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The Yorkshire 
Archaeological Journal 

Yorkshire Archaeological Society 



^y^ 4-1.4' 



Harbarlr College l.ibrars 

FROM THE FUND OF 

CHARLKS MINOT 

(Glass of 1828) 



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THE 

YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL 
JOURNAL. 



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THE 



YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL 
JOURNAL. 



PUBLISHED UNDER THE DIRECTION OF 
THE COUNCIL 



l?orft0b(rc Brcb«olofiical Society* 
VOL. XVII. 

^ISSUED TO MEMBERS ONLY.^ 



LEEDS: 

PRINTED FOR THR SOCIETY BY 

JOHN WHITEHEAD & SON, ALFRED STREET, BOAR LANE. 

MCMIII. 



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PREFACE. 



The contents of this volume do not call for any special 
remark. Mr. J, Eyre Poppleton is to be congratulated 
on the completion of his description of the Church Bells 
of the West Riding. Those in the North Riding still 
remain to be done. Mr. Mill Stephenson has sent a 
further instalment of his most valuable series of papers 
on the Monumental Brasses in this county, this time one 
containing those in the North Riding. The concluding 
paper, describing the brasses existing in the city of York, 
will appear in the next volume. Canon Fowler has 
again proved himself a good friend of the Society by 
sending articles on matters of a more or less ecclesias- 
tical nature. Writers of articles in former volumes, as 
Mr, Chadwick, Dr. Leadman, Mr. Clay, Dr. Fairbank, and 
Canon Wordsworth, continue to show their interest in 
the Society by contributing to the pages of the JournaL 
A considerable portion of Paver's Marriage Licenses is 
given in this volume. 

The Council desires to take this opportunity of thank- 
ing all these and other contributors for their various 
papers, and has only to add that in this, as in former 
volumes, the contributors alone are responsible for the 
opinions and statements made in their several papers. 

lo. Park Street, Leeds, 
October^ 1903. 



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CONTENTS. 



Preface 
Contents . 
Illustrations . 
Addenda et Corrigenda . 



FAGB 
V 

vii 
ix 
xi 



Notes on the Bells of the Ancient 
Churches in the West Riding of 



Yorkshire . 


• 


. J. Eyre Poppleton . 


1 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


192 


Do. 


do. 


do. 


434 


'. Hilda 


• 


Alex. D. H. Leadman, 
F.S.A. 


33 



Robert H. Skaife 



The Will of Timothy Bright, M.D., 
Rector of Meihley and Barwick- 
in-Elmet, 161 5 

Testamentum Willelmi de Ledes, 
filii et heredis Rogeri de Ledes, 
Factum .... 

Yorkshire Briefs 

Danby v. Sydenham : A Restoration 
Chancery Suit 

The Normanby Effigy 

Yorkshire Deeds 

Humberston's Survey 

Paver's Marriage Licenses (Part XVI) J. W. Clay, F.S.A. 

Early Inscription in Bilsdale 
Church .... 



SO 

55 
59 

72 

94 

96 

129 

155 

237 



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VUl CONTENTS. 

Notes on Yorkshire Churches 

The Feast Days of St. Hilda 

Some Legends of St. Nicholas, with 
special reference to the Seal of 
pocklington grammar school . 

Monumental Brasses in the North 
Riding .... 

Vescy of Brampton-en-le-Morthen 

IN THE PARISH OF TrEETON, CO. 

York, and their Descendants . 

Grave-Slab of Abbot Barwick in 
Selby Abbey Church, 1526 

Treason in 1685 

Two Yorkshire Charms or Amulets: 
Exorcisms and Adjurations 

The Rectory of Fishlake . 

Kirklees Priory 

Notes : — 

LXXXII.— Haliwerfolk . 

LXXXIII. — Inscription formerly 
at Dewsbury 



Sir Stephen Glynne, 




Bart. 


241 


George Buchannan 


249 


Canon J. T. Fowler, 




D.C.L., F.S,A. 


254 


Mill Stephenson, 




B.A., F.S.A. 


261 



C. E. B. Bowles, M.A. 340 



Canon J. T. Fowler, 



D.C.L., F.S.A. 


373 




374 


Rev. Christopher 




Wordsworth, M.A. 


377 


F. R. Fairbank, M.D., 




F.S.A. 


413 


S. J. Chadwick, F.S.A. 


420 


Canon J. T. Fowler, 




D.C.L., F.S.A. 


127 


do. 


128 



Index 



. 463 



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ILLUSTRATIONS. 



FAGB 

Yorkshire Church Bells— Plates IX-XV . to face i 

Plates XVI-XX . „ 192 

Seal of Whitby Abbey . , • »i 43 

Seals of the Corporation of Hartlepool • « 43 

Harwood Dale Chapel — From the South-East . . » 78 

From the South-West. „ 78 

South Door • »> 79 

Interior, looking East . . „ 79 

The Normanby Effigy — Left side • » 94 

Right side . . . ,, 94 

Plate of Seals • . . . • }> 100 

Inscriptions in Bilsdale and Kirkdale Churches „ 237 

Seal of Pocklington Grammar School „ 254 

Monumental Brasses: — 

Alddoroughy near Boroughbridge — William de Aldeburgh, 

■ circa 1360 .... 264 

By/and Abbey — Casement of Brass to an Abbot, 

fifteenth century . . . to face 268 

Farcett — Mrs. Anne Underbill, 1637 . . • ,1 276 

GilHngy near Helmsiey — Robert Wellington, Rector, 1503 „ 276 

Helmsley — Crest of the Manners Family . 281 

Hornby — Christopher Conyers and wife Ellen, 1443 • ^84 

„ ' Thomas Mountford, 1489, and wife Agnes io face 286 

Kirby Moorside — Lady Brooke, 1600 „ 292 

Kirkleatham — Dorothy Turner, 1628 . „ 296 

„ Robert Coulthirst, 1631 . . 299 



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X ILLUSTRATION^!. 

PACK 

Monumental Brasses {continued)'.— 

Roxby Chapel — Thomas Boynton, Esq., 1523 . to face 304 

Sessay — Thomas Magnus, Archdeacon of the East 

Riding, 1550 .... 310 

„ Palimpsest Portions of Brass to Thomas Magnus 311 

Sheriff Hutton — Thomas and Agnes Wytham, 

circa 1480 .... to face 314 

„ Mary Hall, 1657 . . 319 

West Tanfield — Thomas Sutton, Rector, circa 1490 . 320 

Topcliffe — Thomas de Topclyff and wife Mabel, 1391 to face 326 

Wensley — Sir Simon Wensley, Rector, circa 1360 . 334 

W^rZ/jf^f— Ralph Wiclif, 1606 . . 338 

The Hall, Brampton-en-le-Morthen . . , to face 360 

Incised Slab from Selby Abbey Church — 

John Barwick, Abbot 1 522-1526 . „ 373 

Two Charms from the Ingleby Arncliffe Crucifix . „ 402 



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ADDENDA ET CORRIGENDA. 



Page 33, notes, col. 2, line 11. For Hillersley read Hillerslev. 

„ 46, line 2 from bottom. For so read to. 

„ 47, line 9. For so read to. 

,, 57, line II from bottom. October 9, 1635. Licence for Mary and Dorothy 
Falkingham, sisters of John Falkingham, to enter upon the manor of 
Norlhall-juxla-Leeds. (Deputy Keeper of Public Records Reports^ 
xlviii, 547.) 

,, 58, lines 7 and 8. Colonel Edmund ^Ison points out that Mr. Skaife has 
made a mistake as to the position of the manor of North Hall. 
This manor was situated near the bottom of Lady Lane, pretty nearly 
due north from the parish church. See Thoresby Society^ ix, 2, and 
accompanying map. Mr. Skaife Sifates that the manor was on the 
east side of Leeds, but he has hardly made sufficient allowance for 
the growth of the town since Elizabeth's reign. The Northall Street 
mentioned in Mr. Skaife's article leads from Burley Street to Kirkstall 
Road, not to Wellington Road, which is on the other side of the river. 

,, 66, line 5. For Quarters read Quarter Sessions. 

,, 77, line II from bottom. For Anne read Elizabeth. 

,, 87, note 3. For an account of brasses of the Danby family at Kirkby 
Knowle see page 290. 

„ 104, line 8 from bottom. For Marlon's read Martin's. 

„ 109, line 3 from bottom. For Gosser recui Goffer, and also on page no, line 2. 

,, III, notes, col. 2, line 3. For Robert read Richard. 

,, 118, line 13. For I. T. readT. H. These are the initials of Thomas Howden. 
Sheriffs were first instituted in York in the place of bailiffs in the 
year 1396. 

,, 119, line 12. Isabel Maulevcrer was daughter of Robert Urswick. 
(Vol. X, I49«.) 

„ 1 88, line 20. For Osbaldkirk read Oswaldkirk. 

„ 239, line 4 from bottom. For AEDpARD read EADpARD. 

fi 338, lines 4 and 12. For Roger read Ralph. 

„ 342, line 13. For Alice read Isabel. 

,, 344, line 3 from bottom. For Thryburgh read Thrybergh, and also on 

page 345» line 3. 

„ 360, line 19 from bottom. For Matildore recui Matild?. 



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THE 



YORKSHIRE 



Hrcba^ologtcal Journal. 



PUBLISHED UNDER THE DIRECTION OF 
THE COUNCIL 

OP THE 

l?orft0bire Hrcba^ological Society 



Part 65. 

(BEING THE FIRST FART OF VOLUME XVII.) 
IISSUED TO MEMBERS ONLY.'] 



LEEDS: 

PRINTED FOR THE SOCIETY BY 

JOHN WHITEHEAD & SON, ALFRED STREET, BOAR LANE. 

MCMil. 



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K^^ The Council of the Society are not responsible for any 
statements or opinions expressed in the YORKSHIRE 
ARCH>EOLOGICAL JOURNAL, the Authors of the various 
Papers being alone responsible for the same. 



CONTENTS OF PART 65. 

(Being the First part of Volume XVII.) 



PAOB 

Bells in the West Riding of 
Yorkshire J. Eyre Poppleton . . i 

St. Hilda A. D. H. Leadman, F.S.A. 33 

Will of Timothy Bright, M.D., 
Rector of Methley and Bar- 
wick-in-Elmet, 1 61 5 .50 

Testamentum Willelmi de Ledes, 
FiLii et heredis Rogeri de 
Ledes Robert H. Skaife . . 55 

Yorkshire Briefs 59 

Danby V, Sydenham : A Restora- 
tion Chancery Suit 72 

The Normanby Effigy 94 

Yorkshire Deeds 96 

Notes — LXXXIL — Haliwerfolk Rev. Canon Fowler, F.S.A. 127 
LXXXin. — Inscription 

formerly at Dewsbury ,, „ „ „ 128 



fillttgtrationjs. 



• Yorkshire Church Bells -Plates ix-xv 

^ Seal of Whitby Abbey 

• Seals of the Corporation of Hartlepool . 
^ Harwood Dale Chapel from the South 

J ,, „ FROM THE South-west 

• „ ,, from the South-east 

^ „ ,, Interior looking East 

• The Normanby Effigy — Left Side . 

„ „ Right Side 



to face 



FAUK 

I 

43 
43 

78 

79 
94 
94 



CJe lotkgjite jpamfj i^gbter ^otutg. 

The Society was formed in 1899 for the purpose of printing the older Registers 
of the county. The following have been either issued or are in the press : — York— 
St. Michael-le-Belfrey, Burton Fleming, Horbury, Winestead, Lin ton-in- Craven, 
Stokesley, Patrington, Blacktoft, Scorborough, Bingley, Kippax, Hampsthwaite, Wath- 
on-Deame, and Brantingham. 

Subscription, One Guinea per annum. President: Sir George Armytage, Bart.; 
Hon, Treasurer: J. W. FouRNESS, Victoria Chambers, South Parade, Leeds; Hon. 
Secretaries: Francis Collins, M.D., Pateley Bridge; G. D. Lumb, 65, Albion Street, 
■■'"' '^ to whom applications for membership should be sent. 



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56. 



Plate IX. 



54. 



57- 



58. 

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64. 



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Plate XI 








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Plate XII 







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Plate XIII, 



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Plate XIV. 



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Plate XIV. 



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Plate XV. 



66. 



69. 67. 

70. 



72- 
73- 
71- 



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AS<L IU,<>,1 



THE 



[orblire ^rc|$0l00kal InirrnaL 



NOTES ON THE BELLS 

OF THE ANCIENT CHURCHES OF THE 

WEST RIDING OF YORKSHIRE. 

By J. EYRE POPPLETON. 



'* Continued from VoL XVI, page 83,) 

DIOCESE OF YORK. 

Archdeaconry of York {continued). 



{The Jig^tres in brackets throufihout these notes refer to the illusiraiioHs.) 



(e) Deanery of Selby. 
BRAMHAM (All Saints). Six bells. 

These were cast in 1875 ^Y Messrs. Warner & Co., and have 
only the makers' name, &c. 

The three old bells which previously hung in the tower were 
destroyed by a fire on Christmas Day, 1874. I am told that they 
bore only the names of two or three churchwardens. 

BRAYTON (St. Wilfrid). Three bells. 

1. GLORIA IN ALTISSIMIS DEO 1 769 

(lower) l^n!f"k ^'^^ frieze of bells similar to <') 

30 in. dia. 

2. GLORIA IN ALTISSIMVS DEO 1706 

(lower) {ew}^'^ 33 in. dia. 

35i in. dia. 
VOL. XVII. A 



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2 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHi^SOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

CAWOOD (All Saints). Three bells. 

1. GLORIA IN ALTISSIMIS DEO 1674 

(lower) EW ^'^ 32 in. clia. 

2. * (55) Smtit M-VL^xtt ©ta )e>ro ;Ci.ofai0 ^'> 

34i in. disi. 

3. GLORIA DEO PAX HOMINIBVS W.M.VIC. 1674 

(lower) G.W. i.T. ^Z^,^s {il\^'^ 

36 in. dia. 

The second bell is said to have been brought from the Chapel 

of the old Palace at Cawood of the Archbishop of York. Up to 

about 1850 a bell was rung every Sunday at 8 a.m. 

HAZLEWOOD CASTLE CHAPEL (St. Leonard). One bell. 

GLORIA IN ALTISSIMIS DEO 1680 

(lower) RECAST BY MEARS & STAINBANK LONDON 1 869 

There were formerly two bells. This chapel was formerly a 
Parish Church, and was granted to the Vavasour of the day in 
reward for his loyalty during the threatened attack of the Spanish 
Armada, It is said to be, with one exception, the only Parish 
Church in England which has never witnessed the Anglican rite 
{Church Times^ 11 January, 1889). 

LEAD (St. Mary). 

There is now one bell, 8 in. diameter, without mark or inscription, 
but the old bell-cot has evidently been made for one much larger. 

KIRBY WHARFE (St. John Baptist). Three bells. 

1. GOD SAVE OVR CHVRCH AND QVEEN 160I W O <3») 

(lower) Royal arms (See Plate xiv.) 

32 in. dia. 

2. (This bell has no inscription or mark, but I judge it to be of 

1 8th century.) 

34 in. dia. 

3. lESVS BE OVR SPEED 1623 

36 in. dia. 

LOTHERTON CHAPEL. One bell. 

DALTON YORK FECIT 1 777 

MONK FRYSTON (St. Mary). Three bells. 

1. SING PRAISE TO THE LORD 1658 <*> 

2. JESVS SAVE OVR CHVRCH 1610 

3. GLORIA IN EXCELSIS DEO 1675 

/I \ r « CHVRCH / SS ) (i) 

(lower) T, B wARDKN \ Eborr 



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BELLS IN THE WEST RIDING OF YORKSHIRE. 3 

NEWTON KYME (St. Andrew). Three bells. 

1. VENITE EXVLTEMVS DOMINO 1768 |^Rb^"[ 

2. TE DEUM LAUDAMUS 1 768 ^DaUonV 

3. THOMAS FAIRFAX ESQ« PATRON 1 ^^''o f 

V Ebor J 

(on rim) THESE three bells were recast and enlarged 

BY A LEGACY LEFT BY NICHOLAS GIRLING LATE 
rector OF THIS PARISH 1 768 

RYTHER (All Saints). One bell. 

J. WARNER & SONS CRESCENT FOUNDRY LONDON 1 856 



PATENT. 

The two former bells, having been cracked by ringing at the 
Squire's birth or wedding, were recast into the above. 

SAXTON (All Saints). Three bells. 

I. * «55) WBLiWimsi SSallag ©e aaiton^*) atmiger fecit jFieti fHe(^> 
[Arms of France and England quarterly.<59)] 
(lower) *«^5) Sancte iWtergareta ©ra Pro K0f««»4><59) 

133 in. dia. 
£^6,) j^omen iWagtialene Campana d&nti 
""''' i«el0We(59)(64) 

36 in. dia. 

3. 1^1 (62) In fRxxliisi 2nnig Uewnet Campana Joijannig (59) (64) 
SELBY (St. Mary and St. Germans). Eight bells. 

1. MEARS LONDON FECIT 

(lower) VENITE EXULTEMUS DOMINO JAMES AUDUS 1 863 

SEMPER PARATUS 

2. MEARS LONDON FECIT 

(lower) BENEDICITE OMNIA OPERA 

ROBERT ADAMS SELBY JOHN ADAMS SHEFFIELD 1 863 

3. T MEARS OF LONDON FECIT 182I 

4. CANTATE DOMINO CANTICVM NOVVM 171O 

(lower) {il^<" 

35J in. dia. 

{a) William dc Sallay was Lord of His grandfather was Sheriff of York in 
the Manor of Saxton, and died in 1492 I397-S- 
( Yorkshire Archaologi£al/ournali x, 300). 



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4 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL, 

5. SOLI DEO GLORIA PAX HOMINIBVS 1710 MICHAEL MARSHALL 

(lower) {E^forr^'^ 

37J m. dia. 

6. VOCO VENI PRECARE 17x0 GALFRID RISHTON MINISTER 

40J in. dia. 

7. VT TVBA SIC SONITV DOMINI CONDVCO COHORTES 1710 

(lower) {itV'^ 

44 in. dia. 

8. MEARS LONDON FECIT 

DE PROFUNDIS CLAMAVI 

OLIM CAMPANA SANCTI GERMANI RECONFLATA 1710 

JOHN WAUD \ 

JOHN COCK I 

^ GUARDIAN I 
RICH MORRITT I 

JEF PALMER / 

ITERVM RECONFLATA I 863 

F W HARPER MINISTER 

HENRY GREEVES CURATE 

THOMAS STANDERINC; \ 

CHARLES SMITH 

y CHURCHWARDENS 
GEORGE CHEESMAN 

JAMES ARMSTRONG f 

(Weight, i8f cwt.) 

There was formerly a bell having — 

I E \ 

LAVDATE DOMINUM 1 733 V*^^f''Jj 

32f in. dia. 

{Mountain,) 

Robert Auby gave a ring of bells to the church in 1 6 14. A 

tablet let into the west wall of the north transept records this as 

follows : — 

" Rofet Auby panniculari's. 

"Vir honest's atq : de reipub huius oppidi optime 

" merit* in honore dei et ornamentu huius ecctiae . 

"S. Germani de Selby hoc classicu Tintinabuloru deo 

"patriae et patriae deo ex meris suis expensis dicavit 

**et in perpetuum consecravit. 

"Anno Dni 1614." 

The same man devised lands in Selby for maintaining a chime 
of bells. jQ$ per annum is now paid out of the foeffee^s estates on 
this account. 

(Cfiarity Commissioners^ Report^ West Riding, pp. 1 09-1 10.) 



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BELLS IN THE WEST RIDING OF YORKSHIRE. 5 

Michael Marshall, who died ist January, 1619, gave a bell and 
;;^5o to this church. 

In 1882 I was told by the clerk that a bell was rung daily at 
eight p.m. in winter. \ bell is now rung on weekdays at six a.ni. 
and on Sundays at eight a.m. 

The chimes formerly went at five and nine a.m. and noon. 

(AforrM ) 
SHERBURN IN-ELMET (All Saints). Eight bells. 

1. I CAST BY JOHN WARNER & SONS L^^ LONDON 1897 

2. I DIAMOND JUBILEE gUEEN VICTORLV 1 897 

M. E. JENKINS VICAR 
JOHN COOKE 



. CHURCHWARDENS 
ARTHUR THOMPSON 



I 

(Weight, 5 cwt. 3 qrs. each.) 

3. CAST BY JOHN WARNER & SONS LONDON 1 878 
(lower) THIS BELL WAS GIVEN BY 

Wm day . EVERSLEY . GARTH . 
SHERBURN . 1 875 
(lower) THE LORD TO PRAISE MY VOICE i'LL RAISE 

4. SUM DECOHI ECCLESI/E PINUS CEU MONTIBUS ALTIS 1750 

( E \(d) 

5. HUC PROPERATE MEA VOCE SONANTE VIRI 1750 \^|{'^''j 

6. VOX MI HI DATA SACRA EST MAN I BUS ME TANGITE 

CASTIS 1750 { Seller r 
I Ebor^ 

7. CAST BY JOHN WARNER & SONS LONDON 1 878 

(lower) CAELORUM . SANCTIS . LIMINA . SACRA PATENT . 1750 

8. * CUM . SONO . BUSTA . MORI . CUM 

PULPITA . VIVERE . DISCE . 1750 
(lower) WIL . GILL . VICAR . THO . BONNEL . ROB . 

GIBSON . GEO . THO . TURNER . CURATE 
WIL . KNOWLES . MICH . HALLILEY . 
CLARKSON . CHURCHWARDENS 
- RECAST 1878 
(lower) JAS. MATTHEWS - VICAR . W. B. BROUGHTON CURATE 
H. H. MAWSON I 
G. L. LEWIS f CHURCHWARDENS 

CAST BY J. WARNER & SONS LONDON 1 878 

(Weight, 13 cwt.) 
^ A Mtiall mark, similar lo (i), not (5). 



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6 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

In the Exchequer — Queen's Rememb' Miscellanea, 2 and 3 
P. and M. y*, is an Indenture, as follows : — 

"This Indenture made the xxiiij daye of November in the 
second and third yere of the rayne of our soveraigne lord and lady 
Phillipe and Mary by the Grace of God Kinge and Quyne of 
Ingland France Naples Jerusalem and Ireland Defendours of the 
Faythe Princes of Spaine and Giselle Archduke of Austryge Dukes 
of Myllan Burgondy and Brabant countyes of Haspurch Flanderres and 
Tyroll (1555) Bytwyxte Harry Say vail Esquyer survayare in the West 
Rydinge in the Countie of Yorke to owr said soveriynge lord and 
lady of the one partye and Syr Henry Hublethorne Knight and 
John White of London Alderman of the other partye Wytnesseth 
that the said Syr Henry Hobblethorne and John White have 
resayvyd at the delyvery of the sayd Harry Sayvayll by forse of a 
warrant beringe date the xxiiij daye of Auguste in the fyrst and 
second yere of the rayne of our said soveraigne lord and ladye 
Phillipe and Marye direct from the right honorable Marcis of 
Winchester Lord High tresurer of Ingland and Syr John Baker vice 
tresurer of the number of iiij belles remayninge in Sherborne in the 
countye of York the ierons taken owte and alowd wayinge thyrtie 
one hondreth a halffe and fourten powndes wayght and the charges 
dysbursed by the said Sir Henry Hoblethorn and John White 
about the wayinge therof and other wyse abowt the same amounteth 
unto the some of fyftye fyve shillinges and ten pence as more 
playnely appereth by a byll of parsell to this indenture annyxed 
In wytnesse wherof as well the said Syr Herry Hoblethorne and 
John Whyte as the sayd Syr Herry Sayvayll to this indentures 
interchangable have put to ther hand the day and yere above wrytten 

By me Herry Hoblethorne 
And by me John White. 

Costs and charges leyd forthe and expences abowte the taking 

forthe and wayinge of the belles remayninge at Scherborne in 
Yorkshire : — 

For caridge from Scherborne by watter and land 

to Hull xvjs iiij^ 

For cranedge and porters ther and wayinge xj* x** 
For survayers charges his servants and horsse 

for iiij dayes to delyver the belles wayed . xxvij* viij^ 

Summa Totallis . . lv« x^^" 



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BELLS IN THE WEST RIDING OF YORKSHIRE. 7 

From this there appear to have been in the sixteenth century at 
least four bells. I gather from the expression "belles remayninge^' 
that there may have been more. In 1750 there were three large 
bells, then recast into five, of which the firesent 4, 5, and 6 remain. 
The third bell was given by Mr. William Day in 1875, l>cing cast by 
Messrs. Mears. In 1878 it was found to be too light and also out of 
tune, and was recast by Messrs. Warner. 

Rev. William Gill was also Vicar of Kirk Fenton, and died 
2nd February, 1756. 

For the death bell here they ring — 

For a man, three strokes three times \ 
For a woman, two strokes three times then pause 

For a boy, three strokes once I and repeat. 

For a girl, two strokes once j 

TADCASTER (Sl Mary). Six bells. 

1. CRY ALOUD LIFT UP THY VOICR LIKE A TRUMPET 

2. PRAISE GOD IN THE FIRMAMENT OF HIS POWER 

3. MY SOUND IS SWEET ATTEND THE SOLEMN CALL 

4. GOD SAVE HIS CHURCH OUR KING AND REALM 

5. GLORY TO GOD IN THE HIGHEST HALLELUJAH 

IT IS REMARKABLE THAT THESE BKI LS WERE MOULDED IN 
THE SIVERE FROST 1 783-4 

6. HERE GOD PRESIDES HIS PRESENCE FILLS THE PLACE 

JOHN CROSSLEY A.M. VICAR 

JOHN POITER AND 

RICHARD ILES CHURCHWARDENS 1 784 

On each bell also— 

C & R D ALTON YORK FOUNDERS 1 784 

THORPE ARCH (All Saints). Three bells. 

I. iL&s'&is :eer^58) ®isc:bi s^&&j^ 1630 1 h 

2. JESVS BE OUR SPED JC AD 1616 

3. FILI DEI MISERERE MEI 1630 

No. 1 is remarkable in having its lettering from obviously 
medieval stamps. The date stamp, however, is contemporary, and is 
similar to that on No. 3. 

No. 2 has a curious lettering, which I have not met with 
elsewhere (see Plate xiv). 



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8 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

WISTOW (All Saints). Three beUs. 

fj0<38) 1590 

2. SOLI (♦> DEO (4> GLORIA <*> PAX <♦> 
HOMINIBVS AS ET WC 

FECIT SEP 25 1655 

(lower) T R R W CHVRCH 

T C T 1 WARDENS 

T H 

Q jj GENT 35 in. dia. 

3. SM GOD SAVE HIS CHVRCH 1590 f)fl <38) 

(lower) WC rw tf rl 



(f) Deanery of Snaith. 
ADLINGFLEET (All Saints). Three bells. 

I. W BROWNE PARSON — VENITE EXVLTEMVS 



DOMINO 1697 Etor^'^ 



2. W BROWNE PARSON —GLORIA IN ALTISSIMIS 

] 

3. * SOLI DEO GLORIA PAX HOMINIBVS 1663 



DEO 1697 i^/'^ 



ARMIN (St. David). Two bells. 

17 in. dia. 

( ^ 1 
2. GLORIA IN ALTISSIMIS DEO 1 765 I^J.^"/ 

19 in. dia. 
CARLTON-JUXTA-SNAITH (St. Mary). Four bells. 

1. lESVS BEE OVR SPEED 1 65 2 

2. SOLI DEO GLORIA 1 623 

3. FILI DEI MISERERE MEI 1 623 

There is also a bell about 1 2 in. diameter without inscription or mark. 



DRAX (St. Peter and St. Paul). Five bells. 

JAMES HARRISON BELL FOUNDER 1 792 



2.1 

3. THIS PEAL OF BELLS CAST DECEMBER THE 15TH 1792 

JAMES HARRISON FECIT 

4. JAMES HARRISON OF BARTON UPON HUMBER FOUNDER 1 792 



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BELLS IN THE WEST RIDING OF YORKSHIRE. 9 

5. JOSEPH FISHER VICAR 

(lower) JOHN JACKSON CURATE 

JAMES HARRISON FOUNDER 
(lower) THOMAS DICKINSON & JOHN HARDWICK 

FISHLAKE (St Cuthbert). Six bells. 

CANTATE DOMINO NOVVM CANTVM 1706 {e^o ^'^ twicC , 
CANTATE DEO PSALLITE NOMINI EIVS I706 

TE DEVM LAVDAMVS TE DOMINVM CONFITEMVR 1706 E^^'^ 
SOLI DEO GLORIA 1 64 1 

* Cclorum ite placeat tei 0onu0 tote <*^^ 

JOHN WARNER & SONS LONDON 

RECAST BY SVBSCRIPTION 
A D. 1868 
C. ORNESBY VICAR 
J. H. MARSDIN 



I' 



T «. r.«^^r.*..«^ I CHURCHWARDENS 
J. F. FROGGATT ' 

In an article by Rev. Geo. Omsby, Vicar of Fishlake {Gentleman^ s 
Magazine^ VoL 51, May, 1859), he states that the church had then 
two ancient bells — 

i (in Lombardics) SM:M,^W^ ^^TL^:M!&M^S^& 

ii (in black letter) Bite Jle0u C^ttdte placeat STtfat 0onu0 istte 

(i) is probably now represented by No. 6, having been recast as 
thereon stated; but I think (ii) is but a misreading of the present 
No. 5, especially as Mr. Ornsby says that the other bells were put up 
''about a century and a half ago." 

In 1506 Robert Cook the Elder by his will left 3 J. 4^., "magnae 
campanae" of Fishlake, pfrobably the St. Nicholas bell. 

In 1692 the churchwardens were presented to the Archdeacon for 
"That the bellropes and bellfraraes be so much decayed that they 
are not fit for use." 

In 1705 the churchwardens were presented for not getting the 
great bell, which was broken, repaired. 

It will be noticed that three of the present bells were cast in the 
following year, probably as a result of this presentation. 

In 1886 it was customary to ring the tenor bell at 6 a.m., noon, 
and 6 p.m. on weekdays. On Good Friday morning the tenor used 
to be tolled for service instead of a bell rung as usual (Henderson's 
Folk Lore^ Northern Counties^ p. 61). 

VOL. XVII. B 



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10 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

Ringers* Rules. 

(On a board in the tower.) 

All you that are ringers, these words well remark 

If a bell you throw over, by light or by dark 

Four pence you do forfeit; or your hat to the clerk. 

If any with hats on or spurs they do ring 
Fourpence without grudging must pay unto him. 

Also all new ringers on the entering day 

Twelve pence each man to the old ringers must pay. 

James Pitman 
Licensed Clerk 

1733 
HOOK (St. Mary). Two bells. 

1. C. & O. MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 1 845 

21 in. dia. 

2. lESVS BE OVR SPEED 163O 

22 in. dia. 

KIRK FENTON (St. Mary). Three bells. 

1. fac <57) tiW <5"> lialitwta <57) fi (sx) ut <57) acceptaiflw i»ta 

A figure of St John Baptist,<5^> 

2. GLORIA IN ALTISSIMIS DEO 1 7 TO 

(lower) Eb^r^'^ twice. 

3. TH0» MEARS OF LONDON FECIT 1 793 

32 in. dia. 

RAWCLIFFE (St. James). Three bells. 

1. VICKERS SONS & co LIM SHEFFIELD 1874 

PATENT CAST STEEL 62 1 6 
18 in. dia. 

2. 5980 

20 in. dia. 

3. 6582 

22 in. dia. 

SNAITH (St, Lawrence). Six bells. 
I 2 i 

fi I 1-PACK & CHAPMAN OF LONDON FOUNDERS 1 77 8 

4 Of 5 I 

3. AT PROPER TIMES OUR VOICES WE WILL RAISE 
IN SOUNDING TO OUR BENEFACTORS PRAISE 
(lower) PACK & CHAPMAN OF LONDON FECIT 1 778 

6. l£ PACK & CHAPMAN OF LONDON FECIT 
REVD Ma BRACKEN MINISTER 
JOHN LATHAM & ROBERT MOORE CHURCHWARDENS 1 778 l£ 



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BELLS IN THE WEST RIDING OF YORKSHIRE. 11 

Weight. Key. Weight. Key. 

(1) 5 CWt. E (4) 7 CWt. Ajt 

(2) 5i n Ctt (5) 9 » Gjt 

(3) 6i „ B (6) 12 „ Fjt 

At the Survey of 1552 there were four bells in the tower and a 
little bell in the clock, but in 1778 there were only three bells. In 
1614 ;^8 was paid for recasting the great bell, and again in 1623 it 
was recast by William Oldfield at a cost of 20 nobles and 20 marks 
raised by assessment. After this second recasting the great bell was 
hung on 24th March, 1623-4. 

SWINEFLEET (St. Margaret). One bell, about 20 in. diameter. 
SYKEHOUSE (Holy Trinity). One bell. 

VENITE EXVLTEMVS DOMINO 1 7 24 

(lower) {E^r}^'^ 24in.dia. 

There are marks in the bell chamber as if there had been two 
other bells. 

THORNE -(St. Nicholas). Nine bells. 

1. FIDES J. J. LITTLEWOOD VICAR 

2. SPES A. L. PEASE \ 

}' 

These three were cast by Messrs. J. Shaw & Co., of Bradford, in 1892. 

4. lESVS BE OVR SPEED 1671 

5. GOD SAVE HIS CHVRCH 1 67 1 

7. &M.^:mx&M 

For the magnificent lettering Nos. 6 and 7, and the shield bearing 
apparently three wheat sheafs, two and one, see Plate xi. 

8. eWDatb 0aub5 ticfjart gtariteg tohett Uxnill jofjn mger* 1671 

(Weight, 19 CWt.) 
There is also a bell about 18 in. diameter without inscription or 
mark, known as "Jenny Bell." 

At the Survey of 1552 there were three bells here. 
A bell is now rung daily at 6 a.m., noon, and 6 p.m. 



CHURCHWARDENS 
J. H. BELTCHER 

CARITAS W. A. ARMITAGE , ^.^„^,,„„ 

SIDESMEN 
B. MASKILL 



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12 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

WHITGIFT (St. Mary Magdalene). Three bells. 

1. <^> (four times) iesvs <4) be <4) ovr (=) speed (4) (twice) 1662 
(lower) <«> Eight times (Badly cracked.) 

2. Rbv henry SIMPSON Rector 

Edw Wilkinson Tho Ella John 
Egremont CI). BHarbettg 1792 

3. VENITE (4) EXVLTEMVS <4) DOMINO <4> A <4> S (4) W <4) 

C FECIT 1662 

(Badly broken at lip.) 



II. Archdeaconry of Sheffield. 
(a) Deanery of Sheffield. 
ATTERCLIFFE (Christ Church). 

The original Church was built in 1630, and a bell was then 
procured for it by "Mr. Bright," probably John Bright, who was 
afterwards vicar of Sheffield. He was born in 1594, and died in 
1643 (Hunter's Hallamshire^ 2nd ed., p. 406). 

The present bell has — 

T. MEARS of LONDON FECIT 1827 

36 in. dia. 

ECCLESHALL BIERLOW. One bell. 

This Church was restored about 1622, and a bell then bought 
for it. In 1844 a bell weighing 12 cwt. was procured from 
Messrs. Mears, of Whitechapel. 

SHEFFIELD (St. Peter and St Paul). Twelve bells. 

^' !■ ROBERT STAINBANK FOUNDER LONDON 1 868 

3. OUR VOICES SHALL WITH JOYFUL SOUND 
MAKE HILLS AND VALLEYS ECHO ROUND 

(lower) THOMAS MEARS OF LONDON FECIT 1 798 

4. THOMAS MEARS OF LONDON FECIT 1808 

5. THOMAS MEARS OF LONDON FECIT 1804 

6. G MEARS FOUNDER LONDON 1 858 

7. THE BRIDE AND GROOM WE GREET 
IN HOLY WEDLOCK JOINED 

OUR SOUNDS ARE EMBLEMS SWEET 
OF PEACE AND LOVE COMBINED 

(lower) THOMAS MEARS OF LONDON FECIT 1 798 



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BELLS IN THE WEST RIDING OF YORKSHIRE. 18 

8. THOMAS MEARS OF LONDON FOUNDER 1 836 

9. THOMAS MEARS OF LONDON FOUNDER 1804 

10. THE REVO j^s WILKINSON VICAR(^> M« JOHN GREAVES TOWN 

[collector BENJ'* wain WRIGHT M.D. CAPITAL CHURCH 
[burgess THOMAS MEARS OF LONDON FECIT 1 798 

11. THOMAS MEARS OF LONDON FECIT 1804 

12. FRANCIS FENTON CAPITAL BURGESS ROB't TURNER JAMES 

[wheat SIMON ANDREW SAMUEL STAINFORTH JOHN 
[rAWSON JOHN GREAVES D« WAINWRIGHT D» YOUNG 
[john KENYON 
(lower) JOHN FRANCIS YOUNG BURGESSES ANNO DOMINI 1804 

[THOMAS MEARS OF LONDON FECIT 

Nos. I and 2 were the gift of Henry Wilson, Esq., of Sharrow, and 
were hung 28th March, 1868. Particulars of the ring of 1745 are 
given by Mr. Leader {Old Sheffield^ 2nd ed., p. 352) as follows: — 

1. DEO OPT 

2. VENITE EXULTEMUS 

3. FRATERNITAS NOSTRA EST CONCORDIA REFECTUM 1 745 

DONUM SOCIETATIS CULTRARIORUM ANNO DOMINI 1 688 
JOHN SPOONER 
MASTER CUTLER 1 745 

(On the opposite side, the arms of the Cutlers' Company.) 

4. DONUM GILBERTI COMITIS SALOP ET MARIE UXORIS 1606 

REFECTUM 1 745 HEC OLIM MEMINISSE JUVABAT 1 745 

5. IN TERRIS PAX ^ 
•^ MA 

DANIEL HEDDERLY MADE US EIGHT IN 1 745 

6. GLORIA DEO IN EXCELSIS 1 745 

7. ET ERGO HOMINES BENEVOLENTIA 

DANIEL HEDDERLY MADE US ALL EIGHT 

8. FINIS CORONAT OPUS 

THOMAS WATERHOUSE CAPITAL BURGESS 1 745 

There was also a small bell known as "Tom Tinkler," which had — 

1588 ^ " (probably II). 

In 1687 the Sheffield Town Trustees laid down ;^io for the 
Church Burgesses in settlement of the latter's account with Thomas 
Palmer, a bell founder. In the same year a Mr. Bagaley, a bell 
founder, was paid j[^i "for coming over about ye Bells." 

ic) Vicar 1750 to 1805. 



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14 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

The Cutlers' Company in 1689 paid Humphrey Wilkinson £4^ 15J. 
for a new bell (see No. 3 of the 1745 ring, super), and in 1690 they 
had it recast, with additional metal, at a cost of ;^i6 i8x. 6d. 

In 1695 t^® Church Burgesses paid Mr. Samuel Smith, of York, 
jC6 JOS. lid, for recasting the 3rd, 4th, and 5th bells. 

The Earl of Shrewsbury, who gave the original fourth bell, was bom 
20th November, 1553, and married Mary, daughter of Sir William 
Cavendish, of Chatsworth. The Earl died in London, 8th May, 16 16, 
and, with his wife, is buried in the Shrewsbury Chapel in this church. 

It is recorded that the Tenor of Hedderly's ring of 1745 was 
cast in a barn which stood at the east end of the churchyard. Up 
to about 1865 ^ ^^^ ^^s ^"iS o" weekdays at 6 a.m., noon, and 
7 p.m., and on Sundays the treble bell was rung at 7 a.m., and the 
second at 8 a.m. From time immemorial the bells have been rung on 
Tuesday evenings from the Tuesday after Doncaster St. Leger to Shrove 
Tuesday. For tolling the passing bell the clerk formerly received 
IS, for the eighth bell, is, 6d, for the ninth, and 2s, if the tenth bell 
was used. 

SHEFFIELD (St. Paul). One bell. 

THE GIFT OF FRANCIS HURT ESQ* 1 777 



(b) Deanery of Ecclesfield. 
BOLSTERSTONE (St. Mary). Eight bells. 
Formerly one bell, about i8in. diameter, with 

f E Us) 
DEO GLORIA 1 738 \^JJjJj 

This bell is still retained, but in 1892 a new ring of eight was 
obtained from Messrs. Taylor & Co., of Loughborough, at a cost of 
nearly ;^6oo. These have inscriptions as follows : — 

[IF©®© <axsci ^©^rer 

(Weight, 3 cwt. I qr.) 
(Weight, 3 cwt. 2 qr. 11 lb.) 

3. :p@r:Bi y^©j5. :p>er:Bi ^m^ml'M'm.s 

(Weight, 4 cwt. I qr. 6 lb ) 



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BELLS IN THE WEST RIDING OF YORKSHIRE. 15 

(Weight, 4 cwt. 3 qr. 16 lb.) 

(Weight, 5 cwt 3 qr. 7 lb.) 
(Weight, 6 cwt 2 qr. 26 lb.) 

(Weight, 9 cwt. 2 qr. 26 lb.) 
(lower) i:Bi ^I©" ©jat^mi-^X^El ^W 

[.^xa;€f5Be>:Bii®^cjs 
\mM.~^®:Bii® iaEij^@r:Ei® yafi:Ec.s€):Bi 

MDCCCXCII. 

(Weight, 12 cwt 3 qr. 24 lb.) 



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16 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHffiOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

BRADFIELD (St. Nicholas). Six bells! 

I THIS PEAL WAS CAST BY JOHN TAYLOR & SON OF 

[LOUGHBOROUGH APRIL 1 847 

(Weight, 5 cwt. o qr. 14 lb.) 

2. — 1847 — (Weight, 4 cwt. 3 qr. 26 lb.) 

3. J TAYLOR & SON FOUNDERS LOUGHBOROUGH 1 847 

(Weight, 6 cwt. i qr.) 

4. A.D. 1847. (Weight, 7 cwt, o qr. 4 lb.) 

5. JOHN TAYLOR & SON FOUNDERS LOUGHBOROUGH A.D. 1847 

(Weight, 8 cwt. 2 qr. 25 lb.) 

6. JOHN TAYLOR & SON FOUNDERS LOUGHBOROUGH LATE OF 

[ST. NEOTS OXFORD AND BUCKLAND BREWER DEVON 

(lower) 1847 (Weight, 11 cwt. 2 qr. 14 lb. 

At the Survey of 1552 there were three bells here, which in 
1847, when the present ring was cast, were represented by: — 

1. Cast by T Hilton of Wath 1794 

(Weight, 5 cwt. i qr. 14 lb.) 

3of in. dia. 

2. No date. (Weight, 5 cwt. 2 qr. 14 lb.) 

32^ in. dia. 

3. 1604 (Weight, 7 cwt. 3 qr. 22 lb.) 

36} in. dia. 
Mr. Eastwood (Ecclesfield^ page 464) quotes from the Wilson 
^^^.(1743-44):— 

"The clerk, Jonas Rich, says the bells at Bradfield 
"hanged formerly in the corners of the steeple, and 
"one large frame in the middle for the great bell, 
"which was carried to Ecclesfield, with a promise to 
"give another in lieu of it, which never was performed." 

A bell is rung daily at noon. 
ECCLESFIELD (St. Mary). Nine bells. 

\^^ \ MEARS & SONS BELLFOUNDERS LONDON 

3&4 I 

5. THE GIFT OF lOHN WATS ESQUIRE I75O 

(lower) :rn,?M^ "FOUNDERS 

I. LUDLAM 



6. THE GIFT OF lOHN WATS ESQUIRE 

A. WALKER I 
I. LUDLAM 



1 

\ 

' > FOUNDERS 1750 



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BELLS IX THE WEST RIDING OF YORKSHIRE, 17 

7. *(«) ^tt @ram|jana jSaora Ufat 5Primtate ;Bcata *'^> 
(lower) :K^'7^^'^^ ®^'9) 

8. * lESVS BE OVR SPEED 1617 

(lower) G D (''> R s <*> I s (/) f b <^) t h (-*> 
(Weight, 18 cwt. 3 qr.) 

Nos. I, 2, 3, and 4 were cast in 1845 out of two old ones, with 
new metal to the value of ;^7o 11^. 7^. The treble weighs 4 cwt. 
3 qr. 22 lb. 

There is a small bell called " Tom Tinkler." It is mentioned in 
the churchwardens' accounts for 1587 as "the lyttle Santys bell," and 
bears the arms of Wombwell of Thundercliffe, viz.: Azure, three demi- 
HanSy rampant, erased erminois. Crest (out of a mural coronet) : 
GuIeSj a demi-Uon, rampant, as in the field, 

John Parker, of Ecclesfield, by his will dated 26th February, 1552, 
and proved at York 27th April, 1555, bequeathed "to the church at 
" Egglesfield xx* towards the buying of two bells, to be paid at such 
"time as the parishioners shall fortune to buy and pay for the said 
"bells and not else." 

Sir William Everingham, priest at Ecclesfield, by his will (proved 
17th November, 1556) bequeathed: — 

"To the buying of a fourth bell vj» & viij^." 

William Hyde, of Birley, by his will (proved 26th September, 
1558) gave "to the byng of ij bells vi* viij*^." 

The parishioners, encouraged by these bequests, set about obtain- 
ing some new bells, and employed one Richard Brock. The result 
was not altogether satisfactory, as I find in the churchwardens' 
accounts {Eastwood, page 180): — 

"Accompts that Richard Brock is charged withal and hath 
"not accompted for 9 Junij 1569 

" Imp'mis of bellmettel that he had and hath 
"not accompted for, it waid 137^^ at iiij** 
"a pownde iij'» xix* 

"Itm one other peece of bellmettell waiyn 
"about C waight (he confessed it to 
"henry shawe) and new hide xl*" 

d Gilbert Dickenson, ^ Francis Barbar, 

€ Richard Sheircliff, * Thomas Hanley, 

/"John Shaw, the churchwardens in 161 7. 

VOL. XVII. C 



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18 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

In 1578, however, a new bell was bought, the expenditure being 
spread over two years, Peter Fearnley, Thos. BuUos, Wm. Parker, and 
Rich. Birkes each advancing xx*. 

In 1 58 1-2 one bell was cast, made tuneable, and sold to the 
churchwardens, by Henry Oldfield, of Nottingham. The bell 
weighed 1,630 lb. 

In 1583 a bell was recast at a cost of j£g $s,, with 271 lb. of 
new metal, at 6d, per pound, jC6 i^s. 6d. It appears from another 
entry in the same year that one of the old bells had become useless, 
for money was paid for taking it down, and the churchwardens 
having borrowed jQz 6^- 8//. from Nicholas Sheirclyffe, tanner, agreed, 
in default of payment by a certain day, to let him have "the vacant 
bell in the churche" for ;^8. In 1584 they, however, debit them- 
selves with the sum of jQg for one bell sold. In 1595 a bell was 
recast at a cost, with additional metal, of jQ^ 19J. The carriage of 
the bell from Nottingham cost jQ2 {Eastwood^ page 220), No. 7 is 
either this bell or the one cast in 1581. In 1639 Sir Francis 
Foljambe, of Aldwark, gave a new bell to the church. 

A bell is rung daily, except Saturdays and Sundays, at six a.m., 
noon, and eight p.m. On Saturdays the evening bell is rung at 
seven p.m. instead of eight p.m., and after the ringing a number of 
strokes corresponding to the day of the month is struck on the bell. 

On Sundays a bell is rung at seven and eight a.m. On Shrove 
Tuesday the seventh bell is rung at eleven a.m., and on £)aster 
Monday the tenor is tolled to call the parishioners to the vestry 
meeting. In tolling the death-bell, five strokes are given to denote 
the death of a man, seven that of a woman, and nine that of a child. 

At the Survey of 1552 there were three bells here. 

TANKERSLEY (St. Peter). Three bells. 

1. DANIELL HEDDERLV CAST ME 1729 

29 in. dia. 

2. FILI DEI MISERERE MEI 1 628 

31 in. dia. 

ifjC<3) RH<^) 

33 in. dia. 
There is a tradition that the second bell was brought here from 
Worsbrough Church. 

A bell is rung at eight a.m. on Sundays, Christmas Day, and 
Good Friday. 

In ringing the death-bell here it is customary to give nine strokes 
for a man, six for a woman, and three for a child. 



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BELLS IN THE WEST RIDLXG OF YORKSHIRE. 19 

WORTLEY (St. Leonard). Eight bells. 



There is now a ring of eight bells, cast by 


Messrs. John Warner 


and Sons, Limited. 








The particulars are as follows: — 








Diameter. 


Weight 






Inches. cwt. 


qr. 


* lb. 


Note. 


(I) 27i 5 


3 


24 





(2) 2Sl 6 





10 


^1 


(3) 29i 6 





20 


E 


(4) 31 6 


I 


2C 


D 


(5) 33 7 





14 


C 


(6) 35 8 





15 


B 


(7) 37 9 





14 


A 


(8) 41 12 








G 


Total... 60 


2 


6 





On the tenor bell is the following inscription : — 

* TO THE PRAISE AND GLORY OF GOD AND FOR THE CON- 
TINUAL JOY AND COMFORT OF THE PEOPLE OF WORTLEY, 
FOR THE USE OF THE CHURCH OF S. LEONARD, THESE 
BELLS, BEING THE GIFT OF MARY CAROLINE, MARCHIONESS 
OF DROGHEDA, DAUGHTER OF JOHN, SECOND LORD WHARN- 
CLIFFE, IN PERPETUAL MEMORY OF HER BELOVED HUSBAND 
HENRY, THIRD MARQUIS OF DROGHEDA, WHO DIED JUNE 
XXIX, MDCCCXCII, WERE DEDICATED BY THE MOST REV°- 
W. D. MACLAGAN, D.D., LORD ARCHBISHOP OF YORK, 
JULY XXXI, M.D.CCCXCIII * 

9 O PRAISE GOD IN HIS HOLINESS 

PRAISE HIM UPON THE WELL-TUNED CYMBALS 
LET EVERY THING THAT HATH BREATH 

PRAISE THE LORD 
O, YE SPIRITS AND SOULS OF THE RIGHTEOUS 

BLESS YE THE LORD; 
PRAISE HIM AND MAGNIFY HIM FOR EVER * 

CAST BY JOHN WARNER & SONS L'^^ LONDON 

There was formerly a bell, 24 in. diameter, which had on one 
side : — 

W & T 
HOULDEN 
FOUNDERS 

and on the other: — t smith 

I BACKHOUS 

CHAP; 

WARDENS 

NOSCE . TEIPSUM 
1751 



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20 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHiEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

(c) Deanery of Rotherham. 

ANSTON (St. James). Six bells. 

At the Survey of 1552 there were two bells and a Sanctus bell 
here. In 1877 there were three bells, the oldest of which (the 
second) is said to have been brought from Newark. One of these 
former bells is said to have had — 

WHEN ERE YOU HEAR MY MOURNFUL SOUND 
REPENT BEFORE YOU LYK IN GROUND 

The present ones have on each — 

J. TAYLOR & C° FOUNDERS LOUGHBOROUGH 1871 

And the tenor has in addition — 

TO THE PRAISE AND GLORY OF THE TRIUNE GOD AND IN 
[grateful AND HUMBLE ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF HIS 
[numberless BLESSINGS AND INFINITE MERCY, THIS PEAL 
[of six BELLS WAS GIVEN TO THE CHURCH OF S"*" JAMES 
[aNSTON BY GEORGE WRIGHT OF SOUTH ANSTON ESQUIRE 
[and BARNARD PLATTS BROOMHEAD OF SHEFFIELD 



[gentleman 


MARCH 187 I 








These bells weigh : — 










cwl. qr. 


lb. 


cwt. 


qr. 


lb. 


(0 5 3 


26 ■ (4) 


7 


3 


7 


(2) 6 r 


6 (5) 


9 





18 


(3) 7 2 


2 (6) 


II 


2 


II 



Until about 1870 a bell was rung here daily, from May Day to 
Michaelmas at 4 a.m., noon, and 6 p.m.; and from Michaelmas to 
May Day at 5 a.m., noon, and 8 p.m. 

For the death-bell they ring three threes for a male and three 
twos for a female on one of the bells. 

ASTON (All Saints). Three bells. 

i & 2. walker & hilton 1 784 

3. w. mason<') rector . i . kesteven . i . whitehead 

[churchwardens 

(lower) WALKER & HILTON 

At the Survey of 1552 there were three bells here. Formerly a 
bell was rung here at 6 a.m. and noon on weekdays, and 7 a.m. on 
Sundays. Now only the latter is rung. 

''William Mason, Rector 1755 to 1797 (see his epitaph in Hunter ^ ii, p. 170). 



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BELLS IN HiE WEST RIDING OF YORKSHIRE. 21 

BRAITHWELL (All Saints). Three bells. 

I. HENRICVS EYRE MD DE BRAMLEY ME VIGINTI LIBRIS 

[dOTAVIT 1702 {Euir}(^> 
_ 26 in.-dia. 

2- 0ce anlrtea o p n<"> 

28 in. dia. 

3. S stDertlg . toUng . mm . Do • call . to . tastte . on . meats . ti)at 

[ , feel>« . tije . Mule . 1664 h o<*5) 

31 Id. dia. 

Henry Eyre was the eldest son of Nathaniel Eyre, of Bramley, 
gentleman, and Alice, daughter of John Frank, of Pontefract. He 
was baptised in this church on 30th January, 1621, and died in 
1686 without issue {Hunter, i, 136). 

In 1889 the first bell was rung daily at noon, and after the 
ringing, the day of the month was struck on the tenor. 

BRAMLEY ( ). One bell. 

1 63 1 I2i in. dia. 

DINNINGTON (St. Nicholas). One bell. 

1723 24 in. dia. 

FIRBECK (St Peter). One bell. 

JAMES HARRISON FOUNDER BARTON 182I 

HANDSWORTH (St Mary). Three bells. 

I. T MEARS OF LONDON FECIT 1828 

(lower) @>® 1590 HoW 

3. T MEARS OF LONDON FECIT 1828 

In 1886 a bell was rung daily at six a.m. and eight p.m. 
HARTHILL (All Saints). Five bells. 

1. IN MEMORY OF THE REV^ G. T. HUDSON 

FOR 36 YEARS RECTOR . DIED . 7*^" JULY . 1 884 : 
CAST BY J. WARNER & SON LONDON 1 889 

2. lOHN STAINLAND lAMES LISTER 

CHVRCHWARDENS 

(lower) MDCCCXiiii 

3. PEREGRINE OSBORNE LORD MARQVISS OF CARMARTHEN^ 

[gave me MDCCIIII 

*Thc second Duke of Leeds and baptised in this church 29lh December, 
Vicc-Admiral of the Red. He was 1659, and died 25th June, 1729. 



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22 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

4- 3 0l3acetly toHng men bo call to taste on meate ti)at 

[UttiSi tfje Mule 1 668 ho Cs) 

5. GOD SAVE OVR KING 1660 GO 

6. 1 : OSBORNE ^^ R : MULLINS 1 769 

In 1886 a bell was rung on weekdays at noon, and at eight a.m. 
on Sundays. 

LAUGHTEN-EN-LE-MORTHEN (All Saints). Four bells. 
I. A small (18 in.) bell, without inscription or mark. 

2. <33)^^@r imM.M%M^ &:jbim-^ilM- 

3. WILL xM BOLER DW 1704 

4. * lESVS BE OVR SPEED 162I 

40 in. dia. 

The death bell is rung — for a man nine strokes and then three 
threes; for a woman six strokes and then three twos. 

LETVVELL (St. Peter). One bell. 

&®:m MM.'w^ Ki^ ®:K^jfci<grj&j 1681 

At the Survey of 1552 there was one bell here. 

MALTBY (St. Bartholomew). Three bells. 

1. ^ ilHfedt I9ecelt0 ^abeo Nonten (Sahieltst 

28 in. dia. 

2. GOD SAVE HIS CHVRCH 

G P I W WARDENS 1 684 

30 in. dia. 

3. FILI DEI MISERERE MEI 1630 

32 in. dia. 

No. I is a very fine bell. The beautiful inscription and very 

curious trade-mark shield are reproduced in Plate xii. 

Until about 1880 a bell was rung every Sunday morning at 
eight a.m. 

RAVENFIELD (St. James). Six bells. 

I. W. p. BOSVILLE D.D. 1 797 

^* > I LUDLAM ROTHERHAM 1756 

^Prol)ably Ihomas, fourth duke, the grandson of the above; born 
6th November, 1713; died 23rd March, 1789 {Hunter). 



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BELLS IN THE WEST RIDING OF YORKSHIRE. 23 

4. T. HILTON OF WATH FOUNDER 1 797 

5. (No inscription or mark.) 

6. I LUDLAM FOUNDER ROTHERHAM 1 756 E. P. 

On Nos. 2 and 3 is a mark {^oTMERHrMF something like <») without 

the bells. ' ■ 

In 1887 a bell was rung every morning at eight a.m. 

RAWMARSH (St Mary). Eight bells. 

I & 2. MEARS & STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON 

THE GIFT OF JOHN KNAPTON, ESQ. 
RAWMARSH HALL 
HOLINESS TO THE LORD 
1870 

I't^&^S I C & G MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 1 855 

WILLIAM VESEY ROSS MAHON BARONET RECTOR 
JOHN KNAPTON I ^^^pg^g 

JAMES LUDLAM J 
HOLINESS UNTO THE LORD 

Mr. Lukis informed me that there was formerly a bell here with 
''Benedictus das deus." 

The death-bell is tolled quickly for about ten minutes; and then 
are given nine strokes for a man, six for a woman, and three for a 
child. At the end of all the age of the deceased is struck on the 
tenor bell. 

At the Survey of 1552 there was one bell and a Sanctus bell here. 

ROTHERHAM (All Saints). Ten bells. 

-' I* ^s,^ r T MEARS OF LONDON FECIT 1821 

S, 6, 7 & 9 j 

8. (No inscription or mark.) 

10. THIS HARMONIOUS PEAL WAS ERECTED IN THE PARISH 

CHURCH OF ALL SAINTS ROTHERHAM BY VOLUNTARY 
SUBSCRIPTION IN THE YEAR 1821 
(lower) THE REV» THO* BAYLIFFE VICAR 

ROBERT CLARKE 
JOHN FISHER 



MESS»* 



TAwwro «r^^r.««.,x CHURCH WARDENS 
JAMES WOODHRAD 



MESS"* 



JOHN LAMBERT 
T MEARS OF LONDON FECIT 
SAM^ CARR 
FRANCIS SQUIRES 
THO^ BAGSHAW 
JAMES WILKINSON 
JOHN OXLEY 
^ANDREW CRAWSHAW 

(Weight, 32 cwt.) 



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24 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

The cost of these bells was as follows : — 

"182 1. I The Church Bell Committee in A/c with Samuel Clark. 
"Mar. 15/ £ s, d. 

"To Mr. Mears' account for a peal 
of ten bells, weight 139 cwt. 
oqrs. i9lbs., @ i6</. ... 1039 2 8 

"To ten new clappers ... ... 10 o o 

"To new stock, wheels, ironwork, 
brass rollers, also making 
and putting up new frames 
and hanging the bells, com- 
plete, per estimate 142 o o 

"To timber for the frames ... 50 o o 



"Gross cost ;£i24i 2 8 
"Deduct old bells, weight 96 cwt. i q. 17 lbs., 

@ i2d. 539 17 o 



"Net cost of Bells ;67oi 5 8" 

These bells were first rung 20th December, 182 1, and were 
formally opened on the Easter Monday following. 

Up to 1752 there seem to have been four bells. By his will, 
dated 21st July, 1501, William Greybern, first provost of Rotherham 
College, left 6s. Sd. to the bells at Rotherham Church. In 1704 the 
great bell was recast by Samuel Smith, of York, at a cost, including 
various expenses, of ;^49 16s. 3^^. In 1752 a tenor, weighing 
24 cwt., and treble were cast by Hilton, of Wath. 

The old bells were last rung on 19th February, 182 1. 

THORPE SALVIN (St Peter). Three bells. 
I. * (36) ganc ta marc a 

[^^perjD^r 1595 

(lower) 31? © (38) 

[i-ya? m^i :!simi 1595 y^e^^^^ 

The initials r p m s on the tenor may be those of Sir Roger 
Portington, of Barnby Don, and Mary Sandford, daughter of Hercy 
Sandford, of Thorpe Salvin, who were married at Thorpe Salvin about 
the date of the bell, and are buried in this church {Hunter^ i, 310). 



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BELLS IN THE WEST RIDING OF YORKSHIRE. 25 

THROAPHAM (St John). One bell. 

S : TAYLOR . CHVRCHWARDEN 

(lower) A WALKER I „^„„^^„ 

^ ' > FOUNDER 

I LUDLAM J 

THRYBERGH (St. Leonard). Five bells. 

1. lOHANNES : RERESBY : BARONETTVS : PRiESES : CIVITATIS : 
EBORVM : SVB : REGIBVS : CAROLO : ET : lACOBO : SECVNDIS : 
PRIMAM : HANC : POSVIT : CAMPANAM I I4 APRILIS 1687 

(lower) {/^l(.) 

2. lOHN RERESBY ESQVYER 1638 H L 

3- t^c<3) ffiiotta in £xcetet0 tieo 1609 

[g h (almost exactly <*7) but a slight difference in the o) 

4. lii (x6) aif® 19 iW ® Lxxx VI (a shield, 

with a plain St. Andrew's Cross) 
(lower) "gj (6) ('8) (Head of King, with a palm 

branch on his right <53)) 

5. * ftancte leotiartie ®ra ^^ot NoM» Stieum (See Plate xiii) 

The John Reresby commemorated by the second bell was after- 
wards the first baronet, created in 1642, and was an ardent Royalist. 
He died in 1646. The John Reresby, the donor of the treble bell, 
was son of the above, born 14th April, 1634, so it will be noted that 
he gave this bell on his birthday. He was an important personage, 
and governor of York at the Revolution of 1688. He died i6th 
May, 1689 {Hunter^ ii, 39, 40. Cartwright's Reresby Memoirs), 

The last word of the inscription on the tenor is curious Latinity. 
It is probably intended for "ad Deum," and though such a con- 
struction would be inadmissible in classical Latin, it may be found in 
the Vulgate {Acts viii, 24). A bell at Worsborough has "Voco ad 
deum." 

A bell is rung at Thrybergh at 11 a.m. every Shrove Tuesday. On 
all weekdays except Shrove Tuesday a bell is rung at noon, and on 
Sundays until recently a bell was rung at 9 a.m. (:£ee Canon 
Bennett's articles on these bells in Rotherham Advertiser^ loth August, 
189s, 21^^ Yorkshire Weekly Post^ 29th August, 1896.) 

TODWICK (All Saints). Three bells. 

1. 1824 

2. feare ge tfie lorti go i6'i58 

3. FLOREAT ECCLESIA MDCCXIIII 

In tolling the death-bell they finish with — for a male nine and for 
a female seven strokes on each of the bells. 

At the Survey of 1552 there were three bells in this steeple. 



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26 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

TREETON (St. Helen). Seven bells. 
Prayer-bell. i777- 

1. DOMINVS OMNIS SPIRITVS LAVDET 
(lower) TAYLOR FECIT 1 89 2 

2. DNM IN CYMBALIS BENE SONANTIBVS LAVDATE 
(lower) TAYLOR FECIT 1 892 

3. IHESVS BE OVR SPEED 1 63 1 
(lower) TAYLOR RECAST 1892 

4. T MEARS OF LONDON FECIT 1826 

5. SOLI DEO GLORIA 1 642 

6. * ECCE CRVCEM DNI FVGITE PARTES ADVERSA 
(lower) TAYLOR FECIT 1 892 

At the Survey of 1552 there were **iij belles of one accord" here. 

In 1886 I was told that a bell was formerly rung daily at 5 a.m. 
and 8 p.m., but was then rung at 6 a.m., noon, and 8 p.m. 

In ringing the death-bell they finish with nine strokes for a man, 
seven for a woman, and five for a child. 

WALES (St. John). Three bells. 

1. lESVS BE OVR SPEED 1630 

2. (^6) * a * » * a ('8) 

3. (Lion's head) * (Bishop's head) JSE^EUlMJ-WM-WM. 

(Lion's head) (Dragon) SM^^T^SiM^ (Dragon) 
(Fleur de lis) "MJiMJ!^ (Fleur de lis) KEO" (Dragon) 
(Bishop's head) 4^M.m:j^M.MM. 
(Dragon) (Lion's head) :mM.M.WM^ 

The character of this inscription is similar to that on a bell at 
South Somercotes, in Lincolnshire, the date of which is said to be 
1423 (see North's Church Bells of Lincolnshire) (see Plate xv). 
In ringing the death-bell here they conclude with — 
Four threes for a man. 
Four fours „ woman. 
Three threes „ boy. 
Three fours „ girl. 

A bell is rung every Sunday at 8 a.m. 

WHISTON (St. Mary Magdalene). Three bells. 

1. * <«5) ^ancte Petre ©ra l^ro Kobia <^> <59) 

2. * («5) Uflx ajpwtini Sonet £n ante »ei <*<> 



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BELLS IN THE WEST RIDING OF YORKSHIRE. 27 

3. GOD SAVE OVR CHVRCH W B ^G R 1 636 

27 in. dia. 
I. C. G. 6 Ed. VL ¥ p.m. 

In ringing the death-bell here they end with nine strokes for a 
man, seven for a woman, and five for a child- 

WICKERSLEY (St. Alban). Three bells. 

1. DANIEL HEDDERLY 1 799 

2. I ROBUCK I VATS CHURCHWARDENS 1781 
(lower) T HILTON WATH 

3. * Ibc ^ tiono tini 3a\}i» Slcofe r c <56) 

Possibly John Elcoke, Rector of Wickersley, from 1438 to 1491 
{ Hunter y i, 279). 

Up to about 1867 a bell was rung here on weekdays at 6 a.m., 
noon, and 6 p.m., and on Saturdays also at 7 p.m., after which the 
day of the month was struck. The 7 p.m. bell on Saturdays survives. 



(d) Deanery of Wath. 
ADWICK-ON-DEARNE (St. John Baptist). Two bells. 

1. (No mark or inscription.) 

19 in. dia. 

2. * J^"WJ© * * iSlJ^iBlXi^ * * * 

20 in. dia. 

At the Survey of 1552 there were two small bells here. 

BARNBRUGH (St. Peter). Three bells. 

1. (^<5) * j5 * j5 * j5 

2. SOLI DEO GLORIA PAX HOMINIBVS AS WC 

FECIT 1662 W several times, 
(lower) R B <»> several times. 

3. FILI DEI MISERERE MEI 1628 IR 

The treble bell is rung at 8 a.m. on Sundays. 

Death-bell — Three threes for a male. 
Three twos „ female. 

BOLTON-ON-DEARNE (St. Andrew). Four bells. 
I. we antfjoni o p n^^a) ^tya clerk»on g h " 

2. ii,c<3*) gh(") smm. fmM:m3LM. <s>:jpm 

3. SOLI DEO GLORIA 1 649 

40 in. dia. 

On the floor of the bell-chamber was in 1891 a bell iij inches 

diameter, with canons broken off. It had only "ific"^^^ 



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28 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

At the Survey of 1552 there were three bells here. A bell was 
formerly rung daily at noon, and at 8 a.m. on Sundays, but in 1891 
only the latter survived. The death-bell indication is given by three 
strokes for a male and two for a female. 

DARFIELD (All Saints). Six bells. 

1. (Painted on the bell) Randolph Marriott recfor 

W LOXLEY CHURCHWARDENS 

(Cast) T HILTON WATH 1780 

2. VENITE EXVLTEMVS DOMINO 1675 
(lower) RW EW IC chvkchs J SS j.(i) 

3. * <3«) xgii ©*ampana JBene jSontt .^ntoniug jGElonct 

4. *(36) jn X3Elultij5 ^^ttttw ,EleMnct ©Tainpana yofjisJ 
For capitals similar to those on 3 and 4 see Cawthorne (post), 

5. w : DAY : I : scales : t : slack i : stephenson : 

I : PRESTON : I : BURKS : I : STOROR 

CHURCH i^i-Q 

WARDBN S ' ^ 

(lower) I : ludlam : a : walker . . founders 

43 in. dia. 

6. * ALL MEN THAT HEARE MV MOVRNFVLL SOVND REPENT 

BEFORE VOV LYE IN GROVND 1613 

(Weight, 19 cwt.) 
Rev. Randolph Marriott was rector from 1732 to 1782, and 
rebuilt the Vicarage. See his epitaph in Hunter^ ii, 116. 

Hunter states that the second bell was given by Mr. Eaton, the 
rector, who died in 1704. 

There was a tradition that the third and fourth bells were brought 
here from Beauchief Abbey. 

Thomas Wykerslay, by his will dated loth July, 1434, and proved 
in the same year, bequeathed "Pro Magna campana facienda de 
minima ibidem (i>. ecclesia mea de Derfield) XX marcas" {Test. 
Ebor,^ V, 247). 

On the bell frames is cut, "These bells hung by James Harrison 
of Barrow in Lincolnshire 1741," and on a copper-plate attached to 
the frames is: — 

"Mr. Jno. Cawthorn 
J no. Ainley 
Thos. Slack 
Wm. Wordsworth \ 
Thos. Andrew 
Roger Schofield 
Henry Wilkinson ' 
Joshua Hawksworth Workman." 
Up to about 1865 a bell was rung daily at noon, but in 1891 I 
found the only extra bell was rung at 8 a.m. on Sundays. 



Churchwardens 
An<» D" 1736 



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BELLS IN THE WEST RIDING OF YORKSHIRE. 20 

FRICKLEY ( ). One bell. 

1638 I c 

18 in. dia. 

HICKLETON (St. Wilfrid). Three bells. 

1. * MEMENTO MORI 

27 in. dix 

2. GOD SAUE HIS CHURCH G O 1658 

31 in. dia. 

3. WHEN I DOE RING GODS PRAYSES SING 1 676 RS OH 
(lower) W C (*3) 35 in. dia. 

I. C. G. 6 Ed. VI. V- 21 

HOOTON PAGNELL (All Saints). Nine bells. 

Seven of these bells were cast by Messrs. Taylor in 1895, and one 
by them in 1896. These all have the makers* name, etc., in raised 
letters on the shoulders, and on the waists are inscriptions as follows, 
cut slightly into the metal with a chisel. They were given by Mrs. 
Warde-Aldam, of Frickley Hall. 

1. CHRISTE AUDI NOS J W-A 

2. IT IS NOT NOISE BUT LOVE 
THAT SINGS IN THE EAR OF GOD 

J W-A NOV 1895 

3. J W-A NOV 1895 

4. VE PEOPLE ALL WHO HEAR ME SING 
BE FAITHFUL TO YOUR GOD & KING 

5. ON EARTH BELLS DO RING 

IN HEAVEN ANGELS SING ALLELUIA 

J W-A NOV 1895 

6. (Cast in 1896 for a necessary semitone.) 

FOR MERCIES UNDESERVED THIS PEAL IS RAISED 
AND MAY THY NAME O GOD THRO CHRIST BE PRAISED 
WITH LOVING VOICE WE CALL TO CHURCH & PRAYER 
AND BID THE LIVING FOR THE GRAVE PREPARE 
J W-A 

7. OUR VOICES SHALL WITH JOYFULL SOUND 
MAKE HILLS & VALLEYS ECHO ROUND 
WHILST THUS WE JOIN IN CHEERFUL SOUND 
MAY LOVE AND LOYALTY ABOUND 

8. iii<^> iJIi ionaxt iift^^ ^'JS^^M.M.^® Rh<»8 

9. I TOLL THE FUNERAL KNELL 
I HAIL THE FESTAL DAY 
THE FLEETING HOUR I TELL 
I SUMMON ALL TO PRAY 

J W-A NOV. 1F95 



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80 THE YORXSHIRE ARCILffiOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

There were formerly three bells, viz. the present No. 8, which was 
the tenor, and two others. 

1. (Fleur de lis) tcba (stop) (Lion) <34) on ml (stop) 

(Portcullis) (Tudor rose) onm (stop) 

2. <»<^) ffielorum ite placeat tibi rei jwmusj iste <'^> 

These latter were melted up to form part of the 1895-6 ring. 

The lettering on the tenor bell is curiously mixed in style, the 
first and last words being from quite different sets of ' " Lombardic " 
stamps, and the two middle words English Text. 

Nicholas Wortley, of South Kirkby, Esquire, by his will dated 
25th December, 1492, bequeathed, "Ad fabricationem campanarum 
eccl. par. de Hoton Panell xx*" {Test Ebor,^ iv, 77). 

HOOTON ROBERTS (St. Peter). Three bells. 

1. *<''^> if|c<3) *<'•>> ifjc^3) 

2. *(55) ftancte (stop) Petre (stop) ©ra (stop) ^^0 (stop) 3fabfe 

3. lESVS BE OVR SPEED 1624 

The initial cross and lettering are from similar stamps to those 
used for St. Leonard's bell at Thrybergh (see Plate xiii). 

In 1887 a bell was rung at noon on weekdays, and 9 a.m. on 
Sundays. 

HOYLAND NETHER (St. Peter). Three bells. 

1. REIOICE : IN : THE : LORD : 

MRS lANE : TOWNEND RECAST 

24 in. dia. 

2. BE : lOYFUL : IN : THE : LORD 

R : wiGFiELD : w : beergher : c : w : 

(lower) I LUDLAM founder 

26 in. dia. 

3. GLORY : BE : TO : GOD : IN : the : highest : 
the : gift : of : r ; townend : esq 

(lower) I LUDLAM founder 1755 

28 in. 'dia. 
MEXBOROUGH (St. John Baptist). Three bells. 

1. (33) G H <") ^33) 

2. GLORIA IN ALTISSIMIS DEO 1 748 I^Pf'/ 

with bell frieze similar to <') 
(lower) tho. seller junior ios cudworth 

THO SELLER SENIOR RICH THOMPSON 
church WARDENS 



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BELLS IN THE WEST RIDING OF YORKSHIRE. 31 

3. SANCTUS . SANCTUS . SANCTUS . 

DOMINUS . DEUS SABAOTH . 

(lower) J : taylor & c9 founders Loughborough 1879 

HENRY BLLERSHAW VICAR 

J°«::^"°f*^«i WARDENS 
JOHN BULLOCK J 

A.D. 1879. 

The foimer tenor had the same marks as the present treble. 
At the Survey of 1552 there were three bells here. 

SWINTON (St. Margaret). One bell. 

7 HILTON 1803 

18 in. dia. 

There is now also a set of eight ''Tubular Bells," but in 1887 
there was a bell weighing 9^ cwt., which had in "Lombardic" 
lettering — 

"C et G Mears Londini fecerunt 1848" 

THURNSCOE (St. Helen). Two bells. 

1. WALKER & HILTON 1 784 

ao in. dia. 

2. G WOLLY RECTOR ^*"> J MOORHOVSE . W RAINFORTH 

CHVRCH . WAR 
(lower) WALKER & HILTON 1 784 

22 in. dia. 

WATH-UPON-DEARNE (All Saints). Six bells. 

1. SOLI DEO GLORIA 1 748 

2. THOMAS EARL OF MALTON <"> DONER KNIGHT OF THE BATH 

(lower) 1742 

3. W. KAY WRIGHT C WATH TOWN GAUE ME IN 1 74 1 

4. FILI DEI MISERERE MEI 1 62 6 

5. I : D : M : F : I : R : I : I : R I T 1748 

[;B>er<g) 

(lower) i||c<3) M.:mM^& ®:im 158^ ohM 

42 in. dia. 
(Weight, 14 cwt.) 
On the frames is cut — 

"Will" Twittey Vic' 1741 John Jackson Rich^ Bingley Jos Bingley 
Tho* Smith and Godfrey Bingley Churchwardens. 
James Harrison of Barrow in Lincolnshire Bellhanger." 

« Rev, Godfrey WooUey was vicar ham in 1746, and, d^ing at Wentworth 

1772 to 1788 {Hunter, ii, 156). in 1750, was buried m York Minster. — 

« Thomas Wentworth was created Earl Hunter, ii, 91. 
of Malton in 1734, Marquis of Rockin^- 



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32 THE YORKSHIRE ARCIL^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

Briscoe, in his Curiosi/ies of the Belfiy^ says that a Mr. Tuke, of 
Wath, who died in 1810, bequeathed half a guinea to the ringers to 
ring one peal of grand bobs, which was to strike off whilst the 
testator was bdng put into his grave. 
The death-bell is rung here — 

Three times three strokes for a man. 
Three times two „ „ woman. 

Twice times three „ „ boy. 

Twice times two „ „ girl. 

WENTWORTH (Holy Trinity). Six bells. 

These were cast by Messrs. John Warner & Co., in 1863, and 
till July, 1893, hung in the tower of the old church, now used as a 
mortuary chapel only. At the latter date they were removed to the 
tower of the new church. The death-bell is rung here with — 
Nine strokes for a man. 
Seven „ „ woman. 
Five „ „ child. 

At the Survey of 1552 there were three bells here. 

WOMBWELL (St. Mary). One bell. 

T HILTON OF WATH FOUNDER 1 747 

WORSBOROUGH (St Mary). Three bells. 

1. T. HILTON OF WATH FOUNDER 1 797 

26 in. dia. 

2. R H <'*> GOD SAVE HIS CHVRCH AMEN 

(lower) :i&i <«)<'«) js><7) %m:m^%s 

28 in. dia. 

3. VOCO AD DEUM POPULUM 

(lower) W . PORTER . VICAR . F . PATRICK 

[g . TATTERSHALL . CHURCHWARDENS 180O 
(lower) T . HILTON . OF . WATH . FOUNDER 

Jarvis Rockley was the son of Robert Rockley and Mary, 
daughter of Sir W. Fairfax, of Steeton. He was born 1560, died 
1604, and is buried at Worsborough {Hunter^ ii, 286). 

Up to 1884 a muffled peal was rung every Good Friday before 
the usual three o'clock service. 

Formerly a bell rung at 6 a.m. and 8 p.m. each weekday, but 
now only the latter, and that irregularly. 
The death-bell is rung here — 

Three times three for a man. 
Three times two „ woman. 
Three single strokes „ child. 



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ST. HILDA. 

By ALEX. D. H. LEADMAN, F.S.A* 

This noble and illustrious princess, of whom every Yorkshireman and 
Yorkshirewoman may justly be proud, was bom in 614. Her saintly 
life and learning have found her a deserved place in some calendars 
of our early English Church. Her father was Hereric,* nephew of 
Edwin, first Christian King of Northumbria. Hcreric married 
Bregusuid, of whose family we know nothing. The offspring of this 
marriage was first a daughter, Heresuid, secondly a younger daughter, 
Hilda,* and thus in the veins of these sisters flowed the royal blood, 
Hilda and her sister being grand-nieces of the King. 

For some reason of policy or evil design Hereric was kept in 
confinement by Cerdic or Ceretic, the King of El mete, and there he 
ended his days by poison. It was probably to avenge Hereric's 
death that ** Edwin seized on Elmete, and expelled Ceretic its 
King."^ All this took place during Hilda's infancy, so that she 
never remembered her father's face, or knew his paternal love. 



* I have to thank my friend Rev. 
Canon Fowler, D.C.L., F.S.A., for 
translating the offices of St. Hilda, and 
for several valuable notes. 

a Bede, Book IV, ch. 23. The edition 
of Bede used is that edited by Moberly 
(Clarendon Press, 1869). 

^HUd, A.S., and Hildr, Old Norse, 
only met with in poetry, mean battle. 
It was the name of one of the Valkytias 
(choosers of the slain), who were regarded 
as the handmaids of Odin. It is rare as 
a prefix in Norse names, but frequent 
in Old High and Low German ; of men, 
Hildir, Hildibrand, Hildigrimr, Hilde- 
frith, Hildewine ; of women, Hildr, 
Hildirithr. Again it often forms the 
latter part in female names, and is often 
spelt or sounded without the aspirate, 
Ashildr, Brynhildr, Geirhildr, Grimhilldr, 
Ragnhildr. The Old Norse Guttnr, and 
A.S. Guikry appearing in .the names 
Gunnhildr and Guthmund (protection 
in battle), have the same significance 
(Qeasby and Vigfusson's Icelandic- 
English Dictionary s. v. Hildr and Gttnnr^ 
and index to Cartularium Saxofiicum). 

VOL. XVIL 



Although the name Hilda rarely occurs 
in English place-names, as Hinderwell, 
near Whitby, and Hilde kelde (Hilda's 
spring), in Guisborough, now lost, it, or 
the masculine form Hildir, is far from 
uncommon in Norse-speaking countries. 
Kok in Del Danske -Folkesprog (ii, 
177) gives many instances, as Ilillerup, 
Hillestrup, Hillestorpe, = Hilda's thorpe ; 
Hyllested, Hillested, = Hilda's stead or 
place ; Hillebo, Hilda's house ; Hillersley 
=» Hilda's heritage — all in Denmark; 
Hillersjo, formerly Hildishogh, Hilda's 
houe, in Sweden ; and Hildarheimr, now 
Hildrum, Hilda's home, in Norway. 
Hilda is a Latinised form of Hild, 
which means "battle.*' To call a girl 
battle seems strange, but does not alter 
the fact. To give such names to girls 
was a favourite habit of the Anglo- 
Saxons (Rev. W. W. Skeat, Notes and 
Queries, 8th S. VIII, 72). Also among 
other northern nations to bestow on their 
children the names of their favourite idols 
was a very old custom (as seen from both 
sacred and profane history). 

* Bede, I V, 23. Nennius (Monumenta 
ffistorica Britannica), p. 76. 



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34 THE YORKSfflRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

Dr. Young hints that the following incident occurred during 
Bregusuid's pregnancy, and that Hilda was a posthumous^ child. It 
seems unnecessary to maintain either one or the other of these 
suppositions, for the dream would apply in any case. The story, as 
told by Bede, is that whilst her husband was absent Bregusuid had a 
remarkable dream. She was wandering about in quest of him, but 
disappointment awaited her on every side, "she was seeking for him 
most carefully, and could find no sign of him anywhere ; but after 
having used all her industry to seek him, she found a most precious 
necklace set with jewels under her garment, which, whilst she was 
looking on it very attentively, cast Such a light as to spread itself 
through all Britain."^ 

Applying the moral of the dream to her daughter Hilda, the 
latter became the hope of her life, the star of the night of that dark 
widowhood which she was so cruelly destined to bear. Nor was she 
disappointed. 

When Edwin was placed on the throne of Northumbria in 6i6* 
Hilda was two years old, yet how she spent her time for some ten 
years we know not, but in all probability she was brought up amid 
the worship of the gods of her forefathers, Thor and Woden, idols of 
wood and stone. Next we hear of her as a girl of thirteen, at the 
royal court of Edwin, perhaps soon after that mysterious visit to 
Edwin, whose misfortunes had well-nigh crushed* his spirit, when 
Paulinus came* about 625, and had that memorable conversation 
with him in which he offered him a safer place of retreat than any 
other friend could. 

"Who comes with functions apostolical ? 
Mark him of shoulders curved and tall. 
Black hair and vivid eye and meagre cheek. 
His prominent feature like an eagle's beak, — 
A man whose stature does at once appal. 
And strike with reverence."* 

Such is the picture a Christian poet has painted of Paulinus, and 
there is no doubt that Hilda would often hear the voice of this great 
missionary of the North, of "tall stature, stooping form, black hair, and 
meagre visage, with thin, hooked nose, yet of venerable and majestic 
aspect."* It was from his lips that Hilda heard of Jesus Christ, of a 
future life, a heavenly kingdom, a crown of glory. Along with King 

1 Dr. Yonng's/Zis/aryo/ mi/fy(iSn), •* Be^/e, Book II, ch. 12. 

Vol. I, p. 133- » Wordsworth's Ecclesiastical Sonnets^ 

a Bede, Book IV, ch. 23. XV. 

3 Angh-Saxm ChronicU says 617. « Bede, Book II, ch. 16. 



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ST. HILDA. 85 

Edwin and the rest of the court at York, at that joyful Eastertide, 
1 2th April, 627,* Hilda received the Sacrament of Baptism, and from 
that hour a benign light was sprung, which, in future years, was to 
shed its rays over all Northumbria, for Bede says she had "embraced 
the faith and mysteries of Christ, at the preaching of Paulinus of 
blessed memory, the first bishop of the Northumbrians."* 

Her sister, Heresuid, had married iEthelric, and was left a widow 
sometime before 647. They had a son, Aldwulf, who was King of 
the East Anglians, and died in 713.' 

Between 627 and 633 it may be presumed that Hilda lived at 
the court of her royal grand-uncle. During that year Edwin was 
killed in battle at Heathfield, supposed to be Hatfield, near 
Doncaster, on October 12th,* 633, the cause of Christianity in the 
North was temporarily overthrown, Paulinus with the widowed Queen 
Ethelburga sailed to Kent,* all which events were a great shock to 
Hilda. Yet amid all the general apostacy she kept her faith, did not 
fly with the rest, or renounce her faith, but quietly retired into her 
nephew's kingdom, East Anglia, hoping that some chance would allow 
her to get to the monastery of Chelles, in France, a house distant 
some ten miles from Paris, where her widowed sister Heresuid was 
patiently "waiting for her everlasting crown."* 

She passed a year at Aldwulfs court preparing for this change, 
but it was not destined to take place. She then seems to have gone 
back to Northumbria, where Bishop Aidan, who had returned from a 
long journey, heard of her intentions, and, forming a life-long and 
mutual friendship, persuaded her to assume the religious life.^ 

She may have listened to ministrations of that good man, James 
the Deacon, who preached in Yorkshire.® 

She was 33 years old when she assumed the veil and, called home 
by Aidan, she received a hide of land, a place for one family, on the 
north bank of the river Wear, where Monkwearmouth* now stands. 
Here, with a few females as companions, she remained in seclusion 

* Ibid.^ ch, 14. According to Nennius ® Ibid,^ Book IV, ch. 23. **A passage 
(pp. 75, 76) 12,000 were baptised at the in Venerable Bede's History has been 
same time as King Edwin. The Britons supposed to refer to this place (Monk- 
called Paulinus Rum map Urbgen» and wearmouth), and to affora the earliest 
tried to make out he was of British glimpse of its history. He tells us that 
origin [Nennius^ pp. 75, 76). St. Hilda, after remaining a whole year 

* Bcde, Book IV, ch. 23. in East Anglia, and intending all the 
^ Ibid., Book IV, ch. 23. Yorkshire while to leave her own land and become 

Archaological Journal^ III, 353. a nun in the monastery of Chelles, at 

^ Bedey Book II, ch. ao. the end of that time was recalled to her 

* Ibid.y Book II, ch. 2a native North by Bishop Aidan, * who gave 
*Ibid,i Book IV, ch. 23. Chelles is her the land of one nimily in the north 

called Cale in the original. district of the Wear {ad septentrionalem 

■^ Ibid.y Book IV, ch. 23. plagam Wirt fluminis)^ where for a year 

^ Ilnd,y Book II, ch. 20 she led a monastic life, with very few 



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86 



THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 



for one year. Then she removed to Heruteu, or "The Island of the 
Hart,"' at the mouth of the Tees, a place then almost surrounded by 
the sea, but now the modern Hartlepool. Here, that servant of 
Christ, Heiu,' presided over a nunnery, but shortly left for a 
similar post at Tadcaster,' whereupon Hilda became abbess of 
Heruteu about 650. Her rule over the house of Heruteu* was 
marked by the introduction of a regular system, in which she had 
been instructed by the very many learned men with whom she had 
met. Bishop Aidan and many other divines admired her innate 
wisdom and "devotion to God. But an important event was soon 
to bring Hilda's life into prominence. A few years rolled by. 
In 655, on Sunday, 15th November, Penda," the heathen King of 
Mercia, was laid low on the field of Winwoed, the cause of Thor and 
Woden was lost for ever; and the victorious Oswy, King of 
Northumbria, made a vow that if the " triumph of Christ prevailed " 



associates.' An entirely apocryphal Z^ 
of St, Bega confounds that Saint with St. 
Heieu (Hartlepool), and makes her the 
founder of a religious house on the north 
side of the Wear. This, however, we may 
dismiss as purely mythical. But that St. 
Hilda, before her removal to Hartlepool, 
spent a year in some kind of monastic 
establishment in the 'north district' of 
the Wear there can be no reasonable 
doubt, though there is not a particle of 
evidence to identify the site of that house 
with that of the later foundation of 
Benedict Biscop. An annotator of 
Leland (Collectanea ^ iv, 39) remarks that 
* there is an humble church between the 
mouths of the Tyne and Wear, dedicated 
to the Blessed Hilda, and farther [hngtus) 
distant from the Wear than the Tyne. 
It is situated on a certain point vulgarly 
called Sowter [Souter Point]. Probably 
here was formerly the little monastery of 
Bega. ' No church, we have strong reason for 
believing, ever existed near Souter Point, 
and the only church dedicated to St. 
Hilda between the Tyne and the Wear 
is that of South Shields, for many centuries 
a chapelry to the mother church of Jarrow. 
The dedication can scarcely be accounted 
for, except on the assumption that the site 
of this church is in some way connected 
with the home occupied by St. Hilda, 
before her removal to Hartlepool. It is 
also worthy of remark that the town of 
Shields was long best known as *St. 
Hild*s.' There is great probability in the 
suggestion made by Mr. Surtees that the 
church of South Shields is not perhaps 
without some claim to be considered as 
the 'humble church' of St. Hilde, which 



sUndeth nearer to the Tyne than to the 
Wear" (J. A. Boyle's Guide to the County 
of Durham), "Accepit locum unius 
familis ad septentrionalem plagam Viuri 
flumen," translated in the Anglo-Saxon 
version (Early English Text Society, 
1880, p. 236), *'Tha onfeng heo anes 
heoscipes stowe to north daele Wiire 
thsere ea." In the Metrical Life of St. 
Cuthbert (Surtees Society, LXXXVII), 
p. 34, the following account of the 
chapel is given : — 

»* We rede, 
Be tellyng of Saint Bede, 
How some tyme was a monastery 
That eftir was a nonry, 
Bot a litil fra Tynemouth'. 
That mynster in to the south'; 
Whare Saint Hilde chapell' standes no we, 
Thar it stode tyme trewe/' 

1 Ibid. 

^ Ibid., Book IV, ch. 23. The first 
Northumbrian lady who had been conse- 
crated to a religious life by Bishop Aidan. 
It must be noted that Bede never describes 
Hilda as a virp^in, but speaks of her as 
"noble by birth," and "living most 
nobly in the secular habit." When she 
retired to monastic life he writes of 
her as "a woman devoted to God," 
and *'a most religious servant of Christ." 
In the Office of St. Hilda she is called 
**a virgin but not a martyr." (See 
Appendix.) 

3 Bede (Book IV, ch. 23) calls the place 
Kaelcacaestir. 

* Heortea or Hereteu. Bede^ Book III, 
ch. 24. 

^ Bede^ Book III, ch. 24. Anglo- 
Saxon Chronicle y sub anno 655. 



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ST. HILDA. 



37 



he would consecrate his daughter AelHeda (then scarce a year old) to 
the service of God, and in addition grant lands to build and endow 
monasteries. This amounted to twelve portions, each consisting of 
twelve hides of land.* 

Shortly after this battle little Aelfleda, scarce a year old, was put 
under the care of Hilda,* who two years later (657) removed with 
her royal pupil and ten nuns to a place called Streoneshalc, a cliff 
on the coast of Yorkshire, near where the Esk joins the sea, where 
she had obtained possession of ten hides of land.' "The bay of the 
Light-house," Bede calls it* "The Hall of Streona," say others; and 
the "Dunum Sinus" of Ptolemy.' 

None of these names are at all satisfactory. Streon or Streona 
may be a personal name, but as to the affix no solution has yet been 
arrived at' Here two or more portions of land were granted to 
Hilda, and here under her own superintendence arose a monastery 
with its various offices, built of wood — split trees — moss, rushes, or 
straw to fill up the crevices, and sand for the floor/ Such would be 
the first church — the houses of residence and the offices very little 
better.' Neither did it occupy the site of the present well-known 
ruins, but was built on a level space,* girt in for many hundred yards 
by precipitous cliffs, called "Almary Field," below which is the great 
"Kitchen-midden," which fixes the site of the domestic offices.^® In 



a Ibid, 

' Ibid. ' * Comporata possessione decern 
familiarum in loco qui dicitur Streanaes- 
halch, ibi monasterium construxit," or 
as it is in the Anglo-Saxon version, 

"Seo gebonte tyn hyda lond 

hire in aehte in thsere stowe, seo is 
cweden Streoneshealh, thxr heo mynster 
getimbrode " (Bede*s EccUnastical His- 
tory, E.E.T.S., p. 236). 

* Ibid., Book III, ch. 25. 

^ Dunsley Bay is three miles northward. 

• The nearest approach to the meaning 
is from beu^h or naugh — a crag — a glen 
with steep sides. The name is variously 
written Streoneshalch, Streaneshale, 
Str?enaeshale, or Streneshalh. Streone 
may be a nick-name, or, as Freeman 
sajrs, a surname, " Edric Streone," or, 
as found in the LMfer Vita, a prefix 
Streonberct. The late Rev. Canon 
Atkinson, in his Handbook for Ancient 
Whitby and its Abbey (London and 
Wliitl^, 1882), in a footnote on p. 24, 
says, *'Thus Streones-healh, or Stre6nes- 
heal, or Streones-halch (equivalent terms), 
would literally mean the cave or hollow 
of strength." 

' Whitby Chartulary, Vol. I, p. xvii. 



« Ibid. 

• Ibid. , Vol. I, p. XV. " In loco qui 
olim Streoneshalc vocabatur, deinde 
Prestebi appellabatur. nunc vero Witebi 
vocatur" (Ibid., Vol. I, p. i). 

'^^ Ibid., Vol. I, p. XV. On the south 
side of the Abbey a slope leads to the 
edge of the cliff, and here was an exten- 
sive "kitchen Midden." Diggings have 
revealed birds' bones, oyster, whelk, and 
periwinkle shells, bones and skulls of 
oxen, sheep, goats, and tusks of wild 
swine, etc., etc. In 1867 a bone comb 
was found, imperfect, but bearing part of 
a runic inscription quite distinct, read and 
completed thus : — (go)d usmte us. (;od 
aluwaludo helipee cun (nises ussaes). God 
bless us. God Almighty help our kin 
(Stephens' Runic Monuments, Part III, 
p. 180). This very comb may have been 
used by St. Hilda ! Also a leaden bulla 

with the words ^fil' ^^,^'"^ which was 
PATH niAc 

possibly once attached to a document 
brought to England by Wilfrid (Canon 
J. T. Fowler). Both the above I believe 
are in the Museum at Whitby. An illus- 
tration of the comb is given in the 
Yorkshire Archaological Journal, II, 279. 



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38 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL JOURNAL' 

657, Hilda commenced her residence at Streoneshalc, whence the eye 
stretches far and wide over the German Ocean, and where its waves 
wash the very foot of the rock itself. 

Her new home, now dedicated and consecrated to Him whom 
she so devoutly loved, soon became a most attractive centre, and its 
fame spread wide abroad. Learning and piety combined with strict 
discipline were in every way encouraged, for, as was the case elsewhere 
at this early date, this was a double foundation, that is of monks as 
well as nuns, both presided over by the abbess. Kings came to seek 
her advice ; her counsel was listened to by both bishops and priests.* 
"This holy abbess," says Alban Butler, "who was eminent in all 
virtues, excelled particularly in prudence, and had a singular talent in 
reconciling differences, and in maintaining concord, being herself 
endowed with the spirit of charity, meekness, and peace."* She was 
ready to listen to all, whether rich or poor, high or low, to none did 
she turn a deaf ear, and winning souls for Christ seems ever to have 
been her highest desire. Truly she was the Deborah of the North.' 
So holy was her life and conversation, so kind was she in her 
manner to the people around her, that out of pure affection they 
gave her the sweet name of "Mother."* 

In 663' an important Council took place at Streoneshalc. The 
King met the bishops and priests of his realm to discuss and 
determine the proper time to observe Easter. It must have been an 
impressive scene — Colman, Bishop of Lindisfarne; Agilbert, Bishop of 
the West Saxons ; the priests Agatho, Wilfrid, James, Romanus, some 
Scottish clergy and others were present Hilda held the same 
opinions as Colman and the Scots, but when the arguments of Wilfrid 
prevailed, and decision was given in his favour, she at once fell in 
with the views of the Roman majority. 

From Streoneshalch came men of erudition, filled with true 
religion, men destined to hold high offices in the English Church, 
and to assist in shaping its policy. From amongst its inmates 
Wilfrid and Bosa were consecrated to fill the see of York. The 
sainted John of Beverley went to Hexham, and thence was translated 
to York, Aetla or Heada to Dorchester, and afterwards to 
Winchester, Oftfor to Worcester, and Tadfrid, a man of great 
ability, was bishop-elect of Worcester, but a sudden and fetal sickness 
overtook him ere he could be consecrated.' 



1 Bede, Book IV, ch. 25 * Bede, Book IV, ch. 23. 

' ^^""vnf ^yT .^«f ' ^'''' "-^ '^ ' ^^'^M Book IV, ch. 25. 

im/s, Vol. XI, p. 327. * ' -^ 

8 Green's History, I, 26. « Ibid, 



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ST. HILDA. 39 

At Streoneshalch arose the first outburst of English song, when 
Caedmon, the cowherd, saw his wondrous vision and received that 
inspiration from above which caused him to sing verses to the praise 
of God — "the beginning of created things; the fall and redemption 
of man, death, heaven, hell, the day of judgment, and the final 
consummation of all things/' It was to Hilda he first took his 
poetry, and she, at once recognising the precious gift, bade him enter 
the monastic life/ 

About the year 674 Hilda contracted an illness from which she 
never fully recovered ; " falling into a fever, she fell into a violent 
heat and was afflicted with the same for six years continuously," 
says Bede. Yet she would allow no suffering to interfere with her 
religious duties, and was "ever admonishing people to serve God in 
health, and always to return thanks to Him in adversity or bodily 
infirmity." She had founded several small cells, or convents, in 
connection with Streoneshalch, and the last year of her life she had 
one built at Hacanos, now Hackness.^ 

But the closing scene was not far off. "In the seventh year of 
her sickness," writes the Venerable Bede, " her distemper turning 
inwards," about early dawn on Saturday, the 17th of November, 680, 
after thirty-three years of monastic life, at the age of sixty-six, 
"having received the Holy Communion to further her on her way," 
she called together the inmates of her house, and bidding them to 
be at evangelical peace amongst themselves and with all others, she 
gently breathed her last— "in the words of our Ix)rd," says Bede, 
"passed from death to life," leaving behind her weeping eyes and 
sorrowing hearts, who spent the now dreary hours in prayer and 
vigil until the daybreak appeared.' 

A beautiful legend is related about Hilda's death. At Hackness 
a nun called Begu* had a dream, in which she heard the sound of a 

^ Jbid., Book IV, ch. 24. {Ibid,, p. 536), Neva I agenda Angliat, 

ofu--* -1 r Txn.'.u T *u sotnc MS. Calendars and the Gallican 

« Thirteen miles from Whitby In the ^artyrologies all give Nov. 17 (see also 

««t end of the south aisle of Hackness j^^^/ ^ ^^ j/ ^ j„j^„ ^il^^ ^^^ 

Church IS an ancient inscribed cross, ^ victim to rheumatic fever, with its oft 

believed to have been erected to the ^ ^^nt sequel of heart disease and 

memory of St. Hilda. ^^^^ We learn in the life of St. 

' Bede gives the date of her death, Cuthbert that her successor was so 

Book IV, ch. 23, and Book V, ch. crippled that she had to go on all fours, 

24, the Anglo-Saxon Ckromck until healed by the miraculous girdle of St. 

(sub anno), and Ethelwerd's Chronicle Cuthbert. 

(Monumenta Historua RrUannica, p. * The place in Cumberland called St. 

678) only the year. Florence of Worcester Bees is named after this saint. 



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40 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

passing^ bell, and saw the top of the room open, and a strong light 
shining from above. Looking intently she saw the soul of Hilda 
being transported to heaven by angels. This awoke her, when she 
discovered that all the other sisters were still asleep. The impression 
made upon her by the dream' was so great that she got up and 
hurried to Frigyd, who presided over Hackness, told her the dream 
amid sighs and tears, and said that the abbess Hilda, the mother of 
them all, had departed this life. Frigyd awoke all the inmates, and 
the rest of the night was spent in the church praying and singing 
psalms for Hilda's soul. 

With the advent of morning some brethren from Streoneshalch 
arrived at Hackness with the sad tidings.' They buried her in the 
abbey she loved so much,* but her influence lived long after her, and 
for many years Streoneshalch was famous as a seat of learning and a 
school of theology." 

She was succeeded by her royal pupil, Aelfleda, now a woman of six 

. and twenty summers," who for several years had the benefit of her own 

mother's advice and support, and also the counsel of the wise and 

pious Bishop Trumwine, who had taken refuge at Streoneshalch, 

when driven from his own district by the Picts and Scots.^ 

She followed in the steps of her instructress and predecessor, the 
saintly St. Hilda. More than once she was sought out for the sake 
of her counsel by St. Cuthbert, and we know that Archbishop 
Theodore addressed to her a letter on important ecclesiastical affairs, 
and on other occasions she seems to have been held in high 
honour. An early writer, Eddius, refers to her as the Abbess Aelfled, 
ever the comforter and best counsellor of the whole province. Beda, 
in referring to her death (which must have taken place about the 
year 715), when she was fifty-nine years of age, says: "In that same 
monastery she, and her father Oswi, her mother Eanfled, her mother's 
father Edwin, and many other noble personages were buried in the 
Church of the Blessed Apostle Peter."® 

After her death a complete blank occurs in the history of this 
far-famed monastery, which has been justly styled "The Craiile of 
Christianity in Yorkshire." 

^ This is the earliest allusion on record that people should thus dream when 

to a "Passing Bell." "Audivit subito expecting a death, apart from a miracle, 
in aere notum campanse sonum, quo ad ^ Bei/Cy Book IV, ch. 23. 

orationes excitari vel convocari solebant, * Bede makes no mention of her burial 

cumquiscorumdesseculofuissetevocatus** at Streoneshalch, but it may be naturally 

{Bedty Book IV, ch. 23). assumed. 

a A ... , A. . ^ ^^^ Boo^ IV, ch. 23. 

a A similar dream occurred to a nun at « /^,v/., Book IV, ch. 26. 

Streoneshalch \Ibtd.), The same is related 7 /^,-^ 

of many others, e.g. St. Cuthbert seeing a 7^;/!, Book III, ch. 24. Yorkshire 

St. Aldan's soul. It was likely enough Archaologkal Journal, III, 358. 



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ST. HILDA. 41 

Over 1,200 years have gone by since Hilda died, yet the popular 
veneration for her memory lingers yet, while the abbey which bore 
the dedication to St. Peter, and at a later period to St. Peter and 
St Hilda,^ is at the present day far better known as St. Hilda's. 

She was canonised, and the day marked in the calendar for the 
observance of her festival is August 25th.' No miracles are recorded 
concerning her, but a popular superstition of later date says that 
Whitby was once infested by snakes, which were changed into stone 
by the saint's prayers, and even sea-fowl dropt their wings whilst 
flying over the ground where the remains of the abbey stand. 

"They told how in their convent cell 
A Saxon princess once did dwell, 

The lovely Edelfled : 
And how of a thousand snakes, each one 
Was changed into a coil of stone. 

When holy Hilda prayed ; 
Themselves, within their holy bound, 
Their stony folds had often found. 
They told how sea-fowls' pinions fail. 
As over Whitby's towers they sail, 
And sinking down with flutterings faint, 
They do their homage to their saint."' 

Of the many old legends that are worth preserving that of the 
snakes is one. 

Leland, in Henry Vlllth's time, found a note of it in one of the 
old registers at Whitby, but his reference is insufficient to identify 
the passage, and to indicate its date. The passage translated runs 

^ ''MonasteriuminhonoreSancti Petri as all saints were in those days, by the 

Apostoli et Sanctae Hildae Abbatissae" voice of the local church. 

{H^Ai/dj^CAar/ulafy,l, i). So RiponfiTsl .„ ^ . . ., 

Peter, then Peter and Wilfrid, lastly ' Martnion, Canto II, xhi. A similar 

Wilfrid. legend is related of St. Keyna, a Cornish 

« St. Hilda occurs in the York Calendars Saint, of St. Keyne, near Liskeard, ' * who, 

under VIII Kal. Sept. (Aug. 25), "S. ^o'^'* >" Brecknock, when grown up 

Hild«, vii^inis non martyris, III, led." determined to live a life of prayer, and 

VorJk Breviary (Surtees Society, Vol. 71), migrated thither and begged of the prince 

I; Breviary I, Calendar after p. 726 (10). that she might dwell in a woody glade. 

Not in Sarum, Hereford, or Roman He assured her that neither man nor 

Calendars. In Gallican Martyrologies beast could hve there on account of its 

on Nov. 17, and in a Durham Missal, swarming with serpents. She replied 

**ad altare S. Jokannis Baptists et that if allowed to live there she would rid 

Afargareta ad IX altaria in eccL catk. »t of the noxious reptiles, and when she 

Dutulm. (Harleian MS., 5289) on Nov. Played they were turned into stone. 

17. Also styled "Virgin and Abbess" in And to this day the stones in that region 

Harleian, Nos. 1804, 4664, both Durham do resemble the form of a serpent, as 

Calendars, as* 'Virgin "simply. (See also though sculptured by a stonecutter, 

Note 3, p. 39.) There were no formal can- through the fields and villages" (Nov, 

onizatioDS so early. She was canonized, ^' ^"g"> H» '03)* 



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42 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

thus : " It is a wonderful thing to see the Serpents at Streoneshalch 
twisted into circles, and by the mercy of heaven, or as the monks 
relate by the prayers of St. Hilda, converted into stone." Burton, 
writing in the middle of the last century, in his Monasticon 
Eboracenscy puts the matter thus: "The monastery over which Hilda 
was set was at that time greatly infested by serpents, who lurked in 
the shrogs and bushes about it, to the great terror of her and her 
nuns. Upon which she prayed to God that He would cause them 
to crawl down the cliff, and be converted into those stones found on 
this coast, and called to this day by the country people, from this 
supposed miracle, St. Hilda's Stones, having the appearance of 
serpents or snakes rolled up or in their coil." 

It is perhaps needless to say that the numerous fossils with 
which the lias clay at Whitby is so rich, are not the remains of 
snakes, but they are the remains of the shell of an extinct mollusc 
very closely allied in some respects to the nautilus — which- is also 
found in a fossil state, but which has survived and is still living. 
There are a very large number and great variety of fossil 
ammonites, as this mollusc is called, and it is quite clear from the 
remains which have been found that it belongs to the class named 
Cephalopoda, to which class the cuttlefish belongs, though it has no 
external shell. When the Liassic seas were gradually depositing the 
great masses of clays these animals must have been very abundant, 
for over a hundred and twenty different species have been described 
from these Liassic beds alone. From later strata, up to the 
time of the end of the great chalk deposits, some two or 
three hundred more species may be reckoned. When the tide 
goes out it washes away the clay and the shells may be 
easily picked out, for from the fact that the iron which is present 
in the clay having chemically taken the place of the animal, they are 
rendered very hard. In size they are generally only two or three 
inches across, still those of four or five inches are not uncommon, 
and sometimes they are found a foot or so across, and with the 
brilliant metallic lustre which the iron has given to them, it is no 
wonder that they were mistaken for snakes. The legend of St. Hilda 
would soon follow. 

Sea-fowl too, after travelling the ocean for long distances, would, 
out of sheer fatigue, rest on the abbey walls. 

Charlton, the historian of Whitby, writing in 1776, says: "I shall 
produce only one instance more of the great veneration paid to the 
Lady Hilda which still prevails even in these our days, and that is 
the constant opinion that she rendered and still renders herself 
visible on some occasions in the Abbey of Streonshalch, where she so 



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Seal ok Whitby Abbby. 



SEAUb OK nib CoKt'UKAriO.S OF IlAKTUKroOL. 



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ST. HILDA. 43 

long resided. At a particular time of the year, namely in the 
summer months, at ten or eleven in the forenoon, the sunbeams fall 
in the inside of the northern part of the choir ; and *tis there that 
spectators who stand at the west side of Whitby Churchyard so as 
just to see the most northerly part of the Abbey, past the north of 
Whitby Church, imagine they perceive in one of the highest windows 
there the resemblance of a woman arrayed in a shroud. Though we 
are certain this is only a reflection, caused by the splendour of the 
sun's beams, yet report says and it is constantly believed among the 
vulgar to be an appearance of Lady Hilda in her shroud, or rather 
in her glorified state."^ 

The seal of Whitby Abbey has on one side St. Peter under a 
church, with a key in his left hand, his right hand raised in 
benediction. The legend runs :— SIGILL. SCI: PETRI ET SCE : 
HILDE : DE WYTEBY : MONAS. On the reverse is a figure of 
St. Hilda, her left hand on her breast, her right hand holding a 
crosier, and this legend :— YMAGO VIRGINIS HYLDE.> 

St. Hilda holds an important place in the Corporation Seals of 
Hartlepool. One seal has her full-face figure standing under a 
pinnacled canopy, holding a crosier in her right hand and a book in 
her left. On either side is a vested priest, facing inwards with 
uplifted hands, standing before an altar on which is a chalice. 
Above the head of each priest is a sacred dove holding the Sacred 
Host in its mouth. Above the right-hand figure is a six-pointed 
star, above the left-hand figure a quarter moon. The legend is : — 
SUBVENIAT . FAMUL(IS) . NOBIL(IS) . HILDA . SUIS. 
"Let noble Hilda help her servants." In another seal there is a 
triple-pinnacled canopy. Hilda occupies the centre, a book in her 
right hand, while the left grasps a crosier. On either side there is a 
bishop fully vested, facing front, each with a crosier in the left hand, 
the right hand raised giving the blessing — all stand on a couching 
hart, probably intended as a punning allusion to the name of 
the town. The legend is :— -S . OFFICII ; . MAJORIS . DE . 
HERTILPOL. "Official Seal of the Mayor of Hartlepool."' 

1 No matter in what form these local ^ Beautiful impressions of the Corpora- 
legends have come down to us they are tion Seals of Hartlepool were kindly sent 
always worth preserving. to me by the Town Clerk, from which 

"This seal was discovered at York, these blocks are reproduced. In the 

affixed to a lease granted by Henry Davel, British Museum is a sulphur cast 

the last Abbot of Whitby, January loth, (No. 4328) from a fine impression of a 

153S* It was probably made in the time thirteenth century seal of Whitby Abbey, 

of Abbot Richard H, e.g, Richard de with the same legend. It is two inches 

Waterville, 1177-90. Peter's face and in diameter. St. Hilda the abbess, 

some other parts are much damaged standing on a bracket, in the ri^ht hand 

(Young's Whitby y Vol, II, Appendix iii, a crozier, curved outwards, and in the 

P- 936)' left a book, between two altars, on each 



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44 



THE YORKSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 



After her death' many churches were named in honour of St 
Hilda. At HinderwelF a well in the churchyard is dedicated to her, 
as also is the church. At Egton a church was consecrated in 
honour of her by the Bishop of Damascus (acting for the Archbishop 
of York), on the 13th June, 1349." Hartlepool,' South Shields, 
Danby-in-Cleveland, the chapel below Kildale Park,* Thorpe-on-Tees, 
Bilsdale, EUerburne, Ampleforth, Sherburn, near Scarborough, and 
recently Middlesbrough, and Knowstrop, near Leeds, are all dedicated 
to her,' whilst Hackness is dedicated to St. Mary and St. Hilda, and 
many others. 

The abbey which Hilda erected was destroyed by the Danes 
under Ingwa and Ubba, sons of Radnor Lodbrog, or Rough 
Breeches, in 866 or 867," when Titus, the then abbot, fled, as was 
contended, with the relics of St. Hilda to Glastonbury.' It lay a 



of them a chalice, and before each a 
priest, standing on a bracket, lifting up 
the hands to consecrate the mass. Over 
the head of each priest a bird flying with 
a wafer in its beak. Above these, in the 
field, a crescent on the right, and a star 
of six points on the left ; all beneath an 
arched, churchlike canopy, with a cross 
on each gable, supported on two slender 
columns. 

* More properly Hilderwell. 

» Graves^ History of Cleveland^ p. 283, 
quoting Torres AfSS. This must have been 
are-dedication, as it appears from the Papal 
Letters (I, 537) that a relaxation of one 
year and forty days of enjoined penance 
was granted in 1291 to penitents visiting 
the church of St. Hilda of Egeton on the 
four feasts of the Blessed Virgin, on that 
of St. Hilda, and in their octaves. 

^ In July, 1833, while excavating in 
•'Cross Close," about 135 yards S.E. of 
the present church of St. Hilda, the 
workmen came upon the ancient ceme- 
tery. Many skeletons were found with 
their heads resting on small flat stones, as 
on pillows, and over those other stones 
marked with crosses and inscriptions, in 
Runes and Romanesque letters. Two 
have the Greek letters A O. Many were 
dispersed and lost at the time, but some 
are now in existence, t^g. one in the 
Durham Cathedral Library (see ^^ Notes on 
the History of S. Begu and S. Hild, and 
on some relics of antiquity discovered on 
the sites of the religious establishments 
founded by them. Hartlepool ; printed 
by J. Proctor, High Street,'* n.d.). That 
account is illustrated by nine woodcuts 
representing Hartlepool stones, with their 
inscriptions, viz. r(eqviesc(i)t .... (lo)co 
. . . ? (fragment) A O Hildithryth ; Hild- 



digyth ; Kdiluini ; Ora pro Uermund & 
Torhtsuid ; Orate pro Ediluini ; Orate pro 
Uermund et Torhtsuid ; A O Bcrchtg)*d ; 
Kanegneub ; (Ora)te p(ro) Bregusv .... 
guguid. This last the writer (D. H. 
Haigh) thought to be the memorial of 
Breguswid, the mother of St. H ilda. The 
latter part may be a portion of another 
name. There are also notices of 
memorials at Healaugh and at Hackness. 
Some of the names are found in the 
Epistles of St. Boniface addressed to 
Anglo-Saxon nuns (see Yorkshire Archao- 
logical Journal^ Vol. IH, p. 349, et seq.). 

* Guisborough Char tula fy (Surtees 
Society), II, 389. 

^ lAwton's Dioctsis Ehcracensis (Lon- 
don, 1842), and other sources. 

• Anglo-Saxon Chronicle ^ sub annis 
866, 867 

^ An annotator of Leland ( Collectanea^ 
XV, 39) states that Abbot Titus fled 
to Glastonbury with the relics of St. 
Hilda. In a pedigree of the Percy family, 
printed in the Whitby Chartulary (Surtees 
Society, II, 689), William Percy, the first 
abbot of that house (about 1 109), is alleged 
to have acquired by a miracle from 
Glastonbury the head, arm, and two 
thighs of the Blessed Virgin Hilda. 
Bishop Stubbs, in his introduction to the 
Memorials of St, Dunstan (Rolls Series, 
p. cxvi), speaking of the alleged removal 
of St. Dunstan's bones to Glastonbury, 
and showing that the legend was for the 
glorification of that house, proceeds : — 
"King Edmund (941-946) was believed 
to have removed from the north to 
Glastonbury the bones of Aidan, Ceolfrid, 
and Hilda, and these Saints had special 
commemorations at Glastonbury so early 
that the invention of the story cannot 



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ST. HILDA. 



45 



heap of ruins for more than two hundred years,^ when Reinfrid, 
1074, with some willing associates, restored the desecrated monastery." 
A noble building was raised, and the house continued to flourish in 
great wealth and splendour until the Dissolution, when it was stripped 
of everything valuable and movable, unroofed, leaving nothing but 
naked walls, a skeleton of its former grandeur, to battle with those 
certain causes of decay — Time and the elements. 

The existing building has been erected at several periods, but for 
the most part is Early English in style (middle 13th century). It is 
built of inferior sandstone, so it is no wonder that : — 

"The wasting sea-breeze keen 
Has worn the pillars carving quaint. 
And mouldered in his niche the saint."' 

The great tower fell on 25th June, 1830.* The frontispiece 
shows the ruins as they were in 18 15. 

"They dreamt not of a perishable home who thus could build." 
Little did the men who raised that and other splendid churches, 
sparing no pains to beautify the House of God, little did they think 
that a time would come when the words they so often chanted in 
their service would be literally fulfilled : — " Thine adversaries roar in 
the midst of Thy congregations, and set up their banners for tokens. 

But now they break down all the carved work thereof with 

axes and hammers. They have set fire upon Thy holy places, and 
have defiled the dwelling-place of Thy Name, even unto the ground."* 



pr( 

Wi 



fairly be ascribed to William of Malmes- 
bury. Edward and Odo were believed to 
have carried off the body of St. Wilfrid 
from Ripon to Canterbury. These were 
cases in which the bodies of the Saints 
were removed to save them from the 
Tofane hand of ihe Norsemen." See also 

illiam of Malmesbury's Gista Regum^ 
I, 56, 60, and Gesia Pontificum, 198, 
both in the Rolls Series. 

* From about 867 or 870 to 1074. 

^ Reinfrid, " miles strenuissimus in 
obsequio domini sui Willelmi Nothi 
Regis," eventually became a mouk of 
Evesham, and coming into favour of 
William de Percy he was granted "the 
ancient monastery of S. Peter the Apostle, 
together with two carucates of land in 
Prestebi in frankalmoign. At that time 
there were as ancient countrymen have 
delivered to us about forty cells or ora- 
tories, but roofless and in ruins, only the 
disused and shelterless altars remained." 
These cells or oratories were probably 
very similar to the early Christian 
buildings still remaining in Ireland, as 



Scelig Mhichil, St. Michael's Rock, off the 
Kerry coast, and the Seven Churches at 
Glendalough, County Wicklow. One of 
the best examples is on the Brough of 
Deerness, in tne Orkneys, where there 
are the remains of a small church, 
surrounded by eighteen cells, all enclosed 
by a stone wall. See the plan in 
Anderson's Scotland in Early Christian 
Times t p. 102. Reinfrid became the 
first abbott, and in 1178 was joined 
by Stephen, who afterwards became 
abbot of St. Mary's, York {l^hitby 
Chartulary^ I, i). The above shows that 
the earlier monastery had grown to 
extensive proportions, and had been a 
stone structure with massive, strong, and 
well-built walls, of which considerable 
remains were still standing in 1078 (Ibid.^ 
Preface, p. xxvi). Many of the stones, 
perhaps all, would l^e used for the present 
building, thus preserving its continuity. 

^ Phillips* Rivers^ Mountains^ and Sea- 
coast of Yorkshire, 

* Newspaper Records. 

« Fsaim btxiv, 5, 7, 8. 



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46 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

It is easy to picture their deep sorrow had they lived to see the 
sad scene of desolation. 

"The sacred tapers' lights are gone, 
Grey moss has clad the altar-stone, 
The holy image is overthrown, 

The bell has ceased to toll. 

The long-ribbed aisles are burst and shrunk, 
The holy shrines to ruin sunk, 
Departed is the pious monk, — 

God's blessing on his soul!"' 

Arms of Whitby Abbey : — ^Azure, three snakes, encircled "roset," 
two and one, above the shield are placed the head of a cross and a 
mitre argent, the circlet whereof is or (Tonge's Visitation of Yorkshire 
(Surtees Society), p. 22). 



APPENDIX. 



MASS OF ST. HILDA. 
(York Missal, Surtees Society, Vol. II, pp. 91, 157.) 

Of St. HILDA, VIRGIN, viii Kal. Sept. (August 25). 

Officium (Introit). Dilexisti, Thou hast loved righteousness and 
hated iniquity : therefore God, even thy God, hath anointed 
thee with the oil of gladness above thy fellows. 

Oratio (Collect). Omnipotens sempiterne, O Almighty and Ever- 
lasting God, grant unto us that with fitting devotion we may 
rejoice in the feast of blessed Hilda Thy Virgin ; that in 
her departure we may both praise Thy power and obtain 
the help provided for us, through Jesus Christ our Lord, 
Amen. 

(9r, as in one MS., 

Grant, we beseech Thee, Almighty God, that we who 
rejoice in the yearly solemnity of blessed Hilda Thy Virgin, 
may by her intercession be changed from that which is old 
into newness of life, through Jesus Christ our Lord, Amen. 
Epistola (Epistle). Qui gloriatur. He that glorieth, let him glory in 
the Lord, so that I may present you as a chaste virgin to 
Christ (2 Cor^^ x, ly-xi, 2). 

1 The Abboty Sir W. Scott, ch. viii. 



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ST. HILDA. 47 

Gradale (Grail). Diiexisti, V. Thou hast loved righteousness, and 
hated iniquity. R. Therefore God, even thy God, hath 
anointed thee with the oil of gladness above thy fellows. 

Alleluia. 

V. Emulor, For I am jealous over you with godly 
jealousy : for I have espoused you to one husband, that 
I may present you as a chaste virgin to Christ 
Evangelium (Gospel). Simile e$i^ etc. The kingdom of heaven is 
like unto ten virgins, sOy watch therefore, for ye know neither 
the day nor the hour when the Son of Man cometh {St, 
Matth, XXV, 1-13). 
Offertorium (Offertory). Filia regum. King's daughters shall be 
among Thine honourable women : upon Thy right hand did 
stand the queen in a vesture of gold, wrought about with 
divers colours. 
Secreta (Secret). Hostias iibi. We offer before Thee, O Lord, this 
Thy sacrifice, that through the merits of the blessed virgin 
Hilda, we, being reconciled to Thy mercy, may be made a 
living sacrifice, acceptable unto Thee, through Jesus Christ 
our Lord. 

(So in one MS. Probably the Secret from the Mass of 
a Virgin not a Martyr was commonly used, as follows : — ) 

Offerimus Hbi, We offer unto Thee, O Lord, prayers 
and gifts, rejoicing in honour of St. N, (Hilda); grant, we 
beseech Thee, that we may rightly do these things, and be 
able to obtain everlasting relief, through Jesus Christ our 
Lord. 
Communio (Communion). Quinque prudentts. The five wise virgins 
took oil in their vessels with their lamps, but at midnight 
there was a cry made. Behold, the bridegroom cometh, go ye 
out to meet Christ the Lord. 
Post-communio (Post-communion). CaeUstis convivii. We beseech Thee, 
O Lord, that we, having received the blessing of this 
heavenly feast, may, by the intercession of the blessed virgin 
Hilda, and through that which is a sacrament to us, obtain 
the benefit of salvation, through Jesus Christ our Lord, 
Amen. 

(So in one MS. Probably the Post-communion for a 
Virgin not a Martyr was commonly used, as follows : — ) 

Satiasiiy Domine. O Lord, who hast nourished this Thy 
family by Thy sacred gifts, do Thou ever refresh us through 
the intervention of her whose solemnities we keep, through 
Jesus Christ pur Lord, Amen. 



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48 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHiEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

NOTE. 

It is, of course, to be borne in mind that the above passages 
from the Mass are only those which were "proper" for the day, 
corresponding to the Collect, Epistle, Gospel, and Proper Preface, in 
the English form of that service as contained in the Book of 
Common Prayer. The rest was very much as in the Roman Mass at 
the present time. The service (after the Introit, etc.) began with the 
Kyrie, which in the English service is lengthened and interspersed 
with the Commandments, then followed the Gloria in Excelsis when 
it was used, as it ordinarily was, then the Collect, etc., as above. 
After the Gospel, as in the English rite, came the Nicene Creed, 
then the Offertory. The Secret was said by the celebrant in an 
inaudible voice between the Offertory and the Preface, after which came 
the Prayer of Consecration and the Communion of the Priest. The 
"Communion" was afterwards sung or said, during the Communion 
of the people originally, and the Post-communion is a prayer 
implying that the people had communicated, as they formerly did at 
all celebrations, and as, in theory at least, they Still may at any. 

The whole service may be seen in English in Pearson's translation 
of the Sarum Missal, or, sufficiently for ordinary purposes, in "The 
Missal for the Laity," to be obtained at a small cost from the 
Roman Catholic booksellers. 



OFFICES OF ST. HILDA. 
(York Breviary, Surtees Society, 75, II, 507, 508.) 

These were the ordinary Daily Offices with certain Proper 
I^essons, etc., for the day. They would be far too long to be given 
here as they stand, but they may be seen in the York Breviary, 
Surtees Society Edition, Psalter, Vol. I, cols. 727-944; Common of a 
Virgin, Vol. II, cols. 59-69; or in English, sufficiently well, in the 
Marquis of Bute's translation of the Roman Breviary, Vol. I, 1-178, 
and 878-886. 

The only parts "proper" to St Hilda are the three Proper 
Lessons, which are taken from Bede's Eccl. Hist,, IV, 23, and here 
follow in English. 

Of St. HILDA, VIRGIN. 

The First Lesson, Hilda the blessed handmaid of Christ was of 
noble birth, being the daughter of a nephew of King 
Hetwin (Edwin), named Hererich. With which king also 
she came to the preaching of the blessed Paulinus, the 



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ST. HILDA. 49 

first bishop of the Northumbrians, and received the faith 
and sacraments of Christ She then, having decided to 
forsake the secular habit and to serve Him alone, departed 
to the province of the East Angles. For she was a 
near relation of their king, and she had a desire to leave 
her fatherland and all that she had, and in some way to 
pass from thence into Gaul, and to lead the Ufe of a 
stranger for the Lord's sake in the monastery of Chelles. 

The Second Lesson, For in the same monastery there was a sister of 
the same Hererich, the mother of Aldulf, King of the East 
Angles, subject to the regular discipline. Emulating her 
example, she herself also was retained for a whole year in 
the aforesaid province, with the intention of going abroad. 
Then, being recalled by Bishop Aidan to her own father- 
land, she accepted the land of one family on the north side 
of the river Tigris,^ where for one year she led a monastic 
life with a few companions. After this she was made 
abbess in the monastery which is called Heorthen.' And 
when she had presided over this monastery for some years, 
it came to pass also that she undertook the government of 
a monastery in the place which is called Strenshale (Whitby). 

The Third Lesson, But when she had presided over this monastery 
for many years, it pleased Him who hath made such 
merciful provision for our salvation, to make trial of her 
soul by long-standing infirmity of the flesh. Being plagued 
with fevers, indeed for six years she ceased not from her 
labours while enduring the same affliction. In the seventh 
year of her sickness she arrived at the last day, and about 
the cock-crowing, having received the viaticum of the all-holy 
Communion, amid words of prayer and exhortation, she, 
rejoicing, saw death ; yea, she passed from death unto life, 
through Him who liveth and reigneth for ever and ever. 
Amen. 

The rest from the Common of one Virgin not a Martyr, 

1 Mistake for Bede*s reading Uiuri^ of the Wear. 
^ Bede has HenUeu^ now Hartlepool. 



VOL. XVII. 



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THE WILL OF TIMOTHY BRIGHT, M.D., 

RECTOR OF 

METHLEY AND BARWICK-IN-ELMET, 1615. 

The following is the account of Timothy Bright in the Dictionary of 
National Biography: — 

Timothy Bright was born in or about 1551, probably in the neigh- 
bourhood of Sheffield.^ He matriculated as a sizar at Trinity College, 
Cambridge, imputes at. 11, on 21 May, 156 1, and graduated B.A. in 
1567-8. In 1572 he was at Paris, probably pursuing his medical studies, 
when he narrowly escaped the St. Bartholomew massacre by taking 
refuge in the house of Sir Francis Walsingham. He graduated M.B. at 
Cambridge, in 1574, and was created M.D. in 1579. For some years 
he appears to have resided at Cambridge, but in 1584 he was living 
at Ipswich. He succeeded Dr. Turner as physician to St. 
Bartholomew's Hospital about 1586,^ and must have resigned in 
1590, when his successor was elected. His first medical work (dated 
1584) seems to have been written at Cambridge. It is in two parts, 
**Hygieina on preserving health" and " Therapeutica on restoring 
health," and is dedicated to Cecil, Lord Burghley. Bright afterwards 
abandoned the medical profession and took holy orders. His famous 
treatise entitled " Characterie : An Arte of short, swifte, and secret 
writing by character," he dedicated in 1588 to Queen Elizabeth, 
who, on 5 July, 1591, presented him to the rectory of Methley, then 
void by the death of Otho Hunt, and on 30 Dec, 1594, to the 
rectory of Barwick-in-Elmet.' He left a widow, whose name was 

^ It has been suggested that Timothy his medical writings with dates. There 

Bright was born at Carbrook, near is no record of his birthplace in any of 

Sheffield, but no authority is forthcoming his works" (Dr. Norman Moore), 
in support of this statement. Cambridge, * Bright prol>ably owed his promotion 

or its vicinity, is also believed to have to his acquaintanceship with the Cecil 

been the place of his birth. family (see his Hygieina and Tkera^- 

^ lliis is an error. **He was elected ticd)^ and his theological opinions, rather 

physician to St. Bartholomew's Hospital than to his little book on shorthand. He 

m 1584, and in 1590 his successor, apparently resigned Methley alx>ut 1594. 

Dr. Dayley, was appointed. In the In the list of presentations of the Duchy 

St. Bartholomew's Hospital Reports for of Lancaster in the Record Office is the 

1 88 1, Vol. xviii, an account is given of following entry: — Methley, Christopher 



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THE WILL OF TIMOTHY BRIGHT. 51 

Margaret, and two sons, Timothy Bright, barrister-at-law, of Melton- 
super-Montem, in Yorkshire, and Titus Bright, who graduated M.D. at 
Peterhouse, Cambridge, in 16 ii, and practised at Beverley. Bright's 
works include a "Treatise on Melancholie" and "An Abridgement of 
John Foxe's *Book of Acts and Monuments of the Church.'" 
Bright will ever be held in remembrance as the inventor of modem 
shorthand writing. Only one copy of his "Characterie" is known to 
be in existence, and is now preserved in the Bodleian Library. 
The shorthand signs are all written in ink (Dictionary of National 
Biography), 

The Rev. Joseph Hunter,' in his account of Timothy Bright, adds 
some further particulars about him and his children. Amongst his 
works he published, in quarto, in 1589, "An Abridgement of the 
Acts and Monuments of the Church," and it is in his dedication of 
this abridgment of Fox that he mentions his escape from the 
massacre of St. Bartholomew. His other works were "A Treatise on 
Melancholy," octavo, 1586, 1613, and " Animadversiones in G. A. 
Scribonii Physicam," published at Cambridge in 1584. "For his son 
we shall find a monumental inscription in the church of Melton. It 
appears from it that he and his lady, after a union of nine years, 
died within ten days of each other. In the interval she made her 

will It appears that Dr. Bright the elder, notwithstanding he 

had such valuable preferment, died in debt." 

The rector of Barwick's will shows that he was very highly 
cultured. The number of books mentioned is greater than usual. 
In Notes and Queries (8th Series, xii, 302), the list of books 
bequeathed in the wills of nineteen clergymen of the diocese of 
Durham, dated between the years 1559 and 1603, and printed by 
the Surtees Society in the Proceedings of Bishop Barnes, App. x, is 
tabulated. They are very few in number. In eight only, out of 
the nineteen, is there any mention of books, and where they are 
mentioned they seem in some cases to compare but poorly in value 
with other belongings of the testator. In the lengthy will of Leonard 
Pilkington, prebendary of the seventh stall in Durham Cathedral, no 
mention is made of books, a remarkable fact, seeing that Pilkington 
was from 156 1-1564 Master of St. John's College, Cambridge, and 
for a short time, 1561-2, Regius Professor of Divinity in the same 
University. Dr. Bright's library was much better furnished. Besides 

lindall, 21 May (Timothy Bright re- and sacraments, and Doctor of Physic" 

signed), 36 Eliz. In the same list is It is probable he was never instituted, as 

contained his presentation in 1590 to the there is no record of him there. 
rectory of Stanford Rivers in Essex, in * tt- . ^ n ^i xr r r- y ^ 

which he is styled "minister of y* word * ^*'^ry of South Yorkshire, I, 365. 



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52 THE YORKSHIRE ARCaaEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

books on physic and philosophy he had a Hebrew Bible and a 

Syriac Testament, as well as works in Italian, Greek, and Latin, which 

prove he was no mean linguist. He was fond of music, and died 

possessed of a couple of theorbos, a stringed instrument, and an 

Irish harp. He studied music in theory as well as practically, and to 

aid him had bought the standard work on harmony by an Italian, 

Joseph Zarlino. 

The following skeleton pedigree, chiefly derived from Hunter, will 

show his relations : — 

William Brk;ht, = 
fetthcr of Doctor Bright. 
Buried at Methley, 
August 24, 1592 



Timothy Bright, M.D.= Margaret. William Bright, B.D., 

Will dated Aug. 9, - - - - . «. . 

161 5; proved 
Nov. 13 following 



Living 1 61 7 preacher at Shrewsbury. 

Living 161 5 



(l) Timothy Bright, of Melton, a barrister. Died Sept 20, 1617; buried at 
Melton ; married Edith, daughter of John Lewis, of Marr, 
recorder of Doncaster. Will dated October 4, proved 
November, 161 7 



Timothy Bright 
Robert Bright 
Mary Bright 
Jane Bright 

(2) Titus Bright, M.D, Living 161 7; married Anne, daughter of John 

Anne, of Frickley 

(3) Eliz. Living 16 17 

(4) Susan. Buried at Methley, November 26, 1593 



[Consistory Court, Vol. xxxi, fo. 180.] 

