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(Ebr i. 3H. Mill iCtbrarij 




Nnrth (Earolina &tatf Unitipratlg 

LD5b2t5 

N75 
v.l 

1903 

cop. 2 



THIS BOOK MUST NOT BE TAKEN 
FROM THE LIBRARY BUILDING, i 




20M- 10/72 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2009 with funding from 

NCSU Libraries 



http://www.archive.org/details/agromeck1903nort 



i>^^^^^^ 







VOLUME ONE M 



PUBLISHED ANNUALLY 
BY THE SENIOR CLASS OF THE 

North Carolina 

College §f Agriculture 

CS, Mechanic Arts 

WEST RALEIGH 



MAY : 



: Nineteen Hundred and Three ^^ 




MOOSE BROS. CO.. PRINTERS, LYNCHBURG. VA 




STATE CAPITOL 






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DR. GEORGE TAYLOE WINSTON 



THE AGROMECK ^ME^^m. 




George Tayloe Winston, A. M., LL. D. 

|.\S born October 12, 1852, in Windsor, Bertie county, North Carolina, son 
of Patrick Henry Winston and Martha Elizabeth Byrd. His ancestors are 
]-"nE;lish on the paternal and Scotch on the maternal side, and are well- 
known in the annals of Virginia. 

He was educated in the celebrated Horner School, Oxford, X. C : in 
the University of North Carolina, which he entered at the age of thirteen; in the 
United States Naval Academy, where he ranked No. i in his class; and in Cornell 
University, Ithaca, N. Y., where he received the medal for Latin scholarship, and 
during his senior year was appointed Instructor in Mathematics to fill the place of a 
professor who was given leave of absence. He was graduated from Cornell University 
in 1874 with the degree of Bachelor of Letters, and for high scholarship was enrolled 
as a member of the Phi Beta Kappa Society. 

On the reoganization of the University of North Carolina in 1S75 he '^^"^•^ elected 
Assistant Professor of Literature, at the age of 23, and the next year was promoted to 
the full professorship of Latin and German. For sixteen years he served as professor 
in the University, when by unanimous vote he was elected President. During the five 
years of his presidency he doubled the income of the University and ncarlv trebled its 
enrollment of students. 

In 1896 he resigned the presidency of the University of North Carolina to accept 
the presidency of the University of Texas, to which he was elected by unanimous vote 
of the Board of Regents of that institution. He greatly increased the income and the 
student enrollment of this university, and also brought it into close touch and sympa- 
thy with the public schools and with public sentiment, as he had done previously with 
the University of North Carolina. Finding the semi-tropical and arid climate of Texas 
very detrimental to the health of his family, he resigned the presidency of the Texas 
University and accepted the presidency of the North Carolina College of Agriculture 
and Mechanic Arts, to which he had been invited both by the Board of Trustees and 
by resolutions of the student body. This is the fourth year of his presidency, and 
the growth of the College in that time has been the wonder and the delight of the State. 
The "A. & M." now ranks with the best in the United states, and is doubtless the 
foremost in the South. 

President Winston's career as an educator and public speaker and writer is well 
known throughout the country. In addition to the positions above named, he has 
also been twice President of the North Carolina Teachers Assembly, President of the 
Association of Southern Colleges and Universities, member of the Board of Inspectors 
of the United States Mint at Philadelphia, member of the Board of Visitors of the 
United States Naval Academy. He has delivered lectures and orations before the 
National Education Association, the National Prison Reform Association, the American 
Academy of Political and Social Science, the Guilford Battle Ground Association, the 
University of Texas (commencement oration), the University of North Carolina (25th 
anniversary of re-organization), Clemson College (commencement oration). Harvard 
University (Phi Beta Kappa dinner). Nineteenth Century Club, New York citv. North 
Carolina Agricultural Society (annual address). Daughters of the Confederacy (annual 
address). United States Naval Academy (commencement exercises). 







THE CHRISTENING 



THE AGROMECK 



PREFACE 



r\tfl 



A] FTER man\' niunths of wcaiT toil, we submit the first volume of "The 
Ai;komkck, " not with fear and trembling, not c\en with the hope that it 
will find favor in }ciur e\es. We are forced to confess that it is far 
difterent fmin what our enthusiasm once led us to hope to make it. But 
-^|^y| the work was more difficult than we thouijht: sometimes we have been 
^^ 11 on the brink of giving up the task, but some kind, loving friend 
would breathe into i>ur ears words of encouragement. Thus we have laboretl 
on and finally produced this work, which will doubtless make the worlil stand 
agliast and amazed at its wondrous contents. Surelx', this is a wonderful book, 
not so much because <jf what it is itself, but because of the conditions under which 
we have labored. We have had no old, tried and trustv hand to guide us through the 
intricate labyrinth of blunders. For this reason we will be grateful if you are lenient 
in criticizing. There are things we know ought not to have gone in Thk Agromeck, 
still they were put in just to fill up. "To fill up" — that is not usuall}- our trouble, 
but in this case it has been. We have even been forced to the necessity of offending 
S(.>me to fill up (jur pages; to these we get on our knees and beg for mercv. Others 
we have praised too highly; these we can assure it was all a mistake. 

It is our earnest hope that other volumes of The Agromeck will be produced, not 
like this one, but better. The class of '03 has set the pace — let the classes hereafter 
follow suit. 

To our many friends who have labored with us, and helped to make The .Agromeck 
what it is, we wish to e.xtend our heartfelt thanks. Especially is it a pleasure to ac- 
knowledge our indebtedness and gratitude to Prof D. H. Hill and Dr. Charles Wm. 
Burkett for the very substantial aid and encouragement they have given. 

And to our artist, John A. Park, we give our sincere assurance of appreciation, for 
without his help it would have been impossible to have produced The Agromeck. 
Readers, you will find in this book the results of the unselfish work, the untiring 
efforts of a loyal son of A. c*c .M. As such, John, we salute you, and thank you for 
the valuable assistance you have given us. 

With a due appreciation for contributions received from other of our friends, and 
with h(3pes that the '03 Agromeck may prove a pleasant memento of our college life, 
and that it may be the beginning of a permanent A. & M. C'. Annual, we are. 

Respectfully, THE EDITORS. 




\fJUIiam r Kirkpatpick 
sjchry 1), te p^ U30 ri . 

Leslie /^Ooncy. 
John n. Glenn 



\Ualten Clatk, Jr 
dohn C. Lioit. 
L-ugene L..Culbfeth 






\ 







THE AGROMECK 



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^ GREETING ^ 



We are men of work-day training 

Who earn our bread by sweat of brow; 

Can our hands, their work disdaining, 
Sway the realm of letters now ? 

Can the toil-worn hands that wrought 
Full manfully in wood and field. 

To this grave task of letters brought, 
Earn rich reward or harvest yield ? 

Will the hands that have excelled 

The work of shop or drawing room. 

To this stern work of letters held. 

Do aught else save to write their doom ? 

Can the hands that nimbly weaving 

Cloths of chic design and hue. 
Their own occupation leaving. 

Some other work as well pursue ? 

We but serve our Alma Mater, 

We do our best from sense of duty; 

W^e plant a latent seed that later 
May grow into a thing of beauty. 

As children strive their sires to please 
So we have worked with best intent. 

Nor given ourselves to idling ease; 
Our hearts to labor of love were lent. 

For praise or fame we do not ask; 

With swelling hearts we give this token, 
Freely wrought, for 'tvi^as love's task; 

Alma Mater, 'tis to thee our loving hearts 
have spoken. 



I 




13 






THE AGROMECK 




1902. THURSDAY, JULY 10. 

I'.ntrance examinations at each County court-house at lo a. .m 
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 3 

l'.iitrani.r exaniinatiiiiis at the College at 9 A M. 
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 4. 

First term begins; Registration Day. 

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 27. 

riianlcsgiving Day. 

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 22. 

I'irst term imls. 

1903. FRIDAY, JANUARY 2. 

Seei.ind term begins; Registration Daw 

SATURDAY, MARCH 14. 

Second term ends. 

MONDAY, MARCH 17. 

Tliird term begins; Registration Day. 

SATURDAY, MAY 23. 

Kxaminations end. 

SUNDAY, MAY 24. 

Haecalaureate Sermon. « 

MONDAY, MAY 25. 

Aluiiun Daw 

TUESDAY, MAY 26. 

Annual ( )ratii m. 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 27. 

Commencement Dav. 



14 









SYMPOSIUM ON THE A. M. C. 

By \A^. C, Jr. 



m 







MAIN BUILDING 



1 IF. .growth uf this country in extension of territon- has been phenomenal. 
The little thirteen cr>ionies, hemmed in b\- the Atlantic on one hand and 
the trackless West on the other, where lurked the crafty savage or murderous 
wild beast, have grown into a nation whose boundaries stretch from ocean to 
ocean. But yet more phenomenal has been the country's growth in population, civ- 
ilization, commerce and manufactures. In the beginning of the nineteenth century 
this country was very thinly .settled, and the majority of settlers were farmers, but soon 



Agro 2 



15 



&^Ji:^&^ii=^/>=s^&^ 



THE AGROMECK 



."^''^"^"^"^"^ 



there came a change. Where once liad stuud tlie wigwam of tlie mighty Indian chief, 
now stands a prosperous cit}-; where the stealthy Indian had pursued his solitary trail 
now flashes a monster breathing forth fire and smoke; where the canoe had ploughed 
its noiseless way, now shrieks from the hoarse throats of passing steamers smite the 
ear, and where once the disciple of Isaak Walton sat idly angling during the long 
summer days in unbroken solitude and silence, is now heard the clanging bell, shrill 
w-liistle and busv hum nf factories, sawmills, railroads and other industries. 




HORTICULTURAL BUILDING 

With these changes has come a demand lor men to lill these shops, workmen to use 
these tools, craftsmen to ])ly these trades, skilled fiinners to till the soil; and the cry 
is still l''ir more lalmixTs. But what kind nf lalidrcrs are needed .•■ 'I'lie rough plough- 
man, the rude blacksmith.' Xo ! the demand is for skilletl labor, skilled not only in 
handicraft, but that handicraft controlled by brains — the hand guided by the head. 
This demand was far in excess of the su|iply. "More men, more skilled nun, more 
skilled young men," was the constant cry. At last a man appeared whose wisdom 
was in a large measure to devise a way to supply eilucated brain and hand w-orkers. 

lO 



/L^&^e^/i^&^&^ 



THE AGROMECK 



^3'^3'J^/^^3'^^ 



Justin Smith Morrill, the vc-ncrable senator from Vermont, heard the demand and 
came forward in Congress with a bill as an answer. This bill, subsequently enacted 
into law, gave to each state public lands "for the endowment, support and main- 
tenance of at least one college whose leading object shall be, without excluding other 
scientific and classical studies, and including military tactics, to teach such branches 
of learning as are related to agriculture and the mechanic arts, in order to promote 
the liberal and practical education of the industrial classes in the several pursuits and 
professions of life.'' This hill was passed by Congress in 1862. Part of the money 




INFIRMARY 

arising from the sale of the lands given to North Carolina was lost during reconstruc- 
tion days. The interest on what was left was for some \-ears given to the State 
University, but in 18S5 a bill was introduced into our legislature by A. Ix-azar, Esq., 
of Iredell county, which in 1887 was passed and became a law, providing for the 
transfer of those funds tn aid in the establishment of the North Carolina College of 
Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. This name was given the new college to emphasize 
the kind of instruction that Congress intended to be given in these institutions. At 
this stage of afiairs R. S. PuUen, Raleigh's most progressive and 1 ,nevolent citizen, 
Erave a valuable building site, with sufficient land for a farm. This land adjoins the 



^^^^m THE AGROMECK ^^^^^^ 




TEXTILE BUILDING 

park that he hail ,u;ivin tn the city of Ralcij^h. 'I'liis generous ijift fixed the establish- 
ment of the collefi;e in Ralei.sfh. 



li 



At last, on Oct. i, 1S89, the North Camlina College of Agriculture and ^Mechanic 
Arts was formally opened for students. The College at that time consisted of only 
one brick building and a corps of five instructijrs, appointed by a Board of Trustees. 
Too much honor cannot be accorded this band of earnest men who as directors and as 
faculty went forward so quietly, but faithfully, with small capital and amid many dis- 
couragements, to build up a college whose scope of work and wliose purposes were 
alike new to our people. 

To the call for students about fifty responded. A majority of these were farmers 
or sons of farmers. The college commenced growing from its very birth; not too rapidly, 
but slowly, surely increasing year by year. When found absolutely necessary, money 
for buildings and apparatus has been appropriated by the Legislature from time to 
time. The college met with opposition at first from some quarters, as it was thought 
to be antagonistic to the University and the other colleges of the state. But as it 
pursued its way it became evident that it did not antagonize other colleges, but simply 
supplied what could not be obtained there. The men who were guiding it held it 
strictly to its proper sphere. It stood then, it has alwa3s stood, for strictly technical 
education. 'This fact was at last clearly recognized, and all opjiosition to the institu- 
tion died a natural death. 

As time passed students were graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Science and 
Bachelor of Engineering. These young men were eagerly employed by different in- 
dustrial concerns in this and other states. The young graduates stood the test of 
commercial life and made their marks as men trained and worthy. The eyes of the 
people were opened. They saw that what had been ridiculed as an experiment had 
been tried and not found wanting. They saw the great need over the whole country 
for educated industrial workers. They saw the harvest reaped by nun able to do the 
world's industrial work. They saw the great opportunity presented to their sons and 
eagerly took advantage of it. Since that time the College has been crowded and its 
capacity taxed to the uttermost. To meet this growth great expansion became nec- 
essary. The corps of fi\e teachers in a few years became a faculty of eleven professors, 
assisted by nineteen subordinate instructors; where one building stood, thirteen now 
proudly lift their heads, among them some of the best in the state. The one first 
constructed — the main building, as it is called, being about the center of the group — 
is still used for class rooms, laboratories, and the upper floors for dormitories. 
Primrose Hall (named in honor of Mr. W. S. Primrose, one of the founders of the 
institution, whose wise counsels and fidelity have contributed so greatly to its success) 
is a two-story building with modern appliances, containing the Horticultural depart- 
ment. This building with its greenhouses adds much to the beauty of a very attrac- 
tive campus. The Mechanical and Electrical buildings are plain and substantial, 
containing laboratories, shops, drawing and recitation rooms. The dairy and barn 
are frame buildings, admirably adapted to their purpose. The Textile building, just 
completed, is a modern, up-to-date cotton mill, containing all • lodern machiner}-. 

19 



^^^^^■j^& 



THE AGROMECK 



^^^S'^S'J^^S^^ 



The infirniar\- is a two-stoiT building, equipped witli all the best appliances, and 
under control of an etiicient matron and nurse. The boiler-house is immediately 
back of the main building, and contains the boilers, fire jjump and the machinery 
connected with the steam heating plant. There arc also four vi-ry good, but small, 
dormitories to the left of the main building as you face it. 

At present two buildings, which will add much to the College, in appearance and 
usefulness, are Hearing completion. The new Watauga, which is a very handsome, 
well-equipped dormitory, rises from the ashes of the old which was burned on No\'. 
30, 1901. The fire originated in the culinary department, which then occupied the 




VIEW LOOKING NORTH 

l(jwer flocjr, and some of the students barel)' escajied with their lives, losing all their 
possessions. A few instances of heroism connected with this fire may well be men- 
tioned here: Sonu' students, awakenetl by the llames, went from r<iom to room, rousing 
the inmates anil dragging them from their beds, where they would soon ha\e been 
sufi'ocateil by the smoke and heat. These young men thus saved many lives, while 
all their own worldly goods fell a y\\\ to the flames. Others formed a bucket brigade; 
others climbed on the roofs of adjoining buildings and heroically fought the flames in 
the bitter November winds. Many other instances might be mentioned, but these 



20 



^^^^^ THE AGROMECK ^^^^S 



show of what material the A. & M, boy is made, and the spirit sucli a college fosters. 

The loss of this building was a heavy blow to the College, but out of great evils 
sometimes arises great good. A larger dormitory was needed for the rapidly increasing 
number of students, and this need the new ^^'atauga supplies. TJie new structure 
contains sixty rooms, well lighted, well ventilated and well heated, the dangerous 
kitchen being removed to other quarters where there will be no danger of the catas- 
trophe being repeated. 

The other new building is Pullen Memorial, named in honor of the benefactor, 
R. S. Pullen. This building will add materially to the comfort and well-being of the 
students, since it fills the "long-felt want " of a large auditorium, a ciimmi)dious 
dining room, and a spacious librarv and reading room. 

This increase in the number of buildings has been made necessary by the unex- 
ampled increase in the numlier of students. In 1889 there were fifty students: todav 
five hundred stalwart voung men strut about the College grounds in the grey in which 
their fathers fought and died. Instead of a few boys loitering in the evening on the 
campus, the ground now trembles beneath the measured tread of a battalion of si.K 
companies. At the last State fair the "boys in gray" drilled so well that they re- 
ceived a continuous ovation along the whole route, and many were the compliments 
received by our able faculty on their bearing and deportment. 

The object is now, as it has always been in the past, to conduct an institution in 
which young men of character, energy and ambition may fit themselves for useful and 
honorable work in any line of industry in which training and skill are requisite to 
success. It is intended to train farmers, mechanics, engineers, architects, draughts- 
men, machinists, electricians, miners, metallurgists, chemists, dyers, mill workers, 
manufacturers, stock raisers, fruit growers, truckers and dairy men, by giving them 
not only a liberal but also a special education, with such manual and mental training 
as will qualify them for their future work. 

It oflFers practical and technical education in agriculture, horticulture, animal in- 
dustry, civil engineering, mechanical engineering, mining engineering, metallurgy, 
chemistry, dyeing, textile industry and architecture. It also ofters practical training 
in carpentry, wood turning, blacksmithing, machinery work, mill work, boiler tend- 
ing and road building. Although the leading purpose of the College is thus to furnish 
technical and practical instruction, yet other subjects essential to a liberal education 
are not omitted. 

How can we judge of the future except by the past .? With a glorious past we 
must and shall expect a glorious future. We can say what Webster said of Massa- 
chusetts, "the past, indeed, is secure." Not only can we say that the past is secure, 
but also reasonably say that the future is also secure. Our institution has had a short 
but honorable past, marked from the beginning by a steady and promising growth, 
but we cannot expect and do mit wish a phenomenal growth such as that achieved by 
the Universitv of ^lichigan. which in a few decades after its establis'inent had three 






THE AGROMECK 






thdusanil stiultnts, for " wluU comes easy goes easy. "' In Michii^an. at the fnuniliiiji 
of the L'niversity. there were only one or two poorlj'-eqiiipped colleges, ant! the found- 
ing of tile University, with a princely endowment, naturally attracteil to it all those 
\nuug men in the state whu had liithertn been ci.>mpelled to go to other states fur a 
higher educatinn. 

The A. ct M. was not sn fortunate. It was fniinded in a state where there are 
scores >.>'( other well-e(iuip]ieil colleges and schools. There were tliousands of graduates 
from these colleges who naturally wished their sons to attend the college from which 




VltW LOOKING SOUTH 

they had their diplomas. The revenues are So small that tlie eolKi^c cannot be run 
on the broad basis which w as intended. In sjiite of these ilitficulties ami disadvantages, 
which have to some extent retarded the progress of the A. it I\I.. we have good reasons 
to believe the College has a great future befon- it. These reasons are : 

1. The A. & M. is free. It is under no obligation, as are denominational colleges, 
to maintain and observe creeds and confessions. It stands for morality and right, and 
high living, but not, of course, for sectarianism. 

2. The second ground for hope of a great future for the A. & M. is the iialurc iinj 



22 



THE AGROMECK 



e.xleni of ivork it is nmv doing for the stale. North Carulina is liecoming a great mami- 
facturing state. Already it has more cotton mills than any other state in the Union. We 
must have men to run our cotton mills, our factories and our other industries, and the 
A. & ]\I. is furnishing these men. It gives a bo}' a practical antl technical education, 
enabling him to become a ''great master of industry " if he has the ambition. What 
kind of boys are receiving this education .' Not the rich men's sons who wish to enter 
some "honorable i)rofession, " but mainly poor bi)\s, amiing the best, the manliest 
bo3's in the state, for the expenses are reduced to the smallest pcjssible minimum, and 




VIEW FROM ATHLETIC FIELD 

it is in reach of all Since we will be a manufacturing state, it is these boys on whom 
the future of the state depends. 

The pettifogging lawyer cannot run a cotton mill; the doctor cannot harness the 
great water power of this state; the politician cannot design railroads, bridges, saw 
mills, etc. The men for this work have been furnished by other states, but it now 
remains for the A. & M. graduate to take these places. The college is so bound uj) 
with the best life of the state that we must grow with its growth and strengthen with 
its strength. The new knowledge taught at the A. & I\I. is so important and practical, 



23 



/i^/L^&=^&^&^&:^ 



THE AGROMECK 



j^j^j^/^i^^^^ 



ami contributes so directly "tu tiie relief of man's estate, " that the jjcople of North 
Carolina are bound to hold in appreciation and honor the agencies by which it has 
been brought hcmie to them. 

Every student and alumnus of this institution can rest assured that a great future, 
commensurate with the greatness of the state, awaits their Alma Mater. She com- 
mands the elements that command success. .MI hail tn the glad day w hich is dawning, 
and may each student feel that on him lies the responsibility of liastening the ha])py 
hour when the Agricultural and Mechanical College of North Carolina shall stand at 
the head of all Southern colleges. 




24 



..^* 



^^^^^B THE AGROMECK 



Board §f Trustees 

($> 

STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 

S. L. PATTERSON, President (cv-i/fficio) Raleigh 

T. K. BRUNER, Secretary (e.x-ojicio) Raleigh 

J. B. COFFIELD, Everetts First District 

E. L. DAUGHTRIDGE, Rocky Mount Second District 

WILLIA:\I DUXN, Xewbern Third District 

C. N. ALLEN, Auburn Fourth District 

J. S. CUNNINGHA:\L Cunningham Fifth District 

A. T. McCALLU-M, Red Springs Sixth District 

J. P. IMcRAE, Laurinburg Seventh District 

P. B. KENNEDY, Daltonia Eighth District 

W. A. GRAHAM, :\L\chpelah Ninth District 

A. CANNON, Horse Shoe Tenth District 

HOWARD BROWNING Littleton 

J. R. JOYCE Reidsville 

G. E. FLOW Monroe 

J. C. RAY Boone 



^^^^m THE AGROMECK ^^^^M . 

Board §f Visitors 

W. S. I'KlMKi >SI'., I'REsii)f:\i- Rai.kich 

R. I.. S.MIIU, Seckhtakv Aihkmari.f. 

D. A. TOM I'K INS tHAKunrK 

FKAXK WOOD Kdextox 

r.IATI" M( )ORK Kexaxsville 

U. II. RACAX High Point 

J)A\1I) CLARK : Charlotte 

j. II. STOKES Windsor 

W. J. PEELE Raleigh 

J. FRANK RA^■ Fraxklix 

CHARLES W. CiOLD Wilsox 

(JEORGE T. WINSTON, President oe the College {ex-officio). 



«^R <!^e^ 



Agricultural Experiment Station 

C.EORC.E TAVLOF WINSTON, A. .M., LL. I) Preside.st 

liFNJAMlN WLSLKV KHXIORE, ^L S Director 

W1LLL\M ALPHONS( ) WITH1:RS, A. M Chemist 

WILBCR FISK MASSEV, C. E Hortk vltirist 

C'lIARLES W1LLL\M BURKFTT, M. Sc, Ph. D Agriculturist 

IW IT JiUTLER, V. S Veterixariax 

FRANK LINCOLN STEVENS, .M. .Sc., Ph. D Biologist 

OEORGE STRONACII FRAPS, Ph. I) Assistaxt Che.mist 

BENJAMIN SMITH SKINXKR Assistaxt AciKicuLTiKisT 

ARTHLR FINN B( )\\ EN Buksar 

Miss ANNIE CARLS PEDDIE Stexograi-her 

26 



^^^^^B THE AGROMECK 



Faculty of the A. and M. College 



GEORGE TAYLOE WINSTON, A. M.. LL. D., President, Professor o/ PoUikal 
Economy. 

B. Litt. Cornell University; A. Vi. Davidson College; LL. D. Trinity College; 
Instructor of ]Matheinatics Cornell University; Assistant Professor of Literature Uni- 
versity of North Carolina: Professor of Latin and German ditto; Professor of the 
Latin Language and Literature ditto; President ditto; President University of 
Texas; President North Carolina Teachers Assembly; President Southern Association 
of Colleges and Schools; member Administrative Council of Southern History As- 
sociation; Advisory Editor of the "World's Best Orators"; speaker and lecturer 
before National Educational Association, Southern Educational Association, Ameri- 
can Academy Political and .Social Science, L'. S. Naval Academy, etc. X *; <t> B K 

\\TLLIA:\I ALPHONSO withers, a. :M., Pro/essor of Chemistry, and Chemist 
North Carolina Experiment Station. 
A. B. Davidson College '83; A. M. ditto '85; Cornell Universitv, Fellow in Ag- 
ricultural Chemistry "88-'9o; Assistant Chemist North Carolina E.\periment Station 
"84-'88; Chemist since '07; acting Director and .State Chemist 'g-j-'gi); State Statis- 
tical Agent U. S. Department of Agriculture ■95-02; Fellow American Association 
for the Advancement of Science; member American Chemical Society: vice-presi 
dent: ditto "oi-'o2. X 4'; § I 

DANIEL HARVEY HILL, A. M., Professor 0/ English. 

A. B. Davidson College '80: A. .M. ditto '84: Professor (jf F^nglish in the Georgia 
Military and Agricultural College fur nine years; present position since ojiening of 
College in 1S89. 

WALL.\CE CARL RIDDICK. A. B., C. E.. Professor of Civil Engineering and Math- 
ematics. 

A. B. University of North Carolina '85; C. E. Lehigh L'niversity '90; with Roa- 
noke Navigation & Sujiplv Cn. K A 

FREDERICK AUGU.STUS WEIHE, M. E., Ph. D., Professor of Physics and Elec- 
trical Engineering. 
Graduate of a German Agricultural College, Germ my: .AI. E. Lehigh LJniversity: 
two years instructor in Iowa Agricultural College; three vears Professor of llechani- 
cal and Electrical Engineering in Delaware Agricultural College; Ph. D. Berlin 
University, Berlin, Germany. 

FREDERICK ELISHA PHELPS, U. S. Ar.my (retired), Professor of Military Sci- 
ence and Tactics, Conunandant of Cadets and Instiuctor of History. 
U. S. ^Military Academy at \\'est Point '70; assigned as Second Lieutenant Sth U. 
S. cavalry, then in Mexico; First Lieutenant 8th U. S. cavalry '79; retired from active 
service April, '91, by reason of disabilities contracted in line c"" duty; served in 
Arizona, New Mexico, Texis, Colorado, Indian Territory, Kansas, Nebraska and 



THE AGROMECK ^^^^^M 



the Dakotas from '70 to '90; Commandant of Cadets Agricultural and Mechani- 
cal College of Kentucky '84-'87. 

HKXRV MKRR^'IMAN WILSON, A. B.. Pro/vmir of Te.xlik Itidusiry. 

A. B. Johns Hopkins University '97; Philadelphia Textile School '99. >(> T A. 

CHARLES WHJJAM HLRKETT. M. Sc, Ph. 1)., Professor of Agncii/titrc, and 
Agriculturist of North Carolina Experiment Station. 

B. Sc. Ohio State University '95; Vl. Sc. Ohio State University '98; Ph. 1). Lima 
"00; Assistant in Agriculture Ohio State University '95-'98: Agricultural Editor Ohio 
State Journal '96-'98; Assistant Professor of Agriculture New Hampshire College '98; 
Professor of Agriculture ditto, 'gS-'oi; Agriculturist New Hampshire College E.xper- 
iment Station '98-'oi; Special Agent, Division of Agrostology, \}. S. Department of 
Agriculture 01. A Z; K §. 

THOMAS .MURRITT DICK, U. S. N.wv, Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 
Graduate U. S. Naval Acatlemy '95: assistant Engineer L'. S. S. Cincinnati '95- 
'97; assistant Engineer L'. S. S. I\Iontgomery '97-'98; Chief Engineer U. S. S. Vixen, 
'99; head of De]iartment Steam Engineering Key West Naval Station '99-'oo; member 
American Society Naval Engineers; associate member American Society ]Marine 
Engineers and Naval Architects. A T Q 

'I'AIT BUTLER, V. S. , St.vte Veterinari.vn, Professor of Veterinary Science and 
Veterinarian of Agricultural E.xpcriment Station N. C. College of A. &f M. Arts. 
V. S. Ontario Veterinary College, Toronto, Canada, '85; assistant State Veteri- 
narian of Iowa and President Iowa State Veterinary ]\Iedical Association; Professor 
of N'cterinary and Physiolngy and Wterinarian to the Agricultural Experiment Station 
Mississippi Agricultural antl .Alochanical Ccillege: 'In.spector Bureau of Animal In- 
dustry \5. S. Department of Agriculture; Presitlent American Veterinary INIetlical 
Association; State Veterinarian and Prejfessor of N'eterinary Science and Veterinarian 
of the Agricultural Experiment Station. Nasau State Agricultural College. 

ERANK LINCOLN STE\'EN.S -^1- S., Pn. D., 1!. I.., B. S., Professor of Biology. ■ 
biologist if E.xperinient Station. 
\\. L. Hobart College '91; B. S. Rutgers College '93; M. S. Rutgers College '97; 
Ph. 1). L'niversity of Chicago '99; Assistant in Experiment Station Rutger's College 
'9i-'(;_5; Professor of Natural ."science at Racine College '93-94; Teacher of Biology 
Columbus North High School, Columbus, Ohio, '95-'98; Eellow in Botany Univer- 
sity '98-"99; Sanitary Analyst for Chicago Drainage Canal Board '99-00; Travelling 
Fellow in Botany to L^niversity of Chicago 'oo-'oi; Instructor in Biology N. C. Col- 
lege of A. & M. Arts '01-02; Eellow of American Association for the Advancement 
of Science; A.ssociate Botanical Society of America; studied at Bonne Hall and 
occupied the Smithsonian table at the Naples Zoological Station. <t> K H' 

BENJ.V.MIX WL.SLKN' KILOOKf:, .M. S., Lecturer on Soils and Fertilizers. 

B. S. Mississippi Agricultural ami I\Iechanical College '88; M. S. ditto '91; fohns 
Hopkins University '95-'96: .Assistant Chemist Mississip])i Agricultural and Mechan- 
ical College '88-'89; Assistant Chemist North Carolina Exjieriment Station '89-'97; 
Pnjfessor of Chemistry Mississipjji Agricultural and Ex|)eriment College and State 



^^^^m THE AGROMECK ^^^^g 



Chemist 'gj-'g8; State Chemist North Carolina '99; Director North Carolina Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station since 01; President of the Association of Official 
Agricultural Chemists 'oo-'oi. 

ROBERT EDWARD LEE YATES, A. M., Assistant Professor 0/ Mathematics. 

Prepared for college at Fray & Morson's Male Academ\-, Raleigh, N. C. ; A. M. 
Wake Forest College '99; special course in Higher Mathematics University of 
Chicago '01. 

GEORGE STRONACH FRAPS, B. S., Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Cheviistry and 
Assistant Chemist North Carolina Experiment Station. 
B. S. North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts '96; Ph. D. 
Johns Hopkins University '99; fellow Johns Hopkins University '98-99. <}) B K. 

CHALMER KIRK :\IcCLELLAND, B. .Sc, M. S. .\., Assistant Professor of Agn- 
C2ilture. 

B. Sc. (Agr.) Ohio State University '98: M. S. A. Cornell University '02. A Z. 

CHARLES BENJAMIN PARK, Superintendent of Shops. 

Raleigh ]Male Academy; served a number of years as carpenter and contractor; 
entered Allen & Cram's machine shops '84 as apprentice, served five years; 
Superintendent Hygeinic Plate Ice Factory, Raleigh, N. C, until destroyed by fire; 
with S. A. L. Machine Co. as machinist: with S. A. L. as road engineer when 
present position offered; present position since '91; director in IMechanics Dime 
Savings Bank since organization; auditor of N. C. Building & Supply Co. 

WILLIAM ANDER.'^ON S^•.ME, B. S., Instructor in Chemistry. 

Raleigh Male Academy: B. S. North Carolina College of A. i<c M. Arts. 

THOMAS ALFRED CHITTENDEN, B. S., Instructor in Mechanical Draivmg. 

Apprentice with Straight Line Engine Co.; B. S. ^Michigan State College of A. & 
M. Arts '98; served with Mcintosh ifc Seymour Engine Co., Auburn, N. Y; State 
Normal College, Albanv, N. '\'. 

