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Full text of "Ye names & ages of all ye old folks in every hamlet, city and town in ye state of Connecticut"

974.6 

N17y 

1241129 



GY COL-U-ECTtOW 



iir'iinriii'im'iiriT,y.r.'ilSLiCLiBRAR 



3 1833 00826 2229 



^^ names & ages 



of all 



Y^ OLD FOLKS 

in every Hamlet, City and 
Town in 



Y« 



State of 



CONNECTICUT, 



now living, 



with ye sketches of 

TWENTY LIVING CENTENARIANS, 



Compiled by 

FREDERICK H. NASH, 

Westport, Conn. 



F H Nash Esq^ Bkidgepokt, Conn., Octobei 27, 1884. 



W. B. HALL & CO. 



NEW HAVEN, CONN: 
Printed by Price, Lee & Co., 713 Chapel Street. 

1884. 



AW KNTIREILY BTBW MAGHinEI 

OTJR LATEST SUCCESS! 




-MANUFACTURED BY- 



THE HOWE MACHINE CO 

BRIDGEPORT, CONN. . . 




x>:e3.^Xj:e3xis x'v^-A.j>irTi3i>. 



^ names & ages 



of all 



^' OLD FOLKS 

in every Hamlet, City and 
Town in 

^' State of 
CONNJECTICUT, 

now living, 

with ye sketches of 

TWENTY LIVING CENTENARIANS. 



Compiled by 

FREDERICK H. NASH , 

Westport, Conn. 



F. H.NASH, Es(x: Beidgepoet, Conn., Octobei 27 1884 

^r.^iB^^'^'^'^v'^'^^^^^^^^^^ -e^'^mTeZ'ni lAZ^Trl'^^^'ST'''-' '" Connecticut." 

W. B. HALL & CO. 



NEW HAVEN, CONN- 
Pkinted by Price, Lee & Co., 713 Chapel Street 

1884. 



To the twenty centenarians, and more than 6,000 old folks now living in 
Connecticut, whose names and ages herein appear, and to the members of the 
General Assembly of 1884, and many ladies and gentlemen in various parts of the 
State, to whose kind assistance success in obtaining the names was rendered possi- 
ble, this little work is respectfully inscribed. 

Westport, Conn., October, 1884. 



Entered according to Act of Congi-ess, in the year 1884, by 

FREDERICK H. NASH, 
In the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington. 



1241129 

-*^|t lNTR0DUeTI0N. :iK- 



The list following embraces the names and ages of all persons 
living in Connecticut who were, on May 1st, 1884, eighty years old and 
over. The task of gathering them has never before been undertaken, 
^ and its accomplishment has entailed a vast amount of labor, corres- 
pondence and travel and interviews with persons, occupying more 
than ten months of time. The result of it is a " Grand List of Old 
Folks," the magnitude of which had not been dreamed of. The list 
." is at once novel and interestino' and shows how desirable the Conecti- 
V cut region is for those who hope to live out the full measure of their 
Xs^ days. The number of names exceed 6,000. The aggregate of their 
^<. ages is 498,000 years; their average 83 years. Of the number twenty 
. are 100 years and over, nine are 99, thirteen are 98, eleven are 97 and 
^^ six hundred and fifty-one are 90 and over. No age of less than 80 

) years has been recorded. The number of names could have been 

made to exceed 20,000 by adding those who are VO and over. In a 
work so extensive, embracing every hamlet, town and city in the 
State, some errors of necessity appear, but the work is as correct as it 
was possible under the circumstances to make it. Sketches of all the 
centenarians are interspersed in the work. 



Ye Old Folks of Connecticut. 



Note. — The names of Old Folks deceased since May 1, 1884, have not been stricken 
from the lists herewith, for the reason that, to obtain correct vital statistics from all the 
towns in the State would require the time of months. 



ANDOVEB. 




John Drummond, 


81 


BARKHAMSTED. 




Population, 428. 




Alice Glazier, 


88 


Population, 1,398. 




Asa Prentice, 


93 


Almira Horton, 


83 


Miss Slade, 


86 


Mrs. Abigail F. Bingham, 


. 91 


Ebenezer James, 


84 


Chauncey Rice, 


86 


Miss Nancy White, 


88 


Eunice James, 


83 


Mrs. Chauncey Rice, 


84 


Mrs. Lucy Post, 


87 


Esther Moore, 


81 


Marcus Burwell, 


86 


Samuel B. Daggett, 


83 


Thomas Slade, 


83 


Emma Carter, 


86 


James E. Marsh, 


82 


Phebe White, 


81 


Evets Carter, 


85 


Ransford Button, 


82 


Roswell Whiton, 


81 


Sylvester Case, 


84 


Hiram A. Brown, 


82 






Abner Slade, 


84 


Deacon Gurley Phelps, 


80 


AVON. 




Mrs. Mallory, 


83 


: Isham, 


89 


Population, 1,058. 




Lydia Loomis, 


83 






Mrs. Stella Woodford, 


93 


Jackney, 


83 


ASHFORD. 




Mrs. Delia Woodford, 


90 


Nancy Pinney, 


83 


Population, 1,041. 




Miss Martha Williams, 


90 


Esther Loomis, 


83 


Hannah Smith, 


94 


D wight Humphrey, 


85 


Miss Gould, 


83 


Laura Lincoln, 


90 


Mrs. Dwight Humphrey, 


86 


Mrs. Cook, 


82 


Francis Wilson, 


90 


Edward Miller, 


83 


Emily French. 


83 


Prudence Sumner, 


90 


John McKee, 


81 


Marilla Taylor, 


81 


Lydia Smith, 


90 


Eveline Woodford, 


83 


Amanda Baldwin, 


81 


Andra Thurston, 


90 


Phineas Gabriel, 


83 


Mrs. Shepard, 


83 


Maria Moseley, 


82 


Mrs. Phineas Gabriel, 


83 


Miss Pinney, 


81 


Abigail Peck, 


80 


Horace H. Judd, 


84 






Bezaleer White, 


81 


Solomon P. Wilcox, 


83 


BEACON FALLS. 




John Walker, 


80 


Derinda Blackwell, 


83 


Population, 379. 




Luciua Walker, 


81 


Mrs. John Woodford, 


84 


Martin Maloney, 


90 


Orrin Ashby, 


83 


Severius Stone, 


87 


Miss Auretia Baldwin, 


83 


Hannah Bennett, 


80 


Elida Pierpont, 


84 


William Gillette, 


81 


Mary Baker, 


80 


Mrs. Elida Pierpont, 


83 


Miss Amy Gillette, 


83 



HISTORY OF EDMOND R. KIDDER, OF BERLIN. 

Edmond R. Kidder, of Berlin, Connecticut, was born in Fairfield, Connecticut, August 17, 
1784. His father died when he was 11 years of age, and up to that time he attended the dis- 
trict schools of his town during winters, employing himself, as boys usually did in those days, 
during the summers, on farms, and in various other ways. His mother married soon after he 
was 13 and, removing to a distant State, he was compelled to take care of himself. This was 
difficult in view of the limited advantages with which he had been favored. At the age of 
13, after reading many stories of the sea, he turned his thoughts in that direction, hoping to 
realize some of the pleasures so graphically pictured. Like thousands of others, experience 
taught him how shallow was the realization. In New York he found a vessel bound for the 
East Indies, and he shipped with her as a cabin boy. This beginning of a seafaring life 
ended at the close of more than three years, and he returned to the port from whence he had 
started, by way of Cape Horn, having circumnavigated the globe. He then engaged with a 
lumberman on the Hudson river, and remained in that business several years. All this before 
the introduction of steamboats by the renowned Fulton, and at a period when, to conduct a sail- 
ing craft along the interwindings and in the currents of a mighty river, was supposed to require 



NAMES OP YE OLD FOLKS OF CONNECTICUT, 



more tact and a greater display of science than seems to be shown in these days of steam. From 
the year 1818 to 1826 he resided in Genesee, N. Y., Pentield, Ontario county, N. Y., Riga, Erie 
county, N. Y. , and Newark, N. J. From the last named city he came to Hartford, Conn. , and 
was employed by ihe late Judge Seth Terry. When New Britain was a mere village, and before 
any had dreamed it was destined to become a city, he went there to commence life anew, remain- 
ing several years, with indifferent success, and then removed to the neighboring hamlet of 
Kensington. Since 1859 he has dwelt in Worthington Parish, town of Berlin. In 1841, at 
the age of 57. he married Lydia Fielding Johnson, widow of Shadrach Johnson, of Hart- 
ford, by whom he had three children and who is still living with him. Two of these chil- 
dren are dead, and the third is unmarried and his only living descendant. Until Mr. Kidder 
reached his 90th year he had been active and vigorous and had displayed genial traits so much 
admired in extremely aged persons. Since that date he has become nearly blind, deaf, and 
memory has failed. At this time he is feeble physically and unable to leave his residence. 
Through life he has been industrious, and in his associations with men has shown kindness 
of heart. Now, while with him it is evening, he can say, truly, ' ' I have not an enemy in 
the world." He receives all callers and has a word for each, but he is unable to recall for 
their edification many of the great events in his country's history, which occurred during his 
time, late in the last and early in the present century. When asked for facts in regard to his 
long life, he appeared surprised and remarked that it was the first instance that questions of 
that kind had ever been put to him. He seemed to realize the importance of the event which 
rendered him a centenarian, and there was a large gathering at his house to take part in its 
proper celebration. 

BERLIN. 

Population, 2385. 

Edmond R. Kidder, 
Mrs. Sedgwick, 
Bernard Killen, 
Jonathan Webster, 
Mrs. Ruth Clark, 
Mrs. Elias Tubbs, 
Rev. Joseph Whittlesey, 
Mrs. James Elton, 
Mrs. Sophia Camp, 
Warren Sellabridge, 
Mrs. Warren Sellabridge, 
Mrs. Polly Bartram, 
Mrs. John North, 
Josiah Robbins, 
Mrs. Josiah Robbins, 
Mrs. Abbey Smith, 

Seabeor, 

S. Hurlbutt, 
Mrs. George Buuce, 
Albert Belden, 
Henry Norton, 
Miss Betsey Steele, 
Mrs. William Bowers, 
Mrs. Angeliue Atwater, 
Mrs. Leonard Patterson, 
Mrs. Leonard Hubbard, 
Mrs. Amos Botsford, 
Mrs. George Bunce, 

Mrs. Gorham, 

Mrs. Seth Hooker, 
Mrs. Selah Galpin, 
Mrs. John Hall, 
Mrs. George Dunham, 
Mrs. Lewis Ringwood, 
Mrs. Ira Kent, 
Mrs. Samuel Hart, 
Mrs. Lum, 
Mrs. Zetus Penfield, 





Mrs. Lincoln, 


81 


BETHLEHEM. 






Mrs. Elizabeth Peck, 
Mrs. Rachel North, 


80 

88 


Population, 655. 




LOO 


Charles Wilcox, 


84 


Mrs. Norman Monson, 


91 


98 






Mrs. Charles Jackson, 


89 


94 


BETHANY. 




James B. Skidmore, 


88 


93 






Sauford Hannah, 


87 


91 


Population, 637. 




Harmon Bird, 


86 


90 


Mrs. William Burnham, 


88 


Mrs, Charles Bloss, 


85 


86 


Alfred Doolittle, 


86 


Harlow Judson, 


85 


81 


Mrs. Elizabeth Doolittle, 


85 


Mrs. James Jackson, 


84 


87 


Mrs. Hannah Russell, 


83 


Hawkins Atwood, 


84 


82 


Mrs. Zina Sperry, 


80 


Mrs. John Crane, 


83 


80 


Miss Sally Beecher, 


81 


Edwin Clark, 


83 


81 


Miss Julia French, 


81 


Charles Foster, 


83 


85 


Adam Bowden, 


87 


Mrs. Joshua Bird, 


82 


81 


Miss Alvira Adams, 


81 


Mrs. Rufus Ames, 


81 


80 


Mrs. Julia Todd, 


83 


Morris Fenn, 


81 


81 


Clark Hotchkiss, 


81 


George M. Hasson, 


81 


87 


Abijah Nettleton, 


87 


Moses Barrett, 


81 


80 
83 
85 


Darius Driver. 


85 


William Judson, 


80 


BETHEL. 




BLOOMFIELD, 




80 
83 


Population, 2,726. 




Population, 1,346. 




85 


Cyrus Andrews, 


93 


Bildad Rowley, 


90 


80 


Lemuel Bebee, 


91 


Grove Barnard, 


83 


84 


Levi Bebee, 


86 


Charles Jones, 


83 


87 


Benjamin Durant, 


82 


Fannie Gillette, 


84 


82 


Mrs. Harriet Wheeler, 


81 


Josiah Capeu, 


86 


84 


John Bell, 


84 


Amos Gillette, 


85 


82 


Daniel F. Bebee, 


80 


Samuel D. Goodwin, 


80 


85 


Edward Ratchford, 


83 


Joseph Forsyth, 


81 


84 


Mrs. Betsey Weed, 


80 


Peter Cullen, 


80 


82 


Daniel Trowbridge, 


83 


S. F. Burnham, 


80 


85 


Mrs. Polly Starr, 


88 


Bushen Hagan, 


80 


87 


Alva Taylor, 


80 


Patrick Cavanah, 


83 


81 


Mrs. Huldah Bradley, 


84 


Nancy Filley, 


80 


84 


Mrs. Oakley, 


83 


Elizabeth Mitchelson, 


80 


82 


Seth Donalds, 


81 


Fanny Griffin, 


83 


80 


Major Dikeman, 


82 


Betsey Meacham, 


83 



NAMES OF YE OLD FOLKS OF CONNECTICUT. 



BOLTON. 

Popultition, 512. 

Mrs. Charles Gay, 
Alfred Turner, 
Aaron Andrus, 



Calvin Carver, 

Joseph Eaton. 

William Kerney, 
89 Mrs. William Kerney, 
87 Mrs. Isaac Keeney, 
84 Mrs. Calvin Carver, 



83 Thomas J. White, 

83 Mrs. Roswell Bailey, 
82 Mrs. Alfred Turner, 

81 Mrs. Mary Wilcox, 

84 Michael Gorman, 

82 



84 



HISTORY OF MRS. ABBEY SMITH, OF BOZRAH. 

Mrs. Abby Smith (col'd) of Bozrah, New London County, is the daughter of a sailor 
named Rhodes, and was born on shipboard. May 15th, 1782, during a passage from Europe 
to this country. Her father died on that trip before her birth and was buried at sea. She 
consequently never saw him, and is unable now even to give his first name. She remembers 
very little about her mother or the date of her death, but it sure, she is buried near a city in 
Rhode Island. Her death took place when she was four years old. Her early years were 
passed near Providence, and in the year 1803, at the age of twenty -one, as near as she can 
recall, she married John Smith by whom she had seven children. They went out into the world 
young, four sons and three daughters, and so far as she knows, they are all dead, though the 
holds to the fond belief that some of her grand-children by one of the daughters are living, 
and she may yet set eyes on them. Mrs. Smith has resided in New Loudon, Preston, Ston- 
ington, Norwich, Bozrah, Colchester and Salem, but the dates or the exact number of years 
in each, she cannot designate. She is quite active for one so aged, doing housework for her- 
self and a young man who resides with her. She hears readily, does not use glasses while 
walking about the house and reads coarse prinf without them. Her memory of old friends, 
with whom she used to live, and their names and ages, is good, but she can give no dates. 
She has a faint recollection of a call for men at the outbreak of the war of 1812 to defend the 
forts at New London, in which town she then resided, but can give no particulars further 
than an outline of the excitement in the commvinitj^ which the call evoked. Events of the 
Revolution which closed in her day are as blanks to her mind, though as a little girl she 
heard the name of Washington and wondered with others as to the power of his greatness. 
Thirty years ago a Mr. Johnson which whom the centenarian then resided and who died in 
1878, made an attempt to fix her exact age by questioning her as to the names of towns in 
which she had dwelt, and the number of years she thought she had lived in each. From data 
thus obtained he footed up 125 years, a much larger number tlian he was willing to credit 
her with. Mr. A. D. Herricks, clerk and registrar of Bozrah, has been acquainted with 
Mrs. Smith more than thirty years, and gives it as his opinion that she is one hundred. Others 
in the vicinity are convinced by words she has spoken, personal appearance and their ideas 
of what constitutes vast age, that she is not only one hundred, but may be much beyond it. 



BOZRAH. 




Watrous Howd, 


82 


Population, 1,093. 




Mrs. Margaret McNulty, 


81 


Abby Smith (col'd), 


103 


Mrs. Phebe B. Par.sons, 


86 


Simeon Lathrop, 


93 


Mrs. Lucy L. Page, 


85 


William Cabel, 


84 


Truman Sheldon, 


81 


William Green, 


83 


Benjamin Tyler, 


80 


Clarissa Haughton, 


82 


Mrs. Martha"^ Towner, 


89 


Rhoda Hunt, 


80 






Lucretia Johnson, 


84 


BRIDGEWATER. 




Mary A. Leffingwell, 
Gardner Leffingwell, 


80 


Population, 708. 




83 


Mrs. Abby Randall, 


92 


William Mitchell, 


81 


Daniel Mino, 


90 


Mary Mitchell, 


81 


Hiram Lobdell, 


86 






Luman B. Hamlin, 


88 


BRANFORD. 




Grant Northrop, 


82 


Population. 3,047. 




Carlostin Cole, 


80 


Mrs. Auguste Willoughby, 


, 92 


Hiram Higby, 


80 


Mrs. Polly Hemmingway, 


, 90 


Mrs. Phebe Mead, 


82 


Mrs. Eliza L. Ball, 


88 






William Bryan, 


86 


BRISTOL. 




Mrs. Nancy Bryan, 
Benjamin L. Carter, 


82 


Population, 5,347. 




81 


Phebe Bronson, 


94 


Mrs. Sophia Dudley, 


81 


Charles Raymond, 


92 



Lucy Atwater, 


90 


Lucy Hotchkiss, 


90 


Hannah Plumb, 


90 


Mary Kennedy, 


90 


Elizabeth Brewster, 


90 


Manesia Candee, 


82 


Eliza Hills, 


80 


Marilla Lindsley, 


84 


John Norton, 


81 


Bridget Rice, 


81 


Amanda Wooding, 


87 


Charry Bunnell, 


82 


Marella Coughlin, 


88 


Iva Churchill, 


86 


Betsey Churchill, 


86 


Clarissa Curtiss, 


80 


Darius Drake, 


88 


John R. Deming, 


86 


Burton Hoadley, 


84 


Sophronia Loveland, 


83 


Roxanna Oakley, 


84 


Charry Roycee, 


81 


Polly Camp, 


83 



NAMES OF YE OLD FOLKS OF CONNECTICUT. 



James Holt, 
Sophia Harkey, 
Maria Lewis, 
Solomon Curtis, 
Sarah L. Curtis, 
Maria Riger, 
Azubah Adams, 
Louisa Bunnell, 
Lauren Byington, 
S. E. Browne, 
Caleb Barnum, 
Bathsheba Barnum, 
Lucy Horton, 
Julia A. Hubbell, 
David Matthews, 
Hopkins Stephens, 
Ralph E. Terry, 
Mary Woodruif , 
Amanda Harrison, 

BBOOKFIELD. 

Population, 1,152. 

Polly Burdick, 
Beeman Fairchild, 
Dennis Enright, 
Clara Bradley, 
Betsey A. Stevens, 
Daniel W. Northrop, 
Ira Stevens, 
Lucy Wanzer, 
F. B. Barlow, 
Emma Barnum, 
Mirinda Camp, 
Nelly M. Dibble, 
Stephen Edget, 
Hiram Fairchild, 
Betsey Fairchild, 
Harry Knapp, 
Isaac Lockwood, 
Polly Morehouse, 
Phebe Morehouse, 
Lewis Osborne, 
Roswell H. Parker. 
Abigail Starr, 
Orriu Salmons, 
Sarah M. Taylor, 
Charles Hawley, 

BROOKLYN. 

Population, 2,308. 

Miss Amelia Clark, 

Mrs. Pratt, 

Mrs. Hannah Hammond, 
Mrs. Septimus Davison, 
Miss Clarissa Davison, 

Mrs. Taylor. 

Mrs. Levi Ross, 
Mrs. Cliarles Rodgers, 
James Stetson, 
Mrs. James Stetson, 
Moses Waldo, 
Evan H. Sharp, 



82 Mrs. William Smith, 
80 Mrs. Charles Cady, 



BURLINGTON. 

Population, 1,224. 



82 
84 
84 

87 Mrs. Mary Stino, 

85 Major Hadsell, 

86 Amos Smith, 

85 Mrs. Pamelia Cornwall, 

82 Miss Fanny Bunnell, 

80 Sherman Cleveland, 

81 Leeman Spencer, 
81 Isaac Sampson, 
81 

80 CANAAN. 

II Population, 1,157. 

81 Mrs. Belinda L. Howe, 
Mrs. Polly Bailey, 
Jonathan Bates, 
Ozias Root, 

Captain Charles Wright, 

97 Stephen Howe, 

91 Lyman Page, 

90 Thomas Bailey, 

90 John Hunt, 

90 Mrs. Sally White, 

86 William P. Semley, 
85 Mrs. Elizabeth Bailey. 

83 Mrs. Rachel Holcomb, 
80 Miss Sally Beklen, 

83 Mrs. Hepsey Deming, 

84 Mis. Phebe Nickerson, 

85 Captain Henrv Dean, 
84 1 



CANTERBURY. 

Population, 1,272. 



Patrick Ward. 



orj Perrin Adams, 
Of, Dillis Morse, 
sn Mrs. Seth Clark, 
Tl Jedediah W. Morse, 
go Mrs. .L Morse, 
cjR Miss Susan Allen, 
OQ Mrs. Tabitha Dewing, 
Miss Harriet Bacon, 
Walter Eaton, 
Russell Adams, 
Mrs. Charlotte Jenks, 
Miss Lydia Phinney, 
94 Miss Nancy Phinney, 
94 Miss Eliza Phinney, 
87 Mrs. Wetten, 
87 Mrs. David Hicks, 
83 Thomas Latlirop, 
83 Ernest Sechtinsr, 
82 Mrs. Edith Stephens, 
82 Miss Mary A. Stephens, 
82 Mrs. J. Backus, 
80 Mrs. R. Handy, 

86 Miss Winchester, 

80 Mrs. Eunice House, 



90 



BRIDGEPORT. 

Population, 29,148. 

Mary Pilke, 
Elizabeth Shepard, 
Margaret Beck, 



gK Grace Mclntj^e, 
gg Margaret Townley, 
Q^ Catherine B. Smith, 
gg Catherine McNamara, 
go Harriet Peck, 
gj Mary Mclntyre, 
g^ Patrick Donahue, 

Palmer Stevens, 

Sarah Rogers, 

Mary Beach, 

Betsey Youngs, 



92 



Marcia Beach, 



Qf, R-^.v. Cyrus Silliman, 
q^ Michael Northrop, 
9j Bridget Gregg,^ 



Orre Sherwood, 
Ann Rowe, 



gg Sally Parrott, 

cjcj Sophronia Falconer, 

gg MaryBuckhee, 

go Margaret Crocken, 

Qo Bridget Kernan, 

2^ Henry May, 

gg Elam Nichols, 

g- George Ochne, 

gg Mary" Rose, 

g-. Catherine Wing, 

r>. Charles Evers, 

°* Mary D. Lines, 

Ambrose Stillson, 

.Julia Stillson, 

Eliza Beach, 

James Crossley, 

96 Ellen Connor, 

94 James Donnelly, 

89 James Green, 

93 IMichael McCarty, 

92 Eunice Rigby, 

80 AVilliam Rogers, 
88 Mariah Taylor, 

81 Caroline Way, 

82 N. B. Fairchild, 

82 Mrs. Ezra Kirtland, 

81 Mrs. Rebecca Leigh, 
80 Sophronia Moody, 
87 Margaret Shelton, 
84 Fanny Sherwood. 

82 Jane E. Sterling, 

87 Maria Adam, 

91 Nancy S. Buckley, 

82 Clarissa Beach, 

83 Emily Brown, 

83 Schuyler Seeley, 

84 Abigail Seeley, 
86 Sarah Wilson, 
83 Arnold Ayres, 
82 Deborah Holley, 

88 William Peck, 



83 



?J"AMES OF YE OLD FOLKS OF CONNECTICUT. 



Amelia Brady, 
Thomas Knight, 
Mariah Leavenworth, 
Mary Lewis, 
Jane McOuchlty, 
John Murphy, 
Jane Odel, 
Laura Balcom, 
Captain Joseph Bartram, 
Thomas B. Bartram, 
Edmund Claris, 
Hernion Gray, 
Lockwood N. DeForest, 
James Dawson, 
Owen Dugan, 
Sarah H. Ferguson, 
Monson Hawley, 
Charlotte Higby, 
Eliza Hayes, 
Stephen Jordan, 
Henry Knutzen, 
Mrs. Burr Knapp, 
Lucy Mallett, 
John North, 
W. W. Selleck, 
Eliza Slosson, 
Thomas Smith, 
Anna Wooster, 
Susan Connors, 
Christian Eckart, 
Henrietta Eckart, 
Anson T. Hawley, 
Johanna Paul, 
Mary Quigley, 
Nora Quirk, 
Lawrence Rooney, 
Lavina Tuttle, 
Laura Westover, 
Amorette Freeman, 
Susan Wilson, 
Eliza Carrington, 
Abby J. Patterson, 
Mercy Morris, 
Maria Nichols, 
James Porter, 
Lydia Treadwell, 
Mary E. Andrews, 
Joseph Anderson, 
Richard Buss, 
Lewis L. Beebe, 
Elijah Cram, 
Mary Gould, 
William Timmins, 
Robert Cameron, 
Elizabeth Conklin, 
Mary E. Doty, 
Kate Schmitt, 
Jason Beers, 
Maria Hawley, 
Susan Blank, 
Lewis Fox, 
Gideon Thompson, 
Ruth S. Jackson, 
Melinda Powers, 
John Phalen, 



Rose Skael, 
William Worthen, 
John Wallace, 
Catherine Yeako, 
Mary A. Brisco, 
Hannah Carr, 
Christine Eberhard, 
Minnie M. Freer, 
Giles Judson, 
Sarah Morehouse, 
Thomas Shaw, 
Eliza Shaw, 
Sarah Elyea, 
Elizabeth Munger, 
Maria Clark, 
Eliza Jones, 
Harry Wheeler, 
Mrs. Craw, 
John O. M. Park, 

CHAPLIN. 

Population, 627. 
John Griggs, 
Mrs. John Griggs, 
Rev. Joseph Sessions, 
Morris Church, 
Joseph Easier, 
Mrs. Nathaniel Flint, 
Mrs. Mary Warren, 
Mrs. A. Holt, 

CANTON. 

Population, 2,301. 
Chloe Hotchkiss, 
Jacob B. Cobb, 
Hannah Cobb, 
Olive Pike, 
Philo B. Bristol, 
Mrs. Philo B. Bristol, 
Mrs. ]\Iary Bristol, 
Lorin N. Humphrey, 
Mrs. Lorin N. Humphrey, 
Mrs. Martin Barber, 
Mrs. George Mills, 
Olive Seiger. 
Lucy Merrill, 
Melissa Lane, 
Miss Achsale Humphrey, 
Mr. Hotchkiss, 
Mary G. Sage, 
Julia Bailey, 
Mrs. Hadsell, 
Mrs. Alouson Merrill, 
Wyllis Berton, 

CHATHAM. 

Population, 1,967. 

FIRST DISTRICT. 

Mrs. Joel Archer, 

Mrs. Fluria F. Thomas, 

Mrs. Alice Norcott, 

Mrs. Amos Clark, 

Mrs. Deborah G. Barton, 



86 Thomas Wall, 

80 Mrs. Delia Stewart, 

82 Mrs. Hannah Clark, 
86 Mrs. Lucy Strong, 

81 Mrs. Betsey M. Clark, 
80 Nathaniel C. Smith, 

84 Mrs. Maria A. Niles, 

83 Mrs. Belinda S. Hurd, 
86 Samuel H. Tooker, 

85 Mrs. Abby Usher, 



88 


Rev. Thomas G. Brown, 


85 


81 


Mrs. Orimel Clark, 


83 


83 


Daniel Brooks, 


86 


82 
83 


SECOND DISTRICT. 




80 


Simeon Goff, 


93 


86 


Mrs. Simeon Goff, 


93 


80 


Mrs. Judah L. Taylor, 


93 


81 


Mrs. Eleazur Norcott, 


91 




Harvey S. Hurd, 


82 




:\rrs. Harvey S. Hurd, 


83 




Stephen Hubbard, 


87 


94 
92 

84 
81 
85 
83 
84 
82 


^Memory Hubbard, 


85 


Mrs. B'uell Evans, 


80 


Buell Evans, 


80 


Miss Nancy Webster, 


85 


Mrs. T. B. Strong, 


85 


Mrs. William Holing, 


84 


Mrs. Lewis. Taylor, 


85 


Isaac Geifelt, 


85 


Mrs. Patrick Riley, 


83 




David Dickman, 


80 




Mrs. Harry Clark, 


82 


93 


CHESHIRE. 




84 
80 


Population, 2,284. 




83 


Mrs. Samuel Hall, 


99 


81 


Mrs. Beers, 


97 


82 


Mrs. Sarah Burr, (col'd) 


97 


81 


Captain William Peck, 


97 


85 


Mrs. Silas Ives, 


81 


85 


Captain Joel Moss, 


86 


85 


Enoch Piatt, 


83 


81 


William Plumb, 


86 


82 


Edward A. Cornwall, 


81 


80 


Nerval Williams, 


82 


83 


Nathan Booth, 


83 


80 


Norman Beach, 


82 


89 


Mrs. John Burke, 


85 


87 


Mrs. Nathaniel Newell, 


83 


81 


Mrs. Julia Stevens, 


86 


84 


Mrs. Hiram Andrews, 


83 


80 


Nelson Tuttle, 


85 


82 


Mrs. Amos Bristol, 


87 




Mrs. Rhoda Humiston, 


84 




William x\ndrews. 


83 




Cornelius Doland, 


84 




Mrs. Cornelius Doland, 


86 




Mrs. Lydia Fields, 


83 


94 


Mrs. Loyd Moss, 


81 


93 


Delos Hotchkiss, 


83 


.91 


•leremiah Upson, 


86 


90 


Eliazur Ives, 


83 


81 


Henry C. Judd, 


83 



10 



NAMES OF YE OLD FoLKS OF CONNECTICUT, 



CHESTER. 

Population, 1,177. 

Mrs. Ruth Augur, 
Henry Huxtep, 
Jarvis Boyes, 
Noah Gladding, 
Henry Shipman, 
Spelman Gibbs, 
Gideon Southworth, 
Erastus Watrous, 
Horace Arnold, 
Mrs. Lucinia Morgan, 
Mrs. Sarah Warner, 
Mary C. Ely, 
Mary L'Hommedieu, 
Mrs. Maria Clark, 

CLINTON. 

Population, 1,403. 

Mrs. Clara Merrills, 
Benjamin P. .Tones, 
Miciiael Kennelly, 
Aaron G. Hurd," 
Captain Pierce Jones, 
Frederick K. Wright, 
Mrs. Phebe A. Kelsey, 
Mrs. Mary Parks, - 
Mrs. Amanda Hull, 
Harvey Stevens, 
Russell Wright, 
Miss Pliebe Kelsey, 
John D. Leffingwell, 
Miss Catherine Garven, 
Mrs. Anna Wilcox, 
Mrs. Maria Griffin, 
Calvin Kelsey, 
Chauncey Manwariug, 
Mrs. Charlotte Merrills, 
Mrs. Huldnh Davis, 
Mrs. 3Iarv Smith, 
Willis Dowd, 
Bishop Spencer, 

COLCHESTER. 

Population, 2,974. 

Mrs. .Joseph Smith, 
James Rash (colored). 
Miss Mary Proctor (coFd), 
Mrs. Pt-ters, 
Asa Byeton, 
Talcott Buell, 



Mrs. Sylvania Norton, 
Mrs. Mary Smith, 
Mrs. George Smith. 
Mrs. J. D. Packmore, 
Mrs. Joseph Williams, 
Mrs. J. B. Wheeler, 
Amasa Standish, 
Mrs. Laura Chase, 
Patrick Garlan, 
Mrs. Emily Carver, 
Mrs. Ardelia Sparrow, 

Mrs. Newton, 

J. L. Foster. 



86 Justus Williams, 

84 

88 
81 



COLEBROOK. 

Population, 1,148. 
Neisus Kinnej', 
Mrs. Clarissa Baxter, 
Phineas Peck, 
Romania Tuttle, 
Mrs. Abigail Smith, 
D. C. Y.' Moore, 
Charles Sawyer, 
Mrs. .Jane McCann, 
Allen Hotchkiss, 
Mrs. Caroline Simons, 
Mrs. Elizabeth Allen, 
William Swift. 
Hiram Sage, 
Rev. Thomas Benedict, 
Miss Mary Rockwell, 
Miss Ann Gilbert, 
Miss Eliza Gilbert, 
Mrs. Amos Corbiu, 

COLUMBIA. 

Population, 757. 
Mrs. Betsey Ilolbrook, 
George Wright, 
Mrs. Seba Yeomans, 
Miss Deborah Barrows, 
Miss Nancy Robinson, 
Simeon Downer, 



CORNWALL. 

91 Population, 1,583. 

91 Mrs. Laura Fox, 

89 Mrs. Philomela Rogers, 

82 Menzies Beers, 

80 Mrs. Menzies Beers, 

84 William Bonney, 



81 Talmon Millard, 

82 Mrs. Talmon Millard, 

83 Fowler Bradford, 

84 Mrs. Fowler Bradford, 

83 Mrs. Clara Cross, 

80 Mrs. Waterbury, 

80 Mrs. Harriet Barnum, 

80 Mrs. Sabra Baldwin, 

86 Albert Hart, 

85 Philander Vail, 

82 Mrs. Flora Taylor, 

84 E. Rogers White, 
80 Mrs. P. B. Clark, 

83 Mrs. Mary Payne, 
Frederick Kellogg, 
Ozias Palmer, 



COVENTRY. 

Population 2,043. 
Jeremiah Austin, 
Jesse Read, 
Roxana Loomis, 
Mary Hewlet, 
Chloe Morgan, 



83 



l^ Fanny W. West, 
gg Elisha Thayer, 
Q^ Diantha Lyman, 
on Hannah S. Carpenter, 
^^ Mary Dunn, 
QQ Triphenia Dingwell. 
r,^ Jane French, 
gV Sophia Macht, 
QF- Samviel Rogers, 
2, Mercy Tillinghast, 
«/, James T. Talbot, 
^^ Joseph Wetherill, 
jVIary A. Babcock, 
Alvin Bishop, 
David Bradbury, 
97 Nathan Burnap. 
33 Elizabeth L. Bailey, 

83 Lucy Boker, 

84 John Cummusk, 
86 Mary Cummusk, 
82 Eliza Fitch, 

George E. Fitch. 
Rufma Green, 
Diantha Loomis, 
Wealth}^ Matthewson, 
92 Rhoda Spencer, 
91 Mizra Turney, 
89 Harriet Topliff, 
86 T^oring Winchester, 
84 Harvey Wright, 



84 



102 



90 



HISTORY OF JEREMIAH AUSTIN, OF COYENTRY. 

