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Full text of "The Y.W.C.A. cook book : a selection of tested recipes"



ST. THOMAS 

Y. W. C. A. 




Cook Book 



1 908 








w^n 



•iPL*'.' v\ j 



^ 



ST. THOMAS' BEST STORE" 




IMPORTER STAPLE AND FANCY DRY GOODS 



ST. THOMAS 



ONTARIO 



Wedding Outfits 
a Special Feature 



DEPARTMENTS 

FIRST CLASS 
DRESSMAKING 



Mourning OrdetJ 
have prompt care 



Fine Drew Goodj. Sillu. Velvet!. Gowni, Linjerie. Ribbons, Licet, Kid Glovei, Hotiery, Corteli, 
Underwear, Dreu Trimmingi, Art Good*. Wooli, Notioni, Jeweller>', Millinery, ManlJes, CcKtumo, 
Skini. Fun. SKirt Wai«t». Walerproofi, Umbreilai, Table Lineni, Household Linens, Quilu. Blankets, 
Heavy Staples, Carpels, Curtains, Mats, Rugs, Drapes, Damaskj, Blinds, Rollers, Linoleums, Oil Qoths, 
China and Cocoa Mattings, Gents' Furnishings, Hats and Caps, Ready-made Clothing. 



SELECT NOVELTIES IN BALL. RECEPTION AND WEDDING MATERIALS 



"^\\t l^nutr nf ^anb Jprmtmg" 



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ehe Sailutay (Hily'a ISrtiil^tfBt Daily 



Our Job Department is equipped with the very latest 
type and machinery for turning out first 
class work in book work, programmes, 
invitations, etc. 'PHONE 525. 



I 



"Before the housewife now our book is laid — 
'Twill aid her, if its teachings be obeyed. " 


(UV f. M. GI- A. 


Qlnok look 




A Btintxon of Srstrli W^ttxptB (Hampxkli 



IMB 



THE JOURNAL PRESS. 
St. Thomaj, Ontaiio. 



(grafting 




WT'.^tr^ HE YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN 
Association, in sending out this Gook 
Book, feel confident that it will find a 
welcome in the homes of our city 
and surrounding country. 

It will not only solve many diffi- 
culties in the domestic life, but will 
give many an opportunity to help on the work of the 
Association, as the proceeds from the sale of this book 
will be applied on the Building Fund. 

The thanks of the Association are due to the 
business men of our Gity and elsewhere, who have 
advertised in the book, thus defraying the greater 
part of the expense of publication and making it 
possible for the Y. W. G. A. to use almost the entire 
proceeds towards decreasing the debt on the Building. 
The Y. W. G. A. has now been in existence 
some five years and has proved its right to a place in 
the life of our Gity. It has a Boarding House Depart- 
ment which is doing good work among the young 
women who come as strangers and who are employed 
in various ways. 

As the Association becomes stronger finan- 
cially, it hopes to have a better equipped Gymnasium, 
classes in Domestic Science, etc., which are essen- 
tial parts of Y. W. G. A. work everywhere. 

The Association thanks the many citizens of 
our city for its generous aid in the past and feels 
assured that this new effort to decrease its indebted- 
ness will meet with a hearty response. 

THE 

YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

St. Thomas, Ontario 



Snhtx tn KhwvtxBnB 



J. Mickleborough Inside front cover 

Journal Printing Co. " " " 

Ellison & Lewis Inside back cover 

Molson's Bank " " " 

Dominion Bank Back cover 

Page 

Home Bank - ... 4 

Oak Hall - - - - 4 

Alma College - - - - 8 

The Brantford Starch Works - 12 

The Merchants Bank - - 16 

C. H. Hepinstall, Jeweler - 16 

Anderson Co. & J. Mickleborough 20 

E. McCredie, Bicycles - - 24 
A. L. Garland, Dry Goods - 24 
Crocker's Greenhouses - - 28 
The Peoples Meat Market - 28 
S. A. Crawford, Hardware - 28 

F. Sutherland, Shoeman - 28 
Geo, H. Small, Druggist - - 28 
The Wm. Davies Co., Butchers 32 
Marlatt & Smith, Coal Dealers - 32 
Southern Loan & Savings Co. - 32 
S. Dubber, Butcher - - . 36 
P. R. Williams & Son, Undertkrs. 36 
The Goodwin Furniture House - 36 
I. W. McPherson, Insurance - 36 
R. H. & J. Dowler, Clothiers - 40 
R. Sanders, Carpenter - - 40 
Can. Telegraph and Business Coll. 40 
Hay's Book Store - - 44 
Hamilton & Stott, Plumbers - 44 
Logan & Wading, Dyers - 48 

E. O. Pound, Insurance - - 48 
W. E. Lumley, Butcher - 48 
S. G. Wright, Insurance - - 48 
Red Rose Tea Co. - - 52 
Gilbert Roche, Insurance - - 52 
S. J. Spencer, Baker - - 56 

F. M. Griffin, Coal Dealer - - 56 



Page 

Geo. Geddes, Insurance Z 56 

W. B. Jennings Furniture Co. - 56 

Butler Bros., Grocers - - 56 

Langdon & Ruth, Real Estate - 56 

Moody & Clark, Butchers - 60 

C. E. Raven, Boots and Shoes 60 

Lewis Jones, Fur Dealer - 60 

Canadian Canners, Limited - 64 

W. C. Forbes, Jeweler - 68 

Ingram & Davey, Hardware - 68 

Andrew Grant, Barrister - - 68 

S. B. Pocock, Boots and Shoes - 68 

Brewster & Co., 10c. Store - 68 

F. M. Bond, Baker ... 68 

St. Thomas Packing Co. - - 72 

Miss McCormack, Dressmciker - 76 

Miss Moore, Ladies Tailoring - * 76 

J. G. Lang, Teas and Coffees - 76 

Geo, P. Smith, Butcher . - 76 

T. H. Duncombe, Druggist - 76 

W. O. Foster, Druggist - .76 

Hirsch's Shoe Store . - - 80 

W. G. Brown & Son, Hardware 80 

F. W. Judd, Druggist . - 80 

J. H. Hopkins, Photographer - 80 

Reeks & Co., Grocers . - 84 

McDonald & Douglas, Clothing - 84 

Mrs. Geraldine Olson - - 84 

W. R. Jackson, Jeweler - - 84 
T. Hortop, Livery - . .108 

J. A. McCance, Grocer . .108 

Wm. Cadman, Tinsmith - - 108 

E. A. Smith, Real Estate . . 108 

R. H. Beattie, Baker - . 108 

R. McLachlin, Bookseller - 116 

C. E. Sanders, Dry Goods - 116 

Adcock Flour Mills - - - 1 16 

Dutlou's Shoe Store - . - I 16 

John Campbell Co. - - 120 



.^lO^ 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK-BOOK 



®I|? i^mxu lank nf QIaiialia 

ORIGINAL CHARTER 1854 

ij^pah (§f&a (Toronto 



Savings Bank in connection with 
each office. 



St. Thomas Branch, cor. of Talbot 
and Hiawatha streets. Open on 
Saturday evening from 7 to 9. 



G. W. N. BOULTON, Manager 



h.b.k; 



The 'HusKy' Shirt 

is manufactured for the workingnmn. "NOXOL'" is the name of 
the Cloth from wliich "Husky" Workingmen's Shirt.-^ are ma(ie. 
It is the strongest cotton cloth manufactured and is controlled 
exclusively by the Hudson Hay Knitting Company. No other 
maker of workingmen's shirts in Canada can use Noxol Cloth. It 
i.M triple woven and made from Sea Island cotton, and is guaran- 
teed to he free from adulteraticm . It is tlie Longest-wearing 
workingman's shirt that was ever made. It is the only shirt 
known that carries with it a guarantee for twelve months. No 
otlur wnrkingmniis ..ihirt is gnai;inte»d iit nil. 

"HUSKY" Shirts ZLre GuaLfaixted for Twelve Months 

&.i\4 Cb.n be procured BlI the 

OAK. HALL 



.Vf. Uhomaj' "Beji Clothing Sfort. 



419 21 Te^lbol St. 



I 



ST. THOMAS Y. W, C. A. COOK BOOK 



TABLES 



For Fruits (Boil) 



Cherries 5 

Raspberries 6 

Blackberries 6 

Strawberries 8 

Plums 10 

Pie Plant 10 

Bartlett Pears 20 

Ripe Currants 6 

Peaches 1 8 

Whole Peaches 1 5 

Siberian Crabs 25 



minutes, 6 oz. sugar to quart 
4 

6 

8 

8 

" 10 

6 

8 
4 

4 
8 



Weights and Measures 



1 



2 cups butter 1 pound 

4 " flour 1 

2 " granulated sugar 1 

2f " brown sugar 1 

2 " fine chopped meats 1 

3 teaspoons 1 tablespoon 

16 tablespoons 1 cup 

2 tablespoons butter 1 ounce 

4 '" flour..... 

1 pint 2 cups 

1 ordinary egg .ff. 2 ounces 

10 " " 1 pound 

1 slice of bread, an inch thick 1 ounce 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 



SOUPS 



Pea Soup ^ 

One can of peas, one quart of milk, butter size of an egg. 
Bruise the peas and strain. Then add the milk. Place in double 
boiler. Add butter. When hot dissolve two teaspoons of corn- 
starch and stir quickly. — Mrs. Cochrane. 

Bean Soup 

One pint beans cooked in water until soft, one quart milk, 
two tablespoons flour moistened with milk, one tablespoon but- 
ter, 1 teaspoon salt, one-half teaspoon pepper. After beans are 
cooked mash through strainer and add to thickened milk, then 
add salt, pepper and butter, and bring to a boil. — Mrs. J. A. Mc- 
Cance. 

Clear Tomato Soup 

One pint tomato juice, one pint hot water, half table spoon 
sugar, one-half teaspoon salt, 2 cloves, 2 bay leaves, one-half 
small onion chopped, cayenne to taste. Simmer ten minutes. 
Add one-half tablespoon butter and thicken with one- half table- 
spoon cornstarch. Strain and serve with toasted crackers. — 
Mrs. D. J. Hughes. 

Noodles 

Two large cupfuls flour, one tablespoonfuF butter, salt. Mix 
well together. Two well-beaten eggs, a very little water, just 
enough to make a very stiff dough. Roll as thin as possible. 
Spread out on bake tray for a few hours and allow to dry. Cut 
into (juarter inch strips and throw into boiling salted water. Boil 
for fifteen minutes then drain as dry as possible and put in serv- 
ing dish. Fry bread crumbs a rich brown in i)lenty of butter 
and put o\er noodles. Pour a cup of milk in pan the bread was 
fried in, let come to a boil ami pour over noodles. The noodles 
also make very nice soup if boiled in beef stock. — Mrs.S.H.Eby. 

Potato Soup 

Oiu; < uj- iiill celery (the coarse parts with a few !<a\cs will 
do), two srhall onions chopped fine and 4 medium sized potatoes, 
also cliDppcd. Cook with one fjuart water until very tender, then 
'*^ add one lu.irt rich milk, into wliich stir one small tcaspoonful 
flour. Season with pepper and salt also piece of butter size of 
walnut. If desired hot, mashed potatoes put through a sieve may 
Se added instead of cooking potatoes withcelery. — Mrs. K.Heard. 



ST. THOMAS Y, W. C. A, COOK BOOK 



Tomato Soup 

Tliree large tomatoes or one can, one bunch celery, one 
onion, one quart water, salt and pepper to taste. Thicken with 
one tablespoonful of butter and one of flour creamed. — Very 
good. — Mrs. Babbitt. 

Mock Bisque Soup 

One quart milk, two tablespoons butter, one tablespoon flour, 
one teaspoon salt, one-eighth teaspoon cayenne pepper, one small 
onion, one pint tomato juice. Heat and strain tomato, melt but- 
ter in sauce pan, when bubbling add flour, add onion to milk and 
heat in double boiler, then add gradually butter and flour, beating 
thoroughly, put in salt and pepper and remove slices of onion, 
put into tomato juice a pinch of soda. Just before serving add 
this to the milk preparation, serve very hot. — Mrs. Urie. 

White Stock for Soup 

Two knuckles of veal, two onions, two tablespoons salt, 
eight quarts water. Boil six hours. Strain into a stone jar and 
keep in^cool place. When cool remove the fat. 

Oyster Soup 

Take one quart milk, 1 tablespoon butter, one-half teaspoon 
salt, a dash of pepper, four rolled crackers. Bring to full boiling 
heat as soon as possible, add three cups oysters. Let the whole 
Come quickly to a boil and serve at once. 

Sago Soup 

Two quarts soup stock, thicken with sago to the consistency 
of pea soup and season with catsup. 

Bean Soup 

One cup beans soaked over night and boiled till tender, drain, 
add the rough parts of two bunches of celery, one-half small 
onion chopped fine. Cook in as little water as possible. When 
done season with salt and pepper. Put in one quart milk, one 
tablespoon butter, thicken with teaspoon cornstarch and bring to 
a boil. Serve at once. — Mrs. R. Heard. 

White Soup 

Three scant tablespoons tapioca soaked in one pint of milk, 
four large potatoes, two small onions, two tablespoons of butter, 
pepper and salt to taste. Boil the vegetables and butter in three 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 



m99y »-»-»-»<>»»»^>3»»»«r>»»-9 »**•{ 



I Where Will 

i You Edu- 
i cate Your 
I Uaushter? at^sSl^ 




ALMA LADIES' COLLEGE S 



ST. THOMAS. ONT. (Chartered 1877. Opened 1881) 
Is a Leading Residential School and Offers Many Advantages 



1. A RMidcnlial School ii BpjI. Alma College furnishes superior 
home condilioiM. You are cordially invited to viiit the College to see the 
excellent accommodation.'-. 

2. SEVEN DEPARTMENTS: Collegiate (or all High School Classes 
pf- ~-— • *'r Lniversiiy Matriculation and Teachers' Non-Professional 
I ■ . Junior Department lor Girls doing F'ublic School studies; 
M iates prepared for University and Conservatory music examin- 
fttions): Kine Art; Elocution&Physical Culture; Commercial; Domestic Science. 

S 3. Strong Staff of Teachers and Governesses in the Residence with 

2 ihe students. Alma offers a refining and sociali;ing life. 

9 4. Good Board ; good health. St. I honias is one of the healthiest 

Z cities in Canada. 

A ^- Buildings and Equipment superior. College is patronized by all 

2 the Churches. 

Z 6. Alma't Students successful in examinations by the University and 

5 by the Education Department. Alma has one of the strongest and most 

• thorough music schools in Canada. Alrr.a has led for many years in I'ineArt 

Z studies. Elocution and Physical Culture especially successful. Full Busi- 

2 ne»s College Courses. Alma has been the pioneer of Canadian schools in 

J Domestic Science. The rales al Alma are exceptionally moderate ; indeed 

S often It is real economy to place the daughter in Alma College where 

S she has the chance to concentrate her thought on her studies and where she 

2 hai the stimulu* of contact with specialists pursuing various lines of culture. 

Z This u highly important. 

2 New students may enter at any time when there it • vacancy. 

« _ 

LI" or Clalrndar and Syllahus of Studies address. 
F^F:V. PRlNCir^AL WARNI.R. M. A.. D. D. 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 



pints of water, until very tender, then pour through a collendar, 
return to the saucepan, add the milk and tapioca. Boil twenty 
minutes stirring constantly. — Mrs. Still. 

Cream Pea Soup 

One can of peas cooked very soft, rub through a sieve and 
add enough water to make a good pint, season with salt and pep- 
per to taste, heat in double boiler one pint of milk thickened with 
two teaspoons of flour, rubbed smooth in a very little cold milk, 
cook about ten minutes and add butter about size of an egg, stir 
well and add hot pea liquid. Strain and serve hot with salted 
wafers. This may be heated the second day. — Mrs. T. Robertson. 

Note — Cream corn soup may be done the same way. 

Cream Tomato Soup 

Take eight ripe tomatoes or one can tomatoes, one onion, 
two cups of milk, one cup of celery, two pounds of flour. Stew 
all together until soft, then strain, put milk on to heat when hot, 
add flour that has been rubbed smooth with a little cold milk. 
Add to tomatoes one-half teaspoon of soda, stir well then add 
boiling milk to which butter the size of an egg has been added. 
Serve at once. — Mrs. H. B. Smith. 

Brown Soup Stock 

Two shins of beef, one of veal, one dozen cloves, one dozen 
peppercorns, two tablespoons salt, eight quarts water. Boil eight 
hours, strain into a jar and when cold take off the fat. When 
lemon is to be added to soup, put it into tureen and pour hot 
soup over. 

Celery Soup 

One-half cup rice, one cup celery, chopped fine. Cook in dif- 
ferent sauce pans until quite soft. Add two quarts milk, salt, 
pepper and butter to taste. — Mrs. H. B. Smith. 

Tomato Soup 

Boil soup meat five hours, strain, cool, remove fat, add bunch 
of celery, two large onions, one quart toqiatoes, salt and pepper 
to taste. Strain and serve with small squares of toasted bread. — 
Mrs. H. B. Smith. 

Tomato Soup 

One quart tomatoes, one small onion, cup of water, and salt 
to taste. Boil till onion is soft then strain and add a good sized 



10 ST. THOMAS Y. \V. C. A. COOK BOOK 

piece of butter and a little roast beef dripping. Add slowly one 
cup of milk and when hot thicken with a little flour. \\'hen 
ready to serve add one-(]uarter teaspoon soda. — Mrs. Murphy. 

Ox Tail Soup 

In hot saucepan place good sized piece of butter and brown. 
Wash and cut three ox tails and place in browned butter and fry, 
then pour all in pot with four quarts of boiling water, cut fine one 
onion, one carrot, sprig parsley and celery. Boil two hours and 
a half, salt and strain. When cold, skim fat off and add one 
tablespoon tomato catsup. When boiling, stir two tablespoons 
flour mixed in cold water. Simmer till ready. — Mrs. Murphy. 

Cream of Celery Soup 

One head of celery, one pint water, one pint milk, one table- 
spoon butter, one tablespoon flour, one-half teaspoon salt, one- 
half teaspoon pepper, one teaspoon minced onions. Wash and 
scrape celery, cut into half-inch pieces and put into one pint of 
boilinji water, cook until very soft. When tender mash in same 
water, add salt and pepper. Cook onion in milk and with it make 
white sauce with butter and flour, add this to the celery and strain 
and return to the saucepan and reheat. — Mrs. Stainsby. 



Qk^ 
^f^ 



For Receipts in this Book Use Harvey's Baking Powder 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 11 



FISH 



Tests for Fresh Fish 

1. There must be blood in the gills. 

2. The eyes should be bright ?nd bulging. 

3. Meat should be firm and elastic. 

4. The tail should be firm but drooping. 

Baked Fish Stuffing 

For baked fish use same stuffmg as for chicken. 

Boiling or Steaming- Fish 

In boiling or steaming fish wrap in cheese cloth and do not 
allow it to touch the bottom of the kettle. 

Boning Fish 

To bo;ie a fish cut off the head, lay fish out flat with bone 
uppermost and begin at the head end with the fingers, or sharp 
knife, loosen the bone from the flesh, gently drawing out their 
encasing the smaller bones at the side. Carefully loosen the bone 
all the way down to the tail. 

Baked Fish 

Prepare and clean, dry carefully, rub the interior with a 
little salt and fill it with stuffing, leave enough room for it to 
swell slightly, sew up the slit with foot-ball stitch, secure in 
position and place in pan, dredge with flour, pepper and salt, 
surround with plenty of dripping and bake until brown, basting 
frequently. For a four pound-fish allow three-quarters to one 
hour. — Ella Smith. 

How to Serve Baked Fish 

Baked fish is served with its tail in its mouth or in the shape 
of a letter "S". 

- Boiled White Fish 

Wrap fish firmly in a cotton cloth, boil one hour in salted 
water, drain and lay on platter. Serve with a sauce made of two 
tablespoons butter, one tablespoon flour, one cup boiling water. 
Garnish with parsley and hard boiled eggs. 



12 ST. THOMAS Y.W.C.A. COOK BOOK 

CELLULOID STARCH 

Keeps Linen Looking New. 

From first to la^ Celluloid Starch is best. It is 
easier on you and easier on your linen. 

To those who have never used Celluloid Starch, 
about the hardest part of ironing day was the starch- 
ing. The boiling of the ^arch, the hard rubbing to 
get it into the fabric and then the continual sticking of 
the iron. 

But Celluloid Starch is different. 

Celluloid Starch is a cold water starch — it re- 
quires no cooking. Just mix it with cold water and 
its ready for use. 

It requires a great deal of hard rubbing to get 
common starch below the surface of the fabric, taking 
a great deal of starch. But Celluloid Starch soaks 
into the fabric without any rubbing, fills every fibre. 

Then you don't require wax — the iron won't 
stick when Celluloid Starch is used — and just the 
right stiffness and the proper gloss is secured with very 
little ironing. 

Celluloid Starch will make your linen look better 
and last longer- -'twill do this in less time with less 
work and bother than any other starch you can use. 

Get a package of Celluloid Starch from your 
grocer today and prove these facts to your own 
satisfaction. 

The Brantford Starch Ulorks 

LIMITED 

Brantford :: Canada. 



ST. THOMAS Y. W, C. A. COOK BOOK 13 



Boiled Salmon 

Boil one can of salmon twenty minutes, take from can and 
serve with sauce. Two tablespoons butter, one tablespoon flour, 
one cup boiUng water. Garnish with hard boiled eggs and pars- 
ley.— Mrs. H. B. Smith. . 

Boiled Fish 

Wrap the fish in a piece of clean cheese cloth and when 
water boils, lower fish into it and rest it on a platter or iods. 
Do not let water rise above simmering point and to the water 
add the juice of half a lemon or quarter cup vinegar, piece of bay 
leaf, two tablespoons salt and a few cloves, usually it takes thirty 
or forty minutes. 

White Sauce for Fish 

One cup milk, one tablespoon flour, one tablespoon butter, 
salt and pepper to taste, make white sauce and add one teaspoon 
chopped parsley or one hard boiled egg chopped fine. This is 
used for boiled or steamed fish. 

Boiled Salmon with Sauce 

Put a can of salmon in boiling water, boil forty minutes, 
prepare this sauce while salmon is boiling. Chop fine six hard 
boiled eggs, mix with two tablespoons of butter, one teaspoon of 
pepper, pinch salt, two teaspoons mustard, milk enough to make 
a gravy, boil two minutes, open can of salmon, pour on a large 
warm platter and cover with the dressing. Serve hot. — Mrs. F. 
A. White. 

Baked Salmon 

One can salmon, three eggs well beaten, four tablespoons 
melted butter, one-half cup sweet milk, four crackers rolled fine, 
pepper and salt to taste. Beat all together then roll another 
cracker and sift over top, bake a few minutes in a quick oven 
until browned nicely. — Miss Wickett. 



Baked Salmon 

One can salmon, six soda biscuits, one-half cup hot water, 
small piece butter. Remove bones from fish and then put in dish, 
add water. Roll biscuits, put on top with butter on top of them, 
bake fifteen minutes or till brown. — Mrs. Jones. 



14 ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 



Salmon Croquettes 

One can salmon, one-half cup milk, one egg, ten soda bis- 
cuits (rolled fine), salt and pepper. Mix all together, make into 
patties, roll into beaten egg and bread crumbs and fry in butter. 
Sauce. — One quart of canned tomatoes (strained), two teaspoons 
sugar, one teaspoon cornstarch. Scald tomatoes, tlien add sugar 
and comstaich. — Mrs. IC. A. Smith. 

Scalloped Salmon 

Into a buttered bakuig dish put a layer of salmon, then a 
layer of stale crumbs, a layer of white sauce, repeat until dish is 
full and put a layer of buttered crumbs on top. Hake in a hot 
oven until crumbs are brown. It is better to use a sliallow dish 
and not have more than two layers of hsh. — E. Smith. 

Scalloped Salmon (No. 2) 

Take one can biiimon and pick t(i pieces, put layer of salmon 
in buttered dish, then layer of cracker crumbs, a little salt and 
pepper and tiny little bits of butter, repeat until salmon is used 
and then have ready one and one-half cups sweet milk with one 
egg beaten in it and pour over allowing it to soak well in. 
Sprinkle cracker crumbs over and put in hot oven. Allow twenty 
minutes to a half an hour. — Mrs. T. Robertson. 

Salmon Cheese 

One can salmon, eight soda crackers, one egg, one cup milk, 
salt and pepper. — E. Smith. 

Salmon in a Mould 

Take one can salmon, drain off lif}uid, chop fish fine and rub 
into it minced parsley or celery, beat two eggs light with one-half 
cup cracker crumbs. Mix all together well. Fut into buttered 
mould and steam one hour. — Sauce for same : one cup milk 
heated to boiling point and thickened with one tablespoon corn- 
starch, then add liquor from salmon, one large teaspoon butter, 
one teaspoon catsup. Last of all stir in one well beaten egg and 
boil one minute. Watch carefully or it may curdle. Four sauce 
over when taken from the mould.- Mrs. K. Ht-ard. 

Salmon Loaf 

One can salmon, two tablespoons sweet milk, two table- 
spoons melted butter, one-half cup of soft bread crumbs, salt and 
cayenne to taste. Mix and add three eggs well beaten, put in 
well-buttered mould, steam one and one-quarter hours. 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 15 



Salmon Loaf 

Melt two tablespoons of butter in saucepan, add two eggs, two- 
thirds cup cracker crumbs, salt and pepper to taste, one can sal- 
mon, remove bone and skin, then add the above mixture, put in 
buttered tin and steam one hour, remove from tin while hot and 
set on ice, garnish with hard boiled eggs, parsley or quarters or 
slices of lemon. — Mrs. Turville. 

Creamed Codfish 

Two cups milk, one cup codfish, four tablespoons flour, four 
tablespoons butter, salt and pepper. Pick the codfish apart and 
soak in luke warm water, time depending on the hardness or soft- 
ness, drain off the water and reheat the fish in the cream sauce. 
Just before removing from fire add well beaten egg, garnish with 
slices of hard boiled egg. 

Fish Balls 

The remains of any cold fish can be used. Break the fish 
to pieces and remove bone and skin, and shred very fine. Add 
an equal quantity of mashed potatoes, and make into a stiff bat- 
ter with a piece of butter and some milk and a beaten egg, flour 
your hands and shape the mixture into balls or cakes. Fry in 
boiling lard or dripping to a light brown. — Mrs. G, T. Baldwin, 

Codfish Balls 

One cup salt codfish, one and one-eighth teaspoons pepper, 
one teaspoon butter, two cups mashed potatoes, one 
egg. Pick codfish to pieces, let soak in warm water 
for one-half hour, drain and cook till tender, drain, add hot mashed 
potatoes, fat, pepper and beaten egg, beat mixture until very 
light, set away to cool. When needed mould into balls, roll in 
crumbs and egg, fry in deep fat. 

Codfish Balls 

One pint codfish picked up, one quart potatoes cut up in 
small pieces. Put in kettle and cover well with cold water and 
boil until potatoes are done. Drain off water and mash together 
until very fine, then add one good tablespoon butter, two eggs, a 
little pepper, fish usually makes them salty enough. Beat thor- 
oughly with a spoon until very light, dip in spoonfuls into deep 
hot fat and fry until brown. Take up on a hot platter on which 
area couple of thicknesses of brown paper. I sometimes dip the 
balls into rolled cracker before frying. — Mrs. J. M. Green. 



16 ■ ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 

The Merchants Bank of Canada 

i ST. THOMAS. ONT. ^ 

(} Talbot and Ross Street Branches () 

-<o<:> <:><:> v 

^ Capital and Reserve over $10,000,000.00. ^ 

^ One of the great financial bulwarks of our a 

^ country. (^ 

(} A record of 40 years before the people of this <) 

V country. v 

^ Any amount will open an account and you will ^ 

? be credited with the interest fOUP timCS d ycaf. \ 

^ F. B. HOLTBY . Manager ^ 




(} Wedding Presents, Cut Glass and (} 

oilverwear ^ 

K We give Good Commercial Values, and avoid \ 

,^ all Questionable Goods. a 

With Plated Ware, especially, this protects our 

A patrons to the greatest possible extent. K 

() Keep us in mind for your next wedding. h 

(} C. H. Hepinstall ^ 

'I 308 Talbot St.. ST. THOMAS. Phone 118 ^ 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK-BOOK 17 



Finnan Haddock 

Steam to loosen skin, remove all skin and bones, put into a pan 
with a little milk and cook in slow oven fifteen minutes. 
Serve with the hot milk poured over it. — Mrs. H. Smith. 

Cream Finnan Haddock 

Pick to pieces, removing skin and bones. After being cooked 
tender, h^ve ready cream sauce, add, and let heat thoroughly. — 
Mrs. T. R. Robertson. 

Oyster Omelette 

One cup bread crumbs soaked in one cup of milk, four eggs 
beaten separately, one salt-spoon salt, one and one-half teaspoons 
of softened butter, add the stiffly beaten whites of eggs last and 
turn into a well buttered hot omelette-pan, when well set spread 
half with drained oysters. Let stand in hot oven three minutes, 
then fold and serve at once. Salmon may be used instead of oy- 
sters.— Mrs. L. M. Miller. 

Scalloped Oysters 

One pint oysters, two cups bread crumbs, four level table- 
spoons butter, salt and pepper to taste, melt butter, add crumbs 
and seasoning. Butter baking dish and place alternate layers of 
crumbs and oysters. The whole may be moistened with st milk. 
—Mrs. F. M. Gnfhn. 

Creamed Oysters 

Take one dozen select oysters and wash them until perfectly 
free from pieces of shells, put them in a saucepan at the side of 
the fire and let simmer gently for a few minutes until oysters 
plump up. Remove the oysters with a skimmer and put them on 
a warm dish in the oven, add to the liquor one teacup cream or 
good milk and salt and pepper to taste. Place the pan on the 
fire, when the liquor boils add two tablespoons of butter into 
which has been stirred one teaspoonful flour. When creamy, put 
in the oysters and remove the pan from the fire. Have ready 
some pieces toasted bread, nicely buttered, put the oysters on them, 
pour over the cream and serve very hot. — Marion Witte. 

Fried Oysters 

Select fine oysters, dry out of their own liquor, have ready a 
plate of beaten egg and one of rolled cracker crumbs, lay them in 
the egg and then in the cracker crumbs, allowing them to remain 



18 ST. THOMAS Y. M. C. A. COOK BOOK. 

a couple of minutes or so. This will make them adhere and not 
come off as a skin in the pan. Fry in hot butter, when they are 
a golden brown on both sides the ovster is cooked sufficient. — 
Mrs. T. R. 

Fried Oysters 

Take fine large oysters and drain tlieni, have ready crackers 
rolled to a powder, season with salt and pepper, also two well- 
beaten eggs, dip the oysters in the eggs, then in the . cracker 
crumbs. Have a frying pan ready with boiling lard or butter and 
fry a nice brown. Place on a dish and garnish with parsley. — 
F. A. Farley. 

Dressing for Fish or Chicken 

One cup bread crumbs, one tablespoon melted butler, salt 
and pepper to taste, a little onion, savory or thyme and parsley. 
Fill cavity, allowing enough room to swell, sew up cavity with 
strong thread or twine. If fish is dry cut gashes crosswise and 
put in strips of fat salt pork. — I-". Smith. 

Sauce for Fish (No. 2) 

One-half cup butter, two eggs, one tablespoon lemon juice, 
one-quarter teaspoon salt, dash cayenne, one-third cup boiling 
water. Break the eggs into a round bottomed bowl, beat until 
light, add lemon juice and one-third butter, place bowl in boiling 
water and beat until the butter is melted, add the second third of 
butter and continue beating, adding the last third as the sauce 
thickens, add water gradually. Salt, pepper and beat until mix- 
ture is thick enough to cling to beater. 



#> 



y 



Harvey's Baking Powder is Pure and Wholeson:e 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 19 



MEATS 



How to Select Them 

Beef should be a bright clear red and the fat white. It 
should be well clothed in fat to insure its being tender and juicy. 
The finest pieces are the sirloin and +he ribs — the latter making 
the best roasting piece in the animal. In cooking steaks remem- 
ber it is far better to turn over three or four times on a platter 
containing a little olive oil than it is to hammer them tender. 
The object is not to force out the juice but to soften the fiber. 

In selecting pork one cannot exercise too great care in ex- 
amining it. Do not buy any that is clammy or has kernals in 
the fat. Remember, too, when the rind is hard it is old. 

Veal should be fine in grain of a delicate pink. 

Mutton should be firm and juicy. The flesh close-grained, 
the fat hard and white. 

Boiled Ham 

Put ham (ten pounds) on m cold water, let come to a boil 
and boil forty minutes, remove from stove and cover with paper 
first, then with a large piece of carpet or rug for twenty-four 
hours, when it will be ready for use. Delicious. — Mrs. G. Sym- 
ington. 

Lamb Chops 

Heat pan hot, place chops on it, turning it constantly with a 
knife until brown. Prepare mashed potatoes and pile in middle of 
dish, moulding neatly. Place chops upright on potatoes and pour 
tomato sauce on each side. Garnish with parsley. — Tomato 
sauce : One cup strained tomato, one tablespoon butter, one table- 
spoon flour, salt and pepper. — Miss Gray. 

Scalloped Lamb 

For sauce : Boil together, one quart canned tomatoes, two 
bay leaves, a few black peppers, for ten minutes, strain. Melt 
three tablespoons of butter, three tablespoons of flour, work 
smooth and add to tomato juice, with one cup of stock. 

Place in dish thin layer of buttered bread crumbs, a layer of 
thinly chipped cold lanib, then laver of cooked rice, and some of 



20 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 



Crompton and C/C 

a la Grace Corsets 





~^ 



For ^alt in ~yi Thomaj Bi 



6/)e Anderson Co., and J. Mickleborou^K, 



Limited. 



Limited. 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 21 

the sauce between each layer of rice and meat until dish is nearly 
filled. Have buttered crumbs on the top, bake one half hour, let 
brown on top. Do not fill dish too full, for it will expand while 
cooking. — Mrs. H. T. Gough. 

Roast Loin of Veal 

Leave in the kidney around which put considerable salt, 
make a dressing the same as for fowl, unroll the loin put the 
dressing well around the kidney, fold and secure well with twine 
in all directions. Place in dripping pan, thick side down and put 
in rather hot oven, letting it cool to moderate, in half an hour 
add a little hot water and baste often. Half an hour after turn 
over the roast and when done dredge with flour lightly and baste 
with melted butter. Before serving remove the twine. A roast 
of four or five pounds will bake in two hours. For gravy skin 
off some of the fat if there is too much, dredge in flour, stir until 
brown, add hot water if necessary. Serve with green peas and 
lemon jelly. Is very nice sliced cold for lunch and Worcester- 
shire or Chili sauce forms a fine relish. 

