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1914 PROSPECTOR 



OF 




The Colorado School of 

cTWines 




VOLUME III 



Published by 

The Class of Nineteen Hundred and Fifteen 



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PRESS OF 
THE WAHLGREEN PUBLISHING COMPANY 

DENVER, COLORADO 



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jForetoorO 

This, the year-book of the class of 1915, is simply 
a heterogeneous collection of facts and fancies regard- 
ing this class and the school in general. If the 
"fancies" be too far fetched, we hope the readers will 
accord the staff of editors leniency and remember 
that many late hours and much "cutting" of school 
have been necessary in producing the book. The sole 
purpose of the book is to preserve memories of friends 
and friendships, and if it should fulfill its purpose 
and thereby be a source of pleasure, we sincerely hope- 
that, in giving credit, you will not forget the ones to 
whom we are deeply indebted, and without whose aid 
the book would have been an impossibility, namely: 



For Art Work 

Mr. R. G. Bowman 
Mr. J. R. H. H. Billyard 
Prof. E. J. Ditttjs 

For Other Work 

Mr. L. L. White 
Mr. Tames Ord 



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DeOication 



to 



Acting President Wm. G. Haldane B. S. 

whom 

we respect as an able leader of men and an 

ardent co-worker in producing 

a better 

Colorado School of Mines 

we 

the class of 1915 

respectfully" dedicate this volume 

The 1914 Prospector 



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Editor in Chief 
A. F. Duggleby 



Statistical Editor 
L. Adair Stewart 



Athletic Editor 

D. D. HlNMAX 



Art Editor 
L. M. Gross ('14) 



Business Manager 
G. H. Vax Dorp 



Assistant Business Managers 
H. S. McKnight 
A. S. Walter H. H. De Laittre 



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pcftool Organisation 



THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

F. C. Steinhauer Capt. J. C. Smith 

President Secretary 

F. G. Willis 

E. C. Van Diest J. B. Bennett 






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President Emeritus 
Dr. Regis Chauvenet, A. B., B. S., L. L. D. 

Acting President 
W. G. Haldane, B. S. 



Treasurer 
H. M. Rubey 



Registrar 
T. C. Doolittle 



Librarian 
Mrs. P. Garrison 



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WILLIAM GEORGE HALDANE, 
Acting President. 



William George Haldane 

K 2, T B n, 2 B 

Acting President 

B. S. 1900 — Case School of Applied Science, Mining Course. Connected 
with the school since 1901. 

* 
1913 — Acting President. 



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<25eologp Department 




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Hyrum Schneider 

2 B 

Instructor in Geology and 
Mineralogy 

A. B. 1908 — Brigham Young 
College. 

A. M. 1911 — University of 
Wisconsin. 

Instructor in Geology 
and Mineralogy since 
September, 1912. 
Member American As- 
sociation for Advance- 
ment of Science. 



Jenner Alfred Pynch 

Instructor in Mineralogy and 
Geology 



A. B. 1908 — University of Wis- 
consin. 

Instructor in Mineralogy and 
Geology since September. 
1913. 




HYRUM SCHNEIDER, 
Instructor in Geology and Mineralogy. 




JENNER ALFRED PYNCH, 
Instructor in Mineralogy and Geology. 



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HORACE BUSHNELL PATTON, 
Professor of Mineralogy and Geology. 



Horace Bushnell Patton 

x $, t b n 

Professor of Mineralogy and Geology 

A. B. 1881— Amherst. 

Ph. D. 1887— University of Heidel- 
berg. 

Professor of Geology and 
Mineralogy since 1893. 
Fellow Geological Society of 
America; Member of Coun- 
cil, 1908-1910; Second Vice- 
President, 1914. 
Fellow American Association 
for the Advancement of 
Science, Secretary Section E, 
1901. 

Fellow Colorado Scientific 
Society. 



The subjects of geology and mineralogy are among those that are of very 
special value to the mining engineer because of their practical bearing upon 
his work. For this reason the subjects selected for presentation in this de- 
partment are mostly those that emphasize the practical side of these branches 
of science. 

General geology, including structural and historical geology, must of 
course be adequately given in any college course and is necessarily presented 
at some length. It is, however, the sight-recognition of minerals and of rocks 
that is of every day practical interest to the mining engineer. For this reason 
mineralogy and lithology are taught with a view to train the student to identify 
at sight all the more common minerals and rocks. 

Among the other more practical subjects taught is economic geology in 
connection with which the nature and origin of ore deposits receives particular 
attention. 




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Cf)emistrp Department 



Charles Darwin Test 

Assistant Professor of Analytical 
Chemistry 



B. M.E. 1894— Purdue University. 

A. C. 1896— Purdue University. 

Assistant Professor of Chem- 
istry since 1903. 

Member American Chemical 
Society; American Electro- 
chemical Society; Franklin 
Institute ; American Orni- 
thologists' Union. 







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CHARLES DARWIN TEST, 
Assistant Professor of 
Analytical Chemistry. 



John Christian Bailar 

2 S 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B. S. 1901— University of Colo- 
rado. 

A. M. 1905 — University of Colo- 
rado. 

Assistant Professor of Chem- 
istry since 1906. 

Member American Ceramic 
Society ; American Concrete 
Institute; Western Associa- 
tion of Technical Chemists 
and Metallurgists. 





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JOHN CHRISTIAN BAILAR, 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 



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Herman Fleck 

b © n, t b n 

Professor of Chemistry 

B. S. 1890 — University of Penn- 
sylvania. 

Nat. Sc. D. 1892 — Tubingen Univer- 
sity, Wurtemburg, German}'. 
Professor of Chemistry since 
1903. 

Member Chemical Society of 
America ; Western Associa- 
tion of Technical Chemists 
and Metallurgists; Colorado 
Scientific Society ; The 
Deutsche Chemische Gesell- 
schaft. 



HERMAN FLECK, 
Professor of Chemistry. 



The Colorado School of Mines exacts specialties in the way of chemistry 
which are in a sense unusual. The University, with its mining or metallurgi- 
cal course, also has other courses, medicine, hygiene, mechanical engineering, 
on all of which the one given chemical course must be formed. Naturally, 
favoritism toward any one of these courses is not allowable, however desirable 
it may be. But with us all roads lead to Rome and the department has more 
leeway. All chemistry at present is for the benefit of the mining and metal- 
lurgical engineer. This means that special stress may be laid on the theory 
and application of the theory of chemistry in all the ramifications of our 
specialized subjects. Gradually there have been built courses to keep pace 
with the advanced courses higher up and dove-tailed into them, and again there 
have been opportunities, yes, even necessities, for individual courses, research 
and study on the part of the "prof" so that his student may get valuable hints 
of knowledge at the bargain counter. 




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Qitmrtg Department 




Harry James Wolf 

t b n 

Professor of Mining 

E. M. 1903— Colorado. School 
of Mines. 

M. S. 1913— Colorado School, 
of Mines. 

Professor of Mining 
since 1912. 

Member American In- 
stitute of Mining En- 
gineers ; American 
Electro-Chemical So- 
ciety ; Colorado Scien- 
tific Society; A. A. A. 
S.; Teknik Club, of 
Denver ; Associate 
Member American In- 
stitute of Electrical En- 
gineers. 



Wm. Reuel Chedsey 

K 2, t b n 
Assistant Professor in Mining 

E. M. 1908— Colorado School 
of Mines. 

Member American In- 
stitute of Mining Engi- 
neers ; International En- 
gineering Congress; 
American Electro- 
chemical Society; 
Northwest Mining As- 
sociation; Associate 
Member American In- 
stitute of Electrical En- 
gineers. 




HARRY JAMBS WOLF, 
Professor of Mining. 




WILLIAM R. CHEDSEY, 
Assistant Professor in Mining". 






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In order to accumulate the required number of credit hours for grad- 
uation, the student is required to attend numerous discussions of the theory 
and practice of mining. He may, or may not, absorb information which will 
enable him in the future to make a favorable impression not only on those 
who are uninformed on mining, but perchance on some employer who will 
thrust upon him a handsome salary, in recognition of his ability to stand pat 
when his bluff is called. Scenes from real life are placed before the student 
so that he will not go forth with an exaggerated conception of the luxurious 
comforts of the outside mining world. In a life-size mine tunnel, made by 
the students, the school conducts work designed to acquaint the coming expert 
with the various noises made by real mining tools, so that he will not show 
his ignorance by shying at these objects at some inopportune time in the future 
home of the hints on mine management may suggest to the over-enthusiastic 
would-be director of the destinies of large gold fields that there are several 
kinds of mud-crawling to be mastered before it is safe to stage any deep water 
acts. During his investigation of the subject of mine valuation the student 
is acquainted with some of the common diseases of ore bodies; he is told how- 
to diagnose symptoms with caution and how to conduct himself with dignity 
at a P^t mortem, he is given hints on a variety of documents, from a mine's 
clean bill of health to its death certificate. The subject of mine accounting 
is discussed so that the student may learn how mining companies record their 
favorite methods of planting money in the ground; how they indicate the 
results of therr harvest; and how they dispose of their crops. Incidentally 
the optmnstic one observes how such systems may be applied in keepin* tab 
on his immense future salaries and fees and their judicious disposal. After 
attending these and several other courses of instruction, wherein he is told 
how to do a few things and how not to do a few others, the student gradually 
experiences that healthful feeling that he knows just a little about a very 
broad subject concerning which he has much more to learn. 




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Spetall utgp Department 



Regis Chauvenet 

t b n 

President Emeritus 

Special Lecturer in Metallurgy and 

Chemistry ; Professor of English 

A. B. 1862 — Washington Univer- 
sity. 

A. M. 1865 — Washington Univer- 

sity. 

B. S. 1867— Harvard. 

LL. D. 1900 — Washington Univer- 
sity. 

Special Lecturer since 1912. 
1913 — President Emeritus, 
Colorado School of Mines. 




REGIS CHAUVENET, 
President Emeritus. 



Edward Julius Dittus 

<f> K *, © T 

Instructor in Metallurgy 



E. M. 1911— Colorado School of 
Mines. 

Instructor in Metallurgy since 
1912. 

Member Electro-Chemical 
Societv; Teknik Club. 




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EDWARD JULIUS DITTUS, 
Instructor in Metallurgy. 



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FRANK WEISS TRAPHAGEN, 
Professor of Metallurgy and Assaying 



Frank Weiss Traphagen 

t b n, s S 

Professor of Metallurgy and Assay- 



Ph. B. 1882— Course in Analytical 
and Applied Chemistry, Col- 
umbia School of Mines. 

Ph. D. 1883— Columbia School of 
Mines. 

Professor of Metallurgy and 
Assaying since 1903. 
First President of the West- 
ern Association of Technical 
Chemists and Metallurgists ; 
Fellow Deutsche Gesell- 
schaft; A. A. A. S. ; Society 
of Chemical Industry; Mem- 
ber American Institute of 
Mining Engineers, American 
Institute of Mining Engi- 
neers, American Chemical So- 
ciety, Teknik Club. 




This department offers courses in assaying; an extension of the work on 
fuels; the metallurgy of iron and steel, lead, antimony, bismuth, zinc and 
cadmium, in the Junior year; while the Seniors take up the metallurgy of 
mercury, gold, silver, and copper; ore dressing; metallography; electro-metal- 
lurgy, metallurgical practice; advanced general metallurgy; and advanced 
metallography. Every course is thorough in every way and given in the most 
practical manner. The ,'equipment of laboratories in this department is 
entirely complete, especially so in regard to the assaying laboratory, which 
without a doubt excels that of any other college in the world. As nearly as 
may be, the student is placed under smelting conditions and is early made 
familiar with the systems prevailing in the best laboratories, so that in the 
end he may be able to take his place in such a laboratory without undergoing 
a "breaking in" course after leaving school. And so it is with the other 
courses in this department. The completion of the new ore dressing plant 
makes it possible to give the most complete, thorough, and useful course in 
metallurgy possible. 



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Mathematics Department 



Charles R. Burger 

ATA, $ B K 
Professor of Mathematics 

Ph. B. 1892 — University of Colo- 
rado. 

A. B. 1893— Harvard, Post-Grad- 
uate Course in Mathematics. 
Professor of Mathematics 
since 1903. 



George E. F. Sherwood 

Assistant Professor in Mathematics 

A. B. 1904— University of New 
Brunswick, Canada. 

A. B. 1908 — Harvard University. 

A. M. 1913 — Harvard University. 

Assistant Professor in Mathe- 
matics since 1909. 




CHARLES R. BURGER, 
Professor of Mathematics. 




GEORGE E. F. SHERWOOD, 
Assistant Professor in Mathematics. 



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The course in mathematics at the Colorado School of Mines is designed 
to meet the needs of the up-to-date, practical, investigating mining engineer. 
While the keynote is utility, the basic idea is thoroughness. The practical is 
constantly kept in mind; at the same time the cultural value of a good train- 
ing in mathematics is not underestimated. The course requires the daily per- 
formance of assigned tasks which can be accomplished only by well directed 
and concentrated effort. Slovenly and inaccurate work will not be tolerated. 
Good form in all written work, an element so essential in an efficient engineer, 
is insisted upon. An abundance of blackboard space affords an opportunity for 
classroom drill, which is of great importance in elementary mathematical 
training. Daily written quizzes, carefully corrected and returned, necessitate 
regularity in the preparation of lessons. Reliable results are of the utmost 
importance in all kinds of engineering. To that end the student is con- 
stantly urged to look into the reasonableness and the probable outcome of his 
solutions. He is trained into habits of painstaking and persevering effort, 
and that at all times he should be willing to carry long and tedious calcula- 
tions to successful conclusions. 

The work in mathematics is so exacting that a student who has not had 
a thorough preparatory training in Algebra, Plane and Solid Geometry, is 
greatly handicapped. Soon after entrance, students who are found deficient in 
any of their mathematical prerequisites are assigned to special classes, pro- 
vided by the school for that purpose, to make up such deficiencies. The 
courses, however, are so arranged that a delinquent student, mathematically 
inclined, may make up this extra work before the beginning of the Sophomore 
year. The student who desires to continue his mathematical study beyond the 
prescribed work will likely find among the elective courses, work adapted to 
his needs and tastes. 

The summer school affords an opportunity for conditioned, as well as 
prospective students not sufficiently prepared, to take such studies as they may 
need with a view to removing the deficiency. 






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0§ect)amcal (Engineering Department 



Claude S. Johnson 

Instructor in 
Mechanical Engineering 



B. S. in M. E. 1901— Purdue Uni- 
versity. 

Instructor in Mechanical En- 
gineering since 1912. 




CLAUDE S. JOHNSON, 
Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 



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Ilo Ivan Taylor 

t b n 

Instructor in Mechanical Engineering 

B. S. in C. E. 1910— Iowa State Col- 
lege. 

1912-15 — Instructor in 
Mathematics ; Instructor in 
Mechanical Engineer ing 
since September, 1913. 




ILO IVAN TAYLOR, 
Instructor in Mechanical Engineering 



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Ransom Smith Hawley 

Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

B. S. 1907— University of Mich- 
igan. 

1910-11 — Instructor. 
1911-12 — Assistant Professor 
of Mechanical Engineering. 
Professor of Mechanical En- 
neering since September, 
1912. 



RANSOM SMITH HAWLEY, 
Professor of Mechanical Engineering 



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It is generally recognized that the well-trained Mining Engineer must 
have a knowledge of Mechanical Engineering. He should be particularly 
familiar with that branch which might be termed Power Engineering. He 
need not be a designer of machinery but he should know something of the 
principles of design. He may never be called upon to fire a boiler or operate 
a hoist but it is quite essential that he be able to get the most out of the equip- 
ment under his supervision and reduce operating costs to a minimum. It is 
the intention of this department to acquaint the student with those branches 
of mechanical engineering which are closely associated with mining work. 
The Freshman year is devoted to a study of descriptive geometry and engineer- 
ing drawing. Lettering, freehand and mechanical drawing, mapping and 
topography are included in this course. This is intended to be a preparatory 
drawing course for all departments of the school. In the Sophomore year the 
work covers elementary machine design and mechanism. The Junior course 
includes boilers, steam and gas engines and auxiliary equipment of modern 
power plants. Compressed air and pumping machinery comprise a three-hour 
course which will be given in the first semester of the Senior year, and a labor- 
atory course in power plant testing will accompany it. These courses and 
Mine Power Plants, which comes in the second semester, are required of all 
students who elect the metal mining group but are not included in the sched- 
ule of those taking the metallurgy group. The first three years of work in 
this department are required of all students. All of the mechanical engineer- 
ing courses are, from the very nature of the work, practical, and are treated 
in°a practical manner, but the idea of training the student to think clearly, 
attack a problem logically, and to be painstaking in his methods is not lost 
sight of. 



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OBIectrical Department 



Wm. Jonathan Hazard 

t b n 

Professor of Electrical Engineering 



E. E. 1897— Colorado 

Mines. 



School of 



1897 — Instructor in Physics 
and Draughting. Since then 
has held various positions, 
becoming in 1910, Professor 
of Electrical Engineering. 
Associate, American Insti- 
tute of Electrical Engineers. 
Member National Electric 
Light Association; American 
Academy of Political and 
Social Science; Colorado 
Electric Club. 




WILLIAM JONATHAN HAZARD, 
Professor of Electrical Engineering 






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Ralph R. Knowles 

Instructor in Electrical Engineering 
and Physics 

E. E. 1899 — Worchester Polytech- 
nic Institute. 

With School of Mines since 
1911. 




RALPH R. KNOWLES, 

Instructor in 

Physics and Electrical Engineering. 



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A complete description of the electrical courses was written for the 
Prospector two years ago — so complete in fact that the editors of last year 
took warning and did not ask for any at all. We do not care to burden the 
innocent public with all of the shocking details of our story and so we shall 
confine it to the new elective Senior course being given on the personally con- 
ducted plan by Mr. Knowles. Those who join this class constitute a jury 
or a corps of doctors as the case may be, to pass upon the welfare of the 
electrical equipment about the school. 

One day a motor in the basement of Chemistry Building was caught 
smoking while on duty. This was a serious offense. How should it be pun- 
ished? Should the field be pushed gently over the knee of the magnetization 
curve and given something to remember, or should the motor be suspended? 
If suspended, should it be with a rope around its neck, or should it be given 
a leave of absence without pay? All these important questions had to be 
settled by the class. 

Our motor-generator had been showing a very mean disposition for sev- 
eral months. Whenever anyone was around, it would growl and mutter and 
if one placed his hand soothingly on the M-G's shoulder, it would tremble 
with rage and try to shake itself loose. It was feared that the machine was 
mentally unbalanced and was liable to do serious injury to itself and others 
at any time. This behavior was continued even when it was fed with the 
proper number of volts with the customary frequency and given the special 
brand of juice that it is supposed to thrive upon. The class undertook to 
determine the best treatment to restore it to health — and with great success. 
They gave it a thorough physical examination, turning it over and over, 
carefully weighing all the evidence and found that a vertebra was misplaced. 
A simple osteopathic treatment restored the symmetry of the spinal column and 
now the machine is quiet, well-behaved, and runs like a top. It always did 
run like a top but sometimes even tops get wobbly. 

One more example will be cited. One of the motors at the Testing Plant 
was grossly insulted a few weeks ago. He is a little fellow — only five horse- 
power at four hundred and forty volts, but he has spunk. Someone tried to 
make him run. They put a thirty ampere fuse and a piece of baling wire 
in the circuit and then to add injury to insult, left an old blown fuse in the 
third leg and left the switch closed. Our brave little motor did not budge 
an inch but it made him so hot that he literally sweat beads of compound and 
solder. I do not know? what he said to the intruder as there were no witnesses, 
but the bully is probably running yet for we have not caught him. The motor 
was "all in" after this experience, but he is now under the care of the Senior 
laboratory squad and before this goes to print he will be back at work as 
lively as ever. 

These examples go to show that this course is not cut and dried. It is 
not found in a text-book. Like life or a series circuit, "it is just one thing 
after another." 




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&- jhi prospector 



Citril (Engineering Department 



Harry Munson 
Showman 

t b n 

Assistant Professor of Civil Engi- 
neering 

E. M. 1910— Colorado School of 
Mines. 

1910-1912 — Instructor in 
Mathematics. Since 1912, 
Assistant Professor of Civil 
Engineering. 



HARRY MUNSON SHOWMAN 
Assistant Professor of Civil Engineer] 





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_ Probably one-third of the students make use of their knowledge of civil 
engineering immediately upon leaving school, long before they have an oppor- 

TZ r P d Tf 6 ° ther PrmdpleS they haVe kamed - A dassificTon 
of the graduates by occupation would show that many are engaged in civil 
rather than mining, engineering. To meet these conditions ft is necessarv 

engLLTng""' § ^ & Sh ° rt 0ne ' <* "^ in dvil and g™l 

Sophomores are introduced to the department by their courses in plane 

mens? 111 ? , ^ ^ * th ° WUgh g roundin g * the principled of 

mensuration and a fair amount of actual practice. After he ha finished the 
summer held practice, the student needs but little outside experience to make 
mm a comjDetent surveyor. 

* n ,J h j m ° St ^P 011 ^* and comprehensive course of the department is given 
to the Juniors under the short but ominous title of Mechanics. Here the 
student learns to apply his mathematics to elementary principles of structures 
and machines. With the course goes a series of experiments upon building 
materials m the Testing Laboratory which illustrate portions of the theory 
A small amount of time in the Senior year is devoted to Hydraulics and 
here also various principles are demonstrated by laboratory experiments Brief 
elective courses are offered in structural design, but many important subjects 
such as sanitation, road-building, dams and masonry construction, are treated 
hastily or even omitted. It is to be hoped that future arrangements of courses 
will permit a more extended treatment of the broad field of civil engineering 



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ptjpsics Department 





Louallen F. Miller 

2 A. E. 
Professor of Physics 

A.B., A.M. 1899 — Michigan Univer- 
sity. 

Instructor and Director Lab- 
oratory in Physics, 1901-07. 
Professor of Physics since 
1907. 

Member A. A. A. S. ; Amer- 
ican Electro-Chemical So- 
ciety; Colorado Scientific So- 
ciety. 



LOUALLEN FREDERICK MILLER, 
Professor of Physics. 

The equipment of the Department of Physics has been designed for the 
purpose of giving a very complete course in physics, especially adapted to 
engineering students. Emphasis is placed upon mechanics, heat, electricity 
and magnetism, the idea being to prepare a good foundation for such succeed- 
ing courses as Steam Engines and Boilers, Mechanics and Construction, Power 
Plant Testing, Electric Power Transmission, etc. Some elementary testing on 
small machines is given in determining the power, efficiency, and work done. 
It is desirable not to leave a chasm between this course and the succeeding 
courses which depend upon it. They should fit together with such perfection 
that the student should pass from one to the other with the utmost smoothness. 
Although the subject of light may not be emphasized quite as much as the 
others, the intention is to afford a good preparation in such principles of 
optics as are involved in crystallography and the construction of telescopes and 
microscopes. This course also lays the ground work for the one graduate 
course given in this department; namely, the courses Spectroscopy and Radio- 
activity. In connection with this work there is a complete spectroscopic equip- 
ment, including a fourteen-foot Littrow Spectrograph, with three systems of 
producing spectra; i. e., glass prisms and lens, quartz prisms and lens, and a 
grating. Also quadrant electrometers, field and laboratory electroscopes for 
making all sorts of radioactive determinations. In the first semester of the 
Senior year, the physical side of the Electro-Metallurgical course is given by 
this department, which includes electrical measurements in Electrolysis, High 
Temperature Work, Heats of Combinations, Conductivities, Radiation, Pyro- 
metrv and Electrical Furnace Efficiencies. It is intended that there shall be 
no more complete course of Electro-Metallurgy in any other institution than is 
offered by the Colorado School of Mines. 