South Coventry, in the town of Coventry, Tolland County, Conn., possesses that rarest 
of inhabitants, a centenarian. In a population of little over 2,000 it has thirty-five persons 
who are 80 years old and over, and eight persons who are over 90. Among these is Mr. Jer- 
emiah Austin, who was born in West Greenwich, R. I., February 10, 1783, and consequently 
is advancing towards his 102d birthday. Early education in those days was not, as now, con- 
sidered essential to the success in Jife of a young man, and, after the very limited advantages 
afforded by the district schools, Mr. Austin went into the world to seek fortune. His career 



NAMES OF YE OLU POLKS OF CONNECTICUT. 



11 



was marked by vicissitude, the depression following the war of 1813 and the financial revul - 
sion of 1843, weakening all kinds of values and well nigh destroying even the hope of a par- 
tial recovery. In the year 1808, at the age of 25. his marriage took place, and with his wife 
he formed a pleasant home in Greenwich. He left it, however, for another town in his State, 
and in 1839 removed to Coventry, where he has dwelt ever since. Mrs. Austin died many 
years since at an advanced age. Their children numbered nine, and two of them are still 
living. Mr. Austin counts eight grandchildren and eleven great great grandchildren now liv- 
ing, most of whom call occasionally to see him. He has led a very quiet life, but has been an 
observer of affairs; and, although he is unable to follow the events of the day as they tran- 
spire, he manifests an interest; and, particularly at this time, as to politics, hesitates not to 
declare his presidential preferences, and expects to add one vote to the score of the success- 
ful candidate. As a voter he goes way back to Monroe's time, when voting by ballot seemed 
less a mockery than it does now, and he has much to say of the methods then in vogue, the 
confidence reposed by the people in their chosen rulers, and the tendency which then existed 
to respect the powers that be. Mr. Austin is quite ready with war anecdotes, and it is inter- 
esting to listen to the stories of Revolutionary times brought down the roadway of time, and 
which, though oft repeated, seem new to the youthful ears and understandings of those who 
are willing and ready to listen. His physical condition is such that he is able to walk about 
his premises. He enjoys second sight, and his mind and memory are clearer and stronger 
than most persons ten years younger than himself. 



CROMWELL. 

Population, 1,140. 
Mrs. Jared Post, 
R. B. Barber, 
W. W. Pelton, 
John Heumer, 
David Hurlburt, 
David Edwards, 
Mrs. Almira Topliff, 
Mrs. Samuel Wilcox, 
Mrs. Alva Baldwin, 
Mrs. Edward Jones, 
Mrs. Henry Stocking, 

Mrs. Brown, 

Mrs. Dunham, 

Mrs. S. Gledman, 

Miss Tiffany, 

Miss Gilbert, 

Jesse Goff, 

DANBURY. 

Population, 11,669. 
Mrs. Triphenia Bevens, 
Amos Morris, 
John Dermette, 

Mrs. Barlow, 

Amasa Hodge, 
Adam Hawthorne, 
Mrs. Ann Hodge, 
Asahel Beebe, 
Reljecca Lyon, 
Polly Coombs, 
Zerah Hamilton, 
Julia White, 
Maria White, 
Sarah A. Elwell, 
Susan Brush, 
Mary Jennings, 
Amelia Bronson, 

Mrs. Craft, 

John L. Mallory, » 

A. McDonald, 



Aaron Purdy, 
Levi Knapp, 
Samuel Brunkee, 
John Hoiiinott, 
Mrs. Priscilla Holmes, 
Isaac Sirrine, 



o, Horace ^larshall, 

Q< Charles Benedict, 

^.y Benedict Crofut, 

O.T Richard Osborn, 

ori Matthew Stevens, 



Mrs. A. Taylor, 
Mrs. Lydia Stevens, 



Q9 John i\Ialoney, 

go Mrs. Monmouth Lyon, 

o( DuuDing Babbit, 

y* Mrs. Mary Weed. 

yQ George Crofut, 

uQ Jacob Frye, 

Mrs. Caroline Burchard, 

Ira Dibble, 

Mrs. Betsey Gregory, 

Mrs. Amelia Sirrine, 

99 JohnBaird, 

9.5 WiUiam Jabine, 

94 Mrs. Betsey Bates, 

94 Mrs. Parmelia Sirrine, 

91 Daniel Bradley, 

90 Mrs. Mary Fanton, 

90 John Dermont, 

90 Hubbell Wildman, 

86 Daniel Treadwell. 

84 Mrs. Betsey Osborne, 

83 Amos O.sborne, 

82 Griffing Flagler, 

82 Ira Northrop, 

81 Mrs. Ira Northrop. 

83 Mrs. Margaret Purdy, 

83 Mrs. Lorinda Betts, 

80 Mrs. Parmelia Abbott, 

81 John Morehous'j, 

84 Mrs. Mary Elwell, 
80 Amos Purdy, 



81 


John Stott, 


83 


87 


Mrs. Ann Stott, 


85 


84 


Philomen Hoyt, 


81 


83 


Thomas Hoyt, 


81 


86 


Levi Knapp, 


86 


83 


Colonel N. B. Dibble, 


81 


85 


Amasa Hamilton, 


84 


80 


Mary -Ann Bradley, 


82 


83 


Maria Frj'e, 


87 


83 


Mrs. John Crawford, 


81 


84 


Edwin Mills, 


80 


82 


Ora Mills, 


83 


84 


Miss Mai'ia Pease, 


86 


84 


Mrs. Sylvia Fuller, 


80 


86 


Mai-garet Wixted, 


83 


84 


Mrs" Stephen Hurlbutt, 


83 


81 


Ellen Croft, 


80 


83 


Henry C. Knapp, 


85 


80 







84 


DA5.IEN. 




84 
83 


Population, 1,948. 




86 


Mary Selleck, 


94 


81 


Holley Bell, 


90 


81 


Betsey Lockw^ood, 


90 


83 


Jane C. Foss, 


90 


87 


Sally Scofield, 


90 


85 


Julia Wallace, 


90 


84 


Theodosia Gray, 


90 


86 


William Waterbury, 


83 


84 


Sally Roberts, 


85 


81 


Elizabeth Warren, 


85 


81 


Harriett Lasher, 


83 


83 


Smith C. Samis, 


80 


85 


Lewis Clock, 


80 


84 


John Pender, 


88 


82 


Abigail Bell, 


86 


84 


Phebe Mather, 


85 


84 


Eliseph Whitney, 


85 


87 


Edward P. Waite, 


84 


86 


Mary A. Mather, 


83 


84 


xlngeliue Whitney, 


83 


81 


Angeline Brown, 


87 



12 



NAMES YE OLD FOLKS OF CONNECTICUT. 



Jane Weed, 
Lucy Walmsle3% 
Rebecca Hoyt, 
Hannah M. Dickerman, 



DERBY. 

Population, 11,649. 

Polly Roden, 
Maria Durand, 
Ephraim Short, 
Widow Charles Wilcoxson, 
Mary E. Smith, 
Mary Carroll, 
Joseph B. Payn, 
Elizabeth Cooper, 
Hannah Sullivan, 
Martha Smith, 
Elizabeth Gilbert, 
Lavinia Stoddard, 
Catherine Miller, 
Lewis Hotchkiss, 
Betsey Elliott, 
Miss Rebecca Gates, 
Martha Bachelor, 
Joseph P. Swift, 
Henry Crook-, 
Julia Swift, 
Hannah Hawkins, 
Mary G. Swift, 
Sarah Adkins, 
Bartholomew Hine, 
Bridget Comenford, 
Mrs. John Dyer, 
Nancy Freeman (colored), 
David Bradley, 
Ann Hotchkiss, 
Ellen M. Baker, 
Elizabeth Hanners, 
George Blackman, 
John McMahon, 
A. Baldwin, 
Lois CrofEut, 
Oliver B. Sherwood, 
Daniel D. Gilbert, 



BIRMINGHAM. 

Elizabeth Boyce, 
Cai'oline Burlock, 
Ann Kelledy, 
Ann McGuire, 
John Phelan, 
Sylvia Talmadge, 
Thomas Walsh, 
Ferdinand Schnist, 
Edward Coyle, 
Johannah Daly, 

ANSONIA. 



85 Hurleigh Skinner, 
83 Catherine Lawlor, 
83 William Dodge, 
80 Thomas O'Brien, 
Zenas Ailing, 
Lucy Holbrook, 
Mary O'Brien, 
Willis Hotchkiss, 



DURHAM. 

Population, 990. 



g^ Prudence Spencer, 

Q| Electa Prout, 

Q/> Lois Rogers, 

OQ Sophronia Robinson, 

Qo Sherman Stone, 

jjn Julius Field, 

or^ Edward Hartnett, 

If. Ellen Hartnett, 

g3 John Hull, 

OQ Almira Miller, 

oo Sarah B. Atkins, 

gg Eliza Atwell, 

UQ Parnell Camp, 

on Bela Davis, 

og Mehitable Thayer, 

o~ Leander White, 

oA Phebe White, 



Esther Nettleton, 
Horace Newton, 
Barbara Strong, 
Eliza Gates, 
Charles Hickox, 



^l RuthMaltby, 

gJJ Sally Maynard, 

OQ Sarah Coe, 

Qc, Maria Coe, 

g^ Lucius Foote, 

80 

81 

84 EASTFORD, 

84 

85 

Mrs. Halman, 

Jacob Bantell, 
Reuben Preston, 

Q4 Silas Preston, 



Population, 855. 



gA Mrs. Laura Wilson, 

g-i Mrs. Betsy Adams, 

QQ James Chapman, 

orv Manning Mumford, 



84 



Mary Terry, 
Thomas Murphy, 



EAST GRANBY. 

Population, 754. 

Mrs. Sally Brown, 
Mrs. Catherine C. Gould, 
Mrs. Sally Alderman, 
Mrs. Sophia J. Powers, 
Mrs. Lydia T. Clark, 
Mrs. Fanny Cornish, 



80 Mrs. Sally Phelps, 
84 John Allison, 
80 Joel C. Holcomb, 
83 Franklin Fox, 

84 

82 

82 
81 



EAST HADDAM. 



Population, 3,032. 

Henry Wallace, 

Clarisssa Smith, 

Lucy Sawyer, 
92 Adonijah Olmstead, 
88 Charlotte Babcock, 
QQ Daniel E. Dodge, 

80 Nancy B. Silliman, 

81 Giles Shattuck, 

85 Prudence Fillmore, 

80 Clarissa Gettson, 

82 Julia F. Gates, 

81 Sophronia Loi'd, 

83 Louisa M. Brownell, 
80 Anna Rich, 

80 Phebe A. Warner, 

84 Abby Warner, 
84 Delight Watrous, 
84 Diodate Lee, 

80 Theodore Watrous, 

80 Mary Chapman, 
87 Brainard Palmer, 

8.5 Clarrissa M. Williams, 

87 Roxana Fuller, 
84 Mary Gates, 

81 John A. Lord, 
84 Ann Holmes, 
83 Roxana Boyne, 

86 Hezekiah W. Percival, 

88 Abner H. Stannard, 
81 Austin S. Shailer, 

Augustus C. Jones, 
Austin C. Brownell, 



83 



HADLYME DISTRICT. 

(East Haddam.) 



Mrs. Lucy Luther, 


100 


Nancy Hungerford, 


90 


Rev. S. A. Loper, 


84 


C. B. Phelps, 


82 


William M. Willey, 


82 


C. H. Brockway, 


81 


Eliza Hungerford, 


82 


Abby Tolles, 


82 


Eliza Rose, 


81 


Miss Anna Holmes, 


85 


Mrs. Gatlan, 


85 


Betsey Shailer, 


88 


Clarissa Miner, 


82 


Eliza Brockway, 


82 


Rebecca Day, 


80 


Huldah Gates, 


80 



NAMES OF YE OLD FOLKS OF CONNECTICUT. 



13 



HISTORY OF MRS. LUCY LUTHER, OF HADLYME. 

Mrs. Lucy Luther was boru in Hadlyme, a hamlet in the town of East Haddam, January 
6, 1784, and has always resided there. Her parents were farmers, and her childhood and 
youth were spent after the manner of the times. As a farmer's daughter she was unlike 
most of her associates. Timidity was a stranger to her — boldness and daring her character- 
istics. Very early she displayed nerve in emergencies, and when other girls shook with fear 
she would smile as if in her element. A fondness for horses manifested itself, and her 
father having the means, she was enabled to gratify her taste for horse- back riding. Unbroken 
colts and very spirited animals were her choice always, and it became well understood that 
Lucy Lord had no equal in the use of the bridle. In 1811, at the age of 27 years, she mar- 
ried John Luther, a farmer by occupation, but who varied his time as a ship-caulker at the 
various ship-yards on the Connecticut river. He died in 1864. They had six childi-en, two 
of whom — the oldest, now nearly 60 (with whom Mrs. Luther resides), and the youngest are 
living. Her grandchildren number twentj'^ and her great-grandchildren fourteen. Mrs. 
Luther is quite active, and is able to walk about her house easily and to the near neighbors 
occasionally. She saj's she supposes she is 100 years old, but it does not seem to her that she 
can be. Mr. Luther was a soldier in the war of 1812. She draws a pension on accoimt of 
that service, and writes her name every quarter on the vouchers sent her from the bureau. 
The use of a pen causes her to complain of the "ager" which makes her hand rather 
unsteady. Not long since a lady, aged 90, was driving past her house. It caused remark as 
a rare circumstance. Mrs. Luther thought that was not a great thing to do, and speaking to 
her son, said: " If you will get up your horse [quite a spry one] I can drive to Semantha's 
ju.st as well as not." Semantha is the centenarian's daughter, who lives a mile away. Mrs. 
Luther belongs to the Baptist Church, and through listening to its teachings for more than 
two generations, is firmer than ever in the correctness of her religious convictions. Hers is 
a splendid Christian character, and even though she has passed 100 years, there is mental and 
moral strength remaining, and, like some grand tree, when spring has merged itself into 
summer, it stands a living example of firmness and beauty. Mrs. Luther is a frequent 
I'eader of the Bible. Seated at her window she may be seen almost any day with the Sacred 
Book in her hand. She is very genial and has a happy word for those who call. The parish 
of Hadlyme has about 300 of population. Seventeen of these are over 80 years old. The 
people take pride, and justly, in the fact that one of this number is more than a centenarian. 



EAST HARTFORD. 

Population, 3,500. 

Augustus AmerHnxen, 81 

Mrs. Annie Butler, 90 

Thomas Burnham, 81 

Mrs. 'Fannie Brewer, 82 

Mrs. Sarah Brewer, 85 

Mrs. Hannah Coimers, 80 

James Case, 87 

Mrs. Mary Forbes, 83 

Mrs. Mary Fox, 80 

Mrs. Hannah Fox, 88 

Mrs. Sarah Hills, 80 

Mrs. Lydia Hyde, 86 

Samuel O. Hollister, 82 

Ralph Hills, 80 

Mrs. Marian Phelps, 81 

Mrs. Catharine Hawson, 84 

Mrs. Mary C. Jones, 82 

Mrs. Ellen Kyle, 89 

Mrs. Elizabeth Lincoln, 89 

Mrs. Aseneth Lowe, 84 

Mrs. Jane McClellan, 80 

Mrs. Eunice Millard, 82 

Hanford M. Xortham, 83 

Mrs. Mercy Northam, 80 

Mrs. Lucinda Risley, 87 

Jason Roberts, 83 

Mrs. Sally Risley, 83 



Henry Schmidt, 84 

George A. Sloan, 80 

Abraham Williams, 81 

Mrs. Emily Wadsworth, 82 

Mrs. Pauliua Williams, 82 

Mrs. Delia Wallace, 85 

Allen Wadsworth, 91 

EAST HAVEN. 

Population, 3,067. 

Mrs. Nancy Woodward, 91 

Mrs. Polly Farren, 90 

Mrs. Susan Davidson, 87 

Samuel Andrews, 84 

Mrs. Sally Andrews, 84 

Mrs. Sally Chedsey, 85 

Mrs. Olive Blackstone, 83 

Desire Farren, 80 

Mrs. Betsey Bradley, 80 

Factor Russell, 82 

Mrs. Hrrriet Bishop, 86 

Harrington Chidsey, 83 

Mrs. Betsey Street, 80 

Mrs. Emeline Bagley, 80 

Selah Clarke, 86 

Mrs. Rebecca Spencer, 82 

William Thompson, 83 

Jesse Tuttle, 80 

Miss Julia Thompson, 80 



EAST LYME. 

Population, 1,731. 

Miss Sally Chapell, 95 

John G. Rogers, 93 

Mrs Morehouse Daniels, 92 

Mrs. Alfred Coleman, 93 

John Dwyre, 87 

Daniel Phillips, 85 

Mrs. Daniel Phillips, 83 

Nehemiah Caulkins, 86 

Mrs. Xehemiah Caulkins, 83 

Mrs. Morgan, 88 

Joseph Gotham, 84 

Chauncey Manwarning, 82 

EASTON. 

Population, 1,1''5. 

Nancy Coley (colored), 105 

Charles Goodsell, 94 

Benjamin B. Ogden, 93 

Miss Rhoda Hall, 91 

Walter Banks, 91 

Sidney Staples, 80 

Mrs. Sidney Staples, 80 

Samuel W. Bradley, 86 

Sophia Pattison, 85 

Samuel Wheeler, 84 

Caroline Seeley, 83 

Gilbert Wakeman, 83 



14 NAMES OF YE OLD FOLKS OF CONNECTICUT. 

Josiah Mallett, 84 Alva Gregory, 87 Hezekiali Lockwook, 80 

David O. Banks, 82 Mrs. Alva Gregory, 86 Mrs. Hezekiah Lockwood, 83 

Benjamin Hall, 87 Mrs. Deborah Jennings, 87 Aaron Beers, 80 

Clarissa Coley, 81 Mrs. Newell, 88 Mrs. Aaron Beers, 80 

Mrs. Ahaz Oakley, 84 Mrs. Stebbins Sanford, 85 Philo Hall, 80 

Mrs. Eben Gould, 88 Mrs. Andrew Beers, 85 

Nathan Davis, 88 Mrs. Deborah Silliman, 84 

BEEN TAKING SNUFF NINETY YEARS. 

A WOMAN WHO RKME5IBKKS WHEN SOLDIERS OF THE REVOLUTION CAME Ht^)ME. 

In the southwestern portion of the town of Easton there dwells in a lowly cottage which 
is kept scrupulously neat, a colored woman, Mrs. Nancy Coley, who, accepting her story as 
true, and relying on the statements of a former town clerk, Mr. A. Osborn, who searched the 
records in her behalf, is 105 years old. She was born at Greenfield Hill, a portion of the 
town of Fairfield, November 29th, 1779. She was the daughter of Titus Burr, a native of 
Africa, who came to this country when a boy, about the year 1732. Aunt "Nance" as she 
is familiarly called, was never a slave, though she was cotemporary with Captain Ascher. 
Samson and his wife Dorcas, all colored people, belonging to the neighboring town of West- 
port, each of whom had been a slave, and at their deaths a few years ago, were each over 100. 
The most aged resident of Easton, Mr. Charles Goodsell, now in his 95th year, says Aunt 
"Nance" was an old woman when he was 21, and other aged citizens of that locality agree 
that she is lAuch more than a centenarian. In the year 1799, at the age of 20, she married 
her first husband, Castile Nichols, by whom she had twelve children. Ten of these have 
died. One of the remaining two and her youngest, Charles Nichols, resides in Bridgeport. 
With this husband she was often seen at work in the fields — he bareheaded, she with the 
traditional turban characteristic of her sex and race. At her birth, it is said, she was so 
small that those in attendance placed her in a pewter teapot, such as was used in those days, 
and shut the lid down. As a girl she was frail, but grew up to be a strong woman and could 
endure any amount of fatigue and not be affected by it. At the age of five years she says 
she saw the soldiers when they returned from the Revolution. 

There was great excitement, as many of them had been away seven years. They were 
farmers, and when the call for men was made they had left their plows and horses in the 
field, and with rusty flint-lock King's arm muskets, had gone forth to their country's defense. 
They went out for a purpose, remained in the field till it was accomplished, and when they 
got back — and the aged lady sighed as she remarked, "some of them never came," — the neigh- 
bors and friends were wild with delight. They almost wanted to tear the clothing off the 
veterans to show how glad they were. Cases of old Jamaica — the real article, were employed 
as a partial means of entertainment, and the spigots of all the cider barrels in^ the neighbor- 
hood were placed at their free disposal. There was no end to the marvelous stories which 
the braves narrated, and no limit to the patience exhibited in listening. In fact, Fairfield was 
happy in the assurance that the war was really ended, and the windows of the court 
house, and those in a building which sutficed for a county jail seemed to smile a grateful ap- 
proval. But otfering lil)atious and listening to stories were not sutficieut in themselves to 
satisfy the delighted home guard. There must be a more substantial recognition of the Con- 
tinentals' services. So the folks decided to have a barbecue in honor of their return, and they 
held it near the court house. She distinctly remembered the event. The folks dug a big 
hole in the ground, built a fire in it, the sides of the hole being laid with stones like a well. 
The fattest ox in the township was slaughtered and dressed and suspended whole over the 
fire. The cooking, however, was not complete and the soldiers were able to eat only out- 
side portions of the carcass. What remained was cut up and given to the poor. _ She could 
not be mistaken about the ox roast, for her father got a large piece and brought it home to 
the children. When a girl, she lived with the family of Robert Fairchild, of Stratford, and 
with Ephraim Knapp, of Bridgeport, a brother of James Knapp, of Fairfield. How many 
years she dwelt in these places she cannot tell, but thinks she located in Easton before the 
war with England. Her first husband died twenty years, ago, and in 1865 she married 
James Coley, aged 70, at this time a mere child compared to her as to years. Uncle "Jim" 
remembers Aunt Nancy's old boss in Greenfield and has many stories to tell of the queer 
ways of doing things which characterized him. Through life a hut has been her masnion, 
and though others within the sight of her abode have enjoyed roofs which defied the weather, 
a simple thatch, which storms and cold north winds invaded, has been satisfactory to her. 
Domestic felicity has not continuously favored Aunt ' 'Nance. " Some of her descendants have 
failed to respect the command, " Honor thy Father, etc.," and frequently within her domain 
there have occurred those incidents which were not indicative of harmony. Indeed for more 



NAMES OF YE OLD FOLKS OF CONNECTICUT. 



15 



than half a century the veteran's mind has been harassed by those who should have contribu- 
ted to its peace. At the age of fifteen Aunt ' 'Nance" acquired the habit of taking snuflf, and for 
90 years, with few interruptions, she has continued it. It was an expensive luxury at first, 
and during the war of 1812 and for some years thereafter, a brand which suited her could 
not be obtained for love or money. During these " corners" in the snuff market artifice was 
resorted to to get the luxury. Chewers of Old Virginia were watched with eagle eyes, and 
that which they relinquished for a fresh mouthful was seized, dried, pounded and sifted 
with care and skill, and, so far as a miserable substitute could produce it, there was joy m 
the household again. Yet the centenarian was often subjected to long periods of total absti- 
nence, caused by politicians wrangling as they are now, over policies "for protection and free 
trade, and as a conseciuence, the innocent consumer suffered. Tranquility came at last, 
though there was a forced ripple after 1842, but since, along with the progress and develop- 
ment of the country, the old lady has enjoyed her favorite. In this, the evening of her days^ 
snuff is her only solace, and whoever would draw near her heart and cause her countenance 
to beam with delight, has simply to tender her a package of strong old Maccaboy, after a 
pinch or two of which she is prepared to answer all manner of questions as to herself. Un 
fortunately, memory has became treacherous and she cannot readily recall facts and dates 
Many of her utterances are incoherent and only by asking questions not pertinent to the in. 
formation sought, and from answers inadvertently given can a tolerably correct theory as to 
what she really would say, be formed. Hearing and sight remain good, but she moves about 
in her little apartment with difficulty. Her tottering step, sunken eye and husky voice 
speak immistakably of the vast period of years through whicli she has passed. 

The anniversary of Mrs. Coley's birth will be informally celebrated. A few friends will 
call, and for their edification she will repeat stories of events in the remote past. 

EAST WINDSOR. 

Population, 3,110. 

Elsie Watson, 
Almira Woodworth, 
Chester Gray, 
Anna Lord, 
Harriett Smith, 
Isabella Sunderland, 
Thomas I. Tucker, 
Robert Wheeler, 
Trumbull Wells, 
John J. Waldorf, 
Mary P. Woodward, 
George D. Woodward, 
Tryphenia W. Watkins, 
Hiram Watkins, 
Sarah Gray, 
Liberty Hills, 
Emeline Hunter, 
William A. Heath, 
Eliza C. Haskius, 
Joseph Haskins, 
Jeanette Haskins, 
Mary Kelly, 

HISTORY OF MBS. YIOLET CHAPPELL OF ELLINGTON. 

Mrs. Violet Chappell, colored, was born in Belchertowu, Mass., August 29, 1783, just 
before the clo-e of the Revolution. While the exact day of her birth may be somewhat in 
doubt, from statements of those in families where she used to live, Mrs. Chappell is much 
more than 101 years old. During the first years of her life property in slaves was common 
in Massachusetts as well as in Connecticut, but she was never held as a slave. She left her 
native State soon after the war of 1812, and about the year 1820 was married to John Chap- 
pell. He died many years ago. For a time she had a residence in Vermont, but finally 
settled in Ellington. She is at this time in possession of every faculty, sight bting the best 
preserved. Her mind and memory are somewhat impaired, and there are only a few things 
in the past of which she has any recollection. Dwelling always afar from the stirring scenes 
of her time, she has simply heard of them and knows comparatively little of their meaning 
and significance. She cannot tell how old she is, as there are no written records for reference. 





Seymour L. King, 


81 




P. C. Lee, 


82 




Eliza Lord, 


81 


92 


Hiram Lord, 


81 


91 


Mary Allen, 


81 


90 


Mary Allen, 


88 


90 


Elizabeth T. Bissell, 


83 


80 


David 0. Bancroft, 


81 


86 


Mary Buckley, 


87 


84 


Rufus A. Bush, 


81 


85 


Olive Dunham, 


83 


88 


Orpha Fish, 


87 


86 


Christopher Fowler, 


84 


80 


Charlotte Mason, 


82 


83 


Harriet Niels, 


83 


80 


Submit Morton, 


82 


82 


Almon Noble, 


81 


82 


William Noltemier, 


80 


81 


Mirinda Osborne, 


82 


80 


Roxana Porter, 


81 


80 


Cynthia W. Porter, 


84 


81 


Sophronia W. Palmer, 


81 


85 


Azel S. Roe, 


85 


81 


Julianna Robertson, 


81 


82 


Mary Ellsworth, 


82 



ELLINGTON. 

Population, 1,569. 

Mrs. Violet Chappel (col'd), 101 

Mrs. ]\[ary Emmons, 94 

Mrs. Eunice Kibbee, 94 

Mrs. Rhoda Green, 93 

Miss Betsey Newell, 88 

Mrs. Sarah Johnson, 84 

Mrs. Jane Lane, 80 

Mrs. Lora Aborn, 81 

Mrs. Laura Aborn, 87 

Mrs. Ruth Charter, 83 

Mrs. Mary Dow, 88 

Mrs. Elizabeth Benjamin, 83 

Mrs. Abigail Morton, 83 

Mrs. Cynthia Martin, 84 

Mrs. Polly Riggs, 88 

Thomas J. Whlton, 84 

Samuel D. Chapin, 83 

Theodore Spencer, 87 

Elisha Buckley, 83 



16 



NAMES OF YE OLD FOLKS OF CONNECTICUT, 



but she has sometimes been heard to remark that she did not believe she was a hundred. 
This may have bee a caused by a sort of vanity often displayed by advanced persons who 
wish to be known as younger than they really are. From neighbors and aged residents, 
however, comes the declaration that she was a very old woman when they first knew her, 
and some of these are over 90. In bodily health she is stronger than many at 60. She is, in 
fact, like some aged tree with firm roots, putting forth leaves as seasons return, smiling when 
sunshine falls upon its foliage with as much apparent satisfaction as the younger ones with 
which it is surrounded. Her recollections of events of long ago, while in every instance she 
is not exact, is such as to show that there has been a time when she was familiar with them. 
On many occasions she has spoken of persons and things relating to the late war with Eng- 
land, which were conclusive that no fabrication had been attempted, but that they were 
based on truth, which she knew to be such. 



ENFIELD. 

Population, 6,754. 
Walter Pease, 101 years, March 
29, 1885. (A farmer by oc- 
cupation, and always lived 
in Enfield.) 
Chauncey Allen, 89 

Jonathan Button, 86 

Aholiah Johnson, 85 

Joseph P. Converse, 84 

James Ely, 86 

Seth Thompson, 87 

Mrs. Parsons Henry, 83 

Mrs. Elihu Colton, 87 

Mrs. Joseph Converse, 84 

Mrs. Jonathan Bartlett, 83 
Mrs. William S. Morison, 81 
Henry Abbe, 100 

Mrs. Henry A. Abbe, 85 

Thomas Bostock, 93 

Ebenezer Willis, 91 



Ellen Broderick, 
Arthur Damon, 
James Benson, 
Elizabeth R. Cooley, 
Alice Campbell, 
Sybil Ely, 
Bridget A. Grifllth, 
Agnes Hood, 
Joseph Hibblethwaite, 
John Hamilton, 
Martha Kelly, 
Amy Lord, 
Mary McFebrick, 
Edith Phelps, 
Charles Stewart, 
George Wilbraham, 
Mary Allen, 
Julia Deneen, 
Annie Ervin, 
Hart Hancock, 



90 


Lucretia Hancock, 


81 


90 


William Hickton, 


84 


86 


Russell Haskill, 


83 


83 


Betsy S. Johnson, 


83 


81 


Chloe Mixter, 


83 


83 


Nellie Newcomb, 


81 


86 


Lyra Potter, 


83 


84 


Elizabeth Ryan, 


86 


83 


Calvin Stebbens, 


83 


83 


Margaret Shepherd, 


88 


83 


James Ronald, 


86 


81 


Mary A. Ronald. 


84 


83 


Otis Chieson, 


83 


80 


Orrin G. Currier, 


81 


81 


Willis Phelps, 


81 


86 


William Samis, 


83 


83 


Mrs. Bates, 


83 


84 


Elijah Johnson, 


80 


80 


Simeon Parsons, 


83 


82 


Anson K. Parsons, 


83 



HISTORY OF WALTER PEASE, OF ENFIELD. 

Walter Pease was born March 29, 1784. He has always resided in Enfield on property 
which descended to him from his fathers, and he has rarely, during his long life, been absent 
from it. At an early age he began as a farmer and continued until old age demanded his re- 
tirement. He has enjoyed good health from the beginning, and never but once was visited 
by sickness — about sixty years ago. He is now able to walk about his house, and on the 
farm during fair days, unassisted, and his teeth are so firm that he can bite into a hard apple 
equal to a boy of 14, and he never had a tooth extracted. Socially and morally he stands 
high in the community, and in business affairs his judgment is,and has always been, sought. 
Death has visited his family but once, in 1874, when his wife, at a great age, departed The 
home in which he was born has long since been pulled down, and he now resides in a modern 
structure, near the site of the old one, with two daughters, aged respectively 78 and 60 years. 
The goodness and self-sacrifice of these ladies — such devotion as they have shown towards 
their aged father, is rarely seen in these modern days, and they honor themselves in thus hon- 
oring him. Mr. Pease has, living in various parts of the country five children, thirteen 
grandchildren and ten great grand children, most of whom were present to celebrate the cen- 
tenial. About one hundred relations and friends were also present to greet Mr. Pease's en- 
trance upon his second hundred years. In politics he has always been a Democrat, and never 
has missed a Town, State or Presidential election. He was made a freeman in 1805, and his 
first vote was cast for Jonathan Trumbull (Brother Jonathan) for Governor of Connecticut. 
His first vote for President was cast for .James Madison in 1808. He was quite a boy when 
Washington assumed the Presidential ofl3ce in New York, and was nearly 16 years old when 
that great man died, in 1799, and remembers well the expressions of sorrow which the news 
of that event called fort;h and his narrations of the events of long ago as relating to the early 
history of our country are very interesting. Mr. Pease takes pleasure in speaking of the fact 
that he has read the Hartford Times from time immemorial, and that he had the honor of 
distributing the first copies of that paper on the west side of the Connecticut River in the 
Enfield neighborhood. He is a strict Connecticut man, and advocates the State as the best 



NAMES OF YE OLD FOLKS OF CONNECTICUT. 



17 



one in the thnty-eight to live in, basing his opinion on an experience coverino- a period so ex- 
tensive that none ot his associates can, with any show of grace, interpc^e a°doubt as toll 
correc ness. He i^ached his 100th birthday with a mind u°nimpaired^?nd a boSy more v - 
November 4™ 1884 '' ""^ '' ^"^^^^ ^^'^ ^""'^ ^"' ^^^ ^"'- P^'^^'dent^n Enfill^, 

HISTORY OF HENRY ABBE, OF ENFIELD. 

TT. w I ^^^f Yf born, has always resided, and is one of the foremost citizens in Enfield 
He has been hotel-keeper, farmer and broker, and is the -^--ti---^^^ — >- -•- - -— -e^"u«JU- 
high socially, and is known for his honesty and inteo-rity 
children and grandchildren occupy high social positions, 
two grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. 
ESSEX. 
Population, l,85o. 

94 

90 

90 

90 

83 



, — ^. He stands 

It IS a remarkable fact that all his 
Mr. Abbe has five children, twenty- 



Harriet Williams, 
Fanny Ha^'den, 
Martha H. Hayden, 
George Brockway, 
Richard H. Sizer, 
Bezallel F. Smith, 
Charles C. Starkey, 
E. Dennison Post, 
Lyman Spencer, 
Abraham Denison, 
Thomas Rann, 
Azubah Starkey, 
Charles Starkey, 
David Williams, 
Temperance Williams, 
Hari-iett A. Williams, 
Alexander Hannah, 
Alanson H. Hough, 
Austin Lay, 
Gamaliel Couklin, 
Horace Clark, 
Abby Dennison, 
Maria Fuller, 
Phebe Hayden, 
Lucioda Arnold, 
Josiah M. Bartlett, 
Rebecca A. Post, 
Eunice Pratt, 
Ann Post, 
Abby Pratt, 
Bela Comstock, 
Philena Clark, 
David Andrews, 
Eliza S. Andrews, 

FAIRFIELD. 