Brine for Pickling Beef 

One gallon water, three pounds salt, six pounds brown sugar, 
half-ounze salt petre. Put all the ingredients in sauce pan and 
boil for half an hour, skim often. Pour pickle into crock and 
when cold add meat. Let stand from eight to fourteen days ac- 
cording to size. This pickle will keep good for six months if 
boiled and skimmed every two weeks. 

An Easy Sunday Dinner 

Take a two-gallon butter jar, one that is as wide as it is high. 
It costs only ten cents. Wash the roast, season to taste, place 
into the jar "dry," with no water whatever. Have a good cover, 
weighted heavily, to keep steam in. Place the jar on an asbestos 
mat over a slow coal fire or gas burner at ten o'clock Sunday 
morning, go to church without a second thought about your 
roast, come home at half-past twelve, and find it beautifully done. 
The gravy juice is golden brown and ready for thickening, while 
the potatoes are boiling. No gravies compare in flavor and 
smoothness to this kind. Even the cheapest cuts, of meats be- 
come tender and delicious with this treatment, and' the process 
needs no "watching" or "basting" at any time. I have pre- 
pared as large as six-pound roasts in this jar ; I have used no 

Harvey's Baking Powder is all Leaven 



12 ST. THOMAS V. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 

Other way for four years, and my delicious roasts ha\-e won many 
converts to this manner of preparing. My estimates for the 
length of time required for cooking are as follows: 

Beef 30 to 40 minutes per pound 

Pork . .„ 20 to 30 

Lamb 20 to 25 

Chicken 30 to 35 

Tame duck 40 to 60 

Wild duck 30 to 40 

— Mrs. E. C. Harvey. 

Yorkshire Pudding 

( Mil- iJint of milk, four egg yolks and whites beaten separately 
one teaspoon salt, two cups of flour. Bake three-quarters of an 
hour. — Mrs. F. M. Griffin. 

Liver and Bacon 

Calf's liver preferred. Slice it one-quarter inches thick, pour 
hot water over and let stand a few minutes, then dry in a napkin. 
Take one-half pound thin sliced bacon, or as much as you require, 
and fry to a crisp. Lay on platter and keep hot, then fry the liver 
in same pan, having first seasoned it with salt and pepper and 
dredged in flour. Serve with a slice of bacon on top of each 
slice of liver. — Mrs. K. Heard. 

Fried Sweet Breads 

Let llicm iif lor hall an liour ni warm water then thiow iiUo 

liot water t(j harden, draw off" the outer casing and remove the 

little pipes. Par-boil five minutes, wipe dry, slice and fry in a 
very little butter to a crisp brown.— Mrs. R. Heard. 

Tenderloins Stuffed with Oysters 

Take two large tenderloins, split them, season with salt, 
pcpi)er and relery salt. Spread one tenderloin with dressing, 
putting the other half of tenderloin on top, then spread the top 
thick with dressing. Tie together with cord. Bake as you would 
a chicken. Baste often. \'ery fine. 

Baked Tenderloin 

Wipe tenderloin, put in adripi>ing-pan and brown quickly in a 
hot oven, sprinkle with salt and pepper and dredge with flour. 



Harvey's Baking Powder assures Success 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 23 

Bake forty-five minutes, keep covered and baste occasionally. — 
Mrs. D. G. McKellar. 

Stuffing for Goose or Tame Duck 

Mash potatoes finely, season highly with minced onion, sage, 
salt and pepper. Never fill a fowl more than two-thirds. Apples 
may be substituted for potatoes. 

Chicken Croquettes 

Four cups minced chicken, one cup bread crumbs, three 
eggs, drawn butter. Roll chicken, bread crumbs, eggs, seasoning, 
and enough drawn butter to moisten, mto pear-shaped balls. Dip 
these into beaten eggs and bread crumbs. Put mto chafing dish 
and fry a nice brown. 

Veal, Chicken and Rabbit Bondinettes 

To every one pound of finely minced meat, add one-quarter 
pound of mashed potatoes. Season with salt and pepper and 
moisten with gravy made from the bones of the cold meat. Press 
the mmced meat into well buttered cups and bake for twenty 
minutes. Turn out on dish, pour a little brown gravy around 
and stick a sprig of parsley into each bondinette. 

Smothered Beefsteak 

Take one slice of round steak, place in very hot pan, over 
this pour drawn butter sauce, made as follows : two tablespoons 
butter, one tablespoon flour, one-quarter teaspoon salt, a little 
pepper. Cover the pan and bake in moderate oven one and one- 
half hours. Just before raising add one-half can tomatoes, 
heated and serve. — Mrs. R. Heard. 

Roast Steak and Potatoes 

Butter a baking dish and sprinkle in a layer of chopped 
steak, season with salt and pepper. Put over this a layer of raw 
potatoes, peeled and sliced. Dust over a little flour, add another 
layer of steak, and so on until the pan is full. Fill pan with hot 
water, cover and bake three hours. The flour used thickens the 
water and makes a delicious gravy. 

Rolled Steak 

Take a good rump steak, flatten and lay upon it a seasoning 
made of bread crumbs, parsley, pepper and salt, mixed with but- 
ter beaten to a cream with a fork. Roll up and bind with twine, 



Harvey's Baking Powder is absolutely Pure 



24 



ST. THOMAS V. W . C. A. COOK BOOK 



M^CREDlEroRBlCYCLES 




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Garland's New Cash Store 

STAPLE AND FANCY DRY GOODS 
MANTLES, MILLINERY AND FURS 

The Home of High Art Millinery 

The Greatest Good to the Greatest Number 
is the Principle on which This Store Works 

455-457 



ST. THOMAS Talbot Street 

X Telephone 411 Box 2 9 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 25 

lay in a dish with a cup of boihng water, cover and bake forty 
minutes, basting frequently. Remove cover and let brown before 
sending to the table. Thicken the gravy with browned flour. 
A layer of oysters, instead of the bread crumbs is a pleasant 
change. 

Spiced Beef 

Boil a shank of beef in as little water as will merely cover 
it. Cook till meat falls from the bone. Chop very fine, spice 
with ground cloves, pepper, salt and summer savory. Add suf- 
ficient of the liquor in which it was boiled to' moisten well. 
Press into moulds and when cold slice. 

Toad-in-the- Whole 

Sift four large tablespoons of flour and a pinch of salt 
into a basin. Beat an egg well and add to the flour. Gradually 
add one pint of milk until the batter is smooth. Cut up one-half 
pound of steak into dice pieces, sprinkle with pepper and salt and 
place in a well buttered baking dish. Pour the batter over the 
meat and bake until a straw will be free from batter, when stuck 
into it. Serve on warm plates with mashed potatoes. — M.Tucker. 

Shepherd's Pie 

Put cold meat through a chopper, place in baking dish, 
moisten with cold gravy, seasoned. Cover with a thick layer of 
mashed potatoes and cook in a moderate oven half an hour. 

French Meat Pie 

Fry a large onion until brown, in a tablespoon of butter, add 
one cup soup stock or gravy and one cup tomatoes. When boil- 
ing, add cold meat cut in small pieces, season with salt and pepper 
and thicken slightly with flour. When boiled sufficiently pour into 
a dish and cover with mashed potatoes. Put in oven and bake 
half an hour or until potatoes are done. — Mrs. S. H. Smilev. 

Meat Pie 

Ingredients : Sliced raw potatoes, chopped onion, raw beef 
in cubes. Put alternate layers of potatoes, onion and meat, 
Sprinkle with flour and season with pepper and salt, until baking 
dish is almost full, add small quantity of water and three table- 
spoons tomato catsup. Cook three hours in slow oven. Twenty 
minutes before serving cover with rich paste and brown. — Mrs. 
Thompson. 

No Ammonia or Alum in Harvey's Baking Powder 



26 ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 

A Genuine Irish Stew 

Cut two pounds of chops from the best end of a neck of 
mutton and pare away nearly all the fat. A portion of the breast 
m^y be cut into squares and used, but a neck of mutton is the 
best joint for the purpose. Take as many potatoes as will 
amount after peeling to twice the weight of the meat. Slice them 
with eight large onions also sliced. Put a layer of mixed pota- 
toes and onions at the buttom of a stew pan, place the meat on 
this and season it plentifully with pepper and lightly with salt. 
Pack closely and cover the meat with another layer of potato and 
onion, pour in as much water or stock as will moisten the top 
layer, cover the stewpan tightly and let its contents simmer 
gently for three hours. Be careful not to remove the lid as this 
will let out the flavor. 

Jellied Tongue 

Boil a large tongue eight hours, remove from hot liquid and 
skim, taking away any bone or gristle and fat. Press and skewer 
the tip of the tongue firmly into root or else bind with a piece of 
cotton. Crowd into a bowl, stand in cold place till set. A 
knuckle of veal added to the tongue and boiled with it will im- 
prove the jelly. Reduce liquid to half pint and pour over tongue 
in bowl. When thoroughly cold and skewers removed it will 
slice beautifully. — Mrs. R. S. Heard. 

Jellied Veal 

Cook a knuckle of veal till tender, lift from kettle and chop 
very fine, season with pepper and salt to taste. Garnish the 
bottom of mould with slices of hard boiled eggs and sprinkle over 
this a few sprigs of parsley. Put in a layer of meat, a layer of 
eggs and if desired a little finely chopped onion. Cover with re- 
maining meat. l3oil down the liquid until reduced to a cupful, 
pour (»\cr iiH-at into [h(- mould. I'ress and chill. 

Jellied Veal 

Take one shank of veal, fair size, cook until tender, remove 
from bone, cut in small pieces, carefully removing gristly part, 
lH)il down licjuor until half, season with salt, pepper and a little 
savory. Have ready three hard boiled eggs, cut in half. Row 
round bottom of mould, face down, mix meat and liquor 
well and j)our over eggs. When cold turn out on platter and 
garnish with parsley.- Mrs. Robertson. 



You get good results with Harvey's Baking Powder 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK-BOOK 27 

Veal Oysters 

Cut vearfrom the leg or tenderloin into pieces size of an 
oyster. Season with pepper, salt and a little mace, dip in egg, 
then into cracker crumbs and fry. They both look and taste like 
oysters. To be eaten with tomato sauce. — Mrs. R. S. Heard. 

Veal Patties 

Two pounds of veal, chopped, one small grated onion, salt, 
pepper, and just a little sage. Make in little patties and roll in 
cracker crumbs, and fry in hot drippings, turning often to brown 
evenly. — Mrs. McAndrews. 

Beef Patties 

Chop fine some cold beef, beat two eggs and mix with the 
meat, adding a little milk, melted butter, salt and pepper. Make 
into rolls and fry. 

Meat Croquettes 

One pound of raw minced beef, one egg, one onion chopped 
fine with a little parsley, pepper and salt. Form into cakes, 
dredge with flour and fry in very hot Ko-nut or drippings. 

Salt Pork (nearly equal to fresh) 

Cut as many slices as needed, soak over night in one pint of 
milk and water, about half of each, sour or sweet milk will do. 
Rinse till water is clear, roll in cornmeal and fry. Quite as nice 
as fresh pork. — Farmer's Wife. 

Fried Salt Pork 

Take thin slices of pickled pork, fry lightly then mix a batter 
of egg, flour and milk, and nnmerse the pork in this till it has be- 
come completely covered and fry to a light brown. — Farmer's 
Wife. 

Chicken or Veal Fritters 

Cold chicken or veal, one cup flour, one tablespoon baking- 
powder, half cup milk and two eggs, salt and pepper, beat eggs 
thoroughly, add the milk, and pour on the flour and baking-powder 
sifted together. Beat thoroughly. Cut chicken or veal into thin 
slices, season with salt and pepper. Dip them into the batter 
and fry. 

Harvey's Baking Powder assures Success 



28 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 



CRO CKER^S G REENHO USES 

41-49 ANN STEET, ST. THOMAS. TELEPHONE 210 

Cut Flowers and Pot Plants at all Seasons. 

Made-Up-Floral- Work a Specialty. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed. 



The People's Meat 
Market 



We make provision 
to supiJy you with 
meats of only the first 
(limlity. We select 
••un-fully and expertly 
only. We.«hallV)egla<l 
to see you in our store 
anytime, but ifyou can- 
not come in |)ersoii tel- 
ephone <)82 for what 
you want and wc will 
d>> tilt- n>t. 

580 Talbot Street 



The People's Meat 
Market 



BUY THE 

"GEM" 

food Chopper 

The Best in the World 

S .A. Cra^wford 

Is the Agent 

2 TWO STORES 2 

219 Talbot St. 
53 Ross St. 



AN ODE 

In making cookery to 
please, 

^uur feet should cer- 
tainly be .shod with 
ease ; 

Come to Sutherland's 
and see the .«hoes. 

If it he 6"s, 7"s or num- 
ber 2's. 

Comfort in footwear 
m;iny a time, 

.Saved a dinner ever so 
Hue — 

Thus SrTHEKL.\ND en- 
deavor.s to plea.«e — 

For what is life without 
this ease '' 

F. Sutherland, 

321 Ta^lbot Street 

Sole Agent for Queen Quality 

fur Women, and Invictus 

Biioes for Men 



EVERY RECEIPT 

In this Book will give the best satisfaction 
if our flavoring Extracts, Spices, and Baking 
Powder are used. 

GEO. H. SMALL, 



300 TALBOT ST. 



Druggist 



ST. THOMAS 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 29 



Caserole of Rice and Meat 

One cup boiled rice, two cups cold meat, hot water, stock or 
gravy to moisten the meat, salt and pepper to taste. Steam thirty 
to forty-five minutes. Butter a mold, line with rice, put meat in 
the centre, cover the top with rice. Steam and serve with tomato 
sauce, or white sauce with curry powder. — Ella Smith. 

Rice and Meat Croquettes 

One cup of boiled rice, one cup of finely chopped cooked 
meat, any kind, one teaspoon salt, a little pepper, two tablespoons 
of butter, half cup milk, one egg. Put milk into boil and add 
meat, rice and seasoning. When this boiis, add the egg, well 
beaten. Stir one minute. After cooling, shape, dip in egg and 
crumbs and fry quickly in boiling fat. It will take one and one- 
half minutes. Take up and lay on brown paper, in a warm pan. 
Serve at once. — Mrs. W. B. Doherty. 

Meat Croquettes 

Cut bits of meat and potatoes as for hash, add a little onion 
and parsley, salt and pepper, cream, one spoonful of butter and 
flour together. Add milk. When thickened stir into it the meat 
and potatoes, cook for four minutes, turn into buttered dish, 
shape into croquettes, roll in cracker crumbs, bake in hot oven 
fifteen minutes. Is very nice to make cream sauce to pour 
over before serving. If flour is browned before sauce is made it 
will be much better. — Mrs. Babbitt. 

To Keep Meat Hot 

A nice way to keep meat hot without drying is to place it in 
a hot dish and set it over a large saucepan of hot water at the 
side of the stove. Cover the pan and again cover that ^yith a 
cloth. It will keep meat, sauces or vegetables hot without re- 
duction or burning. 

Roast Turkey or Chicken 

W'ash fowls in three waters, wipe them dry inside and out, 
dredge with a little flour, salt and pepper inside. Prepare a 
dressing of bread crumbs, seasoned with pepper, salt, sage, sum- 
mer savory, and plenty of butter. Moisten with luke warm 
water. Fill the bodies and crops of the fowls. Make a paste of 
flour and butter and put all over the fowls. Then bake them for 
two or three hours, according to size. Baste them frequently 

in this Book Use Harvey's Baking Powder 



30 ST THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK, 

while roasting. Stew the giblets in a saucepan. Just before 
serving, chop the giblets fine and add to the gravy of the roast 
fowls. Thicken the gravy with a little flour. Roast turkey 
should be served with cranberry sauce, celery and jellies. — Mrs. 
S. Chant. 

To Roast Old Fowl 

Neatly dress and soak in cold water for two hours. Boil 
until tender, then put into roaster and stuff with sage dressing. 
Take two tablespoons t^our mixed with butter and spread over 
chicken. Put in oven and bake until a delicate brown. 

Fried Chicken 

< 
Steam a good sized chicken until tender, remove from liquor, 
roll in flour, brown in butter, seasoning with pepper and salt. 
Remove to hot platter, garnish with parsley, add the liquor to the 
brown butter in pan and season with salt and pepper and thicken 
with a little brown flour. — Mrs. Robertson. 

Fried Spring Chicken 

Cut up chicken, roll in flour, fry in hot butter or drippings 
(or mixed), season with salt and pepper, cover, cook until nearly 
done, then brown. Add half cup of milk to gravy and tliicken 
with a little flour. 

Jellied Chicken 

Prepare two chickens as for stewing, boil in water enough to 
cover, until you can take out all the bones, there should be one 
quart of liquor when stewed, put the meat back with the liquor, 
season with pepper, salt, and a lump of butter, to taste. Have 
a small box of jelatine dissolved in cold water, add to the chicken 
and lifjuor, when boiling. Let it boil up, and then pour into a 
mould. Have the chickens in as large pieces as possible. 
— Mrs. Tonge. 

Chicken with Mushrooms 

Put m ( hafui^ disli two tablespcjons of butter, <>iu- table- 
spoon of flour, with half pint of nnlk, one gill mushroom liquor. 
Add one pint of cold chicken. Cook three or four minutes, add 
half can of mushrooms sliced. Cook three minutes longer, then 
add very slowly the yolks of two eggs, salt and pepper, stirring 
all the time. Serve on toast. 

Harvey's Baking Powder is absolutely Pure 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 31 

Roast Quail 

Rinse well and steam over boiling water until tender, then 
dredge with flour and smother in butter. Season with salt and 
pepper and roast in oven. Thicken the gravy. Serve with 
green grape jelly and garnish with parsley. 

Maryland Fried Chicken with Corn Dodgers 

Cut up a chicken (young) and drop pieces into boiling lard. 
Fry until well browned and thoroughly cooked. Remove to hot 
platter, pour off the lard, leaving only the chicken gravy and pour 
m about one cup of cream. Dredge in a little flour and stir, 
boil three minutes, season with pepper and salt, and pour over 
chicken, sprmkle top with chopped parsley. Have ready firm 
cold corn-meal mush, cut it into sLces, dip them lightly in egg, 
cove*" with flour and fry in butter. Garnish the edge of the plat- 
ter with these corn dodgers and serve. 

Meat, Fish or Fowl Souffle 

To make the white sauce : Two level teaspoons butter, two 
level teaspoons flour, one cup cold milk. Melt butter and add 
flour until perfectly smooth, do not boil butter. One teaspoon of 
grated onion, two egg yokes and whites beaten separately and 
very light, a little cold water with the yokes, a pinch of salt with 
the whites. Add yokes and cook a minute with white sauce and 
a cup of chopped fowl, meat or fish previously cooked. When 
cold fold in the whites and bake in a buttered dish twenty min- 
utes. Must be served immediately with any table sauce desired. 
The salt should never be added to the cream sauce until after it 
is cooked or it might curdle. — Mrs. A. C. Hill. 

Escalloped Chicken 

To a pint of boiling hot cream add one tablespoon flour, mix 
till smooth, season with pepper and salt. Scatter a few bread 
crumbs in dish, then a layer of seasoned chicken cut fine, 
then a layer of cream dressing, put two layers each, then bread 
crumbs and small pieces of butter on top. If milk is used in- 
stead of cream add a small teaspoon butter. A dainty use to 
make of cold chicken. 

Chicken Croquettes 

Take a cup of cold boiled rice, add a cup of finely minced 



You get good results with Harvey's Baking Powder 



32 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 



Choice Provisions 




Study Your Range 

A LL stoves do not burn 
the same kind of 
coal to the best advantage. 
It depends on the require- 
ments of the stove and the 
strength of the drafts. 
No matter what kind of 
coal your stove needs we 
can give you a satisfac- 
tory article, as we carry 
a complete stock of the 
best grades of coal on the 
market. 

MAHLATT & SMITH 

IMIIINK 414 
WELLINtJTON AND RAILWAY 


and Meats 

Y5|7E make a specialty 
of supplying the 
the best in these lines and 
our stock is always fresh. 
Fresh butter and eggs- 
direct from the farm — at 
lowest market prices. 
None better at any price. 

Orders promptly diik 'ercd 
to any part of the City. 


The WM. DAVIES CO. 



Southern Loan & Savings Co. 



366 TALBOT STREET. 



Assets 



ST. THOMAS. ONTARIO 



$2,000,000.00 



Lo&ns !7ioney at current rates of interest to purclmse 
Ijomes in St. Thomas. 

Receives deposits (subject to cheque) and allows 
interest ( ompoimdcd (juarterly thereon. 

Issues Debentures for a fixed term at special rates 
of Interest. 



J. W. STEWART 



Manager 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 33 

chicken, one egg, salt, pepper and a tablespoon of flour. Make 
in little cakes and fry brown in butter. — Mrs. H. Morley. 

Chestnut Dressing 

Shell three pints of chestnuts, put them in hot 
water and boil until the skins are soft, then drain the water and 
remove the skins. Replace the chestnuts in water and boil until 
soft. Take out a few at a time and press through a colander 
while hot. Season with two tablespoons butter, two teaspoons 
salt and a quarter teaspoon pepper. — Mrs. R. Heard. 

Potato Dressing 

Two cups mashed potatoes (hot), one teaspoon onion juice, 
four tablespoons of cream, yolks of two eggs, one tablespoon of 
parsley, one tablespoon of butter. Mix all together. Nice for 
duck or goose. 

Dressing for Fowl 

Six cups of fine bread crumbs, a little salt, marjoram, sage, 
and thyne. Two small boiled potatoes, one egg well beaten. 
Mix with a little butter or pure beef-drippings. — L. Lewis. 

Drawn Butter 

Two tablespoons butter, one tablespoon flour, thoroughly 
creamed together, season to taste with salt and pepper, pour over 
half cup boiling water, stir till smooth and thick. 

Veal Loaf 

Chop fine three pounds of veal and a half pound of salt pork, 
three soda' crackers rolled, two eggs, butter the size of two eggs, 
one teaspoon pepper, one teaspoon salt. Mix well, then stir in 
all the liquor. Put in mold and steam two hours. — Mrs. J.J.Hall. 

Beef Loaf 

Three pounds chopped beefsteak, three eggs, three rolled 
soda biscuits, half cup sweet milk, a pinch of salt, dash summer 
savory. Put in baking pan and bake in moderate oven one 
hour.— Mrs .F.White. 

Beef Loaf 

Two pounds round of beef chopped, with half pound of salt 
pork, one cup fine cracker crumbs, one egg, just a sprinkling of 



Harvey's Baking Powder is Pure and Wholesome 



34 ST. THOMAS V. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 

onion, a little salt and pepper, and, if preferred, a very little 
sprinkling of sage. Mix well and roll loaf in flour, bake a nice 
brown and serve with the gravy. — Mrs. McAndrew. 

Beef Loaf 

One and a quarter pounds minced veal, three-quarter pound 
chopped beef, two unbeaten eggs, one teaspoon salt, half teaspoon 
pepper, one tablespoon melted butter, mix well. One cup sweet 
milk, four rolled soda biscuits. Form in loaf and bake one hour. 
—Mrs. W. Powell. 

Beef Loaf 

Two pounds beefsteak chopped fine, one cup cracker 
crumbs, one cup milk, one egg, pepper and salt, sage, parsley 
or savory. Mix well together. Bake in deep pan for one hour. 
— Mrs. R. M. Anderson.' 

Beef Olives 

'lake a tablespoon e;uh of chopped parsley and onion (or 
onion alone) with salt and pepper, spread on pieces of thin beef- 
steak, off round, cut two inches long and four wide. Roll up and 
skew. Fry one tablespoon butter and one tablespoon chopped 
onion, and brown olives nicely in this, then cover with cold water 
and let stew slowly an hour or two. Thicken gravy with brown 
flour and remove skewers. Serve hot. — Miss Taylor. 

Beefsteak Pudding 

One pound of bcetsteak cut in cubes, four cups flour, one 
teaspoon salt, one teaspoon baking powder, one heaping cupful 
of chopped suet. Mix flour, salt, baking powder and suet. Add 
enough cold water to make a soft dough. Line a bowl, put in 
the meat, sjirinkle with salt and pepper, cover with another piece 
of dougli, sealing all carefully. Turn out on a well floured 
rloth, tie lightly, leaving room for pudding to swell. Boil two 
hours, when done turn out on platter. Cut disc out of top and 
add one-half cup of hot water for gravy. Be sure water is boil- 
in./ wild) oiKidiiiLr Is put in first. 

Roast Beef 

Have oven very hot, put in roast, allow twenty minutes for 
each pound, without water. Let roast half of required time, take 
from oven, season to taste, return to oven with enough water lo 
keep from burning. 

For Recipes in this Book Use Harvey's Baking Powder 



ST. THOMAS Y.W.C.A. COOK BOOK 35 

Yorkshire Pudding 

Two eggs, one-half tea spoon salt, one cup flour, one cup of 
sweet milk. Put one tablespoon of the meat juice in tin, pour 
in batter and bake. — Mrs. Haight. 

Beef Tea 

Put one pound of chopped lean beef in a glass fruit-jar and 
add one pint cold water, let it stand for one hour, stirring and 
pressing occasionally. Place jar in a kettle of water, put it over 
the fire and allow water to come to boiling point, then move ket- 
tle to back of range when the water will simmer for one hour, 
keeping the jar closely covered. Strain beef tea through a fine 
seive, allowing the sediment to pass through, it adds to the nour- 
ishmg qualites. Flavor with salt. — -Miss E. Smith. 




Harvey's Baking Powder is Pure and Wholesome 



36 ST. THOMAS Y. \V. C. A. COOK BOOK 



BUY MEATS OF S. DUBBER 

Who keeps nothing but the 
best Quality. All orders by 
phone attended to without 
delay ..... 



P. R. WILLIAMS ® SON 

Funera.! Directors e^nd EmbaLlmers 

469 Ta^Ibot St., ST. THOMAS 



We Disinfect with Dr. Geo. Leininger's Solidi- 
fied Formaldehyde and Apparatus after each 
death. No Contagion. No Bad Odor. Every 
Scientific Precaution taken. 



THE GOODWIN riRNITURE HOUSE 

Corner Talbot and riinks Streets. ST. TNOMAS. ONTARIO 



DEALER IN 



Furniture, Upholstered Goods, Etc. 

$1 5. - Ostermoor Patent Electric Felt Mattress - $1 5. 

First Cost is Last Cost and Only Cost 

L W. McPHERSON 

Real Estate Broker 

Gity and Farm Property Bought and Sold on Gom- 

mission. Fire and Life Insurance. Money to 

Loan on Real Estate and Ghattel Mortgages 

Office 19 Elgin St.. ST. THOMAS 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 37 



MEAT RELISHES 



Tomato Mustard 

Six large onions, six large tomatoes, six large apples, one- 
fourth pound mustard, one-half tablespoon salt, one and one-half 
cups granulated sugar, one quart vinegar. Boil tomatoes, apples 
and onions until cooked, then strain. Put in vinegar, salt, mus- 
tard and sugar and boil till thickened. — Mrs. Cathcart. 

Indian Sauce 

Twelve tomatoes, sixteen apples, one and one-half pounds 
brown sugar, one pound raisins, one large pepper, seven onions, 
four tablespoons salt, two quarts vinegar. Chop all fine and boil 
one hour and put through a sieve. Then add two tablespoons of 
ginger and one tablespoon of mustard. Let all boil half an 
hour. When cold, bottle and cork tight. — Mrs. A. H. Adkins. 

Grape Catsup 

Five pounds of grapes, two and one-half pounds sugar, one 
pint vinegar, one tablespoonful of cinnamon, cloves, pepper and 
allspice (each ground), one-half tablespoon salt. Boil until thick, 
then strain. — Mrs. L. E. Tate. 

East India Relish 

Twelve heads celery chopped fine, three onions chopped 
fine, one-fourth pound mustard, one tablespoon black pepper, 
two tablespoons salt, one tablespoon curry powder, one table- 
spoon turmeric, three cups brown sugar, three quarts cider vine- 
gar. Boil one hour. — Mrs. R. S. Heard. 

Tomato Relish 

One gallon green tomatoes, five large onions, two heads 
celery, one head cabbage, three red peppers, two pounds sugar, 
one-fourth pound mustard, one-half ounce turmeric. Slice toma- 



Harvey's Baking Powder assures Success 



3*^ M. J hl>ma> v. w. c. a. cook book 

toes and onions, sprinkle with salt, stand over night,drain and chop 
not too fine, add the other ingredients also chopped, cover with 
vinegar. Boil till tender, mix mustard and turmeric and sugar 
with vinegar and add while boiling. — Mrs. Atkins. 

Corn Relish 

Twel\ e ears sweet corn, one head cabbage, four red peppers, 
one-half gallon vinegar, one pound granulated sugar, one-half 
pound Coleman's mustard, two heads of celery, three-fourths cup 
salt. Chop cabbage, salt and let drain one hour, chop peppers 
and celery together, cut the corn ofl' the ears. Mix mustard in 
cold vinegar. Add all together, cook slowly two hours. — Mrs. 
Hugh McPherson. 

Tomato Mustard 

One peck tomatoes scalded and put through a seive, three 
teaspoons wliite pepper, one-half teaspoon black pepper, salt, one 
I>ound onion, one-half ounce mace, three large cloves of garlic. 
J-Joil one hour, strain and add one pint of vinegar, one-half pound 
mustard mixed with vinegar, add and boil twentv minutes. — Mrs. 
F. M. Gufiin. 

Made Mustard 

One small cup mustard, three teaspoons sugar, one teaspoon 
siilt. Mix to smooth paste with good vinegar, then put in air- 
tight bottle or jar till you requiie to use. This is better when 
m.ide some time and will keep indefinately. — Mrs. E. C. Harvey. 

French Mustard 

Two eggs, one teacup of sweet cream, one teaspoon of butter, 
one teaspoon of sugar, one-half teaspoon of salt, one-half cup of 
mustard. Beat the ingredients together and cook in a double 
boiler; when thickened add one-half cup of vinegar. — Mrs. J. 
Spurr. 



Harvey's Baking Powder is Pure and Wholesome 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A, COOK BOOK 39 



French Mustard 

One egg, one teaspoon butter, one teacup vinegar, two table- 
spoons mustard. Add a little salt, pepper and one tablespoon 
brown sugar. — Mrs. W. P. Bell. 

Bordeaux Sauce 

One peck green tomatoes, one cabbage cut fine, ten onions 
chopped fine, four green peppers, one teacup salt. Mix and let 
stand for one-half hour then drain and put in a kettle with one- 
half ounce tumeric powder, one-half ounce celery seed, two pounds 
brown sugar, one gallon vinegar — Mrs. A. McPherson. 

Pepper Sauce 

One large head cabbage, twelve good sized onions, one dozen 
each of red and green peppers all chopped fine, salt and let stand 
over night. In the morning heat three pints of vinegar with one 
a:nd one-half pounds brown sugar, four tablespoons each of mus- 
tard seed and celery seed. Throw over the chopped mixture and 
when cold bottle. — Mrs. A. McPherson. 

Corn Sauce 

Twelve ears of corn shredded off ears, one head of cabbage 
chopped fine, salt and drain, four red peppers with seeds out, one- 
fourth pound mustard, four cups sugar, two level tablespoons salt, 
one-half gallon vinegar. Let come to a boil and seal. — Mrs. Eby. 

Cranberry Frappa 

Boil one quart berries in one pint of water for tew minutes, 
strain through a coarse cheese cloth, add one pint sugar, stir and 
boil till sugar is dissolved. When cold add juice of two lemons, 
freeze to a mush, using equal parts salt and ice. Serve in glass 
custard cups with turkey. — T. G. Plewis. 

Tomato Jelly 

One quart can of tomatoes, one small onion, a piece of celery 
root, one tablespoon full sugar, one teaspoon of salt, four whole 
cloves, one-fourth tea-spoon of cayenne pepper, a piece of bay 
leaf. Simmer fifteen minutes or till the tomatoes are soft, then 

For Recipes in this Book Use Harvey's Bakirjg Powder 



40 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 



Dowler Fioe Clothing R. Sanders 



The best recipe for 
well dressed men and 
boys is to be found in our 
up-to-the-minute store 
— keenest cash prices. 



R. H. & J. DOWLER 



ST THOMAS 



RECIPE 

{extraordinary) 

Take a good school (Best's 
is the name), put in a wide 
awake boy or girl, add one 
of our expert teachers, mix 
well for one term and when 
taken out you will find a 
Well Done CjRadlatk 
Telkc.rai'HY.Shorthand, 

COMMLRfFAL. 
♦♦♦♦•*"•>•»••»■■«■ -f -f -I- + 4^ •«■•«"•"«•••• -I- 

C&nadijvn Tele^rsvpK 
a^nd Business College 

Write or phone 540-563 

E. H. BHS 1, M:mn'er 



Manufacturer of 

Sash, Doors, Blinds 
Mouldingfs, House 
Furnishings 

Wholesale Dealer in 

Lumber 'y^ 

Lath, Etc. *" 

Contracts Executed Promptly 

General Job Work Done 
on Shortest Notice 

Office and Mill 

Corner Ross and Amelia Streets 




i:. H. BHST. Mana(.u» 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 41 

strain and add one-half box of geletine after it has been softened 
in one-half cup of cold water. Serve ice-cold on lettuce leaves 
with salad dressing. — Mrs. H. Heard. 

Aspic Jelly 

One pint soup stock, bay leaf, pepper, one teaspoon lemon 
juice, one-half ounce gelatine (6 sheets), salt-spoon salt, pinch of 
celery salt, teaspoon Worchester Sauce. Soak gelatine in enough 
cold water to cover. Put seasoning in soup stock and beat for 
a few minutes, color with caramel. If necessary add gelatine 
and clarify with white of egg. 

Quick Aspic 

One-half box geletine, one and one-half pints cold water, 
one-half small onion, one-half carrot, cayenne, one teaspoon 
Worchester Sauce, one-half pound chopped beef, small slice tur- 
nip, one teaspoon salt, two teaspoons lemon juice, one bay leaf, 
one clove, one teaspoon beef extract. Put egg-white to clarify. 
Put meat, vegetables, spices on stove with one pint cold water, 
bring slowdy to a boil and simmer one-half hour. Strain, add 
lemon juice and other seasonings also gelatine, add white of egg 
mixed with two teaspoons cold water, boil five minutes without 
stirring. 

Celery Sauce 

One peck ripe tomatoes, twelve large onions, six bunches of 
celery, one and one-half quarts of vinegar, three large red peppers. 
Chop all fine, add handful of mixed pickling spice, salt and brown 
sugar to taste, boil two and a half liours. — Mrs. E. A. Lewis. 

Celery Mustard 

Six heads celery, two onions, two ounces mustard seed, six 
ounces mustard, one cup white sugar, one quart vinegar, a little 
salt and cayenne pepper. Cook about one hour, a little more 
sugar may be added. This can be thinned with cream if de- 
sired. — L. Midgley. 