In the name of the most holie and blessed Trinity, God the 
ffather, God the sonne, and God the holy ghost, one God eternall and 
omnipotent, I, Timothy Bright of Barwick in Elmett in the County of 
Yorke, Gierke, and Doctor of Phisick, being sick in bodie, but of 
good and perfect remembrance, do, this present nyneth day of 
August, in the yeare of our lord and saviour Christ, one thousand six 
hundreth and fHftenth, make and declare this my last will and 
testament in manner and forme foUowinge, that is to say, ffirst w*^ a 
most thankfuU acknowledgment of Godes great benefittes, both 
spirituall and temporall, bestowed on me of his free mercye w'^out 
any desert of myne, I comend my soule vnto God to remayne in 
cuerlastinge blisse, w'^ the rest of the soules of Godes Sainctes, as is 



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THE WILL OF TIMOTHY BRIGHT. 53 

my constant fayth it shall, by the merittes of my saviour Christ, and 
my body I comitt vnto ye earth, to be buried when and where it 
shall please God, ther to remayne vntill the generall ioyfull 
resurrection. And for the disposicon of my goodes and chattells, my 
will is, , and I do hereby will and bequeath vnto my much beloved 
brother, William Bright, Bacho"^ of Divinitie, and publique preacher of 
Codes word in the towne of Salop, in the County of Salop, all thoos 
my bookes, called or knowne by the nam^ or names of the Hebrue 
byble, the Syriac testament, Josephus Zarlinus in Italian,^ in two 
volumes, and Plato in Greeke and latine, translated by Marsilius 
ficinus,' and thoos my Instrumentes of musick called the Theorbo,' 
w*^ its case, and the Irishe harpe,* yt^^ I most vsuallye played vpon. 
And I giue and bequeath to Titus Bright, my sonne. Doctor of 
Phisick, the somme of xx'>" poundes in money, and all my bookes of 
Phisick and Philosophie, and the rest of my Instrumentes of musick, 
not bequeathed to my said brother, for his full childes parte and 
porcon of all my goodes, chattells and estaite. Furthermore after my 
debtes and legacies in this my will specified and my funerall charges 
and expenses satisfied, paid and discharged, I give and bequeath vnto 
my deare and entirelie beloved wife, Margaret Bright, all the rest and 
residue of my goodes, chattells, credittes and estate, w^** I shall haue 
to me in any wise belonging, due or owing at the tyme of my death, 
reposeing my whole trust in her for to give and bestow to my 
daughter, Elizabeth Bright, such a portion for her maintenance and 
preferment in marriage, as my said wife shall thinke meet, and not 
otherwise. And my will further is, and I do earnestlie inioyne my 

^ Joseph Zarlino, master of the chapel works. Five years more elapsed before 

of St. Mark's, Venice, and one of the the first edition was printed, in 1482, at 

most celebrated writers on the theory of Filippo Valori's expense. He also 

music, was bom at Chioggia in 1519, translated Plotinus and Dionysius the 

and lived until 1599. An edition of his Areopagile, **On the Hierarchies'* 

collected works was printed at Venice in (Symonds' Renaissance in Italy, Re-mval 

1589 in four folio volumes. His most of Learnings 1882, p. 324). 

celebrated work on music, the one pro- * The Theorbo was a musical instru- 

bably alluded to above, appeared in folio ment of the lute class, having two necks, 

at Venice in 1558,- 1562, and 1573, under the one above the other, the lower bearing 

the title: — Istituzioni harmoniche, divise the melody strings, which were stretched 

in quattro parti, nelle quale, oltre le over a fretted fingerboard, and the upp)er 

materie appartenanti alia musica, tro- bearing the accompaniment strings or 

vano dichiarati molti luoghi de poeti, " diapasons," which were deeper in pitch, 

historici e filosofi. and were played without being stopped. 

* Marcilio Ficino, son of Cosimo de The Theorbo was much used in the seven- 
Medici's physician, was born at Figline in teenth century for accompaniments of all 
1433. When a youth of eighteen he kinds, and was an important constituent 
entered the Medicean household, and in the orchestra of the period (Century 
began to learn Greek, in order that he Dictionary), 

might qualify himself for translating Plato ^ The old Irish harp was similar to the 

into Latin. He was forty-four years old harp in the royal arms. See Groves' 

when he finished his translation of Plato's Dictionary of Afusic^ s,v. Harp. 



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54 



THE YORKSHIRE ARCH-ffiOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 



said wife, that she suffer not myne eldest sonne, Timothy Bright,^ to 
haue any parte of my said goodes, chattells or estate, in regarde I 
haue alreadie advanced him aboue my estate in hope of his 
kindness, to be shewed to my said wife and other children, according 
to his promyse in that behalfe made, w<^^ I chardge him to performe, 
as he will avoyde the wrothe of God. And nevertheless I giue and 
bequeath to my sonne, Timothy, a peece of gold of vs, vjrf., for and 
in full payment and discharge of his parte and portion of all my 
goodes, chattells and estate. And I do make and ordeyne my said 
wife, Margaret, alone to [be] my sole and onely executrix of this my last 
will and testament, and I do appoint my very wor^"*^ and approved 
ffrend, S"^ Henry Goodrick,' of Ribston, in the Countie of Yorke, 
knight, to be overseer of this same my last will and testament, to 
whome I give my other theorbo, as a token of my love. In witnes 
wherof I haue herevnto put my hand and scale, the day and yeare 
aboue written. Sealed, subscribed, written and published in the 
presence and sight of William Bright, Thomas Harries, William 
Rowely, Richard Hoddins, George Wright, Paull ffarrles and Elizabeth 
Langley. Proved by the relict on Nov. 13, 161 5. 



^ Administration to the estate of 
Timothy Bright, of Meltoa-on-the-Hill, 
Esq., and the tuition of his children, 
Timothy, Robert, Mary, and Jane, were 
granted on Nov. 7, 161 7, to Thomas 
Lewes, of Marre, esq. The will of his 
widow, Edith Bright, of Melton, sick in 
body, but of good memory, was proved 
the same day by her brother, the above- 
named Thomas Lewes. By her will, 
dated Oct. 4, 161 7, she left her son, 
Timothy, ;^6oo, and a similar sum 
between her three other children, which 



sums were to be raised out of the lease- 
hold impropriate of Roiston. She men- 
tions her mother-in-law, Mrs. Margaret 
Bright, and her brother-in-law, Titus 
Bright, who were witnesses to her will, 
with Thomas Lewes, John Davies, 
Thomas Levitt, M"» Mary Lewes of 
Marre, and Dorothy Lee (^<jf'. Tesl.f 
xxxiv, 748). 

^ Sir Henry Goodrick married Jane, 
daughter of Sir John Savile of Methley, 
which may account for his friendship with 
Bright. 



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TESTAMENTUM^ WILLELMI DE LEDES, FILII ET 

HEREDIS ROGERI DE LEDES, FACTUM. 

Communicated by ROBERT H. SKAIFE. 

In Dei nomine, Amen. Vicesimo secundo die mensis Julii, anno 
Domini millesimo cccc"®, ego Willelmus de Ledes, filius et heres 
Rogeri de Ledes,^ militis, condo testamentum meum in hunc modo. 
In primis do et lego animam meam Deo Omnipotenti, Beate Marie 
Virgini, atque Omnibus Sanctis, et corpus meum ecclesiastice sepulture 
ubicumque Deus disposuerit. Et insuper volo quod Johanna, mater 
mea, habeat et teneat ad terminum vite sue totum manerium de 
Okewell,* cum omnibus membris et pertinenciis suis, reddendo inde 
annuatim Willelmo Burgoigne sexaginta solidos sterlingorum ad totam 
vitam suam, ita quod post decessum dicte Johanne, matris mee, 
dictum manerium, cum omnibus membris et pertinenciis suis, rectis 
heredibus meis integre remaneat imperpetuum. Et volo quod omnia 
terre et tenementa mea, redditus et servicia, cum pertinenciis suis, in 
villis et territoriis de Morlay et Burlay, veniant per feoffatores, in 
eisdem terris et tenementis feoffatos, cuicumque carnis venei possunt,* 
et pecunia inde r.ecipienda ad satisfaciendum pro debitis meis et 
prefati Rogeri, patris mei, et quod residuum fuerit in adrainistracione 
pro salute animarum nostrarum administretur. Et volo quod omnia 
alia terre et tenementa mea, cum pertinenciis, in comitatu Eboracensi 
rectis heredibus meis integre remaneant. Et volo quod dicta Johanna, 
mater mea, habeat et teneat ad terminum vite sue totum manerium 
de Ledes, cum pertinenciis suis, reddendo inde et solvendo Elizabethe, 

* York Corporation Records, B.y., fo. part of a fee in Leeds, for which he was 

25^. My copy of this will, made in 1867, assessed at 5^. in the Aid granted for the 

has been kindly collated with the original marriage of the King's eldest daughter 

by Mr. William Brown, F.S.A., to whom (/bid., page 28). He was probably the 

I am also indebted for transcripts (see same person as Roger de Northalle, who 

next page) of those of Sir Roger de Ledes was assessed at 2j. z^d. for one carucate 

and his descendant, Dame Jane Hussey. in Wortley, near Leeds (Ibid,, page 279). 

1^^ l^~A^'L^^Tluf-^l.t "Oakwell, in the parish of BirsUU, 

^^Z^'^l^lyTr^""^ about three miles west'Som Money P). 
Henry, Earl of Lincoln (Surtees Society, * An obscure passage, which I am 

voL idix, page 38). One of the jurors unable to elucidate. Mr. Brown suggests 

on the Inquisition concerning Knights* that the testator intended that his property 

Fees in Skyrack wapentake in 1302-3 was in Morley and Burley should be. sold to 

Roger de Ledes, who then held the eighth some relative. 



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56 



THE YORKSHIRE ARCHiEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 



sorori mee, ad maritagium suum, xx//. sterlingorum ; et Katerine, sorori 
mee, ad maritagium suum, xx//. Et si altera eorum obierit, ilia que 
vixerit habeat ad maritagium suum totam pecuniam eis superius 
legatam. Et volo quod Johannes Marsshall, cognatus meus, habeat 
et percipiat ad terminum vite sue redditum xxs, de manerio de 
Ledes, cum pertinenciis. Et lego Willelmo Forester, servienti meo, 
unum redditum xiijj. ni}d, ad totam vitam suam, de manerio predict© 
percipiendum. Et Johanni Coke, servienti meo, unum redditum 
xiijj. iiij^. ad totam vitam suam, de predicto manerio percipiendum. 
Et Dakyn Birche, servienti meo, unum redditum xiijx. iiij^. ad totam 
vitam suam de manerio predicto percipiendum. Et lego domino 
Roberto de Brompton, capellano, xxs. vel unum garum (?) vocatam 
Jak. Et domino Johanni de Morley, capellano, vjx. iiij^. Residuum 
vero omnium bonorum meorum, superius non legatorum, do et lego 
prefate Johanne, matri mee, ad faciendum inde pro anima mea et 
animabus omnium fidelium defunctorum, prout melius viderit expedire. 
Et prefatam Johannam, Thomam Gra,* et Willelmum Burgoigne facio 
et et (sic) constituto executores meos per presentes. In cujus rei 
testimonium huic presenti testamento sigillum meum apposui. 
Datum Eboraci die et anno predictis." [Ex registro ejusdem civitatis 
vocato Domeseday.] 

From the evidence furnished by the above wills, the following 
short pedigree may be constructed: — 



Sir Roger de Ledes = Joan 

Owned property Living in 



Owned property 
in Burley, etc. 
Dead in 1398 



July, 1400 



Katherine 



William de Ledes, son and heir, lord of the Elizabeth 

manors of Leeds and Oakwell. Held land "^ v 

in Burley, etc Will dated at York, 22nd Living in 1400 

July, 1400 



therin 



* Probably Thomas Gra, lord mayor in 
1398, whose eldest son, Sir John Gra, of 
North Ingleby, co. Lincoln, married 
Margaret, daughter of Sir Roger de 
Swillington. 

8 Administracio comessa in bonis domini 
Rogeri de LedeSy tnilitis. Memorandum 
quod hoc est ultima voluntas, nuncupative 
probata, domini Rogeri de I^des, mi litis, 
videlicet : quod prinio et principaliter 

3uod de bonis suis mobilibus solverentur 
ebita in quibus tempore mortis sue 
creditoribus suis tenebatur. Et si bona 
hujusmodi ad hoc non suffecerint, aliena- 
rentur redditus sui in Burlay et Cusse- 
worth, ac parcelle reddituum, ad ipsum 
pertinentes, in villa de Morlay. Et, si 



quid ex perceptione vendicionis hujus- 
modi, solutis debitis, superesset, quod 
illud residuum reservaretur in ad marita- 
gium Elizabethe et Katerine, filiarum 
suarum. Nullos tamen constituit execu- 
tores hujus voluntatis sue, et ideo ex 
officio, tanquam ab intestato, penultimo 
die mensis Februarii, anno Domini supra- 
dicto [139S] commissa e&t administracio 
in bonis dicti domini Rogeri, nuper 
defuncti, in forma constitucionis super 
hoc edita, domine Johanne, relicte dicti 
defuncti, cum addito juramento per 
eandem [quod] conservabit dominum 
archiepiscopum et ejus officiarios total iter 
indempnes in hac parte, etc. (AV^. Test.^ 
iii, fo. 17). 



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LEEDS WILLS. 



57 



That the above may be compared with Thoresby's version, and 

also to show the descent from Sir Roger de Ledes of Dame Jane 

Hussey, whose will is printed below, I append a pedigree constructed 

from evidence supplied by the Ducatus Leodiensis (ed. 1715, 

pp. 112-114), the Visitations of 1584-5 and 1612 (ed. Foster, p. 225), 

and the Register of the Corpus Christi Guild (ed. Surtees Society, 

VoL Ivii) :— 

=Sir Roger de Ledes 



Joan=Wiiliam de Ledes 
Living Living in 141S--9 

in 14 18-9 (see Fine of this 

date, below). 

Died without issue 



Emma de Ledes = Geoffrey Pigott 



Margaret = 
daughter of William Sewerby, 
Esq., of Sewerby. Died in 
1485 



= Ranulph Pigott 
Livmg in 1437 



Sir Geoffrey Pigott, 
of Clotherholme, 
near Ripon 



Joan=(i) Sir Ranulph Pigott, 
daughter of of Clotherholme. 

Sir Richard Entered the C.C. 

Strangwayes, Guild in 1479. 

of Harlsey. 



(2) Thomas Pigott = 
gentleman, of 
Melmerby. 
Entered the 
C.C. Guild 
in 1479 



Sir Giles Hussey = Jane 

of Cawthorpe, daughter and co- 



co. Lincoln 
(second son of 
John, Lord 
Hussey, of 
Sleaforth) 
(first husband) 



heiress. Will 
dated 2nd Feb., 
36 Eliz. [Proved 
14th Dec, 1597], 
"to be buried 
within the high 
quear of Leedes, 
neare unto Sir Roger Leedes, 
myanccster." — 29 Oct., 1597. 
' Ladye Hussye, of the North 
-"^^^ (Burials, Par, Reg.) 



= Thomas Falkingham, Esq., 
of the North Hall. Buried 
at St. Peter's, Leeds, 15th 
June, 1593, as "Mr. Thomas 
Falgyngham, esquyer" 
(Par. Reg) 
(second husband) 



Hair 



A\ 



John Falkingham, Esq. 

Held the manor of North Hall 
of the Queen, as of her manor 
of Leeds. Living in 161 2 



1 



I 



*Pygote" 

&ptized at Leeds, 27th April, 1586. 
Buried there, 7th June, 1597 



The following Fine, printed by the Thoresby Society (vol. ii, 
page 43), refers to the above William : — " 6 Hen. V. William Roger, 
cap., and John Dalby, cap., quer", and William, son of Roger de 
Ledes, kt., and Joan his wife, def'% of the manors of Okewell and 



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58 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

Northalle de Ledes." In a footnote, to which the initials "W. W." 
are appended, it is stated that "the North-hall here referred to has 
vanished, and its site is rather obscure. It was situated near Lady 
Lane and George's Street." As these thoroughfares are on the east 
side of the town, it appears to me more probable, from the above 
testamentary evidence, that the manor of William de Ledes was 
situated on the west side, its site being indicated by North Hall 
Street, which leads from Burley Road into Wellington Road. 



2 Feb., 36 Eliz. [1593-4]. Dame Jane Hussey, widowe, late wief 
of Thomas Falkingham, esq., of the North Hall, neare Leedes, and 
in the parishe of Leedes. I bequeathe my soule into the hands of 
Almightie God, my maker, and to Jesus Christ, his sonne, my 
redeemer, and to the Holy Ghoste, my comforter, trusting in the 
mercie of Almightie God to be saved and delivered from all my 
sinnes, and my body to be buried within the high quear of Leedes, 
neare unto Sir Roger Leedes, my ancester, without any pompe or 
ceremonie, but accordinge as I have will[ed] and declared vnto my 
exequutor and children in my lieftyme. Unto Pigott Falkingham, 
eldest Sonne vnto John Falkingham, my sonne, all my inheritance, 
etc., in all England. Unto Thomas Falkingham the younger, the 
sonne of Thomas Falkingham of Temple, my sonne, all my goodes, 
etc., to take them as of my guifte and in possession and full season 
of the same. I have presently given vnto the sayd Thomas 
Falkingham yonger one ringe of golde, to weare for mee, willinge him 
and commandinge him to pray for mee and to have mee in his 
remembrance, and to see my body honestly caried to the church and 
buried, and air my servantes wages payed, and the litle wench Catt 
that lyeth with mee to have ten shillinges payed her. All the rest 
of my goodes, etc., I do freely give vnto the sayd Thomas 
Falkingham yonger, whome I do ordaine my sole exequutor of this 
my last will and testament, spoken and declared often tymes in my 
lief tyme afore these witnesses, Thomas Falkingham, the elder, 
Christofer Boyes, P[h]illippe Lambert, and Agnes Hare [Proved 
14 Dec, 1597, and administration granted to the executor] {Reg, 
Test.^ xxvii, fo. iii). 



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YORKSHIRE BRIEFS. 

\Continiud from Vol. xvi, p. 120.] 

Bransby Church, N.R., 1766. 
Represented as well upon the humble petition of the Rector and 
Churchwardens of the parish church of Bransby and of the principal 
inhabitants, as by the certificate under the hands of Stephen Croft, 
Ralph Bell junior, Simon Butterwick and Peter Bell, Justices of the 
Peace, assembled at the General Quarter Sessions of the Peace held 
at Easingwold on Jan. L5 last, That the parish church of Bransby is 
a very antient building and much decayed in every part thereof, and 
that notwithstanding the parishioners have laid out considerable sums 
in supporting the said church, yet the same is by length of time 
become so ruinous that it must be taken down and rebuilt. The 
truth of the premises made to appear at Quarter Sessions by the 
oaths of several able and experienced workmen who have carefully 
viewed the said church and made an estimate of the charge of 
taking down and rebuilding the same, which upon a moderate 
computation will amount to the sum of 10036//. 9J. \od, (exclusive 
of the old materials), which sum the petitioners are unable to raise 
among themselves, being chiefly tenants at rack rents and burthened 
with a numerous poor. House to house visitation in the counties 
of York and Lincoln. Trustees and receivers^ Stephen Croft, Ralph 
Bell junior, Peter Bell, Simon Butterwick, Philip Harland, John 
Bowman esquires, John Bearpark, Matthew Fewster, John Atkinson, 
Robert Hill, Thomas Proud, John Mason, William Pearson gentleman. 
Feb. 6, 6 Geo. III. (B. vi, i.) 

Burton Leonard Church, 1779. 

Represented as well upon the humble petition of the Minister, 
Church Wardens and major part of the principal inhabitants of the 
parish of Burton Leonard, as by the certificate under the hands of 
the Justices of the Peace of the West Riding, assembled at the 
General Quarter Sessions of the Peace held at Knaresborough on 
Tuesday, Oct. S, 19 Geo. Ill (1779), That the parish church of 
Burton Leonard is an ancient building and very much decayed. 
The steeple and a considerable part of the roof of the church are 
already fallen down, and the walls of the nave or body of the church 



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60 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

are cracked and bulged, and in so ruinous a condition, and the 
materials thereof so bad that the same cannot any longer be 
repaired, but must be wholly taken down and rebuilt, and that the 
parishioners cannot assemble therein for public worship of Almighty 
God without manifest danger of their lives. The truth of the 
premises made to appear at Quarter Sessions by the oath of William 
Belwood, an able and experienced workman, who has carefully viewed 
the church and made an estimate of the charge of taking down and 
rebuilding the same, which upon a moderate computation amounts 
to the sum of 1038//. 17^. 4//., exclusive of the old materials, which 
sum the inhabitants are not able to raise amongst themselves, being 
chiefly tenants at rack rents, and burthened with a numerous poor, 
for which reason they cannot take down and rebuild the same 
without the charitable assistance of well disposed Christians. House 
to house collection in the counties of York, Lincoln, Nottingham, 
Lancaster, Durham, and Northumberland. Trustees and receivers^ 
Thomas Turner Slingsby Buncombe, Henry Duncomb esquires, 
Thomas Lamplugh clerk, James Collins junior, Peter Taylor, Andrew 
Gilbertson, Andrew Brown, Thomas Stevenson, and John Stevenson 
gentlemen, and the Ministers and Church Wardens of Burton Leonard 
for the time being. Dec 20, 20 Geo. III. (B. xx, 3.) 

William and Thomas Greenwood, of Calverlev Mills. W.R. 

Fire. 1823. 
Represented as well upon the humble petition of William 
Greenwood and Thomas Greenwood of Calverley Mills, sufferers by 
fire, as by certificate under the hand of the Justices of the Peace, 
assembled at their General Quarter Sessions of the Peace, held by 
adjournment at Bradford, July 18, 3 Geo. IV (1823), That on the 
morning of Sunday, June 9, 3 Geo. IV (1823), a sudden and terrible 
fire broke out at Calverley Mills in the scribbling and corn mills 
occupied by the said poor sufferers, which in a short space of time 
burnt down and destroyed the said mills with all the machinery 
therein, with a considerable quantity of wool, oil, flour, com and 
shelling, with a great number of sacks and nearly every article and 
utensil then within the said mills belonging to the said poor 
sufferers, the whole of which machinery and other property in the 
said mills was wholly uninsured, and that the loss has been estimated 
under a moderate computation to amount to the sum of 3856//. i6j., 
the truth of all which was shown at Quarter Sessions, not only on 
the oaths of the said sufferers, but also of John Bottomley of 
Bramley millwright, and Benjamin Gommersall of Tong cardmaker, 



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YORKSraRE BRIEFS. 61 

credible persons, who have been long acquainted with the premises, 
and having carefully viewed the same since the accident took place 
tender the foregoing sum as a correct estimate. That the sufferers 
has each of them a wife and eight children to support, are reduced 
from comifortable circumstances to a situation of much difficulty and 
distress. House to house collection throughout the counties of 
York, Northumberland and Westmoreland, and the county palatine of 
Lancaster. Trustees and receivers^ James Armitage Rhodes, Matthew 
Freeman, Charles Rogers and ^-^ Redhead* clerks, and Ellis Cunliffe 
and John Stevenson Salt esquires. Nov. 9, 3 Geo. IV. (C iii, 7.) 

Chapelthorpe Chapel, 1772. 

Represented as well upon the humble petition of the Vicar, 
Chapelwardens and the principal inhabitants of the chapelry of 
Chapelthorpe in the parish of Sandal Magna, as by certificate under 
the hands of our trusty and well l)eloved Justices of the Peace, 
assembled at the General Quarter Sessions holden by adjournment 
at Bradford, Aug. i, 11 Geo. Ill (1771), That the chapel of 
Chapelthorpe aforesaid is in so ruinous a condition as to the walls 
and roof, that it cannot be repaired but must be wholly taken 
down and rebuilt. That the truth of the premises was made to 
appear to our Justices assembled at the General Quarter Sessions of 
the Peace aforesaid, not only by several of the said parish of Sandal 
Magna, but also upon the oaths of two able and competent workmen 
who have carefully viewed the said chapel and made an estimate of 
the charge of taking down and rebuilding the same, which upon a 
moderate computation (exclusive of old materials) amounts to the 
sum of 1 1 94//. and upwards, a sum the parishioners are not able to 
raise amongst themselves, being chiefly tenants and cottagers and 
burthened with a numerous poor. House to house collection in the 
counties of York, Lincoln, and Lancaster. Trustees and receivers^ 
Sir Lionel Pilkington baronet, Thomas Beaumont esquire, Henry 
Touch, Thomas Touch, Ralph Brocklebank clerks, John Hadfield, 
Robert Allott, William Beatson, Richard Beatson, James Rhodes, 
John Bingley, Charles Pollard, William Taylor, George Cusworth, 
Thomas Stevenson and John Stevenson gentlemen. July 7, 12 Geo. III. 
(B. xii, 6.) 

CoLEY Chapel, 1798. 

Represented as well upon the humble petition of the Ministers, 
Chapel Wardens and principal inhabitants of Coley in the parish of 
Halifax, as by certificate under the hands of the Justices of the 

^ So in the original. 



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62 THE YORKSraRE ARCttffiOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

Peace for the West Riding assembled for their General Quarter 
Sessions held by adjournment at Wakefield on Thursday, Jan. 12, 
37 Geo. Ill (1797), That the chapel of Coley aforesaid is by length 
of time become so very ruinous that the parishioners cannot now 
assemble therein for the worship of Almighty God without danger of 
their lives, and that it cannot be repaired, but must be entirely taken 
down and rebuilt. The truth of the premises made to appear at 
the Quarter Sessions aforesaid, not only by the inhabitants, but also 
upon the oath of William Bradley, an able and experienced 
workman, who hath carefully viewed and made an estimate of the 
charge of taking down and rebuilding the chapel, which upon a 
moderate computation amounts to the sum of ii6i//. 13J. Sd., which 
sum the inhabitants cannot by any means in their power raise among 
themselves, and therefore are unable to undertake so great a work 
without the charitable assistance of religious and charitably disposed 
persons. House to house collection through England, Berwick-on- 
Tweed, and the counties of Flint, Denbigh and Radnor in Wales. 
Trustees and receivers, the Archbishop of York, Samuel Waterhouse, 
John Walker, Henry Wickham, William Walker and Joseph Edwards 
esquires, Rev. William Henry Coulthurt D.D., Rev. Richard Hudson 
clerk, William Mitchell, William Stevenson and John Stevenson 
gentlemen. Aug. 8, 38 Geo. IH. (B. xxxviii, 10.) 

Co LEY Chapel, 1804. 
Represented {eU., as in the last), as by certificate under the hands 
of the Justices of the Peace for the West Riding assembled at their 
General Quarter Sessions of the Peace held at Pontefract on 
Monday, April 9, 44 Geo. HI (1804), That in the year 1798 Letters 
Patent had been granted as above, and that public collections had 
been made to the amount of 97//. 2X. 9^/., which had been paid to the 
trustees, but that the same being very inadequate to the expense of 
taking down and rebuilding the said chapel there was yet wanting 
for that purpose the sum of 1064//. 10s. 8^., and that the inhabitants 
Cannot by any means raise among themselves so large a sum, they 
are therefore incapable of undertaking so great a work without 
further aid and assistance. Licence as before. Trustees and receivers, 
the Archbishop of York, Henry William {sic) Couthurt D.D., John 
Watson clerk, William Walker, John Walker and Joseph Edwards 
esquires, William Stevenson and John Stevenson Salt gentlemen. 
Nov. 20, 45 Geo. ni. (B. xlv, 2.) 



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YORKSraRE BRIEFS. 68 

East Cottingwith Chapel, 1783. 

Represented upon the humble petition of the Minister, Chapel- 
wardens and principal inhabitants of the parochial chapel of East 
Cottingwith, and by certificate under the hands of the Justices of the 
Peace for the East Riding assembled at the General Quarter 
Sessions of the Peace held at Beverley on Tuesday, Jan. 15, 
22 Geo. Ill (1782), That the parochial chapel of East Cottingwith is 
a very ancient structure, the walls, roof and steeple whereof are 
altogether so ruinous that the parishioners cannot assemble therein 
for the worship of Almighty God without the manifest danger of 
their lives, and the materials of which the said chapel is built are by 
length of time become so ruinous and bad that it cannot any longer 
be repaired but must be entirely taken down and rebuilt Truth 
made to appear at Quarter Sessions by the oath of William Hall, an 
able and experienced workman. Estimate 1029//. 19X., exclusive of 
the old materials, which sum the said inhabitants are not able to 
raise amongst themselves, being most of them tenants at rack rents 
and burthened with a numerous poor, and therefore incapable of 
undertaking so great a work without the charitable assistance of well 
disposed Christians. House to house collection in the counties of 
York, Lincoln, Lancaster, Chester, Nottingham, Northumberland, 
Cumberland, and Westmoreland. Trustees and receivers, Robert 
Nottingham, George Blashard {sic\ John Medcalf, John Room, Thomas 
Carr, William Holmes, George Wilson, John Hemingway, Thomas 
Stevenson, William Hilditch gentlemen, and the Minister and 
Chapelwardens. For one year. March 20, 23 Geo. IH. (B. xxiii, 3.) 

Deanhead Chapel, 1799. 

Represented upon the humble petition of the Minister, Chapel- 
wardens and principal inhabitants of the chapelry of Deanhead in 
Scammonden in the parish of Huddersfield, and by certificate under 
the hands of the Justices of the Peace for the West Riding 
assembled at their General Quarter Sessions of the Peace holden by 
adjournment at Wakefield on Jan. 12, 39 Geo. Ill (1799), That the 
chapel of Deanhead is by length of time become so very ruinous 
that the parishioners cannot now assemble therein for the worship of 
Almighty God without danger of their lives, and that it cannot be 
repaired but must be entirely taken down and rebuilt. The truth 
of the premises made to appear at Quarter Sessions by the oath of 
Charles Hopkinson, an able and experienced workman. Estimate 
578//I 12s, iod», which the inhabitants cannot by any means in their 
power raise amongst themselves, and therefore are unable to 



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64 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

undertake so great a work without the charitable assistance of well 
disposed Christians. House to house collection in the counties of 
York, Chester, Derby, Lincoln, and Lancaster. Trustees and receivers, 
Thomas Thornhill and William Walker esquires, Joseph Cartledge 
M.D., Thomas Falcon clerk, John Denton, John Walker, Michael 
Hoyle, John Dyson, Thomas Dudley, William Stevenson and John 
Stevenson gentlemen. July i6, 39 Geo. III. (B. xxxix, 4.) 

Deanhead Chapel, 181 3. 

Represented (etCy as in the last), and by certificate under the 
hands of the Justices of the Peace for the West Riding holden at 
Bradford on Thursday, July 16, 52 Geo. Ill (181 2), That the Letters 
Patent abovementioned were granted, and that public collections had 
been made and paid to the order of the trustees, but that the same 
being very inadequate to the expense of taking down and rebuilding 
the said chapel there, there was yet wanted for that purpose the sum 
of 530//. 11^. 4</. Further licence for a house to house collection 
in the counties of York, Chester, Derby, Lancaster, and Lincoln. 
Trustees and receivers, Thomas Thornhill and William Walker esquires, 
Joseph Cartledge M.D., Thomas Falcon and Ralph Younger clerks, 
John Denton, John Falcon, John Walker, Michael Hoyle, David 
Parkinson, William Kenworthy, John Dyson, Thomas Dudley, John 
Stevenson Salt gentlemen, and the Minister and Chapelwardens. 
June 26, 53 Geo. III. (B. liii, 8.) 

Deanhead Chapel, 1818. 

Represented {etc, as before), and by certificate under the hands of 
the Justices of the Peace for the West Riding assembled at their 
General Quarter Sessions at Bradford on Thursday, July 18, 

57 Geo. Ill (181 7), That collections have been made to the amount 
of 240//. 8x. io\d,, and that a further sum of 428//. 3^. ii|i^. and 
upwards is still wanting, which sum the said inhabitants are not able 
to raise among themselves, being chiefly tenants at rack rents. 
House to house collection in the same counties. (Same trustees and 
receivers as before with the omission of Thomas Dudley.) April 28, 

58 Geo. III. (B. Iviii, 10.) 

Deanhead Chapel, 1822. 

Represented by the certificate under the hands of the Justices of 
the Peace for the West Riding assembled at their Quarter Sessions 
of the Peace held at Bradford, July 18, 57 Geo. Ill (1817), and that 
a sum of 329//. 9^. 8|^. had been collected, but the inhabitants 



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YORKSHIRE BRIEFS. 65 

being unable to raise the remaining part of the estimstted expense 

amongst themselves, either by rate or otherwise, the chapel remains 

in an unfinished state, and cannot be completed without the 

assistance of well disposed Christians. House to house collection in 

the counties of York, Derby, Lincoln, and Chester. Trustees and 

receivers^ the same with the addition of Thomas Norton esquire, and 

William Hirst gentleman, and omission of John Denton, Michael 

Hoyle, David Parkinson, and William Ken worthy. Nov. 9, 3 Geo. IV. 

(C iii, sO 

Dewsbury Church, W.R., 1766. 

Represented as well upon the humble petition of the Vicar and 

their Churchwardens of the parish church of Dewsbury and of the 

principal inhabitants of the township and parish of Dewsbury 

aforesaid, as by certificate under the hands and seals of the Justices 

of the Peace for the West Riding assembled at their General Quarter 

Sessions of the Peace, holden by adjournment at Leeds on Oct. 4, 

4 Geo. Ill (1764), That the parish church of Dewsbury is a very 

ancient fabrick, and by reason of the increase of the inhabitants 

within the said township and parish it will not contain above one 

half of those who are desirous of resorting thereto for the worship of 

Almighty God, and that notwithstanding the parishioners have 

expended considerable sums in supporting the said church, yet the 

same by length of time is become so ruinous that it cannot any 

longer be supported, but must be taken down and rebuilt. The 

truth of the premises hath been made to appear at Quarter Sessions 

upon the oaths of able and experienced workmen, who have carefully 

Viewed the said church, and made an estimate of the charge of 

taking down and rebuilding the same, which upon a moderate 

computation will amount to the sum of 1020//. is, (exclusive of the 

old materials), which sum the parishioners are incapable of raising 

among themselves, being chiefly cottagers and tenants at rack rents 

and burthened with numerous poor. House to house collection 

through the county of York. Trustees and receivers^ Sir George 

Saville and Sir George Armytage baronets. Rev. John Mulsoe, Rev. 

Thomas Scott clerks, Thomas Thompson, John Taylor, William 

Wilcock, Thomas Walker, Timothy Dighton, John Greenwood, Robert 

Nalson, Christopher Naylor, William Banks, John Wallis, Thomas 

Stevenson and John Stevenson gentlemen. Feb. 6, 6 Geo. III. 

(B. vi, 3.) 

VOL. xvn. F 



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66 THE YORKSHIRE ARCttffiOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

DoNCASTER. Fire. 1818. 

For John Wright of the borough and soke of Doncaster, miller, 
sufferer by fire, as by certificate under the hands of the Justices of 
the Peace for the borough and soke of Doncaster at their General 
Quarters of the Peace, held at Doncaster on Oct. 16, 57 Geo. Ill 
(181 7), it was represented that on Jan. 17, 181 7, a sudden and 
terrible fire broke out at Doncaster, which in a short space of time 
destroyed all the extensive flour mills and their valuable machinery, 
the property of the said John Wright, which was proved by his oath, 
and also the oaths of William Crossley and Matthew Turton, credible 
and experienced persons, who were well acquainted with the premises 
at the date this misfortune happened, and who have made an 
estimate upon oath of the loss, and which {sic) upon a moderate 
calculation amounts to the sum of 6000//., by which calamitous 
event the said poor sufferer is reduced to great difficulty and 
distress. House to house collection in the counties of York, 
Chester, Cumberland, Durham, Lancaster, Northumberland, and 
Westmoreland. Trustees and receivers^ Thomas Pearson esquire. 
Mayor of Doncaster, Samuel William Nicoll esquire, recorder of 
Doncaster, Rev. John Sharpe, and Richard Robson and John 
Stevenson Salt esquires. April 28, 58 Geo. III. (B. Iviii, 11.) 

Drypool Church, 1822. 

Represented upon the humble petition of the Minister, Church- 
wardens and inhabitants of the parish of Drypool in the deanery of 
Holderness, and by certificate made at Quarter Sessions at Beverley 
for the East Riding, July 16, 3 Geo. IV (1822), That the church of 
the parish of Drypool, which was built prior to the year 1400, 
became lately much decayed, and was found upon examination to be 
in so ruinous a condition that it required to be taken down, and 
the population having increased greatly it becomes necessary that a 
church be erected upon a plan sufficiently enlarged to accommodate 
the numerous inhabitants who desire to assemble for the public 
worship of Almighty God, the truth of which was made to appear at 
Quarter Sessions by the oaths of William Marshall and John Beevor 
the churchwardens, and of William Hutchinson and John Earle, 
able and experienced workmen. Estimate 1990//., exclusive of the 
sum of 500//. granted by the Commissioners for building new 
churches. The inhabitants are unable to raise the required sum 
amongst themselves either by rate or otherwise, and are thereby 
prevented from executing the desired work unless they receive the 
charitable assistance of well disposed Christians. House to house 



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YORKSHIRE BRIEFS. 67 

collection through England, Berwick-upon-Tweed, and the counties 
of Flint, Denbigh, and Radnor in Wales. Trustees and receivers^ 
George Thompson, John Wade, Robert Cook, John Sumpner, John 
Waddingham, James Webster, William Broadbent and John Stevenson 
Salt esquires. Nov. 9, 3 Geo. IV. (C. iii, 4.) 

Easington Church, N.R., 1768. 

Represented upon the humble petition of the Minister, Church- 
wardens and inhabitants of the parish of Easington in the North 
Riding, That the parish church of Easington is a very ancient 
structure, and so much decayed that notwithstanding the parishioners 
have for many years past laid out considerable sums of money in 
repairing the said church, it is dangerous for the parishioners to 
assemble therein for divine worship, and it cannot any longer be 
supported but must be wholly taken down and rebuilt, the truth of 
which has been made to appear to the Justices assembled at their 
General Quarter Sessions holden at Guisborough for the North Riding 
on July 14 last, not only by the oaths of the Minister, Churchwardens 
and principal inhabitants, but also on the oaths of able and 
experienced workmen who have carefully viewed the church and 
made an estimate of the charge of taking down and rebuilding the 
same, which amounts to the sum of 11 45/1. and upwards (exclusive 
of the old materials), which sum the said inhabitants are not able 
to raise among themselves. House to house collection through the 
counties of York, Cumberland, Durham, and Northumberland. 
Trustees and receivers^ the Archbishop of York, Rev. William Harper, 
Francis Middleton, George Baker, Ralph Jackson esquires, Michael 
Smith, Thomas Wardell, William Sanderson, Francis Easterby, Thomas 
Stevenson and John Stevenson gentlemen. Feb. 8, 8 Geo. III. 
(B. viii, 4.) 

Easingwold. Fire. 177 8. 

For William Beldrige of Easingwould, sufferer by fire, as by a 
certificate under the hands of the Justices of the Peace for the 
North Riding assembled at the General Quarter Sessions of the 
Peace held at Northallerton on Thursday, July 16, 18 Geo. Ill 
(1778), it appears that on Dec. 13, 1777, there happened a sudden 
and terrible fire at Easingwould which by the violence thereof in a 
short space of time burnt and consumed the weaving shop and 
warehouse of the said William Baldrige, containing therein several 
working implements, goods, merchandize, and other effects which were 
his whole substance. General licence. Trustees and receivers^ Rev. 
John Armitstead clerk, Robert Yates and Christopher Goulton esquires, 



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68 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

Stephen Featherston, Thomas Clough, William Driffield, Thomas 
Stevenson and John Stevenson gentlemen. Aug. 15, 18 Geo. IJI. 
(B. xviii, 4.) 

ECCLESALL ChAPELL, 1 784. 

Represented upon the humble petition of the Minister, Chapel- 
wardens and principal inhabitants of Ecclesall, in the parish of Sheffield, 
and by certificate iinder the hands of the Justices of the Peace for 
the West Riding, assembled at the General Quarter Sessions of the 
Peace, holden by adjournment at Doncaster on Wednesday, Jan. 21, 
24 Geo. Ill (1784), That the chapel of Ecclesall is a very ancient 
structure, and by length of time become so very ruinous that it 
cannot be repaired but must be entirely taken down and rebuilt, so 
that the petitioners cannot assemble therein for the public worship of 
Almighty God without manifest danger of their lives, the truth of which 
was made to appear at Quarter Sessions by the oaths of John Bishop, 
mason, and Joseph Badger, joiner, able and experienced workmen, who 
have carefully viewed the said chapel. Estimate for taking down and 
rebuilding the same 1553//. 4s. 5^., exclusive of the old materials, 
which sum the said inhabitants are not able to raise among 
themselves, being all tenants at rack rents, therefore incapable of 
undertaking so great a work without the charitable assistance of well 
disposed Christians. House to house collection in the counties of 
York, Lancaster, Chester, Derby, Notts., Lincoln, Durham, Cumberland, 
Northumberland, and Westmoreland. Trustees and receivers^ Rev. James 
Wilkinson, William Murray esquire, Richard Fenton esquire, George 
Woodhead, Robert Poole, Anthony Thompson, Hugh Spooner, 
William Fowler, John Winter, Joshua Spooner, Jonathan Moor, 
Thomas Glossop, Jonathan Hague, George Greaves, John Parsons, 
Thomas Stevenson, William Hilditch gentlemen, and the Minister 
and Chapelwardens. Feb. 12, 24 Geo. HL (B. xxiv, 5.) 

Egton. Fire. 1803. 

For Thomas Shaw of the constablery of Egton, par. Lythe, it is 
represented by certificate under the hands of the Justices of the 
Peace for the North Riding, assembled at their General Quarter 
Sessions of the Peace, held at Northallerton on Tuesday, April 27, 
42 Geo. in (1802), That about ten o'clock on the morning of 
Saturday, March 13, 1802, the said Thomas Shaw's dwellinghouse 
was discovered to be on fire, which raged with great violence several 
hours, and notwithstanding very great exertions were made by very 
great numbers of people for the purpose of extinguishing it, the 
whole dwellinghouse with the furniture therein, beds, bedding, linen, 



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YORKSHIRE BRIEFS. 69 

wearing apparel, wheat, oats, beef, and bacon were destroyed, the 
truth of the premises made to appear at Quarter Sessions by the 
oaths of Willam Law and John Wilson, two of his principal 
neighbours, who were well acquainted with the premises at the time 
this unfortunate accident happened, and who have made an estimate 
of the loss sustained by the said poor sufferer, which upon a 
moderate computation amounts to the sum of 508//. 6j,, by which 
calamitous event the said poor sufferer, who is only a small farmer, 
and having a large family to maintain is much distressed and cannot 
be relieved therefrom without the assistance of charitable Christians. 
House to house collection in the counties of York, Durham, Derby, 
Notts., Lincoln, Lancaster, and Chester. Trustees and receivers^ the 
Archbishop of York, Robert Sinclair, Richard Moorsom, Thomas 
Mayes esquires. Rev. John Gilby, Rev. Samuel Harding, William 
Stevenson and John Stevenson Salt gentleman. June 14, 43 Geo. III. 
(B. xliii, 8.) 

Erringden Chapel, 181 7. 

Represented upon the humble petition of the Minister, Chapel- 
wardens and inhabitants of Erringden, par. Halifax, and by certificate 
under the hands of the Justices of the Peace for the West Riding, 
assembled at their General Quarter Sessions of the Peace held by 
adjournment at Bradford on Thursday, July 17, 57 Geo. HI (181 7), 
That the chapel of Saint John in the Wilderness in Erringden is 
not only in an unfinished state, but that although there has been 
already collected in the neighbourhood and expended the sum of 
1349^^- 15^- 7^-1 there is yet owing to the workmen who have been 
employed in building the same the sum of 326//. \2S, 7^., the truth 
of which was made to appear at Quarter Sessions by the oath of 
William Crabtree, an able and experienced workman. Estimate for 
the charge of finishing the same 478//. 4^. 10^., including the money 
now owing, which sum the said inhabitants are not able to raise 
among themselves, being principally labouring people and tenants at 
rack rents, besides being greatly burthened with poor, therefore 
incapable of completing the work without the charitable assistance of 
well disposed Christians. General Licence. Trustees and receivers^ 
Rev. Henry Coulthurst D.D., Joseph Priestley and Thomas Horton 
esquires, Roger Swire, David Oliver, Richard Ingham, William 
Murgatroyd, William Hinckliff, John Greenwood and John Stevenson 
Salt gentlemen. Nov. 8, 58 Geo. IH. (B. Iviii, 2.) 

EVERINGHAM ChURCH, 1 76 1. 

Represented upon the humble petition of the Minister, Church- 
wardens, and the principal inhabitants of the parish of Everingham, 



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70 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

and by certificate under the hands of Sir Robert Hildyard baronet, 
Sir Digby Legard baronet, Francis Best, William St. Quintin, John 
Grimston, Henry Willoughby Henry Egerton and Emanuel Jefferson, 
esquires, Justices of the Peace for the East Riding, made at their 
General Quarter Sessions of the Peace on Tuesday, April 15, 
33 Geo. II (1760), That the said parish church of Everingham is a 
very ancient structure, that the walls and foundations thereof are so 
bulged and sunk that they cannot any longer be repaired but must 
be entirely taken down and rebuilt, that the steeple is in such a 
dangerous and shattered condition, and also the roof and covering 
of the church, and the timber very much decayed, and every other 
part of the said church in so ruinous a condition that the same 
must be totally taken down and rebuilt. The truth of the premises 
was made to appear at Quarter Sessions by the oaths of several able 
and experienced workmen. Estimate of taking down and rebuilding 
the same 11 00//. and upwards, which sum the said parishioners are 
utterly unable to raise amongst themselves, being most of them 
tenants upon very small farms and being burthened with numerous 
poor. General licence. Trustees and receivers^ Sir Edmund Anderson 
baronet, Rev. William Williams, Robert Robinson, John Rudd, 
Kingsman Baskett and Robert Jackson clerks, Walter Staveley, 
Edward Plumpton, John Holmes, Thomas Stevenson and John 
Stevenson gentlemen. Jan. 9, i Geo. III. (B. i, 3.) 

Farnham Church, 1770. 

Represented upon the humble petition of the Minister, Church- 
wardens and inhabitants of the parish of Farnham, and by certificate 
under the hands of the Justices of the Peace for the West Riding, 
assembled at their General Quarter Sessions held at Skipton on 
July 12, 1768, That the parish church of Farnham is in so ruinous a 
condition that the inhabitants cannot assemble therein without 
eminent danger of their lives, and that the same cannot any longer 
be supported but must be wholly taken down and rebuilt. The 
truth of the premises was made to appear at Quarter Sessions by the 
oaths of able and experienced workmen. Estimate for taking down and 
rebuilding 1135//'. 6s. Sd., exclusive of old materials, which sum the 
said inhabitants are unable to raise among themselves, being chiefly 
tenants at rack rents and burthened with a numerous poor. House 
to house collection in the counties of York and Lancaster. Trustees 
and receivers^ Charles Slingsby, Thomas Turner Slingsby, Oliver Coghill, 
Richard Roundell, esquires, Duffield Scarab, Thomas Stevenson and 
John Stevenson, gentlemen. Jan. 16, 10 Geo. III. (B. x, 2.) 



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YORKSHIRE BRIEFS. 71 

Fearby. Fire. 1760. 

For Elizabeth Dawson on behalf of herself and five other persons, 
suflferers by fire at Fearby, it is represented by certificate under the 
hands of Thomas Robinson, Charles Crowe, Roger Talbot, Gregory 
Elsley, Edward Place and John Milbank, Justices of the Peace for 
the North Riding, made at their General Quarter Sessions of the 
Peace on April 4, 31 Geo. II (1758), That on Aug. 16 last a sudden 
and terrible fire broke out in the dwellinghouse of the said Elizabeth 
Dawson at Fearby, from which the flames reaching to other adjacent 
buildings, the dwellinghouses, barns, stables, cowhouses, malt kiln, 
household goods, furniture, and implements of husbandry of the said 
poor sufferers were totally burnt and destroyed, whereby the said poor 
sufferers are reduced to great want and misery. The truth of the 
premises made to appear at Quarter Sessions by the oaths of several 
credible persons who were neighbours to and well knew the premises 
before the said calamities happened to the said poor sufferers. 
Estimate of the losses (including a fire at Bengeworth in the borough 
of Evesham) 1151//. and upwards, exclusive of all insurances and 
private collections. That the Justices further have certified that by 
the said calamities the said poor sufferers are reduced to great 
misery and poverty and become real objects of charity, and must 
languish under heavy pressures unless relieved by the charity and 
benevolence of compassionate and well disposed Christians. House 
to house collection in the North Riding. Trustees and receiver s^ 
Sir John Rushout baronet, John Rushout, Thomas Rous, Thomas 
Coventry, John Hardcastle, William Danby and Arthur Danby, 
esquires, Thomas Ashfield, William Phillips, Thomas Dunn, Thomas 
Hull, William Penny, William Hardcastle, George Green, Thomas 
Stevenson and John Stevenson. July 14, 34 Geo. II. (A. vii, 3.) 



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DANBY V. SYDENHAM: 
A RESTORATION CHANCERY SUIT/ 

The Chancery Petition here printed was presented when Edward 
Hyde, Earl of Clarendon, was Lord High Chancellor of England, 
that is between April 20, 1661, when he was created an earl, and 
August 30, 1667, when the Great Seal was taken from him. It is a 
most excellent specimen of legal draughtsmanship, combining clear- 
ness and accuracy. The author, a barrister, Thomas Rokeby,* and 
member of Gray's Inn, was called to the Bar in June, 1657, and 
became one of the Judges of the Court of Common Pleas at the 
Revolution. Rokeby had a personal interest in the case, as he 
married the plaintiff's daughter. 

The story set forth in the petition commences with a certain 
Arthur Dakins, lord of the manor of Hackness, near Scarborough, 
and owner of valuable estates in that district. Although a Dakyn de 
Idsford contributed to the Poll Tax' in 2 Richard II (1379), in 
Bradford, near Clitheroe, the name only appears in this county in the 
sixteenth century, and at first in the neighbourhood of Hull. This 
family, like many others, rose to wealth by speculating in lands 
which had belonged to monastic houses, when it was possible to 
make very good bargains, as many persons were deterred from 
competing by religious scruples, or fear of a reaction, which would 
have forced them to disgorge their purchases. The manor of 
Hackness itself had formed a portion of the possessions of Whitby 
Abbey, which also owned land in Silpho, Harwood Dale, Suffield, and 
Everley, where Dakins had other property. In the Visitation of 
1584-5^ his father's name is called Robert Dakins," but nothing is 

1 The Chancery Petition is printed by Richmond, where he founded a hospital 

the courtesy of Dr. Francis Collins, a and grammar school. George Foxe tells 

member of our Council, who has kindly us that as Commissary for the Bishop of 

lent a copy of the decree of the Court of Chester he had charge of George Snell, 

Chancery m the case of Hobby v. Chap- who was afterwards burnt, 

man, and other illustrative documents. ^ Foster's edition, p. 169. 

""A Brief Memoir of Mr. Justice ^ The coat granted to the Dakins family 

Rokeby*' is printed in Vol. xxxvii of the is a good specimen of the pictorial arms 

Surtees Society, under the editorship of affected by Elizabethan heralds : — GuUsy 

the late Canon Raine. a lion passant guardant argent between 

^ Poll Tax for ike West Ridings p. 289. two mullets or and two flanches argent^ 

There was a well-known person of this each charged with a lion rampant sable. 

name, John Dakins, LL.D., rector in On his monument in Hackness Church, 

Queen Mary's time of Kirkby Hill, near Arthur Dakins bears a much more simple 



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A RESTORATION CHANCERY SUIT. 73 

said about him, and as the arms were granted only twenty-five years 
previously, it would appear that the family had only lately become 
important Arthur Dakyns had an elder brother, who was designated 
as of Chelmorton, near Buxton, in Derbyshire, but under what 
circumstances he became settled there is not known. There was also 
a sister Margaret mentioned in the Petition, who married a Derby- 
shire man, Edward Brewerton, which would tend to prove that the 
family had some connection with that county. There was another 
family of the same name related to the Dakins of Hackness, living 
at Foulbridge on the Derwent, near Yeddingham, and at Linton in 
the parish of Wintringham, near Sledmere, but bearing a different 
coat-of-arms.^ Arthur Dakins became a man of importance, and rose 
to be a member of the Quorum and a Justice of Peace at a time 
when that honour was more rarely bestowed than at present. He 
married his only child, Margaret, to Walter Devereux, second son of 
Walter Devereux, Earl of Essex, and sister to Elizabeth's ill-starred 
favourite. 

His will,* dated May i, 31 Eliz, (1589), contains a good deal of 
information about his family. It commences, " I, Arthure Dakins of 
Hacknes, esq., .... weighinge within myselfe the vncertanty and frailety 

of the lyfe of man in this transitorie world bequeath my soule 

into the handes of Allmighty God, assuredly trustinge of full remission 
of all my sinns and offences through the death and passion of his 
onely sonne, Jesus Christe, the Saviour of the world, and the 
Redeamer of me and all mankinde." Th^ testator then directs his 
body to be buried Christian like, where it should please God to 
appoint, the order whereof to be referred to his executors. He left 
his wife, Thomasine, a life estate in his manors of Linton and 
Thirkleby on York Wold, and in the tithe of corn and grain within 
in the town and fields of Place Newton and Thirkleby, and in all 
his property in the parishes of Kirkby " Grindallieth " and Wintring- 
ham, which he had purchased of George Dakins, late of Fowbridge, 
esq.' Remainder to his daughter Margaret, wife unto Walter 

coat, Argent^ an anchor sahle^ but on Isons, the lease of the personaige of 

what authority does not appear. His Weirthorpe, alias Weverthorpe (except 

cousin, George Dakins, bore entirely lo/i. rent which Thomas Colthurste of 

different arms : — Or, on a fesse sable ^ York, gent., doith paye vnto me for the 

between three pelicans vulning themselves tiethes of Eastelutton and Westlutton), 

guleSi a Itatt peasant guardant, between payinge the rente dewe to the deane and 

two cinquefoils gules {Foster, ^. 6^)). chapiter of Yorke. To sonne, Arthure 

*/5/</., pp. 511, 639. Dakyns of Cowton, my lease of the 

' Heg. Test., xxvi, 227^. personaige of Cowton, paying yearlie 

' March i, 21 Eliz. (1578-9). George vnto my nephew, Thomas Dakyns, and 

Dakins th'elder, of Foulbridge, esq. To Margaret, his wif, duringe there lyf 

children of son, George Dakins, and of naturall, sex poundes. To Eliz. Dakins, 

daughter, Mary Isons, wife of Charles doughter to my nephew, Thomas Dakins, 



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74 



THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 



Devercux, esq., in tail; with remainders in tail male to Humphrey 
Dakins of Chelmerton, in the Peake, county Derby (his brother), to 
his nephews, Richard Gates and William Brewerton, and to Arthur 
Beverley, son of Peter Beverley. After giving 20//. to Elizabeth 
Strangwish, and half that sum to Elizabeth Constable, daughter of 
William Constable of Sherburne, and giving the residue to his wife 
and daughter, whom he appointed his executors, he made his trusty 
friends, Thomas Bambrough, esq., and Richard Percy of the city of 
York, Doctor of Law, the supervisors of his will. The will was 
proved by the executors on Jan. 31, 1 595-6. 

Between the date of the will and its proof Margaret Dakins not 
only lost her husband, Walter Devereux, but had married a second 
husband, Thomas Sidney, third son of Sir Henry Sidney, brother of 
the well known Sir Philip Sidney. The authority for this marriage is 
the monument to Arthur Dakins at Hackness. A little over a year 
after she became a widow for the second time. She married lastly 
Sir Thomas Posthumus Hoby, in conjunction with whom she erected 
a monument to her father's memory in Hackness Church. 

This monument,^ which is affixed to the north wall of the 
chancel, within the altar rails, consists of a black marble slab, 
measuring 2i§ inches in height by 21 inches in breadth, upon which 
is the chief inscription. The main portion of the monument is of 
white marble veined with red, and has a projecting cornice at the 



towardes her preferment in marriage, 
tenne pounde. To my doughter-in-lawe, 
Katherine Creike, 40J. a yeare oute of the 
said personaige of Weythroppe. To Elline 
Sapcotes, towardes her preferment in 
marriage, y>/i. , so that she marry withe 
the consent of my sonne, Arthure Dakins. 
To Katherine Colthurst, wyf of Thomas 
Colthurst, for her paynes taken with me 
in my sicknes, my bed wythe the furny- 
ture, and other my houshold stuff nowe 
remaynynge at her husbandes house. 
Res. to my sonne Arthure Dakyns, my 
sole executor. My cosyn, Arthure Dakyns 
esq., to be supervisor, and for his paynes 
I gyve vnto hym my best horse. Wit- 
nesses, Charles Isons, John Bickerton, 
William Miles. Codicil, dated March 6 
in the same year. To nephew Thomas 
Dakins of Westheslerton, and Margaret, 
his wyf, all my interest and terme of 
yeares in all that parlor or house, stand- 
inge in the precmct of the courte or 
yearde of Fowbrige, my chamber, one 
litle garth, called tne Dove Cote, on the 
easte side of the said parlor, one close or 
pasture, called the Litle Pranck Close, 
withe the heyc growinge vpon the furrowes 
of the come close, on the southe side of 



the other Prank Close ; the gaites or 
pasturinge of 22 kyen, 4 oxen, 4 horsses 
or maiers, within the closes and groundes 
of the manour of Fowbrige, during the 
hoUe tyme of the yeare; and the wyn- 
tringe and keipinge of seaven score sheipe 
with sufficient and competente fother and 
pasture in wynter onely, by vertue of a 
leAse maid vnto me by George Dakyns, 
the yonger, my sonne ; also all my tytle 
to one close, called Great Pranck Close, 
under a similar lease. In a second 
codicil, dated the day following, made in 
the night time, namely about one or two 
of the clock, when the bequest to 
Katherine Colthurst was read to him, he 
said, **Naye, Marye, I do not, for I 
neither gave the teastour, northe vallainge, 
nor the curtinges, nor the coueringe, 
meanynge that coueringe whiche in his 
last seiknes, nowe and then, did lye opon 
hym« nor the downe bedd, but onely so 
moche as was at her howse." Proved 
March 23, 1578-9 (AV^. 7>j/., xxi, 313). 
1 The reader is indebted to Mr. E. W. 
Crossley, a member of our Society, for 
notes on the monuments at Hackness and 
a description of the chapel at Harwood 
Dale. 



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A RESTORATION CHANCERY SUIT. 76 

top. This cornice is surmounted in the centre by a device, on which 
are the arms of Dakins, and over them a visor; above this, again, 
being the forefront of a horse erect. The device is flanked on either 
side by a pyramidal column of red marble. The slab bearing the 
inscription is surrounded by a double border, the inner and narrower 
being plain, and containing in the centre of each side a water lily in 
high relief. The top portion of the outer border is decorated with 
three circular bosses of black marble. The outer border on each 
side is embellished with three shields of arms. The bottom portion 
of the outer border, which projects somewhat and is separated from 
the inner border by a slight moulding, is ornamented with three 
circular bosses similar to those on the top portion of the border. 
On either side of the central of these latter bosses is the supple- 
mentary portion of the inscription. Below this again comes some 
scroll work in low relief, with a larger circular boss of black marble 
set in the centre of it. 

Here lieth interred in v» assvred hope of y« resvrrec- 
TiON Arthvre Dakins esqvire who after he had at- 

TAVNED VNTO Y« AGE OF 76 YEARES DIED V^ 13 DAY OF IVLY 
1592* HE LEFT BEHINDE HIM BY ThOMAZIN HIS WIFE Y« DAVGH : 

OF Thomas Gvy esqvire & Alice his wife sister vnto s" 

WIMVND CAREWE OF AnTHONY IN Y« COVNTIE OF CORNWAL 

Knight one only davghter & heyre named Margret 
whome he twice bestowed in mariage in his life time 
FIRST VNTO Walter Deverevx esqvire second brother 

VNTO Y» RIGHT HON : ROBERT NOW ErLE OF EsSEX BVT HE 
DIED IN HIS FIRST YOVTH W^HovT ISSVE BY A HVRTE RECE- 
VED IN SERVICE BEFORE ROANE IN Y» YEARE I591 & THENE HE 
MARIED HER VNTO ThOMAS SiDNEY ESQVIR Y« THIRD SONNE 

OF Y» honovrable s"* Henry Sidney Knight & companion 

OF Y= MOST noble ORDER OF Y= GaRTER BVT HE AFTER HE HAD 
TWO YEARES OVERLIVED HIS WIVES SAID FATHER DIED ALSO 
WT"OVT ISSV Y« 26 DAY OF IVLY 1 595 WHOS BODY WAS BY HIS 
DISTRESED WIDDOW HONOVRABLY BVRIED AT KINGSTON VPPON 
HVLL ft IN Y« 13 MONETH OF HER SINGLE & MOST SOLITARYE LIFE 

Y« SAID Margaret disposed of her self in mariage vnto 
s* Thomas Posthvmvs hoby kinght y« second sonne of 
s** Thomas hoby knight who died in Paris in y« yeare 
1566 where he then remayned resident Ambassa- 

DOVR from OVR most DREAD SOVERAIGNE THE 

Q : Ma*^'* that nowe is. 

^ The figure 2 in 1592 is painted, or cut and painted, over a figure 3, 
which is still quite distincl. 



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76 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

On the bottom of the monument the following, in 
somewhat larger type: — 
In Dvtifvll memorye of y« erecfed this monvment 

FORESAYD ArTHVRE DaKINS S" WHOE ALSOE REPAYRED Y^ 

Thomas Posthvmvs Hoby & Chawncell y« 9 day 

Dame Margaret his Wiff of Avgvst 1597 

This monument contains a wealth of heraldry, for the elucidation 
of which the Society is indebted to the Rev. C. V. Collier. 

I. At the top in the centre. Argent, an anchor sable. — Dakins. 

II. At the top on the dexter side, quarterly of sixteen : — 

1. Argent, a fess gules, in chief three torteaux, with a 

crescent or for difference. — Devereux. 

2. Argent, a cross engrailed gules between four water- 

bougets sable. — Bourchier. 

3. France and England quarterly, a bordure argent — 

Thomas of Woodstock. 

4. Azure six lions rampant or between a bend cotised of 

the second. — Bohun. 

5. Gules two bend, one or, the other argent. — Fitz Walter. 

6. Quarterly or and gules an escarbuncle sable. — 

Mandeville or Magneville. 

7. Gules, sem^e of billets or, a fess argent. — Louvain. 

8. Argent, a fess and a canton gules. — Wydeville. 

9. Argent a saltire gules fretty or. — Crophull or 

Croxhill. 

10. Or, a fret gules. — Verdon. 

11. Party per pale or and vert, a lion rampant fourch^e 

gules. — Marshall, Earl of Pembroke. 

12. Gules, a bend lozengy or. — Strongbow. 

13. Vair or and gules. — Ferrers. 

14. Azure, three garbs or. — Blondeville. 

15. Gules, seven mascles or, voided of the field. — Quincy. 

16. Gules, a cinquefoil argent. — Beaumont. 
III. Quarterly :— 

1. Or, a pheon azure, a mullet for difference. — Sidney. 

2. Argent, three chevronels gules, a label of three points 

argent. — Barrington. 

3. Quarterly or and gules an escarbuncle sable. — 

Mandeville. 

4. Barry of ten argent and gules a lion rampant or. — 

Adams. 



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A RESTORATION CHANCERY SUIT. 77 

IV. Quarterly of eight, with Dakins on an escutcheon of 
pretence : — 

1. Argent, a fess between three hawks sable, beaked and 

jessed or, a crescent for difference. — Hoby.^ 

2. Gules, three battle axes in fess or. — Hackluyt. 

3. Argent, three fusils in fess gules. — Hoby. 

4. Sable, an eagle displayed argent. — Dernford. 

5. Argent, a lion rampant sable, langued and ducally 

crowned or. — Morgan. 

6. Sable, a pomegranate or, seeded proper, leaved and 

slipped or. 

7. Gules, a lion rampant regardant argent 

8. Argent, a chevron between three boars' heads couped 

sable. — SwiNFORD. 

On the sinister side: — 
V. Devereux impaling Dakins as above. 
VI. Sidney impaling Dakins. 
VII. Hoby impaling Dakins. 

The third husband of Margaret Dakins was not unworthy by birth 
to succeed the brothers of the brave Earl of Essex and the chivalrous 
Sir Philip Sidney. His father. Sir Thomas Hoby, of Bisham in 
Berkshire, had died in 1566 when Ambassador in France, leaving, as 
the name implies, a posthumous child. Besides his services as a 
diplomatist. Sir Thomas did good work for his country by translating 
in a most masterly fashion from the Italian the Courtier of Baldassart 
Castiglione^ which has lately appeared in the series of Tudor 
Translations. His mother, Anne, was one of the learned daughters 
of Sir Anthony Cooke, all of whom are said to have been well 
versed in the learned languages. One of Lady Hoby's sisters was the 
mother of Francis Bacon, who consequently was Hoby's first cousin. 
In his younger days he served in Ireland, where he was knighted in 
1593-' I^ ^^t^r life his name constantly occurs in the Quarter 
Sessions Rolls of the North Riding, where he played the part of a 
most energetic and useful Justice of the Peace. 

Although there were no children, the marriage seems to have 
been a singularly happy one. In his will and in the monument he 
erected to her memory, her husband speaks in the most affectionate 

1 Hobby, a small falcon. his Diary gives a very unpleasing account 

« Metcalfe's Book of Knights (Harleian of Hoby, and speaks of him as litigious 
Society), p. 208. Sir Hugh Cholmley in and overbearing. 



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78 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

terms of the wife^ he had lost. The church at Hackness was largely 
restored by their munificence in 1597, and a chapel, dedicated to St 
Margaret, was erected by him in 1634, shortly after his wife's 
decease, in accordance with her wishes, for the good of the souls 
and bodies of the inhabitants dwelling within Harwood Dale. He 
also made provision for one sufficient preacher to preach God's word 
and to catechize on every Lord's Day, commonly called Sunday. 

It is sad to relate that, in consequence of inconvenience, this 
most interesting example of the earnest churchmanship of Caroline 
times, a building coeval with St. John's, Leeds, and Nicholas Ferrars' 
church at Little Gidding in Huntingdonshire, has been allowed to go 
to decay; having been superseded by a new chapel built, about a 
mile lower down the dale, in the year 1862, by the late Sir J. V. B. 
Johnstone, Bart, the lord of the manor. 

A friend who has lately visited the old chapel describes it 
thus : — 

"The chapel, which is picturesquely situated, is in a very bad 
condition, although the roof is still on. There is a good boundary 
wall round the graveyard, which is tidy. The grass seems to be 
mown occasionally. In regard to the chapel itself, the roof of the 
south porch (the only one), has fallen in, and that part of the south 
wall against which it abuts has also collapsed to within a few feet 
of the ground, and as far as its junction with the west wall. There 
is a very bad crack in the masonry of the south-east corner, reach- 
ing from the top nearly to the bottom of the wall. There are also 
one or two smaller cracks. Where the southern slope of the roof 
meets the western gable it is almost torn away from it, owing to 
the collapse of the wall beneath, already mentioned. On the north 
side nearly one-sixth of the slates are off, principally those nearest 
the north wall. What appears to be an elder tree, about five feet 
high, with several offshoots, is growing on the top of the north wall. 
There are not many slates off on the south side. 

"Inside, the seating and floor-boards, or flags, have all dis- 
appeared, except the platform for the altar, and part of that is falling 
from its place. The floor is covered with rubbish of all kinds, 
stones, and there are many which have fallen into the chapel owing 
to the collapse of part of the south wall, referred to above, plaster 
from the north wall, and any amount of dust and leaves. There is 
no glass in the windows, so the chapel is become a nesting place 
for pigeons, of whom there were many about at the time of my 
visit. What appears to be the font lies broken to the south of the 

* Abundant evidence of her piety is furnished by her diary, now preserved in the 
British Museum (Egerion MS., No. 2614). 



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Harwood Dale Chapkl from the South-East and from the South-West. 



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u 

3 
< 



X 



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A RESTORATION CHANCERY SUIT. 79 

altar platform. At some time, probably later than the time when 
the chapel was built, the roof has been underdrawn with boards, 
which have been painted a turquoise blue colour; but about half 
have been ripped off. 

"The chapel is built of squared stones, and it is probable that 
if a little care had been taken to keep it in decent repair it might 
have lasted a long time. Messrs. Poole & Hugall, in their book on 
The Churches of Scarborough^ Fil^y% <^nd the Neighbourhood^ published 
in 1848, speak of it as in good condition, and give a picture of the 
lichgate, which must be one of the oldest in the North of England, 
where they only have been introduced in modern times. The lichr 
gate has been built of smaller and rougher stones than the chapel 
itself. The roof has entirely disappeared, except three timbers. The 
side posts and lintel of the gate itself remain. There have been no 
seats in the gateway, or stone upon which to rest the corpse. The 
height of the doorway, from the under-side of the lintel to the 
ground, is 6 feet 4 inches; the width of the doorway, 5 feet i^ inches." 

The inscription, commemorating the foundation, is on a slate 
slab, surrounded by a stone border, which is quite plain on 
three sides, but on the top side takes the form of a projecting 
cornice, and is affixed to the east wall of the chapel, on the south 
side of the east window. The following is a copy : — 

"When S" Thomas Posthvmvs Ho [by] knight 

& the LADY MaRGARETT HIS LATE WIFE WERE 
VNITED TOGETHER IN THIS WORLD THEY BOTH 
RESOLVED TO HAVE A ChAPPELL ERECTED FOR 
DEVINE SERVICE FOR Y« GOOD OF Y« SOVLES & BODYS J 

OF Y« InHABITANTES DWELLINGE W^HIN HaREWOOD DALE 
& WT«IN VERY FEWE MONTHES NEXT AFTER HIS 
SAID WIVES DECEASE HE DID ERECT THIS ChAPPELL 
IN Y* YEARE 1 634 AnD AS THEY HAD BOTH 
FORMERLY RESOLVED HE HATH BY CONVEYANCE 
PROVIDED THAT HIS ASSIGNE (VNTO WHOM HE HATH 
ASSVRED THE INHERITANCE OF HaREWOODDALE 
IN REVERSION AFTER HIS OWNE DEATH) AND 
HIS HEIRES & ASSIGNES SHALL FOR EVER 
FINDE ONE SVFFICIENT PREACHER TO 
PREACH GODS WORD, AND TO CaTECHYSE 
HE [re] IN ON EVERY LoRDS DAY COMONLY 
CALLED SVNDAY." 

After his wife's death, in September, 1633, Hoby erected a 
monument, now on the south wall of the chancel of Hackness 



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80 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

Church, as a testimony to their entire mutual affection to one 
another. It is 57^^ inches high by 57 J inches wide, and consists of 
a black marble tablet, 35 J inches by 35^ inches, bearing the inscrip- 
tion given below, which is surrounded by a white marble border. 
This border has a seeded rose in each corner, and the arms of 
Hoby impaling Dakins in the centre of each of its four sides. The 
top and bottom portions of the border have a small rectangular 
panel of black marble, 11 J by 2f inches, on either side of the coat 
of arms. That portion of the border, on either side of the 
monument, has the head of a cherub enveloped with wings in the 
place of the marble panel. 

The inscription on the monument is as follows : — 

The Lady Margaret Hoby, late wife of S« Thomas Posthvmvs 
HoBY Knight, 

•AND SOLE DaVGHTER & HEIRE OF ArTHVRE DaKINS ESQ* BY 
ThOMASIN HIS WIFE 

after she had lived seven & thirty yeares & one moneth 

wth her said hvs- 
band in mvtvall entire affection to both their extraordinary 

comfortes and 
had finished the woork that god had sent her into this 

world to performe 
and after she had attained vnto the begining of the sixty 

third yeare of her 
age on the fovrth day of the seventh moneth of that yeare, 

it was the will of 
Almighty God to call her fovrth of this vale of miserie; 

AND her body was BV- 

ryed in this chancell, on the sixt day of the same moneth 
(beinge September 

An<> 1633) SOE NEER VNTO THE BODIES OF HER SAYDE FATHER; AND 

of her sayde mo- 
ther (wc» was interred by her sayde fathers bodie on the 

thirteenth day of 
November An® 161 3) as that all three will become bvt one 

HEAPE of DVSTE. 

Whilst this Lady remained in this natvrall life she helde 

ACONSTANT RELI- 
GIOVS COVRSE IN PERFORMINGE THE DVTIES REQVIRED OF EVERY 
FAITHFVLL ChILD OF 

God both in their pvblike and private callings : not only by 
propagatinge 



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A RESTORATION CHANCERY SUIT. 81 

HIS HOLY WORD IN ALL PLACES WHERE SHE HAD POWER BVT ALSOE 

BY EXERCISINGE 
HER SELFE DAYLY IN ALL OTHER PERTICVLER CHRISTIAN DVTIES, AND 

ENDEVOURES TO PER- 
FORME THE WHOLE WILL OF GOD THROUGH HER FAITHE IN ChRIST 

THE FRVITES 
WHEROF were DAILY REAPED BY SVNDRY OF THE FAITHFVLL 

serv antes of god, 
(aswell strangers vnto her, as of her own kinred & Allies) 

WHOSE 
WANTES WERE LARGELY SVPPLIED BY HER CHRISTIAN CHARITIE AND 

ALL SVCH 
AS WERE EYE WITNESSES OF HER GODLY MANNER OF LYFE AND 

CONVERSATION 

AND OF Gods great mercy shewed vnto her in her laste 

SICKNES BY 

GIVINGE VNTO HER MEMORY TO PRAY VNTO HIM : AND IN THE MANNER 

OF SEPE- 
I 
I RATINGS HER SOVLE FROM HER BODIE WITH SOE LITTLE BODILY 

PAYNE: HAD AN 
I ASSVRED HOPE FIXED IN THEIR HEARTES THAT HER FVTVRE 

RESVRRECTION WILL BE 
TO INHERIT THAT EtERNALL HABITATION IN GODS HEAVEN [l]y 

KiNGDOME WHICH 
WHILST SHE LIVED WITH VS HERSELFE OFTEN EXPRESSED (bOTH BY 

HER WORDE & DEEDS) 
THAT SHE WAS ASSVRED ONLY THROVGH THE MEER MERCY AND 

[pr]eciovs MERITES 

OF HER ONLY SaVIOVR IESUS CHRIST, TO ENIOY AFTER HER 

dep[ar]tvre OVTE 
of this mortall lyfe, as the crowne of that faith which she 

professed 

and practized heer on earthe. 

non ero vobiscvm donec devs ipse vocabit : 

tvnc cineres vestros consociabo meis. 

Thomas Posthvmvs Hoby. 

It seems probable Hoby spent a large amount of money on his 
wife's property, and felt justified in persuading her, after a great deal 
of importunity and solicitation, to settle the manor and rectory of 
Hackness and her other lands upon herself and her husband and 
their heirs, with remainder over to his own heirs. The agreement, 
by which Hoby and his wife agreed with Ralph Sutton and William 

VOL. XVII. G 



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82 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

Chapman to levy a fine for this purpose, was executed on July 27, 
8 Car. I (1632). There was in the deed a proviso enabling him to 
make such revocation thereof as he should please. She died in 
September, 1633. Before her death she expressed a wish to sell all 
her property except Everley, to raise money to be disposed amongst 
her kindred and for other charitable purposes, at the discretion of 
her husband ; 100//. being for the use of her kinswoman, Thomasine, 
wife of James Danby. With the object of carrying out her intention, 
about a month after her decease, he conveyed the lands to John 
Chapman, a relative of his wife, in trust, to raise 2,700//. for this 
purpose; but Chapman becoming by a debauched course of life 
altogether unmeet to stand any longer trusted, Hoby brought actions 
in the Courts of Wards and of Chancery against him and his father, 
William Chapman, to have the conveyance set aside. The defendants 
agreed to reconvey the property, saving the estate of John Chapman 
and his wife, Katherine, in Harwood Dale, where he (Chapman) was 
to find a preaching minister at the new chapel. However, when the 
deed was ready for execution, the defendants denied that there ever 
had been any such agreement, and in their answer in the new suit, 
brought by Hoby against them in the Court of Chancery, William 
Chapman alleged that Hoby had promised him a lease for seven 
years, at a very reasonable rate, of a fair messuage, called Nettlehead, 
but that since the agreement the plaintiff had ruinated a fair house 
which was upon the premises, and carried away a great part of the 
materials. Ultimately judgment in the suit was given on Tuesday, 
October 22, 1639, by Lord Coventry, keeper of the Great Seal, 
assisted by the Chief Justice of the King's Bench and the Chief 
Baron, when it was decreed that the agreement should be performed 
by both parties, and that all suits in the Star Chamber or elsewhere 
should cease. 

Before Hoby had recovered the property he proceeded to carry 
out his wife's wishes, and, amongst other of her kindred, paid to 
Thomasine Danby 100//.; but to guard against the money being 
wasted, as it had been by Chapman, took a bond for that amount 
from her husband, James Danby, payable at the end of twelve 
months. This took place in April, 1638. Shortly before the money 
became due Danby went to see Hoby on the subject, and was told 
that, as he had a good report of him, the hundred pounds would 
not be recalled. Hoby desired Danby and his wife not to make 
themselves strangers to him, as he had a kind respect towards them, 
and all other his deceased lady's kindred that were hopeful. After- 
wards he distributed further portions of the 2,700//. to his wife's 
kindred, but always took bonds for the sums so paid. 



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A RESTORATION CHANCERY SUIT. 83 

Sir Thomas made his will on March 28, 1640, in the following 
terms: — "I, Sir Thomas Posthumous Hoby of Hacknes, knight, 
being in health of body and of perfect memory, and calling vnlo 
my mynde that man is not soe assured of anything in this world as 
of a deprivation of his naturall life, and that there is not anything 

more vncertaine then the tyme thereof I doe first comend my 

soule vnto Almyghty God, my glorious creator, and (in Jesus Christ) 
my most gratious and mercyfull father, with an assured hope and 
confident beleife that onely through his mercy, and the merittes and 
passion of my Lord and onely Saviour, Jesus Christ, my soule, as 
soone as it shall part from my mortall body, shall imediately be 
receiued into an eternal habitacon in Godes heauenly kingdome, and 
that it shall there remaine vntil the day of the last resurrection; and 
that then both my soule and my body shall againe be vnited 
together, and shall foreuer after enioy eueriasting life in the presence 
of the coequall and coeternall Trinity. And for my body I doe 
comend the same vnto the earth, the originall materiall substance of 
all flesh, to be buried by the apointment of my executors in decent 
manner, but neyther with superfluous cost, nor in ouer publique sort, 
in the chancell of the parrishe church of Hacknes, next vnto the 
dust of the body of my late most deare and onely wife, the Lady 
Margarett Hoby." 

He appointed as his executors, George Hickes, clerk, parson of 
Leesham^; Francis Prowde, clerk, preacher of God's word in the 
parish of Hackness; and James Moore, of Angram Grange, gent, 
in trust for his dearly-beloved and most-esteemed cousin, John 
Sydenham, eldest son and heir of John Sydenham, late of 
Brimpton, in the county of Somerset, esquire, by his near 
kinswoman, Alice, his wife, that was the daughter of William 
Hoby, late of Hales in the county of Gloucester, esquire, until he 
should accomplish the age of twenty-one years, and then he to be 
sole executor. He appointed Mr. Robert Barwick, of the city of 
York, counsellor at law, supervisor of his will. And he proceeds: — 
"And whereas I, being desirous to be beneficiall vnto many of my 
late wife's poore kindred and freindes, haue heretofore voluntarily 
conveyed and setled certain landes, parcell of my mannour of 
Hacknes, vpon one John Chapman and his heires, with intent and 
vpon trust that I might at my owne will and pleasure cause seuerall 
summes of money to be distributed, as a free guift by me giuen 
vnto them, as a remembrance of that extraordinary aflection that was 
betweene her and myselfe in our life tyme. The most part of 
which money I have already paid, as will evidently appeare by the 

^ Levisham, near Pickering. 



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84 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

acquittances, by me received at their seuerall paymentes thereof. 
Concerning which lands I haue obteined a decree in the High 
Court of Chancery, in Michaelmas Tearme last, against the said John 
Chapman, whereby a certaine proporcon of land, in the said deed 
specyfied, ought to be reassured to me and my hcires, which 
assurance is not yet done. My will and mynde is that, in case I 
depart this life before I shall make better and other assurance of 
the same land vnto the said John Sydenham, that he shall hould and 
enjoy the said lands to him and his heres for euer to his owne sole 
vse. And touching the residue of the moneyes, as yet vnpaid vnto 
my said late wives kindred, considering that my personall estate is 
fittest to be charged therewith, I doe giue and distribute the same, 

as in this my present will is hereafter menconed To my said 

executor, John Sydenham, esq., the flaggon bracelett* of gould, with 
the picture of my late most deare and onely wife deceased, which is 
fastned therevnto, and which I doe purpose (if God shall permitt), 
to weare about myne arme vntill and att the tyme of my death. 
And alsoe one other picture of my said late wife, that is sett in a 
box of ivery or elephantes tooth, with a peice of christall to keepe 
it from the dust, hopeing that my said executor will keepe them for 
memoriall of that affectionate care which my said late wife did, in 
her life tyme, take of his well doeing, and for his education in his 
youngest yeares. And to that end I desire that myne executors in 
trust doe take order that the said bracelett may be carefully 
preserued at the tyme of my death, and may be saifely deliuered 
after my death vnto my said cosin, John Sidenham, or els lett it be 
saifely deliuered vnto his wife. Vnto my cosen, Mary Sydenham, 
one of the sisters of my said executor, loo//. Vnto my said 
executor's younger brother, George Sydenham, 300//. And I doe 
desire that my said executors shall pay all such legacyes as are 
already menconed, eyther in this my last will or in the schedule 
herevnto now annexed and subscribed by myselfe, eyther at the tyme 
of the publishing hereof, or at any tyme hereafter dureing my life, to 
be in like sort subscribed and published by way of addition to the 
same, all the legacyes by me soe expressed, or to be expressed in 
the same schedule, to be paid or otherwise discharged." 

John Sydenham was made the residuary legatee. The witnesses 
to the will were Francis Lutton, James Danby (relatives of his wife), 
and Edward Todd, Jeremy Cockerell, and John Beswick. 

The testator did not live long after making his will, but falling 
into a fit of a cold palsy, died suddenly, so that at the time of his 

* A flagon-bracelet y or chain, is supposed to have been a chain -bracelet to which a 
smelling bottle (French /br^//) could be attached. See New English Dictionary, j.v. 



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A RESTORATION CHANCERY SUIT. 85 

death the name of only one of his wife's relatives, Hester Dakins, 
daughter of Robert Dakins, was inserted in the schedule. Hoby's 
will was proved on April 26, 1641, by Prowde and Moore, Hickes 
renouncing.* Hoby was buried according to his wish in Hackncss 
Church, near his wife; but in consequence of the minority of his 
heir, John Sydenham, and the disturbances caused by the Civil Wars, 
no memorial was erected till over forty years later, when his devisee's 
son. Sir John Posthumus Sydenham, placed a slab to his memory, now 
on the wall of the north aisle. It is of white marble with a central 
space, heart shaped with a blunted apex, 30J inches by 29J inches 
across the top, and 24 inches across the centre, bearing the inscrip- 
tion given below. It is surrounded with folds of drapery, amongst 
which the arms of Hoby are worked in at the top, and those of 
Sydenham, Argent, three rams sable, armed and unguled or, with the 
red hand of Ulster, impaling Herbert, Per pale azure and gules, 
three lions rampant argent, langued gules, in a similar manner 
at the bottom. The whole is surmounted by a small urn, out of 
which issues a golden flame. 

Deponuntur heic juxti 

Dignifsimi Cineres 
Domini Thomae Pofthumi Hobby 

Viri Lectifsimiq' pii 
Hujus manerii quondam Domini 

Qui obiit 3o<> die Decembr* An° 
1640 
iEtat: suae septuagesimo 

In cujus memoriam 
Dominus lohannes Sydenham* 

(cui nunc manerium 

clarefsimi {sic) praedicti donum) 
Monumentu' hoc pofuit 

Anno Dom : 1682 

After his death his executors did nothing about the 100//., and 
Sydenham, knowing Hoby's wishes in the matter, also refrained. The 
statement, however, in the petition that a period of four years elapsed 
between Hoby's death and Sydenham's coming of age is disproved 
by Sydenham being created a baronet on July 28, 1642, which is 

^ The original will is preserved in the with the following inscription :— " This 

York Registry in the bundle for August, Royal Atchievement was Erected by y« 

164X-2, and a copy in the bundle for Hon*>>« S' Philip Sydenham, L«* of this 

September, 1646-7. Mannor [and] of Brimpton in Sommerfet, 

*In the vestry at Hackness are the and M.A. of y« Univerfity of Cam- 
royal arms and the letters, Wy« iii«* R, bridg; 1699." 



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86 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHJEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

hardly likely to have been done whilst he was a minor, and by the 
fact that he died in that same year. On July 14, 1648, Francis Lutton 
exhibited an inventory of Hoby's effects in the name of Lady Anne 
Sydenham, executrix of her husband's will.^ 

Nothing was done about the bond till after the Restoration, when 
Sir John's widow brought an action on it against Danby in the 
King's Bench for the loo/r'., and the penalty for non-payment. Danby 
alleged in his petition in the Chancery suit, which he brought to 
obtain relief from the Common Law action, that Lady Sydenham 
had purposely delayed bringing the action till all the persons who 
could have given evidence in the matter were dead or removed into 
unknown places. There was, however, another very good reason for 
delay. Rokeby, who had drawn the petition, was one of the chief 
advisers of the Puritans in the North of England, and seems to have 
been in some way connected with the Court of Cromwell. During 
the Commonwealth Lady Sydenham would hesitate to bring an 
action against a man whose son-in-law occupied so influential a 
position in the Puritan party; but when the King enjoyed his own 
again, she no doubt thought she would have a better chance, as her 
adversary's party was under a cloud. It is to be regretted that the 
issue of the case is not given. 

Pedigrees' showing the connection between Sir T. P. Hobby and 
Sir John Sydenham, and between Margaret, Lady Hoby, and James 
Danby ; — 

A. 
William Hoby=: 



William Hoby,= Sir Thos. Hobby =Eliz., 



of Hursley | Ob. 1566, 

act. 36 



William Hoby= 



dau. of Sir 
Anthony Cook 



Alice = John Sydenham 

Sir John Sydenham, Bart. = Anne, 



Sir Edw. Hoby= 

Ob. 1605 ^ 

Sir Tbofww Posthumus Hoby 



Ob. 1642 



second daughter of John Hare, 
of Stow Bardolph, co. Norfolk 



Sir John Posthumus Sydenham, =(i) Elizabeth, dau. of Lord Powlett 
Bart, M.P. Ob. 1696 I (2) Lady Mary Herbert 



I 
Sir Philip Sydenham, Bart., o.s.p. He gave a library to 
Hackness Church in 1700, and rebuilt most of 
the North aisle. 

* Dickering Act Book^ sub anno^ 1641. 
» I am indebted for these pedigrees to Mr. J. W. Clay, F.S.A. 



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A RESTORATION CHANCERY SUIT. 



87 



B. 
Robert Dakins= 



(i) Humphrey Dakins, — 
of Chelmorton, yf^ 
CO. Derby 



(2) Arthur Dakins=Thomazine Gye William Brewerton 



Margaret = Ed ward Brewerton, 
I CO. Derby 



I Eliz. Brewerton =Geo. Anlaby, 

Margaret Dakins. Mariied Sir T. P. j of Thorpe Bassett* 

Hoby, and died without issue | 

Anne Anlaby= James Richardson, 
I of Grimston^ 



Thomazine Richardson = James Danby* 



UrsuIa^Thomas Rokeby, 

Justice of the Common Pleas. 



* May 10, 1613. George Anlabie, of 
Thorbasset {sic). Buried in the quier of 
parishe churche of Thorbasset. My 
parsonage or rectorie of RoUington (^V) 
to Francis Anlabie, my sonne and heire. 
The lease of my farme or farmes in 
Thorbasset to Eliz., my wife, and Francis 
Anlabie, my sonne, joyntlie. To Eliz. 
Lakine and Anne Lakine, my grand- 
children, 2oit\; which sum my sonne-in- 
lawe, Robert Lakine, is indebted unto 
me. My daughter, Anne Richardson, 
2olt\ George Dakins, my godson, 20s. 
Brother-in-lawe, Will. Brearton, super- 
visor. Proved January 24, 1 61 3-4 (^^. 
7>//., xxxii, 653^/). 

* Licence for their marriage in 1603, at 
North Grimston or Thorpe Bassett ( YorJk- 
shire Archaological Journal^ x, 450). 

* The connection between the ntmily of 
Danby, of Kirkby Knowle, and the 
family of the same name living in the 
adjoining parish of Leake, though highly 
probable, has not yet been proved. I 
add the will of a member of the Kirkby 
Knowle line, who must have been nearly 
related to the complainant, Tames Danby. 
July 20, 14 Car. I, 1638. George 
Danbye of Kirkbyeknowle, yeoman. . . . 
My bodye to be buried within the 
parrishe churche yarde, neare vnto my 
ancestors. Vnto Marye, my lovinge wife, 
my tenement and farmehold in Kirkbye- 
knowle for her widdowhead ; (excepte one 
parlor in my dwellinge howse, wherein 
my sister, Beatrice, now lyeth, which 



parlor and all my tearme and interest 
therein I give vnto my said sister, 
Beatrice, for the tearme of her naturall 
life). My said tenement and farmeholde, 
after the deathe or marriage of my said 
wife, vnto my nephew, George Danbye. 
That moietye of my farme at Cowesbye, 
which somtymes were in the possession of 
my brother, William Danbye, vnto my 
nephew, Thomas Danbye. The other 
moietye vnto my said wife duringe her 
widdowhood, and after to my said 
nephew, George Danbye. Vnto my neece, 
Anne Danbye, 3/«. Vnto my neece, 
Kateryne Danbye, 301. Vnto my neece, 
Averill Danbye, 40J. Vnto my neece 
Elizabeth Danby, 40J. To my neece, 
Jaine Danbye, 30J. To my sister, Alice 
Danbye, 8/j. To my syster, Beatrice, 
4ar. To Joseph Constable, son and heire 
of John Constable, esq. , 20J. To Joseph 
Moore, clerke, 20J. To the poore of 
Kirkebyeknowle, 20r.; of Bagbye, lOf.; 
of Cowsbye, 5x.; of Boltby, y.\ of 
Vpsall, i&/.; of Felixkirke. i&/. To my 
brother, Thomas Waire his children, 51. 
To my nephew, Edmond Danbye, loj. 
Nephew, Joseph Danbye, 5j. To Robert 
Todd, son of William Todd, a gimber 
lamb. Vnto George Coates twoo children, 
eyther of them, a gimber lambe. To 
Jayne Todd, 5/1. Res. to Marye my 
wife, whome I make executrix. Signed 
with a mark. Witnesses, Josephe Waire, 
Robert Danby. Proved November 29, 
1638. 



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88 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 



To the right hon^^« Edward, earle of Clarendon, lord high chancelour 
of England, 
Humbly compleyning sheweth unto your lordshipp your dayly 
oratour, James Danby of Kirkeby Knowle,* in the county of Yorke, 
gent., that Margaret Dakins, sole daughter and heire of Arthure 
Dakins, esq., was heretofore seised in her demesne as of fee, or of 
some other estate of inheritance, of and in the mannour or lordshipp 
of Hacknes in the county of Yorke, and of and in divers messuages, 
landes, tenementes, and hereditamentes, in Hacknes aforesaid, and in 
Harwood, Harwood Dayle, Silfo, Suffeild, Hingles, and Everley,' in the 
said county, of the cleare yearly value of fiftene hundred poundes 
per annum, or thereaboutes. And being thereof soe seised, about 
fiftie yeares agoe, marryed and tooke to husband Sir Thomas 
Posthumus Hoby, knight. And haveing lived many yeares together 
marryed, and haveing noe issue, the said Sir Thomas Hobye much 
importuned the said dame Margaret, his wife, to settle the inheritance 
of the said mannour, landes, and premisses, upon him and his heirs, 
after the decease of him, the said Sir Thomas, and the said dame 
Margarett, his wife, without issue of their two bodyes begotten ; which 
the said dame Margarett was not willing to doe. Howbeit by the 
importunities and contynual soUicitations of the said Sir Thomas 
Hobye, her said husband, she, the said dame Margarett, was drawne 
to consent to the same, soe as the landes in Harwood Dayle, 
Hingles, and Suffeild, parcell of the premisses, might be settled in 
remainder after the death of him, the said Sir Thomas Hobye, and 
the said dame Margarett, his wife, without issue of their two bodies, 
upon one John Chapman and his heirs; (the said John Chapman 
being a kinsman of the said dame Margarettes, and brought up by 
her); and that two thowsand and seaven hundred poundes might be 
disposed of, to, and amongst other the kindred of the same dame 
Margarett, by such proporcions as the said dame Margaret should 
appoint; all which the said Sir Thomas Hobye agreed unto, and 
faythfuUy promissed shoulde be done, according to her mynde. And 
thereupon the said mannour and lordshipp of Hacknes, and all and 
singular the said premisses, were by fine and other good conveyance 
and assurance in the lawe, shortly after conveyed, settled, and assured 

* James Danby purchased New Build- for 1652, fo. 45, John Constable is 

ing, in the parish of Kirkby Knowle, described as of New Building, gent, 
from the representatives of John Con- , . . , ^ 

stable. The editor of the Surtees volume ^ All these places are m the parish of 

(xxxvii, 7«) is in error in stating that Hackness. Hingles is a farmhouse, one 

Danby gave the name of "New Building" and a half miles south-south-west of 

to the house. In the Bulmer Act Book Harwood Dale Chapel. 



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A RESTORATION CHANCERY SUIT. 89 

upon the said Sir Thomas Hobye and the said dame Margarett, his 
wife, and the heirs of their two bodyes, and for default of such 
issue, to the use of the heirs of the said Sir Thomas Hobye ; as by 
the said conveyances, if your oratour had the same to shewe, would 
more plainely and at large appeare. And your oratour further 
sheweth, that the said dame Margarett Hobye, about the month of 
September, which was in the yeare of our Lord God one thowsand 
six hundred thirtie three, being sicke of the sicknes whereof she 
shortly after dyed, did desire and appoint the said Sir Thomas 
Hobye, her husband, to pay, or give order to pay, one hundred 
poundes (as part of the said two thowsand seaven hundred poundes, 
^[to be distributed among the said lady's kinred]), unto Tomazin, 
then and nowe your oratour's wife, one of her nerest kinswoemen 
then living ; that is to say, daughter of James Richardson and Ann, 
his wife, which Ann was the daughter of George Anlabye and 
Elizabeth, his wife, which Elizabeth was the daughter of Edward 
Brewerton and Margarett, his wife, which Margarett was sister to the 
said Arthure Dakins, late father of the said dame Margarett Hobye, 
from whome the said landes discended to the said dame Margarett 
Hobye as aforesaid; and alsoe appointed other particular sommes to 
be paid to other of her kindred. 

And shortly after the said dame Margaret Hobye dyed without 
issue, and the said Sir Thomas Hobye her survived. Shortly after 
whose death the said Sir Thomas Hobye, in part performeance of 
the said agreement and promis, did convey the said landes in 
Harwood Dayle and Hingles, and certaine landes in Suffeild alsoe, 
to the said John Chapman and his heirs, and declared his mynde 
and purpose to be, to distribute 'and pay the said two thowsand 
seaven hundred poundes to the kindred of his said deceased lady, 
according to her pious intencion and his faithful promis to her. 

Howbeit the said John Chapman, after the said landes were 
settled upon him as aforesaid, proveing wastefull, and refuseing 
to be advised, by the said Sir Thomas Hobye, he, the said 
Sir Thomas Hobye, exhibbitted his bill of complaint into this 
hon^i* Courtt, and alsoe into the Court of Wardes, against the 
said John Chapman, setting forth thereby, that the landes in 
Suffeild, part of the landes before mencioned to be settled upon 
the said John Chapman and his heires, were soe settled in trust to 
and for the raysing of part of the said two thowsand seaven hundred 
poundes, to be distributed to the kindred of the said lady; and for 
that the said John Chapman was greatly altered, and through a 

^ Interlined by Rokeby. 



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90 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

debauched course of life, become altogether unmeet to be any longer 
trustee ; prayed that the said John. Chapman might be inioyned to 
reassure the said landes, soe settled in trust as aforesaid. Depending 
which suits the said John Chapman and William Chapman, his 
father, did by writeing under their handes agree and promis, that the 
said John Chapman should and would reassure the said landes to 
the said Sir Thomas Hobye and his heires, although they alledged 
that the said landes were to be settled absolutely, and the said two 
thousand seaven hundred poundes to be paid alsoe to the rest of 
the kindred; howbeit afterwardes the said John Chapman refused to 
settle the same. Whereupon the said Sir Thomas Hoby shortly after 
exhibitted another bill of complaint into this hon^^« Courtt against 
the said John Chapman and William Chapman, to have the said 
agreement performed; to which the said John Chapman made 
answere, and the same cause proceeded. 

And, upon hearing of the said cause in this hon^^« Court, the 
two and twentieth day of October, in the fiftenth yeare of the rayne 
of our late soveraigne lord, king Charles the first (1639), It was 
ordered, adjudged, and decreed, that the said agreement should be 
performed, and that Mr. Page, one of the Maisters of this Court, 
should be attended with assurances or conveyances for settleing the 
said landes, according to the said agreement; as by the said 
proceedings, and decree, and order of this hon*>^« Court, remaineing of 
recorde in this hon^^« Court, may more plainely and at large appeare. 

And the said Sir Thomas Hobye, contynueing myndefuU of his 
said faythfull promis to his said lady, touching the payment of the 
said two thousand seaven hundred poundes to his said ladyes 
kindred, and your oratour haveing marryed and taken to wife the 
said Tomazin, his nowe wife, as aforesaid, the said Sir Thomas 
Hobye sent for your oratour and his said wife to come to him. 
And they accordingly repaireing to him at Hacknes aforesaid, he, 
the said Sir Thomas Hobye, acquainted your oratour and his said 
wife with his deceased ladyes good intentions to them; and that he 
did intende that the some of one hundred poundes should be paid 
unto them at his death; and that he would pay all such sommes as 
his said deceased wife intended for them and other her kindred. 
Whereupon your oratour desired of the said Sir Thomas Hobye 
that he would lett your oratour have the said one hundred poundes 
then in hand, which would be a great benefitt to your said oratour. 
Which the said Sir Thomas Hobye was contented to doe, but 
alledged that he would not soe put the same out of his owne 
power. 



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A RESTORATION CHANCERY SUIT. 91 

But that in case your oratour should prove in ill husband, as 
the said John Chapman had done, that he would recall the said one 
hundred poundes from your said oratour, and for that end and 
purpose he would have your oratour's bond for the same. At which 
tyme one Sir Robert Barwicke, knight, Counsellour at lawe, affirmed 
that your oratour was a good husband, and that he would be your 
oratour's suretie, and enter bond for the same, together with the your 
said oratour. And thereupon your said oratour and the said Sir 
Robert Barwicke, then by the name of Robert Barwicke, esq., by 
their obligacion under their handes and scales, bearing date on or 
about the month of Aprill, which was in the yeare of our Lord God 
one thousand six hundred thirtie eight, did become bound to the 
said Sir Thomas Hobye in a great penall somme of money, for the 
payment to him [of] the said one hundred poundes at the end of 
twelve months next after. And the said Sir Thomas Hobye then 
paid the said one hundred poundes unto your said oratour. 

And your oratour, about a weeke before the said money became 
payable by the condicion of the said bond, repaired to the said Sir 
Thomas Hoby, to knowe his pleasure concerning the same. At 
which tyme the said Sir Thomas Hobye tould your oratour that he 
had heard a good rcporte of your oratour, and that he would not 
recall the said one hundred poundes; and wished your oratour and 
his said wife not to make themselves straingers to him, for that he 
had a kinde respect towardes them and all other his deceased ladyes 
kindred that were hopefull; and inquired of your oratour the names 
of divers others of his ladyes kindred. And to some of them the 
said Sir Thomas Hobye paid certaine somes of money, in further 
part of the said two thowsand seaven hundred poundes, and tooke 
securitie by bond for the somes he soe paid unto them, in like sorte 
and to the like end for which he had taken securitie of your oratour. 

And shortly after, to witt, on or about the eight and twentieth 
day of March, anno Domini one thowsand six hundred and fortye, 
the said Sir Thomas Hobye made his last will and testament in 
writeing, written in his life tyme, and therein sett forth as touching 
such part of his goodes and chattells as he had not alreadie disposed 
of in his life tyme, declared his will to be, and did thereby nomynate, 
appoint, make, and ordayne George Hickes and Frances Prowde, 
clerkes, and James Moore, gent., his executours of his last will and 
testament, in trust and confidence to and for the use of John 
Sydenham, esq., until the said John Sydenham should eyther depart 
this life or should accomplish the age of one and twentie years. 
And that after the said John Sydenham should attaine that age, that 



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92 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHJEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

then and from thenceforth the said executorshipp of the said George 
Hickes, Frances Prowde, and James Moore to cease, and the said 
Sir (sic) John Sydenham from thenceforth to stand and be sole 
executour of his said will and testament And by the said will made 
mencon that he had paid severall somes of money to his wives kindred, 
meaning, as your oratour hopeth to prove, the severall somes of money 
paid to your said oratour, and his said wife, and others of his said 
ladyes kindred, as aforesaid. And by his said will further settes 
forth in these wordes : — "And touching the residue of the moneys, 
as yet unpaid unto my said wives kindred, considering that my 
personall estate is fittest to be charged therewith, I doe give and 
distribute the same, as in this my present will is hereafter mencioned. 
And I doe alsoe promis, and it is my will and desire, that my said 
executours shall pay all such legacies as are alreadie mencioned, 
eyther in this my last will or in the schedule hereunto nowe annexed 
and subscribed by my selfe, eyther at the tyme of the publishing 
hereof or at any tyme after dureing my life to be in like sorte 
subscribed and published, by way of addicon to the same, all legacies 
by me soe expressed, or to be expressed in the same schedule, to 
be paid or otherwise discharged by my executours within one month 
next after my decease." And named the said Sir Robert Barwicke, 
supervisour of his said will, as by the said last will and testament 
may more plainely and at large appeare. 

Which will be caused to be fairely ingrossed, and caused a 
schedule to be affixed to the said writeing, purporting his said last 
will and testament. Which schedule he caused to be intituled and 
written in the uppermost part of the same, as foUoweth, videlicet : — 
"A schedule of sundry particular legacies given by me. Sir Thomas 
Posthumus Hobye, knight, unto the kindred and frendes of my late 
deceased lady and others, as followeth." And caused the said 
schedule to be affixed to the said writeing, purporting his said will, 
and then subscribed his name, and sett his seale to the said will; 
and in the presence of divers witnesses, published the said writeing, 
to which the said schedule was annexed, to be his last will and 
testament; and then declared that he would with his owne hand 
sett downe in the said schedule the names of the severall persons 
and the particular somes of money that should be paid to his said 
ladyes kindred. 

And the said Sir Thomas Hobye sent for your oratour, to be a 
witnes of the sealeing and publishing of the said will. And the said 
Sir Thomas Hobye then tould your said oratour, that he would at 
some convenyent tyme look up your oratour's said obligacion and 



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A RESTORATION CHANCERY SUIT. 93 

cancell the same. Howbeit the said Sir Thomas Hobye, shortly after 
falling into a fitt of a could palsie, or such like sicknes, which 
suddainely seised upon him, dyed without perfecting the schedule, or 
setting downe in particular the names of the persons of his said 
ladyes kindred and the somes of money to be paid untq them. 

Shortly after whose death the said Frances Prowde and James 
Moore, two of the said executours, proved the said will, and tooke 
upon them the execucion thereof until the said John Sydenham, 
esq., attained his full age, upon whome the said Sir Thomas Hobye 
settled the said mannour of Hacknes and all other his landes. '[And 
ye said Francis Proud and James Moore, or ye said John Sydenham, 
or dame Anne Sydenham, his relict, or some of them, or some other 
person, by their or some of their appointmentes (as your orator is 
informed), did pay or satisfye severall sums of mony to severall of ye 
said lady's kinred, as part of ye said 2,700//., and tooke acquittances 
or receiptes for ye same]. 

* Inserted by Rokeby at the bottom, in a different hand. 



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THE NORMANBY EFFIGY.' 

In the autumn of 1900 a curious discovery was made at the 
Normanby Brickworks, in the parish of Ormesby, near Middlesbrough. 
The men when digging clay some four feet below the surface came 
upon a large stone which, when extracted, proved to be the lower 
portion of the monumental effigy of a knight. Unfortunately, the 
stone was broken across in removing it from the clay. It seems 
that arms and other portions of the effigy were unearthed a few years 
ago, and have since been reburied under what is now an enormous 
heap of earth and debris from the brickworks, too huge to make it 
possible to search for them. 

The fragments of the effigy, when pieced together, measure 2 feet 
6 inches in length by 22 inches in breadth at the widest part. It 
is of Caen stone, or some similar stone to Caen. The portions 
unearthed show the feet and legs, clothed in chain mail, with the 
lower folds of the surcoat, and the poleyns of leather, stamped 
with a four-leaf ornament, protecting the knee. This ornament, so 
characteristic of the Decorated period of Gothic architecture, occurs 
again on the moulded edge of the slab on the left hand side. The 
spur, which is not shown in either of the plates, is of the rowel, or 
wheel, kind. The leather band, by which the spurs are fastened on, 
is very distinct The feet rest upon a lion, with an animal in its 
mouth. 

This fragment strongly resembles the Colville effigies, dated about 
1300, plates of which are given in the last volume of the Journal 
(pp. 135, 136). In these cases the spurs are of the prick or straight 
kind, so they are probably a little earlier. The effigies at Crathome, 
near Yarm, and at Norton, near Stockton, are almost identical with 
the Normanby find. The probable date of this fragment is about 
1320. All these effigies, it is thought, came from the same workshop, 
probably at York, where * marbelers * were at work during the middle 
ages. 

* Founded on a communication by Mr. Antiquaries, and printed in iheir Pro- 
J. M. Fallow, F.S.A., to the Society of ceedings (Second Series, xviii, 232). 



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THE NORMANBY EFFIGY. 95 

What is remarkable is that there is no church or chapel anywhere 
near where the portion of the effigy was found, nor is there any 
record or tradition of a church having ever existed in the immediate 
neighbourhood. The carving is so sharp that it seems likely that 
the effigy came to grief on its way to some church, Wilton, Eston, 
or Kirkleatham, north of the hill on the top of which it was found, 
and that it had been c^t aside as rubbish. The moulded edge is 
not continued on the right side, which is jagged and broken, whether 
unfinished for resting against a wall, or for an effigy of a lady, though 
in most cases the female lay on the left side of the male. How it came 
to be where it was found is the puzzle. The theory that it never 
reached the church for which it was intended is corroborated by the 
entire absence of the least trace of mortar on the underside. The 
unearthing of the fragment so deep down, and in the place high on 
the hillside, though near an old bridle path, is very remarkable and 
unaccountable, except on some such theory as that suggested. 



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YORKSHIRE DEEDS.' 

{Continued from vol. xvi, p. 107.) 

Eppleton IRoebttcft*' 

January 26, 40 Eliz. (1597-8). Inq. /. m. of Thomas Wylde of 
Appelton, carpenter, taken in the Guildhall, York, before Christopher 
Beckwith, mayor and escheator, by the oath of Robert Shawe, gent., 
Anthony Woode, gent., William Scott, ntarcer^ Robert Hopwoode, John 
Bousfeilde, William Farrington, William Brearey, Gilbert Coldwell, Henry 
Bannester, John Broughton, Elisha {Elize) Micklethwate, Thomas Marshall, 
Percival Barnes, Thomas Barker, and John Lasinbye. Thomas Wylde 
died seised in his demesne as of fee of a messuage and 16 acres 
of land, etc., in Appleton, in the county of the city of York; and being 
thus seised, by a deed dated August 10, 20 Eliz. (1578), he granted to 
Richard Wylde, his younger son, the said messuage, and half a bam, 
garden, toft and croft, and half of a close of pasture called Burdon 
croft, and of a garden called Qeckgarthe, also a rood of meadow abutting 
on le Horse close, another rood of meadow lying on le Forthersyde in 
le Eastyngesyaie, and half of the arable land of the said 16 acres, to 
have the same after his decease. He died at Appleton, on June 2, 2^1 Eliz. 
(1595), the premises held of the Queen, as of her manor of Eastgrene- 
wiche, in free socage, by fealty only. Thomas Wylde, the son and heir, 
aged fifty and upwards at the time of his father's death. 

Christofer Beckwithe, escheatour. 

Seal bears the arms of the city of York, On a cross five lions, 
« SIGNACVLVM EBORACENSIVM. 

Bolton*' 

August 6, in the year of our Lord God according to the computation 
of the Church of England, 1655. Release by William Plaxton of 
Pocklington, yeoman, to George Whitmoor of Balms, in the county of 
Middlesex, gent., of all right in a close called the Bellowe close, in 
Boulton, lying at the west end of the New close, which with divers other 
lands called Forby lands, then in the holding of Thomas Fewgill, had 
been granted on March 8, 11 Car. (1635-6), by George Cobb of Boulton 
to William Plaxton and William Bainton, since deceased, to hold to the 
use of George Cobb for life, then to Richard Bainton of Boulton and 
Helen his wife, for their lives, remainder to Geo. Bainton, their son and 
heir apparent, in fee.* 

William Plaxton. 

* From the originals in the possession * In the Ainsty. 

of Mr. J. S. Earle, F.S.A., 6, Kensington * In the parish of Bishop Wilton. 

Palace Gardens, London, W., by whose * The Baintons sold to Whitmoor by a 

courtesy these transcripts have been m$ide. d^ed of even date* 



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YORKSHIRE DEEDS. 97 

Sutton f)alL' 

Sunday after St. Hilary (January i6), 1311-12. Grant by Matilda, 
relict of Robert Burdeus of Burton, in her pure widowhood, to Agnes, 
her daughter, of a toft with the buildings, and things growing on it 
{crescentibtis), in the vill of Burton, lying between the toft of John, the 
clerk of Birne, on the one side, and the toft of Robert, son of Mawe del 
Lund, on the other ; also a bovate of land belonging to the same toft 
in the field of Burton, lying between the land of Robert, son of Hugh 
de Lund, on the one side, and the land late of the said Robert Burdeus, 
deceased, on the other. Witnesses, John son of Adam de Birne, Adam 
Norays of the same, Thomas son of John of the same, Walter Basset of 
Brayton, Hugh son of Guy {Guydo) de Lund, Nicholas son of William 
Bate of the same. 

Sunday after Easter (April 26), 132 1. Grant by John de Birne, clerk, 
to William son of Hugh de Burton, of a toft and croft which he (John) 
had of the feoffment of Robert Gori, as they lay in the vill of Burton 
between the toft and croft of the said William on the one side, and the 
toft and croft of Ralph del Launde on the other. Witnesses, John de 
Lascy of Gaytford, John de Burstal of the same, John at the Hall of 
Hamelton, Walter Basset of Brayton, Nicholas Bate del Lund, Hugh of 
the same. Burton. 

November 6, 31 Hen. VI (14S2). Demise by William Burdeux of 
Burton the elder, and William Burdeux of the same the younger, to 
Richard West of Brayton, of a rood of land in Burton lying in a place 
called Stretelandes, between the tenement of the abbot and convent of 
the monastery of St. German of Selby on the east and west, and abutting 
on the second stadium^ from the common pasture of Burton {sufer 
secundum stadium a fasiura communi de Burton) towards the south, 
and on Fairfeldlandez towards the north, from Martinmas for a term of 
toi years at 4^/. a year. Covenant by the grantee that the grantors 
shall grind their suitable* com at the mill, situate on the moiety of the 
half acre of land belonging the said abbot and convent on the west of 
the said rood, immediately after the com of the abbot and convent and 
the said Richard, for reasonable multure.* Witnesses, William Chestir 
of Gaytford, Robert Squyer of Lund, James Hall. 

^ In the parish of Brayton. assignati nostri, molabimus grana nostra 

' *' Stadium, spacium quodcumque '* is habilia ad molendinum, situandum super 

one of the definitions given by D Amis. medietatem medietatis vnius acre terre 

The stadium may have been the sections predictorum abbatis et conuentus, ex 

of enclosed arable land divided by the parte occidentali predicte rode, inmediate 

balks. post blada dictonim abbatis et conuentus, 

* That is the com, not beans, or peas, etsuccessorum suorum,et predicti Ricardi, 
or such like. et heredum, et assignatorum suorum, pro 

* Et predictus Ricardus vult et con- racionabili multura inde capienda. 
ccdit per presenies, quod nos, heredes, et 

VOL. XVII, H 



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98 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHiEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

October 19, 39 Hen. VI (1460). Grant by Robert Burdeux of Brayton, 
and John Richardson of Westhadylsay, to William Burdeux of Burton 
and Joan his wife, for their lives, of two tofts and two bovates of land, 
with a rent of 4^. from the windmill of Burton, with two selions of land 
lying in Lundcroft, with their appurtenances in Burton, with remainder 
to the heirs and assigns of William Burdeux. Witnesses, John Caterall, 
esq., Thomas Mascald the elder, William Smyth of Brayton, Robert 
Smyth of Thorpe, Robert Swhyer of Lund. Burton. 

May 21, 8 Edw. IV (1468). Grant by Edward Buklay of Haytefelde, 
late of Gayteford, and Joan his wife, late wife of William Burdux 
of Burton, to John Lascy, son of William Lascy, Thomas Smyth of 
Brayton, and Richard Burdux, of two tofts, two bovates of land, and 4^. 
rent from the windmill at Burton, and two selions of land in Loundcroft 
in Burton, paying yearly to the grantors 6s. during Joan*s life. If the 
rent shall not have been paid in the church of St. Wilfrid the Bishop in 
Brayton within twenty days after it is due, the grantors can distrain. 
Witnesses, John Stodfolde, vicar of the church of Brayton, William 
Lascy of Gayteforth, John Ricall of the same, John Batee, and Robert 
Squyer of London. 

TAree labels. One seal, R below a crown, 

June 5, 22 Edw. IV (1482). Release by Agnes Fethirstayne, late wife 
of William Fethirstayne, late of Saxelby, co. Lincoln, to Richard Burdux 
of Burton by Gayteford, of all claim in half an acre of meadow in 
Westhathilsay. Witnesses, William Couper of Westhathilsay, Richard 
Cryplyn of the same, John Spofiforth of the same, Robert Cophirst of the 
same, and Thomas Watson of Midelhadelsay. 

June 24, 6 Hen. VII (1491). Grant by Christopher Pryston, son [and 
heir] apparent of Thomas Pryston, esq., and lord of Rowall in the parish 
of Kellington, and by Isabella his wife, to Richard Burdux of Burton, of 
a toft built over {toftum idificatum), with a croft belonging to the 
same, lying between the land of John Boswell esq., on the east and 
west, and abutting on the field of Burton on the north, and extending 
to the common pasture and moor of Burton on the south ; and a bovate 
of land, lying in different places within the field of Burton, in Burton by 
Gayteford, paying 2s, a year. Witnesses, Richard Byrlay of Gayteford, 
gent., Thomas Hall of Brayton, John Alayne of the same, Thomas Ricall 
of the same, and William Bate of Lound. 

June 24, 6 Hen. VII (1491). Release by Christopher Pryston, son 
[and heir] apparent of Thomas Pryston, esq. and lord of Rowall, and by 
Isabella his wife, to Richard Burdux, of all right in a toft, and croft, 
and bovate of land in Burton by Gayteford. Witnesses, John Alayne of 
Brayton, Robert Walker, John Broun of Burton, Robert Emson of Thorp, 
and Henry Bate of Lound. 



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YORKSHIRE DEEDS. 99 

£adtrfndton* 

July 2J, 1562, 4 Eliz. Demise by Michael SotehilP of Estrington, 
gent., to John Atkynson, Lawrence Atkynson, William Atkynson, and 
Richard Raby, of Estrington, husbandmen, in consideration of 100//'., of 
his manor at Estrington, commonly called the manor of the Spennes," in 
the parishes of Estrington and Hoveden ; (except one close called the 
Spen Ynge, one close next adjoining to the same called the Spen Flatt, 
one close on the. south side of the wood or spring called the Sothermost 
Spen, and one croft at the south end of Estrington, next to Wawdby 
Croft, all which closes were in the holding of Anthony Lowther) ; from 
the Annunciation last past for 21 years, at an annual rent of 17//'. os, 2d., 
and paying all other rents yearly going out of the same to the bishop 
of Durham and his successors, and all other persons, during the said 
term ; a rent of 20//. a year to Maistres Dorothee Savyle always 
excepted. The lessees covenant to leave the premises sufficiently 
repaired and fenced at the end of term, and also to find to the said 
Michael Sotehill once every year (when and at such time he shall come 
forth of the south country into these north parts) two horses or mares 
by the space of two weeks, at his so coming into these parts, during 
the said term. The lessees to have all manner of gorre,^ wood, and 
thorns, coming, being, or growing on the premises. The lessor to have 
the letting of a cottage in Estrington, wherein Rauffe Heryson dwelt. 

Signed with marks. 

Four labels, (i) S; (2) B; (3) a pelican in her piety ; (4) destroyed. 

Sealed and delivered in the presence of Thomas Abbot, Thomas 
Crowsey, Robert Wetherall, Richard Hode, and John Dodynge. 

October i, 8 Eliz. (1566). Covenant by Edward Savile of Thornhill, 
esq., son and heir apparent of Sir Henry Savile, knight, deceased, and 
Henry Savile of Lupsett, esq., with ^Michael Sotehill, son and heir of 
Thomas Sotehill, esq., late of Sotehill; (reciting an indenture dated 
October 10,3 Eliz. (1561), by which Edward Savile covenanted and granted 
to Francis, lord Talbott, William Vavasoure, knight, and others, the manor 

*Only son of Thomas Sothill, of Elizabeth, wife of Sir Henry Savyll, 

Sothill, now Soothill in the parish of knight, as was found by an inquisition, 

Dewsbury. He died without issue, when taken at Leeds, September 30, 31 

his half sister, Elizabeth, who married Sir Henry VIH (1539). This property 

Henry Savile, K.B., and heiress of her belonged to the Sotehills from the time 

mother, Margery, one of the daujghters of Edward I at least. I have seen some- 

and heiresses of Sir William Fitzwilliam, thing about Michael — but what I forget 

of Sprotborough, became his heir. Her and cannot find my notes — being illegiti- 

son, Edward Savile, of Thornhill, is men- mate or weak-minded, and Savyll in 

tioned in the next deed. Thomas possession of deeds, etc. — A.S.E. 

Sotehyll, esq., of Sotehill, died December oa • ri j .u . r t' * 
«« TP-,r DJ^A r.f ♦K* .«-«,x, <vf T -^»«« A piece of land, north-west of Last- 
29» 1535* seised of the manor ot Liaxton, . . '^^. , . V... ,« j ,. c ,«-. 

with messuages, lands, and tenements ""^''" w ^"'ik ' r f f^J H uSf. 

there, held of the Bishop of Durham, as ]P^^' ^f.^^^^ ^'f' mentioned lower 

^f fkL «.««^. r.f i4^„,^i.. u,. i,«J,„« down, still gives its name to a field, 

of the manor of Howden, by unknown ^ ^ Wauldby or Wouldby Croft, 

service, and worth 4QJ. a year. Michael, '^""'*" « aumi^/ wi tt^uivi j ^ 
son and heir, aged 30, and a daughter, ^ Gorse. 



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100 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

of Estryngton, to the use of Michael Sotehill, upon certain conditions 
touching the assurance of the manor of Haddilsaye) ; in consideration of 
such assurances as the said Michael had agreed unto, of and in other 
lands which were the lands of his said father, to assure the manor of 
Estryngton, otherwise called the manor of Spennes, to the said Michael 
Sotehill, and to grant by deed and fine the said manor with the lands 
thereunto belonging in Estrington, Spennes, and Howlden. Such grant 
not to be prejudicial to Dorothy Savile, to whom Sotehill covenanted to 
pay the rent due* 

Edwarde Savile 

p* me Henricu' Savile. 

Witnesses, Mathew Usher, Nycholas Fenye, Edmunde Sandes, Henre 
Batte, William Scurre, Robert Day. 

November i6, 8 Eliz.(i566). Bargain and sale by Michael Sotehill of 
Lonndon, esq., to John Vavasour of Spaldington, and Richard Aske of 
Owstroppe, gentlemen, for 300//. of his manor of Spenn, otherwise called 
the manor of Estrington, in the parishes of Estrington and Howden. 
Covenant against any grants from Sir Henry Savill, knight. 

Myghell Sotehyll. 

Witnesses, Henry Vavasour, Harry Bordman, Will*m Shafton, 

Seal: a bird's kead(?a heron* s) erased^ between MS. 

Deed of even date. Power of attorney to John Duddinge and Peter 
Atkinson to deliver seisin. 

April II, g Eliz. (1567). Grant by Peter Vavasour of Spaldington, 
esq., to Richard Aske of Owsthorpe, gent., and Elizabeth, his wife, of a 
bovate and a half of land in Estrington in the holding of Peter 
Atkinson, a bovate and a half of land in Estrington in the holding of 
William Atkinson and Lawrence Atkinson, 2\ acres of land in the 
holding of Richard Hode, a close in the holding of Anthony Lowther, a 
cottage, a croft, and a toft in the holding of Edmund Wickwall, a close 
of pasture called Spenns alias Westclose in the holding of William 
Atkinson, a close of pasture called le olde Spenn in the holding of 
Anthony Lowther, a close called le olde Spenn in the holding of John 
Atkinson and William Atkinson, a close called Spenn Flattes in the 
holding of William Atkinson, and two closes called Bell Closes in the 
holding of Lawrence Atkinson. To hold in special tail, w^ith remainder 
to Aske*s right heirs. Power of attorney to Robert Skipsie and Robert 
Strumbie, yeomen, to deliver seisin. 

Peter Vavasour. 

February 18, 10 Eliz. (1567-8). Bargain and sale by Richard Aske of 
Oxthorpe alias Owsethorpe, gent., to William Atkynson of Estryngton 
the elder, husbandman, of a toft and croft, or messuage wasted, in 
Estryngton, in the occupation of Richard Raby, and a close near 
Estryngton, formerly in the occupation of Richard Hod, and then of the 
said William Atkynson. Covenant against incumbrances, saving an 



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YORKSHIRE DEEDS. 101 

annuity out of the manor of the Spennes near Estrington (of which the 
premises were parcel), payable to Dorothy Savile for life, and a lease 
granted by Michael Sotehill, esq., to John Atkynson, Lawrence Atkynson, 
the said William Atkynson, and Richard Raby, whose interest was then 
held by Bartilmewe Abbot of Belassise, gent. Covenant by the vendor 
to acknowledge this bargain and sale, and grant unto the inroUing of 
these indentures before the Justices of the Peace, the Gustos Rotulorum, 
and the Clerk of the Peace, according to the Statute made for the 
inrolling of estates of freeholds and inheritance. 
Signed with a mark. Seal^ R. I. 

September 7, i Jas. (1603). Bargain and sale by Robert Aske of 
Sancton, co. Lincoln, esq., to Peter Vavasour of Willitofte, gent., for 90/j'., 
of his moiety of the manor of Spenns, otherwise called Estrington, and a 
messuage and cottage in the tenure of John Petchye of Estrington, and 
the closes called Bell Closes, Spenn Innges, and Seavy Closes, and 18 
acres of arable land in the tenure of George Grawsay and Robert Ellis 
of Oustroppe. Warranty, except against the estate of Peter Aske, 
Richard Aske, and Julian Aske, children of Richard Aske, under their 
father's will. 

Robert Aske. 

Witnesses, Thomas Arksey, John Arksaye, Phillip Darell, Xpofer 
Mason, John Hickington, William Nawtonn. 

Release of the same date, sealed in the presence of the same 
witnesses. 

S^a/ partly broken^ A. 

Livery of seisin on October i (1603), in the presence of Thomas 
Arksey, John Arksaye, Phillip Darell, Anthony Kitchin, Thomas Parker, 
Thomas Wetherill. 

Peter Aske, Richard Aske, and Julian Nelstroppe gyve theire 
consent and mayd theire attornment vnto the sayd Peter Vavasour w*in 
named, the fifte daye of October, accordinge to the tenure of this 
present deede, exceptinge theire owne estates, for the terme of theire 
lyves, in the presence of George Elis, Richard Elis. 

f)aHfai. 

July 6, 2 Edw. IV (1462). Surrender by WiUiam Brodelee of the 
reversion, after his decease, of two closes with the buildings thereon, 
lying on the west side of Shagheloynd in Halifaxe, to the use of John 
his son, and his heirs, by Margaret, his wife, daughter of Thomas 
Foumas, remainder to William in fee. Fine for entry, dd, 

February 9, 7 Hen. VII (1491-2). Court of the prior and convent of 
the monastery of St. Pancras of Lewes. Admission of William Brodelee, 
son of John Brodelee, to a parcel of land, lately enclosed from the lord's 
waste, containing 34 poles in length and 12 in breadth, in Halifaxe, l3ring 
between Shaghahille on the north and the land of William Brodelee the 
elder on the south, at an annual rent of one penny. Fine for entry, 
2S. 4^/. 



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102 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

August 1 6, 6 Jas. I (i6o8). Court of David Waterhous, esq., 
coroner and attorney of the king, in the king's court. Surrender by 
Nathan Carter of Sowerbye, and Sibil, his wife, and Michael Carter of 
Hallifaxe, by Homfrey Drake, of a house, a garden, a le folcLe sieade, 
and three closes of land and meadow, then made into two closes 
containing two acres, lying near le Shawe in Hallifax, in the tenure of 
the said Michael Carter, to the use of Simon Bynnes of le Shawe in 
Hallifax. Fine for entry, 26s, 

Ex : per me Nich'm Fenay. 

ftoltbp.' 

Wednesday after the Ascension, 42 Edw. Ill (May 24, 1368). Grant 
by Edmund de Conyngeston. William de Kepewyke, Robert de Bretby, 
and Thomas Elysson of York, to William de Hesill, of York, and John 
de Selby of York, goldsmyth, of two messuages, a dovecote, and five 
acres of land in the vill and territory of Holteby, which they had of the 
grant of William son of Robert de Croft, chaplain ; which messuages 
lay between the land of William son of Richard de Santon of York, 
draper, on the one side, and the land late of John de Grantham, son of 
John de Grantham of York, on the other, and extended from the " 
highway in front to the ditch behind. Witnesses, Robert de Howome. 
then mayor of York, John de Clayton, Roger de Moreton, and John de 
Esshton, then bailiffs of the same, John de Grantham, son of John de 
Grantham, John de Hemelsay, William Lat3rmer, Thomas Gower, John 
de Twenge, John de Killum, Ivo de Thornton. Holtby. 

Two labels, one seal destroyed, the other bears a shield : ermine 
a saltire, 

ftirftbs Mbarfe. 

April 3, I Eliz. (1559). Release by George Shawe, clerk, to Gabriel 
Fairefaxe of Steton, esq., of all rights in a moiety of the manor of 
Kyrkby on Wharf, which be (the grantor), William Fayrfaxe, knight, and 
John Ardyngton, both deceased, acquired from Anthony Haymond, esq., 
deceased. 

By me s* Georg Shaw, prest. 

Witnesses, Thomas Waytt, John Jakson. Thomas Mytton, Hary 
Croox, John Reade. 

Xanabaurob. 

August 28, 17 Ric. II (1393). Grant by Walter de Urswj'k, knight, 
to Robert de Urswyk, knight, his relative, of a rent of twenty marks 
in ^Asilby, Heton, Lythe, Bameby, Mykilby, Uggethorpe, Eggeton, 

1 Near York. ton, Slainton, Maltby, Arncliffe, Varm, 

^ Aislaby, Hutlon Mulgrave, Lythe, Kirk Levington, Worsall, Picton, Ingleby 

Barnby, Mickleby, Ugthorpe, Egton, Arncliffe, Faceby, Busby, Great Brough- 

Ellerby, Newton Mulgrave, Ilinderwell, Ion, Little Broughton, Easby, Battersby, 

Rousby, Essington, Loftus, Liverton, Ingleby Greenhowe, Kildale, Westerdale, 

Brotton, Kilton, Skelton, Guisborough, Danby, Glaisdale, Tocketts, Hutton 

Marske, Rirkleatham, Wilton, Lazenby, Lowcross, Upsall, Pinchingthorpc, Nun- 

Lackenby, Normanby, Marlon, Ormesby, thorpe, Tunstall, Stokesley, Castle 

Linthorpe, Acklam, Thornaby, Hemling- Levingion, and Crathorne. 



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YORKSHIRE DEEDS. 103 

Ellerby, Neuton, Hilderwelli Rouceby, Esynton, Loufthous, Lyverton, 
Brotton, Kilton, Skelton, Gisburae, Merske, Lythome, Wilton, Laysyngby, 
Lakenby, Normanby, Marton, Ormesby, Leventhorpe, Aclom, Thormotby, 
Hemlyngton, Staynton, Malteby, Erneclif, Jarum, Kirklevyngton, Wirsale, 
Pykton, Ingelby by Emeclyf, Faceby, Buskby, Breghton, Lytelbroghton, 
Eseby, Bathersby, Ingelby under Grenehowe, Kildale, Westerdale, Danby 
wyth Glasdale, Tocotes, Hoton, Upsale, Thorpe Pynchon, Nenthorpe, 
Tunstale, Stokesley, Castellevyiigton, and Crathorne, to be received by 
the hands of the heir of Walter Fauconberge from the wapentake of 
Langebergh, he being the tenant in chief. This rent had been granted 
by a fine levied in Trinity Term, 43 Edw. Ill (1369), before Robert de 
Thorpe, John Moubray, William de Fyncheden, and William de 
Wickyngham, the King's Justices, by Thomas de Alberton to the said 
Walter de Urswyk. Witnesses, James de Pikeryng, Robert de Neville 
of Homeby, Thomas Col vile, Nicholas de Haveryngton, John Depeden, 
and John Elys, knights, Thomas Fairefax, John de Aske, John Amyas, 
Adam Mirfeld, Robert Ryville. Skelton. 

Xagtbam.' 

February 20, 18 Hen. VIII (1526-7). Bond from Thomas Merler, 
gent, to Robert Aske, son of Robert Aske, knight,* in 30//., to observe 
the covenants contained in a bargain and sale of a toft with a croft, a 
garden, and 2^ oxgangs of land in Lathom. 

Ylabutne. 

Quitclaim by Richard Pinchewar and Helewissa his wife to Richard 
Mansel, of all right in the assarts, made or to be made on account of 
two bovates of land, which they held of him in the vill of Nabume. In 
return Richard Mansel gave them an acre of land on [super) Langthwait 
towards Norphwde, and three roods. Witnesses, Thomas the parson of 
Acastre, John and Thomas the clerks of FuUeforde, Henry Neve, Robert 
the archdeacon of Acastre, Richard Pinchewar, Hugh Mus', Peter son 
of Hugh Monay, and Emald the clerk. 

Sealy green wax, li x |. A fleur-de-lys , Inscription blurred. 

Grant by Richard le Maunsel of Nabume, for the health of his soul, 
in frankalmoign, to the canons of St Andrew of York in Fykgate (w), 
of the order of Sempingham, a bovate of land in the territory of 
Nabume, that one, namely, which Robert de Hov once held of him ; 
that is to say, two cultures in Langehwait, nearer towards Moreby, with 
the meadow between those cultures -and the Use; and two selions 
{selliones) on Great Stainhov, and a culture at Morland, and a selion in 
Stainlande, and two selions in Baunelandwro, and a culture in Tekwro, 
which the same Robert and William son of Gerard once held, and 
three roods of land in the south part of the culture in Swithne which 
Andrew held of him, and all the land at Swithne which he had acquired 

* In the parish of Aughton. ^ The leader in the Pilgrimage of Grace. 



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104 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

of the men of William de Paumes. He gave them in addition a toft 
in the same vill of Naburae, lying between Litelpwait- and the road, of 
a breadth of five perches (ferticaiarum) on the south side of the toft 
of his daughter Joan. By reason of this grant the canons were not to 
have any part in his assarts, either which had been assarted or which 
should be assarted, nor in his pasture. Witnesses, William de Paumes, 
William de Hamerton, Robert Buistard, Alan Malekake, Benedict his 
brother, Simon le Flemhing, Richard Pinchewar, Gervase son of Ranulf, 
Hugh Mus, Peter son of Hugh, Hurvey (sic) Brito, Walter de Hugate, 
William the smith (fabro), John Dunden, Hugh son of Henry de 
Acastre, Roger Prince. 

Seal, red w^x, ijxij, a bird standing to the sinister with 
extended wings DE NABVRN 

Grant by Richard Mansel to John de Cawde, for his homage and 
service, and in increase of his land, two acres of land in territory of 
Naburne, by the pole (pertica) of twenty feet, lying between Sandgate 
and the land of William de Palma. Witnesses, William de Palma, 
Robert Bustard, Thomas Mansel, John de Fulford, Thomas de Fulford, 
Hilger de Hemelsay, Gerard de Skipwic, Munay, Richard Pinchewer, 
John de Hoby, Hugh the smith, Peter son of Hugh de Naburne, Emald 
the clerk. 

Grant by Martin de Nortfolck, citizen of York,* to Richard Mansel 
of Naburne, knight, of all his land in^ a place called Fulemose, except 
his great assart, as the mound extended from his stone boundary, which 
was between him and Hugh de Seleby, to the head of Louthen ; and so 
from Louthen by the mound to Buretredale, and so by Buretredale by the 
bounds of Ditton to the land of Walter de Acastre on the south, and so 
by the mound of the same Walter to his (Marton's) stone boundary, in 
exchange for Richard's land in a place called Stockinge, with a toft, a 
plot of land, and a house, which a certain miller long held, near the 
mill on the water of Naburne; from the bounds of Dusfeldstyel to the 
land of Amald de Naburne, clerk, towards the vill of Naburne ; and so 
from Amald's land to the land of Helewise, the said Richard's sister, 
in Littelwait, and so from Littelwait by the bounds which were the said 
Richard's between his land and the land of William de Palmis to the 

1 Bailiff in 1257. tofto, quodam placio lerre, et dome, que 

3 In loco qui vocatur Fulemose, excepto quidam molendinarius iam dudum tenuit, 

magno assarto meo, sicut fossatum se que sunt propinquiora molendino aque 

extend it de bunda mea lapidea, que est de Naburne ; de hundis de Dusfeldstyel 

inter me et Hugonem de Seleby, usque usque ad terrain Arnaldi de Naburne, 

ad capud Louthen ; et sicde Louthen per clerici, uersus villam de Naburne ; et sic 

fossatum usque ad Buretredale ; et sic de de terra Arnaldi uscjue ad terram Hele- 

Buretredale, per bundas de Ditton usque wise, sororis dicti Kicardi, in Littelwait ; 

ad terram Walteri de Acastre, uersus et sic de Littelwait, per bundas que 

austrum ; et sic per fossatum ipsius fuerunt ipsius Ricardi inter terram suam 

Walteri usque ad predictam bundam et terram Willelmi de Palmis, usque ad 

meam lapideam ; pro tota terra ipsius terram Galfridi le Grant ; et sic de terra 

Kicardi Mansel, quam habuit, uel vnquam ipsius Galfridi usque ad assartum meum 

habere potuit, in loco qui vocatur Stock- uersus orientem. 
inge, sine aliquo retenemento, cum vno 



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YORKSHIRE DEEDS. 105 

land of Geoffrey le Grant, and so from Geoffrey's land by the mound to 
his (Martin's) assart on the east. Witnesses, William de Palmis, Hugh 
de Seleby, Robert de Clerewas, John de Vesey, William de Fulford, 
Nicholas of the same, Thomas Godman, John de Nortfolck, Thomas de 
Alna, Amald de Naburne, clerk, Andrew the clerk. 