Population, 3,748. 
James Bane, 
Sarah Merwin, 
Charles Carter. 
Esther Sherwood, 
Eliza Hull, 



92 Lois J. Sherwood, 

91 Laura Sturges, 

91 Susan Sturges, 

80 Eunice Sturges, 

81 Mary J. Smith, 
84 Huldah Turney, 



80 
80 
80 
82 
81 
84 
80 
80 
80 
85 
84 
87 
83 
85 
81 



Caroline Turney, 
Morris Wilson, 
Susan Sanford, 

FARMINGTON. 

Population, 3,014. 
Egbert Cowles, 
Calvin Hatch, 
William Rourk, 
Joseph A. Lewis, 
Nicholas White, 
Jeanette Steadman, 



84 Cephas Skinner, 



Obediah W. Jones, 
Catheiine Perry, 
Priscilla Burr, 

John Anderson, 

Bradley Banks, 

JMahali Blackman, 

John Banks, 

Caroline Banks, 

Abigail Bulkley. 

Catherine Cook, 

Abigail Goodsell, 

Marinda Gould, 

Ellen Osborne, 

Susan Hull, 

Kate Hunter, 

Benjamin Plawkins, 

Mary (!. Nichols, 

Mary Nichols, 

Laura Nichols, 

Charlotte Nichols, 

Orriii O. Nichols, 

Charity Nichols, 

Alva Raymond, 

Sarah Sherwood, 

William Sherwood, 

Eli Slu'iwood, 

Hiram Tliorpe, 

Silas AV'akeman, 

Charity Wheeler, 

Julia A. Brothwell, 

Eliza Bennett, 

Ann S. Beers, 

Anson Bibbins, 

Eliza Brown, 

Mrs. Benjamin Wakeman 

Mrs. Burr Clemens, 

Finette Benson, 

Hannah E. Burr, 

Catherine M. Beers, 

:\Iarv Ferry, 
95 Laui-aHall, 
94 Mary E. Johnson, 
93 Marion Judd, 
92 Betsey Phillips, 
92 Clara Seeley, 

HISTORY OF MR. EGBERT COWLES 

(Farmington, Conn). 

Egbert Cowles was born in Farmington, Conn. , April 4th, 1785. The house in which he 

first saw the light has long since been pulled down, but the one in which he has 1 ved since a 

little child stands opposite his birth place and is one of the most attractive! and perhaps the 



John R. Smith, 
xVnna Smith, 
Harriet Wheeler, 
Eli D. Preston, 
Matthew Adam, 
Lucy Andruss, 
Mary Buck, 
Catherine Deming, 

80 Benjamin Hosford, 
82 Oliver Bernard, 

81 Francis Freeman, 
84 Maria Gladding, 

84 Henry Hotchkiss, 

85 Harry Hill, 
Mary E. Hill, 
Margaret Lapise, 
Barney McGee, 
Richard O'Connor, 
Emeline- Porter, 
Mercy Root, 
Francis Newton, 
Heman Northrop, 

84 Chloe M. Preston, 

85 Johu L. Seignon, 
85 Martha Upson, 
81 George W. Way, 



85 



100 
96 
94 
93 
91 



18 NAMES OF TE OLD FOLKS OP CONNECTICUT. 

neatest dwelling in town. Mr. Cowles is to-day vigorous, and is one of the few remaining 
specimens of an old-time courtly gentleman. As an indication of his well preserved mental 
powers, he wrote and published in 1880, at the age of 95, an interesting work entitled, 
"Sketches of the early Settlements of the Plymouth Colony; Historical, Biograpical and 
Anecdotical." It is written in a clear, concise style, and presents facts, argument and narra- 
tive in a manner not often witnessed. Mr. Cowles' early advantages for education were lim- 
ited. Like many, he made his own way, and was self-taught, except a little aid from the dis- 
trict school. His five-score years have been spent in Farmiugton, except one winter at the 
South, where he had peddlers employed, and tinware manufactured. This, with two or 
three journeys West, to Ohio (which forty years ago was deemed very far west), and once to 
St. Loilis, is about all the traveling he has- done. That the home of his youth "is all the 
world to him," is shown by his devotion to it and tarrying in it, far beyond the oldest of 
his associates. He has been married but once— about the beginning of the present century, 
to Miss Sophia S. Woodruff, of Southington, Conn., then a part of Farmington. Ten sons 
and one daughter were born to them. The latter is still living at Staten Island, N. Y. Four 
sons are also living, and eight grandchildren. Of the sons, one lives with the centenarian, one 
in New York City, one in Hartford, Conn. , and one in Ohio. 

The American Board of Foreign Missions was organized in Farmington nearly seventy- 
five years ago, and yet, when this venerable society was formed Mr. Cowles was a man of 
twenty-five, and to-day he discourses freely of the men who framed it — Governor Treadwell, 
Dr. Noah Porter, and others, — all of whom long since passed awaj^ Most eloquently does 
he relate incidents of the Revolutionary war and the prominent actors in that fierce struggle 
for our national independence, which filled his youthful mind, and which seem to outlive 
much or most of what has since transpired. The stories heard by him in early youth, as 
told by his parents of Washington, Putnam, Gay, Stark, Green andPrescott, are as fresh and 
real to his active mind, as are the names and stories of Grant, Sherman, Meade and Sheridan 
to those of us who are most familiar with the great conflict in which they were such active 
participants. 

To cold and rain Mr. Cowles has seemed almost invulnerable, and it has become a com- 
mon remark wdienever a raw disagreable day occurs, " this is the day on which Mr. Egbert 
Cowles will go to Hartford," and while other men would bundle up with furs and wraps, he 
would quite disregard any such appliances for comfort. One of the very cold and icy days of 
January, 1884, he was met walking vigorously down a steep hill which was covered with ice, 
dressed — with the exception of a jaunty fur cap— as if it was the month of August. 

Although Mr. Cowles never saw General Washington, he describes that great man's visit 
to Farmington, on his way to Wethersfield, to hold conference with French officers. He 
knew personally, many of the men of 1812 who went to war, and repeats the stories they told 
when they returned. 

He reads the papers daily, and is interested in what occurs in both of the great political 
parties. For more than ten years he has abstained wholly from alcoholic stimulents, and his 
robust appearance is indicative that he may outlive his one-hundredth birthday. Mr. Cowles' 
son, now verging upon 80 years, is not stroager physically, if appearance may be taken as 
proving it, than his father. Recently the little daughter of a neighbor called at the door to 
speak with the centenarian, and seeing the latter asked, " Who is that?" and was told by her 
father, "that is Mr. Cowles' son." She exclaimed, "why papa! lie is an old man;" Mr. 
Cowles belongs to the Congregational church. His membership covers nearly eighty years. 
Not long ago he urged the establishment of a Sunday school at " Scott's Swamp," one of the 
outer districts of his town. He is much interested in the " Morning Star," recently launched, 
and not only took stock in it, but has prepared a beautiful axe helve for the cabin ofthis new 
mission steamer, which, ere long, as its friends hojje, will set sail for the Micronesian Isles. 
Dwelling in Mr. Cowles' family as a domestic for more than forty years, is a woman so aged 
in appearance as to frequently call forth the remark, "she looks old enough to be Mr. 
Cowles' mother." She came from Ireland; and it is intended to write to the record-keepers 
of her town and ascertain, if possible, her age. Mr. Cowles has a l)rother ninety-seven years 
old, a lawyer of note, residing in San Diego, Cal. 

FRANKLIN. Miss Sally Lathrop, 

T-. , ^. ^o- Mrs. Maria Smith, 

Population, 680. ^^^^^^ jj^^^^i,^ 

E. jVI. Kingsley, 92 Mrs. Eliza Bailey, 

Miss Harriet Ladd, 90 Mrs. Mary Mason, 

Miss Clarissa Ladd, 86 S. T. Gavitt, 

Miss Amanda Lathrop, 86 Mrs. S. T. Gavitt, 

Miss Betsey Lathrop, 84 Mrs. Mabby Huntingt^on, 84 James Bariy, 



HI 


Mrs. Dolly Ayer, 


81 


86 


Bartholomew McCarty, 


82 


87 


Thomas Mullen, 


80 


85 


Mrs. Henry Otis, 


81 


85 


Mrs. Gurdon Pendleton, 


81 


84 


Albert Daniels, 


80 


80 


Horatio Hyde, 


80 



NAMES OF YE OLD FOLKS OF CONNECTICUT. 



19 





Jared G. Talcott, 


88 


Mrs. Southworth, 


82 




Mrs. Julia Wilson, 


86 


Mrs. Pamela Curtis, 


86 


100 


Mrs. Betsey Gaines, 


85 


George Dart, 


82 


97 


Benjamin Taylor, 


84 


Mrs. Hannah Chapman, 


83 


97 


Jesse Ladd, 


80 


John Curran, 


85 


96 


Miss Sally Babcock, 


83 


Julius Bidwell, 


84 


94 


Osman House, 


80 


Mrs. Betsey Ann Tryon, 


82 


94 


Mrs. Achsa Dolpli, 


88 


Ogden McLean, 


84 


98 


Mrs. Kingsbury, 


86 


Jasper Buck, 


84 


92 


Mrs. Mary Dunham, 


85 


John F. Hubbard, 


81 


98 


Dorrunce Wells, 


84 


]\[rs. Lucretia Hubbard, 


81 


91 


Mrs. Adehna Holmes, 


88 


Joshua Goodale, 


82 


86 


3Irs. Polly Bartholemew, 


80 


Mrs. Harriet House, 


84 


84 


Miss Emily Morsely, 


80 


Alfred Strickland, 


81 


83 


Daniel Brown, 


83 


Mrs. Hopestill Turner, 


87 


82 


Horace Goodrich, 


83 


Narcissa Brainard, 


80 



GLASTONBURY. 

Population, 8,580. 
Mrs. Eunice HoUister, 
Mrs. Lucinda Goslee, 
Mrs. Mehitable Da>ton, 
]Mrs. Can^line Strong, 
Michael Dunn, 
Alfred Chapman, 
Amos A. Parker, 
Mrs. Julia E. Parker, 
]\Irs. Pamela Hale, 
Halsej^ Buck, 
]\Irs. Pamela Wrisley, 
IMarshall Wier, 
Slmbael Hills, 
Sidney Smith, 

HISTORY OF MRS. EUNICE HOLLiSTER, OF GLASTONBURY. 

]\Irs. Eunice Hollister was born in Glastonbury, Conn., August 9th, 1784, and has 
always resided in that town. The building in which she first saw the light is still in exist- 
ence, and was built after the manner of farm-houses of that day, the foundations for the 
chimney occupying about one-third of the space inside, and the timbers of hewn oak are 
adequate for the frames of four houses of that size, such as are put up in this generation. It 
stands not far from the residence of the Misses Smith, of " cow case " notoriety, who 
recently attracted so much public attention bj^ their refusal to pay taxes levied on their real 
estate by the town authorities, for the reason that they were not allowed the pi'ivilege of vot- 
ing the same as men. The centenarian's maiden name was Eunice Hale, the child of Frary 
Hale and Eunice Atherton, taking the name of the latter. Her early years were passed in 
Glastonbury, and she received a limited education, her studies being pursued in books with 
wooden covers, when Murray's Grammar was the only authority on the construction and use 
of language known in country schools. The town records do not show it, nor has her 
family Bil^le any record, but so far as her recollection goes she was married about the year 
1803 to Nehemiah Hollister. At his decease, nearly half a century ago, she took up her 
abode with her only son, Edwin Hollister, remaining with him till his death in 1869, at the 
age of 67. She has six grandchildren, twice that number of great-grandchildren, and two 
gi'eat-great-granchildren, each of whom improve frequent opportunities to honor themselves 
by calling on her. Her mind is in excellent condition, and she speaks intelligently. She 
enjoys society and is happy, especially when in the company of yovmg children. Her recol- 
lection of past events appears to be limited, but the names of early associates and social 
matters in which she took part are spoken of and narrated. When she was in her teens, 
and for years after, a conveyance on wheels for transporting people was unknown. One 
could not ride or walk by choice, as now, to some distant church on Sunday, or town centre 
on market days. There was but one means, in the absence of a horse, and that " to hoof it." 
Steamboats were not known till she was thirty, and as to railroads, they had been heard of 
but not adopted in her State till she was well along in years. She often alludes to the new- 
fangled things moving on rails, drawn by iron horses, as strange contrivances, likely to kill 
somebody yet, and never fails to counsel a return to the simpler, and what she knows to be 
a safer mode of travel — the real horse and chaise. She brings down from another century 
some of the characteristics of that far-off period when age was truly venerated, and, as if 
in honor of domestic impressions then made, she appears daily in the frilled cap and ample 
neckerchief so dear to the heart of everyone who has a great-grandmother. Her religious 
beliefs are of the Methodist persuasion, a member of which Church she has been for upw^ards 
of eighty years. Though somewhat bent in form she enjoys walkiiig, and to a limited extent 
is able to move about unassisted except by a cane. Her 100th birthday was celebrated under 
a large tent pitched near the house, and descendants to the fifth generation and friends to the 
number of 300 took part in it. 

GOSHEN. 

Betsey Cook, 
Allen Cobb, 
Thomas Caliill, 
Betsey .Johnson, 
Elizabeth Lamphier, 
Clarissa Norton, 





Norman Norton, 


87 


Ariel R. Bragg, 


88 


87 


Lyman Richard, 
Maria Seeley, 


81 


Eli Brunker, 


80 


80 


87 


Damaris Bancroft, 


85 


86 


Pheobe Wright, 


83 


Hosea Crandall, 


84 


86 


Pheobe Wooster, 


84 


Alosia 0. Crandall, 


80 


83 


Olive F. Adams, 


88 


Allison Palmer, 


81 


83 


Miles Axley, 


88 


Thomas Robinson, 


87 



NAMES OF YE OLD FOLKS OF CONNECTICUT. 



Alicia Reed, 
Thomas Stuart, 
Nelson Tuttle, 
Sterling Wooster. 

GRANBY. 

Population, 1,340. 
Mrs. I'heodocia Reed, 
Mrs. Nancy Edgerton, 
Chauncey Holcomb, 
Francis Clark, 
Hiram Cbapin, 
Mrs. Catharine Hayes, 
Mrs. Orrin Daniels, 
Mrs. Byron Goddard, 
Mrs. Electa Allen, 
Mrs. Nancy Alderman, 
Mrs. Candace Holcomb, 
Miss Julia Holcomb, 
Mrs. Elizabeth Smith, 
Orrin Daniels, 
Riley Dibble, 
Starling El key, 
Mrs. Anna Dibble, 
Miss Lydia Dibble, 
Mrs. Amelia Kasson, 
Mhomas Beeman, 
Byron Goddard, 

GREENWICH 

Population, 7,892. 
Charles Green, 
Mrs. Mary B. Husted, 
John C. Sherwood, 
Mrs. Cornelia G. Graham, 
David Banks, 
Harry Briggs, 
Martin Sherwood, 
N. B. Dayton, 
David Lyon, 
Mrs. Ann Ferris, 
David Hill. 
William K. Quintard, 
Mrs. Deborah Reynolds, 
Mrs. Emily Lyon, 
Col. Thomas A. Mead, 
Mrs Julia Horton, 
Mrs. Mary Green, 
Mrs. Rachel Mead, 
Mrs. Amanda L. Mead, 
Samuel M. Todd, 
Mrs. Alice Finch, 
Henry Grigg, 
Mrs. Hannah Lyon, 
Mrs. Elester Lyon, 
Mrs. Eliza Studwell, 
Silas Wood. 
Oliver Mead, 
Mrs. Catherine Davis, 
William A. Husted, 
Mrs. Hannah Mead, 
Mrs. Mary Mead, 
Isaac Weed, 



Mrs. Huldah Mead, 
Reuben Mead, 

Mrs. Maudaville, 

William Brush, 
Mrs. S. C. Heusted, 
Henry Mead, 
Allen Sutton, 
Mrs. Sally Burns, 
Michael Donovan, 
Mrs. Mary H. Hunt, 
Jonathan Husted, 
Mrs- Jane McDougal, 

Mrs- McCann, 

Mrs- Hannah Moshier, 
Mrs- Maria Brown, 

Mrs- Trumpey, 

Mrs-. Field, 

Benjamin J. Knapp, 
WiliiamPeck, 
John Purdy, 
Miss P. Close, 
Benjamin Reynolds, 

GRISWOLD. 

Population, 3,745. 
Prudence Lord, 
Franklin Fanning, 
Prudence Benjamin, 
Celia Watson, 
Nathaniel Brown, 
John Holmes, 
Mrs. John Holmes, 
John Connel, 
Marilla B, Soule, 
Lucy P. Young, 
Priscilla L. Geer, 
Johanna Palmer, 
Eunice Matison, 
Rev. Thomas L. Shipman, 
John Fanning, 
Hezekiah Boardman, 
John Whitman, 
Andrew Davison, 
Mrs. Eliza Davison, 
Daniel S. Anthony, 
Louisa Brewster, 
Betsey Burton, 
Bonaparte Campbell, 
Joseph Leonard, 
Mrs. Kezia Campbell, 
Henry Saunders, 
Elisha Potter, 
George D. Palmer, 
Sophia McKuskeo, 
Isaiah Wilcox, 
John Dolan, 
Alice Prentice, 
Lucinda Kinney, 



82 


Julia Clark, 


95 


82 


Abby Young, 


92 


82 


Mrs. Alfred White, 


92 


82 


Mrs. Giles Chester, 


86 


81 


Mrs. Erastus Baldwin, 


84 


81 


Mrs. John 0. Miner, 


83 


81 


Eunice Dart, 


84 


81 


Sarah Williams, 


83 


81 


Mrs. Peter Williams, 


81 


81 


Lucy Swan, 


81 


81 


James Belden, 


83 


81 


Mrs. James Belden, 


83 


81 


Mrs. Daniel Latham, 


80 


81 


Austin Burrows, 


80 


81 


James Mitchell, 


80 


81 


John Mitchell, 


84 


81 


John Beuham, 


80 


80 


i\Iary Dodge, 


83 


80 


H. i). Morgan, 


80 


80 


C. G. Newbury, 


84 



83 GROTON. 

82 Population, 5,127. 

82 WEST GROTON. 

82 Mrs. Albert Latham, 

82 Betsey Avery, 



84 



82 



CENTER GROTON . 

Henry Haley, 80 

Anson Davis, 83 

Solomon Chapman, 81 

Mrs. Charlotte Hempstead, 88 
Miss Pnadence Burrows, 88 



POQCONNOC. 

Capt. Sanford Morgan, 
Mrs. Sanford Morgan, 
Sarah Gardner, 
Mrs. Elisha Morgan, 
Caroline Perkins, 
Mrs. Calvin Morgan, 
John Manier, 
Coddington Holdredge, 

NOANK. 

Elihu Spicer, 
John Rathbvin, 
Isaac Scofield, 
Dea. Eben Rogers, 
JVIrs. Eben Rogers, 
Hannah Ashbey, 
Betsey Chester, 
Mrs. Desire Chester, 
Mary Fitch, 
Sally Burrows, 
Prudence Ci'omwell, 
Silas Latham, 

MYSTIC RIVER. 

Amos Slack, 
Daniel Edgecomb, 
Isaac Haucoji:, 
Harry Latham, 
Mason R. Packer, 
George B. Packer, 
William Bray, 
Simeon Cummings, 
William Murphy, 
Reuben Bradley, 
Mrs. Reuben Bradley, 



NAMES OF YE OLD FOLKS OF CONNECTICUT. 



21 



Nathan Lamb, 


84 


Abraham Hubbard, 


90 


Mrs. Nathan Lamb, 


82 


Mrs. Chloe Bishop. 


90 


Rebecca Read, 


84 


William Avery, 


81 


Lucy Jones, 


83 


Jonathan Bishop, 


87 


Mannda Denison, 


83 


George Bartlett, 


85 


Sally Sawyer, 


87 


Mrs. George Bartlett, 


83 


Marj' Williams, 


SO 


Mrs. Marv Bishop, 


86 


Eraeline Edwards, 


82 


Samuel A. Barker, • 


86 


Mrs. Levi Allen, 


80 


Mrs. ]Mary Ann Barker, 


81 


Lucy Wheeler, 


81 


Mrs. Betsey Crampton, 


88 






Mrs. Betsey Crittenden. 


83 






Mrs. Temperance Spencer 


, 97 


UPPER MYSTIC. 




Mrs. Eunice Chittenden, 


91 


Chris. Eldridge, 


85 


Leverett Vail, 


90 


Mrs. Chris. Eldridge, 


83 


Mrs. William R. Collins, 


85 


Martha Eggleston, 


85 


Mrs. Polly Davis, 


84 






]\Irs. Mary Fowler, 


81 






Mrs. Sarah Fiske, 


82 


GUILFORD. 




Mrs. Charrie Fowler, 


83 


Population, 2,783. 




Amos Fowler, 
Ammi Fowler, 


83 
84 


Mrs. Elsie Chittenden, 


100 


Mrs. Marina Fowler, 


84 


William R. Collins, 


94 


Mrs. Lucy C. Hale, 


84 


Phineas Walker, 


91 


Daniel PLand, 


84 


Mrs. Lucinda Partridge, 


91 


Jacob Hall, 


83 


L. McQuillan, 


91 


Mrs. Betsey Hall, 


83 


Mrs. Anna Munson, 


91 


Hawley Hubbard, 


86 



Willis Hull, 
Mrs. Rachel Johnson, 
Mrs. Eliza Johnson, 
Wealthy Kimberly, 
Samuel Landon, 
Beulah Landon, 
James S. Loper, 
William C. Dudley, 
Mrs. Caroline Kelsey, 
]\Irs. Content Loper, 
James E. Lee, 
Hiram Middlebrook, 
Mrs. Sarah McKeon, 
Miss Lucretia Norton, 
William Norton, 
Horace Norton, 
Erastus Page, 
Mrs. Jonathan Parmellia, 
Mrs. Mary C. Robinson. 
Wealthy Roberts, 
Enoch Stannard, 
Mrs. Rachel Stevens, 
Charles Siefut, 
Mrs. Christina Siefut, 
Mrs. Sarah Todd, 
Miss Eliza Talman, 
Mrs. Phineas Walker, 



81 



85 



HISTORY OF MRS. ELSIE CHITTENDEN, OF GUILFORD. 



At the head of a list of 64 persons in Guilford who have passed their 80th year, stands 
Mrs. Elsie Chittenden who was born April 24, 1784, in the town of Durham, Conn. Her 
early education was completed in that place. Her maiden name was Reave, and long before 
the present century began, she was a Durham belle and sang counter in the church choir of 
that place, at a time when going to church meant more, oftentimes, than it seems to now. 
The pitch pipe was the only musical instrument permitted at the choir end of the church, 
the tuning fork having not yet put in an appearance, and the congregation were satisfied 
when Old Hundred, Mear and Dundee, or the authem "Before Jehovah's, Awful Throne, 
etc.," were selected from the ancient tune book with its buckwheat notes, for their edifica- 
tion. The days of Mrs. Chittenden's youth are often alluded to in story by her and she makes 
a charming narrative of them. About the year 1800, or soon after, she married Mr. Joy 
Meigs who had been conspicuous in all good matters in the village of Durham, and she became 
the mother of six children, four of whom, a son, and three daughters, are living, and with 
the eldest of them, Mrs. Ebenezer Evarts, herself an octogenarian, she is now residing. 
From this devoted daughter she receives the best of care, and her every want is antidpated. 
Her first husband died more than half a century ago, and marrying Mr. Charles Chittenden 
she removed to Guilford, which has ever since been her home. Mr. Chittenden died many 
years since. Of late the contenarian has kept her bed, receiving her food and talking with 
her friends while in a recumbent posture. For more than sixty years she has been a snuff 
taker, and although no disposition to relinquish the habit has ever manifested itself, she 
wishes it to be understood that she is not a slave to snuff. Through life, under all circum- 
stances she has persistently refused to partake of spirituous liquors in any form. To this, by 
many, is attributed her tendency to longevity. Persons and tilings of her early childhood 
she remembers and talks of very correctly, but events of the present time she does not retain. 
This is the case to great extent with most of those of advanced age. She has her second 
sight and is able to read without glasses. In a moment of brightness the other day she called 
Mrs. Evarts to her bedside and said, as if the utterance inspired thoughts of joy: "My 
daughter, I am an old woman; I shall be one hundred years of age April 24th." She com- 
pleted her 100th year and entered upon her 101st in as good bodily health as she had enjoyed 
for a long period, and as she has no physical disease, has never taken medicine and does not 
propose to, she seems to have a reasonable promise of continuing. 



22 



NAMES OF YE OLD FOLKS OF CONNECTICUT. 



HADDAM. 

Population, 2,419. 

Mrs. Deborah Sugden, 91 

David B. Ventres, 90 
Ansel Brainard (Pensioner 

war of 1812), 90 

Mrs. Cynthia Shaler, 90 

Horace Arnold, 88 

Mrs. Sylvester Scofield, 88 

Miss Beulah Childs, 87 

Miss Clarissa Selden, 87 

Mrs. :Mary Bridges, 87 

John Smith, 87 

Ezekiel Clark, 86 

Oliver B. Arnold, 86 

Miss Dorothy May, 86 

Mrs. Esther Rockwell, 86 

George A. Freeman, 85 

Mrs. Susan House, 84 

Mrs. Ansel Brainard, 84 

Mrs. Lucinthia Smith, 84 

Miss Larissa Shailer, 83 

Reuben White, 80 

Heber Brainard 80 

Martin Chapman, 80 

Mrs. Delila Clark, 83 

Mrs. Hannah Emmons, 83 

Chauncey Skinner, 82 

Lyman Freeman, 82 

Beuanuel Bonfoey, 82 

Harris Cook, 82 

Miss Harriet Turner, 82 

Mrs. Susan C. Tyler, 82 

Coleman Clark, 82 

Mrs. Clarissa Ventres, 82 

Mrs. Elizabeth Rich, 81 

Mrs. Caroline M. Strong, 81 

Mrs. Ann White, 81 

Mrs. William White, 81 

Elder Davis F. Shailer, 81 

Mrs. Hannah Brooks, 81 

James Thomas, 81 

Mrs. Lucinda Richards, 80 

He man Clark, 80 

Mrs. Benanuel Bonfoey, 80 

Mrs. Elizabeth Loveland, 80 

Mrs. Russell Gladwin, 80 

Mrs. John Smith, 81 

HAMDEN. 

Population, 3,408. 

Mrs. Chester Gaylord, 90 

Mrs. Jason Bassett, 83 

Charles Brockett, 80 

Harvey Candee, 80 

Patrick Deehan, 87 

Enos Dickerman, 83 

Jared Dickerman, 85 

Mrs. Laban Downes, 81 

Mrs. Thomas Farrall, 83 

Elias Ford, 80 

Merritt Ford, 81 

Mrs. Jesse Gilbert. 84 



Mrs. Ezra Ailing, 
Henry Handy, 
Mrs. Andrew Merrill, 
Mrs. Zeri Peck, 
Mrs. Horace Potter, 
Mrs. Stephen Smith, 
Mrs. Loyal Todd, 
Julius Tuttle, 
Orrin Tuttle, 
Mrs. Jesse Underhill, 
Mrs. Walter Wakefield, 
Lewis Warner, 
Charles Woodin, 

HAMPTON. 

Population, 827. 
James Fuller, 
Ex-Gov. C. F. Cleveland, 
Alfred Burnham, 
Mrs. Alfred Burnham, 
Lucy Farnham, 
Andrew M. Litchfield, 
Elijah Cady, 

Mrs. Renyon, 

Milton Perkins, 
Mrs. Erastus Ashley, 
Mrs. Bera Fuller, 
Mrs. William Durkee, 

Mrs. Shippee, 

Artemas Downing, 
Mrs. Fisk, 

HARTFORD. 

Population 42,553. 
Triphenia Jackson, (col'd) 
William Hamilton, 
Lydia Watson, 
Electa Smith, 
Margaret B. Ludlow, 
Roxey P. Pearson, 
Nancy Morris, 
Ellen Hayes, 
Bridget Hickey, 
Frank Kilday, 
Maria Kirby, 
Mrn. James Tisdale, 
William Hamilton, 
Josephine Streeter, 
Roxey Woodford, 
Mary Williams, 
Henry Goodwin, 
Ruth' Rowley, 
Mary Ray, 
Sophia Storrs, 
Sarepta Burr, 
Louisa Hollister, 
Huldah W. Marsh, 
Susan Allyn, 
Julia B. Burbank, 
Paulina Barbour, 
Harriet Barnette, 
William Bigelow, 
Ralph Bliss, 



84 Ann Bolan, 


80 


83 EHza B. Bull, 


82 


80 Charles Benton, 


83 


80 Elizabeth Barker, 


81 


82 Mary Brown, 


80 


89 Mary Berrian, 


87 


80 Annie W. Barckley, 


88 


85 Lyman Boardman, 


81 


89 Charity Burt, 


86 


82 Mary Blackman, 


82 


82 0. N. Beebe, 


80 


80 Mary Brown, 


84 


82 Esther M. Bull, 


85 


John S. Butler, 


80 


Elmira Babcock, 


87 


Julius Catlin, 


85 


Q,^ Lucy S. Church, 
^' Abby Colgrove, 
2o Clarissa Coolidge, 
°? Sheldon H. Calhoun, 
2i Richard Cowan, 
2o Henry K. Carter, 
11 Henry Cronin, 
11 Sarah N. Clark, 
°^ Fannie Carpenter, 
l^ Hannah Champlin, 
°i Elizabeth Cross, 


82 


83 


82 


80 


86 


81 


80 


85 


88 


80 


81 


°l W. H. Cowles, 


80 


°f Margaret Clavess, 


84 


^^ Marinda Champion, 
^* Wm. Cunningham, 


84 


83 


«-' Timothy Cronin, 


80 


Florence McCarthy, 


83 


Ora H. Crane, 


83 


Susan W. Cowles, 


83 


103 Laura Clough, 


80 


.02* Harriet Day, 


88 


98 L W. Dimock, 


83 


95 Rosa Donahue, 


84 


95 John Degenhardt, 


80 


97 Mary Donovan, 


81 


94 Patrick Dillon, 


80 


94 Leonard Daniels, 


82 


90 Jemima Deraing 


86 


94 Prudence L. Ely, 


83 


94 Dennis O'Flaherty, 


84 


94 Joseph McFarland, 


86 


94 Warren Flint, 


82 


93 Mary Foot, 


84 


91 Maud Frazier, 


80 


91 John Finn, 


84 


90 Aurelia Fitch, 


86 


90 Fannie Flower, 


80 


90 Jeanette Goodrich, 


82 


90 Mary Guinan, 


83 


90 Clarissa Gaines, 


81 


90 Emily Goodrich, 


84 


90 Ann C. Guernsey, 


84 


81 Margaret A. Goodwin, 


80 


86 Lydia Gregg, 


88 


80 Mary H. Grant, 


86 


85 Eliza Goodwin, 


85 


81 Louisa Graham, 


84 


80 John McGee, 


85 



NAMES OF YE OLD FOLKS OF CONNECTICUT. 



23 



Emma A. Hall, 


87 


Sarah Mungan, 


83 


Mary E. Simpson, 


Abigail G. Hayden, 


83 


Abby Martinson, 


81 


Catherine Shay. 


Hiram Havens, 


81 


Lizzie Moliraphy, 


84 


Maria L. Savage, 


Lucy Hazeu, 


80 


Ann Merrill, 


81 


Caroline Smith, 


Harriet L. Hoadley, 


81 


Margaret O'Hara, 


80 


Clarissa Smith, 


Rhoda B. Hubbard, 


81 


A. B. Olmstead, 


83 


Margaret Sullivan, 


C. T. Hillyer. 


84 


Mary Phillips, 


87 


Henry Swan, 


Catharine Hillyer, 


83 


Polly Parker, 


88 


Sophronia Saunders, 


Sophie Hills, 


81 


Orville Pierce, 


80 


William Storrs, 


Samuel Hamilton, 


85 


Levi Piatt, 


83 


Rebecca Spinner, 


Harriet Fiollister, 


81 


Deborah Plato, 


83 


Patrick Sullivan, 


Ozias Hills. 


85 


Mary F. Periy, 


81 


Thomas Spinner, 


Clarissa Hills, 


83 


Sarah E. Perkins, 


80 


Eliza F. Sage. 
William W. Turner, 


Eliza Jones, 


84 


Lester Pasco, 


83 


Wm. Isham, 


81 


Emily Preston, 


87 


Maria L. Turner, 


Emily Jerrell, 


83 


John M. Porter, 


85 


Aurelia Talcott, 


Sarah B. Johnson, 


88 


Julia C. Richmond, 


86 


Augusta Thompson, 


Phebe L. Keeley, 


84 


Henry Reardel, 


80 


Giles J. Thompson, 


Alice Keruan, 


80 


Nancy G. Roberts, 


84 


Catherine Toohey, 


Julia Kelley, 


87 


Margaret Rosbraugh, 


84 


Martin Tierney, 


Mary E. Lent, 


86 


Emma S. Robinson. 


83 


Catherine Tierney, 


Caroline Lloyd, 


83 


Geo. W. Root, 


81 


Matilda Treat, 


John Lygett, 
Orville B. Lyman, 


83 


Hannibal Ritter, 


83 


Christiana Thrall, 


80 


Jane Rocks, 


85 


Mary A. Wales, 


Lvdia L. Lord, 


88 


Jane Shelroy, 


80 


David Wright, 


Honora Listy, 


83 


Mary Synnott, 


84 


Mrs. E. C. Whitman, 


Benjamin Lewis, 


80 


Eliza T. Sage, 


85 


John Vogt, 


Sarah Larkin, 


80 


Francis Sugermeyer, 


83 


Sarah White, 


Thomas J. Litchfield, 


83 


John Sullivan, 


80 


Harriet Willman, 


John G. Litchfield, 


81 


Bridget Shay, 


84 


Lucy Wadsworth, 


Wolcott R. Loomis, 


86 


Mary Sheridan, 


83 


Walter Winship 


Harriet Loomis, 


84 


Catharine Cleery, 


80 


Eunice Wilde, 


John R. Lee, 


80 


Edwin Spencer, 


85 


Rebecca L. Winship, 


Mary Moran, 


86 


Calvin E. Stone, 


83 


Polly A. Woodworth, 


Jesse Miner. 


88 


Messina Spencer, 


83 




Mary Muchler. 


80 


Mary Sanderson, 


83 





HISTORY OF TRIPHENIA JACKSON. 