Celery Sauce 

Twenty-four ripe tomatoes, four heads celery, one quart vin- 
egar, six large onions, three tablespoons salt, two cups brown 
sugar, three red peppers, two tablespoons cinnamon, two table- 
Harvey's Baking Powder is absolutely Pure 



42 ST. THuMAh \. \\ . L. A. COOK BOOK 

spoons allspice. Cut ' up tomatoes, add chopped onions, celery 
and peppers, nii^ -^^ t,.,r,.ii,,r :,M,il>.'il f' "■ t'lree hours. — Mrs. 
T. Robertson. 

Celery Sauce 

Twenty-four ripe tomatoes, six heads of celery, six onions, 
three tablespoons of salt, two cups of vinegar, three tablespoons 
of allspice, two tablespoon of cinnamon, two cups yellow 
sugar, one red pepper, boil one hour. — Mrs. E. Lowe. 

Celery Sauce 

Thirty tomatoes, five onions cliopped fme, three cups vinegar, 
twelve tablespoons sugar, six teaspoons salt, five bunches celery 
chopped fine, three red peppers. Boil two hours. — Mrs. Angus 
Murray. 

Celery Sauce 

Twelve large ripe tomatoes, four heads of celery, two 
pounds of sugar, one cup vinegar, three green peppers, two onions, 
salt. Chop fine, boil one hour and bottle hot. — Mrs.F. M. Griffin, 

Tomato and Celery Sauce 

Eighteen large tomatoes, two heads of celery, three large 
onions, four red peppers, ten tablespoons of sugar, three table- 
spoons of .^alt, two and a half cupsful of vinegar. Cut the 
celery in small pieces, chop onions and red peppers, add sugar, 
salt and vinegar, boil two liours. Mrs. J. A. Moodie. 

Celery Sauce 

Thirty large tomatoes sliced, twelve large onions sliced, 
four or five heads of celery, four or five red or green peppers, 
eighteen large tablespoons granulated sugar, six cups of vine- 
gar, six table-spoons salt. Boil for three hours. — Miss Love. 

Celery Sauce 

Thirty tomatoes, five onions chopped fine, three cups vine- 
gar, one-half tablespoon salt, six tablespoons sugar, five bunches 
celery chopped fine, two red peppers. 13oil two hours. — Mrs. 
A. W. Graham. 



You get good results with Harvey's Baking Powder 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 43 

Ripe Cucumber Sauce 

Twelve large ripe cucumbers, twelve onions sliced thin, with 
salt. Let the cucumbers and onions stand over night, drain and 
chop. Three pints of vinegar, three cups of sugar, one table- 
spoon of mustard, one tablespoon of curry powder, one 
tablespoon of flour, one teaspoon of cayenne. Allow the vin- 
egar to come to a boil, then add all but the mustard and flour. 
Mix them with vinegar to a paste and add last. — Mrs. E. Lowe. 

Pepper Hash 

One large cabbage, one dozen large onions, fourteen green 
peppers. Remove seeds from half the peppers and chop fine, 
stand all night with cup of salt on it, drain through cheese-cloth 
getting all juice out. Add three-fourths cup white mustard, two 
heaping cups brown sugar, one tablespoon celery seed and cover 
well with vinegar. — Miss Wickeft. 

Chili Sauce 

One peck ripe tomatoes, six large onions, two teaspoons each 
of cinnamon and cloves, two cups brown sugar, four cups vinegar, 
salt and pepper to taste. Boil four hours. — Miss Wickett. 

Green Tomato Sauce 

Nineteen green tomatoes, peal and soak in salt over night, 
ten onions, four apples, four cups of sugar, eight red peppers, one 
tablespoon cinnamon, one tablespoon cloves, one quart of vinegar 
or more, all chopped fine. Cook four hours. — Miss Langan. 

Chutney Sauce 

Six green tomatoes, two green peppers, twelve tart 
apples. Peel and core the apples, remove seeds 
from tomatoes and peppers. Add four onions, one cupful 
seeded raisins, chop all fine, together or separate. Stir two heap- 
ing cups brown sugar, two tablespoons of dry mustard and two 
tablespoons of salt into one quart best vinegar. Set the lipuid on 
the fire, boil for five minutes, then add all the rest of the ingredi- 
ents and cook for one hour over a safe hre to prevent scorching. 
Seal in hot glass jars or bottles, keep in a cool dark place. — Mrs. 
A. W. Graham. 



You get good results with Harvey's Baking Powder 



44 ?T. THOMAS V. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 



HAY'S 



The LeaLdin^ 
Bookstore 

375-7 Tzdhoi St Si. Thomas, OaI. 

HIGH-CLASS STATIONERY 
AND LEATHER GOODS 

Pictures, Wall Papers, Books of all kinds 
(new and old), Bibles, Prayer Books, 
Hymn Books. Our Stock is very large, 
and prices right. Call and see us. No 
trouble to show goods : : : : 

TelepKone 176--" HAY'S ' 



BERT HAMILTON JAMES STOTT 

HAMILTON (JJL STOTT 

Plumbers, Tinsmiths, 
Steam and Gas Fitters 

MAKERS OF 

Sheet Metal Cornice and Galvanized Iron 
Sky-Light Windows, Hot Air and Hot 
Water Heating a Specialty. Eavetrough- 
ing and all kinds of Jobbing - 



ST. THOMAS, 

445 Talbol St. Phone 269 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 45 



Tomato Chutney 

Ten pounds ripe tomatoes, one pound chopped apples, six 
red peppers, six ounces gro. ginger, two and one-half quarts vin- 
egar, ten ounces raisins, ten ounces salt, eight small onions, one 
and one-fourth pounds brown" sugar, all to be chopped fine, and 
boil or simmer for six or seven hours. — Mrs. L. E. Tate. 

Four Devils Sauce 

Two cups apples, two cups cucumbers, two cups onions, one 
cup red pepper. Chop all fine, add desertspoon salt, vinegar to 
cover. Chop apples last so not to discolor. — Mrs. Margaret A. 
Strong. 

Chow Chow 

Two quarts cucumbers cut fine, two quarts little whole cucum 
bers, one quart onions cut fine, one quart little whole onions, six 
green peppers, two small heads cauliflower. Put in separate 
dishes and cover with hot brine, let stand over night, drain and 
add eight cups sugar, one-half gallon vinegar, one-fourth pound 
celery seed, one-fourth pound white mustard seed, let it come to 
a boil. Make a paste of two-thirds cup of flour, one-fourth 
pound mustard, one and one-half ounce tumeric. Put this in 
slowly, stir quickly and let boil up. — Mrs. Still. 

Chow Chow 

Three quarts cucumbers peeled and cut fine, one quart 
onions chopped, two quarts small whole onions, two quarts cauli- 
flower cut fine, six green peppers. I^ut in crock and cover with 
a hot brine and let stand over night. Drain and add seven cups 
of granulated sugar, one-half gallon cider vinegar, three table- 
spoons mustard seed, two tablespoons celery seed. Let come to 
a boil. Make a paste of two-thirds cup of flour, one-fourth 
pound mustard, one-half ounce tumeric. Mix with cold vinegar 
and stir in slowly. Stir quickly and let boil for few minutes. — 
Mrs. Cochrane. 

Chili Sauce (good) 

Eighteen ripe tomatoes, remove skins, six onions, three 
green peppers all chopped fine, twelve even tablespoons of sugar, 
three even tablespoons of salt, five cups of vinegar, two table- 



No Ammonia or Alum in Harvey's Baking Powder 



46 ~i iiiv.>iA::> V. \V. C. A. COOK BOOK 



spoons celerN^BBed. two tablespoons mustard seed. Boil all slow- 
Iv lun nni\ .mt'-lialf Iinurs. — ^Irs. L. Laycock. 

Green Chili Sauce 

Nine large green tomatoes chopped fine, feur reej pejipers 
chopped fine, two onions, three cups vinegar, jjiree tablespoons 
sugar, two tablespoons salt, one teaspoon clcJ\es, one teaspoon 
allspice, one teaspoon ginger, one teaspoon nutmeg. Mix all 
tdLTf^thcr and hoi! .nip hour.— Mrs. A. H. Adkins. 

Chili Sauce 

Twenty-five large red tomatoes, six onions, three peppers 
(chop fine), three tablespoons salt, six tablespoons sugar, one tea- 
spoon each of ginger, allspice, cinnamon, cloves, two cups vine- 
gar. Boil one and one-half or two hours. — Mrs. Cathcart. 

Chili Sauce 

TweKe large ripe tomatoes, fous green peppers, two large 
onions, one cup vinegar, two tablespoons sugar, four teaspoons- 
ful salt. The onions and peppers to be chopped fine. All the 
ingredients to boil one hour.— Mrs. T. Crothers. 

Tomato Catsup 

Boil one-half bushe! of tomatoes until soft. Put through a 
fine sieve then add, one quart vinegar, one pint salt, two oences 
whole cloves, two ounces allspice one-half ounce cayenne pepper 
ground, one tablespoon of pepper. Boil three hours then 
bottle, Cloves and allspice to be put in a muslin bag to save 
straining. Mrs. P. H. Minshall. 

Tomato Catsup (never ferments) 

Two gallons cooked tomatoes, two quarts vinegar, two pounds 
brown sugar, one-half pound salt, five red peppers, two ounces 
whole black pepper, two ounces whole allspice, one ounce whole 
cloves, one ounce bruised ginger, one pound mustard. Boil 
and strain tomatoes through colander, add all ingredients but mus- 
tard, cook and stir well. Mix mustard with part of vinegar, add 
and cook until as thick as thick as wanted. Strain through sieve 
and put away. Will keej) in jug. — Mrs. L. M. Miller. 



Harvey's Baking Powder assures Success 



ST. THOMAS V. \V. C. A. COOK BOOK 47 

Raw Catsup 

one peck ripe tomatoes, eight onions, one-half cup salt, one- 
half cup horseradish, one-half cup mustard seed, one tablespoon 
celery seed, one-half teaspoon cayenne pepper, four red peppers, 
one tablespoon black pepper. Slice tomatoes, let drain overnight. 
In morning chop fine with onions, add spices and cover with cold 
vinegar and seal. — Mrs. Benj. Marlatt. 



X5X 



Harvey's Baking Powder is absolutely Pure 



48 



ST. THOMAS V. \V. C. A. COOK-BOOK 



I Dyeing and Cleaning I 

Dry Gleaning, Steam Gleaning and 9 

Dyeing. Ladies' and Gents' Wearing 

Apparel. Prompt Service. Pressing "X 

and Repairing. Phone 505. T 



LOGAN & WATLING 



o 



446 Talbot Street 



;• <*^a^K> ■^0-^<>4K>^<>^H>^O~4-O-^><><K>=K><K> 



OFFICE : 
Corner Railway and Centre Street* 



E.O. Pound 

Real Estate 
and Insurance. 
Money to Loan. 



TELEPHONE 658 



W. E. Lumley 
jt butcher 3?r 

Cooked Meats, Poultry, 
Butter and Eggs, Etc. 

607 TALBOT ST. 

Opposite Wilcox House. 



PHONE 
216. 



Orders called for 
and delivered. 



I ?L^ C IP E F O R AH A P^P Y LIFE | 

9 A Receipt for a Policy in one of our lines of p 

9 LIFE HEALTH J, 

I INSURANCE I 



ACCIDENT 



FIRE 



^^ Will insure you a clear conscience, a sense of security and a happy -^ 

. mundane existence Talk to your husband about it, then see us 6 

I RaBo?,o3, S.G WRIGHT I 

J "^^ 453 Talbot Street ST. THOMAS. q 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 49 



PICKLES 



Mustard Pickles 

One quart large cucumbers chopped fine, one quart small 
cucumbers left whole, one quart large onions chopped fine, one 
quart small onions left whole, two heads cauliflower broken in 
small pieces, three green and three red peppers chopped fine 
Put in large crock and cover with hot brine, stand over night and 
in the morning drain well. For paste : two quarts of vinegar, 
four cups sugar, one-quarter pound mustard seed, one-eighth oz. 
celery seed, one-quarter pound mustard, one cup flour, half oz. 
tumeric. Put vinegar on to boil. Mix other ingredients, wet 
with cold vinegar, and mix well. Stir in boiling vinegar and pour 
over above. — Mrs. E. A. Smith. 

Mustard Pickles 

One quart small silver onions, one quart cucumbers cut up, 
one quart green tomatoes, two small green peppers, three heads 
of cauliflower. Let each stand in a separate dish of salt water 
twenty-four hours, then drain and boil all together, excepting 
cucumbers, in three pints of vinegar until tender, then skim out. 
Paste : half gallon vinegar, one small cup flour, quarter pound 
mustard, half ounce tumeric, three small cups sugar. Mix and 
when boiling add all pickles and boil a few minutes. — Mrs. Dr. 
Fitzsimmons. 

Mustard Pickles 

Two quarts cucumbers, one quart onions, two cauliflowers, 
and green beans. Pour boiling water and salt over each veget- 
able, allowing them to stand in brine three days, changing the 
water each morning. Drain and pour over following dressing and 
simmer (not boil) half an hour; cool, then bottle. Dressing : three 
pints vinegar, six tablespoons mustard, one pound sugar, half cup 
flour, half ounce tumeric, two green peppers, two cents of celery 
seed.— Mrs. Faw. 

Harvey's Baking Powder is Pure and Wholesome 



50 ST. liiu.MA:^ i.W. C.A. COOK BOOK 



Mustard Pickles 

Four quarts cucumbers, two quarts onions, two large cauli- 
flowers. Soak in salt water over night (twenty-four hours), scald 
in weaker vinegar. Dressing : one and a half ounces celery seed, 
one and a half ounces tumeric, two cups flour, six cups sugar, 
half pound mustard, one gal. vinegar. Stir smooth in a granite 
dish, add vinegar and boil until thoroughly cooked, then pour 
over pickles.- -Mrs. Geo. McCubbin. 

Mustard Pickles (Kood) 

One bunch celery, onecjuart large cucumbers cut fine, one quart 
of small cucumbers left whole, one cauliflower part cut fine, three 
green peppers cut fine, three sweet peppers cut fine. 
Put all in separate dishes and cover with hot brine, stand over 
night. In the morning drain, put all together, and add half gal. 
vinegar, cjuarter ounce white mustard seed, quarter ounce celery, 
and let come to a boil, and then add half ounce tumeric, eighth 
ounce mustard. — Mrs. Murphy. 

Mustard Pickles 

Four large red peppers, one (juart cucumbers, one .quart 
tomatoes, one or two heads cauliflower, one quart white onions. 
Brine : four quarts water to one pint salt. Pour over mixture 
and let stand twenty-four hours. Heat just enough to scald and 
turn into colander to drain. Mix one cup flour, six tablespoons 
ground musL'ird, one tablespoon ttimeric, with sufficient vinegar 
to make smooth paste, one cup sugar, then add enough vinegar 
to make three quarts in all. J-Joil this mixture until it thickens 
and is smf>oth, stirring all the time. Add vegetables and cook 
until heated through. Kate A. McCnll. 

Cucumber Pickles 

One do/en large cucumbers (not too large), half dozen onions, 
one (juart vinegar, half teaspoon powdered alum, half cup must- 
ard seed, one tablespoon celery seed, two cups brown sugar. 
Slice the cucumbers in pieces about an eighth inch thick, also 
the onions. Sprinkle with salt and let stand over night, then 
pour of] the water. Heat the vinegar and pour over the pickle 
three times, allowing the vinegar to get cold each time. The 



For recipes in this Book Use Harvey's Baking Powder 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 51 

third time let the pickle come to a boihng point. When 
cold, seal. 

Chopped Pickles 

Two quarts chopped onions, two quarts chopped green to- 
matoes, two quarts chopped cucumbers, two heads cauliflower, 
six heads celery. Sprinkle with salt and let stand over night, 
then drain and pour boiling water over, let stand until vinegar 
boils. Three quarts vinegar, four cups sugar, three-quarter cup 
flour, one teaspoon salt, half cup mustard, half ounce tumeric, 
one egg well beaten, pinch cayenne, one ounce butter. Mix all 
with cold vinegar. Stir in boiling vinegar, pour over pickles after 
water is drained off. — Miss Reekie. 

Cucumber Pickles 

One gallon vinegar, one cup sugar, one cup grated horse- 
radish, one cup salt, half cup mustard, whole spices. Wash cu- 
cumbers from vines at any time and drop in mixture. Stir fre- 
quently. — Mrs. Morley. 

Mixed Pickles 

One quart celery, one quart cabbage, one quart onions, one 
quart cucumbers. Chop fine and put in a weak brine for twenty- 
four hours. Then put on the stove and let come to a boil. Add 
one quart vinegar, two and a half tablespoons mustard, two table- 
spoons tumeric, two and a half cups brown sugar, three red pep- 
pers. Let boil three hours, then bottle and seal. — Mrs.Cathcart. 

Cucumber Pickles 

Pack pickles in stone jar and make strong brine (boiling), 
pour this over cucumbers in morning, let stand until next morn- 
ing, pour off and reheat. Do this for three days then drain fourth 
morning. Make strong alum water (boiling) and pour over cu- 
cumbers, let stand twenty-four hours, drain, wipe every cucumber 
dry, and pack in jars. Add brown sugar to taste. Add mixed 
spices, pour boiling vinegar, etc., over cucumbers and seal at 
once. — Mrs. C. B. Buncombe. 

Highden Pickles 

Chop fine equal quantities of green cucumbers, tomatoes and 
onions, and a few green peppers. Mix, sprinkle with salt, let 

Harvey's Baking Powder is all Leaven 



52 



ST THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK. 



"Tea tempers the spirit and harmonizes 

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ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 53 

stand a day then drain. Put over it boiling vinegar to cover, 
with spices to suit the taste. — Mrs. H. B. Smith. 

Chopped Tomato Pickles 

Cut one peck green tomatoes, and eight large onions in 
thin sHces, and, with one tea cup salt, pack in layers, and let 
stand over night. In the morning drain well, add six green pep- 
pers and chop all fine. Put in kettle and add pint of vinegar, 
one tablespoon each ground cloves, cinnamon and white mustard. 
Cook until soft and sweeten to taste. Mrs. H. T. Gough. 

Green Tomato Pickles 

Slice tomatoes and onions enough to fill good sized granite 
kettle, sprinkle with salt, let stand over night, drain, put enough 
vinegar to cook them until tender, Avith a teaspoon pepper, two 
teaspoons cinnamon, one teaspoon cloves (ground), two teaspoons 
currie powder, two and one-half cups coffee sugar. — Mrs. Walden. 

Red Pickles 

One peck ripe tomatoes, twelve large onions, six bunches 
celery, four red peppers. Chop all fine and let stand twelve 
hours. One and one-half cups salt, two cups brown sugar, one- 
half gallon vinegar, one tablespoon each of cloves, cinnamon, 
black pepper, red pepper. — Mrs. Margaret A. Strong. 

Spiced Pickles 

Nmeteen green tomatoes, ten onions, chop fine and sprinkle 
with salt. Let stand over night, four large apples (chop fine), 
four cups coffee sugar, four cups vinegar, three green peppers, 
one teaspoon cinnamon, one teaspoon cloves (ground). Cook 
slowly three or four hours. — Mrs. Turville. 

Pickles 

Twelve sweet green peppers, twelve sweet red peppers, 
twelve sweet yellow peppers, twelve onions, two heads cabbage. 
Chop peppers, onions and cabbage, salt and drain over night. 
Three pints vinegar, one and one-half pounds granulated sugar, 
four tablespoons celery seed, four tablespoons mustard seed. 
Heat vinegar, sugar and seeds, then mix with peppers. Bottle 
cold. — Mrs. McAndrews. 



Harvey's Baking Powder assures Success 



54 ST. THOMAS V. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 



Pickled Beans 

One peck of butter beans, cut small. Cook one-half hour 
in salt and water. Three pints of cider vinegar, three pounds of 
sugar (bring to a boil), one cup of mustard, one cup of flour, two 
tablespoons of tumeric, two tablespoons of celery seed. Mix 
together in cold vinegar, stir constantly, add beans and cook five 
minutes. — Mrs. \V. Xorsworthy. 

My Mother's Pickle 

One quart of red cabbage chopped fine, one quart of boiled 
beets chopped fine, two cups sugar, one tablespoon salt, one tea- 
spoon black pepper, one- fourth teaspoon red pepper, one teacup 
grated horse-radish. Cover with cold vinegar and keep from the 
air. — Mrs. Dixon. 

India Pickles 

Six quarts vinegar, one-half pound salt, one-fourth pound 
root ginger, six large onions^ one tablespoon cayenne pepper, two 
ounces ground white pepper, four ounces mustard seed. Mix 
and boil; when cold add two ounces mustard, two ounces tumeric 
powder. — Mrs. Finlay. 

Mustard Pickles 

Three quarts good vinegar, two. ounces bruised ginger, one 
ounce allspice, one-half ounce chili peppers, one-half pound mus- 
tard, one-half pound salt. — Mrs. L. 1*2. Tate. 

Olive Oil Pickles 

( )iic hundred cucumbers three or four inches long, 
slice fme but do not peel, two onions chopped fine; leave in brine 
over night. In morning drain and add a good cup salt, one and 
one-half pounds white mustard seed, one cup oli\eoiland vinegar 
to cover. Put in crock and cover.— Mrs. I )ugald McColl. 

Spiced Currants 

Four fjuarts currants, one pint of vinegar, three pounds of 
sugar, one tablespoon of cinnamon, allspice and cloves. Boil 
until thick. 

Pickled Apples 

'!"(» onr (luart \ inegar use four pounds granulated sugar, two 

Harvey's Baking Powder is Pure and Wholesome 



ST. THOMAS Y, W. C. A. COOK BOOK 55 

ounces of stick cinnamon and whole cloves mixed. Put on stove 
and when hot add fruit, cook slowly, and when tender put in 
crock, let stand for few days, drain off vinegar, boil down and 
pour over again; this will do for pears or peaches. — Miss Haight 

Cold Sweet Pickles 

One peck of cabbage, one quart onions, two quarts green 
tomatoes, one quart vinegar, three pounds brown sugar, a little 
cayenne pepper, one ounce celery seed, four green peppers. 
Chop cabbage, onions, peppers, tomatoes very fine, add one cup 
salt and stand over night; in morning drain well. Dissolve sugar 
in vinegar and pour over. 

Pickled Plums 

One pint best vinegar, four pounds sugar, eight pounds plums, 
spice to taste. Boil plums in mixture until soft, then take out 
and boil the syrup until quite thick, then pour it over plums. — 
Mrs. Finlay. 

Sweet Pickle Tomatoes 

Take tomatoes just before turning red, wash and slice with- 
out paring. Put in a crock with salt sprinkled between layers, 
let stand over night. In the morning drain. Make a rich syrup 
of vinegar, sugar, cinnamon and cloves. Put a few tomatoes in 
the syrup at a time and let cook until tender, not too soft. Con- 
tinue this till you have used up tomatoes. Let syrup boil down 
until thick and pour over tomatoes and cover tight. 

Sweet Pickles 

Pare and core quinces, steam just long enough to pierce 
them with a fork. IVIake a syrup of three pounds sugar, one 
quart vinegar and spices to taste. Use whole spices tied in a 
bag. Boil syrup well and throw m quinces just a few min- 
utes, drain out and pack in fruit jars; boil syrup a little longer 
and fill jars. — Mrs. McAndrew. 

Green Tomato Pickles 

One peck green tomatoes, six onions. Slice separately, 
sprinkle with salt and let stand over night. Next day drain and 
cook separately in vinegar and water until tender, drain and mix 
in crock. Put one quart vinegar, four cups white sugar, six 

No Ammonia or Alum in Harvey's Baking Powder 



56 



ST. THOMAS Y. \V. C. A. COOK BOOK 



Spencer s Bread 

The Epicurean's Choice 

Wholesome, Sweet and always 

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*House of Quality' 



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ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 57 

green peppers, one tablespoon whole cloves and a little stick cin- 
namon into a granite kettle and boil well. Strain out spice and 
pour over pickles, leaving the peppers in. Next day drain off 
the vinegar, boil again and pour over the pickles. They will 
keep in crocks or sealed jars. — Mrs. E. Heater, Aylmer, Ont. 

Green Tomato Pickles 

One peck green tomatoes, one-fourth peck large onions. Peel 
and slice, sprinkle with salt and let stand over night. Dram 
thoroughly and cover with vinegar, then add one teaspoon of 
white pepper and one teaspoon of black pepper, two red peppers. 
Boil till tender, then seal. — Mrs. J. P. Fmlay. 

Sweet Tomatoe Pickles, 

Slice one-half bushel green tomatoes, sprinkle with salt and 
stand over night. In the morning drain, then scald in vinegar, a 
few at a time, skim out of hot vinegar and- drain again until all 
have been scalded. Add sufficient vinegar to what is left to make 
one-half gallon, add five pounds brown sugar, one desertspoon 
each of cloves and cinnamon and one-half teaspoon red pepper. 
When boiling put in tomatoes and boil three minutes. Place in 
stone jars and tie down with paper. — Mrs. S. H. Smiley. 

Sweet Tomato Pickles 

One peck of green tomatoes, slice, sprinkle with a cup of 
salt and let lay over night. Drain and add one-half gallon of 
best vinegar, two and one-half pounds sugar, one-half ounce 
cloves, one ounce ginger, one ounce cinnamon (all whole), two 
red peppers sliced. Boil slowly till done. — Mrs, Ben. Marlatt. 




Harvey's Baking Powder is absolutely Pure 



58 ST. THOMAS Y. \V. C. A. COOK BOOK 



VEGETABLES 



Potato Croquettes 

Two cups mashed potatoes, one tablespoon butter, one cup 
rolled biscuit, one cup milk, two eggs, salt and pepper. Make 
in round cakes, dip in beaten eggs and cracker crumbs fry in 
butter and serve hot. — Miss G. Smith. 

Potato Apples 

P'our cups hot mashed potatoes, yolks two egg beaten well, 
one teaspoon parsley cut fine, salt to taste, dash cayenne, two 
tablespoons butter. Mix thoroughly, mould in apple shapes with 
blow of cloves for blow and stem of cloves for stem. Apply a 
touch of pmk coloring on sides. Serve hot. These may be made 
before hand and put in oven, to heat when needed. — Miss Gard- 
ner. 

Potato Puff 
Two cups cold mashed potatoes, stir into it two tablespoons 
butter beaten to a cream. Add two well beaten eggs and one cup 
of milk, salting to taste. Beat all well together, pour into a deep 
dish and bake until nicely browned. — Mrs. A. McPherson. 

Sweet Potato Croquets 

Two pounds sweet potatoes boiled and mashed, pepper and 
SJilt, a teaspoon of sugar, two eggs, half a cup of flour. Make 
into bails and fry m hot lard. — Mrs. J). G. Goodwin. 

Escalloped Potatoes 

Try your escalloped potatoes tins way : Slice potatoes thin, 
also a little onion, salt and pepper. Cover well with milk and 
boil on top of stove until nearly done. Stir frequently to prevent 
sticking to bottom. Now sprinkle bread crumbs on top and put 
little pieces of butter on top and put in oven to brown. — Mrs. S. 
Eby. 



For Recipes in this Book Use Harvey's Baking Powder 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 59 



Potato Puff 

Two cups smooth mashed potatoes, two tablespoons melted 
butter. Beat to a cream, add two well beaten eggs, one cup 
sweet cream; beat well and bake in deep dish. — Mrs. J. B. Mor- 
ford. 

Potato Cake 

Three cups mashed potatoes, one egg, butter size of an egg, 
Two cups flour, pinch of salt, three teaspoons Harvey's baking 
powder. Bake. — Mrs. E. A. Smith. 

Potato a' la Royal 

One pint of hot boiled potatoes, a generous half cup of 
cream or milk, two tablespoons of butter, the whites of four eggs 
and yolk of one, salt and pepper to taste. Beat the potatoes 
very light and fine, add the seasoning, milk and butter and lastly 
the whites of the eggs beaten to a stiff froth. Turn into a 
buttered escalop dish, smooth with a knife and brush over with 
the yolk of the egg which has been well beaten, and brown 
quickly and serve. It will take ten minutes to brown. The dish 
in which it is baked should hold a little more than a quart. — Mrs. 
W. B. Doherty. 

Potato Oyster Pats 

Peel and boil twelve potatoes, mash fine, salt to taste, add 
piece of butter the size of an egg, four tablespoons of sweet cream, 
beat lightly. When cold work into pats, putting two oysters in 
each. Dip in beaten egg, roll in cracker and put butter on top of 
each. Bake in a quick oven. — Mrs. E. A. Smith. 

Baked Potatoes 

Take small potatoes and bake; cut off one end and remove 
the potato. Mash well, season, add butter and milk and whip with 
a fork till creamy. Refill the jackets and heat in oven when wanted 
—Mrs. L. M. Miller. 

Potato Balls 

Pare and boil potatoes, mash well and season to taste. Add 



For recipes in this Book Use Harvey's Baking Powder 



60 



ST. IHUMAS Y. \V. C. A. COOK BOOK. 









4- 



JTT\/OU want the best you can get when you 
j\ ■*• are testing these recipes, and to get same 
you have to come here where you can 
rely on your orders being promptly attended to. We 
carry nothing but first class meats of all kinds ; also a 
full line of poultry and fish ; game in season. 



ilonbu ^ (Elark 

PHONE 25. 






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ST. THOMAS Y. \V. C. A. COOK BOOK 61 



small piece of butter and milk, roll into balls the size of walnuts, 
dip in beaten egg and roll in bread crumbs, cook in deep fat like 
doughnuts until a golden brown. It is well to use a wire basket 
to hold them while cooking. Heat well in oven before serving. 
—Mrs. L. M. Miller. 

Creamed Potatoes 

Stir cold boiled potatoes into a cream sauce, when very hot 
beat in two teaspoons minced parsley. To make richer pour in 
gradually, just before adding the parsley, a well beaten egg. Stir 
for one-half minute. Serve. 

Potato Puff 

Chop cold boiled potatoes rather fine, put in a baking dish 
with sufficient cream sauce to just cover. Dust the top with 
grated cheese and put in a hot oven until nicely browned. 

Boston Baked Beans 

Soak over night one quart of beans m clear water. In the 
morning boil the beans until they begin to crack. At the same 
time boil one pound of salt green bacon, either in another dish or 
in with the beans. When beans are ready, put in bean pot, add 
the bacon if not boiled with beans, and stir in one large spoon of 
molasses, one-fourth teaspoon of soda, salt and pepper to suit 
taste. Have beans very moist when put in oven or they will 
grow too dry in baking. Bake five or six hours. — Mrs. L. Wil- 
son. 

Boston Baked Beans 

Soak one pint of beans over night. Parboil for fifteen min- 
utes with a pinch of soda in the water. Drain and put in crock, 
add one and one-half teaspoons salt, one tablespoon brown sugar, 
one tablespoon molasses, pepper to taste, and a pinch of mustard. 
Put pork on top (two or three little pieces of fresh pork), fill 
crock with water and cover tight. Bake five hours: the beans 
will swell to twice the quantity when soaking but will not swell 
much after being put in the oven. — Mrs. R. Heard. 



Harvey's Baking Powder is Pure and Wholesome 



t)J ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 



Boston Baked Beans 

Soak beans in cold water for ten or twelve hours, drain, cover 
with cold water, add a pinch of soda and let come to a boil. 
Remove from fire at once and drain again. Put in bean crock, 
add molasses and salt. — Mrs. }*'by. 

Boston Baked Beans 

One (juart beans, one cup granulated sugar, one tablespoon 
salt, one-half teaspoon soda, one-half pound salt pork (fat). Soak 
beans over night in cold water. In morning add fresh water and 
boil but do not let skins crack. Drain, put into bean pot with 
above ingredients, placing pork on top, over all. Pour boiling 
water and bake all day adding water till the last two hours. — 
Mrs. Dr. Gray. 

Chili Conconi 

Two cups beans, one teaspoon spice, one onion, two tea- 
spoons sugar, one teaspoon spice, one cup catsup, one pound steak 
cut in small pieces. • Boil beans until soft, tlien drain, add other 
ingredients, a little water, and bake several hours. 

Succotash 

This is made of sweet corn, lima beans or butter beans. 
Have a third more corn than beans. When the corn has been cut 
from the cobs, a'nd the beans shelled, put into boiling water 
enough to cover them and stew gently until tender. Pour off 
nearly all the water and add one cup milk, salt, pepper and 
butter to taste, and stew a few minutes longer. String beans 
can be used if cut^ up fine. — Mrs. Kdpatrick. 

Canned Beets 

Boil beets until tender, then peel. Boil vinegar and sweeten 
to taste; add pepper, salt and a pinch of cayenne pepper. Slice 
beets into the hot vinegar and be sure they are heated through. 
Place beets in jars and pour hot vinegar over. To four quarts 
use three cups white sugar. — Mrs. Finley. 

Scalloped Turnips With White Sauce 

Boil th(; turnips and then cut into cubes. Make a cream 
sauce by rubbing together a tablespoon butter and one of fiour 
and one-half pint milk, and stir until boiling. Put in a layer of 



Harvey's Baking Powder is all Leaven 



ST. THOMAS Y. W, C. A. COOK BOOK 63 

turnips, then a layer of sauce, and continue so, having the last 
layer of sauce. Sprinkle over with bread crumbs and bake for 
ten minutes. — Mrs. A. McPherson. 

Asparagus Patties 

Fill patty pans with puff paste, bake a light brown. Boil 
asparagus in salted water till done thoroughly, drain and add a 
large cup of cream. Mix a spoonful of flour in a little cold cream, 
and stir in cream, let boil till thick then season with salt, pep- 
per and plenty of butter. Fill shells with this mixture and you 
will find it a very good substitute for meat. — Mrs. McAndrew. 

Broiled Tomatoes 

• Slice unpeeled tomatoes, dip m olive oil or melted butter, 
then in flour or fine bread crumbs, place m a wire broiler and 
cook quickly. 

Stewed Celery 

Cut in inch pieces, simmer until tender in a little water, add 
sweet cream, season to taste and serve, or pour over slices of 
toasted bread and serve hot. 

Carrot Croquettes 

To one and one-fourth cups of mashed carrots well seasoned 
with butter, salt and pepper, add the yolks of two eggs slightly 
beaten; cool slightly, shape into smooth, flat cakes, dip in crumbs 
and cook in hot fat. — Mrs. E. A. Smith. 

Creamed Cabbage 

When cooked, drain the cabbage carefully and cut it rather 
fine; to the cabbage add cream sauce and mix; reheat before 
serving. — Mrs. E. A. Smith. 

Escalloped Cabbage 

Cook coarsely cut cabbage in boiling salted water uncovered 
for ten minutes, then drain well and place in baking dish in layers 
alternately with the following sauce: Melt two tablespoons butter 
over fire without browning, add two tablespoons flour (level), one- 
half tablespoon salt, one-fourth tablespoon white pepper. Cook 
until foamy, then add one cup sweet milk or cream, cook until 
thick. If liked, a little grated cheese may. be added to each 
layer. Cover with buttered bread crumbs and bake. until brown. 
— Jean F. McLoney. 

