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Entered accordingr to act of Congrress, in the year 1833, 
by Charles Bowen, 
in the Clerk'i office of the Dietrict Court of the District of Massachus< 



281939 



c A mbrioge: 

CHARLES F0L80BI, 
Printer to tba UniTcrtity. 




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PREFACE. 



Ehcouraoed by the approbation, which our labors have hitherto 
receirefi, we offer to the public the 5th volume of the American Al- 
manac. For explanations of the astronomical department, we would 
refer the reader to Mr. Paine's Preliminary Observations. There 
will also be found in the course of the volume, such explanatione 
and remarks relating to other portions, as make it unnecessary here 
to say much respecting them. 

Complete lists of the Members of the American Congresses, from 
the year 17G5 to the present time, are given in this volume. A list 
of the Members of Congress from 1774 to 1778, has never before, so 
far as we know, been published. This list has been carefully formed 
from the ** Journals of Congress " ; but these Journals do not furnish 
such information as to insure entire accuracy with respect to dates. 
Mr. Force's " National Calendar " for 1829 contains a list of the 
Members of Congress under the Constitution, from 1789 to 1827, 
on a different plan from that of the list here inserted ; and the cor- 
respondent who prepared the latter, was not awnre of the existence 
of the former, till he had completed his undertaking. 

It will be seen tliat a Miscellaneous Department, and also a de- 
partment for brief Obituary Notices, have now been introduced ; 
and wo hope that they will be regarded as an improvement of the 
plan of the work. 

The space allotted to the notices of Individual States, in this vol- 
ume, is chiefly occupied by an account of education and literary 
inatitntioiw id the several states; and the quantity of materials 
on these topics demanding insertion, has been so considerable 
aa to render It necenary to exclude other useful tnaltfix \ «i\V!bnraL^ 
tbe walinoe haa been eomewiuX enlarged. ^ ^ GooQie 



IV 



PREFACE. 



We would renew the expression of our grateful acknowledg- 
ments to our friends in the different parts of the country, who 
have been so good as to forward information for the improvement 
of this work ; and we respectfully solicit a continuance of their fa- 
vors. 

In the next volume we propose to give, in addition to other mat- 
ters, a view of the financial institutions of the country, viz. banks, 
, insurance companies, and savings banks ; also of periodical lite- 
rature, including newspapers and other periodical publications, on 
a plan, which is exemplified in this volume in relation to Mas- 
sachusetts (see page 169) ; and on these topics, particularly, infor- 
mation is desired. 



Caiubndge, Massachusetts^ 
October 18, 1833. 



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S9B 
900 

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999 

97 



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Flofkb T0Ritonr . 
FtowwiBf ofFhdtT 
FMCBMlobttii 
PtMfee . 
Pnrit TiMvFlowerii 
G«onia — GowraaM 

BdSctttlon 5 FraaklL. ,, , ,. 

Md CollMre oTGMigU 999— W 




TiMvFloweriiit of 

Bdoctttlon; Ffwiklio CoQ^ ; llo(# 



GovornonofStatM .. 9BT 

OtoAt Britain — GovwomoMt ; mainly I 
HoQMofLoidt} BiahofM} HooMof 
OonuBokit; Fiisi Rofbrawd PntlU- 
mqnt; Jodieiuyj Britkli Mioirtrj 
fio« 1807 to 1893 . . 974—984 
HeislitofUMGraatartTidM 91 

BillTllowland . . . < 319 

HUlhouM. JaoM ... 318 

Bolyoke. Dr.,hk Motoondogiod JMund 78 



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Col- 
953—965 

141 
61 



97 
il774tol788 . 97-109 
,lMtofl9d . . .108*— 193 
^«M . . 339 

^SMrfMMor 190 

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171 — 179 

ti^^*fl^HHkiiii^H li>0 

'. ..' '. » .• '■ 997 



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ly — GoT«rnnient : Jodieiuy j 
Ltion : TraiuylTanui UniTonity t 
B ColUte ; St. Jo«epb*a CoUujo t 
■ta Colkifo; Cumbortaiiii Col- 



HoQM Of liocdt or ^Mn 975 

llliooit — Governmont ; Jodieiory } Edn- 
cation: lllinoi* CoUtto ; Alton Ulo- 
nry and Tlnologieal Seminary 990-961 
Inporu and Export^ tloiied Statv 149 
Indiana— GoTomnont ; Jodidanr ; Bdo- 
cation ; Indiana CoUogn ; Soutta Hano- 
ver CoIUfo . 948,940 
Individaal Statee ... 145 
Inllaeoee of the Moon ... 73 
lotereoone with Foreign Nationi 134 
Juhnaton, Jotiah 8. • . . 315 
Judiciary, United States . «. 130 
Kean, Edmand .... 311 
Kentucky — Govemnient : JodieiarT 2 
Education ; '"" — • — ' " ' •- 
Centre Co 

Auguita 

k^ : Oeoraetown CoUan 935—949 

Latitude and Longitude ofFlaeefl 94 

Lawl^ehoola . . . . 9S9 

UigiaUitoei of States 956-4958 

Udie, Sir John .... ^^ 

LOnriee in United 8»atoa Hi 

liOrds or Peen, House of -978 

Louisiana— Goremment; Judioia 

Edueatioo ; College ofLoulsiana S 

MaekintosH, Sir James mi 

Maine — Goveniment s Judiciary : MIH- 

tia; Education} Bowdqin CoHsfe } • 

WatenriOe College ; »laiBeThoSgl!> 

oal InsillutiMi} Maine WsSm 

r I LiUfued Soeletiee M-*-] 



Seminnrr I LiUfued Soeietiee 448-^ 
lurietta| Tompensure at 
Mwylnad— Oovemmentf Judidiffyi 




INDEX. 



Page. 
Beminarie* ; Learned Societies j Peri- 
odical I «iter«tuio IGl — 169 
Medfieia, Temperature at . . Hi 
Medical £(ci>ooU, Uoiied States . 959 
Meteorolofical OtMervations . 77 
Mctbodin bpucopaJ Churuh . 9t'>4 
MichtgaDTeiritory ... 256 
MiliUa, United e^Ulcs 143 
Military FmU, Temperature at 81 
MijiisuV ofGreut Briuin . 974 4t 2U4 
Mint of the Unhud States . 129 
Minia«ippi — Governmfnt ; Judiciary ; 
Outlines of the Constitution } Educa- 
UM» •, Jeffenon College 227 — 230 
Missouri — Government ; Judiciary ; 
Education ; St. Louis University ; bt. 
Mary's College . . 252 — 353 
Mooo, Influeuctf of ... 73 
Jfew Hampshire — Government ; Judici- 
ary j Statistics : Common Schools j 
Academie:! ; Uartrooutii College j 
Learned Societies iS— 158 
Hew Jersey — Government ; Judiciary ; 
Common Sebools ; Academies; Col 
lege of New Jersey : Uutcers College 

lW-191 
Hew York — GoTemment ; Judiciary ; 
Common Scboolt ; Academies ; Ke- 
Cents uf the Univoriiity ; Columbia 
College ; Union C'ollefe j Hamilton 
College ; Geneva College ; Brockport 
College ; Hamilton Literary and 
TbeoIo;;ical Seminary ; Epincopai 
Theological Seminary ; Auburn Theo- 
logical Seminary ; Hurtwick Theo- 
logical Seminary ; College of Physi- 
cians and Suigeons; University of 
tbe City of New York} Learned 
Societies . . . .178—188 

North Carolina — Government; Judi- 
ciary; Education: University of 
North Carulina . . 215 — 316 

Obituary, American . . 312 

Obituary, Foreign , . . 308 

Occultations .... 16 

Oceanica 270 

Ohio — Government ; Judiciary ; Com- 
mon Schools Academies ; Uliio 
University ; Miami University ; Wes- 
tern Reserve College ; Kenyon Col- 
lege f Franklin College ; Lane Semi- 
nary ; Granville Literary and Tlico- 
iMical Institution ; Metlical Culli>ge 
of Ohio ; Ohio Keforniod Medical 
School; Law School . 942 — 218 

Oriani, Bamaba ... 30«< 

Parliament,* British ... 275 

Parliament, Members of 284 

Penney Ivania— Government ; Judiciarjr ; 
Common Schoob ; Academies ; Uni- 
versity of Penns) Ivania ; Jeffi^raon 
Modkral College ; Dickinson College ; 
Jefferson College ; Washington Col- 
lofe ; Western University ; Allegheny 
College ; Pennsylvauia College ; Lor 
frvette College : Girard College ; Bris- 
tol CoUeginto Institute; Institution 
fur the Daaf and Dumb ; Theological 
Samiiiarioe} Learned Soeietioe 192 — 90) 
PlsasioDcrs, JlBvolaiioaMty mad laraUd 143 
rȤ0r, Cmgintir 
JPgricd^ml Utetmtan tiirMi^fboat th» 



Population and Extent of the Globe 

Population, U. S., 5 Enumerations 

Porter, Anna Maria 

Post-Ollice Estabishment 

Post-Oflicen, principal 

P«tsiage, Kates uf 

Protest uiit Episcopal Church 



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144 
303 
135 
136 
137 
904 



Hhf*/ 



3WI 
951: 



President uf the United States, Votes for, 

from 17(59 to 1833 ... 126 
Public Debt, United States* . 149 
Public Lands, Share of . . 143 
Rain, Quantity of, at several places 85 
Randolph, Juhn . . . 316 
Rates of Post ago ... 137 
Refractions, Dr. Young's . 58 
lUichsludt, Duke of . . . 3U3 
Religions, Numbers of the different 270 
R<>li;>ious Denominations, U. S. 263 — 265 
Rcinusat, Abel, . . 309 
Revolutionary {Pensioners . 143 
Rhode Island — Government ; Judiciary j 
Education ; Brown University ; Learn- 
ed Societies . . .169 171 

Salaries of Governors, ^. . 958 

Snlein, Teniperuture at * . 78 

Say, Jean-Buptiste . . . 306 

Scarpa, Antonio . , . 307 

Scott, Sir Walter ... 305 
Sessions uf Congress . • 195 

Signs of the Planets . . 3 

Signs uf ih<) Zoiliac . , 4 

Skinner, Richard. . . . 316 

Slaves in the United States . 144 

South Curulina — Guvernmont ; Judici- 
ary ; Frtie Schools ; Academies } 
College uf South Curolinu ; Charles- 
tun College ; Medical Colleges ; Theo- 
logical Seminaries ; Learned bucie- 
tics . . . 216 — 221 

Sovereigns of Europe . . 271 

Spurzheim, Dr. . . . 307 

SUiiley, John, . . .319 

Stephen, Jumes . . 306 

Sun*s Parallax in Altitude . 50 

Tariff of Duties . . 138 

Temperance ... 89 

Tennessee — Government ; JuiUciary ; 
Education ; UniverAitv of Nashville; 
Greenville College ; East Tennessee 
College ; Theological Seminary 23! — 235 
Thetdogical Seminaries, United Sutes S259 
Tide Table ... 91 

Tides, Height of ... 93 

Tucker, Commodore . . 315 

United States . 97 It 256 

Vacations in Colleges 969 

Vermont — Government ; Judiciary ; 
Common Schools ; Academies : Uni- 
versity of Vermont ; Middiebury 
College .158—160 

Virginia — Government ; Judiciary ; 
]:^ucation ; Academies ; UnivemitT 
of Virginia; William and Mary Col- 
lege i Unmpden-Sydney ( ollege; Wash- 
ington College; Randolph-Macon Col- 
lege : Protestant Episcopal Seminary ; 
Virginia Baptist Seminary . 906^914 
Votes for President, Itc, U. S. 196 

W4ke6eld, Priscilhi ^Kft 

Weat Indies, British . ^CA 

H^iJberforce, Win. . « ^IV 

Wokott, Oliver r^ ^ \ • lO 



Ziwii, Baron d«tzedby,L.OOgle 



ILRRATA. 

Page 3, last line, for " Q the descending node/' read " y," &c. 

" C, Oct. r3th, for " Feast " read '* Fast " 

** 9, near the bottom, for " San cent, eclipsed " read *' Sun sets 
centrally eclipsed " 

•* 15, for " Norfolk, Pa." read " Norfolk, Va." 

" 27, " Salem, in lat 42° 31' 30" " not " 52°," &c. 

*' 33, The setting of the Moon is, to a certain extent, erroneously 
stated for New York, Washington, Charleston, and New 
Orleans. The variation of the Moon's semidiurnal arch 
having been, inadvertently, applied with a wrong sign. 

«* 90, After the name of Mitchell, Stephen M., for "J7b3-04, 
1765-06," read "1783-84, 1785-86." 

" 192, 2d line from the bottom, for " Robert C. Trier," read " Robert 
C Grier." . 

" 276, for «• Essex," read "§ Essex." 

*«* For Additions and Corrections^ see pages 335 and 336. 



N. B. In the volumes of the Almanac for the years 1830, 1831, and 
1832, the rising and setting of the sun were given according to appar- 
ent time ; but in the volumes fur 1833 and 1834, they are given according 
to mean time. 



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uSirdlf with ftfictii^te be ego- 
MDpletely ihot oatfitmi the ngiit^ 
U9^ IGth, ItiOfl^ when the Sao w«» 
,,^^^ixiiite«. M fiiiich light remained aplp 
^Ml. greater darkneee will not pn>h^y 
ifcthR preeent oeoim^. 
^' \ tMrneyer. a great (kpreaaiQii dipm 
^ will pre^hly he iMmed» v^d^^M 
mm»ni of gceateat AMOiatioiBi^ mi 
condenaing tfa^ edUr raya,^ 
. At the tipie of the Annular eofipae 
emd hj t^ Editor, that the r 






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a|id that dmm^ the QontinoaiNlt' 
P^dac^hjT placing itf M a efc ipiaa 



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M tneipMr the path of the centre, wiQ ha 

yitory etlLrluuMaa, and of the Suteaof 

and Sbath Caroliiuu The prindpal 

1 pinhihljhe complete, are Charleeton, 

lie, Tneoalooaa, and Little Rock. 

«,»^in any place, will he aboat Im. 

^.^ ljasi^53a. and at Beaofort, Im. 401. ; 

r .ih9 peatrat path. At Charleston and 

. be enpiderahljr leaa, the former being 

l^ofjthhrpathrthe latter about thirty aoath. 

'^"*--— w¥aries in its passage acroea the 

^ be aboat one hundred milea. 

ie Stetes, who desire to behold 

land sublime of the phenomena 

'EHugara ainha into medioeritjy 

^iM which to make their obaer- 

Hrtuatty when they reflect* 

a apace of thirty^fiTe yean, 

dOndbeyii^Statea, or 

iM, avkdi biflm^ 

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X PRELIMIffART OBSERVATIONS. 

and even injury was sustained from want of care in looking at the Sun 
without any protection for the eye, or tlirough glass not sufficiently 
colored, it may be proper to remark, that should the sky, during the 
Qontinuance of this Eclipse, be clear, one of the very darkest green or 
red glasses of a sextant, and in default of this, a piece of common 
window glass, free from veins, and rendered quite black by the smoke of 
a lamp, onttfy can be used with safety. If the lustre of the Sun should, 
be diminished by intervening clouds, a lighter shade will be sufficient. 

In the computation of the phases of this Eclipse for some of the prin- 
cipal places in the United States (see pages 10 — 15), the semidiameters 
of tne Sun and Moon were reduced 5'' for irradiation and inflexion ; the 
quantity indicated by all the observations on the Eclipse of Feb., Ib3l. 

The total eclipse of the Moon of June 21 si, and that of Dec. I5th, 
will be more interesting to the public generally, than to the astronomer. 

Occultations of the planets and of stars of not less than the fourth 
magnitude, will this year be rare. Jupiter will be eclipsed in the 
morning of September 24th, and Venus, in the southern extremity of 
the United States, in the aflernoon of tlie 2d of December. 

The moment of the Immersion or Emersion of any star, however 
small, behind, or from, the dark side of the Moon, can be determined 
with precision ; but if the star is small, great difficulty is experienced in 
satisfactorily ascertaining it, when the phenomenon takes place on the 
side that is enlightened. Indeed, it has been found by Professor Struve, 
even with the assistance of the celebrated telescope in his possession, 
by Fraunhofer, so nearly impossible, that he recommends measuring 
with a micrometer the star's distance from the limb of the Moon, some 
minutes before or after the moment of contact, and when it^ light is, 
comparatively, but little diminished by her superior lustre. Those con- 
junctions, however, of the Moon with stars of less than the fourth magni- 
tude, which mav be occultations in some part of the United States, are 
noted in the Calendar pages by an asterisk, instead of the usual syrabM 
(^conjunction. 

The catalogue of the eclipses of the Satellites of Jupiter (pages 17 
and 18) contains only those visible in some part of the United States. 
The eclipses before the planet comes into conjunction with the Sun, 
on the 9lh of May, will happen on the east side, then, until the opposi- 
tion, on the 21.)lh of November, on the west, and ailerwards again on 
the east : between the Oth of May and 21Hh of November, the Immer- 
sions only of the first and second satellites will be visible, and during 
the remamder of the year, the Emersions only j but both the Immersion 
and Emersion of the two outer satellites can sometimes be seen. 

The fourth satellite will not, however, be eclipsed this year, its Lati« 
tude, at every opposition, being greater than the planet's semidiameter. 

The eclipses take place fartliest from the body of Jupiter when in 
quadrature, and nearest when in opposition or conjunction ; but for some 
weeks before and afler he is in the latter position, the eclipses cannot 
be observed, the planet and satellites being rendered invisible by the 
superior light of the Sun. As these eclipses appear to take place at the 
same moment of absolute time in every part of tne Earth where they are 
'visible, to determine the approximate time, at which anyone in the 
catalogue will happen in any place in the United States, it is necessary 
merely to subtract the estimated Longitude of that place from the time 
of Immersion or Emersion at Greenwich. 

In the table of Latitude and Longitude of some of the principal 

places in the United States (page 24, &c.), will be found the latitude 

ofBevora], as determined by the editor, by recent observations made hy 

A/tnseJf; aho the longitude of a few, deduced by VumiimTV ob«%T^atXoQfl 

^,^debjrotben on tSe annular eclipse of F^xiary \«iSV,oT aa %»&«- 

tMiaed by comparison of the place in question, by cVMonoxnft\fct%,^>^ 



PRKI«IMI1IAKT OBSERVATIONS. XL 

the capitol at Washington, the Univeraity of Virginia, Philadelphia, or 
Boston, the distance of which from the meridian of Greenwich is sup- 
posed to be correctly known. The longitude of the Capitol is Uie mekn 
of the results, deduced from the observations on the annular eclipses of 
1791, 1811, and 1831, and has recently been confirmed by the edi- 
tor, by compsrinff it by chronometers with the University of Virginia 
and the city of Philadelphia. The unfortunate adoption, in the con- 
struction of several maps of this country, of the longitude of the Capi- 
tol (5h. 7' 42"), reported by an individual acting under authority or a 
Resolve of Congress, has caused an error of i\^ minutes of a degree 
therein Since uts table went to press, the position of several places in 
Massachusetts and New York has been determined by the editor, the 
poblication of which must be deferred until another year. 

In the arrangement of the Calendar pages there is no alteration from 
that in the Almanac for 1833. 

In the computation of the rising and setting of the Sun, two correc- 
tions have been introduced into the Almanac for this year, for the first 
time. These corrections are, 1st, for the effect of refraction in caasinff 
him to appear above the sensible horizon sooner in the morning and 
later in the aflernoon, tlian he actually is, and 2dly, for tlie interval 
between the rising or setting of his centre and of his highest point ; the 
instant of the appearance or disappeaiance of this point, and not (as 
hereto.ore) of his centre, being considered the time of his rising or 
setting. So that at the time indicated in the Calendar pages, as tluit of 
sunrise or sunset, his centre is 9U° 50' from the zenith *, me semidiome- 
ter being about Hi' and the horixontal refraction 34'. 

The amount of tliese corrections varies at every place, with the 
season of the year, and is different in different latitudes. At Boston, 
when greatest, they lengthen tlie interval between sunrise and sunset 
about 12 minutes ; at New Orleans, nearly 9. 

3'he setting of the Moon b given from new moon to full, and the ris- 
ing from full moon to new; the letters M. A. m. a., found in these 
columns and in other parts of the Almanac, are used to denote Morning 
and .Afternoon. 

The time of the Phases of the Moon is computed for the meridian of 
Washii]f]g^n, but may be readily reduced to that for any other meridian, 
by adding or substracting the cfifference of the longitude, according as 
tne same is east or west of that city. The time of the moon's southing 
is computed for the same meridian. The variation, however, even in a 
remote part of the United States, will be inconsiderable. 

The time of High Water is corrected for the difference of the Right 
Ascension of the Sun and Moon, and the distance of the Moon from the 
Earth. The time of the tide immediately preceding the southing of the 
moon, only, having been given, it should be corrected by the addition 
of half the difference when tlie time of the other tide is required. 

The Planets are placed in the order in which they pass the meridian 
on the first day of each month, and their declinations are computed 
for the moment of their passage over the meridian of Washington. 

The £phemeris of the Sun (pages 52 to 57) is parti v taken from the 
celebrated Almanac of Professor Encke and partly from the English 
Nautical Almanac; now for the first time truly an " Astronomical Ephe- 
mens,'* and worthy of the great nation under whose auspices it appears. 
In ours, wiU be found, the Sun's Semidiameter, Horizontal Parallax, 
and Declination, the time (meatij which, by the addition of 0.1S[", will be 
converted into sidereal) occupied by the Semidiameter in culminating or 
]Mssing the meridian, the Eqnation or redaction of appaTenl \o m««.ii 
time^ to be sppUed to tgfffarmi time in the manner IndicaUd, 1]be ^\4tt* 
/wa/ time, snd the Obliqaity of the Ecliptic. The epoch of «\\ Vl nOMli 
meMn tuae, of the mendiaa of Greenwich. d e i by v^v^v^^v i^ 



Xll PRELIMINARY OBSERVATIONS. 

The Table of Refractions (pages 58, 50) is that computed on princi- 
ples explained by Dr. Young, and is recommended by its great sim- 
plicity ; moreover, it is said to agree as closely as any other with the 
latest observations ; nevertheless, had not Professor BesseFs new Table 
required the use of logarithms, it would have been preferred. 

The elements of the eclipses (page GO) were computed from the Berlin 
Jahrhuchf and reduced to the meridian of Greenwich by consideringr 
the Longitude of Berlin 53m. 35.5s. The solar elements were corrected 
for the second differences ; those of the Moon, at the time of the eclipses 
of January IHh. June 7th and !i21st, and December I5th, for the second 
and third ; but in those of the eclipse of the 30th of November, correc- 
^ tions were introduced for the differences of the fourth order. 

The Tables used by the computers of the Jakrbuch, are Bessers, for 
the Sun, and Burckhardt's, for the Moon. 

All the calculations in this Almanac have been adapted to mean 
solar time, or that time which should be indicated by a well regulated 
clock. On account of the eccentricity of the Earth's orbit and the 
inclination of the Ecliptic to the Equator, the motion of the Earth in 
I Right Ascension is not uniform, and consequently the solar* days are 
not equal, about half being more, and about as many less, than 24 
hours, and requiring a clock indicating apparent or solar time, to be 
frequently adjusted. To avoid this inconvenience, the fiction of mean 
time has been invented ; which has already come into very general use 
and probably will soon supersede the other. It derives its name from 
the circumstance, that the length of a mean solar day, hour, «&c , is the 
mtan or average length of all the apparent solar days, hours, t&c, in a 
tropical year. 

The greatest difference between Mean and Apparent Time occurs on 
the 3d of November, viz. Kim. IGJ^s., and the equation then being sub- 
tractive from apparent time, the instant the Sun's centre is on the 
meridian or bears exactly south, a clock regulated to mean time should 
indicate llh. 43m 43is. On the Uth of Februarv is the greatest 
additive equation, when the time of noon by the clock should be 14m. 
34s. afler 12. 

But mean time can be easily reduced to apparent, by applying the 
equation (pages 52 to 57) on the day in question, in a manner directly 
the reverse of that indicated therein. 



The most interesting of the Astronomical phenomena happening in 
tlie^ear lcJ35, and visible in the United Slates, are the Occultation of 
Jupiter in April, the return ef Halley's Comet (otherwise called the 
Comet of 1759) to its perihelion, on l)ie 4th of November, and, on the 
7th of tlie same month, the transit of Mercury over the disc of the Sun. 

A communication of any observations that may be made on the total 
eclipse of the Sun of November of the coming y«?ar, tocrether with the 
correct Latitude of the place of observation, will be thankfully received 
bv the Editor of the Astronomical department, and the Longitude of the 
place be thence deduced. 

R. T. PAINE. 

16 KewUm Place, Boston, 
September 2S>th, 1833. 

* A Bolmr daj u the iatorrml bttween the instant his centre is on the meridian of any 
pUco, to the iastaat oftdt return to the same lUaalion. 



dbyGoogk 



AMERICAN ALMANAC 



FOB 



1834. 