YIRGIL WILLIA:M BRAGG, Instructor in Wood-Worl^ing. 

Graduate and Post Graduate of Miller ]\Ianual Labor School of Virginia. 

THOMAS NEL.SON, Instructor in Weaving and Designing. 

Technical School, Preston, F^ngland; Lowell Textile School '99, Lowell, INIass. ; 
Richard Goodair Springfield INIill, Lancaster, England: Wilding Bros., Alexandria, 
Lancaster, England: Instructor of Weaving Lowell Textile School, Lowell, Mass. 

CHARLES LEMUEL FISH, B. S., Instructor in Civil Engineering. 
B. S. Worcester Polytechnic Institute. § A E 

FRANKLIN SHER:\IAN, JR., B. S. (Agr.), Instructor in Entomologv. State Entomo- 
logist. 
Entered Maryland Agricultural College '94; Assistant Ento' .ologist of ^Maryland 
'97; B. S. (Agr.) Cornell University '99: taught in Summer School of Nature 

29 



THE AGROMECK 



Study at Curiicll University oo; member American Association of F.conomic 
Entomologists; member American Association for Advancement of Science; cor- 
responding member Washington F.ntomological Society; fellow and member N. C. 
Academy of Science; Secretary N. C. State Horticultural Society. § Z. 

EDWIN BENTLV OWEN, B. S., Instructor in English. 

B. S. X. C College of A. & M. Arts '98; Harvard Summer School '01-02; 
Librarian X. (". College of A. & M. Arts, '99-'o2. 

HARR^■ CASPF.R WALTER, B. S., Instructor in Electrical Engineering. 

B. S. Worcester Polytechnic Institute '00: with General Electric Comjiany 
'oo-'oi. <t> T A. 

OLIVER CAR TER, Instructor in Forge and Machine Shops. 
North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. 

JOllX CIII'.STER KENDALL. B. S., .Assistant in Dairying. 
B. S. New Hamjishire State College '02. K 5 

SAINIUEL EDWARD WEBER, Jr., B. S., Assistant in Mvclianicil awl Freehand 
Draining. 

B. .S. Pennsylvania State College 02. 

PHILIP ROLAXD FREXCH, B. -S., Instructor in Chemistry and n\,-ing. 
W. S. .Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

C.\RROLl. l..\Ml; .MAXX, C. E.. Instructor in Civil Engineering and Mathematics. 

B. S. Xorth Carolina College of .Agriculture and .Mechanic .\rts; C. E. ditto; 
Instructor of Mathematics, ditto; with Isthmian Canal Commission as .\.ssistant 
Engineer on the Nicaragua Canal '00; Assistant Engineer Seaboard .\ir Line 'oi-'o2. 

AUSTER (lARDEX IIOL.MES, B. .S., Jnstructor in Mathematics. 

B. S. South CariiHna .Military .\cademy '97; Principal of Pendleton Public 
Schools, Pendleton. S. C. : Instiuctor in Mathematics Suwannee Grammar School, 
Suwannee. Tenn., 01-02. 

.MRS. ADELINE C. STEVEXS, Instructor in Zoology. 
Cniversitv of Chicago. 

.MAKSll.M.L 1)kI..\XCIA' 1 1 \^■\\ ()( )1), Lihrarian. 

ARIIIIK IIXX WnWV.S, /111 rsar. 

FREDERICK ERAS PCS SL().\X, B. )>., Registrar. 

B. S. Civil Engineering Xorth Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic 
Arts '99; with Roanoke Navigation \- Water Supply Co. '99-01; Standard Oil Co., 
Jacksonville, Ida., 01-02. 

BEXJAMIX SMI I'll SKIXXER. Farm Superintendent and Ste^vard. 

DR. J. R. ROGl'.RS, .\. B., .M. IX, Physician. 

MR.s. DAISY LEWI.s, Matron. 

30 




5*3^^ '(g/#\# "wcy"-^ 

INSTRUCTORS AND ASSISTANTS 



THE AGROMECK 



1[n flDeinoviam 

Susan Colwell Carroll. 



W1HEN the A. & M. College was founded in 1889, Mrs. Susan Colwell Carroll, of 
^^^ Sampson count}-, was elected matron, having charge of the Cadet Hospital 
^§^§ and the dormitories. 

Rugged in jierson, in health and in character, blunt in speech, kindly of 
heart to the extreme, impressive and commanding, she was the right woman in the 
right place. Her heart was big, her sympathy unbounded. Many a home-sick lad, 
away from liome and friends for the first time, ready to give up, wept out his misery 
on her shoulder, and, being comforted and strengthened by her words, buckled on his 
armor again and fought the battle out. To those who came under her administration 
in the hospital slie was patient and untiring, sitting up night after night. She en- 
couraged the weak, and when the end came the dying boy clung t(.i the hand that had 
nursed him and listened to the kindly voice that bade him put his trust in God. 

Her memory for names and faces was wonderful. At a moment's ni_>tice she could 
tell what room a man was assigned to, who his room-mate was; and in the many 
efforts to confuse and puzzle her she was always triumphant; and then how she would 
laugh at the crestfallen boy who had attempted to prove that -'Mrs. Carroll sometimes 
made mistakes. " 

Completely wrapped up in the success of the College, growing in usefulness as the 
College grew, she became a power for good, antl when on the evening of Sept. 6, 
1901, without a moment's warning, she died — as she had always wanted to die — in 
harness, at her post, God took her. 

The students of the A. & M. have placed on the wall of the Cadet Hospital a 
beautiful marble tablet to her memory, bearing, besides her name, this simple tribute 
so worthily won: 

"The Students' Friend." 



35 



AGROMECK -^^^^^S 



The Alumni Association 

($> 

HE Alumni Association of the North Carolina College of Agriculture and 
.Mechanic Arts was organized in June, 1895, two years after the graduation of 
the first class. The charter members, fifty in all, are, therefore, members of 
the classes of '93, '94 and '95. The first president of the Association was Mr. 
C. D. Francks of Onslow county, with Mr. Charles Pearson, now of Hattiesburg, 
Miss., as vice-president. Mr. E. S. Darden, of Wilson, was its first secretary-treasurer. 
The following gentlemen have served as president: Charles Pearson, J. A. Bizzell, C. 
B. Williams, G. S. Fraps. At present Mr. David Clark is president; JNIr. C. D. Welch, 
vice-president; Mr. E. B. Owen, secretary-treasurer; Mr. S. E. Asbury, statistical 
secretary; I\Ir. C. B. Williams, chairman of the executive committee. The Associa- 
tion now numbers 15S. Three graduates have died. 

The object of the Association, as set forth in its by-laws, is: "To further the in- 
terests of the College, to promote technical and scientific education in North Carolina, 
and to keep alive a fellow-feeling among the graduates of the institution." Members 
of the Association meet at the College on commencement week of each year, hold a 
business meeting, and attend the annual banquet. JNlonday evening is given to the 
Alumni, when one of the number delivers a jjublic address on some subject relative to 
technical education. .The Associatit)n each year contributes to a loan fund for 
needy students. 

In addition to the work of the Association already mentioned, it has done good 
service for the College. The idea of a textile school was first suggested and discussed 
in the Alumni A.ssociation. The Watauga Club and other strong friends of the College 
soon took it up and gave their encouragement and aid. Only a few years later the idea 
materialized in the textile school, of which the whole state may justly be proud. 

As new classes graduate, the Association becomes stronger ami better able to be of 
service to our Alma Mater. Ten years ago the College sent out its first graduates. 
Then technical education in North Carolina was but an experiment. Today its success 
is doubly assured. It is announced that an effort will be made to bring together at 
our next commencement the nineteen successful young men who ten years ago received 
the first diploma issued by the College. 

These ten jears have been years of proving the men and the training that have gone 
out from the A. i^ M College. None can gainsay the value of technical education to 
the old North State. The Alumni are widely scatteretl and are engaged in manv oc- 
cupations, but they are reflecting credit upon the College and the state. 



3<- 



THE AGROMECK 



Class d' '03 

.AliiiTo: Nil Dc>p(jiaiKlum. Colors: Baby Blue and Wliitc. 

Fi.owkk: White Rose. 



YELL 



Kippo Kiro, Bumbo Siio 
Kuinbo, Kiro, Kippo ! 
Hiro Giro, Zip Rah Zee ! 
A. i^ 1\I. Seniors, 1903. 



OFFICERS 

( ). MAX GARDNER Prksidim- 

K. II. RICKS ViCE-PKKSIDENt 

J. II. GLENN Secrktary 

CHARLES B. ROSS Tre.vsurek 

WILl.LA.'M !■■. KIRKI'A'I'RICK 1 1 ist(iki()c;k.m'her 



38 






Senior History 



HiISTORY is a simple s\'stematic statement, or written account, of facts. So, 
^^^ dear reader, look not here for the neatly-turned phrases, the pretty word pic- 
S^MB tures, the beautiful and the sublime, which you will find elsewhere in this 
book; only remember that you are reading plain and simple truths concerning 
a body of young men upon whose escutcheon there is no blot, and in whose wake 
there follow no signs of defeat. 

To mention every barrier we have burned, to recount all our noble achievements, 
to depict the stately character of each member of this illustrious band, would be utterly 
impossible. The purpose of this humble history, therefore, will be to submit only a 
partial sketch, an unfinished portrait, of the present Senior class since first they entered 
their Alma Mater. 

'Twas the summer, or early autumn, of 1899. One hundred antl thirty-two boys 
had decided to come to Raleigh to their State College in an effort to solve the follow- 
ing problem: Having given one thousand dollars and four years of the best part of 
one's life, how can a person get an education.? (And right here let us turn aside for a 
moment ti) say this to the "Fresh" — if you would obtain a correct solution of the 
above problem, if you would say on the day of your graduation, "Veni, vidi, vici,'> 
then follow in our footsteps, for we have been more than victorious in this four years' 
career of conflict and strife.) We exposed our ignorance of the rules and regulations 
on the first Sabbath after our arrival by marching to the Tabernacle Church under the 
leadership of Sergeants Person and Lougee and Corporal Norman. Of course, we were 
humbled, humiliated — yes, degraded (as we thought at the time) — by this practical 
joke, which was heralded throughout the state by the daily newspapers. But to us, 
as to every one else, was given the opportunity of retrieving in the future the losses of 
the past, and so, long before our Freshman course was run, we had fully demonstrated 
to the Faculty that we were students in the truest sense of the word. 

Passing on to our Sophomore year, the writer feels safe in saying that we became 
more self-confident on learning that Freshman examinations were things of the past 
— only memories. Indeed, we began to take issue with the learned astronomer 
who said, 

" Twinkle, iwinkle, little star, 
How I WONDER what you are." 

For at all times and everywhere we were diffusing the philosophy, 

"Twinkle, twinkle, little star. 
We know EXACTLY What you are." 

There was a "falling otf" of numbers, but a "picking up" in determination in 

39 



,^^s^^^^^^ 



THE AGROMECK 



this our second year at college. Perhaps we did not see ourselves as others saw us at 
that stage of the game, but we know now that the period in question could not have 
been dispensed with, since it prepared us so well for the propositions which were ot 
confront us in our Junior year. 

On re-entering college for the second time, our air antl aspect — so late arrogant 
and aggressive — became more affable and agreeable. We imagined ourselves no longer 
" obno.xious to the charms of womankind"; our fancy had lightly turned to thoughts 
of love. Coming into possession of Junior liberties (visiting Raleigh on Friday and 
Sabbath nights), we thought to cultivate the friendship of the gentler ssx; and some 
of us, perhaps, spent much time, precious time, in discussing that branch of natural 
history sometimes called feminology, when we should have been trying to solve the 
great problem given at the outset. 

Up until this time we had been so successful in all our undertakings that maybe 
we were over-elated; grant that we were even conceited, this feeling certainly all dis- 
api)eared when such terrors as Analytics and Mechanics loomed up just ahead. They 
had the appearance of castles locked antl barred; there was one way around, but 
apparently no way through; so frightful did these objects look that some of us inwardly 
wisheil to turn back, others to "change their course." Our intention to proceed, 
however, was not to be balked by these hinderances; not for a moment did we enter- 
tain the idea of being sidetracked hero; so we fought hard and stubbornly for an 
entrance, and with almost no avail, until ime among us conceived the happy idea of 
writing to Hinds & Noble. This well-known firm agreed to supply us, at a minimum 
cost, "Keys" guaranteed to fit anything from the pantry lock to calculus. \nu may 
well guess that we e.\i)erienced no further trouble along this line. N<it mih was the 
transition from arithmetic to higher mathematics, from the forge shop to Intlustrial 
Chemistry, from bookkeeping to Hridge Design, made easy, but along the journey we 
enjovcil such an immense amount of mince pies, peanuts and canned peaches that we 
feared the ill health of some of our members. 

Our Junior year completed, the strangely-new burden of .Senior dignity was placed 
upon our shoulders, and we stepped forth robed in those garments which make one 
heedless of danger and fearless of op|)osition, those garments which lead one to disdain 
injustice and revenge and to act and sacrifice for noble objects. He it yours to decide 
whether or not we have demeaned ourselves according to our standard Something is 
usually said in papers of this sort about the unity of the class. Let us say concerning 
our own that it has never been a unit; we have had dilferences and disagreements, 
fights ami fusses, from start to finish; we attribute such a state of alfairs, however, to 
the fact that "the cour.se of true love never did run smooth." 

( )ur class being considerably larger than any preceding us, it is not at all unnatural 
that our influence in athletic circles has l)een strongly felt; for the same reason we 
have had more representatives on both the football and baseball teams. We are sorry 
to say that our boys have never yet indulged in intercollegiate tennis: no doubt nur 
successors will in the not distant future. 

40 



THE AGROMECK 



Through the instrumentality of the Seniors, Greek letter fraternities were introduced 
into the College during the current year. We trust and believe that these organizations 
will be beneficial not only to their members, but also to the entire College. 

We have endeavored to save some of the best things to the last. Although a part 
of the following data may not strictly concern the Senior class, we feel justifiable in 
placing it here, since ours is the first Annual in the history of this College. We have 

witnessed the total number of registered students increase from in '99-1900 to 

for the scholastic year just ended. We have seen the erection of an electrical labo- 
ratory, a textile building, PuUen Memorial Hall, and a new Watauga Hall; in addition 
to these, many lesser improvements have been made. The curriculum of the College 
has been broadened and its standard raised since we entered the A. & M. 

During our Junior year the College and its students suffered two great losses — 
losses that were incomparable with each other, however, since one was measured in 
dollars and cents, while the other was measured in affection and esteem. 

Watauga Hall was burned to the ground the night of Nov. 29, 1901. The College 
authorities were somewhat puzzled at first, but with their accustomed readiness for 
anv emergency, the President and his able supporters had soon perfected arrangements, 
and classes were met as usual, with only one day out of College. On the si.xth of 
September, of the same year, the Angel of Death touched our tenderest feelings, and 
severed one of the closest ties of friendship, by calling Mrs. Susan Carroll from' time 
to eternitv. INIrs. Carroll was matron of this College from its founding in 1889 to her 
death. She was not onlv an esteemed and beloved friend of this class, but a worthy 
friend of the entire student body; she was one of those sweet and noble women whom 
none knew but to love; whom none named but to praise. 

In our Sophomore year a new Commandant of Cadets joined us in the person of 
F. E. Phelps, retired captain of the U. S. army. "Cap'n," as we all call him, has 
seemed quite fond of the boys, by whom he is respected and honored. 

So many new and sensational things developed in our Freshman year that we 
cannot recount them all just here. 

This class and the administration of Dr. Geo. T. Winston began together. For 
the former the time has been profitable, indeed; let us hope that it has been at least 
pleasant for the latter, and we wish him a long and successful term. 

If anything upon these pages has been said amiss, be gracious enough, gentle 
reader, to consider it our misfortune antl not our fault; think that no remark has been 
made through colossal conceit, but rather through pardonable pride. 

Now, ere we close, let us ask the overruling Deity to guide and guard the fortunes 
of these young men safely into the harbor of prosperity. May the friendship begun 
here as college boys grow and ripen into maturity as they become men of the world. 
God grant that each one of these thirty-nine shall so live and so act as he will wish he 
had done when he comes to render in his account at the great and final day of 
judgment. 

41 






lUith tbc Class of '03 

With the class of '03 will our liearts ever be, 
Where'er we may drift upon life's troul)le(l sea; 
Xo matter where our lots may be cast 
We will live again in our class's past. 

We can hardly remember the time we first met, 
Days fille<l with longing, heart-achings, regret; 
Nights filled with bitterness, solitude, tears, 
Our lonely hearts missing the friendships of yean^. 

Our loneliness vanished with friendships new, 
While the love for our class and our classmates grew; 
Friendships stronger than all others we have formed here; 
Bonds that ne'er will be bnikeii ; ties we all Ixpld dear. 

We have been four years together struggling side by side; 
What one had as much another's, nor was aid deiuod; 
We have learned to prize our clas.i-mates, each and every one; 
Strangely dreaded future when each must staiul alone ! 

We will think of our class in the years to Ije, 
When life loses its zest and drags drearily; 
We will call the roll of our class and fear 
The silence of each gun, unanswered here. 

We will think of our class in life's autumn cold, 
When our years have passed as a tale that is told. 
One thing we shall cherish while life shall last— 
The love that we bear for this life of the past. 

With the cla.«s of '03 \:\\\ our souls ever be. 
In Heaven or Hell through eternity; 
And perish together our souls, swear we. 
With the Id.'is of our love for the class of '03. 



^^^^^ THE AGROMECK ^^^^ 



CLASS STATISTICS 




"Iteautiful anti childlike is he." 

SYDNEY \V(.)()I)WARI) ASBURY, 

BlRKMOXT, X. C. 

Capt. Co. C '02-03; ist Sergt. Co. 15 
'oi-'o2; 1st Corp. Co. B '00-01; A'arsity 
football team '01 -'02; Yarsity baseball 
team 'oi-'o2; Capt. baseball team '03; 
best class athlete '03; Capt. Freshman 
baseball team "oo-'oi; scrub baseball team 
'00; secretary Athletic Association '01 ; 
business mgr. lied and While 'oi-'o2; mar- 
shal Leazar Literary Society. 

\Yeight 135 lbs.; height 5 ft. 6 in.; age 
20 year-s. 



"And they gazed, and still the wonder prew. 
How one small head could carry all he knew." 



WILLIAM .MORTON BOGART, 

Washington, N. C. 

Mechanical Engineering. 

I St Lieut. Co. A 'o2-'o3; 2ncl Sergt. Co. 
C '01 -'02; 4th Corp. Co. D 'oo-'oi; pres. 
PuUen Literary Society '02: treas. P. L. S. 
'01; winner of medal public debate P. L. 
S. May '02. 

Weight no lbs.; height 5 ft. 6 in.; age 
19 years. 




■o/rTT' 



43 



'^^^^m THE AGROMECK ^^^^M 




"Better late than uever." 

LESLIE NOkWOor) Ii(J^■K^■, K i 

Wai.i.ack, N. L'. 

Texlile Engineering. 

Major 'o2-'o3; 2nd Lieut. Co. A 'oi-u2; 
4th Scrgt. Co. B 'oo-'oi; treas. Athletic 
Association '02; asst. editor ./?tv/ and While 
'oi-'o2; sect. Leazar Literary Society '00- 
'o I ; capt. eastern team L. L. S. 'oo-'o i ; 
whip eastern team L. L. S. 'o2-'o3; public 
debate L. L. S. '02; Marshall Commence- 
ment L. L. S. '00; pres. Junior Class 
'oi-'o2; asst. editor Agromeck '02-03; 
pres. Y. M. C. A. 'oi-'o2-'o3; sect, and 
treas. A. and I\I. C. German Club '02; sect. 
Thalerian German Club '02; chief ball 
nigr. Commencement '03; Dramatic Club 

'OI-'02-'03. 

Weight 152 lbs.; height 5 ft. i i '4 in.; 
age 22 years. 



"Of m liest mien nnil prneeful in his gnit." 

|\(). SAM. PINKNEY CARPENTER, 

LiNCOLNTON, N. C. 

Textile Engineering. 

Third Lieut. Co. D 'o2-'o3; N'arsity foot- 
ball team 'oi-'o2; class football team '99: 
business mgr. Jied and While '03; Leazar 
Literary Society: committee on cuts fur 

AcJROMF.CK. 

Weight 180 lbs.: height 6 ft. 2 in.; age 
23 years. 




44 



THE AGROMECK 







"One may smile and smile and be a yillian." 

WAI.IER CLARK, Jr.. 

R.M.EIGH, N. C. 

Mechiiiilcd/ Engineering. 

Day student; entered Sophomore 'oo; 
3r(l Lieut. Co. A '02-03; asst. editor 
Agromeck 'o2-'o3; orator public entertain- 
ment L. L. S. Feb. '03. 

Weiglit 145 ilis. ; height 5 ft. 1 i '4 in. : 
age I 7 _years. 



\&a\lijxi jfc^oAjfe, 



" A venerable asiicfl " 

JOHN ELIOT COIT, 

S,\N AXTOXIO, Tl 

Agricultural Course. 

Lcazar Literary Society; winner of 
nietlal, public entertainment L. L. S. 
Y. M. C. A.; pies. Rural Science 
■01-02; pres. Biological Club 'o2-'o3: 
pres. Biological Club 'oi-'o2. 

Weight 145 lbs.: height 5 ft. 10' 
age 23 years. 



essay 

01 : 

Club 

vice- 




^.(U^d^ 



45 



THE AGROMECK 'mW€^^S 




CCct/yutn^i^. 



"Oh. then, renounce thy impious self-esteem." 

SUMMEV CROUSK CORWVELL, K A 

D.XLI.AS, N. (.' 

Civil Engineering. 

Capt. Co. E ■02-'o3; ist Sergt. Co. C 
'01-02; 2nd Corp. Co. A "00- "oi; treas. 
Athktic Association '01-02; pres. Lcazar 
Literary Society '02; censor L. L. S. '00; 
public debate L. L. .S. May 02; marshal 
I.. L. S. Feb. entertainment 00; marshal 
L. L. S. May entertainment '01; cliief- 
marshal coniniencement 02: business mgr. 
Agkomkck 'o2-'o3: vice-pres. Junior Class 
'01-02; sect, and treas. Suphoniorc Class 
'oo-'oi; pres. Iloplite German Club '01: 
treas. Hoplite (iermaa Club '01: pres. 
'I'halerian German Club '02; final ball 
committee; pres. Civil Engineering Society 

'02-'03. 

Weight 120 lbs.: height 5 ft. 5 in.: age 
2 1 \ears. 



"You .told a lie; an odious, damned lie; 
Upon my soul, a lie; a wicked lie." 

CH.A.S. L. CREECH, K §. 

Gkkensboko, N. C. 

Chemical Engineering. 

Capt. Co. D 'o2-'o3; Sergt. Major 'oi-'o2; 
5tli Sergt. Co. D 'oo-'oi; ist Corp. Co. B 
'00; pres. Athletic Association '03; mgr. 
football team '02; asst. mgr. football team 
'00; asst. mgr. baseball team '01; sect. 
Athletic Association '01; a.sst. mgr. Red 
,iml White '01-02; vice-pres. Leazar Liter- 
ary Society '02; marshal L. L. S '00; 
orator L. L. S. Feb. '03; debater L. L. S. 
May '02; vice-pres. German Club '02; pres. 
Sophomore Class '00- 'oi; vice-pres. Dra- 
matic Club 'oi-'o2; class liar. 

Weight 140 lbs.; height 5 ft. 8 in.; age 
20 years. 



46 




-^■L. /^JULt ^ 



THE AGROMECK 




" Music is the height of my ambition.' 

EUGENE ENGLISH CULBRETH, K t 

Si ATESVIl.I.E, N. C. 

Electrical Engin eeriiig. 

Capt. Co. A '02-03; 2nd Lieut. Co. D 
■oi-'o2; 2nd Sergt. Co. D 'oo-'oi; vice- 
jires. Athletic Association '02; treas. Ath- 
letic Association '01 ; vice-pres. Tennis 
Club '02; treas. Leazar Literary Society 
02; public debate L. L. S. '02; ist sub. 
marshal commencement '01; pres. Electri- 
cal Society '02; sect. Electrical Society '01: 
Old German Club 'oi-'o2; vice-pres. Thal- 
erian German Club '02; Dramatic Club 
'oi-'o2-"o3; treas. Dramatic Club '02; 
junior editor Red and While 'oi-'o2; busi- 
ness mgr. Red and White 'o2-'o3; Agro- 
MFXK board 'oz-'oj. 

Weight 130 lbs.; height 5 ft. 8 in.; age 
2 2 years. 



" \yith what a graceful tenderness he loves." 

WALTER LEE DARDEN. K § 

GoLDSBORO, N. C. 

Textile Engineering. 

Entered Sophomore '00; Capt. and Adjt. 
"o2-'o3; 2nd Sergt. Co. D '01 -'02; pres. 
Athletic Association '02; auditor Athletic 
-Association '00; Varsity football team 
'oi-'o2; vice-pres. Leazar Literary Society 
'02; public debate L. L. S. '01; winner of 
medal public debate L. L. S. '02; ist 
orator L. L. S. Feb. '03; ist sub. marshal 
commencement 02; honor roll 'oo-'oi; 
German Club 'oi-'o2-'o3; sect. German 
Club '01; vice-pres. Thalerian German 
Club '02; final ball committee; editor-in- 
chief of Agromeck 'o2-"o3; junior editor 
Red and Whi'e ■01-02; sect. Dramatic 
Club '01-02; vice-pres. Dramatic Club 
'o2-'o3; sect. Junior Class 'oi-'o2. 

Weight 153 lbs.; height 5 ft. 10 in.: age 
20 years. 




.i<,^g,&W-tc... 



47 






THE AGROMECK 




p/^f^- 



•• Long, slick, slim, slender, sapling." 

JUNIUS FRANKLIN DKIGS, K A. 

Dkjgs, N. C. 

C/iemicii/ Engineering. 

C'apt. Co. F '02-03 ; i.-;t Sergt, Co. D 
'oi-'o2: 1st Corp. Co. A "oo-'oi; Athletic 
Association; Tennis Club; Leazar Literary 
.'-^ociet}" marshal L. L. S. May entertain- 
ment 02, asst. business mgr. A(;romeck 
'o2-"o3; vice-pres. Hopiite German Club 
02; treas. Hopiite German Club 01: 
]in'S. 'riialerian German Club '02; leader 
fall germans "02: treas. Thalerian German 
Club '02: vice-pres. Liebeg Chemical .'so- 
ciety '01-02. 

'Weight 140 lbs.: height 5 It. 11 in.: age 
1 9 years. 



" l-'iill bJLT he was of bruwn, anii ■■uk of honcjf." 

TllLUriJlLU.S THtAMAS I'.Ll.l.S 

Bear Pond, N. C. 

E/ec/ricii/ Engineering. 

Third Lieut. Co. A '02-03: treas. F.lec- 
trical .^^ociet)' 02. 

Weight lyo lbs.: height 6 ft.: age 25 
^•ears. 




^^, (3M<. 



48 



THE AGROMECK 







" Glancing an eye of pity on his losses." 

EDW. EVERETT ETHERIDGE, K A. 
Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Eleclriciil Engitu-cring. 

Second Lieut. Cd. C "02-03: vice-pres. 
Athletic Association "02: Pullcn Literary 
Society; marshal commencement P. L. S. 
'01; German Club; Tennis Cluli; Electrical 
Society. 

Weight 155 lbs.: height 5 ft. 10 in.; age 
2 1 \ears. 



"I am erouin? ^\ ise; I'm growing— yes— 
I'm growing old." 

JOHN DANIEL EERGUSON, 

Bl..\DENBORO, N. C. 



Elecli'ical Engineering. 
Co. B 'o2-'o3; I St Sergt. 



Capt. Co. B 'o2-'o3; ist Sergt. Co. A 
'oi-'o2; 1st Corp. Co. C 'oo-'oi; sect. 
Athletic Association '02; treas. Athletic 
Association '02-03 • Leazar Literary So- 
ciety; marshal L. L. S. May '02; Y. M. 
C. A.; associate editor Red ami While 
'o2-'o3; asst. editor Agromeck 'o2-'o3; 
pres. Electrical Society '03; librarian Elec- 
trical Society '03. 

Weight 138 lbs.: height 5 ft. S'_, in. ; 
age 23 years. 




49 



THE AGROMECK 



^^^^ 




"All hell will boil for this." 

HUGH P. FOSTER Vance, N. C. 

3fechaiiical Engineering. 

Capt. and Quartermaster ■o2-'o3; Quart- 
ermaster Sergt. 'oi-"o2; 3rd Corp. Co. C 
oo-'oi; I.eazar Literary .Society; Y. M. 
C. A. 

Weight 148 lbs.: height 5 ft. 9>< in.: 
age 22 years. 



>yV^2^^K^^ 



"Conceit may jiulT a man up. but never iirop him up." 

OLIVER :\L\X (lARDXER, S N 

Sheluy, X. C. 
Chemical Engineering. 

First Lieut, and Adjt. (resigned) 'o2-'o3; 
Color Sergt. oi-oi; 2nii Sergt. Co. B 
'oo-'oi; vice-pres. Athletic Association '03; 
sect. Athletic Association '01; auditor 
.Xthletic Association '01; mgr. baseball 
team '03; asst. mgr. baseball team '02; 
mgr. class baseball team 'oo-'oi-"02; capt. 
football team '02; vice-i)res. Pullen Liter- 
arv Society 03; orator commencement P. 
L. S. 03: winner orator's nietlal P. L. S. 
'02: winner debater's medal P. L. S. '01; 
chief inarshall commencement '01 ; marshal 
P. L. S. '00; sect. P. L. S. '01; sect. Dra- 
matic Club '02-'03; junior editor Red and 
While '01-02; asst. editor Red and While 
'o2-'o3; asst. lousiness mgr. Red and While 
"00-01: vice-pres. German Club '02; pies. 
Liebeg Chemical Society '02; asst. editor 
.VcKoMECK '02-03; pres.Seniiir Class '02-03. 

Weight 215 lbs.; height 6 ft. I J^' in. ; 
ai^e 20 years. 




(3ta,o^ '^cUo^JU.tM- 






THE AGROMECK ^^^^^^ 




"He was the mildest mannered man 
That eTer scuttled ship or cut a throat." 

I.A:\rAR CARSOX GIDXEV, 

Shelby, X. C 

Electrical Engineering. 

Second Sc-rgt. Co. A 'oi-'o2: 4th Sergt. 
Co. B '00-01; 5th Corp. Co. A '99-00: 
sect. Electrical Society '02; librarian Elec- 
trical Societ\' 03. 

Weight 130 lbs.; height 5 ft. 10 in.; age 
I V vears. 



*' You have too much respect upon the world." 

JOHX HOWARD GI.F.XX. 

Crowders Creek. X. C. 

Mcchanicai Engineering. 

Third Lieut. 'o2-'o3 (resigned); 4th 
Sergt. Co. B 01-02; 4th Corp. Co. C 
'oo-'oi; honor roll lor scholarship "oi-'o2; 
honor roll for piunctualitv 01-02; sect. 
Leazar Literar}' Societv '02; sect. Senior 
Class 02-03; treas. Y. ,M. C. A. 'o2-'o3. 

^^'eight 145 ll;s. ; height 5 ft. 11 in.; age 
2 1 \ears. 




J-^rX^e^i^T.^,^^ 



^^^^ THE A G R O M E C K ^^^^ 




q^^yAA^S' $)jiMAJM^. 



'* Men of few words are thu best men " 

K.MII. GIXTKR PlKKSnX, Ki.okida. 

Electrical Liiginccn'iiff. 

Lieut. Co. .\ (resigned) '02-'03: 2ncl 
Sergt. Co. B '01-02; 2nd Corp. Co. li 
'00- '01; sect. Leazar Literary .Society '02; 
honor 'oo-'oi and 'oi-'o2; librarian Kiectri- 
eal .'>iiciety "oi-"o2. 

\\\ight 140 ll)s. : JKigiit 5 ft. S'jin. : 
ajic T 9 years. 



"I know net wliy I am so s:ui." 

EUGKXE COLI.^irs jOHNSOX. 

Ixcui.i), X'. C. 

I\lvchanical Engiiicciiiii^. 

'I'liird .Si-rgt. Co. C 'oi-'o2; 4tli Corp. 
Co. C 'oo-"oi: Leazar Literaiy .Society; 
treas. V. Vl. C. A. '02-03. 

Weight 150II1.S. ; heigli' 5 ft. 9 in. ; age 
22 years. 




^x-o«rx,.-o^ toJ(<&^^.o a-rS. 



^^^^^^^^ 



THE AGROMECK 



31 




"His only lahor was to kill tlie time." 