You get good results with Harvey's Baking Powder 



64 ^T. 1 HuMAS V. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 



Y 



ou should ONLY buy CAN- 
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COMPANY. 



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ST. THOMAS Y. W, C. A. COOK BOOK 65 

Sauer Kraut 

Cut up the cabbage fine (the finer the better) with a cabbage 
cutter. Put a layer of two or three inches in a clean barrel and 
sprinkle a handful of salt on it, pound it down with a wooden 
pounder, (This is easy to make. Take a block of wood, bore a 
hole in it and put a broom handle on it.) Pound down every layer 
until the barrel is full. Put a board the size of the barrel inside, 
lay it on the Sauer Kraut and weight it down with a stone. It 
should have liquor enough of its own to completely cover the 
kraut. Keep in the cellar from freezing. It will be ready to 
use in about three weeks. You shoula use about two pounds of 
salt to one dozen heads averagjs cabbage. It will keep all winter. 
When taking out any of the Sauer-Kraut, dip off the liquor first, 
and wipe off all skum from side of barrel. After removing the 
Kraut put on about one quart of fresh water and put weight on 
as before. — Mrs. Eby. 

To Cook Sauer Kraut 

Wash it in clean water and drain. If too salty parboil for 
fifteen or twenty minutes and drain. Put it on now and boil 
with spare ribs for two or three hours. Some also put in a small 
piece of breakfast bacon. — ]Mrs. Eby. 




Harvey's Baking Powder assures Success 



66 STV THOMAS V. W. C. A. COOK-BOOK 



EGGS 



To Boil Eggs 

Put eggs in cold water and when water comes to a boil they 
are done. 2. Put eggs in boiling water enough to cover them 
and set vessel on the stove where it is warm. Cover well and let 
stand nine minutes. 

Brine for Eggs 

One pint of lime, one pint of salt, three gallons of boiling 
water: mix well, let stand for twenty-four hours, pour oft' clear 
brine and use for pickling the eggs. 

Deviled Eggs 

Cut in two, crosswise, one dozen hard-boiled eggs, remove the 
yolk carefully, mash them very fine and season sparely with 
mustard, vinegar, salt and pepper and a tablespoon of melted 
butter. Chicken, minced very fine, may be added if desired. Be 
sure that the mixture is sufficiently moist and not lumpy. P^ill 
the spaces in the whites of the eggs with the spiced yolks, 
smooth even with top. Sprinkle witli chopped parsley, garnish 
with same and serve cold. Excellent dish for picnic. — Mrs. E. 
A. Smith. 

Omelet 

Pour eggs, yolks and whites beaten separately, one cup 
milk, one-half cup water, an even tablespoon and a half of corn 
starch, a teaspoon of Harvey's Baking Powder, pepper and salt 
to taste, whites of eggs added last. Pry in butter. -Mrs. A. C. 
Hill. 

Omelet 

To each egg add one teaspoon milk, salt, pepper. Beat yolk, 
add milk, salt and pepper. Beat white very stiff. Have pan 
well buttered and hot, put beaten whites in with yolk, fold in 



You get good results with Harvey's Baking f^owder 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 67. 

lightly and put in hot pan, when done, slip in oven to brown top. 
You may change this from plain omelet to cheese by sprinkling 
cheese over the top before folding. — Mrs. H. B. Smith. 

Ham and Eggs Shirred 

Butter gem tins and drop an egg in each, sprinkle each with 
chopped lean ham. Bake in slow oven. Serve on slices of 
toast. 

Scotch Woodcock 

Four hard-boiled eggs, three tablespoons butter, one and 
one-half tablespoons flour, one cup milk, one-fourth teaspoon 
salt, dash of red pepper and celery salt. Make thick, white 
sauce, eggs chopped hne. Serve on toast. — T. G. Plewes. 

Eggs, Swiss Style 

Cover the bottom of a dish with two ounces of fresh butter 
and on this scatter grated cheese. Drop the eggs upon the 
cheese without breaking the yolks, season to taste. Pour over 
the eggs a little cream and sprinkle with about two ounces of 
grated cheese. Set in a moderate oven for about fifteen minutes 
— Miss Midgley. 

Macaroni and Eggs 

One pound of macaroni, that has been boiled, or a cup of 
boiled rice. Have some butter hot in the frying pan, add mac- 
aroni or cheese and toss it with a fork until thoroughly buttered. 
Beat two eggs and a generous amount of grated cheese, salt and 
a little cayenne pepper, add slowly to the macaroni, tossing it 
until thoroughly coated. Serve hot. — Mrs. H. Morley. 




Harvey's Baking Powder is absolutely Pure 



68 



ST. THOMAS V. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 



I W. C. FORBES I ! 

f ! 

9 Impaired Vision Scientifically ^ 
T Corrected ■ 




A Modern Dark Room 
in Conntction «• 

605 Talbot Street 
Helps for the Housewife 

^Ve c:irry a complete stock 
of Kitchen Hardware, also the 

oook"s friend, the 

" Happy Thought RaLnge." 

'i'lif li'uding inukes ul wa>li- 
itig machines are sold hy us. 



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MONEY TO LOAN 



381 Talbot St. 



Phone :r)3 



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Big Cash Shoe Store 

OPP. POST OFFICE. St. Thomas 

Has as many advantages 
to offer to the buying of 
proper footwear at right 
prices as this cook book 
supphes in the methods 
of proper cooking. 

Brewsters 

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For Cooking Utensils antl all 
the little Kitchen Articles at 
little i)rices. 

Brewster's 

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Confectioner. 
Wedding 
Cakes a 
Specialty. 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 69 

Cheese Straws 

One cup grated cheese, one cup bread crumbs, two-thirds cup 
flour, one tablespoon butter, one fourth teaspoon salt, one-eigth 
teaspoon pepper, two tablespoons milk. Cream butter, add 
flour, crumbs and cheese, then seasoning. Mix thoroughly, add 
milk, roll, cut in straws, bake in moderate oven. — I. G. Plewes 

Cheese Croquets 

Whites of three eggs, one cup grated cheese, one saltspoon 
mustard. Beat whites very stiff, add cheese slowly and season- 
ing. Let stand in a cool place till stifi enough to mold, shape in 
balls, size of a hickory nut, fry m hot fat. — I. G. Plewes. 

Cheese Custard 

One cup grated cheese, one-half cup grated bread, one cup 
sweet milk, two eggs, salt, cayenne pepper dash. . Butter the 
basin, place layer of cheese, then layer of bread, then cheese and 
so on. Beat eggs and milk together and pour over cheese and 
bread. Bake twenty minutes in hot oven and serve immediately 
on taking from oven. — Hazel C. Haight. 

Cheese Ramakin 

Put one cup of bread crumbs and one cup of milk on the 
fire to boil, stir it and boil it until smooth, then put in four table- 
spoons of grated cheese, one tablespoon butter and some salt and 
pepper, stir until the cheese is dissolved, remove from fire, beat 
two eggs, yolks and whites separately, stir the yolks into mixture 
and then the whites. Put in pudding-dish and bake fifteen for 
twenty minutes. Serve hot or cold. — I. Flach. 

Cheese Puffs 

Mix together a one-half pint each of sifted flour and grated 
cheese, one teaspoon of salt and a dash of cayenne. Put one cup 
of water and two tablespoons of butter in a saucepan over the 
fire and when boiling throw in quickly the dry mixture. Stir and 
beat vigorously until it draws away from the sides of the saucepan. 
Take from the fire, cover closely and set on ice until cool. Drop 
in, one at a time, three eggs and beat until smooth. Drop this 
soft dough by small teaspoons two inches apart in buttered pans. 
Sprinkle with grated cheese and bake in a moderate oven, — ^Mrs. 
W. W. Olmstead. 



Harvey's Baking Powder is absolutely Pure 



70 ST. THOMAS Y. W, C. A. COOK BOOK 



Cheese Rassuquen 

Four tablespoons of grated cheese, one-half cup of milk; two 
ounces of bread crumbs, yolks of two eggs, one tablespoon of 
butter, one-half teaspoon of mustard, one-half teaspoon of salt, 
a pinch of cayenne, whites of two eggs. Crum the bread and 
add tt) the milk. Boil together, add the butter, cheese and 
seasonmg and the yolk of eggs. Beat well, beat the whites to a 
stiff fnnh and add just before going in the oven. Cook fifteen 
minutes in a quick oven. — Mrs. Idsardi. 

Cheese Sauffie 

Two tablespoons of butter, one heaping tablespoon of flour, 
one-half cup of milk, one cup of grated cheese, three eggs, one- 
half teaspoon of salt, a pinch of cayenne pepper. Put the butter 
m a saucepan, when hot add the flour, stir till smooth but not 
browned, add the milk and seasoning, cook two minutes, then add 
the yolks, well beaten, and the cheese. When cold add the 
whites beaten to a stifl froth, turn into a buttered dish and bake 
twentv minutes in a hot oven. Serve the moment it comes from 
the oven. — Mrs. Idsardi. 

Cheese and Macaroni 

One-fjuarter pound of macaroni, one-ciuarter pound cheese, 
one and one-half cups milk, three tablespoons butter, salt, pepper 
and breadcrumbs, four tablespoons flour. Break macaroni in 
inch pieces, put into two cjuarts of boiling water, add a teaspoon 
salt and boil rapidly twenty minutes, drain and throw into cold 
water for ten minutes, then drain again, put layer of macaroni in 
bottom of baking dish, then layer of cheese and bread crumbs 
and season with salt and pepper, then more macaroni and so on 
until dish is full. Over this pour the following sauce: Mix 
butter and flour and stir milk in gradually; season with salt and 
pepper. — Mrs. F. M. Griffin. 

Cheese Straws 

(>iu<-up flour, two cups chopped cheese, one tablespoon 
butter, pinch of salt, one scant teaspoon Harvey's Baking Pow- 
der. Mi.x with water and roll out like pie crust, cut in strips and 
bake a light brown. To be eaten with salad. 



You gel good results with Harvey's Baking Powder 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 71 



Cheese Fondu 

One cup rolled crackers, one cup milk, three-fourtlis cup 
grated cheese, two eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately very 
light. Stir all togehter and bake in a very quick oven. Serve 
immediately.. 

Cheese Relish 

One-fourth pound cheese sliced, put into a frying pan, pour 
over it one large cup of milk into which has been mixed one-half 
teaspoon of dry mustard and a pinch of salt. Add a piece of 
butter size of a walnut, stir all the time; have ready three Boston 
crackers (pulverized), sprinkle them into the above mixture, when 
thoroughly mixed turn into a warm dish and serve. Very nice 
for luncheon. 




Harvey's Baking Powder assures Success 



ST. THOMAS Y.W.C.A. COOK BOOK 



"Elgin Brand" 



gm 



MEATS 

AN D 

LARDS 



^ Every good cook knows a good article when they once 
use it. 

^ That is the reason for the ever-increasing demand for " Elgin 
Brand" meats and lard. 

^ Our meats and lard are giving the best of satisfaction, 
because "Elgin Brand" meats are the best that can be made. 

^ Our "Elgin Brand" lard is a pure lard, its the pure leaf lard 
kettle rendered. We guarantee its purity. 

^ Our " Elgin Brand " Sausage has already created such a 
demand that it has overtaxed our capacity and we have been 
compelled to enlarge our sausage room. 

fl Our other lines are selling just as fast, thus proving our 
assertion that " Elgin Brand " meats are here to stay. 

^ Ask your dealer for " Elgin Brand." 



^Ctn^tr^. 



ST, THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 



SALADS 



Chicken Salad 

Equal proportion of chicken and celery, season to taste' 
Serve with dressing. If celery is lackmg use cabbage and celery- 
^alt, if chicken is lacking use veal and tenderloin or veal and 
chicken. 

Chicken Salad 

Rub a chicken with pepper and salt, put an onion inside and 
steam until tender. When cold separate the meat from the bone 
and tear into tiny bits. To one cup of chicken allow one-half 
cup of crisp white celery cut into half inch lengths and then 
into strips. Mix the chicken and the celery together with a little 
mayonnaise. Heap the mixture in the center of a salad bowl 
with the fresh, white tops of the celery leaves arranged about the 
edge. Pour the remainder of the mayonnaise on top and put in 
refrigerator until time to serve. — Mrs. T. Robertson. 

Chicken Salad 

Dressing for two chickens. The best of six heads of celery, 
a sprinkle of Cayenne pepper over the chicken, four eggs, one tea- 
spoon of white pepper, one teaspoon of made mustard, two des- 
sert spoons of sugar, one teaspoon of salt, half cup of butter, one 
cup of vinegar. Mix well and put over teakettle to thicken; stir 
till done. When nearly cool, add a cup of cream. — Mrs. W. B. 
Doherty. 

Chicken a' la Tomato Salad 

Boil an onion and stalk of celery for twenty minutes in one 
pint of tomatoes, strain and pour upon one-half box of gelatine 
which has been soaked one hour in one-half cup of cold water. 
Season with salt and cayenne, put in a mould and on ice. When 
cold and firm turn from the mould on a bed of crisp lettuce 
leaves, making a hollow in the center of the jelly and filling it 
with chicken salad covered with mayonnaire. — Mrs.T. Robertson. 



Harvey's Baking Powder assures Success 



74 ST. THOMAS V. \V. C. A. COOK BOOK 

Neapolitan Salad 

One cup green [leas boiled and cold, the same of string beans 
cut into one-half inch lengths well cooked.one cup celery cut into 
one- half inch pieces, one cup boiled carrots cut into neat dice 
also cold, one cup red beets boiled and cut into dice. Leave all 
the ingredients in the ice box until chilled and stiff. Ha\e ready 
a glass dish or silver, a shallow one is best, heap the beets in the 
centre, next a ring of celery, then the beans, next the carrots, 
lastly the peas, all forming a mound. Ponr over this a good 
dressing and garnish with lettuce. — Mrs. E. S. Anderson. 

Lettuce Salad 

Wash three heads of lettuce and sling to dry (to sling it put 
lettuce in a good-sized piece of muslin, gather the four corners 
together and swing it round and round. This is the best way to 
dry lettuce). Then put the leaves together, a leaf to the stalk, 
turn about and cut fine with a sharp knife as if cutting cabbage 
for salad, till all the lettuce is cut, throw this lightly into a salad 
bowl and sprinkle with finely chopped lamb mint. In the mean- 
time have two hard-boiled eggs cold, chop the whites coarsely 
and sprinkle over the lettuce and mint and just before serving 
pour over the whole a dressing made of one tablespoon dry mus- 
tard, rubbed with two hard-boiled yolks to a smooth paste, 
one teaspoon salad oil, one-half teacup sugar, one-half tea- 
spoon salt and pepper, one small cup cream or sweet milk, one- 
half cup vinegar. Do not cook this. — B. S. P. 

Rgg Salad 

One dozen hard-boiled eggs cut fine, put a small onion in if 
desired; a layer of egg, pepper and salt until dish is filled, then 
pour on salad dressing. — Mrs. Finlay. 

Egg Salad 

Cut hard-boiled eggs in half, remove yolks and mash smooth, 
add an equal (]uantity of chopped chicken, turkey or veal and 
moisten with mayonnaise'. Shape into balls and fill center of 
eggs again and |)ress together and put on ice until ready to serve. 
When r(!ady, lay the whole eggs in a circle in a nest of crisp let- 
tue leaves with mayonnaisse dressing heaped in the center, 
garnish with capees and nasturtium leaves and blossoms. — Mrs. 
T. Robertson. 



For Recipes in this Book Use Harvey's Baking Powder 



ST. THOMAS Y. W, C. A. COOK BOOK 75 



Beet Salad 

One quart raw cabbage chopped fine, one quart cooked beets 
(cool before chopping), two cups sugar, one tablespoon salt, one 
teaspoon black pepper, one-fourth teaspoon cayenne pepper, one 
cup grated horse radish, one bunch celery. Cover with best cold 
vinegar and it will keep for months. — Mrs. Rivard. 

German Potato Salad 

Cut up two slices of breakfast bacon into 1 inch squares, fry 
to a nice brown, sprinkle enough flour in pan to take up all the 
grease, stir, then add vinegar and water to taste, stir until thin and 
smooth like cream, add salt and pepper. Pour over six or eight 
cold boiled potatoes which have been sliced thin, with some onion, 
stir well together and serve immediately. — Mrs. Eby. 

Potato Salad 

Eightmediumsized potatoes boiled in "jackets", two or more 
small onions chopped, three hard cooked eggs chopped, one cucu- 
cumber cut in cubes. Cut potatoes in small cubes, add other 
ingredients. Mix with dressing, garnish with lettuce and chopped 
parsley. Serve very cold. — Jean F. McLoney. 

Potato Salad 

Boil potatoes with peelings on them. When cold, peel and 
cut in dice shape, with two raw onions. Dressmg: beat one egg 
in a cup, fill with sour cream, put one-half cup vinegar in granite 
pan, add one tablespoon butter, three tablespoons of sugar, one 
teaspoon salt, pepper to taste. Set on the fire, add cream and 
egg, stir till thick, pour over potatoes and onions and stir with a 
fork. Mrs. Haight. 

Fruit Salad 

Cut up four oranges and three bananas in small pieces, shred 
a can of Morgan's canned pmeapple, stone three-quarters of pound 
Malaga grapes. Allow the juice of the fruit on the amount of 
water required on two packages of pineapple gelatme in which 
you have put the juice of one lemon and a little sugar to taste. 
When cold, pour over the fruit and set away to stiffen. This 
makes a large salad. — Mrs. Geddes. 



For recipes in this Book Use Harvey's Baking Powder 



76 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 



3IISS 3ICCOR3ITCK 

I>RESSMAKER 



7t 



FARLEY BLOCK 



ST. THOMAS 



LADIES' TAILORING 



BY 



MISS MOORE 



JOURNAL BUILDING 



ST. THOMAS, ONT. 



CITY TEA DEPOT 

HIGH-GRADE 
TEAS AND COFFEES 



J. C. LANa 



465 TALBOT ST. 



for the best go to 

Geo. P. 

Omith Dealer m 

Choice rresh and 
( ured Meats 

Butter, Eggs and Provisions 

Cor. Ross & WeTllngton 

SI. THOMAS. 


For Pure Essences 

TRY OUR 

SPECIAL 
QUALITY 

q No Cake or Fuel- 
ing should be made 
without them. 


DUNCOMBE 'S 

Family Drug Store. 



Get it at Tostcr*s... 



WHEN YOU WANT THE BEST 

Baking Powder Pure Spices 

Flavoring Extracts, Fruit Colorings, etc. 



PHONE 143 



221 TALBOT STREET 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 77 



Raspberry Salad 

Mix in equal proportions raspberries and currants by placing 
in a glass or porcelain bowl a layer of currants, sprinkle with 
sugar, then a layer of raspberries, sprinkle with sugar, and thus 
alternately until all the fruit is added. Set in a cold place an hour 
before using. 

Fruit Salad 

Two bananas, two oranges, one-half pineapple, one lemon, 
one-half pound large white grapes, chopped walnuts and whipped 
cream. Dice oranges, slice bananas, shred pineapple; pour over 
this lemon juice, sugar to taste. If grapes are used cut in half 
lengthwise; if nuts are used they may be sprinkled on top with 
a little salt or else mixed in; if whipped cream is used stir m 
lightly. Serve very cold. — Mrs. E. A. Smith. 

Fruit Salad 

Pine apple cut in small cubes, celery and bananas. Dress- 
ing: Scant one-half cup rich cream, one whole egg, yolks of two 
eggs, one and one-half rounded tablespoons sugar. Cook in 
double boiler until it is the consistancy of custard, then add two 
tablespoons of lemon juice. — Mrs. C. E. Williams. 

Banana Salad 

Roll a banana in salad dressing, sprinkle thickly with chop- 
ped walnuts. Serve on lettuce leaf and garnish with sliced 
orange and gelatine jelly. Salad Dressing for above: Two 
tablespoons of butter, the yolks of three eggs, half cup of vine- 
gar, three-quarter cup of sugar, beaten whites of eggs just before 
taking from stove. When cold, add half cup of whipped creani(. 
— Genice A. Coghill. 

Stuffed Olives 

Remove pits of olives and stuft^ with two tablespoons cream 
cheese, two tablespoons chopped walnuts, dash of cayenne. 
Spear with toothpicks. — Mrs. Angus Murray. 

Lobster Salad 

Nearly as much chopped celery as lobster, salad dressing 
with cut pickles and plenty of whipped cream in it. Serve on 
shredded lettuce. Use "Sterling" or "Red Devil" lobster. 
—Kate A. McCo ll. 

You get good results with Harvey's Baking Powder 



78 ST. THOMAS V. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 

Waldorf Salad 

Siicc t\v(i cups apples, une and one-half cups celery cut fine 
and one cup of nuts chopped. Mix with mayonnaise dressing, 
shape up nicely in salad bowl and spread all over the top with 
whipped cream. Serve at once after mixing. — Mrs. Eby. 

Veal and Celery Salad 

I'se stewing veal, cook veal until tender, cool meat in liquor 
in which it has been cooked. Cut it and the celery in one-ha!f 
inch cubes and serve highly seasoned with dressing. — Ella G. 

Smith. 

Salmon Salad 

One can salmon, one head celery, five cents worth shelled 
walnuts. Chop all and mix with dressing. Serve on lettuce leaf. 
Dressing: One teaspoon Hour, one and one-half tablespoons 
sugar, one and one-half tablespoons butter, one egg, three-fourths 
cup milk, one-half teaspoon mustard, a little salt and pepper. 
Mix dry ingredients and butter, add egg and milk and vinegar 
(while It is boiling). 

Tomato Salad 

Select tomatoes of equal size, remove skins, cut out the 
blow end and fill with finely chopped onions and cucumbers, 
place on lettuce leaves and pour over each a little salad dressing. 
(iarnish with parsley. — Mrs. K. A. Smith. 
Cauliflower Salad 

Take a head ot cauliflower and bcjil in a piece of fine cheese 
f loth, drain, sprinkle over two tablespoons lemon juice or vin- 
egar. Set away to cool. At serving time break cauliflower in- 
to little tlowerets, arrange neatly on a dish, sprinkle over them 
a little chopped parsley, cover with a good French dressing and 
serve. Mrs. F. A. White. 

Salad Dressing 

One teaspoon mustard, one tcaspo(Mi salt, one teaspoon flour, 
one and one-half teaspoons powdered sugar, one teaspoon melted 
butter, one-third cup hot \inegar, one-half cup cream, few grains 
cayenne pepper, yolk of one egg. Mix dry ingredients, add 
butter, egg and vinegar, cook slowly over boiling water. — M'rs. G. 
Fllison. 



No Ammonia or Alum in Harvey's Baking Powder 



ST. THOMAS Y. \V. C. A. COOK BOOK 79 



Salad to Serve With Game 

Cut a cold, boiled red beet into small strips of even size, 
cut celeiy into the same lengths and split into sections. Now 
chop some beet rather fine and cut celery into small dice, cover 
each with mayonnaise dressing and let stand for fifteen minutes. 
Cut a little watercress finely and scatter through the beet and 
celery as it is arranged in a mound on a large plate. Shape the 
edge with a spoon and lay the strips of the beet and celery alter- 
nately, close and upright around the edge. Garnish with cress 
or celery on top of mound. This salad looks very tempting 
arranged for individual service but it takes more time. Shape 
by pressing a muffin ring over the beet and celery, set the border 
of strips around and lay a sprig of celery at the side of each 
salad. Lay the celery stalks in cold water for an hour or two. 
Add one-half teaspoon of vinegar to two quarts of water to make 
celery crisp. — Mrs. A. C. Hill. 

Mayonnaise 

Yolk of one egg, one cup olive oil, one-half teaspoon salt, 
cayenne, two tablespoons lemon juice or vinegar or one table- 
spoon of each. To mix this use a soup plate and silver fork. 
Have everything very cold; beat egg yolk slightly and mix 
seasonings with it, add oil, very slowly at first, drop by drop, as 
it thickens add oil more quickly but never add more oil until all 
the egg is taken up. When too stiff to beat easily add a little 
vinegar or lemon juice and continue adding oil and vinegar alter- 
nately until all IS in. — Ella G. Smith. 

Salad Dressing 

One cup vinegar, one cup sugar, four tablespoons butter 
(heated together); stir together and stir m one beaten egg, dessert- 
spoonmoistened cornstarch, teaspoon mustard, a little salt and 
pepper. Stir while boiling. Two or three tablespoons of cream 
added when cool and ready to use add to the taste. — Mrs. H. W. 
Reede. 

One-fourth cup sugar, one teaspoon mustard, one-half tea- 
spoon flour, one egg, pinch of salt and pepper. Beat them 
together and then add one-fourth cup milk, one-fourtli cuj) vine- 
gar. Cook until it thickens. — Mrs. Stainsby. 

Harvey's Baking Powder is Pure and Wholesome 



80 



ST. THOMAS V. \V. C. A. COOK BOOK 



The Busy Cash Shoe Store 

for L JIRSCH^ 

Bargains ^ ^ 381 xaibot St. 



STOVES 

Dangler Oil Cook Stove 

*' Oil and Gas 

Heating Stoves 

Jewel Gas Stoves 

Coal Heating Stoves 

Cook Stoves and 
Ranges. 



^ Brown L 

Fhorxr 371 353 Tivlbot St. 



Always 
Use . . . 



J 



UDD'S SPICES. 

UDD'S FLAVORING 
EXTRACTS. 

L'DD'S BAKING 
POWDER. 



Then You'll be Sure— 
Instead of Sorry 

¥ Wo Judd 

Tiie Pure Drug Store 
ST. THOMAS ONTAR O 



Hopkins' ... 

Photos 



/Ire /lliucivs Good 



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0pp. Elgin St. 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 81 



Salad 

One egg beaten up with one-half teaspoon black pepper, one- 
half teaspoon salt, one-half teaspoon mustard, one teaspoon sugar. 
Then take one-half cup vinegar and mix all together, boil and 
stir until thick, one tablespoon cream. — Miss Turville. 

Boiled Salad Dressing 

One heaping tablespoon of mustard, one tablespoon of sugar, 
one tablespoon of melted butter or salad oil, two tablespoons sour 
cream, six tablespoons of vinegar, one egg. Mix the mustard 
smoothly in part of the vinegar, add the remainder of the vinegar 
and. the sugar. Beat the egg and butter or oil together, stir in 
the cream or milk, pour into the vinegar and mustard, mixmg well. 
Let it boil a few minutes, stirring briskly. Cool before usmg. 
It will keep several days; is good and cheap and can be used with 
lettuce or cold meat, fowl, potatoes or any cold pieces are 
made palatable by using this dressing. — Mrs. E. A. Smith. 

Salad Dressing with Oil. 

One teaspoon mustard, one-half teaspoon salt, one cup 
olive oil, two tablespoons vinegar, cayenne or two tablespoons 
lemon juice, yolks of two eggs. Mix mustard, salt and cayenne 
until well blended. Add this to the yolks. Beat well. Then 
add oil slowly until one-half cup has been used, beating with an 
egg beater. Then add alternately the vinegar or lemon juice 
and the remainder of the oil. — Mrs. H. B. Smith. 

Cream Salad Dressing 

Beat the yolks of three eggs until light and thick, add a tea- 
spoon of mustard, also one of salt, a speck of cayenne pepper, two 
tablespoons of sugar, same of melted butter, one cup of cream 
and a half a cup of vinegar, then add the whites of the three eggs 
beaten stiff. Put all together in a double boiler, boil until thick, 
stirring well while cookmg, bottle tightly. This will keep for a 
week or two. — Mrs. E. A. Smith. 



Harvey's Baking Powder is absolutely Pure 



-T. THOMAS V. W, C. A. COOK BOOK. 



Salad Dressing 

Mix thoroughly and gradually one teaspoon each of flour, 
mustard and sugar, one-half teaspoon salt, yolks of two eggs and 
one-half cup milk or cream. Place on the stove and stir until 
hot, then add gradually a small half-cupful vinegar, and lastly a 
lump of butter size of a walnut. When cold, if too thick, thin 
u ith olive oil, cream or vinegar. — E. C. Hindmarsh. 

Two egg yokes, two tablespoons vinegar, two teaspoons 
made mustard, one-half teaspoon salt, two tablespoons sugar, one 
desert spoon butter. Let vinegar come to a boil, then pour into 
beaten egg. Add other ingredients and return to stove. Cook 
till thick. Before using thin with e<iual quantity of cream. If 
vour cream is whipped the dressing will be much nicer. — Mrs. E. 
C. Harvey. 

Four eggs, one cup vinegar, one large tablespoon sugar, two 
teasj)oons mustard, two teaspoons salt, one-quarter teaspoon of 
cayenne pepper, one teaspoon cornstarch, two tablespoons butter. 
Boil over hot water until as thick as cream. When cold add 
one-half cup of cream, whipped. — Mrs. Idsardi. 

Two cups vinegar, one-half cup butter, salt and jiepper, put 
on stove to boil. Mix together two tablespoons sugar, one table- 
spoon mustard, two eggs and a large tablespoon flour. Stir all 
into the boiling vinegar and let boil up together for a minute, 
stirring all the time. When mixing with salad mix with cream 
enough to make the dressing the consistencv of cream. — Mrs. S. 
TI. Kbv. 

Mayonnaise Dressing 

Two well-beaten eggs, one and one-half cup granulated 
sugar, one teaspoon of salt, two teaspoons smooth mustard, dash 
cayenne pepper, one cup vinegar. Cook in double boiler until 
thick. When dressing is nearly cold add one cup sour cream. — 
Mrs. G. K. Crocker, 



Harvey's Baking Powder is all Leaven 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 83 



French Dressing 

Use two or three times as much oil as vinegar, salt and 
pepper to taste. Put oil, salt and pepper in a bowl aud mix until 
salt is dissolved, then add vinegar very gradually, stirring vigor- 
ously all the time; add a little mustard if desired. — Mrs. E. A. 
Smith. 




Harvey's Baking Powder is Pure and Wholesome 



84 ST. THOMAS Y. \V. C. A. COOK BOOK 

REEK S & CO. 

FRUITS A SPECIALTY. ^jVy Hlgh-ClaSS 

Cor. Talbot & Elgin Sts. ''*'' LrrOCCriCS. 



Gentlemanly Appearance 

Is assured to ihe patrons of "THE RIGHT SHOP FOR MEN." 

MacDonald $ Douglas 

ClolKing, Furnishings, Trunks. Suit Cases NEXT CITY HALL 



PHONE 695 62 MITCHELL ST 

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Toronto Orthopeoic Hospital Weir Mitchell Ststem 



r^- 



N/\ 



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Jeweler and Optician 

DIAMONDS WATCHES 

JEWELRY CUT GLASSWARE 

296 Talbot St. St. Thomas 



^ 



ST. THOMAS V. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 85 



BREAD 



Whole Wheat Bread 

Dissolve one yeast cake in about cup of warm water, stir in 
white flour enough to make batter and let rise till very light. 
Before going to bed take two pints warm water, add one table- 
spoon molasses, a little sugar, two teaspoons salt and add the 
yeast. Mix well together, then sift in all the whole wheat flour 
you can stir in with spoon ; let rise over night. In the morning, 
stir down as soon as you can and let rise again. Turn out on 
moulding board and shape into loaves. Bake one hour. — Mrs. 
E. C. Harvey. 

Nut Loaf 

Make a cream sauce by melting two tablespoons of butter, 
add three tablespons of flour and two cups of milk. Mix one 
large cup of nut meats, broken small, with one cup of bread 
crumbs, moistened with one well beaten egg. Into this stir the 
cream sauce, and season to taste. Sliape mto a loaf and bake. 
— Miss Winnie Graham. 

Sally Lunn Bread 

One quart of flour, butter the size of an egg, three table- 
spoons sugar, two eggs, two small teacups milk, two teaspoons 
Harvey's Baking Powder, teaspoon salt. Stir sugar and salt into 
the flour ; add the eggs with beating the butter melted. Stir all 
well together. Bake in long tin. — Miss Turville. 

Pancakes 

Sift one cup of flour and one-half teaspoon baking soda in 
bowl, beat one egg, and add to one cup of buttermilk or sour 
cream, beat until smooth batter. — Mrs. Haight. 

Pancakes with Bread 

Soak one and one-half cups of bread crumbs in four cups of 
buttermilk. When soft beat smooth, add one egg, one teaspoon of 
soda, a little salt, enough flour for smooth batter. — Mrs. Haight. 

Harvey's Baking Powder is absolutely Pure 



8h ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 



Buckwheat Pancakes 

One quart water, one tablespoon salt, one-half cake yeast — 
I'leishman's, dissolved in luke-warm water, three and three-fourth 
cups buckwheat ilour, beat until smooth. Cover closely and let 
stand until morning in warm place ; in morning, dissolve half 
teaspoon soda in one tablespoon boiling water, add to batter 
with 2 tablespoons molasses. — Mrs. C. B. Duncombe. 

Buckwheat Cakes 

When first starting, take at night, one quart of lukewarm 
water, one cup of Graham flour and enough buckwheat flour to 
make a stiff batter, add one-half yeast cake (compressed yeast is 
best) dissolved in a little warm water, set in a warm place over 
night ; in the morning add one teaspoon of melted butter, one 
teaspoon of sugar, one-half teaspoon of soda and salt to taste, if 
too thick add a little warm water. Always save a cupful of the 
batter to start the ne.\t morning. Keep in a cool place during the 
day. —Mrs. Idsardi. 

Scones 

One <|uart flour, one teaspoon salt, two teaspoons Harvey's 
Baking Powder, one large tablespoon lard, mix thoroughly with 
sweet milk ; roll about a half inch thick ; cut in pieces and bake 
in frymg pan on top of stove. — Mrs. Lowe. 

White Gems 

( >iK- Lupsweri milk, one cuj) flour, one egg and one tea- 
poon Harvey's Baking Powder, a pinch of salt. This makes 
eight gems. — Mrs. I">. J. Iluulies. 

Egg Rolls 

Sift two teaspoons of Harvey's Baking Pcwder into one 
pint of flour. Butter size of an egg, a little salt, one cup milk 
(sweet), one tablespoon of sugar, flour enough to make a soft 
dough. Cut with a large cake cutter, butter the top, fold over 
and butter again. — Mrs. W. Norsworthy. 

Graham Gems 

(Jne cup draham flour,vtw() tablespoons of flour, one table- 
poon granulated sugar, two teaspoons Harvey's Baking Powder, 
and a little salt, all sifted together. Beat one egg, add one cup 
milk and stir all t(jgether.— Mrs. H. T. Gough. 



