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Full text of "Yoncopin"

CENTENRRY 
COLLEC 



1382 YONCOPIN 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/yoncopin571982edit 



GUIDEBOOK 

THE ABC'S OF CENTENARY 




A 



ALTHEA 



Althea is a campus fixture as permanent as Jackson 
Hall, but she is not made of concrete and steel — Althea 
is a brown, black and white spotted mutt who strolls the 
campus grounds meeting people, investigating oddities, 
and occasionally attending classes. A few students think 
Althea is a snob, but the majority appreciate the warmth 
and fur which remind them of their pet back home. Much 
of Althea's life is a mystery, but she has seen Centenary 
students come and go, and will probably continue to do 
so for many years. 









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2* Guidebook 



ATHLETICS 




Centenary's Athletic Department is quite an achieve- 
ment for such a small school. The program includes Varsi- 
ty Baseball, Soccer, Golf, Gymnastics, Men's and Wom- 
en's Basketball, Tennis, and Cross Country. The Golf team 
went to the NCAA Tournament in California last spring, 
and the Gymnastics team captured the championship in 
Division II for the fourth consecutive time. Every year the 
Ail-American Athletes are honored with a luncheon at- 
tended by students, faculty, and interested public. The 
student body is proud of the athletic department and 
our outstanding athletes. 



ATTITUDE 



Attitude is the major factor in adjustment to college 
life. College requires you to be carefree, responsible, 
interested, apathetic, obnoxious, well-behaved, aggres- 
sive, passive, conforming, and slightly insane. Whatever 
mixture of attitude you adopt determines what facet of 
college life you will enjoy most. The important aspect of 
all attitudes is flexibility. Centenary has achieved a bal- 
ance within the student body that allows a person to 
assume whatever attitude he chooses and have a terrif- 
ic four years. 





Guidebook • 3 



B 



BELLS 



Centenary' bells are not exactly world-reknowned, 
but they are a nice addition to the college. They remind 
you that you're late to class though, and alot of neigh- 
boring houses complain about the noise, so now they 
only ring during the day. One sunny spring day when 
you're walking peacefully across campus, and the bells 
ring, reflect upon what a collegiate atmosphere they 
create. Too bad it is really only a tape. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



The Board of Trustees functions as a protectorate for 
the school. Members make up a cross-section of the 
Shreveport/Bossier community and surrounding areas. 
Chairman George D. Nelson heads the board in review- 
ing and implementing administrative, academic, and fi- 
nancial matters of the school. The Board members are 
generous and involved with the school, and the college 
appreciates their time and help. 





BOOKSTORE 



Nestled in the bottom of the SUB, the bookstore is the 
only place where you can buy your textbooks, but they 
usually run out before you get one, or it is midterm when 
your books arrives. Besides textbooks, the bookstore car- 
ries greeting cards, school supplies, magazines, and 
clothing with assorted Centenary emblems. It is the clos- 
est place to cash a check, but it costs you a dime. 




4 • Guidebook 



BUSINESS OFFICE 

The business office is a source of unrelenting frustration 
for most students. Somehow they always manage to bill 
you for lab fees when you're not taking a science course, 
or parking tickets when you don't own a car. Our busi- 
ness office sends bills for one cent while hundred dollar 
checks are misplaced, and just to torment graduating 
seniors, a policy of checking with the business office for 
outstanding debts must be followed before you get your 
diploma. 





c 



CAF 



The caf is the social center for our campus — never 
mind the food. Aside from the socializing and the ice 
cream, the cafeteria offers little. The food lacks variety; 
insolent workers battle head-to-head with equally inso- 
lent students; and you never know when you'll have to 
eat off a paper plate with a plastic fork and knife. It is a 
place to eye members of the opposite sex, scope out a 
date for the next big party, catch up on the latest gos- 
sip, and enjoy good company. 




Guidebook • 5 




6» Guidebook 




Guidebook • 7 




CHOIR 



The Centenary College Choir has been a part of the 
school for forty-one years. The choir performs several 
concerts during the year, including Rhapsody in View, 
various ensembles, and Elizabethan Dinners. This past 
year the Choir toured Germany, Belgium, the Nether- 
lands, Switzerland, France, and Great Britian. Though 
many of the faculty do not consider the time missed from 
class very beneficial, the choir performs an important 
recruiting function for the college at concerts in high 
schools around the Ark-La-Tex. 





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CLASSES 



Classes are those annoying time slots which interrupt 
your sleep in the morning and your sun time in the after- 
noon. At Centenary class attendance policies are set by 
the individual teachers; unfortunately for students, they 
are usually exactly that — set. As inconvenient as it may 
be, class attendance is usually a big factor in the grade 
of a course — but even the best students occasionally 
skip when the sun comes out after a long rain, or Friday 
afternoon parties are scheduled, or weekend road trips 
last until Tuesday, or . . . 



8 • Guidebook 



CONGLOMERATE 



The Centenary Conglomerate can be entertaining, 
informative and unbiased. It can also be boring, unrelia- 
ble, and quite opinionated. Like any other media, the 
newspaper is subject to harsh criticism, no matter how 
hard the staff works. Putting out a newspaper each 
week is difficult to do. It takes research, photographs, 
articles, editorials, advertisments, and mostly time that 
seems to slip away when Wednesday comes. The staff 
rushes over to the Bossier Tribune, lays out the copy, and 
prints it. Every Thursday, neat stacks of Conglomerates 
are delivered around campus, and no matter how criti- 
cal some students are, it seems like everybody reads it. 

CULTURAL PERSPECTIVES 

When you are a freshman, you're subjected to all sorts 
of inconveniences that you don't have to endure as an 
upperclassman. Cultural Perspectives is one of these. CP 
requires attendance of ten cultural events such as recit- 
als, plays, convocations, and art exhibits. Two things 
make Cultural Perspectives particularly inconvenient: 1) 
the fact that you have to go, and 2) the fact that if you 
do not attend five of these events by midterm, your 
parents call in a rage demanding to know why you have 
an F in this class. It doesn't do any good to try to explain 
that because you didn't run over to the art museum one 
afternoon, you received the grade. It also doesn't do 
any good to try to explain that once you do this you will 
have a passing grade. Instead, you have to listen to your 
parents tell you to study more in this class, and in the 
meantime, your allowance is cut. 








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D 



DORM LIFE 



Living in the dorm is a test of compatibility and toler- 
ance. The nice things about the dorm are the fact that 
there is always someone to talk to, no required cleaning, 
and it is cheap with maintainence and utilities included. 
The bad things about the dorm are the noise, the lack of 
privacy, fire drills after midnight, and the fact that a meal 
ticket is required. More problems concerning room as- 
signments drift into the Dean of Students office than 
anything else, and living with someone whose habits are 
not like yours make you appreciate your room at home. 



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Guidebook • 11 



DRINKING 



Alcohol has earned a prominent place in the guide- 
book, because it has earned a prominent place in the 
boodstreams of many students. Almost everyone has 
experienced that drunken feeling of euphoria and that 
sunken feeling of a hangover. Every weekend some fra- 
ternity or sorority has a party, and another silver keg 
floats down fraternity row. Though alcohol is not permit- 
ted on campus, occasionally a beer or two can be found 
in a dorm room refrigerator — nothing to worry about 
though, they disappear quickly. 



E 



ELECTIONS 



Elections are announced in the Conglomerate a few 
weeks before the day of voting. If anyone is interested, 
he petitions to the SGA and floods the campus with 
posters announcing his candidacy. Election day comes 
and voices fill the air — "What are we voting for today?" 
"Why is there always just one candidate?" "Why bother 
to vote?" (Our student body has never taken an over- 
whelming interest in politics.) Because of apathy, we're 
stuck with what we get, and unless you can say, "Well, I 
certainly didn't vote for him," don't complain. 



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FOREIGN STUDENTS 



Ready to try to handle the English language and 
American cultural differences, these students leave their 
homeland and travel to Shreveport, Louisiana. The Eng- 
lish language barrier does not prevent them from scoring 
high GPAs or becoming an active part of the Centenary 
campus. 



12 • Guidebook 












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FRESHMAN ENGLISH 



A year of intensive grammar, composition, and class 
attendance is required for graduation. Freshman English 
has been the downfall of more than one or two students, 
and people who have always made As in English sudden- 
ly find themselves looking at a pink slip. Our English de- 
partment is tough and has a more stringent grading 
scale than most other departments because the profes- 
sors believe that English is the foundation for the rest of a 
college career. Most students soon discover, however, 
that the basis for their grade is writing in the style of the 
teacher. 





G 



GRADES 



Grades come out two to four times a year, depending 
on whether you take Interim and summer school. They 
are what you've worked for all semester, but likely as 
not, they are not as high as you had hoped. A week after 
final grades are due, that little square carbon garde 
report arrives in your mailbox, you rush inside, "Grasp and 
Pull", and see what the labors of the semester have 
wrought. 



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Guidebook • 13 




GRADUATION 

The commencement exercises held in May represent a 
passing from Centenary into the real world. Students 
have prepared for this moment and equipped them- 
selves with a college education in order to establish a 
satisfactory life. The Gold Dome is decorated in a formal 
maroon, the faculty and administration march in their 
parade dress, and the seniors approach their chairs in 
caps and gowns. Parents sigh and reflect on how much 
older their child has grown. Diplomas are presented, the 
recessional begins, and amidst the pomp and circum- 
stance a mixture of relief and sadness emerges for the 
end of four years of college. 

GREEKS 



Centenary has four fraternities, Kappa Alpha, Kappa 
Sigma, Tau Kappa Epsilon, and Theta Chi; and three 
sororities, Chi Omega, Zeta Tau Alpha, and Zeta Phi Beta. 
The Greek system serves many functions on campus. The 
system forms cohesive groups of people with similar inter- 
ests. Becoming a Greek offers a chance to make friends 
and meet people. It also offers an endless source of 
parties. Fraternities and sororities also serve an often 
overlooked function in serving as an incentive to make 
good grades. Another advantage of Centenary's size is 
that one does not have to join a fraternity or sorority to 
find good friends. Friendship crosses barriers here, and 
being a Greek or not being a Greek does not limit a 
person's behavior toward others. 





H 



HIGH SCHOOL WEEKEND 



High School Weekend, held each spring, is a great 
opportunity for high school students to visit the college 
and get to know what goes on at Centenary. The high 
school students stay in dorm rooms and participate in 
such activities as church services, rappelling, talent 
shows, Hardin games, open house parties given by the 
fraternities, and exhibitions presented by various organi- 
zations on campus. Everyone goes out of their way to 
make the guests feel comfortable and see the best side 
of Centenary. 



14 • Guidebook 





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HOMECOMING 



Centenary's Homecoming was held on December 5th, 
and the Gents lost an exciting game to Louisiana Tech, 
62-63. The festivities included open house at the fraterni- 
ty and sorority houses, an Alumni Luncheon, and a dance 
held in Haynes. Cindy Lee was crowned Homecoming 
Queen from a court of girls chosen by the student body. 
Elaine Mayo was First Maid, and Elberta McKnight was 
Second Maid. Other girls chosen to be in the court were 
Cathy Amsler, Missy Moore, Carole Powell, and last year's 
queen, Libby Taylor. 



Guidebook • 15 




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HONOR CODE 



The Honor Code is Centenary's institutional reminder 
that students are indeed adults and have certain re- 
sponsibilities. The pledge which one can barely scrawl at 
the end of a fifteen page essay test is a sign of respect 
for higher learning as well as higher morals. The atmo- 
sphere of trust rather than the threat of punishment cre- 
ates self -enforcement. 




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INTERIM 



Interim is the three week period following Christmas 
vacation. Its original purpose was to allow the students to 
take a culturally enriching course Pass/Fail so that stu- 
dents would be exposed to a course in college that 
could be fun and still broaden horizons. Cultural Perspec- 
tives now fills this purpose, and Interim has been caught in 
a cross-current of feelings embodied in its original pur- 
pose versus feelings which question the worth of three 
hours of easy credit. For the students who take trips, it is 
still alot of fun and a nice way to see more of the world 
than Shreveport. For the students who stay on campus, it 
is a chance to relax and have some peace and quiet. 
This year Shreveport got five inches of snow, so classes 
were cancelled, and residents got to play in the snow. 





INTRAMURALS 



Centenary's Intramural program includes football, bas- 
ketball, Softball, cross country, volleyball, pool, ping 
pong, golf and tennis. Fraternities battle for the sweep- 
stakes trophy, and independents form teams to try to 
outdo the Greeks. Intramural football tends to draw 
more spectators than the other sports, and this year's 
championship game where the Sun Devils defeated 
Kappa Sigma I turned out to be an exciting game. 



18 • Guidebook 




K 



KSCL 

Our campus radio station is located on the second 
floor of the SUB. The interior is painted blue and silver and 
is decorated with various posters and notices. Station 
Manager Jaxon Baker and Program Director Guy Cas- 
singham have worked hard on the station. It has expand- 
ed to 150 watts and has cut back to eight hours of 
broadcasting time a day. Since it is a "progressive" radio 
station and the disc jockeys mostly play acid rock from 
the early 70's, most students consider it "regessive" and 
flip to another station. 



L 



LANDSCAPING 



Centenary has one of the prettiest campuses in the 
nation. The grounds are covered with beautiful gardens, 
towering trees and impressive azaleas and roses. The 
school's new sign located on the corner of Kings Highway 
and Centenary Boulevard is dedicated to Mr. and Mrs. 
Harry Balcom, and they have taken quite an interest in 
seeing that our landscaping continues in a similar man- 
ner. Most students feel lucky to have the peaceful 
beautiful campus, especially in the spring when Crumley 
Gardens burst into a symphony of red, pink and white 
azaleas. 




Guidebook • 19 



LIBRARY 



Magale Library is located on the east side of campus 
and faces Woodlawn Avenue. It houses around 130,000 
books, a music listening room, a lounge area among the 
magazine racks, and study rooms on the second floor. 
The library is a nice place to study and visit with people. 
The only time it is really crowded is during exam week 
and a week before Freshman English research papers 
are due. 





M 



MAIL 



Mail is one of the few contacts from the outside world. 
Students check their mailbox diligently for the sight of the 
diagonal edge of an envelope, a magazine, or even 
junk mail. If you receive a letter, it makes your whole day, 
reminding you of your family, friends, and boy- or girl- 
friend back home. Though our mail service may not be 
the best, we at least have twice a day delivery and 
mailboxes in our dorms. 



20* Guidebook 






MARDI GRAS 



Even though Mardi Gras is not an officially scheduled 
holiday, Bacchus, Rex, Comus and Endymnion call a num- 
ber of students to New Orleans for the gala celebration. 
This year the Senate worked hard to convince the facul- 
ty that this Louisiana tradition should be included in the 
school calendar. The festivities, the parades, the people 
and the carefree atmosphere are an experience to be 
treasured. 