Triplienia Jackson (colored), was born in Hadley, Mass., June 3rd, 1783, fifty-five years 
before a railroad was known in this state, and sixty-one years before the first telegraph. She 
was married to Thomas Jackson at the age of 35, in 1817, and with him resided in New Haven 
several years; then in Springfield Mass., in the family of Doctor Buckingham, brother of the 
late Governor W. A. Buckingham of this State. Thirty-five years ago she removed to Hartford, 
Conn., in which city she has since dwelt, in the family of a niece, to whose care and devotion 
her present physical condition is largely due Mr. Jackson, her husband, a very old man, 
died thirty years ago. The couple had no children. The aged woman passes much of her 
time in bed, but is able to walk about the house with the aid of a staff. She sees without 
glasses, answers intelligently most questions put to her, but her memory is weak, and she 
cannot trace the events of her long life with anything like correctness. When dates are re- 
quired she turns to the niece, who is able to supply all needed data. It is, however evident, 
from her wrinkled hands and face, her sunken cheeks and piping voice, that she represents 
even a longer period of time than that with which she is credited. The apartment she occu- 
pies is a model of neatness, owing in part, to her own care, and despite her great age and in- 
firmities she is cheerful and seems to enjoy herself. The heat of summer had a depressing 
influence, but the cooler air of autumn has restored her to her wonted strength and vigor. She 
seldom ventures to the street, and then but for a short period, returning to her home satisfied 
that there Is her only earthly rest and satisfaction. A striking feature in her appearance is a head 
of hair almost complete, and white as the driven snow. Her eye is undimmed, and the tones 
of her voice indicate a vitality adequate to carry her through another season and to another 
birthday. 

A CENTENARIAN. 

William Hamilton was born in Ireland during the month of May, 1783, of humble par- 
ents, receiving a limited education. At the age of twenty years he came to this country, 
and after turning his mind to various occupations, concluded to try farming. He went to 



24 



NAMES OF YE OLD FOLKS OF CONNECTICUT. 



Hartford, Conn., 75 years ago, and bought a tract of land, occupying it until his death, which 
took place on July 26th, 1884. He was a steady, honest man, attending strictly to his own 
affairs, and was respected by all who knew him. He was eccentric in some of his ways, and 
for nearly eigthty years had been an inveterate smoker. His house was on Zion street, and 
his neighbors delighted to be in his society, that they might listen to the quaint stories he was 
inclined to tell of himself and the people he was acquinted with so long ago. His end was 
peaceful and he retained nearly all his faculties to the last. 



HARTLAND. 

Population, 643. 

Sarah Gates, 92 

Lucy Bushnell, 84 

James Banning, 83 

William Cables, 84 

Mary Emmons. 81 

Henry Mattock, 86 

Orpha Osborne, 86 

Marilla Stillman, 80 

Virgil Stebbens, 81 

Lydia Tififany, 81 

HARWINTON. 

Population, 1,216. 
Mrs. Belinda Bartholomew, 98 

Enos Frisbie, 93 

Lewis Foote, 92 

Dan Catlin, 92 

Erastus Baldwin, 90 

Mrs. Polly Baldwin, 87 

Mrs. Lucy Birge, 86 

Mrs. Harriet Scott, 85 

Truman Goodwin, 85 

Thomas Mather, 84 

Harlow Curtiss, 83 

Levi C. Frisbie, 82 

Mrs. Celeste Leonard, 82 

Mrs. Jesse Hotchkiss, 80 

Mrs. Olive Catlin, 82 

Mrs. Chloe Clark, 81 

Mrs. Amanda Harrison, 81 

Mrs. Lois Gridley, 80 

Roswell Cook, 80 

Miss Cynthia Alfred, 80 

Joseph Scovill, 80 

Hiram Miner, 80 

Mrs. Lucy Perkins, 81 

Mrs. Anna M. Phelps, 81 

Mrs. Sheldon Pond, 80 

Mrs. Asa Crow, 85 

HEBRON. 

Population, 1,443. 

Mrs. Hannah Turner, 94 

Mrs. Mary Johnson, 93 

Mrs. Sybil Gellette, 93 

Mrs. David Hall, 91 

Miss Sarah Brown, 91 

Mrs Almira Elliott, 90 

Mrs. Betsey Lockwood, 90 

Miss S. Brown, 88 

Miss Dolly Freeman, 88 

Mrs. Martha Hall, 88 



Mrs. Cynthia M. Root, 
Mrs. Philo Brown, 
Mrs. Fannie C. Hewett, 
Mrs. Laura Brown, 
Mrs. Matilda Post, 
Mrs. Elizabeth Goodno, 
Deacon -Jasper Porter, 
Capt. William Hutchinson, 
Stephen B. Fuller, 
Solomon Norton, 
Col. Harvey Brown, 
Milano German, 
Seth Wheeler, 

HUNTINGTON. 

Population, 2,699. 
Laura Bradley, 
Silas Hurd, 
Polly Hubbell, 
Mehitable Rich, 
Sarah Wheeler, 
Hezekiali Hubbell, 
Ambrose Hyde, 
Betsey Lewis, 
Moses Wheeler, 
James Beard, 
Nancy Beard, 
Sheldon L. Bronson, 
Alma Bronson, 
Eliza Blackman, 
David Beecher, 
Daniel Benedict, 
John Drew, 
Fannie Perry, 
Andrew Tuttle, 
Booth Lewis, 

KENT. 

Population, 1,922. 
Mrs. .John Newton, 
Eber S. Peters, 
Hiram Merrell, 
Mrs. Hiram Merrell, 
Hiram Stone, 
Miss Mary Beach, 
Miss Nancy Beach, 

KILLINGLY. 



Population, 6 
Mrs. B. Stedman, 
Henry Sparks, 
Mrs. L. Williams. 
Sukey Burlingame, 
Mrs. Bower, 



721. 



81 



Coe, 90 

Mrs. E. Thompson, 88 

W. W. Wright, 81 

Delight Wright, 81 

Sallie Davis, 81 

Mattersou Hopkins, 83 

Erastus Short, 83 

Eliza Bacon, 83 

I. L. Hutchins, 88 

Mrs. Coe, 87 

Mrs. William Sprague, 86 
Mrs. Thomas Chesborough, 81 

J. K. Holbrook, 80 

Mrs. Hosea Martin, 84 

Lowell Graves, 81 

Charles Preston, 82 

Abigail Wheaton, 84 

Willis Graves, 83 

Mrs. Kelly, 81 

Mrs. Sterry Bennett, 83 

Horace Boroughs, 80 

Mrs. Horace Boroughs, 81 

Franklin Clark, 80 

Mrs. E. Kingsbury, 82 

Mrs. Daniel Arnold, 83 

Mrs. Brown, 81 

]\Irs. Huntington, 83 

Sylvester Mclntyre, 82 

Mrs. .John Matthews, 81 

Barnice Carter, 84 

Cromwell Chace, 83 

David Mason, 81 

Mrs. Wetherell, 87 

N. Wiles 84 

Mrs. N. Wiles, 83 

Mrs. S. Stearnes, 82 

Mrs. .John Morse, 84 

Mrs. Allen, 83 

Mrs. Hammet, 87 

Mrs. Sarah Thompson, 82 

Phebe A. Cranston, 84 

Leonard Day, 83 

Varnum Simmons, 83 

-James Darling, 83 

Samuel R. Bushnell, 84 

KILLINGWORTH. 

Population, 848. 

-Jemima Burr, 92 

Sally Nettleton, 93 

Anna Griswold, 90 

Michael A. Nettleton, 80 

Rufus Redfield, 83 

Philander 8tevens, 84 

Samuel Way, 83 

Leverett Blake 81 



NAMES OF YE OLD FOLKS OP CONNECTICUT. 



25 



(lives in Guilford.) 




Dan. T. Gager, 


88 


Rufus Crane, 


83 


Zerviah McCall, 


82 


Sabra Everts, 


80 


Jabez McCall, 


81 


Maria Franklin, 


84 


Charles H. Thomas, 


83 






Lucy WiUiams, 


82 


LEBANON. 




Olive Westcott, 


83 






Mary Whitford, 


88 


Population, 1,345. 




Justin Clark, 


81 


Miss Eunice Saxton, 


100 


Lester Ford, 


85 


Wealthy A. Abell, 


91 


Betsey G. Potter, 


80 


Joseph King, 


90 


William S. Peckham, 


81 


Catherine Perry, 


90 


Prudence Taylor, 


85 


Mary Perry, 


90 


Bertha Wattles, 


84 


Jeremiah Mason, 


90 


Miller Austin, 


85 


Abby Fitch, 


83 


Samuel W. Burke, 


82 


Eliza Gager, 


82 


]\rary Wells. 


84 


Catherine Gager, 


82 


Anson Fowler, 


80 



Lester B. Babcock, 


80 


Harriet Wright, 


81 


David S. Woodworth, 


80 


Sally Harvey, 
George H. Lathrop, 


88 


84 


Joseph Potter, 


84 


D. L. Sherman, 


88 


Anna P. Sherman, 


80 


Benajah Barker, 


88 


Samuel W. Barker, 


80 


John Beaumont, 


86 


Abigail Beaumont, 
Lydia Gardner, 


82 


86 


Eliza Peckham, 


81 


Abby Smith, 


88 


Jeremiah Wilcox, 


84 



HISTORY OF MISS EUNICE SAXTON. 



Miss Eunice, Saxton was born in Colchester (Westchester Society;, Conn., September 6th, 
1784. She was the daughter of James and Deborah Saxton, and resided in their homestead 
84 years. In 1868 she removed to Willimantic, and in the family of Mr. and Mrs. William 
Saxton, her grandnephew and niece, and dwelt fifteen years. During the past year she has 
been with them in their new home at Lebanon. It is a remarkable fact that at all times 
through the 99 years of her life she has never been sick enough to require a physician. Her 
bodily health remains good, and this is doubtless maintained by the strength of a good 
appetite, the outgrowth of a fine constitution. Her senses of sight and hearing have failed 
perceptibly of lale, and she is less inclined to walk now than formerly. Walking induced 
weariness uiuch more readily since she passed her 98th year. Miss Saxton has traveled but 
little in her long life. Home has been the place of her enjoyment, and so long as that was- 
pleasant and all its surroundings in keeping with her feelings and thoughts she was satisfied, 
never having curiosity to any great extent to discover what we call important, going on out- 
side. In 1812, when she was in her 33d year, she consented to join a party to visit New 
London, and it was her good fortune, though she knew not of its significance at the time, to 
be within the walls of Fort Trumbull when the news of a declaration of peace with Great 
Britain was oflicially announced to the soldiers on duty. She saw the British soldiers gaily 
bedecked in red, and saw without fully understanding it, their maneuvres and, with Ameri- 
cans of that daj^ was impressed with their absurdity. In company with friends she crossed 
the Sound in a sloop to Sag Harbor for a visit and returned in the same way. These journeys- 
embraced all her outward movements in the line of travel. Her eye never fell upon a steam- 
boat, and from Andover to Willimantic by rail, less than ten years ago, is the only instance 
that she ever saw a train drawn by a locomotive. Thus her life has been an uneventful one. 
Her parents were humble farmers, 

"Content the stubborn glebe to break," 

passing their days in the work of procuring the necessaries of life and leaving an inheritance 
for their children. They grew flax and raised sheep, and the centenarian as a girl was taught 
the use of the distaff and spinning wheel. She wove by hand loom, a contrivance which, 
compared with the elegant and swiftly moving appliances for doing the same thing by power 
now, is very rude and uncouth. Like most strong aged persons, she has peculiarities, but 
they are trifling and present nothing which is offensive. With her, sight began to fail at the 
age of 70, but it was succeeded by second sight, and at 80 she could see as well as ever and 
without the aid of glasses. Mrs. Julia A. Cummings, her great-niece, has a pair of pillow- 
slips made by the aged lady when she was in her 70th year, at which period she could sew 
unaided by specs. At this time she takes an interest in everything going on about her, but 
she dwells in memory, and the past, or the recollection of it, is all that there is real for her. 
Events of to-day, which are important to younger ones about her, have no special interest, but 
those of the long ago she can speak of and tell long stories about them which have fascination 
both for narrator and listener. Her life, as she speaks of it, has been as a dream. It has had 
its clouds, but the twilight of its evening outlines no regrets, but rather the joyful hope of 
what is in store for her beyond the river. 



26 



NAMES OF YE OLD FOLKS OF CONNECTICUT. 



LEDYARD. 

Population, 1,073. 

Mrs. Betsey Stoddard, 97 

John Mej^ers, 95 

Mrs. Laura Geer, 91 

Giles Bailey, 91 

Samuel Allyu, 86 

Isaac Hewitt, 85 

Mrs. Caroline Hewitt, 83 

Mrs. Harriet Allyn, 85 

Robert Wilcox, 81 

Miss Nancy Etliridge, 82 

Georo:e Ayer, 81 

Asa Gray, 80 

Miss Harriet Gallup, 83 

Mrs. Freelove Turner, 84 

Mrs. Anna Prosser, 83 

Allen Turner. 81 

LISBON. 

Population, 630. 

Simeon Lathrop, 91 

Mrs. Abby Smith, 91 

Ebenezer Lyon, 84 

Thomas G. Read, 80 

William C. Abel, 81 

Gardner Leffingwell, 82 

Andrew Leffingwell, 80 

Mrs. J. W. Houghton, 83 

Mrs. L. Johnson, 81 

Solomon Gardner, 80 

LITCHFIELD. 

Population, 3,410. 

Mrs. Theron Beach, 96 

Mrs. Asinath Griswold, 96 

George Gorham, 94 

John^Griswold, 93 

William Graham, 93 

Tomlinson Wells, 92 

Norman Kilborn, 96 

Rhoda Moore, 91 

Rachel Webster, 90 

Mrs. Noah Gurnsey, 90 

Mrs. George Gool^ 81 

Mrs. Harlev Morse, 82 

Frederick Gibbs, 81 

Benjamin McCall, 80 

Mrs. Lucinda Perkins, 80 

Harriet Blakeslee, 84 

Johanna Hannon, 84 

Julia Little, 82 

Mrs. Horan Baldwin, 82 

Mrs. Hannah Hinsdale, 87 

Mrs. Mary Bishop, 87 

Captain Charles Jones, 86 

Stephen Trowbridge, 86 

Mrs. Caroline Parmelee, 81 

Ethan Kilburn, 81 

Myron Osborne, 87 

Mrs. Emeline Osborne, 83 

Mrs. Melissa Hopkins, 82 

Mrs. Louisa Phelps, 81 



Miss Polly Marsh. 80 

Orman Stone, 83 

Mrs. Harriett Hallock, 80 

Joseph Bronson, 80 

Jonathan Caldwell, 80 

Malissa Hopkins, 82 

Elizabeth Lounsbury, 87 

Anna Wooster, 80 

Sylvesta Spencer, 85 

Ithamer Page, 80 

Milo Beach, 81 

Abial Barbour, 84 

L. O. Meafoy, 80 

Mrs. Lucy Peters, 86 

Samuel H. Dudley, 80 

Amos Bissell, 84 

Mrs. Sidna Taylor, 82 

Charles Ferris, 80 

Miss Sally Bissell, 81 

Miss Lucretia Dunning, 80 

Anson B. Beach, 80 

Mrs. Bridget Lavin, 85 

Lucretia Buell, 80 

Anna Gurnsey, 84 

Ann Kinlock, 88 

Clorinda Mills, 87 

Elihu Webster, 84 

LYME. 

Population, 1,0^5. 

Sarah Beck with, 92 

James Lester, 93 

Betsy Shalor, 90 

Huldah W. Gates, 80 

Stephen Loper, 83 

Rachel Loper, 83 

Elizabeth Peck, 84 

Betsy Russell, 83 

Lucinda Sisson, 84 

Mary Wilcox, 87 

Ann E. Wood, 81 

John Brockway, 83 

Charles H. Brockway, 82 

Simeon Brockway, 82 

Samuel Daniels, 85 

Horan Ely, 81 

Marinda Ely, 86 

Fanny Lasker, 85 

Lucy Lord, 82 

Clam Miner, 82 

Francis Tiffany, 84 

Elizabeth Warner, 83 

MADISON. 

Population, 1,669. 

Mrs Eliz. H. Scranton, 93 

Mrs. Weld, 92 

Mrs. Amand Scranton, 85 

Mrs. Chloe M. Bishop, 83 

Mrs. Fred. M. Scranton, 84 

Mrs. Jerusha Stevens, 85 

Mrs. Mary Weeks, 87 

Mrs. Abner B. Stevens, 82 



Mrs. Edward T. Kelsey, 81 

Mrs. Laura Bassett, 81 

Mrs. Calista Tibbals, 80 
Mrs. Dwg't F. Richmond, 82 

Mrs. Jessie Tooley, 81 

Mrs. Alpha Dowd, 82 

Mrs. Alva O. Wilcox, 80 

Mrs. Levi Bishop, 82 

Miss Sophia Hand, 86 
Mrs. Jonathan E. Norton, 81 
Miss Evelyn S. Scranton, 86 

Frederick S. Whedon, 87 

Lemuel Dowd, 85 

Alva O. Wilcox, 84 

Julius N. Dowd, 84 

Amasa J. Dowd, 83 

Daniel Hill, 83 

Charles M. Miner, 82 

Levi Bishop, 82 

Frederick W. Scranton, 82 

Rufus Crane, 83 

Jonathan T. Lee, 81 

Daniel R. Meigs, 80 

H. Felson Hill, 80 

Leander Griswold, 80 

Horatio Hand, 81 

Robert Mallum, 80 

John Scranton, 80 

Russell Tooley, 80 

John H. Bassett, 81 

MANCHESTER. 

Population, 2,154. 

George Bunce, 95 

Robert Bacon, ' 94 

Ellen Fahey, 94 

Mary Keeuey, 91 

Deborah Spi'llaine, 90 

Mrs. Samuel Baker, 84 

Mary Cheney, 83 

John Cheeney, 88 

Daniel Griswold, 85 

Michael Calhoun, 80 

Ruby Freeman, 82 

Lori'n Gardner, 86 

Adaline Hawes, 80 

Abel Lewis, 80 

Marshal Weir,* 85 

George Cotter, 84 

Timothy Beeming, 83 

Lucius Parks, 80 

Mary J. Joyner, 84 

Horace Keeney, 88 

Ann Rich, 81 

Ellen Sullivan, 84 

William Taylor, 86 

Eliza Atwood, 82 

Hannah Burk, 84 

Gurdon Childs, 80 

Electa Chapman, 85 

Michael Connolly, 84 

Tuzah Dart, 84 

John Harrison, 86 

Horace White, 83 



NAMES OF YE OLD FOLKS OF CONNECTICUT. 



R. L. Griswold, 


80 


Joseph Gleason, 


81 


Nathaniel Keeney, 


80 


*Lives in Ghistonbury. 




MANSFIELD. 




Population, 2,154. 




John Pollard, 


93 


Hannah Turner, 


93 


Joshua Barrows, 


91 


Harriet Welch, 


91 


Earl Pierce, 


86 


Charles Grain, 


84 


Phedia Grain, 


81 


George B. Armstrong, 


83 


Jared Wentworth, 


81 


Mrs. Welch, 


82 


Lucia Perkins, 


82 


Henry Whitford, 


81 


Mrs. Bowers, 


82 


Mrs. Evans Parish, 


82 


Eunice Barrows, 


80 


Henry Brown, 


86 


Mrs. Mary Parker, 


86 


Buckley Miuot, 


84 


Job Eddy, 


83 


Mrs. Job Eddy, 


81 


Hiram Parker, 


82 


Harlone Fowler, 


81 


Orson Strong, 


81 


Hannah Parker, 


80 


Elijah Shumway, 


81 


Nathan Southwick, 


86 


Martha Rember, 


86 


Deborah Barroner, 


85 


White. 


85 


Mrs. Coffin, 


85 


Mrs. John Snow, 


84 


Elizabeth Pierce, 


84 


Shepard Stearns, 


83 


Paul Rathburn, 


82 


William C. Spunny, 


81 


Polly Swift, 


80 


Philip Roberts, 


80 


William Reid, 


80 


Thomas S. Cummings, 


80 


Martha Crain, 


80 


Joshua Dean, 


84 


David White, 


84 


Martha Reid, 


85 


Elisha Mowrey, 


81 


Abigail Surley, 


82 


Rebecca Newcomb, 


81 


Peace, 


82 


Simeon Cummings, 


82 


Wales Presbrey, 


84 


MARLBORO. 




Population, 391. 




Charles Carter, 


95 


^ David Kellogg, 


80 


Orrin Dickinson, 


81 


Lois Lord, 


80 



MERIDEN. 

Population, 18,340. 

Mrs. Mehitable Curtis, 
Mrs. Maria Peret, 
Calvin Coe, 
Mrs. Lottie L. Kalner, 
Mrs. Hannah Hathaway, 
Mrs. Anne McNuce, 
Mrs. Rebecca Schus, 
Gottlieb Lunge, 
Mrs. Agnes Stannis, 
Mrs. Julia Frazier, 
Mrs. Cynthia Dickerman, 
Mrs. Mary Lovelaud, 
Mrs Phebe Upson, 
Amos Aubran, 
Mrs. Susan Aubran, 
Mrs. Bridget McMahan, 
Mrs. Mary O'Brien, 
Mrs. Marv Robstock, 
John Sutliff, 
Mrs. Hannah Foster, 
Mrs. Margaret P. Hall, 
Peter Hanson, 
Mrs. Martha Stebbens, 
Mrs. Abigail Beckley, 
Mrs. Lucy Faster, 
Mrs. Bridget Roach, 
Mrs. Caroline A. Betts, 
Joshua Coit, 
Henry Farnam, 
George W. Hicks. 
Lester P. Parker, 
Mrs. Maria Smith, 
Mrs. Harriet B. Skinner, 
Mrs. Maria Sheffield, 
Mrs. Harriet Coe, 
Peter Cloude, 
Martin Miller, 
Mrs. Wealthy Park, 
James Williams, 
Mrs. Anna E. Yeomans, 
Aman Andrews, 
Peleg Crocker. 
Patrick Darah, 
Justus Whitehead, 
Charles B. Wright, 
Lorenzo Bidwell, 
.Toseph Fanyon, 
Mrs. Bridget Lacy, 
Alance Sclimit, 
Mrs. Marian Schmit, 
Norman Wittwill, 
Israel Camp, 
Mrs. Sarah Corner, 
Mrs. Joanna Hogarne, 
Luther Webb, 
Theron Scott, 
Thomas Warnock, 
Mrs. Cynthia Bailey, 
Mrs. Ellen Bulkley, 
Mrs. Jeanette C. Case, 
Natalie Clemens, 



Mrs. Hannah Conant, 

Patrick Daly, 

Bradford B. Ellsbree, 
94 Mrs. Catherine Flack, 
90 Mrs. Malinda G. Hines, 
90 John Lane, 

90 Mrs. Mary Lane, 

91 Electa Reynolds, 

92 Mrs. Malinda Adkins, 

91 Mrs. Margaret Beach, 

92 Mrs. Louisa Churet, 

92 William Churet, 

93 James Daily, 

93 Mrs. Mary Daily, 
96 Mrs. Jerusha Hine, 
91 Mrs. Melissa Hull, 
86 William H. Jones, 

81 George Root, 

80 Mrs. Emeline Stocking, 
83 Mrs. Susan Smith, 

82 Mrs. Sally Tuttle, 

81 

81 MIDDLEBURY. 

80 Population, 687, 

g- Mrs. Elihu Baldwin, 
^^ Mrs. Alvin Hine, 
oi Mrs. William Curtiss, 



85 



84 



-Woodruff, 



°' Mrs. Woodruff, 

cjo Medad Spencer, 

on Mrs. Medad Spencer, 

^^ Edwin Porter, 

gj Mrs. Edwin Porter, 

gQ Charles Boughton, 

g^ Calvin Camp, 

°^ John E. Bradley, 

OA Harry Johnson, 

80 

80 MIDDLEFIELD. 

81 Population, 928. 
86 Mrs. Almon Miller, 

86 Mrs. William Rockwell, 

80 Mrs. Dennis Coe, 

83 Miss Almira Ward, 

84 Mrs. Heziah Cook, 
88 Mrs. Margaret Steed, 

85 Mrs. Benjanin Miller, 
83 Colonel Amos ]Miller, 



MIDDLETOWN. 



82 Population, 11,731. 

86 Timothy Cronin,* 
80 John Miller, 

82 Catherine Manser, 

84 Hannah P. Bent, 

87 Esther Sumner, 

80 Mary VanDusen, 

88 Deborah Johnson, 

81 Phebe Savage, 

82 Leonard Pryor, 

81 Sarah L. Whittlesey, 

83 Nancy A. Russell, 



91 



28 



NAMES OF YE OLD FOLKS OF CONNECTICUT. 



William Southmayd, 


91 


Ellen Brennan, 


83 


Ebbie Smith, 


8» 


Mary Campbell, 


90 


F. W. Coit, 


80 


Mrs. M. Welch, 


86 


Enoch Wilcox, 


90 


Harry Freeman, 


84 


Mrs. Jerusha Baldwin, 


87 


Caroline Nichols, 


90 


Seth S. Hall, 


81 


Mrs. Mary Baldwin, 


86 


Almira G. Elwell, 


90 


Sarah Hale, 


80 


Mrs. Marg't A. Beardsley, 


82 


Parnell Tryon, 


90 


Patrick Murray, 


80 


Roger A. Beard, 


83 


Joseph Barrett, 


90 


Harriet Seabor, 


84 


Grace Baldwin, 


83 


Joseph Lathrop, 


90 


Ann Williams, 


80 


Abel Clark, 


89' 


Selah Goodrich, 


90 


Jesse G. Balden, 


80 


Roger Clark, 


83 


Sarach P. Nevils, 


90 


Jane Hubbard, 


86 


Mrs. Anna Clark, 


83 


Hepziah Wilcox, 


90 


Hannah Priest, 


86 


Mrs. Anna Durand, 


86 


Phebe Daniels, 


90 


John S. Smith, 


86 


Samuel Davidson, 


85 


Alfred Hubbard, 


80 


Eunice Smith, 


83 


Mrs. Mary A. Ford, 


83 


Julia Lucas, 


84 


Samuel Stearns, 


83 


Mrs. ]\Iary Fowler, 


87 


Justus Loveland, 


83 


Lucy F. Woodman, 


87 


Augustus Kelsey, 


81 


Thomas L. Lincoln, 


84 


Katherine Ahern, 


86 


Alfred Mallett, 


83. 


Thomas Pedden, 


83 


Cornelius Cronin, 


83 


Mrs. Diana T. Mallett, 


8a 


Betsey Burr, 


80 


Delia Clark, 


83 


Mrs. Abigail J. Mallett, 


83. 


Augusta C. Clark, 
Gilbert Curtiss, 


83 


Louisa Fuller, 


83 


Mrs. Martha Nettleton, 


84 


88 


Jane Hamilton, 


83 


Mrs. Abigail M. Parish, 


83 


Julia Deasy, 


83 


Salmon Knapp, 


83 


Prince, 


83 


Margaret Gibbons, 


81 


Ilezekiah Merwin, 


80 


Mrs. Cornetia B. Peck, 


84 


Horace Johnson, 


84 


Eliza Merwin, 


80 


Mrs. Mary Ann Peck, 


86 


Johathan Kilbourn, 


82 


Bertha E. Parmlee, 


82 


Charles Smith, 


83 


Sophia Kilburn, 


84 


Sarah Roberts, 


88 


Mrs. Louisa Smith, 


83 


Simeon Spencer, 


85 


Elizabeth Sturtevant, 


88 


Alvin Smith, 


83 


Chester Shepard, 


80 


Catherine Condieu, 


82 


Mrs. Adeline Smith, 


80 


Elizabeth Woodward, 


86 


Mary Flynn, 


84 


L. M. Smith, 


84 


Sarah Bacon, 


83 


Ellen Cornell, 


84 


Augustus Kelsev, 


81 


Betsey Crofut, 


81 


Johanna Donovan, 


82 


- 




Norman Crittenden, 


85 


Daniel Glover, 


84 


MONROE. 




Mrs. B. Edwards, 


80 


Cornelia Hilliard, 


84 


Population, 1,157. 




Olivia Fenn, 


80 


3Iehitable Hall, 


83 


Mrs. Henry Lewis, 


98 


Ada Gilbert, 


82 


Sidney Miller, 


81 


James French, 


95 


Fanny Hubbard, 


82 


Spencer Rice, 


87 


Mrs. William Beach, 


91 


Thomas Lahae, 


82 


Phebe Thorn, 


87 


James French, 


96 


Harriet McKinster, 


83 


Ann Wbalen, 


84 


Mrs. Sarah B. Beardsley, 


90 


Abner Nettleton, 


82 


Elizabeth Baker, 


88 


Mrs. James French, 


88 


Hannah Nettleton, 


80 


Lucy Farell, 


80 


Banjamin Hall, 


83 


Mrs. F. W. Steuben, 


83 


Dothan Johnson, 


85 


Miss Herminia Curtis, 


83 


Julia Bunnell, 


80 


Susan Smith, 


86 


Mrs. Lyman Sears, 
Mrs. Marcus McEwen, 


80 


Agnes Cairnes, 


87 






80 


Ellen Cromwell, 


84 


MILFORD. 




Mrs. Horace Shelton, 


80 


Ruth Fisk, 


88 


Population, 3,347. 




Charles B. Clark, 


83 


Henry Hamilton, 


85 


Mrs. Abigail Plumb, 


95 


Mrs. Samuel B. Beardsley, 88 


William Knowles, 


88 


Mrs. Polly Ford, 


96 


Mrs. David Tomlinson, 


80 


Harriet Lucas, 


81 


Mrs. Thomas Burwell, 


94 


Charles Lane, 


87 


Sybil Smith, 


83 


Mrs. Sarah Burwell," 


95 


Isaac Burr, 


85 


Sarah Smith, 


87 


Stephen Merwin, 


93 


Julia A. Nichols, 


80 


Emily Tracy, 


80 


Mrs. Nancy Piatt, 


93 


William Penfield, 


80 


Chloe Tucker, 


84 


Aaron Somers, 


91 


Mrs. Eunice Peet, 


82 


Mary H. Stillman, 


80 


Mrs. Jane G. Bryan, 


83 


Mrs. Hannah Porter, 


88 


Enoch C. Young, 


80 


Mrs. Julia Bradley, 
Hubbard P. Botsford, 


84 


Rachel Turney, 


84 


Elisha Hurlburt, 


80 


83 


Cynthia Wheeler, 


89 


Edward Johnson, 


83 


Clement Curtis, 


85 


Mrs. Charity AVarner, 
Mrs. Sabra Wheeler, 


83 


Mary B. Miller, 


84 


Ashael A. Clark, 


86 


81 


Melita Merritt, 


85 


Mrs. Sarah Clark, 


81 


Charles Bennett, 


83 


Elizabeth Paddock, 


80 


Mrs. Eli N. Clark, 


80 


Abijah Beardsley, 


86 


Joseph Roberts, 


80 


Orpha Gregory, 


84 


W. A. Clark, 


80 


Esther Sears, 


81 


Samuel C. Merwin, 


83 


Abijah Durand, 


80 


Charles Pryor, 


82 


Mrs. Emeline Northrop, 


86 


David Dayton, 


87 


John Dunn, 


83 


Mrs. Hetty Peck, 


84 


Mrs. Melissa French, 


87, 


Mary O'Keefe, 


83 


Adam Pond, 


82 


Miss Betsey E. Gray, 
Beebe M. Gray, 


81* 


William Walen, 


80 


Mrs. Sybil Piatt, 


84 


88 



NAMES OF YE OLD FOLKS OF CONNECTICUT. 



29 



Jolin Hall, 
Mrs. Betsey Lane, 
Mrs. Nancy Lane, 
Mrs. Comfort Lewis, 
Mrs. Julia Lewis, 
Mrs. Sally Blackman, 
Mrs. Theresa Curtis, 

MONTVILLE. 

Population, 2,666. 
Marvin Smith, 
Mrs. Sybil Smith, 
Alfred Holies, 
Alviu G. Smith, 
Mrs. Nancy Smith, 
Lyman Smith, 



83 John C. Maples, 

80 Mrs. John C. Maples, 
87 George Dolbeare, 

87 Thomas J. Church, 

81 Mrs. Sally Bolles, 
80 Mrs. Sally Church, 

85 Miss Mary Thorpe, 
Miss Eleonore Rogers, 
William G. Johnson, 
Mrs. Annie O. Baker, 

00 Mulford C. Raymond, 
87 Mrs. Ann Thompson, 
90 Miss Florimel Fox, 

84 William Thompson, 
84 Jonathan T. Gay, 

86 Lyman Rogers, 



86 Mrs. Swayne, 83 

82 Mrs. Hannah Rounds, 85 

82 Joshua Dayton, 83 

83 William Frink, 80 
80 Robert Fargo, 86 

80 Mrs. Robert Fargo, 81 

84 Mrs. Eliza Manwaring, 83 

82 Mrs. Beckwith, 80 

84 Mrs. Mary A. Chappell, 84 

81 Mrs. Sarah R. Vincent, 83 
84 Mrs. Sybil Tew, 87 
81 Mrs. Harriet Palmer, 86 

81 Mrs. Sarah A. Parker, 80 

82 Mrs. — Gardner, 83 



HISTORY OF MR. MARVIN SMITH. 

Marvin Smith was born November 18th, 1784, in the town of Moutville, New London 
■county, and has always resided there. For nearly one hundred years he has dwelt within two 
miles of his birth-place. He has been twice married. His first wife, Anna Newton, who 
was the mother of his children, was born in 1784 and died in 1844. Mr. Smith married his 
present wife, Sybil Morgan, in 1845. She was born in 1796, and will be 88 years old Novem- 
ber 1st, 1884. "The first marriage took place in 1812, just before the war, and three children 
— two daughters and one son — were borne to them. Mr. Smith has never been farther from 
home than Long Island save once, when he visited New York city with his brother about the 
year 1803, proceeding there in a little sloop which his brother owned. This brother was 
several years younger than himself, and is now livmg. Mr. Smith's father died in 1852, 
leaving six children, the centenarian being the eldest. Two brothers, now living in Mont- 
ville, are aged respectively 84 and 86. Mr. Smith's residence stands on the west bank of the 
Thames river, opposite Allyn's Point. The old house in which he was born stood also near 
the river, about two miles above his present residence. His whole life has been spent along 
this river. In his younger days Mr. Smith was a ship-carpenter; sometimes employed at the 
yards in New London, at other times in Norwich, and at various points along the riVer. His 
residence is about half way between Norwich and New London. He has held the title to about 
sixty acres of land since 1819, soon after that date erecting thereon his present dwelling. The 
buildings on his place and all the surroundings show thrift and neatness. The grounds 
adjoining, sold by him, are of considerable notoriety at this time, being owned by the Kit- 
temaug Association. On these grounds the association have erected buildings for social and 
convivial entertainments. It is a beautiful spot, having a grove of rare beauty surrounding 
it, and lying on an elevation which slopes towards the river and extends to its banks. 

Mr. Smith has led a very quiet life, attending closely to his personal affairs, never hold- 
ing any town ottice, although fully quahfied, being a man of fair education for his day and 
possessiog remarkably good judgment on matters in which he was concerned. He never 
sought office of any kind, but was regular at the polls, and has voted in every Presidential 
election, since he was made an elector, except the last, in 1880. His first vote for President 
was cast in 1808. 

There has never been a highway near his house— none nearer than about two miles. The 
Thames has been his only highway, and his traveling has been usually over the water in his 
skiff or row-boat. 

