forms, 
submarine fans, and river evolution. The 
new Institute for Genomic Biology, which 
just opened on campus, allows research 
on the microbial communities of the sedi- 
mentary realm. And the National Center 
for Supercomputing Applications provides 
opportunities for developing numerical 
simulations of processes. Collaborative 
proposals under development with the 
Department of Geography, the Illinois 
State Geological Survey, the Department 
of Atmospheric Sciences, and the 
Department of Civil and Environmental 
Engineering are seeking funding for major 
new field equipment, including LIDAR 
and ground-penetrating radar. 

Our renewed commitment to sedi- 
mentary geology also includes an associa- 
tion with the Center for Water as a 
Complex Environmental System 



(CWACESJ . The Center, under the 
leadership of Bruce Rhoads, is devoted 
to improving understanding of water- 
related issues. Our hydrogeology faculty, 
Craig Bethke and Tom Johnson, add an 
important groundwater component to 
the Center. 

We have been increasing opportuni- 
ties for our students to participate in 
field trips to examine sedimentary 
processes and produces. Under the aus- 
pices of Geology 415/515, students have 
trekked across the deserts of southern 
Arizona, have rafted down rivers in 
Utah, and have snorkeled over reefs in 
Curacao. Recent generous gifts from 
Shell Oil Company allow us to expand 
our program. We hope to offer a trip to 
the sedimentary basins of western 
Ireland in the coming year. 



Scott Morris Establishes a new Office 
of Business Affairs 



s part of the development of the 
School of Earth, Society, and 
Environment the Departments of 
Geology, Atmospheric Sciences, and 
Geography have consolidated busi- 
ness and financial operations, includ- 
ing grants and contracts administra- 
tion, purchasing, travel, and account- 
ing into a single facility called the 
Office of Business Affairs. In June, 
2006, Scott Morris was appointed as 
the Operations Manager of the School 
— in this capacity, he supervises the 
Business Affairs Office. He also over- 
sees computer and technical support, 
facilities, and construction projects for 
the School. Morris, who grew up in 
Altamont, Illinois, attended Lake Land 
College, Eastern Illinois University, 
and holds a bachelor's degree in 
Business Administration from 
Kennedy-Western University. He has 
been with the University since 1986, 



with the exception of a few years dur- 
ing which time he worked as 
Operations Manager for a faculty start- 
up company in the Research Park. 

According to Morris, "centralizing 
business operations for three depart- 
ments, currently housed in three differ- 
ent buildings, has proven to be quite a 
challenge, considering that each has 
developed its own procedures over the 
years. However, we have now estab- 
lished a combined office on the 4th 
floor of the Natural History Building 
allowing us to bring all financial staff 
together in the same location. We have 
also hired a new Grants & Contracts 
Specialist. The combined office can 
provide improved and more consistent 
services, where the staff will be able to 
focus on specific tasks but cross-trained 
to provide back up as needed. The new 
approach is a big step in the right 
direction." 



Renovation Plans in NHB 

xciting plans are under development to renovate NHB in order to be able to incorporate all three 
""departments of the new School. There's quite a bit of unutilized or underutilized space in the 
building at present. Most of the space is left over from the closing of the museum, but there are also 
classroom spaces that have not been updated for decades and are underutilized. The goal is to try 
to figure out how we can renovate this space for a reasonable cost to make it possible for three aca- 
demic units to operate in the building. When the academic units are there we'll have three times as 
many faculty members and three times as many graduate students residing in the same building. So 
NHB will become a much livelier space. 



NSF Teaching 
Fellowship leaves 
lasting Impression 

ow do you explain isotopic frac- 
tionation to 5th graders? This 
was one of the many questions 
that graduate student and National 
Science Foundation GK-12 Teaching 
Fellow Scott Clark faced during the 
2005-06 academic year. NSF 
Teaching Fellows collaborate with 
K-12 teachers to bring energy and 
fresh perspectives into the 
teacher's classrooms. 

Clark's fellowship took him to 
the Unity Point School in southern 
Illinois, where he designed and led 
geological field trips for 5th-grade 
and high-school students. The 
products of this effort included "a 
multi-day project that fosters stu- 
dent learning on subjects ranging 
from the theory of plate tectonics 
to earthquake-hazard prepared- 
ness." He focused on developing 
inquiry-based teaching methods 
and on the use of technology in 
earth science classrooms. 

"The students were fun 
because they were interested, were 
willing to tackle challenging topics, 
and were not afraid or embarrassed 
to ask questions." 

Clark was also delighted to 
learn that after his teaching stint, 
the school applied for and received 
a school seismograph from the IRIS 
Seismographs-In-Schools program . 
The students have seen the instru- 
ment record an earthquake halfway 
around the world. 

"Now, an earthquake isn't just 
something that gets reported in the 
news," Clark says. "Such experi- 
ences make science alive for kids." 




Mapping A Future in Geology 




Jessica Parker 



Tie road to from 
_ geography to geol- 
ogy is paved with 
maps. Just ask grad- 
uate student Jessica 
Parker, who will be 
mapping carbonate 
sediment in the Gulf 
of Mexico as an 
intern for Shell Oil 
this summer in Houston. Parker's U of I 
undergraduate degree in geography gave 
her only a taste of geology via environ- 
mental science classes, but gave her valu- 
able experience with geographic informa- 
tion science (GIS) . Her brief experience 
led her to look into the option of pursuing 
a double major in geology and geography. 
After discussing options with folks at the 
Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS), 
where she held an internship, and in the 



Department, she realized she had 
enough credit to graduate 

"Instead of staying another year an 
undergraduate, I went ahead and began 
a master's in geology." 

Support from a research assistant- 
ship in the Veterinary Medicine School, 
applying her background in GIS made 
the switch in disciplines possible. 

For Parker the two disciplines of 
geography and geology are simpatico, 
and the connections, via the study of 
maps, has led to an opportunity for a 
summer internship at Shell Oil 
Company. 

"In my mind the two disciplines 
aren't very different. At the ISGS I was 
working with maps of state geology. At 
Shell, I'll be focusing on making maps 
that spatially display carbonate data. 
The internship will bridge my geography 
and geology training." 



The mapping of the carbonate 
deposits is a key component of oil explo- 
ration, Parker notes. 

"Porosity and permeability, two fac- 
tors that determine whether or not a 
rock is a good oil reservoir, vary with 
location. Maps can display the distribu- 
tion of permeability, and can help deter- 
mine if it economical to extract oil from 
a particular formation." GIS techniques 
provide an efficient way to manipulate 
large volumes of data. 

Parker has found that the Geology 
Department is a supportive environment 
for combining disciplines. 

"I was a little intimidated at first 
because I lacked a solid geologic back- 
ground. But the Department is definitely 
open to new ideas and has been very 
encouraging. They were very supportive 
in having me join the program." 



Seismologists locate missing lithosphere slab under Tibet 



eologists in the Department have locat- 
ed a huge chunk of Earth's lithosphere 
that went missing 15 million years ago. By 
finding the massive block of errant rock 
beneath Tibet, the researchers are helping 
solve a long-standing mystery and 
clarifying how continents behave when 
they collide. 

About 55 million years ago, the 
Indian plate crashed into the Eurasian 
plate, forcing the land to slowly buckle 
and rise to produce the Tibetan Plateau, 
the world's largest and highest plateau. 
Tectonic models of the plateau vary great- 
ly. According to one model, the thickened 
lithosphere beneath Tibet became unsta- 
ble, and a piece broke off and sank into 
the deep mantle. 

"While attached, this immense piece 
of mantle lithosphere under Tibet acted as 
an anchor, holding the land above in 
place," said Wang-Ping Chen, professor of 
geophysics. "Then, about 15 million years 




ago, the chain broke and the land rose, 
further raising the high plateau." 

Until recently, this tantalizing idea 
lacked any clear observation to support it. 
Then doctoral student Tai-Lin (Ellen) 
Tseng and Chen found the missing anchor. 

"This remnant of detached lithos- 
phere provides key evidence for a direct 
connection between continental collision 
near the surface and deep-seated dynam- 
ics in the mantle," Tseng said. 



Through a project called Hi-CLIMB, 
an integrated study of the Himalayan- 
Tibetan Continental Lithosphere during 
Mountain Building, Tseng analyzed seis- 
mic signals collected at a number of per- 
manent stations and at many temporary 
stations to search for the missing mass. 
She precisely measured the velocities of 
seismic waves traveling beneath the 
region at depths of 300 to 700 kilometers. 
Because seismic waves travel faster 
through colder rock, Tseng was able to 
discern the positions of detached, cold 
lithosphere from her data. 

"We not only found the missing 
piece of cold lithosphere, but also were 
able to reconstruct the positions of tec- 
tonic plates back to 15 million years 
ago," Tseng said. "It therefore seems 
much more likely that instability in the 
thickening lithosphere was partially 
responsible for forming the Tibetan 
Plateau, rather than the wholesale sub- 
duction of one of the tectonic plates." 



Scientists propose alternate 
model for plume on Enceladus 




hat's causing all the commotion on 

Enceladus? 

Last year, when the Cassini space- 
craft discovered an enormous plume 
erupting on Enceladus, one of Saturn's 
moons, scientists speculated that liquid 
water lay at shallow depths beneath the 
icy surface. 

Now, as reported in a recent issue 
of the journal Science, researchers have 
proposed an alternate model to account 
for this spectacular plume. 

"With a diameter of only 500 kilo- 
meters, Enceladus is a tiny moon; it 
would fit easily between Los Angeles 
and San Francisco," says Professor of 
Geology Susan Kieffer, lead author of 
the Science paper. "This tiny satellite 
should be cold and inactive, like our 
own moon. But it isn't." 

Kieffer, who holds a Charles R. 
Walgreen Jr. Chair in the Department of 
Geology, has studied geysers and volca- 
noes on Earth, Io (a satellite of Jupiter), 
and Triton (a satellite of Neptune). 

The surface of Enceladus is com- 
posed of water ice with traces of car- 



bon dioxide. Part of this surface does 
appear old and cratered like Earth's 
moon, Kieffer said. "The south polar 
region, however, is geologically active, 
with many surface features, indicating 
current activity." 

Initial reports speculated that 
chambers of liquid water lay close to 
the moon's surface and erupted in a 
giant geyser. The water would be near 
freezing, so scientists dubbed the model 
"Cold Faithful," after the familiar, but 
hotter, Old Faithful geyser in 
Yellowstone National Park. 

"A problem with this model," 
Kieffer said, "is that 10% of the plume 
consists of the gases carbon dioxide, 
nitrogen and methane. You might get a 
carbon dioxide-driven liquid geyser 
there, but you can't put this much 
nitrogen and methane into liquid water 
at the low pressures found inside 
Enceladus." 

Kieffer and colleagues have pro- 
posed an alternate model to explain the 
plume on Enceladus. The gases in the 
plume, they propose, are dissolved in a 



reservoir of clathrate under the water 
ice cap in the south polar region. The 
clathrate model allows an environment 
that would be 80° to 100° Celsius cold- 
er than liquid water, with a "Frigid 
Faithful" plume emanating from 
clathrates, rather than from liquid water 
reservoirs. 

"Exposed to near- vacuum condi- 
tions by fractures at the south pole, the 
clathrates decompose violently, spewing 
out nitrogen, methane and carbon diox- 
ide gases, and ice particles; as well as 
leaving fracture walls coated with water 
ice," said Kieffer, who has recently been 
appointed as a professor in the U of I's 
Center for Advanced Study, one of the 
highest forms of campus recognition. 

The other authors of the paper 
besides Kieffer are postdoctoral 
researcher Xinli Lu and Department 
geologists Craig Bethke and Steve 
Marshak, planetary scientist John 
Spencer at the Southwest Research 
Institute, and chemist Alexandra 
Navrotsky at the University of California 
at Davis. 



Researchers study role of natural organic matter in environment 



he decomposition of plant, animal, 
and microbial material in soil and 
water produces a variety of complex 
organic molecules, collectively called 
natural organic matter. These com- 
pounds play many important roles in 
the environment. 

By studying the molecular mecha- 
nisms responsible for the complex 
behavior of natural organic matter, 
Research Associate Professor Andrey 
Kalinichev and Professor Jim 
Kirkpatrick in the Department of 



Geology are finding new ways to pre- 
vent the compounds from fouling water 
purification and desalination facilities. 

"Bio-fouling creates great complica- 
tions for the water purification and 
desalination industries," Kalinichev said. 

Because of its acidic nature, natural 
organic matter can form complexes with 
dissolved metal ions. The way in which 
such ions bond to natural organic mat- 
ter, and the potential effects of the ions 
on bio-fouling, were studied using mole- 
cular dynamic computer simulations 



performed by Kalinichev, and nuclear 
magnetic resonance measurements 
performed by Kirkpatrick and former 
student Xiang Xu. 

Kalinichev and Kirkpatrick found 
that sodium and magnesium ions have 
very weak interactions with natural 
organic matter. Cesium interacts more 
strongly, but calcium has the strongest 
interaction with natural organic matter. 

This work was funded by the U.S. 
Department of Energy and the 
National Science Foundation. 




Finding New Worlds in the Subsurface 






Ted Flynn is almost poetic when he 
describes what he has been exploring 
in the huge Mahomet Aquifer that under- 
lies much of central Illinois and supplies 
the region with its clean drinking water. 
"In the very fine, water-filled glacial 
sands filled of the aquifer, there's no oxy- 
gen but things are still living! The water 
contains anaerobic bacteria, organisms 
that don't breathe in oxygen and breath 
out carbon dioxide like we do, but rather 
breathe in sulfate and breath out sulfide. 
"This permits an entire ecosystem of 
micro-organisms to exist underground, 
and these have the capacity to affect 
groundwater geochemistry. We're study- 
ing how microbes and microbial respira- 
tion affect groundwater geochemistry. " 
The third-year Ph.D. student, who 
came to Illinois from Notre Dame to work 
with Prof. Craig Bethke, has developed a 
new water-testing system that more accu- 
rately samples groundwater. Flynn want- 
ed to test the assumption that the bacteria 
collected by simply filtering a water sam- 



ple taken from a well actually represents of 
the bacterial community in the aquifer as a 
whole. What he found was that traditional 
testing only examines a fraction of that 
community. 

To see what else is in the groundwa- 
ter, Flynn filled bags with sterilized sand 
from the Mahomet Aquifer, then placed the 
water down wells. He allowed the sand to 
be colonized by the bacteria in the water 
samples and then removed the bags and 
extracted bacteria using filters. 

"Once we have a filter with the water 
bacteria and the sand with the attached 
bacteria, we extract the DNA from the bac- 
teria and then use molecular biology tech- 
niques to compare the entire microbial 
community from one sample to the other. 

"We found was that there are actually 
two distinct groups of microbes: the 
attached bugs and the unattached ones. 
Amazingly, the attached community in a 
well is more similar to the attached com- 
munity in a different well tens of miles 
away than it is to the unattached commu- 



nity in its own well." 

Because of his results, Flynn notes 
the traditional filter tests do not give the 
complete picture. "Perhaps 99% of the 
microbes in an aquifer are attached to 
solids at any given time." 

Flynn wants to continue exploring 
the differences between bacteria in vari- 
ous watery communities. He enjoys the 
multidisciplinary nature of his research 
and says the U of I, with programs in 
both hydrogeology and geomicrobiology, 
was the perfect choice for graduate 
school. He has had the opportunity to 
work not only with Prof. Bethke, but also 
with Prof. Bruce Fouke and Research 
Scientist Rob Sanford. Through the 
geomicrobiology program, he now can 
interact with researchers at the new 
Institute for Genomic Biology. 

"I really like the collegia! atmosphere 
here. I've also been able to interact with 
people from different groups and different 
departments— from animal sciences to 
civil engineering." 



Affiliate Professor Marcelo Garcia won 
the 2006 Hans Albert Einstein Award 
from the American Society of Civil 
Engineers for "outstanding research 
contributions to sediment transport engi- 
neering, and outstanding service 
through visionary editorship of the 
ASCE book on Sediment Engineering." 
This award, named for Albert Einstein's 
son, is the highest recognition interna- 
tionally in the field of sedimentation 
engineering. Professor Gary Parker 
received the award in 1994. 

Professor Jay Bass has received an 
Honorary Doctorate from the University 
of Lyon in France. This prestigious 
award recognizes his contributions in 
mineral science. He has also been 
elected to the governing board of a 
newly formed Synchrotron Project, 
HPSynC, which is an Earth science 
synchrotron effort. 



Around the Department 



Geology Librarian Lura Joseph has been 
promoted and granted tenure in the University 
of Illinois Library. Joseph was a geologist in 
the oil industry for 18 years before taking a 
degree in library sciences. Her responsibilities 
have recently increased because the Geology 
Library has taken over responsibility for the 
Atmospheric Sciences collection. With this 
acquisition, the library now provides service to 
twice as many students and faculty. 

Associate Professor Craig Lundstrom has 
been appointed an Associate of the UIUC 
Center for Advanced Studies. This is an honor 
bestowed upon faculty to provide them with 
time to pursue high-profile research. 

Professor Wang-Ping Chen is serving on the 
Advisory Board of COMPRES (Consortium for 
Materials Properties Research in Earth 
Sciences, USA) until June of 2009. Professor 
Jay Bass continues his service on the 
Executive Board of COMPRES. 



Professor Emeritus Alberto Nieto will be 
teaching for several months in the geo- 
technical program at Tsinghua University in 
Peking. 

The Geology Department is now a member 
of UNAVCO, the national consortium for 
space-based geodesy. With this new mem- 
bership, our Department is now represent- 
ed in all three major research consortia in 
geosciences (the other two being IRIS. 
Incorporated Research Institutions for 
Seismology, and COMPRES). Professor 
Wang-Ping Chen is serving as the 
institutional representative in UNAVCO. 

Professor Ralph Langenheim continues 
his service as an elected member of the 
Champaign County Board. His former stu- 
dent. C. Pius Weibel (Ph.D. '88), was 
recently elected to the Board and has been 
made the Board's chair. Weibel is a geolo- 
gist at the Illinois State Geological Survey. 



Windows into the Past 



George Maxey and the Birth of Hydrogeology at Illinois 



by Ralph L. Langenheim 

In 1955, Department Head George 
White joined with the Illinois State 
Geological Survey to hire George 
Burke Maxey with a joint appointment 
as Associate Professor of Geology and 
Head of the Illinois State Geological 
Survey Division of Ground Water 
Geology, thus launching a dynasty in 
geohydrology at the University of 
Illinois. Maxey remained at Illinois for 
only seven years. He left in 1962 to 
join the Desert Research Institute in 
Nevada, and was succeeded, succes- 
sively, by his doctoral students, first 
Robert N. Farvolden (1960-1967), then 
John Bredehoeft (1968-1969), and 
finally by Patrick Domenico (1969- 
1982). 

The time was ripe for bringing 
hydrogeology to Illinois, for increas- 
ingly many graduates were ending up 
practicing geohydrology in their jobs 
with government agencies. Maxey 
was the right person to get the pro- 
gram off the ground, for he distin- 
guished himself as an innovative, 
charismatic and convivial leader of 
students. Along with his wife, Jane, 
Maxey hosted many memorable par- 
ties at his home, and encouraged a 
sense of camaraderie and enthusiasm 
among his students that has rarely 
been matched. Encouraged by White 
in 1960, Maxey joined Ven Te Chow's 
group in the Department of Civil 
Engineering and together with them 
organized Illinois' first groundwater 
course. While Maxey supported stu- 
dents studying Illinois aquifers for the 
ISGS, he also sent a group to Nevada 
to work in the Humboldt River water- 
shed, a project instigated by a group 







of ranchers interested in increasing 
irrigation. This "band of brothers"— 
including Bob Farvolden, Phil Cohen, 
John Hawley, Keros Cartwright, Lyle 
McGinnis, Bill Wilson, and John 
Bredehoeft— along with some of 
their families, lived together in 
Winnemucca where they completed 
one of the first comprehensive region- 
al evaluations of both surface water 
and groundwater in a desert climate. 
When Bob Farvolden, a founding 
head of the Alberta Research 
Foundation Ground Water Division, 
succeeded Maxey he began a pioneer- 
ing program on the hydrogeology of 
landfills. Farvolden went on to estab- 
lish the first Canadian degree program 
in hydrogeology at Western Ontario, 
and later organized a center for hydro- 
logic research at the University of 
Waterloo, where he hired Mini Ph.D.s, 
John Cherry and George Pindar. 