Seal, green wax, i|x|. An antique, a female figure leaning 
against a pillar addressing a child, probably Venus and Cupid, 
« SIGILL' MARTINI DE NORFOL. Poor impression. 

Grant by Emma daughter of Robert Roune of Naburne, in her 
virginity, to Nicholas Dayvile of a toft in Naburne lying between the 
toft of Hugh Roune on the one side and the toft of the prior and 
convent of St. Andrew's on the other, and bounding on the king's high- 
way at both bounds,* with the appurtenances and housbote and hayebote 
belonging to the same, according to the tenor of a charter which 
William the smith {faber) had of the whole toft, paying a rose at the 
time of roses to the chief lords for all services. Witnesses, Nicholas de 
Nortfolke, William de Morby, William Russel, Henry Tynteluve, Austin 
the cook of Naburne, William the clerk. 

Seal, green wax, circular, J in. diameter. Shield with a lion 
rampant. Inscription blurred, 

Dorso : — Carta Emme, filie Roberti Roune, facta Nicolao Dayuille, 
etc. This came to Agnes Dyul, wife of A. P., and so to W. P. 

Grant by Richard Maunsel, knight, of Brudeforthe, to John Maunsel, 
his son, of a culture in the territory {terrura) of Naburne, containing 
one carucate of land, namely that one called Fulmose, paying a pair of 
white gloves at Easter, for all secular suit, etc. Warranty to the 
grantee by the same metes and bounds as it had been held by Martin 
de Nortfolck', late citizen of York. Witnesses, Sir William de Malebise, 
Sir William son of Thomas, Sir William his brother, knights, Adam de 
Pountaise, Richard de Mureres, William his brother, Simon Fleming of 
Naburne, Giles'* de Paumes, Hugh his brother. 

Circular, green wax, ij inches. Bird standing to the sinister, 

with wings displayed SE ABVRN. « A good 

deal broken, 

Wednesday before St. Simon and St. Jude's day, 21 Edw. I (Oct. 21, 
1293). Grant by William de Paumes to Simon son of Giles de Paumes 
of husbot and haybot in his wood of Naburne, that is oakwood by the 
view of his foresters, and underwood without view. Witnesses, Sir John 
Bellew {de Bella aqua), Sir Ralph son of William, Sir William de 
Morers, knights, John de Hothum, Jerard Salvain, Robert de Hosgoteby, 
and Thomas de Houeton, York. 

Seal, green wax, circular, one inch. An animal passant to the 
sinister NIS D* PA A good deal broken, 

* Et bundat super stratas domini regis ad vtrasque bundas. 
'^ Written GiUs in the charter. 



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106 THE YORKSfflRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAl!. 

Thursday after the feast of St. Everilda (July 14), 1295. Grant in 
tail by Edmund Maunsel to William Helewise of Nabume, and Alice 
his wife, of a toft in Naburne, lying in breadth between the toft of 
Thomas de Northfolk and Maude his wife on the one side, and U Lyrpii 
on the other, and abutting on the highway at either end, at an annual 
rent of 3 J. Witnesses, William de Paumes, William de Morby, Walter 
de Heraelsay, John de Skipwith, William Russel of Naburne, Robert 
Tintelove, Augustine the cook, Hugh Freman. Naburne. 

Sunday after the feast of St. Luke the Evangelist, 28 Edw. I 
(October 23, 1300). Licence by Edmund Maunsel to William Helewys 
and Alice his wife, to dig turfs in his moor of Fulmose in Naburne, with 
one man for two days in the year, by the view of Edmund's foreman 
{prepositi\ or of someone else having the custody of his lands in the 
said vill ; and to carry the turfs to the tenement they held of him in the 
same vill, and not elsewhere. If Edmund or his foreman, or the man 
having the custody of his lands should refuse to make a view at a 
suitable time, then William and Alice might enter upon the moor and 
dig turfs for two days in the year by the view of their neighbours, if 
they wished to be present. Witnesses, Nicholas de Northfolk, William 
Paumes, Robert Tyntelofe, Hugh Freman, Augustine the cook. Horton. 

Grant by Henry, son of William Helewyse of Naburne, to Robert 
Tyntelove of Naburne, of a toft in the vill of Naburne, which lay 
between the land of the said William Helewyse on the one side, and 
the land of John de Lepyngton on the other, and extended from the 
land of the said William Helewyse to the water of Use ; paying yearly 
for the first twenty years, beginning at the Annunciation, 13 15, a rose at 
the time of roses, if demanded, and afterwards half a mark of silver. 
Witnesses, William Paumes, Nicholas de Northfolk, Thomas le PedUr, 
John Russell, Hugh Freman, William Helewyse. 

Seal, green wax, in an hexagonal frame, lixij inches across, a 
mermaid with looking-glass in right hand. Inscription bluired. 

Thursday after the Annunciation (March 26), 1321, 14 Edw. IH. 
Release by Muriel (Muriolla) de Kelkefeld to Agnes, late wife of 
Robert Tyntelove of Naburne, of all right in three acres of arable land 
in Naburne, in le Overriddinges, as they lay in length from the field 
del Netherriddinges to the land of Thomas de Northfolk', and in 
breadth between the land of John Russel and the land of Simon de 
Neuton ; and also in all the rent from the same. Witnesses, William de 
Paumes, Thomas de Norff', John Russel of Naburne, Nicholas de Norff*, 
Simon de Neuton. Naburne. 

Saturday after the feast of St. James the Apostle, 24 Edw. HI 
(July 31, 1350). Release by John de Barton of Naburne to John de 
Barneby and Agnes his wife, relative and heir of Robert Tyntlove of 
Naburne, of all right in the lands, etc., which belonged to Robert 
Tyntlove in Naburne. Witnesses, Roger Lascels, John Toures, William 
de Rymyngton the younger, Robert de Morton, John Russell of Naburne, 
and Robert Lyster of Selby. Naburne. 



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YORKSHIRE DEEDS. 107 

Michaelmas, 24 Edw. Ill (September 29, 1350). Grant by John de 
Barneby and Agnes his wife to John de Barton of Nabume, of all their 
arable lands and meadows in Nabume, formerly belonging to Robert 
Tintelove, paying yearly for the first eighteen years a rose at the 
Nativity of St. John the Baptist, and afterwards loli, of silver. 
Witnesses, Roger Lascelles, William de Moreby, John Lascelles, William 
de Grove, John Russel of Nabume, John Lyster of Selby. Naburne. 

Seal, green wax, circular, |. Shield on a bend three 

4h SIGILLVM 

Counterpart of the same, 

Sunday after the feast of St. Leonard the abbot, 35 Edw. Ill 
(November 7, 136 1). Grant by John de Esshton, citizen of York, to 
Simon de Waghen, citizen and ntercere of the same, of an acre of 
meadow in the meadow of Nabume, lying in breadth between the 
meadow of Sir John de Gray on either side, and in length from a meadow 
called le Filers, in front, to the water of Use behind, which he (the 
grantor) had of the grant of Robert son of John de Fosse the younger. 
Witnesses, Richard de Waghen, John de Danthorpe, John Russell, 
Thomas Thurkill, John de Staunton, clerk. Naburne. 

Seal, green wax, circular, 1 inch in diameter. A shield with a 
chevron between two anchors in chief and in base. ^1- S' lOH'IS 

DE ASSHTON. 

Same date. Power of attomey from John de Esshton, citizen of 
York, to William Gryme, chaplain, to deliver seisin of an acre of meadow 
in the meadow of Nabum ta Simon de Waghen, citizen and mercer of 
York. York. 

©WBtborpc' 

Monday after Whit-Sunday (May 31), 1322. Grant by Thomas son 
of Sir John de Metham, knight, to Sir John de Ousthorpe, canon of the 
church of Houeden, of two and a half acres of meadow and t%s, lod, 
rent in Ousthorpe. Witnesses, John de Bosevyle, Peter de Eyvile, 
knights, Nicholas de Sutton, Nicholas de Portington, William de 
Warwyke, William de Belasyse, William de Lincoln of Blaketoft, Robert 
de Belasyse, John son of Agnes de Ousthorpe, Thomas de Houeden, 
Jordan the clerk. Ousthorpe. 

St. Simon and St. Jude's day (October 28), 1341. Grant by Richard 
son of John son of Agnes de Ousthorpe to Thomas Tasker of the same, 
of half an acre of land in the west field of Ousthorpe, between the land 
of Thomas de Ousthorpe on the north, and the land of John son of John 
son of Peter of the same on the south, and abutting on the grantor's 
capital selion and le Moregate, Witnesses, Thomas de Ousethorpe, 
Alan de Garton, Robert de Cave of Hythe, Roger de Neuland, William 
de Walsay, John son of John son of Peter de Ousthorpe, Adam his 
brother of the same. Ousthorpe. 

^ A mile nurth-north-east of Eastrington. 



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108 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

Sunday after St. Lawrence's day (August 15), 1367. Grant by Ralph 
de Wresill and Richard de Gunnays, chaplains, to Sir Henry de Ing-ilby, 
Richard de Aske, John de Aske, and John de Brakenholme, of the 
manor of Ousthorpe with its appurtenances, which formerly belonged to 
Sir John de Ousthorpe, knight, and Thomas Verious, in the vills and 
territories of Ousthorpe, ^Hythe, Belassisse, Cotenesse, Wyton, Neuland 
by Estrington, and Grisby. Witnesses, William Dayville, Nicholas 
Roscelyn, William Lange, Robert de Cave, Stephen de Herlethorpe. 
Ousthorpe. 

Two labels y one seal remaining'^ bearing the lamb and flag. 

Tuesday after the feast of St. Ambrose the bishop (April 5), 1373. 
Grant by Henry de Ingilby, canon of St. Peter's, York, John de Braken- 
holme, and Robert Boseville, chaplain, to John de Aske, of all the lands, 
etc., which Richard de Aske acquired for himself, and them and their 
heirs, or which they had of the grant of Ralph de Wresill and Richard 
Gunnays, chaplains, in Ousthorpe, Hithe, Dyke, Belasisse, Portington, 
Houeden, Brighton,^ Cotenesse, Neuland, Estrington, and Askilby,* in 
tail, with remainder to Richard de Aske's right heirs. Witnesses, 
Thomas de Saltmerske, William Dayville, John de Kirkby, Stephen 
Cccill,* Gilbert de Lincoln, Thomas Baroun. Houeden. 

Ihree labels for seals:— (i) Part of the panelling on the dexter side 
remains; (2) a shield bearing a front of bracken. S' lOHANNIS .... 
HOLM. (3) Apparently a bird with webbed feet ; much broken. 

Saturday after St. Peter and St. Paul (July 2), 1373. Power of 
attorney from John de Aske to John Amyas, Robert Balif of Sandholm, 
and Thomas de Hertilpole, to deliver to James de Raygate, John de 
Brakenholme, Robert Boseville, chaplain, and Thomas Everard, chaplain, 
seisin of his manors of Thurkilby,^ Ousthorpe, and Belassise, and of his 
manor of Nesebytte* in the bishoprick of Durham, and of his other lands, 
etc., there, and in Hythe and Portyngton. Ousthorpe. 

July 16, 9 Hen. V (142 1). Grant by Thomas Taschar of Ousthorpe 
to William Bayle and John Aylcy of his lands and tenements in the vill 
and fields of Ousthorpe. Witnesses, John Alanson, Hugh Colton, Robert 
Brompton. Ousthorpe. 

Label for one seal, fragment left, perhaps an eagle displayed. 

October 10, 11 Hen. VI (1432). Grant in tail by Robert Conestable, 
esq.. Master Richard Moresby, clerk, Alesia de Miton, Robert Rudestane, 
Thomas Wilton, Robert Barde, William Baillie, and William Barete, to 

1 Hive, Gilberdike, Bellasize, Cotness, of Howden, 1539. David Cedll, of 

Wcighton, and Newland, all near East- Stamford, grandfather of Lord Burleigh, 

rington. Grisby seems to have dis- married for his second wife Joan Roos, 

appeared. who died in his lifetime, March 8, 1537, 

« Breighton. seised of the manor of Cotness {Notes 

8 Accplhv ^'^ Queries, 6th Series, vii, 384, and xi, 

^^f ^^*.„ ,,r ^ u. t. .. 69; 7th Series, xii, 144).— A.S.E. 
* 1 he Cecills of Howdenshire subsisted 5 Thirkleby, in the parish of Swine, 

till the death of George Cecill, gent., « Nesbit, in the parish of Hart. 



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YORKSHIRE DEEDS. 109 

Richard de Aske) son and heir of John de Aske, and to Margaret his 
wife, of the manor of Ousthorpe with its appurtenances in Ousthorpe, 
Hithe, Sandholme, Dike, Bealassis, Yuckeflete, Meteham, Cottenes, 
Hoveden, Askilby, Grenake, Cavill, Neusom, Brynd, Suth Duffeld, and 
Brighton. Witnesses, Robert Bapthorpe, knight, Thomas de Meteham, 
John Portyngton, William Moston, esquires, and William Thorpe. 
Ousthorp. 

Copy certified as in the next deed. ** Memorandum of this writing, 
in the handes of (blank) ^ hath foure labelles pendant thereat, to twoe of 
which labelles are seaies of redd waxe affixed, 27 November, 1606." 

September 5, 2 Edw. IV (1462). Grant by Robert Ughtred, William 
Gascoigne, knights, John Nevyll of Wymbvislay,* Robert Constable of 
Flaynburgh, knight, William Baret, and Richard Frankeleyn, to Thomas 
Babthorpe, clerk, John White, rector of Holme in Spaldyngmore, Robert 
Slak, rector of Seteryngton, and William Pedlyngton, rector of Langton, 
of all the lands, etc., which had belonged to Richard Aske, esq., in 
Ousthorpe, Hythe, Dyke, Neuland, Belasyes, and Cotnes, with the 
passage over the Derwent between Bubwith and Duffeld, called Bubwith 
Fery, which the grantors, together with John, Cardinal and Archbishop 
of York, Richard, Earl of Salisbury, Henry Vavasour, Robert Rouclyff, 
Alvered Mauleverer, and William Hautewesill, deceased, had of the 
grant of the said Richard Aske, upon trust to enfeoff John son and heir 
of the said Richard Aske and Margaret, late his wife, and Elizabeth 
daughter of Ralph Bygote, knight, and Anne, late his wife, within six 
weeks after their marriage, in the premises, to hold in special tail, with 
remainder to John's right heirs. Power of attorney to John Redeshawe 
and John Langdale, to deliver seisin. Witnesses, Thomas Metham the 
younger, knight, Robert Babthorpe, knight, Thomas Manors, esq. 
Ousthorp. 

Copy certified by Richard Wright, notary public, and his servants, 
John Oughtred and Brian Wilton. Shown to Humfrey Birletson and 
Peter Vavousour on their examination at Howden on March 31, 1607, in 
the case of Richard Sunderland and others against Francis Aske. 
Witnesses, Mich : Portington, Matt : Kay, J. Midgley, Jo : Hansoun. 
Examined by H. Aikeroyd, September 9, 1607; also by Christo. Hodgson. 

March 28, 16 Hen. VIII (1525). Grant by William Tasker of 
Oxthorpe, the elder, to John Bailzey of Hyth, William Goffer,* William 
Sutton> and Richard Pereson of Houeden, of two messuages with the 
crofts in Oxthorpe, upon trust for himself for life ; remainder to his sons, 
Robert and William, in fee. Witnesses, Robert Abbott of Belasysse, 
gent., John Gosser, William Webster the elder, William Bailzay, and 
Robert Jackson. Oxthorpe. 

Four labels, one seal: — B. 

1 Womersley, near Pontefract. 
2 Now Gofer, or sometimes Gopher, an old local name. — A.S.E. 



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110 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

September 29, 21 Hen. VIII (1529). Grant by William Tasker of 
Ousthorppe, the elder, to William Gosser, William Stadder, and John 
Fulgiame, of two messuages with a croft in the vill {villata) of 
Ousthorppe. Seisin delivered to William Tasker on the same day in 
the presence of John Webster the elder, John Webster the younger, 
William Richardson, and William Sharp. 

The true entent of this dede of feoflFament, to the which this sedull 
is annexed, and the delyuere of seisyn made by the same, is that the 
feofifes in the seid dede named shall stound and be seised of and in all 
the saides {stc) londes and tenementes especified and conteigned in the 
seid dede, to thuse of me, William Tasker thelder, named in the seid 
dede, for terme of my lyff naturall, and shall sufifre me to take and 
resceyue the proffettes of the seid londes and tenementes ; and after my 
decesse I will that my seid feoffes shall stound and be seised of the 
seid londes and tenementes to thuse of William Tasker my son, and to 
his heires for euer. In witnes wherof, as well to this sedull as to the 
seid dede, I haue setto my seale the day and yere conteigned in the 
seid dede. 

June 13, 22 Hen. VIII (1530). Bargain and sale by William Tasker 
of Ousthorpe to Robert Aske,* son to Sir Robert Aske, knight, of two 
messuages, four crofts, 11} acres of land in Ousthorpe, for %li. 

Seal bears a saltire^ not heraldic. 

Release dated the same day. Livery of seisin, June 13, in the 
presence of Robert Aske, esq., son of John Aske, esq., William Monkton, 
gent., Ralph Flecher, Anthony Brown, William Stather, John Webster, 
William Sharp, Thomas Fuliambe, William Crosby, Thomas Sleight. 

April 15, 29 Hen. VIII (1538). Bond from Miles Tasker of the city 
of London, shereman, to John Aske of Awghton, esq., in 10/;., for quiet 
possession of "all suche messes, landes, and tenementes in Ousthorpp, 
the wyche the said John hathe of the gyft of the aboue bond on Miles 
Tasker." 

p' me, Mylles Tasker, clotheworker, of London. 

Seal indecipherable, 

October 31, 30 Eliz. (1588). Covenant by Robert Aske of Aughton, 
esq., with Sir Ralfe Bowcher, knight, Sir Anthony Thorold, knight, 
Francis Vawghan, William Hildyard, John Estofte, Hewghe Bethell, 
esquires, and George Fawcett, yeoman, **to intale the sayme in suche 
sorte as yt may continew in the name and blud of Askes to the heires 
males for the continewance of the same in his name and blud and 
continewance of howse," to assure the manor of Owstropp, and lands, 
etc., in Owstropp, Dyke, Hive, alias Hithe, and the manor or grange of 
Hornington, to Bowcher and the others to hold upon trust for himself 

* leader in the Pilgrimage of Grace. 



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YORKSHIRE DEEDS. Ill 

for life ; remainder to his wife Ellin during life or widowhood, remainder 
to their son Francis* in tail, remainder to himself in fee. 

Robert Aske. 

Witnesses, John Crosbie, clerk, Wyllm Snawsell, Frauncis Coplande, 
Richard Lawson, John Aske. 

Exhibited at Howden, March 31 and September 8, 1607, on behalf 
of the plaintiff in the suit of Aske v, Sunderland, Sowden, and others. 

January 10, 32 Eliz. (1589-90). Rycharde Aske of Owstroppe,*gent., 
seeke in body but whole of mynd and of perfect remembraunce. Fyrst, 
I bequythe my soule to Almyghtye God, my savyour and redemer, and 
my body to be buryed in my chappell, called St. Savyour chappell, vnder 
the southermost tombe, where my wief doythe lye, within the parysshe 
churche of Estrington. To Robert Aske, my sonne, my howse in 
Estrington which Myles Petchye doythe dwell in, and the land belong- 
inge to yt, and all my free rentes and other ryaltyes belonginge to the 
manner of the Spennes of Estrington. To Peter Aske, my sonne, my 
Bell Closes. To Rychard Aske, my sonne, my closes, called the Spenne 
Inge. To Julyan Aske, my doughter, my closes, called the Seyve Closes; 
item, my howses in Estrington, which John Petchye doyth dwell in, and 
the land belonginge to yt; provyded alwayes that she doythe marrye 
with the concentt of her frendes, or els to stand to that which the lawe 
will geve herr. The resydue of my landes within the feildes of Estring- 
ton, nott bequythed, I geve to Peter Aske and Rychard Aske, my sonnes, 
and Julyan, my doughter, to be equally devyded amongest them. To 
Bryan Ellys,^ my sonne in lawe, and Elsabethe, his wiefe, my doughter, 
fyve yeres rentes fourthe of my lease of Thyckytt, in full consyderacion 
of his wiefe portion, and to begiuge at the fyrst rent day next after my 
deathe. To my doughter Ellys my gray mare which was Mrs. Leedes. 
To Mathewe Ellys, my doughter eldest sonne, fyve markes. To my 
doughter Ellis children fower poundes, to be devyded equally amongest 
them. My lease of Owstroppe to my brother in lawe, Mathewe Claton, 
gent., to bestowe of which of my children as he lykes best. The 
resydewe of all my goodes to Robert Aske, Peter Aske, and Rychard 
Aske, my sonnes, Julyan Aske and Elsabethe Ellis, my doughters, whom 
I mayke my whole executours, and I constitute Mathewe Claton, gent., 

> Mr. Francis Aske had Owsthorpe relates to him and his wife:— ** On 

from his father, and resided there. He May 5, 4 and 5 Philip and Afary 

married Anne, daughter of Edward Hoi- (1558), Robert Aske and Elizabeth, his 

beach, of Stowe, in Lincolnshire, and wife, surrendered in the court baron at 

grand-daughter of John Portington, of Rycall of Miles Spenser, clerk, prebendary 

Portington ; died without issue, and was of Rycall, before Robert Cloughe, the 

buried at Eastrington, January 2, 1640-1. steward, seven acres in a close in Rycall, 

— A.S.E. called le Nessty to the use of John Ellys, 

^ A pedigree of the Askes of Owsthori>e, of Stockebrydgefeild, for a fine of \\s. 

si^ed by the testator, is given in the &/." 

Visitation for 1584 (p. 107). Richard » Brian Ellis, second son of John Ellis, 

Aske, of Owsthrope, gent., buried March of Barnbrough. She was his second wife 

31, \^(^ {Eastrington Parish Registers). {Jbid.^ p. 135). She was of Stockbridge, 

He married a Lincolnshire lady, named in Ryther. Administration September 18, 

Elizabeth Hall. The following document 1603.— AS. E. 



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112 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHffi:OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

my brother in lawe, the supervisore of this my last will, and for his 
paynes I do geve hyme fortye shillinges, to bye hyme a nagge withall. 
Thesse wytnesses, John Weddall, Anthony EUys, and Chrystofer Guribye. 

Proved October 12, 1590, before the official or guardian of the peculiar 
jurisdiction of Howden and Howdenshire, by Richardi Aske, son of the 
deceased, the other executors being under age. R. Percy. 

May 10, 34 Eliz. (1592). Covenant by John Aske, esq., son and next 
heir of Robert Aske," esq., deceased, with the right honourable Sir 
William Cecill, knight, Lord Burghley, Lord Treasurer of England and 
Master of the Queen's Majesty's Court of Wards and Liveries, and 
Richard Kingsmell, esq., surveyor of the same liveries, for and in the 
name and behalf of the said Soveraign Lady the Queen; that the 
Queen having agreed to grant him a special livery of his father's lands*, 
the writing annexed contained and specified all the lordships, etc., with 
their yearly value, which came to him from his father. 

An extent of the yearly value of the manors, etc., late belonging to 
Robert Aske, esq., late of Aughton, deceased, which descended to his 
son and heir, John Aske. Robert Aske died August 31, 32 Eliz. (1590), 
John Aske being 25 years old and upwards at the time of the inq. p, m,, 
which was taken at Selbie, July 8, ^^ Eliz. (1591). The son asked for 
special livery on September i, 32 Eliz. (1590), and it came at Michael- 
mas, ^^ Eliz. (1591). 

Manor of Aughton, 20 messuages, 1,000 acres of land, meadow, and 
pasture, held of the heirs of Peter de Mellelawe.^as of (blank), by knight 
service, that is the eighth part of a knight's fee, worth 30//. . 

Manor of Everthorpe,* 20 messuages, 800 acres of land, meadow, and 
pasture, held of the heirs of Peter de Mallelawe, as of (blank), by knight 
service, that is the tenth part of a knight's fee, worth i2li. 

Manor of Owstropp, held of the Bishop of Durham, as of his manor 
of Howden, in free socage, by fealty only, worth 7//. 

Land and tenements in Hithe and Dike, held of the Bishop of 
Durham as of his manor of Howden, in free socage, by fealty only, 
worth 36J. 4^/. 50//. 16^-. 4<3?. 

Annual rent from lands in the holding of John Nicholson in Sowth- 
duffeild, I4J". 

Scite of the late priory of Ellerton and 200 acres of land, meadow, 
wood, and pasture, held of the Queen in chief, by the tenth part of a 
knight's fee, worth 6//. 131. 4^/. 

Pasture for sheep, called Sheepegates, in Killingoth, worth 6j. 8^/. 

* An error for Robert. of Francis Meering, of Collingham, Notts. , 

2 Roljert Aske, of Aughton, whose who remarried in 1593 George Constable, 

grandmother was one of the daughters of Everingham (Yorkshire ArchaologiccU 

and co-heiresses of Sir Ralph Rylher, of /ournal, ix, 57). John Aske sold Augh- 

Ryther, married (i) Elizabeth, daughter ton and all his other lands, 

of Sir John Dawney, mother of the above- * That is ** de Malo lacu," or Mauley, 

named John Aske, and (2) Ellen, daughter * In the parish of North Cave. 



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YORKSHIRE DEEDS. 118 

Manors of Ryther, Ossendike, and Stockbridge, with the advowson of 
the church of Ryther, 12 messuages, 8 cottages, 100 acres of land, 500 
acres of meadow, 200 acres of meadow in Ryther and Ossendyke, and 
200 acres of pasture in Stockbridgefeild, held of the Queen as of her 
Honour of Pontefract, parcel of the Duchy of Lancaster, by the eighth 
part of a knight's fee, worth 50/^ 

Manor of Dighton, and 10 messuages, 7 cottages, 200 acres of meadow 
and pasture, and bd, rent, held in chief, by the tenth part of a knight's 
fee, worth 70J. 

Messuage, called R3rtherhill, held of the Queen, as of her Honour of 
Pontefract, by the twentieth part of a knight's fee, worth 20//. 

Capital messuage, called Cottingwith Graunge, 2 tenements, 100 acres 
of land, etc., and 8^. \d, rent, held in chief by the tenth part of a 
knight's fee, worth 7//. i/\d. 

Tenement and 40 acres of meadow and pasture in Thorgondby, held 
in chief by the tenth part of a knight's fee, worth 29J. 

Four messuages, 100 acres of land, etc., and a moiety of a messuage 
beyond the water of Derwent, in Bubwith and Brighton, held of the dean 
and chapter of York in free socage, worth 43 J. lod, 

Scite of the priory of Thickhead, a windmill, 150 acres of land, etc., 
held in chief by the tenth part of a knight's fee, worth lOOS. 

Two tenements and 200 acres of land, etc., in Holme, held in chief 
by the hundredth part of a knight's fee, worth loos. 

Capital messuage, a cottage, 2 pieces of land, a water mill, 200 acres 
of land, etc., in Goodmadham, held in chief by the fortieth part of a 
knight's fee, worth 8//. 3J. 

Graunge or capital messuage, 3 tenements, a cottage, 100 acres of 
land, etc., in Laytham, held in chief by the tenth part of a knight's fee, 
worth 6//. loj. %d. 

Toft, croft, 4 bovates of land, called Clevinge, held in chief by the 
tenth part of a knight's fee, worth 8//. 

In possession, 58//. gj. 3^. 134/^'. i is- Sd. 

Sum total, 175//. 8j. 

In reversion, 116//'. iSs, Sd. 

Examined by John Churchill. 

Robert Aske by his charter, dated March i, 24 Eliz. (1581-2), granted 
the premises to feoffees upon certain uses, namely as to a tenement in 
Ryther, and certain tenements within the demesne of Ryther, a tenement 
in Ossendyck in the holding of Thomas Wetherall, the manor of 
Deighton, and all his lands in Dighton, West Cottingwith, Thorgonby, 
Bubwith, and Sowth Duffeild, and the scite of the lately dissolved 
monastery of Thickhead, to the use of John Aske, his son and heir 
apparent, and of Christiana daughter of Thomas Fairfax, knight, wife of 
the said John, for their lives, remainder in tail male; and as to the 
manor called Stockbridgefeild, and his lands in Holme, Goodmadham, 
and Laytham, and the lands called Clevinge, to the use of himself and 

vol.. XVII. I 



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lU THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

Helen his wife for life, remainder to John Aske in tail male; as to the 
remainder to himself for life, remainder to John Aske in tail male. 
7//'. 135*. to be deducted to make up the Queen's third. 

From a copy examined with the original by Richard Sunderland, 
John El wood. 

Ss yesterday cominge vnto my sonne Dollmans* to see him and my 
littell grandchild, I ouertooke a sade and mutch trobled gentelman, Mr. 
Francis Aske, vpon his way to you. I, thinkinge it had benne to haue 
perfected what formarly I writte to you about, found that the sheriffe 
w^^ your Sonne for you had taken possession of his howse and groundes, 
and therof yo' people were and are peacably possesed. I conceaue it 
donne rather by the instigation of some that loues not the gentillman, 
then of yo' owne dispotion (sic), nor can I thinke he woulde falter 
wth you in any thinge agreed one betwixt you, and therfor haue staled 
him w*** me att Bads worth, and of purpose sent this messenger to intreat 
you to mett me to-morrow, beinge Munday, by tenne in the fornone att 
Wakfeld, and to send me word by this bearar what howse you will be 
att, for I knowe none. And if you cannot come I will come one to you, 
desiring mutch to doe the best office of a frind betwixt you, conceauinge 
what is now performed to proceed rather from som supposed mistake 
then any iust cause, lovinge him as a neybour and kinsman and valew- 
ing you, my worthy frind. So w''* my best respect, I rest, 

Badsworth, this Yours assured, 

present Sunday. Tho: Metham. 

Ss tho' it be interlyned, I meane Wakfeild, wher by tenne in the 
fornone I hoope to se you, and appointed this bearar to mett me ther 
wt«» yo' ansquer and yo»^ place appointed, whear you wilbe in the towne. 

To the wor" and my 

worthy frind, Richard 

Sunderland, esquire, 

att Cooley, 

this 

Worthy S', May you please to understand that I rec** this day your 
letter by this bearer, but cannot attend you at Wakfeld according to your 
request, having to be at Bradford then to meet S' Richard Tempest about 
the county business, w*^'^ by my absence would be disapoynted. Yf it be 
your pleasure to have me to meet you at Wakfeld at any other tyme 
during your being at M' Dolman's house, I will answer (?) the same any 
other day this next week except Wednesday, for to give you my satis- 

* Thomas Dolman, of Badsworth, Thomas Metham, of Metham, who was 
married as his second wife Barbara, the slain at Marston Moor, 
second daughter and co-heiress of Sir 



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YORKSHIRE DEEDS. 115 

faction of my manifold endevours by all reasonable means to haue had 
a firendly and finall end w*** Mr. Aske, who hath not mad such use therof 
as in reason and equity he might have done, wherby I rec** no small 
losse and damage. Thus v^ remembrance of my service I take leave, 
and shall ever rest, 

Y" to be commanded, 

Ric. Sunderland. 

To the right wot^ my most worthy frend 

Sir Tho: Metham, kt., at Mr. Dolman's 

house in Badsworth be these d'd. 
Vera copia originalis examinata per me, Richardum Sunderland. 

1. S'Tho. Metham* s letter, i8 April, 1630. 

2. My answer thereto. 

©Iton/ 

Undated. Articles betwixt Anthony Yates of Oxton, yeoman, and 
William Marshall of Tadcaster :— 

(i) Anthony Yates shall sell to William Marshall one parcell of a 
farm in Oxton, which he hath lately bought of the right honourable 
Philip, Lord Wharton, that is six acres of land in a field called Long- 
land, that is six lands lying for three roods apiece, with nether ends 
going over the highway. Item, three lands lying in the same field, with 
their nether ends going over the highway, containing half acres apiece. 

(2) Another little close or parcel of ground called Ousterbers, con- 
taining two acres, and two lands, lying within a close of John Bean's, 
near to adjoining to the said close, containing two roods. 

(3) Anthony Yates shall pay all the church, constable, and poor 
'* sesmentes," and all other duties belonging to that farm for ever, 
excepting monthly "sesses" for the king. 

(4) 105//. to be paid upon the sealing and delivery of the deed. 

(5) Covenant for quiet possession. 

(6) William Marshall shall have the grass growing upon the land 
ends. 

Anthony Yeates. 

Witnesses, William Marshall, junior, Anne Barker (mark). 

6 roode landes, abutting on Hargarth Carr. 

3 half acre landes, abutting on y« Seggy Car. 

One close called Oxterbarr, containing two acres, abutting on Tad- 
caster Low More, with two roode landes adioyning to the said close, 
lying in John Beanes close. 

Sunday after the feast of St. Nicholas the bishop (December 12), 
13 1 6. Grant by Robert son of John Cambelhoy of Sinderby, to John his 
brother, of a rood of land in the field and territory of Sinderby, lying by 
the road leading to Ripon, between the land of John son of Robert on 

> In the parish of Tadcaster. « In the parish of Kirklington. 



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116 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

the one side, and the land of William Cambelhoy on the other. 
Witnesses, John son of Geoffrey de Sinderby, Adam at the Bridge, 
William de Holm, Robert de Holm, Henry de Pykeh(ale), clerk. 
Sinderby. 

SleDmete. 

February ii, i342(-3), 17 Edw. III. Grant by William Gra of York 
to John son of Henry de Sledmer, and Alice his wife, for their lives, of 
a toft in Sledmer, which Eustachia Taloun had formerly held of the said 
William, paying ^od. a year, at Whitsuntide and Martinmas, and two 
fowls at Christmas. John de Woume, William de Rigton, Henry Danvers 
of Sledmer, John Palfrayman, Robert de Collum of the same. York. 

Ifforlt. 

Tuesday before the feast of St. Thomas the Apostle, 31 Hen. Ill 
(December 18, 1246). Grant by Gaudin le Orfeure of York to John his 
son, of his estate for the life of Elena, who was wife of Geoffrey Glover 
{cirotecarius) of York, of the demise of the said Elena, in the third part 
of a messuage in Fischergate in the parish of St. Stephen, as it lay 
between the land of William Skinner (pellt'parii) and the land of Adam 
Miller, and in length from the highway to the water of Fosse, which 
third part Elena had recovered in the King's Court by a writ of dower. 
Witnesses, Thomas de Thurkelby, Thomas Grunt, William Rudde. 

In dor so : — Vacat. 

No date. Grant by Eva Clairvaux (de Clarisuallibus), relict of 
Robert Clairvaux, formerly citizen of York, in her widowhood, to her son, 
William Clairvaux, of the land in Fiskergate, which lay in breadth 
between the lands of Adam Hall {de Aula), and in length from Adam's 
land to the King's ditch (fossatum) towards the east; and of an annual 
rent of 40^. in a house with a toft, lying between the same Adam's lands 
in breadth, and in length from the highway to the said land which lay 
between the said Adam's lands ; and of an annual rent of 35*. in the 
messuage with the land of Martin Siuelot in Walmegate, in the parish 
of St. Nicholas, lying between the lands of Nicholas de Warthill in 
breadth, and in length from the highway of Walmegate to the Fosse; 
and of an annual rent of 2S. in the vill and territory of Barkethorpe, 
from the land Thomas de Barkethorpe held of the grantor, by the pay- 
ment of a rose on St. John the Baptist's day for all service. For 
greater security Sir Thomas Clairvaux, knight, confirmed the above, and 
joined in sealing this deed. Witnesses, John de Seleby, mayor of 
York,* Richard Blundus, John de Cunigeston, and John Spicer 
{speciarius), bailiffs. 

Wednesday before St. Wilfrid's day (October 9), 1342, 16 Edw. III. 
Grant by William de Hothum, citizen and skinner (pelliparius), of 
York, to John de Lascels of Eskrike, of a plot of land in Fisshergate in 
the suburb (suburbio) of York, which the grantor had of the grant of 

* Mayor in 1263. 



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YORKSHIRE DEEDS. 117 

William son of Philip de Gilling, as it lay in breadth between the land 
of John de Northfolk*, sherman, on the one side, and the land of Sir 
John Grunt, chaplain, on the other, and in length from the highway of 
Fisshergate before to the highway leading from Walmgate Bar (de harra 
de Walmegate) to Fulford behind. Witnesses, Nicholas Foukes, mayor 
of the city of York, Richard le Ferour, Robert le TValshe, and William 
Fox, bailiffs of the same city, Andrew de Bossale, Robert de Podeseye 
the elder, John de Redelay, John de Northfolk', Sherman^ Ingelram de 
Naflferton, Alan le Hosier. York. 

Dor so : — Carta de ten. in Fissergate in suburbio Ebor. v. 

January lo, 38 Eliz., 1595-6. Release by William Cooke the younger 
of York, pewlherer, and Joan his wife, to James Godson of York, tailer^ 
of all right in a messuage in Micklegate, in the parish of St. John the 
Evangelist and Apostle, at Ouse Bridge end, formerly in the holding of 
Roger Smarthwaite, barber, deceased, and then of Edward Browne, 
tailer, and lying in breadth between the tenement of Roger Leedes on 
the west, and the tenement in the occupation of Christopher Fordane, 
tailer t on the east. As the releasors' seals were to many unknown, the 
mayor, Robert Brooke, at their request, affixed his official seal. 

Willyam Cooke. Seal, a bird standing, 

Robert Brooke, maior. Seal destroyed, 

Signum Johanne Coke, vxoris predicti Willelmi. Seal^five human 
legs conjoined in the /esse point, at the upper part of the thighs, 

April 2%, 42 Eliz. (1600). Bargain and sale by William Thweinge of 
Heworthe, esq., to William Northe of Yorke, yeoman, for 115/^, of a 
messuage and garden in Goodromgate in the parish of the Holy Trinity, 
sometimes in the tenure of Richard Kellett, deceased, afterwards of 
Elizabeth Kellet, widow, deceased, late wife to the said Richard, late of 
John Smithe, gent., and then of the said William Northe, as the same 
lay together between the tenement of Leonard Williamson, partechement 
maker, and the garth or orchard belonging to the tenement of William 
Garbutt, schoolmaster, in St. Andrewgate, towards the east, and the 
tenement and garden of the subchanter and keeper of the house or 
college, called the Bedderne, and the vicars choral of the Metropolitan 
church of Yorke, in the tenure of the said William Northe, towards the 
west, and abutting upon the Queen's street of Goodromgate towards the 
north, forwards, and upon the garden or orchard in St. Andrewgate, in 
the tenure of Thomas Rogerson, towards the south, backwards, and all 
and singular, etc., **and all the wainescote, sealinges, brewinge leades, 
brewinge vessell, coolers, cestomes, heirelomes, glasse windowes, wells, 
and buckettes.*' 

Will'm North. 

Witnesses, Thomas Rogerson, Tho. Emondson, Adam Ketlewell, 
Jo : Miers, George Thweinge. 

Sealy a lion passant to the dexter. 



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118 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHiEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

Monday, the feast of St. Gregory the Pope, 20 Ric. II (March 12, 
1396-7). A plaint of an assize of fresh force,* done within forty days, 
was brought by Agnes, widow of Master Richard de Waghen, clerk, 
against Adam del Brigge and Alice his wife, about her freehold in 
Trichourlane, York, before William Frost, mayor of York, and John del 
More and Thomas de Houedene, the sheriffs. The action was tried in 
the Guildhall, before the mayor and sheriffs, on Monday before St. 
Ambrose's day (April 2), when the recognitores found that the plaintiff 
had never been in seisin of the tenement, so that she could be disseised. 
In testimony whereof to this present record the official seal of the said 
sheriffs is appended. 

Seal^ circular, one inch in diameter, fortified gate, probably 
representing one of the York Bars, I. T. at top, with central 
tower between m vicec ciuitatis. 

INDENTURE OF APPRENTICESHIP WITH A DRAPER. 

August I, 13 James I, 1615. Indenture by which Richard Paicoke, 
son of Peter Paicoke, late of Ownesbie,' yeoman, deceased, puts and 
binds himself apprentice to George Smalwoode of York, draper, and with 
him to abide, dwell, and well and trulie serve from the daite hereof unto 
the full ende and tearme of eighte yeares then next after followinge, 
fuUie to be completed and ended. Dureing all which tearme the said 
Richard Paicoke, as apprentes, shall deligentie doe the lawfuU com- 
maundementes of his said maister, his secret counsell lawfuU and 
honneste he shall keep and laine^; he shall not consume nor waiste his 
maister's goodes, nor lende them to anie withoute his maister*s license ; 
and shall not plaie att dice, cairdes, taibles,* nor att anie other vnlawfuU 
games dureinge the said terrae. He shall not contracte mattrimonie nor 
committ adultrie with anie woeman dureinge the saide tearme. He shall 
not kno anie mannor of person aboute to hurte or hinder his maister or 
his goodes, but he shall geve him warninge thereof. He -shall not goe 
awaie, nor vnlawfullie absente himselfe from his said service by day nor 
neight, but he shall well, trulie, and honnestlie behave and vse himselfe 
vnto his said maister, boeth in woordes and deedes, att all tymes dureinge 
the said tearme. And lastlie he shall geve and render a juste and true 
accounte of all such thinges as he shall have chairge of, att such tyme 
and tymes as his maister shall demaunde anie reckonninge of him 
dureinge the said tearme. Within which said tearme the said George 
Smallwood, the maister, promisseth and granteth by these presentes to 

1 Fresh force, frisca fortia, is a force accrued, have a bill out of the chancery 

done within forty days, as seems by to the mayor (Manley's ItUerpreter), 

Fitzherbert's Naiura Brevium, fo. 7. ^ Reading uncertain. 

For if a man be disseised of any lands ^ To conceal. The word is still in use 

or tenements within any city or borough, in the northern counties and the south 

or deforced from them after the death of of Scotland. Cf the Scotch proverb, 

his ancestor, to whom he is heir, or after ** Women and bairns layne what they ken 

the death of his tenant for life, or in tail ; not." 

he may, within forty days after his title * Backgammon or draughts. 



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YORKSHIRE DEEDS. 119 

enforme and teach, or cause to be enfonned and taught, the said Richard 
Paicoke, his said apprentes, in the said scyence or occupacon called the 
draiper scyence or occupacon, after the best mannor that he cann or may 
leame withoute anie layninge thereof, with reasonable correction ; and 
alsoe shall finde vnto his said apprentes sufficiente meate, drinke, and 
cloath, lynnen, and woolen hose, shoes, beddinge, and all other thinges 
to him necessarie ; and to geve him euery yeare six pence in the name 
of his sallarie. 

George Smalwoode. 

Witnesses, Will'm Belwood, Ambrose Hutchinsonn. 

MARRIAGE SETTLEMENT OF WILLIAM VAVASOUR AND 
ISABEL, WIDOW OF AVERY MAULEVERER. 

December i8, 1455. This endenture made the xviij day of Decembre, 
the yere of the reigne of Kyng Henry ye sext after *the conquest xxx** iiij, 
Betwene James Pykeryng, knyght, Thomas Vrsswyk, squyer, and dame 
Kateryn, doughtter of ye same Thomas, on yat one partie, and dame 
Elizabeth Sewerby, William Vauasour, sonne to Henry Vauasour, squyer, 
late dede, and Laurence Kyghley, gentilman, on yat other partie, 
Witnesseth that the saide parties been fuUie agreede and accordede, 
that the saide William Vauasour shall, be the grace of Godd, haue and 
take to wyffe Isabell, late wyflfe to Averey Mauleuerer, before the fest of 
Pentecost next commyng after the date of yis writyng. And the saide 
dame Elizabeth, William Vauasour, and Laurence shall causse and do 
to be made a sufficiaunt and sure estate to the saide William Vauasour 
and Isabell, and to the heires male of the saide William of the body of 
the seide Isabell lawfully begottyn ; and, for defaute of such essue, the 
remeynder therof to the seide William and heires for euer, of the londes 
and tenementes to the yerly value of xx//'. ouer all chargez and reprisez, 
of chartour lande and coppy holde, within thre monethes next after the 
manage and esspouses hade and solempnizide betwix the saide William 
and Isabel ; and that by dede endentede of that that is chartour lande, 
wheroff the one partie shall be delyuered to the saide Kateryn. And, 
ouer yat, yat ye same William shall haue and stand in a lawfull estate, 
sole seased of chartour land and coppy holde, in his demene as of fee, 
wheroff the seide Isabell nowe be dowable of othir landez and tene- 
mentez to ye yerely value of x marces, ouer all chargez and reprises, 
within iij monethes next after the saide esspouses. And also that the 
same William shall haue and be soly possessyde of gooddes and catalles 
to the value of yj c marces to his owne vsse and behoue, without any 
condecyon, coueyne, or eny othir malengyne, charge and costez of the 
maryage deducte. And also yat ye same William Vauasour shall 
rewarde and yeve vn to Piers Bankes and Kateryn his wyffe, moder of 
the same Isabell, such some of money fore the interesse and gud wille 
of ye same Piers and Kateryn his wyffe, for the sayde mariage to be 
had, as shall be auysed and apoynted hym to doo by the same Sir 
James, Dame Elizabeth, and Kateryn. And ye sayde James Pykeryng, 



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120 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

Thomas Vrsswyk, and Dame Kateiyn graunten on yeir partie vn to the 
saides Elizabeth Swerssby (sic)^ William Vauasour, Laurence Kyghtley, 
that all the landes and tenementes, the wicK the saide Thomas Vrsswyk, 
squyer, or eny othir man to his vsse, hath and holdith in ye countee of 
Yorke, the wich sorae'tyme were Jenettes, wyffe of the same Thomas, 
graundame to the seide Isabell Mauleuerore, shall inmediatly after the 
deceasse of the same Thomas, remayne, falle, and come vn to the saide 
Isabell and to hyr heires, or to her and to her heires of hir body 
becommyng; except certaine landes and tenementes lyying in 
Wechsshyngton, Gyllyng, and Barnynggara* in Rychemondeshyre, of wich 
landes and tenementes the seide Isabell is seysyde off at this day. 
And that othyr landez and tenementes, after the deceasses of both ye 
same Thomas Vrsswyk and Kateryn hys doughter, shall descend, 
remayne, falle, or com i vn to the saide Isabell Mavleuerere, to haue and 
hold to her and to her heires, or to her and her heires of hyr body 
becommyng, accordyftg to the right, title, and interesse, in and off ye 
same, to the saide Isabelle belongyng. The wich landzand tenementes, 
with the saides othir landes and tenementes afforsaide, which late were 
to ye saide Jane, graundame of the saide Isabell, shall be to the yerely 
value of xl raarces, clerly aboue all chargz and reprisez. And to all the 
couenaunts and grauntes, yat been to be fulfilled and perfourmed on the 
part and behalue of ye saide Sir James, Thomas, and Katetyn, by the 
tenure of thees presentes, ye same Sir James, Thomas, and Kateryn, 
bynde yaim, and ych of hem, by yees presentes endentures, vn to the 
seides Elizabeth, William, and Laurence, in c//. And in lyke wysse ye 
same dame Elizabeth, William, and Lawrence, to all the couenauntes 
and grauntes, yat been to be fuUfiUed and perfourmed on the part and 
behalffe of ye saide Dame Elizabeth, William, [and] Laurence, by the 
tenure of yees presentes, the same Elisabeth, William, and Laurence 
bynd yaim, and yche of hem, by yees presentes endentures vn to the 
saide James, Thomas, and Kateryn, in celt, 

Dorso: — Indentur of y« couandes of y« mariege of Issabelle Vauesour. 

There have been three seals. 

BONDS. 
April 12, 5 Eliz. (1563). Bond in 100//. from William Vavasour of 
Hessylwood, knight, and John Vavasour of the same, esq., his son and 
heir apparent, to William Brokden of York, draper, to observe the 
covenants contained in an indenture of even date, made between 
Sir William Vavasour and Brockden. 

Wyll)rm Vauasour. 
Jhon Vavasor. 
Witnesses, Anthony Mallor}', Oswald Wilkinson, Richard Brockeden, 
James Brockeden, Will'm Marshall. 

Seals :--{i) A cock within a frame. VAVASOVR. 

(2) A dog", passant to the dexter, beneath some trees. 

* Washton, Gilling, and Barningham. 



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YORKSHIRE DEEDS. 121 

July 1 8, 31 Eliz. (1589). Bond in 80//. from Brian Stapleton of 
Carleton by Snathe, esq., and Richard Stapleton, his son and heir 
apparent, to George Cartwright of RufForth, in the county of the city of 
York, to observe the covenants declared in a pair of indentures of even 
date, made between the same parties. 

Brian Stapylton. 
Rychard : Stapylton. 

Witnesses, Adam Kettlewell, Will'm Rosse, Peter Fearneley. 

One seal remaining {two originally appended) , bearing a crest, 
a lion passant to the dexter. 

May 19, 4 Jas. I, 1606. Bond in 200//. from Philip, Lord Wharton, 
to Matthew Blenkinsopp of Wharton, in the county of Westmerland, 
gent., Richard Brogden of Tadcaster, gent., and Robert Shawe of 
Helawghe, in the county of the city of York, gent., to keep them harmless 
from a bond of the same amount, dated April 30, 1606, that he should 
pay on November i then next ioo/j. to William Skrafton of York., gent., 
at his dwellinghouse in Conistreete. 

Ph : Wharton : 

Witnesses, Richard Rigge, Edm : Braithwaite. 

July y« ID'**, 1666 {sic). 

WILL OF WILLIAM GEE OF HULL, MERCHANT.i 1600. 

Weras in the scrieptours the great God of hevin and yerth as willed 
by the prophete to say to Hezekie, the king, to make ys will, and to put 
things in order, for that he moste die, so I do we nowe pra and humble 
beseche y' grate and myghty God, to conffownde and destroye all thois 
men, lawers.^ and others whatsoever, to y« dewells, to dwelle in the pitte 
of Hell, w«^ dow*"* counsell o' take vppon them to alther this my will. 
Amen, Lorde. 

In the name of Gode, the maker'* of heven and yerth, the saezes, 
and all that therin ys, Amen. I, William Gee of Kingston vpon Hull, 
merchaunte, beinge nowe in good helth and parflBte memorie at this 
presentes, for y® wich I dowe geve moste humble thankes and lawde and 
prase to Jhus Criste, my onelly Savear. Item, nowe I do orden and 
make throwgh Godes permyssyon and soverrance this my laste will and 
testament in maner and forme foUowinge. Fyrste, at my departing forth 
of y* worlde, I moste humble beseche my Savear, Jhus Criste, the Almyghty 
God, y* Holian* of Israill, to receve my solle into his moste mersyfuU 
handes ; 'and my boddy to y« yerth, to be buried in the Trenytty Churche 

^Entered at York in the Reg, Test,^ the readings from the Register are given 

xxix, laSdf. This will is an example of in the notes. The testator's eldest son, 

the curious phonetic spelling of a Hull Sir William Gee, of Bishop Burton, 

merchant of wealth and position at the knight, secretary to the Council for the 

commencement of the seventeenth cen- North, heads the pedigree in Dugdale's 

tury. The spelling was normalized when Visitation (p. 321). 

the will was entered in the York Registers. ^ " Lawyers " in the Register. 

The original is somewhat carelessly ^ Father, 

written. Where there is any obscurity * Holy One. 



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122 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. ^ 

in Kingston [vpon]' Hull, in the querre. Item, I geve and bequeth for 
privie tythes forgotten, xks. Item, I geve and bequeth to my sone, 
William Gee, for his full child's porcion, the some [of]* 2 thowsand 
poundes, and iiij sylver pottes, ij dobill gilt, and 2 wheit. Also I geve 
to him a sylver salte, dobbill gilte, 3 holies of sylver, dobil gilte, the 
best, and a dosen silver spons, dobill gilte. Also I geve to hym ij rings 
of gowld, my singnet, and another greater^ w'** a read stone in yt, being 
a boes* head. Item, I dowe bequeith to my sonne, Walter Gee, for his 
fill! porcion, towe houndreth pounds in mony. More, I geve to h3rm ij 
sylver holies, parsell gilte, a wheit sylver salt and a dossen sylver spones, 
bowght in Flanders. More, I geve to hym ij ringes of gowld, my viij 
lynkes and a ringe w**» a wheit maid head. Item, nowe I dowe geve and 
bequeith to my sone, Samuvell Gee, for ys full porcion, one houndreth 
pounds in mony, for that before he haith receivid a great porsion ; and 
one dossen' silver spones, lyke Postills fassion, ij silver goblets, parsill 
gilte. Item, I dowe geve and bequeth to my dawghter Legerde* child^ne, 
to hir Sonne, William Legerd,'' I dowe gave* y* some of fyfty pounds in 
mony ; and also to hir dawghter, Jane Legerd, the some of one houn- 
dreth markes in money and one dosen of silver spones. Item, I dowe 
geve to my dawghter, Ellizabeth Stevins,* yf she be lyvinge, the some of 
fyftie pownds. More, I geve hir one sylver salt, and a note^® of silver 
w*** cover. Also I dowe geve and bequeith amongs my dawghter 
Ellizabeth Stevns^* childerne the some of one hondreth and xx«* powndes. 
Item, I geve and bequeith to my dawghter Ellener^* Gee the some of one 
hondreth pounds in full of hir porcion, for that I gave moche before tow 
Mr. Hardwicke. Also I dowe geve hir one gret silver sapjt*"* with cover, 
parsilde,** and a dossen sylver spones, gelt at ends, and ij silver pots, 
dobill gilte, and one goblit, dobill gilt. Item, I will ther be geven after 
my buriall, by God's permyssion, amongs y« pore people, xiij/i. yjj. viij^f. 
in money. Item, I geve and bequeith for xij men and xij wemen gowens 
at ye beryal, x//., and every one xxjd, sl pece, and bred, drink, and cheis. 
Item, I bequeith [and give]^' one houndreth and fiftie poundes in mony, 
to be stoid** in lande by my executors*'' and supervisors, for the w^** ther 
shalbe gevin yerely to the pore people in Hull for ever, v]lt. xiijj. iiij^., 
at that tyme and day of the yere that I departid forth of this mortall 
worlde, 3//. vjj. viij</., and at Al Halwe tyde^^or Martilmas day,*« other 
iij//. vji". viij^., for the w^^** the to geve thankes and prasees to God, that 
moste holy and blessid Lord, wich dow* oppon y^ harte of man to geve 
sum parte to y« neid*® solles remening in the world, w^"* of his great 

1 Omitted in the Register. ** Stevens. 

« ** Of " supplied from the Register. la Ellinor. 

"Great one. *» Salt. 

* Bores. »* Parceld. 

6 •• Of" in Register. *« From Register. 

« Legerd's. ** Bestowed. 

' L^rd. *^ Excquitors. 

«Give. >» Alhallowtide. 

■ Stevens. *® Martynmas day. 

10 Nutt. «<> Needy. 



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YORKSHIRE DEEDS. 123 

goodnes^ that [he]* sent yt me, for y* yr^ I dowe geve to ys goodnes 
moste humble thankes and glory and prasees* w'** my very harte and 
soUe. Item, I geve to the mending of the heighwaes w'^^ow'*' y« towne 
of Hull, iij/i. vjj. viijflT. Item, I dowe I* bequeith to y« pore people in the 
towne of Rotheley,^ in Lestershier,® wher my f rends dwells, in mony, xLr. 
Item, I geve and bequeth amongs the pore people in Monestrell toune, 
in Lestershier,® x\s, I dowe geve to the heighwaes mendinge in 
I^s!er* towne x\s. in mony. I dowe geve to the heighwaes mending in 
Rothelay towne xxxs, in mony. I dowe geve to the heighwaes mending 
in MoslrilF towne, in Lestershier,® xxks. in mony. Item, I bequeith to 
my brother, Ewel® Gee, in mony xli,, and also to his wyffe xLr., for ring 
of remembrance. Item, I geve to syster Anne, being leving, vj/j. 13J. 
iiij^. I bequeth to my sister, Ales Smyth, being leving, v//., and to hir 
childem^® leving, \lt, a pece in mony. I bequeth to my Ellyner,** being 
levinge, v//., and to hir childern^* leving, 3//. 6s, %d. a pece. Item, I geve 
and bequeth to my brother John Gee childem, vnmarie[d], xiij//. vjj". 
viijV. Also I dowe geve to his childem, beinge maryed, ever[e]*" one 
leving, iij//. y}s, v\\]d, apece. Also I dowe geve to all my godchildern, 
bein[g] leving, ws, apece for a remembrance. Item, I dowe geve amongs 
my neighbours in the streid** wher I dwelte** in mony, to make merry 
togethir w»^ all, ij//. x\\}s, i\\}d., and so to geve thankes to my good God. 
Item, I bequethe to William Wynsper, Ellen Wynspersone,w<='» crissoned,** 
vj//. 13 J. iiij</., and to hir my worstid gowne, and a gowld ringe for a 
remembraunce. I dowe geve nowe to my servants, being w* me, ther 
wags vnpaid, and more in mony xxj*. Item, I geve and bequeth to the 
Trenytte Church w<Mn Kingston vppon Hull, in this order, the some of 
\xlt.\ I say threscore powndes in mony, that the churche m",^' w'** the 
good advyse of Mr. Maior and his brethern,i«y« shall put forth y" forsaid 
mony at v//. the yere proffit for yt w*=** I will that ye said geue*' be 
imp[l]oyed thiis: — iiij//. yerely to the reparing and mending of the said 
Trenytty Church, and y« other xxs. of y« mony yerely to be paid to the 
reparing of Sente Mary's Church, in the said towne of Kingston vpon 
Hull ; and thus to be done w'** all for ever by God's permyssyon, accord- 
inge to my good meninge. Provided alwaes yflf that y« will not thus 
dow, then I will the said mony remene and go amonges my childem 
^uiQw^ delay. I dowe geve to Mr. Walter Jobeson*® of Brantingam,** 
to stoy** in a ring, xLr. Item, I dowe geve to Mr. John Stevins, 
wcfc marred my dawghter, to be* stoy** in a ring for remembraunce, 2//'. 

1 Register, fo. 129. i« Children. 

" From Register. i» Euery. 

« Prayse. 1* Street. 

* " And " in the Register. ^^ Dwell. 

« Rothley. i« Christened. 

* Leicestershire. *' Maisters. 
T Monstrell. i® Brethren. 

* Leicestershire. *® Guifte. 
»Ewell. "ojobson. 

1® Children. "* Brantingham, 

11 Ellen. «« Bestow. 



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124 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

i^s, 4^/. Item, I dowe geve to Mr. Mychaell Jobeson^ xLr., to be stoy* 
in a ringe. Item, I dowe geve to Mr. Antony CoUe,* alderman, xLr., to 
be stoy* in a ringe. I dowe geve to Mr. Colle* wyffe xLr., for a ring. 
Item, I dowe geve Sarraa,* my wyflFe sister, xlr., for a ringe. I dowe 
geve to Mr. Walter Jobezon' wyffe 2it\ 131. 4^/., to be stoy® of a ringe 
for a remembrance. Item, I dowe geve amongs to pore people in the 
Greet Masendewe* xiijj. iiij^. I dowe geve amongs^^ to pore in the^^ 
Trenytty Howse xxs. I dowe geve amongs in the^ ■ pore in the Massen- 
dew, besydes Sent Mary Church, in mony vjs, viijdf. Item, I bequeth 
and geve to the Toune Chamber of Kingston vppon Hull, for a rem em - 
braunce, xx/i. in mony. More, I dowe bequeth to the Tounes Charobre 
of Hull the some of one hondreth and threscore powndes in mony, 
w*^** Mr. Maior and his brethem,^^ w*"* good advise of other hon[e]ste 
persons, shall yerely at the beginninge of the yere to imploy the said 
mony and to bye come for y« vse of the porre** of that towne, so that 
y* may have yt for mony, so that y« said towne losse** not by ytt ; and 
thus to contynnue for ever. Provided alwais that [if]** the will not so 
dowe, then y« sitty of Yorke to have the said mony, and to implo[y] it 
for ther pore accordingly, and to put in good suertes for the same 
according to my good menynge therof. Item, I dowe geve to porre^^ 
maideins mariges w^in King[s]ton vppon Hull xxx/i., to be paid 13^. 
iiij^. at at tyme, till yt be all paid ow* by my executors*® and supervisors. 
Also iif the name of Jhus Criste, my savear, I bequeth and geve to the 
Townes*® Chamber of Kingston vpon Hull for ever the Massendew and 
howsse w^"* I did bild in the Chapil lane for the pore, by God's per- 
myssion, w*^ y^ iiij^' tenementes joining before of yt, being in rent yerely 
[ys]"® iiij//. xyjj. vnjd. Also I dowe geve to y« howse for ever more, towe 
howsses in the said Chapill Lane,** w*^"* I bowght of Petter Ewe, the*" rent 
yerely 3//. xvs,; and the great chamber above y* hosse to be let forxiijj. 
iiij//. the yere [I say. Item]** w^*' I will ther be paid wekly to ten pore 
women of honest name, I sae women having no childem to come 
w*** them in jrtt, every one of y« x persons to have wekly paid iiijd, a pece 
for ever ; Item, I geve to my sonne William Gee and his here males all 
my landes in Kingston vpon Hull and Beverlay, so that he pay forth of 
yt in Hull toune the some of xxs, for forty yeres, at soche tymes of the 
yere as the queue, or kinge after hir, have any taxe in Hull, then my 

*Jobson. ** Lose. 

* Bestow. i« Omitted in the Register. 
»Cole. 17 Pore. 

* Bestow. 18 Exequitors. 

" Cole. 5 » Register, fo. 129^. 

• Sara. «o Omitted in the Register. 
TJobson. *i Laine. 

« Bestow. 3« His. 

• Massendew. »* The sentence is very confused in the 
i<> Amongst. original. It reads thus in the Register : — 
11 Omitted in the Register. *' Item, I will ther be paid weekely to 
1* " In the " omitted. ten, I say ten, poorc women of honest 
1 8 Brethren. name, I say women haueinge noe children, 
i*Pore. to come with them in yt." 



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YORKSHIRE DEEDS. 125 

said sone, or his assyners,* to pay for every of y* porearre" sorte, w'** ys 
sessid' in Sent Maiy ward, iiijV. or \}d. a howse, then the said xxr. to 
be paid for as many of them as it reche too. Item, I dowe geve to my 
sone William Gee wiffe one portiguis* of gowld, for a remembrance. 
Item, I dowe geve towards the reparing of Rothela* Churche, in Lester- 
shier,® ij//'. xiijj. iiijd. Item, I dowe geve to thois pore folkes w^^ I dowe 
geve wekly a pene a pece, the to have, evere one of them, ijs, yjd. the 
pece, w*** in xiiij* da«s paid, and so y« to prase God for yt. Item, I give 
xiij/*'. yji". vHjd. to be stoide' of a gravestone, wheron to be graven my 
towe wyffes and all my childem in order, and the day [and]® yere of my 
departor. Item, I will yt my executors* dowe take no forfytor of my 
dettors**^; and yf the will pay ther deett oing truly** w**»in half a yere after 
my departing. Item, [I] orden and make my executors, *« my sonne 
William Gee and his childem together, praing him to be good to my 
other childem, in vsing them selves well towards him, as natur will cawse 
him so to dowe. Item, the rest of my goods vnbequethe[d], my legesses 
and all other things discharged, I will that my sone be sto it*' in land, 
w^** land 10 goo from erre to ere** mail for ever. Item, I dowe orden and 
make my supervyssors of my will, Mr. Antony Colle,*"my brother, Mr. 
Mychell Jobeson,i« and Mr. Luke Thmscroft,!^ and I will y' the have for 
ther panes xlf. a pece. I geve to my cossine*® William Gee wyffe xLf., 
for a remembrance. And thus in Godes name I make a nend. And I 
pra all persons and people w^h ever I offendid in the worlde to forgeve 
me, a s)mer. And I nowe frely from my harte dowe forgeve every one 
w^'^ ever offendid me, so yt shortely I dowe beleve and trust to sey*® my 
most holly and blessid Lord and Savear, Jhus Cryst, in ys gloriows 
kingdome in heven, ther to presse**^ his holynes for ever. So be it, Amen. 
In wittenes for the tmth hereof I have written this by God's permyssion 
and goodnes w**» my hone hand, and setto my seall the 22^ day October, 
in the yere of owr Lord God 1600. Also I geve and bequeth to the 
scole of Hull, vf^^ 1 beldide throwgh God's goodnes, towe howeses in the 
Bochery,** one w^*» Richard Kytchen haith, painge iiij//'. by yere, and the 
other of Patreke Wiestide,*^ p^ing xLr. by yere. I geve theis howses for 
ever, for and towardes [of]'* the said skole Mr. fee, for ys goode techinge 
and bringinge vpe yowth, w*^** howsse [I] bowghte of Pattricke. 

* Assignes. *' Bestowe yt 

' Poorer. ** Heire to heire. 

3 Cesscd. *« Cole. 

* Portigue. *• Tobson. 

« Rothley. *t Threscroft. 

* Leicestershire. ** Cozen. 
f Bestowed. *» See. 

« From the Register. ao Prayse. 

» Exequitors. «* Butcherie. 

'® Forfeiture of none of my debtes. ^* Pattricke Wiestead. 

11 Debte owinge truly. ** Omitted in the Register. 
*« Exequitors. 



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126 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

Memorandum* that after the making of this will he, y* w**»in named 
William Gee, did give by word of mouth to Mr. Whincopp, preacher of 
3^ towne of Kingston vpon Hull, tenn pound, in the presence of vs, 
Anthonye Cole, Will'm Legerd. 

Vndecimo die mensis Aug^sti, a.d. millesimo sexcentesimo tertio, 

approbatum fuit huiusmodi testamentum (alias antehac in Curia 

Cantuariensi coram venerabili viro, magistro Johanne Gibson, legum 

doctore, Curie Prerogatiue eiusdem commissario), per testes in communi 

juris forma probatum. et administracio commissa fuit Willelmo Gee, filio 

naturali, et legitime dicti defuncti, executori prius legitime nominato, 

etc., saluo jure cuiuscumque. Habet ad examinandum inventarium 

citra festum Purificacionis. 

p' me, W" Gee. 

Seal : ^ 
xj° Augusti, 1603. Testamentum Gee. Harthill. 

Dorso : — This ys my laste wille and testamente, I prase God for yt. 
Wittenes theis persons whois [names] here vnder wryten. {^JVone ^ven ,"} 

^ This memorandum written in a different hand. 



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flotce. 



[The Council have, decided to reserve a small space in each Number for notices of 
Finds and other discoveries ; and it is hoped that Members will assist in making 
this a record of all matters of archaeological interest which from time to 
time may be brought to light in this large county.] 



LXXXII. 

HALIWERFOLK. 

The unfortunate misprint of "Haliwen folk" in the Yorkshire 
ArcJuBological Journal^ xvi, 459, seems to offer an opportunity for a 
short note on the term " Haliwerfolc," which has often been mis* 
understood. The word is derived from the oldest English haligweresfolc^ 
the folk or people of the holy man or saint (cf, Alfred's translation 
of BcMla^ iv, 27, '* ]?one hal3an wer . . . Cu}>byrht"), called in the Metrical 
Life of St Cuthbert, c. 1450, 1. 4608, "Cuthbert folk;" 1. 7517, ">e 
saint pople," the original Latin being "populus ipsius," "populum 
ipsius Sancti" (Auctarium de Miraculis^ ii, Symeon, EccL Dunelm.y 
xxxiv). They were in the first instance the people who went about 
with the body of St. Cuthbert in its wanderings, then those who were 
members of or immediately connected with the ecclesiastical body, 
now represented by the Chapter of Durham. Hence in the 
thirteenth century the Archdeacon of Durham was styled "Archi- 
diaconus de Haliwarfolc " (A^zcw/«^/fr Cartulary^ 214). 

From its inhabitants a considerable portion of the bishopric of 
Durham, the precise boundaries of which I am not able to define, 
came to be called " Haliwerfolc," thus "Unam bovatam terras in 
Cunsdine (Coundon), quae est in Haliwerefolc " {Newminsier Cartulary^ 

133)- 

As early as the fourteenth century, when wer^^^ m2j\" had become 
obsolete, the term was misunderstood, and corrupted as haly-wark- 
folk, i,e, people who had the holy work of defending and caring for 
the body of St. Cuthbert, and it has frequently been so printed and 
understood in modern times. Hence it comes that there are, in 
point of fact, two distinct words, viz. Haliwerfolc=Holy man folk, 
and Haliwercfolc=Holy work folk. For examples of both see the 
New English Dictionary. 

J. T. F, 



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128 NOTES. 

LXXXIII. 

INSCRIPTION FORMERLY AT DEWSBURY. 

In the Yorkshire Archaological Journal^ i, 221, I have stated that 
Leland in his Itinerary speaks of having seen at Dewsbury a cross 
with the inscription, "Paulinus hie celebravit et predicavit." There 
seems to be nothing of the kind either in the Itinerary or in the 
Collectanea^ and I have no recollection of how or where I got the 
reference to Leland, which I must have used second hand, without 
verification. Mr. S. J. Chadwick suggests that, as LeL.*id's Itinerary 
is silent about a good-sized piece of Yorkshire north-\iwSt of Wake- 
field, there may have been a portion, now missing, in which the note 
may have been seen by some one who has handed on the reference 
to it. The inscription is referred to in an old ballad quotejjl •Hy me 

and others. 

J. T. F. 



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Cl^e gorhsl^ire ^rr^aeologital Journal. 

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{For further particulars amply to the Hon, flffic, Mr. S. J. Chadwick, F.S.A., 
Church Street, Dewsbary. 

Vol 1— (INQUISITIONS (James Land Charles I.). 

IyORKSHIEE WILLS AT SOMEBSET HOUSE, 1649-1660. 
2, 6, 7, & 8.— YORKSHIRE FEET OF FINES. 

( PROCEEDINGS of the COUNCIL of the NORTH. 
8-— 1TW0 EARLIEST SESSIONS ROLLS of the WEST RIDING of YORK. 

C SHIRE. 
4, 6, 11, 14, 19, 22, 26 & 28.— WILLS PROVED AT YORK. 
9.--ABSTRA0TS OP WILLS, 1665-6. 
10, 18.— COUOHER BOOK OF SELBY ABBEY. 
12, 28.— YORKSHIRE INQUISITIONS (Vols. I. & II.). 
16, 18, 20.— ROYALIST COMPOSITIONS. 
16, 21.— LAY SUBSIDIES (Vols. I. & II.). 
17.— MONASTIC NOTES (Vol.1.). 

25.— THE CHARTULARY OF ST. JOHN OF PONTEFRACT (Vol. I.). 
27.— YORKSHIRE SCHOOLS (Vol.1.). 
29.— WAKEFIELD MANOR COURT ROLLS, 1274-1297. 

Also the Puhlicaiions of the North Riding Record Series, 



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THE 



FOUNDED. 1868. INCOBPORATED, 1898. 



PATRONS. 

For the North Riding, The Most Hon. the MARQUIS of RIPON. K.G., Lord-Lieutenant. 
For the East Riding, The Right Hon. the LORD HERRIES. 



His Grace the DUKE of NORFOLK, K.G., 

Hereditary Earl Marshal. 
The Right Hon. the EARL of CARLISLE. 
The Right Hon. LORD GRANTLEY, F.S.A. 
The Right Hon. LORD DERWENT. 
Sir JOHN WILLIAM RAMSDEN, Bart. 
Sir FRANCIS SHARP POWELL, Bart., M.P. 



WENTWORTH BLACKETT BEAUMONT. 

Sir THOMAS BROOKE. Bart., F.S.A. 

The Rev. CANON WILLIAM GREENWELL, 

M.A., F.S.A. 
ANDREW SHERLOCK LAWSON, F.S.A. 
JOHN LLOYD WHARTON, M.P. 



PRESIDENT. 
Sir THOMAS BROOKE, Bart., F.S.A. 



ARMYTAGE,Sir G., Bart., F.S.A. {BHihoust). 
BILSON, JOHN. F.S.A. {Hull), 
BOYNTON.THOS., F.S.A. {Bridlington Quay), 
CHARLESWORTH, JOHN i^lVaJUfield). 
CHEESMAN, W. N. {Selby). 
COLLINS, FRANCIS, M.D. {PaUUy Bridge), 
DICKONS, JOHN NORTON {Bradford), 
EDDISON, J. E., M.D. {Leeds), 
FALLOW, T. M., F.S.A. {Redcar). 
FOWLER, The Rev. Canon, F.S.A. (Durham), 
HORDERN, ISAAC {Hudder^eld), 



COUNCIL. 

I LEADMAN, A. D. H., F.S.A. {Pocklington), 
I LISTER, JOHN {Halifax), 
I LUMB, G. D. {Leeds). 

MORKILL, J. W., M.A. {Bell Busk), 
, MORRELL,W. W. (F^Tr/frV. 

PUDSEY, Col. H. FAWCEIT {Hull), 

SCOTT, JOHN. Jun. {Skipton). 

TAYLOR, The Rev. R. V., B.A. {Richnumd), 

WALKER, J. W., F.S.A. {IVakefieltt). 

WEDDALL, G. E. {Brougk, E, Yorks.). 

WILSON, EDMUND, F.S.A. {Leeds), 



HONORARY TREASURER. 
MATl'HEW H. PEACOCK, M.A., B.Mus., School House, Wakefield. 

HONORARY LIBRARIAN. 
E. K. CLARK, M.A., F.S.A., M.I.C.E., lo, Park Street, Leeds. 

HONORARY SECRETARIES. 
WILLIAM BROWN, F.S.A., Whitehouse, Northallerton. 
For the Recoru Series. —S. J. CHADWICK, F.S.A., Church Street, Dewsbur^'. 



'Ik. 



CLAY, F.S.A., Rastrick House, Brighouse. 



Cjje CijDresbg Societg. 



The Society was formed in 1889 for antiquarian objects in connection with Leeds 
and District. Its publications include the Leeds Parish Church Register^ Adel 
Register, Kirkstall Abbey Coucher Book, Calverley Charters, and Miscellanea, Methley 
Register is in preparation. 

Subscription, lof. (>d, per annum. Life Fee, ;f5 5J. President and Hon, 
Treasurer: EDMUND Wilson, F.S.A., Red Hall, Leeds; Hon, Secretaries: 
G. D. LuMB, 65, Albion Street, Leeds; W. H. Witherby, M.A., Cromer House, 
Leeds. 



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THE 



YORKSHIRE 




Hrcba^ological JournaL 



PUBLISHED UNDER THE DIRECTION OF 
THE COUNCIL 

OF THE 

l?orh9birc Hrcb^oloflical Society 



Part 66. 

(BEING THE SECOND PART OF VOLUME XVII.) 
IIS SUED TO MEMBERS ONLY.'] 



\ 
LEEDS: 

PRINTED FOR THK SOCIETY BY 

JOHN WHITEHKAD & SON, ALFRED STREET, BOAR LANK. \ 

MCMIII. ! 



/•■ 



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^The Council of the Society are not responsible for any 
statements or opinions expressed in the YORKSHIRE 
ARCHiCOLOGICAL JOURNAL, the Authors of the various 
Papers being alone responsible for the same. 



CONTENTS OF PART 66, 

(Being the Second part of Volume XVIL) 



rAOB 



Humberston's Survey • .129 

Paver's Marriage Licenses. 

Part XVI . J. W. Clay,* F.S.A. . .155 

Bells in the West Riding of 
Yorkshire J. Eyre Poppleton . .192 

Early Inscription in Bilsdale 

Church 237 

Notes on Yorkshire Churches . Sir Stephen Glynn, Bart. 241 



JUttsttations. 



^ Yorkshire Bells — Plates XVI-XX 

^ Inscriptions in Bilsdale and Kirkdale Churches 

J Plate of Seals (from last Part). 



to face 


192 


♦> 


237 


»> 


100 



ksljire JIamij il^gister Societg. 

iiic oucici> w«a formed in 1899 for the purpose of printing the older Registers 
of the county. The following have been either issued or are in the press: — York— 
St. Michael -le-Belfrey, Burton Fleming, Horbury, Winestead, Linlon-in-Craven, 
Stokeslcy, Palrington, Blacktoft, Scorlx)rough, Bingley, Kippax, Hampsthwaite, Wath- 
on-Deame, and Brantingham. 

Subscription, One Ciuinea per annum. Prgddent : Sir Georce ARMYJACiE, Bart.; 
Hon, Treasurer: J. \V. FOURN ess, Victoria Chambers, South Parade, Leeds; Hon, 
Secretaries: Francis Collins, M.D., Pateley Bridge; G. D. Lu MB, 65, Albion Street, 
Leeds, to whom applications for membership should be sent. 



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HUMBERSTON'S SURVEY. 

After the suppression of the rebellion, which raged in the north 
of England during the months of November and December, 1569, 
usually called the Rising in the North, the estates of the leaders 
were forfeited by their subsequent attainders, and came into the 
hands of Queen Elizabeth. With the object of ascertaining their 
value and condition she sent, in the spring of the following year, 
certain Commissioners to survey them. The Commission was issued 
on March 10, 1569-70, and directed to Edmund Hall and William 
Humberston.^ The return made by these two Commissioners, in two 
volumes, is preserved amongst the Exchequer papers in the Public 
Record Office, and is known by the title of "Humberston's Survey." 
The parts printed here are taken from the first volume. Although 
he has given his name to the survey, nothing seems known about 
Humberston. Of his companion, Hall, we have somewhat more 
information. Lord Clinton, the Lord High Admiral, writing to the 
Earl of Sussex, the President of the North, in December, 1569, calls 
him a person of very good credit, and says he is competent to give 
explanation of the letters he was carrying.* He had been a hard 
worker from his youth, so much so that he felt himself incompetent 
to undertake such an important business as this survey.^ His doubts 
as to his fitness did not prevent him from doing his duty. He 
arrived in York on Thursday, April 30th, and found his fellow- 
Commissioner, Humberston, who had arrived a couple of days before, 
awaiting him. In the letter printed at end of this article, and dated 
April 23, 1570, Hall gives Sir William Cecil, afterwards Lord 
Burleigh, an account of how he and Humberston had been carrying 
out the survey. In another letter,* dated at Scrooby, on Wednesday, 
July 21, he writes again to Cecil, "Humberston and I have gone 
through all the offenders' lands in Yorkshire, Cumberland, West- 

1 In the CtUmdar of State Papers send up a certificate hereof to the Barons 

(Domestic)^ Elizabeth^ Addenda, page 260, of the Exchequer not later than Michael- 

another commission is given. March 18, mas, with a writ of assistance. With note 

1570. Commission to Sir Thomas Gar- of another commission in April, to which 

grave, Edmund Hall, William Hombers- John Lambert and Christopher Chater are 

ton, Richard Ashton, and John Jenkyns, to be added. 

to survey the lands of the Earls of ^ Calendar of State Papers {Domestic)^ 

Northumberland and Westmoreland, Addenda, 1566- 1579, page 132. 

Leonard Dacre, and all others engaged ^ Ibid.^ page 288. Printed below, 

in the late rebellion in the North, and ^ Ibid,, page 307. 

VOL. XVIL J 



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130 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

moreland, Northumberland, and the Bishopric of Durham, that are 
indicted and have not the Queen's pardon, saving these two 
lordships of Sir John Nevill's (BiUingley) and Edward Dacre's 
(Great Houghton), which will be perfected by to-morrow night ; 
thence Humberston and Jenkins go to Eggiston (Eckington), a 
lordship of Leonard Dacre's, in Derbyshire, where he will finish his 
survey by Monday, and be at Greatford on Wednesday. There we 
shall tarry two or three days to oversee our whole doings, and make 
a fair copy of our survey for Council ; but this cannot well be done 
before the beginning of next term." The last mention of the survey 
in the State Papers* is an order from the Queen to Hall and 
Humberston, dated July 26. — "Understanding that you have finished 
the said surveys, although you cannot finish your books so speedily, 
we desire you to send us a brief of all the said lands, with a clear 
yearly value, and the names of the possessors, and not to deliver to 
any person any survey or particular value until the whole survey 
shall have been presented to us." This survey, besides the extracts' 
here printed, contains lists of tenants, with their rentals, but has few 
or no details as to the nature of the holdings. The survey is quite 
as dry and jejune as documents of a like nature usually are. 

The Rising in the North, which was the cause of this survey, is 
best described in the words of Sir Cuthbert Sharp*: — "Thus 
terminated an enterprise begun without foresight, conducted without 
energy, and ending in dastardly and inglorious flight; entailing on 
the families of those concerned lasting misery; and inflicting on the 
leaders attainder, proscription, and death." 

The history of this rebellion has been so exhaustively and ably 
dealt with by Sir Cuthbert Sharp, that it will only be necessary to 
give a brief chronology of the chief events connected with it, for 
the guidance of the reader. 

1568, May 16. Mary, Queen of Scots, lands at Workington. 

May 18. She is conducted to Carlisle by Captain Lowther, 
Lieutenant of the Frontier. The Earl of Northum- 
berland writes to Elizabeth, off"ering to take care 
of her. 

* Calendar of State Papers {Domestic)^ of Witton-le-Wear, which appeared in the 

Addenda, 1566- 1579, page 308. Transactions of the Architectural and 

^ Descriptions similar to those here Archaeological Society of Durham and 

printed are given of Cockermouth, Aln- Northumberland^ 1886-1889, page 174. 

w .S^l^o;. „!intrC^ 7h» //.^/^^T/- P«Re xix. This work, founded on State 

M::K»5r v?83. %^^7 :{ Fp^^r^th^^m' amhonties^n. 

Raby in the excelknt account of that *«'/S,.'^ ,^V't« best descnption of this 

pla^ by the Rev. J. F. Hodgson, vicar '^l^"'"" "^ ^ y" ^^ *""«"• 



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HUMBERSTON'S SURVEY. 181 

May 27. Sir George Bowes earnestly advises the Earl to 
forbear his repair to the Queen of Scots till the 
Queen's pleasure should be known. 

July 14. Mary removed to Bolton Castle, Yorkshire. 
1569, Jan. 8. The Earl of Northumberland visits the Spanish 
Ambassador.^ 

Jan. (latter part). Queen Mary removed to Tutbury, Staffordshire. 

April Removed to Wingfield, and stays there five months. 

Sept. 21. Returns to Tutbury. 

Oct. 9. Sunday. The Earls of Northumberland and West- 
moreland attend the Lord President and the Council 
at York, and satisfy them as to their loyalty. 

Nov. 4. Letter from the Earl of Sussex, the Lord President, 
summoning the Earls to York. 

Nov. 6. The Earl of Northumberland writes to Sussex from 
Beamish, between Durham and Newcastle, excusing 
himself from going to York. 

Nov. 7. The Earl of Westmoreland writes to the same fr©m 
Brancepeth, refusing to go. 

Nov. 8. The Earls write to the Pope. Letter lost. Answer 
given by Sharp (page 319). 

Nov. 9. Wednesday. Sussex commands the Earls to repair 
to Court. Bells rung at Topcliffe at midnight, as 
Sussex's secretary was leaving. 

Nov. 13. Northumberland writes to the Queen, excusing himself 
for not coming, but protesting his fidelity. Dated 
at Topcliffe, but really written at Brancepeth. 

Nov. 13. Royal proclamation against the Earls and their 
confederates. 

Nov. 14. The Earls enter Durham. 

Nov. 15. The Earls publish their proclamation. 

Nov. 16. Queen Mary conveyed to Coventry. 

Nov. 19. The Earls denounced as rebels. 

Dec. 20. The Earls flee into Scotland. 
1572, June 7. The Earl of Northumberland surrendered at Berwick 
by the Scots to Lord Hunsdon on behalf of 
Elizabeth. 

^ Calendar of State Papers [Spanish), Northumberland came to see me, dis- 
1568-1579, page96. The Spanish ambas- guised, at four o'clock in the morning, 
sador to Philip II ; — "The Earl of and he is ready to serve your Majesty." 



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182 THE YORKSHIRE AKCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

Aug. 1 8. Leaves Alnwick for York. 
Aug. 21. Arrives at York. 
Aug. 22. Thursday. Beheaded in York. 
1587, Feb. 8. Queen Mary executed at Fotheringhay. 

It will be seen from the above table that this ill-planned rebellion 
lasted less than five weeks, when the two Earls were forced to flee 
from their country, — one to return to suffer a traitor*s death, and 
the other to drag out a painful exile of thirty years. 

Thomas Percy, bom about 1528, was the eldest son of Sir 
Thomas Percy, brother and heir-presumptive to Henry Algernon, 
sixth Earl of Northumberland, who died without issue. His father 
figured conspicuously in the Pilgrimage of Grace, and was executed 
for his participation therein at Tyburn, on June 2, i537» His 
mother was Eleanor, daughter of Guychard Harbottle, who fell at 
Flodden, and one of the sisters and co-heiresses of George Harbottle, 
of Beamish, in the county of Durham.' He was restored in blood 
in 1549, and in 1557 he was created Earl of Northumberland. He 
married Anne, daughter of Henry Somerset, Earl of Worcester. 
With the view of attaching the Earl to her cause Elizabeth made 
him Lord-Lieutenant of Northumberland and Durham, and Lord 
Warden General of the East and Middle Marches in the first year of her 
reign, and in 1563 he received the Garter. He long continued in 
favour, as in the very year of the Rebellion he was appointed one 
of the Commissioners of Musters in Yorkshire. During the earlier 
part of Elizabeth's reign he certainly conformed to the Established 
Church, for, as he himself says, he was reconciled by Master Copley 
to the Church of Rome about two years before the stir. Hurried 
into rebellion against his judgment, he bitterly expiated his error. 
The brief outbreak was followed by two years* weary exile in 
Scotland, most of which was spent in prison. On his surrender to 
Elizabeth he was detained for nearly two months at Berwick, and 
was subjected to several strict examinations as to his share in the 
rebellion and the names of his confederates. When the Queen had 
made up her mind about the date of his execution, she ordered her 
cousin. Lord Hunsdon, to take him to York. On his indignant 
refusal,* the charge was committed to Sir John Forster, of Alnwick 
Abbey, then Lord Warden of the Middle Marches. The bill sent in 

1 She was aged 24 when her brother's * Lord Hunsdon to Lord Burghley. 

inq, p. m, was taken, on March 23, July ii, 1572. Berwick. Thys day 

1527-8. The other sister, Manr, then syttyng doune too dyner, havyng dys- 

aged 22, married Edward Fyton. (Deputy patcht a pakket nott paste an ower befor, 

Keeper of Public Records Reports, xliv, I receyved your lordship's pakket of the 

431.) 8th, whyche gave me my dyner, fyndyng 



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HUMBERSTON^S SURVEY. 133 

by his keeper for taking him to York is still preserved. Three post- 
horses are charged for on the outward journey, but none on the 
return, so it is clear that extra horses were hired for the conveyance 
of the Earl.* He was delivered into Forster's charge on Monday, 
August 19, 1572, slept that night at Alnwick, and next day went as 
far as Newcastle, 38 miles. On the Wednesday, passing through 
Durham, where the rising had first burst out, he reached Darlington 
in the evening, after a journey of 33 miles. On Thursday he must 
have been on the road all day, covering a distance of 52 miles. He 
went by Topcliffe, which was then the direct road from the north to 
York,' and here a change of horses gave him an opportunity of 
seeing for the last time the home he loved so well, and where he 
had spent many happy hours hunting and fishing. From Topcliffe 
he went direct to York, where he was beheaded the next day, Friday, 
August 22, in the Pavement, at three o'clock in the afternoon. "His head 
was smitten oflf with a broad carpenter's axe. His head was set on 
a very high pole, on the top of Micklegate Bar ; but his body was 
buried in St. Crux church, by two of his servants and three women, 
in St. Thomas's quire, where he now lies, without any memorial."' 

Guilty of treason as the Earl was, even by the confession of 
hostile witnesses, he met his death bravely. Sir Thomas Gargrave, 
one of the Council of the North, wrote to Burghley: — ^ 

"So farre as may appere by any talke or doyngs of the late 
erle of Northumberland, at or before his dethe, he contynewed 
obstynate in relygyon; and declared he wold dye a catholyke of the 
Pope's churche. He accompted his offence nothynge, and especyally 
after he knewe he shold dye; but before he seemyd to confesse he 
had offendyd, and wold qualyfye yt, seyynge he dyd that he dyd by 
compulsion, and for feare of his lyffe. He confessyd he was reconcylyd 
to the Pope ; he affermyd this realme was in scysme, and that al were 
sysmatykcsj he sayd here was neither petye nor mercy e. In his 
talk with dyvers he namyd himselfe *symple Thome'; and sayd 
* symple Tome must dye to sett up crewell Henry.'* At his dethe he 

myself hardly delt withall, too be a ^ Sharp's suggestion (page 333^) that 

carryer of any nobellman to executyon, the horses were hired for a carriage in 

yntoo a place where I have no thyng too which to take the Earl to York, is clearly 

do. My charge is butt yn thys toune and inadmissible. With such roads as then 

th* Este Wardenry ; and therefore, for existed, it would have been quite impos- 

me too be putt too bryng hym too Yorke sible to traverse the 120 miles between 

for to be executed, I can neyther thynke Alnwick and York in three days, 
that hyr Majesty deales well with me ^ In the Survey of Topcliffe it is stated 

theryn, nor that I have any such frends that that place was situated sixteen miles 

abowt her Majesty es I accounted of; from York, in the roadway towards 

and sewrly I wyll rather suffer sum Berwick, 
ymprysonment then doo yt (Sharp^ page ^ Sharp, page 334«. 

331)- * ^<^*^» page 335- 

* His brother, the eighth earl. 



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184 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

wyshyd his brother to be of his relygyon ; and then, yf he had hys 
lyvynge, he trystyd he wold pay his dettes, and helpe his chyldren 
and servantes." 

This account is confirmed by a despatch^ of the Spanish Ambas- 
sador to the Duke of Alba, which states that there were three points 
the Earl specially dwelt upon. "First, that he was being unjustly 
executed, because he would not recognise the Queen for his 
Sovereign or his judge; second, he asked that they would pray for 
him, and said he pardoned all his enemies, and prayed for pardon 
for all his offences. The third point, upon which he dwelt urgently 
and at length, was, that he wished them all to bear witness that he 
had lived all his days, and died now, firmly and faithfully believing 
in the Holy Roman Catholic Church, in the sacraments, and all the 
rest. He confessed that the Supreme Pontiff was the only head of 
the Church, and condemned with great vehemence all other doctrines, 
which he said were invented by the devil and his ministers, the 
sectaries and innovators." 

The chief characteristic of this unfortunate nobleman was want 
of decision. Undeterred by his father's fate he dallied with treason, 
till his own servants by a ruse were able to force him to declare 
himself against the Queen. When the Earl of Sussex sent his 
secretary to TopcliflTe to warn him against rebelling, his retainers, to 
counteract the effect of this message, made the Earl believe that Sir 
Oswald Wilstrop, a personal enemy, was at the park pale, at Topcliffe, 
accompanied by a band of soldiers, with orders to take him, and the 
townsmen ringing the bells, he was obliged, against his will, to become 
a party to the insurrection.^ Later on Lord Hunsdon reported that 
but for his wife's encouragement, he would gladly have submitted, 
and added that the gray mare was the better horse.* His 
neighbours, the most ardent promoters of the rebellion, Richard 
Norton, at Norton Conyers, some six miles from Topcliffe, and 
Thomas Markenfield, whose family seat, Markenfield, was ten miles 
away, were frequent visitors, and no doubt, with his wife, were the 
chief means of engaging him in the rising. It is noticeable that 
his brother-in-law, Francis Slingsby, the husband of his only sister, 
Mary, who lived at Scriven, ten miles from Topcliffe, was an 
energetic supporter of Elizabeth, and immediately there was a report 
of a rising, threw himself with other loyalists into Knaresborough 
Castle, to preserve it from the rebels.* 

1 Calendar of State Papers (Spanish) ^ 1568- 1579, page 411. 

^ Calendar cf State Papers, Addenda, 1 566-1579, page lOi. 

^ /bid.y page 124. 

*/^iVf., pp. 85. 95. 



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humberston's survey. 135 

With such a vacillating nature, it is hardly to be wondered that 
he was called Simple Tom. At his examination, after his surrender 
by the Scots, Lord Hunsdon, by no means an unfriendly witness, 
was astonished at his simplicity. "I never thought him," he writes 
to the Queen, **so simple as I now find him, and if his confession 
be true, he was greatly procured to it by others."^ His high rank 
and position as head of the Roman Catholic party in the North 
called him to play a part he was ill qualified to fill. 

In his private capacity he seems to have been a most estimable 
and lovable character. Like most noblemen and gentry, then as well 
as now, he was an ardent sportsman. For the purpose of enjoying 
the great commodity of hunting and hawking in the fields and small 
rivers near Topcliffe, he erected a timber house there. All his forests 
and chaces were guarded by efficient keepers and well replenished 
with game. Except at Wressel, where there were red deer, the deer 
were all fallow. At Leckonfield and Wressel there were marks or 
games of swans, under the care of swanherds, besides wild ones. 
. Even when he was in constant expectation of being sent to execution. 
Lord Hunsdon was astonished to find the Earl readier to talk of 
hawks and hounds than anything else, and though very much abashed 
and sorrowful, being in great fear of his life, readier to talk of those vain 
matters than otherwise.' He was fond of music, as is testified by 
the inventory printed at the end of this paper, in which are 
enumerated violins, viols, virginals, comets, and a bandora or 
banjo. The gardens at Wressel, which excited the admiration of the 
Commissioners, as they had that of Leland some forty years earlier, 
bore evidence to his love of horticulture. The large and stately 
house at Leckonfield was, like his other seats in this^ county, in good 
repair. He was a very generous landlord, and even when his 
fortunes were at their lowest, and he an exile, the Lord Warden 
wrote to Cecil* in December, 1569, when it was expected that the 
Earl of Murray would deliver him up: "It may be that whosoever 
have the karyage of hym (Northumberland) shall have somewhat too 
doo, too bryng hym threw Northumberland, for he must be karyed 
thurow all hys own tenants, and thuro them that loves hym better 
than they doo the Quene." A striking example of the love with 
which the family of Northumberland inspired their dependents is 

1 Calendar of State Papers^ Addenda, small value. This hardly ap^ees with 
1 566-1 579, page 401. Lord Hunsdon's testimony given about 

a Shar^ nacre iiQ. ^' » *"^ ^^ °*"** ^ remembered that it 

^narpy page 329. ^^ ^^^ ^^ tenants' advantage to make 

' Sharpy page ZZV*- ^^1 i^ his letter their holdings appear dear, and to make 
printed below accuses the Earl of rack- the surveyors believe that heavy fines had 
renting and taking sore fines for things of been exacted. 



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186 THE YORKSHIRE ARCaffiOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

afforded by the wilP of George Lomax, who at the time of this 
survey was keeper of the house of Leckonfield and of the park 
there, called the Coursyng Parke, It is dated March i6, 23 Eliz. 
( 1 580-1), and after describing himself as of Leckonfield, yeoman, he 
bequeaths " vnto the right noble Henry, erle of Northumberland, my 
singuler good lord and maister, in token of the great bounden dewtye 
and trewe service I have all way borne toward his lordship and his 
noble house, one gold ringe of the valewe of tenne grotz; 
besichinge his lordship of his bountifull goodnes to be good lord 
and maister to my poore wiffe, so longe as she shall behave her selffe 
as a true and dewtifuU servant and tenaunt vnto his lordship." The 
following extracts are interesting : — " To Robert Steare, of Leckenfeld, 
one of my blewe leverey cotes.* I do hartelie desire my lovinge 
frend, Michaell Thirkeld, and William Coxe, gent., even for the great 
love and trust that hath ever bene betwene them and me, to be 
supervisores of this my said last will and testament; and in token 
of my good will towardes them, I do give to either of them a gold 
Jeniuy' of the value of halfe a crowne a pece; and after my 
deceass, I hartelie besich them to be good vnto my poore wiffe and 
doughter." 

The usual custom of letting land at this time, and long previous, 
was to take a heavy fine at the time of the demise, and a low rent, 
so what is meant by the term finable in the survey is that, at the 
expiration of the existing leases, the Queen would be able to exact a 
considerable sum or fine, called gersuma or gressom in the Middle 
Ages, on granting new ones. This custom seems to have been 
generally followed, so that in many cases the Queen got little from the 
forfeited estates. 

At Leckonfield and Wressel the tenants held their lands by copy 
of court roll according to the custom of Cumberland, so that fines 
were paid at the death, alienation, or exchange of either lord or 
tenant. This was regarded as a very favourable tenure for the 
tenant, and is thus described in the survey of the Honour of 
Cockermouth : — 

"To the sayd Honour belong a greate nombre of custumary 
tenauntes, which hold their landes by copy of courte roll, and to 
their heyres, doyng sute to the lordes courte, seruyce by hymself 
and all his famyly to the Borders, when necessyte shall requyre, and 

1 Reg, Test., xxii, fo. 115. {Canterbury Tales, B, 1925) :— 

2 Derived from the blue lion of Percy. ** Of Brugges was his hosen broun, 

3 Jane, a small coin of Genoa, intro- His robe was of ciclatoun, 
duced into England towards the end of That coste full many a jane." 
the fourteenth century. The word is used Jamuys and Jatiuayes are sometimes 
by Chaucer in the Rime of Sir Thopas found for •* Genoese." 



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humberston's survey. 137 

paying his fyne at the lordes will after the death, alyenacon, or 
exchaunge of euery lord and tenaunt. Which custom hath hertofore 
been by the lordes of that Honour so reasonably vsed, as all the 
most [part] of the customary tenauntes of Cumberland, Northum- 
berland, York, and the busshepryk of Duresme, haue in all their 
auncient grauntes and copyes, to hold to them and their heyres, 
according to the custome of th' Honour of Cokermouth. The lyke 
grauntes haue been made by the lordes of manours within the 
county of Comberland, wherwith the tenaunts thought themselfes 
well pleased and in good estate. And albeit their fermeholdes were 
but small, yet the comons were great and large, so as the tenauntes 
were well hable to lyve, to maynteyne themselves and their famyly, 
and alwaies to haue in redynes horse, and suche armour as the 
countrey requyreth for the seruice of the prynce and defence 
of their countrey; till now of late yeres the gredynes of the lordes 
hath been suche, and their practyses so horrible, by making 
conveyaunce and devyses of their landes, to cause the pore tenauntes 
to make fyne, somtyme ones in two, thre, or foure yeres, or more, as 
to them seme good, as the pore tenauntes are so raunsomed that 
they are neyther hable to lyve and maynteyne their famyly, or yet 
to haue horse and armour to seme the prynce, and maynteyne the 
countrey, so as the custome, which hertofore they most desyred, ys 
now become so odyous vnto them, as they are not hable to endure 
it." 

The Earl of Westmoreland,* the other nominal leader, was less 
influential both as regards wealth and age than the Earl of 
Northumberland. His two chief seats, Raby and Brancepeth, lay in 
the adjoining county of Durham. In Yorkshire his only residence, 
the manor at Kirkby Moorside, was deemed but simple for an earl, 
though a good house for a gentleman of worship. Middleham and 
Sherifif Hutton, the two great Neville strongholds in Yorkshire, had 
passed out of their hands by the attainder of the Kingmaker 
nearly a hundred years before. The Earl's father, Henry Neville, the 
fifth Earl of Westmoreland, had by his matrimonial adventures in his 
old age, tarnished the glory of the family. His first marriage, which 
was celebrated on July 2, 1536, with exceptional splendour, united 
him to Lady Anne Manners, eldest daughter of Thomas, Earl of 
Rutland. She was the mother of Charles, the last Earl of 
Westmoreland of the Neville line. On her death he married Jane, 

1 There is a most excellent account of on *' Raby,** printed in the Transactions 

the Lords Neville and Earls of West- of the Architectural and Archceological 

moreland by the Rev. J. F. Hodgson, Society of Durham and Northumberland^ 

vicar of Witton-le-Wear, in his Qaper 1893-1895, pp. 153-260. 



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188 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

daughter of Sir Roger Cholmeley, of Thornton-on-the-Hill. After- 
wards, stubborn in his own self-will, and defiant alike of all laws, civil 
and ecclesiastical, to the contrary, he took to himself, after his second 
wife's decease, her sister, Margaret, widow of Sir Henry Gascoigne, of 
Sedbury. Nothing could convince him of the impolicy of this 
marriage, which he denied was opposed to ecclesiastical law. In a 
letter to Cecil, dated November lo, 1561, the Archbishop of York 
says, " He is marvelouslye affected to this hys pretensed wyffe. I 
think that manye lawfull husbandes in England be not nearlie in 
such great love with theyr lawfull wyffes;" adding that he was 
encouraged in his opinions by "Mr. Whitehead and such other 
singler divines." Ultimately, however, and before any legal decision 
was arrived at, the contention was settled by the unhappy man's 
death in 1563. 

According to his father's inquisition, taken at Durham on August 
28, 1564, Charles Neville' was then of age Quite early in life, and 
when only just of age, he espoused Jane, eldest daughter of Henry 
Howard, Earl of Surrey, and sister of Thomas, Duke of Norfolk, 
both of whom were put to death by Tudor sovereigns. Fox, the 
martyrologist, bears witness to the talents and abilities of the young 
Countess. The young Lady Jane (he says) profited so wondrously 
in the Greek and Latin tongues, "that she might well stand in 
competition with most the learned of that time, for the praise of 
elegancy in both kinds." Robert Constable, the spy, says in his 
evidence, that " for rypeness of wyt, wydenes of memmory, and playn 
and pythy uttrans of hyr words, I have talked with manny, but never 
wyth hyr lyke." Her great abilities and force of character gave her 
great ascendancy over her indolent husband, who cared chiefly for 
the chase and pleasures of a country life. 

The Earl of Northumberland in his confession' says that the 
rebellion was principally procured by old Norton and Markenfield, 
and earnestly followed by the two Countesses, and that it was only 
at the last hour, and by his wife's procurement, they could get any 
hold of the Earl of Westmoreland. In his second confession,' 
in answer to an interrogatory as to what means Lady Westmoreland 
used to provoke her husband, replied, "None that he knoweth, 
till the last daie, when they thought to have broken [up] and 
every man to have shifted for himself; at which tyme, she did 
provoke hym and the rest, with vehement perswacion and 
cryengs." All along she was in favour of vigorous measures, and 

^ Deputy Keeper tf Public Records Reports ^ xliv, page 534. 

^ Calendar oj State Papers (Elizabeth) ^ Addenda, 1566- 1579, page 401. 

^ Sharpy page 212. 



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HUMBERSTON'S SURVEY. 139 

on November 15, 1569, Bowes reported to Sussex* that when 
Markenfield and others fled, "my ladye braste owte agaynste 
them with great curses, as well for their unhappye counselling as 
nowe there cowerd flyghte." He goes on to say that Christopher 
Neville, the Earl's uncle, was still with him, and that he had done 
his nephew more harm than could be thought. Unlike the Earl of 
Northumberland, the Earl of Westmoreland managed to escape into 
the Low Countries from Scotland, where he had taken refuge on the 
advance of Elizabeth's victorious army. He lived there an exile 
for thirty years, dying November 15, 1601 — a pensioner on the daily 
charity of strangers, alone, deserted, and despised — and thus perished 
miserably, on a foreign shore, Charles, sixth and last Earl of 
Westmoreland, of the mighty house of Neville. 

Hall's letter, here printed, is supplementary to these surveys. It 
gives an account of the houses belonging to some of the chief rebels, 
as Norton Conyers and Markenfield. In looking through the pedigrees 
of the persons mentioned, it is impossible not to notice how much the 
rebellion must have been a case of relationship. All Norton's sons 
but two joined in the rebellion. His son-in-law, Henry Johnson, his 
grandson, John Green, and his nephew, Thomas Markenfield, were 
other participants in this rising. Christopher Danby, brother of Lady 
Neville of Liversedge, and his brothers-in-law, Sir John Neville and 
Marmaduke Neville, were also involved. Instances such as these 
could be multiplied almost indefinitely. 

The cause which has led to the preservation of the inventory of 
the Earl of Northumberland's goods demands a brief explanation. 
After the suppression of the rising Sir George Bowes found that the 
rebels had despoiled him of all his personal property. In a letter" 
dated December 14, 1569, addressed to Sir William Cecil, he writes, 
" At my comyng abrode, my storers, and kepers off my houses, repayred to 
me with the sayme speache that Jobes' servants to him (save only 
for my children); for I am utterly spoylled off all my goodes, bothe 
within and without ; my housses, and all my corn and cattle, karried 
away; and my housses fully defaced, by pulling away off the dores, 
wyndowes, irons off the windows, sylyng, and all my brewe vessels, 
and other vessels and chymnees apperteyning to my kytchyn; so 
that I now possess nothing but my horse, armor, and weapon, 
brought out of Barnard Castle, which I more esteem than twenty 
times so much more of other thinges; for that by yt I am enablyd 
to serve my good Quene, whom God preserve, and I wery not all 
my losses." To recompense him for the losses he had sustained he 

* Sharps page 33. « Ibid,y page loi. ^ Job i, 19. 



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140 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHLffiOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

was authorised to take and receive all such stuff and other things 
as belonged to the Earl of Northumberland, which were then 
remaining in Breckenborough, Topcliffe, or the Lodge.^ 

On February 12, 19 Elizabeth (1576-7), a Commission was issued to 
John Clopton, Christopher Chaetor, Thomas Ca[l]verley, and Thomas 
Langton, esquires, ordering them to ascertain into whose possession 
the chattels mentioned in the schedule, here printed, had come. The 
inquisition was taken at Startforth, near Barnard Castle, on April 11 
following, and states that a little after Christmas after the rebellion 
in these northern parts, about seven years before, Nicholas Young was 
sent by Sir George Bowes, knight, and Robert Bowes, his brother, at 
that time treasurer of Berwick, to Brakenbargh, in Yorkshire, to make 
an inventory of the Earl's goods there. Young gave these goods to 
Francis Lucas and George Lomas, who were then in the EarPs 
service, and to Nesbethe, Plompton, and Vaughan, gentlemen, attend- 
ants and servants on the ladies, the daughters of the late Earl, for 
their use. Into whose possession they had come, or where they then 
were, the jurors were unable to state.^ 

From what is here stated it would appear that Bowes and his 
brother had found out that the EarUs daughters* were in very poor 
circumstances, and had generously given them their father's goods, 
which belonged to them by grant from the Crown. There can be 
no doubt of their extreme poverty. Their parents in exile, their 
home occupied by strangers and enemies, and they themselves of 
"tender age," there was no one to succour them in their distress. 
On January 19, 1569-70, Sir Henry Percy, their uncle, wrote* to the Earl 
of Sussex, " Passing by the younge ladys, I founde them in harde case, 
for nether had thay any provisione, nor one peny to relyve them 
with, .but sume lyttel thynge frome me. Thay wolde gladly be 
removyde, ther wante of fier is so grett, whos yeres may nott well 
suffer that lacke." 

It does not appear why a portion of the Earl of Northumber- 
land's goods were stored at Breckenbrough, the seat of Christopher 
Lascelles, which is only some four miles from Topcliffe. 

1 Sharps page I20«. It is very sugges- ^ Exchequer: Special Commissions, 

tive of the want of discipline in the York, 19 Eliz., No. 2613. 
Queen's army that Bowes had to get a ^ Henry Percy, Earl of Norlhumber- 

letter of protection from the Royalist land, had one son, Thomas, who died 

commanders, forbidding any soldiers to young, and four daughters: Elizabeth, 

spoil, rob, or carry away any goods or wife of Richard Woodroffe, of Wollcy, 

chattels of Sir George Bowes in Brecken- co. York, esq.; Lucy, wife of Sir Edward 

brough or the lodge at Topcliffe (Ibid.). Stanley, of Eynsham, co. Oxon., K.B.; 

Lord Sussex complained bitterly of the Jane, wife of Lord Henry Seymour ; and 

spoil made by the soldiers, who made no Mary, founder of the Benedictine Dames 

distinction between friend and enemy at Bruxelles. 

(Calendar of State Papers (Domestic), * Cott. MSS., Caligula, B. 9, fo. 417, 

Addenda, 1566-1579, page 177). quoted by Sharp (page 349). 



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HUMBERSTON'S SURVEY. 141 



EXTRACTS FROM THE SURVEY. 

(fo. 208.) The view and survaie of all the lordshippes, manours, 
landes, tenementes, parkes, wast groundes, woodes, vnderwoodes, and 
of all other the heredytamentes, apperteynyng and belongyng to 
Thomas, late erle of Northumbreland, in the county of Yorke, made 
by Edmond Hall and Wyllyam Homberston, by vertue of her 
Highnes said comyssyon (March 10, 1569-70), in the monethes of 
Apryll, May, June, and July, in the sayd xij*** yere of her Highnes 
most prosperous reygne (1570) as hereafter pertyculerly ensue. 

The manour of Tadcaster ys scytuat vpon the ryver or water of 
Wharthe (sic), tenne myles from Yorke, in the rode wey towardes 
London, wherin th'erle had no mansion house,^ but the demeasnes 
are devyded amongest dyuerse of the tenauntes, and graunted by 
indenture for terme of certeyne yeres yet enduryng, and are very 
fynable when the leases are expyred. 

The lord hath belongyng to the sayd manour the leete courte, 
wyth all the royalties belongyng to the same, and all yssues, fynes, 
amercyamentes, wayfe, estraye, felons* goodes, the goodes of deodandes 
and felons of themselves, and suche other casualtyes happenyng and 
renewying wythin the said manour. 

The personage of Tadcaster ys empropred,' and yet was th*erle 
patron of the vycaredge, to present as often as yt should become 
voyde, and ys worth by yere xiij//. vjx. viij^/. 

(fo. 216.) The manour of Spoforth' ys a stately manour and ys 
scytuat within three myles of Wetherbye, towardes the north, wherein 
the auncestours of th'erle haue inhabyted. And on the west syde 
of the towne, in th'one syde of the parke, was th'erles mansion 
house, buylded all of stone, and covered with leade, which was 
partely spoyled and defaced in this late rebellyon, and parte of the 
leade stollen by the soldyours comyng owt of the south partes. To 
the sayd manour belongyth a parke, conteynyng in compas fower 
myles, which hath been for the moste parte all wood, and haue (sic) 

* "The Bridge at Tadcaster over ^ The church of Tadcaster was appro- 

Warfe hath 8 faire Arches of stone. priated to Sawlcy Abbey by Maude 

Sum say there that it was laste made of Percy, Countess of Warwick. 
Parte of the Ruines of the old Castelle ^ " Spofford, wher the Earle of North - 

of Tadcaster. A mighty greate Hille, umbreland had a goodly Lordship and 

Dikes, and Garth of this Castelle on Manor Place with a Parke. The Manor 

Warfe be yet scene a litle above the Place was sore defacid in the tyme of 

Bridge. It semeth by the Plot that it the Civile Warre betwixt Henry the 6 

was a right stately thing." (Lelantfs and Edward the 4, by the Erie of 

Itinerary y Yorkshire ArchaologiccU Jour- Warwik and Marquise Monteacute his 

nal^ X, page 244.) Brother.*' (Lelan<ts Itinerary ^ Ibid., 

page 337.) 



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142 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

been of -late yeres sold by th'erle, and the spryng spoyled for want 
of good preseruacon; and yet ys there good plenty of wood and 
tymbre, and a very parkelyke ground, and well replenyshed with 
deere. 

And within the sayd manour ys a greate wast ground, very well 
replenyshed with wood and tymbre, which is called by the name of 
the Owt Woodes, and hath been in nature of a chace, and there ys 
at this present a keper and a boweberer of th'Out Woodes, as well 
as of the parke, by lettres patentes, and hath for his fee yerely 
Ixx. x^. 

To the sayd manour belongyth the leete courte, yvherunto sue all 
the tenauntes and inhabytauntes of Spoforth^ Lynton, Kyrkcbye, 
Metherbye {sic), Kyrkebye Overblowse, Syckynghall, FoUyfet, and 
Lyttle Rybston,^ within all whiche townes the lord of Spoforth hath 
all wayfes, estrayfes, felons' goodes, and all other amercyamentes and 
profittes, belongyng to the leete. 

(fo. 228^.) Topclyf ys a stately manour," and ys scytuat vpon 
the water or ryver of Swale, syxtene myles from York, in the 
rodewey towardes Barwyke, wherin th'erle had his mansyon house 
in the Lytle Parke, for the most parte of his owne buyldyng, all of 
tymbre and covered with tyle. And this last erle dyd moche delyght 
to lye there for the greate comodyte of huntyng and hawkyng in the 
feldes and small ryvers nere vnto the same manour, which are very 
well replenyshed with all kynd of game and fowle, apt and mete for 
that pastyme. 

To the sayd manour belongyth two parkes, th'one called the 
Greate Parke, conteynyng in compas fyve myles, wherof one Christofer 
Stockdale is foster in fee, as apperith by a decree vnder the seale of 
the Courte of Augmentacions, and hath for his fee yerely Ixs, xd., 
and suche other casuall profEttes as to the same apperteyneth. And 
the sayd parke ys well planted with wood and tymbre, and ys a very 
parkelyke ground, and well replenyshed with deere. 

The Lytle Parke adioynyth to the south est parte of the towne, 
and ys very well planted with coppyes, woodes, and greate tymber, 
and conteynyth in compas ij myles and a half, and ys well 
replenyshed wyth fallow dere ; and to the same belongyth one keper,' 

1 Linton, Follifoot, and Little Ribston from the Toune, almost on the Ripe of 

in the parish of Spofforth, and Kereby, Swale. The last Erl of Northumberland 

Netherby, and Sicklinghall in that of did cost on this House. There long 2 

Kirkby Overblow. Parkes to this Manor, the bigger wherof 

3 "Topeclif,anuplandischToune, wher is a 6 or 7 miles in Cumpace, and is 

I cam over Swale by Bridge of Tymbre. well vvooddid." {Lg/atufs Itinerary^ Ibid,^ 

The Praty Manor Place of Topclif page 326.) 
stondith on a Hille about half a mile ^ William Grene. 



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humberston's survey. 143 

which hath for his fee yerly \xs. viij</., and suche other casual 
profittes and comodytees as to the same offyce apperteynyth. 

The manour of Topclyf extendyth into the hamlettes of 
Skypton, Carleton, Catton, Greysthwayte, Thorpfeld, Assenby, Dalton, 
and Crakehall,Uhe tenauntes wherof held their landes for the most 
parte by indenture for terme of certeyne yeres, and are very fynable 
after th' expiracon of their leases. 

(fo. 249.) The Manour of Lekenfelde* extendyth within two myles 
of Beverley, and ys scytuat in a countrey very plentyfull of good come, 
soyle, pasture ground, medow, and woodland ; and the manour place 
or mansyon house .of Lekenfeld ys the largest and statelyest house 
which th'erle had in the county of York, buylded within a parke 
and inclosed aboute wyth a mote, very fayer buylt and in good 
ordre, parte of stone and parte of tymbre, and ys in good repayre, 
and well kept. 

To the sayd manour belong three parkes, whiche were somtyme 
all in one, and devyded by the late Kyng of famous memory, Kyng 
Henry the eyght; wherof the fyrst parke ys called the Coursyng 
Parke, enclosyng the manour place in euery parte, and ys well 
planted with vnderwood and tymber, and well replenyshed with 
fallow deere ; and conteynyth in compas ij myles and a half, and the 
pale well mayntened and in good repayre, and hath one keper, who 
hath for his stipend yerely \xs, viij^., and suche other fees and 
comodytes as to his offyce apperteynyth. 

The second ys called the Newe Parke, and adioynyth to th'other 
towardes the west, and ys lyke wyse well planted with vnderwood 
and tymbre, and well replenyshed with fallow deere, the pale well 
mayntened and in good repayre, and conteynyth in compas ij myles; 
wherof is one keper,' who hath for his stipend yerely Ixs, viij^., and 
suche other fees and comodytes as to the same apperteyneth. 

The thyrd ys called th'Olde Parke, well planted with greate 
covertes of vnderwood and tymber, and large laundes, and very well 
replenyshed with red deere and fallow deere, the pale in very good 
repayre, and conteynyth in compas iiij myles, wherof ys one keper,* 
who hath for his stipend yerely \xs, viij//., and suche other casuall 
proffittes and comodytes as to his offyce apperteynyth. 

^ Skipton Bridge, Carlton Miniott, saw in a litle studiyng Chaumber, caullid 

Catton, Grislhwaite, Thorpefield, Asenby, Paradice, the genealogie of the Percys. 

Dalton, and Crakehill. The Park therby is very fair, and large, 

^ '* Lekingfeld is a large House, and and raeately welle woddid. Ther is a 

stondith wiihyn a great raote yn one very fair tour of Brike for a Logge yn the 

'spatius courte. 3 Partes of the House, Park." {LeiatuPs Itinerary y Ibid, ^ page 

saving the meane gate that is made of 245.) 
Brike, is al of tymbre. The 4 Parte is ^ Thomas Bynkes. 

fair made of Stone and sum Brike. I ^ Hamlet Carrington. 



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144 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

(fo. 24gd.) To the sayd manour also belongyth a greate fenne, 
called the Carre, wherein th'erle hath a greate marke of swannes,^ 
and also many wyld swannes bredyng there yerely, and very moche 
other wyld fowle, and a very proffitable fyshyng, which th'erles haue 
alweyes reserved to their owne possession for th^use and comodyte 
of their house, and appoynted foure kepers or overseers, as well of 
the fowle as the fyshe, and euery of them hath for his travayle or 
paynes aboute the same iijj. iu]d. And where as the tenauntes had 
comen of pasture in the same in dry yeres, the dryft of the cattell 
dyd disturbe the bredyng of the wyld fowle, and especially of the 
wyld swannes, the late erle compounded with the tenauntes to 
forbere there comen in that fenne, and payeth them yerely in 
recompence therof xiijj. iiij^. And there are in the Carre at this 
survey, by the confession of the swannerdes, xlvij whyte swannes, 
and all the sygnettes are to be marked and put out, by cause no man 
hath warraunt to take them. 

The mannour of Lekenfeld extendyth into Lekenfeld, Aram, 
Scorborough, Cheryburton, and Hasell; and the most parte of the 
tenauntes hold theyr landes of the sayd mannour of Lekenfeld by 
copy of courte roll, accordyng to the custome of Cumbreland, whiche 
ys to make fyne at the death, alyenacion, or exchaunge of the lord 
or tenaunt. And the lord of the mannour of Lekenfeld hath, in right 
of the sayd mannour, the leete within all the sayd mannour with his 
membres, and all weyfs, estrayes, felons' goodes, amercymentes, and all 
other casualtyes, due and apperteynyng to the leete. 

(fo. 260.) The mannour of Wressell* and the castell of the same 
ys scytuat in the borders of Holdernes, nere vnto the ryver of 
Darwent, and ys a very bewtyfull house, buylded aboute a square 
courte, all of stone and covered with leade, and ys planted in a 
country voyde of nothyng, mete and necessary for the mayntenaunce 
of hospitalyte; and the soyle about the same very good and 

^ This expression occurs again under where the enlre is ynto the Castelle. The 

Wressel, where the Earl had a "marke Castelle ys al of very fair and greate 

or game of swannes in the ryver of squarid stone both wilhyn and withowte, 

Darwent." It means a set of marked wnereof (as sum hold opinion) much was 

swans. They were marked, as they are brought owt of Fraunce. In the Castelle 

still, by marks cut on their bills. A little be only 5 Towers, one at eche Corner, 

lower down it is stated that the cygnets almost of like Biggenes. The Gate 

were to be marked before being put out. House is the 5, having fyve Lon^inges 

^ " The ground that the Castelle of yn high. 3 of the other Towers have 

Wresehill standith on [is] sumwhat high 4 Highes in Longginges. The 4 con- 

yn the Respect of the very lough ground teinith the Boiery, Pantery, Pastery, 

theraboute. Most Part of the Basse Lardery, and Kechyn. The Ilaule and 

Courte of the Castelle of Wresehil is al the great Chaumbers be fair, and so is 

of Tymbre. The Castelle it self is motid the Chapelle and the Closettes. To 

aboute 3 Partes. The 4 Parte is dry conclude, the House is one of the most 



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humberston's survey. 



145 



batefulP for come and gresse, and great plenty of medow belongyng 
to the sayd castell, lyeing vpon the water or ryver of Darwent. The 
gardens about the castell very well planted with arbors and open 
walkes, and well kept and preserved ; and wyll so contynue yf the 
pore man^ may have his stipend allowed, which ys yerely iiij//. xiijj. iiij^., 
for three lai^e gardeyns. And the sayd castell ys in good repayre, 
and ys not lyke to decay onles yt be for want of good oversyght, 
the buyldyng ys so strong. 

To the sayd castell belong ij parkes, th'one of fallow deere, 
called the Lyttle Parke, within half a myle of the castell, well 
planted with wood and tymbre, and a very parkelyke ground, and 
well replenyshed with fallow deere, and conteynyth in compas 
ij myles and a half; and hath one keper, who has hath for his fee 
]xs, viij^., and suche other casual proffytes and comodytes as to the 
same apperteyneth. 

Th'other parke ys called the Great Parke, or Newsham Parke, 
and ys one myle and a halfe from the castell, whiche ys well 
planted with woodes, and a very parkelyke ground, and conteynyth 
in compas iij myles, and was replenyshed with red deere; but the 
pale is so decayed of late yeres, as the deere lye owt of the ground, 
and especially in somer, in the corne feldes, and are stollen and 
spoylled, so as at this survey, by confession of the keper, ther are 



propre beyouud Trente, and semith as 
newly made ; yet was it made by a 
younger brother of the Percys, Earle of 
Wiccester, that was yn high favor with 
Richard the Secunde, and bought the 
Maner of Wresehil, mountting at that 
tyme litle above 30/1. by the yerc : And 
for lak of Heires of hym, and by favor 
of the King, it cam to the Erles of 
Northumbreiand. The Basse Courle is 
of a newer Building. And the last Erie 
of Northumberland saving one made the 
Brew House of Stone without the 
Castelle Waulle, but hard joyning to the 
Kechyn of it. One thing I liked 
excedingly yn one of the Towers, that 
was a study cauUed Paradise, wher was a 
Closet, in the midle of 8 squares latised 
aboute: and on the Toppe of every 
square was a desk ledgid to set Bookes 
on, and Gofers withyn them, and these 
semid as yoinid hard to the Toppe of the 
Closet: and yet by Pulling one or al 
wold cum downe, briste highte in 
rabettes, and serve for Deskes to lay 
Bokes on. The Garde Robe in the 

VOL. XVII. 



Caslelle was excedingly fair. And so 
wer the Gardeins withyn the Mote, and 
the Orchardes withoute. And yn the 
Orchardes were Mountes cpere topiurio 
writhen about — with Degrees like 
Tuminges of Cockilshilles, to cum to the 
Top without Payn. There is a Parke 
hard by the Castelle." (Lelancfs Itinerary^ 
Ibid,, page 314.) The Castle appears to 
have begun to fall into decay in 1537, 
when the Duke of Norfolk wrote to 
Cromwell, " I have just heard that my 
lord of Northumberland daily gives away 
houses and the bricks of Wressle and 
other things, so that unless remedy be 
applied it will be greatly decayed when it 
comes into the King's hands.'* {Henry 
VIII State Papers, xii, page 539.) 

* Not in the Neiu English Dictionary, 
although baitless is. The word bait means 
food, refreshment, especially a feed for 
horses. In the survey of Kirk by Moorside 
(page 147), ** the demeane very good and 
batefuU for corne and gresse." 

* Gervase Fowler, "custos trium gar- 
dinorum." 



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146 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHiEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

not aboue xvij red deere belongyng to the ground. And the 
keper^ of that parke hath for his fee yerely Ixj. viij^/., and suche other 
casualtyes and fees as to that office apperteynyth. 

(fo. 260^.) To the lord of the sayd manour belongyth the 
moyte of the fyshyng of salmon and other freshe water fyshe in the 
water or ryver of Darwent, and also the moyte of the ferry or passage 
over the sayd ryver. And the lord hath a marke or game of 
swannes in the ryver of Darwent, but how many whyte swannes 
there are wee knowe not. 

The manour of Wressell extendyth also into the townes and 
hamlettes of Newshara, Brynde, Loftsom, Clyff, Assylbye, Bryghton, 
Cowyke, Newhald, and Wawkyngton.^ And all the custumary 
tenauntes in Wressell, and the forsayd townes and hamlettes, hold 
their landes by coppy of courte roll accordyng to the custome of 
Cumbreland, whiche is of lyke estate, and fynable at suche times as 
I haue before declared in the mannour of Lekenfeld. And the rest 
of the tenauntes hold their landes by indenture for terme of yeres, 
whiche are very fynable when their leases shall expyre. 

(fo. 386.) The view and surueie of the lordship of Kyrkeby 
Moresyde, in the county of Yorke, parcell of the possessions of 
Charles, late erle of Westmerland, wyth all his rightes, membres and 
appurtenaunces, and of all the landes and possessions in Famedale, 
Braundesdale, Fadmore, and Gyllymore, parcell of the sayd manour, 
made by Edmond Hall, William Homberston, and John Jenkyns, the 
seyxt of June in the yere aforsaid (1570). And the said lordship 
ys within foure myles of Malton in Ryedale, and in th'est parte of 
the county of Yorke, in the edge of the moreland, and ys a very 
stately lordshipp, and extendyth into the townes, hamlettes, and dales 
of Farnedale, Braundesdale, Fadmore, and Gyllymore, and ys in 
compas aboue xxvj miles, and inhabyted with many welthy and 
substancyall men, and haue very good fermes by reason of the 
greate and, large comons and wastes; and all the tenauntes, except 
the towne of Kyrkeby, hold their fermes and tenementes by indenture 
for terme of yeres, whiche are very fynable landes, after the leases 
be determyned. And the towne of Kyrkeby is a market towne, 
inhabyted all with pore people, and hold their cotages by copye of 
courte roll to them and to their heyres, accordyng to the custome 
of the manour, payeng certeyne rentes, customes, and servyces, and 

1 William Whalley, also bailiff here and at Thornton. 

^ Newsham, Brind, Loftsorae, Long Cliff (?), Asselby, Breighton, Cowick, 

Newbald, and Walkington. 



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HUMBERSTON*S SURVEY. 147 

haue no landes or other comodytes to theyr cotages, so as their 
rentes must of necessyte decay, onles the comens which Henry, late 
erle,* toke from the tenauntes, aboute viij or ix yeres past, and 
enclosed them, whiche was th'only releyf of the inhabitauntes of the 
towne, wherein they kept euery man one, twoo, or three kyen, for the 
releyf of themselves, their wyves and chyldren. 

The scyte of the manour ys scytuat in throne syde of the parke, 
buylded of stone, and covered parte with leade and parte with slate, 
and served for a removyng house for th'erles, when their pleasure 
were to come to hunt and take pastyme in that country. The house 
is but symple for an erle, but a good house for a gentleman of 
worshipp; and the demeane very good and batefuU for corne and 
gresse, and greate plenty of mewn ground, lyeng by a fayre ryver," 
suffycyent for the provysyon of a house for any gentleman of worship. 

The parke adioynyth to the scyte of the manour, very well 
planted with wood and tymbre, wherin are large laundes, and ys 
well replenyshed with fallow deere, and conteynyth in compas two 
myles and a half, and in measure, by the pole of xxj fote, clxxvij 
acres, wherin ys one keper,' which hath for his stipend yerely 
\xs, y'ujd.y and suche other casuall comodytes and proffittes as to the 
sayd office apperteynyth. 

(fo. 386^/.) The sayd lordshipp was somtyme parcell of the 
possessions of the Lorde Wake, as apperyth by dyuerse auncyent 
grauntes made to sundry tenauntes of dyuers tenementes in Farne- 
dale and Braundesdale. And in the same with all the membres the 
lord hath, as in right of the said lordship, the leete courte with wayfe, 
estrayes, felons* goodes, and all other royalties, lyberties, comodytes, 
and proffittes due and appurtenaunt to the leete. 



LETl^ER FROM EDMUND HALL TO SIR WILLIAM CECIL, 

KNIGHT, DATED APRIL 21, 1570. 

[S/a/e Papers ( Domestic )y Addenda, Elizabeth, vol. xviii, Art. 46]. 

Mye duetye remembred with most humble commendacions. And 
where it hathe pleased youe to appointe me to traivell in this iorney, 
for me farre unmeet, not onely for lacke of experience in so great a 
worke but also the traivell I have contynualiy exercised my selfe in 
from my youthe, nowe makethe me feele that it is tyme for me not 
to thincke my selfe able to take upon me suche a iorney as this 

i Henry Neville, Earl of Westmore- 2 The Dove, 

land. 1 549- 1 563. 3 William Bankes, 



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148 THE YORKSHIRE ARCaffiOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

wilbe before we canne returne. But in that it hath pleased youe to 
appointe me to it I will gooe throught, God gevinge me my healthe, 
and shalbe readie duringe my lyfe, at your commandement, in any 
service that I am able. For that I maie not seme to youe 
unmindfull of my duetie causeth me to trouble youe with these letters, 
in gevinge you to understande of our proceedinges. Mr. Humberston 
came to Yorke the Tewsdaie in Ester weeke (March 28), and I the 
Thursday next followinge. For if I had not received your gentle 
warninge I shoulde have bene farre unreadie to have so sone 
followed M^ Gumberston (sic), not onely for ordringe of mine owne 
causes, but also for lacke of horses, whereof utterlie I was unprovided 
upon the receipte of your letter, by occasion of my late traivell in 
these parties. 

We did remaine at Yorke after our cominge thether untill the 
Fridaye senighte after, beinge the vij'^ of this present, for instruccions 
which we received of my Lorde of Sussex, M"" Attornie, and M' 
Solicitour,^ for our better procedinge in our service. And as we have 
received of M' Attornie the names of suche as be indicted and 
offendors in the late rebellion, so by my L. of Sussex order we have 
received from M' Sheriffe'* divers presentmentes, wherebie is expressed 
many of the townes where the offenders' landes do lye, which is a 
good helpe to lede us to the same. We have surveied Tadcaster, 
Spofforde, and Topcliffe, with their members, parcell of the Erie of 
Northumberlandes landes, wherein is not left undemised so muche 
grounde as is able to kepe a geldinge more then his parkes; and of 
his parkes are claymed dyverse grauntes which were made by the 
late Erie deceased, notwithstandinge the Erie that nowe is hath had 
the possession of them these viij or ix yeres at the least, and as it 
is saide by the countrie's reporte, that he had fully recompenced 
them that nowe claime the same. 

He hath taken of his tenantes soore fines for thinges of small 
value, for all the tenantes of Spofforde and Topcliffe, to my under- 
standinge, be much dearer rented then thei be with us, and the 
groundes be not greatlie fruictfuU, either by corne or grasse. Thei 
have great commons for the sommer tyme for stoore cattle upon the 
moores. In Spofforde and Topcliffe is muche great tymber, but 
muche spoiled with snaithinge,' and the underwoodes cleane 
destroied both in the parke and outwoodes. 

1 At this time Sir Gill:)ert Gerard was ^ Lopping. A.S. snadan, to cut, lop, 

Attorney General, and Thomas Bromley hew. C/. Snaith, the place cut off by the 
Solicitor General. rivers Aire and Don. 

« Sir Christopher Hildyard, of Wine- 
stead, knight. 



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HUMBERSTON'S SURVEY. 149 

Also we have surveied Walton head,* Leethley, and Farnley, bcinge 
parte of Henrie Johnsons landes, w<* be much intangled, his landes 
be not muche, for he hath solde the greater parte of that his father 
lefte him, and that he hath lefte he hathe conveighed by fine to 
himselfe, his wife, and to the heires of their two bodies. He hath 
builded a small house at Walton head of stone, upon a demeine 
adioyninge to a large common, in a wilde countrie, wherof the olde 
ladie of Northumberlande hathe the moitie of the demeanes duringe 
her life, well stoored of olde wood, the underwood utterlie spoiled, 
and the grounde is not fertill either of corne or grasse, and evill 
medowed. All his lande is demised by lease, savinge the parte of 
the demeanes which he had at Walton heade before named. 

Nighe unto Topcliffe we finde certaine landes which were 
S'^ Giles Stranguishes, and were in debate' betwene I^onerde Dacres 
and M"^ Tankarde, who hath boughte Rosses interest. But where we 
finde that M' Tankarde hathe the possession quietlie for iij or iiij 
yeres, we minde not to deale with them ; but such as we finde that 
Leonerde Dacres had possession of of late tyme, we determine to 
take the survey of, and minde to charge the tenantes to awnswere the 
rent to the Quenes Receyver. 

We be informed that Christofer Lockwood of Sowrsbie' shoulde 
have of his father in lawe M"" Christofer Lassells gifte, either an 
estate of inheritaunce of the manour and parke of Sowrsbie, or els 
a lease for terme of yeres for a small rent, which the saide 
Christofer Lassells utterlie deniethe. Notwithstandinge we minde to 
take the survey therof to the Quenes use, except we shall receive 
commandemcnt to the contrarie at our comminge thither, upon some 
matter by Lassells shewed to the Quenes councell. 

