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Full text of "A history of the Hanna family. Being a genealogy of the descendants of Thomas Hanna and Elizabeth (Henderson) Hanna, who emigrated to America in 1763"

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A history of the Hanna family 



Charles Elmer Rice 



GIRCULATi2 



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Hugh H. Haiina, 

Grandson of James Hanna, ( 1753-1827. ) 

From the painting in N. Y. Chamber of Commerce. 

Page 150. 

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A History of the Hanp^, Family, 

Being a Genealogy of the Descenclants df Thom- 
as Hanna and Elizabeth (Hehderson) 
Hanna^ who emigrated to 
America in 1763 



BY 



CHARLES ELMER RICE, 



^ 184<S > 



Member of the Virginia Historical Society. 



ALLIANCE, OHIO. 



-J905.- 



LIMITED EDITION, OF WHICH THIS IS 
NO. 



^^-^^.^^c.-) 



With an Appendix containing the Genealogy and History of 
the Wrights of Kelvedun Hall and their descendants in the Uni- 
ted States. 



^i»n ^Hm $t S0tt, Vvintzvs, 
1905. 



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CONTENTS. 



CHAPTER I. 

PAGE. 

The Kaunas of Sorby Castle 5 

CHAPTER II. 

The Scotch-Irish aud souie Account of Thomas Hanna and 

Elizabeth Henderson Hanna 8 

CHAPTER 111. 

The Virginia Quaker Branch. 
History of Robert Hauna (1753-1837) and his wife Catharine 
Jones, with the Jones and Monroe Families and the de- 
scendants of Robert and Catharine Hanna 12 

CHAPITER IV. 

The Kentucky and Indiana Presbyterian Branch. 

Historyotfjames Hanna ( 1 753-1827) and Hanna (Bayless) 

fialiu^, w^ffi coMiplete account of their descendants ^^^ 

• ••••• • • •*• 

CHAPTER V. 

The Virginia and Tennessee Episcopal Branch. 
History of Martha Hanna Saunders and her descendants jcg 

CHAPTER VI. 

The Pennsylvania and Ohio United Presbyterian Branch. 
History of Thomas Hanna and Jane Cowden Hanna, wiDi a 

complete account of their descendants 174 

APPENDIX. 

The Wrights of Kelvedon Hall, England, and their descend- 
ants in the United States 204 



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^EP i 6 1952 



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Castle Sorby, Built in I3lh Century, 

Galloway, Scotland 

Page 5. 



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CHAPTER I 

INTRODUCTORY. 

THE HANNAS OF SORBY CASTLE. 

The Haiiiia family has not been traced back of the 
thirteenth ceiitnry, when Patrick Hannay bnilt and oc- 
cnpied a castle, since known in history as Castle Sorby. 
Castle Sorby, still standing, but in a half ruinous state, 
is on the waters of the Mull of Galloway, in Wigton, 
southern half of Ayrshire (see illustration, from a cut 
obtained recently in England). 

The Hannay family came into prominence about the 
time of the **Wars of the Roses** and some of the occu- 
pants of the Castle of Sorby wielded a commanding in- 
fluence during that period. The Hannay s coutinued to 
occupy and own Castle Sorby until the close of th^seven- 
teenth century, when the male members of the family all 
having emigrated to Ireland, it passed, through an inter- 
marriage with the Lords of Galloway, into the posse.ssion 
of Sir Alexander Stewart of Garlics, a grandson of Sir 
Alexander Stewart who had married Margaret, daughter 
and heir of Patrick Hannay of Sorby. 

This Sir Alexander, who now came into possession^ 
of the seat of the Hannays, was in great favor with James 
VI, who knighted him in 1590 at the coronation of his 
consort. Queen Aiuie of Denmark. Sir Alexander mar- 
ried (ist.) Christian, daughter of Sir William Douglas 
and (2nd) the Lady Elizabeth Douglas, daughter of Da- 
vid, Earl Angus, and widow of John, 7th Lord Maxwell 
(Earl of Morton). He died 9, Oct. 1596, leaving i.ssue. 



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five children. His son and heir Sir Alexander Stewart, 
a man of great talent, loyalty and integrity, was elevated 
to the Peerage 19 of Jnly 1607 by the title of Baron of 
Garlies, and upon the 19 of Sept. 1623 was advanced to 
the Eari. of Galloway. He married, 16 of Oct. 1600 
Grisel, daughter of Sir John Gordon, of Lochinvar, and 
dying in 1649 left two sons and a daughter. He was .suc- 
ceeded by his son Jamks vStewart, 2nd Lord Gallo- 
way, who in his father*s life-time had been created a Bar- 
onet of Nova Scotia. He was a firm adherent of the Stu- 
arts and was fined 4,000 pound.s by Oliver Cromwell, for 
his attachment to the Royal family. He lived to .see the 
Restoration and came into great favor with King Charles 
II. He married, 1642, Nicolas, daughter or Sir Robert 
Grier, of Grier.son, M. P. and had issue two sons and four 
daughters. His olde.st son, Alexander Stewart 3D 
Lord Galloway, married Mary, daughter of James, 2nd 
Earl of Queensbury^ by whom he had issue .six .sons and 
two daughters. The oldest .son became Alexander, 
4TH Earl of Galloway. The .second son James be- 
came 5TH Earl of Galloway. The third son, John 
was a Brigadier-General and died unmarried, at Castle 
Sorby, in 1748. The fourth .son Andrew had died, or 
been killed, in the Darien expedition in 1699. William 
and Robert died young, umnarried. 

Castle Sorby, which appears to have fallen to the 
third son, John Stewart, brother to the 4th and 5th 
Earls, about this time fell into disuse, or was not occu- 
pied by any of the Stewart family and we find no further 
record of it in history since the death of its owner in the 
year 1748. It .still, however, is owned by the heirs of the 
Earls of Galloway. All of whom are descendants of Pat- 
rick Hannay ol Sorby Castle. 

The Hannays occu|>ied many u.seful public positions. 
They were members of Parliament during several gene- 
rations and in 1630 Sir Robert Hannay was made a Bar 



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on. This Baronetcy is now extinct. 

Early in the seventeenth century, soon after the 
death of Shakespeare, we find Patrick Hannay one of the 
prominent writers and poets of that time. In 1622 was 
published a volume of his |K)ems, which must have had 
some excellence as the following is a specimen of the eu- 
logies which were showered upon the poet by his con- 
temporaries; 

" To His Much Respected Friend Patrick Hannay." 

"Hannay, thy worth l)etrays well whence thou art sprung, 
And that honoured name thou dost not wrong; 
As if from Sorby*s stock no branch could sprout, 
But should, with ripening time, bear golden fruit. 
Thy ancestors were ever worthy found, 
Else Galdus* grave had graced uo Hannay *s ground. 
Thy father's father, Donald, well was knowne, 
So the English by his sword, but thou hast showne 
By pen (times changing), Hannays are 
Active in acts of worth, be itrpeace or warre. 
Goon in virtue, after times will tell 
None but a Haunay could have done so well.** 

The Galdus referred to in the above lines was the 
celebrated Galgacus, the leader of the Confederate Cale- 
donians against the Romans. In Scotch History he is 
known as Cororedus Galdus. This reference to Galdus 
being interred on *Hannay's ground' would appear to add 
considerable color to the presumption that the Hannays 
were an extremely ancient house in Scotland. 



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CHAPTER n. 

T4ie Scotsman is of composite race. The forefathers 
of three fourths of the Scotch-Irish in the United States 
lived in the western Lowlands of Scotland and their blood 
was of various strains, blended into what finally became 
that of the Scottish race. The basis of the race was the 
Romanized Briton, (and from this line the Lowland Scot 
gets his Celtic blood, and not from Ireland) with more or 
less marked departures, occasioned by intermarriages, 
first with the Picts and Scots, then with the Angles, the 
Danes, and the Norsemen. From the hist named stock 
comes the mast of the Teutonic blood of the western Scot; 
while the Angles occupied and largely peopled the east 
coast. After the eleventh century the Normans came in- 
to Scotland, in large numbers, and occupied much of the 
land, so that many families can claim Norman descent. 
Long before the seventeenth century, when the emigra- 
tion to Ireland began, the various race groups had be- 
come fused into one composite whole, having the attri- 
butes of the Celt, the Norse, the Angle and the Norman: 
thus typifying many centuries ago the identical race 
which we are beginning here in America to recognize as 
the American — a combination of the Teuton and the Celt. 

The real history of the forefathers of that part of 
the American people who live in eastern Ohio, therefore, 
is not to found in the pages of the historians and writers 
of Etigland; but those of Scotland. 

Nearly all the Scotch who settled in the North of 
Ireland at the time of the first plantation of Ulster, came 
from the Western Lowland counties of Scotland, lying 
on the opposite coast and less than thirty miles distant 
from county Down. The greater part of them came from 
Ayrshire and Galloway, and those tw^o districts of Scot- 
land were the nesting places of the early Scottish Ances- 



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tors of the majority of the people living in the Ohio Val- 
lej' to day. 

The scene of Scott's **Giiy Mannering*' is laid in 
the western half of Galloway and all readers of Burns are 
familiar with Ayrshire. 

FROM p. HUMS BROWN'S HISTORY OF SCOTLAND — (1902) 

'* Notable among the events of James VPs reign was the famous 
'^plantation of Ulster," in which Scotland played so large and im- 
portant a part. In June 1607, the Irish rebellion under SirCahit 
O'Dougherty had been effectnally put down; and for the future 
p^ace of the conntry James adopted the experiment which on a 
smaller scale he had tried in the Island of I^ewis. The province 
of Ulster was to be subdivided into lots and offered on certain 
condition to colonists from Scotland and England. In March 
1609, there came a letter to the Scotch Privy Counsel announcing 
ths offer which His Majesty — ' 'out of his unspeakable love add 
tender affection" now made to his Scottish Subjects. Seventy- 
seven Scots came forward as purchasers; and if their oflFer had 
been accepted, they would have possessedamong them 147,000 a- 
cres of Irish land. A rearrangement which was made the follow- 
ing year, however, diminished the number of Candidates. When 
in the Autumn of 1610 the Plantation actually began, fifty-nine 
was the number of the favored Scots, and 81,000 acres were to be 
at their disposal. Of the fifty-nine five were nobles — The Duke 
of Lennox, the Earl of Abercorn, Lord d*Aubiquy, the Lord of 
Barley, and LordjOchiltree. The Colonists did not at once pro- 
ceed in a body to their possessions, and it was only gradually that 
the enterprise bore its full effect. But the connection between 
the two countries was established; and the condition of Ulster to- 
day, with its miterial prosperity and its leaven of Scottish blood, 
is in large degree its direct and noble result." 

"In 1640 there were said to be 40,000 able-bodied Scots in the 
north of Ireland, Gardiner's Hist, of England IX 213) The 
plantations in counties Down and Antrim were limited in scope 
in compiirison with the "Great Plantation in Ulster," for which 
Jani^s I'sts reign will be forever remembered in Ireland. It was 
on Galloway men that the greatest grants were bestowed, almost 
all the great houses of the time are represented; Sir Robert Mac- 
Lellan. Laird Bomby, who afterwards became Lord Kirkcudbright; 
John Murray of Bough ton, one of the Secretaries of State; Sir Pat- 
rick McKie of Laerg: Dunbar of Mochrum, one of the Stewarts of 
Garlics; Hannay of Sorby Castle and Vance of Barnbarroch. 



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With the recipient of 2,000 acres of land the agreement was* 
that he was to bring **forty-eight able bo<lied men, of the ages of 
eighteen or upwards, being born in England or in the southern 
parts of Scotland." The progress of the Colonies in the different 
counties is very accurately described in a series of reports by gov- 
ernment inspectors, at various f>eriods between the years 1610 to 
1620, and in letters to be found in the State Papers for Ireland, 
■md in the Carew |Xipers. The most exact account of the emi- 
gration to Ulster is contained in a book of travels in Scotland and 
Ireland, by Sir Wm. Brereton, of Cheshire, England. He states 
that he came to Irvine in Ayrshire, on July ist 1635, and was hos- 
pitably entertained by Mr. James Blair, and that his host informed 
him that '*above ten thousand persons have within two years last 
past left this country wherein they lived, and gone fcr Ireland; 
they have come by one hundred in company through this town, 
and three hundred have gone hence together shipped for Ireland 
at one time. None of them can give a reason why they leave the 
country; only some of them who make a better use of God*sha::d 
upon them have acknowledged to mine host in these words "That 
it was a just judgment of God to spew them out of the land for 
their unthankfulness/' One of them I met withal and discoursed 
with at large, who could give no good reason, but pretended the 
landlords increasing their rents; but theii swarming in Ireland is 
so much taken notice of and disliked, as that the Deputy has sent 
out a warrant to stay the landing of any of these Scotch that come 
without a certification." 

It was the spirit of unrest, the thirst for adventure, 
and, chiefly, the desire to better their worldly condition, 
that led them into the Land of Promise in that day and 
at numerous periods since. 

They came without regard to the jealous forebodings 
of the governing few, already on the ground, who feared 
they themselves would be outnuml)ered by the strangers; 
they likewise paid no regard to the official restrictions 
by which the rulers of Ireland at that time and the Coun- 
cils of American Colonies a century later, sought to pre- 
vent their entry. 

The emigration from Ireland to America of the 
grandchildren and greatgrandchildren of these Scottish 
colonists of the Seventeenth century began soon after 
1700; and for more than three quarters of a century af- 



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lerwards, Ulster poured into America a continuous 
stream, sometimes even a flood, of people of Scottish 
hirtli or descent. In 1718 several hundred of them came 
together from the Valley of the Baun, in Londonderry, 
landing at Boston. 

Here they were not permitted to remain, by the Pu- 
ritans, but were obliged to go out to the frontiers, form- 
ing colonies along the Coast of Maine, at Londonderry 
in New Hampshire and at Vl^orcester, Mass. 

A great many Scotch- Irish also emigrated to New 
York, to New Jersey and to Maryland, Virginia and the 
Carolinas; but it was tc Pennsylvania, the Quaker Colo- 
ny, that the great bulk of the Ulster migration came. 
They began to reach there before 17 10 and before 1720 
thousands had come into the colony by way of Newcastle, 
Delaware. Before 1730 they had settled and occupied 
much of the lower lands in the Townships of East and 
West Nottingham, Cecil Co. Maryland, Mill Creek, and 
White Clay Creek in Newcastle County, Delaware, 

In Penn.sylvania they settled in the Townships of 
Chester County and in the Townships of Lancaster, Dau- 
phin and Bucks Counties. 

From these temporary settlements in Pennsylvania 
one stream of our emigrants followed the Cumberland and 
Virginia Valleys into Virginia and North and South 
Carolina and from these colonies passed on into and set- 
tled Tennes.see and Kentucky. Another powerful body 
went into western Pennsylvania and, settling on the head 
waters of the Ohio, became famous in civil and ecclesiast- 
ical l^istor3^ The next move we find is that from North 
and South Carolina and Virginia northward into the Ter- 
ritory of the Northwest (afterwards Ohio). The first 
settlers going west, after the opening of the Territory to 
settlement stopped, naturally, in Ohio. As there were 
then no Friends' meetings in that Territory, Quaker em- 
igrants left their certificates at Redstone, (in Fayette 
County,) and Westland (in Washington County) Penna. 



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Most of the certificates to Westlaiid and Redstone came 
from Virginia meetings. Those Friends who took certif- 
icates to these meetings were but the advance guard of 
western migration which set in about the year 1800. 
They continued to go to these meetings for a year or two 
longer; then South River sent twelve members to West- 
land in 1801, and the Southern Goose Creek sent fifteen 
in 1801 and 1802. Meetings were soon established with- 
in the Northwest Territory. In 1S02 we find certificates 
from South River to * 'Concord Monthly Meeting, North- 
west Territory/* which very soon after changed to ''Con- 
cord Meeting, State of Ohio.*' From 1812 to 1816 there 
was a considerable migration from the lower meetings of 
the Virginia Yearly Meeting. South River (Lynch- 
burg,) furnished the greatest nunil)er of emigrants. 

From this meeting there went eighty-six families 
and forty-six single persons, from 1801 to 1840. A- 
mongst these, in 1801-02 we find record of the removal 
to Ohio of the families of James, Hanna, Baugham, Har- 
ris, Holloway, Terrell, Stratton, Ferrell, Carle, and Tel- 
lis. 

Robert Hanna's Statement; from a manuscript in his own h-'nd wri- 
ting, now in the poeession of Chas. E. Rice. 

"I, Robert Hanna, at my daughter Esther Hole's request. I 
was boru in Ireland, in the county of Monaghan, the year 1753, 
the 2nd of 3rd month. My Father's name was Thomas Hanna. 
My Mother's maiden name was KlizHl>eth Henderson. They 
brought us, their six children to America in the year 1763. Our 
eldest brother John, died at Newcastle, after the ship cast anchor. 
The names of us their surviving children were, James, Robert, 
Hugh, Martha and Thoma.s. I was married to Catharine Jones 
the 31st day of the first month, 1776. We joined Friends after 
our sons Thomas and Benjamin were born, near about the year 
1780." 

The above statement by one of the original emi- 
grants settles several disputed or obscure points in the 
Hanna family history. 



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Charles A. Hanna, Aiithor of '*tlie Scotoli-Irish in 
America "thought that the date of emigration to Penn- 
sylvania was 1764 and that the name of Thomas Hanna's 
wife was Jane Henderson. From the proof, furnished 
by the author of this volume, Mr. Hanna changed these 
items so that they were published to conform to the a- 
bove statement of Robert Hanna. In a letter dated A- 
pril 4th, 1899, Mr. Hanna .suggests that Robert and 
Thomas Hanna, of Ballyhay, County Monaghan, Ire- 
land, belonged to the congreg^ation of Rev. Thomas 
Clark, and as that entire congregation came to New 
York in 1764 it must have been at that city and not at 
Newcastle, Delaware, that Thomas Hanna and his family 
landed. The discovery of tliis niann.sciipt however clears 
up this important point. Robert Hanna says that 'they 
cast anchor at N^wcistle/ and in 1763. Thomas Hanna, 
the earliest emigrant in this line, and probably a Grandson 
or great grandson of the Hannay of Castle Sorby, in Gal- 
loway, Scotland, was past 21 years of age in the year 
1749, for we find his name appended to a call, to the Rev. 
Thomas Clark, to the Pre.sbyterian Church in Bally bay 
Count}' Monaghan; on the same document'is also. found 
the signature of Robert Hanna, probably the father of 
Thomas and, at that time, a very old man. Thomas 
Hanna must have been born as early as the year 1720. 
He was but 43 years old at the time of his arrival in A- 
merica in the fall of 1763. It has l^een asserted and pub- 
lished, in recent years, that Thomas Hanna was influ- 
enced by Benjamin Franklin to come to this country and 
it has even been written thr.t he and his family came on 
the same ship and in company with Franklin, who was 
retnrning from England, where he had been sent to en- 
ter the protest of the American people against the infa- 
mous Stamp Act. This is undoubtedly an invention of 
some latter day newspaper correspondent in an endeavor 
to couple the Hanna name with that of Franklin. Thom- 
as Hanna was influenced by none but religious motives, 



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it is probable, and came to America because of the emi- 
gration of the entire Presbyterian Church, of Bally bay. 
of which he was a member. 

After landing at Newcastle, Delaware, the famih 
pushed on into Buckingham, Bucks County, Pennsylva- 
nia, and settled amongst the Quakers of that vicinity. 
Within the year Thomas Hanna died and was buried in 
the burying-ground of the Friends' Meeting House, at 
Buckingham. If any stone ever marked his grave it has 
long since disappeared, but the date of his death was 1764. 

The date of death of Elizabeth Henderson Hanna is 
not known. It is probable that she remained in Bucks 
County until her death. Of her remaining family, the 
two oldest sons, James and Robert, who were twins, were 
apprenticed or bound out to farmers in the neighl)orlu)od 
and remained in Bucks County until they were of age, 
when James went to Kentucky and Robert married in 
Chester Co. Pa. The remaining three children followed 
the tideof emmigration into Western Pennsylvania, where 
Hugh and Thomas married and settled in Washington 
County, and the only sister, Martha following the other 
line of emigration went into Virginia, settled in Bedford 
County and married a wealthy planter of that state. The 
families of these 5 children of Thomas and Elizabeth Han- 
na will now be given in separate chapters and in detail. 



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Robert Hanna, i753-i837-) 
Page 15. 



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CHAPTER in. 

Robert Hanna, born in County Monaglian, Ireland, 
March 2, 1753, was one of the twin sons born to Thomas 
and Elizabeth Hanha. Coming to America in 1763, with 
his parents he remained in Bucks and Chester Counties 
until he was of age. He was raised in a Quaker family 
and was the first of the Hannas in this country, to take 
an active interest in the aflFairs of the colonies. He was 
one of the number of patriot heroes, known as the *'Pro- 
vencial Committee," who met in Carpenter's Hall, Phil- 
adelphia, in July 1774 to demand the appointment of del- 
egates to the first Continental Congress. A movement 
which culminated in the Declaration of Independence. 

On Jan. 31, 1776 Robert Hanna married Catharine 
JONKS, in Chester County, Pa. and the young couple be- 
gan housekeeping, that historic year, on the Battle Field 
of the Brandy wine. Here their oldest son, Thomas, was 
lx)rn May 2, 1777. In 1779 they removed to Campbell 
County, Virginia, where Robert Hanna, in partnership 
with John Lynch, laid out the City of Lynchburg, on 
lands owned by them. The City was given the name of 
the senior proprietor, although Robert Hanna had an al- 
most equal ownership. At Lynchburg eight children 
were born to Robert and Catharine Hanna between the 
years 1779 and 1797, and in 1801 they removed, with six 
children, to Columbiana County, Ohio. Three children 
had died, in infancy or early youth, in Virginia, and the 
parents, Rol)ert and Catharine had joined the Society of 
Friends at Lower Goose Creek in Bedford County and af- 
terwards at South River, in Campbell County. The 
three little children were buried in the South River 
graveyard. 



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Settling in Fairfield Township, Columbiana County, 
(then Jefferson Co.) the Hannas seem to, at once, have 
entered politics, for the early records of the village of 
Columbiana show that Benjamin Hanna, (the 2nd son) 
at that time less than 26 years old, was elected, on April 
ist, 1805, the first Clerk and Treasurer of the township, 
while his father, Robert Hanna was, at the same time e- 
lected a Trustee of the township. 

In 1806 Robert and Catharine Hanna left Columbiana 
and removed to Middleton Township in the same county 
where Roljert laid out and founded the present village of 
Clarkson. Here they continued to reside until all their 
children were married and alx)ut 1819 went to New Lis- 
bon, the county seat of Coiumbiana County. Here they 
lived near their sons Albert and Benjamin, until the 
death of Catharine Hanna September 28, 1835. She was 
buried in the old Lisbon burying ground and nothing 
now remains to identify her grave. After the death of 
his wife, with whom he had lived for just sixty years, 
Robert Hanna lived with his children; Benjamin, in Lis- 
bon; Esther Hole, at Carmel; Catharine Hole, at Au- 
gusta and Ann Hambleton, near New Garden. This 
round was made by him on horseback and his usual and 
favorite traveling companion was his little grandson. Ker- 
sey Hanna, then but some 12 years old, now living at 
No. 325 Kennard Street, Cleveland, O., and past 80 years 
of age. 

Kersey Hanna has many pleasing recollections of these 
horseback rides with his aged grandfather, from one 
home to another, and he is the only person now living 
who came into such intimate contact with our venerable 
ancestor. 

At the present writing there are but six of the grand- 
children living, these are. Kersey Hanna, of Cleveland, 
O.; Jacob Hole, of Salem, O.; Joel G. Hanjbleton of 
Searslx)ro, Iowa; Caleb Hole, of Damascus, O.; Rachel 
Hole Rice, of Alliance, O., and Martha Hambleton Crav- 

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Catharine (Jones) Hanna (1754- 1835) 
Page 15. 



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'er, of Marslialltowii, Iowa. 

Rol)ert Haiina finally settled clown, for a permanent 
home, with his daughter Catharine Hole, living near Au- 
gusta, Carroll County,01iio. He lived, however, but a 
year after his last move, and died there on July i6, 1837 
in the 85th j^ear of his age. He was buried hi the Au- 
gusta Friends' grave yard. 

I'hK JONKS AND MONROE FaMIUES. 

Among the family papers left to the writer \iy hi^ 
grandmother, Catharine (Hanna) Hole, is the following 
statement made by her mother Catharine (Jones) Hanna. 

'*My Mother's Statement." 

*'My Father's name was Benjamin Jones. My Mother's 
name was Rsther Evans, Her parents came from Wales before 
her birth, and settled in the Great Valle^'^ in Chester Countjs 
Penna. 

I was born in the year 1754, 27 of 8th month. My Father 
died when I was aljout 3 months old. My Mother married a sec* 
time to John Jones, and deceased abont or iu the year 1816, aged 
about 82 years, (lx>rn 1734)." 

Of the Welsh family of Evans we know absolutely 
nothing, but concerning Catharine Hanna's paternal an- 
cestry much of interest is known and will here be given, 
in part. Just how it happened that young Benjamin 
Jones, of an old and aristocratic Virginia family, went in- 
to Pennsylvania and married Esther Evans, of Welsh de- 
scent, will probably never be known. 

Benjamin Jones was born in King George County, 
Virginia, in the year 1 731, and died in Nov. 1754, aged 
but 23 years. Catharine (Jones) Hanna, was his only 
child, Benjamin Jones had an older brother and a sis* 
ter in Virginia. The brother, Judge JOvSeph Jones, was 
born in 1727, and died October 28, 1805. He was a mem- 
ber of the House of Burgesses from King George Coim- 
ty, served on the Committee of .safety in 1755, and in the 



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Convention of 1776, and represented Virginia in tfie Con- 
tinental Congress in i778-'79, and in i78b-'83. He was 
appointed Judge of the General Court 011 January 23^ 
1778 but resigned in October 1779. He was re-appoint 
ed to tlie same Court November 19^ 1789, was a menil)er 
of the Convention of 1788 and a Major General of Vir- 
ginia Militia. He was a friend of Washington and had 
a correspondence with him relative to the limitation of 
the power of Congress by the several States in 1780. 
Judge Jones' letters and correspondence were published, 
in part, a few j^ears ago by Mr. Worthington C. Ford; 
the letters naw being the property of the Department of 
State, at Washington, Judge Joseph Jones never mar- 
ried and, dying with a considerable estate, he, according 
to the old English custom, left the bulk of his property 
to his Nephew, James Monroe, son of his only sister Eli- 
za Jones Monroe, 

Eliza Jones, only sister of Benjamin and Joseph 
Jones, was lx>rn in Virginia in 1729. Married Spence 
MoNROB, a member of an old Scotch family which prob- 
ably came into Virginia as early as 1650. Settling in 
Westmoreland Co. Virginia, to them was lx»rn, with oth- 
er issue, James Monroe, destined tol)ecome the 5th Pres- 
ident of the United States. 

James was lx)rn April 28, 1758, was educated at Wil- 
liam and Mary College and at Princeton, Entered the 
Army in 1776 as a Lieutenant in the 3d, Va. Regt. under 
Col. Hugh Mercer. During 1777- '78 he served as Major 
on the staff of the Earl of Sterling and took part in the 
battles of the Brandywine, Germantown and Monmouth. 
His cousin, Catharine Jones Hanna. was, at the time of 
the Battle of the Brandywine, married to Robert Hanna, 
and living in a stone house on that battle-field. It is not 
impro*)able that J.iinis Mjiiroevisited his only living 
cousin at this time or while encamped in that vicinity. 

He formed thi acquaintance of Governor Jefferson, 



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and was sent by liim as a military' commissioner lo col- 
lect information in regard to the condition and prospects 
of the southern army. He thus attained the rank of 
Lieutenant Colonel. 

His uncle Joseph Jones, in one of his letters which 
lias been preserved, wrote to him,'* You do well to cul- 
tivate the friendship of Mr. Jefferson, * * and while you 
continue to deserve his esteem, he will not withdraw his 
countenance." The hitimacy at this time established, 
continued throughout life and was the key to Mr. Mon- 
roe's early advancement and his ultimate success. Of 
President Monroe, as president, or of his various high 
offices and his innnense popularity, which gave to his 
administration the name of the **Era of good-feeling,'' 
we will not speak, but confine our text to his family con- 
nections and records. Twice, wMthina few months Mon- 
roe crossed the Alleghenies, for the purpose of becomin;g 
acquainted wMth the actual condition of the country. 
This was after the close of the Revolutionary War, and 
while the other members of the family were living in 
Bedford County, Virginia, near the present site of the 
City of Lynchburg. Again Mr. Monroe crossed the 
mountains and visited throughout Michigan and Ohio, 
in 1817; and the writer now owns a bed-stead on which 
the President slept, and a Mahogany wardrobe in which 
he hanged his knee-breeches while stopping in Ohio, as 
well as the letter in w^hicli Lewis Cass announces their 
coming, in order that all might be in readiness for the 
President's visit and that he might meet his Ohio rela- 
tives. Mr. Cass, (afterwards Secretary of War and 
State) writes under date of August 14, 18 17, that "the 
President, with General Brown, General Macomb and 
myself, leave here (Detroit) on Saturday or Sunday next 
— We go go to Sandusky, Delaware, Columbus, ChilH- 
cothe, Lancaster, Zanesville, St. Clairsville, &c. I think 
weshall reach Chillicothe about the 25, *6, or '7 inst. Igive 
you this in formation for fear you might, as we have been, 

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be taken by surprise." Little but tradition is left to us of 
this famous visit, but at St. Clairsville the journey was 
broken and Mr. Monroe visited his cousin, the only daugh- 
ter of his uncle Benjamin Jones, then residing in the lit- 
tle village of Clarkson, in Columbiana County. Catha- 
rine Hanna had at this time lived in the wilds of Ohio for 
over 1 6 years. Her husband, Robert Hanna,. had laid out 
and founded the village of Clarkson in 1806. She was at 
this time 63 years old, four years older than her cousin, 
the President, and was the mother of 10 children. Only 
one child remained at home at the date of this visit. 
This was Catharine, who was married the next January 
to John Hole. From her the events of the Presidential 
visitation were gleaned when she was past So years of 
age, and the dates and details were somewhat shadow}^ in 
her mind. 

Mr. Monroe married, in ijS^J Elizal>etli Kortright, 
who was born in New York City in 1768 and died in Lou- 
doun County Virginia in 1830 and was buried on the es- 
tate at Oak Hill, near Leesburg. Mrs. Monroe was the 
daughter of a Captain in the British Army. She accom- 
panied Mr. Monroe in his missions abroad in 1794 and 
1803, and while he was Mini.ster to France she effected 
the release of Madame de Lafayette, who was confined 
in the prison of La Force, hourly expecting to be execu- 
ted. The accompanying portrait of Mrs. Monroe is from 
a Miniature painted l)y Sene' in Paris in 1794. The por- 
trait of President Monroe was also painted in the same 
year, while he was in Paris. Both were loaned by the 
oldest member of the President's family now living, Mrs. 
Maria Gouverneur, and acknowledgment is hereby made 
of her kindly interest and helpfulness in obtaining the 
Jones-Monroe genealogy for use in the Hanna Book. 

President Monrof/s Famii^v. 
To James and Elizabeth Monroe were born two 



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daughters, Ei^iza and Maria. Very little has ])een 
written of this family and the Author has for some years 
endeavored to obtain a complete list of the President's de- 
scendants. After considerable correspondence with va- 
rious members of the family he believes he can here pre- 
sent fully the list of living descendants of Eliza Jones 
Monroe, through her son James Monroe. Some extracts 
from the letters of Mrs. Gouverneur, widow of the Presi- 
dent's Grandson will first l>e of interest. 

*'My Dear Dr. Rice: — 

I am truly grateful for the pleasure derived 
from tlie photographs aud also for the Joues Genealogy which 
was most interesting. 1 regret that our record d<»es not go l)eyoud 
Judge Joseph Jones, for doubtless his antecedents would l>e most 
interesting. I have numerous letters written by him to Mr. Mon- 
roe, but he deals entirely with the current events of his period. 

* * My husband, S&tnuel L. Gouverneur was born in 1826, 
married iti 1855 and died in 1880. My Maiden name was Marian 
Campbell and 1 was from New York. Mrs. Harriet Taylor Upton 
of Ohio wrote articles entitled "The Children of the White 
House." She had photographs made from various portraits in my 
possession and among others was a portrait of Maria Monroe 
Gouverneur, an unfinished likeness taken during her father's 
Presidential term. We have an excellent portrait taken at 
a much later period. I also have a beautiful portrait of Madison 
by Vanderlyn, presented to Mr. Monroe by Madison. I may not 
be able to send you the photographs mentioned as speedily as 
I otherwise would, on account of sickness * * * ♦ 

I am under the impression that 1 posse.ss at least thirty letters of 
Judge Joseph Jones, written to Mr. Monroe when he was Minister 
to France — 1794. Mr. Monroe seemed to defer to him as he would 
to a father. Mr. Monroe's letters to him are touching, for he seems 
to have delegated to himself the maintenance of his kindred, * 

* * * 

Truly yours, 

Maria Gouverneur.'* 

•*My Dear Dr. Rice: — 

1 hasten to respond to your interesting 
letter received a few «lays ago. I am much interested in your re- 
searches and will assist you to the best of my ability. There are 



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none of Mrs. Hay's or Mrs. Gouverneur's children now in exis- 
tence but can readily give you a list of their grandchildren * 

* * * I wouhl >)e much gratified to have a photogra]>h of 
your grandmother, Mr. Gouverneur's ccnsin; if you will kindly 
send me one. I would also like to see your researches on the 
Jones family, Judge Joseph Jones married Miss Talliferro of Vn- 
ginia and Mr. Monroe had a brother Joseph Jones Monroe. 
Judge Joseph Jones lived in Frederickburg. He left no children 
and Mr. Monroe inherited from him 2,000 acres of land in I^u- 
doun County where he built a residence cal'ed "Oak Hill," * 

* * * . Truly yours, 

M. GOUVERNKUR." 

Eliza Monroe, l)orni790. Married Judge Geo. Hay, 
of Richmond, Virginia, and had issue, one daughter, 
HoRTENSE, who married Lloyd N. Rogers of Baltimore, 
Maryland. Hortense, who was named for the Queen of 
Holland, a friend of her Mother's, had three daughters, 
now decea.sed. There is one granddaughter living. 
This is Mrs. Wm. Mclntire of Baltimore, Maryland. 

Maria Monroe, born 1803, married Samuel L. 
Gouverneur in 1820. To them were born three children, 
ist, James Monroe Gouverneur, born 1821, died unmar- 
ried. 2nd, Elizabeth Kortright, 1823, married Dr. 
Hei.skell, U. S. Army, and had issue, three sons. Monroe 
Heiskell, decea.sed; (leaving a son Minor Fairfax Gouv- 
erneur, who has changed his name.) Henry Lee Heis- 
kell of Washington, D. C, and Dr. vSydney O. Heiskell 
of Baltimore, Maryland. 3d, Samuel L. Gouverneur, 
born 1826, married Marian Campbell and had is.sue three 
daughters, ist, Ruth Gouverneur, married Dr. W. C. 
Johnson, of Frederick, Maryland; 2nd, Rose Gouverneur, 
married Chaplain Hoes, of the U. S. Navy; 3d, Maud C. 
Gouverneur, Washington, i). C. 

Eliza Monroe, afterwards Mrs George Hay, the most 
exclusive lady who has ever been mistress of the White 
House, loved France and Paris, where she was educated, 
and dying there, was buried in Pere-la-Chaise. There .she 



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sleeps to-day. But though born in Paris, when her father 
was minister there, Maria loved America and Virginia, 
and when she died in New York thej^ brought her body 
to Oak Hill to be laid beside that of her mother. Even 
then the remains of Monroe were in a hired vault in 
New York city. 

In 1858, twenty seven years after the death of Mon- 
roe, and on the looth anniversary of his birth, a resolu- 
tion was introduced in the Senate and General Assembly 
of Virginia, appropriating the sum of $2,000, or so much 
of the sum as might be necessary, for the purpose of bring- 
ing the body of the author of the now famous **doctrine" 
to Richmond. A section in Hollywood was acquired, and 
this is deeded to the State. It is proposed that the re- 
mains of the wife shall be laid upon one .side of the tomb 
and tho.se of the beloved daughter, who took care of him 
in his old age and pjverty, on the other side. 

•'CHILDREN OF THE WHITE HOUSE." 

The lives of Mrs. Monroe and her daughters are ex- 
ceeding interesting on account of their influence upon 
public affairs and the friendships with the great people of 
the earth which lasted throughout their lives. 

Mrs. Monroe was a Miss Kortright, of New York 
city, and she became the v/ife of Mr. Monroe when he 
was repre.senting a Virginia district in Congress. The 
two children of this marriage were Eliza, born at Oak 
Hill, probably in 1790, and Maria, 13 years later, Dur- 
ing the time her father was representing this country in 
Paris, Eliza was going to school there. She learned the 
ways of aristocracy, and her education in this direction 
bore abundant fruit when her father l^ecame President, 
and, on account of the feeble health of her mother, she 
Ijecame practically as well as ab.solutely the mistress of 
the White House and the most exacthig little monarch 
that stately mansion has ever had. She would not visit 
any one, and it was she who held up the diplomats to 



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Mrs. Esther Ilofe McDowell, all relatives of tlie Monroe 
family, visited the old Oak Hill estate near Leesbnrg, 
Virginia, and were received most cordially by Senator 
Fairfax and shown the hoiise, the grounds and the graves 
of their relatives. The graves of Mrs. Monroe and her 
daughters were at this time hi a sadly neglected condition 
and not so much as a .stone marked or identified the pla- 
ces of interment of the wife and daughter of the Presi- 
dent of the United States. 

Since that time and since the above lines were writ- 
ten the State of Virginia has caused the bodies to be re- 
moved to Richmond. 

THE CHII^DRBN OP ROBERT AND CATHARINE HAN If A. 

( I ) Thouiaa, born May 7, 1777; died Sept. 17^ 1828, in Lisbon, O. 
)2) Benjamin, born Jun. 14, 1779; *hed JuU 15,, 1853 in Lisbon, O. 

(3) Esther (ist), born Aug. 6, 1781; died Nov. 3, 1791 > bnried iu 
South River graveyard, Lynchburg. 

(4) David, born Jan. 9, 1784; died Oct. 24, 1791, buried in South 
River graveyard, Lynchburg. 

(5) Caleb, born Sept. 4, 1786; died July 15, 1790, buried in Sontli 
River graveyard, Lynchburg. 

( 6) Robert, born June 20, 1789; died Sept. 25, 18,54 at Wilming- 
ton, Delaware. 

(7) Esther (2nd), born April 10, 1792; died Dec. 6, 1849, "* ^*^r" 
niel, Columbiana Co., Ohio. 

( 8) Catharine, born Nov. 25, 1794; died May 3, 1881, Augusta, 
Ohio. 

(9) Ann, born July 30, 1797, died Mareh 3, 1867 >" Iowa. 

(10) Jo.shua, born Feb. 16, 1802; died Sept. 11, 1804, Middleton, 
Ohio. 

Of this large family five died without issue and of 
the remaining five, who married and left children, only 
one has descendants today bearing the Hanna name. 
All the other numerous descendants of Robert Hanna, 
the Patriot, are through the female or "distaff'* side of 
the house, being the posterity of the three daughters Es- 
ther Hole, Catharine Hole and Ann Hanibleton, and 

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three grandchildren, (again on the '''distafP' side) ot 
Robert Hanna Jr. 

The Descendants of Benjamin Hanna. 

(2) BENjAMrN Hanna, the second son of Robert and 
Catharine Hanna, was born hi Campbell County, Va., 
June, 14, 1779, married Rachel Dixon, (bom July 19, 
1785) Dec. 15, 1803. Died in Lisbon, O., July 15,1853, 
Rachel Dixon Hanna died Feb. 28, 1S51. In 1852 Ben- 
jamin Hanna married Hannah Kersey, a daughter of the 
«minent minister Jesse Kersey. He died within the year 
and was survived by his second wife. 

To Benjamin and Rachel Hanna were bom 13 chil- 
dren: 

< A) Joslma, Nov. 8, 1804. died July 7, 1881. 

(B) Leonard, March 4, 1806, died Dec. 15, 1862, 

^C) Levi, Feb. 7, 1808, died May 5, 1898. 

<D) Zalinda, Feb. 23, iBio, dfed Dec. 4, 1854. 

<E) Robert, Aug. 15, 1812, died April 3, 1882. 

<F) Tryphena, June 12, 1814, died May 23, 1893. \ . . ^ 

(G) Tryphosa. June 12, 1814, died Jan. 17, 1815. p^*^^ 

<H) Rebecca, Sept. 21, 1816, died Oct. 15, 1847. 

(I) Thoni;is B. May 22, 1818, died Nov. 9, 1885. 

(J) Anna, March 3, 1821, died Jan. 26, 1846. 

(K) Benjamin J. March 14, 1823, died April 3, 1881. 

(L) Kersey, Oct; 6, 1824, lives in Cleveland, Ohio. 

(M) Elizabeth, June 12, 1827, died Jan. 28, 1833. 

(A) Joshua. Hanna, marrie<l Feb. 3, 1830, Susan Richardson> 
born June 24, 1803, He died July 7, 1881. She died Dec. 17, 1875, 
Issue: 

(a) Jason R. Hanna, April 6, 1831 — Sept. 6, 1868. Married 
June 18, 1857 Margaret A, Lewis (born July 13, 1836) who died 
Jan. 14, 1870. They had issue, 

1. Robert C. Hanna, May 18, 1858. 

2. Louis B. Hanna, Aug. 9, i86r, 

3. Mary E. Hanna, April 21, 1863, died Sept. 5, 1873, 

4. Jeanie M. Hanna, Feb. 19,-1867. 

(b) George Hanna, Feb. 18, 1833, died July 28, 1833. 

(c) James L. Hanna, June 11, 1839, died April 14, 1847. 

(d) Alice R. Hanna, July 15, 1842, died April 9, 1847. 



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fB] Leonard Haniia, M. D. 1806 — 1862, married Saniantli • Con- 
verse, Sept. 10, 1835. [see sketch following.] 

Chii^drkn of Dr. Lkonari>andSamanthaConversk Hanna, 

[a] Helen G. Haniia, July 17, 1S36, died Nov. 28, 1891. 

fb] Marcira A\onzo Hanna, Sept. 25, 1837, died Feb- 15, 1904, 

fc] Howard Melville, Jan. 23, 1840. 

[d] Salotne Maria, May 17, 1844. 

[e] Seville Samairtlia, March 30, 1846. 

[f] Leonard Converse, Nov. 30, 1850. 

[g] Lillian Converse, Dec, 3, 1852. 

Dr, Iveouard Hainia was an eminent pliysician and 
surgeon y a graduate of several medical schools and a Lec- 
turer on Medical and various scientific subjects. He rati 
for Congress 011 the Whig ticket but was defeated. No 
adequate sketch can l>e obtained at this date, 

Saniantha M. Hanna, widow of Dr. Leonard Hanna 
died in Asheville, N. Carolina, in 1897, The following 
notice appeared in the annual report of the Cleveland, O- 
hio, Early Settler's association. 

"Mrs. Hauita, the mother of Senator M. A. Hanna, died af 
Asheville, N.Carolina, April 16, 1897, froiu pnentuonia. She had 
been sick but a week, and was eight}' -four years ohl. Mrs, Han- 
na was the mother of seven children, six living, of whom Senator 
Hanna was the oldest. The other children areL. C. Hanna, H. M. 
Hanna, Miss Lillian Hanna, Mrs. James Pickandsand Mrs. J. Wy- 
man Jones, formerly Mrs. George Cliapin. Ever since her hns-« 
band's death, which occurred ih 1862, Mrs. Hanna has lived in 
the large Hanna mansion at 736 Prospect Street, with her daugh- 
ter, Lillian, to keep her company. For the last few weeks she 
had been sojonrniog at Asheville, and whil e there contracted a .se- 
vere cold, which first develo|>id into bronchitis and then into 
pneumonia. Mrs, Hanna lefl Cleveland about five weeks before 
Iier death and went direct to Asheville. April 3rd was her birth- 
day, she having been 84 years old on that day. It was then that 
the severe cold was coutracted, as a result of which she died. 
There were with her when she died four of her children and her 
family physician from Cleveland. Her children who were pres- 
ent were Miss Lillian Hanua, Mrs. James Pickands, Mr. H. M. 
Hanna, and Captain L. C. Hanna. Captain Hanna had been with 
his mother only an hour, having left Cleveland on Wednesday, 



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taking with him Dr. Edward F. Cushing, his mother's physician. 
Dr. Cushing was unable to do any good, Mrs. Hauua being in a 
dying condition when he reached Asheville. Senator M. A. Han- 
na and his sister, Mrs. J. Wyman Jones, the latter of Knglewood, 
New Jersey, did not reach Asheville until too late to .see their 
mother alive. 

The late Mrs Haniia was Miss Samautha Converse, and was 
born at Randolph, Vermont, April 3, 1813. She married the late 
Leonard Hanna, Septemlier 10, 1835. He died in this city Decem- 
l)er 10, 1862. There were seven children, the six wlio have been 
referre<l to and Mrs. Helen Gertrude Hubbell, who died Novem- 
ber 18, I 891. 

During her long years of residence in Cleveland she became 
very greatly beloved, and her death will be generally mourned. 
She was most benevolent, and contributed very largely to charity. 
For many years she was a member of the First Presbyterian 
Church, and took the most lively interest in all churcl: work. 
She was an honorary member of the Early Settler's Association of 
Cuyahoga County." 

[a] Helen G. Hanna, married, Aug. 7, 1862 Henry S. Hubbell 
[born Oct. 16, 1827]. She died Nov. 28, 1891. 

[b] Marcus Alonzo Hanna, 1837-1904, married Sept. 27, 1864 
Charlotte Augusta Rhodes [born Sept. 22, 1843] and had issue, 

1. Daniel Rhodes Hanna, born Dec. 27, 1866. 

2. Mabel A. Hanna. June 13, 1871, married J. Medill 
McCormick. 

3. Ruth Hanna, born 1873, married Harry Parsons. 

[c] Howanl M. Hanna, married Dec. 28, 1863, Catharine 
Smith, born Oct. 22, 1843, and lias issue, 

1. Helen Hanna, July 29, 1864, died July 31, 1864. 

2. Bessie Hanna, Sept. 15, 1865, died Sept. 15, 1856. 

3. Mary G. " Dec. 7, 1866. 

4. Kate B. " Dec. 26, 1871. 

5. How. M. " Dec. 14, 1878. 

6. Leonard " died July 9, 1881. 

[d] Salome Maria Hanna, married, Sept. 10, 1868 George W. 
Cliaptu, born Feb. 22. 1837 and has issue, 

Henry H. Chapin, Dec. 9, 1869, died July 12, 1881. 

Charles M. Chapin, April 19, 1871. 
Mrs. Chapin married (2nd) J. Wyman Jones, millionaire mine and 
railroad owner in Mis.«4ouri. He died Oct. 27, 1904 in New York 
City aged 88 years. He was the founder of Engle wood, New Jersey. 



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(e) Seville Samantha Han na, man ied Sept. 15, 1887 James 
Ptckands, who died July 14, 1896 

(f ) Leonard C. Haiina, married May 17, 1876 Fanny Mann, 
born Aug. 10, 1852. She died July 11, 1885, liaving issue, Claire 
Hanna, Leonard Hanna, Fanny W. Hanna. 

(g) Lillian Converse Hanna, married Feb. 15, 1898 Samuel 
P. Baldwin, born Oct. 26, 1868. 

(C) Levi Hanna, third child of Benjamin and Rachel Hanna, 
born Feb. 7, 1808, died May 5, 1898 in his 91st year. He married, 
Mar. 21, 1833, Nancy Watson, (born July ir, 1808, died April 1, 
1879) Had issue, 

(i) Elizabeth Hanna, June 13, 1834, died Aug. 29, 1838 

(2) Mary C. Hanna, June 12, 1836, died April ^9. 1837. 

(3) Aniada Hanna, April 13, 1839, died Nov. 2, 1887. 

(4) Amelia Hanna, Nov. 13, 184 1, died Sept. 8, 1842, 

(5) George Hanna. Jan. 25, 1845, married Clara L. Von 

Gohran, July 8-, 1876, and had 2 children, 
Robert E. Nov. 5, 1874. 
Clarence L. June 25, 1876, died Oct. 6, 1876. 

(6) Charies Hanna, Nov. 22,1844, died Mar. 21, 1895, mar- 

ried Catharine E. Marshall (born Aug. 39, 1845) and 
had two children, Hobart S. April 28, 1875. 
Cornelia M. July 4, 1886. 

(7) Alice Hanna, March 13, 1847, died Aug. 26, 1848. 

(8) Frank Hanna, Jan. 15, 1850, married July 31, 1878, Mary 
A. Lounsberry (born Oct. 28, 1846 and has issue Laurin Hanna, 

Aug. 4, 1879. 

(D) Zalinda Hanna, married. Feb. 28, 1828, Charles D. Hostetter 
(born April 29, 1802, died Aug. 26, 1872) and had issue, lochildren. 

1. Charles F. Aug. jo, 1830, died June 15, 1833. 

2. Leonard H. Mar. 26, 1820, died Mar. 30, 1832. 

3. Franklin H. Mar. 27, 1833, died Nov. 14. 1836. 

4. Albert K. Oct. 15,1835, married Mar. 7, 1871, Mary E. 
Shnmway, born Dec. 28, 1838. 

5. Susan A. Mar. 31, 1839, married July 13, 1859 Wi'liara 
Morse, born Feb. 2, 1830. She died June 26, 1867, leavinc^ 
issue, Wni. L Morse, Apr. 27. i860. 

George E. Morse, June 14, 1863. 
Edward L. Morse, Aug. 15. 1865. 

6. Henrietta M. June 12, 1841, died Feb. 15, i860. 

7. Benjamin F. June 12, 1843, married Oct. 27 T87oJosepliine 

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E. Wright, boni Aug. 8, 1844 *"^ has issue, 

Chas. E. Hostetter, Aug. 27, 1871. 

Alice M. *' Sept. u, 1873, died Oct. 29, 1879. 

Carro A. ** July 3, 1875. 

Augie M. '* May 29, 1881. 

( E) Robert Hauna, 5th child of Beujaniiu and Rachel Hanna, 
married March 15, 1837, Harriet E. Brooks, born March 8, 1815, 
died July 27, 1882 aud had issue, three children. 

( i) Ariel T. Hanna, Jan. 27, 1840, married William H. Whit- 
acre Oct. 17, i?^66, died Nov. 16, 1875, leaving issue, 
Hattie Whitacre, Mar. 8, 1868. 
Susie •* July 12, 1870— Oct. 6, 1877. 

Mary E. ** Jan. 14, [872. 
Robert H. *' Sept. 17, 1873. 
(2) Cassins B. Hanna. April 10, 1845, married Dec. 8, 1868 
Hattie L. Thompson (Aug. 24, 1847) and has issue, 

Ariel Hanna, 1870. 

Edith Hanna 
(F) Try phena Hanna, 6th child of Benjamin and Rachel 
Hanna, married Sept. 4, 1833 Samuel Nichol.s, born Jan. 21, 1807, 
died May 23, 1873. Had issue 6 children, 

[[] Samantha Nichols, Feb. 8. 1835 — Mar. 25, 1893. 
[2] BenjamiuF. Nichols, Sept. 23, 1836, married Dec. 31, 
i860 Lauretta J. Hessin, [Feb. 16, 1842] and had issue, 
Carrie V. Nov. 18, i86i— Oct. 19, 1865. 
Anna L. l''eb. 18, 1863. 
Henry H. April ii, 1868. 
Mary A. Aug. 16, 1869. 
Lucy, Aug. 9, 1877. 
Samuel, Mar. 15, 1881. 
[3] William J. Nichols, Oct. 30, 1838. 
[4] James H. Nichols, Mar. 27, 1847. 
[5] Spencer J. Nichols, Jan. 15, 1850. 
[6] Rachel A. Nichols, Dec. 6, 1856. 

[G] Tryphosa Hanna, the 7th child of Benjamin and Rachel 
Hanna, died unmarried. 

[H] Rebecca Hanna, the 8th child, married May 31, 1837, Jesse 
Holmes, born Aug. 2, 1813, aud had 3 children, 

[i] Elizabeth U. Holmes, Aug. 11, 1838, married David 
Townsend Sept. 5, 1861 and had issue, 
Mary A., July 15, 1863" 
Kersey H., May 12, 1866— Aug. 18, 1868. 
Carroll C, Sept. 26, 1869. 

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Roy H., Nov. 14, 1870 
[2 J Orlando W. Holmes June 15, 1840. 
[3] Kersey O. Holmes, Aug. 2i» 1842. 

[I] Thomas B. Hanna. gtli child of Benjamin and Rachel Hanna. 
married March 5, 1843, Sophia T. Tabor, born May 24, 1822, died 
Oct. 20, 1895, and had 5 children, 

1. Lavinia Hauna, Dec. 11, 1843 died May 21, 1875. 

2. Lounette Hauna, Feb. 8, 1848. married Aug. 25, 1869 Al- 
bert L. Adams born April 23, 1846, and had issue Louis H. 
Adams, July 21, 1870, died Dec. 27. 1883. 

3. Harry O. Hauna, April 16, 1854, died May 5, 1850. 

4. William T. Hanna, July i, 1856— Dec. 29, 1857. 

4. Mary H. Hanna, June 22, 1862, married 1888 Albert Han- 
.son. 
(J) Anna Hanna, loth child, married March 27, 1845, Hiram T. 
Cleaver and died without i.ssue. 

(K) Benjamin J. Hauna, nth child, married March 26, 1845 
Catharine McCook, born Nov. 24, 1823, died March 1904, 
and had issue 4 children, 

1. Mary E. Hanna, Jan. 16, 1846, married Oct. 12, 1875 Sam- 
uel F. Folsoni. Has one child, Arthur Folsou. 

2. Louis G, Hanna, Feb. 16, 1850, married Mary Bulwer and 
has i.ssue Grace Hauna and Benjamin Hanna. 

3. Catharine T. Hauna, July, 9 1856— Feb. 16, 1861. 

4. Gertrude Hauna, May 26, 1863. 

(L) Kersey Hauna. the 12th child, married March 15, 1889 Mary 
A. McCook, born Jan. 7, 1826, died Feb. 7, 1891, and has issue, 

1. Flora A. Hauna, March 23, 1850. 

2. Alice Hauna, May 9, 1853 — Sept. 24, 1874. 

3. James B. Hanna, Aug. 26, 1854. married Feb. 26, 1896 Har- 
riet L. Beggs and has i.ssue, 

Harriet K. Hanna, Feb. 20, 1900. 
Helen M. " Aug. 10, 1901. 
Marion A. '* June 16, 1903. 

4. Edwin Hauna, Nov. 18, 1857, married March 20, 1890, 
Mary E. Slater, and has issue, 

Edwin D. Hanna, Nov. 8, 1893. 
Constance McC(x>k Hauna, Dec. 8, 1H96, 
James A. Hanna, Feb. 5, 1900. 

5. Mary L. Hauna, June 12, i860. 

6. Margaret Hanna, May 21, 1865. 

r 
(M) Eliz^ibeth Hanna, the 13th child of Benj luiin and Rachel 

Hanna, died Jan. 28, 1833, at the age of five and one half years 



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Kersey Hanna 

Grandson of Robert Hanna (1753-1837) 

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Marcus Alonzo Hanna, U. S. Senator from Ohio 
Great Grandson of Robert Hanna (1753-1837) 

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MARCUS ALONZO HANNA, 
Born Sept. 24, 1837. Died February 15, 1904. 