John Bredehoeft served as an 
interim visiting professor directing the 
geohydrology program for the 1978-69 
academic year. He went on to a distin- 
guished career at the U.S. Geological 
Survey where he led initiatives in the 
quantitative analyses of fluid flow and 
advocated application of computer 
modeling in hydrogeology. These 
achievements earned Bredehoeft the 
Distinguished Service Award and 
the Meinzer Award of the GSA 
Hydrogeology Division, the Penrose 
Medal, the Horton Medal of the 
American Geophysical Union, and 
membership in of the National 
Academy of Engineering. Pat 
Domenico, the last of Maxey's direct 
intellectual offspring, succeeded 
Bredehoeft and remained at Illinois 
until 1982, when he moved to Texas 
A&M. 

In all, almost 50 hydrogeologic 
theses have been written at Illinois. 
The Illinois hydrogeology program that 
Maxey founded graduated many 
remarkable individuals who went on 
to preeminent programs in the coun- 
try, as hydrogeology defined itself and 
became a major discipline within geo- 
science. The numerous Mini on the 
roll of recipients of the Distinguished 
Service Awards of the Hydrogeology 
Division of the Geological Survey testi- 
fies to the quality of that influence: 
George Maxey, 1984; Robert 
Farvoden, 1992; John Sharp and Paul 
Witherspoon, 1996; John Cherry, 1998; 
Keros Cartwright, 1991; Paul Seaber, 
1993; Stanley Davis, 1997; Richard 
Parizek, 1992; and John Bredehoeft, 
2003. 



Alumni News 




Dr. Frank Schwartz Receives Alumni Achievement Award 




e are very 
pleased to 
announce that Dr. 
Frank Schwartz 
(FPI) (72, Ph.D) is 
the 2007 
Department of 
Geology Alumni Achievement Award 
winner. Dr. Schwartz is an internationally 
respected research scholar and teacher in 
hydrogeology and hydrology. He joined 
The Ohio State University (OSU) in 1988 
as The Ohio Eminent Scholar in 
Hydrogeology. This endowed chair is 
among the most prestigious at The Ohio 
State University. Professor Schwartz is 
the author of more than 150 publications 
and is known internationally for his work 
on field and theoretical aspects of conta- 
minant hydrogeology and remediation, 
mass transport, ground- water geochem- 
istry, and watershed hydrology. He has 
co-authored three textbooks, which are 
widely used for teaching hydrogeology 
around the world. Since arriving at OSU, 
Dr. Schwartz has been successful in 
attracting close to $5M in funded external 
research from a variety of Federal agen- 
cies. In 2005, he was named as the 
Director of the School of Earth Sciences, 
which now has 37 faculty members and 
about 130 students. 

Professor Schwartz has received 
major awards recognizing his status as a 
scientific leader. He is a co-recipient of 
the prestigious O.E. Meinzer Award 
(1984), the Excellence in Science and 
Engineering Award (1991), and the GSA 
Distinguished Service Award (2005). He 
received the King Hubbert Science Award 
(1997). He was elected as a Fellow of the 
American Geophysical Union in 1992. 

In addition to teaching and research, 
Professor Schwartz has acted as a consul- 
tant to government and industry, and in 
various advisory capacities. He serves 
regularly on panels of the Water Science 
and Technology Board, an arm of the 
National Research Council designed to 
guide government policies. 



We asked Dr. Schwartz to share a 
few remembrances of his years at Illinois. 

"What I remember so vividly about 
my time at U of I are the people, faculty 
members and fellow graduate students. 
The professors and students of my time 
were exceptionally talented individuals— 
really in a league of their own. Clearly, 
when students come to a world-class 
institution like U of I, it is to discover tal- 



ented professors, the Pat Domenicos, 
Vic Palciauskases and Don Graffs of 
the world. These individuals are all 
long gone from Illinois, and probably 
not well known to more recent alumni. 
You should think of them as links in 
the long chain of accomplishment and 
scientific excellence, which has been a 
hallmark of our department." 



Obituaries 




Donald Munro 
"Hendy" 
Henderson of 

Urbana passed 
away on October 
21, 2006. He was 
85, and leaves 
behind his wife 
Peggy, five chil- 
dren, and five grandchildren. 

Don received his bachelor's 
degree from Brown University and his 
master's and doctoral degrees from 
Harvard University. He joined the fac- 
ulty of the University of Illinois in 
1948 as an instructor, moved through 
the ranks to become full professor in 
1969, and became professor emeritus 
in 1989. A large retirement party was 
held in his honor at the Krannert Art 
Museum, complete with a string quar- 
tet playing music composed for the 
occasion. 

Don was a member of the 
Mineralogy Society of America, the 
Geological Society of America, the 
American Geophysical Union, the 
American Association for the 
Advancement of Science, and the 
American Crystallographic 
Association. From 1958 to 1959, he 
held a Guggenheim Fellowship. 

Over his long career, Hendy con- 
ducted research on a variety of topics, 
ranging from crystal chemistry, to 
nuclear magnetic resonance studies, to 
the process of dolomitization. He also 
published on aspects of geological 
education. 



In the Department, Hendy's rig- 
orous courses in mineralogy were leg- 
endary. They yielded generations of 
very well trained students. From 1978 
to 1983, he assumed the position of 
Assistant Head and Educational 
Coordinator for the Department, and 
in this capacity ensured that teaching 
assignments were made and fulfilled, 
and that students received the advice 
they needed to succeed in their grad- 
uate programs. 

Sadly, Hendy suffered adult polio 
soon after he arrived at the University 
of Illinois, and needed to walk with 
canes for the remainder of his life. 
Nevertheless, he continued to accom- 
pany students on field trips, and to 
commute daily from his home in 
Urbana by bicycle. In the winter he 
attached crampons to his canes, to 
conquer the ice. 

Hendy will be remembered as a 
very kind person and a friend who 
served as a rational anchor in the 
department over many decades. He 
will also be remembered as an 
incredible punster who could always 
bring a note of levity to any situation. 
In his memory, his family and friends 
have established the Donald M. 
Henderson Memorial Fund within the 
Department of Geology's endowment. 
When the fund has grown, its income 
will be used to help purchase books 
for the Geology Library. One could 
often find Hendy in the stacks, read- 
ing both modern and historic geologic 
literature. 



Alumni News 




Obituaries 



Robert W. "Moose" Leonard (B.S. '55) of St. Charles, Illinois, passed away on 
December 29, 2006 in Oak Lawn, Illinois, surrounded by his loving family. He 
was 74. Bob will be remembered for his genuine kindness and his devotion to 
family, church, friends, and community. 

Following college, Bob served as an officer in the United States Army Air 
Corps until 1958 and in the Army National Guard until 1965. For 33 years, he 
served as a pilot with United Airlines and retired as a 747 captain. He also served 
as Mayor of North Aurora, Illinois, from 1965 to 1969, and spearheaded the 
development of the River Corridor Master Plan. 

James F. Luhr (B.S. 75) of University Park, Maryland, died 

peacefully at home on January 1 , 2007 of complications from 

influenza. He was 53. 

A renowned geologist, he was director of the Global 

Volcanism Program at the Museum of Natural History, 
"^ Smithsonian Institution. Jim was the devoted father of two 
daughters, and was married to Karen Prestegaard, whom he met at UC Berkeley 
when both were pursuing doctoral degrees. 

Jim was a passionate scientist, committed to deepening public awareness of 
scientific discovery. He helped to curate the Museum's enormously popular Hall 
of Geology, Gems and Minerals; collaborated extensively with Mexican scientists 
during years of research in that country; and chaired the Museum's mineralogy 
department for five years. He popularized science in every available medium: 
as editor of the books "Earth" (2004) and "Paricutin: The Volcano Born in a 
Mexican Cornfield" (1993); in exhibitions; through online and CD-Rom products; 
and even with a "build your own volcano" kit for children. Among his achieve- 
ments, Jim contributed to the development of early-warning systems to protect 
trans-Pacific flights from the effects of volcanic eruptions. Jim was also an 
accomplished fiddler, specializing in Irish music. 

Catherine A. Hier-Majumder (B.S. '97) passed away October 27, 2006 after 
being struck by a train in the Washington D.C. area. Cathy was beginning a 
career in planetary geophysics at the Carnegie Department of Terrestrial 
Magnetism. After graduating from Illinois, Cathy completed a Ph.D. in geophysics 
at the University of Minnesota in 2003. She spent the next year on a postdoctoral 
appointment at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Cathy joined 
DTM in April of 2005, and was known as a brilliant and creative scientist. Her 
mother and her husband, Suswata, who is a professor at the University of 
Maryland, survive her. 



1950s 

Alumnus and former faculty member 
William Hay (M.S. '58) received the 
Twenhofel Medal for a career of out- 
standing contributions in sedimentary 
geology from the Society of Sedimentary 
Geology. In his acceptance reply Bill 
credited U of I's George White for his 
support. 



Margaret Leinen (B.S., '69) is the chief 
science officer and vice president of 
Climos, a climate change research firm, 
as of January 2007. 



1970s 

Owen White (Ph.D. 70) received the 
R.F. Legget Medal, the highest honor 
given by the Canadian Geotechnical 
Society. The medal is "presented to 
an individual who has made signifi- 
cant personal contributions to the 
Canadian understanding of the inter- 
relationship of civil engineering and 
engineering geology through publica- 
tions, research or professional society 
activities; and who has stimulated 
geotechnical activities in Canada 
through the encouragement of co- 
workers. " 



l() 



Jim Granath (B.S. 71, M.S. 73) has 
been promoted to Principal Structural 
Geologist for Midland Valley, a Scottish 
structural geology-consulting firm that 
specializes in cross-section construction 
for the oil industry. Jim will be based 
in Denver. 

Rod Balazs (M.S. 71) is with Mor- 
Staffing, Inc., a human resources firm 
based in Fort Washington, PA. He 
stopped by the GSA alumni reception 
in Philadelphia. 

1980s 
Richard Leary (Ph.D. '80) retired from 
the Illinois State Museum at the end of 
1997 after more than 35 years as 
Curator of Geology. He returned as a 
volunteer to provide information for 
the exhibit. In January of 2006, Richard 
and his wife traveled to Antarctica, 
their seventh continent, and in March 
they visited Guatemala and Costa Rica, 
bringing the total of countries visited to 
50. They also have camped in all 50 
states (49 in a tent) . 

Snehal Bhagat (B.S. '84, M.S. '88) is 
now a project manager for TRC, an 
environmental consulting firm. He has 
recently transferred from Chicago to 
their Kansas City Office, and will soon 
be getting married. 

Joanne Kluessendorf (B.S. '83, M. S. 
'86, Ph.D. '90) Director of the Weis 
Earth Science Museum, has received 
the AGI Award for Outstanding 
Contribution to Public Understanding 
of the Geosciences. This award recog- 
nizes her continuing work to establish- 
ing the Weis Museum, which is the 
official mineralogical museum of 
Wisconsin. She has also nominated 
numerous geologic sites for National 
Historic Landmark status. Previous 
winners include Stephen J. Gould and 
Robert Ballard. 

Jim Cremeens (B.S. '89, M.S. '90) 
is the Principal Engineer of SRK 
Consulting, in Lakewood Colorado. 
He passed through C-U during August 
2006 and visited the Department. 

1990s 

Richard D. Poskin (B.S. '91) teaches 
in the Science Department at Wabash 
Valley College in Mt. Carmel, Illinois. 







Tim Paulsen (Ph.D. '97) recently 
received the EAA/C.R. Meyer 
Endowment for Excellence Professorship, 
a four-year appointment that supports 
scholarly activities at the University of 
Wisconsin Oshkosh. 

Tim is working on the McMurdo Ice 
Shelf drilling project as part of ANDRILL, 
an international geologic drilling pro- 
gram focused on understanding the cli- 
mate and tectonic history of Antarctica. 

Tara Curtin (M.S. '97] is an assistant 
professor of geoscience at Hobart and 
William Smith Colleges. Tara joined the 
HWS faculty in 2001 and teaches courses 
in environmental geoscience, sediments 
and sedimentary rocks, and hydrogeolo- 
gy and geochemistry. 

Amy Berger, (Ph.D. '98) is associate pro- 
fessor of geology at Heidelberg 
University. She was named the Ream- 
Paradiso Distinguished Teaching Award 
winner. The award recognizes excellence 
in classroom teaching, academic accom- 
plishments, professional activities and 
service to the Heidelberg community. 

Maitri Venkat-Ramani (B.S. '98) mar- 
ried Derick Erwin on January 2, 2007 in 
Pennsylvania. Maitri is a geophysicist 
with Shell Exploration & Production Co. 
in New Orleans. Derick is a native of 



Wisconsin and is a computer systems 
administrator in New Orleans. 

2000s 

Mike Harrison (Ph.D., '02), has been 
promoted to associate professor with 
tenure at Tennessee Tech University. 
He is now Chair of the Department of 
Geology, and continues his research 
on the structural geology of the 
Appalachians. Mike and Diane have 
their hands full, with new twins in the 
house. 

Ashley Ravenstein (B.S. '05) has been 
hiking the Pacific Crest Trail. You can 
check her progress, view her photos 
and read her journal here: 
www.allinthejourney.com. 

Marynia Kolak (B.S. '06) holds an 
internship with the USGS in St. 
Petersburg, Florida as a "Gulf of 
Mexico Analyst Intern," She hopes to 
save up enough money for a trip to 
South America. 

Births 

George T. Bonheyo, who worked as a 
Research Scientist in geomicrobiology 
at UIUC is the proud dad of Clara Stase 
Bonheyo, who was born on June 20, 
2006. 



New Generation of Geology Alumni Join Faculty Ranks Nationwide 

Illinois has long had a tradition of training geoscientists who become faculty at colleges and universities. 
This tradition is certainly continuing, for a number of students who have completed graduate degrees 
since 1990 have joined faculty ranks at institutions around the country. Examples include Brian Phillips 
(Ph.D. '90) at SUNY-Stonybrook, Steve Hagemen (Ph.D. '92) at Appalachian State University. Ming-Kuo 
Lee (M.S. '90, Ph.D. '93) at Auburn University, Honn Kao, (Ph.D. '93), at the Department of Geosciences, 
National Taiwan University, and Institute of Earth Science, Academia Sinica, Taiwan. (Currently at Pacific 
Geoscience Center, Sydney, BC, Canada.), Fred Siewers (Ph.D, '95) at Western Kentucky University, 
George Grathoff (Ph.D. '96) at Portland State University, David Finkelstein (Ph.D. '97) at University of 
Tennessee. Tim Paulsen (Ph.D. '97) at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh, Tara Curtin (M.S. '97) at 
Hobart and William Smith College, Doug Tinkham (M.S., '97) at Laurentian University. Christine Clark 
(M.S. '97) at Eastern Michigan University, Eric Holdener (Ph.D. '97) at Kenyon College. Joel Johnson 
(M.S., '98) at the University of New Hampshire, John Werner (Ph.D.'98) at Seminole Community 
College, Oswaldo Araujo (Ph.D./99) at the University of Brasilia, Amy Berger, (Ph.D.'98) at Heidelberg 
College, Mike Brudzinski (Ph.D. '02) at Miami University, Qusheng Jin (Ph.D. '03) at the University of 
Oregon, Andre Ellis, (Ph.D. '03) at the University of Texas at El Paso, Jennie Jackson (Ph.D. '05) at Cal- 
Tech. Kurt Burmeister (Ph.D. '05) at the University of the Pacific, Jim Klaus (Ph.D. '05) at San Jose State 
University, and Alex Glass (Ph.D. '06) at Central Washington University. At least two are already depart- 
ment chairs— Scott Wilkerson (Ph.D. '91 ) at DePauw University and Mike Harrison (Ph.D. '02) at 
Tennessee Tech. We hope we haven't left anyone out! If so. please let us know. 



Degrees Conferred in 2006 



Bachelor of Science Degrees 
May 

Tyler Beemer 
Jeremy Bellucci 
Ellen Benefield 
Jacob Bennett 
Christopher Crowell 
Sara Doubek 
Jared Freiburg 
Brittany Guzzo 
Lewis Hutcheons 
James Jacobsen 
Melanie Mudarth 
Krishna Sipowicz 
Boback Kendy 

August 

Joshua Carron 
Marynia Kolak 
David Li 

December 

Andrew Schaaf 
Martin Stroka 

Master of Science Degrees 
May 

Jon S. Brenizer, High-temperature Elastic 
Properties of Iron-bearing Enstatite, (Jay 
D. Bass) 

Kelly Marie Hutchings, Cn'stalline 
Architecture of Travertine Terraces at 
Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone 
National Park, U.S.A., (Bruce W. Fouke) 

Thomas J. Schickel, Dynamics of Calcium 
Carbonate Precipitation at Mammoth Hot 
Springs, Yellowstone National Park, USA, 
(Bruce W. Fouke) 

August 

Nicole Bettinardi, (Susan W. Kieffer) 

December 

Emily Berna, The First Field Study 

Demonstrating Stable Chromium Isotopes 
as a Quantifier of Cr(VI) Reduction, 
(Thomas M. Johnson) 

Doctor of Philosophy Degrees 
October 

Alexander Glass, The Brittle Star Fauna of 
the Hunsruck Slate and A Phylogeny of 
the Paleozoic Ophiuroidea, (Daniel 
Blake) 



II 



Annual Report for 2006 



12 



Faculty 

Stephen P. Altaner (Associate Professor) 

Jay D. Bass (Professor) 

James L. Best (Threet Professor) 

Craig M. Bethke (Professor) 

Chu-Yung Chen (Associate Professor and 

Associate Head) 
Wang-Ping Chen (Professor) 
Bruce W. Fouke (Associate Professor) 
Thomas M. Johnson (Associate Professor) 
Susan W. Kieffer (Walgreen Chair) 
R. James Kirkpatrick (Grim Professor and 

Executive Associate Dean) 
Jie Li (Assistant Professor) 
Craig C. Lundstrom (Associate Professor) 
Stephen Marshak (Professor and Head) 
Gary Parker (Johnson Professor) 
Xiaodong Song (Associate Professor) 

Department Affiliate 

Marcelo Garcia (Seiss Professor, Civil and 

Environmental Engineering) 
Feng-Sheng Hu (Associate Professor, Plant 

Biology) 

Academic Staff, Post-Docs, 
Visiting Staff 

Panakkatu Babu (Research Scientist) 
Geoffrey Bowers (Post-Doctoral Research 

Associate) 
Alessandro Cantelli (Post-Doctoral Research 

Associate) 
Pinaki Chakraborty (Post-Doctoral Research 

Associate) 
Justin Glessner (Geochemistry Specialist) 
Richard Hedin (Research Programmer) 
Holger Hellwig (Research Scientist) 
Eileen Herrstrom (Teaching Specialist) 
Stephen Hurst (Research Programmer) 
Roy Johnson (Research Scientist) 
Andrey Kalinichev (Research Associate 

Professor) 
Michael Lerche (Post-Doctoral Research 

Associate) 
Ann Long (Teaching Specialist) 
Xinli Lu (Post-Doctoral Research Associate) 
Stephen J. Lyons (Newsletter Editor) 
Michael Martin (Post-Doctoral Research 

Associate) 
Padma Padmanabhan (Post-Doctoral Research 

Associate) 
Philip Parker (Visiting Research Programmer) 
Jean-Phillipe Perrillat (Post-Doctoral Research 

Associate) 
Marc Reinholdt (Post-Doctoral Research 

Associate) 
Daniel Saalfeld (Visiting Research Programmer) 
Carmen Sanchez-Valle (Post-Doctoral Research 

Associate) 
Rob Sanford (Senior Research Scientist) 
Michael Stewart (Lecturer) 
Rajeswari Vanka (Resource and Policy 

Analyst) 



Sharon Yeakel (Research Programmer) 
Zhaofeng Zhang (Visiting Scholar) 
Jianming Zhu (Visiting Scholar) 

Emeritus Faculty 

Thomas F. Anderson 
Daniel B. Blake 
Albert V. Carozzi 
Donald L. Graf 
Richard L. Hay 
Donald M. Henderson 
Albert T. Hsui 
George deV. Klein 
Ralph Langenheim 
C. John Mann 
Alberto S. Nieto 
Philip A. Sandberg 