Mr. Smith remembers well the war of 1812. He was then called into service and 
stationed at New London. He now receives a pension as a soldier of that war. He very 
distinctly remembers about the f I'igates United States and Macedonia and"sloop-of-war Hornet 
lying nearly opposite where he lived, the river having been blockaded by the English vessels 
at the mouth of New London harbor. He can now clearly recite the incidents of that time 
as the ships lay at anchor, and remembers taking out to the ships milk, oysters and other 
articles needed on board. He often mentions the incident of the first steamboat, the Fulton, 
which steamed up the Thames, and contrasts the shape, style and propelling machinery of 
that day with those of the present. He says the people along the shore were greatly sur- 
prised at seeing a steam vessel, and rushed out of their houses to gaze in wonder as it moved 
slowly yet gracefully past. In the month of July, 1817, Mr. Smith says, the same steamer 
Fulton passed up the river with flags flying and music playing in honor of James Madison, 
then President of the United States, who was on board. The President was on a tour through 
the Northern States. 



30 



NAMES OF YE OLD FOLKS OF CONNECTICUT. 



The house in which Mr. Smith was born stood about one-half mile from the wigwam in 
which Uncas, the Mohegan chief, lived a little more than one hundred years before, and 
within two miles of the Old Indian Fort where Uncas was relieved by Thomas Leffingwell, 
of Saybrook, when besieged by the Narragansetts. 

Time has made changes in the neighborhood. A railroad now passes along the shore 
and through Mr. Smith's fields, a few rods from his front door, (the houses along the river 
all front towards the water, there being no highway in the vicinity,) and the iron horse 
thunders along the track with almost lightning speed. The Thames now bears upon its 
bosom stately steamers; the telegraph tlashes the news from the ends of the earth; the tele- 
phone is performing its wonderful mission; and all have sprung into existence since the 
youthful days of the centenarian. 

Mr. Smith has led an unostentatious life, and is greatly respected by his neighbors and 
townsmen. Through nearlj' five-score years he has been known for his honesty of purpose, 
strict integrity and exemplary Christian character. About the year 1804 he iinited with the 
Methodist Church, and was one of the first to organize a church society at Uncasville, where 
he has since been a faithful and efficient member, and even now forgets not to respond when 
the opportunity is presented. Mr. Smith gave liberally of his means to the first church and 
aided materially in the building of the parsonage, contributing also every year to the support 
of the ministry. He, with three Christian women, defrayed the cost of a parsonage at 
Uncasville. The first church was erected there, and many pleasing incidents of Mr. Smith's 
life are associated Avith it. 



MORRIS. 




Mrs. Asnath Wilmot, 


96 


Curtis C. Camp, 


80 


Population, 627. 
David Benton, 




Mrs. Clara Beecher, 


81 


Johanna Coughlin, 


83 


84 


Mrs. Electa Bigelow, 


85 


Emily Curtis, 


84 


Mrs. Sarah Bristol, 


81 


Dorothy P. Francis, 


81 


Mrs. Amy H. Benton, 
Mrs. Rhoda S. Cowles, 
Hepzibah Curtiss, 
Samuel M. Ensign, 
Mrs. Sally A. Griswold, 


80 

82 
81 
80 
85 


Mrs. 3Iary Dunn, 
Mrs. Sarah Hine, 
Mrs. Nancy Hoadley, 

NEW BRITAIN. 


81 

82 
82 


Harriet Hendricks, 
George Hart, 
Mrs. Chester Hart, 
Mary Hamlin, 
Septina Haslan, 


83 
83 
83 
81 
84 


Ramsley Hull, 
Mrs. Mettle Morgan, 


81 

86 


Population, 13,978. 
Luena Strickland, 


93 


Sophia Hall, 
Edwin Lees, 


83 
82 


Joseph W. Mason, 
Harlon H. Newton, 
Olive S. Thorp, 
Miss Caroline B. Waugh, 


83 

82 
86 
82 


Perry Moore, 
Martha Hotchkiss, 


93 
92 


Mary Ann Bissell, 
Martha Butler, 


80 
84 


Rebecca Dewey, 
Peter Coley, 


91 
91 


Emeline Belder, 
Annie Connelly, 


82 
84 


NAUGATUCK. 




Jane Hayward, 
Annie Coffey, 


90 
90 


Emeline French, 
Adna Hunter, 


83 
80 


Population, 4,272. 




William O'Brien, 


90 


Maria King, 


84 


Mrs. Eliza Bradshaw, 


83 


Mary jVIcCarthy, 


87 


R. S. Southworth, 


83 


Mrs. Nancy Gorham, 


88 


Nathan Tolles, 


88 


Lydia Sauford, 


83 


Mrs. Priscilla Woster, 


88 


Silas Wright, 


86 


Celia Nilson, 


81 


Mrs. Eunice Baldwin, 


81 


James Landers, 


86 


Virgil Cornish, 


85 


Mrs. Ann Senior, 


84 


Ann Kenlock, 


86 


Maiy Frazier, 


80 


Mrs. Mary Nettleton, 
Thomas Keirnan, 


85 


Abigail Townsend, 


88 


Silman Hinsdale, 


80 


88 


Mary Haffey, 


81 


Richard Pine, 


80 


Morris Monks, 


85 


Lucy Hull, 


80 


Margaretta Wetmore, 


83 


Asheal Smith, 


80 


Rachel Humiston, 


83 


Loretta North, 


81 


Harvey Curtiss, 


81 


Ann Kelly, 


84 


Mary Robinson, 


81 


Henry Hull, 


80 


Lorenzo P. Lee, 


84 


Emeline Avery, 


81 


Josiah Culver, 


85 


Jeanette T. Lee. 


80 


Francis Cutter, 


83 


Selem Doolittle, 


81 


Mary McGann, 


84 


George Francis, 


84 


Bennett Hine, 


83 


Mary Mortinion, 


83 


Louisa Nichols, 


83 


William Riggs, 


80 


Louisa Parsons, 


81 


Naomi Parsons, 


84 


Basaleel Scott, 


81 


Sarah Winchell, 


86 


John Sniff, 


84 


Mrs. Chloe Jacobs, 


80 


Elizabeth Belden, 


82 






Mrs. Mary Lines, 


86 


EKza B. Woodruff, 


82 


NEW CANAAN. 




Joseph Lines, 


82 


Sarah F. Wilcox, 


84 


Population, 2,673. 




Mrs. Margaret Clancy, 


82 


Eli Warner, 


81 


Mrs. Nancy Selleck, 


90 


Mrs. ThirzaHotchkiss, 


87 


Albert Williams, 


81 


Mrs. Esther Bouton, 


90 


Mrs. Annie Osborn, 


86 


Ann Andrews, 


82 


Mrs. Eveline Seeley, 


8a 


Mrs. Sarah Spencer, 


82 


Sarah Baldwin, 


84 


Mrs. Caroline Husted, 


80 


Mrs. Lockey Woster, 


90 


Emeline Bassett, 


80 


Mrs. Cynthia Hyatt, 


80 



NAMES OF YE OLD FOLKS OF CONNECTICUT. 



31 



Mrs. Anu Ketchum, 
Mrs. Maria Hyde, 
Mrs. Rachel Scolield, 
Mrs. Ruth Raymond, 
Miss Mary Flynn, 
Mrs. Charlotte Brown, 
Mrs. Abigail Beers, 
Mrs. Mary W. Scribner, 
Mrs. Betsey Bouton, 
Mrs. Polly Daniels, 
Mrs. Abby Northrop, 
Mrs. Anna Weed, 
Mrs. Lois Fancher, 
Mrs. Mary McLochlen, 
John Davis, 
Seymour Comstock, 
Samuel Iloyt, 
Benjamin Hoyt, 
Norman S. Hall, 
Joseph Davenport, 
David Dickens, 
John Jones, 
Samuel Keith, 
Walter Gurnsey, 
Jacob Hover, 
Andrew Crawford, 
Thaddeus Davenport, 
Samuel Selleck, 
David Travis, 
Timothy Raymond, 

NEW FAIRFIELD. 

Population, 701. 
Louisa Barnum, 
Ethel Wheeler, 
Wheeler Judson, 
Armenia Palmer, 
Huldah Penney. 
Lydia Treadwell, 
Emma Treadwell, 
Eunice Scudder, 
Betsey Taylor, 
Cordelia Eastwood, 
John Sturge, 
Alfred Beardsley, 

NEW HARTFORD. 

Population, 2,302. 
Caroline Seymour, 
Samuel Couch, 
Aslibel Marsh, 
Abigail Couch, 
Sally Dyer, 
Julia JVIaynard, 
Luke McCabe, 
Hiram Pike, 
Omri Segur, 
Laura P. Steele, 
Truman Tuttle, 
Charlotte Tuttle, 
James Trowbridge, 
Deborah Trowbridge, 
Ammi Wilcox, 



81 Horace Goodwin, 

81 Julius Harris, 

81 Herman Holcomb, 

83 Joseph Hogarty, 

83 Lucy Jacqui, 

83 Grove S. Marsh, 

83 Michael Ronan, 

83 Catherine Speed, 

83 

84 NEW HAVEN. 

84 Population, 62,882. 

85 Isaac Clark (colored), 
87 Rev. Joel Mann, 

87 Clarissa Hall, 

80 Sally Cannon, 

80 Ellen Breen, 

80 Peret Sanford, 

81 Lyman Osborn, 
81 Bridget Gunney, 
81 Eimon Blakeslee, 

81 Amos Townsend, 

82 Elizabeth Scranton, 

82 Jesse Potter, 

83 William Munson, 
83 Ann Upson, 

83 Margaret Keenan, 

83 Augusta Semen, 

84 Grace Wheeler, 

86 Sarah B. Ball, 

87 Ellen Crouin, 
Leah Gould, 
Catherine Sullivan, 
Nathaniel Bland, 

r,, Julia Woodruff, 



81 



Sarah Warren, 
Jeremiah Peck, 



or. Caroline Foskett, 
Qr. Mary Cunningham, 

0\) XT 



Esther Fuller, 



Q. Henry Lowe, 
Qo Henrietta Hine, 
Q^ Salina Andrews, 
^^ Russell Ailing, 
^ Mary Adams, 
^. Lois Appel, 

Temperance Andrea, 
Truman Ailing, 
Johanna Ahern, 
Elizabeth Atwater, 
91 Nancy S. Austin, 
90 Nancy Butricks, 
90 Buckley Bartlett, 

84 Mary Brown, 

85 Jane M. Bishop, 
84 Nancy M. Bemis, 
82 Mabel Brinsmade, 
88 Lydia Beach, 

88 A. K. Bradley, 

82 Minerva Blodgett, 

83 Samuel Blodgett, 
81 Catherine Bronson, 

84 E. W. Blake, 
81 Mariah Bishop, 
80 Eliza M. Beers, 



80 


Francis N. Butler, 


85 


80 


Samuel Bassett, 


87 


81 


Daniel W. Buckingham, 


85 


81 


Henry Bronsen, 


80 


81 


M. Beecher, 


88 


80 


Amelia Beckley, 


82 


84 


Anu Brown, 


84 


87 


Nancy Blackman, 


80 




Luther Barnes, 


80 




Mary A. Beers, 


85 




Ro.xauna BoUes, 


80 


106 


Phebe H. Barnes, 


88 


96 


Lida Burnett, 


80 


96 


Isabella Burns, 


84 


94 


Caroline Booth, 


80 


93 


Mary Bu trick. 


81 


93 


Selinda Boardman, 


89 


93 


John Bryant, 


84 


92 


Mary A. Benham, 


83 


92 


Mary Bunnell, 


81 


92 


AVilmot Beecher, 


82 


92 


Sarah Beach, 


82 


91 


Lucy Bunnell, 


80 


91 


Lucy S. Burnham, 


80 


91 


David Bunnell, 


80 


91 


]SIary R. Barnes, 


81 


91 


Harriet Barnes, 


88 


91 


Elizabeth Brewer, 


89 


91 


Mary A. Bunnell, 


85 


90 


Mary Bohan, 


88 


90 


Mrs. Legrand, 




90 


Mary E. Cameron, 


86 


90 


Bethiah Cummins, 


89 


90 


James Carley, 


83 


90 


Elizabeth Christy, 


87 


90 


David Coggswell, 


88 


90 


Harmon Conway, 


86 


90 


Abigail Chatfield, 


87 


90 


Irene Chapman, 


89 


90 


Elizabeth Candee, 


84 


90 


Phebe Case, 


84 


80 


Catherine Cassidy, 


83 


80 


Julia Clinton, 


86 


83 


Sarah Cady, 


84 


82 


Emily Cotton, 


80 


87 


Julia Cowley, 


81 


84 


Mary Clayton, 


84 


84 


Mary R. Colt, 


81 


84 


David Crockett, 


80 


85 


Mary Cooper, 


83 


83 


John Carpenter, 


81 


82 


Mary Cook, 


83 


82 


Francis Clark, 


84 


82 


Thirza Chattield, 


86 


80 


Rebecca B. Denslow, 


84 


82 


Adeline Diens, 


81 


84 


Clarissa Devine, 


88 


82 


William Daggett, 


82 


80 


Prelate Demich, 


88 


81 


Mary Dale, 


81 


83 


John Dale, 


86 


84 


Mary Dempster, 


88 


84 


Charles Daskam, 


83 


86 


Patrick Doherty, 


82 



32 



NAMES OF YE OLD FOLKS OF CONNECTICUT. 



Emeline Evarts, 
Elizabeth Euler, 
Madeline Ernst, 
Mary J. Eaton, 
Lucius Ford, 
Sarah Frisbie, 
Abigail Fairchild, 
Mary Fanning, 
Martha Frink, 
Olive H. Foote, 
Lewis Fitch, 
Sophia Fowler, 
J. McAllister Ferguson, 
Mary Fitzgerald, 
Ann Garvey, 
Patrick Gordon, 
Louis Grannis, 
Alfred Goodsell, 
Patrick Gallagher, 
Emma L. Gilbert, 
Nancy Goodale, 
Caroline Goodmann, 
Hezekiah Gilbert, 
George Gabriel, 
Mary Gridley, 
Margaret Hawle,y, 
Betsey Hoadley,' 
Sophronia Hull, 
Martha Helger, 
Mary Hough, 
Urania Hall, 
Lucinda B. Hurlburt, 
Harriet Hotchkiss, 
Fidelia Hart, 
Alva Hough, 
Minerva Howland, 
John Hodson, 
Benjamin Hitchcock, 
Esther Homan, 
Eliza Hotchkiss, 
Thomas C. HoUis, 
Thomas Horsefall, 
Harvey Hoadley, 
Tabitha Jackson, 
Amanda Johnson, 
Jane Jarman, 
Catherine Jarman, 
Betsy Johnson, 
Isaac Judson, 
Johanna Keane, 
Mary Kirby, 
Wealthy Kimberly, 
Frederick C. Key, 
Emily Kirk, 
Almira Knitrht, 



82 Peter Keyes, 

80 Sarah Lines, 

84 Mary Leonard, 

80 Ebenezer Lane, 

81 Levi Luddington, 

82 Sarah Lindsley, 

82 Augustus Lines, 
84 John E. Lovell, 

83 Frederick C. Lukey, 

84 Horatio N. Lyman, 
82 E. A. Lefiingwell, 

80 ILmnali Leonard. 

81 David Lewis, 
89 Peter Lee, 

80 Louisa Lemon, 

81 Carl Muller, 

82 John Mix, 

80 Bridget McCarthy, 

80 Fannie McGee, 

83 Lucy Moulthrop, 

81 Francis ^litchell, 
80 Jane Matthews, 

83 Hezekiah Meeche, 

85 Mrs. Caleb 3Iix, 
87 Rebecca Mouson, 

84 Mary A. Monson, 

84 Charles Monson, 
80 Samuel Miller, 

80 Mary Maloney. 

81 Mrs. M. Merriman, 

86 Joseph ]Mann, 

85 i^Iarg^u•et McHoag, 

87 Mary Miller, 
81 Sarah ^lassey, 
81 Asahel Millard, 
81 Sarah Miller, 
87 Sopiiia Martin, 

80 Jane D. Merritt, 

85 Abigail H. Moss, 

86 Lucius Maltby, 

81 Michael Nicholson, 

81 Lydia Xeade, 

80 Wm. Pat. O'Brien, 

83 Charles O'Niel, 

82 Mary Owen, 

80 Denison Olmstead, 

80 Esther Osborne, 

80 John Pierson, 

86 Elizabeth Peck, 

80 Seymour Potter, 

84 Almira Pond. 

82 Warren Potter, 

83 Sally Perkins, 
82 Roxaua Pratt, 
80 Beuiamin Peets, 



85 


Lucina Perkins, 


80 


80 


Louisa M. Parker, 


86 


83 


Charlotte Page, 


81 


81 


Nathan Parkhurst, 


81 


83 


Mary Powers, 


83 


83 


Mary H. Perkins, 


82 


86 


Jerusha Pomeroy, 


88 


88 


Charles F. Robinson, 


84 


82 


Elizabeth Roathar, 


88 


80 


Lauren Russell, 


84 


81 


Fanny Reddy, 


80 


84 


Lugui Roberti, 


80 


87 


Julia Sherman, 


87 


82 


Nathaniel Smith, 


84 


82 


Stephen Sanford, 


81 


81 


Mary Skinner, 


87 


84 


Nabby Scott, 


88 


80 


Eldridge G. Sanger, 


85 


80 


Susannah Sperry, 


80 


81 


N. Sperry, 


88 


81 


Eunice Sandford, 


89 


81 


Timothy Stannard. 


88 


83 


Hettie tuttle, 


82 


88 


Esther H. Thompson, 


83 


87 


Zerah P. Tuttle, 


83 


80 


William Townsend, 


85 


84 


Charles Thompson, 


81 


83 


Charles S. Thompson, 


83 


83 


Joseph Trueman, 


87 


86 


Margaret Tieriiey, 


82 


S7 


Nancy Thatcher, 


88 


88 


Clara Tchoty, 


83 


82 


Sarah Talmage, 


80 


88 


Hester Talmage, 


80 


86 


Julia Talmage, 


80 


84 


Grace Umbefield, 


88 


84 


Thomas Wallace, 


81 


84 


Charlotte H. Williams, 


81 


82 


Sarah Winter, 


84 


86 


Parmelia Warner, 


80 


84 


Laura Wildman, 


85 


88 


Lucy P. Wright, 


87 


84 


Betsey Woodiug, 


84 


84 


Israel Wooding, 


87 


82 


William Walker, 


84 


80 


Esther Wilcoxson, 


83 


81 


Henry Warren, 


84 


83 


Annie P. Waite, 


81 


80 


Theodore D. Woolsey, 


82 


82 


Henry Williams, 


81 


84 


Lucy H. Yale, 


82 


82 


Alex. C. Twining, 


85 


88 


Alex. Storer, 


80 


84 






80 







ONE HUNDRED AND SIX YEARS OLD. 

In the New Haven "Town House," an institution for paupers, resides a man who has 
laeeh a constant inmate there since 1833. He is not a pauper in the strict sense of that term 
though his associates are, and, as " birds of a feather," etc., he has the repution of being one. 
His name is Isaac Clarke, and he was born near Montauk Point, Long Island, September 
21st, 1778, according to his own statements and those who have long known him. The 
appearance he presents, physical and mental condition, recollections of historical events 
known to all, and his own stories concerning them, render it certain that he is much more 



NAMES OF YE OLD FOLKS OF CONNECTICUT. 



than a centenarian, and indeed, the oldest man in New England. His birth took place a 
little while atter the declaration of independence, and he was more than five years old when 
the Revolutionary war closed, nine years old when the Constitution was adopted and was 
three months beyond the age required by law for an elector— and might have voted had the 
law permitted-when in 1799 the Father of his Country died. The great Napoleon was 
only nine years old when "Uncle Ike," as he is familiarly called, first saw the light, and he 
had reached tl.e age of 43 when the disturber of European peace breathed h?s last at St 
Helena. (.\ap.)leon was born August 15, 1769, and died May 5, 1821.) Of course as there 
are none but himself left to speak of it, little can be gleaned of his early history but he 
says he shipped at tiie age of twelve with Captain Chase, of the Nantucket whaler Vesper 
tor a yoj-age to the Pacific, via Cape Horn, and was gone three years. Two years after 
that in 1*95, a.s is well known, Captain Greene made his noted voyage in the ship Neptune 
Uncle Ike says he was 15 years old when he got back from " whalin'." As Captain Greene's 
date of saihng was two years later, the date of the centenarian's birth seems fairly well estab- 
lished as having taken place in 1778. The aged man speaks of what he saw among the 
l^acihc islands, of the Indians who came swimming out from land and wanted to board the 
Ship, and ot the desire of sailors to go ashore, but were not permitted as the natives were 
man-eaters. 1^ rom his description, the islands he saw were the Sandwich Islands on which 
a tew years before. Captain Cook was killed by the Kanakas, as the natives were called and' 
tor aught we know, was eaten by them. In his narratives Uncle Ike always alludes to Cook 
as the English Captain, vvhich shows that in early life he must have been familiar with 
tne tacts ot the noted navigator's exploits. He continued to make voyages, usually before 
the mast, on whalers and merchantmen of Nantucket and the Vineyard, until 1822 when 
either by reason of losing his sea-legs or failing to see further profit or novelty in lon'o- trips' 
he became a coastwise boatman, confining himself to the northern shores of Long- Island' 
with on occasional trip to Connecticut. In 1833 he drifted into New Haven sickness ore- 
vented his earning money, and finally, finding himself high and dry on the shoals of want 
with no prospect of fair tides floating him off, in 1834, at the age of 56, he applied for and 
obtained admission to the " Town House," as stated. Soon afti'r he became physically dis- 
abled, and tor many years could not help himself. Years of careful treatment have as it 
were, rejuvenated him and, aided by second sight, he improves the hours, sailor like in 
taking stitches in flannel garments, displaying skill in the use of the needle. He .sees with- 
out glasses, and has done so for more than twenty years. He speaks in husky "tones but 
intelligently, and his power of hearing is wonderfully acute. The best people in New 
Haven, among whom are Thomas R. Trowbridge, Jr., visit the aged man of ten, hear his 
story and confidently believe it. & ^ . "ccti ms 



NEWINGTON". 

Population 934. 

IMrs. Rose Clark, 97 

Hannah Francis, 80 

Nancy Griswold, 82 

Erastus Kilburne, 82 

Harriet M. Rockwell. 85 

Mary E. Stolger, 83 

NEW LONDON. 

Population 10,529. 

James Cranston, 93 

!Char]es Babcock, 92 

Nathan Newbury. 91 

JVirs. Lydia Harris, 90 

iCharles Strickland, 90 

George Davidson, 90 

Mrs. William Bailey, 90 

Mrs. Harriet Brown, 90 

Mrs. Fannie Smith, 87 

Mrs. Sisson, 87 

Erastus Crandall, 87 

Ehjah Bolles, 87 

Captain Nat. Richards, 86 

Mrs. Brown, 86 

lohn Howard, 85 



Mrs. Ellen Perkins, 
Miss Nancy Beebe, 
Thomas Payne, 
Mrs. Richard Rogers, 
Mrs. Ann Beebe, 
Jonathan Lewis, 
Charles Chapman, 
Jabez S. Swan, 
George Comstock, 

Mrs. Turner, 

Enos Gates, 

Mrs. Benajah Brewster, 

Mrs. Parmelia Potter, 

Mrs. Williams, 

Mrs. Merritt Rockwell, 

Mrs. Laura Tebele, 

Mrs. Horton, 

Samuel Ames, 

Mrs. Lucretia Woodward, 

Mrs. Samuel Ames, 

Albert M. Adams, 

W. H. Connor, 

Joseph Smith, 

Gilbert Holmes, 

Mrs. Susan Culver, 

Mrs. Martha Rogers, 

Richard Rogers, 



85 Griswold Holmes, 

85 Mrs. Shepard, 

§5 Mrs. Maria Lake, 

84 James AVcavcr, 

84 Mrs. Erastus Crandall, 

84 Timothy Sizer, 

84 Oliver Lake, 

84 Burral Holran, 

84 Mrs. William Goodwin, 

84 ^Irs. Almira Goodwin, 

84 Mrs. Charles Cobb, 

84 Charles Strickland, 

84 Mrs. Abby Tinker, 

82 Allen I. Tooker, 

83 Mrs. Aaron Chapman, 
83 Giles Perkins, 

82 Mrs. Moran, 

83 Samuel Smith, 

82 William Champlin, 

82 Alex. Merrill, 

83 Jonathan Lewis, 

83 Mrs. Crocker, 

83 Mrs. Hough, 

83 Mrs. Acors Barnes, 

83 Mrs. Theodore Robinson, 

83 Mrs. Daniels, 

82 Mrs. Rexford. 



83 
82 
82 
81 
81 
81 
81 
81 
81 
81 
82 
81 
81 
81 
81 



:i4 



NAMES OF YE OLD FOLKS OF CONNECTICUT. 



Mrs. James Keeney, 
Mrs. Bently, 
Mrs. Daniel Huntington, 
Miss N. Hempstead, 
Mrs. Dr. Perkins, 
W. W. Billings, 
Mrs. Douglass, 
Mrs. Benjamin Gardner, 
Mrs. Daniel Forsyth, 
Mrs. John Danforth, 
Miss Mary Beebe. 
Mrs. Mary Coverly, 
Roger Mulrooney, 

Mrs. Ledyard, 

Asa Manwaring, 

Mrs. Latham, 

Mrs. Mary Walden, 
Miss Rebecca Simpson. 

NEW MILFORD. 

Jane Hendrix, 
Betsey Marsh, 
Mercy Lockwood, 
Susan Morehouse, 
Laura Osborne, 
Lucia R. H. Tomlinson, 
Anna Richmond, 
Betsey Ervin, 
Sally Woodruff, 
Henry E. Fenn, 
Fannie Fi-e^iian, 
Irene Hoyt, 
Henry Hoyt 
Levi S. Knapp, 
Daniel ^Vlarsh, 
Martha D. Mygatt, 
Sophia Phillips, 
Jerusha Roberts, 
Eliza Kol)erts, 
Anna Walker, 
Darius Williams, 
Salonu' Williams, 
Deborah Adams, 
Philo Adams, 
Maljel Baldwin, 
Robert Feruis, 
Julia .AL Gaylord. 
Joseph P. Hubbard. 
Eliza ]Mallett, 
Harriet Mallet, 
Silas Russell, 
Harriet Stone, 
John W. Soule, 
John Soule, 
Luther Beach, 
jVIrs. Luther Beach, 
WiUiam Hartwell, 
Benjamin E. Bostwick, 
Mrs. Benj. E. Bostwick, 
Minerva Beardsley, 
Clarissa Banker, 
Eliza Bristol, 
Luther Beach, 



Population, 4,013. 



83 Rebecca Buck, 

81 Ohve G. Crawford, 

82 Ann Dunn, 

81 James A. Giddings, 

83 Armida Giddings, 

82 Orrin Hawley, 

83 William N. Canfield, 

81 Barbara Loveridge, 

82 Sophia McMahon, 

81 Martin Penny, 

82 Rebecca Phelps, 

82 William Roberts, 

83 Reuben Whitnev, 

81 Thomas A. Welton, 

82 Cynthia Sherwood, 
82 ]\Irs. Heber Johnson, 

84 Laura Abbott, 

81 Truman Bates, 
William Couch, 
William H. Fairchild, 
Laura Hallock, 

93 Eliza S Knapp, 

93 John Main, 

91 Oliver Penny, Sr., 

91 David Mead, 

91 Mary A. Soule, 

91 Betsey Warner, 

90 Salina M. Wheaton, 

90 

90 NEWTOWN. 

80 

83 

80 Polly Curtis, 

86 Lucretia San ford, 

82 Joel T. Camp, 

80 Polly A. Camp, 
88 Abigail Fairchild, 

81 Lois Crof ut, 

87 Eliza Beers, 

83 Nathan Burr, 
85 Susan Buit, 

82 Thomas Bradley, 

82 Nancy Bradley, 

83 Luther Camp, 

87 Nathaniel Elwood, 

84 Harriet Elwood, 
84 Margaret Lillis, 

81 Matiiaret McMahon, 

82 David B. Beers, 
84 Russell Crofut, 
80 Susan Fairchild, 
80 Betsey French. 
80 ilarinda Glover, 

80 Samantha Hill, 

83 Walter Johnson, 

83 James M. JMatson, 

81 Charles storehouse, 

82 Anna Morehouse, 
80 Bridget Blake, 
80 Samuel Bainum, 

82 Sally M. Curtis, 
88 George Graham, 

84 Margaret Holihan, 

83 Richard Reilly, 



82 Margaret Wixtad, 8« 

80 Phebe A. Northrop, 8* 
84 Almira Northrop, 8© 
87 Sarah E. Nichols, 84 

87 Louisa W. Nichols, S* 

81 Hermann Parmlee, 80 
80 Bennett Piatt, 8^ 
80 Anna Somers, 86 

88 Sarah Shepard, 84 

80 Sarah E. Bray, 80 

81 Isaac Beers, 80 

87 Sarah Chambers, 83 
80 Uriah Elwood, 84 

80 Julia Johnson, 80 

81 Mary Lillis, 84 

88 Philander Seeley 81 

82 Hannah Waite, 88 

82 

81 NOBFOLK. 

80 Jedediah Humphrey, 93 

83 Wealthy Smith, 90 
83 Louisa R. Cowles, 80 

81 Betsey Camp, 80 
80 Phillip Ryan, 80 
83 Lucinda F. Smith, 83 
86 Amanda Baldwin, 81 
80 Diantha Burr, 88 
80 Amanda Bramble, 80 

Axa M. Browne, 84 

Mary E. Dewell, 80 



NORTH BRANFORD. 

Population, 1,035. 

Mrs. Andrews Linsley, 90 

Mrs. Charlotte Gates, 80 

John Rose, 85 

Mrs. Rebecca Harrison, 88 

Mrs. Betsey Linsley, 87 

Miss Abigail Harrison, 84 

Mrs. Aima Harrison, 85 

Jonathan Barker, 88 

Mrs. Lois Rogers, 84 

Miss Lydia Baldwin, 83 

Chauncey Russell, 84 

George Bunnell, 80 

Mrs. Salina Foot, 96 

Mrs Electa Boardman, 86 

Chauncey Monson, 83 

R. Johnson, 82 

NORTH CANAAN. 

Population, 1,537. 

Almeriau Gillette, 93 

Palmer Stevens. 93 

Sh-s. Sally Rood, 91 

Mrs. Mary Millard, 90 

Mrs. Almerian Gillette, 87 

Mi's. Lavina Cummings, 83 

William Adams, 85 

Frank Emmons, 80 

Leonard Lawrence, 81 

Mrs. Huldah Ives, 80 



124i129 

NAMES OF YE OLD FOLKS OF CONNECTICUT. 



Sedgwick Fenn, 
Roswell Day, 
Jacob Rood, 
Mrs. Malinda Smith, 
Mrs. Polly Bettis, 

Mrs. Couch, 

Mrs. Williams, 



80 Dudley R. Wheeler, 

80 Prentice Mann 

84 John Partelo, 

87 L. B. Mine, 

80 Samuel Sheftield, 

83 Mrs. Nelson Billings 

80 " ' 



NORTH HAVEN. 

Population, 1,763. 

Mrs. Beda Butten, 9« 

Mrs. Polly Munsou, 93 

Mrs. John Todd, 89 
Mrs. Katherine Frolich, 86 

Mrs. Alfred Pierpont, 81 

Mrs. Almira Robinson, 83 

Mrs. Lydia Peck, 83 

Mrs. Abby Tuttle, 81 

Mrs. Orrin Todd, 80 

Miss A. Barrett, 81 

Mrs. Nancy Beach, 88 

Mrs. Chloe Thorpe, 86 

Mrs. A. Tuttle, 83 

Mrs. A. Mix, 81 

Mrs. Julia Bishop, 86 

Chester Doolittle, 87 

Pierpont Dayton, 88 

L. C. Bigelow, 82 

Zina Ball, 83 

Merritt Barnes, 83 

Bethuel Brockett, 81 

Burritt Brockett, 82 

Orrin Todd, 84 

G. G. Bailey, 82 

A. Lindsley, 80 
Levi Brockett, 88 
Jared Bassett, 83 
Zerah Tuttle, 83 
E. Dickerman, 81 
S. Gilbert, 81 

B. Goodyear, 84 
Mrs. Esther Doolittle, 85 
Mrs. Anson Bassett, 82 

Mrs. Moultrop, 80 

Miss Betsey Mills, 83 

NORTH STONINGTON. 

Population, 1,769. 

Mrs. Mary Royle, 95 
Deacon Charles Wheeler, 9.5 

T. W. Lewis, 91 

Thomas W. Lewis, 90 

Brister Swan, 90 

Mrs. Nancy Wheeler, 90 

Mrs. Whitney, 88 

Mrs. Polly Mann, 82 

Miss Emily Park, 80 

Mrs. Joel Pitcher, 80 

Mrs. Eunice Gray, 81 

Deacon Ezra Miner, 81 

Mrs. Polly Main, 80 

Mrs. Ezra Miner, 80 

William M. Hillard, 85 

William West, 85 



NORWALK. 

Population, 13,956 
Anna 31. White, 
Edwin Webb, 
Nancy W. Sammis, 
Matilda Wallace, 
Betsey Saunders, 
Catherine Feeney, 
Mary Ra.ymond, 
Lanah Sharrell, 
Julia E. Thorpe, 
James Smith, 
Polly Camp, 
Lavina Aiken, 
Ann Dowues, 
Martha Se^Tuour, 
jMrs. Mary Seeley, 
David Edmonds, 
Catherine McDonald, 
Sally Allen, 
Mary A. Brown, 
Betsey Beach, 
Eliza S. Hoyt, 
Loruida Lockwood, 
Henry Lamb, 
Abigail Lamb, 
John Miller, 
Rebecca Mallory, 
Esther Olmstead, 
William S. Hyatt, 
Phebe Marvin, 
Richard Maloney, 
William Peck, 
John Roberts, 
Lewis Sherwood, 
Isaac Selleck, Sr., 
Julia Wilson, 
William N. Seymour, 
Juda A. Smith, 
Charles C. Thompson, 
James Wilmot, 
Lewis Smith, 
George Richards, 
Hester Drake, 
Abigail Craft, 
Eliza Gregory, 
Lydia Mitchell, 
Eliza Royce, 
Betsey Benedict, 
Nancy Gregory, 
Rumania Hamilton, 
Smith Scofield, 
Jesse Smith, 
Amanda Smith, 
Serena Dann, 
AVilliam Durant, 
Betsey Hubbell, 



87 Catherine Armstrong 
87 Elizabeth Byxbee, 
86 Azuba Burr, 
82 John J. Cape, 
80 James W. Pinkney, 
82 Maria Smith, 
Polly Smith, 
Stephen K. Stanley, 
Lucia K. Stanley, 
Malinda Weed, 
97 Jo.seph P. Wood, 
94 Julia M. Arlington 
96 Ezra M. Baxte?, ' 
93 Elizabeth Bartram 
93 Eliza Carlton, 
92 Isabella Dow, 
91 John Dingen, 
90 Daniel H. Gedney 
90 Ann Gilbert, 
90 Eliza Gilbert, 
90 Gardner Arlington, 
90 Hannah Brown 
88 Zillah Bassett, 

86 Phebe Cox, 

87 Marza Raymond, 
84 Charles C. Brooks, 
82 Lewis O. Wilson 
82 Hetty Huld, 

82 William S. Lockwood 

84 Lydia Rile, 

82 Julia N. Benson, 

82 Amelia Gedney 

83 Sally A. Bowne, 

80 Robert Guthrie, 

84 Clara Harris, 

81 Evart Quintard, 

80 Harriet Piatt, 

83 Nancy St. John, 

82 Harriet Brotherton, 

84 Susan J. Chichester. 

81 Bridget Carney, 

84 Elizabeth Hanford, 
81 Rufus Richards, 

81 Lucy Hoyt, 

82 George W. Jennings, 
80 John Ballard, 

80 Asenath G. Ballard, 

81 Henry Evers, 
88 Elnathan Finch, 

82 John Bedient, 

83 Walter Doty, 
86 Deborah Dann, 
88 Mary Gillum, 

88 Chancey Griswold, 
86 Althea Gregory, 

80 Giles Gregory, 

81 Angeuette Hoyt, 
81 Mary Hayes, 

80 Priscilla Holmes, 
80 Mary Ann Lyon 
83 Sally Mallory, 
80 Mary Mannin, 
83 Caroline D. Piatt, 
83 Lewis Richards, 
83 Lewis Raymond, 



84 



85 



83 
80 
80 

82 

82 

84 

83 

84 

83 

80 

80 

86 

80 

85 

88 

84 

81 

81 

87 



36 



NAMES OF YE oLU FOLKS OF CONNECTICUT. 