PART I. 



by Google 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



by Google 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



AMERICAN ALMANAC 



FOE TBB TEAE 



1834, 



Being the latter part of the 58th, and the beginniDg of the 59th, 
year of the Independence of the United States of Amer- 
ica; 
the 6547th year of the Julian Period ; 

^ the latter part of the 5594tb, and the beginning of the 
5595th, year since the creation of the world, according to 
the Jews ; 

** the 2587th year since the foundation of Rome, according 
to Varro; 

M the 2580th year since the era of Nabonassar, which has 
been assigned to Wednesday, February 26^ 3967 of the 
Juliai^Period, (747 years before Christ according to the 
cbronologists, and 746 according to the astronomers ;) 

*' the 2610th year of the Olympiads, or the second year of the 
653d Olympiad will begin in July, 1834, by fixing the era 
of the first Olympiad 775} years before Christ, or at about 
the first of July, 3938 of the Julian Period. 

** the latter part of the 1249th, and the beginning of the 
1250th year since the Hegira, or flight of Mahomet 



I. THE CALENDAR 
AND CELESTIAL PHENOMENA FOR THE YEAR. 



SIGNS OF THE PLANETS, &e. 




$ Ceres. 

1|. Jupiter. 

Yl Saturn. 

i^ Henchel or Uranus. 



The Sun. 
_ The Earth. 
^•0€ ThcAIoon. 
Mercury. 
$ Venus. 

C5 ConjuBction, or haTing the sams LongiUds or Right Ascension. 
D Quadrature, or differing 90° in •• ir m 

^ ^ pontioB •« 180° in " •* « 

Mweending, (I the detcending node. 



aThei 



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4 CHEOROLOttlCAL CTCXJB8, Bieiffl OF THE ZODIAC, &C. [1834. 

An aiteriak (*) prtfixed to the oonjunction of the Moon with a star or 
planet, indicates that the star or planet may be eclipaed in eome part of 
the inhabited portion of the United States. 

The aign -|- '^ prefixed to the latitude, or declination of the Son or 
other heavenly body, when norths and the sign — when south ; but the 
former prefixed to the honriy motion of the Moon in Latitude, indicates 
that she is approaching, and the latter that she is receding firom, the 
marth pole of the ecliptic. 

The letters M. A,^ m. a., denote Morning and ^ftemDon. 



CHRONOLOGICAL CYCLES. 



Dominical Letter . . . E 
Lunar Cycle, or Golden Number 11 
Epact 20 



Solar Cycle 
Roman Indiction 
Julian Period 



23 

7 
6547 



Spring 
signs. 



SIGNS OF THE ZODIAC. 



C8. n 



cp Aries. 
Taurus. 
Gemini. 



fl««««r (^- G Cancer. 
Summer U. ^ Leo. 

( 6. nj Virgo. 



signs. 



Autumn 
signs. 

Winter 
signs. 



C 7. £i: 

\ 8. m 

i 9. / 
( 10. ytf Cj 
\ 11. m A( 
02. HPi 



£^ Libra. 
Scorpio. 
Sagittarius. 
Capricornus. 
Aquarius. 
Pisces. 



BEGINNING AND LENGTH OF THE SEASONS. 

b. m. t. 
Sun enters Vf (Winter begins) 1833, Dec. 2l8t, 7 25 46 M. T. Wash. 



cp (Spring 
« *< £2 (Summer 
** " ^ (Autumn 
« *« yjf (Winter 

Sun in the Winter Signs 
« « Spring 
<« " Summer 
Autumn 



1834, March 20th, 8 5G 38 
June 2l8t, G 3 9 
Sept. 22d, 19 58 31 
Dec.2lBt, 13 21 57 

d. h. m. ■. 
. 89 1 SO 52 

92 21 C 3l 
. 93 13 55 22 

89 17 23 26 



<< north of Equator (Spring and Summer) 186 11 1 53 
« south ** (Winter and Autuom) 178 18 54 18 

Length of the tropical year, beginning at ^ 

the winter solstice 1833, and ending V 365 5 56 11 

at the winter solstice 1834, ) 

Mesui or avenge length of the tropical year 365 5 48 48 

Digitized by (^OOQIC 



1834.] 



SMBBft DATS, SlC J£WI8H CALXJIBAR. 



EMBER DATS. 



Febraarr 19th, 21 it, and 22d. 
May 21st, 23d, and 24th. 



September 17th, 19th, and 20th. 
December 17th, 19th, and 20th. 



MOVABLE FESTIVAL OF THE CHURCH IN 1831 

Septuagesima Sundaj Jan. 26thl Rogation Monday May 5th 

Qoinq. or Shrove « Feb. 9th! « Tuesday •< 6th 

Ash. Wed. let day of Lept ** 12th 'Ascen. Day, or Holy Th. <* 6th 

Mid Lent Sunday March 9th Whitsunday, or Pentecost « 18th 

Palm Sunday << 23d Trinity Sunday *< 25th 

Easter Dmi << 30th Corpus Christi day ** 29th 

Low Sunday April 6th [Advent Sunday Not. 30th 

Rogation Ssnday May 4th | 



JEWISH CALENDAR. 

[The amiiTenariM marked with an utarisk (*) am lUictly obiarred. j 

Tear. Namea of the Mtmthe. 

5594 Ist of Thebet Dec. 13, 1833. 

•< lOlh << Fast for the Siege of Jerusalem 22, « 

» IstofSebat Jan. 11,1834. 

" IstofAdar Feb. 10, « 

«« 14th ** Little Purim .... 23, " 

«< IstofVeadar March 12, « 

«« 13th " Fast of Esther ... 24, «* 

" 14Ui " . •Purim .... 25, " 

^ 15th « Schuscan Purim ... 26, <« 

" Istof Nisan April 10, *• 

" 15th " •Beginning of the Passover 24, «« 

" 16th " "Second Feast, or Morrow of the 

Passover • . . 25, *i 

u 21st « •Seventh Feast .... 30, " 

« 22d « "End of the Passover . May 1, " 

•• Istofljar 10, « 

« 18th <• Lagbeomer .... 27, '< 

** lit of BiTaii June 8, " 

•< 6th « "Feast of Weeks or Pentecost 13, <' 

« 7th « "Second Feaat .... 14, '• 

•• IftofThammus July 8, " 

*» 17th « Fastfor the Taking of the Temple « 24, *' 

«« latof Ab ....... Aug. 6, " 

u 9th <« "Fast for the Burning of the Temple 14, " 

»* Istof Elni ..«.•.. 8cpC 5) *' 

i* 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



6 MAHOMSTAIf CALBNDA&. BCL1P8S8. [1834. 

5585 Itt of Tiflii *Feast for the New Tear . Oct. 4, 1834. 

« Sd " •Second Feast for the New Tear 5, *' 

"3d •' Fast of Gedaljah ' . . 6, " 

« 10th « •Feast of Reconciliation . 13, " 

" 15th « •Feast of the Huts or Tabernacles 18, <* 

" 16th " •Second Feast of the Hute . 19, « 

" 21st " Feast of Pahns or Branches . . 24, « 

It 22d <* *£nd of the Hut or Congregation I 

Feast . . . . . 25, " 

«*. 23d ** *Rejoicingfor the Discovery of the '* 

Law 26, « 

<« IstofMarcbesyan Noy. 3, « 

•» IstofChisleu Dec. 3, " 

" 25th of " Consecration of the Temple 27, <* 

« latofThebet Jan. 2,1835. 

" 10th <* Fastfor the siege of Jerusalem 11, " 



MAHOMETAN CALENDAR. 



Year and Names of the Montlii. 

1249 IstofShaban 

<« Ist of Ramadan 
" let of Schewall 
** IstofDsu'l'kadah 
" IstofDsu'l-hejjah . 

1250 JstofMoharrem 
« IstofSaphar 

« IstofRabiaL . 
« IstofRabialL 
« Istof Jomadhil. 
" Istof JomadhilL . 
" IstofRejeb 
" let of Shaban 
" Ist of Ramadan 



rMonth of Fasting) 
(Month of Rejoicing) 



(Month of Fasting) 



Dec. 


13, 


1833. 


Jan. 


11, 


1834. 


Feb. 


10 




March 11, 




April 
Alay 


10, 
9» 




June 


8, 




July 


7. 




Aug. 


6, 




Sept. 


4, 




Oct. 


4, 




Nov. 


2, 




Dec. 


2, 




Dec. 


31 





ECUPSES IN 1834. 

Tive eclipses will happen in the course of the present year, of which 
three will be of the Sun and two of the Moon. One of the former and 
both of the latter will be visible throughout the United States. 

1. Thursday, January 9th, a partial eclipse of the Sun, invisible 
throughout the United States. 
Beginning of the General Eclipse on the Earth, at 4h. 9m. A. (M. T. 

at Washington,) in Long. 100^ 40^ East from Greenwich, and in Lat. 

52<' 43^ South. 
Greatest obscuration on the Earth (6^ IS') At 6h. 48m. A., in Long. 11^ 

IS East, Lat 67o 47' Sonth. 
End of the General EcUpee on the Earth, at 7h. 27m. A., in Long. 69^^ 
J^ Weat, Lat 48^ 32' South. 

Digitized by VjH^V^'V IC 



1834.] 



xcLUPSBS OF juirx 7th AHD 31 ST. 



Bat little more than half the San will be obeeared where the Eclipee is 
greatest, and the only land to which it will be risible is the soattera 
extremitj of Soath America. 

II. Sataxday, Jane 7th, the Sun partially eclipsed, invisible throogh- 
oat the United States. 

Beginning of the General Eclipse on the Earth, at 2h. 49m. M.,Mean 
Time at Washington, in Long, fy* 15' West, Lat. 47<» 30' South. 

Greatest obscuration on the Earth (11® 12') at 5h. Im. M., in Long. bS9 
22^ East, Lat. .64® 39' South. 

End of the General Eclipse on the Earth, at 7h. 12m. M., in Long. 71^ 
34' East, Lat. 27® 27' South. Although this Eclipse will not be cen- 
tral in any place, it will be, where greatest, nearly annular. It will 
be Tisible to the southern extremity of Africa and the adjacent oceans. 
At the Cape of Good Hope, in Lat. 34<> 24' South, Long. 18® 26' East. 
The Eclipse will begin at 9h. 22JI m. M., and will end at 3i m. A. 
Mean time of the Cape. Digits eclipsed 5^ 35' on Sun's South limb. 

III. Saturday, June 21st, the Moon totally eclipsed, risible through- 
out the United States. 



♦Albany 

'Baltimore 

•Boston 

Charleston 

Cincinnati 
♦Halifax, N. S. 
♦Hartford 

Jefferson &. ) 

Little Rock S 

Lexington, Ky. 

Mobile 

Nashville 
•New Haven 

New Orleans 
•New York 
♦Norfolk 
•Philadelphia 
♦Pittsburi 
•Portland 
♦PortsmoQth 
•ProvideDce 
♦Raleigh 
♦Richmond 

Sarannah 

St Louis 
•Washin^rtoo 



oTlhe 
EclipM. 


Wot* 
Immeraioo. 


Middle 

of the 

Eeiipse. 


Eod of 

Total 

rmmeraion. 


End of 

the 
Eclipse. 


h. m. 
1 39 M. 


h. m. 
3 43 M. 


h. m. 
3 36 M. 


h. m. 
4 9M. 


h. m. 1 
6 18 M. 


1 38 


3 83 


8 16 


3 68 


6 9 


1 60 


3 64 


3 87 


4 90 


6 34 


I 14 


3 18 


8 1 


3 44 


4 48 


67 


3 1 


3 44 


8 97 


4 81 


3 30 


8 34 


4 7 


4 60 


6 64 


1 43 


3 47 


3 30 


4 13 


6 17 


36 


1 80 


3 18 


3 66 


4 


67 


3 1 


3 44 


8 97 


4 81 


43 


1 46 


3 39 


8 13 


4 10 


47 


1 61 


3 34 


8 17 


4 31 


1 43 


3 47 


3 80 


4 13 


6 17 


84 


1 88 


3 81 


3 4 


4 8 


1 88 


3 43 


3 36 


4 8 


6 13 


I 39 


3 83 


8 16 


3 69 


6 a 


1 34 


3 86 


8 31 


4 4 


6 8 


1 14 


3 18 


a 1 


3 44 


4 48 


1 63 


3 67 


8 40 


4 93 


6 37 


1 61 


3 66 


8 88 


4 91 


6 36 


1 49 


3 63 


8 36 


4 19 


6 33 


1 19 


9 38 


8 6. 


3 49 


4 63 


1 96 


3 99 


a 13 


3 66 


4 60 


1 10 


3 14 


9 67 


3 40 


4 44 


30 


1 40 


9 93 


3 6 
3 W 


4 10 


1 9$ 


9 90 


9 IM 



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SCLIP8B OP IVOVXMBEa SOtM. 



[1894. 



At thote of the aboye cities marked with an asteriak the end of the 
eclipse will not be visible, as it will take place after the rising of the 
Son and consequently afler the setting of the Moon. 

Althoogh on this occasion the Moon will be totally immersed in the 
shadow of the Earth for the space of Ih. 26m., it is probable she will not 
entirely disappear, but will remain visible of the color of dusky 
copper. 

ly. Sunday, Norember 30th. 
The Son totally eclipsed, visible throughout the United States. 

Phases of the General Eclipse. 

The penumbra first touches the Earth at sanrise at llh. 33m. M. 
(M. T. at Washington) in Lat 43» 55/ North, Long. 140° SS' West from 
Greenwich. 

The penumbra leayes the Earth at sunset at 4h. 3m. A. in Lat 17^ 2^ 
North, Long. 57^ 36^ West. 

Duration of the entire Eclipse for the whole Earth 4h. 29im. 



Path of the Central Eclipse for every minute, whilst crossing the Ter- 
ritory of Arkansas and the States of Mississippi, Alabama, Greorgia, and 
South Carolina ; and for every fifth minute, during the remainder of the 
time of its continuance on the Earth. 





Meantime 


Bfean time 


Layiode 


Loaritujdo 






at 


at 


of 


of 






Waah*tOD. 


the pbcs. 


Ilia plau. 


Ibe place* 




8. ria. eent. ee. at 


h. m. a. 

53 ISA. 


h. m. $^ 
9 0'i7M. 


^36N. 


»55 13 W. 




«*«ont.ocliiModat 


056 96 


10 30 


64 57.6 


191 O.S 


the northweat coaat 


(C u 


1 1 S6 


99 51 


50 %\A 


U4 55.4 


of N. America. 


C( i( 


696 


SL 


47 14.0 


110 53.9 


Northweat pert of U.S. 


M (i 


11 96 


11 j^4a 


44 4«.» 


107 41,4 


M CC CC 


M (i 


16 96 


SI 41 


m 47.t 


J 04 5^.1 


<C M CC 


U (C 


91 96 


39rf[ 


41 3.0 


109 30.A 


CC CC CC 


• U (i 


94 50 


4ti55 


AQ 0.0 


JOl 0.7 


CC MM 


CC CC 


96 96 


W1«A. 


^a^.5 


100 19,0 


CC M CC 


CC CC 


31 96 


€40 


3^]!}.9 


0913J 


M M M 


M CC 


36 96 


10 49 


37 3.Q 


dtuiia 


M MM 


U CC 


37 96 


93 n 


aS5O.0 


03 4^1 


CC M CC 


M Ct 


38 96 


94 5^ 


3f7-3 


95^ 


CC M CC 


M CC 


39 96 


97 S^ 


95.0 


%M 


CC MM 


f CC C« 


39 34 


97 44 


S3.6 


94 50JII 


CC CC M 


M CC 


40 96 


99 JS^ 


mo 


3H,6 


Terriiorj of Arkanaaa. 


M C( 


41 96 


»33 


1.3 


I5il 


IC CC 4C 


M CC 


«96 


35 6 


35 50.1 


99 5L0 


CC M CC 


M CC 


43 96 


37 39 


30^ 


ad.7 


M M M 


M Cf 


44 96 


40 19 


9«,5 


5.5 


M CC M 


« <C 


45 96 


49 45 


Jtt.» 


Ua^jm 


neerLltUeBoeli. 


M CC 


46 96 


45 14 


&1 


It.l 


Tesritory of AilLsnaaa. 


M <C 


47 96 


47 50 


34 5B.1 


91 55^9 


CC CC c« 


« M 


48 98 


5(1 S3 


48,4 


;^7 


C< M M 


^ M ~ «C 


49 97 


f^56 


39^ 


9.4 


M M M 


* QstbesMii^ 


Uaa of the 


phMW. 




Digitized by 


Google 



mLi 



ECLIF8S or lfOT£MB£E 90tH. 



State of Mississippi, 



t cent.ecli|W6di 



MMaUme 


MaaoUme 


UUtode 


Loofitiide 


at 


at 


of 


Sf 


Wuh*toa. 


the place. 


the place. 


the place. 


h.in. •. 
1 50 97 A. 


h. in.t. 
55 99 A. 


Ai.8N. 


9& 46.1W. 


51 97 


56 3 


90.9 


99.8 


58 97 


1 036 


19.4 


89 50.4 


53 97 


3 10 


4.9 


35.9 


54 97 


545 


33 56.9 


19.3 


55 97 


890 


486 


88 48.6 


56 27 


10 55 


41.3 


94^ 



Territonr 

of the 

Choctaw IndiaiM 



lying ia 
Mil - 



County 



of iioiiioa. 



State of Alabama. 



157 97 A. 


1 13 31 A. 33 34.3 


68 ^^ 


County of Pielmw. 


58 97 


16 7 


97.6 


87 36.8 


M «« Tukalooflu 


59 97 


18 44 


91.9 


19^ 


it (( <( 


9 097 


9199 


15.0 


86 48.0 


•* «« Shelby 


197 


94 1 


9.9 


93.4 


Creek territory. 


997 


96 40 


3^ 


85 58.6 


t( t« 


397 


99 90 


3968J 


33.6 , 


M M 



State of Georgia, 



3497 AJ 


139 lA. 


39 53.9 


185 8.3 


597 


34 44 


4&5 


84 4917 


697 


37 97 


44.1 


16.9 


7 97 


40 11 


404) 


83 508 


897 


49 57 


36^ 


94.4 


997 


45 44 


39-9 


88 57*6 


10 97 


48 39 


99-6 


30-5 


11 97 


5193 


97.1 


3.0 


19 97 


5414 


94.7 


8135-1 



Cherokee Territory! 
Creek " 

(( « 

Coonty of Crawford. 
" Twigga 
" Lanreni 
" Emanuelf 
<* BuUocI^ 



State of South Carolina, 



|9 13 97 A.|l 57 . 7 A.|33 99.7 
I 14 97 9 9 91.1 



181 &8 
80 38U) 



iDiatriet of Beaofoit. 

I <( (( tc 



Atlantic Ocean, 



c< 


(( 


a 15*7 A. 


3 3 OA. 


39 19.8 


80 8.6 


*« 


•< 


16 27 


559 


19.0 


79 38.8 


It 


C( 


17 97 


9 


♦18.5 


8.5 


(« 


CI 


18 97 


19 4 


•18.5 


78 37.5 


«» 


(( 


19 27 


1511 


19.0 


5.8 


i( 


« 


90 27 


18 21 


90.0 


77 33.3 


M 


•( 


9127 


2134 


91.4 


0.1 


«« 


CI 


96 97 


3833 


36.7 


74 0.5 


C. 


u 


3197 


57 42 


3310.1 


70 98.1 


t« 


<( 


36 27 


3 90 50 


34 13.1 


65 56.1 


M 


tc 


4197 


3 54 40 


36 98.8 


58 43.6 


&oenUecKpeedat 


43 13 


4 39 17 


39 45.0 


i49 46.0 






DaratioE 


of the cent 


ral eclipM 


Ih. 5Uin 



Coaat of 8. Carolina 
eatt of 
Beaufort. 
Do. 8. of Cnpe Rofillifab 
l>o. 8. 8. VV. U. Feat. 
Do,8.ofC. Foar. 
Da 8. £. of C. Fear. 
l)u. 8. E.ofC.nattera* 
Weft of the Bermudas. 
North of " 
Northeast of ** 

Is. 



* The least Latitude of the path of the cenuo. 



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1 6 81 A. 
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ItenlilsMiJi 
JJbmy. 






I EdipM s .8 83. S7 
IKgHi •el^pMdlO'* Jdl^onSiiA'i Soath limb. Th^Mll^'winW- 
gla«l>p0fa[il in«lM^t ligliiiddAdrtMSwi 970 64' fio«i tlii wttSlE ij^ 
kll^Miipoiatofkbaiie. n .- ^ 

IjLt44fl)B'3Sf. Lini«.69O60r. 



[^of tho EelipM 
emttion 



h. n. 
197 54A.\ 

94640 iMetnTiiiMsl 
9 46 96 t Aajnute. 

8 67 7 -> 

9 90 13 



ApMMit d in the Ediptie 

DnifiMiortiieBQUffe. 
Di8iii«fi%w4 10» 9|' <m Sna't Soath limb. 

, Poinl A»t touehed by • tlie lioon at tbe begimiing of the Ed^ 
101^ ^fiom the Yertez. 

Ckjf qfBuAVWovr, m tA« State ^SncCft Coroltna. 
• Lift. d9» 94^.1^091.800 41. 

BifiBaiiHr^theBeKpee . 

AMjUent () in the Ecliptio, |he ) 
Han oentnllT eelipeed v 

JM^letalil^UiMir^ 
Sii4ol'the£ctipee 

DMte of lold 4 

: :.Jf - ^.>||»:dirtkde] 

of the 




Ibm. ■. 
31 66A.1 
. 1 68 64 

169 47 

9 040 
« 8W96 . 


.Mean Time el 
Beaufort 


146 
9 48 30 




North Liabe 
Centrei 
8011th Umfae 


. . 90J58V 
. . OM 

9o.oe 


^SOTflomthe 


▼ertox. 






iflHioB'Ui right iMt, and u 
•r kmtiiii tdewQpt to «Bo4, the 



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16340 



KCUPM or If OTSMBSE SOtB. 



11 



jr«w Siaie'HauBetin the CUffqfBamat, mmd Slate rfMa$mtim$ai». 
Lai. 430 9(y 68^'. Long. 71o 4^ 9^'. 



h. m. t. 

1 S2 29 A. \ 

2 41 45 f Mean Time at 

2 42 27 I Boaton. 

3 54 19 ^ 



r of the Eclipee 
Gmtest Obecnration 
Apparent () in the Ecliptio . 
End of the Eclipee . 

Dniation of the Eclipee . 2 31 50 

Digits ecllpied liP 25^ on Siin*a Soath limb. 
P<Mnt first touched 101^ 25' from the Tertez. 

Tht ColUge in the CUy ef Cbarlsstoh, mnd SUUe qf Scmih CaroUma, 
Lat 820 47'. Long. 80<» C 52". 



Beginning of the Eclipee 
Bigimung of total darJaust 
Nearest approach of the Centres ) 
of the Son and Moon * > 

Apparent c5 in the Ecliptio 
End of total darlauss » 
End of the Eclipse . 

Duration of total darkness 
^ the whole Eclipse 



h. m. •. 

35 43 A.^ 

2 235 ' 

2 3 11 

2 3 15 

2 3 47 

3 23 17 



Mean Time at 
Charleston. 



J 12 
2 47 34 , 

A« ♦!.-> ««..^ ..^^^^k ( Distance of the North limbs 
At the nearest approach > ., „ Centres 

of the Centres I u a South limbs 

Point iSrst touched 84^ 20' from the Tertex. 



34.94" 

14.73 

5.48 



City of CiHciHirATX, tn tke State qf Ohio, Lat 999 6'. Long. 84<' 22^. 



4 35A. 

1 29 43 

1 30 48 

2 50 25 



! Mean Time al 
I Cincinnati. 



BeginninfiT of the Eclipse 
Greatest Obscuration 
Apparent c5 in the Ecliptic . 
End of the Eclipee . 

Duration of the Eclipse • 2 45 50 

Digits eclipsed 10^ 59}' on Sun*s South limb. 
Point first touched 79^^ 18' from the vertex. 



Town qf Halivax, tn the British Prowace qf Nowl Scotia. 
Lat. 440 39' 20". Long. 63« SO* 40". 



Mean Time at 
Halifax. 



Beginning of the Eclipse 
Greatest Obscuration 
Apparent c5 in the Ecliptic 
Sun sets eclipsed 

Uncorrected for refraction ; the Ellipse ends about 10m. later. 
Digits eclipsed l(P 19}' on Sun's South limb. 
Point first tooohed 19!P 22^ from the vertex. 



2 2S45A. \ 

3 17 48 I 

3 18 15 ( 

4 16 20 y 



d by Google 



h. m. >. 




11 18 36 M^ 




045 38A 




46 18 1 


Mean Time at Little 


46 ii5 f 


Rock. 


47 12 
2 12 19 






1 34 




2 53 43 


* 



18 SCLIPSE OF NOVBMBBR dOrS. [1831 

Tmom qf Lxttlx RocXi the »eat of government of the Territory ofArisanoas, 
Lat34<'40'. Long. 92^ 12'. 

Beginning of the EcHdm 
Beginning qf total darkneu 
Apparent c5 in the Ecliptic 
Nearest approach of the Centrea 
End of total darknees 
End of the Eclipae . 
Duration of total darkness . 
M the whole Eclipse 

distance of the ^ South limbs . 34i84 

Point fiiBt touched 59<* 35^ from the Tertex. 