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special Lectutes 



Frederick S. Titsworth 

Instructor in Mining Law. 

C. E. 1893— Princeton. 

E.M. 1895— Colorado School of 
Mines. 

A. B. 1904 — Denver University. 

Instructor in Mining Law 
since 1911. 



rHEDERICK S. TITSWORTH, 

C. B., K. M., A. B. 

Instructor in Mining Law. 

F. E. Shepard, President, The Denver Engineering Co. 

Recent Advances in Coarse Crushing. 
W. G. Swart, Manager, The American Zinc Ore Separating Co., Denver, 
Colorado. 

Modern Practice in Zinc Metallurgy. 

Electrostatic Ore Separation. 
J. L. Malm, Metallurgical Engineer, Denver, Colo. 

The Future of Chemical Engineering. 
Max W. Ball, U. S. Geological Survey, Washington, D. C. 

. The Organization and Work of the U. S. G. S. 
John W. Amesse, M. D., Denver, Colo. 

Diseases of the Tropics. 
C. M. Tennant, M. D., Denver, Colo. 

First Aid to the Injured. 
H. C. Parmelee, Western Ed.., Metallurgical and Chemical Engineer. 

The Value of Inspection Trips. 

The Complex Ore Problem. 
Phillip Argall, Consulting Metallurgist, Denver, Colo. 

The Flotation Process. 
A. M. Plumb, American Zinc Ore Separating Co., Denver, Colo. 

Dry Separation Processes. 
Wm. M. Davis, M. E., S. D., Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Theories of Coral Reefs. 

The History of the Front Ranges of the Rocky Mountains. 
P. M. McHugh, The Dorr Cyanide Machinery Co., Denver, Colo. 

Continuous Decantation. 









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Cfte CIS0S of 1914 



OFFICERS 

Russell P. Luke, President 
Adolph Bregmas, Vice-President 
Elmer R. Wilfley, Secretary 
Earle A. Strong, Treasurer 



Erwin F. Baker 
Henry A. Barney 

(C. E. Ohio Northern) 
W. Lloyd Beck 
Arnold A. Bowhay 
Glen A. Brandow 
Adolph Bregman 
Lionel Brooke 
Andre R. Brousseau 
Melvin Brugger 
Thomas W. Callahan 
Armistead F. Carper 
Yefah F. Chen 
Dah Chung Cheng 
Louis F. Clark 
Allen E. Craig 
Theodore H. M. Crampton 
Ernest R. Crutcher 
Miguel Espinosa 
Oscar A. Fischer 
Shu Foo 

Frederick W. Foote 
Bertram Grant 
Edward V. Graybeal 
Gail G. Grigsby 
George G. Griswold, Jr. 
LeRoy M. Gross 
Charles W. Hammen 
Robert R. Harper 
Wallace H. Hayden 
(A. B. Bowdoin) 



Merritt Hutton 

John B. Johnson 

Carl L. Klatt 

Karl L. Koelker 

Arthur Krohn 

Samuel Z. Krumm 

Ping Lee 

Rufus E. Litchfield 

Russell P. Luke 

Neill MacNeill 

Frederick S. McNicholas 

Percival S. Moses 

(Ph. B. Sheffield, Yale) 

James W. Pearce 

Frank L. Pittman 

Keith Roberts 

Albert W. Smith 
Ralph W. Smith 
Eugene G. Snedaker 
Earle A. Strong 
Lemuel K. Taylor 
Robert A. Thurstin 

(B. Sc. Kenyon College) 
Yu Lien Tsui 
John H. Turner 
Mark U. Watrous 
Charles N. Whitaker, Jr. 
Elmer R. Wilfley 
Joseph H. Woolf, Jr. 
Charles E. Wuensch 
W. T. Yang 
William G.'Zulch 






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Erwin F. Baker 

"Bake" 
Metallurgy 

Executive Committee, Y. M. C. A. 
Glee Club (2, 3, 4; Treasurer (4). 

Born August 9, 1890, at Denver, Colo. 
Graduated from the Manual Training High 
School, Denver, Colo. Home residence. 
Denver, Colo. 



Henry Albert Barney 

"H A." 

Metal Mining 

Born at Colombia, South America, Febru- 
ary 18, 1890. Graduated from the Amer- 
ican Collegiate Institute (C. E. Degree), 
1908. Home residence, Cali, Colombia, 
S. A. 




W. Lloyd Beck 

"Becky" 
Metal Mining 

Glee Club (3, 4). 

Treasurer Y. M. C. A. (3,4). 

Born at Denver, Colo., March 31, 1893. 
Graduated from the West Denver High 
School, Denver, Colo. Home residence, 
Denver, Colo. 



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Arnold A. Bowhay 

t b n 

"Angel," "Prof" 
Metallurgy 

Track (3). 
Glee Club (4). 
Senior Trip Committee. 

Born at Denver, Colo., December 29, 
1889. Graduated from the East Denver 
High School, Denver, Colo. Home resi- 
dence, Denver, Colo. 



Glen A. Brandow 

K 2, Trowel Club 

"Kate," "Smiley" 

Metallurgy 

Tennis (1). 

Business Manager 1913 Prospector. 
Assistant Manager Baseball (2), 
Manager Baseball (3). 

Born at Bristol Center, N. Y., October 
13, 1886. Graduated from Canandaigua s 
Academy, Canandaigua, N. Y. Home resi- ... .„ 
dence, Golden, Colo. 



Adolph Bregman 

"Breg," "Anarchist" 
Metallurgy 

Basketball (3, 4). 
Class Baseball (1, 2, 3, 4). 
Student Editor C. S. M. Magazine. 
Glee Club (3,4); Vice President (4). 
Vice President Class (4). 

Born in Russia, March 21, 1890. Grad- 
uated from the Ethical Culture High 
School, New York City. Home residence, 
Victor, Colo. 



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Lionel Brooke 

K 5, (») T, Trowel Club 
"Slocker" 
Metallurgy 

Class Baseball. 

Baseball (1, 2, 3). 

Class Football (2). 

Integral Club Committee (2). 

Cheer Leader (2). 

Born at Daggett, Cal., November 3, 1888. 
Graduated from the Polytechnic High 
School, Los Angeles, Cal. Home residence, 
Los Angeles, Cal. 



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Andre R. Brousseau 

2 N 

"Bruce'' 

Metallurgy 

Class Football (2). 
Class Track (2). 

Born at New Orleans, La., August 14, 
1891. Graduated from the Manual Train- 
ing High School, New Orleans, La. Pres- 
ent residence, New Orleans, La. 



Melvin Brugger 

b © n 

"Brug" 

Metal Mining 

Junior Prom Committee (3). 

Born at Columbus, Neb., March 12, 
1892. Graduated from the Columbus High 
School, Columbus, Neb. Home residence, 
Columbus, Neb. 



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Ernest Russel Crutcher 

2 A E, © T 

"Crutch," "Myrt" 

Metallurgy 

President Class (3). 

Smokeless Smoker Committee (3). 

Assistant Football Manager (3). 

Junior Smoker (3). 

Secretary Scientific Society (4). 

Vice-President Social Club (3). 

Born at Owensboro, Ky., June 8, 1891. 
Graduated from the Salida High School. 
Home residence, Salida, Colo. 



Miguel Espinosa 

"Espi" 
Metal Mining 



Born in Durango, Northern Mexico, July 
29, 1889. Attended University of Illinois. 
Home residence, Golden, Colo. 



Oscar A. Fischer 

5 n 

"Fish" 

Metallurgy 

Inter-fraternity Council (3). 
Chairman Senior Day Committee. 

Born at Chicago, 111., May 9, 1889. 
Graduated from Crane Manual Training 
High School, Chicago, 111. x\ttended Illi- 
nois University, Armour Institute, Val- 
paraiso University. Present residence, 
Chicago, 111. 






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Shu Foo 

"Shoe Full" 
Metallurgy 

Born at Chungking, Sze Chyan Prov- 
ince, China, August 29, 1890. Attended Fu 
Tan College, Shanghai, China, three years. 
Present residence, Chungking, China. 




Frederick William Foote 

ATA 

"Freddie" 

Metal Mining 

Born at Washingtonville, N. Y., Febru- 
ary 2, 1892. Graduated from Horace 
Mann High School, New York City, in 
1909. Attended Columbia University, 
1909-1912. Home residence, New York 
City. 



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Bertram Grant 

"Bert" 
Metallurgy 

Born at Norristown, Pa., November 22, 
1891.. Graduated from the Central Manual 
High School, Philadelphia, Pa. Present 
residence, Philadelphia, Pa. 






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Edward V. Graybeal 



S N, T 

"Ed" 

Metal Mining 

Junior Prom Committee (3). 

Born at Jefferson, X. C, March 28, 
1892. Graduated from the Pueblo High 
School, Pueblo, Colo. Home residence, 
DeBeque, Colo. 



Gail G. Grigsby 

"Grig'' 
Metal Mining 

Class Football (2). 
Glee Club (3, 4). 

Born at Lena, 111., March 2, 1893. Grad- 
uated from North Denver High School, 
Denver. Colo. Home residence, Denver, 
Colo. 



George G. Griswold, Jr. 



"Gris" 

Metallurgy 

Assistant Business Manager, Propector, 
1913. 

Born at Denver, Colo., Augut 19, 1890. 
Graduated from Salida High School, 
Salida, Colo. Present residence, Golden, 

Colo. 



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Leroy Maurice Gross 



ATA 

"Fuzzy/' "Rabbit" 
Metal Mining 

Art Editor Prospector ( 4 ) . 
Senior Photo Committee. 

Born in New York City, November 9, 
1890. Graduated from University High 
School in 1908. Attended Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1909-12. Home residence, New 
York City. 



Charles W. Hammen 

K ?, T b n 

"Buck" 
Mining Geologv 

Tennis (1 ) . 
Track (1, 3). 

Born at Chicago, 111., February 16, 1889. 
Graduated from the Northwest Division 
High School, Chicago, 111. Home resi- 
dence, Chicago, 111. 



Robert R. Harper 

3 A E 

"Dutch" 

Metallurgy 

Class Football (1). 
Football (2, 3, 4). 
Track (1, 2, 3). 
Scientific Societv. 
Y. M. C. A. Board (3). 

Born at Des Moines, Iowa, July 29, 
1891. Graduated from the West Des 
Moines High School, Des Moines, Iowa. 
Present residence, Des Moines, Iowa. 






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Samuel Z. Krumm 

"Zeke" 

Metallurgy 

Born April 1, 1890, at Columbus, Ohio. 
Graduated from Columbus High School, 
Columbus, Ohio. Attended Ohio State 
University. Present residence, Columbus., 

Ohio. 



Ping Lee 

Metallurgy 



Born at Wusih, China, 
Attended College of Pekiru 
dence, Wusih, China. 



October, 1890. 
. Present resi- 



Rufus E. Litchfield 

5 A E, T 
"Rufe," "Litch" 

Metal Mining 



Baseball (2). 

Basketball (1, 2, 3, 4), Captain (2), 

Manager. (4). 
Inter-fraternitv Council. 
Glee Club (2). 

Born November 13, 1889, at Fitchburg, 
Mass. Graduated from Phillips- Andover, 
Mass. Present residence, Fitchburg, Mass. 



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Neil M. McNeill 

2 N 

"Mack.'' "Whiter" 

Metallurgy 

Track (2, 3), Captain 1911. 
Junior Smoker Committee, 1913. 

Born October 12, 1889, at LaMoffle, 
111 Graduated from Crane High School, 
Chicago, 111. Present residence, Plum 
Push, Colo. 



Frederick S. McNicholas 

"Butch" 

Metallurgy 

Scientific Society President (4). 

Born at Durango, Colo., May 30, 1888. 
Graduated from the Durango High School, 
Durango, Colo. Present residence, Durango. 
Colo. 



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Percival Sneed Moses 



K 2, T B n, Trowel Club 
"Put," "Perk" 
Metal Mining 

Freshman Football, 1912. 
Junior Smoker Committee (3). 
Football (4). 

Born June 11, 1891, at Augusta, Ga. 
Graduated from the Savannah Preparatory 
School in 1905. Graduated from Law- 
renceville School in 1908. Graduated 
from Sheffield Scientific School cf Yale 
(Ph. B.), 1912. Home residence, Sav- 
annah, Ga. 



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James W. Pearce 
b ® n, © t 

"Doc," "Bill" 
Metal Mining 

Class Football (2). 

Football (2, 3, 4). 

Class Secretary (3). 

Freshman Ball Committee (1). 

Smokeless Smoker Committee (1, 3). 

Social Club (3). 

Glee Club (4). 

Born at Rocky Ford, Colo., April 22, 
1892. Graduated from the La Junta High 
School, La Junta, Colo. Attended the Uni- 
versity of Colorado one year. Present res- 
idence, Denver, Colo. 



Frank L. Pittman 

Trowel Club 
"Pitt" 

Metallurgy 

Class Football (1). 
Class Treasurer (1, 3). 
Class President (2). 
Social Committee (2). 

Born at Kansas City, Kansas, August 4, 
1889. Graduated from the Tacoma High 
School, Tacoma, Wash. Present residence, 
Tacoma, Wash. 









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"Hank," "Bobs" 
Metallurgy 

Class Track (1, 2, 3). 
Class Basketball (1, 2, 3). 
Social Club (4). 

Born at Chicago, 111., August 1, 1889. 
Graduated from the New Trier High School, 
Winnetka, 111. Present residence, Wilmette, 
111. 



Albert W. Smith 

2 A E, T B n 

"Smithy," "A. W." 
Metallurgy 

Scientific Society. 

Born at Pueblo, Colo., May 27, 1891. 
Graduated from the Central High School, 
Pueblo, Colo. Home residence, Pueblo, 
Colo. 



Ralph W. Smith 

B © n, T B n, Trowel Club 

"Smitty" 

Metal Mining 

Art Editor, Prospector, 1913. 
Glee Club (3, 4). 

Born at Denver, Colo., October 12, 1891. 
Graduated from the Manual Training High 
School, Denver, Colorado. Present resi- 
dence, Denver, Colo. 



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Mark U. Watrous 

S. P. A. 
"Wattie" 

Metal Mining 

Born at Windsor, N. Y., February 14, 
1891. Graduated from the Monte Vista 
High School, Monte Vista, Colo. Present 
residence, Monte Vista, Colo. 



Charles N. Whittaker, Jr. 

K 2, T B IT, Trowel Club 

"Whit" 

Metal Mining 
Social Club ( 1 ) . 
Class Treasurer (2). 
Inter-fraternity Council. 
Editor-in-Chief, Prospector, 1913. 

Born at Marion, Kansas, May 9, 1889. 
Graduated from the Monrovia High School, 
Monrovia, Cal. Present residence, Denver, 
Colo. 



Elmer R. Wilfley 

Ben, e t 

"Zeph" 
Metallurgy 

Scientific Society Board (3). 
Assistant Business Manager, Prospector, 
1915. 

Born at Denver, Colo., January 15, 1891. 
Graduated from the East Denver High 
School, Denver, Colo. Present residence, 
Denver, Colo. 



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Joe H. Woolf, Jr. 

2 N, © T 

"Tuffy - " 

Metal Mining 

Football (2, 5, 4). 

Basketball (1, 2, 3), Captain 1910. 

Class Track. 

Class Baseball. 

Born at Greeley, Colo., December 6, 
1890. Graduated from the Greeley High 
School, Greeley, Colo. Present residence, 
Greeley, Colo. 







Charles Erb Wuensch 

t b n 

"Herpi" 
Mining Geology 

Class Football (1, 2), Captain 1910. 

Football (2, 3, 4). 

Track (1, 2, 3 4), Captain 1913. 

Class Track (1, 2, 3). 

Freshman Ball Committee. 

Secretary Y. M. C. A. 

Born March 20, 1892, at Newark, X. J. 
Graduated from the Barringer High School, 
Newark, N. J. Present residence, Newark. 
N.J. 



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W. T. Yang 

Mining Geology 

Born at Chentu, China, January 3, 1890. 
Attended Fu-tan College. Present residence, 
Chengtu China. 



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William G. Zulch 

B © n, Trowel Club 

"Gussie" 

Mining Geology 

Class Football (1). 

Junior Prom Committee (3). 

Glee Club (4). 

Born at Boulder, Colo., August 13, 1890. 
Graduated from the North Denver High 
School, Denver, Colo. Home residence. 
Denver, Colo. 



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Yefah F. Chen 

Metal Mining 



Born at Shanghai, China, January 11, 
1892. Attended St. John's University. 
Home residence, Shanghai, China. 



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Thomas T. Gow 

"Tom'' 



Born at Tungchew, Shantung, China. 
Attended Shantung Union College. Present 
residence, Tungchew, China. 



Samuel Eugene Watson 

"Watty" 

Baseball (1, 2, 3, 4), Captain 1911. 

Born at Clarksville, Texas, April 15, 
1891. Graduated from the Clarksville 
High School, Clarkksville, Texas. Present 
residence, Clarksville, Texas. 



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Mearle William Wilkinson 

2 A E 

"Wilk" 

Junior Prom Committee (3). 

Born at Dallas, Texas, September 12. 
1890. Graduated from the Manual Train- 
ing High School, Denver, Colo. Present 
residence, Denver, Colo. 



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CJ)e Class of 1915 



OFFICERS 

B. C. Essig President 

James Ord Vice-President 

Rex P. Oliveros Secretary 

L. Adair Stewart Treasurer 



CLASS ROLL 



Raymond B. Anderson 
Alpheus B. Beall 
Alfred H. Bebee 
Ulysses H. Berthier 
Max Boehmer, Jr. 
Albert E. Bolam 
Jay J. Burns 
Samuel J. Burris 
Daniel W. Butner 
Monroe O. Carlson 
Arthur C. H. Dammann 
Gilmore S. Davis 
Horace H. De Laittre 
David C. Dodge, Jr. 
Alfred F. Duggleby 
Benjamin C. Essig 
Wells A. Franklin 
A. Ff. Graham 
Hugo C. Grauting 
John H. Greenwood 
Charles F. Haselton 
F. Eugene Heatley 
Dale D. Hinman 
Henrv W. Kaanta 



Arthur L. Lee 
Alfred C. Levis 
Hugh S. McKnight 
Rex P. Oliveros 
Van Cleave A. Olson 
James Ord 
Walter C. Page 
Charles A. Rogers 
Breese Rosette 
John R. Shanley, Jr. 
William W. Simon 
L. Adair Stewart 
William S. Stringham 
Merwyn E. Swigart 
John N. Teets 
Clarence F. Fodd 
Hsaing Tsai 
Parks B. Van Dolah 
Glen H. Van Dorp 
Adolph S. Walter 
Simon F. Weller 
Leonard L. White 
Fletcher H. Wood 



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Ray B. Anderson 

"Andy" "Ray" 
Metal Mining 

Freshman Football. 

Born October 17, 1891, at Brooklyn. 
N. Y. Attended Brooklyn Polytechnical 
Preparatory School. Graduated from 
Barnard School. Home residence, Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 



"Andy" first saw light, possibly a little aberrated, in the wilds of Brooklyn, amidst 
the terrible dangers of the ferocious trolley-car, the smoking baby carriage, and the 
National League team. He has survived them all, but the continual effort for self pre- 
servation has left him rather short in stature, with a neck out of all proportion. "Ray" 
has now developed into a wild and wooly Westerner— note the Stetson and the swaggering 
walk. However, "Andy" is right there when it comes to upholding the honor of the class 
by cane spreeirg and football. 




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Alpheus Benjamin Beall, Jr. 

b n 

"Abie" 
Metal Mining 

Basketball (1, 2, 3), Captain (3). 

Tennis (1). 

Class Representative Integral Club Board. 

Born September 26, 1893, at Sioux City, 
Iowa. Attended Sioux City High School 
and St. John's Military Academy. Home 
residence, Sioux City, Iowa. 



"A. E's" quiet ways and unaffected manner make him a favorite with all who know 
him. "lis said that he once had a girl, but she moved away, and he has never fallen 
since. His favorite roles are as a "rough stuff' player in the gentle game of basketball, 
and as a sightseer in Pueblo and Greeley. He is very staid and dignified, in fact, his 
usual pose is with his nose up in the air. However, Alpheus is just as loyal as the next one 
and has repeatedly shown that he will give all he has for the "silver and the blue." 






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Alfred Henry Bebee 



S. P. A. 

"Beeb." "B 2 " 

Metallurgy 

' Junior Smoker Committee. 
Assistant Manager, Baseball (2). 
Manager Baseball (.5). 

Born in Denver, Colo., February ,5, 1891. 
Graduated from the Cripple Creek High 
School in 1910. Home residence, Cripple 
Creek, Colo. 



Beeb since coming to Golden, has cultivated the habit of walking the floor and 
worrying about his studies. But he always gets away with them, even making 100 in a 
Mechanics final, which was disastrous for him, as he received several good "wrinklings" 
or it. Bebee is quite an artist on the piano. There is one objection to his plavin» 
however which is, that his repertoire is so limited, consisting of the one tune, "School 
l)ays. I he ladies are all crazy about "Al," even calling him "Dearie," but he runs awav 
from them around here, apparently being very bashful. But there is a girl in the Springs 
who could tell us otherwise. "Beeb" is the originator and only one'" who can do the 
Vnpple Lreek Glide. Just watch him going down the street some day. 



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Ulysses Henry Berthier 

S. P. A. 

"Bertha," "Teddy" 

Metallurgy 

Class Editor, Alumni Magazine. (1, 2). 
Art Editor (Elect), Prospector. 

Born in Mexico City, Mexico, August 23. 
1893. Graduated from Spring Hill College 
in 1911. 




Bertha came here as a young and unsophisticated Freshman, who didn't know the 
difference between a pretzel and a "sinker," but he has since developed in the knowledge 
of all things earthly. When he first "hit" town it was said of him, that he looked Dutch 
had a French name, and spoke Spanish, all of which is true. There is a girl in New 
Orleans— but that is a story that doesn't belong here. "Bertha" left us to go down to 
Mexico to join his confederate Mexican athletes and quiet the revolutionists, but he will 
be back next year. 






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Max Boehmer, Jr. 

"Max" 
Metallurgy 

Born at Leadville, Colo., October 20, 
1891. Graduated from East Denver High 
School in 1909. Attended Amherst one 
year. Home residence, Denver, Colo. 

5 fax's distinguishing characteristic is his laugh. 

If you should hear a noise suggesting fiendish 

glee from "Faust," you will know who the owner 

is. Besides being the hero and expert witness of 

an automobile accident, Max has made a name 

for himself in the Physics lectures, where he has frequently startled us by remarkable 

questions and by giving new fundamental laws, upsetting all preconceived ideas. However, 

such is the spirit that goes into the making of "Tau Betes." 





Albert Earl Bolam 

Trowel Club 

"Fat" 
Metal Mining 

Bom August 9, 1891, at Aspen, Colo. 
Graduated from the Reno High School, 
Reno, Nevada. Home residence, Los 
Angeles, Cal. 

"Fat" is an easy going chap, who delights in 
asking questions. One would almost think he 
were from Missouri, for he surely has to be shown. 
Somewhere in Nevada, Bolam owns a mine, and 
it is surely "some" mine, containing all sorts of 
minerals and formations, with an incline that doubles back upon itself, in fact it is so 
crooked that the skip has to have wheels on the side, bottom and even on the top. Having 
lived in Reno for a number of years, Bolam is well acquainted with the fancy methods of 
getting divorces, hence he feels safe in having a "happy home" in Boulder. 