^ Walton Head in the township of ^ No doubt some quarrel about the 

Follyfoot and parish of Kirkby Over- Strangwayes' inheritance. Sir Giles 

blow. Henry Johnson, son of Sir Strangwayes, an ancestor of the present 

Thomas Johnson, of Lindley, knight, Lord Ilchester, was the male representa- 

and Isabel Palmes of the same place tive of the family, and Leonard Dacre 

(Test. Eb^,y iii, page 376), married and Robert Roos derived their rights 

Elizabeth, daughter of Richard Norton, under an Act of Parliament, passed in 

of Norton Conyers. "He is very simple, IS43, dividing the estates of Sir James 

was abused by his wife, who is Strangwayes, the last male of the main 

Norton's daughter, and he hath made a line. (Yorkshire Archaological Journal ^ 

state of his lands to her at the t3nne of vii, page 490. ) 

his marriage ; so as by his life the Queen ^ Christopher Lockwood, of Sowerby, 

shall have his lands, and by his death his near Tbirsk, married Clare, daughter of 

wife shall presently have them, according Christopher Lascelles, of Sowerby and 

to the slate.** Prudential reasons pre- Breckenborough. He was a servant of 

vailed, and Johnson, after being respited the Earl of Westmoreland. (Calendar 

for his simplicity, was pardoned in May, of State Papers^ Domestic^ Addenda, 

1 573- (Sharp, page 269/1. ) ' 566-79. page 115.) 



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150 



THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 



Parte of John Fullthroppes landes in Iselberke and Thirkleby* we 
have surveied, as his house and demeane of Iselberke, a house too 
evill for anie shepherde or simpell heardman to dwell in; and a 
demeane, for the quantitie of the best grounde, for pasture and 
medowe, that I have scene of all the landes that we have yet 
vewed, and conteinethe aboute viij^* acres, whereof is well towarde fiftie 
acres of good water medowe. The whole demeane lyethe severall 
together within an hedge, and the olde man John Fullthroppe hath 
allwaies dwelt in this evill house. 

And now presentlie we be at Rippon in takinge of the survey of 
Mr Richard Nortons landes and Mr Thomas Markin fields in these 
parties. 

Mr Norton hathe a [d/ank] house' builte of bricke, to the shew 
faire, but within all out of order, no faire roome in all the house 
but the hall and the lodginges be all together unorderlie. His house 
is well placed, with apte groundes for gardens and orchardes, 
wherein it semethe he had some pleasure. And within lesse then 
halfe a mile of his house he hath a proper parke, in compasse 
aboute one mile and a halfe, well stoord of yonge tymber wood and 
some olde timber, parte of the grounde indifferent good, and parte 
verie barraine ; and it hathe bene stored w**» deere and conies, which 
nowe be allmost all spoiled. Of his demesnes parte is reasonable 
good grounde, lyinge about the ryver of Yewre : but I finde not the 
groundes which lie on the ryvers in these parties so good as the 
groundes in the Southe be, which lye on the ryvers there. His 
demeanes be aboute ccU*' acres. 



* Islebeck and Thirkleby, near Thirsk. 
Fulthorpe was executed at York, on 
March 24, 1569-70, for his share in the 
rebellion. (^-Aor/, page 226/1.) He is 
perhaps the same person as the John 
Fulthorpe who married Jane, sister of 
Thomas, first Lord Wharton. {Visita- 
tion of Yorkshirey 1 563-4, page 347.) 

* Norton Conyers, near Ripon, the seat 
of Sir R^^ald Graham, bart., is in the 
main an Elizabethan building, and seems 
to have been erected by the last Norton, 
who owned it. Richard Norton, gene- 
rally called " Old Norton," was the most 
important person (the Earls excepted) 
engaged in the rebellion. He was the son 
of John Norton and Anne, daughter and 
heiress of William Ratcliffe, of Kilston in 
Craven. He married Susan, daughter of 
Richard, Lord Latimer, by whom he had 
eleven sons, two of whom were dead before 
the rebellion, and six daughters. He was 
High Sheriff of Yorkshire in 10 Eliza- 
beth, the year before the rising. '* He 
engaged in the rebellion from attachment 



to the ancient faith." Camden 

describes him as ''an old gentleman, 
with a reverend grav head, bearing a 
cross, with a stremer." 

* ' The Nortons' ancyent had the cross, 
And the five wounds our Lord did beare." 

The age of Norton (seventy-one) had 
not damped his ardour, and he rushed 
headlong into this ill-fated enterprise, 
which brought such niin and desolation 
on his house." (Sharp^ page 277.) All 
the sons except two, Edmund Norton of 
Clowcroft, ancestor of Lord Grantley, 
and Sampson Norton of Wath, who 
married Bridget, one of the daughters 
and co-heirs of Sir Ralph Bulmer, of 
Wilton in Cleveland, were engaged in the 
rebellion. "Old" Norton escaped to 
Flanders, where he died, and only one 
son, Christopher, suffered capital punish- 
ment. Thomas Norton, Richard's brother, 
was executed at Tyburn, with his nephew 
Christopher, on May 27, 1570. 

a Or dcl«. 



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HUMBERSTON'S SURVEY. 



151 



As Mr Nortons house liethe two myles from Rippon northest, so 
is M"" Markinfieldes^ scituated on the southwest side one mile di. from 
Rippon, who hath an auncient house builte all of stoone, to the 
outward shew faire and stately, the hall and the lodginge side all 
imbatelled, builte not quadrante but more in lengthe then in 
breadthe, and builte of three sides, invironed with an evill moote, 
but his house is served with a conduicte verie plentiffullie. 

Againste the en trie of the courte is builte the hall and the 
kitching, and of the right hande of the courte is builte for lodginges, 
and the lefte hande is stables, brewhouses, and houses of office. 
The hall and lodginges be all vawted, and were, at the firste, builte all 
aboute one roome of heighte. Beside the vawtes, the walls 6f great 
heighte without order, whereof parte is devided with a flowerth at the 
mid transom of the windowe, so as the roomes be all out of good 
order. The house is placed in a parke of the like quantitie to Mr 
Nortons parke, better grounde for the most parte of it, well planted 
with wood, with dyverse large tymber trees of the fairest lengthe that I 
have sene in anie placa And to his house is adioyninge a large 
demeane which will amounte above viij*= acres, in the which is no 
quantitie of water medowe, but there is made muche haie in 
seasonable yeres in the hey groundes. The soyle throughout for the 
most parte of his demeanes is reasonable good for grasse. 



^ Thomas MarkenBeld was son of 
Thomas Markenfield, of Markeniield, 
and Margaret, daughter of Thomas 
Norton, the rebel, and grandson of 
Sir Ninian Markenfield, who was one 
of the commanders on the English 
side at Flodden. His father died 
on April i8, 1550, when he was 17 years 
and 9 months old. * * This Thomas sought 
refuge abroad in the reign of Elizabeth, 
so strong were his wishes for a change in 
religion and politics. He came back to 
England, and was one of the three 
planners and leaders of the Rising in the 
North in 1569. In Thomas Norton's 
Address to the Queues Maiesties poore 
deceived subJecUs of the North there is a 
passage relating to the three. *The 
residue of your doltish Captaynes, what 
be they? Thinke you they be men able 
to beare you out against the power of a 
Prince, all his Nobilitie, Cities, Kealme, 
Subjectes, Frendes, and Allies? One 
with little wiite far set (Swynbome of 
Chopwell in Durham) ; another in his old 
age, weary of his wealth (Norton); an 
other, a runneaway with a young wilde 
braine tickled to see fashions (Markin- 
field).* This extract is taken from the 



copy in the Minster Library, York, in 
which Archbishop Matthew has added 
the names" [Test, Ebor.y\^ page 232»). 
He escaped to Scotland and ultimately to 
Flanders and Spain. Sharp (page 
264//) gives the following information 
about his later life : "A letter from one 
who calls him cousin, and who signs 
*you know who,' from Toumay, March 
19, 1593, addressed to him in Madrid, 
states that he had received his letter from 
Portugal, written uix)n * the back of a 
targelt,' and he was glad to hear from 
him, as he was reported to be dead. The 
writer states that, after much vexation for 
the *catholique fay the, 1 thanke God I 
have escaped myne enemyes, to venter 
my lief in his Catholique Majesties 
service, agaynst heretiques and heresy.* 
He says, * your wif is powre, but prayelh 

hard for you I fear she is in 

great lack of worldly comforts ' {Harleian 
MS. 286, i^age 205). He is mentioned in 
the Estate of English Fugitives as one of 
* those that are only, for want of things 
necessarie, and of pure povertie, con- 
sumed and dead.' His wife was allowed 
a small pension of his estates for life." 



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152 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

Because we have not yet vewed but a small parte of their 
landes, I am not able to advertise youe of the true vallues, but if 
your pleasure shallbe hereafter to understande the value of anie 
parte, I shall sende them to youe upon your pleasure knowen. 

There be a great number of offenders that have compounded 
with the Commissioners, yet notwithstandinge we are appointed by 
M"" Attornie to inquire what landes thei have, so as if thei have 
above v//. in landes thei be bounde to make new composicion. 

Amonge which we finde one John Greine, sonne and heire of 
[blank'] Greene of Newbie,* nighe unto Topcliffe, and yet within age, 
was warde to the olde Countisse of Northumberlande, who sold him 
to Mr Richarde Norton, his father in lawe, and he is not yet 
maried, so as I thincke the Quene is to have the manage of him. 
Yf it maie please youe to graunte me the preferment I were much 
bounden unto youe, and if it be not alreadie to some other graunted, 
he shall not have duringe his mothers life as it is saide cf. by the 
yere, but he shall have after her decease a proper gentlemans house 
with a faire demeanes, lyinge upon the ryver of Swale. 

The countrie people have bene sore taken on, what by their 
lordes in takinge great fines for their landes, the spoile latelie made 
by the armies, and composicions made by men for their lyves, not 
before the Quenes commissioners but to other without commission. 
By occasion whereof the people seme to be in much obedience, 
thoughe thei talke of some of their countriemen somwhat at large, 
for their harde dealinge with them. 

Many a man praiethe for M^ Attornie and M*" Solicitour for that 
by their meanes thei have recovered parte of that which without 
good order was taken from them. 

M** Markinfielde hath made leases all most of all the landes he 
hath, savinge of a parte of his demeanes at Markinfielde, and hath 
received great fines, and of manie of his tenantes iiij^^ five or six 
yeres rente before hande, so as thei make great exclamacion of him. 

From hence we gooe to Leedes for the survey of S' John 
Nevells' landes, and from thence into Craven and so into the 

^ John Green, son of Henry Green, of ^ S\i John Neville, of Liversedge, 

Newby, and Mary, daughter of Richard married Dorothy, daughter of Sir 

Norton, the rebel. On July 21, 1570, Christopher Danby, of Thorp Perrow, 

Hall writes to Cecil, "Thanks for near Bedale. Her brother, Christopher 

remembering my request for the marriage Danby, of Beeston, was attainted for his 

and wardship of Green, although that share in this rebellion. In February, 

suit will come to none effect, as some say 1570, Sir Thomas Gargrave writes, 

he was of full age before the offence com- " Lady Nevill, Sir John's wife, is in poor 

mitte<l by Norton, his guardian" {Calendar case, having only a white frieze gown and 

of State Papers, Domestic^ Addenda, ten children, and neither house, meat, 

1566-79, page 308). nor drink. She says her husband would 



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HUMBERSTON'S SURVEY. 153 

Bishoppricke. Yf youe shall have anie occasion to write to us, your 
letters, directed to M*^ Sherife,^ he will cause them to be sent to us. 

Thus, leavinge any further to trouble youe, I shall praie to the 
Lorde longe to preserve you my good Ladie with all yours in 
health, to your comforte. From Ripon the xxj*^ of Aprill, 1570. 

Your most bounden to conimaund, 

Edmond Hall. 
[Addressed] To the honourable S"" 

William Cecill, Knighte, 

principall Secretarie to 

the Quenes Ma'»*. 
[Endorsed] xxj° Aprilis, 1570. 

M' Edmund Halle to 

my M*" 



INVENTORY OF THE GOODS OF THOMAS PERCY, 
EARL OF NORTHUMBERLAND. 

[£x. Special Commissions y York, 19 Elizabeth, No. 2613.] 

Com. Ebor. Certen goodes and cattalles which were sometymes 
Thomas, late earle of Northumberland, attaynted of highe treason, 
specified in an inventory taken by Sir Thomas Gargrave, knight, late 
shrief of the countie of Yorke,* the viij**^ daye of Maye, in the xij*^ 
yeare of the quenes maiesties reigne (1570), and preysed by John 
Jackson and others, as followeth, viz. : — 

In primis six fetherbeddes, sixe bolsters, tenne mattresses, six 
rugges, foure fustyan' blankettes, xj paire of woUen blankettes viij//. 

Item a testor of yellowe satten and black veluet ymbrodred, fyve 
curtens to the same, black and yellowe sarcenett,* iij//. xx//. 

Item a quylte of yellowe satten of Bridges' liijj. 

Item xj quyshins of grene clothe, one chane of grene veluett xj. 

Item one carpett for a shorte table xxvjj. viij^/. 

come in on promise of life, and that he left it on May 10, 1573. {Ibid.^ pages 

went to persuade the rebels not to bear 381, 467.) 

arms against Her Majesty, and to prevent ^ Sir Christopher Hildyard, knight. 

from spoil Her husband is of a ^ Gargrave had been Sheriff in 1569. 

good nature, was a Protestant in King ^ Formerly a kind of coarse cloth made 

Edward's days, became a Papist in Queen of cotton and flax. 

Mary's through Dr. Robinson, and is now * A kind of thin silk. *' But," quoth he, 

confirmed in popery. (Calendar of State '* there is no reason why Marie's smocke 

Papers f Domes/ic, I $66-yg^ pages 2^2-^.) shoulde be of sarsnet^ seeing Joseph's 

He was attainted. Early in 1572 he was breeches were not of silke. ' (Afar- 

setting out, with a good mind and fervent Prelates' Epistle (Arber's Reprint), ps^e 

zeal, on a journey to Rome, but was in 44.) 

Madrid the autumn of that year. He ^ Bruges in Flanders. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



154 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

Item a canapy of sylver fuger' with curtens of blewe sarcenett, a 
cradle clothe of crymesen veluett, laide one with a bone lace'* of 
gold, and a redd canapy for the cradle, and fowre hanginges of 
verdures' xx^'. 

Item fowre pillowes, a litle pillowe, fyve longe table clothes, one 
olde longe table cloth of diaper, fyve olde cupborde clothes, one 
dossen of damaske napkyns, tenne dyaper napkyns, xij playne 
napkyns, fyve hall clothes, fowre arminge clothes* iiij^'. vj^. 

Item twoo payre of fyne Holland sheetes, ande one and twenty 
payre of howsholde sheetes, worth nothinge xxj. 

Item xxj dishes, xj sawcers, thre brasse pottes, twoo possenettes,' 
and fowre pannes, xij candlestickes, two tynne pottell pottes, one 
pewter salte, eight spyttes, and one paire of andyornes viijA*. vs. 

Item one blacke cheste with fyve vyolandes, one other with thre 
vyolandes, one other with foure. vialles, one other with five vyalles, 
one other cheste with a bandora, a paire of duble virgynalles, a 
paire of single virgynalles, one sett of greate recorders, and one sett 
of cornettes iiij//. 

Item a gylte boll with a cover, weinge by estymacion xx" 
ounces iiij//. v']s. viij</. 

Item one cuppe with a cover gylte, weinge by estymacion iiij 
ounces xlvijj. mjd. 

Item one lytle cuj)pe of assaye,* weinge by estimacion thre 
ounces xiijj. 

Item twoo porringers, not gylte, by estymacion xvj ounces 

iij//. ixs, iiij^. 

Item thre spones, by estymacion one ounce di. vji*. viij^. 

Item one beare jugge with two eares, weinge by estymacion 
xviij ounces iij//. xviijj. 

Item a gilte salte, by estimacion xix ounces \xixs, iiij^. 

Item a potte with a cover gylte, by estymacion weinge fyftene 
ounces Xxvs. 

Summa . . Ixxiij//. viijy. iiij</. 

1 Fuger or fugo^ a word of unknown * This phrase does not occur in the 

meaning, some kind of satin. {New New English Dictionary. It probably 
English Dictionary^ s.v.) means cloths used as protective covering. 

« Lace, usually of linen thread, made g A^^smSl^^cuo with which assav of 

by knitting upon a pattern marked by ^^.J '^^] ^^ ^iL %%t"^\^. 
pms, w^th Ix^bbms originally made of ^^,^jj^ ^^ f^^^,^,^ ^, ^^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ 

bone ; formerly ^^"f ,*^«^-ff;;f . /^^V' q"cne with a cuppe of golde and a cuppe 

now largely sui^rseded by bobhm-net. ;{£ ^ssay of thesame." (Hall's ChronUle 

(Neiv English Dictionary, s.v,) (1550), page 212, quoted in the Nov 

3 Tapestry. English Dictionary, s.v. assay.) 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PAVER'S MARRIAGE LICENSES. 
Part XVI. 

(CONTINUED FROM VOL. xvi, P. 37.) 

With Notes by J. W. CLAY, F.S.A. 
[Add. MSS. s9, 667.] 

1626. 

[389] 

John Agar and Mary Harrison, of St. Helen, Stonegate, York— at St. Helen. 

John Rho<les and Elizabeth Irish, of Whitkirk— at Whitkirk. ^ 

Edmund Colton, of St. Michael-le-Belfrey, and Grace Edwards, of St. John, 

Micklegate, York — at either church*. 
John Conset and Jane Younger, of Speeton — at Speeton. 
Robert Watson and Margaret Templeman, of Thorganby — at Thorganby 
William Midgley, of Baildon, and Elizabeth Kawson, of Keighley— at either place. 
John Linley and Barbara Webster, of Dinnington — at Aston or Dinnington. 
Jo. Mitchell, of Darton, and Mary West, of Penistonc — at either place. 
Robert Fidlcr and Priscilla Ransome, widow, of St. Mary, Hull— at St. Mary. 
Denis Nelherwood and Catherine Netherwood, of Leeds — at Leeds.* 
George Sinim and Mary Bulmer, of Wilton — at Wilton. 
John Birtwisie, of Rothwell, and Sarah Moore, of Pontefract — at either place. 
John Leppington, of Howden, and Ann Gibson, of Bubwith — at eiiher place. 
Thomas Wainwright, of Rawmarsh, and Dorothy Bloome, of Darfield — at either 

place. 
George Atkinson, of Deighton, and Martha Watson, of St. Laurence, York—at 

either place. 
James Thirgill, of Holy Trinity, Hull, and Alice Ness, of St. Michael-le-Belfrey, 

York,* at either place. 
Robert Colbeck and Elizabeth Marshall, of Felkirk— at Felkirk. 
Anthony Tyne, of Sandal Magna, and Frances Stephenson, of Silkstone — at either 

place. 
William Robinson and Mary Almond, of Cottingham— at Cottingham. 
[390] 
Francis Watson, of Scawby, and Sarah Watson, of Holy Trinity, King's Court, 

York — at either place. 
Abraham Riley and Dorothy Norham, of St. Helen, Stonegate, York— at St. 

Helen. 
William Kendall, of Humbleton, and Constance Hardy, of Hilsion— at either place. 
Francis Ellis, of Kiddall,^ and Alice Lepton, of Stayhouse in Oversilton — at 

Barwick or Oversilton. 
Nicholas Beaumont and Jane Eyre, of Pontefract— at Pontefract, or St. Mary, 

Bishophill senior, York. 

Thomas Wilkinson, of Pontefract, and Susan Moorhouse, of Kirkburton — at Kirk- 
burton. • 

(1) Married there 29 March, 1626. (6) Mayor of Pontefract, 1639. Slain in Pontc- 

(2) Married at Belfrey's, 30 March, 1626. Tract Castle, 1644. She was, according to 
h) Married there 18 April, 1626. Dugdale, daughter of William Morehouse, of 

(4) Married there 17 April. 1626. Symondley, co. Derby. No registers at Kirk- 

(5) Seventh son of John Ellis, of Ktddall, £sq. burton at this date. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



156 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHiEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

1626. 

Henry Watson, of Sutton-in-HoIderness, and Frances Lutton, widow, of Preston- 

in-Holderness— at either place. 
John Burrell, of Hedon, and Agnes Gaul, of Paul— at either place. 
William Dinmore and Alice Bell, of Topcliffe — at Topcliflfe. 
William Lee, of Whitby, and Dorothy Lound (?), of Guisbrough — at either place. 
Lancelot Woodward, of BewIey-in-Helmsley, and Mary Wilson, of Kildale or 

Kirkdale — at either place. 
Paul Winnington, of Birches, and Elizabeth Cutler, of Silkstone* — at Silkstone. 
Thomas Dugard, of Longpreston, and Margaret Carr, widow, of Gargrave— at 

either place. 
Richard Winter, of Rotherham, and Alice Ward, of Brailhwaite-at either place. 
Thomas Fisher and Curtis Lucas, of Londesborough — at Londesborough. 
Robert Nelson, of Leeds, and Ann Jackson, of St. Martin^ Coney Street, York — at 

either place." 
Robert Bridckirk, of St. Laurence, York, and Elizabeth Pulleyne, of Sherbum— at 

either place. 
Matthew Wright, of Heslewood, and Joan Hall, of Bardsey — at either place. 
Jo. Atkinson, of Batiey, and Mary Walker, of Birstall— at either place. 
Thomas Peel, of Bolton-by-Bowland, and Janet Butterfield, of Gisbum — at either 

place. 

[391] ^ ^ 

John Rogers, of Marske, and Elizabeth Duck, of East Barnby, in Lythe — at Lythe 

or Marske. 
Robert Cracherode, now or late of Hemingborough, and Margaret Jobson, widow, 

of South Cave — at South Cave. 
Robert Banks, of Stonegravc, and Ellen Brooke, of Holme-on-Spalding-Moor— at 

either place. 
Robert Whitley and Margaret Culshel (?), of Worsborough — at Worsborough. 
George Rogers, of St. Olave, York, and Dorothy Smith, of Acomb — ^at either 

place 
William Thornton, of St. Michael, Spurriergate, and Sarah Bossall, of St. Denis, 

York— at either church. 
Jo. Linn and Susan Thompson, of Holy Trinity, Hull — ^at Holy Trinity. 
Richard Appleton and Elizabeth Lutton, widow, of Goodmanham — ^at Good- 

manham. 
Edward Thweng, gentleman, of Heworth, and Beatrice Todd, of Over Hemsley — 

at St. Cuthbert, York, or Over Helmsley. 
Thomas Midgley, of Bradford, and Mary Sowden, of Leeds — at either place.' 
William Oust, of Halsham, and Calherine Malson, of Skeckling — at either place. 
John Fothergill and Mary Herbert, widow, of St. Margaret, York— at Sl Margaret. 
William Thompson, of Gisbum, and Bridget Brigg, of Milton — at either place. 
Thomas Nightingale, of Laid ton, and Ann Walker, widow, of Felkirk — at Felkirk. 
Jo. Nicholls, of Baildon, and Mary Sudden, of Bradford — at either place. 
Jo. Holland, of Sheffield, and Ann Botham (?), of Dronfield— at Sheffield. 
William Lupton, of Calverley, and Elizabeth Baynes, of Tong — at either place. 
William Tenison, of Kayingham, and Dorothy Green, of Paul — at either place. 
Michael Knipe, of Harwood, and Bridget Sherlock, of Kirkby Overblow — at either 

place 
William Whittaker, of Bingley, and Elizabeth Wade, of Kildwick — ^at either place.* 

(i) She was daughter of Thomas Cutler, of (2) Not at I^cds. 

Stainborough, by Ellen Rainey, and was (3) Married at Leeds, 15 May, i6a6. 

baptbed at Silkstone, 34 Oct., 1596. (4) Not at Bingley. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



paver's marriage licenses. 157 

1626. 

[392] 

Henry Robinson, of Buckton, and Mary Scudamore, of Holy Trinity, Goodram- 
gate, York — at Holy Trinity. 

Miles Frankland, of Danby, and Judith Frankland, widow, of Spaunton— at either 
place. 

John Whittell and Ann Crowther, of Elland— at Elland.i 

Edward Birkin [? Barckin] , of London, merchant, and Elizabeth Brearey, daughter of 

William Brearey, alderman, of St. John, Micklegate, York — at St. John. * 
Jo. Redman, esq., of Water Fulford, and Jane Claphamson, daughter of Robert 

Claphamson, notary public of St. Martin, Coney Street, York — at Fulford, or 

St. Martin. 
Lionel Rayner, of Birstall, and Elizabeth Walker, of Sandall Magna— at either 

place. 
William Bamford and Elizabeth Brooke, of Huddersfield — at Huddersfield. 
John Riley and Grace Firth, of Elland— at Elland. ^ 
William Howard, son of William, lord Howard, of Hinderskelf-in-Cramb, and 

Mary Cholmley, widow, late of Brafferton, now of Hinderskelf— at Hinderskelf.* 
Richard Curie, of Catterick, and Mary Fauconbridge, of South Otterington — at 

South Otterington. 
John Swainson, of Giggleswick, and Elizabeth Foster, of Clapham — at either 

place. 

Francis Scamonden and Grace Carr, widow, of Barnsley — ^at Bamsley. 

Samuel Winter, of Leeds, and Elizabeth Headiley, of Sprotborough — at either 

place. * 
Robert Walter, of St. Martin, Coney Street, York, and Joan Saule, of Bugthorpe — 

at either place. 
Edward Bolton, of Leeds, and Martha Booth, of Calverley — at either place. • 
John Marshall and Jane Carieil, of Holy Trinity, Hull— at Holy Trinity. 
Robert Lambert and Ann Mooisom, widow, of Holy Trinity, Hull — at Holy 

Trinity.'' 

William Rawdon, of Cawood, and Ellen Nayle, of Bishopthorpe — at Bishopthorpe. 

William Oddy and Elizabeth Coore, of Gisburn — at Gisbum. 

[393] 

George Carr, of Cowick, and Margaret Wcddell, of St. Michael-le-Belfrey, York — 

at St. Michael. 8 
Giles Edney, gentleman, of Etton, and Ann Jackson, of Killingraves — at Etton. 
Matthew Dodsworth, of Settrington, and Agnes Postill, of Kirby — at either place. 
William Lonsdale, of Holme-on-Spalding Moor, and Julian Todd, of Leeds — at 

either place.® 
William Middleton, of Stainburn, and Mary Oddy, of Pateley — at Stainburn. 
Matthew Usher, of Wig [ton], and Ellen Pearson, of Sherburn— at Sherburn. 
Francis Cotton, of St. Martin, Micklegate, York, and Elizabeth Laycock, of Leeds — 

at either place. ^♦^ 
Richard Clarke, of St. John, Beverley, and Helen Wilberfoss, of Walkington — at 

either place. 
William Verey, of St. Mary, Beverley, and Frances Williamson, of St. John, 

Beverley — at St. John. 

(x) Married at Elland, 2a M.iy, x6a6. (5) Not at Leeds. 

U) In DugdaU's Visitation he is called (g) jjot at Leeds. 

Edmund Brasken, a merchant in York. Her ^ C « ,> j » 1 r^. .^ .. ^ 

father was three times Lord Mayor. (7) Sec DugdaUs Visttaiton, p. 367. 

(3) No entry in Elland Register. (8) George Scarr (in Register). Married 31 

(4) Third son of " Belted Will," of Naworth May, 1626. 
Castle. She was daughter of Wm. Hungate, /„) ^^^ ^t Leeds. 

of Saxton, and married first Richard Cholmley, / * w -^ * c. m *• • ic t jc ic 

9f Brandsby, who died s.p., circa 1623. <»^> Earned at St. Martins, 6 June, 2626. 



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158 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

2626. 

William Greenwood and Ann Moorhouse, of Wakefield— at Wakefield. 
John Steele, of Womersley, and Mary Wintringham, of Auston — at Auston. 
William Warde and Ann White, of Guisbrough — at Guisbrough. 
Richard Bowes, of Silkstone, and Jennet Thompson, of Wakefield — ^at ehher place. 
Thomas Serlby, of the archdeaconry of Nottingham, and Mary Mitchell, of 
Ruiston — at Ruiston. 

Jo. Sherbum, of Riccall, and Ann Marshall, of St. Michael-le-Belfrey, York — 

at either place.* 
John Birks and Elizabeth Styring, of Penistone — at Penistone. 
Joseph Tong and Elizabeth Browne, of Woodkirk — at Woodkirk. 
John Micklethwaite, of Penistone, and Dionis Marriott, of Cumberworth — at either 

place. 

Ambrose Greenwood and Elizabeth Sharpe, of Halifax— at Halifax. 

[394] 

William Waite, of Otley, and Mary Bradley, of St. Martin, Micklegate, York — at 

either place.* 
John Plewman, of Skelton, and Elizabeth Cammis, of Rockcliffe— at St. Olave, 

York. 
Edward Harrison, alias Cundall, of Ripon, and Ellen PuUeyne, of St. Helen, 

Stonegate, York— at either place. 
William Banks, of Leckonfield, and Elizabeth Brigham, of St. John, Beverley — at 

either place. 
Ralph Watson, of Helmsley, and Margery Smith, of St. Helen, Stonegate, York — 

at either place. 
William Baynes and Mary Hepworth, of Wakefield — at Wakefield. 
Thomas Baynes, of Wakefield, and Mary Frobisher, of Normanton — at either place. 
William Hird, of Scawby, and Agnes Dring, of Cloughton — at either place. 
John Blackburn, of Darfield, and Margaret Tottington, widow, of Worsbrough — at 

either place. 
William Grange, of Ripon, and Mary Hill, of Farnham— at either place. 
Samuel Lightfoot, of Drypool, and Ellen Browne, of St. Mary, Hull — ^at either 

place. 
Alford Truslove, of Bridlington, and Jane Hill, of Flam borough — at either place. 
Henry Hoyle, clerk. Rector of Sigglesthorne, and Grace Waterhouse, of Sprot- 

borough — at either place. 
John Lambe, of Leathley, and Ellen Mandby, of Harwood— at either place. 
William Skelton and Isabel Ward (? Wood or Wade), of Barkston— at Sherburn. 
[395] 
Thomas Brearcliffe, of Eastrington, in Bardsey," and Grace Pulleyn, of East 

Keswick — at Bardsey or Harwood. 
William Pheasant, of Mexborough, and Alice Firth, of Wath — at either place.' 
Robert Moss, of Menthorpe, and Barbara Watson, of Burythorpe — at Westow or 

Burythorpe. 
James Stirk, of Whiston, and Sarah Rhodes, of Dinnington — at either place. 
George Vaughan, of Sutton, and Isabel Clithero, of Crambe — at Crambe. 
Roger Nicholson, gentleman, late of London, and now of St. Michael-le-Belfrey, 

and Eleanor Haddock, late of Halifax, and now of St. Martin, Coney Street, 

York— at St. Martin or Halifax.* 
Thomas Vaux (?), of St. Crux, York, and Elizabeth Bell, of Escrick— at either 

place. 
Patrick Howell and Margaret Robinson, of Holy Trinity, Goodramgate, York — at 

Holy Trinity. 

(i) Tohn Sheerebume and Ann Maskall. (3) Not at Wath. 

Married Belfrey's, xo June, 1626. (Register.) (4) Not at Halifax. 

(2) Married at St. Martin's, 13 June, 1626. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PAVER^S MARRIAGE LICENSES. 159 

1626. 

Robert Haldenby, of Adlingfleet, and Jane Wilkinson, of Foxholes— at either place. 
John Hodgson, of Bridlington, and Frances Stutt, widow, of St. Nicholas, 

Beverley — at either place. 
William Vevers, of Barwick-in-Elmett, and Jane Hopkinson, of Rothwell — at 

either place. 
John Darby and Ann Bainbrigg, of Helperby — at Brafferton. 
John Gamble and Ann Hartiis, widow, of Coxwold — at Q)xwold. 
Robert Thorpe and Ann Horner, of Sheffield — at Sheffield. 
John Milner, of Ripon, gentleman, and Ann Browne, of Holy Trinity, King's 

Court, York— at Holy Trinity. 
Robert Hayton, of Fulford, and Margaret Marton, widow, of Sutton-upon- 

Dcrwent — at Sutton. 
Edward Hobson, of Brighouse, and .\nn Steven, of Sheffield — ^at Sheffield.^ 
Qement Stephenson, of Thorner, and Mary Freeman, of Bardsey — at either place. 
John Dawson, of Cottingham, and Jane Twist, of St. Olave, York — at either 

flace. 

Robert Chappell, of Barnsley, and Agnes Horsfield, of Kirkheaton — at either place. 
Edward Raper and Isabel Smithson, of Rtpon — at Ripon. 
George Hodgson and Priscilla Thompson, of Scarborough — at Scarborough. 
Francis Parker, of Ripley, and Ann Robinson, of Pateley Bridge — ^at either place. 
James Lumby, of Calverley, and Frances Smithson, of Bradford — at either place. 
John Craven, of St. John, Beverley, and Ann Newhouse, of Holy Trinity, Mickle- 
gate, York— at Holy Trinity. 2 

William Clarkson, of Harpham, and Ann Lister, of Lowthorpe— at Lowthorpe. 

John Teshe, of Harwood, and Ann Leming, of Otley — ^at either place. 

Boniface Silkworth, of Holy Trinity, and Frances Leedam, of St. Mary, Hull— at 

either church. 
Abraham Dyson and Dorothy Crowlher, of Elland — at EUand.^ 
Thomas Matthew and Ann Rudd, of Dar field — at Darfield. 

Thomas Payler (? Paley) and Elizabeth Clapham, of Giggleswick — at Giggleswick. 
William Dickenson, of Sessay, and Bridget Cracroft, of Thormanby— at either 

place. 
Henry Young, of Hebden, and Elizabeth Carleton, of Burnsall— at Linton or 

Bumsall. 
Laurence Browne and Mary Gibson, of Aldbrough — at Aldbrough. 
John Preston and Margaret Iveson, alias Lawson, of Longpreston — at Longpreston. 
Thomas Brandsby, of Kilham, and Pctronel Richardson, of Wharram Percy— at 

either place. 
Walter Laycock, of Leeds, and Elizabeth Droning, of St Ciiix, York— at either 

place.* 

[397] 

Richard Lawson, of Otley, and Ann Campleshon, of St. Michael, Spurriergate, 

York — at either place. 
Daniel Crosley and Mary Barroa, of Stansfield — at Heptonstall. 
Jonas Ainsworth and Frances Jowett, of Bradford — at Bradford.* 
Nicholas Smith and Margery Smith, of Kilbum — at Kilburn. 

(t; Written Edwd H. Ann S., Brighouse p. Wetherby, as his second wife. Mr. NorclifTe 

Shef. says at St. Crux 15 July, 1626. He was Chief 

(3) Married there 4 July, 1626. She was called Aulnager for the Northern Counties, and was 

Newes. buried at Leeds i8 Oct., 1634. They had a 

(3) Married there xa July, 1626. son Walter, who settled at Copmanthorpe. 

(4) According 10 Dugdale, Walter Laycock (5) Written Rradf«i. 
married ElixaMth, daughter of John Wood, of 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



160 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

z6a6. 

Robert Stowpe, of Kirkleaiham, and Mary Bate, of Eston — ^at either place. 
William Jackson, of Aberford, and Jane Wilson, of Sherburn — at Sherburn. 
John Brigg and Phebe Brooksbank, of Halifax — at Halifax. 
Robert Style, of Sutton, and Elizabeth Thompson, of Garforth — at Garforth. 
Thomas Plummer, of St. George, York, and Phillippa Taylor, of Wheldrake — at 

either place. 
Thomas Bell, of Cottingham, and Ann Messenger, of St. Mary, Hull — at St. Mary, 

Hull. 
Thomas Burchill, of Almondbury, and Dionis Crosley, of Penistone — at either place. 
John Lister, of Harwood, and Mary Moss, of I^eds — at either place. ^ 
William Shan and Alice Dent, of Wakefield— at Wakefield. 
Henry Ellis, of Adwick-upon-Dearn, and Elizabeth Childers, of Doncaster — ^at 

either place. 
John Simonit, of Hickleton, and Elizabeth Kaye, of Doncaster — at either place. 
Richard Younge, ol Ellerton, and Unica Wray, of Seaton — ^at Seaton. 
Luke Brensforth and Alice Rose, of Sheffield — at Sheffield. 
Christopher Folherby, of St. Mary, and Grace Harrison, of St, Nicholas, Beverley — 

at either church. 
William Horsley and Bridget Ingleby, of Acklam — at Acklam. 

Thomas Vause [Vaux], of St. Crux, and Susan Sadler, of St. Laurence, York — at 

either church. 
Christopher Strikill, of Preston-in-Holderness, and Mary Wharam (?), of St. Mary, 

Beverley — at either place. 
Thomas Hutton, of Withemsey, and Jane Bird, of Skefling — at either place. 
Ely Wilson and Elizabeth Sunderland, of Halifax — at Halifax. 
John Norwood, of St. Michael-le-Belfrey, and Dorothy Norton, of St. Michael, 

Spurriergate, York— at either church. * 
Samuel Bateson and Grace Bateson, of Guiseley — at Guiseley. 
William Smith, of Ampleford, and Dorothy Phillips, of Oswaldkirk — at either 

place. 
Richard Leyland, of Linton, and Isabel Rathmell, of Oswaldkirk — at Linton or 

Kettlewell. 
Thomas Ridehall, clerk. Curate of Frickley, and Susan Mabson, widow, of the 

same — at Frickley. 
Ezekiel Taylor and Elizabeth Purdon, of Bradford— at Bradford.^ 
Francis Mason, of Croftoii, and Dorothy Sheppard, of Darfield — at either place. 
William Newby, of St. Michael, Spurriergate, and Elizabeth Jennings, of St. 

Cuthbert, York — at either church. 
James Ellerker, of Rowley, and Frances Percy, of Hornsey — at either place. 
Ruben* Wade, of Luddenden, and Barbara Barstow, of Birstall — at either place. 
Henry Wright, of St. John, Micklegate, York, and Susan Hewley, of Acaster 

Malbis — at either place. 
William Appleton, of Goodmanham, and Isabel Barnes, widow, of St. Ma^aret, 

York — at either place. 
Hugh Foddell and Mercy Johnson, of St. Mary, Hull — ^at St. Mary. 
William Portington, of Elloughton, and Margaret Watson, of North Ferriby — at 

either place. 

[399] 

Thomas Coates, of Sutton -upon- Derwent, and Emote Tomlinson, widow, of 
Whitwell— at Sutton. 

Thomas Thrush and Margaret Rogers, of Guisbrough — at Guisbrough. 



... Not at Leeds. (3) Bradf*. 

[a) Not at Belfrey's. (4) Reuben. 



ai 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



paver's marriage licenses. 161 

Z626. 

Simon Dalton, of Huddersfield, and Elizabeth Meller, of Almondbury — at either 

place 
Robert Hird, of St. Michael-le-Belfrcy, and Elizabeth Coward, of St. Olave, 

York — ^at either church. "^ 
Matthew Ainsworth and Susan Deane, of Bradford — at Bradford. 
Thomas Wood, of Spofiforth, and Ann Oglethorpe, of Bramham — at either place. 
Gilbert Dobson, of Rothwell, and Mary Ellison, of Badsworth — at either place. 
Thomas Smith, ofPudsey, and Susan Holdsworth, of Halifax — at Halifax.* 
Christopher Linskell, of St. Mary, Hull, and Elizabeth Pearson, of Ebberston — at 

either place. 
Robert Burton, of Sutton, and Barbara Driffield, of Farlington — at either place 
Thomas Driffield, of Sutton, and Margaret Burton, of Farlington — at either place. 
John Bonfrey, of Iledon, and Beatrice Isaac, of Paul — at either place. 
Richard Meller, clerk, Vicar of Salton, and Isabel Williamson, of Kirkham — at 

Kirkham. 
John Prince, of Garforth, and Frances Browne, of Whitkirk — at either place. ^ 
William Brocklebank, of Welton, and Elizabeth Pondei-son, of Swanland — ^at 

Ferriby. 

Stephen Barrett and Maud Lambe, of Kildwick — at Kildwick. 

Matthew Nicholson and Isabel Dickenson, of Halifax — ^at Halifax.* 

Henry Gamble, of Northallerton, and Catherine Bell, of Topcliffe — at either place 

[400] 

Christopher Clarke and Mary Browne, of St. Michael -le- Bel frey, York — at S . 

Michael. *• 
John Farrer and Elizabeth Walker, of Birstall— at Birstall. 
Edward Whitehead and Sithe Heighley, of Leak — ^at Leak. 
James Williamson, clerk, of Crake, and Ann Huddlesey, of St. Crux, York — at St. 

Crux. 
Anthony Roberts and Elizabeth Moore, of Woolley — at Woolley. 
John Bamforth, of Halifax, and Mary Bentley, of Haworth — at either place. • 
Robert Colthurst, of Welbury, and Elizabeth Cayley, of Brompton — ^at either 

place. 
John Rawson, of Preston, and Helen Erratt, of Dry pool — at either place. 
John Swift, of Wakefield, and Judith Hanson, of Elland— at EUand.' 
Thomas Geldart, of Calverley, and Susan Ramsden, of Leeds — at either place.® 
Edward Hoopes, of St. Helen, Stonegate, York, and Jane Lincoln, widow, of 

Lofthouse — at Loft house. 
Peter Sturtivell, of Wawne, and Mary Hartus, of Ulram — at either place. 
Richard Musgrave, esq., of Wickham, and Dame Elizabeth Tancred, widow, of 

Hawnby — at either place. 
John Micklethwaite, of Penistone, and Elizabeth Coldwell, of Bradfield — at either 

place. 
Henry Rawlings, of London, and Frances Ryder, of Whitkirk — ^at Whitkirk. 
Marmaduke Langdale, esq., of Cherry Burton, and Lenox Rhodes, of St. Michael- 

le-Belfrey, York— at St. Michael. « 
Thomas CoUey, of Bainton, and Frances Swire, of Agnes Burton — at Bainton. 

(i) Not at Belfrey's. (7) Married at Elland, 19 Sept., 1636. She 

(j^i Married there ^r Auir 1626 ^** baptised there 21 May, 1508, being 

yl „ "".^^ 1^.\ . "^'^ f' , , daughter of Thomas Hanson, of Brighouse. 

(3) Married at Whitkirk, 22 Aug., 1626. ^sT Not at Leeds. 

(4) Married there 36 Aug., 1626. (9) Sir Marmaduke Langdale created Lord 
is) Married there 24 Sept., 1626. cu"^'^*'*'^ '^^S- The Royalist Commander, 
/fv %. . J T, ,.r XT < ^ She was daughter of Sir John Rodes, of Bari- 
(6) Married at Halifax, 11 Nov., 1626. borough, co. Derby. They were married 13 

Sept. 
VOL. XVII. L 



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162 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHiEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

z6a6. 

John Hudson and Judith Shackleton, of Keighley — at Keighley. 
James Dodsworth, of Barmston, and Dorothy Stonehouse, of Whitby — at Whitby. 
[401] 

Robert Watson^ of Halifax, and Alice Firth, of Cumberworth — at either place. 
Robert Miles, of East Harlsey, and Barbara Williamson, of Nunthorpe — at Nun- 

thorpe. 
John Hall and Dlonis Brooke, of Birstall — at Birstall. 
Robert Hewitt, of Ackworth, and Grace Dixon, of St. Sampson, York — at either 

place. 
James Spooner and Mary Bell, widow, of Ripon — at Ripon. 
Richard Wrey, of St. Margaret, York, and Mary Dennis, of Kirkby Wharfe — at 

either place. 
Anthony Wiggles worth, of Kirkby Overblows, and Catherine Sherlock, of St. 

Helen, Stonegate, York— at Sl Helen. 
Ralph Grundy and Isabel Barton, widow, of Yarm — at Yarm. 
William Hudson, of St. Crux, and Mary. Hardy, widow, of St. Denis, York — 

at either church. 
Roger Trivie and Catherine Townend, of Tankersley — at Tankersley. 
Edmund Moorhouse and Ellen Wilkinson, of Louthersall* — at Louthersall. 
Thomas Coventry, gentleman, of Lythe, and Helen Tomlinson, widow, of Holy 

Trinity, Goodramgate, York — at Holy Trinity.^ 
William Gray, clerk. Vicar of North Grimsby, and Petronel Richardson, of 

Wharram Percy — ^at Wharram Percy. 
John Britton and Grace Lumley, of St. Helen, Stonegate, York — at St. Helen. 
Thomas Clithero, of Stillingfleet, and Elizabeth Healey, of Holy Trinity, Good- 
ramgate, York — ^at either place. 
Michael Whcwell, of Birstall, and Alice Balguy, of Bradfield — at either place. 
Bartholomew Parkinson and Ann Wreste, of Gargrave — ^at Gargrave. 
Robert Bowcock, of Clitheroe, and Dorothy Lacey, of Bracewell — at either place. 
Matihew Talboyes and Ann Browne, of Guisbrough — at Guisbrough. 
[402] 
Edmund Kaye, clerk, of Wakefield, and Elizabeth Hill, widow, of Ruiston — at 

either place. 
William Favour, of London, and Priscilla Wade, of Wakefield — ^at Wakefield. 
George Wentworth, gentleman, of WooUey, and Averil Maltby, of Cottingham — at 

Royston or Cottingham.^ 
Robert Hardy, of Tolthorpe, and Isabel Morwin, of Etton — at South Wharome or 

Etton. 
William Drew, of Holy Trinity, Hull, and Elizabeth Goodwin, of Cottingham— at 

either place. 
Thomas Crooke, of SpofTorth, and Elizabeth Atkinson, of Hampsthwaite — at either 

place. 
Jo. Blackburn, of Darfield, and Isabel Hemsworth, of Whitkirk — at Whitkirk.* 
John Rayner, of Ecclesfield, and Elizabeth Tempest, of St. Mary, Castlegate, 

York— at Bradford or St. Mary, Castlegate. « 
Thomas Favell and Jane Flower, widow, of Methley — at Methley.* 
Edward Horsley, of St. Helen, Stonegate, and Mary Simpson, of St. John, 

Micklegate, York — at either church. 

^i> Query Loversall. daughter of Christopher Maltby, of Maltby, 

(3) She was daughter of Matthew Dodsworth. near Yarm. She died 9 Sept., 1639 (See 

Chancellor to the Archbbhop of York, and Yorkshire ArchaologiceU jourttal^ xxx^ ^^), 

S?^*''^'*^. f^^l" Dodsworth, the Antiquary ( j Married there 4 Oct., i6a6. 

Her first husband was John lomlinson, of , C «, . . « T, V, . . . 

York, who died 16x7. (s) Married at St. Mary, Castlegate, 30 April, 

(3) Second wife of Sir George Wentworth. '^^7- 

She was generally called Everild, and was (6) Married at Methley, 34 Oct., 1626. 



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paver's marriage licenses. 163 

Z626. 

Richard Vevers and Agnes Toolhill, of Barwick — at Barwick. 

Edward Barber, of Ecclesfield, and Ellen Coldwell, of Bradfield — at either place. 

Thomas Long, of St. Helen, Stonegate, and Dorothy Dinson (?), of St. Sampson, 
York — at either church. 

Hugh Nutt, of Ecclesfield, and Ann Barnsley, of Sheffield — at either place. 

William Crooke and Elizabeth Foster, widow, of Weston — at Weston. 

Jo. Stockdale, of St. Michael-le-Belfrey, and Sibel Brearey, of St. Helen, Stone- 
gate, York — at either church. ^ 

Jo. Chamberlain and Frances CoUinson, of Rothwell — at Rothwell.^ 

William Carleil and PhiIippa*Millington, of Holme-on-Spalding Moor — at Holme- 
on-Spalding-Moor. 

[403] 

Robert Armytage, of Birstall, and Elizabeth Legard, of Bradford — at either place. 

Martin Hodgson, of Drypool, and Susan Hodgson, of Hornsea — at either place. 
John Silliman, of Leeds, and Grace Casson, of Tadcaster — at either place. ^ 
Gilbert Gates and Elizabeth Hirst, of Sheffield— at Sheffield. 
Sir Richard Hutton, of Goldsborough, knt., and Margaret Wentworth, of Went- 

worth Woodhouse — at Wentworth.* 
Henry Lake, of Hunsworth, and Jane Hancock, widow, of Whitkirk — at Whitkirk. * 
William Baldwin, of Marton, and Ellen Fox, widow, of Fewston — ^at either place. 
Ralph Calverley, of Kippax, and Ellen CoUett, of Methley — at either place. • 
Stephen Armistead, of Giggleswick, and Janet Clarke, of Kirkby Malham — ^at 

either place. 
Abraham Hinchcliffe, of Leeds, and Ellen Purdie, of Whitkirk — at Leeds.'' 
Leonard Sooley, of Carlton, and Elizabeth Miles, of East Harlsey — at either place. 
Richard Pursglove, of Tidswell, co. Derby, and Mary Hanson, of Silkstone — at 

Silkstone. 
Thomas MickleBeld, of North Cave, and Ann Tomlin (?), of Eastrlngton — at 

either place. 
William Birkby and Thomasin Carleil, of Holy Trinity, Hull — at Holy Trinity. 
Francis Wright, of Bolton-upon- Swale, and Ann Meryton, of Kirk Leavington — at 

either place.** 
Thomas Tancred, esq., of Marton, and Meriol Besse, widow, of Copgrave — at 

either place. 
Peter Jackson, of Guiseley, and Ann Baynes, of St. Helen, Stonegate, York — at 

either place. 
Jo. Scott, of Penistone, and Ann Rawson, of Tankersley — at either place. 
Thomas Storey, of St. Michael-le-Belfrey, and Mary Campleshon, of St. Michael, 

Spurriergate, York — ^at either church. ° 

[404] 

Thomas Palliser, of Knaresborough, and Frances Snadall, of St. Saviour, York — 

at St. Saviour's. 
Hunte Nesfield, of Folkton, and Jane Consett, of Speton — at Speton. 
John Milner, of Langtoft, and Jane Lister, of Frodingham — ^at either place. 
Charles Cowper and Ann Earle, widow, of St. Cuthbert, York — at Scrayingham. 
Thomas Haworth and Mary Heslerton, of Sheriff Hutton — at Sheriff Hutton. 
William Wade and Martha Turner, of Luddenden — at Halifax or Luddenden. 

(i) Not at Belfrey's. (s) M.irried there a8 Oct, i6a6. 

(a) Married there 10 Oct., 1626. (5) Nq^ ^t Kippax. 

(3) Mamed at Leeds, 19 Oct., 1626. y v xt t j 

(4) High Sheriff of Yorkshire, 1642. Slain at V7) Not at Leeds. 

Sherbum, 15 Oct., 1645. She was daughter of (8) Son of Francis Wright, of Bolton-oii- 

Sir William Wentworth, and sister of the great Swale. She was daughter of George Meryton, 

Earl of Strafford. They were married 17 Oct., D.D., Dean of York (^tc Du^daU's Visitation). 

1626, (9) Not at St. Michael-le-Belfrey. 



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164 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

Z626. 

John Saville, esq., late of the Middle Temple, and now of Methley, and Mary 

Robinson, of Rothwell — at either place.* 
Robert Gates, gentleman, of Seamer, and Heleanor Mompesson, of Willerby — at 

either place. 
Richard Wood and Ann Bellamy, of Hansley — at Hansley, 

John Bailey, of Mitton, and Margaret Crumbleholme, of Chippin — at either place. 
Christopher Gale, of Cundall, and Frances Rounthwaite, of Ripon — at either place. 
Abraham Duffield and Frances Duffield, of RijTon — at Ripon. 
Lionel Mitchell, of Penistone, and Alice Catling, of Silkstone — at either place. 
Abraham Lockwood, of Kirkburton, and Grace Smithies, of Elland — ^at either 

place. ^ 
James Melthorpe and Isabel Crambie, of Pontcfract — at Pontefract. 
Ralph Beaumont, of Sprotbrough, and Elizabeth Waterhouse, of Doncaster — at 

either place. 

Edward Greenhood, of Riston, and Elizabeth Cowper, of Hornsea — at either place. 

Henry Wilcock, of Thornton, and Mary Wainman, of Gargrave — ^at either place. 

John Bryan and Mary Foster, of Hutton-on-hill — ^at Hutton. 

[405] 
Thomas Siddall, of Tadcaster, and Joan Walker, of St. Mary Bishophill junior, 

York — at either place. 
Christopher Fountaynes, of St. Sampson, York, and Margaret Lazenby, of 

Escrick — at either place. 
Anthony Goodwin, of Rawmarsh, and Ann Badger, of Rotherham — at either 

place. 
Robert Chambers, of CoUingham, and Ann Penvause, of All Saints*, Pavement, 

York — at either place. 
James Robinson and Alice Hogg, of Holy Trinity, Hull — at Holy Trinity. 
Henry Shaw, of Cowlne (?), and Judith Field, of East Ardsley — at East Ardsley.* 
Thomas Pearson, clerk, of Catton, and Thomasin Webster, of Bossall — at Bossall. 
William Martin, of Ottrington, and Ann Sigsworth, of Brompton — at either place. 
Thomas Blacker, of Thornhill, and Elizabeth Atkinson, of Sandal Magna — at 

either place. 
Gilbert Cowper, of Leeds, and Deborah Bubwith, of Rothwell — at Rothwell.* 
William Bcnolt and Isabel Kitching, of Caton — at Caton. 
William Ashburner, of Si. Michael-le-Belfrey, York, and Margaret Lister, of 

Stoncgrave— at Stonegrave. 
Robert Pighills and Ann Broadley, of Halifax — at Halifax.'' 
Andrew Gill and Janet EUiston, widow, of Halifax — at Halifax.* 
William Dickenson and Jane Whiteside, of Holy Trinity, Hull — at Holy Trinity. 
Richard Hutchinson and Elizabeth Wilkinson, of Keyingham — at Keyingham. 
Richard Riley, of Fenton, and Janet Peel, of Saxton — at either place. 
George Jubb and Ann Wilson, of Hickleton — at Hickleton. 
Christopher Higgins and Agnes Walton, of Birnoldswick — at Barnoldswick. 
[406] 

William Scurr, of Scawton, and Jane Consett, of Hovingham — at either place. 
Henry Edwards and Margaret Smithson, of Scorbrough — at Scorbrough. 
William Smith, of Cawood, and Jane Shann, of Methley — at either place. 

(0 High Sheriff, 1647. Baptised at Elland, (2) Not at Elland. 

of John Robinson, Esq., of Rither, 7th Nov., , v w • j i. ^ -..t 

i6a6. She was buried at Methley, 7 May, (4) Mamed there 16 Nov., 1626. 

1636. Her children died young; and from a (5) Married there 29 Jan., 1626-7. 

eS° of 'M«b?rou°V"K'scenlK "'''■'' ^^"^ ^''''**"' ^^^ Married there 5 Feb., 1626-7. 



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paver's marriage licenses. 165 

1626. 

Matthew Yeoman, of Whitby, and Elizalxjth Martin, of St. Cuthbert, York— ^t 

either place. 
Francis Petty, of Kildwick, and Margaret Simpson, of Skipton— at either place. * 
Laurence Pickard and Jane Lawson, of Harwood — at Harwood. 
Thomas Adamson and Mary Greenside, of Bilsdale — at Helmsley. 
John Scurr and Alice Cooke, of Pontefract — at Pontefract. 
John Little, of Seathorne, and Frances Spence, of Hutton Cranswick — at either 

place. 
William Martin and Mary Wilkinson, of Husthwaite— at Husthwaite. 
George Jackson, of St. Mary Bishophill senior, York, and Effam Browne, of 

Buckton-in-Bridlington — at St. Mary or Bridlington. 
Gilbert Meeke, of Lund, and Audrey Leake, of Hoi me-on- the- Wolds — ^at either 

place. 
Guy Taylor, of Drax, and Ann Tatham, of Pontefract — at Pontefract, 
James Burnett, clerk, of Holy Trinity, Hull, and Elizabeth Barnard, of Hessle — at 

either place. 
William Latham and Margaret Booth, of Whitkirk— at Whitkirk. 
Richard Birdsall and Isabel Priestman, of Thornton -in- Pickering — at Thornton. 
Nicholas Hodgson, of Wakefield, and Barbara Heather, of Warmfield — at either 

place. 
Hugh Hirst, of Darrington, and Elizabeth Moore, widow, of Pontefract — ^at either 

place. 
William Bulterwick, of Ecclesfield, and Mary Huddersley, of Bradfield — at either 

place. 
[407] 
Hugh Dunch and Jane Kirsse, of Skeckling — ^at Skeckling. 

Sir Thomas Fairfax, of Gilling, knt., and Dame Mary Bamburgh, widow, of 

Howsham — at either place. ^ 
Richard Tempest, of Bailey, and Ann Frank, widow, of Harwood — at either 

place. 
William Spawton, of Holy Trinity, King's Court, and Alice Owston, of St. 

Maurice, York — at either church. 
William Wade and Mary Midgley, of Halifax — at Halifax. 
William Riley, of St. Michael-le-Belfrey, York, and Mary Coyne, of Overton — at 

Overton. 
Alexander Crispin, of Holy Trinity, Hull, and Dorcas Somerscoates, of Scar- 
borough — at Scarborough. 
Robert Wrathoe aiias Tailforth, of Cawood, and Jane Cooke, of Riccall — at either 

place. 
Robert Hudson, of Whitby, and Thomasin Strangwayes, of Oswaldkirk — at either 

place. 
Richard Beswick, of Seamer, and Ann Pawston, widow, of Wold Newton — ^at 

either place. 
William Taylor, of Skirpenbeck, and Sarah Whitwell, of Scrayingham — at Skir- 

penbeck. 
William Hudson, of Easingwold, and Mercy Carter, of Linton-upon-Ouse — at 

either place. 
Christopher Jackson, of St. Laurence, York, and Ann Wallis, of Holy Trinity, 

Hull — at St. Laurence. 
William Willoughby, of Acomb, and Mary Stephenson, of Holy Trinity, Mickle- 

gate, York— at Holy Trinity. ^ 

(i) Not at Skipton. lent., widow of Sir William Hamburgh, and is 

(a) Created Feb. 10, 1628, Viscount Fairfax, said to have died 33 March, 1638-^. 

of Enilcy, co. Tipperary. Died 1636. She was . v 1., . 

his second wife, daughter of Sir Robert Ford, (3) No entry there. 



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166 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

1636. 

Marmaduke Wilson, of North Deighton, and Ann Ramsden, of Almondbury — ^at 

either place. 
[408] 
William Bennet, of and Ann Clibume, of St. Martin, Micklegate, York — 

at St. Martin. 1 
William Crispin and Mary Harrison, of St. Mary, Hull — at St. Mary. 
Robert Pilkington and Jane Lambert, of Foston — at Foston. 
Ralph Greenside, of Kirkby-in-Cleveland, and Ann Scarth, of Hutton Rudby — at 

cither place. 
Bryan Fauconer and Sibcl Wright, of I^eds—at Leeds.'* 
Nathaniel Grantham, clerk, and Christobclla Hanson, of Rudston — at Rudston. 
John Eastwood and Rosamund Hey, of Heptonstall— at Heptonstall. 
Thomas Hewson, of Kihiwick-on-the-Wolds, and Emote Jefferson, of Warter— at 

either place. 
Gilbert Didsbsrry, of Aston, and Jane Turlon, of Treeton — at either place. 
Wilbred Anderson, of Thirkleby, and Mai-garet Trewman, of St. Michael, Spurrier- 
gate, York- -at St. Michael. 
William Tempcron and Grace Smith, of Carnaby —at Carnaby. 
Thomas Johnson, of Bridlington, and Dorothy Yates, of Boynton — at either place. 
John Bovill, of Naburn, and Elizabeth Charlton, of Fulford — at Fulford. 
Nicholas Booker and Frances Wilson, of Halifax — at Halifax.' 
Robert Woodall and Ann Powell, of Scarborough — ^at Scarborough. 
John Rayner, of Woodkirk, and Grace Keighley, of Birsiall— at either place. 
Stephen Harrison, of Kirkburn, and Margaret Hauley (?), of Great Driffield — ^at 

Kirkburn. 
Peter Man and Elizabeth Man, of Holy Trinity, King's Court, York at Holy 

Trinity. 

James lies, of Leeds, and Mercy Booth, of Calverley— at either place.* 

James Robinson and Elizabeth Marlden, of Wakefield — at Wakefield. 

[409] 

Richard Batley, of Bardsey, and Euphemia Benton, of SpolTorth — at either place. 

Robert Croft, of Methley, and Jane Calverley, of Roihwell— at either place.* 

William Heeles, of Burnsall, and Isabel Favell, of Linton— at either place.** 

Edward Banks and Ann Henlay (?), of Sheffield — at Sheffield. 

Nicholas Wolfe, of Bridlington, and Alice Haxby, of Wheldrake — ^at either place. 

Robert EUerker, of Brantingham, and Mary Collinson, of St. Nicholas, York — at 

either place. 
William Woodhead, of Penistone, and Dorothy Lockwood, of Tankersley — at 

either place. 
William Hard wick, of St. Crux, and Elizal>eth Taylor, of St. Margaret, York — at 

St. Crux. 
James Pearson, of Calverley, and Sarah Lilly, of Baildon— at either place. 
Robert Ryder, of Escrick, and Ann Fawcett, of Normanby — at Normanby. 
Charles Tancred, of Arden, gentleman, and Elizal^eth Crosland, of Helmsley — at 

Helmsley. ' 
Francis Goyfaite and Helen Hornby, of Thirsk — at Thirsk. 
James Baynes, of Clapham, and Elizabeth Remington, of Giggleswick — at either 

place. 

(1) Mr. Wm. Bennet, "preacher of godes (5) Married at Rothwell, 8 Jan., 1626-7. 
woord," and Mrs. Ann Clibborn, married 8 (6) Not at Burnsall. Marriages at Linton 
Dec, 1626. missing for this year. 

(2) No entry in Leeds Register. (7) Daughter of John Crosland Baptised at 

(3) M.irried there 31 Jan., 1626-7. Helmsley 15 Jan. 161 1-12. Married there 16 

(4) Not at Leeds. Jan., 1626-7. 



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paver's marriage licenses. 167 

Z626. 

George Baxter and Emote Rotsey, widow, of Foston — ^at Foston. 

George Tweene, of Holy Trinity, and Ann Spindalow, of St. Mary, Hull— at 

either church. 
Thomas Smales, of St. Nicholas, Beverley, and Frances Hammond, of South 

Cave— at cither place. 
Thomas Wright, of Sandal Magna, and Judith Baldson, of Hutton Roberts— at 

either place. 
Richard Cowper, of Halifax, and Ann Rishton, of Church Church (sic)— At either 

place. 
[410J 
Thomas Mercer, of Uglebarnby, and Ellis Shiming, widow, of Egton — at either 

place. 
Robert Bullock and Elizabeth Hopperton, of Hovingham — at Hovingham. 
Henry Simpson and Janet Fletcher, of Bilton — ^at Billon. 

William Waller, of Middlethorpe, and Elizabeth Redman, of Fulford— at Fulford. 
Thomas Nelson, of Cottingham, and Dorothy Stapleton, of All Saints', North 

street, York— at All Saints'. 
George Whitton, of Kirk Leavington, and Elizabeth Best, of Birkby — at either 

place, 
llkomas Stephenson and Julian Belgravc, of Londeslwrough — at Londesborough. 
Robert Dibb and Isabel Dunwell, of Kirkby Overblows — at Kirkby. 
John Laister and Elizabeth Vevers, of Rothwell — at Rothwell.* 
Edward Porter and Ann Paul, of Nafferton — at Nafferton. 

John Warde, of Middleham, and Dorothy Grant, of Aplisthorpe — at either place. 
Anthony Shiming and Isabel Huntress, of Filingdales — at Fih'ngdales. 
George Dunnington and Margaret Flint, of Holy Trinity, Micklegate, York— at 

Holy Trinity. 2 

Francis Lassells, of Stank, and Frances St. Quiniin, of Foulton — at Foulton.' 
Matthew Flather and Isabel Pickard, of Leeds — at Leeds.* 

Henry Fairfax, clerk. Rector of Ashton-under-Lyne, and Mary Cholmlcy, of Su 
Helen, Stonegate, York— at St. Helen. « 

[411] 

Henry Grice, of Sandal Magna, and Mary Ramsden, of Kirkheaton— at either 

place. 
William Birkell, junior, of Mapleton, and Jane Carleton, widow, of Hornsea — at 

either place. 
John Wilson, of Seaton, and Margaret Eiherington, of Great DriflSeld — at Great 

Driffield. 
Michael Godley and Sarah Turner, of Elland — at Elland or Halifax.* 
William Gofton and Elizabeth Thompson, of Guisbrough — at Guisbrough. 
Thomas Poplewell, of Hull, and Elizabeth Hadlesey, of Beeford — at Beeford. 
Francis Simpson and Barbara Bclgrave, of Elloughton — at Elloughton, 
Laurence Wade and Ann Abson, of Bolton-upon-Dearne — at Bolton. 
Francis Lee and Frances Myers, of Halifax — at Halifax.^ 
William Cuthbert, of Drypool, and Catherine Humphreys, of Holy Trinity, 

Hull — at either place. 
Thomas Whelpdale, of Garton, and Alice Rooc, of Holy Trinity [Hull] —at either 

place. 

(1) John Laciter and Eliz. Vevers, married (5) Son of Thomas, first Lord Fairfax. He 
there 5 Feb., 1626-7. was successively Rector of Ashton, Newton 

(2) Married there 20 Jan., 1626-7. Kyme ai»d Bolton Percy. Buried in the latter 
) . . , !_ T^ , , XT J ou church, 1665. She was daughter of Sir Henry 

(3) Ancestor of the Earl of Harewood. She cholmley, of Roxby. They were married 4 Feb., 
was the daughter of Sir W. St. Quintin, and was 1626-7 

buried at Kirkby Sigston 30 Sept., 1658. (5) Married at Elland, 3T March, 1627. 

(4) Not at Leeds. (7) Married there 29 Jan., 1626-7. 



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168 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

Z626. 

Richard Kirkby, of Helperthorpe. and Elizabeth Tyndale, of North Grimston— at 

North Grimston. 
Richard Fall, of St. Michael, Spurriergate, and Ann Frost, of All Saints*, Pave- 
ment, York — at either church. 
George Frear, of Coxwold, and Ann alias Agnes Atkin, of Carlton Husthwaite — 

at either place. 
John Winchester and Alice Beck, of Holy Trinity, Hull— at Holy Trinity. 
James Best, senior, of Holy Trinity, Hull, and Elizabeth Wylde, widow, of 

Beverley — at Holy Trinity. 
John Pybus and Elizabeth Neville, of St. Crux, York— at St. Crux. 
Christopher Tempest, of Tong, and Ann Thompson, of Addle — at Birstall or 

Addle. 1 
Edward Gray, of Holy Trinity, King's Court, York, and Elizabeth Haldenby, of 

Swinefleet — at Swmefleet. 
[412] 
James Maw, of Wharram Percy, and Elizabeth Morwin, of Sledmere— at 

Sled mere. 
Thomas Midgley and Mary Linley, of Hsilifax — at Halifax." 
John Barwick and Mary AUanson, of Ripon — at Ripon. 
Peter Scagglethorpe, of Skipwith, and Margaret Curtis, widow, of Stanley — at 

Stanley. 
George Stowe and Isabel Illingworth, of Halifax — at Halifax. 
Christopher Perchey, of Ryton, and Frances Strickland, of Boynton — at Boynton.* 
Francis Dickins and Elizabeth Robson, of Barton-le-Street — at Barton. 
Richard Tatton (? Tatham), of Pontefract, and Mary Skipton, of Darrington — at 

either place. 
Richard Richardson and Susan Swayne, of Bradford — at Bradford. 
William Taylor, of Towthorpe, and Ellen Morwin, of Sledmere — ^at Sledmere. 
Robert Wellock and Ann Seward, of Linton — at Linton. 
Christopher Topham, of St. Martin, Micklegate, York, and Elizabeth Chambers, of 

St. Mary, Hull— at St. Mary. 
John Saville, of Lupsett, esq., and Elizabeth Armytage^ of Hartshead— at Harts- 
head or Birstall.^ 
Peter Hessell and Ann Blithe, of Ellerton— at Ellerton. 
Guy Nesfield, of Snainton, and Pelronel Hobman, widow, of Brompton — at 

Snainton. 
Thomas Waterhouse, of Halifax, and Elizabeth Greenwood, of Bradford — at 

Bradford. 
John Hustler, of St. Michael, and Elizabeth Pape, of St. Leonard, New Malton— 

at either church. 

Thomas Dal ton, of Holy Trinity, Hull, and Ellen Smales, of St. Mary, Beverley— 

at either place. 
Thomas Craggs, of Brewell (?), and Catherine Amcotte, of Tickhill— at Brewell. 
[413] 

Timothy Hookes and Jane Williamson, widow, of St. Michael-le-Belfrey, York — 
at St. Michael." 

John Heath, of Holy Trinity, Hull, and Margaret Kcll, of North Cave— at either 
place. 

(i) Second son of Richard Tempest, Esq., of (4) Younger son of Sir George Savile, of 

Tong. Baptised there 12 Jan., 1608. No mar- Thornhill, Hart. Knighted aa Tune, 1627. 

riage in Adcl Register. High Sheriff 16^9. Buried at Horbury 8 May, 

(2) Married there 4 Feb., 1626-7. 1660. She was daughter of Sir John Armytage, 

(3) Son of Thomas Pcrcehay Esq., of Ryton. of Kirklces. They were married at Hartshead 
He appeared at Dugdale's Visitation in 1665. 4 Feb., 1626-7. 

She was daughter of W.-ilter Strickland Esq., ^ x «, . . « .i- . .^ 1 

of Boynton. (s) Married at Bclfrcy.^, 15 Feb., 1626-7. 



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paver's marriage licenses. 169 

1626. 

Anthony Norton, gent., of Scruton, and Margaret Duflfield, widow, of Bolton-upon- 

Swale — at either place. 
Weddell, clerk, of Burton Leonard, and Jane Houseman, of Stillinglon — 

at Stillington. 
Rowland Eyre, clerk, Rector of Leven, and ^Frances Bell, dau. of Thomas Bell, 

clerk, Rector of Beeford — at Beeford. 
Andrew Key and Helen Spendley (?), of Settrington — at Settrington. 
John Woodhead, of Bradfield, and Joan Haigh, of Wath — at either place. 
John Middlewood and Mary Poole, of Drax — at Drax. 
Robert Metcalfe, of St. Michael-le-Belfrey, and Cecily Metcalfe, of Holy Trinity, 

King's Court, York — at either church.^ 
Godfrey Petley, clerk. Minister of Rosedale, and Alice Watson, of Rosedale — at 

Rosedale. 

Lancelot Dodsworth, of Ix)ndesborough, and Mary Catterson, of Skipton — at 
Skipton.2 

Robert Newton, of Norton, and Jane Dobson, late of Sinnington, and now of 

Westow — at Westow. 
Henry Hoyle and Hester Fournes, of Bradford — at Bradford. 
Lancelot Dawson, of Calverley, and Ellen Buck, of Bradford, widow — at either 

place. 
Francis Banks, of Beeford, and Isabel Meeke, of Skipsea — at either place. 
Samuel Booker and Isabel Mallinson, of Halifax — at Halifax.* 
John Storey, of St. Mary, Hull, and Ann Tyler, of Sculcoates — at either place. 
William Duckin, of St. John, Beverley, and Jane Clithero, of Atwick — at either 

place. 
Marmaduke Robinson and Priscilla Thornhill, of Holy Trinity, Hull — at Holy 

Trinity. 

[414] 

Thomas Sherowe, of Topcliffe, and Elizabeth Hutchinson, of Watlass — at either 

place. 
Joseph Thorpe and Janet Firbank, widow, of Halifax — at Halifax. 
Thomas Fowler, of Kildwick, and Dinah Brigge, of Halifax — ^at either place. 
Robert Rhodes, of Dewsbury, and Ellzal^eth Bingley, of Thornhill — at either place.* 
Gabriel Merrick and Mary Smith, widow, of Oswaldkirk — ^at Oswaldkirk. 
Hugh Ripley, alderman, of Ripon, and Mary Darby, widow, of Ripon — at Ripon. 
William Powell and Christobella Dickinson, of Scarborough — at Scarborough. 
Thomas Burton, of St. Dennis, and Magdalen I^dge, of St. Nicholas, York— at St. 

Nicholas. 
Henry Barker, of St. Mary, Castlcgate, York, and Mary Carr, of Almondbury — at 

Almondbury. 
Robert Wood, junior, of Bradford, and Sarah Walker, of Crofton — ^at either place. 
Matthew Potter, of St. Crux, and Elizabeth Atkinson, widow, of St. Michael, 

Spurriergate, York — at either church. 

1627. 

Edmund Clough, esq., of Whitkirk, and Dame Miirgarct Ellis, widow, of St. 
Olave, York— at St. Olave.^ 

(i) Married at Bclfrey's, 34 Feb., 1626-7. U) Married at Dewsbury, 22 March, 1626-7. 

(2) There must have been some hitch here, w^^) Of Thorp |*^P*!'?"' '1 *?* ^"^^ ""^ 
as there is no maniagc entry in the Register ^ 7- '^ ^r"/ £''^"^S:^°"^*'t^***-' ^"^*'" 
On II May. 1627, we find-" Bapt. Ann, ?^ ^!?2 * m"^^ Earned first-Frances, daugh- 
the daugh. of Lanclat Dodsworth, fiegoten in IVo^l^T a ^^^^^"V u ^**?"' *«»"J^y- 
fornication uppon the bodie of Mary Catterson, !?,f P^'^- ^JJ^S^ter of Roger Lepton, Esq., 
widdow " "5"^' ™ Sir George Ellis. She was afterwards 

married to George Anby (Thoresby's Ducatus 

(3) Married there 25 April, 1627. Leodiensis^ 225). (A.S.E.) 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



170 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH-ffiOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

Z627. 

Joseph Micklethwaite, of Holy Trimly, Micklegate, and Ann Topham, of St. 

Martin, Micklegate, York — at either church.^ 
Adam Hilton and Susan Binns, of Halifax — at Halifax. 
Robert Burgoyne and Agnes Stoups, of Swine — at Swine. 

C415] 
John Taylor alias Prince, and Margaret Nodder, of Kippax — at Kippax.^ 

Edward Haigh and Hesther Lindley, widow, of Woodkirk — ^at Woodkirk. 

Jo. .West, of Firbeck, and Frances Hodgson, of Leeds — at either place. ^ 

William Birkby and Maiy Walker, of Birstall— at Birstall. 

William Craven, of Middlesmoor, and Elizabeth Clifton, widow, of Ripon — at 

either place. 
William Turton and Elizabeth Barber, widow, of Sheffield— at Sheffield. 
Philip NichoUs, of Holy Trinity, Hull, and Catherine Wittie, of Middleton-on-the- 

Wolds — at either place. 
William Brooksbank and Sarah Lister, of Bradford — at Bradford. 
John Pennock, mariner {ttauta), and Ann Johnson, of St. Mary, Hull — at St. 

Mary. 
William More, of Tadcaster, and Mary Bracebridge, widow, of Brayton — at either 

place. 
Simeon Waterhouse, of Thornhill, and Dorothy Bingley, of St. Helen, Stonegate, 

York — ^at either place. 
Robert Wright and Margaret Rawson, of Kighley — at Kighley. 
Thomas Sharrow, of Kilbum, and Dorothy Sigsworth, widow, of Raskelf— at either 

place. 
John Stamper, of Westow, and Alice Fawcett, of Terrington — at either place. 
William Watkin, of Darrington, and Catherine Byard, of Owston -at cither place. 
George Ellis and Alice Bland, of Arksey — ^at Arksey.* 
George Hyde and Margaret Crofts, of Rotherham— at Rotherham. 
Nicholas A41en, of Thornhill, and Dorothy Butteroyd, of Dewsbury — at Dewsbury.* 
George Utay (?), of South Dalton, and Sarah Wheelwright, of Helmsley— at 

Hclmsley. 
[416] 
Giles Howland, of Hutton Rudby, and Phillis Hunter, of Great Ayton — at either 

place. 
John Cannan (?), of Burgh, co. Lincoln, and Ann Robinson, of Holy Trinity, 

Hull— at Hesle or Holy Trinity. 
Laurence Walker, of Calverley, and Ann Wilton (?), of Tong— at either place. 
Roger Steare and Grace Beiley, of Wakefield— at Wakefield. 
Stephen Lowson and Appoline Houghton, of Long Preston — ^at Long Preston. 
Richard Wilkinson, of Sheffield, and Elizabeth Wood, of Ecclesfield — at Eccles- 

field. 
John Webster and Ann Swichcall (?), of Weighton — at Weighton. 
Thomas Smales, of St. Nicholas, Beverley, and Mary Humfrey, of Holy Trinity, 

Hull — at either church. 
John Watson and Helen Johnson, of St. Mary, Hull— at St. Mary. 
Nicholas Kirke and Dionis Horncastle, of St. Mary, Hull — at St. Mary. 

(i) Eldest son of Elias Micklcthw.iitc, Alder- (3) Aged 7 at the Visiution of i6ia. Died 

man, York. He was M.D., and purchased the s.p. Buried at Firbeck. M.I. She was daughter 

manor of Swine. Married at St. Martins, 27 of Christopher Hodgson, of Newhall, Beeston. 

March, 1627, Ann, daughter of Percival Levitt, I)ied 13 Feb., 1657. Also buried at Firbeck, 

of York, widow of Christopher Topham, mer- M.I. They were not married at Leeds. 

/ "I'V V •»•... .u T L (4) ^l^c ""»y have been the widow of AHam 

(2) In Kippax Register It states that John Bland, brother of Sir Thomas Bland, of Kippax, 

Pnnce and Margaret Nodder were married who was buried at Arksey, 12 July, 1623. 

37 March, in St. Sampson s Church, York, "per / x », ■ . ^ o a •» ^ 

me Wm. Smith." (s) Married there 18 April, 1627. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PAVER'S MARRIAGE LICENSES. 171 

1627. 
William Gray and Mary Tennant, of St. Olave, York— at St. Olave. 
John Robinson, of Methley, and Elizabeth Hearing, of Castleford — ai either place. ^ 
Edmund Cowper, of Deanhouse -in- Halifax, and Alice Midgley, of Riccall — at 

Halifax or Riccall. 
Edward Pollard, of Wakefield, and Joan Mallinson, of Halifax — at either place. 
Robert Blanchard and Ellen Askc, widow, of Aughlon — at Aughton. 
Edward Walker and Margaret Beecham, of Holy Trinity, Hull — ^at Holy Trinity, 
John Middleton and Margaret Kendall, of Long Preston — at Long Preston. 
John Dalton, son and heir of Wm. Dalton, of York, esq., and Dorothy Darcy, ot 

Cox wold — at Cox wold.* 
Richard Shan and Frances Hardcastle, of Barwick-in-Elmet — at Barwick. 
Robert of Cawood, and Alice Hutchinson, of Wistow — at either place. 

Gliomas Watson, of Lastingham, and Elizabeth Lithe, of Pickering — at Pickering. 

John Bume and Ann Bulmer, of Hornsea — at Hornsea. 

Thomas Slater and Joan Houseman, of Catton — at Catton. 

John Richmond and Elizabeth Wilson, of Oswaldkirk — at Oswaldkirk. 

John Salmon and Margaret Wilson, of Haram — at Helmsley. 

William Small wood, of St. Mary, Castlegate, York, and' Ann Haigh, of Over 

Poppleton — at either place. 
Thomas Lockwood and Ann Haigh, of Kirkburton — ^at Kirkburton. 
Henry Boyne, clerk. Rector of Kirk Smeaton, and Ann Creswick, of Kirk 

Smeaton — at Kirk Smeaton. 
Robert Oldfield and Elizabeth Gotte (?), of Kildwick— at Kildwick. 
George Hutton, of Brotlon, and Ann Wilkinson, of Skelton — at either place. 
Thomas Foster, of Kirkby Knowle, and Elizabeth Kensey (?), of Borrowby — at 

either place. 
William Wilberfoss, of Wighton, and Hesther T^ngford, widow, of St. Mary or 

Holy Trinity, Hull— at St. Mary or Holy Trinity. 
Jo. Calverley, of Kippax, and Alice Downes, of St. Mary, Castlegate, York — ^at 

either place. ^ 
Thomas Waller, of St. Mary, Bishophill Senior, and Thomasine Heslerton, of St. 

Helen, Stonegate, York —at either church. 
Timothy Geldart, of Bedale, and Dorothy Johnson, of St. Martin, Micklegate, 

York— at either place.* 
William Cuthbert, of Ingleby Greenhow, and Ann Dowson, widow, of Stokesley — 

at either place.* 
Henry Cooke and Catherine Huscroft, of Fishlake — at Fishlake. 
Edmund Smith and Beatrice Briggs, widow, of Ripon — at Ripon. 
Josiah Collier, of Guiseley, and Rebecca Marshall, of St. Michael-le-Belfrey, York — 

at either place." 
Edward Cutts and Ellen Bright, of Sheffield— at Sheffield. 
[418] 

Richard Marshall, of Brandon, and Elizabeth Shipman, of Farndon— at Famdon. 
Rowland Watson, of Bolton -upon -Dcam, and Elizabeth Fairburn, widow, of 

Mexborough — at either place.'' 
Peter Swale, of Helmsley, and Elizabeth Hirst, of Kirkdale— at either place. 

» Married at Methley, 17 April, 1627. (4) Married at St. Martin's, 3 May, 1627. 

-^ -. . r . ... ... . , j^j Married at Ingleby, 8 Ma ' 



(a) Of Hawkeswell. Baptised at St. Michael- (5) Married at Ingleby, 8 May, 1627. She 

le-Belfrey, 17 Sept., 1603. Died at Newark was called Dawson, vidua. 

Castle of wounds received at Burton-upon- (6) Married at Belfrey's, 11 May, 1627. 

Tr«nt, while conducting the Queen from York (7) Probably the Rowland Watson (son of 

to London. Buried at York Minster, 26 July, William Watson, of Bolton) mentioned in 

1644 {Skai/e), She was daughter of Conyers, DugdaWs Visitation^ page 283, as having 



Lord Darcy and Conyers, of Hornby Castle. married secondly the daughter of . 

(3) Not at Kippax. Scofeild, of Aukeridge juxta Doncaster. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



172 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHJEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

1627. 

John Wood, of Tong, and Elizabeth Moss, of Calverley— at either place. 
Gregory Wilson, of Kildale, and Dorothy Leake, widow, of Kildwick— at either 

place. 
Robert Lowson (or Lawson) and Priscilla Fish, of Scarborough— at Scarborough. 
Bernard Bickerdike, of Farnham, and Mary Browne, of Ripon — at Ripon. 
William Chambers and Ann Jobson, of Holy Trinity, Hull— at Holy Trinity. 
John Beighton and Rose Matthewman, of Sheffield —at Sheffield. 
George Watson, of St. Clave, York, and Ann Burne, of Crake— at either place. 
Samuel HoUings, clerk, of St, Laurence, and Mary Allan, of St. Margaret, York— 

at either church. 
Percival Robinson, of Laslingham, and Elizabeth Pinder, of Kirkby Misperton— at 

either place. 
William Harrison, of Owston, and Frances Jenkinson, of Kirk Bramwilh— at cither 

place. 
Richard Stanley and Catherine Cooke, widow, of Doncaster— at Doncaster. 
William Swallow, of Wath, and Mary Foster, of St. Michael, Spurriergate, York— 

at either place. * 
Philip Lassells, of Stainton, and Elizabeth Brearcliffe, of Scarborough— at Scar- 
borough. 
John Allott and Mary Holt, of Emley — at Emley. 
Richard Davy, of St. Cuthbert, York, and Elizabeth Barnard, of Bossall— at either 

place. 
Jo. Cowling, of Holy Trinity, King's Court, and Elizabeth Heeles, of St.' Helen, 

Stonegate, York— at either church. 
William Yarburgh, of Wakefield, and Elizabeth Binns, widow, of Warmficld— at 

either place. 
[419] 
Henry Bryan and Margaret Thompson, of Guisbrough — at Guisbrough. 

Thomas Petch, of St. Martin, Coney Street, and Jane Gill, of All Saints, Pave- 
ment, York — at either church. 
Thomas Thompson, of Snaith, and Ann Morritt, of Birkin— at either place. 
John Hartley, of Whitkirk, and Ann Roberts, of Swillington — at either place. 
George Smith and Ellen Sorsby, of Ecclesfield— at Ecclesfield. 
William Holgale and Ann Cowper, of Rawmarsh — at Rawmarsh. 
Ralph Raven, of Elsternwick, and Alice Gibson, of Wawne— at either place. 
Abraham Brooke and Alice Wilkinson, of Almondbury— at Almondbury. 
Edward Evans, clerk. Rector of Oswaldkirk, and Elizabeth Williamson, of Oswakl- 

kirk — at Oswaldkirk. 
Richard Naylor (?), of Skipsea, and Margaret Browne, of Beeford— at either place. 
Edmund Lapidge, of Pontefract, and Margaret Cawood, of Tankersley — at cither 

place. 
John Kirby and Elizabeth Scatcherd, widow, of Leeds— at Leeds. « 
Robert Carr, of Bolton- by-Bowland, and Sibel Brenand, of Slaidburn— at either 

place. ' 
Thomas Heaton, of Wakefield, and Ann Traildarr (?), widow, of Rotherham— at 

either place. 
Michael Saville, of Rothwell, 22, and Clare Bubwith, late of Rothwell, now of 

Kippax, spinster, 20 — at Kippax.* 
George Jenkinson, of Rosedale, and Elizabeth Johnson, of Oswaldkirk — at either 

place. 

William Humphrey (?) and Ann Parker, of Sheffield— at Sheffield. 

(i) Not at Walh. (3) Married at Bolton, 30 May, 1627. 

(2) Married there 30 May, 1637. (4) Married at Kippax, 31 May, 1637. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



paver's marriage licenses. 173 

1627. 

George Browne, of Clarborough, and Ann Machell, widow, of Edwinstowe — at 

either place. 
John Urton alias Styring (?), of Thribergh, and Ann Misterton, of Rotherham —at 

either place. 
Christopher Acey and Ellen Barchard, of Sculcoates — at Sculcoates. 
[420] 
James Ness, of St. Michael, New Malton, and Margery White, of Thornton — at 

either place. 
Ralph Wilson, husbandman, of Preston-in-HoIdemess, and Frances Thweng, 

spinster, 26 or more, of Wighton — at either place. 
Robert Gartham and Bridget Cowling, of North Cliffe— at North Cliffe or Santon. 
John Allan, clerk, of -St. Laurence, York, and Ellen Tempest, of Tong— at Tong.^ 
John Dent, of Guisbrough, and Ann Ferrand, of Carlton — at Carlton. 
William Withes and Ann Smirthwaite, of Leeds— at Leeds.* 
Ralph Blakey, of Leeds, and Elizabeth Walker, of Warmfield — at either place. ^ 
Robert Lambe, yeoman, and Jane Rokeby, spinster, of Hutton Rudby — at Hutton 

Rudby. 
Thomas Willan (?), of Wentworth, and Margaret Hay, of Rotherham — at either 

place. 
William Walker, of Bentley, and Elizabeth Storker, of Womersley — at either place. 
Miles Parker, of Leeds, and Margery Scholes, of Rothwell — at either place.* 
Robert Conyers, gent., of E^ington, and Ann Conyers, of Sedgfield— at Easington.^ 
George Key and Dorothy Binns, of Kirkheaton — at Kirkheaton. 
Thomas Fairweather, tailor, and Jane Poskett, of Ingleby Arncliffc — at Ingleby. 
Thwaites Fox and Ann Clarke, of St. John, Beverley^at St. John. 
Edmund Wadsworth, of I^uddington, and Susan Holmes, of Haworth — at either 

place. 
Walter Rounthwaite and Catherine Palliser, of Ripon — at Ripon. 
Edward Cheetham, of Rotherham, and Emot Leafe, of Slingsby — at either place. 
William Douthwaite and Ann Cowper, of Leeds — at Leeds. ^ 
[421] 
Robert Nixon, of Otley, and Jane Cave, of Guiseley — ^at either place. 

Thomas Dewick and Rosamund Thwaytes, of Holy Trinity, Hull — ^at Holy Trinity.'' 
Samuel Horncastle, of St. Mary, and Ann Bulmer, of Holy Trinity, Hull — at either 

church. 
John Jefferson and Dorothy Hewitson, widow, of Wold Newton — at Wold Newton. 
John Ellis, of Darfield, and Elizabeth Oxley, of Barnsley— at Barnsley. 
John Norseman and Jane Davison, of Ripon — at Ripon. 
Michael Potts, of Kilvington, and Ann Welles, of Coxwold — at either place. 
Christopher Pate and Elizabeth Dobson, of Allerston — at Allerston. 
Richard Greave, of Penistone, and Jane Massey, of Hanp*, co. Derby — at either 

place. 
William Norrison, of Whitby, and Mary Smelt, of Skelton-in-Cleveland — at either 

place. 
Robert Sugden, of Bradford, and Mary Barraclough, of Halifax — at either place. ^ 
William Dawson, gent., of Farlington, and Mary Agar, of Skelton — at Stockton- 

on-the-Moor. 

(i) Daughter of Richard Tempest, Esq., of His wife was daughter of Sir. Ralph Conyers, of 
Tong. Baptised there 14 July, 1600. Married Layton. (See DugdaUs Visitation.) 

'**(!) Jlot" b' itSs R?^*tlr***''* '^ ^"^'* '^^'' ^^^ Married there ai June, 1627. 

1?) Not at Leeds * ^7^ Third son of Michael Dewick, of Appleby, 

(4) Not at Leeds.' *^°' Lincoln, ^t. 70 at Dugdalis Visitation^ 4 

fs) Robert Conyers^ Esq., of Boulby. Pro- Sept., 1665. 

bably buried at £asington, 18 Jan., 1639-40. (8) At Halifax, 35 Jane, 1627. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



174 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

1627. 

Caleb Cockcroft, of Heptonstall, and Mary Scott, of Haworth — at either place. 
John Rhodes, of Skipsea, and Ann Thoresby, of Thorganby— at either place. 
George Wilkinson, of Badsworth, and Isabel Medley, of Pontefract — at cither 

place. 
Bxiward Chew and Ann Topham, of Gisburn — at Gisburn. 
Peter Mellers, of Harworth, and Elizabeth Lambert, widow, of Blythe — at eiiher 

place. 
John Angell, of Aston, clerk, and Alice Daod, of Mansfield Woodhouse, co. 

Nottingham — at MansBeld. 
Thomas Bindlows, of Kirklington, and Elizabeth Ra[)er, of Welbury — ^at either 

place. 
[422] 
James Guy, of Kirkby Lonsdale, and Ann Cundrey, of Skipton-in -Craven — at 

either place.* 
John Harland and Elizabeth Molland, of Hinderwell — at Hinderwell. 
William Wyville, esq., of St. Martin, Coney-street, York, and Dame Frances 

Frankland, widow, of Alne — at Alne. 
James Johnson, of Sutton-in-Holderness, and Joan (?) Milner, of Keyingham — at 

either place. 
Thomas Bolton, of Addingham, and Frances Harrison, of Otley — at either place. 
John Anderson, of St, Michael-le-Belfrey, York, and Ann Harrison, of Burnley — at 

either place. ^ 
Thomas Wilkinson and Frances Hardcastle, of Guiseley — at Guiseley. 
Nicholas Abraham and Dorothy Hodgson, of Lythe — ^at Lythe. 
Paul Gierke and Mary Huntress, of Holy Trinity [Hull]— at Holy Trinity or 

Hessle. 
John Greathead, clothier, and Elizabeth Walker, of Leeds — at Leeds.' 
James Parkinson, of St. Michael, Spurriergate, and Elizabeth Gray, of All Saints', 

Pavement, York — at eiiher church. 
Richard Lockwood, gent., of Thirsk, and Dorothy Withes, widow, of Killinghall- 

in-Ripley — at Thirsk or Ripley.* 
Adam Tildesley and Agnes Thompson, of Spofforth — at Spofforth. 
Richard Stead, of Kirkby Overblows, and Grace Sutton, of Harwood — at either 

place. 
William Scott, of Danby, and Mary Hall, of Skelton — ^at either place. 
George Sit well, gent., of Eckington, co. Derby, and Margaret Childers, of 

Doncaster — at Doncaster.* 

Thomas Thompson and Alice Leigh, of I/ceds— at Leeds.® 

James Oldfield and Martha Davy, of Plalifax — at Halifax.^ 

[423] 

Nathan Dodson and Ann Rayner, of Wakefield — at Wakefield. 

James Styring and Alice Parker, widow, of Leeds — at Leeds." 

Robert Hall, of Skelton, and Margaret Thompson, of Stokesley — at either place.® 

Jo. Blackburn, of Birstall, and Beatrice Lancaster, of Wakefield— at either place. 

James Taylor, of Birstall, and Isabel Green, of Tankcrsley— at either place. 

William Stephenson and Frances Stutt, widow, of Wawne — at Wawne, 

(i) At Skipton, 3 July, 1627. Cundra, in (5) She was daughter of Hugh Childers, 

Register. Mayor of Doncaster, 1604. Was baptised 23 

(2) Not at 5J« Michael's. Nov., 1603, and married \^ July, 1627. 



(2) Not at 5J« Michael's. Nov., 1603, and married 

(3^ Married there 6 July, 1627. (6) Married 12 July. 

(4) There is a pedigree of Withes, of Cop- , ( xi . .u 

grove, in the Visitation of 1612 (p. 591). It ^1> *^°* '"«"• 

seems likely that Dorothy was the widow of (8} Married there Aug 

Ch.irlcs Withes and daughter of William Tyring in the Register. 

Hrereton. (9) Not at Stokesley. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



paver's marriage licenses. 175 

Z627. 

William Shillito, of Featherstone, and Ann Headley, of Silkstone — ^at either place. 

John Ask with, cloth dealer, and Ellen Cooke, of Leeds — at Leeds. * 

William Jackson, of Copmanlhorpe, and Mary Thompson, of Acaster Malhis — at 

either place. 
Thomas Staveley (? Staneley) and Elizabeth Simpson, of Riix)n — at Ripon. 
Simon Lyon and Alice Lawton, of Middleton and Carton — at either place. 
Edward Dealtry and Elizabeth Backhouse, of Full Sutton— at Full Sutton. 
John Lamb and Elizabeth Liones, of Skelton-in-Cleveland — at Skelton. 

Henry Rogers and Ann alias Rogers, of Ripon —at Ripon. 

Henry Hole and Mary Greaves, of Sheffield — at Sheffield. 

Thomas Lewis, gent., of Marr, and Elizabeth Talbot, of Penwortham — at either 

place* 
John Beauchamp, of Barrowby, and Mary Gale, of Letbie — at either place. 
Jo. Dale and Ann Warde, of Westerdale — at Westerdale. 

[424] 

George Carleil and Elizabeth Ripley, of Holy Trinity, Hull — at Hessle or Holy 
Trinity.* 

Philip Storke, of Kirkby, and Margaret Hall, widow, of Scrayingham —at either 
place. 

Henry Horsfall and Grace Gates, of Halifax — at Halifax.* 

John Wood, of Kirkby Moorside, and Ann Wilson, of Slingsby — at Slingsby. 

John Gr^[son and Elizabeth Thorpe, of Slaidburne — at Slaidburne. 

Thomas Carleil, gent., and Ann Ramshaw, of Brandsburlon — at Brandsburton. 

James Webster and Mary Haddlesey, of Foston — at Foston. 

William Vippon and Margaret Wilcock, of Bolton-by-Bowland — at Bolton. 

Thomas Spence, of Holy Trinity, King's Court, and Mary Routles, of St. Michael- 
le-Belfrey, York — at either church.^ 

George Dickenson and Elizabeth Keld, of Scawby — at Scawby. 

Richard Webster, of St. Mary, Beverley, and Isabel Spence, of St. Mary, Castle- 
gate, York — ^at either place. 

James Cayley, of Holy Trinity, Goodramgate, and Ann Burton, of St. Michael, 
Spurriergate, York — at either church. 

Richard Pinder, of Rokesby-in-Hinderwell, and Dorothy Ripley, of Lythe — at 
Hinderwell or Lythe. 

Richard Doubiggin, of Doncaster, and Susan Ross, of Wistow — at either place. 

John Meller, of Kirkburton, and Agnes alias Ann Kitson, of Birstall— at Kirk- 
burton. " 

John Knowesley, clerk, S.T.B., rector of Tansor, and Ann Knowlsley, of Burton 

Fleming — at Burton Fleming.' 
Richard Harrison, of Harwood, and Elizabeth Reader, of Thume— at either place. 
John Harrison, of Kirk Leavington, and Elizabeth Simpson, of Yarm-at either 

place. 
Thomas Empson and Elizabeth Todd, of Holy Trinity, Hull— at Holy Trinity. 
[425] 
John Hartus and Mary Hobson, of Ulrome-in-Skipsea — at Barmslon or Skipsea. 

Christopher Porrett and Ann Palmer, of Holy Trinity, Hull — at Holy Trinity. 
John Walker and Frances Croft, of Leeds — at Leeds.® 



(1) In the Leeds Register, as Aug., is entered (3) Married at Holy Trinity, Hull, ai Aug., 

"John Atkinson, of Bramley, and Ellin Cooke, 1627. See Dugdales Visitation^ p. 130. 
int^U^^ii^^r'^"^ *' ^"*''*° chappell." {An (^) Married there 37 July, 1637. 

'"(a) Son of 'xhom-is LewU, of Marr. He died ^/s) At St. Michael's, 7 Aug. She was called 

s.p. Sept., 1634. She was daughter and co- Mary RutI edge. ..... 

heiress of Thomas Talbot, of Bashall. According (^J JJ^'^H*^ \^"S. She was called Anms. 

to Hunter they were married at Penwortham, $7) Married there a8 Aug. 

5 Aug., 1627. (8) Married there n Aug. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



176 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

Z627. 

John Elam, of Sheffield, and Catherine Jubb, of Man— at either place. 

Edmund Danser, of St. Martin, Micklegate, York, and Grace Hatfield, of Wakefield 

or Rothwell-at Wakefield or Rothwell.' 
Robert Middleton, of Sutton-in-Campsall, and Ann Holme, of Burghwallis — at 

Burgh wal lis. 
Ralph Jackson, of Skeckling, and Jane Johnson, widow, of Halsham — at Skeckling, 

Burst wick, or Halsham. 
William Stockton, of Great Ayton, and Mary Fawcett, of Ingleby Arncliffe— at 

either place. 
Thomas Burton, of Methley, and Jane Wright, of Sandal Magna — at either place. ^ 
John Carr, of Brashaw-in-Gisburn, and Dionis Waddington, of Gisburn — ^at Gisbum. 
Oswald Parkinson and Dorothy Cholmley, of Spofforlh— at Spofforth.^ 
Richard Kildale, of Skeckling, and Frances Stoney, widow, of Holy Trinity, 

Hull— at either place. 
John Freeman and Hesther Bolland, of Adlingfleet — at Adlingfleet. 
William Forde, of Nunburnholme, and Susan Deane, of All Saints, North-street, 

York — at either place. 
Francis Metcalfe, of Leeds, and Sarah Denton, widow, of Batley — at either place.* 
James Heblethwaite, gent., and Ann Hungate, of Norton —at Norton.* 
William Wentworth, gent., of Sandal, and Hesther Arthington, of Leelley — ^at 

either place.* 

[426] 

John Hawortk and Mary Corbett, of Wakefield — ^at Wakefield. 

Robert Uppleby, of Benton, and Elizabeth Newell, of St. Mary, Hull — ^at Benton. 

Wilfred Saunderson, of Tolthorp-in-Strensall, and Ann Burton, of Heslington — ^at 

Strensall, or St. Laurence, York. 
William Currer, of Ilkley, and Elizabeth Margraves, of Bolton Canons — at either 

place. 
Francis Johnson, of Carnaby, and Mary Taunton, of North Burton — at either place. 
John Watmough, of Almondbury, and Ann Windle, of Windle (su) — at Almond- 
bury or Elland.'' 
Robert Harpham, of Drypool, and Mary Procter, of Marfleet — at either place. 
Richard Hirst (?), of Slaidburn, and Margaret Cliusse (?), widow, late of same, 

now of Bolton—rat cither place. 
Robert Hoyland and Mary Etton, of Sheffield— at Sheffield. 
Arthur Burnley and Alice Abdy, of Whiston — at Whiston. 
Bernard Bickerdike, of Knaresborough, and Elizabeth Atkinson, of Hampsthwaite — 

at either place. 
Marmaduke Lawson, of Bransby, and Ann Elwood, of BrafTerton— at either place. 
William Little, of St. Crux, York, and Jane Hillam, of Bolton Percy — at either 

place. 
Miles Newton, of Ripon, and Dorothy Belt, of Thirsk — at either place. 
John Wilberfoss, of St. Maurice, York, and Mary Marshall, of Tadcaster — at either 

place. 
Robert Hope, of Drypool, and Margaret Wilburn, of Marfleet — at either place. 
Walter Walker, of Bingley, and Grace Brogden, daughter of John Brogden, of 

Addingham — ^at either place. ^ 

(1) Married at Rodiwell, 13 Aug., 1627. daughter of Thomas Hungate, of North 

(2) Not at Methley. ^/l*'*'^,^'^***'^ "^^1 ^J*"^*^"^ ]A ^"^- u r. 

/ WQ> TA V. f -o- u J m, I 1 f (6> Eldest son of George Wentworth, Esq., 

(3) (tt Daughter of Richard Cholmeley, of ^f West Bretton. He died s./. 22 Oct., 1642. 
bkewsby. She was the daughter of Richard Arthington, 

(4) Not at Leeds. of Castley, in the parish of Leathley. 

(5) Son of James Heblethwaite, of Norton. (7) ^\^r,"^i »* Mirfield, 25 Aug., according 
He was buried there xx April, 1653. She was to the Klland Register. 

*^ (8) Not at Bingley. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



paver's marriage licenses. 177 

Z637. 

Robert Millington and Mabel Webster, of Holme-on-Spalding Moor— at Holme. 

[427] 

John Clarke, of St. John, and Mariana Rooe, of St. Mary, Beverley — at either 

church. 
Laurence Hammerton, gent., of Gisburn, and Mary Winterburn, of St. Martin, 

Micklegate, York— at St. Martin. 
Richard Beaumont and Rosamund Akeroyd, of Dewsbury — at Dewsbury.^ 
Richard Marshall and Mary Battersby, of Copmanthorpe — at Copmanthorpe. 
James Parkins and Grace Flinton, of Holy Trinity, Hull— at Holy Trinity. 
Thomas Franke, of Old Malton, and Grace Watson, of Kirkby Overcarr — at either 

place. 

Nicholas Inman, of St. Crux, York, and 

Roger Sawyer and Alice Bowes, of Thornton^t Thornton. 

Richard Pickhaver and Alice Styring, of Gisburn — at Gisburn. 

Robert Gill and Mariana Crawshaw (?), of Wakefield — at Wakefield. 

Thomas Cliflford, of Holy Trinity, Hull, and Elizabeth Field, of Drypool — at either 

place. 
George Needham, clerk, rector of West Rounton, and Mercy Casson, of Harlsey — 

at Harlsey. 
John Wright, of Tadcaster, and Elizabeth Thackray, of St. Helen, Spurriergate, 

York — at either place. 
John Bate and Ann Hird, of Sutton-upon-Derwent— at Sutton. 
Samuel Clough, of Halifax, and Elizabeth Foxcroft, of Bossall — at Bossall. 
Robert Farthing and Elizabeth Arnett, widow, of Holy Trinity, Hull — at Hessle of 

Holy Trinity. 
George Thompson, of Muston, and Mary Wildon, widow, of Hunmanby — at either 

place. 
Henry Chough and Elizabeth Whit wham, of Brought on — at Broughton. 
John Crosley and Grace Milnes, of Penistone — ^at Penistone. 
[428] 

Lancelot Frank and Elizabeth Metcalfe, widow, of St. Mary, Hull — at St. Mary. 
Henry Simpson, of Leeds, and Ann Gill, of Richmond — at either place. ^ 
George Parker, of Kirkby-on-Moor, and Alice Hill, of Farnham — at either place. 
Francis Bramon, of Ecclesficld, and Elizabeth Barber, of Bradfield — ^at either place. 
Thomas Lazenby, of Huntington, and Ann Richardson, of Wharram Percy — at 

either place. 
Thomas Elmsall, of Featherstone, and Isabel Foreman, of Rothwell — at either 

place.' 
Richard Potter, of Selby, and Margaret Walker, of Brayton — ^at either place. 
Rowland Swinbank, of Holy Trinity, Goodramgate, York, and Ann Sadler, of 

Bumiston — at either place. 
Thomas Ray and Margaret Sunderland, of Bubwith — at Bubwith. 
Robert Parker, of Giggleswick, and Elizabeth Parker, of Long Preston— at either 

place. 
Samuel Foxcroft, of Wakefield, and Ann Cromack, of Horbury — at either place.* 
Robert Salvin, esq., of Foxholes, and Margaret Spink, widow, of Driffield— at 

either place. 
Henry Raper, of Pickhall, and Meriol Key (?), of St. Crux, York — at either place. 
Thomas Arnold and Isabel Hansley (?), of Wawne — at Wawne. 
William Beckwith, of Rawcliffe-in-Snaith, and Mary Winchester, of Clifton, in St. 

Michael-le-Belfrey, York— at Snailh or St. Michael. « 

(i) Of Almondbury parish. Married 6 Sept., (3) At Rothwell, 17 Oct., 1627. 

at Dewsbury. (4) Not at Horbury. 

(2) Not at Leeds. (5) Married 7 Oct., 1627, at St. Michael's. 

VOL. XVU. M 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



178 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

1627. 

Marmaduke Poole, of Foston, and Dorothy Beaumont, of Sutton— at either place. 

George Kay, of Snaith, and Janet Bayles, of Doncaster — at either place. 

William Brearey, alderman, and Dame Margaret Robinson, widow, of St. Crux, 

York— at St. Cnix.i 
William Girr, of Rotherham, and Alice Oldfield, of Royston — ^at either place. 
Robert Wadsworth, of St. Crux, and Catherine Homer, widow, of St. Michael, 

Spurriergate, York — ^at either church. 

[429] 

James Best, of Hull, and Ann Lewling, of Barmborough — at Barmborough. 

John Walker and Mary Gill, of North Collingham — at North Collingham. 

Michael Portington, gent., and Dorothy Wentworth, of Sandal Magna — at Sandal 

Magna. ' 
Nicholas Burrow, of Catton, and Margaret Hicks, of St. Maurice, York — at St. 

Maurice. 
Jonas Waterhouse, esq., and Joan Harrison, widow, of Stillingfleet — at Stillingfleet. 
Christopher Cooke and Margaret Clarke, of Long Preston — ^at Long Preston. 
John Clarke and Alice Lache (?), of Long Preston — at Ivong Preston. 
Richard Sykes, clerk, and Grace Stocks, of Kirkheaton— at Kirkheaton.* 
William Wilson and Mary Squire, of Doncaster — at Doncaster. 
George StansBcld, of Heptonstall, and Isabel Witham, of Burnley — at either place. 
John Cass, of St. John, Beverley, and Isabel Mandby (?), of Kilnwick, near 

Watton— at either place. 
William Douthwaite and Ann Thompson, of Coxwold— at Coxwold. 
George Baguley, clerk, and Mary Redman, of Fulford — at St. Denis, York. 
Robert Halliday, of St. Mary, Castlegate, York, and Jane Boade (or Boake), of 

Bransby — ^at either place. 
John North and Jane Stable, of Pontefract — at Pontefract. 
William Dickenson and Agnes Moore, of Brompton — at Brompton. 
William Forman, of Roth well, and Ann Field, of Ardsley — at either place.* 
[430] 
James Blakey, of Colne, and Mary Lupton, of Kildwick — at either place. 

Samuel Greenwood and Mary Lindley, of Halifax — at Halifax. 

James Clayton and Dorothy Barton, of Hands worth — at Handsworth. 

Francis Horsley, of Skirpenbeck, and Isabel Frear, of Helmsley — at either place, ^ 

Richard Barroclough, of Halifax, and Hesther Brigge, of Sowerby — at either place.® 

William Rigg, of Stonegrave, and Christiana Bedford, of Topcliffe — at either place. 

Ralph Salvin, of Hemingborough, and Ann Hemsworth, of Kippax — ^at either 

place. ' 
William Tomlinson, of St. Michael-le-Belfrey, and Bridget Metcalfe, of St. Helen, 

York — ^at either church.** 
Lancelot Humphrey, of Wawne, and Jane Hunter, widow, of Skeckling — ^at either 

place. 
John Rudston, of Bessingby, and Mary Rudston, of Hay ton — at either place. 

(x) Twice Lord Mayor of York, 161 1 and 1652. Buried at Clerkeawell. She was daughter 

1629. He was buried at St. John's, 19 Aug., of Alexander Stocks, Rector of Kirkheaton. 

X637. She was daughter of John Jenkins (or She was buried in the choir of Kirkheaton 

Jenkyn), Esq , of York, and widow of Willi.im Church. ITicy were married 20 Oct., 1627. 

Robinson, of York (ancestor of the Marquis of () n^i ^^ Roth well. 

Ripon). Ihcy were married it Oct., 1627. ; \ _ - _ . „ 1 t v u c . 

She was buried at St. John's, Micklegate, 29 (s) Son of Francis Horsley, of Full Sutton. 

July 1644. o J 7 Died m his fathers lifetime. See Du£da2es 

(2)' Of Portington. Buried at St. Denis, yisitaHon, p. 169. 

York, I July, 1644. She was daughter of (6) At Halifax, 4 Nov., 1627. 

George Wentworth, Esq., of West Bretton. /_n jr^t .. Kionax 

(3) Rector of Kirkheaton. Baptised at Leeds, ,«v „ e ff. L „ 

24 July, 1603. Died at Islington, 10 Jan., (8) Not at St. Michael s, 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PAVER'S MARRIAGE LICENSES, 179 

Z627. 

William Gray and Mary Pockley, of St. Saviour, York — at St. Saviour's. 
Abraham Marshall and Joan Baker, of Holy Trinity, Hull — at Holy Trinity or 

Hessle. » 
Robert Worwen (?) and Margaret Key, of East Harlsey— at East Harlsey. 
Tristram Thompson, of Holy Trinity, King's Court, and Elizabeth Ruler (? Rider), 

of St. Saviour, York^t either church. 
John Hesleton, of Hinderwell, and Alice Jackson, of Scarborough — at either place. 
Thomas Lonsbrough, of Muston, and Jane Welburn, of Rillington — at either place. 
Peregrine Willix and Margaret Moss, of Holy Trinity, Hull — at Hessle. 
Samuel Turvin and Ann Purvey, of Tickhill — at Tickhill. 
John Creyke, of St. Laurence, and Margaret Tennant, of St. Olave, York — at 

either church. 

[431] 

Francis Dishworth, of Westow, and Susan Kirke, widow, of Bradford — at either 
place. 

William Thornbrough and Mary Beaumont, of St. Michael-le-Belfrey, York^t St. 
Michael, a 

Leo Sunckersgill,^ of Kirkby Malzeard, and Ellen Topham, of Ripon — at either 

place. 
Lionel Hawksworth and Margery Hawton, of Hatfield — at Hatfield. 
William Lambe and Elizabeth Ruddock, of Rillington— at Rillington. 
William Clitheroe and Ann Browne, of Nunkeeling — at Nunkeeling. 
Richard Rowland, of Cold Kirkby, and Mary Foster, of Kirkby Moorside— at 

either place. 
Richard Phipps, of High Hoyland, and Penelope Wheatley, widow, of Emley — ^at 

either place. 
James Thompson and Julian Clarke, of Rigton— at Rigton. 
Anthony Horsley, of Ellerbum, and Isabel Hudson, of Thornton— at cither place. 
Josias Matthew, clerk, rector of Kirkby-in-Cleveland, and Barbara Marwood, of 

Ayton — at Ayton or Stokesley.* 
Thomas Parkinson, of Giggleswick, and Elizabeth Ashe, of Long Preston — ^at 

either place. 
William Swaync, of Cawood, and Jane Todd, of Ryther — at either place. 
Francis Siddall, of Hatfield, and Ann Ashley, of St. Mary, Castlegate, York — at 

either place. 
John Atmer, of Skipwith, and Dorothy WooUas, of West Cottingwith — at either 

place. 
William Lister, of Bradford, and Margery Northen, of Halifax— at either place.*' 
Robert Helme and Mary Tennant, of Leeds— at Leeds. • 
Francis Topham, of Coverham, and Mary Payler, of Skirpenbeck— at either place. ^ 

[432] 

Hugh Booth, of Elland, and Susan Denton, of Halifax — at either place. « 

Thomas Pigot, of Bradfield, and Ann Hagg, of Penistone — at either place. 

Leonard Chamberlain, of Selby, and Ann Rummans, of Wistow — at either place. 

William Hutton, of Calverley, and Isabel Howson, of Giggleswick — at either place. 

Henry Lealam, of Scawby, and Mary Thompson, of Scarborough — at either place. 

Abraham Blackburn, of Leeds, and Sarah Shaw, of Huntington — at either place.** 

(1) Married at Holy Trinity, a Nov., 1627. (5) At Halifax, 27 Nov., 1627. 

WM«™>*««4Nov. gXVfo^of Edw«d Toph.™. of 

(3) Smeckcrgill (?X Aglethorpc. She was daughter of Sir Edward 

U) Grandson to. Toby Matthews, Archbishop Taylor, of Thoraldby, Bart. (See DugdtUei 

of York. She was baptised at Stokesley, 27 Visitation, p. 149.) 

Dec.. 1603. They do not seem to have been (8) At Elland, 20 Nov. 

nutmed there, (9) Not at Leeds. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



180 THE YORKSHIRE ARCILffiOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

1627. 

Thomas Fairbarn and Elizabeth Heptonstall, of Hartshead — at Hartshead. 

Henry Fletcher and Margaret Brooksbank, widow, of Halifax — at Halifax.^ 

John Rawson, of Bingley, and Isabel Rawson, of Keighley — at either place.* 

Henry Davison, of Thirsk, and Clare Wilson, widow, of Sowerby — at either place. 

Stephen Jenkinson and Mercy Oley, widow, of Wakefield — at Wakefield. 

Richard Aldburgh, gent., and Alice Mallory, of Ripon — at Ripon.* 

Thomas Sharow, of Topcliffe, and Judith BoUes, of Worksop — at either place. 

John Thompson and Ann Horncastle, of Hooton Pagnell— at Hooton. 

William Wilkinson, of Bossall, and Margery Dobson, of St. Michael, New 

Malton — at either place. 
Edward Grant, of St. Michael-le-Belfrey, and Mary Chapman, of St. Helen, 

Stonegate, York — at either church.* 

Robert Dockray, clerk, and Bridget Watson, of Giggleswick — at Giggleswick. 

Richard Hogley and Catherine Abson, of Bolton-upon-Dearn — ^at Bolton. 

[433] 

Humphrey Peckett and Margery Humble, of Kilburn— at Kilbum. 

Thomas Walker and Mary Browne, of Osbaldwick — at Osbaldwick. 

John Lyon, gent., of Holy Trinity, King's Court, and Jane Bray, widow, of St. 

Helen, Ston^ate, York — at either church. 
Nathan Bates, of Norland, and Jane Maude, of Halifax — at Halifax.* 
Christopher Hird and Margaret Frere, of Foston — at Foston. 
George Sanderson, of Bradfield, and Ann Rawlinson, of Ecclesfield— at either 

place. 
Thomas Longley, of Horbury, and Ann Richardson, of Bradford — at either place.* 
Francis Walsham, of Cawthorne, and Alice Wilcock, widow, of Thornhill — af 

either place. 
Anthony Holgate, of Halifax, and Grace Brigge, of Luddenden — at either place. ^ 
Ralph Hills and Ann Pennock, of St. Mary, Hull — at St. Mary or Drypool. 
John Hargraves, of Colne, and Alison Hartley, daughter of Roger Hartley, 

of Haworth— at either place. 
Henry Wright and Jane Hammerton, widow, of St. Laurence, York — ^at St. 

Laurence. 
William Dixon and Mary Race, widow, of Ripon — at Ripon. 
John Coates, of St. Margaret, and Margaret Murton, of St. Sampson, York — at 

either church. 
William Gamble, of Feliskirk, and Jane Dunning, widow, of Thirsk — at either 

place. 
John Haddlesey, of Foston, and Elizabeth Luccock,- of Middleton-in- Pickering — at 

either place. 
Timothy Folhergill, of St. Margaret, York, and Mary Haddlesey, of Beeford — ^at 

either place. 
Edward Sanderson, of Felkirk, and Alice Hodgson, widow, of Anston — at either 

place. 

Anthony Croft and Mary Chambers, of Burnsall — at Burnsall.* 

[434] 

Christopher Maw, of Rotherham, and Elizabeth Wade, of Whiston— at either place. 

Laurence Farrington, clerk, rector of Emley, and Ann Allott, of Emley — ^at 

[Emley]. 
Richard Gill, of Silkstone, and Elizabeth Blacker, of Darton — ^at either place. 

(i) Not at Halifax. (4) Not at St. Michael's. 

(2) Not at Bingley. (5) At Halifax, 9 Dec. 

(3) Richard Aldborough, Esq., of Aid borough, (6) At Horbury, i Dec. 
near Boroughbridge. She was daughter of (7) Not at Halifax. 
William Mallory, Es<j.^ of Studley. Baptised (8) Not at Burnsall, 

33 Feb., 1608-9. Married a2 Nov., 1627. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



paver's marriage licenses. 181 

1627. 

John Cooke, of Preston-in-Holdemess, and Frances Raynes, of Sprotley— at either 
place. 

Robert Skilbeck and Ann Foster, of St. Michael-le-Belfrey, York— at St. Michael. * 
George Clapham and Susan Sugden, widow, of Keighley — at Keighley. 
Robert Croser, of South Cave, and Elizabeth Burton, of North Newbald— at either 
place. 

Edward Nyscall and Catherine Selley, of Holy Trinity — [place not named]. 
Bryan Daniel and Ann Moxon, of Saxton^-at Saxton. 
William Deighton and Catherine Keld (?), widow, of Skipsea — at Skipsea. 
William Sykes, of Leeds, and Margaret Lodge, of Addle — at either place.* 
Zachariah Barrow and Cassandra Laverack, widow, of Fishlake — at Fish lake. 
Edmund Hind, of Leeds, and Cecily Kitchingman, of Thorner — ^at either place.* 
Thomas Man, of Burnsall, and Ann Cawdrey, widow, of Skipton — at either place.* 
William Stephenson, of Welton, and Margery Essey, widow, of Kirkella — at either 

place. * 
Nicholas Heslewood, of Thorganby, and Alice Driffield, of Wheldrake — at 

Thorganby. 

William Huggard and Ann Lawson, of St. Crux, York — ^at St. Crux. 

[435] 

Laurence Brearcliffe and Grace Fouldes, of Colne — at Colne. 

John Rawson, of St. Mary, and Susan Frisbie (?), of Holy Trinity, Hull — at either 

church. 
Richard Hardcastle and Elizabeth Lund, of Burnsall— at Burnsall. • 
John Abbott, of Ripon, and Ann Craven, of Myton— at Myton. 
James Trotter, of St. Crux, and Alice Noble, of St. Michael-le-Bclfrey, York — at 

either church.' 
Thomas Hudson and Faith Oglethorpe, of Kirkburton — at Kirkburton.* 
William Ashton, of Saxton, and Margaret Howden, of Milford — at Saxton or 

Sherbum.® 
Daniel Hall, of Birstall, and Cecily Bentley, of Halifax— at Halifax. *<» 
William Robinson, of Roecliffe, and Frances Metcalfe, of Moor Monk ton— at St. 

Michael-le-Belfrey, York, or Moor Monkton.^i 
John Blackburn and Hcsther Westerman, of Tong— at Tong or Birstall. 
John Raikes, of Holy Trinity, and Susan Harwood, of St. Mary, Hull — at either 

church. 
Thomas Nevinson, of Tankersley, and Dorothy Hole, of Wath — at either place.** 
Robert Lawrence, of Everingham, and Rebecca Janivier, of Londesborough — at 

either place. 
Edward Brooke, of Rolhwell, and Catherine Greggs, of Whitkirk — at either place. ** 
Richard Piehills, of Dewsbury, and Elizabeth Waugh, of Kirkheaton— at either 

place. ** 
Andrew Goodhand, gent., and Jane Levett, of Melton-on-the-Hill — at Melton.**' 
Marmaduke Gates, of Ferriby, and Susan Nicholls, of Holy Trinity, Hull — at 

either place. 
William Croyser and Faith Nicholson, of Kirkby— at Kirkby. 



(1) Married there 10 Dec. She was called (9) At Saxton, 23 Dec, 1627. 

Alice. (10) At Halifax, 30 Dec. 

(«) At Leeds, 20 Dec. 00 Not at St. Michael's. 

(3) At Leeds, 20 Dec. (12) At Wath-on-Dearne, 12 Jan., 1627-8. 

(4) At Skipton, 22 Dec. (13) At Whitkirk, 25 Jan., 1627-8. 

(5) At Kirk Ella, 26 Dec, 1627. She was (14) At Dewsbury, 19 Jan., 1627-8. 

called "Margeria Asie." (15) She was daughter of Thomas Levett, of 

^6) Not at Burnsall. Melton. (See Hunters South Yorkshire^ i. 



Not at St. Michael's. p. 365.) 

(8) Married there 5 Jan., 1627-8. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



182 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

1637. 

[436] ^ , 

John Kay, of Tankersley, and Francis Swifte, of Silkstone— at either place. 

John Smurthwaite and Mary Walker, widow, of Holy Trinity, Hull— at Holy 

Trinity. 
Thomas Newsam, of Riccall, and Elizabeth Barratt, of Hemingborough — ^at either 

place. 
John Cundall and Ann Rounthwaite, of Ripon — at Ripon. 
Alexander Swayne {or Swanne), of St. Mary, and Margaret Ramsden, of Holy 

Trinity, Hull — at either church.^ 
Nicholas Greaves, clerk, and Mary Crosland, of Almondbury— at Almondbury. 
Robert Thorpe, of Hessle, and Elizabeth Harwood, of Holy Trinity, Hull— at 

either place. 
William Oates and Elizabeth Barnsley, of Sheffield— at Sheffield. 
William Carver, of Doncasler, alderman, and Margaret Hayfurtb, widow, of 

Doncaster — at Doncaster. 
Stephen Keld and Mary Hall, widow, of Wickham — ^at Wickham. 
Francis Home, of Almondbury, and Mary Pickles, of Wakefield — at either place. 
William Hall, of Mirfield, and Mary Kellet, of Halifax— at either place. » 
Thomas Mewburn, of Holme-on-Spalding Moor, and Dionis Cockerell, of 

Burstwick — at either place. 
Henry Hawksworth, of Harlsey, and Dorothy Gamble, of Northallerton — at either 

place. 
Henry Bargh and Mar}» Clarke, of Topcliffe—at Topcliffe. 

Joshua Cockerell, of Hackness, and Mary Walker, of Hunmanby— at either place. 
James Browne, of Holy Trinity, Hull, and Elizabeth • Davison, of St. John, 

Beverley— at either church. 
Henry Lindlcy, of Warm field, and Susan Hardcastle, of Featherstone — at either 

place. 

Thomas Adamson and Elizabeth Childe, of Darfield — at Darfield. 

[437] 

Edward Middleton and Elizabeth Bossall, of Huby, in Sutton-on-the-Forest — at 

Huby. 
Richard Holdsworth and Alice Frankland, of Halifax— at Halifax.^ 
Edward Watson, of Raskelf, and Janet Atkin, of Sessay — ^at either place. 
Thomas Ferrand, of Ilkley, and Agnes Flathers, of Leathley — at either place.* 
John Bower, of Barnsley, and Gertrude Morton, of Bradfield — at either place. 
Martin Atmar and Elizabeth Fish, of Scarborough— at Scarborough. 
Edmund Bennett and Margaret Hutchinson, of Whitkirk — at Whilkirk.^ 
Edmund Magnyer, of Ingleton, and Barbara Salkeld, of Clifton, in the diocese of 

Carlisle — at either place. 
Robert Banks, of Giggleswick, and Mary Knipe, of Long Preston — at Giggleswick. 
Henry Raynes, of Wyton, and Frances Kitching, of Bilton — at either place. 
Francis Fothergill, of St. Margaret, and Susan Sadler, of St. Laurence, York — ^at 

either church. 
William King, yeoman, of Cottingham, and Helen Jefferson, of Ferriby — at either 

place. 
John Hardy and Judith Firth, of Halifax— at Halifax. « 
John Bracebridge and Dorothy Binks, of Humbleton — at Humbleton, 
John Greenhall, of Calverley, and Mary Sugden, of Keighley — at either place. 
Ralph Hopkinson and Ann Greaves, of St. John's [<^/a//>&]— at St. John's. 

(1) Married at Holy Trinity, ao Feb., 1627. (4) Son of William Ferrand, of Westhall. 

(3) Not at Halifax. (See Dugdal^s yisitation, p. 27.) 

/ » A* IX i-f T ic o (5) Married there 3 Feb., 1627-8. 

(3) At Halifax, 30 Jan., 1627-8. (5, Married there 25 Feb., 1627-8. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



paver's marriage licenses. 188 

1627. 

Roger Baker, of EUerburn, and Isabel Wasson, of Wickham— at either place. 
Robert Brooke, of Leeds, and Mary Bales, of Halifax — at either place. ^ 
Humphrey Wright, of Keyingham, and Rachel Hellas (?), of Holy Trinity, Hull — 
at either place. 

[438] 

William Preston and Isabel Armitstead, of Giggleswick — at Giggleswick. 

Richard Hirst and Bridget Senior, of Mirfield— at Mirfield. 

Thomas Rejmolds, of St. Olave, York, and Catherine Wayne, of Bransby— at 

Bransby. 
Christopher Bransby, of Thirsk, and Elizabeth Sherbum, of Topcliffe— at either 

place. 
Robert Fox, of St. John, Micklegate, and Margery Geldart, of St. Martin, Coney 

Street, York — at either church. 
Henry Wyrrall and Ann Hawksworth, of Bradfield— at Bradfield or Ecclesfield. 
John Dickenson and Ann Freesby, of Holy Trinity, Hull— at Holy Trinity. 
John Naylor and ChristabcUa Stocks, of Hartshead — at Hartshead. 
William Hutton and Jane Hall, of Seamcr— at Seamer. 
Richard Wade, of Moor Monkton, and Bridget Wilstrop, of Kirk Hammerton— 

at either place. 
William King, of Pickering, and Jane Hall, of Irton-in-Seamer — at Pickering or 

Seamer. 
Mark Sanderson, of Guisbrough, and Jane Jowcy, of Danby — at Danby. 
Henry Naylor, of Heptonstall, and Hesther Mitchell, of Halifax— at either place. « 
Thomas Appleyard, gent., and Catherine Orell, of South Cave — at South Cave. 
John Brooke, clerk, son of William Brooke, of Birstall, and Elizabeth Oxley, of 

High Hoyland — at either place. 
[439] 
William Poplewell and Isabel Wilkinson, widow, of St. Mary, Hull— at St. Mary. 

Robert Miller and Ellen Bellasses, of- Whitkirk— at Whitkirk.» 
George Rawdon, of Elmsall, and Isabel Clough, of Snaith— at South Kirkby or 
Snaith. 

William Richmond, of Ripon, and Isabel Cooper, of Sessay — at either place. 

Josua Raikes and Ann Richardson, of Holy Trinity, Hull— at Holy Trinity. 

Jo. Wilson, of Sigglesthorne, and Mary Dales, of Etton— at either place. 

Thomas Wood and Mary Ellis, of Ackworth — at Ackworth. 

William Bramham and Janet Hagger, of Rothwell— at Rothwell.* 

Edward Taylor and Martha Midgley, of Halifax — at Halifax.* 

Robert Sugden, clerk, curate of North Dallon, and Dorothy Hudspeth, of North 

Dalton— at North Dalton. 
Christopher Copley, gent., of Wadworth, and Elizabeth Bosville, of Warmsworth— 

at either place.® 

Robert Wmder and Francis Hill, of Melton— at Wath or Melton. "^ 

Thomas Hardcastle, of Ripon, and Ellen Langstaff, of Kirkby Malzeard — at either 

place. 
Thomas Keld and Sarah Watson, of Scawby — at Sea why. 
John Hoopes and Isabel Calvert, of Skelton— at Skelton. 
John Pearson, of Ellerton, and Ann Thorpe, of Cottingwith— at EUerton or 

Thorganby. 

(i) Married at Halifax, a6 Feb., 1627-8. (6) Son of William Copley, of Wadworth. 

(2) Not at Halifax. He was a Colonel in the Parliamentary Army. 

(3) Robert Milner (in Register). She was (?) Buried at Wadworth, 20 Feb., 1653. She 
daughter of Francis Belhouse, of Newsome, was daughter of Gervase Bosvile, of Warms- 
near Swillington. Married 21 Feb., 1627-8. worth, and died x6 Aug., 1644. Buried at 

(4) Married there 25 Feb., 1627-8. Wadworth M.I. 

(5) At Halifax, 26 Feb., 1627-8. (7) At Wath-on-Dearne, 23 Feb., 1627-8. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



184 THE YORKSHIRE ARCaEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

1627. 

[440] 

Oswald Robinson and Mary Smith, of Pocklington — at Pocklington. 

George Leafe, of Slingsby, and Jane Eshton, widow, of St. Mary, Castlegate, 

York — at cither place. 
James Clarke, of All Saints, Pavement, and Ann Fawcett, of St. Mary Bishophill 

senior, York — ^at either church. 
William Webster, of Holy Trinity, King's Court, and Sarah Bennett, widow, of 

St. John, Micklegate, York — at either church. 
Jonathan Lynne and Alice Thompson, of Holy Trinity, Hull — at Holy Trinity. 
Henry Cawcroft and Maiy Wade, of Ovenden — at Halifax.^ 
John Horncastle, of Skelbrook, and Mary Harrison, of Owston — at either place. 
Peter Hawksworih and Ann Slack, of High Hoyland — ^at High Hoyland. 
William Emmot>, of Kildwick, and Mary Ripley, of Broughton — at either place. 
Thomas Walker and Sarah Hill, w^idow, of Bingley— at Bingley.^ 
Edward WooUer and Ann Grimes, of Stainton — ^at Stainton.* 
William Pearson, of Hessle, and Margaret Brocklebank, of Ferriby— at either 

place. 
Cuthbert Kether and Elizabeth Driffield, of Wheldrake—at Wheldrake. 
Matthew Wirmouth, of E^sington, and Elizabeth Beane, widow, of Kilnsea — at 

either place. 

Z628. 
William Bower and Priscilla Lee, of Wickham — at Wickham. 
Thomas Baynes, of Bentham, Sedbergh, and Alice Mason, of Denton — at either 

place. 
Thomas Walker, of Leeds, and Sibil Pearson, of Birstall — at either place.* 
Thomas Ingmire, of Kildwick, and Christabella Weadley, of Preston — at either 

place. 
Edward Wooller and Ann Grymes, of Stainton — at Stainton. 
[441] 
William Stowe and Alice Lupton, of Kildwick — at Kildwick. 

Robert Childe and Elizabeth Wilkinson, of Elland— at Elland.'* 

Thomas Woodburn and Ann Matthew, of Spofforth — at Spofforth. 

Marmaduke NorclifFe, of Nunnington, and Mary Dolman, of Ampleford — at 

Nunnington. • 
William Walton, clerk, minister of Seamer, and Emote Jackson, of Wilton — at 

Wilton. 
William Sturdy and Jane Thompson, of Kilburn— at Kilburn. 
Patrick Weems, clerk, curate of Rufforth, and Catherine Tate, of Rufforth — at 

Rufforth. 
William Darley, gent., of Buttercramb, and Elizabeth Amcotts, widow, of Hutton 

Bushell— at Hutton Bushell.'' 
John Easton, of Middleton, and Thomasin Cooper, of Lastingham — at cither place. 
Francis Binns, of Wragby, and Ann Crawshaw, of Silkstone. 
Edward CoUett, of Barwick-in-Elmet, and Jodoca Sharpe, of Leeds — at either 

place. ® 
Henry Alder, of Whitby, and Judith Weems, widow, of St. Margaret, York — at 

either place. 

(i) At Halifax, 16 April, i6a8. (6) Fifth Son of Thomas NorclifFe, of Carling- 

(a) Married there 8 May, 1628. how and Nunnington. Baptised at Nunnington 

/XTM.' ._• .J. .VI f 25 April, 1591. WjU proved London, 1659. She 

. <3) This entry « repeated at the bottom of ^^ "daughter of Rilph Dolman, Rector of 

this folio under the succeeding year. Everingham. (Foster.) 

(4) Not at Leeds. (7) iTiere is a pedigree of Darley in Glcvtr't 

(5) At Elland, 15 April, 1628. ^'fif^li""' P?^' , 

(8) Not at Leeds. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



paver's marriage licenses. 185 

i6a8. 

Francis Dealtry, of Skirpenbeck, and Ann White, of St. Michael, Spurrier-gate, 

York — at either place. 
Richard Walker, of Bradford, and Grace Bateman, of Windermere — at either place. 
William Procter, of Tateham, and Agnes Winder, of BoUon-by-Bowland— at either 

place. 

Richard Tyas, of Marr, and Ann Mitchell, of Hutton Pagnall — at either place. 

Thomas Giles and Ann Curtis, widow, of Ottringham— at Ottringham. 

Robert Clarke and Susan Aldred, of Holy Trinity, Hull— at Holy Trinity. 

[442] 

Henry Mangie and Jane Wigglesworth, of St. Helen, Stonegate, York— at Saint 

Helen. 
Samuel Hammond, of Bradford, and Susan Gledall, of Tong — at either place. 
Robert Brigge and Susan Farrer, of Luddenden — at Ludd[enden]. 
Anthony Arnold, of Wragby, and Ann Grace, of Crofton— at either place. 
William Lindley, of Hull, and Dorothy Bateson, of St. Michael-le-Belfrey, York— 

at St. Michael. 1 
Bryan Middleton, of Bubwith, and Isabel Wilson, of East Cottingwith — at either 

place. 
Robert Walker, of Holy Trinity, King's Court, and Ellen Thirkill, of St. Helen, 

Stonegate, York — at either church. 
Christopher Welbury and Catherine Love, of Kirklealham ■*- at Kirkleatham. 
Walter Rogerson, of Tong, and Elizabeth Balguy, of Kirkburton — at either place. " 
William Johnson, of Stokesley, and Ann Weath, of St. Margaret, York — at either 

place. ^ 

John Russell, of Sheffield, and Mai^ret Eyre, of Ecclesfield — ^at either place. 