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MONEY 



This topic may not be known to most students, be- 
cause they never seem to have any. If you happen to be 
lucky enough to have some, it always manages to disap- 
pear a week after you got it. Then it is time for that 
ominous phone call that all parents dread (collect, of 
course) — "Hi Mom and Dad! How's everything at home? 
I'm doing okay; classes aren't giving me too much trou- 
ble, and of course the soup at the mission is free ... Do I 
need money? Well, now that you mention it ... " 





Guidebook • 21 




22 • Guidebook 






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N 



NUMBERS 

Among Centenary's Admissions Department's strate- 
gies for recruiting new students is a spiel about the differ- 
ences between our small college and big universities — 
"At Centenary, you're more than just a number." Then 
at registration, the new student finds himself thinking, "At 
Centenary, you're more than just a number, you're ten 
numbers. You're an ID number, a meal ticket number, a 
phone number, a STAN number, a room number, a park- 
ing lot number, ..." But numbers stop when it comes to 
the closeness of students on campus. After a while you 
realize that Dick Anders knows your name and not your ID 
number. 



o 



OFF-CAMPUS STUDENTS 



Students from the Shreveport/Bossier area comprise 
over half of the enrollment of Centenary. They drive to 
school, go to class, and drive home. They usually never 
quite get around to the social centers of campus — the 
caf and the dorms. These mysterious creatures can be 
seen only at registration where on-campus students with 
puzzled looks think, "Who are all these people?" 



p 



PARKING 



Centenary's parking lots range from perfectly smooth 
cement in front of James and by the Smith Building to 
muddy expanses filled with potholes on the far edge of 
campus. Even though there never seem to be as many 
spaces as cars, and the security guards are quick to issue 
tickets for parking in the wrong lot, the convenience of 
having a car makes all the parking problems seem small. 



















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24* Guidebook 



PARTIES 

Parties on the weekends make the weekdays worth it. 
The fall semester is sprinkled with KA Jungle Party, TKE 
Graveyard Party, Sig Pajama Party, Theta Chi Mafia, Chi- 
O Barnyard, Zeta Swamp Party, and Fall Ball. The spring 
semester has the formals which usually involve parties, 
pre-parties, pre-pre-parties for days ahead of time. Ev- 
eryone has their favorite parties to go to, and everyone 
loves to go to parties. First a day is announced for the 
party, then everyone suffers the indecision of who to ask 
and what to wear. Finally the night itself rolls around, 
excitement fills the air, the sun goes down, the music 
goes up, and the occasion has arrived. 




PLAYS 



Centenary's Theater Department produces two plays 
each semester. The Playhouse is usually a flurry of activity 
— building sets, rehearsing scripts, working on costumes, 
and planning programs. Opening night comes, the play is 
presented, and then the cast awaits reviews. This fall 
Madame de Sade and Medea were produced. During 
Interim, a musical production, An Evening With Lemer and 
Lowe, was staged. 




Guidebook • 25 



R 



REGISTRATION 



Registration is held at the beginning of each semester, 
and students, faculty, and administration all agree that it 
is not a pleasant way to start the year. You stand in five 
or six different lines, and then when you finally have to 
write a check for some huge amount of money, you feel 
nothing but frustration. How can it cost so much money? 
Pre-registration cuts down on the time involved, and the 
trauma wears off after a few days. 




REVEL 



The Red River Revel is Shreveport's celebration of the 
arts. The riverfront is decorated by booths, signs, and 
stages. The Revel is characterized by delicious food, 
beautiful crafts, colorful paintings, and interesting dem- 
onstrations. This year's Revel included a hot air balloon 
race; downtown was lit up with colorful cloudlike bal- 
loons. The Revel is a celebration which should not be 
missed. 





26 • Guidebook 



RUSH 



Rush is a week of madness which takes place at the 
beginning of the fall semester. Freshman girls and guys 
and any other students interested in becoming a Greek 
are swept through a week of fraternity or sorority ideolo- 
gy and history, socializing with total strangers, and finally, 
pledging. Whether or not you pledge, you've had a 
chance to meet a large number of Centenary students. 
On Sunday the guys wear their new jerseys and the girls 
run down the hill; the madness has ended, and each new 
member now has a house off campus, new friends, and a 
table in the caf. 





s 



SECURITY 

Since Dick Anders became Dean of Students, security 
has been tighter on campus. Hardin Dorm has a 24-hour 
lock on the doors; Cline Dorm has two locked doors 
facing Kings Highway. It is still questionable whether thefts 
have decreased, but he has created a protected and 
isolated campus that leaves students less prepared for 
the real world. 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT 



Our fearless leaders meet each Tuesday in the Student 
Senate on the second floor of the SUB. Elected by the 
student body, officers and senators plan such projects as 
forum speakers, campus entertainment, and blood 
drives. Their most important job is deciding how to divide 
the money received from student fees. Though earth- 
shaking decisions are not usually handled by the SGA, 
what goes on in their meetings does affect the lives of 
Centenary students. 




Guidebook • 27 




28 • Guidebook 




Guidebook • 29 



SUB 

The Moore Student Center, located at the center of 
campus, houses the post office, bookstore, coffeehouse, 
the media, the Student Senate, and a game room re- 
cently titled "The Gentlemen's Quarters." One of the 
SGA's pet projects is to improve the SUB through renova- 
tion and increasing facilities available to students. Al- 
though the SUB is not exactly the center of student activ- 
ity, it is a nice place to kill a few hours between classes. 
The coffeehouse has a wide screen TV and all sorts of 
electronic games, pool and ping pong tables are avail- 
able. 





T 



TESTS 



One of the unfortunate things about college is that you 
are assaulted by tests throughout the semester. You 
sweat, study, sweat, worry, sweat, and cram until it is 
over. The relief overwhelms you, and unless you have a 
test the next day, you probably go out and celebrate. 
Tests evoke all sorts of emotions — panic, determination, 
stubborness, sometimes carelessness, and occasionally 
pride because you know that you did well. 



30 • Guidebook 





V 



VISITATION 



Visitation is a fancy word for taking a member of the 
opposite sex into your dorm room. This may be done only 
at certain hours and according to certain rules. Even 
though complaints are loudly voiced about procedures 
and hours, visitation is the administration's mixed-up, me- 
dieval way of trying to protect the girls. It is also impor- 
tant to remember that visitation is a privilege which may 
be revoked if the rules are bent a little too far. 





Ah, that marvelous mechanical device that offers es- 
cape, escape, escape! How much enjoyment is offered 
by General Hospital when you have a test that night 
cannot be explained. This spring the dorm televisions 
were connected to cable, so lobby attendance has 
increased. The school is not trying to advocate incessant 
television watching or lobby leeching, it is merely trying 
to offer the students some of the conveniences they 
might have with an apartment off campus. 




w 



WOODROW WILSON FELLOWS 




Centenary participates in the Woodrow Wilson Visiting 
Fellows Program, a program which brings lecturers to 
campus. They meet people, socialize with students and 
faculty, and host informal discussion sessions with classes. 
Outstanding diplomats, journalists, corporate executives, 
and politicians have visited Centenary. This fall Edward P. 
Morgan, a distinguished news commentator, was our 
twentieth Woodrow Wilson fellow. 




Guidebook • 31 



Y 



Yoncopm 

The Centenary yearbook arrives in nicely bound 9x12 
covers each May. The students review it, critique it, and 
enjoy the parts they like. The difference between the 
yearbook and the other media, i.e., the radio station and 
the newspaper, is that it is a one shot affair; if it comes 
out bad, you have to wait until the next year for another 
one. One good thing about the yearbook is that it lasts; 
after you leave, you take the book along as a reminder 
of what your fellow students look like. This year's staff has 
worked hard to produce a quality yearbook, and we 
would like to thank Janie Flournoy for her time and help. 



z 



zoo 

Students often feel that the Centenary campus trans- 
forms itself into a zoo at certain times of the year — the 
end of exam week, the beginning of exam week, right 
around midterm, the Sunday after rush, when everyone 
gets back from Christmas and almost any given time 
during any given semester. Crazy actions, loud music, 
temper tantrums, and late night cries of agony become 
a way to ease the pressures of being a student. Amidst 
this confusion exists a bond of friendship and cooperation 
that helps you through the day. And when you reflect on 
your college career, it will be the crazy times that you'll 
remember. 




32 • Guidebook 



IN MEMORY OF PAUL M. BROWN 







Centenary alumnus; founder cf the Brown Chair of English; President's Scholarship donor; a 
loving husband, father and grandfather; Paul Marvin Brown will long be remembered and revered 
on Centenary's campus. May he rest in peace. 



33 




u" 



w 







$ 

mm® 




vi-' 



36 • Students 





etsy Segers, Sharon Ferguson 



Deborah Greer 




Trip Ludwig, Elberta McKnight 






I 



1/ . 

jilt*' 



Missy Moore, Cathy Amsler, Crissy Clarke. Madeline Murphy 




38 • Students 





Students • 39 




..■•..:■• ■.•:;.• •;.',-' 



, 




Chris Fahringer, Margaret Germann 



Colleen Coburn. Kathy Woods. Liz Selby 






Students • 41 




Leigh Ann Cannon 



42 • Students 



Troy Henry, Chuck Weber, Brian Sinclair 




Catherine Banks 




Students • 43 




Sam Buice, Diane Fowler, Ramona Bethley, Chris Ward, Mark Yardley 



Lisa Davidson. Karen Armstrong 



44 • Students 




Cara Milner, Sheila Fannon, Alison Webb 



Kauffman, 



Colbert 




Students • 45 




Bonnie Getsinger 



Linda Baker, Cheri Holdridge, Susan Adrian 




Alfredo Steinberg, Javier Torres, Masami Takahasht Mario Junguito 








40* 




""IT"'^ 




Newby 



ents 



Michele McMahen, Michele Finlay 








JK7 






Donna Richardson, Brian McRae 



48 • Students 




^atty Hamilton. 



ras, Je 



raig Coleman, Jill Leach, Ronnie Bowers 



Students ♦ 




Kathy Snelling 



50* Students 




» - 



te Blakely 



Students • 51 







52 • Students 




Students • 53 




54 • Students 




56 • Students 





wn Grammer. 



:■ : i .U^II^U lih^ i ; ! : ifc. : ? ^'l s : ! 








Students • 57 






:ynthia Martin, Elizabeth Hoffman, Lisa Slaughter, Liz Montgomery 



58 ♦ Students 



i 




Margaret Avard, Debbie Brown, Leona McCaughan, Deane Allen, Tracy Murreli 



Students • 59 



^* 





\s 



♦ * 





Angle Gil! 




60 • Students 





Sissy McNeely, 




Melame west, Cara Derrick, Cie Hawkins 



Students* 63 




ricia Wdrr en, Robert Harp< 



Alyce Boudreaux, Kay Juranka 





Students • 65 






Julie Jor 






68 • Students 




Students • 69 




i 






* 




■2ffiHW.y> 





Victoria Pravenza 



Evpnne Greene, Chris Murphy 




Sue Haynie, Bastiaan Vaandrager. Kirk Labor. Pat Downs 



70 • Students 




Theresa Hart, Sandy Holt, Suzann 



Susan Yoblonsky 



John Robinson 




Angela Hamous 



72 • Students 




Patty Kendrick 



Students • 73 




74* Students 




John Mottice, Scott Goodwin, Julie Bone, Jeannie Mewrnan 



Larry M 



Students* 75 





Scott Green. Cindy Goins 



Carole Powell. Andy Freeman 






%a//dd'/(/ " ■O'l i 



Colin Kimbali 



76 • Students 








Students • 77 





lHLE'.=v"S 






80 • Students 




Students* 81 




V 




84 • Administration 



flNE 







Dr. Lee Morgan 

Associate Dean, Brown Chair of English 



Elaine Hand 

Secretary to the Vice President 



VICE-PRESIDENT/DEANS 



Administration • 85 



DEAN OF STUDENTS 






Joy Jeffers 

Assistant Dean of Students 




Dick Anders 

Dean of Students/Director of Placement 



Emily McWilliams 

Secretary, Dean of Students Office 



86 • Administration 



I 



niW__ 







« 






Kay Lee 

Secretary. Public Relations/Alumni 



Janie Flournoy 

Director of Public Relations 



Rosemary Morris 

Research Assistant, Alumni/Development Office 






Chris Webb 

Director of Alumni 



ALUMNI/P.R. 



Administration • 87 



M B M ESMW aa 












ADMISSIONS/FINANCIAL AID 




Roberta Lambrecht 

Financial Aid Secretary 



Muzette Gallagher 

Financial Aid Counselor 



Kathryn O Byrne 

Assistant Director of Financial Aid 



88 • Administration 



Donald McDowell 

Director of Church Relations 



James Perkins 

Director of Development 






Dorothy Ricketson 

ecretary, Church Relations/Scholarship Development 



Robert Brown 

Director of Scholarship Development 



DIRECTORS 



Administration • 89 



EM 



BUSINESS OFFICE 




Jessie Outlaw 

Busiriess Manager 



Harold Bond 

Treasurer 





Left to right: 
Merble Bennett 

Shirley Copes 
Carolyn Bryant 
Connie Sawyer 

Melanie Koch 
Bea Adams 

Nikki Letmon 

Business Office 



waaliw 



90 • Administration 



*&gM^m 






mm 




m 

wM 

wW H Wi w 8 E W 8mS !K ^8BL' 







Admnistration • 91 



SECRETARY/MAINTENANCE 



Maintenance Crew 




Bettye Leslie 

Faculty Secretary 



Housekeepers 



92 • Administration 








Betty Christian 
Clerk 



David Bently 

Bookstore Manager 



Roy Seagroves 

Post Office Manager 



Sherry Barefield 

Computer Center Manager 




Dr. David Thomas 

Director of Computer Center 



Cornelia Brown 

Campus Operator 


■ . 










COMPUTER/BOOKSTORE 



Administration • 93 



^■■^H 






Margie Burns 

Secretary of Church Careers 



Cheryl Washburn 

Church Admission Counselor 



Bentley Sloane 

Coordinator of Pastoral Relations and Church 
Careers 





Bert Scott 

Director of Church Careers 



John Washburn 

Associate Director of Church Careers 



94 • Faculty 




Kathy Brown 

Catalog Librarian 



Ella Edwards 

Assistant ana Reference Librarian 




Nancy Middleton 

Heaa of Library Acquisitions 



Mary Rademacher 

Serials and Exchange Librarian 




Carolyn Garison 

Music Librarian/Archivist 




Jim Volny 

Director of Library Services 




Anna White 

Head of Circulation 



LIBRARY 



Faculty • 95 



RELIGION/PHILOSOPHY 





Robert Ed Taylor 

Chaplain, Chairman of Religion 



Don Emler 

Associate Professor of Religion 



L. Hughes Cox 

Chairman and Professor of Philosophy 



Webb Pomeroy 

James Professor of Religion 




96 • Faculty 




SOCIOLOGY 
HISTORY 



Eddie Vetter 

Chairman and Associate Professor of Sociology 



Mark Dulle 

Chairman and Associate Professor of Psychology 



j miii 




Lewis Bettinger 

Associate Professor of Psychology 



Alton Hancock 

Chairman, Professor of History/Political Science 



Joseph Koshansky 

Instructor in History/Political Science 




PSYCHOLOGY 



Faculty • 97 



ENGLISH 



Michael Hall; Barry Nass 

Assistant Professor of English 



■ttfW-tfMS 





Anne Rogers 

Instructor in English 




EE& 



Earle Labor 

Professor of English 



Linda Weems 

Instructor in English Language Center 



Michael Hall 

Chairman, Associate Professor of English 



98 • Faculty 




David Middleton 

Lecturer in Art 



Dorothy Rambin 

Acting Directqr, English Language 
Center 



Judy Godfrey 

Director of Museum Programs 




Willard Cooper 

Chairman, Professor of Art 



Elizabeth Friedenberg 

Adjunct Professor of Art 



LANGUAGE/ART 



MUSIC 









'" \'""2^^" 





Daisy Duncan 

Secretary, School of Music 



Frank Carroll 

Dean of School of Music 





Ronald Dean 

Associate Professor of Music 



William Teague 

Professor of Music 



BBS 



m 



mm 



" v ' -'»■'., ; 




Mary Beth Armes 

Associate Professor of Music 




Donald Rupert 
Professor of Music 



81 



100 • Faculty 



William Riley 

Instructor in Music 



Chandler Teague 

Lecturer in Music 





aim 

dp 



m 





Laura Crawford 

Director ot Suzuki Violin School 



Robert Reynolds 

Professor of Music 




Constance Carroll 

Lecturer in Music 



Faculty 101 




Robert Buseick 
Chairman, Associate Professor of Theatre/Speech 



Isobel Rosenbloom 

Lecturer in Theatre/Speech 



102 • Faculty 



SSSi 





Linda Williams 

Coordinator of Teacher Placement, Education 



Joseph Garner 

Chairman and Professor of Education 



Robert Hallquist 

Professor of Education 




EDUCATION 



'. ■ I 



Faculty 103 



SCIENCE 








Beth Leuck 

Assistant Professor of Biology 



Ed Leuck 

Assistant Professor of Biology 





Gary Hallee 

Assistant Professor of Physics 



Robert Zawalski 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 




Left to Right: Warren White, Wortham Professor of Engineering; Jeffrey 
Trahan, Keen Chair, Chairman, Associate Professor of Physics; Gary Hallee. 