HISUFE IN ALL ITS VARIED ASPECTS, AS A CITIZEN, IN 
BUSINESS, IN POLITICS AND AS A STATESMAN. 

Any sketch of Marcus Alonzo Hanna which failed 
to view the various sides of his character would be incom- 
plete. That he was a man of more than one side no one 
who knew him intimately will deny. Nor does this mean 
that there was a bad as well as a good side. 

He must be considered as a citizen, as a business 
man, as a politician, and as a statesman. In allthese va- 
rious aspects he was the man Hanna. The chief element 
of his character was force. Next to being a forceful man, 
he was a man of inherent kindness of heart. When he 
left his father's grocery store, where he did hard work 
as boy and young man, to engage in business for himself, 
it was force w^hich gave him success. Later when he 
had broadened the scope of his enterprises, and was suc- 
cessfully engaged in the building and sailing of ships, 
the mining, buying and selling of coal and iron ore, the 
operation of street railroads, the direction of banking es- 
tablishments, and the financing of various enterprises, 
it was still force which made hiin a power in the business 
world. Still later, when his business affairs had been so 
arranged that he could indulge his fondness for participa- 
tation in political affairs, during his career from the time 
when he mixed in the politics of his ward, then engaging 
in State campaigns, and finally taking charge of the Pres- 
idential campaigns of 1896 and 1900, leading the Republi- 
can party to victory by unprecedented pluralities, it was 
force thai made him powerful. It was not the force of 
physical strength. It was rather the force of will — a 
will controlled by a healthy and wonderfully active brain 
mind trained to grasp details, analyze .situations, 

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meet emergencies, control men, and make them serve in 
them serve in the carrying ont the plans he formed. 

In the earler days, when Mark Hanna was engrossed 
with the cares of business, the force that was in him man- 
ifested itself in ways thet were often deemed ungentle. 
The popular, hut mistaken, impression of him was that 
he was hard and intractable. True it is that he was 
brusque, direct and candid. He did not palaver. He u- 
.sually said what he thought. Sometimes he was not 
careful enough to inquire or care what other people 
thought alx)ut what he said. If he believed his own 
way was right he contended for it strenuously. But he was 
willing to listen to advice and heed it. Men who did not 
understand him sometimes thought they had been crowd- 
ed aside; sometimes they cherished enmity. But he on- 
ly adopted the common methods of business, perhaps, do- 
ing as other men have one to win success in the hard 
and practical battle of life. Yet he was genial and kind- 
ly to all who knew how to approach him, and his code of 
business ethics gave no countenance to trickery or dis- 
honesty. Mark Hanna's word was always as good as 
his bond. He never made a promist: he could not keep; 
he never failed to keep a promise he had made. That was 
true in his business career; it was also true of his later 
political career. 

It was the misrepresentation of Mark Hanna's meth- 
ods in ihe rough and tumble of business which won for 
him the reputation he bore w^hen he dropped business, 
in a measure, to go into politics. Upon his brusqueness 
was ba.sed the foundless charge that he was a hard and 
tyranical man, a labor crusher, and a fit exponent of the 
gospel of greed, selfishness and inhumanity in which the 
masses were told every rich man believed. Yet the pic- 
ture that was drawn of Mark Hanna, the business man, 
was not a truthful picture. Not one in a hundred of the 
cruel and brutal things that were said of him w^as true. 
The people soon had an opportunity to see another side 



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of him — a side wliich only liis family and close associates 
liad setiiup to that time. 

A NEW v<?IDE VIEW OF HIS NATURE REVEALED IN POLITICS. 

When Mark Hiiiiia engaged in politics he revealed 
the side of his nature which had l^en obscured from the 
public through the efforts of his enemies, political and 
otherwise. Under the tutelage of the mild-mannered and 
diplomatic McKinley he learned the value of tact as a 
weapon of political warfare. The lesson which he learn- 
ed from the masterful politician whom he helped to the 
White House — one of the greatest politicians the country 
ever produced was invaluable to him. Thus Mark Han- 
na the politici.'.n, became a different man from the popu- 
conception of Mark Hanna, the business man. The good 
nature that had been kept for his family and close friends 
broke its way through the habits and mannerisms which 
had formed during his business career. Men whose help 
he desired were won by cheer and kind words. In poli- 
tics he desired things as he had desired them in business, 
but he went about getting them b}' gentler methods. In 
business he was wont to say, "Do this or that," and it 
was done in obedience to his command. In politics he 
said, "I wish ycm would do this,'* and it was done be- 
cause the di)er thought it an honor to serve a man in mas- 
terful control of a great political party. But while he 
was making men do his bidding he was winning friends 
and silencing his enemies. No man in American politics 
was ever worse maligned than was Mark Hanna eight 
years ago. Few men have enjoyed the respect and con- 
fidence of the American people to the degree that he did 
when he was re-elected to the Senate of the United States 
by a vote in the Ohio Legislature, which was well-nigh 
unanimous. 

The third side to Mark Hanna was presented when 
he took his place among the statesman of the nation as a 
member of the United States Senate. Up to that time 



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nobody had questioned his wisdom and abih'ty as a busi- 
ness man. Nobody, however, suspected in him the pos- 
session of the qualities of leadership among the lawmak- 
ers of a nation. He had never given evidence of ability 
as an orator. Yet, of a sudden almost^ the quiet business 
man and successful campaign manager prov^ed his ability 
to make an eloquent and convincing s[)eech. Resolving 
into sound logic the facts he had accumulated in his long 
business career, he stood among the solons as an ex- 
pounder of wisdom. Almost at the beginning of his 
Senatorial term he was looked up to as a mentor upon 
questions relating to the business of the c(mntry. His 
views upon such subjects were eagerly sought, and in or 
out of the Senate he l:)ecame an element of force in the 
life of the nation. The reason for that was plain. Mark 
Haiina believed in applying to the broad que.stious of 
national policy the principles of sound business as he had 
learned them in tlie hard school of experience. He stood 
in the Senate, as he had always stood for connnercialism 
— the term being used in no sense of criticism. He was 
convinced that the welfare of the country and all its peo- 
ple dei>ended upon industrial and commercial prosj^erit}' — 
the pro.sperity restored by the election of McKiuley — and 
he regr^rded as unwise any legislation or agitation design- 
ed to weaken the productive forces of the nation. For 
that reason he rapidly gained the confidence of the busi- 
ness men of the country, and the same confidence on the 
part of the masses of the people was bestowed later, but 
more slowly. 

It was, moreover, his devotion to the commercial 
welfare of the nation which led to the development of an- 
other side of his nature — the side which showed itself 
when he undertook, through the organization of the Civ- 
ic Federation of America, to establish relations of a::iity 
between capital and labor. Mark Hanna had always 
Ixien friendly to lalx>r. He was the first employer in Q- 

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hio to recoo^iiize the union principle in treating with an 
organization of coal miners. Furthermore, as the control- 
ing spirit of several big corporations, he emploj^ed about 
five thousand men, among whom there was never a strike. 
When, therefore, he sought, through a national organi- 
zation, to close the chasm between capital and labor, he 
did nothing inconsistent with his past record as an em- 
ployer of labor. But his advocacy of the Civic Federa- 
tion's plnn of restoring harmony between capital and la- 
bor was inspired by the — it cannot be called selfish — 
rather it was patriotic — desire to promote the industrial 
welfare of the country. He knew that warfare l^etween 
capital and labor was costly. Experience had proved 
that. He felt that capital would be the gainer and that 
labor would likewise be benefitted if some plan could be 
adopted under which all threatened wage disputes could 
be adjusted without a resort to strikes, with all the at- 
tendant evils of violence and bloodshed. Mark Hanna 
put his whole heart into the work of promoting peace in 
the industrial world. He was sincere in his efforts, but 
he did it more for the country than for any special in- 
terest. 

THE SUNNY SIDE OF MR. HANNA'S NATURE REVEALED. 

The sunniest and brightest side of Mark Hanna was 
that which reflected the goodness of his big heart. No 
appeal for help ever fell upon his ear without being heard. 
He was often generous when generosity did more harm 
than good, perhaps, but the thousands of dollars which 
he gave to charitable and benevolent enterprises, much of 
it in a quiet way, was l)estowed without a thought beyond 
the feeling that he was doing good in a worth}' manner. 
Not half or a quarter of his beneficences ever reached the 
public, and this side of his nature was only revealed to 
those who knew him intimately or had his confidence. 

But if Mark Hanna stood four sided to all the w-inds 
that blew — meeting on one side the chilling blasts of win- 

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ter and uixDii another reflecting the bright sunshine of 
sunnner — nol)ody ever questioned his courage or his man- 
hood or his integrity. A candid man in business, he was 
never unjust intentionly; kindly in his relations with 
those who needed his help, he was never effusive to the 
point of sentimentality; shrewd in a pcMititical way, he was 
never a demagogue; ready to make peace when peace 
was necessary, he never was afraid to fight when believ- 
ed his political interests were being attacked or principles 
for which he stood were at stake. For many years the 
people did not know Mark Hanna, and the word of his 
enemies was taken for the truth. Afterwards they knew 
him better and di.scoovered that their estimate of him 
had been erroneous. But history will give him his due. 
It will place him among the distinguished Americans 
who hav honored their country by serving its best inter- 
ests with wisdom and ability. 

HOW HK BEGAN HIS BUSINESS CEREER IN CLEVELAND. 

Everybody in Cleveland is familiar with fhe early 
life of Mark Haiuia as a business man. He was born in 
the village of New Lisbon, Columbiana Count j% on Sep- 
tember 24, 1837. He was descended from ancestry which, 
on one side was Virginia Quaker and on the other Vermont 
Presbyterian, From his father he inherited the staid 
principles of the Friends, and from his mother sturdy no- 
tions of right and wrong. He was of good blood and he 
was endowed with a brain that added ability to all the 
other qualities which came of his ancestry and his envi- 
ronment. It was not surprising, therefore, that when 
he was given a chance as a boy to learn the ways of bu- 
siness in his father's grocery store, after he had complet- 
ed a course in the high school, and part of a course at 
Western Reserve College, he improved all the opportuni- 
ties that were presented to him. At the age of twenty 
he was doing hard work, and he continued to give his fa- 
ther faithful service until the elder Hanna fell ill and 

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died. Then the business had to be closed, and Mark 
Hanna, at that time thirty years of age, left the grocery 
store and became interested in the coal and iron business 
with the family of his wife to whom he had been marri- 
ed three years before. The career of M. A. Hanna and 
the men associated with him was from that time on a se- 
ries of successes. It is enough to say of him, perhaps, 
that he accumulated a fortune which, in those days, was 
counted a big one. He achieved his purpose. He desir- 
ed wealth and power, and both came to him in a large de- 
gree. 

Mark Hanna was proud of his connection with the 
business affairs of Cleveland. He knew that his own l>e- 
ginning had been inconspicuous, and it was with modest 
pride that he referred to his success. In an address to 
the Cliamber of Commerce on the evening of May 13, 
1897, ^^^ said: "I see before me the men whose brains and 
talents and industry have made the city what it is. And 
in mentioning them I will not forget the thousands of 
builders — the working clas.ses' of our city; to them as 
much as to ourselves is due our greatness. My recollec- 
tions go back to the beginning of my business career — to 
1857. It was an important year in business circles in 
Cleveland, a very important year, and, I might .say, a 
good year for the young man 10 cut his eye teeth. Com- 
ing to Cleveland to make it my home in 1852, I found 
here a beautiful city of 30,000 inhabitants, known as the 
'Poorest City,' called so, I presume, because there were 
more native forest trees than there were houses; and you 
didn't have to go very far from this hotel to get into the 
forest. I have watched and studied the growth of Cleve- 
land from a business standpoint all these years, and I am 
proud to be able to stand before this audience to-night 
and .say that no city has the right to be more proud of its 
record and the men that made it that the city of Cleve- 
land. Then, almost the only industry that might be so 
called, was ship building. The old river bed was lined 



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with ship yards. The music of the saw and ax were 
heard by day, and that of the frogs by night.*' 

On a subsequent occasion — on the evening of June 6, 
1859, Mr. Hanna spoke to the Chamber of Commerce. 
He said: "It makes me feel old wlien I remember that 
forty -three years ago I carried my little samples to the old 
Board of Trade rooms in the old Exchange at the foot of 
Superior street. I did not have on a dress suit or white 
vest, but I had on bhie overalls. That was my first con- 
nection with the Chamber of Commerce, or. as it was then 
called, the Board of Trade of the city of Cleveland. I 
was the youngest member, and, if two certain men v/ere 
not here to-night, I might say I am tlie oldest member. 
I have fully appreciated what can be and what has been 
accomplished by such an amalgamation of capital and in- 
dustry as is found in the chaml)ers of commerce and 
boards of trade throughout the country." 

CDtiir.iiuj^, Mr, Hanna gave a clear idea of his views 
concerning the association of business and politics. He 
said: "I do not care in the few remarks I liave to make 
to-night to say anything upon politics or of the political 
situation. But I merely wisli to sa\' one word with ref- 
erence to the campaign of 1896, in which I took part, 
and I want to go on record among my friends here to- 
night, and in confidence tell that no factor, no influence, 
no power in those results was felt more than the united 
action or the business men of the whole country. 

'*It is a misfortune," he continued, "that business 
men and men of affairs do not take greater interest in 
public affairs — call it politics if you will, it is none the 
less their aifair — and if things are not as they should be, 
if our municipal, State and national governments are not 
what they should be, it is our fault. It is our fault be- 
cause we never feel that it is necessary to leave our homes 
at night, or neglect our business by day. to «pend one 
minute or one hour for our citv, wState or country, only 



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Hon. M. A. Hanna's Boyhood Home 

Lisbon, Ohio 

Page 38. 



Canal Lock Stone, No. 37 

A Relic of the Sandy and Beaver C^nal 

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when a crisis comes — and tlieii we do it with the sudden 
motive of self-preservation. When we complain of tha 
laws which are passed at the State capitol we should re- 
flect that we are responsiljle for the agents we send there 
to enact those laws, If we find fault with the administra- 
tion of our cit}^ affairs, we ninst remember that we stay- 
ed at home on the night of the primaries and took no 
part in the selection of the officers to whom w« entrusted 
our city government." 

THERRAl, BEGINNING OF MR. HANNA'sCAREER 
IN NATIONAL POLITICS. 

It is not surprising that a man who believed it to be 
the duty of every citizen to interest himself in public af- 
fairs should have actively participated in politics earlj^ in 
life. In the local affairs of Cleveland Mr. Hanna became 
known a quarter of a century ago as a political worker of 
shrewdness and inffuence. He always attended the pri- 
maries and conventions of the Republican party, and he 
never failed to vote on election day. In that way he did 
what he believed to be his duty as a citizen. It was in 
1880, however, that he became interested in political af- 
fairs beyond the limits of his ward and city. That was 
at the beginning of the Garfield campaign for the Presi- 
dency. The defeat of Grant in the Chicago convention 
had estranged Conkling and his followers in tlie East, 
and it was rightly deemed of importance that peace 
should be restored between General Garfield and the stal- 
wart Republicans of the East. Mark Hanna undertook 
the difiScult task of bringing Garfield and Conkling to- 
gether, and as a consequence of his efforts they met. The 
big mass meeting held at Warren, at which l)oth Conk- 
ling and Grant made speeches for the candidate, was the 
direct result of what Mr. Hanna did, and nobody will at- 
tempt to deny that this meeting, fraught as it was with 
tlie spirit of conciliation, had very much, indeed, to do 



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with the success of General Garfield at the polls. But 
Mr. Hanna had an active though inconspicuous part in 
that canipaij^n in another way. He organized in Cleve- 
land the Business Men's League, a political movement 
which was extended to all parts of the country, and which 
exerted a most ixjwerful influence in shaping public o 
pinion and in drawing contributions from the men of af- 
fairs everywhere. At first the practical i>oliticians were 
wont to refer to Mr. Hanna as "only a business man," 
but they discovered before the campaign had ended that 
he was a man of power and influence, whose assistance 
they were glad to have. In 1884 Mr. Hanna was a dele- 
gate at large to the Republican national convention from 
Ohio, and that same year he served as Ohio member of 
the Republican National Connnittee, having charge of 
Mr. Blaine's campaign for the Presidency in Ohio. He 
did valuable work for the party, but was not even then 
recognized at his true worth in a political way. Four 
years later Mr. Hanna had allied himself with the Pres- 
idential ambitions of John Slierman, and he went to the 
Chicago convention as one of Mr. Sherman's campaign 
managers. The fight was a losing one, General Harrison 
taking the nomination away from the Ohio man. 

HIS FIGHT FOR THK NOMINATION AND KLKCTION OF 
MCKINLEY. 

For six years thereafter Mr. Hanna took little inter- 
est in national politics. In 1894. however, while Wil- 
liam McKinley was occupying the oifice of Governor of 
Ohio, Mr. Hanna undertook the work of making him 
President of the United States. He had known the elo- 
quent champion of the cause of protection for many years. 
The two had beconi;! acquainted while Major McKinley 
was defending a party of Stark county coal miners who 
were charged with rioting. He was impressed with 
McKinley 's honesty of purpose and his devotion t o the 



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principles of right and justice. The two became fast 
friends. Mr. Hanna l:elieved in the policy of protection 
to which Major McKinley was devoted and by the ad- 
vocacy of which his public career up to that time had 
been shaped. It was here that Mr. Hanna's patriotic de- 
votion to the w.lfareof the country was exhibited. Be- 
lieving as he did in the princi])les for which McKniley 
stood, and believing, furthermore, that prosperity, which 
had been destroyed by the application of unwise i>olicies 
in the national government, could be restored by the e- 
lection of McKinley and the restoration of protection to 
the tariff law, he threw himself into the movement for 
McKinley's nomination with all the energy he possessed. 
He did not claim full credit for the work of the St. Louis 
convention in 1896, for he admitted that the demand for 
McKinley's election to the Presidency w^as in the air tw^o 
years before that time. Nevertheless the McKinley 
forces needed a leader, and they found one in Mr. Han- 
na. The Politicians who had been in the habit before 
that of dictating nominations thought they knew what 
the party needed in the way of a candidate. They would 
have picked another man for the Presidency if they could, 
even though they had seen at Minneapolis in 1892 evi- 
dence of McKinley's growing popularity with the voters 
of the party. These President- making politicians scoffed 
at Mr. Hanna. They intimated that he would have no 
power when the convention met. Hov; erroneous were 
their estimates of the strength and resourcefulness of 
the Ohio business man with whom they had to con- 
tend was proved when the cnnvention met, and McKin- 
ley was nominated upon a platform declaring for .sound 
money and protection. From that time on Mr. Hanna's 
power was recognized. Nobody asked after that **wlio 
is Hanna?' ' Nobody thenceforth referred to him as* 'only 
a business man." His prestige had Ijeen established. 
All the politicians who thought they had been com- 

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nii.ssiaiied to administer tlie affairs of tlie Repitblicaii par- 
ty and run the government were swept aside, and Mark 
Hanna stood as the recognized Warwick of American 
politics. One year l)efore Mr. }{anna, then committed to 
the candidacy of Judge George K. Nash for the Gover- 
norshipof Ohio, in the interest of McKinley's control of 
the party machinery in the State, had been forced to re- 
main content with thepv)siti()n of sj^ectator at the Zanes- 
ville convention, where Governor Foraker and George B. 
Cox, working in combination, had nominated Asa S. 
Bush nell for the Governorship. In 1896 the politicians, 
not only in Ohio, bnt throughout the country, were will- 
ing to lx)w down to the business man who had proved 
his ability to make politics a matter of business. 

HOW THE CAMPAIGN OF 1 896 WAS FOUGHT AND WON. 

The McKinley campaign was a revelation in Amer- 
ican politics. Never l^efore had such a battle been fought 
in this country; probably another like it will never be 
fought. As he had organized the ante convention cam- 
paign, so Mr. Hanna planned the )X)st -convention battle. 
The national committee was divided. Headquarters were 
ojiened in both the great cities of the country — New York 
and Chicago. Trained political workers were put in charge 
of all branches of the work. vSpeakers were booked by 
the hundred. Cainp:iign docunients were printed and 
distributed by the ton. The whole country was brought 
within the scope of that organization. Hanna, as the 
chairman of the national committee, divided his time be- 
tween the two headquarters, stopping occasionally in 
Cleveland to look after Ohio, or going to Canton to con- 
sult Mr. McKinley, as he was moving between the two 
battlegrounds. The campaign was fought upon a direct 
appeal to the business interests of the country. Business 
was sick. Industries were paralized; conunerce languish- 
ed; railroads were upon the verge of ba'.ikruptcy; agri- 



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cultural conditions were deplorable. With * 'protection, 
sound niuuey, and prosperity** as the watchword, the 
battle went forward to a victorious conchision. When 
the votes had been counted in November and it was found 
that Republicanism had triumphed. Mark Hanna was 
hailed as the man who had accomplished that result. 
To him was given the credit for picking the candidate 
who could win and organizing the campaign that ended 
in victory. 

Then the Republicans asked Mark Hanna to take 
his reward. He was urged to accept a place in the Cab- 
inet of President McKinley, and the President was urged 
to offer him a place. But Mark Hanna refused to con- 
sider such a proposal. He wanted no reward. He 
said he had worked for McKinley unselfishly. He had 
hoped for nothing at the hands of the man he had helped 
to elevate to tlie Presidency. Whatever of political pre- 
ferment came to him he desired to earn. So other men 
went into the Cabinet of William McKinley. John Sher- 
man, of Ohio, was chosen for Secretary of State, retiring 
from the Senate to accept that portfolio. This left a 
chance for Mark Hanna, His friends demanded of Gov- 
ernor Bushnell that Mr. Hanna be apppointed to fill out 
Mr. Sherman's unexpired term. There was opposition 
to this. Forces were set at work with the purpose of an- 
noying Mr. Hanna, but in the end Governor Bushnell 
gave him the appointment, and his career a.s a member 
of the Senate began. 

Up to that time Mr. Hanna had only been in politics 
to help other men. When he became a member of the 
United States Senate he acquired a constituency of his 
own, and was in a sense before the American people. He 
fought his own first personal campaign for office in the 
summer and autumn of 1897. By the Republican State 
convention of Ohio, which met at Toledo that year, he 
was indorsed as a candidate for United States Senator to 

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succeed himself. That made him a candidate directly 
before the people. In the meantime the administration 
of President McKinley had begun. Mr. Hainia was in- 
fluential at the White House. He was still the close friend 
of the President, and to a large extent his adviser. That 
gave him further power and influence in his own State, 
and in the nation. But his enemies were still numerous 
and active, and they nearly accomplished his defeat after 
a Legislature pledged to his election had l>een cho.sen. 

THE SENATORIAL BATTLE OF 1897-8 AND ITS OUTCOME. 

Thestor}^ of the campaign of 1897 and of the Sena- 
torial election at Columbus, the following winter, is told 
impartially by a writer in the Review of Reviews for Feb- 
ruary of 1898. The Ohio campaign, though waged di- 
rectly for the election of a Governor and other State offi- 
cers and a new Legislature, was in reality led on the two 
opposing sides by the accredited party candidates for the 
United States Senate. The Republican State convention, 
while granting a renomination to Governor Bushnell, 
designated Marcus A. Ha una as its choice for the Unit- 
ed States Senate. The Ohio election in November re- 
sulted not only in the re-election of Governor Bushnell, 
but also in the election of a Republican Legislature, by a 
small but safe majority. The great struggle of tlie cam- 
paign had been for the control of the Legislature, and 
had l)een led by Mr. Hanna on the Republican side and 
by John R. McLean on the Democratic side. It was per- 
fectly agreed and understood throughout the State that 
if the Democrats should gain control of the Legislature 
Mr. McLean would be elected to the Senate, while Re- 
publican .success would mean that Mr. Hanna should not 
only continue to serve through the few remaining weeks 
of the present term, but .should also be chosen for the 
full succeeding term of six years. 

Mr. Hanna's victory was therefore considered by the 

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couiitr)' at large as entirely assured when it was learned 
that a Republican Legislature had been chosen. This as- 
surance rested upon precisely the same grounds of Amer- 
ican political custom as made certain Mr. McKinley's 
success when it was ascertained in November, 1896, that 
the Republicans had secured a majority of the electoral 
college. Nobody supposed for a moment that the friends 
of Speaker Reed, Senator Allison, or any other promi- 
nent Republicans would endeavor to persuade a few Re- 
p ublican electors in the scheme to cast their votes in the 
electoral college for some other Republican in order to de- 
feat Mr. McKinley. 

There was, of course, no law to prevent their enter- 
ing into just such an arrangement. In accordance with 
both the letter and the original intention of the Constitu- 
tion, the electors could have cast their votes for any eli- 
gible American citizen at their discretion. But in the 
matter of electing Presidents the existing custom has be- 
come as accepted a rule as if it were embodied in the 
Constitution and the statutes. In just the same manner 
it has become understood that where in any given State a 
Legislative campaign is fought upon party lines, and the 
party conventions have named Senatorial candidates, the 
members elected to the Legislature are bound in good 
faiJi tt) vote for the party's Senatorial nominee. Only 
such members of the Legislature as clearly and openly 
during the campaign had avowed an independent position 
on the S^natorship could be regarded as free to work and 
vote against the party's choice for the United States Sen- 
ate. 

In view of the.se facts and considerations, it may well 
be imagined that Ohio was thrown into fierce excite- 
ment when it wa.«! discovered on the eve of the assembling 
of the Legislature that — under the leadership of Charles 
L. Kurtz, the former chairman of the State Republican 
committee, with the countenance and moral aid of Gov- 
ernor Bushnell — a strenuous eiTort was being made to ef- 



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feet an agreement by which a handful of anti-Hanna Re- 
pubh'can legislators should l)e suported by the entire bod- 
y of Democrats in the Legislature, to defeat Mr. Hanna, 
and elect a Republican belonging to tl e other faction of 
the party. Mr. Kurtz played this unprecedented politi- 
cal game with an amazing energy, and his combination at 
first seemed to be sure of success. Mr. Kurtz's combina- 
tion elected anti-Hanna Republicans as presiding officers 
of both the House and Senate. All that was needed to 
defeat Mr. Hanna on the joint ballot of both houses was 
eight Republican votes, with the solid concurrence of all 
the Democratic meml)ers. The excitement became in- 
tense, and leading Republicans from all parts of Ohio 
flocked to Columbus, while Ohio Congressmen in Wa.sh- 
ington deserted their posts to mingle in the fray. Charg- 
es of bribery and other improper methods were made up- 
on both sides. The half dozen Republican legislators 
who had helped to bring about the anti-Hanna organiza- 
tion in the Hou.se and Senate were besieged by angry con- 
stituents from the home counties, and were subjected to 
intense pressure by the principal leaders of both sides. 
Several of them wavered, and finally went back to the 
Hanna camp. A great effort was being made, mean- 
while, to induce two or three of the Democratic members 
to desert the combination and throw away their votes by 
casting tliem for Democrats who were not actual candt* 
dates. The Hanna supporters finall}^ succeeded, and Mr. 
Hanna was elected by the barest possible majority over 
Robert E. McKisson, of Cleveland, the Kurtz candidate. 

WHEN HK BECAME THE REAL LEADER OF 
OHIO REPUBLICANS. 

That ended the most exciting political campaign ev- 
er waged in Ohio, and the first in which Mr. Hanna went 
directly before the people. His success, in view of all 
the circuuLStances, proved that he was a politician of 

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^reat power and resources. There was an aftermath of 
scandal, of course. There were charges of bribery, 
which were denounced by the Senator's friends as liaving 
f)een trnni|>ed up. Those charges were eventually carried 
to the United States Senate in the effort to prevent the 
seating of Mr. Hanna, but the proof was not regarded as 
conclusive. Not one of the friends and supporters of Mr. 
Hanna in that memorable campaign has ever believed that 
money was used corruptly to influence the votes of mem- 
bers of the Legislature. Indeed, Mr. Hanna declared, 
when it was suggested to him that a certain man's vote 
might be obtained for a price, that if he could not be e- 
lected without resorting to the use of money he preferred 
to be defeated. 

From that time on, Mr. Hanna was the leader of the 
Republicans of Ohio. Other men disputed his claims, 
but the}' did it feebly and without effect. In each annual 
campaign the convention was under the control of his 
friends, and Senator Hainia, having developed skill as a 
campaign orator, took the lead in fighting the battles of 
his party. Unlike some other men who represent great 
States in the United States Senate, he did not believe that 
the success of his party was only essential wdien he hap- 
pened to be a candidate. He fought for the party all the 
time. Steadily moreover, he gained in the confidence and 
esteem ^/f the Republican masses. Eiich State campaign 
was fought with a slogan of hisgiving. First it was "Let 
well enough alone;'* then "Keep on letting well enough 
ah)ne;" then again "Stand pat." There was something 
trite and homely about those expressions, but the vo- 
ters understood wluit he meant and they took his advice, 
rolling up Republican majorities year after year, until 
the wave of popular approval culminated in Noveml^er 
last in a deluge which nearly drowned the Democrats out 
of the Legislature and gave the Governorship to the Re- 
publicans by a majority larger than any ever reached for 
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HE FOTTGHT THE CAMPAIGN OF I90O CONFIDENT 
OF VICTORY. 

When McKinley was renominated in 1900, with 
Roosevelt as his companion npon the ticket, Senator Han- 
na was again chosen as the chairman of the national cam- 
paign committee. With the experience gained in the na- 
tional contest of fonr years before, he went into this cam- 
paign with his forces well organized and read}- for the 
practical business of politics. He was not donblfnl of 
the result. That was proved by a short speech he made 
to an assemblage of Republican leaders. "Let the other 
fellows have the fiddles and barbecues/* 'he said. *'Our 
argument exists, per se, at the bench, in the workshop, 
at the desk, in the counting room, at the chair b}* the fire- 
side. Let them do the shouting; we will do the showing. 
They may have the hysterics; we have the conditions. 
'Let well enough alone' is a mighty good saying, if it is 
well enough, as it is now for a good many more than a 
majority of the voters of the United States. We need 
not wave the flag. If the^'^ force it — the people of the 
country are patriotic. We need not win any gory victo- 
ries upon the stump, nor storm any Spanish armies from 
wagon ends. The war is over, and over with the utmost 
credit to the Republican administration. The people 
know that, and we need not worry them by dwelling jiip- 
on it. Our appeal, and it need not be an appeal — still 
less a defense — is to sober common sense as against vis- 
ions; to what is and is satisfactory, as against what may 
be and may be disastrous; to present prosperity as against 
possible panic; to what has been tried and found true, as 
against what is untried and likely to be found wanting — 
in short to the sanity of the nation." 

This campaign was fought as vigorously as had been 
the one of 1896. Mr. Hanna was even more aggressiv-e. 
He went upon the stump himself, nuich, it may he said. 



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to the alarm of timid politicians who were afraid that he 
would say something he ought not to say. In almost the 
first speech he made he alarmed those timid ones. 16. a.. 
Chicago address he declared that were no trusts. Tech- * 
nically, he was correct, but Republicans stood aghast. 
For had not l)oth political parties been kicking the big 
corporations al)out the political battlefield? Still, Mr. 
Hanna was not afraid. 

THE DBATH OF PRESIDENT MCKINLEY AND ITS 
CONSEQUSNCES. 

There is no doubt that the death of President Mc- 
Kinley was a severe blow to the man who had been so 
clo.sely associated with him. The tragedy at Buffalo 
shocked the nation, but to Senator Hanna it meant the 
severing of the ties of a friendship formed years l>efore. 
The Senator showed the deep grief he felt when, with 
lx>wed head, he wept over the dead body of his friend 
and political associate. Many Americans believed, more- 
over, that the death of McKinley would be more to Sen- 
ator Hanna than the loss of a dear friend. It was ex- 
l^ected that the coming of a new occupant to the White 
House would mark the decline of the political power and 
prestige of the famous Ohioan. There was a change, to 
be sure, but all who had supposed that the Ohio Senator 
leaned upon McKinley for support discovered that they 
were mistaken. He lost none of his prestige in the na- 
tron. On the contrary, he gained in public confidence 
and respect. His former detractors were silenced, and 
his friends became more ardent in their devotion to him. 

THE CULMINATING TRIUMPH OF HIS POLITICAL CAREER. 

Mr. Hanna's last political campaign — the one fought 
in Ohio in the autumn of 1903 — re.sulted in the culmina- 
ting triumph of his political career. Indorsed by the 
State convention of his party as its candidate for the U- 

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nited States Senate, to succeed himself, Mr. Hanna went 
directly before the i>eople. The election was, of course, 
for a Gov^enior and other State officers, as well as a Leg- 
islature. But the Democrats so shaped their campaign 
as to make the re-election of Mr. Hanna the chief issue. 
It was their avowed purpose to obtain a majority in the 
General Assembly, thus making the defeat of Mr. Hanna 
for re-election certain, ai.J to insure tlie sending of a 
Democrat to the Senate in his ]^lace, Under the circum- 
stances it fell to Mr. Hainia to lead the Republican cam- 
paign, and he did it. Practically no attention was paid 
to State affairs by the Democratic speakers and newspa- 
pers. They made Mr. Hanna the issue and at him all 
their attacks were aimed. The result was a magnificent 
victory for the Senator, Not only 'did the vState go Re- 
publican by the largest plurality ever given toacandi.Iatc 
for Governor, but there was elected an overwhelming 
majority of Republican mend)ers of the Legislatuie. Nev- 
er before had such asignal political triumph been achiev- 
ed in Ohio. Mr. Hanna regarded the result of the elec- 
tion in the light of a personal victory. He felt that he 
had vindicated his claim to popularity among the j)eoi)le 
of Ohio, and established his political prestige among his 
friends and neighbors in the State in which he had lived 
all his life. 

Not only did this victory add to Mr. Hanna's [)res- 
tige at home. It resulted in a pronounced access of pop- 
ularity among the Republicans of the nation. From all 
parts of the country came letters and telegrams of con- 
gratulation, coupled with the wish that Mr. Haiuia 
would periniL the use of his name in connection with the 
Presidential nomination. There is no doubt but the tac- 
it pledge of loyalty he had given to Theodore Roosevelt 
when the latter acceded to the Presidency upon the death 
of McKinley, Senator Hanna could have made of himself 
a formidable candidate for the Presidencv. Had he for- 
gotten the promise of President Roosevelt to carry out 



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the policies inaugurated by McKinley and to regard the 
wishes of of McKinley 's friends, and undertaken, two 
years ago, to win for himself the Presidential nomination, 
it is ahnost certain that the recent victory in Ohio would 
have enabled him to have gone to the national conven- 
tion this year, had he lived, with sufficient backing to 
liave captured the nomination which many Republicans 
desired to bestow upon him. But Mr. Hanna, while 
he appreciated the praise of his friends, and while he was 
not insensible to the high honor that was conveyed by 
the suggestion of his name for the Presidency, refrained 
from taking a position which would have embarrassed 
the President in his efforts to secure the nomination. He 
told his friends he was not a candidate for the Presiden- 
cy; he discouraged their efforts to put him in a false po- 
sition, and it was certain that, had he lived, he would 
have gone to the national convention at the head of the O- 
hio delegation, loyal to the President and pledged to sup- 
port him for the nomination. 

Senator Hainia died at the Arlington Hotel, Wash- 
ington, I). C. at 6:40 o'clock, p. m. Feb. the 15, 1904. 
Funeral services were held in the Senate Chamber of the 
U. S. on the 17, at which time the Rev. Edward Everett 
Hale, Chay)lain of the Senate delivered the funeral ad- 
dress, in the presence of the President of the U. S. ; the 
Cabinet officers; meml)ers of the Senate and House of 
Representatives and representatives of the army and Na- 
vy; the Supreme Court and the Diplomatic Corps. 



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Rkv. Dr. Hale's Address. 

"Those who knew hiin best loved him most. And 
those who knew him little loved him much. 

**You speak of no one else as you go and come in 
these days, and this is the impression which is made, say, 
on a man like me — almost a stranger to him personally. 
I knew him very little. And yet I feel the power and 
the charm. There are a hundred men who are hearing 
me better fitted than I am to descril>e him or recount his 
power. But I think they would all have to recognize the 
promptness, the intensity, and the thought and action 
which come when a man's heart is engaged — the energy 
and success of a man who does what he loves to do — 
what he wants to do — what he ought to c o — because he 
loves it, because he believes in it; because he lives, not 
for himself, but for those whom he so gladly serves. 

** Indeed, here is the difference between men — be- 
tween these men who are seeing themselves with every 
throb of the brain and every breath which they draw and 
move, and these men who are eager, who are passionate 
in their determination to enter into the infinite work and 
to serve mankind. 

"The first are remembered only as Napoleon is re- 
membered, or any other calamity. The others are re- 
membered, oh, wherever a true man is known and loved. 

**I was talking once with a distinguished mission- 
ary, who had spent his life in one of those philosophical 
countries, whose religion came more or less into fashion 
among us half a century ago, and he said to me that the 
people among whom he had lived, loved the Lord their 
God with all their heart and with all their mind, but 
did not love him with all their strength. Our friend 
loved with all his might. He found out what was to be 
done and he did it. 

** *As God lives this thing shall go through.* That 

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resolve is only the poor, selfish energy' of Napoleon. It 
is worthless. But if it conies in the consciousness of a 
man who fights himself in the person for others, why, 
all things follow. 

'*That class of people, which is too large, who make 
it their profession to ascribe the worst conceivable mo- 
tives for every human action, could not make Mr. Hanua 
out when he appeared in what is called public life. They 
made the mistake which such men always make of think- 
ing that the mind with all its maneuvers and gynmastics 
and memories and imagination is greater and stronger 
than the soul of man, when it works in sincerity and 
truth, in faith and hope and love. They had to imaghie, 
therefore, a cunning intrigue, a man who accounted for 
his success as you might account for a boy's success in a 
game of marbles. 

**But the analysis of character did not prove true. 
You might as well compare the stilted adjectives and 
substantives of a schoolboy's theme against the passion- 
ate song of Burns or of Tennyson. Here was no con- 
triver, no schemer, no mere inventor, least of all was here 
any copyist. Here was a whole-souled child of God, 
who l>elieved in success, and who knew how to succeed 
by using the infinite powers. He knew that faith and 
hope and love serve, if you would mine iron or smelt it 
or draw it into bars; and he was not afraid to trust in 
faith and hope and love if the business in hand were the 
governing of states, if 'he did the thing that he was set 
to do. ' 

** 'Their rulers shall be of themselves and their gov- 
ernors shall proceed from the midst of them.' 

"Had any man asked Mr. Hanna what was his the- 
ory of administration, I think he would have said it was 
this story of the prophet. For, see, the whole thing 
changes. In the old systems the ruling class looks out 
for the ruling class. The Caesars look out for the Caes- 



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ars, or the priests for the priests, or in a military goveiii- 
nieiit the army looks out for the army, but when *\ve, the 
people,' are at the helm, we, the people, take care of 
'us, the people' — of the whole and not of a class or an 
order. A man like Mr. Hanna, a r.ian w^ho really be- 
lieves in democracy, or the purposes of any republic, is 
seeking to carry out the central theory. If you want 
Ben Franklin, take Ben Franklin, though he is a tallow 
chandler's boy; if you want Abraham Lincoln, take 
Abraham Lincoln, and take either as you would choose 
a doctor or an engineer, or a shipmaster or a boatbuilder. 
Get the best. Eight years ago an accomplished friend 
of mine said to one of the speakers in the canvass: 

** *Who is this Cleveland man, this Mr. Hanna, 
whom the newspapers are describiiig?' 

**The answer stays by me. I wonder if the man 
himself remembers it? 'Hanna is a man who means to 
apply to politics the methods of business men of honor.* 

"Honor, truth and love. Go to the botlcm and 
these are what win success. A square bolt will not fit a 
round hole in the side of a steamship. Truth ! Unless 
my word is as good as nn' note, my note will be looked 
at coldly when I offer it for discount. And unless I pur- 
sue the duty God has given me with an eager love of 
those who have fallen down, or those who have stum- 
bled: luiless in my strength I bear the infirmities of the 
weak; ah, woe is me. Love. 

"And so when men tell us what is true, that this 
man more than any other could mediate between I he men 
who provide the tools and the men who luindle them, that 
this man had tiie confidence of the workman, and of the 
man whose father was a workman, or the man, who, like 
himself, had made nature his stair, and ruled things, 
with what is Godly power, you understand what worked 
the miracle. V:"ou can work it yourself. 

"These three abide: Faith, hope, and love. *' 

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CHAPLAIN HALE*S BEAUTIFUL PRAYER. 

* 'Let US pray. Father, lie is with thee. He sees 
as he is seen. He knows a?^ he is known. Bnt we will 
wait a little longer. We need not pray for him. He 
prays for us in the glad certainties of a future life, and 
we go and come, remembering him and looking forward 
to the meeting. 

Father, may every memory of him quicken up a 
larger life, and every thought of the future show us how 
we are to meet the dear ones who have gone before, how 
we are to see as we are .seen, and to know as we are 
known. 

We ask thy blessing upon those near to him in the 
home, where they will not hear his whisper nor see liis 
face. But we are all brothers and sisters in the house 
of death. We a.sk it each for all and all for each, that 
we may bear each other's burdens as we have not done 
so until now, that we may be strong in each other's 
strength, that we may walk, Father, with thee, that ev- 
ery day we may hear thy whisper and go and come in 
thy perfect love. 

Grant us more of faith in thee, that we may see thee 
who art invisible, that we may hear thee in the whi.spers 
of thy spirit, speaking to us in our own lives, that thou 
wilt in.spire us with thine own holy spirit, that we may 
enter into that service which is perfect freedom, that we 
may do the duty every day which thou doth command, 
and that never more we may feel alone, but always that 
we may know our Father is with us. 

"Give us more of faith that we may look forward as 
immortals do look forward, that we may live as immor- 
tals live, that we may enter into thy work indeed, be- 
cause thou hast given it to us to do, that we may partake 
of thy nature and live in heaven to-day, to-morrow, and 
in the days that are to come, that we may speak with 



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thy word, that we may think with thy thought, that we 
may love with thy love, and l^e glad with thy joy. 

"Give us more of hope, and for this, Father, that 
we may bear one another's burdens, that we may remem- 
ber the lessons of such a life as this, that we may forget 
ourselves while we live for others, that we may go about 
doing good as he, thy well l)eloved son, in the homes of 
the sick and the poor and the weak, as in the homes of 
the rich and the powerfnl and the strong, that all being 
knit together we may bear each other's burdens, and so 
fulfill the whole law of Christ. 

''Reverently, humbly, and with the tears of the na- 
tion, we bear the body and lay it in the ground, dust to 
dusl, ashes to ashes. But he is with God ever. He is 
changed in a moment, in the twinkling of an eye. He is 
in the future life. 

"Father, we pray that we may learn the lessons of 
that life as we go and come here, that we may go about 
the works that thou hast given us to-day and tomorrow, 
and that we may be ready at any moment to hear the 
whi.sper coming to us that we may enter into the joy of 
our Lord.'* 

When Dr. Hale had concluded his address and his 
prayer the Gridiron Clul) quartet, from the press gallery 
above, sang "Nearer, My God, to Thee.*' No portion 
of the services was more affecting. The benediction was 
pronounced by Dr. Hale, and the services were at an end. 

The assembly quietly dispersed from the chamber, 
the family going first, then the President and his Cabi- 
net, the members of the Supreme Court, the diplomatic 
corps, the Senate, and the House. 

The tribute to the memory of Senator Hanna had 
been paid by his colleagues and the men in public life. 
His casket was left to remain until taken away to the 
train in the evening. 

There were many pathetic incidents in connection 

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with the services at the Capitol. For an hour l)efore the 
body came in Senator Piatt, of New York, himself an 
old man, worn by labor, weak with infirmity, his eyes 
heavy, sat alone in the chamber looking at the banks of 
flowers before him. The other aged men of the Senate, 
Pettis, Frye, Piatt, of Coiniecticnt: Stewart, Morgan, 
Cockrell, and that long list of distinguished statesmen, 
were visibly affected. President Roosevelt sat gazing at 
the casket before him, oral Dr. Hale, as he delivered his 
impressive eulogy. Senator Hainia's close friends. Sen- 
ator Scott, Senator Kittridge, Postmaster General Payne, 
Secretary Moody, General Dick, and the others who 
loved him so much, were deeply and visibly affected, 
quietly .sobbing. Senator Foraker, Senator llanna's col- 
league from Ohio, was most deeply touched by the sad 
ceremonies, and showed in his face his .sense of loss. 

There was among all the thou.sands there scarcely a 
dry eye. Mrs. Hanna sustained herself with remarkable 
bravery, yet her grief was touching to see, and showed 
it.self in the drooping figure and tear- worn face. She 
was given the most tender care by the other meml)ers of 
the family. 

The funeral party returned immediately to the Ar- 
lington after the services. President Roosevelt and fam- 
ily were driven at the same time to the White House. 

Senator Hanna' a body was taken to Cleveland, Ohio, 
where services were held in St. Paul's Episco|>al Church. 
Bishop Wm. Andrews Leonard conducte<l this service 
and the funeral oration delivered by him is here given in 
full. 



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Bishop Lkonakd's Ei.oquent Funerai. Oration. 

*'We are gathered here to-day in this house of God," he said- 
"for the last services of benediction over tlie body of our distin- 
guished citizen, our kindly ne'ghbor, and our beloved friend. The 
nation has honored him with its civic functioii at the Capitol of 
the United States; the Commonwealth of Ohio, by the hand of 
her Governor, has received him back into her care and keeping; 
the city has stood silently abDUt liis bier, reverencing his memory 
and .sorrowing at his departure. Aud now the holy church would 
commit his body from whence it came, and his soul unto the 
righteous Savior who redeemed it and who loved it with an in- 
fiuite affection. 

It is not the time or plac^ for extended eulogy and praise, such 
words will be fitly spoken by those wel'. equipped for such a priv- 
ilege. But there are certain qualities and characteristics of this 
man so highly regarded by all classes of }>eople that ought as- 
suredly to receive leco^nition in the midst of his frieiuls and as- 
sociates, and at this .solemn hour. The testimonies tliat have 
been given from many and varied sources blend together in a 
common strain and harmony as they s|)eak of his liigh integrity, 
his inflexible and dauntless purix>se. and his tender, true heart. 
Their composite resultant seems to portray with unmistakable out- 
line .ind detail the features of his human service. Those who are 
assembled here neetl no inspiration for Iheir love and estimation 
of this earnest, helpful life. We knew him well, we love<l 
him well, we mourn for him with undiminished sorrow l)ecause 
we shall sei his face no more. But we may each of us go forth 
into the life Go<i hathgrant-'d us, wilh added enthu.siasm for our 
tasks and toils since we have noted how worthily he did his duty 
for others; and we realize that the world he served is not unmind- 
ful of his greatness and gotxlness, nor ungrateful for what he 
strove after and for what he acconii)lished. 

**.\nd first the universal comment is on his integrity. This 
was a keynote in his life. 1 recall a fine, ringing address he made 
at Kenyon College last year when the degrees were being confer- 
red upon its gra<luating class. Aud the thoughts of his heart 
found expression in his elotpient wonls, as he urged upon those 
men the essential importance of a high and pure integrity. It is 
this word that is carven deep upon the stone that marks his long 
and useful business career. He was not only honest, but he was 
fair and just in all his dealings. He was resjjeced by everyoue in 
his employ. Kach man of the hundreds that looked up to him. 



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felt that ill the master niiud tliere was always tlie clear, iiushaka- 
ble element of integrity. This, too, was the principle that affect- 
ed his pubiic endeavors. Contending strenuously for victories, 
his opponents all pay tribute to his integrity. His field was an 
open one and his methods never belittiirg or degrading. And 
such a course with such an actuating motive invites the antago- 
nism of whatever is contemptable, false and selfish. And though 
the arrows fly swiftly, yet do they fall from such a shield harm- 
lessly; and the champion sustained by his integrity, stands forth 
unscathed and triumphant at last. He is an example to the young 
men of our country who would achieve success in any department 
of endeavor* .A. nd his advice is a legacy to the ardent youth of 
our great republic. 

"Then, too, he was a purposeful man. He had definite ob- 
jects in his life. He had aims to achieve, goals to reach, standards 
to attain. Is he not conspicuous in this? The Apostle Paul speaks 
of a classof men who do nothing with an intelligent reason, who 
never reach a conclusion, who never score a success because they 
*beat the air.' How inflexible and dauntless in his purposes was 
this mau we remember before God to-day. Clear visioned, quick 
in his perceptions, his diagnosis of a situation was rapid and search- 
ing. And then, when he had determined upon his duty, how 
positively and persistently, and patiently and fearlesaly, he mov- 
ed towards compassing. I think he would have disdained a mean 
or evil course. His record is before the nation now. The people 
are quick to detect the deceiver, the ch^rletan, the corrupt. And 
this day, far and near, fToiii high and low, rich and poor, goes 
forth but the one splendid verdict of praise and approval, because 
hechose the path of private and public rectitude, and that path is 
the straightest road to ultimate accomplishuient. 

'•And, finally, how true and tender of heart he was. He 
eached the highest levels in life, but it did not spoil him. His 
good heart was untouched by any canker of pride or arrogance. 
Great men stoop down easily to those that are humble and poor. 
Good men do the same. And if you wish a just estimate of this 
life and character, I believe you will find it among those who fear- 
ed him, not because they knew his heart, they knew he was their 
best friend, their benefactor, and their sympathizer. Would you 
see him among the laborers on the dock, among the workmen of 
the mills, among the Salvation Army people, among simple and 
plain folk, you would find him cordial, hearty, wholesome, and 
friendly. Do you note the signs of universal mourning and sym- 
pathy in our city and our State to-day? It is not alone Ijecause 



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our great statesman and Senator is dead, but because our dear 
frieud is gone into tbe greater life and is hidden from our view. 
Do you not recognize the reality of this man's genial, generous ef- 
forts in the silent approbation those 800,000 miners are offering 
while we worship here — the tribute that rebukes Ihe noisy, .•■hal- 
low liarangue which would inflame one clas.s against another; and 
that tells the world of the reverence of the vast industrial army 
for a righteous man, a strong leader, a considerate employer? The 
miners of the coal pits have cea.sed their work to-day, and they 
have laid down their picks and put out their, lamps, that, joining 
with you and me, they may honor the friend of the laborer. Yes, 
he was kind of heart and' generous of impul.se, hospitable, glad 
when others were happy, approachable, neutral, clean of life, 
clear of brain, and we could not help loving him becau.se he was 
so true and faithful. 

*'And now we leave him with the Heavenly Father, in whom 
he believed. Of course he had faults, his weaknesses, his sins. 
He is our brother man in this. But God knows nil about each one 
of us. He does not forget our services for the world. He never 
shuts his ears to our prayers. He alone sees our motive and reads 
our inmost disposition, and, taking our record with its flaws and 
imperfections, he works out of it all such good and lasting prod- 
ucts as are pleasing in his sight. And, therefore, in his loving 
care and keeping — into the hands of a merciful Savior — we com- 
mend the .soul of our friend. And whatever it lacked » whatever 
evil or stain may have shadowed its fair surface, he is able to wash 
out and punfy in his most precious and availing blood. With such 
a knowledge and in such a trust we may turn our faces to the 
light and pray for a happy reunion with the 'ju.st made perfect* 
and a joyous resurrection in the last victorious da3'.*' 



A Few Words OF Appreciation, Showing the Estimation 

IN Which Senator Hanna Was Hei,d by the Most 

Eminent Statesmen of His Day. 

by secretary hay. 

To Secretary Hay the death of Senator Hanna came as a great 
loss. 

"No one who knew Senator Hanna," said Mr. Ha\', "could 
fail to recognize in him those remarkable qualities of mind and 
heart that distinguished him. He was a man in a thousand for 
generosity, honesty, aud loyalty. He was one of the truest friends 

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that ever lived. 

Mr. Hay said that oue of the most surprising things about 
Senator Hanna's career was the contrast between the man's true 
character, and the cloud of calumny and vituperation that was 
made to surround his name by political opponents. Things that 
attributed to him by thoughtless adversaries were precisely the 
things of which he was absolutely incapable. 

••Senator Hauna was the soul of honor, candor, and open fair 
dealings," added Mr. Hay. "So far from being, as some liked to 
consider him, a creator of trusts and organized wealth, he was one 
the most powerful and devoted champions of the laboring people 
this country has ever known. He believed in his party. He was 
devoted to his friends, and we will find, now that he has gone, 
some of the truest mourners in the ranks of the opposition, as a- 
mong them in his life he counted stjuie of his most devoted friend. 

•'Senator Hauna was a faithful and loyal friend of President 
McKinley, perhaps his most intimate friend, and their names will 
always be associated in our political history. 

MOST FORCKFUL CITIZKN OF THK UNITKD STATES. 

Mr. Cannon, Speaker of the House of Representatives, said: 
As a businessman, political manager, and legislator, combin- 
ing the qualifications which distinguish men in each of these 
groups, Mr. Hanna was the most forceful citizen of the United 
States. Others may have done greater work in each of these lines 
of endeavor, but no man of this or preceding times, so far as my 
recollection or study of history goes, has combined these qualifi- 
cations, and deserved and won greater distinction in each and all. 
And he, more than any citizen of his time, welded these interests 
together, fulfilling the highest ideals of the statesman. To him 
the great business and labor interests and the great body of the 
people turned, having full confidence in his judgment and patri- 
otism, making him the most trusted arbiter in the most important 
public questions arising for solution. His death is a public loss 
in the full measure of that expression." 

"ONE OF THE NOBI^EST CHARACTERS I EVER KNEW," 
SAYS SECRETARY SHAW. 

Secretary of the Treasury Shaw was deeply affected when 
news of Senator Hanua's death was brought to him. Mr. Shaw 
said: 

'^Senator Hanna was oue of the noblest characters I ever 

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knew. As a business tiian he was very successful; as a politician 
he ranked with the most potent; as a statesman he was a broad- 
niitided, far-seeing, and intensely patriotic, and and as a friend 
he was the truest of the true. Not by luck nor by circumstance 
did he work his way from a position c|uite generally misunder- 
stood, to universal respect and confidence. It was real charac- 
ter, real patriotism, and real worth. His loss is national, and in 
the sad bereavement the humblest will be participant.*' 

BY VICE PRKSIDENT FAIRBANKS OF INDIANA. 

Senator Pairbauksjof Indiana, who has campaigned frequent- 
ly in Ohio with Senator Hanna, and whose acquaintance with 
him has extended over a number of years, was, perhaps, as deep- 
ly grieved as any man in Washington when the announcement 
of his death was made. Si>eakiiig of his deceased friend he said: 

**The death of Senator Hanna conies as a great personal sor- 
row. He was one of the noblest and best friendsanyone ever had. 
His loss is felt in many households f^om one end of the country to 
the other. The American people had come to love him and to 
trust him. He was a man of great ability, of broad and generous 
sympathies, and it is a great pity that we should lose him at the 
very meridian of his power and influence. He was among the 
most unselfish of men. He has sacrificed himself for his country 
and for his countrymen. No soldier ever fell upon the field of 
battle'and died for his country more courageously than Senator 
Hanna has died for it. He was a brave, frank man. His meth- 
ods were direct and honorable. He always was actuated by the 
highest and most generous motives, He was a wise, incorrupti- 
ble and patriotic statesman. He possessed the confidence of la- 
bor and capital in an unusual degree. His .services as president 
of the Civic Federation were invaluable. He looked upon his 
work in connection with this organization as more important e- 
ven than his work in the United States Senate. He was an able 
legislator, and we .shall greatly miss him." 