For Recipes in this Book Use Harvey's Baking Powder 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 87 



English Scones 

One quart flour, one cup sugar, one cup currants, three tea- 
spoons Harvey's Baking Powder, two-thirds cup shortening, one 
teaspoon salt. Sift flour, baking powder and salt together, work 
in shortening lightly with tips of fingers. Add sugar and currants 
and mix to soft dough with skim milk or a mixture of milk and 
water. Roll into a sheet about half an inch thick and cut into 
three cornered cakes with knife. — Mrs. E. C. Harvey. 

Graham Gems 

One cup yellow sugar, a little salt, one-half cup lard, one 
egg, one cup buttermilk, one cup Graham flour, one cup white 
flour, one good teaspoon soda. Drop in warm gem pans and 
bake from twenty miiiutes to half an hour. — Mrs. Atkins. 

Gems 

One cup sugar, one cup 'butter, small, two eggs, one cup 
sour milk, one teaspoon soda, two cups whole wheat flour. 

Muffins 

One egg, one pint sour milk, one teaspoon soda a lump of 
butter the size of an egg, one-half brown and one-half white flour, 
a little sugar. — Kate A. McColl. 

Johnnie Cake 

One tablespoon butter, two-thirds cup granulated 
sugar, two eggs, a little salt, two-thirds cup sweet milk, two tea- 
spoons Harvey's Baking Powder, one cup of flour, one cup of 
cornmeal. — Mrs. H. T. Gough. \, --— -^v_— --^ ■ — — 

Half cup sweet milk, half cup water, three tablespoons flour, 
six tablespoons cornmeal, three tablespoons sugar, one tea- 
spoon salt, one egg, two teaspoons Harvey's Baking Powder. 

Cornmeal Cake 

One and one-half cups cornmeal, two and one-half cups of 
flour, half cup of sugar, eight teaspoons Harvey's Baking Pow- 
der (level), half teaspoon salt, two cups milk, two eggs, two 
tablespoons melted butter. Bake forty minutes. — Miss Langan. 



No Ammonia or Alum in Harvey's Eaking Powder 



88 ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 



Corn Cake 

One cup sour milk, one cup cornmeal, one cup flour, one 
epR, one tablespoon butter, one tablespoon sugar ; mix over 
night and add a teaspoon of soda, dissolved in a little watftr in 
the mornmg. If wanted for tea, mix at noon. — Mrs. Hutchinson. 

White Cornmeal Gems 

Two eggs, one-quarter cup of sugar, piece of butter the size 
of-an egg, three-quarters cup cornmeal, a good cup of flour, half 
cup sweet milk, two teaspoons Harvey's Baking Powder. — Miss 
Turville. 

Corn Bread 

Two cups sour milk, half cup molasses, one tablespoon soda, 
salt, one cup cornmeal, one cup Graham, one cup flour, one cup 
chopped raisins. Steam three hours. I'se baking powder tins 
to put it in. Do not fill them over half full. 

Helpful Hints on Bread Making 

1. Knead the dough quickly. 

I. The longer the batter is beaten, the less kneading the 
dough will require. 

3. If you cannot ai'end to your dough at its first rising, 
take" a knife and cut it down and let it rise again. 

4. Bread th?.t contains large bubbles has risen too fast or 
too long. 

5. I'se individual pans as much as possible. 

6. Bread when baked shrinks from the tin and sounds hol- 
low when tapped on the under side. 

7. Dough when light enough to bake should be double the 
size in bulk it was .vhen set to raise. 

8. Heatreq-.ired for baking bread, SyS** F; for rolls, 400^' 
F. 

9. Bread as soon as taken from the oven should be turned 
from the pans and placed* uncovered where the surface will get 
the air. Do not alow it to come in contact with anything that 
will give it an unpleasant odor or taste. 

H). Do not wrap bread in cloth while warm. 

I I. Keep bread in a box or jar in a dry, cool room. 



For recipes ir *his Book Use Harvey's Baking Powder 



ST. THOMAS Y, W. C. A. COOK BOOK 89 



Quick Bread or Buns 

One cup of liquid, one-fourth tablespoon salt, one-half table- 
spoon sugar, and tablespoon butter, one yeast cake, one pound 
white, Graham or whole wheat flour. Make a sponge as usual, 
convert it into a dough, knead well and mould. When well 
risen bake in a hot oven. Whenever Graham flour is used it is 
put in the sponge and the white flour is added to make the dough. 
Use Fleischman's yeast for this process. — Mrs. E. A.Smith. 

Three-Hour Bread 

Eight cups mashed potatoes, one cup sugar, one cup flour, 
half cup salt, sixteen cups water, one yeast cake. Let rise thirty- 
six hours. This mixture will keep in covered crock in cool, dry 
place. When you want bread, take any quantity of this yeast, 
warrh yeast a little, stirring constantly ; mix soft with flour and 
make into loaves. Let rise about one hour, knead again just 
enough to take the lightness out, let rise about half hour. Bake. 

Home-Made Yeast 

One large potato mashed, two tablespoons flour, 
one tablespoon sugar, one teaspoon salt, one-quarter 
teaspoon ginger, 1 tablespoon hops steeped in one pint boiling 
water. Mix potato, flour, sugar, ginger and salt together and 
add a little cold water, stirring until all the lumps are smoothed 
out, strain water off hops and pour over mixture. Put on stove 
until it comes to the boil, stirring all the time. Pour into a 
crock. When luke warm add one-half dried yeast cake dissolved 
in luke warm water, stir occasionally. In five or six hours it 
will be ready for use. If bottled, this will keep a long time in a 
cool place. 

Hop Yeast Bread 

At night take the quantity of yeast made, add two cups of 
warm water, half cup sugar, two tablespoons salt. Fill the 
bread pan about half full of flour, making a hollow in the centre 
large enough to hold all your liquid. Stir in enough of the flour 
to make a thin batter. Cover lightly with flour. Cover with a 
cloth and set in warm place to rise. In the morning add two 
cups warm water to the batter. Stir in the rest of the flour, add- 
ing more flour if necessary and kneading well until the dough 
will not stick to the pan or the hands. Cover with cloth and set 
in warm place to rise until double the bulk. Then mould in 
loaves, place in pans, allow to rise until double the size when 
put in the pans. Bake one hour in over 375" fahrenheit. 

Harvey's Baking Powder is Pure and Wholesome 



90 ST. THOMAS V.W. C.A. COOK BOOK 

Bread at Noon 

One cup of flour in crock, two teaspoons salt; drain into this 
potato water. Let it stand until luke warm and add one-half 
yeast cake dissolved in one-half cup of warm water. Let it 
stand until bed time. At night add about one quart of warm 
water and flour enough for stiff" batter. In the morning mix 
stiff", put in warm place to rise, then cut into loaves, and when 
they are light bake in a moderate oven for one hour. 

Buns 

I'se a piece of dough the size of a loaf of bread. Roll, 
spread with shortening, sugar and spice. Mix together and put 
in a warm place to rise. Cut out in bun pieces, put in pans to 
lighten. Bake in a moderate oven. 

Bread 

Two tablespoons of sugar, two tablespoons of salt, two 
tablespoons of lard, one quart potato water, one-half yeast cake. 
At noon mix the sugar, salt, lard and potato water in a crock. 
When cool put in the yeast cake, which has been dissolved in 
one-half cup of warm water. Set in a warm place. By night 
it shfjuld look foamy. In the morning make the mixture luke- 
warm and mix stiff^ with flour. When light, knead, and let 
rise again. Put in pans, let rise again, and bake one hour. — Mrs. 
A. L. Xorsworthy. 

Salt Yeast Bread 

One pint of shorts, one teaspoon salt, one teaspoon sugar, 
one teaspoon ginger, one teaspoon soda. Mix these well and 
put in a sealer for use. Put three tablespoons of dry ingredients 
in a bowl and scald with enough hot water to make batter; let 
stand in warm place over night. In the morning take one cup 
warm water with one teaspoon sugar and little salt, stir Warm 
flour in this until thick batter, then put in the yeast. Put this in 
a kettle of warm water, cover, and let stand till it comes to the 
to|) of dish. Have flour scalded with two quarts of water or 
half milk, and cooled enough to pour yeast in, and stir enough 
flour in to knead it. Let this rise till light, then knead and put 
in pans. When light, bake twenty minutes or one-half hour, 
according to size of loaves. — Mrs. Gray. 

Harvey's Baking Powder assures Success 



ST. THOMAS Y. VV. C. A. COOK BOOK 91 

Easy Way to Make Bread 

Put into a mixing bowl one pint equal parts of milk and 
warm water, add one-half ounce cake of compressed yeast, after 
•being dissolved in about three tablespoons of cold water, and a 
teaspoon of salt. Then stir in flour with a spoon until a dough 
is formed sufficiently stifT to be turned from the mixing bowl in 
a mass. Put this dough on a molding board and mix well add- 
ing flour until it ceases to stick to the fingers or the molding 
board. Then put it in a well-greased earthen bowl, brush the 
top of the dough with melted butter or lard to keep it from crust- 
ing over, cover with a bread towel, set to rise for about three 
hours, at a temperature of 75 degrees. At the end of that time 
form into loaves or rolls, put into well -greased pans, brush the 
top of loaves as before, with butter or lard and again set to rise 
for about an hour at the same temperature, then bake. Be sure 
and have the oven the proper temperture, also be sure the yeast 
is strictly fresh. This quantity will make two good loaves. — E. 
C. Hindmarsh. 

Boston Brown Bread 

One cup sweet milk, two of sour, two cups cornmeal, one of 
flour, two-thirds cup molasses, good teaspoon soda, salt, 
steam four hours, leave in warm oven till ready to use. — Mrs. H. 
W. Reede. 

One cup (level) Indian meal, two cups (heaping) rye, one 
teaspoon of salt, one teaspoon soda, one cup of molasses. 
Mix thoroughly meal, salt and soda, mix one pint of 
hot water with molasses and stir into meal until a smooth batter. 
Put into buttered steamer (a large pail is excellent), cover tightly 
and steam three and one-half hours. When done set in oven ten 
minutes before removing from steamer. If too sweet use three- 
quarters cup molasses and one-quarter more water. — Mrs. Dr. 
Gray. 

Brown Bread 

Four cups buttermilk, four cups bran, four cups flour, two 
teaspoons soda, one teaspoon salt, half cup brown sugar, one cup 
raisins. Stir all together and p^rt into two loaves and bake 
slowly for one or one and a half hours. — Mrs. Kennedy. 

Two cups Graham flour, one cup w'hite flour, one cup corn- 
meal, one cup sugar, a little salt, one teaspoon soda, two cups 
buttermilk. Bake in deep pans. This recipe makes two loaves. 
— Mrs. Ferguson. 

You get good results with Harvey's Baking Powder 



92 ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 



Brown Bread 

One teaspoon soda in a cup of molasses. Let stand on 
Ivick of stove until molasses froths. One pint water, one tea- 
spoon salt, two teaspoons baking powder, four cups Graham flour. 
Steam.— Mrs. J. J. Hall. 

Three-cjuarters cup of lard and butter mixed, half capsular, 
two eggs, two cups sour milk, one teaspoon soda, half cup molas- 
ses, two cups graham flour, one and one-half cups white flour, 
season with nutmeg and cinnamon. Bake one hour and one- 
'juarter with slow fire. — J. A. Coghill. 

Two cups oatmeal, four cui:)s boiling water, one tablespoon 
salt. Stir and allow to cool, one Fleishman's yeast cake which has 
been dissolved in warm water ; one cup syrup, one cup chopped 
raisins, one cup chopped walnuts, seven and one-quarter cups of 
flour. Mi.x well, put in a warm place and let stand over night. 
Put in pans in the morning, let rise, bake three-quarters of an 
hour. — Mrs. Eby. 

Boston Brown Bread 

One quart Graham flour, one pint cornmeal, one quart sour 
milk, two teaspoons soda (level) dissolved in milk, one teaspoon 
salt, one cup molasses. Steam three hours then bake half hour. 

'i'wo cups shredded wheat biscuit crumbs, one cup yellow 
cornmeal, one cup New Orleans molasses, one and three-quarter 
cups sweet milk, half cuj) sour milk, one teasj^oon salt, one tea- 
spoon soda, one-half to be dissolved in sour milk and one-half in 
molasses. Steam two to three hours. — Jean F. McLoney. 

Brown Bread 

Two cups graham Hour, two-thirds cuj) white flour,, one cup 
sour milk, half cuj) golden sprup, one teaspoon soda, salt, one tea 
cup raisuis (stoned and cut in half. Steamed two and one-half 
hours. — Mrs. Walter Xorsworthy. 

Rolls 

Two cups bread sponge, two eggs, one cup sugar, two cups 
milk, half cup butter, half cup lard, one dessert spoon salt. Mix 
to soft dough. Keep in warm place, let rise for four hours, 
make into rolls, brush warm lard over tops, let rise two hours. 
Hake in hot oven. — Mrs. P. McDiarimd. 

You get good results with Harvey's Baking Powder 



( 

ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 93 



Parker House Rolls 

One pint of sweet milk, boiled, and while still warm add a 
lump of butter the size of an- egg, also two tablespoons sugar, 
about half teaspoon salt, half cake compressed yeast, dissolved 
in half cup of warm water. When light mold fifteen minutes. 
Let rise again and cut in round cakes. Spread each half with 
butter and fold over on the other half. Put in j^ans and when 
light bake in quick oven. — Miss C. Elliot. 

Hot Biscuits 

Rub into one quart of flour one tablespoon butter, one table- 
spoon lard. Add one tablespoon of white sugar, one-half tea- 
spoon of salt, two heaping teaspoons Harvey's Baking Powder. 
Put all these things through a seive three times. Then with a 
wooden spoon stir lightly in sufficient milk, or milk and water, to 
make a tiiick batter or rather a thin dough. Turn out upon a well- 
floured molding board. Flatten lightly with the bowl of the spoon 
until about one inch thick and cut out with a small sized cookie 
cutter. Lightly place in a greased baking tin, barely touching each 
other, and bake in a hot oven. Delicious and digestible if quickly 
and lightly handled. — Mrs. J. M. Green. 

Baking Powder Biscuit 

Sift together one quart flour, half teaspoon of salt and two 
heaping teaspoons Harvey's Baking Powder, then rub m one 
heaping tablespoon of butter or lard, and mix with one and one- 
half cups of sweet milk. Turn out on floured board and knead 
a few times to mix thoroughly. Roll out half an inch thick and 
cut in small rounds. Bake in hot oven fifteen minutes. — Mrs. 
M.G. Hay. 

Cornmeal Gems 

Two eggs, one and one-half cups flour, one and one-quarter 
cups cornmeal, one and one-half table spoons butter, half cup 
sugar, one pint sweet milk, three teaspoons B. P. salt. — Mrs. F. 
M. Griffin. 

Wheat Muffins 

One pint flour, two teaspoons B. P., three tablespoons 
sugar, butter size of half an egg, one beaten egg, one teacup 
milk, beat quickly to a batter and bake in a cjuick oven. — Mrs. F. 
M. Griffin. 



Harvey's Baking Powder is Pure and Wholesome 



94 ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 



Graham Muffins 

Three-quarters cup brown sugar, four tablespoons melted 
butter, one egg, one cup sweet ntilk, one and cyie-half cups 
graham flour, one cup white flour, one and one-half teaspoons 
soda, two teaspoons cream of tartar and a little salt. Drop in- 
to buttered gem tins and bake in hot oven. — Mrs. A. H. BaiUie, 
Aylmer,'Ont. 

Biscuits 

F"our even cups flour, one and one-half cups sweet milk, 
tour even teaspoons cream of tartar, two even teaspoons soda, 
butter (size ot an egg). Bruise the soda well, and sift it and the 
cream of tartar into the flour. Work butter lightly through and 
add milk last. Bake in quick oven. — Miss G. Smith. 

Whole Wheat Muffins 

One egg, one cup sour milk, two tablespoons sugar, one 
tablespoon melted butter, one-third teaspoon soda, pinch of salt. 
Beat egg light, add milk, sugar and salt, stir in enough whole 
wheat flour to make a rather stiff batter, add melted butter then 
soda dissolved in one teaspoon hot water. When ready drop 
into well heated muffin tins. — Mrs. Kirkpatrick. 

Johnny Cake 

i wo Lujjh ct)iniiiu;il, one cup flour, two tablespoons sugar, 
one tablespoon molasses, pinch of salt, two cups sour milk, one 
heaping teaspoon soda dissolved in the milk. 

Muffins 

CJne egg, one tablespoon melted butter, one cup milk, two 
cups flour, one teaspoon salt, two teaspoons Harvey's Baking 
Powder, one teaspoon sugar. Have the muffin pans well 
greased and hot. Bake half hour.— Mrs. Dixon. 

Sour Milk Biscuit 

Sift together one quart flour, one teaspoon salt, one-third 
teaspoon cream of tartar (scant). Dissolve one teaspoon soda in 
one cup sour milk and mix with flour, then add enough sour 
milk to handle well without sticking. Knead as little as possible 
and bake in a hot oven. 



Harvey's Baking Powder is absolutely Pure 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 95 



Raised Biscuits 

One quart milk, three-quarters cup lard and butter, two 
tablespoons white sugar, one teaspoon salt, half cake compres- 
sed yeast, flour to make soft dough. Mix over night, warming 
milk, butter and lard. In morning, work in flour enough to roll 
in sheet, three-quarters inch in thickness. Cut in round cakes 
and set closely in pan and let rise twenty minutes or until light. 
Bake twenty minutes. — Mrs. T. W. Crothers. 

Finegans 

Short biscuit dough. Roll out about one and one-half 
inches thick, spread over with butter then sprinkle'with cinnamon 
and sugar quite thick. Roll and cut in small pieces and cook in 
quick oven. 

Sandwich Filling 

Stone two dozen olives, chop fine and pound to a pulpcbe- 
fore mixing with half a cup of crisp celery, also chopped ; add a 
salt spoon of prepared mustard, a teaspoon tomato catsup, two 
tablespoons cracker dust, and a small cup of mayonnaise dressing. 

Salmon Salad for Sandwiches 

One can of salmon, minced fine, take one quart of milk, 
two eggs beaten, salt and pepper to taste, and let come to a boil, 
then put in the salmon and thicken with cracker crumbs, using 
four or six crackers. — Mrs. Turville. 

Olive Sandwiches 

Stone and chop olives and mix with mayonnaisse, butter the 
bread, which must be cut very thin. — INIrs. Haight. 

Hickory Nut and Banana Sandwiches 

To half cup of chopped hickory nut meats add about two 
sliced bananas. The bananas must be firm and not over ripe, 
spread between slices of brown bread. Delicious. — Mrs. Haight. 

Maple Sugar Sandwiches 

Prepare maple sugar by scraping. Cut thin brown bread, 
butter and spread on sugar and sprinkle well with choppe,d wal- 
nuts or almonds. If sugar is not moist enough add a little 
cream. — Mrs. E. S. Anderson. 

Harvey's Baking Powder assures Success 



1 HUMAS V. \\. C. A, COOK BOOK 



Walnut Sandwiches 

Chop walnuts very fine. Mix with mayonnaise dressing 
and spread between tliin bread and butter. — Mrs. E. S. Anderson. 

Sandwiches 

I'ut dates, figs and raisins througli meat chopper, moisten 
with a little orange juice and spread between thin slices of 
bread and butter. — Mrs. E. S. Anderson. 

Tea Sandwiches 

Chop English walnuts fine and mix with a little cream 
cheese, add celery or water cress chopped fine and moisten Avith 
mayonnaise dressing. Spread between thin slices of bread and 
butter or criso toast. — Mrs. E, S. Anderson. 




Harvey's Baking Powder is all Leaven 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK ^OOK 97 



CAKES 



Layer Cake 

One cup sugar, one egg, butter and lard together the size of 
an egg. Beat together. One and one-haTf cups flour, one tea- 
spoon soda, two teaspoons cream of tartar. — Mrs. Horton. 

Layer Cake 

A piece of butter the size of an egg, three-fourths cup 
of sugar, three-foi r hs cup of milk, two teaspoons Harvey's 
Bakmg Powder, three eggs. Bake in quick oven. — Mrs. S. 
Flach. 

Jelly Cake or Cottage Pudding 

One tablespoon butter, one cup brown sugar, two eggs, one 
large cup flour, one and one-half teaspoon Harvey's Baking 
Powder, one-half cup milk. Add milk last. — Mrs. T. W. 
Crothers. 

Lemon Layer 

Two cups of flour, two teaspoons of Harvey's Baking Pow- 
der, one-half cup of sugar, one-half cup of butter, one-half cup 
of milk, two eggs. Filling! Juice and rmd of two lemons, white 
of an egg, if desired. Thicken with icing sugar. — Mrs. J. P. 
Freek. 

Hurry-up Cake 

One cup sugar, one and one-half cups flour, two teaspoons 
Harvey's Baking Powder, two eggs broken into a cup (not beaten) 
and filled up with milk. Mix sugar, flour and baking powder 
together and then put in eggs and milk. Last of all add five 
tablespoons melted butter and vanilla or other flavormg extrfct. 
Bake in a loaf. — Mrs. D. J. Hughes. 



Harvey's Baking Powder is Pure and Wholesome. 



98 ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK. 



Fruit Layer Cake 

One cup'i brown sugar, one-half cup butter, one-half cup 
sour milk with a half teaspoon soda, two cups chopped and 
seeded raisins, two cups flour, two eggs. Bake in two layers 
with white frosting between. — Mrs. McAndrew. 

Good Plain Cake 

One cup of sugar, one heaping tablespoon butter creamed 
together, add two-thirds cup milk, one egg, two cups sifted flour, 
two heaping teaspoons Harvey's Baking Powder. — Mrs. E. C. 
Harvey. 

Potato Caramel Caice 

Two-thirds cup butter, two cups granulated sugar, two cups 
flour, one cup mashed potatoes (hot), half cup sweet milk, four 
eggs, two teaspoons Harvey's Baking Powder, one cup grated 
chocolate, one cup chopped English walnuts, half teaspoon of 
cloves, half teaspoon cinnamon. 

Orange Cake 

Grate the rind of one orange and reserve. One cup white 
sugar, (juarter cup butter, cut orange in dice in a cup, fill up with 
cold water : beaten whites of two eggs, one and three-quarter 
cu|)s flour with one small teaspoon soda and two small teaspoons 
cream of tartar. Bake in one layer. Add the grated rind to the 
iripL' Mrs. E. M. Miller. 

Raisin Cake 

Two eggs, one cup brown sugar, half cup blackstrap, half 
cup butter, one teaspoon each of soda, cinnamon, nutmeg ; half 
cup sour milk, one and one-half cups flour. Bake in layers. 
Filling — one cup chopped raisins, boiled (about fifteen or twenty 
minutes), with half cup sugar and thickened with teaspoon flour. 
Spread between layers and on top of cake, put chocolate icing 
with chojjped walnuts. Mrs. E. D. Hunt. 

White Fruit Cake 

One f)Ound each of butter, sugar, flour, te.n eggs, three- 
quarters lb. blanched almonds, half lb. peel, and bandied cherries 
if desired. — Mrs. F. M. Griffin. 



You get good results with Harvey's Baking Powder. 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 99 



Pork Cake 

One lb. fat salt pork, put through the chopper, over this 
pour one pint of boiling water. One cup of molasses, two cups 
sugar, one lb. raisins, quarter lb. lemon peel, one lb. currants, one 
teaspoon of soda, nutmeg, cloves, two oz. cinnamon. Mix all 
together and stir in sifted flour to make the consistency of com- 
mon cake mixture. Good. — Mrs. Dr. Fitzsimnions. 

Wedding Cake 

Flour, one lb. ; seeded raisms, three lbs. ; nutmeg, one lb. ; 
brown sugar, one lb. ; currants, one lb. ; brandy, one wine glass ; 
butter, three-quarters lb. ; citron, one lb. ; eggs, ten ; quarter lb. 
almonds, blanched and powdered in rose water. Stir butter and 
sugar to a cream then add whites and yolks of eight eggs, beaten 
seperately. Stir in tlte flour, then spices, and add the fruit just 
before it is put in the pans. Bake slowly. This cake will keep 
two years. — Mrs. L. Wilson. 

Carmel Cake 

Half cup butter, two cups brown sugar, one-half cup milk 
with one teaspoon soda and two cream tartar dissolved in it, two 
eggs, two cups flour, one-half to three-fourths cup of grated 
chocolate melted and put in last. — Kate A. McColl. 

Minnehaha Cake 

(White part.) Whites of three eggs, two-thirds cup of 
sugar, one-half cup butter, four tablespoons sweet milk, one tea- 
spoon Harvey's Baking Powder sifted in one large cup of flour 
and cornstarch mixed, flavor with vanilla. (Red part.) Two 
eggs, one-half cup butter, one-half cup red sugar sand and enough 
white sugar to make cup two-thirds full, four tablespoons sweet 
milk, one heaping teaspoon Harvey's Baking Powder in one large 
cup flour, and one-half teaspoon rose extract. (Yellow part.) 
Yolks of three eggs, one-half cup butter, two-lhirds cup yellow 
sugar, four tablespoons sweet milk, one large cup flour, one tea- 
spoon Harvey's Baking Powder, flavor with vanilla mixture. 
Bake in layers and put together with one cup of chopped raisins 
in a white boiled icing. — Mrs. McAndrew. 



Harvey's Baking Powder is Absolutely Pure. 



100 ST. THOMAS V. W . C. A. CuoK BOOK 

' Minnehaha Cake 

One e^g, three-fourths cup sugar, one-half cup molasses, 
one-half cup cold water, one tablespoon butter, one-half teaspoon 
vanilla, one large teaspoon soda, two cups flour. Make in two 
layers. Filling for same: onecup sugar, seven tablespoons water, 
one Clip chopped raisins, white of one egg. Boil sugar and water 
until it hairs (in gold water) then add beaten white and raising 
and beat well. — Mrs. Wilcox. 

Vanity Cake 

One and a half cups sugar, half a cup butter, half cup sweet 
milk, one and a half cups flour, half cup corn starch, teaspoon 
Harvey's Baking Powder, whites of six eg^s. Bake in two 
cakes, putting frosting between and on top. — Mrs. E. S. Ander- 
son. 

Ice Cream Cake 

One cup butter, two cups sugar, one cup milk, three cups 
flour, whites of fl\e eggs well beaten, three teaspoons Harvey's 
Baking Powder. Bake in layers. Icing for same : Three small 
cups sugar, three tablespoons water. Boil till threads, pour over 
beaten whites of eggs, beat till cool. Enough for two cakes. — 
Mrs. 1'. McDiarmid. 

Dover Cake 

Five eggs, half pound butter, one lb. sugar, quarter lb. 
mixed peel, half lb. nuts, one cup raisins, one lb. flour, half cup 
sweet milk, one teaspoon soda, dissolved in one tablespoon of 
inegar. — Mrs. Cochrane. 

Jam Cake 

One cup sugar, three-fourth cup butter, one and one-half 
( ups flour, three eggs, three tablespoons milk, one teaspoon Har- 
vey's Baking Powder, one cup game spices. — Mrs. W. H. Gra- 
ham. 

Clove Cake 

Three eggs, one and one-half cups sugar, one cup butter, 
one-half cup sour milk, one cup chopped raisins, three cups flour, 
one tablespoon cloves, one tablespoon cinnamon, one teaspoon 
< ream tartar, two teaspoon soda. — Miss Wickett. 



Harvey's Baking Powder is all Leaven. 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 101 



Buttermilk Cake 

One cup brown sugar, one-half cup butter, one-half cup 
sour milk, one and one-half cups flour, one cup chopped raisins, 
two eggs, one teaspoon soda, spices to taste. Bake in two layers 
with plain white icing. — Mrs. T. W. Crothers. 

Cocoanut Cake 

One-half cup butter, one cup sugar, one-half cup milk, two 
scant cups flour, two teaspoons Harvey'3 Baking Powder, whites 
of four eggs, half cup prepared cocoanut. Rub butter and sugar 
to a cream, beat whites of eggs to a stiff froth, put baking pow- 
der with flour and sift together. Add milk to sugar and butter, 
add flour, cocoanut, and whites of eggs last. Flavor with half 
teaspoon of extract of lemon. Bake in two layers and put 
together with boiled frosting made of whites of two eggs and one 
large cup of sugar. When frosting is cool, spread between each 
layer and over the top and sides, and sprinkle cocoanut over it 
all. This cake is excellent made with any kind of nuts in place 
of cocoanut. — E. C. Hindmarsh. 

White Cake. 

Whites of five eggs, three-quarter cup butter, one and 
one-half cup sugar, three-quarter cup sweet milk, two and one- 
half cup fiour, two teaspoons Harvey's Baking Powder. — 
Mrs. Babbitt. 

Half cup butter, one cup sugar, one and one-half cups 
flour, half cup milk, whites of four eggs, two teaspoons Har- 
vey's baking powder. Flavor with vanilla and stir a great 
deal. — Mrs. Atkins. 

One cup white sugar, one-quarter cup butter, three- 
quarters cup cold water, two teaspoons baking powder, two 
eggs (whites only), one and three-quarter cups flour, flavoring. 
— Miss L. Risdon. 

The whites of two eggs, beaten to a stiff froth, one table- 
spoonful butter, one cup granulated sugar, three-quarters 
cup sweet milk, one and a half cups flour, 2 teaspoonfuls Har- 
vey's baking powder,. one-half teaspoonful vanilla, pinch salt. 
Bake in a moderate oven. — A. Murch. 



Harvey's Baking Powder is Pure and Wholesome. 



102 ST. THOMAS V. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 



White Cake. 

One cup granulated sugar, one-half cup butter. Beat to 
a cream. Two cups flour, two teaspoonfuls Harvey's baking 
powder, one cup milk, salt and flavoring. Add whites of 
three eggs, well beaten, after having thoroughly beaten above 
ingredients. — Miss Love. 

One-half cup of butter, one cup of sugar, half cup water, 
four eggs (whites only), one and a half cups flour, three tea- 
spoons baking powder. 

Perfection Cake. 

Three cups sugar, one cup butter, one cup sweet milk, 
one cup cornstarch in one half milk, three cups flour witli 
two teaspoons cream tartar sifted in, one teaspoon soda in re- 
mainder of milk, whites of twelve eggs. — Mrs. M. McAndrew. 

White Face Cake. 

One cup sugar, one-quarter cup butter, whites of two 
eggs, three-quarters cup water, two teaspoons Harvey's bak- 
ing powder. 

Icing. 

One cup j)Owdered sugar, one tablespoon butter. Mix 
thoroughly and thin witli cream. — Mrs. Kennedy. 

Snow Cake. 

Three-quarters cup l)uttcr, two cups sugar, one-half 
cup milk, two and one-half cups pastry flour, one-half tea- 
spoon ful soda, one and one-half teaspoonfuls cream of tartar, 
one teaspoon ful almond extract, whites of eight eggs. Mix 
soda and cream of tartar with flour. Be sure to use one and 
one-half teaspoons cream of tartar, as extra amount is necess- 
ary to stiffen whites of eggs. Rub butter to a cream, add 
sugar and beat again. Add milk and flour alternately, a 
little at a time, beat well. Lastly add beaten whites and 
almond extract. — Miss Midgley. 



Harvey's Baking Powder is all Leaven. 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 103 



Chocolate Cake. 

One cup sugar, one-half cup milk, one-half cup grated 
chocolate, yolk of one egg. Cook this one minute and set 
away to cool, then pour into the following mixture: 

One-half cup butter, one cup sugar, one-half cup milk, 
two cups flour, two eggs, one scant teaspoon of soda and one 
teaspoon of vanilla. Bake in a loaf tin. Use the boiled 
icing. — Mrs. Idsardi. 

One-half cup chocolate, one-half cup milk, boil till thick. 
While hot, add yolks of two eggs, well beaten, let cool, add 
two tablespoons butter, one cup sugar, one and one-half cups 
flour, one teaspoon soda sifted together twice. Add one tea- 
spoon vanilla. — Mrs. A. Murray. 

Grate five tablespoons chocolate. Add one-half cup of 
milk, yolks of two eggs. Beat together and bring to a boil 
stirring constantly, remove from fire, add three table-spoons 
melted butter, one cup granulated sugar, one-half cup of 
milk, in wl>ich one teaspoon of baking soda has been dissolved- 
one and two-thirds cups of flour. Bake in rather a slow oven, 
— Mrs. W. Norsworty. 

One-half cup chocolate, one-half cup milk. Boil for a 
few minutes, then beat the yolks of two eggs in, saving whites 
for icing. When cool, add one cup sugar, two taVjlespoon 
butter, one-half cup milk, one and one-half cups of flour, one 
teaspoon soda, one teaspoon vanilla. — Mrs. Tonge. 

Chocolate Loaf Cake 

One tablespoon butter, one and one-half cups of brown 
sugar, yolk of one egg mixed with one-fifth cake of grated 
chocolate (unsweetened), and one-half cup boiling water. 
This when stirred together will thicken instantly. Add this 
to butter and sugar and with it put another one-half cup boil- 
ing water, into which has been dissolved one teaspoon soda, 
one and one-half cups flour. Flavor with vanilla. Bake in 
moderate oven. — Mrs. R. Heard. 



For recipes ip »his Book Use Harvey's Baking Powder 



104 ST. THOMAS Y. VV. C. A. COOK BOOK 



Chocolate Cake 

One-half cake chocolate or one large spoonful Lowney's 
chocolate powder. Boil in half cup of sweet milk, when cool 
add yolks of two beaten eggs, two tablespoons of butter, 
stir into one-half cup sweet milk, one teaspoon soda, one cup 
sugar, one teaspoon vanilla, one and one-half cups of flour 
sifted. 

Icing 

One and one-half cups granulated sugar, one-half cup 
water. Boil until it threads, add the whites of two eggs, 
well beaten to a stiff froth. Flavor with rose water or almond 
flavoring. Stir in boiled sugar until smooth. Put on cake 
when cold. — Mrs. Hugh McPherson. 

Chocolate Cake or Devil's Cake. 

One-halt' cup grated unsweetened chocolate, one-half cup 
sweet milk. Let boil. When chocolate is thoroughly dis- 
solved, add the beaten yolks of two eggs, let cool. Add one 
cup brown sugar, two tablespoons melted butter, one-half cup 
milk, one and one-half cups of flour, two teaspoons baking 
powder. Flavor with vanilla. Bake in two layers. 

Icing 

One cup granulated sugar, four tablespoons water. Let 
boil until it threads, and pour over the beaten whites of two 
eggs. — Mrs. B. C. Turville. 

"House Upside Down" Cake. 

One and one-half ctips flour, two teaspoons Harvey's bak- 
ing powder. Sift these four times and add one cup sugar. 
Take teacup and in it put whites of two eggs (not beaten). 
Fill to the half cup with butter and to the full cup with milk. 
Stir this into the sugar and flour. Beat well and bake in eith- 
er lavers or square tin. Use chocolate or anv chosen filling. 
— S.'P. King. 