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Jay Joseph Burns 

K 2, © T 

"Bobbie" 

Metallurgy 

Freshman Football. 

Basketball (1). 

Freshman Ball Committee. 

Athletic Board. 

Smokeless Smoker Committee. 

Athletic Editor, Prospector (resigned). 

Born at Franklin, Pa., in 1892. Grad- 
uated from the Franklin High School, 
Franklin, Pa. Home residence, Franklin, 
Pennsylvania. 



"Bobbie" has greatly aided scientific investigation by proving that even the stolid 
Pennsylvania Dutch or Scotch (as the case may be) are not wholly immune from the 
ravages of the deadly Hookworm. "Bobbie" used to be one of our infant athletic 
prodigies, but he now devotes his entire attention to indoor sports. Though short in 
stature, Burns is long on Bull, and will soon own a mine or two. 




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Samuel J. Burris, Jr. 

2 N, ® T 

"Sammy," Penny-pecker" 

Metallurgy 

Freshman Football. 
Football (2, 3). 
Baseball (1, 2), Captain (3). 
Athletic Representative (2). 
Athletic Board (3). 

Born in Pueblo, Colo., July 7, 1893. 
Graduated from the Pueblo Centennial 
High School in 1911. 



"Sammy" is small but 100 per cent effiicient, as can be testified by numerous 
opponents on the gridiron, for when once "Sammy" starts, he is going to get there. 
He learned the game at the Centennial High School of Pueblo, which accounts for 
his actions. In baseball "Sammy" wields the "willow" with any of the big leaguers. 
His favorite study is Mine Surveying and he would rather go hungry than miss a 
lecture in this subject. Business is his real major, however, and if anything gets by 
him without an argument, it is because it is an axiom. 













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Daniel Worth Butner 

5 A E, T B n 

"Dan," "But" 
Metallurgy 

Freshman Ball Committee. 
Mountain and Plain Festival Commit- 
tee (2). 
Cheer Leader (3). 
Athletic Historian (1, 2, 3). 

Born at Salem, N. C, December 8, 1890. 
Graduated from Colorado Springs High 
School, 1911. Present residence, Colorado 
Springs, Colo. 

"But" is the wit of the class, which probably accounts for his universal popularity. 
In Denver circles he is known by his vociferous cheer leading. A man of varied 
accomplishments, he has success with anything he undertakes. This is attested by his 
remarkable ability as a singer — when he has a bucket along, in which to carry the tune. 
He is also thinking of joining the Golden Fire Brigade, for one of his hobbies is pulling 
the hose cart across the creek. Dan's forte, however, is with the ladies, for the one 
who does not fall before his Chesterfieldian manner still remains to be found. In fact, 
his experiences since entering school lead us to believe that he is really operating a 
matrimony bureau. In spite of all this, "Dan" is a very public-spirited individual and 
is ever ready to do something for his class. 



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Monroe O. Carlson 

"Carl" 
Metal Mining 

Born October 14, 1893, at Denver, Colo. 
Graduated from South Denver High School 
in 1911. Attended Denver University one 
vear. Home residence, Denver, Colo. 



The worst thing that can be said of "Carl" is 
that he went to D. U. for a whole year, but he 
saw his error and explains it by saying that he 
just stopped off there on his way to Golden. 
"Carl" is often seen but seldom heard, and if he 
He declares that he is an obscure man, and refuses 




has a case, that, too, is on the quiet. 

to give us details of his past, hence we must take him just as he is. 






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Arthur C. H. Dammann 



k a n 

"Blondy," "Birdseye" 
Metallurgy 

Tennis Squad (2). 

Glee Club (3). 

Class Editor Alumni Magazine (3). 

Born October 21, 1889, at Chicago, 111. 
Attended Crane Tech. Graduated from the 
Lewis Institute in 1908. Home residence, 
Chicago, 111. 



"Vaseline" is the question mark of the school. He has appointed himself as chief 
adviser of Dr Chauvenet and Prof. Chedsey. His bump of research is enormous, as 
was evidenced by the numerous questions he asked on the Pueblo trip, and by his 
remarkable scientific blowpipe extraction of lead from a lead pencil. Incidental y the 
former earned him a severe reprimand from the class in the form of a '•wrinkling. 
However Dammann's popularity is amazing, for on this same trip he had everything 
coming his way, especially at meals, and was paged so much that there was a continuous 
"Call for Mr. Birdseye." 





Gilmore S. Davis 

2 A E, ® T 

"Gillie" 

Metallurgy 

Track (1, 2). 

Cheer Leader (2, 3). 

Glee Club (2). 

Social Club Committee (2, 3). 

Freshman Ball Committee. 

Junior Prom Committee. 

Born at Trinidad, Colo., November 24, 
1889. Graduated Phillips Andover, 1910. 
Present residence, Trinidad, Colo. 

Gillie is a joyo/s spirit who can expatiate authoritatively on the unrivaled merits 
of Trinidad — and Denver. His sociable disposition makes hm a favorite among the 
members of the faculty, with whom he is a swear-word. His greatest sphere of useful- 
ness, however, is on the Track. As a steeplechaser Gillie is "there," and if he occasion- 
ally splinters a hurdle it simply goes to show what he is made of. 



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Horace H. DeLaittre 

ATA, T 

"Red," "Hoddie" 

Metal Mining 

Football (1, 2, 3), Captain (3). 
All Rocky Mountain Tackle (2, 3). 
Prospector Staff (3). 

Born February 21, 1891, at Minneapolis, 
Minn. Graduated from the North High 
School, Minneapolis. Home residence, 
Minneapolis, Minn. 



Because of "Hoddie's" personal charms, a red pompadour, and a very contagious 
smile, the fair sex call him "the lovable boy." In spite of these charms, he captained 
one of the best football teams that ever representd this school, and his fighting ability 
has been recognized by his being placed on two All Rocky Mountain teams. However, 
since football season "Red" has taken on much weight. How much do you weigh, "Red" ? 



David C. Dodge 

c ® n, ® t 

"Dave" 
Metal Mining 

Baseball (2). 

President Freshman Class, 1911. 

Freshman Basketball. 

Born at Denver, Colo., August 8, 1890. 
Graduated from Manual Training High 
School, Denver, Colo., in 1910. Home res- 
idence, Denver, .Colo. 



"Dave" is some "big league stuff," especially when it comes to breaking up games 
in the last inning by a little home run. Although he is not a raving beauty, Dodge 
creates quite a sensation with the passing crowds by his winning German smile and 
general amiability. The latter quality makes him a popular man and he has everybody 
catering to him, even the faculty. 




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Alfred F. Duggleby 

2 A E, T B n 

"Dug," "Seawater," "Wildcat" 
Metal Mining 

Vice-President of Class (1, 2). 

Freshman Football. 

Glee Club (3). 

Freshman Basketball. 

Freshman Ball Committee. 

Football (3), All Rocky Mountain Guard. 

Track (1, 2). 

Geology Club President (3). 

Editor-in-Chief The Prospector. 

Junior Quartet. 

Born at Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. 
Graduated from Davenport High School. 
Davenport, Iowa. Present residence, Daven- 
port, Iowa. 

"Dug" comes more or less directly, from the Australian bush, but is quite intelligent 
in spite of his origin. A typical Englishman, he is a light shell pink in color. He 
shaves once a month as a matter of form and to keep that pesky whisker off his chin. 
"Seawater'' stoutly maintains that it is rank paganism to worship at the shrine of a 
mortal goddess, but when he does occasionally step into the social arena, we notice that 
other contestants may as well retire. If there is any school activity that Spike hasn't had 
a finger in. it must be that he hasn't heard of it. 

Benjamin C. Essig 

K 5, ® T 

"Ben," "Scissor-bill" 

Metal Mining 

Freshman Ball Committee. 
Social Club. 
Freshman Football. 
Smokeless Smoker ( 2 ) . 
Assistant Manager Football, 1913. 
Athletic Board, 1913. 
Junior Prom Committee. 
President Junior Class. 

Born February 5, 1891, at Weston, Mich. 
Attended Michigan Agricultural College. 
Present residence, Golden, Colo. 

Off and on for a number of years, "Ben" has been talking the faculty out of 
credit hours. Although battling against such a tremendous handicap as having been 
born in Owosso, the land of a single taxicab, he has done wonders in becoming accus- 
tomed to city ways. "Ben" says he can understand almost anything, with the exception 
of the reason for putting salt on pretzels. His favorite pastime is politics;' very 
probably his name will soon appear on the Tammany roster. 




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Wells A. Franklin 

2 A E 

"Frank" 
Metallurgy 

Class Basketball (1). 

Social Club (1, 2). 

Freshman Ball Committee. 

Y. M. C. A. Executive Committee. 

Assistant Manager Track and Basketball 

(2). 
Manager Track and Basketball (3). 

Born in Rochester, N. Y. Graduated 
from West Rochester High School, Roches- 
ter, X. Y., 1911. Present residence, Den- 
ver, Colo. 



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Frank is a genius of considerable ability, but he has a marvelously agile side-step 
when there is any work around. He is no longer following the pursuit of happiness and a 
mining education in our midst, the first having flown hence and the second having be- 
come undesirable. Still we think that the school may depend on "Frank" for a kindly 
interest and encouragement. 



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Allan H. Graham 

$ r a 

"Tessie" 
Metallurgy 

Born at Ottawa, Ohio, 1888. Attended 
Ohio Wesleyan University. Home resi- 
dence, Ottawa, Ohio. 

"Tessie" has joined us from Ohio Wesleyan 
University, so that he stands amongst us with a 
superior knowledge of all things heavenly, and 
incidentally, earthly. Tess' favorite haunt" is the 

drawing lab, and from all reports he is some draftsman, especially when it comes to 

designing steam boilers. 



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Hugo G. Grauting 

"Dutch," "Checkers" 
Metallurgy 



Born in Pueblo, Colo., September 25, 
1893. Graduated from the Florence High 
School, Florence, Colo. Home residence, 
Florence, Colo. 



Did you ever sec a checkerboard cap going 
down the street? Well, that's "Dutch." Or if 
you hear anyone saying, "Say, did you get that 
Calc?" you may know for sure it is "Dutch." 
Poor Grauting had hard luck in his Freshman year as far as getting "wrinkled" serai- 
hourly was concerned, but he has since graduated into a more dignified sphere and can 
now say, "I should worry." 

The only objection we have to "Checkers" is the odor of camphor balls in his 
clothes. 



John Harold Greenwood 

b © n, t b n 

"Greeny" 
Metal Mining 

Secretary Class (1). 

Born at Salt Lake City, June 2, 1892. 
Graduated from the Salt Lake City High 
School in 1910. Home residence, Salt Lake 
City, Utah. 



"Greeny" conies to us from the land of the Mormons, which accounts for his 
polygamous instincts and saintly appearance. His specialty is athletics, all branches. 
John says that he does this for the training it involves, especially for track meets. As 
a Welsh rarebit artist "Greeny" is known far and wide, which fact, added to his prowness 
as a story teller and promoter of "sessions," makes him a first-class entertainer. 








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Charles F. Haselton 

Trowel Club 

"Hazel" 
Metallurgy 

Born at Janesville, Wis., February 24, 
1891. Graduated from Oak Park High 
School, Oak Park, 111. Home residence, 
River Forest, 111. 

"Hazel'' is an all-around man, both mentally 
and physically. 'Tis said that in his Freshman 
year, study was incidental, as he spent most of 
his time in the quest of sociological problems. 
Since then, however, "Fat" has gradually emerged from this obscurity to his recent status 
as a social lion. However, now he haunts the Bachelors' Club, for a Senior appeared 
upon the scene. Our advice to "Hazel" is to stick to it, as "Faint heart ne'er won 
Fair Lady !" 



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F, Eugene Heatley 

"Gene,'' "Angel Face'' 
Metallurgy 

Football Squad (2, 3). 

Glee Club (2, 3), President (3). 

Born February 12, 1890, in Golden, 
Colo. Graduated in 1910 from the 
Manual Training High School, Denver, 
Colo. Home residence, Denver, Colo. 






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"Gene" is a modest, unassuming youth, with the voice and shy glances of a maiden. 
However, "tis said that in Denver, where "Gene" has a lady friend who takes him to the 
dances, he presents a somewhat different aspect. Although "Hygiene" is one of the 
regulars on the "Sunday Midnight Special," he tends strictly to business while in Golden. 
Some day we expect to hear great things of him. 




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Dale Durkee Hinman 

b © n, t b n 

"Heinie" 
Metal Mining 

Freshman Football Captain. 
Track Squad (1). 
Football (2, 3). 
Basketball (1, 2, 3). 
Freshman Ball Committee. 
Athletic Editor, Prospector (3). 

Born at Cherokee, Iowa, November 4, 
1891. Graduated from the Delta High 
School, Delta, Colo. Home residence, 
Austin, Colo. 

"Heinie" is the original Mother Jones, being a born agitator, and enjoying nothing 
more than a rough-house. His fighting spirit earned him a place on both the football 
and basketball teams. "Heinie's" title of "Hero," coupled with his love of all the fair 
sex, makes him a popular social favorite, especially at Boulder. Dale is a good student 
and still finds plenty of time for "solo," and kindred pursuits. 



Henry W. Kaanta 

"Pop" 
Metallurgy 

Athletic Editor, School of Mines Maga- 
zine (3). 
Junior Prom Committee. 

Born May 2, 1889, at Rock Springs, 
Wyo. Graduated from the Telluride High 
School, Telluride, Colo. Home residence, 
Golden, Colo. 



"Henry" is the only one of the class who does not believe in "single blessedness." 
When he is trying to study and the kid bothers him, "Pop" has devised a scheme 
whereby to keep "sonny" busy. He just puts some molasses on the child's fingers and 
gives him a feather. According to reports, it works fine, if the Mrs. is not around. 
Kaanta's standard excuse, made at home, when he wants to go to Denver, is that he 
has to buy a cubic centimeter. He has also found it necessary to make a special trip 
to the city to get a dozen Iron Pyrites. Henry is not afraid to tell the Profs what 
he thinks of their courses, and due to this, he has found it hard to get through some 
of them. 





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Arthur L. Lee 

"Ping" 

Metallurgy 

Class Track (1, 2, 3). 

Track (2). 

Junior Smoker Committee, 1913. 

Born December 30, 1891. Graduated 
from the Greek}' High School in 1910. 
Home residence, Milliken, Colo. 



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Lee, his camera and his "M" sweater, are familiar sights around Golden, as they 
are always seen in company with each other. Every Spring "Ping" gets out and gambols 
around the track, and incidentally displays his manly beauty to admiring eyes. After 
specializing in Physics for two years until it became tiresome, "Ping" has taken up 
another hobby, that of originating new dances. We have not heard of the New York 
society people dancing them yet. however. Lee would like to get his head shaved like 
the rest of the "Black Hand Bunch," but ruefully says that his wife won't let him. 




Hugh S. McKnight 

K A, T, T B II 

"Hughie," "Mac" 

Mining 

Football (1, 2, 3), Captain-elect, 1914. 
Baseball Squad (2). 

Born at Dallas, Texas, November 25, 
1891. Graduated St. Matthew's School, 
1909. Attended Sewanee University two 
years. Present residence, Dallas, Texas. 



Hughie is a nice, well-behaved boy who will bite you on the ear without provocation. 
He is probably the best ear biter now living. Besides that, he is an expert Mineralogist, 
being able to identify "agonised" wood on sight. His main hobby is speechmaking and 
he looks forward to the next season's football speeches with — a cold sweat. Mac thinks 
he can come nearer to saving the country on the gridiron than on the rostrum. In any 
case we like his game, and, like everybody else, we like Mac. 



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Alfred C. Levis 




K 5 
"Levi' 
Metal 



Born February 14, 1894, at Baltimore, 
Md. Graduated from Baltimore Polytech- 
nic Institute. Home residence, Baltimore, 
Maryland. 

"Soloman" walked into Golden with a trunk- 
check and a thirst for knowledge. If it were 
, . . not for Machine Design no doubt "Levi" would 

have a good fame but with the aid of wet towels and the midnight oil, there is still hopes 
for him getting through the school. 






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Rex Phillipps Oliveros 




K 2 
"Rex" 

Metal Mining 

Freshman Football. 
Social Club. 

Freshman Ball Committee. 
Assistant Athletic Editor, C. S. M. Maga- 
zine. 
Class Secretary (2, 3). 
Junior Prom Committee. 

Born December 25, 1891, at Savannah, 
Georgia. Attended Georgia Tech., and 
Alabama Polytech Institute. Home resi- 
dence, Savannah, Ga. 

"Rex," our Southern beauty, whose "cute Southern accent" has won him many 
admirers among the ladies, is a great advocate of the gentle art of fussing. In this con- 
nection "Rex" still maintains that her "Papa" was entirely wrong when he kicked 
him out at 9 p. m. This so mortified Oliveros that he decided to "take the veil," 
getting his head shaved and subsisting on "crackers with the cramps." However, he 
has now recovered and once more his bright, cheery smile brings sunshine into our' life 
on the campus. 



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Van Cleave A. Olson 



S. P. A. 

"Olie" 
Metal Mining 

Football Squad (2). 

Football (3). 

Chairman Junior Smoker Committee. 

Born in Alexandria, Minn., August 4, 
1894. Graduated from Alexandria High 
School in 1911. 



The '■Terrible Swede" comes from a farm in Minnesota. He says he doesn't like 
farming as there is too much work attached to it. There is a prevalent report that he 
has a temper but he never shows it (as it is always lost). Olie has a heart that is 
almost as big as his appetite, and when it comes to jokes, say, he is "some jokester. 
His two favorite jokes which he never tires of telling, are "Fighting? Oh. that s nice. 
and "Abie, did you whistle?" 

The Swede is a Bull Mooser. too. It is feared that he and Teddy are the last of 
the species. If you wish to know anything about. Omaha, ask Olie. 



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James Ord 

S. P. A. 
"Jim" 

Metal Mining 

Vice-President of Class (3). 

Athletic Board (3). 

Junior Smoker Committee (3). 

Born at Fort Missoula, Montana, Novem- 
ber 16, 1890. Graduated in 1911 from 
McKinley Manual Training School, Wash- 
ington, D. C. Home residence, Chevy 
Chase, Maryland. 



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Jimmy is a little quiet, perhaps, but he is right there when he is needed. "Way out 
by the smelter, one dark night, he captured, single-handed, one of those desperate Boulder 
Goat Hunters and brought him in to the gang. Jim is a "natural born" musician, and 
can make music on anything from a piano to a dishpan. He says he prefers clog dancing 
to ragging, but just the same, at the Frosh Ball he was right there in full dress without 
a vest. 




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Walter Chatfield Page 

2 n 

"Chatfield" 
Metallurgy 

Born October 7, 1891, at Syracuse, Neb. 
Graduated from the Grand Junction High 
School in 1910. Home residence, Grand 
Junction, Colo. 

Early in his life, "Chatfield" was transplanted 
from the barren wastes of Nebraska to the green 
orchards of Grand Junction, which probably 
accounts for his undying faith in frequent 
"Irrigation" at all seasons of the year. After 
made the most serious mistake of his life, which 
. namely that of attending Boulder. Fortunately he 
realized his error and eventually entered Mines. Page is a man of leisure, and believing 
in the versatility of man, he gives his studies, the Gym, and Denver equal portions of 
his time. In the "good old days*' Walt explored all the mysteries of the clay pits, so 
that now he is an authority on the geology of that portion of Golden. Page is also an 
authority on Methods of Descending from Mt. Lookout under difficulties. 



graduating from High School, "Chat" 
he has just succeeded in living down, 




Charles Arthur Rogers 



HE 

"Art" 

Metal Mining 

.Born at Salida, Colo., October 26, 1892. 
Graduated from East Denver High School, 
Denver, Colo. Home address, Salida, Colo. 

"Art" is the boy who makes the Old Lady 
Sphinx jealous by his power to keep "Alum." In 
fact he is so quiet that it makes everybody think 
that he has one of those murky past records which 
are discussed by "disinterested" parties in whis- 
pers. Not so ; for Arthur can and will talk at great length when sufficiently aroused. 
Furthermore, he's a wise chap, for who ever saw such luxuriant curls as he has cover a 
vacuum. One might marvel that such a man should be running around unattached, but 
that's just it, he isn't. Furthermore, fickleness certainly is not one of his failings. We 
advise those looking for men who will make good to keep an eye on "Art." 




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Breese Rosette 

a n 

"Rosy," "Breezy" 
Metal Mining 

Born in De Kalb, 111., June 28, 1892. 
Graduated from De Kalb High School. 
Home residence, De Kalb, 111. 

Hailing from Illinois where he was born and 
reared, "Rosy" is so thoroughly a cornhusker that 
at times it seems as though he himself is thatched 
with corn tassel. Contrary to his nickname, 
"Rosy" _ is anything but breezy, holding his peace at all times, and is an agreeable 
companion in both work and play. It is said that still waters run deep, hence we are 
expecting to hear some day from DeKalb that "Rosy" has startled the world by a new 
process of manufacturing sewer pipe. 



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John R. Shanley 

b ® n, © t 

"Bud," "Mucket" 
Metallurgy 

Baseball (1, 2). 

Football (1, 2, 3). 

All Rocky Mountain End (2, 3). 

Born in Denver, Colo., 1890. Graduated 
from West Denver High School in 1909. 
Home residence, Denver, Colo. 



"Bud" is a son of the "auld sod," and although fighting with Tuffy for the honor 
of height, he is a whirlwind at both football and baseball. He is an expert judge of 
chewing tobacco and expects to go into that branch of the Government's service. "Mucket" 
is a leader of the Black Hand and is always ready for a rough-house or a "wrinkle." 
"Bud's" hobbies are selling memory books to the Freshmen, and cultivating pets. With 
the latter, during Summer Surveying, he had so much success that they became a nuisance. 
Everywhere that "Buddie" went, his pets were sure to go. 







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William W. Simon 

"Bill," "Fat" 
Metal Mining 



Born May 28, 
Graduated from 
School in 1909. 
ence, Colo. 



1890, at Florence, Colo, 
the Canon City High 
Home residence, Flor- 



"Bill," the fat man of the class, is losing weight 

since he has overcome his liking for the German 

beverage, root beer. When the skip stop method 

was in operation out on the Aurora line, Bill 

was the only person besides the conductor, who knew where and when the car would 

stop between the Loop and the Woman's College, for, since he got the jelly on his hands, 

he has surely been stuck on that place 



11 



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Lincoln Adair Stewart 

S. P. A. 

"Stew," "La-la" 
Metal Mining 

Class Treasurer (3). 
Junior Prom. Committee. 
Treasurer Scientific Society (5). 
Statistical Editor, Prospector. 

Born at Denver, Colo., May 10, 1891, 
Graduated from the Hutchinson High 
School, Hutchinson, Kansas. Attended 
Kansas University two years. Home resi- 
dence, Ouray, Colo. 



The one man that would rather be treasurer than president. His special delight is 
to hear the jingle of dollars. Even Juniors must "give the Devil his dues." 'Tis said 
that he left K. U. because there were too many girls to suit him, but from other 
sources we learn that he is well known up in Greeley. In this connection he is one 
of the star members of the "reception committee" and an authority on the scenery of 
this vicinity. He likes company on his travels because, being statistical editor of the 
Prospector, he is liable to be waylaid by some vengeful Junior. 



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William Stephen Stringham 



S. P. A. 

"Bill" 
Metal Mining 

Freshman Football. 
Football (2, 3). 
Baseball (1, 2). 
President Class (2). 

Born August 21, 1891, at Manitou, Colo. 
Graduated from West Denver High School 
in 1911. Home residence, Denver, Colo. 