Twon ofMzMvau, in the southwest extremity of the State of Tennessu. 
Lat.'35o (y. Long. 90o 11'. 

h. m. I. 

Beginninfir of the Eclipse . 11 30 41 M. n 
Greatest Obscuration . 58 41 A. I Mean time at 

Apparent d in the Ecliptic . 58 46 / Memphis. 
End of the Eclipse . 2 23 40 ) 

Duration of the Eclipse . 2 52 59 

*Digito eclipsed ll^ 591'. 

Point first touched 63^ 57' from the vertex. 

Town of MiLLEDGXTiLLE, the Seat of Government of the State of 
Georgia. Lat. 33® 7'. Long. 83® 20'. 



h. m. B. 

Beginning of the Ecliose . . 14 23 A.^ 
Beginning of total darkness . .14216 
Nearest approach of the Centres . 142 46 
Apparent d in the Ecliptic . . 1 42 51 
End of total darkness . . . 143 16 
End of Uie Eclipse . . . . 3 4 34 ^ 


Mean Time at 
MilledgeviUe. 


Dorationof total darkness . . 10 


** ihe whole Eclipse . 2 50 11 

""m^Unc^f IhT"''' ^' ^^ ^-^-^^Ce'ts"'". • 16^ 
distance of tiie . . . . ^ g^^^j^ jj^^^ 3^^ 


Pbint first touched 77® 27' from the vertex. 



* At the neareit approach of tho centrot, at MemphiR, thoir diatance accordinf to tbt 
tablet and for the above latitude and longitude will be 91.93", and the difllfrence of the 
•orreeted Mmi-diametert 91.31''. 80 that it b impoeiible to aetert with oertalntjr 
whether the Eelipie will, or will not, be total there. The probability is, howerer, thttta 
men point of the upper limb of the Bun will escape obtenratioa By recent obserr*- 
UoM, it hat been ascertained, that the line of 35* Lat. passes throofh Memphia, sad 
^oa09gu0ot/f tbst place lies partly in MiMinippi and ipaxW^ in Tettuisae. 

Digitized by V3V7V.JV H^ 



1S34.] SCI.IPSB or ivovBHBBE 30rH. 13 

YaU CoiUgB intheeUy o/Niw Hatxit, tn t&e SimU of ComueHeuU 
Lat. 4\^ 17' 6d". Long. IfP &r 4&'. 

h. m. •• 
Beginningof the Eclipse ri2 14A. \ 

Greatest Obecuration . . S2 32 48 I Mean Time at New 

Apparent c5 in the Ecliptic . 2 33 31 4 Haven. 

End of the EcUpse . . . 3 46 37 -^ 

Duration of the Eclipse . 2 34 23 

Digits eclipsed lO^' 33^ on Sun's South limb. 
Pomt fiiBt touched 96^ 47' from the vertex. 

City of Nxw Orlxahs, in the State of Louisiana. Lat. 29^ 57' 45". 
Long. 90<» U' 49". 

h. m. >. 
Beginningof the Eclipee . 11 34 6M. \ 

Apparent (j in the Ecliptic . 1 3 A. I Mean Time at 

Greatest Obscaration . 1 4 9 i New Orleans. 

End of the Eclipse 2 30 31 / 

Duration of the Eclipse . . 2 5G 25 

Di^ts eclipsed 11^ 16<| on Sun's North limb. 
Pomt first touched 59^ 34' from the vertex. 

Town of Nx WPORT, tit the State of Rhode Island, Lat. 41^ 29'. 
Long. 7i"=> 21' 14". 
h. m. I. 
Beginning of the Eclipse . . 1 21 35 A. \ 
Greatest Obscuration . . 2 41 21 I Mean Time at 

Apparent d in the Ecliptic . 2 42 4 | Newport. 

End of the Eclipse . . . 3 54 27 ^ 

Duration of the Eclipse . 2 32 52 

Digits eclipsed 10^ 32^' on Sun's South limb. 
Point first touched 100° 50' from the vertex. # 

CUy HaU m the City o/New York, tn the State of flew York, 
Lat. 490 42' 40". Long. 74o 1' 8". 

h. m. I. 
Beginning of the Eclipse 1 6 25 A. \ 

Greatest Obscuration . . . 2 27 46 I Mean Time at 

Apparent c5 in the Ecliptic . 2 28 29 4 New York. 

End of the Eclipse . . . 3 42 18 -^ 

Duration of the Eclipse . 2 ^5 53 

Di^ts eclipsed 10^ 37' on Sun's South limb. 
Point first touched 97** 2' from the vertex. 

Staie-House in the City of Philadklphia, tntAe State of Pennsylvania. 
Lat 39<> 56* 59". Long. 75° 10' 59". 

h. m. s. 
Beginning of the Eclipse 1 1 A. ^ 

Greatest Objuration . 2 22 13 C Mean Time at 



Apparent c5 in the Ecliptic . 2 22 56 V Philadelphia. 

EDdoftheEclipM . • 3 37 S3 3 

Google 



Dumtion of the^clipM 2 37 32 

Digits eclipsed 10^ 431' on Sun's South limb. 
Pbint 6nt iaachedS6^ 4P&om the rertez. 





. a 12 17 ^ f Mean Timtf it I^^A 
S 18 54 t Rtehmoiid. f '? 




329 43 

\ .. 2 41 44. 
SiiiiVfltetttliliii^. 



T^im , 









Loiig.8f»8r. 



29 48 A/ 

1 57 9 

157 5P 
1.57 53 

158 37 
.3 18 51 



UpA Time at 
Bavaiwili. 



41 « tfw wliol9 Befine • 2 4{ 

ll^lli^ tilt T«rtez. 



lief 

2 49 8 



MJf- I 



1^' 



• • •• • • (Sopithliiiihi«»«* 






•t.«^i9^. Loii|t.67«>^a^^ ^T^fi 

JlCttM #6lipM 



b- a. ti 
1149 8M> 
. M6«A. 

lit a 






1634]. 



KCI.IP8B or irOYXMBBR 30rH. 



15 



IV Cdpiiolf in the CUy of Washinoton, in the District of Columbia. 
Lat 38° 62^ 54". Long. 7T» 1' 48". 



Begiiming of the Eclipse 
Greatest Ot>scuration 
Apparent (j in the Ecliptic 
Endoftlie Eclipse 



h. m. •. 
49 37 A. 
2 13 04 

2 13 47 

3 29 50 



f Mean Ti 
I Washin 



ime at 
shington. 



Doration of the Eclipse . . 2 40 13 

Di^ts eclipsed lO'' 53^ on Sun*s South limb. 
Point first touched 93*^ & j&om the vertex. 



The phases of the Eclipse at the foUovving places were not strictly 
computed (which was considered un necessary), but were estimated from 
the preceding. It is believed, however, that they will be found by ob- 
servation to be very near approximations to the truth. 



Baltimore, Md. 
Bangor^ Me. • 
BrattleboroughjVt 
Columbia, S. C. 
Concord, N. II. 
Dover, Del. 
Frankfort, Ky. 
Harrisburg, Penn. 
Hartford, Con. 
Lowell, Mass. 
Mobile, Ala. * 
Nashville, Ten. 
Natchez, Miss. 
N. Bedford, Mass. 
Norfolk, Pa. 
Pittsburg, Penn. 
Portland, Me. 
Portsmouth, N, H. 
Raleigh, N. C. 
St Augustine, Fn. 
Sprin^eld, ^^ass. 
Trenton, N. J. 
University of Va. 
Worce.<«ter, Mass. 



ning. 
h. m. 

53 A. 

1 36 
1 IS 
039 
1 18 
66 
S 

60 

1 14 
1 31 

11 46 M. 
11 68 
11 36 

1 34 A. 

64 

81 

1 36 
134 
043 
030 
1 14 
1 8 

43 

1 18 



1 Greatest 
1 Obscur. 
h.m. 


End. 
h.m. 


Dura, 
tion. 
h.m. 


Point lit 
touelied. 

1 

a 


3 16 A. 


8 31 A. 


3 39 


94 


3 61 


4 3 


3 27 


104 


383 


846 


3 33 


100 


1 66 


8 16 


3 47 


88 


337 


849 


3 31 


103 


3 31 


3 87 


3 39 


04 


1 30 


360 


3 47 


78 


3 13 


8 39 


339 


93 


3 84 


8 47 


333 


99 


340 


863 


3 31 


101 


1 16 


340 


366 


64 


130 


343 


3 49 


74 


66 


3 31 


366 


60 


3 44 


866 


3 33 


101 


,3 19 


a 36 


3 41 


93 


1 64 


8 13 


3 41 


87 


344 


366 


330 


103 


343 - 


366 


3 31 


103 


3 7 


8 36 


344 


88 


1 67 


8 16 


3 47 


76 


384 


848 


334 


100 


336 


8 40 


387 


96 


3 6 


838 


3 41 


90 


388 


8 61 


383 


101 



DigiU 
eclipsed 


10 60 


10 8 


10 30 


11 66 


10 16 


10 61 


11 10 


10 47 


10 80 


10 33 


11 83 


11 37 


11 88 


10 83 


11 16 


10 47 


10 16 


10 31 


11 80 


11 86 


10 36 


10 43 


11 3 


10 34 



The above ire expreued in mean time of the respective places, 



y Google 







ti^.^^^- 










■^^ 



-'•5 



^a 




tmm 4W • 'i • • 

*3W4'.H W W.7' -1 ■ 

saw* t 



Digitized^GfOOglc * ,.' 




18 



BCLIP8SS OF THX SATELLITES OF JUPITKE. 



[1884. 





d. 


h. 


m. 


». 




Bat. 




d. 


b. 


m. 


(b 


Bat. 


April 


9 


13 


36 


14.4 




2 


Oct. 


14 


20 


32 


43.9 


8 


May 


Oth 


:^ 1| 


aD<] 


'g. 






it 


19 


23 


57 


24.6 


1 


June 


8 


21 


27 




2 


(C 


20 


IS 


26 


20.4 


3 


i< 


12 


19 


22 


40.1 




1 


tt 


20 


15 


44 


30.9 Em. 


3 


« 


19 


21 


16 


53.4 




1 


ii 


21 


18 


25 


51.6 


1 


« 


20 


19 


40 


12.3 


£m. 


3 


<c 


21 


23 


9 


44.7 


2 


a 


27 


21 


31 


24.6 




3 


iC 


23 


12. 


54 


17.3 


1 


July 


3 


18 


36 


27.2 




2 


it 


25 


12 


28 


41.6 


2 


« *^ 


5 


19 


33 


31.3 




1 


iC 


27 


17 


25 


504 


3 


it 


10 


21 


13 


18.7 




2 


it 


27 


19 


44 


40.9 Em. 


3 


«( 


12 


21 


27 


24.9 




1 


(C 


28 


20 


19 


41.8 


1 


u 


21 


17 


49 


28J2 




1 


c< 


30 


14 


48 


8.5 


1 


(t 


28 


19 


43 


19.8 




1 


Nov. 


1 


9 


16 


38.7 


1 


Auff. 


2 


17 


30 


59.0 




3 


11 


1 


15 


5 


38.6 


2 


«* 


2 


19 


42 


449 


Em. 


3 


<c 


3 


21 


25 


17.5 Im. 


3 


t( 


4 


18 


22 


9.7 




2 


(C 


4 


22 


13 


38 JJ 


1 


« 


4 


20 


39 


40.0 


£m. 


2 


ii 


6 


16 


42 


7.0 


1 


« 


4 


21 


36 


58.3 




1 


it. 


8 


11 


10 


39.4 


1 


« 


6 


16 


5 


22.9 




1 


it 


8 


17 


42 


33.8 


2 


u 


9 


21 


30 


26.2 




3 


ii 


13 


18 


36 


14.0 


1 


« 


11 


20 


59 


12.2 




2 


it 


15 


13 


4 


48.3 


1 


t( 


13 


17 


58 


56.5 




1 


i( 


15 


20 


19 


27.3 


2 


<( 


20 


19 


52 


27.3 




1 


tt ' 


19 


9 


37 


322 


2 


u 


27 


21 


45 


55.8 




1 


ti 


20 


20 


30 


29.5 


1 


t€ 


29 


15 


32 


25.6 




2 


tt 


22 


14 


59 


6.2 


1 


it 


21) 


16 


14 


16.8 




1 


<c 


22 


22 


56 


19.5 


2 


ii 


29 


17 


50 


24.3 


Em. 


2 


u 


24 


9 


27 


40.7 


1 


Sept. 


5 


18 


7 


44.4 




1 


tt 


25 


9 


25 


14.7 Im. 


^ 


«*^ 


5 


18 


9 


29.8 




2 


tt 


26 


12 


14 


25.4 


2 


« 


5 


20 


27 


37.8 


Em. 


2 


tt 


-29th S 


u 


&0 




« 


7 


15 


43 


38.9 


£m. 


7 


Dec. 


1 


13 


30 


38^ 


1 


it 


12 


20 


1 


12.9 




1 


(( 


2 


15 


48 


3.1 Em. 


3 


ti 


12 


20 


46 


353 




2 


it 


3 


17 


11 


34.3 


2 


ti 


14 


17 


28 


27.2 




3 


.it 


6 


20 


56 


42.9 


1 


ti 


14 


19 


43 


24.5 


Em. 


3 


' (( 


8 


15 


25 


23.7 


1 


it 


19 


21 


54 


40.7 




1 


it 


9 


19 


49 


35.1 Em. 


3 


it 


19 


23 


23 


39.9 




2 


tt 


10 


9 


54 


7.8 


1 


it 


21 


16 


23 


2.3 




1 


« 


10 


19 


48 


34.9 


2 


it 


21 


21 


27 


33.6 




3 


<c 


13 


22 


51 


35.1 


1 


n 


23 


IS 





9.2 


Em. 


2 


it 


14 


9 


7 


18.9 


2 


it 


28 


18 


16 


31.7 




1 


tt 


15 


17 


20 


17 9 


1 


ii 


30 


15 


18 


422 




2 


It 


17 


11 


49 


4.6 


1 


it 


30 


17 


37 


21.6 


Em 


2 


ti 


17 


22 


25 


33.5 


2 


Oct. 


5 


20 


10 


4.9 




1 


tt 


21 


11 


44 


13.5 


2 


i< 


7 


14 


38 


30.1 




1 


(( 


22 


19 


15 


215 


1 


ti 


7 


17 


55 


43.1 




2 


it 


24 


13 


44 


10.6 


1 


it 


12 


22 


3 


42.2 




1 


it 


28 


14 


21 


6.1 


2 


•t 


13 


11 


43 


48.6 


Em 


. 3 


«« 


29 


21 


10 


33,8 


1 


it 


14 


16 


38 


8.3 




1 


tt 


31 


15 


39 


85.3 


1 



d by Google 



1831] POSITION Aim MAemTuoE or tux riitos of saturit. 19 

fmtion tmd JIfagniiude qf the Rings of Saturn, according to Btssd and 
StruvCffor every fortieth day in the year. 



6h.A. 




p- 


l. 


«. 


b. 


«. 


Im Dec. 


31 


-3-8 


+ 8'4(/ 


40.2a" 


6,06'' 


244-50' 


1834 Feb. 


9 


— 3 8 


8 28 


43.02 


633 


244 51 


March 


21 


— 328 


7 16 


44.57 


5.64 


242 41 


April 


30 


— 3 41 


6 


43.76 


458 


240 6 


June 


9 


— 348 


6 88 


41.24 


4.05 


239 5 


July 


19 


— 339 


628 


38.52 


4.34 


240 22 


Aug. 


28 


— 3 18 


8 11 


86.64 


5.21 


243 34 


Oct 


7 


— 2 47 


10 16 


35.98 


6.42 


247 51 


Nov. 


16 


— 2 16 


12 13 


36.67 


7.76 


252 13 


Dec. 


26 


— 1 51 


13 31 


38.63 


9.03 


255 31 



201*45' 


201 46 


199 37 


197 1 


196 


197 18 


200 80 


204 47 


209 8 


912 96 



p. Angle of the semiconjugate axis of the ring' with the circle of dec- 
lination, fKwitive when east, negative when west 

L Angle of elevation of the Earth above .the plane of the rings, as 
seen from Satarn, positive when north, negative when south. 

a. Semitransverse axis of the rings. 

6. Semiconjugate axis of the rings ; positive when their northern sur- 
face is visible, negative when their southern. 

u. Longitude of the Earth as seen from Saturn, reckoned on the plane 
of the rings and from their ascending node in the equator. 

u'. The same longitude reckoned from their ascending node in the 
ecliptic. 

\* It has been recently discovered, that Saturn is not placed exactly 
in the centre of the rings. This singular circumstance was for some 
time considered an optical illusion, occasioned by the shadow of the 
planet on the ring ; but Professor Struve has ascertained, with the cele- 
brated Dorpat telescope, that the rings are actually eccentric. The 
eccentricity is, however, too small to be perceived by any other than 
the very best and most powerful telescopes. 



ASPECTS OF THE PLANETS IN 1834. 

The inferior planets (Mercury and Venus), from their superior to their 
inferior conjunctions, and the superior planets, faom their oppositions to 
tlieir conjunctions, pass the meridian' between noon and midnight and 
Maally set in the evening after the Sun. The inferior planets, from 
their inferior to their superior conjunctions, and the others, from Utfir 
oonjonctions to their oppositions, pass the meridian between midnight 
and noon, and osnally nae hefon the Son in the morning. 



y Google 






'^\r^ii....lrA 



.] 



HEIGHT OF THE GREATEST OE 8PEI2fO TIDES. 



31 



HEIGHT OF THE GREATEST OR SPRING TIDES IN 1834. 
Gm^M/tf^ by the formula of La Place {MScanique Cileste, Vol. II. p. 389.) 



Hew or 


ftiU 






He 


ijrht of 'Newer 


Full 






HeifhtoT 
theTide. 


Moon 








. Um 


I'ide. 


Moon 














d;- 


h. 










d. 


h. 


New Moon 


,Jan. 


9, 


6A 


0.76 


Full Moon 


July 


20, 


3 A 0.79 


FnU 


«( 




5S, 


5M 


0.95 


New 


i( 


Aug. 


2. 


2M 0.92 


New 


u 


Feb. 


8, 


OA 


0.80 


Full 


tt 




19, 


3M 0.81 


FoU 


C( 




23 


4A 


1.07 


New 


u 


Sept. 


3, 


10 M K06 


New 


<l 


March 10, 


6M 


0.84 


Full 


(C 




17. 


7 A 0.85 


Foil 


« 




25, 


IM 


l.l:? 


New 


c« 


Oct. 


2, 


6 \ 1.13 


New 


«< 


AprU 


8, 


11 A 


0.85 


Full 


« 




17, 


OA 0.84 


Foil 


«« 




23, 


10 M 


1.07 


New 


tt 


Nov. 


1. 


4M 1.08 


New 


<( 


May 


8, 


4 A 


0.81 


Full 


tt 




16, 


6 M 0.79 


Full 


« 




22, 


6A 


0.94 


New 


tt 




30. 


2 A 0.9C 


New 


« 


June 


7, 


5M 


0.79 


Full 


(t 


Dec. 


10, 


OM 0.77 


FnU 


« 




21, 


4M 


083 


New 


(« 




30, 


2M 0.80 


New 


u 


July 


6. 


4A 


0.81 













The unit of altitude, at any place, is the rise of that tide which 
arriTes about a day and a half afler the time of New or Full Moon, at 
that place, the Sun and Moon at the moment of cj or ^ having been at 
their mean distance from the Earth and in the plane of the equator. 

The unit of altitude at any place can be ascertained by observation 
only, and multiplied by the quantities in the above table will give the 
height of the spring tides at that place for the present year. 

By the preceding table it appears that the tides of February 25th, 
March 26th, April 24th, September 4th, October 3d, and November 2d, 
will be the greatest of all in 1834. 

The actual rise of the tide, however, depends so much on the strength 
and direction of the wind, that it not unfrequently happens that a tide, 
which would, independently of these, have been small, is higher than 
another, otherwise much greater. But when a tide, which arrives when 
the Sun and Moon are in a favorable position for producing a great 
elevation, is still further increased by a very strong wind, the rise of 
the water will be uncommonly great, sufficient perhaps to cause dam- 
age. 

The following Table contains the Unit of Altitude of several ports 
and places on the coast of America, accoiding to the best authorities. 

llie unit of altitude of the several places in the Bay of Fundy was 
apcertained by recent observations. 



fe'et. 



Advocate Harbour(Bay of Fundy )50 
Andrews, St . . . . .25 
Annapolis (N. S.) . • 30 
Apple River. .... 50 
Av^psUne, St. . , . 5 



Basin of Mines (Bay of Fundy) 60 

Bay, Bristed .... 8 

«« Broad .... 9 

** Buzzard's .... 5 

" Ca»C9 . . ^- • 9 



y Google 



^" ," '" ' ^3:i£:^c'i-4 



1834.] 



TIOB TilBLK. 



TIDE TABLE. 



The following Table contaiiui the difference between the time of high 
wmter at Boston, and &t a large number of places on the American coast, 
bj which the time at any of them may be easily ascertained, by sub- 
Irmeting the difference at the place in question from the time at Boston, 
irhen the sign — is prefixed to it ; and by adding it, when the sign is-^. 

The time of high water, in the calendar pages, is of that tide which 
immediately prectdes the southing of the Moon. 



Albany 
Andrews, St. 
Annapolis (N. S.) 
Annapolis (Md.) 
Aogostine, St 
Bay, Bristed 

" Broad . 

«« Casco 

«« Chebucto . 

•* Genevieve, and 

«« St. Barbe 

<< Buzzard's 

** Narraganset 

«• Pistolet . 

« St. Mary's . 

« Sandwich (N. S, 

*^ Schecatica . 
Bermuda Inlet 
Cape Ann 

" Cansor . 

" Charles 

" Chat 

« ChurchiU 

"Cod 

«« Fear . 

" Hatteras . 

" Henlopen 

" Henry . 

'< Lookoat 

*« St. Mary 

« May . 

«( Romaiii (S. C.) 

« 8d>le (N. 8.) 



- h. m. 

4-4 12 


— 30 
—4 18 
—4 

— 3 45 

— 45 
—0 45 

— 4 



— 3 50 

— 3 53 

— 4 45 

— 2 

— 2 30 

— 30 

— 4 30 


— 3 

— 3 45 
4-0 SO 
—4 10 


—3 30 
—2 30 

— 2 45 

— 3 Bo 
—2 30 
—2 30 

— 2 45 
—3 30 
—3 30) 



Cape Split 


h.n. 
-0 15 


Charlkston 


— 4 00 


Cumberland (Basin Fort) 


+ 30 


Eastport 





Elizabeth Town Point . 


— 2 36 


Florida Key . 


-2 40 


Fort St. John . 


— 2 30 


Fryingpan Shoals 


— 5 


Gay Head 


— 353 


Georgetown Bar , 


-4 30 


Gouldsborough 


— 30 


Gut of Annapolis . 


— 1 30 


Gut of Cansor . 


-3 30 


Halifax . , . 


— 4 


Hampton Roads 


-380 


Harbour, Amelia . 


— 3 


" Beaver 


-2 45 


" Nantucket 


+ 030 


" Rhode Island . 


—4 45 


" Seven Isles . 


— 30 


" Towns^nd 


— 46 


Hillsborough Inlet 


— 4 


Holmes's Hole 


— 1 20 


Ice Cove 


— 1 30 


Isknd, AnUcosti, W. end 


+ 4 


" Bell, Straits of . 


— 2 15 


" Block . 


—3 63 


" Button . 


— 4 40 


« EUzabeth . 


— 260 


" Fox . . 


-0 45 


« Green . 


— 2 60 


« MOOM 





<« Prince Edwixd . 


—1 ^ 



d by Google 



u 



TABLB or LATITDDB AKD LOHGITUOK. 





h. m. 




h. m. 


Iiland, Rhode 


— 4 45 


Portland 


— 046 


« Sable . 


. —3 


PorUmouth (N. H.) . 


. —0 15 


« Seal . . 


. —2 45 


Port Campbell 


^2 30 


Janeiro, Rio 


. +5 


" Hood 


. —4 


John's, St. (N. B.) 


. +0 30 


" Howe . 


— 3 


« St. (N. F.) . 


. —5 


« Jackson . 


. —3 30 


Kennebec 


— 45 


" Roseway 


— 3 15 


Kennebunk 


. —0 15 


" Royal 


. —4 14 


Louisburg . 


. —,4 15 


Providence . 


— 3 5 


Machiaa . 


. —0 30 


Quebec . 


. —5 30 


Marblehead . 


O' 


Race Point . 


— 15 


Martha"sVineyard(W.Point)-3 53 


Richmond 


+ 4 20 


Mary's, St., Bar . 


— 4 


River, Apple 


— 30 


Monomoj Pnint . 





" St. Croix 





Motinl Desert 


. —0 30 


«« Delaware, entrance 


i —2 30 


Nantucket (town) . 


. +0 30 


" George's 


— 045 


" (shoal) 


+ 44 


« Penobscot . 


. —0 45 


Nassau (N. P.) 


. —4 


« Sheepscut . 


— 46 


New Bedford 


— 3 30 


Salem, Mass. 