Sophia C. Cressey, 86 

Jobauna Ericson, 82 

Arthur A. Suowdeu, 81 

Lewis O. Wilcox, 82 

Hezekiah Raymond, 81 

Sarah Cantield, 85 

NORWICH. 

Population, 21,141. 

Rev. David M. Bentley, 99 

Mrs. Polly Savin, 99 

Mrs. Nancy Bushnell, 99 

Mrs. Hannah Anthony, 98 

Col. George L. Perkins, 97 

David Barry, 95 

Mrs. Mary Wilson, 95 

John Lanioiu, 93 

Otlmiel Gager, 92 

Samuel Case, 9-4 

Mrs. Sally Case, 91 

Mrs. Nancy Roath, 91 

Mrs. Catherine Prentice, 90 

Mrs. Julia Hartigan, 90 

John Quirk, 90 

Eleazur Kingsley, 90 

Patrick Dumphy, 90 

Mrs. Frances Barry, 85 

Ally Allen, 84 

Samuel Allen, 82 

Olive M. Bentley. 80 

Mrs. Catherine Chace, 83 

Mrs. Susan P. Backus, 86 

Mrs. Polly Bacon, 81 

Mrs. Hannah Carmody, 84 

Mrs. Mary Burke, ' 83 

Mrs. Ann Coonej', 81 

Mrs. Ellen Denmin, 87 

Edward Corey, 80 

Miss Sarah Crocker, 80 

Mrs. Joanna Fenton, 84 

Martin Glvnn, 81 

Mrs. Jane"W. Hallam, 83 

Mrs. Rebecca Hadley, 83 

Jefferson Lamb, 81 



Mrs. Eliza Nelson, 82 

John Ratigan, 80 

Jesse D. Noyes, 80 

Mrs. Margaret Schilling, 87 

Mrs. Mary A. Ripley, 84 

Mrs. Diana Reed, 81 

Mrs. Mary A. Tracv, 82 

Mrs. Sarah P. Richards, 83 

Timothy Shea, 84 

Hugh Trolan, 83 

Allen Trolan, 83 

Henry H. Chapman, 80 

Mrs. Ellen Fitzgerald, 80 

Mrs. Rose Dupiey, 80 

Mrs. Jeremiah Davis, 88 

Mrs. Harriet Davis, 80 

Mrs. Margaret Flood, 81 

Mrs. Bridget Quirk, 87 

John Stapleton, 82 

Mrs. Ellen ]\Iurphy, 86 

Mrs. Lucj^ Arnold, 83 

Mrs Mary Bachelder, 88 

Mrs. Julia Sullivan, 88 

Mrs. Ann St. Clair, 81 

Mrs. Mary Sullivan, 86 

Mrs. Annie Swift, 82 

Mrs. Lucy Tucker, 85 

Mrs. Phebe Armstrong, 87 

Horace Whitaker, 81 

Mrs. Sarah M. Beckwith, 84 

Mrs. Joanna Hartigan. 85 

Mrs. Harriet Hyde Colton, 87 

Mrs. Catherine Kelly, 80 

Chester Clark, 80 

Mrs. Rosanna Clinch, 86 

Simeon Drown, 80 

David Fitzgerald, 84 

Mrs. Sally C. Hopkins, 84 

Hiram Hill, 81 

Mrs. Hannah Lamphan, 80 

Mrs. Maria Lamb, 87 

Andrew Matthews, 81 

Mrs. Lucy W. Prentice, 87 

Mrs. Almira Ladd 87 

John S. Rodo-ers, 80 



Miss Alice B. Sherman, 85 

Mrs. Ann Sullivan, 83 

Mrs. Elizabeth Spear, 81 

Mrs. Mary Woodworth, 86 

Mrs. Jerusha Waters, 87 

Mrs. Mary Hamilton, 85 

William S. Marshall, 80 

Mrs. Mary Archer, 81 

Mrs. Lucy P. Arnold, 80 

Chester Fuller, 81 

Mrs. Chester Fuller, 81 

Owen Stead, 80 

John Schofield, 84 

Miss Elizabeth Stevens, 80 

Mrs. Ruth Potter, 84 

Mrs. Betsey Roath, 83 

Dimon C. Lovett, 80 

Mrs. Ira Lee, 82 

Mrs. Olive Prior, 81 

Mrs. Polly Cushman, 85 

Mrs. McNaught, 87 

Michael Brennan, 81 

Mrs. Susan Thompson, 83 

Mrs. Eunice Barstow, 80 

William P. Rogers, 81 

John B. Truman. 83 

Mrs. John W. Foote, 82 

Capt. Edmund D. Roath, 83 

Mrs. Abby L. Harland, 84 

Mrs. Helena Armstrong, 82 

Charles Dennison, 86 

Joseph H. Lucas, 85 

Daniel Brown, 84 

Eunice Morse, 85 

Nancy Freeman, 82 

Almira Freeman, 80 

Nathan Cook, 82 

Mrs. Eliza Cranston, 89 

Mrs. Mary Ann Williams 82 

Rowland Stanton, 89 

Mrs. Coombs, 81 

Chollar, 82 

Mrs. Mary Rockwell, 

Mrs. James B. Bromley, 80 

Capt. George W. Clark, 88 



HISTORY OF REV. DAVID NILES BENTLY, OF NORWICH. 

Rev. David Niles Bently, wiiose death took place June 24th, 1884, was born in North 
Stonington, New London County, July 27th, 1785, and was therefore nearly one-hundred 
years old. He was baptized in what is called the Cove, near the depot of the New London 
and Northern R. R., by Rev. Peter Vannest in 1800, and was licensed to preach in 1805. 
He was ordained deacon in New London in 1818, and elder in Providence in 1823, Right 
Rev. Bishop George officiating on both occa.sions. It will thus be seen that he had been in 
the ministry nearly 80 years. During that long period he preached more than 4,000 times, 
attended 3,888 funerals, preaching at 588 of them; baptized 588 persons, and married more 
than 588 couples; and what is most remarkable, never took a farthing for his services. He 
was indeed a helper in the cause of Christ. His benefactions to churches and church work 
amounting to $78,888, and that the work might continue, bequeathed liberally to the cause in 
his will. He was a very patriarch, and when the silver cord was loosed, and the golden bowl 
broken, he passed to the beyond, peaceful and full of hope. After the funeral, June 30th, 
his remains were laid in the grave by his three sons: L. D., G. W., and A. J. Bently, and 
his son-in-law H. M. Wilter, of Worcester, Mass. Bequiescat en pace. 



NAMES OF YE OLD FOLKS OF CONNECTICUT. 



37 



OLD LYME. 

Population, 1,387. 

Mrs. Polly Swaney, 

Miss Nancy Maxson, 

Capt. George H. Chadwick, 

Prentice Comstock, 

Hon. Charles .J. McCurdy, 

Abel L. Himtly, 

Seldeu Maynai-d, 

William Beckwith, 

Capt. Charles Chadwick, 

Marvin Huntly, 

Joel Saunders 

Capt. Nathan Conklin, 

William B. Tooker, 

Mrs. W. Tinker, 

Mrs. Phebe flavens, 

Mrs. Henry Sprague, 

Mrs. S. Saunders, 

Mrs. Charles C. Griswold, 

Mrs. Nancy Bates, 

Mrs. James Bliss, 

Mrs. William Beckwith, 

Mrs. Charles Peck, 

Mrs. Martha Griswold, 

OLD SAYBROOK. 

Population, 1,302. 
Abraham Chalker, 
Samuel B. Dickinson, 
Mrs. Amelia Dickinson, 
Mrs. Jeauette Bushnell, 
Calvin llipley, 
Mrs. Harriet Chalker, 
Edward Sanford, 
Mrs. Mary Beers, 
Mrs. Eunice Ellis, 
David Clark, 

Mrs. Phelps, 

Chauncey Spencer, 

Mrs. Ayer, 

Mrs. Maria Lynd, 

ORANGE. 

Population, 3,341. 
Deacon Aaron Clark, 
Benedict Crofut, 
Jonathan Treat, 
Eliakim T. Feun, 
Josiah Boardman, 
Merit WoodrufE, 
Mrs. Susan Smith, 
Mrs. Martha Smith, 
Mrs. Lucy Ailing, 
Mrs. Julia Ailing, 
Eben Ailing, 
Mrs. Mary Ailing, 
Richard Thomas, 
Peter R. Forbes, 
William A. Peck, 
Thomas Anderson (col'd), 
Mrs. Harriet F. Benham, 



Mrs. Abigial Smith, 
Mrs. Willis Ailing, 
Mrs. Bela Ailing, 

OXFORD. 

Population, 1,120. 
3rrs. Patty Candee, 
Mrs. Mary Hedding, 
A. Buckingham, 
Nehemiali Andrew, 
John Bassett, 
Eber Benham, 
Mrs. Eber Benham, 

Mrs. Beebe, 

Mrs. Charles Booth, 
E. N. Buckingham, 
Mrs. E. N. Buckingham, 
Burritt Davis, 
Mrs. Burritt Davis, 
Nathan Dorman, 
Mrs. Robert Downes, 
Smith Downes, 
Mrs. Smith Downes, 
Mrs. Julia French, 
Mrs. Evelina Graham, 
Alfred Hager, 
Mrs. Benjamin Holbrook, 
Miner Harris, 
Mrs. Silas Hawkins, 
Mrs. Asa Hawkins, 
Mrs. .Jeanette Hine, 
Mrs. Harriet Hinman, 
Everett Hubbell, 
Mrs. Olive Oatman, 
Ira Hyde, 
Mrs. Augusta Lum, 
Stiles Tucker, 
Erastus Wheeler, 
William S. Upson, 
Clark Webster, 
John Smith, 
Nicholas French, 
William A. French, 
R. B. Limburner, 
Clark E. Lum, 



PLAINFIELD. 

86 Population, 4,021. 

83 Phebe Rood. 

84 Eunice Tilliughast, 

85 Nancy Munro, 
82 Hannah Cole, 

84 W. C. Fry, 

86 Orra Gallup, 

82 Lydia R. Palmer, 

85 Esther Sweet, 

84 Marvilla B. Soule, 

83 Susan P. Walker, 
91 Tabitha Kennedy, 
93 Elizabeth Briggs, 

84 Lucinda Perkins, 
80 Polly Hill, 

83 Lydia Bishop, 

86 Esther Brown, 



83 Lucretia A. Coggswell, 82 

84 Amy Davis, 80 
82 John Graham, 80 

Mrs. Anna Spalding, 90 

Ivory Soule. 83 

Dinah Spalding, 83 

93 William Wilcox, 83 

93 

91 PLAINVILLE. 
80 PoiMilatinn, 1,930. 

80 Elizabeth Church, 92 

82 Fanny Tillotson, 91 

80 Eliada Sanford, 90 

80 Delia Darrow, 90 

81 Fanny Munson, 82 

80 Samuel C. McCoy, 80 

81 Jeremiah Neal, 82 
81 Bryan Newell, 80 
80 Martha Wekster, 80 

80 Russell U. Peck, 80 
84 Solomon Curtiss, 82 

81 Phebe Bradley, 84 
80 Rhoda Bristol, 83 

84 John Brock, 87 
87 Levi Curtiss, 84 
80 AnnCafferty, 80 

82 William Hills, 80 

83 Ira Hadsell, 82 

85 Maria A. Sanford, 88 

84 Sarah Swift, 81 
87 Josiah C. Usher, 81 
82 Elizabeth Woodruff, 87 

80 

87 PLYMOUTH. 

82 Population, 2,350. 

84 Mrs. Elam Fenn, 86 

81 Mrs. Ann McCue, 83 

82 Hiram Miner, 81 

80 John R. Coy, 82 

81 Mrs. John R. Coy, 88 

80 Lucas Lane, 83 

82 Mrs. Rhoda Fenn, 82 

81 Jerome Camp, 84 
80 Lyman Tolles, 82 
80 Mrs. Anna Smith, 81 

Miss Julia Swift, 82 

Mrs. Hendricks, 91 

Mrs. Amanda Griggs, 91 

92 Hiram Barnes, 82 
91 Mrs. Hiram Barnes, 80 
90 Mrs. Sophia Baldwin, 85 
80 Mrs. Eliza Bull, 83 

82 Mrs. Pollv Fenn, 87 

83 Mrs. Huldah E. Church, 84 

83 Mrs. Hannah Bassett, 87 

85 Mrs. Julia Stoughton, 83 
80 Mrs. Harriet Sanford, 81 

84 Heziah Sanford, 80 

CO 

90 POMFRET. 

89 Population, 1,470. 

87 Miss Betsey Richmond, 90 

80 Seth Chase, 84 

81 Mrs. Seth Chase, 86 



38 



NAMES OF YK OLD FOLKS OF CONNECTICUT. 



Miss Mary Sumner, 
Joel Baker, 
Mrs. Stephen Smith, 
Mrs. L. Botham, 

PORTLAND. 

Population, 4,146. 
Sylvester Gildersleeve, 
George Stancliff, 
Jonathan P. Southmayd, 
Erasmus Gladwin, 
Mrs. Lucy Culver, 
Sherman Kelsey, 
Mrs. Mary C. Polly, 
Mrs. Margaret Furguson, 
Mrs. David Sage, 
Mrs. Alex. Hale, 
David Hall, 
Halsey Hubbard, 
Doane Childs, 
Abner Hall, 

PRESTON. 

Hopulation, 3,519. 

Mrs. .Joseph Harvey, 
Mrs. Lucy Rood, 
Mrs. Prudy Pollard, 
Samuel Sherman, 
Captain George Sydleman, 
Mrs. Mary Richards, 
Amos Corning, 
Mrs. Sallie Hazen, 
Mrs. Betsey Cooke, 
Mrs. Sallie Avery, 
Mrs. Nancy Buddington, 
Peleg Edwards, 
Thomas Gardiner, 
Hezekiah Robbins, 
Russell Fitch, 
Miss Fannie Witter, 
William P. Witter, 
Irus Witter, 
Amos Stanton, 
Mrs. Betsey Lewis, 
Packer Keeney. 
Gideon Ellis, ' 



83 PROSPECT. 

85 Population, 493. 

84 Mrs. Anthony, 

87 Warren Wilson, 

Lucius Merriam. 



84 



PUTNAM. 

Population, 5,837 
Esther Coville, 
Edward Latimore, 
Martha Clark, 
Elizabeth Gadele, 



90 

81 
87 
84 

«? Amy Cutler, 



Daniel Mason, 



Achsah Seward, 
^^ Mary Woodlock, 
QQ Marcia Chandler, 
rj9 Eliza Gadboy, 
gg Oliver Potter, 



Martin Leach, 
Sallie Hazard, 



Poline Benway, 
Patrick Brady, 
James Chadwick, 
Abigail Fuller, 
Mary Mason, 
97 Rebecca Smith, 
95 Lydia F. White, 
93 John Giles, 
91 Mary F. Howe, 
91 Eliakim Sawyer, 
91 Sarah Warren, 
87 Daniel Crowley, 

84 Deborah Draper, 

85 Mary Howe, 
89 William Sharp, 

83 Peter Benway, 

84 Henry Bailey, 
84 James Collins, 
87 Francis Duchon, 

86 Emeline Holmes, 
86 Pauline Luther, 
84 Sophia Smith, 
81 Mary Augur, 

83 Mary Clark, 

84 Baptiste Gadele, 
80 Elvira Torry, 

85 Eunice Carpenter, 



John B. Carroll, 84 

John J. Greene, 86 

97 George Marsh, 80 

86 Mary Perchie, 81 

83 JohnLeclare, 85 

Rosum May. 88 

Lem Brown, 80 

Lara Blackner, 80 

^^ REDDING. 

90 Population, 1,540. 

90 Darby Green, 101 



90 


Priscilla Goodsell, 


96 


90 


Stephen Adams, 


94 


90 


Elizabeth Lyon, 


94 


90 


Melinda Gould, 


92 


81 


Lemuel Adams, 


88 


83 


Harriet Bartram, 


80 


88 


Deborah Barlow, 


80 


88 


Thomas Bassett, 


84 


83 


Jesse Banks, 


84 


85 


Catherine Bradley, 


80 


80 


Sally Whitehead, 


81 


81 


Polly Bates, 


80 


85 


Nancy Coley, 


84 


83 


Mabel Crofut, 


83 


83 


Aaron T. Dimon, 


80 


85 


Sally Dart, 


86 


83 


Abraham Dremer, 


81 


81 


Rachel Fairchild, 


84 


86 


Eunice Hewitt, 


83 


85 


Eveline Lyon, 


81 


80 


Laura Middlebrooks, 


85 


85 


Rebecca Merchant, 


80 


83 


Hanford Sturges, 


83 


80 


Elizabeth Mellen, 


81 


90 


Sally Nichols, 


81 


86 


Harry Pickett, 


83 


86 


Phebe Pickett, 


81 


83 


George Perry, 


80 


80 


Eliza Sanford, 


81 


81 


Armaziah Smith, 


83 


85 


Emeline Spaulding, 


80 


81 


John W. Sanford, 


85 


80 


Althea Sanford, 


84 


80 


Eliza Sanford, 


83 


81 


Harriet Hull, 


83 


83 







HISTORY OF MR. DARBY GREEN. 

Darby Green, of Redding, was born in the town of Kilijaha, County Clare, Ireland, 
November 17th, 1783, and will therefore be 101 years old November 1st, 1884. He came to this 
country in 1864, having been preceded by some of his family, and located with them in Red- 
ding, where he has since dwelt. He is small in stature, and his general appearance indicates 
great tenacity to life. He cannot speak a word of English, and it is impossible to obtain 
details of a career which has extended through a period so remarkable as to duration. His 
has been an unostentatious life, uneventful, only marked by those incidents which form a 
purely domestic history. Mrs. Green, his wife, died in 1873, several years his junior. Mr. 
Green is surrounded by seven sons, the eldest of whom is 65. His grandchildren number 
twenty-four. Of great-grandchildren he has five. For one so aged his constitution is strong, 
and his general health excellent. He is given but little to conversation, most of his time 
being devoted to an arm-chair, seated in which, and leaning upon his staff, he communes 
with himself, and never wearies vsdth the seeming recreation. Marvelous events have taken 



NAMES OF YE OLD FOLKS OF CONNECTICUT. 



39 



place during his time. Since his birth our revolutionary war has closed; our union of 
States was formed; General Washington was made President twice, and distinguished suc- 
cessors have occupied the chair of state; Napoleon came forth to surprise the world long 
after he had reached the j^ears of discretion, and the Duke of Wellington struck the blow at 
Waterloo which heralded the waning of that brightest of military stars; Mr. Green was 
more than half a century old when Queen Victoria, now advanced in years, took England's 
throne; and he has been an observer, though silent and, it may be, often unconscious of 
their importance, of all the events of 100 years which have been connected with and tended 
to the world's progress. 



RIDGEFIELD. 

Population, 2,028. 
Albin Jennings, 
Abijah Ressequie, 
Susan Bailey, 
Millicent Beers, 
Laura Olmstead, 
Wm. J. U. Wilkinson, 
David Glass, 
James Gilbert, 
Smith Keeler, 
Daniel Sholes, 
Timothy O. Scott, 
Lewis Reynolds, 
Robert C. Edmonds, 
Harvey Dickens, 
Keeler Dauchy, 
David B. Burr, 
Benajah T. Betts, 
Solomon Brown, 
Harry Hunt, 
Thaddeus M. Benedict, 
Sherwood Mead, 
Jonathan Rockwell, 
Edward B. Reynolds, 
John Holly, 
Johnson J. King, 
Clara Olmstead, 
Sally C. Williams, 
Pollv S. Jennings. 



Amelia Gilbert, 
Ruhania Northrop, 
Polly B. Northrop, 
Harriet Norris, 
Sarah Scott, 
Sarah Stebbins, 
Sally Stewart, 
Abby Edmunds, 
Rachel Been, 
Sophia H. Perry, 
Betsey June, 
^^ Abigail Bradley, 
37 Laura Reynolds, 
g4 May Hyatt, 

82 Miss Sally Keeler, 
80 ^^^I's. Sally Keeler, 

83 

85 
80 
83 
85 
83 
80 
87 
88 
84 
82 
89 
81 
86 



ROXBURY. 

Population, 950. 
Truman Hurd, 
Mrs. Joseph Squires, 
Mrs. Eunice Squires, 
Mrs. Glover Botsford, 
Charles Glover, 
Samuel Baldwin, 
Ciiarles Trowbridge, 
Edward E. Garlick, 
Mrs. Mary Thomas, 

SALEM. 



Mrs. 
Mrs. 



ROCKY HILL. 

Population, 1,109. 

Mabel Beaumont. 

Mabel Porter, 
Mrs. Mary Hale, 
Ashbel Belden, 
Deacon J. G. Dimock, 
Chester B. Goodrich, 
Mrs. C. B. Grimes, 
Mrs. Abigail Smith, 
Mrs. Mary Butler, 
George O. Chambers, 



89 Population, 574. 
88 William Ray, 

Mrs. Lydia Treadway, 

Joseph Smith, 

Mrs. Seibel Tew, 

Mrs. Nancy Rogers, 
93 Rev. Nathaniel Miner, 
91 Jesse Maynard, 

90 Mrs. Green. 

85 Daniel Wilson, 

81 Mrs. William De Wolfe, 

82 Deacon John A. Niles, 
87 Mrs. John A. Niles, 

83 Mrs. Lucy Herrick, 
83 Mrs. Lucretia Harris, 
83 Mrs. Elizabeth Latham, 



HISTORY OF WILLIAM RAY, OF SALEM. 

William Ray, of Salem, New London county, was born on the Island of Nantucket, 
September 17tli, 1785, and dwelt with his parents until after the year 1800. His early associ- 
tions are with the sea, and he can remember when whaling as an industry was considered 
one of the most important, and his town what then seemed to be one of the business centres 
of the world. At the age of 20 he found his way to Rhode Island where, after unimportant 
personal endeavors to establish a business, he directed his steps to Connecticut, and in 1810, 
in the town of Montville, married Abby Martin, a lady about two years his junior, by whom 
he had seven children, four sons and three daughters. She died about the year 1825. His 
second wife was Cynthia Whitman, and she died in 1829. Two sons and one grandson are 
living. Mr. Ray has resided in Salem since 1858, making that place his home at the age of 
71. For nearly fifty-six years he followed the sea continuously, voyaging to Europe, up the 
Mediterranean and to Africa. His last voyage was made in 1854, with Captain Nicholas 
Johnson, of the schooner Oxford, to Mozambique, Africa, for dye-wood. He was an old 
man when he retired from sea-faring life, and since, his chief amusement has been hunting, 
which he continued until his eyesight failed. He is hale and hearty, has the use of 
every limb and joint, and seems to enjoy life as well as ever he did. Any day, in fair 
weather, he may be seen walking with the aid of a cane in the open air, as smart as many 
who are thirty years younger. Indeed, there are few at the age of 70 who look younger or 
are more spry than he. His hearing is good, and memory enables him to trace events in his 
own and his country's history far back into another century. His stories of observation of 
the countries he has visited are very interesting. Having passed into his 100th year, he is 



40 



NAMES OF YE OLD FOLKS OF CONNECTICUT. 



anticipating — and'his friends as well — the arrival of the date which shall render him a cen- 
tenarian. He has lived under every administration, and expects to vote for President once 
more, on Tuesday, November 4th. 



SALISBURY. 

Population, 3,715. 
Mrs. Amelia Barnett, 
Simeon Cooper, 
Mrs. Simeon Cooper, 
Miss Mary Reed, 
Horace Smith, 
Mrs. Elizabeth Owen, 
Mrs. Fanny Botsford, 
Robert Merrifield, 
Hiram Fanning, 
Cornelius Snyder, 
Mrs. Cornelius Snyder, 
Joseph Hulett, 
John C. Silverman, 
Mrs. Lucretia Silverman, 
Freeman Woodin, 
Andrew Wintei's, 
Miss Caroline Ball, 
Philip Veeley, 
Joseph O. Brinton, 
Mrs. Caroline Brinton, 
Mrs. Asenath IMcArthur, 
Simeon Miller, 
Mrs. Eliz. O. Chittenden, 
Miss Euphemia Johnston, 
Mrs. Olive Pratt, 
Samuel S. Bobbins, 
James Landon, 
Ex-Gov. Alex. H. Holley, 
Mrs. Mary S. Cleveland, 
Frederick A. Reed, 
Mrs. Lucy A. Shaw, 
Mrs. Eleanor Landon, 
Mrs. Marj^ Hutchinson, 
Henry Myers, 
Ensign Titus, 
John Prince, 

SAYBBOOK. 

Population, 1,362. 
James Dixon, 
Elizabeth Comstock, 
George E. Bailey, 
Epaphrodotus Bates, 
Wealthy Clark, 
Peter Grant, 
Russell Jennings, 
Temperance H. Murray, 
Alfred Platts. 
Sophia Platts, 



Hope Shailer, 
Gilbert Stevens, 
(JO Chloe Southworth, 
QP Sally Worthington, 
:i^ Abel Webber, 
:^f, Ashabel Watrous, 



Richard Buckingham, 



Q,. Mary A. Dennison, 
^Jj Hannah Hoadley, 



Polly Jones, 
Hart L. Murray, 
Phebe Nichols, 
Louisa H. Phelps, 
John Rand. 



°^ Caroline Rand, 
^X Rufus Pratt, 



SCOTLAND. 

Population, 590. 
Mason Palmer, 
Mrs. Eleazur Fitch, 



•^•i Miss Abby Fuller, 



Miss Mary Ann Webb, 
Mrs. David S. Fuller, 
William Dorrance, 



David F. Smith, 
Mrs. Lora Spotford, 
Mrs. Fanny Hovey, 
Mrs. Olive Palmer, 
David P. Walden, 
John D. Waldo, 



88 
80 
80 
80 
80 __ _ ^^ 

^J( George Bingham, 
^^ Mrs. Alice Smith, 
^^ Mrs. Maria Bass, 

o* 

^^ SEYMOUR. 

gl Population, 3,318. 

Mrs. Sarah White, 
Mrs. Mary Hedden, 
Mrs. Nellie Brennan, 
Mrs. Mary Cochran, 
92 Mrs. Sarah Chatfield, 
90 Mrs. Rachel Carrington, 

83 Joel R. Chatfield, 

80 Mrs. Harriet E. Denney, 

80 Jeremiah Durand, 

80 Mrs. Maria M. Holbrook, 

84 Mrs. Julia Peck, 

85 Mrs. Julia Hine, 

83 Mrs. Katy Horitz, 

84 Mrs. Harriet Holbrook, 



84 Sheldon C. Johnson, 


86 


80 Mrs. Sophia McEwen, 


80 


80 Mrs. Polly Riggs, 


87 


83 Mrs. Sarah SheUon, 


83 


81 Mrs. Sarah Smith, 


83 


84 Mrs. Lois Smith, 


1 


84 William C. Smith, 


80 


83 Damarus Somers, 


86 


80 Mrs. Levitta Thomas, 


83 


81 Mrs. Hiram Upson, 


86 


85 




IJ SHARON. 




81 Population, 2,580. 




^^ Mrs. Hannah Everett, 


94 


83 Samuel Prindle, 


92 


Mrs. Benjamin Hamlin, 


91 


Mrs. Hannah Hilton, 


91 


Mrs. Betsey Lockwood, 


90 


A. A. Hotchkiss, 


84 


93 Judson St. John, 


82 


82 Garry Morehouse, 


89 


84 Zacheus Bissell. 


82 


84 Lemuel Peck, 


80 


82 Earl Cartwright, 


82 


81 Solomon Hunter, 


80 


83 Mrs. Chesterfield King, 


85 


84 Mrs. Joseph Lord, 


89 


81 Mrs. Sabra Smith, 


81 


83 Mrs. Betsy 0. Perkins, 


85 


80 Mrs. Betsey E. Roberts, 


80 


82 Julia Ocain, 


87 


83 Mrs. Mary Everett, 


81 


84 Mrs. Nancy Everett, 


89 


82 Mrs. Harriet Fuller, 


87 


Mrs. Abby Pierson, 


87 


Mrs. Electa Calkins, 


89 



92 



SHERMAN. 



84 Population, 828. 

83 Phebe Briggs, 

84 Eli Patchen, 

85 Truman Bottsford, 

80 Abner Curtis, 
85 Marcus Durga, 
84 Cornelia Gelston, 
83 Louisa Gould, 
90 Jane Hubbell, 
88 Abigail Hurd, 

81 Wealthy White, 
87 Minerva Wanzer, 



100 
93 

85 



82 



HISTORY OF MRS. PHEBE BHIGGS, OF SHERMAN. 

Mrs. Phebe Briggs was born in New Milf ord. Jerusalem District, November 16, 1784, 
and as Sherman borders upon that town at the west, and her bouse is just over the line, 
it will be seen that she has dwelt almost a century within a short distance of her birthplace. 
She lived as a girl in primitive times, and acquired what she has of education un- 
der difiiculties. She has descended from a long lived race, most of her ancestors living to be 



XAMES OF YE OLD FOLKS OF CONNECTICUT, 



41 



very old. At the age of 34, February 8, 1848, she was married to James Briggs, and left 
New Milford for Sherman, then called New Fairtield, to occupy a farm which Mr. Briggs 
had inherited. His father, Zephania, located on it in 1770. He was born in 1735, fought in 
the French and Indian wars, and in the Revolution, for which he received a pension. He 
died in 1837, at the age of 102. The musket he bore, a rusty flint-loek, is carefully kept in 
the family as an object of curiosity. The stories he told of experiences at Ticonderoga and 
elsewhere are often recalled by his descendants. He left a large family of children. James 
took the homestead where the aged lady now resides, and his brothers and sisters removed to 
different parts of the country. Mrs. Briggs has had three children, only one of whom, Miss 
Ophelia Briggs, in her 74th year, is living. The others, Calvin H. and Eusebia, were born 
1811 and 1814, and died in 1880 and 1843 respectively. Mr. Briggs died in 1859, in his 79th 
year. Since his death Mrs. Briggs has resided in the beautiful home of Mrs. Calvin Briggs, 
widow of her only son. Miss Ophelia Briggs lives with them and kindly cares for her aged 
ancestor. It is a rare and beautiful spectacle to see these three together, and it must be 
pleasing for daughters so advanced in years to be able to say "my mother." Kindly and af- 
fectionately they anticipate the wants of the centenarian, and as a combined duty and pleas- 
ure, minister to them. What a satisfaction will be their's, some day, as memory commends 
their splendid acts. 

Mrs. Briggs is enjoying a comfortable degree of health, though eyesight is impaired and 
power of locomotion weak. Like most extremely aged ones, she is a little deaf, but this does 
not prevent her hearing the words of joyfulness uttered in her presence, and catching the ideas 
which visiting friends convey. In conversation she speaks in an interesting and entertaining 
way, and veins of humor often call forth laughter in which she is not slow to join. She re- 
calls with great distinctness the events of the past, though she is troubled at times to fix dates 
and repeat names, and is forgetful during temporary illness and suffering. Her mental fac- 
ulties show so few signs of weakening that it may be said she is the equal of many who are 
a generation younger. She is the light of the household, though there are no grandchildren 
or great-grandchildren upon whom to shed a portion of it. Her's is a glorious evening of 
life, in the twilight of which she calmly waits for a summons, trusting in the Savior who has 
graciously led her along the pilgrim way. The weekly Standard has been a regular visitor 
at the homestead since it was founded. Mr. Briggs began taking it when the first copy was 
printed, the family continuing it till this time, fts arrival is looked for and its contents are 
read to the aged listener. An ancient Bible containing genealogical tables of all members of 
the family was lost recently in transit from the West by express, much to the sorrow of Mrs. 
Briggs and her daughters. This book had a record of the centenarian's birth, which hun- 
dreds had seen. Thus her great age is authoritatively established. She is regarded by 
friends and neighbors with love and veneration. As these call to offer congratulations, the 
wish, often expressed, that she may complete her century of existence, is heard, and that, on 
the 16th of November, there may be a celebration worthy of the event to be commemorated. 



SIMSBURY. 

Population, 1,830. 

Mrs. Myra Alford, 83 

Mrs. Catherine Brown, 88 

Sevilla Bacon, 86 

Joseph S. Bartlett, 80 

Elam Case, 80 

Mrs. Emma Cornish, 82 

Mrs. Julia Case, 80 

Davis P. D^ay, 81 

Elmore Griffin, 80 

Mrs. Lavinia Griffin, 80 
Mrs. Elizabeth Humphrey, 84 

Mrs. Harriet E. Morse, 85 

Thomas Morton, 89 

]Mrs. Mary Payne, 85 

Avis C. Pickett, 90 

Orson Reed, 85 

Mrs. Lucy Reed, 87 

Jacob Bolls, 86 

Horace Root, 86 

Mahala Terry, 82 

Mrs. Lucinda Tyrrel, 81 



Mrs. Esther A. Taylor, 
Mrs. Jane Wilcox, 
Mrs. Nancy Wyman, 
Martin Wilcox, 
Charles Waddingburgh, 

SOMERS. 

Population, 1,242. 

Verona Cooley, 
Louisa Charter, 
Warren Kibble, 
Austin Pease, 
Joel Adams, 
Martin Risley, 
Luther Stebbens, 
Eunice Langdon, 
Polly Pease, 
Lucinda Pomeroy, 
Horace Fuller, 
Samuel Converse, 
Achsah Jones, 
William Taylor, 
Sumner Root, 



91 


SOUTHBURY. 