"String" comes up here to school every morning to pass the time away, as he can't 
go fussing in the morning or afternoon, and he feels that he must have something to do. 
He used to have one of those little Dutch derbies, but he had hard luck trying to wear it, 
especially on the trip to the coast last year. Down at D. U. "Bill" is well known among 
the _ co-eds, and Capitol Hill has oft times been honored with his presence. The only 
noticeable effects that fussing has had on "Bill" is that he has acquired to a marked 
degree one of the modern feminine characteristics, that of changing his mind as often as 
the proverbial woman. We predict that "String" will not follow mining as a profession 
but will probably settle down on a chicken farm back in Missouri. 






Merwyn E. Swigart 

Trowel Club 

"Swag" 
Metal Mining 



Born at Carbondale, Colo., July 15, 
1890. Graduated from the Carbondale 
High School. Home residence, Satank, 
Colo. 



"Swag" is an. ex-cowpuncher and a rough rider 
of some ability. In his native haunts on the 
plains around Carbondale he is quite a "dear" 
hunter, his favorite varieties of the species 
However, while in Golden, he divides his atten- 
What we can't understand is how Swigart can 
keep his proboscis in such a blooming state, when he drinks nothing stronger than 
lemonade. He has asked "What is the best powder for a man to use on a red nose?" 
and the echo answers, "100 per cent Gelatine." 



being "school-marms" and "squaws." 
tions between Denver and Boulder. 



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John Nicholas Teets 

5 A E 

"Jack," "Germany'' 
Metallurgy 

Glee Club (3). 

Junior Prom Committee. 

Baseball Squad (1, 2). 

Freshman Ball Committee. 

Junior Quartet. 

Billy Gray's Barber Shop. 

Various Orchestras. 

Born at Junction City, Ky., November 
17, 1890. Graduated from Newton High 
School, 1908. Attended Annapolis Prep. 
School, 1909. Present residence, Red Cliff, 
Colo. 

John Newton Nicholas Red Cliff Teets is a man of parts— lots of parts. He is 
quite a "Goose," and everybody is laughing when he is around. Johnny is locally famous 
as a musical decomposer, playing anything from the drums to poker. He has finished 
the elementary course in Engineering of the Muck Stick and says that he's ready for some 
real work. "His chief delight" is E. P. T. All the ladies say that he is such a tease, 
but we've a hunch that they like it. 




Clarence T. Todd 

K 2 

"Toad," "Pert" 

Metallurgy 

President Freshman Class. 
Social Club. 
Freshman Football. 
Assistant Cheer Leader (2, 3). 
Glee Club (1, 2). 

Born April 8, 1891, at Los Angeles, Cal. 
Graduated from the Los Angeles Poly- 
technic High School in 1911. Home resi- 
dence, Los Angeles, Cal. 



"Toad" comes to us from the only land worth while, in a native son's estimation, 
California. Almost immediately he was taken up by the Golden society, and later by 
Denver's sacred younger set. But "Clarence" is not satisfied; like Alexander, he 
sighs for new and virgin worlds to conquer. It is said that the "jerk" has been able 
to declare an extra dividend because of Todd's numerous trips to and from Denver. 
On Saturday night he regularly amuses the travelers by his talkativeness. 




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Hsiang Tsai 

"Cyrus" 

Metal Mining 

Born at Hankow, China, October £ 
1891. Attended Boone University. Pres 
ent residence, Hankow, China. 



Out of the several boys from the Far East 
who started with the Class of 'IS, Tsai is the 
only one who has stayed with us through the 
strenuous three years' existence. According to 
himself, Tsai is "some student," but the rest of 
us fail to see anything phenomenal about him. He has become so Americanized that he 
is as big a "staffer" as the next one. His hobby is E. P. T., in which subject he shines 
like a glow-worm in a heavy fog. 



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Parks Briggs Van Dolah 

Trowel Club 

"Van" 
Metal Mining 

Born at Fort Collins, Colo., August 16, 
1888. Graduated from the Preparatory De- 
partment of Colorado Agricultural College. 
Home residence, Victor, Colo. 



"Van" comes to us from the Class of 1914. 

and in him we have gained a good man, and, 

above all, a true friend. His latest tendencies 

seem to be toward the winged members of the 

future, and it is on this account that we never ask him for a match, or to take a cold 

one on a hot day. "Van" thinks that door bell buttons' should be provided with guards, 

so that leaning against the door will not bring her Ma and Pa out to see the moon. 



II 



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Glen H. VanDorp 

K 5, T B n, Trowel Club 

"Van" 

Metal Mining 

Secretary Class (1). 
Freshman Ball Committee. 
Social Club. 
Y. M. C. A. Cabinet. 
Business Manager, Prospector. 

Born April 29, 1892, at Topeka, Kansas. 
Graduated from Topeka High School, 
Topeka, Kansas. Home residence, Topeka, 
Kansas. 



"Dink" may always be seen among the elite. The women literally tear each other's 
hair out fighting for the privilege of a glance from those twin lamps of brown which are 
his eyes. "Van" recalls his Freshman surveying with great pleasure, as it consisted 
mostly of practical application and demonstration of "arms and the man (also the girl)." 
Glen is quite a student on the side and is the bandit who forced our advertisers into 
making this book possible. 




H 

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Adolph Skinner Walter 

2 N 
"Ott" 

Metallurgy 

Baseball (2). 

Basketball (2). 

Assistant Manager, Prospector. 

Born May 7, 1889, at Denver. Colo. 
Graduated from the Manual Training High 
School, Denver, Colo. Attended the Uni- 
versity of Virginia. Home residence, Den- 
ver, Colo. 



Not realizing that "Mines" was so close, Ott attended the University of Virginia 
during 1911-12. He then got "wise" and entered Mines. We hear that "Ott" is 
seriously thinking of making another change by taking the short course at Greeley. 
However, we hope it is not as serious as that. In any event the business training 
which he received while huntings ads for the Prospector, of which he is Honorary 
Assistant Business Manager, will do much to smooth out his marital troubles. Being 
a practical man, we expect to hear great things of "Ott" some day, in fact he has 
already demonstrated the uselessness of the Calculus. 





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Clje Class of 1916 



OFFICERS 

Charles B. Gauthier President 

Kenneth S. Ferguson Vice-President 

R. Mearle Fullaway Secretary 

Alvah L. Miller Treasurer 



CLASS ROLL 

John W. Beam Denver, Colo. 

Harold F. Bicknell Clarksville, Tenn. 

Carl A. Blaurock Denver, Colo. 

Fred G. Brenneman. Eureka, Colo. 

Frank E. Briber Denver, Colo. 

Carl E. Carstens Ackley, Iowa 

(A. B. — Lake Forest University.) 

August H. Chatin .Walsenburg, Colo. 

George M. Cheney Williamstown, Mass. 

(A. B. — Williams College.) «■ 

James L. Craig Dallas, Texas 

Kenneth S. Ferguson Denver, Colo. 

F. S. Follansbee Fort Spring, W. Va. 

Richard M. Fullaway Los Angeles, Cal. 

Murray E. Garrison Golden, Colo. 

Charles B. Gauthier Detroit, Mich. 

Edward A. Hammen Chicago, 111. 

Wayne A. Harrod Fort Wayne, Ind. 

F. D. Holt Webster City, Iowa 

Howard E. Hornickel Cleveland, Ohio 

Walter J. Jenne Pueblo, Colo. 

Jefferson L. Keese San Paulo, Brazil 

Harry M. Lavender Telluride, Colo. 

Hunyat Lee Kwantun, China 

Milton M. Levy Denver, Colo. 

John M. Lliteras Tucson, Ariz. 

Alvah L. Miller Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Karl A. Mohr Apalachicola, Fla. 



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CLASS ROLL— Continued 

Walter H. Ralph. Valparaiso, Cal. 

George H. Roll Ellsworth, Minn. 

Albert D. Schoensiegel Denver, Colo. 

Sidney S. Small Denver, Colo. 

Frank A. Smith San Pedro, Cal. 

Oliver W. Steele Dallas, Texas 

William M. Traver, Jr Central City, Neb. 

Santiago Urteago Laredo Tannanlipas, Mex. 

Lisle R. Van Burgh Denver, Colo. 

Frank J. Wiebelt Arvada, Colo. 

John H. Winchell, Jr Edgewater, Colo. 



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C&e Class of 1917 



OFFICERS 

William H. Wblxtams President 

Arthur W. Stedman, Jr Vice-President 

Charles N. Beyrle Secretary 

John G. Menke Treasure? 

CLASS ROLL 

William J. Anderson Plainview, Texas 

Thaddeus H. Andrews Walsenburg, Colo. 

Charles N. Beyrle Los Angeles, Cal. 

Harry E. Boot Denver, Colo. 

Francis H. Breene Denver, Colo. 

John R. Bryan Golden, Colo. 

Mifflin N. Butler Golden, Colo. 

Albert K. Chan San Francisco, Cal. 

Fan Chen Washington, D. C. 

Yung Khang Chiang Washington, D. C. 

John J- Clifford Edgewater, Colo. 

John J. Croston New York City, N. Y. 

George W. Cutting Florence, Colo. 

Earl J. Dickinson Denver, Colo. 

George R. Durkee Omaha, Neb. 

Francis H. Geib Denver, Colo. 

Oscar E. Hanno Durango, Colo. 

Mearl G. Heitzman Denver, Colo. 

Robert Higgins Pueblo, Colo. 

Max T. Hofius British Honduras 

Shih-hung Hu Washington, D. C. 

Oscar W. Marks Sewaren, N. J. 

Harold F. Maxson Los Angeles, Cal. 

Norman E. Maxwell Silverton, Colo. 

John G. Menke Neola, Iowa 

Sydney A. Mewhirter Denver, Colo. 

Clinton D. Moore Denver, Colo. 

Harold E. Munn Golden, Colo. 



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C&e Class of 1917 

CLASS ROLL— Continued 

John E. Nissen Arvada, Colo. 

Gustavo A. Nufio British Honduras 

Walter Olsen Arvada, Colo. 

Walter S. Pfrimmer Bloomington, Ind. 

John R. Poss New York City, N. Y. 

John H. Post Battle Creek, Mich. 

Webster F. Putman Denver, Colo. 

Lawrence A. Renehan Union City, Conn. 

Karl W. Reynolds Denver, Colo. 

Edward W. Robinson Denver, Colo. 

Harry A. Robinson Lawrence, Mass. 

Herbert T. Salzer Golden, Colo. 

James C. Smith Franklin, Pa. 

Rowland S. H. Stanfield Okmulgee, Okla. 

Arthur W. Stedman, Jr Boston, Mass. 

Edward Stotz Pittsburg, Pa. 

Robert D. Stouder Edgewater, Colo. 

Carroll C. Taylor Plainfield, N. J. 

Charles W. Teets Red Cliff, Colo. 

Ralph M. Weaver, Jr Tulsa, Okla. 

Roger F. White Golden, Colo. 

William H. Williams Denver, Colo. 

Lee K. Worth Denver, Colo. 



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Ci)e alumni 



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'06 



'06 

'SS 



Abel, "Waiter D., '06 
Adami, Charles J., '99 
Adams, Charles, '04 
Ailinger, Walter J., 
Aldrich, Harold W., 
Allen, Carl A., '05 
Allen, Maynard C, 
Aller, Frank D., '92 
Ambroslus, Carl E. 
Anderson, Axel E„ '04 
Anderson, Neil A., '02 
Andre, Morris V., Jr., '11 
Andrews, Earle D., '12 
Arfsten, George J., '13 
Armington, H. C, 
Arthur, Charles S. 
Arthur, Edward P 
Atkins, Horace H. 
Atkinson, W. J., '96 
Atwater, Maxwell W 
Austin, Arthur, '05 



'07 
, '13 
, Jr., 
, Jr., 



95 
9 4 



•01 



Badger, Herbert E., '02 
Badgley, Charles W., '06 
Bailey, E. W„ '05 
Baker. Hamilton W., '11 
Ball, Bvron E., '13 
Ball, Louis R., '00 
Ball, Max W., '06 
Ballagh. J. Courtenay, '10 
Banks, Leon M., '12 
Barbour, Percy P., '98 
Barenscheer, William J., '96 
Barker, Franklin L., '06 
Barker, Pierce, '07 
Barnes, Corrin, '96 
Barnett, Walter W., '11 
Barron, Chauncey T., '02 
Bartholomew, Tracy, '06 
Bastanchury, G. A., '07 
Beck, Daniel L., '12 
Beeler, Henry C, '96 
Bell, Charles N., '06 
Bellam, Henry L., '89 
Benjovsky, T. D., '09 
Benwell, George A., Jr., '00 
Benner, Howard C, '13 
Bergh, John E., '02 
Berry, Albert, '05 
Berthoud, Capt. E. L.. 
Bertschy, Perry H., '98 
Biglev, Arthur C, '13 
Billyard, John R. H. H., '13 
Bishop, Raymond, '01 
Bisland, John B., '13 
Blackburn, Ward, '08 
Block, Garrv E„ '08 
Blow, A. A. Hon. E. M., '10 
Blum, Sidney, '11 
Blumenthal, Emil E., '98 
Bo"wie, James W., '94 
Bowman, Frank C, '01 
Bowman, Reginald G., '11 
Bovd, Jesse T., 'OS 
Boyle, Willis J., Jr., '12 
Bradford. Albert H„ '09 
Bradford. Julius S., '10 
Bradley, Joseph M., '01 
Brandt, A. R., '07 
Breed, Charles F., '01 
Brinker, Arthur C., '01 
Bronstein, Charles N., '13 
Brooks, Eugene C, '10 
Brown, C. Leroy, '08 
Brown, John B., '06 



Brown, Norton H., '92 
Brown, R. L., '05 
Brown, Samuel R., Jr., '11 
Brown, Walter R., '10 
Bruce, Harry F., '00 
Bruce, James L., '01 
Bruce, Stuart S., '99 
Bruderlin, Emil J., '10 
Brunei, Frank P.. '12 
Brunei, Rene L.. '06 
Bryan, Russell R., '08 
Bucher, John W.. '02 
Buck, Arthur H., '97 
Budrow, William B., '92 
Buell, Arthur W.. '08 
Bulkley, Frank, Hon. E. 3 
Bumsted, Edward J., '01 
Hunger, Milne E., '09 
Burgess, Charles W., '09 
Burlingame, Walter E., '01 
Busey, A. P., Jr.. '05 
Bussey, Edwin E., '97 
Butler, G. Montague, '02 



Cain, Louis S., '13 
Calvert, Clarence E.. '12 
Campbell, Kent P., '10 
Canning. -Walter E., '09 
Carman, John B., '10 
Carney, Hugh J., '04 
Carpenter, Cranston H., '09 
Carpenter, Paul H., '10 
Carstarphen, F. C, '05 
Cary, Webster P., '10 
Chamberlin. W. O., '05 
Chandler, John W., Jr.. '01 
Chapman, Irving A., '13 
Chapman, Thomas L., '06 
Charles, Lavern J., '02 
Chedsey, William R., '08 
Christensen, Walter, ML' 
Clapp, Leroy P., '09 
Clark, Geo. B.. '01 
Clark, Winfred N., '98 
Clausen, Samuel J.. Jr., "11 
Cline, Seymour F., '08 
Coghill, Will H., '03 
Cohen, Louis, '97 
Colburn. C. L., '07 
Cole, Burt. '92 
Collbran, Arthur H., '02 
Collins, Phillip M., '93 
Collins, Shrive B., '01 
Comstock, Charles W., '80. 
Copeland, Clarence E.. '13 
Corry, Arthur V., '98 
Corson, N. G., '07 
Cory, J. J., '05 

Cowperthwaite, Edward W., '13 
Cox, Augustus D., '03 
Cox. W. Ray, '02 
Craigue, William H.. '89 
Cramer, Curtis P., '99 
Cronin, Harry M., '13 
Crowe, Thomas B., '00 
Cuno'. A. F., '05 
Currens, Warren W. . '12 
Curtis, Roy P., '09 



D'Arcy, R. L., '05 
Daman, C. J., '13 
Dauth, Herman, '13 
Davenport, John, '12 
Davis, Carl R., '95 
Davis, Gilbert L., '99 



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Cfte Alumni 



Davis, John R., '13 
De Camp, W. Val., 08 
De Cou, Ralph E., '01 
De Sollar, Tenney C, '01 
Dick, James E., '12 
Dilts, Ira J., '08 
Dittus, Edward 3., '11 
Dockery, L. A., '95 
Dollison, James E., '98 
Douglas, William C. "11 
Dove, Dean R., '13 
Dow, William G., '06 
Downer, Roger H., '01 
Downes, Frank A., '13 
Doyle, Donald B.. '09 
Draper, Marshall D., '97 
Drescher, Frank M., '00 
Dudgeon, James W.. '13 
Duer, C. L., 05 
Dunlevy, Forrest S. , '08 
Durell, Charles T., '95 
Dyer, Charles E-, '10 
Dyrenforth, Donald, '12 



Fames, L. B., '05 
East, John H., Jr., '10 
Eaton, Albert L., '95 
Eaton, Walter J., '13 
Eddy, Harold C, '09 
Ehle, Mark, Jr., '03 
Ehrich, Walter L., '02 
Elder, Robert B., '08 
Ellis, T. P., '07 
Ellis, William W., '02 
Ellsworth, Alfred C, '08 
Emeis, Walter A., '01 
Emeus, Ray B.. '07 
Emrich, Clarence T., '09 
Emrich, Jay L., '12 
Engle, Frederick, '11 
Enriquez, Edward W., '09 
Erickson, Guv W., '12 
Estes, Frank M., Jr., '02 
Evans, Henrv R.. '00 
Everest, Herbert A., 'OS 
Ewing, Charles R., '00 
Eye, Clyde M., '95 



Farnam. Lynn C, '09 
Farrar, Russell J.. '10 
Fay, Chas. H.. '13 
Fay, Herbert M., '13 
Febles, John G, '97 
Field, Edmund M., '12 
Field, Fred M., '95 
Fillius, Lee L., '04 
Filteau, C. A., '07 
Finigan, William H.. '06 
Fitz Gerald, Ronald P., '10 
Fleming. William L., '03 
Flinn, Alfred. '13 
Flint, F. F., '05 
Ford, Homer D., '05 
Foster, George C, '03 
Franck, Albert C, '04 
Franck, Robert P., '04 
Frank, Harrv L., '01 
Frank, Morton E., '0 6 
Frankel, Jacob M., '13 
Frazee, Verne, '12 
French, Burr J., '08 
French, Clare L.. '13 
French, Sidney W., '08 
Frev, Carl E., '13 
Frick. Frederick F., '08 
Friedhoff, W. H., '07 




Frv, Louis D., '03 
Fullerton, Wilfred, '1 
Funk, Walter A., 03 



Garnett, Thomas H, '11 
Garza, Aldape, J. M., '05 
Gaul, John C, '12 
Geary, E. S., '12 
Geary, Richard E., '09 
Gehrman, Charles A., '86 
Geib, Karl V.. '11 
Geisel, C. R., '07 
Geringer, George T.. '10 
Giddings, Donald S., '00 
Gilbert, Arthur K., '06 
Gilbert, William J.. '06 
Glasgow. Charles M., '10 
Goe, Harold H.. '08 
Golden, J. P., 07 
Goodale, F. A., '10 
Goodale, Stephen L. , '01 
Gordon, John G, Jr., '0 6 
Gow, P. A., '07 
Grant, Lester S., '99 
Gray, Latimer D., '95 
Greensfelder, Nelson y., ' 
Gregg, Daniel B., '13 
Greve, E. E., '05 
Grider, R. L., '05 
Grier, Charles D., '12 
Griffith, John R., '09 
Griswold, George G., '96 
Grommon, Philo D., '07 
Gross, John, '97 



Hager, E. T., '12 
Hale, Genei'al Irving, Hon. 
Halletl, Alfred F., '09 
Hallett. R. L., '05 
Hallet, William J., '05 
Hamilton, Frank R., '98 
Hamilton. William J., '09 
Hammond, John Hays, Hon., '09 
Hammond, Herbert R., '13 
Hammond, William L.. '09 
Hansen. Charles L., '09 
Harkison, Charles W.. '06 
Harrington, Charles L., '12 
Harrington, Daniel. '00 
Harrington, Orville, '98 
Harris, Arnold W., '12 
Harris, Frank B., '13 
Harris, Morrison, '08 
Harrison, Thomas S., 'OS 
Hartzell, Lester J., '95 
Harvey, John V., '11 
Hawley, R. H.. '93 
Hazard, William J., '97 
Heaton, Charles D.. '12 
Heinricbs, Walter E., '13 
Heitz, George H., '06 
Henslev, James H.. Jr.. '06 
Herres, Otto, Jr.. '11 
Hewitt, A. F., '05 
Hiester, Arthur J.. '12 
Hill, Charles R.. '12 
Hill. Frank G, '04 
Hills, Leon P., '08 
Hilsdale, Paul, '12 
Hilton, Howard J., '10 
Hindrv, Willis E., '92 
Ho, Chieh, '13 
Hodgson, Arthur R., '99 
Hornbein. Julius, '05 
Howat, A. M., '07 
Hubbard, John V.. '10 



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Taggart, George K. , '03 
Taggart, Oliver R., '09 
Taylor, Harry Picotte, 
Tefrill, A. C., '05 
Tescher, Samuel, '04 
Thomas, Lester C, '12 
Thompson, James S., '99 
Thomson, A. T., '0o 
Thomson, Francis A., '04 
Thum, Ernest E., '06 
Thurston, Ralph V., '11 
Titsworth, Frederick S., '95 
Toenges, Albert L., '12 
Townsend, Arthur R., '99 
Trott, Mavnard J., '08 
Trott, Roland S., '06 
Trueheart, Lawrence G.. '13 
Trumbull, Loyal W., '04 
Tyler, Sidney B., '99 

Utley, Howard H., '00 



Vacek, Vincent F.. '10 
Valentine, Malvern R., '9S 
van Diest. Edmond C, '86 
Van Wag'enen, Hugh R., '06 
Voelzel, Gustave W„ '11 
Wackenhut, George J.. '04 
Walker, A. D., '12 
Wallace, Howard J., '04 



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"Wallace. Louis R.. 
Waltman, Will D. 
Wang, Shoa-Ying 
Ward, Merwin H., 
Ward, William F., '03 
Warfel, G G., '07 
Warnecke, Carl M., '9. 
Warren, Seymour P., '13 
Washburn, Howard G., '04 
Waslev. William A., '09 
"Watson, Guy P., '10-'] 2 
Watson, Hugh C, '01 



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Watson, Samuel E., '13 
Wattles, "William C, '03 
Watts, Alfred C, '02 
Weed, Floyd, '97 
Weil, Jacob, '04 
Weinig, Arthur J. 
Weir, John A., '09 
Weiss, Andrew, '99 
Weisz, Joseph J., '09 
Wells, Ben T.. '04 
Wells, Frank B., '03 
West, John R., '10 
Wheeler, Charles E., '9^ 
Wheeler, Robert M., 'OS 
Whitaker, Orvil R.. '9 8 
White, J. L., '07 
Whitehead, Paul, '12 
Whitehouse, Howard D. 
Whitehurst, J. W., '10 
Wigton, George H., '13 
Wilcoxson, Edward D., ' 
Wiley, Walter H., 'S3 
"Wilfley, George, '13 
Wilkinson, Mearle W., 
Williams, Fred T., '01 
Williams, Irving B., '11 
Williams, John C, '13 
Williams, Wakely A., '9 
Wilson, Dudlev M., '09 
Wolf, A. G., '07 
"Wolf, Harry J., '03 
Wong, William A., '13 
Wood, Ernest B., '09 
Woods, Thomas H, '97 
Wraith, Charles R., '11 
Wright, Thomas W., '13 



'08 



Young 



Peter A., '13 



Zulch, Herman C, '08 
Zwetow, Arthur N., '11 



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Olson 

Beall 

Lee 

Walter 

Hutton 

Briber 

Stringham 

Brooke 

Bregman 

Pearce 

Ferguson 

Strong 

Roll 

Davis 

Carper 

Woolf 

Wuensch 

Turner 

Gauthier 

Harper 



E. O. Kistler 



HONONARY 



Brandow 

Shanley 

McKnight 

Taylor (L. K.) 