Adam Dale, of Thirsk, and Margaret Dunning, of Cundall — at either place. 

Robert Jackson and Ann Hessey, of Londesborough — at Londesborough. 

William Hirst and Dorothy Kenerley, widow, of Huddersfield — at Huddersfield. 

Richard Moore, of Whitkirk, and Mary Moore, of Hornsea — at either place.* 

Robert Kirke and Ellen Cordwell, of Settrington— at Settrington. 

John Starkey, of Thurne, and Alice Carlill, of Doncaster — at Doncaster. 

John Rushworth and Susan Procter, of Halifax — at Halifax. « 

John Watson, of Scawby, and Mary Fishe, of St. Mary, Beverley — at either place. 

[443] 

Thomas SUcy and Sarah Scholefield, of Sheffield— at Sheffield. 

Christopher Brearey, of St. John, Micklegate, and Elizabeth Kay, of St. Martin, 

Coney-street, York — at either church. <* 
Thomas Monkman and Ann Smales, of Whitby- at Whitby. 
Richard Best, of Appleton-upon-Wiske, and Mary Morley, of Croft — at either place. 
Isaac Naylor, of Heptonstall, and Ellen Dardin, widow, of Halifax — at either 

place. 
William Turner and Agnes Anderson, of Weston — at Weston. 
Richard Jackson and Catherine Clarke, of Lythe — at Lythe. 
Isaac Wormall, of Huddersfield, and Hesther Wilkinson, widow, of Almondbury. 
Robert Overance and Elizabeth Swift, of Rothwell— at Rothwell. "^ 

(i) Son of Nicholas Lindley, Mayor of Hull. (4) Not at Whitkirk. 

He was a merchant there, and was fined J^xi^ t^ "^ox. there. 

for not taking knighthood at the Coronation of r,^ _ . .,,*.„. ., » j ■•* ^ 

Charles I. Buried at Trinity Church, Hull, 7 ^<«) Son of William Brearey, Lord Mayor of 

Feb., 1634-5. His wife was daughter and co- XpS'-jj^V^'" ^^^o^"^ Mayor in 1669. And 

heiress of Brian Bateson, of York. They were of Middlethorpe. Buned St. John s, ai Dec, 

married at St Michael's, x May, 1628. Their »675. She was daughter of fhomas Kay, a 

son Francis was of York and Bowling Hall. Ul««:!?an' ^t York. The marriage was at St. 



s 



Not at Kirkburton. ' Martin's, Coney Street, 13 May, 1628. 

Not at Stokesley. (i) At Rothwell, 19 May. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



186 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

z6aa 

Richard Dennis, of Bossall, and Ann Freeman, of Birdsall^t Bossall. 

William Smith and Elizabeth Featherston, of Holy Trinity, Hull—at Holy Trinity. 

Thomas Oddy, clerk, and Jane Harrison, of Kirkby-in-Cleveland — none. 

Christopher Morris and Mary Munday, of Helmsley— at Helmsley. 

John Baynes, of Wakefield, and Grace Birkett, of Stillington -at either place. 

Lionel Buckle, of Holy Trinity, Hull, and Rachel Watson, of Sutton— at either 

place. 
David Dodgson and Elizabeth Rawson, of Heptonstall — at Heptonstall or Halifax.* 
Joseph Little and Magdalen Rotherham, of Holy Trinity, Hull^at Holy Trinity. 
John Hardy, clothier, and Mary Jackson, of Kirkheaton — at Kirkheaton. 

[444] 

Alverey Whitley, of Whitley-hall, in Warren, and Sarah Stocke, of Kirkheaton— at 

Kirkheaton. 
Sampson Dunn, of Northallerton, and Elizabeth Todd, of Sigston— at cither place. 
Robert Rayner and Ann Webster, of Rothwell — at Rothwell.* 
William Petty and Mary Holmes, of Bolton-in-Skipton — at Skipton.^ 
Thomas Skaybart, of Royston, and Elizabeth Norton, of Sandal Magna — at Sandal 

Magna. 
John Grant, clerk, vicar of Calverley, and Ann Pease, of Leeds — at either place.* 
William Farra and Mary Stansfield, of Halifax — at Halifax. 
Charles Fairfax, of Sledmere, and Ann Johnson, of Preston-in-Holdemess — ^at 

Preston. ^ 
Robert Greenside and Margaret Braithwaite, alias Lazenby, of Osmotlierley— at 

Osmotherley. 
John Winteringham, of Owston, and Bridget Dickenson, of Wamisworth — at 

Warmsworth. 

William Richardson and Ellen Cordingley, of Halifax-^at Halifax.® 

John Wilson and Elizabeth Strickland, of Leeds — at I^eds. ' 

Thomas White, of Bradford, and Elizabeth Blakey, of Otley— at either place. 

Thomas Cockerell, mariner [/miz/a], and Susan Lynn, widow, of Holy Trinity, 

Hull— at Holy Trinity. 
Thomas Shillito, of Featherstone, and Ann Boyne, of Sandal Magna — at either 

place. 
Thomas Brenand and Bridget Parker, of Slaidbum — at Slaidbum. 
Robert Johnson, clerk, of Beford, and Ann Alured, of Sculcoates — at either place. 
Peter Parker, of Leeds, and Ann Browne, of St. Martin, Coney Street, York — at 

either place.® 

[445] 

Robert Beet, of Sheffield, and Emma Lee, of Treeton — at either place. 

George Dickenson, of All Saints, and Ann Harrison, of St. Dennis, York — at 

either church. 
Roger Gibson, of Sculcoates, and Jane Haggitt, of Easington— at either place. 
Robert Glossop, of St. Martin, Micklegate, and Frances Johnson, of St. Michael- 

Ic-Belfrey, York — at either church.* 
Thomas Beck with and Sarah Beckwith, of Aldborough— at Masham. 
Hugh Morwin, of Wharram, and Ann Stainton, of Westow — at either place. 

(i) At Halifax, 24 May, 1628. (5) Son of Thomas Fairfax, of Sledmere. He 

(2) Married there 16 Aug. was residing at Whitby, 22 March, 1665-6, then 

(3) Not in the Skipton Register. aged 54. ^Du^dales VisitaUoH^ p. 229.) She 

(4) JohnGraunt, M.A., Dublin, was instituted was his first wife. 

to Calverley, 24 April, 1627. He was buried f6) At Halifax, 3 June, 

there 14 March, 1641-2. They were probably (7) Married 29 May. 

married at Calverley, but the Register is den* (8) Not at Leeds, 

cient at that time. There is no entry at Leeds. (9) Not at St. Michael's. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



paver's marriage licenses. 187 

1628. 

Christopher Bailey, of Elland, and Frances Stocke, of St. Saviour, York — at either 

place. 1 
Thomas Masterman and Jane Ley, of Dalton-in-TopclifTe — at TopclifTe. 
Samuel England, of Leeds, and Isabel Hill, of Marston — at Marston. 
Thomas Mudd, of Guisborough, and Mary Bardsey, of Helmsley — at either place. 
Frances Corbelt, clerk, rector of Patrington, and Ann Lamplugh, of Winestead — ^at 

either place." 
CJodfrey Whittingham, gent., of Goolner (?), and Isabel Vavasour, daughter of Sir 

John Vavasour, knt.. of Spaldinglon — at Aughlon or Spaldington. 
John Awnby, esq., of Kilvington, and Dame Margaret Ellis, alias Clough, of 

Barwick-in-Elmet — at either place. ^ 
Peter Oddy and Ma^aret Slater, of Keighley — at Keighley. 
John Lancaster, the younger, of Gisbum, and Elizabeth Hopkinson, of Slaidburn — 

at either place. 
Laurence Duxbury, of Downham, and Ann Pudsey, of Bolton-by-Boland, 

Lancashire— at either place. 
Thomas Agar, of Danby, and Cecily Foster, of Scawby — at either place. 
John Fletcher and Alice Smith, of Rotherham—at Rotherham. 
[446] 
William ilauley (?) and Elizabeth Wilkinson, widow, of Ecclesfield — at Ecclesfield. 

Edward Green and Elizabeth Green, of Silkstone — at Silkslone or Cawthorne. 

John Foster and Magdalen Shillito, of Doncaster — at Doncaster. 

John Pinler (?) and Elizabeth Sherecroft, of Campsall — at Campsall. 

John Twisleton, of Averingham, and Dorothy Stapleton, widow, of All Saints, 

North -street, York — at either place. 
John Swaldale, of Catterick, and Priscilla Sand with, of St. Olave, York — at St. 

Olave. 
Roger Norfolk, of Felkirk, and Ann Jenkinson, of Barnsley — at either place. 
Anthony Hatfield, of Laughton-en le-Morthen, and Faith Westby, of Rotherham — 

at either place.* 
Richard Greave, of Pateley Bridge, and Ellen Demeane, of Skipton — at either 

place. ** 
John Haigh, of Penistone, and Frances Home, of Silkstone — at either place. 
Jonathan Mitchell and Martha Deane, of Halifax — at Halifax. 
Robert Carrington, of Spaunton, and Ann Pilley, of Guisborough — at Lastingham 

or Guisborough. 
George Brearley and Grace Haigh, of Halifax — ^at Halifax. 
Nicholas Inman and Alice Geldart, of St. Crux, York — at St. Crux. 
Richard Harhind, of St. Michaelle-Belfrey, and Ann Streaker, of St. Olave, York— 

at either church.* 
John Hirst, of Almondbury, and Elizabeth Brooke, of Horbury — at either place.' 
Robert Harper, of I^eds, and Elizabeth Ryder, of All Saints, North-street, York — 

at All Saints. 
Jo. Oxley, of St. Michael -le-Belfrey, and Ann Lovell, widow, of St. Olave, York — 

at St. Michael. 8 

(i) Not at Elland. Stapleton, to whom she was married 26 March, 

(a) At Patrington, 20 June. He was inducted '627 at St. Ohive% York. (See p. i6o«.) 

25 May 1627 * ' ■' (4) Eldest son of Ralph Hatfield, of Laughton. 

/ \ /-vr OL J TT 11 u J- 1 1 . ^ She was daughter of George Westby, of Raven- 

(3) Of Sherwood Hall. He died about 1647, field, and died 19 Sept., 1659. They were 

having entered his pedigree at the Visitation married at Rotherham, 19 June, 1628. 

ofi6i2. She was his second wife, being daughter (5) Not at Skipton 

of Roger Lepton, Esq., and widow of Sir George \^\ ^ot at St. Michael's. 

Ellis, Knt., of York, who died 22 Nov., 1626, > ) ^t Horbury, it Sept. 

and of Edmund Clough, Esq., of Thorp J3) ^j st. Michael's, 17 June. 



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188 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

1628. 

[447] 

Richard Bowstard, of Kirkby Wharf, and Bridget Turpin, of Sherbum — at 
Sherburn. 

James Lambert, of Leeds, and Mary Hirst, of Almondbury — ^at either place. ^ 

Rol^rt Sandwith, of St. Olave, and Margaret Hutchinson, of St. Cuthbert, York — 
at either church. 

William Madson and Elizabeth Thorpe, widow, of Holme-on- Spalding Moor — at 
Holme. 

William Cooke, of Weighton, and Ann Fewster, of St. Crux, York — at either place. 

John Horsley and Jane Camplejon, of Cation — ^at Catton. 

Rowland Furnes and Jane Cowling, of Doncaster^t Doncaster. 

Richard Austwick and Frances Webster, of Batley — ^at Batley. 

William Atkinson and Margaret Sillibame, of Eston — at Eston. 

Robert Pinkney, of Leeds, and Margaret Husband, of Stokesley — at Stokesley.* 

Stephen Brogden and Maiy Demeane, of Skipton-in-Craven — ^at Skipton.* 

Richard Pratt, of Pontefract, and Elizabeth Foster, late of Ruiston, now of St. 
Helen, Stonegate, York — at either place. 

James Spenlay, of Thornton, and Mary Morley, of Grimston — at either place. 

James Rucroft, of Harte (?), and Alice Scadlock, widow, of Osbaldkirk — at either 
place. . 

Ralph Greaves and Elizabeth Wilson, of Bradfield — at Bradfield. 

[448] 

John Singleton, of St. Michael-le-Belfrey, York, and Audrey Hitchmough, of 
Wheldrake — at either place.* 

Brian lies, of Leeds, and Elizabeth Pawson, of All Saints, North-street, York — at 
either place.* 

Thomas Wood, gent., of Leeds, and Susan Pigott, of Monk Fryston— at either 
place. ^ 

William Strickland, of Batley, and Mary Baynes, of Leeds— at Leeds.'' 

Nicholas Burley and Elizabeth Warde, of Bradfield— at Bradfield. 

John Camaby and Jane Cundall, widow, of Easingwold — at Easingwold. 

William Redshaw, of Pannall, and Ann Rawe, of Pudsey — at Pannall. 

John Thornton and Alice Johnson, of North Dal ton — at North Dalton. 

William Richmond and Isabel Bnimley, of Ripon — at Ripon. * 

Francis Thompson, of Brandesburton, and Margaret Robinson, of Leckenfield — at 
Brandesburton. 

Richard Madson and Ann Brabbs, of Bubwith— at Bubwith. 

Francis Carbutt and Ellen Thompson, of Bolton Percy — at Bolton Percy. 

Mark Burdon, of Feliskirk, and Dorothy Roantree, of Leak — at either place. 

Alexander Strawe, of Hooton Roberts, and Alice Fawkes, of Wath— at either 
place. ® 

John Key, gent., of Rothwell, and Mary Riley, widow, of Wakefield— at Rothwell.® 

[449] 

Thomas Hill, of Acomb, and Alice Birdsall, of Doncaster — at either place. 

(t) Not at Leeds. (6) Married at Monk Fryston, 11 July, 1628. 

(2) At Siokcsley, 8 July, 1628. (7) Married there 12 July, 1628. 

(3) Not in the Skipton Register. (8) (?) Shaw. Married at Wath*on-Deame, 

(4) Not at St. Michael's. 22 July, 1628. 

(5) Not at Leeds. (9) At Rothwell, 21 July, 1628. 



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paver's marriage licenses. 189 

Z628. 

Thomas Brearcliffe, of Bardsey, and Isabel Leeming, widow, of St. Michael-le- 
Belfrey, York — at either place. ^ 

Joseph Watkinson, of Scruton, and Mary Binns, of Bingley— at either place. « 

Richard Ramsden, of Halifax, and Alice Rhodes, of Mirfield— at either place. 

Edward Crosland, of Ecclesfield, and Margaret Coupland, of Frickley — at either 
place. 

Robert Metcalfe, of Wakefield, and Frances Bagley, of Sandal — ^at either place. 

John Gibbon, of Bridlington, and Thomasin Carleton, of Hornsea — at either place. 

Robert Yoward, of Clifford's Inn, London, and Ellen Rishforth, of Marsk — at 
Marsk. 

Edward Copley, of St. John, Mickl^jate, York, and Elizabeth Favell, widow, of 
Womersall (?) — at either place. 

Edward Headley, of Rosse, and Thomasin Fishe, of Scarborough — at either place. 

Stephen Sergison and Margaret Foster, of Glsbum — at Gisburn. 

Christopher Elye, mercer, and Frances Houghton, of Holy Trinity, Hull — at 
Hessle or Holy Trinity. 

Richard Sloe, of St. Helen, Stonegate, and Petronel Scatchley, of St. Michael -le- 
Bclfrey, York — at either church.^ 

Thomas Vause, of St. Crux, and Elizabeth Hunter, of St. Margaret, York — at 
either church. 

John Arminson and Ellen Eyre, of Catton — ^at Catton. 

Roger Hobson, of Skipsea, and Dionis Wharram, of Barmston — at either place. 

John Hudson, of Featherstone, and Margaret Hallifax, of Pontefract — at either 
place. 

Thomas Briggs, of London, and Mary Briggs, of Barmston — at Barmston. 
[450] 

John Maior and Isabel Hauley (?), of Great Driffield— at Sigglesthorne or 
Driffield. 

Thomas Creswick, of Ecclesfield, and Ellen Fretwell, widow, of Maltby — at either 
place. 

John Baynes, merchant, and Grace Birkett, of Leeds— at Leeds.* 

John Facon and Ruth Smith, of Cottingham — at Cottingham. 

Thomas Poole and Mary Thorald, of Whitkirk— at Whitkirk." 

Thomas Squire and Elizabeth Mitchell, of Marton — at Marton. 

John Leach, of Luddington, co. Lincoln, and Ann Brooke, widow, of Batley — at 
Batley. 

John Atkinson, of Slaidburn, and Elizabeth Barber, of Gisburn— at either place. 

William Stones, of Kildwick, and Elizabeth Wall, of Skipton — at either place.* 

Francis Johnson and Susan Lowson, of Hunmanby — at Muston or Hunmanby. 

Thomas Fleming, gent., of Whitkirk, and Isabel Rokeby, of Wakefield — at either 
place. "^ 

William Arnold, of Kirksandal, and Elizabeth Birks, of Huns worth — at either 
place. 

George Westerman and Isabel Gledhill, of Bradford — at Bradford. 

St. Michael's, 21 July. (5) Married there T2 Aug. 

§»n?J«y; 3o,.J"ne- (6) Not at Skipton. 

St Michael s, 13 Aug. ) v xt . . iirv-.i • 1 

Leeds, ao Aug. (7) Not at Wbitkirk. 



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190 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

1628. 

John Agar, of St. Michael-le-Belfrey, and Isabel Lupton, of St. Mary, Castlegate, 

York— at St. Mary.i 
Richard Tyson and Mary Tancred, of Helmsley — at Helnisley. 
Richard Oxspring, of Ecclesfield, and Ann Ashbury, widow, of Sheffield — ^at either 

place. 
John Emmot, of Colne, and Ann Walker, of Bolton-by-Boland — at Bolton. 
Henry Carr, of Holy Trinity, Hull, and Bridget Pannall, of Cottingham — at either 

place. 
Adam Morte, of Preston, and Ann South worth, widow, daughter of Sir Thomas 

Tildesley, knt., of St. Michael- le-Belfrey, York— at either place. « 

[451] 

Robert Naylor, gent., of Fishlake, and Patience Riccard, of Snaith — at either place. 

Joseph Troughton and Cecily Walker, of Bradford — at Bradford. 

Richard Emyson and Isabel Millington, of Holme-on-Spalding Moor — at Holme. 

Richard Harrison, of Leeds, and Grace Peirson, of Birstall — at either place.* 

James Bright and Ann Spencer, of Sheffield — at Sheffield.* 

Roger Warde, of Morion, gent., and Catherine Ellis, of St. Michael-le-Belfrey, 

York— at St Michael.* 
John Hirst, of Almondbury, and Elizabeth Brooke, widow, of Horbury — at either 

place. ® 
Richard Elmhirst, of Worsborough, and Margaret Micklethwaite, of Doncaster — at 

Worsborough. ' 
Laurence Roberts, of Kirkburlon, and Elizabeth Pighills, widow, of Huddersfield — 

at either place. ^ 
Roger Johnson and Mary Wharton, widow, of Newton-upon-Ouse— at Newton. 
William Squire, clerk, and Mary Bayle, of Everingham — at Seaton. 
John Ellard, of Calton, and Dorothy Saunderson, of Marton— at either place. 
Christopher Procter, of Gargrave, and Dorothy Young, widow, of Burnsall — at 

either place.** 
Richard Seeker and Ellen Mansfield, of Rawmarsh— at Rawmarsh. 
Richard Acomb and Emote Taylor, of Burton Agnes — at Burton Agnes. 
James Babinj[lon and Alice Hughes, of Skipton — at Skipton.^*^ 
Thomas Flint and Mary Emerson, widow, of Knaresborough — at Knaresborough. 
William Humphrey, of Fulwood, and Julian Smales, of St. Mary, Beverley — at St. 

Mary. 
Francis Hutchinson, of Lythe, and Elizabeth Oliver, of EUerby — at either place. 
[452] 
Anthony Burslead, of Kirkby Wharf, and Christiana Briscoe, of Ryther — at Ryther. 

John Rogers and Lucy Roper, of Holy Trinity, Hull— at Holy Trinity. 
Thomas Bell, of Wath, and Catherine Bell, widow, of Ripon— at either place. 
Thomas Coulson, of Hackness, and Ann Allotson, of Wickham — at either place. 
Roger Walker and Joan Wilkinson, of Long Preston — at Long Preston. 
Edward Nicholson and Magdalen Coulbie, of Craike — at Craike. 
John Riley and Mary Hallilcy, of Luddenden — at Luddenden. 
Nicholas Greaves, of Penistonc, and Elizabeth Wainwright, of Cawthorne — at 
either place. 

(0 Not at St. Michael's. (7) Richard Elmhunt. of Houndhill, which he 

(a) Ac St. Michael's, 14 Aug. fortified for the Royal cause. Buried in St. 

(3) At I^eds, as Aiie. Helen's Church, York. She was daughter of 

(4) Third son of Thomas Bright, of Car- Richard Micklethwaite, of Swaithe Hall. She 
brook, a mercer at Sheffield. She was daughter died a Oct., 1633, and her husband married 
of William Spencer, of Attercliffe. Married 97 secondly Elizabeth Waite. 

Aug., 1628. Dugdale states she afterwards /g) Not at Kirkburton. 

married John Dawson, of Mi&terton, co. Notts. /xa.o n o* a a 

U) At St. Michael's, 21 Aug. (9) At Burnsall, 4 Sept., i6a8. 

(6) At Horbury, 11 Sept. (10) At Skipton, 77 Aug., 1638. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



paver's marriage licenses. 191 

1628. 

Robert Aray and Thomasin Morville, widow, of Linton — at Linton. 

Thomas Darley, gent., of Bossall, and Ursula Fisher, of Foston — ^at either place. 

George Winterburn, of St. Michael, Spurriergate, York, and Jane Carr, of Shields, 

province of York — at Shields. 
Henry Dickenson and Elizabeth Lewis, widow, of Owston — at Owston. 
Laurence Knowles, of St. Mary, Beverley, and Dorothy Parker, of South Cave — at 

either place. 
Edward Clerke, of Keighley, and Margaret Tennant, of Gisburn — at either place. 
John Shaw and Elizabeth Allan, widow, of Darton — at Darton. 
John Abbey, of Wighill, and Elizabeth Camidge, of Bramham — at either place. 
Roger Perritt, of Butterwick, and Mary Robinson, of Ormsby — at either place. 
William Sturdy, of Kirkby Moorside, and Jane Fewster, widow, of St. Crux, 

York — at either place. 

[453] 

John Atkinson, of Fewston, and Dorothy Palmes, of Otley — ^at either place. 

Richard Roberts and Ann Richardson, of Linton — ^at Linton.* 

William Higgin and Mary Hudson, of Barnoldswick — at Bamoldswick. 

Peter Nesfield and Elizabeth Cowper, of Scarborough — at Scarborough. 

William Barker, of Burton Leonard, and Catherine Simpson, of Hampsthwaite. 

John Nunns and Joan Carver, of Methley — at Methley.* 

Robert Williamson, of St. Martin, Coney-street, York, and Ann Hansley, of 

Kilnwick or Kildwick — at Kilnwick (?). 
Robert Walker and Sarah Taylor, widow, of Sheffield— at Sheffield. 
William Bromby, of Holy Trinity, Hull, and Elizabeth Piatt, of Sutton— at either 

place. 
John Lawrence, of St. Crux, and Ann Pawson, of St. Sampson, York — at either 

church. 
Thomas Miller, of St. Mary, and Joan Hemsley, of Holy Trinity, Hull — ^at either 

'church. 
Thomas Scarth, of St. Crux, York, and Elizabeth Heward, of Stonegrave— at either 

place. 
John Whittaker and Joan Simpson, widow, of Leeds — at Leeds. ^ 
Richard Hawksworth, of Loversall, and Jane Reynold, of Cantley — at either place. 
Rowland Badger, of Sheffield, and Margaret Wigfall, of Darfield — at either place. 
Robert Crompton, esq., and Ceziah Strickland, of Boynton — at Great Driffield or 

Boynton.* 
Robert Wilson, of Thirsk, and Mary Palliser, of Kirkby Wiske— at either place. ^ 

I Married there 97 Oct. was thrice married, and was buried at Cherry 

I Not there. Burton, 4 Sept., 1646. She was daughter of 

_} Married there 9 Oct., 1628. Sir Walter Strickland, of Boynton, and was also 

(4) Son of Thomas Crompton, who heads the buried at Cherrv Burton, 7 Dec., 1667. (C.B.N.) 

pedigree in Dugdaie's Visitation^ p. 322. He (5) See Dugaaie's Visitation^ p. 94. 



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NOTES ON THE BELLS 

OF THE ANCIENT CHURCHES OF THE 

WEST RIDING OF YORKSHIRE. 

By J. EYRE POPPLETON. 



(Conlhnud from page 32.) 



II. DIOCESE OF RIPON. 

Archdeaconry of Craven. 



{Tht Jigwrtt in brackets throughout thtse note* refer to thi iilustrations.) 

(a) Deanery of Craven (North). 
ARNCLIFFE (St Oswald). Three bells. 

For style of lettering see <^>. 3^ !»• dia. 

2. fKear0 fecit ILontimt 
(lower) (Slorta in altt00imi0 l9eo 

(Weight, 12 cwt. 3 qrs.) 

3. (STlamtto Et STempIum (l^uoti Fenetere Ideum 16 16 
(lower) <^8> without R. o. 

The first bell may well be one of those mentioned by Mr. 
Walbran (Mems. of Fountains) as having been given by Prior 
Whixley, of Fountains. 

BURNSALL (St. Wilfrid). Six bells. 

On each: dalton of vork fecit 1790 

CONISTON-WITH-KILNSEY (St. Mary). Two bells. 

1. Nil. 2oin. dia. 

2. 1887 22 in. dia. 



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> 

X 

UJ 

< 

-J 
Q- 







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Plate XVII. 




75- 



76. 



78. 



74- 



79 



80. 



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Plate XVIII. 



82. 



83- 



81. 



85- 



84. 



86. 



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>< 

X 

(- 
< 

_i 

Q_ 




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X 
X 

lU 
H 

< 



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BELLS IN THE WEST RIDING OF YORKSHIRE. 193 

These were given by Miss Blake, of Rylstone, as a Jubilee 
offering. There are two old bells in the church, which have — 

16 in. dia. 
2. S ANNO REGNI RGIS CAROLI NRI SGDI 16 ANNO DOMINI 1664 
(lower) THO WARDE WILL TENNANT CHVRCHWARDENS 

GARGRAVE (St Andrew). Eight bells. 

1. ON EARTH THE BELLS DO RING 

2. IN HEAVEN THE ANGELS SING 

3. GLORY TO GOD 

4. ON EARTH PEACE 

5. GOOD WILL TO MEN 

6. Hujus sCi Petri 37 in. dia. 

7. LAVS DEO 1747 FRN. YATES VICAR 
ROB. DVRDEN RICH. SHACKLETON 
CHA. ATKINSON ROB. MARKENDALE 
WIL. AIRTON INO. CLOVGH 

ANT. TOMLINSON CHVRCHWARDENS 

39 in. dia. 

8. VT TVBA SIC SONITV DOMINI CONDVCO COHORTES 1703 

WT IR RG HR WT WH RR CHVRCHWARDENS <»> 

43 in. dia. 
The first and second bells were cast by Messrs. Warner in 1880, 
and the next four by them in 1875. ^^^ inscription on the sixth is 
the same as that upon a pre-Reformation bell, which, having become 
cracked, was taken down in 1875. 

GIGGLESWICK (St. Alkelda). Six bells. 

These were cast by Messrs. Mears in 1850, at the expense of 
Mary Long Dawson and Elizabeth Hutton Dawson, of Halton Gill 
and Marshfield. 

1. FORTITUDE 4. CHARITY. 

2. TEMPERANCE 5. HOPE 

3. JUSTICE 6. FAITH 

Each has also the founders' name and the date. 
HALTON GILL (St John Baptist). One bell. 

GLORIA IN ALTISSIMIS DEO 1690 
•o^e-- {ilLV^ 18 in. dia. 

VOL. XVII. N 



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194 THE YORKSHIRE ARCa«OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

HORTON-IN-RIBBLESDALE (St. Oswald). Three bells. 

I & 2. GEO. DALTON YORK FECIT 1 776. 

3. In Inctintiitate jsoni »onato tibi Bne 1614 wo (39) 

HUBBERHOLME (St. Michael). One bell. 

9 IHESVS BE OVR SPEED 1601 

(lower) w o (32) Royal Arms (See Plate xiv.) 

KETTLEWELL (St. Mary). Three bells. 

These are by Messrs. Mears, and were given about i860 by Miss 
Dawson, of Settle, in place of the one bell then in use. 

KIRBY MALHAM (St. James). Three bells. 

1. * GOD BE OVR SPEED BOTH NOW AND EVER 1617 

w o W without R O 39 in. dia. 

2. SOLI DEO GLORIA DALTON FECIT YORK 178$ 

41^ in. dia. 

3. GOD SAVE OVR CHVRCH OVR QVEEN AND REALME 

lOSIAS LAMBERT ESQVIRE l6o2 

w o ^3*) Royal Arms (See Plate xiv.) 

46 in. dia. 
This last is said to be the largest bell in the diocese of Ripon, 
except the tenor in the Minster Tower. 

The death-bell is tolled for a time, and then, as a distinguishing 
finish, four strokes are given for a man, three for a woman, and two 
for a child. 

LINTON (St. Michael). One bell. 

GLORIA IN ALTISSIMIS DEO 1 692 

LONG PRESTON (St. Mary). Three bells. 

1. E DONO I KNOWLES IN 1630 
LESTER & PACK OF LONDON FECIT 1 762 

(Weight, 6 cwt.) 

2. LESTER & PACK OF LONDON FECIT 1 762 

(Weight, 9 cwt.) 

3. M^IEREH. HARRISON VICAR 

LESTER & PACK OF LONDON FECIT 1 762 

(VVeight, 12 cwt.) 
These were all rehung by Messrs. Mallaby in 1887. 

RYLSTONE (St. Peter). Three bells. 



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BELLS IN THE WEST RIDING OF YORKSHIRE. 195 

3. GLORIA IN EXSELSIS DKO C W W B 1658 

(lower) ^^ 

Each bell has on the rim : 

RECAST BY C & G MEARS LONDON 1 853 

These three bells replace three which bore the same (principal) 
inscriptions, which hung in the tower until the church was rebuilt 
in 1852. 

The inscription on the first was misread by the Rev. William 
Gary, formerly Incumbent of Bolton Abbey, into "J.N. God us ayde," 
the motto of the Nortons of Rylstone. Dr. Gary communicated this 
to the poet Wordsworth, and it is referred to by him in " The White 
Doe of Rylstone,^' Ganto vii : — 

"When the bells of Rylstone played 
Their Sabbath music * God us ayde,* 
That was the sound they seemed to speak. 
Inscriptive legend which, I ween, 
May on those holy bells be seen." 

Wordsworth adds a note (Edition 1837, vol. iv, p. 113): — "On one of 
the bells of Rylstone Ghurch, which seems coeval with the building 
of the tower, is the cypher, * J. N./ for John Norton, and the motto, 
*God us ayde.'" 

Dr. Fowler first exposed the error in Notes and Queries (28th 
November, 1868), and a reproduction of a rubbing, taken by 
Dr. Fowler from the actual inscription, afterwards appeared in the 
Reliquary (vol. x, Plate 7). (See Plate xvi.) 

It will be noticed that the shield or trade mark <3») occurs also at 
Grofton, near Wakefield, with a similar inscription, and at Kellington 
(with a cross in chief) with quite a different one, but no two of 
these three instances have the same lettering. 



(b) Deanery of Graven (South). 
BINGLEY (All Saints). Eight bells. 

I. MEARS & STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON 

(lower) THIS AND THE TENOR BELL ADDED 

AND THE PEAL REHUNG AT THE COST OF 

WALTER DUNLOP ESQ«= 1 874 

28^ in. dia. 
(Weight, 4 cwt. 3 qrs. 19 lbs.) 



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196 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH-ffiOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

2. THOMAS MEARS OF LONDON FECIT 1 828 

29 in. dia. 
(Weight, 5 cwt. 2 qrs. 8 lbs.) 

3. IF YOU HAVE A JUDICIOUS EAR 

YOU LL OWN MY VOICE IS SWEET AND CLEAR 

30^ in. dia. 
(Weight, 6 cwt. o qrs. 22 lb.) 

4. AT PROPER TIMES OUR VOICES WE WILL RAISE 
IN SOUNDING TO OUR BENEFACTORS PRAISE 

32 in. dia. 
(Weight, 6 cwt. 3 qrs. 8 lbs.) 

5. SUCH WONDROUS POWER TO MUSICS GIVEN 
IT ELEVATES THE SOUL TO HEAVEN 

34 in. dia. 
(Weight, 8 cwt. i qr. 5 lbs.) 

6. YOU RINGERS ALL THAT PRIZE YOUR HEALTH AND HAPPINESS 
BE SOBER MERRY WISE & YOU LL THE SAME POSSESS 

37J in. dia. 
(Weight, 9 cwt. o qrs. 22 lbs.) 

Nos. 3, 4, 5, and 6 have also on a lower line — 

PACK & CHAPMAN OF LONDON FECIT 1 7 73 

7. THOMAS MEARS OF LONDON FECIT 1 828 

REV° RICH° HARTLEY D.D. VICAR 

(lower) WILLIAM ENGLAND 

MICHAEL BROWN 



CHURCH WARDENS 
JAMES EDMUNDSON 



DAVID MITCHELL 

42 in. dia. 

(Weight, 12 cwt. I qr. 19 lbs.) 
Tenor. 

MEARS & STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON 1 87 3 
(lower) RING OUT THE DARKNESS OF THE LAND 

RING IN THE CHRIST THAT IS TO BE 
45 in. dia. 
(Weight, 15 cwt. 3 qrs. 24 lbs.) 

The tenor of Pack & Chapman's ring weighed 11 J cwt., and had — 

THIS PE.AL WAS RAISED IN T773 

JOHNSON ATKINSON BUSFIELD ESQ" WAS THE 

PRINCIPAL BENEFACTOR 

In 1828 this bell was cracked. 

Up to 1824 a bell was rung on weekdays at eight p.m., and after 
long discontinuance the custom has been revived in recent years. 
The Pancake Bell is still rung here. 



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BELLS IN THE WEST RIDING OF YORKSfflRE. 197 

KEIGHLEY (St. Andrew). Six bells. 

These are by Messrs. Lester, Pack & Chapman, circa 1 761-81. 
The tenor weighs 14 cwt. 

Up to about 1850 a bell was rung every weeknight at eight o'clock. 

KILDWICK (St. Andrew). Six bells. 

1. REV. M^DEHANE VICAR 

2. ROBERT SPENCER JOHN BOOTH WILLIAM LEE 

FRANCIS STIRK CHURCHWARDENS 

3. JOHN WATSON 

4. WILLIAM COCKSHOTl' 

5. SAMUEL SLACK 

6. PETER SMITH 

(Weight, 10 cwt.) 
On each, in addition : — 

PACK & CHAPMAN OF LONDON FECERUNT 1780 

Churchwardens' Accounts : — £ j. d, 

1746. September i. To Thos. Witherop, the Sexton, 
for his half-year's wages for looking to the clock and bells, 

and ringing night and morn o 10 o 

(Gray's Airedale^ p. 208.) 
SILSDEN (St. James). Six bells. 

These are by Messrs. Warner & Co., and bear only the name of 
the founders and the date, 1895. They were dedicated by the Bishop 
of Richmond 4th August, 1895. 

Up to that year there was one bell, which bore nothing but the 
date 1659, and is said to have been the dinner-bell at Skipton 
Castle. In connection with this story it is notable that Silsden 
Church was built by Thomas, sixth Earl of Thanet and eighteenth 
Baron de Clifford (Lord of Skipton), in 171 2. The old bell was last 
rung as the noon bell on 9th January, 1895. 



(c) Deanery of Craven (West). 
BARNOLDSWICK (St. Mary). Three bells. 

1. PEACE AND GOOD NEIGHBOURHOOD 

28 in. dia. 
(Weight, circa 5 cwt.) 

2. RENDER THEREFORE UNTO C/ESAR THE THINGS WHICH ARE 

[CiESARS AND TO GOD THE THINGS WHICH ARE GODS 

29 in. dia. 

3. WILLIAM DRAKE CHVRCHWARDEN 

31 in. dia. 
(Weight, circa 8 cwt.) 



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198 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

BOLTON-BY-BOLI.AND (St. Peter and St Paul). Three bells. 

1. *<36) See paulc ora pro alabug f)enriri pubsjeg et 

[matgatete conMrte<*) «tie 

2. lii <36) j^ce 3ol)t0 baptissta ota pro aiabus tol)t0 pubseg 

[mflittft et jpptacie consorte sue 

3. CVM SONO BVSTA MORI CVM PVLPITA VIVERE 

[DISCE 1749 fE^l"}^^^ 

The first and second bells bear also a small figure of the Blessed 
Virgin and Child, about 2 in. x i in., very indistinctly cast. 

There is a tradition that Nos. i and 2 came fi-om Sawley Abbey, 
and there is an undated entry in the Parish Register : " The Great Bell 
in the Parish Church of Bolton was given by Edward King, Esqr., 
then Vice-Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster," but it was told me 
at Gisburne that one of the bells from that church was taken to 
Bolton (possibly bought by Mr. King) in 181 8, when Gisburne 
obtained six new bells. 

Sir John Pudsey (eldest son of Sir Ralph Pudsey and Margaret, 
daughter of Sir Thomas Tunstall, of Scargill, knight) in 3 Edward IV 
married Grace, daughter of Lawrence Hamerton, of Hamerton, and 
had issue. Henry Pudsey, his eldest son, married (i) Margaret, 
daughter of Sir John Conyers, of Hornby Castle, knight. She died 
in 1500, and is buried with her husband (who died in 1509) at 
Bolton. Their son, Henry Pudsey, who was living in 1511, married 
Margaret, daughter of Roger Tempest, of Broughton. 

(Foster's Pedigrees^ ii.) 

At the time of a funeral a peal is rung here from the time the 
funeral is sighted till it reaches the church. 

BRACEWELL (St. Michael). One bell. 

GLORIA IN ALTISSIMIS DEO 1718 

(lower) {^Vfi^[*'[ '^^ 10 WILKINSON CHVRCH 
CH BROWN WARDENS 

There have evidently been three bells originally, and two at a 
comparatively recent date. 

BROUGHTON-IN-CRAVEN (All Saints). Three bells. 

I. * BONVM EST CELEBRARE lEHOVA 1 663 
2 GLORIA IN ALTISSIMO DEO 1713 

{a) The first syllable of this word is represented by a curious abbreviation 
resembling the figure 2. 



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BELLS IN THE WEST RIDING OF YORKSHIRE. 199 

3. In lEncuntittate £ont £onabo EM Qne Bulcetiine 

[Uocig Cantabo STuo i^loe * 1615 * * 
(lower) w o ^^^ 

RO 

CARLTON-IN-SKIPTON (St Mary). Three bells. 

1. SOLI DEO SIT LAVS ET GLORIA 1615 

(lower) w. o. <^> without r. o. 

2. G MEARS FOUNDER LONDON 1859 

3. WHEN I DOE RING GODS PRAYSES SING 1 65 6 AS 

(Weight, 8 cwt.) 
(lower) w. c. ^'3) 

The second bell is a mediaeval bell, recast. It formerly had — 

GISBURNE (St. Mary). Six bells. 

On each — x mears of london fecit i8i8 

In addition, on — 

4. these bells were ordered by JOHN earnshaw 

5. THE KING THE CHVRCH & LIBERTY 

6. REV^ ROBERT KNOWLES MINISTER 

JOHN BARLOW HENRY WILKINSON JOHN MOORE 
ROBERT WOFINDALE CHURCHWARDENS 

John Earnshaw was a Clitheroe man. 
Robert Knowles was vicar 1793 to 1822. 

Up to 18 1 8 there were three bells here, of which Mears got two, 
and the third is said to have been sent to the neighbouring church 
of Bolton (^.z'.). It may be the present tenor at Bolton. 

Formerly the third bell was rung at seven a.m. and eight p.m. in 
summer and seven a.m. and six p.m. in winter. This was discontinued 
about 1888, but the then Lady Ribblesdale and others protested, and 
the bell is now rung at seven a.m. and eight p.m. all the year round. 
A bell is rung at eleven a.m. on Shrove Tuesday. 

For a death the tenor is rung for a short time, and then — 
For a man, three strokes each on third, fourth, and fifth bells. 
„ woman, five „ „ „ „ 

„ boy, three „ first, second, and third bqlls. 

„ girl, five „ „ „ „ 

GRINDLETON. One bell. 

This, I am informed, is a small bell, without inscription, which 
was formerly a mill bell. 



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200 THE YORKSmRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

MARTON-IN-CRAVEN (St. Peter). Three bells. 

I. In ]^ncuntiitate Sont £onaba QTibt IBne. 

(lower) 1635 

2 & 3. G. MEARS FOUNDER LONDON 1 85 9 

(Weight of tenor, 4^ cwt.) 
GREAT MITTON (St. Michael). Six bells. 

1. J TAYLOR & CO LOUGHBOROUGH 1 87 2 

2. RO. PARKER THO WALMESLEV RIC. MAYSON JOHN EMETl' 

WIL HALL CHURCH WARDENS 1726 <»> 

3. GOD SAVE HIS CHVRCH 1624 

4. SYR. LAWRENCE SPEYKE VICAR R. W. H. M. ^^^ 1 567 

5. lEHVIS HT WH NW RB KW 1567 <7o) 

6. THOMAS MEARS OF LONDON FOUNDER 1 834 

The fifth and sixth bells are of an unusual (in Yorkshire), rather 
ornamental, Roman lettering. 

SKIPTON (Holy Trinity). Six bells. 

On each — lester & pack of London fecit 

Also — 

1. VENITE EXULTEMUS DOMINO 1 759 

2. (incised) fras. atkinson ch. warden for barden 

[welbury howgate for h alton 1 759 

3. jno chippindale for eastby . geo. demaine 

[for hazlewood . 1759 

4. w" myers ch. warden for draughton . 

[w" atkinson for embsav 1759 

5. henry atkinson & thos. booth ch. wardens 

[for STIRTON CUM THORLBY 1 759 

6. (incised) Walter priest, vicar, hugh tilletson 

[& w^ chippindale & tho. heelis 
[churchwardens 1759 
(Weight, 18 cwt. 2 qrs. 24 lbs.) 

In 1628 Francis, Earl of Cumberland, gave "the litle bell," with 
wood for its frame. Gent, in his History of Ripon (page 40), states 
that the five bells which hung in the tower at the time of the Civil 
War were seized as prize of war. ;£^2oo was paid to redeem them, 
but only four were sent back, and these hung in the tower till 1759. 
Timothy Crowther, who was parish clerk about the middle of last 
century, tried to persuade the churchwardens to get a new ring of 



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BELLS IN THE WEST RIDING OF YORKSmRE. 201 

bells, but could only induce them at that time to afford new clappers. 
It IS said that Crowther intentionally procured clappers so much too 
heavy as to crack such of the bells as were whole, and thus neces- 
sitate a new ring ; hence the item in the churchwardens' accounts : 
"1757. May 9. Paid at the Visitation with the present't touching 
the bells being out of repair, 6s. 6d" 

At a vestry meeting held on 23rd September, 1759, it was resolved 
to have the existing bells exchanged or melted down with other 
metal into a ring of six new bells, the tenor to be 18 cwt., and it was 
agreed to raise the cost and expenses to be incurred by subscription 
and assessment. The little bell was sold to the churchwardens of 
Rilstone for jCiS, and the others were taken and allowed for by 
Messrs. Pack & Chapman. 

Messrs. Pack & Chapman received ^203 igs. 6d. for work and 
additional metal. Mr. James Harrison, of Barton, hung the bells, and 
received ;;^37 10s, 9^., besides ^10 2s. paid for clappers and other 
ironwork, and jQi^ for wood for the new frames. Carriage and 
other expenses brought the total cost of the new bells and their 
fittings up to ;£^293 17J. ^d, £iSl ^9^- w«^s raised by subscriptions, 
including ;^5o from the Earl of Thanet and ;£"2o from the Duke of 
Devonshire, and jQi^S i^^- 3^- ^^^ raised by sale of the old metal 
and by assessment. (See Dawson's History of Skipton^ pp. 16 1-4.) 

Up to about fifty years ago the bells were always rung on 29th 
May and 5 th November. 

Formerly a bell was rung daily at noon and at five p.m. In 
1880 I found a bell rung at noon and at eight p.m., and after the 
latter the day of the month was struck upon the bell. 

SLAIDBURN (St. Andrew). Six bells. 

These are by Thomas Mears in 1843, with a tenor, weighing 
i5i cwt. Formerly there were — 

1. THOMAS DUGDALE JOHN WEBSTER JOHN GUV 

[jOHN TOWNSON CHURCHWARDENS 

2. SERVAVIT ME CUM SERMONE 

3. IN DOMINO CONFIDO 1 567 

In 1889 a bell was rung here daily at eight p.m. 
THORNTON-IN-CRAVEN (St. Mary). Four bells. 

I. J. SHAW SON & C^- FOUNDERS BRADFORD 

(lower) GIVK PEACE IN OUR TIME . O . LORD 

RECAST JUNE 1 887 



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202 TliE YORKSHIRE ARC HiEO LOGICAL JOURNAL. 

2. K P IMPRIMIS VENERARE DEUM HENRY RICHARDSON A.M. 

[rector JOHN WILCOCK STEPHEN BANISTER JOHN 
(lower) HARGREAVES CHURCHWARDENS. 

LESTER & PACK FECIT 1 759 

(incised) 6.2. 12 (possibly the weight) 

3. * (36) Campana jjc« 9ntaniug 

4. ^ (3<5) atje gra plena tni tecum 

The first bell formerly had, according to Whittaker's Craven, an 
inscription similar to that on the present second. Whittaker also 
gives the inscription on another bell, which he makes No. 3 : — 

VENITE AD PRECKS VENITE AD CONCIONES 
LESTER il- PACK I 759 

When I was in the tower in 1889 there was the appearance of 
there having at one time been six bells. 

The Rev. Henry Richardson was rector 1735-78, and has a 
monument in the church. On the tower is carved the date of its 
building, a'no D'm mcccccx, and this may very well be the date of 
the present third and fourth bells. 

TOSSIDE (St. Bartholomew). One bell. 

I am informed that this is a small bell, without inscription. 



h 2, 3» i 

4&5 i 



WADDINGTON (SL Helen). Six bells. 

PACK & CHAPMAN OF LONDON FEUT I774 

ROB^ SMITH MINISTER JOHN PVE RICH. CURTIS GEO. 

[hORNER JOHN HARGREAVES CH. WARDENS 
PACK & CHAPMAN OF LONDON FECIT 1 774 



(d) Deanery of Bradford. 
BRADFORD (St. Peter). Ten bells. 

1. LOVE IS THE FULFILLING OF THE LAW 
CAST IN THE YEAR OF OUR REDEMPTION 1 846 

2. FOR WHATEVER IS NOT OF FAITH IS SIN 

J. TAYLOR FECIT A.D. 1 846 

3. BUT THEY HAD ALL THINGS IN COMMON 

J. TAYLOR FECIT A.D. 1 846 
4) 5) I JOHN TAYLOR & SON FOUNDERS LOUGHBOROUGH 
8 & 9. f A.D. 1846 



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.(I) 


5 


(2) 


5 


(3) 


6 


(4) 


6 


(5) 


6 



BELLS IN THE WEST RIDING OF YORKSHIRE. 203 

6. J, TAYLOR & SON FOUNDERS LOUGHBOROUGH 

LATE OF OXFORD AND ST. NEOTS 

7. THE MOST HIGH DWELLETH NOT IN TEMPLES MADE 

[with HANDS A.D. 1 846 

8. THIS PEAL OF TEN BELLS WEIGHING 5 TONS 5 CWTS WAS 

[cast by JOHN TAYLOR & SON OF LOUGHBOROUGH 

[A-D. 1846 BY PUBLIC SUBSCRIPTION 

WILLIAM SCORESBY D.D. F.R.S. VICAR 

W" PEARSON AND EDWARD HAWKSWORTH PARRATT 

CHURCHWARDENS 

4 ft. dia. 

The weights of the bells are as follows: — 

Cwt. qrs. lbs. 

3 o (6) 

3 II (7) 

1 4 (8) 

2 o (9) 
2 6 (10) 



It is notable, in view of the recent controversy about musical 
pitch, that when these bells were agreed for it was specified that 
they were to be in " that most noble and magnificent key, C sAarfi "; 
but according to present pitch they are in the key of C natural 

According to the churchwardens' accounts there were four bells 
only in 1666. In 1715 these were, with additional metal, cast into 
six, at a cost of ^200. In 1750 two more bells were added. The 
ring however does not seem to have been satisfactory, for in 1750 
certain exchanges were made with other churches in Leeds or the 
neighbourhood, at a cost of ;£^5o. In 1846 the eight were recast, 
with additional metal, into the present ten, at a cost of over ^500, 
raised by subscription. They were opened on 3rd September, 1846. 

Up to 1840 it was customary to ring a bell daily at five a.m. and 
eight p.m., but in that year the vestry put an end to the custom. 
Formerly a tune was played on the bells every four hours, viz. at 
four, eight, and twelve. The bells were at one time rung all through 
the night previous to Bradford Fair, as a guide to drovers and others 
making their way thither. In their 1683 accounts the churchwardens 
charge : — 

I s. d. 

"In candles for ye Ringers ringing at ye Income 

(incoming) of S. Andrews flfaire 00 00 i " 



Cwt. 


qrs. 


lbs. 


8 


2 


I 


10 





21 


10 


I 


15 


17 


I 


14 


27 





14 


104 


2 


2 



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204 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

CALVERLEY (St. Wilfrid). Eight bells. 

At the Survey of 1552 there were three bells here. The present 
bells were cast by Messrs. George Mears & Co. in 1862, at a cost of 
;^202, raised by subscription. Up to 1745 there were only three 
bells. I.C.G. 6 Edw. VI V" i'- On 3rd July, 1745, at a meeting 
held in the vestry of the Parish Church, it was agreed that the 
existing three bells should be new cast and converted into six, and 
that the Rev. Mr. Dodgson, vicar, Thomas Clapham, and Samuel 
Popplewell should be empowered to contract with Messrs. Edward 
and John Sellars, of York, for the executing of the said work, and 
that such assessment should be from time to time raised as should 
be sufficient to satisfy the said Edward and John Sellars for the 
performance of the same, provided such assessment so to be raised 
do not in the whole exceed the sum of eighty guineas. 

( Yorkshire Magazine^ iii, 480.) 

By September, 1745, the recasting had been effected. Sir Walter 
Calverley in his Note Book ( Yorkshire Diaries^ Surtees Society, Ixxii, 
p. 148) gives particulars as follows : - 

New Bells at Calverley. Account of the Charge, 
7th September, 1745. 

To three old bells recasting, 32 cwt. o qrs. 17 lbs., at 

20//. per ton 32 3 o 

To additional mettal to make six bells, 1 1 cwt. i qr. 2 lbs., 

at 14^. per lb. ... ... ... ... * ... ... 74 4 o 

To exchange of clappers, &c. ... ... ... ... 2100 

To six bells hanging .. ... ... ... ... 24 o o 

Which was paid as under to one Edward Sellars, a Bell Founder in 

York, the 8th November, 1745. 

C s. d. 
Sir Walter Calverley gave towards the charge of the 

above bells ... ... ... ... ... ... 20 o o 

The Rev. Mr. Dodgson, Vicar of Calverley, gave 10 o o 

The Parish of Calverley, by the Churchwardens 102 17 o 

N.B. Sir Walterley Calverley, besides giving 20//., lent the 
churchwardens the remainder of the money without interest, which is 
now all paid in. 

N.B. In the year 1748 the above bells cost rehanging the sum 
of twelve or thirteen i)ounds, paid to Harrison, of which sum Sir 
Walter Calverley paid and gave in timber seven or eight pounds. 



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BELLS IN THE WEST RIDING OF YORKSHIRE. 



205 



HA WORTH (St. Michael). Six bells. 



6. 


THESE BELLS WERE RAISED 


BY 


SUBSCRIPTION 






REV. P. BRONTE A.B. INCUMBENT 






MR GEO. FEATHER 
M« JAS. LAMBERT 


} 


CHURCHWARDENS 






C & O. MEARS FOUNDERS 


LONDON 1845 




These bells were first rung in the 


tower on loth March, 


1846 


The weights 
(I) 


are as follows : — 

2 ft. 4 in. dia., Key F 




Cwt. qrs. lbs, 
... 436 




(2) 


2 „ 4* » „ Eb 




4 3 20 




(3) 


2 „ 7* »i n Db 




•• 532 




(4) 


2 „ 9i n M C 




... 709 




(5) 


3^1 » » Bb 




... 9 19 




(6) 


3 » 4 » „ Ab 




... II 2 27 





In ringing the death-bell here the tenor is used for a man, the 
fourth bell for a woman, and the second for a child. 

IDLE. One bell. 

The one bell is by Messrs. Shaw, of Bradford. The bell formerly 
hanging in the old chapel, erected in 1630, is at the mission room, 
in a quite inaccessible position, but does not appear to have any 
mark or lettering on it. 

LOW MOOR (Holy Trinity). Eight bells. 

These were cast in 1856. There is one of the former bells in 
the basement of the tower, which bears — 



« 



(lower) 



w r(^) r 


R(^) 


N P 


T G 


R P I 


P 






tr(^ 


S W 


1640 




MINISTER 
I F 


I S 


IS 


CHVRCH 
WARDENS 





I s 



Archdeaconry of Richmond. 



(a) Deanery of Clapham. 
BENTHAM (St. John Baptist). Seven bells. 

There were formerly three bells. These were taken down in 
1877 and photographs taken of them as they stood in the church- 



(b) William Rookes, of Royds Hall. 

(c) Robert Rookes or Richard Rookes, 
brother of the last. 



(ct) Tempest Rookes, another brother. 
(See pedigree of this family in Whittaker's 
History of Leeds.) 



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206 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

yard. The treble had apparently no inscription. Of the second bell 
only the word " mori " and the date "1733 "is to be made out. The 
tenor still survives, and is hung in the church porch. It is tolled at 
funerals. It has — 

« (55) £um ]&ada ]^ubata fHuntif ilSatia Focata 
The capitals being very fine and crowned.^^O 

In the tower are six bells, by Messrs. Taylor & Co., of Lough- 
borough, of the following weights : — 

Cwt. qrs. lbs. 

(1) 702 

(2) 8 O 21 

(3) 8 3 17 





Cwt. 


qrs. lbs. 


(4) 


10 


I 17 


(s) 


13 


I 


(6) 


19 


2 14 



67 I IS 
CHAPEL-LE-DALE (St. Mary). One bell. == 

A SEWARD LANCASTER 

18 in. dia. 
This bell was cast about 1877. 

CLAPHAM (St. James). Three bells. 

1. VENITE EXVLTEMVS DOMINO I720 

(lower) ^ss^(0 

2. *(72) 1594(73) TIME DEVM NOSCE TE IPSVM RESPICE FINEM 

3. MY CRACK IS CVRED NOW ALOVDE I CRY 
COME PRAY REPENT 

HEARE BELEEVE LEARNE TO DYE C P 

(lower) w c ^^3) five times w c (^^ s s fecit 1662 
(Weight, 30 cwt.) 
No. 2 is from stamps I have not found elsewhere ; possibly a 
I^ncashire founder. 

DENT (St. Andrew). Six bells. 
On each — 

W" MEARS OF LONDON FECIT 1 787 

(Weight of tenor, 8 cwt.) 
There is an old story that once, when Sedbergh and Dent were 
each having a new ring of bells, by mistake of the waggoners the 
Dent bells were taken to Sedbergh and the Sedbergh ones got to 
Dent. The old bells at Sedbergh {q.v.\ however, were certainly not 
all of the same date, but i6o to 200 years older than the present 
bells at Dent. 



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BELLS IN THE WEST RIDING OF YORKSHIRE. 207 

GARSDALE (St. John Baptist). Two bells. 

One of the bells came from the old church, rebuilt in i860, and 
the other is said to have been procured at the rebuilding. Neither 
bell has any mark or inscription. 

INGLETON (St. Mary). Six bells. 

These are steel bells, E. Reipe's patent, cast by Naylor, Vicars 
and Co. in 1861. 

There were formerly three bells, which were sold to raise funds 
for the present ring. The old bells had — 

1. BE IT KNOWN TO ALL MEN THAT ME SE 

THOMAS STAFFORD OF PENRITH MADE ME ANO DONI 1630 R F 

2. T.P| ESQ: T-B- CVRATEi T.W j H.C • R.F j 

c.w: cHVRCHg: ,r: clark : c.b- t.r; iwj cii 

WARDEN * • ..... 

i.Ri T.Bi o.S: p.Pi 1 7 19: i.g | lm* c.o| 

3. SOLI DEO GLORIA PAX HOMINIBVS 1 7 79 

The new bells cost ;;^358 12s. Sd, 

SEDBERGH (St. Andrew). Eight bells. 

r. * Wza gratiag qui Uetiit nabisi Uictoriam * 
(lower) a. fH. ffi. © et in p.m. Eoberti ?^etberti (Buick ijg 
parocbiae Ficarii 1883-1887 liti. uiot tjug 1897 

2. * J^ora fugit, ora, labora * 
(lower) 1897 

3. * Per singulog bieg benetiicemug Et * 
(lower) 1897 

4. * Suraum dorlia. J^abenrajs ati ©nm * 
(lower) 1897 

5. * Hunc tjitnittisj gctbum tuum fflne in pace * 
(lower) 1897 

6. * (!C0nctpienj5 I pia Uirgo coetum tega * 
(lower) IBenba rccanflata 1897 

7. * Coelotutn Itr placeat tibi tci jsonutf ijste * 
(lower) JBenbo reconttata 1897 

8. * Jifaec campana gacra fiat drinitate beata * 
(lower) ffienbo teconfiata 1897 

Each of these bells has also Messrs. Taylors' mark, a bell 
surrounded with a circle, bearing "* John * Taylor * and Co * 
Loughborough," with an Agnus Dei above. To fill up the principal 
line of each inscription a beautiful ornament is used, blackberries and 



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.208 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

their leaves on the first four bells, and vine leaves with grapes on the 
other four. According to a brass plate in the church, these bells 
were given in memory of the Rev. R. H. Quick, a former vicar, by 
his widow. 

The third bell is rung for the daily service, the fourth for the 
Holy Communion, and the fifth as a passing bell. 

There were formerly three bells, of which excellent photographs 
were taken before they were broken up. These had — 

1. Celotutn lie placeat tibi xtx aonua inte <'^> ^'^^ 

2. Concipimtf ipia bitfio celum refia^'^^Xis) 

3. 3^cc Campana Sacra Uiat STrmitatc ISeata <»<5) ds) h («) (7) 

The " C " in No. 2 is <'9) right side up, and the " C " in No. 3 is (7) 
right side up. On No. 2 was a figure of the Blessed Virgin similar 
to that on the Rouclyffe Bell at Cowthorpe. (See Plate xx.) 

THORNTON-IN-LONSDALE (St. Oswald). Three bells. 

1. Dulcetime Vocisi Cantabo Cuo Noe 1671 
(lower) ws(74) 

2. Cn InrimtJitate «oni gonabo tibi line 1635 
(lower) w s ^74) 30 in. dia. 

(This bell was cracked about 1854, and now lies unhung in 
the intermediate stage of the tower.) 

3. VT TVBA SIC SONITV DOMINI CONDVCO COHORTES 1 7 22 

(lower) t^) 

A bell was formerly rung every Sunday at eight a.m., but the 
custom is now discontinued. 

In ringing the death-bell it is customary to sound sixty strokes 
each on the first and third bells. If the ringing is for a male the 
strokes are given on the tenor bell first, if for a female on the treble 
bell first. 

(b) Deanery of Masham. 
KIRKBY MALZEARl) (St. Andrew). Six bells. 

I & 2. CAST BY JOHN WARNER & SON LONDON 

(lower) KIRKBY MALZEARD 1 866 

ERECTED 1 866 BY VOLUNTARY SUBSCRIPTIONS 

3. lESVS BE OVR SPEED 1 62 2 
(lower) W R 34 in. dia. 

4. lESVS BE OVR SPEED 1609 (3*) 

37 in. dia. 



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BELLS IN THE WEST RIDING OF YORKSHIRE. 



209 



5. GOD SAVE OVR CHVRCH 1609 <3a) 

40 in. dia. 

6. ALL MEN THAT HEARS MY DOLEFULL SOUND 
REPENT BEFORE DEATH YOU CONFOUND 

(lower) GEO" THIRKILL CH. WARDEN 

LESTER & PACK OF LONDON FECIT 1 768 

44 in. dia. 
This bell bears the figures of two short-handled picks or 
hammers/^'> which may represent the tool with which bells were 
tuned by chipping the sound bow. 

Mr. R. C. Hope, of Scarborough, has furnished me with extensive 
extracts from the churchwardens' accounts, &c., of this parish, com- 
mencing with the year 1576. 

In 1591 one of the bells was recast in the church itself. The 
items in the accounts are as follows: — 

Imp. for casting the Bell iij^*. vij5. 

To Will. Ripley, for that layde out aboute the bell casting . . . xljj. vd. 

It, for I board 4 yards long w\]d, 

„ woode for drying the mold xij^. 

„ flags for his fornaces viijj. 

„ j pounde of Bee waxe xd, 

„ drinke at takeing downe the Bell ... xiiij^. 

„ 2 planks ij.f. v]d. 

„ to Cudbert ffisher, for going to Yorke to buy mettall . . . \\]s, '\i\]d, 

„ cleeving of woode viij^. 

„ I gallon of ale at the drying of the moeld vd, 

„ ale & breade at the bell casting xix//. 

„ ale & brede & ale for draweing the bell into the 

steple iijj. \)d, 

„ to ffran. Braythwaite, for iij dales worke about hanging 

the Bell ijj. \]d. 

„ for going to Rippon to fetch one cable liij^. 

„ to Vincent Outhwaite, for paveing the Church where 

the bell was casten ... ... ... ... ... ijj. 

„ bearing of horse dung to the bell casting iijx. iiij^. 

„ Pewter for the bell vijj. iiij^f. 

„ payde to John Burnet, that borrowed about the bell 

casting... ... ... ... ... ... ... xxf. 

„ to ffabian Heywoode, for the like xj. 

„ „ Cud. ffisher xs. 

„ „ „ for leading woode \]s. 

„ „ Will. Man, for 30 pounde of Bras ... ... \s. 

VOL. xvn. o 



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210 THE YORKSHIRE ARCrt^EOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

It, to Will. Walker, for 9 pounde of Bras iiij^. 

„ „ Thos. „ 15 „ vj^. 

„ „ John Beckwith, for bringing mettall from Yorke ... i}s. 

„ „ Gilb. Anderson, for 12 pounde of Bras iiijj. 

,, „ Sym. Woodhouse, ij pounde & a halfe ... ... iiiji. xd. 

„ „ Mar. ffoster, for bands nailes to the Bells iiijf. i}d, 

„ „ Christ. Toppon, for one litle Bell (probably a hand 

bell melted up) .. ... xs. 

„ for j hide of woode iiij^. 

„ for riving of woode in the spring ... ... ... x^. 

„ Antho: Gaines wife, for woode iujd. 

Suirie disbursed about the bells, xij//. \xs, yiijd. 

In 1609-10 three of the great bells were recast by Mr. Oldfield, 
he being paid ;;^38 for his work. The wording of the accounts 
seems to imply that there were more than three great bells in the 
tower, and in 16 16 /our bell wheels were paid for. The tenor, 
second, and third bells were those recast by Oldfield in 1609, the 
tenor being dealt with at one time and the two smaller bells at 
another. These latter still remain. The tenor seems to have been 
recast in 1768. 

The accounts do not state where Oldfield set up his furnace, &c., 
but it could not have been far off, as the item, "Itm., for bringing 
the bells to the furnaces and for weighing them," is only i]s. In 1622 
"the litel bell," which seems to have escaped in 1609, was taken to 
Thirsk and recast there, in pursuance of an agreement previously 
entered into with William Oldfield. The negotiation seems to have 
been thirsty work : — 

It., to the bell (founder in earnest ... ... ... ... xij^. 

„ spent in drinke when Willm. Oldfield was heare xij</. 

„ spent in ale when the bargaine was mad for casting the bell xij^. 

In 1623 Oldfield was paid j£6 14s. for the recasting. This 
church is said to have received four bells out of the twelve taken 
from the Trinitarian Priory at Knaresborough (g.v,). 

From 6th April to nth October they ring the second bell here 
on weekdays at seven a.m. and five p.m. 

MIDDLESMOOR (St. Chad). Six bells. 

1. TO CALL THE FOLKS TO CHURCH IN TIME WE CHIME 

2. PEACE ON EARTH GOOD WILL TO MEN 

3. BE JOYFUL UNTO THE LORD 
.'. PRAISE GOD ON HIGH 



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BELLS IN THE WEST RIDING OF YORKSHIRE. 211 

5. LOVE ONE ANOTHER 

6. IN MEMORY OF SIMOJI HORNER MERCHANT OF HULL 
NATIVE OF THIS PLACE BORN 1 735 DIED 1829 AGED 94 

REMEMBER THE SABATH DAY 
CAST BY WILLIAM BLEWS & SONS BIRMINGHAM 1868 

This ring weighs 2 tons 11 cwt., and was presented by Mrs. 
Barkworth in furtherance of the wishes of her uncle, Mr. Simon 
Horner, of Hull, at a cost of upwards of ;£5oo. The Homers are a 
very old family in this district. It was particularly requested by the 
donor that the bells should be rung every Saturday evening. The 
ring was opened nth June, 1868. {Ripon Gazette, 12th June, 1868.) 



Archdeaconry of Ripon. 



(a) Deanery of Boroughbridge. 
ALDBOROUGH (St. Andrew). Six bells. 

1. TO HONOUR GOD AND KING 
IN MELODY WE RING 

(lower) THO* MEARS LATE LESTER PACK & CHAPMAN 

[of LONDON FF-CIT 1790 

2. I CALL THE PEOPLE 

I ADORN THE FESTIVAL 1 784 
. (lower) DALTON FECIT YORK 

3. CHAPMAN & MEARS OF LONDON FECERUNT 1 782 

4. « (6a) (75) Sancte tKotna ®ra Pro iHobte <76) 

5. * (6a) (76) S(t i^omen Bomini Bertctiictum ^^s) 

6. * ^77) lESVS BE OVR SPEED 

ANNO DOMINI 1627 

36 in. dia. 

The dedication of No. 4 is, I think, unique in the Riding. May 
the bell have been given by Thomas Myton, who was vicar of 
Aldborough in 1380? 

Between each word on No. 6 is a stop like that on the Thorparch 
bell. (See Plate xiv.) 

Mark Smithson, Esq., by will dated 12 May, 1787, gave money 
sufficient to purchase ;^3,333 6j. 8^. Three per Cent. Consols to the 
vicar and two churchwardens of the town of Aldborough upon trust 
as to the dividends {inter alia) as to ;^io thereof for the ringers of 
the town to ring a peal on Thursday evenings and Sundays. 

{Charity Commissioner^ Report^ West Riding.) 



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212 THK YORKSHIRE ARCH^fl^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

Up to about 1880 a bell was rung nightly at seven, and on 
Sundays at seven and eight a.m. Also a bell was rung daily during 
Lent at ten a.ni. and four p.m. Of these only the eight a.m. bell on 
Sundays is now rung. 

ALLERTON MAULEVERER (St. Martin). Three bells. 

1. No inscription. 

2. lESVS BE OVR SPEED 1 627 

3. GLORIA IN ALTISSIMIS DEO 

RICARDVS MALLEVERER MILES ET BARONETTVS A" 1 666 
GRATIA REFVNDIT 

BOROUGH BRIDGE (St James). Six bells. 

1. Psalm cv. 4 "Seek" 

2. Psalm cv. 4 "The Lord" 

3. Psalm cv. 4 " Seek " 

4. Psalm cv. 4 " His strength " 

5. Psalm cv. 4 "His Face" 

6. Psalm cv. 4 " Evermore " 

This peal of 6 Bells given by Angella G. Burdett Coutts a.d. 1870 

in memory of her Father being elected 

Member of Parliament for Boroughbridge 1796 

These inscriptions are all on the waists of the bells. On the 

shoulder of each is — 

Mears & Stainbank Founders London 1870 
There were formerly three bells here — 

1. Aancti 3acobi mentis precibud IBetis autit no0 1557 

2. 3})e0U0 be our tqiebe 1598 

3. Dated 1609, and bearing the Tancred crest — an olive tree 

fructed. 
These were recast in 1842, and another added by subscription. 

DUNSFORTH (St. Mary). Two bells. 

I. GLORIA IN ALTISSIMIS DEO 1671 

2. * M^m ^M (SMM-W ^MM^ 

18 in. dia, 
GOLDSBROUGH (St. Mary). Three he\\s. 

26 in. dia. 



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BELLS IN THE WEST RIDING OF YORKSHIKE. 213 

2. (line i) « M.MX^& i 3^©i3tliX^i : il.1^0 

(line ii) « ,^:Bim,M. : M^(*> i ®3E@m,^ 

(line iii) :Bi^jg. i Tii;g(t©;a i e-i'^^iae'^Bi ; 

28 in. dia. 

3. * IHC * DOMINVS RICHARDVS GOLDESBVRGH MILES XIII 

[fecit ISTAM 
30 in. dia. 
A very rough, rectangular lettering, about ij in. high. See ^78). 

I am informed that there were at least et^/i/ Richard Goldesburghs 
between 1295 and 1479, ^^^ ^ cannot find that anyone of them had 
a wife named Johanna or Joan. 

HUNSINGORE (St. John Baptist). Six bells. 

1. GLORY TO GOD IN THE HIGHEST 

2. PEACE ON EARTH 

3. GOOD WILL TOWARDS MEN 

4. WE PRAISE THEE 

5. WE BLESS THEE 

6. WE WORSHIP THEE 

MARTON-CUxM-GRAFTON (Christ Church). One bell. 

This bell is hung in a bell-cot on the vestry. The inscription is 
very indistinct in "Lombardic" capitals, reversed. The bell is very 
long waisted, and is 18 in. high, 18 in. diameter at the rim, 8^ in. at 
the shoulder, and the sound bow is i^ in. thick. 

NUN MONCKTON (St. Mary). Three bells. 

2. * REPENT LEST YE PERISH 

3. G MEARS & C° FOUNDERS LONDON 

* RECAST 1863 * 
REV^ E GREENHOW INCUxMBENT 
ISAAC CRAWHALL ESQ* LORD OF THE MANOR AND 
JOHN BINNS CHURCHWARDKN 
9 tl)C lit 



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214 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

OUSEBURN, GREAT (St. Mary). Two bells. 

1. CVM VOCO VEENI PRECARE 

GEO CASS ) CHVRCH 

GEO BARBER j WARDENS ''^° 

2. FVNERA DEPLORO POPVLVM VOCO FESTA DECORO 1 738 
JOHN WALKER I CHVRCH 



WIL. WILCCX:K VICAR 
ROB. PICK j WARDENS 



I 

Both have— f^E^l""} ^'^ 



OUSEBURN, LITTLE (Holy Trinity). Two bells. 

I. GLORIA IN ALTISSIMIS DEO 1676 

(lower) IP IB CHVRCHWARDENS 

SS (0 
Ebor 

33 in. dia. 

An article on these bells appeared in the Richmond and Ripon 
Chronicle of i8th September, 1858. 

There were formerly three bells. The treble is now missing, and 
the story is that it was taken to Great Ouseburn. The present tenor 
is said to have been brought from Fountains Abbey, to which the 
church was attached. 

WHIXLEY (Ascension). Six bells. 

1. SOLI DEO GLORIA 
(lower) DALTON FECIT YORK 

2. GLORIA IN ALTISSIMIS DEO 1 667 
(lower) I B MINISTER T D T T ^"VRCHg 

3. (Seven impressions of a coin.) 

4. LAUDA DEUM VERUM PIEBEM VOCO CONSECRO VESTA 1 86 1 

5. WILLIAM VALENTINE MA VICAR 

JOHN BAILEY HENRY PRICE CHURCHWARDENS 

6. THE GOVERNORS OF TANCRED HOSPITAL GAVE THIS BELL 1 86 1 

[at the VICARS EARNEST REQUEST 

(Weight, 6^ cwt.) 

The above inscriptions on Nos. 4, 5, and 6 are on the waist. On 
the shoulder of each is — 

C MEARS & OP FOUNDERS LONDON 



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BELLS IN THE WEST RIDING OF YORKSHIRE. 215 

(b) Deanery of Knaresborough. 
BURTON LEONARD (St. Leonard). One bell. 

voce . VENI , PRECARE . CORRIGE . DISCE . MORI . 171I 

COPGROVE (St Michael). One bell. 

This was given by the late Squire of Copgrove Hall about 1840. 
" Depositions from York Castle. 

"January 14th, 1654-5. Before Martin lies, Alderman, and Francis 
AUanson, of Leeds. 

"Thomas Baxter, of Copgrove, saith that on or about the 24th 
day of December last (being the Lord's Day) hee, being clerk of the 
church of Copgrove and having the keyes of the church doore, 
missed a Bell which he verily beeleeveth at that tyme or at some 
tyme the wecke beefore was stollen out of the said church steeple, 
in regard he then found the said church doore unlocte and the lock 
bended, which the Sunday beefore he had lockt. Having informacon 
that a bell was to be sould at Leeds, and mistrusting it to be the 
stollen bell, he repaired thither, and coming to the howse of one 
Francis Powell there, to whom he heard the bell was sould, found 
there severall peeces of a bell which he verily beeleeveth was parte 
of the same bell soe stollen ; in regard the smith lately beefore lyeing 
a band of iron upon the said bell, some parte thereof was broken of 
thereby, which he, bringing alonge with him and joyneing and com- 
pareing the same with the other peeces in Powell's possession, found 
it just to supply and fill upp the place out of which it was broken, 
and as he verily beeleeveth the words * Michaell th'archangeir was 
engraven upon the said bell. 

"[Note: — The bell at Copgrove Church is stolen. The buyer 
says that he purchased the pieces of Robert Sawrey and Elizabeth 
Watson, at 4//. per pound. Watson denies this, and says that the 
fragments were bought at Bolton or Tickhill Castle. Subsequently 
the woman confesses that the proper name of Sawry is Barnard 
Bumpus, that he is her father-in law, and that she heard him say the 
bell was stolen from Copgrove.]" (Surtees Society, xl, 67.) 

FARNHAM (St. Oswald). Three bells. 

1. (incised) the rev^ thos collins vicar 

J WOOD CH WARDEN 1 7 74 

(raised) pack & chapman of london fkcit 

2. lESVS BE OVR SPEED 1 63 1 

3. FILI DEI MISERERE MEI 1 63 1 

The death-bell is rung with twelve strokes for a man, nine for a 
woman, and six for a child. 



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216 THE YORKSHIRE ARCRffiOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

HAMPSTHWAITE (St. Thomas of Canterbury). Three bells. 

1. DEO GLORIA 1 738 

EDWARD BAINBRIDGE VICAR 

lONA: HVTCHINSON [ 

„«.T ,> . .Tc^^w t CHVRCHWARDENS 

hen: RANSOM ) 

/seUerl ^^^'^ * ^"^ ^^ ^^^ ornament 
\ Kbor) similar to C'). 

2. C & G MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 1857 

3. C & G MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 1 85 7 

(incised) given to the parish of hampsthwaite by 

[bILTON JOSEPH WILTON ESQUIRE MAY I^t 1 85 7 

There were formerly two bells, bearing the inscriptions: — 

1. SOLI DEO GLORIA 1626 

2. TO GOD THAT DOTH DISPOSE ALL THINGS 

TO HIM ALL GLORY AND PRAISE WE RING 162O 
SOLI DEO GLORIA W O 

These were the second and tenor respectively, and being cracked 
were taken down and cast into the present second bell. 

By a codicil to his will, proved at York 5 January, 1406, John 
Parker, Doctor of Medicine, states : — 

" Item volo quod tres librae sterlingorum assignatae in testamento 
meo pro expensis funeralibus apud Ebor deliberentur vicario de 
Hamsthwayt ad facturam cam^janarum ecclesiae parochialis de 
Hamsthwayt." (7>j/. Edor., i, 343.) 

HARROGATE (Christ Church). Three bells. 

I & 2. T MEARS OF LONDON FECIT 1 83 1 

3. J TAYLOR & C*^ BELL FOUNDERS LOUGHBOROUGH 1874 

KIRK HAMMERTON (St. John Baptist). Two bells. 

1. VOCO VENI PRECARE 1708 (^ 

20 in. dia. 

2. CAMPANA SANCTI QVINTINI 1 667 
(lower) R V R A CHVRCHs 

^ ^ WARDEN 

24 in. dia. 
The tenor bell here is, I think, the only instance I have met with 
of a pre- Reformation inscription being copied by a seventeenth century 
founder. Can it have any allusion to the St. Quintin family of 
Harpham E.R.? 



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BELLS IN THE WEST RIDING OF YORKSHIRE. 217 

KNARESBOROUGH (St. John Baptist). Eight bells. 

1. OUR VOICES SHALL IN CONCERT RING 
TO HONOUR BOTH OF GOD AND KING 

(Weight, 5 cwt. 3 qrs.) 

2. WHILST THUS WE JOIN IN CHEERFUL SOUND 
MAY LOVE AND LOYALTY ABOUND 

(Weight, 6 cwt. o qrs. 9 lbs.) 

3. PEACE AND GOOD NEIGHBOURHOOD 

(Weight, 6 cwt. i qr. 4 lbs.) 

4. YE RINGERS ALL THAT PRIZE YOUR HEALTH AND HAPPINESS 
BE SOBER MERRY WISE AND YOU'lL THE SAME POSSESS 

(Weight, 7 cwt. i qr. 4 lbs.) 

5. IN WEDLOCK BANDS ALL YE WHO JOIN WITH HANDS 

[your HEARTS UNITE 

so shall our tuneful tongues combine to laud 

[the nuptial rite 
(Weight, 8 cwt.) 

6. SUCH wond'rous powers TO music's given 

IT ELEVATES THE SOUL TO HEAVEN 

(Weight, 10 cwt. o qrs. 20 lbs.) 

7. IF YOU HAVE A JUDICIOUS EAR 

you'll own MY VOICE IS SWEET AND CLEAR 

(Weight, 13 cwt. I qr.) 

8. THE REV T COLLINS M.A. VICAR 1 774 PROCUL ESTA PROFANI 

JOHN INMAN JOSEPH YOUNG CHURCHWARDENS 

(Weight, 19 cwt. I qr. 11 lbs.) 
On each bell is also — 

PACK & CHAPMAN FECIT 1 774 

These bells cost JC462 3^., and the carriage from London ;£82 
IIS. 5^. further. JC226 los. was allowed for the four old bells, 
jCio2 1 35. 6d. was subscribed, and the balance, ;^2i5 10s. iid.^ was 
paid by the parish. 

Mr. Frank Buckland {Curiosities of National History, 3rd Series, 
i, 56) states that the Rev. J. E. Ramskill told him that the four bells 
taken by the bellfounders in 1774 came from the Trinitarian Priory 
at Knaresborough. When the priory was dissolved it had twelve 
bells, which were shared between Spofforth, Kirby Malzeard, and 
Knaresborough. 



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218 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

NIDI) (St. Paul). Five bells. 
On each — 

MEARS & STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON 1 867 

On the tenor, in addition — 

this peal of five bells 

prp:sented by 

elizabeth rawson 

when she rebuilt the church 

1867 

There were formerly two bells, but at the time of the rebuilding 
only one. 

RIPLEY (All Saints). Three bells. 

1. VENITE EXVLTEMVS DOMLVO I701 £1^/*^ 

2. CRY ALOVI) REPENT 164O 

3. (iLORIA IN SVPREMIS DEO I717 ^b^/'^ 

(JEO. WILSON }- CHVRCHWARDENS 



W. HARDCASTLE 
I WILLIAMSON I 



SOUTH STAINLEY (All Saints). Two bells. 

STAVELEY (All Saints). Three bells. 

These are steel bells, by Naylor, Vickers & Co., of Sheffield, and 
were hung in 1864, in place of two old metal bells, which were sold. 

THORNTHWAITE (St. Osythe). 

One small bell, without mark or inscription, but apparently cast 
in this century — possibly in 18 10, when the church was rebuilt. 



(c) Deanery of Leeds. 
A DEL (St. John Baptist). Three bells. 

These were recast in 1839 by Thomas Mears, of London. The 
tenor weighs 4 cwt.' 

ARM LEY (St. Bartholomew). One bell. 

ALDERMAN CALVERLEY CHURCHWARDEN 1780 



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BELLS IN THE WEST RIDING OF YORKSHIRE. 219 

BEESTON (St. Mary). One bell. 

GLORIA IN ALTISSIMIS DEO 1 764 
(lower) JDaUon) 15 in. dia. 

BRAMLEY (St. Peter). Six bells. 

These were cast in 1863, by Messrs. John Warner & Sons. 

5. CAST BY JOHN WARNER 1 863 FOR BRAMLEY CHURCH SPIRE 

6. THIS BELL AND CLOCK IS GIVEN TO THIS CHURCH BY 

[SARAH THE WIFE OF RICHARD NICHOLS ESQUIRE 
[bRAMLKY HILL TOP 1 863 

(Weight, 12 cwt.) 

The five smaller bells were given by John M. Sagar-Musgrave, of 
Red Hall, Shadwell, in memory of his uncle, Abraham Musgrave, of 
Bramley. In the Terrier of 1809 is the item : — 

"One bell of sixteen inches, with this inscription, viz.: — 

GLORIA IN ALTISSIMIS DEO 1686" 

CHAPEL ALLERTON (St. Matthew). Three bells. 

I, 2 & 3. JOHN TAYLOR & SON BELLFOUNDERS LOUGHBOROUGH 

[1854 

FARNLEY (St. Michael). One bell. 

This I am informed was obtained new on the rebuilding of this 
church in 1885. 

HEADINGLEY (St Michael). Six bells. 

I, 2 & 3. THOMAS MEARS OF LONDON FECIT 1 797 

4. J TAYLOR & OP FOUNDERS LOUGHBOROUGH 1865 

5. THOMAS MEARS & SON OF LONDON FECIT 1807 

(With names of vicar and churchwardens.) 

6. C & G MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 

RECAST 1832 

(With names of vicar and churchwardens.) 

HOLBECK (St. Matthew). Eight bells. 

These are by Messrs. J. Warner & Sons, and brought to the 
church on i6th September, 187 1. The tenor weighs 16 cwt., and 
bears the inscription : — 

THIS PEAL OF BELLS WAS ERECTED BY J. E. WOODHOUSE AND 
ANN HIS WIFE TO THE GLORY OF GOD AND IN PIOUS MEMORY 
OF JOHN WOODHOUSE OF WOODLANDS HALL WHO DIED A.D. 1871 

HUNSLET (St. Mary). Eight bells. 

These bells were cast by Messrs. Warner in 1864. 



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220 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHiEOLOGlCAL JOURNAL. 

LEEDS (St. Peter). Thirteen bells. 

1. THE GIFT OF WILLIAM (JEORGK AND SAMUEL SMITH (Key G.) 

2. THESE BELLS WERE CAST FROM A DESIGN OF M« W 

[GAWKRODt;ER OF LEEDS BEING THE FIRST PEAL OF 
[13 BELLS EVER CAST IN THIS KINGDOM (Key FJt) 
2(1. THE GIFT OF JAMES RHODES ESQ. OF KNOSTROP 

[and HIS WIFE MARIA (Key Fji.) 

I' ^\ tf ' ^* r THOMAS MEARS & SONS LONDON 184I 
o, 9, 10 & TI. ) ^ 

12. REV" W. F. HOOK D.D. VICAR REV° J. W. CLARKE B.A. LECTURER 

[rEV° G ELMHURST B.A. CURATE REV" E. BROWNE M.A. CLERK 

[in ORDERS RKV" W. D. MORRICE B A ASSISTANT CURATE 

(Key C.) 
The ring cost ;£ 1,203 i6s, 4^., and the weights are as follows : — 

Cwrt. qrs. lbs. 

(7) 
(8) 

(9) 

(10) 

(II) 
(12) 



According to Thoresby {Ducatus l^odiensis, 2nd edition, pp. 40 and 
58) the inscriptions on the old bells were as follows: — 
Passing Bell, all men tljat fjeat mg moumtull sounl! 
reprnt before gou Ig tn grounti 1623 

2. (5®D JSaum 3^ES (IJ^FRCJIJff 8851 

3. A cross floree, with " god " and the characters for Jesus and 

Mary, 

4. JESVS BE OVR SPEED 1 65 2 

5. GLORIA IN ALTISSIMIS DEO 1671 

TIMOTHY BROOKE WILLIAM CALVERLEY 

6. VENITE EXVLTEMVS DOMINO 1 67 1 

TIMOTHY BROOKE WILLIAM CALVERLEY 

7. DKO ET REGE SACRVM 1 682 

8. GLORIA IN EXCELSIS DEO 1 682 

9. SOLI DEO GLORIA 1 67 2 

10. SOLI DEO GLORIA PAX HOMINIBVS 1712 

Thoresby says that the passing bell was taken down in 1778, being 
out of tune and too heavy, viz. 1,800 lbs., and that No. 6 was recast 
in the same year as being too light. In 1778 was also recast No. 10. 



(0 


Cwi. 

6 


qrs. lbs, 
26 


(2) 


5 


3 24 


(2a) 


6 


I 14 


(3) 


6 


2 10 


(4) 


7 


26 


(5) 


7 


3 5 


(6) 


8 


16 



10 


I 


19 


12 


2 


7 


13 





21 


17 


2 





25 


3 


9 


35 


1 


9 


162 


3 


26 



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BELLS IN THE WEST RIDING OF YORXSHIRE. 221 

LEEDS (St. John). Four bells. 

Three bells by Thomas Mears, dated 1837, and a bell, about 
12 in. diameter, without inscription or mark. 

Thoresby says that the inscription on the great bell, which was 
ordered by his father, on its being recast, was — 

WHEN I THE LOVDEST RING 
THK FOVNDERS PRAISE 1 SING 

Which inscription went exactly round the bell, whilst that of Dr. Ant. 
de Weever (which Thoresby does not give) went twice round the 
second bell. {Ducatus Leodiensis^ 2nd edition, p. 58.) 

LEEDS (Holy Trinity). Two bells. 

1. DEO GLORIA 173 . . . . 

(This bell is about 15 in. diameter, and very much corroded.) 

2. GLORIA IN ALTISSIMIS DEO 1 7 28 {^'e^I"}' 

30 in. dia. 



(d) Deanery of Otley. 
ADDINGHAM (St. Peter). Six bells. 

1. KIND HEAVEN INCREASE THEIR BOUNTEOUS STORE 
AND BLESS THEIR SOULS FOR EVERMORE 

LESTER & PACK OF LONDON FECIT 1 759 

2. WE TWO ARE HUNG WITHIN THIS STEEPLE 
BY GIFT OF WELL DISPOSED PEOPLE 

L & P FECIT 

3. OUR VOICES SHALL WITH lOYFUL SOUND 
MAKE HILLS AND VALLEYS ECHO 

LESTER & PACK I 759 
4 & 5. LESTER & PACK OF LONDON FECIT 1 759* 

6. W BELL H SPENCER & R LANE CHURCHWARDENS 

W WATSON J THOMPSON CHURCHWARDENS 

(lower) REV w Thompson rector 1759 

REV W THOMPSON RECTOR 1 89 1 
RECAST BY J SHAW & C° OF BRADFORD 1 89 1 

Weights, &c.: — 

(i) 4i cwt. Key E. (4) 6 cwt. Key B. 

(2) 5^ ., n I^. (5) 8 M „ A. 

(3) 5i » » C. (6) 10 „ „ G. 



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222 THE YORKSHIRE ARCRffi:OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

BAILDON (St. John). Two bells. 

1. LAVS DEO 1 71 7 

O HVDSON I iX\ 
WARDEN I ( Ebor I 

2. C S WOODS LEEDS 1806 

HARDEN TOWER CHAPEL. 

One small bell, about i8 in. dia. On rim — 

J. WARNER & SONS LONDON 1 864 

BOLTON ABBEY (St. Mary and St. Cuthbert). 
One bell, about 2 ft. diameter. 

VENITK EXVLTEMVS DOMINO 1695 k1^^'^ 

BRAMHOPE (Old Chapel). One bell. 

AD. 1874 

DENTON (St. Helen). One bell. 

Cawood & Son Leeds 1812 

FARNLEY NEAR OTLEY (All Saints). 

One bell, about 20 in. diameter. Without inscription, but appear- 
ing to be of early eighteenth century make. 

FEWSTON (St. Michael). Four bells. 
On each — 

LESTER & PACK OF LONDON FECIT 1808 

GUISELEY (St. Oswald). Eight bells. 

''6^'7^&^8^* I ^ * ^ MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 1846 

8. (lower) w clark md vicar j h f Kendall curate 

W DOWNHAM churchwarden 

(Weight, 10^ cwt.) 
HORSFORTH (St. Margaret). 

One small bell, without inscription or mark. 

ILKLEY (All Saints). Eight bells. 

1. JOHN TAYLOR & C*' FOUNDERS LOUGHBOROUGH 1 873 

2. THIS rp:AL WAS CAST BY J TAYLOR & SON OF LOUGHBOROUGH 

(lower) ®s iHff®ifi 3iN:5^mxcEa»E5!; jL^mmem 

3. GOD SAVE THE (^UEEN AND PRESERVE OVR PEACE A.D. 1 845 

(lower) « mZVSi »E ©F» Z^^^JS 



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BKLLS IN THE AVEST RIDING OF YORKSHIRE. 223 

[E®mffi?^i3®]&®mffiji| 9.19. 1845 

5. j. taylor & c9 founders loughborough recast me 1 873 

6. john taylor & son founders loughborough 1 845 

7. this peal of six bells was recast a.d. 1 845 from 

[three dated 1600 1636 1676 
john snowdon m.a. vicar 
tho^ beanlands james critchley nimrod w« howden 
churchwardens 
john taylor & son founders loughborough 
late of oxford & s"^ neots 1 845 
Tenor. j taylor & c" bellfounders Loughborough 1873 

(lower) THIS peal of bells was augmented to eight by 

[the adding of a treble and tenor a.d. 1873 

The old bells referred to in the inscription on No. 7 had — 

1. GLORIA IN EXCELSIS 1676 

2. SOLI DEO GLORIA 1 636 

3. IN jvcvnditate soni sonabo 1600 

The ring of six of 1844 weighed 41 cwt. o qrs. 24 lbs., with a tenor 
of 10 cwt. 3 qrs. 18 lbs. They were first rung on 13th January, 1846. 
The inscription on No. 5 (No. 4 of the 1844 ring) was — 
holiness to the lord 
john taylor & son founders 1 845 

The new ring weighs 66 cwt. i qr. 23 lbs., and was opened on 
23rd November, 1873. 

LEATHLEY (St. Oswald). Four bells. 

1. LESTER & PACK OF LONDON FECIT 1760 

(lower; incised) edono henrici hitch de leathlev 

[aRMIGER anno DOMINI MDCCLX 

2. * (55) .Sancte <84> Jofjanneg G>ra J^io (S4) js^oiw 

3. * (55) .Scancta illaria ^""^ i^XK 'J^xo ^ohisi 

4. In (coin) Jncuntiitate (coin) gorti aonabo tibi (coin) 

[tmt (coin) 1 6 10 
(lower) w o ^^*> 

Mr. George Benson, of York, who has made a special study of the 
York bellfounders and their work, thinks a bell at St. Michael's, 
Spurriergate, in that city (which has the mark (s*)), to be by Thomas 
Innocent, of York. At <'*> on the third bell are three lions similar 
to ^^\ but without the crowns, and the lower lion is inverted. The 



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224 THE YORKSHIRE ARCttrEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

inscription on this bell is a good deal broken in casting, but the 
capitals are fine and crowned, and similar, although not identical^ 
with those on the second bell. The lions I have not found else- 
where, except at St. Michael's, York, but the capitals I have found at 
Bentham and Cawood. See ^70. 

Henry Hitch was the son of Robert Hitch, of Leathley, who was 
M.P. for Knaresborough 1715-22, and great-grandson of Robert 
Hitch, Dean of Vork. The Hitches intermarried with the Hoptons 
of Armley (Thoresby, Ducaius Leodiensis, p. 188). 

OTLEY (All Saints). Eight bells. 

'' ^^^V"^' f CHAPMAN & MEARS OF LONDON FECERUNT 1781 

7. JAMES SHAW SON & OP FOUNDERS BRADFORD A.D. 1 888 

8. W" CHAPMAN OF LONDON FECIT 1781 

6th June, 1748. Sir Walter Calverley subscribed and paid jQ^ ^s, 
towards the new bells at Otley Church, which (excluding the old 
metal) cost jQ2^o, ( Yorkshire Diaries, Surtees Society, ii, 47.) 

This Sir Walter was the great-grandson of the Walter Calverley of 
the " Yorkshire Tragedy." He built Esholt Hall, and married Julia, 
daughter of Sir William Blackett. 

RAWDON (St. Peter). One bell. 

THE . GIFT . OF . FRAVNCIS . LATON . OF . RAWDEN . ESQVIER . 1661 

Lower on the bell there is a founder's mark, having three bells, 
one and two, the upper one surmounted by a crown. These are 
encircled with an inscription, "thomas bartlet made me," and 
outside all is a circle of cable ornament. 

Francis Layton was the son of Francis Layton, of West Layton 
and Kirkby Hill, by Anne, daughter of John Layton, of East Layton. 
He was one of the Masters of the Jewel House to Charles I and 
Charles H, and died 23rd August, 1662, aged 84. He was the 
founder of Rawdon Church, which was built by his eldest son Henry, 
and a graveyard, surrounded by a wall, was provided by his second 
son Thomas. An old stone over the tower door in the present 
(rebuilt) church has "t. l. 1706." 

In the Register of the mother j>arish church of Guiseley is the 
following note: — " Memorandu, on Friday, the second of May, 1684, 
John, L^ Archbishop of Yorke (Archbishop John Dolben), came from 
his primary visitation at Otley to Guiesley, and laid that night at ye 
Parsnage house, I> Will. Brearey, Archdeacon of ye East Riding, being 
then Rector of Guiesley, where the next day his Grace confirmed at 
morning and evening prayer about three hundred and fifty persons 



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BELLS IN THE WEST RIDING OF YORKSHIRE. 225 

of ye Parishes of Guiesley and Addle. On Sunday ye fourth of May 
Hee consecrated ye chappell of Rawden, and Preached there : In ye 
afternoon he consecrated ye Chappell Yard, and after evening prayer 
he confirmed several persons in that chappell. On Sunday (? Monday), 
ye fifth of May, he returned to his Graces Pallace at Bishopthorp, 
having laid three nights at ye parsonage of Guiesley." 

STAINBURN (St. Mary). One bell. 

*(85) I®3^aXNffi6 e&E N®iH«N i»ffilJf» 

(lower) © Ifll d M in. dia. 

WESTON (All Saints). Two bells. 

I. (No inscription, but apparently a very old bell, 19 in. in height 
and 16 in. diameter.) 

2. « (w) ctaiWi^aNa (s^) bessi:® (87) ifHa»i!E (87) 



(e) Deanery of Ripon. 
RIPON CATHEDRAL (St. Wilfrid). Ten bells. 
These are in the south-west tower, and have — 

1. JOHN KEARSLKY CIV: RIPON AMABILIS OB: 189O 

(lower) R KEARSLEY H C BICKERSTETH AND H KEARSLEY 

[d.d. in MEMORIAM 
(lower) J SHAW & c^ Bradford 1891 

2. J SHAW & C9 BRADFORD 1 89 1 

(lower) * TO THE GLORY OF GOD AND IN MEMORY OF 

[aNN CROSS WHO DIED 1890 

(This beill was given by Miss Cross, of Coneygarths.) 

3. 5, 6 & 8. LESTER & PACK OF LONDON FECIT 1 76 1 

(No. 8 has incised on it, "12 2 15," its weight) 

4 & 7. CAST BY JOHN WARNER & SONS LONDON 1 866 



(lower) 



PATENT 
9. THE RIGHT REV^ ROBERT DRUMMING ARCHBISHOP 

(lower) (i) A boar's head (Dean Wanley's crest), with the 
inscription — 

" F . WANLEY . DD . DEAN . OF . RIPPON " 

(ii) A mitre. 

(iii) A hunting horn, with the letters " rippon " inter- 
spersed (the arms of the city), with the 
inscription — ** iohn . terry . esq . mayor " 

VOL. XVII. p 



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226 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

lO. THE REV" IN« DERING SUB DEACON GUL^^ LAMPLUGH HENRY 
[gOODRICKE HUGH THOMAS IN^ FOGG CHRIS. DRIFFIELD 

(lower). AND JAS. WILKINSON PREBENDS 

LESTER & PACK OF LONDON FECIT 1 76 1 

(lower) (i) The seal of the church, an Agnus Dei. 
(ii) The arms of Aislabie of Studley. 
(iii) The arms of Lawrence of Kirkby Fleetham 
{Ar, a cross ragully gu,). 

The weights of the bells of lister & Pack's ring which still 
remain, viz. i (3), 3 (5), 4 (6), 6 (8), 7 and 8 (9 and 10), are as 
follows : — 

Cwt. qrs. lbs. Cwt. qrs. lUs. 

(i; 623 (6) 12 2 15 

(3) 722 (7) 15 2 O 

(4) 8 3 26 (8) 19 3 8 

The bells are now hung in an iron frame, but the old wooden 
frame formerly had the inscription :—" Francis Wanley, D.D., Dean; 
James Harrison, of Raisen in Lincolnshire, Bell Hanger; John 
Hutchinson, Matthew Beckwith, and Thos. Fothergill, Agitators. 1762." 

Thomas Gent in his History of Rippon (1733) gives the following 
inscriptions as on the then bells : — 

i. omnis spiritvs lavdet dominvm hallelviah lohannes 

[drake ecclesi^ collegiat/E de ripon svbdecanvs 1673 

33 in. clia. 

2. * Sancte aSilWlie ®ra ?Pro iflobw 

36J in. dia. 

3. ^ $i'0ticu0 et |larbU0 bicor bocor ct Eeonarbus et tetno 

[numeto eccle^ue 0umu0 orliine bcro 

36} in. dia. 

4. GLORIA IN ALTISSIMIS DEO 1 663 

3S in. dia. 

5. lACOBVS SMITH EBORACENSIS FECIT 1 663 

42 J in. dia. 

As to the Rev. John Drake, Sub-dean, see Memorials of Ripon, 
Surtees Society, ii, 282. 

These bells were in the south-west tower. In the north-west tower 
was a large bell, 51 in. diameter, said to have been brought from 
Fountains Abbey. It had — 

« 3. ?^. S>. ®ra mcnte pia l^ro j%abt0 Fitgo JHatia 
9lexanl)iet Episcopus lEbor 'Bti ffitacia 

Archbishop Alexander Neville held the see 1373- 1388. 



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BELLS IN THE WEST RIDING OF YORKSHIRE. 227 

In a cupola at the north-west angle of the central tower ("St, 
Wilfred^s Steeple," as Gent calls it) was a bell 25 in. diameter, 
bearing — 

VOCO VENI PRECARE 

A fragment of this bell remains in the Minster vestry. It is said 
that this fragment, which bore the date (1)710, was shown at an 
exhibition as a portion of an eighth century bell; but someone who 
saw it, and knew that the cupola bell had been recently broken up, 
found by experiment that the fragment had been part of it. 

The bells described by Gent were taken down in 1761, and 
recast by Lester & Pack into a ring of eight, weighing altogether 
4 tons and 3 lbs. The recasting cost ;^5S7 iif. 11^., towards which 
the Corporation contributed ;^So. Nos. 3 and 5 of this ring, now 
represented by the two bells by Messrs. Warner, had — 

3. LESTER & PACK OF LONDON FECIT 1 76 1 

5. LESTER & PACK FECIT I761 lOHN HUTCHINSON 

[alderman MATT"^BECKWITH THC* FOTHERGILL 
(lower) (i) The arms of Beckwith (an antelope proper; in 
the mouth, a branch — motto, '* Coram viris 
sinceram "). Beckwith • was Mayor of Ripon 
1755-67. 
(ii) The arms of Hutchinson (?) (a head dishevelled). 
Hutchinson was Mayor of Ripon four times. 

On a board still remaining in the ringing chamber is — 

"Orders made and agreed upon the second day of February, in 
the year of our Lord 1764, by the Society of Ringers, and to be 
observed by strangers and others that enter this belfry. 

"Every person refusing to keep his hat off after having been 
requested by any member so to do, shall forfeit sixpence. Every 
person making a bell sound with hat or spur on shall forfeit sixpence. 
Every person swearing, giving the lie, offering to lay wagers, guilty of 
any other abusive or indecent language, or behaving himself in any 
disorderly manner, shall forfeit one shilling. 

" Every person guilty of the malicious and unwarrantable practice 
of spoiling or besmearing the painting, cutting or marking the wood 
or plastering of this belfry, or otherwise obliterating or defacing any 
part thereof, shall forfeit two shillings and sixpence. 

" And lastly, all the above forfeitures for every time such respective 
offence may be committed shall be immediately paid to the President 
or Treasurer for the time being of the said Society, or in his absence 



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228 THR YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

to such member thereof here present then to be appointed to receive 
the same, and it is earnestly requested by the said Society that all 
persons here assembled would be very still and keep strict silence 
whilst they are ringing." 

A list of the members of the said Society anno Domini 1764: — 
Thomas Hunter, Verger ; Thomas Dowson, Thomas Fothergill, John 
Gilbertson, Thomas White, Robert Askwith, Jos. Turkington, John 
Orton, Edward Harrison, Matthew Thirlwall. 

In the Ripon Fabric Rolls are to be found many entries with 
regard to the bells, particularly as to the "Lady" bell referred to 
above as formerly hanging in the north west tower. 

The third bell appears to have been recast in 1540, at a cost of 
j£S, by (Jeorge Heathecott, of Chesterfield (to whom we may assign 
marks (") and <27)), as appears by the following memorandum {Memorials 
of Ripon^ iii, p. 289) : — 

"Thys by 11 mayd the xv day of August, ye yere of or lord god 
Mccccc and xl, wytnessz y^ s»" Rawlynge Sysgyswyche cham'lane of ye 
collegge churche of Rypon, haythe delyu^yd unto Mast' Crystofer 
Dragley, p'sedentt, and Mast*" Marmaduke Bradley, p'bend, of ye sayme 
churche, iiij pownd of good ynglysche money in full contentacyon and 
paymentt of eyghtt pounds for the castyng new of on bell callyd ye 
thyrde bell, as ys specyfyed in a payre of Indenturs mayd by twyxtt 
ye p'esedentt and ye chapytor of ye on p'tye, and George Heathecott, 
of Chestrfeld, belfoundr, of y« oy' p'tye. 

" p*" me, Cristoferu p«" me, M*"maducu Bradley, 

Dragley. manu p' ppia & noie sig. % 

"Summa iiij//." 

It seems to have been the custom to ring four bells at funerals, 
as John Arnclif, who died in 1478, by his will left a legacy: — 
"Sacristae pro pulsacione iiij°^ campanarum in die sepulturae ejus 
scilicet prout consutudo est." 

RIPON (Holy Trinity). One bell. 

FEARE GOD 1 5 94 I W 

cir. 34 iii. dia. 

This church was erected and endowed in 1827 as a chapel of ease 
to the Minster, but where this bell came from I have not discovered. 

RIPON (Hospital of St, Mary Magdalene). 

There is no mention of any bell in the inventories of the goods 
of this hospital in 1306, 1329, and 1335, but there appears afterwards 
to have been a bell, with — 

''Sum lEgo pubata IK-oga munW bocata" 



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BELLS IN THE WEST RIDING OF YORKSHIRE. 229 

Dean Waddilove, who was appointed to the mastership of the 
hospital in 1792, is said to have appropriated this bell, and to have 
substituted a wooden bell, which still remains in a chest in the old 
chapel. (Baring Gould, Yorkshire Oddities^ ii, p. 96.) 

RIPON (Hospital of St. John Baptist). 

The chapel of this hospital formerly had a bell, with — 

CAMPANELLA HOSPITALIS S lOHANNIS IVXTA RIPON 1 663 INV MO 

There is no mention of any bell in the inventory taken in 1370 
of the goods of this hospital. 

ALDFIELD. One bell. 

GEORGE DALTON YORK FECIT 1 775 
18 in. dia. 
There is no room in the present turret for another bell, but on 
the schoolhouse is a bell, about 15 in. diameter, with — 

GLORIA IN ALTISSIMIS DEO 1 669 

PATELEY (St. Cuthbert). Seven bells. 

In May, 1893, si.x bells, supplied by Charles Carr, of Smethwick, 
Birmingham, were hung in this church tower. The tenor weighs 
12 J cwt, is in the key of G flat, and bears the inscription — 

to the glory of god and in loving memory of 

[george h marker a.d. 1893 

BLESSED are THE PURE IN HEART 

These bells were given by Mr. and Mrs. Harker, of Harefield, in 
memory of their eldest son, George Hodgson Harker, who died 8th 
January, 1892. They were dedicated and first rung on 27th May, 1893. 

There is in the vestry a bell which formerly hung in the old 
church tower. It has — 

* <79) Sancte I ?^ C t«<>) ^etre I J^ C ^^^ ®ra 1 1^ C (^o) 

18 in. dia. 
SAWLEY (St. Michael). Two bells. 

In 1769 this church was rebuilt and a bell obtained. In 1879, 
when the church was again rebuilt, this bell was rehung by Messrs. 
Mallaby with a new bell, which was obtained by them. 

SKELTON (St. Helen). One bell. 

About 14 in. diameter, without founder's mark or inscription, but 
apparently from a York foundry about 1750. 

WINKSLEY (St. Cuthbert and St. Oswald). One bell. 
Small and without inscription. 



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230 THE YORKSHIRE ARCafiOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

(f) Deanery of Wetherby. 
BARDSEY (All Saints). Three bells. 

1. IN IVCVNDITATE SONI SONABO TIBI DOMINE 167I 

(lower) pSS 0) i : fW vie : R : w i : H ,ckv«c„s 

2. LAVS DEO W: ANDREW VICAR THO : TATE 

[W: SMITHSON w^rSenS 1 7^3 

(lower) E^/0 

3. lOHN BENSON VICAR RO MARSHALL 

[CH VRCH 
10 WINTERBVRXE xvakdens 1 7 '9 

(lower) ^s^/0 

COLLINGHAM (St. Oswald). Three bells. 

1. GLORIA IN ALTISSIMIS DEO 173I 

2. GLORIA IN ALTISSIMIS DEO 1679 

S'^ (0 R D R S CHVRCMs 

Ebor WARDEN 

3. SOLI DEO GLORIA PAX HOMINIBVS INET 1650 W C H B 

COWTHORPE (St. Michael). Three bells. 

'• (Dahonl '757 

t York J 16 in. dia. 

2. ♦ MY . SOVND . THE . MBANE . YET . DOTH . ASPIRE . 

TO . SOVND . MENS . HARTS . AND . RAISE . THEM . HIRE . 

1622 . R . K . w o p8) without R o] 
18 in. dia. 

3. O ♦ thou ♦• blyssid ♦ trinite ♦• of ♦ bryan ♦ rodlyff ♦• 

[haf ♦ pyte 
(/) U) ih) (.) O) 

20 in. dia. 

The stop between the words of the inscription is intended for a 
chess rook, the badge of the Rouclyffs. 

This is a most interesting bell. Sir Bryan Rouclyff, who com- 
memorates himself on it, was the son of Guy Rouclyff, Recorder of 
York, by Joan, daughter of Thomas Burgh, of Kirtlington, Notts. Sir 
Bryan Rouclyff was made a Baron of the Exchequer in 1458. He 
married Joan, daughter of Sir Richard Hamerton, of Wigglesworth-in- 
Craven. In 1455 ^^ petitioned Archbishop Booth for leave to 

{e) Rev. John Fentiman, instituted (h) The Blessed Virgin and Child. 

22 March, 1 661; afterwards vicar of Irby. ,.. .^^^ r m«^^^,»^« . j^ - 

(/) Our Lord in glory. (/) Arms of Hammerton :-^fy. 3 

\g\ Arms of Rouclyff :-./;y. on a hammers, ^ and i, .a, 

ihivron between three h'ons' heads erased (J) Probably a founder's mark. (Sec 

gn. a mullet or pierced 0/ the second, Plate xix.) 



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BELLS IN THE WEST RIDING OF YORKSHIRE. 231 

rebuild Cowthorpe Church, and by August, 1458, it was ready for 
consecration. This bell may therefore be taken as of the latter date, 
and is the earliest Ens:iish inscription I have found. 

Further particulars as to Sir Bryan, and a full account of his 
most interesting memorial brass in Cowthorpe Church, will be found 
in the Yorkshire ArchcMlogical Journal^ xv, 10. 

HAREWOOD (All Saints). Four bells. 

I. (»<5) (14) ^(6)ec ©X7)ampatta ® eata ^acra ^rinitate 

[I^iat J?? <^ <'®> J^ (7) («5) (9) (21) 

36 in. dia. 

2. SOLI DEO GLORIA PAX HOMINIBVS 1 66 1 
(lower) T P MINISTER II R W AD wTr^ITens 

38^ in. dia. 

3. DALTON OF YORK FOUNDER 1778 

42 in. dia. 

4. (Clock bell on tower roof) 

LESTER & PACK OF LONDON FECIT 1 759 

KIRK DEIGHTON (All Saints). Six bells. 

These are by Messrs. Taylor & Co., of Loughborough, and were 
cast in 1863. They weigh 40 cwt 2 qrs. 20 lbs. The three old bells 
taken down in 1863 had no inscriptions, but only "small crosses, 
&c.,"as I am told. They weighed 5 cwt. 2 qrs. 10 lbs., 6 cwt. 3 qrs. 
23 lbs., and 9 cwt. 3 qrs. 20 lbs. respectively. 

KIRKBY OVERBLOW (All Saints). Three bells. 

1. lESVS BE OVR SPEED 1 634 

2. PACK & CHAPMAN OF LONDON FECIT 1 769 

3. * GOD IS MY DE FEN DER 1 598 

PANNAL (St. Robert). Three bells. 

1. TE DEVM LAVDAMVS 1 703 gj^,^'^ 

2. GLORIA DEO IN EXCELSIS 1 669 <4) 

3. DEVS SVPER OMNIA HONORANDVS 1 669 (4) 

0\ \> \> \ n CHVRCH 

OWery B B I C WARDENS 

This church is said to have received three bells from Fountains 
Abbey, but of course not any of the above three. 

SPOFFORTH (All Saints). Four bells. 

I. VENITE EXVLTEMVS DOMINO 

,/:^- *T rr, CHVRCII 

1693 N : T WARDEN 

(lower) ^ss/0 



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232 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

2. (!rel0ttim xte placeat ttbi rrx 0onu0 tote 
(lower) <»8> 

3. * (77) GOD SAVE OVR CHVRCH 1609 

(lower) WL iw tb gar WO<3a) 

4. S <77) NON FORMAM SPECTAS DOMINO SED SUPLICE FLECTAS 

[CLAMITO TE TEMPLUM QUOD VENERERE DEUM 
[wW WI LW TB WR RB RE CAR 1609 

In the moulding of this bell at least three sorts of letters were 
used — plain Roman, English text, and a sort of hybrid ; and many of 
the letters are upside down. 

By his will, dated 6th July, 15 21, James Holyngley bequeathed — 

"To the byeng of a grete bell at Spofford vji. y\\}d" 

{Test Ebor., v, 249.) 

When the Trinitarian Priory at Knaresborough was dissolved it 
is said to have had twelve bells, of which four were given to Spofforth. 

The death-bell is here rung, ending with 8 strokes for a man, 
9 for a woman, and 10 for a child. 



(g) Deanery of Whitkirk. 
BARWICK-IN-ELMET (All Saints). Three bells. 
The old bells had— 
I. ifac tibt 13aptt0ta sit ut acceptabtlto feta 

(With a head, probably of St. John Baptist.) 
(Weight, 8 cwt. i qr. 26 lbs.) 
Possibly this was a similar bell to No. i at Kirk Fenton. 

2. VENITE EXVLTEMVS DOMINO 1 668 

(Weight, II cwt. 3 qrs. 19 lbs.) 

3. Sn Jucunlittate 0ont 0onabo ttbi lB!xit et in buUelime 

[bocig tu0 noe 1604 w. o. ^»> (4) 
(Weight, 15 cwt.) 
Nos. I and 2 were recast in 1844 by Messrs. Mears, and now 
weigh 8 cwt. o qrs. 6 lbs. and 1 2 cwt, i qr. 14 lbs. respectively. 

GARFORTH (St. Mary). Three bells. 

I. GLORIA IN ALTISSIMIS DEO 1760 

CHARLES „„^^^„ RICH. DAWSON I CHVRCH 

RECTOR > 

WIGHTON DAV SCHOLES J WARDENS 



/seller I 
\ Ebor-' 



I Ebor-' 

rob: HARRISON RAN: DAWSON 
VOCO VENI PRECARE 1716 

(lower) Ei^r^'^ ^mcQ 



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Minute 


Age. 




bell 


rung. 


Under 


10 


5 r 


ninu 


lO to 


30 


10 


» 


30 » 


60 


15 


»} 


Above 


60 


20 


M 



BELLS IN THE WEST RIDING OF YORKSHIRE. 233 

3. THO* MEARS OF LONDON FECIT 1 794 

30 in. dia. 
In ringing the death-bell it is customary here to give very 
elaborate differences, as follows : — 

lielU. 
First. Second. Third. 

5 minutes, followed by strokes on 1 i i 

» 5 7 9 

7 9 II 

9 II 13 

KIP PAX (St. Mary). Three bells. 

1. FILI DEI MISERE MEI 1 638 

2. SOLI DEO GLORIA 1 638 

3. SOLI DEO GLORIA 1 636 

It is the custom here to ring a peal on 29111 May. 
In ringing the death-bell, after tolling the tenor bell, the bells arc 
struck as follows : — 

First bell. Second bell. Tenor. 

For a person under 14 years... 5 strokes 7 strokes 9 strokes 
For one over that age •••7 )> 9 ^ n » 

METHLEY (St. Oswald). Three bells. 

I. JAMES HARRISON OF BARTON ON HUMBER FOUNDER 1813 
2 & 3. 1813 

At the Survey of 1552 there were three bells. 

There is a tradition that when, in the early part of the seven- 
teenth century, the Savile family removed from Stainland to Methley, 
the bells from Stainland chapel were also removed to Methley. 

ROTHWELL (Holy Trinity). Eight bells. 

In 1837 six bells were procured from Mr. John Taylor, of Oxford. 
After a few months' use the tenor was cracked, and in 1838 it was 
recast and the trebles added. The tenor now bears the inscription — 

TO SPEAK WITH MELLOW TONE AND NEVER SWEAR 
JOHN TAYLOR TAUGHT US WITH A FATHERS CARE 
TONGUES SCREWS AND CLAPPERS KEEP WELL IN PLACE 
THEN FOR AN AGE SOUND WELL IN GRACE 

The weights of the bells are : — 

Cwt. qrs. lbs. Cwt. qrs. lbs. 

(0 5 3 6 (5) 6 3 7 

(2) 6 o 27 (6) 7 - 7 

(3) 608 (7) 9 I 18 

(4) 615 (8) 13 2 7 

61 3 I 



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234 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

SWILLINGTON (St. Mary). Three bells. 

1. INVOCO DEVM 1732 

RICH PRINCE WJL GREEN chvrcii JEScIlcrfCs) 

WARDENS ( Ebor r 

38 in. dia. 

2. SOLI DEO GLORIA PAX HOMINIBVS I S <^> 1656 I S <^> A S 1 S <»> 

(lower) w c (^3) twice 

39 in. dia. 

3- WHEN I DOE RING GODS PRAYSES SING 

WHEN I DOE TOVL PRAY 
(lower) HEART AND SOVL 1 656 

W L II T W ^"^"S"S H r(^) MINISTER A S fkcit 

WARDEN 

42 in. dia. 

A bell is rung here on Sundays at eight a.m., except on Easter 
Day. On Easter Day and Christmas Day the bell is rung at six a.m. 

In ringing the death-bell they end with three threes for a man 
and three twos for a woman. 

THORNER (St. Peter). Six bells. 

These were cast in 1864 ^y Messrs. Taylor, of Loughborough. 
The tenor is 6 ft. 7 in. in circumference, and the bells weigh as 
follows : — 

Cwl. qrs. Iba. Cwt. qrs. \\j>. 

(0 4 3 14 (4) 6 2 12 

(2) 519 (5) 7 2 20 

(3) 6 o 25 (6) 10 2 o 



41 o 24 
The three bells here prior to 1864 bad — 

2. TE DEVM LAVDAMVS E VICAR 1 685 

EI T C CH\ KCH 

WARUKNS 

3. SOLI DEO GLORIA 164O TT HW chvrch 

^ WAKOKNS 

WHITKIRK (St. Mary). Three bells. 
On each — 

THOMAS MEARS OF LONDON FECIT . 1803 

By her will, dated loth July, 1454, and proved the same year at 
York, Lady Johanna VVombwell, daughter of Sir William Fitzwilliam, of 
Sprotborough, and second wife of Thomas Wombwell, of Wombwell, 
but described in her will as a widow, late of Whitkirk, bequeathed 
"facturae campanarum de Whitekirk, x\s," {Test Ebor,, ii, 177.) 

{k) Henry Robinson, died about 1663. 



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BELLS IN THE WEST RIDING OF YORKSHIRE. 235 

In 1654 there seem to have been three bells, and in that year 
the tenor was recast, and all rehung. Items in the Churchwardens' 
Accounts, supplied by the late Mr. W. C. Lutis, are as follows : — 

Charges in going to Doncaster to the bellfounder 
(probably William Cuerdon, who was at this time 
working at York, &c., with Abraham Smith, but two 
years later was carrying on business alone at Don- 
caster, and died there in 1678) \s, \]d. 

Charges when the bellfounders came to Whitkirk, and 
divers neighbours met them, to agree the articles 
about casting the bell ixi. 

Charges about hiring the carriage of the bell to York ]s. 

Payed to the bellfounder for casting the bell xl//. iijj. \\\]d. 

For carrying the bell to York and bringing it back 

again xviijj. \\\]d. 

Charges upon ourselves, our horses, in going to York, 
upon the bellfounders and their workmen there, 
and upon the draught men there and in the way xixi. xyl. 

Charges upon the workmen and neighbours about 

taking down and drawing up the bell xv^. myi. 

Charges for getting, bringing, and carrying again the 
ropes, pullies, and takles, to take down and draw 
up the bell again with ... \]s, m]d. 

To Will'm Strickland and his men for their work about 

all the bells and putting them all in frame ... j//. vJ5. 

Payed to Henry for all the ironwork about the 

bells and steeple j//. ix^. \]d. 

Payed more to Strickland and his man for fastening 

the great bell in the and for mending the 

wheels, and for laying the lower chamber floor 

again ... ... ... ... ... ... ... iiijj. x^. 

More to the Clark for drawing articles between the 

bellfounders and us about casting the great bfell... ]s, 

(For a sample of ** articles" see South Kirkby, diocese of York.) 

The rehanging does not seem to have been satisfactory, for it 
required attention the following year — 

£ s. d. 

" Paid to Wiirm Strickland for mending ye hanging of 
the bells and for mending the wheels and for cotterills 
and ffortoches and other iron work o 5 6" 



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236 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHiEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

In 1682 the middle bell was recast — 

" P^ for taking downe, carrying to Yorke, casting, bringing 
againe, and hanging the midle bell, with charges at 
seu'al times about the same 18 i 2" 

On 1 2th January, 1763, it was ordered that two sufficient oak 
beams be put under the floor of the steeple next below the framing 
of the bells to support the said floor, and a new sole tree under the 
great bell, and also a new upright post in the same sole, and the 
whole framing to be stayed and amended at as small expense as may 
be, at the discretion of the churchwardens, and that Henry Atkinson 
the younger be employed for working the said reparation. 

In 1780 John Hardwick, of Colton, agreed to rehang the great 
bell in wood, brass, and iron for J[^2 125. 6^., "to be referred to 
Mr. Smeaton, if necessary," Mr. Smeaton being the great engineer of 
Eddystone Lighthouse fame, then resident in the parish. 

On 2Sth July, 1802, two of the old bells being broken, it was 
resolved to have three new ones. The old bells weighed 31 cwt. 
2 qrs. 20 lbs., and ;^i73 19J. \d. was allowed by Mr. Mears for the 
metal. The new (present) bells weighed 24 cwt. 2 qrs. 5 lbs., and at 
\s, $d. per lb. cost ;^i92 14s, 9^., in addition to j£^ 8j. gd. for 
clappers and ;^io 16s. 5^. for carriage and other expenses. 

Total, ^206 19^. lid. 

Amongst the disbursements entered in the Churchwardens' 

Accounts are the following: — 

£ s. d. 
1653-4. P'^ to the Ringers for ringing upon ye 5th of 

November o 5 o 

P^ for candles for ye Clarke to ring 7 of ye 

clocke with ... ... ... ... ... o i o 

1659-60. P'* to James Nicolson for towling ye sermon bell 040 
Given to ye Ringers for ringing upon ffriday, ye 

4th of May instant, upon the news of ye 

agreement between ye King and Parliament... 006 
1664-5. Paid to the Ringers for ringing on the coronacon 

day ... ... ... ... ... ... o 4 6 

1668-9. Paid to the Ringers for ringing on St. Geo. his day 026 
1678-9. Paid to the Ringers for ringing on the Kings 

coronacon day, the ffast day, and thanksgiving 

day 012 6 

1686-7. P^ ^o ^^ ringers for the whole yeare, with some 

charges with them 1 6 8 

It is curious to note that ringing on 5th November survived the 
death of Charles I. The bells were not rung on St. George's Day in 
honour of the saint, but because it was the anniversary of the 
coronation of the King (James II). 



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INSCRIPTIOVS FROM BH.SDALE AND KIRKDALK ClirRCllES. 



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\ 



lkr,^**» 



-X^ 



1. SKAI. OP MICHAEL SODIMJII., 1 S'^S (l*. TOo). 

2. Sy.K V. I02. 

3. SKK v. H>6. 

4. SEAL OK THE SHKkll-K OK YOKK, 1.5Q7(>'- "S). 



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EARLY INSCRIPTION IN BILSDALE CHURCH. 

Young, in his History of Whitby (ii, 748), after giving an account of 
the well-known inscription in Kirkdale Church, proceeds : " The 
church, or chapel, of Bilsdale, presents us with another commemora- 
tive inscription, also unpublished. It was found in 1 813, at the 
rebuilding of the chapel, the stone being taken out of the wall, into 
which it had been thrown as a common stone, at some distant era, 
when the chapel had been rebuilt. It is now happily rescued from 
the oblivion to which it had been consigned, and placed in the front 
of the chapel, the station which it must have originally occupied." 

This stone now occupies ;i similar position in the present church, 
which has been entirely rebuilt since Young^s time. It is placed 
inside the porch, close up to the roof, so that the inscription on it can 
only be read with diffi'culty. With the object of rendering the stone 
more visible, it should be moved to the other end of the porch, and 
placed immediately over the actual door of the church. 

The stone is apparently taken from the inferior oolite, though it 
is darker and more finely grained than the local sandstone. It 
measures 24 inches by 1 2^. The letters are not very deeply cut. It 
reads as follows : — * 

© COOND'DIT ecLe« 
SIffffM WIILLeLMvV 
NOBILIS ISSTSfflOD INTEME 
RRSSTE NOOMMIINNE SC 

E VIIRGINNIIS PIILDE ^ 

That is \— 

Cond[i]dit ecclesiam Willelmus nobilis istam 

Intemerate nomine sancte virginis Hilde. 

Except for the absence of the csesura in the second line the verses 
are passable hexameters. The excessive reduplication of the letters, 
which proceeds on no principle and is applied to consonants as well 
as vowels, appears to be unique, and can only be attributed to the 

' The Society is indebted to Mr. Robert photograph of this most interesting stone, 
Garbutl, Seave Green, Bilsdale, for a from which the plate has been made. 



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238 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

unskilfulness of the carver. It is strange to meet in the same 
inscription different forms of the letters S, E, and M, and in the 
case of the first one in the same word. The T in the first line 
differs from the form used, in the other parts of the inscription. 
The letter O has a dot in the centre, which is unusual, as has C 
in the penultimate line. As far as is known no inscription or 
manuscript exists with these peculiarities, so that as far as the form 
of the writing is concerned it is impossible to decide on its date. 

The occurrence of the proper name William is a certain proof 
that it cannot be of a date earlier than the Conquest. This name 
appears only three times in the index to the Cartularium Saxonicum, 
In the Yorkshire Domesday one pre-Conquest tenant, at Utley, in 
Craven, bore this name. Bilsdale was a chapelry in the parish of 
Helmsley, the church of which was given to Kirkham Priory by 
Walter Espec at its foundation in 1 122. It is very improbable that 
any private person would build the church after it had passed into 
the possession of that priory. Thus it seems the date must be 
between the years 1066 and 11 22. 

The date, however, can be defined within more narrow limits 
than these. Bilsdale itself is not mentioned in Domesday, but at 
that time, 1086-7, there were three manors in Helmsley, under which 
Bilsdale would be included ; two belonging to the King, and the 
third to his brother, Robert, Earl of Mortain. The advowson of 
Helmsley Church with its chapels would, no doubt, belong to the 
owners of the manor. By the attainder, in 11 06, of William, the 
second Earl of Mortain, the third manor came to the Crown. Nothing 
is known of the history of Bilsdale or Helmsley till the foundation of 
Kirkham, some thirty years after the date of the great Survey, when 
they formed part of the possessions of Walter Espec. The date of this 
inscription then lies between Domesday, 1086-7, ^"^^ the foundation 
of Kirkham Priory in 1122. 

The next question to be considered is, who was the " noble 
William" who built this church? Owing to the silence of history for 
the thirty years during which this stone may have been erected, it is 
impossible to give a certain answer. One conjecture may be dis- 
missed as unlikely. The first prior of Kirkham was William, an 
uncle of Walter Espec, who had been rector of Carton - on - the - 
Wolds, and it may be suggested that the foundation of the church 
may be attributed to his liberality. Unless the exigencies of verse 



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EARLY INSCRIPTION IN BILSDALE CHURCH. 239 

compelled and excused the use of the epithet "noble," as applied to 
a man in orders, this suggestion may be ruled out of court, as this 
epithet, at least in later times, was always applied to laymen. If, 
however, the suggestion is correct, the date of the inscription must 
be not long after 1122, as abbot William reigned less than two 
years.* 

Abbot William being excluded, one of the owners of the manor, 
before the mother church of Helmsley was granted to Kirkham, was 
the most natural person to build the church. Walter Espec's 
Christian name precludes him, and it is exceedingly improbable that 
either the Conqueror or his son had anything to do with the work, or 
the Earl of Mortain, so it must have been some lord who owned the 
property after it passed out of the royal hands, and before it came to 
Walter Espec. The parentage of Espec is nowhere given, but when it 
appears that Wardon, in Bedfordshire, where he founded a Cistercian 
abbey in 11 36, belonged at the time of the Survey to a certain 
William Spech, it is impossible to doubt that the founder of the 
monasteries at Kirkham, Rievaulx, and Wardon, was the heir of the 
Domesday baron. The possible solution of the question then is, 
that the manor of Helmsley with its dependencies, including Bilsdale, 
was granted by the Crown, at some date after 1106 and before 
1 1 22, to William Spech, who was in due course succeeded by his 
heir, Walter Espec ; and that it was this William to whom is due the 
building of the original Bilsdale Church. 

With the object of showing how the art of stone cutting had 
deteriorated in the sixty years succeeding the Conquest, a plate is 
given of the well-known inscription at Kirkdale, distant some dozen 
miles from Bilsdale Church. Unluckily the plate does not do 
justice to the original, or to the photograph from which it is taken.* 
It is very interesting, as from the mention of Tostig the earl, it must 
have been cut in 1065. The inscription runs thus : — 

® ORM . GAMAL . CAN . 7 TO FALAN . 7 HE 

SVNA . BOHTE . SCS . HIT LETMACAN . NEpAN . FROM 

GREGORIVS . MIN GRVNDE XPC . 7 SCS GREGORI 

STER . DONNE HI VS . IN AEDpARD DAGVM CNG 

T.pES AELTOBRO IN TOSTI DAGVM EORL © 

7 HApARD MEpROHTE . 7 BRAND PRS 

pIS IS D.EGES SOL MERCA ^T ILCVM TIDE. 

» Rievaulx Chartttlary (Surtees Soc. ), « From a photograph kindly lent by 

p. 264. Mr. S. A. Farrer, Brighoiise. 



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240 THE YORKSHIRE ARCRffiOLOGICAL JOURNAL.' 

That is, in modern English : — 

Orm, the son of Gamal, bought St Gregory's Church when it was 
all broken and fallen down, and he caused it to be built anew from 
the ground, for Christ and St. Gregory, in the days of Edward the 
king and Tosti the earl, and Hawarth wrought me, and Brand the 
priest. This is the day's sun marks at every hour. 



TESTAMENTARY BURIALS. 

May 17, 1407. Thomas Barker de Billesdale. Sep. in cimiterio 
capelle de Byllesdale. Domino Willelmo, capellano, xij^. Ad vnam 
candelam exhibendam coram Trinitate in capella predicta, vj. (Rfg- 
Test,y iii, 26gd.) 

May 20, 1476. Willelmus Hoj:sley de Bylesdale, Sep. in cimiterio 
capelle de Biiesdale, Ricardo Graye, vicario ibidem, meum optimum 
animal, nomine mortuarii mei. {/h'd.j iv, 91^.) 

Oct. 24, 1542. Lawrencie Kirke of Billisdale. My soull to God 
Almightie, to his mother, Marie, and to all the hevynlie company, 
and my bodie to be buried in the churche erthe of Sancte Ude in 
Billisdale. My curate. Sir Thomas Swaill, a witness. {Md.y xi, 653//.) 



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NOTES ON YORKSHIRE CHURCHES. 

By the late Sir STEPHEN GLYNNE, Bart. 

(continued from p. 503, VOL. XV.) 

St. John, Laughton. 

Sept, 20, i860. — Less than a mile from Laughton-en-le-Morthen i§ 
this neglected church, used formerly only for occasional service, but 
now likely to be better employed and cared for. It has a nave and 
low aisles, chancel, and western tower. The tower is Perpendicular, 
embattled with small buttresses, divided by three strings, with three- 
light window on the west, and closed door, belfry windows single. 
The arcade of the nave is Early English, with pointed arches on 
circular columns with moulded caps and toothed respond at north- 
west. The clerestory is large and out of proportion, having 
three windows of three lights. The tower arch rises at once from 
the walls. The chancel arch resembles those in the arcade, and 
there is a Perpendicylar rood Screen. The north aisle is continued 
one bay along the chancel. The chancel has a bad east window. 

The south doorway is Norman of late character, has shafts with 
capitals of foliage, the door has the original ironwork. The font is 
Perpendicular, richly panelled. There are tombs in the chancel. 

St. Lawrence, Adwick-le-Street. 

Feb. 19, 1862. — This church has a nave with north arch, chancel 
with north chapel, western tower, and south porch. The nave was 
undergoing a restoration when this church was visited. The doorway 
within the porch is Early Norman, the arch upon shafts with very 
large square abaci, and having cylindrical mouldings. 

The nave generally is not of early date. It is rather unusually 
wide, and the arcade has three pointed arches on octagonal pillars. 
The clerestory has square-headed Perpendicular windows of two lights. 
The windows of the north aisle are Late Perpendicular, quite debased. 
On the south is one of three unfoliated lights and tracery, one 
square-headed debased. The nave roof is low pitched. The tower 
arch pointed on octagonal corbels. 

VOL. XVII. Q 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



242 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

The chancel arch is somewhat similar. The chancel is divided 
from its north chantry chapel by two small Decorated arches on a 
pile of four close-clustered columns, and a third arch next the nave 
short and odd-shaped. The chancel has a two-light plain window on 
the south without foils, and a better one of Decorated character. 
There is a double sedile at the south-east, which seems Early 
English, on a single shaft with square abacus to the capital. The 
ceiling is flat. The south-west window of the chancel has two lights, 
each with the flattened trefoil head, not very ecclesiastical in 
appearance. The north chapel has at the east end two lancets, with 
a circle above them, and also a single lancet on the north. The 
roof of this chapel is new, and it contains a Perpendicular high tomb 
panelled with quatrefoils. The organ is placed here. The roofs 
have no parapets. The tower is good Perpendicular, embattled, with 
four pinnacles, has corner buttresses, a west window of three lights, but 
no door, belfry windows of two lights. The porch is mean. 

St. Helen, Burgh wallis. 

Feb. 19, 1862. — A small church. Plan : Chancel and nave 
without aisles, south porch, and west tower. The tower is Early 
Norman, has thick walls and no buttresses, a splayed early window on 
the west, and no door. It is of three stages, diminishing upwards, 
the belfry window of two lights with circular central shaft having 
abacus. The tower is covered with rough cast. The arch to the 
nave is obtuse upon imposts. The upper part has a later battlement 
and four pinnacles. In the north wall of the nave is seen externally 
a little herring-bone masonry, and there are no windows on the north 
of the nave. On the south are some Late Perpendicular windows 
with square heads of three lights. 

The chancel arch is very plain and pointed. There is a pretty 
good Perpendicular rood screen. The east window is Perpendicular 
of three lights. On the south of the chancel there is a wide lancet 
of doubtful character, and a small piscina pointed in a square 
frame. Near the east window a stem bracket, and on the south a 
stone seat with elbow, large enough to admit three persons. There 
is a brass of a knight, and within the sacrum may be seen the 
original altar stone, with five crosses nearly obliterated. 

The font has a circular bowl, with moulding round the top and 
base, and on an octagonal base. The porch has the stone arched 
roof with ribs not uncommon in this district. The door within is 
modern, as also the priest^s door. 