104 • Faculty 



Edmond Parker 

Professor of Engineering 




Carl Cathey 

Instructor in Geology 




Nolan Shaw 

Woolf Professor of Geology, Chairman 




Rosemary Seidler 

Professor of Chemistry 



Stanton Taylor 

Chairman, Professor of Chemistry 





MATH 



Left to Right: David Thomas; Michael Manes, Instructor in Mathematics; 
Virginia Carlton; Betty Speairs, Donald Danvers. 




Betty Speairs 
Associate Professor of Mathematics 



Donald Danvers 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 



A 06 • Faculty 




m ^M JUL. X> ^1 


■ ! 




BR§y 


SB I f 


/ 

JR ' 


v» 1 1 

si I 9 


gl/ 

■FT' 




Harold Christensen 

Assistant Professor of Economics/Director of 
Economic Education Center 



Barbara Dowden 

Instructor in Business 



Delbert Chuml.ey 

Professor of Business 




George McGovern 

Assistant Professor of Business 




Douglas Morrill 

Assistant Professor of Economics 



' ■ ■ i- 



BUSINESS 



Richard Scott 

Instructor of Business 



Linda Wallace 

Instructor in Economics 



Faculty 107 



' 



P.E. 




James Farrar 

Chairman, Associate Professor of P.E. 




Rick Foster 

Assistant Professor of Military Science 



Roger Ivy 

Instructor in Military Science 




Tommy Vardeman 

Assistant Basketball Coach 






Tommy Canterbury 
Head Basketball Coach 







108 • Faculty 




Michael Carroll 

Assistant Athletic Director 




James Harrison 

Tennis Coach 








f-V- 



mfW 




Terry Finklea 

Secretary 




Julia Van Tiem 

Basketball Secretary 



Faculty 109 












V 





\ 








112* Honors 



PACESETTERS 




Omicron Delta Kappa, 
President's Advisory Council Chi 



Junior Senator, Student-Lite 
Committee, MSM, Open Ear, 
Elections Committee, Pre-Law 
Club, Who's Who, Washington 
•, Dean's List 




MISSY MORN 




KIRK LABOR 





PACESETTERS 







*» 




KRIS ERICKSON 



m*. 



Varsity Gymnastics, Chi Omega 
Rush Chairman ana Personnel, 
Dean's List. MSM, President's 
Advisory Council Alpha Kappa 
Delta, Social Science Club, 
Order of Diana, TKE Sweetheart, 
Homecoming Queen, 
Panhellenic, Who's Who 
Omicron Delta Kappa, 
Intramurnk 








LIBBY TAYLOR 



PACESETTERS 



■Mi 



■BBM^^HH 








BRIGITTE GORT 



w>-?si ' ;™?-- 



y*yK«KwS; : S#Sw^^ ...■■.,.;. 









ORD WILLIAMS 



f 7 <5 • Honors 




PACESETTERS 





Centenary 

Sigma Grand Procurator and 

Guard, Yoncopin Photographer, 

CSCC, Zeta Tau Alpha Big 

Brother, Inframurqls, Varsity 

Tennis, President's Advisory 

Council 




CHARLIE ATKINS 




Chi Omega Treasure 



>rleader, Choir Alto Section 
Leader, Intramurals, Panhellenic, 
Open Ear, Judicial Board, 
President's Advisory Council, 
Public Relations Committee, 
Homecoming Queen 






CINDY LEE 







PACESETTERS 





-J^i 



%?:;!£: ; %^ 



DELTON ABRAMS 





MISSY MOORE 




Honors 



PACESETTERS 







Maroon Jacket, Omicron Del 
Kappa, Alpha Chi, Honor Cou 
President's Scholar, Dean's Li 
Dorm Council, President's 
Advisory Council, Open Ear, 
Cross Country, Intramurals, MSM 





LYNN YOUNG 




Honors* 119 



-&■ 



PACESETTERS 



■ 




Zeta Tau Alpha Vice President, 
Pledge Trainer and Scholarship 
Chairman, Head Cheerleader, 
Omicron Delta Kappa, Alpha 
Chi, Maroon Jackets, Who's 

Jho, Homecoming Court, 
Judicial Board, President's 
Advisory Council, Dean's List, 
Dorm Council President, 
Intramurals 




DONETE COOK 




DR. HAROLD CHRISTEi 



I I F 



FACULTY PACESETTERS 




tonors 




_iJ 



backstage, occasionally mciuaea in 
the Yoncopin, recognizes junior and 
senior students, and faculty, who 
have contributed toward improving 
Centenary's atmosphere, Selected 
by the Yoncopin staff, the people in 
this section have promoted 
enthusiasm among the student body 
and have excelled in various areas 
of campus life. This section is the 
Yoncopin 's thank you for the 
contribution of their time and help. 




NELL CHAMBERS 

Alpha Chi, Omicron Delta Kappa, RA, 
Who's Who, Alpha Kappa Delta, Social 
Science Club, Open Ear, MSM, Maroon 
Jackets 



NANCY PORTER 

Chi Omega, Panhellenic, Who's Who, Choir, Opera 
Workshop, Organ Guild 













?22 • Honors 




sitM 



m 




5wa 



W* 




RICHARD LILES 

Maroon Jackets, Open Ear, Alpha Kappa 
Delta, Social Science Club, Kappa Alpha, 
Who's Who, President's Advisory Council 




Chi Omega, De 
Daughter, Rivert 
Delta Kappa, Pr 
Homecoming G. 



POWELL 

•, Alpha Chi, Theta Chi 
layers, Choir, Omicron 
's Advisory Council, 
:>nglomerate 



SUSAN WEBB 




Alpha Epsilon Delta, Dean's List, Alpha Chi, Who's 
Who, Circle K, Honor Court. Maroon Jackets, RA 
Dorm Council. President's Advisory Council 



DR. VICKIE GOTTLOB 



124 • Honors 




GREG BLACKMAN 

fau Kappa Epsilon. Varsity Cross Country, Alpha Chi, 
Dmicron Delta Kappa, Who's Who, SGA Senator, RA, 
Dean's List 



MANDY ARNOLD 

Chi Omega Treasurer, Yoncopin Studen 
Editor, Alpha Chi, Theta Chi Daughter 
Open Ear, Circle K. Dean's List 



raQ 



91 






Ji 



■ 




FELICIA SANKEY 

Omicron Delta Kappa, Alpha Epsilon Delta, Who's Who, Dean's List 



JENNY PINER 

Choir President and Female 
Vice-President, Zeta Tau 
Alpha, Kappa Sigma 
Starduster, Homecoming 
Court 




.onors 




Yoncopin Editor and Greeks Editor, Alpha 

Chi, Omicron Delta Kappa, Dean's List, 
Educational Policy Committee, Elections 
Committee, Theta Chi Sweetheart 



Alpha Chi, Theta Chi President, Alpha Epsilon 
Delta, Dean's List, Student Affiliates of the 
Chemical Society, KSCL 




EVONNE GREENE 



Dean's List, Alpha Chi, Choir 
Treasurer, Conglomerate, 
Yoncopin, Who's Who, Tau 
<appa Epsilon Order of Diana, 
-tomecoming Court 



Rivertowne Players, Chi Omega Rush Chairman, Who's 
Who 



126 • Honors 










tfW#<« 



ffi 



■■ 



■ 
HI 



Wm 



1 



■ 



H 



ra 



P"# ■ 



':"-: 




I 




MICRON DELTA KAPPA 




Standing, l-r: Pat Booras, Dr Earle Labor. Kathy Nester. Dr. Frank Carroll. 
Dr. Vickie Gottlob. Dr Willard Cooper. Nell Chambers, Elaine Mayo, Lynn 
Young. Felicia Sankey. Sarah Branton. Dr Webb Pomeroy. Dr Lee Mor- 



gan. Dr Rosemary Seidler. Ford Williams. Susan Cottongi. 
Carole Powell. Donette Cook. Sally Sherrod. Missy Morn 




Omicron Delta Kappa, or V4 ODK" as it is popularly known, is an nonor society made up of the leaders of the 
college community. Members have been shown to be well-rounded individuals in the areas of scholarship; 
athletics; media; the arts; and social, service, and religious activities. Members, elected by the society, are 
^tapped" at a convocation. 




ALPHA CHI 




Alpha Chi is a national honorary fraternity consisting of stu- 
dents, faculty and administration. Juniors and seniors with a 
cumulative grade point average of 3.5 or higher may be- 
come members. Alpha Chi holds several dinner meetings dur- 
ing the year, and members discuss current events and contro- 
versial issues. Sponsoring the fraternity is Dr. Lee Morgan. 




Forrest Parlette, Nell Chambers, Kevin Alexander, Shawna Stotts, Elaine Coss, Dr. lee Morgan, Brian Sinclair, Carol Poole, Laura McGough, Don- 
Mayo, Mandy Arnold. Carole Powell, Ford Williams, Chris Fahringer, Andy ette Cook, Fran Stevens, Greg Blackman. 




»?;--* ■.:'■■ J 





r 







mmmmmmm 




STCL 
AMERICA 






,-i.y^.... ,7- 








tevens, 





m 





Felicia Sankey 
Dr. Rosemary Seidl 
Nell Chambers 
Brian Ingalls 
Susan Webb 
Delton Abrams 
Lynn Young 
Dr. Sam Shepherd 



fy Catanese 

Gray 
owler 
>g@ 
n Lambert 
. jham Bateman 
Cindy Lee 
7id Henington 







ILT 



Steve Holt 
Michael Manes 

Dick Anders 
William Teague 

>iana Munoz 



..rtinusen 




NTENARY'S YONCOPIN 




Another deadline, so 
soon? . . . Jeff, I hate to 
bother you again, but 
. . . Why is there never 
enough time? . . . How 
many late days do we 
have? . . . 

The editor would like 
to thank everyone for 
their cooperation; the 
staff has done a terrific 
job, now if the publisher 
will do the same . . . 
and we're sorry for the 
Muffy Howingtons in 
this book. 



Dawn Sikes, Faculty. 
Jeff Blakeman, 

Photographer. 
Elaine Mayo, Photographer. 
Susan Cottongim. editor. 
Right stall: 

Kirk Labor, Photographer. 
Mandy Arnold, Students. 
Frances HarreH, 

Photographer. 
Sally Sherrod, Greeks. 
Not shown: 
Sheila Fannon, Sports. 
J. J. Jordan. Organizations. 





138 • Organizations 





jncure, and Jaxon 
Baker. 



OrganL 



TM6 



(Penteiunrg (fern alum crate 



Official Publication of Oldest College West of the Mississippi 





The Centenary Conglomerate, 
our campus newspaper, comes out 
each week after a madcap rush to 
fill the space. Published by the Bos- 
sier Tribune, the Conglomerate is a 
mixture of campus news, entertain- 
ment features, photographs, edito- 
rials, and sports information. The 
Conglomerate staff deserves a 
hearty thank you from the students 
for their efforts. 











STUDENT 
GOVERNMENT 
ASSOCIATION 



The goal of Centenary's Student Government Asso- 
ciation is to work toward a better atmosphere on 
campus, and improve community and student life. 
They act as a middleman for students to the faculty 
and administration for the presentation of student 
opinions. They also oversee campus media, judicial 
bodies, and hold a constitution of their own. 

Standing, t-r: Elizabeth Krecker, Lisa King, Laura Echols, Martha 
Bigner. Michael Hayes, Ford Williams, Wade McCutcheon, Greg 
Blackmaa Jennifer Blakeman, Chris Murphy. Seated, l-r: Missy Morn, 
Alyce Boudreaux, Brigitte Gort, Shay McNulty. 





Mrs. Lafern Coll 
Rotary Dor- 





i 










jrganizcm 



DORM CO 



An important part of the Student Government Association, Article II of the Constitution states that dorm councils 
regulate internal dorm life such as discipline, following of rules, and coordination of activities in dorm living. The 
councils are voted on and elected by dorm residents in each dorm, hoping that the elected council holds 
representatives from all campus groups. 





Back row, l-r: Bess Robinson, Diane Germani, 
Carol Stephens, Laurie Puilen. Front row, i-r: Kim 

lan. Michele Finlay, Bonnie Brown, Carolyn 

rcim. 






T my%: 



9 H BJJJ jT«| B^ w " * u i ^* ■ * W H^HH 



STUDENT ORGANIZATION 

Founded September 9, 1980 




uiivares, Ammar n< 

Delton Abrams Fourth row, l-r: Masami Takahashi, Monte Manske, Rutchadaporn Pathumanun, Jennat Chin, Mario 
Junojto 






PRESIDENT'S 

ADVISORY 

COUNCIL 



Alyce Boudreaux 
Greg Brown 
Margaret Germann 
Susan Webb 
Sonya Sankey 
Kim Boynton 
Felicia Sankey 
Carol Stephens 
Liz Selby 
Nell Chambers 
Chris Fahringer 
Cindy Hawkins 
Kim Cady 
Dr. Donald Webb 
Elizabeth Krecker 
Graham Bateman 
Donette Cook 
Cindy Lee 
Diana Munoz 
Charlie Atkins 
John Dupuy 
Fran Stevens 
Margaret Avard 
Lynn Young 





ACTIVITIES 
ADVISORY 
COUNCIL 




Standing, l-r: Karen 
Klusendorf 
Vicki Rice 
Seated, l-r: 
Doug Robinson 
Diane Fowler 





jj ^^. 

|MII mm 










■■«■■» 




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■;V;'-/;.. ■;. :; .,;':"' ,: '■. . ;,. . ■ ■ ' ■ . -:.v :: ;;,; . ^/'K:^;;::'^^.' 1 ,'-':; '. P ■■:■:■.■ .jr ■- .. ■■. ::: ;' : V-- £3f" ■-■» %,. "■ 


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a 









J Fullilove French Ho, 



Conductor: 





The student chapter of the American Guild of 
Organists in conjunction with the North Louisiana 
chapter of the AGO periodically schedules musical 
programs of various interests, 

Opera Workshop has had a successful year with 
the high point of their performances being the pro- 
duction of The Miracle of the Nativity, 




Essie Hughes 







^reer. bopr< 



ce-President. 
; Evonne 
3k . Chns 



If o Section Leader; Deborah 
Leader. 