Newburyport . 


. —0 15 


Salvador, St. . 


+ 4 15 


New Haven . 


. —0 14 


Sandy Hook 


— 4 38 


New London 


. —2 36 


S-ivnnnah 


— 3 15 


Newport 


— 3 50 


St. Simon's Bar . 


—4 


Nkw York 


. —2 21 


" Offing . 


-4 5 


Nootka ground 


+ 50 


« Sound 


—2 30 


Norfolk . 


. —3 


Snnbury . . . . 


— 2 


Qcrmcock Inlet 


—2 30 


Tarpaulin Cove . 


—2 38 


Old Point Comfort . 


. —5 25 


Vineyard Sound 


— 30 


Philadelphia 


+ 2 57 


Windsor 


+ 30 


Plymouth 





Wood's Hole 


—2 60 



LATITUDE AND LONGITUDE OF SOME OF THE PRINCIPAL 
PLACES IN THE UNITED STATES. &c.. WITH THEIR DIS- 
TANCE FROM THE CITY OF WASHINGTON. 

The Longitudes are reckoned from Greenwich, 

The Capitah (seats of Government) of the States and Territories are 
designated by Italic Letters. 

The Latitude of those places which are marked with a * hat be^n d«- 
ienained, hj the Editor, from actual observations, made hy himself 



Digitized by 



Google 



1834.] 



TABLE OF LATITUDE AUD LOROITUDE. 



25 



within a few months, and may be relied on within a few seconds. 
The Latitude of the places marked witii a t has recently been ascer. 
tained by others, and communicated for publication. 

The Longitude of the places marked with a * was computed by the 
Editor from observations on the Annular Eclipse of the Sun in February, 
1831 , alter correction for the errors of the Moon's place, as given by the 
tables of Damoiseau. The Longitude of those marked with a t was 
recently determined by the Editor by chronometers, by comparing the 
place in question with Washington, the University of Virginia, Phila- 
delphia, or Boston ; the position of which is supposed to be correctly 
ascertained. 

The Latitude and Longitude, however, of very many of the places in 
the following table, where no recent observations have been made, are 
to be considered only as approximations. 







Latitude. 


Lonjritude, We«t. 


Diat.from 






North. indejirces., in time. | 


Waah'n. 




„ 


o / II 


h. in. 1. 


milei 


Albany (State House), 


N.Y.^ 


■^42 88 65 


78 44 49 


4 54 69.8 


876 


Alexandria, 


D.C. 


88 49 


77 4 


5 8 16 


6 


Annapolis . . 


Md. 


39 


76 48 


6 6 63 


87 


Auburn, 


N.Y. 


43 65 


76 3S 


5 663 


830 


Augusta, . 


Ga. 


33 38 


81 54 


5 37 36 


660 


Augusta (State House), 


Me. 


*4A 18 38 


69 60 


489 30 


696 


Augustine, St. . 


Fa. 


39 48 30 


81 36 


636 30 


841 


BalUmore(BatMon't.), 


Md. 


*39 17 13 


t76 37 60 


f5 6 31.3 


86 


Bangor (Court House), 


Me. 


*44 47 40 


68 47 


4 36 8 


661 


Barnstable (Old C.H.), 


Mass. 


*41 41 59 


70 16 


4 41 4 


466 


Batavia, 


N.Y. 


43 59 


78 18 


5 13 63 


370 


Beaufort, 


S.C. 


33 35 


80 41 


5 33 44 


699 


Bosf4m (State House), 


Mass. 


*43 30 58 


71 4 9 


4 44 16.6 


489 


Bnstol (Hotel), 


R. L 


^^41 39 43 


71 19 


4 45 36 


409 


Brooklyn (Navy Yard), 


N.Y. 


40 41 50 


♦73 59 30 


*4 55 58 


997 


Brunswick (College), 


Me. 


43 53 


6956 1 


4 39 40.1 


668 


Buffalo, 


N.Y. 


43 63 


78 65 


5 15 40 


876 


Cambridge (Harv. Hall), Mass.| 


*43 31 58 


71 7 36 


44439.7 


431 


Camden, 


S.C. 


84 17 


80 30 


6 33 13 


467 


Canandai^ua, . 


N.Y. 


43 64 


ni7 


5 9 8 


886 


Cape Cod (Light House), Mass. 


*43 3 6 


70 4 


4 40 16 


607 


Charleston (College), 


S.C. 


t33 47 


^'SO 53 


*6 30 3.6 


644 


Charle8town(Navy Y'd), Mass. 


43 33 


71 8 33 


4 44 14.3 


483 


Cincinnati, 


Ohio. 


89 6 


84 33 


5 37 38 


497 


Columbia^ 


ac. 


83 57 


81 7 


534 38 


500 


Cidumbus^ 


Ohio. 


39 47 


83 8 


6 33 19 


896 


Concord, (SUte House), N. H. 


*43 13 19 


71 39 


446 66 


474 


Dedham (Court House), 


Mass. 


43 10 


71 11 


444U 


499 


uthxni^ • o • 


Mich. 


43 34 


83 66 6 81 88 MS 


DomddsonvOU, . 


La. 


80 8 


91 9 6 4 8 1918 


Dorchester ( Ast Obs.), 


Mass. 


t43 1» 6 


71 4 15 4 44 17 I 4M 


DoOSTf . 


Del. I 


99 90 


76 80 


\ 6 a 


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3 



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p:^' 







_ .cksburfff 

nederickitowii, 
Okmowter» . 




erstowii. 
Ha"- 
HaDowel], 



Hod 
HmitmUe.*^ . 



Iboaky 
Kingston, 

Lodnloit. 

Lonki (St), . . 

lioniivillflu 

Loir^ (Mer. House), 

llUMtown» . 



ioMHdi 




r* h-'i 


f*r 


'-' ILttttM 


•w.; 


N.if. 


4t It 


laoi 


4 49 99 


Me. 


44H 


«9 90 


497 44 


N.a 


«t 


W 7 


099 96 


N.H. 


ais 


TO 90 


4 a 40 


ft 


asu 


84 40 


09940 . 


asu 


77 99 


10 99 


N.B. 


40 a 


00 40 


497 


Hd; 


a9 94 


77 18 


19 


&C. 


aau 


79 17 


17 


Mass. 


49 ae 


70 40 


449 40 


MaM. 


49 ar 


.79 90 


400 94 


Md. 


aaar 


77 90 


10 90 


N.a 


t44a0 9O 


*8aao40 


♦4 14 91 


Me. 


44 17 


oaao 


490 90 


Pa. 


40 16 


70 00 


790 


Ckmn. 


4146 


7900 


4 0190 


N.Y. 


49U 


78 40 


400 4 


Ala. 


uae 


00 07 


47 48 


Ind. 


aaaa 


00 


044 90 


MVi. 


astt 


00 


099 


MM. 


aeae 


09 8 


899 


Me. 


4a 9ft 


70 99 


4tf 9 


U.G 


44 8 


78 40 


040 


Tenn. 


aaao 


89 04. 


090 00 


Pa. 


40 996 


70 90 98 


99.9 


Ky. 


98 6 


84 18 


097 19 


Ark. 


U40 


09 19 


6 848 


N.Y. 


46 11 


78 40 


10 4 


M'ri. 


asaa 


80 88 


016 94 


^ 


as :i 


80 ao 


049 


*49a8ftft 


7118 40 


4 40 10 


Va, 


araa 


79 99 


17 98 


Mass. 


49 98 


70 01 


449 48 


Maas. 


49 90 


70 01 


448 94 


Coon. 


41U 


79 90 


400 00 


Ga. 


aa T 


89 90 


088 90 


Ala. 


ao40 


88 11 


008 44 


Vt 


44 It 


79 98 


400 94 


Hub. 


'^4189 98 


•» 191 


*4 40 0.1 


L.C. 


49 91 


78 90 


404 90 


l)iMaia. 


"4110 19 


•» 749 


*4 40 10.8 


Toon. 


t90 9 90 


»*40 a 


*0 47 10J 


Jfl*- 


9194 


9194 49 


0988 


»J. 


40 40 


74 10 


486 40 


i¥Maia. 


'^1140 


*10 00 49 


*4 48' 4T.8 


^i^G. 


90 99 


77 


090 


.^ KIT. 


4191 


U, 1 


406 4 


^^^Nmi* 


muk 


10 09 


4 49 96 


^#if 


tin r 


Hi 11 


ro 9 6 



■piiM. . 

496' 

Tm 

991 

4M 



110 



on* 

1090 



106 



649 



601 



714 


r 


1146^ 


' \ 


no 


-1 


40i\ 


^\ 


997 


•.♦^ 




«c 


■ * 



'Digitized 



ibyGoogk 



1834.] 



TABLE or LATITUDE AlfD LOHMTUDX. 



37 





Lithuda 


Lonffitude.WMt. 


Dut. fron 




Nortb. 


in defreet 


intiiM. 


WMh»n. 




• • ti 




milM. 


yew Haven (College), Conn. 


fil 17 Ad 


79 57 48 


4 81 ai.1 


801 


New London, . . Conn. 


4133 


73 9 


448 86 


884 


New Orleans (City), La. 


^30 57 46 


*90 6 49 


6 37.8 


uit 


JSTewport, . R. L 


41 39 


71 31 14 


4 45 34.9 


40t 


New York (City Hall), N.Y. 


40 43 40 


♦74 1 8 


*4 56 4.5 


996 


Norfolk (Farmer's Bank),Va. 


*86 60M 


t76 18 47 


t5 5 15.1 


917 


Northampton (Court H.), Mass. 


*43 18 46 


73 40 


450 40 


876 


Norwich, . • Conn. 


41 88 


73 7 


448 38 


869 


Pensacola, . . Fa. 


80 38 


87 13 


548 48 


1060 ' 


Petersburg, . . Va. 


77 19 54 


77 30 


5 930 


lU 


Philadelphia (Tnd'ce H.) Pa. 


*89 66 69 


•75 10 59 


*5 48J> 


186 


Pittsburgh, . . Pa. 


40 83 


80 8 


5 30 33 


998 


Plattsburg, . .N.Y. 


44 43 


73 36 


458 44 


589 


Plymouth (Court H.), Mass. 


*4I 57 13 


70 43 30 


443 50 


430 


Portland (Town H.), Me. 


*48 89 16 


70 30 80 


4 41 93 


549 


Portsmouth, (Court H.), N. H. 


♦43 4 U 


70 45 


443 


491 


Poughkeepsie, . N.Y. 


41 41 


73 55 


456 40 


801 


Princeton, . .N.J. 


40 33 


74 35 


466 30 


177 


Prorirfence (Old Col.), R. L 


*41 49 36 


*7l 35 56 


*4 45 48.7 


894 


Quebec, (Castle), L. C. 


46 47 17 


70 66 31 


4 43 46.1 


78» 


Raleigh, . N.C. 


36 47 


78 48 


5 15 13 


986 


Eiehmond (Capitol), Va. 
Rochester (R'r House), N. Y. 


*87 83 17 


t77 36 38 


f5 9 49.9 


139 


*43 8 7 


77 51 


6 11 34 


861 


Sable (Cape), . PPda. 
Sackett's Harbour, N.Y. 


34 50 


61 15 


535 




43 65 


75 57 


5 848 


407 


Saco . . . Me. 


43 31 


70 96 


4 4144 


538 


Salem (North Choich), Mass. 


f53 8130 


♦76 53 7 


*4 48 33.5 


446 


Savannah, . . Ga. 


83 3 


81 8 


5 34 13 


663 


Schenectady, . N. Y. 


43 48 


73 56 


456 40 


891 


Springfield (Court H.), Mass. 
TaLUj3ias$u^ . . Fa. 


•43 5 58 
i0 38 


73 36 
84 86 


450 94 
688 34 


857 
896 


Taunton, . . . Mass. 


41 54 


71 7 


4 44 38 


415 


TVcntoR, . N.J. 


40 14 


74 89 


458 86 


166 


Troy, . . .N.Y. 


.43 44 


73 40 


454 40 


888 


TvLScaloosOy . . Ala. 


33 13 


87 43 


550 48 


868 


University of Virginia, Va. 


t38 3 8 


*78 31 39 


*5 14 5.9 


134 


UUca (Dutch Church), N.Y. 


*43 6 39 


75 13 


5 53 


^ 


Vandalia, . 11. 


88 50 


89 3 


666 8 


781 


Vevay, . . Ind. 


38 46 


84 59 


539 66 


566 


Vincennes, . . Ind. 


38 43 


87 35 


5 49 40 


603 


WASHINGT0H,(Capit0l), D. C. 


*38 6a54 


*n 1 48 


*5 8 7.3 




Washington, . . M'pi. 


3136 


91 30 


6 630 


1146 


Wheeling, . • Va. 


40 7 


80 43 


533 48 


364 


Wilmington, • . Del. 


89 41 


75 38 


5 1 53 


108 


Wilmington, . N. C. 


84 11 


78 10 


5 13 40 


416 


Worcester (Ant Hall), Mass. 


«43 16 9 


7149 


4 47 16 


894 


York, ... Me. 


48 10 


70 40 


4 43 40 


500 


York, . . .Pa. 


89 56 


76 40 


5 640 


87 


York, . , . U.C.I 


498S 


79 90 


6 n9(> 


\ m 



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28 January^ J'lr-f Mimth^ begins on We.dmsdmf, [18^4,, 


w 


'J *v 1 1 1 ;; h I k'gi m wta LMi J», Mt «JI I i me t 






Itt (by* 


7th day. . l.Uli dny. 


1 mhd^j. I 


S5tb day. 




bcfioi., Eudi. 


Ik'K'in 


t^ En^y, lU'i^jns 


. ^nOi. 


' Ua|;iiii. 


£.id«. 1 


Iic^tni., Ei)d«, 






h. m. 


luni. 


h. m. 


ii. til. In in. 


h. til. 


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Apogee, 15th, Ih. A — DiiUiice ^I.GOU mi. | Vt^rii^u, dati, llJi. A. — fiUl«ne« 5234,600 in«. 




f'AttJCj ci/ 1A« Mooji. 




lAit Quiirierp Sa dny. nil. 4,5,n. M. Full Moon, 2.>ih dAy» 5b. 4.0i5i. Bfl- 




Now Moon, Oih '* tS 2,3 A. La^i Uuarior^ 31*t ♦* B 6.5 A. 




Fir*t QudiUT, ITiii '* 9 34.7 A. 




1 

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ijuu*! «p!p<r liiab riioii atid m^t, (,C(ir. Air refract.) M. T. 


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January has Thirty-one Days, 



Pma*^ of the Meridian 
Dec. 



( mean ti tpe) a nd D« c!in>tion of the Plaoeta. 
J 9th d ay ~ 
Soiuks.] Dec. 



13th dny. 



aSih d ay. 




■^ 



2</ Sunday u/Ur Christmas, 
Epiphany. 

d D 9. d D ^. 
Battle at New OiIeans» 1816. 
d 9 (J» O ec, invisible. 
Stamp act passed, 1765. 
5 ill y. Linnxus died, 1778. 
\st Sunday after Epiphany, 
d ? 1 V /,di5t. 21'. 
Hallcy died, 1742. 
CharlcsloD burnt, 177S. 
Battle at Coruniia, 1809. 
DUO- Franklin born, 1706i 
Battle at Cowpens, 1781. 
2d Sitnday ajler Epiphany. 
U. S. independence acknowledg. 
•D.y. [by G. 8.1788. 

Battle at Tallapoosa, 1814. 

•d D ^n. dD^n. 

Frederick the Great bom, 1712. 
Conversion of 8t, PauL 
Septuagesima Sunday. 
Treaty with France, 1832. 
d D c iq;. Peter Greal d. 1725. 
d ^ h- Georg* IH- «li<^» 1890. 
Cbariei 1. behetdwi, \«4». 
d g g. 



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t'rbrunry^ Hccomi Mmith^ begins mi Saturday. [Ic^4.| 



Twitii^bt bt^^rii mii^ cndi, M 


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Nuw Hofin» mh diij, Hk f>a.{»fn. M, 1 Pint Cltuirtir» 16tb tlay, 4h. 33.am. A. 
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I834.J 


FcMruart/ has Tioenly-eiiiht Days, 3I| 


Paft<«ns«> of tiio Mrriilian (mean tinra) ami l>«rlinatiuii of the PlanMtM. | 


ijitiiuy. ' all iiay. | iJtu uay. 


lUih uuy. i '2.*tii day. 


\&mtks, Dec. 1 &«iAi. 1 Dec. Souths 


. Itec. 


! Souths. i>oc. \Somths., Due. 


1 b. m. , , h. m. 1 , , 1 li. in. 


. , ' h. m. ! , , .j h. m. 1 . , 


J I «!n -j-i6 1J| 1 36m +26 r »6r 


D+26 48 27m 4-37 30|jll 64a. -|-98 8 


h 3 aO 1 63 3 36 —- 1 48 3 11 


— 1 41| 2 46 .' — 1 33 ' 2 2im — 1 94 


5 » 41 — 11 46 9 26 — IQ 32 i 9 10 


— 12 16 8 64 , — 11 67 . 8 37 —11 88 

—22 3' 10 10 1—21 l^I'lO 6 — 90 14 


(J 10 ii '23 17 10 19 |— 22 44 10 13 


? 1141 '—20 8 1148 1—18 21 1166 


— 16 16' ia.| — 13 61 6a — II 10 
U —16 10 36 |— 10 63! 64 — 6 58 


9 1143 ! — 21 9 Oa.j — 18 36*0 189 


y 49U.— 14 61 28 —14 44 1 7 


— 14 38 11 47m — 14 3l'|ll 96m — 14 94 


g 1 M I — 13 34 1 39 —12 31 | 1 26 


— 11 27 1 13a. —10 22' 1 oa., — 16 


H. j 6 3 +9 68,'. 4 42 -f-lO 17 , 4 21 


+10 33, 4 1 +11 0|! 3 41 +11 98 


$ 11 6« 1—2-2 14' 11 30 1—20 19 11 2 ',—18 6 10 35 1—16 .^9' 10 9 18 s| 


^ 


MiMtw n^K* or HfU. Mviiu limo. 






^ fi . , ,x , - 






PHENOMEN.A AND ODSBRVA- 


^ 

s 


- 5 o 


41^ 

J^ 


£P.. 


1. 


i.i 


TIONS.. 


"5 

S 


ii i 1 


1 


¥ 
^ 




S5 

2 i 


Sundays and other RemarkabU 
Days. 




J riei. 


riM. 


n*M. 


rwM. 


rtsts. 






k. m. h. in. j h. m. | h in. 


Ii. m. 


b. ni I 




1 


6 20^m 66in; 63m 6om 


4im 


40ra 


Battle of Brieime, 1814. 


S. 


7 11.3m 2 6111 2 2m 1 68n) 


1 46ni 


1 44m 


Punjicaliotif Sexages. Sunday. 


3 


8 3.4 3 12 


3 8 3 4 


249 


2 46 


Spanish Inquisition abol. 1813. 


4 


8 66.4 ,4 16 


4 11 


4 6 


3 48 


3 44 1 


C^s.bo«. b. U.S. &G.B. 1783. 


6 


9 40.4 ', 5 13 


6 8 


6 2 


444 


440 1 


Galvaui died. 1799. 


6 


10 41.7 6 4 


6 


664 


6 37 


633 1 


d D ^. Qualla Baiio dest. 1832. 


7 


11 32.1 ' M<«. 


»eU. 


$et4. 


seta. 


sets. 


d D 9. d J) ?. [3.48 


s: 


20.1a- 


' 6 19a. 


6 24a. 


6 2da. 


6 4ia. 


6 47a 


^ $. Strength of $'s light 
Shrove Sunday. Capture of the 


1 6.6a 


6 21a. 


6 26a. 


6 28a. 


6 3SU. 


6 44a.' 


10 


1 48.9 


7 21 


724 


726 


7 33 


737 1 


Shrove BIond:y. [Insurg. 1799. 


11 


2 30.4 


890 


832 


823 


826 


829 


Shrote Tuesday. 6 O ^' 


12 


3 11 


9 19 


990 


920 


920 


9 22 


Lent begins. Ash Wednesday, 


13 


S61.6 


10 18 


10 18 


10 17 


10 14 


10 16 1 


Inf. d 9 ©. d 3y H. 


14 
15 


4 33.0 
6 16.2 


11 19 


11 17 


11 16 


11 9 


11 8 1 


d D U. d 9 t «. [1.46 
8 i O' iStreagtb of $'s light 












. . . j 


5. 


6 2.2a.' 2om 


18m 


16m 


6m 


sm 


17 


6 61.8 1 24 


1 21 


1 17 


1 4 


* ' 1 


16th. Frig. Phila. destroy. 1804. 


18 


7469 1 229 


9 26 


920 


2 6 


9 1 1 


Mania Lutlicr died, 154G. 


19 


8 42.4 3 33 


338 


3 22 


3 6 


. 1 1 


dpH&.j n. 


•20 


9 42 1 '432 


427 


4 21 


4 4 


4 ; 


Voliaire b. 1G94. Garrick, 1716. 


21 


10 42 7 1 5 23 


623 


6 18 


6 1 


4 67 , 


d P 2 u c 


22 


11 42 


ri*M. 


riMts. 


rwM. 


ritts 
6 50H. 


rises. '■ 
6 66a. 


Washington bom, 1732, N. S. 
Id Sunday in Lent. Peacock 


5 3sa. 


6 38a. 1 6 40a. 


24 


40.6m 6 62 


666 


6 67 


7 2 


7 6 


St. Matthicu. [taken, 1813. 


25 


1 36.8 ; S 10 


8 11 


8 12 


8 13 


8 16 


d P h- d^v*- 


26 


3 29.3 , 9 » 


996 


9 96 


922 


9 23 


Bonaparte left Elba, 1815. 


27 


t 31.7 10 41 


10 40 


10 37 


10 30 


10 99 


d ^? ^ Vf » <l«*lance 2'. 


28| 


4 IS 8 11 54 


11 61 


11 48 


11 87 


11 85 




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'S2 Marrh, Third Monih^ bri^iits tm Sntarday. [IBJM, 



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7 U 

7ai 

7 3fl 



_l!JLh tiny* 
tiiTgiitftJ Ends. 



gTith day. 



Ii 

4 Mm- 
4 S4 
4 Sff 
443 
4 40 



7 46 a 
7 49 
7 40 
7 33 
7 31 



h. tn 
4 90tll< 

4 3a 

4 98 

{4 34 



740 

T4« 
7 48 



Jipofft9 and Pwgea ef tk« Mooh, 
ApqgOB, lltb^ 1h. M,— DUi.aag/iOil mil«a, \ JVrtg« P. g4tta, 7h. A. ^Dttt. 9^21,700 milat. 




\ta4.] March has Thirt^^ne Days. ^ 


FMMy« of the MerkUan (mean Ume) and DeoUnation of the Plamu. 




lat day. | 


7tbday. 


I3tb day. 


19tb day. 1 


19ibaay. 1 


Stmllu. 


D«c. 


StmtkM. 


l>ee. 


SntM* 


. Dec. 


Sauik*. 


Dae 


SnUMs. 


~De«r 




k. m. 


• ' 


b. m. 


• / 


h.m. 


• 


1 j h. m. 


• ' 1 


h.m. 


• 1 


h 


s ftzn- 


-118 


1 40m 


— 1 8 


1 140 


Q — 67 49m 


— 46| 


34m 


— 086 


fi 


827 • 


—11 33 


8 10 


— 11 fl 


763 


— 10 84 7 36 


—10 7, 


7 18 


— »a» 


i 


10 S • 


—19 311 


968 


—18 30 


963 


— 17 


3; 948 


—16 39 


948 


—14 f 


l^\U 11 ■ 


-14 30, 


10 48 


— 14 IS 


10 36 


—14 


7 10 8 


—14 


9 41 


— 18 54 


$lo 9a.- 


— 9 38 


isa. 


— 631 


178 


L. — 3 39 ; 3ia. 


— 036 


034a. 


+ 336 


fiiOM j- 


— 8 33 


089 


— 73a 


036 


— 6 19 18 


— 6 13 





— 4 7 


«^ i 1 4 1- 


— 3 18 


1 14 


--343 


1 »" 


--6 30' 064 


--8 8 


31 


--7 8 


u 


S98 - 


•\*\l 39 


3 9 


,--13 4 


360 


--13 29. 3 81 


--13 66 


3 18 


- -18 91 


$ 


9 fta - 


—11 16 


938 


-8« 


9 6 


— 6 69;| 8 43 


— 3 38 ! 8 31 


— 1 6 


$!ii« '- 


-H8 36! 


11 6 '-f-3fi44 


10 38 


-f-38 53| 10 11 


-{-28 68,. 9 44 


-|-38 46 


r 


. 


Met 


Ml ri«e» or loU. 


Mean time. | 




1 






.; 


.. 




^ 


PilENOBiK*>JA AXMU UlSBt^HVA- 


o 


5 


4 

i 


1^ 


1' 


1 

55 


T10N8. 

Sundays and other Remarkablr 
Days. 






ri0ieji. 


rittt. 


riaes. 


n#e*. 


rues. 




1 


b. m. 

6 6.ini 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


b. m. 


b.m. 