Harvcy'j Baking Powder is Pure and Wholesome 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 105 



Chocolate Cake 

One-half cup grated chocolate, one-half cup milk. Boil 
together a few moments, then beat in yolks of two eggs, sav- 
ing whites for icing. When cool, add one cup sugar, two 
tablespoons butter, one-half cup milk, one and one-half cups 
flour, one teaspoon soda, one teaspoon vanilla. — Mrs. Murphy. 

Prince Albert Cake. 

One cup brown sugar, one cup raisins, chopped fine, one- 
half cup of shortening, one teaspoon ground cinnamon, one 
teaspoon ground cloves (level), one heaping cup flour, three- 
quarters cup buttermilk, one teaspoon soda, two eggs. Bake 
in a moderate oven.— Mrs. Ralph Crocker. 

Icing for same. 

Cook one-half dozen figs chopped fine with one-half cup 
granulated sugar, until soft, spread on the cake and put a 
boiled icing on top. — Mrs. Ralph Crocker. 

Apple Sauce Cake. 

One and one-quarter cups cold unsweetened apple sauce, 
two small teaspoons soda (stirred in apple sauce), small one- 
half cup butter, one cup sugar, stirred in butter, one-half tea- 
spoon salt, one teaspoon cinnamon, one-quarter teaspoon 
cloves, a little nutmeg. Stir in last one cup chopped raisins, 
two cups flour. Bake in moderate oven three-quarters of an 
hour. — Mrs. Wilcox. 

Dried Apple Cake 

Two eggs, one and one-half cups brown sugar or syrup, 
one cup sweet milk, one and one-half cups butter or beef drip- 
pings, one and one-half teaspoons soda, three and one-quarter 
teaspoons each of cinnamon, allspice, cloves and nutmeg. 
Flour enough to make stiff batter — about 7 cupfuls. Take 3 
cups dried apples and cut into small pieces, two cups brown 



Harvey's Baking Powder assures Success 



106 ST. THOMAS Y. VV. C. A. COOK BOOK 



sugar, or svrup. Put the apples on to cook in plenty of water 
and with the two cups brown sugar or syrup, cook about 2 
hours or until apples are tender and syrup is thick. The ap- 
ples are to be put into cake last and are to be cold. 

Minnie Ha Ha Cake. 

Three-quarters cup coffee sugar, one egg (yolk only), 
one tablespoon butter, one-half cup molasses, one-half cup 
cold water, one even tablespoon baking soda, dissolved in the 
water, one-half teaspoon vanilla, one and one-half cups flour. 

Icing 

Three-quarters cup granulated sugar, three tablespoons 
water Boil and when it threads, add to the beaten white of 
egg. — Mrs. Turville. 

Raisin Cake 

One cup brown sugar, one-half cup butter, one-half cup 
sour milk.one and one-half cups flour, one teaspoon soda, three 
eggs, two cups raisins, stoned and cut, spices to taste. Cook 
slowly. Cream butter and sugar. Add eggs well beaten, 
spices, flour. Then sour milk and soda, well mixed. Beat 
well, then add raisins, well dredged in flour. — Mrs. T. Robert- 
son. 

Hickory Nut Cake. 

One cup sugar, one-half cup butter, two cups flour, one 
teas])oon cream of tartar, one-half teaspoon soda, one 
large cup raisins, chopped, one large cup nuts, chopped, two 
eggs, one cup milk. — J, F. Hutchinson. 

White Cake. 

Whites of four eggs, beaten, one and one-quarter cups of 
sugar, one-half cup sweet milk, two cups flour, sifted three 
times, two teaspoons Harvey's baking powder, one teaspoon 
lemon or vanilla.— Mrs. J. P. Finlay. 

V ' 

Harvey's Baking Powder is absolutely Pure 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 107 

Fruit Cake. 

One-half pound flour, one-half pound sugar, one pound 
seeded raisins, one pound currants, one-half pound citron, 
six ounces of butter, two ounces blanched almonds, one tea- 
spoon rosewater, one-half one-half wineglass of wine, five 
eggs, one teaspoon of soda. Stir the sugar and butter to 
a cream, then add eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately. 
— Mrs. M. H. Penhale. 



Two cups sugar, one cup butter, one cup water, one tea- 
spoon soda, dissolved in water, two cups chopped raisins, four 
cups flour, four eggs, one teaspoon each of nutmeg, cinnamon 
and cloves. — -Miss Wickett. 



One and one-half cups brown sugar, one-half cup butter, 
one and one-half cups milk, one cup chopped raisins, three 
eggs, one-half nutmeg, one teaspoon cinnamon, one of cloves, 
two of Harvey's baking powder and about two cups of flour. — 
Mrs. T. H. Hutchinson. 

Spanish Bun 

Mix together butter size of an egg and one cup sugar. 
Add one-half cup sweet milk, two eggs, well beaten, leaving 
whites of one for icing, one teaspoon each of cinnamon, all- 
spice, cloves, one teaspoon Harvey's baking powder, two 
cups flour. — Miss Wickett. 

One whole egg, yolks of three, two small cups sugar, 
one-half cup butter, one cup milk, two cups flour, one table- 
spoon mixed spice, three teaspoons Harvey's baking powder. 
Bake in long tin. When done, make frosting with whites of 
two eggs and a good cup brown sugar and spread on the cake, 
when hot. — Miss Turville. 

Three eggs, two cups of light brown sugar, one-half cup 
butter, one teaspoon each of cinnamon, cloves and allspice, 
one cup of sweet milk, two and one-half cups of flour, and a 
little salt, one small teaspoon of soda, two tablespoons of vine- 
gar^ 

Harvey's Baking Powder assures Success 



108 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 



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ST. THOMAS Y. W, C. A. COOK BOOK 109 



Spanish Bun 

Mix butter and sugar together, then beat eggs, put in 
milk, add. spices, dissolve the baking soda in a little hot water, 
add to milk, sift in flour. Add vinegar last thing, beat well, 
and bake in loaf tins. — L. Lewis. 

Four eggs, two cups sugar, two cups flour, one teaspoon 
cloves, one teaspoon cinnamon and allspice, one cup sweet 
milk, one cup butter, two teaspoons cream tartar, one tea- 
spoon soda. Save whites of two eggs to use for icing. — Mrs. 
H. B. Smith. 

Two cups brown sugar, two and one-half cups flour, three- 
quarters cup butter, one cup milk, yolks of three eggs and 
whites of two, three teaspoons Harvey's baking powder, one 
teaspoon of cinnamon. Use the left-over white of egg for 
icing, mixed with enough brown sugar to make a pretty thick 
paste. — Mrs. A. Laycock. 

Marble Cake 

White Part 

One cup sugar, half cup butter, half cup sweet milk, four 
eggs, whites only, two cups flour, one teaspoon cream tartar, 
half a teaspoon soda. 

Dark Part 



Dark Part 

Half cup molasses, half cup butter, half cup sour milk, 
one cup brown sugar, half teaspoon soda, two cups flour, four 
eggs, yolks onlv, half teaspoon of each spice. — Mrs. H. B. 
Smith. 

Sunshine Cake 

Six eggs, one and a quarter cups granulated sugar, one cup 
flour, scant third teaspoon cream tartar, flavor to taste. Beat 
whites slightly, then add cream tartar and beat until stiff. 
Beat yolks well, add sugar to whites, beat well with spoon, fold 
in yolks and sift flour several times and add slowly. Bake in 
angel food tin for 45 minutes in slow oven. — Mrs. Dugald Mc- 

Coii. 

You get good results with Harvey's Baking Powder 



1 10 ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 



Sunshine Cake 

One level cup sugar, six large eggs, one level cup flour, 
three-quarter teaspoonful of cream of tartar. Flavor with 
lemon extract. Sift flour once before measuring, and four or 
five times after. Separate whites and yolks of eggs. After 
beating each a few seconds, add to yolks, one-quarter tea- 
spoon, and to whites half teaspoon of cream of tartar. Beat 
very light. Stir in lightly into the beaten whites (i) sugar, 
(2) yolks, lastly flavoring and flour. _ Rinse angel cake tin 
in cold water, and bake forty minutes. -^Mrs. Still. 

Seven whites and five yolks, one cup of sugar, one cup of 
flour (sifted thrice), a third teaspoon cream of tartar, add 
pinch of salt and flavoring. Beat the whites of eggs half. 
Then add cream of tartar. Finish beating, add the sugar, 
then the yolks, (beaten lightly). Lastly fold the flour in. — ■ 
Mrs. Cochrane. 

Sponge Cake 

F'ive large or six small eggs, one and a half cups granulat- 
ed sugar, one and a half cups flour, a third teaspoon cream 
tartar, pinch salt and flavoring. Separate eggs and beat yolks 
well, and whites about half. Then add cream tartar and beat 
stiff. Add sugar, then yolks and flour. Bake 40 minutes. — 
Mrs. Mc An drew. 

Four eggs, beaten ten minutes. Add one cup sugar, 
beaten 20 minutes. Flavoring to taste. Sift one cup flour. 
Fold in withoutibeating. 

Six eggs, beaten separately, one cup of sifted sugar, one 
cup of flour, a pinch of salt, a half teaspoon of cream of tartar, 
one teaspoon of almond extract. Bake forty minutes. If 
more, in a slow oven. — Mrs. Isardi. 

Sponge Jelly Cake 

Two eggs, one cup flour, five tablespoons boiling water, 
vanilla and salt, one small cup sugar, two teaspoons Harvey's 
baking powder. Bake quickly in a large pan with well-butter- 
ed paper in it. Turn out on wet cloth. Spread with jelly 
and roll. — ^Miss Haight. 



Harvey's Baking Powder is Pure and Wholesome 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 111 



Devil's Cake 

One-half cup of cocoa or chocolate, and a half cup of 
milk, boil together. Put in yolks of two eggs, well beaten, 
when hot. Let it cool. Add two tablespoons of butter, 
one cup of sugar, one teaspoon of vanilla, and another half 
cujj of milk, one cup of flour, one even teaspoon of soda. Sift 
flour and soda twice. Bake in an oven not too hot. — Mrs. J. 
M. Glenn. 

Custard Part 

One cup grated chocolate, one-half cup sweet milk, one 
cup of brown sugar, yolk of one egg. Stir all together in a 
granite or porcelain saucepan. Cook slowly and set away to 
cool. 

Cake Part 

One cup brown sugar, one-half cup butter, two cups of 
flour, one-half cup of sweet milk, two eggs. Cream butter, 
sugar and yolks of eggs, add milk, sifted flour and whites of 
eggs, beaten stiff. Beat all together and then stir in custard. 
Lastly add a teaspoonful of soda, dissolved in a little hot 
water. 

Filling 

One cup of brown sugar, one of white sugar, one cup of 
water one tablespoon of vinegar. Boil until thick like 
candy and stir in the whites of two eggs, one-quarter pound of 
marshmallow. Boil up again and place on the cake, letting 
each layer of filling cool before putting the cake on top of it. — 
Mrs. Hugh A. Mann. 

Devil's Cake 

One cup brown sugar, three-quartei's cup grated choco- 
late, one-half cup sweet milk. Set these ingredients on the 
stove to dissolve, but not to boil. One cup brown sugar, 
a third cup butter, one whole egg and yolks of two eggs, one- 
half cup sweet milk, two and one-haff cups flour, one tea- 
spoon soda (sift with flour), one teaspoon vanilla. Cream 
butter and sugar, stir in custard, then eggs beaten light, 
then milk and flour alternately. Bake in moderate oven. 



Harvey's Baking Powder is all Leaven 



112 ST. THuMAS V. \V. C. A. COOK BOoK 



Frosting 

One cup white sugar, a third cup milk, one teaspoon but- 
ter. Boil till it comes to a very soft boil. Beat and spread on 
cake. When cool, cover with melted chocolate. — Edith 
Forbes. 



Nut Cake 

One-half cup butter, one cup sugar, yolks of three eggs, 
one-half cup milk, one and three-quarter cups flour, two and 
one-half even teaspoons Harvey's baking powder, sifted with 
fiour, whites of two eggs beaten stiff, one cup broken nut 
meats. Cream butter well, add sugar gradually. Beat yolks 
light and add with milk, flour and nuts and whites of eggs 
last. Bake fortv-five minutes in moderate oven — Mrs. L. M. 
Miller. 

Hickory Nut Cake 

One cup butter, two cups sugar, one cup milk, three and 
a quarter cups flour, two teaspoons Harvey's baking powder, 
whites of eight eggs, two cups chopped hickorv nuts. — Mrs. 
E. C. Harvey. 

Walnut Cake 

Three eggs, half cup butter, one cup white sugar, half cup 
milk, one and three-quarters cup flour, one cup chopped wal- 
nuts, two teaspoons Harvey's baking powder. 

Icing for Same. 
Two cups brown sugar, half cup milk, butter the size of 
an egg, half cup chopped walnuts, flavor with vanilla. — Mrs. 
Hugh A. Mann. 

Materials. 

One-half cup butter, two cups of sugar, well beaten to- 
gether, one cup sweet milk or cream, three cups of flour, two 
heaping teaspoons of Harvey's baking powder, one cup chop- 
ped walnuts, one cup finely cut raisins. Beat whites of five 
eggs to froth and mix in cake. Add teaspoonful of vanilla 
or lemon extract. 

For Recipes in this Book Use Harvey's Baking Powder 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 113 



For Icing. 

Yolks of five eggs beaten and mixed with pulverized 
sugar, quite stiff, spread on cake and put half walnuts on 
top. — L. Lewis. 

Date Cake 

One small cup of lard and butter mixed, one cup coffee 
sugar, two eggs, one cup sour milk, one teaspoonful soda, one 
teaspoonful' cinnamon, one teaspoonful cloves, two and a half 
cups flour, one pound dates. — Mrs. J. J. Hall. 

Date Cake 

One cup brown sugar, two eggs, one-third cup butter. 
Beat till light and add half teaspoon of spices (each), half cup 
molasses, two-thirds cup water, two teaspoons Harvey's baking 
one pound dates, cut fine, flour to thicken. 

Icing 

Two tablespoons cocoa, one tablespoon butter, cream to 
thin. — -Mrs. Murphy. 

Date Loaf 

Two cups graham flour, one cup white flour, half cup 
brown sugar, two teaspoons baking, powder, two cups sweet 
milk, one pound chopped dates, salt. Add any kind of nuts if 
you wish. — Kate A. McColl. 

Tutti Frutti Cake 

Half cup butter, one cup sugar, two eggs, one teaspoon 
cloves, one tablespoon cinnamon, half cup milk, half cup nuts, 
half raisins, one and a half cups flour, one and a half teaspoons 
Harvey's baking powder. 

Icing 

One cup sugar, half cup water. Boil till itliairs and pour 
on beaten white of one e(^g, add half cup raisins and half cup 
nuts, chopped. — Mrs. Murphy. 



Harvey's Baking Powder is Absolutely Pure. 



114 ST. THOMAS V. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 



Tutti-Frutti Cake, (very good) 

Cream one and a half cups sugar with one cup of butter, 
add one cup milk, two and a half cups flour, sifted with two 
heaping teaspoonsful of Harvey's baking powder, add one 
pound raisins, seeded, one pound figs, cut rather fine, one 
pound of almonds, blanched and cut lengthwise, one pound 
dates, cut up, a quarter pound citron peel, sliced, followed by 
whites of seven eggs. Bake in a slow oven. — B. S. P. 

Apple Sauce Cake 

One and a half cups apple sauce, a half cup butter, one 
cup brown sugar, two cups flour, one teaspoonful soda, sifted 
with flour, one cup raisins, one teaspoonful cinnamon or spice 
to suit taste. — B. S. P. 

Soft Gingerbread 

One cup molasses (Orleans), one-half cup sugar, one-half 
cup lard, one cup hot water, two and one-half cups flour, two 
teaspoons soda, one egg (added last), tablespoon ginger, tea- 
spoon cinnamon, a little salt. — Mrs. H. W. Reede. 

Molasses Cake 

Two eggs, one-half cup butter, one cup molasses, one and 
a half teaspoons of soda, dissolved in a cup of boiling water, 
one and a half cups of flour. Bake slowly in layers. — Mrs. E. 
A. Smith. 

Ginger Cake 

One-half cup molasses, one-half cup sugar, one-half cup but- 
ter, one-half cup hot water, one and a half cups flour, two eggs, 
one teasiKJon cinnamon, one teaspoon ginger, one teaspoon 
soda, a half teaspoon salt. Sift flour several times and do 
not add anv. — Mrs. T. Robertson. 

Soft Gingerbread 

One cu]) New Orleans molasses, one cup butter or drip- 
ping, one cuj) brown sugar, one cup sour milk, two eggs, two 
teaspoons soda (level) dissolved in milk, one tablespoon gin- 
ger, one tablespoon cinnamon, three cups flour, one teaspoon 
salt, Bake in a slow oven. — Jean F. McLoney. 



No Ammonia or Alum in Harvey's Baking Powder 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 115 



Belfast Cake 

Half cup butter, one and a half cups sugar, half teaspoon 
cinnamon, a quarter teaspoon nutmeg, pinch of salt, one tea- 
spoon soda, in cup of sour milk, two eggs, one cup raisins, 
floured with third of a cup of white flour, two cups sifted gra- 
ham flour. — Miss Sanderson. 

Dundee Cake 

One cup butter, one and a half cups sugar, two eggs, one 
and a half cups milk, half cup raisins, half cup currants, three 
cups flour, two and a half teaspoons Harvey's baking powder. 
Flavoring, essence of lemon. — Mrs. Horton. 

Rose Cake 

Whites of six eggs, three and a half cups flour, two cups 
white sugar, one cup butter, one cup sweet milk, two teaspoons 
Harvey's baking powder, sifted well in flour. 

Red Part 

Whites of three eggs, one cup red sugar, one-half cup but- 
ter, a quarter cup sweet milk, one and a half cups flour, one 
Harvey's and a half teaspoons baking powder sifted in flour, 
use rose flavoring. — Mrs. M. McAndrew. 

Angel Food 

Take whites ofeleven eggs and beat to a froth, add pinch of 
salt before beating. Then add one teaspoonful of vanilla. Sift 
a cup and a half of granulated sugar (scant) and a cup of flour 
flour, sifted four times, the last time add one teaspoonful of 
cream of tartar to the flour before sifting. Stir only until all 
is mixed well, then put in a deep tin dish with a spout in centre 
and having three legs Bake 35 minutes in a slow oven. 
After taking out of oven, turn the dish upside down on, its legs 
and place under it a large plate. In about from five to ten 
minutes the cake will drop on plate, if not, gently help it by 
using a knife to loosen it, then it will fall on plate. Be sure 
not to butter the dish. Either cut the cake or break it while 
serving. — Irla Flach. 



You get good results with HaVvey's Baking Powder. 



116 ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 



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If you want the best results from recipes printed in 
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"MAPLE LEAF FLOUR" 

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GEO. ADCOCK St. Thomas 

CITY MILLS 



ST. THOMAS Y. W, C. A, COOK BOOK 117 



Gold Loaf 

Yolks of eight eggs, one cup granulated sugar, half cup 
butter, half cup sweet milk, one and three-quarter cups flour, 
two teaspoons baking powder, flavor to taste. Sift, measure 
and set aside the flour, with the baking powder added. Cream 
butter and sugar thoroughly. Beat yolks to a very stiff froth 
and stir thoroughly through, add milk, then flour and flavor, 
and stir all together very thoroughly. Put in a slow oven at 
once. Will bake in 30 to 50 minutes — Mrs. C. E. Williams. 

Fancy Pound Cake 

Three-quarter pound sugar, three -quarter pound butter, 
two pounds flour, six eggs, one pint milk, two teaspoons bak- 
ing powder, one-quarter pound lemon peel. — Miss Turville. 

New Year's Cake 

Half cup butter, one cup sugar, two eggs, one cup milk, 
one cup chopped raisins, one cup chopped hickory nut meats, 
two teaspoons baking powder, sifted in two and a half cups 
flour. — Mrs. Mc Andrew. 

Cheap Fruit Cake 

One cup. sugar, one cup sour milk, half cup butter, one 
cup raisins, one teaspoon soda, half teaspoon salt, half tea- 
spoon all kinds of spice, two cups flour. Add sour milk with 
soda and salt in it, then the flour mixed with spices, currants 
and raisins. Mix thoroughly and bake. — Mrs. E. C. Harvey. 

Fruit Cake Without Eggs 

Two cups brown sugar, two cups sour milk, four cups 
flour, one tablespoon butter, one tablespoon soda, half cup 
strong coffee, two pounds currants, two pounds raisins, half 
pound mixed peel, one pound cooking figs, quarter pound al- 
monds, one tablespoon vanilla, one teaspoon cinnamon, half 
teaspoon cloves, half teaspoon nutmeg, one teaspoon salt. 
This makes two good loaves and is excellent. — Mrs. R. Heard. 



Harvey's Baking Powder is absolutely Pure 



118 ST, THOMAS V. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 



Fruit Cake 

One pound butter, three cups brown sugar, seven cups 
raisins, two cups currants, two cups almonds, two cups mixed 
peel, five cups sifted flour, ten eggs. Bake three hours in 
moderate oven. — Mrs. Angus Murray. 

Four eggs, one cup sour cream, one cup butter, one cup 
sugar, one cup raisins, one cup currants, one each of lemon and 
orange peel, one nutmeg, one teaspoon each of cloves and cin- 
namon, half teaspoon of soda. Flour enough to make a stiff 
batter.— Mrs. H. B. Smith. 

Fifteen eggs, four cups brown sugar, four cups butter, one 
cup sour cream, six pounds raisins, four pounds currants, two 
pounds almonds, one pound lemon, one pound citron, half 
pound figs, one tablespoon cloves and cinnamon, two nutmegs, 
one teaspoon soda, about one and a half pounds flour. Bake 
in a very slow oven for four or five hours. — Kate A. McCoU. 

A Plain Fruit Cake 

Take butter, flour, raisins, currants, candied peel and 
sugar, each half pound, one nutmeg, a few chopped almonds, 
the juice and rind of a lemon, four eggs. Beat the butter to a 
cream, add the eggs, one by one, and then the other ingredi- 
ents. Bake in a papercd-tin for one hour in a moderate oven.— 
Mrs. Rogers. 

Black Fruit Cake 

One pound brown sugar, three-quarter pound butter, 
one pound flour, twelve eggs (whites and yolks Vjeaten separ- 
ately), three pounds raisins, three pounds currants, three-quar 
ter pound citron, quarter ounce each of cinnamon, nutmeg and 
cloves, one and a half cups dark molasses, three teaspoons 
Harvey's baking powder. Rub butter and sugar to a cream, 
add yolks of eggs, and beat a little. Now add half the flour. 
all th cspice, whites of eggs, after being beaten to a stiff 
froth, then the molasses. Mi.x all of this thoroughly. Sift the 
baking powder in the other half of the flour and dredge all 
of the fruit and citron with it and stir it in last, mixing all 
thoroughly. Bake four hours in a slow oven. — E. C. Hind- 
marsh. 

Harvey's Baking Powder is all Leaven. 



ST. THOMAS V. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 119 



Fruit Cake 

Two pounds flour, one pound currants, one pound raisins, 
stoned, one pound sugar, one pound butter, half pound al- 
monds, six ounces candied peel, a little salt, four eggs, and 
milk enough to moisten four heaping teaspoons Harvey's 
baking powder. — Alice Sharpe. 

Cream Fruit Cake 

One egg, one cup of brown sugar, one cup of sour cream, 
a piece of butter the size of an egg, one teaspoon of soda, one 
cup of fruit, two cups of flour. Add a little molasses to make 
it darker, also ground allspice to suit the taste. — Mrs. J. Spurr. 




Use Harvey's Baking Powder. 



120 



ST. THOMAS Y.W, C.A. COOK BOOK 



The Home of the 




FAMOUS^ 



Sunbeam 



Fl 



our 



IT NEVER FAILS TO GIVE SATISFACTION 



The John Campbell Co., Limited 

St. Thomas and Brownsville. 



ST. THOMAS y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 121 



FILLINGS AND ICINGS 



Chocolate Icing 

Two tablespoons cocoa or chocolaLe, one and a half table- 
spoons melted butter. Mix well. Add icing sugar moistened 
with cream and stir till smooth enough to spread on well. — 
Mrs. Atkins. 

One cup of granulated sugar, two tablespoons of grated 
chocolate, half cup milk. Boil until it thickens in water. Re- 
move from fire and beat until cool. — Mrs. Cochrane. 

Coffee Icing 

Quarter cup of butter, one cup of powdered sugar, two 
tablespoons of coffee, two teaspoons of cocoa. Cream butter 
and sugar. Then add coffee and cocoa. If not thick enough , 
add more sugar. — Mrs. Cochrane. 

Caramel Icing 

Two cups of brown sugar, one cup of milk, one tablespoon- 
ful of butter. Boil 30 minutes, then add one teaspoonful of 
vanilla, and let it cool somewhat, then spread over the cake 
quickly. — I. Flach. 

Maple Sugar Icing 

Put a heaping cupful of pure maple sugar, broken in small 
pieces in a saucepan with just enough boiling water to moisten 
them. Set on the stove where it will not burn and boil rapidly 
for fifteen or twenty minutes. Have ready in a bowl, the 
white of an egg beaten to a stiff froth. Pour the syrup slowly 
into this stirring hard. Then beat the mixture till cold. 
Spread on cake. — Mrs. Atkins. 



You get good results with Harvey's Baking Powder. 



122 ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 



Good Filling For Cake 

Melt one tablespoon butter and half cup sugar. Then 
add juice and grated yellow of a lemon, then stir in two well- 
beaten eggs and pinch salt. Let thicken and remove from 
fire. Let cool and spread. — Mrs. McAndrew. 

Lemon Filling 

Yolks of two eggs, one tablespoon cornstarch, half cup 
sugar, one cup water, juice and rind of one lemon, small piece 
of butter. Beat yolks, add sugar, starch, butter and grated 
rind and juice of one lemon and water. Put on stove and 
cook till thick, stirring constantly. — Mrs. H. B. Smith. . 

Royal Icing 

One and three-quarter cups granu ated sugar, one cup 
water, four ounces chocolate. Melt the chocolate. Boil the 
sugar and water till it threads, and pour on the me ted choco- 
late. Beat till thick.— W. C. Baldwin. 

Icing for Layer Cake 

One large cup icing sugar, small piece butter, moistened 
with cold coffee, loc. worth of chopped nuts. Flavor with 
almond:- — Mrs. W. G. Whitmore. 




Success crowns yogr efforts if you use Harvey's Baking Powder. 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 123 



Cookies and Doughnuts 



Oatmeal Macaroons 

One cup white sugar, two tablespoons butter, two eggs, 
two large cups rolled oats, one -half teaspoon salt, four table- 
spoons flour, two teaspoons Harvey's baking powder. Butter 
pans well. Drop teaspoons of dough, m the pan, leaving room 
to spread. Almond flavoring. — Miss Turville. 

Oatmeal Rocks 

Two eggs, one cup brown sugar, half cup butter, one cup 
raisins and currants (mixed), one teaspoon soda (level), one 
teaspoon cinnamon, one cup flour, two cups oatmeal, salt and a 
little nutmeg. — Mrs. F. M. Griffin. 

Drop Cookies 

One cup brown sugar, two-thirds cup of butter, two eggs, 
one and a half cups of flour, one cup of raisins, half cup of 
chopped walnuts, half teaspoon cloves, one teaspoon cinna- 
mon, one teaspoon soda, dissolved in a tablespoon of hot 
water. Drop on buttered tins and bake in moderately hot 
oven. — Mrs. Cochrane. 

Oatmeal Cookies 
One cup shortening, one and a half cups yellow sugar, 
half cup sour milk, one level teaspoon soda, three cups oat- 
meal and flour to make a stiff dough. Bran cookies are made 
the same, only substituting bran for oatmeal.- — Mrs. S. H. 
Smiley. 

Good Oatmeal Cookies 

Two cups flour, two and a half cups granulated oatmeal, 
one cup coffee sugar, one cup butter or beef drippings. Stir 
altogether with hands, like pie crust. Add two well-beaten 
eggs, pinch of salt. Use two and a half teaspoons of Harvey's 
baking powder, dissolved in three-quarters of a cup of sweet 
milk. This is better than soda and sour milk. Mix well and roll 
thin. Cook in^quick oven. — Mrs. F. A. White. 



Use Harvey's Baking Powder. 



124 ST. THOMAS V. \V. C. A. COOK BOOK 



Oatmeal Cookies 

One cup brown sugar, one cup butter or lard, one tea- 
spoon soda, half cup sour cream or milk, two cups flour, two 
cups oatmeal. Roll very thin and place together with the 
following filling: 

One pound dates, one cup water, one and a half cups su- 
gar Boil until soft, stirring often. — Mrs. Hockin. 

Three and a half cups oatmeal, three and a half cups flour, 
two cups sugar, one teaspoon soda, two-thirds cup sour milk, 
one egg, one and a half cups lard and butter mixed, one pound 
dates. — -Mrs. E. C. Harvey. 

One cup lard, one cup sugar, two eggs, one cup milk, two 
cups oatmeal, three teaspoons Harvey's baking powder, a little 
nutmeg. Currants, if desired. Flour enough to roll out. — 
Mrs. Horton. ' 

Date Wafers 

Half cup lard, half cup butter, one and a half cups brown 
sugar, two eggs, one teaspoon vanilla, one and a half cups oat- 
meal, two cups flour, one teaspoon soda, one teaspoon cream 
tartar, use third cup flour for rolling. 

Date Filling 

. One pound dates, one cup sugar. Boil in two cups water 
nntn Oii' k Mv;. Marf^aret A. Strong. 

Date Oatmeal Cookies 

Three-quarters cup butter and lard mi.xcd, one and a half 
cups brown sugar, two eggs, one and a half cups oatmeal, one 
teaspoon soda, one teaspoon cream tartar, two cups flour, use a 
third cup for rolling out. Roll tliin. 

Take one pound of dates and one cup granulated sugar. 
Boil together till cooked. One teaspoon vanilla. Spread 
dates on half cookie and fold over. Bake in hot oven. (Ex- 
cellent). — Miss E. Martin. 



Harvey's Baking Powder assures Success. 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 125 

Kisses 

Whites of four eggs, beaten stiff, one cup granulated sugar 
nine ounces cocoanut. Bake until brown in moderate oven, 
on buttered paper. — Mrs. C. B. Buncombe. 

Cocoanut Kisses 

Whites of three eggs, beaten stiff and one cup granulated 
sugar. Set bowl in hot water till warmed through. One 
teaspoon cornstarch, one-half pound grated cocoanut. Flav- 
or with vanilla and drop from spoon on buttered-tins. Bake 
in slow oven. Let cool before removing from tins.- — Mrs. 
Rivard. 

Whites of four eggs, beaten to a stiff froth. Add half 
cup granulated sugar (beat well), then add nine ounces of 
cocoanut. Put a paper on the top of an inverted meat pan, 
do not grease at all, and drop the mixture by teaspoonsful on 
the paper. Bake in a moderate oven, till brown. Wet a 
board and slip the paper, with the cakes on, off the pan, as 
soon as taken from the oven, on to the w^et board. Let them 
steam awhile, when they can be easily removed from the 
paper. — B. S. P. 

Whites of three eggs, beaten stiff. Add one cup granu 
lated sugar. Put in double boiler and heat. Remove and 
add one tablespoon cornstarch and half pound cocoanut. 
Flavor with almond or rosewater. Drop a small teaspoonful 
on buttered-tins, 3 inches apart. Bake in moderate oven, 
until a delicate brown. — Mrs. L. M. Miller. 

Lemon Puffs 

One cup hot water, half cup butter. Let boil and stir in 
one cup flour. Allow to become cold, and add three unbeaten- 
eggs, one at a time. Drop a teaspoonful on buttered-tins and 
cook abput half an hour in hot oven. 

Filling 

*One cup sugar, one beaten-egg, rind and juice of one 
lemon, one tablespoon water, one teaspoon flour. Cook in 
double boiler, until thick. Make a^i opening in side of puffs 
and fill.— Mrs. L. M. Miller. 

Harvey's Baking Powder is all Leaven. 



126 ST. THOMAS V. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 



Grace's Drop Cakes 

Two eggs and one cup sugar, beaten light, half cup milk 
and butter, size of egi^, boiled well. After it is cool, stir in 
egg and sugar, and add one sounding cup of flour, before sifted 
Harvey's with one teaspoon baking powder, half teaspoon 
lemr.n -\[r< McAndrew. 

Date and Almond Puffs 

Half pound dates, half pound almonds, one cup of white 
sugar, white of one egg. Beat the white of egg well, and chop 
the dates and almonds fine. Then drop a spoonful of the 
mixture on a well-buttered paper and bake in a slow oven. — 
Mrs. A. Baillie 

Dutch Cookies 

One and a half cups very dark sugar, one cup butter, 
one cup currants, one cup chopped raisins, one cup 
chopped nuts, three and a quarter cups flour, three eggs, one 
small teaspoonful cinnamon, one small teaspoonful soda. — 
Mrs. G. Ellison. 

Rolled Oat Macaroons 

One cup rolled oats, one egg (white only), one teaspoon 
Harvey's baking powder, half cup sugar, one teaspoon almond 
extract, half cup cocoanut, three teaspoons cold water. Drop 
in from teaspoon on buttered pans, far apart. Bake ten 
minutes moderately hot oven. — Mrs. A. L. Xorsworthy. 

Lemon Biscuit 

Two eggs, beaten separately, two cupfuls sweet milk, two 
and a half cupfuls sugar, one and a half cupfuls butter, 5cts, 
worth oil of lemon, 5 cts. worth baking ammonia, flour to stif- 
fen like cookies. Cut with square cake-cutter. — Mrs. M. G. 
Hay. 

Lemon Biscuits 

One and a half cups sugar, two eggs, one cup lard, one 
cup sweet milk, one teaspoon oil of lemon, two tablespoons 
ammonia, pinch of salt. — Miss Wickett. 



Harvey's Baking Powder assures Success. 



ST. THOMAS Y. VV. C. A. COOK BOOK 127 



Hermit Cookies 

One cup butter, one and a half cups sugar, one cup stoned 
raisins, chopped fine, three eggs, half cup chopped nuts, one 
teaspoon soda, one teaspoon different spices, flour, enough to 
stir stiff. Roll thin, and bake quickly. — Mrs. Angus Murray. 

Hermits 

One cup sugar, one cup butter, one cup raisins, chopped 
fine, half cup buttermilk or sour milk, two teaspoons soda, two 
teaspoons cinnamon, two teaspoons cloves, two teaspoons all- 
spice. Mix soft with flour, and roll thick. — Mrs. Hutchinson. 

Hermits 

One and a half cups sugar, one cup butter, three eggs, 
small teaspoon soda, dissolved in one and a half tablespoons 
boiling water, three cups flour, half teaspoon each, of cinna- 
mon and cloves, one cup dates, one cup raisins, one cup wal- 
nuts, chopped fine. Drop in small teaspoons in buttered 
pan.— Mrs. W. P. Bell. 