JAMKS MATTIIKW KENNEDY, 

McClahny, N. C". 

Text ill' Eiigi?ieen'iig. 

Second Lieut. Co. A "02-'o3; 5th Sergt. 
Co. D 'oi-'o2: 3rd Sergt. Co. D 'oo-'oi ; 
\'arsity focjtball team '01; .sidj. fcjotball 
team '00; class football team 'yy; Leazar 
Literary Society; declaimer's medal '00: 
sect, debater's contest '02; committee im 
cuts for Agromeck 'o2-'o3; vice-pres. Y. M. 
C. .\. 'oo-'o2-'o3; sect. Y. M. C. A. 'oo-'oi. 

Weight 155 lbs.; height 5 ft. 6 in.; age 
22 \ears. 



/f M-^dt^l^^^^^ 



" His talk is like a slream that runs. 
With rapid chaii,i,'e from politics to pun?." 

WM.FRANKLIN KIRKPATRICK, K A 

Charlotte, N. C. 

Electrical Engineering. 

Entered Junior Class '01; 3rd Lieut. Co. 
D 'o2-'o3; auditcjr Athletic Association '01; 
pres. Leazar Literary Society '03; orator 
public entertainment L. L. S. Feb. '03; 
Qebater L. L. S. May '02; marshal L. L. S. 
Feb. 02; Thalerian German Club; final 
ball committee; class historiographer; ist 
associate editor Auromeck 'o2-'o3; pres. 
Tennis Club '03; \ice-pres. F-iectrical So- 
ciety '0I-'02. 

Weight 132 lbs.; height 5 ft. 10 in.; age 
22 years. 




l/U:^}riC>:^^^;iz::^ 



^0 



THE AGROMECK 




^vj^yyyuM^ C^^om/A/^ 



\V7 



"The healthy hunt&miin with a cheerful horn, 
SummoiiB tile dogs, and greets the dappled morn." 

I5ENNETT LAND, Ji<, 

Ki.iz,\nK.TH Cn^, X. C. 
Chii Eiii^incci /ii{^. 

Athletic A.ssociati()n: Lcazar Literarv 
Sdcicty; Society of Civil Kngincers; his- 
tmian C. E. Society 'o2-'o_3. 

\\Vii,'lit 150 lbs.: height 5 ft. 9 in.; age 
24 \ears. 



"(iod made liiiii anil ilirrefore k'l him pass for a man." 

JUIIX TllU.-MAS L.Wl), 

Pol'I.AK 1>K.\N<H, X. C. 

Civi/ Ejigineering. 

'J'liiiti Lieut. Co. B 'o2-'o3; Athletic As- 
sociation; Leazar Literary Society; capt. 
oratory section eastern team L. L. S'. 'o2-'o3; 
capt. technology section eastern team L. 
L. S. 'oi-'o2; vice-pres. Civil Engineers 
Society 'o2-'o3; historian Civil E.ngineers. 

Weight 140 lbs.; height 5 A. y in.; age 
20 years. 




y .^...^ 



5+ 



&^&^&^ii=^li=^&=^ 



THE AGROMECK 







tsX ^ f^^- 



"A plain blunt man." 

EDWARD SHAW I.VTCH, 

Lai RixBiRG. X. C. 

Electrical Enginccrmg. 

First Lieut. Co. D 'oz-'oj,; 3rd Seigt. 
Co. A 'oi-"o2; 3rd Corp. Co. D 'oo-'oi: 
vice-pres. Electrical Societ_v '02; Leazar 
Literary Society. 

Weight 170 lbs.; height (^ ft. 1)2 in ; 
age 23 years. 



•' Too good, too laire. for this bail wicl<ed worM." 

JESSE J(JHX MORRLS Norfolk, V.\. 

Civil Engineering. 

Second Lieut. Co. F '02-03; Athletic 
Association; sect. PuIIen Literary Society 
entertainment '02; A. i ^L German Club 
'oo-'o2; Thalerian German Club 'o2-'o3; 
Civil Engineers Society. 

Weight 138 lbs.; height 5 ft. 9-v^ in.; 
age 20 years. 




3D 



, :3;5S3ir:^ 



THE AGROMECK ^^^^^S. 




^y'<[^6L^\^y, 



" He lovfS to wind his nioiitli up and I lien let it gougiiin. ' 

1)A\II) S-|'AKR ()\\'1:N. 

F.WKTI KVILLK, N. C 

First Lieut. Co. C 'o2-'o3; 4tii .Seigt. Co. 
C 'oi-'o2; 2rnl Corp. Co. 1) oo-'oi; i)res. 
Leazar Literary Society 02; vice-pres. L. 
L. .S. '02; cciisnr L. L. S. '00; pres. ora- 
torical cntcrtaiiinu-nt L. L. S. "03. 

Wci^lit 140 lbs.: lirinlit 5 ft. i; in.: age 
1 1) year.s. 



" His imliiro is too noble for the world." 

JOHN il\K\i:\' ]'.\RKER, 

HlI.l.SHOKO, X. C. 
FJrclriial F.tii^inccring. 

First Lieut. Band 02-03; '*t Scrgt. 
Band '01-02; .Xthletic -Association; Tennis 
Club 'o2-'o3; full back Klectrical football 
team; 'Lhalerian German Club; capt. dec- 
lamation section Leazar Literary Society 
'01: trea.s. F'lcctrical Society '03; pres. 
Glee Club '03. 

Weight 160 lbs.: liciglit 6 ft.; age ly 
years. 







THE AGROMECK 




"I have not loVL-d the world nor the world me." 

JOEL POWERS Method, N. C. 

]\I('chanic:il Kiii;iiiC('riiig. 
Dav student: Leazar Literary Suciet}-; 

^■. M'. C A. 

\\'fig'ht 130 llis. : height 5 ft. 7 in.: age 
24 A ear-i. 



"But let me play the fool." 

EDW.VRl) HAYS RICKS, K §. 

Eni'iei.d, N. C". 

j\[i'chanical Engineering. 

Second Lieut. Co. Y. 'o2-'o3: Athletic 
Association; trcas. Leazar Literary Society 
'oi-'o2; chief marshal L. L. S. Feb. '03: 
1st sub. marshal L. L. S. '02; Dramatic 
Club 'oi-'o2-'o3: treas. German Club '02; 
vice-pres. Senior Class '02-03; ^'- ^f- *- • -^- • 
vice-pres. Glee Club '00. 



Weight 130 lbs. 
21 rears. 



height 



It. 



y 111.; age 




57 



THE AGROMECK H^^^^H 




•■ He was as fresh as is the month of May." 

GASTOX WII.Dl.k K(((ii:RS. K A. 

R.\lku;h, X. C. 

Electrical Eiigi)nrn'ng. 

Day student; ist Lieut. Co. B '02-03; 
4th Sergt. Co. A 'oi-'o2; marshal Leazar 
Literary Society 02; associate editor Agro- 
meck'o2-'o3; honor roll 'oo-'o I : Thalerian 
("lerman Club; l'".lcctrical .Society; pres. 
.\utiimobile Clul). 

Weight 140 lbs.: height 5 ft. ir in.: age 
1 9 years. 



" Do otlKTS or Ihev will lio you." 

CIi.\k!.KS HrRDr.TIK RO.SS, 

Chaki.ottk, N. C. 

Textile Engiticeritig. 

Entered Sophomore 00; 2nil l.iiut. Co. 
D '02-03; Athletic .Association: N'arsity 
football team '01; Tennis Club; Leazar 
Literary .Society: marshal 1 L. L. S. Feb. 
'01; vice-pres. lloplite (lerman Club '02; 
leader Thalerian German Club '02; clas.s 
rogue. 

Weight 160 lbs. : height 5 ft. S in.; age 
20 years. 




&=^ii=^£=^S=^&=^&s^ 



THE AGROMECK 




•' Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world like 
a colossus.'" 

JXO. HOUSTON SHIFORD, 

Charlotte, X. C. 

Dyeing Course. 

Second Lieut. Co. C 'oi-'o2; 5th Sergt. 
Co. A 'oo-'ni; Athletic Association; editor- 
in-chief ^Cf/ (zW White 'o2-'oy. Leazar Lit- 
erary Society; orator L. L. S. Feb. 02: 
custodian annual trophy in orat'irv L. L. 
S. '01 -'02. 

^\"clgllt 150 lbs.; hei,t?ht 5 ft. 8 in.; age 
26 vear.s. 



'■He was a schtilar, and a ripe and good one." 

HOWARD snn^sox, 

Simpson's .Store, X. C. 
2IccJhuiical Engineering. 

First Lieut. Co. F "02-03; S^h Sergt. 
,Co. C 01-02; sect. Athletic Assijciation 
oi-'o2; pres. Pullen Literary Society '02; 
Sect. P. L. S. 01; librarian P. L. S. 'oi; 
Censor P. L. S. 00; orator P. L. S. May 
'03; public debate P. L. S. '02; marshal I 
P. L. S. '01; chairman prf)gram committee 
P. L. S. ■o2-"o3: V. y[. C.A. 

Weight 138 ll)s. ; height 5 ft. 9 in.; age 
2 I years. 




//)U^/^x^t(/y(^*'''^'^^i'^r>^ 



59 



'^^^^m THE AGROMECK ^^S^^ 




^cC 'CO^ ^toZnn^^-^ 



"There's a brave fi'llow ! There's a man of pluck!" 

KDWAKl) KOI'. SIA.Ml'S, K A 

Kai.f.ich, \. C. 

Tc.xHIc Engineering. 

Da) student; 2nd Lieut. C'i>. B ■o2-'o3; 
4th Sergt. Co. B 'oi-'o2; Lcazar Literary 
Scicict}': honor roll 'oo-'o: ; Thalcrian (".cr- 
man t'lub: vice-pres. Automobile C'lul>. 

\\Vi.L,dit I 50 Ills.; hLij;ht 5 It. 10 in.; age 
I y years. 



" Ilatli a lean ami liuii^ry look." 

(;k()R(;k ^■.\!'l•;s stk.mh.kv, 

.\SHICVII.I,K, X. (,'. 

Ch 'il En gin < v 'I'ing. 

Third l.icut. Co. 15 ■02-03; Athletie As- 
sociation; I'ullen l.iterar\- Society: prus. 
A. (). M. J. T. Club. 

Weight 150II1.S. ; liL-ight 5 It. 10 in.; age 
23 years. 




•-^^^^^ ^<z<&- ^-^v^-ly^ 



60 






THE AGROMECK 




**Not always aotious show the man." 

CHAS. KDWARl) TROirKR, 

P'ranki.in, N. C. 

Ch c mica I Engin ear iiig. 

First Lieut, and Hospital Steward 'o2-'o3; 
4th Sergt. Co. I) oi-'oa; class baseball 
team 'oi; PuUen Literary Society; critic 
P. L. S. 'oi; Biological Ciub. 

Weight 135 lbs.: height 6 ft.: age 18 
\ears. 



icci^ G yyz-^-^t^Stl^ 



"His worst fault is to be in love." 

JONATHAN WINBORNE WHITE, 

(JREENVII.I.E, N. C. 

Dvciiig Course. 

First Lieut. C"<i. E '02-01; 3rd Sergt. 
Co. B 'oi-'o2; 3rd Corp. Co. A oo-'oi; 
Leazar Literary Societ}-; sect. Liebeg 
Chemical Society 01 -'02; treas. Liebeg 
Chemical Society '02-03. 

Weight 155 lbs.; height 5 ft. 9^2 in.; 
age 19 years. 




Q^rA^ 



61 



M^M^^i^M^ 



THE AGROMECK 







feoLuKA^/ 4>. UrkCuvvo/ 



" Great wits are sure to madness near allied. 
And thin partition do their bounds divide." 

i:i)\Vl\ SK^'MOUR WHITING, 

Hamlet, N. C. 

Textile Eiiginciiing. 

Fourth Scrgt. Co. B '01-02; 4th Corp. 
Co. B '00-01; honor roll 'oo-'oi; Lcazar 
Literary Society; essayist 1.. L. S. I\Ia\- '01; 
vice-pres. L. L. S. 'oi-'o2; orator Feb. en- 
tertainment L. L. S. 03; comic s,nA &\- 
ch&ngn {:A\\.ov Red and ■W/ii/e "02-03; asst. 
editor Agromeck "02-03. 

Weight 150 lbs.; height 5 ft. 7 in.: age 
20 vears. 




62 



^m^^3 THE AGROMECK ^^^^^ 



^-■^\> 



.iAr^-''-»^-y^j^.;:^>s^<;-j---f><57»f>(— ^-, ">rV"'^N;..^-^ 







cv- -i^—.^fK.'rK.-f:-^^,-^ s.<r 




i» Class Prophecy ^ "k^'i^ 



Once upon a midnight dreary, 
AVhile I piindered, weak and weary, 
O'er the future that's beture us, 

What it has for us in store, 
Suddenly there came a vision, 
Mocking me in slieer derision. 

Showing things I'd never seen befure. 

Through all liell with lava burning, 
Never blessing, ever "durning, " 
There to seek what lay before us, 

Passed my wretched, trembling soul. 
There I found a fearful warning 
Of the future that is dawning, 

Of what goon will be our goal. 

With hell's Hanies upiin uie gloa'ing, 
l!(piling vapors 'ronml me fioating, 
Hiving in hell'.s nmlten lava, 

There I saw what was l)efiire — 
Saw what fate had long decreed us, 
What the devil would concede us ; 

Only this and nothing more. 

" Prophet, " said I, " Ood of evil, 
Lord of sin from time primeval, 
By the (lames that roar around us 

By all good that we deplore, 
Tell me, Evil One, discerning 
What our fate is while here burning. 

Tell me ; tell me, I implore. " 



ASBURY 

Swathed in iron's hot fluid plaster, 
Gathered fast and gathered faster, 
O'er hell's awful diamond racing. 

One whom I had seen liefore. 
Never from his pastime turning — 
In his heart no other yearning — 

He played baseball evermore. 

BOGART 

o'er a drawing bcaril reclining, 
One frail yuuth I saw designing 
What the devil had assigned him. 

" iM. E !" sighed the youth, and swore; 
Then I knew in joy unending. 
Life and soul alike expending, 

lie would draw forevcrmore. 

BONEY 

In that awful, ceaseless burning, 
Still upright and evil sjiurning. 
Did another lead good orders, 

Though all hell conspir'd to turn him — 
Him that mimicked goodness ever, 
Satan would with torture clever 

Through eternity l)urn him. 

CARPENTER 



And the devil, gravely sitting. 
Never for a moment quitting, 
Not for one brief second leaving 

His throne o'er a furnace door, 
Told me I could see my class-mates 
Following liis royal dictates; 

This I saw and nothing more : 



There was one who loved to revel 

In coarse jokes that shocked the devil. 

Who Plis Majesty did rival in liis sphere. 

Through hell's vastness ever roaming, 
In hell's darkest caverns hi#-g. 
In its depths forever biding. 

He would be "til time's deep gloaming. 



63 






THE AGROMECK ^^^S^ 



CLARK 

JCot all evil inucli enjoying, 
Not himself with sin destroying, 
Was another in torment's abyss. 

Never knew I why he came there; 
Yet he \va9 in hell consuming, 
Ever damning, ever dooming 

All things which liad bruught him there. 



DARDEN 

Never rringing, never quailing, 
Never writhing, never wailing. 
One was sternly silent ever. 

There forever doomed to be, 
So fair angels far above him 
Never brought lii know and love him 

Could from mortal love be free. 



COIT 

Doomed was one to useless fanning 
On a hired liillside charming; 
Loudly in their echoes rang his prayers for 
rain. 
Heard but never granted, prayers in hell. 
Now as ever lived the farmer liand to month. 
Fiercely raged forever hell's unending 
drouth. 
And rain long iirayi'd for never fell. 

CORNWELL 

One with heaven made c-oiinec-tion, 
Maybe some former predilection 
Of his own had earned him this ; 

Or why forever should it be his doom 
To have within his hearing heaven's bliss. 
Mayhap ^ujne lovely angel's cool-lipped 
kiss, 

And yet be sunk in hell's deep gloom. 

CREECH 

In that roaring, ceaseless lire. 
His own lies his funeral pyre. 
Was one .soul eternally consumed ; 

Truthfulness forever shunning, 
All things true for aye den\ ing. 
Hell's worst imps liimself outlying 

In his fiendish, matchless cunning. 



DIGGS 

Kept from marring heaven's beauty, 
Chained in hell to irksome duty, 
One soul struggled to be free. 

Longed for what could never be ; 
Welded molten hot around him, 
Fast his shackles ever bound him 

Throughout all eternity. 

ELLIS 

One who feared not any man 
From the very first began 
To fear the devil. 

To him hell's horrors multiplied 
From spectres, phantoms, g(}blins all. 
Which the devil did to his mind recall 

Him the devil ever terrified. 



ETHERIDGE 

With liis luck forever failing. 
Endless loss himself entailing. 
One would bet and lose eternally. 

And the devil much would taunt him 
Show him chances fair to lure him; 
'Gain.st all losses would insure him; 

In the end let losses haunt him. 



CULBRETH 

One, His Majesty the devil had decreeil 
Should at once report each vile misdeed, 
Where'er committed in his realm ; 

In this failing, tortures ever 
Were to meet this luckless wretch ; 
Tortures worse than |)en can sketch 

Would be his forever. 



FERGUSON 

There was one old soul, it seemed. 
Even by the devil nnich esteemed, 
Who with good advice and counsel fraught 

Aided the devil his sole lord. 
Not with other demons playeil he; 
Ever plans and projects laid he. 

Much the devil loved this ward. 



64 



,s^^^^^^^^ 



THE AGROMECK 



FOSTER 

Then another, this man's brotlier 

In his manner, — since no otlier 

Ties — not even years — could make them so, 

Ever gave liimself to labor; 
Ever strained his burdened mind; 
And grew a grim, relentless grind. 

Knowing not his nearest neighbor. 



JOHNSON 

One there was forever trailing 
Por success, and ever failing 
To win what he had striven for; 

Him the devil much was taxing; 
Ever struggling, never gaining ; 
Ever losing, ne'er attaining, 

Never from his task relaxing. 



GARDNER 

Given to eternal wooing. 
Ever vainly love pursuing, 
One whom I had known of old; 

Fate could not have been more cruel ; 
Ever doom'd to disappointment, 
For his heart no healing ointment 
For the wounds from Cupid's duel. 



KENNEDY 

There was one perpetual dead-beat 
Sweltering in that awful hell-heat. 
There to lounge forevermore; 

Fated thus to idling ever. 
Always in that same place sitting; 
Never it a moment quitting; 

From his pastime moxing — never. 



GIDNEY 

Ever struggling over-loaded. 
While his temper oft exploded, 
Under the vast weight he bore. 

So commanded, one pale youth did 
'Round with him an extraordinary 
Supply of things and stationary, 

Which he was ever forced to "jag.'' 

GLENN 

There I saw one who in pureness, 
^lodesty and shy demureness 

No one ever yet excelled. 
What if he had virtues rare ? 
Because he did not love the fair 
The devil him a hostage held. 



draa 



KIRKPATRICK 

One soul was striving to convince 

The devil of his innocence — 

To prove himself imjustly doomed; 

Ilim the devil ever routed; 
Every stand from him he outed, 
Every proof of his he doidjted. 

And his best pleas ever scouted. 

LAND, B. 

One there was the devil naming 
As beyond his own harsh taming, 
Breaking all hell's regulations. 

As was his wont to do before. 
With his hounds forever straying. 
In their hoarse, deep-echoed baying 

Joyed his soul forevermore. 



GUNTER 

Learned, studious, quiet, profound, 
As any that dwelt under ground. 
The devil's wise chief engineer; 

Him the devil tortured lightly; 
He set hell with light to glowing, 
Over hell his arc lights throwing; 

His work pleased the devil might'ly. 



LAND, J. 

One unhappy youth was smoking, 
On an endless " three-for" choking. 
Doomed to puff it for all time; 

And the devil ever eyed him, 
At his torture ever railing; 
Had him smoke and flames inhaling, 

Had all rest for aye denied him. 



65 



THE AGROMECK 



LYTCH 

From one's lilis tliere came no token, 
Ever they one word hail spoken; 
To be ever silent was his doom. 

Oft his lips in agony would open 
Moving mutely as to speak, 
As in horror loud to shriek; 

Close in silence never l)roken. 



RICKS 

Into one rapt circle glancing, 
There I saw forever dancing. 
Following a painful pastime 

Eternally one soul would be; 
And the nuisic never ceasing, 
Not a moment him releasing, 

Tortured him eternallv. 



MORRIS 



ROGERS 



Plans for roads and tunnels laying, 
In the devil's realm surveying. 
Was another youth employed. 

Hell he found a bit informal. 
Though the devil much did love him. 
Prized no other slave above him; 

Punished him with torture normal. 



One there was in his opinion 
Fit to rule that va-^t dominion, 
Though the devil knew far better; 

Ever mouthing, ever growling. 
In that roaring conflagration. 
Subject to vile degradation, 

Would he be fon^ver howling. 



OWEN 



ROSS 



There was one forever roasting, 

Ever bragging, ever boasting 

Of what things he'd done before. 

For his ])art had the devil I'ast 
That he sliould ever roam hell o'er, 
.\ud unto death each demon bore, 

While long eternity should last. 



iS'ot all tortures, fearful, awful. 
Not all means and mandates lawful, 
Could ever force one soul to -.vork; 

For the devil long had tried him, 
.\nd, the devil once defeated, 
Though in agony entreated, 

lOver liad all sleep (leniecl hhii. 



PARKER 

Then came one of great position, 
High in rank, — hell's chief musician; 
Ever playeil he on his molten horn. 

lie thus for once warm music made. 
Wailing notes each vast gulf lilling, 
And each soul with horror thrilling; 
Anything but music — what he jilayeil 



SHUFORD 

There 1 saw a late cla.«s-niate 
Struggling 'gainst relentless fate, 
Where time was not, was always lae. 

lie as ever in time long past 
Ever hurried, ever scurried, 
Kver rushed, ever Hurried, 

And in the end was late at last 



POWERS 

Ever rushed and ever hurried, 
Ever overworked and worried, 
One, as ever, seemed to be 

Doomed all pleasure to forego. 
O'er him ruling care imperious 
Seived to make him far too serious. 
And the devil made him more so. 



SIMPSON 

There was one soul whose self-conceit 
Was ever chilled by grim defeat. 
Which ever dragged lum farther <lown. 

In his course often changing; 
To higher class always a.«piring, 
To lower classes oft retiring. 

Was his soul forever ranging. 



66 






THE AGROMECK 



STAMPS 

Sbrit'k:^ and yells and howls demnnian 
Doubled hell's hfiarse pandemonium, — 
Issuing from one noisy demon, 

A demon whom I'd seen liet'ore. 
Not a moment's surcease taking, 
Ever bell with uproar shaking — 

In that his doom forevermore. 



TROTTER 

One whose name I cannot mention, 
Ever moved Ijy good intention, 
Now not understood as ever, 

Wrongly condemned, was sent to hell; 
Sissy-like wu-s hell's bead matron, 
Matle so by bis lordly patron 

And given other rank as well. 



STRADLKY 

Kept forever there on duty 

Was one smiling, youthful beauty, 

AV'ho was O. B. there forever. 

Alone, sedate and solitary. 
Trying ever to keep onler, 
On insanity's near border. 

From endless dutv militarv. 



"WHITE 

Never dying, ever dyeing, 
Nothing else forever trying 
Dyed one vain soul eternally. 

Other's merits ever quelling, 
High in bis own estimation. 
Higher in others detestation, 

Mver his own ])raises yelling. 



"WHITING 

One soul of fate did not complain — 
'Twas him who ran the brimstone train. 
Nor ever wished his place to change; 

Ever laboring with a zest, 
Never his wild run forsaking — 
Ever some fast record breaking. 
Forever wanting "tight hours rest." 




67 



^^^^ THE AGROMECK ^M^^ 



Junior Class 



President W, A. BARRE T 

Vice-President 

Secretary R. P. REECE 

Historian HILL IM. HUNTER 



COLORS 

I'ur]ilc and Old C,ok\. 



MOTTO 

'Tu ho, rather than to seer 



YELL 

W'li..! Kah! Roar, 
Who! Rah! Roar! 
A. & I\L, A. A AL, 1904. 



68 



^M^^^^ THE AGROMECK «««««« 



Junior History 



To write a class history without running into the sna^-es of repetition is quite 
a difficult task. Especially is this true of a College whose discipline is 
based on the military system, where the routine of life varies little. 

During our three years of college life there have been few variations 
outside of our regular college work. The Watauga fire and the "Revolt" are the 
only incidents that have happened to disturb our otherwise peaceful lives. 

We arrived here one bright morning in the early part of September and soon 
settled down to regular work. We learned a few things which were not mentioned 
in the Catalogue — some to our discomfort, others much to our pleasure. 

The class of 1 904 upon entering numbered seventy. Our ages averaged higher than 
those of most of the classes that had heretofore entered. This was probably due to 
the standard having been raised the year we entered, our class being only a few 
months behind the class of '03. 

Our first class president was Harding. We met soon after registering and elected 
our first class president without any outside help whatever. 

The class of 1904 furnished the baseball team a pitcher — Miller, and the football 
team a quarter-back — Thompson, in our fresh year. 

Our class returned in September, 1901, fifty-three strong, feeling our importance, 
for w-e were no longer Freshmen. However we lost a great deal of our pleasures as 
Sophomores by having such stringent regulations against "monkeying with the 
Fresh. " The Booze-West Point hazing matter was before the public at that time, 
hence our inability to "polish" a few of the deserving. The only thing we could 
do was to whistle at a few of the most needy. 

It was also during this year that we made our acquaintance with Mr. Holmes's 
interesting work on the "Steam Engine," and Mr. Thompson's enjoyable book, 
"Electricity and Magnetism." Several of us found these new acquaintances very 
unpleasant, especially Mr. Holmes's " Steam Engine. " That first "steam" exami- 
nation was the "real article, '' and many were they that were compelled to take the 
broad and easy road to 60 — n. 

Hedrick was class president, and we were represented on the baseball team only 
by Miller and Gulley, and the football team by Council and Gulley. 

At the beginning of this session we numbered fort}-, thirteen of our men failing to 
return. We missed the familiar faces of our old comrades, for we had fought A. and 
M. "mixture" and other minor battles side by side for two long years. We also 
had our pleasures together, and when they failed to return we all/elt that we had 
suffered a loss as a class, and individually. 

69 



"^^^^m THE A G R O M E C K ^^^^M 

During the first term \vc lost three more good men. Ikdrick dccidetl to study 
medicine, and returned home tlic latter ]>art of (Xtober. Rogers also left about the 
same time. Foster had to leave in November on account >>f the death of his fatiier. 
We felt the loss of these men keenly, as they were all good fellows, and an honor to 
their college and class. 

Gulley and (Jaither represented our class on the best football team the College 
has ever had. 

Ill the meantime we are enjoying Sunday liberty, which was granted us during the 
(irst term. 

Cl.ass Histokian. 




70 



'^^^^m THE AGROM E C K ^^^^^^ 



Class sT '05 

($» 

COLORS 

X'iolet and White. 

YELL 

Boom Rah! Boom Ree 
Boom Rah! Boom Ree 
S-O-P-H-W-O-R-E! 

MOTTO 

" Honor by Devotion to Dutv. " 

OFFICERS 

WARD SHANNONHOUSK p,,^^„^^^ 

STERLING GRAVDON VrcK-PKKstBKNT 

JULIAN MEREDITH HOWARD S.c,<kt..vkv-Tre..surkr 

CHARLES WIGG MARTIN 

Poet 

WILLIAM MILLER CHAMBERS h,.^ 

Historian 



^ 
*■ 



73 



THE AGROMECK <^^^^^^ 



^'^^V^' ^ ^^l^^ ^ j^^'^^ 



Sophomore History 



T 



< ) relate all that has befallen us during our i^'lorious existence since first we 
began our career as stuilei>ts at the North Carolina College of Agriculture 
ind Mechanic Arts, woukl be sinijily inipossible, ami, accordingly, the 
jiurijose of this humble history will be to represent only a few of the grand 
ilei-ils and paint but an imperfect picture of this imposing array of So])homores. 

As all class historians lune done, I, too, shall begin at the time when we first 
enterctl college. Within less than a week after the Ixginning of our Freshman 
vear. we were known as the greenest class that ever matriculated at the A. t^ M. 
But, in a short time, we had shown t(.> the P'acuUy and the stuilent body that we 
hail in our ranks the material from which men are made, and that we were stuilents 
as well as pupils. Stepping, by hard and steady work, from Freshmen to Sopho- 
mores, we displayed our real worth to the upper classes. 

(3ut of a class of eighty-t;ight, only fifty returned (a few failed to make the 
required sixty on finals, but the majority had various good reasons), to assist in 
making the history of the Sophomore class. At the beginning of the year our 
number was increased by twelve or fifteen new- men, who have proved themselves 
comjietent to rank with the old members. Our class was organized early in the 
lust term, the best and strongest men being chosen as oflicers. Under their leader- 
ship we have worked together as one man. Our class spirit and college patriotism 
have become proverbial. Although our existence here has been but short, we are 
recognized by the student body as the strongest ami most closely united class in 
College. 

In athletics we are well rt-pre.sented. (Jn A. & AT. 's best football team we 
point with pride to Hadley, who, as centre, met the rushes of the opposing team like 
a stone wall ; while Shannonhouse, as half-back, always took the ball for go(3d 
gains. Both these men played their positions well, and to them is due much credit 
for the fine record of the 'Varsity team. Our class team was the strongest in College. 
We challenged each class separately for the championship, but each in order returned 
our challenge and regretted being unable to play us on account of their inferior 
strength. Failing to get a game with the Senior, Junior, or Freshman class, 
we then agreed to play any eleven men in the College — the Varsity team excepted — 
anil when this challenge was not accepted we justly claimed the class championship 
in football. We also have a number of men whose prospects are good for making 
the " Big Nine '" Shannonhouse and Hadley plaved excellent ball last season and 
are almost sure to make the team again ; besides these, several other Sophmores have 
the odds in their favor for positions on the College team. In baseball we expect to 

74 



THE AGROMECK 



keep up our established reputation and win the spring championship. 

Those of us who could not actually play ball performed our duty faithfully on 
the side lines by cheering and encouraging the men of the Varsity team. In this 
way we helped to make the game with the University of North Carolina a draw. Our 
systematic rooting club — an organization never before known at the A. L<i: I\I — was a 
distinct feature of all the games plaved here. 

In celebrating ball victories the Sophomores were always in the lead from the 
start ; we were chief builders of bonfires and leaders of processions down town, and 
always had ready a suitable class song. 

Heretofore, the Second Year Short-Course men have been counted as Sophomores, 
but we, not pleased with such a reckoning, came out and separated ourselves from 
them; so that now our class is composed of only the regular four-year Sophomores. 

In our studies we are not behind the record of preceding classes. In fact, we 
are further advanced in some of our work than the Sophomore class of last year ; and, 
if we successfuU}' pass Chemistry and Electricity and Magnetism — the stumbling 
blocks of all Sophomores — our record will indeed be a brigh; one. 

We now come to the greatest event of the year, the Sophomore Banquet. About 
the first of November, we decided to have a class dinner and appointed a committee 
to make the necessary arrangements. To this committee we are largely indebted for 
the success of that memorable occasion. On the evening of November 14th the 
class met on the campus just in front of the main building and went in a body to 
the Yarborough House, where the feast was spread. At 8:30 o'clock we marched 
into the brilliantly-lighted dining hall, where plates were laid for fifty-si.\ of our 
members and for President Winston and Commandant Phelps, whom the class had 
invited. Captain Phelps made the address of welcome, after which came that 
part of the evening's program which made glad the heart of every Sophomore 
present. We had a fifteen-course dinner served in the usual elegant style characteristic 
of the Yarborough House. Two short hours were spent in enjoyment becoming the 
occasion ; and in passing, let us pause a moment to say that our dinner differed 
much from a meal prepared by "One Billings. ' The remains of the cheese and 
coffee taken awav, cigars were lighted and the following toasts proposed by the 
Toastmaster : Football, response by C. A. Seifert ; Baseball, response by S. Gray- 
don ; Class of '05, response by W. M. Chambers. President Winston's closing compli- 
mentary remarks ended the long-to-be-remembered Sophomore Banquet, and, since we 
had nothing stronger than coffee, we experienced no trouble in finding our way back 
to the " Hill " and to our quarters. We do not wish to appear egotistical ; but we 
do want to give honor to whom honor is due To the present Sophomores, therefore, 
we give the honor of being the first to establish the custom of annual class banquets 
at the A. & M. 