9 in ft. d D n & ^ :£i:. 
3d Sunday in Lent. 


s: 


5 09.101 












1 410 


1 om 


66m 


43m 


39m 


3 


12.7 


3 9 


3 6 


1 69 


1 43 


1 39 


War dec. against Algiers, 1815. 


4 


7 46.1 


3 9 


3 4 


368 


3 41 


3 37 


23d Congress began, 1833. 


6 


8 88.A 


4 3 


8 67 


3 61 


8 84 


8 80 


MoMsacre in Boston, 1770. 


6 


9 119.1 


4 47 


443 


487 


4 31 


4 17 


d D ^. [blew up, 1778. 


7 


10 17.4 


636 


633 


6 17 


6 3 


469 


Sup. d ? O- Frig. Randolph 


8 
5. 


11 33 

11 AlJOm 


668 


666 


6 61 


6 39 


587 


6 i ^Vfy dist. 31'. 
Mid Lent Sunday, 


•eu. 


ttU. 


seU. 


seU, 


•eta. 


10 


38 9a. 


6 13a 


6 16a. 


6 na. 


6 3ia. 


6 368. 


d D ?. 


11 


1 9.7 


7 13 


7 13 


7 13 


7 14 


7 17 


Great, east, eloog. of 9 . d D 9- 


12 


100.3 


8 11 


8 11 


8 10 


8 8 


8 9 


d ^ t Vf » di«>aoce 4'. 


13 


3S1.3 


9 11 


9 10 


9 8 


9 8 


9 3 


d D U- ChampollioD d. 1832 


14 


3 18^ 


10 13 


10 10 


10 7 


9 69 


9 67 


Planet Uranus discovere<l, 1781. 


15 
17 


S574» 


11 16 


11 13 


11 8 


10 66 


10 54 


Pros. Jackson born, 1767. 

5th Sunday in Lent. 

Brili»sh 6nally left Boston, 1776. 


4 4&.3a 
6 35.9 








11 648 


11 62a. 


18m 


14m 


lom 


18 


6 39.9 


1 20 


1 16 


1 11 


63m 


60m 


• D /* n. 


19 


7 36.6 


3 31 


3 16 


3 10 


1 53 


1 48 


Great fire in Boston, 17C0. 


20 


8 35.0 


3 17 


3 13 


3 6 


349 


2 45 


Spring begins. E*&vx talc. 1814. 


21 


9 33.7 


4 6 


4 3 


366 


3 42 


3 38 


Battle of Alexandria, 1801. 


22 


10 31.4 


4 49 


446 


4 43 


429 


4 36 


Goethe died, 1832, aged 83. 
Palm Sunday. Penguin capt. 


11 17.68 


r'utf. 1 riinu. \ 


rues. 


rUu. 


rises. 


24 


8- 


6 40a. 


6 43a. 


6 4.38. 


6 46a. 


5 49a. 


a S^' CJ 9 ?. [1S15. 


25 


13.3m 


6 68 


660 


669 


6 67 


659 


Lady day. d D b • 


26 


1 6.3 


8 16 


8 16 


8 13 


8 8 


8 8 


Napoleon entered Paris, 1815. 


27 


1 69.9 


933 


930 


938 


9 19 


9 17 


<9 h ©. Peace of Amiei««. l«Ol. 


2S 


3 64.1 


10 48 


10 U 


10 41 


10 29 


10 25 


Good Friday. Raphael b. 1438- 


29 


3 49.1 


11 09 


11 64 


1160 


11 35 


11 80 


Inf. d 9 O- • 1> •^ "I- 


4 44.6D) 




• • • 


• • • 


• • • 


. 


Batter day. Bat. of Gtochoyi &. 


3J »s9.7 It 9m/ semi simi S5m\ 


OJim 


Easier Mondavi, VWii>K«,\»\ 



^ 



V V3V7VJVH>. 



34 April, Fmrth Month, begins on Taesdatf. [1834. 


TwUifht bc^ni ai>d end*. Mciwi time. 




l.td«^ 


iUi tiny. j 


Ulib dfcjr* II 


l»th dmf. 1 


Bwioi. l^uU, 
b.ni. b.m. 


ETL. b 




b.m. 




li. m. 


b. en. lh.ni. ' 




Emim, 


4 im. e 


, la. 


3 urn, 


a 9&. 


^ 4III] 


.$ 10 a. 9 3lm. 


97 a. 


3 lonu 37 a. 


N.York» 


4 11 7 


97 


U 


9 


148 


B 14 3 97 


33 


330 030 


Wuh. 


4 Ifi 7 


£3 




8 I 


^&3 


<» » 3^ 


S 17 


J 33 8 30 


Cbadef. 


4^ 7 


49 


4 16 


T 49 


4 7 


7 AS A U 


8 


3A1 ft 


N. OrPi» 


!« ^ i7 » 


Wl 


T 44 


4 n 


b4» [4 


ft 1 


7 03 


[3 00 7 Ai 


AfK^fH, 7th, 3h. H. ' BlKl. ^,500 jnilcf , |>i?rifee, SSd, &b. M, — But. 999,000 mll«t. 


Kfl%r MoGii, ath d«T, lib. a4aiu. a. I FuII Moon, ^d tlmr, 3h.ir7,t^. M. 
Fim Quftfwr,^ Ifith •* 7 10.0 A. | Ln#t CluartBi, SOth ^Ml ^i^ M- 


5 

as 

1 




SUTi'« Mfipa- JitiiEi rtii«i BEid icii. (ct»r. for rofrttct,} 11. T. 


Uigii wAiei^ M. liiiu^ 1 




— i 


o 

1 


J4 




1 




4 




1 
3 














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h. m. 








h. in. 


b. m. 


b. nu 


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& jfi 


6n 


a 40 


ft ;I2 


& 40 


6 3f» 


A ao 


10 


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3 37m 


A8IE 


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07 


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5JS 


4JI 


S3 


40 


31 


40 


90 


034 


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3«| 


SiTh, 


40 


Si 


41 


3G 


43 


H4 


40 


31 


47 


3t 


T43 


a 33 


343 


4^F, 


aa 


99 


%9 


37 


41 


n 


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3J 


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8 40 


039 


4 40 


esu. 


as 

»S4 


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91 


37 


39 


40 

£ 3& 


6 30 


14 

a 4^ 


3S 
33 


4« 
ft 44 


31 
03S 


034 


7 13 


a34 


10 ]0m 


740m 


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7M, 


93 


3^ 


92 


«0 


50 


37 


41 


34 


49 


31 


10 43 


31 


043 


S.Tu. 


11 


Ha 


aa 


HI 


«d 


m 


30 


^ 


41 


93 


11 13 


ftl 


7 19 


9W. 


^ 


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aa 


SS 


39 


^ 


M 


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39 


11 40 


9 19 


740 


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W 


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81 


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30 


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lliP. 


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s« 


ar 


34 


90 


Bl 


AS 


37 


SO 


34 


37 


10 13 


837 


12 8. 
18^: 


114 


37 
636 


4 44 


3a 

€34 


98 
6 37 


33 

033 


34 

» 33 


fl 30 


1 97 


6^ 


] 11 


10 50 


11 


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11 sstn 


40ED 


UM, 


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ae 


33 


17 


!l$ 


» 


33 


90 


u 


30 


333 


ua. 


10 n 


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1S» 


40 


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3a 


94 


«A 


XI 


m 


34 


37 


3 3ft 


1 4 


11 3S 


16! W. 


19 


li 


1» 


m 


S3 


^0 


90 


AO 


33 


37 


4 34 


3 13 


034a. 


17 TL 


li 


4i3 


IS 


40 


33 


37 


^ 


01 


31 


38 





3 30 


3 


I8F. 


14 


4a 


t« 


41 


90 


as 


30 


la 


91 


90 


7 37 


ft 


337 


19 S. 

20 Su. 


14 
9 11 


44 
6 4ft 


u 

A IJ 


49 
G 43 


10 
5 17 


3« 
040 


37 


03 
6 39 


A so 


30 
S 90 


BAft 


6 14 


4 33 


37IL 


7 60. 


37a. 


21 M. 


10 


4t 


li 


49 


10 


41 


34 


34 


90 


30 


10 1ft 


7ft4 


1ft 


22 


•I'll. 


a 


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40 


14 


4^ 


3^ 


as 


37 


31 


100a 


i X7 


OflO 


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w. 





49 


i 


47 


n 


43 


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30 


31 


1140 


10 


7 40 


24 


Th. 


a 


SO 


s 


4fl 


n 


44 


3L 


30 


Si 


33 


* ' ■ 1 


10 3 


fiSi 


25 


l\ 


a 


«Q 




4» 


to 


44 


30 


A? 


34 


33 


osszn 


10 40 





26 


S. 


i 1 


a 
OM 


« 4 







40 
47 


10 
A 10 


37 
$38 


33 

ft to 


33 

9 34 


1 


1138 


40 


m 


Ai. 


I 40in 


4 * . 


10 aftiL 


tS 


M, 


4«9 


AS 




Al 





4« 


10 


30 


30 


30 


3 3ft 


uro 


1133 


29 


Tu. 


«fi 


St 




oa 


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4fi 


u 


ao 


10 


U 


3 33 


1 3 


■ 1 « 


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W, 


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A4 


1 


M 


14 


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19 ■! 30 1 


4 ^ 


3 1 


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Digitized by \^KJKJWl\^ 



1834.] 



April has Thirty Days. 



35 



PmMmgB of the Meridian (mem time) and Declination of the Pianeii. 



let day. 



— 9 6 

13 48;' 8 flS 
— 12 19 I 9 80 



Ib.mc 

¥9 15 
1^ 986 
1134 
11 46 

39a. 

1 61 
7 66 
9 16 j-|-« 37 

11 60 — 30 



Dec. 



7th day. 



SautJu. 
b. m. 
6 89m 



3 51 

+ 5 67 

18 61 

1 n 



11 3 

83a. 

1 38 

739 
8 61 
11 36 



Dec. 

• i 

— 836 

— 13 48 

— 10 41 
-f-0 61 

— 146 
-[-853 

— -14 18 
4-8 83 

38 3 

— 9 



13th day. 



,S0utJkt.\ liecT 

!h.m. . 

6 30m — 6 5 
8 29 — 13 39 



9 34 

10 38 

11 30 



8 58 

— 39 

— 44 



37a. --11 42 

j 1 16 j- -14 44 

7 31 ' 

838 
10 69 14-0 1 



19th day. 



Simths. 
h. m. 

6 ira 

8 6 

9 17 
10 36 



Dec. 

• / 

— 7 36 
— 18 86 

— 7 18 
88 



11 6 '--0 19 



43a. 
67 

7 4 

8 6 
10 34 



- -14 21 
--15 10 
4-6 40 
36 59 

-ho 111 



asthday. 



h. 

i 6 4im 
I 748 

9 11 
10 31 
10 68 

47a. 

039 

648 

7 46 
10 9 



Dec. 
• / 

— 7 4 
— 13 31 

— 636 
4-046 
-- 1 36 
--16 46 
--16 86 
4-7 69 

31 
19 



§ 



11 



IS. 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 



14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
& 
21 
22 
28 
24 
26 
26 



S 
28 
29 



h. m. 

6 88.8ID 

7 36.8 
S IS.3 
9 1.8 
9 459 



10 38.3m 

11 9.1 
n 49.6 

3(Ua. 

1 13.3 
1 66.1 
3 43.6 



3 81.9a. 

4 34.3 

6 ia9 

6 16J3 

7 118 

8 7.9 

9 3.7 



9 66.4a. 

10 49.6 

11 43.9 

8 

87.im 

1 63^ 
3 39.6 



t97.im 
4Si.7 
6 l&S 
80| 6 0.9 



Moon rines or wt*. Mean time. 



h. m. 
I 50m 

3 47 
838 

4 3 
4 SO 



4 5dm 

6 19 
Mis. 

7 6a< 

8 6 

9 8 
10 11 



n 14a. 



16m 

1 11 

3 1 
3 46 
333 



3 56m 
rues. 

6 47a 

7 6 
823 
987 

10 47 



rues. 
h. m. 
1 64m 
3 43 

3 34 
8 59 

4 37 



4fi3m 

6 19 
sets. 

7 7a. 

8 10 

9 13 
10 17 



4 53m 

6 18 
sets. 

7 9a. 

8 13 

9 16 
10 31 



11 30a. 



33m 

1 18 
3 7 
3 61 
3 38 



11 i 



4tm 
137 



3 50m 
rises. 

6 476. 

7 4 
6 19 
9 83 

10 43 



11 * 



88in 
13S 



1^ 

m 



h.n 
1 48m 
3 87 

3 19 

a 56 

4 36 



11 36a. 



38m 

1 34 
3 13 

2 55 

3 31 



4 2m 
rises. 

5 466 

7 1 

8 16 
939 

10 87 



11 88a. 



•24 

m 

JS 



rises. 
h. m. 
1 3im 
3 30 

3 4 
8 42 

4 15 



4 45m 

6 14 
seU. 

7 ua. 

8 20 

9 38 
10 85 



4 44m 

5 15 
seU. 

7 isa. 

8 35 

9 34 
10 43 



11 4ia. 



45m 

1 41 
3 30 
3 10 
3 43 



4 9m 
rises. 

5 43a. 
664 

8 4 

9 13 
10 30 



11 318. 



83m 

1 17 I 



16m 

1 2 



rues. 
h. m. 

1 36m 

2 16 

3 

3 39 

4 13 



11 49a. 



53m 

1 50 

2 38 

3 17 
3 49 



4 14m 
rises. 

5 44a. 
663 

8 3 

9 10 
10 16 



11 16a. 



lom 

067 



PHENOMENA AND OBSERVA- 
TIONS. 

Stmdays and other RemarkabU 
Days. 



[Turkey &l E^pt, 1832. 
Easter Tuesday. War between 
Battle of Cop>cnbagen, 1801. 

(5^ cy«.,di9t. 8'. [18S2. 

d D <?• Treaty with Mexico, 
Low Sund. Rev. in Brazil, 1831 
d D 9. d U ocp. 
French entered Spain , 1828. 
9 in y . d D ? . Hacon d. 1C26. 
CJ D U. Bank U. S. incorpo- 
[rated, 1816. 
* ]) « y . Rodney's vicl. 1782. 
2d Sunday after Easter. 
d U ^ T* Battle of Almanza, 
[1707. 
BufToii died, 1788. 
Franklin died, 1790. 
l9Ui. Byron died, 1824, a. 36. 
Battle of Lexington, Mass. 1775. 
2d Sunday after Easier. 
d D U • ^^^ B^ Montreal, 1832. 

d ?U- ? 31' north of 1|.. 
Greatest west, elong. of ^ . 
f at greatest south latitude. 
St. Mark. «7th. York Uk. 1818. 
4//t Sunday after Easter. 
Chaucer died, 1484. 
Epervier taken, 1814. 
Wasbingion l»t Fret. VT^. 



Digitized by Google 



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TwiliKbt Iwjfin* HMil »»»•'•. Mctn lifiie* [^r | 




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7tti-1ay^ .1 i;fOi<iay* i 

Begins. Eortn. llBosinB^I Enrti. 
h. m. In m. K. tn* )h in* | 


nith <li«y. 


a til *iaj. [; ' 




EiiUi. 


1. 01. 


Bridi. 
h-m. 


Bogiri*. 


Had*, y 

h.m. g 


Boiton, 


3 7ra. 


J 47 a- 


3 6etlLa57H. 


3 4inL9 7 a. 8 36m 


» na. 


3 34111. 


9 38 a. ■ 


N. Vork, 


3 14 


J40 


3 4 


6 4» 


9 64 6 68 'a 43 


6 8 


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6 40 


3 4 8 48 !3 6» 


6 67 


9 47 


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6 37 H 


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9 8 


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J New Moon, Slh ddy, 3L. ]7.0ciu A. 1 Full MtKin, 9^1 dnj, fth. 53.{>iii. A.J| 

First auirtnf. Ifitb " t -W.-^ M. 1 Lwl annrtPr, anth " 3 4S.6 M. fl 


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5? 


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h. m. 


b. m. 


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4 M 


6 69 


4&» 


6 &» 


3 3 


6 63 


y 13 


6 41 


A 17 


6 37 , 


9 36111 


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F. 


M 


7 


56 


66 


1 


63 


12 


43 


10 


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664 


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3 64 f 


3 

4 


Sir. 


52 
4 50 


1 

7 a 


67 
4 66 


67 
6 66 



4M 


64 
r( A6 


^ 10 


43 
ii44 


a 16 


39 
6 40 


6 3 


6 43 


- ^ ,1^ 


6 661)1 


6 34UI 


4 36111 ■ 


6 


M. 


49 


<i 


JUl 


m 


68 1 


66 ' 


JO 


45 




40 


9 36 


7 14 


636 : 


6 


Tu. 


43 


4 


ft4 


T 


67 


66 




45 




41 


la 11 


7 50 


6 11 ; 


7 


W. 


41 


fr 


fl3 


1 


60 


61 




40 




42 


10 43 


8 3'J 


a 43 : 


8 


Th, 


46 


e 


A'2 


3 


66 


68 




46 




43 


Jl 13 


9 53 


7 13 \ 


d 


F. 


4A 


7 


SI 


a 


M 


60 




47 




43 


11 45 


904 


7 46 ^ 


10 

u 


a. 


44 

4 43 


5 
7 9 


SO 
4 40 


4 

7 6 


03 
4 63 


T 
7 1 


•> 6 


46 

6~46^ 


A 10 


44 
6 44 


196. 


9 6B 


Slfl i: 


666. 


10 36m 


6 6611 ' : i ■ 


12 


M, 


4^ 


10 


43 


6 


&J 


a 




49 




46 


I 37 i 


11 16 


9 37 ["; 
10 03 f' 


15 


Tu. 


41 


II 


47 


7 


60 


3 




60 




45 


3 31 


33. 


14 


W. 


40 


13 


48 


8 


43 


4 




60 




46 


3 16 


u »a 


13 16 it; 


IS 


Th. 


S9 


13 


44 


9 


46 


6 




61 




46 


4 18 1 


1 57 


oia«||^ 

133 ll 


W 


F, 


38 


14 


45 


10 


47 


6 




bX 




47 


633 


3 13 


17 

18 


ST 


37 

4ae 


IS 

Tilt 


41 
i 41 


It 
I 13 


46 
446 


6 
7 7 


S 


\ 63 
663 


6 6 


48 

6 46 


666 i 


\ 36 


3 6gj| 


6 7a. 


6 46:i. 


19 


M, 


30 


17 


40 


13 


46 


S 


I M* 


61 




49 


» 3 


6 43 


6 3 


20 


Tu. 


35 


IB 


39 


14 


44 


fi 


m 


64 




43 


9 51 


7 30 


6 6J 


21 


W. 


34 


10 


aa 


14 


43 


9 


66 


65 




w> 


10 38 


8 17 


6 38 ; 


22 


Th 


33 


30 


37 


1« 


43 


10 


67 


66 




60 


11 33 


9 3 


7 33 


23 


R 


3^3 


ai 


36 


16 


\% 


11 


67 


66 




6] 


• . . 


9 46 


6 a 


24 




31 
4flO 


7 SI 


3ft 
4 36 


17 
7 16 


41 
4 41 


13 
7 13 


66 
460 


66 
6 61 


6 3 


61 
6 63 


6ni 


10 36 


6 49 1: 


49ni 


11 loa. 


9 311»^ 


26 


M. 


!KI 


94 


34 


10 


^ 


13 


66 


61 




6-2 


1 ai 


11 61 


10 It'i 


27 


Tn, 


29 


*J5 


34 


a» 


3d 


14 


A6 


66 




63 


3 n 


. « ■ 


10 31 Jl 


28 


W. 


38 


9a 


33 


^1 


36 


IS 


61 


6S 




63 


366 


S4m 


1] 41 ly 


■2» 


rh. 


•It 


^ 


3^ 


23 


38 


16 


04 


m 




63 


343 


1 31 


• • ^1 


I;t0 


F. 


36 


27 


33 


33 


37 


16 


63 


69 




64 


^38 


a 17 I 


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fllff/ 


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93 


37 


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64 


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390 


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Digii 


zed by V 


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It 


\ 



1834.] May has Thirty-one Days. 37 










l«t day. 1 1 7Ui day. 


13ih d«y. 


i9th day. | 


3ftlh day. 1 






SmtAi. '. Dec. 1 StmUu, , t>oc. 


Santa. 


l>ec. 


SomUU. 


Dec. 


amUks. Um. 1 




a.«-Jom — ea*' Atom 




h.m 


• 1 


h m. 


• / 


h.m. 


• ; 




-6 6 


4S7ra 


— 688 


4 ,6m- 


— 6 18 


8 6im 


— 460 




^?j7 90 —13 28,' 6 57 


-13 36 


684 


—13 34 


6 10 - 


-13 381 


6 47 


—18 93 




J|9 6 338|8ft8 


-148 


8 6, 


--0 1 


8U - 


-149! 


887 


--886 




B ilO 40 j- 


-2 1810 26 


--3,6 


10 19 


--4 11 


966 • 


--6 6| 


945 


--6 60 




»jio« '- 


-3 2jil0 28 


--6,3 


10 40 


--9 69||l0 66 |- 


-14 11' 


11 19 


- -18 19 




Hi 


oaia.:- 


-16 0|i 3a. 


--16 24 


U 46 


1--16 48 


11 97 - 


-17 11! ill 9 1 


--17 88 




? 


63 - 


-18 68! 1 


--90 60 


1 7a. 


--39 33 


1 16a. -|-33 83| 


1 38a. 


--34 17 




$ 


8 31 1- 


- 9 8!| 6 16 


--10 6 


6 


--10 63 


646 - 


- -11 81 


6 8, 


--13 




? 


7 94 1- 


-35S8l| 7 6 


--34 62 


6 46 


--94 a 


627 


- -28 11 


6 9 -{-39 16| 




h 


9 44 - 


- 261 9 19 1 


--013 


8 66 


--OSfi 


8 80 1 


- - 42 


8 6 


+ 044 




JE • • 


Mitnn ri<fes or «eU. Mean Time. | 


PHENOMENA AND OBSERVA- 




^ ^ s 




• 


£■ 


^ 


^ 




O 3 .2 

2 Of-, 


^ 


4 


1 


1 


e 


Tio.sa 




in 


1 

1 


o 
>< 


r 


JS. 


2 


Smtdayt and otiter RemarkabU 
Days. 






rue*. 


rueg. 


rues. 


nses. 


risea. 






|h. m. 


h. m. 


h. rn. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 






11 6 M^m 


2 4in 


2 im 


1 66m 


1 4im 


188m 


8tt. Philip and James, 




2{ 7 43^ 


235 


2 32 


329 


2 17 


3 16 


9 in ^. BatUe Luizen. 1813. 




111 « ^-^ 


3 1 


250 


2 67 


249 


2 47 


Havre de Grace burneil, 1813. 
Rogation Sunday. (5 }^ S- 




S^l 9 7.8ti. 


S2»m 


3 24m 


3 2sm 


3 ism 


3 18m 




5| 9 48J 


3 47 


848 


8 47 


3 46 


8 47 


Rogat. Mond, Laplace d. 1817. 




6'; 10 28^ 


4 8 


4 10 


4 10 


4 12 


4 15 


Rogation Tuesday, d P 9 • 




Tjll 10^ 


439 


4 33 


434 


438 


4 44 


Bible Society funned, 1808. 




8jll SS^ 


set*. 


SftM. 


sets. 


Hia. 


aeU. 


Ascension day, d D U* 




9 


39.8il 


8 2a 


760a. 


7 65a. 


7 4ia. 


788a 


Mahometan year 1250 begins. 




10 


1 287 


9 8 


9 4 


8 66 


8 43 


889 


dP?. [dUO- 

Sunday after Ascension. 




2 20 5a 


10 loa. 


10 6a. 


9 doa. 


9 42a. 


9 38a. 




12 


3 14.9 


11 8 


11 3 


10 67 


10 89 


10 34 


Batilc of Pharsalia 48 B. C. 




13 


4 10^ 




11 55 


11 49 


11 82 


11 28 


d ? T 8 • Va. sealed, 1607. 




14 
15 


6 6.7 
6 1.8 


OlT) 










Vaccination first applied, 1796. 
Cape Cod discovered, 1602. 




045 


4im 


36m 


2im 


17m 




16 


65.3 


1 34 


1 21 


1 17 


1 4 


1 1 


Battleof Albuera, 1810. 




17 


7 47.4 


1 67 


1 56 


1 52 


1 43 


141 


ay© dpis&fnj. 

Whitsunday or PenUcost. 




A 


8 88 7a. 


2 27m 


2 26m 


2 24m 


2 19m 


2 19m 




19 


9 30.1 


2 66 


9 66 


266 


2 65 


266 


Steamer Lioness deal. 1833. 




20 


I0 5B.4 


3 24 


3 26 


3 27 


380 


3 33 


Columbus died, 1506, O. S. 




21 


11 16.6 


rifu. 


ritu. 


rise*. 


risM. 


rwM. 


Dr. T. Wharton died, 1790. 




22 


8 


7 12a. 


7 98. 


7 6a. 


6 6ia. 


6 48a. 


Pope bom, 1688. * D » ni- 




23 


13.5m 


826 


823 


8 16 


8 


^66 


Battle of Ramillies, 1706. 