The Centenary College 
Choir has become a tradition 
as well as an enjoyable activity 
for students talented in music, 
The Shreveport community has 
heard the ghosts of graduated 
voices leave, and new, youn- 
ger voices take their places, 
From Rhapsody to the annual 
summer tour, the Centenary 
campus and surrounding com- 
munity hold great pride in this 
lovely ensemble of voices. This 
tradition is led by Will K. An- 
dress. 








Front row, l-r: Chris Fahringer, Wendy 
Phifer, Marty Chadwick. Mary Alfred. 
Dan Scroggins. Julie Jordan Second 
row. l-r: Tripp Phillips. Cindy Hawkins. 
Connie Getsinger, Denise McMullan. 
Lisa Chaisson. Keith Oncale, Roy How- 
ard. Linda Little Third row. l-r: John 
Gayle. Robert Buseick, Kathy Woods. 
^§§§^§§|p ra Derrick. Mae Ann 

ven. Frank Bonner. Debra Hicks. 

leryl Brr 
Fox, Gin" 



Educational theater is a creative, 
practical activity. Educational theater is 
a creative, democratic activity. Educa- 
tional theater is a creative, culturally en- 
riching activity, Educational theater is a 
creative activity which has personal and 
therapeutic values. Educational theater 
is a creative activity which has definite 
vocational and professional possibilities. 







viMd? 




Organizations* 157 



.he spring production of "The Ballad of the 
Sad Cafe" featured Curtis Jackson. Cindy 
Hawkins, John Willcox, and Craige Ames. 




he BaBad of the Sad Cafe" roles were held by students John Gayle, 
hn Willcox, Curtis Jackson, Dan Scroggins, Bob Coleman, Lee Morgan, 



Sue Voightlander, Carole Powell, Paul Armstrong, Wendy PNfer, Chris 
Fahringef/ and Cindy Hawkins. 




r rotes. 



"Madame de Sade", an entry in the American College Theater 
Festival, was the Critics' Choice, Cindy Hawkins won the Irene Ryan 

Award for Acting, Cara Derrick Won the Amaco Award for 
Outstanding Acting. 




J 




Front row, l-r: Robert Ed Taylor, Tom Wuenschel, Lisa Davidson, Terl Chambers, Dana Mathewson. Carolyn Benham. Steve Matta Second 
row. l-r: Nancy Jones, Kelly Crawford. Mark Evans, Dawn Slkes. Tina Hackett, Laurie Sanford. John Washburn, Jack Regan. Linda Baker. 
Jami Zimmerman, Pierre Bellegarde. Linda Baker. Cheri Holdridge. Susan Adrian Third row, l-r: Kelly Walker. Laurajane Baker, Darren Daigle. 
Victor Everharf, Ted Newby, Bob McDowell, Margie Burns, Sharon Faust, Carta Bauer, Bentley Sloane, JoAnn Cook, Joe VanHorn, Wade 
Loep, Mary Anne Minniear, Sam Buice, Diane Fowler, Bert Scott, David Otto, Chris Ward, Allan Todd, Laurie Thoman, Michael Hayes 



KM 



l*L*it!f4»ULVi 







jock row, i-r: Chris Fahrmger, Jim Ogden, J. Alan Irvine 
Front row, l-r: Matt Jacocks, Susan Clements/Dan Mann, 
Jeff Blakeman 



* 






tfftt 



f if 



M # f f 



iff 



f 



« ♦■ 






\ 



Back row, i-r: Laura Enrhardt, Sam Buice. Lee 
Thompson, Dawn Sikes, Nancy Jones, Scott An- 
drews, Robert Ed Taylor, Lynn Young, Joanne Cook, 
Laurajane Baker Front, l-r: Susan Adrian, Kelly Craw- 
ford, Cheri Holdridae, Debra Martin 



METHODIST 



STUDENT 






MOVEMENT 



The Interfraternity Council is de- 
signed to supervise and coordinate 
the fraternities' cooperation. It gives 
the groups a chance to bring new 
ideas for strengthening Greek 
bonds on campus. It also has a disci- 
plinary function when pranks devel- 
op into trouble. 




4l <a_« 



o 



aSS^OsHg^fe 



6. 





WK 






PANHELLENIC 




bock to front Elaine Mayo. Audnanna Gn- 
sham, Jenny Piner, Tammy Parrar, Julie Jor- 
dan, Kathleen Bradford, Cindy. Lee. Cathy 
Amsler, Nancy Porter, Elizabeth Martinu-; 
sen, Nancy Warnock 



JUNIOR 
PANHELLENIC 




Cynthia Martin, Nancy Porter, Sarah Floy 
Kathleen Bradford, Elizabeth Martinuse 
Audrianna Grisham Not Pictured: Laura 
Echols, Jennifer Blakeman, Lisa Parker . : 







m 








i: 



Iota Gamma Chapter of Chi Omega began 
the year with a Number One Pledge Class. It was 
a year to remember with kidnaps, owl box, 
clean-ups, the Revel, Parent-Daughter Banquet, 
Big Sisters, the Dirty Dozen, and Blue Dresses. Par- 
ties were also tons of fun— Barnyard, Night Owl, 
Crush Party, Formal, and Pre-Parties. Chi Omegas 
also got involved in service projects — Open Ear 
fund-raising and the Diabetes Walkaton. Chi 
Omegas can be found as Fraternity sweethearts 
and little sisters. R.A.'s, tennis team, cheerleaders, 
Choir, SGA, Yoncopin, RTP, and CSCC. Chi Ome- 
gas were also found as Pacesetters, Who's Who, 
Homecoming Court and Queen. All in all, the little 
hooters had a great time this year. 



CHI OMEGA 





Missy Moore 
President 



Cie Hawkins 
Vice- 
President 



Nancy 

Gordon 

Secretary 



Mandy Arnold Cathy Amsler 


Libby Taylor 


B. Brown 


Carole Powell Frances 


Treasurer Pledge 


Personnel 


Rush 


Harrell 


Trainer 






Social 




168 • Greeks 




Rebecca Allred 
Karen Armstrong 
Laurajane Baker 
Graham Bateman 
Marian Bellamy 
Carolyn Benham 
Karen Bielek 
Jennifer Blakeman 

Alyce Boudreaux 
Susie Scholar 
Kim Cady 
Lisa Chaisson 
Crissy Clarke 
Susan Clements 
Hilarie Clower 
Jenifer Cook 

Sarah Darnell 
Cara Derrick 
Laura Echols 
Angela Estill 
Tammy Farrar 
Cindy Goins 
Polly Greve 
Ginny Guin 

Elizabeth Haas 
Patty Hamilton 
Sue Haynle 
Valerie Heard 
Chris Hummer 
Lisa tiling 
Tammie Kelley 
Lisa King 

Karen Klusendorf 
Elizabeth Krecker 
Cindy Lee 

Mary Jean Mathews 
Elaine Mayo 
Margaret McClure 
Laura McGough 
Kelly McNeil 

Kim Meng 

Mary Anne Mlnniear 
Liz Montgomery 
Missy Morn 
Johanna Otwell 
Lisa Parker 
Nancy Porter 
Lynette Potter 



Mindy Ramey 
Lisa Rothell 
Liz Selby 
Sally Sherrod 



Dawn Sikes 
Kathy Slaney 
Shawna Stotts 
Lisa Thornton 



Melanie West 
Michele Whitt 
Cheryl Whittington 
Kathy Woods 



Greeks* 169 




170 • Greeks 







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Greeks* 171 



Jeri Brown 

Annette Burke 

Dawn Calhoun 

" Patricia Catanese 

Patty Castellano 

, Laura Ehrhardt 

Sara Floyd 

Nancy Fox 

Nobia Fox 

Carole Gerhardt 

Shawn Grammer 

Audrianna Grisham 

Cass Hall 

Debbie Hicks 

Elizabeth Hoffman 

Julie Jordan 

Kay Juranka 

Susan Keller 

Nancy Ann Knuckols 

Lesley Lake 

Paige Lambert 

Stephanie Lynch 

Cynthia Martin 

Elizabeth Martinusen 

Elberta McKnight 

Elizabeth McNeely 

Kathy McNeely 

Cathy Miller 

Madeline Murphy 

Rachel Parks 

Lori Prestenback 

Donna Richardson 



Lillian Rogers 

Betsy Segers 

Susan Shaw 

Margaret Shehee 

Celia Sirman 



Kathy Snelling 

Amy Walker 

Nancy Warnock 

Claire Wiegand 

Davina Yates 




172* Greeks 



ZETA TAU ALPHA 




oyle 

heatwood 

■esident 



Sheb Adkisson 

Vice 

President 



Donette 
Cook 
Pledge 
Trainer 



Sara Gilchrist 

Receiving 

Secretary 



Kathy 
Packard 
Correspond- 
ing Secretary 



Kathleen 


Vicki Rice 


Jenelle 


Bradford 


Ritual 


Deprez 


Treasurer 




Historian 



Jenny Piner 
Membership 











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The Beta lota Chapter of Zeta Tau 
Alpha bean the year with a successful 
Rush. The Zeta Ladies were busy with 
Las Vegas Night, Red River Revel Hal- 
loween Party, Fantastic Voyage, 
White Violet Formal, and kidnaps. Be- 
sides these activities the Zeta's were 
involved in chapter service projects, 
SGA, Maroon Jackets, Who's Who, 
and Fraternity Little Sisters. This year 
has been a very successful and pros- 
perous for the Beta lota Chapter of 
Zeta Tau Alpha, 




m i 



ZETA TAU ALPHA 
PLEDGE DAY 1981 




Greeks* 173 




774 • Greeks 




Greeks* 175 



ZETA PHI BETA 



Sigma lota Chapter of 
Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc. 
had a great year. The 
members of the sorority 
and WIZ Club, with exem- 
plification and intensifica- 
tion, projected the goals 
and ideals of the sorority- 
scholarship, finer woman- 
hood, sisterly love and hu- 
manitarian and communi- 
ty services. Women with 
participatory virtues and 
innumerable attributes, 
these young women can 
boast of love and pride 
for their sorority. Among 
these prolific and bene- 
volent activities, Zeta's 
legacy has found women 
with pride perseverence, 
integrity, concern and as 
unrelentless pursuit for ex- 
cellence, playing major 
roles as contributions to 
the college and commu- 
nity. 




Dr. Virginia Carlton 
Advisor 



Elizabeth Jennings 
President 




Leisa Browning 
Vice President 









Kawanis Akins 






Secretary 




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176 • Greeks 



Tamiko Frank - WIZ 



Brenda Cooper - WIZ 




Greeks • 177 




178 • Greeks 



KAPPA ALPHA 



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The Alpha lota Chapter of the Kappa Al- 
pha Order celebrated its 90th year at Cen- 
tenary College. It continues to maintain the 
high ideals of chivalry and strong brother- 
hood, The KA's were active on campus as 
Maroon Jackets, Who's Who, Judicial Board, 
Stage Band, Alpha Chi, AKD, ODK, Open 
Ear, PAC, and varsity athletics. Some festivi- 
ties included the weekly Back Hall Parties, 
sorority swaps, Jungle Party, Christmas Par- 
ty, Pledge Party ,and the Granddaddy of 
them all — Old South, a weekly celebration 
of fine Southern Heritage. This year KA par- 
ticipated in fund-raising for Muscular Dystro- 
phy. 

Group Picture, front row, 1-r: Steve 
Wood, Alan Yokem, Mark Hansche, Jimmy 
Burke, Nick Nolfe, Jay Greenleaf, Jerry Lips- 
comb, David Henington, Charlie Warren 
Back row: Jimmy Woolridge, Richard Liles, 
Greg Bergstedt, Mike Talley, Tony Leo, Da- 
vid Hodges. Not pictured are Ron Evans, Bill 
Fullilove, Jeff Robertson, Bob Everett, Jack 
Thomson, Shawn Calhoun, and Brian 
McRae. 



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Greeks • 179 




180 • Greeks 




Greeks* 181 



KAPPA SIGMA 



The Epsilon Chapter of Kappa Sigma 
started the year off right with a fanta- 
sitc Rush. The Kappa Sigs participated 
in all intramural sports, Festive parties 
were also fun — South Seas, Pajama, 
Christmas Party, and Black and White 
Formal. The Kappa Sigs visited the 
Crippled Children at the Shriners' Hospi- 
tal during Christmas as their service 
project. Kappa Sigmas can be found 
on campus as choir members, cheer- 
leaders, R. A.'s, PAC, Pacesetters, and 
varsity athletics. An exceptional year 
was had by all brothers of Kappa Sig- 
ma. 




Fall Officers of Kappa Sigma are Mark Eldredge. Treasurer: Steve Burkhalter, Presi- 
dent; Joey Kent, Secretary; Charlie Atkins, Guard; and John O. Moore, Grand 
Master of Ceremonies. Not pictured are Trip Ludwig, Grand Procurator and Barry 
Breit, Guard. 




182 • Greeks 








David 












Mark 


Charlie Atkins 


Eubanks 


Chuck 


Ed Hall 


Lanny 


John Gupuy 


Tammy Farrar 


Eldredge 


Grand 


Grand Master 


Renshaw 


Grand 


Clement 


Guard 


Sweetheart 


Grand Master 


Procurator 


of 
Ceremonies 


Grand Scribe 


Treasurer 


Guard 







Dr. Harold Christensen 
Faculty Advisor 




Todd Anders 
Bill Bland 
Barry Breit 
Steve Burkhalter 
Roger Burleigh 



Scotty Caroom 
Pat Downs 
Nico Duett 
John George 
Trey Gleason 



Kirke Goff 
Trey Harris 
David Inman 
Joey Kent 
John Kolwe 



Martin Krecker 
Shawn Livesay 
Rolla Long 
Trip Ludwig 
Charles Mallory 



Tim Miler 
John O. Moore 
David Morton 
Don O'Bryne 
Mark Peeler 



Jack Regan 
Jimmy Rogers 
Mark Suhar 
Danny Talley 
Dan Trahan 



Les Turk 
Ron Viskozki 
Ron Whitler 
Jacgues Wiener 
John Yianitsas 



Greeks* 183 





184 • Greeks 









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TAG KAPPA EPSILON 




KRI5 ERICKSON 
P&TANIS 







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^56 • Greeks 




The Iota Theta Chapter of 
Tau Kappa Epsilon had a 
very successful year. Parties 
are always fun at the TKE 
House — Graveyard, TKE 
Wine and Cheese, Cowboy 
Party, Mo-Town Party, 
Apocalypse Now Party, 
Champagne Party, and Red 
Carnation Ball. TKE's partici- 
pated in service projects 
such as Open Ear Fund-rais- 
ing drive, St. Jude's Chil- 
dren's Hospital, and Cystic 
Fibrosis "Bowl for Breath." 
TKE's were involved on cam- 
pus as cheerleaders, R. A.'s, 
Pacesetters, SGA, Who's 
Who, ODK, Alpha Chi, AED, 
PAC, and Conglomerate. 
The men of Tau Kappa Epsi- 
lon will agree that they had 
an incredible year. 