Adjunct Faculty 

Robert J. Finley 
Leon R. Follmer 
Dennis Kolata 
Morris W. Leighton 
Hannes Leetaru 
William Shilts 
Wolfgang Sturhahn 
M. Scott Wilkerson 

Library Staff 

Lura Joseph (Librarian) 

Sheila McGowan (Chief Library Clerk) 

Diana Walter (Library Technical Specialist) 

Staff 

Shelley Campbell (Staff Clerk) 

Barb Elmore (Administrative Secretary) 

Ed Lane (Electronics Engineering 

Assistant) 
Michael Sczerba (Clerk) 

Graduate Students 



Min Jeoung Bae 
Peter Berger 
Emily Berna 
Charles Bopp 
Jon Brenizer 
Shane Butler 
Bin Chen 
Melissa Chipman 
Scott Clark 
Dai, Wei 
Joshua Defrates 
Dong Ding 
Theodore Flynn 
Lili Gao 

Chris Henderson 
Fang Huang 
Kelly Hutchings 
Adam Ianno 
Meijuan Jiang 
Michael Kandianis 



Dmitry Lakshtanov 
Qi Li 
Qiang Li 
Jorge Marino 
Christopher Mead 
Mara Morgenstern 
Jessica Palmer 
Alan Piggot 
David Robison 
Thomas Schickel 
Pragnyadipta Sen 
Xinlei Sun 
Tai-Lin Tseng 
Ivan Ufimtsev 
Huan Wang 
Jingyun Wang 
Emily Wisseman 
Kevin Wolfe 
Zhen Xu 
Zhaohui Yang 



COURSES TAUGHT IN 2006 


Geol iOO 


Planet Earth 


Geol 101 


Introductory Physical Geology 


Geol 103 


Planet Earth QRII 


Geol 104 


Geology of the National Parks 


Geol 107 


Physical Geology 


Geol 108 


Historical Geology 


Geol 110 


Exploring Geology in the Field 


Geol 117 


The Oceans 


Geol 118 


Natural Disasters 


Geol 143 


History of Life 


Geol 333 


Earth Materials and the 




Environment 


Geol 380 


Environmental Geology 


Geol 411 


Structural Geology and Tectonics 


Geol 415 


Field Geology 


Geol 417 


Field Camp (in Utah) 


Geol 432 


Mineralogy and Mineral Optics 


Geol 436 


Petrology and Petrography 


Geol 440 


Sedimentology and Stratigraphy 


Geol 452 


Introduction to Geophysics 


Geol 460 


Geochemistry 


Geol 470 


Introduction to Hydrogeology 


Geol 481 


Earth Systems Modeling 


Geol 497SK 


Geological Fluid Dynamics 


Geol 511 


Advanced Structural Geology 


Geol 515 


Advanced Field Geology 


Geol 540 


Petroleum Geology 


Geol 591 


Current Research in Geoscience 


Geol 593110 


Geochemical Kinetics 


Geol 593F2 


Current Topics in 




Geomicrobiology and Microbial 




Ecology 


Geol 593 GP 


River Morphodynamics 


Geol 593J2 


Molecular Modeling of Water & 




Interfaces 


Geol 593 Kl 


Continental Lithosphere 


Geol 593K8 


Current Literature in Earth's 




Deep Interior 


Geol 593K11 


Experimental Simulation of the 




Earth's Interior 


Geol GeolL2 


Advanced Petrology Seminar 



Research Grants Active inl 2006 



Air Force 

Xiaodong Song — Characterizing High-Resolution 
Seismic Velocity and Attenuation Structure of 
Yunnan-Sichuan Region, Southwest China 
using Seismic Catalog and Waveform Data. 

Xiaodong Song — Surface Wave Dispersion 
Measurements and Tomography from Ambient 
Seismic Noise in China 

Department of Energy 

Craig M. Bethke and Robert Sanford — Field- 
Constrained Quantitative Model of the Origin 
of Microbial and Geochemical Zoning in a 
Confined Fresh- Water Aquifer. 

R. James Kirkpatrick and Andrey G. 

Kalinichev — Computational and Spectroscopic 
Investigations of the Molecular Scale Structure 
and Dynamics of Geologically Important Fluids 
and Mineral-Fluid Interfaces. 

Robert Sanford — Biomolecular Mechanisms 
Controlling Metal and Radionuclide 
Transformations in Anaeromyxobacter 
Dehalogenans. 

Robert Sanford — Towards a More Complete 
Picture: Dissimilatory Metal Reduction by 
Anaeromyxobcter Species. 

Michigan State University 

Robert A Sanford — Growth of Chlororespiring 

Bacteria to High Cell Densities for Use in 

Bioaugmentation. 



NASA 

Susan Kieffer — Multicomponent, Multiphase 

H20-C02 Thermodynamics and Fluid 

Dynamics on Mars. 

National Science Foundation 

Jay Bass — Sound Velocities and Elastic Moduli of 

Minerals at Mantle Pressures and Temperatures 

with Laser Heating. 

Jay Bass — Collaborative Research: Composition 
and Seismic Structure of the Mantle Transition 
Zone. 

Jay Bass — Collaborative Research: Elasticity 
Grand Challenge of the COMPRES. 

Jay Bass — Development of Laser Heating for 
Sound Velocity Measurements at High P & T. 

Jay Bass — Consortium for Material Property 
Research in the Earth Science. 

Wang-Ping Chen — Collaborative Research: 
Lithospheric-Scale Dynamics of Active 
Mountain Building Along the Himalayan- 
Tibetan Collision Zone. 

Wang-Ping Chen — Collaborative Research: A 
Study of Deep Subduction Integrating 
Broadband Seismology and Mineral Physics. 

Bruce Fouke— Geobiological and the Emergence 
of Terraced Architecture During Carbonate 
Mineralization. 

Thomas M. Johnson— Quantification of 

Hexavalent Cr Reduction in Groundwater Using 
Cr Stable Isotopes. 



Thomas M. Johnson and Craig C. Lundstrom — 

Technical Support for the New Mc-ICP-MS 
Laboratory at University of Illinois. 

Susan Kieffer — Multiphysics Modeling and 
Terascale Simulations of Volcanic Blasts Over 
Complex Terrains. 

Jie Li — Experimental Investigations of Solid- 
Liquid Boundary in the Earth's Core. 

Jie Li — Constraints on Core Composition from 
Nuclear Resonant Scattering and X-Ray 
Diffraction Studies on Fe-Light-Element 
Compounds. 

Craig C. Lundstrom and Stephen Marshak— 

Assessing Diffusive Differentiation During 
Igneous Intrusion Using Integrated Theoretical 
Experimental and Field Studies. 

Xiaodong Song— CSEDI Collaborative Research: 
Observational and Theoretical Constraints on 
the Structure and Rotation of the Inner Core. 

Xiaodong Song — Structure and Dynamics of 
Earth's Core and Lowermost Mantle. 

Office of Naval Research 

Bruce Fouke and Milton McAllister — 

Microbiological, Physiological, and 
Toxicological Effects of Explosive Compounds 
on Coral Health. 

Bruce Fouke — The Role of Shipyard Pollutants in 
Structuring Coral Reef Microbial Communities: 
Monitoring Environmental Change and the 
Potential Causes of Coral Disease. 



Colloquium Speakers for Spring and Fall 2006 



Ed Evenson, Lehigh University 

Glaciohydraulic Supercooling, Basal Freeze-on, 

Debris Entrainment and Deposition at Modern 

Glacier Margins in Alaska and Iceland ... Is the 

Present the Key to the Past? 
Paul Knauth, Arizona State University 

Impact Origin of Sediments at the Opportunity 

Landing Site on Mars with Implications for 

Astrobiology 
Scott Tinker, Director, Texas Bureau of 

Economic Geology 

The "I" in Business Ethics 
Franz Geiger, Northwestern University 

Environmental Interfaces in Geochemistry: 

From CrfVI) to Antibiotics 
Paul Hoffman, Harvard University 

Snowball Earth: Science or Snowjob 
Lucy Flesch, Purdue University 

Constraining the Extent of Crust-Mantle 

Coupling in Central Asia Using GPS, Geologic, 

and Shear Wave Splitting Data 
Rosaly Lopes, The Jet Propulsion Laboratory 

(NASA) 

The Surface of Titan: Results from the Cassini- 

Huygens Mission 
Miaki Ishii, Scripps Institute of Oceanography 

December 26, 2004 and March 28, 2005 

Sumatran Earthquakes Imaged by the Japanese 

Hi-Net Array 



Barbara Sherwood Lollar, University of Toronto 

Use of Stable Carbon Isotope Analysis to 

Identify Source and Degradation of Chlorinated 

Solvents in Groundwater 
Dr. Thomas Prickett, T. A. Prickett and 
Associates 

The History of Groundwater Modeling 
Carmen Sanchez- Valle, UIUC Department of 

Geology 

Fluid-Mineral Interactions in Subduction Zones: 

Constraints from Experiments in the Diamond- 
Anvil Cell 
Paul Fenter, Argonne National Laboratory 

Observing Mineral-Water Interfaces with 'X-Ray 

Vision' 
Scott Olson, UIUC Earthquake Engineering 

Using Liquefaction Features to Evaluate the 

Strength of Paleoearthquakes 
Brian Phillips, Stony Brook University 

Incorporation of Large Adsorbed Ions in Calcite: 

Structural Information from NMR Spectroscopy 
Daniel Holm, Kent State University 

Proterozoic Tectonic Evolution of the Upper 

Great Lakes Region 
Wendy Mao, Los Alamos National Laboratory 

Viewing The Core-Mantle Boundary through A 

Diamond Window 



Gabe Bowen, Purdue University 

Prospects for a High-Carbon Future Inferred 

from Earth's Past: The Paleocene-Eocene 

Thermal Maximum 
Eric Sandvol, University of Missouri, 

Columbia 

The Eastern Turkey Seismic Experiment: The 

Study of a Young Continent-Continent 

Collision 
Grant Heiken, Los Alamos National 

Laboratory 

Geology and Urban Sustainability— The View 

from Rome 
Mark Reagan, University of Iowa 

Evolution of Volcanism in the Mariana 

Islands 
John Hawley, Hawley Geomatters 

Neogene Basin-fill Aquifer Systems of the Bi- 

national Paso Del Norte Region - Advances in 

Characterization of their Depositional History 

and Hydrogeologic Framework 
Fangzhen Teng, University of Chicago 

Diffusion-Induced Lithium Isotopic 

Fracionation in Crust 



13 



List of Publications for 2006 



14 



Park, J., R.A. Sanford, and CM. Bethke, 
2006, Geochemical and microbiological 
zonation of the Middendorf Aquifer, South 
Carolina. Chemical Geology: 230, 88-104. 

Roadcap, G.S., R.A. Sanford, Q. Jin, J.R. 
Pardinas and CM. Bethke, 2006, 
Extremely alkaline(pH > 12) ground 
water hosts diverse microbial community. 
Ground Water. 44, 511-517. 

Kieffer, S.W., X. Lu, CM. Bethke, J.R. 
Spencer, S. Marshak and A. Navrotsky, 
2006, A clathrate reservoir hypothesis for 
Enceladus' south polar plume. Science: 
314. 1764-1766. 

Li J., Sturhahn W., Jackson J., Struzhkin 
V. V., Lin J. F., Mao H. K., and Shen C, 
2006, Pressure effect on the electronic 
structure of iron in (Mg,Fe)(Si,Al)03 per- 
ovskite: A combined synchrotron 
Mdssbauer and X-ray emission spec- 
troscopy study up to 100 GPa. Physics and 
Chemistry of Minerals: 33, 575-585, DOl 
10. 1007/s00269-006-0105-y. 

Li J. and Fei Y., 2006, Experimental con- 
straints on core composition, 2nd edition. 
The Mantle and Core, Vol. 2 (ed. R. W. 
Carlson): 521-546. 

Lu, X., Watson, A., Gorin, A. V, and 
Deans, J., 2006, Experimental 
Investigation and Numencal Modeling of 
Transient Two-phase Flow in a Geysering 
Geothermal Well, Geothermics: 35, 409- 
427. 

Lu, X. and Kieffer, S. W., 2006, A 
Comparison of Terrestrial and Martian 
Gravity Conditions on the Behavior of 
C02-driven Aqueous Flow, 37th Lunar and 
Planetary Science Conference, No. 2011 . 

C. C. Lundstrom, A.L. Sutton, M. 
Chaussidon, W.F. McDonough and R. Ash, 
2006, Trace Element Partitioning Between 
Type B CA1 Melts and Melilite and Spinel: 
Implications for Trace Element Distribution 
during CA1 Formation, Geochim. 
Comochim. Acta: 70, 3421-3435. 

F. Huang, C.C. Lundstrom, and W. F. 
McDonough, 2006, Effect of melt structure 
on trace element partitioning between 
clinopyroxene and silicic, alkaline, alumi- 
nous melts, Amer. Mineral: 91, 1385-1400. 

M. Pertemann, and C. Lundstrom, 2006, 
Phase Equilibrium Experiments at 0.5 GPa 
and 1100-1300°C on a Basaltic Andesite 
from Arenal Volcano, Costa Rica, J. 
Volcan. Geotherm. Res.: 157, 222-235. 

C. Lundstrom and F.J. Tepley, 2006, 
Investigating the origin of anorthitic pla- 
gioclase through a combination of experi- 
ments and natural observations, J. Volcan. 
Geotherm. Res.: 157,236-251. 

F.J. Tepley, C.C. Lundstrom. J. Gill and 
R.W. Williams, 2006, U-Th-Ra disequilibria 
and the time scale of fluid transfer and 
andesite differentiation at Arenal Volcano, 
Costa Rica (1968-2003), J. Volcan. 
Geotherm. Res.: 157, 147-165. 

L. Rademacher, C. Lundstrom, T. Johnson, 
R. Sanford, J. Zhou, and 2. Zhang, 2006, 
Experimentally determined uranium iso- 
tope fractionation during biotic and abiotic 
reduction, Envir. Sci. Tech.: 40 (22), 6943 - 
6948. 

H. Hellwig, A. Sehirlioglu. D. A. Payne, 
and P. Han, 2006, Hyper-Raman active 
soft-mode in Pb (Mgl/3Nb2/3)0.73 Ti0.27 
03, Phvs. Rev. B: 73, 094126. 



Anderson, L.L., Hu, F.S., Nelson, D.M., 
Petit, R.J., and Paige, K.N., 2006, Ice-age 
endurance: DNA evidence for a white 
spruce refugium in Alaska. Proceedings of 
the National Academy of Sciences USA 
103, 12447-12450. 

Gavin, D. C, and Hu, F.S., 2006, Spatial 
variation of climatic and non-climatic con- 
trols on species distribution: The range 
limit of Tsuga heterophylla. Journal of 
Biogeography: 33, 1384-1396. 

Gavin, D. C, Hu, F.S., Lertzman, K, and 
Corbett, P., 2006, Weak control of stand- 
scale fire history during the late Holocene 
in southeastern British Columbia. Ecology: 
87, 1722-1732. 

Hu, F.S., Brubaker, L.B., Gavin, D.G., 
Higuera, P.E., Lynch, J. A., Rupp, T.S., and 
Tinner, W, 2006, How climate and vegeta- 
tion influence the fire regime of the 
Alaskan boreal-forest biome: The Holocene 
perspective. Mitigation and Adaptation 
Strategies for Global Change: 11, 829-846. 

Hu, F.S., Nelson, D.M., Clarke, G.H., 
Ruhland, KM., Huang, Y.S., Kaufman, 
D.S., and Smol, J.R, 2006, Abrupt climatic 
events during the last glacial-interglacial 
transition in Alaska. Geophysical Research 
Letters: 33, L18708, doi: 
10.1029/2006GL027261. 

Nelson, D.M., Hu, F.S., Grimm, E.C., 
Curry, B.B., and Slate, J., 2006, The influ- 
ence of aridity and fire on Holocene prairie 
communities in the eastern Prairie 
Peninsula. Ecology': 87, 2523-2536. 

Nelson, D.M, Hu, F.S., and Michener, R.H., 
2006, Stable carbon isotope composition of 
Poaceae pollen: An assessment for recon- 
structing C3 and C4 grass abundance. 
The Holocene. 16, 819-825. 

Tian, J.. Nelson, D.M., and Hu, F.S., 2006, 
Possible linkages of late-Holocene drought 
in tire North American Midcontinent to 
Pacific Decadal Oscillation and solar activi- 
ty. Geophysical Research Letters: 33, 
L23702, doi:10.1029/2006GL028169. 

Tinner, W, Hu, F.S., Beer, R., Kaltenrieder, 
P., Scheurer, B., and Krahenbiihl, U., 2006, 
Postglacial fire and vegetation history: 
Pollen, plam-macrofossil, and charcoal 
records from two Alaskan lakes. 
Vegetation Histon' and Archaeobotany: 15, 
279-293. 

Alkmim, FF, Marshak, S., Pedrosa-Soares, 
A.C, Peres, G.G., Cruz, S.C and 
Whittington, A., 2006, Kinematic evolution 
of the Aracuai - West Congo orogen in 
Brazil and Africa: Nutcracker tectonics 
during the Neoproterozoic assembly of 
Gondwana. Precambrian Research: 149, 43- 
64. 

Holbrook, J., Autin, W.J., Rittenour, T.M., 
Marshak, S., and Goble, R.J., 2006, 
Stratigraphic evidence for millennial-scale 
temporal clustering of earthquakes on a 
continental-interior fault: Holocene 
Mississippi River floodplain deposits, New 
Madrid seismic zone, USA. Tectonophvsics: 
420, 431-454. 

Marshak, S., Alkmim, F.F., Whittington, 
A., and Pedrosa-Soares, A.C, 2006, 
Extensional collapse in the Neoproterozoic 
Aracuai Orogen, eastern Brazil: A setting 
for reactivation of asymmetric crenulation 
cleavage. Journal of Structural Geology: 
28, 129-147. 



Best, J.L., Woodward, J., Ashworth, P.J., 
Sambrook Smith, G.H. and Simpson, C.J., 
2006, Bar-top hollows: a new element in 
the architecture of sandy braided rivers. 
Sedimentary' Geology: 190, 241-255. 

Boyer, C; Roy, A.C: Best, J.L., 2006, 
Dynamics of a river channel confluence 
with discordant beds: Flow turbulence, 
bed load sediment transport, & bed mor- 
phology. J. Geophysical Research, Earth 
Surface: 111, F04007, 
doi:10.1029/2005JF000458. 

Corney, R.K.T., Peakall, J., Elliott, L., 
Amos, K.J., Best, J.L., Ingham, D.B., 
Keevil, CM. and Parsons, D.R., 2006, The 
orientation of helical flow in curved chan- 
nels. Sedimentology: 53, doi:10. 1111 /j. 1365- 
3091.2006.00771.x. 

Fernandez. R., Best, J. and Lopez, F, 
2006, Mean flow, turbulence structure and 
bedform superimposition across the ripple- 
dune transition, Water Resources Research: 
42, W05406, doi:10.1029/2005WR004330. 

Keevil, C, Peakall, J., Best, J.L. and Amos, 
K.L., 2006, Flow structure in sinuous sub- 
marine channels: velocity and turbulence 
structure of an experimental submarine 
channel. Marine Geology: 229, 241-257. 

Kuhnle, R. A.. Horton, J. K., Bennett, S. J. 
and Best J. L., 2006, Bed forms in bimodal 
sand-gravel sediments: laboratory and field 
analysis. Sedimentology: 53, 
doi:10. 1111 1). 1365-3091 .2005.00765.x. 

Sambrook Smith, G.H., Ashworth, P.J.. 
Best, J.L., Woodward, J., and Simpson, 
C.J., 2006, Alluvial architecture and sedi- 
mentology of the sandy braided South 
Saskatchewan River, Canada. 
Sedimentology: 53, doi: 10.1111/j. 1365- 
3091.2005.00769.x. 

Sambrook-Smith, G.H., Best, J.L., Bristow, 
C.S. and Petts, C, 2006, Braided Rivers: 
where have we come in 10 years? - 
progress and future needs, In: Braided 
Rivers: Process, Deposits, Ecology and 
Management, (Eds. Sambrook-Smith, 
G.H.. Best, J.L., Bristow, C.S. and Petts, 
C), 1-10, Special Publication of the 
International Association of 
Sedimentologists: 36, 

Schlaberg H.I.; Baas J.H.; Wang, M.; Best 
J.L.; Williams, R.A.; Peakall J., 2006, 
Electrical Resistance Tomography for 
Suspended Sediment Measurements in 
Open Channel Flows Using a Novel Sensor 
Design. Particle and Particle Systems 
Characterization: 23, 313-320. 
doi: 10. 1002/ppsc.200601062 . 