Johnson 

Watson 

Duggleby 

DeLaittre 

Dittus 

Hinman 

Dodge 

Snedaker 

Burris 

Litchfield 

Fullaway 

Taylor (C. C.) 

McNeill 

Hammen ( C. W. ) 

Hammen (E. A.) 

Lavender 



Captain W. C. Bryan 






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ERLE O. KISTJLER. Ph. B., Yale. 

Erie Oatman Kistler 

Athletic Director 

1911, Ph. B. Yale University. 

1911, On Graduate Coaching Staff at Yale. 

1912, Football Coach, Colorado School of Mines. 

1913, Athletic Director and Head Coach Mines. 

"Kis," popularly referred to as the man who again placed "Mines on the football 
map," is a Yale graduate, playing fullback on one of its famous teams. His influence has 
already made a profound impression on Western athletics, the most notable features being 
"The Yale Spirit" of clean, hard athletics, and the famous Yale shift. The latter has 
attracted much attention since it gave the smallest, lightest -team in the Conference a 
weapon with which it was able to cope with the biggest of them, and has produced one 
championship team and one, we might say, near championship team. As "Kis" refused 
any other recognition for his services, he was made our Athletic Director, and in that 
capacity has reorganized our athletic department, bringing it to a modern basis. Due to 
business responsibilities he will be unable to be our coach next fall, but we have his 
assurance that he will help us whenever possible, which puts a much brighter aspect on 
our next year's prospects. 



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8©mes att)Ieticg 

The name of "Mines" in athletic circles has always conjured up visions 
of strength and prowess. "Mines" has ever been a strong contender for the 
State or Rocky Mountain Championship in every event she has been entered 
in any year, and it is not exaggerating the matter to state that most of the 
interest of current athletics centers around her as a nucleus. Smaller than 
any of the more important schools she has to contend with, drawing from only 
a limited number of her own students due to a higher degree of effiiciency 
exacted in academic work, she has nevertheless forged steadily ahead, winning 
regardless of restrictions and in her own clean way. But the winning itself 
would be but a tithe of the glory had the school not at the same time estab- 
lished a name of sportsmanship and clean athletics second to none in our 
Western country. And it is this same spirit of fair play that we who have 
the interest of Mines at heart, are trying to foster in our institution so that 
through us it may permeate the whole Rocky Mountain Region. 

Do not misunderstand me, however, that I wish to minimize the glory of 
winning. We have won repeatedly in the past and while we continue in our 
former policy of clean sportsmanship first, we will win continually in the 
future. 1912-13 was the first season in — (I do not remember how many 
seasons) — that we have not won the Rocky Mountain Championship in 
Basketball. Even in that season we lost the championship by one game. This 
year, with green material, discouraged at the outset by the loss of two veterans, 
both individual stars, the team reconstructed itself and after a few preliminary 
defeats straightened out and finished by defeating both the contenders for the 
title by a good margin. Wonderful spirit, that! 

The Baseball and Track teams have always been handicapped by the 
loss of the Seniors in the height of the season. Despite this very serious draw- 
back, they have gone ahead winning their full share of victories. The Baseball 
team won the Conference championship in 1912, and the Track team finished 
second in the indoor track meet this last Spring with only four individual 
entries and a relay team. All but one of the individual entries captured at 
least one first place. 

It is, however, to our Football team that we bow and sweep the heavens 
with our praise. Recently the team won the championship for four years 
straight, an unprecedented event in Colorado. Then for three years they 
slackened their pace, until defeat after defeat had discouraged them. Finally, 
in the Fall of 1912, a small contingent at Golden turned out with a set pur- 
pose before them of restoring the pennant. Setting aside traditions of rights 



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of old players, and going after the problem in a slightly different manner, they 
gained for themselves through dint of hard and concentrated work the name 
of a team playing better ball each Saturday than the Saturday before, and won 
the Conference championship with but the loss of one game in the earlier part 
of the season. This, mind you, was a team of men discouraged by three years 
of defeat. This last fall the problem was even more difficult, and was un- 
fortunately not as successfully solved. It consisted of taking a team already 
far too light, with every veteran in the center of the line missing, and injecting 
enough snap and system into their maneuvers to offset the natural weight and 
strength of their opponents. Without the consistent effort and enthusiasm of 
every man on the squad this could never have even been considered. But the 
whole school responded; the team fought through each successive game, 
outweighed at every turn, handicapped by numerous injuries to those seem- 
ingly invaluable players, winning every game, even though with a small 
margin until they finally came to their ancient enemy, Boulder, with a clean 
record. It was the old question of a good heavy team against a good light 
team, with the odds of weight unduly exaggerated. Not to be daunted, how- 
ever, this small group of eleven men went in to win, and while their strength 
lasted, played remarkable football. Finally beaten down by a winning spirit 
as well as by an average of over twenty pounds of weight, the closing whistle 
blew on a reverse score of 20-0, but the line is written that those men died 
fighting and never quit. 

Coming from such a defeat, with every man in the team injured to some 
extent, they nevertheless overrode every instinct except that of a dsire to 
win, and win cleanly, and just five days later defeated the University of Den- 
ver by the largest score in the history of the two schools. 

Such is the spirit of Mines! 



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H. Buckingham 

"Buck" was another one of the 
men responsible for the showing 
that the "Miners" made in foot- 
ball last season. Coming here 
from Princeton, where he was one 
of their strongest line-men, he 
was engaged as our coach and im- 
mediately won the respect of 
everyone connected with the school 
Realizing that our line was our 
weakest point, he devoted his en- 
tire attention to it with the result 
that our line, though the lightest 
developed into the scrappiest and 
one of the most efficient in the 
state, which is attested by the fact 
that at the end of the season it was 
given four "All Rockv Mountain" 
positions. Besides being one of 
the best coaches Mines ever had, 
"Buck" made everybody a friend 
by his even disposition and his 
"Southern" courtesy (that is ex- 
cept when talking to the team) 
Unfortunately we will not have 
his services next year as he is to 
coach a rival squad, but we wish 
him all the luck in the world ex- 
cept in our game. 



Capt. Wm. C. Bryan 

"Cap"' has long been identified 
with the school as trainer and 
coach. Being one of the world's 
foremost footracers in his youth 
and having trained many promi- 
nent teams both in this country 
and others, he is well qualified for 
the position and is in active 
charge of our athletics at the pres- 
ent He is easily the greatest 
athletic enthusiast we have, and 
may always be counted on to put 
forth everything he has toward 
turning out a winning team. 



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Cije athletic 13oar0 

E. O. Kistler, Athletic Director 
CAPTAINS 

Football McKnight 

Basketball .tJeall 

Baseball 

rj, , FULLAWAY 

Track 

MANAGERS 

Football ; EsslG 

Basketball Litchfield 

Baseball ^ EBEE 

Track WHITE 

STUDENT MEMBERS 

; T un i or Ord (Secretary Athletic Association) 

Senior. .....' LuKE ( Senior President) 



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jToot&all 

Captain H. H. DeLaittke 

\ E. O. KlSTLER 

Coaches |H. Buckingham 

Manager E.G. Snedaker 

Assistant Manager B. C. Essig 

Captain-Elect H. S. McKnight 

The annual call for candidates was sent out by 
Captain DeLaittre immediately after the opening of 
school, and one of the largest squads in the history 
of the school responded. Of the championship team 
of the year before we had only lost five men and with 
Kistler back and "Buck" on the job, prospects 
looked bright indeed. Our lone weak point was the 
line, and to this "Buck" devoted his attention. 
Various men were tried out until finally he had a 
line to his suiting, light, but fast and scrappy. The 
first few weeks were spent in fundamental football, 
in developing the new line and in learning the new 
shift formation which "Kis" had evolved during the 
summer. After playing several High School games, 
we left for our first game, which was at Laramie. 

This game was looked forward to with consid- 
erable anxiety by the coaches as this was to be their 
first opportunity to see several green line-men under 
fire, upon whose showing depended the prospects for the whole season. It 
was a case of a team of unknown caliber playing a team which only a week 
before had held Boulder down to one touchdown. Fortunately their fears 
were unfounded. In the first half the team seemed unable to get started and 
at the end they were just beginning to find themselves and to realize that their 
new shift was a powerful machine. With the beginning of the second half, 
however, a different feeling was apparent. The score began to pile up as the 
shift got in its work and Wyoming did not have a chance. This game was 
marred by the injury of Lavender who was so severely hurt that he did not 
recover till the season was well advanced. 




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UTAH 

The second game of the season was with the University of Utah in Salt 
Lake City. Remembering the last game we played in Utah, this was antici- 










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pated with much anxiety bv the coaches. The team left Thursday momins 
determined to wipe out the memories of our defeats at Utah's hands the last 
four years. The>- were given a royal send-off by the student body. After 
the long and tiresome trip a day was spent in resting up and the next day 
Utah was beaten on their own field by a score of 7-0. This score, however, 
does not show the true merits of the two teams, as the actual time played was 
only thirty-seven and one-half minutes. The Miners were onlv forced to kick 
once while Utah, with the exception of a long run made by Sutherland, onlv 
made first down once. "Woolf starred for the Miners, making several sensa- 
tional end runs. Unfortunately he was injured in the third quarter so badly 
that he was unable to play the rest of the year. This game was a great help 
to the Miners by giving the new men confidence in beating a team which had 
beaten them for the last four years, even though the score was a small one, 
and thus the hoodoo was lifted. 



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COLORADO AGGIES 

Although they had two victories to their credit, the Miners approached 
this game in a far from confident manner. The previous week the Aggies had 
played Boulder and the latter had had a hard time winning. Heavy and 
hard line plungers, they were still in the championship race and it was realized 
that the game was to be a test of the Mines' line. The greater part of the 
student body showed their support of the team by chartering a special train 
and attending "en masse." The Fort Logan band furnished the music, doing 
much to make the trip an enjoyable one. 

These students were amply repaid for the game was a thrilling one, 
although a great deal of time was taken out for injuries due to the extremely 
hard field. The Miners securing the ball on the kick-off, advanced it by 
steady gains to the 5-yard line, only to lose it on a fumble. The Aggies 
punted out and, undismayed, the Miners again resumed the march with like 
results. At this stage of the game the Aggies took the ball and by a fake end 
play scored a touchdown, making the score 7-0 in their favor. The Miners 
came back fighting and carried the ball steadily down the field, Hinman 
carrying the ball over for the first touchdown, thus making the score 6-7. 
Now occurred one of the strangest incidents of the year. After a few minutes' 
play we had the ball on our 10-yard line and- Harper attempted a forward 
pass to Pearce. This was intercepted by the Aggie player Strong, and he, 
being somewhat "rattled," threw it up into the air instead of touching it to the 
ground. One of the Miners, Duggleby, grabbed it and crossed the line. How- 
ever, after much discussion, the officials decided to allow us only two points, 
making the score 8-7 in Mines' favor. In the third quarter the Miners scored 



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again, Harper carrying the ball over. At this time the crowd was wildly 
excited for it seemed as though the Aggies might score at any time thus tieing 
the score. Their suspense was needless, however, for the ball merely see- 
sawed back and forth during the remainder of the game which ended with the 
ball in the Aggies' possession on the 55-yard line. 

COLORADO COLLEGE 

The team now had a clean schedule with three victories and no defeats, so 
the}' approached the C. C. game, which was next on the schedule, with a feel- 
ing of confidence. With the exception of Woolf, who was still out with an 
injured knee, the team was in good condition for the game. The entire student 
body accompanied the team to Denver which with the delegation sent by C. C. 
made a record-breaking crowd on the field which was on one side a mass of 
vellow and black and on the other a mass of blue and white. C. C. kicked 
off to Mines and by steady marches they advanced to C. C.'s 5 -yard line only 
to lose the ball on a fumble. • The same tactics were used again and this time 
Harper carried the ball over for a touchdown. In the second quarter Burris 
grabbing a fumbled punt raced for another touchdown, making the score 14-0. 
In the third quarter, neither side scored though the ball was in C. C.'s territory 
most of the time. However, with the coming of the third quarter and dark- 
ness the fireworks began. C. C, by use of the forward pass, scored two touch- 
downs and then kicked goal making the score 14-13 in our favor. Soon after 
this the Miners took their turn and Stringham made a beautiful Princeton, 
netting us three more points. By this time it was so dark that the players could 
not be distinguished from the stands and it was then that Taylor of C. C. 
almost ruined the hopes of the Miners by breaking through the line on the 
kick-off and going 65 yards before being downed. It was just in the nick of 
time that Hinman rose up and saved the Miners by downing the fleeting runner. 

UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO 

Boulder 20, Mines 0. 

"Outweighed but not outfought; it was simply a case of a team of good 
little men being beaten by a team of good big men."' This is the statement a 
Denver newspaper made after the Boulder game. It was really a small blue 
line against a heavy gray one and in the end weight told. The Miners fought 
even- inch, not letting up a minute, but of no avail for it simply could not hold 
the irresistible two- or three-yard advances of the big gray men. Boulder did 
not try to make any long gains but, knowing their weight, they used it in the 
above manner. 



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The first quarter of the game was very evenly divided, first one team 
advancing the ball and then the other, and it seemed that the light blue team 
might be able to hold its own, after all. However, with the coming of the 
second quarter things took on a different aspect. Everything went well until 
with about five minutes left to play the Miners had the ball on their 15-yard 
line and Stringham dropped back to kick when someone sifted through the 
line and the kick was blocked. Knowles of Colorado, grabbed the ball and 
made the first touchdown of the game, ending the half with a score of Mines 
0, Boulder 7. The second half of the j;ame was disastrous indeed for the 
Miners seemed unable to stop the Colorado machine in the middle of the field 
and allowed them to bring the ball twice within kicking distance when Ivers 
improved the opportunity by netting six more points for Boulder with his toe. 
After this the little blue team, though game to the core, wore down rapidly, 
with the result that at the end of the game the big gray team had added one 
more touchdown and the final score was Colorado 20, Mines 0. 









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DENVER UNIVERSITY 

In the closing game of the season the Miners seemed to be easy prey for 
D. U. with a team crippled as a result of the battering received in the previous 
game with Boulder. However, the game put up by them lead a Denver news- 
paper to say, "If that is a crippled team, what would they do when whole.'' 
First Burris and then Stringham would swing around the ends for gains, and 
McKnight, playing in place of Hinman who was injured in the C. C. game, 
would go through center for another big gain. Thus the procession continued. 
Stringham brought the stands to their feet with a 75-yard run for a touchdown, 
and just as time was to be called a D. U. player made a similar run making 
their only score. Altogether the game was the easiest of the season and a 
fitting close as everybody was given a chance to play and the final score was 
Mines 49, Denver 7. 

Although we lose Tuffy Woolf and Johnnie Johnson by graduation, we 
will have a fine nucleus and a likely bunch of new men to start with next year 
and under Captain-elect McKnight's leadership there should be no doubt as 
to the outcome. 



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De Laittre 



Left Tackle {2, 3). 

All Rocky Mountain Tackle (2, 3) 

"Red" De Laittre, captain of the 1915 
squad, is one of the best tackles in the confer- 
ence having been chosen as All Rocky Moun- 
tain tackle for two years in succession. His 
fighting spirit was one of the prime factors in 
bringing us the successes of the past season 
with such an inexperienced light squad to 
work with. Always in the game, bearing the 
brunt of the work himself, at the same time he 
always had a word of encouragement for his 
teammates thus inciting them to do their ut- 
most. Luckily "Red" has still another year 
and will undoubtedly be one of the pillars 
around which our next year's team will be 
built. 



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McKnight 

Half-back (2, 3). 

University of the South (one year). 

Big, fast and one of the best defensive men 
on the team, "Mac" is an ideal captain for 
next year. Though not a showy player on 
either defense or offense, he may always be 
depended on for his yards and it is very 
seldom that a man gets past his secondary de- 
fense. He is a student of the game so that 
never a point escapes his notice. These, 
coupled with the fact that he has that rare 
power of instilling the fighting spirit into his 
men, lead us to expect a great team next year 
under "Mac's" captaincy. 



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Harper 



Quarterback (2, 3, 4). 

"Dutch" is undoubtedly one of the best 
quarterbacks in the West, and one of the most 
valuable men the school has. Fast on his feet, 
he returns punts as well as any man in the 
Conference, is a sure tackier and an excellent 
ground gainer. 

Dutch's ability as a field general is widely 
known. He runs his team fast and has the 
faculty of choosing his plays well. Sad to 
say, this is Dutch's last year with us. His 
loss is certainly a regrettable one and his place 
will be a hard one to fill. 





Woolf 



Half-back. 



"Tuffy," one of the old guard, was shifted 
from quarterback to half-back this year and 
in that position made a reputation for him- 
self throughout the state, being one of our 
"midget backfield." Though only weighing 140 
pounds. Tuff was one of the best open field 
runners in the game, and ran unusually good 
interference. Unfortunately he was severely- 
injured during the Utah game and was unable 
to play again till the end of the season. With- 
out doubt this is all that stopped him from 
making the All Rocky Mountain team. 
Though Tuffy has fought for the Blue and 
White a long time all good things must come 
to an end and this is his last year. 



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End (2, 3). 

All Rocky Mountain End (3). 

Bud's reputation as a hard smashing end 
and a sure tackier has spread far and wide. 
He is also a good man breaking interference 
as many sadder but wiser opponents can testify. 
Being Irish probably accounts for the fact that 
he is in the game every minute and does not 
know when to quit. Having been with us 
three years, he has still one left which will be 
a big factor in producing a winning 1914 
team. 



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Pearce 

Right End (2, 3, 4). 

All Rocky Mountain End (3, 4). 

"Doc," who plays the other end, has also 
fought three long years for the Silver and Blue, 
and is leaving us this year. His place will be 
an exceedingly hard one to fill because of this. 
The caliber of "Doc's" playing is shown bv 
the fact that he has made All Rocky Mountain 
end for the last two years. His strong point 
is on the receiving end of a forward pass which 
has been responsible for many a badly needed 
yard. "Doc" is noted for his brainy playing 
rather than physical powers and it is a wily 
player that can get past him in running back 
a punt. 





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"Dug" is a new man, this being his first 
year on the varsity. However; his work on 
the "Scrubs" during the last two years de- 
veloped "Dug" so that he was one of the 
finds of the season. He made All Rocky 
Mountain Guard and his work surely deserved 
the position, for being light in weight, he 
fought, handicapped in most cases by having a 
heavier man against him. "Dug" will be with 
us next year fighting harder than ever. 




.- 




Lavender 



Tackle (2). 

"Lav." or "San Miguel Co.," a recruit from 
last year's Freshman team, played in hard luck 
all through the season. Being hurt in the 
Wyoming game it took him all season to re- 
cuperate. However, he came back and played 
the last two games in the old time form. 
"Lav." is a strong charger on both offense 
and defense, and great things are expected of 
him next year. 




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Hinman 

Fullback (2,3). 

Heine's ability as a football player is tersely 
described by his newspaper name, "Ram em 
to Hell Hinman." During his two years' 
playing he has been our most consistent ground 
gainer, and his ability in backing up the line 
on defensive work has saved many a game. 
Whenever a yard was needed the ball went to 
"Heine" through the line with a well nigh 
irresistable charge. Always a valiant fighter 
for the "Silver and Blue," he has still one 
more year left to give to his "Alma Mater," 
for which we are all duly thankful. 



Burris 

Halfback (2, 3). 

"Sammy," another of the famous "Midget 
Backfield," is one of the hardest men to down 
and one of the best ground gainers we have. 
He is a good defense man, and his tackling 
ability stands out especially strong. If any- 
one should start to rough it with Sammy they 
would find that he can more than hold his 
own in this also. Sammy will also go a long 
way towards making a championship team in 
1914. 








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Wuensch 



Fullback and End (; 



4). 



"Herpicide," another of the "Midget Back- 
field," has played his third and last year on 
the Mines team. Being short, but heavy com- 
bined with a "ten-second" record, he is an 
exceedingly good line smasher, and once 
started, it is almost impossible to stop him. 
In fact, his favorite sport is to march down 
the field with two or three men on his back. 





Gauthier 

Quarterback (2). 

"Shrimp" played his first year of varsity 
football on this year's squad. He is noted 
as the smallest man on the squad and the most 
active. His specialty is the forward pass, 
which he can use anywhere within a distance 
of SO yards. Probably "Shrimp" will be our 
next year's quarterback, which leads us to 
expect great things of the 1914 team, as besides 
being an individual star he is a good general, 
and has the rare faculty of inspiring his men 
to do their utmost. 









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Johnson 

Center (3, 4). 

"Johnnie," center on the 1915 squad, is 
undoubtedly one of the best centers the school 
has produced. He is fast, heavy, and an ac- 
curate passer. These qualities combined 
made him the mainstay of the line on both 
offense and defense, in fact, it was around his 
weight, as a nucleus, that our line was built. 
His work was considered of first rank calibre 
by various critics. This is Johnnie's last year 
with the Mines, but here's hoping that we 
find as good a successor to his place. 



Stringham 

Halfback (2,3). 

"String's" toe is probably known throughout 
the West, and it certainly has done much to 
win our games. He can hold his own with 
any in a punting duel, and drops them over 
the bar with clock-like regularity anywhere 
within the forty-yard line. As an open-field 
runner, "String" is a terror to opposing ends, 
and his experience should make him a valuable 
man during his two remaining vears at 
"Mines." 








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Briber 



Right Guard (2). 

"Bribe,' - a member of last year's Freshman 
team, did not develop till rather late in the 
season. However, his work in the C. C. and 
Boulder games stamped him as a valuable man, 
making up for his lack in weight by determina- 
tion and fight. With another year's coaching 
"Bribe" should develop into one of the best 
guards in the state. 





Olson 



Guard (3). 

"Ole," another recruit from last year's scjuad. 
made a place on this year's team by his hard 
fighting game. Like all "Terrible Swedes," 
he does not know when to quit, which makes 
him such a valuable man on defense. With 
the experience gained this year and additional 
weight, "Ole" should be one of the mainstays 
of our next vear's line. 



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Right Guard (4). 

"Lute" came out for football at the begin- 
ning of the season with the ostensible purpose 
of getting a little exercise and incidentally 
helping out a little on the scrubs. However, 
the fates decreed that Lute was to be no mere 
scrub, hence, "Lo and Behold," he found a 
place on the varsity, which he filled, very 
creditablv, his peculiar method of waving his 
arms after the fashion of a windmill being 
very efficient in warding off the enemy. As 
this is "Lute's" last year he will henceforth 
have to support the Alines from the sidelines. 



Hammen 

Tackle (2). 

"Ed" is one of the few heavy men on the 
team, and certainly had a hard place to fill. 
However, though not having had much expe- 
rience, he used his weight to good advantage 
and did much to strengthen the right side of 
our line. "Ed" is a new man at the game, 
but has two more years in which to develop, 
so that he will be more widely known before 
he graduates. 