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NOTES ON YORKSHIRE CHURCHES. 243 

St. Luke and All Saints, Darrington. 
Feb, 19, 1862. — This church is in many ways very interesting. The 
plan is a nave with north and south aisles. Chancel with north 
chapel. Tower engaged in the west end of the nave and south 
porch. The tower is originally Norman, and seems to have opened 
to the nave formerly by only a very narrow arch, part of which is still 
to be seen, on shafts with scolloped capitals and abaci, but a larger 
pointed arch has at a subsequent period been opened above it. The 
tower opens to the north aisle by an obtuse arch, to the south aisle 
by a pointed one. The west respond of the south arcade is also a 
Norman impost. The nave has beyond the tower on each side an 
Early English arcade of three tall and handsome arches upon 
circular columns having moulded capitals and bases. The roofs look 
modem, and are covered with slates. There is no clerestory. In the 
south aisle are some very good Decorated windows of three lights, 
having reticulated tracery. At the east end of the same aisle is a 
single lancet, beneath which is a moulded horizontal ledge and a 
pretty piscina having a foliated ogee surmounted by a horizontal 
battlement, and springing from shafts with capitals, and the whole set 
upon a moulded projecting ledge. The nave is neat, but fitted with 
pews and a west gallery, though some of the ancient carved bench 
ends still remain. The windows of the north aisle are square-headed 
and Perpendicular, but one set higher up the wall is Decorated, of 
two lights. The west windows of the aisles are lancets. 

The chancel arch is pointed, on octagonal columns with capitals. 
The chancel is large and handsome. The east window of five 
lights, good Perpendicular. On the south are three windows, the 
centre one Decorated of two lights, with some remains of good old 
stained glass ; the others plain Perpendicular of three and five 
lights, that next the east has the sill prolonged and panelled below, 
forming a sedile. Near it is a small rude piscina with trefoil head. 
These windows have panelling beneath them externally. There is an 
Early English priest's door on imposts. 

The north chapel is an addition to the original chancel, opening 
to it by a wide pointed arch broken in the wall, upon octagonal 
columns, of which the eastern has nail heads in the capital. East- 
ward of this the wall looks as if it must have been an outer one, 
and has a lancet open now into the chapel. 

The chapel itself opens to the north aisle of the nave by a 
pointed arch rising straight from the wall, above which is a feature 
highly curious and singular, viz. a stone gallery approached by a 



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244 THE YORKSHIRE ARCttfiOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

Staircase within a square tower on the north-west side of the chapel 
or chantry. This gallery must have led to the roodloft, and is 
lighted by three small arched openings on each side, looking into 
the chantry and into the aisle of the nave. The chantry chapel is 
also curious from having a stone arched roof with ribs, something 
like the south transept of Minchin Hampton. The roof is high 
pitched, and has in its apex on the west side a lancet seen over the 
roof of the aisle. The east window is Decorated, of three lights, 
lately restored. Near it is an enriched corbel. The northern 
windows are Perpendicular, of three lights, merely muUioned and 
foiled. At the east end are two very fine stone effigies: a knight, 
cross-legged, bearing a shield charged with a saltier, and a lady with 
joined hands. 

The south porch is a fine Decorated one, of solid character and 
lofty, having a stone vault with the arched stone ribs so often seen in 
this part of Yorkshire. Within it a fine Early English doorway, 
having three orders of moulding and shafts with moulded round 
capitals. 

The tower is low and not imposing, it seems to have some 
Norman ingredients, but is partly debased. The belfry windows on 
the south and east are Norman, the west windows and door Late 
Perpendicular. 

St. Oswald, Horton-in-Ribblesdale. 

May 6, 1862. — The plan is a nave and chancel without archi- 
tectural division and aisles continued to the west end, a western 
tower and south porch. The exterior is chiefly Late Perpendicular, 
and the walls covered with white stucco, but within are earlier 
features. The windows are mostly late and square-headed, and 
without foils, but the west window of the north aisle is of two lights, 
cinque-foiled. The east window is of three lights, very ordinary and 
Late Perpendicular. 

The arcades within are Late Norman. On the south the arches 
are semi-circular and quite plain, the piers circular and rather 
slender, with square abaci. The southern arches are chamfered, the 
northern are not, but otherwise resemble those on the south. The 
third pier on the north is octagonal, with square capital sculptured 
with shield and fleur-de-lis. The fourth arch on the north is 
elliptical and of two orders. The eastern arch on both sides is very 
wide and lofty, just pointed, rising from an octagonal pillar. Over 
the south arcade is a queu clerestory, with blind square-headed 
windows. The north aisle windows are modern. The interior is 
encumbered by pews and whitewashed. The roof ordinary, the tower 



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NOTES ON YORKSHIRE CHURCHES. 245 

arch pointed. The font, Norman, has a round bowl diminishing 
downwards on a square base, and sculptured with longitudinal 
bands of chevron. The tower is low, of plain Perpendicular 
character, embattled, with corner buttresses and no string course, has 
at the west a poor three-light window and plain doorway, and belfry 
windows of two lights, and under them small single trefoil-headed 
windows. 

St. Michael, Hubberholme. 

May 7, 1862. — This rude church is in a romantic valley amidst 
mountainous and picturesque scenery. It consists of a body and 
equal north and south aisles, with west tower and south porch. The 
east end presents one ungraceful wide gable containing three 
windows, the central square-headed and Perpendicular, of three 
foliated lights, that of the north aisle of two, of the south three 
lights, all square-headed. The other windows on the south are 
mutilated or modern, on the north they are late and square-headed, 
one of five, one of three, one of two lights. 

The arcades within are very rude and dissimilar. On the north 
are four low chamfered pointed arches with slight curvature, on short 
octagonal piles with capitals. The fourth arch (within the chancel) is 
much wider than the others, with low spring and no impost, and has 
an extraordinary appearance from its width and lowness. The third 
arch on the same side has been strengthened by some addition to 
the pier. On the south the arcade is of four very clumsy round 
arches set very awkwardly upon octagonal columns, without real capitals 
but coarsely wrought wedges set on alternate faces. The date of 
this very rude work is difficult to ^\. There is a break in the arcade 
on the north to mark the chancel, which is enclosed by a rough 
rood screen with the loft. On the loft facing east is some open 
wood panelling, and some of like kind in the screen. Above the 
loft facing west the decalogue, &c., are inscribed on boarding. There 
are some traces of more rude wood screen work. In the east angle 
of the south aisle are traces of rude stone steps. The roof is plain, 
of flat pitch, the interior whitewashed, badly pewed and generally 
untidy and neglected. Along it stretches a frightful stove. The 
tower arch is very rude and small, obtusely pointed, on imposts. The 
font has an octagonal bowl on octagonal stem and round base. On 
the bowl are quatrefoils, on one side two heads, on another a fleur- 
de-lis. The whole of the walls are of rough stone, the roof covered 
with lead. The tower is low and rude, with quasi-battlement and 
one string course, without buttresses, the belfry windows square- 
headed, of two lights, other openings mere slits. 



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246 THE YORKSHIRE ARC Hi5i:0 LOGICAL JOURNAL. 

The churchyard has a sweet, tranquil appearance, bounded by the 
river, with view of a picturesque bridge and fine woody hills. The 
porch bears the date 1696, and is flagged. In the churchyard is an 
ancient dial. 

St. Oswald, Askrigg. 

May 7, 1862. — This church has the common arrangement of nave 
and chancel undistinguished, with north and south aisles extending quite 
to the east end, a western tower and south porch. The prevailing 
features are late local Perpendicular. The aisles have plain moulded 
parapets, the clerestory is embattled and is extended entirely to the 
east end. The walls of the aisles and the windows have been lately 
renewed. The southern windows are not the same as those on the 
north, but all of two lights. The east window is of five lights, and 
has an emba^ttled transom, those of the clerestory are square-headed, 
of three lights. The roof is of flat pitch, panelled of plain 
character, with brackets. The tower arch is pointed, very plain and 
rude. The arcades are not quite similar. On each side ^y^ 
pointed arches, those on the south are chamfered, with octagonal 
pillars having capitals. On the north the arches are wider and 
stilted, but lower and with slighter curve, upon circular columns. In 
the south aisle is a piscina, with a trefoiled arch. The pews are 
new. The tower has strong arched stone vestry, with ribs. The 
tower is like a Welsh one, plain and without buttresses or string 
course, embattled, with four pinnacles, the belfry windows square- 
headed of two lights, on the north and south are slit openings, on 
the west a new window. There is a priest's door south of the 
chancel. The south porch plain. The font modern. 

In the town of Askrigg is a good stone house with gable and a 
long range of stone roof, date 1657. 

St. Andrew, Dent. 

May 6, 1862. — This church is not unlike the last-named, having 
the three equal aisles and a western tower and south porch. The 
whole is of rough work, apparently of sixteenth century. The roof is 
of strong stone tiles, with dormer windows introduced. The east 
window, like that of Askrigg, is of five lights, with embattled transom 
and no foils nor tracery. The windows are square-headed, without 
foils, of two and three lights. The arcades are of six bays, and there 
is an expansion of the aisles at the two eastern bays on each side, 
perhaps marking the chancel. The arches are pointed, the two 
western piers are circular, with octagonal capitals, the next pier 



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NOTES ON YORKSHIRE CHURCHES. 247 

octagonal without capital ; the two next piers octagonal with capitals. 
The eastern portion of the north aisle is used as a vestry, elevated upon 
a vault. At the east of the south aisle appear in the wall some 
rough high stone steps, the use of which is obscure ; there are also 
two rude openings in the wall. The font is small. The seats are 
mostly open benches, very plain and rude, with backs to them. The 
pulpit has the date 1614. On the north is a plain obtuse arched 
doorway, the hood with hatched moulding, probably Early English. 
The south porch has an outer doorway with continuous hatch 
mouldings. There is a pew with date 16 19. The tower is low and 
embattled, the belfry windows of two lights, square-headed and 
labelled. The exterior walls are whitewashed. On the north of the 
churchyard is a schoolhouse, and on the same side a charming view 
over the valley, the church standing on a sort of terrace. 

St. Andrew, Sedbergh. 

May 7, 1862. — A large church, arranged according to the local 
fashion much as the two last named, externally having for the most 
part a Late Perpendicular character, but with much of earlier work 
within. The aisles go to the east end, as also does the clerestory, 
and the chancel is scarcely defined. There are north and south 
porches, and a western tower. In the north porch there is an 
obtuse niche over the door. The aisles and clerestory are embattled ; 
at the west of the north aisle is a flat-faced buttress of Early English 
character. The tower is small and Early English, with later battle- 
ments and four short pinnacles; under the parapet is. a corbel table. 
On the west side is a Perpendicular three-light window, the belfry 
windows of three lights, square- headed and labelled ; more recent 
buttresses have been added. The window at the west of the south 
aisle is Early Decorated of two lights, that at the west of the north 
aisle of three trefoiled lights with label over it on heads. The other 
windows are Perpendicular, mostly ugly and square-headed, and of four 
lights. The clerestory windows are all square-headed, without foils. 

The interior has an irregular effect from the dissimilarity of the 
arcades. The northern arcade has eight arches, the southern only 
six. The latter are all Early save the two eastern, the first from the 
west wider, but very plain, on a clustered respond ; the others have 
better mouldings and hoods, the columns circular, with square capitals 
and rather short. Of the northern arches the six western are all 
semi-circular, and the two western are very narrow ; the more western 
pillars are circular, with capitals. Beyond the two western arches is a 



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248 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

break, and a wall pier with imposts, the four next arches are of 
superior character, with mouldings, and the piers circular on square 
bases, with octagonal capitals. The western respond is a plain impost 
moulding. The fifth and sixth arches are somewhat mis-shaped, and 
the sixth is not a whole arch, but quite ill-formed. The seventh 
arch is good Norman, with circular column, the eighth is pointed, 
Early English, and plain, with a hood. The south-east arch facing 
the aisle has a hood on corbel heads. The south arcade turns 
inwards towards the east 

The eastern arch on the south is wide and pointed, on an impost 
respond, and the two next are very wide and somewhat of elliptical 
form, the one is of plainer character than the others, the columns 
circular, with stilted bases of square form. In the south aisle near 
the east is a rude aperture on the wall and a bracket. The east 
window has a flat arch. The chancel has some good ancient seats 
and parclose screens on the north, new stalls, and the steps to the 
altar of fine black marble. The roof is of flat pitch. The tower 
arch is plain and pointed, on imposts with rude figure. Near the 
south door is a stoup. The font has an octagonal bowl of black 
marble, with concave sides charged with shields, the stem also of 
marble with concave sides. An ancient poor box has the date 1633. 
Three bells and a barrel organ. 



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Cl^c gorksl^trf ^wl^aologkal Journal. 

List of prioes of Publioations of the Society, which may be had on application 
to the Librarian, Mr. E. K. Clabk, F.S.A., 10, Park Sti'eet, Leeds :— 

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Also the Publications of the North Riding Record Series. 



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THE 



FOUNDED, 1863. INCORPORATED. 1893. 



PATRONS. 

For the North Riding, The Most Hon. the MARQUIS of RIPON, K.G., Lord-Lieutcnant. 
For the East Riding, The Right Hon. the LORD HERRIES. 



His Grace the DUKK .>k NORFOLK, K.G., 

Hereditary E.irl Marshal. 
The Right Hon. the EARL ov CARLLSLE. 
The Right Hon. LORD (iRANTLEY, F.S.A. 
The Right Hon. LORD DERWENT. 
Sir JOHN WILLIAM RAMSDEN, Bart. 
Sir FRANCIS SHARP POWELL, Bart., M.P. 



WENTWORTH BLACKEIT BEAUMONT. 

Sir THOMAS BROOKE, Bart., F.S.A. 

The Rev. CANON WILLIAM GREENWELL, 

M.A., F.S.A. 
ANDREW SHERLOCK LAWSON, F.S.A. 
JOHN LLOYD WHARTON, M.P. 



PRESIDENT. 
Sir THOMAS BROOKE, Bart., F.S.A. 



Of 



COUNCIL. 



ARMVTAGE.Sir G., Bart., F.S.A. (5n/A<»««). 

BILSON, JOHN, F.S.A. (//«//). 

BOY N TON, TH OS., F.S.A. {Hndiingtim Quay). 

CHARLESWORTH, JOHN {.Wakefield). 

CHEESMAN, W. N. (Sclby^. 

COLLINS, FRANCIS, M.I). {Pateley Bndge). 

DICKONS, JOHN NORTON {Brad/erd), 

EDDISON, J. E., M.D. (Leeds). 



LEADMAN, A. D. H., F.S.A. {Fockiington). 

LISTER, JOHN (Halifax), , . 

LUMB, G. D. (Leeds). 

MORKILL, J. W., M.A. (Bel> Busk). 

MORRELL,W. W. (York). 

PUDSEY. Col. H. FAWCETl" {Hull). 

SCOTT, JOHN, Jun. (Skif^ton). 

TAYLOR, The Rev. R. V., B.A. (Richmond), 

WALKER, J. W., F.S.A. (Wakefield). 



FALLOW, 'I. M., F.S.A. (Redntr). wi\i.MiK. j. w., r.r».A. \traKepeta). 

FOWLER, The Rev. Canon, F.S.A. (Durham). WEDDALL, G. E. (Brot^A, E. Vorks.). 

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_ J, \v. — * ~ t . -- .... 



CLAY, F.S.A., Rastrick House, Brighoose. 



Cjje Ortjambs Societg. 



The Society was formed in 1889 for antiquarian objects in connection with Leeds 
and District. Its publications include the Leeds Parish Church Register^ Adel 
Register^ Kirkstall Abbey Coucher Book^ Calverley Charters^ and Miscellanea, Methley 
Register is in preparation. 

Subscription, \os. (yi. per annum. Life Fee, £$ ^s. President and Hon. 
Treasurer: Edmund Wilson, F.S.A., Red Hall, Leeds; Hott. Secretaries: 
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Leeds. 



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/ Ut m ^^^j 



1 



THE 

YORKSHIRE 



Hrcba^ological JournaL 



PUBLISHED UNDER THE DIRECTION OF 
THE COUNCIL 

OP THB 

l^orltdbire Hrcba^olodlcal Society?. 



Part 67. 

(BEING THE THIRD PART OF VOLUME XVII.) 
[ISSUED TO MEMBERS ONLY.^ 



LEEDS: 

PRINPEI) FOR THE SOCIETY BY 

JOHN WHITEHEAD & SON, ALFRED STREET, BOAR LANE. 

MCMIII. 



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^ The Council of the Society are not responsible for any 
statements or opinions expressed in the YORKSHIRE 
ARCHiCOLOGICAL JOURNAL, the Authors of the various 
Papers beins alone responsible for the same. 



CONTENTS OF PART 67. 

(Being the Third part of Volvme ZVII.) 



The Feast Days of St. Hilda . 
Some Legends of St. Nicholas, 

WITH Special Reference to 

THE Seal of Pocklington 

Grammar School . 
Monumental Brasses in the 

North Riding 
Vescy of Brampton-en-le-Morthen 

IN THE parish OF TrEETON^ CO. 

York, and their Descendants 

Grave-Slab of Abbot Barwic in 
Selby Abbey Church, 1526 

Treason in 1685 .... 



George Buchannan 

( Canon J. T. Fowler, 
r D.C.K, F.S.A. 

I Mill Stephenson, B.A., 

i F.S.A. . 

C. E. B. Bowles, M.A. 

I Canon J. T. Fowler, 
) D.C.L., F.S.A. 



PAOS 

249 



254 

261 

340 

373 
374 



5lltt»tratiott8. 



The Seal of Pocklington Grammar School .... 
Monumental Brasses: — 

Aldbaroughy near Boroughbridge. — William de Aldebuigh, c. 1360 

By land Abbey, — Casement of Brass to an Abbot, 15*** century 

Forcett^^Hiv^ Anne Underbill, 1637 

Giilingy near Helmsley. — Robert Wellington, Rector, 1503 

Heimsley, — Crest of the. Manners Family . 

Hornby, — Christopher Conyers and wife Ellen, 1443 
,, Thomas Mountford, 1489, and wife Agnes 

Kirby Moor side. — Lady Brooke, 1600. 

Kirkleatham. — Dorothy Turnor, 1628 
„ Robert Coulthirst, 1631 

Hoxby Chapel. — Thomas Boynton, Esq., 1523 

Sessay. — ^Thomas Magnus, Archdeacon of the East Riding, 1550 
„ Palimpsest Portions of Brass to Thomas Magnus 

Sheriff Hutton, — Thomas and Agnes Wytham, c 1480 
,, Mary Hall, 1657 .... 

West 7a«/£f/</.— Thomas Sutton, Rector, c. 1490 

Topcliffe. — ^Thomas de Topclyff and wife Mabel, 1 391 

Wensley. — Sir Simon Wensley, Rector, c. 1360 

Hycliffe.^Ra\ph Wiclif, 1606 .... 
The Hall, Brampton-en-le-Morthen 
Incised Slab from Selby Abbey Church— John Barwic, Abbot 1522-26 



PAOB 

to face 254 

264 

to face 268 

,. 276 

,, 276 

281 

284 

to face 286 

„ 292 

„ '296 

299 

to face 304 

3«0 

311 
to face 314 

319 
320 

to face 326 
334 
338 

to face 360 

373 



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THE FEAST DAYS OF ST. HILDA. 

By Mr. GEORGE BUCHANNAN. 

On reading Dr. Leadman's interesting paper (pp. 33-49) I was 
struck by one or two matters as to which I should like to add a 
few words. 

First with regard to the Feast of St. Hilda, which is, as stated in 
the York Kalendars, the 25th of August I remember more than 
forty years ago being puzzled, when copying for another purpose 
some ancient charters, by finding that King Henry H had granted to 
the Abbot and Convent of Whitby with other liberties "feriam ad 
festum S. Hyldae" (Whitby Chartulary^ Surtees Society, vol. i, p. 148), 
and that this fair, when subsequently confirmed or otherwise referred 
to, was always associated with the Feast of St. Hilda. Now the 
actual fair at that time, though but the shadow of a shade, was 
regularly and formally proclaimed, and always on the 25th of August 
Yet there was no trace of St. Hilda's Feast in the old form of 
proclamation, nor any mention in histories or documents of a change 
in the date of the fair. And although in Charlton's History of 
Whitby (p. 139) the author states that the fair is held **on St Hilda's 
Day or August 25th," and adds the interesting statement that the 
date was not altered on the change of style, he says (p. 37) that 
"the Church of Rome has always observed and still continues to 
observe the festival of Hilda's translation on the 15th day of 
December." 

Dr. Young's History of Whitby^ however, corrected Charlton as to 
the tradition of the Church of Rome, and explains how the mistake 
arose, that is, by mistranslation of "die quinta decima Kalendarum 
Decembrium," the date of St. Hilda's death as recorded by Bede 
(Young, vol. i, page 211). The date of St Hilda's death (17th 
November) is thus restored as the date of her Feast But Dr. Young 
also states (Ibid,, p. 574), "There are two fairs held in Whitby, the 
one begins August 25th, said to be St. Hilda* s Day, the other is held 
at Martinmas; each lasts three days, but very little business is done 
at either. The first is the regular fair, held by proclamation ; the 
last has come in by custom." 

It is needless to say that when I had access to the York Missal 
and York Breviary in the Surtees Society's editions, I found ample 
VOL. xvii. R 



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250 THE YORKSHIRE ARCRfiOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

confirmation of Dr. Young's rather doubtful words above quoted, and 
that the traditional date of the fair, still observed for that purpose, 
was indeed the date of the Feast of St. Hilda, to which were assigned 
a proper mass and office. But in that case what was I to make of 
the positive statements as to the observance of the 17th of November? 

The answer is that there were in fact two commemorations of St 
Hilda, one on the 25th of August, and one on the 17th of November, 
and that the former was the Feast of the Translation, the latter 
commemorating the death of the Saint. This is made clear by the 
Award of Henry de Percy, Earl of Northumberland ( Whitby Chartulary^ 
vol. ii, p. 501), in which the parties are said to have appeared "devaunt 
nous, avant dit Counte, en la feste del Translacion de Seint Hylde — 
cest assavoir le xxv jour daugst." Furthermore we find that the Feast of 
the Translation was termed "dies S. Hyldae in k\i\xymYCiO^\Guisborough 
Chartulary^ Surtees Society, vol. ii, pp. 213, 214, 220, 221), and that 
the 17th of November was called the Feast of St. Hilda in Winter, 
if, as seems probable, that was the date intended by the Grant in 
43 Henry HI to Peter de Mauley, third of that name, of a fair at 
Egton yearly for eight days, beginning on the eve of St. Hilda in 
Winter (Graves* History of Cleveland^ p. 281, quoting Cart, Antig.^ ii, 
p. 8«). The Church at Egton was dedicated to St. Hilda, and the 
connection between fairs and the commemoration of the local saint 
is too well known to need comment. Graves adds that St. Hilda's 
Fair has been discontinued for some time, but there are four fairs 
which are still kept annually, namely on the Tuesday before May 
Day; upon St Bartholomew's Day; on the Tuesday before St Martin's 
Day; and on the Tuesday before the Purification. Through the 
kindness of John Foster, Esq., of Egton Lodge, I have been able 
to ascertain that these dates were assigned by a charter of King 
William HI to Henry, Viscount Longueville, then owner of the Egton 
estate, which now belongs to Mr. Foster and his family. And it will 
be observed that one of these dates (St Bartholomew) is the Eve of 
St Hilda in Autumn, and another, the Tuesday before St Martin's 
Day (that is November 23rd, ihe date still called Martinmas), must 
closely approach the date of the Winter Feast of St Hilda, though 
it is not likely that anything but custom led to its selection by 
Lord Longueville. 

That Dr. Young is correct in stating that November 17th, that is 
the Winter Feast, the death-day of St Hilda, is that on which she has 



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THE FEAST DAYS OF ST. HILDA. 251 

been commonly commemorated, is clear from the authorities cited in 
the notes to Dr. Leadman's paper, other than the York Missal, and 
Breviary. These (and others) are also referred to in the notice of 
St. Hilda in the Menoiogy of England and Wales, compiled by order of 
the Cardinal Archbishop and the Bishops of the Province of Westminster , 
published in 1893. 

The Translation of St Hilda, commemorated on August 25th, is 
doubtless the translation of her relics, supposed to have been acquired 
from Glastonbury, as referred to by Dr. Leadman in his note on 
p. 44. If we had the ^^ liber Tomae de Sancta Hilda^^ once in the 
libraiy of the abbey at Whitby (^Whitby Chartulary, vol. i, p. 341), 
we should at least know what was believed in the monastery as to 
the miraculous Translation, the commemoration of which seems to 
have overshadowed even that of the death of the Saint. 

Of the local veneration of St. Hilda few traces remain, but little 
things are sometimes worthy of notice, and one such matter may be 
mentioned. Children in Whitby used to be told, and may yet be told 
for aught I know, that if they wished for anything very much they 
were to cross their shoes towards the Abbey, before they went to 
bed, and they were sure to get it. 

Another circumstance which readers of Charlton and Young may 
observe is that the Saint is constantly called Lady Hilda. And by 
that title and no other she was certainly known to Whitby folk in 
days not distant. Compare the use of "Our Lady" as applied to the 
Blessed Virgin. 

Possibly also the same thing is suggested by the language of the 
l^end on the Hartlepool seal, figured in Dr. Leadman's paper, which 
Dr. Young actually rendered by " Let Lady Hilda help her servants " 
{Young, i, 142). This, by the way, is evidently a rhyming "Benedic- 
tion," as appears when it is printed thus : — 

"Subveniat famulis 
Nobilis Hilda suis." 

Compare a similar Benediction in the Aberdeen Breviary: — 

"Conserva famulos 
Virgo Maria tuos." 

Perhaps, as the Fair at Whitby has now finally vanished, room may 
be found for a copy of the Proclamation as it was last used, if only 
for the sake of its quaint English. It will be observed that the 



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252 THE YORKSfflRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

disappearance of St. Hilda's Day from the Kalendar at the Reformation 
led to the rather cumbrous use of the Feast of St. Bartholomew as 
fixing the date after which the Fair was to be held. It came in fact 
to be called "Bartlemytide Fair." 

PROCLAMATION. 
XRIlbCCCad there has been, time out of mind, an ancient fair held 
and kept by the Predecessors of Sir Charles William Strickland, 
Baronet, in the Town of Whitby, for three successive days following 
the Feast day of St Bartholomew yearly (except the first day following 
the Feast day fall out to be on a Sunday then to begin and be held 
the day after) for the selling and buying all manner of wares merceries 
and merchandises goods and chattels, paying the lawful and accustomed 
tolls and payments for the said wares merceries and merchandises 
goods and chattels brought there to be sold. 

Sir Charles William Strickland, Baronet, now Ix)rd of this Town 
and Manor Doth hereby give Notice and Proclaim the said Fair to 
be held and kept for 3 days according to the ancient use and custom 
of the said Lord and Burgesses of the said Town of Whitby; 

And in the name of the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty Doth 
hereby strictly charge and command all manner of persons whatsoever 
coming and resorting to this present Fair that they and every of 
them during the continuance of this present Fair do keep and 
preserve the public peace without making any assault affray brawling 
cheating or quarrelling with any person or persons whatsoever or 
doing or committing any act whereby the public peace may be 
disturbed. Also that no manner of person or persons whatsoever sell 
any corrupt unlawful or unwholesome victuals for men women or 
children's bodies to any person or persons whomsoever or presume to 
sell any wares merceries and merchandises goods and chattels being 
deceitful or use any unlawful or deceitful weights or measures to the 
deceiving of any person or persons whatsoever upon pain and peril 
that shall fall thereon. 

And the said Sir Charles William Strickland Doth hereby Order 
and appoint a Court of Pie Powder to be kept at the Office of 
of Whitby aforesaid Steward for the Lord of 
the Manor aforesaid where all matters of difference or controversies 
arising or accruing during the holding of the said Fair shall be 
remedied according to Law and Justice. God Save the Queen and 
the Lord of the Manor. G. B. 

To the list of ancient dedications (p. 44) named by Dr. Leadman 
must be added that of the Church or Chapel of Sneaton, near 



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THE FEAST DAYS OF ST. HILDA. 263 

Whitby (Whitby Chariulary, vol. ii, p. 414). The fact that this was 
dedicated to St. Hilda had been entirely lost until the publication by 
the Surtees Society of the Whitby Chartulary (Young's History of 
Whitby y vol. i, p. 375«). For want of this knowledge the Church had 
been very informally dedicated by the Lord of the Manor, who rebuilt 
it in the last century, to St Andrew, and the present writer cannot 
but admire the national feeling which led Colonel Wilson to wish to 
associate the Church with the patron saint of his own country, 
Scotland. How it came to pass that in the Diocesan Kalendar St. 
John was afterwards named as the patron does not appear; but at 
any rate, of the three Saints who thus are made to contend for 
possession, Saint Hilda has certainly the oldest, and, as it would seem, 
the best title. 

Amongst the place-names formed from the Saint's name, or the 
masculine form, Hildir, a list of which is given on p. 33/1, Hinder- 
skelfe, now Castle Howard, was omitted. 



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SOME LEGENDS OF ST. NICHOLAS, 

WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE SeAL OF POCKLINGTON 

Grammar School. 



By Canon J. T. FOWLER, D.C.L., F.S.A. 

The seal* is 2^ inches in diameter, and represents, on a geometrical 
pavement, a scene or tableau of John Dowman, archdeacon of Suffolk, 
founder of the school, kneeling, in a long flowing robe with a hood, 
and with his hands raised and clasped together in prayer at a desk, 
before which, on a lozenge, is a shield charged with a monogram 
composed of the initials of his name: — I.D. Before him are three 
carved brackets or corbels, each containing a standing figure on it 
In the centre, Our Lord as a child, with cruciferous nimbus and 
naked, lifting up both his hands in benediction; on his breast an 
oval plaque bearing the monogram, ii)C, on his right stands the 
Virgin crowned, the Child on her right arm ; on his left St. Nicholas, 
bishop of Myra, in albe, chasuble, etc., and mitred ; in his right hand 
a crosier, his left hand raised in benediction, with the thumb and 
two fingers extended ; at his left side three children in a tub, one of 
the usual emblems of the saint. In the field, on which are eight or 
nine objects resembling triple tongues of fire, the holy name, iijCf 
repeated five times. Round the margin is the inscription, which has 
a rose in place of the usual initial cross, and *coie' instead of the 
usual *coe,* so that we must read "Seal of the community of the 
fraternity," etc. 

♦ SigiUu : cote • f rater • now • il)u ■ bte • mane • Cci • 
ntcfji • t!e • pofehngton 

The iconography of the seal is quite what we might expect it to 
be. The central figure is the Holy Child Jesus; and Dean Colet 
founded " St. Paul's School," as it came to be called, in honour of 
"the Child Jesus," in 15 12, two years earlier than the foundation of 
Pocklington School. The other figures, besides that of the founder, 
are those of SS. Mary and Nicholas, who were regarded as patrons 

* The plate of the seal has been taken Pocklington. There is a sulphur cast 
from a photograph, kindly lent by Mr. from the matrix in the collection of casts 
A. D. H. Leadman, F.S.A., Oak House, at the British Museum. 



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SEAL OF KOCKLINGTON GRAMMAR .SCHOOL. 



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SOME LEGENDS OF ST. NICHOLAS. 255 

of schools; King's College, Cambridge, and Eton, for example, and 
in our own time Lancing, have been dedicated in their honour. 
SS. Mary and Nicholas are associated in the dedications of seven 
ancient English churches, but the idea out of which the association 
arose does not lie upon the surface, and it is not easy to say what 
it was, unless it was that St. Mary was the mother of the Child 
Jesus. But there are at least two reasons why St. Nicholas should 
have come to be regarded as the patron of children. One is thus 
given in the Festiall or Liber Festivalis in the sermon for 
St. Nicholas' day:— 

"We rede that he had a fadir that was called Epiphanus. 
ande his modir was called Joh'na the whiche hadde saint Nicholas 
bitwene hem. 

"And whan he was borne thaie avowed chastite. and delid no 
more to gidir: but helde hem plesid on this oo childe the whiche 
thaie made to be c'stined. 

"And yet thay wolde not calle him Nicholas whiche is a manys 
name. 

"And so all his liue daies he was callid the name of a childe. 
and the v'tue y'with. that is to saie meke and simple; and without 
malice. 

"And while he vsid the cradill he fastid Wedinsdaie and fridaie. 
the whiche daies he wolde sowke but ons on the daie. and so helde 
him paied (pleased), and contynewed so forth all his liffe in thise 
vertues with his childis name. And unto this daie children haue 
him in remembran'ce specialli bifore all other saintes in the yere.*" 

This story is found in the Golden Legend and in the Breviaries 
of Rome (ancient and modern), Sarum, York, Liege (1746), but not 
in those of Quignon (1549), Soissons (1742), Bourges (1783), or Paris 
(1836). In the Li^ge Breviary (1746) it is related in the First Lesson, 
and is compactly given in the third verse of the hymn, thus : — 

"Quarta et sexta Feria, 
"Semel sugebat ubera: 
"Post in fetate tenera 
"Hac usus abstinentia,"- 

This association with children would afterwards be emphasised by 
the legend of the boys in the tub, now to be considered. 

St. Nicholas is represented on the Pocklingtoa seal, as he usually 
is, with three little boys in a tub standing by his side. The legeivJ 

1 Durham MS. Cosin V. iii. 5. fo. 56. « Pars Hyemalis, 458. 



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256 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

referred to was one of the most popular of all that related to this 
saint, but it was one of those for which there was the least authority. 
It does not even appear in the Golden Legend," in which are many 
stories concerning St. Nicholas that are hardly, if at all, less extrava- 
gant. Nor is it referred to in the Sarum or York Breviary, nor in 
any others that we have consulted ; it was just a piece of folklore 
that in all probability arose out of representations of something that 
might easily have happened, as we shall see. There is no mention 
of it in the other lives of the saint, Leonard Justinian's, John the 
Deacon's, and that of Metaphrastes, but all these contain a credible 
story of three rescued officers, which appears in the Golden legend 
and in the Sarum, Roman, and other Breviaries. It is to this effect : 
that the Emperor Constantine sent three officers of his army to put 
down a rebellion in Phrygia. They arrived at Myra, where Nicholas, 
the bishop, entertained them honourably. As they were sitting down 
to the feast it was told to St. Nicholas that the prefect had con- 
demned three innocent men to death. He at once arose, and, 
followed by his guests, arrived at the place of execution just in time 
to save the lives of the three men. Such is the substance of the 
story, which is told with a great many more details than need here 
be related. But the sequel of it in the Sarum Breviary is that the 
three officers were afterwards unjustly accused to Constantine and 
sent to prison, where, expecting to be put to death, they called upon 
God and St. Nicholas. The saint appeared to the Emperor in the 
visions of the night, rebuked him severely, and made him set the 
prisoners free. 

We now come to what is supposed by many to be a later and 
highly distorted version of the same legend, which may here be given 
first in the words of Mrs. Jameson,* and then in some early forms. 

"As he was travelling through his diocese to visit and comfort 
his people, he lodged in the house of a certain host who was a son 
of Satan. This man, in the scarcity of provisions, was accustomed 
to steal little children, whom he murdered, and served up their limbs 
to his guests. On the arrival of the bishop and his retinue, he had 
the audacity to serve up the dismembered limbs of these unhappy 
children before the man of God, who had no sooner cast eyes on 
them than he was aware of the fraud. He reproached the host with 
his abominable crime, and going to the tub where their remains 
were salted down, he made over them the sign of the cross, and* 
they rose up whole and well." 

* Sacred and I^gendaiy Ari, ii, 454. 



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SOME LEGENDS OF ST. NICHOLAS. 257 

Cahier* quotes from the Norman poet Wace {circa 1180) the 
earliest version of the above story that we have yet met with. What 
is here translated will be found below in the original French. 

"The meaning of the salting tub and the three "toiall children is, 
according to the Norman poet Wace, as follows :— \ 

* Three clerks were going to school, y^ 
I will not make a long tale about them, 
Their host slew them by night, 
Hid the bodies, took their goods : 
Saint Nicholas by God's help knew it; 
Instantly he was there, as it pleased God, 
He demanded the clerks of the host; 
He could not hide them, but showed them to him. 
Saint Nicholas by his prayer 
Put the souls back into the bodies; 
For that he did this honour to the clerks. 
The clerks celebrate his festival upon his day.* 



"As to the fact in itself, which is not to be found in Greek 
(authors) for all their enthusiasm for St Nicholas, I suspect that it may 
be explained by the aid given by the great bishop of Myra to the 
three officers condemned to death by Constantine. Captives are 
often represented in the middle ages in a small tower, and perhaps 
•owing to a desire to make the scene more vivid, the tower was cut 
through the middle. As those protected by a great personage were 
often reduced to small proportions by the artist, in order to make 
the intercessor stand out, may not the tower have become a tub and 
adult clients been changed into small boys?** 

About seventy years later the story is introduced in one of his 
sermons by no less a person than St. Bonaventura^ (i 221-1274), to 
the following effect : — 

" The more the blessed Nicholas followed Christ in any way, the 
more did he walk in His steps in the working of miracles. For 
among all the saints of his own times he was renowned for the 
greatest, indeed stupendous miracles, as Holy Church says of him in 
the collect, *0 God, who hast adorned the blessed Nicholas by 

1 Charactei istiqucs cUs Saints (Paris, 1 867), pnge 304, col. 2. 
^ S. Bonaventurae Opera, Tom. 3, Sermo i {rirca fifitm). For the original 
Romae, 1596, page 242. De S. Nicholao Latin, see below. 



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258 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

innumerable miracles,' some of which are given in the Legenda,* while 
some have been narrated above. But I will tell you one which is 
not in the Legenda itself, but is written elsewhere. There were two 
scholars, noble and wealthy, who, carrying with them much gold, were 
travelling to Athens to study philosophy; desiring, however, first to 
see St. Nicholas and commend themselves to his prayers, they came 
to the city where the bishop resided. But the innkeeper, seeing that 
they were so rich, and impelled by an evil spirit, slew them, cut them 
up as they do pigs, and salted their flesh in a tub. St. Nicholas, 
being informed of this by an angel, soon arrived at the house of the 
innkeeper, showed him what he had done, rebuked him strongly, and 
at length by his prayers brought the boys to life again. Because 
then in the working of miracles he imitated Christ, that can be 
quoted concerning him which is said of Christ: 'They shall come 
unto thee that despised thee, and shall bow themselves down at the 
soles of thy feet.'* Therefore let us beseech the Lord" {ends here). 

It will be noticed that only two youths are mentioned by 
St. Bonaventura. The same form of the story is given in P. Giryet 
et P. Guerin, Les Petits Bollandistes^ vies des Saints^ Paris, 1869, 
tome 12, p. 95, where also another version is given, in which there 
are three scholars resuscitated in like manner on the way from 
Nicaea, where St. Nicholas had been taking part in the first General 
Council. The editors remark that there is no ancient evidence for 
these prodigies, but only popular tradition, and that perhaps the 
two stories have related to a single miracle differently reported by 
different authors. 

The number three recurs again and again in the legends of 
St. Nicholas; there were three poor maidens whom the saint kept 
from a life of shame by providing them with marriage portions ; three 
officers, as we have seen, witnessed the rescue of three condemned 
prisoners, and were afterwards rescued themselves; and lastly three 
children, according to the most generally accepted version of the tub 
legend, were murdered, salted, and brought to life again. Cahier (see 
above) thinks that the story and representations of the three children 
in the tub have arisen out of representations of the three officers 
of Constantine. Baring-Gould refers them to the three prisoners at 
Myra.' It is a small matter. We may be pretty sure that the salting 
tub story has arisen out of a misunderstanding of representations of 
three men in a round tower. 

1 That is, the Legenda Sanctorum in ^ Isaiah Ix, 14. 

il^S'^MauSsTnrt^i^ai: »/^--/'^ ^-V.. December (.877). 

of the Saints. P^«*7. 



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SOME LEGENDS OF ST. NICHOLAS. 259 

Dom Gu^ranger gives long extracts from a twelfth century office 
of St. Nicholas, but in these we find no mention of the legend of 
the children in the tub, though prominence is given to such things 
as the refusal of the breast. The Liturgical Year^ tr. by Shepherd 
(Dublin and London, 1867), vol. i, pp. 355-369. 

St. Nicholas was the patron of children, and especially schoolboys, 
as we have seen*; of poor maidens, because of the three to whom 
he showed such kindness; of sailors, because he calmed a storm at 
sea and helped the sailors ; of travellers and merchants, for the same 
reason, and because he multiplied com in a time of dearth. He 
was accounted a protector against thieves, and losses by robbery and 
violence, because of legends in which he appears in that capacity. 
He is the chief patron of Russia, also of Bari, whither his body was 
conveyed in 1087, of Venice, of Freiburg, and of many other towns 
and cities, particularly of seaports and towns engaged in commerce. 
Hence the churches of St. Nicholas at Newcastle-on-Tyne, Great 
Yarmouth, Old Shoreham, South Ferriby, and elsewhere. But there 
are about 372 old churches in various parts of England named in 
his sole honour. A frequent "attribute" of St. Nicholas is three 
golden balls, sometimes three purses of gold, in allusion to the three 
marriage portions that he secretly put in at the window for the 
three poor maidens mentioned above. The three balls now used as 
a sign by pawnbrokers are supposed to have some time been a 
device adopted by merchants, of whom pawnbrokers are in some sort 
the successors. The three balls do not appear upon the Pocklington 
seal, the saint being sufficiently indicated by the children in the tub. 



PASSAGES TRANSLATED ABOVE. 

CHARACTERISTIQUES DES SAINTS, 
par Le P. Ch. Cahier. Paris, 1867. Page 304, col. 2. 
Voici la signification du saloir et des trois petits enfants, d'apres 
le trouvere normand Wace. 

Trois clers alloient a Tecole, 
N'en ferai pas longe parole. 
Ix)r ostes par nuit les ochist, 
Les cors mucha, I'avoir en prist. 
Saint Nicholas par Dieu le sot ; 
Sempres fu li, sicom Dex plot, 

*.The Boy Bishop was elected on St. ward state of a bishop until the Holy 
Nicholas* Day, and maintained the out- Innocents' Day. 



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260 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

Les clers k Toste demanda; 
N'es pot celer, se li mostra. 
Saint Nicolas par sa proiere 
Mist les ames el core ariere. 
Por che c*as clers fist cele honor 
Font li clers sa feste a son jor. 



Quant au fait en lui-meme, qu'on ne retrouve pas chez les Grecs, 
si enthousiastes de saint Nicolas, j'y soupgonne une interpretation 
du secours prete par le grand eveque de Myre aux trois officiere 
condamnes a mort par Constantin. Les captifs sont frequemment 
representes, au moyen ige dans une petite tour; et pour peu qu*on 
ait voulu rendre la sc^ne plus visible, la tour aura ete coupee par le 
milieu. Les proteges d'un pereonnage etant sou vent reduits par 
Partiste a de petites proportions pour faire ressortir Tintercesseur, la 
tour ne sera-t-elle pas devenue un baquet, et les clients adultes 
n'auront-ils pas ete changes en petits gargons. 

SANCTI BONAVENTURAE OPERUM, TOM : 3. 

Romae: Ex Typographia Vaticana mdxcvi. De S. Nicolao Sermo i, 
(circa finem), page 242. 

Quarto beatus Nicolaus secutus est aliqualiter Christum, quantum 
ad vestigia potestatis in opere signorura. Nam inter sanctos omnes 
temporibus suis maximis miraculis claruit, et stupendis, sicut de eo 
sancta Ecclesia in oratione dicit : Deus, qui beatum Nicolaum 
innumeris decorasti miraculis, de quibus quaedam in Legenda sunt 
posita, quaedam supra narrata. Nam ego unam ponam, et alibi 
scriptum est, quam in ipsa I-^genda. Nam duo scholares nobiles et 
divites, multumq. secum auri deferentes, Athenas ad philosophandum 
pergentes, prius sanctum Nicolaum videre volentes, ut se eius ora- 
tionibus commendarent, in civitatem in qua degebat Episcopus, 
advenerunt. Quos hospes tam divites cernens, maligno spiritu pulsa- 
tus, eos occidit, et more porcorum in frusta concidit, et eorum carnes 
in vase saluit Quod sanctus Nicolaus dum ab Angelo cognovit, in 
domum hospitis mox accessit, et quidquid fecerat indicavit: eumq. 
valde redarguit, et tandem orando pueros suscitavit. Quia ergo in 
opere miraculorum imitatus est Christum, potest de eo exponi illud 
de quod de Christo dicitur; Venient ad te, qui detrahebant tibi, et 
adorabunt vestigia pedum tuorum. Rogamus ergo Dominum. 



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MONUMENTAL BRASSES IN THE 
NORTH RIDING. 

By mill STEPHENSON, B.A., F.S.A. 

The North Riding contains twenty-three brasses with effigies, which 
may be classed thus : 

5 Ecclesiastics (Romaldkirk, Sessay, West Tanfield, Thirsk, 

and Wensley). 
4 Armed figures with ladies (Catterick (2), Helmsley, and 

Hornby). 
3 Armed figures alone (Aldborough, Roxby, and Wath). 
I Judge and lady (Wath). 

3 Civilians and ladies (Hauxwell, Leake, and Topcliffe). 
I Civilian alone (Kirkleatham). 

3 Ladies alone (Forcett, Kirby Moorside, and Sheriff Hutton). 
3 Children alone (Kirkleatham, Sheriff Hutton, and Wycliffe). 

To these may be added the devices (now lost) at Hornby, and a 
small late shrouded figure in the churchyard at Thornton Watlass. 

Of the ecclesiastics, two are in mass vestments, one at Wensley, 
the other a half effigy at Thirsk ; two, at Sessay and West Tanfield, 
are in processional vestments, and one, formerly at Romaldkirk, is in 
amice, albe, and cope. The only fourteenth century armed figure is 
that at Aldborough; in the fifteenth there are examples at Catterick, 
Helmsley, Hornby, Wath j and in the sixteenth at Roxby. The judge 
and lady at Wath are almost effaced. The only early civilian is at 
Topcliffe, the rest are all late. The single figures of ladies are all 
of the seventeenth century, the best being the finely engraved plate 
at Forcett. There is a curious but worn pair of children in 
swaddling clothes at Sheriff Hutton, with the date in arabic numerals ; 
a girl of four years of age, but represented as a grown-up person, at 
Kirkleatham, and a boy of fourteen at Wycliffe. Two fine Flemish 
examples occur, one at Wensley, worked on the English fashion 
without any background, probably the finest figure of a parish priest 
in existence ; the other at Topcliffe, a typical Flemish plate, but not 
particularly rich in detail nor of large size. It is, however, the only 



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262 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHiEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

early canopied brass remaining in the Riding. The earliest example 
of the local Yorkshire school is the fine armed figure at Aldborough, 
circa 1360; in the next century are the curious armed figures at 
Catterick and Wath, and possibly the priest formerly at Romaldkirk, 
the children at Sheriff Hutton, and the inscriptions at Gilling and 
Kirklington, with probably some others. Most of the late inscriptions 
are the work of local engravers, some are signed, as at Bedale, 
Ingleby Arncliffe, and Thornton-le-Street. Three palimpsests have 
been noted — a small plate now in the Scarborough Museum, the 
Flemish brass at Topcliffe, and the brass of Thomas Magnus at 
Sessay. The two former are probably examples of shop waste 
re-used, the latter of plunder from the dissolution of the monastic 
houses and chantries. Builders of churches or founders of chantries 
occur at Catterick, Romaldkirk, Roxby, Sheriff Hutton, and Thirsk. 
Founders of schools, although not so specified on the brasses, are at 
Bedale and Sessay. One of the brasses at Helmsley, two at Wath, 
the one at Thirsk, and an inscription at Sheriff Hutton are almost 
effaced by constant wear. The fine figure at Aldborough has at 
some time been treated in the most barbarous manner, great iron 
nails having been driven through the eyes and dotted round the 
body. The tomb of John Lewelyne at Romaldkirk was ruthlessly 
destroyed in the early part of the last century, and the brass scattered. 
A small inscription disappeared from Stanwick St John during a 
restoration in 1868, and for many years the brasses at Catterick have 
been concealed by the organ. The Flemish brass at Topcliffe, which 
was getting much worn, has recently been lifted from the floor, 
together with its original slab, and fixed against the wall. 

The writer is especially indebted to Messrs. William Brown, F.S.A., 
W. J. Kaye, F.S A., and J. Challenor Smith, F.S.A., for numerous 
rubbings, without which it would have been impossible for him to 
have completed this paper. He is also indebted to many more 
friends for assistance and advice ; to Mr. J. W. Clay, F.S. A., for the 
notes from DodswortKs MS,; to Mr. Everard Green, F.S. A., Rouge 
Dragon, for the notes from Dugdale's MS,, now in the College of 
Arms; to Mr. J. G. Waller, F.S. A., for permission to reproduce his 
engravings of the brasses at Aldborough and Topcliffe, and to 
Mr. T. M. Fallow, F.S.A., for the loan of the blocks illustrating 
Kirkleatham and Roxby. 



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MONUMENTAL BRASSES IN THE NORTH RIDING. 263 

AINDERBY STEEPLE. 

I. 

WILLIAM CALEYS, rector, r. 1460. 

Inscription only. Size of plate 19^ by 5 inches. Now on. the 
nave wall; 

f^tc tacet W& WSLi\V9i Calegs quoliain 
rector tett' ecc'te confeissor 3o|)annt0 Vni 
Uiicrop qtwr' ai'abujj p'piciet' Xitm. 9men. 

William Caleys was instituted on March 28, 1437, on the presen- 
tation of John, Lord Scrope. The date of his death is unrecorded, 
but his patron, Sir John le Scrope, Lord Scrope of Masham, to whom 

he was confessor, died in 1455. 

IL 

On the south side of the churchyard is a fine and interesting 

casement of early date. The slab, which measures 6 feet 6 inches 

by 2 feet 10 inches, shows the indents for a floriated cross rising 

from three steps, a crosier with fine crocketted head resting on its 

dexter arm, and a narrow inscription fillet crossing the top. The 

cross is 5 feet 10 inches, the crosier 5 feet 7 inches in length, and 

the inscription fillet measures 2 feet 7 inches by 2 inches. This 

slab, which local tradition assigns to an abbot of Jervaulx, is engraved 

in T. D. Whitaker*s History of Richmondshire^ vol. i, page 260, and 

the Rev. C. BoutelFs Christian Monuments^ page 53. In Whitaker's 

time it was in the " middle aisle " of the church. 



ALDBOROUGH,^ near BOROUGHBRIDGE. 

I. 

WILLIAM DE ALDEBURGH, c. 136a 

A large full-length effigy in armour, holding a small heart, and 
standing upon a crocketted bracket, which has a leopard's face for a 
finial, and is inscribed round the edge with the name BBiirjs tie 
9Itieimtst>* This fine figure, which was most barbarously treated at 
the time of its removal in 1827, is an excellent example of the work 
of the early local school and of the gradual growth of plate armour; 
it is also interesting as being the latest example of a figure bearing 
a shield. Both the shield and the jupon are charged with the arms 
of Aldeburgh, of Aldborough, (-^^.), a fess per /ess indented . . . and 
. . . , between three crosses botony (or), the dexter cross charged with an 
annulet . . . for difference. The indented lines of the fess are clearly 
shown on the shield but not on the jupon, although there can be 

^ This should have been inchided in ihe West Riding series, as the greater 
portion of the village is in that Riding. 



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264 



THE YORKSHIRE ARCRffiOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 



no doubt that they were originally so shown on this latter garment 
when the colouring was complete. The pointed hascinet is attached 
to the camail by means of laces passing 
through staples, as is clearly shown on 
the brass. The body is protected by a 
hawberk of mail, with probably a breast- 
plate, but this is hidden by the embla- 
zoned jupon. The arms are cased in 
plate with mail gussets at the armpits 
and elbows, and the gauntlets, probably 
of leather, have long cuffs and are divided 
into fingers, the backs of the hands and 
fingers being protected by steel plates. 
Between the jupon and the hawberk 
appears the pourpoint studded with small 
bosses. The legs are clothed in mail, 
the thighs being covered with pourpoint 
work enriched with small quatrefoils. The 
knee pieces are of curious shape and 
the shins defended by steel plates. The 
sollerets are long and pointed, and have 
rowell spurs. Round the hips is a belt 
of open metal work, designed in the 
form of small castles or turrets, support- 
ing the sword and misericorde, the first 
appearance of this latter weapon. On 
the left arm is a semi cylindrical shield 
charged with his arms as above. 

The figure including the bracket 
measures 6 feet 2 inches in length, and 
is now fastened to the wall of the north 
aisle. It seems to have been moved 
from "a white stone about three yards 
long" on the floor of the Aldeburgh 
chapel in 1827, when great nails were 
ruthlessly driven through the eyes and 
dotted over and round the body. 

There is a beautiful engraving of this 
brass, in fact the only correct one, in 
Messrs. Wallers* Series of Monumental 
Brasses^ and here reproduced by per- 
mission of Mr. J. G. Waller, F.S.A. It 
is also figured in the Oxford Manual of 



William de ALOiBUROH. o. iseo 

Aldborouqh, 
near borouqh bridge. 

{About one-twtl/th full size.) 



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MONUMENTAL BRASSES IN THE NORTH RIDING. 265 

Monumental Brasses^ p. Ixx (incorrect, no annulet in arms); the 
Rev. H. Haines' Manual of Monumental Brasses, Introduction, p. clvi 
(incorrect in detail and heraldry); Gentleman's Magazine, N. S., 
vol. xxxiv, part ii (1850), p. 44 (from Haines' block), and N. S., vol. v, 
part ii (1858), p. 8 (from block in Oxford Manual)] J. Hewitt's 
Ancient Armour, vol. ii, p. 124 (from block in Oxford Manual)) 
J. R. Planche's Cyclopadia of Costume, vol. i, p. 53 (detail of armour), 
and vol. ii, p. 104 (effigy but incorrect, no annulet in arms) ; and the 
Yorkshire Archceological Journal, vol. ix, p. 179 (from Haines' block 
amended, but still incorrect in detail and no annulet shown in the 
arms). 

William de Aldeburgh, judging from his arms, appears to have 
been a cadet of the house of Aldeburgh of Aldborough, but the 
early history of this branch of the family is obscure. Messrs. Waller 
in their account of the brass seem to have confused him with the 
better known Sir William de Aldeburgh of Harewood, who figures 
largely in Scottish affairs at this period.* 

n. 

In the Rev. C. Boutell's Christian Monuments .and Slabs in 
England and Wales, page 104, is engraved the fine casement of a 
cross brass, which still lies at the east end of the north aisle. The 
cross rises from three steps, and at the intersection of the arms is a 
shield. Two other arms like branches of a tree issue from the main 
shaft of the cross, and from these are suspended four shields. Four 
quatrefoils, originally containing the symbols of the Evangelists, are 
also on the slab itself, and not as usual fornling the angles of the 
marginal inscription, which in this case encloses the whole design. 



BEDALE. 

I. 

RICHARD YONG, 1583, and wife ELIZABETH, 1619. 

Inscription only. Size of plate 14 by 6 inches. Now on the wall 
of the north aisle. 

HiC lACENT Ric'US YONG 

Qvi OBiiT 5° April : 1583 
& Elizabetha vxor defvnc- 
TA 10: Sept: 1619. qvorvm 
ai'abvs indvlgeat Devs. 

A late example of the use of the formula, "quorum animabus," &c. 

* The same confusion occurs in Sir of Aldeburgh *' in the Yorkshire Arch<Eo- 
George Duckett's paper on the "Arms logical fonnial, vol. vi, p. 420. 

VOL. XVIl. S 



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266 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHiEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

II. 
JOHN WILSON, Esq., i68i. 

Inscription with shield of arms. Size of plate 24^ by 15^ inches. 
On wall of north aisle. 

Hie juxta positus est 
lOHANNES Wilson armiger 

(FILIUS IOHANNIS WILSON 
SACRiC THEOLOGIiE PROFESSORIS 

Ac hujus ECCLESiiC quondam rectoris) 
Beata Resurrectionis spe reconditus, 

Dum vixit 
luris^ Consultus Legum peritissimus 
Omnimoda doctrifue doHbus ornatus^ 
Clientibus sincerus, Amicis certus, 
Ac singulari erga omnes m&destia insignituSy 
Miles in Bella Regi fidus, cu: fortis 
Cessante Bella lustitiarius pads studiasus, 
Ac publica justitia strenuus assertar. 

Diem clausit extremum, 
Septembris 24**^ Anna Uni 1681. ^tatis suae SJ, - 
A MARIA vxore amantissima^ ac maria unica filia 
Maxime deplaratus. 

/. Mann Ebor. Sculpt- 

Arms : {Sa,\ a waif rampant (ar) ; in chief three estoiles of the 
last, Wilson. 

IIL 

PETER SAMWAIES, rector, 1693. 

Inscription with shield of arms. Size of plate 17 by 12 inches. 
Chancel floor. 

Epitaphium in memoriam Petri Samwaies 

D.D. Rectoris huius ecclesice annas ji qui obiit &^ 

die Aprilis Anno Domini 16^3. /Etatis sua 

Hie jacet augustus samwaies qui clarus in arcto 
Emicuit comites sede vacante dolent 
Dum tamen Hie inter coelestia sydera regnat 
Spe fruimur titulo sede mieante novo 
Martuus et manitum Jam prcetereuntibus hoe dat 
7h bene fae Defle Crimina Disce mori, 
Dan, 12, s 

P, fecit, Ric, Crosse. Scu^^^ 
i6g4. 



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MONUMENTAI. BRASSES IN THE NORTH RIDING. 267 

Arms : (Sa,), on a fess between three crosses flory {pr\ as many 

martlets of the field, samwaies. 

Crest : A lion^s jamb erect and erased (or) holding a mallet (gu.), 
Peter Samwaies was instituted rector on the 31st of December, 

1660. He was the founder of a grammar school at Wath, near Ripon. 



BROTTON. 

THOMAS PRESSICK, 1710. 

Inscription with shield of arms, the latter much broken and 
damaged. Size of plate in its present condition 12 by 8^ inches. 
Now affixed to a plain stone cross in the churchyard, but probably 
removed from the old chapel, destroyed in 1740. 

Ifere lyeth y body of Tho Pressich 
Blacksmith who departed this life 
March y 24*^ Anno Dom^ 1710 

Aged 74 years 
Wrong him not when he is gone 
For whilst he Hv'd he wronged none 
Mors mea vita mihi. 

Sufficient of the small shield at the top of the plate remains to 
show that it bore the arms of the company of blacksmiths, (&.), 
a cheifron (arg. ) between three hammers (az^^ crotvned and handled {or). 



BURNESTON. 

ELEANOR HARRISON, 1668. 

Inscription only. Chancel floor. 

Ellianora Thomce Harrison de Ellerthorpe 
Armi^ et Mariae Vxoris delectce filia 
primogenita postquam moribus piis et 
exemplari modestid parentes beaverat 
Anno virginitatis sua 16^ calestes^ nuptias 
consum'aint Anno Ufti 1668. 



BYLAND ABBEY. 



A large casement, 8 feet 4 inches by 3 feet 4 inches, now much 
broken, with indents for the figure of an abbot, 48 inches in height, 
in mass (?) vestments, with crosier over left shoulder, triple canopy 



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268 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

with side shafts and some device, apparently the Annunciation, on 
two plates between the finials, a foot inscription below the figure, and 
two shields at the upper corners of the slab. Most of the rivets 
still remain in the stone. Probable date about the middle of the 
fifteenth century. 

CATTERICK. 

I. 

JOHN DE BURGH, Esq., 1412, and wife KATHERINE. 

Inscription and one shield of arms, three other shields lost. Size 
of inscription plate 22 by 4J inches, of shield 7 by 5^ inches. On 
floor of north aisle. 

?^ic jacent Jofj'ejs be Butab armig* et Itaterina ui* 

tim qui 3o{)'e0 obttt x^ trie mmm Sanuat' 3nna 

Vni miWmo (!C€(S:C''IJi3 quot' ai'abj p'piciet* Va amen. 

The only remaining shield, which is on the lower sinister corner 
of the slab, bears . , . a saitire . . . , probably for Neville. 

John de Burgh, who assumed his mother's name, was the eldest 
son and heir of Richard de Richmond by Elizabeth, daughter and 
heiress of William de Burgh. He married Katherine, daughter of 
Roger Aske, and dying on the loth of January, 141 2-13, was 
probably buried in the old church and subsequently moved into the 
" porche" or chapel of Our Lady, built on the north side of the new 
church. His widow was one of the contracting parties for the new 
church, the contract bearing date 18 April, 13 Henry IV. See 
Catterick Churchy by the Rev. James Raine and Anthony Salvin. 

II. 
WILLIAM BURGH, Esq.. 1442, and his son WILLIAM BURGH, Esq., 1465. 

This memorial, a curious and typical example of the Yorkshire 
school of brass engravers, consists of the armed figures of father and 
son, each 36 inches in height, a foot inscription 36 by 5 J inches, and 
four shields of arms, of which two are lost. 

The figures, with the exception of some small details, are alike. 
Both father and son are represented bareheaded, their heads resting 
on helmets, and are armed in gorgets with mentoni^res, breastplates 
strengthened with demiplaccates, the son having in addition a lance 
rest, large overlapping shoulder pieces with invecked edges, large 
elbow pieces, and shellback gauntlets with long peaked cuffs. To 
a short skirt of three taces are attached two large and pointed 
tuilles with a baguette of mail in the centre. The knee pieces are 
large with plates above and below, the thigh and shin pieces plain. 



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CASEMENT OF BRASS TO AN ABBOT, 16th CENTURY. 

BYLAND ABBEY. 

{Atcut otU'Sixieenth /uU siu.) 



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MONUMENTAL BRASSES IN THE NORTH RIDING.. 271 

and the soUerets, composed of overlapping plates, are long and 
pointed, with rowel spurs buckled over the insteps. The various 
fastenings of the armour are clearly shown, whilst the swords are 
suspended from narrow belts which cross the taces diagonally. The 
daggers are unusually large, and both figures stand upon lions. 
Inscription : 

l^fc facent Wii\V» Hux^ atmtget filtu0 et fjetess 3(Ai*i» Burgfi 

qtii obili quarto trie noue'br' a° Vni M^ 
CCCC"" IMS Et iWatillia uxor eiu0 que ohiii H3 tit mtnm 

nouembr' anno Vni iRBl° CTCCDC^ IIH3° Et WBiirg 
Butgfi armfger filiujs et fterw pVci WiilVi qui obiit ultim* "tit 

mV bece'br' a° U'ni jBR^ (S^iS^as^dt^'* aiU<» Et Elena uxor 
fpi' fUSilli' mi WSiillV plj'ci que obiit 11^ tit me'»' 3unii a^ Vni 

iRo CCCC^ aElLFS** q°rj om'i ai'abj p'piriet' o'ipotmjs tre' ante'. 

According to Raine* the two remaining shields bear burgh, 
{Arg,\ on a saltire (sa.) jive swans of the fields quartering Richmond, 
(Arg.), a Jess engrailed between six fleur-de-lys {sa.). 

This curious brass is now (1902) on the floor of the north aisle, 
but completely concealed by the organ. There is a faint rubbing of 
the figures and inscription in the collection of the Society of 
Antiquaries, and engravings may be found in T. D. Whitaker's 
History of Richtnondskire^ vol. ii, page 28, and in the Rev. J. Raine 
and A. Salvin's Catterick Churchy plate xi. 

William Burgh, son and heir of John and Katherine Burgh (No. i), 
and one of the contracting parties for the rebuilding of the church, 

married Maud, a daughter of Lascelles of Sowerby; she died 

the 1 2th of November, 1432, and he on the 4th of November, 1442. 
Their son William married Ellen, daughter of John Pickering; she 
died on the 20th of June, 1446, and he on the 31st of December, 
1465. All were buried in the porch or chapel of Our Lady. 

III. 
WILLIAM BURGH, Esq., 1492, and wife ELIZABETH. 

Full-length effigies, turned sideways, of \Villiam Burgh, one of the 
founders of the chantry of St. James, who died in 1492, and wife 
Elizabeth. William Burgh is represented in armour, standing on a 
mound, bareheaded, with long flowing hair, and wears a collar of mail, 
breastplate, shoulder pieces differing in shape, the left with an upright 
ridge, elbow pieces of moderate size, shellback gauntlets with long 

^ Catterick Churchy page 20, where is in the collection of the Society of 
a woodcut of the Richmond coat. The Antiquaries, 
shields are not shown on the rubbing 



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272 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

peaked cuffs, short taces and mail skirt, over which are strapped three 
small tuiles, plain thigh and shin pieces, small knee pieces with plates 
behind, and large round-toed sabbatons wjth gussets of mail at the 
insteps and rowel spurs screwed into the heels. The sword and 
misericorde are suspended diagonally behind the body, but without 
any visible means of support. The lady wears the early form of 
pedimental head-dress, a close-fitting gown, cut low at the neck, with 
tight sleeves and large fur cuffs. Round the waist is a narrow girdle 
with long pendent end. 

The inscription reads thus: 

l^ic facet WiiWmfi Butflli arntiget unusj ffuntjatot' tjstiug cantarfe 

q* obiit IlTEJo tjte auflujsti 
a^ Vni fH^ CCC(!t:<' EIIIIO cut ai'e fpititV W. lEt orate 
p* bono statu lEIfjabet!) ux't0 efu0. 

The form, " Orate pro bono statu," or " Pray for the good estate 
of," although frequent in painted glass, is rarely found on brasses. 
The male effigy is 36 inches in height, the female 35 inches, and the 
inscription plate measures 26 by 2 inches. The brass, which is a 
good example of the local school, is engraved in Whitaker^ vol. ii, 
page 28, and Raine, plate xii, who also states, page 20, that " the 
armorial bearings upon this stone have been removed." The stone 
is now (1902) under the organ in the north aisle. There is a faint 
rubbing of the brass in the collection of the Society of Antiquaries. 
William Burgh, eldest son and heir of WiUiam Burgh by Ellen, 
daughter of John Pickering, founded in conjunction with Richard 
Swaledale the ** porch " or chantry of St. James on the north side of 
the church in 149 1, and dying on the 17th of August, 1492, was 
therein buried He married Elizabeth, a daughter of Christopher 
Conyers of Hornby, who survived him, as is shown by the wording 

of the inscription. 

IV. 
GRACE LOWTHER, 1594. 

Inscription only. Size of plate 18 by 7 inches. Now mural, 
under the sedilia on the south side of the chancel. 

GRATIA BELEINGAMII FILIA, VIDVA CLIBVRNI, GERARDI 
LOWTHERI VXOR, LECTISSIMA FfEMINA SVMMyE PIETATIS, 
INVICT/E PATIENTI^, CHARITATIS IN PAVPERES MAXIMA, 
VERBORVM PARCIOR, EXIMI/E PRVDENTIi«, SINGVLARIS IN 
MARITOS OBSEQVII, MORTIS ADEO MEMOR, VT SEPTEM POS- 
TREMIS HVIVS PERIGRINATIONIS SViE ANNIS NVNQVAM 
ITER FACERET, QVIN LINTEVM SEPVLCRALE CIRCVM- 
FERRET : OBDORMIVIT IN DOMINO ANO /ETATIS SViE 36 
1594- 



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MONUMENTAL BRASSES IN THE NORTH RIDING. 273 

From the Visitation of 1584-5, the lady appears to have been a 

daughter of James Bellingham, of Westmorland, and widow of Edmund 

Cliburn, of Killerby. According to the inscription she afterwards 

married Gerard Lowther. 

V. 

JOHN SWALDELL, 1630. 

Inscription only.^ Now under the pews on the north side of the 
nave. 

HERE LYETH JOHN SWALDELL GRANDCHILDE TO 
RICHARD SWALDELL WHOSE PREDECESSORS BVYLT 
HALFE THE SINGINGE QVYER W'^"IN THIS CHVRCHE 
WHO DIED THE SECONDE OF MARCHB ANNO DOMINI 1630. 

The "predecessor" who "bvylt halfe the singinge qvyer" was 
Richard Swaldall, who in conjunction with William Burgh founded 
the chantry of St. James on the north side of the church in the 
year 1491, and to whose memory Dods worth, on the 20th of October, 
1622, saw the following inscription in the"midle ile on a marble": — 

"hie jacet Ricardus Swaldall yoman semifundator cantarie infra 
ecclesiam Sancte Anne de Cattryk qui obiit xx die Maii anno domini 
M°cccc<>LXXXXix cujus animc propicietur Deus."* 



CAYTON. 
On the chancel floor is an inscription, together with the symbols 
of the Evangelists, but completely effaced. On the same stone is a 
modern inscription to John Wyvill, Esq., of Osgodby, who departed 
this life 29th January, 1705, aged 78. 



COXVVOLD. 
JOHN MANSTON, Esq., 1464^ and wife ELIZABETH. 
Inscription 24 by 4J inches, and shield 5 by 6 inches. Nave floor. 

©rate pro ai'abj Sofi'ijJ IHansjton arm^g' qui abiii Wt" trie tnntjjte 
©ctobrijs atin0 Vni ilR«CCCC°S.H5I3*' Et Elijaietfi uxorfe 

ei' que 
oiitt tjie meng' S'' Ti*ni iW^CCCC q°c* af abj p'piciet' V am' 

The shield is much worn. It appears to have borne a bend 
indented impaling a coat which is now entirely obliterated. The 
arms of Manston. are variously given as, .Sa., a bend embattled {or 

1 Raine and SaWin*s Caittrick Churchy page 17. 

a Dodsworth MS. (Bodleian), vol. 160, fo. 271. For this note the wiiter is 

indebted to Mr. J. W. Clay, F.S.A. 



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274 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

embattled counter-embattled^ or indented) arg. By will, proved at York, 
17 November, 1464, John Mansion desires to be buried "in cimiterio 
eclesie parochialis de Cukwould," and leaves his wife Elizabeth the 
residue of his goods, and makes her executrix. Her maiden name 
is unknown. 

The inscription is reproduced in the Reliquary^ N. S., vol v (1891), 
page 39, from which source the above particulars have been obtained. 



CRATHORNE. 

THOMAS CRATHORN, Esq., and wife ELIZABETH, c. 1410-20. 

Inscription 18 by 2 J inches, and shield 6 by 4 J inches. Chancel 
floor. 

f^ic lace't 5ri[j0ina« Cratfjotn SLrmtg' et (Ri 
jabetl) ux' et' quot* at'abj p'ptctetut \itm. 

Arms : {Arg.\ en a saltire igu,) five crosses patty {or), Crathorn. 
Thomas Crathorn is said to have been living in 1398, and to 
have married Elizabeth, a daughter of Peter Bagot. 



EASBY. 
ELENOR BOWES, 1623. 
Inscription and shield of arms. Size of plate 17^ by 13^ inches, 
of shield 6J by 5f inches. Mural, at the east end of the south aisle. 

Here lyeth Elenor Bowes davghter to Sir 
Richard Mvsgrave of Hartlay-castle Knight 
She was onlie heire to him and to her brother M"* 
Thomas Mvsgrave who died a ward in Qveene 
Elizabeths time in the Ninteene yeark of 
his age. She was hindered from possessing y« 

INHERITAVNCE BY COMPOSITION AND INTAILES. ShE 
WAS GRANDCHILD TO ThOMAS FIRST LORD WhaRTO 

She was wife to worthie M"* Robart Bowes of 

ASKE ESQ3 BEEING ThRESVROR OF BaRWICK & AMBAS- 
SADOR FOR Scotland y^ most parte of one & 20 
YEAREs. She lived comfortablie his wife one 

& 30 YEARES & A HALFE. ShE REMAINED HIS WIDOWE 
AT ASKE ABOVT 5 & 20 YEARES. ShE DEPARTED THIS 
LYFE IN YK HOLIE PROFESSION OF GODS TRVTH IN Y« 77 
YEARE OF HER AGE THE 25™ DAY OF IVLII An*' DnI 
1623. 



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MONUiMENTAL BRASSES IN THE NORTH RIDING. 275 

Arms : (Az.), six annulets^ j, 2, and i {pr\ for Musgrave. 

Robert Bowes was the fifth son of Richard Bowes, captain of 
Norham, by Elizabeth, daughter and co-heiress of Roger Aske, and 
only surviving brother of Sir George Bowes, Knight. He was a well- 
known public man, being member of parliament for Carlisle, 
ambassador to Scotland, and treasurer of Berwick, at which place he 
died, and was there buried on December i6, 1597. He was twice 
married, firstly to Anne, a daughter and co-heiress of Sir George 
Bowes, of Dalden, and secondly to Elenor, daughter and heiress of 
Sir Richard Musgrave, of Hartley Castle, Cumberland, who survived 
him, and was buried at Easby. For a full account of his services to 
the State see The Correspondence of Robert Bowes^ published by the 
Surtees Society, vol. xiv (1842). 



FELISKIRK. . 
I. 
Inscription only. Size of plate 22 by 10 inches. Chancel. 

William Turbutt, gent, 1673, set. 26; by his wife Anne he had 
two sons, William and Richard. 

n. 

Inscription only. Chancel. 

Joseph Duckenfield, vicar for 19 years, 1739, aet. 58. 



FORCETT. 
MRS. ANNE UNDERBILL, 1637. 

A well-engraved quadrangular plate 28^ by 23 J inches, with recum- 
bent figure of Mrs. Anne Underbill under a canopy composed of a 
square topped arch of classic design, with figures of Labour and 
Rest standing on the capitals of the side shafts, an heraldic achieve- 
ment in the centre, and a long inscription filling up the background. 

Mrs. Underbill is represented with her head supported on two 
cushions and hands clasped in prayer. She wears a large calash or 
hood over the head and shoulders, a ruff, peaked bodice, and gown 
with close sleeves and turned-back cufis. 

" Labour " is represented by an almost naked figure of a boy with 
long curly hair in the act of digging with a spade, his garment slung 
over his shoulder. "Rest" is a draped figure, also of a boy with 
long curly hair, leaning on a fork, the prongs of which rest on a 
human skull. 



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276 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHiEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

The inscription reads thus: 

M. S. 
Here lyeth interred M* Anne Vnderhill 
daughter of Richard Leuer of litle I-euer 
in the countie of Lane : Esq. late wife of Thomas 
Shuttleworth Esq., by whom shee had issue 3 sonnes 
& 3 daughters viz: Richard Shuttleworth 
of Gawthropp in y« said countie Esq. Nicholas 
Shuttleworth of Forcett, Esq. & Vghtred Shuttle 
worth Esq. deceased late councellor at lawe 
& one of y« Bench of y« Hon"V" scocietie of Lin- 
colnes Inne Anne married to James Anderton 
of Claiton in y« said countie Esq. The Ladie 
Ellenor married to S*" Ralphe Ashton of Whalley 
in y« said countie Barronet, & Elizabeth married 
to Mathew Whitfeild of Whitfeild in y« countie 
of Northumbe?: Esq. Shee depted this mortall 
life in y« faith of our Lord lesus Christ & hope of 
a blessed resurrection to eternall glorie y« 12*^^ day 
of May A<*: Dni : 1637. being of y* age of 68 yeares. 
Death is the way unto life. 

The heraldic achievement consists of a lozenge bearing the arms 
of Lever, {Arg.\ two bends (sa. ), the upper engrailed^ the lower plain^ 
with a helmet surmounted by the crest of the same family, on a 
tivisted trumpet a cock with wings expanded^ and surrojanded by heavy 
mantling. The brass is on the south wall of the na\^. 

Anne, daughter of Richard Lever, Esq., of Little Lever, co. 
Lane, first married Thomas Shuttleworth, Esq., by wrapm she had 
three sons and three daughters, whose names and alliaf^ces are set 

out in the inscription. She afterwards married Underbill, and 

died 12 May, 1637, aged 68. 



GILLING, NEAR HELMSLEY. 
ROBERT WELLYNGTON, rector, 1503. 
Inscription only. Size of plate 25 by 7^ inches. Chancel floor. 

©rate p' ai'a magi«tri i&oierti BKcIlgngton 
oltm prAentiartt p'bentie tie bluesskeU t'cot' 
be !60lt0n petcg et rector' i»ti' eccl'ie q< obitt 
ifafif We me*»' fEeimarit &<> tio« iW^ (ICffdC*^ lO. 



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MRS. ANNE UNDERHILU 1637. 

FORCETT. 
(Ahout oHi-sixth full siu.) 



ROBERT WELLINGTON. Rector, 1503. 
QILLINQ, NEAR HELMSLEY. 

About one-sixth full size.) 



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MONUMENTAL BRASSES IN THE NORTH RIDING. 279 

A good specimen of the lettering of the local school at this period. 

Robert Wellington was instituted to the rectory of Gilling on 
March 28, 1483, collated to the rectory of Bolton Percy on Novem- 
ber 6, 1490, and to the prebendal stall of Ulleskelf at York on 
October 20, 1492. By will, dated February 16, 1503-4, proved 
February 23 following, he desires to be buried in the parish church 
of the Holy Cross of Gilling, **w4n the qwher, if it happy n me ther 
to departe," and "y^ a marbyll ston be bought and laid upon my 
grave." This will, together with a full account of the testator, is 
printed in Testamenta Eboracensia^ vol. iv, page 225 (Surtees Society, 
vol. liii). 

GUISBOROUGH. 

SUSANNA PYCKERING, 1641. 

Inscription only. Size of plate 19 by 7 inches. Nave floor. 

A VERTVOVS WIFE, THIS MARBLE STONE DOTH HIDE, 

AssvREDLY, A Saint in heaven shee's tryde; 
Religiovs was her life, the like her end, 
In seeking Christ, she most her time did spend. 
If reader thov her name desire to know? 
Svsanna chaste the same, Pyckering ioyn'd too. 
Obiit 2 2° Sept: A<^ 1641. 



HAUXWELL. 
THORESBY memorial, 1611. 

In the year 1611 Henry Thoresby, bencher of Lincoln's Inn and 
a master in Chancery, erected this plate to the memory of his parents 
and also as a record of certain benefactions given by himself. The 
memorial consists of a quadrangular plate 23^ by 17 inches, bearing 
on the upper portion the figures of a civilian and lady kneeling to a 
small prayer desk, on which lie open books. Above the desk is a 
shield of arms bearing Thoresby, {Arg.\ a chevron between three lions 

rampant (ja.), armed and langued (gu.), impaling a chevron 

between three birds . . . 

The man is represented in civil dress, with ruff, doublet, and 
gown with long false sleeves, and has beard, moustaches, and short 
curly hair. The lady wears the Paris head, ruff, under and over 
gown, the latter with large turned-back collar. Below is the following 
inscription : 



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280 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

I Henry Thoresby Bencher of Lincons Inn and 

^ one of the M»* of y« Chavncery in ordinary 

Sonne & heire of William Thoresby Esq and 
Ann his wife, one of y= davghters of M" Iohn 
scroope a yonger brother of the lorde 

ScROOPE of BoVLTONN, WHOS SAID PARENTS LYE 
BVRYED OV« AGAINST THIS MONVMENT, CAWSED THERE 
TOMBE TO BE REPAYRED & BVTIFIED AND THIS IN- 
SCRIPTION TO BE SETT IN Y= WALL OV« AGAINST 
THE SAME ASWELL FOR THE REMEMBRANCE OF 
THERE BVRIALL THERE, AS ALLSO FOR A DECLARA- 
TION THAT two' Sermons yearely are ap- 
pointed IN this church Arr two' certaine 

DAYES & THAT CERTAINE MONIES THEN & ATT SV* 
OTHER TYMES ARE TO BE DISTRIBVTED YEARELY TO 
CERTAINE POORE OF Y» SAID P'RISH BY Y« GIFTE & DIREC- 

Tio OF Y= SAID Henry his last will for y« pvrpose 
I61I. 

The plate, which is much corroded, is in a stone frame on the 
north wall of the chancel. It is erroneously entered in the Rev. 
H. Haines' Manual of Monumental Brasses as at Otley. 

The writer is unable to assign the impaled coat in the shield. 
William Thoresby married Ann, daughter of John Scrope, a younger 
brother of Lord Scrope of Bolton, whose arms one would expect to 
be the well-known coat of Scrope, differenced in some manner to 
denote a younger branch. Henry Thoresby married Jane, daughter 
of John Palmer, of Clerkenwell; he died in 16 15, she in 16 16, and 
there was formerly a monument' to their memory in Hackney Church, 
but the shields thereon contain no coat resembling the one in 
question. 

HELMSLEY. 

I. 

JOAN, wiFtt OF WILLIAM CHETVVYND, 1410. 

Inscription only. Size of plate 23 by 4 J inches. Now mural, 
North Chapel. 

%\t facet Jolianna qu0ntiam ttx0t WJXCx Cfiettusnln 

que obttt octauo tiie mensis Januarit 3nna ti'nf 

^° CCCC^ F vxC ai'a in ginu abrafje requiewat amc*. 

* Originally spelt **tow," and altered * Engraved in R. Thoresby*s Z^kt/t/wj 

to** two." /,^<7^/>«m, page 72. 



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MONUMENTAL BRASSES IN THE NORTH RIDING. 281 

The wording of the concluding sentence is unusual. The arch 
of the canopy of the fine brass to Laurence de St. Maur, 1337, at 
Higham Ferrers, Northants., is inscribed, "Suscipiat me xpistus qui 
vocavit me et in sinu Abrahe angeli deducant me." The same idea 
occurs as late as 157 1 on the inscription to John Thompson, 
prebendary, in St. George's Chapel, Windsor : 

" Whose soule we hope abides in blisse, of heavenly joye and rest 
With prophets and with patriarkes in faithfull Abrams brest." 

and again at Eton College, 1572, probably from the same workshop, 
on the brass to Thomas Smith: 

"Whose soul we hope dothe now remain in Abrams brest." 

IL 
A MAN IN ARMOUR OF THE MANNERS (?) FAMILY and WIFE, r. 1465. 

A large stone, 8 feet 8 inches by 3 feet 2 inches, formerly in the 
north aisle but now on the floor under the arch between the tower 
and the west end of the nave, bears the nearly effaced figures of a 



CRE8T OF THE MANNERS FAMILY. 

HELM8LEY. 
man in armour and his wife. Above their heads is a fine achieve- 
ment of arms, the shield, now lost, suspended from the buckle, also 

VOL, XVII, T 



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282 THE YORKSHIRE ARCtt«OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

lost, of the helm. The helm itself is draped with mantling, and from 
the wreath rises the Manners' crest, a bunch of peacocks feathers 
between two wings. The inscription plate, 27 by 4 inches, the scrolls 
from the mouths of the principal figures, three children, each inlaid 
separately and about 8 inches in height, apparently two sons and a 
daughter, the latter the centre figure, and four shields of arms at the 
corners, are all lost. The man, 28^ inches in height, so far as can 
now be made out, is bareheaded, with short hair, and is clad in 
armour of the period circa 1460-65. He appears to have worn a 
plate gorget, over which is a collar, possibly of suns and roses, large 
shoulder pieces with projecting ridges, large elbow pieces, short skirt 
of taces with large pointed tuilles, large knee-pieces and long pointed 
soUerets with rowel spurs. His sword is suspended diagonally in 
front of the body, and a small dagger is fastened to the lowermost 
tace on the right band side. His feet rest on a lion. 

The lady, 27 inches in height, appears to have worn a small 
horned head-dress with veil, and a high-waisted, close-fitting gown 
with tight sleeves. On the right-hand corner of her dress is a 
small dog. 

The brass is usually attributed to Sir Robert Manners, of Etall 

Castle, Northumberland, who in 1469^ married Eleanor, eldest sister 

and co-heir of Edmund, Ix)rd Roos, and daughter of Thomas, Lord 

Roos, by Philippa, eldest daughter of John, Lord Tiptoft, Earl of 

Worcester, by which alliance the barony and estates passed from 

the Roos family to that of Manners. Sir Robert died in 1495' ^^^ 

his wife in 1487,' but the style of armour and costume fits neither of 

these dates. 

IIL 

FRANCIS WHELEWRIGHT, 167 1. 

Inscription only, enclosed within a narrow ornamental border. 
Size of plate 18 J by 14! inches. Mural, north aisle, 

Nere this place lyeth the body of Francis Whelewright 
late of this Toivne gentleman {Sonne of Stephen Whelewright 
late Vicar of this Parish) who Departed this Life the 11*^ of 
September Anno Um i6ji^ And by his last will gave to the Poore 
of this Towne five Poundes to be Distributed within A weeke 
after his Deaths and fire Poundes to the Poore Stocke^ and Fifty 

*The licence to, the vicar of Wressell June 13, 1469. Test, Ebor,^ vol. iii, 

to marry in the chapel or oratory, within page 340. 

the manor-house of Wressell, Sir Robert « , • ^ ^ a o i^ » u 

Manners, knight, lora of Etall in North. „ V^^'^ffrr^'' '''^'''''"' ^ ^^^°^'' 

umberland, and Eleanor Roos. domiceOa " "^"^^ ^^^• 
of John, Earl of Westmorland, is dated » The Complete Peerage^ by G. E. C 



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MONUMENTAL BRASSES IN THE NORTH RIDING. 283 

Poundes to be lent at Interest for ever^ and the Interest to 
be Distributed every Sonday in the Church to fourtene Poore 
Protestant Persons of the same Towne, every one A Penny in 
Bread and the Advantage to the Clarke for his Paines ; and gave 
many good Legacyes to his Relations in this Towne and elsewhere. 

There is a maker's name on the bottom of the plate, apparently 
that of Thomas Mann, of York, but very indistinct. 

IV. 
WILLIAM MOORE, 1685. 

Inscription only, enclosed within an ornamental border. Size of 
plate 14 by 8^ inches. Mural, South Chapel. 

HERE LIES THE BODY OF WILLIAM MOORE 
SON OF WILLIAM MOORE GENTLEMAN 
WHO WAS BORNE THE EIGHTTEENTH OF 
FEBRVARY ONE THOVSAND SIX HVND- 
RED EIGHTTY TWO AND WAS BVRYED 
THE EIGHITEENTH OF FEBRVARY 
ONE THOVSAND SIX HVNDRED 
EIGHTTY FIVE 
QVI IN LIMINE VITiE IN CiELVM TRANSILIEBAT. 

V. 
CHRISTOPHER AGAR, 1729. 

Inscription only. Size of plate 12 by 9^ inches. Mural, north 
aisle. 

Here Lies the Remains of Christopher 
Agar who Departed This Life November 
The 10, 1729, After a short and violent 
Fever in the 40 Year of his Age. 



The Grateful Tribute of one Friendly 
Tear is all I crave of Thee Kind Reader Here 
See How Untimely Death Has Snatched 
Me Hence, The Just Decree of all Wise 
Providence, Many Dear Friends on Earth 
I've Left Behind, A Partner Too Who Was 
Sincere And Kind. Oh May My Fate a 
Serious Warning Prove and Cause Them 
For To Seek a Saviours Love, Even Jesus 
Love, Whose Blood Alone Can Save From 
Sin, Eternal Death And From The Grave. 



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284 



THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 



VI. 
JOHN PEIRSON, 1770. 

Inscription only. Size of plate ii^ by 9 J inches. 
Chapel. 

Here lyeth y Body 
of M^ John Peirson late of 
Whitby who gave y CandUstiF^ 
To y Church he departed this 
Life y 12'^ of December lyyo 
/E JO years 



Mural, South 



HORNBY. 

I. 

CHRISTOPHER CONYERS, Esq., and wife ELLEN, 1443. 

Of this brass, which was laid down on the death of Ellen Conyers, 
only the inscription and two sets of scrolls, three over each device, 





{^inacnit:£nftotoni9 ^Duren; arnr 



BIHBCUIlid 



,uc Glint \itin[fHrf 



CHRISTOPHER CONYERS AND WIFE ELLEN. 1443. 

HORNBY. 
(Adoui ane-sixth/Mll site.) 

remain. The lost devices seem to have consisted of pairs of shields, 
with possibly hands holding hearts above. From each heart proceeds 



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MONUMENTAL BRASSES IN THE NORTH RIDING. 285 

three scrolls, those on the dexter riding: pctd'rj tcmidwone' — camtd 
tegttttecco'em— &itam etetnam, and those on the sinister : relJe'ptar me' 
biiii—m nQbi$»im bie— be t'ta autectut' m\ 
The inscription is thus: 

Jliic latent Crwt0f0nMi Congerjs artnig* qui abiii bfe mt'a* 
a^" b'ni iE° CffCC^ St £Iena uiot eiua que oWit 1JI° tiie me'»' 
auflurti a° b'ni iB° CCdiT JiLIO^ qxior' ai'aij p'pidet' ti'« amen 

The brass lies on the floor of the South Chapel. The inscription 
plate measures 25J by 4J inches, and the devices, including the 
scrolls, about 21 by 14 inches. 

According to the Visitation of 1563-4, Ellen was a daughter and 
co-heiress of Ryleston. 

II. 
THOMAS MOUNTFORD, Esq., 1489, and wife AGNES. 

Full-length effigies of Thomas Mountford, in armour, legs and feet 
lost, wife in widow's dress, foot inscription, a group of eight sons and 
a group of seven daughters. Three shields and four quatrefoils, 
probably containing the symbols of the Evangelists, lost.^ 

Thomas Mountford is represented bareheaded, with long hair, and 
wears a collar of mail, a breastplate strengthened by deml-placcates, 
shoulder pieces composed of overlapping plates, elbow pieces of 
moderate size, gauntlets with long peaked cuffs, short skirt of taces 
with fringe of mail, and two small rounded tuilles. The sword is 
suspended from a narrow belt diagonally in front of the body, and 
the handle of the dagger just appears on the right of the taces. 
The whole of the left leg, the greater part of the right, and the beast 
at his feet are lost. His wife Agnes is attired in the usual widow's 
dress, the veil head-dress, barbe, kirtle and mantle. Of the eight 
sons, the first, sixth, and seventh are small figures, 5 inches in height, 
in civil dress, and probably died in infancy; the rest are larger, 
7 inches in height, the second, third, and fifth being in armour 
similar to that of the father. The fourth is in civil dress with a large 
pouch attached to his girdle, and the eighth appears as a priest in 
academical costume. The seven daughters are uniform in size, the 
sixth being attired as a nun, whilst the rest appear in butterfly head- 
dresses and close-fltting gowns cut low at the neck. 

* In a copy of Haines' Monumental "Helmet and crest (lost) within circular 

Brasses ^ once the property of the late label (nearly all lost)." This is now 

Rev. W. C. lAikis, of Wath, and now in covered by the stone effigies, which partly 

the possession of the writer, is this note : lie over the slab. 



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286 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

The inscription reads thus: 

tias of Januars tfje sere of oure lorti Soti 9 i^B^"^ CCCiilSLXXHZ 

anti tfje F gere 
of tfie i&egstte of oure dou'agffne lorti king fienrg tfie 1]H on 

Ini^o^d 0ouli0 tli'u fiaue m'cg. 

The male figure was originally 28^ inches in height, but is now 
only 18 inches, the female is 27^ inches, the inscription plate 24 by 
3^ inches, and the groups of children 7 by 9^ inches. The brass is 
now on the floor of the chapel at the east end of the south aisle, 
the slab partly covered by two stone effigies. Dugdale* noted two 
shields of arms on this stone, one bearing Mountford, (Arg.), semy 
of crosses crosslet (gu,), a lion rampant (az,) ; the other .... three 
covered cups . . . Dodsworth* noted *' on a marble in brass " the arms 
of Mountford "paled with three cups covered." 

According to the Visitation of 1563-4,' Thomas Mountford married 
Agnes, daughter and heiress of John de Kyllom, whose arms were — 
{Az.\ three covered aips (or), which agrees with the coat formerly on 
the brass. It also gives the names of the sons and daughters, viz.: 
Thomas, who married Isabel, daughter of Sir John Norton; Henry 
" clericus "; John and John " gemelles obierunt "; William ; . . . . ond 
(? Edmond) "obiit puer"; Christopher; George, married AHce, 
daughter of Thomas Franke ; Cecyli ; Margaret, married John Dods- 
worth; Jane, married Christopher Conyers ; Elenor, married William 
Tankart ; Ann, married John Swale, junior ; Margaret, married Thomas 
Layton; and Elizabeth, married firstly to Thomas Thornton and 
secondly to Peter Aykrig. This agrees with the number of children 
on the brass ; in the case of the sons, the small figures, one, six and 
seven, may be taken to represent the three who died young, the 
first armed figure represents the eldest surviving son, Thomas, the 
priest being no doubt Henry, the remaining three being represented 
as the other two armed figures and the civilian with a pouch. Of 
the daughters, the nun is probably Cecily, the only unmarried one. 

5 Yorkshire Church NoUs, MS. Coll. « Dodsworth MS, (Bodleian), vol. l6o, 

Arm., fol. 144 b. fol 270, under date 21 October, 1622. 

' Harleian Society, vol. xvi, page 214. 



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THOMAS MOUNTFORD. 1489, AND WIFE AQNE8. 

HORNBY, 

{About one-ninth full size.) 



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MONUMENTAL BRASSES IN THE NORTH RIDING. 289 

in. 

HENRY HARRISON, 1668. 

Inscription Only. Size of plate 29 by yf inches. On floor of 
South Chapel. 

Henricus filius natu minor Thoma Harrison de AUerthorpe 
Militis et Margarita filiia hon****'*^ Baronis Uarcy et Conyers 
Qui duxit in uxorem Elizabethatn filliam unicam et haredem 

Uarcy 
Conyers Armig: de Holtby in hac Farochid: Ex qud genuit^ et cui 

reliquit 
duos filios et quatuor fillias^ et obiit jj^ Anno cetatis suce 1668 
Quam transiens cetas^ quam fmanens cetemitas, 

Henry Harrison, youngest son of Sir Thomas Harrison, knight, of 
AUerthorpe, by Margaret, daughter of Baron D'arcy and Conyers, 
married Elizabeth, only daughter and heiress of D'arcy Conyers, Esq., 
of Holtby in the parish of Hornby, by whom he had two sons and 
four daughters, and died in 1668, aged 35 years. 



INGLEBY ARNCLIFFE. 

ELIZABETH MAULEVERER, 1674. 

Inscription only. Size of plate ii| by 13^ inches. Now in the 
churchyard, on the site of the old chancel. 

/ asli^t and had what I desired forever^ 
I sought and found calestiall joy forever^ 
I knocl^t and heaven was opened unto me^ 
And there I rest in god eternally : 
All that desire to find etemall rest 
Do as I haue done and be for ever blest. 
This Epitaph of Elizabeth Mauleverer 
senior^ was made by herselfe 18^ 
January 1661, who died 22 May 1674, 

Tho: Mann Eboraci sculps 

Elizabeth Mauleverer was the eldest daughter of George Metcalfe, 
of Northallerton, and wife of Timothy Mauleverer, of ArnclifFe. For 
a full account of Ingleby Amcliffe and the Mauleverer family see the 
Journal^ vol, xvi, pp. 121-226. 



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290 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^fiOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

KIRBY KNOWLE. 

Nine small inscriptions, alike in shape and design, each with a 
shield of arms at the top and a cherub's face and wings at the 
bottom. Size of plates 9^ by 6^ inches. Ail on the chancel floor. 

I. 
JAMES DANBY, 1676. 

Here lyeth Buryed the body 
of M^ fames Danby who 
dyed the 16 oj December 
1676: in the 76 yeare of his 

Age 
Memoria Pii Sterna 

Arms : (Arg.), three chevrons braced (ja.), on a chief of the second 
so many mullets cu the firsts a crescent , ,for difference Danby. 

II. 
THOMASINE DANBY, 1678. 

Here lyeth Buryed the body 
of M^ Thomasine Danby wife 
of M"" James Danby who 
Dyed the 4*^ of October 1678 
in the year of her age. 

The 
Memory of the just shall be had 
in Everlasting Remembrance. 

Arms: Danby as in No. i impaling , , . on a chief . . . three beasts^ 
heads erased . . . The year of age is blank. 

III. 
DAME URSULA ROKEBY, 1707. 

Here lieth Dame Ursula 
Rokeby Widow of S^ Tho' 
Rokeby Kn^ formerly one 
of the Justices of the Kings 
Bench She was Daughter 
6r Coheir of James Danby 
Esf" She died 16 Aug 1707 
Aged 74. 

Arms: Rokkby, {Arg,\ a chevron {sa.\ between three rooks ppr 
with Danby on an escutcheon of pretence. 



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MONUMENTAL BRASSES IN THE NORTH RIDING. 291 

IV. 
MILCAH ROKEBY, 1726. 

Here lyeth Jlf^ Milcah 
Rokeby Widow of M*" 
Joseph Rokeby Merch^ 
and Daur ^ Coheir of 
James Danhy Esq^ 

She died Ocr 

1726 Aged Sg, 
Arms as on No. III. 

V. 
ELIZABETH BUXTON. 

Here lieth 
if/^* Elizabeth Buxton 
Widow of John Buxton 
Esq^ &* sister of Joseph Rokeby 
Esq^ she died 
Aged 

Neither date of death nor age filled in. Arms: Buxton, {Arg,)^ 
a lion rampant, the tail elevated and turned over the head (sa,), 
impaling Rokeby. 

VI. 
JOSEPH ROKEBY, 1741. 

Ifere Ueth Joseph Rokeby 
Esq^ son of M"" Joseph Rokeby 
and Milcah his Wife he died 
12^^ Aug, ij4t Aged 64. 

Arms : Rokeby, with a crescent for difference. 

VII. 
URSULA OAKLEY, 1758. 

Here lieth M'^ Ursula 
Oakley Widaiv of the Rev^ 
M*- Will'^ Oakley &* daughter 
of John Buxton Esq^ &* Eliz, 
his Wife she died jo April 
1738 Aged 61 

Arms: Oakley, (Arg.), on a fess between three crescents {gu,) as 
many fUur-de-lys {or), impaling Buxton. 



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292 THE YORKSHIRE ARCttfiOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

VIII. 
JOSEPH BUXTON, 1766. 

Here lieth Joseph Buxton 
Esf youngest son of John 
Buxton Esq"" 6- Eliz, his Wife 
DaW" of Af"" Joseph Rokeby 
^ Milcah his Wife he died 
J 2 Oct" 1766 Aged 67 
Arms: Buxton. 

IX. 

VAULT OF SMYTH FAMILY, 1770-1824. 

Vault of 
the Smyth Family 
of New Building 
in the Parish of 

Kirby KnawU 
A.D, 1770 to A,D, 1824. 

Arms: {Arg,\ a cross {gu.\ between four peacocks (ax,\ a label for 
difference, Smyth. 

KIRBY MOORSIDE. 

LADY BROOKE, i6(X). 

A quadrangular plate, 22| by 11 inches, bearing in the centre the 
figure of I^dy Brooke kneeling on a cushion to a small prayer desk, 
on which is an open book. The lady wears the Paris head-dress, 
rufT, long peaked bodice and gown, all plain. Behind are the kneeling 
figures of five daughters similarly attired, but without cushions. In 
front are the figures of six sons, kneeling on cushions ; all are bare- 
headed, with short curly hair, and wear knee-breeches, doublets, 
cloaks and swords. The pavement on which the figures kneel is 
worked in squares. Above, cut in stone, are the following verses : 

Reader 
Prepare for death for if the fatall sheares 

COVLD have bene STAYD, BY PRAYERS, SIGHES, OR TEARBS 

They had bene stayd and this tombe thov seest here 
Had not erected beene yet many a yeare. 

And below, also cut in stone, the following inscription : 

Here lyeth the body of my Lady Brooke who while shee 

LYVED 
WAS A good woman, A VERY GOOD MOTHER, ft AN EXCEIDING GOOD 



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MONUMENTAL BRASSES IN THE NORTH RmiNG. 295 

WIFE, HER SOVLE IS AT REST W^" GOD FOR SHE WAS SVRE Y"** HER 

REDEMER 
LYVED & THAT THOVGH WORMES DESTROYED HER BODY, YET SHEE 
SHOVLD SEE GOD IN HER FLESH SHE DYED THE 12'*'" OF IVLY 1600 

The whole composition is mural in the chancel, the brass plate 
rather rough from oxidation. There is an engraving of the brass in 
A Guide to Ryedak^ 6-r., page 43. 

Owing to the indefinite wording of the inscription and the want 
of armorial bearings, it is almost impossible to identify Lady Brooke 
with any certainty. Mr. J. W. Clay, F.S.A., suggested to the writer 
the possibility of the lady being the widow of Robert Brooke, twice 
Lord Mayor of York, who died in 1599, and was buried in the 
church of All Saints' Pavement in that city. His inscription mentions 
his wife Joan, or Jane, and their sixteen children, whereof eleven were 
living at the time of their father's death. According to York custom, 
the wife of a Lord Mayor was styled "Lady" for the rest of her life, 
as the old couplet says: 

"The mayor is a lord for a year and a day. 
But his wife is a lady for ever and aye." 

Mr. J. Challenor Smith, F.S.A., kindly took up the search at this 
point, and investigated the will of the Lord Mayor and that of his 
widow Jane, in neither of which is there any mention of Kirby 
Moorside. In the probate following the will of her husband the 
lady is styled " domina," but not so in her own will, which bears date 
September 28, 1603, and was proved September 3, 1604. In this 
document she expresses a desire to be buried in the church of All 
Saints' Pavement with her husband, but the register of that church 
contains no entry of her burial. The plague was then raging with 
great violence in the city, as is proved by numerous entries in this 
register, so that it is possible she may have fled into the country to 
escape its ravages.^ The registers now existing at Kirby Moorside 
commence in the year 1622. Mr. Smith, however, found a transcript 
for 1600 in the Diocesan registry at York, but the only entry of burial 
for July in that year is one for Agnes Lyon, widow, on the 4th of 
July. No transcript for 1604 could be found. It is a curious 
coincidence that the lady at Kirby Moorside should be represented 
with six sons and five daughters, and that the Lady Mayoress also 
had six sons and five daughters living at the time of her husband's 

^ *' In 1604 no less than 3512 persons Courts adjourned to Ripon and Durham, 
died of the plague in York ; the markets and many of the citizens left their 
were all cried down, the I<ord President's houses." History of York. 



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296 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNA1-. 

death, but the assumption of identity can only be supported by the 
theory of an error in the date of the year of death recorded on the 
brass. 



KIRKLEATHAM. 

I. 

THOMAS LAMBERT, 1453 (?). and wife AGNES. Engraved c, 1470 (?). 

Inscription only, in raised black letter, much worn. Size of plate 
21^ by 4 J inches. Nave floor. 

®rate pto at'abj Qniome lambert et aflnetist ux'us mz tie 

IS^egtk Ietf)am 
qui qmtnem (Stomas obttt qut'to (?) tite mensitd %tjfitx(fyti% 

9nno tmmmi 
miirm0 dCdffilLUJ (?) et liicata (?) aflnejj tAiii . . . tiie 

menate iiHarcii 
anno tjomini min'mo CCCSaiJIS (?) quorum af'aij 

p'piciet'.tu'd amen 

Thomas and Agnes I^mbert were, no doubt, the parents of 
William Lambert, vicar of Gainford and master of the college of 
Staindrop. In his will, proved 23 April, 1485,* he leaves "ad fabricam 
ecclesiae de Lethora, pro animabus parentum meorura, Ixvjj. viij^." 
He had probably already placed this brass to their memory. The 
style of lettering and the coarse hatching of the background point 
to a date well into the second half of the fifteenth century. 

II. 
DOROTHY TURNOR, 1628. 

Small round-topped plate, 11 inches m height, bearing the full- 
length figure of Dorothy, daughter of John and Elizabeth Turnor, 
who died 26 February, 1628, aged 4 years 2 months and 6 days. 
She is represented standing on a pavement worked in squares, and 
wears a French hood, large ruff, slightly peaked bodice, a gown with 
lace cuffs, and a mantle or cloak hanging from the shoulders. 

Below is the following inscription on a plate measuring 13^ by 

5I inches: 

Here lyeth V^ body of Dorathy 

davght' of Iohn Tvrnor gent and 

Eliza : his wyfe, who deputed 

THIS LYFE the 26*^" OF FeBRVARY 

An® Dni 1628. being of y^ age 
of 4 yeares 2 monethes & 6 days. 

1 printed in fuU in Test. Ebor,, vol. iii, page 254. 



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DOROTHY TURNOR. 1628. 

KIRKLEATHAM. 



(Ahflitt one<juarter full sizr.) 



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MONUMENTAL BRASSES IN THE NORTH RIDING. 



299 



This brass, which lies on the chancel floor, is reproduced in the 
Reliquary^ N. S., vol. viii (1894), page 117, together with the following 
account of the family: — "John Turner, the father, was originally of 
Norton, in the county of Hereford. He married Elizabeth, daughter 
of Robert Coulthirst, and in 1623 purchased the manor and estate of 
Kirkleatham from Sir William Bellasis, to whom they had been 
granted by Queen Elizabeth. Dorothy was the third daughter of 
John and Elizabeth Turner, 
who had a large family of 
thirteen children. Two of 
her brothers rose to a certain 
amount of fame. John, the 
eldest, succeeded to the es- 
tate. He was a successful 
barrister, and eventually ser- 
jeant-at-law and recorder of 
York. William, the third son, 
went to London, and entered 
into business as a woollen 
draper in St. Paul's Church- 
yard. He there amassed a 
considerable fortune, and rose 
to be alderman, sheriff, and in 
1669 lord mayor of London, 
having received the honour of 
knighthood in 1662. In 1676 
he founded the hospital at 
Kirkleatham." 

in. 

ROBERT COULTHIRST, 1631. 
Large full-length effigy of 
Robert Coulthirst, gent, of 
Upleatham, "free of ye mar- 
chantaylors of London," died 
August 7, 1 63 1, aet. 90, with 
marginal inscription and four 
shields of arms. The figure 
measures 3 feet 10 inches in 
height, the shields 6 by 5 

. J 4.U u 1 ROBERT COULTHIR8T. 1631. 

mches, and the whole com- 
position 6 feet by 2 feet 6 KIRKLEATHAM. 

, i^About ont-fourieenih full siu,) 



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300 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

Robert Coulthirst is represented as an aged man with moustache, 
long pointed beard and curly hair, holding in his right hand a book 
and in his left a long staff or stick, and standing on a pavement 
worked in squares alternately plain and diapered. He wears a ruff, a 
doublet with close sleeves and lace cuffs, and an over gown trimmed 
with fur, and having long false sleeves. 

The four shields are alike, each bearing the arms of the Merchant. 
Taylors' Company of London, {Arg,\ a royal tent between two 
parliament-robes (gu.\ lined ermine^ the tent garnished {pr\ tent-staff 
and pennon of the last^ on a chief (az,) a lion passant guardant (or). 

The marginal inscription, with fleur-de-lys in the corners, surrounds 
the whole, and reads thus : 

Here lyeth bvryed the body of Robert Covlthirst 

FREE OF Y« MaRCHANTAYLORS OF LONDON AND LATE OF 

Vpleatham gent: who departed this life y« 7*^" of 
August 1631 being of the age of 90 yeares whose 
sovLE resteth w"*"" y"* Allmightey. 

This brass, now mural on the south wall of the chancel, is repro 
duced in the Reliquary^ N. S., vol. vi (1892), page 49. 



KIRKLINGTON. 

I. 

JOHN WANDYSFORD, Esq., 1463, and wife ELEANOR. 

Inscription only. Size of plate 14J by 6 inches. South aisle. 

©rate p* ai*abj Jfofj'id IHBanTjgrfortJ 
3rmifl'ijj et alienore uiorijj ehw 
qui obiit q*rf tiie mail 2t° tj'ni W 
CC€C geiafledimo t*cio. 

A good example of the work of the local school of this date. 
John Wandysford married Eleanor, a daughter of Thomas 

Montford. 

II. 
SIR CHRISTOPHER WANDISFORD, 1686. 

A small inscription on the east wall of the south aisle. 

Here lies buried the body of 
Sir Christopher Wandisford Baronet 
March 12^^ 1686, 



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MONUMENTAL BRASSES IN THE NORTH RIDING. 301 

Sir Christopher Wandisford, created a baronet on August 5, 1662, 
was the second son of Christopher Wandisford, by Alice, daughter of 
Sir Hcwett Osborne, and married Eleanor, daughter of Sir John 
Lowther. 



LEAKE. 
JOHN WATSON and wipe ALICE, c, 1530. 

Two effigies and a foot inscription. John Watson, sometime 
auditor to Lord Scrope of Upsall, is represented full face, with 
long curly hair, and wears a long gown faced with fur and with full 
sleeves and fur cuffs. To his girdle is attached a gypci^re and 
rosary. 

The lady is represented turned three-quarters to the left, and 
wears the pedimental head-dress and a gown, with close-fitting sleeves 
and fur cuffs. Round the hips is a girdle, with long pendent end. 

Inscription : 

©f go^ rfjarite p'g for g« aouled of 3of)*n JUKatsion siu'tg 
me Sutnitoi^ t0 g^ lorTi Skroope of \xfmM anti Slice 
f)i» inife to* tfjet djift brfjojs muUjj Jegu pTion. 

The male effigy measures 15 J inches in height, the female 15 J 
inches, and the inscription plate 17 by 3I inches. The brass, which 
is much worn, lies on the nave floor, but has apparently been relaid, 
since the lady now turns her back on the man. As the inscription 
expressly mentions **w* ther child," and as the man is full face and 
the lady side face, it is probable that there were originally three 
figures, the man being in the centre, the lady on his left, and the 
child (now lost) on his right hand. 

Nothing is known either of John Watson or of his wife Alice. 



MASHAM. 
CHRISTOPHER KAY, 1689. 
Inscription on a narrow plate, 16 by 8 inches, with small achieve- 
ment of arms at the top. Now fastened to the west wall of the nave. 
This curious inscription, apparently the work of an amateur, 
possibly. of Christopher Kay himself, contains an acrostic, the first 
letter of each line when read downwards forming the christian and 



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302 THE YORKSHIRE ARCa«OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

surname. The lettering is in various styles, and the spacing exceed- 
ingly bad. At the top of the plate is the date of the burial of 
Christopher Kay, and also that of Mrs. Jane Nicollson, who appears, 
from some interpolated verses, to have been his grandmother. 



Christopher 




Kay 


Buried 


1 


Anno: Dotn 


October 
the 23 


1 

SHIELD 

or 

ARMS. 


i68g 


Ms Jane 


' 


Nicollson 


Bu June the 




4th j6go. 


CONFINED . 


IN . A . BED 


: OF . DVJ/ 


HEAR . DOTH . A . BODY 


. LYE 


RAISED . AGAIN . IT . WILL I TRVJ/ 


INTO THE 


i HEAVENS : 


HIGH 


SIN . NOT . 


BVT . HAVE . 


A CARE 


TO : MAKE 


. YOV . CALLING . SVR^ 


OMIT . THOSE . THING* . 


W>4lC/4 






triuial are 


PRISE . THAT . w • WILL 


. indu 






re 


Mange . not 


. your . Mind . On 




secular things 


^joch . one . 


doth . fade . 


apac 



Kiches . the . chief, of , ^ - hath 
winges 

A MATRON . GRAVE . IS . HERE . INTER*D 
WHOSE SOVL . IN . HEAVEN . IS . PREFER'D h 
AFTER . HER . GRANDSON . LOST . HIS . BREAT 
SHE . SOON . SVRRRNDER*D . VN TO . DEATH. 

Keeping . no . certaine . place 
Adict . your . selues . unto . his 

conuersation 
YouU . purchase . heauen . for 

youre Habitation 

Arras : . . . a chevron between three birds . . . 



MIDDLEHAM. 
I. 
The much worn inscription to Master Thomas Bynham, or 
Bcrnham, " frater ordinis ," fifteenth century, is apparently lost. 



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MONUMENTAL BRASSES IN THE NORTH RIDING. 303 

It is noted in the Rev. H. Haines' Manual of Monumental Brasses^ 
part ii, page 231, and is thus described in the Rev. W. AthilPs 
Church of Middlehatn (Camden Society, i S., vol. 38):— "There is 
under the altar step a portion of a brass inscription, nearly 
obliterated, a line seems to be hid by the steps; the part seen 
appears to be: 

3^ic lacet majjisit' Crfjomad Kgnjj'm (rat* 

ortJinte * * • . * 

The corner pieces of brass are all lost." 

II. 
CHRISTOPHER COLBY, Dean, 1727. 

Inscription with small achievement of arms. Size of plate 17 by 
13 inches. Chancel wall. 

Near 

this place lies 

Christopher Colby, AM, 

late Dean of Midleham 

Second son of John Colby Esq 

of Bowbridge Hall who died 

July the p'^ 1727 Aged 83 years 

He was a ki?id Husband 

tender Father and a Learned 

and Pious Divine. Near him 

lieth Margaret his IVidotu 

John Qabriel Moore Ann 

and Frances their children. 

Arms: {Az,)y a chei'ron bettveen three escallops within a bordure 
engrailed (or), Colby. 

Crest : An arm in armour, the hand holding a broken sword, 
Christopher Colby was installed dean in 1681. 

in. 

EDWARD PLACE, 1785. 

A small plate, 5J by 4 inches, now on the wall under No. II, 
probably marked the burial place of Edward Place, dean from 1754 
to 1785. The plate bears a crest, a fleur-de-lys on a wreath, and 
the initials 

E, P, 

Ob: 28 Ap: 1785 

iE: 58. 



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304 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

RICHMOND. 

I. 

THOMAS CAWING (?), 1506. 

Inscription only; much worn. Size of plate 19^ by 4 inches. 
Formerly on the chancel floor, now on the west wall of the tower. 

©rate p' ai'a CTfjome Catoing (?) quontja* i»tiu» [Imrjji] 
a[ene«call]i qui obiit 111113° tJie Sprflte a° Vni i«° 
(ilSCCffi^ FF nil' afe p'picietur W amen. 

C. Clarkson in his History of Richmond^ page 177, calls him 
**Cawling," and suggests in a note that it may be "Cowling." 

II. 
CHRISTOPHER PEPPER, 163$. 

Inscription only. Size of plate 20 by 5^ inches. Formerly in 
the south aisle, now on the west wall of the tower. 

Here lyeth the body of Christofer 

Pepper Esqvier who Departed this life 

THE 28^" Day of March An^ Dni 1635 

Into thy hands I Commend my spirit for thov 

hast redeemed me O Lord thov God of trveth. 

The last line is now covered by a gaspipe. 

Clarkson^ page 173, says: "At each corner were inlaid shields of 
arms on brass plates, which had nothing to do with Pepper. The 
slab and arms belonged to a much earlier tenant." 



ROMALDKIRK, 
JOHN LEWELYNE, Rector, c 1470. 

Of this most interesting brass not one fragment now remains in 
the church. It is here described from an old rubbing in the 
collection of the Society of Antiquaries. 

P'ull-length effigy of John Lewelyne, head gone, holding a large 
clasped book and vested in amice, albe, and richly diapered cope. 
This combination of vestments is of rare occurrence; another pre- 
cisely similar figure, probably from the same workshop, is at Beeford 
in the East Riding.^ 

* Illustrated in the Yorkshire ArcJueo- to the memory of Thomas Tonge, LL.B., 
lo^cal Journal, vol. xii, page 198. It is rector of Beeford, who died in 1472. 



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THOMAS BOYNTON. ESQ^ 1623. 

ROXBY CHAPEL. 
{About OHt-eighih full stse.) 



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MONUMENTAL BRASSES IN THE NORTH RIDING. 307 

Marginal inscription, mutilated in places, in raised black letter, 
with sprigs of foliage between each word and the symbols of the 
Evangelists, that of St. John lost ; at the corners : 

3of)*te EetDcIgnc qiiontja' Ucctorw feti' eccVie 

tor' et pet0c})ianot' »uot' qui funtiabit unam 

Cantattam perpetuam ati altare australe infra ptetiictam Sccriam 
ftuntiabit insitper una'^ fabticaturam unius pontic 

0tipeta titfam qui obiit 

The figure without the head measures 30 inches in height ; when 
complete it was 34 inches. The quatrefoils, which bore the symbols 
of the Evangelists, are 4I by 4f inches, and the fillet of the marginal 
inscription is one inch in width. There is a poor engraving of the 
brass in T. D. Whitaker's History of Richmondshire^ vol. i, page 131. 

The high tomb in the chancel on which the brass originally lay 
appears to have been destroyed about the year 1828, and the top 
slab let into the chancel floor and boarded over. The various pieces 
of the brass were apparently given away as curiosities. About the 
year 1895 ^^ chancel was restored, and the top slab with the case- 
ment of the brass taken up and inserted in the north wall. One of 
the symbols of the Evangelists, St. Mark, is said to be in private 
hands in the village, and other fragments, including the figure, are 
said to be preserved in the private chapel of Lartington Hall. The 
chantry founded by Lewelyne was doubtless that at the east end of 
the south aisle. It was dedicated to St. Thomas the Apostle, and 
endowed with a yearly stipend of £,2^ 6s. Sd., for the payment of 
which the revenues of the abbey of Eggleston were chargeable at the 
Dissolution. Local tradition still recalls the existence of a chapel at 
the south end of Eggleston bridge, which chapel and bridge were 
doubtless built by the rector and the parishioners of Romaldkirk 
and Middleton. 

ROXBY CHAPEL. 

THOMAS BOYNTON, Esq., 1523. 

Effigy 25 inches in height, foot inscription 19^ by 4I inches, and 
four shields of arms, each 5 J by 5 inches. Thomas Boynton, the 
founder of the chapel and " ye fyrst corsse that was beryed in yt," is 
represented in armour, bareheaded, with long hair and with bare 
hands. The figure, which is clumsy and ill proportioned, is armed 
in a collar of mail, breastplate, skirt of taces, with fringe of mail, 

* Whitaker supplies the words "capellara ad finem'* here. 



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308 THE YORKSHIRE ARCRffilOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

over which are three very small leaf-shaped tonleteis. The pauldrons, 
or shoulder-pieces, differ slightly in shape> that on the left shoulder 
having an upright ridge. The elbow-pieces also differ slightly. The 
knee-pieces are very large and the sabbatons round-toed, with gussets 
of mail at the insteps, and large rowel spurs. The sword, the greater 
portion of which is lost, is supported by a narrow belt crossing the 
hips diagonally and having a somewhat complicated fastening. 

The inscription, now some little way below the figure, is an 
interesting record. It reads thus: 

^tag for ti)e soule of Cfiom'ct ^Sognton of ISos^bg S^quter toljo 
caa0et( tfjto rijgrcfie fgtist to be fjalotneti anti inas g^ fstsst consste ti^at 
teas betsetj in gt anti becestdeli tj^e XXSX tiag of matcfie tije ^n* of 

0* lortj 
floti iW^ V^ anti 133113 on tofjoge »ouIe S^u' fjaue mercg anwn 

At the four corners of the stone are shields, each bearing the 
arms of Boynton, {Or\ a /ess dehveen three crescents {gu,). 

The brass, which has been relaid, lies in the centre of the floor 
of the chapel. It is reproduced in the Reliquary y N. S., vol vii (1893), 
page 99. . 

Thomas Boynton was the eldest son of Henry Boynton, Esq., by 
Margaret, daughter and co-heiress of Sir Martin de la Sea, and married 
Cecily, daughter of James Strangeways, of Sneaton, near Whitby. His 
will is printed in Test, Ebor,, vol. v, page no. 



SCARBOROUGH MUSEUM. 

In the museum of the Scarborough Philosophical and Archaeo- 
logical Society is preserved a curious little palimpsest plate, found in 
1 810 near the site of the destroyed Benedictine church of St. 
Nicholas. On the obverse side is an inscription, in late Lombardic 
characters, to Brother William of Thornton, thus : 

On the reverse is the numeral ix or xi, with an ornamental stop, 
being a portion of a marginal inscription from a large Flemish brass 
of the fourteenth century. The plate is very small, being only 2% by 
if inches. The obverse is engraved in T. Hinderwell's History of 
Scarborough^ second edition (181 1), page 125, and both sides are 
reproduced in the Journal of the Oxford University Brass Rubbing 
Society, vol. i, page 255. 



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9 




• 




THOMAS MAGNUS, Archdeacon of the East Rioinq.ISSO. 

SESSAY. 

{About otu-eUventh full siu.) 



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PALIMPSEST PORTIONS OF BRASS TO THOMAS MAGNUS. 

SESSAY. 

{About one-elnftntk full site.) 



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MONUMENTAL BRASSES IN THE NORTH RIDING. 313 

SESSAY. 

THOMAS MAGNUS, Archdeacon of the East Riding and Rector 
OF Sessay, 1550. 

Full-length effigy in cassock, surplice, almuce and cope. A late 
example of the use of processional vestments. The hood of the cope 
appears on the shoulders, and the morse bears the word iesvs in 
large capital letters. From his hands proceeds a scroll, bearing 
3tfin fill tiet miderere met in black letter. 

Inscription : 

l^ete Isetfie fHa^ter (JTi^omas M^Stim 3tcf)itieacon ot tfjest Egtisns 
in tfje iWetrqjolitan Cfjgrrfje of gorfee $c p'gon of tfjfe Cfjgrcfje 

tDi|tri)e 
ffigetj tfje IIFH:3<«> tjag of aujjust 8° tj'ni M"" CCCCC^ 3L. 

tDt|O0e 0oule gotj plion 

At the four corners of the slab are quatrefoils, the upper dexter 
and lower sinister bearing the Holy Lamb with cross, and the upper 
sinister and lower dexter the stalk and flower of the columbine.^ 
Below the inscription is a shield charged with the arms of Magnus, 
Bendy of six {vert) and {gu.\ on a fess (or) a lion passant guardant 
bet%veen tivo cinque/oils of the second^ and above is the motto Sg ffiotJ 
iDgll in black letter. 

The figure including the scroll is 25^ inches in height, the 
inscription plate measures 24 J by 3 J inches, the quatrefoils 5 by 4 J 
inches, and the shield 6| by 5J inches. The brass lies on the 
chancel floor, and is engraved in J. Gill's Vallis Eboracensis^ page 352, 
and R. A. S. Macalister's Ecclesiastical Vestments^ page 147 (effigy only). 

In March, 1902, the whole brass was loose in its casement, and 
on examination the greater portion proved to be palimpsest. For 
this information and for a rubbing of the palimpsests the writer is 
indebted to Mr. W. J. Kaye, F.S.A. With the exception of the trunk 
of the figure, the whole brass is made up of fragments of earlier 
brasses. The head and a greater portion of the scroll is in one 
piece and cut out of an earlier figure, but is too fragmentary to say 
what the figure may have been. The inscription plate appears to 
have been cut out of the centre of a large figure of a lady, probably 
wearing a mantle, as a portion of the cord and tassels for fastening 
this garment appears at one end of the plate. The shield may 
possibly have come from the same figure, as it bears lines of similar 

* " In the old church was glass con- the arms, and the herbage was full of 
taining his rebus, an Agnus Dei with columbines." Tonge's Visitation (Surtees 
M thereon. Above was the motto as on Society, vol. xli), page 59 {fiote). 

VOL. XVIl. V 



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314 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

drapery. Two of the quatrefoils are cut from a coped priest, the 
orphrey of the cope being ornamented with foliage and circles 
bearing letters ; two letters (3 and (S) remain. The other two quatre- 
foils are made up of bits, one bearing portions of drapery from the 
feet of a figure, the other a portion of similar drapery and a large 
Lombardic J^, with traces of some other letter, but obscured by the 
solder used to fasten the pieces together. 

Thomas Magnus was a man of considerable note. He was the 
son of John and Alice Magnus, and was born at Newark-upon-Trent. 
He was appointed archdeacon of the East Riding in 1504, was 
chaplain to Henry VIII, canon of Windsor, and held numerous other 
clerical appointments. He was constantly employed in the service 
of the State, being in 1524-25 ambassador to Scotland. In 1529 he 
founded the free school at Newark. For a full account of his services 
see the Dictionary of National Biography. 



SHERIFF HUTTON. 

L 

THOMAS AND ALICE GOWER, c. 1480 (?). 

On the floor of the South Chapel is a large stone, now partly 
covered by pews ; in the centre is a much worn three-line inscription 
in raised black letter, on a hatched ground. Above is the indent 
for a shield about 9^ by 8 inches, and at the top corners, and pre- 
sumably at the bottom corners also, are indents for quatrefoils, which 
probably bore the symbols of the Evangelists. The inscription, 
which is in the form of a scroll with rolled ends, measures 19 J by 
6 inches, and is now almost illegible, but the following letters and 
words can still be traced; 

©ui ISecu .... iiHiI . . . ip'e Otfjame fHwercrc 

ffioto 

a" £t (ore i^ummi 

Dodsworth,' who visited this church in August, 1623, notes this 
inscription, but even then it seems to have been in a worn condition, 
for he failed to completely decipher the second line, and there seems 
to be something lacking in the date in the third line. He notes it 
as ** on a marble," and gives the following transcript : 

**Qui recubant militi Christe Thome miserere 

Gower et Alicie e perpetue 

Anno tunc Domini semel MC et fore summi." 

1 DoJsworth MS, (Bodleian), vol. 160, fol. 210 b. For this no»c the 
writer is indebted to Mr. J. W. Clay, F.S.A. 



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THOMAS AND AQNE8 WYTHAM, c. 1480. 

SHERIFF HUTTON 

(About one-Ji/th full size.) 



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MONUMENTAL BRASSES IN THE NORTH RIDING. 317 

The identity of the persons commemorated is uncertain. Admin- 
istration to the goods of Sir Thomas Gower, late of Sheriff Hutton, 
knight, intestate, was granted to his son Thomas Gower on i6 May, 
i486. 

II. 
' THOMAS AND AGNES WYTHAM, c. 1480. 

Inscription and shield of arms. Size of inscription plate 19 by 
6 inches, of shield 7 J by 6 J inches. On the floor of the North 
Chapel, which is now boarded over, but a trap-door enables the brass 
plates to be seen.^ 

The inscription, in raised black letter, records the building of a 
vestry and the erection and foundation of a chantry chapel by 
Thomas and Agnes Wytham, and is undated. It reads thus : 

Fegtiiulum fieri qui fecit et igta capellam 
J^ic cantatiam i^istete petpetuam 
ffuntians xp'e W^tivxt ClSstfjam miserere sueqj 
^fltteti Sponge qui simul ^it tecubant. 

The shield is charged with the arms of Wytham, {Or\ three 
popinjays {vert?) over all a benilet (^.),' impaling Thweng, {Arg.\ 
on a /ess (j^.) between three popinjays {vert) as many escallops of the 
field. 

Thomas Wytham, of Cornburgh, near Sheriff Hutton, chancellor of / 
the Exchequer, married Agnes, a daughter and co-heiress of William 
Thweng, of Cornburgh, and in conjunction with her founded, as the 
inscription records, the North Chapel and its eastern compartment, 
now used as a vestry. By will, dated i March, 1474-5, and proved 
18 April, 148 1,' Thomas Wytham desires to be buried "in ecclesia 
de Sherifhoton, in quadam capella ibidem per me noviter constructa, 
sub lapide marmoreo ante altare ibidem per me disposito." He was 
dead before 22 November, 1480, for on that date a commission was 
issued to William, bishop of Dromore, to veil Agnes, widow of Thomas 
Witham.* On 12 January, 1490-1, Agnes Wytham, then living at 

* Gill in his Vallis Eboracenshy p. 428, and were probably derived from the 
describes the stone as having **at its Thweng arms. 

^""^^A ^f'T^ J°' '™''" ''''°"'' "°'** ' P"nted in full in Testamenta Ebora- 

robbed of iheir brasses." ,^,.-^ „^i ;;: rv.rr« -»/;^ 

« The birds in the Wylham coat are ^^"'^ ^°^' "^» P^e 264. 

generally termed eaglets or sheldrakes, * Test, Ebor.^ vol. iii, page 265 (tiofe) 

but are here clearly shown as popinjays, and page 345* 



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318 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

Cornburgh, made her will, desiring her body to be buried " in the 
chancell of Seynt Nicholas in Sherifhoton, in the tumb which my 
husband, Thomas Witham, is bered in." This will was proved 
5 October, 1495.^ They apparently died without issue, as there is 
no mention of any children in either will The licence to Thomas 
Wytham to found a chantry at the altar of the Blessed Confessors, 
Sl Nicholas and St. Giles, in the chapel of the same confessors, 
built by the said Thomas in the church of Sherifhoton, or in other 
church in the county of York or Lincoln, to pray for Margaret, Queen 
of England, the said Thomas and Agnes his wife, and Joan, late the 
wife of William Thwenge, is dated 5 November, 1447.' 

On the 13th of June, 1481, a licence was issued to Sir Guy Fairfax, 
Brian Roucliff, baron of the Exchequer; Richard Pigot, serjeant-at- 
law; Miles Metcalfe and William Chamberleyn, feoffees of Thomas 
Witham, deceased, to found a chantry at the altar of the Holy Trinity 
and the Blessed Nicholas in the church of Sherefhoton to pray for 
the said Thomas and Agnes his wife.' 

HI. 
DOROTHY AND JOHN FENYS, 1491. 

A small quadrangular plate, 11 by 7 inches, slightly rounded at 
the top, bears the effigies of two children, male and female, in 
swaddling clothes, their heads resting on cushions. Below, on a plate 
measuring 1 2 ^ by 7 inches, is the following inscription : 

l^ic Botetljea ffengsj tn* f re 3o\i*t quiejjcit 
In celte lauro ©onat' uterqj hixtHii 
(!rf)oma0 Idacre 13ato (?)^ 0ua conisord 
3nna parentes Illot} fuera't data 
ijirtute ftuenteg a° U'ni U9l. 

The date is in Arabic numerals. The brass, which is much worn 
in places, lies on the floor of the nave. Dorothy and John Fenys 
were probably children, who died in infancy, T)f Sir Thomas Fiennes 
or Fenys, Lord Dacre, by his wife Anne, daughter of Sir Humphrey 
Bourchier, of Benningborough. 

1 Printed in full in TVj/. Edor., vol. iii, ^ /^/^. 

^'^"yfrls&CAan/ry Surveys, vol. i, " r>odsw<^th is the authority for this 

page 93 ('""<•), Surlee/society. vol. 91. *""'• *'"^*' " "°* ''''"°'' '='^"'^- 



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MONUMENTAL BRASSES IN THE NORTH RIDING. 



319 



IV. 
MARY HALL and INFANT SON, 1657. 

Small full-length effigy of Mary, wife of Henry Hall, Esq., of 
Lining, in the parish of Sheriff Hutton, holding in her left arm 
her " little sonn," who is represented 
n swaddling clothes, with plain bib, 
larjge collar and cap. They were 
buried on the ist of September, 
1657, the mother having probably 
died in childbirth. She is repre- 
sented with long curls, and wears 
a long flowmg kerchief as a head- 
dress, a plain falling collar, .peaked 
bodice, and a gown, with full 
sleeves and large turned-back cuffs. 

Below is the following inscrip- 
tion, slightly mutilated at the bottom 
left-hand corner: 

Here lyeth the body of 
Mary the late and most 
deare Wife of Henry 
Hall of this parish Esq 

WT»» their little BONN 

bvried the first of 
september 1 65 7. 



MARY HALU 1667. 

SHERIFF HUTTON. 

{About one'Cighth full size.) 



The effigy of the mother is 19 
inches in height, the infant 4I 
inches, and the inscription plate 
measures 12 by 5^ inches. The 
brass, which is very poorly engraved and probably of local origin, 
lies on the chancel floor. There is a space of two inches between 
the figure and the inscription, and the figure is curious as having no 
groundwork beneath the feet. 



STANWICK ST. JOHN. 

EDINE, WIFE OF SIR RALPH PUDSAY, 1485. 

Lost, stolen, or destroyed during a "restoration'* in 1868. 
Inscription only. Size x>f plate 16 by 4 J inches. Formerly on 
the chancel floor. 



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320 



THE YORKSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 



3^ic tacet iStitna quon^a' ux' i3lat(ul{)f)i iPutieag 
Vni tie Barffortie militijj que ohiit anno Vni 
miirma CCCCiLIiaElJ^ Cum« afe p'piciet' V ante*. 

A rubbing of this plate is preserved in the collection of the 
Society of Antiquaries of London. 



WEST TANFIELD. 

THOMAS SUTTON, M.A., rector of Tanfield and canon of 
West Chester, c. 1490. 

Full-length effigy in cassock, surplice, almuce and cope. 
Black letter inscription, in four lines : 

Bum bixit ifllectot tre SEanfelb Noi'e Ktomast 
Sutton. £n facet l)tc gratiuatud ^ Slle magts(t' 
3rttb}. ac ectam Canontcus fjtc q^ <lISe0tc!)e0ter 
Zit Norton' bictor fifuntiite bota p*cor. 

The word "victor" presents 
a puzzle which the writer has 
been unable to solve. Thomas 
Sutton was appointed a canon 
of the collegiate church of St. 
John the Baptist, Chester, on 
26 October, 1458, and resigned 
in 1489, his successor being 
appointed on 15 May in that 
year.^ 

The brass, of which the 
effigy is 19 inches in height and 
the inscription plate measures 
13 t)y 4f inches, lies on the 
chancel floor. It is engraved 
in T. D. VVhitaker's History of 
Richmofidshire^ vol. ii, page 174. 

In the Rev. H. Haines' 
Manual of Monumental Brasses^ 
part ii, page 229, mention is 
made of a brass to "A man in 
armour, c. 1480, inscription lost." 
This is an error ; no such brass 
exists in the church. 



THOMAS 8UTTON, rector, c. 1490. 

WEST TANFIELD. 

{.About one-seventh fuil size.) 



^ G. Ormcrod's History of Cheshire y 2nd cd. (1882), vol. i, page 310. 



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MONUMENTAL BRASSES IN THE NORTH RIDING. 321 

THIRSK. 

ROBERT THRESK, priest, 1419. 

On the floor of the south aisle is a curious but nearly effaced 
brass to Robert Thresk, rector of Market Bosworth, Leicestershire, 
remembrancer in the king's exchequer, and founder of a chantry in 
the church of Thirsk. In the upper part of the stone, on a plate 
20J by 4J inches, is the following inscription, now almost illegible, 
but fortunately preserved by Dugdale, who visited the church on 
August 22, 1665^: 

{)ic tacet Eob'tus Cijredtt crtcu0 nup' l&ector (Sccl'ie tie 

[funTiatar istius cantarte] 
Bosetoorti) [et tememorator regis in scc'io] qui obiit WM. 
iBtr Uece'br 3^ Vni iltt° CCCC** HI cui' ai'e p'pieietur tj'» amen 

Both Dugdale and Dodsworth give the words "fundator istius 
cantarie"in the second line; but as there is no space for them in 
this line, which, although much worn, still shows traces of the word 
" rememorator " following the word " Boseworth," it must be conjec- 
tured that these words were interpolated in smaller letters between 
the lines, and have been completely worn out. 