BY SENATOR FORAKER. 

In discussing the death of his colleague. Senator Foraket 
said: 

"The death of Senator Hanna removes frou: pnblic life one 
of our strongest and most capable leaders. His political successes 
have been most extraordinary, especially' in view of the fact that 
he lacked some of the qualities and accomplishments crdinarily 

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Hon. Warren Watson Hole 

Common Pleas Juilge, 9tli Jmlicial District of Ohio 

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thought to be essential to a successful public career. He was not 
a scholarly man, and yet he commanded the respect of the most 
learned. He was not, in the ordinary sense, a student of state 
affairs, and yet he comprehended, as by intuition, every trouble- 
some problem that arose, and efficiently aided in its solution. |||b 
seldom participated in debate, and yet he wielded an influence iii 
nioldin)^ the legislative will scarcely second to any other member 
of the Senate. 

**Tlie secret of his success was strong, intellectual endowment, 
a keen perception, and a courageous nature, combined with a 
pleasing ])ers(>nality and a plain, direct, straightforward manner 
that commanded respect and excited confidence. He had an un- 
coniniou hold on the esteem and good will of his countrymen. 
That has been strikingly manifested during his illness. The 
whole nation has literally waited at his bedside for the final sum- 
mons, and now all mourn his loss without regard to political 
difl*e fences. 

''His long service in the Senate had prepared him for still 
greater usefulness during the term for which he had just been re- 
elected. It accentuates the misfortune we sustain that his death 
should have come at what is apparently so inopportune a moment. 
He will long live in the appreciative memory of the American 
people as a strikingly successful and typical product of American 
life and opportunities. His death is a great loss to his party, his 
State, and the nation." 



Addrbss by Judgb W. W. Hoi^b (Grandson op Bsthbr 

Hanna) at thb Grant Banqubt in Sai«bm, O., 

Aprii. 27, 1903, 

(al which Senator Hanna was the guest 0/ honor), in which the 
Senator* s Cousin displays the Fatnily4ree, 

Mr. President, Gentlemen and Ladies: 

If this were a gathering 
of Shouting Methodists instead of a sober Quaker meeting, I 
should have begun the ceremonies by lining off that good old 
hymn: 

"This is the day we loug have sought. 
And mourned because we found it not" — 
The day when the God-father of the M. A. Hanna Republican 
club is present, in the flesh, to meet and greet us all. 

A full half century has rolled around since our distinguished 

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gtiest left the green hills of old Colaiiibiaiia comity for wider field* 
of activity, and our cluh certainly enjoys a high privilege in con- 
ihictiug the first public functio-n in which lie has participated in 
the county in which he was honi, and where his father was born — 
the county whicli his grandfather helped to organize, and which 
his great grandfather entered as a Quaker pioneer, when the land 
where we now stand was stiU a howling wilderness, and knowu 
as a part of Washington county, in the great North-west territory. 

Beiijainin Franklin was the first commercial traveler tliat 
America ever put on tlie road; and when he visited Great Britain 
about the middle of the eighteenth century, to protest against 
the passage of the Stamp Act. lie spread broadcast many facts and 
figures concerning the wonderful land across the seas. Thomas 
Hauua, of Monahan county, Ireland, a lineal descendant of Pat- 
rick Han nay, the noted lord of Sorby Castle, a celebrated strong- 
hold erected on the Southwest coast of Scotland in the thirteenth 
century, heard the news disseminated by the American philoso- 
pher, and in 17^3, the same year that Franklin returned to the 
colonies, and tradition says u|x>n the same vessel, this sturdy 
Scotch-Irishman, the great-great-grandfather of our guest, took 
passage for America, and landed in Philadelphia, jwor in worldly 
goods, but as rich in the matter of chihlren as even Theodore 
Roosevelt could desire. 

At hisdeath a year later, his son Robert, the greatgrandfather 
of our guest, was bound out to a worthy member of the Society 
of Friends resi<ling in Southern Pennsylvania, who taught his 
apprentice both how to plow and to wield a tailor's sliears and at 
the same time instilled hi«s mind wi*h the doctrines of George 
Fox. 

But there is not much milk and water in the bloo<l of aScotch- 
Irishniau, even when impregnated with Quaker principles; and 
as proof of this I hold in uiy hand a pamphlet containing the his- 
tory of Carpenter's hall, in Philadelphia, which shows that Robert 
Hanna (who had then just attained his majority) was one of the 
coterie of patriot heroes knowMi as the "Provincial Committee*' 
who met at that historic spot, in July, 1774, in the face of the fact 
that the Royalist, a Tory newspaper, warned them that "their 
necks might be inconveniently lengthened," and there passed 
those famous * 'instructions" which demanded that the Pennsyl- 
vania assembly should appoint delegates to the first continental 
congress. These "instructions" were com])lied with by the as- 
.sembly the next day after tViey were presented, and thus was 
started that momentous movement which culminated in the Dec- 



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laratioii of Independence, 

The English newspapers winch have asserted that Tor the past 
six years Marcus A. Hauna has done more than an^ other single 
person to direct the policy of our government, may '^properly be 
reminded that a .nan whose grandfather may well be called an ad- 
vance agent of American MT)erty, ought to have (according to En- 
glish notions, at least,) some licreditary right to sliape tlie desti- 
ny of this Republic. 

From Pennsylvania Robert Hamia went to Virginia, wliere 
he an<i John Lynch founded the city of Lynchburg. Here he re- 
sided for a score of years, and tradition says he hati some warm 
controversies with the planters of that commonwealth ou the sub- 
ject of slavery, lu the fall of 1801 he migrated with his family 
to the North-west territory, traveled in the great Conestoga wag* 
ons, which were then the chief means of transportation. He 
crossed the Ohio river at Smitirs Ferry, and located fist in Faii^ 
fisld township in this county, and afterwards in Middleton town- 
ship, where he laid out the town of Clarkson. 

Through the courtesy of Mr. Charles I). Dickinson, I have 
here the original records of Fairfield township, which show that 
**on the First day of the Fourth month'* in 1805, Robert Hanna 
was elected trustee, and his son, Renjamin, was elected clerk and 
treasurer of that township. History does not inform us, senator, 
whether or not your Quaker ancestor was ever called a boss, but 
I very much fear that he merited that title, for this record shows 
that he was chairman of the election board whicli certified the e- 
lection of him.self and son, your grandfather, and that both candi- 
dates received all of the 27 votes cast. 

In those early days fences were almost unknown, and it was 
necessary that each owner of domestic animals should have them 
properly marked for identification. 

In this record, we find in the handwriting of your grandfath- 
er the earmarks adopted by many of the early settlers. 

It is here pictured and written that your grandfather's mark 
for cattle, sheep and hogs was a crop off of the left ear and an un- 
derbit out of the right ear, which mark was recorded on the Third 
day of the Third mouth, 1806. Let us pause for a moment, and 
imagine, if possible, how the peaceful calm of your grandfather'» 
Quaker home must have been disturbed in the spring of 1806, by 
the medley of bellowing, bleating and squealing which arose 
when your grandfather was tagging his live stock. 

But there came a time that spring when the earmark business 
was laid aside. This record shows that from the 3i-d to the 13th of 
of March no entries were made, and on the latter date the accu- 

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Ululated business was disposed of. I wondered what caused this 
hiatus until I learned thai your father, Leonard Hanua, was born 
on the 4th of March. 1806, and then I realized that this book is a 
mute but unimpeachable witness to the fact that your grandfath- 
er was a devoted husband and considered the new baby more im- 
portant than any other live stock. 

In those days, no one person had capital enough to start a 
store, and therefore in 181 2, a nunilierof substantial Quakers form- 
ed a combine, which in these days nnght be called a trust, but 
which they simply called a "company store.** This was located 
at Salem, and Benjamin Hanna was placed in charge as manager. 
He lived in Salem for two years, 1812 to 1814, and two of his chil- 
dren were born here. After leaving Salem for Lisbon, where he 
entered business for himself, he still seems to have retained some 
regard for our Quaker village, for I have in my possession a deed 
from Samuel Davis, dated the 20th day of 3d month, 1820, con- 
veying to Benjamin Hanna lot number six in a **row of lots near 
and adjoining the town of Salem. " Walter M. Hole's furniture 
store is now located on this lot, probably the geographical center 
of the city. 

But I need not dwell long upon the history of the Hanna 
family in this county, sla it is well known to most of us. The 
senator's grandfather was quick to see the vital importance of 
having good transportation facilities, and before the days of rail- 
roads he started a pioject for the building of the Sandy and Bea- 
ver canal, and for twenty-five years was president of that canal 
company. 

There are present in this assembly one or two gentlemen who 
heard Dr. Leonard Hanna, the senator's father, speak from the 
stump in the notable campaign of 1840, when the slogan of the 
Whig party was "Tippecanoe and Tyler, Too !" And those who 
listened to his eloquent voice then, as well as those who later 
heard, in this Quaker village, his impassioned utterances against 
the institution of human slavery, know that our distinguished 
guest comes honestly by his talent for extempore oratory. 

We have assembled here tonight to fittingly observe the 8ist 
anniversary of the birth of Gen. Ulysses S. Grant. The day nat- 
urally brings to our minds thoughts of war, commotion and 
bloodshed. Yet, in this Quaker city, it is fitting that we should 
remember also the words uttered by the great commander at the 
close of the rebellion, "Let us have peace." The double theme 
for tonight is, therefore, War and Peace— the Civil war which 
preserved the Union, and the industrial peace which it is hoped 
may soon ue conciuueu a|,d forever mai"taiued oeiweeu lUe 

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forces of capiL'tl and labor. 

I may add my voice to that of our president in extending to 
our guests a most cordial welcome. Tbe freedom of our Quaker 
city is assuredly yours — but don't forget we have lately elected a 
Democratic mayor. 

Webster in his address to La Fayette said, **Welconie! All 
bail ! And thrice welcome, citizens of two hemispheres I" If I 
were permitted to paraphrase these words in extending a special 
welcome to our guest of honor, remenil>ering his recent parlia* 
mentary victory in securing the passage of an act, and the ratifi* 
cation of the treaty relating to the construction of the Panama 
canal, I would say, Welcome! All hail! And thrice welcome to 
the citizen who has put in motion the machinery which will carve 
a lienii.«phere in twain, make Siamese twins of two mighty o* 
ceans, and shorten by twelve thousand miles the water way from 
New York to San Francisco. 



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The following letter written to Catharine Uanna 
Hole, by her mother, Catharine Hanna, just before the 
separation in t)ie Friend's Church in 1828, shows the 
feelings of the time and the agitation of our venerable an- 
cestress over the division between the Hicksites and the 
Orthodox Friends. 

''Dear Child: 

We recieved thy most affectionate let- 
ter. I thought thy mind was concerned about the times, 
and really it is enough —I find it so. 

The orthodox party is going on, may I not say, too 
much in their own wills; they have laid down our meet- 
ing without ever coming to visit friends here, to know 
upon what grounds they stand. This is new discipline. 
My very head and heart and all that is within me is 
moved. Is not the time come that the sacred writings 

say "the time will come that the Father shall be against 
the Son and the Son against th^ Father; the Mother 
against the daughter and the daughter against the 
mother." Oh it is come in our family. Thy Father is 
gone to Monthly Meeting at IClk Run on purpose to shun 
our meeting tomorrow. 

John Neills have left ns and attend that meeting. 
Friends intend to keep up our meeting and I can see 
nothing better for me to do than to attend it. I cannot 
get any where else, but 1 cannot make thee sensible of the 
distress I have been in; it has so overcome me that I had 
to take my bed and v/liile there I was favoured to beg of 
him who has brought us through many trials and tribula- 
tions if he would l)e pleased to direct the way that I 
should go. I expect thou hast heard many false reports 
about us here and for thy satisfaction I can inform thee 
that I have taken solid opportunities with thy brothers 
and their wives. They have fully .satisfied me that they 



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are clear of such charges as are laid to them, such as De- 
ists, lufidels, Blasphemers and the like. They fully be- 
lieve in the Lord Jesns Christ who suffered and died up- 
on the cross to save them and all men. I don*t think 
there is one out of an hundred who is called a Deist 
rightly. Oh, if I could but tell one half my mind! I be- 
lieve I must stop this time. Thy relatives are all well but 
mvself (she was at this date 74 years old) and Benjamin 
(The grandfather of Senator M. A. Hanna). His. arm 
is very painful. There have been some sudden deaths of 
late, very alarming, Andrew Brinker, near here, ate his 
breakfast, went out and was found dead. Edward Hus- 
ton died the day Nathan Hole was buried: struck 
with the dead palsy; lay about a week but never spoke. 
His wife is very low with dropsy. May we apply the 
language of our Lord and Saviour when on earth "be ye 
also ready.*' We have sent a pressing letter to Elizabeth 
to let us know something about our dear son Robert, but 
have had no answer. Now my dear children the Lord 
Almighty be with you and bless you. 
From your affectionate mother, 

Catharine Hanna." 

• "My child, I wish thee not to trouble th> self too 
much about what I have written, but l)e still and see the 
salvation of the Lord. This lias been my first thought 
in this trouble." 

This remarkable and model letter, written by our 
great grandmother, the first cousin of President Monroe, 
but entirely uneducated and one of the staunch pioneers 
of the Northwest Territory, is probably the only letter 
now extant written by her pen. It shows her eminent 
piety and her concern for the affairs of her Church, then 
about to suffer a division, which did soon separate fami- 
lies and place, the "mother against the daughter and the 

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daughter against the mother/' Catharine Hanna, with 
her daughter Ann Hambleton and her son Benjamin, 
remained in the old meeting and were called Hicksites. 
She gives, however.in this letter, her belief and nnchang- 
ing faith, showing that she did not l)ecome a Unitarian, 
as did the greater part of the followers of Elias Hicks. 
I shall give here the full text of several letters from her 
daughters Ann Hambleton and Esther Hole, showing 
their sweetness of spirit and the goodness of their hearts 
and lives. I only wish I could ol)tain letters written by 
the other sister, my grandmother, Catharine Hanna Hole, 
but as her letters passed into other hands, they do not 
appear to have been preserved. The sisters Esther and 
Ann Hanna, whose letters are here given, were diamet- 
rically opposite, as regards Church connection, discipline 
and supposed creeds — the one being a recognized and 
eminent minister in the orthodox Society of Friends; the 
other being a member of the Hicksite denomination. 
The third sister, none of whose letters I possess, was for 
more than fifty years an Elder in the orthodox, or Gur- 
ney Friends* Church. Let us see how their letters com- 
pare. 



LETTER FROM ANN HANNA HAMBLETON TO HKR SISTER, 
CATHARINE HANNA HOLE. 

** Dear Sister: 

* 'Retirement affords me an opportunity for 
writing which I have a mind to embrace, according to 
my small capacity of imparting sentiments by means of 
pen and paper — though I do not know that I have anv- 
thing that will be interesting to communicate. Some- 
times our situations may be solitary, our friends being 
far separated from us by distance; but though separated 
in body, our minds may be nnited in prayer for the wel- 
fare of each other here, and everlasting peace and rest 

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liereaFter, in the mansions of bliss. l)ear sister, oil t1ia\ 
•we may be engaged at heart for onr souls' salvation, 
which should be the great object of our pursuit, for our- 
selves and also for the tender laml>s committed to out 
•care. I consider it a great and important charge to in- 
struct their tender mhids in the Lord. When I seriously 
•contemplate these things I am almost ready to faint by 
the way; knowing my inability to perform aliy good 
thing without tire assistance of the Lord^ but he is able 
:and willing to lielp^all tlrose who rightly seek him and 
:ask. 'Seek and ye shall find, knock and it sliall be opened 
unto you.' I see there is great need to be upon our 
watch. Oh, that we may meet where parting is iiomore^ 
I must draw to a conclusion for the preaeiit, I hope not 
tfor W\^ future-^ with love to thee and thine I remain, 
Th5' affectionate Sister, 

Ann Ham8i.kton.^* 

JLETTER FROM ESTHER HANKA HOLE TO HEll SISTEft, 
CATHARINE HANNA HOLE. 

*^5th Mo. 27, 1828. 
My dear Sister: 

I may inform thee that we are in mid^ 
dling healtli at present and hope these may find thee and 
thine enjoying the same, with earnest desire for our pre- 
servation in the path of safety. That we may so tun ouf 
race that we may be crowned at last with peace is, I 
think, the daily concern of my mind for us all; but I 
may inform thee that my trials have been very great re- 
specting the state of our Society and the alarming di^ 
vision that is taking place among Friends, but stand still 
and see the salvation of our God, for he is the same al* 
ways. He was and will be a strong tower to those that 
put their trust in him. 

For my part I cannot see what is to be gained by de- 

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parting from the society. Indeed it appears to r/.e to be 
a delusion of the ad v^ersary of our peace * * :}= 
My ver3' dear little children, I often th.ink of yoii 
and should be glad to see you all but I do not know 
when that will 1^, so try to be good children and love 
one another and your dear parents and tell the truth al- 
ways and don't forget your Aunt Esther. Sister I have 
sent thee a runnet and if thee can send nie a cheese I will 
try to pay thee for it some how. Thy Sister, 

**KsTHKR Holk/' 

y\ Month 26tli, 1829. 

My Very Dear Sister: 

I hav^e just sat .lowii to write a few 
lines to thee to let thee know we are all in middling good 
health at present. My love for you all I think has not 
decreased by any means, tho we have not got to see you 
yet. I still hope it will not l>e for long. Sister, I desire 
W€ may be in earnest about the great cause for which we 
were created: to give glory, honor and praise to our dear 
Redeemer who laid down that precious life for us. I de- 
sire that we may l)e in earnest while we have time and 
opportunity, and not delay accepting so great atonement, 
but press forward through every opposition, for the evi- 
dence is sure there is an arm of power to sustain in every 
trial and state whaiever, if rightly sought. And the 
dear children — I often feel them very near to me. I long 
for their welfare every way. Tell them not to forget 
their Aunt Esther for I do not forget them. 

Give my best love to our dear father and mother 
Hole and tell them I want to see them very much. With 
love to thy dear husband and children and thyself I re- 
main, thy affectionate sister, 

EsTHKR Hole." 



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Thk Dkscendants of Esther Hanna, the 7TH 
Child of Robert and Catharine Hanna. 

Charles Hole, eldest son of Jacob and Mary (Thomas) 
Hole, was married to Esther Hanna, May 16, 181 1. Af- 
ter the prelinn'naries required by the Discipline of the 
Society of F^riends, they were married at the time and 
place named in the following hUeresting document. 

'* Whereas, Charles Hole, of Middleton Township, in 
the County of Columbiana and State of Ohio, son of 
Jacob Hole, of Bedford County, State of Virginia, and 
Mary, his wife; and Esther Hanna, daughter of Robert 
Hanna, of Middleton Township, Columbiana County, 
Ohio, and Catharine, his wife, having declared their in- 
tentions of marriage with each other, before a monthly 
meeting of the rel'gious Society of Friends at Middleton 
according to the good order used among them, and hav- 
ing consent of parents, their said proposal of marriage 
was allowed by said meeting. Now these are to certify 
whom it may concern, that for the full accomplishment 
of their said intentions, this sixteenth day of the fifth 
month, in the year of our I^rd, one thousand, eight huu- 
dred and eleven, they, the said Charles Hole and Esther 
Hanna, ai)peared iti a public meeting of the said people 
held at the meeting house of Friends south of little Bull 
Creek, and the said Charles Hole taking the said Esther 
Hainia by the hand, did oj^enly declare that he took her, 
the said Flsther Hanna, to be his wife, promising with 
divine assistance to be unto her a loving and fr.ithful hus- 
band until death shoidd separate them; and then, in the 
same assembly, the said Esther Hanna did in like man- 
ner, declare, that .she took him, the said Charles Hole, to 
be her husband, promising, with divine assistance, to be 
unto him a loving and faithful wife, until death should 
separate. And, moreover, they, the said Charles Hole 

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and Esther Hanna, [she accordnig to the custom of iiiar- 
rfarge, assuming the name of her husband] did, as a fur- 
ther confirmation thereof^ then and there to these pres- 
ents set their hands. 

T>^^r.^A^A Charles Hole. 

Recorded, ^^^^^^ ^^^^ 

Ai*i we whose names are also hereunto subscribed,, 
being present at the sorenmizalion of said marriage andf 
subscription, have, as witnesses thereto, set onr hands; 
the day and the year atove written/'' 

"William iTuderwood Robert Hciniia 

Benjamin Scott Catharine Hanna 

John Edmundson Nathan Hole 

Susannah HeacocP: Ann Hole 

Sarah Heacock Tace Hole 

Amy Morlan ITry B. Hole 

Jane McMillan Catharine Hanna, Jr, 

Jonathan Marslr Ann Hanna 

Sarah Thompson Robert Hanna, Jr. 

Silvanus Fisher Anne Hanna 

Sarah Richardson Mary Morlan 

Sarah Scott Thomas Hanna 

Elizabeth Scott Benjamin Hanna 

Benjamin Samnts Rachel Hanna 

James Marsh Joshua Hanna 

Edith Marsh Jason Morlan 

Ann Edmundson Joseph Fisher, Jr." 



Charles and Esther Hole spent all the years of their 
Inarried life in Columbiana County, Ohio. Esther was 
a minister in the Society of Friends and traveled exten- 
.sively in Ohio and Virginia. She was a pioneer Anti- 
slavery advocate, laboring in this reform amongst the 
slave holders of Virginia. She was always courteously 
received by them and argued her cause where none but 
such a gentle and refined Quaker lady might dare ap 
|)roach such a subject. 

From the Friends' Review ist month, 5th, 1850. 

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**Died, at the residence near Clarkson, Columbiana 
County, Ohio, on the 6th of last month, Esther, wife of 
Charles Hole, a minister and member of Carmel Monthly 
Meeting, in the fifty-eighth year of her age. During 
her last sickness, which \vas severe, she was remarkably 
favored with cahnness and resignation, remaining sensi- 
ble to the last.*' Charles Hole died June 3d, 1854, and 
both were buried at Carmel Meetii^g House, Columbiana 
County, Ohio. To Charles and Esther Hole were born 
nine children. 

( 1 ) Thomas Hole, bom Jan. 2, 1812; died Oct. 30, 1869. 

(2) Rebecca Hole, born Nov. 13. 1813; died Nov. 29, 1889. 

(3) Catliariiie Hole, born Jan 25, 1816; died July 31, 1894. 

(4) Mary Ann Hole, boru July 3, 1818; died Jan. 18, 1883. 

(5) Benjamin Hole, born Oct. 25, 1820; died Feb. 3, 1903. 

(6) Joseph Hole, born July 26, 1823; died April 27, 1887. 

(7) Robert Hole, born Nov. 4, 1825; died Feb. 27, 1889. 

(8) Jacob Hole, born July 18, 1828, Salem, Ohio. 

(9) Hannah Hole, born April 10, 1832 ; died Apr. 10, 1887. 

( I ) Thomas Hole, born Jan. 2, 181 2, died Oct. 30, 1869, niar- 
ried Abigail F. Moore, born March 6, 1821, died Sept. 15,1864. 
Married Oct . 7 , 1 84 1 . 

CHILDREN OF THOMAS AND ABIGAIL HOLE. 

Charles Virgil Hole, born Aug, 27, 1845, died Aug. 28, 1858. 

George Alpine Hole, born Aug. 27, 1847. 

Mary Hole, Iwrn Dec. 10, 1848, Died Nov. 22, 1854. 

Anna M. Hole, born Jan. 6, 1862. 

Thomas Harvey Hole, boru June 22, 1863, 

M. E. Farr, married Anna M. Hole, July 4, 1876. 

CHILDREN OF M. E. AND ANNA FARR. 

Mary Annetta Farr, boru Jan. 28, 1878. 

Vergil H. Farr, liorn July 31, 1879. 

Robert L. Farr, born Nov. 25, 1881. 

Florence Farr, born Feb. 15, 1885. 

Harold T. Farr, born Sept. 13, 1888. 

Raymond Farr, born May 12, 1891, died Oct. 24, 1891. 

Clarence ly. Farr, born Aug. 13, 1896. 

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Donald Farr, born March 22, 1899. 

Thomas Harvey Hole, Sarah Robinson, married March 17, 1886. 

CHILDREN OF HARvEY AND SARAH HOl^E. 

George Willis Hole, boru May 5, 1887. 
Ethel Hole, born Feb. 25, 1889. 
Eva Tamar Hole, born Jan. 7, 1892. 
Esther Hole, boru June 25, 1894. 
Louis Marcus Hole, born Sept. 21, 1896. 
Bertha Anna Hole, born Dec. 6, 1898. 
Robert Vergil Hole, born Jan. 22, 1901. 

(2) Rebecca Hole, born Nov. 13, 1813, died Nov. 29, 1889, 
married Israel Heald (born Jan. 11, 1897, died Jan. 20, 1888), had 
issue seven children. 

(A) (i) Ezra Heald, born Aug. 24, 1843, married Delita M. 
Crespin, Aug. 30, 1877, and has Ida R., born Aug. 24, 1878, and 
Walter E., Nov. 8, 1882. 

(B) Lydia A. Heald, lx)rn Feb. 2, 1845, died Oct. 8, 1859. 

(C) Mary Ana Heald, boru Sept. 12, i<^49, married Samuel 
Embree, born Sept. 13, 1842, and had issue nine chihlren. 

(i) Esther Rebecca, born July 9, 1869. 

(2) Myra Hannah, born Feb. 9, 187 1. 

(3) Cynthia Heald, born Dec. 19, 1872. 

(4) Caroline E., July 13, 1875, married Arthur H. Molt, 
May 21, 1900, and had issue Ervin Lester Mott, boru Nov. 3, 1902. 

(5) Isabella Embree, boru Sept. 17, 1877. 

(6) lilizabeth T., born Feb. 7, 1800, died Aug. 5, 1881. 

(7) Edna Lydia, born March 21, 1882. 

(8) Mary Irene, born June 14, 1884. 

(9) Warren Jesse, boru Sept. 29, 1887. 

(D) Lindley Heald, born March 25, 1848, married Nancy L. 
Fritchmau, Dec. 6, 1871, and has issue three children. 

(i) Edith L., born Oct. 30, 1872, married Louis W. Em- 
mons, May 6, 1903. 

(2) Margaret A., born July 20, 1874. 

(3) Lydia A., May 7, 1883, married Roy R. Sheets. Dec. 23, 
1903. 

(E) Esther Heald, born March 13, 1850; died Sept. 21, 1852. 

(F) Cynthia L., born March 3, 1852: died May 19. 1876. 

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(G) Charles, horn April 25, 1854; ^»ed April 2, 1855. 

(3) Catherine Hole, born Jan. 25, 1816; died July 31, 1894. 
Married Nathan Engle, (born June 13, 1814; died Nov. 14, 1891) 
in Jan., 1840, and had issue seven children. 

(A) Lemuel Engle, married Nancy Waller, and had issue, 
(i) I/tllian C, married Charles Iveicht, deceased. 

(2) Harvey R., married Visa Povle, died leaving issue Roy 
L. and May. 

(3) Minnie H., married Edward Matheny, has issue Earl L. 

(B) Esther, mariied James Cruni, is deceased, leaving issue 
Arfhur J., Edgar and Irwin J. Crum. 

(C) Robert, married Sarah McQueety, and had i.ssue, Charles, 
Mary and Queeta. 

( D) Charles, married Sarah Cooper and died 1894, leaving issue, 
Robert, Ernest (married a Povle), and Mabel, who married Ade- 
liza Davis, and has Herbert. 

(E) Mary Elnia, married John Crosand, and has Linton, Albert 
and Clarence. 

(F) Eliza A., married Isaac Lindley, and has, 
( I ) Adelbert, 

(2) Virgil. 

(3) Esther. 

(4) Albert, married Ella Newsom, and has Ralph, Chester 
and Nettie. 

(G) Albert N. Engle. 

Mary Ann Hoi^e, born July 3, 1818; died at Carthage, Ind., 
Jan. 18, 1883. Married at Carniel Meeting House, Columbiana 
Co., Ohio, on Dec. 20, 18.^4. to Aaron Huestis. Aaron Huestis; 
died in Nebraska. 

CHILDREN OK AARON AND MARY ANN HUESTIS. 

( 1st) Isadora, died at Carthage Ind. 

(2nd) Srmantha, died at Bridgeport, Ind., Dec. 2, 1893. 

(3rd) Moses Henry, living at Cortland Neb., in 1899, has two sons^ 

(4tli) Enimor Benjamin, died at Bridgeport, Ind., July 3, 1872. 

(5th) Charles H., pa.stor of Congregational Church at Exeter^ 

Neb., in 1897. Has two children. 

(5) Benjamin Hole, born in Columbiana Co., Ohio, Oct. 25, 1820; 

died at Fairlaud, Shelby Co., Ind., Feb. 3, 1903. Married in Jack- 



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son Co., Iiid., June 17, 1857, to Isabel Wilson, who was born in 
Washington Co., Ind., Aug. 23, 1837. 

CHILDREN OF BENJAMIN AND ISABEL W. HOLE. 

(i) MyraHanna, born in Jennings Co., Ind., Oct. 9, i860, mar- 
ried at Bridgeport, Mariou Co., Ind., Sept. 28, 1881, to Robert Mc- 
Beth, who was Ixjrn at Fraserburgh, Scotland, Oct. 24, 1851. Rob- 
ert McBeth died at Fairland, Shelby Co., Ind, June 10, 1902. 

(2) Charles Wilson, born in Jennings County, Indiana* 
Jan. 4, 1865, died at Bridgeport Marion Co., Ind., July 18, 1865. 

(3) *Allen David, born at Bridgeport, Marion Co., Ind.. 
Aug. 6. 1866. 

(4) Wilson Joseph, born at Bridgeport, Marion Co., Ind., 
April 23, 1868, married at Bridgeport, Marion Co., Ind., July 10, 
1894, to Alfaretta Hoffman, who was born at Bridgeport, Marion 
Co., Ind., Dec, 23, 1873. 

(5) Rebecca Mary, born at Bridgeport, Marion Co., Ind., 
Feb. 2, 1870; died Oct. 12, 1870. 

CHILDREN OF WILSON JOSEPH AND ALFARETTA HOFFMAN HOLE. 

1. Wymond W., born at Maryville, Tenn., July 2, 1895. 

2. Maurice K., born in Marion Co., Ind., Nov. 9, 1896; died 
July 19, 1897. 

3. Christine, born in Marion Co., Ind., June 6, 1898. 

4. Russell C. born in Marion Co., Ind., April 3, 1900. 



*Prof. Allen D. Hole of Earlham College, Indiana, (see por- 
trait) after some work in common schools, taught in high schools 
as follows: Friendswood Academy, Wisconsin, 1885-1887; Mar}^- 
ville Normal and Preparatory School Maryville, Tennessee, 1894- 
95; Union High School, Westfield Ind., 1898; Sand Creek Semi- 
nary, Azalia, Indiana, 1898 r900. Received his degree of Bachelor 
of Science from Earlham College, Richmond, Ind., in 1897. Re- 
ceived degree of Matser of Arts from the same college, in 1901. 
Since 1900 he has been a member of the Faculty of Karlham Col- 
lege, being at the present time Secretary of the Faculty an<l Pro- 
fessor of Geology. For the past four summers, 1901 -'02 and '03 
he has been enrolled in the graduate school of the University of 
Chicago for work in Geology. In pursuance of this work he spent 
the summer of 1903 in the Bighorn Mountains of Northern Wyo- 
ming. 



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5. Carroll Hoffman, bom in Bartholomew, Coiiiily Indiana, 
Nov. 7, 1901. 

(6) Joseph Hole, son of Charles Hole and Esther Han na Hole, 
born July 26, 18^3; died April 27, 1887, married Nov. 26, 1846, Es- 
ther M. Pvle, daughter of Benjamin Pyle and Elizabeth WrigUt 
Pyle, born Nov. 29, 1823; died Dec. 21, 1828. Their children were: 

I. Henrie Pyle Hole, born May 10, 1849; died, June 21, 1902. 

2 Evelyn, born Jan. 6, 1852, 

3 PvMzabeth C, born Dec. 12, 1854. 

4 Charles Fremont, born Aug. 4, 1856. 

5 Ivinda Hannah, lx>rn Jan. 2, 1861. 

6 Ella Mary, born Apr. 10, 1863. 

7 and 8. Two children died in infancy, 

( i.st) Henrie P. Hole, married (first) Emma L. Appling, Oct. 30, 

1880. 

Emma L. Hole, died June 18, 1891. Their children are: 

Albert George, born Nov. 5, 1881. 

Frank Rufus, born Dec. 11, 1883. 

Myrtle Luella, Ixirn May 15. 1886. 

Fredrick Harrison, born Sept. 24,1888. 

Henrie P. Hole, married (second) Estelle R. Child, June 5, 1894. 

(3) Elizabeth Hole, unmarried. 

(2) Evelyn Hole, married Enimor C. Malmsbury, Feb. 22, 1873. 

Their children; 

Frank B., born Jan. 21, 1874. 

Ida H., born May, 22, 1876. 

Clyde H., born June 19, 1878. 

Frank B., married Mamie H^^irston, April 25, 1900, and had issue, 

one child, Gladys, born June 7, 1901. 

Clyde H., married Mary A. Lindsey, Nov. 7, 1902. 

(4) Charles F. Hole, mairied Sarah Ryan, Sept. 15, 1896. Their 
children are: 

Ruth, born Dec. 30, 1897. 
Esther E., born June 23, 1899. 

(5) Linnie H., married George M. Swarthout, Nov. 2, 1887, 
Children are: 

Ella Harriet, born July 10, 1888. 
Grace Evelyn, born June 14, 1861. 



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(6) Ella M., married LaiuTon M. Kibler, May 15, 1902.' One 
child: 

Kirk Matsoii, born July 2, 1903. 

(7) Robert Hole, Ixjrn Nov. 4, 1825; marrietl Caroline Morlan, 
(laughter of Monlecai and Rlizii Morlan*, Dec. 30. 1852, and resid. 
ed in Salem, Ohio, from that time until his death, which occurred 
Feb. 27, 1899. He was a prominent and useful citizen of Saleni» 
serving on the School Board for 15 years an<' for 12 years of that 
time was the president. Though born a Friend, or Quaker, he i- 
dentified himself with the Methodist Church and was for many 
years a trustee of the Salem M. K. Church. In jK>h'tics, Robert 
Hole was, in early life, a Whig, but joined the Republican party 
Ht its formation. He joined the Masonic order and was one of 
the charter members of Salem Connnandery No. 42, K. T. To 
Robert and Caroline Hole, were born eight children. 

(i) Esther Hannah, l>orn June 14, 1854; died Jan. 24, 1877. 

(2) Walter M. born May 17, i8.«)7; Salem, Ohio. 

(3) Warren Watson, born Nov. 9, 1858; Salem, Ohio. 

(4) Charles Dean, born May 23, i860; Salem, Ohio. 

(5) Marion Lenhart, born Sept. 9, 1864; Salem, Ohio. 

(6) Willis Robert 1 , . ( born Sept. 15, 1866: Lisbon. Ohio. 

(7) Louis Jacob j ^^^"^ \ born Sept. 15,1866; DelNorte,Col. 

(8) Vesta Gertmde, born Nov. 9, 1871; died Aug. 10, 1873. 

(2) Walter M. Hole, married Susie Earle (born June i, i860) 
and has issue. I. Estlier Gertrude, born Oct. 14, 1886 and 2. 
Henry Karle, born Nov. 18, 1891. 

(3) Warren Watson Hole, married July 10, 1884, Martha E- 



*Mordecai Morlan. son of Stephen Morlan and Mary, his wife, 
was born May 14, 1793; married May 31, 1821, to Eliza Ann Dean, 
(daughter of Jonathan R. and Hannah Dean), who was born Jan. 
26, 1800. Mordecai and wife had eleven children of whom Caro- 
line who married Robert Hole, was the sixth, and Amelia, who 
married Jacob Hole, was the tenth. Albert M. the youngest child 
was born Oct. 10, 1850, when his mother was 50 years old, and 
the event was considered "well nigh miraculous" by the tvise zvo- 
men of that day. 



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Marlha Whittlesey Hole 
Page 83 



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liza Whittlesey, born Oct. 20, 1857,* and liad i«sue, 
(i) Frederick Louis, horn April 30, 1887 

(2) Robert Whittlesey, born April 15 1889, died Ang. 14, 
T890. 

(3) I^onard Schilling, born Nov. 29, 1893. 

(4) Edith, horn Aug. 12, 1895. 

(4) Chirles Dean Hole, tiiarried June 14, 1890, Nellie Burwell, 



*The Whittlesey family are of the family of William Whittlesey, 
Archdeacon of Huntingdon, elected October 23, 1360; confirmed 
by the Pope July 31, 1361; consecrated 48th Bishop of Rochester, 
February 1361; transferre<l to Worcester and consecrated Bishop 
of Worcester; appointed 57th Archbishop of Canterbury by King 
Edward HI, crowned metropolitan and primate of all England, 
who stoo<l next to the Pope in Romish hierarchy. ArcJibishop 
Whittlesey died at Lambeth Palace, Jan. 3, 1374. i. John Whit- 
tlesey, l)orn July 4, 1623. in Cambridgeshire, England, [son of 
John, born 1593], came to America in 1635: married Ruth Dud- 
ley, and died April 15. 1704, had issue 12 children, of whom the 
1 2th, 2. Rev. Samuel Whittlesey, born 1686, married July i, 
17 12, Sarah Chauncey, born 1683 who died Oct. 23, 1767, died A- 
pril 15, 1752. [Snrah CliHuncey was the granddnughter of Rev. 
Charles Chauncey, of Yanlly, England, horn 1592, came to Mast*, 
in Dec. 1637, was the second president of Harvard College, died 
Feb. 19, 1582; married Catharine Eyre, b rn 1601, died 1667, 
daughter of Robert Eyre of Soruni, born 1569; married Annie, 
daughter of Rev. John Still Bishop, of Bath and Wells 1592, who 
married iu 1593, Lady Jane Horner, born 1561, daughter of Sir 
John Horner, Knight, and Lady Anna Speke, daughter of Sir 
George Speke, Knight.] Siniuel and Sirah Whittlesey 2. had 
issue, with others, 3. Elisha Whittlesey, born Oct. 19, 1721, 
died Feb. 25, 1808; married April 8, 1754, Susannah Hall, had is- 
sue, with others, 4. Elisha> born Jan. i, 1755; died Sept. 16, 
1782; married Sept, 8, 1777, Sarah Jones, and had issue, with oth- 
ers, 5. John Hal) Whittlesey, born June i, 1778, married Aug. 
4, 1804, Charity Brush, and had issue. 6. John B. Whittlesey, 
born Aug. 15, 1805, married Emeline Mix; died in 1900, aged 94 
years, had issue, 7. Charles Chauncey, born April 7, 1832; mar- 
ried June 1856, Sarah A. Shilling, [born April 4, 1838] died Oct. 
1865, had issue, 8. Martha Eliza Whittlesey, l)orn Oct. 20, 1857, 
married July 10, 1884 to Warren Watson Hole, as above. See por- 
trait of Martha Whittlesey Hole, . 



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Hiid has issiu^, 

(i) Caroline M., born May 29, 1891. 

(2) Elsie Dean, born Aug. 21, 1892. 

(3) I,awreiice Robert, born Feb. 11, 1894. 

(4) Katharine E., born April 14 1900. 

(5) Margery, lx)rn Ang. 4, 1901, died in infancy. 

(5) Marion I^enhart Hole, married June 22, 1888, E.nnia Fawcett. 

(6) Willis Robert Hole, married May 7, 1891, Elma Gilbert, anil 
has 

( 1 ) Louis G.. born JuFy 6, 1892. 

(2) Robert J., born April 16, 1894. 

(3) Earnest M., born March 28, 1896. 

(7) Rev. Louis Jacob Hole, Sept. 15, 1866, married July 5, 1893, 
Cora S. Burford, is at present pastor of the M. E. Church at Del 
Norte, Colorado. Had issue, 

(i) Dorothy Hole, born Jan. 1895. die<l Nov. 1897. 

(2) Francis Hole, born Sept. 30, 1897. 

(3) Hilda Hole, horn Nov. 27, ^899. 



Rev. Louis J. Hole was educated at the Salem Public 
Schools, and at Mt. Union College. He is the artist of 
the family and for some years worked along art lines, 
being with an Engraving Co. of Philadelphia and in the 
drawing dept. of the Mullin's Sheet Metal Statuary 
works of Salem, O. He felt called to the ministry and 
was licensed and afterward ordained as a minister of the 
M. E. Church. His first charge was at Melbourne, Flor- 
ida, where he continued to exhibit his love of art by mak- 
ing sketches of the tropical .scenery of that region, which 
were published in a small but beautiful volume in 1895. 



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Robert Hole 

Grandson of Robert Hanna (1753-1837) 

Page 82. 



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Since leaving Florida his pastorates have all been in 
Colorado, where he finds the climate favorable to his 
health, which was affected ])y asthma when he resided in 
lower altitndes. He has been stationed successively at 
Wray, Del Norte and Pagosa Springs, and is now preach- 
ing at Basalt. As a pastor he has always been beloved 
by his people and his labors have been crowned with 
abundant success, to which his ability to **talk with 
chalk" lias contributed in no small degree. 



Hon. Warren Watson Hole was born in Salem, 
Columbiana Co., Ohio, November 9, 1858. He gradu- 
ated from the Salem High School in June, 1879. He 
entered Mount Union College, and by taking extra stud- 
ies, completed the course, and graduated on July 25, 1878. 
He was the class |X)et and wrote the song which was sung 
by the class on connnencement day. He studied law in 
the office of Kennett and Ambler at Salem, Ohio, teach- 
ing school in the winter; and also during his study of 
the law, from August, i88r, until March, 1882, acted as 
assistant Business Manager of the "Chautauquan" at 
Meadville, Pennsylvania. 

He was admitted to the bar by the Supreme Court 
at Columbus, Ohio, in June, 1882, taking first rank in a 
class of forty-two. He enjoj^ed a large practice in the 
courts of his own state, and was counsel in a number of 
important cases, argued before the Supreme Court of 
Peinisylvania. 

In April, 1884^ he became Solicitor of the incorpo- 
rated village of Salem and .served for four years. He 
had charge of the legal steps, b}' which the village was 
raised to the class of a city and afterward served for four 
years. He was elected Judge of the Court of Common 
Pleas, of the Ninth Judicial District of Ohio, in Novem- 
ber, 1899, for a term beginning November i, 1900. 

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In February, 1900, Judge P. N. Smith resigned, and 
Governor Nash appointed Judge Hole to fill out the un- 
expired terra. He has presided at the trial of many 
important cases in various counties of the district, and 
his decisions have generally been affirmed by the higher 
courts. 

Judge Hole has always taken interest in the religious, 
educational, social and political life of the communit3^ 
He is a member and trustee of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, and for a number of years was President of the 
Young Men's Christian Association. He is a member of 
the Board of Trustees of the Salem Public Library and 
was a member of the Board of Exann'ners of the Salem 
public schools for fifteen years, resigning when taking 
his place on the bench. 

For many years he has been a member of the Ma- 
sonic Order and at present is affiliated with Perry Lodge, 
number 185, Salem Chapter number 94, Salem Com- 
mandery, number 42, and Omega Council of Salem, Ohio. 
He is also a member of the Benevolent Protective Order 
of Elks. He is considered a most excellent toastmaster 
and after-dinner talker. Judge Hole has always taken 
an active interest in the welfare of the Republican party, 
in the city, county and .state, and from the time he left 
college to his elevation to the bench, his voice has been 
heard in every campaign. Judge Hole is six feet, two 
inches in height, and weighs two hundred and twenty 
pounds. He is an enthusiastic hunter, and in college 
and since has taken great interest in athletics, and as a 
pedestrian has few equals. On July 10, 1884, he was 
married to Martha E. Whittlesey. Four children have 
been born to them, of whom three are still living. (See 
family record .) 



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Chas. Morlan Hole, M. D. 
Page 87. 



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( 8) Jacob Hole, born July i8, 1828, is the last surviving child of 
Charles Hole and Esther Hanna. He married, Oct. 24, 1867, 
Amelia Morlan, daughter of Mordecai and Elizabeth (Dean) 
Morlan, a sister to Caroline, wife of Robert Hole, his brother. 
Jacob Hole has been for many years a merchant and furniture 
<lealer in Salem, Ohio, where he now resides. "Jacob and Amelia 
Hole have issue, 

(i) Dr. Charles M. Hole (see portrait and sketch), born 
Aug. II, 1868, married Carrie McArtor: physician, Cleveland, 
Ohio. 

(2) Edgar T. Hole (see portrait and sketch), lx>rn Nov. 28, 
1869, married Adalaide M. Welder, April 14, 1897, and had issue, 

(i) Margaret, died in infancy.. 

(2) Leona M., born Jan. 17, 1902. Edgar T. Hole with his 
wife and daughter Leona M. are in Africa, as missionaries of the 
Friends* Church and stationed at Ki^umu, British East Africa. 

(3) Wilmer Dean, born April i, 1872, married Susie Laviiia 
Jones, June 29, 1901, and resides in California. 

(4) Virginia L.r born Sept. 13, 1873, married Dr. Elisha 
Blackburn, and in May, 1903, went with him to British East Afri- 
ca, where they are sent by the Friends' Church, as missionaries. 

(5) Esther Eliza, boru Jan. 26, 1875, married Addison Fritch- 
man, Aug. 4, 1897, and died May 13, 1902, leaving issue, 

(i ) Eleanor Fritchman, born Juii« 28, 1898. 
(2) Stephen Fritchman, born May 12, 1902. 

(6) J. Leroy Hole, born July 14, 1876. 

(7) Harry R. Hole, born Aug. 20, 1881; married Sept., 1904. 

(9) "Aunt Hannah," ninth child of Charles and Esther Hole, 
never married. She lived for others and was beloved by her 
brothers' and sisters' families and by all who knew her. She 
died on the fifty-fifth anniversary of her birth, April 10, 1887, 
while on a visit" to her brother, in Jennings County, Indiana. 

Charles Morlan Hole was born at Salem, Ohio, An- 
gnst II, 1868. He attended the public schools of his na- 
tive city, and afterwards entered the employ of the Buck- 
eye Engine Company, ot Salem, and became an expert 
mechanical engineer, and for several years .supervi.sed the 
erection and installation of the engines manufactured by 
this famous company. 

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He then entered the medical department of Western 
Reserve University at Cleveland, Ohio, from which he 
gradnated in 1898. Bj^ securing the highest ranks at a 
competitive examination, he won the api>ointment as res- 
ident phsician of the Cleveland City Hospital, and served 
as such until January i, 1900, when he went into general 
practice at No. 300 Cedar avenue, Cleveland, where he 
still resides. 

He was married to Miss Carrie McArtor, of Salem, 
in November, 1900, and finds in her a real helpmate in 
his profession. He has been honored by the authorities 
of the Forest City by appointment to the offices of District 
Physician and Medical Inspector of the city, and is also 
acting as Medical Inspector of the Ohio State Board of 
Health. 

He is a member of the clinical staff of Lakeside Hos- 
pital Dispensary, and is the Medical Examiner of the 
Western and Southern Life Insurance Company, of Cin- 
cinnatti, Ohio. 

He is over six feet in stature and tips the beam at 
more than two hundred pounds, and the brief vacations 
which he allows himself are generally spent in tramping 
over the hills of Columbiana County in company with his 
double cousin Judge Hole, at which times they drink co- 
pious draughts from the spring where their great grand- 
father Robert Hanna, built his first log-cabin one hundred 
years ago, and test their marksmanship with the rifle, 
which is their invariable companion. But which of these 
gentlemen is entitled to be called champion, either as pe- 
destrian or marksman, the author of this book is unable 
to state. As each one fiercely claims that title after each 
annual outing, it would require a bolder and a larger man 
to safely decide the question. By way of post- scriptural 
advice, however, he wH)uld suggest that if these two con- 
testants will journey to the wilds of Jennings County, In- 
diana, and follow for a single day in the footsteps of that 



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Rev. Edgar T. Hole 

Kisutnu, British East Africa 

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]>eerless inasler of woodcraft, Charles Freinotit Hole, of 
Bntlei-ville, they will return to the Buckeye State thor- 
oughly silenced and subdued. 

Edgar T. Hole was born at Salem, Ohio, Nov. 28, 
1869. After completing the grammar and high school 
courses, he spent several years in the study of architec- 
ture and draughting. While living in Cleveland in 1893, 
he gave np this work, temporarily, on account of his eyes, 
and took a business position which he held until 1902, 
when with two other \'oung men he was sent by a board 
of the Society of Friends to prospect and establish a mis- 
sionary station in Africa. Here his wife and child, with 
other missionaries, joinxl him a year later. He was 
married to Adalaide ll^eider, of Cleveland, in 1897. They 
have one daughter, Leona May, born Jan. 17, 1902. 

During his residence of more than two years in 
Cleveland, he was active in busine.*^s and church work. 
In his church he held the office of elder, overseer and 
treasurer; he v/as a Sabbath school teacher, C. E. presi- 
dent, trustee of the Friends' Bible Institute, and gave 
much time and energy lo lcx:al mission work. He is at 
present superintendent and treasurer of the Friends* Af- 
rica Industrial Missions at Kaimosi, Tiriki, British East 
Africa. (This is in the Kaviroudo Country, about 20 
miles from Kisuniu, the principal jx)rt on Lake Victoria 
Nyanza; about 8 miles north of the equator and at- an 
elevation of about 5300 feet above sea level.) 

Descendants OF Catharine Hanna Hole, Eighth 
Child of Robert and Catharine Hole. 

John Hole, born in Loudoun County, Va», JaiL 7, 
1785, removed to Ohio in 18 16. Raised in Bedford Coun- 
ty, Va. , in the southern part of that state, he was famil- 
iar with the southern country and was employed, during 
the war of 1812, by the U. S. government, in hauling 

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sripplies from North and South Caroh'iia to Bultiniore 
and Philadelphia. After completing his contract as 
** wagoner" for the government he returned to Bedford 
County, Va., and while working on his father's farm 
taught "singing school/' This is the first instance 
known of any musical ability in the Hole family. In 
1817, at Carmel (Clarkson, O.), he became engaged to 
Catharine Hanna, and as a specimen of the vwdus operan- 
di oi \\\e Socx^iy ofT^riends at that period, the following 
extracts from the records of Carmel meeting will be val- 
uable: ** Agreeably to the instructions of the quarterly 
meeting, the monthly meeting was opened at Carmel the 
20th of the I2tli month, 181 7. At this meeting, John 
Hole and Catharine Hanna apjx?ar here with parents' 
consent and express their intentions of nuuriage with 
each other. Edith Marsh and Deborah Vale are ap- 
pointed to inquire into the young woman's clearness of 
the like engagement with others and rt^port to next 
meeting." 

*'i7thof ist month, 1818 — The Friends appointed 
to enquire into Catharine H anna's clearness with respect 
to marriage engagement report they find nothing to ob- 
struct. They are left at liberty to accomplish the same 
agreeably to good order. ICdilh Marsh and Deborah Vale 
are appointed to attend and see that moderation be ob- 
served and report to next meeting." 

''Twenty -first of 2nd month, 1818." The friends 
appointed to attend the marriage of John Hole and Cath- 
arine Hanna, rejxjrt they thought it orderly accomplish- 
ed and moderation observed. The certificate reads as 
follows: "Whereas John Hole of Middleton Township, 
Columbiana County andvState of Ohio, son of Jacob Hole 
of the same County and Mary his wife; and Catharine 
Hanna, daughter of Robert Hanna and Catharine his 
wife, of Middleton Township, Columbiana County, Ohi- 
o, having declared their intentions of marriage with each 



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John Hole 
From the Painting by Robert Hanna, Owned by Chas. E. Rice 
Page 89. 



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other before a Monthly Meeting of the religious Society 
of Friends held at Cannel according to the good order 
used anioug them, and having consent of parents, their 
said proposal of marriage was allowed by .said meeting. 
Now these are to certify whom it may concern that for 
the full accomplishment of their said intentions this 
twenty-second da}' of the first month in the year of our 
Lord, <me thousand eight hundred and eighteen, they, 
the said John Hole and Catharine Hanna, appeared 
in a publick meeting of the said people held at Carmel, 
and the said John Hole taking the said Catharine Han- 
na by the hand did openly declare that he took her, the 
said Catharine Hanna, to be his wife, promising with di- 
vine assistance, to be unto her a loving and faithful hus- 
band until death should separate them, and then in the 
same assembly the said Catharine Hanna, did in like 
manner declare that she took him, the said John Hole to 
!)e her husband, promising with divine assistance to be 
unto him a loving wife initil death should separate them. 
And moreover they, the said John Hole and Catharine 
Hanna (she according to the custom of marriage a.s.sum- 
ing the name of her husband) did as a further confirma- 
lion thereof, then and there to the.se presents .set their 
hands. John Hoi.e, 

Catharine Holk, 

And we whose names are hereinito .subscribed l^eing 
present at the .solennu'zation of the .said marriage and 
subscription, have as witnes.ses thereto set our hands 
the day and year above written." 

Willin Underwood Robert Hanna 

Sarah Underwood Catharine Hanna 

Rebecca Underwowl Ni.thau Hole 

Rachel TMsher, Jr. Mary Morlan 

Su.sannah Heacock Sophia Hole 

Sarah Heacock Nathan Hole, Jr. 

Elizabeth West Jonah Hole 

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P^li Vale Tlioinas HaiiTTMli 

Will. Fisher Anne Hauua 

Cliarfes Hambletoir Jo»lnia Hai:iia 

Wi)Iiani Griffith Beiii'n Haiiiblelou 

Williii Underwood, Jr. Mahlon Hole 

Hphraini Oliphant Kenj'n Hanna 

Jane McMillen Jane Leech 

Thonia.s Green WilViani Leech 

Elie Kdnnindson Deborah Vale 

Jason Till loss James Marsh 

Jonathan Marsh Kdiih Marsh 

Elizabeth Hole John Vale 
Klizal)eth Dillon 

'^Recorded in Carmer.s records for Marriage certifi- 
cates; Page 5," 



John and Catharine Hole began housekeeping 011 
*'Mnddy Fork," in the eastern part of Carroll Connty, 
and at this home and one adjoining, where they soon after 
settled, were born to them eight children. John Hole 
was a man of great bn.siness ability and had the care and 
settlement of many estates. He was for sei'eral terms 
one of Carroll Connty's Commissioners and as.sociated 
with the Hon. ICphraim R. Kckley, who still survives at 
the age of 93 years. His death occinTe<l qm'te suddenly, 
in his 84th year, s(K>n after lie had walked from his home 
to Minerva and back, a distance of ten miles. Catharine 
Hole survived her husband for many years. She was 
an lilder in Augusta Friends' Meeting for more than 50 
years. For the last seven years of her life she was par- 
tially paralyzed. She died May 3, i8iii, aged 87 years, 
and was the last of her generation of the Hanna family. 
Both John and Catharine Hole were buried at the An- 
gu.sta Friends' Meeting House, where are interred some 
fortv meml)ers of the Hole and Hanna families. 



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Catharine Hanna Hole, Aged 87 Years 

From a Painting Owned by Dr. Chas. E. Rice 

Pages 26-92. 



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THE CHII^DRKN OF JOHN AND CATHARINE HOLE. 