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A remarkable combination of speed and 
weight, great things were expected of "Steve" 
by the football enthusiasts. Howerer, he suf- 
fered a long train of misfortunes so that he 
was unable to play in more than one or two 
games. In the middle of the season this 
hoodoo culminated in a kick on the head re- 
ceived during a practice, game, which forced 
"Steve" to retire for the remainder of the 
season. However, he will be with us to try 
again next year and is looked upon as a 
material addition to the strength of our line. 



Capt. W. C. Bryan 
Trainer 




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THE PPtCP 




EX-CAPT. WOOLF 




CAPT. BEALL, 



EX-CAPT. EITC'HFTEI-Tt 



1914 BASKETBALL 

Captain Beall 

Coach Willett 

Manager Litchfield 



Forwards 

Beall Left Forward 

Gauthier Right Forward 

Taylor Forward 



Guards 

Bregmax Left Guard 

Litchfield Right Guard 

Hammen Guard 



Roll Center 



Prospects for a winning team seemed good at the beginning of the season, 
for, with the return of Litchfield, we had Beall, Bregman, Woolf, Hinman, 
and Litchfield, all experienced and "M" men. A good sized squad appeared 
at the call for candidates and our hopes for the championship took another 
soar. However, we were again doomed to disappointment for the proverbial 
jinx got into action and soon "Tuffy" Woolf was forced to retire on account 






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of the weak knee which he had sustained as the result of an injury during 
football season. 

The first game of the season was with U. of C, on our own floor, and, 
although "Tuffy" could not play, everybody was still hopeful. However, it was 
a repetition of last season's disastrous football game, for once again Boulder's 
weight was too much for us, and by superior team work they came out on the 
large end of the 38-29 score. Hinman, our last year's center, was hurt so 
badly in this game that he was unable to finish the game and put out for the 
season, thus decreasing our chances materially. 

The next game of the season was with the Aggies at Fort Collins, and 
here we again received the small end of the score, Mines 23, Aggies 39. Evi- 
dently the jinx was still pursuing us, for even in the next game with D. U. at 
Denver we had an extremely hard time winning by a score of 15 to 14. 

Next we got a chance to turn the tables on the Aggies by playing them 
on our own floor. Then the last prop was taken from under us when 
Ex-Captain Litchfield was ordered to turn in his suit by the doctor, and our 
hopes fell to nil. In this case, however, our disappointment, if it may be called 
that, was of a different sort, for in one of the best exhibitions of basketball ever 
seen here the Aggies received the surprise of their lives, and were defeated by 
a score of 27 to 25. Our hopes then began to take shape again, but were 
quickly flattened when in the next game we played miserable ball, and with a 
substantial lead in the first half, lost the game to D. U. by a score of 18 to 22. 

To finish the season we met Boulder on their own floor, and, determined 
to retrieve the previous loss, the team, accompanied by a crowd of enthusiastic 
rooters, went to the University with the slogan "Beat Boulder." Just as in a 
previous case, this slogan was again effective, and we ended the season in a 
blaze of glory by beating the state champions in a closely fought battle by one 
point, Mines 24, Boulder 23. 

Next year we will have everybody back except Bregman, so that we ought 
to again bring the championship back to its home in Golden, especially since 
we will be under the leadership of "Shrimp" Gauthier, who was elected captain 
at the close of the season. 



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EX-CAPT. WATS' IX 



I5ase&all 

Captain Turner 

Coach Johnston 

Manager Brandow 

Assistant Manager Bebee 

Captain-Elect Burris 

THE TEAM 

Turner Catcher 

Stringham Pitcher 

Brooke First Base 

Shanley Second Base 

Walter Shortstop 

Burris Third Base 

McGuire Right Field 

Watson Center Field 

Ferguson Center Field 

Dodge Left Field 



THE SEASON 




CAPTAIN TURNER 



Wilson back in school filling the only weak spot in the team, pitcher, and a promising looking 
squad of IS. What more could one wish for in the making of a championship team? However, we 
had a stony path ahead of us, for, presto, the Conference stepped in and ruled Wilson ineligible. Of 
course the coaching staff at once started to develop another pitcher, and as soon as things began to assume 
a more hopeful aspect, the second pitcher, Leet, was found ineligible also. 

Work was started in the Gym. before the snow was off the ground, so as to be in good shape for 
the opening game. This was with Colorado College at Colorado Springs, and resulted in a victory for 
the Miners. With Warren pitching, and backed by errorless playing, the final score was Mines 7, 
C. C. 4. Our next opponent was Boulder. This game we presented to Boulder on a "silver plate," 
since everybody on the team made an error with the exception of Dodge, the final tally being Mines 4, 
Boulder 7. 

We next visited D. U. on their home grounds, and by reforming our style of playing, won by a score 
of 4 to 2. After this came the Sacred Heart game, which, although not a Conference game, was looked 
upon with considerable importance and interest. It was a brilliant exhibition of ball, and resulted in 
a victory for the Miners of 4 to 3. This winning streak seemed too good to last, for in our next game 
the Aggies surprised us by beating us 7 to 3. This was accounted for by the fact that the team was in 
an unsettled condition, owing to Wilson's suspension. 

After this disaster we returned home for a game with D. U. on our own grounds. This was cer- 
tainly one of the most exciting games of the year, as it was replete with sensational playing, the 
climax of which came in the ninth inning. With the score standing D. U. 8, Mines 6, we were up, 
with two men on and two out, and Dodge came to bat. Ball one! Ball two! Stee-rike one! Ball three! 
Stee-rike two! Everybody was holding their breath, when Herreon, the D. U. pitcher, put one over 
the groove and the game was over with the score Mines 9, D. U. S. In another game, featured by 
errors and sensational catches, Utah defeated us on our own grounds by a score of 8 to 7. 

On account of Wilson's ineligibility, our first game with D. U. was cancelled, and we were forced 
to play it over again. However, this was won by a score of 7 to 2, so that the standing of the team 
was unchanged. Next we played Boulder again, and in a hard fought game, featured by Stringham's 
pitching and Dodge's batting, we came out on the long end of a score of 4 to •■!. In the following 
game we defeated the Aggies by a score of S to 4. Finishing the season, we played Colorado College on 
Commencement Day. The game was a very exciting one, going to ten innings, when C. C. got in 
another run, winning by a score of 7 to 6. 

At the close of the season Sammy Burris was elected captain, so that, with a new bunch of star 
Freshmen and the tutelage of "Burt" Jones, things look very promising indeed for the coming season. 

129 



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EX-CAPT. CARPER 





CAPTAIN WUENSCH 



COACH TEST 

Captain Wuensch 

Coach (Johnston 

) Test 

Manager Hutton 

Assistant Manager Franklin 

Captain-Elect Fullaway 

As in all preceeding years, track was our weakest branch of athletics. At the beginning of the 
season a good-sized squad reported, but in a short time enthusiasm waned and as usual we had to 
depend on four or five star men in practically all events instead of a larger well balanced team. 
Captain Wuensch was always good for points in the dashes, while Ex-Captain Carper brought home the 
bacon in the hurdles. Two new men, Fullaway and Briber, showed up well, the former entering the 
dashes, broad jump, and weights, while the latter ran the mile in record time. 

It is a regrettable fact that track is so weak at "Mines," and also one rather hard to account for. 
It should receive more support from the student body, for at best it is a hard grind for the participants, 
and they deserve more credit than they usually receive. Fullaway was elected captain for 1914, and 
from the performances to date it seems that the sport is to be revived. At the recent Conference indoor 
meet we took second only to Boulder, thereby beating Aggies, D. U., and C. C, something which we 
had not done before. It is also said that there are some star Freshmen this year, so it may be that 
track will yet place us on the roll of honor. 








CAPT. -ELECT FULLAWAY 



CAI'TAIN WUENSCH 





McNeill 



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I3eta Cfceta pi 

BETA PHI CHAPTER 

Established 1908 




FRATRES IX URBE 



Adolph Coors, Jr. 
Grover Coors 
Herman F. Coors 



Richard Morrill 
Edward C. Parfet 
Robert R. Willet 



FRATRE IN FACULTATE 

Herman Fleck 

FRATRES IX COLLEGIUM 



Melvin B rugger 
Thomas W. Callahan 
Theodore H. M. CramDton 
James W. Pearce 

Alpheus B. Beall, Jr. 
David C. Dodge, Jr. 
John H. Greenwood 

Francis H. Breene 
Wilfred Flemming 
Howard Hornickel 

Harry E. Boot 
George R. Durkee 
Mearle G. Heitzman 



1914 



1915 



1916 



1917 



Ralph W. Smith 
Keith Roberts 
Elmer R. YVilfley 
William G. Zulch 

Dale D. Himnan 
John R. Shanley, Jr. 



Alvah L. Miller 
George H. Roll 
Herbert T. Salzer 

John G. Menke 

Walter S. Pfrimmer 
Ralph M. Weaver, Ir. 




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DIRECTORY OF THE FRATERNITY 



Amherst (B I) 
Boston (Y) 
Bowdoin (B 5) 
Brown (K) 



Columbia (A A) 
Rutgers (B V) 

Stevens (2) 



Colgate (B ®) 
Cornell (B A) 
St. Lawrence (B Z) 



Dickinson (A 2) 
johhs-JJopkins (AX) 



Davidson ($ A) 
North Carolina (H B) 



DISTRICT I. 



DISTRICT II. 



DISTRICT III. 



- ■-■ '"■' DISTRICT IV. 



DISTRICT V. 



Dartmouth (A O) 

Main t (B H) 

Mass. Inst. Tech. (B Y) 



Wesley an (ME) 
Yale (* X) 



Syracuse (BE) 
Toronto (® Z) 
Union (N) 



Lehigh (B X) 
Pennsylvania ($) 



Virginia (O) 



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DISTRICT VI. 




Bethany (*) 

Pennsylvania State College ( A Y ) 



Central (E) 
Cincinnati (B N) 
Miami (A) 



Case (A K) 
Denison (AH) 
Kenyon (B A) 



DISTRICT VII. 



DISTRICT VIII. 



Washington & Jefferson (T) 
West Virginia (B *) 



Ohio (B K) 
Ohio State (0 A) 
Wittenberg (A r) 



Ohio Wesley an (®) 
Western Reserve (B) 



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De Pauw (A) 
Hanover (I) 
Indiana (II) 




district IX. 



Purdue (B M) 
Wabash (T) 



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Beloit (X) 
Chicago (A P) 

Illinois (2 P) 
Knox (H) 



district X. 



Michigan (A) 

North western (P) 
Wisconsin (A II) 



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district XL 






Iowa (A B) 
Iowa State (T 2) 
Iowa Wesleyan ( A E ) 



Kansas (A N) 
Missouri (Z <J>) 
Yanderbilt (B A) 



Oklahoma (P $) 
Texas (B O) 



Colorado (B T) 
Colorado Mines (B 4>) 



district XII. 



district XIII. 



district XIV. 



Minnesota (B II) 
Nebraska (AT) 
South Dakota (P A) 



Washington (A I) 
Westminster (A A) 



Tulane (B S) 



Denver (A Z) 
Utah (T B) 



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California (fi) 
Oregon (B P) 



DISTRICT XV. 



district XVI. 



Stanford (AS) 



Washington State (B Q) 



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Kappa ^tgma 

GAMMA GAMMA CHAPTER 

Established 1904 

FRATRES IN URBE 
M. B. Tenant 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

W. G. Haldane 

W. R. Chedsey 

FRATRES IN COLLEGIUM 



1914 



L. Brooke 
G. A. Brandow 
C. W. Hammen 
M. Hutton 
J. B. Johnson 

R. B. Anderson 
J. J. Burns 

B. C. Essig 

C. E. Carstens 

E. A. Hammen 

G. W. Cutting 
H. F. Maxson 
CD. Moore 
H. E. Munn 
J. R. Poss 

F. W. Putman 



1915 



1916 



1917 



P. S. Moses 
E. G. Snedaker 
L. K. Taylor 
C. N. Whitaker 



R. P. Oliveros 

C. T. Todd 

G. H. YanDorp 

J. L. Keese 
A. C. Levis 

L. A. Renehan 
E. W. Robinson 
II. A. Robinson 
T. C. Smith 
X. I. Stotz 




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Chapter Uoll 

DISTRICT I. 

Psi — University of Maine, Orono, Me. 
Alpha-Lambda — University of Vermont, Burlington, Vt. 
Alpha-Rho — Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Me. 
Beta- Alpha — Brown University, Providence, R. I. 
Beta-Kappa — New Hampshire College, Durham, N. H. 
Gamma-Delta — Massachusetts Agricultural College, Amherst, Mas 
Gamma-Epsilon — Dartmouth College, Hanover, N. H. 
Gamma-Eta — Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. 

DISTRICT II. 

Pi — Swarthmore College, Swarthmore, Pa. 

Alpha-Epsilon — University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Alpha-Kappa — Cornell University, Ithaca, X. Y. 

Beta-Iota — Lehigh University, South Bethlehem, Pa. 

Gamma-Zeta — New York University, Xew York City. 

Gamma-Iota — Syracuse University, Syracuse, X. Y. 

DISTRICT III. 

Alpha-Delta — Pennsylvania State College, State College, Pa. 
Alpha-Phi — Bucknell University, Lewisburg, Pa. 
Beta-Delta — Washington & Jefferson College, Washington, Pa. 
Beta-Pi — Dickinson College, Carlisle, Pa. 

district IV. 
Zeta — University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va. 
Eta — Randolph-Macon College, Ashland, Va. 
Mu — Washington and Lee University, Lexington, Va. 
Xu — William & Mary College — Williamsburg, Va. 
Upsilon — Hampden-Sidney College, Hampden-Sidney, Va. 
Alpha-Alpha — University of Maryland, Baltimore, Md. 
Alpha-Eta — George Washington University, Washington, D. C. 
Beta-Beta — Richmond College, Richmond, Va. 

district V. 
Delta — Davidson College, Davidson, X. C. 
Eta-Prime — Trinity College, Durham, X. C. 
Alpha-Mu — University of Xorth Carolina, Chapel Hill. X. C. 
Beta-Upsilon— North Carolina A. & M. College, W. Raleigh, N. C. 

DISTRICT VI. 

Beta — University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Ala. 
Alpha-Beta — Mercer University, Macon, Ga. 
Alpha-Tau — Georgia Tech., Atlanta, Ga. 
Beta-Eta — Alabama Polytechnic Institute, Auburn, Ala. 
Beta-Lambda — University of Georgia, Athens, Ga. 

DISTRICT VII. 

Gamma — Louisinia State University, Baton Rouge, La. 
Sigma — Tulane University, New Orleans, La. 
Alpha-Upsilon — Millsaps College, Jackson, Miss. 

DISTRICT VIII. 

Theta — Cumberland University, Lebanon, Term. 
Kappa — Yanderbilt University, Nashville, Tenn. 




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Lambda — University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tenn. 

Phi— Southwestern Presbyterian University, Clarksville, Tenn. 

Omega — University of the South, Sewanee, Tenn. 

Beta-Nu — University of Kentucky, Lexington, Ky. 

district IX. 
Alpha-Zeta — University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. 
Alpha-Sigma — Ohio State University, Columbus, O. 
Beta-Phi— Case School of Applied Science, Cleveland, O. 
Gamma-Xi — Denison University, Granville, O. 

district X. 
Chi — Purdue University, LaFayette, Ind. 
Alpha-Gamma — University of Illinois, Champaign, 111. 
Alpha-Pi — Wabash College, Crawfordsville, Ind. 
Alpha-Chi — Lake Forest University, Lake Forest, 111. 
Beta-Epsilon — University of Wisconsin, Madison, -Wis. 
Beta-Theta — University of Indiana, Bloomington, Ind. 
Gamma-Beta — University of Chicago, Chicago, 111. 

DISTRICT XL 

Alpha-Psi — University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Neb. 
Beta-Mu — University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn. 
Beta-Rho — University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa. 
Gamma-Lambda— Iowa State College, Ames, Iowa, 

DISTRICT XII. 

Alpha-Omega — William Jewell College, Liberty, Mo. 
Beta-Gamma — University of Missouri, Columbia, Mo. 
Beta-Sigma — Washington University, St. Louis, Mo. 
Beta-Tau — Baker University, Baldwin, Kansas. 
Beta-Chi — Missouri School of Mines, Rolla, Mo. 
Gamma-Xu — Washburn College, Topeka, Kansas. 
Gamma-Omicron — University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas. 

DISTRICT XIII. 

Xi — University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Ark. 
Gamma-Kappa — University of Oklahoma, Norman, Okla. 

DISTRICT XIV. 

Iota — Southwestern University, Georgetown, Texas. 
Tau — University of Texas, Austin, Texas. 

DISTRICT XV. 

Beta-Omicron — University of Denver, University Park, Colo. 
Beta-Omega — Colorado College, Colorado Springs, Colo. 
Gamma-Gamma — Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colo. 

DISTRICT XVI. 

Beta-Zeta — Leland Stanford University, Stanford University, 
Beta-Xi — University of California, Berkeley, Cal. 

DISTRICT XVII. 

Beta-Psi — University of Washington, Seattle, Wash. 
Gamma-Alpha — University of Oregon, Eugene, Ore. 
Gamma-Theta — University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho. 
Gamma-Mu— Washington State College, Pullman, Wash. 



Cal. 



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COLORADO LAMBDA CHAPTER 

Established 1903 

FRATRE IN URBE 
F. J. Rcinhart 

FRATRE IX FACULTATE 
L. F. Miller 

FRATRES IN COLLEGIUM 

1913 
M. W. Wilkinson 



A. F. Carper 

E. R. Crutcher 
R. R. Har])er 

D. W. Butner 
G. S. Davis 
A. F. Duggleby 

C. B. Gauthier 
\Y. A. Harrod 

F. H. Geib 
N. E. Maxwell 



1914 



1915 



1916 



1917 



R. E. Litchfield 
A. W. Smith 
E. A. Strong 

C. A. Rogers 
J. N. Teets 
W. A. Franklin 

G. M. Cheney 



A. W. Stedman 
C. W. Teets 




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Lambda — University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tenn. 

Phi — Southwestern Presbyterian University, Clarksville, Tenn. 

Omega — University of the South, Sewanee, Tenn. 

Beta-Nu — University of Kentucky, Lexington, Ky. 

district IX. 
Alpha-Zeta — University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Mich. 
Alpha-Sigma — Ohio State L T niversity, Columbus, O. 
Beta-Phi — Case School of Applied Science, Cleveland, O. 
Gamma-Xi — Denison University, Granville, O. 

district X. 
Chi — Purdue University, LaFayette, Ind. 
Alpha-Gamma — University of Illinois, Champaign, 111. 
Alpha-Pi — Wabash College, Crawfordsville, Ind. 
Alpha-Chi — Lake Forest University, Lake Forest, 111. 
Beta-Epsilon — University of Wisconsin, Madison, -Wis. 
Beta-Theta — University of Indiana, Bloomington, Ind. 
Gamma-Beta — University of Chicago, Chicago, 111. 

district XL 
Alpha-Psi — University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Neb. 
Beta-Mu — University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn. 
Beta-Rho — University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa. 
Gamma-Lambda — Iowa State College, Ames, Iowa. 

district XII. 
Alpha-Omega — William Jewell College, Liberty, Mo. 
Beta-Gamma — University of Missouri, Columbia, Mo. 
Beta-Sigma — Washington University, St. Louis, Mo. 
Beta-Tau — Baker University, Baldwin, Kansas. 
Beta-Chi — Missouri School of Mines, Rolla, Mo. 
Gamma-Xu — Washburn College, Topeka, Kansas. 
Gamma-Omicron — University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas. 

district XIII. 
Xi — University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Ark. 
Gamma-Kappa — University of Oklahoma, Norman, Okla. 

district XIV. 
Iota — Southwestern University, Georgetown, Texas. 
Tau — University of Texas, Austin, Texas. 

district XV. 
Beta-Omicron — University of Denver, University Park, Colo. 
Beta-Omega — Colorado College, Colorado Springs, Colo. 
Gamma-Gamma — Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colo. 

district XVI. 
Beta-Zeta — Leland Stanford University, Stanford University, Cal. 
Beta-Xi — University of California, Berkeley, Cal. 

district XVII. 
Beta-Psi — University of Washington, Seattle, Wash. 
Gamma- Alpha — University of Oregon, Eugene, Ore. 
Gamma-Theta — University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho. 
Gamma-Mu — Washington State College, Pullman, Wash. 



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^igma aipfta OBpsilon 

COLORADO LAMBDA CHAPTER 

Established 1903 

FRATRE IN URBE 
F. J. Reinhart 

FRATRE IN FACULTATE 
L. F. Miller 

FRATRES IN COLLEGIUM 

1913 
M. W. Wilkinson 









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A. F. Carper 

E. R. Crutcher 
R. R. Harper 

D. W. Butner 
G. S. Davis 
A. F. Duggleby 

C. B. Gauthier 
W. A. Harrod 

F. H. Geih 
N. E. Maxwell 



1914 



1915 



1916 



1917 



R. E. Litchfield 
A. W. Smith 
E. A. Strong 

C. A. Rogers 
J. N. Teets 
W. A. Franklin 

G. M. Cheney 



A. W. Stedman 
C. W. Teets 




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PROVINCE ALPHA 

Maine Alpha University of Maine 

Massachusetts Beta-Upsilon Boston University 

Massachusetts Iota-Tau Massachusetts Instittue of Technology 

Massachusetts Gamma '. . . Harvard University 

Massachusetts Delta Worcester Polytechnic Institute 

New Hampshire Alpha Dartmouth College 

PROVINCE BETA 

New Vork Alpha Cornell University 

New York Mu Columbia University 

New York Sigma-Phi St. Stephen's College 

New York Delta Syracuse University 

Pennsylvania Omega Allegheny College 

Pennsylvania Sigma-Phi Dickinson College 

Pennsylvania Alpha-Zeta .Pennsylvania State College 

Pennsylvania Zeta Bucknell University 

Pennsylvania Delta Gettysburg College 

Pennsylvania Theta University of Pennsylvania 

Pennsylvania Chi Omicron University of Pittsburgh 

PROVINCE GAMMA 

Washington City Rho George Washington University 

Virginia Omicron University of Virginia 

Virginia Sigma Washington and Lee University 

North Carolina Xi University of North Carolina 

North Carolina Theta Davidson College 

PROVINCE DELTA 

Michigan Iota-Beta University of Michigan 

Michigan Alpha Adrian College 

Ohio Sigma Mt. Union College 

Ohio Delta Ohio Wesleyan University 

Ohio Epsilon University of Cincinnati 

Ohio Theta Ohio State University 

Ohio Rho -Case School of Applied Science 

Indiana Alpha Franklin College 

Indiana Beta Purdue University 

Indiana Gamma University of Indiana 

Illinois Psi-Omega Northwestern University 

Illinois Beta University of Illinois 

Illinois Theta University of Chicago 

Illinois Delta Millikin University 

Minnesota Alpha University of Minnesota 

Wisconsin Alpha University of Wisconsin 




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PROVINCE EPSILON 

Georgia Beta .University of Georgia 

Georgia Psi Mercer University 

Georgia Lpsilon Emorv Colleae 

?r, rgla Ph J Georgia School of Technology 

Alabama Iota Southern University 

Alabama Mu . University of Alabama 

Alabama Alpha Mu , ..Alabama Polytechnic Institute 

PROVINCE ZETA 

Missouri Alpha University of Missouri 

Missouri Beta Washington University 

Nebraska Lambda-P, University of Nebraska 

Arkansas Alpha-L psilon University of Arkansas 

Kansas Alpha University of Kansas 

Kansas Beta Kansas State College 

J 0Wa ^eta University of Iowa 

Iowa Gamma Iowa State Coll 

South Dakota Sigma University of South Dakota 

PROVINCE ETA 

Colorado Chi University of Colorado 

Colorado Zeta University of Denver 

( olorado Lambda Colorado School of Mines 

PROVINCE THETA 

Louisiana Epsilon. Louisiana State University 

Louisiana Tau-Upsilon Tulane University 

S?f Rh \: University of Texas 

Oklahoma Kappa University of Oklahoma 

PROVINCE IOTA 

Kentucky Kappa Central University 

Kentucky Iota Bethel College 

Kentucky Epsilon Kentucky State University 

Tennessee Zeta Southwestern Presbyterian University 

Tennessee Lambda Cumberland University ' 

Tennessee Nu Vanderbilt University 

Tennessee Kappa University of Tennessee 

Tennessee Omega University of the South 

Tennessee Eta Union University 

PROVINCE KAPPA 

California Alpha Leland Stanford, Jr., University 

California Beta University of California } 

Washington Alpha University of Washington 




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GAMMA ETA CHAPTER 
Established in 1901 

FRATRES IX COLLEGIUM 

Samuel E. Watson 



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Xeil McNeill 
Russel P. Luke 
Karl L. Koelker 
Louis F. Clark 
Oscar A. Fischer 



Joseph H. Woolf, Jr. 
Andre R. Brousseau 
Edward V. Graybeal 
Arthur Krohn 



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Samuel J. Burris, Jr. 
Adolph S. Walter 



Harold L. Bicknell 
John H. Winchell, Jr. 
Kenneth S. Ferguson 



John H. Post 
Robert Higgins 



1915 



1916 



1917 



Breese Rosette 
Walter C. Pasre 



Harry M. Lavender 
Frank A. Smith 
William M. Traver, Jr. 