Eighteen inches below the inscription is the small half effigy of 
a priest in mass vestments, 7^ inches in height, supported by two 
angels. Below this, on a plate 18 by 5J inches, now much worn, are 
the following four verses, which are recorded by both Dugdale and 

Dodsworth : 

(50 teatig ipe q'lJ [non] iacet Ijfc lapig iate 
Corpus ut [ometur jjetj gpiritujj ut] meitt0Tetut 
f)'c tu qui trang'ia [bir fael] muliet puer an m 
pro me f untie p'cess q'a ssic mici)i sit benie stpes^ 

Robert Thirsk was collated to the rectory of Market Bosworth 
on 4 January, 1407, his successor being appointed 18 December, 1419. 
His will is in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury, Marche^ fol. 46. 
The chantry at Thirsk was dedicated to St. Anne.^ 

1 Dugdale's Yorkshire Church Notes, given in Dodsworth* s MSS.^ vol. l6o, 
MS. Coll. Arm., fol. 145 b. For this fol. 254, in the Bodleian, Oxford, 
copy of the inscription the writer is ^ These verses, slightly varied, occur 

indebted to Mr. Everard Green, F.S.A., on a brass in the Temple Church, Bristol. 
Rouge Dragon. The inscription is also ^ Yorkshire Chantry Surveys, vol. i, 

page 90 (Surtees Society, vol. 91). 



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322 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHiEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

THORNTON-LE-STREET. 

I. 
DAME BRIGITT LATON, 1664. 

A quadrangular plate, 23 by 20 inches, bearing an inscription on 
the upper portion and a skull and crossed thigh bones between two 
wreathed shields of arms on the lower portion. 

Pietatis & eximiae virtutis Femineae D'nae BrigittJe 

filiae Witti Penington Ar: ex antiqui Familia Penington 

orum de Mulcastre prosatae Ambrosio Pudsey de 

Bolton in Crauen Af^ : primo nuptae, cui 

vnicum filium eiusdem nominis attulit, & duas 

filias, stit, Annam & Elizabetham. Quarum 

prima Thomae, natu niaximo filio Thomae Laton 

Militis, dein Waltero Rofeti Strickland Militis Secundo 

genito Matrimonii copula, adiuncta fuit. Alteram 

vero Rogerus filius & haeres lohis Talbot 

de Thornton Ai^ : cepit in uxorem Postremo dea (sic) 

D'na Brigitta Thomam Laton Militem in 

maritum secundum, nupsit : cui peperit Carolum 

& Brigittam Laton. Qui Carolus, pietatis 

motu, in charae Matris defunctae memoriam 

hoc curari fecit, obiit ipsa 

VIII Calend Maii 

Anno aetatis suae LXIIJ 

Annoq'Dni M.D.C.LXIIIJ. 

Arms; (Dexter) Pudsev, {Vert\ a chevron betuieen three mullets 
(or), impaling Penington, (or), five fusils in fess [az,\ 

(Sinister) Laton, {Arg.\ a fess behveen six crosses crosslet fitchy (sa.) 
impaling Penington. 

The plate is enclosed within a stone frame on the south wall of 
the chancel. 

Brigitt, daughter of William Penington, of Mulcastcr, first married 
Ambrose Pudsey, of Bolton-in-Craven, who died 2 October, 1595, and 
by him had one son, Ambrose, and two daughters, viz.: Anne, who 
married firstly Thomas, eldest son of Sir Thomas^, Laton, and then 
Walter, second son of Sir Robert Strickland; and Elizabeth, who 
married Roger Talbot. Brigitt Pudsey subsequently married Sir 
Thomas Laton, and by him had one son, Charles, who erected this 
tablet to his mother's memory, and one daughter, Brigitt. She died 
in 1664, 3ged 63. 



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MONUMENTAL BRASSES IN THE NORTH RIDING. 323 

II. 
ROGER TALBOT, Esq., 1680. 

Inscription, 37 by 1 1 inches, and achievement of arms on a plate 
7 by 6 inches. In a stone frame on the east wall of chancel. 

Memoriae Dicatum 
Juxta hie reconduntur ossa Roi^eri Talbot Amdgeri^ pritnogeniti 

filii Johannis Talbot (ex parte Regis Caroli (/)) 
Chiliarchce, defuncti^ Qui cum patre (adhuc juvenis) multis in 

prceliis obsidionibusqz Regi fideliter adhcBsisset 
6^ in campo {ad extremum usqz) viriliter pugftavisset. {Exactis 

jam inimiciSy evectoqz ad solium patris Carolo 2) 
Hie in numero Justiciariorum (pro pace ddini adscitus Chiliar- 

chiaqz {pro bello) Maioris officio insignituSy et {pro 
Rege &* patria) ad Comitia Regni {per plurimos annos) evocatus ; 

tandem cum ex Vxore Elizabetha Ambrosii Pudsey 
Armigeri {defuncti) sorore; numerosatn prolem suscepisset viz, 

Rogerum {primogenito Johanne prius defuncto) filium 
&* heredem^ Ambrosium^ et Thomam^ Carolum, Brigidam {in puer- 

perio sine sobole defunctam) Johanni Wright gent 
Enuptam, Janam Richardo Lockwood gent in uxorem datam, 

Elizabetha\ Anna\ Catherina\ Florentia\ Maria* senio 
dr* curis confectus ab hac luce migravit 2do 8bris, Anno ^tatis 

sues LXL Annoqz Uni MDCLXXX, 

P. Brigges Ebor, Sculps 

Arms: {Arg.) three lions rampant {purpure). Talbot, impaling 
( Vert\ a chevron betiveen three mullets {or), Pudsey. 

Crest: A talbot passant {sa,). Talbot. 

Roger Talbot, son and heir of John Talbot, married Elizabeth, 
daughter of Ambrose Pudsey, of Bolton in-Craven, by Brigitt, daughter 
of William Penington, of Mulcaster, and by her had five sons, Roger, 
John (dec), Ambrose, Thomas, Charles, and seven daughters, Brigitt 
(married to John Wright), Jane (married to Richard Lrockwood), 
Elizabeth, Anne (who placed a brass to her mother's memory), 
Catherine, Florence, and Mary. Roger Talbot died on the 2nd of 
October, 1680. aged 61. His widow (see No. Ill) on the 26th of 
December, 1694, aged 68. 



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324 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

III. 
ELIZABETH, widow of ROGER TALBOT, 1694. 

Inscription on an oval plate, 22J by 18 inches, with a cherub's 
head at the top, a wreathed skull at the bottom, and an ornamental 
border running round the sides. Chancel floor. 

Hie in spe resurgendi 
C"ristum expectans suscitaturu 
requiescit Elizabetha ex antiquo et 
perillustri Pudseiorum de Bolton 
in Craven Stem mate prosata Roger i 
Talbot de Woodend in Parochia de 
Thornton le Street Armigeri Conjux cui 
duodecem Liberos in lucem attulit. Ilia 
postquam annos in Ccelibatu 26, in Con- 
jugio 28 et in Viduitate 14 Compleverat 
Vitam banc senio curis et Arthritide 
Lassata Deo sic volenti non invita re- 
signavit vicesimo sexto die Decembris 
Anno Domini MDCLXXXXIV 
-/Ktatis suae sexagesimo octavo 
Anna ilius filia pietatis motu hoc chara Matris 
memorice dicavit 

For an account of this lady see No. II. 



THORNTON WATLASS. 

I. 

GEORGE FERRARS, rrctor, 1669. 

On a tomb in the churchyard is a small quadrangular plate, 

12 by 9 inches, much indented and defaced, bearing a representation 

of a shrouded figure extended on a mattress and placed on a high 

tomb, with two cypresses in the background. Between the trees is a 

scroll bearing the word resurgam, and on the front panel of the 

tomb the following inscription : 

G. F. OBIIT IN CHRISTO 
QVARTO DIE SEPTEM 
BRIS ANNO DNI 1 669. 

George Ferrer, or Ferrars, was instituted to the living on August 
29> 1635. His burial is thus recorded in the register: "1669 Septem- 
ber 7 was masster George Ferrars rector of VVatleyes buryed." 



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MONUMENTAL BRASSES IN THE NORTH RIDING. 325 

II. 
HENRY THORPE, rector, 1702. 

Also in the churchyard, near to the former, another small plate, 
8 J by 12 inches, bearing some odd twisted devices and the following 
inscription : 

RESVRGAM 
HENRICVS THORPE OBIIT IN CHRISTO 
NONO DIE FEBRVARII ANNO DNI 
1702. 

Henry Thorpe, M.A., was instituted to the living on April 17, 1696. 



TOPCLIFFE. 
I. 

THOMAS DE TOPCLYFF, 1362, and wife MABEL. 1391. 

A fine Flemish brass, now unfortunately much worn and mutilated. 
It is composed of a number of small plates, making a large quad- 
rangular sheet of metal 69 by 31 inches. The design consists of the 
full-length figures of a civilian and wife under rich canopy work, 
with figures of angels, &c., the whole being enclosed by a marginal 
inscription, with the symbols of the Evangelists at the corners. The 
background of the plate is richly diapered with foliage, and the heads 
of the figures rest on diapered cushions held by angels. The canopy 
consists of two cusped arches, divided by a slender centre, column 
and carrying rich shrine work above, each division containing a 
seated figure holding the soul of the deceased and attended by 
censing angels. The side shafts are worked into niches, each con- 
taining an angel playing on a musical instrument, amongst which 
may be noticed a bass and treble viol, a dulcimer, regal, trumpet 
and tabor. 

Thomas de Topclyff is represented in civil dress, with curly hair, 
beard, and moustaches. He wears a tunic with close sleeves, edged 
with fur at the bottom and at the wrists, a mantle fur lined through- 
out and buttoned on the right shoulder. Round his neck is a hood, 
and hanging on his right side is a short sword, the fastening of 
which by means of a short chain attached to the end of the leather 
belt is clearly shown. Under his feet, which are encased in boots, 
is a lion. 

His wife Mabel wears the veil head-dress and wimple so arranged 
as to leave only a square opening for the face, a gown with close, 
tightly-buttoned sleeves reaching to the knuckles, and a mantle lined 
with fur. At her feet is a small dog gnawing a bone and wearing 
a collar of bells. 



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326 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

The marginal inscription, in large, bold black letter, with roses, 
between each word, is broken in the centre by quatrefoils enclosing 
the arms of Topclyff, ... a chevron behveen three peg tops . . . , and 
at the corners by the symbols of the Evangelists, that of St John 
together with portions of the inscription being lost. Each section of 
the inscription was complete in itself; that referring to the man 
commences under his feet, that to the lady above her head. The 
missing words in the inscription, with the exception of the man's 
christian qame, for which Gough is the authority,' are here shown in 
brackets from Dodsworth's transcript taken on October i6, 1622:' 

^ \\t tacet bmetaiint0 [bit (9r{)ain<i0) tie] QTopcIsff qut obtit an[no 
Uomini W CCCiLHJ quotu* ani'e [propicictur Ueua] 

[^ \\t tacet mabtlla] quonliam uxor eiuss que obut anno tiomtni 
fR^ Cv!rCIC3 quoru' ani'e proptcietur tieu0. 

There is a beautiful engraving of this brass in Messrs. J. G. and 
L. A. B. Wallers' Series of Monumental Brasses^ and to Mr. J. G. 
Waller, F.S A., the Society is indebted for permission to publish the 
accompanying illustration, which is a reduced copy of the above- 
mentioned plate. 

There is another interesting feature about this brass, viz. that the 
whole or a greater portion of it is palimpsest. Unfortunately it was 
never properly examined at the time when it was detached from its 
slab. Messrs. Waller^ give the following account of the discovery of 
the palimpsest portions: 

"The brass of Thomas Topcliff and lady was a few years ago, 
during restoration of the church, removed from its slab. The 
reverse was discovered to be entirely, or nearly so, composed of 
plates of metal that had been previously used. But one small 
portion, however, fell under the writer's observation, and that was a 
part of the border, the reverse of which showed a portion of inscrip- 
tion in I^ngobardic capitals and in the Flemish vernacular : * bidt . 
voer . die . ziele,' i,e, pray for the soul. It was extremely well 
executed, much in the style of the brass at St. Alban's to Abbot 
Delamere; and was only a few years earlier in date to that of which 
it now forms a portion. Of the rest, the account given by the 
Rev. H. A. Hawkins, the incumbent of Topcliff, though less complete 
than one could have wished of so curious a fact, is nevertheless 
useful, and tends to support the theory that occasionally spoilt metal 

"^ Sepulchral Monuments^ vol. i, p. 179. ^ Dodsworlh MS. (Bodleian), vol. 160, 

Except for this name, Gough*s transcript f. 257. For this the writer is indebted 
js very inaccurate. to Mr. J. W. Clay, F.S. A. 

* Series of Monumental Brasses^ Introduction, page ix. 



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THOMAS DE TOPCLYFF AND WIFE MABEL. 1391. 

TOPCLIFFE. 

{Abaut ont-tenth full size.) 



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MONUMENTAL BRASSES IN THE NORTH RIDING. 329 

was reworked on its opposite surface. In a letter he says: *I 
remember the fact of its being engraved over its entire surface, but 
I could not make out the design, if there was one. It struck me 
rather as being a collection of several small sheets of brass, on the 
back of which the artist or his apprentice had been trying their 
engraving tools. I could trace no connection between one sheet and 
another; there was something resembling an elaborate ladder on one 
sheet, and on the next a sword, out of all proportion to the ladder, if 
it was intended for one, and only slightly sketched, whereas the ladder, 
as I have remarked, was highly finished.' We must be thankful to 
possess so brief a record of so curious a fact, though we may regret 
the opportunity of a more searching scrutiny has been lost. There 
can be little doubt that we have here the metal of spoilt work, of 
various designs, used over again. That described as a * ladder 'was, 
most likely, the commencement of some architectural feature, dividing 
into panels. ** Mr. Waller also communicated a similar account to the 
ArctuRological Journal^ vol. xviii, page 82. 

Gill describes the brass as being on the floor of the north aisle 
in 1852. Some ten years ago it was on the floor of the chancel. 
Recently it has been replaced in the north aisle and the slab fixed 
upright against the wall. 

II. 

In J. Gill's Vallis Eboracensis (1852), page 370, mention is made 
of a brass plate, now lost, in the nave near the door, and bearing the 
following inscription: 

" hie jacet Robertus Scrope (?) primogenitor (sic) filius 

Scrope de Masham (?) die mensis 



Mr. W. J. Kaye, F.S.A., who kindly searched the church in vain 
for any trace of this inscription, writes me as follows : — " Dr. Carter 
Mitchell, of Topcliffe, told me of the removal some forty years ago 
of a large slab with matrices from ♦ Topcliffe Church to Dishforth, 
some two miles south. Here I found it reposing at the gates of the 
village school, with an accumulation of walls, gates and grass on it 
This seems very likely to be the Scrope slab, as 1 found no other 
matrix in the church, despite a thorough search under cocoanut 
matting." From a sketch sent by Mr. Kaye, the slab shows indents 
for two half effigies, with an inscription plate below and shields at 
the comers. Mr. Kaye also notes that the slab bears signs of 
reappropriation, a larger plate having been inserted in the right hand 
comer of the original matrix. 

VOL. XVII. w 



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880 THE YOKKSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL JOURNAL 

WATH. 

L 

RICHARD NORTON, Chikf Justice op the King's Bench, 1420, 

AND WIFE KATHERINE. 

Two effigies, 35 inches in height, and a foot inscription, 38 by 
Sj inches, all nearly effaced. 

Richard Norton is represented in his judicial robes, with a lion 
at his feet. His robes apparently consist of a long tunic with close 
sleeves, a tippet and hood, and a mantle buttoned on the right 
shoulder. He does not appear to have worn the coif, as his hair 
is long and curly and bunched up over the ears, but the brass is 
too worn to speak with certainty on this point. The figure of his 
wife is almost obliterated. She appears to have worn the veil 
head-dress and a mantle. At her feet was some animal, probably 
a dog. 

The inscription is also much worn and in places illegible. The 
words in brackets are supplied from Whitaker's transcript: 

J^ic iaccnt Eic'us Iftorton* nupct Capit'lw SmiitiwcV Vni [reflijj 

tie xtQ* banco rt Hatertna] 
nuper nx* tim qui Ulceus ohiit bictsiima [tJte mm«te tjfcembri« 

a° Vni fH** CCCC^ 11° et] 
mattrina obiit II<* "tit inen»' [iWaii 3° Vni M"" (I€:CC° XFHI° 

quor* ai'abj] p'piciet' Va amen. 

This brass was originally on the floor of the South Chapel, but is 
now fastened to the wall. It is engraved in T. D. VVhitaker's History 
of Richmondshire^ vol. ii, page 184. 

Richard Norton was appointed King's Serjeant in 1408, and chief 
justice in 1413. His wife was a daughter of Manningham. 

n. 

A MAN IN ARMOUR, C. I49O. PROBABLY SIR JOHN NORTON, I489. 

An interesting armed figure, the work of the Yorkshire school of 
engravers, much worn and damaged, and now fastened to the wall of 
the South Chapel. The figure, which measures 35 inches in height, 
represents a man in armour, bareheaded, with long curly hair, his 
head resting on a helmet, which is surmounted by the Norton crest, 
a Maoris head^ and surrounded by mantling. He appears to have 
worn a collar of mail, a breastplate, shoulder and elbow pieces of 
moderate size, and very short skirt of taces, with two large and 
pointed tuilles strapped over a long skirt of mail. The knee-pieces 
have plates above and behind, the former ornamented with small 
fleur-de-lys at the top. The sollerets with rounded toes are com- 
posed of overlapping plates, and under his feet is a lion. The 
sword is suspended from a very narrow belt crossing the taces 



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MONUMENTAL BRASSES IN THE NORTH RIDING. 331 

diagonally, and to the right hand tuille is affixed a short dagger. 
This figure probably represents Sir John Norton, who died in 1489. 
It is engraved in T. I). Whitaker's History of Richmondshire, vol. ii, 
page 184. 

HI. 
SIR JOHN NORTON and wife MARGARET, 1520. 

In the collection of the Society of Antiquaries is a rubbing of 
the casement of this brass, then on the floor of the South Chapel, 
showing two shields still in position. These shields, together with 
the slab itself, were lost or destroyed in 1875. The dexter shield, of 
lead and much defaced, apparently bore the arms of Norton, {Az.\ 
a maunch (emi\ over all a bend {gu,); the sinister the arms of 
Norton impaling Ward, {Az^^ a cross flory (or). These shields 
measured about 6J by 6 inches, and were at the upper corners of 
the slab. 

The slab measured about 6 by 4 feet, and in addition to the 
shields mentioned above showed indents for a man in armour, 
36 inches in height, his head resting on a helmet, with apparently 
the Norton crest, a Moor's head^ at the apex; a lady, also 36 inches 
in height, her head resting on a cushion, and a foot inscription 39 
by 6^ inches. 

The inscription is thus given by Whitaker': — " Hie jacet Johannes 
Norton miles qui obiit vicesimo octavo die mensis Augusti A° domini 
millesimo quingentesimo vicesimo et Margareta uxor ejus quae obiit 
sexto die Septembris anno supradicto." 

Sir John Norton married Margaret, a daughter of Sir Roger 
Ward, of Guiseley and Givendale. They both died in 1520, he on 
the 28th of August, she on the 6th of September. 

IV. 

Three quatrefoils, 5^ by 5^ inches, respectively bearing the 
symbols of SS. Matthew, Mark, and Luke. Possibly from the brass 
to Sir John Norton, 1489. 

Three leaden shields, two measuring 7 by 6 inches, the third 
7 by 5i inches, but all completely worn out. 

All these fragments are now fastened to the wall of the South 

Chapel. 

V. 

Inscription only. Size of plate 17^ by 7 inches. 

under this stone 
enobled virtue lyes within this tombe 
whose life & death inferiour was to none 
her soules in heaven, this tombe is but a tent 
her endlesse worth is her owne monument. 

^ History of Rkhmotidskire^ vol. ii, page 185. 

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832 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHiEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

Now on the wall of the South Chapel, but originally on the floor 
near the large monument to Lady Catherine Graham, who died in. 
1649, aet. 48, and probably marked this lady's burial place. She was 
the wife of Sir Richard Graham, of Netherby. 

VI. 
RICHARD GRAHAM. 1680. 
Inscription only. South Chapel. 

RICHARDUS GRAHAM ARMIGER honoraHssimi 
RICHARDI GRAHAM BARONETTI per agrum 
Eboracensem VICECOMETIS 
ET 
CHARISSIM.E MATRIS ELIZABETHS 
FILIUS 
NATU MAXIMUS 
IN 
CSLIS ET TERRIS 
HSRES 
GRATIA NATURA Cctleste tamen kabiiaculum aspirans 
Terretuz Hctreditatis jus 
et 
Corporis fragile 
heu! 
Vegetans licet et virescens 
Exuit 
I REDEMTIONIS 1680 
ANNO-'^ ADMISSIONIS IN ACAD: CANT: COLL: CHR : 
li*:TATIS 20 

Mense Martii 

Die Martis 

Die mensis j. 

Hora Semi post tertiam Antelucanam 

FEBRE PLEURATICA LASSATUS 

VIATOR 

Cursum siste tuum totum lustraveris Orbem 

Conditur in Urna quicquid in Orbe patet. 

He was the eldest son of Sir Richard Graham by his wife 
Elizabeth, daughter of Chichester Fortescue, son and heir of Sir 
Faithful Fortescue. 



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MONUMENTAL BRASSES IN THE NORTH RIDING. 333 

VII. 
STEPHEN PENTON, rector, 1706. 

Inscription, with shield of arms at the top. Size of plate 21 by 
21 inches, the comers rounded off. 

HEAR LIES what's LEFT OF STEPHEN PENTON 

RECTOR WHO BEING DEAD YET SPEAKETH ONCE 

FOR ALL MY BELOVED PARISHIONERS 

SINCE ANY ONE OF YOV MAY BE THE NEXT 

LET EVERY ONE PREPARE TO BE SO MENT 

TO PREPARE FOR DEATH DEVOVTLY RECEIVE THE SACRA 

TO PREPARE AGAINST SVDDEN DEATH RECEIVE IT 

OFTEN MAKE YOVR WILL WHILE YOV ARE IN GOOD HEALTH 

THAT YOV MAY HAVE LEISVRE TO DIE WISELY 

AND IF YOV HOPE TO DIE COMFORTABLY 

YOV MVST RESOLVE TO LIVE RIGHTEOVSLY 

GOD SEND VS ALL AN HAPPY MEETING 

HE WAS BORNE AT WINCHESTER WAS FORMERLY FELLOW 

OF NEW COLLEDGE PRINCIPAL OF EDMVNDS HALL 

AND RECTOR OF GI.IMPTON ALL IN OXON AND ALSO 

RECTOR OF TINGSWICK IN BVCKS 

HE DIED RECTOR OF THIS CHVRCH OF WATH 

AND PREBENDARIE OF RIPON OCTOBER iS"^" 

ANNO DMI 1706 ETAT SViE 67. 

Arms : Per chevron (gu.) and {or\ in chief two castles (arg,\ in 
base a lion rampant (az.), Pbnton. 

This plate is now on the wall of the South Chapel. 



WELL. 
DAME DOROTHY NEVELL, 1526. 
Inscription only. Size of plate i6f by 4 J inches. On a high 
tomb on the south side of the chancel. 

I^ic iacet Vnu ^oiQii^tu TStmlV q«nliatn uiot 3a\^'isi 
Neueir xailW filii et IjereV Vni lie latgrnn: una Mwtu' 
et IjeretJu' 3o\fifi Feet C0mit' oionie que oiiii FI3** tit 
februarii a° Vni ilH° V^ IIFI cui' ai'e pr0picietur ljeu«. 

Dorothy, sister and co-heiress of John, fourteenth Earl of Oxford, 
was a daughter of Sir George Vere by Margaret, daughter and 
heiress of Sir William Stafford, and first wife of Sir John Nevill, son 
and heir of Richard Nevill, Lord Latimer, by Anne, daughter of 
Sir Humphrey Stafford, of Grafton, Worcestershire. She died on 
February 7, 1526-7, and was buried at Well 



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334 



THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 



VVENSLEY. 

I. 

SIR SIMON WENSLEY, rector, dec. c, 1390, brass engraved c, 1360. 

A fine Flemish brass, differing 

from the usual type of foreign 
brasses in that the figure stands 
alone and is not surrounded by 
canopy work. The style of work- 
manship is very similar to the 
well-known Flemish brasses at St. 
Alban's to Abbot Delamere, en- 
graved circa 1360, and at Newark 
to Alan Fleming, 1361. The 
Wensley example is probably the 
finest figure of a parish priest in 
existence. Sir Simon is represented 
with his head resting on a richly 
diapered cushion supported by 
angels, his eyes closed, his hands 
folded across the body, and with 
a chalice covered by a paten 
reposing on his breast He is 
vested for mass, in albe, stole, 
chasuble, amice, and maniple. The 
chasuble is enriched with a pall- 
shaped orphrey down the front, 
diapered with foliage and monsters 
in alternate lozenges and circles, 
and with a narrow border orna- 
mented with circles and quatrefoils 
running round the edge. Similar 
diaper work of foliage and monsters 
appears on the apparels of the alb 
and also on the amice, stole and 
maniple, the two latter having 
broad fringed ends. Under his 
feet are two small dogs back to 
back. Originally the figure was 
enclosed by a marginal inscription, 
with the symbols of the Evangelists 
at the four corners, but this has 
long been lost. 

The figure, which lies on the 
chancel floor, measures 64 inches 



SIR SIMON WENSLEY. RECTOR, c 1360. 

WENSLEY. 

{About one-Unih full size.) 



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MONUMENTAL BRASSES IN THE NORTH RIDING. 335 

in height, and is engraved in T. D. Whitaker's History of Richmond- 
shire, vol. i, page 373 ; Messrs. J. G. and L. A. B. Wallers' Series of 
Monumental Brasses ; Rev. C Boutell's Monumental Brasses, page 20 ; 
Transactions of the Cambridge University Association of Brass Collectors, 
part X (1891), page 24; The Builder, November 22, 1890; R. A. S. 
Macalister's Ecclesiastical Vestments, frontis.; F. W. Fairholt's Costume 
in England, 3rd edition, Dillon, vol. ii, page 9 (apparel of alb) ; J. R. 
Planche's Cyclopcedia of Costume^ vol. i, page 9 (apparel of alb). 

For the identification^ of this figure we are indebted to the will 
of a subsequent rector, Oswald Dykes, who died 5 December, 1607, 
and who by will, dated 7 November, 1607, proved at York 2 February 
following, desires "to be buried in the quier of Wenslow, under the 
stone where Sir Symond Wenslow was buried, yf yt please God soe 
to provide the same, havinge this superscription, Non moriar sed 
utinam' ut narrabo opera Domini." His inscription still remains on 
the slab. (See No. II.) 

Mr. Raine gives the following account of the rector of Wensley : 
"Sir Simon de Wenslagh was a man of eminence in character and 
position. He was probably a member of the ancient family of 
Wenslagh, which was of some influence and consideration in York- 
shire. The Wenslaghs were connected with the great baronial house 
of Scrope, and it was probably to that illustrious family that the 
rector of Wensley was indebted for his christian name, Simon. The 
first notice we have of Sir Simon de Wenslagh is in the year 1352. 
On the 14th of September in that year Henry de Bellerby puts 
Simon de Wenslawe, clerk, together with John de Huthwate, clerk, 
and Philip de Fulford, chaplain, in trust for the "whole of his manor 
of Walburn. This manor the trustees release to Bellerby and his 
wife fifteen days afterwards. Soon after this Sir Simon was preferred 
by Richard, Lord Scrope of Bolton, to the valuable and important 
rectory of Wensley. We soon find Sir Simon again undertaking the 
trusteeship of the Walburn estates. On the 8th of June, 1361, 
Henry de Bellerby and Alice his wife put Simon, parson of Wenslaw, 
John de Wawton, and others in trust for the lordship of Walburn, 
&c. The subsequent release is missing. Eight years afterwards, for 
the third time, we find the rector of Wensley put in trust for the 
same estates. We now lose sight of Sir Simon for a considerable 
period. The next and last time that he occurs is in the year 1386, 
when he appears at York as a witness on behalf of his patron. Lord 

* See a paper by the Rev. James Raine, Archaologkal Journal^ vol. xviii, pp. 
entitled "Notice of a remarkable sepul- 238-244. 

chral Brass, of Flemish design, in the ^ *'Ulinam" in will, but probably a 

Church of Wensley, Yorkshire," in the clerical error for " vivam," which latter 

word appears on the plate. 



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336 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

Scrope, in the celebrated controversy with Sir Richard Grosvenor, 
who had usurped the ancient bearing of the Scropes, azure, a bend 
or. Sir Simon had now an excellent opportunity of repaying the 
kindness of his patron, and his statements are so singularly curious 
and important that I shall give them at length. His testimony was 
evidently considered extremely valuable, and it occupies a prominent 
position among the depositions which were then received. It runs 
as follows : * Sir Simon, parson of the church of Wynssdowe, of the 
age of sixty years and upwards, said certainly that the arms, azure, a 
bend or, appertained to Sir Richard Scrope, for that they were in his 
church of Wynsselowe, in certain glass windows of that church, of 
which Sir Richard was patron ; and on the west gable window of the 
said church were the entire arms of Sir Richard Scrope in a glass 
window, the setting up of which arms are beyond the memory of 
man. The said arms were also in divers other parts of the said 
church, and in his chancel in a glass window, and in the east gable 
also were the said arms placed, amongst the arms of great lords, 
such as the King, the Earl of Northumberland, the Lord of Neville, 
the Earl of Warren. He also said that there was a tomb in his 
cemetery of Simon Scrope, as might be seen by the inscription on 
the tomb, who was buried in the ancient fashion, in a stone chest, 
with the inscription, Cy gist Simond U Scrope^ without date. And 
after Simon Scrope lieth one Henry Scroi^e, son of the said Simon, 
in the same manner as his father, next the side of his father, in the 
same cemetery. And after him lieth William, son of the said Henry 
Scrope, who lieth in the manner aforesaid beneath the stone, and 
there is graven thereon, Ycy gist William le Scrope^ without date, for 
the bad weather, wind and snow and rain, had so defaced it that no 
man could make out the remainder of the writing, so old and 
defaced was it. Several others of his lineage and name were buried 
there, one after the other, under large square stones, which being so 
massive were sunk into the earth, so that no more of the stone than 
the summit of it could be seen; and many other of their sons and 
daughters were buried under great stones. From William came 
Henry Scrope, knight, who lieth in the Abbey of St. Agatha, armed 
in his arms, azure, a bend or, which Sir Henry was founder of the 
said abbey; and Sir William Scrope, elder brother of Sir Richard 
that now is, lieth in the same abbey, with the arms depicted but not 
painted. The said Sir Simon placed before the Commissioners an 
albe with flaps, upon which were embroidered the arms of the 
Scropes entire, the making of which arms and the name of the 
donor were beyond the memory of man. He added that the 



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MONUMENTAL BRASSES IN THE NORTH RIDING. 337 

patronage of his church of Wynsselowe had always been vested in 
Sir Richard Scrope and his ancestors bearing the name of Scrope 
beyond the memory of man ; and that the arms, azure, a bend or, 
had always been reputed to belong to him and his ancestors, and he 
never heard to the contrary ; he had never heard that the arms had 
been challenged, or of Sir Richard Grosvenor, or any of his 
ancestors.' After this deposition we hear no more of Sir Simon. 
He was above sixty years of age in 1386, when he gave his evidence, 
and he probably died before the new century began. He is not 
mentioned in the will of his patron. Lord Scrope, which was made 
in the year 1400." He was probably dead before the 4th of April, 
1395, for on that date John de Tebbay was instituted rector on the 
presentation of Sir Richard le Scrope.* 

II. 
OSWALD DYKES, rector, 1607. 

Inscription only. Size of plate 17^ by 5^ inches. Chancel, on 
the same slab as No. I. 

OsvALDVs Dykes iaceo hic rector 

HVIVS ECCLESIiE XX ANNOS REDDIDI 
ANIMAM 5*> DeCEMB. 1607. NON MORIAR 
SED ViVAM, ET NARRABO OPERA DOMINI. 

He was presented to the rectory by Lord Scrope on 5 June, 
1587. His will has already been quoted under No. I. 



WYCLIFFE. 

I. 

ROGER DE WYCLIF and wife KATHERINE, c. 1380 (?). 

Inscription and shield of arms. Size of inscription plate 20^ by 
3I inches, of shield 5^ by 4f inches. Chancel floor. 

Sic iace't Uofier' lie TOSgcIit qun>«m Vm teti' bille i^ 
Itaf ina ui' tiw quot' af abj p'picietur V% amen. 

Arms: (Arg,\ a chevron between three crosses crosslet (sa^, 
Wyclif. 

In 1362 Katherine, relict of Roger de Wyclif, presented to the 
living, but the date of their death seems to be unknown. 

The brass is engraved in T. D. Whitaker's History of Richmond' 
shire J vol. i, page 198. 

^ Test, Evor.f vol. iii, page 40 (note). 



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338 THE YORKSHIRE ARCRfiOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

II. 
RALPH WICLIF, 1606. 

A quadrangular plate, 17 by 16 inches, divided into three com- 
partments, in the first of which is the small figure of Roger, son of 
William Wiclif, who died on the 
5 th of January, 1606, aged 14 
years ; in the second is a shield 
of arms, whilst the third, which 
covers the whole of the bottom 
of the plate^ contains the inscrip- 
tion. 

Roger Wiclif is represented 
as a youth with short curly hair, 
wearing a small ruff, a short 
waisted doublet, trunk hose, 
knee-breeches, stockings and 
shoes. He kneels on a cushion 
placed on a pavement worked in 
squares, and in front of him is 

a prayer desk, on which is an ralph wiclif, leoe 

opeh book. WYCLIFFE. 

The shield, surrounded by {About one-tighih /uu siu.) 

coarse and heavy ornamental 

work, bears, Quarterly I and IV, {Arg,\ a chevron between three crosses 
crosslet (sa.). Wiclif. II, {Arg.\ on a chevron (sa.) three buck^ heads 
cabossed of the field, Ellerton. Ill, Erm,^ on a canton (gu,) an orle 
(or). SuRTEES. Over all a label of three points .... 

The inscription reads thus : 

Radvlfo Wiclifo 
yp^tatis svye decimo qvarto anno vero 
Domini 1606 die Ianvarii qvinto inversa 

FATORVM SERIE DEFVNCTO FILIO SVO VNICO 
SVPERSTES PATER GVILIELMVS WiCLlFVS HOC 
QVANTVM EST MONIMENTI NON SINE SVMMO 
RERVM HVMANARVM FASTIDIO POSVIT 

PlETATIS ET AMORIS ERGO. 

Ralph Wiclif was a son of William Wiclif, who died in 161 1, by 
Muriel, daughter of John Blackstone, of Blackstone, co. Durham. 

This brass, which lies on the chancel floor, is engraved in T. D. 
Whitaker*s ffistory of Richmondshire^ vol. i, page 199. 



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MONUMENTAL BRASSES IN THE NORTH RIDING. 339 

III. 

WILLIAM WYCLIFF. 1584, and wife MERIAL, 1557. 
Their son John placed the brass in 1611. 

Inscription only. Size of plate 32 by 13 inches. Chancel floor. 

WiLHELMVS WYCLIFF ARMIGER, QVONDA HVIVS MaNERII DOMINVS, 

Ecc'LIiE 
PATRONVS, PAVPERV*Q MVNIFICENTISSIMVS ALVMNVS, SVB HOC TVMVLO 

RECON- 
DITVR: QVI licet in PRIORIBVS ANNIS MVLTIS ADVERSiE FORTVNyE 

FLVCTIBVS 
FVERIT lACTATVS: FAMlLIiE TAMEN SViE MEMORIAM, ET ANTIQVITATIS 

SPLEN- 

dorem propagare, svmmam cvram adhibvit, hic qvinto die 
Avgusti 
Anno Dni 1584 ex hac lvce in f^liciore emigravit 

IVXTA CVIVS LATVS DILECTA SIBI CONIVX MeRIAL FILIA PRitNOBILIS 

Dni 
Wil'hmi Dni Evrie sepvlta iacet, in cvivs memoriam hoc 

Marmor fieri 
et locari maritvs eivs cvravit, hiec obiit vicesimo tertio die 

Novemb' 

Anno Dni 1557 

lOHAES WycLIFF VLTIMVS FILIVS D'CTI WiLHELMI ET MeRIALL, ERGA 

CHARIS- 
SIMOS HOS SVOS PARENTES IN AMORIS PIGNVS, ET PIETATIS SV/E 

TESTIMONIV* 

HOC MONVMENTVM DICAVIT AnNO DnI 161I. 

William WyclifF was married first to Dorothy, daughter of John 
Place, Esq., of Halnaby, and secondly to Muriel, daughter of William, 
Lord Eure, and widow of Sir George Bowes, of Streatlam, by both 
of whom he left issue. 



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VESCY OF BRAMPTON-EN-LE-MORTHEN IN THE 

PARISH OF TREETON, CO. YORK, AND 

THEIR DESCENDANTS. 

By C. E. B. BOWLES, M.A. 

The main object of the contents of this article is to correct the 
erroneous pedigrees, already published, which are founded upon that, 
entered in St. George's Visitation of 1612-13 (^ Yorkshire Visitations^ 
edited by Foster, page 585, and Hunter's South Yorkshire^ vol ii, 
page 170), of Vescy of Brampton, a purely Yorkshire family, and 
presumably long since extinct, but whose history, so far as it can be 
gathered from the Charters and MSS., which so lately were in the 
possession of the writer, could not fail to interest the true lover of 
his county, inasmuch as it carries him back into its domestic hfe 
and history during the reigns of the early Plantagenet Kings. For 
though some may be inclined to protest that a small, insignificant 
stream, having its rise in so remote a comer, can have little 
influence on the history of the biggest county in England, yet such 
tiny rivulets, no less than the bigger streams, are important, inasmuch 
as they help to fill, in however small a degree, the mighty rivers of 
our County Histories. 

At the time that the work was begun in preparation for this 
article, the writer's whole collection of Charters, both Yorkshire and 
Derbyshire, was intact, but those belonging to the Vescy family, being 
in use, were in a drawer in the Library on the night of December 
19th, 1 90 1, when a fire broke out, which destroyed nearly all the 
contents of the house, including the Vescy Charters, consequently 
the writer can only now produce a portion of what he had 
originally intended, but at the same time he hopes to place on 
record, while it is still fresh in his memory, all that is possible of the 
contents of the tin box, the only inheritance, which had been 
transmitted to him from his Vescy ancestors, and which, had it not 
been that they were in process of transcription, would even now 
have been in existence, together with the rest of his old Family 
Charters and Deeds, the number of which would probably have been 
nearly doubled but for a former fire, about 100 years ago, as well as 
the peculation so rife in the eighteenth century, which has enriched 



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VESCY OF BRAMPTON-EN-LE-MORTHEN. 841 

the British and other Museums at the expense of private owners, and 
which in this individual case has increased the WooUey Collection of 
Charters. In addition to the notes he had made from his destroyed 
Charters, which most fortunately have been partially saved, the 
writer is indebted for help to Hunter's South Yorkshire^ his History 
of Hallamshire^ and his Familia Minorum Gentium^ Harl Soc. 

The pedigree of this family, entered in St. George's Visitation of 
1 612-13, apparently lays claim to a legitimate descent from the old 
baronial family of Vesci, for in addition to the Tyson Quartering in 
the armorial coat [Quarterly: I. Or^ a cross sable — Vkscy. II. Vert 
three lions rampant argent croumed or — Tyson. III. Gules ttvo bars 
argent in chiefs three mullets of the last — Brampton. IV. Or on a 
chevron sable^ three crescents argent — ^Twittle], the first in the 
Visitation, Esmeus de Vescy is described as of "Knapton," which 
was part of the ancient baronial fee of Vesci. This is improbable 
for many obvious reasons, and there is little but the assumption of 
the heralds to give it any foundation, beyond the fact that the 
baronial family of Vesci owned land at Rotherham, which is close to 
Brampton and Tickhill, where we find these Vescys undoubtedly 
settled in 1322, twenty-five years after the death of William de Vesci, 
presumed to be the last legitimate heir, who in right of his grand- 
mother, Margaret, a daughter of William, King of Scotland, was in 
1 29 1 one of the competitors for the Scottish Crown, and only seven 
years later than the Battle of Stirling, which proved fatal to his son 
William de Vesci, who undoubtedly possessed a portion of his estates, 
but was presumed to be base-born, because at the Inquisition held 
at Lincoln after his death in 1315, his father's heir was found to be 
Gilbert de Aton. But it is more than possible that the family at 
Brampton owes its origin to a natural son of some member of this 
house. 

According to the Heralds' Visitation, Esmeus de Vescy, of whose 
existence there is apparently no other proof, had issue by his 
marriage with Maud, daughter of Wm. de Mirtield, a son Roger, 
who, according to the same authority, married Isabel, daughter of 
Reyner le Franceys, of Brampton. Now that this Roger actually lived 
in 1322, there was abundant proof in the Charters (Append. A), and 
we may fairly assume, from a statement found on the back of a will 
(Append. B), evidently written by William Vescy in 1605, taken in 
conjunction with the Charters and the Heralds' Visitation, that his wife, 
if not a daughter, was at least the eventual heir of Reyner le Franceys, 
because two of the Charters, now burnt, in which however her name 
is given as Clemence, are grants of land at Brampton ''from John 



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342 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHiEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

le Frankys, son of Richard le Frankys, of Brampton en-le-Morthen, 
to Roger le Vescy and Clemence his wife, of the same place," with 
dates 1323 and 1324 respectively. Hunter also refers in his South 
Yorkshire to a grant to Hugh Vescy of lands formerly held by 
Reyner le Franceys. A *' Clemence de Vescy" was in 1337' found 
to be one of the executors of the will of Isabel dc Vescy, widow 
of John, Baron de Vescy, who died in 1289. She has been said, 
on what authority is not stated, to be the widow of John de Vesci, 
son of William, Baron de Vesci, the competitor for the Crown of 
Scotland, who died in his father's lifetime, or she might possibly be 
identical with Roger's wife, as she was certainly living at the same 
time, in which case it suggests a connection with the baronial stock. 
By this marriage with Alice le Franceys, St. George's Visitation credits 
Roger le Vescy with a son and heir of the same name, Roger II, who 
by his wife Alice, the daughter and heir of Walter de Brampton 
(Append. A ii), was the father of Hugh Vescy, who marrying Elizabeth, 
daughter and heir of (Append. E) Hugh Twittle — probably Totehill — 
had a son and heir named John. 

The position in the Visitation pedigree of Roger II and Hugh 
must however be reversed, as it is in the pedigree quoted in 
Appendix B, in consideration of the incontestable facts obtained 
from the Charters, especially from one of them dated 1348, which 
is a grant of land "from Roger le Vescy, of Brampton-en-le-Morthen, 
to Hugh, my son and heir, and to Matilda his wife " (Append. C). 

It is of course possible, though not probable, that there was 
another Roger, father of Hugh, and son of Roger and Clemence, 
and that the Charters between the years 1322 and 1348 allude to 
two men of the same name. But this does not help us, for in that 
case the heralds have omitted a generation in Roger Vescy, the son 
of Hugh and father to John. This Roger II seems to have been 
in possession of the estate in 1379, as he paid 4//. for his lands in 
Brampton to Richard the Second's Poll Tax (Append. D). 

If John I, who succeeded his father Roger, be identical with 
John I (Append. F) of St. George's Visitation, he cannot hare been 
the son of Hugh Vescy, as it asserts, because one of the Charters 
which have perished, dated 1436, described him as "John, the son 
of Roger." 

1 cf. Herald and Genealogist ^ vol. v, page 397, and Reliquary^ vol. xx, page 201. 



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VESCY OF BRAMPTON-EN-LE-MORTHEN. 343 ' 

The former suggestion, therefore, which is confirined by the 
pedigree in Appendix B, is plainly the correct one, namely that 
Roger le Vescy, who was living from the year 1322 to that of 
1348, married Clemence, the daughter and heir of John le Franceys, 
of Brampton, or at any rate the eventual heir of Reyner le Franceys, 
was succeeded about 1348 by his son and heir Hugh, and that he, 
by his marriage with Matilda, who might well be a daughter of Hugh 
Totehill — the Hugh Twittle of the Visitation, for the dates make this 
quite possible (Append. E) — had a son Roger, who owned the estate 
from the year 1379 to that of 1428, and was the father of John I 
and William (Append. D). That this John succeeded his father 
Roger, and was possessed of the estate from the year 1436 to 1450, 
is proveS not only by the Charters now destroyed, but also by one 
in the Woolley Collection (Append. F). The Heralds give him to 
wife Anne, the daughter and heir of John Constantine, by whom, 
they say, he t)ecame the father of Robert his heir, who by his 
marriage with Ellen, the daughter of Nicholas Bosvile of Conisbrough, 
had issue John Vescy his successor, who marrying Joan, the daughter 
of Hugh Revel of Shirland, co. Derby, was the father of Thomas 
his heir. 

In the pedigree already cited however (Append. B), John I 
(Append. F) was not succeeded by Robert, but by his son, John H, 
and he it was who was succeeded by his s6n Robert, which facts 
are corroborated by the only two charters which existed, dated 1474 
and 1475 respectively, and by a bond of 1474, "from John Vescy 
of Brampton to Robert, his son and heir," as well as by a charter in 
the Woolley Collection (Append. G). In the same pedigree this 
Robert, living from 1474 to 1484, is stated to have been the father 
of Thomas, his successor, thus contradicting the heralds' assertion 
that the father of Thomas was John II. 

This discrepancy between the two pedigrees, however, can be 
entirely removed by again reversing the order of father and son, thus 
making John II not only the son of John I, which was accomplished 
by the first transposition, but also the father and predecessor of 
Robert, instead of his son and successor, and this will at once place 
Robert in his probably correct position of father to Thomas Vescy, 
who was presumably born after 1485, as he is not mentioned by 
name in the deed which gives the names of his three sisters 



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344 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHiEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

(Append. J). With him ends the discrepancy between the two 
pedigrees. The amended pedigree, which is in accordance with the 
one in Appendix B, and is supported by the charters, will therefore 
run as follows : — 

Roger le Vescy of Brampton,— Clemence, 

living 1 322- 1 348 I eventual heir of 

J Reyner le Kranceys 

I 
Hugh Vescy, 1348-1375 = Matilda, 

I daughter of 



Roger Vescy, 1379-1428= 
John Vescy, 1436-1450= 



John Vescy, 1474-1484= 



Hugh Totehill 



Robert Vescy, 1474-1485= 



Thomas Vescy, Catherine, Joan, Alice, 

son and heir living living living 

1485 1485 1485 

With respect to their marriages, there is nothing to prove or 
disprove the assertions of the heralds. All the families with which 
the reputed alliances have taken place were living close by, therefore 
all are possible, and might at some future date be proved. That of 
Roger II with Alice de Brampton has been discussed in Append. A ii. 

The heralds marry the above-mentioned Thomas Vescy, who is 
presumedly the father of Robert, to Jane, daughter of Robert, or 
Thomas Eyre, of Highlow, co. Derby, a member of one of the most 
noted and widespreading of the old Peak families, the owners of 
several manors and halls within fifteen miles of Sheffield, and his 
son, Robert Vescy, they marry to Jane, the daughter of Christopher 
Kendal, of Tickhill Castle, co. York. 

Highlow,* which at the present time is a very well preserved 
specimen of an old Tudor hall, near Hathersage, co. Derby, was in 
the year 1569 owned by Christopher Eyre, son of Thomas Eyre of 
Padley, co. Derby, two of whose sons, by his wife Alice, the daughter 
of William Saunderson, of Thickhell (Tickhill), Robert and Thomas 
Eyre, married Yorkshire women, whose home at Thryburgh was only 
a few miles both from Highlow and Brampton. It would not be 
surprising, therefore, if the heralds were right in the statement that 

1 Pfrby shire Archttohgical Journal^ vol. xxiv, page 160, 



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VESCY OF BRAMPTON-EN-LE-MORTHEN. 345 

a member of the Vescy family found a wife at Highlow Hall. And 
inasmuch as one married the daughter and the other the sister of 
Lyon Reresby, of Thryburgh, near Rotherham {Reliquary^ xii, page 40, 
and Foster's Yorkshire VisitaiionSy page 75), it is not surprising if they 
were somewhat confused in their minds as to whether she were the 
daughter of Thomas or of Robert Eyre. 

But a careful comparison of the Eyre pedigree with that of Vescy 
will suggest that the probable date of such a marriage would make 
it impossible that the daughter of either of those two men could 
have been the wife of Thomas Vescy ; and as the mother of his son 
and successor was undoubtedly the possessor of a house at Tickhill, 
in which she and her husband had lived and died, which is not 
suggestive that she was an Eyre of Highlow, it is far more likely 
that the heralds have transposed the two Janes, and that Jane Eyre, 
of Highlow, was the wife of Robert Vescy, his mother being, as her 
will would suggest, the daughter of Christopher Kendal, of Tickhill. 

In the statement endorsed on the will (Append. B) by William 
Vescy, whose signature makes him also responsible for the pedigree 
in St George's Visitation, it will be seen that the name was Tyndal, 
of Tickhill. This is probably an error, for though a William Tyndal 
is a supervisor in Robert's will (Append. J), nothing is known of that 
family at Tickhill, while several generations of the Kendal family 
were landowners there, as their wills prove. The date of Thomas 
Kendal's will, which was made 10 Dec, 1530, and proved 3 Aug., 
1 53 1,' would make it possible for his daughter Joan and Mrs. Jane 
Vescy to be identical, and Christopher, being one of his sons, would 
be brother and not father to Mrs. Vescy. If this be so, the heralds 
have again confused father and son, but till actual proof is found on 
these points, these marriages must be purely conjectural. In the will 
of Jane Vescy, the widow (Append. H), presumedly of Thomas, and 
a Kendal by birth, made 20 June, 1557, and proved the following 
8th November, she directs that her body be buried "wythin my 
Paryshe Church in the Trenytye Quere nere unto my husband in 
Tykyll." She leaves various items of household and farm stock to 
her eldest son Robert and to the children of her daughter Elizabeth 
Bradforth, also to her daughter Katheryne, whose husband, John 
Wylkinson, she makes co-executor and residuary legatee with her son 
Robert, who must have inherited her house and lands, as he 
especially alludes to them in his will. She mentions the wife of her 
eldest son, his daughter Jane, and his eldest son William. She must 
have lived to a fair old age, apparently surviving one daughter and 

1 AV;f. Test,, X, 104«*. 
VOL. XVII. X 



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346 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

her second son, whose name does not occur, but whose son John 
benefits, together with "the other children of my daughter-in-law 
Elizabeth Vescy," and she was survived by her eldest son by only a 
year. She and her husband appear to have lived in her house at 
Tickhill, so it may be that even during their life their son Robert 
lived in the old home at Brampton. At any rate he did so later in 
life, and evidently died there. 

The substance of this will of Mrs. Jane Vescy, the daughter, as 
has been suggested above, of Thomas (not Christopher) Kendal, 
supplies the only information procurable of the issue of her marriage 
with Thomas Vescy, the son of Robert Vescy,* who probably died 
comparatively young, as he has apparently " left no footprints on the 
sands of time," at least none that are discoverable, leaving issue 
by Jane — 

I. Robert, his eldest son and heir. 
II. A son, who had issue by Elizabeth his wife, a son John, 
who is mentioned also in his uncle Robert's will, 1559. 

I. Elizabeth, who married Bradforth. 
II. Katherine, who married John Wilkinson. 

I. Robert Vescy probably succeeded his father early in life. His 
will (Append. J), which was proved 18 May, 1559, was made 15 
Feb., 1558-9, so short a time after his mother's death that several 
articles in her house at Tickhill, bequeathed by her, had not been 
apportioned or removed, and several remained still in the hands of 
his nephew John, mentioned in his mother's will. All his lands, 
situated in Tickhill, Laughton, and Treeton, are left to his eldest 
son William. If the amount of money which he left to the poor in 
each parish was in proportion to the amount of land he owned in 
each, Treeton contained the largest part and Laughton the smallest of 
his real property. His son Edward has an annuity and his six 
daughters have all their share of his personal property, most care- 
fully and justly apportioned according to their respective ages. The 
charters, so lately destroyed, were then all lying safely in "the 
great iron-bound evidence chest remaining at Tickhill, or in the 
lesser chest, with the name of Vescy graven on it," which are left 
to his eldest son. The document under which his children inherited 
their grandparent's bequests, which are all carefully adjusted in his 
own will, would, if forthcoming, probably clear up many points, as 
only two of his eight children benefit by the will of their grand- 
mother Vescy. 

* cf, pedigree on page 3^. 



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VESCY OF BRAMPTON-EN-LE-MORTHEN. 347 

Robert Vescy died 1559, leaving issue by Jane — possibly a 
daughter of Eyre of Highlow — 

I. William Vescy, eldest son and heir. 
II. Edward. 

I. Jane. II. Margaret. III. Anne. IV. Katherine. V. Mary. 
VI. Ellen. 

I.* William Vescy, the eldest son, succeeded to the estates on the 
death of his father. He died i Aug., 1605 (Append. L i), and lies 
buried in the Brampton Quire of Treeton Church, where also was 
buried, 8 Nov., 16 13, his wife Elizabeth (Append. L ii), whom he 
married at Dronfield, 11 July, 1564. She was the daughter of 
Richard Stephenson, of Unston-in-Dronfield, co. Derby, in which 
parish his family was of some importance. She is mentioned in her 
father's will,' 14 May, 1577. 

Among the perished deeds was an interesting inventory of all the 
possessions of William Vescy, with the name of each room in the 
house at Brampton, and its contents, taken at his death. Adminis- 
tration of these goods was granted to his widow, 10 Oct., 1605. By 
her he had — 

I. 'William Vescy, eldest son and heir. 
II. Francis. III. Alexander, of Whitwell, co. Derby,* married 
Elizabeth, widow of Thomas Mottram, and daughter 
of John Westby, of Highwood-in-Whitwell. He was 
probably the father of William Vescy, of Whitwell, 
living" 1652; as well as of Roger, named in his 
uncle William's will as of Cresswell in 1628, and in 
his cousin William's will as of Whitwell in 1662. 
IV. ^Michael, of Brinsworth, near Rotherham, where he was 
buried 22 Jan., 1639; married at Laughton, 28 Oct., 
1602, Elizabeth, sister of Rowland Revell, by whom he 
had— (i) William, (2) Robert, (3) John, (4) Revell. 
V. "Frances, his only daughter, who died 16 Sept., 1609, having 
married William Blythe, of Norton Lees, co. Derby, by 
whom she had one child only, William, also of Norton 
Lees; baptized 8 May, 1608, buried 8 Feb., 1665. 

I. 'William Vescy, eldest son of William and Elizabeth, was living 
in 1612, the date of St. George's Visitation. In his marriage license, 

^ Hunter's Famiiia Minortim Gentium, ^ Page 350. 

page 1207. «/J«/., 1207. 

* Ibid., page 528. ® Ibid., page 1207. 



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348 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH-fiOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

dated 1605,^ he is described as of Todwick, which is five miles from 
Brampton. His wife'^ Margery, only daughter of Robert Bunting, of 
Rotherham, who was buried at Treeton, 16 Nov., 1618 (Append. L iii), 
came of a wealthy mercantile family, and brought money both directly 
and indirectly into her husband's family, as is proved by two 
wills, in addition to that of her father. Both she and her brother, 
Richard Bunting, profited largely under the will of Elizabeth Verey 
(? Vescey), of Rotherham — made i Dec, 1597, proved 4 Oct, 1599' — 
who left her fortune between the Revells and the Buntings, Marjery, 
afterwards Mrs. Vescy, inheriting "all money and other property in a 
messuage at Rotherham, next to the house wherein I now dwell, 
late in the occupation of Robert Bunting her father, saving that 
Richard Bunting shall have one chist in the parlour there, wherein 
the evidence lies." From this will we gather that Richard and 
Marjery were left minors at the death of their father, Robert Bunting, 
under whose will, made 20 April, 1592,* proved 20 October following, 
Marjery inherited the sum of ;£^227 and three acres of arable land 
in Rotherham, which he bought from Richard Hillingworth, besides 
his residue. " Elizabeth Vescey," among others, to have the tuition 
of her, and guardians are also named for her brother Richard. 

Under the will' of Sarah Bunting, of Rotherham, spinster, made 
I June, 1623, proved 31 July following, who was the daughter of 
Richard Bunting, Mrs. Vescy*s only brother, William Vescy and all 
his children largely profit, her "Uncle, Mr. Will: Vescy, of Brampton," 
being left executor and residuary legatee. Her cousins, Anne, wife 
of Mr. William Cotton, and Elizabeth, wife of Anthony Hadfield, 
both named, if daughters of her uncle William Vescy, must have had 
their respective portions on their marriage, as they have no place in 
the will of their father. 

William Vescy died 23 Dec, 1628-9 (Append. K), and was buried 
in the Brampton Quire of Treeton Church, having survived his wife 
twelve years. His will* was made 28 Nov., 1628, and proved 30 
Jan., 1630-1. He devises his estates in Brampton, Woodhouse, 
Morthinge, Whiston, Wickersley, and what had descended to him 
from his father, to his eldest son John, in tail male, on condition 
that he shall marry a wife " not having under one thousand poundes 
porcion at the least," so that he may the better pay the portions 
bequeathed to his younger brothers; with remainder to Robert, 
William and Matthew, his three other sons, to each of whom he 

1 Yorkshire Architological JottrnaU * Reg, TesL^ xxvii, 693^?. 

xi, 215. ^ Ibid.fXyiV,^^, 

« Hunter's Familue Minontm Gentium^ « Ibid.^ xxxvii, 315^. 

page 1207. Ibid., xli, 267. 



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VESCY OF BRAMPTON-EN-LE-MORTHEN. 349 

leaves an annuity in addition to a substantial legacy, naming the trade 
to which he desired that each should be apprenticed. His brother 
Alexander, and his nephews, William Blythe, Roger Vescy, of Cress- 
well, and Revell Vescy are remembered, as also his "sister-in-law, 
Elizabeth Vescy." His kinsmen, George Holmes, Stephen Bright, of 
Carbrook, Anthony Rawlinson, Richard Burrowes, for the most part 
his wife's relations, arc named as supervisors. He left issue, by 
Marjery his wife — 

I. John Vescy, his son and heir. 

II. ^Robert died unmarried, devising in a will made 19 May, 
1642, and 'proved in London, 20 May, 1652, all his 
lands in Tickhill and Rotherham, to his brother 
William, in tail male, remainder to his brother Matthew. 
He names Elizabeth Vescy, the eldest daughter and 
eventual co-heir of his eldest brother John, as also 
the children of Mrs. Alice Vescy, " my loving sister-in- 
law, which she had by her first husband, Mr. Harrison." 
He was buried, according to his desire, **with his 
elders," in Treeton Church. 
III. HVilliam, who proved his brother's will 1652, married at 
Worksop, CO. Notts., 20 Nov., 1655,* Anne, daughter 
of Sir Thomas Hewet, of Shireoakes, co. Notts., by 
his wife, Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Walter Wrottesley, 
of Wrottesley, co. Stafford. He is a party to a deed' 
of partition of lands, Jan., 1661, in which he is 
described as of Thorpe Salvin. He left no issue, and 
in his will, to which Hunter refers, giving the date as 
9 Dec, 1662, he devises the remainder of his lands 
at Willingley to his kinsman, Roger Vescy, of Whit- 
well, CO. Derby. 
IV. ^Matthew married Ellen, daughter and heir of Thomas 
Bosvile, of New Hall, widow of Philip Rolston, by 
whom he had — (i) Bosvile Vescy, of Barley Hole, 
who married the daughter of Thomas Tailor. (2) Francis 
Vescy. 

I. 7obn Vescy, eldest son and heir of William Vescy, was returned 
in St. George's Visitation as being 5 years old in 161 2-1 3, and by 

^ Hunler^ s Fami/ia Mtnorum Gentium^ * Ibid.^ page 1029. 

page 1208. ^ In the possession of ihe writer. 

^ P.P.C, Reg. Bowyer, folio 195. ® Hunter's Familia: Minorum Gen' 

^ YiMTiiti's FatHiiiie Minorufn Gentium^ tiuniy page 1208. 
page 1208. "^ Ibid.^ page 1207, 



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860 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

his father's Ing. post mortem (Append. K) we learn that he was nine 
months over 21 years when, on the day of his father's death, 23 
Dec, 1628, he succeeded to the Brampton estate. "Little further can 
be related about him beyond the fact that " he was admitted of Gray's 
Inn, 15 May, 1626." He was buried in Treeton Church, 11 Nov., 1639 
(Append. L iv). He married' Alice, a daughter of Trubshaw, and widow 
of Harrison, both of Bawtry, co. Notts. By her, who survived him 
twenty-one years, he left issue two daughters — (i) Elizabeth, (2) Sarah, 
his co-heirs, of whom hereafter. The will' of his widow Alice is 
nuncupative, and was made 7 Oct, 1658, sworn 9 April following, 
and proved in London, 21 May, 1659. All personal estate is left 
equally divided between her son, John Harrison, of Braithwell, and 
her two daughters by her second husband, Elizabeth Bradshawe and 
Sarah Vescy. "To her grandchildren, Francis and John Bradshawe, 
sons of Francis Bradshawe, her son- in-law," she leaves 20/1. apiece. 
"A like sum to her grandson, Vessey Harrison, and to George 
Harrison, her son, if he be living and come and demand it"; 5//. to 
Elizabeth, Sarah, and Samuel Harrison, children of her son John. 
Francis Bradshawe, her son-in-law, to have the custody of her goods 
for apportionment, after they have been inventoried and apprized. 
She died the i8th Oct , 1658, and was buried in Treeton Church a 
year before her son-in-law (Append. L v). By John Vescy, her 
second husband, she had issue — 

I. ^Elizabeth, elder daughter and co-heir, married at Braithwell 
20 January, 1652-3, to Francis Bradshawe, of Bradshaw 
Hall, Eyam Hall, and Abney Manor, all in the county of 
Derby. (Arms : i and 4, Arg.^ two bendlets between two 
martlets sable ; 2 and 3, Or, a chevron gules betu»een three 
martlets sable (Stafford). Crest : A stag at gaze proper 
under a tnne tree fruited proper,) The Bradshawe 
estates, were settled in her marriage articles, dated 
20 January, 1652-3, to which William Armytage, of 
Doncaster, and William Vescy, of Whitwell, were parties 
{ Woolley Charters, xii, 92). 
n. 'Sarah Vescy, younger daughter and co-heir, married, about 
1670, to John Elye, of Utterby, co. Lincoln, by whom 
she had John Elye, of Utterby, whose son John left 
a daughter Sarah, his sole heir, who married Richard 
Towne. 

* Hunter's Familicc Minonim Gentium, * Hunler' s Familuz Afinorum Gmiium, 

page 1207. page 1208. 

3 RRC^^^S^R^. Pell. " Lincolnshire Pedigrees, Harl. Society. 



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VESCY OF BRAMPTON-EN-LE-MORTHEN. 351 

I. Francis Bradshawe, the husband of Elizabeth Vescy, the elder 
daughter, was the head of one of the oldest of the Peak families, 
which had become possessed of their Bradshaw lands soon after the 
Norman Conquest,* as is proved by a roll of assarts in the Record 
Office, dated i8 John, 6 Henry III {Feudal History of Derbyshire, 
by Pym Yeatman, sec. vi, page 260). He also represented, through 
his grandmother, the Staffords of Eyam, who held their estates, 
granted to them in the reign of King John, on the condition that 
they kept a lamp burning during divine service on the altar of 
St. Helen in the parish Church ( Woolley Charters, vii, 38). 

Born on the 17th day of February, 1 630-1, at Ford Hall, co. 
Derby, which is about four miles from Bradshaw Hall, and which was 
the property and residence of Nicholas Cresswell, who in September, 
162 1, had married his father's sister, Lucy Bradshawe, Francis was 
the eldest son of George Bradshawe,' who succeeded to the Bradshaw 
and Stafford estates on the death, in 1635, of his brother Francis. 
Instead of taking up his abode at Bradshaw Hall, which for centuries 
had been the home of his forefathers, George Bradshawe lived on 
until his death in the old hall of the Staffords at Eyam, inherited 
through his mother. Four years before his death, namely in 1642, 
the rector, the Rev. Shoreland Adams, left Eyam to be instituted to 
the rectory of Treeton. Thus a link was forged between the two 
homes, that of the Bradshawes of Eyam and of the Vescys *of 
Brampton, at a time when the future husband of the heiress of the 
Vescys would be about eleven or twelve. On the 25 June, 1646, 
George Bradshawe died, leaving Elizabeth, whom he had married in 
1626, a widow, with five children, all under age, Francis, Peter, Ann, 
Mary, and Elizabeth. " Franck Bradshawe," as his father calls his 
eldest son in his will (dated 17 June, 1646, and proved 21 November 
following \Woolley Charters, xii, 91]), would then be little more than 
fifteen years old, and in less than six years afterwards he not only 
had courted and had wed with Elizabeth Vescy, but had taken up 
his abode in the hall of her forefathers, apparently together with her 
mother and her sister Sarah. The old hall at Eyam had been left 
by his father to his widow for her life, hence the necessity for his 
finding a new home. Both his sisters soon followed his example, 
and married Yorkshire neighbours — Mary marrying John Garland,' of 
Todwick, by whom at her death, 20 October, 1681, she left a daughter, 
Elizabeth, who died unmarried 20 November, 1683; and Anne, his 
eldest sister, finding a husband in the old friend of her childhood, 

1 Derbyshire ArckaoUgical faurnal^ xxv, 14. 
^Visitation of Derbyshire, Heralds* ^ llwnK^^-s Fam ilia Miftorum Gentium, 

College, c. 33. page 1074. 



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352 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

the Rev. Michael Adams, rector of Treeton, and son of the late 
rector, to whom she was married at Eyam, 20 April, 1665.^ In their 
marriage license, dated 16 November, 1664,' he is described as 27, 
and she was 23. 

Her husband's father, whom she had known as rector of Eyam, 
had been always a keen and zealous Royalist, and had been con- 
tinually in conflict with the Parliament, concerning whose troubles, 
arising out of his quarrels with the Puritan party. Hunter in his 
History of Hallamshir^ gives a long and interesting account. They 
ended in his deprivation of the living about 1644, and his subsequent 
retirement to his own estate at Woodlathes, near Conisborough, for 
which, when the war was over, he compounded for ;£i98. On the 
Restoration, however, he was reinstated in his Rectory of Treeton, 
where he died 11 April, 1664. In the church, over his place of 
burial, is a monument with a Latin inscription recording his 
sufferings. His son Michael succeeded him, but had not been two 
years in possession of the Rectory, when his wife — she whom he 
had known in the old days at Eyam as Anne Bradshawe — died 
after nine months of married life. Her pathetic story can still 
be read on the old tomb (Append. L viii) in the Treeton Church, 
how, "six days after the delivery and death of a male child, 
the wife of the Rector died on the 27 January, 1665-6." Her 
husband married again, and lost his life in a storm which, overtook 
him on the 27th Dec, 1680, while travelling over a bleak and 
exposed part of Derbyshire. A quaintly worded inscription^ on a 
brass placed in Brassington Church records the cause of his death, 
the place of his burial, and the fact that he left a wife and seven 
young children to mourn his loss. 

Just about the time, however, when Michael Adams lost his first 
wife, the plague was raging in its full virulence at Eyam, whither its 
germs had been conveyed in a parcel of tailor's patterns from 
London. With what fatal speed it travelled throughout that little 
Derbyshire village, what destruction it wrought, and what desolation 
it carried into the cottages and farm-houses, together with the heroic 
bravery of Wm. Mompesson, the Rector, is ably and touchingly told 
by William Wood, in his History of Eyam. The widow of George 
Bradshawe, it is said, fled as soon as it appeared in the village, 
which was destined never again to be their home, and as she lies 
buried in Treeton Church, she, with her only remaining child Mary, 
probably made her future home with her widowed daughter-in-law 

^ Registers. a Page 493, Gatty's Edition. 

2 Faculty Office^ Harleian Society, * Coxe's Derbyshire ChurckeSy ii, 

page 84. page 445. 



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VESCY OF BRAMPTON-EN-LE-MORTHEN. 353 

and her children at Brampton. At the first, however, she would 
naturally have taken up her abode at the Rectory, in view of the 
event which ended so fatally. 

It was fear of the plague, too, which drove her husband's first 
cousin, Edward Bradshawe, from Litton, a small village close to 
Eyam, to find a home in that neighbourhood. A stone (Append. 
L vii), with a neat Latin epitaph marks his burial place in 
Treeton Church, and a tablet with a Latin inscription Hunter says, 
used to hang on the north side, which explained the cause of his 
residence in that parish. The inscription may be thus rendered: — 
" Edward Bradshawe, late of the Society of Gray's Inn in London, 
and one of its oldest members, also of Litton, in the county of 
Derby, Esqr., who, sojourning in this county while a plague was 
raging, died full of years and honours, 22 Dec, 1665, and was buried 
near this place." It will be noticed from the wording that he never 
intended to end his days in Treeton, as also that he lived there but 
a very short time, as he died in the December of the same year in 
which the plague broke out at Eyam, whether of the plague itself 
or by the irony of fate, of some other disorder, is not revealed. It 
will be as well to state who he was, and thus to dispel the ignorant 
confusion which is said to exist by Hunter^ in the minds of the 
Treeton inhabitants, who then supposed, and apparently still suppose 
him to be identical with John Bradshawe, the President of the High 
Court which sent King Charles to the scaffold, who more than five 
years before had been buried with great pomp in Westminster Abbey, 
and whose body at the Restoration had been exhumed, exposed on a 
gibbet with those of Cromwell and Ireton, and afterwards re-buried at 
Tyburn. But tradition, often oblivious of well-known historical facts, 
buries him in Treeton Church under an assumed name, and states 
that he lived in the safe obscurity of that Yorkshire village for the 
first five years of the Restoration. 

Edward Bradshawe, of Litton, was first cousin to Elizabeth Vescy's 
father-in-law, George Bradshawe, and second cousin to President 
Bradshawe, being the eldest son of Peter, who was a younger son of 
Godfrey Bradshawe, the eldest brother of the President's grand- 
father. He inherited the Manor of Litton from his father, who had 
amassed great wealth as a London merchant. He was a member of 
Gray's Inn, as was also his second cousin, the President, who kept 
up a friendly intercourse with his Derbyshire cousins, and is named, 
with his elder brother, as an overseer to the will of George 
Bradshawe, and thus may possibly have lent a helping hand to his 

* History of Hallamshire^ page 496, Gatty's Edition. 



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354 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

cousin's widow in the upbringing of her children, who were all 
very young at their father's death, and thus may have influenced the 
lives of Elizabeth Vescy's descendants. The marriage of his cousin 
Anne with the son of the parson who had given him and his 
colleagues so much trouble, could not have given him much satis- 
faction. 

Francis Bradshawe held the great Court Baron of Abney, co. 
Derby, of which he was Lord of the Manor in October, 1654. But 
he lived only seven years after his marriage with Elizabeth Vescy, 
having died in his thirtieth year, 21 Dec, 1659 (Appendix L xv), 
and was buried in the Brampton Quire of Treeton Church. He had 
issue by EITzabeth Vescy — 

I. Francis Bradshawe, son and heir, bom 16 AP"^ 1654,* 

died 29 Dec, 1677 (Appendix L xii). 
II. John, died 1656, an infant (Append. L x). 
III. Johnr Bradshawe, successor to his brother, born 27 June, 
i656.« 
I. Elizabeth, born 8 March, 1659-60.' 

The entry in the old Bible which had belonged to her grand- 
father, George Bradshawe, is written with a 6ne pen, in a female 
hand, and runs thus : — " Elizabeth Bradshawe was borne at Brampton, 
the 8th daye of Marche, 1659, about 8 of the clocke in the mominge, 
and was chrisened the nine and twentieth. I pray God bless her 
and make her his servant. F.B. E.B." This is the more pathetic 
when it is remembered that she was bom ten weeks after her 
father's death, who in his will names her thus — "as for y* childe my 
wife now goes with all my will is y' whether itt be sonne or 
daughter itt shall have ;;^4oo Pounds portion." The will was 
dated 19 Dec, 1659, and devised all his landed estates to his eldest 
son Francis, ;;^4oo and an annuity to his son John ; his wife to have the 
guardianship of his children and their tuition, also the rent from the 
estates during their minority. William Vescy, Sherland Adams, and 
Thos. Lord witness the will, who also state that " Mrs. Bradshawe 
declared that it was the wish of her husband that the silver bason 
and ewer and two silver flaggons, left to him by his father, should 
go to his eldest son when he reached the age of 21 years." 

In January, 1661,* a partition deed was executed, to which 
William Vescy, of Thorpe Salvin, was a party, dividing the Vescy 

^ Bradshawe Bible. Also a paper in * In the writer's possessioni as are all 

the handwriting of John Bradshawe. Bradshaw MSS. cited, unless otherwise 

" Ibid, stated. 
^Ibid, 



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VESCY OF BRAMPTON-EN-LE-MORTHEN. 355 

estates between Elizabeth Bradshawe, widow, and Sarah Vescy, spinster, 
her sister, and on the 15th September, 1665, Elizabeth Bradshawe, 
widow, settled her share on her three children, Francis, John, and 
Elizabeth Bradshawe. 

. On the 25th Oct, 1664, and again on 20 Oct, 1669, she held 
the great Court Baron of the Manor of Abney for her son, Francis 
Bradshawe "infans." 

She married as her second husband John Bolle, of Thorpe Hall, 
CO. Lincoln. This must have been about 1667-8, for the settlement 
of 1665 was confirmed by John Bolle and Elizabeth his wife in 
1668, and the Court Baron of Abney in 1669 was held by her and 
John Bolle together. By John Bolle, her second husband, who had 
two sons living by his first wife, Ursula Bradley, she had issue — 

I. Edward Bolle (Append. L xi), died unmarried, 15 Nov., 

1696; buried in Treeton Church. 
II. Mary (Append. L x), died 22 Feb., 1673 ; buried at Treeton. 

III. Elizabeth,^ married at South Elkington, 7 March, 1708-9, 

to Thomas Bosville, Clerk, Rector of Ufford, co. 
Northants, by whom she had three daughters. 

IV. Sarah,* married at St John's, Laughton, 24 Feb., 1690, to 

Henry Eyre, of Bramley-in-Braithwell, where she was 
buried 21 June, 1709, leaving John, o.s.p.^ and Margaret, 
married Will. Spencer. 

A settlement of lands in co. Lincoln was made by John Bolle 
and Elizabeth his wife, 20 May, 1675, on Edward Bolle and his two 
sisters, Elizabeth and Sarah. 

Elizabeth Bradshawe's marriage with John Bolle most certainly 
provided a husband for her sister Sarah, because John Elye, who was 
another Lincolnshire Squire, was a son of John Bolle's sister 
Elizabeth. The marriage must have taken place about 1670, for on 
the I St August in that year a deed of settlement of lands was exe- 
cuted, to which Thomas Elye and Elizabeth his wife, and John Elye 
and Sarah his wife, both of Utterby, co. Lincoln, and Elizabeth 
Bradshawe were parties. 

Elizabeth Vescy, widow of Francis Bradshawe and wife of John 
Bolle, died 14 March, 1676 (Append. L xiii). Her second husband, 
John Bolle, was buried at Louth, 10 Sept, 1679. Her eldest son, 
Francis Bradshawe, survived her one year only. He died (Append. 
L xii)) 29 Dec, 1677, and was buried, as was his mother, in the 
Brampton Quire of Treeton Church. 

* Lituolnshire Pedigrees, Harleian Society, page 153. 
a Ibid. 



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356 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

III. John Bradshawe, the third but only other surviving son of 
Elizabeth Vescy and Francis Bradshawe, succeeded to all the estates, 
both in Yorkshire and in Derbyshire, on the death of his brother 
Francis. 

He married, at Rampton,^ 15 July, 1680, Dorothy, the daughter of 
Anthony Eyre, of Rampton, co. Notts., the male representative of the 
Eyres of Highlow, co. Derby.' 

In his marriage settlements, dated 14 July, i68o, to which, her 
father being dead, Dorothy's brother, Gervase Eyre, of Rampton, is a 
party, both the Yorkshire and Derbyshire estates are settled. 

In a document dated 12 October, 1693, signed by George Lord, 
John Revell, Thos. Mallinson, and Thomas Hunt and others, all of 
Brampton, liberty is given to John Bradshawe by the Freeholders to 
build a wall in the More Lane, situated in Brampton, as well as full 
and free possession of the Fish Pond he had made "in a comon 
called the Wood," with the sole use "of the Fish and the Pond," 
which is granted to the "said John Bradshawe and his heirs for 
ever." 

A blacksmith's bill, dated 22 Dec, 17 18, is concerned with the 
shoeing of three horses, called respectively "the Oulder and the 
younger bay Mare" and the "Strawberry Horse," and shows that he 
paid at the rate of id, for each remove of their shoes, ^d, being the 
additional payment for a new shoe, while a "Sadler's" bill, dated 
Sept., 1 7 19, proves that a "currey come and brush" cost half-a- 
crown, and " a paire of malegerths fourteen pence," while repairs to 
"male pillions" and other such articles were in like reasonable 
proportion. 

He served as High Sheriff for the county of Derby during the 
year 17 17, but his life was lived at Brampton, where he died, and 
was buried in Treeton Church, 18 November, 1726.' 

A parcel of conveyance deeds, still in the writer's possession, 
proves that he acquired other lands than those he inherited, some by 
purchase and others by exchange, from Stone, Revell, Lord, and 
other Brampton landowners. A rent roll of his Wortley estate 
shows that a portion of his land is now owned by Lord WharnclifTe. 
A reference in Sir George Sitwell's Letter Book of 1662-7,* refers to 
his friend John Bradshawe dining with him at Renishaw, and in a 
letter' from Sir John Newton, of Barre's Court, co. Gloucester, to his 
son, dated 20 July, 1689, he mentions that he is entertaining "my 
sister Eyre, her son and daughter, and her son-in-law Bradshawe 

1 Rampton Registers. * Penes Sir George SitweU, Bart. 

I Page 345. . s penes Col. Archer- Houblon. 

•* Treeton Registers. 



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VESCY OF BRAMPTON-EN-LE-MORTHEN. 357 

and his lady and daughter." John Bradshawe, as stated, died in 
his 71st year, Nov., 1726, having had by Dorothy his wife, whose 
death is recorded in the Treeton Registers as having taken place "by 
misfortune" on the 23rd Sept., 17 14, four daughters and two sons — 

I. Elizabeth;* baptised at Treeton, 9 July, 1681 ; married at 

Laughton Church, co. York, 11 Jan., 1706,* to Joshua 

Galliard, of Bury Hall, Edmonton, by whom she had 

Pierce, eventual heir. 

II. Margaret;' baptised at Treeton, 16 Aug., and buried 28 

Aug., 1682 (Append. C xiv). 
III. Dorothy;^ baptised at Treeton, 28 Oct., 1685,* buried 

9 Nov., 1686. 
IV. Mary;' baptised at Treeton, 29 Aug., 1687. Died unmarried.' 
I. George,' eldest son and heir ; baptised at Treeton, 26 Feb., 

1683-4. 
II. John ;* baptised at Treeton, 26 March, 1689. Died" in his 
father's lifetime, unmarried, and was buried at Treeton," 
21 Dec, 1724. 

I. George Bradshawe, though he did not actually succeed to the 
estates till 1726, appears to have acted for his father as early as 1722, 
when leases were drawn out in his name. He married Ellen, only 
daughter of Robert Roper, of East Derby, co. Lane; and the marriage 
articles are dated 5 June, 17 10. They had one son James, who died 
in infancy, and was buried at Thorpe Salvin. He was appointed 
Recorder of Doncaster, 16 Dea, 1707, where he must have taken up 
his residence in 1722, as on 20th August in that year an order was 
issued by the Corporation that a deputation should wait upon him, 
and that four dozen of wine should be sent in. His house was situated 
on the east side of the High Street, now known as the Doncaster 
Bank, and was sold by his nephew and heir in 1758.^'^ In 1727 he 
was concerned in the navigation of the River Don as Recorder. He 
died 23 Dec, 1735, having on the 13th of September in that year 
executed a lease for eleven years of Bradshaw Hall and lands, the 
last evidence of a business act done by him, and which was con- 
cerned with the old home of his forefathers. The HalP is near 

1 Treeton Registers. » Ibid, 

a Laughton Registers. 10 Abstract of title of Charles Bowles to 

» Treeton Registers. lands at Chinley, co. Derby. 

5^^'.^* 11 Treeton Registers. 

9^ Ilnd, '^'^ History of SL George* Sy Doncaster, 
' Abstract of title of Charles Bowles to By Rev. T. E. Jackson, 

lands at Chinley, co. Derby. ^^ Sec vol. xxiv, Derbyshire Archao- 

* Treeton Re^sters. lo^cal Society, 



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368 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

Chapel-en-le-Frith, and is a fair specimen of an old Tudor house, 
and in' good preservation. George Bradshawe was buried in the old 
Parish Church of Sl George's, Doncaster, where his widow put up to 
his memory a monument (Append. L xvi), which, like the family of 
which he was the last representative, has passed away from mortal 
eyes, having perished in the fire which destroyed the church, 
28 Feb., 1853. He died intestate,* and the representation, as well 
as the estates, of the houses of Bradshawe, of Bradshaw, co. Derby, 
and of Vescy of Brampton, co. York, then devolved on his nephew 
mentioned above, Pierce Galliard, as heir-at-law, who was the eldest 
son of Elizabeth Bradshawe by her marriage with Joshua Galliard, 
son of Joshua Galliard, of Bury Hall, Edmonton, co. Middlesex. 
(Arms : Azure, a bend between three roses on three stalks and leaves 
gules). When Pierce Galliard succeeded to the estates on the death 
of his uncle, George Bradshawe, his mother had been dead nearly 
twenty years, having died where she had lived, at Bury Hall, 10 Oct., 
1 7 16, aged 35. 

A monument in Edmonton Church records her death and that of 
her husband, Joshua Galliard, who was buried with his wife in 
Edmonton Church, 19 Sept., 1728.' They had issue — 

I. Pierce Galliard, alluded to above as heir to George 
Bradshawe. 
II. John; died unmarried, 29 April, 1745, and was buried in 
Eyam Church, co. Derby, where is a brass to his memory. 
I. Elizabeth; married, 1741, Arthur Beardsley. 
II. Dorothy; married John Richards, of Edmonton, by 
whom she had issue — (i) John, died young, March, 1737. 
(2) Dorothy Richards; baptised at Edmonton, 5 Sept., 
1735; died 17 May, 1748. 

I. Pierce Galliard, the eldest son, so named after Sir Pierce 
Butler, Bart., who had married his father's sister, Anna Galliard, 
matriculated at Christ Church, Oxford, 1727,' at the age of 16. He 
was of Lincoln's Inn, barrister-at-law, I733^• of Queen's Square, 
London, and of Bury Hall, co. Middlesex, at which latter place he 
chiefly resided, and in which house, over the drawing-room mantel- 
piece, is a carving in marble of the Galliard Arms quartering 
Wakefield, Bradshawe and Vescy, and impaling Hughes. He died 
at a great age,' and was buried at Edmonton,' 15 Aug., 1789. He 
married as his second wife, 3 March, 1743, Anna daughter of John 



1 Abstract of tille of Charles Bowles to * Ibid, 

^ Foster's Alumni Oxoftienses. ^ Edmonton Roisters. 



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VESCY OF BRAMPTON-EN-LE-MORTHEN. 359 

Hughes, of London, who was buried^ at Edmonton, 6 November, 1777, 
and by whom he had issue one son and two daughters — 

I. Bradshawe Galliard; baptised at Edmonton,' 16 April, 1747. 
Matriculated at Oriel College, Oxford, at the age of 17, 
the 14th day of November, 1764.' A deed of demise 
of the settled estates in Derbyshire was executed by his 
father in his favour, for their joint lives, on 26th May, 
1777. He died intestate,* in his father's lifetime, at his 
brother-in-law's house at East Sheen,* 4 Sept., 1785, 
when his two sisters became his co-heirs in tail pre- 
sumptive. 
I. Anna Galliard; baptised at Edmonton,' 21 Dec, 1744. 
Married,' without her father's consent, Eaglesfield Smith, 
of Blackwood, co. Dumfries. The Eyam estate devolved 
on her, as well as the plate, family portraits, and the 
greater portion of the contents of Bury Hall, which were 
destroyed by a fire at Blackwood House not long after- 
wards. By the death of their grandson, Bradshawe 
Smith, in 1881, this line became extinct 
n. Mary; baptised in Queen Street,® 25 Feb., 1746. Inherited, 
under a deed of partition bearing date 26 Feb., 1790, 
the Bradshaw Hall and Abney Manor estates, besides 
Bury Hall and a large portion of the Edmonton estate. 
She was married at Edmonton, 29 Jan., 1774,* the 
marriage articles being dated the previous 14th January, 
to Charles Bowles, of Sheen House, co. Surrey. He was 
born at Woodford, co. Essex, 7 Aug., 1736,'° and was the 
second son of Humphry Bowles, of Burford, co. Salop, 
and of Wanstead House, co. Essex. (Arms: AzurCy 
three standing bowls or^ in each a boards head couped. 
Crest : A fkmy boar pierced unth an arrow). He died at 
Sheen House during his year of office as High Sheriff 
for CO. Surrey, 15 Jan., 1795, and was buried at Wan- 
stead, leaving one son, Humphry Bowles, his heir, born 
19 Nov., 1 781, died 12 Aug., 1859, whose grandson and 
heir-at-law possesses the Bradshawe estates, and who 
represents the families of Bradshawe of Bradshaw, co. 
Derby, and Vescy of Brampton, co. York. 

1 Edmonton Registers. • Treelon Registers. 

« Ibid. ^ Abstract of title of Charles Bowles to 

• Foster's Alumni Oxonienses. lands at Chinley, co. Derby. 

* Abstract of title of Charles Bowles to ^ Treeton Registers, 
lands at Chinley, co. Derby. " Ibid, 

« GentUmatCs Magazine. *° Ibid, 



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360 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

The widow of Charles Bowles, the last member of the Galliard 
family, died 7 March, 1836, and was buried at Wanstead. Her will, 
dated 7 May, 1829, was proved 2 June, 1836. 

The Brampton estates, so long the possession of the Vesq^ 
family, were sold by Pierce Galliard shortly before his death in 1789, 
at which date they were in the possession of Mr. Samuel Phipps, and 
were left by him to Sir Sitwell Sitwell, the grandfather of Sir George 
Sitwell, the present owner. A sketch of the house as it was in the 
time of John Bradshawe, the last member of the family who made a 
home there, is given with this article. Built partly of stone, it has a 
half-timbered, overhanging storey, evidently fifteenth century work. On 
a stone is a carving of the Bradshawe and Vescy arms. Within the 
house are two good oak panelled rooms. The house bears generally 
the signs of having seen better days— the days when it was the 
home of the Vescys and of their descendants the Bradshawes. 



APPENDIX. 
A 

(i) About twenty charters of various dates, from 1322 to 1348, 
relating to Roger le Vescy were, till lately, in the writer's possession. 
They were mostly grants of land in Brampton and Treeton. One, 
dated 1348, was a grant of land from Roger le Vescy, "Hugoni filio 
et heredi meo et Matildore uxori ejus." 

(ii) There were also several charters relating to various families 
living in the neighbourhood at this time, which may well find a 
place here. They were for the most part grants of land in and 
about Brampton-en-le-Morthen and Treeton, both in the parish of 
Brampton. The following list was made before they were destroyed : — 

1. To Robert son of Reyner de Brampton— 1296. 

2. To Roger le Vescy, by Isabella daughter of Hugh de 

Brampton, bearing dates 1326, 1332, and 1337. 

3. To Roger le Vescy, by Hugh son of Isabel de Brampton, 

from 1326 to 1331. 

4. To Hugh le Vescy, of Brampton-en-le-Morthen, by Isabel 

daughter of Robert de Brampton — 1369. 

(N.B. — In these charters no mention is made of a Walter 
de Brampton, whose daughter and heir Alice, the heralds 
assert, was married to Roger Vescy II, whose name first 
appears ten years after the grant of land was made to his 
father Hugh, by Isabel, the daughter of Robert de Brampton, 
though it is possible they were her near relations.) 



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<^0 







4 



I 



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VESCY OF BRAMPTON-EN-LE-MORTHEN. 861 

5. By Hugh de Treeton to Ralph Paynter, of Blythe, co. 

Notts., and Clemence his wife, "my daughter" — 1339. 

6. By John le Keu, son of Thomas le Keu, of Maltby. 

7. William Archer, died 20 Henry VI, leaving a daughter Ellen. 

B. 
A verbatim copy of the statement written on the back of a 
parchment copy of Robert Vescy's will, which was dated 1558, and 
which, being evidently in the handwriting of his grandson William, 
must have been written in the year 1605: — "This is the will of 
Robert Vescy, of Brampton-en-le-Morthen, who married the daughter 
and heir of Tyndal, of Tickhill, in this county, and had issue 
William, who was the father of William, the writer. The said 
Robert was the son of Thomas, the son of Robert, the son of John, 
who was the son of John, whose father was Roger the second, the 
son of Hugh, who was the son of Roger the first, which Roger had 
married the daughter and heir of Reyner le Franceys, of Brampton- 
en-le-Morthen." 

C. 

There were fully thirty charters of various dates, from 1348 to 
1375, relating to Hugh Vescy, several of which were grants of land 
to him and to Matilda his wife. 

A charter in the WooUey Collection, British Museum (v. 26), 
dated at Brampton, Wednesday after the Conversion of St. Paul, 42 
Edward IH (24 Jan., 1368-9), is a grant by Isabel daughter of Hugh 
de Treeton, to Hugh Vescy, of Morthing, of seven acres of land in 
Mylne Rydding. 

• Considering that Brampton is in the parish of Treeton, it is 
possible that Hugh de Treeton and Hugh de Brampton were one 
and the same person (cf. A ii, 3, 4}. 

Hunter in his South Yorkshire^ vol. ii, page 179, quotes a charter 

for which he gives no authority, which is a grant of land from John 

de Toychill (? Totehill) (cf. E) to Hugh de Vescy, of Brampton, 

and Matilda his wife. The date he assigns to it is "Monday next 

after the Feast of All Saints, 1253." This date is impossible, for it 

is about 100 years too soon, and it is very improbable that there 

existed another Hugh Vescy and Matilda his wife. It is evidently a 

misprint for 1353. 

D. 

The first of the charters connected with the possession of the 

lands at Brampton by Roger II was dated 1399, and the last was in 

1428. In a deed of entail both John and William were named as 

his sons. There is, however, proof to be found among those who 

VOL. XVII, V 



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362 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

paid the Poll Tax of 2 Richard II ( Yorkshire PoU Tax, page 32a), 
that he and his servant Thomas (probably a relative) both paid 41/. 
for lands in Brampton in the year 1379-80, by which we may assume 
that his father was then dead. 

Other names appear in the same Poll Tax list which may belong 
to this family, and which, although they find no place in this pedigree, 
may be worth recording — Will: Vysce and Cicely his wife, in Whiston; 
Will; Wescy and Magota his wife, in Conisbro'; John Wesci, in 
Barnbro*; and Robert and Dionisia Vesci, in Tickhill. 

E. 
The following paid the same tax: — Will: and Cicely de Totehill, 
in Barnbro', and John and Elizabeth Totehill, in Stainton. In York- 
shire Archceological Journal^ xii, 115, we find that Hugh de Totehill 
made a grant of lands in Brampton-in-Morthing to Michael Pigot, 
Rector of Wath, 1323, and that Hugh de Totehill, son of John de 
Totehill, granted to Roger de Lokyngton and olhers his Manor of 
Brampton-in-Morthyng, in 1377. 

F. 
There were about twenty charters, etc., from 1436 to 1450, which 
proved the possession of the estate by John de Vesci I. In one of 
these he was described as the son of Roger, and there exists also 
in the Woolley Collection in the British Museum (v. 29) one dated 
28 April, 20 Henry VI (1442), being a release by Joan widow of 
William Archer (cf. A ii, 7), of Tykhill, to John Vescy, of all right 
in lands which he (Vescy) had of the grant of her husband in 
Brampton in-Morthing and Woodhouse Brampton. Seal : A cinquefoil. 

G. 

Woolley Charters (v. 28) in British Museum. Copy made, 13 Jan., 
1 640- 1. Grant by Robert Laghton, of Laghton, to John Vescy, of 
Morthing, and Robert Vescy, of Brampton, his son and heir, of seven 
messuages and a cottage with a garden adjoining, and seven bovates of 
land and meadow lying separately in the ville and fields of Brampton- 
in-the-Morthing, and which descended to him by inheritance on 
the death of Robert Laghton, his father, . which his father held 
jointly with William Mirfin, rector of Wickersley, of the grant 
of Roger Vescy. To hold to John Vescy and Robert Vescy and 
the heirs male of Robert, with remainders to Catherine, Joan and 
Alice, daughters of Robert, in fee. Witnesses, John Laghton, John 
Scarcliffe, Henry Dolfyn (all of Brampton), and John Yole and 
Robert Wright, of Morthinge. Dated at Brampton, 2 March, 2 Rich. 
Ill (1484-5). 



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VESCY OF BRAMPTON-EN-LE-MORTHEN. 363 

H. 
TESTAMENTUM JANE VESCY DEFUNCTE. 
[i?<f. Test,, XV (2), ii3<|. 
June 20, 1557. Jane Vescye, of the parysche of Tykhyll, wydowe. 
My sowle to Almyghtie God, and to our Ladye, Saynct Mary, and to 
all the celestyall company of hevyn; and my body to be buryed 
wythin my paryshe churche, in the Trenytye quere, nere vnto my 
husband, in Tykhall aforesayd. To the hye alter for tythes forgotten, 
ijj. For my mortuarye, according to the lawes of this realme of 
England. To Katheryne Wylkinsonne, my doughter, my best froke 
of clothe wyth all my lynnen apperell, my secound fether bedd wyth 
a bolster and my best coueryng, my cowe, my cowneter^ wyth the 
coueryng, my swyne, my cocke and hennes. To Thomas Bewes, her 
Sonne, my gretyst brasse pott. To Robert Veseye (jiV), my sonne, 
my best fether bedde wyth the bolster and one couering, and to 
his wyfe one cupbord, standing in my buttre. To the sayd Roberte 
Veseye, my sonne, one payr of wheles, bownd wyth yron, and one 
great brasyn morter, wyth a pestell, one plat coate wyth the 
shyrtes, one hawbert, one forest byll, and ij gorgettes; one yron 
chyst wyth all his heyr loomes beyng in my kepyng. To 
William Vescye, sonne to the sayd Robert, iijj. iiij^. To Jane 
Vescye, dowghter to Robert Vescye, my ressell {sic) froke. To my 
dowghter Elyzabeth Bradforth chyldren, to euery one of theym, 
iijf. iiij^., and to euery one of the sayd chyldren halfe a quarter 
of barlye, beyng never maryed as yet. To Alys Waddysworth one 
redd pettyecote that was her mother's, and one redd saye. To 
Elyzabeth Vescye, my doughter in law, my thyrd froke. To John 
Vescye, her sonne, vjV. viij^., and to every one of her other chyldren 
iijj. iiij^., to be payd to theym when thay com to lawfull age, abyll 
to receyve yt, and one halfe quarter of barley or malt, toward theyre 
brynging vp. To Jane Bybbe, my seruaunt, ij^. To Elizabeth 
Hawmon, my servant, my worke day frocke. To Syr John [114] 
Knagges xij^. To euerye one of my god chyldren iiij^. The 
resydewe to Robert Vescye, my sonne, and John Wylkinsonne, my 
sonne in lawe, whome I constitute and mayke my trew and lawfull 
executors of this my last will and testament; and they to bring my 
body honestlye to the hearth, as my trust is in them, at the ouer- 
syght of my trusty and wellbelouyd frend, Thomas Frankyshe, whome 
I constitute and mayke the supervysor of this my last will and 
testament, to se all thyngis, in my sayd will comprehended, to be 

1 A table on which accounts were cast. 



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364 THE YORKSfflRE ARCHiEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

performed and fulfyllid according to the meanyng therof. Thes 
beyng wytnes, Syr John Knagges, Robert Hudsonne, Thomas Slater, 
Richard Brodhed, Thomas Bradforth. [Proved by the executors Nov. 
3, 1557.] 

J. 

TESTAMENTUM ROBERTI VESCIE, PAROCHIE DE TRETON. 

DEFUNCTI. 

[AV. 7>j/., XV (3), 397]. 

Feb. 15, 1558-9, Robart Vescye, of the parishe of Treton. My 

soull to Almightie God, and our Ladie, Saint Marie, and to all the 

holye companye of heaven; my bodie to be buried at Treton afore 

my stall, yf it please God I die at Bramptone, in our Ladie quere. 

And to my mortuarie accordingly as the lawcs of England will 

permytt and suffer. To the anoring^ of the blessed sacrement of the 

hie aulter of Treton fore tithes forgotten xijd. Item I gyue one 

J pound of wax to the crosse light in Treton. To the poore people 

in [the] parishe of Treton ijj. To the poore people of Light* 
parishe xxd. To the poore people in the parishe of Tickhill ii)S. 

^ iiij^^., to pray fore my soull and all Christen soulles. To William 

Vescy, my sonne and heire, two siluer spones which he will chose of 
my spones, one greate brasse pott, one greate caldren, one old riall 
of gold, one greate yron bonde evydens chiste, remaynynge at 
Tichull, one lesse chist withe the name of Vescye graven of it, one 
greate bruinge leade, one salting fatt, leyed within one greate arke, 
standinge at Bramptone, in my parler, one greate cubbord ore 
prasse, one iren bound wayne, one greate iren spytt, one greate 
brasen morter with a pestill of iren, one fetherbedd with the 
bolstere; thes to, morter and fetherbed, remayneth in John 
Vescye handes, which he had in my mother howse at TickhilL 
To the said William Vescye two bigge bullokes, a brownne and a 
spvnget,' a litill grey colte, and a ringe of gold, theis to be 
heire lomes frome heire to heire, all thes thinges but there 
bullokes and the colte, to haue in recompense of his grandfather and 
grandmother gyftes and bequestes. To Edward Vescye, my sonne, 
one annuyte of xx^. by yere owt of my howse at Morthing, to be 
paid to hym at to vsuall termes in the yere, at Wytsonday and 
Martynmes; and fore fawte of payment of the said annuytie of xxs,, 

* The honouring. nounced spangd^ or (formerly) spangg-ki^ 

IT u.^« /!»\ meaning "variegated.** See Halliweirs 

Laughton {?). Dictio^ry, s,v. The literal sense is 



*In j/v«^/the«^islikethatin/<?wf^r, •'covered with spangs,*^ or injnodcm 
finger. Phonetically, spvnggei is a mere English spangle ■ • - « ^ 

variant of Northern English spanged, pro- fV. W* Skeaf), 



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VESCY OF BRAMPTON-EN-LE-MORTHEN. 365 

he to distreyne of my said farme, and the said stres to take, and 
dryve, and carie away to the next pound, till the said annuytie of 
xxs, to be paid, fore terme of his naturall lyf to hym. I geve to the 
said Edward Vescie one old aungell of gold, one good cowe, fyve 
yewe shepe, to be fore his grandfather and grandmother giftes and 
recorde.^ To the said Edward Vescye fore his childes porcion and 
filliall' childe parte xx**« markes in penye and penyworth, and one 
siluer spone, and one honest bedd with all thinges to yt belonging. 
To Jane Vescie, my doughter, my best fetherbed at Brampton, with 
all thinges to yt belonginge, with lynnyng shetes to yt, one cowe, 
fyve yewe shepe, her mother best hatt [397^ and cap, her best 
frocke, her best kirtill, and a petticole, and a pattelet' of velvet, her 
mother best beides of correll, xx*»« markes of penyes and penyworth, 
in full parte and her childes porcion, one siluer spone, one old 
aungel of gold. To Margaret Vescye, my doughter, one cowe and 
fyve yewe shepe, fore her grandfather bequest and rewarde, one lesse 
fetherbed with a bolster and pillos, a paire of lynnyn shetes, and 
other thinges to a bedd belonginge, her mother roset frocke with her 
secound kettell, one lettes* capp, one old angell of gold, one spone of 
siluer, one cowe, v'** yewe shepe, t wen tie markes of my goodes in full 
parte and porcion of her childes parte. To Anne Vescye, my 
doughter, one cowe, v'^ yewe shepe, for her grandfather reward, and 
one mattres with a paire of lynnyn shetes, a paire of hemppinges 
shetes, with all other thinges to an honest bedd belonging, and 
one old aungell of gold, one spone of siluer, twentie markes, 
for her full parte of her childes porcion. To Katheryn Vescye, 
my doughter, one cowe, v*** yewe shepe, for her grandfather 
reward gyven to her, one mattres, a paire of lynnyng shetes, ij 
paire of warr shetes, with all thinges to an honest bed belong- 
ing, one old angell of gold, one spone of siluer, twentie markes 
of my goodes, in full parte and porcion of her childes parte. To 
Marie Vescye, my doughter, one cowe, v'** yewe shepe, one mattres, 
one paire of lynnyn shetes, iij paire of harden shetes, with all close 
to an honest bed belonging, and twentye markes of my goodes, one 
old riall of gold, one spone of siluer, in full parte and porcion of 
her childes porcion. To Ellyn Vescye, my doughter, one cowe, v'*» 
yewe shepe, one mattres, one paire of lynnyn shetes, iiij payre of 

* "Rewarde" below. thirds one went to the widow and the 

'^ FinialL The filial portion was the other to the children. 

child's share in the parent's estate, of * A partlet, a woman's gorget. See 

which he could not be deprived. By Fairholt's Costume in England (Dillon). 

custom in the province of York the ii, 308. 

testator had power to bequeath but one- * ^^ Leiice^ a beast of a whitish gray 

third of his personalty, of the other two- colour." — Cotgrave, 



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366 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

storer shetes, with all other clothes to an honest bedd belonging, one 
old riall of gold, one spone of siluer, and twentye markes of my 
goodes, in full parte and porcion of her childes parte. To William 
Vescye, my sonne, my best doublet and my best gowne, and all my 
other reperell {sic\ belonging to my bodie, to be equally devyded 
betwix Edward Vescye and William Vescye. And yf my goodes 
will not pay my children there partes, and pay my dettes, I will that 
my hole landes in Tickhill shall pay all that lackes of my child 
partes and dettes. I gyue to euery one of my seruandes, being^with 
me in serves, more then there waiges, vj</. Also I will that yf it 
please Almightie God. to call and take any of my children to his 
mercie, that there partes of there childes porcion shalbe deuyded 
amonges my other children lyving, having children partes. Also all 
my goodes at Tickill that is my owne, and that goodes that is myne 
by the gyft and being executor to my mother, both goodes and 
corne, that my sonne, William Vescye, shall haue and receaue, and my 
mother legacies and her dettes, as it appeareth by a dett booke. 
The residewe to William Vescye, my sonne, whome I make my 
executor. I constitute and ordaine to se my will be fulfilled in all 
thinges John, Lord Darsey, Godfray Foliambe elder, euer my good 
maister, maister William Tyndall, and M^ William Ball, to be super- 
visors of this my last will, and euery one of them to haue v* of 
gold fore there paynes. Thes bearing wytnesse, John Holden, John 
Norbarne, Sir Richard Beard, Nicholas Jowett, and John Dawson 
with other mo. [Proved May i8, 1559.] 

K. 

INQUISITION ON THE DEATH OF WILLIAM VESCY, OF 

BRAMPTON, ESQ. 

[Inq : Post Mortem^ C<mrt of Hoards, vol. Ixii, No. 253.] 

Wakefield. Tuesday, 26 May, 5 Car. I [1629]. Francis Bellasse, 
gent., the Escheator. William Vescy, late of Brampton, Esq. He 
died seised in his demesne as of fee of 5 messuages, 8 cottages, 
3 dovecots, 200 acres of land, 40 acres of pasture, in Brampton, 
Morthinge, Bramley, and Thickhill, which came to him on the death 
of William Vescy, his father; and of a close, called Clay Croft, a 
close called Clarell Flatt, a close called le Twelve Acre, a close 
called Thirteen Acre, a close called Espes Close; and of divers 



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VESCY OF BRAMPTON-EN-LE-MORTHEN. 367 

other closes and selions of land Ijring scattered in all the fields 
within the territory of Tickhill, and acquired by him from John 
Sybery, Richard Witton, George Hamerton, Samuel Turvin, Robert 
Turvin, George Turvin, John Stephenson, and Christopher Reader; 
and of a close called Long Moreflett Close, two closes called Dalton 
Brook Closes, in the parish of Rotherham; a close near Herring- 
thorpe, in the parish of Whiston; a close called Great Lee, two 
closes called Farr Lee, a close called Barley Croft, a close called 
Little Lee, and 20 acres of meadow and pasture in Morthing and 
Brampton, acquired by the said William of Henry Hewett, Edward 
Baynes, Christopher Sindall, and Thomas Sindall. 

The 2 messuages, 4 cottages, a dovecot, 100 acres of land, 30 
acres of pasture, 30 acres of meadow, parcel of the said tenements in 

Brampton held of Harries, gent., as of his manor of Swinton, 

parcel of the late dissolved Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem, in 
free and common socage, namely, by fealty and an annual rent of 
i6d,; five acres, residue of the tenements in Brampton, held of the 
King as of his manor of East Greenwich, in free and common 
socage, that is, by fealty only. Tenements in Brampton, worth 6lt\ a 
year — One messuage, a dovecot, 30 acres of land, 10 acres of 
meadow, and 10 acres of pasture, in Morthinge, held of Francis 
Foljambe, knight and baronet, as of his manor of Aldwarke, in free 
and common socage, by fealty and 2s. 2d, a year, worth 40J. a year. 
A cottage, 6 acres of land, and 3 acres of meadow, in Bramley, held 

of Waterhouse, gent, as of his manor of Breythwell, in free and 

common socage, by fealty and a rent of 8^., worth 6s. Sd. a year. 
Two messuages, 3 cottages, a dovecote, 50 acres of land, 14 acres 
of meadow, 10 acres of pasture, in Tickhill, held of the King as of 
his honour of Tickhill, parcell of his Duchy of Lancaster, in 
socage, by fealty and a rent of los. 2^., worth 4/1, a year. The 
property in Tickhill, acquired from John Sybery and others, held of 
the King as of his honour of Tickhill, in socage, by fealty and a 
rent of i6s. 3^/., worth 40s, a year. The property in Rotherham, 
'Herringthorpe, and Whiston, acquired of Edward Barnes,* held of 
William, Earl of Pembroke, Lord Steward of the King's Household, 
as of his manor of Rotherham, in socage, worth 5X. a year. The 
property in Morthing and Brampton, bought of Henry Hewett and 

* Written Baynes above. 



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368 THE YORKSHIRE ARCR£OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

Others, held of Francis Foljambe, knight and baronet, as of his 
manor of Sladhooton, in socage, by fealty only, worth loj. a year. 

William Vescy died Dec. 23 last. John Vescy, gent., son and 
heir, aged 21 years 9 months and upwards on the day his father 
died. 

L. 
Treeton Church, 

The Church dedicated to St. Helen, and built in the 13th 
century, consists of a nave, with side aisles and chancel, a south 
porch and aisle. The latter, which terminates at the east end with 
an altar, is called the Brampton Quire, and is the burial-place of 
the two families of Vescy and Lord. The left side is devoted to 
the Vescys, and apparently consists of two large vaults, constructed 
end to end, the further one of which extends under the altar to the 
outside wall, though some of the family lie in the chancel and other 
parts of the church. 

The following inscriptions refer to this article : — 

1. Heare lyeth the Bodye of William Vescy 

day of August Ano: Dni: 1605. 

2. Here lyeth the bodie of Elizabeth late wife of William 

[Vescy, of Brampton, one of] the daughters of Richard 
Stev[enson], of Ounston, 

3. Here lyeth the body of Margerie late wife of William Vesscy, 

of Brampton, gent , sole daughter of Robert Buntinge, late of 
Rotherham Marchant who has yssue by the said W^illiam 
Power Sons John Robert William and Matthew was buried 
the 26 daye of November An: Do: 1618. 

4 lieth the bodi of M^ John Vescy of Brampton the son 

of M' William : November 1639.* 

5. Heare lieth the Boady of Ales Vesscy widow, the wife of John 

Vesscy of Brampton Gentleman who departed this life the 
r8'^ Day of October 1658. 

6. Robert Vescy of Brampton Gentleman who died the first of 

July Anno Dom : 1642. 

7. Hie Jacet Edwardus Bradshawe Afmiger in occiduo sinere 

expectans eum cui nomen est oriens Qui xxii Die Decemb 
MDCLxv occubuit. (Arms: Bradshawe with a crescent for a 
difference.) 

^ Hunter puts his death ten years probably a misprint, but the surface of 
earlier in his Familia Minorum Gen- the stone is very much worn. 
tium^ that is Nov. 11, 1629. This is 



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VESCY OF BRAMPTON-EN-LE-MORTHEN. 369 

8. Here lieth the body of M*^ Anne Adams wife of M' Michael 

Adams Rector of Treeton who died 6 days after the delivery 
and death of a male child Jany 27 1665. (A cross* impaling 
Bradshawe.) 

9. On a brass inserted in the centre of the stone covering a 

vault in which are buried William Routh and his family, is 
the following : — " Here lieth the body of Elizabeth Bradshawe 
Relict of George Bradshawe late of Eyam in the County of 
Derby Esquire who died on the Ninth day of November 
A D 1677. iEtatisque suae 64." 

10. Here lieth the body of John son of Francis Bradshawe, of 

Brampton Esq"" Departed this life the lo*^ of June 1656 In 
the first yeare of his age. Here lieth the body of Mary 2"** 
daughter of John BoUe of Brampton Esq' Departed this life 
22"** Feby 1673. 

11. Here lyeth y« body of M' Edward Bolle who died y« 15*** of 

November 1696. 

12. Here lieth the body of Francis Bradshawe of Brampton in the 

CO. of York Esquire who departed this life the twenty ninth 
day of December Anno Domini 1677. 

13. Here lieth interred the body of Elizabeth daughter of John 

Vescy of Brampton Gentleman sometime wife of Francis 
Bradshawe of Brampton Esq*", and also late wife of John Bolle 
Esq*^ who departed this life the fourteenth day of March 
Anno Domini 1676. 

14. Here lieth the body of Margaret Daughter of John Bradshawe of 

Brampton Esq"^ who departed this life the 27*'^ August, 1682. 

15. Francis Bradshawe of Brampton 21 Dec 1659. [Not discoverable. 

History of Hallamshire^ page 496.] 

16. Hunter*s South Yorkshire^ vol. i, page 43. The following was on 

a marble tablet in the Old Parish Church of St. George^s, 
Doncaster, destroyed by fire 28 Feb., 1853 : — 

M.S. 

Georgii Bradshawe, armigeri, 

hujusce municipii propraetoris ; 

qui pro-avorum de Bradshaw-hall 

in agro Derbiensi, 

1 The same as the Vescy coat. It is also to be found on her father-in-law's tomb. 



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870 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHiEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

longo ordine tarn in regis 

quim in patriae emolumentum 

honeste d^entium, 

agmen claudit 

Vir 

in sermonibus miscendis 

comis et facetus: 

in litibus dirimendis 

sagax et integer: 

in legibus exequendis 

fidus et intrepidus. 

Uxorem duxit Elenam, 

Roberti Roper de East- Derby 

in comitatu Lancastriensi, generosi, 

filiam unicam, 

ex quk suscepit (ilium 

in ipso vitae limine abreptum. 

Obiit Dec. 23. a.d. 1735. 

^tatis sua: 52. 

Marmor hoc extris curavit 

Elena 

in officii conjugalis monumentum. 



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INCISED SLAB from SELBY ABBEY CHURCH. 

JOHN BARWICK. ABBOT 1622-26. 



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GRAVE-SLAB OF ABBOT BARWICK IN SELBY 
ABBEY CHURCH, 1526.* 

The effigy is incised on a limestone slab, and represents a mitred 
abbot fully vested. The figure is represented as lying under a 
segmental foliated canopy, with the head and shoulders on a pillow, 
and the feet on the ground, in which are tufts of grass. The pillow 
is protected by a cover laced on at the two ends, and has a knot 
and tassel at each comer. The abbot is represented with his hands 
placed palm to palm in front of him, and the crosier, with the 
crook turned outward, rests under his right arm, with the spike on 
the ground. The mitre is of medium height, and both it and the 
vestments are much earlier in style than the date of the monument. 
The chasuble has what is called the Y orphrey, and the same 
ornament appears on the shoes. Over the top of the chasuble 
appears the apparel of the amice, while below it are seen the lower 
portions of the dalmatic and tunicle with their slits and fringed 
edges. Lower still the albe appears, but without apparels. On the 
left wrist is an embroidered fanon (maniple). The stole is entirely 
concealed. The hands are without gloves or ring, and the crosier 
has no veil attached to it. One of the many mistaken notions that 
have prevailed about the crosier is that a bishop carries his crosier 
with the crook turned outward to denote jurisdiction in his diocese, 
while an abbot carries his turned inward because his jurisdiction is 
limited to his abbey. The fact is that both bishops and abbots are 
represented with them either outward or inward. It is simply for 
want of room when they are turned inward, as on the oval seals 
both of bishops and of abbots. 

The inscription begins in elegiacs, and, with the contractions 
extended, is as follows : — 

Fato lugifero Jacet hie tellure Johannes 
Dompnus Barwicus, opere valde bonus. 

Bis binis annis pastor laudabile cunctis 
Prebuit exemplum, sic penetratur polum. 

qui obiit ij kalendis Aprilis anno domini M** 

I> xxvj® cuius anime propicietur deus. 

At the corners are the symbols of the Four Evangelists, the Man of 
St. Matthew and the Eagle of St. John at the top, the Ox of St. 
Luke and the Lion of St. Mark at the bottom. 

An engraving of this slab was published by William Fowler, of 
VVinterton, in December, 1820. 

J. T. F. 
> From a rubbing by Mr. Mill Stephenson, F.S.A. 



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TREASON IN 1685. 

Thb feelings of resentment against James II, which led many in the 
West of England to support the Duke of Monmouth in his 
rebellion, were not without sympathisers in North Yorkshire. In the 
summer of 1685, about the time the Duke was landing in England, 
John Dale, a yeoman from Holme, near Helmsley, was ])resented for 
seditious words, "I will fight for the Duke of Monmouth so long as 
any blood remains in me."* A little later a man at Fylingdales was 
presented for repeating the common report that Charles II had been 
poisoned by his brother, the Duke of York, "The Duke did barber 
the late King, and the Duke's wife did then drink to him a good 

health to the Barber It was thought that the King did not 

live long after it."' 

Unfortunately after the July Sessions of 1685 there are no entries 
in the Quarter Sessions Books till January, 16S7-8, so that it is 
impossible to cite more cases of disaffection from these volumes. 
This lacuna is to a certain extent filled up by original presentments 
and depositions before Justices of the Peace, only a few of which 
have been noted by the editor of the North Riding Records. 
Amongst these unprinted depositions are the two given below. 

The first deposition was made before Constable Bradshaw, of 
Nunthorpe, near Stokesley, a Roman Catholic. Here the charge, 
made by the informer, is one "tending towards treason." Nellist, the 
accused party, is said to have been disaffected to the king and 
government. The case seems a weak one, based on no other 
evidence than that of Mercer, the informer. Common informers, or 
as they were generally called, qui fams, from the opening words of 
the information, "qui, tam pro domino rege, quam pro se ipso, sequitur," 
as they sought to recover half the penalties due to the Crown in 
cases of a criminal or quasi-criminal nature, were usually persons of 
tainted character, whose evidence required strong corroboration. At 
a later period they earned their livelihood by feigning illness near a 
public-house, and persuading the unsuspecting publican to supply 
them with spirits during prohibited hours, whereupon they at once 
informed against their benefactors, and divided the money accruing 
from the fine. Readers of Oliver Tkvisi will remember what Dickens, 

1 JVbriA Ridirt^ Records^ vii, 77. « Ibid,, 79. 



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TREASON IN 1 685. 375 

at the close of the story, tells of the means by which Noah Claypole 
and his wife gained their livehhood. " His plan is to walk out once 
a week attended by Charlotte in respectable attire. The lady faints 
away at the doors of charitable publicans, and the gentleman being 
accommodated with three-pennyworth of brandy to restore her, lays 
an information next day, and pockets half the penalty. Sometimes 
Mr. Claypole faints himself, but the result is the same." 

Although this seems to be the latest mention of the common 
informer in literature, he still exists, though shorn of most of his 
powers of mischief. A legal friend writes: — "There are several 
statutes under which the whole or part of the penalty goes to the 
informer, as for example the old Highway Act (1S35), as I daresay 
you know, though that part of the business is so exclusively clerk's 
work that most Justices know nothing at all about it Under the 
Inland Revenue Act, 1890, the Commissioners have power to reward 
informers, but perhaps Noah Claypole would not have much chance. 
The best case I ever had of an action for a penalty was by a wretch 
who took advantage of his own wrong, and sued under the statute of 
31 Elizabeth, c. 6, for a penalty in respect of a simoniacal transaction 
which he had himself promoted ! My client was innocent but for 
the maxim, 'Ignorantia legis non excusat* (good law and vile Latin), and 
I sought in vain for a way out. I laid a case before a distinguished 
civilian when the action was threatened, and his opinion virtually was, 
* YouVe a bad lot, and you must pay, and serve you right.' However, 
when I was grubbing myself in the Statute Book to see if I could 
find a hole to creep through, and had just given it up, my eye fell on 
another Statute immediately preceding (31 Eliz., c. 5), and I found it 
provided a twelve months' limitation. I kept my own counsel, and 
as good luck would have it, the writ was not actually issued until a 
few days too late. Then I instructed Chitty to plead (it was under 
the old practice), and he advised that our defence was conclusive, and 
so thought the plaintiff, who was very glad to abandon his action." 

It is worthy of note that the names Nellist, Proddam and 
Laverick are still existing in the Dan by district. 

The other case is an instance of oppression by the dominant 
Royalists, a party of whom came to Hutton Conyers, near Ripon, and 
accused the informant, John Storaker, and the other inhabitants of 
the place, of being traitors and favourers of the Duke of Monmouth. 
Beyond putting them in a fright and threatening them, the Royalists 
seem to have done nothing. The complainant in this case is 
probably the same person as the John Storzaker who acted as Deputy 
Sheriff at the North Riding Quarter Sessions from 1689 to 1700.* 

^ North Riding Records^ vii, 94-174. 



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376 TREASON IN 1 685. 

I. 

North Riding Com. Ebor. The informacion of John Mercer, within the 
parish of Westerdale, yeoman, taken vpon oath before Constable 
Bradshaw of Nunthorpe esq., one of His Majesties Justices 
of y« Peace of y« said Rideing, y« 2^ day of September, Anno 
Domini 1685. 

The said Informant vpon his oath saith y^ vpon Sunday last^ Edward 
Nellist and Samuell Proddam, both, of y« parrishe of Danby, was 
drinking, in y« house of Ann Laverick who sells ale, and did perswade 
y* said Informant into theire company, and y* said Samuell Proddam 
did drink y* Kinges health vnto him, and said. Whether shall it bee 
to ye King in heaven or on earth? To w*^'* y* said Edward Nellist 
did reply, Y* there was noe King now in England. And y** Informant 
said they had a King in England, and did hope hee was in good 
health. And y* said Edward Nellist demanded how hee could prove 
it. And y® Informant telling him y' his expression was tending 
towardes treason, hee therevpon struck at the Informantes face, and 
made him bleed. And this Informant further saith y' y* said Edward 
Nellist is reputed to be a person disaffected both to the King and 
Government, and further saith not. 

Capta die et anno supradictis 

Coram me C. Bradshaw. John Mercer. 

II. 
The informacion of John Storaker taken vpon oath in y® open 
Sessions, holden att Thirske, y* 6*** of October, anno Domini, 1685. 

Who saith y', vpon y« 26^^ day of September last nast, Richard 
Briggs, William Flower, and two other men and a boy, came to 
Hutton Conyers in the evening and threatned to bUrne the towne, 
putting the inhabitants in a greate fright, calling them traitors, 
Presbiterion rogues, Oliver and Mulmoth* dogges, and that they would 
have them all hangued for speaking treason, and particularly charged 
this Informant, and called him traytor, curseing and swearing that 
they would have him hangued for saying that he hoped to see the 
Duke of Monmoth King of England betwixt [then] and Christenmas 
next; and further said that within a week their company would be 
downe, and that then they would acquaint them what rogues we were, 
and that then I and y* rest of us should be all hangued w'** out 
examining or questioning us about it. And further saith that they 
threatned all the inhabitants there with dangerous expressions. And 
further saith not. 

Jo: Stooraker. 
* August 30lh, a Monmouth, 



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Cl^e gorhsl^ire ^rtj^aologital Journal. 

List of prioes of Pablications of the Society, which may be had on application 
to the Librarian, Bir. E. K. Clabk, F.S.A., 10, Park Street, Leeds :— 



Yorkshire Archaeological Journal, bound in doth, post-free, x x 

„ „ double parts, unbound „ xo 

„ „ single parts, unbound „ 5 

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CONTENTS OF PART 68. 

(Being the Fourth part of Volume XVI I.) 



rAom 

Two Yorkshire Charms or Amulets : ) Rev. Christopher 

Exorcisms and Adjurations . / Wordsworth, M.A. 377 

The Rectory of Fishlake F. R. Fairbank, M.D., 

F.S.A. . . .413 

KiRKLEES Priory ... S. J. Chadwick, F.S.A. 420 

Bells in the West Riding of ( j t^,^,, t>^„„. ^„ 

Yorkshire f J. Eyre Poppleton . 434 

Index 463 

Preface v 

Contents vii 

Illustrations ix 

Addenda et Corrigenda xi 



Illtt»trati0n. 



Two Charms from the Ingleby Arncliffe Crucifix . to face 402 



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TWO YORKSHIRE CHARMS OR AMULETS: 
EXORCISMS AND ADJURATIONS. 

By the Rev. CHRISTOPHER WORDSWORTH, M.A. 

Here beginneih the Tale of the 
Wyf of Bathe, 

T N th' olde dayes of the King Arthour, 
, •■• Of which that Britons speeken greet honour, 

Al was this land fulfild of fayerye. 

The elf-queen with her joly companye, 

Daunced ful ofte in many a grene mede ; 

This was the olde opinion as I rede. 

I speke of manye hundred yeres ago ; 

But now can no man see none elves mo. 

For now the grete charitee and prayers 

Of limitours^ and othere holy freres, 

That serchen every lond and every streem, 

As thikke as motes in the sonne-beem, 

Blessing halles, chambres, kichenes, boures, 

Citees, burghes, castels, hye toures, 

Thropes,^ bernes, shipnes,' dayeryes, 

This maketh thai ther been no fayeryes. 

For ther as wont to walken was an elf, 

Ther walkcth now the limitour himself. 

— Chaucer, 
T T was the common belief of the early Christian Church, surrounded 
'*• as it was with pagan idolatries, and, in the remembrance of the 
time then recent, when Palestine itself had been full of persons 
possessed by devils, at the epoch of our Saviour's coming, that the 
world around them was full of malevolent and unclean spirits. They 
trusted truly in the divine promise of the supremacy of Good over 
Evil, as of Light over Darkness {St, Luke x, 17 ; St Mark xvi, 9, 17 j 
Acis v, 16, xvi, 18), and were confident that not an apostle or a 
prophet only, not merely a bishop or a deacon, but the simplest 
Christian believer could withstand the Power of Darkness and speak 
with confidence in their Master's Name, and could cast out devils 
by the use of prayers and adjurations of a less pretentious and 
mysterious kind than those which were pronounced by * the strolling 
Jews, exorcists' {Acts xix, 13; cf, St, Matthew xii, 27), or were written 
in the books and *Ephesian letters' of the heathen practisers of 
* curious dJX.%' {Acts xix, 19). 

1 Begging friars. ^ Villages. ^ Stables. 

VOL. XVII. Z 



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378 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

The subject of exorcism in the Early Church has been treated 
by Bingham in his Antiquities of the Christian Churchy book iii, ch. iv, 
book X, ch. ii, sec. 8 ; by Dean E. H. Plumptre, Archdeacon Chetham, 
and Mr. P. Onslow in Dictionary of Christian Antiquities (* Demoniac,' 
* Exorcism,* and * Exorcists,' where there are some remarkable woodcut 
illustrations), as well as by Cardinal Bona, Dom Edm. Martene, 
and others. It is enough to say here that * energumens,' or possessed 
persons, and the * tempest-tost,' as a class, were recognised in the 
antient liturgies of the Greek Church,* and were provided with a 
special place in the building, or its porch, within hearing of the 
psalmody, and had an order of ministers to care for them and to 
employ them in simple industries. By the time of St. Augustine the 
work of exorcism was committed to special ministers, and was 
directed, not only to the taking care of such afflicted persons, but to 
the exorcising of candidates for baptism in general, coming from 
paganism and from the worship of evil powers (i Corinthians x, 20). 
The practice of exorcism (mentioned in the Bible and by Irenseus, 
Justin, and Tertullian as a free charismatic function of all Christians 
in general, as the Holy Spirit enabled them) had become in the days 
of Chrysostom and Augustine, and even in the time of Cyprian, an 
office placed, as we may say, * in commission,' and devolved upon a 
certain minor order of exorcists, although of course it resided also in 
the powers of such higher orders as the christening and confirming 
priest and bishop in giving their various benedictions. Thus exorcists 
are mentioned among the Orders, in a letter of Cornelius of Rome to 
Fabius of Antioch, a.d. 251, 

According to the seventh canon of the fourth Council of Carthage 
(a.d. 400), among the seven orders ranking above the Psalmista or 
cantor, the exorcist holds the third grade, i,e, above the doorkeeper 
and reader, and beneath the acolyte (or ceroferarius), sub-deacon, 
deacon, and priest. 

The form of his ordination is thus given in the early tenth 
century copy of the Pontifical of Egbert, who was Archbishop of 
York in 732 (page 13). It seems to have been not originally a 
Roman form, but was adopted from the Galilean rite. See the 
Bishop of Salisbury's Ministry of Grace y ch. iii, sec. 217. The opening 
words are taken directly from the canon of Carthage, as follows : 

* Brightman, Easttrn Liturgies^ pp. 5, stitutions, viii, emrgoumen^iy cheimazo- 
6, 22 {Syrian Rit€y from Apostolic Con- menoi)^ pp. 521, 524 {Pontic Exarchate), 



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CHARMS AND AMULETS. 379 

Ordinatio Exorcistae. 
Exorcistc^ cum ordinatur^ accipiat de manu episcopi Ubellum in quo 
scripH^ sunt exorcistni^ dicente sibi^ episcopo^ 

S Accipe et commenda memoriae, et habeto potestatem imponendi 
manum (-nus) super inerguminum* sive baptizatum, sive cataecuminum. 

Prefatio Exorcista. 
T^EVM Pattern omnipotentem "supplices deprecamur,' ut hunc (hos) 
izmyxXum tMum 111. bene(*)dicere dignetur in officium' exor- 
cistae, ut s/t spirital/s imperator ad abiciendos demones* de corporibus 
obsessis cum omni nequitia eorum multiformi: ^adiuuante Domino 
nostro Jesu Christo, qui cum eo viuit et regnat Deus in unitate 
Spiritus sancti per omnia saecula sseculorum. Amen.^ 

Benedictio Exorcistae^ 
T^OMINE, Sancte Pater, omnipotens aeterne Deus, bene(*)dicere 
digneris \iunc famul«/« \Mum 111. in officium exorcists, ut per 
inpositionem** manuum et oris officium turn eligere digneris, ut 
imperium habea(n)t spiritus immundos cohercendi," et probabil/V si(n)t 
medicttJ lecclesiae tuae^* gratia curationum virtute [que]** confirmatwj. 
Per Dominum." 

\^Hucusque tertius gradus,'\ 

The later pontificals slightly enlarge the form, while retaining the 
antient prayers, which we have printed above. Thus the Pontifical 
of Edmund Lacy (Bishop of Exeter in 1420, who had been con- 
secrated for Hereford in 141 7) may be summarised as follows: — 

(page 81) After the ordination of the readers: 

Tunc sedeat episcopus et legatur secunda lectio cum graduali^ et 
sequitur tercia oracio ; qua dicta^ dicat archidiaconus^ 

1 We do not give all variations of omnis substantiae modos erigit, sic exor- 

grammatical termination provided for use cista redigit in sua diligentia totius regni 

when there was a plurality of candidates Domini secreta, ut memoriae mandat de 

for the order of exorcist. See also, for sacramentis." 

the simple form, ^* Exorcisia cum ordina- ^ conscripti, Cuthb.^ fo. 2**. 

tur .... siH episcopo, Accipe, et com- ^ Omit *sibi.* Leofr,^ p. 212. 

menda . . . caticuminum." Benedictional * energuminum. Leofr. Lacy, 

of Roberty Archbishop [of Rouen, circa ^ fratres karissimi. Add, Lacy, 

980], ed. H. A. Wilson, pp. 1 16-17. * deprecemur. Lacy. 

The early collection of canons, called the ' officio. Ijxcy, 

Hiherrumis (vi, 2), cites the canon of ®~® Omitted in I^ofr. Jjicy. 

Carthage, and prefixes to it (vi, i) an ^ eiusdcm, L.eofr, 

extract, ^ De exordio cxorcisiarum,* from *^® per impositionis. L^o/r, 

Isidorus — ** Hie gradus ab Hesdra sump- ^^ et. Leofr, spirituum immundorum 

sit initium, qui in templo jussit disposi- cohercendo. Leofr. Cuthb. 

tores esse, quos auctores (/p^'actores*) ^^perhabilis (w/ perhabilcs). Cuthb, 

templi memorat Hesdras, eosque nunc vt probabiles : atque probabiles. Lacy. 

ecclesia Domini exorcistas nominat. Quo- *' tuje omitted in Zk^/r. 

modo enim auctor {actor) prudens et ** virtuleque celesti. Lacy. 

bonus scit, quid sit domini sui census et ^^ Per eundem. Leofr, 



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880 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

Recedant lectores: et accedant qui ordinandi sunt exorciste. 
[* Tunc accedant gut ordinandi sunt exorciste* (Camb. Univ. MS., 
Add. Ff. vi, I.)] 

Sedendo dicit episcopus eis, 

TJ*XORCISTE competit abijcere demones; et dicere populo qui 
^ non communicet, vt det locum : et aquam in ministerio fundere. 

Tunc \s tans'] episcopus tradat illis librum exorcismorum^ dicens iiiis 
circumeundoy Accipite et commendate \ut supra\ 

Et rediens sicut prius super eos dicat, Deum Patrem omnipotentem, 
fratres karissimi, supplices deprecemur (<§^'r.). 

Oremus. 

\_Diaconus'\ Flectamus genua et Leuate. 

\Benediccio Exorcistarum."] Domine, sancte Pater (ut supra). 

Tunc sedeat episcopus^ et iegatur tercia leccio cum gradualiy et sequatur 

oracio quarta ; qua dicta^ dicat archidiaconus, 

Recedant qui ordinati sunt exorciste : accedant qui ordinandi 

sunt acoliti. 

I 
Mr. W. H. Frere's Pontifical Services^ illustrated (Alcuin Club, 

quarto publications, No. iv), vol ii, plate ii, fig. 4, gives a photograph, 

showing the ordination of three exorcists, from a miniature in the 

Clifford Pontifical (now Parker MS., 79, at Corpus Christi College, 

Cambridge), written about 1397, and finished about 1421. The 

Bishop is represented standing. He holds in his gloved left hand 

his staff, with the crook outwards towards the ordinandi. He wears 

mitre, alb, and chasuble, but neither dalmatic nor tunicle. With 

his right hand (gloved) he delivers a large quarto liber exorcismorum^ 

or other representative volume' (with its clasp towards himself), to the 

foremost of the exorcists, who have shaven crowns, and wear albes, 

girded round the waist, with apparels at the hem. 

Mr. Frere gives in the same volume (plate xv, fig. 43) a similar 

scene from a West German Pontifical {British Museum MS, 

Add. 14,805, fo. 9). Here, however, the Bishop sits in his folding 

chair, and wears no gloves. The foremost exorcistisandus receives 

the book, held horizontally ; and he and his companions kneel, vested 

in long, full-sleeved surplices. The altar has a green frontal, a low, 

painted reredos, and above it a blue dossal, on which is *I.H.S.' 

1 Et tradat eis episcopus starts librum ^ The Pontifical authorised by Leo X 

in quo script i sunt exorcism i, Camb. allows a pontifical to be handed to the 

Univ. MS., Ff. vi, i, sec. xiii, commonly exorcist, in place of a book of exorcisms, 

known by the name oT its subsequent The Pontifical of Urban VIII says a 

owner, Chr. Bainbridge^ Archbishop of missal or poniifical. Martene, De Ant, 

York, Eccl, Ritibus^ lib. i, cap. viii, art. 8, 

sec. 13. 