Greeks • 187 




188 • Greeks 



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Greeks* 189 



THETA CHI 




190 • Greeks 




Stuart Eason Joe Jewell Kelly Allison Sam Brock 

President Vice-President Secretary Treasurer 



Andy Freeman Cathy Amsler 
Pledge Trainer Sweetheart 




The Eta Rho Chapter of The- 
ta Chi began the year with a 
great Rush. Theta Chi Actives 
and Pledges were involved in 
campus activities including 
CONGLOMERATE, Sigma Gam- 
ma Epsilon, Alpha Epsilon Delta, 
the Chemical Society, Alpha 
Chi, Cheerleading, Cross 
Country, Choir, CSCC, IFC, and 
Dorm Council. Not only did the 
Theta Chi's involve themselves 
in campus activities but they 
were busy with Theta Chi func- 
tions: Mafia Party, a Christmas 
Party given by the pledges. 
Belated New Year's Eve Party, 
Geek Party, Informal in Florida, 
and Demon Weekend with 
Northwestern Brothers. The 
Theta Chis had a terrific year. 



David 
Lawrence 



Wade Loep 



Larry Morse Kevin Murphy 



Charlie Ramsey Garry Russell 




Don Bernhardt Greg Brown 



Stacy Brown Jeff Ellis 



John Harrison Tommy James Steve Watson 




Greeks • 191 




192 • Greeks 




Greeks • 193 



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A/O. 


PLA YER 


POS. 


HT. 


WT. 


CLASS 


HOMETOWN 


5 


Napoleon Byrdsong 


G 


5-11 


145 


Jr. 


Longview, TX 


10 


Steve Burkhalter 


G-F 


6-4 


175 


Sr. 


Ruston, LA 


13 


Greg Haddox 


G 


5-11 


155 


Sr. 


Ruston, LA 


15 


Reginald Hurd 


G 


6-1 


160 


Fr. 


Dallas, TX 


22 


Rodney Bailey 


F 


6-6 


185 


So. 


Bossier City, LA 


23 


Chris Weaver 


G 


6-3 


175 


Fr. 


Ashland, LA 


30 


Jerry Smith 


F 


6-5 


185 


Sr. 


Gardendale, AL 


32 


Rusty Ward 


F 


6-6 


195 


Sr. 


Pampa, TX 


33 


Willie Jackson 


F 


6-5 


190 


So. 


Sibley, LA 


34 


Eric Bonner 


F-C 


6-7 


225 


So. 


Shreveport, LA 


40 


Jimmy Disbrow 


F 


6-4 


185 


Fr. 


Shreveport, LA 


44 


Cherokee Rhone 


C 


6-9 


225 


Sr. 


Springhill, LA 


45 


Greg Smith 


F 


6-8 


205 


So. 


Shreveport, LA 


50 


Morgan Sanders 


F 


6-4 


185 


Sr. 


Shreveport, LA 1 



196 • Sports 




Sports* 197 




198 • Sports 




Sports • 199 







200 • Sports 




Sports • 201 








Jerry Smith 





Chris Weaver 



202 • Sports 




Sports • 203 




204 • Sports 








SCHEDULE 




Date 


Opponent 


Site 


Nov. 28 


Montana State 


Gold Dome 


Nov. 30 


Southeastern Louisiana 


Gold Dome | j 


Dec. 5 


Lousiana Tech 


Gold Dome j 


Dec. 10 


Mississippi College 


Gold Dome 


Dec. 12 


University of Arkansas 


Fayetteville, AR 


Dec. 14 


Univ. of Ark. -Little Rock 


Little Rock, AR 


Dec. 19 


California State 


Gold Dome j 


Jan. 4-5 


Hatter Classic 


Deland, FL 


Jan. 9 


Northeast Louisiana 


Monroe, LA 


Jan. 11 


Louisiana Tech 


Ruston, LA 


Jan. 15 


Houston Baptist 


Houston, TX 


Jan. 19 


Northwestern 


Natchitoches, LA 


Jan. 21 


Univ. of Ark. -Little Rock 


Gold Dome 


Jan. 23 


Hardin Simmons 


Gold Dome 


Jan. 25 


Georgia Southern 


Statesboro, GA 


Jan. 27 


Mercer 


Macon, GA 


Feb. 1 


Southeastern 


Hammond, LA 


Feb. 4 


Samford 


Gold Dome 


Feb. 6 


Georgia Southern 


Gold Dome 


Feb. 8 


Northeast Louisiana 


Gold Dome 


Feb. 13 


Houston Baptist 


Gold Dome 


Feb. 18 


Hardin Simmons 


Abilene, TX 


Feb. 22 


Northwestern 


Gold Dome 


Feb. 25 


Mercer 


Gold Dome 


Feb. 27 


Samford 


Birmingham, AL 


Mar. 4-6 


TAAC Tournament 


Monroe, LA 






Sports • 205 



CHEERLEADERS 




206 • Sports 




Sports • 207 



BASEBALL 



208 • Sports 





Sports • 209 




210 • Sports 




Sports* 211 




212 • Sports 







Sports • 213 



GOLF 




214 • Sports 




Sports • 215 



mr ^•■*. 



The Centenary Golf Team had a 
good year under the direction of 
Terry Moores and Bob Brown. At the 
All College Golf Classic in Oklahoma 
City, Oklahoma, the team placed 
8th with a total score of 870. At the 
Morton Braswell Intercollegiate Tour- 
nament in Shreveport, the team 
placed 6th with a score of 938. In the 
three round Louisiana Intercollegiate 
Tournament, the team played a 54 
hole, par 216 course and emerged 
victorious. Kirk Jones and Todd Hingt- 
gen both finished 3rd with a score of 
224. 

In the spring of 1981, the team 
played in the Division I NCAA Tourna- 
ment in Stanford, California. Al- 
though the team lasted only until the 
3rd round, they finished 21st in the 
country. Kirk Jones personally fin- 
ished an outstanding 10th in the 
country. 



216 • Sports 




Sports • 217 



ENNIS 




218 • Sports 




Sports • 219 




220 • Sports 




Kneeling, l-r: Byron Yarbrough, Terry Dalzell, 
Shawn Livesay, John Dupuy, Randall 
Gonzalez Standing, l-r: Pat Downs, Bastiaan 
Vaandrager, Joe Prather, Mike Ameen, 
Scott Caroom, Mark Harrison 



Sports • 221 



GYMNASTICS 




Diana Marble 
Jennifer Forshee 
Jessica Soileau 
Lisa Greenhaw 
Margot Todd 
Jill Brown 
Susan Gibson 



222 • Sports 




Sports • 223 




224 • Sports 




226 • Sports 




Sports • 227 



Front row, l-r: 
Scott Davidson, 
Pierre Bellegarde, 
Khaldi 

Muhammed, John 
Hand, Ron Evans, 
Jimmy Burke, 
Gene Oakes, 
Coach Enos Russell 
Second row, l-r: 
Ammar Nabouba, 
Jeff Robertson, 
Richard Liles, Chris 
Hirsch, Murray 
Stacy 





228* Sports 




Sports • 229 






CROSS COUNTRY 






230 











231 



LADIES BASKETBALL 





MaryJo Monzingo 




Nancy Hultquist 





Tamiko Frank 




Tempie Ratcliff 



232 • Sports 



Coach Joe St. Andre 




Sports • 233 



INTRAMURALS 




234* Sports 




235 






.,'/-'%& 











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JEWELERS 

519 Marshall 
otrcct 




cSSr 

Sandwich SKoppc 



Sandwiches 
Salads 



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Ice Cream 



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637 E. Kings Hwy. 869-2379 




Your exciting 
DEPARTMENT STORES 

DOWNTOWN SOI TH P IKK MALL 

HEART O' BOSSIER J PTOWl% 



JACK E. ZAHM 




Merrill Lynch 

Merrill Lynch, Fierce, Fenner 6k Smith Inc 

A breed apart. 



The First National 
Bank Tower 

Suite 1108 

400 Texas Street 

Shreveport, LA 71101 

459-2019 



Bank 

& TRUST COMPANY 

Member FDIC 

On the corner in your neighborhood. 
On your side in banking. 



240 • Advertising 



BAYOU STATE 
OIL CORPORATION 



Established 1928 

Charles Ellis Brown, 
President 



LBT Building 



Shreveport, LA 





THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER COMPANY. 




Good atmosphere 

Great drinks 

Friendly service 

Terrific food . . . 

Everything is the way 

you like it. 

The Mississippi 
River Company 

115 Texas Street 

In Shreve Square 

221-0126 






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Advertising* 241 



MWmmm 



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BANK& TRUST C 



MEMBER F.D.I.C 



:, UNt TED S TA TES DEPOSf TOR Y 

SHREVEPORT. LOUISIANA 




VICKI A. 
RAINBOLT 

OIL & GAS LEASES 

P.O. Box 52281 O.C.S. 

Lafayette, LA 70505 

233-0310 





Arkla 





4 

Dedicated 
To Energy Growth 



CADCTfrCI r-^ 




210 Travis Place 

Shreveport, LA 71101 

227-6400 



ABES 



1900 MARKET STREET 
SHREVEPORT, LOUISIANA 71101 






Advertising* 243 






V 



N.O. THOMAS, JR. 
T. COLE FLOURNOY 



COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE 



Patrick D. Cordaro's 



AMA MIA'S 



irevepor 
221-1958 



AngL 



HARRY M. 
JARRED 

Oil & Gas 

1209 C.N.B. Building 
Shreveport, LA 71101 



Newspaper 

The 



CONGLOMERATE 



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SHREVEPORT, tA 71101 ' 



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222-4721 




Coke adds life. 



COCA-COLA BOTTLING CO 
OF SHREVEPORT, INC. 



fc£ 



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Advertising • 245 






■ 



WHB EXPLORATION, INC. 




Petroleum Tower 

Suite 804 

P.O. Box 103 

Shreveport, LA 

227-9721 



246 • Advertising 



1HI 




HS 



Advertising • 247 



am 









Wre all the bank 
you'll ever need. 



LiJ 



The 

National Bank 

of Bossier City 



Mfmtv FDIC 



TOMORROW'S 

CAR 

TODAY 




ELECTRIC Agr 



EHICLE 
r CORPORA TION 



P.O. Box 37024 
Shreveport, LA71103 
(318) 222-5312 



PAUL H. BROWN 
President 




G. G. Nesbitt III 
William D. Pittman 



TELEPHONE 
318-226-1171 
318-226-1172 
318-226-1173 




PRINTING 



520-A EAST KINGS HIGHWAY 

SHREVEPORT, LOUISIANA 71105 

PHONE: 865-8424 



E.L.F. 



248 • Advertising 



SAWYER 



1300 American Tower 




AND 






m> 



I 



Shreveport, LA 




Advertising • 249 




Now... bank night 
and day, weekends 
and holidays. . . 
it's your personal 
key to the bank! 



COMMERCIAL 

NATIONAL BANK 

SHREVEPORT, LOUISIANA 

MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 





250 • Advertising 



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2001 BECK BUILDING 
SHREVEPORT. LOUISIANA 71101 






ins 

BOB 



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Advertising* 251 



(YMEiilEi 



TOYO T A 




"Shreveport's Award 
Winning Toyota Dealer" 

Toyota's most 
prestigious national award 

Sales • Service • Parts 

Daily Car Rantala A Laatlng 





LAND CRUISERS • TRUCKS 
• USED CARS • FINANCING 

Complete Body Shop 

636-9851 

2730LINWOODAV 71103 




Bossier 
Bank & 
Trust 



Main Office 1325 Barksdale Blvd., Barksdale Branch 
Barksdale Air Force Base, Heart O'Bossier Branch Old 
Minden Road, Airline 2039 Airline Drive, East 80 Branch 
Haughton, Louisiana, 71 South Branch 3248 Barksdale Blvd. 




SAYE PETROLEUM INC. 



221-4504 
509 Beck Building 




252 • Advertising 



JT IN THE SQUARE S3 

Welcome Ccntenapjf dh idants/ 

% h fVicc Couai * Ghat*6a to Ganhmaw/ 
^plhs uiifb school id & Ihfu dune 15,82 

NighHy Good Dacils- 
Monday- <MK dnaf P pewb 

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ItadmradQy* Hump might 9Nh Dnuit spdau 

Ihn^tay LADIES' MflE - >to ccweMn'nle. specials to £emmes! 

wrSc** '& (orI* HAPpy hour 8-10 pm 



■ 



395 



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207 -084-5 Qnlei'Ioimticf tl in toe 50U 



Advertising • 253 



Sr 



DAY vJU otlV-UKI 1 Y 

SYSTEMS, INC. 



861 • 6887 
512 East 69th 

'Building Safer Security' 

• Central station alarms 

• Burglar alarms • Fire alarms 

• Closed circuit t.v. 

• Access control 



254 • Advertising 






J* 




The staff of the 1982 Yoncopin hopes that 
the student body likes the yearbook. It is hard 
work to put one together. The hardest part is 
getting pictures. We had a lot of film ruined at 
the last minute this year, so we had to go with 
what we had. Anyone who has any really 
good pictures can offer them to the staff — 
we could sure use them and that way you 
would feel like the book is more personal. Stu- 
dents should take a more active part in put- 
ting the yearbook together. Organization pic- 
tures should be scheduled by the sponsors, 
and Greek pictures should be provided before 
Christmas vacation. Let's do better next year, 
gang. 

The material within the 1982 Yoncopin does 
not reflect the views of the administration of 
Centenary College. The editor takes full re- 
sponsibility. The staff would like to wish a good 
summer to all returning students, and a nice life 
to all who leave. You guys are all right! 








■ 



i*?*> 












INDEX 



Abbiatti, Michael Dean 

Abdulmajeed, Hussain 

Abels, Cathy 

Abrams, Delton45, 79, 118, 137, 143, 

146, 186, 234 

Adams, Don Carthel, Jr. 74 

Adams, Mark David 

Addtngton, Laura 

Ades, Mark M, 79, 186, 237 

Adkins, Margaret Fisher 

Adkisson, Virginia Sheb 76, 78, 123, 

174, 175, 190, 191, 192, 193, 173, 11 

Adrian, Susan Gay 46, 160, 163 

Akins, Kawanis 176 

Alexander, Kevin 79, 131, 186, 206, 

207, 13, 16, 25, 186, 187 

Alexander, Nancy E. 39 

Alfred, Mary Kathlyene 25, 156, 159 

Allen, Deane Marie 59, 153, 154 

Allen, Harry Bubba 68, 170, 211, 22 

Allen, John Horton, Jr. 66, 136, 9, 186 

Allen, Josephine 

Allen, Kathryn Dianne 47 

Allen, Rebecca Delaura 

Allen, Ruth Anne 

Allison, Kelly 57, 96, 150, 190, 191, 

192, 193, 237, 10, 29 
Alired, Rebecca 49, 169 
Allums, George Willard 

Ameen. Michael 69, 220, 221 

Amonette, Lois Binkley 

Amsler, Cathy S.H. 1, 38, 122, 143, 

165, 171 190, 193, 4, 11 15, 23, 168 

Anaers, Todd 68, 143 

Anderson, Daniel 

Anderson, Jake Feazel 

Anderson, Martha Kurz 

Andress, Julia Hamiter 

Andrews, Scott Cloyd 152, 154, 163 

Angell, Kathryn Deaton 

Armstrong, Karen Ruth 44, 153, 154, 

170, 171 169 

Arnold, Mandy Admiral 69, 125, 131 

138,170,171, 169,190, 191,192,236, 

4 

Arraez, Luis Armando 

Ary, Nina Renee 

Ashworth, Glenna Margaret 66 

Astin, Leanne 61 141, 20 

Atkins, Charlie 69, 117, 148, 207, 236. 