(i) Lemuel Hole, born Oct. 27, 1818, died Jan, 20, 1865. 

(2) Klias Hole, born May 4. 1820, died Oct. 22, 1873. 

(3) PMlier Hole, born May 7, 1822, died Aug. 18, 1890. 

(4) Anna Hole, lx>rn June 15, 1824, died Nov. 2, 1850. 

(5) Caleb Hole, born March 6, 1827; Damascus, Ohio. 

(6) Robert H. Hole, l)Orn June 16, 1829, died Dec. 5, 1866. 
[7] Mary Hole, born April 2, 1833, died July 9, 1859. 

[8] Rachel Hole, born Aug. 16, 1837; Alliance, Ohio. 

(i) I^KMUKL HoLK was married to Unity C. Stan- 
Uy, Apr. 30, 1840. She was the daughter of Benjamin 
:ind Klizal)eth Stanley, born Jan. 27, 1820, died Aug. 29, 
1885. Lemuel Hole was a most honorable, honest and 
upright man: a man of great business ability and of a 
j;oo<l nund. He was associated with the leaders and or- 
ganizers of the Republican party and corre.sjx)nded with 
such men as Joshua R. Giddings, Benjamin F. Wade 
and S. P. Chase. He died at the early age of fort) -seven 
years, Jan. 20, 1865, having amas.sed what at that day 
was considered a handsome fortune. Lemuel and Unity 
Hole were both buried at the Augusta Friends' meeting 
hou.se. 

CHIU>RBN OF I.KMUKI. AND UNITY HOLE. 

[i] Benjamin Stanley, born Apr. 12, 1841, resides in Alli- 
ance, Ohio. 

[2] Gnlaelnia, born Nov. 26, 1842, died June 18, 1856. 

[3] Leonard Hanna, born Jnne 23, 1844; 59 Cedar Street, 
N. Y. City. 

[4] Catharine Klizabeth, lK)rn Qct. 5, 1846; Damascus, Ohio. 

[5J Kliza Ann, born Dec. 27, 1848; Lawrence, Kansas. 

[6] John Franklin, born Mar. 19, 1852, died Dec, 17. 1856. 

[7] Jacob Thomas, born Mar. 18, 1854, died in Kansas, 1896. 

[8] Charles Stanley, lK)rn Auj;. 11, 1856; living in Texas. 

[9] Esther Elnia, born July 31. 1858; Millersburg, Ohio. 

[10] Lemuel Penrose, born Nov. 5, i860; died 1904 at Spo- 
kane, Washington. 

[1] Benjamin Stanley Hole, married, March 10, 1868, Mary 



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Marshal], and had i.'fsue, 

[AJ RosellaC. Hole, born Dec. 17^ 1868, married Oct. 10, 1889, 
Clifton Cunningham [born Feb. 19. 1867], resides at Sebring. O., 
and has Owen L.. l)orn Jan. 29, 1891, and Paul C, born May 29. 
1892. 

[B] I^avinaU., born Jan. i, 1870; married Dec. 25, 1894, James 
Wooster Ogle* and has issue, 

[i] Marshall Rodney Ogle, l)orn Oct. 3, 1895. 
[2] Mary Ruth Ogle. l)orn Sept. 17, 1897. 
[3] Carl Henry Ogle, born Jan. 5, 1900. 

[C] Linnens M., born June i, 1 871, married Anna L. Roach, 
lx)rn March 27, 1874, and has issue, 

[:i] Franklin H. Hole, born June 10, 1893. 
[2] Arthur J Hole, lx>ru April 7, 1900. 

[D] Lemuel G. Hole, lK)rn April 7, 1881, married Mary E. Betts 
[born Sept. 16. 1879], Oct. 27, J900. 

Benjamin Stanley Hole niarried [2d] Mrs. Eliza J. Abell, of 
Kilgpre, OImo, and now resides on Rice street. Alliance. 

(3) Lepoard Hanna Hole niarried Sarah Belle MoflFatt, of Cadiz, 
Ohio, July-13, 1870 [daughter of John N. Moffatt and Margaret 
Jane Ramsey, daughter of John L. Ramsey and Sarah Ann Slay- 
tor], and had issue, 

(i ) Jay Wilb'erforce, born April 13, 1871; died at LasCrucas. 
N. Mexico, Feb, 2, 1892. 

(2) Lemuel Homer, born Dec. 4, 1874. 

(3) Charles Benjamin, l)orn Feb. 12, 1878. 

(4) Ralph John, born June 26, 1884. 

Charles Benjamin Hole, married June 20, 1901, Nina May 
Howlett, daughter of T. A. and Adelia A. Howlett, of Ann Arbor, 
Michigan. 



*James Wooster Ogle is a great-grand-nephew of Caesar Rod- 
ney, a signer of the Declaration of Independence; and a cousin to 
the Caesar A. Rodney who was Attorney General of the United 
States. On the maternal side, James W. Ogle is a great-grand- 
nephew of General Wooster of Revolutionary fame. He was lx)rn 
April 19, 1852, and resides at 418 Kirtland Ave., Cleveland.Ohio. 



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Home of Catharine Hanna Hole 

Here Robert Hanna, Sr. Died in 1837 

Page 92 



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Of this family Leonard Hanna Hole and his wife, 
Belle MofFatt, were students at Mt. Union College. 
Leonard H. graduated in the class of 1868. Lemuel 
Homer graduated in the class of 1899 from the Universi- 
ty of Michigan, Law Department. Charles Benjamin 
Hole graduated in Law Department, University of Mich- 
igan, 1899, and his wife, Nina May Howlett, in the 
University of Michigan, Literary Department, 1901. 

Leonard Hanna Hole was born in Augusta, Ohio, 
June 23, 1844. 

From the first of 1864 to the close of the Civil War 
he was actively engaged for the Government, in the 
Freedman Department and Secret Service, in Virginia 
and North Carolina. 

He entered Mount Union College in 1865; gradu- 
ated fnmi that institution in 1868, and from the Law 
Department, University of Iowa, in 1870. 

In 1870 he married Miss Belle Moffatt, of Scio, Har- 
ri.son County, Ohio. 

Leonard H. Hole practiced law in Oskaloosa, Iowa, 
for many years. He served in the School Board, was 
a member of the Board of Directors and lecturer on busi- 
ness law of Penn College for several years, and memljer 
of the City Council. 

In the late eighties he took an active part in gaining 
admission and the division of Dakota Territory, forming 
North and South Dakota. He was elected a member of 
the Constitutional Convention of South Dakota, and as 
chairman of the Schedule Committee wrote the Constitu- 
tion and assisted in putting the State machinery in mo- 
tion, and for several years had much to do with the 
legislaticm of the new State. As attorney he practiced 
in the Supreme Courts of Iowa, Kansas, and the two 
Dakotas: and the U. S. Supreme Court and the Interior 
Department, at Washington, D. C. 

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For ten years was president of the North American 
Loan and Trust Company, Chicago 111., and now a mem 
ber of the firm of W. N. Coler and Company, Bankers 
and Brokers, Members of the New York Stock Exchange. 
No. 59 Cedar Street, New York. 

Meml)er of Friends Church, Campfire Club and Law, 
yers Club, New York, Union League Club, Chicago and 
Montclair Club, New Jersey. 

(4) Catharine Elizabeth Hole, married, July 14, 1870, Georj^f 
Morton Bashaw (boru Oct. 28, 1838, died Feb. 12, 1894) and 1i:hI 
issue, 

(A) Tveuiuel Rolla, born May 21, 1871, married Clara AUison Oct. 
19. '895. and has Walter Leonard, born April i, 1897, and Ha/i-l 
Catharine, l)orn Dec. 26, 1898. 

(B) OttiM-ell Wilfred, born May 3, 1873, married Kflfie Evilin 
Stutler, Oct. 23, 1897, and has Lucile Genevra, born Oct. 19, 1902. 

(C) John Herbert, born Aug. 16. 1881, married Au^. 20. 1902, 
Gertrude MayGriflfeth. 

(D) Clyde lyeonard Bashaw, born Aug. 2, 1887. 

(5) Eliza Anna Hole, married Robert Terrell Crew, of Jefferson 
County, Ohio (Aug. 12, 1846), married March 4, 1869. Resides 
in Lawrence, Kansas, and has issue, 

(A) Elizabeth Crew. Jan. 16, 1870, married Arthur E. Huddle- 
ston, of Douglas County, Kansas (l)orn Nov. 30, i860), Nov. 17, 
1902, has issue a daughter (name not given). 

(B) Charles Corwin Crew, born in Iowa, Dec. 17, 1871, married 
Grace Lena Cross (born June 29, 1876) Jan. i, 1902. 

(C) Mary Catharine Crew, born in Iowa, Oct. 15, 1875, an artisl. 
studied in Italy and in New York City 1900-1903. 

(7) Jacob Thonuis Hole, married Mary Emma Tope, June Jo, 
1880. He was a graduate of Mt. Union College, class 1878, and 
of Peun College, Iowa; practiced law and was an Editor in Wa.sh- 
ington, Kansas, where he died in 1896. Jacob and Emma Hole 
had issue, 

( 1 ) Lemuel Everett. 

(2) Gertrude Elma. 

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Leonard Hanna Hole 

Great Grandson of Robert Hanna ( 1753-1837) 

Page 95. 



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(3) William Warren. 

(4) Leonard I^mar. 
<5) Clarence Frederick. 

(6) Walter Tope. 

(7) Esther Grace. 

(8) A younger da ngliter. name not given. 

(8) Charles St«»nley Hole, marrie<l Hannah W. Young (l)orii 

Jan. 16, i860) on April I4tli, 1880, and has issue, 

(1) Edward Lemuel. l>orn March 5, 1S81.* 

(2) Carl Cliflfonl. born July 3. 1884. 

(3) Elizabeth, born Oct. 17, 1889, died Dec. 22, 1902, 

(4) Esther, born Oct. 20, 1894. 

(5) William T., Ixirn May 31, 1896. 

(9) Esther Klma Hole, married Hon. John Ander- 
son McDowell (lx)rn Sept. 25, 1853), Aug. 21, 1879. 
Resides at Millerslnirg, Ohio. Esther Elnia Hole at- 
tended Mt. Union College, and was a member of the 
class of 1880. Her hiis1)and, l)orn in HohnesCo., Ohio, 
was edttcated at Lebanon Normal University and Mt. 
Union College (class 1887), was Snperintendent of the 
Millersbnrg schools for 1 7 years, Comity Examiner 7 
years, instrnctor in Wooster University and various 
Slimmer .schools and institutes. Was elected to 55th 
Congress as a Democrat, receiving 26, 109 votes, against 
21,169 for Addison S. McClure, Republican; was re- 
elected to the 56th Congress. Since the expiration of 
his second term he has taught in Wooster University. 
To Mr. and Mrs. McDowell have l)een born twelve chil- 
dren: 

(i) James Garfield, lK>rn July 4, 1881; died Dec 23, 1882. 

(2) Waldo Emerson, born Dec. 1, 1882. 

(3) Clyde Stanley, born Oct. 28, 1884. 

(4) Edith Bell, l>orn Jan. 23. 1887. 



♦Edward Lemuel Hole enlisted in the Regnlar Army, Company 
G, i8th Infantry and served three years as a private; over two 
years of the time in the Phillipine Islands. 

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(5) Homer Hole, born Aug. 20, 1889. 

(6) Mabel Margaret, Aug. 4, 1891. 

(7) Percy Hanna, July 8, 1893. 

(8) FraucesCWillard, Ocl. 21, 1895. 

(9) John Anderson, July 3, 1897. 

(10) Wilbur \ fl)orn Nov. 21, 1898; died 

Hutchinson, v Twins -J Dec. 12, 1 1 

(11) Wayne Allison, j ( born Nov. 21. 1898. 

(12) Esther Ainiee, born Feb. 4, i9or, died Aug. 9, 1902. 



(10) Lemuel Penrose Hole, married Sitllie Cooper and died in 
Spokane, Washingtoii, in 1904. 

(2) EUAS HoLK, born Oct. 27, 1818, married Mary Ann Yeager, 
May, 1854. He died Oct. 22, 1873. , She die«l in April, 1898, aged 
80 yeays, and is buried in Kairview Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio. 

(3) Esther Hole, born May 7, 1822^ married Aug. 28, 1858, 
JanieS Peirrase (born 1803, died 1881), and died, without issue, at 
Damascus, Ohio, Au^. 18, 1890, was interred at Hope Cemetery, 
Saleni, Ohio. 

(4) Anna HoLE.born June 15, 1824, married Oct. 30, 1843, Da- 
vid Haldeman (Dec. 30, 1820— May 5, 1894), son of David Halde- 
uian, July, 17^7 — Aug. 27, 1844, son of Abrahum and Mary 
Haldeman, of Chester Co., Pa., and of Ann, his wife, who was 
daughter of Renjamin and Ann Johnson, born in Chester Co., 
Pa., Oct. 12, 1783, died March 14, 1878, in her 95th year) and had 
issue, 2 children. Anna Hole Haldeman died Nov. 2, T850. 

(i) John 1/eando Haldeman. born March 16, 1847, married Mag- 
gie E. Scarlott, Aug. i, 1888; no issue. 

(2) Anna Halderman, born Oct. 26, 1850, married David Winder, 
Mttrch II, 1875. died Feb. 7, 1881, leaving issue, i daughter, Clara, 
who married Frederick Mitchell Kdgcrton, Jan. 18, 1899 and has 
issue, two children ( names not divulged. ) 

(5) Caleb Hole, married Sophia Miller Hole and had issue, 
(i) Norman W. Hole, born May 23, 1869. 

(2) Anna Lulu Hole, born June 18, 1873. 

( 1 ) Norman W. Hole, married June 10, 1896, Lena Cobbs 
and has issue, 

(i) Bertha, lK>rn March 14, 1897. 

(2) Donald, born May 10, 1898. 

(3) Alfred, born Feb. 1900. 



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Charles Benjamin Hole, 

Great-great-grandson of Robert Hanna, (1753-1837.) 

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Caleb Holk was born near Augusta, Oliio, March 
6, 1827, and married Feb. 11, 1868, Sophia (Millei) 
Hole. He has lived to be the oldest of his parents' eight 
children; has spent the greater part of his life on his 
farms in Carroll County, Ohio but removed to Damascus, 
Ohio, wluMi about sixty years of age. He is known to all 
the family and to the world at large as a most upright 
and successful business man; a man who has transacted 
a vast amount of public business and negotiated import- 
ant transactions for various companies and corporations. 
As one of the chief heads of the Ohio Yearly Meeting of 
Friends he has held various ofl&ces of trust and has 
brought to a successful ternn" nation much of the commit- 
tee work and handled large amounts of the meeting's 
trust funds. From these arduous duties he has now, at 
fiis own request, been released, with regret on the part of 
the Yearly Meeting. He was known as the bachelor of 
the family as he remained at home with his parents, but 
during his bachelor days he cared for and raised the two 
sons of his brother Roljert, who are now successful busi- 
ness men and farmers and both of them eminently Christ- 
ian gentlemen; a credit to the uncle who rai.sed them and 
to the entire family. After the death of his father in 
1 868 Caleb Hole married Sophia Miller. To them were 
bom a son and a daughter. The son, Dr. Norman W. 
Hole, was educated at Damascus Academy, Mt. Union 
College and the Western Reserve Medical College. 
Graduating with the degree of M. D., in 1898, from the 
Wooster Medical College, Cleveland, Ohio, he afterwards 
took post-graduate work (Hospital and Clinic) in New 
York City. Dr. N. W. Hole married Lena Cobbs, and 
is the father of three children, Donald, Bertha and Al- 
fred, and successfully practices his profession in North 
Jackson, Ohio. 



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The daughter, Anna Lnia Hole, one of tlic most in- 
tellectual members of the Hole family, died inCleveland, 
Ohio, Feb. 8, 1896, at the early age of 22 years. She 
was educated at Damascus Academy, Earlham College, 
Indiana, and graduated in the Classical Course from Mt. 
Union College, in 1893, l)eing the youngest meml)er of 
her class. While in college .she belonged to the Delta 
Gama Sorority and was an active worker in the Republi- 
can Literary Society. She was engaged as teacher of 
Modern lyanguages in JefTerson Institute, Jefferson, Ohio, 
and afterwards taught in Andover, Ohio, and in Collin- 
wood, Ohio. 

(6) RoBKKT H, Hoi.E, bom June 16. 1829, "tarried Lydia H. 
IJpsey, Oct. 27, 1853, died in Logansport, Intl., Dec. 5, 1866. 
Lydia Hole died May 31, 1889, leaving issue, 

(i) Leander H. Hole, born Dec. 6, 1854, married Ida Coul- 
8on (Oct. 17, 1857) Jau. 10, 1879. Merchant at Lupton, Michigan, 
and has issue one son, Erwin J. Hole, born Oct. 14, 1888. 

(2) J. Melville Hole, lK>rn April 27, 1859, married Lovi.sa E- 
Haldeman (June 22, 1861 ) Dec. 1882, daughter of David and Julia 
(Eastman) Haldeman. (See David Haldeman, above in (4) Anna 
Hole.) J. Melville and Lovisa E. Hole have one daughter, Ger- 
trude F. Hole, married to Herman Cattell, and reside in Alliance, 
Ohio. 

(7) Mary Hoi,e. born April 2 1883, married Henry Tritt. 
She died July 6, 1850, leaving issue, (i ) Edward Tritt and (2) 
Charles Tritt. Edward Tritt married and resides iu Cripple 
Creek, Colorado: has five children. Charles Tritt died in Alli- 
ance, Ohio, without i.ssue. 

(8) Rachel Hole, eighth child of John Hole and 
Catharine (Hainia) Hole, married, Dec. 29, 1858, Dr. 
William Pettit Rice, only son of Charles Hawley Rice 
and Charity Dean Pettit (see "Pettit Family Geneal- 
ogy," by Charles E. Rice). They removed to Stearns 
Connty, Minnesota, where, l)eing on the frontier, they 
suffered many hardships and had thrilling experiences 
with the Sioux and Chippewa Indians. William P. Rice 
was Coinily Surveyor of Stearns Co. , and did govern 
ment work at Fort Snelling during the Indian outbreaks 



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Caleb Hole 

Grandson of Robert Hanna (1753-1837) 

Page 99 . 



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and Civil War. Returning to Ohio they settled in Mt. 
Union (now Alliance), where Dr. Rice practiced dentist- 
ry nntil his death, Dec. 9, 1891. He was for several 
terms mayor of the city, president and clerk of the school 
l)oard, /8 years a councilman and 22 years a steward and 
treasurer of the M. E. Church, in which latter position 
he was succeeded by his oldest son who has been treasur- 
er and steward in the Union Ave., M. E. Church for 18 
years. He was a graduate of Duff's College, and a good 
business man, occupying positions of trust from the time 
he was seventeen years of age till his death. 

Rachel Hole Rice, now residing at 1750 South Uni- 
on Avenue, Alliance, Ohio, is an active worker in reform 
movements, having held various offices in in the State, 
County and Local W. C. T. U., Woman's Suffrage As- 
sociation, Woman's Foreign Missionary Society of the 
M. E. Church, etc., etc. To W. P. and R. H. Rice were 
born seven children: 

(1) Ida May Rice, married Joseph A. Wright, Oct. 22, 1896, and 
resides at 131 Pigeon St., Jackson, Michigan. 

(2) Charles Ehner Rice, 1750 S. Union Ave., Alliance, O. 

(3) William Oscar Rice, died in infancy, 

(4) John Clarence Rice, married Pertrl Frances Grubb, Sept. 17, 
1896 and has issne, 

(a) William Elmer Rice. 

(b) Joseph Clarence Rice. 

(c) Verda Mae Rice. 

All residing on Rice Street, Alliance, Ohio. 
Pearl Frances Rice died Oct. 18, 1904. 

(5) Robert Emer^n Rice, died in infancy. 

(6) Virginia Alpharetta Rice, married Herman Norville Morton, 
Dec. 24, 1897 and has issue one son, 

(a) Cliarles Theodore Morton, lw>rn in Sandusky, Ohio, 
where his father was Principal of the High School. Prof. Morton 
is at present Principal of the Urbana, Ohio, High School; address 
407 East Church Street, Urbana, Ohio. 

(7) William Herbert Rice married Dec. 25, 1901, Mina M.ie Mil- 
ler. He is a graduate of Mt. Union College, with degree of Mus. 
B., and has been a student of the Metropolitan College of Music, 



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N. Y. City, studying under such celebrated musicians and com- 
posers as Harry Ro we Shelley, Prof. Albert Ross Parsons, H. 
Rawlins Baker and William Sherman. His present address is 
170 Amity street, Flushing, New York City, where he is engaged 
in teaching music. 

Charles Elmer Ricp:, second child of Rachel Hole 
(No. -8) and Dr. WiiL Pettit Rice, was graduated from 
Mt. Union College, AMiance, Ohio, receivi^ig there both 
his Bacclaureate and Master's degree. Was educated at 
the Philadelphia Dentel College; The Medico-Chirurgi- 
cal College, of Philadelphia, and the Jefferson Medical 
College; Is a, member of of tiie Virginia Historical Socie- 
ty, and the Ohio, ArcheologicaJ Society. He has publish- 
ed a "History of the Hole Family in England and Amer- 
ica;" A History of the Pettit Family. and genealogies of 
of the Families of Douglass, Morton, Grubb and Miller. 
By request one of his experiences while in England is 
here given. 

From the "Columbus (Ohio) Press." 

TWO OHIO boys' experience WHILE ON A TKIP TO 
EUROPE. 

Ohio is in the lead, as usual, even when it comes to 
affairs of royalty, and just now when the eyes of all na- 
tions are directed to the coining coronation and every 
one is anxious to remember some little personal connec- 
tion with anything of a * 'royal" nature, Ohio brings 
fprtli two uiodest young men who informally spent the 
day with King Edward and his son and were photo- 
graphed watli the distinguished party, when visiting the 
Waterloo battle ground in 1900. 

The young men are Dr. Charles E. Rice, of Alli- 
ance, and Ira Morton a student at Mt. Union college, 
who makes his home with Dr. Rice. 

Mr. Arthur Rugh, of Colum!)ns, who has just been 



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Rachel Hole Rice 

Grand-daughter of Robert Hanna ( 1753- 1837) 

Page 10 1. 



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apix)inted field secretary of the International Students' 
Volunteer Movement, after serving a year as state secre- 
tary, and who will be sent to China next year in the in- 
terest of the movement, was in Alliance last week and 
visited his friend Dr. Rice, who is well known not only 
in Ohio but in various parts of the United States. When 
abroad he carried with him a letter of introduction to 
Lady Henry Somerset, from Mother Stewart, and was a 
guest at the home of Lady Somerset. 

Dr. Rice is a young bachelor who lives in a twenty- 
room house at Alliance which is a veritable curiosity 
shop, so full is it of antique furniture, curios and inter- 
esting souvenirs from all over the world. Dr. Rice has 
been twice abroad and will go over again in the fall. 

While at the home of Dr. Rice last week Mr, Rugh 
was privileged to sleep in what is known as the **presi- 
dent's bed" in which have slept three presidents and 
other distinguished people, Hayes, Garfield, McKinley, 
Scuyler Colfax, and the two Shermans. There is an- 
other bed called ihe "bishops' bed'* in which six bishops 
have slept. There is also a chair, among a varied and 
interesting collection of chairs, which was used by Abra- 
ham Lincoln. 

For years past Dr. Rice has been accustomed to an- 
nually entertain a party of fifty or more of the oldest 
people of the state, frequently having in the party sev- 
eral centenarians, some 102 and 103 years old. Among 
his younger guests have Ijeen Mother Garfield and Moth- 
er McKinley. 

Dr. Rice has had so manj' interesting experiences 
that he relates his experience with the members of the 
royal family with but little more than ordinary enthu.si- 
asm. 

*'I doubt if any one was ever more surprised than 
Mr. Morton and I," said Dr. Rice, in telling of the oc- 
currence, **at being unexpectedly thrown into the com- 
pany and actual companionship with the Prince of Wale 



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and the Duke of York, on tlie field of Waterloo. 

**It was on April 12, 1900. We had employed the 
official guide in Brussels and had taken the train for 
Braine L'allaud, when, upon arriving at the station, it 
was discovered that his roj'al highness, the Prince of 
Wales, his son, the Duke of York, and another young 
man, whose title was not divulged, also wanted the ser- 
vices of the official guide. This guide enjoyed the dis- 
tinction of being the grandson of the "Old Guide" of 
Victor Hugo, of Generals Grant and Sherman, and had 
l)een trained almost from infancy, for his duties as a 
guide to the battle field. 

*'On our way to Braine L'allaud the young man en- 
tertained us with his family history and pointed out the 
little farm owned by his father. This farm, of which 
the man was justly proud, consisted of five acres, and 
the father, moreover, owned five cows and two hordes 
and had a man-.servant. This was opulence, indeed, for 
a Belgian farmer where the population is the most dense 
of any country in Europe. 

'*The young official guide received 600 francs per 
year from the government besides extorting what he 
could from tourists. Upon leaving the train at Braine 
L'allaud our guide was commanded to wait for the ex- 
press train which was soon due. In the meantime he 
had hired a hack, a roomy, covered tally-ho sort of an 
affair, and in it we were to be conveyed, over the extens- 
ive field. 

MET THE PRINCE. 

"When the express train arrived, out from a first- 
class carriage stepped the Prince of Wales, the Duke of 
York, and the companion with a camera. Being extreme- 
ly averse to losing any tips, our guide blandly informed 
the prince that he now had a party of five, three English- 
men and two Americans, and would his royal highness 
please be .seated in the hack, etc., etc. 



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Dr. Chas Elmer Rice 
Great Grandson of Robert Hanna (1753- 1837) 



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** Without a word of dissent or a look wliicli beto- 
kened an}' unwillingness on bis pert, the prince cabnly 
clambered into the rear end of tbe 'bus and we five set 
off, in a drizzling rain, for Haute Sainte, a ride of about 
two miles, wliicli afforded us ample opportunity to study 
our distinguished fellow travelers. 

"His royal highness, quite fleshy, rosy and looking 
none the worse for the shock incident to the attempt np- 
on his life by Sipido, in Brussels a few days previous, 
was attired in a plain grey Eng^lish hunting suit with 
cloak and crush hat. His son, George. Duke of York, 
now heir apparent to the Knglish throne, was a charm- 
ing and handsome young man, very much like an Amer- 
ican student or college boy. 

"At Haute Sainte, when looking over the relics 
which were on sale in the Waterloo museum, and which 
liad the appearance of being genuine, the lofty Edward 
gave but little attention to them and regarded them dis- 
dainfully. The son was interested, however, an<i invest- 
ed in some scrap which had been an ornament on a mili- 
tary suit. I found a fine old flint lock from a musket, 
with the original flint in it and upon offering to purchase 
it, Kdward picked it up and said: 

■' 'You can get this kind of stuff anywhere.' 

"The affable Duke of \ ork, however, not being im- 
pressed with the oracular utterances of his father, took 
up the gun lock and politely said: 

" 'Well, this came from Waterloo and at any rate is 
interesting.' 

"Of course I bought it then; would have lx)Ught it 
if the price had been doubled then and there, for aside 
from having come from the field of Waterloo, had it not 
been handled and commented on by two kingsl 

"At Haute Sainte we were transferred to a light 
running dog cart, with two facing seats without backs. 
The rain had ceased, so this was the most desiiable con- 



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ve3'aiice we could possibly have had only we had a balky 
horse. On our way to Hougoumont farm the horses 
phtnged down a steep declivity from an up^x^r to a lower 
road. Tlie ann of the prince which had been resting on 
the slight railing back of nie, suddenly tigliteneii around 
my waist. Mr Morton^ the Duke of York and the great 
miknownching together. It was o\'er in a moment. It 
was the first time we had *pift our faith in princes' but it 
.saved us, 

*'Tlie dog cart righted itself, and we proceeded oti 
our way, but had to dismount shortly afterward, for up- 
on reaching the ruined chateau of Hougoumont one of the 
horses again balked and neither fear of the driver nor re- 
spect for the royalty he was suptK)sed to be accomodat- 
hig deterred him from utterly re/using to proceed up the 
little hilly lane to the chateao. The guide shouted, swore, 
expostulated, but could do nothing more. So his roval 
highness^ now Edward VII, cheerfully suggested that we 
all get out and walk. This we did and proceeded to 
climb up the hill like a pack of school l>oys. Edward VII 
stopped occasionally to pick some violets which grew in 
profusion in the grass. The Duke of York was talka- 
tive and made himself very agreeable. It was when we 
reached the chateau that the camera fiend lined us up in 
the enclosure and photographed the ci*o\vd. 

*' Albert E^lward climbed the Lion Mound, a feat 
sufficiently difficult for a younger and less portly man. 
The mound is 2(x> feet high and the ascent is made by a 
steep, unbroken flight of steps. The day was extemely 
windy and climbing was difficult. Mr. Morton headed 
the party, after him came the prince and the rest follow- 
ed informally. At the summit, under the shade of the 
great Belgian Lion, weighing 30 tons, the prince was 
*vvinded' but talkative. He said he had l)een in the U- 
nited States but it was a lon^ time ago. He was partic- 
ularly well informed reganiino the ix)ints of interest on 
.she great battle field and his talk was similar to a lecture. 



106 



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Prof. William Herbert Rice 

Great-Grandson of Robert Hanna (1753- 1837) 

Page 1 01. 



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In writing his name in the visitors^ register at Hoiigoii- 
mont he wrote it 'Renfrew* as he always does in travel- 
ing incog. 

"To all appearances King Edward was that day a 
quiet, self-possessed Englisli gentleman; reserved but 
not haughty, arrogant or disagreeable, he displayed a 
disposition to ask and answer questions and impressed 
one as bdngatrue gentleman, well bred and well in- 
formed. 

**For his royal highness, now the heir apparent and 
next in succession, we could have but the highest ad- 
miration. Young, handsome, boyish, with large blue 
eyes, light mustache and charming manners, he appeared 
like a l)oy just out of school. Though married and the 
father of four children he seemed very young and his 
conversation so artless, his laugh so engaging and con- 
tagious that we parted at Braine L'Lallaud feeling al- 
most that we had left along time school friend in the 
person of George Albert, Duke of York." 

The Family of Ann IIanna, 9TH Child of 
Robert and Catharine Hanna 

Ann Hanna was born in Campbell County, Virgin- 
ia, July 30, 1797. She came with her parents, brothers 
and sisters to Eastern Ohio in the Fall of 1801, being at 
that time the baby of the family, (the loth child, Joshu- 
a, being born in Ohio in 1802). She spent her cliild- 
hoo<lat Columbiana and Clark.son, in Columbiana Coun- 
ty, and married in 1815, Benjamin Hambleton, of Scotch- 
Irish descent, who was born on the battle field of the 
Brandywine, in Pennsylvania, March 15, 1789. 

The Hambleton family came to the United States 
from Scotland and their history has l)een written b)' 
Chalkley Hamilton, of Chicago, deceased. The writer 
has not been able to procure the book and his knowledge 
of theantecedentsof the family is limited. Benjamin and 

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Ann Ilanibletoii were iiienil)ers of the Sodetyof Friends. 
They removed to Iowa at a ver}- early date in the histo- 
ry of that State and both are buried in the Friend's bu- 
rying ground between Searslx)ro and Lynnville, Iowa, 
as are also their son Osborn and grandsons Orlando and 
Thomas Fremont. 

Benjamin Hambleton died April 22, 1865, in his 77tli 
year. His widow surviv^ed him less than two years and 
died March loth, 1867, in her 71st j^ear. 

To Benjamin and Ann Hambleton were born ten 
children. 

(1) Rachki. Hambckton, born Oct. 14, 1816, died Jan. 186a. 
Married EHsha Ehitton in 1853. Had one child, Hniina (Dutlon) 
Thomas, born March, 1854. Kninia Dutton Thomas, a widow, 
now resides at Winona, Ohio. 

(2) Osborn Hamblkton, born Jiine 13, 1818. Married Philena 
K. Cooper, March 29, 1H42, died Nov. 25, i88:r. Philena Cooper 
Hambleton resides at Harvey, Illinois. Children of Osborn and 
Philena Hambleton, (i) Angelina H,, born Jnne 29, 1843, mar- 
ried Charles K. Craver in 1866. (2) Lorilla A. Hambleton, born 
Aug. 20, 1848. Resides at Harvey, Illinois. 

(3) Levi Hambleton, born Aug. 4, 1820, married Mary H. 
Hall, of Chester Co., Pa., Oct. 10, 1844. She was born Jan. 17. 
1821, died Jan. 27, 1900. 1-evi died April 2, 1899. He was engag- 
ed in mercantile business on the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers^ 
then in Columbiana and Stark Counties, Ohio, then in Oskaloosa, 
Iowa, was iu the Real Kstate business at the date of his death. 
To Levi and Mary Hall Hdinbleton were born four children, (i) 
Leondo E. born Aug. 18. 1845, died Jan. 31, 1849. (2) William 
Cj, l)orn Oct. 12, 1850, died Dec. 31, 1872. (3) John T. of Des 
Moines Iowa, l)orn Nov. 8, 1852, married Elizabeth B. Gritman 
(born April 5, 1856) and had issue four children (A) Grace G. 
married Clarence D. Coggeshall, Nov, 28, 1900. (B) Kthel B. 
born March 14, 1884, died Jan. 22. 1895. (C) Mary H. (D) 
Ruth G. 

(4) All>ert F. N. Hambleton, now in Real estate and a Repre- 
sentative in 30th General Assembly of Iowa, from Oskaloosa, Ma- 
haska County; l)orn Sept. .^, 1857, married Sarah Josepha Rob- 
erts (born March 13, 1858) on Sept. 3, 1879, and has issue, 



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Ann Hanna Hanibleton 

Daughter of Robert Hanna (1753- 1837) 

Page 107. 



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(A) Alma R. bom Sept. 14, 1890 (adopted). 

(B) William Ross, born Nov. 28, 1890, died Nov. 29, 1892. 

(4) Catharink HAMBI.KTON, born Sept. 28, 1822, died, unmar- 
ried, March 19, 1893. 

(5) JOBL G. Hambi^eTon, born Sept. 16, 1824, married Phebe 
Cooper March 30, 185 1. They celebrated their golden wedding 
the 30th of March, 1901. Had issue, 

(i) Orlando G. Hambleton, born June 29, 1852 died Sept. 11, 1902 
uimiarried. 

(2) lyindeu Hambleton, born May 3, 1854, married Alice Bur- 
roughs Nov. 27, 1884, of Ottuinwa, Iowa. Issue, one child, who 
died in infancy. 

(3) Thomas Fremont Hambleton, born July 3, 1859, died May 
16. 1862. 

(6) Thomas C. H ambi^eTon, born June 30, 1831, married, Dec. 
29, i860, Emily Morlan, of Morlan's Grove, Illinois (born Oct. 26, 
1841.) She died Oct. i, 1888. Thomas married a second time. 
Sarah E. Babcock, of Flora, Illinois. He died Oct. 2, 1903. Is- 
sue, by first wife, 

(i) Minnie A. born Apr. 3, 1862, died July 22, 1863. 

(2) Allen Wesley, born Sept. 21, 1863, died Sept. 12, 1864. 

(3) Clarence Neal. born Mar. i, 1866, married July 5, 1903, An. 
na Schell of Jeffersonville, Illinois. 

(4) Osborn Leslie, born Jan. 25, 1868, died Nov. 29 i?.97. 

(5) Mary Viola, born Oct. 7, 1870, died Aug. 29, 1871. 

(6) Effie Kate, born Aug. 10, 1872, married William B. Hanua, 
June 16, 1891, (born Dec. 15, 1869.) 

(7) Edith Grace, born Sept. 25, 1874, married Nov. 13, 1898, 
John Adam Logan, and resides at Scott City, Kansas. 

(8) HattieW. R., born May 30, 1877, married Aug. 19, 1900, 
Franklin G. Thompson, Wayne City, Iliuois. 

(9) Charles Hambleton, born Sept. 5, 1879. 

[7] Martha K. Hambi^eton, born Aug. 8, 18833, married Hen- 
ry Craver, fborn Nov. 27, 1837] and resides in Marshalltown, lo- 
w^a, and has issue, 

[i] Estella Craver, born Sept. 5, 1862, married John F. Sea- 
right, aiul had oue child, Ray M., who was born Sept. 1884 and 
died Dec. 26, 1892. 

[2] Edward E. Craver, born May 27, 1867, married Etta M. 
Craver. 

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[3] Alva S., born March 4, 1870, married Eliza J. 

[4] Henry Wilson, born Sept. 5, 1875, married Grace 

The other children of Benjamin and Ann Hanna 
Hambleton died in infancy. These were Esther, Sa- 
rah, and one unnamed daughter. Esther and Sarah 
died when Ijetween one and two years of age. It will 
be seen that there are comparatively few descendants of 
Benjamin and Ann Hambleton now living. Two chil- 
dren survive — Mrs. Martha Graver, of Marshalltown, 
Iowa, and Joel G. Hambleton, of Searshoro, Iowa, 
whose portrait, taken expressly for this l>ook, is given. 
This cousiii is now past 80 years of age, and one of the 
six living grandchildren of Robert and Catharine Han- 
na. To him I am greatly indebted for assistance ren- 
dered and data .supplied for the Hanna family history. 



Rev. Robert Hanna, Sixth Child of Robert 
AND Catharine (Jonks) Hanna. 

Robert Hanna, the sixth child of Rol^ert and Cath- 
arine Hanna, a Methodist minister, artist, engraver, 
lecturer, writer and philanthropist, was probably the 
mo.st gifted and versatile of the members of his father's 
family. He was born in Campbell County^ Virginia, 
May 28, 1789, and died at Smyrna, Delaware, Sept. 25, 
1854. 

Early in life Robert Hanna became a Methodist and 
formed the acquaintance of Bishop Francis Asbury, a 
friend.ship that lasted until the death of the Bishop in 
1816. He early entered the niinistry of the M. E. 
Church and his first appointment was to Bottetourt, Va., 
in 1 81 2; his senior preacher being Wesley Webster and 
his presiding elder Christopher Frye. 

In 1 81 3 he was .sent to Calvert, Maryland, under 
Joshua Welles, presiding elder, and Henry Smith, sen- 
ior preacher. In 1814 he took the Monongahela district. 



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Joel G Hanibleton, Aged So years 

Grandson of Rodent Hanna (i753-i«\^7) 

Page 109. 



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with Feryas elder and John White senior preacher. In 
1815 he was sent to Bedford, Carlisle district, under Ja- 
cob Grul^er, presiding elder. 

These facts and dates have been obtained, with no 
small lal)or, from research in ancient Methodist records 
and journals. In the librarj^ of Drew Seminary, at 
Madison, New Jersey, is the manuscript journal of Bish- 
op Asbury. This valuable journal has never been pub- 
lished nor is it often permitted any one to examine it, 
on account of the very personal and sometimes caustic 
remarks on various young ministers made by the good 
Bishop. The writer has very kindly been allowed the 
use of this manuscript in seeking information regarding 
Robert Hanna. Under date of Saturday, March 18, 1815, 
the Bishop writes: 

**I preached at the Point. Our Conference began 
on Monday and prudence restrained me to one session 
per day: perhaps I did not speak officially six times dur- 
ing the Conference. When it was understood that the 
Ancient Superintendent did not attend in the afternoon, 
the visits to him were renewed. Stationing about 85 
preachers we found to be no small work." 

"Friday, 25th. — We ordained the Deacons in Light 
Street Church. Being Good Friday a fast was appoint- 
ed and I spoke a few words on the sufferings of Chri.st.*' 

This was the date of Rol)ert Hanna's admission and 
ordination. The date of his admission on trial in the 
Baltimore Conference was Wednesday, March 24, 18 13; 
and under that date Bishop Asbury wrote: "Robert 
Hanna, sensible young man (carried from 18 12), hard 
of hearing, pious and useful." 

This reference to a physical infirmity of Rev. Robert 
Hatnia will explain why he left the work of tlie M. E. 
Church at an cMily dale and turiK-d his allenlion to art. 
He had soiiu liow k-aruL-d the art of engraviug on copper, 
and there is \ ct preserved in his faniih' a fine portrait of 
Bishop Asbury, the work of Robert Hanna, engraved 



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thus and never published. He fornud the acquaintance 
of Edwin Forrest and painted from life a niagnificenf 
portrait of that eminent tragedian. From 1816 until his 
death in i'854, he was engaged in jx^rtrait painting, and 
painted hundreds of. portraits' throughout the South, in 
Tennessee, North and South Carolina and Virginia. 

He also painted a number of allegorical and Script- 
ural subjects. Many of these are now owned by the de- 
.scendants of the original owners, many are in art galleries 
(that of Forrest in Philadelphia). Some 21 canvases are 
owned by his three grandchildren, residing in Bridgeport, 
Ohio. The portraits of Robert and Catharine Hanna, 
shown in this volume, are copied frohi his paintings now 
owned hv Charles Elmer Rice, of Alliance, Ohio, who 
also owns the large painting of ''The Good Samaritan," 
a canvas .some six by eight feet in size. Robert Hanna 
was also a lecturer on Temperance and various reforms, 
a writer of considerable ability, and a pioneer Anti- 
Slavery advocate. 

On Sept. 7, 1815, Mr. Hanna married Elizabeth I,i.s- 
ton, at Selvey sport, Maryland. When he left his charge 
that year and ceased his work in the ministry, Mr. and 
Mrs. Hanna came to Lisbon, Ohio, near v;here his par- 
ents were living and where their first child, Lavinia 
Liston, was born, on July 6, 1817. vShe died at Wheel- 
ing, W. Va., Jan. 4, 1819. 

Removing to Wheeling, W. Va., Mr. Hanna made 
that city and Bridgeport his home during the remainder 
of his life, but frequently was absent a year or more at a 
time, while engaged in portrait work in the South. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Hanna were born six children. 

[i] Lavinia Liston, horn July 16, 1S17. died Jan. 4, 1819. 

[2] Amanda Virginia, born Nov. 2, 1S19, married Andrew Gou- 

dy Nov. 5, 186 1, died at Bridgeix)rt, Ohio, Jan. 13, 1904. 

[3] EHzaheth Liston, horn Nov. 29, 1821, died Sept. 7, 1858. 

[4] Fletcher John, l)orn Aug. 20, 1824, nuirried Nov. 11, 1853 E- 



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Rev. Robert Hanna, (Artist) 
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lizabetli Blake, died Jan. 8, 1865. They had issue four children, 

three of whom died in infancy and the fourth, Virgiuia Hanna, 

die<l at the age of 34 years. 

[5] Raphael Angelo, bornjan. 18, 1827, died Oct. 6, 1879. 

[6] Proxina I«avittia Hanna, born Nov, 16, 1836, married Nov, 

9. 1858, James A'exander Wharry, and died F«b. 6, 1869, near Pe- 
troleum Center, Pa. To Laviiiia Hanna and James A. Wharry 
were lx)rii three cliildren. 

Benjamin Foster Wharry, f>orn Oct. 13, 1859. 

Kale Lee Wharry, lx)rn Jan. 29, 1862. 

John Kersey Wharry, l)orn Aug. 3, i8f^5; married, Oct. 17, 
1903, Grace Rebecca Dinsniore. 

These three grandchildren ai*e the only living posterity of 
Rev. Rol)ert Hanna. Miss Kate Lee Whariy and her brother 
Benjamin Foster Wharry reside in Bridgeport,Ohio. John Kensey 
Wharry resides at Cant(»n, Ohio. A daughter, Elma Kinsey was 
lK)rn to John K. and Rebecca D. Wharry on Jan. 20, 1905. 

Th? following letter from the eccentric and celebrated Jacob 
Gruber to Rev. Rol)ert Hanna will l)e read with interest, on ac- 
icount of the curious and explicit directions given him for reacli^ 
ng h is new charge: 

Baltimore Conference, Leesburg, March the 26th, 181 2. 
Dear Brother Robert Hanna; 

This will inform you that you were admitted into the Travel- 
ing Connection at this Conference. I hope you will strive to 
acquit yourself as a man of courage and zeal — a man of God. 
Pray much and strive to l)ear up under your labour and cheerful- 
ly l>ear your cross. You may expect your share of difficulties 
and trials, but you have the Lord for your stronghold; trust in 
Him; He will support you in all your travels and labours. May 
the bles.sing of God rest upon you and His presence attend you 
in every place. 

Your appointment is on Bottetourt Circuit, in Green briar 
District. The way for you to find the Circuit is as follows: To 
Washington, then to Morgan town » then to the Swamp meeting 
house, then to Stalnecker's, then to the Valley, from there to 
Greenbriar on the little Levels and through Monroe, by the 
Swe — [torn]— to Craig's Creek, where you are in the Circuit. 
When you go enquire for the places where the preachers stop. 



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You can get information from place to place. I remain your Bro. 
in the I/>nl, Jacob Grubbr. 

N. B. I received Thirty-seven Dollars and sixty cents for 
you at this Conference. Ten Dollars and fifty-six cents I paid 
for your great coat, which taken out will leave Twenty-seven 
Dollars and four cents, which T enclose in this letter as near as I 
can to you. Farewell, 

Addressed to "Mr. Rol^ert Ha una, Jr., in the West of Penn- 
sylvania.** 

Since writing the history of Robert and Catharine 
Hainia, and especially the facts concerning their meeting 
and the marriage of Benjamin Jones and Esther Kvans, 
(pages 17 and 1 8) a journal or diary has l>een found, 
written by Rev. Robert Hanna, Jr. in 1830. This throws 
much light on some formerly obscure points. Robert 
Hanna, Jr. says that his parents informed him that he 
was the first white child born in the city of lyynchburg, 
Va. This was on May 28, 1789 and in a log house, 
weatherboarded, built by Robert Hanna, Sr. on the 
south side of Main Street. The family had moved to 
Lynchburg from Crooked Run, Frederick C<mnty, Vir- 
ginia, ''where Robert Hanna and Catharine Jones had been 
7naf ried. ' ' Of his mother (Catharine Jones) Robert Han- 
na, Jr. says, "she was born in Chester Comity, Pa., near 
the Yellow Springs, eleven miles from Philadelphia, Aug. 
27, 1754. Her grandparents had all comefrotn Wales, 
They came to America with William Penn's first colo- 
nists. Of these had descended her mother, Esther Evans 
and her father Benjamin Jones. Her father died about 
three months after her l)irth and her mother went to re- 
side with her aunt. Her mother did not marry again un- 
til she, the daughter, was eiglit }ears old and then to a 
John Jones who was in no way related to her former hus- 
band.'* This aunt was doubtless Eliza Jones Monroe, 
the ofdy aunt on her fathers side, and it was probably at 
her home, in Virginia, that Robert Hanna met Catharine 
Jones, and there they were married, Jan. 30, 1776. The 



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Chas Theodore Morton 

Great great-grandson of Robert Haiina (1753-1837) 

Page 101. 



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mother, Esther Evans Jones, died at Crooked Run, Va. 
at 80 years of age. Robert Hanna's diary and journal 
also states that his father was born at Lesarah Lock, 
County Monaghan, Ireland, sixty miles from Londonderry 
and twenty miles from Newrey: also, that the parents of 
Rol)ert and Elizabeth Hanna **were of that stock that 
emigrated from Scotland into Ireland.*' **They took 
shipping for America at Colerain, and Elizabeth Hender- 
son Hanna died in 1766." 



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CHAPTER IV. 

Jamks Hanna, one af the twin sons of Thomas ami 
Klizabeth Hanna, was l)orn in County Monaghan, Ire- 
land, March 2, 1753. He emigrated to the Province of 
Pennsylvania in 1763, when ten years of age, in compa- 
ny of his parents, one sister and three brothers. After 
the death of his father, in 1764, James was reared in the 
family of a Presbyterian farmer in Bucks County, Pa. 
April 4, 1782, at Havre de Grace, Marylai»d, James 
Hanna was married to Hannah Bay less. She was of 
Huguenot de.scent. Her grandfather vSamuel, with his 
brother William, came to America in the latter part of 
the 17th century and settled near Basking Ridge, New 
Jersey. In the begimiing of the eighteenth century the 
four sons of Samuel Bayle.ss emigrated to the Maryland 
Colony and had farms near Havre de Grace, in Herford 
County, and there Hannah Bay less was born Aug. 13, 
1761. Shortly r.fter their marriage James Hanna and 
Hannah, his wife, emigrated to Kentucky, making the 
entire journey on horseback, she riding on a pillion, be- 
hind her husband. They settled in Scott County, Ken- 
tucky. Here their nine children were born and here 
they continued to reside until 1804, when they removed 
to Dayton, Oiiio. Within the year Hannah Bay less 
Hanna died, and was buried in tlieold Dayton Cemetery. 
The date of her death was Aug. 14, 1804. 

James Hanna married a .second time ai»d had four 
children, of whom three died in infancy and the fourth, 
Harriett, born in 1817, early leaving home, was entirely 
lost track of and nothing is known of her hi.story. 

James Hanna was a weaver by trade but a farmer 
by occupation. In his religious life he was an orthodox 
Presbyterian, serving his Church for fifty years as an 



16 



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James Hanna (i 753-1827.) 
Page 116. 



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Elder. Ill politics he was a Whig. He died at his home 
near Dayton, Ohio, Oct. 3^, 1827. The portrait here 
presented of James Hanna is taken from the original now 
owned by Mrs. Eliza Hanna Hayden, daughter of Sam- 
uel Hanna, of Fort Wayne, Indiana. There is a copy of 
this painting also, now owned by Mr. Oliver S. Hanna, 
of Fort Wayne, Indiana. 

Chii<drkn of James Hanna, Sr. and 
Hannah Bayless Hanna. 

I Elizabeth (Jolinsoii, McCorkle), l>orii Jan. 9, 1783; died Nov. 
27. 1857. 

2. Thomas Hanna, born , 1785; died ? 

3 Martha (Telford), born Jan. 29, 1789; died Aug. 23, 1850. 

4 James Hanna, lx)rn Mar. 31, 1791; died Feb. 18, 1855. 

5 Sarah (Ward), born July 20, 1795; died Jan. 22, 1872. 

6 Samuel Hanua. born Oct. 17, 1797; <HedJuue 11, 1866. 

7 Hugh Hauna, !)orn Ju!y 26, 1799: died Jan. 18, 1879. 

8 Nancy (Barnett), born , 1801; died Aug. — , 1857. 

9 Joseph SinithlHanna, born Dec. 7, 1803; died Aug. 4, 1864. 

(2) Thomas Hanna, the second child, died without issue. 

( I ) Er,iZABBTH|HANNA, eldest child of James Hanna and Han- 
nah Bayless Hanua, was born January 9, 1783, iu Scott County, 
Kentucky. She was married to John Johnson, a Soldier of the 
War of 1812, on March 8, i8o8. John Johnson was a farmer, re- 
siding at Pi<|ua, Ohio. He died Nov, 15, 1816, leaving his widow 
with three small children, viz: 

(1) James Johnson, born Dec. 25, 180S, died Oct. i, 1890. 

(2) Martha Hanna Johnson, April i, 1813, April 10, 1904. 

(3) Elizabeth C. Johnson, May, 4, 1815, died Oct. 10, 1854. 

l^^lizabeth Hanna Johnson was married, Aug. 21, 1821, to James 
McCorkle, and by this marriage there was but one child. 

(4) Rev. Wm. Augustus McCorkl,e, born Nov. 2, 1822, died 
April 16, 1896. 

A rather cnrioiis happening it was that Elizabeth 
Hainia Johnson, and her son and danghter should marry 
the two brothers and sister in the McCorkle family. 



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The mother married James McCorklem 182 1. Hero 
est son, James, married Mary McCorkle (sister to 
James) on Dec. 25, 1834, and the youngest daughter 
married a younger brother, Milton McCorkle. Elizabeth 
HaiHia, the mother, died at the home of her oldest son, 
James Johnson Nov. 27, 1857, at Thorntown, Indiana. 
She was a noble christian woman and devoted her life to 
the Master's work. Her portrait is given in this volume 
and will be a valued souvenir to her descendants. 

(i) James Johnson, oldest son of Elizabeth Hanna 
and John Johnson, married Mary McCorkle, Dec. 25, 
1834, removed to Thorntown, Boone County, Indiana, 
where he engaged in the mercantile business until 1844 
when he removed to Crawfordsville: thence to Wabash 
where he was employed by his uncle Hugh Hanna, in 
the grain and limiber business. In 1852 he returned to 
Thorntown and was Postmaster during Pres. Lincoln's 
administration. He was an ardent Republican, an elder 
in the Presbyterian Church and a leading citizen in all 
tliat went to elevate the standard of the morals of the 
connnunity. In 1870 he went to lola, Kansas, where his 
wife died, at the home of their oldest son and where he 
continued to reside until his death which occurred on 
Oct. I, i8yo, in his 82nd year. 

To James and Mary Johnson were born nine children 
six of whom died in infancy. Those now living are: 

John Wkbstkr Johnson, of lola, Kansas, uiiiiiarried. 
Mary Ai^ice Johnson, of lola, Kansas, unmarried. 
Chari«bs W. Johnson married Emma Wheki^ER. Resides at 
Thorntown, Indjana, and is engaged in the Real Kstate and In- 
surance business. Mr. Johnson is a member of the School Board 
of the city; a leader in temperance work, and has been an Elder 
in the Presbyterian Church for the past twenty years. He was 
Commissioner to the General Assembly in 1900, and was a soldier 
in the Civil War from 1861 to 1865. In 1869 he married Miss 
Emma Wheeler and they are the parents of eight children, all 
living. 



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(A) Edgar Johnson, married Mabei« Wallace :iii I 
two children, Charles Roller! and Frederick W. Johnson. 

(B) Arthnr Hugh Johnson, D. D. S., married Effie Bruce 
and has one son, Baird Wheeler Johnson. 

(C) James Charles Johnson, Chicago, 111. 

(D) Mary John. ^on, Thorn town, Ind. 

( E) Horace Johnson, Chicago, 111. 

(F) Wilbur E, Johnson, Thorutown, Ind. 

(G) Harold McCorkle Johnson, Thorntown, Ind. 
(H) J, Boyd Johnson, Thorntown, Ind. 

The family group of the Johnson family here pre- 
sented is a picture to delight the heart of Piesident Roose- 
velt. It is a remarkably fine picture of a remarkably 
handsome family of boys and girls, none of whom will 
ever be handsomer than the father and mother, but all 
of whom can probably be depended upon to uphold Mr. 
Roosevelt's **fundamental principle" of the Republican 
party. 

(2) Martha Johnson, second child of Elizabeth Han- 
na and John Johnson, was born April i, 18 13, and died 
April 10, 1904, in her 92d year. She was married Sept. 
4, 1834, to Samuel Kinkaid, in Ohio. Removed to 
Thorntown, Indiana, in 1856. Mr. Kinkaid died in 1883. 
Martha Kinkaid, after the death of her husband, resided 
with her daughter Alice. For many years previous to 
her death she was the only living charter member of the 
Presbyterian Church of Thorntown. In a memorial 
picture of the pastors and officials of that Church, the 
only woman in the group is Martha Kinkaid. She was 
the mother of eight children, i^even of whom lived to 
maturity. These were, 

(.\) Mary Hanna Kinkaid, married, in 1859, Alexander Cor- 
rie. He died in 1869, leaving her a widow with four small chil- 
dren. She died in 1892, having had issue, 

1 Frank J. Corrie, married Lulu Rector. 

2 Chas. J. Corrie, married May Cliss; issue, Ethel C. Corrie. 

3 Martha A. Corrie; single. 

4 Catharine Corrie, married Frank Tetrington. 



119 

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(A) KuZABETH P. KiNKAiD, married Joli II Corrie, July 31, 1856. 
He died Feb. 8, 1901. Elizat)eUi lives in Thoriitown, Iiid. They 
had issue, 

1 James Corrie, married Mary Searing. 

2 Ada B. Corrie, married William Munson; issue, Archy 
and Hazel Munson. 

4 Cordelia May Corrie; unmarried. 

4 Alice C. Corrie, married Richard Searing. 

(C) Cornelia Kinkaid, born 1840; died April 10, 1890. 