Tseng, T.-L., and W.-P. Chen, 2006, 
Probing the southern Indian shield with P- 
wave receiver-function profiles. Bull. 
Seismol. Soc. Am.: 96, 328-333. 

Chen, W.-P., and M.R. Brudzinski, 2006, 
Repeating earthquakes, episodic tremor 
and slip: Emerging patterns in complex 
earthquake cycles? Complexity: in press. 

Chen, W.-P., and T.-L. Tseng, 2006. Small 
660-km seismic discontinuity beneath 
Tibet implies resting ground lor detached 
lithosphere. J. Geophys. Res.: in press. 

Lee, C.-T, and W.-P. Chen, 2006, A possi- 
ble mechanism for chemical stratification 
in the Earth's mande. Earth Planet. Sci. 
Lett.: in press. 

Wang. J., Kalinichev, A.C, and 
Kirkpatrick. R.J., 2006. Effects of substrate 



structure and composition on the struc- 
ture, dynamics and energetics of water 
on mineral surfaces: a molecular dynam- 
ics modeling study. Geochim. 
Cosmochim. Acta: 70, 562-582. 

Kumar P, P., Kalinichev. A.C, and 
Kirkpatrick, R. J., 2006, Hydration, 
swelling, interlayer structure, and hydro- 
gen bonding in organo-layered double 
hydroxides: Insights from molecular 
dynamics simulation of citrate-intercalat- 
ed hydrotalcite, J. Pays. Chem. B.: 110, 
3841-3844. 

Xu, X., Kalinichev, A. C, and 
Kirkpatrick, R. J., 2006, 133 Cs and 35 C1 
NMR spectroscopy and molecular 
dynamics modeling of Cs + and CI' 
complexation with natural organic mat- 
ter. Cosmochim. Geochim. Acta: 70, 4319- 
4331. 

Bondarenko, G. V, Gorbaty, Yu. E., 
Okhulkov, A. V and Kalinichev, A. C, 
2006, Structure and hydrogen bonding in 
liquid and supercritical aqueous NaCl 
solutions at a pressure of 1 ,000 bar and 
temperatures up to 500°C: A compre- 
hensive experimental and computational 
study. J. Phys. Chem. A: 110, 4042-4052. 

J.-P. Korb, J.-P., McDonald, P.J., 
Monteilhet, L., Kalinichev, A. C, and 
Kirkpatrick, R.J., 2007, Comparison of 
proton field-cycling relaxometry and 
molecular dynamics simulations for pro- 
ton-water surface dynamics in cement- 
based materials. Cement and Concrete 
Research: (in press; published online 
March 6, 2006; 

htt p://dx.doi.org/10.1016/i,cemcon- 
res.2006.07.0041 . 

Kalinichev, A. C, Wang, J., and 
Kirkpatrick, R. J., 2007, Molecular 
dynamics modeling of the structure, 
dynamics and energetics of mineral- 
water interfaces: Application to cement 
materials. Cement and Concrete Research 
(in press; published online September 
14, 2006; 

http://dx.doi.Org/10.1016/i. cemcon- 
res.2006.02.009) . 

Liang, C.T., and X.D. Song, 2006, A low 
velocity belt beneath northern and east- 
em Tibetan Plateau from Pn tomogra- 
phy. Geophys. Res. Lett.: 33, L22306, 
doi: 10. 1029/2006GL027926. 

Sun, X.L., C Poupinet, and X.D. Song, 
2006, Examination of systematic mislo- 
cation of South Sandwich Islands earth- 
quakes using station pairs: Implications 
for inner core rotation. J. Geophys. Res.: 
Ill, B11305, doi:10.1029/2005JB004175. 

Sun, G.-K., Kirkpatrick, R. J., and 
Young. J. F, 2006, The role of Al in C-S- 
H, a high-field 27A1 NMR study. Cement 
and Concrete Research: 36, 18-29. 

Kim, Y„ and Kirkpatrick, R. J., 2006, 11B 
NMR investigation of boron interaction 
with mineral surfaces: Results for 
boehmite, silica gel and illite. Geochim. 
Cosmochim. Acta: 70, 3231-3238. 

Reinholdt, M. X., and R. J. Kirkpatrick, 
2006, Experimental Investigations of 
Amino Acid-Layered Double Hydroxide 
Complexes: Glutamate-Hydrotalcite. 
Chemistr,' of Materials: 18, 2567-2576.. 

Xu, X. and Kirkpatrick, R. J., 2006, NaCl 
interaction with interfacial polymerized 
polyamide films of reverse osmosis 
membranes: a 23Na NMR study. J. 
Membrane Sci.: 280, 228 - 233. 



~>r~ 




HONOR ROLL OF DONORS 



Brennan, R. A., R. A. Sanford, and C. J. 
Werth, 2006, Chitin and corncobs as 
electron donor sources for the reductive 
dechlorination of tetrachloroethene. 
Water Research.: 40, 2125-2134. 

Wu, Q., R. A. Sanford and F. E. Loftier, 
2006, Uranium(VI) reduction by 
Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain 
2CP-C. Appl. Environ. Microbiol: 72, 
3608-3614. 

Roadcap, G., R. A. Sanford, Q. Jin. J. R. 
Pardinas, and C. M. Bethke, 2006, 
Extremely alkaline (pH > 12} ground 
water hosts diverse microbial communi- 
ty. Ground Water. 44, 511-517. 

Sung, Y., K. M. Ritalahti, R. A. Sanford, 
and F. E. Loffler, 2006, Characterization, 
description, and specific detection of 
Geobacter lovleyi strain SZ, sp. nov., a 
metal-reducing and tetrachloroethene 
(PCEJ-dechlorinating bacterium. Appl. 
Environ. Microbiol: 72, 2775-2782. 

Brennan, R. A., R. A. Sanford and C. J. 
Werth, 2006, Biodegradation of tetra- 
chloroethene by chitin fermentation 
products in a continuous flow column 
system. J. of Environ. Eng.: 132, 664- 
673. 

G. Gioia, P. Chakraborty, and S. Kieffer, 
2006, Lava channel formation via the 
viscoplastic indentation of hot sub- 
strates. Geophysical Research Letters: 33, 
L19305. 

G. Gioia, P. Chakraborty, and F. 
Bombardelli, 2006, Rough-pipe flows 
and the existence of fully developed tur- 
bulence. Phvsics of Fluids: 18, article 
038107. 

P. Chakraborty, G. Gioia, and S. Kieffer, 
2006, Vole an Reventador's unusual 
umbrella. Geophysical Research Letters: 
33, L05313. 

G. Gioia and P. Chakraborty, 2006, 
Turbulent friction in rough pipes and 
the energy spectrum of the phenomeno- 
logical theory. Physical Review Letters: 
96, article 044S02. 

P. Chakraborty, S. Balachandar, and R. 
J. Adrianm 2006, Comment on "Axial 
stretching and vortex definition." 
Physics of Fluids: 18, article 029101. 

C.C. Porco, P. Helfenstein, P. Thomas, 
A. P. Ingersoll, J. Wisdom, R. West, G. 
Neukum, T. Denk, R. Wagner, T. 
Roatsch, S. Kieffer, E. Turtle, A. 
McEwen, T.V. Johnson, J. Rathbun, J. 
Veverka, D. Wilson, J. Perry, J. Spitale, 
A. Brahic, J.A. Burns, A.D. DelGenio, L. 
Dones, CD. Murray, S. Squyres, 2006, 
Cassini Observes the Active South Pole 
of Enceladus, Science: 311, 1393-1401 

Chakraborty, P.. Gioia, G., and Kieffer, 
S.W., 2006, Volcan Reventador's unusu- 
al umbrella. Geophysical Res. Letters: 33, 
L05313, 5 pages 

Gioia, G., Chakraborty, P., and Kieffer, 
S.W., 2006, Lava channel formation via 
the viscoplastic indentation of hot sub- 
strates, Geophys. Res. Letters: 33, 
L19305, 4 pages. 

Kieffer, S.W., 2006. The concepts of 
beauty and creativity: earth science 
thinking, Geol. Soc. America Spec. 
Paper: 413, 3-11. 



Pope, K.O., Kieffer, S.W, and Ames, 
D.E., 2006, Impact melt sheet formation 
on Mars and its implication for 
hydrothermal systems and exobiology. 
Icarus: 183, 1-9. 

Frias-Lopez, J., Klaus, J.S., Fouke, B.W., 
2006, Cytoxic activity of Black Band 
Disease (BBD) extracts against the sym- 
biotic dinoflagellate Symbiodinium sp. 
Proceedings of the International Coral 
Reef Symposium, Okinawa, 785-788. 

Klaus, J.S., Frias-Lopez, J., Fouke, B.W., 
2006, The effect of temperature on bac- 
terial communities inhabiting healthy 
tissues of Diploria strigosa, Proceedings 
of the International Coral Reef 
Symposium, Okinawa, 794-799. 

Bonheyo, G.T., Frias-Lopez, J., and 
Fouke, B.W, 2006, A test for airborne 
dispersal of thermophilic bacteria from 
hot springs. In Inskeep, W.P., and 
McDermott, T.R., Geothermal Biology 
and Geochemistry in Yellowstone 
National Park. Proceedings of the 
Thermal Biology Institute Workshop, 
Yellowstone National Park, WY. 
Montana State University Publications, 
327-342. 

Anders, Alison M., Roe, Gerard H.. 
Hallet, Bernard. Montgomery, David R., 
Finnegan, Noah J., Pulkonen, Jaakko, 
2006, Spatial Patterns of Precipitation 
and Topography in the Himalaya, In 
Willett, S.D., Hoovius, N., and Brandon, 
M.T., and Fisher, D.M., eds., Tectonics, 
climate and landscape evolution, GSA 
Special Paper 398. Chapter 3. 39-53. 

Kieffer, John., Jacqueline A Johnson, 
Oleg Nickolayev, and J D Bass, 2006, 
Structures and visco-elastic properties of 
potassium tellurite: glass versus melt. J 
Phys: Condensed Matter: 18, 903-914. 

Sanchez-Valle, C, S V. Sinogeikin, J R. 
Smyth, J D. Bass. 2005, Single-crystal 
elastic properties of dense hydrous mag- 
nesium silicate phase A. Am. 
Mineralogist: 91, 961-964. 

Chamorro, E.M., Perez, I. Daniel, J.C. 
Chervin, P. Dumas, J.D. Bass and T. 
Inoue, 2006, Synchrotron IR study of 
hydrous ringwoodite (Ej-Mg2Si04) up 
to 30 GPa. Phys. Chem. Minerals: 33, 
502-510. 

Sinogeikin, SV, J D Bass. V Prakapenka. 
D L Lakshtanov, G Shen. C Sanches- 
Valle, M Rivers, 2006, A Brillouin spec- 
trometer interfaced with synchrotron X- 
radiation for simultaneous x-ray density 
and acoustic velocity measurements. 
Rev. Sci. Instr.: 77, paper 103905. 

Jackson, J.M., S.V. Sinogeikin, S D 
Jacobsen. H J Reichmann. S J 
Mackwell, and J.D. Bass, 2006, Single- 
crystal elasticity and sound velocities of 
(Mg0.94Fe0.06)O ferropericlase to 20 
GPa. J Geophys. Res.: Ill, B09203, 
doi:10.1029/2005JB004052. 

Clark S.K., Reagan M.K., and Trimble 
D.A., 2006, Tephra deposits for the past 
2.600 years from Irazu volcano, Costa 
Rica. In Volcanic hazards in Central 
America, (ed. W.I. Rose, G.J.S. Bluth, 
M.J. Carr, J. Ewert, L.C. Patino, and J. 
Vallance) Geological Society of America 
Special Paper 412. Boulder, CO. United 
States. 225-234, doi: 
10.1130/2006.2412(12). 



The following is a list of friends and alumni of the Department of Geology who 
have donated to the Department during the 2006 calendar year. We are very grateful 
for their generous support. 



Individuals 

Prof. Thomas F. Anderson 
Dr. Robert F. Babb II 
Mr. Rodney J. Balazs 
Ms. Debbie E. Baldwin 
Mrs. Laura S. Bales 
Mr. Robert S. Barnard 
Dr. and Mrs. James R. 

Baroffio 
Dr. and Mrs. William M. Benzel 
Ms. Jean M Bethke 
Dr. and Mrs. Marion E. 

Bickford 
LTC Ronald E. Black (RET) 
Mrs. Heidi Blischke 
Dr. Bruce F. Bohor 
Mr Eugene W. Borden Sr. 
Mr Joseph E. Boudreaux 
Mr. and Mrs. Allen S. 

Braumiller 
Ms. Annette Brewster 
Mr. and Mrs. Ross D. Brower 
Dr. Glenn R. Buckley 
Dr. Susan Buckley 
Mr. and Mrs. Steven P. 

Burgess 
Dr. Thomas C. Buschbach 
Mr and Mrs. Terry L. Carius 
James W. Castle, PhD 
Dr. Thomas L. Chamberlin 
Dr. Dennis D. Coleman 
Mrs. Diana Colvin 
Ms. Michelle M. Corlew 
Ms. Patricia V. Crow 
Mrs. Lucinda Firebaugh 

Cummins 
Dr. Norbert E. Cygan 
Mr. and Mrs. M. Peter deVries 
Ms. Stephanie Drain 
Ms. Sophie M. Dreifuss 
Ms. Amanda B. Duchek 
Dr. MohamedT. El-Ashry 
Dr. Frank R. Ettensohn 
Mr, Kenneth T, Feldman 
Dr. Peter Fenner 
Mr. Max C. Firebaugh 
Mr. Gary R. Foote 
Mr. Jack D. Foster 
Mr. Robert E. Fox 
Mr. and Mrs. Edwin H. Franklin 
Mr Barry R. Gager 
James C. Gamble. PhD 
Mr. John R. Garino 
Ms. Sharon Geil 
Dr. Richard A. Gilman 
Mr. Albert D. Glover 
Mr. Hal Gluskoter 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. 

Gossett 
Dr. and Mrs. Stuart Grossman 
Mr. Edwin E. Hardt 
Mrs. Catherine L. Harms 
Dr. Henry J. Harris 
Dr. Richard L. Hay (DEC) 
Dr. Mark A. Helper and Dr. 

Sharon Mosher 
Mr. Henry A. Hoff 
Mr and Mrs. Mark F. Hoffman 
Mr. and Mrs. Glen A. Howard 
Dr. Roscoe G. Jackson II 



Mr Joseph M. Jakupcak 

Mr. Steven F. Jamrisko 

Mr. Martin V. Jean 

Mr. Bruce A. Johnson 

Dr. Edward C. Jonas 

Dr. Robert E. Karlin 

Dr. Suzanne Mahlburg Kay 

Mr. Donald A. Keefer 

Dr. John P. Kempton 

Mr. John N. Keys 

Dr and Mrs. John D. Kiefer 

Dr. R. James Kirkpatrick 

Mr. George J. Klein 

Dr. Paul Kraatz 

Mr. Robert F. Kraye 

Mr. Scott R. Krueger 

Mr. Lawlor 

Mr. Michael B Lamport 

Mr. Rik E. Lantz 

Ms. Mary K. Latendresse 

Mr. Stephen C. Lee 

Dr. Hannes E. Leetaru 

Dr. Morris W. Leighton 

Mr. Duane M. Loofbourrow 

Mr. Rob Roy Macgregor 

Mr, David L. Macke 

Dr. Megan E. Elwood Madden 

Prof, and Mrs. Stephen Marshak 

Mr. Robert S. Mayer 

Dr. Murray R. McComas 

Mr. and Mrs. Hugh S. McMullen 

Mr. and Mrs. Kendall W. Miller 

Dr. Haydn H. Murray 

Mr. Don H. Neeley 

Mr. W. John Nelson 

Mr Walter I. Nelson 

Mr, Bruce Nims 

Mr. Brian Donald Noel 

Mrs. Evelyn B. Norris 

Mr. Ronald L. Norris 

Dr. Norman J. Page 

Ms. Katherine A. Panczak 

Mr. Krisa and Mrs. Corinne 

Pearson 
Dr. Russel A. Peppers 
Mr. Charles E. Pflum 
Mr. Bruce E. Phillips 
Mrs. Beverly A. Pierce 
Ms. Sue A. Pilling 
Dr. Paul L. Plusquellec 
Dr. David W. Rich 
Mr Donald O. Rimsnider 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward L. 

Rosenthal 
Dr. Linda R. Rowan 
Mr. Stephen C. Ruppel 
Dr. Richard P. Sanders 



Dr Gayla F. Sargent 

Mr. Michael L. Sargent 

Mr. Jay R. Scheevel 

Dr. and Mrs. Detmar Schnitker 

Dr. David C. Schuster 

Dr. and Mrs. Franklin W. 

Schwartz 
Dr. and Mrs. John W. Shelton 
Mr. Ned R. Siegel 
Dr. Charles H. Simonds 
Dr. Brian J. Sinclair 
Mr. and Mrs. Roger A. Sippel 
Mr. John F. Smith 
Mrs. Mary R. Snoeyenbos 
Mr. Robert D. Snyder 
Dr. J. William Soderman 
Dr. Ian M. Steele 
Dr. Ronald D. Stieglitz 
Dr. John E. Stone 
Dr. Gary D. Strieker 
Mr. David S. Thiel 
Mr. and Mrs. Jack C. Threet 
Dr. Edwin W. Tooker 
Dr. JohnB.Tubb Jr. 
Mr. Robert G. Vanderstraeten 
Mr. Robert W. Von Rhee 
Dr. F. Michael Wahl 
Ms. Harriet E. Wallace 
Dr. James G. Ward 
Mr. Carleton W. Weber 
Dr. W. F. Weeks 
Ms. Patricia A. Wiegers 
Mr. Jack L. Wilber 
Mr John J. Wilson 
Mr. Roland F. Wright 
Mr. Robert G. Zirkle 

Corporations 

BP Foundation 
Chevron 

ConocoPhillips Corporation 
Dominion Foundation 
DTE Energy Foundation 
ExxonMobil Foundation 
ExxonMobil Retiree Program 
Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund 
Harris Bank Foundation 
Isotech Laboratories, Inc. 
Northwestern University 
Pfrizer Foundation 
Shell Oil Company 
Shell Oil Company Foundation 
Global Impact/Symantec 
Whiting Petroleum Corporation 

an Alliant Company 
lllini Technologists Working 

Metal 



Roscoe Jackson's Generous Gift 

Roscoe Jackson's (M.S. 73, Ph.D. 75) generous endowment 
provides support tor both graduate research projects and for 
equipment purchases. The initial purchase we made was a 
modern, digital video microscope system (or students to 
see thin sections in the context ot classes. It's a beautiful 
instrument that Jim Best was responsible for selecting and 
purchasing. 



■r 




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Geology students and faculty on a recent field trip to the Marquette region of 
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GEOLOGY LIBRARY 



2007 YEAR 



I N 



REVIEW 



n ^artment of Geology 



h 



T +m TY OF 

Students Explore Coral Reefs, Shear Cliffs 
During Overseas Field Trips 



LLINOIS AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN 



In the middle of a stark Illinois winter, 
Professor Bruce Fouke and 35 students 
hopped a plane and headed for the 
southernmost part of the Caribbean. 
Another example of "timing is every- 
thing." The trip was the culmination of a 
semester's worth of lectures and labora- 
tory preparations in Geology 415/515, 
Field Geology, co-taught in 2007 by 
Fouke and Ed Morford, assistant director 
of campus recreation for aquatics. 
Students were also required to attend 
class sessions at Freer Pool where they 
demonstrated their swimming capabili- 
ties, learned first aid, and practiced 
snorkel-based research techniques that 
they then applied on the coral reefs. 