237, 14, 19, 182 

Avard, Margaret 59, 136, 147, 148 

Bailes, Allison 71, 131 144 

Bailey, Rodney 196, 198, 32 

Baker, Charles D. 

Baker, Jaxon 76. 130 

Baker, Laurajane 53. 160, 163, 170, 

193, 169 

Baker, Linda Carol 46, 160 

Baldelli, Douglas 

Baldwin, Phillip 

Bankard, William Flynn 

Banks, Catherine Denise 43 

Baranik, Joseph Paul 

Barker, Richard Patrick 

Barnes, Donald James 79, 143, 186 

Bartlett, Carolyn T. 

Basco, Jeanne Sudduth 

Bash, Katherine L. 

Bateman, Graham 45, 135, 137, 148, 

169 

Battley Toussaint, Jr. 

Bauer, Carla 54, 136, 160 

Baughman, Thurndotte 88, 186, 187 

Beattie, Brad 5, 236, 237, 31 



Beard, Bonnie 

Beck, Joseph William 

Beckett, Glenda I. 

Bell, Nancy Karen 

Bellamy, Marian Louise 53, 170, 169 

Beilar, David Sanford 

Belleau, Susanne Renee 58 

Betlegarde, Pierre 40, 146, 147, 149, 

151 160, 179, 229 

Benham, Carolyn 68, 145, 160, 169 

Bennett, Ricky 68, 152, 154, 8 

Bennight, Craig Alan 

Bentley, David 

Berg, Melinda Rae 

Bergstedt, Greg 180, 20, 179 

Bemhard, Judy Stacks 

Bernhardt, Donald, Jr. 40, 57, 191 

192, 230, 231 235, 16 

Bethley, Ramona 44 

Bhatia, Satbir 

Bickham, Alan Demint 135 

Bicknell, James Scott 

Bieiek, Karen Lynn 170, 188, 169 

Biggs, Randall Dale 186 

Signer, Martha 54, 122, 128, 129, 141 

Binion, Tina Marie 59, 147 

Birdsong, Linda 

Black, Donald 

Blackman, Greg 61 125, 128, 129, 

130, 131 141, 230, 231 186 

Blakely, Carolyn 

Blakely, Charlotte 51 147 

Blakeman, Jeff 57, 138, 162, 234, 7, 

10 

Blakeman, Jennifer 49, 141, 3, 169 

Bland, William W. II 13 

Blazetic, Blanka 

Blocker, Frances Jean 

Bodie, Dennis R. 52, 236 

Bolch, Martha M. 

Bond, Onita T. 77 

Bonner, Eric W. 32, 196 

Bonner, Robert Frank 158, 152, 154, 

156 

Booras, Bobby Charles 1 49, 209, 

211 210, 3 

Booras, Katina Manitzas 

Booras, Patrick 131, 132, 123, 209 

Bottoms, Michael W. 

Boucher, Marklyn P. 

Boudreaux, Alyce E. 64, 141, 148, 29, 

169 

Bowdon, Maredia Martha 

Bowdon, Maredia Pace 

Bowers, Ronald S. 49 

Boyd, Bill B. 

Boyd, Charles F. 152, 154, 149, 151 

Boyd, Gregory Dee 

Boynton, Kim Elaine 148, 171 

Bradford, Anna Kathleen 52, 145, 

165, 175, 31 173 

Bradford, Arlene E. 150 

Bradford, Mildred Hill 

Brannon, Gary Alan 

Branton, Sarah Dale (Wilkerson) 61, 

130, 128, 120 

Breit, Barry Andrew 47, 155, 152, 154, 

235, 8, 21 

Brennan, Timothy J. 150 

Brennen, Joanne Dale 

Bridges, Bill McBride 70 

Brisco, Deloris Graham 

Brook, Samuel Stephen 57, 235, 237, 

206, 207, 164. 190, 191, 192, 193, 23 

Brossette, Mary Edna 



Brown, B. Sergeant 145, 68, 170, 171, 

1123, 31, 178, 168 

Brown, Bobra Lohnes 

Brown, Bonnie Jean 65, 145, 150 

Brown, Cheryl Joy 156 

Brown, Deborah Ann 59 

Brown, Gregory James 60, 191, 148 

Brown, Jeri 78, 174, 175, 12, 172 

Brown, Jill Renee 43, 223, 225, 227, 

192, 222, 4 

Brown, Judy Lessard 

Brown, Kathy J. 

Brown, Kay M. 

Brown, Pamela T. 

Brown, Scott Stacy 247, 57, 191 4, 

16, 25, 28 

Browning, Lesia Ann 176 

Bruce, Ellace James 

Buice, Sam 44, 163, 136, 160, 147 

Bunce, John Peter 

Bunnag, Roong 

Burke, Frnces Annette 172 

Burke, Jimmy 236, 156, 32, 228, 179 

Burkhalter, Steve 184, 185, 6, 32, 182 

Burleigh, Roger Scott 44, 182 

Burson, Nancy Dean 

Burt, Stacy Edward 208, 210 

Buseick, Stephen John 

Butler, Gary 37 

Buvala, Helen Terese 

Byram, Kelly Gene 

Byrdsong, Napoleon III 196, 199, 32 

Cady, Susan Kimberly 152, 154, 148, 

171, 17, 169 

Calfee, Shari 44 

Calhoun, Alison Dawn 49, 175, 17, 

172 

Calhoun, William Shawn 

Callaway, Roger 

Cannon, Leigh Ann 42 

Canterbury, Carol A. 

Cantwell, William Casey 149 

Capelan, Carl Rueben 

Carell, Edith T.P. 52, 218. 219 

Carlton, Jack Kenneth 75 

Carmody, Josephine G. 

Caroom, Scott 220, 221 183 

Casey, Jerome 41 

Cash, Harriett R. 

Cassingham, Guy W. 77, 139, 19 

Causey, Judith K. 

Causey, Patricia M. 

Catanese, Patricia Lynn 43, 137, 172 

Castellano, Patricia J. 60, 172 

Certain, J. Randy 44, 186 

Chassey, Harold A. 43 

Chadwick, Martha Jean 72, 156 

Chaisson, Lisa Rene (M.L.S.) 67, 296, 

297, 146, 170, 171 22, 25, 169 

Chambers, Barbara Nell 71, 120, 131 

121 128, 129, 134, 136, 137, 148, 150, 

143 

Chambers, Teri Lisa 150, 160 

Chandler, Carolyn Renae 

Chatlos, Janet Mae M. 

Cheatwood, Sydney Gayle 175, 173 

Chin, Jennai Lennot 37, 146 

Chludzinski, Cathie 

Choate, Resta L. 

Christ ensen, Jo Ann H. 

Claiborne, Jeri L. 

Claiborne, Stacy Dee 

Clampitt, Jeanne Marie 

Clarke, Crissy 23, 29, 38, 169, 171 

190, 191, 192, 193 



Ctarkson, Amanda 

Clayton, Laurie Lee 

Clegg, Julie Ann 42, 136, 152, 154 

Clement, Lanny 22, 183 

Clements, Susan 57, 133, 145, 153, 

162, 169, 170, 171, 206, 207, 31 

Clifton, Robert B, Jr, 73 

Cloud, Wade 68, 131 135 

Cloud, Lucian 

Clower, Hiiarie Dene 16, 81 147, 169, 

170, 171 16 

Coburn, Colleen 41 

Coffee, Kathryn Sue 

Colbert, Shelley Marie 45, 48 

Cole, Nathaniel Dean 212, 213 

Coleman, Laura Marie 

Coleman, Madison 

Coleman, Steven Craig 49 

Collins, Andrew 236 

Collins, Betty Jean 

Colvin, A. Lavelle 

Conley, Sidney 

Connell, Kathleen 

Cook, Allyson Anne 47 

Cook, Donette 52, 120, 128, 129, 

130, 131 134, 145, 148, 173, 174, 175, 

215 

Cook, Elizabeth A. 

Cook, Elizabeth C. 

Cook, Jenifer Lane 61 161 170, 206, 

207, 25, 169 

Cook, JoAnne Pedraza 160, 163 

Cook, Mark C. 8, 62, 151 152, 155, 8 

Cooley, Betty Spurgeon 

Cooper, Berry L. 

Cooper, Brenda Carol 147 

Copeland, Estella 

Copelin, Angela Kay 66 

Corbin, Michael David 

Corley, Bonnie Williams 

Corley, Helen Batlew 

Coss, David 14, 131 211, 212, 213, 

14, 32 

Costello, David Joseph 

Cottongim, Susan S, 126, 130, 138, 

145, 190, 191, 192, 193, 29, 31 

Courtney, J.D., Jr. 

Cowell, Teresa Lynn 

Cox, Martha Sutton 

Cox, Patti 56, 135 

Crawford, Kelly Jean 36, 160, 163 

Crawford, Sally E. 53, 207, 25 

Creamer, M. Edwina 

Cromer, Vicki Bethel 

Crone, Eddie Dean 209, 212 

Cross, Katie Fields 

Cunningham, Brenda Sue 142 

Cumutt, Jean-Marc 

Currie, Lee Ella 

Curtis, Margaret G. 74 

Cush, Greg 

Cush, Sarah Anne 

Daigle, Darren David 73, 160 

Dalzell, Terry 42, 69, 220, 221 

Daniels, Cheryl 67 

Darnell, Sarah Jane 65, 169 

Davenport, Amy Lynn 

Davidson, Garland 

Davidson, Lisa Beth 44, 153. 154, 160 

Davidson, Robert Scott 74 

Davis, Asunta 

Davis, Penny 232, 233 

Davis, Robert Allen 

Davis, Theola 

Davis, William Joe 215 



256 



Day, Mix Diane 48 

Deason, Sherry Lynn 

Dees, George Cecil, Jr. 

Deloach, Robert E. 

Dempsey, Brian William 230, 231 

Denney, Elizabeth Ann B. 

Deprez, Dorethea Janelle 71, 143, 

175, 173 

Derosia, Patricia J. 

Derrick, Cara Lorraine 63, 156, 159, 

171, 17, 25, 29, 169 

Dinkins, Marian Ellen 

Disbrow, Jimmy 32, 49, 196, 199 

Dobson, Linda Sue 79 

Donley, Michael Vernon 

Downs, James Patrick 70, 185, 221, 

182 

Downs, Leslie Glenn 

Dozier, Hallie 

Dring, Cheryl 66, 152, 154 

Ducote, Leo 

Duett, Neato Nico 62, 182, 14, 29, 

182 

Duhon, Sharon 

Dukes, Kay Cheesman 

Dulin, Winnie Moore 

Duncan, Sandra Lynn 

Dupuy, John Roy Chinese 69, 148, 

220, 221, 14, 17, 182 

Durden, Bettie S. 

Dusse, Joe 150 

Eason, Stuart 126, 156, 190, 191, 193, 

237 

East, William Ted 

Echols, Laura 47, 141, 160, 169 

Edwards, Ella 

Edwards, Pamela J. 75 

Edwards-Page, Julie Ann 60 

Ehrhardt, Laura Leigh 54, 163, 172 

Elmo, Mark Dennis 69, 122, 184, 182 

Eltedge, Randall Dwayne 213 

Els, Jeffrey Paul 51, 190, 191, 28 

Eilzey, Charlotte Rene 

Erickson, Kristen Bates 79, 115, 128, 

129, 188, 189, 237, 5, 186, 187 

Espinosa, Raul Gullen 

Estes, Phil 

Estill, Angela Ramona 170, 169 

Eubanks, David P. 39, 150, 152, 154 

Evans, Angela Kay 

Evans, Mark Everett 71, 137, 160 

Evans, Mary Virginia 

Evans, Ronald James 32, 48, 178 

Everett, Robert Charles 20, 178 

Everhart, Victor 149, 151 160 

Fahringer, Chris Robin 41, 131 148, 

156. 158, 162 

Fair, Darlene Portier 

Fannon, Sheila Ann 45 

Farmer, Nancy Brazzil 

Farrar, Tammy Lou 121 143, 165, 171, 

184, 215, 29, 169, 182 

Fauber, George 211 213, 17 - 

Faust, Sharon 45, 160 

Ferguson, Sharon Anne 37, 135 

Fernandez, Gustavo 

Fess, Stephen Larry 

Finlay, Michele Lynn 46, 145 

Finley, Teresa 47 

Fisher, Debra Jean 78, 152, 154, 8 

Fleming, Celestine 

Flowers, Ola Virginia 

Floyd, Sarah Nelle 71, 145, 165, 172 

Fogle, Karen Ruth 

Fontenot, Darrell James 

Ford, Lie Battle 

Forshee, Jennifer Jo Ann 222, 223, 

224, 227 



Fowler, Blanche Lee 66, 150, 161 27 

Fowler, Diane Mirvis 9, 44, 61 137, 

140, 148, 160 

Fox, Janette 72, 156, 158 

Fox, Kay Harris 

Fox, Nancy Kay 80, 172 

Fox, Nobia 80, 19, 172 

Frank, Tamiko 232, 176 

Franklin, Bryan Keith 20 

Fraser, Donna Kathy 65, 140 

Fraser, Patricia 41 

Frazier, Rebecca Lynn 

Freeman, Andy Mr. Crush 76, 131 

132, 133, 190, 191 193, 247 

Frey, Cathy Eve 

Freyre, Kim Michelle 

Friesen, Diane Wenske 

Frye, Beauford Paul 

Fulco, David Kevin 

Fuller, William G. IV 

Fullilove, William J. IV 150, 16 

Fultz, Daryl Ray 

Futrell, Nancy 51 247 

Gafford, Marva 39 

Gardner, Sally Ivey 

Garner, Jon Michael 56, 186, 187 

Gathmann, Roger Willet 

Gayle, John Whitworth 141, 156, 158, 

159 

George, John 

George, Lorin Renaldo 196, 32 

Gerhardt, Carole Yvonne 153, 154, 

172 

Germani, Diane Lynn 80, 145 

Germann, Helen Jean 50, 136, 148, 

218 

Germann, Margaret Mary 41, 143 

Germann, Virginia Susan 

Getsinger, Connie Marie 46, 156 

Gibson, Susan Jane 47, 222, 223, 225, 

226 

Giddens, Mary R. 

Giffin, Deborah Lynn 

Gilchrist, Sara Rust Bubba 76, 78, 127, 

128, 129, 145, 175, 21 173 

Gill, Angle 60, 5 

Gillespie, Cheryl Ann 

Gillespie, Willima J. 

Gilmer, George M., Jr. 