(D) Sarah Ann Kinkaid, married Lewis W. Jaques, Nov. 29, 
1870 and has issue, living, Jesiie Jaques, married to Ira Can.pl)ell 
and has daughter Vera Canipbell. 

(R) Wm. B. Kinkaid, married Sept. 21, 1881 Oma L. Hague 
and has issue three children: (1) Esther, married Crayon McKin- 
sey (issue Ethel McKinsey) (2) Rnlph and (3) Leah. 

(F) AucE Johnson Kinkaid, unmarried and resides in Thorn- 
town, Indiana, cared for her mother for many years and now 
keeps house for her brother William B. whose wife Oma L. died 
some years since. 

(G) Samuel Ward KiNKAiD,married Eva T. Kendall and has 
issue; Edgar, William and Hellen Kinkaid. Resides on the old 
home farm just out of Thorntown, Indiana. 

(3) Elizabeth C. Johnson, third child of Elizabeth Hanna 
and John Johnson, l)orn May 4, 1815. Married Milton McCorkle, 
a brother of her brother James* wife and also a brother of her 
mother's second husband. They resided in Thorntown from some 
time in the "thirties," until the death of Eli.zabeth in October, 
1854. She left three small children. 

(i) Jasper McCorcle, enli.sted in the nth Indiana volunteers 
and was killed in battle in in 1864, September 21st, aged 22 years. 

(2) Martha J. McCorkle, married G. W. Dickey and lives 
in Colorado Springs, Colorado. They had issue, Stella, Dickey 
married and has two children: Jessie Dickey, married: Roy Dick- 
ey, single. 

(3) Anzonetta McCorkle, married Hamilton Wise and has 
issue two daughters, Helen W. Wise and Nettie Wise. 



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Elizabeth Hanna Johnson McCorkle, 

Daughter of James Hanna ( 1753-1827.) 

Page 117, 



Martha Johnson Kinkaid, in Her 92iid Year. 

Samuel Kinkaid. r-^ 1 

Page.. 9. -g^zeabyi^OOgle 



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<4) 'riie Rifv. William AuGusTrs McCokklT":, only 
child of Rlizabeth Hanna h}' her second marriage, with 
James McCorkle, w^s l)oni on his father^'s fann near 
Troj', Ohio, on Kovenil)er 2, 1822; he was gradnaled 
from Wal)ash College, Cravvfordsville, Indiana in the 
class of 1850. He studied theoloy at Lane Seminary, 
Cincinnati, Ohio, and Ai Andover Seminary, Andover, 
Massachnselts. He was a Presbyterian and was ordain- 
ed to the Ministry' by the Presbytery of Crawfordsvilleoii 
June 19, 185,3. ^^^^^ degree of Doctor of Divinity was 
conferred ii\Km him by Waliash College in 1871. His 
chief pastorates were: The Presbj-terian Church at Mar- 
j»hall, Michigan, First Presbyterian Church of Detroit, 
the second Presbyterian Church of Princeton, New Jer- 
sey, and Presbytarlan Church of Ypsilanti, Michigan, 
His work in the ministry was successful and he always 
occupied a ccunmanding |X)sition in every conimiuiity in 
which he lived. He was always hiterested in public af- 
fairs and in educational matters, and had nuich to do 
with the establishment of Alma College, a new and grow- 
ing institution in Michigan. He died on April 16, 1896. 
Sept. 9, 1852 Rev. W. A. McCorkle was married to Ma- 
ria Foster, in Adrian MichigaiL Of this marriage there 
were born six children: 

1. Cordelia KIizt»i<?lli AkCoiklt?. born in AltiCH, liidinra, 
July 12, 1853, 

2. William Foster McCorkle, tH)rii in Tliornlown, Indiana 
January 7, 1S55. 

3. Charles White McCorkle, horn in Siijieiior, Wisconsin, 
November 5, 1856, died in Detroit, Michigan, March 30, 1898. 

4. Frances Augusta Mc Corkle, horn in Detroit Michigan, 
September 15, 1858. 

5. FVe<lerick James McCorkle, horn in Marshall, Michigan, 
June 4, i860, died in Marshall, Michigan, September 5, 1862. 

6. Herbert Inglis McCorkle, born in Marshall, MichigHii, 
June 25, 1863. <hed in Dc'troit, Michigan, January 4, 1864. 

William P'oster McCorkle married Miss Bessie Lura 
Dalzell, of Detroit, Michigan, April 20, 1897, — one child, 



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Hilciii D.ilzsll McCorkle, born Jaiinary ii, T89S. 

Charles While McCorkle married "Xliss Mary E- 
Barnes, of Detroit Michij^an^ September 5, 18^. Two* 
children were born of this niarriaj^e — Doroioy Barnes. 
Me Corkle, born May 27, 1889 and Marjorie Mc Corkle 
born October 21. 1893. 

The sons William Foster McCorkle and Charles 
White McCorkle were gradnated from Princeton Uni- 
versity in the classes of 1877 and 1878. Wm. F. is a 
practising Attorney in Detroit, Michigan, where he has 
been located since 1883. Clias. W. , practicetl law in 
Yi)6ilanti, Michigan, and died in 1898. 

The two sisters Cordelia and Frances Augusta Mc- 
Corkle, are unmarried and live in Detroit. 

(3) Martha Hanna, tliinl cliild of James and Haiirm Bayless 
Haitna, wa^ !)oru in Scott County, Kentuck}', Jan. 29, 1789. She 
married Andrew Tel fonU (l)orn March 27, 1790; Died June 12, 1853) 
a son of Mary McCanipbell, :ii»d Alexander Telford, Jr. Martha 
Telford died August 23, 1S50, having had issue three chiUlren. 

» 

(A) James Haniia Telford, horn Sept.. 6, 1824, died July 16 
?8vSo. Married Pamela Hale, horn March ib. 1827; dieil Sept. 19 
188 1. 

(B) Asa McCorkle Telford, Ikmu July 30, 1826; died Oct. 21, 
1845. 

(C) Samuel W. Telford, horn Dec. 31. 1828; died Dec. 17' 

1858. 

(A) James Han na Telford and Pamela Hale had issue five chil- 
<iren. 

(a) Cecilia Hale Telford, born Feb, 13, 1852. 

(b) Martha Han na Telford born Feb. 3, 1854, married David 
Murphy, (tyorn Nov. 23, 1833; diet! May 6. 1901.) 

(c) Joseph Hrovvn Telford, born I>ec. 22, 1855; died April 

14, i«56. 

(d) James Andrew Telford. 1>orn June 27, 1858, married 
Minnie Powers, (iK)rn Aug. 20, 1866, died Feb. 22, 1896) and had 
issue, James Andrew Jr., Ixnu Mar. 17, 1891: died Mar. 19, 1891. 

(e) Florence Pamela Telford, Uirn May 14, 1862, married 



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Roberl Henry Agiiew Boyd, M P. (Ijornjiily 22, i'86i; died July 
'» 1895) and had issue Agues Klizabeth Boyd, horn Aug. 4, 1890; 
•died Aug. 11, 1891. (The mother of !>. Robert H. A. Boyd, wjW* 
•one of the Haunts of Peiiusylvaiiia.) 

<4) James Hanna Jt,, fourlli cliikl of James and Hati- 
iiali Bay less Haniia, was l)oni in Washiiigfton Comity, 
Pa., March 31, 1791. He resided in Kentucky until 1804, 
\vlieii he moved to Dayton, Ohio. He first went to 
Crawfordsville, Indiana, in i>^33, and with his brothers 
Samuel and Joseph, and Leroy and Robert C. Gregory, 
purchased a .stock of general nierchandise and conunenc- 
'ed business in a frame building on the southwest corner 
of Main and Green streets, Mr. Hanna also pui"cha.sed a 
large tract of land situated in Coal Creek Town.ship, and 
included in .sections 26, 27, 28 and 33. all in township 20, 
range 5. Mr. Hanna did not, however, bring his family 
to Crawfordsville until the fall of 1835, when they ar- 
rived with their household effects in a train of old time 
Peini.sylvania wagons. He came from Troy, Ohio, where 
all his children had been born. He had there married 
Nancy Telford, April i, 1824 daughter of Alexander Tel- 
ford, a .soldier of the War of the American Revolution, 
wlio was present at the surrender of Cornwallis at York- 
town. Mr. Alexander Telford, with his brother William, 
liad first emigrated from Rockbridge County, Virginia, 
and .settled in Scott County, Kentucky. His wife's maid- 
en name was Mar\' McCampbell, a .sister of Andrew Mc 
Campbell, the head of the McCampbell family now resid- 
ing in Parke County, Indiana. The Tel fords have been 
a marked family in this country. They were of English 
origin — of the original Talfourd stock. Their settlement 
in the United States was very eirly — ^probably sometime 
in 18 1 6. Alexander Telford's children were Andrew, 
Mary Orbinson, Dr. John Gilmore and Nancy Hamia- 
The first three spent the whole of their lives at Troy, O- 
hio and died there. Charles Linneus Telford, the dis- 

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(inguished (awyer of Cincinnati, was the onF}* son of Dn 
John G. Telford. He |X)ssessed brilliant talents and was. 
ranked anvong the first o-f the l)ar ii? the day of Caldwell;,. 
Storer, Pifgh, Groesbeck, and Lytle. He died wlien l)nt 
2P. 3^ears of age, Andrew married Martha Hanna and! 
was the father of Samuel VV^/PelfordJieretofore mention- 
ed. Mrs. Nanc>' Haiuia, who died February rS^, 1855, '^ 
still affectionately ren)eml3ered by her surviving contem- 
|)oraries. She was a rare woman. Although brought up 
ill the midst of plenty and hixury, editc^ited according to 
the best methods- of her day, and allied b}- her birth to 
one of the wealthiest, most intellectual andailtiired fam- 
ilies in the country, .she came to Indiana with her hus- 
band, without regrets for that which she had left i)ehind, 
and here, during the Ixdance of her life, wrought the 
good work of faith, hojK* and charity, in the church of 
her allegiance, and \\\ the midst of the large circle of 
friends who knew her and comprehended her virtues. It 
may l>e said here both the Hanna and Telford families 
were Presbyterians as far back as they can l)e traced. 
Mrs, Hanna was sinallin stature, a thorough brunette, 
her hair as black as ever .seen, her eyes dark hazel, lus- 
trous and heroic in expression, and when young was re- 
garded by her cotemp)raries beautiful and graceful in a 
period when American beauty was extraordinary. Her 
scholarship and reading were amongst the nuxst thorough 
and advanced of her day. Her chief mental character- 
istic consi.sted in the fact .she was uniformly accurate. 
She was ea.sy and brilliant in conversation and charmed 
every ear she invited to her friendship, but she was in- 
clined to be cloistered and aristocratic in her tastes and 
associations. In the home circle she was a jewel of the 
brightest lustre. She loved her family with singular ten- 
derness, and to them she was an object of idolatry. Sl^.e 
had great family pride and none of her blood, even in the 
remotest degree, no matter for what cau.se, was ever for- 
.saken or neglecttd. She was a meek, lowly, devout 



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Christian, without a cloud on her faith. 

James Hanna, Jr. had for many years carried on the 
business of taiuier r.nd furrier. His means were quite 
ample and his immigration into Indiana, as it seemed, 
was not so much influenced by hopes of a more success- 
ful business, as the desire to enjoy the educational facili- 
ties of Wabash College, then recently founded at Craw- 
fordsville. His connnercial ventures were not successful 
and, after a few years of trial abandoned. In 1836 he 
built the large brick block on the northwest corner of 
Main and Washington streets. It v.-as at this place he 
closed out his stock. He had formed a singular affection 
for V^abiish College, and seemed to think or car*^ for lit- 
tle else. In the trying days of that institution, now ris- 
en to such great and noble proportions, struggling as it 
was with its mortgages and a little further on with the 
ravages of fire, he becai.ie its general traveling agent, 
and rode over ahnost the entire State on horseback so- 
liciting subscriptions for its relief. He was eminently 
successful in his efi'orts. 

Mr. Hanna was large — over six feet in height, had 
sandy hair, a massive head, unusually manly and well 
defined features, and was powerful in frame and mind. 
He was a devout Christian of the Presbyterian denomi- 
nation, and for many years was ruling elder of Center 
Church, Crawfordsville. His early education had l)een 
limited, but he had few equals in the natural graces of 
speech. He maintained the closest social relations with 
such scholars as Elihn Baldwin, Charles White, E. O. 
Hovey, Caleb Mills, and more so of all others, with James 
H. Johnston, the most patient student, and most pro- 
foinul scholar of any who have lived and died in Mont- 
gomery County. Johnston and Hanna were inseparable 
in friendship and two more Godly men, perhaps, never 
crossed the line which separates the two eternities. Con- 
sidered as a mind untrained in the classic schools, and as 
one who had onlv drunk at the natural fountains on his 



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way, lie was an orator of the best type — stately, clear, 
impassioned, strong^, irresistible. On Sunday night before 
lie left his home for the last time, and which proved his 
last Sabbath on earth, at a monthly concert held in the 
interest of Religious Foreign Missions, he delivered one 
of the most powerful appeals to the young men in attend- 
ance, ever delivered in Center CJiurch. That fiery ap- 
peal will never fade from the memory of any who heard 
it. He left home the next Tuesday and died the follow- 
ing Thursday, of cholera, on the Ohio River steamer 
"Monongahela," and was buried a few miles above 
Blannerliassett\s Island. His Ixxly was subsequently 
removed to Craw fordsvi lie and now reposes in Oak Hill 
Cemetery. 

To James Hanna, Jr., and Nancy Telford Hanna 
w^ere born four children. 

1 Martha A. Ilaiiiiu, resides al Darlington, Tnd. 

2 Mary Klizaheth, died iS88, at Crawfordsville. Ind. 

3 Alexander Little, died in California, leaving one daughter, 
Lucy Hanna. now Mrs. Lucy Dunlap, who has one child, Scott 
Dunlap. 

4 Bay less Washington Hanna, born March 14, 1829, married 
Sarah Oakalla Reed (horn June 28, 1838), on Sept. 9, 1858, in St. 
Stephen's Protestant Episcopal Church, Terre Haute, Ind. 

Baylkss Washington Hanna. 

(Prepared hy His Son, Read Hanna.) 

The Indianapolis "Sentinel-,'* in its editorial mention 
of the death of Bayless W. Hanna, said: "Bayle.ss W. 
Hanna, who died at Crawfordsville last night, was one of 
the most brilliant and gifted men Indiana ever prod need, 
and had had a distingnished career at the bar and in 
pnblic life. He was incomparable as a racoiiietir and his 
genial personal qualities made him a host of friends wher- 
ever he went. His last pnblic service was as Minister to 
the Argentine Republic, which post he held during 
Cleveland's administration. He had been in failing 



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Hon. Bayless W. Hanna 
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health ever since his return from South America in 1889. 
His deatli will Ije widely deplored.'* 

"The New York "World" among other things said: 
"Bayless W. Hanna, whose deatli at his home in Indiana 
has just been announced, was probably the most remark- 
able talker the Hoosier State ever prcxluced. His capac- 
ity for entertaining a crowd was wonderful indeed.'* 

At the memorial meeting of the Bar at Terre Haute, 
Indiana, the following was a part of tlie re.solutions pre- 
pared by the late Senator Voorhees, and adopted: 

"The records of this court show tluit Bayless W. 
Hanna was a member of its bar for more than a third of 
a century, during twenty- five years of which time he was 
an active and brilliant participant in the bu.siness which 
came before it. Until within the last ten years he was 
also a resident of this city, our neighbor and our friend. 
We knew him well and intimately and our hearts are 
saddened that his term of life has closed. Few men have 
ever surpa.ssed him in the fascination of his social gifts 
and the charm of his coloquial powers. As a lawyer he 
was faithful in all his inidertakings and equal to all the 
professional requireuicnts ever made upon him. In every 
official relation of life, from his first election as a mem- 
ber of the Legislature to the close of his career as an 
American minister in South America, his record is one 
of integrity, ability, and .strict fidelity to every public in- 
terest." 

Mr. Haiuia was born in Troy, Ohio, March 14, 1829, 
where he resided until 1836, when his parents removed 
to Crawfordsville, Indiana, where he was educated and 
resided till his removal to Terre Haute in 1857. He en- 
tered Wabash College at an early age and completed his 
Junior year in that institution, when he was comjxflled 
by failing health to leave for the South where he resided, 
for two years at Natchez, Mississippi. Mr. Hanna, how- 
ever, was given the degree of Master of Arts by Wabash 
College in 1883. While in Natchez he began the study 



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of law with Josiali Winchester and, after examination, 
was admitted to the Bar. On his return to Crawfords- 
ville he resnmed tlie stnd)^ of law with Joseph E. McDon- 
ald, afterwards, United vStates Senator, and this laid the 
foundation for a brilliant career at the bar and in public 
life. He was elected and served a term as prosecutin)^: 
attorney of Montgomery' County, at the termination of 
which, he removed, in 1858, to Terre Haute, Indiana, 
where he formed a partnership with Daniel W. Voorhees, 
who afterwards served three terms in the Senate of the 
United States. On September 9, 1858, he united in mar- 
riage with Miss Sarah Oakalla Read, daughter of Dr. Kzra 
Read, a distinguished physician and surgeon of Terre 
Haute, and also a neice of Judge Nathaniel Read of the 
Supreme Court of Ohio, of Abner Read, Lieutenant Com- 
mander, United States Navy, of Daniel Read, L. L. D. , 
afterwards President of the University of Missouri, and 
Jonathan Young, who died a few years ago a Commodore 
in the Navy. Mr. Hanna soon became prominent and 
brilliant in his profession, his rapier was keen, his thrust 
swift and sure, and although his opponents were often 
tried gladiators of renown in the profession, his equip- 
ments were such that he challenged at all times their con- 
fidence and admiration. 

At this period in his career Mr. Hanna drifted very 
naturally, for one of his tempermenl and gifts, into poli- 
tics. The feeling between the North and South had 
reached an acute stage, the discussions on the rostrum 
and in the press were acrimonious and threatening, and 
the gathering clouds portended a storm that at last broke 
and deluged the country with blood. Mr. Hainia, fiery, 
bold and eloquent, espoused the cause of the Democratic 
party — although his fathei had been an ardent Whig — 
and was prominently identified as a Democrat till the day 
of his death. He at once plunged /';/ fncdias res and in 
1862 was elected by the Terre Haute district as a mem- 
Ix^r of the Legislature, and in 1864 to the State Senate. 



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His speeches were iiiaslerpieces and liis effort against the 
ratificatiqii of the Fourteenth Aniendnient won for him 
a reputation as an orator that at once placed him among 
tlie most promising and influential leaders of the Democ- 
racy of his State. In 1870 he was elected Attorney- 
General of Indiana; was re-noniinated, but defeated in 
this disastrous canijxiign of 1872. In this same year he 
was a delegate at large to the Baltimore Convention 
which nominated Horace Greely, In 1876 he was again 
a delegate at large to the Democratic National Conven- 
tion, held at St. Louis, and managed the forces of Thom- 
as A. Ht^udricks, a candidate for the Presidential nomi- 
nation, who was defeated !)y Mr. Tilden but was given 
second place on the ticket. Mr. Hanna was appointed 
one of the committee to officially notify Tilden of his 
iionn'nation, and his s|x?ech on that occasion was truly a 
gem in oratory. In 1880 he made the race for Congress 
in the Eighth Congressional district, but was defeated, 
altlumgh he made a brilliant canvass and ran far ahead 
of the rest of the ticket. In 1883 Mr. Hanna removed 
to his old home at Craw fords vi lie, where he edited the 
*'Crawfordsville Review" for a period of two years. In 
1884 he was elected Elector-at- Large on the Cleveland 
and Hendricks ticker. In 1885 he was appointed by 
President Cleveland Minister to Persia, which he declined 
and was innnediately appointed instead as Minister Res- 
ident and Consul General to the Argentine Republic, 
with the Legation at Buenos Ayres. Through Mr. 
Hanna' s efforts the grade of the mission was raised by 
Congress, and Mr. Hanna in 1887 was re-appointed Kn- 
voy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary and 
served as such until June, 1889, when he was stricken 
with apoplexy and was compelled by the dangerous con- 
dition of his health to leave for Enghuid, en route for his 
home, where he arrived in Angu.st, 1889. He died at 
Crawfordsville August 5, 1891, leaving surviving him a 
wife and six children. Mr. Hanna was an honorary 

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mem!)er of Indiana Gamma Chapter of the Phi Kappa Si 
fraternity of Wabash College, also a Master Mason, bein|»j 
raised as such in a Lodge at Terre Haute. Mr. Hanna 
was originally Presbyterian, but his wife l>eing Episco- 
palian he desired to join that Church in order that his 
household mig^lit be of the same religious faith, and lie 
was confirmed as such by Bishop Talbot at Terre Haute 
hi one of his annual confirmations there in the 70's. 

Mr. Hanna was fully six feet in height and weighed 
250 poinids but was not corpulent, and his hair was as 
black as a raven's wing. In his earlier years even after 
he served in the Legislature, he allowed it to grow long 
so that it fell in thick clusters over his massive shoulders. 
His eyes were large, dark brown, and carried a light 
within like smoldering fire. His carriage was erect and 
graceful and strikingly fl^/5//7/^7/<?, his voice musical and 
resonant. He was unquestionably one of the greatest 
orators the middle West ever produced, he was graceful 
in his delivery, ixjwerful in invective, scathing in ridicule, 
and could wither a projx)siti()n he opix>sed by his sarcasm. 
His anecdotes were Inimoious and inimitable. He could 
be pathetic and tender as a child. He was scrupulously 
jealous of the English language and his adjectives, syno- 
nyms and antonyms absolutely correct in the shading, 
strength and tone of every sentence in all his public ad- 
dresses. He was exceedingly generous and gave with a 
lavish hand. He cared nothing for money but he made 
large fees — he served from 1867 to 1880 as attorney -gen- 
eral of the I. and St. L- Railway, and at one time solicitor 
for the Receiver of the Missouri Pacific Railway. His le- 
gal .services were always in demand, but he .spent money 
as fast as he made it, in his charities and kindnes.ses to 
his friends. He left no estate, but bequeatlied as a leg- 
acy to his devoted family a name .spotless in its integrity, 
a reputation at the bar and on the rostrum that cannot 
be surpas.sed by any of the most brilliant men the middle 
west ever produced and a memory of kindness and love 



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that entwines itself in tlie hearts and minds of his fianiily 
like tenacious ivy. 

Among his warmest friends might be mentioned 
Hendricks, McDonald, Voorhees, Gov. Williams of Indi- 
ana, President Benjamin Harri.son, Thnrman and Pen- 
dleton of Ohio, Alexander H. Stephens, Lew Wallace, 
and the late John McCnlloch, the eminent tragedian, 

Mr. Hanna was as brilliant a writer as he was an or- 
ator. Lew Wallace, his life-long friend well knew his 
gifts this in line and often nrged him to write a book and 
Mr. Hanna shortly before his fatal illness at last de- 
cided to apply himself in tliis direction but the stroke 
came arid all his earthly efforts ceased in the presence of 
iinpenditig death. He loved the classics and was partic- 
fond of Homer and Virgil. Among the orators Sergeant 
S. Prentiss was his favorite, he never heard liimbnt read, 
again and again, many of the speeches of this genius of 
Mi.ssissippi. 

In liis conversational powers he was exceedingly 
brilliant, and he was never more at his ea.se than in the 
drawing room among guests who appreciated his remark- 
able colloquial gifts. 

Of his speeches, lectures and foreiiisc efforts iiiiglit be special- 
ly iiieutioiie<l. 

Speech at a vast meeting held in Chicago, 111., September 1, 
1864 to ratify the nomination of McClelian and Pendleton. 

Speech in the State Senate of Indiana, December 12, 1865 on 
the Agricultural College Bill. 

Speech at the Democratic State Convention, at Louisville, 
Kentucky, by s})ecial invitation. May i, 1866. 

Speech in the State Senate of Indiana, January 16, 1867, on 
the ratification of the proposed Amendment to the Constitution. 

Address before the students of the University of Missouri, at 
Columbia, Missouri, June 27. 187 1. 

Speech at New York July 11, 1876, to officially notify Sanmel 
J. Tilden of his nomination for the Presidency. 

Speech at Indianapolis. Indiana, January 8, 1877, at a meet- 



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dig of the State (Teniocracy to proteiit a^^a^llst the iisnrpafioiis of 
the Electoral Conriiiission. 

Argiuiieiit before U. S. Circuit Court at Springfield, Illinois at 
the March term, 1877, in the matter of the receivership of the O. 
and M. Railway. 

Argmnent before the Jury at Terre Haute, Indiana, Feb. 14, 
^879, in the prosecution of Jackniaii aixl Knight for murder. 

Speech at Terre Haute, Indiana, Aug. 5. 1880, in making a 
race for Congress. 

Banquet speech at the lyiclede Hotel, St. Louis, Missouri, 
March 17 18&1, before the Knights of St. Patrick, of St. Louis Mo. 

Address before the Students of Wabash College, at Cra wfords- 
▼ille, Indiana, Martrh 3, 1882. 

Ba liquet speech at Southern Hotel, St. Louis, Missouri, March 
17, 1882, at a banquet connnenioralive of St. Patrick. 

Atldress before the Iroquois Club at a banquet in Palmer 
Hou.se, Chicago, Illinois, in March 1884. 

Address lx?fore the students of Holy Cit)ss College, at Buenos 
Ayre.s, Argentine Republic iti 1886. 

Address l>efore the students of St. Andrews College at Buenos 
Ayres, Argentine Republic in 1887. 

Bay less W. Han na and Sarah Oakalta Hanna were the par- 
ents of fourteen children, seven of whom died in infancy. Those 
surviving were, 

(a) John Telford Hanna, born June 28, i860, married iii 
1884, Cornelia McDonald. He died June 6, 1887. 

(b) Read Hanna, l>orn Dec. 18. 1862, married May 8, 1900, 
Evelyti Tasker of Washington, D. C. and resides at 1328 Massa- 
chusetts Ave. N. W. Washington 1). C. (See sketch of Read 
Hanna, following list of the children of Hmi. liayless Hanna.) 

(c) Bay less Hanna, born July 12, 1865. Resides in Chicago, 
Illinois. 

(d) James Richmond Hauna, born Jan. 12, 1867, graduated 
from Wabash College 18S9. Admitted to the Bar at Crawfords- 
ville, Indiana 1890. Special Pension I^xaminer 1894-1903, now 
practicing law iu Chicago. 

(e) Oakalla Hautia. born Dec. 14, 1871, married B^lward I). 
Castleton of Citicinuati, Ohio, in 1S98. 

(f) Mary Hanna, born Dec. 21, 1876, married P*eb. 23, 1902 

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Riad Hanna, 

Great-grandson of James Hanna. (1753-1827 ) 

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at Charleston, S. C, to Win. K. Martin, issue James H. Martin. 
(l*) Ruth Hanna, born June 3, 1882, at Terre Haute, Indiana. 
Mrs Bayless W. Hanna resides in Chicago, Illinois. 

READ HANNA. 

Read Haiuia, son of Ba^'less W. and Sarah Oakalla 
Read Hanna, was horn at Terre Hante, Indiana, Decein- 
her 18, 1862, where he hegan his education in the com- 
mon schools, which he left in Septenil>er 1879 in order to 
prepare for college in Paris, Illinois. He entered the 
second preparatory class at Wabash College in Septem- 
ber, 1880, to take the classical conrse and graduated at 
that institntion in June, 1885, receiving from Dr. Joseph 
P\ Tnttle, President, the degree of Bachelor of Arts. In 
August, 1885, he left for Buenos Ay res, Argentine, Re- 
pnblic, where he served till Jnly 1889, as clerk to the 
U. S. Legation, nnder his father, who held the position 
of minister. Immediately on his arrival in Buenos Ay res 
he took up the study of the Spanish language, which he 
pursued with such diligence that in six months he was 
able to speak it fluently, and was the interpreter of the 
Legation till his retirement in 1889. In July, 1889, he 
left Buenos Ayres, accompanying his father to Kngland, 
where they visited Southampton, London and Liverpool. 
He returned to his home at Crawfordsville in September 
of the same year, where he completed the study of law 
which he had begun under the tutelage of his distin- 
guished father. He was admitted to the Bar at Craw- 
fordsville, Nov. 25, 1890, and entered into a partnership 
with his yoiniger brother, Jamen R., under the firm name 
of Hanna and Hanna. He took an active part in the 
ix)litics of his own county and campaigned in 1892, 1894 
and 1896, in support of the Democratic ticket. In 1897 
he was appointed United States Special Examiner of 
Pensions, after a competitive Civil Service examination 
in which he attained the highest average of seventy-five 

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competitors; since which time he has filled responsible 
assignments as Special Examiner in Iowa, Nebraska, 
Sonth Dakota, Tennessee, Mississippi, Louisiana, South 
Carolina, North Carolina, and Washington, D. C, 

While in college he was an enthusiastic member of 
the Indiana Gamma Chapter of the Phi Kappa Psi fra- 
ternity. He is a menil)er of Washington Centennial 
Lodge, No. 14, F. A. A. M.; Mount Vernon Chapter 
No. 3 R. A. M.; Columbia Commandery No. 2, Knights 
Templar; and Almas Temple of the Ancient Arabic Or- 
der of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine; all oi Washing- 
ton, D. C. Ls also a Past Noble Grand of Central Lodge, 
No. I, I. O. O. F., of Washington, D. C. He takes a 
deep interest in fraternity work and during the year 1891 
served his Blue Lodge as one of its instructors. He has 
made a number of addresses before various Lodges of 
Masons and Odd Fellows in Washington. Is still in the 
Civil Service. United in marriage May 8, 1900, with 
Miss Evelyn Tasker, of Washington, D. C. 

(5) Sarah Frazier Hanna, fifth child of James and Hannah 
Bayless Haiina, was bom July 20, 1795, in Scott County, Ken- 
tucky. In 1804 she removed with her parents to Ohio, settling 
near Dayton. On October 10, 1820, she was married to Harvey 
Ward, of Kentucky. Harvey Ward was born I)ecend>er 13, 1792, 
near Cynthiana, Harrison County, Kentucky; the son of William 
Ward and Martha Jameson, who were Virginians. At Cedarville, 
Green County, Ohio, the seven children of Harvey Ward and 
Sarah Hanna Ward were born. Harvey Ward died September 12, 
1844, while on a visit in Troy, Ohio. Sarah Hanna Ward died 
January 22, 1872, at the home of her son, James H. Ward, in 
I/afayette, Indiana. 

CHIIvDRKN OF HARVKY AND SARAH WARD. 

(A) Harriet Hannah Ward, born Dec. 15, 1821; died Mar. 14, 
1901. 

(B) Martha W^ard, born Feb. 2, 1824, died June 24, 1854. 

(C) Caroline Ward, born March 53, 1827, died July 8, 1870. 



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(D) Jas. Harvey Wartl 1 , ■ u -kt u / Lafayette.Iud. 

(E) Win. Lewis Ward }'«""*• »'■ M»y 3'. '829 1 Apr/14, ',894. 

(F) Margaret Elizabeth Ward, bo-n Dec. j8* 1831, died Nov. 26, 
1894. 

(G) Thos. Bayless Ward, born Apr. 27, 1835, died Jan. i, 1892. 

(B) Martha Ward, married Baniett Jaiikiiis, June 17, 1847, at 
Lafayette, [iidiaita. He was born in England Way 18, 1824, and 
died at Lafayette, Indiana, Jannary i.*^87. 

(I)) James Harvey Ward, inarried Jane Rainey, Sept. 22, 1853, 
at Lafayette, Indiana. Jane Rainey was born Jan. if 1834 and 
died Jan. 14, 1892, issue three children. 

Sarah Hanna W^rd, died in infancy. 

Charles Samuel Ward, died in infancy. 

Martha Harriett, living in Lafayette, Indiana. 

(E) William L.Ward married Annie Elizabeth Parker Nov. 
15, 1855. She was born March 1835, died March j888. To Wil- 
liam and Elizabeth Parker Ward were born five children: 

(a) Mary King Ward, married Chas. R. Barnes, Dec. 25, 1883. 

(b) Edward H. Ward, died 1878, aged 19 years. 

(c) Jessie Ward, married Robert P. Davidson, June 1883. 

(d) William Ward, died in infancy. 

(e) Caroline Ward, died in infancy. 

(a) Issue of Mary King Ward and Chas. R. Barnes, 2 children, 

Edward W. Barnes, died 1887. 

Charles Lyle Barnes. 
(c) Issue of Jessie Ward and R. P. Davidson, 3 children, 

William Ward Davidson, 

Eleauore Davidson, 

Robert P. Davidson. 

(F) Margarkt Elizabeth Ward married Thomas Gilland 
Rainey, Oct. 26, 1853. He was b)rn Mar. 15, 1829. Issue, 

(a) Harvey Ward Rainey, born 1854, died 1902, married 
Maria Venventerville. 

(b) Charles Samuel Rainey, married Florence Geaves, Oct. 
1896. 

(c) Caroline Elizabeth Rainey, died 1891. 

(d) Thos. G. Rainey, died 1880. 

(e) Frank L. Rainey, married Bella Murdoach Apr . 20 1894. 

(f) Alice Jane Rainey. 

(g) Edward Ward Rainey. 

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(G) Thomas Bayless Ward married Harriet L. Waiiee June lo, 
1856, she was born in Ohio in 1838, Issue, 

Sarah Ward. 

lyucy M. Ward. 

Mabel Ward. 

Harvey Warran Ward, died in infancy. 

Skktch of Thomas B. Ward. 

Thomas Bayless Ward, Grandson of Jauies Hanna 
(1753 — 1827), born at Maryville, Union Comity, Ohio, 
April 27, 1835. Moved to Lafayette, Indiana, witli his 
parents in 1836, was educated at Wabash College and at 
Miama University, Oxford, Ohio: graduated from the 
last named institution in June 1855: studied law and was 
admitted to the bar in 1857: wa-i elected Mayor of Lafay- 
ette in 1861, and re-elected in 1863, serving four }■ ears: 
served one term as clerk to the City of Lafayette and 
three terms as Cit}^ Attorney of that city: was appointed 
by Governor Hendricks, in 1875, Judge of the Superior 
Court of Tippenanoe County, Indiana, and elected to 
that position in 1876, serving five years in all as Judge: 
was elected to the Forty eighth Congress, and was re-e- 
lected to the Forty-ninth Congress as a Democrat: serv- 
ed as Congressman from 1883 to 1887, when he resinned 
the practice of law, and died January i, 1892. Mrs. Har- 
riet L. Ward, wMtli her three daughters resides in lVa.sh- 
ington, D. C. (See portrait- of Honorable Thomas B. 
W^^rd.) 

(6) Samuei. Hanna, sixth child of James Hanna and 
Hannah Bayless, was born in Scott County Kentucky, 
October 17, 1797. Died June 11, 1866, aged 68 years 
and II months, at Fort Wayne, Indiana. Married Eli- 
za Taylor, born at Clinton (Buffalo), New York, Febru- 
ary 13, 1803. She was the daughter of Israel Taylor 
and Mary Blair, of Massachusetts. Died January 12, 
1888, at Fort Wayne Indiana. She lived twenty-one 
years after the death of her husband, in the Hanna home- 

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Hon. Thomas B. Ward, M. C. 

Grandson of James Hanna (1753-1827) 

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stead at Fort Wayne, Indiana. Mrs. Hanna was a noble 
woman, to her husband an encouragement and helpmate; 
an evei ready friend to all those in need, and her long 
life was spent in well doing. She was loved by a large 
circle of friends and relatives. Eliza Hannahs grandfa- 
ther Blair was an officer in the Revolutionary war and liv- 
ed to the age of over loo years. 

Samuel Hanna and Eliza Taylor were married March 
7, 1822, at Fort Wayne, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hainia had twelve sons and one daugh- 
ter. Eight sons lived to manhood: 

(A) Jambs Bavless Hanna, born Jan. 11, 1823; died Aug., 
1851, at Ft. Wayne, Iiid. Married Mary K. Fairfield in 1843. 
They had two sons and one daughter, Clara Louise, Oliver Samu- 
el and James Thomas. 

Clara married Wni. h. Carnaliaii, of Lafayette, and they had 
four children, Louise (married Dr. Loyd N. Deming and has two 
children, Nelson and Mary Deming), Robert H. (married Connie 
Lumbard and has two children, Rol>ert and William), Clara and 
Virginia. 

Oliver S. married Mary E. Nuttman; they have two daugh- 
ters, Julia and Gertrude. 

James Thomas married Eliza Colerick, they having three 
children, Ethel, Margaret and Charles. 

(B) Amos Thomas Hanna, born Feb. 28, 1825; married Sarah 
Fairfield in 1845. Amos Thomas died in 1846. They had one 
daughter, Thomasette. Thomasette married Benjamin D. Skin- 
ner, of New York. They had one daughter, Emily Montgomery. 

(C) Henry Clay Hanna, born Feb. 15, 1829, married, Oct. 25, 
1854, to Elizabeth Carson; died July 25, 1881. 

CHII^DRBN op HBNRY clay hanna and EUZABBTH C. CARSON. 

1 Samuel Carson Hanna, born Dec, 18, 1855, died Dec. 31, 

1855. 

2 Joseph Thomas Hauna, born Feb. 17, 1857; married Su- 
sannah Tousley. 

3 Henry Clay Hanna, Jr., born June 11, 1858; married So- 
phia Sea ton. 

4 Minnie Eliza Hanna, born April 18, 1862, died Dec. 13,1871. 

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5 CTiarlotle Hannah born Ang. 16, 1864, died Feb. 20, 1884. 

6 Annie Louise Hanna, Ixirn Jan. 19, 1866, died Sept. 15, 1893. 

7 Robert Blair Hanna, lK>rn March 15, i86f^. 

8 Elizabeth Catl>arine Hanna, born Dec. 31, 1870; died Dec. 
15, 1871. 

(D) Chari^s H ANN A^ born Jan. 10, 1831; married Stirah C. 
McLaiD, Nov, 26, 1856; died Feb., tS8i. Tlieir children were 
Caralya and Samuel Frederick. 

(E) Samuki, Tki,KORD Hanna, born Aug. 22, 1834; marrietl 
Martha Brandriff, Jan. 12, 1865. Samuel T. died November, 1887. 
They had three children, Mary, John I^owry, and Margaret Cl«ra. 
John L. married Edna Grund. Margaret C, married Frederick 
Kouch, 

fF) Horace Hovey Hanna, born April 6, 183S; married Eliz- 
abeth Rogers in i858,died Dec. 1869. Their children were Alice, 
Jessie, Samuel. Dur wood, Horace Woodwofth and Charles Hovey. 

Alice married William C. Heckman. They have two chil- 
dren, George Clarence and Jessie H. 

Jessie married Hugh McCullock Bond. 

Samuel D. married Minnie Kemp. They have two children, 
Eliza and Herl>ert Hovey. 

Horace W. married Mary Grier, having one son, Hovey. 

Charles Hovey married Jessie Weavei-. They have two chil- 
dren, Alice and Samuel. 

iG) Wli^WAM WiHiS Hanna, born Jaw. 26, 1840, died Sept. 
15. 1869. 

(H) Hugh Tayi«or Hanna, born Jan. 8, 1842. 

II) Eliza Hanna, Iwrn I>ec. 11, 1843. 

After the Cuiiseciitive births of twelve sons, the ad- 
vent of a daughter into the family of Judge Hanna, as 
can readily be imagined, was the occasion of great re- 
joicing. 

The only "girl" grew np to be not only the kind, 
devoted dano'hter, but tlie loved and trusted companion 
of her parents. 

With many of the happy domestic characteristics of 

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A mosl clianuhig, aifectronate iiiotlier, slie iiilieritecl to ii 
marked degree many of the noble traits of her disthi- 
$;uished father. 

She is a woman of superior execnti\^ ability and 
has filleil many ])ositions of honor and trust. 

Her marriage with the Hon. Fred J. Hayden, Jmi^ 
4, 1873, hi\H l)een a remarkably happy one, 

Frki) J. Haydkn is a native of Coboni*g, Canada, 
the son of the Rev.W. Hayden. 

Ke was graduated, with honors, from the University 
of Victoria, College of Canada, hi 1864, and received the 
Dtgree of M. A, in 1866. 

In 1873 ^^r- Hayden married the only daughter of 
the late Hon. Samuel Hanna, of Fort Wayne, Indiana, 
and in 1875 he resigned the Secretaryship of the C. P. 
and M. Railway and Mining Company of Canada, which 
office he had filled for several years, and with his wife 
took up his residence at the Hanna homestead in P'ort 
Wayne. 

In 1884 Mr. Hayden was elected a member of the 
Lower House in the Indiana Assemf)lyand served tv;o 
Sessions. In 1888 he was elected Joint Senator for the 
Counties of Allen and W hi tie}', and served two Sessions 
in the Upper House. 

In 1892 he was api)ointed by the late Governor Hov* 
ey a member of the Indiana Fair Com::iission and at the 
organization of the Board was iniamimously ejected its 
Treasurer, which ^office he filled until the close of the 
Worlds Fair in 1893. 

For Military Services rendered in 1867 Mr. Hayden 
received a l)eautiful Silver Medal from the British Gov- 
erinnent and from the Ontario Government, a grant of 
250 acres of land in New Ontario, bordering on the Nep- 
igon River, the most famous trout stream in the world. 

He has been for many years a Director in the First 



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National Bank of Fort Wayne. 

He takes great interest in agricultural pursuits and 
like most Englishmen is an ardent lover of all kinds of 
out door sports and recreation. He and his wife own 
and con inue to occupy the Hanna Homestead in Fort 
Wayne, Indiana, a picture of which is here given. 



Sketch of Hon. Samuel IIanna. 

Samuel Hanna was born Oct. i8, 1797, in Scott 
County, Kentucky. His father, James Hanna, removed 
to Dayton, Ohio, in 1804, 21"^ settled on a new farm, ly- 
ing south of that town. Samuel's earliest employment, 
away from the paternal roof, was that of post-rider, as it 
was called; that is, taking newspapers from ihe publica- 
tion office, and delivering them to subscibers at their res- 
idences, located far and near over the country. 

Subsequently he engaged in teaching a country 
school. He attended the Indian treaty at St. Mary's in 
1818, in the character of a sutler, or purveyor, in con- 
nection with his brother Thomas, furnishing both food 
for the men and provender for horses, all of which was 
hauled with an ox-team from Troj^ Ohio; he, with his 
own hands, hewing out feed troughs for the slock. 

By this operation he realized a 5wa// amount of mon- 
ey. It was his first substantial acquisition — the corner 
stone upon which his subsequent colossal fortune was 
reared. He .settled in Ft. Wayne, Indiana, in 18 19, 
when he was in his 22nd year, the place at that time be- 
ing a mere Indian trading-post, with very few white in- 
habitants. Here he entered into mercantile pursuits, his 
first storehou.se being a rude log cabin, erected, princi- 
pally, by his own hands. At this early day his chief cus- 
tomers were Indians. It may be remarked that Indian 
traders as a class, have mostly l)een regarded as about 



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Judt^e Samuel Hanna 

Son of James Hanna (1753-1827) 

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the worst specimens of the race, but no such imputation 
attaches to the character of Mr. Hanna. His splendid 
fortune was not acquired by defrauding his fellow-men, 
either white or red, but by great business sagacity, the 
most indomitable industry and rigid economy. He often 
declared that he never expended a single dollar for ^ any 
personal pleasure or luxury until he was worth over fif- 
ty thousand dollars. 

Samuel Hanna was empliaticaliy a general in civil 
life. His name is intimately associated and blended with 
every period in the history of Fort Wayne. It would be 
impossible to write the history of Fort Wa yne without 
at the some time, writing a large part of the biography 
of Samuel Hanna. 

He early became an associate Judge of the Circuit 
Court and was repeatedly elected, at that early period, 
and in subsequent years a member of the State I^egisla- 
ture. 

He became an extensive land owner in the Wabash 
valley and elsewhere, and was heard to say, upon set- 
ting out for Indianapolis, in 1843, that he could go by 
way of I^afayette and return by way of Andersontown, 
and feed his horse at his own corn crib every night dur- 
ing the journey. 

A dim foreshadowing of a canal to connect Lake Erie 
with the Ohio river, was entertained by General Wash- 
ington and early patriots and statesmen, as one of the 
possibilities of the far future. 

But we are indebted to Judge Hanna for the first 
practical conception of that magnificent project. He 
first mentioned the project to Mr. David Burr, of Fort 
Wayne, who was a scholarly gentleman, of ability and in- 
fluence. The two finally matured a plan of operations. 
Their efforts resulted, in 1827, in a grant by Congress to 
the State of Indiana, of each alternate section of land for 
six miles on each side of the proposed line, through its 

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eiuire length, to aid in the construction of the canal. 

Thus originated and was inaugurated almost entirely 
through the influence and untiring energy of one man, 
this stupendous work of internal improvement, the Wa- 
bash and Erie canal; the longest continuous line of arti- 
ficial .water comminiication on the American continent, 
if not in the world. 

The American Railway Review of Septeml^er i, 185,9, 
says, "No one contributed more to the success of the ca- 
nal policy during the first and trying years of its prog- 
ress, than Samuel Hanna, of Fort Wayne. From 1828 to 
1836, he was successively Canal Commissioner and Fund 
Commissioner, besides serving three years in the State 
Senate and one in the House, representing as Senator 
probably one-third the entire area of the State and filling, 
in each body for a time, the post of Chairman of the Ca- 
nal Committee. In these official stations he evinced the 
same judgment, tact and force of character, which nearly 
a quarter of a century afterwards enabled him to render 
important service to the northern section of Indiana — 
the enterprise of completing that portion of the Pitts- 
burgh, Fort Wayne and Chicago Railway lying west of 
Crestline." 

Perhaps the wisdom and abilit> of Senator Hainia 
were never more strikingly displayed than in the estab- 
lishment of the State Bank of Indiana. The President 
(Jackson) having recommended the creation of more 
State Banks, Judge Hanna was made Chairman of a 
Committee of the State Legislature to draft a Charter. 
How well he performed that duty may be inferred from 
the fact that it passed both Houses of the Legislature 
almost precisely as it came from his hand, and was ap- 
proved Januar}- 28, 1834. Thus was created the State 
Bank of Indiana — by common consent one of the best 
banking institutions that has ever existed in this coun- 
try. No one ever lost a dollar by the State Bank of In- 
diana. 



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A Branch Bank was at once established at Fort 
Wayne, of which Jnd>>e Hanna was President much of 
the time, and Hon. Hugh McCulloch (afterwards Sec- 
retary of the United States Treasury under Lincohi, 
Johnson and Arthur) was Cashier. 

In 1852, in connection w-ith Hon. Wm. Mitchell and 
Pliny Hoagland, Judge Hanna took the entire contract 
for bm'lding the Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne and Chicago 
Railway from Crestline to Fort Wayne, a distance of 132 
miles, and immediately entered upon the prosecution of 
the work. After making some progress the means of 
the Company l)ecame entirely exhausted and the work 
was suddenly brought to a standstill. No one could de- 
vise ways and means to adv-ance a step in the work. The 
President of the Company resigned in despair. Judge 
Hanna was elected to fill the vacancy. In three days he 
was in the P^astern cities, pledging his individual credit 
and that of his coadjutors, Hoagland and Mitchell, for 
funds. This effected, wiLliout delay he went to Montreal 
and Quebec to redeem iron that had l>een forfeited iot 
non-payment of transportation. The crisis was past: 
work was resumed, and in November, 1854, the cars 
from Pittsburgh and Philadelphia came rolling into Fort 
Wayne. 

In the fall of 1852 Judge Hanna was elected Presi- 
dent of the Fort Wayne and Chicago Railway Company. 
He was then President and chief manager of two compa- 
nies — both without money. Judge Hanna early and 
earnestly espoused the cause of consolidatioti , On the 
first day of August, 1856, the three minor corporations 
were obliterated and the great Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne 
and Chicago Railway Company succeeded to their fran- 
chises and liabilities. Mr. Haiuia was elected Vice Pres- 
ident of the Consolidated Company, and held that office 
unlil -lis '!c:'.'.'i. IL'liv;.*(l to s.-f this ^lenl Railway a 
co.nplciexl .uid s.icCv^sfnl pul)lic work, lit- lived to see 
Fort Wavntr — ihecily of his love, to which he came 

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when it was a mere trading post, with no post-oflfice be- 
tween it and Chicago — grown to a large and prosperous 
city. 

He lived to reap as he deserved, large pecuniary re- 
wards for his years of toil and self denial. He was emi- 
nently a man of affairs, a practical man, one of a large, 
clear mind and indomitable purpose. He was a great 
reader and belonged to the highest type of the pioneer 
class of men. He wasmore than a statesman forhe had in 
him the elements and power of the men who build cities 
and found States. He was a temperate, well controlled 
man; the idol of his family. His last ilhiess was brief. 
He was taken ill on June 6, 1866, and died on the nth. 
The funeral took place on June 13, 1866, under the 
charge and direction of the Masonic Fraternity, of which 
Judge Hanna had long been a consistent and honored 
member. The attendance was undoubtedly the largest 
ever witnessed on a funeral occasion in Northern Indiana. 

Judge Hanna's religious training was in the Presby- 
terian Church, of which his father was an Elder for some 
fifty years. He early became a Ruling Elder in the 
First Presbyterian Church in Fort Wayne, organized in 
1 83 1, an office which he held during the remainder of 
his life. 



COLONEL HUGH HANNA. 

(7) Colonel Hugh Hanna, seventh child of James 
and Hannah Bayless Hanna, was born near Georgetown, 
Kentucky, July 26, 1799; died at Wabash, Indiana, Jan- 
uary 18, 1879, in his 8oth year. He came to Dayton, 
Ohio, with his parents, in 1804, and there learned the 
Cabinet business. 

January 22, 1824, he married Elizabeth Ernley, who 
died in 1861. In 1823 he removed to Fort Wayne, Indi- 
ana, and engaged in mercantile business, his business 

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"being chiefly In supplying tlie Indian trade. In the 
•spring of 1834 ^»^ bought government land in Wabash 
County and laid out the town of Wabash. In 1835, with 
his wife and two children, he moved to Wabash, then 
known as **Treaty Springs." Here he engaged in gen- 
eral store business and supplying the Indians and 
contractors on the Wabash and Erie Canal, then being 
constructed. Mr. Hanna was elected the first County 
Treasurer, holding that office two terms; was Postmaster 
for some years, and held other offices. He also built the 
first Court House for Wabash County, His home, for a 
hundred miles around, was known as the Presbyterian 
Tavern, the ministers always making it a point to stop 
with Col. Hanna. 

To Hugh and Elizabeth Hanna were born three sons 
and four daughters— George W., Hugh W., James W., 
Julia Ann, Josaphine, Isaphine and Ada C. Hanna, 

(i) George W. Haiiiia died when 18 luoiiths old. 

(2) Josaphine tlie<l a>(ed 12 years. 

(3) Julia A. died in 1898. She had married Judge James D. 
Connor in 1846, and had issue, (a) O. W.Connor married to An- 
uie Keys, they have issue four sons and two daughters, (b) Ho- 
ratio, married Mary Keys and has issue three sous, (c) James D., 
Jr. married Clara Thurston and has issue, three daughters. 

(4) Hugh W. Hanna nianied in 185S , who 

died in 1890, having had issue two slaughters (a) Nettie 1., 

married to C. F. Morris and has one daughter, Marie H., marrieil 
to Mr. South and has infant boy. (b) Gertie K., uiarried to 
Wm. D. Smith, aiul has issue five datighters and one son. Hugh 
W. Hanna resides in Chicago a«id married in 1892 Miss I^icv 
Poorbaugh. 

(5) James W. Hanna married Sarah J. Miles; issue, a sou 
and daughter— Hugh, nianied; and Lucy, married and has issue 
41 son and a daughter, Reshdes in Chii*ag<>. 

(6) I.sa])hine Hanna, married A. L. Tyor and h^s issue a sou 
4iMda daughter. She resides in Wabash, Indiana. 

(7) Ada C. Hanna inarrie<l William Miles aud has one son 
Aud three daughters: Bert, Hlanche, Ivlizabeth and Lucy, Ada 

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Haniia Miles resfdes in Wabash, Iiidiarra. 

(This record of Hirgh Hanna's family is imi)erfect, because 
members of the family neglected answering letters of inquiry.) 

^8) Nancy W. Hanna, eighth child of James Hanua and Han- 
nah Bayless, died in Ft. Wayne, Ind., in 18.57. (I>ate of birth not 
given.) The following letter from her daughter, Mrs. Susan R. 
Slioaff, gives all that the Author has been able to learn concerning 
tlie family of Nancy Hanna: 

III reply to your letter of last November regarding 
members of "James Hanna' s" family, I will give yon as 
correct a history as I possibly can of n>y Mother's direct 
family, Nancy W. Hanna my mother was married to 
my father James Barnett November 22, 1824 in Troy O- 
hio at the home of mother's sister Mrs. Telford. My 
father came to Fort Wayne in 181 2 with a company of 
soldiers. Fort Wayne was at that time but a trading 
post. My father remained here and opened a general 
trading store of merchandise. He transported his goods 
from Dayton by canoes and dug outs. In 1824 my father 
and mother were married and my mother came directly 
to Fort Wayne after her marriage and spent the rest of 
her life here. When a child I heard my mother many 
times tell of their wedding journey in a covered wagon 
and that my father had to surround their camp at night 
with a fire line for protection against the howling wolves. 
They had eight children of whom four died in infancy. 
My eldest brother John Huston died over thirty years a- 
go unmarried. A. G. Barnett, a younger son, is still 
living and has two sons, two daughters and one grand- 
son. The oldest daughter Mary A. Barnett married 
Watson Wall in 1849 and is now living in St. I^ouis, she 
also has four children, two sons and two daughters, one 
granddaughter and four grandsons. I am the youngest 
member of my father's family, was married in 1870 to 
John A. Shoaff. We have two children, our daughter 
Mary now Mrs. Albert J. Mitchell, is living in St. Louis. 
Our son, Frederick Barnett Slioaff is married and is now 

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Joseph Smith Hanna 

Son of James Hanna (1753- 1827) 

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Tacticiiig: law in Ft. Wayne. Shortly after my niotlier's 
marriage her brother Samuel was induced to locate here. 
He and my father were associated together in business 
for some years. In 1831, my father and mother with 
Mine others organized the First Presbyterian church here, 
which is now the parent of 2nd, 3rd and 4th branches. 
In June 1851 my father died and my mother August 1857, 
Yours Siih:erely, 

Susan R, Shoaff 



JOSEPH SMITH HANNA. 

(9) Joseph Smith Hanna, the ninth child of Jame?s 
and Hannah Bayless Hanna, his wife^wasborn in Dayton, 
Ohio, December 7th, 1803, after the family had removed 
from Scott County, Kentucky to that place. He died in 
Lafayette, Indiana, August 4th, 1864, and was buried in 
Greenbush Cemetery. His mother died when he was but 
eight months old, and his sister, Elizabeth, had the care 
of his very early childhood. 