From January 4 to January 11, 2007, 
students studied modern and ancient 
coral reefs surrounding the island of 
Curacao, located in the Caribbean Sea 
near the northern coast of Venezuela. 
Approximately half of the course was 
taught in the shallow, near shore envi- 
ronments using snorkel techniques, 
while the other half was based on land. 
The students experienced a highly 
integrative educational experience, which 
included dynamic sedimentary processes, 
geomicrobiology, large-scale tectonics 
and groundwater hydrology. "Curacao is 
a unique natural laboratory in which to 
teach students the complex interactions 
between life and earth, and allow them 
to tangibly track these physical, chemi- 
cal, and biological feedback interactions 
through geological time," said Fouke. 
Tom Schickel (MS '06), a recent 
graduate of the Fouke research group at 
Illinois who now works full-time as an 
» exploration geologist at Shell, joined the 




Just after snorkeling at the Water Plant dive site 
on Curacao, Fouke shows the students how a 
spiny sea urchin moves its spines using internal 
water pressure, called a hydrostatic skeleton. 

trip to help Fouke teach techniques fun- 
damental to hydrocarbon exploration, as 
well as meet students and further 
strengthen long-standing recruiting ties 
with the Department. 

In May 2008, Professor Jim Best will 
be teaching Field Geology on the west 
coast of Ireland. Best will be accompa- 
nied by a mixture of undergraduate and 
graduate students— 39 in all— and five 
faculty and staff who will visit the mag- 
nificent cliffs of County Clare. They will 
stay in the small country village of 
Kilfenora. Best explains that the cliffs are 
a spectacular example of a range of 
ancient sedimentary environments, some 

(continued on page i) 



New Textbook Uses 
Google Earth 




Sand dunes in Namibia as seen from 
Google Earth. 

n the course of an introductory 
geology class, students can fly to 
the Amazon rainforest, the deserts 
of Namibia, or the tundra of Siberia 
courtesy of the latest edition of 
Earth: Portrait of a Planet, a text- 
book written by Geology 
Department Head and Professor 
Steve Marshak. 

The third edition of Earth: 
Portrait of a Planet, published in 
late 2007, includes over 200 virtual 
field trips called "Geotours." Each 
Geotour utilizes Google Earth to fly 
students to spectacular examples of 
geologic features. Google Earth, a 
free computer tool that provides a 
navigable mosaic of satellite 
imagery, allows students to examine 
structures and landscapes in amaz- 
ing detail. 

"Instead of just seeing a static 
image of Mount St. Helens, students 
can fly around the volcano, can 
zoom in and zoom out of the crater, 
and can tour the damage that 

(continued on page 3 ) 









Letter From The Head 



If the only constant in life is change, then 2007 is truly a year of constant change. 



hile we con- 
gratulate Jay 
Bass and Craig 
Bethke as new 
Ralph E. Grim 
Professors of 
Geology (with for- 
mal investitures held on February 28, 
2008), R. James Kirkpatrick, a Ralph E. 
Grim Professor of Geology and former 
head of the department, has resigned his 
post of senior executive associate dean of 
the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 
to become the dean of the College of 
Natural Science at the Michigan State 
University. We wish you all the best, Jim 
and Carol. 

Meanwhile, we welcome Marilyn 
Whalen, the new administrative secre- 
tary to the Department as Barb Elmore, 
who served in this position for decades, 
has retired. I have no doubt she will 
keep busy in her retirement! Throughout 
this issue of the newsletter, you will find 
related reports on these important mile- 
stones in the Department and more. 
Speaking of which, you'll notice that we 
have a new editor, Kim Schmidt, who 
has instigated some new features in this 
issue. 

The fact that I am writing this letter 
means Steve Marshak, who has served 
the Department as head for almost a 
decade, is taking a well-deserved sabbat- 
ical for the entire 2007-08 academic year. 



Year in Review is published once a year by the 
Department of Geology. University of Illinois 
Urbana-Champaign, to highlight the activities 
and accomplishments within our department and 
feature news from our alumni and friends. 
Acting Department Head: Wang-Ping Chen 

(wpchen@uiuc.edu) 
Administrative Secretary: Marilyn Whalen 

(mkt@uiuc.edu) 
Editor: Kim Schmidt (kimsch@uiuc.edu) 
www.geology.uiuc.edu 



In addition to research time at the 
Woods Hole Institution of Oceanography 
in Massachusetts, Steve is traveling to 
Brazil and France to collaborate with col- 
leagues and conduct fieldwork. So far 
Steve has managed to stay away from 
administrative matters that may distract 
him from the privileges of being on sab- 
batical. 

Over the past summer, the 
Department officially became a member 
of the School of Earth, Society, and 
Environment. Don Wuebbles, a professor 
of Atmospheric Sciences, is serving as 
executive coordinator of the School while 
an international search for a permanent 
director is underway. In the short time 
since I served as acting head, it is quite 
apparent that the long tradition of strong 
support from our alumni distinguishes us 
from Atmospheric Sciences and 
Geography, the other two Departments in 
the School. 

To this end, the newly formed 
GeoThrust Graduate Fellowship exempli- 
fies the spirit and the tradition of giving 
back, bringing our total number of grad- 
uate fellowships to six (others include 
the Bluestem, the Evergreen, the 
Texas/Louisiana Geology Alumni, the 
Harold R. Wanless, and the Harold W. 
Scott Fellowships] . Over the years, the 
GeoThrust Committee, comprised of all 
alumni volunteers, has worked diligently 
and creatively with all of you to support 
the Department in many ways. The story 
(p. 7) behind the new Fellowship is 
intriguing and we are so proud of the 
dedication and the entrepreneurship of 
our alumni and friends! Indeed, the 
insight to recognize opportunities, the 
ability to assemble resources and the 
perseverance to achieve goals are what 
makes our students, alumni, friends, and 
faculty shine in so many different 
endeavors. 



On this note, you have probably 
noticed that the job market for geoscien- 
tists has been booming. The growth is 
not just in the energy sector. Mining, 
land management, environmental, and 
geotechnical consulting all have large, 
unmet demands for qualified geoscien- 
tists. This trend is expected to continue 
in the near future. This background plays 
into the long-term planning of the 
Department and will be the subject of 
careful consideration in 2008 and 
beyond. Meanwhile, some of our majors 
are working with graduate students to 
organize the very first student chapter of 
the American Association of Petroleum 
Geologists on this campus. 

With research and teaching going 
strong across the board in the 
Department, I have focused my energy 
as acting head in seeking direct support 
from industry. In recent years, with the 
exception of support for individual pro- 
grams or field trips, support of the 
Department from industry is largely in 
the form of matching funds. We are in 
the process of developing a close work- 
ing relationship with some major petro- 
leum companies, seeking their support 
in the form of graduate fellowships and 
undergraduate scholarships in Geology. 
So stay tuned. 

Indeed, we love to hear from all of 
you — about your activities, your ideas, 
your vision and above all, your passion; 
your passion for the future of the 
Department, the University, the geo- 
sciences, and the society at large. Please 
enjoy reading this issue and stay in 
touch. 

Best wishes, 
Wang-Ping Chen 




Students Explore Coral Reefs, Shear Cliffs 



(continued from page 1) 

of the best in the world. "These sedi- 
ments are 325 million years old and 
show past surface environments, from 
shallow water corals and reefs, deltas 
with vegetation and swamps, through 
shallow seas with a whole range of dif- 
ferent beasts swimming around in them, 
to the dark, deep seas. So what we can 
do is go and look at essentially a slice 
through all these environments and 
work out how this area formed geologi- 
cally," Best said. 

Many of the sediments the students 
will be studying are similar to those 
found subsurface in Illinois and 
Pennsylvania. In fact, much of the early 
pioneering work on how these types of 
sediments accumulated was done by 
Harold Wanless during his long tenure at 
Illinois. 

While on the trip, students will 
spend a majority of their time working 
in groups to collect, analyze, and present 
data, using what they've learned in the 
past semester to create a picture of the 
geological history of this paleo-environ- 
ment. In the last three days of the trip, 
they will travel to a 
site that they have not 
yet seen and will be 
asked to create a geo- 
logical map of the 
area, complete with 
an interpretation of 
the area's geological 
history. 

Best has invited 
several guest speakers 
to join them in the 
field in Ireland. The 
first, Dr. Mike Simms 
from the National 
Museums of Northern 
Ireland, will help the 
group look at recent glacial geology, 
including the landforms as they have 
evolved over the last 20,000 to 30,000 
years. The second is Dr. Carleton Jones, 





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The cliffs at Foohagh Point. County Clare 
show syn-sedimentary soft sediment defor- 
mation in deltaic sediments. These carbonif- 
erous deltaic sediments were deformed while 
they were still soft and results of this 
process is vividly seen on this cliff face . 



an archeologist from the National 
University of Ireland at Galway, who will 
take the group to some of Ireland's most 
spectacular and beautifully preserved 
Neolithic remains, including burial cham- 
bers. "This is an area that was populated 
from about 7,000 years B.C. onwards and 
there are many remains of early habita- 
tion as these cultures farmed the hills, 
changed the landscape, and left their bur- 
ial grounds and different marks on the 
geography of the area. The trip is meant 
to be principally geological in focus, but I 
also want to discuss recent geomorpholo- 
gy, including how the landscape has been 
formed and shaped, and recent human 
occupation," said Best. 

Hydrocarbon geologists from oil 
companies around the world visit the 
cliffs of County Clare to learn more about 
ancient sediments and apply their find- 
ings to current drilling projects. Best sees 
this trip as an opportunity for students to 
learn not only about the academic side of 
geology, but also about the applied and 
economic side. Schickel, who traveled 
with Fouke to Curacao, will also partici- 
pate in Best's course 
enabling students to 
make "links between 
industry and what 
the students are 
learning in their 
undergraduate or 
graduate courses," 
said Best. 
Shell Oil Company 
has provided differ- 
ent forms of support 
to the Department 
and is making a 
major subsidy so that 
these major field trips 
are accessible for stu- 
dents. Acting Head Wang-Ping Chen 
notes that "Industrial sponsorship of 
University activities is in a state of flux as 
state funding continues to decline. In this 
case, direct support from Shell enables us 



New Textbook 

(continued from page 1) 

resulted from the cataclysmic 1980 
explosion. Students can also measure 
distances and elevations right on 
screen. I think that such active 
imagery achieves a much better job 
of conveying the context of geology, 
than can any static image," said 
Marshak. 

To help instructors use Geotours 
for classes, M. Scott Wilkerson (PhD 
'91 J, now chair of the geology 
department at DePauw University, 
and Marshak produced a new work- 
book, as an ancillary to Earth: 
Portrait of a Planet. The workbook 
provides questions about the Geotour 
sites that students can answer only if 
they visit the site themselves, on the 
computer. Wilkerson, who intro- 
duced Marshak to Google Earth, has 
also prepared a computer file that 
allows students to reach Geotour 
sites at the click of a button. 

The use of Google Earth as a 
teaching tool is a relatively new 
idea— in fact Earth is the first geology 
textbook to integrate the tool. The 
book's publisher, WW. Norton & Co., 
reports that the Geotours, and the 
new workbook, are being incorporat- 
ed in courses around the country. 

Disclaimer: The Department of Geology holds 
no business interest with either Google or 
W.W. Norton & Co. 



to take students to key field areas over- 
seas — an important function in the con- 
text of the "global village." 

In previous years, students in Field 
Geology have traveled to the American 
Southwest to study geology in the Death 
Valley and along the San Andreas Fault 
with Professor Steve Marshak and in the 
GwmA Canyon and along the San Juan 
River region with Associate Professor 
Craig Lundstrom. 



Kirkpatrick Retires from College 



im Kirkpatrick retired from the 
Department in July 2007. Kirkpatrick 
first came to Illinois when he was a 
graduate student in the early 1970s. He 
went on to become an alumnus, a pro- 
fessor, a department head, a dean, and 
a donor. By the time of his retirement, 
he had dedicated almost 40 years of 
service to Illinois. 

Shortly after earning his Ph.D. 
from Illinois in 1972, Kirkpatrick left 
the state, traveling first to Houston to 
take a position as a senior research 
geologist at Exxon Production Research 
Company. He then spent two years as 
a research fellow at Harvard before 
moving to California to work on the 
Deep-Sea Drilling Project with the 
Scripps Institution of Oceanography. 
The Midwest called him back, howev- 
er, and in 1978 he returned to Illinois 
to join the faculty. 

A short ten years later, Kirkpatrick 
was named head of the department, a 
position he held from 1988 to 1997 
when he was named a senior execu- 
tive associate dean in the College of 
Liberal Arts and Sciences. 

Throughout his tenure as an 
administrator, Kirkpatrick maintained 
an active and distinguished research 
program. "Jim is one of those unique 
kinds of faculty who reinvents himself 
progressively during his career so what 
he's doing at a late stage in his career 
is totally different than what he was 
doing at the initial stage of his career. 
The result of that is that he was 
always on the cutting edge of his disci- 
pline," said Steve Marshak, head of the 
department. 

Kirkpatrick was Professor Craig 
Bethke's advisor while Bethke earned 
his doctorate at Illinois. "Throughout 
his career at Illinois, Jim's research 
program remained at the very pinnacle 
of his field, in terms of productivity 




and scientific impact. And the time and 
energy he put into leadership and ser- 
vice, first as department head and then 
as associate dean for the sciences, was 
the impetus for revitalizing the geology 
department. Jim is not someone who 
can be replaced," said Bethke. 

In 2004, Kirkpatrick was honored 
with the Dana Medal from the 
Mineralogical Society of America. In his 
acceptance speech, Kirkpatrick said, 
"We live in an extraordinary historical 
period for science, and it has been my 
great fortune to be able to build my 
career during that time. When I started, 
equilibrium thermodynamics was the 
nearly universal way of thinking about 
geochemical systems, the electron 
microprobe was a novel tool, and auto- 
mated diffractometers were just coming 
on line. What change there has been! 
The two parts of my career, the earlier 
days of crystallization kinetics and 
igneous petrology and the later days of 
materials structure and dynamics with 
NMR spectroscopy and molecular mod- 
eling, are reflections of these changes. " 



Kirkpatrick's career has been 
just as extraordinary as the time in 
which he's worked and, accordingly, 
his peers have recognized his contri- 
butions to the field. In addition to the 
Dana Medal, Kirkpatrick was award- 
ed the Brunauer Award and was 
named a fellow of the Mineralogical 
Society of America, the Geological 
Society of America, and the America 
Ceramic Society. In 2005 he was 
named the R.E. Grim Professor of 
Geology. 

In July 2007, Kirkpatrick was 
feted at a retirement celebration cele- 
brating his years of service to the 
University. Held at the Union, more 
than 100 guests attended and Dean 
Sarah Mangelsdorf, former Interim 
Provost and Dean Jesse Delia, and 
Department Head Steve Marshak 
gave remarks. 

Upon his retirement, Kirkpatrick 
left an endowment to the Department 
that will fund the Kirkpatrick lecture- 
ship. Kirkpatrick delivered the inau- 
gural speech in August, entitled 
"Spectroscopic and Computational 
Studies of Mineral-Fluid 
Interactions." "The Kirkpatrick lec- 
tureship—a fitting reminder of Jim's 
legacy— is the latest addition to the 
Department's named lecture series, 
bringing the total to nine." said 
Wang-Ping Chen, acting head of the 
department. 

Kirkpatrick is now the dean of 
the College of Natural Science at 
Michigan State University. His wife, 
Carol, retired from the office of the 
Provost and Vice Chancellor for 
Academic Affairs at UIUC to join Jim 
at Michigan State. In the 1980's, she 
was a support staff who mainly 
worked on matters related to gradu- 
ate and undergraduate studies in the 
Department. 




r 



A Trip Back to Camp 



Over the past year and a half, Norb 
Cygan (BS '54, MS '56, PhD '62) visit- 
ed Fort Lewis, Colorado and Sheridan, 
Wyoming— field camp sites that Illinois 
students attended from the 1950s through 
the 1980s. Cygan was an assistant at the 
Sheridan camp from 1955-1956 and was 
visiting lecturer from 1956-1961. 

What did you find when you went back 
to Fort Lewis, Colorado? 

In the fall of 2006, Bob "Moose" 
Leonard (BS '55) and I visited the Fort 
Lewis, Coloardo area where field camp 
was held in the early and mid-50s. Fort 
Lewis, at that time, was a two-year col- 
lege for the University of Colorado system 
and was primarily a high altitude agricul- 
ture school. A lot of people went there 
from overseas, from places like Chile, 
Austria, places like that, that had a high 
altitude farming and so on. 

At field camp, we stayed in what was 
the old army barracks of Fort Lewis itself 
which was a frontier post. We used the 
facilities of the university for lectures and 
making maps after we went out in the 
field every day to do field work. When I 
visited in 2006, many of the buildings had 
been torn down. The old barracks where 
we students stayed was a bull artificial 
insemination station. I thought everyone 
would get a kick out of that. That build- 
ing is still there. 

When did Illinois move to the Sheridan, 
Wyoming camp? 

In 1955 field camp moved to 
Sheridan, Wyoming. Initially we used old 




army barracks. Then we stayed in the 
abandoned Sheridan hospital. 

Eventually we moved the campus 
up to Sheridan Junior College. The col- 
lege has expanded quite a bit, but when 
we were there, at one time, everybody 
had sleeping bags and slept on the gym 
floor. That was our barracks. We also 
used the facilities at that site for drafting 
and lectures. 

What did you do for fun? 

The ranchers used to hold parties 
for us. They really treated us well. They 
took us out waterskiing on the lakes 
there and they had barbeques on their 
ranches. We were allowed to walk 
through their ranches and look at the 
rocks. Many famous people owned 
ranches there— like actor Robert Taylor. 
He was quite famous back in the 40s. 
Some of the guys had lunch at his 
ranch. We also made side trips to 
Yellowstone and the Grand Tetons and 
camped out on those trips. 



Can you tell us about the memory 
brick? 

There is a plaza in town called 
Sheridan Plaza. They have statues of 
cowboys and Indians and pioneers. I 
bought a brick that commemorated 
Illinois's field camp and they planted 
that brick along with many others in 
the plaza. A lot of the people there have 
long since passed away, but there are a 
lot of people, especially the women 
who are now in their 40s and 50s who 
remember our students. 

Why is field camp important? 

Many people decided after field 
camp they didn't like that kind of life 
and dropped out. Other people realized 
that this was going to be part of their 
life— doing fieldwork all over the world. 

What are you doing now? 

I've done a bit of consulting this 
last year, especially on water, and some 
on uranium. But my big push has been 
working with kids and teachers at 
Dinosaur Ridge, an area on the outside 
of Denver that has dinosaur footprints 
and bones in the rocks which are uplift- 
ed from the Rocky Mountain event. It is 
an outdoor educational lab and tens of 
thousands of kids a year come to visit. I 
teach classes on the geology of 
Colorado at Denver University. I also 
teach special science programs to 
Colorado teachers through Colorado 
School of Mines and University of 
Northern Colorado. 




Field Camp remains an important part of the geology program today. Illinois 
has partnered with the University of Iowa. University of Minnesota-Duluth. 
University of Wisconsin-Madison. Michigan State University, and the University of 
the Pacific to teach this six-week course in Park City. Utah. In 2008, 21 students 
from Illinois will be attending Wasatch-Uinta Field Camp— the largest number of 
students attending in 25 years. Lecturer Michael Stewart will be an instructor at 
the camp and the new director is our alum Kurt Burmeister (PhD 05). Students 
will map in the Wasatch and Uinta Mountain Ranges and take day trips to Grand 
Teton National Park, southeastern Utah, and the gold fields of Nevada. 



Alumna at Caltech 



Editor's Note: We are adding "Profile of 
Recent Alumni" as a new feature in the 
Year in Review. 

ennifer Jackson (PhD '05) was one 
of many first-year undergraduates sit- 
ting in the lecture hall for Geology 104, 
Geology of the Natural Parks. The class 
filled a requirement, and though she 
liked science in high school, she never 
expected that little more than a decade 
later she would land a faculty position 
at the California Institute of 
Technology. 

But that class inspired her to sign 
up for more courses in geology and 
she began to realize that she wanted to 
turn her interest into an academic 
career. Soon after taking Physical 
Geology, she began working in 
Professor Jay Bass's lab doing what 
she calls "real research" for the first 
time. The combination of her work in 
the lab and an inspirational trip to 
northwest Arizona with Professor 
Steve Marshak's Field Geology class 
solidified her interest in geosciences 
and set her on her path. In 1999, 
Jennifer graduated from Illinois with a 



degree in mathematics and a 
minor in geology. 