I am indeed sorry that the space here allotted me will not f .rmit an elaborate 
and full individual history of this noble body of illustrious and far-famed Sophomores. 

Historian. 

75 






THE AGROMECK 



t^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 
^^^F^ 



mb\> II %o\K L^ou 

Is it because your eves so blue, 

With softly radiant twinkling light, 

Alone to you my heart hold true. 

Anil thrill my scnil with gentle might? 

Perhaps your dinijiled cheeks aglow 
With flush like roses crimson red 

In some way make me love you so, 
Nor love some other girl instead. 

It may be that your mouth so sweet, 

Like luscious fruit well formed and ripe. 

My taste, if not my lips, may meet — 
liul why of all lips choose one type.-' 

It may be true tliat nothing save 
\'our manner, care-frt'e and so gay. 

Or, sueetl}' serious wlu'n 'tis grave, 
My heart holds fast in tyrant's sway. 

It may be beauty, graces rare, 

Which other girls seem not to own. 

Combine to make you doubh fair. 
And make me love- but \-ou alone. 



Still, other girls have eyes as blue. 

Have dimpled cheeks that Hush and glow; 

Sweet are their li])s and manners, too; 
\'et I lovi- onh' xnu. I know. 

W. 






EiET? THE AGROMECK ^^^^M. 



Freshman Class 

«$> 

MOTTO 

"W'isdiiin is [iiiwer, tliercfDre ije-t wisiinui." 

COLORS 

Purple- ami Okl Odd. 

YELL 

Hulla Bal<jo, Ge-lie, Ge-hix, 
\Vi;"re the Class of 1906. 

OFFICERS 

A. W. ( IREGORV President 

P. i 1. ASBURV \"ice-Presidkkt 

I). \V. K( )BERTSf)N Secrf.tary-Treaslkek 

S. H. CLARK Historian 



^ 
/ 



»GBO 6 79 



&=^&^&^&^e^&=^ 



THE AGROMECK ^^^^^^ 



T 



Freshman History 

III'! lMitr;uice K.\ainin;itii)ns over, tlie Class of "'06" cnttred ujion its long 
jiiiiniev in search of tlit- niiich-valuccl sheepskin. 

( )ur class is one of the largest ever known in the annals of the College, 
anil brighter prospects for success were never so marked ; for among our 
ranks are athletes, students, and hoys with determination written on their brows. 

The persi>nnel of the class stands verv high, for our boys are sons of eminent 
judges, lawyers, physicians, ministers, progressive farmers, and successful business 
men. 

Our class is compused of couiparativelv well-l)uilt young men, their ages ranging 
anvwhere fmni fifteen to twenty-four years, and with the college training they will 
receive slioulil tleveloj) into strong, healthy and learned men. 

As usual, Captain Phelps, our commandant, presided over the first meeting and 
nominated Turner for president, who was temporarily elected for thirty days, as were 
Tonilinson, vice-president, and Tdlman, secretary antl treasurer. At the expiration 
of that time, (Iregory, iu\-sident, .\sbury, vice-president, and Ixobertson, secretary 
and treasurer, were permanently elected and the class organization was complete. 

Like their predecessors, the Freshmen this year learned to drill very quickly and 
in a short while the battalion had six well-drilled companies. 

The majority of the new men joined the IJterary Societies and show much 
enthusiasm in participating in their jirogrammes. They also joined the Athletic 
Association ami gave it and the hjotball team their earnest support. 

Most of our boys are gifted with a patriotic spirit, and every afternoon the 
athletic field is limd with interested spectators. We have representatives both on 
the lii'st and scrub teams who reflect credit upon their class. In the spring we are 
confident of having several men on the baseball team who will do their share toward 
lowering the banner of our old rival. 

One of the most enjoyable days during the first term was Thursilay of Fair Week, 
auLl will be ninemlured by all as one of the pleasant ilays of their Freshman vear. 



80 



THE AGROMECK S«^^^^ 



A Tale of the Civil War 



f^n 



LL da}- long I had trudged up and down across the autumn-browned sand 
hills. All day long my dog had hunted hard all over those hills. I was 
tired; so was the dog. 

It was a cold, wintry afternoon. Almost since mid-day the sun had 
UM ^^'■'" hidden by leaden gray clouds that stretched everywhere as far as 
the eye could reach. In a little while darkness would help the clouds to 
drive away what light was left. Unconsciously I quickened my steps. We were 
homeward bound, the dog and I. At intervals the dog would make a short detour 
as if he thought there might be birds near. Not finding any birds he would come 
back with mute apology in his soft brown eyes. 

Now and then a sparrow would start from where it had nestled for the night, or 
some lone bird would fly swifty past. Except for the swish of my feet in the thick 
wild-grass, the silence was unbroken. After some time we came to a large clearing. 

In the middle of the clearing stood a house, deserted years before, and falling 
fast to ruin. A moment of hesitation, and I turned toward the house. 

The house was of the old Colonial style, squarely built with spacious rooms and 
halls and wide verandas. It was but a tottering relic of its former glory. 

Upon its weather-beaten sides the storms and rains of years had left their mark. 
The pillars beneath the house were crumbling slowly to dust. The floors of the 
wide porches trembled under my step. With never a hand to stop them some of the 
blinds swung open or closed as the wind blew them. Long before all the window- 
panes had fallen out. The house itself shivered under the fierce gusts of winter 
winds. Seen from the outside the house was a picture of desolation. Impelled by 
curiosity I slipped inside. 

Inside were the same signs of ruin and decay. The plastering had cracked and 
fallen from the walls. Some of the doors had fallen flat upon the floor. Under my 
slight weight the stairway swayed and creaked ominously. I wandered through each 
bare, deserted room. In a rear room upstairs there was an opening to the attic, which 
I did not explore for fear of its ghostly darkness and silence. 

Wild animals might have been hidden there. Who knows what might have been 
hidden there.'' The loneliness of the old house haunted me. Starting at every 
squeak of the unsafe stairway, I hurrieil down and slipped outside. I was as glad to 
be off" again as my dog was. 

As we walked along in the gathering gloom, I could not help thinking nf the 
deserted mansion. I wondered who had lived there in time long f>- A — what revels 
youth and beauty had had within those spacious halls. My mind was taken up with 



85 



^^^aBB THE AGROMEC K gggggg 



these reflections wlieii, cciuung t<i ;i ro.ul, 1 met a very old negro who was driving my 
way in liis ox cart. 

" Have a Hft, sah .' " he asketl, moving aside to mai;c room lor me. 

With grateful thanks 1 accepted his offer. When I got settled 1 aski,-d, -'Uncle, 
ilo you know who used to live in that old house hack yonder.' " 

" Ves, sah. Deed I docs, deed I iloes," the old negro rephcd. Then lie 
waited respectfully before saying more. He was of the old type. 

His grizzled heard brushed low upon his massive chest. From under his shagg) 
e_\e-liro\\s his e}es, kei-n but kindly, like the eyes of a good dog, looketl straight at me. 
When he spoke it was with slow delil)erateness and occasional weighty pauses. 

Impressed by the ok! man's air ; and urged by my own curiosity, I begged him to 
tell me all lie knt-u 'Ihcji the (ihi man began his stor)' : 

"Long, long time ago, befoh de wah, Ule Marse Everitt own de |ilace. Ole 
Marse he come from way cross dc big water somewhere. He rich, very rich. He 
usc-d to keep de finest place around dese parts. 1 doan 'member how many niggers 
he had, hi'ap of 'em, dough. I)ey had quarters where you see dem <>le cliimbleys 
crumbleil down, out from de big house. 

" Whole heap of white men (Jle ^[arse have workin' for him, gettin' out timber 
an' tur|)entine. Mos' all de lanil around here was his. Big I'owiiattan, the mill 
pon' vou pass back yonder, was his. Little Powhattan, dit little p m' back from de 
head of tie big ])on', he use for liis fish pon'. Dem times de\' keepis me round '.\r 
house to run errons an' such like. 

"When Marse John was a little bitt}- clia]i ( )le Marse gives him to me an' tells 
me to tek care of him. From dat tiiue on I looks out for Marse |olin. .Soon as 
he's big enough we go huntin' an' fishin' together. I cU)an stan' back from doing 
anything Marse lohn wants done, an' Marse )r)hn he jes' gives me an\tliing I wants. 
Wen he growed up to be a man he ci:)uld oiitswim, outritie an' outshoot anvbodv 
'roun' dese parts. Marse John was much of a man. I belie\e he was de bes' 
lookin' man I ever saw : an" everybotly likes him. 

"Well, Marse John falls in love will i\Iiss Emily — she was Ole Marse's ])artner's 
daughter. She she' was a jjretty woman, .she hail blue eyes an' wavy hair. W'en 
she laughed it was like water ripplin' an' gurglin' in de branch. Slie was plum]) an' 
full of fun. Lor', how she could sing an' dance ! ^larse John goes a plum fool 
over her, but you couldn't tell 'cept by her eyes what she thinks o' him. Dey leads 
all de big dances at Ole Marse's house. It keeps on 'til Marse John gets more fool 
over lur dan evir. Den come de war. 

"Marse John say he mus' go. Miss Emily she doan want liim to go. Ole 
Missus jus' cries an' doan say anything. Ole INFarse chokes an' great liig tears comes 
in his eyes w'en he says, 'Go, boy, it's your dut\ ! ' 

" I follows young Marse to de war. I was in de camp lookin' after his things for 
him. He says for me to keep way from dc battlefiel'. I doan see him fight ; but I 

86 



^^^^m THE AGROMECK ^^^^M 



hears men talk of Marse John. Dey say he fights terrible ; an' our men ain' 'fraid 
w'en dey followin' Marse John. After awhile he gets to be Cap"n of his company. 
Often Miss Emily writes to him. Sometimes w"en he reads her letters he cries — de 
only time Marse John ever cry. 

"One day, I forgets de name of dc place, but de Yanks and Rebs had fought like 
debils for three days: an' de evenin' of de last day Marse John is missin'. Some of 
dem say de last dey see of him he was fightin': an' fightin' harder dan dey ever see 
him fight. W'en night comes I wanders over dat awful fiel' of blood an' death, 
lookin' for IVIarse John. After awhile I comes to where a ghoul is bendin' over 
somebody. I looks ijver his shoulder; an' it was Marse [ohn he was robbin'; it 
was de gold locket, wid Miss Emily's picture in it, he was takin'. I knocks de 
ghoul in de head wid de butt of my gun, quick an' strong like I'd strike my axe in 
de butt of a big swamp gum. He falls widout a groan. Wid m}- own ban's I buries 
Marse John. Den I makes my wav back here. 

"When I gets back I find dat Ole Missus an' Miss Emily done taken sick an' pine 
away an' die — Ole Marse the only one left; an' he doan seem like he used to be. 
Long, long time I look after Ole Marse. He was jus' as good to me as he could be ; 
but somehow Ole Marse ain' never happy again. 

" One day he sits on de front porch a long time readin' a book. 1 goes out once 
to see if he wants anything. 'Pears like to me Ole Marse sorter quiet. I goes up 
an' hiuks over his shoulder. Where he was readin' was a picture of a battlefiel' — I 
reckon where Marse John fought. On de picture two big tears was slowly dryin'. 
Ok- Marse mighty still, seem like. I leans over an" looks in his face; an' befoh God, 
( )k- Marse was dead. 




87 




s 

B 

A 

T 

T 
A 

I 

O 

N 



THE AGROMECK 



Military Department 



WITHIN the last few years the Military Department of our College has made 
rapid advancement. It can be safely asserted that any student taking a 
degree in one of the regular courses, and having pursued in the meantime 
the course in military science, both theoretical and practical, will be as well 
prepared for the duties of an army otlicer as a graduate from the highest institutions 
of our country, barring West Point. 

The growth of this department has not been spasmodic, but in keeping with 
the remarkable development of the College. When first introduced, in 1895, 
military discipline was not pressed to any great extent. Uniforms were worn only 
on drill, the 7 and 10:30 inspections were unheard of, and from all that we can 
learn the students were comparatively free. They visited when the slightest oppor- 
tunity presented itself, and observed study hours only when "chased in" by the 
night watchman. As years passed hurriedly times and manners changed and more 
attention was paid to military instruction. The Freshmen of today see only their 
portion of the city, being allowed to visit Raleigh Saturday afternoon and Sunday 
morning and evening. 

In the fall of '99, when the class of '03 entered College, Mr. N. R. Stansel, a 
former graduate, was made commandant, and to those of us who knew him it is 
useless to say he ruled wisely and made many friends. His patience was put to the 
most severe tests in the performance of his duties, but in spite of all these trials he was 
not found wanting. He served a very successful term of one scholastic year in the Chair 
of Military Science, and we were sorry to lose him in the fall of 1900, when he 
entered Cornell University to complete his course in Electrical Engineering. 

He was succeeded by Captain F. ¥-.. Phelps, of the United States Army. Captain 
Phelps has been in every way an ideal commandant, popular in every respect and 
loved by the whole battalion. In the performance of his duties, even though it be 
putting a noisy rat under arrest, he never loses his temper, but orders arrests and 
assigns demerits with a stern countenance that sweeps the most daring Freshman oft" 
his feet. And it is to Captain Phelps more than anyone else that we owe the remark- 
able advancement of this department. The great growth and universal popularity of 
this department is shown very strikingly in the interest manifested by people of 
Raleigh and the young ladies of the various female colleges in the city. They come 
out in scores time after time to see our battalion drills and dress parade. 

The At'7w a/iii Observer, in speaking of our parades, said in substance: "They 
are among the most interesting and attractive things at the Coll^ . There are six 
companies in the battalion this year, two more than has been necessary in previous 

89 






THE AGROMECK 






VL-iii's ; ami it is witli juidu ami love, i.iui|ilcil uilli acliiiiialH >ii lliat we Irmk ii|)mii 
those stronu:, manly cadets, unifoniied in the '(ji'cy' that is so (k-ar to the South and 
its history. " 

A idiik at the long ari'ay of manl)- and h'i|iclul laces in c.nr corps makes us feel 
proud 111" iiur (.'olle.s;e ; proud ol the pmminence it has attained in militarv circles; 
piiiud 111" (iiir presitlent and Cimmandant, and proud i>l' Ik ini; numbered nue of 
the inanv uliieh eonstitutt- such a coni,''eniai wlmle. 




■WH1.K1. WKkl, VUU l.Ail NIGHT 



90 




1I5S • MARY- HArWOODtANDREWS 

SPONSOR BATTALION 



^^^^i THE AGROMECK ^^^^^g 



Commandant's Staff 

«$» 

Captain F. E. PHELPS, of U. S. Army, Commandant. 

1.. N. l;( )^■|•■.^■, '03 tailct Maj..r .if Hattalioii 

\V. I,. I).\RI)i;X, '03. ... (.'iiptuin ;uul Ailjiirant 

II. I'. l-'()>ri''.K, 'u^ C'niitaiu and ( Uiarturinastci- 

C. v.. ri\< » r ri';i\, o,;.. i>l I.icut. ami Hospital Stcwaril 

j. li. IIARDINC;, 04. . . Sergeant Major 

1'. S. GRIKRSON, '04. . Color Sergeant 

W. 1. I'AI' TON, '04 (Quartermaster Sergeant 



92 




SPONSOR COMPANY A 



^^^^^ THE A G R O M E C K ^M^^M 



Company A 

Captain E. E. CULBRETH 



LIEUTENANTS 

First W. Al. liOtJART 

Second J. M. KENNEDY 

Tliinl W. CLARK, Jr 

SERGEANTS 

First V. C. FflELPS 

Second.. J. A. MILLER 

Third jAS. McKhMMON 

Fourth . . \V. M. McKINNON 

CORPORALS 

First H. A. HR()(_)M 

Secn.L . . A. C. LEHMAN 

•i'hird F. \V. HADI.EV 

Fourth k. H. HARPER 

Barrett, W. A., Ikebe, H., Bell, N. E., Blacii, K. L., Bostain, J. A., Cox, D. A., 
ColHns, M. H., Davis, C. M., Dixon, A. M., Eldridgc, T., Gaither, E. \V., Llall. 

C. A., Henderson, ( ). FL , ILml^s, W. \V., Isler, L. , Kennedy, P. D., I.yteh, C., 
Lynch, G. (]., .McGirt, M. R., Miller, E F., !\Iyatt, G. P., Page, W. E., Quickel, 

D. R., Satterwhite. S. J.. Scott. R. \V., Sellers, W., Smith, C. M., Turner, H. M., 
Watts, W. W.. Williams. |. U.. \'oung, ( ■, F. 



y6 




SPONSOR COMPANY D. 






THE AGROMECK 



<^^^^^^^^^ 



Company D 



«trt 



Captain C. L. CREECH 



LIEUTENANTS 

First E. S. LVTCH 

Second C. B. ROSS 

riiir.l \V. F. KIRKFA TRICK 



First . 

Si-cmid. 
'Fliird . 
Fcmrtlt 



SERGEANTS 



. W.M. KiCHARDSOX 

W. \V. HARBFR 

JF:SSK M. HOWARD 
. . A. C. WHARTON 



First . . 
Seci>!iil 
Thirti. . 
Fourth , 



CORPORALS 



w. k. chaahsers 
. . ..f:. g. porter 

W. O, FINCH 



AlUn, R. !.. Abcrnetliy, I,. F., Hodilic-, S. (J., Buys, W. A., Brnusliton, N. R., 
Bullock, J. W., Cline, S. G., Cianly. iS . C, Ciaytun, I.. C, EtheridgL-, W. e'.. 
Haiglcr. W. AT.. HarrL-ll, C. C, IFardcsty, G. R., HcrritaKC j. R., Ko.,ii. j. H., 
Kelly, W. E. , Knox, W. (i., Knight, W. T. , Lockhart, A., Lipe, M. P., Norwood, 
W. ]., Ncwland, B. A., Nivens, L. A., M<h .reman, W. B., McLean, A. L., Nichols, 
C. G., Pittnian, W. (;., Squires, J. H., Tart. L. A.. Tillman. R. H.. \'enable, C. 
T., White. I). 1.. 



100 




SPONSOR COMPANY B 



^^^^^ THE AGROMECK ^^^^^ 



Company B 



Captain JOHN D. FERGUSON 



LIEUTENANTS 

First (i. \V. ROGERS 

Second K. R. STAMPS 

Third J. T. LAND 

SERGEANTS 



First 




11. M. HLNTKR 


Second 


J. R GULLEY, Jr 


Tliinl 




J. C. BARBI'R 


Fourlli 


CORPORALS 


H. M. FOY 


l'"irst 


- 


ILLIAN :\I. HOWARD 


Second 




SIKRLINC; GRAVDON 


'j-hinl. 




A. T. KENYOX 


!•■. lurlli 




I. H. I'IKKCK 



Ashiirv. (;. 1'., Harnes, K. H., lienson, Z. T.. Boddic, S. G., HMimiwell, J. G. , 
Ikuwn, H. 1'., Blown, W. A., Byniim. j. N., Carter, R. H., Cherry, J. L., Chesbro, 
M. H.. Clark, S. H., Coflin, A. (i.. Cole, G. C, Cromartie, A. D. , Crump, W. O., 
Dove, C. B.. Drake, J. S. , Diiekett, A. F., Kwart, J. 11., llaekett. C. W. , llariiesty, 
G. C, Hevlin, H. W., Hewlett, C. W.. Hollmui. \V. 11., il.iwle, E. B. , Kendrick, 
Koonce, Likes, L. G., McMillan, A. 1'., INLithews, 1.. C, Morj,Mn, J. T., Murr, L. 
A., Myrick, J. C, Nichol..<on, 11. 11., I'aseliall. A. [.., I'roctor. E. ^L, Smith, (1. E., 
Smith, J. R., Sinnmervilie, W. , Talton, V. ].. 'i'lKker, R, C. . Tate, C. S. , Thijfpen, 
n. J., Walker, W. T., Watson, C. .^L, West, |. L. 



104 




SPONSOR COMPANY C 



/l-^j/L^'//l~'j/t-^//i--^j/i~'J 



THE AGROMECK 



Company C 



Captain S. W. ASBURY 



LIEUTENANTS 

First D. S. OWEN 

Second 

Third 



K. E. ETHERIDGE 
r. T. ELLIS 



First.. . 
Second. 
Tiiird... 
l''<.urtii.. 



SERGEANTS 



E. P. B.MLEY, Jr 

. E. E. LINCOLN 

<;. W. FOUSHEE 

..k. R. KING 



CORPORALS 

First ; W. SIL\NNONHOUSE 

Second S. T. WHITE 

Third J. R. SECHREST 

Fourth 

Allison, R. v., Blackmer, P. P., Collin, A. G., Ciinnin-ham, N. E., Edens, E.V., 
Farrior, J. W., F.iwler, E. W, Gardner, P.. F., Gregory, A. \V., Howie, E. B., 
Ireland, S. C., Jordan, L. L,, Koonce, j. IL, Lee, E., Lockhart, S. S.. Lyon, J. A., 
McCaskill, I). T., Mcl.aehlin, \V, E., Moore, J. E., Neese, A, A., Payne, C. L., 
Peschau, \V. A., Presson, \V. H., Ranke, G. E., Smith, F. R., Smithwick, A. IX, 
Spoon, J. R., Taylor, B., Tiill, R., Turlington, M. T., Wilson, R. ( ). 



loS 




SPONSOR COMPANY E 



^^^^m THE AGROMECK ^^^^g 



Company E 

Captain S. C. CORNWELL 



LIEUTENANTS 

First J. W. WHITE 

Second K. H. RICKS 

Third J. S. P. CARPENTER 

SERGEANTS 

First C. H. HODGES 

Second , R. P. REECE 

Third N.ADAMS 

Fourtli W. W. RANKIN 

CORPORALS 

First R. R. HOLT 

Second S. D. WALL 

Third C. A. SIEFERT 

F..iirth . . S. N. KNOX 

Allen, t;. (i., Huie, P. I)., Clvirk, I). M., CKuk, j. W., die, G. E., Crump. 
W. V.., Edwards, L. V., Forbis, R. E., Ciant. K. W.. (Sil.son, J. L., Hamilton, G. P., 
Herritage, W. D., Johnson, C. W., Mclntyu, W. 11.. Maury, S. S., IMiddleton, 
W. B., Morgan, J. F.. .Myrick, J. C, O'Berry, J. C., i'inkus, J. L., Pivcr, A. B., 
Reynolds, h'., Roberson, F., Roseman, W., Stack, E. I)., Tlicirntoii, L. A., Tomlin- 
son, S., V'alear, P., Vaughan, L. L., VVarren, R. L., White, A., Whitehead, E. M. 



I 12 




MISS • LOUISE • LINTON 



SPONSOR COMPANY F 



^00&^& THE AGROMECK S^^^^^ 



Company F 

Captain J. F. DIGGS 



LIEUTENANTS 

First H. sniPSOX 

Second J. J. MORRIS 

Third G. Y. STRADLEV 

SERGEANTS 

First L. A. NEAL 

Sfcoiul ,.M.K. WEEKS 

Third W. V. M( )RS( )N 

Fourth W. W . ITXl.l'A' 

CORPORALS 

First L. :\1. li()FF7,IAN 

Second (). L. I!A(;i.E\' 

'I'hird J. I). Sl'lXKS 

Fourth W. L. S.Mnil 

Barnes, E. IL, liaiduin, J. C, lin>ck, W. F., Bmwn, II. I'., ]!r..\\n. W. A., 
Carter, K. 11., C'..urts, F. J., Clark, j, I)., Drake, J. S., Hamilton, C. .M., Ilaniilton. 
II. 1.., Uanselman, J. F., Hodges, C. \V., Huhard, \V. C, Evkes, T. I\I., Maxwell, 
K., l'ep])er, C. R., Primrose, H., Roherson, I). W'., Ross, t'. \'., Sigmon, \V. H., 
Tillet, E. R., Tuttle, I. C.. Winston, E. T., Wilkinson, A. C. Waitt. 1. K. 



ii6 




SPONSOR BAND 









THE AGROMECK 



The Band 



Captain and Instructor E. T. ROBESON 



LIEUTENANTS 



First . . 
Second. 

First. . . 
Second . 
Third . . 

FMurth, 



First. 



SERGEANTS 



. . H. 



. . . J. H. PARKER 
H. G. ALDERMAN 



. . B. F. HUGGINS 
B CARl'WRIGHT 
, . !■:. C. BAGWELL 
. .J. F. McINTVRE 



Principal Musician, J. P. ROSE. 
CORPORAL 



L. M. PARKER 



MEMBERS 

L)f;;l, P. G., Uzzcll, R. P., Odi-ii, L. AL, P.irk.s, J. A., I'ivcr, W. C, Fisher, S. ]\r., 
Higgs, James, Lougce, L. K, Williams, J. I-'.., White, T. W. , White, E. E., Lilly, 
II. .^L. Oghurn. r. j.. Bray, A. ()., Hartliscn, j. G., Clinard, E. C, Smith, R. II. 



170 




A TEST OF DISCIPLINE 



THE AGROMECK ^^^^^^^ 



A Fable 



Si 




\SCV. tlu-rc was an innoccnt-luDking ciuintry lail whu lived near the little 
\illage of Foxtown. This boy's youth was very happily si)ent, but he did 
not get un to the Fact until in after years. He used te) work fourteen 
hours a day among the corn rows for his Board and Clothes, and his only 
Dissipation was going to Goldsboro once a year on Show Day to see Adam F(jrepa\v's 
big Street Parade. 

Leke's education was obtained at a near-by country school called Hogskin. 
The onlv l)ook he ever really enjoyed reading was Webster's Collegiate Dictionary. 
Leke thought the plot simply (]rand, and he had studied the Story so thoroughly 
that he could do a Big Word Stunt on the slightest provocation, antl would repeat 
the Offense indefinitely if anybody seemed the least bit amused. 

Bv and by this boy moved to town, where he learned to wear Store Clothes and 
High-up Collars; he soon acquired the White Vest Habit and began to put Oil on 
his Hair. Leke was something Swell ; he hail everything in Foxtown skinned a mile. 
Every semi-occasionally he got invited out to some sort of a Function, at which 
everbody has such a charmingly delightful evening, and at the same time is almost 
Bored to Death. 

Along about now an old Uncle down in the Sand-hills passed up his checks and 
left Leke a little roll of Currency. The Skate imnieiliatily imagined himself a 
Financial Heavy-Weight, and couUl see the "Mile-stones of his busy Life strung 
back across the V'alley of Tribulation into the Green Fields of Chiklhooil. " Right 
here he made up hi.s mind to spend a year at the A. & RI. College, not to learn 
an\tliing — for Leke knew it all — but just to blow himself, have a Big Time, 
and exercise that Huge Vocabulary of his. On the quiet, tliis Cuy didn't ha\e 
enough Horse Sense to tell a Bass ilrum from a (lock of Wild Geese. 

Leke knew it would be dead l-.asy to jiush into socii-tv. lie ordrrtd a li\e-ilollar 
Cap and a fawn-colored Raglan, with pearl buttons about the size of Milk Biscuits. 
He wore gray Gloves and Patent Leather Shoes all the time, and bought a large 
22-karat Ring for his little linger. 

Before a week had passed, Leke tagged on all this Paraphernalia and proceeded 
to parade the streets of Raleigh that he might view the Aristocrats. He thought the 
girls were as Easy as shootin' fish ; so he Chased him.self up to a pnit\- lilonde and 
tried the Old .-Vcquaintance gag on her, but it tlidn't work ; then he tried that Kind 
Assistance business, and it failed ; finally, he met one of those ojien-hearted girls 
who doesn't care if Tooth picks are a dollar apiece. 

Next dav Leke wanted to demonstrate to her that he was Fine and l-'ancv. the 



'3° 



^^^^^^ THE AGROMECK <SCC€€^ 



Real Sure-enough Thing, so he wrote her something like this: " May I have the 
extreme and exquisite beatitude of escorting 3-our sweet little corporal system over the 
elegantly-paved street intervening between your parental domicile and the house 
erected for divine worship? With your gracious consent, we shall commence this 
awfully short, but highly pleasing and delectable journey, after the dialummary has 
sought his nocturnal resting-jdace behind the occidental horizon and the city has 
become artificially lighted with that wonderfully subtle fluid called electricity. I 
certainly trust ynu have no previous injudiciously-contracted engagement." 

The girl replied simply, "Mother's illness keeps me at home to-night"; but 
lietween the lines one might have read, " What sort of a fool can Leke Bluster be.' " 

Leke knew that, as a debater, he had Eddie Burke completely petered ; so he 
tackled the tariff' question one night in society, with the following for his Introduc- 
tion: "In promulgating my psychological observations or articulating my super- 
ficial sentimentalities, I invariably endeavor to let my conversation possess a clarified 
conciseness and a coalescent consistency. I never make extemporaneous descantings 
and unpremeditated expatiations ; I seduously avoid all polysyllabic profundity, 

pompous prolixity, ventriloquous verbosity, and " here some member interrupted 

with a motion that all the scsquepcdaliim Fools keep quiet, and Leke sneaked out of 
the room like a crawfish gettin' back in his hole. 

The first girl to whom Leke was Legally introduced he learned to love faster than 
powder'll burn. He did a Fountain Pen specialty by writing her that " the honor of 
her acquaintance had placed him in that state of indefinable ecstacy and inexpressible 
bliss which was allowed only to the inhabitants of the infinite meadows of Heaven, 
where ' blossom the lovely stars, the Forget-me-nots of the Angels '; that if she would 

only be governed by the law of reciprocity and consent . " Here the girl 

stopped short, and wrote Leke that the only Kindness she asked was to be Scratched 
oft" his List. 

This fellow was too Foxy for anything. He couldn't follow an interference, and 
always blocked his own plays. 

At the end of three weeks, Leke Bluster counted up his Uncle's Collateral and 
found that he had left only enough to get home on. 

Moral : 

*' K little learning is a dangerous thing ; 
Drink deep, or t^iste not the Pierian spring." 



131 



U^y/t-^v//- 



'&^ii=^ 



THE AGROMECK 




' ^this 



For several years after the establishment of this College the Agricultural course 
was weak ami could boast of but few students. But within the past two years a great 
change has come, and the Agricultural course, no longer a pigmy, 
proudly takes rank among the largest and best instructed courses 
at our College. 

The growth in the number of students has been phenomenal. 
Two years ago the number of our students was less than twenty; 
year our number is 127. The teaching force has been in- 
creased from five to eight. 

Although the present equipment of the course is sadly inade- 
quate to the needs, still there has been great improvement along 
this line. The dairy herd has been nearly doubled; there is an ad- 
ditional herd of eighteen Aberdeen Angus cattle. Two new barns 
and innumerable new implements have been added. Several new 
separators and an outfit for making cheese, two good teams, new 
apparatus for bacteriological work in the biological laboratory, 
new electric stereopticon for illustrating the conformation of live 
— ^ — -^ " ^ stock purchased, new soil apparatus has been ordered, and va- 

rious other improvements have been made. Although 
these things have materialized, the future is brighter 
still. Already we see looming up in the near future 
the massive walls of the Agricultural building, a build- 
ing well suited to house the College of Agriculture, . -=s— = 
This building is the gravest need of the Agricultural -J— --^^. '~-= , 
course today, and its erection w-ill be a tremendous v.t^''V../J^ 

step towards the improvement and encouragement of 
agriculture throughout our state. 

133 





^i^^5. 






THE AGROMECK 



^^^^p^^^^w^^ 




w 



HEN we were approached some time ago by the editors and asked to con- 
tribute a short article to the Annual on the Mechanical Department, we 
looked with considerable trepidation on the task. We realized the vastness 
of the subject on which we were requested to write and knew the small 
number of pages to which this Annual is limited. We tried to offer these as e.xcuses 
for remaining steadfast to our time honored custom of declining to sing our own 
praises. But, no! the song was forced upon us. Now we hope that other departments, 
knowing that this is done against our will, but who, of course, all realize our greatness, 
will pardon us for any cruel statements that ma}- seem to belittle them, and we will 
refer them to the immortal Shakespeare for our justification, 

"This above all: to thine own self be true." 

Someone who, though he lived a long time ago, knew what he was talking about, 
sent down to posterity a remark about blowing your own horn, as no one else will 
blow it for you. We shall use a very little horn only and give a very gentle Iilast nn 
it — ^just enough to sound the glories of this greatest department of a great college. 