Givens, Claudia Lynne 

Giadney, Darden 

Gladney, Glorysteen 

Gleason, Edgar H„ III 182 

Gleason, Mary Williams 

Goff, William Kirke 184, 185, 182 

Goins, Cynthia Rene 61 152, 154, 171, 

169 

Gonzalez, Randall King S. 42, 220, 221 

Goodwin, Randal Scott Yoga 75 

Gordon, Nancy Carol 39, 136, 153, 

154, 171, 8, 168 

Gort, Brigitte 1 64, 116, 128, 129, 

141 143, 146, 147, 4 

Grammer, Shawn 54, 57, 172 

Gray, James Ernest 79, 80, 137, 27, 

186 

Green, Gordie Thomas 

Green, Scott H. 152, 154, 8 

Green, Virginia 

Greene, Evonne 70, 126, 140, 153, 

154, 155, 188, 17. 27 

Greenhaw, Lisa Ann 222, 224, 225, 

226 

Greenleaf, Jay G.O.B. 179 

Greer, Deborah Lamar 37, 151 153, 

154, 155, 17 

Greer, Gary L. 

Gregory, Margaret 

Grenchik, Stephen P. 230, 231 



Greve, Pauline E. 43, 145, 153, 154, 

170. 171 169 

Griffey, Jon Alan 

Griffin, Sharona Yvette 

Grimes, Tery 141 

Grisham, Audrianna 53, 165, 172 

Grisonsree, Kaisang 

Guin, Mary Virginia 171, 169 

Guin, Stacy Stanley 

Gurba, Ronald 46 

Guyton, William Darrell 

Haacker, James Robert 45, 206, 207, 

150, 25, 182 

Haas, Sophia Elizabeth 40, 145, 171 

169 

Hackett. Tina 60, 160. 147, 7 

Haddox, t=>reg 196, 32 

Halk, Franco 79, 188, 189, 186 

Hall, Cassandra 81 172 

Hall, Edward Wayne 133, 153, 154, 

155, 182 

Hall, Jon W. 53 

Hall, Kenneth Huffman 149 

Ham, Thomas L. 

Hamilton, Patty 49, 170, 218, 219, 3, 

18. 22, 169 
Hamm, Susan E. 
Hammond, Linda Gene 
Hamon, Sally J. 

Hamous, Angela Vaughn 72 

Hanchey, Lilyan L. 

Hancock, Jane Barnette 

Hand, John Momon 228 

Hand, Kristina L. 150 

Hand, Lillie Lavonne 

Hansche, Mark 179 

Hansen, Mark Bradford 75 

Hardaway, Richard Alan 211 

Hare, Nancy Diane 52 

Harper, John Robert 64, 149, 151 

Harper, Paul Watkins 193 

Harrell, Francine 54, 138, 170, 171, 

184, 168, 182 

Harris, Frank Trey 39, 154, 152, 8, 13 

Harris, John Brent 

Harrison, David Craig 

Harrison, John S. 49, 140, 144, 190, 

191 192 

Harrison, Mark Malloy 220, 221 

Hart, Janet 

Hart, Theresa Lillian 72, 133 

Harville, Stuart 135, 136, 143, 147 

Harwell, William G., Jr. 235 

Haughton, Ethel 

Hawkins, Cie 17, 25, 63, 68, 126, 128, 

129, 148, 156, 158, 159, 169, 170 

Hayes, Michael 77, 141, 152, 154, 

160, 8 

Haynes, Minette 

Haynie, Sue Ellen 70, 169 

Heard, Valerie Lee 63, 169 

Hedges, Kay Lynne 73, 152, 154 

Hedges, Lisa Ann 73 

Heidecker, Ruth Urfis 

Hendrickson, Ron 213 

Henington, David T. 69, 136, 137, 164, 

19, 29, 178, 179 
Henry, Troy 42, 149, 151 

Hibbs, William Timothy 43, 153, 154, 

155, 21, 186 

Hicks, Deborah Kay 36, 135, 174, 172 

Hicks, Janette Marie 66 

Hicks, Sandra Elizabeth 

Hicks, Valerie Dee 38 

Higgins, Dudley Daffeny 

Hines, Benjamin Robert 183 

Hingten, Todd 215 

Hinogosa, Jonny 

Hippler, Melissa K. 150 



Hirsch, Chris 228 

Hodges, John David 20, 179 

Hoffman, Elizabeth 58, 174, 175, 172 

Hoge, Bradley Earle 66, 137, 186 

Hogg, William 

Holdridge, Cheri 46, 150, 160, 164 

Holloway, Ray Evan 

Holm, John Edward 80 

Holmberg, Robert Thomas 

Holmes, Joe Scott 

Holmes. Ruthie Mae 

Holt, Melvin Ray, Jr. 65, 147 

Holt, Michael Roy 65, 147 

Holt, Parnell 236, 237 

Holt, Sandra 72 

Holt, Steven Edward 132, 133, 137, 10 

Hooks, Ruthie Bush 

Hopkins, Jean Talbot 

Hopper, Mark A. 

Horgen, Donna Denise 42 

Homaday, Philip 153, 154, 8 

Home, Bobby G. 

Home, Judith Pettigrew 

Horning, Johndavid 154, 153, 8 

Horning, Robert Morris 

Howard, Chartene Kay 

Howard, Linda Lea 62, 232, 233 

Howard, Roy Anthony 156, 157 

Howell, Leslie A, 

Huckaby, Pearl Aaron 

Hughes, Maurice 

Huguley, Donald Lee 

Hulet, Robert Glenn 

Hultquist, Nancy Hope 232 

Hummer, Christine Anne 73, 170, 169 

Humphries, Maylon D. 

Huneycutt, Latricia R. 

Hunt, Debbie 131 

Hurd, Reginald 196, 200 

Hurley, Patrick Joseph 

Hutchins, Carta Denise 62, 232, 233 

lies, Paul William 

llgenfritz, Hugh 

llling, Lisa Christine 64, 169 

Imperial, Dorothy Jane 

Ingalls, Brian 59, 79, 112, 113, 128, 

129, 132, 134, 137, 188 

Inman, David Scott 139 

Irvine, Jeffrey Alan 66, 131, 141, 140, 

162 

Israel, Judy Ann Davis 

Ivory, Jessie III 

Ivy, Roger 

Jackson, Curtis Charles 156, 158 

Jackson, Franklin 

Jackson, Michael 

Jackson, Willie James 196, 200, 26, 32 

Jacocks, Matt 56, 162, 32 

James, Tommy 57, 66, 144, 153, 154, 

190, 191 192, 4, 28 

Jamison, Paul 

Jefferson, Aivin Earl 5, 186 

Jefferson, Dorothy J. 

Jennings, Elizabeth 176 

Jett, Garbo Gaines 

Jewell, General Joe 51 144, 190, 

191 192, 193, 25, 28 

Johnson, Lori 153, 154 

Johnson, Margaret 

Johnson, Max 

Jones, Andrew Wayne 

Jones, Kirk Randall 75, 214 

Jones, Melody Jeane 

Jones, Nancy L. 44, 160, 161 

Jones, William Dale 

Jordan, Julie Rae 67, 156, 157, 159, 

165, 190, 193, 172 

Jordan, Mark 215 

Juranka, Kay 64, 174, 29, 172 



257 



Kalimeris, Andreas L. 

Kauffman, Tina Arlene 

Keeth, Appolonis Bernal 

Keller, Susan Frances 36, 174, 24, 172 

Kelley, Jay 210, 213 

Kelley, Tammie Gail 170, 171, 218, 

219, 7, 169 

Kelly, Jimmy Ray 

Kelly, Steven Randall 

Kendrick, Patricia 73, 139, 141 

Kennedy, Jeffrey Glenn 

Kennedy, Sandy 63 

Kent, Joey 184, 26, 182 

Kent, Penelope 

Keriey, Joyce Anne 

Kimball, Colin 76 

King, Lisa 67, 141, 170, 171, 169 

Kintzing, Betty Green 

Kiusendorf, Karen 49, 145, 148, 169 

Knight, John Thomas 

Knight, David 67, 197 

Knoop, Suzanne Marie 66 

Knuckols, Nancyann 172 

Kolstad, Steve 52, 95, 211, 236, 14 

Kolwe, John William 68, 152, 154, 207, 

185, 25 

Krecker, Elizabeth 58, 141. 147, 148, 

150, 7, 169 

Krecker, Marty 47 

Kunz, Cynthia 53 

Labor, Kyle 42, 119, 164, 3, 22, 186 

Labor, Kirk 70, 79, 114, 128, 129, 138, 

164, 189, 16, 28 

Lake, Lesley 62, 147, 172 

Lamb, Walter 

Lambert, Paige 67, 172 

Landry, Randal Joseph 

Landry, Suzanne Annette 72 

Langston, David 41, 152, 154, 8 

Laveile, Mark Thomas 

Lawrence, Betty Schmitt 

Lawrence, Big Dave 57, 190, 191, 

192, 235, 236, 237, 4, 19 

Lawrence, Mary 

Lawrence, Paul 

Leach, Janie Wlizabeth 

Leach, Jill Allison 49 

Lee, Cynthia Faye H.Q. 39, 117, 137, 

148, 152, 155, 154, 165, 169, 170, 171, 

185, 215, 10, 15, 17, 169 

Lee, Robert Edward 

Legan, Barbara 

Lengel, Rodney John 

Lengel, Theresa 65, 161 

Leo, Tony 230, 231. 29, 179 

Leone, Philip August 

Liles, Richard 124, 134, 228, 29, 179 

Lipscomb, Jerry 20, 179 

Lipscomd, Sherrie Jane 

Little, Linda 156 

Llorens, Richard 

Livesay, Shawn 42, 220, 221, 182 

Loep, Wade 160, 190, 191, 192, 193, 

237 

Loker, Jeff 

Long, Barry Jay 

Long, Roanne 55 

Long, Robert R. 

Long, Rolla Lewis, III 13 

Love, Chauncey 

Love, Melinda 41, 174 

Lowrey, Cynthia Paige 41 

Ludwig, Trip 37, 184, 185, 236, 237 

Luff, Laura 

Lukey, Linda 193 

Lupton, Rubye Carol 150 

Lynch, Stephanie 141, 27, 172 

MacDowell, Bill 57 

Madden, Tom Douglas 



Maeger, Lisa 184 

Maguire, Timothy 

Mahadumrongkul, Praiya 

Malizia, Tony 

Malloy, Charles F. 185 

Mangham, Mark 208, 211 

Mangham, Mike 211 

Mann, Daniel 56, 162 

Manning, Connie 50 

Manske, Monte 146, 235 

Marble, Diana Margaret 59, 147, 222 

Marks, Ken Lynn 212 

Marlin, Gerald George 

Marsalis, Gordon 

Marshall, Timothy 

Marshall, William 

MartirTCynthia Dawn 58, 165, 172 

Martin, Jo Ann Brake 

Martin, Martha Jean 

Martin, Rebecca Anne 

Martinusen, Elizabeth 137, 165, 180, 

181, 172 

Mason, Lassiter A., Jr. 

Mathews, Mary Jane 6, 169 

Mathewson, Dana 71, 160, 161, 150 

Matta, Stephen Andrew 63, 160 

Maurer, Joyce 62, 232, 233 

Mayfield, Charles E. 

Mayo, Elaine 76, 112, 113, 130, 131, 

134, 138, 128, 129, 165, 169, 170, 171, 

190, 191, 192, 193, 215, 15, 22 

McCammon, Larry 152, 154 

McCart, Rebecca Ann 66 

McCarthy, Lisa Kaye 61 

McCaughan, Leona 59 

McClure, Margaret 78, 153, 154, 169 

McConnathy, John 

McCoy, Don Thomas, II 80, 151 

McCoy, Melinda Delle 

McCray, Jennifer 

McCrocklin, Mark 58, 186 

McCroskey, Chris Alan 152, 155, 186 

McCutcheon, Robert Wade 79, 141, 

143, 150, 188, 187, 186 

McDermott, Janet Cox 

McDonald, Richard 

McDowell, Robert E., Jr. 54, 160 

McElmurry, Ronald 

McFarland, Forrest 

McGilvray. Jimmy 208, 210, 212 

McGough, Laura Lynn 39, 131, 150, 

171, 5, 169 

McGuire, Veronica Kay 59 

McKinney, Mary 

McKnight, Elberta 2, 37, 152, 154, 

174, 175, 15, 172 

McMahen, Michele 46 

McMinn, Cully 236, 237 

McMullan, Denise Ann 156 

McMullan, Dennis Conroe 

McMullen, Elouise 

McNeely, Elizabeth Ann 63, 175, 172 

McNeely, Kathleen R. 19, 172 

McNeese, Mary Jefferson 

McNeil (Woolbert), Kelly Ann 78, 145, 

170, 171, 190, 192, 193. 215, 31, 169 

McNulty, Shay 38, 141, 6 

McPherson, Pamela Kay 40, 127, 131, 

132 

McReynolds, Claire 77 

McWilliams, Flora 

Mekavuthikul, Manit 

Mendes, Carlos 

Meng, Kimberly Ann 67, 170, 171, 

235, 18, 169 

Merritt, Sue 

Messer, Kathy 232, 233 

Meyer, Mary Conley 

Middleton, Peggy Ann 48 



Midyett, Terri Norrell 

Milem, David Wesley 53 

Milem, Donna Sandell 53 

Miles, Peggy L. 

Miles, Tommy 

Miller, Cathy Suzanne 36, 174, 175, 

172 

Miller, Mike Alan 214 

Mills, James Hardy 

Milner, Cara M, 45 

Mims, Laura Lee 

Minniear, Mary Anne 79, 160, 170, 22, 

169 

Mitchell, Donald 

Mitchell, Willie H. 

Monsour, Kimberly e. 

Montgomery, Liz 58, 170, 171, 218, 

219, 169 

Montgomery, Kipper 232, 233 

Montgomery, Madeline 44 

Monzingo, Mary Jo 3, 232 

Moody, Sandra 

Moore, James R. 54, 170, 182 

Moore, James Randall 80 

Moore, John O, 69, 164, 184, 185, 

236, 237, 6, 11, 19, 182 

Moore, Missy K.P.O.C. 38, 118, 170, 

171, 184, 185, 218,6, 15, 168 

Morales, Warren James 56, 79, 152, 

154, 16, 186 
Morgan, Al Vernon 
Morgan, Everett Lee 156, 158 
Morgan, Katherine Ellen 
Morgan, Lucy 

Marhaus, Patty Roberts 

Morn, Missy 60, 114, 130, 141, 145, 

153, 154, 170, 171, 5, 25, 169 

Morning, Rosemary 

Morrill, Tim 

Morris, Anne 51 

Morris, Lee Nicholson 

Morris, Margaret Anne 

Morris, Michael Alan 

Morris, Richard W. 

Morse, Larry 75, 191, 10, 32 

Morton, David Allan 39, 153, 154 

Mrdja, Betty 150 

Munos, Laura 

Munoz, Carlos 64, 143 

Munoz, Diana 64, 127, 128, 129, 137, 

143, 135, 148 

Murphy, Christopher D. 70, 79, 133, 

140, 141, 153, 154, 26 

Murphy, Kevin William 57, 190, 191, 

192, 193, 4 

Murphy, Madeline 38, 57, 174, 175, 

190, 191, 192, 13, 25, 172 

Murray, Mark 

Murrell, Tracy Elaine 59 

Myers, Gary 

Nance, Violet West 

Nelloms, Tawonia Faye 55 

Nelson, Patricia Marie 74 

Nerren, Mike J. 