William H. Williams 
Lee K. Worth 



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PROVINCE EPSILON 

Georgia Beta University of Georgia 

Georgia Psi Mercer University 

Georgia Epsilon Emory College 

Georgia Phi Georgia School of Technology 

Alabama Iota Southern University 

Alabama Mu .University of Alabama 

Alabama Alpha Mu ] . . ..Alabama Polytechnic Institute 

PROVINCE ZETA 

Missouri Alpha University of Missouri 

Missouri Beta Washington University 

Nebraska Lambda-Pi University of Nebraska 

Arkansas Alpha-Upsilon University of Arkansas 

Kansas Alpha University of Kansas 

Kansas Beta Kansas State College 

Iowa Beta University of Iowa 

Iowa Gamma I owa State College 

South Dakota Sigma University of South Dakota 

PROVINCE ETA 

Colorado Chi University of Colorado 

Colorado Zeta University of Denver 

Colorado Lambda Colorado School of Mines 

PROVINCE THETA 

Louisiana Epsilon Louisiana State University 

Louisiana Tau-Upsilon Tulane University 

Texas Rho University of Texas 

Oklahoma Kappa University of Oklahoma 

PROVINCE IOTA 

Kentucky Kappa Centra] University 

Kentucky Iota Bethel College 

Kentucky Epsilon Kentucky State University 

Tennessee Zeta Southwestern Presbyterian University 

Tennessee Lambda Cumberland University 

Tennessee Nu Vanderbilt University 

Tennessee Kappa University of Tennessee 

Tennessee Omega University of the South 

Tennessee Eta Union University 

PROVINCE KAPPA 

California Alpha Leland Stanford, Jr., University 

California Beta University of California 

Washington Alpha University of Washington 




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GAMMA ETA CHAPTER 

Established in 1901 

FRATRES IX COLLEGIUM 
Samuel E. Watson 



Neil McNeill 
Russel P. Luke 
Karl L. Koelker 
Louis F. Clark 
Oscar A. Fischer 



1914 



Joseph H. Woolf, Jr. 
Andre R. Brousseau 
Edward Y. Graybeal 
Arthur Krohn 



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Samuel J. Burris, Jr. 
Adolph S. Walter 



Harold L. Bicknell 
John H. Winchell, Jr. 

Kenneth S. Ferguson 



John H. Post 
Robert Higgins 



1915 



1916 



1917 



Breese Rosette 
Walter C. Page 



Harry M. Lavender 
Frank A. Smith 
William M. Travel'. Jr. 



William H. Williams 
Lee K. Worth 










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FIRST DIVISION 
Beta — University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va. 
Lambda — Washington & Lee University, Lexington, Va. 
-University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill N. C. 



Psi- 



Beta Tau — North Carolina College of A. & M. Arts 
Delta-Kappa — Delaware College, Newark, Del. 



West Raleigh, N. C. 



SECOND DIVISION 
Sigma — Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Term, 
Gamma-Iota— State University of Kentucky, Lexington, Ky. 

THIRD DIVISION 
Mu — University of Georgia, Athens, Ga. 
Theta— University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Ala. 
Iota — Howard College, East Lake, Ala. 
Kappa — North Georgia Agricultural College, Dahlonega, 
Eta — Mercer University, Macon, Ga. 
Xi— Emory College, Oxford, Ga. 

Beta-Theta — Alabama Polytechnic Instittue, Auburn, Ala 
Gamma-Alpha— Georgia School of Technology, Atlanta, 
Delta-Mu — Stetson University, De Land, Fla. 



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FOURTH DIVISION 
Epsilon— Bethany College, Bethany, W. Va. 
Beta-Nu — Ohio State University, Columbus. 
Beta-Iota — Mt. Union-Scio College, Alliance, Ohio. 
Gamma-Pi— West Virginia University, Morgantown. 
Delta-Alpha— Case School of Applied Science, Cleveland, Ohio. 
Delta-Zeta— Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. 

FIFTH DIVISION 

Delta-Theta — Lombard College, Galesburg, 111. 
Gamma-Rho— University of Chicago, Chicago. 
Gamma-Gamma — Albion College, Albion, Mich. 
Gamma-Beta — Northwestern University, Evanston, 111. 
Gamma-Lambda — University of Wisconsin, Madison. 
Gamma-Mu — University of' Illinois, Champaign. 
Gamma-Nu — University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. 

SIXTH DIVISION 

Beta-Mu — State University of Iowa, Iowa Citv. 
Gamma-Sigma — Iowa State College, Ames. 
Gamma-Tau — University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. 
Delta-Eta — University of Nebraska, Lincoln. 












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SEVENTH DIVISION 
Nu — University of Kansas, Lawrence. 
Rho — University of Missouri. Columbia. 
Beta-Xi — William Jewell College, Liberty, Mo. 
Gamma-Xi — Missouri School of Mines, Rolla. 
Gamma-Omicron — Washington University. 
Delta-Epsilon— University of Oklahoma,' Norman. 
Beta-Kappa— Kansas State Agricultural College, Manhattan. 

EIGHTH DIVISION 
Upsilon — University of Texas, Austin. 
Bhi — Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge. 
Beta-Phi — Tulane University, New Orleans. 
Gamma-Upsilon — University of Arkansas, Fayetteville. 

NINTH DIVISION 

Gamma-Eta— Colorado School of Mines, Golden. 
Gamma-Kappa — University of Colorado, Boulder. 

TENTH DIVISION 

Gamma-Chi— University of Washington, Seattle. 
Gamma-Zeta — University of Oregon, Eugene. 
Gamma-Phi — University of Montana, Missoula. 
Delta-Iota — State College of Washington, Pullman. 

ELEVENTH DIVISION 
Beta-Chi — Leland Stanford, Jr., University. 
Beta-Psi— University of California, Berkeley. 

TWELFTH DIVISION 
Pi — Lehigh University, South Bethlehem, Pa. 
Beta-Rho — University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. 
Gamma-Epsilon — LaFayette College, Easton, Pa. 
Gamma-Theta — Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y. 
Gamma-Psi — Syracuse University, Syracuse, N. Y. 
Delta-Delta — Pennsylvania State College. 

THIRTEENTH DIVISION 
Beta-Beta — DePauw University, Greencastle, Ind. 
Beta-Zeta — Purdue University, LaFayette, Ind. 
Beta-Eta — Indiana University, Bloomington. 
Beta-Upsilon— Rose Polytechnic Institute, Terre Haute, Ind. 

FOURTEENTH DIVISION 
Beta-Sigma— University of Vermont, Burlington. 
Gamma-Delta— Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, 
Delta-Beta — Dartmouth College, Hanover, N. H. 
Delta-Gamma — Columbia University, New York. 
Delta-Lambda — Brown University, Providence, R. I. 
Delta-Nu — University of Maine, Orono. 



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8. p. a. 

Founded in 1910 

MEN IN COLLEGE 

1914 
Mark U. Watrous 



1915 



Alfred H. Bebee 
Ulysses H. Berthier 
Van Cleave A. Olson 



Carl A. Blaurock 
August Chatin 



1916 



James Ord 

L. Adair Stewart 

William S. Stringham 



Walter H. Ralph 
Santiago Urteaga 



1917 
Thaddeus H. Andrews 




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Founded in 1909 



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IN FACULTY 

E. J. Dittus 
W. G. Haldane 
L. F. Miller 
H. J. Wolf 



IN SCHOOL 

A. L. Bolam 
G. A. Brandow 
L. Brooke 
C. F. Haselton 
M. Hutton 
J. B. Johnson 
P. S. Moses 

F. L. Pittman 
R. W. Smith 

E. G. Snedaker 
M. E. Swigart 
P. B. VanDolah 

G. H. YanDorp 
L. L. White 

C. N. Whitaker, Jr. 
W. G. Zulch 



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Prof. H. B. Patton, X * 

Prof, E. J. Dittus, <r> K * 

Prof. C. R. Burger. ATA 

F. W. Foote, A T A 

L. M. Gross, A T A 

F. D. Holt, A T A 

H. H. De Laittre, ATA 

W. H. Hayden, A X 

H. S. McKnight, K A (Southern) 

J. W. Beam, K 2 

F. H. Wood, © K i 

A. H. Graham, <£> T A 

F. S. Follansbee, n K A 

S. S. Small, 2 X 



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GAMMA CHAPTER 

Established in 1907 



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FRATRE IX FACULTATE 
E. J. Dittus 

FRATRES IN COLLEGIUM 
1914 

L. Brooke 
T. W. Callahan 
E. R. Crutcher 
E. V. Graybeal 
R. E. Litchfield 
R. P. Luke 
J. W. Pearce 
E. G. Snedaker 
E. A. Strong 
T. H. Wool'f, Ir. 
E. R. Wilfley 

1915 

J. J. Burns 
S. J. Burris 
G. S. Davis 
H. H. DeLaittre 
D. C. Dodge 
B. C. Essig 
H. S. McKnight 
J. R. Shanley, Jr. 



C&aptct moll 

Alpha — University of Minnesota 

Beta — Michigan School of Mines 

Gamma — Colorado School of Mines 

Delta — Case School of Applied Science 

Epsilon — University of California • 

Zeta — University of Kansas 

Eta — Massachusetts Institute of Technology 



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ALPHA OF COLORADO CHAPTER 

Established 1905 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE 



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R. 


Chedsey 


Dr 


. Regis Chauvenet 


w. 


G. ' 


Haldane 


w. 


T. 


Hazard 


H. 


B. 


Patton 


H. 


M. 


Showman 


I; 


I. Taylor 


F. 


\Y. 


Traphagen 


H. 


J. 


Wolf 


FRATRES 


IX COLLEGIUM 




1914 


A. 


A. 


Bowhav 


L. 


F. 


Clark ' 


T. 


H. 


M. Crampton 


C. 


W. 


. Hammen 


M 


. Hutton 


P. 


S. 


Moses 


A. 


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. Smith 


R. 


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. Smith 


E. 


A. 


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C. 


N. 


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C. 


E. 


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1915 

D. W. Butner 
A. F. Duggleby 
J. H. Greenwood 
D. D. Hinman 
H. S. McKnight 
G. H. YanLorp 

HONORARY MEMBERS 

F. W. Swart 
F. E. Shepard 
A. A. Lakes 




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Alpha of Pennsylvania Lehigh University 

Alpha of Michigan Michigan Agricultural College 

Alpha of Indiana Purdue University 

Alpha of New Jersey Stevens Institute of Technology 

Alpha of Illinois University of Illinois 

Alpha of Wisconsin University of Wisconsin 

Alpha of Ohio Case School of Applied Science 

Alpha of Kentucky State University of Kentucky 

Alpha of New York Columbia University 

Alpha of Missouri University of Missouri 

Beta of Michigan Michigan College of Mines 

Alpha of Colorado Colorado School of Mines 

Beta of Colorado University of Colorado 

Beta of Illinois Armour Institute of Technology 

Beta of New York Syracuse University 

Gamma of Michigan University of Michigan 

Beta of Missouri Missouri School of Mines 

Alpha of California University of California 

Alpha of Iowa Iowa State College 

Gamma of New York Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

Beta of Iowa University of Iowa 

Alpha of Minnesota University of Minnesota 

Delta of New York Cornell University 

Alpha of Massachusetts Worcester Polytechnic Institute 

Alpha of Maine University of Maine 

Beta of Pennsylvania Pennsylvania State College 

Alpha of Washington University of Washington 




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Cfte <Seologp Cluti 

A. F. Duggleby, President F. E. Briber, Vice-President 

F, G. Brenneman, Secretary 



The newest organization of the student body is the Geology Club. Under 
the efforts and encouragement of Prof. Schneider, the club was organized and 
given a start. This club, though very much alive, has had hard times, owing 
to the seeming lack of interest at the meetings, but the chief reason for the 
dampening of the activities was the peculiar climate of the state, which always 
pulled off some big stunt in the line of weather. After several such set-backs, 
the club was determined to have a meeting regardless of the fury of the ele- 
ments, nothing in the line of weather that Colorado could give would be able 
to stop that meeting. All was ready, the word was passed, at last, the members 
were to put one over on the weather, and the appointed night came. 

Then, that very night, Colorado changed her climate, adopted a genuine 
Alaskan blizzard, and not only stopped the meeting, but stopped the whole 
Rocky Mountain region also. The storm raved, ripped, roared and snorted; 
the snow came down with a bang; and the Geology Club at last was tamed. 

But some dark night, when the weather is not looking, that Geology Club 
is going to sneak out and hold a meeting. Yet, should the climate again run 
amuck, the members will have to compromise for the sake of Colorado. The 
club is not a victim of hard luck, no siree; when seven times arrangements are 
made for a meeting, and for each of those seven times the weather does its 
worst, that isn't hard luck, THAT'S CONSPIRACY! 

Well, the club is going to keep on, that's certain. The object of the club 
is to study geology in the field and talk about it afterward. It never held one 
of these field trips for the simple reason that it snowed, and the snow covered 
the geology from view. We are truly surprised at this ill treatment from the 
weather. Is the state actually ashamed of its Geology? Well, let's not go into 
it deeper. We will admit that Colorado had a pretty nice climate before the 
club started, but that club was started and it's going to keep on. 






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■vens A. (". Dammann. 

W. L. Beck, '14 

R. F. White, '11 






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Third Annual Concert Program and 
List of Officers 

OFFICERS 

F. E. Heatly- President 

A. Bregman Vice-President 

E. F. Baker Sec'y and Treas. 

PROGRAM 

1. (a) College Song 

(b) Kentucky Babe Ceibel 

GLEE CLt'B 

2. Solo — Night and Dawn : Liddle 

Top O' the Mornin' Von-Tilzer 

MRS. BURGER 

3. (a) There Little Girl Don't Cry Westendorf 

(b) Carry Me Back to Old Virginny Bland 

GLEE CLUB 

4. Piano Solo — Waltz Caprice Mrs. Test 

MRS. TEST 

5. Traumerei Schuman 

MANDOLIN TRIO 

6. Ding Dong Bell Mvers 

GLEE CLUB 

7. Solo — Spring Voices Strauss 

MRS. BURGER 

8. Popular Selection 

MANDOLIN TRIO 

9. Reading 

MRS. FOSS 

10. "A Hard Night's Study" Selected 

GLEE CLUB 




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Cfre aiumm association 



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OFFICERS 

Presi dent \y. B. Milliken, '93 

Vice-President O. R. Whitaker, '98 

Secretary M. D. Draper, '97 

Treasurer W. O. Chamberlin, 'OS 

fF. S. Titsworth, '95 

Executive Committee.. J G. W. ScHNEmER, '94 

| G. A. Kennedy,' '95 

Ass't Sec'y and Treas . Orville Harrington, '98 



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Cfje integral Club iBoarD 

Neill M. McNeill, '14 
Alpheus B. Beall, Jr., '15 
H. E. Hornickel, '17 
Dave Johnson, Manager 



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Coloraoo ^cftool of opines alumni ^aga^tne ^taff 

Student Editor Adolph Bregman, '14 

J A. C. H. Dammann, '15 
Class Editors -< F. G. Brenneman, '16 

L N. I. Stotz, '17 

Athletic Editor H . W. Kaanta 

Ass't Athletic Editor R. p. Oliveros 



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^oiing even's Cimstian Association 



OFFICERS 

President F. L. Pittman, '14 

Vice-President E. F. Baker, '14 

Secretary W. L. Beck, '14 

Treasurer F. E. Briber, '16 

COMMITTEES 

E. F. Baker, '14 Wm. M. Traver, Jr., '16 

C. W. Hammen, '14 W. L. Beck, '14 

G. H. Van Dorp, '15 H. Tsai, 'IS 

F. E. Briber, '16 
General Secretary James C. Stevens 



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R. P. Luke, '14, President 
L. Brooke, '14 
K. Roberts, '14 

B. C. Essig, '15 
R. P. Oliveros, 'IS 
L. L. White, 'IS 

C. B. Gauthier, '16 
J. Lliteras, '16 

H. M. Lavender, '16 
Durkee, '17 
Williams, '17 
Smith, '17 



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Cf)e jFresjjman IBall 

THE COMMITTEE 
S. A. Mewhirter, Chairman 




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Music 

Earl Dickinson 
Henry G. Schneider 



Refreshments and Decorations 

Harry A. Robinson 
Merle Heitzman 
Norman E. Maxwell 
Clinton D. Moore 
John H. Post 



The Annual Freshman Ball, given by the Class of 1917, was held in 
Simon Guggenheim Hall on Friday evening, December 12, 1913. A descrip- 
tion of the affair would hardly be complete without mentioning the great 
handicap at the start. The transportation service from Denver had just been 
open a few days, on account of the heavy snow, and a few beaten paths through 
the four-foot blanket were the only approaches to Guggenheim Hall. But, 
despite this, ninety couples turned out and enjoyed the festivities of the 
evening. 

The big snow also gave the committee's scheme of decoration a big setback. 
A few of the bolder fellows braved the snow and obtained some Christmas 
greens from the mountains. Through the courtesy of several Golden mer- 
chants, enough pennants were obtained to more than decorate the hall and the 
touches of green here and there easily upheld the honor of the season. 

The dance proper consisted of twenty dances and two extras. Ice cream, 
sandwiches, coffee and cake were served during the intermission, while punch 
was on hand at all times. The dance was chaperoned by Dr. and Mrs. Regis 
Chauvenet, Acting President and Mrs. W. G. Haldane, Mr. and Mrs. F. C. 
Steinhauer, Dr. and Mrs. Herman Fleck, Dr. and Mrs. H. B. Patton, Prof, and 
Mrs. C. R. Burger and Prof, and Mrs. E. J. Dittus. House parties at the 
different fraternities brought the affair to an end, which, taken all in all, was 
a brilliant success. 






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Cbe junior prom. Committee 

DECORATION 1 
A. B. Beall f. H. Wood 



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MUSIC AND REFRESHMENTS 



James Ord 



G. H. Van Dorp 



J. N. Teets 



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FLOOR AND DECORATION 




R. P. Oliveros 
L. L. White 



H. W. Kaanta 
L. A. Stewart 



A. H. Graham 

SPECIALTY 
D. D. Hixmax 



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In order that all Freshmen may receive the proper welcome into "Mine," 
hfe it is customary to devote a day to them during the first week of school 
Having been instructed in their part of the festivities the day before the 
Freshmen gathered at the Clear Creek bridge at the close of school for the 
annual tug of war between the Freshman and Sophomore classes. After the 
necessary negotiations in choosing the side of the creek, etc., both classes 
assumed their positions and started to pull. However, this did not last very 
long, for the Freshmen soon pulled their superiors through the remarkably 

baX;:: eK after which both ciasses retired to w *» ^ 

the fit? r m - 1 ° f f ^'r'T da> ' b ° th the daSSeS S athered « the campus for 
he final struggle for the class supremacy. Arc lights had been provided for 
the watching crowds so that it was a very interesting sight. At the signal 
given by an upper classman the two classes rushed together with a clash and 
each proceeded to tie up their opponents. This lasted for an hour when 'the 
closing signal was given and the struggle ended. The count revealed that the 
Sophomores had turned the tables on the Freshmen as there were far more 
of the latter tied than of the former. 



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Senior iDap 

Once each year, March 17, the patron saint of all engineers, St. Patrick, 
is honored by the Senior class and incidentally the entire school. Woe be 
unto him who refuses to pay this humble homage, for there is always an abund- 
ance of catsup, mustard, etc., on hand ready for application. March 17, 1914, 
was no exception to the rule, so, accordingly, a band of some 60 Seniors gathered 
in a rendezvous at 10 a. m. and proceeded to put themselves inside and outside 
of almost anything available. The result was grotesque to say the least. At 
10:30 the Pee-rade started for the school buildings. At the front were two 
devils, which seemed to portend dire happenings to the Profs. They also 
depicted the fact that Satan catches them all, large or small, as shown by the 
great difference in size of Johnson and Tsui. The assemblage was inspired 
to do battle by the awe inspiring music of the "Insurrecto Band," composed of 
Smith, Grigsby, Litchfield and Pearce. The first fort attacked was Stratton 
Hall, where the Juniors were liberated from the clutches of "Happy" Hazard. 

Following the band was the famous speed car from Egypt, driven by men 
of the same calibre, namely "Snydhymer" and "Slocker." By means of it 
they lured "Gain- Deslys," who followed them on to destruction. In this 
costume or lack of costume, "Breggie" made quite a hit, in fact, he even had 
a wild man, hardened to such sights, following him. To see that no real harm 
was done by this terrible man eater, Baker, a coterie of Profs, followed. First 
came Bunsen Patton, ably portrayed by Crutcher, and accompanying him was 
"Trap" Zulch and "Doc" Chauvenet McNichoIas. 

All hands then stormed Prof. Miller's stronghold. He resisted bravely 
and was aided by a severe attack of "Grouch," so that the siege was quite a 
protracted one, in fact, it took quite a little persuasion to keep him from seizing 
Johnnie Johnson and tearing him to pieces. After breaking up the Freshman 
class the Pee-rade proceeded to Guggenheim, where the real events of the morn- 
ing were to be staged. Programs were then distributed and the show was on. 
First came Bunsen's "go to sleep'' lecture, presided over by Crutcher. Then 
our own beloved "Trap" issued forth and, assisted by Zulch, he gave a very 
varied and scattered dissertation on everything from cyaniding to stamp mills. 
Next, "Doc" Chauvenet in person of McNichoIas explained the origin of some 
of his jokes from the Sanscrit. The concluding number and easily the best of 



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the morning was entitled "The School of the Future," and was lead by 
"Chezzie" Clark, after which the participants retired for full dinner or only 
lunch, as the case might be. 

The afternoon was taken up by a baseball game between the Faculty and 
the Seniors. This was featured by the great display of up-to-the-minute 
baseball by Prof. Pynch, who held down third, which accounted, in part for 
the final score of Seniors + Infinity — Faculty 1. 