After earning her master's 
degree in mineralogy and crystal- 
lography from Notre Dame in 2000, 
Jennifer returned to Illinois to pursue her 
Ph.D. Again, she found herself working 
alongside Professor Bass who served as 
her advisor for her dissertation, "The 
Effect of Minor Elements on the Physical 
and Chemical Properties of Lower Mantle 
Minerals at High-Pressure." 

Jennifer is now an assistant professor 
of mineral physics in the Seismological 
Laboratory of the Division of Geological 
and Planetary Sciences at Caltech where 
her current research focuses on the mater- 
ial properties of deep Earth minerals under 
extreme conditions in an effort to under- 
stand terrestrial-type planetary evolution. 
In the past two years she has been invited 
all over the world, and has visited Japan, 
Australia, England, and Italy to give talks 
about her research. 

Though her research is integral to her 
position at Caltech, Jennifer enjoys the 
balance between research and teaching. 
Now, with a lab of her own, Jennifer is a 
mentor to three graduate students and one 




£V? 






undergraduate student. Working 
alongside these students in the lab 
offers her the opportunity to do for 
them what Illinois faculty did for her 
nearly ten years ago: to provide sup- 
port and encouragement. "I want to 
make sure they have all the tools 
they need and every opportunity to 
learn and do exciting research," she 
said. 

In addition to the one-on-one 
instruction in the lab, Jennifer also 
spends time in the classroom teach- 
ing courses such as "Topics in Deep 
Earth Mineral Physics" and "Mineral 
Physics of Earth's Interior," a course 
she recently developed for her 
department. "Teaching keeps every- 
thing in perspective," she said. 
"These very sharp students are here 
to learn, and when you are explain- 
ing high-level science to them, you're 
also learning." 



Students and Faculty Named Excellent Instructors 



Twenty-three Department of Geology 
instructors were named to the UIUC List of 
Teachers Ranked as Excellent by Their 
Students for the spring, summer, and fall 
2007 semesters. 

Graduate students Charles Bopp, 
Shane Butler, Bin Chen, Melissa Chipman, 
Adam lanno, Daniela Lindner, Chris 
Majerczyk, Chris Mead, Mara Morgenstern, 
Jessica Palmer, Alan Piggot, and 
Pragnyadipta (Deep) Sen were named to 



the list for their work as teaching assistants 
in the Department. 

Faculty and academic professionals 
appearing on this list include Stephen 
Altaner, Jay Bass, Craig Bethke, Bruce 
Fouke, Eileen Herrstrom, Tom Johnson, Jei 
Li, Ann Long, Craig Lundstrom, Steve 
Marshak. and Michael Stewart. 

Four instructors received the highest 
ranking of "outstanding." During the spring 
semester, this ranking was earned by 



Shane Butler (Geology 108). Associate 
Professor Stephen Altaner (Geology 100) 
and Pragnyadipta (Deep) Sen (Geology 
417) were named outstanding for the sum- 
mer semester. In the fall, Daniela Lindner 
(Geology 101) and Pragnyadipta (Deep) 
Sen (Geology 411) earned top honors. 

Rankings are released every semes- 
ter and are based on student evaluations 
maintained by the Center for Teaching 
Excellence on the Illinois campus. 




V 



GeoThrust Committee Rallies Together to Fund New Graduate Fellowship 



in 2005, a fundraising effort to build the 
Department's endowment not only met, 
but exceeded its goal of $3 million. Lead 
by the GeoThrust Committee, this cam- 
paign resulted in generous gifts from hun- 
dreds of donors and established a wide 
base of departmental support including 
fellowships, named professorships, and 
two funded lecture series among other 
needs. 

Members of the GeoThrust 
Committee, chaired by Bill Soderman (MS 
'60, PhD '62), recently embarked on a 
new fundraising effort coinciding with the 
larger University of Illinois campaign. 
Brilliant Futures. "At the end of the previ- 
ous fundraising process I realized the 
Committee didn't give a group gift. It 
occurred to me that this would be an 
excellent way to commemorate the group's 
good work." Thus, the GeoThrust 
Graduate Fellowship was born. 

Soderman contributed half the funds 
needed to establish the fellowship in 
September 2007 and encouraged his fellow 
Committee members to do the same. "I'm 
strongly motivated to develop fellowships 



at Illinois — I know what it meant to 
receive a fellowship myself," said 
Soderman, who received the Petroleum 
Research Foundation Fellowship as a doc 
toral student. "It 
makes me feel good 
that I can give back to 
the University." 

Members 
embraced Soderman's 
challenge and quickly 
raised the remaining 
funds needed. The 
official agreement for 
the GeoThrust 



Graduate Fellowship 
was created in 
November 2007 and 
the Office of the 
Provost will provide 
matching funds to 
enhance its impact. 

"I was so pleased to have such a 
good and timely response," said 
Soderman. 

Acting Head Wang-Ping Chen said 
"The Department is truly fortunate to 



Members of the GeoThrust 
Committee 

James R. Baroffio (PhD '64) 

David K. Beach (BS 73) 

Marion E. Bickford (MS "58; PhD '60) 

Lester W. Clutter (BS '48) 

Norbert E. Cygan (BS '54; MS '56; PhD 

'62) 
Edwin H. Franklin (BS '56) 
John R. Garino (BS '57) 
James W. Granath (BS 71 ; MS 73) 
Morris W. Leighton (BS '47) 
Haydn H. Murray (BS '48) 
Patricia A. Santogrossi (BS 74; MS 77) 
J. William Soderman (MS '60; PhD '62) 
Jack C. Threet (AB '51) 
F. Michael Wahl (MS '57; PhD '58) 



have the GeoThrust Committee as a dri- 
ving force for our fundraising efforts. 
Over the years, the Committee has 
worked diligently and creatively with all 
of our alumni and 
friends to support 
the Department in 
many ways. The 
new fellowship is 
another example of 
inspiration, leader- 
ship, and entrepre- 
neurship — charac- 
teristic of our 
alumni." 

Alumni and 
friends who are 
interested in con- 
tributing to the 
GeoThrust Graduate 
Fellowship, or to the 
Department in gen- 
eral, are encouraged to contact the LAS 
Office of Advancement at 
(877) 265-4910, (see back cover for 
details) and indicate that you wish to 
make a gift to the Department of Geology. 



Beloved Secretary Retires After Twenty Years 



n August 2007, Geology administrative 
secretary Barb Elmore retired from the 
University with 26 years of service. Barb was 
with the geology department for 20 of those 
years and was well loved by faculty and stu- 
dents alike. 

"Barb became the institutional memory 
of the department— over the years, she really 
kept track of what all of our graduates have 
done. In fact, she would often be the first per- 
son alumni would go see when they came 
back to visit the department,'' said Professor 
and Head of the Department, Steve Marshak. 

Elmore was honored twice for her 
work— once in 1998 when she was awarded 
the Chancellor's Distinguished Staff Award 
and again in 2007 when she was named one 
of the recipients of the 2007-2008 LAS Staff 
Award. 



Marshak explained that these awards 
recognized Elmore's success in expertly 
managing a heavy workload. "When Barb 
took the job, she effectively took on three full 
jobs and she did them all incredibly well." 

Upon her retirement, the Department 
and friends celebrated Elmore at a party held 
at the lllini Union. "Not only was the party well 
attended, but a lot of people got up to give 
testimonials about Barb. The expressions of 
gratitude came from everyone, ranging from 
current undergrads to senior emeriti," said 
Marshak. 

When asked what she is doing with her 
new found free time, Elmore said, "I don't 
know how I found the time to work!" Since her 
retirement, Elmore has kept busy with pro- 
jects around the house and with helping her 
mother, who is almost 90 and still lives alone. 




N 



-. 



On August 29. 2007, 
friends and col- 
leagues celebrated 
Barb's service to the 
Department during a 
retirement party held 
at the lllini Union 



She is also spending more time on the hob- 
bies that she loves, including reading and 
crochet. 

Elmore notes that she greatly enjoyed 
working with students, but she acknowl- 
edges that it was bittersweet to see them 
graduate. "It was always fulfilling to see the 
students attend Commencement after all 
their hard work." Elmore said. "But then, 
sadly, I had to say goodbye!" Luckily, as 
Marshak pointed out. many graduates came 
back to see her. "I really enjoyed seeing the 
alumni when they came back," she said. "It 
was always fun to have them come in." 



Windows into the Past 



Oceanography on the Prairie 



by Ralph L. Langenheim 

Editor's Note: "Windows on the Past" is a 
regular feature of the Year in Review con- 
tributed by Professor Emeritus Ralph L. 
Langenheim. Ralph's writing represents a 
long-serving faculty member's recollections 
and his perspectives of the Department's 
past. 

mprobable as it may seem, oceanogra- 
phy was an important part of our 
departmental program, beginning in the 
1930's. A newly-minted Ph.D. from the 
University of Chicago, Francis Shepard 
came to Illinois in 1922, joining our fac- 
ulty as a structural geologist. He 
remained responsible for instruction in 
structural geology until 1942 when he 
joined the University of California 
Division of War Research. His doctoral 
research in structural geology was based 
on field work begun on his honeymoon 
when he traveled by train, horseback, 
and on foot, camping out in the 
Canadian Rockies. One summer on Cape 
Cod, however, would alter his research 
significantly and lead to a very distin- 
guished career as a founding father of a 
sub-discipline in marine geology. 

After the birth of their first child, 
Shepard and his wife Elizabeth did not 
return to the Rockies and to his previous 
research, but instead spent the summer 
cruising off Cape Cod on the family 
yacht at the suggestion of his father. 
While on the yacht, Shepard collected 
sediment samples from the shoreline to 
the edge of the shelf. Here he discovered 
that, instead of sediments becoming pro- 
gressively finer grained offshore, coarse 
and fine grained sediments occurred 
patchily between the shore and the shelf 
margin. This pattern was contrary to 
accepted doctrine, a point that he made 
in his 1927 "Influence of Oscillating Sea 
Level on the Development of the 
Continental Shelves," a report that 



attracted wide notice and marked the 
beginning of a permanent redirection in 
Shepard's research career. Thenceforth 
he concentrated on the submarine geol- 
ogy of the continental shelf and slope, 
most notably describing the submarine 
canyons on the Atlantic coast of the 
United States and, most extensively, off 
the coast of Southern California, while 
maintaining his academic home base at 
Illinois until 1942. 

As his interests changed, Shepard 
introduced geomorphology to our cur- 
riculum in 1930, a course that he contin- 
ued as Physiographic Geology from 1931 
through 1941. Finally, Geology of the 
Ocean was introduced in 1941. His 1948 
book, Submarine Geology, perhaps the 
capstone of his career, is a summary of 
the results of the pioneering, gentleman 
yachtsmen who established modern 
American academic oceanography at the 
Woods Hole and Scripps oceanographic 
institutions. 

While at Illinois, and as a life long 
friend, Shepard collaborated with Harold 
Wanless, who came to Illinois after grad- 
uating from Princeton as a new Ph.D. in 
1923. Together, they published Sea Level 
and Climatic Changes Related to Late 
Paleozoic Cycles (1936), which explained 
Pennsylvanian cyclic sedimentary pat- 
terns as brought about by the melting 
and the reestablishment of continental 
glaciers in the Southern Hemisphere. 
Decades after its publication, this work 
that countered the time's consensus that 
Late Paleozoic cyclic sediments resulted 
from repeated crustal uplift and depres- 
sion, has become the generally accepted 
explanation for Late Paleozoic cyclic sed- 
imentation. 

Wanless was also an early protago- 
nist for using aerial photographs in geo- 
logical mapping and research, a tech- 
nique that was just beginning to come to 
the fore in the late 1930's. Although pri- 
marily famous for his cyclothemic stud- 




Francis Shepard testing a sample grabber 
and a stereo camera on the E.W. Scripps, 
September 22, 1942 

ies, Wanless continued his collaboration 
with Shepard, compiling sequential 
charts and aerial photographic records of 
Gulf and Atlantic shoreline configura- 
tions while Shepard compiled records of 
the Pacific Coast. Their final report, "Our 
Changing Coastlines," was published 
after Wanless' death in 1971. While 
Wanless supervised doctoral candidate 
Mohammed al-Ashry, now famous for 
his work on marine environments for 
the United Nations, Shepard supervised 
three Illinois doctoral students in marine 
geology: George Cohee, who left 
oceanography for a distinguished career 
in government surveys; K. 0. Emery, 
whose outstanding career culminated in 
his directorship of the Woods Hole 
Oceanographic Institution; and Robert 
Dietz who became famous for pioneer- 
ing research on deep sea mapping, deep 
sea drilling, sea floor spreading, and 
meteoritic impact sites. Departmental 
legend has it that Dietz proposed a study 
of lunar geology for his Ph.D. project 
only to be turned aside. Dietz also was 
associated with the Department in the 
1980"s as an adjunct professor supervis- 
ing thesis research on impact sites. 

The saga of oceanography on the 
Boneyard continued with Jack Hough, 
who always contended that his work on 
the Great Lakes was oceanography, and 
with Bill Hay; a suitable topic for our 
next installment. 



*,r~ 




Around the Department 



Professor Wang-Ping Chen was named 
acting head of the Department for the aca- 
demic year 2007-2008 while Professor 
Steve Marshak was on sabbatical. This 
event cut short Chen's sabbatical as a 
chaired visiting professor of the National 
Science Council of Taiwan at the Institute 
of Earth Sciences, Academia Sinica. 

Geophysical Journal International ranked 
a paper co-authored by Professor Jay 
Bass and three French colleagues as 
number ten on a list of "most cited papers 
over the last three years." The paper is 
titled, "Lower Mantle Composition and 
Temperature from Mineral Physics and 
Thermodynamic Modeling" and was pub- 
lished in the March 2005 issue. 

Professor Steve Marshak spent the 2007- 
2008 academic year on sabbatical. During 
the fall, he worked with geologists at the 
U.S. Geological Survey in Woods Hole, 
MA on thrust-belt deformation. He went to 
Brazil in the winter to work with a col- 
league there on ongoing projects concern- 
ing Precambrian geology. In the spring, he 
worked at the University of Lausanne 
(Switzerland), continuing work on 
Precambrian geology, and was a visiting 



professor at the University of Naples 
(Italy), continuing work on thrust belts. 

Dr. George Devries Klein, professor 
emeritus, remains active as a geological 
consultant in the greater Houston area 
and is president of SED-STRAT 
Geoscience Consultants, Inc. Since 
October 2005 it has been nearly non-stop 
consulting for him, proving there is life 
after 74! Project areas where Klein has 
completed work include South Texas, East 
Texas, Permian basin, Russia, the 
Louisiana Shelf, Alberta basin (Canada), 
San Joaquin basin (California), and 
Galveston Bay, Texas. 

Geology librarian Lura E. Joseph 

received the Best Paper Award given by 
the Geoscience Information Society for 
her paper "Image and Figure Quality: A 
Study of Elsevier's Earth and Planetary 
Sciences Electronic Journal Back File 
Package." The paper was published in 
Library Collections, Acquisitions, & 
Technical Services. 

John Kolinski, an undergraduate 
researcher in geological fluid mechanics 
who has worked closely with Professor 



Susan Kieffer for the past two sum- 
mers, was selected as one of the top 
four presenters from lllinois's 
Undergraduate Research Opportunities 
Program sponsored by the Illinois 
Space Grant Consortium. The ISGC 
subsequently sponsored his participa- 
tion in the Great Midwestern Regional 
Space Grant Conference held at Purdue 
University in September 2007. 

Professor Jim Best gave three keynote 
addresses in 2007. Two covered his 
work on Argentinean rivers: one was 
given at the USGS National Surface 
Water Conference & Hydroacoustics 
Workshop held in St. Louis and the 
other was given at the Workshop on 
Morphodynamic Processes in Large 
Lowland Rivers held in Sante Fe, 
Argentina. He also delivered a keynote 
address to the 2007 Hydraulic 
Measurements & Experimental Methods 
Conference (HMEM), held in Lake 
Placid, New York and sponsored by the 
American Society of Civil Engineers' 
(ASCE) Environmental and Water 
Resources Institute (EWRI) and The 
International Association of Hydraulic 
Research (IAHR). 



Bachelor of Science Degrees 
May 

Mark Danielson 
Lauren Feiter 
Steven Keown 

August 

Elizabeth Armstrong 
Rivkah Cooke 
Eric Riser 
Brandon Weinberg 
Joshua Welch 

December 

Phillip Swartz 
Erica Toledo 

Master of Science Degrees 

May 

Wei Dai, Teleseismic Earthquake Waveform 
Doublets from South Sandwich Islands 
Subduction Zone: Spatial and Temporal 
Distributions and Implications for Inner 
Core Rotation (Xiaodong Song) 

Joshua Defrates, Crenulation Cleavage and 
Down-Dip-Verging Mesofolds in the 
Precambrian Baraboo Syncline, South- 
Central Wisconsin (Stephen Marshak) 



August 

Shane Butler, A Facies-Constrained Model of 
Pleistocene Travertine Deposition and 
Glaciation in the Northern Yellowstone Region 
(Bruce Fouke) 

Adam lanno, Differentiation Mechanisms in 
Zoned Plutons: Insight from Non-Traditional 
Stable Isotopes (Craig Lundstrom) 

Emily Wisseman, Bacteria as Sensitive Indicators 
of Coral Reef Health: Bacterial Community 
Shifts across Coral Reef Environmental 
Gradients (Bruce Fouke) 

December 

Melissa Chipman, A Paleolimnological Record of 
Climate Change Over the Past 2000 Years at 
Ongoke Lake, Southwest Alaska (Feng Sheng 
Hu) 

Doctor of Philosophy Degrees 

May 

Michael Kandianis, Modeling Departures from 
Abiotic Expectations During the Calcium 
Carbonate Precipitation Process (Bruce Fouke) 

Dmitry Lakshtanov, Elasticity and Phase 



Transitions of Stishovite and NaCl at 
High Pressure (Jay Bass) 

Xinlei Sun, Three Dimensional Inner Core 
Anisotropy, Lowermost Mantle 
Structure, and Inner Core Rotation 
(Xiaodong Song) 

Tai-Lin Tseng, Seismic Studies of the Mantle 
Transition Zone (Wang-Ping Chen) 

October 

Jorge Marino, Paleogeothermal Conditions 
in the Illinois Basin dunng Late 
Paleozoic Coalification (Steve Marshak) 

December 

Scott Clark, Selenium Stable Isotope Ratios 
in Wetlands: Insights into 
Biogeochemical Cycling and How a 
Diffusive Barrier Affects the Measured 
Fractionation Factor (Tom Johnson) 

Fang Huang, Studies of Magmatism by 
Trace Element Partitioning between 
Clinopyroxene and Silicate Melt, U- 
Series liisequilibria in Lavas from 
Subduction Zones, and Non-traditional 
Stable Isotopes (Craig Lundstrom) 



Alumni News 



Obituaries 



Reverend Robert L. Brownfield (MS 

'55) died January 16, 2007 at the age 
of 88. He retired from the Illinois 
Department of Highways in 1985 
where he worked as a geologist and 
civil engineer. In 1992 he was 
ordained as a Catholic priest. 

Paul Clawson (BS '55) died May 11, 
2007 at the age of 81. After serving in 
World War II and Korea, Clawson 
earned his degree from Illinois and 
eventually founded Geothermics, Inc., 
a company that drilled shallow wells 
for irrigation and provided geological 
consulting services. 

Willis M. Decker (BS '39) died 
January 10, 2007 at the age of 91. He 
worked for Cities Service Oil 
Company in Tulsa for 39 years and 
went on to become vice-president of 
Jett Oil Company until 1983. 

Robert L. Glossop (BS '52) died July 
12, 2007 at the age of 77. He owned 
Glossop Oil and Gas Company. 

Richard Thomas Hercher (BS '50) 
died January 7, 2007 at the age of 77. 
Hercher was an independent consult- 
ing geologist who spent 25 years par- 
ticipating in the exploration and 
development of oil and gas produc- 
tion in Colorado and Nebraska. 

James Francis Luhr (BS 75) died 
January 1, 2007 at the age of 53. Luhr 
was director of the Global Volcanism 
Program at the Museum of Natural 
History, Smithsonian Institution. 

Joseph Morgan (BS '50) died 
September 24, 2007 at the age of 80. 
After receiving his master's degree 
from the University of Wyoming, 
Morgan worked as a geologist in the 
oil and gas industry. 