He removed to Randolph County, Indiana when a- 
Ijout nineteen years of age, and lived at first on a farm. 
He removed thence to Lafayette, Indiana, in the autumn 
of 1827 and was an early pioneer merchant at the head 
of navigation on the Wabash River at that point, which, 
for many years, was a distributing center for the supplies 
consumed in central Indiana and brought by freighters o- 
ver the Allegheny Mountains down the waters of the O- 
hio and Wabash Rivers to Lafayette. At that time there 
were also supplies brought from New Orleans up the Mis- 
sissippi, Ohio and Wabash Rivers and distributed or sold 
at Lafayette. He was related in a large sense to the 
products of central Indiana and the needed supplies of 
the people. 

He was President of the Lafayette branch of the 



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vState Bank of Iiutiaiiar ami afterwards the owner of the 
controlling interest in the Commercial Bank at Lafay- 
ette, which was finally merged into the First National 
in 1863, about a year before his death. 

He was a broad minded Chrislian man of fine char- 
acter and sni)erior mental jK)wer, of modest gentle nature^ 
generous in full n>easnre and suceess^ful in everj'^ phase of 
life. 

He was an elder in the Second Presbyterian Ghurch 
ofLafa3'ette for many years; a quiet man of sterling 
worth. Among the ixij^ers j)resented at the Semi-Cen- 
tennial celebration of the Second Presbyterian Church 
of Lafayette, Indiana in 1890, is found the following 
reference to Joseph Smith Hanna: 

"Mr, Hanna was a strong man in integrity, judg- 
ment and piety, and was esteemed and loved by church 
and community. He had a nuxlest, impressive dignity 
of manner, was deliberate and unprejudiced in his opin- 
ions, but true to his convictions of right. Active in busi- 
ness, he was helpful to young Uicn and many have been 
able to date the commencement of their business succe.ss 
to the counsel and personal aid received from him. Not 
a few he also assisted in getting an education. He used 
his ample means willi liberality and his home was called 
the "Presbyterian Hotel," as it was open to minister, 
layman or stranger, witli generous hospitality. It wa.s 
only a fitting tribute to true worth, when in after years 
his pastor preached his funeral sermon from the text, 
"And he was a good man and a just.*' 

At the time of his death, the local paj^r connnented 
as follows: 

"Lafayette loses in Mr. Hanna a citizen who will 
long be regretted and whose loss will be deeply felt by 
all classes of society. He was charitable and benevolent 
without ostentation — ever consistent, kind, honorable 
and obliging. The record of his good d'*cds and kind 
words is impressed ui>()n the hearts of many who will 



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Joseph Sumwalt Hanna, 

Grandson of James Hanna (1753-1827.) 

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cherish and keep green his memory while life shall last.'* 
He married his first wife, Nancy Nelson, in 1826. 
To them were born four children, three dying in infancy, 
and one, Esther Jane, lived to the age of twenty-three, 
becoming the wife of William A. Potter and dyhig in 
1850. Nancy Nelson, his first wife, died in 1831. 

In 1832, in Lafayette, Indiana, he married Hester 
Ann Sumwalt, daughter of Godfrey Sumwalt and Bar- 
bara Kleinfelter Sumwalt. She was born in Baltimore, 
Maryland, in 1809, died in Lafayette, Indiana, April 10, 
1893, and was buried beside her husband in Greenbush 
Cemetery. She survived her husband twenty-nine years. 
She was frail in body, but her beautiful face expressed 
her gentle spirit. She was superior mentally. Her 
amiability, her piety, her love for her children and her 
neighbors was known to all in spite of her modest self 
effacement. 

Below is a list of the children born to Joseph Smith 
Hanna and Hester Aim Sumwalt; viz. : 

1 Nancy, died in infancy. 

2 Jatnes Godfrey, born 1834, died 1838. 

3 Henrietta AnieHa, l)or!i 1838, died 1866. 

4 Martha Rhzal)etli, born 1841, died 1863. 

5 Joseph Snmwalt, born Dec. 7, 1843. 

6 Mary Alice, born March 8, 1846. 

7 Henry Hngh, born Sept. 19, 1848. 

8 WiHiani Potter, l)or s Oct. 26, 1850. 

Henrietta AmeUa (the third child) married Alexander Wilson in 
1858. Children: Jane Hanna Wilson, born 1859; Joseph Hanna, 
born 1862; Thomas Sliar|)e, born 1864; Alice Hanna, Ixjrn 1866. 

Jane H.Wilson married George K. Levering in 1881. One 
child, Ernest Wilson, l)orn 1882. 

Joseph Hanna Wilson died in 1900. Married Engenia Gross 
in Tiffin, Ohio, 1887. One child, Thomas Sharpe, born 1890. 

Thomas ShariH? Wilson (son of Alexander) died in 1887. 

Alice Hanna Wilson married E<lward Ayers, 1893. One child, 
Agnes, born 1897. 

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Joseph Sutiiwalt Hauiia (fifth child) married Frances Virginia 
Weaver, 1873* Children: Joseph Stewart, born 1874; Florence 
Hester, born [876; Fanny Weaver, born 1878; Alice, born 1881; 
William Phillip, 1884. 

Florence Hester married Earl Fort, 1898. One child, Isabel, 
born 1902. 

Mary Alice Hanna (sixth child) married John Whetstone Heath, 
1869. Children: Helen Hanna, born 1870, died in 1871; Frances, 
born 1873; Alice Hanna, born 1874; William Philpot, born 1876: 
Bertha Hanna, born 1882, 

Frances Heath married Washburn Tilson, 1B95. Children; 
Alice Heath, born 1896; Donald, born 1899, 

William P. Heath married Mary S. Spence, 1900. 

Henry Hugh Hanna (more commonly written Hugh 
Henry Hanna) the seventh child of Joseph Smith Hanna 
and HesteV Ann Sumwalt, Publicist and Manufacturer, 
Indianapolis, Indiana, was born in I^afayette, Indiana, 
September 19, 1848, and continued to make Lafayette 
his home until 1880, when he removed to Indianapolis. 
He was educated in Lafayette common schools, Wabash 
College, and the University of Berlin, Germany. He 
was uni-ted in marriage with Amia Hester Sharpe, 
daughter of Thomas Hindman .Sharpe and Elizabeth 
Catharine Wilson Sharpe, of Indianapolis, at the home 
of her parents, October 22, 1873. Below is a list of the 
children born to them: 

Hngh Henry Hanna, Junior, born Feb. 28, 1876. 

Elizabeth Wilson Hanna, born Feb 20, 1882, died May 18, 
1886. 

Katharine Wilson Hanna, born March I2, 1889, died Oct. 27, 
1892. 



Hugh H. Hanna. 

The man who made it his business to fight for the 
gold standard until it became securely clinched, who, by 
his single energy made the Indianapolis Monetary Con- 
vention succeed, has been called **tlie hero of a great 



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Mrs. Anna Sharpe Hanna. 
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financial victory." He is Mr. Hugh H. Hanna. The 
brevet was awarded by Mr. William E. Dodge, the night 
the New York Chamber of Commerce presented Mr. 
Hanna with a well-earned gold medal for his work. 

Later Ex-President Benjamin Harrison said of him: 
**He has created a new standard of unselfish public ser- 
vice." Few men have had so keen a sensed public 
duty to the community, and fewer the pluck to accom- 
plish such a national task as Mr. Hanna performed in 
marshaling the power of the Monetary Convention and 
directing it in the work it did so well. 

He was born in 1848, at Lafayette, Indiana, where 
his father, Joseph S. Hanna, was a banker. Leaving 
Wabash College, at Crawfordsville, in his Sophomore 
year, and going abroad, he studied for some time in 
Stuttgart and Wurtemberg, He was a great traveler in 
his younger days, partly from choice, and partly forced 
by ill health. In 1873, he married Miss Anna Sharpe, 
of Indianapolis, daughter of the late Thomas H. Sharpe, 
a banker, and one of the early settlers of the town. Seven 
years later he bought an interest in the Atlas Engine 
works of Indianapolis, one of the largest establishments 
of its kind in the country, of which he later became the 
active head and sole proprietor. 

Mr. Hanna' s whole life has been a useful one, and 
of late years his public spirit has manifested itself in na- 
tional aflairs. Never seeking oflSce, he has shown what 
could be accomplished by a patriotic citizen who was 
willing to put aside ambition, and to sacrifice him.self and 
his time and money for the welfare of the public. The 
city of Indianapolis has felt his influence for good in 
many ways. His readiness to help in all good causes, 
and his deep interest in whatever concerned the well- 
being — whether spiritual or material — of the community, 
have long been recognized by his townsmen, and there is 
no one who stands higher in their regard. 



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Mr. Haiina had much to do with the organization of 
the charities of Indianapolis, and for many years he took 
an active part in tlie administration. The Art Associa- 
tion, too, owes mucli to him, and any movement looking 
to the beautification of the city has found him to be a 
warm friend and supporter. Gradually his influence 
spread abroad, and in the Republican State convention of 
1896 he was an earnest advocate of a frank and honest 
declaration in favor of sound money. In those distress- 
ful days the country was listening with profound anxiety 
for word from the States of the Middle West, particularly 
Indiana, which was then, as it had been for years, a piv- 
otal state. In many parts of the country little was ex- 
pected. Indiana was chiefly known because of he wide- 
spread prevalence of the greenback heresy in earlier days, 
and it was doubted whether the Republicans would have 
the courage to speak the needed word. Worse yet, only 
a few years before this, a Republican State convention 
had connnended the Sherman silver purchase act as a long 
yet prudent step in the direction of free-silver coinage. 
But Mr. Hanna and his friends won their fight, and the 
convention of 1896 said: 

"We favor the use of silver as currency, but to the extent on- 
ly and under such rsgulations that its parity with gold can l)e 
maintained, and in consequence are opposed to tliefree, unhniited 
and indpendent coinage of silver at a ratio of 16 to i ." 

It was a great victory, with a moral effect that can 
hardly be overestimated. The National Republican con- 
vention, that met at St. Louis soon afterwards, was much 
infltienced by the Indiana declaration, and the influence of 
the Indiana men had much to do with strengthening it in 
its declaration for gold. Mr. Hainia was active through- 
out the campaign. He was glad to recognize any men 
as allies who were willing to help in the flight against 
free silver, no matter what might be their views on other 
questions. Unlike some of his Republican friends, he 



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saw that there was but one issue — the financial — and he 
bent all his energies to secure the right verdict on that. 

But he also recognized that the election did not of 
itself settle anything. The Republican victory was 
nothing more than a commission or mandate to the party 
to carry through the work of financial reform. Out of 
the agitation, in which Mr. Hanna tore a leading part, 
came the call of the Indianapolis Board of Trade, issued 
shortly after the election, summoning a conference of the 
commercial bodies of the Middle West to consider the 
policy to be pursued. This conference called a conven- 
tion of the commercial organizations throughout the 
country, which r.iet in Indianapolis in January, 1897. 
It was a notable gathering, and its deliberations led to 
important consequences. Of course it declared for the 
gold standard, and outlined a scheme of monetary reform. 
It asked Congress to appoint a commission to deal v/ith 
the great question, and make a report for the guidance 
of Congress. 

Keeling, however, that Congress might refuse to act, 
the convention constituted an executive conunittee of 
fifteen members, with Mr. Hanna at its head, which was 
to appoint a connnission to do the work in case Congress 
should fail to act. The appointment of this commission 
devolved on Mr. Hanna, and great wisdom and tact were 
shown l)y him in the choice of its members. It devoted 
much time to the consideration of the subject in all its 
details, and presented its reiK)rt, together wMth a bill for 
a currency system, to the convention which re-assembled 
at Indianapolis in January, 1898, under the presidency 
of Governor Shaw, of Iowa, now Secretary of the Treas- 
ury. 

The report was adopted by the Convention and was 
widely distributed throughout the Country . The fight 
was kept up till the free silver majority in thcvSenate was 
overthrown, and connnittees of both Houses had agreed 
on a measure embodying the main prrnciples advocated 



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by the Monetary Coiinnission. In this struggle Mr. 

Haniia was a leading figure. I 

He spent much time in Washington, and used his ' 

personal influence with Mr. McKinley and with Congress I 

to secure favorable action. 

And his services have l)een generously acknowledg- 
ed. In April, 1900, he was elected an honorary mem- 
l)er of the New York Chamber of Connnerce, which gave 
a dinner in his honor. On that occasion a gold medal 
was presented to him. One of the .speakers was Mr. 
Wm. K. Dodge, of New York, who .said: ''I really think 
that we have no military or naval hero who has carried 
on a Ixittle more wisely' , with more genius, with more 
true strategem than he has; and he has been so honest 
about it, so kind and so true, everybody in Washington 
knew him and every lx)dy loved him. Several gentlemen 
there told me that he had more influence than any other 
man in the Capitol, l>ecause he had absolutely no selfish 
motive behind him. 

I hope and believe that Mr. Hanna's name will go 
down to posterity as the hero of a great financial victory. 
I feel that .since the time of Alocander Hamilton we have 
had no man who has done more for the industrial and 
financial and connnercial interests of the country than 
Mr. Han!ia has done. We are honoring ourselves in 
honoring him, and those of us who have been associated 
with him not only admired his genius, his high charac- 
ter and his un.selfish patriotism, but we have learned to 
love him as a true man. And as long as America con- 
tinues to produce such men as Mr. Hatnia, and those 
who have Ix^en associated with him, we need have no 
fear for our country." 

A few days before this Mr. Hanna was the guest of 
honor at a dinner i!i Indianapolis. The late Benjamin 
Harrison presided, and many of the leading citizens, Mr. 
Hanna's friends and neighlxjrs, were present. 



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Hugh Henry Hanna. Jr. 
Great-Grandson of James Hanna (1753-1827) 

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The recognilioii of Ins services to the coiintr}^ was 
generous and enthusiastic. Mr. Harrison said: 

\ **Here in our beloved city, three years ago, a move- 

ment was inaugurated having for its central purpose the 
definite establishment by law of the simple gold standard 
as the basis of our currency. That movement spreading 
from this center, and sup]K)rted by the great commercial 
!)odies of the United States, has won a notable and last- 
ing triumph. In the good work done by tho.se great 
c{)nnn«*rcial forces one of our fellow citizens has been the 
director general, . . Wanted — a strong, trained 

man, who has made a success of his own business, who 
will quit it and bring to reform work the energy and 
wisdom he has used in his own affairs, without compen- 
sation. We had better make that advert i.sement *till 
forbidden,' for there will be no rush for the place. The 
Indianapolis Monetary Convention, by a rare stroke of 
good fortune, found a man like that, as the song goes, 
* The very first time. ' Our friend and neighbor, Mr. 
Hugh H. Hanna, has done a very noble and a very nota- 
ble work. He has set up a new standard of un.selfish 
public service, and we are here to express our appreci- 
ation of it." 

As further evidence of the appreciation in which his 
services were held, Harvard University conferred upon 
Mr. Hanna the degree of M, A., and Waba.sh College 
gave him the degree of LL. D. Mr. Hanna still finds 
lime from his large and absorbing business to work for 
the i)ublic good. He is a trustee of the Tuskegee Nor- 
mal and Industrial Institute, in which he is deepl}' inter- 
ested; and he is a member of the Southern Education 
Board. Thus he has been a potent force in the life of 
the City, State and Natio!i, and his influence for good 
has steadily grown as men have come more and more to 
appreciate his ability, his earnestness and his entire dis- 



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interestedness. Mr. Haiiiia lias been nincli interested in 
this volume of history of the Hanna famih- , and has very 
generously furnished much of the data for the genealogy 
of his Grandfather Hainia's direct and rather inimerous 
posterity. It is but fair to add that this i)ersonal 
sketch of Mr. Hanna is here inserted entirely without 
his knowledge or approval, he having furnished only the 
very meager account contained in the few modest lines 
found beneath his name in the list of his father's children. 
The portrait of Hugh H. Hanna, given in this volume, 
is from the oil painting which hangs in the New York 
Chamber of Commerce. 



HUGH HENRY HANNA, Jr. 

Hugh Henry Hanna. Junior, Manufacturer, Vice 
President of the Atlas Engine Works of Indianaplis, In- 
diana, was born in Lafayette, Indiana, February 27th, 
1876, removing with his parents to Indianapolis August 
1880, was educated in the private schools of Indianapo- 
lis, the Hill school of Pottstown, Pen!isylvania, and the 
Massachusetts School of Technology, Boston. 

On December 31, 1900, he was united in marriage to 
Agnes McCulloch, daughter of Rev. Oscar McCuUoch 
and Alice Barteau McCulloch. 

Their son Hugh Hknry Hanna, Third, was born 
to them April 13, 1902. This beautiful child, now less 
than three years old, is the great-great-grandson of James 
Haiuia, the twin, and his jwrtrait is here presented as a 
representative of the fifth generation from the brothers 
who came to this country in 1763. There will also be 
found in this volume the portraits of Charles R. and 
Fredrick W. Johnson, the gr^at great -great- grandsons of 



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Hugh Henry Hanna III 

Great-Greal-Grandson of James Hanna ( 1753-^827) 

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James Hanna; Charles Weess Haiiiia; great-great-grand- 
sons of Tlionias Hanna; and Charles Theodore Morton, 
great-great-grandson of Rol)ert Hanna 



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CHAPTER V. 

FAMILY OF MARTHA HANNA. 

Martha Hanna, the fifth child tnid only daughter 
of Thomas Hanna and Klizal)eth his wife, was born in 
County Monaghan, Ireland, January 7, 175,8. She went 
with her brothers Hnj^h and Tho!nas into Washington 
County, Pennsylvania, while yet a yoU!ig girl; was tak- 
en into Virginia and raised by a wealthy family, and was 
married in early life to Kdward Saundkrs, only Si^u 
and heir of James Saunders, who had represented Orange 
County, North Carolina, in the Provincial Congress, 
which met at Halifax, April 4, 1776; ai!d also in the 
Congress held at the same place, Nove!id)er 12, 1776. 
He was appointed Colonel of the northern regiment of 
his county. James' younger brother, William, the father 
of Ronuilus M. Saunders, Statesman and Senator, was 
an officer in the North Carolina line. The grandfather 
of ICdward Saunders emigrated from England to Virginia 
and acquired large landed estates. One of the Emi- 
grant's grand.^ons, John Saunders, Jurist, born i!i Vir- 
ginia in 1754, studied law, but in 1776 raised a troop of 
horse at his own expen.se, and joined the Royal forces. 
He was sub.sequeiitl)- Captain of Rangers in the Queen's 
Cavalry and was twice wounded. After the conclusion 
of the Revolutionary War he went to England, became a 
mend)er of the Middle Temple, and jnacticed law^ In 
1790 he became a Judge of the Supreme Court of New 
Brunswick, and a member of the Council of the Colony. 
In 1822 he became Chief Justice. He po.s.sessed two 
valuable estates in Virginia, both of which were confis- 
cated. These estates were afterwartls restored to the 
Saunders family and pissed to the only child of Edward 

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and Martha Haiina Saunders, John W. Saunders, who 
thus became an extremely wealthy man. John W., born 
in 1794, removed from Virj>inia to Tennessee, married 
Cynthia Pillow, a sister of General Gideon Pillow, of 
South Carolina, and purchased the mag!iificent mansion 
and estate of Melrose, near Nashville, from U. S. Sena- 
tor Barrow, of Louisiana. (Alex. Barrow, U. S. Senator, 
born at Melrose ihor, died 1846, removed to Louisiana 
and became Whig U. S. Senator, May 31, 1841 to his 
death in 1846.) 

To John W. Saundkks and Cynthia H. Pillow 
were born three children, (i) Cynthia Pillow, who be- 
came the wife of Colonel Thomas Williams and died with- 
out issue; (2) Narcissa Pillow, and (3) Major John Ed- 
ward Saunders, the last two still living. These are the 
only living descendants of Martha Hanna Saunders. The 
writer has been in correspondence with his cousin Nar- 
cissa P. Saunders, for many years past and has several 
times visited the scenes of the Saunders homes in Nash- 
ville, Tennessee. From recent letters the following ex- 
tracts will be given, showing Narcissa Saunders' estima- 
tion of her parents, and afterwards will be given an arti- 
cle showing who Narcissa Saunders is and that she, the 
last of the Hanna family, in her line, is justly entitled to 
the high honors that have l>een paid her, the true "Belle 
of the Southland." 



Nashville, Jan. 28, 1904. 

* * * I wrote you yesterday a hurried 
note and will write you on the subject we have mentioned, 
the Saunders family, or our bra!ich of it. 

My Father, who was a magnificent young man, was 
born in Virginia. My Grand Father, Edward Saunders, 
was a Virginian, but his family came from North Caro- 
lina, Both Father and Grand Father were only sons, 
great aristocrats, and occupied, high positions both in 



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Virginia and in North Carolina from tlie early periods of 
those states. My Father was a consin of the late Judge 
Romulus N. Saunders of North Carolina, who was Min- 
ister to Spain, under President Polk and had been Gov- 
ernor ****** of my Moth- 
er, who was one of the greatest and most Ix^autiful wo- 
men the South ever produced, and she was as good as she 
was great, Ex-United States Senator Fowler, a very 
talented man, once said, '*She was the greatest woman I 
ever knew, she was one hundred years in advance of her 
time. She could have governed an empire or command- 
ed an army in person.*' Annie Payne, my Grand Moth- 
er, was a cousin of Governor Carroll but Governor Car- 
roll loved her as a daughter and she lived for some years 
at his lumie * h^ * * * 



Nashville, March 6, 1904. 

My friend and Cousin: — 

What a pleasure it is to 
know that I have met a new kinsman, esj>ecially on the 
Saunders side, for I have very few on my Father's side 
and I feel a great i!iterest in those whose blocxi has even 
a small quantity of my own; and you have searched out 
this family with such energy and ability that I cannot 
doubt we are cousins. We are, on our side, a very ener- 
getic and ambitious family, and yoiu" little cousin, who 
is writing this, inherits these qualities in a high degree. 
I was greatly interested in looking at the pictures )'ou sent 
me, particularly that of your Grandmother; such a sweet, 
lovely looking old lady, and her Father's sister married 
my Grandfather, Edward Saunders of Virginia. * 
* * * * We have no portrait of my very 
handsome Father, who, when he married my Mother was 
said to be the handsomest man in Virginia or Tennessee. 



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I do not know in what year my Father was born, being 
an infant when he died. 

I am trying to get a miniature of my dear mother, a 
very lovely one, and if I succeed you shall have a fine 
copy. * * * I must tell you a little about 
my brother's name. He was first named simply, Edward, 
for his grandfather, Edward Sainiders, of Virginia, but 
when his Father died my sorrowing Mother added Johi^ 
through respect for her husband, a!id so he always goes 
by the name of John Edward Saunders. He was a sol- 
dier under General Lee, and greatly distingui.shed him- 
self, although little older than a boy. He is finely edu- 
cated and a fine writer, and by nature an exceedingly 
hand.some man. My only sister, Cynthia Pillow Saun- 
ders, long since dead, was one of the most gifted and ex- 
quisite beauties in the South. I wish you could see her 
portrait. * * 

Very sincerely your cousin, 

Narcissa P1L1.OW Saunders," 



MELROSE. 

To John W. Saunders, elegant, talented, wealthy, of 
unimpeachable character and of an old Virginia family, 
it was given to win the hand of the famous beauty. But 
this first wedded life was of short duration. In a few 
years the devoted young husband died. 

It was during his la.st illness that John Saunders 
made three requests of his wife, ,so soon to become a wid- 
ow. The first of these was that she should take up her 
residence at *' Melrose," previously purchased by him of 
Senator Barrow, of Louisiana. The second, that their 
three children, a son and two daughters, should be rais- 
ed in the Episcopal faith; the third, that his son should 
never enter mercantile life; all of which were faithfully 
carried out. 



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A few years after the death ot John W. Saunders, 
son of our Aunt Martha Hatnia Saunders, his widow 
Cynthia married Governor Aaron V. Brown, twice Gov- 
ernor of Tennessee, and Postmaster General in the Cabi- 
net of President Buchanan. 

An amusing story is told of the courtship of Govern- 
or Brown and this attractive young widow. In paying 
his addresses — as yet unavowed — he called at her house 
one day nnd was ushered into a room darkened to the 
degree which the prevailing fashion of those days pro- 
nounced correct; l)efore the Governor had familiarized 
himself with the surrounding objects in the gloom, Mrs. 
Saunders entered. With enthusiastic politeness he ad- 
vanced to meet her, not noticing a low stool directly in 
his pathway; unhappily he stumbled over it and fell up- 
on his knees at the fe^t of the object of his affections. 
Equal to the absurd predicament, he .seized her hand be- 
fore she could utter a word of sympathy or apology, and 
exclaimed; ** Madam, a happy accident has brought me 
where inclination has long led me.'* 

Such a declaration was, of cour.se, successful, and 
the wedding took place one month after Gov. Brown's 
inauguration as Chief Executive, and from this perio<l 
l)egan for Mrs. Brown a public career of unsurpassed 
distinction and splendor. The entertainments at Melrose 
were many and brilliant, and as the gubernatorial resi- 
dence it was visited by men of every distinction from 
every section. 

At the expiration of his gubernatorial term Gov. 
Brown, "the great war governor," was made Postma.ster 
General under President Buchanan. A friend, writing 
of that jxfriod, says: "As the wife of a cabinet mini.ster, 
Mrs. Brown's great beauty, hospitality and splendor of 
her entertainments made her the leader of Washington 
society. On gala occasions her house, the finest private 
residence in Washington, was a scene of attractive mag- 



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uificeiice that elicited the praise not only of all visitors 
but also received the conunendation of the press through 
out the Union. President Buchanan frequently called 
upon Mrs. Brown to preside at the White House, and 
was often heard to declare that she was the most beauti- 
ful woman he had ever seen." 

Mrs. Toucey, wife of the Secretary of the Navy, 
was one day heard to exclaim, on seeing Mrs. Brown at 
a levee: **Wlien I .see her in white satin and laces and 
diamonds I think her the most beautiful woman I ever 
.saw; when I see her in rose satin with flowers and pearls 
again.st her fair complexion, I think her more beautiful 
still; when I again see her, superb in .silver and green 
brocade, I think her most beautiful of all." 

Lord Napier, the British Minister at Washington, 
and his wife, gentle Lady Napier, became greatly at- 
tached to her, and never was a ball opened at the British 
Emba.ssy until Mrs. Brown made her appearance. On 
one occasion she sent a representative, but Lord Napier 
would not suffer a refusal, but sent an especial nnnister 
begging her presence and stating that the guests were 
waiting. He descended to tlie carriage upon her arrival 
and escorted her to the ball room upon his arm. 

Gov. Brown's death occurred in Washington during 
his term of office as Postmaster General. His remains 
lay in State in the great East room of the White House, 
and were then brought to Nashville on a special train, 
and accompanied by a congressional conunittee, and tak- 
en to the Capitol, where, for forty-eight hours, thous- 
ands of people, with teardinnned eyes, surged about the 
catafalque. 

To his widow, who then returned to Melrose, he left 
a fortune approximating a half million dollars, but more 
than this the heritage of an untarnished name. 



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ESTABLISHMENT OE BEAUTIFUL MELROSE 

With its new name and its new mistress ** Melrose" 
took unto itself a new lease of life. But three and one 
half miles south of Nashville, l)etween the Franklin and 
Nolensville pikes, its situation was wholly suburban, yet 
urban in every convenience and touch of the city life. 
The adjoining estates were owned and o«!cupied by the 
two sisters l)efore mentioned, both of whom were wedded 
to men of standing and influence. The sight of Melrose 
was naturally picturesque. Near the entrance to the 
grounds arose a pretty lodge house, surrounded by mag- 
nificent evergreens and forest trees. The approach to the 
mansion was through a blue grass valley and over a rip- 
pling stream spanned by a rustic bridge, thence up a 
slight incline thick set with luxuriant flora, and about a 
heart-shaped circle, in the center of which sparkled and 
splashed a marble fountain and basin, the water for its 
supply forced up from a spring near by. 

The house was brick and of old colonial style, with 
grand pillars supported by stone foundations and broad 
steps leading up to the porticos. The view from the 
front was fine, showing the blue hills in the di.stance, 
with the low lying valleys between them. 

The interior of the house was quite, in keeping w.ith 
its handsome exterior. The rooms were lofty, large and 
exquisitely furnished. The front hall was imposing in 
dimensions and opened into large parlors and drawing 
rooms. Against the walls hung a collection of paintings, 
considered one of the rarest in the Southland. Plate 
glass windows hung on hinges like doors and 0[)ened to 
numerous balconies, and on every hand was evidenced all 
the elegance and luxury that wealth and a cultivated 
taste could command. 

The Civil War commenced shortly after the death 
of Gov. Brown, and Melrose l)ecame a point of con.spicu- 
ous interest. The kinspeople of Mrs. Brown, including 

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lier son, Maj. J. E. Saunders, entered the Sontliern army, 
and while her synipatliies were enhsted with the South 
she regarded secession as a political error. 

Lett alone at Melrose with her two daughters, Misses 
Narcissa P. and Cynthia P. Saunders, a young son of 
her second marriage, Granville P. Brown, and a retinue 
of servants, and hennned in on every side !)y large and 
ofttimes lawless bodies of troops, she met the situation 
with the same courageous and fearless spirit that made 
her ancestors so renowned. 

Melrose was often placed directly between the mili- 
tary lines of the opjwsing armies, and the ix)sition of 
these unprotected women l)ecame at times critical and 
even dangerous. 

With kindly hands they administered to the dis- 
tressed and the suffering on either side as occasion sug- 
gested or required, until Melrose came to be a *'kind of 
sacred groiuid" between the enemy. For their l)etter 
protcctioji, guards were furnished by the conunanders of 
both armies, and thenceforth Melrose was visitetl by all 
prominent Federals and Confederates. 

And strange it is that during all the devastation and 
ruin of battle that raged about it, the mansion remained 
wholly unscathed. * 'There seems to have been,*' wrote 
a war correspondent of that day, **a sheltering aegis 
that sheltered Melrose and its iinnates from harm, for 
its splendid grounds and magnificent surroundings are 
not marred in the slightest degree either by the careless 
and indifferent soldiery, or the canno!i Imlls from Fort 
Negley and the surrounding fortresses, which laid low 
nearly every house in the vicinity." 

Far from the least interesting figures of Melrose, 
were the daughters of the hou.selu)ld, whose attractions 
won for Narcissa, the elder, when in Washington with 
her parents, and then in the blush of young womanhood, 
the appellation of "The Young Queen of the Southrons." 
Handsome, accomplished, wealthy and a member of an 

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illtistrioiis family, it is affirmed by those fully cognizant 
of tlie facts, that this favored young woman as the reign- 
ing l)eauty received more offers of marriage from men of 
prominence in the United States and foreign countries 
than was ever accorded to another of her sex. 

But at the close of the war the wedding !)ells rung 
merrily out at Melrose in celebration of the nuptial tie 
of the younger daughter, Cynthia, and Col. Thomas 
Williams, staff officer of Gen. Rous.seau\s staff; rung 
merrily only to Ix; stilled, alas ! by the funeral dirge of 
the winsome young wife within one short year of her 
marriage. 

With the dissipation of the war cloud, the hospi- 
table and charitable life at Melrose was resinned to a 
great extent. The ix>or, as well as the rich, the lowly, 
as well as the eminent, were alike welcomed to its doors. 
But "Time .steals on and time steals from us," and 
through the con.sequenc^s of war and other causes, the 
hand.some patrimony left to Mrs. Brown l)ecame curtailed 
and Melrose pas.sed to other hands, Mrs. Brown, with 
her .son and daughter, who still survive her, removing to 
Na.shville. 

With the change in ownership came alterations, and 
the .spell of the old association was broken. But to the 
habitues of Melrose of that olden time, its memories are 
unalterable and lasting and sweet. 



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Obituary Notices From Various Southkrn Papers, 
mrs. aaron v. brown. 

Some Hitherto Uyipublished Historical Facts in Hcf Career, 
Nashville Ainericaii. Oct. i6, 1897. 

President Monroe sent young Gideon Pillow on a 
special and perilous mission through the wilderness on 
horseback from V^asliington to a point near Nashville. 
The Cuml)erland River was much swollen; it could nei- 
tlier Ije forded n(.)r conld a man upon a horse swim it. 
A brave maiden, taking a paddle and seating herself in a 
canoe, stemmed the tide and ferried the handsome stran- 
ger across the stream. 

This incident determined the destiny of the youthful 
pair. With Gideon Pillow it was a case of love at first 
sight, nor could beautiful Annie Payne long remain in- 
different to the handsome and chivalrous youth who, 
with love and devotion, sought her heart and hand. The 
father of each were Revolutionarj^ soldiers under Gen. 
Washington luitil the surrender of Lord Cornwallis at 
Yorktown, which event terminated the struggle for in- 
dei)endence. 

Aiuiie Payne was the daugnter of Josiah Payne, of 
North Carolina, and first cousin of Mrs. President Mad- 
i.son and of Mrs. George Steptoe Washington. Her an- 
cestors were descendants of the royal family of McGre- 
gor's, of Scotland. Gideon Pillow was of English origin. 

He was distinguished for great intelligence, great a- 
miability, high moral character, and conspicuous valor — 
the latter trait forcibly illustrated by his conduct in nu- 
merous contests with the Indian.s. 

William Pillow, brother of Gideon, was a noted Col- 
onel of a regiment of Tennessee volunteers inider Gener- 
al Jackson in the Florida war, and at the battle of Talle- 
dego was shot entirely through the body. A haudker- 

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chief wrapj)ed around a ramrod was i)assed tli rough ihe 
ajierliire and the wound thus cleansed. He was after- 
ward an aide-de-camp of Gen. Jackson at New Orleans, 
and lived to l>e 103 years old. 

Cynlhia Holland Pillow, the subject of this sketch, 
was the daughter of Gideon and Ainiie Payne Pillow, 
and was lx>rn uix)ii the si>lendid estate of her father in 
Giles County, Tennessee. At an early age she was sent 
to the Nashville Academy; she resided with her relative, 
Gov. Carroll, who, as well as his estimable wife, was as 
devoted to her as if she had been his own daughter. He 
seemed never to tire of praising both her beauty and the 
loveliness of her dis|X)sition. She remained under the 
guardianship of this distinguished General — and twelve 
years Governor — until her graduation from the academy 
under President Alfred Hume. Returning to her home 
in Maurv County, this state, where, also, her father 
owned a fine estate, she l)ecame a great belle, and her 
hand was sought by many suitors. 

After the laspe of a few years she married John W. 
Saun:lers, a handsome, talented and elegant young gen- 
tleman of high social j>osition and of six)tless character, 
and who belonged to a prominent Virginia family, 

On one occasion Mrs. Saunders visited Mrs. Andrew 
Jackson, the adopted daughter of Gen. Jackson, at the 
Hermitage. The General, on learning that she was In 
the house, and although he was then virtually in a dying 
condition and propped up by pillows, sent for her. Ap- 
proaching him he feebly asked her to kneel beside his 
bed: placing his hand upon her head, he said: **God 
bless you, my daughter; you came from as brave and 
true a stock as ever draw a breath of life.'* The time, 
the place, the solenniily of her surroundings, the passing 
away of the great hero, made an impression upon her 
which lasted through life. 

The happiness of her first wedded life was of brief 
duration. In a few years her devoted young husband 

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died. 

After some 5'ear.s of vvidowliood the beautiful Mrs. 
Saunders, at her magnificent home, ** Melrose," near 
Nashville, married the popular orator and distinguished 
statesman, Governor Aaron V. Brown, one month after 
his inauguration. From this period commenced her 
public career of unsurj>assed distinction and splendor* 
Melrose, her home, became a type of genuine Southern 
hospitalit3\ Their entertainments were numerons and 
brilliant. The gubernatorial residence was visited bj' 
men of distinction from every section of the United 
States, as well as from foreign countries. 

In this connection it is well to mention that Gov. 
Brown and President Polk were intimate i>er.sonal and 
political friends, the former having acted as groomsman 
for the latter in marriage. In the conduct of the Mexican 
war President Polk had no warmer snpporter than Aaron 
V. Brown, called the * 'Great War Governor." 

Mrs. Brown*s brother, Gideon J. Pillow, who had 
been President Polk's lav/ partner and life-long friend, 
was made Major-General and second in command of the 
American Army in Mexico. In this war he was the con- 
fidential adviser of the President. In that brilliant cam- 
paign Gen. Pillow received two wounds — the one at Cerro 
Gordo, the other at the storming of ChapuUepec — which 
action closed the war. 

The next pnblic position held by Gov. Brown, after 
the expiration of his gubernatorial term, was that of 
Postmaster- General under President Bnchanan. As the 
wife of a Cabinet Minister Mrs. Brown's great beanty, 
hospitality and splendor of her entertainments made her 
the leader of Washington society. On gala occasions her 
house — the finest private lesidence in Washington — was 
a scene of attractive magnificence that elicited the praise, 
not only of all visitors, but also received the commenda- 
tion of the press throughout the Union. 

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President Buchanan frequently called upon lier to 
preside at the White House. He had been Minister to 
England and had seen many of the court beauties of Eu- 
rope, but alwa) s declared that Mrs, Brown was the most 
beautiful and queenly woman he had ever seen. The.se 
comi)liinents from the President were plea.shig to her 
husband, who entertained for liis wife .sentiments of the 
most romantic devotion to the last moment of his life. 

Lord Napier, the British Minister at Wa.shington, 
always declared that Mrs. Brown was the most graceful 
and beautiful woman he had ever met, and Lady Napier, 
his gentle wife, was attached to her above all other wo- 
men. Although Mrs. Brown was .so admired by the 
high placed, the wealthy and the powerful, by the plain 
people she was devotedly beloved. She was their beau 
ideal of a ]>erfect woman. 

During her brilliant career in Wa.shington her acts 
of charity and kindness to the jwor in Tennessee, as well 
as to those around her were continuous and unceasing. 
Upon the death of Gov. Brown, which occurred before 
I he expiration of his term as Postmaster General, his 
w'idow returned to "Melrose.'' Very shortly thereafter 
the Civil War connnenced, during which eventful pericxl 
she was a cons|)icuous figure. She regarded the attempt 
to dissolve the Union as a political error, but .she never 
expressed her opinions offensively to any one. Her love, 
however, for these in whose mid.st she was born and 
reared and lived, was never affected b}' her political .sen- 
timents 

All of hei kindred who were old enough to wear a 
sword or bear a musket were in the Southern army. Her 
gifted son, Granville P., the only child of her .second 
marriage, was killed on his mother's plantation in Ar- 
kansas, while defending a slave, being about 15 years old 
at the time of his death. Her other son, Maj. J. E. 
Saunders, was far away with Gen. Lee's army, and with 
two daughters, Misses Narcissa P. and Cynthia P. Saun- 



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ders, Mrs. Brown was left at Melrose, siirroiiiuled 1)3' 
many slaves, by lawless men and large bodies of troops. 
In this unprotected condition, however, she was treated 
b}^ the commanders of both armies with the greatest 
kindness and most distingnished consideration, they 
kindly and without solicitation furnishing her guards for 
the protection of herself and daughters. Throughout 
the war Melrose was visited by the conunanding Generals 
of both sides, as well as by nearly all the more promi- 
nent officers. Her guards invariably became much at- 
tached to the kind lady whom they were protecting, and 
many of them maintained a correspondence with her to 
the close of her life. Some of these soldiers in after life 
named their children after her or seme mtmber of the 
family. 

Immediately after the cessation of hostilities, at the 
urgent request of a nmnber of Confederate officers and 
prominent citizens, who desired pardons from Pre.sident 
John.son, Mrs. Brown went to Washington. She had 
heard so much of the President's prejudice toward the 
Southern people that she dreaded to call upon him. Mrs. 
Brown was therefore agreeably surprised when the Pres- 
ident sent his daughter in his carriage to the hotel with 
a cordial invitation from himself and wife to make the 
White House her home during her stay at the Capitol. 
This invitation was at first declined, but it being urgently 
and repeatedly renewed, it was finally accepted. While 
there Mrs. Brown described the wretched condition of 
the Southern people, and by her pathetic eloquence and 
touching appeals moved Mr. Johnson to tears. She suc- 
ceeded in procuring pardons in the case of every appli- 
cant, and it was believed and stated by many prominent 
men that her visit had much to do with conv^erting his 
prejudice toward the Southern people into sympathy, 
and in formulating his policy towards the South. 

It may not be uninteresting to mention as a singular 

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fiiculent that a niagnificeift floating palace, in tlie sliape 
of a pleasure boat liad been fitted up for tlie use of Presi- 
dent and Mrs. Lincoln. Among the staterooms were 
two — one for the President, the other for his wife, fur- 
nished with ro\^al mngnificence, and which had never 
l)een occupied. The vessel was awaiting their first trip 
at the time of Mr. Lincoln's assasination. While Mrs. 
Brown was at Washington President Johnson gave an ex- 
cursion party, and tlie former was one of the guests. 
She was assigned to Mrs. Lincoln's stateroom. At the 
breakfast table next morning the President asked her if 
she had slept well. Her reply was, **Mr. President, I 
did not sleep at all. but rested delightfully on that down- 
y couch;" adding, "Strange, is rt not, that I, a poor 
Southern woman, here in behalf of those luihappy peo- 
])le, should, instead of Mrs. Lincoln, have first occupied 
that splendid state-room?" He replied **that the ways of 
God were mysterious and strange." The friendship form- 
ed during this visit continued until Mr. Johnson's 
death. He rarely failed to pay his respects to her at Mel- 
rose on his visits to Nashville. After the war she resumed 
to a great extent her hospitable and charitable mode of 
life. Were all the acts of charity and kindness of this 
estimable lady related by the recipients thereof the recital 
would fill volumes. 

Mrs. Brown was called upon by man}' bodies of emi- 
nent men and distinguished strangers visiting Nashville. 
Her house and grounds were open alike to the rich and 
poor, fhe great and the humble. Church and school 
gatherings, pleasure parties and picnics were continually 
ill the beautiful groves and grounds, and for every per- 
son she had a pleasant smile and kindly greeting. In- 
deed, by her course of life the name of her illustrious hus- 
band was held in honor before the public almost as con- 
spicuously as it could have ])een had he been living and 
in the full jxjssessioti of all his s[)leiidid faculties. Alx)Ut 



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ten or twelve years ago she was iioininated by the I^a- 
dies Mount Vernon Association for the Union, Vice Re- 
gent for Tennessee, but declined the ixjsition. Being urg- 
ed to accept, she did so. In this position, nor in any of 
a fiduciary nature, would she receive into her hands one 
dollar under any circumstances. A year or two ago she 
was made an honorary niem]»er of the Ladies' Hermitage 
As.sociation. Mrs. Brown never sought prominence. 
She was always modest, retiring and unselfish. Honors 
were thrust upon her from her girlhood to the day of 
her death. She never assumed an air of superiority over 
any human Ijeing. In her manners she was a blending 
of natural dignity, grace, graciousness and gentleness. 
Her diction and pronunciation were exquisite. Her 
voice was clear, soft and pleasing. She was a woman of 
great moral and physical courage. No prs.ssure could 
move her against the convictions of her own conscience, 
though her .sensitiveness was extreme. No danger or 
emergency was ever so great as to make her lose h .m' self 
passession, and her courage approached the sublime. 
Wealth and prosperity did not .spoil a di.sposition which 
the trials and sorrows of this life could not .sour. De- 
scended from among the most illustrious families of 
America, she never made her lineage a subject of boast or 
mention. She possessed ability and extraordinary beauty 
without vanity; large wealth without .selfishness; and 
her veracity vvas ah.solutely unquestioned. Throughout 
her whole life she was given to kind words and good deeds. 
In the beautiful fulne.ss of her character we might declare 
her to have been the Washington of women. 



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CHAPTER VL 

FAMILY OF THOMAS HANNA AND JANK 
COWDKN HANNA. 

Thomas Hanna, sixth and youngest child of Thomas 
Hantia and Klizahetli Henderson, was born in Ireland in 
the year 1760; eniij^rated, with hisj^artnts, to Anitrica in 
:763. He left Bucks County, Pennsylvania, sometime 
prior to 1793 as at that date we find he had settled in 
Buffalo Township, Washington County, Pennsylvania. 
He married, in 1786, Jank Cowdkn, who was born in 
1759. In 1835 Thomas and Jane Hanna removed to 
Harrison County, Ohio, where he died April 9, 1839, 
the date of Jane Hanna's death we do not have, but 
both Tliomas and Jane Hatuia were buried in the Cadiz 
(Ohio) cemetery. To them were 'H>ni six children, one 
of whom, (thc5lh) 77/^///^^, died in infancy, the sixth 
child and youngest son was given the same name. 

CHir^I>RHN OK THOMAS HANNA AND JANE COWDRN. 

1. Klizabctli, born 17SS, married Saimiel McCinie, died 1827. 

2. John Cowdeii. born 1790, married three times, died 1865. 

3. Mary. l)orii 1792, married Rev. Jose])!! Scroggs, died 1848. 

4. James, born 1794, married IMary Dickson. 

5. Thomas, born 1796, died in infancy, 1797. 

6. Tliomas II., born >799, married Jemima Patterson, died 1864. 

{]) Kmzabkth Hanna, born i78Sand named for lier paternal 
grandmother, married vSamukl McCunk in Washington County, 
Pa. lvlizal>eth and Samnel McCnne had seven children. 

(A) Margaret McCnne, accidentally killed when a child. 

(B) James McCnne, married a Patterson, lived near Cand>ridge, 
Gnernsey County, Ohio. 



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(C) Thomas McCuiie, a Minister in the U. P. Church never mar- 
ried and died many years ago. 

(I)) Samuel McCune, died a child. 

(E) Maryraret McCune II, died a child. 

(P*) Mary McCune, married David Patterson, both now deceased, 
but a son and a daughter live in Clevelaiid, Ohio. 

(G) Elizabeth McCune, born 1824. married Samuel Brownlee a 
prosperous farmer of Washington Co., Pa. on Sept. 2fj, 1848. He 
died some 25 years since. Elizabeth Urownlee, now 80 years of 
age, lives with her childrtn. Kli'/-ibeth and Samuel Hrownleehad 
issue seven children: 

(a) Mary Hrownlee, marrit^l James G. Maxwell of Washing- 
ton Co., Pa., they have two sons: the Rev. Montrose B. Maxwell, 
Pa.stor of the United Presbvterian Church at Hirmingham, Mich., 
and Dr. Clark Maxwell, a Physician, Pittsburg, Pa. 

(b) Ella Brownlee, married Rev. W.J.Buchanan of Mon- 
mouth, Illinois, the financial agent of Monmouth College. They 
have two daughters and three sons. 

(c) Martha Brownlee, married Hugh Gabby of Pawnee, Neb. 

(d) Clark Brownlee, the only son, died at the age of 17 years. 

(e) Ivouis Brownlee, died while a student in Monmouth Col- 
lege. 

(f ) Etta Brownlee died in the 22nd year of her age. 

(g) Belle Brownlee, married Prof. E. E. IClIiott, of the State 
Agricultural College, Pnllman, Washington. She «lied in 1903/ 



(2) John Cowdhn Hanna, second cliild of Thomas and 
Jane Cowden Hanna, was born July 14, 1790 and died 
Sept. 15, 1865. He was pions from his early yoiith and 
was chosen Ruling Klder in North Buffalo Associate 
Congregation when l)nt 26 years old. He wa^< among 
the first teetotalers of his day. and had difficulty in gath- 
ering his crops l)ecause he would not supply the harvest- 
ers the accustomed whiskey. He cast the first Abolition 
vote in his Township and kept with the despised minori- 
ty until he joined the tiium])hant majority under Lin- 
cohi. He was interested in the Underground Railroad, 
and his close covered carriage frequently mule night 



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trips l>eaniig fugitive slaves on their way northward . 
Mr. Hnnna was a man greatly beloved by his neighbors 
and a larj>e circle of friends and his funeral proces- 
sion was the longest that ever wound its way up the 
long hill to the North Buffalo grave j^ard. He was three 
times married, ist to Lsabklla Martin, March 19, 18 16, 
she died June 14, 1828 having lx)rne five children: 

(A) Margaret Haiiiia, born Peb. 28, 1817, died Sept. 17, 1844. 

(3) Tlionias Hanna, born Feb. .8. 1819^1;^,! of measles 

(C) James M. Hanna, born Mar. 19, 1822) ^*^'*' ^' '^^^* 

(D) Jane Cowden Han ha, born Anp. 22, 1824, diet! June 21, 1843. 

(E) R'iamlieth Martin Hanna, l)orn March 10, 1828, still living 
and resides in Denver, Colorado, married James LeijKir who died 
in 18S3. They had issue: 

(a) John C. LeijHjr, Atty. at Law, Denver, Colorado. 

(b) Har[>er Leiper, Head of a department on *'The Rocky 
Mountain News." 

(c) Robert Iveiper, Greely, Colorado. 

(d) Mal>el I^eiper, married a Mr. Montgomery, the Private 
Secretar}' to the Gov. of Colorado. 

John Cowdkn Hanna married, 2nd, Rkbkcca M. 
Allison, on Se})teniber 3. 1834. She was born in 1805 
and died Novenil)er 29, 1839. She was the daughter of 
Hugh Allison whose oldest brother, Gavin Alli.son was 
the Grandfather of Nancy Allison McKinley. *'Mother" 
McKinley was therefore, a .second cousin to the Hanna 
children, the issue of John and Rebecca Hanna. The old 
Allison Homestead, her birthplace, is .shown in this book. 

On Octol>er 2, 1897 Mother McKinley spent the day 
at the home of Charles Klnier Rice, in Alliance, Ohio, at- 
tending the Annual "Old Folks' Party." It was the 
last time she ever left her home, and exactly two months 
from that day, or on I)eceml)er 2, 1897, she suffered the 
stroke which terminated her life. Slie was, on this occa- 

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Birthplace of Nancy Allison (McKinley.) 
Mother of President McKinley (1S09-1897.) 



The Old McKinley Home, Lisbon, Ohio. 

Page 176. ^ - 

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Rev. Thomas Henderson Hauna, D. D. 

Grandson of Thos. Hanna ( 1760-1829.) 

Page 177. 



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sloii 89 \7ears of age, and during the da}' she gave many 
reminiscences of the Hatma family, of lier Cousins in the 
John Hanna line, of the authors Great-grandparents, 
Robert and Catharine Hanna, of Lisbon, Ohio, and of 
their chiklren, Benjamin, Esther Hole and Catharine 
Hole, all of whom she well knew, and of whom she had 
the fondest recollections, they having been her earliest 
playmates and near neighbors. Thus we learn that while 
Marcus Alonzo Hanna, the President Maker, was not in 
any way related to the President, there was an often 
misquoted relationship l)etw^een the families. 

The cliiidreii of John Cowtleii llaima and Rebecca Alhson 
Hanna were 

(e) Maria Scroggs Hanna, born Jnne 1835, 

(f) Rev. Thomas Henderson Hanna, born May 5, 1837, 

(g) James Rankin Hanna, born Nov. 10, 1838. 

(h) Hngh Allison Hanna, lx>rn Nov. 11, 1839, died 1842. 

Maria (e) married WilHani G. Maxwell, a farmer of Wash- 
ington Co., Pa., and an Elder in the Bnffalo U. P. Church, issue: 
John C. Hanaa, married Mary Snodgrass, 1902. 
James Grier Maxwell, married Wilnia McCracken. 
Emma Lou Maxwell, married Rev. Neil Ferguson of Spring 
Hill, Indiana, U. P. Church. They have three children; 
Lois, Maxwell and Neil Cnyler, 

(f) Rev. Thomas Henderson Hanna, born May 5, J837, was 
graduated from Westminster College, in 1856, and from the Xe- 
nia Theologicftl Seminary in 1861. He was Pastor of the Fifth U- 
tiited Presbyterian Congregation, of Philadelphia, Pa., from 1867 
to 1875; P*irst Church, Xeina, Ohio, 1875 to 1880, and of First 
Church, Monmouth, III., from 1883 to 1903, a perio<l of over 23 
years, wiieu he retired from the active pastorate. Though retir- 
ed he has in no wi.se ceased his labors or become inactive, but, as 
he says, in a recent letter, *is a sort of "Minister-at large," sub- 
ject to the l)eck and call of any congregation in temporary need, 
or of a Brother in distress." 

He received his degree of I). D. from his Alma Mater also 
from Monmouth College. Was Moderator of the General Assem- 
bly at Rock River, Illinois, in 1897. On Oct. 16, 1862 Mr Hanna 
was married to Mary E. Tkmplkton, and has i.ssue: 



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Win. Findfey Haiina, born Oct. 15, 1863, now Sec'y and 
Treasurer of Owens Machine Tool Co. of Springfield, Ohio. Mar- 
ried in June 1900 Elizabeth K. KHiot, of Pliiladelpliia. 

John Charles Hantm, lx>rn Aug. 13, 1855. Educated at Mon- 
mouth College and Xenia nieological Seniinarj. Organized the 
Charlks Hanna Mkmoria7« Church at Oakland, California. 
Married Ella Frances Porter, of Monmouth, Illinois, Jan. i, 1891- 
Took charge of the North United Presbyterian Church, Philadel- 
phia the same month and died, ( f Ty])hoi<l fever, the 24th of A- 
pril, 1891. His public ministry was brilliant and successful. See 
.sketch, below, of Rev, J. C. Hanna. 

James Aaron Hanna, the 3rd son, is General Secretary' of Y. 
M. C. A. in Galesburg, Illinois. He married, in 1893, Miss Frank 
Weess of Keokuk, Iowa, and has one son, Charles Weess, bom 
June 10, 1896. 

Tlionias Hanna, Jr. Educated at Monmouth College, Illinois^ 
and Allegheny Theological Seminary, and has been Pastor of the 
U. P. Congregation, Steubenville, Ohio, for the past eight years. 
Is unmarried, 

Lyda Hanna, Educated at Monmouth College, married, June 
3rd, 1896, Palmer Findley, M. D., A.ssistant Prof, of Gynacology 
•n Rush Medical College. Has issue Thomas and Mary. 

Hugh Allison Hanna, now in the Passenger Department of 
Penua. R. R, in Philadelphia, Pa. 



Sketch of Rp:v. John Charlks Hanna. 

Rev. John Charles Hanna, the .second .son of the 
Rev. Dr. Thomas H. Hanna and Mary E. Hanna, \va.s 
born in Washington County, Pennsylvania, Augu.st 15, 
1865. The days of his infancy were piis.sed in Philadel- 
phia, during his father's pastorate over the Fifth Presby- 
terian Church. 

His childhood was spent in Pittsburgh; his boyhood 
at Xenia, Ohio; college days and early manhood at 
Monmouth, Illinois. 

He was graduated from Moinnonth College in the 
class of 1886. Here his literary abilities began to at- 



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Rev. John Charles Hanna, 

Great-grandson of Thos. Hanna (1760-1839.) 

Page 178. 