Our institution bears the name "College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts." To 
some of the misinformed, it may seem from this that the ]\Iechanical part is a 
secondary one. This is a grievous error, and we trust that you misguided ones will 
make haste to right yourselves. The name is arranged thus as a matter of courtesy 
only to agriculture, as agriculture is a little oliler than mechanic arts, and age before 
beauty always. There are records that agriculture had its beginning as early as the 
third day of the year one, and it was therefore given a good start, but w-as handicapped 
by being put in the ground — where it still is — and it is now far outstripped in the race, 
and cannot po.ssibly hope to reach the zenith toward which the mechanic arts are 



134 



^^^^^^^^^^p" 



THE AGROMECK ^^^^^^ 



soaring. ]\Ioderii potatoes are no bigger than the potatoes of ages gone by; apples, 
even North Carolina apples, as we find them, are inferior, certainly, to those of the 
("larden of Eden; but the mechanic arts, as with a magic wand, have changed Noah's 
ark intii the mighty Oceanic, the cow path of the Garden into the Southern Railway 
of today, and so on ad infinilum. When it is fully understood, then, how wonderful 
and progressive a part in the world's development has been pla\ed by Mechanic Arts, 
is it strange that we call attention with pride to one of the mightiest factors of the 
twentieth century's ccjming achievements, the Mechanical department of this College? 

\\'hen the College opened its doors in 1889, among the Faculty was Prof J. H. 
Kinealy (nijw Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Washington University, and a 
noted heating expert) as Professor of Mathematics and Practical Mechanics. His 
department was then housed in the south end of the present main building, but the 
Board of Trustees at once saw that for such a department a new and separate building 
would be necessary, and the Mechanical division of the class entering in 1890 was 
cared for in the handsome building which had been erected during the summer, and 
which the department still occupies. This class was also the first to come in contact 
with the genial Prof Park, without mention of whom no tale about this department 
could be complete. 

In 1894 it was again necessary to furnish more room for this rapidly growing 
department, which at this time included Civil Engineering, and the present wood and 
forge shops were built. By 1895 it had been found necessary to devote the whole of 
this building to a Department of Mechanical Engineering, which separate department 
was then established, with Prof N. R. Craighill in charge, and the Department of 
Civil Engineering and Mathematics was sent to seek other shelter. Fnjm then until 
now the growth of the Mechanical Department has been rapid. It is now pushed 
almost out of its building by the number of students that try to crowd into it for 
instruction. Thirty per cent, of the boys who this year applied for admission into 
the machine shop courses alone have been turned away on account of lack of room 
and of equipment. By ne.xt year it is confidently expected, however, to have the line 
shafting strung across the campus and lathes and planers pleasantly located under 
near-by shade trees — in which case no one will be turned away from our doors. 

Of the Freshman students of this year, numbering about two hundred and fifty, 
fully two hundred of them are receiving one-third of all of their instructions in this 
Department. Through the higher classes also a large number of Mechanical students 
are to be found. The importance and value of the instruction given in this depart- 
ment may be better appreciated when it is known that every student of every 
department of the College is, at some period of his four years, sent over to this great 
fount of knowledge to get a drink, or drinks. 

It is hardly necessary to mention the mental qualifications of the students in this 
Department. The positions secured by its graduates tell better than words what good 
material has passed through the mill, and a glance at our present clas' _s shows where 



135 



BBBBBB THE AGROMECK ««^«^^ 



flic flower of the student bod}- has cast its lot. As this Annual is, however, a 
inonvinunt to the glory and honor of the Class of '03 — and being the first of its kind 
ever attemi)ted here, is more than ever a credit to this great class — it may not be 
amiss to mention a few of the particular qualifications of the Mechanical members of 
'03. Each man is, of course, a student of renown, a joy to his teachers and a 
stranger to the word "condition." But each inan is also a master of one or more 
very select specialties — .\sbury, for instance, the great diamond and gridiron fiend; 
Bogart, an expert in playing adjutant; Clark, tall and handsome; Foster, the "Boy 
Carnegie"; Glenn, author of " Mow to Make 100 on Exams."; Johnson, a quiet and 
deep thinker; Powers, a Joel at all trades and good at all of them; Ricks, songster, 
harpist, actor, talker, dancer (and many others); and Simpson, last but not least, 
"the last shall be first and the first shall be last." 

More might be told of the glories of this great nine. They add much tn the 
achievements of the Class of '03, and to the honor of the College, but it is the same 
with all the Mechanicai students, and to keep on writing it wouKl he but repeating an 
old story. 




136 



THE AGROMECK ^^^^^^^^^ 



a Stubcnt's ^oil 

Why is it that from 3-onder tower 
The student's lamp is burning still, 

Tho' it is past the midnight hour; 
And sleep is brooding on the hill ? 

Is it for old historic lore. 

Or modern science he would seek; 
Or strives he now his mind to store 

In order that conditions he may defeat ? 

'Tis not the wisdom of the sages, 
Nor science fair that him enchants; 

An earthless task his time engages; 
He's sewing buttons on his pants. 



U7 







"The Electrics" 



I 



I 



N att(.'ni])ting fu chmnicle the events which liave marked the course of the 
l*"Jectricals it is with varied emotions that the historian mal<es his bow to an 
expectant ])ul)Hc. He not only appreciates the honor, luit fully realizes the 
grave responsiblity entrusted to him. 

We are struggling against the great forces of the world which are irrisistible and 
impalpable ; we cannot grasp or fathom them, and though they are real enough they 
have the ap])earance of being unreal. Electricity is as subtle as it is mighty. It 
eludes the hand i>f the most skillful philosopher, " Fausty, " who vainly endeavors to 
fathom its mysteries and gain knowledge of its laws; in view of this fact it is well 
for the average man not to venture too deeply into its intricate mysteries. 

"Emile Zola" and "Willie D." are perhaps the quiet men of this division. The 
first is an Edisc.m, and has fame in view, or better still, "A Franklin Gas Engine"; but 
if he is not careful a " Gater " will get him. "Willie D." hopes to do something, 
but Dr. W. thinks growing "Asparagus" would suit him better. He hopes some 
ilay to comi)lete his storage battery, and then you will see him supremely hajipy. 

"Logger-head" and "Big'un" carry the weight of this section. They are both 
fine fellows and no doubt wdl be missed from home, as they were chief plough-boys 
when there. They will enter the arena of life to deliver messages on board moving 
trains or flash into dazzling splendor the city thoroughfares. We predict that " Log- 
ger" will live in close proximity to the " Seaboard Air Line," anil " Big'un " will never 
undcrstanil " why the fire blew out," or "why the belt came olT. " 

It would take pages to tell of "Gene" with his "God bless her sweet soul," as 
he endeavors to draw tho.se B. k H. curves which the professor thinks so necessary. 



138 



^^^^ THE AGROMECK ^^^^g 

"Bit" comes along with his original wit, who will operate countless autumatic 
devices, originate all kinds of home comforts; he will fan himself when heated, 
warm himself when cold, treasure u]! all available bulletins, and hand down his 
Weinshurst machine to his future generations. 

We introduce to you "my dear Gastrin," a veritable "Adonis" of gentility, 
who, if not careful "vill do someding smardt or funny." We cannot prophesv that 
he will ever find the "philosopher's stone, ' but if he ever does we hope that he will 
telegraph the news to the other electrics. "Adonis" is one of the few men of our 
class without whcjm some of the professors couldn't get along, and he is going to 
take a post course next year just to please them. 

"Kirk" and "John" are so reserved and noncfmimittal that we have not been 
able to gather much of them. "Kirk"' is generally the first on hand at the labora- 
tory, or, more correctly, the engine, of which he has such a fondness. He doesn't 
"just see why" some things are, but delights the class with the fi>rce of argument. 
"John" will graduate just to get away from the A. & M., but before he does he is 
going to complete his motor (.') and take it with him to the Philippines. 

Ned at last comes to our notice; we hope no worse fate will befall him than that of 
the others. To him we owe our existence during these four long years; without him 
we would have been a dead note. He is a quiet, innocent-looking chap, but looks 
are deceiving even in "magnetic blowouts. ' 

In the language of the old hymn we can say, "Our days are gliding by." and 
there is not one of us who does not wish he could "detain them as they fly." 

Our College course is nearing its end. May the friendships we have formed be 
ever firm and true, and despite whatever vicissitudes we meet, ma\' we ever be noble 
and loyal sons of A. M. C. , and honorable men of the class of 1903. 



139 



THE AGROMECK ^^^^^B. 



The Civils 



THE history of the (Civils or 1903 of the A. & ^1. College really begins with 
their Junior year, for up to that time we were known simply as Engineering 
students, with ni.ithing but our good looks and great intellectual ability to 
distinguish us from the h<_)rde of our uncivilized classmates. 

When the parting of the ways came at the beginning of our Junior year, nearly 
all of the class wanted to take the course in Civil Engineering, but Professor Riddick 
had evidently made up his mind not to be bothered with any but the best; so he 
selected only six of us as capable of civilization. To the others who applied he 
depicted the horrors of the course in Civil Engineering with such vividness that they 
concluded that discretion was the better part of valor, and decided to take one of 
the minor courses — ^Mechanical, Electrical, Chemical, or Textile. 

When the six of us — Cornwell, Land, B. , Land, J., Love, Morris, and Stradley — 
found that we alone of all the applicants had been selected, we were highl\- elated, 
and started in to prove ourselves worthy of Professor Riddick's confidence. We soon 
realized the greatness of the work whereunto we had been called, for Professor Rid- 
dick began at once introducing us to his friends — ;\Ir. Baker, the stone mason; 
Messrs. Merriman and Brooks, surveyors; Mr. Searles, and many others, whom he 
represented to us as pleasant and approachable gentlemen. It must be confessed, 
however, that we found them not at all disposed to allow any very intimate acquain- 
tance on the part of most of us, and after a year's association we were only slightly 
acquainted with them. 

One of the most important events of our history was the arrival of P. F. Darden, 
who came to us during the fall term, fresh from a lumber camp down East. He came 
with the aroma of the pine forests, and some say with a tinge of its verdure still 
clinging around him. He soon convinced us all, including our teacher, that he was 
an engineer by experience and intuition, and that all formulae and rules, except the 
slide-rule, were to him but folly. 

A most pleasant incident of our Junior year was our week of camp life while we 
were assisting Professor Ritldick and the Senior cla.ss in the survey of a railroad to 
connect the Neuse riv'er with the Seaboard Air Line Railway. The Seniors said we 
were taken along to wait on them and to keep us out of mischief; but we have good 
reason to believe that Professor Riddick took us because he was afraid to risk the 
Seniors with the work, and sub.sequent events showed his wisdom in taking us. We 
enjo3'ed three days of hard work and three nights of camp life, then struck tents, and 
returned to the College only to find ourselves overwhelmed by examinations. 

Our Senior year, so far, has passed without any startling incidents except the 
failure of some of our bnjther civils, who were forced to spend the Xmas holidays 
at the College, studying to. get off contlitions. Also, in this year, we lost one of our 
most brilliant members — Love, who finding our progress too slow for him, withdrew 
from College to accept a position with a western railroad company. 

On class one day, while studying Riilroad Curves, Darden discovered by accident 
that he had used 2-t, instead of t, in his work before coming to A. & ^L, for the first 
ofliset in the method of "Offsets from the Chords Reduced." He was so mortified 
when he found out that he had been making mistakes heretofore,^*' at he declared he 
would go back and correct them. We all hated to see him go, and have missed him 
from among us very much, and wish him success wherever he may go. The remain- 



ing five are here awaiting graduation. 



141 




HENRY M. WILSON, 

THOMAS NELSON 

PHILIP R. FRENCH, 



BONEY, L. N. 
ROSS, C. B. 



HARDING, J. B. 
FOUSHEE, O. \V. 



A. B Professor in Charge 

Iiifitructor in Weaving and Designing 

B. S Instructor in Chemistry and Dyeing 



SENIOR CLASS 

CARPENTER, J. S. P. 
STAMPS, E. R 
WHITING. E. S. 

JUNIOR CLASS 



DARDEN, W. L. 
KENNEDY, J. M. 



HUNTER, H. !\I. 
McKIMMON, J. M. 



DIXON. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS. 
HUFFMAN. 

SECOND YEAR SHORT COURSE 



WATT, W. \V. 



CARRAWAY, E. C. 
ISLER, LEROY. 



HAIGLEK. \V. M. 
DURHAM, C. H. 



McKINNON, W. N. 
PAYNE, C. L. 
ROSE, J. P. 

FIRST YEAR SHORT COURSE. 



MAUNEY, Z. C. 
HOWARD, JESSE M. 



HALL, C. A. 
RANKIN, F. B. 



142 



^^^^m THE AGROMECK ^^^^M^ 



THIS has been styled the "Textile Departtuent " for the reason that the different 
courses of instruction in this College are grouped under the head of " Departments." 
In some other places it would be called a Textile school; and this has been frequently 
referred to as the North Carolina Textile School. The special field covered by the 
instruction here is cotton manufacturing, since cotton is the chief textile fiber and the 
most important agricultural product of the South. In some of the Textile Schools of this 
country instruction is also given in the manufacture of certain other textile fibres, such as 
wool and silk. But until these shall be produced more extensively in this country it is 
probable that the work here will be entirely in cotton. 

Instruction in manufacturing cotton, as a distinct subject, was first given in this College 
during the term of 1899-1900, although, previous to this, some lectures on cotton machinery 
had been given. The first class numbered four students. There was no equipment and the 
work was entirely theoretical and carried on under very trying conditions, as would be any 
practical subject where there was no opportunity for demonstration. But good seeds had been 
planted, which were destined to have a healthy and vigorous growth. The next College 
ses.sion, that of 1900-1901, found the Department installed in the Chapel of the College, in the 
main building, which Dr. Winston had given over " to the voice of the spindle and the loom." 
The eiiuipment was the nucleus of the present one. It consisted of enough machinery to 
demonstrate the mill operations from the card to the loom. Arrangements had been made for 
its operation, but from the lack of necessary electiic power it remained idle during that year. 

The State Legislature, during its 1901 session, made provision for a continued growth of 
both Department and College. The sum of $20,000 was appropriated to erect and equip a 
Textile I5uilding, with the nece-sary machinery. "Work on this buihling was begun in .July, 
1901, and it was completed the following winter. Then began the work of machine installa- 
tion. It was a never-to-be-forgotten time for the classes of that year. There was no heat in 
the building, and the machinery was as cold as the weather outside. But, much to the credit 
of the students, these difficulties and obstacles were overcome. Machine after machine was 
hoisted with block and tackle and placed in position. Literally, the installation of machinery 
was made by the students, directed by the erectors sent from the different machine shops. 
Tliis was hard work, of course; but it was a valuable experience, combined as it was with the 
<ither instruction. The work was pushed along during the summer, so that the opening of the 
present session of College found most of the e(|uii)ment installed and ready for operation. 

The work of this Department is sul)-divided into the following: 

First — Carding and spinning. This embraces " Yarn Manufacture," producing thread from 
the bale of cotton. 

Second — \\'eaving and Designing. Here the yarns are woven into various styles and 
designs of cloth. 

Third — The Dyeing or Ojloring of the yarns and cloths. 

In each division of the work the equipment for instruction is installed as in a cotton mill. 
The instruction is carried on in as practical a manner as is possible with the proper theoretical 
teaching of the nature of the processes and the manipulation of the machinery to perform 
these. In short, the graduate of this Department should have a good working knowledge of 
every class of machinery in a cotton mill and the work that is performed by each. When he 
goes into the mill to begin his career he will be familiar with the technical nr theoretical part 
of the work. He can devote himself then to a more thorough mastering of the practical 
details of his work, which is an essential feature of every manufacturing business. 

Henry M. Wilson. 



'43 



THE AGROMECK 







Chemical Department 



f^trt 



THE Chemical Dep.irtnient was eqiiippeil and has been couiUicted under the direction 
of Professor W. A. Withers, who, with a snifjle exception, is tlie only member of the 
jiresent Faculty who has been connected with the College since its openinjr. fourteen 
years a^o. Messrs. H. L. Miller, S. F,. Asbury, C. B. Williams, J. A. Bizzell, and H. 
W. Primrose have assisted Professor Withers in conductin;; this lle|>artment in the 
past, and at jiresent Dr. G. S. Fraps, Mr. W. A. Syme and Mr. P. R. French are doing so 

The Department was orit;inally assigned a place in the north wing of the main building, 
but it has since been assigned additional space on the first floor and in the ba.-sement of the 
main building, and also in the textile buikling. But even with this enlargement, the Depart- 
ment has not sulliciently large laboratories to permit the admission of all students desiring to 
take chemical instruction. Tlie Visiting Committee and Trustees have therefore very properly 
recngnizcd that a Chemical Building is one of the jiressing needs of the College. 

The im|)ortance of chemistry in agriculture is shown by the fact that a majority of tlie 
.Agricultural Kx|ieritnent Station Directors, before their elevation, were chendsts; that there 
are al)out as many chendsts connected with Experiment Stations as all the other scientists put 
together; and that many, if not a majority, of the agricultural liO'ks, are written by chemists. 
'I he so-called modern ideas of farmers' institutes, jiopular bulletins, l>ringing the farmers to 
the Agricultural Cnllege in (he Sununer time, etc., were all advocated about si.xty years ago by 
.Justus von Liebeg, the father nf agricultural chemistry. 

.Ml students, before graduation at this College, are required to take a course in general 
chemistry, .\fier that the chemical work depends on the course the student is taking, the 
agricultural students devoting their time to the chemistry of soils, fertilizers and feed stuffs; 
the engineering students to industrial chemistry; the ndning students to metallurgy, ami the 
textile students to dyeing. The laboratory work is planned similarly. 

Of the Ifil grailuates of the College, twenty-two — about one-eightli — are engaged in chemi- 
cal work, and each one of these is, employed in an agricultural or nianufa<'turing institution, 
which is a very striking fact, and illustrates forcibly the demands along this line, ami tlu' 
.success <>{ the Dejiartment in the great cause of industrial education which the College was 
established to adxance. 

The chemical graduates are employed in Agricultural Colleges, .\gricultural Kx-]ieriment 
Stations, State Departments of Agriculture and Textile S<-hnols; in the maimfacturf of fertil- 
izers and gas; in the metallurgy of iron and copper; in dyeing; in the reliiungof lard, uiauu- 
laclure of tol)acco products, etc. They have taken fellowships at Cornell and .lohns Hopkins, 
have been referees in the .\ssociation of Othcial Agricultural Chemists; are leading ollicials in 
the Xortli Carolina section of the .\merican Chemical Society, and one of them enjuys the 
honor of being the only .\merican to prepare a text-book on Dyeing. 

The clienncal students formed the Berzelius Society, which is now the Local Chemical 
Society of Raleigh, and they now maintain in the College the Liebeg Chenucal Society. 



144 



rooT 




BALL 



^S&^&h^^i& 



THE AGROMECK 



Football 



C. F. CREECH, Manager. 



O MAX GARDNER, Captain. 



ARTHUR DEVLIN, Coach. 



Tl 1 1 1'. IcMitball season li;is l)iu latoh' passetl awav. and with it manv of thi- 
^^_^ li.ilipitst and bluest da\s of our college life have slipped into the past: nor 
!^^^ is there error in s]ieaking of our colle.ge days ami football as being insepara- 
bly bound tiigeiher There is no other game which appeals to the emotion 
and College spirit of students as does football. It is pre-eminently the college game. 
The gridirons of ail the large colleges in the Atlantic or Eastern States have in 
the season past been the scenes of a great manv surprises. Probalily never before in 
the history of the game have so many une.xpected happenings crowded themselves 
into a short season of two months. We, here in Raleigh, have had our share of 
these surprises. There were unexpected victories; there were uncxjiected reverses. In 
looking over the |)ast season, there seems a great deal to regret, Init a great deal 
more to remember with pride and pleasure. 

The i)rospects for a strong team at the opening of College was com])arativelv 
bright. With a mi.xture of confidence and fear as to what might be the final out- 
come, those best informed on football and its many requisites, entered into the work 
of turning out a good football team. 'The)' might well have doubts, for at the 
opening of the season only si.\ N'arsitv men of the 'oi team were present. The.se 
were the si.\ left to form the nucleus of the team (jf 02: one guard, one tackle, two 
hall-backs, one (juarter, and one end. 'The te.im drew some good material from tlie 
Freshman class and one half-back from the Sophomore: tlien there was A. \- '\\. gni 
which afterwarils proved a big factor. 'This, then, was the make-up of our team 
when, (jn .'September loth, football uniforms were donned for the first time, "ur 
coach, Arthur Devlin, from Georgetown, arrived a few ilays later. He brought with 
him a great re[)utation as a player: and, as events have shown later, his coaching 
ability is ecjual tij his playing. 'The first game of the season was at C'lemson, against 
the veterans of Clemson College. 'The game was played in a perfect downpour of 
rain. At the end of two twenty-minute h.ilve-:. th:- score was 10 to 6 in their Lw;w. 
'This same Clemson team defeated C. N. C.. 'oi, in Charlotte, 21 to 5, so we considireil 
our stantl against them encouraging. 

On the following Monday we pla\ed T'lnnuin University, in (Jrecinille, S. C. 
'This game, and that of a week later, wen- our greatest surprises. In the (ireenville 
game we carried the ball friim one end of the field to the other, time after time, twice 
coming within one foot of scoring, only t<j lose the ball on a fumble. .\t the end 
of two twentv-minute halves the score stood nothing to nothing, with the ball in 
Funnan territorv. 



14'' 



^^^^^^^^ THE AGROMECK ^^^^^^^^^ 

Our next game was with Furman, in Raleigh, on October 13th. This game was 
a repetition of the first, in that we outplayed the sand-lappers at all stages of the 
game; but the Bajitist brethren seemed unconquerable; and we just could not beat them. 
Three times A. & M. fumbled when on Furman's two, five and three-yard line. The 
Furman full-back kicked a difficult goal from the twenty-five yard line, making the 
score 5 to o. In the second half A. & M. scored a safety, making the score 5 to 2 in 
favor of Furman, after two twenty-five minute halves. 

On the 1 8th of October we played V. P. I., one of the foremost football teams 
in the South. After riding all night and a part of next day, we played the Virginians 
to a standstill. Four minutes before the game was over the score was 6 to 5 in our 
favor. Ah ! Those fatal four minutes lost the game for us. The ball was kicked to 
riur full-back and advanced to our fifteen-yard line, from where we tried to farther 
advance it. In the first rush our half-back made five yards, but some one took the 
ball out of his hands on our twenty-yard line; and with Carpenter, of V'. P. I., 
hitting over line, they gained the coveted touchdown just as time was called. 

We played St. Albans in Roanoke on the following Monday. In this game the 
team work of A. & M., was especially commendable, though frequent fumbling did 
much to offset an otherwise brilliant game. St. Albans had just tied V. M. I. ; and 
had been beaten only 15 to o by the University of Virginia, so St. Albans thought 
that we would be dead easy. Poor St. Albans ! How wretched they looked after 
that game I am afraid posterity will never quite imagine. When they found that the\' 
could not score on A. & M., they entered into a pugilistic encounter with the 
" Farmers. " It would have been better for the St. Albans team if it had been satisfied 
with the results of the football contest. When the referee blew his whistle, the score 
stood, A. & M., 10; St. Albans, o. 

On the 31st of October, in Raleigh, we played Guilford in the presence of from 
four to five thousand people. In this game A. & M. ran rough-shod over Guilford, 
beating them 29 to 5. This was a triumph of united action against individual eflnrt. 

Our next game was to stand out as an epoch in the annals of our College. This 
game was with the University of North Carolina. For the first time A. & M. kept 
Carolina from crossing the goal line. Carolina looked rather dangerous when she 
took the field that afternoon. But in the heart of each man on our eleven was a 
grim determination to hold his own — the kind of resolution that makes men battle 
unflinchingly with the impossible. After the game commenced we knew that, from 
the start, we were in the game. The A. & M. had subordinated all her games before 
this for the one crucial test; and how well she held the University down is known to 
eight liundred onlookers there that raw and chilly afternoon, and to Captain Foust 
and his men from Chapel Hill. The Ncivs and Observer of the following day says; 
"It was unquestionably the greatest game of football ever seen in Raleigh, or in the 
State, for that matter." The University had the advantage in weight, strength and 
experience, while the Farmers were imbued with the characteristic just mentioned, a 

Aono 10 ' -1 7 



THE AGROMECK 



Sriin tk'tt-rminatiiin tn win. At tin- eiul of twn twciity-tive minute liai\x-s, the score 
was U. N. C, o; A. M. C, o, which we consider as virtually a triumjih for A. it M. 

In the game with the University of Virginia, the Universitv of Xortli Carolina 
plavid X'irginia to a standstill, lioth sides scorinj;' twelve points and Carolina coming 
within the vards of scoring again. Since the team that tied Virginia could not cross 
the goal line when playing against A. & M., then our team must rank among the first 
in the South. 

After our game with the University, we were intoxicated by our success. Then 
were we to go up against Davidson. Now, the University heat Davidson 28-0; we 
tied tlu- Universit\'. Wu would wipe- Davidson's team from the face of the earth. 
When we came to go up against Davidsijn, we were like the drunken man who was 
bent upon beating his mule. 

The man had \aguel}' decided that fence rails propei'lv broken U])on tin- mule 
would also break the nude. He was appl_\ing the fence rail cure when his wifi- 
apjieared. 

•'Oh ! ]5illv, come away, come away; the mule will kill \-ou, " she begged. 

"What, said he, ''that damn little mide kill me .•" He coukln't do it to sdvc his 
life." 

The- next day lo\ing frieniis kindlv adjusted the ui)jier half of his head to the 
lower half and laid him to rest. 

The score was: Davidson, 5; A. ct M., o. We were i>ver-con(ident; the}' had 
caught us off our guard, antl we had lost. It is trut' that our team was made u[) largely 
of substitutes, but that is not why we were beaten. It was purely the result of over- 
confidence on our part. The lesson we learnetl at Davidson was apparent when we 
jilaxed Riihmond College in Raleigh on the following Tluirsdav. H\ the \\a\, we 
have another ex|)huiation why we were beaten by Davidson: 

" De Possum whip de Coon, 
He Dog he whip de Possum; 
En de Coon eat up de Dog. 
Brudderin', how you Kwine reconcile 
iJese things on Judgment Day ? " 

Richmond College had beaten Randolph-Macon, 30-0; and had reason to be a 
little confulent against us. Thursday was an ideal day for a football game; and the 
men seemed to have good s])irit. The game began at 3 ]>. m. There were two 
twent)-live minute liahes. It was apparent from the first that .A. A I\I. had a walk- 
over for the Richmond men could not stop the terrific rushes of our guarils' back 
formation. It did not take the s]iectators long to sec tiiat the game was ours; and it 
was then a matter of argunu nt how much the score would be in our favor. .\t the 
end of the second half, the score was, A. & M., 30; Richmonil, 5, Richmond making 
a dro]) after five trials. Every time their full-back would try for a drop, an A. & M. 

14S 



^^&^&j0 THE AGROMECK ^^^^^^ 



man would break it up: and each time a Richmond man would fall on the ball. Finally, 
the half-back succeeded in sending it across. The game with Richmond closed what 
is considered b}' all the most successful season we have ever had. In spite of its 
misfortunes and reverses, it is a season that ought to make every student proud of his 
College, every graduate prciutl of his .\lma Water. 

I wish to render my thanks to the Cadet Battalion for the spirit shown from the 
beginning of the season; and for the way in which they so generously contributed to 
the several calls for cash subscription. 

And to Captain Phelps we give our most sincere assurance of appreciation for his 
efforts in behalf of athletics. What he has done for A & ]M. since he has been with 
us is now a matter of history. While we have Captain Phelps to back us, nothing 
but a first-class team will represent us. 

To Bill Devlin: Bill, you left many a staunch friend behind vou when you left A. 
L*c M. As a coach and a player y(.iu have few equals and no superiors. Nothing 
would make us quite so sure of a successful team for next year as to have you with us. 

Also, to Professor Hill we express our most sincere appreciation for the great 
interest he has always shown in the athletics of the College. 

And last, but not least, to Dr. Charles Burkett we extend our hearty thanks for 
the generous support, financial as well as moral, which he has always given; not 
football alone, but athletics in general. 

In closing, we would urge the student body always to give football their heartiest 
support. Football is essentially part of a man's college training. It is a game 
which develops perseverance and coolness, combined with quickness of decision — 
traits which the player will find useful in after life. A properly-uniformed plavcr 
has no risk of being seriously or fatally hurt. It is a game that gives strength, 
physical endurance, manliness. It is a game that is peculiarly adapted to a military 
institution. The season of '02 has passed; it belongs to a year that is dead. The 
old must give place to the new; other men must take hold of the work. Let them 
strive to place the laurels of A. ifc INI. in the verv front rank. 

We of the old year take with us many good men whom the team of '03 will miss. 
But we leave behind us the nucleus of a team which may hope to surpa.'^s all previous 
records in our history of athletics. 

To the team of '03 we will say that we wish as much for their success as we once 
wished for our own. We hope that next season will be one which you may look 
backward to with jiride and pleasure. As our hearts have been, will our hearts ever 
be, with A. & M. athletics. 



149 



THE AGROMECK 



The Varsity Football Team 

YELL 

Kil-Li, Ki-Lit, 
Rah, Rah, Zit, Zit, 
Ha, Ha, Yah-Ho... 
Bam-Goo, A. 'M. 02. 



C. L. CREECH, '03.. Manager 

O. MAX GARDNER, '03 Captain 

ARTHUR DEVLIN Coach 



TUCKER, '06 ( 1 60 lbs. ) Left V.m\ 

GARDNER, '03 (215 lbs. ) Left Tackle 

CAKPEN'i'ER, '03 (182 lbs.) Left (Suaril 

IIADLEY, '05 (I 85 lbs.) feiitre 

HKKBE, '06 ( 1 95 lbs. ) Right Guard 

NEAL, '05 (185 lbs. ) Right Tackle 

GULLEV, '04 (156 lbs. ) Right End 

DARDEN, '03 (155 lbs.); ASBURV, 03 (140 lbs. ) Quarter Back 

WELCH, '02 (160 lbs.) ' Right LLilf Back 

SHANXOX HOUSE, '05 ( i 65 lbs. ) Left Half Back 

ROBERSOX, '06 (155 lbs.) EuU Back 

(JAITIIER, '04 (175 lbs.) Substitute Guard and Centre 

1\( )()X. '06 (175 lbs.) Substitute Half Back 

MH.LER, '04 (150 lbs.) Substitute ILvlf Back 

Avenige tveig/il rjjAj //". 

GAMES PLAYED 

A. & M. Opp. 

October 4th — Clemson College at Clemson, S. C 6 10 

October 6th — Eurnian Lhiiversity at Greenville, S. C o o 

October 13th — Eurman University at Raleigh, N. C 2 5 

October i8th — Virginia Polytechnic Institute at Blacksburg, \'a 6 10 

( )ctober 20 — St. Albans at Roanoke, Va 10 o 

October 31st — (iuilford College at Raleigh, X. C 28 5 

November Sth — University of North Carolina at Raleigh, N. C o o 

November lyth — Davidson College at Greensboro, N. C o 5 

November 27th — Richnumd College at Raleigh, N. C 30 5 

Ti 'tal 83 vs. 40 

150 



,^^^^^s^s^ 



THE AGROMECK 



Baseball 



f\trt 



O. MAX GARDNER, Manager 



S. W. ASBURY, Captain 



T'' thusc who arc iiiteresteil in the national ,u:amf we can gi\e encouragement 
_____ as to our fiitute. Of Course it is a little premature just now to speak of our 
§S^ liasel)all ]irosi)i'cts: Imt now, just before the season begins, we have plenty 
of good material, anil everything tends to show that we will have a rattling 
good team. What we want is a good schedule with good college teams, so that wt- 
can hav(- s<jmething to i)lay for; and then more interest will be taken in the game. 

Baseball has always been an attractive game to Raleigh people, and it is in a 
large measure\lue to them that we owe our good rec(jrd anil fmancial success. We 
ho])e to give tho citizi-ns ol' Raleigh an excellent opportunity of seeing good, fair, 
straight baseball this spring. The cadets are supporting the Athletic Association well, 
which certainly iri\licatcs that we will not be lacking in college spirit. .\sbury, our 
Captain, is well qualified for his position, and we predict for him and his team a 
successful year. 



SCHEDULE FOR 03 



SchrJi '\ 



March 2j — liingham Sch£;<5t i Raleigh. . . . 
?rarch 27 — Trinity hkgh Schooi^- ,'(aieigh 
.\pril I — Sharp'.s I.M^i^tute at Raleigh 
.■\pril 6 — Trinity ("oUbge at Raleigh. . .• 

April 8— oyC Ridge at Raleigh 

.\pril 15 .-lloinir at Raleigh 

April 15 — Red ."Springs at Raleigh 

.\pril I7 — Wake Forest at Wake Forest. . . . 



'4«i 



.\pryi 23 — Danville [Military Institute at Raleigh. 

.\yrfil 27 — Furman Lniversit}' at Raleigh 

".\])ril 29 — Davidson College at Raleigh 

May 2 — Wake l''orest at Raleigh 

.May 6 — Guilfortl College at Raleigh 

May 8 — Syracuse at Raleigh 

May I 1 — Ilorner at O.xfonl 

May 15 — Red Springs at Red Springs 



A. A iM 



Opp. 