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In conclusion we hope that Senior Day will continue to grow and eventually 
be the means of bringing back the old "Grads" for just one day of innocent 
fun and frolic. 



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junior Smoker Committee 



Olsen, Chairman 



Wood 

McKnight 

DeLaittre 



Dodge 
Bebee 
Ord 



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Junior Smoker program 






1. Boxing — Blaurock and Garrison 

2. Fencing — Keyes and Taylor 

3. Cane Spree — Fullaway and Beyrle 

4. Presentation of letters by President Haldane 

5. Talk by Kistler and Pyke Johnson 

6. Quartet — Litchfield, Davis, Harrod, Snedaker 

7. Boxing — Brugger and Harper 

8. Wrestling — Moses and Menke 

9. Boxing — Turner and Lliteras 

10. Boxing — Prof. Knowles and Prof. Schneider 

11. Boxing — Van Burgh and Geib 

12. Wrestling — Taylor and Steele 

13. Mandolin Club — Pearce. Zulch and Smith 

14. Boxing — Stedman and Brown 






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Z&z ffilonOer 

Why Bird's Eye makes his cupels of K- CO 3 . 

Why the Dentists are being over-worked in Golden this year. 

Why Swigart puts powder on his nose. 

How McKnight got so much back on his assaying ticket. 

Why the curb on Washington avenue is so popular Sunday afternoons. 

Why Gauthier doesn't pick on someone his size in the basketball games. 

How Tuff}' Woolf ever made them believe he was big enough to join the army. 

Why Gross and Roberts don't swap Foot and Felix. 

Why Todd likes guinea-pigs. 

Why Dodge is addicted to the grape juice habit. 

How much Olsen weighs. 

Where Chedsey did his "practical mine surveying.'" 

How Ord cultivated the dimple in his chin. 

When we should use the square root of three. 

Why Pynch was absent at the Junior Smoker. 

When Fleck and Chauvenet will get some new stories. 

When Happy will get a hair cut. 

Where the annual artists get their models. 

If the Seniors will get the mumps. 



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HE PISSPECTns 







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J^ere anO Cbere 

Freshman — What caused those scars on Tiny's face ? 

Sophomore; — Those are not scars. They are striations due to twinning. 

+ t •(• 

Happy — The cost of supplies are given F. O. B. Portland. The holes 
for setting the poles cost $3.25 apiece. 

Clark— Is the $3.25 F. O. B. Portland? 

f|i 4, if. 

Burger — Well, John, it seems natural to see you back again in the class. 
How did you like Columbia? 

J. Beam — Oh, I liked it well enough, but they don't give enough Math. 
there. 

4* 4. 4- 



hot. 



First Sophomore — Gee, Miller surely does lose his temper when he gets 
Second Sophomore — Yes, he must have an awful lot of iron in his system. 

4. 4. 4. 

Patton — How does Monazite usually occur? 
Sophomore — In small glass bottles. 

4, 4. 4. 

Happy — Olsen, has this alternator an odd or even number of poles? 

Olsen — An odd number. 

Happy — What makes you think so? 

Olsen — Well, everything about A. C. is odd. 

4, 4, 4, 

Freshman in Drawing Laboratory — Mr. Taylor, I haven't any thumb 
tacks. 

Taylor — Well, use a finger nail. 

4? -i- 4" 

Fleck — Yes, oxygen is the most important element known, not only to 
man, but to all plant and animal life, and, strange to say, it was only dis- 
covered a few centuries ago. 

Marks — What did they do before they discovered it? 



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Sherwood— What figure can be inscribed within a rectangle? 
Stedman — An eclipse. 

•h ♦ ♦ 

Happy— Does anybody know what the square holes in the base of this 
alternator are for ? 

Essig— To break up the lines of magnetism floating around there. 

4. 4, 4. 

Freshman at home Christmas vacation— Yes, in Chemistry we learned all 
about Meta-oxytetraethyldiamidotriphinylcarbids. 

4. 4, 4. 

Red DeLaittre— I don't see how you ever got such a cake in your pipe 
\ ou never buy any tobacco. ' 

Gilly Davis — Oh, this is sponge cake. 

4. 4. 4, 

Rosette did some research work this morning. He counted the number of 
times per minute that Chedsey uses that fashionable Ah-ah. Result— 20 times. 

4. 4, 4, 

Teets— Well, let's go to E. P. T. 
Butner — That's a happy thought. 

# ♦ ♦ 

White, in Hydrostatics— Will you please explain the Bourbon gage? 

♦ 4> 4/ 

called?^ 5 " - What ^ the ° peration of cleanin S U P a sluic e with a spoon 
Roll — Spooning. 

4. 4, 4, 

Oceans of love and a kiss on each wave. 



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Quarried even's Clufi 



Motto: "Let the women do the work" 
Colors : Black and Blue or Spanked Red 
Emblem : Baby Cab. 

FACULTY ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



H. M. Showman 



C. D. Test 



I. C. Bailar 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



Keeper of Safety Pins 
H. W. Kaaxta 



Chief Cab Wheeler 
M. Espixosa 



Custodian of the Soothing Syrup 
T. H. M. Crampton 



PLEDGED MEX 



L. F. Clark 
Keith Roberts 
W. G. Zulch 
A. L. Bolam 

D. D. Hinman 
O. A. Fischer 

E. A. Strong 
A. W. Smith 



B. C. Essig 
A. L. Lee 
S. Z. Krumm 
L. K. Taylor 
Neffl MacNeffl 
H. G. Grauting 
A. S. Walter 
M. W. Wilkinson 



Der jfeetspall (Same 

You know my son Ikey? Yell, I got a tellesmapatch savin' "Fadder, 
come up to de feetspall game." Yell I vent up and Ikey got's me a seat avay 
up in de scrandstand. Everything vas fine until dot funny man vot makes der 
noise mit de hands begin his monkeydoodle bizness. I stood it de best vot I 
could, but I tink he was a Jew. Purty soon some more funny fellows come 
out and dey stooped down and de crowd holler'd for them to stop. I tink 
somebody owned de pall. Anyhow one man starts to auction it off an says 
"32-51-25-hep." I guess Ikey bid de highest; dey gif him de pall and mine 
son Ikey starts to makin' de outskippen mit de feet and some big fella gifs 
mine Ikey a vallop in de noses and anoter pulls de foot off of him. Poor 
Ikey. De mob vent vild und started makin' a clappin mit de hands and a yell 
"Hurra. Hurra for Goldstein," and I say, "For vy you laugh und say dot ven 
mine Ikey is kilt?" And he say, "He gained a yard." And I say, "Yes he 
gained a yard and lost a foot. To hell mit de feetspall game." 



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15e accurate 

DAILY REPORT 

Copper Co. 

Shift— Day 

Working Place— 105 B 

Holes Drilled— One 

Depth of Hole — 3 ft. 2' 4 in. 

Powder — 2V\ sticks 

Fuse— 4 ft.' 10J/6 in. 

Caps — One 

Remarks — One missed hole 

Signed: Fete O'Brien 

Colorado ^cijool of Seines tttnoerrjarten 
Students' Denver Permit 

Name of student 

Name of father or guardian 

Address of father or guardian 

Time you expect to leave Golden 

What are you going to do in Denver ? 

How much money are you taking? 

Where are you going to spend it ? 

Time you expect to return to Golden 

Approved or not approved 

(Signature of Instructor) 

NOTE — This card must be presented for approval immediately after 
your return. Students returning after 8 P. M. shall present this card to the 
night watchman. 

Students' Hoisting Permit 

Name of student 

Street address 

Which hoist room do you prefer ? 

How many trips do you make to the hoist room? 

Do you hoist during the day or during the night? 

How much can you hoist in an hour ? 

What effects has hoisting on- you ? ' 

Approved or not approved 

(Signature of Instructor) 

NOTE — Students should form themselves into squads of two or more. 
("United we stand, separated we fall.") 

J 3 | £ 



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O our advertisers 
we are indebted 
in a very large 
degree, for by their 
liberal support this 
"Prospector" was 
made possible. 




We Solicit Your Patronage 
in Their Behalf 



Personal, Prompt, n ... , „ 

Friendly and Capital and Surplus 

Efficient Service. ? 100 ' 000 



Progressive Management and Conservative 
Methods Are Afforded the Corre- 
spondents and Customers of 



XLhc 

XKHoobe^1Rubq> 

Iftattonal Bank 

(Solben, dolorabo 




United States Depository 



W. S. Woods, President 
H. M. Rubey, Vice-President J. W. Rubey, Vice-President 

T. V. Phelps, Rce-Prewtfew* H. W. Pratt, Cashier 

Gordon Smith, Ass't Cashier 



We Appreciate Your Patronage 



FOSS 

DRUG 

CO M P A N Y 



ufmSiS: 



Rexall Store 



Golden, 



Colorado 




1A Ansco 

$15 and $20 

Also made in all 
regular sizes at 

$6 to $55 



A Good Camera is Indispensable to a 
Mining Engineer 

•J High Grade Photo Supplies, 
Films, Plates, Papers. Importers 
of Exclusive European Equipment. 

Superior Photo Finishing 



OSSEN s p u H , 

415 AND 819 16TH STREET 



OTO 
SUPPLY 



Ainsworth Precision 
Theodolites 



Are preferred by discriminating 

engineers owing to their accuracy, 
rigidity and stability of adjustment. 



Send for Catalogs showing balances and 

engineers' instruments of our 

manufacture. 



Wm. Ainsworth & Son 

Denver, Colo., U. S. A. 



DORR 

MILLING SPECIALTIES 

ARE USED IN 
PRACTICALLY ALL 
LEADING MILL 8 

Here are a few Colorado users: 

Ajax Gold Mining Co. 
Golden Cycle Mining Co. 
Liberty Bell Gold Mining Co. 
Portland Gold Mining Co. 
Smuggler Union Mining Co. 
Tomboy Gold Mines Co., Ltd. 
Western Chemical Mfg. Co. 

CLASSIFIERS THICKENERS 

AGITATORS 

Write us for full data of 
machines in operation 

The Dorr Cyanide Machinery Company 

730 First National Bank Bldg. 

Denver, Colorado 



The Colorado Fuel 
and Iron Company" 



Wire Nails 

Miscellaneous nails, brads, cement coated nails, tinned, blued and galvanized 
nails, wire spikes, special nails. 

Wire 

Wire rods, plain annealed wire, annealed bale wire, plain galvanized wire, 
annealed market and stone wire, bright soft market wire, galvanized market and 
stone wire, coppered and liquor-finished market wire, wire hoops. 

Nail wire, hard, soft or extra soft, solid galvanized clothes lines, wire straightened 
and cut to lengths, telephone wire, twisted cable wire, extra heavy galvanized wire for 
winding wooden stave pipe. 

Staples 

Fence staples, polished and galvanized, poultry netting staples, concrete staples, 
blind staples, hoop staples, barrel staples, basket staples, tub staples, hame staples, 
electrician staples, speaking tube staples, broom staples, clamp staples, bedspring 
staples, and other special staples, double pointed tacks. 

Barb Wire 

Barb wire, painted and galvanized, 2-pt. and 4-pt, hog and cattle. 

Single Loop Bale Ties, Field Fence 
Poultry Fence, Pig Iron 

Spiegel, Bessemer and Open Hearth Blooms and Billets. 

Steel Rails 

Plain Splices and angle bars, angles, channels, track bolts, track spikes, bridge 
and machine bolts, lag screws, nuts, rivets, steel bands, rolled thread for wooden 
stave pipe, twisted bars for reinforced concrete. 

Bar Iron and Steel 

Steel shafting, R. E. steel and iron tire, toe calk, plow, lay, slight shoe, rough 
lock, mild and machinery steel, screen bars. Cast iron water and gas pipe and 
specials. 

Steam and Domestic Coal, Coke 



GENERAL OFFICES 

BOSTON BUILDING, DENVER, COLORADO 



The 

American Metal 
Company 

(Limited, of New York) 



Buyers of ZlUC OrCS 

Lead Ores 
Copper 
and Lead Bullion 



825 A. C. FOSTER BLDG. 

Denver, Colo. 



Speed 

Is the Purpose of the Typewriter 

Accuracy 

Is a Requirement of Speed 

Stability 

Insures Continued Efficiency 

The 

Underwood 

Has them all 
(See the Records) 



'The Machine You Will Eventually Buy" 



Denver Branch: 
1631 CHAMPA STREET 



COMPLIMENTS 

of 



The Garlock Packing 
Company 

(Incorporated) 



1540-42 Cleveland Place 
Denver, Colo. 



Come in and 
See the 



Plumb Pneumatic Jig 
Huff Electrostatic 



and 
the 



Separator 



Two Standard and 





Successful Ore 
Handling Devices 








* 




AMERICAN 

1422 Blake 


ZINC ORE SEPARATING CO. 

St. Denver, Colo. 




and 



Mining 
Milling 

Steam ana 
Electrical 



Machinery 
Supplies 

Designers, Manufacturers, Jobbers 

m 

ANY years' experience has brought our 
Engineering Department to the highest 
standard in all details of Mechanical, Elec- 
trical, Hydraulic, Alining and Metallurgical 
machinery and installation. This depart- 
ment is maintained for your benefit, and you should 
not hesitate to ask us, if there is any doubt in your mind. 






Hendrie &BoMioff 
Mfg.& Supply Co. 

Denver, Colorado. 





Get A Business Education 



Everywhere employers are looking for trained workers. They 
are looking for men who do not need to he told what to do. 
The country is fairly teeming with opportunities for young men who have a 
thorough business training. Plan to spend this summer in the study of 
Bookkeeping and Accountancy, Shorthand, Typewriting, Stenotypy, etc., at 

The Central Business College 

■111 15th St., Denver 



The Ohio & Colorado Smc lung & Refining Co. 

SALIDA, COLORADO 

Buyers of 

LEAD, COPPER AND MIXED ORES 

Producers of 

LEAD BULLION 



822 FOSTER BUILDING 



DENVER, COLORADO 




Card Patent Wheels 

ROLLER OH PLAIN BEARING. 
SPOKE OK PLATK PATTERN. 
OPEN OR DUST-PROOF Hl'B. 
A3JL STYLES EOR ANY CONDITION. 

Our trucks are easily attached to any mine car. 
Manufacturers of steel and wood mine cars, wheels, trucks, shaking and revolving screens, 
iges, dumps, steel chutes and hoppers, frogs and switches, sheaves, rope haulage supplies, etc. 

Our Catalogue on Request 

THE C. S. CARD IRON WORKS CO., Denver, Colo. 



Wm. M. Sarell 

HARDWARE AND PLUMBING 
COMPANY 

«J Pocket and Table Cutlery, Guns and 

Ammunition. 
€J Miners' and Mechanics Supplies. 
«J Blasting Powder, Fuse and Caps. 
q Plumbing. 

Our prices are right 

1118 WASHINGTON AVENUE 

Golden, Colo. 





£. 


£. 


Smith 




Dealei 


in 










Men's and 

Shoes, R 

Ovei 


Boys' Boots, 
ubbers and 
•shoes. 




Fine 


Shoe Repairing 















Pueblo's Largest and Finest Hotel 



200 ROOMS 

The Congress 

100 BATHS 



European Plan 
J. M. OAKS, Manager 

Pueblo, Colo. 



Rates: $1 a day and up. 



Go to the 



Orpheum 

Studio 



For a 

Perfect Likeness of 

Yourself. 



1521 Welton Street 

Denver, Colo. 



Primos Ferro-Yanadium 
Primos Tungsten 
Primos Molybdenum 



•I Buyers of Molybdenum and Tungsten 
Ores of Good Merchantable Quality. 



Primos Chemical Co- 

Primos, Delaware Co., Pa. 

ADDRESSES 



Telegraphic 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



( 'able 
"Briquette," Philadelphia 




Transits 
and Levels 



q Our Transits and Levels embody im- 
provements of design and construction that 
are recognized by the engineering pro- 
fession as being the best. Made complete 
in our own factories. In other words — 
made right. Send for catalog today. 

Eugene Dietzgen 

Company 

Manufacturers: 

Complete Line of Field and Office 
Supplies 

166 West Monroe St. 
CHICAGO 

New York San Francisco New Orleans 
Toronto Pittsburg Philadelphia 



Robinson's Book Store 

Students' Headquarters for Books, Stationery, 

Sporting Goods, Pennants, School of Mines 

Jewelry, Etc. Subscriptions taken to 

All Magazines. All Goods Sold 

At Denver Prices at 

Robinson's 




M. Koexig, President W. H. Bolitho, Secretary 

The 

Koenig Mercantile Company 

Staple and Fancy Groceries 

We make a specialty of supplying 

eating clubs and fraternities 
1884 1914 



Telephone Golden 691. Golden, Colorado 



The City Tailor Shop 

SUITS TO ORDER $16.00 UP 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 

Altering and Repairing Done at 

Reasonable Prices 

ilen's Suits Sponged and Pressed S .50 

Men's Suits Thoroughly Cleaned 1.00 

Ladies' Suits Thoroughly Cleaned .... $1 and up 

J. S. WALKER 

13th and Washington Avenue, Golden, Colorado 



Phone 
Golden 491 




Office 

lOtol 

3 to 

7 to- 


Hours 
2 A. M. 
S P. M. 
8 P. M. 


DR. 


ARNOLD 


MINNIG 




Physician 


and S 


urgeon 

Golden. 


Colo. 



Good Groceries at the 
Right Price 

Quality, not Quantity, our Motto 

MRS. E. ROWLING 

q GROCERIES, TOBACCOS, 
CIGARS, CANDY, ETC. 

1 1 OS Washington Ave. 
Phone Golden 851 Golden. Colorado 



ROBINSON'S ART AND 
NOVELTY STORE 

Photographic Supplies, Cigars 

and Candy. 

Stationery, Leading Periodicals, 

Daily Papers. 

Picture Framing, Developing and 

Printing Our Specialty. 

H. W. ROBINSON, Proprietor 

Armory Building 



LUTHER HERTEL 

•jMen's, Boys' and Children's 
Clothing, Furnishing Goods. 

€J Shoes, Bags, Trunks, Hats, 
Caps and Umbrellas. 



1212 Opera House Block Golden, Colo. 



Office Hours 

\ 1 :.•!(! to :{ 1*. M. 

I (!::!(! to S P. M. 
Sundays by Appointment 



Joseph R. Hood, M. D. 



Phone Golden 531 



Harrison Block Washington Ave. 

Golden. Colorado 



The 

GOLDEN MARKET 

F. J. MEYER, Proprietor 

HIGH GRADE MEATS 
FANCY SAUSAGES, ETC. 



Washington Ave. 



Phone Golden 1261 



Tailoring and French Dry 
Cleaning 

ONLY 

HIGH CLASS WORK 

DONE 

HARRY THE TAILOR 

Gem Theatre Bldg. 



Get Your Pipe 
Repaired at the 



Opera House Cigar Store 



CLIF. HOLBROOK, Proprietor 



PAUL FICHT 

CIGARS 

CIGARETTES 

TOBACCO 

GOLDEN, COLORADO 




Contractors 

Sheet Metal Work 

Plumbing" 

Steam Fitting 

Water Supply 

Heating and 

Sewer Systems 



J. H. Linder Hardware Co. 

General Hardware, Sporting Goods, Farm 

Implements, Seeds, and 

Harness 

Golden Colorado 



'COLORADO 

AND 

vSQUTHERN/ 



To Denver, Colorado Springs, Pueblo and Trinidad 

or to 

Boulder, Loveland, Longmont, Fort Collins, 
Greeley and Cheyenne 

Fast, Frequent, Dependable ami Ample Train Service 
Is Provided via the 

Colorado & Southern Railway 

The Colorado & Southern Lines comprise the straight southeast 
route from Denver to Ft. Worth, Dallas, San Antonio, Houston 
and Galveston, Texas. Saves J00 miles. Two daily trains — 
12:15 noon and 11:30 P. M. 

T. E. Fisher p mogixms, Agent 

General Passenger Agent, Golden, Colo 

Denver, Colo. 



The Standish 


N E W 


MODERN 


FIRE PROOF 

Popular Prices 


The Most Centrally Located Hotel Headquarters for School of Mines 
in Denver Students when in Denver 


S. C. HOOVER 

Proprietor 




— *»C«w*'^ r*m\- i 



BUREAU OF ENGRAVING INC. 

MINNEAPOLIS', MINNESOTA. 



The Roessler & Hasslacher 

Chemical Company 




LOO WILLIAM STREET 
NEW YORK 

Works: Perth Amboy, N. J. 



CYANIDE 

98-99 % 

CYANIDE OF SODIUM 

123-130'/ 
AND OTHER CHEMICALS FOR MIXING PURPOSES 




The Castle Rock 
Ice Cream Parlor 



J. E. DEXXIS 



Cigars, Cigarettes, 
Tobaccos, Candies 
Baur's Ice Cream 



St udents' Headquarters 



Phone Golden 701 



Golden, Coir 



Gem Theatre 

Golden's first, last and 
all the time 

Photoplay 

house for up-to-the-minute 

Movies 



Always Attend the "Gei 



Frank R. Ashley, 

President and General Manager 

Lewis B. Skinner, Paul C. Skinner, 

Treasurer and General Superintendent Secretary and Assistant Superintendent 



The Western Chemical 

Manufacturing Co. 

Manufacturers of 

COMMERCIAL SULPHURIC, MURIATIC AND NITRIC ACIDS, 

ELECTROLYTE, CHEMICALLY PURE ACIDS AND AMMONIA, 

AQUA AND ANHYDROUS AMMONIA, LIQUID CARBONIC ACID GAS 

V 

Buyers of 
MIXED ZINC, LEAD, IRON SULPHIDES 



Denver, Colo. 



The Trade Mark Protects the User 

There can be no question about the sound business sense of installing 
Trade-Marked goods. When you have occasion to specify or order valves please 
remember that all genuine 

The good service which these valves are sure to give 
makes them a permanent investment. Based on ser- 
vice, they are more economical to use than any other 
valve at any price. The complete valves seldom wear 
out. They have made good for over 40 years. 

Jenkins Bros, valves are made for all pressures 
and for all purposes, in brass, iron body or cast steel. 

Jenkins Bros, also make a superior line of mechan- 
ical rubber goods for engineering use, including Jenkins '96 and Jenarco sheet 
packing, pump valves, and the like. Catalogue descriptive of the entire line 
mailed on application. 

JENKINS BROS., New York, Boston, Philadelphia, Chicago 

Jenkins Bros., Limited, Montreal, London Jenkins Rubber Co., Elizabeth, N. J. 




TABOR GRAND i^, XG 

ALL SUMMER'S ENGAGEMENT 



Louis 15. Jacobs Tabloid 



Musical Comedy Co. 



50 PEOPLE 
MOSTLY GIRLS 



New Musical Travesty Production Each Week, Starting Sunday 
Matinees Sunday. Tuesday and Saturday 

Prices 10c, 20c and 30c 




The Regal 
Shoe Store 

FOR MEN AND 
WOMEN 

$3.50, $4.00 and $5.00 

538 Sixteenth St. Denver. Colo 



Phone Main 73f.ti 



The FINEST CHOP SUEY 
HOUSE IN THE WEST 

The Nanking 

Chop Suey. Noodles, American Short Oidt 



Open 11 A. M. to 6 A. sr. 
Orchestra 9 to 12 



Special Attention tr 
Parties 



1712 Curtis St. 



ReadThis 

THERE is absolutely 
nothing in the print- 
ing line we cannot do 
with real promptness, 
(jl The completeness of 
our plant places us in a position to do work in the 
most modern way. No job too large or too small. 

The Wahlgreen Publishing Co. 

Commercial Printers 
1846 Stout Street, Denver. Phones Main 1308-1309