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tract attention, and on three separate occasions lie waii^ 
chosen to represent his Society in contest. On finisliing 
his college course he taught, for a 3'ear, at West Sun- 
bury Academy, Coulterville, Pennsylvania, and then 
entered the Theological Seminary at Xenia, Ohio, grad- 
uating in March, 1890. At the ciose of his senn'nary 
course he accepted an appointment by the Board of Home 
Missions to Oakland, California. Before leaving for this 
new field arrangements were made for his ordination to 
the Gospel Ministry by the Presbytery of Monmouth. 
This service was held in the First Church, Monmouth, 
May 17, i8go, his father preaching the ordination ser- 
mon. He reached San Francisco at the close of May 
and preached his first sermon in California at the First 
Church, June ist; and in the evening of the same daj'^ 
occupied the pulpit of the Second Church. After some 
six months spent in Oakland a call came and was ac- 
cepted from the North Church of Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

January i, 1891, Rev. Mr. Hanna was married, at 
Monmouth, Illinois, to Ella Frances Porter, and with 
his young wife entered at once upon the work of his life, 
preaching his inaugural sermon in Philadelphia the sec- 
ond Sunday in January, 1901. The installation followed 
in the same month, January 29th. Thus inducted into 
his proper official relations over the congregation, he 
settled down to the ministry of the Word and the pa.stor- 
ate, with a devotion that carried all the intensity of his 
consecrated manhood with it. But it was not destined 
to belong. His final sickness did its work rapidly, and 
on April 24, 1891, death ended his brief and promising 
career. After services at the North Church, his Ixxly 
was lx)rne from the scene of his brief labors and laid to 
rest in Monmouth, Illinois, on the 29th following. His 
cousin, classmate and friend, the Rev. Thomas Hanna 
McMichael, now President of Monmouth College, pays 

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(Ill's l)eaiitiful tribute to tlie iiieiiior}' of the Rev. John 
Charles Haiiiia: 

**Iii this little volume of reuiembrance it is mine to 
speak of Charlie, for so he is and niusit e\'er be to those 
who knew him Ix^st dnring^ his ct)llege days. But to one 
who knew him all his short life tho^ie years furnish bul 
a small part of the memories that crowd the mind. As 
I write I am carried Ixick to the other side of college 
days— Tnick to the time of childhood , for even then we 
were often together; and now come the college days; 
and now on this side the years of seminary life. How 
many a niche in memory filled by his face and his words. 

None of all his classmates had brighter prospects. 
None gave promise of a longer and more useful life, and 
just in the ver\' morning time his sun went down. We 
ivonder why, yet it is not for us to ask why. ''For even 
so. Father, for so it seemeth good in Thy sight." 

His was a personality that stanii)ed itself on others. 
Wherever he went, in college and out, he made friends, 
and these friends have l)een made better by contact with 
him. 

Purity w'as Wvt soul of his life. His finely wrought 
nature shrank instinctively from anything impure and 
polluting. Those closely associated with him could not 
but breathe and feel invigorated by this healthy moral 
atmosphere he ever carried with him. In the fragrance 
that his daily life shed upon others, in the warm and 
earnest words of his i)ublic ministry, we know that he 
still lives. Tlie day he died he was to have read a paper 
at a Young People's Convention at Baltimore, entitled, 
*The Advantages of Ivnly Consecration.' His heart 
could have spoken from experience on that subject. That 
paper, however, was never read; yet the life he lived, 
the death he dieti, set forth all that it could have con- 
tained then. But now could he tell of those advantages, 
how nuich loftier and sweeter woidd ht his strain. As 



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Charles Weess Hanna, 
Great-great-grandson of Thomas Hanna, 

(1760- 1839) 
Page 178. 



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a classmate, as a friend, as one wlio lias l;een helped by 
his life, I wish to place this sprig upon his tomb." 

John Cowdkn Hanna married, 3d, Martha 
Smith, July 3, 1845. She died November, 1890, in her 
'89th year. 

(3) Mary Hanna, daughter of Thomas and Jank 
Cowdp:n Hanna, was born in Washington County, Pa., 
in 1792, and died July 29, 1848. She married Rev. Rob- 
ert ScROGGS, D. D. , of IJgonier Valley, Pa. He was 
for over fifty seven years pastor of one congregation and 
a noted and eminent character in the pioneer ministry 
and church. His accuracy of scliolarship and ability as 
a theologian were never questioned. He was keen of wit 
and could scarcely respect a man who couUl not appre- 
ciate pure humor or crack a joke. His anecdotes are 
said to hav^ean abiding place in the old folk-lore of the 
Ligonier Valley. In the pulpit, however, sj^eech and 
mind were as if he stood on holy ground and in the very 
presence of God. To "Polly" and Joseph Scroggs were 
born eleven children, all of whom lived to maturity ex- 
cept James R. who died in his tenth year and an infant 
uiniamed. 

CHILDREN OK POLICY AND RKV. JOSEPH SCROGGS. 

(A) M^irgaret C. Scroggs, horn Dec. 18, 1818, married Joshua 
Diishatie, Jiiii. 22, 1855. Issue, one child. Joseph Diishaiie, now 
Uving in Wilkinshurg, Pa., and lias four children. Marj^aret S. 
Diishanedied May iS, 1861. 

(B) Thomas II. vScrogj^s, M. D., horn March i, 1821 married Lou- 
isa H. Hunter, Sept. 27, 1846. Issue 4 children, one daujjhter and 
three sous. I)r Scroggs died March 4, 1859. His widow residt-s 
at Wapello, Louisa (^o., Iowa. 

(C) Jane H. Scroggs. horn June 28, 1823. married Rev. R.H. 
.Pollock. D. D. May 7,1845. Rev. Pollock fell <leiid fiom his 



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liorse as he leisurely rcnle along the streets of Mt. Vernon, O., in 
June, 1877. His widow resides at No. 52 Larwell Street, Wooster, 
Ohio. Of their large family but two survive: Mary Pollock, resid- 
ing with her mother, and Thomas C. Pollock, of Aspinwall, Pa. 

(D) Kllen M. Scroggs, born Dec. 15, 1825; died Aug. 26,1849. 
Married Rev. Abraham Anderson, May 12, 1848. He died July 31, 
1849. No issue surviving. 

(E) James R. Scroggs, born March 1, 1828, died Oct. 14, 1837. 

(F) Elizaljeth M. Scroggs, born Sept. i, 1831, married John 
Collins, Feb. 14, 1853 and died May 12, 1884. Issue six children: 
l<Vank, Mary, Jennie, Blanche, Ella and Joseph. Frank aud 
Joseph are deceased, Ella Collins resides in Xenia, Ohio. Mary 
Collins married Rev. T. J. C. Webster, and resides in California. 
Jennie Collins is married and lives at Cedarville, Ohio. Blanche 
Collins married Rev. J. W. Hallentine, a Missionary, now in In- 
dia. 

(G) Rachel W. Scroggs, born Dec. 8, 1833; married Huston 
Cochrane Dec. 9, 1856, and resides at Macedonia, Ohio, issue two 
daughters and four sons. 

(i) Laura Ella Cochrane, born 1858, married Wni. McFar- 
land, in 18^3. Her oldest son Hiistou M., born 1884, died 1887. . 
2nd son, O*?orge Wheeler, born 1888. 3d son Albert Rankin, born 
J 891. 

(2) James Edwin Cochrane, born i860, died 1861. 

(3) Joseph Scroggs Cochrane, born 1862, died 1884. 

(4) Harry Adolphus, born 1866, married Myrtle Nesbit and 
has one child, Helen Rachel Cochrane. 

(5) Agnes Elizabeth Cochrane, born 1868, married George P. 
McFarland, in 1900 and resides near Greenburg, Pa. 

(6) Thomas Pollock Cockrane, born 1872, died 1876. 

(H) Rev. Joseph A. Scroggs, born July 28, 1835. He was 
among the first to eidist when the civil war broke out, tho not 
yet through Collge. He enlisted under the call of President Liu- 
coln for three year men. He was at that time teaching school in 
Iowa, and became a member of Company C, nth Iowa Infantry. 
He was in the Battle of Shiloh, and nearly all the sub.sequent bat- 
tles arouiul Corinth and at Vicksburg; in nearly all the engage- 
ments under Sherman, between Chattanooga and Atlanta; was mus* 



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tere<l out some six weeks after his term of enlistment had expired, 
or a few days before Sherman marched for the Sea. During his 
Army life Mr. Scroggs contracted wliat is technicnlly termed 
•'granular Ophthahnia" in his eyes, the result of" which was that 
he could not read a word for some three years after his return to 
civil life. This has so increased during the recent years that he 
is assured that total blindness will overtake him if he lives a few 
years longer. Though he is largely disabled from the active work 
of the ministry, he still preaches occasionally, and teaches a class 
of ladies in tl:e Sunday School. He usually teaches without t'^e 
use of a Bible having first carefully consulted the large family Ki- 
ble in his private room, and couimittiug the lesson to memory. 
Rev. Mr. Scroggs has but one son, David A. Scroggs. born Jan. 
28, 1879. residing in Canonsburg, Pa. David A Scroj^gs was mar- 
ried April 8, 1900 to Alice Boone and they have one little daugh- 
ter. Rev. Joseph A. Scroggs also resides in Canonsburg, Pa. 
His portrait is here given, together with that ot his sister Rachel 
Cochrane, the 7th child of Mary Hanna aud Rev. Jos. Scroggs. 

(I) John H. Scroggs, M. D., born Aug. 30, 1838; died Feb. 13, 
1 891, unmarried. 

(J) Jemima R. Scroggs, born March 6, 1841, married Rev. A. H. 
Elder, May 31, 1864, died Jan. 18, 1895, leaving two daughters. 
The oldest married Henry Ritchie and resides at 197 West Thorn- 
ton St., Akron, Ohio. The other married Rev. t,. h. Gray aud 
resides in Knoxville, Ohio. 

(K) The eleventh child, l)orn Nov. 1, 1843, died unnamed. 

The Father, Rev. Joseph Scroggs, died April 18, 1873, aged a 
little past 80 years. He had l>een Pastor of the United Presbyte- 
rian Congregation of Fairfield and Douegall during a period of 
fifty-seven aud a half years, comuienciug Oct. i, 1815. 

(4) Jamks Hanna, son of Thomas and Jane Cowden Han- 
na, born 1794. died January 11, 1865; married, ist, Mary Dick- 
son; 2d, married- Margaret Rankin, with whom he lived for many 
years, and both died in New Wilmington. Pa. To James and 
Mary Dickson Hanna was born one daughter, Mary Dickson 
Hanna, born November 8, 1823, at Cadiz, Ohio, died September 
25, 1899. She married (ist) George Carnahan, who died not 
many months after his marriage. Married (2d) on July i, 1845, 
to the Rkv. Georgk C. VincknT, and went with him to his pas- 

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tnral cliarj^e in Wash i iij» ton, Iowa. I quote a few lines from Dr. 
McLean: ': James Haiina was an Elder in the Cadiz Con jf legation, 
tlien under the pastoral charge of his hrother, the Rev. Thomas 
Hanna, afterwards piistor of our church at Washington, Pa. Mr. 
James Hanna and wife afterwards removed to Leljauon Congrega- 
tion; Mercer Co. ( Rev. Vincent having returned from Iowa and 
.settled in Mercer Co., Pa.) where they lt>cated on a farm until 
near the time of Mr. Han na'-; death, then living in New Wilming- 
ton, Pa. He was a ruling elder in the Lebanon Congregation and 
a most estim:i1)Ie and lovable man. My own heart went out 
strongly to Mr. Hanna an 1 I never met him that I «lid not feel 
that I had met a frieuil indeed.'* 

Martha Dickson Hanna, only child of James Hanna and 
Margaret Dickson Hanna, was lx)rn near Buffalo, Pennsylvania, 
Nov. 8, 1823; married July 1, 1845 Rkv. George C. VincenT. 
They 1 ved for several years in Washington, Iowa, where Rev. 
Mr. Vincent lia<l gone as a mis.sionary. In 18J7, on account of 
broken health they returned to Penn.sylvania, where he became 
Pastor of the a.ssociale Presl)yterian (Now ist United Presbyteri- 
an) Church of Mercer Pennsylvania. 

Skktch of Rkv. OhOROK C. Vincent, D. D. 

During the time of his pastorate there he wa.s also 
Principal of the Mercer Academy. Afterward he with 
some others removed to New Wihnington, Penii.s^lvania 
and founded Westminister College, in 1852. Dr. D. H. A. 
McLean says "Dr. Vincent was peculiarly fertile in re- 
source to accomplish a desired end. As an agent had he 
l)een willing to undertake it he could have stirred up the 
j>eople to educate their .sons and daughters, and rai.sed 
more money for the college than any man we could have 
selected." 

The arduous toil of rearing buildings, raising fluids, 
securing students and Profe.ssors, was the work of many 
years. Rev. Dr. J. B. McMichael says: "These events 
will help the reader to understand the bu.sy .scenes in 
which Dr. Vincent spent almost twenty years of his life. 
From 1852 to 187 1 his head, his hands, his her.rt were 

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Westminster College, Pa. Founded in 1852 by Rev. George C. Vincent. 

Page 185. 



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occupied in founding, building, tencliing, and devising 
ways and means for the success of tlie Colleoe. Nom- 
inally lie was Professor of Greek, but in the earlier days 
he had to teach at times almost everything in the course. 
During six or seven of these years he was editor of the 
Westminster Herald, and associate editor of the United 
Presbyterian, published in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 
and for nearly twenty years pastor of the Lebanon Con- 
gregation, seven miles distant. God placed Dr. Vincent 
in a supreme place, and he did supreme duty." After 
nineteen years of such service he accepted a call to the 
pastorate of Hrookville, Pennsylvania, where he enjoveil 
for a few years relief from the excessive labors of the 
College life. 

In 1877 quite unex{)ectedly to himself the Board of 
Directors of I'^ranklin College chose him to the Presidenc}' 
of that College. He was loath to accept the work entail- 
ing so nuich excitement and turmoil, but as the matter 
was pressed upon him b}' the college, (his alma mater) 
and some of the younger members of the family were to 
be educated, he accepted the position, and gave himself 
with tense energy and ripe experience to the college work 
in 1884. Having by this time secitred the desired uduca- 
tional advantages for his family, and having greatly ele- 
vated the standard and incre.ised the efficiency of the in- 
stitution, he resigned his p.)siii()n and aece|)l<.(l the Pas- 
torate of the I/atro!).', Pa., l^iiiu-d i*resb\ieiian Church. 
This happy Pastorate continued until a few days before 
his death. **His long and arduous public life only ceas- 
ed in time for him to lie down and die, which he did in 
peace, surrounded by his family on t!ie morning of Octo- 
ber 16, 1889. 

Martha Dickson Hanna Vincent was the constant in- 
spiration and strong arm of help to her husband in all 
these busy yaars of responsibility and toil. The happy 
home life lent new vigor and courage to the husband and 

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father amid all his cares. Mrs. Vincent was a friend and 
favorite among the students and the people of the 
churches among whom thej'^lived and was extremely gen- 
erous in her hospitality and kindness to them. Her 
strength of character and warm sympathetic heart made 
her life a tower of strength in the rearing of her family 
and her wide influence for good in the community. In 
the midst of the many demands upon her time and 
strength she counted not her life dear unto herself, but 
gave of her best, year in and year in and year out, in 
bearing with her husband her share of the heavy burdens. 
Six children were lx)rn to them to crown their married 
life with blessing. 

(i) Jamks Hanna Vincent was born July 31, 
1846 and died in Mercer County, Pa., March 17, 1848. 

(z) WiivWAM Hanna Vincent was born in Mer- 
cer, Pa , October 24, 1848. He grew up in the atmos- 
phere of Westminster College from which he graduated 
hi the classical course in 1869. After spending .some time 
in teaching, he attended the theological Seminaries of 
Newl)urg, New York, and Allegheny, Pennsylvania, 
graduating from the latter in 1873. 

He accepted a call to IJgonier, Pennsylvania, and 
took charge of the congregation in April 1874 being or- 
dained to the Ministry in the following June. Part of 
the years 1878 and 1879 was spent in .study in Edinburgh, 
Scotland, and in travel abroad. 

In June of 1880 he was married to Nettie M. Jami- 
son, only daughter of Hon. John C. Jamison, of Cadiz. 
Ohio. In July, 1887, having accepted a call to Mansfield, 
Ohio, he removed thither and remained in this Pa.storale 
until in 1890, at the call of the Home Mis.sion Board, he 
took up the work of restoring the work of the United 
presbyterian Church in Detroit, Michigan, which had 
been well nigh destroyed by defections and removals. 
He entered upon this work iu Octol^er, 1890, with a little 



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Rev. William HaDna Vincent, D. D., 

Great-grandson of Thomas Hanna, (1760- 1829.) 

Page 186. 



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liand fill of people and not h dollar's worth of property. 
The work was ver>' trying, but the congregation grew, 
and the Sabbath School, Yonng People's V^ork, and all 
the arms of the Chnrch's usefulness, were little by little 
developed. In 1896 a beautiful Church and Parsonage 
were completed and the congregation went steadily for- 
ward in prosperity. In the fall of 1902 the newly formed 
Third United Presbyterian Congregation of Youngstown, 
Ohio, called him, without his knowledge, to become its 
first Pastor. It was difficult to sever the ties of a Pastor- 
ate of more than twelve years in Detroit, where the 
Church had grow-n alxnit him as a fauiilj'. The Church 
had grown from 13 to 170; the Sabbath School, Young 
People's Union and other brandies of the work were in 
excellent condition, and property secured worth $30,000, 
Youngstown, however, presented many excellent oppor- 
tunities for mission work, which prevailed, and Youngs- 
town was chosen. He came to his charge in January, 
1903, 

Dr. William Hanna and Nettie M, Vincent are the 
parents of three children: 

(A) ELEANOR Marib Vincbnt, hoTM at Ugonier, Pa., March 30, 
1882. Graduated from the Detroit High School, in first honor 
rank, June, J900. Graduated from Westminster College June, 
1903, also in the first rank. She is now a teacher in the City 
Schools of Youngstown, Ohio. 

(p) Gkorge Cr^ARK ViNCKNT, bom in Ligonier, Pa., Jan. 29, 
iftS4. Now in residence at Queen's College, Oxfonl, England. 
(See sketch below.) 

(C) Martha Oijve Vincent, l)orn in Detroit, Mich., July 2, 
1894. Now a pupil iu Elm Street School of Young.stown, Ohio. 



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Thk Han^a Family Rkprkskxtative at Oxforh 

Univkrsity, OccrPYiNG thkCkcil 

Rhodks Scholarship. 

Gkorgfc Clark Vincknt, son of Rt*v. William If. 
Vincent, and a j^reat-j»ivat iiiaiulson of Thomas Hanna 
who emij^rated from Ireland in 1763, was lx)rn in IJ^o- 
nier, Pennsylvania, January 29, iSS4. 

He gradnaled from the I)etrt)il Central High Schcol 
hi 1901, being president of a (^lass of 63; iind from West- 
minster College, in the first honor rank, in June, 1904. 

He won the prize in Junior Onition Contest in Col- 
lege in 1903; the second prize in com[)etitive examina- 
tion on New Testament (>reek conducted by the Ameri- 
can Institute of Sacred Literature, of the Chicago Uni- 
versity, o[>en to all colleges and universities in the United 
States and in which 300 colleges com |K'led. In SeiHem- 
ber, 1904, Mr. Vincent sailed for Knghmd, to occupy 
the Cecil Rhodes vScholarship, won by lii:.i in competitive 
examination, and took uj) lesidencein Qnten*s College, 
Oxford. The Hon. Cecil Rhodes made libeial provision 
for the education at Oxford of \ oung m-n from the Brit- 
ish colonies and the Uniltd Siak-^, also a few from (icr- 
many. The entire number is in the neighborhood of 
170, of whom 4S are to be from ilu- United States. This 
gives but one scholarship to each Stale at [Mesent. 

To George C. Vnicent was given the iiigh honor of 
representing the State of Ohio. The examination for 
entrance to Oxford was held in the United States; but 
the subjects, lists of ciueslions, etc., were prepared at 
Oxford and sent to the United vStates, and applicants 
were examined and their pajers forwarded to Kngland 
and the question of eligibility to l^'niversity standing 
was decided there. 

The examinations for Ohio were held at Columbus, 
in April of 1904. Ivleven xoung men entered the race; 
one grew discouraged the fust day and dropped out. Of 



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George Clark Vincent, 

Great-great-grandson of 

Thomas Hanna, (1760-1839.) 

Page 188. 



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the other ten whose papers were forwarded to Oxford, 
three passed as having the necessary qualifications for 
entrance. A committee of five College Presidents in the 
State — namely, of Oherlin, Otterbein, Ohio State Uni- 
versity, Marietta and Oliio Wesleyan — assigned the 
scholarship for Ohio on the grounds of scholarship, ath- 
letics and social qualities. 

Mr. Vincent, who is now but 21 years old, measures 
five feet eleven inches in height, weighs 160 pounds and 
is proficient in athletic sports. He is a member of the 
Third United Presbyterian Church of Youngstown, Ohio, 
of which his father, the Rev. IVilliam H. Vincent, is pas- 
tor. He has been active in College Y. M. C. A. and 
Mi.ssionary work. The entire Hanna family is honored in 
having this distinguished member as a representative at 
Oxford. A picture of Westminster College, New Wil- 
mington, Pennsylvania, is presented in this volume. At 
this Institution, founded bj^ his Grandfather and long 
under his care, this brilliant young member of the Hanna 
and Vincent family was graduated. His father and sev- 
eral other members of the family are also graduates of 
Westminster. Other members of the family were grad- 
uated from Franklin College, at New Athens, Ohio, of 
which the Rev. George C. Vincent was President tor 
many years. A picture of Franklin College will also be 
found in this volume. 

(3), Mary VinchnT Hamit^Ton was born June 2r. 1851. 
Graduated from Westminster College in 1871. Was married to 
William Find ley Hamilton, Oct. 24, 1882. Thej' reside in Doug- 
las, Wyoming. 

(4) C. Jank VinchnT, M. I)., horn July 3, 1853. Graduated 
from Franklin College, studied nie<licine in Woman's Medical Col- 
lege of Pliiladel])liia, Had one year of hospital training. Prac- 
ticed medicine in Allegheny City from Dec. i, 1882. until her 
death, J^n. 7, 1902. 

(5) JamKS R. Vincknt, M. D., was horn July 28, 1855. Kd- 

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ucated at Praiikliti College. Studied medicine in Cincinnati, O. 
Began practice of medicine in Wilkinsburg. Pa., March, 1884, re- 
moving later to East Lilnirty, where he continues the ]>ractice of 
his profession. 

(6) Anna Martha Vincknt, born Nov, 28, 1857. Gradu- 
ated at Franklin. A teacher in Allegheny City, where she died 
June 5, 1894. 

Mrs. Martha Dickson Vincknt coiitimied to re- 
.side in Allegheny City with her danghter^ Dr. C. Jane 
Vincent, until September 25, 1899, when • she sweetly 
fell asleep in Jesns. 

The fifth child of Thomas and Jane Cowden Hanna, 
was named Thomas. He died in infancy. The sixth 
and yonngest child was also named Thomas Hanna. 
He was born near Taylorstown, Washington County, Pa., 
Oct. 4, 1799. Graduated from Jefferson College, Canons- 
burg, in 1818. At Theological Seminary, Service, Pa., 
licensed by the Chartiers Presbytery Aug. 16, 1820. Or- 
dained by same Presbytery Pastor at Piney Fork, Wills 
Creek and Cadiz, Ohio. Removed to Washington, Pa., 
Oct., 1848. Was called to the Associate Church (after- 
w^ards the U. P. Church) May 14, 1850, resigne<i Oct. 8, 
1862, and died Feb. 9, 1864. He received the degree of 
D. D. from Franklin College, New Athens, Ohio. Was 
Moderator of Synod from 1834 — 1842. Director Alleghe- 
ny Theological Seminary 1863-64. 

In /820 Thomas Hanna married Jkmima Patter- 
son, at Short Creek, Ohio. She died in 1847 and he mar- 
ried, 2nd, Sarah R. Foster Principal of Washington Sem- 
inary. 



Sketch of Sarah Foster Hanna. 

Sarah R. Foster Hanna was born in Hebron, 
Washington Comity, New York, Nov. 10, 1802, married 



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Rev. Thomas Hanna in 1848, died in Washington, Pa., 
Sept. 15, 1886 in her 84th year. After having served for 
thirty four years as Principal of the Washington Female 
Seminary, Mrs. Hanna resigned her position in 1874. At 
that time a reunion of her students and graduates was 
held and the proceedings published in book form. From 
this little volume of appreciation the following articles con- 
cerning her work, have been taken. 

Mrs. Relx^cca Harding Davis, one of Mrs. Hanna's 
graduates, wrote for the New York Tribune of July 19, 
1874, ^^*^ following article which was read at the reunion: 

"A Woman's Work,*' — "Many years ago Margaret 
Fuller, in her 'Women in the Nineteenth Century,* called 
attention to the work and position of a certain Mrs. Sarah 
Hanna (then bearing her maiden name) as among the 
hopeful signs of women's progress. The occasion which 
prompted her notice was a visit paid by Ex- President John 
Quincy Adams to a school for girls, under the care of this 
lady, in a pretty village in Western Peiuisylvania. It 
was long before the time when a woman, without tramp- 
ling on all conventional rules, could lecture or .speak as 
freely as man in public. It was the time when one of 
our foremost thinkers presented the Clytie as the type of 
a perfect woman, 'Observe that the hair covers the fore- 
head down to the eyebrows,' said he 'The intellect is there, 
but is veiled of men.' This teacher in the quiet little 
town had already determined to do what lay in her power 
towards unveiling the hidden intellect. Having some- 
thing to say to her guest on the subject of her life's work, 
slie said it, and in public, in a few well chosen, modest 
words, strong in sound common sense. 

(President Adams said that Mrs. Hanna was the 
only woman whose strength of character and iK*rsonality 
had ever made him lose his presence of mind. — C. E, 
Rice. ) 

Margaret Fuller recognized l)Otli the sense and 



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propliec}' which its ntleraiice at that time conveyed. She 
would have been quick also to recognize the jx^cnliar 
lesson embodied in the future work of this woman: and 
we think this work worthy of mention here because it 
differs from that approved and sought after b}- the ma- 
jority of women now, in its quiet and sturdy usefulness, 
without any straining after dramatic effect. 

She ki'.ew, when choosing her work, apparently 
what few women care to know, precisely what she could 
and could not do. She was not meant for an artist or au- 
thor, or even a teiicher par excellcuce; but she had an 
exceptional executive ability; and a p^.^culiar fitness for 
managing and controlling the young. She made her 
work therefore the founding and oversight of schools, 
having under her charge atone time three large and suc- 
cessful seminaries for girls. vShe has educated and sent 
out hundreds of tenchcis, and wives and mothers in mi- 
numbered homes cherish for her grateful affection. Next 
week, as we learn, she gives up the work v.hich she be- 
gan in early youth, and from all parts of the country her 
scholars nre going back to say farewell to her. 

It has been a. quiet, undramatic life, brought to a 
quiet undramatic ch)se, and we should have no right to 
drag it thus before the public were it not to hint to other 
women how large and wholesome may be the residt of a 
noiseless private life when it is vitalized by connnon 
sense sincerity, and integrity to the service of the Great 
Master." 

A very beautiful pai>er was read by Mrs. Julia Rob- 
ertson Pierpont, of the class of 1847, the wife of Hon. 
P'rancis Pierpont Governor of Virginia during the Civil 
War. Mrs. Pier])ont said; Nearly thirty-one years ago 
I stood, with my sister, a stranger at the seminary door, 
and sent a look of inquiry from the basement up to a row 
of dormer windows all along the roof. Dear old dormer 
windows! they stand out in memory individualized, and 

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Rev. Thomas Hanna, D. D. 

Son of Thos Hanna (1760- 1829.) 

Page 19*). 



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casting arms of protection above youthful forms and 
sweet girl faces. "Peace to their r.slies!" they i:)eriHhed 
martyrs of cremation, and went up in heroic flames dur- 
ing the conflagration of 1848, giving up their being to 
newer forms of architecture. * * * * 

'*In May of the next year, 1844, the telegraph was 
first put into practical operati )n between Baltimore and 
Washington. Thereupon Miss Foster called some of us 
down to her room — and I .shall never forget how cautious- 
ly she suggested that even we might live to see the.se 
wires working all over the country and even in foreign 
lands; or how .skillfully she a.ssociated it in our minds 
with one of the richest and sweetest of the P.salms — the 
I9tli — by reading the 4th verse: 'Their line is gone out 
through all the earth, and their words to the end of the 
world.* Some of us memorized the beautiful words of 
the entire P.salm, and many times, as we have traveled 
by the side of the telegraph wire, we have rei:)eated the.se 
words and recalled the suggestive thoughts of that day. 
So she fed us with manna, 'Sweeter than honey in the 
honey-comb,* and we laid it by in store that shall never 
grow old while we tarr^- in the wilderness of life.** 

Mrs. Hanna said of herself: "I l>egan teaching in 
1824. I taught for more than nine years district and se- 
lect .schools, in the different town.ships of Hebron, Salem, 
Argyle and Fort Edward, in my native county. The 
only education I had received was in the district schools, 
and as I contiiuied teaching, I felt the necessity of obtain- 
ing further instruction and acquiring more thorough 
knowledge, to enable me to do what I desired. * * i 
made up my mind to enter some seminary of learning, if 
I could obtain the consent of my parents. I brought ihe 
.subject before them, but they o[)|x)sed my wishes, .saying 
that I could now conunand as high a salary as any lady 
in the county and with this I ought to l)e satisfied.'* 
This opposition seems to have been overcome, for in 

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1833 Miss Foster entered Troy Female Seniinary, tlitii 
under the care and management of Emma Willard, the 
foremost female educator in our country. Miss Foster 
conceived a great admiration for Miss Willard, and in 
her hiter years spoke affectionately of her and ranked 
her among the best women who had ever done a public 
service, and was always ready to pay her the tribute of a 
pupil's gratitude. 

After leaving Troy Seminary Miss Foster was called 
to Cadiz, Ohio, where she established and successfully 
conducted a Seminary for young ladies until 1840, when 
she was elected Principal of the Female Seniinary at 
Washington, Pennsylvania. In 1848 she married the 
Rev. Thomas Hanna, pastor of the Associate Church in 
Cadiz, Ohio. He nMuoved to Washington, Pennsylva- 
nia, and was chosen pastor of the Associate Church at 
that place, of which Church Mrs. Hanna was also a 
member. 

Mrs. Hannahs influence in the community was great- 
er, perhaps, than that of any other citizen. This was 
due not solely to lier jM)sition, but to her character and 
strong |)ersonality. She made herself felt upon the 
people. She made her home in the Seniinary a place of 
social power as well as of mental instruction. Mrs. Han- 
na's graduates are living in all parts of the country and 
many of them are missionaries in foreign lands. Miss 
Isabella Thobmn, of Lucknow, India, was one of these. 
Wherever they reside they remember her with the affec- 
tion of children. U|x>n all of them she left the impres- 
sion of her noble life. As time went on the infirmities 
of age gathered upon her, and on the 28th of March, 
1874, she re.signed her position as Principal and retired 
to private life. Taken all in all, .she was one or the most 
u.seful an<l successful of the eminent women of the first 
half of the nineteenth centUM-. 



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To Thomas Hanna (6) and Jemima Hanna werelK)rn iiiii 
children. 

(A) Robert PaTTBRSON, born 1822; died in infancy. 

(B) ROBBRT Patterson ir. born Jnly 14. 1825, niarrie<l Tsa1)eila 
C. Hammond (born Jnly 13, 1824) on Au>(. 12, 1845, an<l <lied Dec. 
24, 1875— was lost on a boat on the Ohio River. I.oabella H. Han- 

ni died Feb. 7, 1900. To Robert and Isabella Patterson were born 
eight children: 

(a) Thomas Hanni, born Oct. 30. 1846; died Sept. 17, 1848 

(b) James Foster Hanna, born Sept. 27, 1848; married Sarah 
J, C alderhead, Sept. 24. 1869. 

(c) Alexander Wishart Hanna, born Nov. 9, 1850; die<l Sept 
24. 1868. 

(d) Jemima Biizubeth Hanna, born Dec. 10. 1852; marrie<l 
Rev. W. H. McFarland, April 26, 1871; issne .six children: 

1 Wni. Hanna McFarland, born Feb. 14, 1872; died Nov. 
15.1877. 

2 Elizabeth B. McFarland, l)orn May 25, 1874. 

3 Mary M. McFarland, born Auj^. 31, 1876; married Mor- 
ton C. Campbell Dec. 27, r^79andhas danghter, Maiy K. , born 
Feb. II, 1903. 

4 Martha H. McFarland, born Jan. 14, 1879; died Sepi. 9, 
1899. 

5 James M. McFarlan I, l)orn Mar. 16, 1882. 

6 Jeannette McFarland, born Oct. 30, 1887. 

(e) Thomas B. Hanna, born Septtmber 1, 1854; died June 
19, i860. 

(f) Heiiry Clayton Hauua, born April 17, 1857. Mnirie<l 
May I, 1878 Mollie J. Worley. 

(g) Rev. Albert J. Hanna, born June 18, 1850, nmnied Net- 
tie May Panll Slatore, Aug. 3, 1881. Pastor U. P. Church, Ml. 
Perry, Ohio. 

(h) John Charles Hanna, born Aug. 4, 1863, married Clara 
E. Woodruff, Aug. 26. 1884. 

(C) Rev. Thomas Beverage Hanna, died unmarried at the 
age of 23. 



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Skktch of Thomas Bevkridge Hanna. 

Thomas Beveridge Hanna was horn near Cadiz, 
Ohio, March 27, 1828. His father, Rev. Thomas Han- 
na, D. D., was, at that time. Pastor of the Associate 
Presbyterian Congregation of that place. His mother 
was Jemima Patterson, eldest daughter of Robert Pat- 
terson, of Mount Pleasant, Ohio. 

His connnon school education was obtained in Cadiz, 
under different teachers. He commenced the Latin 
grammar when nine years old, and although he did not 
pursue his studies regularly from that time, he entered 
the Freshman class in Franklin College, Ohio, in the 
Autumn of 1840, at the age of twelve, and continued 
there till August, 1844, when he completed his course 
and received the first degree in the Arts. 

The highest honors of his class were awarded to 
him, and the Valedictory was delivered by him on Com- 
mencement day. 

He was a member of the Jefferson Literary Society, 
and was twice chosen by his fellow members to represent 
them in literary contests. 

Among his paj^rs have been found a number of 
essays and addresses on various subjects, wTitteii during 
his collegiate course — essays and orations on **The Pro- 
gress of Truth;" "The Influence of Ambition;'* **The 
March of Mind;" an excellent one on "The Beiiefits of 
Christianity as Contrasted with Infidelity;" one on "The 
Bible;" and an address delivered to the Graduates of the 
Jefferson Literary Society. He was admitted to the 
study of Theology, by the Presbytery of Muskingum, in 
the Autumn of 1844. In Noveml>er he went to the The- 
ological Seminary at Canonsburg and conunenced attend- 
ance on the lectures of Rev. Drs. Martin and Beveridge. • 
As the session only extended from the beginning of No- 
vember till the last of March, he had the intervening 

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Rev. Thomas Beveridge Hanna, 

Grandson' of Thos. Hanna, (1760-1829.) 

Page 196. 



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seven montlis to himself. This time he s|)ent in pursuing 
his studies, in general reaih'ng, in preparing discourses 
for Presbytery, and, during a part of the time, in teach- 
ing a district school, and also a few Latin scholais, in a 
school on his father's farm. 

It soon became evident that he iHissessed more than 
ordinary gifts for preaching. This was known not only 
to the professors and students, but also to the citizens of 
the place. The}' were always anxious to know when his 
turn would come tu deliver a discourse in the Chapel of 
the Seminary, and by their presence and fixed attention, 
on these occasions, manifested their high estimation of 
his ability. 

In June, 1848, he was licensed by the Presbytery of 
Muskingum to preach the Gospel. He supplied three 
months in the Presbytery of Muskingum and Chart iers, 
and then, about the loth of September, proceeded to 
Wisconsin, to which field he had been set apart by the 
Board of Home Missions. 

When he arrived in Wisconsin he found that his 
home was to be at Waterville, Waukesha County. The 
people were generally poor, and as they possessed few 
acconuiiodations he took boarding at the village tavern, 
and, by the kindness of a young physician of the place, 
was permitted to occupy his office as a study room. He 
had four regular preaching places: Ottawa, three miles 
from Waterville; Achei)en, eighteen miles north; Lis- 
bon, fifteen miles northeast; and Warren, thirteen miles 
north. These were his regular preaching places, but 
Neenah and Fond du Lac, the former one hundred miles 
north and the latter seventy, required a part of his time. 

In May, 1849, Mr. Hanna returned to Washington, 
and at the meeting of the Synod at Allegheny, calls were 
presented to him from Cambridge, Ohio, and \{< connec- 
tions, and from the Associate Congregation of Clinton, 

197 

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Allegheny Count)', Pennsylvania, under the care of the 
Presbytery of Chartjers. The latter of these he accept- 
ed, hut decided to labor for five months as a missionary 
in New York City, l)efore entering on his duties as a 
pastor. He went to New York City and remained there 
from June until the end of Octol)er, laboring in what was 
called the Mission Church. Alx)Ut the first of Noveni- 
l>er, 1849, Mr. Hanna l)egan preaching at Clinton. Penn- 
sylvania. He was ordained and installed on December 
I3tli; the charge to him, as pa.stor, being delivered by 
his father, the Rev. Thomas Hanna, Sr. From this 
time until the date of his death, February 5, 1852, Mr. 
Hanna kept a diary, which has been preserved and which 
contains mateiial of great interest. We wish it might 
be given, in full, in this volume. This being impractica- 
ble it is sufficient to say that it is his .simple narrative, 
not of the deeds of a warrior or statesman, but chroni- 
cles the deeds and aims of a higher life and a nobler place, 
showing evidences of great talent and remarkable intelli- 
gence. This gifted and brilliant meml)er of the Hanna 
family was a follower of the meek and lowly Jesus, a 
soldier of the cross — called, chosen and faithful. 

On Tuesday, January 20, 1855, Mr. Hanna had a 
severe attack such as he had several times previou.sly 
been afflicted with, but which was not regarded as seri- 
ous. On Friday he became worse; the disea.se was now 
changed to enteritis, or what would now be known as ap- 
pendicitis. On Wednesday the 4tli of February he sank 
rapidly and died at 8 o'clock on Thursday morning. 

In the character of Mr. Hanna were blended many 
excellencies not usually combined in the same person. 
His personal appearance was prepoSvSessing. He was 
rather tall and slender, and easy and graceful in his man- 
ners. He had a bright, intelligent and expressive eye, 
and his winning countenance was a true index to the 
goo<lness of his heart. There will not be found in the 

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Thomas Hanna McMichael, D. D., 

President Monmouth College. 

Page 199. 



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Hanua book or in the Haiina fainil}^ a more beaiiti 
face than that of this gifted and lovely boy. 

(D) Sarah Janb Hanna, unmarried. 

(K) JAMHS Ai^BERT Hanna, died in childhood. 

(F) JosKPH C. Hanna, died when i8 years old, while attending 
college. 

(G) Mary Narcissa (Joseph's twin) married Dr. J. B. McMich- 
ael, decea:>ed, who was for 19 years President of Monmouth Col- 
lege. They had 6 children, four of whom are living and all grad- 
uated from Monmouth College. Three of them are U. P. Minis- 
ters. The oldest is now President of Monmouth. 

(i) Thomas Hanna McMichael, l>orn July 7, 1863. 

(2) John Charles McMichael, M. D., born Sept. i, 1865, re- 
sides aud practices atGlenville, Ohio. 

(3) William Jackson McMichael, D. D., born Nov. 10, 1868, 
now Pastor of Sugar Creek Congregation, Dayton, Ohio. 

(4) George HarroKl McMichael, born Dec. 31, 1871, died 
March 5, 1873. 

(5) Mary Grace McMichael, born Dec. 19, 1873, died M ly i, 
1892. 

(6) James Eckles McMichael, lx)rn Sept. 30, 1880, will grad. 
nate from Theological Seminary, Xeuia, Ohio, in Apr. 1905. 

The Rev. J. B. McMichael died Dec. 31, 1902. A picture of 
Monmouth College is here presented, it having been presided o- 
ver Father and Son in the Hanna line and being the Alma Mater 
of mauy of the Hanna fauiily. 

(H) Maria KrjZABKTH Hanna, married, in 1861, Col. A. J. 
Sweeney, of Wheeling W. Va. She and her sisters were grad- 
uates of the Washington Female Seminary under Mrs. Sarah Fos- 
ter Hanna. To Col. A. J. and Maria Hanna Sweeney were born 
nine children, three of whom died in infancy. Six are living: 

(a) Mary Ral.sion Sweeney, married John B. Garden and 
has 2 childreu; Geo. Alan and Gertrude. 

(b) Sarah Patterson Sweeney, married Charles O. Roemer, 
has;2 children, Andrew aud Dorothy Donel. 

(c) Wni. Hanua Sweeney, graduate of Washington and Jef- 
ferson College, married Mae Mullen of Sturgeon Bay, Wis. aL:<l 
has 4 childreu: Frank M., Maria Elizabeth, Sarah Hanna. Mary 
Alicia. 

(<1) Frank Bates Sweeney, married Edith Vorliees of New- 
ark, New Jersey. 

(e) Walter Campbell, First Lieut. I4tli Infantry, U.S. Ar- 

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of the firiii the business was extended so as to include 
the manufacture of rolling-mill, steamboat and other 
machinery, and agricultural machinery and implements. 
For a long time Mr. Sweeney was Mayor of the City of 
Wheeling, beginning in 1855; ^^^ was afterwards elected 
in 1861, 1862, 1865, 1867 and 1875, serving from the last 
date till 1881, and in all, serving nine terms in this ca- 
pacity. 

In 1876 President Grant appointed him Commis- 
sioner .for West Virginia to the Centennial Exposition at 
Philadelphia. He was also appointed, in 1873, by Pres- 
ident Grant, a Commissioner to the Vienna Exposition, 
and in 1878 to the French P^xi)osition at Paris; serving 
acceptably in all of these responsible positions. 

During the war of the Rebellion he was a Colonel of 
Militia and served in the field during the famous Morgan 
and Jones raids. While Mayor of Wheeling Colonel 
Sweeney performed the first great act towards .severing 
West Virginia fro::i Virginia. Three days after the 
passage of the Ordinance of Secession, John Letcher, 
Governor of Virginia, telegraphed the Mayor: 



"Richmond, April 20, 1861. 
'*To Andrew J. Sweeney, Mayor of Wheeling: 

**Take possession of the Custom House, Postoffice, 
all public buildings and documents, in the name of Vir- 
ginia. Virginia has seceded. 

"John Lktcher, Governor. 



Here is Mr. Sweeney's answer: 

"Wheeling, April 21, 1861. 
"To John Letcher, Governor of Virginia: 

"I have taken possession of all public buildings, the 
Custom House, Postotfice and public documents, iu the 



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Maria Hanna Sweeney, 
Grand-daughter of Thomas Hanna, 
(17601829.) 
Page 199. 



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name of Abraham lyiiicoln, President of llie United 
States, whose property they are. 

''Andkew Sweeney, Mayc^ of Wheeling." 



In his career Mr. Sweeney saw many vicissitndes, 
politically, in the comitry's history and in a bnsiness way, 
and no man was ever more equal to an emergency than 
he. Some of his official acts will long be remembered to 
his credit, as they .showed promptness, firnniess and in- 
telligence as well as independence. He was an inventor 
of con.siderable renown, a number of valuable patents 
having been granted him, and his intimac}' with all 
forms of machinery and his knowledge of applied mechan- 
ics was .second to that of no man in the country. For a 
generation he was intimately connected with all that 
went to benefit the City of Wheeling. His son is now 
Mayor of that City. In 1861 Mr. Sweeney was married 
to Maria E. Hanna, daughter of Rev. Thomas Hanna. 
To them were born nine children. Col. Sweeney died 
February 14, 1893, i" ^^^^ Sixty-.sixth year of hi.s age. 
He was a gradiuiteof Oxford College, Ohio. 

(T) Martha Hanna the ninth and youiij<est child of Thomas 
and Jemima Haiiua married the Rev. Win. Adams McKenzie. She 
died leaving two small children who were raised by Uieir Aunt, 
Sarah J. Hanna. 

(1) Rev. Thomas Hanna McKenzie, graduate of Williams 
College, now pastor of the Dutch Reform Chiirch at Port Jervis, 
N. Y. He married Frances McMillen and has issue two sons, 
Malcolm and Donald McKenzie. 

(2) Dr. William Adams McKenzie, graduate of Princeton 
College, now practicing medicine in Syracuse, N. Y. He married 
Marietta Grant. 



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APPENDIX A. 

NOTKS ON THK FAMILY OF HUGH HaNNA. 

It has |)een iinix>.s.sil)le to obtain much information 
regarding the descendants of Hugh, the fourth son of 
Thomas and Klizabkth Henderson Hanna. While 
the families of the other fonr children are thought to 1)e 
given quite completely in this volitme, we find much 
confusion of names and dates when we come to the fam- 
ily of Hugh Hanna; and the chronology and names 
here given cannot he said to be full and complete, or even 
strictly reliable. Hugh Hanna was born in Ireland in 
1756 and emigrated with his parents, brothers and sister 
to America in 1763. After the death of his parents and 
after having l>een apprenticed to a farmer in Bucks Coun- 
ty, Peinisylvania, for some years, he went into Washing- 
ton County, Pennsylvania, married Rel)ecca ? 

and settled on Ten Mile Creek, Morris Township. This 
was about or in the year 1790. We have no further rec- 
ord of Hugh Hanna cxcejU that the manuscript notes of 
Rol)ert Hanna, his brother, say that he died in 1820. 
His tombstone, in Peter's Creek U. P. Graveyard, says 
the date of his death was December 27, 1821. 

Robert Hanna s manuscript gives the following list 
of Hugh and Rel)ecca Hanna's children: 

(i) John Vanck, niarrieil LvniA McCollum and had issue 
six ohiKiren: (a) TIioiuhs; (b) Matilda, married John Bradeu; 
(c) Margaret, married MaUhias Miiitoii; (d) (e) (f) died in in- 
fancy. 

(2) Jamks, married PuoKBh; Day; removed to Carrol It on, 
Ohio, where he died, previous to 1835, probably leaving no de- 
scendants. 

(3) Ei.iZABKTM, or Betsy, married SAMUEL Cl^U'iTKR. 

(4) Rkbhcca, died nnniarrie<l. 

(5) Nancy, married Jacob Hathaway. 



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(6) El^KANOR. 

(7) Martha, married Dr. Spencer Blachly. 

(8) Hugh, umrried Dorothy Whitelv. 

(9) Thomas, died young. 

(8) Of the above nine children born to Hngh and 
Rebecca Hanna we are able to find descendants of only 
one — Hugh H.\nna, Jr., the eighth child. He was 
born June 14, 1798, and died June 8, 1842. 

Dorothy Hanna died, 1858, having had issue eight 
children: 

(A) William, bom April 9, 1827 

(B) Thomas, died in Nevada, 1866. 

(C) Frederick, died \n Washington Connly, Pa., in infancy. 

(D) Eleanor, married Samnel Smith, of Cannonslmrg. 

(E) Nancy, married James M. Mcl^oney, -Washington, Pa, 

(F) James, lives in Washington County, Pa, 

(G) Hugh (M. D.) of Claysville, Pa. 
(H) Samuel, <lied aged 2 years. 

Hugh Hanna, Jr. the father of the eight children a- 
bove listed, conducted a Woolen Mill on the Craighead 
farm, in Cecil Towship, Washington County, Peini.sylva- 
nia, for many years and afterwards devoted his time to 
agricultural work in Peter's and Nottingham Townships 
— same county. 

He was an active worker in the Democratic party 
and held various local and county offices. At the time 
of his death (1842) he was a member of the U. P. Church 
of Peter's Creek. 

(A) Wii^LiAM W. Hanna, oldest child of Hugh and Dorothy 
Hanna, was married to Martha Riddle (daughter of the late David 
Riddle, a member of the State Legislature) in 1859, and has issue 
two children: (a) Miss Ai^uquippa Hanna, and (b) Hugh 
RlDDi<K Hanna, born 1866, married Viola Haggerty of Mononga- 
hela, Aug. 30, 1891. To Hugh H. and Viola Hanna were l)orn 
two children: Hugh Paul, who died at the age of six months, and 
Wir.iJAM RoBKRT, l)orn Jan. 13, 189). 



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Hugb Riddle Hauiia resides in Monougabela Pa. and is en- 
gaged in mercantile business. Mrs. Wni. W. Hanna died Oct. 13, 
1902, aged 71 years. 

(D) Eleanor Hann.\ Smith, left no descendants. 

(E) Nancy Hanna, born Dec. 8, 1833, married Jamk.s McLon- 
EY, wbo died Feb. 22, 1905, leaving issue ( i ) Gertrude; (2) James, 
married and lias onedaugbter, Gertrude; (3) Clara McLoney. 

(F) James Hanna, married Catharine Kijzabkth 
Johnson, i.ssiie five cliildreti; (i) Hugh Willard; (2) 
Mar3' Jane, married Aug. i, 1901, Rev. Jolni Lyle 
Proiidfit; (3) George Johnson Hanna, residing with his 
father, (4 and 5) twin son and daughter, both deceased. 
George J. Hanna graduated from Washington and Jeffer- 
vSon CoUege in 1859, with the degree of A. B. 

Rev. Hugh Willard Hanna graduated from Wash- 
ington and JeflFerso!! College in 1899, with the degree of 
A. B. Graduated from Western Theological Seminary, 
Allegheny, Pennsylvania, in 1902, and was licensed by 
Pittsburg Presbytery on May 7, 1901; ordained and in- 
stalled by Redstone Presl)3^tery on June 7, 1502. Is now 
Pastor over Tyrone and Dawson Presbyterian Churches. 
He married Jiuie 12, 1902, Daisy M. Anderson, of Pitt.s- 
burgh, Pennsylvania. 

(G) Hugh Hanna, M. D. Practices iir Claysville, Pa., and has 
had issue three children: (i) Leota May, decea.se d: (2) How- 
ard: (3) Bertie Bell. 

I am greatly indebted to Miss Alliquippa Hanna and 
Rev. Hugh Willard Hanna for these imperfect notes on 
the Hugh Hanna branch of the Hanna fann'ly. It has 
l)een impossible to obtain portraits of the older members 
of the family. Three generations however are here pres- 
ented and everyone will be glad to see the beautiful face 
of the little William Rol>ert Hanna, the great, great, 
grandchild of Hugh. ( 1 756-1 821. ) 



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William Robert Hanna, 

Great-great-grandson of Hugh Hanna, (1756-1821) 

Page 205. 



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APPENDIX B. 

Sketch of U. S. Senator Robert IIanna. 

General Rol)ert Haniia, sometime Senator from Indi- 
ana, was lK)rn in Scmtli Carolina, April 6, 1786. He was 
the son of Robert Hanna, born in the state of Delaware, 
Dec. 10, 1744 and a cousin of the original Thomas Hanna 
who emigra ed in 1763. The senior Rol^ert Hanna was 
an intimate friend of Thomas Jefferson. He removed to 
South Carolina and later to Franklin County, Indiana, in 
1802, where he died January 24, 1821, after having 
brought into the world a number of sons, of whom Gen- 
eral Robert Hanna, the subject of this sketch, was the 
most prominent. Rol)ert Hanna, the younger, showed 
an aptitude for politics at an early age and was a mem- 
l)er of the Constitutional Convention in 1816, helping to 
frame tlie Constitution under which the State was ad- 
mitted to the Union later that same year. In 1826 he re- 
moved from Brockville to Indianapolis to accept the office 
of Registrar of the land office which he held luitil the 
election of General Jackson displaced him in 1829. He 
was very much interested in military matters and during 
the administration of Governor Ray, was at the head of 
the Militia organization of the State with the title of Ma- 
jor- General. He had a deep-seated antipathy to .slavery 
and was prominent in the agitation of the day against 
the extension of slave territory. On the death of 
Senator James Noble in February 1831, Governor Ray 
apiK)inted General Hanna to the United States Senate. 
His term was very brief, since the Legislature met two 
weeks later and elected John Tipton to fill out Noble\s 
unexpired term. 

To Robert Hanna belongs the credit of first navigat- 



208 

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IJ. S. Senator Robert HanDa, 

Born April 6, 17S6; Died Nov. 19, 1858. 

Page 208. 



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iiig White River as far north as Indianapolis with a 
steamboat, known as the General Hanna, which arrived 
at the dock in Angust 1831 amid the shouts of the entire 
population of the village, gathered to witness its advent. 
After this General Hanna engaged in various enter- 
prises, in the course of which he accumulated a very re- 
spectable fortune. He met his death, November 19, 1858. 
He was endeavoring to cross the tracks of the old Peru 
and Indianapolis Railroad, near his home in the north- 
eastern part of the City, when he was run down and 
killed by an incoming passenger train. 



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APPENDIX C 

The Wrights of Kelvedon and South Weald, 

Kelvedou Hatch, a Parish in Essex, 19 miles from 
London, belonged to Ailric, Algar (a freeman) and Leii- 
ena, before the Norman Conquest (1066). 

The Abbot and Monks of Westminster held the 
land till after the year 1532. Kelvedon Hall stands near 
the west end of the Church, and with the Manor came 
into the possession of the Wright family between the 
years 1524 and 1544. John Wright, Esq., with Olive, 
his vvife, were buried in Kelvedon Church in 1551. 
John Wright II., his son, died in 1563. By his wife 
Joan he had an heir, John Wright III., who held this 
Manor of Richard, Lord Rich, Chancellor of England. 
He had also the Manor of White- Notley, and on his 
death in 1608 left John Wright IV. (his son) his heir; 
who married Anne, a daughter of Sir P^dward Sulyard, 
of Flemyngs, in Runwell, and had by her three sons and 
four daughters. He died in 1651. The oldest son was 
John Wright V., who married Frances, eldest daugh- 
ter of Sir Philip Waldegrave, Esq., of Borley. He died 
in 1661, leaving John, Philip and Frances. 

John Wright VI., the eldest son, married Phillip- 
pa, daughter of William FitzAVilliams, Esq., of Glixby, 
in Lincolnshire, and had fwe sons and four daughters. 
Phillippa Wrigut died in 1687 and her husband in 
1691. 

John Wright* VII., the eldest son and heir, mar- 
ried EuGNEiA, daughter of Charles Treuder, Esq. , and 
had by her his son and heir. John Wright VIII., who 



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died in 1751, leaving, b}' his wife (a Carrington), John 
Wright, Esq., IX., who emigrated to New Jersey and 
settled at Basking Ridge. Of this John Wright's family 
we have little account and do not know the names of all 
his children. While we do not snppose that he allowed 
the name of **Jo^i" Wright" to lapse, we have to do with 
another son, Schooley Wright, who died in 1815, 

having married Lavinia , who died April 2, 

18 13, leaving issne: 

[i] Mary Wright, born Dec. 15, 1789 died in FUisliing, O. 

[2] Er,iZABP:TH Wright, born December 14, 179T, married 
Thomas Ridgkway. 

[3] Hannah Wright, born July i, 1793, died Nov. 15, 1867, 
nnnmrried. 

[4] Amos Wrjoht, born Nov. 16, 1794, died Feb. 18, 1877. 

[5] Sar\h Wright, born April 17, 1796, died unmarried. 

[6] Aaron Wright, born July 13, 1798, died May 24, 1879, 
in Ypsilaiiti, Mich. 

[7] Rebkcca Wright, lx)rn May 20, 1801, married a Lewis, 
died Oct. 20, 1855. 

f8] W11.LIAM Wright, born March 21, 1803, died in Barnes- 
ville. Ohio. 

[9] Fanny Wright, born July 23, 1805. Date of death not 
given. 

[10] Rachki. Wright. Iwrn March :24, 1813, mBrried John 
Chambers, and died May 6, 1858. 