156 





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BBBBBB THE AGROMECK ggg^^g 

A Short Vacation 

«$» 

IMS (|uiek tri|) Ikhik', hetwucn the wintrr and spring terms, I had gone 
Mxcr many times in my mind. Now the brief hjng-iuoked-for time had 
eome. There were a few hurried preparations made, the usual good liyes 
and good wishes exchanged between my classmates and me, and I was ofi". 
The ride had nothing of interest about it except the anticipation of being at 
home again. Soon the jtiurney was nearly over. Looking through the car window, 
I saw trees which I knew grew near home. A few minutes later, the train glided 
]]ast woodland haunts where I had often hunted. Then the train began to slacken 
speed. \\'ith ill-concealed impatience, I left my seat and went out upon the platform. 

The little town was much the same. Some changes had been matle; and these I 
noted as with eager, restless e,ve.s I viewed my birthplace. At the depot were new 
faces, but most of the people I knew. In the creiwd somebody touched my elbow, 
and, turning, I saw the old negro who usually looked after my trunk. I spoke to 
him, gave him my check, and, seeing no one there to meet me, started for home. 

Once at home, I was kept answering and asking questions until supper time. At 
supper the old cook came in with a plate of well-browned biscuits in one hand and 
a i)late of crisp ginger snaps in the other. "Chile, you ain't been gettin' nothin' 
much to eat," she said to me. " Dat is, you ain't been havin' no homeeatins'. I 
make dese here especially for you." I took her at her word. 

I need not recite to the average college youth how we all talkeil until late that 
night, and began the talking early the next morning. As I wanteil to take in the 
town, I soon gave my folk the slip, and set out. During the day I found plenty of 
things that interested but did not tire me. Yet, as the day wore on, I became 
dissatisfied. I wanted to see somebody who lived across the way on a hill overlook- 
ing the village. Because of some fleeting memories of a girl friend near the distant 
college, I at first thought that I did not care to see my fair neighbor. This feeling 
soon wore away. By that afternoon I had firmly made up my mind to call, for I had 
to leave early the next morning. Just after supper I went over to see her — to greet 
her, and to say good-bye. 

As the night was mild and warm, we sat on the p<irch. It was more inspiring to 
be in the moonlight. In the little village below us the houses seemed covered with 
silver-coated roofs. Far away in the distance, tall pines were boidl\- outlined against 
the sky. Here and there, upon the distant rolling hills, patches of white sand gleamed 
like snow. Yet all this was not what I saw. All I could see was a pair of bewitch- 
ing brown eyes that sparkled beautifully in the moonlight. 

Finally, with many rea/ regrets that I must leave, I arose to go. She held out 
her hand, and saiil nothing for an instant — just let her eyes flash softly into mine, as 
if they reail my thoughts, and said, "I dare you to. " But I wanted that good-bye 
kiss so badly that I could not resist the impuLst-. She drew back a little, for I was 
going to dare. I leaned forward, farther, farther, farther, until mv face shadowed 
the brown eyes in front of mine. Then I stopped suddeni}-. .My vacation was at an 
end. After all, it was onlv a dream, and my imaginar\- vacation had lasted, perhaps, 
a second. 

iss 




105 J^ 



'01- 0^. 



Tennis Club 

OFFICERS 

\V. F. KIKKl'ATRICK, Prosident E. K. CULBKKTII Vioe-Piesident 

.1. r.. llARI)lN(i, >?eiTftary and Tmwnrer 

MEMBERS 

1!.V. Alli^iiii, S. 11. Clark, II. F. ('hreitzbiirj,', W. .^1. ChaiiilRT.s, J. S. Drake,.!. F. I liggs, K. 
E. Etheridgc, 1). K. Foster, L. M. Hoffman, W. II. Hoffman, W. N. Holt, R. 11. Smilli, .1. II. 
Parker, J. II. Pierce, E. J. Porter, J. L. Pinkus, W. A. Paschaw, C. T. Rogers, .1. A. Lyon, U. 
W. Rogers-, C. B. Ross, J. J. Morris, Louis Winston, W. Walters. 



i6o 



^^^^0& THE AGROMECK 



Red and White 

Organ of the Athletic Association. Published Semi-Monthly. 

*$> 

STAFF 

1. II. .^HLl-'ORD Kditor-in-Chief 

JOHN D. FERGUSON _. Associate Editor 

( ». .M. G.^kDNER ." .\thletic Editor 

\V. .M. CH.\.MBER.S .\ssistant Athletic Editor 

J. E. COIT Agricultural Editor 

J. B. HARDING Local Editor 

W. W. EINLEV Literary Editor 

E. E. CULBRETH Business Manager 

I. S. R CARPENTER ) a ■ . * tj ■ ivr 

- Assistant Business Managers 
\V. E. IMcCANLESS » ^ 

E. S. WHITING Comic and E.xchangc Editor 

C. \V. MARTIN Assistant Comic Editor 

H. .M. HUNTER Social Editor 



162 




I'-.- 



|WI 



H 



'rcsiduiil 

\'ice-Pi"esiiknt 
Secretary .... 

TrcasiirLT. . . , 



^ DEVOTIONAL COMMITTEE 
j. II. (II.I^'N, Chan man 
v. S. (;RIERS()\ 



.1.. N. BONKV 
I. M. KKNXEDV 

. .(-. V. rogp:rs 

K. C. loHN.^oX 



<;. I'. .\SI!LRV 



BIBLE STUDY COMMITTEE 

C. r. ROCJI'.RS. Ch<iiimaii 
]. D. FKRCiUSON C. \\ VKNAIil.K 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

K. C. JOIINSOX, Clhiinii.in \. H. ll.\kl)IN(> 

MISSIONARY COMMITTEE 

P. S. (JRIKRSOX, Ch.iinihtii 

]. M. Ki'.xxi:i)\' M. I'.. \vki:ks 

MEMBERSHIP COMMITTEE 

L. X. H( »XI•■.^■. Chainnui 




^^^^^ THE AGROMECK ^^^^ 



A Senior Recitation 



T was diiL' (if those bright, sunn}- spring mornings, just at 8 o'clock, when 
the class of '03 assembled in the Doctor's room, prepared to give one of 
those typical recitations for which they were so famous. The Doctor was 
'^^^^^ seated behind his desk eyeing the boys as they lolled in one by one. 
Nearly all of the boys had assembled. Even Jim and Charlie were in. Thev had 
come early this morning, and had settled down snugly in their seats, and were now- 
enclosed in the embracing arms of Morpheus. Down the hall, in the far-off end, could 
be heird the ungodly laugh of J. S. P. C. , mingled with Ed. Roe's sparkling wit and 
humor and my dear Gaston's never-ceasing "blow.'' Next came Leslie, and then 
the Doctor knew all were in, and ordered the door to be shut. He then proceeded 
to call the roll and found all present except "the late Mr. Simpson." After waiting 
fifteen minutes, Mr. .Simpson made his appearance in great haste, and was cheered 
by all exce])t Jim, Jnhn. Leslie and Charlie, who now composed the body of 
slumbcrers. 

"Late this morning, !\Ir. Simpson .•'" asked the Doctor. 

Mr. Simpson — " I w.is asleep over in my r.)3:n. Doctor," and failed to hear the 
bell. 

Then fnlliiweil a fifteen-minute lecture on punctuality. "Now, vnii must all 
learn to be punctual. This is the first princifile of Political Economw Vuu can 
never accomplish anything if you are always late. " 

"Now, to our lesson; take fornext time from pa,q;e 126 to page 263. This is a 
short lesson now, and I want yu all to know it. Well, Mr. Stamps, what is our 
lesson about today.'" 

Ed Roe — "Sir! — Oh, yes, sir 1 ilunt kmiw, sir." 

Doctor — "Mr. Gardner, can you tell us.'" 

Gardner — "Doctor, I'm mighty sorry, but I wasn't on class last time, and some 
of the boys gave me the wrong lesson, and, er — I studied the wrong lesson." 

Charles — ■■ He went over tn B. F. C., Doctor." 

Foustie — "I can tell you. Doctor.'' 

Doctor — "Well, let's have it. " 

F'oustie reatls the subject out nf the book. 

Doctor — That'll do. "Now, Mr. Fergusnn, can you tell us wiiat i.-: capital.'" 

John D — "Raleigh." 

Doctor — "Mr. Kennedy, can you tell us.'" 

lim — "Capital is wea — 1 — th sav — e — d — cr — er," (and Jim could get no farther 
before he fell back again in solemn bliss). 

. i6s 



^^^^^ THE AGROMECK SS^^^S 

lessc — '-WlKit's tlK' cuR-stion, Doctor?" 

Doctor rcjicatcd the question aiul cmkHl by asking Jesse. 

Jesse — "1 don't know, sir. " 

Evervthin,a; was quiet now, and not a sound could be heard excejit the Doctor 
explainini; the lesson and an occasional thiinip of a liead hitting against the back ol' 
a bench. 

Doctor — " Xow, Mr, Trotter, will you please tell us what credit is.'" 

Trotter — "What what is. Doctor.''" 

Doctor — "Credit; did you never hear of credit.'" 

Trotter — "Never did, sir." 

Doctor — "Well, 1 will have to ask y<ni what the monkey did the bear, ■ Whar 
wuz you raised .' ' " 

.\t this juncture, the Doctor branched off on a discussion of the defects of 
women, and this time was listened to very attentively by Whiting anil "Judge 
Clark." So mui_h time was consumed by this discussion that the bugle blew for the 
ne.xt hour and found the Doctor still on this engrossing subject; so the Doctor very 
hastilv concluded, and commended the class on their very imposing recitation. 
"Now, gentlemen, " says the Doctor, "we will have a ])reliminary on this subject 
ne.xt time, and I hope yi^u all will do ecjually as well then as you have today, and I 
believe vou will. Class dismissed." 

Whole class (aside) — "Amen: thank de Lord." 



tfiSpt^ ^^^ f^StC' 






1 66 



^gjfZ^ggZgwgl'Cggf 



THE AGROMECK 







The Leazar Literary Society 



«t» 



THE best epitome of tlie history of a successful organization is its present condition, 
both as to materia! well-beinjj; and principles of action; and, so, rather than use the 
allotted space in inaJequate narrative, this article will attempt to give the ideas that 
govern the Leazar Literary Society of today. 

This Society has chosen to be more than the regular old-line literary societies That it 
iiuiy lie more, the word "Literary '' in its title may become a misnomer; but, strictly sjieaking, 
there has always been a m siise of the word, as, for instance, when applied to the old-line 
literary societies themselves; these are, correctly speaking, defined as " elocntional " ; and when 
choosing thus to be more rather than less, the Leazar Society but puts itself in line witli the 
universal movement of democracy. The Leazar Society is more when the curriculum is 
increased; is more when, with really catholic standards, every move of expressing thought by 
word or action is admitted; is more, when by this enlargement of curriculum a means of 
unification is obtained, more complete, more natural, and more lasting than ever was obtained 
in the best days of the old-line literary society. 

Instead of a competitive position among many small organizations, the Leazar Society 
becomes the foster mother of these sjiecial societies, by giving opportunity and incentive for 
the expre.^sion of each smaller society's mode of thought. It is true, when this is done, there 
is a .seemingly invasion of the lields for the smaller special society; but since these are calcu- 
lated to sap the old allegiance, they must not comiilain when met liy countermine. They are 
not destroyed, but correlated. l'>y this recognition they are brought upon ecinality with all 
the historical old-line modes of expression. 

The Leazar Society, during the last ten years, has become thoroughly connnitted to the 
independent system; that is, to its own self-sufficiency, for offering adequate iield of competition 
and incentive for all the energies of its individual members, originally imposed by the College 
authorities because of the intensity of a bitter feeling after a great victory for the Leazar in 
an inter-society contest. This independent system has become the fnndaniental principle of 
her policy. To that end, a steady movement of endowment has become in progress; by the 
investment of interest-bearing trust funds, her founders maintain an independent oratorical 
contest; following the founders, a long line of her alumni members have sustained her in this 
independent system by inninnerable gifts of medals, trophies and other property. 

It is ti'ue, the Leazar Society, with its membersliip of between 250 and 300, is probably the 
largest College Society in North Carolina. These members carry with them suggestions of 
unwieldiness; but its system of sinmltaneous ineelings, its division into three political and 
geographical parties, carrying on incessant contests, its division into fourteen or more sections, 
which give instant as well as pi rnninent reward by large systems of trophies and medals, its 
existing and many projected public contests — all these open wide the door of opportunity and 
measure nntu all richest rewards. 

Our motto, '"Labor omnia vincit" expresses the facts — the Leazar Literary Society is 
a democracy of opportunity, creating an aristocracy of merit. 



■ 67 



Programme 

DEBATE, MAY '02 
fifrt 



President 

SeCKKI AKY. 



j. I.. PARi<i;R 
1. M. KKNXKDV 



Ql'EKv: Ji(:u)/vc(/, "That diii' NatiiJiial ( icjVLTniiK'iU sliuuM iiiiikc- annual appni- 
priatiuns to assl.-^t tlie states in tlie cdJistrLietinn and inainlLiiance nf j,m.i>i| luatls. " 



!•:. K. CUl.BKKl II 



j. !■■. |)I(;(;S 

1. I). i-i;K(;rs()\ 



DEBATERS 

S. C. (-ORNWKI.L 

W. L. DARDEN (Mrdal) 

MARSHALS 

\'. \'. .M( )SS, Cuiv.v. 
v.. I'. RAIl.KN' 
C. W. MARTIN' 



C. I.. (RKFX'll 

W. I'. KIKKI'AIRICK 



F. G. IIARI'I.R 
W. A. liRoWX 



|68 



^^^^ THE AGROMECK ^^^^M 



Programme 

FEBRUARY '03 

f$» 

Pkk.sidkxt 1 ). s lA K ( iWEN 

.Secretary J. 11. HARDING 

Representativk. w the L. C. C. M. a ? W . .M, X. lA' I'CH 

ORATORS 

K. s. \viiri]X(; w'Ai.ri-.K ci.ark, Jk 

W. K. KIKKl'AIRRK W. I.. DAKDF.X (Medal) 

C. L. CRKKCH 

JUDGES 

CnvKKNOK C. li. AVCOCK Sknatcik II. .\. T,.\XI)ON 

Senator J. S. DL'RIIAM 

MARSHALS 

E. II. KICKS, (■iiiri. 
WM. RKIIARDSOX Jk C. W. MAKTIX P. G. ASIURV 

M. !•: WKKKS E. (;. I'OR ri»R 11. ."\I. IL'RXKK 



170 



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^^^^m THE AGROMECK ^^^^M 




Pullen Literary Society 



OFFICERS '02-'03 



FIRST TERM 

Presidkxt W. M. BOGART 

Vice-President. .O. MAX GARDNER 

Secretary H. M. HUNTER 

Treasurer JULIAN M. HOWARD 

Librarian L. V. EDWARDS 



SECOND TERM 

President HOWARD SIMPSON 

Vice-President H. :M. HUNTER 

Secretary J. H. SQUIRES 

Treasurer JULIAN M. HOWARD 

Librarian W. G. FINCH 



The Pullen Literary Suciety is the oldest student organisation, whether secret or 
literary, in our College. A few weeks after the first formal opening of the College, 
on October i, 1889, some of the students organized a society having for its object a 
thorough training in parliamentry law, in composition, and in debate. 

Named in hon(.)r of the late Mr. R. S. Pullen, of Raleigh, the donor of the 
College site, the Society has kept pace with the growth of the College, increasing from 
the charter membership of thirty-five to it.s present position of influence and power 
in a collection of five hundred of North Carolina's best citizens. 

Besides the training referred to above, the Society is an influence for good in 
another direction of equal importance. It is teaching it.s members that thev do not 



173 



^^^^m THE AGROMECK ^^^^M. 

come to College for the exclusive purpose of ieaining tilings cuit of l)ool<s: tliev Uani 
how to get along with their fellow men; how to stutly each other; Imw tn tlo tlie 
thing that are worth while. By associating with other students antl bru>lung 
against them in debate, or in competition for places of honor, they learn to bring 
all the faculties of the mind into play, and the desire to excel is stimulateil. 
Thus the literary society gives a man something that he cannot get anywhere 
else — it turns him out k-res alque nitundus. 

The Society also works in another part of college life. In the absence <>f 
fraternities their place is supplied in a measure by societies. The \i)ung man who 
came from home to college for the first time, and found himself suddenly transplantcti 
from home life to college life, without that self-confidence, which can be acquired oiil}- 
at college, found in the societies a friend indeed, and pledged his everlasting devotion 
to those who comforted him in his dire distress. 

In all its literary exercises, both private and public, the PuUen Society endeavers 
to maintain a high standard of excellence. As a stimulus to greater exertion, two 
medals are given for proficiency in certain branches of the literary work during each 
year by members of the alumni. 

Frequent debates keep the members in touch with the live questions of the ilay, 
while the benefit derived from the writing of essays, declamation, reading, anil 
extemporaneous speaking is inestimable. 

It is the custom of the Society to hold an annual public entertainment in Raleigh 
on the first Friday evening in May. The program consists of four debaters and two 
orators, who compete for medals given by the Society. 

The program for May, '02, was as follows: 

Pkesidf.nt R. K. SXOWDEN 

Secretary J. J. MORRIS 

ORATORS 

O. M. G.\RDNER (Medal)— Subject: " Sane Citizenship." 

J. S. CATES — Subject: "Some Effects of the .\pplication of Machinery 

to Agriculture. " 

DEBATERS 

AFFIRMATIVE NEGATIVE 

E. C. BAGWELL W. M. BOC.VRT (Medal) 

H. M. HCXTER HOWARD SIMPSON 

Query: "Resolved that the passage of the Ship Subsidy Bill wmild be tn the best 
interest of the farmers and manufacturers of our couiitrv. " 

MARSHALS 

]. L. FEREBEE (Chief). 

ASSISTANTS 

]. A. MILLER W. M. CHAMBERS 

\V. L. GRUMES A. S. MANN 

In conclusion, we believe that the Society is the most jiotent inllueiice for culture 
in our curriculum; that its value is recognized, and lielil in grateful remembrance by 
our alumni, is shown by their giving the medals referred to above. .Viid here we 
avail ourselves of the opportanity to express our ajipreciation for their continued 
interest in our work. 

174 



^m^^3 THE AGROMECK E^^^K 



Election Returns 



PKRHAPS we may safely say that the election was the most interesting feature 
connected with The Agromeck. Throughout the meeting there was no 
restless scraping of feet that w-anted to go to town. No one grumbled at 
being kept from doing so and so; no one got up and bravely maintained that 
a motion for adjournment was in order at any time. Everybody was laughing or 
smiling all the while, except the elected, and they could not help grinning. 

The President called the meeting to order. Everyone came to order except 
Rogers. He, of course, had something to say. Just then several benevolent 
members choked him into silence and the business commenced. 

"Gentlemen," said the President, " as I understand it, the object of the meeting 
is to elect various celebrities, as the Biggest Liar, the Ugliest Man, and so on in the 
class." 

After some discussion, it was decided that the candidate receiving the highest 
number of votes should be elected: that we should have a standing vote. 

The first nomination was for the Most Popular Man in the class. In some 
indefinable way. Kirkpatrick had suavely convinced the class that he was the most 
])cipular man; at any rate, he was elected. 

Darden got the next highest number of votes; and very judiciously moved that to 
the former motion be added an amendment that the name of the man getting the 
next highest number of votes be recorded. The motion was carried. We put this 
in for fear Darden would be disappointed. 

Cornwell was also nominated. It is probable that he would have been elected 
if he had had the support of Owen and his adherents. Due to some temporary 
grievance, Owen did not give his support to Cornwell. The result was Cornwell's 
inevitable defeat. 

The next nomination was for the man with the Most College .'spirit. Etheridge 
was the man to get the place. No one better deserved it. He has often said at the 
ball games: 

'* My purse, my person, my extremest means, 
Lie all unlocked to your occasions " 

His is the college spirit, undaunted by the most unfortunate losses. 

P'oUowing this, the President, with a bland and confident smile, opened the way 
for the nomination of the most conceited man. Jack or Gene deserved the place, 
but the class insisted that we give it to Gardner. When the nomination was 
announced for the Ugliest Man, Diggs smiled compassionately upon the rest i:>f the 
class. 

'•Too soon- dejected and too soon elate," Diggs was elected unanimously. 



^^^^^^^^^^^ inn. t\ Kj r^ \j lyi CL, \^ r\. \M^s^Sk^^k ^^ 

Altci wiirds, he- saiil tliat lit' had one consolation — his picture- wmilii lie in the Annual. 
W'c refer the reader ti> his ]iicture. 

At the nomination l^r the Laziest Man in the class, a stampede seennnl imminent, 
[.atcr, it was shown that, while Ross, Kenned\ and .Morris were present, no one else 
was in dani^er of bein;;' elected. I'.ach of thi'se nii>st deserving candidates received 
nine votes. Tiiey were too lazy to rise and vote for each othc-r, and Ijn mutual 
agreement they remained seated. 

When the Jiiggest Bore was to be elected, < )u(n was the one tandidate. 

" Owen, alinie of all our mates is hu. 
Who stands continned in full stuimiity. " 

Here C'oniwcll ntinind gooil for evil, and gave CJwi-n his staunch support. 
l..iter. it was saiil that lie and C'ornwell found theiiiseKcs the only members of 
••A Miiliial Admiraliim Sociely." 

When tlu- house was opened for the nomination of the Best Officer, all the 
t'ajitains looked tiown compassionately on the rest cjf us, for each one of tluan knew 
that he was going to be elected. But Darilen had that day reported a dro\e of 
"rats" for being down the street, so he was elected by a small majority over 
Ferguson. 

Everyone was afraid that he wouhl be elected the Freshest Man, but when the 
voting began w'c fountl that our fears had no foundation, for Rogers was easily the 
victor, Trotter being able to draw but three votes. 

I^vtcli led bv a large majoritv in the election of the Best .\ll-Rouiul C'adtt. 
C'ornw'ell and Rogers ilid a lot of leg-i>ulling, but to no avail, for the class knew 
what it was about. 

The election of Creech for the Biggest Liar was the case of "the survival of the 
fittest." 

By careful nomination and vote-buying on the part of one nomiiue, Doc Boney 
was elected the Greatest Growler. 

For the Hardest Student, Mr. Glenn was easily elected. 

For his outlandish size and general appearance, F.llis was elected the Biggest 
Bum. His constituents forced from him a speech. 

To have elected any one member, or to have omitted any one member, as the 
Biggest Bluff of the class, would have been grossly unjust to tlu- rest i f the class. 
Finally, the whole class was elected. 

To tlu- utter humiliation of Diggs, Morris was elected the Bi-st Looking Man in 
the class. 

Clark and (junter tied for the Most Intellectual Man. 

Rtjss was elected the Biggest Rogue. We don't know why lu- was unless it was 
his ability to steal time. 

Asbury stood the best all-round chance for the Best Athlete. 

Governor Foster well deserved to be elected the Swellest Ladies' .^Lln. 

As a burlesque, the class elected White the Most Fickle Man. 

Stamps was nominated as tlu- Loiuk-st Man in the class. As one man, the- class 
arose and roared, " I\Ir. President, we move to elect him unanimously." 

There being no further business, the President, rather worn out and llurric-d from 
the loi.g meeting, movetl that we "stop discontinuing " the iiueting, ami so it ended 
as it began, in uproar and merriment. 

176 



THE AGROMECK 



From the Heart of a Liar 

A. & M. Ciii.LEGE, lies/ Raleigh, X. C. Oct /j, /()02. 
My Dear Louise: 

Nothing is more jileasure to me than writing to you. You seem to think that I liave drifted 

away from you. How can you misjudge me so cruelly? Ever since I «as a little bit of a Ijny 

you have owned my undivided heart. You know this as well as I. Why do you taunt me so? 

IIovv well I remember when to each other we were the only two in the world. I still wouUl 

have it so. 

* * * * * * * 

There is the bell for class. Adoralile tyrant, would that I had time to write you a whole 
volume. Anyway, I'll see you soon, when you come to the Fair; and will have volumes to 
tell you. Unalteringly yours, 

Leonard. 



A. & M. College, West Raleigh, A'. C. Oil. i6, igo3. 
My Dear Xellie : 

Of late I miss you, if anything, more than ever. We are having such lovely moonlight 
nights here. After supper tonight I took a stroll aroun<l tlie campus. It is a lieautiful niglit. 
"(jn such a night as this," how longs my heart for you. 

Really, you cannot iniagine how much I regretted your moving away from our little village. 
Every summer I mis^ you ever so njuch. There is really no one else there whom I care to see. 
Sometimes in dreamland I meet you. A breath, a wild heart beat, a shifting of my idle, 
sleepy mind, and you are gone. IMy room-mate says that sometimes I cry in my sleep. 
Perhaps I do. 

\'ery, very often I think of you, "and I wonder if you sometime t'link of me." Please do 
not keep me waiting such a distressingly long time for my answer. Tmleniably yours, 

Leiin.4rd. 



A. & M. College, ll'esl Raleigh, X. C, Oct. 20, ig02. 
My Dear Eiinnie : 

I was overjo\ed to hear from you again "after the lapse of centuries." Pardon my writing 
again so soon: because, I can not help writing. You see there is little for me to lojk forward 
to except your letters, which are delightfully entertaining. I enjoy them more than I dare say. 

You must have had a splendid time on the hay ride. How I envy Mr. Waltham — "Juvenis 
Damnabelissimus " — there, I did not mean to shock you. 

By the way, when you have your picture taken will you send me one? In your last letter 
you said something about having taken some photographs of yourself. 1 would treasure yinir 
photograph as a heathen would his god. 

We shall see each other liut little after this. This year I finish, and go back again, away 
from the wfirld, away from civilization, worst of all, away from yon. Please grant me this 
much to treasure in rememberance of you. 

.\ waiting your answer, I am as ever. Devoutly yours, 

LlCONAHll. 



A. & M. College, West Ralegh. X. C, Oct. 21, /go2. 
My Dear Lvcile : 

Yes, I am enjoying life, or rather trying to enjoy it. It is most difficult for me to be happy 



^^^^^^^^Pi THR AGROMECK 



i-iiK-e you liave gone away. You don't know how I miss you when you're {lone. Last niglit I 
went to an opera. It was very good. 1 ought to liave been perfectly happy, for I love nui-sic 
and dramatic-'. The music was simply grand. The love scenes were — how they thrilled my 
heart with tremulous ecstacy! After it was all over I knew that in my pym|)athy with the 
actor I was as near the realization of my love as I could be. I went, away an unimportant, 
wondering, .sorrow-stricken man. No, it isn't your sympathy I want, nor anybody else's — 1 
despise sympathy. Yet further than to sympathize nobody ever has cared or ever will care for 
me. Tell me, is there hope? ]\Iy pride would hold me back from this. It is my love that 
speaks. Save me the agony of long suspense. Hopelessly yours, 

Leonard. 



A. & M. CoLLEcE, West Raleigh, N. C, Oct. 2^, igo2. 
My Dear Mabel : 

No doubt you will be a little surprised to get this letter. We have not seen each other for 
several years — it seems as many centuries to me. It makes me feel right blue to tliink of the 
^'ood times we used to have. I often wonder it you have forgotten. I'm sure I never 
shall forget. 

P.) you remember that night you said 1 could not kis-? you, not even if 1 tried. Believe 
me, that was the most exciting tackle I ever made. An another time, one summer night, we 
were eating grapes in our front yard. You were outrageously pretty that night. That part of 
my life I'd like to live over and over again. 

When vou went away you left the world to loneliness and me. If you will write, it will be 
a source of pleasure inexhaustible to me. Eternally yours, 

Leonard. 



A. c>c .M. CoiLEGE, West Raleigh, N. C, Oct. 27, rgo2. 
My Dear J/aiiiie : 

True to our compact of last sunmier 1 have already written you once. Perhaps it seems a 
long interval for two letters. There has been something or other going on all the while to take 
up my time. After writing you the first letter 1 kept waiti g for you to write. N ■ answer 
came; and 1 hardly knew what to do. It may be that you did not get my letter. You may 
be sure that no one else would exact such .sa<-riHce from me. Well, when it comes to you, you 
are not like anybody else. I had rather have your friendship than any other girl's love. 

I'm a most uidiirky boy. I haven't that aptness for falling in love and falling out again 
that most boys have. It is rarely that I love; and when I do 1 am sure tolove some one who 
doesn't care for me. 

There, I <lid not mean to write such a dismal letti-r. Next tinie I'll write in merrier vein. 
Please wiite. Loyally yours, 

Lkonako. 



178 




1^,T^^^ 



Agro '2 



!^^^ 



THE AGROMECK 






Thalerian German Club 



ftrt 



OFFICERS 

FIRST TERM SECOND TERM 

President S. C. CORNVVELL President J. !•. DIGGS 

Vice-President W. L. DARDEX Vice-President. ... E, E. CULBRETH 

Sf.cretary I.. X. ROXEV Secretary H. .AI. HLX TER 

Treasurer 1-,. IL RICKS Treasirer E. A. XEAL 

Censor E. E. CLLBRETH Censor E. V. WIXSTOX 

Leader J. E. DIGGS Leader C. B. ROSS 



Tlie Thalerian Gfnnan Club 
clubs that existed in College the 

These two clubs, "The Old 
it best to have only one club 
an agreement was reached that 
tion and name. ]\Ianv names 
discussion the name which the c' 

The monthly germans given 1 
and thiise that have slipped b\- 
Mianv an hour which would othe 
in mirth and happiness by the " 

I'p to the present date the cl 
of dancing are from eight until 
College authorities. 

The olTicers of llu- club are e 
held in the ()li\ia Ram \ llall in 



was organized September, 1902, by the union of two 
jirevious year. 

German Club" and "The Hoplite Club,'' thinking 
in College, appointed committees to confer, and 
the two clubs should unite under a new organiza- 
were suggested for the new club, and after much 

lub now bears, "The Thalerian," was chosen. 

)y the club are looked forward to with much pleasure 
lui\e increased the speed of the fleeing hours, and 

rwise have been dull and unprofitable has been spent 

trippers of the light fantastic." 

ub has given six most enjoyable dances. The hours 
eleven; this being the rule given the club by the 

lee ted lor terms nf three- niDntiis, and our dances are 
\alriy;li. 



MEMBERS 



I. 


(;. ASHE 


1. :\l. HOW.VRl) 


E C. IMIKI.I'S 


W" 


.11 HKOWX 


11. M. iirxiT.k 


H. K. I'Kl.MKO.SE 


I'l- 


;(if. i!k.\(;(; 


\V. f. KIRKP.V TRICK 


1:. II. KICKS 


1. 


X. |{nxi:\' 


KKOE KENDAEI. 


K, ROHI'.RSOX 


J. 


1). Cl.ARK 


r. .M. I.VKE.s 


(;. W. ROGERS 


s 


C. CORXWEI.E 


1). l.\'KES 


C. K. ROSS 


E. 


E. CLT.HREllI 


W, V. .McCAXI.ESS 


W. SMAXNOXIinrs 


W 


. E. DARDEX 


1. McKEMMOX 


I.. M. s.-\!nii 


1. 


E DlCCiS 


I'RtJE McLEI.I.AX 


K. K. .STAMPS 


.\. 


M. DIXON 


I. I. IMORRIS 


I'KoK. WAl.Tl-.K 


E. 


E. El'lil'.RIDGK 


1.. A. XEAL 


i'ROE WEHHKK 


.\. 


W. GRf.GORN' 


1). S. OWK.X 


I. T. WIXSTOX 


R. 


11, HAKIM R 


I. II. IWKKKK 


0. .M. G.XKDNT.K 



iS.' 



^^^^m THE AGROMECK ^^^^ 



fij^i^plfSKij^^,i!lf£v \. iTL \^ t^ \j r^ \j ivi L^ \^ r\. \^S&s^s^ 



Biological Club 

OFFICERS 

President J. E. COIT 

\'ice-President J. C. TEMPLE 

Secretary J. (). MORGAN 

CorrespniKlini;- Secretary W. W. FINLEY 



'I'he Biological Club is an (jrganization of agricultural students in College who 
are interested in biological studies. 

The Club was organized early in September, igoi, with eighteen charter members. 
From the first it has made rapid progress, its membership has increased to fifty-one, 
and it is now unchnibtedl}^ the premier scientific club in College. 

During the past year the members have done excellent work in the field of 
biological study, and it is interesting to note that those students who are most 
prominent in the Club stand highest in their classes. Of the five men chcsen to 
speak before the State Agricultural Society in October, igo2, all belonged to the 
Biological Club. 