Scotch Short Bread 

One pound flour, half pound butter, quarter pound sugar. 
Knead on the board, cut in squares and bake in a slow oven. — 
Mrs. F. M. Griffin. 

Jam-Jams 

Two eggs, one cup sugar, one cup lard and butter mixed, 
one teaspoon cream of tartar, half teaspoon soda, dissolved in 
one large tablespoon of sweet milk, pinch of salt, one table- 
spoon vanilla, flour to stiffen. Roll thin and cut in squares. 
Put one on top of the other, with jelly or jam between and 
press edges together. Quick oven. — Mrs. Eby. 

Cookies 

One egg, one and a half cups sugar, one and a half cups 
lard, three-quarter cup sour milk, one teaspoonful soda, two 
teaspoonsful baking powder. — ^Mrs. J. J. Hall. 



Harveys Baking Powder is Pure and Wholesome. 



123 ST. THOMAS Y. W. C A. COOK BOOK 



Cookies 

A cup of shortening, a cup of sugar, four eggs, two tea- 
spoons of Harvcys baking powder, flour enough to roll so as 
not to stick to the board. — Mrs. D. G. Goodwin. 

One egg, one cup brown sugar, one cup butter, four table- 
spoons sweet milk, one teaspoon soda, dissolved in milk, half 
nutmeg, flour to roll out. Cream butter and sugar, add egg, 
milk and soda in milk, and flour enough to roll. — W. F. Mac- 
Kenzie. 

Christmas Cookies 

Beat four eggs well with one pound of sugar, until very 
light, quarter pound citron, quarter pound of almonds, chop- 
ped very fine, one teaspoon cinnamon, one of cloves, one 
teaspoon Harvey's baking powder, one pound of flour. Cut in 
squares. — Mrs. McAndrew. 

Cookies of Sour Milk 

Two cups of granulated sugar, one cup of shortening, 
one cup of sour milk, half teaspoon of soda, four cups of flour, 
one teaspoon of salt, flour, shortening and sugar worked well 
together first, then add the milk. — Miss Gertrude Jones. 

Little Mocha Cakes 

One cupful sugar, half cupful butter, half cupful sweet 
milk, two eggs, two cupfuls flour, three teaspoonfuls Harvey's 
baking powder. Bake 30 minutes in a moderate oven. 

Icing 

Two cupfuls pulverized sugar, four tablespoonfuls butter 
fwarm the butter a little and mix well with the su^ar), half 
tablcspoonful vanilla, half tablespoonful water, half pound 
shelled almonds. Chop the nuts fine and brown slowly. Cut 
the rake in small squares, and ice all over, and roll into the 
nuts. If the cake is made the day before, it cuts better. This 
cake keeps nicely for weeks. — Mrs. M. G. Hay. 



Use Harvey's Baking Powder, 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 129 



Mochas 

Cut any kind of a light cake in small pieces. Half pound 
blanched almonds, chopped rather fine and put in oven to 
brown. 

Dressing 

Two tablespoons butter, mixed with one big cup icing 
sugar, one tablespoon boiling water. Then add two large 
tablespoons vanilla. Make the thickness of icing and 3'ou 
may add brandy, if you like. Dip the pieces of cake in the ic-' 
ing, then roll in the chopped nuts. — Mrs. A. D. MacPherson. 

Sugar Rings 

One quarter pound sugar and half pound butter cream. 
Yolks of three eggs, three-quarters pound flour. When the 
dough is ready, take a small piece between your hands and 
roll it. Twist it into a ring. Dip first into the white of an 
egg and then into sugar. Put on buttered pans and bake in a 
moderately quick oven. — Miss Helen Midgley. 

Ginger Cookies 

One cup molasses, one cup brown sugar, one cup melted 
butter, four tablespoonfuls of boiling water, one teaspoonfu of 
ground ginger, one teaspoonful of soda, a little salt, a dash of 
cayenne pepper, two and a half cups flour. Drop from a tea- 
spoon on buttered pans. — Miss Midgley. 

Rock Cakes 

One pound flour, quarter pound sugar, half pound butter 
two eggs, one teaspoon Harvey's baking powder Take up 
with two forks and drop on your tins. Teaspoon vanilla. 
— Miss Turville. 

Fried Cakes 

One large egg or two small ones, four and a half table- 
spons melted butter, one coffee cup sweet milk, one coffee 
cup white sugar, one teaspoon ginger, two teaspoons cream 
of tartar, one teaspoon soda. Mix soda and cream of tartar 
with the flour, enough flour to make the dough stiff" enough 
to handle. Lard may be nsed in place of butter . -Mrs. Finlay. 



Harvey's Baking Powder is all Leaven. 



130 ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 



Rock Cakes 

Three-quarters cup butter, one and a half cups brown 
sugar, two eggs, salt, vanilla, half teaspoon soda and half tea- 
spoon cinnamon, mixed together, half cup raisins, one cup 
walnuts, broken, two or three cups flour. Batter must be 
stifT. — Mrs. Dr. Fitzsimons. 

Trilby's (Cakei 

Two cups rolled oats, two cups flour, one cup brown .sug- 
ar, one cup butter, or butter and lard mixed, one teaspoon 
soda, one cup sour milk, pinch salt. Mix dry ingredients. 
Chop in shortening. Add soda to sour milk (beating well), 
add to mixture, work slightly on board, roll and cut. Put 
date filling between each two and bake in hot oven. 

Date Filling 

Half pound dates, stoned and cut fine, half cup sugar, one 
cup water. Boil until dates are soft. — Mrs. T. Robertson. 

Fruit Cookies 

Two cupfuls brown sugar, one cupful sour cream, one 
teaspoon of soda, half cupful butter, one pound raisins (chop- 
ped and seeded), one teaspoon of mixed spices (cloves, cinna- 
mon and nutmeg), pinch of salt. Flour to mix real stiff and 
roll thin. Sprinkle granulated sugar over them. — Bake in 
quick oven. — -Mrs. M. G. Hay. 

Two cups white sugar, one cup butter, two cups chopped 
raisins, two eggs, half cup sour milk or buttermilk, one arge 
teaspoon soda, one tablespoon cinnamon, one tablespoon 
cloves, one nutmeg. Mix soft and bake carefullv. — Miss 
Kate McColl. 

Bran Cakes 

Three-quarter cup sugar, one tablespoonful butter, one 
egg, one cup milk, one cup currants, one cup flour, one and a 
half cups bran, one teasj^oon soda.- -Mrs. L. M. Miller. 



Harvey's Baking Powder is absolutely Pure. 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 131 



Louise's Newmarket Cookies 

Two eggs, two cups sugar, one cup, equal parts, lard and 
butter, one cup milk, one coffee spoonful oil of lemon, three 
teaspoons ammonia (powdered), pinch of salt. Flour, to 
make paste thick enough to roll out thin. — Mrs. A. C. Hill. 

.Hickory Nut Cookies 

Two cups of granulated sugar, one cup butter, three eggs, 
half cup sweet milk, four cups flour, two teaspoons Harvey's 
baking powder, one cup hickory nuts, chopped fine. Mix 
butter and sugar well, add eggs, milk, and bakingpowder, sift 
ed.in with the flour. Don't mix very stiff. Roll ver}- thin 
and sprinkle sugar on top, before baking. — Mrs. Ebv. 

Peanut Cookies 

Half pound butter, one cup granulated sugar, half cup 
milk, two eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately, one cup 
chopped peanuts (heaping), flour enough to make a soft 
dough, use one teaspoon Harvey's baking powder with each 
cup flour. Cream butter and sugar, add egg and milk, then 
flour and nuts. Handle as little as possible. — Mrs. Geo. Mc- 
Cubbin. 

Three eggs, one and a half cups sugar, one cup butter, tw^ 
tablespoons sour milk, one teaspoon soda, ten cents worth of 
peanuts, chopped very fine, flour enough to roll. Put peanuts 
in with flour. — Mrs. H. G. Broderick. 

Cocoanut Cookies 

Three cups flour, one cup butter. Mix dry, two cups 
sugar. Add three eggs and two tablespoonfuls water, one 
and a half cups cocoanut, two teaspoons Harvey's baking 
powder, sifted with flour. Roll very thin. — Mrs. Ebv. 

Fig Cookies 

Two cups of flour, one cup of oatmeal, half cup of lard, 
half cup of butter, half cup of buttermilk, one cup of sugar, 
one egg, one teaspoon of soda. Roll thin and put figs be- 
tween. Bake ifi a moderate oven. — Mrs. J. Spurr. 



Harvey's Baking Powder is Pure and Wholesome. 



132 ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A COOK BOOK 



Aunt Nancy's Cookies 

Three eggs, two cups sugar, one cup butter, one cup sour 
cream, four cups flour, nutmeg, one teaspoon soda. — Mrs. 
MurTihv. 

Cookies 

One cup cream, one cup butter, one egg, three cups sugar, 
eight cups flour, one teaspoon soda. Mix thoroughly, then 
add either annis seed or caraway seed. Roll rather thinly and 
bake in quick oven. Ice them with icing sugar and sprinkle 
with caraway seed candies. — I. Flach. 

Tea Cake 

Quarter pound butter, two eggs, one cup sugar, one cup 
and a half of milk, one pint and a half flour, one cup currants, 
two teaspoon Harvey's leaking powder, spice to taste. Bake 
three-quarters of an hour. To be eaten hot. — Mrs. Williams. 

' Tea Cakes 

Three eggs, one cup sugar, one cup butter, one teaspoon 
soda or two of baking powder, sifted in the floun Beat the 
eggs till very light. Cream butter and sugar. Use just 
enough flour to make a soft dough, that will not stick when 
rol ing out. — Mrs. Atkins. 

Rock Cakes 

One pound flour, quarter pound currants, quarter pound 
raisins (seedless), quarter pound peel, two eggs, two tea- 
spoons Harvey's baking powder, quarter pound butter. Mix 
rather stiff with "nc <wp milk. Rako in moderate oven. 
— Mrs. Hodge. 

Doughnuts 

One cup sugar, two eggs, two tablespoons melted butter, 
two thirds cup milk, two tcas])Oons cream tartar, one teaspoon 
soda, flour enough to roll and a little salt and nutmeg. — Mrs. 
Cochrane. 



Use Harvey's Baking Powder. 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 133 



Doughnuts 

One beaten egg, one cup sugar, five tablespoons melted 
butter, one coffee cup sour milk, one teaspoon soda, pinch 
salt, half teaspoon ground cinnamon, half teaspoon nutmeg, 
flour to make a soft dough to roll out. Fry in hot lard. 
Great care should be taken that no flour adheres to the dough 
before dropping into the lard and to have the lard just the 
right heat. — Mrs. H. W. Reede. 



Doughnuts 

One cup sugar, one egg, three-quarters cup sour milk and 
cream, one small teaspoon soda, half grated nutmeg, a pinch of 
salt. Beat egg and sugar together, till very light. Add milk, 
using one-third cream, if you have any. If not, use about a 
teaspoon butter instead. Use flour enough to make dough 
firm enough to roll out and cut into rounds. I keep this dough 
in cold place and fry cakes as I require them. It will keep a 
couple of weeks. — Mrs. E. C. Harvey. 

Doughnuts Without Eggs 

One cup sour milk, one-half cup hot water, three table- 
spoons lard, one cup sugar, half nutmeg, enough flour to roll 
dough, one teaspoon salt, one teaspoon soda. — A. P. Butler. 

Doughnuts 

One large egg, one cup of sugar, two tab espoons sweet 
cream, one teaspoon soda, half teaspoon baking powder, half 
teaspoon salt, quarter of a nutmeg, flour to mix soft Roll 
out a half an inch thick. Cut in strips and twist. Fry in hot 
lard — Mrs. Benj. Marlatt. 



Harvey's Baking Powder is Pure and Wholesome. 



134 ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 



PIES 



Cream Pie 

One egg, two tablespoons of sugar, a pinch of salt, a 
pinch of flour, a pint of cream, not too rich. — Mrs. E. A. Smith. 

Three eggs, keep whites for top, one and a half tablespoons 
cornstarch, two cups milk, two tablespoons sugar, one small 
tablespoon butter, one teaspoon vanilla. Heat milk, beat 
eggs, wet cornstarch with a little milk, add butter to milk, also 
sugar, then stir in the cornstarch, when cooked, add vanilla. 
Put in shell, previously cooked. Use white of eggs for frost- 
ing. — Miss Kate McCo'll. 

Cocoanut Pie 

Yolks of two eggs, two cups of sweet milk, half cup of 
cocoanut, two rolled soda biscuits, half cup sugar. Boil until 
thick. 

Frosting 

Beat whites of the eggs, add a little sugar and shredded 
cocoanut. — Miss McDougal. 

Sour Cream Pie 

Yolks of two eggs, one cup of sugar, juice of one lemon, 
one large cracker, one cup sour cream. Bake in one crust and 
add beaten white and sugar for top. — Mrs. J. J. Hall. 

Chocolate Pie 

One cup sugar and one cup cold water, yolks of two eggs, 
one tablespoon grated chocolate, two tablespoons cornstarch, 
half teaspoon vanilla. Rub sugar and chocolate together, 
then add the rest and boil until thick. Bake the crjst, put in 
custard and frost as for lemon. — Mrs. McLonev. 



Harvey's Baking Powder is all Leaven. 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 135 



Chocolate Pie 

Half cup of chocolate, one cup boiling water, butter, the 
size of an egg, one tablespoon of vanilla, one cup of white 
sugar, yolks of two eggs, one and a half tablespoon of corn- 
starch, dissolved in water. Whites of eggs with two table- 
spoon of sugar for frosting. — Mrs. J. P. Freek. 

Pineapple Pie 

One pineapple, grated, one and a half cups of sugar, one 
egg, four teaspoons cornstarch. Bake with crust. — Mrs. Mc- 
Loney. 

Cranberry Pie 

Four cups cranberries (chopped), two cups raisins, two 
cups sugar, two tablespoons flour, mixed with sugar, two 
cups cold water, a pinch of salt, three teaspoons of vanilla. 
Mix all together and bake with two crusts, or in a deep dish 
with one crust. Half this quantity is enough for four. — Mrs. 
Dixon. 

Rhubarb and Date Pie 

Line a pie tin with rich paste, lay on it a layer of stoned 
dates, then fill up with rhubarb and bake with an upper crust .- 
Mrs. Smith. 

Pumpkin Pie 

Two eggs, beaten well, half cup sugar, one and a half 
coffee cup milk, one and a half coffee cup stewed pumpkin, 
one teaspoon ground ginger, half teaspoon ground cinnamon. 
Salt to taste, beat all together well. — Mrs. Urie. 

Two cups pumpkins, one and a half cups sugar, three eggs, 
two teaspoons ginger, half teaspoon cinnamon, one large cup 
of milk. Enough filling for two pies. If thoy do not seem 
full enough, add a little more milk and stir well. — Mrs. E. C. 
Harvey. 

Three-quarter cup pumpkin , half teaspoon ginger, half cup 
sugar, one egg, one cup milk, nutmeg and butter, the size of a 
hickory nut.— Mrs. E A. Smith. 



For recipes in ^his Book Use Harvey's Baking Powder 



136 ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 



Pumpkin Pie 

Three cups strained pumpkin, one and a half cups sugar, 
three eggs, three soda biscuits, rolled and sifted, one teaspoon 
salt, half grated nutmeg, one teaspoon ground cinnamon, one 
teaspoon ground ginger, one tablespoon of melted butter, one 
quart of milk. Boil the milk, stir the spice into the pump- 
kin, then add biscuit and sugar. When these are mixed, pour 
in the milk. Stir well, adding last, the eggs, which should 
be thoroughly beaten. This quantity will make four pies. — 
Mrs. N. Norsworthy. 

Lemon Pie 

Two tablespoons of cornstarch, wet with cold water. 
Then pour on Vjoiling water, until like thick starch, one teacup 
sugar, a small piece of butter, a little salt, one lemon, juice and 
grated rind, three eggs, whites out for frosting. This :s suffici- 
ent for two pies. — Mrs. Horton. 

Dainty Lemon Pie 

Slice of bread, inch thick. Take off crust, place in a bowl, 
add a little salt, a dessertspoon of butter and a cup of boiling 
water. Beat until smooth, add one cup sugar, juice of one 
lemon, yolks of two eggs, well beaten. Bake in rich crust. 
When cool, add meringue and return to oven to brown. — Mrs. 
(Dr.) Grey. 

Lemon Filling for Pie 

Yolks of two eggs, three-quarter cup sugar, one cup boil- 
ing water, one teaspoon butter, one tablespoon flour, juice 
of one lemon. Beat all together before adding water. Cook 
until it thickens.— Mrs. Stainsby. 

Filling for Lemon Cheese Cakes 

Six lemons, r'x eggs, one pound lumj) sugar, six ounces 
butter. Mode: Grate four lemons. Add the juice of six, the 
yolks of six eggs, the whites of eggs, mix thoroughly. Put all 
in a jug. Place the jug in a saucepan of boiling water. Stir 
one way, until the mixture is a nice thick paste. When quite 
cold, cover closely. It will keep good for a fortnight. Suffici- 
ent for twenty-four cheese cakes. — Mrs. Ermantinger. 

Harvey's Baking Powder is Pure and Wholesome 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 137 



Cheese Tarts 

Two eggs, one cup brown sugar, two tablespoons but- 
ter, two tablespoons cornstarch, two teaspoons essence of 
lemon, one teaspoon ground cinnamon, one cnp, currants. — 
Miss Love. 

One cup currants, two eggs, one teaspoon cinnamon, one 
cup sugar, half a cup butter, one tablespoon flour. Line patty 
pans with paste, and fill with the mixture. — Mrs. Smith. 

Filling for Lemon Pie or Tarts 

Six tablespoons of water, six tablespoons of sugar, one 
and a half tablespoons of cornstarch, one teaspoon of butter, 
half lemon and grated rind. Beat yolk of egg till light yellow. 
Then add water. Mix sugar and cornstarch in saucepan. 
Then add yolk, water and butter. Cook until a clear paite, 
then add lemon, when nearly done. — Miss Love. ' 

Maple Syrup Tarts 

One egg, beaten well, add one large cup of maple syrup. 
Fill shells and bake.— Mrs. L. M. Miller. 

Date Tarts 

Whites of four eggs, two scant cups fruit sugar, half pound 
shelled almonds (hickory nuts are better), half pound dates 
(after pits are removed), one teaspoon vanilla. Whip the 
eggs, beat sugar in gradually. Then add the nuts and dates, 
which should be chopped fine, and vanilla. Bake in buttered 
tins, in a moderate oven, 30 to 45 minutes. When done, part- 
ly cut and break into squares of about one inch. They should 
be about half an inch thick. — Mrs. Eby. 

Strawberry Short Cake 

One egg, one cup sugar, two-thirds cup milk, two cups 
flour, butter, size of an egg, two teaspoons of baking powder. 
Bake in two layers. Spread with berries, which have been 
sweetened and mashed. Serve with cream. — Mrs. Graham. 

Harvey's Baking Powder assures Success 



138 ST. THOMAS V. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 



Strawberry Short Cake 

Beat one tablespoonful of butter to a cream with half a 
cup of white sugar. Add one egg. Stir together thoroughly 
and add half cup of sweet milk and one teaspoon Harvey's 
baking powder, thoroughly mix in a cup of flour. Bake in two 
layers, spread with good butter and put strawberries, well 
sprinkled with sugar, between layers and on top.— Mr'^. Finlay 

Mince Meat 

To two quarts cold lean beef, finely minced, add four 
quarts chopped tart apples, one pound suet, chopped fine, 
three pounds stoned raisins, three pounds currants, quarter 
pound citron, thinly sliced, four pounds sugar, one cup molas- 
ses, three tablespoons ground cinnamon, one tablespoon each 
of cloves, mace and black pepper, three of salt, juice and grat- 
ed rind of two lemons and two quarts sweet cider or fruit juice. 
Mix thoroughly. Heat slowly and when boiling, place in 
fruit jars and seal. Should be made sometime before using. — 
Mrs. S. H. Smile V. 



Two pounds beef, four pounds tart apples, two pounds 
raisins, two pounds sugar, four tablespoonsful salt, one-half 
ounce white pepper, juice of two lemons, one quart fruit juice, 
two pounds suet, two pounds currants, one pound citron peel, 
one quart New Orleans molasses, one and one-half tablespoons- 
ful of mixed spices, t;wo grated nutmegs, one quart boiled 
cider. Chop the beef (when cooked), the suet and the apples, 
and sHce the citron Mix first the meat, salt, suet, and spices 
then add the apples, fruit, lemon, sugar and cider. — Mrs. E. 
A. Smith. 

Swedish Timbles 

Three-quarter cu]i flour, half teaspoon saU, one teas])oon 
sugar, half cup milk, one egg, one teaspoon melted butter or 
olive oil. Mix dry ingredients, add, milk gradually, and egg, 
then oil or butter. Use hot timble iron, fry in deep fat until 
brown. Take from iron, turn upside down on crushed paper 
to drip — Mrs. T G. Plewis. 



Harvey's Baking Powder is absolutely Pure 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 139 



FRITTERS 



One egg, one cup flour, one teaspoon baking powder, half 
cup milk, a pinch of salt. Fry in boiling lard. 

Two cups flour, half cup sugar, one egg, half cup milk, one 
teaspoon baking powder, a pinch o^ salt. Beat egg and sugar 
together till very light. Add milk, then flour and baking 
powder, sifted together. Drop into smoking hot fat with tea- 
spoon. Try them with a splint, to see if cooked through and 
serve hot with maple syrup for dessert. Drain on brown 
paper — Mrs. E. C. Harvey. 

Sauce 

One cup pulverized sugar, half cup butter, moisten with 
a little wine. Beat well, before serving. Add half pint boil- 
ing water. — -Mrs. A. Laycock. 

Apple Fritters 

Beat yolks of two eggs. Add half pmt milk, one coflfee 
cup flour, one teaspoon Harvey's baking powder. Mix well 
and grate two large juicy apples, astly, adding the stiff 
whites of eggs. Serve with clear sauce. — Mrs. T.W. Crothers 



'■■r>0'- 



Make a batter of one egg, one cup of milk or milk and 
water, flour and a little salt. Have it about the consistency of 
pancake batter. No baking powder or soda. Peel apples, 
cut in thin slices. Dip in batter, then in hot fat. Cook to a 
golden brown. Eat with syrup or sugar. 

Corn Fritters 

Two eggs, six ears of corn, salt and pepper, one tablespoon 
milk, one teaspoon butter, one heaping tablespoon of flour. 
Cut the corn through each row, then cut down, do not scrape. 
Beat the whites of the eggs and add last. Grease pan woll. 
have it hot and fry.— W. C. Baldwin. 



No Ammonia or Alum in Harvey's Baking Powder 



140 ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 



PUDDINGS 



Molasses Pudding 

One cup butter, one cup sweet milk, half cup molasses, 
three cups flour, one teaspoon soda in milk, salt, cinnamon 
and cloves. Steam two and a half hours. Then bake about 
five or ten minutes, just to dry out a little. — Mrs. F. T. Chap- 
man. 

Lemon Pudding for Five People 

Beat the yolks of four eggs smooth with two tablespoons 
of granulated sugar. Then stir in the juice and grated rind of 
a large lemon. Add two tablespoons of boiling water and 
cook in double boiler, stirring until like thick cream. Beat 
the whites of the eii;^^ until stiff, then beat into them two 
tablespoons granulated sugar. When light, add to the yellow 
mixture, while the latter is hot, which cooks it sufficiently to 
keep from falling. Serve with cake or crackers Extra good 
and easy to make. — Mrs. Morley. 

Lemon Pudding 

One pint boiling water, one cup sugar. Stir in two table- 
spoons cornstarch. Beat whites of three eggs (stiff) and stir 
in just as soon as you take off the stove, grated rind and juice 
of one lemon, added last. To be eaten with thin custard, 
flavorcrl with vanilla. -Miss \ash. 

Saucer Pudding 

One quart milk, three eggs, five large tablespoons 
flour, one tablespoon sugar. Bake on three flat tins. When 
done, put on top each layer, butter, sugar and nutmeg, and on 
top same. — ^Mrs. Geo. Williams. 



You get good results with Harvey's Baking Powder. 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 141 



Spoon Pudding 

Two tablespoons melted butter, two tablespoons sugar, 
two tablespoons jam (raspberry), two tablespoons boiling 
water, two eggs, four tablespoons flour, half teaspoon soda. 
Steam three-quarters or one hour. Serve with sauce. 

Cream Tapioca Pudding 

Cover three tablespoons tapioca with water, stand 
over night,^add one quart milk, a small piece of butter, a little 
salt, and boil half an hour, beat yolks of three eggs with one 
cup sugar and three tablespoons prepared cocoanut. Stir 
in and boil ten minutes longer, flavor with vanilla and pour 
into dish. Beat whites of eggs to a stiff froth, add three 
tablespoons sugar, put this over top, sprinkle with cocoa- 
nut and brown n oven. — Miss Thomson. 



Grapenut Pudding 

Half cup of grapenut, one and a half cups of milk, yolks 
of two eggs, half cup of white sugar hall cup of chopped rai- 
sins. Scald milk and throw over grapenut Beat the yolks 
of eggs with sugar, raisins and flavoring. Then add to the 
milk. Beat the whites stiff and fold into mixture. Bake in a 
slow oven in a pan of water, half hour. — -C. C. Lumley. 

Baked Apple Dumpling 

One quart flour, two teaspoons Harvey's baking powder, 
half teaspoon salt, mixed well together. Add one large 
tablespoon butter and lard mixed and enough sweet milk to 
make soft dough. Roll out into half inch sheets. Peel and 
quarter tart apples. Put each quarter on a square of dough, 
sprinkle over sugar and cinnamon, press edges together firmly. 
Place in deep pan, sprinkle over sugar and. cinnamon and 
on each a small piece of butter. Fill pan with boiling water, 
leaving top of dumpling uncovered and bake in hot oven. 
Serve with cream.— Mrs R. Weir, Minneapolis. 



Harvey's Baking Powder assures Success 



142 ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 

Cold Rice Pudding 

One cup rice one cup milk, one cup suj^ar four table- 
spoons sherry, half teaspoon salt, half ounce of gelatine, soak- 
ed two hours in half cup water, half pint cream. Wash rice 
and boil in one quart of cold water. When beginning to boil, 
pour oti water and add milk and boil in double boiler one hour. 
Add gelatine, sugar, salt and wine, while hot. Stand dish in 
cold water and stir till cold, then add cream, which has been 
whipped. Put in mould and stand for an hour. — Mrs. T. 
Hutchinson. 

Ground Rice Pudding 

Two cups of milk, two eggs, four teaspoons of white sugar, 
five teaspoons of rice flour, small lump of butter. Scald milk. 
Beat the yolks of eggs, sugar, and rice flour together, and add 
to the milk. Stir until thick, then add butter and flavoring. 
Use white of eggs for top. — Mrs. C. C. Lumley. 

Gateau of Rice 

Quarter pound of rice, one ounce butter, one egg, three 
large tablespoons of marmalade, sugar to taste. Boil the rice 
until tender, stir in the butter and let cool. Add the e^g 
(which has been beaten separately), the marmalade and sugar. 
Butter a mould and sprinkle with bread crumbs, pour in the 
mixture and bake three-quarters of an hour. Serve with 
whipped cream. — Mrs. A. Baillie Aylmer. 

Baked Apples 

Take a dozen nice large api)les, take the core out of the 
centre. Make a filling of half a pound of dates, half a cup of 
sugar. Put on stove, and boil together. Add a quarter of a 
pound of chopped walnuts. Put in oven and bake. Put over 
top white of egg or whipped cream. 

Steamed Apple Puffets 
Three eggs, beaten well, one pint milk, a little salt, suffici- 
ent flour, to thicken as waflle-battcr, one and a half teaspoons 
baking powder. Fill cups alternately with layer of batter and 
apples, chopped fine. Steam one hour. Serve hot, with 
sweetened cream. — Mrs. Urie. 

Harvey's Baking Powder is ail Leaven 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 143 



Baked Apple Pudding 

Pare, core and quarter apples, to cover shallow baking tin. 
Take one pint of flour, rub in butter, size of a lemon, two tea- 
spoons Harvey's baking powder, add sweet milk for a stiff 
batter and pour over apples. Serve with whipped cream. — 
Mrs. J. J. Hall. 

Apple Batter Pudding 

Half cup milk, half cup sugar, one tablespoon butter, one 
cup flour, one teaspoon Harvey's baking powder. Slice 
apples into a dish, sprinkle with cinnamon, sugar and dabs of 
butter, then pour batter over and bake about half an hour or 
until applesare soft. Serve hot, with cream. — T. T. 

Chocolate Pudding 

One egg,' one tablespoon butter, half cup sugar, two table- 
spoons of milk, two tablespoons grated chocolate, one cup 
flour, two teaspoons Harvey's baking powder. Steam three- 
quarters of an hour in dish with spout, cover top with oil 
paper.— Mrs. F. M. Griffin. 

Put in a granite dish, a thick slice of bread, without crust. 
Have a pint of boiled milk, pour a little of it over the bread, 
and to the remainder add a quarter of a cake of chocolate, and 
two tablespoons of sugar. Boil for fifteen minutes, or until it 
thickens. Set aside to cool, pour over the bread, cover with 
white of eggs, beaten stiff", and brown in oven. Serve either 
hot or cold!— Mrs. A. C. Hill. 

New Chocolate Pudding 

A cup of stale bread crumbs, meat.> of a dozen English 
walnuts, chopped, but not fine. Make a boiled custard of a 
cup of milk, four tablespoons sugar , and one beaten egg. As 
it is taken from the fire, beat in half a square of chocolate. 
Mix in the crumbs and nuts, turn into a baking dish and bake 
about ten minutes. Serve hot, with cream. A good emer- 
crency dish and easilv doubled.— Mrs. J. B. Morford. 



Harvey's Baking Powder is Pjfe and Wholesome 



144 ST. THOMAS Y. VV. C. A. COOK BOOK 



Carmel Pudding 

One pint milk, two tablespoons cornstarch Carmel, one 
cup white sugar and add to above, then add beaten white of 
one egg and half cup chopped walnuts. Pour in mould and 
let cool and serve with hot maple syrup. — Mrs. Angus Mur- 
ray. 

Fig Pudding 

One egg, one tablespoon butter, three-quarter cup 
brown sugar, one-third cup sweet milk, three-quarter cup- 
bread crumbs, three-quarter teaspoon soda, dissolved in 
milk, enough flour to make stiff batter, one large cup of 
figs, cut in fine strips and flour on them. Steam for two or 
three hours. Serve with sauce. — Mrs. M. G. Hay. 

One coffee cup flour, one coffee cup figs, chopped fine, one 
coffee cup apples, chopped fine, one coffee cup brown sugar, 
one coffee cup bread crumbs, soaked in milk, twq ounces suet, 
chopped fine, one egg, half teaspoon salt, two teaspoons Har- 
vey's Ijaking powder, two teaspoons molasses, spice to 
taste. Steam two hours. — Mrs. Urie. 

One pound dried figs, half pound beef suet, half cup sugar, 
two eggs, half cup flour, with one teaspoon Harvey's baking 
powder, half pound bread crumbs, half cup milk, half cup 
brandy. Steam in one pound baking powder cans two and a 
half hours. Use hard sauce with nutmeg. — Mrs. McAndrew. 

One pound dried figs, chopped, half pound beef suet, half 
cup sugar, two eggs, half cup flour, with one teaspoon Harvey's 
baking powder, half pound bread crumbs, half cup milk, half 
cup any fruit juice. Steam in one pound baking powder cans 
two and a half hours. Serve hot, with hard sauce, flavored 
with nutmeg and lemon. — -Mrs. C. E. Williams. 

Carrot Pudding 

One and a half cups flour, one cup sugar, one cup suet, 
one cup raisins, one cup currants, one cup potatoes, grated, 
one cup carrots, grated, one teaspoonful soda. Boil or steam 
three iiours. — Mrs. Hutchinson. 



For Recipes in this Book Use Harvey's Baking Powder 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 145 



Carrot Pudding 

One cup chopped suet, one cup raisins, one cup currants, 
one cup potatoes, grated, one cup carrots, grated, one and a 
half cups flour, one cup sugar, one teaspoon soda, one teaspoon 
salt, two well-beaten eggs Steam or boil three hours. 

Graham Pudding 

One cup sour milk, one cup molasses, two cups graham 
flour, one cup raisins, one teaspoon soda. Steam two and a 
half hours. Any sauce. — Mrs. W. H. Graham. 

Six Cup Pudding 

One cup flour, one cup rice flour, one cup chopped suet, 
one cup sugar, one cup currants or raisins, one cup milk, two 
teaspoons soda. Grease mould and steam four hours. — 
Miss Langan. 

Queen Pudding 

One pint bread crumbs, one quart milk, one cup sugar, 
piece of butter size of an egg, rind of one lemon, grated, yolks 
of three eggs. Mix and bake. When pudding is baked, beat 
the whites stiff with a little sugar, and add the juice of the 
lemon. Brown lightly. Eat cold, or warm. 

Ginger Pudding 

Half cup brown sugar, half cup syrup, half cup sour milk, 
half cup shortening (scant), one egg, half teaspoon ginger, half 
teaspoon cinnamon, one teaspoon soda, flour, about three cups. 
Put in pudding dish and steam one hour. 

Cup Pudding 

One cup sugar, one cup raisins, one cup currants, one cup 
bread crumbs, one cup suet, one cup sour milk, one cup chop- 
ped apples, half cup sweet milk, half teaspoon soda, two tea- 
spoons Harvey's baking powder, salt, nutmeg, allspice, gin- 
ger, cinnamon to taste. Flour to make quite stiff. Steam 
six hours. — Mrs. H. G. Broderick. 



You get good results with Harvey's Baking Powder 



146 ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 



Snow Balls (Pudding.) 

Cream one-third cup of butter and half cup of sugar, 
gradually. Sift one cup of flour with half cup of cornstarch 
and three level teaspoons Harvey's baking powder. Add the 
mixture alternately with two-thirds cup of milk and stir in 
gently the stiff whites of four eggs. Place th s batter in- six 
well-buttered cups, and steam for half hour. Turn out gent- 
ly, roll in powdered sugar^ and serve hot, with strawberry 
sauce. 

Strawberry Sauce 

Cream half cup butter with one and a half cups of pow- 
dered sugar, add yolk of one egg. Add one cup of crushed 
berries, before serving. — Miss Cora Lindop. 

Canary Pudding 

The weight of three eggs in sugar and butter, the weight of 
two^ggs in flour, rind of one lemon, three eggs. Beat butter, 
sugar and lemon peel, then flour, beat eggs, add and mix all 
thoroughly. Put in buttered mould and steam two and a half 
hours. Serve with sauce. — Mrs. E. S. Anderson. 