[4] FAM11.Y OB Amos Wright. 

Amos Wright (No. 4), born Nov. 16, 1794, married Ann 
James, removed to Flushing, Belmont County, Ohio, and to Lyn- 
ville, Iowa, where he died Feb. 18, 1878, aged 84 years; having 
had issue: 

[A] Sarah Wright (Smith), born 1832, died March 6, 1882. 

[B] ScHOOLEV Wright, born 1834, died Jan. 8, 1 861, unmarried. 

[C] LiNDi^EY Wright, born 1836, died May 20, 1880. 

[D] John Wright, born Jau. 2, 1839, married Sarah Pim and 
resides at Willis, Mich. 



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Ill 1540 this possession was taken from the Abbey 
and granted by King Henry VIII to Sir Brian Tuke, 
Treasurer of the King's household, who sold it to Sir 
Richard Rich, Lord Chancellor of England. The elegant 
mansion of Weald Hall is chiefly modern, with part of 
ancient building modernized. It is surrounded with 
pleasure grounds, gardens and plantations, enclosed in an 
extensive park. In the park is an ornamental embattled 
tower. Weald Hall is now more commonly known as 
Kelvedon Hall. This Capital Manor came into the pos- 
session of John Wright about the year 1740-44, by pur- 
chase, from Richard, Lord Rich, and was occupied by at 
least nine generations of the Wright family, some of them 
previous to the purchase. 

Arms of Wright: Azure, two bars argent, in chief, 
a leopard's face, or. 



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LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Haiiiia, Hugh Henry. Sr. Frontispiece 


Castle Sorby. Facing Page 5 


Hanna, Robert, Sr. '* * 


' 15 


Haiina, Catharine, Sr. ** * 


' 17 


Monroe, President James ** * 


' 20 


Monroe, Mrs. President '* * 


' 20 


Hanna, Benjamin '* * 


* 26 


Hanna, Rachel Dixon ** ' 


* 26 


Hanna, Dr. Leonard " * 


' 28 


Hanna, Samantha Converse '* * 


* 28 


Hanna, Judge Levi '* * 


' 30 


Hanna, Hon. Marcus A. *' * 


' 30 


Hanna, Kersey ** ' 


' 32 


Hanna, Marcus Alonzo, U. S. S. ** * 


' 33 


Home of M. A. Hanna *' * 


* 41 


Canal Lock Stone, No 37 *' ^ * 


' 41 


Hole, Judge Warren W. 


' 65 


Hole, Prof. Allen D. «« « 


' 80 


Hole, Lemuel ** * 


* 80 


Hole, Martha Whittlesey 


' 83 


Hole, Rol)ert 


' 84 


Hole, Dr. Charles Morlan " 


' 87 


Hole, Rev. Edgar T. 


' 89 


Hole, John *' ' 


* 90 


Hole, Catharine Hanna " * 


* 92 


Hole, Homestead *' * 


' 94 


Hole, Leonard Hanna ** * 


' 96 


Hole, Charles Benjamin " ' 


' 98 


Hole, Caleb 


' 100 


Rice, Rachel Hole " ' 


* 102 


Rice, Dr. Charles Elmer *' ' 


' 104 


215 




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Rice, Will. Herl)ert 

Hanibleton, Ann Hanna 

Hanibleton, Joel G. 

Hanna, Rev. Robert, Jr. 

Morton, Charles Theodore 

Hanna, James, Sr. 

Hanna, Elizabeth, (Johnson, McCorkle), 

Kinkaid, Martha Johnson 

Johnson, Family of Charles W. 

Johnson, James 

McCorkle, Rev. Win. Angiistns, D. D. 

Hanna, Hon. Bayless Washington 

Hanna, Read 

Ward, Hon. Thomas Bayless, M. C. 

Hayden, Eliza Hanna 

Heath, Mary Alice Hanna 

Hanna, Hon. Saninel 

Hanna Homestead, Fort Wayne, Indiana 

Hanna, Joseph Smith 

Hanna, Joseph Snmwalt 

Hanna, AnnaSharpe 

Hanna, Hugh Henry Jr. 

Hanna, Hugh Henry IH 

Melrose, Home of John W. Saunders 

Hanna, John Cowden 

Hanna, Rev. Thomas, D. D. 

Hanna, James 

Birthplace of Nancy Allison McKinley 

McKinley Home, Lisbon, Ohio 

Hanna, Rev. Thomas Henderson, D. D. 

Hanna, Rev. John Charles 

Hanna, Charles Weess 

Scroggs, Rev. Joseph A. 

Cochrane, Rachel Walker 

Vincent, Rev. George C, D. D. 

Vincent, Martha D. Hanna 



1 06 
108 
no 
112 
114 
116 
120 

T20 
118 
122 
122 
126 

136 
138 
138 
140 
144 
146 
148 

'54 
157 
164 

174 
174 
174 
176 
176 
177 
179 
180 
182 
182 
184 
184 



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Westminster College ' 


- 185 


Vincent, Rev. Wm. Hanna, D. D. 


*' 186 


Vincent, George Clark ' 


** 188 


Franklin College * 


' " 190 


Hanna, Rev. Thomas, D. D. * 


' •* 192 


Hanna, Rev. Thomas Beveridge 


' - 196 


Sweeney, Maria Hanna * 


*' 203 


McMichael, Rev. Thomas Hanna, D. D. ' 


*' 199 


Hanna, James 


* *' 204 


Hanna, Rev. Hugh Willard 


* *' 204 


Hanna, William Robert * 


** 206 


Hanna, Robert, U. S. Senator 


•* 208 


Wright, Joseph A. 


* '* 212 


Wright, Ida M. (Rice) 


* " 212 



217 



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HANNA INDEX. 



Page 
Haiiiia, Alice 150, 138, 32, 30 
Alexander W. 195 

Alliqiiippi 265, 206 



Amos T. 


137 


Albert, (Rev.) 


195 


Anne 


76 


Amanda V. 


112 


Anna 


27, 32 



Page 

Hanna, Alexander L. 126 

*• Ann 107, 76, 26 

Ada C. 145 

'* Ariel 3' 

Alice R. 37 

*' Annie 138 

** Amelia 30 

** Amada 30 



Bessie 29 

Bertie Bell 206 

Benjamin 177, 76, 72,67, 

[68, 16, 26. 1 2,27,30,3 1 ,32,32 



Charles Weess i 


57. 


178 


Catharine 76,177. 


70 


,72, 


[10 


76,26 


Charles 




1 37 


Charles H. 






Clara L. 




137 


Caleb 




26 


Charles A. 




»3 


Catharine T. 




32 


David 




26 


Dorothy 




205 


Esther Jane 




J49 


Elizabeth W. 




150 



Elizabeth 158, 174, 147, 
[204, 117, 116, H2, 22, 138 
Eleanor 295, 206 

Esther 177, 26 

Elizabeth M. 176 



Fannie Weaver 
Florence Hester 
Frederick 

Gertrude 
George W. 



137. 



150 
150 
205 

32 
45 



Benjamin J. 


27.32 


Bayless, Mrs. 


133 


Bay less, Jr. 


132 


Bay less W. I 


26. 132, 


[ 


»27, 133 


Catharine Janes 


I 


Cassins B. 


31 


Constance M. 


32 


Charlotte 


138 


Claire 


30 


Charles 


00, 138 


Cornelia M. 


30 


Caralya 


138 


Clarence L. 


30 


Daniel Rhodes 


29 


Eliza 


38, 137 


Ethel 


139 


Edwin 


32 


Edwin D. 


32 


Edith 


31 


Elizabeth Henderson 


[in 


u 14. 15 


Flora A. 


32 


Fletcher J. 


112 


Fanny W 


30 


Gertie E. 


145 


George 


27, 30 



218 



Digitized by 



Google 



Page 
Haiiiia, Henry Hngh 149, 150, 

[i52» 153. 154. 155, 156 
** Henry Hugh, Jr. 150,156 

Helen G. 28 

Hcrl>ert H. 138 

*' Hovey 138 

Hugh 205,504, 158,117* 

[118, 144, 145, 12 

** Hugh Riddle 206, 205 

** Hugh Paul 205 

Hugh A. 117,178 

** Howard 206 

" Hugh(M. D.) 206, 205 

Hugh W. (Rev.) 206 
*' Henry Clay 137 

Henry Clay Jr. 138 

" Isabella E. 195 

** Josaphine 145 

*• James 157, 122, 116, 12, 

[14, 134, 136, 140, T44 

" Josephs. 151, T49, 148, 

[123, 147, 204. 117 



Jos. Sum wait 
Jos, Stewart 
James G. 
James Albert 
John Charles 
John Cowden 
Jane Cowden 



150 
150 
149 
199 
195 
181, 75 
174, 174, 
[190, 176 
Jauies 174, 205, 206, 183, 

[i25» 117 
Jemima E. 195 

John Chas. (Rev.) 179, 

[180. 178 
James Aaron 195 

James R. 177, 172 

Katharine W. 150 

Kersey 32, 27, 16 



Page 

Hauna, Horace H. 138 

** Hannah 147, 122, 144. 

[136, 134 

Hugh Henry Til 156 

'* Henry C. 195 

Horace W. 138 

* ' of Sorby Castle 9 



Howard M. 


29.28 


Harriet E. 


32 


Helen M. 


32. 116 


Hugh W. 


145 


Helen 


29 


HobartS. 


30 


Harry O. 


32 


Hugh T. 


138 


Isaphene 


145 


Julia 


137 


James, Jr. 


I2?,T47 


John Vance 


204 


James B. 


137. 32 


Jennie M. 


27 


Jesse 


138 


James Foster 


195 


James W. 


145 


James A. 


32 


Joshua 107 


', 76, 26 


James L. 


27 


Julia'A. 


14S 


John T. 


132 


John L. 


138 


Jason R. 


27 


John 


12 


Joshua 


27 


James M. 


176 


James T. 


'37 



Kate B. 



29 



219 



Digitized by 



Google 



Page 

Haiina, Leonard (Dr.) 28, 30 
*• Leota May 206 

Lyda 178 

*' Leonard 68, 27, 29 

•* Leonard Converse 28, 30 
*♦ Lillian Converse 28 

" Lavina Liston 112 

'* Mary Alice 149, 150 

Martha Elizabelli 149 

Marcus Alonzo 29, 177, 

65, 66, 67,33,34.28, 35, 36. 

3738,39. 40, 4i» 42,43. 44. 

[45,46,47,48 

Mabel McCorniick 29 

•' Mary G. 29 

•• Martha 158, 181. 205. 

[203, 114, 122, 12 

•' Mary Narcissa 137 

•* Minnie Eliza 137 

*• Maria Elizabeth 119,203 

Mary 181, 174, 138, 132 

*• Mary Dickson 183 

Nancy W. 146, 149 

•• Nancy 205, 204. 206, 117 

'* Oliver 



Patrick 



3» 137, 117 
5.6,7, 13 



inna, Lauriu 


30 


*• Levi 


30. 27 


•• Lucy 


126, 145 


*• Lavinia 


32 


*' Lounette 


32 


Louis G. 


32 


Marias. 


177 


Mary E. 


178, 27, 32 


'* Margaret 


176 


•' Mary Jane 


206 


Martha D. 


184, 185 


Mollie J. 


195 


Martha R. 


205 


Matilda 


204 


Mary L. 


32 


*• Marion A. 


32 


'• Margaret 


£2 


Martha A. 


126 


•* Mary Elizabeth 126 


Margaret C. 


138 



Nettie 



145 



Proxana Lavinia 113 



Robert 177 


, I57» 504. 


Rachel 27,30,31,32 


(66, 


110, 


31, 27 


Read 126. 133, 132 


Rebecca 




27 


* Raphael A. 113 


Robert P. 




'95 


Ruth 133 


Rachel 




76 ' 


Robert E. 30 


Reliecca Jr. 




204 


• Ruth Parsons 29 


Rel)ecca 


205, 204 


Robert C. 27 


Robert 26, no. 


76, 


17, 20, * 


Robert 138 


[t6. 18, 


M. 


15. 14. 





Samuel 205, 137, 123, 136 
Sarah J. 203 

Sarah Foster 191, 190 
Samuel D. 138 



Sanmel F. 138 

Salome Maria 29, 28 

Samuel(Hon) 140, 142 

(141, M3 



Digitized by 



Google 







Page 






Page 


Hanna 


, Sarah Jane 


199 


Hanna 


, Seville Samantha 28 


i« 


Samuel Carson 


137 


1 


Samuel T. 


138 


<i 


Sarah 


117 


<i 


Sarah Oakalla 


132 


<< 


Sarah Read 


126 


tt 


Siirah F. 


134 


ti 


Thomas, (Rev.) 203, 194, 


(i 


Thomas 12, 13, 


. 14, IT7, 




(191, 190. 


196, 198 






(26, 116 


<t 


Thomas 174, 


158, I57» 


tt 


Tryphena 


37.31 




(204, 195. 12 


5, 205. 76 


it 


Thomas B. 


27.31 


(t 


Thomas B. (Rev.) 195 


tt 


Thomas 


66 




(196, 


197, 198 


tt 


Thomas IH 


15 


M 


Thomas B. 


115 


tt 


Tryphosa 


27 


• 4 


Thos. Henderson 177,178 








i( 


William F. 


178 


tt 


William B. 


109 


l« 


Wm. Robert 


205. 206 


tt 


Wm. Willis 


138 


it 


Wm. Potter 


149 


i* 


William T. 


32 


tl 


William P. 


150 









Zalinda 



27 



INDEX OF OTHERS THAN HANNA. 



Adams, John Quincy 24, 


. 191 


Allison, Sr. Wm. B. 




47 


Albert L. 


32 


Anne, of Denmark 




5 


Lrouis H. 


32 


Angus, Earl of 




5 


Abell, Eliza J. 


94 


Appling, Emma I^. 




81 


Abercorn, Earl ot 


9 


Arthur, Chester A. 




«43 


Anderson, Rev. Abraham 


182 


Asbury, 


no, 


III 


*' Daisy M. 


206 


Aubiquay, Lord d* 




9 


Allison, Reljecca M. 


176 


Ayers, Edward 




149 


Hugh 


170 


'* Agnes 




149 


•' Nancy 


146 


Allison, Clara 




96 


Bashaw, George M. 


96 


Blake, Elizabeth 




113 


•• Lemuel R. 


96 


Blaine, James G. 




42 


Ottiwell 


96 


Blachly, Dr. Spencer 




205 


'* John Herbert 


96 


Brandriff, Martha 




138 


• • Clyde Leonard 


96 


Brown, Gen. Jacob 




19 


*' Lucile Genevra 


96 


" Aaron V. 162 


.:i69, 


170 


Walter Leonard 


96 


Cynthia P. 


162, 


165 


** Hazel Catharine 


96 


** Granville P. 


170, 


165 


Baker, H. Rawlins 


102 


Mrs. A. V. 


169, 


170, 


Babcock, Sarah E. 


109 


(i: 


71,73 


!» 73 



221 



Digitized by 



Google 





Page 




Page 


Baldwin, Samuel 


.^0 


Babcock, P. Hume 


9 


" Lillian Hanna 


30 


Brownlee, Samuel 


175 


Balleutine, Rev. J. N. 


185 


" El:zal)eth 


175 


Baldwin, Klilui 


125 


* ' Mary 


175 


Barrow, Alex. 


»59 


Ella 


175 


Barnett, James 


146 


Martha 


175 


John H. 


/46 


Clark 


175 


A. G. 


146 


*' Louis 


175 


" Mary A. 


146 


Etta 


175 


Barnes, Mary E. 


122 


Belle 


175 


Edwin W. 


135 


Bruce, Effie 


119 


Charles L. 


135 


Brinker, Andrew 


119 


Chas. R. 


'35 


Brush, Charity 


83 


Bay less, Hannah 


116 


Brooks, Harriet E. 


31 


'* Samuel 


116 


Braden, John 


206 


William 


116 


Breretou, Sir. Wm. 


10 


Beggs, Harriet L. 


32 


Burns, Robert 


9 


Betts, Mary E. 


94 


Burroughs, Alice 


109 


Boone, Alice 


183 


Burr, David 


141 


Boyd, Robert H. 


123 


Burford, Cora S. 


84 


" Agnes E. 


253 


Burwell, Nellie 


83 


Bond, Hugh Mc 


138 


Burley, Lord of 


9 


Blackburn, Dr. Elislia 


87 


Bulwer. Mary 


35 


*' Virginia Hole 


87 


Bu.shnell, Gov. Asa S. 44, 


► 45, 46 


Blair, James 


10 


Buchauan, Pres. 162,163, 


169,170 


*» Mary 


136 


Rev. W. J. 


175 


Caldwell, Hon. Wm. B. 


124 


Connor, O. W. 


145 


Calderhead, Sarah J. 


195 


" Horatio 


145 


Cannon, Hon. Jos. G. 


63 


Conk ling, Roscoe 


41 


Campbell, Morton C. 


195 


Converse, Samantha 


28 


Mary E. 


195 


Comfort, Alfred W. 


212 


** Marion 21, 


22, 23 


*' Eva Gertrude 


212 


Ira 


120 


Cooper, Philena E. 


108 


Vera 


120 


Sallie 


98 


Caruahan, George 


183 


Pliel)e 


109 


Wm. L. 


137 


Sarah 


79 


** Louise 


137 


Corrie, John 


120 


Robert H. 


137 


" James 


120 


Clara 


137 


" Ada B. 


120 


** Virginia 


137 


" Mary K. 


120 


Robert 


137 


*• Alexander 


120 



Digitized by 



Google 





Page 




Page 


Cariiahaii, Williaiii 


137 


Corrie, Frank J. 


120 


Carroll, Governor, 


160, 168 


•• Charles J. 


120 


Carson, Elizabeth C. 


137 


*• Martha A. 


120 


Cass, Hon. Lewis 


19 


" Catharine 


120 


Castleton, EUward D. 


132 


•* Cordelia M. 


120 


Cattail, Herman 


100 


'* Alice C. 


T20 


Chambers, John 


211 


«' Ethel C. 


119 


Chapin, Salome Hnnna 


29 


Cornwallis, Lord 


167, 123 


Georije W. 


29 


Conlson, Ida 


100 


Henry H. 


29 


Cowden, Jane 


174 


Charles M. 


29 


Cox, George B. 


44 


Charles H, King 


.6 


Craver, Charles F. 


108 


Chase, Hon. S. P. 


93 


•' Henry 


108 


Chancy, Sarah 


»3 


Estella 


108 


*' Rev. Chas. 


83 


" Edward E. 


108 


Child, EstellaR. 


81 


Etta M. 


108 


Clark, Rev. Thomas 


i3 


Martha H. 


16 


Cleaver, Hiram T. 


32 


AlvaS. 


no 


Cleveland, President 


129 


Eliza J. 


no 


Cliss, May 


119 


Henry W. 


no 


Clntter, Samuel 


204 


" Grace 


no 


Cobbs, Lena 


98 


Martha 


no 


Cochrane, Hnstou 


182 


Crespin. DelitaM. 


78 


Lanra Ella 


182 


Crew, Rol)ert T. 


96 


** James Edwin 


182 


*• Elizabeth 


96 


** Joseph S. 


182 


•' Chas. Corwin 


96 


Harry A. 


182 


*' Mary Catharine 


96 


Helen R, 


198 


Crosand, John 


79 


" Agnes E. 


182 


'* Liuton 


79 


" Thomas P. 


182 


" Albert 


79 


Colerick, KHza 


137 


" Clarence 


79 


Coler, W. N. 


96 


Crockard. Estella M. 


200 


Colfax, Schuyler 


103 


Cromwell, Oliver 


6 


Coggeshall, Clarence I). 


108 


Cross, Grace Lena 


96 


Collins, John 


182 


Crum, James 


79 


*♦ Frank 


182 


Arthur J. 


79 


•' Mary 


182 


E<lgar 


79 


*' Jennie 


182 


" Irwin J. 


79 


" Blanche 


182 


Cunningham, Clifton 


94 


- Ella 


182 


" Owen L. 


94 


*• Joseph 


182 


Paul C. 


94 


Connor, James D. 


145 







223 



Digitized by 



Google 





Page 




Page 


Davis, Rebecca Harding 


191 


Dickinson, Cbas. D. 


67 


*' Samuel 


68 


Dickey, Roy 


120 


*• Adeliza 


79 


G. W. 


120 


Day, Plioel)e 


204 


Stella 


120 


Davidson, Wni. W. 


135 


Jesse 


120 


** Elanore 


135 


Dinsmore, Grace R. 


"3 


Robert P. 


X35 


Dodge, William E. 


151, 154 


Dalzell, Bessie Liira, 


121 


Duttou, Elisha 


108 


Dean, Rliza A. 


82 


*• Emma 


108 


*' Jonathan R. 


82 


Dunlap, Lucy 


126 


" Hannah 


82 


vScott 


126 


Decatur, Commodore 


24 


Dunbar, of Mochruni 


9 


*' Mrs. Commodore 


24 


Dushaue, Joshua 


181 


Deming, Loyd N. 


137 


Joseph 


181 


'• Nelson 


'37 


Margaret S. 


181 


'* Mary 


137 


Douglas, Christian 


5 


Dixon, Rachel 


27 


SirWm. 


5 


Dickinson, Chas. D. 


183 


Lady Elizabeth 5 


Eastman, Julia 


TOO 


Embree. Elizabeth 


78 


Earle, Susie 


82 


Engle, Charles 


79 


Edmundson, John 


76 


Mary 


79 


•* Ann 


76 


•* Queeta 


79 


Edward, King Vll 104, 105, 106 


Robert 


79 




(107 


Ernest 


79 


Edgerton, Frederick 


98 


Mabel 


79 


Eckley, Eph. R. 


92 


" MaryEhna 


79 


Elliott, Prof. E. E. 


176 


Herbert 


79 


Elliot, Elizabeth K. 


178 


Eliza A. 


79 


Elder, Rev. A. H. 


183 


Albert N. 


79 


Emmons, I^uis W. 


78 


Nathan 


79 


Embree, Sanmel 


78 


*• Lemuel 


79 


*• Edna Lydia 


78 


Lillian C. 


79 


*• Mary Irene 


78 


'• Harvey R, 


79 


*• Warren Jesse 


78 


Minnie H. 


79 


*' Esther Rebecca 


78 


Ernly, Elizabeth 


144 


♦* Myra HanuHli 


78 


Evans, Esther 


18. 144 


** Cynthia Heald 


75 


Eyre Catharine 


83 


** Caroline E. 


78 


" Robert 


83 


Farr, M. E. 


77 


Folsom, Samuel F. 


32 


** Florence 


77 


'* Arthur 


32 


*' Harold 


77 


Ford, Worthington C. 


150 


•* Raymond 


77 


Foster, Maria 


121 


** Clarence L. 


77 


Forrest, Edwin 


112 



224 



Digitized by 



Google 





Page 




Page 


Fair, Mary Ainiettn 


77 


Fisher, Sylvaiins 


76 


•' Vergil H. 


77 


Joseph Jr. 


76 


^' Robert L, 


77 


Find ley, Palmer 


178 


*' Donald 


78 


** Thomas 


178 


Fairfield, Sa rail 


137 


Mary 


17S 


Fairfax, Hon. Henry 


»5, 26 


Fitz-Willianis, William 


210 


Fairbanks, Chas. J. 


64 


PhilHppa 


210 


Fawcett, Hnnna 


84 


Fritchman, Addison 


»7 


Fergnson, Rev. Neil 


177 


" Eleanor 


87 


Lois 


177 


" Stephen 


^7 


Maxwell 


177 


Nancy L, 


87 


NeilC. 


177 


Franklin, Benjamin 


13.66 


Foraker, Hon. J. 3, 44 


.64,59 


Ftye, Christopher 


no 






Fuller, Margaret 


191 


Gabby, Hngli 


^75 


Gouverneur. EHz. Kortright 22 


Galcacus 


7 


Gilbert, Elma 


84 


Galloway, James of 


6 


Giddings, Joshua R. 


93 


'* Earl Alexander 6 


Gray, Rev. L. L. 


183 


Garfield, Pres. 41, 


42, 103 


Graves, Florence 


135 


Eliza Ballon 


103 


Grier, Mary 


138 


Garden, John B. 


199 


*" Sir Robert 


6 


•' Geo. Alan 


199 


** Nicolas 


6 


** Gertrude 


199 


Grant, Pres. U.S. 41. 68, 


T04, 202 


Gondy, Andrew 


112 


*• Marietta 


203 


Gonlon, Grisel 


6 


Greely, Horace 


129 


** Sir John 


6 


Groe.sbeck, Wm. S. 


124 


Gouverneur, Maria 


20, 21 


Gross, Eugenia 


149 


'• James Monroe 22 


Gritmau, Elizal>eth B. 


108 


Ruth 


22 


Grund, Edna, 


138 


Rose 


22 


Griffeth, Gertrude May 


96 


MaudC. 


22 


Grubb, Pearl F. 


lOI 


** Samuel L.21, 


22, 24 


Gruber, Jacob in. 


M3. 114 


** Maria (Monroe) 24 


Gouverneur, Minor F. 


22 


Hambleton, Ann 26, 72, 73, 107, 


Hole, Robert 


82 


[.08. 


16, no 


*• Esther H. 


82 


Albert F. N. 


ro8 


•* Walter M. 


82, 68 


AlmaR. 


109 


*' Lenmel P» 


98 


Wni. Ross 




•• Elias 


98 


Catharine 




'' Esther 


98 


** Joel G. 109, 


no, 16 


*' Anna 


98 


*' Benjamin 107, 


io8,no 


*• Caleb 16, 98, 99, 93 


Chalkley 


107 


•' Jacob 


]6 




225 ^ 


>^^^T 






Digitized by V_ 


jOOqI 









Page 




Page 


Hamblelou, Win. G. 




108 


Hole, Esther 


97 


•• 


John T. 




108 


'* William T. 


97 


•• 


Grace G. 




ro8 


*' Esther Elma 


97 


4< 


Ethel B. 




108 


*' Wilnier Dean 


87 


(4 


Ruth G. 




108 


•' Susie Lavina 


87 


" 


Mary H. 




108 


*' Virginia ly. 


87 


t« 


Os>)orn 




108 


" Esther Eliza 


87 


•« 


Orlando 




108 


•' J. Leroy 


87 


'• 


Rachel 




108 


*' Harry R. 


87 


♦• 


Angelina H. 




108 


•• Charles, Sr. 75, 76, 77 


ti 


Lrorilla A. 




108 


" Hon. Warren W. 


85, 8^, 


<( 


Levi 




108 




[65, 82 


t( 


Leondo 




108 


•• Martha Whittle«!ey 85, 86, 


" 


Martha K. 




109 




[82 


'• 


EflSe Kate 




109 


" Sophia M. 


98.99 


f ( 


Edith Garce 




109 


" Dr. Norman W. 


98.99 


•* 


Hattie W. R. 




109 


" Anna Lnlu 


98,99 


" 


Charles 




1C9 


'* Thomas 


77 


(t 


Minnie A. 




109 


** Rebecca 


77 . 


'• 


Allen W. 




109 


" Catharine 


77 


" 


Clarence N. 




109 


•• Caroline M. 


84 


•• 


Osborn L. 




109 


•* Elsie Dean 


84 


" 


Mary Viola 




109 


*• Lawrence Rul>ert 


84 


<• 


Orlando G. 




109 


** Katharine E. 


84 


** 


Liudeu 




109 


'* Margery 


84 


<( 


Thos. Fremont 


109 


•• Marion L, 


84 


" 


Thomas C. 




109 


•* Willis R. 


'*^4. 82 


" 


Esther Sarah 




109 


" Louis G. 


84 


Hole. Catharine 197, 70, 


71, 


• 72, 


" Robert J. 


84 




[73. 74. 16, 17 


.92 


,26 


•• Earnest M. 


84 


•' Esther 12, 177, 72, 


73. 


74, 


" Rev. LouisJ. 


84,82 




[75. 76 


. »6 


1, 26 


*♦ Cora S. 


84 


•• Dorothy 




84 


'• Francis 


84 


Hole, Hilda 




84 Hole, Emma L. 


81 


" Nathan 


7» 


,76 


** A Ibert Geo. 


81 


*• Jacob 






75 


" Frank Rnfus 


81 


'* Catharine IClizabeth 96, 


93 


'• Myrtle Luella 


81 


'* Mary 


Ann 




77 


•• Frederick H. 


81 


" Benjamin 




77 


" Linda Hannah 


81 


" Josepl 


1 




77 


" Ella Mary 


81 


" Robert 


77. 


:«7 


" Chas. Frenionl 


81 


•• Jacob 




77. 


87 


•' Joseph 


81 


*' Hannah 


77, 


87 


'• Henry P. 


81 



226 



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Page 

Hole.Chas. Virgil 77 

•* Geo. Alpine 77 

♦ Mary 77 

•• Chas. Fremont 89 

'* Edgar T. 89,87 

** Amelia 87 

'* Hstlier 87 

•♦ Dr. Clias. Morlan 87 

•* Margaret 87 

*• Leona M. 87 

•• Gertrnde F. 100 

*' Mary 100, 93 

'* Esther Gertrn<le 82 

*' Heiiry F^irle 82 

•* Chas. Dean 82 

•* Marion L. 82 

«* Vesla Gertrnde 82 

'» John 89, 92 

*' Catharine 89, 79 

•' Geo. Willis 78 

*• Ethel 78 

** EvaTaniar 78 

*• Anna M. 78 

** Thos. Harvey 78 

♦' Robert Vergil 78 

•' Rebecca 78 

*• Mary Ann 79 

•* Lemuel 93 

*• Elias 93 

** Esther 93 

" Anna 93 

*» Franklin H. 94 

•• Arthur J. 94 

" Bertha Auua 78 

*• Leonard Hanna 95 '93 

•* J. Wilburforce 94 

•* Lemuel Homer 94 

•* Chas. Benjamin 94 

** Ralph John 94 

*• Rachel 93. 100 



Hole, Evelyn 

*• Elizabeth 

«• Ruth 

" Esther E. 

»* Rosella C. 

'* Lavina U. 

•* Linnaeus M. 

" Lemuel G. 

'* Robert H. 

«* Leander H. 

«' J. Melville 

•• ErwinJ. 

** Bertha 

** Donald 

** Alfred 

" Benjamin 

•* Isabella W. 

•* Myra Hannah 

'• Chas. Wilson 

•' Allen David 

•' Wilson Joseph 

•♦ Rebecca Mary 

" AlfarettaH. 

" WymondW. 

*• Maurice K. 

'* Christine 

*' Russell C. 

'• Carroll H. 

** Ann 

•• Tace 

'* Ury B. 

** Esther 

" Louis Marcus 

'* Mary 

*• Eliza Anna 

*« John Franklin 
Jacob Thomas 
Charles Stanley 
Esther Elma 
Lemuel P. 



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Page 




Page 


Hole.Benj. S. 


95 


Halderman, John L. 


98 


" Giilaelma 


93 


•' Anna 


98 


•* Frederick Louis 


»3 


*' Lovisa E. 


IU€> 


•• Robert Whittlesey 


83 


Haggerty, Viohi 


205 


^* Leonard ScUiDing 


83 


Hague, Oma L. 


120 


^* Edith 


83 


Hayes, PTes. Rutherfotd 


105 


*' ChHs. Detiii 


83 


Heald, LydiaA. 


78 


** Edw. Lemuel 


97 


Esther 


7» 


" Carl Clifford 


97 


Cynthia U 


7» 


'* Elizabeth 


97 


** Israel 


7» 


" Hannah S. 


97 


Ezra 


78 


" Clarence Frederick 


97 


Ida R. 


7» 


" Walter Tope 


97 


Walter K. 


78 


*' Esther Grace 


97 


*^ Lindley 


78 


"• Lemuel Everett 


97 


Edith L. 


78 


** GertriKie Elnia 


97 


** Margaret L. 


78 


*' William Warren 


97 


Cliarles 


79 


*• Leonard Lamar 


97 


•* Mary Ann 


79 


** Mary Emma 


97 


Heacock, Susannah 


76 


Hay, Secretary John 


62 


Sarah 


76 


'* Judge George 24, 25, 22 


Hesfrin, Lauretta J. 


3' 


*' HorteDse 


22 


Heath, John W. 


150 


♦' Eliza 


22 


' * Bertha 


150 


Hale, Edw. Everett 


54,58 


Helen H. 


150 


»* Pamelia 


122 


Frances 


150 


HhII, Mary H. 


loS 


Alice Hanna 


150 


*' Susannah 


83 


William P. 


150 


Hay den, Frtd J. 


'39 


Hendricks, Hon. Thos. A 


129. 


** Eliza Hanna 


139,117 




[131 


Rev. W. 


139 


Henderson, Elizal>et1i 


12 


Harrison, Prest. lienj. 42, 


154,131 


Henry VIII, King 


214 


Hanson, Albert 


32 


HeckmaUr Wni. C, 


138 


Hathaway, Jacob 


204 


George C. 


138 


Hairson, Mamie 


81 


** Jessie H. 


138 


Hammond, Isal^elJa C. 


195 


Heiskell, Dr. 


22 


Hamilton, Alex. 


154 


•• Monroe 


22 


Mary V. 


189 


•* Henry Lee 


22 


William F. 


189 


Dr. Sidney O. 


22 


Haldeman, David 


93 


Hicks, Hlias (Rev.) 


72 


'* Abraham 


98 


Holmes, Jesj»e 


3i 


Mary 


98 


'* Kel)ecca H. 


3' 


Holmes, Orlando W. 


32 


Kersey O. 


32 


Holmes, Elizal>etli H. 


3' 


Hostetter, Henrietta M. 


30 


Hovey, Governor H. O. 


125. 139 


Cliaries E. 


31 




228 








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Page 




Page 


Horteiise, Queen 


25 


Host tier, Alice E. 31 


Hofifnian, Alfaretta 


80 


'* 


Carro A. 31 


Hoes, Chaplain, (U.S. 


A.) 22 


** 


AngieM. 31 


Horner, Lady Jane 


83 


Hnestis, Aaron 79 


" Sir John 


83 


'• 


Isadora 79 


Howlett, Nini May 


94 


tt 


Samantha 79 


" A<lelia A. 


94 


" 


Moses H. 79 


T. A. 


94 


" 


Emmor B. 79 


Hosteller, Benjamin V 


30 


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Charles H. 79 


** Charles D. 


30 


Hubbell, Henry S. 29 


ZaIindaH. 


30 


Huddleson, A. E. 96 


" Charles F. 


30 


Hugo, 


Victor 104 


*' Leonard H. 


30 


Hunter 


, Jane E. 181 


Franklin H. 


30 


Hume, 


Edward 71 


A'.hert K. 


3<> 


Hume, 


Alfred 168 


* Susan A. 


30 


Hussey, Sir Thomas 213 


Jackson, Pres. 142, 


, 167, 208 


Johnson, Pres. 171, 172 


Mrs. Andrew 


168 


** 


Catharine Eliz. 206 


Jameson, Martha 


134 


*• 


Edgar 119 


Jamison, Nettie M. 


186 


(4 


Arthur H. 119 


John C. 


186 


tC 


James Charles 119 


James, Ann 


211 


•* 


Mary 119, 118 


James VI 


5,9 


'* 


James 117, 128 


Jankins, Barnett 


135 


•' 


Martha H. 117 


Jaques, Sarah A. 


120 


<t 


jno. W. 118 


" Lewi.s W. 


120 


" 


Mary Alice 118 


" Jesse 


120 


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Cha.s. W. 118 


Jefferson, Thos. 18. ] 


19, 24, 208 


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Baird W. 119 


Johnson, Chas. R. 


156. 119 


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Emma Wheeler 119 


Fred W. 


156. "9 


4 < 


Mabel W. 119 


' ' Horace 


119 


tt 


EffieB. 119 


Wilbur E. 


119 


Jones, 


Catharine 15, 17, 18 20, 


Harold M. 


119 




[114 


J. Boyd 


119 


♦• 


Judge Joseph 17, 18, 19, 


Klizahelh C. 


120, 117 




[21 


'* John 


120, 117 


" 


Benjamin 17, 20, 114 


Dr. W. C. 


22 


'• 


Susie Lavina 87 


*' Preston 


143 


" 


Eliza Monroe 17, 21, 114 


Benj. 


98 


( t 


John 17 


Ann 


98 


•' 


Sarah 83 


Martha 


119 


'* 


J. W>man 29 



229 



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Keys. Annie 
*• Mary 
Kemp, Minnie 
Kendall, Kva T. 
Kersey, Jesse 

" Hannah 
Kibler, Landon M. 

Kirk M. 
Kinkaid Martha J. 
'• Sanuiel 
" Al-ce 

Mary II. 

Elizabeth 

Cornelia 

Lafayette, Madame <lo 
La Fayette, 
I/ei|)er, James 

'• John C. 

" Harper 
Robert 

•• JVIabel 
Leicht, Charles 
Lee, Rola-rt K. 
Lennox, Dnkeof 
Letcher, Gov. John 
Leonard. Itishop Wm A 
Levering, Geo. K. 

Hrnest W. 
Lo^^an, John Adam 
Lewis, Margaret A. 
Lincoln, Abraham 103, r 
[56, 182. 

MacLellan, Sir Robert 
Madison, Dolly P. 
Malmsbury, Hinmor C. 

I'rank B. 

Ida H. 

Clyde H. 

Gladys 
Mann. Fanny 
Markley, Lient Col. 



Page 

•45 
145 
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27 

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119 

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176 
176 
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176 

79 
161 

9 

202 

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149 

149 

109 

27 

18, 143, 

172, 203 

9 
1 67 
81 
81 
81 
81 
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200, 201 



Kinkaid, Sarah Ann 
Wm. B. 
Esther 
Ralph 
" IvCah 

Alice J. 
Samuel W. 
' ' Edgar 

William L 
Hellen 
Ki rend bright. Lord 
Kort right, Elizid)eth 
Kurtz, Charles L. 



Ijncoln, Mrs, A. 
Lipsey, Lydia H. 
Lindley, Ralph 
** Chester 
Nettie 
Eliza A. 
'* Isaac 

" A<lell>ert 

Virgil 
Esther 
Albert 
Lindsey, Mary A. 
Liston, Elizabeth 
Lounsberry, Mary A. 
Lund>ar<1. Connie 
I/ynch, J no. 
Lytle, Robert T. 

Marsh, Jonathan 
" James 
Edith 
Marshall, Catharine E. 

Mary 
Martin, Isal>ella 
Wm. F. 
Jas. H. 
Mathenv. Edw. 



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79 
79 
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79 
79 
79 
79 
81 

112 
30 

137 
15 

124 

76 
76 
76 
30 
94 
176 

133 

»33 

79 



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Page 

Mark ley. Earl L. 79 

Maxwell, Jas. G. 175 

*• Montrose B. 175 

Dr. Clark 175 

** Maria 177 

Wiii.G. 177 

•• Jas. G. 177 

Jolin C. 177 

'* Eiuiiia L, 177 

McArtor, Carrie 87,88 

McBeth, Robert 80 

McCainpl)ell, Mary 12.^, 122 

'• Andrew 123 

'McCIellan.Gco. B. 131 

McClure, Addison S. 97 

McColluni, Lydia 204 

McConib, General 19 
McConnell, Judge W.W. 201 

" Anne 201 

McCook, Catharine 32 

** Mary A. 32 

McCorkle, James 117, 118, 121 

•* Wm. A. 117, 121 

Mary ti8 

Milton ri8 

'* Wni. Foster I2r, 122 

** Clias. White 121, 122 

*' Frances A. 121, 122 

" Frederick]. 121 
Helen Dalzell 122 

" Dorothy B. 122 

" Herl)ert J. 121 

'* Majorie 122 

•' Cordelia 122, i2r 

'* Milton T20 

*' Jasper 120 

*' Martha J. 120 

*' Anzonetta 120 

McCorniick, J. Medill 29 

McOracken. Wilnia 177 

McCulloch, Agnes 156 

•' Rev. Oscar 156 



rage 
McCulloch. Alice B. J.s6 

** John i;,i 

Hugh 143 

McCune, Samuel 174, 17s 

** Margaret 174. 175 

" James 174 

" Thomas 175 

Mary 175 

'* Ivlizabeth 175 

McDonald, Cornelia 132 

Jos. E. 127, 131 

McDowell, John A11der.son97.98 
•' Ja.s. Garfiehl 97 

Waldo Emer.son 97 
Clyde Stanley 97 
*• Frances W. 98 

Wilbur H. 98 

Wayne A. 98 

'* Esther Aim e 98 

Edith Bell 98 

*• Homer Hole 98 

I\Iabel M. 98 

" Percy Hanna 98 

Esther Hole 98 

McFarland, Wm. 182 

Huston M. 182 

'• George M. 182 

Albert R. 182 

" George P. 182 

Rev. W.H. 195 

Wm. Hanna 195 
Elizabeth B. 195 
" Mary M. 159 

Martha II. 195 

'• James M. 195 

'* Jeannette 195 

Mclntire, Mrs. Wm. 22 

McKenzie, Rev. W. Adaii.s 2c3 
*• Rev. Thos H. 203 

Dr. Win Adnns 203 
" M<ii(*olni 203 

" Donald 203 



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McKie, Sir Patrick 9 

McKinley, Nancy A. 176, 103 

Pres. Will. 154, 103, 35 

(36. 42, 43. 44. 45. 46 

(47.; 50. 51. 52 53 

McKiiisey, Crayon 120 

Ethel r2o 

McKisson, Rol>ert E. 48 

McLaiii, Sarah C. 138 

McLean, Dr. 184 

John R. 46 

McMichael, Rev. J. B. 199,184 

R. Thos. H. 199, J 79 

** John Charles 199 

" William Jackson 199 

** George Harold 199 

*' Mary Grace 199 

*• James E. 199 

McMillan, Jane 76 

McMillen, Frances 203 

McQneety, Sarah 79 

Mendenhall, Abigail 212 

•' Lydia 212 

*' Aaron 212 

Mercer, Col. Hugh 18 

Miller, Mitia Mae loi 

•* Sophia 98, 99 

Miles, Bert 145 

'* Blanche 145 

" Elizabeth 145 

*' Lucy 145 

*' Sarah J. 145 

*• William 145 

Mills, Caleb 125 

Minion, Matthias 204 

Mitchell, Albert J. 146 

Mary S. 146 

Mix, Eineliiie 83 

Madison, President James 24 

Moffatt, Sarah Bell 94 



Page 

Moffatt, Margaret 94 

Monroe, President James 167 

(71, 17. 19, 20, 21, 23 

*• Eliza Jones 114 

" Mrs. Pres. 23 

'* Speiice 18 

*' Eliza 21. 22, 23, 24 

•• Maria 21, 22 23, 24, 25 

Montgomery, Mal)el 176 

Mo r Ian, Mary 76 

*' Jason 76 

*' Amy 76 

" Caroline 82 

Mordfccai 82. 87 * 

Eliza 82, 87 

'* Ste])hen 82 

'• Mary 82 

** Amelia 87 

Morris, C. F. 145 

Morse, George E. 30 

" E<lw. L. 30 

William 30 

William L. 30 

Moore, Abigail F. 77 

Morton, Ira A. 102, 106 

" Chas.Tliecxlore 157,101 

" Virjfinia Rice 25 

*• Herman N. 101 

•* Emily 109 

Earl of 5 

Molt, Arthur H. 78 

" Erwin Lester 78 

Mullen, Mae 199 

Mniison, William 120 

" Archie 120 

" Hazel 120 

Murdoch, Bella 135 

Murphy, David 122 

Murray, John 9 

Moffatt, John N. M4 



Napier. Lord 
** Lady 



163 Nichols, Samuel 
163 •» Win. J. 



31 
3> 



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Nasli, Gov. Geo. K. 


86. 44 


James H. 


31 


Neill,Johii 




70 


Spencer J. 


31 


Nelson, Nancy 




149 


** Samantha 


3' 


Nesbitt, Myrtle 




182 


Benj.F. 


31 


Newson, Ella 




79 


Carrie V. 


31 


Nichols, Rachel A. 




31 


AnnaL. 


31 


•* Mary A. 




31 


Henry H. 


31 


Lucy 




31 


Nuttman, Mary E. 


137 


Ochiltree, Lonl 




9 


Ogle, Mary Ruth 


94 


0'I>ouj{herty, Sir Cahir 




9 


•* Carl H. 


94 


Oxle, Jas. W. 




94 


Oglethorpe, James 


213 


'* Marshall R. 




94 






Parsons, Albert Ross 




I(>2 


Pirn, Sarah 


211, 212 


Harry 




29 


** Abigail 


212 


Parker, Annie E. 




135 


*• Garrett 


212 


Patterson, Davi<l 




175 


** Nathan 


212 


" Jemima 


190, 


174 


•• Sarah G. 


212 


Payne, Annie 


160, 


, 167 


Polk, Pre.s. Jas. K. 


160, 169 


'• Josiah 




167 


Pollock, Rev. R. H. 


181 


PendlHon. Geo. H. 




131 


Mary 


182 


Penn, William 




114 


•' Thomas C. 


182 


Penrose, James 




98 


Poor)x>ngh, Lucy 


145 


Pierpont, Governor Francis 


192 


Porter, Ella Frances 


179. 178 


Mrs. Julia 




192 


Potter. William A. 


149 


Pickancis, James 




30 


Povee, Visa 


79 


Seville S. 




30 


Powers, Minnie 


122 


Pillow, Gideon J. 169, 


159. 


167 


Prentiss, S. S. 


'3' 


** Cyiitliia 




'59 


Proudfit, Rev. J. L. 


206 


William 




167 


Pugh, George E. 


124 


'• Cynthia H. 




167 


Pyle. Esther M. 


181 


'• Annie P. 




167 


" Benjamin 
" Elizal>eth 


181 
181 


Queensbury, Earl of 




6 


Queensbury, Mary of 


6 


Raiuey, Jane 




135 


Rice, Joseph Clarence 


lOI 


** Thomas G. 




'35 


*' Verda Mae 


lOI 


Harvey W. 




135 


** Pearl Prances 


lOI 


Charles Samuel 




i35 


•* Dr. Wni. Pettit 


100 


Caroline 




135 


** Charles Hawley 


100 


Thomas G. 




135 


•* Charity Dean 


100 


Frank L. 




135 


«' William Oscar 


lOI 


Alice J. 




'35 


Ritchie, Henry 


183 






233 










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Page 


Raiuey, Edward W. 


135 


Ridge way, Thomas 


211 


Rankin, Margaret 


i8.^ 


Riddle, Martha 


205 


Ramsey, John T^. 


94 


David 


205 


" Sarah Ann 


94 


Rich, Lord Richanl 


210 


Read, Sarah Oakalla 


128 


Rodney, Caesar 


94 


•* Dr. Ezra 


128 


** Cae.sar A. 


94 


** J"*^KC Nathaniel C 


128 


Roach, Frederick 


138 


" Abner 


128 


Rol)ert.s, Sarah Josepha 


108 


'' Daniel 


128 


Roemer, Charles N. 


199 


** Jonathan 


128 


•' Andrew 


199 


Rector, Lulu 


119 






Regester, Lydia 


212 


Dorothy D. 


>99 


Rhodes, Charlotte A. 


29 


Roosevelt, Pres. Tlieo. 


119. 66 


Hon. Cecil 


188 




( 52. 59 


Rice, Rachel Hole i6 


, 101 25 


Rogers, Elizal>etli 


138 


•' Dr. Chas. Elmer : 


M2, 102 


Reed, Hon. Thomas B. 


47 


(loo, 191, 176, 


lOI, 21 


Richardson, Susan 


27 


'» Ida May 


112. lOI 


Sarah 


76 


John Clarence 


101 


Robinson, Sarah 


78 


*' Robert Emerson 


lOI 


Rogers, Lloyd N. 


22 


Virginia Alfaretta 


101 


Roach, Anna L. 


94 


•• William Herbert 


lOT 


Rousseau, General 


166 


** William Elmer 


101 


Rugh, Arthur 


102 


Samms, Benjamin 


76 


Scott, Elizabeth 


76 


Saunders, Romulus M. 


160. 158 


Schell, Anna 


109 


Edward 


160 


Scarlott, Maggie S. 


98 


•• Narcissa P. i; 


70, 161, 


Seiie'' (Artist) 


20 


[165, 159 


Sea ton, Sophia 


'37 


Maj. J. Edward 


» 70. 159 


Searight, John F. 


109 


Cynthia P. 


«7o, 159 


Searing, Richard 


120 


Cynihia H. 


169, 168 


Searing, Mary 


120 


• Edward J. 


161, 158 


Scroggs, Rachel W. 


182 


JohnW. 161, 


168, 159 


** Rev. Joseph A. 


182, 183 


** Martha Hanna 


L 158 


'• David A. 


■83 


Edward Sr. 


158 


•' John H. 


183 


** James 


158 


'* Jemima R. 


183 


William 


158 


'* Rev. Joseph 


i74» 181 


John 


158 


Thomas H. 


181 


Scott, Sir Walter 


9 


** Polly 


181 


Benjamin 


46 


Margaret C. 


181 


•* Sarah 


76 


•' Ellen M. 


182 



234 



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Scroggs, James R. 


182 


Stewart, James 


6 


Elizabeth 


182 


*' General John 


6 


Shaw, Leslie M.Hoii. 


63. 153 


** Andrew 


6 


Shennaii,Gen. W. T. 


104 


Stanley, Unity C. 


93 


John 


42.45 


** Benjamin 


93 


VVilliaiii 


102 


** Elizaljeth 


93 


Sheets, Roy R. 


78 


Storer, Hon. Bellamy 


124 


Shelley, Harry R. 


102 


Stntler, Effie E. 


96 


Sliarpe, Anna 


151 


Stephens, Alex. H. 


13» 


•* Thomas H. 


151 


Still, Rev. John 


83 


Shilling, S^rah A. 


83 


Somerset, Lady Henry 


T02 


Shnmway, Mary E. 


30 


Sorby Castle 


5.6 


ShoaiT, Snsan R. 


146 


Snmwalt, Hester A. 150,149 


John A. 


146 


Sum wait, Godfrey 


149 


Mary 


146 


Snmwalt, Barbara 


149 


Frederick B. 


146 


Sulyard. Sir Edward 


210 


Skinner, Benjamin D. 


137 


** Anne 


210 


Emily 


137 


Swarthout, George M. 


81 


Slater, Mary E. 


32 


Ella H. 


81 


Slatore, Nettie M. P. 


195 


** Grace Evelyn 


81 


Smith.JndgeP. N. 


86 


Sweeney, Col. Andrew J. 


201, 


'* Catherine 


29 


[199, 


200 


'* Willam D. 


145 


** Thomas 


201 


*• Henry 


no 


** Maria Hanna 199, 


200 


" Martha 


iSi 


Mary Ralston 


199 


Sno<1grass, Mary 


177 


'' Sarah Patterson 


199 


Si>ence, Mary S. 


150 


*' Frank Bates 


199 


Speke, I^idy Anna 


83 


Lieut. Walter C. 


t99. 


** Sir George 


83 




[200 


Slewart, Sir AlexandeJ 


6.5 


Wm. Hanna 


199 


** Sir Robert 


6 


Frank M. 


199 


•* Sir William 


6 


Maria Elizabeth 


199 


*' Mother Eliza 


103 


** Sarah Hanna 


199 


Scroggs, James R. 


181 


*• Mary Alicia 


199 


Jane H. 


181 


*' James Edgar 


200 


Tabor, Sophia T. 


32 


Taylor. Florence 


212 


Tasker Bvelyn 


I34» 132 


•* Floyd 


212 


Tayk>r. EHxa 


«36 


Telford. James H. 


122 


*' Inn^l 


136 


Asa M. 


122 


•* Mary 


136 


Samuel W. 122, 


124 


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212 


Nancy H. 


124 


*' Mary Caroline 


212 


*' John G. 124, 


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211 


Andrew 122, 


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235 








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122 


Thompson, Siirali 


76 


Martha 


122 


Franklin G. 


109 


Cecilia H. 


122 


Thurnum, Allen G. 


131 


Martha 


122 


Thurston, Clara 


145 


Jos. B. 


122 


Toi>e, Mary Emma 


96 


*• James A. 


122 


Toncey, Mr.^ Isiac 


163 


Florence P. 


122 


Ton.«ley, Susiinnali 


137 


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123 


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V 


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123 


Roy H. 


32 


William 


124 


Mary A. 


31 


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123 


Carroll C. 


31 


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177 


Treuder, Charles 


210 


Tetrington, Frank 


119 


Eugenia 


210 


Tilden, Samuel J. 


129 


Tritt, Henry 


100 


Tilson, Washburn 


150 


*' Edward 


lOO 


•* Alice H. 


150 


" Charles 


100 


" Donald 


150 


Tultle, Jo.sepli F. 


133 


Thomas, Ennna Dutton 


108 


Tyor, A. h. 


145 


Thoburn, Isabella 


194 


Tuke. Sir Brian 


214 


Thompson, Hattie L. 


31 


Tyler, President John 


68 


Underwoo<l, William 


76 


Upton. Harriet Taylor 


21 


Vance, of Bar nba rock 


9 


Vincent, James R. 


189 


Vanderlyn, [Artist) 


21 


•' Anna Martha 


190 


Venventerville, Maria 


'35 


Martha D. 


190 


Vincent, Eleanor M. 


187 


'* Rev. George C. 


183, 


Nettie M. 


187 


[184, 185 


Dr. Wni. H. 


187, 189 


'• James H. 


186 


George Clark 187 


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Wm. H. 


186, 187 


■' Martha Olive 


187 


Von Golinm, Clara L. 


30 


" Mary 


189 


Vorhees, Daniel W. 


127, 131 


Dr. C. Jane 


189, 190 


Edeth 


199 


Wade, Benjamin F. 


93 


Wanee, Harriet L. 


136 


Wall, Watson 


146 


Ward, Caroline 


"34 


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146 


Harvey 


134 


Waller, Nancy 


79 


William 


134 


Wallace, Mal>el 


119 


*' James H. 


134 


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Harriet 


«34 


Waldegrave, Sir Philip 


210 


Martha 


134 


'* Frances 


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Mary K. 


>35 



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Whitely, Dorothy 


205 


Jesse 


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John 


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John B. 


83 


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194 


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Col. Thos. 


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149 


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149 


" Harvey W. 


136 


Jos. H. 


149 


Washington, Gen. Geo. 


18,141. 


Thos. S. 


149 




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.Alice H. 


•49 


Mrs. Geo. S. 


167 


Wiiuler, David 


98 


Watson, Nancy 


30 


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98 


Weaver, Frances Virginia 150 


Winche.ster, Josiali 


128 


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•38 


Wi.se, Hamilton 


120 


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no 


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120 


Rev.T. J.C. 


182 


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120 


Weider, Adahiide Al. 


87.89 


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195 


Weess, Miss Frank 


178 


Wooley. MollieJ. 


195 


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210 


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210 


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John II 


210 


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H3 


*' Joan 


210 


'* John Kersey 


•13 


John III 


210 


** h^hna Kersey 


'•3 


John IV 


210 


Wheeler, Ktnnia 


118 


John V 


210 


Whitacre, Mary K. 


3^ 


Phillip 


210 


Roht. H. 


3> 


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210 


Hatlie 


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213 


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3^ 


Jolin 


213 


Wm H. 


3J 


Klizabeth 


213 


While. Chas. 


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All»erl 


212 


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1 1 1 


Caroline T. 


212 



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Abbie A. 


212 


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211 


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2IO 



Yeager, Mary A. 



98 York, Duke of 104. 105, u.6, 107 



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