John Matkin Richart (BS '57) died 
March 16, 2007 at the age of 77. 
Richart served with the Navy during 
the Korean War, and after graduation 
was hired by Pure Oil Company 
where he worked for 29 years. 



Mary Barnes Rolley (MS '48) died on 
August 5, 2007 at the age of 86. Rolley 
worked at the Illinois State Geological 
Survey before relocating to California 
and working as a draftswoman for 
North American Aviation and raising 
her family. 

Edward Shover (PhD '61) died 
October 28, 2007 at the age of 71. He 
worked as a geologist in the aerospace 
and petroleum industries in and 
around Houston, Texas. 

Adler Spotte (BS '40, MS '41) died 
January 11, 2007 at the age of 92. The 
son of a coal miner, Spotte grew up in 
Staunton, Illinois. After volunteering 
to serve in the Navy during World 
War II, Spotte built a career leading a 
number of coal companies in Virginia, 
West Virginia, and Kentucky. 

Allen W. Waldo (AB '27, MS '28) died 
March 14, 2007 at the age of 102. He 
taught geology at the College of the 
Pacific and Stockton College and spent 
summers as a ranger naturalist in 
Yosemite and Crater Lake National 
Parks. 

Meggan Kathleen Weeks (BS '96) 
died June 25, 2007 at the age of 33. At 
the time of her death she was working 
toward her master's degree in materi- 
als science and engineering from the 
University of North Texas. 

Roy Edward Williams (PhD '66) died 
April 6, 2007 at the age of 69. While 
earning his Ph.D. at Illinois, Williams 
worked as a research assistant at the 
Illinois State Geological Survey. 

Roger Glen Wolff (MS '60, PhD '61) 
died on January 1 , 2007 at the age of 
74. He worked his entire career at the 
United States Geological Survey. 
Before he retired he served as the 
chief of the Office of Hydrologic 
Research. 



1960s 

David L. Gross (MS '67, PhD '69) was 
appointed by the Governor of Illinois 
and confirmed by the Illinois State 
Senate to the geologist position on the 
Board of Natural Resources and 
Conservation, the governing board for 
the Illinois State Geological Survey, the 
Illinois Natural History Survey, the 
Illinois State Water Survey, and the 
Waste Management and Research 
Center. David is a senior geologist emer- 
itus at the Illinois State Geological 
Survey where he still maintains an 
office. He currently serves as an outside 
director and chairman of First State 
Bank in Beardstown, Illinois. 

1970s 
John Morrone (BS, 79) hails from the 
Colorado office of the Bureau of Land 
Management. As baby-boomers retire, 
he anticipates numerous vacancies 
throughout BLM offices which are now 
offering many student internships. John 
also would like to see more of his con- 
temporaries participate in Departmental 
receptions at national meetings so he 
can catch up with old friends and col- 
leagues. 

Carl Steffensen (BS 79) and Patricia 

Santogrossi (BS 74, MS 76) have both 
been elected members of the AAPG 
House of Delegates (AAPG's legislative 
body) for three year terms (2007-2010) 
representing the Houston Geological 
Society. 

1980s 
Lawrence L. Fieber (BS, '83) has 
worked for the Chicago branch of Burns 
and McDonnell, a major engineering 
consulting firm, for eight years now. He 
recently visited the Department for the 
first time in ages and brought with him 
the news that there is a great deal of 
demand for geotechnical and environ- 
mental geologists in the Chicagoland 
area. Burns and McDonnell is doing 
some serious recruiting at UIUC at the 
moment and Lawrence would love to 
see more alumni from the Department 
join him in the Chicago office. 



10 



r* *, 







Spring 2007 

Jan. 19 

Mark H. Anders, Columbia University 

The Normal Fault Paradox: Getting to the Root 

of the Problem 

Jan. 26 

Wendy Panero, Ohio State University 
Water Transport and Storage of Water in the 
Earth's Lower Mantle 

Feb. 2 

Alan Boudreau, Duke University 

The Evolution of Texture and Layering in 

Layered Intrusions 

Feb. 9 

Steve Jacobsen, Northwestern University 
Earth's Deep Water Cycle: The Emerging 
Picture from Mineral Physics 

Feb. 16 

Eric Roden, University of Wisconsin 
Geochemical Controls on Microbial Fe(lll) 
Oxide Reduction Kinetics 

Feb. 23 

Chuck Langston, University of Memphis 
The Scientific Mystery of the New Madrid 
Seismic Zone 

Mar. 2 

Timm Strathmann, U1UC Environmental 

Engineering 

Rapid Reduction of Aquatic Contaminants by 

Organically Complexed Iron (II) Species 

Mar. 9 

Alan Howard, University of Virginia 
Sedimentary Landforms on Mars: Fluvial, 
Lacustrine, Eolian, and Possibly Oceanic 

Mar. 30 

Dave Bish, University of Indiana 

Water on Mars: Can Hydrous Minerals Explain 

Observed Martian Surface Water? 



Apr. 5 

Laura Crossey, University of New Mexico 
CO, Mound Springs and Travertines of the 
Western U.S.: Towards a Model for 
Continental "Smokers"? 

Apr. 13 

Davis Blowes, University of Waterloo 
Permeable Reactive Barriers for Treating 
Groundwater Contaminated by Dissolved 
Metals 

Apr. 20 

Mike Ritzwoller, University of Colorado 
Revealing the Earth's Crust and Upper Mantle 
in HiDef: An Overview of the State of Ambient 
Noise Tomography 

Fall 2007 

Aug. 24 

R. James Kirkpatrick, College of Natural 
Sciences, Michigan State University 
Spectroscopic and Computational Studies of 
Mineral-Fluid Interactions 

Aug. 31 

Don Wubbles, Executive Coordinator, School 
of Earth, Society, and Environment (SESE) 
The Status of SESE 

Sept. 7 

Bridget Scanlon, Bureau of Economic Geology, 
UT Austin 

Impacts of Changing Land Use on Subsurface 
Water Resources in Semiarid Regions 

Sept. 14 

Pinaki Chakraborty, UIUC Department of 

Geology 

The Rayleigh-Taylor Instability: From Water 

Falling Out of a Glass to Fire Falling Out of the 

Sky 

Sept. 21 

Mark Skidmore, Montana State University 
Microbially Mediated Weathering in Subglacial 
Systems 



Sept. 26 

Jim Butler, Kansas Geological Survey 
Getting the Information Ground Water 
Modelers Need: A Report From the Field 

Oct. 5 

Greg Retallack, University of Oregon 
Global Greenhouse Crises of the Past 

Oct. 12 

Henry Scott, Indiana University at South 

Bend 

High-Pressure and Temperature Investigations 

in the Fe-C and Fe-P systems: Implications 

for Planetary Interiors 

Oct. 19 

Ken Wohletz, Los Alamos National 
Laboratory 

Were the Dark Ages Triggered by Volcano- 
Related Climate Change? 

Oct. 26 

Gary Pavlis, Indiana University 

The Southeast Caribbean Plate Boundary: 

New Insights from the Bolivar Project 

Nov. 2 

Craig C. Lundstrom, UIUC Department of 

Geology 

Magma Differentiation in a Temperature 

Gradient: A Potentially Important Process 

with an Isotopic Fingerprint 

Nov. 9 

Frederik Simons, Princeton University 
Measuring Geophysical Processes in Space 
from the Shifting Weight of the Earth: Old 
Problems, New Methods, New Results 

Nov. 30 

Darryl Granger, Purdue University 
Landscape Response to Tectonics and 
Climate: A Cosmogenic Nuclide Perspective 




&s?vvig 




A group of undergraduates gather on the lawn north of the Natural 
Hisotry Building at the annual Department picnic held on 
September 14, 2007. 



Associate Head of the Department, Professor Chu-Yung Chen joins 
undergraduate senior Meghan Ori at the Majors and Minors Fair held 
at the lllini Union in October, 2007 



Annual report for 2007 



Faculty 



Stephen Altaner (Associate Professor) 

Alison Anders (Assistant Professor) 

Jay Bass (Grim Professor) 

Jim Best (Threet Professor) 

Craig Bethke (Grim Professor) 

Chu-Yung Chen (Associate Professor) 

Wang-Ping Chen (Professor and Acting Head) 

Bruce Fouke (Associate Professor) 

Thomas Johnson (Associate Professor) 

Susan Kieffer (Walgreen Professor) 

R. James Kirkpatrick (Grim Professor & Senior 

Executive Associate Dean) 
Jie Li (Assistant Professor) 
Craig Lundstrom (Associate Professor) 
Steve Marshak (Professor and Head- 
on sabbatical leave until Fall 200S) 
Gary Parker (Johnson Professor) 
Xiaodong Song (Associate Professor) 



12 



Department Affiliate 

Marcelo Garcia (Seiss Professor, Civil and 

Environmental Engineering) 
Feng Sheng Hu (Associate Professor; Plant 

Biology) 
Bruce Rhoads (Professor, Department of 

Geography) 

Academic Staff, Post-Does, 
Visiting Staff 

Geoffrey Bowers (Post-Doctoral Research 

Associate) 
Mariano Cantero (Post-Doctoral Research 

Associate) 
Pinaki Chakraborty (Post-Doctoral Research 

Associate) 
Rocio Fernandez (Post-Doctoral Research 

Associate) 
Justin Glessner (Geochemist) 
Holger Hellwig (Research Scientist) 
Eileen Herrstrom (Teaching Specialist) 
Stephen Hurst (Research Programmer/Geologist) 
Andrey Kalinichev (Research Associate 

Professor) 
Michael Kandianis (Post-Doctoral Research 

Associate) 
Michael Lerche (Post-Doctoral Research 

Associate) 
Ann Long (Teaching Specialist) 
Xinli Lu (Post-Doctoral Research Associate) 
Padma Padmanabhan (Post-Doctoral Research 

Associate) 
Philip Parker (Visiting Research Programmer) 
Daniel Saalfeld (Visiting Research Programmer) 
Rob Sanford (Senior Research Scientist) 
Xinlei Sun (Post-Doctoral Research Associate) 
Michael Stewart (Lecturer) 
Jonathan Tomkin (Research Assistant Professor) 
Tai-Lin Tseng (Post-Doctoral Research Associate) 
Sharon Yeakel (Research Programmer) 
Paulo Zandonade (Post-Doctoral Research 

Associate) 
Zhaofeng Zhang (Visiting Scholar) 
Jianming Zhu (Visiting Scholar) 



Adjunct Faculty 

Robert Finley 
Leon R. Follmer 
Morris W. Leighton 
Hannes Leetaru 
William Shilts 
Wolfgang Sturhahn 
M. Scott Wilkerson 

Emeritus Faculty 

Thomas F. Anderson 
Daniel B. Blake 
Albert V. Carozzi 
Donald L. Graf 
Arthur F Hagner 
Albert T. Hsui 
George D. Klein 
Ralph Langenheim 
C. John Mann 
Alberto Nieto 
Philip Sandberg 

Library Staff 

Lura Joseph (Librarian) 

Sheila McGowan (Library Assistant) 

Diana L. Walter (Senior Library Specialist) 



COURSES TADGHT IN 2007 



Department Staff 

Michael Sczerba (Clerk) 

Marilyn Whalen (Administrative Secretary) 

Graduate Students 



Anirban Basu 
Peter Berger 
Charles Bopp 
Jon Brenizer 
Shane Butler 
Bin Chen 
Melissa Chipman 
Mirona Chirienco 
Scott Clark 
Rivkah Cooke 
Wei Dai 

Joshua Defrates 
Dong Ding 
Xing Ding 
Theodore Flynn 
Lili Gao 
Jessica Hellwig 
Carly Hill 
Ana Houseal 
Fang Huang 
Kevin Hughes 
Adam Ianno 
Meijuan Jiang 
Michael Kandianis 
Dmitri Lakshtanov 



Qi Li 
Qiang Li 
Daniela Lindner 
Vineeth Madhavan 
Chris Majerczyk 
Jorge Marino 
Chris Mead 
Charlie Mitsdarfer 
Mara Morgenstern 
Jessica Palmer 
Mauricio Perillo 
Alan Piggot 
Geoffrey Poore 
Amanda Raddatz 
David Robison 
Pragnyadipta Sen 
Ivan Ufimtsev 
Holly Vescogni 
Jingyun Wang 
Nathan Webb 
Emily Wisseman 
Kevin Wolfe 
Zhen Xu 
Zhaohui Yang 



GEOL 100 


Planet Earth 


GEOL 101 


Introductory Physical Geology 


GEOL 103 


Planet Earth QRII 


GEOL 104 


Geology of the National Parks 


GEOL 107 


Physical Geology 


GEOL 108 


Historical Geology 


GEOL 110 


Exploring Geology in the Field 


GEOL 116 


The Planets 


GEOL 117 


The Oceans 


GEOL 118 


Natural Disasters 


GEOL 143 


History of Life 


GEOL 333 


Earth Materials and the 




Environment 


GEOL 380 


Environmental Geology 


GEOL 411 


Structural Geol and Tectonics 


GEOL 415 


Field Geology 


GEOL 417 


Geology Field Methods, Western US 


GEOL 432 


Mineralogy and Mineral Optics 


GEOL 436 


Petrology and Petrography 


GEOL 440 


Sedimentology and Stratigraphy 


GEOL 454 


Introduction to Seismology 


GEOL 460 


Geochemistry 


GEOL 470 


Introduction to Hydrogeology 


GEOL 481 


Earth Systems Modeling 


GEOL 497A 


The Sciences and Ethics of 




Sustainability 


GEOL 497AB 


Geomicrobiology and Geochemistry 


GEOL 497SK 


Geological Fluid Dynamics 


GEOL 512 


Geotectonics 


GEOL 515 


Advanced Field Geology 


GEOL 552 


Geodynamics 


GEOL 553 


Chemistry of Earth's Interior 


GEOL 560 


Physical Geochemistry 


GEOL 562 


Isotope Geology 


GEOL 571 


Geochemical Reaction Analysis 


GEOL 591 


Current Research in Geoscience 


GEOL 593 


Advanced Studies in Geology 


GEOL 593G1 


River Morphodynamics 


GEOL 593J2 


Molecular Modeling of Water 


GEOL 593K14 Seismic Interferometry, Diffuse 




Wave Correlations, & Imaging 



.•.r. 




AIR FORCE 

Xiaodong Song — Characterizing High-Resolution 
Seismic Velocity and Attenuation Structure of 
Yunnan-Sichuan Region, Southwest China 
using Seismic Catalog and Waveform Data. 

Xiaodong Song — Surface Wave Dispersion 
Measurements and Tomography from Ambient 
Seismic Noise in China. 

AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY 

Jonathan Tomkin — The Effect of Late Cenozoic 
Glaciation on the Evolution of the Olympic 
Mountain. 

Craig M. Bethke and Robert Sanford — Field- 
Constrained Quantitative Model of the Origin of 
Microbial and Geochemical Zoning in a 
Confined Fresh-Water Aquifer. 

Thomas M. Johnson — Chromium Isotopes as 
Indicators of Hexavalent Chromium Reduction. 

R. James Kirkpatrick and Andrey G. 
Kalinichev — Computational and Spectroscopic 
Investigations of the Molecular Scale Structure 
and Dynamics of Geologically Important Fluids 
and Mineral-Fluid Interfaces. 

Robert Sanford — Biomolecular Mechanisms 
Controlling Metal and Radionuclide 
Transformations in Anaeromyxobacter 
Dehalogenans. 

Robert Sanford — Towards a More Complete 
Picture: Dissimilatory Metal Reduction by 
Anaeromyxobcter Species. 

EXXONMOBIL UPSTREAM RESEARCH 
COMPANY 

Craig Bethke — Membership in the Hydro- 
Geology Program Industrial Consortium for 
Research and Education. 

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY 

Robert A Sanford— Growth of Chlororespiring 

Bacteria to High Cell Densities for Use in 

Bioaugmentation. 

NASA 

Susan Kieffer — Multicomponent, Multiphase 

H:0-CO: Thermodynamics and Fluid Dynamics 

on Mars. 

NATIONAL SCIENCE COUNCIL OF TAIWAN 
Wang-Ping Chen— Caucasus Scientific 

Experiments (CAUSE): An Integrated Study of 

Active Continental Collision. 

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION 

Jay Bass— Sound Velocities and Elasticity of 
Deep-Earth Materials at High Pressures and 
Temperatures. 

Jay Bass— Sound Velocities and Elastic Moduli of 
Minerals at Mantle Pressures and Temperatures 
with Laser Heating. 

Jay Bass — Collaborative Research: Elasticity 
Grand Challenge of the COMPRES. 



Jay Bass — Consortium for Material Property 
Research in the Earth Science. 

Wang-Ping Chen — Collaborative Research: 
Lithospheric-Scale Dynamics of Active 
Mountain Building along the Himalayan- 
Tibetan Collision Zone. 

Wang-Ping Chen— CSEDI Collaborative 
Research: A Study of Deep Subduction 
Integrating Broadband Seismology and Mineral 
Physics. 

Wang-Ping Chen— Collaborative Research: 
Imaging the Continental Lithosphere with 
Earthquake Sources. 

Bruce Fouke — Geobiological and the Emergence 
of Terraced Architecture during Carbonate 
Mineralization. 

Bruce Fouke — NSF Research Experience for 
Middle School Teachers at Mammoth Hot 
Springs, Yellowstone National Park. 

Thomas M. Johnson and Craig C. Lundstrom— 

Technical Support for die New Mc-ICP-MS 
Laboratory at University of Illinois. 

Susan Kieffer — Multiphysics Modeling and 
Terascale Simulations of Volcanic Blasts Over 
Complex Terrains. 

Jie Li — Constraints on Core Composition from 
Nuclear Resonant Scattering and X-Ray 
Diffraction Studies on Fe-Light-Element 
Compounds. 

Craig C. Lundstrom and Stephen Marshak — 

Assessing Diffusive Differentiation during 
Igneous Intrusion Using Integrated Theoretical 
Experimental and Field Studies. 

Xiaodong Song — CSEDI Collaborative Research: 
Observational and Theoretical Constraints on 
the Structure and Rotation of the Inner Core. 

Xiaodong Song — Structure and Dynamics of 
Earth's Core and Lowermost Mantle. 




Jonathan Tomkin — Collaborative Research: 
Glacial Erosion in the Patagonian Andes; 
Testing the Buzzsaw. 

OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH 

Bruce Fouke and Milton McAllister- 
Microbiological, Physiological, and 
Toxicological Effects of Explosive Compounds 
on Coral Health. 

Bruce Fouke— The Role of Shipyard Pollutants in 
Structuring Coral Reef Microbial Communities: 
Monitoring Environmental Change and the 
Potential Causes of Coral Disease. 

THE RESEARCH FOUNDATION OF THE STATE 
UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK 

Jay Bass — High-Resolution Inelastic X-ray 

Scattering at High P & T: A New Capability for 
the COMPRES Community. 

SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORY 

Craig Bethke — Software Licenses for Geochemist 

Workbench. 

SCK.CEN 

Craig Bethke— Membership in the Hydro- 
Geology Program Industrial Consortium. 

SHELL INTERNATIONAL EXPLORATION AND 

PRODUCTION 

Gary Parker and Garcia Marcelo — 

Channelization by Turbidity Currents in 
Submarine Fairways and on Fans. 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

Wang-Ping Chen— Building Infrastructure for 
Space-Based Geodesy. 

Bruce Fouke — Calcium Carbonate (CaCOO 
Biomineralization: The Geologic Record of 
Biological Responses to Rapid Environmental 
Change. 



More than 100 guests 
attended the joint UI-IU 
alumni reception at the 
Annual Meeting of the 
Geological Society of 
America in Denver. In the 
foreground, Chuck Norris 
(BS '69) and his wife 
greet Keros Cartwright 
(PhD 73). 




13 



List of Publications for 2007 



Andrews A.H., Lundstrom C.C., 
Cailliet G.M., and DeVogelaere 
A. P. Investigations of bamboo 
coral age and growth from 
Davidson Seamount. Technical 
Report Monterey Bay. National 
Marine Sanctuary. 

Andrews A.H., Kerr L.A., Cailliet 
G.M., Brown T.A., Lundstrom 
C.C., and Stanley R.D. Age valida- 
tion of canary rockfish (Sebastes 
pinniger) using two independent 
otolith techniques: lead-radium 
and bomb radiocarbon dating. 
Marine and Freshwater Research, 
58: 531-541. 