Nester, Kathleen Sue 38. 130, 151 

Netcharussaeng, Boonsong Lee 36 

Newby, Ted Scott 46, 139, 160 

Nolfe, Joseph Dominic 180, 179 

Normand, Neill Hunter 

Oakes, Gene Philip 

Oates, Teri Lynn 50, 123, 153, 154, 

155, 184, 237, 9, 18, 25, 30, 182 
O'Byrne, Denise 

O'Byrne, Don 69, 182 
Odom, Mark Warren 
Ogdea Jim N. 45, 147, 162 
Ogelesby, Patricia 
Omara, Thomas Ervin, Jr. 
Oncale, Keith Anthony 156 



Ormand, Charles 

Osborne, Ann 

Osborne, Joy Sharon 

Osetinsky, Margaret 

Otto, David Duane 40, 160 

Otwell, Johanna 70, 170, 169 

Owen, Brenda M. 

Owen, Mae Ann 156 

Owen, Micael Alwin 

Packard, Kathryn B, 71, 173 

Paige, Helen Williams 

Palmer, Brena Faye 

Parker, Lisa Lynnette 73, 170, 184, 22, 

169, 182 

Parkman, Cheryl Lynn 

Parks, Rachel 78, 174, 175, 12,28, 172 

Parlette, Forrest 131 

Parnell, Janis Lynn 58 

Parra, Roman 

Pathumanun, Rutchadaporn "Eat" 

37, 146 

Patterson, Jeanne 

Pearce, Louise 

Peeler, Mark Allen 182 

Penn, Carey W., Ill 

Penn, Sherri Lynn 

Penniman, Alan 16 

Penniman, Margaret 

Perkins, David Glenn 

Peters, Carol Sandidge 74 

Pham, Quan Viet 

Phifer, Wendy 156, 158, 159 

Phillips, Christopher 

Phillips, Tripp 156 

Phiphitphorn, Duangchan 

Pierre, Evangiline 

Pike, Jonathan James 135 

Piner, Jenny 67, 125, 152, 154, 155, 

165, 174, 175, 184, 173 

Pipkin, Genee Bertel 

Pittman, William 

Pollard, Mark Edward 

Pollard, Nancy 

Pomeroy, Allen 

Poole, Carol 38, 131, 6 

Porter, Danny Rex 135 

Porter, Nancy Marie 51, 121, 165, 

170, 6, 169 

Porter, Steven 56, 188, 189, 206, 207, 

25, 187, 186 

Potter, Lynnette 39, 152, 154, 169 

Potter, Penny 39 

Powell, Carol 76, 124, 130, 131, 140, 

153, 154, 158, 169, 170, 171, 190, 191, 

192, 193, 15, 29, 168 

Powell, Faye Robertson 

Powell, Frank, Jr. 

Prather, Joe A., Jr. 42, 220, 221 

Prestenback, Lori Ann 74, 172 

Price, Sandra Waite 

Procell, Ellen 

Procell, Mary 

Provenza, Victoria 70 

Pullen, Laurie 38, 145 

Pullig, Annette 81, 147, 151 

Pynes, Dale 50 

Rachal, Johnny 

Ragland, Mary Katherine 58 

Ragland, Michael Flynn 59, 141, 186 

Rains, Troy 

Ramey, Mindy51, 152, 154, 170, 171, 

169 

Ramsey, Charlie B.F. 57, 135, 144, 

191, 192 

Ratcliff, Tempie 232, 233 

Rathbun, Wayne 212 

Rech, Margaret Lafeber 

Rector, Meg 65, 140 

Reddell, Susan Lynne 38, 161 



258 



Redding, Deloris 

Reed, Randall Lee 

Reeves, Mary Nell 

Regan, Jack Daniel 66, 153, 164, 160, 

182 

Renfro. Toni Marie 

Renner, Steven Charles 

Renshaw, John Charles 36, 182 

Rhodes, Ann Shoe 

Rhodes, Patsy Ann 

Rhone, Cherokee Chief 196, 201 15, 

30, 32 

Rice, Vicki 51, 145, 148, 173 

Richards, Chung Hee Jill 

Richardson, Carolyn 

Richardson, Donna Kay 48, 179, 172 

Ricke, Michael Elliott 152, 154 

Riggs, William Albert 

Rimes, Julee Anne 63 

Rivera, Eduardo 

Robbins, Henry 

Roberts, Susan 

Robertson, Clay 45, 135 

Robertson, Curtis 153, 154, 189, 16, 

186 

Robertson, Jeffrey W. 

Robertson, Nancy B. 

Robertson, Wallace 79, 189, 186 

Robichaud, Robert P. 150, 186 

Robinson, Douglas Ray 61, 148 

Robinson, John Clifton 72 

Robinson, Bess 71, 141, 140, 145, 147 

Roe, Fred 

Rogers, Beaumon J. 135 

Rogers, James Robert 185, 182 

Rogers, Lillian E. 68, 174, 172 

Rohring, William Thomas 

Rosenblath, Nancy P, 

Ross, Donald P., Ill 75 

Rothell, Lisa Ann 69, 169 

Rountree, Susan Anne 

Rousseau, Duane Thomas 40, 139, 

153, 154, 8 

Rowland, Tara Lynn 80, 161 

Russell, Garry D. 191 

Sale, Michael M. 

Sanders, Morgan 196, 201 

Sanford, Laurie Elaine 60, 147, 160, 7 

Sankey, Felicia Denise 40, 125, 128, 

129, 130, 132, 137, 147, 148 

Sankey, Sonya Lecheryl 40, 147, 148 

Sartor, Marilyn 

Satcher, Zebber Denise 232, 233 

Scales, Priscilla Lynn 66, 152, 154, 170 

Schurman, Judy 

Schurman, Lori L. 152, 154 

Scott, Judith 

Scroggins, Daniel 156, 158 

Seals, Ronald E. 

Segers, Elizabeth J. 37, 172 

Seifert, Alex 

Selby, Elizabeth 41, 148, 170, 169 

Serio, Frank Charles, Jr. 147 

Sewell, Levin Morris 

Shank, Ann Sawyer 

Shaw, B.L. 

Shaw, Jerrell Wayne, Jr. 80, 149, 150 

Shaw, Leland D. 210, 28 

Shaw, Susan G, 80, 172 

Shehee, Margaret Scott 172 

Shelton, Shirley Belle 63 

Sherrod, Sally Ann 68, 122, 128, 129, 

130, 136, 138, 145, 169, 170, 171, 206, 

207, 11,25 

Shoffner, David Glenn 

Shyne, Joe 

Sikes, Dawn Suzanne 61, 138, 160, 

163, 170, 171, 22, 169 

Silmon, Mark Stephen 212 



Sims. Richard Lynn 213 

Sinclair, Brian R. 42, 131 

Singleton, Mary K. 

Sirman, Celia Anne 53, 153, 154, 174, 

175, 2, 172 

Slaney, Kathryn C. 170, 171, 169 

Slaton, Amanda 62, 232, 233 

Slaughter, Lisa E. 58, 81, 16 

Smith, Brigette Velins 

Smith, Diane Elizabeth 

Smith, Edward N., Ill 

Smith, Jerry 48, 75, 144, 196, 202, 32 

Smith, Greg G.A.S. 196, 202, 32 

Smith, Henry Calhoun 

Smith, Jennie Lane 69 

Smith, John Patrick 

Smith, June Streeter 

Smith, Rudolph 

Smith, Stanley Don 236, 1 1 

Smith, Teresa Elisabeth 

Snelling, Kathryn Lee 50, 152, 154, 

175, 172 

Soderstrom, Paula 

Soileau, Jessica 43. 57, 222, 224, 226, 

227 

Sommerfeldt, Paul J. R. 

Speights, Lanis A, 

Stacy, Murray 228 

Staman, Kimberly K, 42, 145 

Steele, Mark Wayne 

Stephens, Carol 52, 148, 150 

Sterling, Paula Lee 

Stevens, Franchelle 38, 123, 128, 129, 

131, 134, 148 

Stevens, Joyce Patterson 

Stevens, Lynn Langston 

Stevens, Tony Eugene 179, 178 

Stewart, Raymond 

Stokes, Dale Evelyn 55 

Stotts, Shawna Leah 39, 131, 153, 

154, 155, 8, 169 

Strange, Alan Dale 150 

Stringer, Lorna Elaine 39 

Stroud, Robert Alan 

Sugar, Miles 

Suhar, Marcus 230, 231 

Sullivan, Melba Burgess 

Sutherlin, Teresa Rene 52 

Sutton, Deborah Ann 53 

Sweeters, Mary Ann 

Tabor, Lynda McCalman 

Tadlock, Gretchen Siess 

Talley, Daniel Jay 

Talley, Michael O.N.S. 29, 178, 179 

Tate, Stephen E. 147 

Tawwatters, Joyce C 

Taylor, Denise Adele 150 

Taylor, Tony 212 

Taylor, Herman, III 

Taylor, Libby 68, 115, 128. 129, 189, 

15. 168 

Taylor, Marjorie G. 

Teekell, Charles H. 

Terry, Ira James, Jr. 

Teter, John Jeffrey 

Thedford, Deborah Ann 

Thoman, Laurie E. 79, 160 

Thomas, Wendy Grace 232, 233 

Thomson, Jack 29, 136, 18 

Thompson, Lee N. 81, 163 

Thompson, Suzanne 64, 73, 153, 154 

Thornton, Lisa Carol 52, 170, 23, 169 

Tillett, Wendy Sue 

Tocci, Philip T.O.B. 78, 28 

Todd, Allan K. 74, 160, 236 

Todd, Margaret 48, 222, 223, 225, 28, 

178 

Tomes, Arthur Henry 

Trahan, Danny 185, 214, 182 



Tramei, Clay B. 

Trigg, John Mendel 36 

Tumbas, Zorica 2, 133, 218 

Tuminello, Charles J, 

Turk, Kelly 58, 132, 147 

Turk, Leslie 64, 144 

Turnage, Pat 

Turner, Hazel Mardis 

Turner, Melvin 

Tuttle, Sharon Anne 193 

Utley, Opal McLeod 

Vaandrager, Bastiaan 70, 220, 221, 

23 

Vahlkamp, Gretchen 57 

Vainiomaki, Leena 36 

Varnell, Mary Alice 

Vaughn, Delores 

Vaughn, Jennifer Jeanne 

Vaughn, William 

Veal, Ricky 55, 208, 209, 234, 10, 32 

Vestal, Tommy 

Viskozki, Ron 68, 182 

Vitarelfi, Jerome P. 

Von Hoene, Gordon Tapp 63, 75, 144 

Walden, James Olive, Jr. 

Walker, Amy 16, 172 

Walker, Audy Darryn 149 

Walker, Donald Stewart 52 

Walker, Edwina Lee 39 

Walker, Kelly Harlow 61, 152, 154, 160 

Walker, Maureen Patton 

Walker, Ramona Lynn 

Wallace, Richard James 55, 186 

Waller, Debra Ruth 

Ward, Chris 44, 160, 5 

Ward, James Curtis 75, 32 

Wardlow, Ann Elizabeth 

Ware, Barbara Elaine 

Ware, Paula Denise 81 

Wamock, Nancy Lee 52, 165, 174, 

175, 31, 172 

Warren, Charles H. 179 

Warren, Patricia Ann 64, 149, 151 

Watkins, Ingrid R. 

Watson, Charlotte Shaw 

Watson, Hilary Stephen 57, 190, 191, 

192, 193, 9, 10, 32 

Watson, Andy 211, 212 

Watters, Douglas Larche 

Weaver, Chris 196, 32 

Webb, Alison 45 

Webb, Mari Bruns 

Webb, Susan Lorraine 40, 124, 134, 

137 

Weber, Charles A., IV 42 

Weeks, Sandra Leigh 66, 140 

Weibel, Mark Alan 214 

Welch, Raymond L. 

Wells, Hugh David 79, 135 

West, Laurie Ann 

West, Melanie Lynne 1, 63, 150, 170, 

171, 17, 28, 169 

Whisenhunt, Larry W. 

White, Rebecca Carol 

Whitener, Gail Buchanan 

Whitler, Ronald Lee 68, 150, 152, 154, 

8, 21 

Whitlow, S. Michael 

Whitt, Michelle 80, 170, 171 192, 169 

Whitten, Frances J. 

Whittington, Cheryl R. 68, 152, 154, 

170, 171, 169 

Wiegand, Claire 80, 161 147, 175, 

19, 29, 172 

Wiener, Jacques Loeb 185, 25, 182 

Wiggins, Carole Ann 

Williams, Charles Ford L. 36, 116, 79, 

128, 129, 130, 131 141 

Williams, Janice Neil 



Williams, Wayne R,, Jr. 

Williamson, Barbara H. 

Wills, Doris Jean 

Wilmore, Randall L. 62 

Wilson, Michael R. 152, 154, 161 

Windham, James Keith 

Winkler, Peter 

Wood, Glenn Steven 29, 77, 179 

Wood, Standley J. 

Woodley, Cecilia Claire 

Woods, Isabelle Muniz 

Wood, John B, 

Woods, Katherine Lynn 41 156, 170, 

169 

lA/orden, Dell Glenn 

Wren, Stephen Atkinson 73, 29, 186 

Wright, Steven Michael 

Wuenschel, Thomas 44, 160 

Yarbrough, Byron Hulan 42, 220, 221 

Yardiey, John Mark 44 

Yates, Davina 29, 68, 175, 218, 219, 

172 

Yates, Lora Jeane 51 

Yianitsas, John Peter 67, 153, 154, 

184, 9, 30 

Yoblonsky, Susan Lynn 72 

Yokem, Alan 29, 56, 181 19, 178, 179 

Young, Lynn 38, 119, 128, 129, 130, 

134, 137, 143, 148, 163, 6 

Young, Robyn Elizabeth 

Young, Timothy Dwayne 50, 144, 186 

Youngman, Robert 188, 235, 186, 187 

Youssef, Farage 45, 229, 3, 186 

Yudin, Scott Russell 57, 186 

Zator, Jack Walter 

Zelier, William E. 

Zimmerman, Jami Marie 160 

Ascanio, Fernando 

Betacourt, Enio 

Briceno, Rosa Elena 

Castillo, Juan Carlos 

Castillo, Rafael 

Coifman, David 74, 146 

Coifman, Jaime 74 

De Brito, Luis N. 146 

Garcia, Tania 

Guerrero, Robert 

Herrera, Andres 

Junguito, Mario 46, 146 

Khaldi, Fatemah 

Leon, Alfredo S. 

Meier, Carlos 50 ■ 

Meier, Olga 146 

Morasso, Jorge 75 

Nabouba, Ammar 64, 146, 228 

Narciso, Enrique 50, 146 

Olivares, Juan Carlos 74, 146 

Ramirez, Alvaro 

Rivero, Edgar 

Rodriguez, Roberto 

Rosias, Jorge 74 

Sol, Rita 146 

Takahashi, Masami 

Teran, Anibal 

Torres, Javier 46, 146 

Vides, Gerado 50, 146 

Steinberg, Alfredo 46, 146, 147 



259