80 
89 


Population, 1,740. 




86 


Mrs. Julia Cann, 


97 


80 


Joseph Squires, 


94 




Mrs. Betsey Hurlbert, 


92 




Mrs. Charlotte Michell, 


93 




Mrt. Betsey Downes, 


91 




Mrs. Betsey Roswell, 


90 




Mrs. Sara Allen, 


83 


92 


Mrs. Phebe Bennett, 


85 


90 


Mrs. Sally Bostwick, 


87 


80 


Alison Chapman, 


82 


80 


Nathan Coger, 


81 


87 


Mrs. Sally Garlick, 


80 


82 


Mrs. Sarah Hunt, 


8& 


80 


Isaac Johnson, 


8& 


87 


Mrs. Olive Laird, 


86 


85 


John Lamb, 


84 


83 


Mrs. Patty M. Mitchel, 
Mrs. Lydia McBrinney, 
Mrs. Nancy P. Mitchell, 


81 


85 


83 


88 


81 


87 


William G. Mosely, 


84 


86 


Mrs. j\Iaria C. Mosely, 


84 


80 


George Ohngemach, 


80 



42 



NAMES OF YE OLD FOLKS OF CONNECTICUT. 



Justus Pierce, 83 

Mrs. Olive Pierce, 80 

Mrs. Julia Piatt, 85 

Mrs. Fannie Peck, 82 

Mrs. Ruth Peck, 83 

Mrs. Ann C. Pierce, 81 

Benjamin Raymond, 85 

Uri Strong, 86 

Mrs. Anna F. Styles, 86 

Mrs. Elizabeth Stone, 89 

Mrs. Hannah Squires, 81 

Mrs. Abigail Thompson, 86 

Mrs. Grace Wheeler, 84 

Andrew AVhite, 83 

SOUTHINGTON. 

Population, 5,411. 

Mrs. Melissa Crittenden, 91 

Mrs. Esther Havilaud, 91 

Mrs. Emma C, Bid well, 90 

Mrs. Moses Beckly, 86 

William Bradbury, 86 

Loyal Barrett, 85 

Mrs. Loyal Barrett, 85 

Mrs. Julius Bristol, 85 

Mrs. Statira Shepard, 85 

Mrs. John B. Woodruff, 85 

David Root Sloper, 83 

Amos Hamblin, 84 

Horace Smith, 84 

Mrs. Sophia Booth, 84 

Mrs. John Neale, 84 

Mrs. Chauncey Dunham, 84 

Timothy Higgins, 83 

Mrs. Joel Pot'ter, 83 

Mrs. Amarilla Camp, 83 

Mrs. Portia N. Beecher, 83 

Mrs. Emeline Lee, 82 

Mrs. Mary W. Skinner, 82 

John Quill, 81 

Inmer Judd, 81 

William Andrews, 81 

Amon Woodruff, 81 

Luman Lewis, 81 

Mrs. Polly Cowles, 81 

Mrs. Oliver Lewis 81 

Rodney Langdon, 81 

Mrs. Timothy Higgins, 81 

Mrs. Patty Payne, 80 

Mrs. Artemus'Gridley, 80 

Mrs. George Gridley, 80 

Mrs. Eliza DooHttle, 80 

Mrs. Emma Curran, 80 

Mrs. iMinerva Billings, 80 

Mrs. Anna Tribbis, 80 

Bryan Newell, 80 

SOUTH WINDSOR. 

Population, 1,902. 

Elizabeth Cayton, 93 

John P. Jones, 93 

Julia Andross, 83 

Edgar Bissell, 83 

Eveline W. Bissell, 80 



Lueius Burnham, 82 

Louis G. Bissell, 82 

Selene Ellsworth, 85 

Fred. W. Grant. 86 

Job L. Higley, 83 

Rockwell Hayes, 87 

Harriet Hollister, 81 

Ann J. Jennings, 80 

William .Jennings, 80 

John Moore, 84 

Harriet Mills, 83 

Amelia McKingsbury, 82 

Austin Pel ton," 82 

Mary A. Pinney, 80 

Mary C. Reynolds, 83 

Henrietta Rockwell, 81 

George Foster, 85 

SPRAGUE. 

Population, 3,307. 

Mrs. Harrett Lillie, 83 

Patrick Shea, 83 

Septa Ladd, 82 

Mrs. Phebe Ross, 86 

Mrs. Betsey Renond, 83 

Charles Logan, 81 

Benjamin Noyes, 83 

Salatha Manning, 83 

Samuel Lovett, 84 

STAFFORD. 

Samuel Harwood, 93 

Orriu Harwood, 95 

Amanda Colburn, 91 

Andrew Connell, 90 

Talman Cross, 80 

Asenath Howe, 83 

Alexander ^laynard, 86 

Sally Phillips, 80 

Daniel Rockwell, 84 

Benjamin Rockwell, 80 

Palace Thresher, 80 

Lodica Wardwell, 83 

Abraham Francis, 85 

Anne Henderson, 85 

Clarissa .Tolinson, 83 

Helen McKendiick, 83 

Anson Spellman, 85 

Marv Sullivan, 83 

Martha Blodgett, 86 

Esther M. Biodgett, 81 

John A. Brewer, 80 

Sibyl Agard, 81 

Sarah Baker, 80 

Abigail Buck, 84 

Eleanor Cummings, 80 

Betsey Jones, " 84 

Andrew Oddy, 86 

Daniel Perkins, 83 

Nabby Rockwell, 81 

Thomas H. Thresher, 83 

Clarissa Walker, 82 

Susan Burdon, 83 

Delight Coggswell, 84 



Maria Fairfield, 81 

Laura Francis, 82 

Nellie Holmes, 88 

Patrick King, 87 

Dolly Lillibridge, 83 

Selinda Orcutt, 84 

Mary Pergier, 85 

Betsey Sibley, 80 

William S. Smith, 81 

Austin Walbridge, 83 

STAMFORD. 

Population, 11,398. 

Nathan White, 95 

Mrs. Nancy Lockwood, 95 

Theodore Davenport, 94 

George Barker, 93 

John Billings, 93 

Mrs. Ruth Smith, 93 

Mrs. Lydia Ferris, 93 

Mrs. Jane Carigal, 93 

Mrs. Maria (colored) 93 

Hagar Holmes, 91 

Candice Gibson, 91 

Seth Miller, 82 

Joseph Selleck, 83 

Charles Quintard, 81 

Charies W. Knapp, 82 

]Mrs. Mary Smith, 82 

Mrs. Mary A. Finnery, 84 

John Ryan, 81 

Apollus Holly, 84 

Thaddeus Jones, 83 

Adam Quigley, 82 

Edwin R. Lockwood, 84 

John A. Scotield, 85 

Ormand Broadway, 81 

Charies Williams, 86 

George Weed, 82 

David Crabb, 84 

Mrs. Phebe Crabb, 81 

David S. Holly, 82 

Mrs. Rebecca Crabb, 80 

John Parsons, 83 

Mrs. Pollv Smith, 81 

J. B. Ferns, 82 

William Provost, 84 

Rue Smith, 82 

Daniel Kennedy, 84 

Stephen Lockwood, 82 

Patrick Dyer, 84 

John Dillon, 81 

Joseph Aiken, 80 

Nathaniel Lockum, 84 

Mrs. Caroline Scofield, 83 

Mrs. Mariah E. Weed, 81 

Mrs. Rebecca Weed, 80 

Selleck Holly, 83 

Thomas Dixon, 81 

Mrs. Mary Nolan, 84 

Mrs. Ryle, 82 

Roswell Hoyt, 81 

John Picker, 81 

George Elder, 84 



NAMES OF YE OLD FOLKS OF CONNECTICUT. 



43 



Naomi Webb, 84 Frank Pendleton, 85 

William Smith, 82 Mrs. Fanny Clark, 84 

Miss Maria Ketclium, 84 Alexdander Palmer, 83 

Charles H. Cole, 84 Miss Eunice Wheeler, 83 

Mrs. Sally Brown, 86 Mrs. Philara Holmes, 82 

William Rosborough, 83 Mrs. Esther B. Fish, 81 

Mrs. Lois Jones, 85 Mrs. Nancy Chesbro, 81 

Titus Hallett, 81 William C. Moss, 80 

John Provost, 83 Joanna Donney, 80 

Mrs. Betsey Lounsbury, 85 Nathan S. Noyes, 81 

Mrs. Charlotte Abbott, 80 Mrs. Guard, 83 

Mrs. Deborah Mabie, 80 Mrs. A. P. Bond, 86 

Hamant Rosborough, 85 Mrs. Abby D. Smith, 85 

Benjamin Webb, 83 Mrs. Fanny Wilcox, 83 

Mrs. Catherine C. Havens, 81 Mrs. Sarah Pendleton, 83 

Mrs. Lavina White, 88 Dr. David S. Hart, 83 

Mrs. Mary Smith, 84 Mrs. Dudley D. Bennett, 83 

Mrs. Mary Marshall, 84 Joseph S. Williams, 83 

Mrs. Eunice Reed, 83 Rev. Paul Couch, 81 

Mrs. Brewer, 80 Denison Chesboro, 81 

A. T. Smith, 80 Grace Clics))ro, 80 

Ezra Jones, 83 James Manning, 80 

Robert Little, 83 Mrs. Jonas Ilorne, 81 

Mrs. Robert Little, 80 ■ 

William Crawford, 
Edward Buxton, 
Mrs. Amzi Scotield.'- 

STONINGTON. 

Population, 7,353. 
Lavina Denison, 
j\Iiss Dolly Palmer, 
(;harles P. Wheeler, 
Ellas B. Chaplin, 
Deacon Simeon Palmer, 
Mrs. Grace B. Noyes, 
Giles Williams, 
Mrs. Nancy Chapman. 
Capt. Thomas Davidson, 
Benj. Franklin Hancox, 
Betsey Chesbro, 

Mrs. Prentice, 

Mrs. Pendleton, 

Phebe N. Wells, 
James Norman, 

HISTORY OF MRS. BRIDGKT FARLEY, OF STRATFORD. 

In Stratford, on Wednesday evening, August 30th, at the house of Dr. W. F. Hutchinson, 
Mrs. Bridget Farley, who was born in the town of Kent, County Mayo, thirty miles from 
Dublin, Iieland. August 30, 1781, celebrated her 103d birthday, about twenty friends taking 
part therein. The aged lady resides with her voimgest son, Lawrence Farley, in a cottage, 
and the apartments being small, it was decided to accept Dr. and Mrs. Hutchinson's invita- 
tion to rooms more ample. Aided by her staff, Mrs. Farley walked from her home to the 
place of meeting and there joined in the festivities, enjoying seemingly all that was offered 
equal to those who had assembled in her honor. When music began and there was a call 
for an old-fashioned breakdown, Mrs. Farley took the floor with Miss Annie Hutchinson as 
partner, bent on going through the figures of a genuine "fore and after." It was a walk- 
over simply, as the aged dancer declared. There was too much " rhumatiz " hanging around 
that left ankle joint of hers, otherwise she'd shake the dust out of the floor seams with a 
vengeance. Previous to dancing, a well-filled table was displayed, and as a host and hostess 
rarely have a guest aged 103, iicen.se was taken to driak the more than centenarian's health 
in a fluid not wholly of water. There was a prompt response by the old lady, who declared 
that it had been her habit through her long life now and then to " take a dhrop," that she 



81 


STERLING. 




81 
83 


Population, 957. 






Naity Foster, 


91 




Cromwell Hill, 


88 




Rhoda Stone, 


85 




Hapsy Wood, 


83 


90 


Lois kenyon, 
Charles Weaver, 


83 


90 


81 


90 

87 


Sophia B. Coates, 


81 


85 
83 
83 


STRATFORD. 




Population, 4,351. 




82 


Bridget Farley, 


103 


83 


Rachel Couch. 


98 


81 


Eliza Chatfleld, 


93 


80 


Lucy S. Ayres, 


93 


83 


Catherine Beard, 


91 


81 


Harriet Curtis, 


91 


87 


Theodosia Lamson, 


91 


86 


Catherine Lewis, 


91 



Elias Wells, 
Betsey Wheeler, 
Maria Dayton, 
Charles Curtis, 
Henry Curtis, 
Nancy Hall, 
Elizabeth Clark, 
Legrand Wells, 
Susan Bristol, 
Silas Blake, 
Isaac Brooks, 
Susan Brooks, 
William Holmes, 
Elizabeth Sands, 
Ciu-tis Judson, 
.Jerusha Curtis, 
Helen Whitney, 
Mabel C. Hyde, 
Eliza Beardsley, 
Odle Bouton, 
Julia A. Beers. 
Salina Booth, 
Amanda Van Voorhes, 
Caroline Goulding, 
Amy J. Burritt, 
Clara Burritt, 
Sherman Benjamin, 
Lucinda Smith, 
James N. Paige, 
Elsie Osborn, 
Tamantha Price, 
Eliza De Forest, 
Lydia B. Turner, 
Mary Wolf, 
Harriet Beardsley, 
David Bennett, 
Mrs. S. Batterson, 
Amelia Dayton, 
Michael M'urphy, 
Harvey Warner, 
Sarah A. Curtis, 
Hannah Jones, 
Julia Lewis, 



44 



NAMBS OF YE OLD FOLKS OF CONNECTICUT. 



"always felt bettlier aftlier it," and her sentiment in connection with this particular indulg- 
ence was " Good luck and good health to all," in real Irish dialect. She indicated that if 
she found the habit to be gi-owing upon her she would surely stop it before she became old 
and infirm. There was a joyful time and although Mrs. Farley was among the happiest, she 
retired, by way of example, early. She makes her own bed daily, preferring to do so, and 
declares that her daughter, who is constant in every attention to the aged one, never knew 
how to make a bed as it ought to be. In 1800, at the age of 19, the veteran was married to 
William Farley, and with him, in 1820, sailed from Dublin in the ship Charity for the land 
of freedom. She said the passage was free and that was one of the inducements they had 
to make this their home. They were six weeks on the way, and on arrival located in the 
lower part of Broad street. New York city, and carried on the hosiery business in a small 
way. As the city grew they went out into the country in Catherine street. From New 
York, after the death of her husband, she went to Augusta, Me. , stayed there several years, 
returned to New York, and during the month of July last located with her youngest son, 
Lawi-ence Farley, aged about 55, where she expects to pass the remainder of her days. 
Physically she is in good condition, and her mind unusually so. Memory is somewhat 
treacherous, and things she thinks the most of occurred so long ago that it is impossible, she 
says, to keep track of them. Of nine children, two are living, and she has six grand and 
eight great-grandchildren. She has three objects as reminders of her affection for the " ould 
sod " — a deal trencher, given her by her mother in 1800 when she went to housekeeping; an 
iron frying-pan, in daily use by her daughter, and an iron shoe pulled from the hoof of her 
favorite and only donkey just before taking ship, an animal which she wanted to bring along 
but could not. She belongs to a long lived family, her father dying at the age of 115 and 
her mother aged 100. She declares that she has but one thing to live for, and that is to 
repent of all her sins, thanking G-od for the privilege of living so long to do it earnestly and 
fully. 



SUFFIELD. 




Mrs. Elisha Pomeroy, 


86 


Alanson Ranson, 


82 


Population, 3,235. 




Aretus Rising, 


83 


Mrs. Abel Gleason, 


85 




Mrs. Lester Rising, 


82 


Mrs. Charles Brown, 


80 


Mrs. Alvira Allen, 


92 


Mrs. Curtis Rose, 


81 


Mrs. Valentine Ballard, 


80 


Milton Lester, 


92 


Mrs. Hannah Remington, 


81 


Mrs. Atresia Crosby, 


84 


Curtis Hunt, 


90 


Horace Sheldon, 


82 


Mrs. Stephen Crosby, 


80 


Mrs. Leverett Norton, 


90 


Mrs. Julius C. Sheldon, 


87 


Miss Sally Elliott, 


80 


Miss Emily Norton, 


90 


Mrs. Mary Ann Sheldon. 


80 


Jesse Alton, 


82 


Noadiah Adams, 


82 


Leverett Sackett, 


80 


Oliver Adams. 


83 


Mrs. Theoda S. Allen, 


81 


Zebina Sikes, 


81 


Mrs. Elizabeth Blake, 


84 


Thomas J. Austin, 


80 


Mrs. Elihu S. Taylor, 


80 


Uzziel Byxby, 


83 


Amos S. Crane, 


81 


Mrs. Ann Wheeler, 


83 


Miss Belinda Bates, 


81 


Ansel Cook, 


82 


Mrs. Lyman Whitman, 


82 


Schuyler Corbin, 


84 


Mrs. William Cannon, 


86 


Mrs. Curtis Warner, 


84 


Miss Sylvia Cunningham, 
Mrs. Nancy Chandler, 


83 


Mrs. Warren Case, 


83 


Mrs. Mary Smith, 


82 


82 


Miss Eliza Denslow, 


81 


Mrs. Climera Rice, 


86 


Mrs. Louisa Day, 


83 


Abiatha Dean, 


88 


Mrs. H. Denslow, 


80 


D. N. Elliott, 


86 


Joseph Fuller, 


81 






Mrs. D. N. Elliott, 


81 


Hiram K. Granger, 


83 


THOMPSON. 




John George, 


87 


Henry Goodman, 
Miss Mary C. Gay, 


84 
82 


Population, 5,051. 




Miss Sophia Joslyn, 
Patrick Kiernan, 


87 
82 


Lyman Griffin, 


84 


Mrs. Hannah Parker, 


97 


Frederick Mills. 


83 


Thomas Hutchins, 


87 


Charles Brown, 


96 


Mrs. Sarah R. MatthewsoE 


, 81 


Milton Hatheway, • 


87 


Mi.ss Sally Bates, 


95 


Obediah Ross, 


80 


Mrs. Robert Hatheway, 


80 


Joseph Byxby, 


94 


Miss Alice Sibley, 


86 


Ransom Hayden, 


82 


Barnby Chandler, 


91 


Franklin Upham, 


82 


Mrs. Asa Harmon, 


82 


Benjamin AVarner, 


90 


David Wilson, 


81 


Abel King, 


80 


Lemuel E. Hascall, 


80 


Aaron White, 


83 


Mrs. Abel King, 


80 


Mrs. Lydia Mason, 
Mrs, Noadiah Watson. 


82 


H. Upham, 


88 


Henry P. Ket, 


82 


85 


Mrs. Abby M. Gay, 


84 


Mrs. Archibald Kinney, 


87 


Mrs. Abby Watson, 


84 


Miss Mary Dunksley, 


80 


John D. Leonard, 


84 


Mrs. Abby C. Gay, 


82 







Mrs. Lucinda Lewis, 


80 


Mrs. Annie Ketchum, 


82 


TOLLAND. 




Joseph Leonard, 


84 


George Day, 


83 


Population. 1,169. 




Mrs. Joseph Leonard, 


82 


Mrs. George Day, 


81 


Ruth Benton, 


92 


John Messenger, 


86 


Stephen Crosby, 


82 


Luther Cobb, 


91 


John Noble, 


81 


Eden Davis, 


82 


Anna Sumner, 


91 


Mrs. Potter Parmelee, 


84 


Winthrop H. Ballard, 


82 


Martha Allen, 


83 



NAMES OF YE OLD FOLKS OF CONNECTICUT. 



45 



Nancy Babcock. 88 

Submit Clark. 87 

Sarah Chapman, 80 

Sherman Chapman, 81 

Daniel Chapman, 80 

j\Iarv Dowliug, 85 

Lewis Ilarwood, 83 

Matilda Ilarwood, 87 

Frank Kimball, 84 

Noali .Moulton, 81 

Alnura Studley, 84 

Lucy Tryon, 83 

Sam'uel Wade, 82 

Fanny West, 83 

Henry Watrous, 82 

Obediah Waldo, 83 

TOBRINGTON. 

Population, 3,337. 

Johanna Bulkley, 89 

John Butler, 84 

Jeremiah Bounds, 91 

Hannah Bounds, 86 

Louisa Brown, 84 

James Batters, 84 

ElizAir Barber, 85 

Amos Cables, 84 

Dianatha Cables, 84 

Augustus Grant, 87 
Charlotte A. Hungerford, 84 

Sylvia Kimberly, 83 

JNiindwell Kellogg, 83 

Emma .Mills, 86 

Frederick North, 80 

Frederick P. Whiting, 84 

Amelia P. Whiting, 80 

Lauren Wetmore, 83 

Fanny Wetmore, 83 

Eliza' T. Cowles, 80 

TRUMBULL. 

Population. 1,323. 

Ali Brinsmade, 92 

Alvord S. Coan, 81 

Andrew Tait, 85 

Mrs. — Parsons, 83 

■ Taylor, 85 

Mrs. Sally Nichols, 81 

Mrs. Beach Plumb, 84 

Mrs. Elam Sterling, 83 

Walker Wheeler, 83 

Burr Goodsell, 80 

Alonzo Sherman, 81 

UNION. 

Population, 539. 

Daniel Steers, 81 

Mrs. Daniel Steers, 83 

Newman Bugbee, 87 

Chauncey Paul, 82 

jMrs. Pavil Lawson, 93 

Mrs. Burley, 96 

Ezra Horton, 86 



Trenck Crawford, 
Mrs. Newman Bugbee, 
Mrs. Merrick Cheney, 

VERNON. 

Population, 6,915. 
Arthur O'Keefe, 
Christopher Becker, 
Valentine Best, 
Azel Bowers, 
Joseph H. Brown, 
W. S. Cogswell, 
G. Colton, 
A. Corey, 
Job Coke, 
George L Keeler, 
Azariah Lathrop, 
James Regan, 
Clark Steer, 
Frederick Schrier, 
Dana Stebbins, 
Michael C. Stortzner, 
Chauncey Whincell, 
Christian I. Young, 
James Hawkins, 

VOLUNTOWN. 

Population, 1,186. 
Mrs. Thankful Douglass, 
Mrs. Abby Young, 
Sereno Kennedy, 
.Joseph S. James, 
Mrs. Esther S. James, 
Christopher Colgrove, 
James Campbell, 
Miss Fanny Whiten, 
Mrs. Susan Bitgood, 
Mrs. Sarah Braman, 
Mrs. Olive Gallup, (blind) 
Mrs. Sophronia Gordon, 

THOMASTON. 

Population. 3.225. 
Mrs. Julia Wood, 
Mrs. — — Martin, 
Mrs. Ruth Blakeslee, 
Mrs. Abigail Blakeslee, 
Mrs. Ann Bottom, 
Mrs. Lucinda Newton, 
Mrs. Sally Painter, 
Mrs. Christina Lyman, 
William T. Woodruff, 
Dea. D. Potter, 
Asabel Harvey, 
William Mann, 
Ransom Newton, 

WALLINGFORD. 

Population, 4,686. 
J. Dailey, 
Mary Palmer, 
Clarissa Hall, 
Sarah K. Carrington, 



84 Merancy Beadle, 
80 Maria Williams, 

88 Patrick Larkin, 
Henry Biggins, 
Rosanna Clinton, 
Sarah G. Harrison, 

9f^ Carlos Hall, 
Betsey Tuttle, 
Clarissa Mehan, 
Caroline Wooding, 
Street Jones, 
Caleb Atwater, 
Joseph Burton, 
Lina Lewis, 
Harriet Morse, 
Caroline Andrews, 
Daniel Howd, 
84 Mary Carrington, 
82 Edward L. Cutter, 
80 Carrie Andrews, 
86 Ann Beaumont, 
84 Mary Hotchkiss, 

89 Emily Hall, 



85 



91 



80 



WARREN. 

Population, 639. 
Mrs. Abby Beeman, 
Alva Weeks, 
Jason Welch, 
Norman S. Hall, 
Mrs. Emeline Byram, 
David Strong, 

WASHINGTON. 

Mrs. Betsey Averill, 
Mrs. Lucy Coggswell, 
Isaac Patterson, 
Medad S. Goodsell, 
Daniel Burnham, 
William Morse, 
Miss Jeanette Hine, 
Miss Minerva Bryan, 
Mrs. Diantha Miles, 

Miss Goodsell, 

Joseph C. Calhoun, 
Mrs. Patty Hollister, 
Mrs. Eliza Coggswell, 
Mrs. R. Barnum, 
Hiram Weeks, 
James Grant, 
Luman Woodruff, 
Mrs. Marilla Allen, 
Mrs. Loretta Titus, 
Mrs. Polly Wetton, 
Mrs. Mary Fowler, 
Mrs. Rebecca Hine, 
Mrs. Mary Ford, 
Mrs. Susan Fenn, 
Mrs. Orpha S. Brinsmade, 



WATERBURY. 

96 Population, 20,269. 

91 Mrs. Amanda Mitchell, 
90 Mrs. Palmyra Hickox, 



85 



46 



)F YE OI.I) 



.KS OF CONNECTICUT. 



Charles Eagan, 
Mrs. Amanda H. Mabott, 
Mrs. Wealthy Munson, 
Mrs. Cynthia Dikeman, 
Mrs. Nancy Russell, 
Timothy Bowes, 
Israel Coe, 
John E. Scorell, 
Miss Lois Hotchkiss, 
Mrs. Sybil Thomas, 
Morgan O'Brien, 
Charles D. Kingsbury, 
George Root, 
Hugh Bennett, 
Mrs. Theresa M. Scott, 
Mrs. Sarah Upson, 
Mrs. Patty Judd, 
Mrs. Nancy Bronson, 
Miss Philena Peck, 
Miss Polly Adams, 
Fergus McClean, 
Sherman Bronson, 
Rufus H. French, 
Samuel W. Upson, 
Merritt Tompkins, 
Mrs. Sally Waldron, 
Mrs. Anna Spruce, 
Mrs. Emma W. Wright, 
Mrs. Sally Tuttle, 
Mrs. Charles Davison, 
Mrs. Margaret Shannahan, 
Mrs. Mary Essex, 
Mrs. Sarah Morris, 
Mrs. Betsey M. Grilley, 
Mrs. Becky Lounsbury, 
Mrs. Martha Kane, 
Mrs. Eunice Kent, 
Mrs. Mary Langdon, 
James Darling, 
Wiilard Spencer, 
John Mix, 

Mrs. Larmon Johnson, 
Mrs. Lucy Brown, 
Mrs. Harriet Sperry, 
Mrs. Lockey Russell, 
Mrs. Bridget Moran, 
Mrs. Eveline Downes, 
Mrs. Louis Hotchkiss, 
Mrs. Elizabeth W. Warner 
Mrs. Azuba Barber, 
Mrs. Sarah M. Upson, 
Mrs. Nancy Bradley, 
Mrs. Harriet Scovil, 
Mrs. Harriet Bronson, 
Mrs. Lucretia Brown, 
Mrs. Jerusha Hine, 
Mrs. Laura Byington 
Mrs. Eunice Geer, 
Mrs. Lois Church, 
Marshal Upson, 
Edward Chittenden, 
William Tyler, 
Enoch W. Frost, 
Matthew D. Root, 



Judah Barker, 81 

Thomas Coyle, 81 

Finton Phalen, 81 

Mrs. Leonra Baldwin, 81 

Mrs. Emeline Stocking, 81 

Mrs. Eliza Eagan, 81 

Mrs. Melissa Hull, 81 

Mrs. Mary F. Fitzgerald, 81 

Mrs. Dorcas Blakesley, 80 

Mrs. Susannah Spencer, 80 

Mrs. Anna M. Bronson, 80 

Mrs. Mary E. Lockwood, 80 

Mrs. Lydia Frost, 80 

Mrs. Ursula Frost, 80 

Sherman Stelle, 80 

Stephen M. Camp, 80 

Henry Sandland, 80 

Nathan Cook, 80 

Horace J. Miner, 80 

WATSRFORD. 

Population, 2,701. 

Charles Staplins, 94 

Esther Edwards, 94 

Polly Madden, 93 

Nathan Newberry, 91 

William Daniels, 90 

Nathaniel Chapman, 90 

Jonathan Calkins, 88 

Osmand Darrow, 84 

Allan Darrow, 82 

William Pacherv, 83 

Josiah Dou-lass, 80 

Hannah Douiilass, 80 

Edward Weeks, 84 

James Howard, 87 

Mrs. James Howard, 86 

Mattie Ward, 83 

Samuel Mosier, 80 

Ann Avery, 83 

Palmer Smith, 84 

Robert Beebe, 84 

Austin Hewett, 82 

Gilbert Holmes, 83 

Enos Gates, 82 

Martha Newberry, 83 

Mrs. Eliza Gallup, 86 

Mr. Mack, 82 

WATERTOWN. 

Population, 1,867. 

Mrs. Huugerford, 94 

General M. Hemingway, 84 

H. Scoville, 82 

Dr. AVoodward, 84 

Mrs. S. Mattoon, 83 

Mrs. Ann A. Warren, 82 

Mrs. Holcomb, 87 

Miss Manarcy Holcomb, 85 
Mrs. Benjamin Peck, 83 

H. Little, 82 

Mrs. Dainter, 83 

Lusk, 84 



Mrs. Lusk, 81 

D. Loveland, 84 

Doolittle, 81 

Philo Hard, 88 

F. Fitch (colored), 86 

IVIrs. Esther Freeman ((•ord),8.'i 



Hiram French, 87 

Mrs. Hiram French, 84 

Wright, 82 

Mrs. Deacon Woodward, 84 

Mrs. Pierce, 83 

Mrs. Granson Hard, 82 

F. Lally, 83 

Mrs. F. Lally, 81 

WESTBROOK. 

Population, 878. 

Mrs. Lydia Bushnell, 97 

Mrs. C^atherine Doly, 95 

Mrs. Nancy Stannard, 87 
Captain Tiinothy Stannard, 87 

Captain Ezra Stannard, 83 

Captain Alcrrilt Post, 83 

Mrs. Merritt Post, 81 

3[iss :\rary H. Cone, 81 

]Mrs. Mary Stannard, 84 

John DeWolf, 83 

Mrs. Hester Morgan, 82 

Mrs. Sally Wright, 88 

Miss Lucy Lay, 84 

Richard Stevens, 87 

Mrs. Louisa Dibble, 80 

William Stokes, 87 

Mrs. Edmund Dennison, 86 

Horace Buslmell, 80 

William H. Lay, 80 

Henry Doane, 80 

Captain Daniel Stannard, 80 

WEST HARTFORD, 

Population, 1,828. 

Emily Talcott, 93 

Elizabeth Whitman, . 93 

Elizabeth Bolan, 83 

Marian Burr, 84 

Lydia Caswell, 87 

Clinton Edgarton, 80 

Mary Fagan, 83 

Sally Mitchell, 87 

Cynthia Selden, 82 

Margaret Talcott, 83 

Hubbard Webster, 81 

Nancy M. Webster, 81 

Lucy'M. Wells, 83 

Patience Briggs, 81 

Harvey Goodwin, 81 

Mary Henderson, 84 

Ann Burr. 93 

WESTON. 

Population, 918. 

Patrick Maloney, 99 

Mrs. Patrick ^Maloney, 97 

Nathaniel Perry, 94 



NAMES OF YE OLD FOLKS OF CONNECIICUT. 



47 



Joseph R. Andrews, 
Polly Abbott, 
G. W. Bradley, 
Molly J. Hendricks, 
Lois Morehouse, 



Charles Scofield, 
Lucinda Scribner, 
Mary N. Tomlinson, 
Ann S. Walton, 
Zillah Weyman, 



Hiram Nash, 
Ellen Perry, 
John Grossman, 
Mary Finch, 



83 



HISTORY OF WARD NICHOLS OF WESTON. 

Mr. Ward Nichols and his wife Sally, who died last winter within a few days of each 
other, aged respectively 92 aud 90 years," were landmarks in the town where they had resided 
fully 70 years. From youth to age thej^ were patterns of goodness, engaging in those pur- 
suits which make domestic life charming, and impart tone to society. If outward evidence 
means anything, through life neither had indulged an evil thought, and in their walk and 
conversation truth and charity were always uppermost. Early in life Mr. Nichols began as 
fur hat manufacturer and conducted it successfully for more than 50 years, putting up build- 
ings for that purpose, and he lived long enough to see every vestige of them disappear. He 
was a prominent member of the Congregational Church in Northtieid, and now that he is 
gone, the people there appreciate the loss they have sustained. Mr. Nichols was remarkable 
for his fine physical condition, which he maintained almost till his last hour, and his mind 
was ever clear, so clear, indeed, that he could call each of his children, grand and great grand- 
children, and they were numerous, by name, knew all their likes aud dislikes and strove to 
be of use to them, aud the same may be said of him as relates to his neighbors aud friends, 
who embraced a vast circle. His death was due to a cold caught while standing with head 
uncovered at the grave of a loved grandchild. 

Mrs. Nichols was revered by all. The death of her companion not only prostrated her, 
but hastened her end, and she passed away, as she had lived, calmly, and in the full hope of 
the promise of a Redeemer. 



WESTPOBT. 




Elizabeth Robinson, 


80 


Maria Rhyders, 


85 


Population, 3,477 




Mrs. Betsey Stetson, 


83 


Fanny Stephens, 


80 


Captain Alfred Taylor, 


93 


Jesup T. Jennings, 


87 


Michael Coyle, 


86 


Sarah Williams, 


93 


Andrews Godfrey, 


87 


Sarah C. Gray, 


85 


Thomas T. Glynn, 


93 


J. Hyde Ogden, 


84 


Wm. C. Hull, 


81 


Tobey Coley, 


91 


William Coley, 


85 


Edward Hyde, 


80 


Scudder Bradley, 


90 


Mrs. — Sherman, 


82 


Elizabeth Burr, 


86 


John McLarney, 


91 


Robert Martin, 


80 


Miss Eliza Bennett, 


85 


Eunice Hurlbutt, 


93 


Mrs. Ezra Hawley, 


80 


William Blaisdell, 


83 


Chloe Taylor, . 


92 


Maria Cauldwell, 


84 


Jane Bennett, 


83 


Marv C. Pierson, 


90 


Abraham Allen, 


80 


Henry Hoyt, 


81 


Joel'B. Bulkley, 


86 


Lucy Hendricks, 


82 


Mrs. Henry Hoyt, 


80 


Caroline Jennings, 


83 


Hezekiah M. Coley, 


80 


Thomas T. Pearsall, 


83 


Anna B. Jennings, 


80 


Elnathan Wheeler, 


80 


Polly Jesup, 


81 


Johanna Murphy, 


80 


Edmond W. Taylor, 


80 


Abigail Guyer, 


84 


Harry Allen, 


80 


George Wheeler, 


81 


Mrs" Joseph Nash, 


80 


Almon Alvord, 


81 


Daniel Darrow, 


82 


Salomi Fairchild, ., 


81 


Rebecca Taylor, 


87 


Mrs. Edward Pattrick, 


83 


Marv A. Hedenbei^, 


84 


Horace Staples, 


83 


Mary Couch 


81 


Charlotte Burr, 


86 


Ezra Hawley, 


82 


Mrs. Lewis Patrick, 


81 


William Batterson, 


83 


Miss Sally Nash, 


83 


Captain Charles Allen, 


82 


Mrs. Frederick Jarvis, 


80 


Amos Barnes, 


82 


Priscilla Bulkley, 


82 


Mrs. Susan Hoyt, 


83 



HISTORY OF CAPTAIN ALFRED TAYLOR, OF WESTPORT. 