Derbyshire Pudding 

Take one pint of milk, reserving one wineglass full. Scald 
milk and mix wineglass full with four tablespoons flour. Add 
to hot milk, stirring constantly, until quite smooth. Then put 
away to cool. ' Beat yolks of four eggs, whites of two and half 
a cup of blanched almonds, cut. not too fine, the grated rind of 
lemon, cup white sugar, piece of butter, size of an q%\i,. Add 
to thickened milk. Pour into buttered pie dish and bake 
slowly half an hour. A(ld juice of lemon, cautiously, over top 
of pudding, after it is taken from the oven. Beat two whites 
to a froth, put on top and return to oven for a few niinntos. 
Eat cold. — Mrs. E. S. Anderson. 

Pudding and Sauce 

Two eggs, one cup sugar, two cups flour, one cup rr^ilk, 
butter, size of egg, one tablespoon Harvey's baking powder. 

Harvey's Baking Powder is Absolutely Pure. 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 147 



Honey Comb Pudding 

Half cup sugar, half cup butter, half cup milk, half cup 
flour. Beat all together and add four well-beaten eggs and 
cup of molasses, with teaspoon of soda in it, till it stops foam- 
ing. Add molasses last thing. Steam two hours and serve 
with sauce. — Mrs. E. S. Anderson. 

Henderson Pudding 

Two or three eggs, half cup sugar, three-quarters cup 
sweet milk, one teaspoon Harvey's baking powder, flour 
enough to make batter like cake. Steam 40 minutes to an 
hour. 

Plum Pudding 

Two cups of suet two cups raisins, one and a half cups 
currants, one and a half cups sugar, two cups flour, four eggs 
one tablespoon sweet milk, one teaspoon salt, half nutmeg, 
one teaspoon ginger, one teaspoon cinnamon, one teaspoon 
allspice, half teaspoon cloves,- one cup lemon, orange and 
citron peel (mixed), one cup figs, chopped Roll fruit in 
flour Vjefore mixing. Stir well. Have water boiling. Take 
cloth, dip in hot water, sprinkle with flour, put in pudding, 
tie carefully, leaving room for it to swell. Boil five or 
six hours. — Hattie Robinson. 

Plum Pudding 

Two and a half pounds chopped suet, one pint bread 
crumbs, two pounds currants, three pounds raisins, one pound 
mixed pee , two nutmegs, grated, two tablespoons cinnamon, 
one tablespoon'cloves, one tablespoon allspice, two teaspoons 
salt, and one of soda. Mix all this together dry, then add six 
eggs, well beaten, and three cups sweet milk, then flour enough 
to make it very stiff. Boil in two large or three medium size 
puddings five or six hours. — Mrs. Hales. 

Baked Suet Pudding 

One cup suet, chopped fine, three-quarters cup sugar, 
three-quarters cup milk, two eggs, one and a quarter cups 
flour, one cup raisins, half nutmeg, two teaspoons baking pow- 
der. — Miss Turvillc. 



Harvey's Baking Powder is all Leaven. 



i 



148 ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 



Plain Plum Pudding 

Two and a half cups raisins, two cups currants, two cups 
sugar, one cup molasses, one cup sour milk, three cups bread 
crumbs, one teaspoon soda, one teaspoon cloves, two teaspoons 
cinnamon, one teaspoon salt, three-quarter pound suet, two 
eggs, one cup mixed peel, flour to make very stiff. — Mrs. E. C. 
Harvey. 

One cup suet, chopped fine, one cup very fine bread 
crumbs, one and a half cups raisins, after seeding, three-quart- 
er cup yellow sugar, half cup molasses, cup sweet milk, one 
teaspoon salt, one tablespoon soda, one teaspoon each, cloves 
and cinnamon. Put all in a tin pail or mould with cover and 
cook in a pot of hot water, boiling for three hours. — Mrs. H. 
T. Gough. 

Yorkshire Suet Pudding 

Two cups of bread crumbs, half cup suet, half cup 
molasses, one egg, one cup seeded raisins, one cup of sweet 
milk, pinch salt, half teaspoon of soda, dissolved in milk, 
half teaspoon cloves, one teaspoon cinnamon. Mix thor- 
oughly and steam two hours in a dish. Eat wuth foam or 
brandy sauce. — Miss Foss. 

Christmas Pudding 

One pound flour, one pound bread crumbs, three pounds 
currants, three and a half pounds raisins, half pound citron 
peel, half pound almonds, two pounds brown sugar, two 
pounds suet, spices and salt to taste, about fifteen eggs. Mix 
all together, but the eggs, and lastly add eggs, one at a time, 
mixing thoroughly, after each one is added. Put in bowls and 
either boil or steam. If boiled, cover bowls with paste made 
of flour and water, and tie a cloth over each. — E. C. Hind- 
marsh. 

Eggless Plum Pudding 

One heaping cup bread crumbs, two cups flour, one cup 
suet, chopped fine, one cup raisins, one cup molasses, one cup 
sweet milk, one tablespoon soda, one teaspoon salt, one tea- 
spoon cloves, one teaspoon cinnamon. Steam two or two and 
a half hours. 



Use Harvey's Baking Powder. 



ST. THOMAS Y. \V. C. A. COOK BOOK 149 



PUDDING SAUCES 



Carmel Sauce for Pudding 

One cup brown sugar, piece butter, size of egg, melt slow- 
ly on stove. When well boiled, stir in a large cupful or little 
more of boiling water and thicken a very little with flour. — 
Mrs. Mc Andrew. 

Sauce 

Yolks of two eggs, one cup sugar, half cup butter, table- 
spoon cornstarch, three gills boiling water, juice of one lemon, 
boil the mixture. The whites of eggs may be used on the pud- 
ding. — Mrs. H. W. Reede. 

Half cup butter, one cup of sugar. Cream well together. 
Then add one quart crushed strawberries and lastly the beaten 
Good. — Mrs. McAndrew. 

Take one cup white sugar, butter, size of an egg, grated 
rind of one lemon and white of an egg. (Beat the white of the 
egg and stir in at the last.) — Mrs. W. G. Whitmore. 

Chocolate Sauce for Pudding 

Three tablespoons of chocolate, one cup of sugar, one 
tablespooon of butter, half pint of milk, thickened with a little 
cornstarch and boil. — Mrs. F. M. Griffin. 

Sauce for Pudding 

One teaspoon flour mixed with cold water, add one cup 
boiling water, let come to a boil, add two cups sugar. Let 
boil fifteen minutes. Flavor with vanilla. — Mrs. L. Beal. 



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150 ST. THOMAS V. \V. C. A. COOK BOOK 



CREAMS 



Chocolate Sauce for Ice Cream 

One cup sugar, one cup milk, one and a half tablespoons 
chocolate, grated fine, (two if desired any thicker), small piece 
of butter. Put on back of stove and let come to a boil, but not 
boil it. Unsweetened chocolate preferred. This will serve 
about 3 5 people. — Mrs. L. Beal. 

Orange Cups 

Cut slice off the top of an orange, scoop out the centre 
and cut in small pieces, then add a little shredded pineapple 
and walnuts, broken fine. Sugar to taste. Place back in cup 
and on top put a spoonful of whipped cream. — Mrs. A. L. Xors- 
worthy. 

Chocolate Ice Cream 

Six ounces chocolate, one pint cream, half pint new milk, 
half pound sugar. Mode: Scrape the chocolate into the milk 
and blend thoroughly. Add the cream and sugar, strain and 
freeze. Sufficient for eight persons. Seasonable at any time. 
Mrs. Ermatinger. 

Orange Charlotte 

One and a quarter tablespoons gelatine, one-third cup 
cold water, third cup boiling water, one cup sugar, juice of one 
lemon, juice and pulp of one orange, three eggs, whites only. 
Pour cold water on gelatine. Let stand five minutes, then 
add boiling water and sugar. Stir until dissolved. Add 
lemon and orange, when almost cool, add beaten whites and 
thoroughly mix. 



Harvey's Baking Powder assures Success. 



ST. THOMAS Y. \V. C. A. COOK BOOK 151 



Custard 

Yolks of eggs, three tablespoons sugar, one and a half 
cups milk, one tablespoon vanilla.— Mrs. Murphy. 

Custard Sauce 

One pint milk, yolks of two eggs, half teaspoon vanilla, 
quarter cup sugar, a few grains salt. Heat the milk. Beat 
yolks of eggs slightly, add sugar, salt and hot milk, gradually. 
Cook in double boiler, stirring constantly, until it thickens, 
strain and when cool, flavor. For lemon Custard Sauce, 
cook thin shavings of lemon rind with the milk. 

Pineapple Sherbet 

Two tablespoonsful gelatine, dissolved in one cup cold 
water. Then add one cup boiling water, one can grated pine- 
apple, two cups sugar, juice of two lemons, and whites of two 
or three eggs. Then put in freezer. — Miss Love. 

Maple Parafait 

Yolks of four eggs, beaten light, add one cup maple syrup 
and cook in double boiler until there is a coating on spoon. 
Stir constantly. Take from tire and beat with egg beater un- 
til cold. Have beaten and on ice, one pint cream Mix, pour 
in^ mould and pack in ice and salt for four hours. — -Miss Foss. 

Boil three w'ell-beaten eggs in one cup maple syrup. 
When cold, add one pint of whipped cream, and quarter 
pound of broken walnuts. Freeze. — Mrs. Hugh McPherson. 

Maple Ice Cream 

Put into double boiler, one pound of broken maple sugar 
and one and a half pints of milk and heat slowly, until sugar 
is melted and scalding hot. Add six well-beaten eggs and 
cook until as thick as custard, then strain and set aside. When 
cold, add one quart of heavy cream, one tablespoon of vanilla 
and freeze. — Mrs. W. W. O'lmstead. 



Use Harvey's Baking Powder. 



152 ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 



Maple Mousse 

One cup maple syrup, one pint cream, yolks of four 
eggs. Boil syrup five minutes, pour over the well beaten 
eggs, beat till cold then stir in cream which has been whip- 
ped. Put in mould and pack in ice and salt for three hours. 
— Miss G. Smith. 

Strawberry Dessert 

Put alternate layers of macaroons, strawberries and 
powdered sugar in a glass dish and pour over them a cold cus- 
tard, made with three eggs, sugar and a cup and a half of mi k. 
Make a meringue of the whites of the eggs and bake it a light 
brown in the oven. This can be done by placing the beaten- 
whites on a buttered plate, set over a dish of hot water. When 
the meringue is cold, slide it over the strawljerries and maca- 
roons and sprinkle the top with rolled macaroons. — Mrs. At- 
kins. 

Pineapple Cream 

One can pineapple, one teacup sugar, thrjee-quarter 
package gelatine, dissolved in half a cup cold water. Mix one 
cup of the juice of the pineapple with melted gelatine, simmer 
twenty minutes, cut one cup of the pineapple into small pieces 
and stir into one pint whipped cream, then add cooled juice 
and gelatine. Mix well and pour into moulds. — Miss Mc- 
Adam. 

Fig Ice Cream 

Three cups milk, one cup sugar, yolks of five eggs, one 
tablespoon salt, one pound figs, finely chopped, one and a half 
cups heavy cream, whites of five eggs, one tablespoon vanilla. 
Make custard of yolks of eggs, sugar, and milk, strain, add 
figs, cool, and flavor. Add whites of eggs, beaten until stiff. 
and heavy cream, beaten until stiff. Freeze and mould. — 
Mrs. C. B. Buncombe. 

Banana Cream 

Make a custard of one quart milk, three tal)lespoons corn 
starch and yolks of four eggs. Salt and sweeten to taste. 
When partly cool, add bananas thinly sliced and the whites of 
four eggs, l^eaten to a stiff froth. Place on ice till served. — 
E. C. Hindmarsh. 



Harvey's Baking Powder is absolutely Pure. 



ST. THOMAS V. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 153 



Fig Mousse 

Half cup sugar, half cup boiling water, one pound figs, 
one quart milk, half cup flour, one cup sugar, yolks of three 
eggs, one tablespoon vanilla. Make caramel out of half cup 
sugar, and half cup boiling water. Wash figs carefully and 
put through a grinder. Pour the caramel over this. Scald 
milk and add flour and sugar, which have been mixed with a 
little cold milk. Pour this into the milk, and then pour this 
hot mixture over the beaten eggs. Turn into a saucepan and 
cool for several minutes. Take from the fire, add vanilla and 
pour the mixture over the figs. When cool, pour in a covered 
mould, pack in ice and salt for three or four hours. — Mrs. E. A. 
Smith. 

Coffee Custard 

Two cups milk, two tablespoons ground coffee, three eggs, 
quarter cup sugar, eighth teaspoon salt, quarter teaspoon 
vanilla. Scald milk with coffee, and strain. Beat eggs 
slightly, add sugar, salt, vanilla and milk. Strain into butter- 
ed individual moulds, set in pan of hot water, and bake until 
firm. — Mrs. C. B. Buncombe. 

Charlotte Russe 

Two cups of cream, add a very little salt and sugar to 
sweeten, beat very stift', flavor with mixed extracts (rose, 
vanilla and pineapple). Dissolve a dessertspoonful of Knox's 
unsweetened gelatine in a very little boiling water. When 
tepid, beat into the cream thoroughly. Put a little cream in a 
bowl and line with lady fingers and fill up with the cream. Let 
set unti. firm and then turn out as you would jelly. — Miss Mc- 
Dougal. ♦ 

Currant Whip 

Beat whites of two eggs until stift". Whip in small glass of 
currant jelly. Sweeten to taste with powdered sugar. Serve 
in sherbet glasses, with candied cherries on top. If desired 
sliced bananas, or chopped pineapple or any other fresh fruit 
may be folded in and served with whipped cream. — Mrs. J. A. 
McCance. 



Harvey's Baking Powder is all Leaven. 



154 ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 



Snow Custard 

Half box of gelatine (Knox), dissolved in one cup cold 
water. Add one pint boiling water, two cups sugar, juice of 
two large lemons. When nearly cold, add whites of three 
eggs and beat all for twenty minutes. Pour in mould to harden. 
Serve with custard. — Yolks of three eggs, one pint milk, swee- 
ten and flavor to taste. — Mrs. T. Crothers. 



Use Harvey's Baking Powder 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 155 



JAMS AND JELLIES 



Tomato Jam 

Allow one pound brown sugar tc each pound of peeled and 
sliced tomatoes. To every six pounds of tomatoes, al ow one 
lemon and one ounce white ginger root. Place all in pre- 
serving kettle, cook gent y, watching constantly. Boil one 
hour and seal up. — Lucy E. Whiting, South Pasadena, Cal.' 

Raspberry Jam 

Allow one pint of currant juice, squeezed through bag as 
you would for jelly, to every two pounds of berries. Put the 
currant juice in a porcelain kettle and boil fifteen minutes, 
then add the berries, well jammed, and boil five minutes, then 
add the sugar and when it comes to a boil, take it off. Allow 
a pound of sugar to ever}- pint of juice and three-quarters of a 
pound to every pound of berries. — Mrs. vV. B. Doherty. 

Chipped Pears 

Eight pounds pears, chipped, eight pounds granulated 
sugar, one pound preserved ginger root, (chopped), six le- 
mons, one cup water. Pare the yellow rind from the le- 
mons and chip in small pieces. Squeeze out the juice and add 
it to the sugar with the water. When the sugar is all dis- 
solved, add the pears and ginger root and boil until thick and 
rich. — Mrs. A. McPherson. 

Grape Jelly 

Scald grapes and strain through a jelly bag, measure juice 
and add same amount of sugar as juice. Put juice on stove, 
let come to a boil, take off stove and add sugar. Stir twenty 
minutes, put in glasses and seal. — Miss May Jay. 



Use Harvey's Baking Powder. 



156 ST, THOMAS V. W, C. A. COOK BOOK 



Cream Nectar 

Dissolve two pounds sugar in three quarts of water, add 
white of one egg, well beaten, then strain, and put in two 
ounces of tartaric acid, one tablespoon of lemon. Shake well 
and bottle. — Mrs. Williams. 

Raspberry Vinegar 

Cover berries with vinegar. Let stand forty-eight hours. 
Drain. One pound of sugar to one pint of juice. Boil twenty 
minutes. Put in air-tight bottles. 

Grape Juice 

One basket of grapes, washed and taken from the stems. 
Put in granite kettle and pounded until juicy. Boil until 
soft, or the seeds rise to the top, stirring frequently to pre- 
vent burning. Strain through cheesecloth, and put juice back 
in kettle, and boil for a few minutes with two large cups of 
sugar, then seal air-tight — Mrs. A. C. Hill. 

Unfermented Grape Wine 

Take twenty pounds Concord grapes and two quarts of 
water. After crushing the grapes, put them in a porcelain 
kettle. When at the boiling point, the juice separates from 
the pulp and skins, then strain through a sieve, using a little 
more water. Add six pounds granulated sugar. After it is 
all dissolved, strain through a cloth, then heat again and pour 
into jars. Seal tight while hot. This will make three gallons. 
Mrs. M. G. Hay. 

Turkish Delight 

One package Knox's granulated gelatine or one ounce of 
the sheet gelatine, dissolved in half a cup of water, one pint 
white sugar, boiled with half a cup water, till it threads as if 
for icing. Add to this when boiling the melted gelatine and 
boil slowly thirty minutes. Add grated rind and juice of one 
lemon and one orange. Pour into shallow pans, let stand 
some hours, till firm and perfectly cold, then cut into squares 
and roll in icing or fruit sugar and chopped nuts. — Miss Mc- 
Adam. 

Success crowns your efforts if you use Harvey's Baking Powder. 



ST. THOMAS V. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 157 



Ginger Wine 

Three lemons, sliced fine, one ounce tartaric acid, one 
ounce sugar, burned, half ounce essence of ginger, quarter 
ounce tincture of capsicum, three pounds of white sugar, 
five quarts of boiling water. — Mrs. W. B. Doherty. 

Salted Almonds 

Shell and blanche one pound almonds. Dry thoroughly 
in a towel, put into a large pan, a piece of butter, size of small 
chesnut, and when melted, turn the almonds into it, stirring 
rapidly, until every nut is shining with butter. Then sprinkle 
over them, an even tablespoon of fine salt, put in bottom of 
oven and let it remain there, shaking and stirring every few 
minutes, until the almonds are a light brown, when they 
will be crisp and delicious. — Mrs. M. G. Hay. 



«& 




You get good results with Harvey's Baking Powder. 



158 ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 



CANDY 



Maple Cream 

Two cups of yellow sugar, quarter cup of milk, lialf cup of- 
maple syrup. Boil fifteen minutes, then add one tablespoon 
of butter. Beat to a cream and put in buttered pans. — Mrs 
\V. Norsworthy. 

Fondant 

One tablespoon glucose, three cups granulated sugar, 
enough water to dissolve sugar. Boil until syrup forms into a 
soft ball in water, allow to cool, and then beat, until it be- 
comes hard and white. Then knead with hands, till creamy .- 
Mrs. E. C. Harvey. 

Butter Scotch 

Two cups sugar, half cup butter, one teacup of cold wa- 
ter. Put water and butter together. When butter is melted, 
add half teaspoon cream tartar, boil until hard and cool quick- 
ly.— Mrs. F. M. Griffin. 

Fudge Candy 

Three cups granulated sugar, two large tablespoons gra- 
ted chocolate, one dessertspoon butter, milk enough to dis- 
solve sugar. Set on stove and stir till sugar is dissolved, then 
let boil, without stirring again, till it will form a soft ba 1, when 
tried in cold water. Set aside till nearly cool, then add one 
teaspoon vanilla and chopped nuts. Stir till creamy and pour 
into square t n. When nearly cold, cut in small pieces. — Mrs. 
E. C. Harvey. 

Vinegar Candy 

Two cups sugar, one cup vinegar, quarter cup butter. 
Boil until it will harden in water. — Miss Nash. 



Use Harvey's Baking Powder. 



ST. THOMAS Y. \V. C. A. COOK BOOK 159 



Marshmallows 

Two tablespoons Knox's gelatine, six tablespoons of 
water. Dissolve gelatine in the water. Two cups granulated 
sugar, six tablespoons hot water. Boil sugar and water until 
it forms a ball, rather hard, in water. Take off and pour over 
the gelatine and heat twenty minutes. Add one teaspoon 
vanilla. Pour into buttered pans dredged with cornstarch. 
When cold, cut in squares and roll in pulverized sugar. — Miss 
Nash. ' • 

Proulines 

One pound, or two cups of 1 ght brown sugar, three table- 
spoons cream, two tablespoons water, butter the size of a wal- 
nut Boi the above, except butter, until it becomes stringy. 
Then add butter and English walnuts and stir until it begins to 
get stiff. Pour into buttered plate and cut into squares. — • 
Miss Nash. 

Fondant 

One cup granulated sugar, quarter cup water, quarter 
teaspoon cream of tartar, flavoring. Stir over fire until the 
sugar is dissolved. Boil, without stirring, until", when tried 
in cold water, a soft ball may be formed, that will keep its 
shape. Let fondant cool, until it becomes a thick waxy con- 
sistency. .Stir until stiff, then work w4th the hands until 
smooth. This fondant is a foundation for any cream candy. 

Patience 

One cup granulated sugar allowed to melt down and 
brown.. Then stir into one cup hot milk, adding it little 
by little. Then add two more cups granulated sugar, a 
small piece of butter, and boil until it hardens in water. Take 
off stove and stir down, until it gets quite stiff, putting in 
chopped nuts and a little fla\'oring. — W. F. Mackenzie. 

Stuffed Dates 

Remove pits and stuff with two tablespoons cheese, two 
tablespoons peanuts, dash of cayenne. — Mrs. Angus Murray. 



Harvey's Baking Powder is all Leaven. 



160 ST. THOMAS Y. W. C A. COOK BOOK 



Dates 

Remove stones from some fresh dates, fill with chopped 
walnuts and roll in powdered sugar or, the dates may be filled 
with boiled icing, and then rolled in sugar. — Mrs. L. I. Hunt. 

Candied Orange Peel 

Make a brine of half cup salt to two quarts of water. Put 
in orange peel and leave a week or more. Drain and wash in 
cold water. Simmer gently, changing w^aters till all taste of 
salt disappears. Cut into strips or put through the grinder. 
Cook in a thick syrup (made by adding two cups of water to 
four cups of sugar), till transparent. Place on a buttered 
plate to dry. When syrup is absorbed, pack in jars. — Hattie 
Robinson. 




Harvey's Baking Powder assures Success. 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C, A. COOK BOOK 161 



MARMALADES 



Orange Marmalade 

One dozen bitter oranges, three sweet oranges, three 
lemons. Slice all the fruit very thin, keep the seeds of all the 
fruit in a bowl, with one cup cold water over them. Put seven 
quarts of water over all the fruit you have sliced, and let it re- 
main over night In the morning, place over the fire and boil 
two hours until the skins are tender. Then take off and mea- 
sure, to every quart of fruit , add three pounds white sugar. 
Now tie the seeds and watar in a muslin bag, squeeze into the 
pan of fruit. Drop bag in also, and boil one hour. It is in the 
seeds you have the jelly. Throw away the peel of the sweet 
oranges. — Mrs. Kirkkpatrick. 

Cut thin one doz. bitter oranges, using all but seeds and 
thick end. To every pint of cut-up friiit, add two and a half 
pints water. Let stand over night in a stone crock. Next 
day boil quickly three-quarters of an hour, then put back into 
crock. The following day measure and to everx' pint of fruit, 
put one and a quarter pints sugar. Then boil for an hour. — 
Mrs. E. Heiter, Aylmer, Ont. 

Two dozen Valencia oranges, four lemons, twelve quarts 
water. Cut up fruit fine, leaving out all skins of one dozen 
oranges and ends of other dozen. Add water and let stand 
over night. Boil two hours. Then measure and put an 
equal quantity of sugar with pulp. Cook till it will jelly. — 
Mrs. E. C. Harvey. 

One dozen Seville oranges, must be quartered, then sliced 
very thin, pulps and all, leaving out the seeds. To each 
pound of sliced fruit, add three pints of cold water. Let it 
stand twenty-four hours. Then boil until tender. Let it 
stand until next day. Weigh it, and to every pound, add one 
and a quarter pounds of white sugar. Then boil until the 
syrup jellies. One hour is generally enough. — Mrs. Kennedy. 



Harvey's Baking Powder is all Leaven. 



162 ST. THOMAS Y.W. C.A. COOK BOOK 



Orange Marmalade 

One dozen bitter oranges, cut in very fine pieces, using all 
the orange except the pips. Cover with ten pints of cold wa- 
ter and let stand twenty-four or thirty-six hours. Then boil 
for two hours, after which, add twelve pounds of granulated 
sugar and boil steadily until it jeUies Add juice of 
two lemons and take quickly ofif stove. Putjthe pithy parts, 
pips and seeds into a kettle with some water and et boil for a 
little time, then strain juice into the mixture, as a great deal of 
the jelly is in the seeds. — Kate A. McColl. 

Citron Marmalade 

Eight pounds citron, chopped fine, eight pounds sugar, 
six lemons, chopped, half pound bruised ginger or preserved gin- 
ger, boihn as little water as possible, for about six hours. — 
Mrs. F. M. Grifhn. 

Red Currant Marmalade 

Six pounds currants, six pounds sugar, six oranges, half 
pound raisins, half teaspoon mace, half teaspoon cinnamon. 
Boil currants three-quarters of an hour, strain through colan- 
der to remove seeds. Cook rind of oranges until soft. Chop 
fine. Chop raisins and pulp of oranges, add to currants and 
sugar. Cook until thick. — Mrs. L. M. Miller. 

Rhubarb Marmalade 

Cut and stew the rhubarb with as little water as possible. 
To every pound of^rhubarb, add one orange and one pound of 
sugar. Cook oranges before putting in the rhubarb. Then 
simmer until thick. Add almonds or English walnuts. — Mrs. 
Hugh Mcpherson. 

Orange and Rhubarb Marmalade 

Five oranges, two and a half "pounds rhubarb, five pounds 
sugar. Peel the oranges and boil skins. When?cooked cut in- 
to fine pieces. Put skins and oranges, rhubarb and sugar on 
to boil, until required thickness is obtained. — Mrs. Cochrane 

Use Harvey's Baking Powder. 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 163 



Pumpkin Ginger 

Five pounds pumpkin, five pounds granulated sugar, 
three-quarter pound root ginger (not bruised). Cut pumpkin 
very fine. Put into a crock, a layer of pumpkin, sugar and 
ginger. Stand for twenty-four hours. Cut six lemons 
thin , add to the ingredients and boil until clear and the syrup 
is very thick. Take ginger out before bottling. — Miss Morley. 

Pear Marmalade 

Put four pounds sugar in kettle. Pour over it, one quart 
cold water. Allow to boil one hour. Skim well. Have ready 
four pounds pears, pared, cored and sliced very thin, add to 
syrup, with rinds of four large lemons. Let simmer one hour. 
Add juice of the lemons. Let boil hard for half an hour. Stir 
constantly. Rind of lemons better, if soaked over night. — 
Mrs. Robertson. 



Eight pounds granulated sugar, eight pounds of fruit, 
half a pound preserved ginger, four lemons. Peel and slice 
pears very thin, also slice ginger in small pieces. Add to 
pears and sugar, half a pint cold water. Boil one hour, stirr- 
ing often. Cook the lemons (whole), until tender, in water, 
cut them in small pieces, add to the pears and boil one hour 
longer. — ^Miss Love. 



Eight pounds of pulp, eight pounds of granulated sugar, 
one pound of preserved ginger root, four lemons, one pint cold 
water. Boil lemons in water, skin and all, till tender, then 
put the water with the pulp. Boil one and a half hours.— 
Mrs. W. H. Graham. 

Rhubarb Marmalade 

Four lemons, cooked whole in a little water till tender, cut 
fine and remove seeds, four pounds rhubarb peel and cut up. 
Add one cup water and cook till tender, add six pounds sugar 
and half pound chopped walnuts. Cook ten minutes. — Mrs. 
M. H. Penhale. 



Harvey's Baking Powder is absolutely Pure 



164 ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 

Red Currant Marmalade 

Six pounds currants, six pounds sugar, six oranges, half 
pound raisins, half teaspoon mace, half teaspoon cinnamon. 
Boil currants until cooked and put through colander. Cook 
rind of oranges, until soft. Chop fine. Chop raisins and pulp 
of oranges, add to currants and sugar and cook until thick. — 
Mrs. J. B. Morford. 

Rhubarb and Pineapple Marmalade 

Three bowls pineapple, two bowls sugar, five bowls rhu- 
barb, five bowls sugar. Let each stand overnight, covered 
with the sugar. Boil all the juice twenty minutes, then add 
pineapple and boil ten minutes, then add rhubarb and boil un- 
til clear. — Mrs. J. B. Morford. 




Harvey's Baking Powder is the Best. 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 165 



BEVERAGES 



Orangeade 

Six oranges, grate the rind and squeeze out the juice, 
six cups water, four pounds sugar. Boil all together. Add 
one and a half ounces citric acid. Bottle up the syrup and 
use like lemonade. — Mrs. A'jkins. 

Punch 

Four dozen lemons, two dozen oranges, one grated pine- 
apple, one pint grape juice, water and sugar to taste. Add 
piece of ice. Marichino cherries and green grapes to garnish, 
— Miss McDougal. 

Cream Nectar 

Dissolve two pounds sugar in three quarts of water, add 
white of one egg, well beaten, then strain, and put in two 
ounces of tartaric acid, one tablespoon of lemon. Shake well 
and bottle. — Mrs. WiUiams. 



REMEDIES 



For Burns 

One pint castor oil,'slightly warmed andbeaten to a froth. 
Add one teaspoon carbolic acid. Cork and use for burns. It 
gives instant relief. 

Cure for Pneumonia 

Rub chest with sweet oil, then cover with powdered lobel- 
ia. 

Cough Mixture 

Four cents anise seed, three cents laudanum, three cents 
essence pepperment, one pint molasses, one cup water. Mix 
with warm water. 



Harvey's Baking Powder is Pure and Wholesome. 



166 ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 



Croup Mixture, tried and true 

One ounce each of camphor gum, alcohol, turpentine and 
castor oil. Rub briskly all over chest and down over the 
bowels. If applied when child shows indications of croup, 
will prevent it. Is also excellent to apply to older ones, suffer- 
ing with cold or sore throat. — Mrs. S. H. Smiley. 

Hop Bitters 

Hops two ounces, ginger one tablespoon water two 
gallons, brown sugar, two pounds, yeast half cup or one cake. 
Boil hops (in bags), also sugar and ginger. Cool to blood 
heat, then add yeast and let stand twenty-four hours, skim 
and bottle. This is a very strengthening drink for the hot 
weather. — Mrs. J. B. Morford. 

Soap 

Five pounds cleaned fat, onecan concentrated lye, quarter 
cup ammonia, half cup borax, one quart cold water. No 
boiling. — Mrs. E. A. Smith. 

Washing Compound 

Cut fine one bar of laundry* soap into two quarts rain 
water, add one teaspoon Gillet's lye. Boil till thoroughly dis- 
solved, remove from the fire and when slightly cooled, stir in 
cup gasoline. Put enough of the mixture into a boiler of wa- 
ter to make strong suds, then plunge clothes in, without rub- 
bing, and boil thirty minutes. They will come out com- 
paratively clean. — Mrs. McKellar. 

A Splendid Liniment 

Two ounces spirits ammonia, two ounces spirits turpen- 
tmc, two ounces spirits camphor, two ounces best sweet oil. 
Rub well and often. — Mrs. T. Robertson. 

Lotion for Hands 

Equal parts of glycerine, witch hazel and spirits of cam- 
phor. — Mrs. Morley. 

Harvey's Baking Powder is all Leaven. 



ST. THOMAS Y. W. C. A. COOK BOOK 167 



Face Cream 

Half ounce White Wax, half ounce Spermaceti, half 
ounce Lanolin, one ounce Cocoanut Oil, two ounces Oil Sweet 
Almond, one ounce Orange Flower Water, thirty drops Tinc- 
ture Benzoin, five drops Oil of Rose. Heat first five in double 
boiler. Beat until cold. Mix liquids and slowly cream a few 
drops at a time. — Mrs. Morley. 

Salve 

For cold in head, rub nose and forehead. For croup, rub 
well, throat and chest. Take equal parts in bulk, (not weight) 
of camphor gum, lard and yellow beeswax. Melt altogether 
until camphor is dissolved. 

Excellent Furniture Polish 

A wineglass of vinegar, a wineglass of sweet oil, and half a 
wineglass of turpentine. — Mrs. A. C. Hill. 

May Dew. — Toilet Preparation 

Excellent for rough or chapped hands. Gum tragacanth 
three-eighths ounce, cologne two ounces, alcohol two 
ounces, glycerine two ounces, soft water one pint. Dis- 
solve the gum tragacanth before add ing the other ingredients. 
Miss Winnie Graham. 

Chiffons, veilings and ostrich plumes in light shades can 
be easily and successfully dyed in tinted gasoline. Mix a 
small quantity of tube paint in half a cupful of gasoline, stir 
gradually into a quart or more of the fluid until, by testing 
with a small piece of the chiffon, the right color is obtained. 
The material must be dipped quickly and shaken, then dried 
in the open air. A white chiffon hat was dyed without ripping 
apart in this way, changing it to a pale blue. 



Ftor recipes in *his Book Use Harvey's Baking Powder 



INDEX TO RECIPES 



PAGES 

Tables 5 

Soups : 6-10 

Fish 11-18 

Meats 19-35 

Meat Relishes 37-47 

Pickles 49-57 

Vegetables 58-65 

Eggs 66-67 

Cheese 69-71 

Salads : 73-83 

Bread and Sandwich Fillings 85-96 

Cakes 97-119 

Fillings and Icings 121-122 

Cookies and Doughnuts 123-133 

Pies 134-138 

Fritters 139 

Puddings 1 40-148 

Pudding Sauses 1 49 

Creams 1 50- 1 54 

Jams and Jellies 155-157 

Candy 158-160 

Marmalades 1 6 1 - 1 64 

Beverages 165 

Remedies 165-167 



WARNING! 

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using our 

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completed and we are in a position to 

J offer exceptional banking facilities to the 

publ'c. 

Saviixi^s De{.^arin\eivt. We make a special feature 
of this department and offer every inducement to depositors 
consistent with sound banicing. Deposits of $ I and upwards 
rccei.ed and (n»cic8t added to accounts four time? a year. 

Eankir.^ for Women. A private room has been 
provided for ladies where they may transact their banking 
lousiness without interruption. 

FaLfmers* Business. For the convenience of farmers 
a large room has been furnished above the bank. Those 
desiring to make appomtments with their friends, to hold special 
meetings or to transad private business are invited to make use 
of this room. 

\\\ depositing money with the Dominion Bank you are 
assured of courteous treatment and undoubted security. 

We invite your nuolness. 

Yours truly, 

E. S. ANDERSON, Manager. 



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