This Club was the lirst organization attcm])ted by the agricultural stuilcnts, and it 
has probably done more than any other one thing to make the agricultural course 
so popular. Its meetings are held bi-monthly in Primrose Hall. All of the meetings 
are public, and \isitors are cordially welcomed. 



184 




BIOLOGICAL CLUB 



THE AGROMECK # 



m^^^^M 






MOTTO 

"Whoever can make two ears of corn or two blades of grass grow npon a spot of gronnd 
where only one grew before renders most essential service to his country." 

OFFICERS 

President \V. \V. FIXLEY 

Vice-President F. i;. SMITH 

Recording Skcretarv M. II. C'I1I',SBI;(» 

CoKRESI'llNDINn Sl-X-RET.VRY R. F. WAKKI'.X 



This Chil> was organized March 25, 1902, by the Agricnltural stndents who were desirous of 
availing thcinselve.s of the great advantages to be derived from the united study and discussion 
of inii)roved and progressive methods of work in practical up-to-date agriculture. 

Twenty-eight students constituted the nienil)ersliip at lirst. This has lieen increased to 
sixty-three, and during the short period of the Club's existence it has done much for the 
advancement of its iiiembers. Regular meetings are held in Primrose Hall on the first and 
third ^^'ellnesda\ evenings <;if each month. Visitors are cordially w^elcomed. 

Interesting papers are presented on agricultural subjects, such as Live Stock, Ilnsbandrv, 
Horticulture, Truck -Farming, and the cultivation and rotation of crops. 

Fspecial attenti m is attached to personal work and observation; one object of tlu' t'hili 
being tc foster a sjiirit of original investigation among its members, who will some day be the 
leaders in the agricidinral advancement ol North Carolina. 



^^^^B THE AGROMECK ^^M^M 



Liebeg Chemical Society 

OFFICERS 

rRKsiDKXT (). :\i. (;ardnkr 

\'irF.-l'KKSII)ENT I. F. DKjGS 

SkCKKTAKV AM) 'rRKASlRKR 1, W. W I I ITK 

MEMBERS 

J. II. SIIUFORD j. W. Wlin'F. (). M. CAKDXFR 

C. F. •IKOrri'.R C". L. CRFFCM J. F. DICGS 

!•:. W. CAFFllKR W. F. SMITH W. IF IMcLXTIRE 

C. A. SIFFFR'F R. F^"KFS (). F. BAGFEV 






THE AGROMECK ^m^^R 



The A. ^ M. College Dramatic Club 



I THE STROLLERS I 



Tl I I-. Dr.inialic C'luli r(|)i\scnts the cLilUnvil ami artistic dtvclcj]niiciit <ii the 
^^^ A. \- M. C'nlU-.nf stiiiK-nt. 

§^^^ The suciessl'iil iierformaiice of Slieritlan's immortal comedy, ■■'I'he Rivals." 
last \car is evidence sufficient tn show that the students <il the A. iV 1\I. 
College ai'e cle\er, painstaking and aitistic; that the liner qualities of uimd and Imdv are 
culti\ated here in as great a degree as at any college in the land. 

The Dratiiatic Club is the outgrowth of tletermination and enter])rise: it is the 
giving i)f the sjiirit iif the student tn atlvanee the College: it is the beginning c)f that 
kind of college s])irit that will be lasting and traditional, making the eolUge and the 
student life one of lasting iiiemcir\' and hopeful pleasure. 

I Ik- training l<> be gaiiieil in the interpretaticui and detail repri Hiuetii >n of a char- 
acter,is a training which the student gets now here else, and such an e.xercise is of lasting 
and incalculable value. ".Ml the w.irlds a stage," truly, and he who can best play 
his part receives the laurels. That thert' is a ])lace in our cnllege life for a dramatic 
organization, and lluit the ".'strollers" ha\e filled that place, has been abundantly 
evidenced by the hearty reception that has abeaih' been gi\en to the Club's 
presentations. May the (.'bib long live, and its standard never hiwer. 

\\'hatever success may have been achieveti, we siiould not forget to attribute largely 
to our young lady friends of the city, whose names have apjieaied in the cast. .Aside, 
too, li-dui sustaining their roles with more than credit, their jireseiKc has turned the- 
chudgery of many long rehearsals into pleasant social events. 

.'\s to the jiainstaking carefulness and unselfish sacrifice of time ami means by 
<iur director. Dr. Hurkett. we can m>t fully e.\])ress our high appreciation. 

When the Club was burn last ()ctiiber, the- following officers were installed: 



1 l<KSII)KN-r 

\'lCK-Pl<lvSII)FNr . . . 

.'si':(Ki.:i.\Rv 

HisiNtss M.\.\'.\(:kk. 



1.. N. HON'b.N' 
K. I!. COCIlk.VN 
W. 1„ DAKDKN 
i;. 11. RICK.S 



j. .S. CATK.S 

. C. T.. CRKKCH 
, .W. 1.. 1).\KI)EX 
R. !■'.. SXOWDl'.X 



MEMBERS 

|. S. CA'l'f.S 
v.. K. CCr.HRKTlI 
1. 1.. FKRKlJliK 
R. l',. SNOWDEN 

DIRECTOR 

l)K. ( ll.\Rl.i:s WM. lilRKI'.l" 



C. I.. CRF.b.Cll 
M. i;. C.\RIT.R 

(). ."\i. (;.\ri)Ni;r 

C. I) WF.I.CH 



I 92 



&=^&^&=^&^&^M=^ 



THE AGROMECK ^^^^^^ 



HONORARY MEMBERS 

Prof. C. W. BURKETT Mrs. C. W. BURKETT 

Miss DAISY ESTELLE MORING Miss FLORA ELOISE CREECH 

Miss ANNE MAUGER TAYLOR Miss KATHERINE SKINNER 

Miss ELEANOR VERTRESS WATKINS 

The first performance was given Easter Monday niglit, I\Iarch 31, at the Academ_v 
of Music. The largest audience of the theatrical season was befcjre the foothghts to 
enjoy the performance. The costumes were brilliant, the stage setting hamlsome, 
and the acting clever throughout. 

Below is cast of characters for the Club's first presentation: 

Sir Anthony Absolute Mr. O. MA.\ GARDNER 

Captain Jack Absolute .Mr. .MARTIN EARLEV CARTER 

Bob Acres Mr. CLEVELAND DOUGLASS WELCH 

Sir Lucius O'Trigger Mr. JUNIUS SIDNEY GATES 

Faulkland Mr. LESLIE NOR\V( )( )D BONEY 

Fag AIr. WALTER LEE DARDEN 

David Mr. CHARLES LESTER CREECH 

Thomas Mr. ROBER T BAXTER COCHRAN 

Servant Boy Mr. EDWARD HAYS RICKS 

Lydia Languish Miss DAISY ESTELLE MORING 

Mrs. IMalaprop Miss FLORA ELOISE CREECH 

Julia Miss ANNE MAUGER TAYLOR 

Lucy Miss ELEANOR ^■ERTRESS WATKINS 

After the hearty reception of Easter Monday night the Club spent a most pleasant 
week on the road, pla3ing Henderson, Goldsboro, Durham, Winston-Salem and 
Greensboro. 

The Academy of Music has again been secured for Easter M(.inday night, 1903, 
and the presentation will be, "She Stoops to Conquer," by Dr. Goldsmith. 
Below is the cast: 

Sir Charles Marlow :\Ir. JUNIUS SIDNEY GATES 

Young Marlow Mr. CLEVELAND DOUGLAS WELCH 

Hardcastle Mr. O. MAX GARDNER 

Hastings Mr. WALTER LEE DARDEN 

Tony Lumpkin Mr. EDWARD HAYS RICKS 

Diggory Mr. CHARLES LESTER CREECH 

Roger Mr. LEWIS WINSTON 

Dick Mr. EUGENE CULBRETH 

Stings :\Ir. LESLIE NOR\\'OOD BONEY 

193 



BBBBBB THE AGROMECK g^^^g^ 

■^'''"^' I Mr. CHARLES MARTIN 

Icrcniy ) 

Mrs. Hardcasilc Miss :\IARGARK'1T TRAPIER 

Miss Neville Miss HELEN' PRIMROSE 

Miss Hardcastle Miss CLAIRE .STAINBACK 

The following are the oflieers and nieinbers of the Club for season 1902-03: 

OFFICERS 

Prksidext C. D. WELCH 

Vick-Pkksidknt W. L. DARDEN 

Sf.cret.vry O. :\IAX CARDNER 

BusiNKSS ;\Iax,\(;er .\M) Dirkctor Dr. CHARLES W.M. BURKEIT 

MEMBERS 

L. N. PONEV j. S, CATES C.L.CREECH 

E. E. CULBRETH W. L. DARDEN O. M. (lARDNER 

1. B. HARDIN(; B. V. HUCiGINS H. M. HUNTER 

C. \V. MARTIN E. II. RICKS C. D. WELCH 

L. T. WINST(3N 

HONORARY MEMBERS 

Prof. C. W. BURKETT .Mrs. C. \\\ liLKKP.rr xMiss CLAIRE .STAINB.VCK 

Miss MARGARETT TRAPIER Miss HELEN PRIMROSE 



fJ^M^ ^^BA t 



w 



194 



H 
X 

3 

w 
S 
ffl 

R 
m 
O 

a: 



> 

s 

> 

71 




THE AGROMECK 



"The Goats" 



MOTTO 
" Wlien we butt, we butt liard, 
But -ve never l)ntt a pard." 

YELL 
Three bleats and two Initts. 



COLORS 

(Tonrd green and kidder brown. 



T 



HERE was created within the A. it i\I. College, un the night of Xovember 6, 
iy02, an ini])(;irtant and reputable order known as (loathond. This order 
was established lor the purpose of maintaining true nianlnjod, \irtue and 
integrit_v. 

These quadrupeds, although very vicious, and with marked peculiarities, do not 
intend to oiipose their brother orders, the Elks and Buflaloes, but to co-operate with 
them in their various work. Those who have so far been inducted into the masteries 
ofGoathood are as follows: C. D. Welch, better known as Dor, or ("irand -Master KiU. 
Like the billy goat, he will butt very furiously when made angry. U i\Iax Gardner, 
better known as Omega, or Chief Ram. Like the gorilla, he is especially fond of 
caressing women. L. N. Boney, better kni;wn as .Vlplia, or Senic.)r Ram. This is a 
very delicate animal, and hibernates most of his time. C. L. Creech, better known 
as Sigma, or Junior Ram. This animal has a smirk on his face as if he snielled 
something odious. E. H. Ricks, better known as Gama, or Little Billy, is very 
troublesome and annoying, and is especially averse to artificial comforts of life, such 
as steam, etc. \V. L. Darden, W. Clark, and E. E. Culbreth are the youngest of our 
tribe. They belong each to a species hitherto unknown. This trio alone wnuld 
make a chamber of horrors justly famous the world over. 

Tliere are a great many orders of Goathood in the various universities anil colleges, 
llenci-. where an order of this kind is established, there is a gain of respect antl moral 
rectitude. Eurther, a true sjjirit of union is develped and cultivated among members 
of a like organization. The sacred obligations which bind the members to this order 
arc observed by us with the greatest fulelity. Each member considers the honor of 
this ancient order his own, and cherishes it not oidy as precious, but as sacred. 



,98 





1 ^^^^^^^^^^hI* l^^tfsw^ j^y^^^^^^^^^Bp ^^p^ 




TiA<4f|^^^^^^^^H^^^^^^HH^^^^^F .^^m^^^^^^^^BK '^-' ^j ^^^ '"^kv 


I^^^^^^^^^^PII^H^^^^HHI^^' \Ji-~ ^^Kk^- 






1 ^:a^fe.,^ 




t-J""*€*"'" -^ 


^»^-«k.'.J--LiJi* 


M^^i'^ _ .^ii^aiifcj 


IL^r*^"^'pii" ' 







^m^^M THE AGROMECK m^^^B. 




Order of Lion's Head 



RULERS 



s. c. c'()K\\vi:ij I 

E. E. ETHERIDGK II 

I.. A. XKAI 



KOHEKSOX Ill 

!•■. DlGfiS IV 

V 



MEMBERS 

A. DR'KSON K. k. STAMPS S. 1). WAI.I. I.. C. I.VKF.S 

(;. \V. ROCKkS W. F. KIRKI'ATRICK I.. M. ll()i'l''MAN 

COLORS 

Olive Crcin uiid Old (".dd. 

20? 



THE AGROMECK 






Electrical Engineering Society 

»$» 

OFFICERS 

President J. D. FERGUSON 

Vice-President i:. S. LVTCH 

Secretary K. E. KTl 1 KRI DOE 

Treasurer J. M. >PARKKR 

MEMBERS 

DR. F. A. WIEHE, \V. K. KIRKPATRICK. O. P. IIAMIETON, 

PROF. H. C. WALTER, I). S. OWEN, II. I,. IIA.AIILTON, 

E. f:. culbreth, o. w. rogers, w. w. hanks, 

T. T. ELLIS, W]\L CHA:\IBER,S, PL I\L LILLY, 

L. GIDNEV, R. E. CRUMPLER, J. C. :\IYR1CK, 

E. GUNTER, E. B. FOWLER, L. R. III. LET, 

F. W. WHITE. 

The Electrical Engineering Society is a ('ullege organization, ciinipi>sed of the 
students of the Electrical Engineering Course. It comprises men IVnin every class in 
College, but the Seniors are largely in the majority. 

The Society was formed in Sejitember, 1902, the initial ste])s having been taken 
by a few .Seniors, aided by Professors Weihe and Walter. 

The object is to promote the welfare of the " FLlectricals "' and to keep in touch 
with the rapid progress being made in electricit)'. 

Meetings are held every alternate Thursday night in the rooms of the Societ}-. 
These rooms are furnished with an extensive librar)-, together with all tlie current 
electrical magazines and papers. 

At the meetings papers arc read on interesting subjects, lectures on tlie latest 
inventions given, and explanations made. 

Much interest is manifested, and everyone works ti> maki.' the uiertings not onlv 
bright and interesting, but instructive 



204 



^^^^m THE AGROMECK ^^^^M 



Society of Civil Engineers 

OFFICERS 

President S. C. CORNWELL 

1ST Vice-President |. ']". LAND 

2ND Vice-President K. K. LINCOLN 

Secretary L. A. NEAL 

Treasurer C. V. SIRADLE V 

Librarian H. G. CARR 

C'ORKESPONDINC Secketakv E. (). PORTP^R 

Historian B. LAND, Jr 

MEMBERS 

S. C. C'URXWKLL H. G. t'ARR P. F. DARDEN 

A. T. KENVON B. LAND, Jk J. T. LAND 

J. J. MORRIS E. (;. PORTER G. V. STRADLEV 

E, E. LINC(.)LN J. K. WAITI' L. A. NEAL 

T. A. THORN r(.>N 



2Ci' 






^0 a. ^ ni>. 

I. 

It is with regret that we go out from your walls, 
And leave behind these scenes we love so well; 

And in years to come when memory recalls, 
Our hearts with pride and gladness will swell. 

II. 

As we think of the good, good times we"vc had, 
And of the ditliculties we've had to iight: 

But it matters not whether good or bad. 

We'll e'er be true to our '' Red and White." 

III. 

We'll miss, oh ! we'll miss it all. 

The teachers ami boys and afternoon drills. 
In the early morn the bugle's call. 

And the I ell that at night the noisiness stills. 

IV. 
And we hope some day in years to come — 

As we hope to attain that priceless gem — 
To all unite at this our hone, 

The ever-dear College of A. and M. 

V. 

But now has come the time for us to leave, 
And while sad our souls and dim our sight, 

We'll suppress the sigh we want to heave, 
.\nd sing " Forever live the Red and White ! " 



io6 



THE AGROMECK 



Raleigh Club 

COLORS 

Old G,,ld and \"iolet. 



President. . . . 
Vice-President. 
Secretary. . . . 

Treasurer 

Censor 



..G. \V. ROGERS 

. . .E. R. STAMPS 

..W. CLARK, Jr 

. ..J. McKIMMON 

II. F. PRLAIROSE 



J. G. ASHE 
W. MORSON 



MEMBERS 

E. C. BAGWELL 
L. M. PARKER 



J. P. ROSE 



J. P. GULLEY 
j. A. PARK 
K. WAITT 



207 






THE AGROMECK 



^M^^^ 



Mecklenburg Union 



«"fr> 



MOTTO 

"Notliiiif,' vcntunil. nnihiiiLC naim-d. 

RENDEZVOUS 

I'antrv, Iiaker\-, and Store-rnDii). 



FLOWER 

Fcuir uclMck (A. M.) 

COLORS 

liloo.i Red and foal Black. 



YELL 

]!i)umcr-lacka! Hoonicr-lacka! Hhw-wcjw-wow! 
C'hickcr-lacka! Chickcr-lac kal C'how-i hiiw-chnwl 
Hoomcr-lacka! Chickcr-lacka! \\'lioo])-sah-turLj! 
All of us boys are from I\Iecklenburg. 

OFFICERS 

Lord High Conspirator \V. F. KIRKPATRICK 

Stealthy PrKLOixKK of Pies C ki. ROSS 

Grand Recorder ok Schemes W. SH AXXONHOUSF, 

F'.xPEKr Rei'lemsher of Maifkiai. W. W. KAXKIX 



MEMBERS 



"i\l-l- K.O'<REt^T ' ASIUKY 

"Happy Fei-low" CHRErrzi!ER(; 
" R.i'RAi. Postmaster" Gihdon 
" C"-^"^''' M-^^' Mamii.ton 
" G'Ki- Pki}ifcior" Hamilton 
■•Jroiciors HvDKoPArHisT " Helvix 

" 'W^ARY Fi'IGNEk" KiKKPAIRICK 

" '^V"'''i G'^iK Knox 



■ Si'i'ArK Ni'^sjiov" Knox 
' M-\'-n.iors Pu.ffrfk" I.ipe 

' W^EARY W'l'"'' KaNKIN 

'Cotillion fiov " Ross 

' 'Wl^ONCDOEK " ShANNONHOLSE 

•Jolly Haiserdasher " Siueord 
' "WisriTi. 'W'l'^HEK " W'a I r 
'y\i])Aciors Cork I KK " Wilkinson 



208 



THE AGROMECK 






Jfair Init Jfalsc 

" Have you forgotten" — soft I spoke, 
"That night three years ago — 

1 coaxed you for a lock of hair ? " 
"Forgotten it? oh, no!" 

" It was a lovely curl that played 

About your forehead fair; 
1 have treasured it through all these }ears- 

That little lock of hair." 

"Thro' all these years I've kept it in 

A pocket of my vest." 
"You really have kept it.? so have I; 

That is, I've kept the rest." 



<^tfl 



ZCo ni>^ pipe 

Meerschaum, Meerschaum, 

Born of the sea, 
Dearest of all things, 

Thou art to me. 

Comrade, companion. 

Better than shrine; 
Thoughts leap from my heart 

As smoke comes from thine. 

Meerschaum, ^Meerschaum, 

Aid to reflection, 
Dissolve all nn' lilues, 

keninve niv dejection. 



210 



An KMQ. 

A\VvVva\)cl. 



JOHN A. PftRK — '05. 



^^^^^^ THE AGROMECK ^^^^M. 




A is f'li ALPHABET, 
Which niiw wj hcf^in, 

To fathnm its contents, 
T(i Innl what we've bcc-n. 




B i> !'"■ tlic BUGLE, 
That wc iiiar every ihi\ : 

As it calls us t<i ilut}', 
And calls us awa\-. 



212 



^^^^m THE AGROMECK ^^^^ 

^"^ — o O 

»«. MR. CULBRtTK — i I» T / * 

OurtEJ\«FUl.l.-t CUTt. " \ \ / / / «. 




C i> for the CENIOR, 

\\'hi> on the fence sat, 
Flirting with the girls 
When down he fell flat. 



^^..^.^^^^^^^^M 



D stands for DINNER, 

Xo one will (I. iiiht, 
That our friend. .Mr. ."^kinner 

Will alwa\s win out. 



D 



.\. i*>: M. College. . . Boarding Dept. 
^ MENU ^ 

DINNER 
A. i.^- yi. ^Mixture 

Billings' Conglomeration 

Waterproof KXO Biscuits 
Sight {.') Bread 
llani.'^kin Beef Bones 

Fried Rawhide Pithy Pickles 

Tomato Peeling .Soup 
Acidulated Jelly Prune .Seeds 

^Mince Pie (a la Junk-shop 
Ice Cream 1 
(once a year) 



2'3 



"^^^^^^^^ THE AGROMECK ^^^^^^^' 



E >.taiuls foi EDITORS, 

From lust sub tn chief; 
Aijainst Learning's back- 
ground 
Thcv stand out in rrbcf. 




F is for the FARMERS, 

VVlu) sa\' Farming's a lai^e, 
Ant! they'll F^n'u no incjre 
For no man's salse. 



214 



^^^©^' THE AGROMECK ^^^^ 




G is for GOATS, 

An order of Fame; 
Which well illustrates 
What's in a name. 



H must stand for HEAT, 
Say we who have to freeze, 

Oh, words are incomplete; 
We shiver and gasp and 
sneeze. 







TVlcuui^ n03. 









I 









J is for JUNE, 

The best incinth in tlic \'car; 
It can't come too soon, 
How \vc wish it were here. 



I is ffM- INCIDENTAL, 

Whicii l<_rni we KikI, 
To wiiat is uncounted 
Of money we spend. 




210 



THE AGROMECK R^^^^^ 



K stand.-; for K O W- 
PUNCHERS, 

A variegated band, 
Where did the)- come from. 
Where in the land? 




L is for LATE 

Kver to be in a hurrv, 

Arc some doomed by fate 

Ever to be in a flurrw 






THE AGROMECK 







O stands for OFFICERS, 
Always on the watch 

To see all misdeeci, 

And report all they kutch. 



M IS for MAJOR, 

The chief of our clan. 
With students and ladies 
A popular Man. 






1 LI L 

^ ■ - ■>. — i— 


Li 


, P . .. — =. 



2I« 






THE 



AGROMECK ^^^^g 



Ik re's P lor PIE 

That the boys all Pull; 
They like it, you see. 

Until thev are ful 




Q is for QUIZ, 

Though they're simple, 'ti 
true; 
How we fail! Gee Whiz! 
Nearly all fall through. 



F '" f^^k»i:^% 



^^^^^ THE AGROMECK ^ 




R is r..r RAT, 

Who fears tu wear citz, 
But wears a straw hat, 

W'itli iinifnrin to tit (?) 



S is the College SEAL, 
As a Scii'"' conceives it; 

When he nightl\- (hnh kneel, 
Let us hope he ri-ceives it. 




220 






^^ THE AGROMECK ^^^^M 



T is I. ,1 TOM, 
A very great gun; 

The hearts of the fair 
He ever has won. 




Here's to our VARSITY, 
Whose playinLj so fine 

Kept Carolina 

From crossinsr our line. 



»^^^ THE AGROMECK ^M^^ 



W is foiWEIHE; 

He has uontkirul store 
()!' I'.lectricity and Physics. 

I 111- stiulcnts til liiiic. 





X IS InrXMAS, 

That we crowd and cram 
i( ir, 
Ikit if we guess right 

\W- don't cart^' — anything 
about. 



Z22 



^^^^m THE AGROMECK ^^^^M 



Y i^ r. .1- YELL, 

A hi )H"ililr >■ iiiiui. 
In its <i\\ n iii\>tie spull 
All ■■ iiMili i> " art- 1h luiiil. 




ONE-TV(0-THREE-FOUR 

THREE-TWCK)NE-F0URII 
WHOINTHEH'LWf FOR? 



Y 




Z i> f"! ZERO, 

A \x-r\- warm grade; 
Needless t<i sa\', it tlirows 
All either marks Iti the 
shade. 



THE AGROMECK '^^^^^^' 



^:^gfciCS^SgS^si^>. 



A French Flirt 



HV. fuiii uf Norman, Sttiin-rt & Co. wl-ic doing business in New York and 
Paris. Being intimatel_v connected with tliis firm, and understanding its 
business affairs thoroughly, it once fell to my lot to make a trip to Paris. 
Having perfected every detail of my arrangements, I hurried down to the 
dock and took boat for Calais. When only a few hours out of New York, I was 
leaning against the rail watching a beautiful sunset, when I heard a sudden rustle of 
skirts. On looking around, my eyes fell upon a very striking form. The girl so pure, 
so simple, and yet so beautiful, also leaned against the rail and dreamily watched the 
sunlight die away in the western sky. The darkness was gathering fast and the air 
was damp and chilly. I noticed that she shivered and, presently, when our eyes met, 
I took occasion to ask, "Is it not too cool for you to be here.?" She replied with a 
sweet smile, but didn't seem to understand my words. A second look told me she 
was no American girl. Then she spoke — a sweeter voice I had never heard, and never 
shall I forget how I felt that moment — but her words were as much a mystery to me 
as mine had been to her, for I knew not a word of French. Then and there I cursed 
myself for not having studied that " romantic " language when a boy. We turned 
and walked together, however, across the deck and she went below. I saw her no 
more that night. Whether from sea-sickness or some other sort of sickness, I cannot 
say — the fact is, 1 slept but little that night. 1 could only think of this 

" Phantom of delight 
When first she Rlea"iefl ui>oii mv sight." 

We met often on deck, but rarely succeeded in exchanging more than smiles and 
glances and warm luiiul-clasps. Verily, we were loving under difliculties. 

We landed. .My business was urgent. I took the very first train IVm' Paris, 
scarcely believing that I would ever see my little l'"rench sweetheart again. 

The ne.\t morning I had settled my aflairs and thought to take a stroll down one 
of the principal streets of the city. When I had walked but two blocks, I came face 
to face with this lovely girl whom I had known so lateh', and whom 1 immediately 
recognized. She halted we with an afiable " Com me vans poiiez-vons?" which I 
a'tewards learned was the French for • ' good morning, " or ' ' how do you do .'' " She then 
began what seemed to be a most pleasant conversation, but since I understood not a 
word, I tore off the back of an envelope, which I handed her. at the same time giving 
her my pencil. She knew at once what I wanted, so wrote a couple of lines, handed 
it to me and passed on. My first impulse was to follow her: then I thought that 
would be foolish. 

Dear reader, you can never know how eager ' was to learu what was written upon 

224 



THE AGROMECK ^S^^^^ 



/irs^ir^^rs-jzrsyiaygy xxxj^ r^\jr\.vyivii:^\^xv T^^^^ 



that piece of paper. I hastened to my hotel, walked straight up to the clerk, and 
said, "Will y(ju please tell me the English i>f this?" '-Why, certain!)-," he replied, 
and took the bit of paj)er. His face took on a hard, stern hiok, as he said, 
" Excuse me a minute, but I must see the proprietor." In a few minutes he returned 
with an angry-looking old gentleman, who seemed greatly e.xcited. This old man 
passed over my paper to me, and, with his stick drawn as if ready to strike me at an\- 
moment, said, " Get out of this hotel; I have already ordered your trunks sent down." 
I hesitated for a moment, but the propritor was determined; so I took mv leave at 
once, and started to another hotel. 

Before registering, I thought to learn the contents of my note. I handed it to 
the clerk again, who in turn handed it to the proprietor. He asked me where I 
obtained the note. I replied, "That's my business; will vou kindly tell me what is 
written there.'" " Xo, confound you, get out of this house." I turned and walked 
away, with my curiosity at its height and wondering what was upon this bit of paper 
that should cause me such great inconvenience. 

I went to a third hotel and registered, but had decided to try to get some one else 
to translate this piece of French, and not depend upon a hotel clerk. I took a car 
and reached my firm's office in the shortest possible time, the same office I had left 
only a few hours before. I found JNIr. Norman alone, and immediatelv told him my 
business. He took the note rather carelessly, but his face soon flushed, and when 
he had finished, he said, witli an ciath, " Perhaps JMr. Steinert may wish to retain you 
with the firm in America, but our business connections in Paris must be severed at 
once." I returned to my hotel mystified. I secured my baggage and started for New 
York by the next vessel. Since I was aboard a French ship, I dared not show this 
piece of worn envelope which was worrying the very life out of me, for fear of being 
thrown overboard. 

On landing in New York, I hastened to my partner's ofltce and rushed in. He 
expressed some surprise at my early return; but without answering any of his questions, 
I brought out my note for him to read. In a firm but gentlemanly manner he said: 
" See here, we have been partners for more than ten years — today these relations must 
cease to exist; our affairs will be settled through our respective attorneys." 

Sad, dejected, melancholy, I went to my home determined to tell my wife all, to 
beg her forgiveness if I had wronged her. I showed her the bit of paper. .She threw 
up her arms and fainted. With a doctor's aid she soon regained consciousness, 
whereupon she telejihoned for a cab, and wired her mother that she was coming home 
on the evening train. I cursed the fate that brought me into the life of this little French 
flirt. 

Although heartbroken, I was resolved to make one last effort to learn what was on 
this piece of paper, which made strangers, partners in business, friends, and even 
loved ones, turn away from me in scorn. I had a friend, an old school chum, in 
Washington, who was a splendid French scholar. He had often told me that I would 

225 






THE AGROMECK 



SI line il;n n-j^^rct not liavini,'- stiuiicil tliis bciiuliful lan,Li;iiage. 'riiiit time luul cdiiic. 

As Sdiin as I rcaclu-d tin- Capital eit\, I li)okt-il u]i my fiiiiul, Imt i.iuld scarcrly 
tell him m\ sti>rv, so gn-at was m_\' fxcitenifiit. Finally, 1 slaiiinuiiHl ■■ut, "(•Id 
liii\', I (hin't want tn slcrj) with \ • ui ; 1 (hint want tu Imnow any nnMuy; 1 ch. n't care 
if you ni:ver speak ti> mt' again alter 1 slu>w \(ui this htlcr; luit 1 want )iin to swear 
l)v the gods, by the eternal friendship we pledged eat h oihir when we wereliovs, that 
you will tell me what is written on the piece (if |iapei- 1 have in ni\ poeUit." I\Iy 
frieiul promised. 1 reacheti into m\' pocket — then I thought he might do like all the 
others — sol made him swear over and over again that he would tell me. Satisfied 
with his promise, I reached int(i my pocket: again I hesitated; 1 felt again, and, hehold, 
1 had lost the ]iaper! 



226 



^^^^^^ THE AGROMECK ^^^^B. 



SPURRED AGAIN 

«$> 

'I soiiK'timcs wish my dignity ilitln't keep iiu- fniiii swearing;." — Old T.ndy Glenn. 

" Knowest thmi not nic, the deep voice cried." — Poivers. 

"To what classic heights do some attain.^" — Ross. 

"O! Jove, in the ne.xt commodity of hair send me a beard." — fMml. B. 

"Friends, Professors and Janitors, 1 am no ordinary man.'' — Simpson. 

"I have an immortal longing within me." — Dardcn. 

"A little learning is a dangerous thicg: 

Drink deep, or tiiste not the Pierian siirinR." 

— Wliiling. 

" He, born for the univei-so, narrowed his mind, 
And to politics gave w hat was meant for mankind." 

—Clark. 

"The ladies call him sweet." — Land, J. T. 

" The lleeoe that has been by the dyer stained, 
Kever again its native whiteness gained." 

— Parker. 

" Fa\ors to none, to all he smiles extends." — Slradlcv. 

Pro/ci.ior — "What were Dryilen's two principal characteristics as a poet.'" 
I\Iorn's — " L'allegro and II Penseroso." 

Grammatically speaking, goats lay too much stress on the conjunction — butt. 

" A visitor from Virginia thought A. & M. was very queer; 
Said he, ' As far as I can make out. yon have no tutors here 
1 answered liini severely, ' 1 wfiuld have you understand. 
We have loolers here a plenty; Ihey are members of the band.' 



-Huggins. 



• A student named Stradley, whom all of you know, 
Had a iihcitoKr.iph taken a short time ayo : 
When be looked at the proof, he denouneed it as ratik, 
lieeause it displayed too much of the crank." 

" You would ki^s me, would you? 
No, you eaniu>t, for last 
Week you left me, and I 
Kound you living with another; 
Yet I will forgive you. 
But you cannot kiss me — 
You run away— (my dog)." 

— Land. 

228 




?rof. Did 

toots kis 
own horn-. 




RUNNING AN ENGINE 



k DAVIDSON- 5 k 





A MIDNIGHT JAG 



<^^^^^^^^^ -pup APrRnMFrK' ^^^^^^ 



Gene's llOeal Girl 
M\- ideal girl nuist have a plump, symmetrical form like Digg's, a sweet, child- 
like face like Stamp's, a melodious voice like Carpenter's, a massive intellect like 
Kennedy's, delicate feet like Gidney's, a temper like Gunter's, a lively disposition like 
(jlenn's, a veracity like Creech's, an on-time record equal to Boney's, hair like Clark's, 
a smile like Stradley's, and a gracefulness like Whiting's. 