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CHARMS AND AMULETS. 381 

Before leaving Mr. Frere's book, we may refer to plate x, fig. 32, 
the Reconciliation of an Apostate (from the Lansdaivne MS,^ 451, 
fo. 96), where the apostate, clothed in a dull red robe, with white 
spots, stands before the Bishop, and holds a brass cross in his left 
hand. The Bishop stands, with his clergy behind him, at the door 
of the church, in white and gold mitre, cope of carmine and gold 
over an alb of a blue colour spotted with white: he breathes (three 
times) in the face of the returning apostate, and says, Exorcizo te, 
immunde spiritus^ per Deum Patrem, &c.^ The form itself may be 
seen in the Pontifical of Edmund Lacy^ Bishop of Exeter, edited by 
Ra. Barnes, 1847, pp. 285-8.- It is entitled ^ Ordo ad reconciliandum 
apostatam a Judaismo^ heresi^ vel gentilitate reuersum^ vet nimis diu in 
sentencia excommunicacionis obstinatum' After blessing holy water, the 
Bishop, with trine insufflation, says the Exorcism, sprinkles the man, 
and leads him into the church, saying, * Ingredere templum Da viui^ 
&c. * Tu autem^ omnipotens et misericors Deus, hanc ouem tuam de 
fauce lupi subtractam^ &c., and Psalm 1. {Miserere), Psalm Ixxxiv. 
{Benedixisti\ and Psalm cxxix. {De profundis\ with the lesser Litany, 
Pater noster, and versicles, over the man prostrate upon the floor, and 
adds the collects, * Deus, qui hominem ad tuam ymaginem conditum^ 
^ Da nobis, Domine, ut sicut publicani precibus^ ^ Domine, Deus omni- 
potens Pater D. /. Christi, qui dignatus es hunc famulum tuum ab 
errore deuiate prauitatisJ Raising him from the ground, he puts four 
questions of Renunciation, enjoins him a penance, and administers 
communion. Forms for special use, in cases of renouncing heresy, 
or sacrilege, are added, with the special Episcopal Benediction, 
^ Deus qui Raphaelis ministerio. Et qui mira vi sanas sauciatum 
reum, a nobis procul propellas Hasmodeum, ut iecur} Quod ipse. 
Cuius, Et benediccio.^ 

In the case where a criminous clerk or bishop was solemnly 
degraded, before being handed over to the secular arm for punish- 
ment, his orders were removed one by one, in the inverse order of 
their conferring, beginning from the highest. This process may be 
found in *the degrading of Bishop Hooper,' 4 February, 1555, in the 
elder Dr. Chr. Wordsworth's Ecclesiastical Biography, ii, 389. *The 
bishop beginneth to plucke off first the uttermost vesture, and so by 
degree and order comming doune to the lowest vesture, which they 
had onely in taking Bennet and Collet': />. the surplice (door-key) 

* Archbishop Benson mentions an ^ cf. Tobit,\\\^%y \*j\ vi, 4-7 ; viii, 2. 

African Bishop in the third century who In Cockayne's I^echdoms there are 

went so far as to say that heretics needed references to Raphael, i, 387 ; Tobit, iii, 

exorcism as much as heathen did. 60; Angels, i, 387, 390; iii, 64, 78. 

CypriMt, p. 258. Also to the spirits Dormiel, Sandrohcl, 

2 See also Maskcll, Mon. Rit, , ii, 341-4. and Laniel, i, 387. 



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382 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHiEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

and first tonsure of the sextonship (with its right to carry aqua 
benedUta to the parishioners), and the cruet and candlestick of * colet ' 
(the acolyteship). Thus, when William, Cardinal Bishop of Tusculum, 
deprived and degraded John Gudulchi Vitalis, a priest and professed 
member of the Franciscan Order, for heresy, in 1354, apparently in 
the diocese of Exeter, the priest's chalice and paten, chasuble and 
stole were severally taken away; then the deacon's dalmatic, gospel- 
book, and the stole from his left shoulder; next the sub-deacon's 
chalice, paten, cruet, water cruet, napkin, tunicle, maniple, and epistle- 
book; after that the candlestick and cruet of the acolyte, all with 
special words of degradation and deprivation. Next he comes 
ad Librum Exorcismorum: 

" Auferimus tibi Librum Exorcismorum ; teque priuamus et exuimus 
potestate manus super energuminos, sive baptizatos, seu catechumenos 
imponendi."^ 

And so the Reader's Book {Codicem\ and the keys of the Ostiarius 
or door-keeper; and lastly follows the sentence of degradation and 
privation, with delivery to the Pope's Marshall, who however is 
formally charge^ to spare the extreme penalty of death or mutilation. 
This, as Mr. Maskell says (1882), was *a horrible and disgraceful 
mockery,' for the ecclesiastical power, which could not inflict the 
punishment of death, fully expected that the civil authority would 
disregard the formal plea for mercy.'* 

Authorised exorcism has survived in the Latin Church in the 
case of the admission of catechumens to holy baptism, and for 
the font, salt, water, oil, flowers and palms, and incense used for the 
aspersion of persons and things, unction, benediction, consecration of 
churches, the ceremonies of Palm Sunday, Maundy Thursday, Easter 
Even, and other occasions.' 

Several of these forms of exorcism will be found in the Stowe 
Missal {circa 900), printed in Mr. F. E. Warren's Liturgy and Ritual 
of the Celtic Church, 1881. 

^ The form in the PontificaU Romanum * Monunitnta RUu€Uia^ ii, pp. clxi-ii. 

is : — Maskell gives the history of degradation 

" Degradatio ah Ordine ExorcistcUus, and deposition (which terms he distin- 

Untis ex Ministris tradit degradando in guishes), ii, clix-clxiv, 332-5. He men- 

manu librum Exordstftoruniy quern Pon- tions that there is on fo. 149 of a 

tifex degradator tolUt de manibus illius^ fourteenth century English MS. of expla- 

dicetis: nations and decisions about rites, cere- 

IDRIVAMUS te potestate imponendl monies, and discipline, in two very 

manum sup|er energumenos, et dae- thick volumes (but omits to give further 

mones de obsessis corporibus expellendi. reference), a small illumination of the 

See Barnes' Zfl^yj /*<?/«/i^<2/, pp. 276-7, d^radation of a priest (ii, clxiii-iv). 
omni tibi Exorcistatus ofhcio intcrdicto. '* * The Leofrk Missal ^wcs exorcisms — 

292-4 ; Hingeston- Randolph's Grandis- oUi (pp. 223, 257), olei crismalis (259), 

son Register^ i, pp. 15 1-3; (/". Martcne, oUi catecuminorum (260), satis (249), 

De Ant, EccL Rill., iii, 2, ord. i, the aquae (250). 
Rouen form. 



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CHARMS AND AMULETS. 383 

* Exorcize te, creatura salis,* ofc. (page 208). 

* Nee te lateat, satanas, imminere tibi poenas/ 6^^. (at baptism) : — 
and, on putting salt into the infant's mouth, 

* Effeta, id est t apertio, effeta est hostia t in honorem suauitatis,' 
page 210 (or as it appears in the Leofric Missal^ tenth century, 
page 238, 6^r., * Effeta, qiiod est, adaperire, in odorem suauitatis. Tu 
autem effugare, diabole, appropinquabit enim judicium Dei '). 

*Domine, sancte Pater, omnipotens aeteme Deus, qui es, qui 
eras,' ^c, 

'Deus qui ad salutem humani generis' (page 211). 

* Exorcizo te, treatura aquae,' ^c. 

* Exorcyzo te, per Jhesum,' ^c, 

* Tibi igitur precipio, omnis spiritus immunde S omne fantasma, 
omne mendacium ' (page 2 1 2). 

' Exorcizo te, creatura aquae omnis incursus diabuli, omne 

fantasma' (page 213). 

And the old Gallican form in the same book: — 

* Exorcizo te, spiritus immunde,' &»c, (page 220).^ 

In the address, with which the commination (called Articuli 
Majcris Excommunicationes) begins, it is declared that the * wikkede 
spirit is coniured and cast out thorouh prayer of the prest, by fore 
the chirche dore whann (the child) shal be cristend,' that spirit having 
dwelt in its soul before baptism; and that, if subsequently excom- 
municate, the person * is than delyuered ayaen vnto the fiend of helle, 
for to putte hym fro his synne in the peyne withouten ende." 

The Rationale^ or Book of Ceremonies^ drafted for the Church of 
England about 1542-3, teaches that in baptism *the minister makith 
a signe of the crosse in the childes forehedde, adiuring the deuyll to 
departe, and no more to approche to hym, but to [ac] knowledge his 
sentence of dampnation, and to give glorye vnto Godd and to Jhesu 
Christ, which tryumphed apon the Crosse,' &c.' 

In accordance with this, when the first English * Book of Common 
Prayer and Administration of the Sacrament of the Church according 

1 Sec Missale Sarunty pp. 30* *, 255, ^ Salisbury Ceremonies, pp. 245-6. 

336 ; Dr. Henderson*s Processionale , , . ^^^ _, 

Sarum, pp. 2, 45, 77; C. Wordsworth's ' Bntish Museum, Cotton, MS,, Cleop. 

Salisbury Ceremonies, \9,(i»,%Z,cf.2A(>\ ^' 5» and the rather more perfect 

F. E. Warren's Leofric Missal, pp. 130, Lambeth MS,, 1107, fo. 172. 
223, 235, 249-50, 257, 259, 260, 



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38 1 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

to the Use of the Church of England' appeared in 1548-9, *the 
Administracion of Publyke Baptisme * contained this section, near the 
opening, just before the Gospel : — 

" Thtn let the priest^ lokyng vpon the chyldren^ saye, 
T Commaunde thee, vncleane spirite, in the name of the father, 
of the Sonne, and of the holy ghost, that thou come out, and 
departe from these infantes, whom our Lord Jesus Christe hath 
vouchesaued to call to his holy Baptisme, to be made membres of 
his body, and of his holy congregacion. Therfore thou cursed spirite, 
remembre thy sentence, remembre thy iudgemente[s], remembre the 
daye to be at handc, wherin thou shalt burne in fyre euerlasting, 
prepared for the and thy Angels. And presume not hereafter to 
exercise any tyrranye towarde these infantes, whom Christe hathe 
bought with his precious blood, and by this his holy Baptisme calleth 
to be of his flocke." 

But in the form for hallowing the font once a month, which was 
then printed as an appendix, after the * Priuaie Baptisme in tyme of 
necessities the exorcism of the water was omitted. 

It may be mentioned here that the forms of exorcism do not 
have * Amen ' as their conclusion \ but a section, de mode terminandi 
oraciones generaliter per totum annum, found in some copies of the 
Sarum Consuetudinary, as printed by Mr. Frere from the Ordinal at 
Salisbury {MS. 175), circa 1385- 1400, and British Museum, Arundel 
A/S. 130, circa 1450, says: 

* Secundum vero romanam auctoritatem nullam oracionem con- 
cludimus cum * Per eum qui uenturus est \_iudicare uiuos et mortuos^ et 
seculum per ignem] * nisi sit exorcismus, in quo per diuinum indicium 
diabolum, ut a creatura Dei recedat, adiuramus. Nam in aliis ora- 
cionibus quas per ^ Dominum nostrum^ concludimus, Patrem, vt per 
amorem filii sui subueniat, imploramus. In exorcismo autem, 
diabolum per Dei iudicium, vt efTugiat, increpamus.* 

The Rituale Romanum of Paul V (16 14), as revised by 
Benedict XIV (1752), contains forms of exorcism to be used by the 
priest at baptism, consecration of the font, blessing holy water, 
blessing oil {plci simplicis\ besides the long section de Exorcizandis 
obsessis a Dicmonioy which occupies pp. 281-301 in the Ratisbon 

* Frcre's L'se of Sarum^ i, 242. 



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CHARMS AND AMULETS. 385 

octavo of 1872, and 19 columns in Migne's Encydopedie Thcologique^ 
1846. The form may be used by a priest,' or by any minister of the 
Roman Church having lawful authority,' and in a church or religious 
place by preference. 

The Pontificale Romanum of Clement VIII (1596), Urban VIII 
(1644), Benedict XIV, as issued by Pius VII. in 1752, allows a 
Pontifical or a Missal to be handed to the exorcist at his ordination, 
in place of the liber in quo scripti sunt exordsmi. The Pontifical 
provides forms of exorcism to be used by the Bishop himself at 
laying the first stone of a church, at blessing water with salt, ashes 
and wine for the consecration of a church, the form ^JDomine pie . . . 
per ignem^ in reconciliation of a church or churchyard, and the 
Maundy Thursday Blessing of the Oleum Infirmorum and Oleum 
Catechuminorum, 

But we must look to earlier records for the more remarkable 
references to Satanic agency, or the influence of malignant spirits. 
When Constantine, in his early days of reformation, forbade the use 
of magic generally, he tolerated for a time the use by heathen of 
such remedia against sickness and destructive storms, and of such 
charms as were not of a malevolent character, but were devised for 
the benefit (as was supposed) of man's health, the conservation of the 
vineyards, &c., and which the majority of his subjects believed to be 
efficacious. But the Christian Fathers, such as Chrysostom and 
Augustine, condemned in plain terms all resort to charms and 
amulets. The Council of Laodicea (circa 363) by its thirty-sixth 
canon prohibits * priests or clergy practising magic, incantations, 
sorcery, or astrology, or making so-called phylacteria (which are, in 
sooth, desmoteria^ or snares, for their own souls). And them that wear 
such [amulets] we order to be cast out of the church.'^ 

Sir T. Browne, of Norwich, confesses (Vulgar Errors^ V, xxii, 4) 
that he always put his spoon through his emptied egg-shell, though 
he knew it to be a superstitious custom. He adds that the reason 
for so doing, as given by Dalecamp, was to prevent witches drawing 

1 Nic. Pavilion, Bishop of Alet for possid^ ; pp. 214-25, VExorcisme pour 

39 years, who died in 1677, says in his chasser h matin esprit dUtne maison. 

Rituet (ii, 187, 4to, 1667) that it would '^ That the exorcism was at one time 

be well to employ exorcists only for the pronounced at the Scrutiniuni Catechu- 

deliverance of obsessi a dccmonibusy and minor wn by the Exorcist (and not the 

not- to reserve the function to priests, priest or Bishop) appears from the Liege 

whereby too much honour was paid to Codex, printed by Martene, Ant. Eccl. 

the evil one. In the Rituel Romain ^ Rit., I, i, i, sec. xi, ord. 6. 

l^tisa^e du diocese d\4let, part ii, pp. ^ See Bruns, Canones^ i, 77. Also 

187-90 contain the Instruction sur les Bingham, Antt.y book xvi, ch. v, sec. 6 ; 

Exorcismes ; pp, 1^-214, t^ Exorcisme du who is, as usual, full of learning on his 

subject. 



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386 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL JOURNAX. 

or pricking their names in them to do them harm. He refers to 
Pliny (/>. Hist, Naty xxviii, 4), who says: *We all have a fear of 
being the mark for dire incantations. Hence people break the 
shells (calices) of eggs [and cockles] after emptying them, or else 
pierce them with their spoons (cochlearibusy He then mentions 
instances of charms and spells, and among them relates how Caesar, 
when dictator, after escaping a dangerous carriage accident, ever 
afterwards used to repeat the common charm {carmen) when he 
started on a journey. 

When missionaries came to Ireland, Scotland, or Britain, they 
found a country full of pagan superstitions. The followers of St 
Patrick and St. Augustine in fourteen or fifteen centuries have not 
entirely banished its remains. Our Devonshire friends still put the 
egg-spoon through the empty shell, lest the mischievous pixie, or 
some more malicious spirit, should embark in it, and they remember 
how their peasant neighbours used to resort to the " white witch " of 
either sex for some charm or amulet. Little Tom Brown, many 
miles nearer London than Exeter, about 1829 was taken, before his 
school days began, by * Old Benjy ' to Farmer Ives, the * wise man,' to 
have his warts charmed away by the * muttering of something ' over 
his hand, and the terminal cutting down of a notched stick.* And 
Tom's great uncle, the Rector, *had encountered and laid the last 
ghost,' which however iurned out to be * the blacksmith's apprentice 
disguised in drink and a white sheet.'* One of my own earliest 
recollections in that same Berkshire Vale, about 1853, was my father, 
then vicar, depriving of his clerkship the parish clerk-and-sexton (who 
bore a name formerly of note in the county) for having filched, or 
exchanged, some coins from the alms which had been offered upon 
the holy table, with a view to using them in some charm for which 
the neighbours had recourse to him.' He was in the employment of 
a worthy farmer, who had sold to old Dr. Rock (then resident priest 
with the Throckmortons at Buckland), a few years before our coming, 
the Sarum service-book, which had remained in the manor-house 
with the churchwardens since the accession of Queen Elizabeth.* 

Some notion of the exorcists' Codex in old times may be derived 
from the collection printed by Martene in his Ancient Rites (book iii, 
ch. ix), with which we may couple ch. vii, which relates to ordeals. 

1 On charms for warts see Notes and iionary. Also Notes and Qtierus, i S., 

Queries^ I S., i, 482 ; ii, pp. 19, 36-7, 68, viii, p. 617 ; (/". vi, p. 50. 
150, 181, 226, 430; iii, p. 256; et alibi, ^t j ..1 u .1. ..i.- *l 

» For exorckm cir. iSoo, cf. Twelfth ^""^ \ "°' '"'7' ,^''<='^^Vi" T ' * 

Night, iv, 2 ; and MuUingei^s History of Sarum Breyiaor of 1519 which the Ronum 

Cambridge, ii, 489. ^^^ ^' Southwark sold to Lord 

s On • Sacr<w^.pieces: or ' Sacrament Beauchamp from Dr. Rock s bequest, or 

iixperuet,' see Wnght's DiaUct Die- °°« °^ •>« '^^'^ '""P"*! treasure*. 



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CHARMS AND AMULETS. 387 

The catalogue of the British Museum Library supplies the titles of 

a few books which contain exorcisms, or ^^ conjurationeSy* as they were 

called : — ^ 

circa 1500. Coniurationes demonum} Coniuratio malignorum spirituum 
in corporibus hominum existent! um, prout in sancto Petro. 
10 leaves, 8vo. (i^ and 10^ blank.) Vatican Basilica, Rome. 
Probably from the press of Stephan Plannck. C. 25, a. 24(1). 

circa 15 10. Coniuratio malignorum spirituum, 8 leaves, 8vo. Rome. 
Probably printed by Eucharius Silber. 3366, a. 42. 

circa 15 15 (and «>ra 1520; C. 32, a. 6). Coniuratio malignorum spiri- 
tuum, 8 leaves, 8vo. Rome. Editions probably by Marcellus 
Silber. 

circa 1663. Rituale Romanum cum coniurationibus et benedictionibus 
variis. Addita formula absoluendi et benedicendi populos et 
agros. 8vo, pp. 288. Apud Turrinum : Venetiis. (There is an 
engraved title-page, bearing the date *i563.*) 3405, eee. 29 (i). 

1663. Rituale Romanum . . . cum conjurationibus ad fugandas tern- 
pestates . . . et alijs. Nunc addita Formula absolvendi et bene- 
dicendi Populos et Agros. 8vo, pp. 322. Venice. Typis Capi 
Francisci Bodij : 845, b. 2. 

1705. Rituale Romanum . . . cum conjurationibus ad fugandas tem- 
pestates . . . ac alijs, etc. 8vo, pp. 262. Venice. Sumptibus 
Pauli Balleonij. 3366, bb. 5. 

The later books are editions of the Roman Rituale^ but are noted 
here because the forms of exorcism and conjuration are mentioned. 
I have before me a small ' Ordo Baptizandi^ et alia Sacramenta 
Administrandi ex Romana Ecchsice RitiK Venetiis^ apvd Jvntas^ 1604- 
1605, pp. 255. The Exordhmus super obsessis occupies pp. 236-246. 
At the head is a picture, a priest in his chasuble (the rubric, how- 
ever, says * Cotta et Stola '), reciting the adjuration, while an attendant 
holds the open book. The left hand portion of his stole touches 
the prostrate energumen, and a black spirit flies out of the open 
window.* The priest is bidden not to exercise — or allow another to 
exercise — this function without the Bishop's faculty, nor to use any 
forms but such as are contained in that book or should be 
sanctioned by the Bishop. He is cautioned not to be put off by 
any protestations on the part of the demon himself that he is the 

* On persons possessed see Burton's energumen, and reading from the book 

Attatomy 0/ Melancholy, I, i, m. I, sec. 4; in his right. A friend stands near, and 

I, ii, m. I, sec. 2. And cf. I^echdoms^ i, two demons fly away, 
p. Ixxxiii ; ii, pp. 306, 350, 354 ; iii, 26. * The MS. O. 2, 48, at Trinity 

Also i, 312, 380-9, 394 (Diabolus). College, Cambridge, of Apuleius and 

^ Under this short title a woodcut Dioscorides, has curious drawings of 

shows the exorcist seated, extending his devils, nearly in the form of bats, passing 

left hand above the head of a kneeling out of possessed persons. 



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388 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

soul of some party deceased, *est enim haeresis.* Then the volume 
concludes with prayers 'Ad Expellendas Nubium Tempestates' and 
the * Passio secundum Joannem.^ So a i2mo Rituale Romanum^ printed 
in 1816, ' RomaCy ex Typogr, de Romains^ contains "quae Parochis ad 
administr. Sacramentorum, Benedictiones, et Conjurationes necessaria 
censentur." . And Exorcismi are found in local issues of the Rituaie^ 
or bound up with them, e.g, (in British Museum 3,395, d. 28) with 
Rituale Sacramentorum, &c., pro ecclesiis Regni Poloniae et Magni 
Ducatus Lithuaniae, Svo, 1700, is bound * Libellus Benedictionum et 
exorcismorum, collectore R. P. Martin. Cochem, Capucino' (from 
Roman, Mainz, and other uses), Thoruniiy 1691. Mr. Cockayne 
{Leechdoms, i, page xxxix) refers to Eynatten, Manualis Exorcismorum^ 
161 9. And reference is made to the Practica Exorcistarum of 
F. Valerius Polydorus Patavinus, Svo, Venice, 1606; Cologne, 1608, 
in Bourne and Brand's Popular Antiquities^ ch. xi, where the form 
for exorcising a haunted house is printed. The so-called "Bangor 
Antiphoner," circa 690, contains a prayer : — 

Collectio super hominem qui habet diabolum, 
F\0M1NE, Sancte Pater, omnipotens aeterne Deus, expelle diabulum, 
et gentilitatem ab homine isto, de capite, de capillis, de uertice, 
de cerebro (&c. &c.), fo. 30^. (This appears as a baptismal exorcism 
in the Stowe Missal, fo. 46, of the ninth century.) 

For early forms of this character used in England we must refer 
to the very interesting ninth and tenth century Collectarius^ edited by 
Mr. Stevenson in 1840 for the Surtees Society,* under the title of 
" Rituale EccLEsii*: Dunelmensis." The Colkctarius itself, written 
in the South of England in the tentji century, and carried to 
Durham, contains (naturally) no exorcisms. But bound at the end, 
after it went to Durham, are two quires perhaps of ninth century 
northern writing. 

The Benedictio super vasa reperta in locis antiquis (found also in 
the * Egbert 'and *Leofric' books) speaks of vessels which needed to 
be hallowed, because they might be remnants of pagan times, 'arte 
fabricata gentilium * (page 97). Then follow blessings of other vessels, 
trees, fruits, bread, house, ^:c. Next (on pages 100-3) a curious series 
relating to a judicium (perhaps a trial by battle), the use of holy 
water in order to catch a thief; then forms for a nun and for a 

^ I should be very grateful to anyone Inil into whose hands it subsequently 

who can tell me what became of Henry passed we do not know. Any pencilling 

Bradshaw's own copy of the Surtees in it ought to be carefully preserved and, 

Society's (vol. x, but not numbered on if ix)ssible, incorporated in a critical 

the back) Rituale Eccles. Dunelm. It edition, 
was purchased by a northern bookseller. 



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CHARMS AND AMULETS. 889 

wedding. Then on pages 112-119 the Adjurationes, &c., which we 
must transcribe in full. They refer to Ordeal by Fire to discover 
the party guilty of theft, &c.: — 

Adivratio. 
"P\EUS, qui per ignem signa magna ostendens, Habraham puenim 
tuum de incendio Caldeorum, quibusdam pereuntibus, eruisti : 
Deus, qui rubum ardere in conspectu Moysi et minime conburi 
permisisti ; Deus, qui ab incendio fornacis Caldaici, plerisque 
succensis, tres pueros tuos inlesos eduxisti; Deus, qui incendio ignis 
populum Sodome et Gamorre involvens, Loht famulum tuum, cum 
suis, salutem donasti ; Deus, qui ante adventum tuum sancti Spiritus 
tui inlustratione ignis fideles tuos ab infidelibus tuis decrevisti, 
ostende nobis in hoc parvitatis nostrae examine virtutem eiusdem 
Spiritus sancti, et per huius ignis fervorem discerne fideles et 
infideles, ut tactus eius furti, criminis, vel alterius, cuius inquisitio 
agitur, conscii et arescant manus eorum, aut pedes conburantur 
aliquatenus; imraunes vero ab eiusmodi crimine liberentur penitus, 
et inlesi permaneant. 

* A DIVRO te, creatura ferri, per Deum Patrem, et Filium et 
Spiritum sanctum, et per tremendum diem judicii, et per xii 
apostolos, et per septuaginta discipulos, et per xii prophetas, et per 
xxiiii seniores,^ qui assidue Deum laudant, et per cxliiii millia qui 
secuntur Agnum, et per onmia agmina sanctorum angelorum et 
archangelorum, thronos, dominationes principatuum et potestatum, 
virtutum, cherubim atque seraphim, et per omnia milia sanctorum 
martyrum tuorum, virginum et confessorum ; adiuro te per sanguinem 
Domini nostri Jesu Christi, et per iiii evangel istas, nee non et per 
septuaginta duos libros veteris ac novi tcstamenti, et per omnes 
scripturas^ et doctores eorum; adiuro te per sanctum ecclesiam 
catholicam et per communionem sanctorum, et per resurrectionem 
eorum, ut fias exorcizatum, adiuratum, et offirmatum adversus inimicum 
hominis diabolum, et adversus hominem, ut si qui ab eo seductus 
furtum hoc, unde ratio agitur, perpetravit, aut perpetrati conscius fuit, 
vel concensum ullo modo prebuit; nee patiaris ab ilia inpune 
baiulari, sed in nomine Domini, et inperio virtutis eius, aefficiaris^ ei 
in conbustionem, et contra pietatem atque ostensioncm nequitie eius, 
nee non adversaris ei, quia adversatus est Creaturi^ tuo ; manifestum- 
que fiat per invocationem nominis tui, Domine, in te commiss[um 
eius] quod diabolo instigante occultum nobis esse [vellet]'; innocentes 

1 A new page begins here over-leaf, " ue, efficiaris (* arfsesttiisse '). 

and is interlined with an Anglo-Saxon 4 Creatori 
gloss, which I omit. 

^forsan scriptores. ^ vald^. 



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390 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

vero et inmunes ab hoc crimine inlesos esse padaris, ut cognoscant 
omnes virtutes Domini in te, quia ipse est benedictus in secula 
seculorum. Amen. 

Among Welsh Ecclesiastical Laws of uncertain date, printed from 
a sixteenth century MS., Haddan & Stubbs give (from Book XIV, 
cap. xiii, sec. 4) in their Councils, i, page 659, the statement that — 

"There were three ordeals by the law of Dynwal [Moel muel] 
for theft, or galanas, or treason to a lord: (i) the hot iron; (2) the 
boiling water, by putting the limb that did the deed therein; 
(3) combat to such as should demand it lawfully; and there would 
be [no punishment for] the one who might overcome in the combat, 
that was instead of proof; and so, in [amending the laws], Howel 
the Good [a.d. 928] and his judges observed that that was not just ; 
so they established proof by men ; for [combat] they did not commend." 

Dr. Lingard, in his Antiquities of the Anglo-Saxon Church (ed. ii, 
1 8 10, page 310), explains the purport of the following from the 
'Durham Rituar:— 

"Three nights before the day appointed for the trial [by ordeal] 
the accused was led to the priest: on the three following mornings 
he assisted and made his offering at the mass, and during the three 
days he fasted on bread, herbs and salt, and water. At the third 
mass the priest called him to the altar before the communion, and 
adjured him by the God whom he adored, by the religion which he 
professed, by the baptism with which he had been regenerated, and 
the holy relics which reposed in the church, not to receive the 
Eucharist, or go to the ordeal, if his conscience reproached him with 
the crime of which he had been accused." 

Ante Communionem. 
halsuncge. 
T C eow [the]* halsige on faeder naman, & on suna naman, thaet is, 
'*' ure dryhten haelende Crist, & on thaes halgan gastes, & for thaere 
cristnesse the ge [thu] underfengan [underfenge], & for the haligan 
thrinesse, & for tha iiii. godspelleras, Matheus, & Marcus & Lucas & 
Johannes, & fer eaile tha halgan reliquias the gind ealne middan- 
geard sindon haligra martyra, & fer ealle tha halgan Godes ciricean 
thaete her on weorolde gehalgode sien, & fer naman thaere halgan 
faemnan Sea Marian thaet ge tO thys' husle ne gangen ne to thaem 
ordale; gif ge scyld on eow [the] witen thaes the eow [the] man 
tihth oththe on gewyrhtum oththe on gewitnysse.' 

* Wc mark by brackets the words * *y' ^t^^r *u.' 

written above the line, for use when only * See Durham Ritual^ p. 114 ; Sweet's 

one person was to undergo ordeal. Earliest Texts (E.E T.S., 1885), p. 175. 



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* CHARMS AND AMULETS. 391 

* Gif men ferlice wyrde unsofte^ oththt sprecan ne tnaege^ 
halga him this water, 
Benedic, Domine Jesu Christe, in nomine Dei Patris et Filii et 
Spiritus sancti istam aquam, sicul benedixisti aquas Canan Galiee, &c. 

(A Blessing of Water to heal a man's eyes.) 
With egna sare sine this. 
Benedicere et sanctificare digneris, omnipotens aeterne Deus, hanc 
creaturam N. aquarum .... &c. 

(A blessing over Ointment or Draught.) 
This man sceall rede ofer drence vel ofer smere, 
Deus, Pater omnipotens, et Christe Jesu, Fiii Dei vivi, et Spiritus 
sancte, rogo te ut mittere digneris benedictionem tuam et medicinam 
celestem super hanc creaturam potionis vel unguenti. 

The following benediction over Ale. 
This mon seal reda ofer tha /eta the ful infalleth, 
Domine Sancte Pater, omnipotens aeterne Deus, qui fecisti coelum 

convertere digneris materiam istam cervise in suavitatem et 

hilaritatem servis tuis his qui in fide catholicha crediderunt (page ii6). 

Several blessings and exorcisms follow, for hunters* nets for catch- 
ing wild creatures, goats, stags; for holy water to disperse fiends, 
protect crops, servants, and fruits, from insects, birds, and demons, &c. 
{^Waeter halgunc to than ilce'\ 

With netena ungetionu 6* thiofum. 
IT ABRAHAM,* Habraham ! equos, capras, et f porcasque benedic 
latrinibus,' angelus qui positus est super animalia nostra cus- 
todiat ea, ut non poterit diaBolus inequitare ilia.' Habraham teneat 
vos per* ac divinitas Dei, Deus ad dexteram, angelus ad sinistram,' 
prophetae vos prosequentur, martyres antecedant vos, patronesque 
prosequentur, vos custodiat Dominus, oves et boves, vitulos, equos et 
apes, custodiantque vos his pastores. Signum crucis Christi Jesu, in 
nomine Dei summi, per Dominum. 

^ According to the Hepiatfuron or ^forsan, a latronibus. 



EUmetita MagUa of P. de Abano, ' cf, * When Mungo's mare stood still 

raym * is the 
spring. But here 
the patriarch, who owned many flocks ^'cf. the familiar * Matthew, Mark, 



*Abraym* is the sun's occult name in and swat with fright.' Pastoral, 
~ ,dherh. 



spring. But here the appeal may be to ^per: gloss, 

the patriarch, who owned many flocks * cf. the fi 

and herds {Genesis xxiv, 35). For Luke, and Jo 

references to Abraham see Leechdomsy i, * Recommends 

388 ; iii, 286. quote from the Horae. 



and herds {Genesis xxiv, 35). For Luke, and John,* and the devotions or 
references to Abraham see Leechdomsy i, * Recommendations * which we shall 



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392 THE YORKSraRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

After this come the orders of confirmation {ad infantes con- 
signandos^ page 119) and baptism (with its usual exorcisms), holy 
water, prayers for the seven canonical hours, &c., and (page 125) a 
glossed addition in another hand, a prayer against the poison of 
venomous creatures : — 

Contra Venenum. 

r^EUS meus, et Pater, et Filius, et Spiritus sanctus, cui omnia 
subiecta sunt, et cui omnis creatura deservit, et omnis potestas 
subiecta est, et metuit, et expavescit, et draco fugit, et silet vipera, et 
rubeta ilia, que dicitur rana,^ torpescit, scorpius extinguitur,' vincitur et 
spilagius,* nihil noxium operatur, et omnia venenata et adhuc fero- 
ciora repentia, et animalia noxia tenebrantur, et omnes adversae 
salutis humani radices arrescunt,* tu extingue hoc venenatum virus, 
operationes eius mortiferas et vires, quas in se habed,* evacua ; et da 
in conspectu tuo omnibus, quos tu creasti, oculos ud' videant, aures 
ud" audeant, cor ud^ magnitudinem tuam intellegant. 

This prayer * against poison ' is found also in the Book of Nunna- 
Minster, circa 800, ed. 1889, page 90; the Book of Ceme, or Prayer 
Book of Aedelualdy circa 818, ed. 1902, page 157; and the eleventh 
century Trinity College, Dublin, Irish Book of HymnSy ed. 1897, i, 91. 
In all these it is attributed to St. John the Evangelist, who after 
seeing a dog, a monkey, and certain persons fall down dead from 
tasting the envenomed chalice, confidently took it into his hand, and 
making the sign of the cross, said this prayer, and drank the potion 
unharmed {St, Mark xvi, 18). The scene is familiar in ecclesiastical 
art. The Irish MS. of Hymns gives, as a conclusion, "Amen, 
Matheus, Marcus, Lucas, Johannes." 

A series of benedictions before the lessons follow, with Comtnen- 
dationes post nocturnas, proper for mattins. On pages 129-30 is 
printed the Benedictio lactis et mel\lis\ which properly belongs to 
Maundy Thursday, and Easter baptism. (See £gberfs Pontifical, 
page 129, and cf TertuUian, De corona militis,) But into it is foisted 

^ add * quiela,' Nunnaminster^ Cerm^ uesligio [nihil] nocet,' H, Spalagius, * a 

Irish Hymns, venomous fly,* Birch's NumtaminsUr^ 

^ add ' rego\w^t N.H.\ * et regulus, * C. page 27, He refers also to spalangiits 

(i,e. the basilisk or cockatrice, translated as an equivalent both for lizard (sUUio) 

*slawerm,* sloughworm, or slow worm). and *slawyrm* (/Elfric). The word 

^ spi/agiusy a venomous beast; gloss., may have been applied to what Sir J. 

spilipg se tttterne. In Bos worth and Mande vile calls *al maner venym.' 
Toller's Dictionary no further cxplana- ^ arrescufU : g\o%s, , siscHma hta. ares- 

tion is given. ' Spi/artgius,' * s/>a/an- cunt, ^.; arescent, C. 
£i^s,' ^PPf '^ phalangii, or tarantulas, «_« ,^^^^^^j ^^^j^^ ^^^^ . . . . ut. 

f^nXmttt that hide m holes, m Cockayne s \j r tj 

Lecchdoms, &c. , i, 306 ; ii, 1 1 2. 'spalagius,* "^ ^^ ^•^• 

N'C,\ * spelagius operatur, id est ' et, Durh, 



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CHARMS AND AMULETS. 393 

a long blessing of crosses to be fixed in houses. It contains the 
sign * twenty times repeated, and such phrases as * Signum * Dei 
vivi . . . . Crux * Salvatoris Christi patriarcharum *. Crux * prophet- 
arum. Crux * apostolorum,' &c., &c. Then come blessings of 
grapes, new corn, and a well (puiei)^ and some responds, antiphons, 
and hymns de tempore. Also some devotions de Communi Sanctorum^ 
and on page 143 the owner's name, written perhaps at Chester-le- 
Street in 994,^ " Dominus salvet^ honoret^ amet^ Aldhunum antistitem " 
(with which we may compare the ^ salvet^ honoret^ ameV of Alcuin, in 
his dedication of his treatise on the Trinity, to Charlemagne). 

The original of pages 145, //. vii, to page 162, //. xvi, was misplaced 
by the binder, and therefore occurs also out of place in the printed 
edition ; but the beginning of the quire (pages 145-7) contains some 
adjurations with Anglo-Saxon gloss. It is entitled * creatura (gescaeft) * 
or a * haelgung (consecratio),' or blessing, against birds upon the corn. 

Super Messem pro avibus [adiuratio]. 
TP\EUM omnipotentem, te Deum dominantem, deprecamur, qui 
Filium tuum, Jesum Christum, xii nominibus nominasti, ideo 
adiuro te, creatura aque, per Panchihelem' archangelum, ut incendantur 
atque fugantur demones atque volucres, vermes atque mures, atque 
omnia venenosa animalia, a nostris segitibus, in nomine Dei Patris, 
et Filii, et Spiritus sancti, qui regnas in secula seculorum. 

Item pro avibvs. 
/^^REATOR et conservator humani generis, dator gratiae spiritalis,. 
^^ largitor aeternae salutis, permitte Spiritum tuum sanctum super 
banc creaturam aque, ut armata virtute caelestis defensionis ad animae 
et corporis proficiat sanitatcm, per Dominum. 

Four similar prayers, with hallowing of water and of bread against 
birds, worms, and demons, which might spoil the crops ; two of them 
name the Archangel *Panchiel' or * Panachihel,*^ and two the demon 
*Asmadeus,' or Asmodeus, who was put to flight by the Archangel 

1 Aid wine was last Bishop of Chester- ''Book of Ceme^ (circa 800) begins one of 

le-Street, before the see was removed to its prayers to the Archangel Michael 

Durham. (with which we may compare one from 

* I do not find Panchihel the Arch- the Sarum Hovie noticed below) : — 
angel among the numerous spiritual ' In Nomine patris, &c. , 

beings named by P. de Abano and Come- Gabrihel esto mihi lurica 

lius Agrippa. * Peniel ' and * Penael ' Michahel „ baltheus 

occur, and I am inclined to think that Raphahel ,, scutum 

Penael, Panael, or Panihel (the mys- Urihel ,, protector 

terious Angel of Peniel, or Penuel, whose Rumihel „ defensor 

hidden name the patriarch Israel asked P(/i)a(»)nihel „ sanitas,' 

when wrestling by the brook Jabbok) p. 153, ed. Kuypers. * Phannihel * 

may be the Archangel intended. The altered later to * Panihel.' 

VOL. XVII. A A 



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394 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHiEO LOGICAL JOURNAL. 

* Raphahel ' and the gall of Tobias' fish.^ One mentions that Panchiel 
is accompanied "cum quattuor quadraginta milibus angelorum," and 
that our Lord named His ". xii . apostolos " with names.^ Perhaps the 
most remarkable is the adjuration of * conjured bread.' It refers to 
our Lord's own twelve names. 

'Isaac et Jacob' (says H. C. Agrippa, De Occulta Philos,^ iii, 47) 
*familiarem consuetudinem habuerunt cum Peliele' Among Angels 
of the Third Heaven assigned (according to P. de Abano, in EUtn. 
Magic) to Friday, cut septentrionem^ are *Peniel, Penael^ Penat, Raphael, 
Raniel, Doremiel.' The ^fumigium^ for incantation on that day was 
cosius? 

/^REATURA (ad volatilia) quse messibus nostris adversantur et 
^^ comedunt ea, per Dominum Patrem omnipotentem, qui Filium 
tuum . xii . nominibus nominasti, adiuro te, creatura panis, ut sis ignis 
ardens adversus insidias diaboli et volatilia, sicut fugit Asmodeus 
demon, qui fugitivus est a felle piscis, per Raphahelem archangelum, 
sic fugantur volatilia a segitibus nostris, in nomine Dei Patris, et 
Filii, et Spiritus sancti. 

The last quire, of ninth or tenth century northern writing, is a 
sort of rudimentary breviary. It contains a curious entry (page 185) 
in the old vernacular, to the effect that " Aldred the provost wrote 
these four collects [in honour of S. Cuthbert] before undern (terce) 
near South Woodgate, at Aclea (Oakley) in Wessex, upon the Laurence- 
mass day, upon a Wednesday, when the moon was five days old, for 
Aelfsige, the Bishop, in his tent" 

Dr. Skeat suggests that Aclea was South Oakley, in Hampshire, 
near Basingstoke and Deangate-St.- Lawrence.* The collects of St 
Cuthbert must have been entered for ^Ifsige (Bishop of Chester-le- 
Street, a.d. 968-90) on Wednesday, loth August, 970. The tent, I 
suppose, was pitched for the consecration of the church. In this 
sheet I will merely draw attention to the curious notes on the eight 
ingredients or elements {pcto pondera) which *in the beginning of 
years there came to the making of man,' viz. clay, fire, salt, dew, 
flowers, cloud, wind, and grace ; and, under the mystical account of 
the divers orders {gradibus) of the church — ". iii . Exorcista : refert 
Josephus' regem Salomonem excogitasse, suamque gentem docuisse," 
which seems to need some elucidation; and five items from the 
curious alphabetical instruction — 

* 7(7^/, iii, 17 ; vi, 3-7 ; viii, 2, 3. See ^ For the use of incense in charms 

(for S. Raphael) pp. 381, 39311, 407W, see Leechdoms^ ii, 140, 294, 344. 
410. ^ On the 'Durham Ritual,' Philol. 

^ H. Corn. Agrippa, De Occulta Philos., Soc. Trans., 1880, p. 6. 
iii, 34, gives the * true names ' of the ^ Perhaps we should read ^Josephum : 

Apostles, * Aleuzi '= Andrew, &c. &c. et.' c/. Genesis xl, 8; I Kings iv, 32. 



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CHARMS AND AMULETS. 395 

A. Adam, primus homo factus a Domino de prima littera, et 

de iiii^ Uteris de quibus nominatum est nomen eius. 

B. Bonus filius/id est Abel, qui pietatem praestabat parentibus 

suis. 

C. Coecatum est, id est, Adam seductus ab Eva, &c. &c. 

H." Hamum, id est Christus, quia tulit inimicum ex hoc mundo, 

&c. &c. 
Z." Zezania, in medio triticorum, id est, peccatores in medio 

justorum. 

cf. ' Un Alphabet Hebreu Anglais au XIV* Sikle,' contributed by 
M. Ars^ne Darmesteter to the Hevue des Etudes juives^ 1882. Also 
the Autun * InterrogationeSy seu Joca Monachorum^ edited by Mons. H. 
Omont in Bibliothtque de VJ&cole des Charles^ t. xliv, 1883, in which 
there is a curious mediaeval riddle (ii, 40) about Elisha being the 

first to bless salt and water *in monte Sarat et exorcidiabit 

{exorcizavtt) montem ilium, et effugabit {-vit) inde dsemonia.' It is 
curious that the office of exorcist is passed over in the other set of 
puzzles (i, 16-20), where the interrogator asks, *When did our Lord 
sing the grail?' Again, *When was He ostiarius, sub-deacon?' &c. 

We may form some notion of the condition of things in 
Northumbria about a century after the coming of Augustine, that is 
to say in the time of Theodore and Wilfrid, from the Penitential, or 
* Answers,' of Theodore, written down by a * Scholar of the Humbrians ' 
{Discipulus Umbrensium\ as edited by Haddan and Stubbs, Councils^ 
iii, 176-204, under the date a.d. 668-690. 

The section Of the Worship of Idols^ or Of these who sacrifice to 
Demons^ prescribes a penance of one year or ten, according to the 
character of the idolatry. Punishments of the duration of sundry 
years and * Lents' are prescribed for women who (i) put their children 
upon the roof, or in the oven {fornacem\ to cure fever, (2) burn 
grains when a man dies, for the safety of the living and of the house, 
or (3) make incantations or divinations of the devil. Priests who 
(4) practise auguries, auspices, or dreams, or any divinations after the 
manner of the pagans {^entHiunif were to be suspended ; and (5) lay- 
men so offending were to do five years' penance. If a person 

^ Read, perhaps, •iii litteris.* A Greek fectly in the printed book (pp. 198-9), 

origin for the name of our first parent is and, with the Icind assistance of Dr. 

given in a note, circa 1277, in Camb. James A. H. Murray, I can supply the 

Univ. MS., Hh. vi, 11, fo. 70, * AnA- missing words. 

thole, Z>usis, ^rthros, iWesymbria': (a ^ This phrase is cited in the Hiber- 

book formerly at Ramsey Abbey). nensis, Ixiv, 5, from Sinodus Aruhiri- 

3 I select these two letters of the tana^ i.e, the 23rd ( = 24th) canon of 

alphabet because they are given imper- Ancyra, a.d. 314. 



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396 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHiEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

confessed that he had partaken of food offered in sacrifice to idols, 
the priest was to deal with him according to his state of health and 
other circumstances (iii, 190). 

The Penitential called Egbert's is placed half a century later 
(a.d. 732-736). No. (i) is repeated, as is No. (5), with the addition 
of a seven years' penance for those who raise storms i^ emissores 
tetnpestatum ') — a kind of witchcraft which * Mark Twain ' describes as 
being still known in the middle of the sixteenth century.* See 
Councils (H. and S.), iii, 420. No. (4) is repeated in the section 
De machina mulierum (iii, page 424); and in the section De Auguriis 
vei Divinationibus (ibid.)^ No. (2), about putting a child on the roof 
or in the furnace. Besides these the * Egbert ' Penitential mentions 
No. (6) observing omens or * lots of the saints,' falsely so called, or 
fortune telling by looking into books or writings (scripturarum) of any 
kind, or making a vow by a tree (*/« arbore^) or anything else 
except a church'; No. (7) defending oneself against darkness i^quando 
obscuratury by crying aloud, and witchcraft; and lastly No. (8) *Caraios 
et divinos precantatores filacteria etiam diabolica vel erbas vel facino 
{ai, snccinum) suis vel sibi impendere, vel quintal/ feriaw (Thursday) 
in honore Jovis, vel kalendas Januarias secundum paganam causam 
honorare, si non (desinit), v annos peniteat clericus: si laicus, iii 
annos peniteat '^ (iii, page 424). 

The words caraios and filacteria (and indeed several expressions 
in this and in the preceding penitential canons) appear in the early 
collection of canons known as the Hibernensis, That document (in 
lib. Ixiv De auguriis) gives *Agustinus' as the authority for two 
passages about * karagii ' or * caragii,' in one of which reference is made 
also to *divinis et aruspicibus vel filacteriis^ 2iS well as to *the Law' 
{Leviticus xx, 27) for stoning the ^ phitonicus^^ with a spirit of divina- 
tion. * Agustinus ' is also quoted as forbidding Christians to * observe 
times' as to the days lucky or unlucky to begin a journey or to 
return home: *for God hath made every day alike.' We are there- 
fore free in our going out and coming in, if we but sign ourselves 
with the cross in the name of Jesus Christ, and recite {^ cantantes') 
the Creed and the Lord's Prayer. {Hibem,^ Ixiv, 8.)* 

* Tht Prince and the Pauper, See also * This phrase was cited also in the 

Cockayne, LeechdomSy i, pp. xlvii-lii. Hibernensis, Ixiv, 4, where it is referred 

"The Judicius P,rnit»,tialis of the '° ** f}'°f^'^ °^ ^'/^' ^Hf^"' 

MissaU Vtsontiontnst (Forbes, Gallican '% "^,« 42nd canon of Agde, AD. 506 
7.-..,— ;-, „„ ,/;» a\ ...k!„», :, ...... Thus about 1230 a Lincoln arch- 

Zrf«^f/«, pp. 36778). which IS very ^ enquires, 'An alicubi levtH/ur 

similar, has here 'ad arbores, vel ad ">=«'^" , V » o .. 1 ""*■""' •'"•'"'" 

fonles aut cancellos, vel ubicunque. nUi f^""f' ^' *>""' bcottalos, vel decertere- 

in ecclesia.' (Missal of Bobbio.j '"^ « preeundo cum vexiUo matnas 

^ ' ecclesie.' Spelman, C^/ir., u, 193 (c. 30); 

^ i,e. at an eclipse. c/. ii, 252, 299. 



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CHARMS AND AMULETS. 397 

The quotation about ^caragii^ {ue, augurs) will be found in the 
Appendix to St. Augustine's Works (ed. Paris, 1838), sermo 278, 
torn. V, col. 3,093, and the name itself in the canons of the Council 
of Auxerre (a.d. 586, can. 4) and Narbonne (a.d. 589, can. 14). The 
last-named synod speaks also of the pagan superstition on Thursdays 
(can. 15), mentioned above. The Council of Auxerre issued another 
curious canon against a pagan custom (can. i); which prohibition 
reappears in our English records: *Non licet kalendis Januarii vetula 
{leg, vitulas, MS, *vecola') aut cervolo facere, vel strenas diabolicas 
observare: sed in ipsa die sic omnia beneficia tribuantur, sicut ct 
reliquis diebus.' ue. It is forbidden to make calves or deer on the 
first of January, or to observe the practice of diabolical new year's 
gifts,' but we may give presents as on ordinary days. There is a 
similar canon (No. 31) in the ^Judicius Penitencialis^ of the Missale 
Vesontionense (Bobiense^ or Gallicanum\ edited by Mabillon (col. 394), 
and by G. H. Forbes (Galilean Liturgies^ pages 368-9). 

Our Dorset antiquary, Canon C. H. Mayo, found in 1891 what is 
known as " an Ooser "* in a farmhouse near Yeovil. It consists of a 
grotesque human face made of wood, with a * practicable ' lower jaw 
of wood, worked by a string, and attached to it a cow's hide, in which 
the farm lads would make a fearsome mumming, fadentes vitulam ; 
" plough-bullockers," or "plough-jags" as we called them in Lincoln- 
shire, " plough-stots " in Yorkshire, and " plough-witchers " in Rutland. 

The fildcteria were doubtless amulets ; and we may well believe 
that the phylacteries (containing passages from Exodus ^ &c.) prescribed 
for Israel (according to Exodus xiii, 16; Deuteronomy vi, 8, xi, 18), 
which were imitated by certain Christians (Bingham, Antt,^ xvi, 5), 
were meant to be a wholesome substitute for the heathen charms and 
amulets of Egypt. 



"IX 7E have seen in the previous section that amulets were for- 
• bidden in centuries the sixth to the tenth. But they still 
survived. An anonymous writer of the tract or letter, De Incantatione 
(appended to the work of Cornelius Agrippa, de Occult, Fhilos., 
Cologne, 1567, page 639), says that for his part, on the authority of 
Aristotle, De Lapidibus^ he had often advised noblemen to hang an 
emerald, as an amulet, from a child's neck as a prophylactic against 
epilepsy; in like manner a jacynth against the plague, a sardius 
against bad dreams, a carnelian against quarrels and haemorrhage; 

1 strenas: cf, strenia, French €trennes. Perhaps the vUula 

were little figures in wax. 

^ cf, the Berkshire word of reproach, *Wosbird*= proles meretricis. 



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398 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

the onyx, on the other hand, increases bad dreams, and also wrath- 
fulness, and in children promotes the flow of saliva. He adds recipes 
from Galen, Dioscorides, and Avicenna, and other authorities on 
medicine, as to the virtues of various strange objects suspended from 
the neck or otherwise applied. Hence he argues that we ought to 
give credence to charms, amulets, and incantations. 

That delight of our childhood, Hone's Table Book, told us how 
in Westmoreland the churn-staff and all the implements of the cow- 
house were made, so far as might be, of the wiggen or mountain-ash. 
For, as we know, 

"Rowan ash and red thread 
Keep the witches from their speed." 

Hone's correspondent (who wrote from Witherslack, near Milnthorpe, 
Westmoreland) added that * all honest people 'took care (in 1826-7) 
to have a branch of the mountain-ash at their bed's head by night, 
and that his mother to that hour carried a hare's foot in her pocket 
to ward off attacks of witches in the day time (i, 656-7). In the 
next volume {Table Book, ii, 582-4) *T. C wrote two letters from 
Bridlington in July, 1827, in which he related how in the latter part 
of the eighteenth century they used to *burn the witch' in the 
Yorkshire harvest-field {^ardere facit grana^ as the Penitential of 
Theodore said), or * brustled pea-reaps ' (burnt heaps of peas), as they 
then called them. His recollections of the expedients practised to 
avert witchcraft are still more curious {Table Book, ii, 583). One of 
them was to suspend a smooth pebble from the sea beach, by a 
string through a wave-worn hole in it, to the stable-door key. The 
*adjuratio' of *Habraham,* to prevent the fiend * riding our animals,' 
in the tenth century will be remembered, (see page 391). 

In the same volume {Table Book, ii, 143) is a picture and 
description of the pendant Lee Penny which Sir Simon Locard, or 
Lockhart, of Lee in Lanarkshire, was said to have procured from a 
Saracen captive prince as part of his ransom, about 1323. People 
from Yorkshire (among others) used to cross the Tweed to get water 
in which this amulet (accidentally brought out from her treasures by 
the Saracen's wife) had been dipped, to save their cattle from the 
murrain. The red stone appears to have been set in an early 
English shilling, depending from a chain. 

The ^ Kalender of the Shepherdess introduced from France into 
England in 1503, deals at some length with *astrologye — physnamy — 
the complexybns ' of mankind, and the various fortunes and destinies 
of those bom under various *sygnes' or planets. In our own day 
we have had our "Orion" in little Rutland, "Zadkiel," and other 



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CHARMS AND AMULETS. 399 

almanack-makers in other parts of England. In earlier times Salisbury 
had its J. Securis (or Hatchett) in the time of Queen Elizabeth, and 
for the meridians in the north J. Ellis printed his ^ Prognosticatiofiy 

* chiefly for the latitude and meridian of Chripplesham and all the 
North parts,' in 1608. For York, R. Kaye in 1608-9, W. Savage in 
161 1, and P. Ranger in 161 5 to 1631. For Lincoln, T. Lakes in 
1627. For Newcastle, J. Honiwax in 1630. And for Durham, M. 
Pierce in 1634 to 1640. Some at least of these went little beyond 
weather forecasts, others offered predictions much like the Moore's 
Almanacks of recent times. But I have before me an early 
eighteenth century book which borrowed the honoured title of * The 
ShephercPs Kalendar^^ with the alternative of * the Citizen^ s and Country 
MatCs Daily Companion,' the fourth Edition, with Additions. i2mo. 
Lond: For A. Bettes worth, C. Hitch (and others), pages iv and 157. 
It belongs to the year 1706, and contains, among other particulars, 
lists of unlucky or dangerous days (of the Egyptians), lucky days, 
certain prognostications, rules showing how to calculate nativities, the 
art of knowing truth from falsehood, or the hopes of success, or proof 
of chastity, by calculation based upon names and numbers, the 
Mosaick Wand to find out hidden treasure, choice secrets in 
astrology on several useful occasions, a safe way to secure a house, 
out-house, poultry, cattle, corn, &c., or to catch a thief by writing an 
astrological figure on parchment, sprinkling it with the juice of night- 
shade (or, pro re nata^ of hemlock, or of fumitory, or of vervain), 
closed with virgin wax and secreted in the place. To drive away a 
ghost, to prevent the effects of witchcraft, the evil eye, or influence 
of a malignant planet, a wolf's skin, the skin of a hyena's forehead, 

* which may be had at the furrier's shop,' the herb * nepe,' to be 
gathered *so soon as ever the new moon appears,' the fat of a 
he-weasel, and various astrological squares, are among the requisites 
prescribed. 

The word atnuiet is said by Dr. Skeat to be derived from the 
Arabic hamala=^h& carried,' hafndil^ or himdyil^ standing for a small 
Koran, hung round the neck as a charm, as well as for a sword-belt, 
slung from the shoulder. Pliny in his Hist Nat, f xxix, 4, 1 9 ; xxx, 
15,47) uses the word ^ amuletum^ iox a talisman, recourse to which 
he however did not recommend. 

For periapts, amulets, and *wise words,' approved by Marcellus, 
circa a.d. 380, and Alexander of Tralles, a.d. 550, see Mr. Cockayne's 
preface, Leechdoms^ i, pages xviii-xxxi. 

The articles in the Dictionary of Christian Biography^ by Dr. 
Hort {^ Abra$ax\ and Antiquities^ by Dean Plumptre {^ Amulet \ 



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400 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

show how prevalent was the use of talismans among the Jews, and 
among many who have (perhaps unjustly) been identified with the 
Gnostics. The letters lAll 2ABAn0 ABPA2AH arc often found 
upon them. ^ Abrasax^ (a name revered by the Basilidians), by 
geniatria, is equivalent to the number 365, which is connected 
with the number of the heavens and the computed parts 
of the human frame, as well as with the circle of the year. In 
like manner, ^^ Abracadabra,^' repeated several times and arranged 
in eleven diminishing lines, as Serenus Samonicus and Cornelius 
Agrippa (or in a pentacle, as the author of Ingoldsby) explains, 
was highly valued. The pentacle is shown as a double triangle,* 
with six points, each terminating in a * in the Elenunta Magica 
of Peter de Abano Pataviensis, a thirteenth century astrologer. 
He directs the sorcerer to begin proceedings by reciting the 
^ AspergeSy^ while sprinkling the circle with holy water,^then to say a 
collect for blessing the odours for fumigation, " Deus Abraham, Deus 
Isaac, Deus Jacob,' benedic has creaturas specierum,^ ut vim et 
virtutem odorum suorum amplient, ne hostis nee phantasma in eas 
intrare possit. Per D. N. J. Christum." After sprinkling the aromatic 
spices, he exorcises the fire, on which they are to be cremated, in 
this form : — " Exorcizo te, creatura ignis, per ilium, per quem facta 
sunt omnia, ut statim omne phantasma ejicias a te, ut nocere non 
possit in aliquo." And the blessing: "Benedic, Domine, creaturam 
istam ignis, et sanctifica; ut benedicta sit in coUaudationem nominis 
tui sancti, ut nuUo nocumento sit gestantibus nee videntibus. Per 
Dominum," &c. 

A Mass of the Holy Ghost was to be said over the pentacle, 
which was to be written under the influence of Mercury, when the 
moon was waxing, upon kid's vellum, and to be sprinkled with water 
from the font,^ The astrologer was to wear a priest's robe, if he could 
obtain it. These preliminaries, and the requirement that he should 
be confessed and househd, and should be provided with a new pot 
full of holy water blessed by a priest^ seem to imply 'that the 

1 cf. H. Corn. Agrippa, De Occult, were strict rules that the font should be 

Philos., ii, 23, on the pentc^on. provided with a lock (serura), lest it 

^ For holy water in charms, see should be turned in alios usus (* Jr. pro- 

Leechdomsy ii, 136, 138, 140, 156, 334; phanos,* gloss.), or, as the constitution of 

iii, 56. St. Edmund, Archbishop, previously 

3 This is the opening of *Gelasian' Treasurer of Sarum, expressly says, 

formulas (ed. Wilson, pp. 48, 49), but the ^propter sortiiegiay in 1 236; or ^ ad 

spices are the matter for benediction with aliqua tt^faria exerceuday as Lyndewode 

Jews rather than Christians. explains. (Provinciaie^ iii, tit. 24, * Bap- 

^ species y i.q, spices. tisterium.') On font-covers, see ^/Vrw^Vi 

5 On this account, when the hallowed An^licana (ed. 1902), pp. i-io; and 

water remained in a font for five or six Micklethwaite, The Ornaments of the 

days (and apparently even for a month), Rubric: Alcuin Club, Supplement^ 1901, 

from one christening to another, there p. 10. 



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CHARMS AND AMULETS. 401 

'operator' may have had oftentimes at least the parish clerk in 
collusion with him.^ After this, the prayer on putting on the robe, 
though certainly theistic, and perhaps Jewish, has no Christian 
characteristic. It begins, " Ancor, Amacor, Amides," &c. 

Robert Burton's Anatomy of Melancholy (I, i, part 2, sec. i ) says 
that it was common (i 621) for 'some men to go first to a witch, and 
then to a physician: if one cannot, the other shall.' Such an one 
* calls a magician God's Minister^ and his Vicar^ applying that of 
vos estis dii (Psalm vi, i) prophanely to' the 'wizards and white 
witches, who are common in every village and they have com- 
monly St. Catherine's wheels printed in the roof of their mouth or 
in some other part about them' (II, i; m. i, sec. i). 

Sir T. Browne says {Vulgar Errors^ i, 10) : To assert that demons 
"are afraid of the pentangle of Solomon (three triangles intersected 
and made of '^s^ lines), though so set forth with the body of man, 
as to touch and point out the five places where our Saviour was 
wounded, I know not how to assent' If perhaps [tlie Devil] hath 
fled from holy water, if he cares not to hear the sound of Teira- 
grammaton (implying Jehovah, which in Hebrew consisteth of four 
letters), if his eye delight not in the sign of the Cross; and that 
sometimes he will seem to be charmed with words of holy Scripture, 
and to fly from the letter and dead verbality, who must only start 
at the life and animated interiors thereof : It may be feared they are 
but Parthian flights, Ambuscados retreats and elusory tergiversations : 
whereby to confirm our credulities, he will comply with the opinion 
of such powers, which in themselves have no activities. Whereof 
having once begot in our minds an assured dependance, he makes 
us rely on powers which he but precariously obeys; and to desert 
those true and only charms, which Hell cannot withstand." 

More than half a century ago a very curious relic was found at 
Ingleby Arncliffe, near Northallerton, and came into the hands of 
Mr. J. W. Ord, a Yorkshire journalist and antiquary, and was 
described by him in his History of Cleveland^ 1846, pages 38-40. It 
was an enamelled crucifix of great age (now unhappily lost to sight)^; 
but one remarkable circumstance about it was that it sounded 
hollow, and proved to contain two slips of parchment, each covered 
on one side with a (different) Latin prayer or incantation, which Mr. 
Ord transcribed. The years passed by, and these parchments also 

1 For masses, as part of a charm, see corporis proportione et nunsura, harmo- 

Leeckdomsy ii, 136-140, 294, 344; ill, 10, niaque), 

46. The paten, ii, 136; iii, 10. Church- , ., ^ , u • u j • 

cross, ii, 136, 344. Mass-priest, ii, 138, / M'- Ord has given a rough drawmg 

296: iii. 56, 60. Bell, ii, 136. 138. of the crucifix m his Hist, of Cleveland, 



* See figures i, iii, v, in H. C. Agrippa, 
De Occult, Pkilos,, ii, 37 (de humani 



Introduction, p. 136. 



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402 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

were mislaid, with the result that some doubt began to be felt 
whether Mr. Ord had not, through his well-known antiquarian pro- 
clivities, been made the victim of a hoax. However, on the death of 
his surviving brother, in 1902, the original writings recently came to 
light again; and they are genuine MSS. of the (early) thirteenth 
century.* These are now the property of Mr. VV. Richardson, of Guis- 
borough, and, through the kind offices of Mr. T. M. Fallow, I have 
been courteously allowed by the owner to examine them and to 
make the transcript which I now offer (with a facsimile) to our readers. 

CHARMS FOUND IN THE INGLEBY ARNCLIFFE 

AMULET CRUCIFIX. 

I. 

Parchment No. I. An irregular strip, 11 J inches wide, by from 
ij to i^^ inches in depth. The writing (early thirteenth century) 
occupies eight long lines of script. 

— In nomine patris & filii et sp/nVws sanc/i annen. 

Coniuro nos elphes & demones & omnia genera fantasmatis per 
patrem & filium & spiritum sanctum, & per sanctam Mariam, matrem 
domini nostri ihesu christi, & per omnes apostolos dei, & omnes 
martires dei, et per omnes confessores dei, et per omnes uirgines dei 
ihesu christi, et uiduas & per quatuor ewange1ista[s] Marcum . 
Matfheum lucam Johenniem'. & per . [incarjnacionem' domini nostii 
ih€su xpi . & per passionem dei, & mortem dommi nostri ihesu xpi, 
& per descencionem dei . ad inferos . & per passionem* dommi 
nos^ ihesu xpi ad celos . & per quatuor ewangelistas domini noslri 

ihesu xpi 4-l— Marcum — !— . Matheuw —I— . lucam . — I— 
'^lla Gla Gja G|a 

. Johannem . -^-1 . & per uirtutem domini nosiri ihesu xpi . & per 
G I a 

magna nomina dei*a*G* L*a*ON* teci a t Gromaton* * 
sabaoth * adonai * & omnia nomina, u* non noceas huic famnlo 
{^fsLTnulsim'* infer/ined) dei adam osanna^ nocte neque die sed per 
mise/7Vv7rdia[m] dei ihesu xpi maximam adiuuante sancfa. maria 
matrem f domini nosiri ihesu xpi ab omnibus malis predictis & aliis 
requiescat in pace am^«. * — . In nomine patris & filii & 
spirifus sancJi Simen . & requiescuwt suo requiescat (* requiescu«t ' 

* Dr. G. F. Warner, at the British shortened word occurring at the begin- 

Museum, has kindly examined the orig- ning of line 3 in the original, 

inals and fully confirms my opinion. ^ /^ead ascencionem. 

2 ,. T«K« *,«««, '' '•^* Tetragrammaton. 

i.e, jonannem. ^ ^.^^ ^^^.^^^ evidently was not strong 

3 The writing of nacionef/ty probably in his Latin grammar. 

by mistake for incamacionem, may be "^ ' Adam ' and * Osanna,' as we shall 

due to the length of the lines, this see, are proper names. 



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CHARMS AND AMULETS. 403 

interlined) iste (isti) famulus dei ih^^u xpi adaw osanna . adiuuante 
sancta, Maria . maXrem f domini nostri ihesu xpi ab omnibus malis 

predictis & aliis amen * -^M . All . All ±\L All Quinq«^ 
^ G;aG|aGlaG|aGla ^^ 

domini ncsfri ihesu xpi & sancte marie de osanna sanc/us dunstanus 

sanc/e andrea sanctus nicholaus . sancfa. Margareta . sanc/e petre sancie 

paule sancie mathea sancte bartholomee sancia quinque^ domini nostri 

ihesu xpi ysancfa brigide A ,__ xpc regnat Al _ & xps inp^rat - I - 

& xps adam osanna ab omni malo defendat am^;i. 

(Verso, hlanlL) 

Translation, 

* Agla. In the Name of the Father and of the Son and of 
the Holy Ghost Amen. I conjure you, ye elves and demons, and 
every kind of phantom, by the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost, 
and by St. Mary, the mother of our Lord Jesu Christ, and by all the 
Apostles of God, and all the martyrs of God, and by all the con- 
fessors of God, and by all the virgins of Jesu Christ [our] God, and 
the widows, and all the elect of God, and by the four Evangelists of 
our Lord Jesu Christ, Mark, Matthew, Luke, and John, and by the 
[Incar] nation of our Lord Jesu Christ, and by God's passion, and 
the death of our Lord Jesu Christ, and by God's descent into hell, 
and by the Resurrection of our Lord Jesu Christ, and by the 
Ascension' of our Lord Jesu Christ into heaven ; and by the four 
evangelists of our Lord Jesu Christ . Agla . Mark . Agla . Matthew . 
Agla . Luke . Agla . John , Agla . and by the virtue of our Lord Jesu 
Christ, and by the great names of God *a*g*l*a*on* 
tetra >b grammaton ^ Sabaoth 9^ adonai >b and all names, that thou 
hurt not this servant (or handmaid) of God, Adam [or] Osanna, by 
night nor day, but by the exceeding mercy of Jesus Christ [our] God, 
with the help of S. Mary, the mother of our Lord Jesu Christ, he 
[and she] may rest in peace from all the aforesaid evils and all else. 
Amen. * Agla. In the Name of the Father and of the Son and 
of the Holy Ghost. Amen. And his folk may rest and this (or 
these) servant(s) of our God Jesu Christ, Adam [and] Osanna, may 
rest, through the help of Saint Mary, mother of our Lord Jesus 
Christ, from all the aforesaid evils, and all other. Amen. * Agla . 

1-1 The five crosses relate to the Quinque the(e) ; or [* By the help of] * Me(e), St. 

Vuhiera of the Crucifix. Bridget.' 

«The Anglo-Saxon thorn-letter ik. » The MS. has, by error, * per 

Here perhaps it means [*I adjure'] passionem' (for 'per ascensionem'). 



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404 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

Agla . Agla , Agla . Agla . The five [wounds] of our Lord Jesu 
Christ, and [five joys]* of St. Mary of Osanna, St Dunstan, St. 
Andrew, St. Nicholas, St. Margaret, St. Peter, St. Paul, St. Matthew, 
St. Bartholomew, the five holy [wounds] of our Lord Jesu Christ, 
the[e] St. Brigit. Agla. Christ is King. Agla. Christ reigns as 
Ruler . and may Christ defend Adam [and] Osanna from all harm. 
Amen. 

The * at the beginning was of course indispensable in every 
exorcism, as in all dealing with the creatures and elements of the 
world — even the horn-book and primer of 'elementary' education, 
which had their cris-cross row even down to the * British Battledore ' 
{circa 1700), which was in the calico scrap book of my own babyhood, 
from which Mr. Tuer has figured it in his History of the Horn-Book^ 
page 170. And so Mr. Hawker, of Morwenstow, rhymed in 1845 
\PoemSy page 173)-— 

Christ His Cross shall be my speed : 

Teach me. Father John, to read. 

Thus the cross was regularly used at grace before meat; so that 
Durandus in his account of the blessing of the Paschal Lamb 
{Rationale Divinomniy VI, Ixxxvi, 8) not only mentions, from the 
Dialogus Gregorii^ that a nun who once ate a lettuce in the convent 
garden without making the sign of the cross, was consequently entered 
by a demon, but that he himself had seen a girl at Bologna {circa 
1250-80), who had been possessed by two devils, as she confessed 
to the exorcist, because she had eaten a pomegranate unblessed. I 
have a little book of instructions for the Malines Seminary, Ritus 
Sacri, printed at Mechlin in 1761, which warns the clergy to be 
careful to make a proper cross, not *signum rotae, sive circulum 
diaboli! 

The reader will of course notice the fear of elves (' el phes'); and 
repeated mention of St. Mark before St. Matthew. The mention 
of elves - (* elphes ') in this connexion is somewhat similar to 
that in an earlier 'adjuration,' which appears in a remarkable 
eighth century book of prayers (British Museum, Royal AfS.^ 
2 A. XX, fo. 45^), which has been described by Sir E. M. Thompson 
in the MSS. Catalogue, by Mr. Walter de Gray Birch, in an 
appendix to the Nunnaminster MS, (pages 109-10), and recently 
edited by Dom Kuypers in the appendix to the early liturgical 
portion of the Book of Cerne^ page 221. It begins, after an *Obsecro,* 
somewhat similar to the famous * Loricay with a curiously written but 

^ Or rather, perhaps, the five dolours. 



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CHARMvS AND AMULETS. 405 

familiar Greek formula, ^^ Eulogumen patera^^ &c., meaning, *We praise 
Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, both now and ever and to the ages of 
the ages. Amen. Adiuro te satanae diabulus aelfae per Deum 
vivum ac verum, et per trementem* diem iudicii, ut refugiatur* ab 
homine illo qui abeat hunc aepist scriptum' secum in nomine Dei 
patris, et Filii, et Spiritus sancti.' 

This 'letter,' or * adjuration,' was evidently to be carried as a charm 
upon the person ; as was also the name of St. Cassius, with threefold 
repetition of the Lord's Prayer, to stop bleeding, according to a 
twelfth century addition on the fly-leaf of the same book. This is 
printed by Birch, * An Ancient MS,,^ or 'Book of Nunna-Minster, 
Winton' (Hants. Record Society), page 112. 

There is also a charm or prayer for sleep, founded upon the 
narrative of the Septem Dormientes^ MartyreSy of Ephesus,* and a 
prayer for hearing, by the intercession of St. Blaise. In the eighth 
century (original) portion of the same MS. there are two or three other 
charms against haemorrhage (^Book of Cerne^ app., pages 207, 223)," 
one of them a mixture of Greek and Latin, addressed to * Beronice ' 
(St. Veronica), who was not only connected with the Legend of the 
Holy Face, but (by tradition) identified with the Woman with the 
Issue of Blood (St, Matthew ix, 20, &c.). 

In Cockayne's collection of Leechdoms^ &c., we meet with * elves ' 
of various kinds : — Land elves, and water elves, ruricolas musas, 
castalidaSy elf-disease, elf-hiccup; there is a recipe for the * water-elf 
disease, when the nails of the hand are livid, and the eyes lacrymose 
and downcast'; a salve for all the elfish kin, for elves and uncouth 
company, dwarves, mares, night mares (mare = spirit), incubi^ &c. 
{LeechdomSy i, pages xlvi, xlvii; ii, pages 65, 138, 140, 290, 296, 306, 
334» 34S> 350; ^f' 3^-) The elves in Shakespeare's time," though 
mischievous, were looked upon with tolerance. In T. Heywood's eyes 
they were simply graceful ; but in the Yorkshire parchment, as in the 
charms of the earlier Leechdoms^ they are entirely baneful agents. 

Scrivener in his Introduction to Criticism of N, T'., pages 70, 71, 
&c., gives 'Matthew, John, Luke, Mark,' as 'the true Western order, 
and mentions some other permutations, but not the one before us. 

* t,e. tremendum. Veronica (Beronice, Murunice), ii, 138, 
"refugiatis. 140, 348; iii, 66, 78. St. Helena, i, 
^ i,e. * qui ^beat banc ep'xsiu/am 384 ; cf. iii; 60, 286. Longinus, miles, 

scriptflm.' i, 393. 

* For the Seven Sleepers, cf. Leech- * Shakespeare does not call his elf 
^//^j, iii, 42, 294. * diabulus^ but 'Ariel,' which was the 

^ For the use of the cross against name of an angelic being for the occult 
haemorrhage, see Leechdoms, i, 394. St. philosopher. 



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406 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHiEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

The mysterious word * Agla^ so often repeated, and once ' Agla . 
on, tetragratnmaton^ (here "teci a Gromaton") ^ sabaoth adanai^* are 
among the mysterious names of the Almighty, on which the famous 
occult scientist, Henry Cornelius Agrippa, subsequently, in 1510, wrote 
a remarkable exposition in his De Occulta Philosophia^ iii, cap. 10. 

AGLA is the Hebrew acrostic of the sentence equivalent to 
* Tu es Fortis Inetemumy Deus^ which is said to have been revealed 
to the patriarch Lot. It stands as the opening of one of the very 
antient Jewish prayers of the Synagogue, which is anterior to the 
Mishnah of the Talmud, viz. No. 2, among the * Eighteen Benedic- 
tions,' or Shemoneh-Esreh of the *Amidah.* I have noticed the 
letters *agla' scattered about the pentacle of a thirteenth century 
writer on magic, Peter de Abano, in his Heptameron^ or Elemtnta 
Magica. He speaks of it as "nomen Dei agla, quod Loth audiuit" 
ON, the Greek 6 m (compare the Apocalypse, i, 8), was known to 
the mediaeval Cabalists as one of "three secret names, *agla, on, 
tetragrammaton,' " to be used in adjurations. (P. de Abano, Elem. 
Magic. Exorcismus spirituum aereorum.) Mr. Isaac H. Jeayes has 
noticed the letters "a.g.l. a." on an antient seal among Westminster 
Abbey Charters. 

* TetragrammatoHy the name of four letters, usually called by us 
' Jehovah,' is familiar to us all in pictured indications of the glory of 
the Lord, the Hebrew letters * jhvh ' being commonly written within 
a triangle surrounded by a halo of irradiation. * Sabaoth ' (of Hosts) 
and ^ AdonaV (Lord) are names well known.* ^ Adam* and ^Osanna* 
at first sight seemed words of mystery occurring naturally enough in 
a cabalistic writing. But it is clear that *Osanna'was a Yorkshire 
name, as, looking in the index to Fcodarium Prioratus Dunelm.^ we 
find a reference in Durham to * Osanna, uxor Thome de Heringtone,' 
page 2oo« (Patent of 23 March, 129 1-2), at Houghall; and 'Osanna 
de Tameton ' occurs in the Guisborough Chartulary^ ii, 28«, 59, in 
1234. It was apparently a female Christian name." I suppose, there- 
fore, that Adam and Osanna were the names of the man and wife 
to whom the crucifix belonged at the time when the * adjuration ' was 
written, or that just possibly they were representative sex names, 
somewhat like our initials N, or M,^ *A. B.,'and *C D.,'and that the 
names were so put in, perhaps, before the crucifix found an owner. 

* The divine names which occur in 348) ; Jehe, Aius, Aius, Aius, Sanctus, 

Leechdoms are: * A. a' (ii, 138; iii, 60, &c. Domines Deus Sabaoth. Amen. 

62, 70) ; ' Emmanuel ' (ii, 140 ; iii, 52) ; Alleluiah (ii, 348). 

*Leo de tribu Juda* (ii, 136); * lao ^Yix. G. F. Warner observes that 

Sabaoth Adonai Eloi ' (i, xx ; ii, 348 ; * Osanna ' occurs as a female name in the 

iii, 66); * Agios' (i, 386, 398; ii. 136, * Exeter Book ' of the twelfth century. 



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CHARMS AND AMULETS. 407 

What exactly is meant hy ^ Sancte Marie de Osanna* 1 cannot con- 
jecture, unless it be * that St. Mary who is Osanna's patron.' 

S. Pepys embodied in his Diary (31 December, 1664), when 
tearing up many^ of his papers, three * charmes,' in English, against 

* a thorne,* * a cramp,' and * a burning,' and one, in Latin, * for stench- 
ing of blood.' To-day, as I am writing, a Wiltshire clergyman tells 
me of a parishioner (of Devonian extraction) who thoroughly believes 
in repeating Psalm viii, 2, thrice, fasting, as a sure remedy for 

* thrush * in children. 

I will collect here the names of the saints specially mentioned 
in this writing — with a fine contempt for grammatical terminations, 
for some of them look like vocative cases, though the grammatical 
construction starts fairly with some nominatives. Perhaps local know- 
ledge may detect something from their collocation. The names are : 

SB. Mary, Andrew, Nicholas, Margaret, Peter, Paul, Matthew, 
Bartholomew (Quinque Vulnera), and S. Brigit.^ 

"[Christus Vincit,] Christus Regnat, Christus inperat" will be 
recognised as occurring at the beginning of the Coronation Litany 
used for Queen Matilda by Archbishop Aldred in 1068. (See 
Maskell, Mon. Rit.^ ii, 85. Also Dr. Legg's Westminster Missal^ ii, 
7i4«.) It is found likewise in the thirteenth century Worcester 
Tropes {Laudes in Die Pasche\ an * Acclamation ' printed in Frere's 
Winchester Troper^ page 130. Also used at Limoges, for Easter; 
ibid,^ page 174 ; 4/! xxvi. 

II. 

Parchment No. IL A strip of parchment 9 J inches wide by 
2 1 inches in depth ; one of the lower corners (sinister) cut off. This 
is in a larger handwriting than No. I. It is written in seven lines. 
The middle of the piece has perished, where the creases in folding 
made a corner. It is in peculiar thirteenth century writing. 

. %vx ifjegu ipe xierftuitt patria, filius uirginis, hancte mariel Agnus 
dei Hhesu xpi'. salus mundi, hostia sacra . verbum caro . fons 
pietatis S Aue *ihes\i xpe"* splendor patris . princeps pacis . it Janua 
celi ^ panis uiuus 9 uirginis partus ^ uas puritatis" ^ Aue ih^5u 

1 The saints who are named in Cock- corruptly written (iii, 78) ; Blaise (iii, 295) ; 
ayne*s Leechdoms are : St. Mary (i, 392, Machutus and Victoricus (against a dwarf, 
&c.) ; Peter, &c. (i, 390, 394 ; iii, 64) ; iii, 38) ; Maximian, Malchus, John, Mar- 
Matthew, Mark, &c. {i, 388, 398 ; ii, 140 ; tinian, Denys, Constantia, Serapion 
iii, 10, 14,24, 52, 288, 290); Veronica, (against warts, iii, 42) ; Garmund (i, 384). 
Longinus, Helena, Raphael («, s) ; Fell- a ^,;„v « Sancte Marie,* Horae Sarum, 
citas (i, 390); Eugenius, Stephanus, 1535-36. 
Protasius, Sambucius, Dionisius, Ches- 3 «>, " ^^1*^ 
ilius, Quiriacus (iii, 294) ; Nicasius (for ^ "^"^^ °'^"^' 
small-pox, iii, 295) ; Brigit (i, 390 ; iii, 78) ; * f^<»'^ transposes the verses. 
Sigismund, Cassian, German, and others ^ uas deitatis, Horae Sarum, 



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408 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHiEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

xpe lumen celorum gloria sanctorum' 9 uisio pacis * deltas' integra 

* uerus homo * flos . & fructus uirginptatis Sf Aue ih«u xpe * 
lumen celi * precium mundi * gaudium nostrum * Angelorura 
panis * cordis iubilus * Rex et sponsus uirginitatis* * 

}^ Aue ih<?ju xpe * uia dulcis : * uereitas' surama : * premium 
nostrum : * caritas uera : 9 fons amoris : * •pax dulcedo * 
Requies nostra * uita perhennis* amen * . 
( Verso, blank.) 

{Tramlafion.) 

}^ Hail, Jesus Christ, Word of the Father, Son of the Holy 
Virgin Mary, O Lamb of God, Jesu Christ, Salvation of the 
World, Holy Victim, * Door of Heaven * Thou Living Bread * 
Virgin-born * Vessel of purity'. * Hail, Jesus Christ, Light of 
Heaven, Glory of the Saints, * Vision of Peace, * Godhead 
unsullied, * Very Man * Flower and Fruit of maidenhood. * Hail, 
Jesus Christ, Light of Heaven, * Ransom of the world, * our Joy, 

* the Bread of Angels, * the heart's Rejoicing * King and Bride- 
groom of virginity. 

1^ Hail, Jesus Christ, our sweet Way * supreme Truth 9 our 
Reward . * true Charity * Wellspring of Love * our Peace 

* our Rest * our never-ending Life. Amen. 

Mr. Edgar Hoskins, in his excellent ^ FrimerSy Sarum^ York^ and 
Romany 8vo, Longmans, 1901, page 149, mentions an edition of the 
Sarum Horae B, Mariae Virginis^ printed by F. Regnault, Paris, 153 1, 
as containing a prayer beginning * Ave Domine Jesu Christe^ verhum 
Patris^ under the title of "-«4 prayer at the elevation,^* In the ver)' 
early edition of the Sarum Horae^ printed on vellum by Wynkyn do 
Worde at Westminster, about 1494, is one which begins precisely as 
our parchment No. II {i,e, without the insertion of * Domine '). In 
1494 it is headed ^ Ad elevationem corporis Chris ti,^ — ^Prayers to the 
sacrament at ievation^ {Hoskins^ i^2igt iii). I find it likewise in the 
Sarum Horae printed by Regnault, 4to, 1535 (25 May, 1536, in 
colophon), on leaf Iviij foil. Several of the prayers just before 
and after it ("a/ the sacrynge of the masse**) have pardons or indul- 
gences {"a hondred days** ^^ vij yere** ^^ as many days of pardon as 
there were woundes in the body of our lorde in the tyme of hys byter 

1 *laus angelorum,' Hor, Sar. "* 'virginis malris/ I/brae Samm, 4to, 

a Here in the MS. 'deltas' has been 1535-6. 

written (at the end of line 3) de/ore the ^ * Veritas,' Horae, 

cross, as well as after it, and is not ® 'pax durabiliset vita perennis,'^ra^. 

altered. ' 'Vessel of the Godhead.' Sarttm 

^ Letters worn away. Horae. 



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CHARMS AND AMULETS. 409 

passyon^ the whyche were v . M . iiij . hondred . iij . scoure et . v .") 
attached to them. This prayer is not here said to have been indul- 
genced. The section in which it occurs begins thus: — 

% An other deuoute prayer to the holy 
sacrement of the awter, 
O sacrum conuiuium {^c) 
y, Panem de celo. 
19. Omne delectamentum. 
Oremus. 
"P^EUS qui nobis, &*c. (i.e. St Thomas Aquinas' Collect for Corpus 
■"^ Christi). And then our form, " A\iq Jesu Xpe verbum 
patris," &c. 

The running heading of the open page here is, **/« e/euatione 
Corporis Christi" So it was clearly used in the fifteenth and 
sixteenth centuries by lay-folk as a devotion in the most solemn 
moments of the mass. 

I have given in the footnotes some various readings from the 
Horae of this edition, of which a copy happens to be here in 
Marlborough. The prayer continues, after the end of our devotion, 
'Ave sacratissimum et preciosissimum corpus Christi, qui^ in ara 
crucis pro mundi salute fuit positum,* ^c, &*c. It then proceeds to 
* An other deuoute prayer shortly after the eleuacyon of our lorde. In 
presentia sacrosancti corporis et sanguinis tui,' &*€. &*c. Before 
taking leave of this edition of the Prymer, or Horae^ I may mention 
that it contains a few devotions, which show how the lay folk of the 
fifteenth and sixteenth centuries were given some forms which are 
lineal descendants of the perhaps less spiritual * adjurations ' of the 
tenth century which we have mentioned on earlier pages. For 
instance, on leaf Ivi : 

" U Thys epystell of our sauiour sendeth our holy father pope Leo 
to the emperor Carolo inagn(^ of the whyche ^we fyndest wryterr^ who 
that bereth thys blessynge vpon hym et^ sayth it ones a daye shall 
obteyne . xl . yere of pardon et^ . Ixxx . lenttynge . dr* he shall not 
perysshe wyth soden deth, 

/^^RUX * Christi sit mecum . Crux * xpi est quam semper adoro . 
^^ Crux S xpi est vera salus . Crux S Xpi superat omne gaudium 
. Crux S Christi soluit vincula mortis . " &*c. 6^^. " * Tu 

1 leg,y *quod.* » Leo III, A.D. 795. 

5 Complaints were made that Regnault did not employ a printer who knew 

English. See my Directorium Sacerdotum^ ii, 654;/. 

VOL. XVII. B B 



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410 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

diabole fuge a me * ecce crucem domini * fugite partes 

aduerse : vicit leo de tribu Juda, radix Dauid alleluya . Et benedictio 
dei patris maneat semper . Amen . Pater noster . Aue." 

There are twenty-two crosses marked in the aforesaid prayer, and 
it has prefixed to it one of the woodcuts of the * Images of Pity * or 

* Armes of Christes passyon ' (No,, vii), which I have had reproduced 
in facsimile for the Henry Bradshaw Society's Directorium Saurdotum^ 
or Sarum Pye, vol. ii, in fine. On leaf Ixxv, among Suffragia, we 
find : " In nomine patris, 6*^. * Sancte Michael, esto michi lorica . 

* Sancte Gabriel, esto michi galea . . . . ii S. Raphael .... scutum . 

* S. Uriel defensor , " &*€. (See above, page 393».) 

% Oratio contra tnortalitatem hominutn aique pestem. 
T)ER signum Thau * a peste epydimie libera nos Jesu . Hie est 
titulus triumphalis . Jesus Nazarenus rex iudeorum . Christus 
venit in- pace . Deus homo factus est Jesus . Amen . Sancte Deus . 
Sancte fortis . (S^'r. &*c. 

On leaf Ixxxv^: 

H A deuoute inuocacion and prayer of all the blessyd names of our 

lorde Jesu Cryst as we fynde them wry tern \ in holy scripture, Oratio, 

/^MNIPOTENS dominus . * Christus . * Messyas . * Sother . 

* Emmanuel . * Sabaoth . * Adonay 6-r. ^* Homo 

* Usyon^ * Saluator . * Alpha . * & oo' * Fons * (et) Origo . 
i* Spes * Fides * charitas . * Oza * Agnus . * Ouis . &*c, * Leo. 

* Uermis*. .... 6^r. * Ego sum qui sum &^c, * Caput . * 

Otheo tecos*. S Tetragrammaton*. * Ista nomina me protegant ." &*c. 

The names of the three Magi, or Kings of Colen, follow, with the 
Apostles and Evangelists. There are forty-five crosses printed in this 
prayer, and prefixed to it is a larger 'Image of Pity'; facsimile No. vi 
in my Directorium Sacerdotum^ 1901. 

On fo. Ixxxvi^ of the Horae of 1535-36 is an adjuration against 
thunderstorms : — 

1 Homo . Usyon : i,e, * Homousion ' * " O 0f ^roxo;. 

(of one substance). , ^ / r . .. 

«oo: i.f. •»(Omega). '' Tetragrammaton {/ekovah). See 

3 cf. Ps. p. 406. 



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CHARMS AND AMULETS. 411 

IT Oratio contra tonitrua et tempestates. 

'T*ITULUS triumphalis . Jesus Nazarenus rex iudeorum.* Christus 
vincit : Christus regnat'': Christus nos benedicat : et ab omni 
tonitruo, tempestate et omni malo liberet et defendat. Amen. 
'Ecce * crucem domini fugite partes aduerse : vicit leo de tribu 
iuda : radix Dauid alleluya'. Kyrie eleyson Qf*c, Pater noster . Et 
ne nos . Sed libera. Oremus. 

/^MNIPOTENS sempiterne deus, parce metuentibus vt post noxios 
^^ ignes nubium vimque procellarum in materiam tue laudis 
transeat tue comminatio potestatis . Per Jesum . Pater . Aue . 

And then a devotion to St. Denys, George, Christopher, the (23 
or more) * AuxiliatoreSy as they were sometimes called. 

This long paper might easily be doubled in length if we added 
extracts from the Rev. Oswald Cockayne's three vols, of ^ Leechdoms^ 
Wartcunning and Starcraft^ of Early England^ (Rolls Series), 1864. 
We must, however, content ourselves with a reference to three or four: 

(i) The charm against toothache or neuralgia {^ migranea^^ i.e, 
hemikrania^ * megrim ') beginning " Christus super marmoreum sedebat. 
Petrus tristis ante eum stabat ; manum ad maxillam tenebat," &c. 
(iii, page 64), deserves mention, not for its own sake, but because it 
has come down to our own times in Scotland, Ireland, Devon, &c. 
(Notes and Queries, ist S., i, pages 293, 349, 397, 429; iii, 258.) 

(2) On hearing that thy cattle are lost, before aught else, say 
* Bsedlem hatte seo buruh,' &c. 

("Bethlehem hight that borough, 
On which Christ's light had birth. 
It is famed through middle earth. 
So may this theft be made known among men. 
Through the holy Rood of Christ. Amen.") 

Then repeat to each quarter of the heaven* an adjuration that, as the 
holy Cross was hidden and then found, so may thy lost cattle be 
found. {Leechdoms, iii, page 60, sec. 91.) 

(3) Against warts} Take seven little wafers {pflatan), such as one 
offers with (at mass), and write on them these names : * Maximianus, 

1 See p. 410. (with apostles, evangelists, prophets, 

* See p. 407. elders, and saints) in the Vatican Basilica 
^ See pp. 4o6», 410. Coniurationes demonum, cir, 1500, men- 

* The (oMX quarters of the heaven are tioned on p. 387. 
among the heavenly powers conjured * Leechdoms^ iii, p. 42. 



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412 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHiEO LOGICAL JOURNAL. 

Malchus, Johannes, Martinianus, Dionysius, Constantinus, Serafion.' 
Then sing the charm into the left car, the right ear, and over his 
head.* And let one who is a maid hang the charm about his head : 

*' Here there stands ' Ever anew 

A spider-man, More cool they grew. 

Holding his hands But, soon and gay, 

Upon his ham. The wild thing's sister 

Says, * Here's my hack : To speak has addressed her, 

Get on his back! And said her say. 

Lay thee quick She promised and swore 

Against his neck.' I That never more 

From earth, like a boat, I This thing shall harm 
Away they float! Him who gets this charm. 



Then so soon as they 
Had floated aw^y, 



Or him that can say it. 
Amen. So be it!" 



The references to the apostles and evangelists, Berenice (Veronica), 
&c., interspersed with sundry crosses, curiously disposed, the sacred 
and mystic names (Emmanuel, &c.) the mention of elves and dwarfs 
and herbs, &c., the scraps of Greek and Arabic, &c., and the 
admixture of superstitious acts with Christian holy water, rites, and 
masses, as seen in the old Leechdoms of this country, are too 
numerous for our present scope. 

^ I infer that the cause of the head- assured him that a sick native had ' a 

ache was considered to be the presence tortoise in his back.' To the interpreter 

of a spider creeping through the ear. this seemed such an obviously probable 

My son tells me that in his district in misfortune that no further information 

Southern Nigeria, a ju-ju man recently was to be acquired. 



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THE RECTORY OF FISHLAKE. 



F. R. FAIRBANK, M.D., F.S.A. 

The Rectory of Fishlake has an interesting history. Fishlake is 
one of the places where the body of St. Cuthbert rested during its 
wanderings'; it is therefore natural that the church should be 
dedicated to him. It is one of the churches which were given by 
the third Earl Warren to Lewes Prioiy. In the year 1352 it was given 
up by the Priory to King Edward III in exchange for the rights and 
privileges of naturalisation ; previously to this Lewes had been con- 
sidered and treated as an alien house, and had been taken into the 
King's hands whenever there was war between England and France. 
This period of its history is dealt with in a former volume of this 
Journal,* and is now only briefly referred to. The church then came 
into private patronage for a time, and was given to the Prior and 
Convent of Durham, as an endowment for their College at Oxford, 
known before the Dissolution of Monasteries as Durham College. 
Afterwards it was re-founded as Trinity College, It is the period of 
private patronage, and the gift of it to Durham, which is now specially 
considered. 

In the former article, above referred to. Hunter's list of the 
Rectors of Fishlake' is given in full for convenience ; the names in 
the present list, which occur in it, are marked with an asterisk (*). 



^ It has been handed down among the 
traditions of the Monastery of Durham 
that Fishlake was one of the places 
where the body of St. Cuthbert rested. 
A list of those places was compiled by 
Prior Wessington in I4i6,and placed over 
the choir door of the Church of Durham. 
The original compilation, in the hand- 
writing of the Prior, is still preserved 
in the Durham Treasury, and under the 
shire of "York," he gives the names of 
"Pesholme," **Fysshlake," and "Ac- 
worth." Also there is a document in the 
Registry of the Dean and Chapter of 
Durham which points in the same direc- 
tion. It is an agreement, dated 22 
September, 1438, between the Prior and 
Convent of Durham and Richard Wryghte, 
of Fysshlake, veoman, who thereby 
became tenant of a portion of ground now 



forming part of the garden of the Vicarage . 
It is therein called ** Culhbcrlshaven*' — 
"vulgariter vocatum Cuthbertshaven." 
The name is now lost locally, but there is 
a landing-place from the river still at 
the exact site of the land referred to. 
(Canon Ornsby in Associated Architectural 
Societies* Reports , 1857, pp. 93, 94.) 
Canon Fowler has called my attention to 
the "Metrical Life of S. Cuthbert" 
[Surtees Society, Ixxxvii, 11. 4741-4764), 
in which nothing is said of the bearers of 
his body "raykmg," or roaming, further 
south than Crayke. From this place 
the saint's body was, according to the 
"Metrical Life,'* moved northwards to 
Chest er-Ie- Street. 

« Vol. xii, pp. 36-37. 

^ South Yorkshire, Deanery of DoH' 
caster, vol. i, p. 192. 



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414 THE YORKSHIRE ARCRSOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

Rectors of Fishlake. 
*(i242. Hunter under this date gives Tozeramundus de Farenze, 
instituted 14 kal. Oct (Sept. 18) on the presentation of the Prior 
and Convent of Lewes.) This appears in several points 
incorrect, and to be a mistake for the following : — 

1247. Joceranus, instituted, "salva pensione," by Archbishop Walter 
Gray. {jR^g- Archbishop W, Gray (Surtees Society), page 
102.) In 1249, at the request of the Archbishop-elect of 
Lyons, Archbishop Walter Gray granted him a license of non- 
residence from St. Laurence's Day (Aug. 10), for the next 
three years. (Ibid,^ page 260.) 

Circa 1252. Gerard de Grandison. Instituted about this date by 
Archbishop Walter Gray. Grandison was a chaplain of the 
Pope, and Bishop of Verdun, Western France, 1275-78. 
(Gam's Series Episcoporum^ page 652.) In 1268-9 * certain 
John of Skelton, clerk, appears to have claimed the Rectory 
on the death of a person, John by name — probably a locum 
tenens for Grandison, who was doubtless non-resident — who, 
he alleged, had been Rector. On March 2 of that year 
Archbishop Giffard, of York, gave sentence that John of 
Skelton had no title to the Rectory; that it was in the 
possession of Gerard de Grandison, Papal Chaplain, who had 
been instituted therein sixteen years and more before by 
Archbishop Walter Gray ; and that the preceding Rector was 
called Jocerandus. {Reg, Archbishop Giffard (Surtees Society), 
page 160.) 

*Circa 1300. John de Warrenne. He resigned in 1327. In 1306, on 
4 non. Junii (June 2), Pope Clement V granted to John, son 
of John, Earl of Warrenne, of the diocese of Hereford, who, 
having been ordained priest under age, held the churches of 
Westbiri, Dorkinge, and Fishlake, in the dioceses of Win- 
chester and York, and a canonry and prebend of York, without 
papal dispensation to retain the same. (Co/. Papal Registers, 
Papal LetterSy ii, page 11.) He had a dispensation for 
illegitimacy on 10 kal. Jan. (December 23), 1291, from 
Richard de Swinefield, bishop of Hereford, "cum legitime 
nobis constet te de soluto fore genitum et ^oluta, ac paterne 
incontinencie imitatorem non esse, set conversacionis et vite 
honeste, ac sufficientis sciencie et etatis legitime, aliasque 
tibi merita suffragari." (Reg. /oh. Romania folio 24.) His 
brother, William de Warenne, clerk, had a similar dispensa- 



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THE RECTORY OF FISHLAKE. 415 

tion from the same Bishop. John, son of Sir John, Earl of 
Warenne, was admitted to the church of Dewesbiry on 
15 kal. Aug., anno 8 (July 18, 1293), on the presentation 
of the Prior and Convent of Lewes, the custody of the 
church being committed to Sir William de Rouleby, priest, 
till the Lent ordinations. {Ibid.) On 17 kal. Julii (June 15), 
1294, the custody was prolonged till Hilary next, but on 19 
kal. Sept. (Aug. 14) following he, whilst only a subdeacon, 
was instituted to Dewsbury church in the person of Sir Oliver 
de Wysete, priest, his proctor. {Ibid,^ folio 27.) His brother, 
William, also a subdeacon, was on the same day instituted to 
the church of Hatfield in the person of. the same proctor. 
John was appointed Jan. 2, 1295-6, to the prebend of 
Tockerington, in the cathedral of York, in the Peculiar of 
Hexham. (Le Neve's Fasii^ iii, 217.) .He was then rector of 
Westbury. Previously to 1301 a payment of 10 marks yearly 
had been granted by the pope to the Carthusian priory of 
Trisulti, diocese of Alatri, south-east of Rome, out of the 
rectory of Fishlake, for sixty years. It had been paid for 
some time, but for many years had remained unpaid. In that 
year — 1301 — the pope ordered satisfaction to be made, and if 
necessary, the rents, etc., were to be seized till the prior and 
Convent were satisfied. {CaL of Papal Letters^ i, page 595.) 
This bull is given in Archbishop Greenfield's Register^ i, 58. 
On his resignation 
•1327, Geoffrey de Cotes, priest, of Grimsby, King's clerk, was presented 
by the King. {CaL of Patent Rolls, 1327, pp. 123, 315.) On 
2 kal. Julii (June 30) the Archbishop appointed Sir John de 
Camesale, priest, his proctor in the Church and Rectory of 
Fisshelake {Reg. Melton, fo. 169); and on 14 kal. Sept. (Aug. 
19) he issued a commission to Master John de Wodehous, 
his Official and Commissary General, Mr. Thomas de Neville, 
Professor of Civil Law, Master William de JafTord, and Master 
Adam de Spiriden, to make inquisition on the church of Fisshe- 
lake, to which the King had presented Geoffrey de Cotes, it 
being in the Royal gift by reason of the temporalities of the 
Prior and Convent of Lewes being in the Royal hands in conse- 
quence of the war with France. {Ibid,, fo. 170.) The finding of 
the commission was adverse to Cotes's claim to the Rectory, 
and on 3 non, Dec. (Dec. 3), 1328, the Archbishop had to 
invoke the aid of the secular arm against him, as he had 
been excommunicated by the Abbot of Roche, at the instance 



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416 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

of Bertrand de Sancto Genesio, dean of Angouleme, the 
agent of Master Peter de Vaurelli, the true Rector, for 
intruding into the church. {Ibid,^ fo. 175^.) He was absolved 
from this excommunication on 9 kal. April. (March 24) 
following. {Ibid.y fo. 177.) As a consolation for resigning 
his rights to the church of Fishlake the King granted 
Cotes a pension of 40//. a year. {CaL of Patent Rolls^ 
1330-^334) P^G '52) He was also called Geoffrey de Ovre, 
deriving his name from Over, in Cambridgeshire. {Cat, of 
Close Rolls, 1327-1330, page 542.) 

*i327. Peter Vaurelli was provided to this church by Pope 
John XXII, 2 non. Oct. (Oct 6), by a bull dated at Avignon, 
at the request, amongst others, of Arnold, Cardinal of St. 
Eustace, of whose household he was a member. {Cal, of 
Papal Letters, ii, 26^1.) 

1330. Peter Guinaberti was provided to this rectory by the 
Pope, on the resignation of Peter Vaurelli. {Ibid,, 317.) 
On 3 kal. Nov. (Oct. 3), 1332, he had leave of absence 
for study for one year, from 2 kal. Feb. (Jan. 31) next, and 
to be ordained a sub-deacon within that period; and on 12 
kal. Oct. (Sept. 20), 1334, he had leave of absence for another 
year. {R^g- Melton, 191.) 

* Thomas de Riplingham, on the presentation of John, Earl of 

Warenne, as guardian of the temporalities of the Priory of 
Lewes during the war with France. On his resignation 

* 1 345-6, Thomas Bertram was instituted on Jan. 26, on the same 

presentation, and on April 28 he had leave of absence for 
two years whilst in service with the Earl of Warenne. 
{Register Zouche, ff. 10, 11.) His will was proved on Feb. 13, 
1347-8, and administration of his goods within the juris- 
diction granted to Alan de Lavenham and John de Coges- 
hale, the executors, the other executors renouncing. {Ibid,, 
fo. 321*/.) 

* 1 347-8. Thomas de Brembre, was instituted on the presentation of 

the prior and convent of Lewes, in the person of his proctor, 
Thomas de Shaldebourne, clerk. {Ibid., fo. 17^.) On his 
resignation 
*i35i, Master Richard Mauleverer, chaplain, was instituted on 
March 28, on the presentation of Sir Ralph de Neville, lord 
of Raby. On April 5 following Mauleverer had leave of 
absence whilst in the service of Master Thomas de Neville, 
canon of York. {Ibid,, fo.- 74d.) 



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THE RECTORY OF FISHLAKE. 417 

*i368, Sir William of York, priest, was instituted on Sept. 25, on 
the presentation of Lady Alice de Neville, Lady of Braunce- 
path, and on Oct. 10 following he had leave of absence for 
two years in her service. {Reg, Thoresby^ ff. 148, 149.) 
On June 22, -1378, licence was granted to the Dean and 
Chapter of York for alienation to them in mortmain by 
certain persons, whose names are mentioned, of certain property 
in York, for finding a chaplain to celebrate divine service 
daily in Holy Trinity, King's Court, according to the Arch- 
bishop's ordinance, for the souls of certain other persons 
named (and amongst them William of York, parson of Fish- 
lake) when they died. {CaL of Patent RollSy 1377-1381, page 
256.) On his death 

*i378, John de Kirkeby, Nov. 2, on the presentation of Sir Richard 
Scrope, knight He exchanged with 

*i 379-80, Thomas de Ulsby or Ullesby, parson of St. Mary's, 
Grimsby, instituted on Feb. 20, on the presentation of Sir 
Richard Lescrope, knight, and Sir John Fairfax, clerk. {Reg. 
Alex. Neville^ i, 29.) In 1386 John de Uluesby and John 
Fairfax, parson of Prestcotes, paid the King 25 marks for 
licence to alienate in mortmain a messuage and a* bovate of 
land in Ketilwell and half the advowspn of the church there 
to Coverham Abbey. {Cal. of Patent Rolls^ 1385-9, page 207.) 

The attention of the Benedictine General Chapter was given, 
inter alia^ to the higher education^ of the monks of the Order. In 
1283 a College had been founded at Oxford, by John GifTord, Lord 
of Brimsfield, for the monks of St. Peter's, Gloucester, and it was 
known as "Gloucester Hall," now Worcester College. The principal 
Benedictine houses in the Southern Province joined in the enterprise, 
and built separate houses for themselves in connection with it. In 
1334 Benedict XII issued from Avignon the bull called "Benedic- 
tina," the most important bull issued by the Papal See for the 
legislation of the Order. Chap, v enacts : In every house a properly 
paid teacher is to be appointed to instruct the monks in grammar, 
logic, and philosophy. Seculars are not to be taught with the monks. 
Chap, vi : One monk in twenty must be sent to the Universities for 
higher studies, and he is to have a fixed allowance. 

Thomas Hatfield, Bishop of Durham, founded a College, also at 
Oxford, for the use of the Priory of Durham. It was known as 

^ Nineteenth Century^ vol. xx, p. 724; Gesta Abbaium Man. S. A /bam; The 
Hist, and Cart. Mon.S.Petei\Ghuce5tria\ English Black Monks of S. Benedict^ 
College Histories i Worcester College^ 1900; Tautiton^ vol. i, p. 40. 



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418 THE YORKSHIRE AKCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

Durham College. In 1380 the Prior, Robert de Walworth, a great 
benefector to the Priory, who obtained a bull from Pope Urban VI, 
giving the right to the mitre and other pontificals to the Prior, 
obtained from Bishop Hatfield licence to acquire lands of the annual 
value of 200 marks for endowment of the College at Oxford. In 
the licence the Bishop speaks of the College as "per nos de novo 
fundato." (Deputy Keeper of Public Records' Reports, i, 275.) 

In 1352 Ralph, Lord Nevill of Raby, who* had so much interest 
with the Bishop, Prior, and Convent that he obtained permission for 
himself and his wife to be buried within the church, which had not 
before been granted to a layman or woman, exchanged the manor of 
Eure, CO. Bucks., with the King for the advowson of the church of 
Fishlake, then in the King's hands, as before explained. Perhaps the 
connection of Fishlake with the history of St. Cuthbert may have 
attracted him to this. He presented once to Fishlake and then died. 
The advowson was put in his i«^. /. w., dated 1638. His widow 
Alice also presented once, in that year, and she died, and the 
advowson appears also in her inq. p. m., dated 1376. The advowson 
went to their son John, Lord Nevill of Raby. He also, like his 
father, was much interested in Durham. Among other benefactions 
he gave 600 marks towards the screen at the back of the high altar, 
which still remains; and he also is buried in the Cathedral, at the 
north end of the middle transept. In 1378 (i Ric. II) he appears to 
have had in his mind a scheme for dealing with the advowson of 
Fishlake, for on 10 June he obtained a patent {Cat. Pat. Rolls, 
1377-1381, page 235) from the King, authorising him to alienate it, 
inter alia, "to any ecclesiastics, secular or regular, and for them to 
appropriate the same." But he was unable to carry this out at the 
time, as he had to go on the King's service into Acquitaine. He 
made it over to Richard Scrope, knight, and John Fairfax, 
clerk; and on June 23, 3 Ric. II. (1379), the King, at Westminster 
{Ibid., pages 343, 367), granted a pardon to them for having acquired 
it and entered upon it without licence, and he thereby granted 
them licence to do so. He further granted them licence to present 
to the Rectory, then void through the death of William of York, 
who had been presented by the Lady Alice. Sir Richard Scrope 
had presented, in November, 1378, John de Kirkeby, who on Jan. 25, 
1379, exchanged the living with Thomas de Ullesby, the King 
granting a patent presenting John de Kirkeby, parson of the church 
of Fishlake, to the church of St. Mary, Grymesby, on an exchange of 
benefices with Thomas de Ullesby. {Ibid,) 



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THE RECTORY OF FISHLAKE. 419 

This alienation by John, Lord Nevill, appears to have been for a 
period of fifty years, with reversion to himself. Later on, in 1384 
(Ibid.^ 1 38 1- 1 385, page 371), he arranged with the King to grant 
this reversion to the Prior and Convent of Durham, for the mainten- 
ance of their College at Oxford; and that it might be granted in 
frank almoin^ he granted it first to the King himself, with the stipu- 
lation "that when the Prior and Convent sue from the Chancellor 
for the re-grant thereof, the King will grant it in Jrank almoin^ and 
the Chancellor for the time being, without further mandate, is to 
prepare a charter under the Great Seal accordingly, upon the petition 
of John, Lord Nevill, who has directed his body to be buried in the 
Monastery of Durham." The actual grant by the King in frank 
almoin {3id,, 1385-1389, page 243), is dated Westminster, Oct. 10, 
10 Ric. II (1386). It states that the grant is made by the King out 
of reverence for the glorious Confessor St. Cuthbert, to the Prior and 
Convent of Durham, and their newly-erected College in the University 
of Oxford, in aid of the support of eight monks and eight secular 
scholars studying, and celebrating divine service therein for the good 
estate of the King, and for his soul after death, and for the souls of 
his father, grandfather, progenitors, and heirs, and the late Queen 
Philippa and others. 

In 1387, on Aug. 8, Alexander Neville, archbishop of York, 
appropriated the rectory to Durham College, Oxford, reserving an 
annual pension of 13J. ^d, to the Prior and Convent of Durham. 
This was confirmed by Pope Urban VI the same year, and on July i, 
1388, it was confirmed by the Chapter of Durham. A Vicarage 
was ordained at the same time, in the presentation of the Prior and 
Convent. The vicar was to receive yearly the sum of jQit^ 6s. Sd,, 
and to have a house. 



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KIRKLEES PRIORY. 

By S. J. CHADWICIC 

"And they saw the sanctuary laid desolate, and the altar profaned, and the 
gates burned up, and shrubs growing in the courts as in a forest or as on one of 
the mountains, and the priests' chambers pulled down." — I Maccabees iv, 38. 



Since my account of the Priory appeared in volume xvi of \^s Journal^ 
an old paper document, in sixteenth century handwriting, has been 
found at Kirklees, containing copies of the following documents : — 

1. Copy of the licence in mortmain, 19 Richard II (20 April, 

1396), of which a summary is given in the Journal^ vol. xvi, 
page 326. 

2. Copy of the grant mentioned in the same volume and page 

of the Journal as having been authorised by the above 
licence. The grant is dated at Mirfield, Sunday next after 
the Feast of St. Michael the Archangel (30 September), 1397 
(21 Richard II), and purports to be made by Sir John de 
Mounteney and John de Amyas only. 

3. Copy of the licence in mortmain, 27 June, 1 Henry IV (1400), 

mentioned in volume xvi of the Journal^ page 327. There is, 
however, no copy of the grant which is authorised by this 
licence. 

4. Imperfect copy of the Bull of Pope Boniface IX, appropriating 

the church of Mirfield to Kirklees. . 

5. Account of the separation of the church of Mirfield from the 

mother church of Dewsbury. 

6. Note as to the patronage of the churches of Kirkheaton and 

Mirfield, which is somewhat similar to the extract from the 
Dodsworih MSS, printed in note 2, page 325, of the Journal^ 
vol. xvi. 

It seems unnecessary to print copies of Nos. i and 3, as I have 
already given their purport in my above-mentioned paper. It is not 
clear why the second licence in mortmain (i Henry IV), which is 
under the seal of the Duchy of Lancaster, was obtained, the grant 
under the first licence having been already made by Mounteney 
and Amyas, as previously stated. Richard II resigned his crown 
29 September, 1399, and was succeeded by Henry IV, and it may have 



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KIRKLEES PRIORY. 421 

been thought safer under the circumstances to obtain a new licence 
and a new grant. The new grant, however, does not appear to have 
been made ; at any rate no copy is known ; but the prioress and 
convent appear to have obtained possession of the property purport- 
ing to be granted to them, and in due course they obtained the 
Pope's Bull appropriating the church of Mirfield to the Priory. The 
extracts from this Bull and from the grant by Mounteney and Amyas 
to Kirklees, which Whitaker gives in his History of Leeds^ are very 
imperfect, and I therefore give a full translation of both the Bull 
and the grant, which has been made by Mr. F. B. Bickley, of the 
Manuscript Department of the British Museum, who has also, with 
the kind permission of Sir G. J. Armytage, made a full transcript of 
the old paper document above mentioned. Mr. Bickley says that the 
original Bull is not in the fine collection at the British Museum, and 
all trace of it has been lost. 

The account of the separation of the church of Mirfield from 
the mother church of Dewsbury and the note on the patronage of 
the two churches of Heton (Kirkheaton) and Mirfield have already 
appeared in print in Whitaker's Loidis and Elmete^ page 362, but with 
many errors, and it seems desirable to reprint ihem here in order to 
make the collection of Kirklees documents as complete as possible. 
The note about the patronage, however, is not very accurate, as will 
be seen on reference to volume xvi of this Journal^ page 325, note 2. 
The account of the separation of the church of Mirfield from 
Dewsbury is not trustworthy. It would appear from an entry in 
Archbishop Grafs Register (Surtees Society), page 96, that Mirfield 
was a separate parish in 1245, and that Richard le Vavasour was 
rector at that time, so that John Heton was not the firft rector. 
The entry is under the date 6 ides (loth) May, 1245, and is to the 
effect that " Ric. le Vavasur has the church of Mirefeld." 

I take this opportunity of mentioning that some information about 
the family of Fleming may be obtained from the Chartulary of St. 
John of Pontefract, edited for this Society's Record Series by the late 
Mr. Richard Holmes. See especially page 497 and the references 
there given. The name also frequently occurs in the early Wakefield 
Court Rolls, and there are many Fleming charters amongst the 
Kirklees muniments, one of the latest being a conveyance, dated 
25 September, 10 Henry VHI (1518), of Hartshead Hall (now part of 
the Kirklees estate), by John Flemmyng, of Clifton, to John Lake. 

I ought, perhaps, in my former paper on Kirklees to have men- 
tioned that in Gough's edition of Camden's Britannia, 1B06, vol. iii, 
plate 14, facing page 267, is engraved the tomb of Elizabeth de 



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422 THE YORKSHIRE ARCH^OLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

Staynton, and the inscription is given on page 377. This engraving 
does not agree with Leland's, of which I gave a copy, facing page 323 
of volume xvi of this Journal^ and neither of these plates agrees with 
that given by Gough in his Sepulchral Monuments^ where is shown 
an elaborate floriated cross bearing the fv^t, wounds of Christ, and 
bordered with an inscription in old French differing somewhat from 
that given by Leland Gough says (vol. ii, part i, page ccxlvii), 
referring to this tomb: "Dug out of the ruins of Kirklees Priory, 
Yorkshire, May 11, 1744, now placed on a raised tomb and inju- 
diciously new cut, so that the ancient form of the cross is scarcely 
discernible," but he gives no authority for his statement or for his 
plate of the tomb, neither of which can be confidently accepted. 
Hearne in his edition of Leland' s Itinerary (published in 1744), ii, 
page 56, says in a footnote that his learned friend. Dr. Richardson, of 
Yorkshire, in a letter received from him dated July 16, 17 12, gives a 
copy of the inscription " lately found in digging amongst the ruins of 
the Priory of Kirkleys.** Gough, therefore, was clearly wrong in his 
statement that the discovery took place in 1744. 



GRANT BY SIR JOHN MOUNTENEY AND JOHN DE AMYAS 
TO THE PRIORESS AND CONVENT OF KIRKLEES OF 
LAND IN MIRFIELD AND THE ADVOWSON OF THE 
CHURCH THERE. 

Let those present and to come know that we, John - Mounteney,' 
knight, and John de Ameas,' have given, granted, and by this our 
present charter confirmed to the prioress and convent of Kirkelis 

* The Mounteneys were an ancient and notices of the family. In the second 

important family residing at Shiercliflfe volume of the Test. Ebor, there is a short 

and Cowley, in the parish of Sheffield. note of the will, dated on the day of 

There is much information about them St. Julian, 1434, of William Amyas, of 

in Hunter's HcUiamshire (see especially Sandal, and of the will, dated 1469, 

pages 388-393 and 434-5 of Gatty's of his son John ; and in the third volume 

edition). There is a pedigree on page is mentioned the marriage licence, dated 

J90. Dodsworth's notes from Eglesfeild 29 October, 1481, of John Amias, of 

(Ecclesfield) Church about the Mounteneys Thornhill, and Margaret Medley, and a 

are printed on pages 5-9 of the volume of marriage licence, dated 1 1 May, 1487, of 

his Church Noies^ which Mr. J. W. Clay John>Painter and Margaret Amyas. The 

is now editing for the Record Series of name occurs in the Court Rolls of Wakc- 

our Society. Various members of the field in the early part of the fourteenth 

family are mentioned in the volumes of century. The following are extracts : — 
the Test. Ebor. of the Surtees Society. "Court held Friday, OcUve of St. 

3 Little is known about the family of Michael, I Edw. II (6 October, 1307). 

Amyas. They lived in Sandal, Horbury, John de Amyas took the town {^iltum) of 

Thomhill, and the neighbourhood. A Wakefield to farm for five years with the 

will of William Amyas, of Horbury, farm of the town {vt/Ie), tolls of fairs and 

P^entleman, dated 8 February, 1509-10, markets, and the perquisites of Court of 

IS printed in Test. Edor.^v, 17, to which the town and with the tolls of the oven 

the late Canon Raine has added some {/omic^) of Sourbyschire and also the 



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KIRKLEES PRIORY. 



423 



and their successors fifty acres of land with the appurtenances in 
Mirfield and the advowson of the church of the same town with its 
appurtenances which we lately held, conjointly with John Woderofe' 
and William de Sandall, chaplain, now deceased, To have and to hold 
the aforesaid fifty acres of land and the advowson aforesaid with all 



mills of Wakefield, Sandale, and Thurs- 
tanhawe, at a rent of ;f ICX) per annum." 

** Court held Friday, Feast of the Con- 
ception, 6 Edw. II (8 December, 1312). 
John de Amyas says that he farmed the 
town of Wakefield with the mill and 
appurtenances, and that he leased the 
new mill under Thorstanhagh, with 
Stanley Mill, to one Henry Calf, for 9 
marks for last year." 

•* Court held Friday, Vigil of SS. 
Simon and Jude, 6 Edw. II (28 October, 
1 31 2). John de Amias took from the 
lord the office of dyeing (tincturd) in the 
town of Wakefield and in any other place 
in the soke of that town for five years, 
paying 8x. 8</. rent yearly and 6^. 8^. 
fine." 

Dodsuoorth (vol. Iviii, folio 5) has a note 
that at a Court held 26 February, 24 
Edw. Ill (1350), Edmund de Amyas did 
foalty for a messuage and garden and two 
lx)vates of land with meadow in Osselt, 
which he acquired from John Amyas his 
brother. Isabel, daughter of Roger Amyas 
and wife of John Thurgorland the younger, 
is mentioned in a deed dated 6 Hen. VII. 
(See volume vii of this Journal^ p. 406.) 
There is some information about the 
Amyas family to be found in Banks' 
WcUks in Yorkshire: Wakefield and its 
Neighbourhood, See also Dodsworth's 
Church Notes (Record Series), p. 13, and 
Giover's Visitation of Yorkshire^ edited 
by J. Foster. John de Thomhill, rector 
of Thomhill, by will, dated i May, 1402, 
appointed Sir William Dronsfeld and 
John Amyas supervisors of his goods. 
Amongst the Kirklees Muniments are 
three charters witnessed by John de 
Amyas, viz. a demise of the Manor 
of Breretwhesell (Brieslfield) from Adam 
de Methelay to Sir W^illiam de Fynche- 
dene, knight, dated 39 Edward UI 
(1365-6) ; a grant of the same manor in 
1365 from Edmond de Dronsfeld to 
Adam de Methelay; and a grant in 1369 
from Adam de Methelay to William 
Vavasor and others of the manor of 
Midelschitlyngton. Percival Amyas is a 
party to another deed in the same collec- 
tion, dated 7 April, 1498, relating to 
property in Mirfield. See also the 
Calverley Charters^ now in course of 
publication by the Thorcsby Society. 



1 This would be the John Woderofe, 
Woderove, or Woodrufie, of W^oolley, 
who, according to Hunter {South York- 
shire, ii, 386), made his will 21 Ric. H, 
in which lands at Woolley are mentioned 
among his possessions. A short account 
and a pedigree of the family are given 
by Hunter (ii, 386-390), and another 
pedigree is given in Glove? s Visitation of 
Yorkshire (edited by Foster), p. 381. A 
branch of the family settled at Bollon- 
upon-Deame. See the pedigree in 
Glover's Visitation, p. 355. The chief 
house, however, of the femily was at 
Woolley, where they had large posses- 
sions. They also had large estates in 
Normanton, Snydale, Altofts, Wakefield, 
Stanley, Criggleston, Notton, and the 
neighbourho^. The Woolley and Notton 
estates passed by sale to the Wentworths 
in the year 1599, and the W^oodruflFes 
then died out or disappeared. They are 
however represented in the female line 
by the Wentworths, Thomas Wentworth, 
the great-grandfather of Michael Went- 
worth, the purchaser of Woolley, having 
married a daughter of Sir Richard 
Wood ruffe, of Woolley. See his will, 
with notes, in volume iv of Test, 
Ebor.y p. 240. Further information 
about the Woodruffes and their connec- 
tions may be obtained from the History of 
the Wentworths of Woolley, which was 
printed in volume xii of this Journal. 
Richard WoodrufTe (brother of P'rancis, 
who sold Woolley to Michael Wentworth) 
married Elizabeth, daughter and co- 
heiress of Thomas Percy, seventh Earl of 
Northumberland, who was attainted and 
executed in York in August, 1572. 
According to the Dean of York [Heraldry 
0/ York Minster, ii, 331), the Earl had 
worn on his breast a golden cross con- 
taining what was said to be a thorn from 
the Saviour's crown, given him by Mary, 
Queen of Scots, This he bequeathed to 
his daughter, Elizabeth Woodruffe, by 
whom it was presented to Stoneyhurst 
College. The marriage licence of Richard 
Woodruffe, of Woolley, and Agnes 
Walker, dated 29 June, 143 1, is men- 
tioned in volume iu of the Test. Ebor., 
and in volume ii, p. 5, occurs the will of 
Oliver Wodcrow, of Woolley, dated 
Martinmas, 1430, with notes by Canon 



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424 



THE YORKSHIRE ARCHiEO LOGICAL JOURNAL. 



their appurtenances to the aforesaid prioress and conrent and their 
successors to find a certain chaplain who shall celebrate for ever 
divine service daily for the soul of John de Burgh,* knight, deceased, 
and for the souls of his ancestors and all faithful dead in the con- 
ventual church of Kirkelis, of the chief lords of those fees by the 



Raine about various members of the 
family; and Sir William Woderuf, 
knight, is mentioned in the will of 
William Amyas, of Horbury, referred to 
above in note I. The will of Elizabeth, 
widow of Peter de la Hay, is printed in 
Test. Ebor,^ ii, 38. She was a daughter 
of John Woodruffe, of Woollcy, and her 
will, which is dated 9 Julv, 1434, con- 
tains a bequest of 6j. Vd, to Alice 
Mirfeld, nun of Kirklees. There is also 
a be(]uest of 20f. to the house of Kirk- 
lees m the will of Sir John Depeden, 
dated 20 August, 1402. (TesL Eb*r,, 
i, 294.) 

^ The de Burghs were an important 
Yorkshire family with large possessions in 
Kirkheaton, Dalton, Walton, Penistone, 
and other places. There is a pedigree in 
the Pontefrcut C^iar/w/ar^ (Record Series), 
vol. ii, 307, and another in the Yorkshire 
Inquisitions (Record Series), vol. i, p. 277, 
and a third in vol. vii of this Jourttaly 
p. 268, showing the descent of the de 
Burghs from Adam, son of Sweyn, son of 
Ailnc. The Wakefield Court Rolls fur- 
nish some additions to the pedigree, e,g, 
Thomas de Burgh essoins at a Court in 
October, 1274, and in January, 1306, Sir 
Thomas de Burgh is presented for 
holding two plough oxen as waifs, 
and is to be distrained because no 
one but the Earl (Warren) is to have 
waifs in the EarVs liberty. At a Court 
held at Wakefield in June, 25 or 26 
Edw. I (1297 or 1298), John le Flemeng, 
attorney of Sir Thomas, son and heir of 
Philip de Burgh (not of age and in the 
Earl's custody), gives ;^20 for the manor 
of Waleton (Walton), which he hulds 
from him in chief. At a Court held 
Friday, before the Feast of St. George 
the Martyr, 16 Edw. II (22 April, 1323), 
John, son of Thomas de Burgh, did 
fealty and homage for the manor of 
Walton, and paid 2s, to have respite of 
suit until Michaelmas. An ox to the 
steward. Thomas de Burgh essoined by 
Robert de Mora at a Court held 9 Novem- 
ber, 1330 (4 Edw. III). At a Court held 
at Wakefield in March, 10 Edw. Ill 
(1336), the tenants of Thomas de Burgh's 
heir (then under age) were to come and 
attorn to the lord ; and at a Court on the 
1 2th April following John de Shepelcy 



did fealty, and acknowledged that he 
held the manor of Shepeley and a caru- 
cate of land, &c., of Thomas de Burgh's 
heir by homage and fealty, and by scutage. 
From an entry on the roll of Court for 
Friday after the Feast of Matthias, 10 
Edw. Ill (i March, 1336), it would 
appear that John de Shelley held the 
manor of Shelley and a carucate of land, 
&c., of the de Burghs. On the roll of 
the Court held 28th July, 1340, it is slated 
that by virtue of a letter from Earl 
Warren to William de Skargill, " steward 
of our lands in the north," an inquisition 
was taken by twelve jurors, who said, 
amongst other things, that a messuage 
and land in Wodesom and Dalton were 
granted by Robert Erl to Thomas de 
Burgh, after whose death the tenements 
came to John de Burgh his son, and 
because John took the religious habit Sir 
Thomas de Bui^gh entered the tenements 
as his brother, and he appears to have 
been in possession at the date of the 
inquisition. Sir Thomas Borc^h, knight, 
was lord of the manor of Brighouse in 
1477 (17 Edw. IV), according to the 
Court Roll for that year, which is 
amongst the Kirklees Muniments. On 
23 November, 1521, licence was granted 
to the \icar of Batley to marry Sir 
Thomas Borowe, alias Burgh, knight, 
and Catherine Mirfield, parish of Batley. 
See Test, Ebor, (Surtees Society), iii, 
371. On 29 May, 1246, Archbishop 
Gray granted the wardship of Thomas 
de Burgo to the Archbishop's nephew, 
Walter de Gray, who had married the 
sister of Thomas. See ICirkfy's Inquest 
(Surtees Society), p. 424, and Archbishcp 
Gray's Register (Surtees Society), p. 256. 
In the preceding year the same Walter 
de Gray and others, as "keepers of the 
heir of Thomas de Burgo," presented 
Thomas de Kirkeby to the church of 
(Kirk)heton (Grays Register^ p. 94). I 
have the following notes of early fines 
of the de Burghs, viz.: — 3 Edw. III. 
Bundle I, No. 92. John de Burgh, plain- 
tiflf, and William atte Grene, chaplain, 
and William de Hatford, deforciants, of 
the manors of Walton and Calthome, 
and the advowsons of the churches of 
Penyston, Myrefeld, Heton, and High- 
holonde. (Reversion to Thomas de Burgh 



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KIRKLEES PRIORY. 



425 



services due and accustomed therefor. In testimony whereof we have 
put our seals to this our present charter. These being witnesses, 
John Scott,* knight, Achilles Bosevyll,' William de Dronsefeld,' Thomas 
de Haryngton,* Hugh de Womewell," and others. Dated at Mirfield, 



and Margaret his wife.) 32 Exlw. III. 
Bundle VI, No. 85. The Dean and 
College of the free chapel of St. Stephen 
at Westminster, plaintiffs, and Eli de 
Burton and John de Dronsfeld, defor- 
ciants (John de Burgh, chiualer, enters 
his claim), concerning the advowson of 
the church of Pen)rston. 36 Edw. III. 
Bundle VI, No. 180. John de Bray, 
John de Pelham, chaplain, and William 
de Staunton, chaplain, plaintiffs, and 
John de Burgh, chiualer, deforciant, 
concerning the advowson of the church 
of Penyston. 8 Richard II. Thomas 
de Arundel, Bishop of Ely, and thirteen 
others, plaintifis, and John de Burgh, 
knight, deforciant, concerning the manors 
of Walton and Calthorn, and the advow- 
sons of the churches of Mirfeld, Hegh- 
holand, and Heton ; also manors, &c., in 
Cambridgeshire and Suffolk. 

1 Would this be the Sir John Scott, 
otherwise Calverlcy, of Calverley, who 
was killed at the Battle of Shrewsbury ? 
See Whitaker's Loidis and Elmete^ p. 217. 

* Achilles Bosevyll would [>robably be 
the son of Sir John Bosvile, of Chevet, 
by his wife Constance, daughter and heir 
of John Mounteney, of Cowley, and a 
collateral relative of the Sir John Moun- 
teney who is a party to this charter. For 
accounts of the families of Bosvile of 
Newhall, Gunthwaite, and Chevet, see 
Hunter's South Yorkshire^ vol. ii. Mr. 
Hunter says (vol. ii, p. 340) that in 
Penistone Church is a Bosvile monument 
with a shield of arms quartering, amongst 
others, Dronsfield and Stainton. 

^ For an account of the Dronsfields 
of Bretton see Hunter's South Yorkshire, 
ii, 240-3. William Dronsefeld here men- 
tioned would probably be the person of 
that name who was knighted by Henry 
IV, and had a large estate. The Drons- 
fields preceded the Hcaumontsat Whitley. 
See Hunter as above; also Whitaker's 
Loidis atid Elmete, 343. See the will of 
Sir William Dronsfeld. (Test. Ebor,, i, 
344.) It is dated Monday, in the vigil 
of St. Bartholomew, 1406, and contains 
a bequest of 131. 4^. to the convent of 
Kyrkleghes to pray for the testator's soul. 

* Probably one of the Harringtons of 
Brierley, near Bamsley, an important 

VOL. XVII, 



family, who traced their descent through 
the Neviles to Adam,' son of Sweyn, son 
of Ailric, previously mentioned as an 
ancestor of the de Burghs. See Hunter's 
South Yorkshire, ii, 401-4, for an account 
of the family and pedigrees. There are 
some notes about the Harringtons in the 
Dodsworth MSS. in the Bodleian Library 
(see vol. CKxxiii, folios 146-9). Was the 
Haryngton who witnessed the Kirklees 
charter father of the Sir William Harring- 
ton whose name stands first in the 
pedi|free ^ven by Hunter (ii, 402)? Sir 
William's son, Sir Thomas, died the day 
after the Battle of Wakefield of wounds 
received in the battle. See his will, 
with notes about the family, in Test, 
Ebor, , ii, 249. I have in my possession 
a deed, dated 20 April, 36 Hen. VI, 
by which Sir Thomas Haryngton, 
Sir John Sayvell, and William Scar- 
gill, William Mirfeld, William Salley, 
and John Wentworth, esquires, granted 
lands in Mcltham to the use of Richard 
Beaumont, esquire, for life, with various 
remainders to his issue, and his brothers 
and their issue in tail. The deed slates 
that the lands had been conveyed to the 
grantors and four others, then dead, by 
the said Richard Beaumont and Richard 
Dronsfeld, late parson of the church of 
Heton, William Smyth, chaplain, and 
John Wod, of Lepton. The last-men- 
tioned conveyance was evidently made 
about 4 July, 7 Hen. VI, for I have the 
power of attorney of that date, by which 
the four last-named persons appoint 
Thomas del Hermitege, their attorney, to 
deliver to the same Thomas Haryngton 
(therein styled armiger) and his co- 
grantees possession of the lands com- 
prised in the conveyance. These deeds 
would probably be executed as protec- 
tions against possible forfeiture in the 
troublous times of the fifteenth century. 
'^ Probably of the family of Wombwell 
of Wombwell, of whom an account and 
pedigree are given in Hunter's South 
Yorkshire, ii, 122-5. See also Hunter's 



Hallamshire, edited by Gatty, pp. 448-9, 
and the pedigree in Mr. J. W. Clay's 
edition of^ Dugdalis Visitation of York- 



shire, ii, 209. There are two pedigrees 
of the family in Glovet^s Visitation of 
Yorkshire, pp. 365-6. 



C C 



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426 THE YORKSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL JOURNAL. 

Sundaj next after the Feast of St. Michael the Archangel, in the year 
of our Lord 1397 and the 21st of the reign of King Richard the 
Second. 

BUfX OF POPE BONIFACE IX APPROPRIATING THE 
CHURCH OF MIRFIELD TO KIRKLEES. 

Boniface the bishop, servant of the servants of God for a perpetual 
memorial of the matter. [For] the zeal for the sacred religion under 
which our beloved daughters in Christ the prioress and convent of 
Kirklees, of the Cistercian Order, in the diocese of York, exhibit a 
devout and sedulous family to the Lord, that virtue might be exalted, 
we assent favourably to their prayers, especially to those by which 
the usefulness of the same monastery may be procured and provision 
made for the necessities of the prioress and convent, so far as we 
can with [the help of] God, and if from the duty of pastoral 
solicitude it behoves us to be favourable and beneficent to each 
person dedicated to divine worship [/audifius], and especially to the 
women under sacred religion, the lord of the fee being so much the 
more well disposed, it is fitting that we render aid, as by the weak- 
ness of the female sex they are known to require the greater help. 
Hence it is that we, moved by the supplications of the prioress and - 
convent in this matter, by the tenor of these presents, with the 
apostolic authority, and of our certain knowledge, unite, annex, and 
incorporate for ever the parish church of Mirfield, of the said diocese, 
the patronage of which, as it is asserted, and [the right] of presenting 
rectors to that church, when it shall be vacant, are known to belong 
to the prioress and convent, with all rights and appurtenances to the 
aforesaid priory; the fruits, rent, patronage, and true annual valor 
according to the common estimate we wish to be had by these 
presents for the express relief of the burdens incumbent for the time 
on the prioress and convent, and for the sustentation of the same 
[prioress and convent], so that, the rector of the church who now is 
resigning, or dying, or quitting that church in any way whatsoever, it 
may be lawful to them by themselves, or another, or others, to take 
and retain for ever corporal possession of that church and its rights 
and appurtenances by their own authority, and to cause it to be 

in divine service by a fit priest secular or regular, to be 

appointed and also removed at the will of the prioress of the said 
priory for the time being, who shall have care of the aforesaid 
church and laudably serve the Lord there, and to convert all fr