Anders A.M., Roe G.H., Durran D.R., 
and Minder J.R. Small-scale spa- 
tial gradients in climatalogical pre- 
cipitation on the Olympic 
Peninsula. Journal of 
Hydrometeorology, 8: 1068-1081. 

Ashworth P.J., Best J.L., and Jones 
M. The relationship between 
channel avulsion, flow occupancy 
and aggradation in braided rivers: 
insights from an experimental 
alluvial basin, Sedimentology, 54: 
497-513. 

Bass J.D. Mineral Physics: 
Techniques for measuring high 
P/T elasticity. In G.D. Price and J. 
Schubert (Eds.), Treatise of 
Geophysics (pp. 269-292). 
Amsterdam: Elsevier B.V. 

Best J., Ashworth P., Sarker M.H. 
and Roden R. The Brahmaputra- 
Jamuna River, Bangladesh, In A. 
Gupta (Ed.). Large Rivers: 
Geomorphology & Management 
(pp. 395-430). Wiley. 

Bethke CM. Geochemical and 
Biogeochemical Reaction Modeling. 
Cambridge: Cambridge University 
Press. 

Cantelli A., Wong M., Parker G., and 
Paola C. Numerical model linking 
bed and bank evolution of inci- 
sional channel created by dam 
removal. Water Resources 
Research, 43(7), W07436. 16 p. 

Chatanantavet P., Parker G., 
Lajeunesse E., Planton P., and 
Valla P. Physically-based model of 
downstream fining in bedrock 
streams with side input and verifi- 
cation with field data. Proceedings, 
River, Coastal and Estuarine 
Morphodynamics, 5th IAHR 
Symposium (RCEM 2007), 
Enschede, the Netherlands 1 7-21 , 
8 p. 



Chen B., Gao L., Funakoshi K.-i., and 
Li J. Thermal expansion of iron- 
rich alloys and implications for the 
Earth's core. PNAS, 104(22): 9162- 
9167, doi 
10.1073/pnas.0610474104. 

Chen W.-P. and Brudzinski M.R. 
Repeating earthquakes, episodic 
tremor and slip: Emerging patterns 
in complex earthquake cycles? 
Complexity, 12 (5): 33-43, 
doi:10.1002/cplx.201S5. 

Chen W.-P. and Tseng T.-L. Small 
660-km seismic discontinuity 
beneath Tibet implies resting 
ground for detached lithosphere. 
Journal of Geophysical Research, 
112: doi:10.1029/2006JB004607. 

Courtier A.M., Jackson M.G., 
Lawrence J. F., Wang Z.-R., Lee 
C.-T. A., Halama R., Warren J.M., 
Workman R., Xu W.-B., 
Hirschmann M.M., Larson A.M., 
Hart S.R.. Lithgow-Bertelloni C, 
Stixrude L., and Chen W.-P. 
Correlation of seismic and petro- 
logic thermometers suggests deep 
thermal anomalies beneath 
hotspots, Earth and Planetary 
Science Letters, 264(1-2): 308-316. 

Huang F. and Lundstrom C.C. 231Pa 
excesses in arc volcanic rocks: 
Constraint on melting rates at con- 
vergent margins. Geology, 35: 
1007-1010. 

Gajda A. and Kieffer S.W. Celebrity 
meets Science: Hollywood's envi- 
ronmentalism and its effect, GSA 
Today, 17(10): 44-45. 

Gioia G., Chakraborty P., Marshak S., 
and Kieffer S.W. Unified model of 
tectonics and heat transport in a 
frigid Enceladus, PNAS, 104(34): 
13578-13581. 

Goncharov A.F., Stanislav Sinogeikin 
S.V., Crowhurst J.C., Ahart M., 
Lakshanov D., Prakapenka V., Bass 
J.D., Beck P., Tkachev S., Zaug J., 
and Fei Y. Cubic boron nitride as a 
primary calibrant for a high tem- 
perature pressure scale. High 
Pressure Research, 27 (4): 409-417. 

Imran J., Islam M.A., Huang H., 
Kassem A., Dickerson J., Pirmez 
C. and Parker G. Helical flow cou- 
plets in submarine gravity under- 
flows. Geology, 35(7): 659-662. 

Jin Q. and Bethke CM. The thermo- 
dynamics and kinetics of microbial 
metabolism. American Journal of 
Science, 307: 643-677. 



KeevilG.M., Peakall J., and Best 
J.L. The influence of scale, slope 
and channel geometry on the flow 
dynamics of submarine channels. 
Marine and Petroleum Geology, 24: 
487-503. 

Klaus J. S., Janse I., Heikoop J. M., 
Sanford R.A., and Fouke B.W. 
Coral microbial communities, 
zooxanthellae, and mucus along 
gradients of seawater depth and 
coastal pollution. Environmental 
Microbiology, 9: 1291-1305. 

Klaus J.. Budd A., and Fouke B.W. 
Environmental controls on coral- 
lite morphology in the reef coral 
Montastrea annularis. Bulletin of 
Marine Science, 28: 233-260. 

Kostic S. and Parker G. Conditions 
under which a supercritical turbid- 
ity current traverses an abrupt 
transition to vanishing slope with- 
out a hydraulic jump. Journal of 
Fluid Mechanics, 586: 119-145. 

Lakshtanov D.L., Litasov K.D., 
Sinogeikin S.V., Hellwig H., Li J., 
Ohtani E., and Bass J. D. Effect of 
Al" and H" on the elastic proper- 
ties of stishovite. American 
Mineralogists, 92: 1026-1030. 

Lakshtanov D.L., Sinogeikin S.V., 
and Bass J.D. High-temperature 
phase transitions and elasticity of 
silica polymorphs. Physics and 
Chemistry of Minerals, 34: 11-22. 

Lakshtanov D.L., Sinogeikin S.V., 
Litasov K.D., Prakapenka V.B., 
Hellwig H., Wang J., Sanches-Valle 

C, Perillat J.-P., Chen B., 
Somayazulu M., Li J., Ohtani E., 
and Bass J. D. The post-stishovite 
phase transitions in hydrous alu- 
mina-bearing SiO.. in the lower 
mantle of the Earth, PNAS, 
104(34): 13588-13590, doi 
13510. 11073/pnas.0706113104. 

Lee C.-T. and Chen W.-P. A possible 
mechanism for chemical stratifica- 
tion in the Earth's mantle. Earth 
and Planetary/ Science Letters, 255: 
357-366. 

Li J. and Fei Y. Experimental con- 
straints on core composition. In H. 

D. Holland and K. K. Turekian 
(Eds.), Treatise on Geochemistry 
Update I, Vol. 2.14 (pp. 1-31). 
Elsevier Ltd. 

Li J. Electronic transitions and spin 
states in perovskite and post-per- 
ovskite. In K. Hirose, J. Brodholt, 
T. Lay. and D. Yuen (Eds.), Post- 
Perovskite: The Last Mantle Phase 
Transition (pp. 47-69). 
Washington DC: American 



Geophysical Union. 

Litasov K.D., Kagi H., Shatskiy, 
A.F., Ohtani E., Lakshtanov 
D.L., Bass J. D., Ito E. High 
Hydrogen Solubility in Al-rich 
Stishovite and water transport in 
the lower mantle. Earth and 
Planetary Science Letters, 262: 
620-634. 

Matas J., Bass J., Ricard Y., 
Mattem E., and Bukowinski 
M.S.T. On the bulk composition 
of the lower mantle: predictions 
and limitations from generalized 
inversion of radial seismic pro- 
files. Geophysical Journal 
International 170: 764-780. 

Mehnert E., Hwang H.-H., Johnson 
T.M., Sanford R.A.. Beaumont 
W.C, and Holm T.R. 
Denitrification in the shallow 
ground water of a tile-drained, 
agricultural watershed. Journal 
of Environmental Quality, 36: 
80-90. 

Mizushima H., Izumi N., and 
Parker G. A simple mathematical 
model of channel bifurcation. 
Proceedings, River, Coastal and 
Estuarine Morphodynamics, 5th 
IAHR Symposium (RCEM 2007), 
Enschede, the Netherlands 17-21, 
4 p. 

Murakami M., Sinogeikin S.V., 
Hellwig H., Bass J.D., and Li J. 
Sound velocity of MgSiO, per- 
ovskite to Mbar pressure. Earth 
and Planetary Science Letters, 
256: 47-54. 

Murakami M., Sinogeikin S.V., Bass 
J.D., Sata N., Ohishi Y, Hirose 
K. Sound Velocity of MgSiO, 
Post-Perovskite Phase: A 
Constraint on the D" 
Discontinuity. Earth and 
Planetary Science Letters, 259: 
18-23. 

Naruse H., Sequeiros O., Garcia 
M.H., Parker G., Endo N., 
Kataoka K.S., Yokokawa M., and 
Muto T. Self-accelerating 
Turbidity Currents at Laboratory 
Scale. Proceedings, River, Coastal 
and Estuarine Morphodynamics, 
5th IAHR Symposium (RCEM 
2007), Enschede, the 
Netherlands 17-21, 4 p. 

Nowack R.L., Chen W.-P, Kruse 
U.E., and Dasgupta S. Imaging 
offsets in the Moho: Synthetic 
tests using Gaussian beam with 
teleseismic waves. Pure Applied 
Geophysics, 164(10): 1921-1936, 
doi: 10. 1007/S00024-007-0250-3. 



14 




.<r. 



HONOR ROLL OF DONOR 






Parker G. and Toniolo H. Note on 
the analysis of plunging of den- 
sity flows. Journal of Hydraulic 
Engineering, 133(6): 690-694. 

Parker G., Wilcock P., Paola C., 
Dietrich W.E., and Pitlick J. 
Quasi-universal relations for 
bankfull hydraulic geometry of 
single-thread gravel-bed rivers. 
Journal of Geophysical Research 
Earth Surface, 112(F4). 

Parsons D.R., Best J.L., Lane S.N., 
Hardy R.J., Orfeo 0., and 
Kostaschuk R.A. Form rough- 
ness and the absence of sec- 
ondary flow in a large conflu- 
ence-diffluence unit, Parana 
River, Argentina. Earth Surface 
Processes and Landforms, 32: 
155-162. 

Peakall J., Ashworth P.J., and Best 
J.L. Meander-bend evolution, 
alluvial architecture, and the 
role of cohesion in sinuous river 
channels: a flume study. Journal 
of Sedimentary Research. 77: 
197-212. 

Perrillat J-R, Nestola F., Sinogeikin 
S.V., and BassJ.D. Single- 
crystal elastic properties of 
Ca 00 .Mg ] „Si,0 ( , orthopyroxene. 

American Mineralogist, 92: 
109-113. 

Sanford R.A., Wu Q., Sung Y., 
Thomas S.H., Amos B.K., Prince 
E.K., and Loftier, F.E. 
Hexavalent uranium supports 
growth of Anaeromyxobacter 
dehalogenans, and Geobacter 
spp. with lower than predicted 
biomass yields. Environmental 
Microbiology, 9: 2885-2893. 

Song X.D. and Poupinet G. Inner 
core rotation from event-pair 
analysis, Earth and Planetary 
Science Letters. 261: 259-266, 
doi:10.1016/j.epsl.2007.06.034. 

Song X.D. Inner core anisotropy. 
In D. Gubbins and E. Herroro- 
Bervera (Eds.), Encyclopedia of 
Geomagnetism and 
Plaeomagnetism (pp 418-420). 
Kluwer Academic Publishers 
B.V. 

Sun, D.Y., Helmberger D.V., Song 
X.D., Grand S.P. Predicting a 
global perovskite and postper- 
ovskite phase boundary. In K. 
Hirose, J. Brodholt, T. Lay, and 
D. Yuen (Eds.), Post-Perovskite: 
The Last Mantle Phase 
Transition. Washington DC: 
American Geophysical Union. 



Sun, X.L., Song X.D., Zheng S.H., 
and Helmberger D.V. Evidence 
for a chemical-thermal structure 
at base of mantle from sharp 
lateral P-wave variations 
beneath Central America, PNAS, 
104 (1): 26-30, 
doi:10.1073/pnas.0609143103. 

Szupiany. R.N., Amsler, ML., 
Best, J.L., and Parsons, D.R. 
Comparison of fixed- and mov- 
ing-vessel flow measurements 
with an aDp in a large river, 
Journal of Hydraulic 
Engineering, 133: 1299-1309. 

Toniolo H., Parker G. and Voller V. 
Role of ponded turbidity cur- 
rents in reservoir trap efficiency. 
Journal of Hydraulic 
Engineering, 133(6): 579-595. 

Tornqvist T.E., Paola C, Parker G., 
Liu K., Mohrig D., Holbrook J. 
M., and Twilley R. R. Comment 
on "Wetland sedimentation 
from Hurricanes Katrina and 
Rita." Science, 316(5822). 

Viparelli E., Sequeiros O., Cantelli 
A., and Parker G. A numerical 
model to store and access the 
stratigraphy of non-cohesive 
sediment as an alluvial bed 
aggrades and degrades in a 
flume. Proceedings. River, 
Coastal and Estuarine 
Morphodynamics, 5th IAHR 
Symposium (RCEM 2007), 
Enschede, the Netherlands 17- 
21, 8 p. 

Wong M., Parker G., De Vries P.. 
Brown T, and Burges S.J. 
Experiments on dispersion of 
tracer stones under lower- 
regime plane-bed equilibrium 
bed load transport. Water 
Resources Research, 43(3), 
W03440, 23 p. 

Zheng S.H., Sun X.L., and Song 
X.D., Fine structure of P-wave 
velocity variations underneath 
the Central Pacific from PKP 
waves recorded at the China 
Seismic Network (CSN). Chinese 
Journal of Geophysics, 50(1): 
183-191. 



The following is a list of friends and alumni of the Department of Geology who 
have donated to the Department during the 2007 calendar year. 



Prof. Thomas F. Anderson 

Dr. Robert F. Babb II 

Mr. Rodney J. Balazs 

Ms. Debbie E. Baldwin 

Mrs. Margaret H. Bargh 

Mrs. Mary H. Barrows 

Mr. Douglas Stephen Bates 

Mrs. Colene R. Bauer 

Dr. David K. Beach 

Dr. and Mrs. William M. Benzel 

Dr. Marion E. Bickford 

Mrs. Heidi Blischke 

Dr. Bruce F. Bohor 

Mr. Eugene W. Borden Sr. 

Michael G. Bradley. PhD 

Virginia A. Colten-Bradley. 

PhD 
Dr. Danita Brandt 
Mr. Allen S. Braumiller 
Ms. Annette Brewster 
Mr. and Mrs. Ross D. Brower 
Dr. Glenn R. Buckley 
Dr. Susan B. Buckley 
Mr. and Mrs. Steven P. 

Burgess 
Dr. Louis W. Butler II 
James W. Castle, PhD 
Dr. Charles J. Chantell 
Mr. Lester W. Clutter 
Mr. Gary W.Cobb 
Dr. Dennis D. Coleman 
Barbara J. Collins. PhD 
Lorence G. Collins, PhD 
Mr. Randolph M. Collins 
Dr. Norbert E. Cygan 
Dr. Ilham Demir 
Mr, M. Peter deVries 
Mr. Richard E. Dobson 
Ms. Sophie M. Dreifuss 
Dr. and Mrs. John B. Droste 
Dr. and Mrs. Mohamed T. El- 

Ashry 
Dr. Frank R. Ettensohn 
Mr. Kyle Marshall Fagin 
Mr. Kenneth T, Feldman 
Mr. Max C. Firebaugh 
Mr. Gary M. Fleeger 
Dr. Leon R. Follmer 
Mr. Gary R. Foote 
Dr. Richard M. Forester 
Mr. Jack D. Foster 
Mr. Robert E. Fox 
Mr. Edwin H. Franklin 
Mr. Barry R. Gager 
Mr. and Mrs. John R. Garino 
Ms. Theresa C. Gierlowski 
Mr. Robert N. Ginsburg 
Mr. and Mrs. Marvin G. Ginzel 
Dr. and Mrs. Stuart Grossman 



Dr. and Mrs. Albert L. Guber 
Dr. Mary Elizabeth Hamstrom 
Mrs. Catherine L. Harms 
Dr. and Mrs. Henry J. Harris 
Dr. Daniel 0. Hayba 
Dr. Mark A. Helper and Dr. 

Sharon Mosher 
Mrs. Margaret F. Henderson 
Mr. and Mrs. Mark F. Hoffman 
Dr. Roscoe G. Jackson II 
Mr, Steven F. Jamrisko 
Mr. John E. Jenkins 
Dr. and Mrs. William D. Johns Jr. 
Mr. Bruce A. Johnson 
Dr. Edward C. Jonas 
Dr. Robert E. Karlin 
Dr. Suzanne Mahlburg Kay 
Dr. John P. Kempton 
Mr. Virgil John Kennedy 
Dr. and Mrs. John D. Kiefer 
Dr. and Mrs. R. James 

Kirkpatrick 
Mr. H. Richard Klatt 
Mr. Robert F. Kraye 
Mr. Michael B. Lamport 
Dr. Stephen E. Laubach 
Mr. Stephen C. Lee 
Dr. Hannes E. Leetaru 
Dr. Morris W. Leighton 
Mr. Eric W. Lipman 
Ms. Crystal Lovett-Tibbs 
Mr. Bernard W. Lynch 
Dr. Andrew Stephen Madden 
Dr. Megan E. Elwood Madden 
Mr. John W. Marks 
Prof, and Mrs. Stephen Marshak 
Mr. and Mrs. Alan R. May 
Mr. and Mrs. Kendall W. Miller 
Ms. Linda A. Minor 
Mr. John S. Moore 
Ms. Melanie J. Mudarth 
Mr. Robert E. Murphy 
Mr. Bruce W. Nelson 
Mr. W. John Nelson 
Mr. and Mrs. Brian Donald Noel 
Mrs. Connne Pearson and Mr. 

Thomas E. Krisa 
Dr. and Mrs. Russel A. Peppers 
Mr. Charles E. Pflum 
Mr. Bruce E. Phillips 
Mrs. Beverly A. Pierce 
Dr. Paul L. Plusquellec 
Dr. Elizabeth P. Rail 
Mr. Paul J. Regorz 
Mr. Donald 0. Rimsnider 
Mr. William F. Ripley 
Dr. Nancy M. Rodriguez 
Dr. Richard P. Sanders 
Ms. Nancy A. Savula 



Mr. Jay R. Scheevel 
Dr. David C. Schuster 
Dr. and Mrs. Franklin W. 

Schwartz 
Dr. John W. Shelton 
Ms. Erika L. Sieh 
Jack A. Simon Trust (DEC) 
Mr. and Mrs. Roger A. Sippel 
Mr. Robert D. Snyder 
Dr. J. William Soderman 
Mr. Eric P. Sprouls 
Dr. Ian M. Steele 
Dr. and Mrs. Ronald D. Stieglitz 
Dr. Gary D. Strieker 
Dr. and Mrs. Michael L. Sweet 
Dr. Susan M. Taylor 
Dr. Daniel A. Textoris 
Mr. and Mrs. Jack C. Threet 
Dr. Edwin W. Tooker 
Mr. and Mrs. William L 

Vineyard 
Mr. Robert W. Von Rhee 
Dr. Floyd M. Wahl 
Ms. Harriet E. Wallace 
Dr. James G. Ward 
Mr. Carleton W. Weber 
Mr. Eldon L. Whiteside 
Mr. Harold TWilber 
Mr. Jack L. Wilber 
Mr. Donald R. Williams 
Ms. Jennifer A. Wilson 
Mr. Roland F Wright 
Dr. William H.Wright III 
Mr. Lawrence Wu 
Dr. and Mrs. Valentine E. 

Zadnik 

Corporations 

American Chemical Society 
Anadarko Petroleum 

Corporation 
BP Foundation 
Chevron 

ConocoPhillips Corporation 
Dominion Foundation 
ExxonMobil Biomedical 

Sciences. Inc. 
ExxonMobil Foundation 
ExxonMobil Retiree Program 
Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund 
Isotech Laboratories, Inc. 
Marathon Oil Company 
Sck.Cen 

Shell International 
Shell Oil Company 
Shell Oil Company Foundation 
Whiting Petroleum Corporation 

an Alliant Company 



L5 



fr M 




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UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS-URBANA 




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