Captain Alfred Taylor, of the Poplar Plains district, the oldest male citizen in West- 
port, is one of those good men whom everybody likes to see and take by the hand. His 
years have been passed in the care of an extensive farm, which, until recently, he superin- 
tended in person. In his humble way he has been an observer of affairs, never seeking place, 
or speaking undue criticism of those who occupied it. Longer ago than most of us can 
remember, he was prominent in the state militia, not for the sake of the 
honors it brought, but in response to duty. In that capacity he received the title 
by which he is known. He is a good citizen, an earnest and exemplary member 
of Christ (Episcopal) Church, and is held in high respect by the community. He 
has voted at all elections since 1812, and Westport was honored at her polling place on Tues- 
day, Nov. 4th, by his presence. His recollections of Thomas Jefferson's time, and of the in- 
cidents of the war of 1812 are vivid. His politics are of the Jeffersonian sort, and in the ex- 



48 



NAMES OF YE OLD FOLKS OF CONNECTICUT, 



ercise of the elective franchise he has obeyed conscience and been swayed by principle. Mrs. 
Chloe Taylor, his wife, somewhat his junior, is still in the possession of every;faculty, and by 
her presence in the household, life's evening shades are imbued with a glow which make them 
seem less rapidly lengthening. Mr. and Mrs. Taylor are surrounded bj' descendants repre- 
senting four generations. 

HISTORY OF HOHACE STAPLES, OF WESTPORT. 

Mr. Horace Staples, at the age of 82, is one of the most remarkable men of the time. 
After graduating from the academy at Easton, and teaching school awhile, he commenced 
business in Weslport, and, from the year 1838 till the present time, has been directly or 
indirectly engaged in it. His lioe was lumber and hardware, and at one time he was a large 
owner of sailing vessels. For about thirty years he has been President of the First 
National Bank, and looks after its affairs now with as much interest and correctness as 
during the first year the honor was conferred on him. Twice each week in the 
year, with the regularity of clock-work, he journej^s by rail to New York on bank- 
ing business, and he finds time to look after a farm, and perform many friendly acts. The 
crowning act of his life, and one which will cause him to be forever remembered by his 
townsmen, is the erection and equipment of a schoolhouse near the center of the town, to 
be used for all time by the children of the several districts, and to be free to those who can- 
not afford to pay tuition. For this he expended $16,000, and he also provides a fund to be 
placed in the hands of trustees for its perpetual maintenance. The lumber interest which he 
built up is now in the hands of a son, Capt. W. C. Staples, and a grandson, W. G. Staples. 



WETHERSFIELD. 

Population, 2,173. 

Mrs. Daniel Buck, 100 

Roswell Butler, 92 

Mrs. Fanny Lossey, 91 

Mrs. George Butler, 91 

Merritt Butler, 91 

Mrs. Jacob Griswold, 90 

Mrs. Eliza Griswold, 90 

Miss Fanny Wright, 81 

Miss Nancy Havens, 86 

Miss Harriet Kobbins, 83 

Miss Polly H. Wolcott, 88 



Mrs. Levi Warner, 

Charles Francis, 

Miss Grace Stanton, 

Miss Mary Woodhouse, 

Miss Lucy Hanmer, 

Mrs. James Standisli, 

Osmond Harrison, 

jVIiss Julia Butler, 

.Mrs. E. P. Cook, 

Mrs. Charles Clapp, 

Mrs. Solomon Woodhouse, 

James T. Pratt, 

Henry Hoxie, 

Mrs. Rebecca Robbins, 



81 


Southmayde Stillman, 


81 


83 


Mrs. Stanley Griswold, 


82 


81 


Mrs. Ashbei Welles, 


80 


86 


Mrs. Amos Benson, 


87 


86 


Silas Walker, 


82 


S2 


Mrs. Charlotte Blinn, 


84 


85 


Mrs. Sallie Rice, 


84 


80 


]Mrs. Henry Robbins, 


81 


87 


Mrs. "Pulsifer, 


82 


82 


Mrs. Barnes, 


80 


84 


Mrs. Alfred Francis, 


80 


81 


John Goldrick, 


84 


84 


Mrs. Mary W. Reed, 


81 


82 


Mrs. Johnson, 


81 



LIFEJF MRS. ELIZABETH BUCK, OF WETHERSFIELD, CT. 

Within a short distance of the state prison at Wethersfield, in an old house on Main street, 
dwells the oldest person in that section of Connecticut, Mrs. Elizabeth Buck, widow of the late 
Daniel Buck, who was born in Wethersfield, January 10, 1784, and has passed nearly her w^hole 
life there. She lives with her two daughters, one seventy and the other sixty years of age. One 
son is living, Daniel Buck, of San Francisco, formerly a merchant in Hartford. The centenarian 
has four grandchildren and tw^o great-grandchildren. Her father, Ezekiel P. Belden, was a 
prominent man in the town affairs of Wethersfield, and sat in the legislature for forty-nine 
consecutive semi-annual sessions. The fiftieth time he was elected he declined to serve. It was 
a stereotyed phrase at the town meeting to "prepare your your ballots for Ezekiel Belden for 
first representative." There was no formal celebration of Mrs. Buck's birthday other than the 
reception of friends and relatives who called to offer their congratulations. The old lady re 
clined on a sofa and conversed pleasantly with all who called, admiring the beautiful fiowers 
which were brought to her in profusion. Until recently the babe of 1784 has been able to take 
daily exercise out of doors, but, as she said to the reporter, she begins to feel old age coming 
on. Her memory is remarkably clear as to events which occurred seventy-five and eighty 
yeai"s ago. She distinctly remembers going to the country school ninety- two years ago, and 
carrying a little red dinner-basket made by an old Indian woman. She stated that she was 
always fond of horse-back riding and kept it up as long as her strength would permit. 



NAMES OF YE OLD EOLKS OE CONNECTlCItT. 



49 





Huldah Rockwell, 


94 


Prudence Taylor, 


84 




Esther Rockwell, 


95 


Mrs. S. Cole, 


81 


85 


Captain John Jones, 


93 


Mrs. Dudley Fox, 


80 


84 


Isaac Davis, 


91 


Betsey C. Belden, 


80 


84 


Bridget McMahon Brown 


. 91 


Hannah F. Ruscoe, 


88 


83 


Polly B. Sutton, 


91 


Mrs. Millie Seymour, 


80 


81 


Polly Fitch, 


93 


Mrs. Clara Seymour, 


81 


81 


Polly Gorham, 


90 


Mrs. Polly Olmstead, 3d, 


88 


80 


Stephen Ruscoe, 


90 


Henry I. Middlebrook, 


88 


83 


Nelson James, 


85 


James H. Cooke, 


86 


83 


Charles DeForest, 


87 


Mary Piatt, 


81 


81 


Mrs. Milla Whitney, 


80 


Anson B. Abbott, 


81 


80 


Polly Olmstead, 


84 


Emily Betts, 


83 


80 


Ebenezer Pettinden, 


80 


Daniel Taylor, 


83 




Eliza Sterling, 


83 


Lucy Hendricks, 


82 




Betsey Sterling, 


81 


Miss Bertha Betts, 


82 




Maria Bundy, 


81 








John Gautling, 


83 






03 


Mrs. Augusta Batterson, 


84 






95 


Hannah Scott, 


84 







WILLINGTON. 

Population, 1,086. 
William Shaffer, 
Ebenezer Potter, 
Miner Bugbee, 
Charles Wood, 
James Duncan, 
Henry Watrous, 
Corliss Barrett, 
Amos Lillibridge, 
Caroline Slocum, 
Lucy Bowers, 
Hannah Cone, 
Elizabeth Bugbee. 

WILTON. 

Population, 1,864. 
Mrs. Clarissa Davenport 
Raymond, 1 

Tr}'phena Palmer, 

HISTORY OF MRS. CLARISSA D. RAYMOND, OF WILTON. 

Of all persons in Connecticut well advanced in years whose age can by documentary evi- 
dence be vouched for, there are none so clearly entitled to the distinguished honor, as honor 
it is, of being the oldest person in this commonwealth, as Mrs. Clarissa Davenport Raymond, 
who, on April 35, 1884, completed her 103d year. Setting out upon her 103d, she took with 
her a mind as strong, a memory as bright, and physical strength as apparent as when, two 
years ago, she celebrated her centennial. If domestic felicity tends to prolong life, as it 
would seem to have done in this case, then a portion of the secret of her wonderful longevity 
is made plain. Tenderly watched over and cared for by her only daughter, Mrs. Nathan 
Comstock, herself almost an octogenarian, and by Mr. John Comstock, her grandson, and 
his amiable wife, the centenarian's cares, if she has any which may be called such, are trans- 
formed into pleasures, and she moves each day in an atmosphere of kindness, herself main- 
taining a supply for distribution in return for that so affectionately and constantly bestowed. 
To these three what a satisfaction it will be some day to recall the fact that the privilege of 
ministering to this rarest of living ancestors was freely and worthily improved. Yesterday, 
when called on by a reporter, the aged lady at once entered her parlor, walking with her 
great cane and leaning on the arm of Mrs. Comstock, and unhesitatingly declared herself in 
as fair health as she had been for some time. She smiled while alluding to herself as a sort 
of a burden upon her family, and there was no incoherence in any of her utterances. Her 
sight has failed somewhat during the past year, and when asked if she did any reading, re- 
plied: "Yes; I did some time ago, with large print, but the words began to blur and I had 
to give it up," and she laughed heartily at the suggestion that the girls — her daughter and 
gi-anddaughter — do some volunteer reading on her account. Mrs. Raymond's history is well 
known, but the temptation to ask her concerning it could not be resisted. She spoke of her 
early life in North Stamford, of the choir there with which she was connected; of Colonel 
Seeley, the Continental army veteran, its leader, who, each year on the Sunday preceding 
May training day appeared in the choir set out in full regimentals; of her marriage and re- 
moval to New York city; the period of her residence there previous to and during the war 
of 1813; and her return to Wilton and the varied experiences which sixty-nine years of con- 
tinuous citizenship had afforded. She could not state positively her recollection of ever see- 
ing her grandfather or grandmother, but she had a volume which embodied within it facts 
sufficient within themselves to establish the antiquity of her ancestry. Turning suddenly in 
her chair, and raising her cane, she exclaimed: " John," meaning her grandson, " go to the 
iipper drawer of my bureau, on the right hand side, and bring the book which Rev. Mr. Da- 
venport gave me two years ago." The .request was complied with, and the visitor was as- 
sisted, as he turned the leaves, by the centenarian, who very readily found the pages on which 
were printed the following: '■ Rev. John Davenport was born 1597, in the town of Coven- 
try, England. At an early age he came to this country, and in 1638 preached the first sermon 
ever listened to in New Haven, under an oak tree which stood at the corner of Church and 
George streets. Many years after the tree was cut down by David Beecher, father of Rev. 
Henry Ward Beecher, and split up for firewood." This Mr. Davenport was Mrs. Raymond's 
great, great, great, great grandfather. Her father, Deodate Davenport, and her elder brother, 
took part in the battle of Ridgefield, and the aged lady alludes sometimes to what she heard 

4 



so 



NAMES OF YE OLD FOLKS OF CONNEOTICltT. 



them say, that, after the village stores were set on fire by the British forces, the molten fat 
from the pork and lard casks ran in the street gutters like water. Mrs. Raymond is very in- 
dustrious and delights to occupy her time in knitting. Examples of her work done a day or 
two before were shown, and a few of them presented to the visitors. A short time after her 
centennial she attended the Congregational Church across the street, of which she has been a 
member for more than sixty years, but she has not felt like going since. On Sundays she sits 
at her front window and enjoys seeing others entering or departing from the sanctuary. The 
severity of weather has kept her within doors all winter, and she rejoices that the day is near, 
which will permit her to walk in her garden, or visit the neighbors. She conveyed the idea 
that interviewers did not weary her, unless they persisted in doing all the talking, and it was 
evident from beginning to end of the call that she enjoyed conversation, and delighted in 
maintaining her share of it. Though the fact of her attaining 103 years was one 
without parallel in this part of the world, there was no formal celebration, but it was 
honored by the proffered congratulations of near relatives and intimate friends. Her two 
great, great grandchildren, Raymond and Alice, aged 4 and 2^ years respectively, childr-en of 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Comstock, of Norwalk, spent the day with the centenarian, aud 
under the old roof met, as they had met many times before, five generations. May 
this rare lady long continue, and her every want be anticipated and supplied by a devoted 
family. 



WINDHAM. 




Mary Fuller, 


84 


Betsey Hall, 


92 


Population, 8,265. 




Eunice R. Heap, 


82 


Lloyd Humphrey, 


87 


Betsey Babcock, 


96 


Vilantia Lomer, 


80 


Lavina Hall, 


80 


Jerusha Ingraham, 


94 


Peter O'Brien, 


85 


James Newman, 


88 


Lucy Eccleston, 


93 


Sally F. Woodward, 


86 


Ira Pettibone, 


82 


Justin Swift, 


90 


Rebecca C'ritchley, 


87 


Mary Rouse, 


81 


Joseph E. Finch, 


90 


Sarah G. Carpenter, 


82 


Annie R. Shepard, 


86 


Alfred Avery, 


90 


Sarah B. Chittenden, 


80 


Abijah Watson, 


86 


Amy A. Avery, 


88 


Esther Burdick, 


81 


Margaret Watson, 


86 


Louisa Abbey, 


84 


Ezra Goss, 


81 


Mary Bifell, 


82 


Denison Avery, 


83 


John Haley, 


84 


Marinda C. Burr, 


82 


Marcia Bibbins, 


86 


Margaret McNamara, 


80 


Amos Beecher, 


85 


Betsey Burgess, 


87 


Johanna Shuckroe, 


84 


Eliza Coe, 


83 


Jerusha Bingham, 


82 


Eunice Woodworth, 


83 


Harriet Ford, 


80 


Sally Babcock, 


83 


Barbara Warburton, 


84 


Abby Hall, 


87 


Phebe Spicer, 


82 







Huldah Marshall, 


85 


Amanda Smith, 


81 


(West Part.) 




Julia H. McCoy, 


87 


George Lilly, 


80 


Elizabth Brown, 


80 


Ruby Phelps, 


81 


Margaret Warner, 


81 


Betsey Brown, 


80 


Roswell Perry, 


80 


Sophia Flint, 


86 


Sophia Clark, 


80 


Lucy Smith, 


80 


Jerusha Finch, 


84 


Priscilla Gray, 


84 


Judson Wadsworth, 


87 


Elisha H. Holmes, 


84 


Jauie D. Homer, 


.87 


Charlotte Austin, 


88 


Austin Lincoln, 


83 


Francis Lee. 


80 


Hannah Brands, 


81 


Eunice Morgan, 


87 


Marilla Smith, 


83 


Electa Chase, 


84 


Etecta Moulton, 


82 


Thomas Shay, 


86 


Maria Corbin, 


84 


Lydia Payne, 


88 


Whitman Williams, 


81 


W. F. Hatch, 


82 


Fredus Preston, 


87 


John Arnold, 


80 


McPherson Hubbell, 


80 


Mary Penra, 


83 


Susan Bennett, 


81 


Austin Maloney, 
Sarah Olmstead, 


82 


Ann E. Robbins, 


83 


Thankful Congdon, 


84 


82 


Harriet Reed, 


85 


Mary R. Davis, 


80 


Polly Host, 


80 


James D. Turtelot, 


80 


Hannah Gould, 


86 


Catherine Ray, 


84 


Mary Trimon, 


84 


Thomas Hempsted, 


88 


Mary Thomson, 


81 


Ezekiel Webster, 


80 


Nelson Jacobs, 


80 


Harvey Wakefield, 


81 


Sophia Welsh, 


82 


Lucy A. Kimble, 


84 


Harriet Andrews, 


81 


Harvey Winchester, 


82 


Margaret Ninon, 


80 


Hannah Buntia, 


80 


- 




Thomas Spencer, 


85 


Selinda Bradley, 
Lucy Cleveland, 


81 


Borough of 




Mercy Spencer, 


85 


84 


WILLIMANTIC. 








George Dudley, 


80 


2d School District. 




WINCHESTER. 




Johanna Hawley, 


80 


(Town of Windham.; 


) 


(Embracing Wiusted aud West 


Maria U. Lewis, 


81 


Population, 8,265. 




Wiusted.) 




Mortimer McMahon, 


83 


Maria Lincoln, 


95 


Diadema Camp, 


99 


Amos Pierce, 


80 


Wealthy Dimock, 


93 


Sophia Brown. 


94 


Mary Poole, 


82 


Bridget Culham, 


90 


Chester Wentworth, 


93 


Sally Rowley, 


80 


Abbie G. Everest, 


88 


Jeremiah Carey, 


92 


Sally Thorp, 


83 



NAMES OF YE OLD FOLKS OF CONNECTICUT. 



51 



HISTORY OF MRS. DIADEMIA CAMP, OF WINCHESTER. 

Mrs. Diademia Camp, accordingto her ancient Bible record, was born in Winchester, in 
that portion of the town now known as Winsted, Conn. , Oct. 15, 1784, and has always lived on 
the same street, less than one-third of a mile from her birthplace. Her father, Stephen Knowl- 
ton, a Revolutionary soldier, came to Winchester from the town of Chatham about the year 
1780. He resided liere till 1804 when, joining the popular movement to locate in the West, 
he moved to the State of Ohio, taking his family with him excepting the daughter Diademia. 
For some good reason she was allowed to remain, and under the care of friends she grew to 
be a woman of many rare qualities of mind. As a girl she attended the district school at a 
time when some parents thought it not too much to require of their daughters to do a little 
knitting along with the process of study, and strange to say, the teachers, who "boarded 
round," rarely manifested courage enough to attempt prohibiting what they knew to be a 
flagrant wrong. Skill at the spinning wheel was more an accomplishment than adroitness 
in spelling and writing. At the age of twenty, having risen to the dignity of an artist in the 
use of the distaff and wheel, Diademia, in the year 1804, married Moses Camp, Sr., a well-to- 
do farmer of that neighborhood. To her wedding, .'just eighty years ago, came the sons and 
daughters from points near and far in Litchfield county, and there was a grand celebration. 
Of all those present she alone remains. Of Mrs. Camp's ten children, seven are living, and they 
reside in different parts of the State and country. Through life Mrs. Camp has been a vigor- 
ous, resolute woman — one of those whom weariness seemed never to overtake, and even now 
she is enjojing excellent health. She appears to be very happy in her old age, and as an in- 
dication, breaks out from time to time, singing the air of some favorite church tune, learned 
when a member of the village choir. Her appetite is good, and her place at table has not 
been vacant for more than a twelvemonth. She walks up and down stairs without aid. and 
has called upon neighbors residing sixty rods away several times this summer. On Thurs- 
day, July 31, she visited friends in town a mile and a half distant, and returning did not 
complain of being tired. She reads a little without glasses, and converses intelligently on 
most subjects, but her memoT-y as to recent events is failing, yet is as bright as ever as to 
those which are remote. Goodness of heart, sympathy and affection are, as they have ever 
been, her characteristics, and, it may be, the presence of them has tended to length of days. 
To the "times which tried men's souls," she often alludes, and compares, aptly too, the ways 
and means of to-day with those in vogue before 1800. 

[Mrs. Camp died suddenly on Monday, August 11, retaining her senses till almost the 
last moment.] 

WOODBRIDGE. 

Population, 829. 

Mrs. John Clark, 98 

Amadeus Newton, 84 

Davis Newton, 80 

Mrs. Lucy Fairchild, 80 

James J. Baldwin, 87 

Lyman A. Bradley, 80 

Mrs. Lydia Baldwin, 87 

Mrs. Abby Bradley, 85 

Mrs. Eunice Clarka, 84 

Lebere H. Carrington, 87 

Marcia Carrington, 84 

Joseph Downes, 82 

Lyman Fairchild, 81 

Elizabeth A. Peck, 82 

Mrs. — Zurich, 83 

Amos Hine, 82 

Edward Hine, 86 

]\Irs. Nancy Lines, 80 

Lyman Manville, 88 

Mrs. Betsey Newton, 82 

Mrs. Elizabeth Piatt, 88 

Bennett B. Peck, 82 

JVIoria Sanford, 80 
Mrs. Fred B. Woodward, 84 

Mary Abagail Clark, 82 



WINDSOR. 




Mrs. Jacob Cobb, 


81 


Population, 3,056. 




Seymour Viets, 


82 


Mrs. Sally Terry (col'd), 


99 






Mrs. Nancy Beckwith, 


93 


WINDSOR LOCKS 




Miss Harriet Cook, 


93 


Population, 2,332. 




Mrs. John Craven, 


92 


Mary Simpson, 


93 


Mrs. Julia Huntly, 


80 


Lucy Osborne, 


91 


Mrs. Betsey Drake, 


80 


Julia Cone, 


90 


Mrs. Rhoda S. Goddard, 


81 


Ebenezer Chaplin, 


90 


Hiram Buckland, 


85 


James Reid, 


80 


Mrs. Zardus Gillette, 


85 


Spencer Rose, 


81 


Mrs. Reuben Cook, 


83 


Bracket Rose, 


84 


Isaac Hakes, 


82 


Jane Anderson, 


83 


Mrs. Mary Cook, 


82 


Ellen Dawe, 


86 


Mrs. Stoughton, 


80 


Betsey Downes, 


82 


Miss Lucinda Hayden, 


83 


ElizaDenslow, 


80 


Mrs. Moses Allen, 


82 


Margaret Fawell, 


84 


Miss Mary Styles, 


80 


Katie Lambert, 


80 


Gurdon Loomis, 


82 


Mary Mullen, 


86 


Raymond Loomis, 


81 


Ann Moffit, 


80 


Miss Clara Loomis, 


82 






William Benton, 


82 


WOLCOTT. 




Elihu Holcomb, 


81 


Population, 493. 




John Griswold, 


89 


Marshall Upson, 


83 


Ira Loomis, 


82 


Mark Tuttle. 


80 


Abner Taylor, 


81 


Mrs. — Garrigus, 


82 


Mrs. David Ellsworth, 


82 


Mrs. Vina Beecher, 


84 


Miles Gillette, 


81 


Mrs. Polly Plumb, 


83 


Jacob Cobb, 


82 


— Robinson, 


82 



52 



NAMES OF YE OLD FOLKS OF CONNECTICUT. 



WOODBURY. 




Stephen F. Galpin, 


87 


Mrs. Abel Turney, 


84 


Population, 2,148, 




Mrs. Patty Calhoun, 


84 


Mrs. Thomas Ward, 


82 


Mrs. Betsey Treadwell, 


99 


Mrs. Eliza Way, 


82 


Horace Manville, 


89 


Edward Nichols, 


95 


Mrs. R. H. Comstock 




Silas Clark, 


80 


Stoddard Strong, 


93 


(Hotchkiss), 


84 


Mrs. Agnes Hood, 
Henry Peck, 


83 


Erastus Lathrop, 


92 


Mrs. George Hurd, 


86 


80 


Mrs. Erastus Lathrop, 


92 


Horace Hurd, 


83 






Mrs Silah Bryant, 


91 


Miss Harriet .Judson, 


84 


WOODSTOCK. 




Daniel Osborne, 


91 


Mrs. Burton Judson, 


88 


John Child, 


95 


Phineas S. Bradley, 


90 


Mrs. Elmore Judson, 


86 


Benoni Austin, 


93 


Horace Manville, 


90 


Mrs. Vincent Judson, 


84 


Mrs. William Steers, 


91 


Elijah Atwood, 


86 


Mrs. Nathaniel Minor, 


84 


Mrs. John Child, 


88 


Mrs. Susan M. Jackson, 


83 


Mrs. John Meramble, 


84 


Mrs. Lydia Chamberlin 


86 


Thomas Bull, 


83 


Charles Millard, 


83 


Axseph Lyon, 


85 


Mrs. Lucy Gurnsey, 


88 


Mrs. Winthrop Morris, 


82 


Mrs. Lydia R. Bimis, 


83 


John Curtiss, 


87 


Mrs. Samuel Nettleton, 


87 


Daniel 'Stead, 


83 


Mrs. Betsey Moore, 


82 


Philander Nichols, 


82 


Rev. Henry Herrick, 


81 


Mrs. Melicent Gurnsey, 


83 


James Preston, 


88 


Lucretia Vinton, 


81 


Benjamin Fabrique, 


85 


Solomon Strong, 


82 


William Walker, 


81 


Mrs. Asenath Hine, 


83 


Miss Nancy Summers, 


84 


Cynthia May, 


80 















The Old Well Cigar Company, 

SOUTH NORWALK, CT., 

Has been established nearly twenty years. In that time it lias kept pace with 
the progress of the age, and studying the ever changing tastes of patrons has 
been able successfully to cater to their requirements. The result has been 
the best brands of cigars from imported and domestic leaf have been offered. 
Smokers' goods generally have been made a specialty. 

The factory, warehouse and tobacco storage are all in the centre of the city, 
and near the railroad depot, thus enabling patrons to obtain what they want 
conveniently. In the varied productions of this house only the best materials 
are employed. 

The reputation of the house needs nothing to support it outside the brands 
of cigars, which speak for themselves, the " R. H." and " Old Well Clubs." 
Of these it can be said, " they fill a long felt want." 

Their 

"R. H.," "OLD WELL CLUBS," "REINA VICTORIA," 

"NUMBER 10," 
"BOUQUETS," "LA CUBA," "DON PEDRO," 

are of the best; their 5 cent cigars are so well known under the brands of 

and several other titles as to really need no mention. It can be said of each 
and all of them, " they speak for themselves." 



THE STAPLES HIGH SCHOOL, 



Westport, Fairfield County, Connecticut, 

was opened to the public Monday, September 1st, 1884, with Mr. J. 
H. Tufts, a graduate of Amherst College, as Principal, and a compe- 
tent lady assistant. 

The land, the buildings, and all its appurtenances are the gift of 



President of the First National Bank of Westport, whose interest in 
the town and its future prosperity is thus plainly demonstrated. 
Westport has had many a noble, generous citizen. She has at this 
time those who see her beauties and natural advantages, and who are 
doing what they can by their presence and their money to elevate her 
character and embellish her name. But, taking the lead of them all, 
Mr. Staples casts aside everything visionary, deals with the real, con- 
siders the needs of the youth with whom he is surrounded, and gives 
an institution, whose doors shall forever be open to the seeker for 
knowledge, and forever free, for all practical purposes, to those of 
limited means. In pei'forming this noble act he asks no consideration 
by way of return. He simply would have his fellow-citizens accept, 
use and be benefitted. 



IN PERPETUATION OF HIS MEMORY, 



this High School will be eloquent with the praise and gratitude of the 
generations, — a monument more enduring than the Pyramids, and, if 
epitaph is needed, let it be, " He builded not for himself alone, but for 
those who are to come after him." 



THE MANUFACTURE OF SILK 



-A. IWI ES H. I O -A. 3Jff I3Sri>XJS T H. Y^- 

The ladies of Bridgeport and vicinity may be interested to know tliat in the great 
building near the Organ Factory south of the Sharpe Rifle establishment, Mr. M. 
C. PATTERSON has a large number of persons employed in the manufacture of 
silk fabrics in every known pattern and variety by the use of steam power looms 
instead of by hand. His products, especially in the line of black dress silks, are 
equal to the imported, and they are placed on the market at figures which are very 
low, when the customs duties which make the foreign article so high are taken into 
consideration. No matter what the color, shade or figure, Mr. Patterson has 
the machinery for producing it. Desirous that citizens should see for themselves 
how these goods are made — become assured that both warp and weft are entirely 
of silk, and that no cottons, linen, or other cheap material are mixed therewith in 
the various processes, in short that silk alone is used, he invites the ladies, young 
and old, and their friends, and all who are interested in silk, to ^asit the factory 
and witness the operations from the moment the little fibres leave the cocoons till 
they become incorporated in the fabric ; see how black dress silks are made alike 
on both sides — something entirely new ; white silk for bridal dresses ; grenadines 
and figured silks in all their multifarious varieties. At this time this is suggestive 
of Summer rather than of Winter, but goods are always made up ahead. All lines 
of colored silks are made to order for the best retail houses in the country. Mr. 
Patterson is anxious and willing to show the goods and hence extends this invi- 
tation. The hand process for doing all these things — the same which has been in 
vogue abroad for hundreds of years, will be shown also. All are invited and are 
welcome. 

283 Main, and 19 Cannon Sts., 

BRIDGEPORT, - - CONN. 

Furnaces, Hanges and Steam Heaters, 

A.TT3i:]VI>S TO 

PLUMBING, GAS, ST EAM FITT ING AND TINNING. 

All matters pertaining to these branches of work Neatly and Promptly 

Done. 



The line of House Furnishing Goods offered, and the low prices main- 
tained by this House, have given it character which 
few others possess. 



The Most Wonderful Discovery of the age is 



5 

the manufacture and control of Avhich is in the liands of MR. ALBERT 

RELYEA, of Norwalk, who, since his identification with this unequalled article 
in pastry, has developed its many excellencies and proved beyond a doubt its 
superiority over all other similar inventions. There was a time when, to make a 
good tea biscuit or roll, the same method of yeast raising as in bread had to be 
employed, and the same weary waiting for the batch to rise. By the use of this 
new flour, not only tea biscuit and rolls, but griddle-cakes, pie crust, dumplings, 
fritters ,nd muflins may be made in three minutes by any one, simply by adding 
to it a little cold water or milk and stirring with a spoon. The invention is, and 
is not, a secret. The ingredients are known to all: Best New Process Flour, pure 
Creamery Butter, bi-carbonate soda, salt and cream of tartar. The proportions 
used are known alone to the proprietor. By the use of complicated machinery 
the ingredients are mixed, rolled and ground together until nothing is seen but the 
Flour itself. It is then placed in bags and boxes for shipment. The preparation 
of this flour for market is destined to become a vast industry. 

SOME ONE HAS SAID : 

lyery Ian Mes.His Own Monument." 

Whether this be true or not, there are none who do not wish to be remembered, 
after life's journey is over, by their friends and relations, and especially by those of 
their own families who are left behind. 

THE HEADSTONE AND THE MONUMENT 

have always been erected in memory of the departed, and their inscriptions relate 
to strangers, as well as to kindred, the record of the one who lies beneath. 
By long experience in 

C3rR,^3SriTE and 3yL.A.R,B3L.E: AArOR,K:, 

and by the very unusual facilities at my command, assisted by a corps of compe- 
tent workmen and artists, I am able to meet the wishes of my patrons and to 
supply to them every variety of plain or ornamental work in HEADSTONES, 
MONUMENTS, COPINGS, BASES, POSTS, ENCLOSURES FOR PLOTS, 
and other work in MARBLE or GRANITE, which in elegance of design, and skill 
and beauty of workmanship, are not excelled anywhere, and at prices within the 
reach of all. 

Stone of every variety, native or foreign, for Builders, Decorators, or for funeral 
purposes, promptly furnished to order, and cut to original or supplied designs. 

Please call at my establishment on WATER STREET, NORWALK, CONN., 
and examine work on hand before contracting elsewhere. 



THERE ARE THREE REASONS 

why the Ladies of Fairfield County feel satisfied that the 

DRY GOODS HOUSE 



-OF- 



William B. Hall i Go. 

OF BRIDGEPORT, 

is desirable. It is in a city which, ere long, will be the 
leading city, in point of population, in the State. It is on 
the chief street and at the business center of that city. It 
is easy of access and most of its varied attractions are on 
one floor. A careful inspection of what is there offered will 
convince those who have journeyed to the Metropolis for 
shopping novelties and often found themselves disappointed, 
that in this store may be obtained every article in dry goods, 
Silks and Satins in all their multifarious varieties in quality 
unequalled, and at prices in accordance with the scale which 
regulates the mercantile world. With this house Silks area 
specialty. Dress Silks are like National Bank notes — a small 
pile represents a very great value. Inspection of the 
shelves of the 

SILK DEPARTMENT 

at this time will disclose the presence of goods which can- 
not be duplicated by a cash expenditure of $40,000. Early 
in October the sum of $10,000 was employed in the pur- 
chase of a particular line of Silks. Embraced in it are 
many varieties of Guinet, Satin-faced, Satin Radimers and 
Bellon, the latter at 50 cents, costing 75 cents before passing 
the Custom House. How the house is able to ofier such 
bargains, and continue so to do, would seem a mystery. 
Besides these are the 

BONNET VARIETIES, 

SO charming in texture and at figures commending them- 
selves to every lady economist. 



Then the VELVETS ! Without question unapproach- 
able as to quality and price. The ladies know what a velvet 
is when they see it, and with them it is far from a disparage- 
ment of the goods when a $3.25 article, 26 inches wide, is 
offered at $2.20. 

The lines of BLACK GOODS are absolutely in- 
describable, and they are, in like manner, extensive. The 
house has anticipated cold weather and the holiday season, 
and the cloak makers' handiwork is a special feature. Every 
approved style of Cloak is not only offered ready-made, but 
every style is made to order on the spot, and no lady need 
be without that garment when it can be obtained at from 
$5.00 to $75.00, and each cloak a bargain. 

In Sacqiies and Dolmans of Seal Skin this house is 

offering elegant specimens, at prices ranging from $125 to 
$450. The stock offered is without parallel in mercantile 
history. 

The Special Muslins, and Merino Underwear Department, 
the Flannels and Domestic Cotton Goods, are so very vari- 
ous and extensive, that, in connection with the store as a 
whole, the visitor need not wonder why the services of fifty 
persons are required to conduct it. 

All of the other departments of the house are too well 
known to need more than the remark, "They are complete." 

It is a credit to Bridgeport, as it certainly would be to 
any city, to have an emporium such as 

W. B. HALL & CO. 

have created and are maintaining. They are keeping pace 
with the times, and buyers are learning that it is to their 
advantage to grant liberal patronage. 

It is given out by this house that any lady centenarian 
visiting it will be presented with material for an elegant 
winter Cloak, and persons 80 years old and over will receive 
a liberal discount from regular prices on all purchases made 
by them, and they will be entitled to discount as long as 
they live. 



WHEELEB & IILSON'S 

Celebrated Sewing Machines, 

For Family Use ani all Srales of lamitactnrliii, 

ADAPTED TO RUN BY FOOT, HAND OR STEAM POWER, 







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CHEAPEST TO BUY, 



BECAUSE THEY ARE 



The Easiest to L( am, the Handiest to Manage, the 

Lightest Running, the Most Durable, 

the Best Finislied, and 

DO THE MOST PERFECT WORK. 



FACTORY AND CHIEF OFFICE OF 

WHEELER & WILSON MFG. CO., 

BPtiDGf-EiPOPLT, ooisrisr. 



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