24 


1 10.3 


33 


928 


922 


9 6 


9 


dU9- J. Randolph d. 1833. 
Trinity Sunday. 




& 


3 8 6111 


10 32a. 


10 27a. 


10 3ia. 


10 3a. 


9 68a. 




26 


S 6.6 


11 23 


11 18 


11 13 


10 65 


10 61 


Bat. Ostrolenka (Poland) 1831. 




27 


4 0.1 


. • • 


11 60 


1164 


11 89 


11 86 


St. Jean d*Acrc taken, 1832. 




28 
29 


4 61.0 

5 38.6 


3m 

036 










Wm. Pitl born, 1759. 
9 in ft. 6$^^- 




oasm 


039m 


17m 


14m 




80 


6 33.8 


1 4 


1 9 


060 


060 


048 


Sir J. Mackintosh died, 1838. 




31 


7 4.9 


1 39 


i39 


lag Il20 1 


J 30 


W^^Ti\ 








4 



















dbyGoogk 



■■1 










■s^ 


■^IBfl 




m 


la 


i9^> 


-A." ; 






^■j Hi - 


^jIS^K 


f^mssi 


5>3iiffl5n 


eSBH 


^ 


38 Jane, Sixth Monih^ begins on Sunday. [ 


18341 


r^l 


Twll%lil bsgiivi atiU endi. Mwn lirne. 




'*'^ ! 




]«t d«y. 


7ili day, j 


l»il.diy. ., 


l»li.day. 
. m. h. Jti. 


•J^Kh day, \? 






, m. 


fa. rn. 


Enda. 
fa. ni. 


fiefiDf. 

b. m. 


End*. 1 

ll. ID. b 


h. nu 


E«d..| 
h.a„J 


»^'-il 


BcMtoD, 


1 nm. 4» 


37 a. 


2 I2ra. 


9 44 0. 


a 9m. 


9 50 a. 1 


Bm, 9 54 aJ 


2 9m. 


95d# 




N. York, 


3 39 9 


3a 


t !» 


9 31 


3 33 


9 37 3 33 


940 


J 33 


9 41^ 




Wwh. 


3 41 9 


ia 


3»T 


9 19 


3 311 


9 34 2 as 


937 


3 9tf 


93» 




! Chaf Iq«. 


a la 9 


41 


a 10 


8 46 


3 10 


S 30 1 a ID 


a 53 


3 11 


ads 




iH,Orl*i. 


134 a 


90 


333 


6 34 


JS35 


e as [|a 23 


1b40 


la^ 


a 41 




j^get tatd Pfrigre ^^'th* Moon. \ 

! Apogee, X$t, 6b. M, =- Dbt. &1,«XI itiif«». T UerigM, im, 6li. A. - DkL 9SB,eO© mile.. 1 

Apofee.aJHh.a M. - Di,t, »!il,(MW mikNi, | ^ 


7*« 


New Moon, 7th dty» 4ti. 4&8m M 
I'lmt Quartor, 14Ui *' 7 MJ) M 


1 Fuir Moon, atn day, 3h- 14J2in. M. = 
1 La*i auarUff, a^ifa ** 8 40.1 A. , 




1 


i 

1 


tjuo'* (tjsrp^r ^u]«» riie« tod MUf [wr- Ibr rpfmct.) M. 1'. 


Hi^li waiof. M 


— . 










^ 
* 


^ 


1^ 


1' 


04l 


1 
1 > 


1. 

i^ 1 










h. ID. 




nues. 


ret-. 


h. m. 


In ni.|li> tti. 


b, ni.| 


h. m- 




fa. m. 


fa. ra. 




1 


6V. 


4 :^ 


1^ 


4 31 


7 34 


i3<! 


T Ifl 54 da 


7 1 


5 


655 


6 5am 


4 37m 


3 6«tn 




2 


M. 


54 


as 


30 


54 


a9 


19 


d3 




159 


5d 


9 3 


5 41 


42' 


: 


3 


Tu. 


M 


30 


30 


a* 


ad 1 


19 


dS 




59 


dd 


a 53 


6 31 


4 53 




4 


W. 


aa 


ai 


39 


56 


ad 


90 


A3 




59 


56 


9M 


7 15 


5M 


1 


6 


Th. 


43 


as 


38 


ae 


ad 


30 


d-J 




59 


, 57 


19 14 


t 6i 


« U 


^ 


eh\ 


33 


33 


30 


57 


34 


ai 


d3 




59 


57 


19 59 


839 


650 ' 




1 i^^ 

BSu. 




33 
7 34 


28 
42« 


as 

7 3fl 


34 
4 34 


31 
7 31 


fi2 


7 4 


59 
4 59 


56 
« 59 


11 27 


9 6 


7 71 




4 &2 


9 oa. 


9 4501 


a em 


' 


9M. 


23 


as 


36 


3© 


U 


33 


63 




S& 


59 


47 


10 3G 


9 47 




10 


Tu. 


5tt 


3d 


2a 


29 


34 


33 


fi3 




A9 


59 


1 29 


n a 


939 




11 


W. 


M 


36 


38 1 


m 


34 


34 


dS 




09 


T 


3 14 


tl 53 ! 


10 14 




IS.Tk 


n 


31 


2S 


M 


U 


35 


53 




69 


U 


3 3 


9 4ia. 


11 3 




ISF. 


23 


37 


38 


ai 


34 


3d 


d3 




59 




3 59 


1 37 


11 58 




14 

15 




4^ 


3fl 
7 5a 


43^ 


at 

7 33 


Si 
4 S3 


30 
7 37 


a3 

4d3 


7 B 


59 
4 59 


7 3 1 


5 a 


3 43 

adsa. 


I aa* 


. .?- 


(s iim. 


3 190. 


. rj 


16 


M. 


23 


30 


38 


33 


33 


^ 


53 




59 




736 


5 Id 


a ao 


-'• il 


17 


TuJ 


23 


aa 


23 


aa 


33 


37 


d3 




59 




8 39 


5 la 


4 09 




18 


W. 


11 


30 


as 


S3 


33 


38 


M 




59 




934 


7 13 


534 


|jg^ 


19 


Th. 


sa 


39 


29 


34 


34 


38 


53 




59 




10 33 


8 3 


639 


W 


20 


F. 


3S 


3« 


39 


a4 


34 


39 


53 




59 




11 6 


8 47 


7 6 


H 


21 
22 


S. 


4*i 


39 
7 3« 


39 
4 2B 


34 
7 34 


M 
494 


38 
139 


53 
4 53 


1 n 


59 
4 59 


7 4 


11 51 


930 
19 11 a. 


7 51 


H 


• » • 


aaM. : 


^1 


23 


M. 


3a 


4I> 


» 


3* 


S4 


30 


53 




59 




33m 


10 50 


9 11 


^1 


24 


Tu. 


34 


40 


no 


^ 


ad 


39 


53 




d 9 




1 11 


11 36 


I>4'I 


H 


25 


W. 


34 


40 


80 


34» 


u 


39 


53 









1 47 


* . , 


10 3S 


H 


26 


Th. 


34 


40 


30 


as 


ad 


39 


53 









333 


2m 


11 


^M 


27 


F. 


3ft 


I 40 


SO 


a» 


M 


29 


53 




9 




a 


39 


11 43 


H 


2S 
29 


8. 


3ft 
43d 


40 
740 


lai 


ad 

7 3d 


m 

4» 


39 

7 39 


54 
4 54 


7 11 


1 
& 1 


7 A 


a 43 


1 31 


* ■ • , 


H 


4 3dm 


'2 um 


oism 


H 


N 


1m. 


3« 


40 


SI 


ad 


36 


S9 


54 




1 




5 43 


3 33 


la 



^r- ft , 



? •* f 



y Google 



:i^! 



mi] 



June huii 'Fhiriy i/ui/.^. 



^9 



P&««9;^ oflhe '^U'ruiian (invaii iHi]i-;i aikj IiL-TlnmijoEi i^f ihi' I'liukeig^ 



mo 

i n u 



day, 

m 

— 4 J 

— n^ 

a AS 

H-n 08 

19 



13 34 
10 



3 Mtn 4 13 



i 33 

I D Ifi 
'lO 30 

141 
9 
ft33 
t 14 



— n n 

--t 4J' 

--li la 

- -w arl 
-^laj 

- - 44; 



3 33111 

43a 
e 10 

S 
10 13 

ASJ 

1 40 

4 4S 
fi 16 
AM 



* I I 
— 4 ]| 
— U3»f 

"i 

A 3ft' 

-I- IS ST 

16 

41 

-13 44 

+ 10 II 

-- 4a 



j^n 4Ay. 



a Am 
4 s 

i « 

646 

3&4 

1 na, 

1 AT 

4»3 
A 

6 tr 



t Si 

— U 96 

4-10 Bff 

-I- a 

18 A6 
34 39 

-|-13 4a 

4*1S 6 





^ifadaj. 



h. CD, 

1 fTm 
144 

6 I 

8 i] 

9 36 
1 4t^ 
a 4 
4 19 
444 
6 4 



Dec. 



^ 3 fift 

— um 
+ia 

9 44 

10 13 

33 ^ 

37 

H-ia 41 

n 4 

H- OH 



s 

17 
18 
l« 

11 

23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
23 

80 



Moon H>t» or »el«» M^*ii TimCd 



3 X 

a i 



7 4A^«in 

9 34M) 
9 7.0 
4ft.fl 

10 34.0 

n ^0 

14«Aa., 



1 0,08 
3 «^0 
t 3^ 

3 «&3 

4 0^3 
44J 
14.0 



7 34 3a. 
9 14^ 
6.0 
49wS 
Ivl U.7 
11 §3^ 

8 



41.1111 

1 4?>4 

3 40,7 

4 16.7 
i O.l 
«41.6 



6 33.0(D 

7 3<& 



llQl 

aom 

30 
44 



JTUI 



&- 
^ 



1 fl3m 

3 Id 
3 44 
9 4 
a 33 

7 mv^ 



9fl3 
10 40 

n 33 

11 m 



300] 



40m 

1 ■J7 
1 OT 
3 so 
ri*u. 

7 101 

8 13 



7& 
041 

10 31 

11 3 
Jl 30 
11 AO 



Otoe 






1 Sim 

3 14 
3 39 
3 
3 3S 

7 ata. 



^a. 

46 

10 44 

11 n 



37Q1 



asm 

1 3S 
1 A9 

3 43 

7 40, 

9 7 

TTal 

9 47 
10 37 

10 49 

11 rt 
n 43 



nm 



4iiEn 

14 
44 

la 



3im 
Mm 

30 
4 
43 

4tft. 

♦0 

44U^ 

21 

14 

48 

30 

49 



lem 

44 



■1^ 

6^ 



b. m. 
1 49m| 
3 18 
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PHENOMENA AND OBSEBVA- 
TlONS. 

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^ greateit norlli latilude. 
d ^ 1^. Reform bill paia. 1832, 
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B^LBuokor Htll, 1775. 
War wiih Eiiglnnd^ 1612. 
iSlh. BatUc of Waterloo, IBIS. 
Spaniih Cortes mel, iB3.*J> 
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Df, Dodd ejtecuied, 1777. 
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PHENOMENA AND OBSERVA- 
TIONS. 

Sundayt ami other Remarkable 
Daye, 



Earth faf thest froin the Sud. 
Fort Erie taken, 1814. 
C5 ]> U- htdepenience dee, 1776. 
Don Miguel's fleet taken, 18SS, 
^th Sunday afler TVtitt/y. 
Greatest east, elong. of 9 • 

Don Pedro land. n.Oporto, 1882. 
Bank U. States Tetoed, 188S. 
East port taken, 1814. 
Bat. of the Boyne, 1890, N. S. 
1th Sunday after TrinUy, 
French revolution of 1789 began, 
d J 4C£b. 

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17ih. c5 1|.2» 8> dist. S'. 
Battle of Halidon Hill, 1833. 
^h Sunday after TrmUy. 
Spanish inq. reealablisbed, 1814. 
Napoleon's son died, 1882, a. 21 
Bat. of Coimbra, Portugal, IBSS. 
23d. Engl, took Gibraltar, 1704, 
French revolution of 1890. 
Fire at Waterford, N. Y. 1883. 
9th Sundayafter Drimiy. 
17th. Com. Bainbridge d. 1838. 
28th. Wilbcrforce d. 1838, m. 74. 






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ftttl. «v Wolt^ S«ott d. IStt, 

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0M, Lmptir, 181S. [1781 

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dU>* Bat. TVt&lgar, 1806.' 
Battle of Red Bank, 1777. 
BauleorEdgelriUtl642. 

dh^«8. d>^. 

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y e/wr TVniwjf . 
* > ^. Antwerp boaburd. 1890. 
|fll.aiMR«iNlflir.AMre. Baiile 
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jh. rn. lb. m« 



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h. M Di»t, 997,5011 1 



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Ftili r^f^on, l5lTi ^* 11 4rt.l1iTi. A, I New Monn, 30th ^* Q 1.«' 



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63 


b. m. 

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66 
66 
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4 66 
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66 
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66 
67 
67 
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I 63 
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41 
41 
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6 43 
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47 
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9 19 

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4 40 
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66 
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60 
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EPHEMERIS OF THE SUN. 



[18 



^t mean noon at Greenwich. 





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b. m. aoe. 






1 


8 23 69.5 


4.37 


10 40 40.44 


1 


8 6 13.0 


10 14.72 


19 88 67.04 






2 


8 1 90 


22.93 


44 87.00 


2 


8 99 81.8 


10 38.61 


49 68.69 






8 


7 89 10.7 


41^ 


48 38.55 


8 


8 62 49.3 


10 63.19 


48 60.14 






4 


7 17 4.9 


1 1.18 


63 30.10 


4 


4 16 4.1 


11 10.47 


60 46.70 






6 


6 64 63.0 


1 90.69 


66 26.66 


6 


4 39 16.9 


11 28.87 


64 48.96 






6 


6 83 83.3 


1 40.43 


11 23.21 


6 


6 2 24.2 


11 46.94 


66 88.80 






7 


6 10 6.0 


9 0.38 


4 19.76 


7 


6 96 98.6 


19 8.14 


18 9 36.86 






8 


6 47 83.8 


3 20.56 


8 16.83 


8 


6 48 38.8 


19 19.98 


6 89.81 






9 


6 34 65.7 


2 40.91 


12 12.87 


9 


6 11 84.6 


19 36.30 


10 99.40 






10 


6 3 13.3 


3 1^ 


16 943 


10 


6 84 16.0 


19 62.27 


14 26.09 






11 


4 89 33.8 


8 23.13 


11 90 6.98 


11 


6 67 0.2 


13 7.78 


18 18 23.17 






12 


4 16 30.6 


3 43.94 


24 9.63 


12 


7 19 89.7 


18 23.81 


99 18.19 






18 


8 68 33.8 


4 8.87 


27 69.08 


18 


7 42 18.1 


18 87.87 


96 16.88 






14 


8 80 31.1 


4 24.91 


81 66.64 


14 


8 4 39.9 


18 61.49 


80 19.98 






16 


8 7 25.7 


4 46.01 


36 63.19 


16 


8 26 60.9 


14 4.98 


84 8.78 






16 


9 44 16.8 


6 7.16 


39 48.74 


16 


8 49 12.7 


14 17.90 


88 8.84 






17 


2 91 4.7 


6 28.33 


48 46.99 


17 


9 11 17.9 


14 8080 


49 1.88 






18 


1 67 49.9 


6 49.69 


47 41.86 


18 


9 83 16.2 


14 43.10 


46 68.44 






19 


] 84 33.6 


6 10.67 


61 88.40 


19 


9 66 4.1 


14 68.80 


49 68.00 






20 


1 11 13.1 


6 31.78 


66 84.96 


20 


10 16 44.3 


16 8.88 


63 61.86 






21 


47 51.8 


6 63.64 


69 81.61 














22 


94 38J) 


7 13.60 


19 8 98.06 


21 


10 88 16.6 


16 18.77 


13 67 48.11 






18 


1 4.8 


7 84.68 


7 94.61 


22 


10 69 87.8 


18 9SU)9 


14 1 44.88 








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23 


11 90 48.3 


18 81.67 


8 41.21 






24 


33 90.3 


7 66.84 


19 11 91.17 


24 


11 41 61.1 


16 80.48 


87.77 




951 


46 46.8 


8 16.88 


16 17.79 


26 


19 9 49.4 


18 46.66 


18 8449 




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8 86.34 


19 I4J97 


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19 98 99.6 


18 69.88 


17 8088 




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2 $3 37.3 


B 60.41 


98 10.89 


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18 68.69 


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II. METEOROLOGICAL IXFOmiATION. 



[From th« Companion to the Britiih Almaaae for 1833.] 



I. — ON COMETS. 

The jear which has just paued awaj has been distinguished bj the 
predicted appearance * of two comets, the most remarkable which have 
jet failen under the notice of astronomers. . These are what are com- 
monly called the comets of Encke t and Biela t- The latter has been an 
object of fear to many on account of the nearness with which it has 
approached, not the eartli, but a point of the earth's path. As publio 
attention has thus been turned to this subject in an unusual degree, we 
seize this opportunity of laying before our readers a slight account of 
the present state of cometary astronomy, distinguishing that which we 
really know of these bodies from the many surmises to which they have 
given rise. 

The signification of the word comet has varied, as new bodies have 
appeared which analogy has led astronomers to include under that 
name. It was first given, as the word denotes, to bodies which appear- 
ed in the heavens with a train of light, or tail, and thus included some 
of the meteors which belong to our own atmosphere. We now apply 
the word to those heavenly bodies, without the limits of our own atmos- 
phere, which are nebulous in their appearance, and with or without a 
tail. We may divide all which have been observed into three classes : 
1. Those whose returns have been predicted, and the prediction veri- 
fied by the fact These are three in number, viz. the celebrated comet 

• Mc Hendenoo has obsenrsd Eotkm*m eomet at the Cape of Good Hope, and Sir 
Joha Henehel that of Biela. We meoiioii theae fteU here, aa neither body ia Ttaible te 
tbe naked eye, and nanj of oar readeis may not be aware of their hsTus been aeea by 
aayooe. 

t Flret dtaoorerad by M. Poos, Hovonher 96, 1816, hat Jaatly named by i 
after ProTeoior Eaeka, ftom hb sMOSSi ia deteethiff its orbit, OMtion, a 

I First dieeovsnd by M.JUela,aBJkwttiaaofloer,Febmary9Bth, 1806. 

6 



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WNIiSiriit^^llie^ en the t3di of March of the 1 
'WlMmi^4l^-mWh had been allowed for errote. We 1 
mm^maim^bm^ ortSSai, ofwUeh thatof End^o haaeiiS*! 
Iglfeiiild/iiiffHdim to prodleHon, aad that of Biek* ha«: been^ 
ilitoiii%y «f jr. Hdtw^h^, both rwj near their piediotod^^ 
IpnM not hate had their tahiei eonatmeted without a 




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i an, M ftr M appMn«» 

Tbt plMBOBMBOBOf tlMUr iltil»ftr 

I M aii^»o«a onljr be Mwovatod for on tlM> 
M^^tlMflMalvM ftm of vofj mill dontity. Ba|.iOYe» 




lof Hm oooMt Imo oAon^lieon so nro^.thoiintll 
ftg.«BnodiipUkinl0ttii^ wo«kl kiiloy haTo lieon oaan 
Tkm Sonooa flMntaono tlie IImsI of otaii' 
Sir W. HonebolMwastarof tho 
nlfoofthoiOonMlof 1795; ProliMter 
rHirowgli thrt of Unnko : aadSirlolia 
, (inobl. a, note) infrmoa^ that 

• MwawlMlo eioator of ota»^ 
I liM.T«i7 ooDlfoof Bioln'o 

r^ti^oouH. AMm^km^ 

I <jfi jndflii^Jlbay wnHi hum bo«iiioon.^#Hi 
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1834.] ON COMETS. 67 

in tbe New River Head, he might justly be blamed for assertin^r more 
thin lie knew, but certainly any one who poeitively denied the fact 
would deeerre the lame censure. 

Af we are not writing for the scientific part of the community, we 
will My a few words on a very general fear which prevails — namely, 
tint the near approach of a comet would break our planet in pieces^ or 
at leist produce a great accession of heat, sufficient perhaps to destroy 
animal and vegetable life, if not to burn the world altogether. The 
argoment aeems to have originated in a notion, that because heat pro- 
duces expansion, therefore very highly expanded bodies must needs be 
fery hot. It would be as good an argument to say, that because expan- 
sion by any other means except heat, produces cold, that therefore all 
oometa mast^ie very cold; and neither argument would, in the least 
degree, afibrd matter even for a rational conjecture. We can form so 
little idea of what the state of a planet of vapor, it may be consisting 
only of one sort of matter, would be, that we might with as much rea- 
eon speculate upon the possible organization of the possible animalcule 
which swim in that vapor, as try, in the present state of our knowledge, 
to ascertain whether any and what degree of danger awaits us from 
such a source. A comet may certainly strike the earth in.the next cen- 
tury ; not one of these which are known, unless the laws of nature be 
singularly altered, but some one or other yet to come. It has been 
shown, bnt by considerations of so high a nature that the result cannot 
be expected to bring much conviction to any but a mathematician, that 
if a comet were launched at hazard into our system, for one orbit in 
which it could strike the earth there are 281 millions in which no such 
thing could take place as the laws of nature stand at present The ad' 
ToeaU* of cometary interference (we have met with some whose manner 
of expressing their opinion on the subject almost entitles them to that 
name) usually suppose a special interposition of the Divine power, 
which, (resting on their own interpretation of certain Scriptural prophe- 
cies,) they suppose will bring a comet on the earth. They are usually 
people of some religious feeling, and would act more consistently with 
the idea they ought to have of their own ignorance and the Divine 
power, if they ceased to prescribe to the Creator in what way it should 
please him lo alter the course of events which it has hitherto been his 
will to ammge. It is impossible to produce any other argument on the 
subject, consistently with the design of this paper ; the province of nat- 
ural pliilosophy is to collect and compare &cto, and to say what 
will be, if things continne as they have been; it never presumes even 
to conjecture what shall be, when the power which has hitherto dis- 
posed events in one maimer, shall judge it right to ordain a different 
srraBgement. 



d by Google 



68 on COMETS. [1834. 

There are many who, without goin^ the length of ietring danger 
from thie shock of a comet» nevertheless imagine that any, nnosnallj hot 
weather which happens while such a body is yisible, or going to be Tie- 
ible, is caused by it in some measure at least. To such a circamstance 
the fine vintage of 1811 was attributed, and many, even amonjg the edu- 
cated classes, imagined that the heats of last September and 'August 
were occasioned by the approach of Biela's comet. We can certainly re- 
echo, from this side of the channel, the complaint which M. Arago 
makes, in the Annuaire for 1832, already alluded to, of the scarcity of 
the meanest knowledge of scientific facts among the middle ranks of 
society. With a burning sun over head, we have heard tboae, who 
might have known better, accusing the comet in the manner afbreaaid. 

It appears, however, from the table of M. Arago, in which the mean 
temperature of every year, from 1803 to 1831 inclusive, is placed side 
by side with the number of comets observed in that year, that there is 
no visible connexion between the one and the other. Thus 1806 and 
1811 were both hot years, the first however hotter than the second, 
though the first had one comet only of no note, and the second had two, 
one of which was the most brilliant which the present generation has 
seen. Again, the year 1836, with its five comets, was not so hot as 
1831, which had only one. That hot years in general have more comets 
than cold ones is very true, and for tliis simple reason, that the former, 
generally giving a finer sky, are more favorable for their discovery. We 
must not forget that the greater number of such bodies are not visible 
to the naked eye. Thus all the years between 1803 and 1831 inclosive, 
the temperature of which exceeded the average, mustered twenly-nine 
comets between them ; and the remaining, or cold years, only -fifteen. 
We must therefore say, not that the comets brought the heat, but rather 
that the heat brought the weather which made the comets visible. In 
the period above-mentioned there were forty-four comets observed, 
counting distinct appearances of the same comet as different ; of which 
only two were in the least remarkable for brilliancy — those of 1811 
and 1823. 