Dr. WittsUm to Ihc class — " Who was the greatest orator among the Greeks ? " 
Whiting {kii(i~i'iii;^/v) — " Cicero. " 

Professor Hill on Englisii — ".Sonnliodv has made Bonev a Senior; therefore, let 
him jiass for one. 

Franklin — "Do — er — cr — er — you th — th — th — think it wouhl do m — m — m — me 
any good to t — t — t — take those lessons.' " 

Ashury, O. K., (who had been taking lessons for stammering): "Why, cer — cer — 

certainly ! er — cr — cr you s — s — s — see its al — al — al — almost! 

cured me. " 

To the Librarian from a "ral" in l/ii- Ilospilal — "I am sick in hed: pic.ise send 
me 'Three Musty Tears. '" 

"If to Ills sliare some trivial errors fall. 
Lonk on his f.vce. and you'll forget them all.' 

— Ciiljlsli As/ir. 



Neal Id Phelps— 



' Hut fiee how oft' ainliitious aims are crossed, 
Anti CHiKK.s eonteiid till all the prize is lojt ! " 



•■Truth from his lips prevailed with doiilile swaw — Crcrch. 



•' Lives of 'Owens' all remiii'l us. 
We can make our lives sublime; 
And. l>y lioastiiiK, leave behind us. 
Footprints cm the sands of time. ' '" 

* Ve friends t(t truth, ye players w ho survey. 
An opi>oiU'nl's eards increase, and mine decay ; 
*Tis yours to judse how wide the limits stand 
Between a splendid and a winninR hand " 

— Elheridse. 



230 








OUR STRENUOUS PROF. BURKETT 



RADIANT ENERGY 






1 



V^. ' "' ^ \ 



BEAVERS GAINING EXPERIENCE 




HOW PASCHAL REPAIRS A 
BROKEN GLASS 



QEffl 









33 



GENTLE MINISTRATIONS 



^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



THE AGROMECK 



It Is Really Amusing 



ffn 



To hear F. Phelps whistle. 

To see Stradley smile. 

To see Joel Powers dance. 

To hear Bundy tell a lie. 

To see Darden on the stage. 

To .see "Tom" Diggs blush. 

To see Kthcridge get "hot." 

To hear Asbury, O. K., try to talk. 

To listen to Professor Hill's jokes. 

To view Bennett Land's aged whiskers. 

To hear Gunter and Gidneysing "Bill 
Baily." 

To see Cilllireth trying to hecome an 
actor. 

To hear Darden, P. F. , exjilain the 
"slide-rule" theory. 

To see little Higgs and O. Max boxing. 

To read one of John T. Land's love 
letters. 

To see Paschal ingulFcd in the smoke 
of a " C'ubanola. " 

To know where jack White took his 
sword. 

To .see the V. M. C. A. President 
leading the final ball. 

To hear "Drag-leg" McC'anless try 
to tell an interesting joke. 

To hear Dr. W'eilie tr}- to explain 
something to a class. 



To hear Owen 
swell time he had. 



)lr)w " abfiut what a 



To take a long, lingering look at 
Kennedy — a "Senior Relic." 

To watch the "rats" and " cow- 
punchers " eat mess-hall hash. 

To see " Logger-head " Ellis and a bar 
of soap headed for the bath-room. 

To see Charlie Ross try to make the 
football and baseball teams. 

To read Whiting's stories about "the 
rich, rare, racy, russet robes of beauty." 

To hear John S. P. C. 'phone to 
three-onc-two, and tlun laugh untiringh' 
and forever. 

To see Captain Ferguson take in sucl\ 
friends as ".'^chlitz," "Wilson," "Old 
Henry," "Paul lones, "etc. 

To see ".'^muck " matching for car 
fare and then arguing the sin therein — in 
case he loses. 

To hear ■■ Prof. ' Sam .\sbury discuss 
before the Leazar Society the problems 
of plutocracy, aristocracy, democracy, 
mobacracy, etc. 

'Po .see a St. fthiry girl's expression on 
being introduced first to Boddir, then 
Pavne, Dv<.: and Collin. 



2_'2 



THE AGROMECK ^^^^M. 



Some of the Newest Books 



'■CLOG DANCING," by Edward II. Ricks. 

This book is fully illustrated and extremely interesting, especialh' when one 
has the honor of the author's acquaintance. 

"STORY OF A PIOUS LIFE," by J. J. Morris. 

In this little work of three volumes, the writer gives his personal experiences, 
and points out the vices and temptations which are likely to beset a college 
youth. 

•'VANITY -M. LYING," by O. M. Gardner and Charles L. Creech. 

These comparatively young writers have made quite a hit in this their first 
publication. 

"GOLDEN SUN RAYS AND SILVERY MOONBEAMS," by E. S. Whiting. 
Five volumes, half leather. 
Note — This book is of little interest and of no real value. 

"WHY I FAILED ON CALCULUS," by the "late" Mr. Simpson. 
Twelve volumes, cloth bound A sad story well told. 

"THE REASON," a companion-piece to the above, by Professor Riddick. 
A pamphlet of only two pages, very short and concise. 

"WHAT BECAME OF THE PIES," by Archie Brown and Lewis Winston. 

This book fully clears up the great pantry njbbery, the deepest m}'sterv in the 
history of the College. 

"WHO STOLE THE BELL," by "Kid" Smith and Sterling Gravdon. 

This detective story is rivalled only by Conan D(jyle's "Sherlock Holmes." A 
free copy was sent to the Commandant. 

"CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATIONS," by E E. Etheridge and J. H. Parker. 

Although a greater part of this work is devoted to Architectural Drawing, the 
authors digress long enough to tell their experiences in the Philippines. 

"HOW TO SELECT CHRISTMAS PRESENTS," by L. A. Neal. 

This very useful b(ji:)k has had an enormous sale. For references as to its merit, 
inquire of certain young ladies in Raleigh. .Marion, N. C, Rock Hill, S. C. 
Aiken, S. C. , and Knoxville, Tenn. 

233 



THE AGROMECK 






IN ARRKST AND CONFINEMENT,' by Eov Romkksox. witli ininHlu..ti..n l.y 
Caitain Phelps. 

The author also acknii\vli-ilj,as the inxalu.ilih- aid received frmn Hunter, liroun, 
Koon and others. 

^TREATISE ON RELIGIOUS THEORIES," by KiRKP.vrRiCK. 

This treatise is noted for its compact and .syllogistic arguments (.•'); for its 
convincing and logical conclusions (.^): noted more, however, for making readers 
wonder if Hell is not more bearable than nothingness. 

'POPULARITY AT FEMALE SCHOOLS, "by Gaston RocKKsand En Roe Stamps. 
The knowledge anil experience gained by the gentlemen at St. ^Mar\'s. \\. F. 
U., and Peace, are enough to guarantee satisfaction to any buyer. 

'HOW TO MAKE LOVE," by J. F. Diggs. 

This entirely new (.>') science is well developed by the author, who has fdled 
his volumes with something so infatuating that one cannot but admire the work 
and love the writer. 

' ISQUINOMICAL DEMONSIBILITIES," by S. C. Cornwell. 
Four volumes, half leather, gilt edges. 
Note — The first three volumes are taken uji in an elTort to ex])Iain the title. 




234 



THE AGROMECK ^^^^^^^ 



a Mor^ for the jfrcsbnicn 

"Speak one little word to me," he cried, 
And the beauty clasped her hands; 

"Speak but one, one little word, my love. 
And I will understand." 

" I ask of you no sweet caress, 

As of lovers when they part; 
I am, for all, content to wait; 

Speak but one word, dear heart." 

His mortar board he doffed and said, 
"My soul rests its faith in thee; 

It asks no solemn pledge of love. 
Speak but one word to me." 

"Speak! speak!!" he cried, "and yet there is 

In my breast wild pit-a-pat " — 
The beauty looked into his eyes. 

And softly whispered, "Rats." 



2^5 



THE AGROMECK 



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THE AGROMECK 



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^ CONTENTS ^ 



ii"iii0*«iii ipiiiiwi •iinnii»'Nifiii"iiiwi""ip m piiiiiiiHiii'iiBii iBiiiiiimriiiiiiBiiiiiiiii niniiiinjiiiniiif iitiNi«ir|fi»'«iwiwifii«"iwi""ip"™ipiii"i(iilr ' 

mm ilIlD 'illl ililt llllln iillUllmilLlll llllliNifLlil ij llll limiliiinlLJI ^Hi ,illlil|liiiMlI] Ullf IJlljIiiiilLllljIi^ .lUil 1^11 Ullt ^ UJ till iHf ill ' 





Front is^piece 

Dedication 

George Tayloe Winston, A. M., LL. D. 
Preface 



PAGE 

. 1 

4 

. 7 

9 

The Agromeck Board 10 

Greeting 13 

College Calendar 14 

Symposium on the A. M. C 15 

Board of Trustees 25 

Board of Visitors 26 

Agricultural Experiment Station 26 

Faculty 27 

In Memoriam 35 

The Alumni Association 36 

Class of '03 38 

Senior History 39 

With the Class of '03 (Poem) 42 

Class Statistics 43 

Class Prophecy ( Poem ) 63 

Junior Class 68 

Junior History 69 

Class of '05 73 

Sophomore History 74 

Why I Love You (Poem) 76 

Freshman Class 79 

Freshman History 80 

A Tale of the Civil War 85 

Military Department 89 

Commandant's Staff 92 

Company A 96 

Company D 100 

Company B 104 

Company C 108 

Company E 112 

Company F 116 

Band 120 

A Fable 130 

Agriculture 133 

Mechanical Department 134 

A Student's Toil (Poem) 137 



PAGE 

The Electrics 138 

The Civils 141 

Textile Department 142 

Chemical Department 144 

Football 146 

The Varsity Football Team 150 

Baseball 156 

A Short Vacation 158 

Tennis Club 160 

Red and White 162 

Y. M. C. A 163 

A Senior Recitation 165 

The Leazar Literary Society 167 

Program Debate, May '02 168 

Program, February '03 170 

Pullen Literary Society 173 

Election Returns 175 

From the Heart of a Liar 177 

Thalerian German Club 182 

Biological Club 184 

Rural Science Club 186 

Liebeg Chemical Society 188 

The A. & M. College Dramatic Club 192 

The Goats 198 

Order of Lion's Head 202 

Electrical Engineering Society 204 

Society of Civil Engineers 205 

To A. & M. (Poem) 206 

Raleigh Club 207 

Mecklenburg Union 208 

Fair but False (Poem) 210 

To My Pipe (Poem) 210 

An A. M. C. Alphabet 212 

A French Flirt 224 

Spurred Again 228 

It is Really Amusing 232 

Some of the Newest Books 233 

A Word for the Freshmen (Poem) 235 

Senior Table 236 

Advertisements. 



Books and Stationery 



FOR T H E 



A. and M. College 



COMPLETE LINE 

CULBRETH and PARPEN 

AGENTS 



ALFRED WILLIAMS & CD'S 



COMPLETE LINE OF 



BOOKS AND STATIO.XLRY 

RALEIGH , North Carolina 



WE SUPPLY WHATEVER IS 

WANTED ;n books and 
STATIONERY 

ORDERS GIVEN PROMPT 
ATTENTION 







HUNTER BROS. &B REIVER 



$3.50 



Specials Worth $j.oo 



ALL STYLES 
and LEATHERS 



POPULAR 
PRICES 



RELIABLE 
GOODS 




DEALERS IN 



Mens AND BOYS" 

CLOTHING 

SHOES, TRUNKS. 
HATS AND FURNISHING GOODS 



OUR PRICES ARE RIGHT 
CALL AND SEE US 



10 E. MARTIN ST . RALEIGH. N. C. 



FINE 
SHOES 



WHEN YOU WANT THE BEST 
SHOES AT THE LEAST PRICE. 
WE HAVE THEM IN MORE OF THE 
LATEST STYLES THAN ANY 
HOUSE IN RALEIGH. I 1 : 



S. C. POOLE 



FAYETTEVILLE STREET 



JOS. G. BROWN. PRESIDENT 



HENRY E. LITCHFORD. CASHIER 



The Citizens 
National Bank 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



l^n 



CAPITAL . , . . 


S 100.000.00 


Profits 


75.000.00 


DEPOSITS . . . . 


750.000.00 


TOTAL Resources . 


1,000.000.00 



SAFETY DEPOSIT BOXES FOR RENT- 



Barrett & Thompson 
ARCHITECTS 



RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



^ 



ORIGINAL AND CORRECT IN 
PLANNING ca, DESIGNING 

Accurate Estimating Efficient Supervision 



^ 



Results Justify these Statements 



With a skylight and camera, almost any- 
one can make a photograph, but if you 
want an ARTISTIC PHOTOGRAPH go to 




DARNELL'S Gallery 

FAYETTEVILLE STREET 



Thomas H. Briggs 
CBi, Sons 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Hardware 

SAFETY RAZORS 

RAZOR STRAPS 

PAINTS OILS GLASS 

Stoves and Cutlery 

BEST GOODS 
LOWEST PRICES SQUARE DEALINGS 


WHEN IN TOWN VISIT THE 
ONLY CIGAR STORE 

Taylors 
Cigar Store 

WE CARRY 

Everything to Smoke 

AND SHINE YOUR SHOES FREE 
LOOK ME UP 

105 Fayette ville St. 



QUAKER CITY 
UNIFORM CO. 



PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Headquarters for 



nigh=Qrade Uniforms 



Foa 



MILITARY SCHOOLS 

An<l all Mit^ir lflt|uipm«inf.s, siu-ii as Swortis, 
Belts, Caps, Chevrons, Badges, Banners, etc. 

R.egalias for Secret Societies 

Also Uniforms for Police, Fire, Mail 
Carriers, Motormen and Conductors 

FIIiST=CLASS WORK 

MODERATE PRICES 




WHITING BROS. 

I Sole Agents for R.alei§h, North Carolina 

f WRITE FOB SAMPLES AND PRICES 

F'T"P '*lliil* rllllllliilllllt Illlll Illlll .Illll milll Mlllllllii.lllllll lllllll millii.lljll ,llllllri.,illlll»iml[lll lllllli ]l llli„illlll .Illll nllllli.,illlllll,ii,illll illll lA ltll,„,, |iai| ,, iilllllljm 



Commenced Business September 30, 1891 



Commercial and 
Farmers Bank 

OF 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Chartered by the Legislature ol North Carolina 

Deposits, $600,000.00 

Capital paid in Cash, $100,000.00 

Surplus and Profits, net, $50,000.00 



J. J. Thomas, President 

Alf. A. Thompson, V.-Pres B. S. Jerman, Cashier 

H. W.Jackson, Asst Cashier 



DEPOSITORY OF STATE, CITY OF 
RALEIGH AND COUNTY OF WAKE 

Safe Deposit Boxes for Rent 

NO INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS 

SEND YOUR N. C. COLLECTIONS TO US 



Everything in Dry Goods 



THE OLDEST DRY GOODS HOUSE 
IN RALEIGH 



WE SELL 



Shoes 



Dry Goods 

Notions, CS,c. 



In the SHOE DEPARTMENT you will 
find many extremely good values at $2.00, 
$2.50 and $3.00. 



Walter Woollcott 

14 East Martin Street, RALEIGH, N. C. 




HAVE YOUR PICTURES MADE BY 
Raleigh's High Class Photographer 

STUDIO : 

119 J Fayetteville Street 



S. MILNOR PRICE. Prest. FRANK HARRISON. V-Prest. 

H. W. SEABURY. Sec'y and Treas. 



• •• X Xx^ ••• 

Henry WalKe 

Company 

Manufacturers' Agents 
and Dealers in 

Railroad, Steamboat and Mill Supplies 

Machinery for Wood and Iron 
WorKing Plants 

Heavy Hardware, Lubricating Oils, 

ETC. 




286=296 WATER STREET 

WAREHOUSE. 6. 8. 10 and 12 LOYALL'S LANE 

NORFOLK, VIRGINIA 



1 


IN OUR 

DRUG STORE 




Not a single article is misrepre- 
sented, if customers do not know 
what they are buying, we tell 
them, and let them be their own 
judges. 

We handle the purest drugs that 
we are able to obtain in all the 
world, and our i>rioes are the 
lowest consistent w i t li upright 
dealing. Don't you want to trade 
at such a drug store as this? 


M. Rosenthal 
AND Company 


GROCERS 


1 3 6 F A Y IC T T E \ 1 L 1 . E S T K K E T 




Our FOl'NTAIX is the Most Poi.iilar 
one iu tlie City 

CROWELL, McCARTY & CO. 

I'l'-TI l-l IaTE 1)1U-111 ; INT.S 

1 ao F A Y E T T E V I L L E STKEET 


RALEIGH, N. C. 




1 

1 


Carolina Trust Company 

RALEIGH, x\. C. 
CAI'ITAI. ----- sioo.nno.fin 


...THE... 

I. D. RIGGAN 

COMPANY 


OUT OF TOWN BUSINESS SOLICITED 


CHINA, TOYS, CANDY, 
SPORTING GOODS 
AND STATIONERY 

ALWAYS TllK LATEST AND BEST 

Kvei-yliody that trades at Kigjran's find it 

for their own -..'iiod— always the 

best and cheapest. 


(Jknkral Hankini.;— Money receuud un df- 

jKisit. sutijec-l to check. 
SAViNCis Hanking— Interest paid on depos-its. 
Tm'srs— Arts a.^ Kxe<'ulor, AdmiTiistralor, 

Ciiardiaii, Assignee. Ktceiver. Broker. 

A^^etit. Trustee. Assumes the management 

of entire Estates; also i'roi>ert.v for the use 

and benefit of others. 
Financial Agent for floating Stocks and 

Bonds of CortX)ratii)ns. 
Ksjieeial and .^ejiarate arrauiiements anti con- 

\ eiiieliees forgentlemen ami lady cuslumcrs 


OFricEKS— W. \V. Mills. President; Leo. 1>. 
lleartt, V-Prest. and Geii'l .Mgr ; Kobert r.. 
stroiif:. Trust Oflicer and General Counsel ; 
William Hayes, t'ashier. 

II I R kct'oks — .lames Webb, .1. D. RiRiran, 
t;harles li. Hart, Alexan-ier Webb, .lulius 
L.'wis. Leo. n. lleiirll, K. T. Ward, W.W. .Mills, 
Allen J. Rullin, W, c. IVttv, P. K. Albright 
and Kobert C. Strong. 

OllUes in Carolina Trust liuilding, 
Kaleiou, N, C. 

( 'orrespondenee solicited. 


lUK J. D. KKiCi.W CU.Ml'.WV 

\S2 Fayetteville Street 
KALEKill : : XOKTII OAKOLIXA 


1 



WE CARRY A FULL LINE OF 

STATIONERY and SCHOOL SUPPLIES 

SEE OUR AGENT AT THE COLLEGE 



WE APPRECIATE YOUR TRADE 

BAPTIST BOOK STORE 

RALEIGH', N. C. 



F. 


M. STRONACH, President R. P. HERVEY. Treasurer 






. . .THE . . . 




w 


. c. 


Stronach's sons 
GROCERS 


CO. 




No. 


215 FAYETTEVILLE STREET 






RALEIGH. N. C. 





3. 1R. dFcnall Si Co, 
(3roccv8 

222 jfavcttcvillc Street 

IRalciob /^ HAortb Carolina 



College Ipbannac^ 

.■^no. E. ©afls, iPvoptictoi 

©ispeneino ©nujoist 



It i^ a place iif convenience, accomo- 
dation and reliability. Headquarters 
for anything carried in a tirst-class Drug 
Store. Si'EciALTiics — School Supplies, 
Sporting Goods, Fine Candies, Cigars, 
Pipes, and all sniokables, &c. 

Private Formula Compounding for 
family use; also l're8cri|ition Comp(iun<l- 
ing w i t li guaranteed accuracy and 
promptness. 

(live it your patronage, and you will 
be pleiised. 



Mcst IRaleiob, 1H. C. 



1Ricb1non^ flDcat flDarhct^ 

3. Scbvvavt3 

stealer in 

Choice ^eats 


Excelsior 
Steam Xaunbv\> 

JB. 1111. JBahcr, Iproprlctor 

Sbirt?, dollars an^ Cntts 

a SpccialtV! 
2)onic6tlc or ©loss jFlnisb 


Sausacie a Spccialtg 


TlWc want Hiicnts in au townis wbcvc wc .itc net 

l■c^n■ctl^:ntc^ 


C(t^. /Iftarhct^ IRalcitlb, IH. d. 

Ip. 0. J6o.\ 3+2 


IRalcioh, m. C. 



r^~ 



North Carolina 

College gf 

Agriculture CS> 
Mechanic Arts 

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 



A combination of theory and practice, 
of book study and manual work in 

ENGINEERING AGRICULTURAL 

CHEMISTRY ELECTRICITY 

MECHANIC COTTON 

ARTS ^ ^ AND MANUFACTURING 



Full Courses (4 years). Short Courses (2 years). 
Special Courses 13 months) 

Normal Industrial Course for the training of teachers 

Summer School for teachers during July 

Tuition and room, $10 a term ; board. $8 a month 

Thirty-five teachers ; Five hundred and two students 

GEO. T. WINSTON, President 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 






WAT50/N'S 

FHOTOGRAm 

GALLERY 

WILL APPRECIATE TOUR 
PATRONAGE 

Satisfaction EVERT TIHE 



W.R.CRAWFORD 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

BUTCHER 



FINE 
SFRl/NC LAne A SrECiALTT 

19 AND 20 CITT MARt^ET 



IlaviiiKaddi'd a first-class Steam Pau?a?eChoii]>(T, 

I am prei>an'd to till ordt-rs of a sviperior 

tiuality in any quantity 



SrECIHL niTENTlON TO ORDERS BY TELEFMOHE 
OR OTHERWISE 



BtST nATERlAL. i5E5T VORt^MANSHlP 

RALEIQH 

Marble Works 

HlCH-CRftDE 

nONUMENTS 

TABLETS. UASES. IRON FENCE 

\tAt/ 

WE FAT THE FREIGHT 

WRITE FOR New Catalogue 'B." 
AND Booklet 

COOPER BROS., Props.. 
RALEIGH. M. C. 




FOR THE BEST_ 



Coal and Coke 

{By the Car Load Direct from Mines and Ovens to Any Railroad Depots 

Grain, Hay, Shingles, Lattis, Lumber 



Direct from .Wills and Producers 



WRITE TO 



JONES iS: POWELL 



fo'ttV/oT' COAL AND ICE 

RALEIGH , , , , NORTH CAROLINA 



WE RESPECTFULLY ASK A PORTION OF YOUR PRINTING 



ALFORD, BVNUM 
iS: CHRISTOPHERS 

Printers 



115 EAST HARGETT STREET 



ONE DOOR BELOW ROYALL & BORDEN 



'iip" 'i lW l wi l ipi" il | || |i» »i p iii i l| pii i «m i imii ipii . i im [ | p i iiil| ||||li i i ill |||| l i mm i lli i il ipi mi linil i iii lipm ill||||ii ' iii|||iii j iii i ||| |ii iii i ip p i ill i p i i i i lf,imill |||l »i il i; ||| l l l | ||l l iiii l H ll iii 



I 




Keuffel (^ 
Esser Co. 



127 Fulton Street. NEW YORK 
BRANCHES : Chicago, St. Louis, San Francisco 



I I 



Drawing Materials 
Surveying Instruments 




The most complete line of Drawing Instruments in various grades. Paragon Instruments 




liiiilinilinilik^^y 
iiliMh) iltklitelilitiliidjlihlilililJl'!^^ 



We make and carry the most complete line of latest improved Slide Rules with K CS. E 
Patent Adjustment. 



htim'i'nwn.Pi 



1 

MUM 



ri''i''] . /■. I .■■J'', . , 



^ 



f 
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Eiuiiillliiiii 



Draughting Scales, boxwood, metal. 

The celebrated Paragon Scales, (white edges). 

Drawing Boards and Tables, T Squares, Triangles, Curves, Protractors, Drawing Inks. 
^Vate^ Colors, Brushes. CS-c, CSlc. 
All our goods are warranted. 
Complete Catalogue *500 pages on application. 

■.■Ulll»„.ilJlili.,.Mlllli t^lL,, ,..iiiii.:|...iUJi .1^1. illlii. ■il!llii,...iillL' ilUllM.M.HllJ l]llii.,..iLU' m Ultlti i,llllili.ii.iLilil A.iiiillllJMiiiHUIl tlHliM..iimHi 



i 



TERRY NOBLE CHAS. A DUNSTON 

NOBLE & DUNSTON 

FASHIONABLE 

BARBERS 



HOT AND COLD BATHS 



THE FINEST SHOP IN THE STATE 



UNDER THE TUCKER BUILDING 



ODELL 

HARDWARE 

COMPANY 

(MILL SUPPLY DEPARTMENTj 

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ALL KINDS OF MILL SUPPLIES 

PIPE, VALVES. FITTINGS. PACKING, AND 

EVERYTHING NEEDED BY THE COTTON 

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GREENSBORO, N. C. 



WE INVITE YOU TO CALL AND 
EXAMINE OUR 

STEIN-BLOCH 
CLOTHING 
KNOX AND 
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AND 
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LEE & 
BROUGHTON 

209 FAYETTEVILLE ST. 



OAK CITY 

STEAM 

LAUNDRY 

216 FAYETTEVILLE STREET 

TELEPHONE 87 



SHUFORD 8c OWEN 

AGENTS 

ROOM 48, 3d Dormitory 



SACO ca, PETTEE 

MACHINE SHOPS 

NEWTON UPPER FALLS, ^ ^ MASSACHUSETTS 

Cotton 
^ Machinery 

"■ ' Aifh. "^^ ^^^ most 

t^^ IMPROVED 

PATTERNS 



SOUTHERN OFFICE : 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

A. H. WASHBURN, Agent 
WORKS AT BIDDEFORD, ME., and NEWTON UPPER FALLS 




ESTABLISHED 1 851 



EIMER CS, AMEND 



205-211 THIRD AVENUE 
Cor. 18th Street 



NEW YORK 



MANUFACTURERS AND IMPORTERS OF 



Chemicals and Chemical Apparatus 

SOLE AGENTS FOR SCHOTT <& GENOSSEN'S 

Jena Laboratory Glassware, (the best on the market I; 
C. A. F. Kahlbaum's C. P. Chemicals and Reagents ; 
Carl Schleicher CS. Schuell's Filter Paper, and many 
other European houses foremost in our line of goods. 



Zeiss' ca, Spencer's Microscopes and Accessories. Finest Analytical Bal= 
ances and WeigKts. Best German and Bohemian Laboratory Glassware. Royal 
Berlin and Royal Meissen Porcelainware. Purest Hammered Platinum. Complete 
line of Bacteriological Apparatus. Scientific Instruments of the newest and most 
improved design. ^ ^ Inspection of our extensive showrooms gladly invited. 



The D.A.Tompkins Co. 

Charlotte, North Carolina 

Eooioeers, cofiiraciois ond ictii 




niton Warliiiifrt. Cotloii (III Marhhirri. and Eh, 

Inr flarhincry. Cotton Jlilh. fo'ltun Oil 

Mills, aDd Electric FlaDts conjpldf 



m^^i - ^ A iW6 



fliSiiHtiiltil 



HIGH-GRADE 

TOOLS 



FOR AIACHIMSTS 

METAL-WORKERS 

WOOD-WORKERS, &c. 






A COMPLETE LIXE OF THE 
TOOLS AND BEXCHES USED BY 
TECHNICAL SCHOOLS, COLLEGES 
AND MANUAL TRAINING SCHOOLS 



CORRESPONDENCE INVITED 

HAMMACHER, 
SCHLEMMER & C O. 

X ]■: W Y ( 1 1: K C I T Y, Since 1 8 4 S 



VISIT 



TURNERS CAFE 



LADIES AND GENTLEMEN 



DAIRY LUNCH OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 

OPPOSITE POST OFFICE 



AGENT FOR 

ODORLESS REFRIGERATORS 






w 


. H. 


HUGHES 

DEALER IN 




CHINA, 
LAMPS, 


CROCKERY, GLASSWARE, 
TABLE CUTLERY 




SILVER-PLATED WARE 
TEA TRAYS, 


'• 


FILTERS. OIL STOVES. 
HOUSEFURNISHING GOODS 


1 27 


Fayetteville Street 





WRIGHT, KAY 8c CO, 

MANUFACTURERS OF HIGH-GRADE 



EMBLEMS 

JEWELRY 

NOVELTIES 

STATIONERY 

INVITATIONS 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 

PROGRAMS 



SEND FOR CATALOGUE AND PRICE-LIST 

SPECIAL DESIGNS ON APPLICATION 



-^^^ 



140-142 WOODWARD Avenue 



DETROIT, MICH. 



OUR 



AIM 



IS TO pIjEase you 




AND SAVE TOC MONET 
BT 08ING 



OuK Mail 

Order 

Department 



A COSTAL CA KD wil 1 brills; you I 'ataloKues. 
Prici-s, or anythiiiK suM in iiur stock of Hard- 
ware, l^loves. Guns, Paints. Wagons, House 
Furuistiing Gooils, Animunitiou, Builders' 
Hardware. Lime, Cements, ie. 

Hart- Ward 
Hardvvahk Company 

^— PAlKTniT X. c. 

Successors to .Julias Lewis Hardware Co. 



« A LEIGH'S BEST HOTEL, 

Hotel 
D O R 8 E T T 

VV. L nOKSETT. Pkophietoh 
F. L. AVILLITS, Manages 



A NEW AND UP-TO-DATE HOTEL 



Centrally located. Bus meets all trains. 
Polite service. Best table. 

Eatks $2 Per Day 

Rooms ^^'^'V't h" ^2.50 



We guarantee to please you, and we will 
appreciate yoiir trade. 



RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 




Dr. JOEL WHITAKER 

DENTIST 



FAYETTEVILLE STREET 
RALEIGH, N. C. 





E. M. UZZELL 

Printer and Binder 

Cob. Wii-MiNGTON and Mabtin Sts. 
RALEIGH, N. C. 




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Charlottesville 
Woolen Mills 



CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA 

Manufacturers of All Kinds of 5 

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s 



Superior Uniform Cloths 



CONSISTING OF 

DARK AND SKY BLUES 

AND CADET GRAY, 

KERSEYS, 

MELTONS, AND 

DOESKINS, 



FOR MILITARY COLLEGES, 



HHUBJWBBBMI 



Letter Carriers, Street Car, Railroad, Police, Military 
and Society Equipment. 



We are the sole manufacturers of the Gray Cloth used by the Cadets of the 
United States Military Academy at West Point, N. Y. 



INDIGO DYES, PURE \VOOL, 
FREE OF ALL ADULTERATION, 
AND ABSOLUTELY GUARANTEED 

as to Wear and Color. Military Schools preferring our goods are requested 
to have it stipulated in contract for uniforms that they shall be used. 



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OLLEGE ANNUALS are 
judged by the way they are 
built. We make a specialty 
of printing for schools and 
colleges and with our modem 
equipments can give you 
such work as will stand in 
decided contrast to the productions of 
most printing houses of this section. 



MOOSE BROS. COMPANY 

Printers of College Annuals 

Cor. Main CS, Tenth Streets, ^ LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 



2#;^^K> 




HIS number of "tife Agro- 
meek" is a specimen of the 
work we are turning out 
every working day in the 
year. 'We handle the large as 
well as small job, and promise 
good work and promptness 
in delivery. Drop us a line and we will 
be pleased to send you some samples. 



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L 






law's- ak.'ii*se,-ti' 



•S>7;*4i^*»A»o<«<, 1^, 



The North Carolina State Normal and 
Industrial College 

for catalogue or other information address 

president, charles d. mciver, 

Greensboro, n C. 



^ -& 



'We Security Life CS, 
Annuity Co. 

(LEGAL RESERVE) 
GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 



Cash Guaranty Capital, $100,000.00 

Deposited with Insurance Commissioner 
North Carolina 



J. Van. Lindley, Pres. Geo. A. Grimsley. Sec. 
P. H. Hanes. V.Pres. E. Colwell. Jr., Mgr. Agts. 

R. E. Foster, Actuary. 



Something New in Life Insurance 

Our Life Annuity 

Disability C^ 
Endowment Policy 

Pfoies CO fliioyoi income lot Lile loi loe Beneiicioff 



Ws National Bank 
if Raleigh 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



Capital - - - - $225,000.00 
Surplus and Profits $100,000.00 



SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES FOR RENT 

IN FIRE AND BURGLAR 

PROOF VAULT 




^^ - — 

'P&y N. MANCHESTER, 
^«^^ INDIANA