Having shown that some comets are bodies in the highest state of 
tenuity, and conjecturing, with a great degree of probability, that the 
same is true of all, we may mention a phenomenon which has been 
several times remarked by different observers, viz., that in their ap- 
proach to the sun they appear to contract their dimensions, or the neba- 
Ions head of the body -diminishes in apparent diameter. As they recede 
from the sun they begin to dilate again. To explain this phenomenon, 
some have had recourse to the highly elastic fluid or ether, which, as 
we shall presently see, has been supposed to fill the solar system at 
least. If this ether, say they, be denser as we approach nearer the aon, 
we muBt expect that the comet will be more compressed by it as it ap- 

Digitizecl by VJVJ\^'V It 



18S4.] OS COMETS. 69 

pnMcliM its perihclkm, and wHl tberef<Mre be confined within tmaller 
Umits. Tothie it ieanawered, and jostlj, that such an explanation 
mi|rfat Boffiee, if the comet had an exterior case, which, not being incom* 
preaaible itself, should hinder the ether from penetratingr the light body 
of Tapor. In the memoir of Sir John Herschel already quoted, three 
distinct poisibie causes are suggested, two of which are entirely inde- 
pendent of an ethereal fluid, and all so probable, that it maybe the phe- 
nomenon is partly due to STery one of them. In the first place, on ac- 
count of the great rarity of cometic matter, it may be that what we call 
cohesion exists only in a Tery trifling degree, so that perhaps we ought 
to consider the motion of the several parts of the comet independently 
of the others. For example, if the diamal rotation of the earth were 
suddenly stopped, and it continued in that state to move round the snn, 
the parts nearest to the sun, being mose attracted by it, would, if they 
were free to move by themselyes, describe an orbit difiering in a slight 
degree from that of the parts which are farthest from the sun. But as, 
owing to the cohesion of the yarious parts of the earth, they must all 
more together, the orbit really described by the earth's centre lies be- 
tween those which would be described by the parts nearest to and far- 
thest from the sun. We have hitherto considered the comet as one 
mass of matter, the motion of every part of wliich influences that of 
the rest. If, however, it should consist of particles so little bound 
together by cohesion, as to allow of each particle describing, or nearly 
describing, its own independent orbit, the consequence would be just 
the phenomenon observed — namely that it would contract as it ap- 
proached the sun, and dilate as it receded again from it. To illustrate 
this, draw several ellipses about the same focus, 
very near to one another, and let one particle 
move upon each from the. perihelion. It will 
be evident that, as the particles increase their 
distance from the sun, they increase their dis- 
tance from one another, and vice versA. The second explanation pro- 
posed by Sir John Herschel is that perhaps, by the motion of the comet 
from the sun, and its consequent appearance in a darker part of the 
heavens, some layers of nebulous matter may become visible, which 
were not so before on account of their yielding too little light. The 
third is, that the cometary matter may consist, lik% a fog, of small par- 
ticles of moisture floating in a transparent fluid, and which the resist- 
ing medium, being hotter near to the sun, renders invisible, by raising 
their temperature, and turning them into vapor. If this were the case, 
it is evident, that as the comet approached the sun, the fog at the 
edges, so to speak, would be cleared \ip, and consequently the apparent 
part of the comet rendered less, and vice versd. It is of course impossit 
ble to decide between these Ttry Ingenious explanations, so as to la^ 

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\*»\^MS.fU »i^nni hkuviiin^% 



mow •hMrT«d»«iUiootiui7 miefa i(lM9fi»' 
Miiwl iniifitioa^ai woitl4epdtqgef Uie mf#tj of 9fkf.4^, 
mjMui^rof pkoeta w«i« IftiiBcbfd ialo api^, wtlMvt 
* miMMOTH^Ht of tl ly 'pif SMtioiMk tiM ohniwct fiwr 1r ^ ^^HIl^ R ^ 
M|M»' wooU be vo^ BmaJL We obicrre ia the eolar 
Sjptef ftot% whieh methemeliotl mnAjjete ebowe us em ij)i|, 
iHli^flfall^^ «■ ftt ee the plea^te tre eoneefned ;^ ] 
ii|j y(B | lfch f u eete t tlit&ei^ one of then, tmi tbe pUneli^i 
ipjlii iirtmiiiiiii iNmoaeaawlher, thetthe >ttiiM?tioii of the 1^11 
ilMiw^'VMy iDooh ipmOer thaa thet of the other plwMte- 
iipir:!* te eame diioetion immd tbe eon. 3. The urMli, 
iMmi^ eireukr; end are ineUiied to one. another at emaU 
llwieoimiBietaneeey and the law of graritaMoOyit. hj|i 
thit |)m aTonife diitenoee of the planeta from the eii% 
» j|iotion«| are ioTariable, or at Jeaat will conUnoe 

mt of agce> which, to o«r limited ideaa, give the noHqn^ 
Bnt aU tbie^ on the auppoeitioni that there ii no fluid wlui^ 
rorigtan oe to the planetary motiona; if anch a fluid 
(p»0 ite denai^ maj be, it oan be ahown tbiat it eontanupjlf 
tin .mean diataneea, and increaeea the mean motiona* 
l pnh ii M Be» that the. mean diatanoea of the pUnetaare 
|||ltL flglij if thi^do Ahaage at all, tha variation iaaoi 
lM|;tpflj>IWt paaaeptiblo to oi|r beat inetrnmenU in hi 
pi^iWi^l&llf #ui4t there^Hw, if it eziata, ii of an exfc^fKi^, 

^^f|lf9wli.ii0iMr the onljpifohanoe left to^na at preeent if 
t^h|i«ff of inftiy Utile deoeily their 

i.4batttlvUof tbe planeta, lartlni 

(it Te i ieiinf inedinm, It wifl 

lb tht «miiai9f, 



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lOi] 09 COM BTC. 71 

''ifliiftjbe pennittad to exitfeat mj opinion on a subjoct which for 
t9df jmn ham in cenm Uy occnpied me, in treating which I have 
iToided no method, however circnitom, no kind of verification, in order 
to retch the truth as fiir aa it Uy in mj power ; 1 cannot consider it 
odierwiee than completely eatabliahed, that an extraordinary correction 
I aeceeeary for Pons* comet " — that is, the one which all the world, 
except Professor Encke, calls Encke*B comet — " and equally certain 
that the principal part of it consists in an increase of the mean motion 
proportionate to the time." Professor Airy adds, " I cannot but express 
my belief, that the principal point of the theory, namely, an effect ex- 
actly similar to that which a resisting medium would produce, is per- 
fectly established by the reasoning in Encke's memoir." Ifthiscon- 
dnnon be correct, we may predict that, in time, this comet and every 
other will fall into the sun ; we know, however, that the medium, if it 
exists, cannot sensibly afibet the planetary motions for a great number 
of centuries. 

There seems to be some cause in operation by which the brilliancy 
of comets is continually diminishing. That of Halley, in one of its pre- 
ceding revolutions, b described as giving a degree of light certainly 
superior to that which it gave in 16d2 and 1759. Sir John Herschel 
could only see Biela's comet through a reflecting telescope of twenty 
feet in length, an instrument of enormous power in the collection of 
light ; and though he afterwards found it with a refracting telescope, he 
asserts that he never should have succeeded with the latter, unless hs 
had previously known where to look for it. If the parts of the comet 
have so little cohesion, as has been, with great probability, conjectured, 
it may easily lose a part of its substance as it passes through a resisting 
medium. We have however as yet but little specific information on 
this subject. 

With regard to the cause of the tails of comets, we can say nothing 
with certainty. Their existence affords a strong presumption for the 
very little density of the nuclei. They were at one time considered as 
being in a continuation of the line drawn from the sun to the co^iet ; it 
has, however, been shown, that they always fdll a little behind this line 
with respect to the comet's path, and have sometimes been even per- 
pendicular to it. That of 1680 was DO^' of the heavens in length, so 
that part of it might have been in the observer's zenith when the comet 
was setting. It was 141 millions of miles in length. Some comets 
have had what we may call a succession of tails, one succeding another, 

trsntlatod into Eofliah by Profewor Airy, with an Appendix in which th« latter 
feattenan folly eoioeidm i« th« coo^.hMioo of ProfeMor Enek<*. Thoae who ars ae- 
qoainled with the prMMit ttato of aeiones will givo ffveat weight to theM aatboritiM, to 
•ay aothiof of their eakoktieoi hoiof htfiwo the world. 



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i:iaediitaifHitw,lf<iri 
til, twmfawiiiy •Kfwwii^ IjpMili 
'4iMif MM. Ifafty^otLiIl of tbdn^i 

|iitf«d't8»%9'tMM/lt will' te 'ttO «M1IMliH> tlMM fik»i§m/^M 

M^fiMiAlrylodweMl «&• iaMAaUtot tfnd«ii6« Is i«di 
iite-'^ Oil totitt^ ef -ii Ht i wy •ppfq— hiw 1 
fhaBdOfobtiMiiddaoiiie itaporteni and intonftiiig ftels I 




. 4^'^.'»^-ti^ 



i^^t^P^.y^^^: ^.;i^. 







t liope ti|t obUtln remits. tli«l 

t Thff iiu|«irf , liowfutr^' kMriof 
For ngr-pvi I ibviM lUm pnftnp^' 
I^vftlMr^tflbb 



ib» ]M# MmwttlbM, iviiieh 



i lli :wl«il*i# It isif^'i artSele, we 

i«1le#wir>' ftr JlpiU, 18S3, a lirief 

if«Miii»^to«tli»lBfl^iioe of the moon 

ifmMlUkMi to extmiiie ie» «*ilft. , 
III. The di^ on wlil^ he 
^ililiriiiof dbienreikma pnUiehed 
VTbej comprehend a period 
i^yiiijiptiiliie foUOwiBg phMsof, nuMly, 
i^J&JM44»^> ^n»n 1S0» to 1812 ; and at 

e|iit«,iti«ii* «ppMn that the max- 

iliti^eeB the firit ilMilef Id^ 

y i ii l iii ii i Mihe J aat foaHac iaA ^ «im 



MK 



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74 INFLUENCE OF THE MOON. [1884. 

moon. The nnmber of rainy days in the last of these intenrals, is to 
that in the first, as 696 to 845, or in round numbers, as 5 to 6. And this 
proportion is not only true of the twenty years taken together, but also 
of the separate groups of four years, which give analogous numbers. 
We are therefore to conclude, if we put faith in the observations, that it 
rains more frequently during the increase, than during the wane of the 
moon. 

** The above results are confirmed by a series of observations made at 
Vienna, and discussed by Pilgram in the year 1788. On 100 repetitions 
of the same phasis, Pilgram found the falls of rain to be as follows : new 
moon 26, mean of the two quarters 25, full moon 29; consequently, at 
Vienna, as well as at Augsburg and Stuttgard, it rains more frequently 
on the day of the full than on that of the new moon. 

** Another element remains to be taken into consideration, namely, 
the moon*8 distance from the earth, which, admitting the lunar action on 
the atmosphere, it is natural to suppose will have a marked influence on 
the phenomena. In fact, Schiibler found that during the 371 anoma- 
listic revolutions of the moon which take place in twenty -eight years, 
the number of rainy days included within the seven days nearest the 
perigee, was 1169, and within the seven days nearest the apogee, 1096. 
From the observations at Vienna, Pilgram found that during 100 luna- 
tions the number of rainy days at the perigee was 36 ; and at the apo- 
gee, 20 only. Thus, other circumstances being, alike, the nearer ths 
moon is to the earth, the greater are the chances of rain. 

« < Confining ourselves,' says Arago, < to the principal results, it aeeros 
difficult to resist the conclusion that the moon exercises an influence on 
our atmosphere ; that in virtue of .this influence rain falls more fre- 
quently towards the second octant than at any other epoch of the lunar 
month ; and lastly, that the chances of rain are fewest between the last 
quarter and the fourth octant.' 

'' The influence of the moon on the terrestrial atmosphere seems also 
to be rendered evident by observations of a different kind, namely, ths 
mean heights of the barometer at the different lunar phases. On calcu- 
lating a series of observations made at Padua by the Marquis Poleni, 
and extending over a period of 45 years, Toaldo found that the mean 
height of the barometer at the quarters is greater than its mean height 
at the syzygies, and that the difference amounts to 0.46 millimetres. 

^' From the observations of M. Flaugergues, made at Viviera in the 
department of Ardeche, and comprising a period of 20 years, there results : 
mean height at the quarters 755.81 millimetres; mean height at Um 
syzygies 755,39 ; difference 0.42. 

" From a series of observations made in the Royal Observatory at 
Paris, and discussed by Bouvard, the following results were found: 
mean height at the quarters 756.59 miUimeU^', mean height at the 
^y'ygi^B, 755.90; difference, 0.09. 

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^011 ttOpflik^ Ml Jtfpfli 

pvprw k. dipt jf thi^ ««b0lt of 

tti ftt ill tt$m»tUf^wmA 

fStoft wkkh k iodk^d lijr tiM ■Imti^ 

Me, llMt if the ▼wnitloii V a^^ 

riedjen of tlie |iieoii,J^eiig|^fQ^iii 

. fliE iDeo9, aadAleo a % M iwil 

entirely to ^mq^few. W^ img[ 
I may yemi ifoby M. fievnid, 

I prad»»« tbe tides of tlie oceivi^lipd if 
riifpjpeekliik Thejpoo d iei o n 

;,jpce«iii^ |gidk«led l>y obferration 

1 0ODi Ubectkm ; to ■ome canee 

c|«f of |rl||i^'tbe nature and mode 

yj^fiffiff^ the popular opinion 

,% tealdo, the ratio (^ the 
r of no d^99igt9 at the diiftr- 
ltp.te,i|.iillowa : lle# moon^ 6 to 1 ; 
1tj||^lSi«md qnaAer, ^jlo 1 ; Peri- 
f,1i J^ ||igr> of aeTeii new moone, mz 
I of fPii^&Mri and at one of them theio 
^#ete, attended with a change; 
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htrmm&u^ «t, ^bai th« moon has appearod 

^ W^a molt of Pilgram'i oboervatioiia at Vienna ia entiialf :ij 
Hitting a handled lonationa, the nnmber of chingea of ^ 
daya of the re^»eotiTe phaaea, were aa foUowa : 

New moon . 66 I Perigee .... 72 I New moon in «pogiM^ I 
FoU moon . 63 Apogee .... 64 Full moon in pedgi« ' 
QMTtera . . 68 | New moon in perigee 80 | Fall moon in f 

^ It reaolta from the aimple inapection of thia table that, wi&i 
to the ehai^^ of weather, the new moon ia ^e leaat aotiTeofld 
fiMMea The eontrary ia proclaimed by popular opinion. TheV 
lUm^ nevertheteaa, from which the table ia deduced, extend 
jreara ; and aa Pilgram waa himielf a believer in the lunar : 
jgatkj be inferred, that if he committed errora, thej would not htLfi^'^l^ 
deney to ynilitate againat hia own preconceiTed notiona. '^'^3 

** Among the ancienta the opinion waa. uniyeraally entertaiqaii^^ 
the different aapecta of the moo^ fomiah tmitprognotiiedoilkkn 
tftate of the weather. ' *^ "^v:^ 

" • If,* aaya Aratua, * on the third day of the moon the hotna ei|tlV 
ereacent are aharp and well defined, the aky will continue aerenfei i 
the whole of the month.' 

** Thia ia a notion which we belicTe to be very prcTalent at the| 
day among the peaaantry of our own country. The f<dlowing 
commentary of Arago : 

.. ** < Infrealifyi when the moon in the CTening begina to diaengagal 
ftom the aan'a raya, ahe haa alwaya the form of a ereacent, 1 
hjr ,l9ro TOiy aharp hema; but if the atmoiphere lu^ipena to be 1 
1^ Ibrtta a^ear enlarged. Thia enlargement, howe?er, ia 

liliiiitoi, and ia ooeaaioned by atrongly iUuminatcfd cloada, j 

^^'^'il#itii the moon, and aeeming to form a eonatittfdil 

1E||b iae extremitiea of the ereacent are then loll^ 

' laofibunda the moon, and becpme inviaikla'l 

liendefad evident by employing a tek^bo^j 

of the aame natore might bH 1 
FUny, ibid athet aaoieat < 

Digitized by VjOOQI(: 





1834.1 



IKTLUENCE OF TBK MOOIf. 



77 



li&iiB. Bat they maj be diamiseed with the general remark that thej 
had their origin in that ignorance which confounds signs with causes, 
and are now disregarded, excepting by the most illiterate and credulous. 
They >re besides at total variance with the theory of the influence of the 
phases. 

** The agency of the moon has not been confined, in popular opinion, 
to the changes of weather ; she has been allowed in all ages and coun- 
tries to exercise a direct and important influence on organic life. Many 
of the opinions vulgarly entertained on this head are curious, and are 
founded on well established facta ; the error lying, not in the observa- 
tions, but in the theory which makes the moon the cause of phenomena 
of which she is only the silent and unconcerned spectator." 



III. —METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS. 
Table 1. ^ TaJUe constructed by Sir John Leslie, to exhibit the Mean 
Temperature at the level of tlu sea, in all the successive latitudes; and 
the Height of Perpetual Congelation. 



Lat. 


Mean 
Temp. 


Perpet. i 

Congel. 

Feet. 


Lat 


Mean 
Temp. 


. Ferpet. 
Congel. 
Feet. 


1 U 

1 15 
20 
25 
30 
35 
40 

i 45 


B4« 2f 
83 8 
fc^ 6 
80 7 
78 1 
74 9 
71 1 
G7 
(32 G 
58 1 


15^^07 1 

15,095 1 

14,764 

14,220 

13,478 

12,557 

11.484 

10,287 
9,001 1 
7,C71 1 


50 
55 
60 
65 
70 
75 
80 
85 
90 


530 6' 
49 2 
45 
41 3 
38 1 
35 5 
33 G 
32 4 
32 


6,334 
5,034 
8,818 
2,722 
1,778 
1,016 

457 

117 

i 



Table 2. The Monthly mean Temperature near Baltimore, from 
8 years* Observation, by Mr. Lewis Brantz. 



MoniJi. 



MafelK * 
i April, . . 

J™/ ' -'/ 
Aufiut, . , 

October, . , 



Mi^n, 



im. 



9S,75 



74 J5 
7U75 



ISIS, 



3L 

mm 

40 
57 

71 

73 

m 

St,6S 

m 

m 



\BW, 



72*66 
76 

oa 



IS^, 189] 



4l,GB 



- [3SJK» ' 

73,25 
74ita 

oa,7fl 



5a,SS 5O>09 5a^ i5l3e»M.<^i55f56 .^.rtl 54.13 5^.9* 



13^ 



5fl,»2 

74,(5 
74^ 



37,33 

4i5,33 
»,75 

:raj5 

7»,5 

78 

m 

54 
34 



leSL 



1^!^ 



1BS4, iMeta. 



Paring theio 8 yean, the thermomf ter fomk four times below zero ; 

tht loweat, Feb. 15, 1817, to ^4, 

2» 



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'''J^lifli iV00^liil'i9l8^' 



*'5^?- 



««1 Jownal in 1736; oonlwoed it thfoi^(li th« year 1806 
9|t'9lalorilmli».i8W, ill IdtloiUt jear. This joturod Itmiii 
^fliMiitfval&9a%^^j^^ with ffisat one, and <Mmtiiiiic4 lor a JkMm»JM|^ 
oCtJVIB bj jAt pane iadiYidjBud than anj other of wfe^ieh pe]|i^f%k|iC|i|>: 
1^^ JUlitiii^li ftom tlua joamal aie pabUsbed in the Sd, ^^^^^ 
«Q|p»ii«l'4ho << 1>anaactioneof the American Aeademj oCAirta «9^|Ar • 
m^*: Xhe portion contained in the 5th Tohwie wae piopared .l^,.j|||^ ; 
£. H»lo> and from which we extract the following Table, ofhiliilip|ti||i^ 

GENERAL SESULTB OF 43 TEARS, FROM 1786 TO 1^ 



k\ 



lieana of each of 7 Seriea and of the whole Peiiod. 




Uu Id Gill ilaytf ♦ , 

Moftu iMinuiil fnngOy , , , 

I § ^1 i 1 Spring, . , , 

* ^ • i Autumn, » . 

l*^i\ nuir 

it niM 



I Ok**!*?-" 



1^1 J uiul abuve, 
= ^'■3 [ 3a and M©w, 



-11 
107 
99,7» 



41 
38 
5^S7 

3,71 



il9 
iini 



.100 



$5 

33 

41 

56,H 

10,85 

lie 

1^7 



66,14 

67 
3S 
38 

50,57 

ro.57 

106 
1»43 



100 


101 


luo 


101 


101 , 


-7 


-11 


-13 


-0 


-13 ! 


Jtr? 


im 


ILl 


no 


114 


M7,fi4 


105 


iOfi 


101 


100,67; 


-5 




C4 


M 




70,85 




w 


70 , 




4i,K^ 




sa 


47 




(itsTf^ 




73 


G4 




m 


00 


fi5 


fi5 ! 


m 


31 


31 


35 


30 , 


96 


50 


47 


44 


45 


m 


4Mi 


46 


fil 


58 


MJ 


6 


IM 


17 


10 


10^ 


ns,w 


IIM 


134 


roe 


11531 


2^ 


5 


4 


9 


m 



tl 



.^LV. 



1834.] 



METEOROI.OGICAL OBaERTATIONa. 



79 



* A«t«. — As neilHer of the timei oroiiMrration was in the coUeit part of the day, the 
nmgt of tho thermometer is elated in the preeedinf Table less than itihould be, and the 
BHan tempciatore too high. Dr. llaJe luppuses that a due correction would reduce tho 
aaaber 4»Jd6 to 47,09, as tlie mean temperature of 43 yean. 

Other interesting Results, 

Hottest years from 1766 to 1828 ; — 1793, 50,9() ; 1825,50,99; and 
1828, 51 ,35. Coldeat year during the same period ; — 1812, 44,28. 



Mean Heat of the Hottest and Coldest Seasons from 1786 to 1828. 

Summer, 



Winter. 



.Spring. 



C Hottest in 1823, 34,40 
{Coldest in 1791, 23,38 

C Hottest in 1703, 50,31 
{ Coldest in 1812, 40,99 



Hottest in 1825. 73,05 
Coldest in 1816, 65,44 

A»t»r«« i Hottest in 1802, 54,62 
^"^"™"-i Coldest in 1823, 48,47 



Mean Heat of Winter and Summer united, 43 years, 48,74 
Mean Heat of Spring and Autumn united, 43 years, 48, 97 

Mean Heat of the Hottest and Coldest Months from 1786 to 1828. 



Hottest, 


Coldest, i Hottest. 


Coldest. 


Jan., 1802,34,12 
Feb., 1828.3«>,94 
Mar., 1825, 40,34 
April, 1800, 50,62 
May, 1826, 63,50 
June. 1793, 71,78 


1792, 19,17 
1818, 19.81 
1812, 34,42 
1786, 40,08 
1812, 49,61 
1816,61,81 


July, 1825, 77,74 
Aug., 1798, 75,77 
Sept, 1822, 67,20 
Oct , 1809, 57,99 
Nov., 1788, 44,3 
Dec, 1794, 40,36 


1816, 66,83 
1815, 66.63 
1812, 58,38 

1789, 45,52 
1827. 33,77 

1790, 19,-15 



The hottest month in this period was July 1825, 77,74; the coldest, 
January 1792, 19.17. 

The greatest heat in the period 101, on June 23, 1816; and also on 
July 21, 1825; the former in the coldest summer of the period, and the 
latter in the warmest. 

The greatest cold in the period—- 13, Jan. 25, 1821. The other coldest 
days were Jan. 17, 1786 ; Jan. 23, 1792; Feb. 14, 1817; and Jan. 13, 
1818; on each of which the thermometer sunk to — 11. 

The mean temperature of the months shows that January is generally 
the coldest, and July the hottest month in the year ; yet February was 
colder than January in 14 years of the 43; and August hotter than July 
in 9 years of the same period : in 3 years (viz. 1790, 1796, and 1798), 
December wai the coldest month ; and in one year (1786), June was the 
hottest. 

The Spring is the most inconstant or variable season. Dr. Holyoke 
remarks of the January of 1802, that it was " perhaps the warmest Jan- 
nary ever known.'* 



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at 


IT . ■> . ■, " . 


Ittlf 1830. 


Te«rinii^ 


T..«.. 




Jmnnaiy, . • • • 

^; .*.■.'.■. 

NoreinlMi', • • 
Deoember, . . . 
Y»Am. . . . 


96,50 
33,96 
43.86 
64^ 
64,58 

. 67,99 
59,10 
48,85 
38J51 
81,19 
46.83 


22,96 
39^ 
47,30 

69,07 
70,00 
70,58 
60,97 
61,97 
38,90 
•15.84 
46,90 


26,90 
35,08 
38,39 
51,68 
61,44 
65,33 
67^ 
59,90 
50,22 
39.47 
29,18 
, 45,79 . 



lllljg^Uit ebld dtoiog Um lOyeara, from 1891 to 1830 inclaeiTe, wm 
IP ihm iflfc; <^ Febmarj 1826, when the rneiemy eonk at i anriie to 18 
dt^t***^^^ *^ > aii4'tbe grecteet htfet ma oi| the llth of Julj, 1896« 
whitm ik^^ipwf iMo ^ nearly 99 degteee* 

[ Fi«ml8Xl tol6a0, thMe were, on an aTerage, in each year, 919 di^ 
dtfltiff uai 146, tidomiy weather : rain fell, more or lem, on 57 dayt> 
amid the annnal aTorage qnanti^ of anew waa about three feet, ae^ 
mnA. wheja newly fiOlen. 

The greateat cold daring the year 1831 waa on the 91at of Janwury, 
when the mereory aunk td 6 degrees below aero. In July and Aogoali 
tht^^m^iewy reee eeTeral tfanea to 87 degrees. There were 901 fldf 
41^ aad 165 dowdy : rain ftfi, aaofe or less, on 65 days, with \ 
fteqiiency and abandanee ; and anow amoonted^to abont 5 fiSit in < 

the neoal ^nanti^. The Aoroia Borealia iHnminatdhlT 
If aii4 thiuvdof and llghtaing were noticed on 91 days. rS 

'■ — ■ ' ' -■ ^ — -t^ 

• Ml VMMlli wtt aiMliigalihtd ftir u •straoidliMuy dagraa of eokU It «MI 
•\$mm.^i.mm^¥^9€ rt t aw ia tiuM M4t at MMfaita, ptfsSa^thtt U waa amsb 
^g^|liiiair^«|iii«M||«blat|Hat«l^ TtosMaatMpmamtiNowBadMM 
^yilllliai.iMi.. «GMS|al M««iB Ftoldflaji, ia hte rwaukf oo Mi nMtMtolo|ipai 
J^^^wwiilWb^lliiMiat rSkycttoHlla (Ifaarftsa], VanMat} *«Th« MutM^* 
I i^'M&iiit [nil] WM 8A «M«b «•• y iwM r 8^ btbw tktt tC tkt «». 




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METBOROLOeiCAL 0BSERTAT10N8. 



81 



1832 was uncommonly cold. The winter of 1831 -2 was 
e^ere ; the months of June and July fell considerably below the 
ncrage hemi ; and early frost of great severity did much injury. The 
eoldeflt day in 1632, was on the 27th of January, when the mercury sunk 
rt sunrise to 16 degrees below zero ; and the greatest heat was 91 de- 
grees. There were 185 fair days, and 180 cloudy : rain fell on 72 daysj 
mud the quantity of snow amounted to 18 inches. Thunder and light- 
mng were noticed on 21 days, first on the 12th of March, and last on 
S9th of September. The appearance of the Aurora Borealis was much 
lets frequent than common. 

January is usually the coldest month, and July the hottest; but in 

1831, December was much the coldest month, and in both 1S31 and 

1832, August was the hottest. 



Table 5. Mstract of a Meteorological Table of the jiverage Observations 
made at the Military Posts of the United States, by the Surgeons of tlu 
Army, for Four Years, — 1822, 1823, 1824, and 1625 ; prepared under 
the direction of Joseph Lovell, M, 2>., Surgeon- General of the United 
States* Army, 



II 



FortSntltM?, Mouth «f Si. PBtfiff 
Fowl ^aElivmn, Hnttport, Me, 

Fort Cmwfmdj Pruirit? Jn Chieia 
Won WwleoiiT Npw]|mjiI| E. I- 
Citoncil Blu^Bj, Ativrioun T(»r, 
Foit Colmnbu«, Nevr-Vark 
FuTt. Mi^ia, PtiilaiJi'lphiA 
Fart 94>vcri], AFUja.pO'lii 
WiLtbifle*®!* City 
Fort iohnitHi^ l!^iniliiiriUD, N. C^ 
Fvtt ^DuUrWj Ch&r^^dtoa} B, G. 
Ca^toi}^ Ji?Biipi, war Kambiio^hn 
BmUm Ron^t La. 
CukCctit^ CJifii^h, Pettiacolo, 
Su Amruitiott?! Plaridu 
Q witorn. B rcKike ^ do, 

Airein^ 

of tbn 

ttteiul 



jemn 



l*ia 



:C| ^ 



SBa 41 '17' 9|> 

INI 

too 
96 



800 






Oenrml Av«r&s« 



108; 
104 

S7,4fl 93 

6Si.77 9S 

7S,3fT, 93 
57,0(^ loa 



-Ifl 1(3 

-m 

^ 1 

'SI 
- 3 



10 
3d 
19 
7 
li 
1 

4a 

■10 

-^ 

-33 i^ 



Waathar. 


1 


MoniH^r Ai'irQgD. | 


Vair U^ufJy 


ULinf }Bmwf\ 


Db^i^ l^ay*. 


7,^ 


Da;.. 


13J)0 9^ 


fi,oa 


Ii5,5^1 &,50 


5,77 


V^ 


[7,01 1 D,39 


*j;*l 


M 


13,47 ?,9i 


4^ 


it,4Sk 


16^1 6^ 


3,117 


li» 


15J!l| B,Lfl 


5,n 


l,«i 


1*^1 GM 


n,m 


lf» 


a),4J 3,5« 


5,47 


^ 


ftl/30 5,19 


5,sao 


,41 


19,117, 4JiO 


5,0i 


t,n 


17,30 ' 6,0S 


li,44 


,m 


16,^7 7,60 


I>^ 


lis 


*ia.39 a.44 


5,00 


,0a 


I8,IS 4 ,40 


7^ 


,oa 


^.rS 4,08 


&,m 




t«,e0. 2,37 


%4Ay 




ao.Gtf a,9i 


t>J& 




le^.lG 3,91 


B^CJ 




IH,90 S,03 


5/3^ 


,85 


i(k4a Into 


5.98 1 1,77 1 


17A^ S,03 


♦^^^ 


^i^ 



IMI 
I7,4fl 



5,57 
5,47 



,4i| 1,3a 



The above Posts are situated between Lat. 27© 57' and 46<' 39' N., 
Fort Snelling being the most northern, and Cantonment Clinch the 
most southern Post; and between Lon. 67o 04' and 96^ 43' W. from 
Greenwich, Fort Sullivan beii^ the most eastern, and Council Bluffs 



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82 MBTXOKOLOeiCAL OMKKTATIOIfS. [1834. 

the most western Post. The centre of the seyeral stations is in Lat. 
88^ 13' N., iind the average mean temperatare 56,52, corresponding 
nearly with die city of Waihington^ which is Lat 38® 5^ N , with an 
average mean tempera! ure of 5G,5C. 

Tbe times of obierTatioii were 7 o'clock, A. M., and 2 and 9, P. M. 
The mean of ench innndi wos deduced from 90 obserrations, and of 
each year from 1095 observations. 



Table 6. Meteorological Observations jn^sented to the Regenis of the 
University ofJVew York^for the year 1830, by the following Academies 
in that State. 



Academies. 



Albany 

Auburn .... 
Cambric!^, Wash. Co. 
Cananiiaigua . . . 

Cayuga 

Cherry Valley . . 

Clinton 

Cortland, (6 months) 

Duteheia 

Erastnui Hall . . . 
Pairliold, (imperfect) 
Franklin .... 

Fredonia 

Hamilton .... 

Hartwick 

Hudson 

Ithacu 

John<town, (imporfoct) 
Kin'dorbook . . . 

Kingston 

i^ansin^burgh . . . 

Lowvilie 

Middlobury .... 
Mont^oiniary .... 
Nowburgh .... 
North Salem .... 

Oxford 

Pompey 

Redhook .... 
Rochester High Sohool 
St, Lawrence . , . 

Union 

Union Hall .... 

Utica 

Washington . . . 
Sem.Gen. JbOn. Conf. 



'214 12 
334 1-2 
198 
030 



Wbathkr, No. ot days. 



235 1-3 

138 



334 

216 1-3 
155 1-9 
314 

2031-2 
1891-3 
174 1-3 
214 1-3 
170 1-3 
103 
179 
[337 
193 1-3 
190 1-3 
ISO 

344 1-3 
337 1-3 



183 

179 

334 

165 IS 

181 1-3 

3151 

343 

1481.9 
1451-2 



-2 21 



S 

__o_ 

139 1-i 
337 
165 
150 1-! 
130 1-3 
173 
135 
95 
131 

148 1-3 
178 1-i 
151 

161 1-S 
175 1-2 

190 1-2 
150 1 

191 1-3 
140 
18a 
128 

171 1-2 
174 1-3 

130 1.1 
137 1-2 
143- 
183 
186 

U 
199 1 
183 1 

1 
133 
141 
916 1-3 
319 



•9 149 1-2 33 



2 93 

40 1.9 

;>0 
1-3 

5t 

57 1-3 

II 

19 1-3 

>2 1-2 
01 
-3|53 

70 

71 

37 

53 
2 58 



30 



25 
31 
13 
14 
13 
15 1-3 

1 

3 

8 1.3 
19 
18 
39 
37 
16 
35 
1.9 9 1-9 
47 9 1-! 

57 1-9.16 19 
44 1.3,10 1-9 
68 14 
55 1-9,35 
4-4 1.9 10 

4 19 
:J7 



•3 35 



jOI.321 
58 1-3 34 
1-9^130 1-8|53 1-31 7 l-Q 
1-9,90 
18 14! 
1 14 19 



■9 51 ] 
9 49 



58 1-9 
116 



1-9125 



3 



190 1-9 



4 
3 

1.9 
7 

61-2 
4 

3 1-2 
3 
4 
4 

1-2 



6 
3 
5 

1 1-2 
I 1-2 
1 
3 1-2 

3*ll2 

4 

1-2 

3 
5 

31-2 






41, a> 

37,et 

35,10 
3l»,60 
37,11 
45,05 
46,65 

46^ 
j53,4' 
20,t<2 
'36,15 
33,93 
43,71 
41,5J1 
39,77 
331.2||35,61 

4 1-2 



36,92 
40,15 
40,67 
3G,6€ 
33,50 
40,99 
34,83 
43,37 
33,79 
30,06 
43,00 

34^47 
96,00 
43,32 
46,19 



41,59 



Sept. 

Feb 

August 

do. 
Feb. 

do. 

do. 

Septl 
do. 
do. 
Feb. 
do. 

August 
do. 
do. 
Feb. 



August 

do. 
Jan. 
April 
Feb. 
Sept. 
August 

do, 
Feb. 

do. 

August 
Feb. 

do. 

do. 

August 
Peg. 



IFeb. 



.1 



s;.s 

§ 



lune 
do. 
Dec. 
June 
do. 
do. 
Dec 

NoV." 
Doc 
Oct. 

JUQO 

do. 
July 
June 

do. 
Nov. 



June 
Nov. 
June 

do. 

do. 
Nov. 

do. 
Dec 
June 

do. 

do. 

do. 
July 
June 
Deo. 

JUIM 



June 



NW. 

S. 
8. 
W. 

S. 

w. 

NW. 

8. 

SW. 

NW. 

W. 

W. 

W. 

NW. 

S. 

N. 

NW. 

VV. 

8. 

WW. 

s. 
aw, 

SW. 

s. 

NW. 

SW. 
SW. 

s. 
w. 

SW, 

a. 

NW. 

w. 

8W. 
NW. 



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I ameh lmg<thtt% In mmmim. 
Il8ai7> 1890, md 1888, ynm Jttnifty; 
,f^ «IHt b 1888, FelHnitfy. The Ibotj^^, 

>ii», t&e gf^i^ oom in tSi'j^ 
^ flii«Mf Hd^tlMi, in4 flM fraatMillHMil In 

li.^^i^^p«ai'iytt olMwnratloiii fnlbii 
|^N|ii J«nM^ impilM eeMesI mottdk, 

E^fV^iM i^i^M% tbin asj HMft pra- 

)ir ttyiittt^1^4lM Ohio Conpmnj in 

limr ^ 'ii&M li^w tN nMmlli ef 

r 1^l^|ibiir1bii« the wttiemenl of yw 



reold in >S1 putaof 

jilMdi idiitih intmedittely pi«- 

r^%^M«if iii^ Hie MiMiiiippi lAMi 

tinpcfttUm WM| ■•▼•ml 

vMebisalinlewMil^^ 

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16 


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16 










19 
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19 
17 




11 
6 


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MmMHlMr 


95 

17 


C 

1^ 


i^ 


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is 


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15 


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99 
15 


9 

15 


•3S 


vSIZIw' 


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1ft 


115 


4,r.n!l K 


y:t 


4,:ct 


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ZSK 


,^«y> 


mm 


m 


«;e» 


mu'- '-' .',..— -1 


905)160 




1916150 


<Of. 



iVti^ ■ ■ - ■ . * 

^tSbft 0iiitt^ of «aui tbit IbH dnrinf the three eomiiier monthe of jft# 

year 1B31» ww iie«lly twiee w grest •• the qumntitj that lell doru^f thd 

thite eorreepondiog moathv of 1833, and more than twice ae great m- 

hlH during the rammer monthe of either of the other yean incladad 1^ 

*oTWo. / ' • 

^ ^Ja ipooeequence of this ahandance of rain, yarioua kinds of prodtM 

j|Hp»ed greatly, especially hay and grain, which* were, in many ptacttf^ 

Ufalhib borders of streams, entirely swept away; in other casesy heaiofi 

Jtopitmiid destroyed, or rendered almost worthless by being loqg iiiiiMi 

jirilli. w»ler. Wheat Tegetated in the field, in some instaneefy bd^jl 

fPieufi^aiid in many cases afterwards. . ,,V 

' jbi FflibrMiy, 1832, the bottom lands on the Ohio were inandalii^| 

Ml gwrtipt flood known since the settlement of the state of j 

^^pMi.1>«9 M Ui highest at Pittsburg, Pa., on the Uth of ] 

•iiii|jji-j^J|fti.of t^ Ohio, at LooisviUe, on the I9th, advaad^g j 

^^l^#Vira|^, tbont 100 ipiles in 24 hoars, bearing on iti J 

r a Tillage, and the produetioiis of a thonsai^f'^' 

"] ited as highasamittioiiofc 

l4lilJ4^' 4«B any other flood nnce,tki|t'v 
#^^ ^thiif bjDtUtook phKMftl 

.aoitkof therlTer. Jlk^ifdi 
^ipp^ aetUers about Wheeih^ 






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IWi-T,* SH I71ftw7 — 6 

I'tt «m < -- ■ ."I ■ > !Ri I- ■ i. ii . H i f. ^n m i 



Ult'WLklK AT dxTBBAL PlAOBI. 



do. 98^ I 4i. 4B;97| daw 9%*. 



do. 54 ,>. 71,01} |f.^4M^ 

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, Ckmrry, mid AppU SVMff m 
-Mem. Amer. Ac«d. Vii^ 



Pa 






I^A. 



i" 



do. 16 
• • • 
do. 9 
Amil 25-801 
do. 90 
do. 8 



do. 



4 
94 



"ssr 



May 95 

do. 99 
do. 25 
do. 1^ 
do. A 
April 90 

do. 10 
4o. 10-181 
do. 4 



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FLOWERING OF FRUIT TREES. 



[1834. 



To THE Editor or the American Almanac. 

lUKdntryf June 4, 1833. 
Iff compliance with your request, I transmit a tabular statement ol 
the flowering of the three most common fruit trees on mj estate, in this 
place, 3 miles from Boston. Persons conversant with the meteorologi- 
cal history of this country, will of course recollect, that, from causes as 
yet unexplained, there are occasional yariations in the climate in differ- 
ent parts of our extended country, which are local. So that a compar- 
iaon of the opening of flowers in one section with any other given one, 
in tome years, will not truly exhibit the average difference. It is only 
8 comparison of several years, which can definitely settle the true differ- 
ence of climate as to the flowering of plants. It is for this reason, that 
I have extended the table to so great a length. 
Respectfully, 

John Lowell. 

TImb8 qf Flowering cf Peach, J§ppU, and Cherry Trees in the foUowmg 

years. 



Pe&ch. 



Cherry. 



Apple. 



1813 

1815 

1816 

1817 

1818 

1819 

1820 

1821 

1822 

1823 

1824 

1825 

1827 

1828 

1829 

1830* 

1831 

1832 

1833t 



May 


11. 


(( 


5. 


« 


6. 


« 


11. 




May 


9. 


it 


4. 


it 


12. 


u 


4. 


Apri 


128. 


(( 


16. 


u 


30. 


Apri 


126. 


u 


18. 



April 29. 



May 10. 

«* 10. 

« 6. 

" 6. 

« 17. 

« 6. 

" 2. 

« 9. 

« 3. 

" 7. 

«< 1. 
AprU 25. 

" 21. 
May 1. 

" 9. 
AprU 28. 

** 23. 
May 12. 
AprU 29. 



May 23. 

" 27. 

" la 

•« 12. 

" 26. 

" 27. 

" 11. 

•« 17. 

" 9. 

« 19. 

" U. 

" 8. 

« 12. 

" 7. 

" 15. 

' '«** ' 6.' 

« 15. 



Average (14 years) May 2 ; (19 years) May 4 ; (17 years) May 16. 



• General Martin Field of Fayetterille, Vt., remarki, on the lit of May oC thia year ; 
** Many apple treei are now in blottom, a circumstance which I have no reooUeetioo of 
wHoeising before in the last 39 years, daring which I have resided in Vermont.'* 

t The statement for 1833 relates to Cambridge, and is added by the Editor. 



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>af to «ieit0 lilt ten of ] 
monk, ImlftrliM 
iMrniBg, mod vtligioii. 
oiganiitd in 8001911, I17 liio bhbm dl 
. ilv liio flup pw io i on of 
■^oapoooiod in ito 
f Hloo ftM wo V of dMUod 0*1 

and wlioloooiiio diiftkftrblMnnia 

^j| wi to dloMiinge and do awpj th* eooloM 

or boopiloiity. For a mnpboi oT 

ooUto and dooidod^ vooM^atti Hi 

4»'koaial«tafjtiUtlMpfoaoBl lioM^ Bvt w> 

wo iMdo 10 tho oame of Toiiiporaiioo» till 

TiPifttraiioa Sodloty in 1888. Tho 

ilo oommfmotmont, hao boon, iojio 

^lilinod lyiiit aa driiOK;— to piomote tom- 

aloohoL The membero of 

«i aoeiatioa ansifiaiy to it, ase pledged to 

•piiifty osaapft aa medioine. Throogli 

^ the Amorioan Temperance Soeiefy, 

hsfo tekan phee in thia oowitiy, in fek- 

ip4 tlwiidijoot haa attraoted the atlen- 

jgdoirtiPjJiit in thia eountiy arooe prin- 

j|»iK## love of eieitement natuial to 

jdjijyip.m and eaao with which enoil^ 

MiNill inanlity of alcohol ; and thiMDy, 

Slfid^ikm nae tf a omaU qoanlityi of in 



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[1891 

i^ \ ^^mm^tl^^f^m^^W^^^ w« m% ^bfaiAvfaL From thli 
illifiOTiO; hoif»T«F» noro thtn flma all 0th«r otofet, no doabt, itom 
^, pnvdUiif me ol Mileiil ^bit, and, of ooone, alnuNit all the ev!lb 

k ki tiM emuitiy. The belief tbit a 

►we oT iiiiNv giMd Ibr Ike ilMneh, the apirHe^ 

|jli)filBifettMiitth, hatf tikeil, it ii updl kilowii, etrang end deep hold 

lifea the pQbUo mind. Eveiy bodj Knew end mdmittedy that it wee 

lH^of aind ii^nrioaa to drink intidb ; but afanoet eyeiy bodj was satisfied 

ijtittw eeme time, that it wee right and wholesome to take a liuU, 

HUm thhi belief was either correct or ino<»rect If earr§Uf the proper 

t^m^ t» driadc iiioieepisk mederetely; end it was the proper 

r of Teaspenmee Seeietlee to exert their isfloenoe to keep the 

e, and to bvinf the intemperate neers to the 




Bm if the beHef In qneetten was gtwuAy inmma^ then the propet 
I wie^ Bol only l»eall the pnblio attentien to the enormons and 
e, Wt, if poarible, to mudeeeire the paUie 
» and «ee of ardent spirit ; andUrostoky the 
jbondation bwni and deeplbr tiie nltimnte and-entiro enppression of 
tte Me ofttae a/ wMMMn drink. ' 

' f\otimuili^ ferthe eanee of kmnanitf, the truth on thu s«b|ect wii 
iftLbngtii net only peroeiTcd, bnt Iblt ; and tkionf h the aett?e labore of 
tkeftiendsef temperancci within the laetseren years, rast nnmben 
havse been fiilly con?tneed, that distilled spirit need as a drink ie net 
feod^ bnl hijvrioas and poisonons; that the nse of it is net filled «e 
"the pfagFeical eonstitntioni er moral condition, of the hnman fiunlly, 

Att eorts ef argnments, liearing npon the subject, hare been 1 
ftrwatd to ehange tlie public mind ; but the most succeeslViI 
hae been that derived fh>m personel experience. All that have I 
Ike haMt of using ardent spirit, whether moderately ^ immoderately^ 
«n^ haire exchanged this hiU>tt fi» that of entire abstinence ftom h^ 
tefi declitedi withent a known exception, that they are dediidly 
VeHMPWitimnt it, than they ever were with it ' 

This argnmnnt firom personal experience is plain, practical, and |M& 
fimHy un^neiremMe^ It can be understood without studying boeiie if 
aintomy, chemistry, or medicine.' Itcanbebroughtiothe teeiby«lrttt;f 
drinker of aident q»irit, temperate or intemperate, who wfil tijto tte 
paAnn fe» tiy it And the firiende of temperance maintain, that iBbmm^ 
perience of the vast numbers who hsTC tried it, and found it y n HMSi 
f , added to the admitted eTils of hitemperanee, li^ nptti'te 
inkers of ardent q»irit the etrongeet moral oU^ilieiafi 
the dXpetiment of abetinenee, and to m^te it fidriy and M^i ' ' 
mmetU^ JbMMitien of tiie American Tbrnpetanee BUffAt^WIMB^ 
man tkm i^ $m JBrtpernnee eocietlwi Imlt% bwaa ftwwtiilad il | i H ii ilit 

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l^mtom viulbnnl^Mtarlttdl 
t^«r 97TMMfai beUmgiiif to 
■vdttBt^iiit;— and tluHoiia*- 
ib fispMty; it has bcecoM eoMWonlbff 
IJliM ▼WM^ wiiteh evny no ■phitamw 



|(4¥j«ible uidiiioit happy laioMioe on t 
Wffujfl^ Ml maiwiftietorinf ettaMiiJinMiirta d 
^ * Ijtilgaged m agrifiiiUoial mnphponak^ 
[•n pmtolti. Of tbaM t im a a, tlia latflt 
Laliaaifal and hsppj at the cloaa dUm^ 
|[||i|diaingoiale4 whan tha mofniiig letunMiy 
' dgjHllad ipirit aa drink, 
thai haMi done in the way of refotBi taify 
IJilO nae of aidant apirit aa drink k atUl 
I s and great impedimenta 
r ipipval* Thaae impedimenta j|fe Tary mnok 
|vi|q^p||iy«aiid are oMefly to he fi»nnd| lat, in the 
[pfB» who take no part in temperance meae- 
ifipoQi the bookai^ their counael from the 
XOtom the labora of iemperanoeao- 
IPP^^ what ia aaOed teMSperate driddng, atUl 
I pafaaii% whoaa example doee all that ia done 
to inak ardent apirit at all ; and 3dly« 
I |ht Injim in |ident apirit. On theae aoTeral 
fj^tathepvugreaaof iht temperance reform, 
;j|0lal|9|p; na to lemark. They are there- 
; oooapdiaflytion of thoae whom they move 
^11^ do well to remember, that no hahii 
f mii$ i^jpry than benefit to Uia fUMol 
9jp!pmd of vkj adTantagtBi Tail fft UDa%- 
rlaiadMdiuaB. ¥L 



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fiytll^ili^^ ItUaajC^y^ Jittai'C. fltofteri; Atotai 

HpUM^ Joim Wivm^ Bftmud Bajud, Ihao MeKim, J. H. Cttdktt,' 
ll^il^ Wyte/Iit^ llferp«r, JetMniah Day, RielMBnl 

l^likfWbop IfelCandrM/Phflip E. Thomu, Dr/TiL C. Jimfl^ J^ 
li^'JItt^ Tbiodoie FrelingHiiTMii, Looii HeLtiie, Genitt Smith/ 
j^'^||tr%^^» O^* Alex. Macomb, Solonaon Allen, Oen. WalMf 
Icffi^^' fir. 8. iCey, Samuel H. Smith, and Joeeph Galea, ]^. ^ JIfoiuyMBi. 
l^rfJ. Laor&ey Rey. S. B. Balch, Rev. O. B. Brown, Rot. Wm. Hail^ 
lei;, W. W. Seaton, Rot. Wm. Ryland, Dr. H. Hoht, Rev. R. POf^' 
Hngii C. Smith, Moeea Sheppard, J.H.B. Latrobe,andR. C.Coxe.— ' 
Key. Bl R. Gnrley, 5eerelar)r. Richard Smitl^, Treantrer, John Ua- 
deirwood, Beeoritr, — Theae were the officeni of the society for thi^' 
y«ir lS!t3.— libe ofBeen m elected annually on the 3d Monday ia^'* 
.J&maijr ' ." ' ' ' ''' 

Irtib loiiitiidoai waa founded in December, 1816, at the city of Wailh^ 
iurfam, chiefly throui^ the instnimentalily of the Rev. Robert Finlejrb 
of Bfew Jetilj. Hie subject of colonixing the free people of color irm 
pro^oeed 1^ Mr. ilefferson to the Legislature of Virginia as early ail 
1777| — the ptaee being left undetermined in the plai;i. In 1787 l>r. 
Thornton, of Washington, formed a project for establishing a coloiiy.cir* 
llee blacks on the western coast of Africa, and publicly invited thoii Hi 
liuHachttsettB and Rhode Island to accompany him ; but the plan Mad 
fitt (he want of Ainds. Previous to 1801, the Legislature of Vh^giitti 
tw^ debated, in secret session, the subject of colonizing the free ooloiad 
^eoulatibn, and in 1801 passed a resolution, instructing Mr. Mmirol^ 
^kli dovemor of Uie State, to apply to the President of the WSM 
States, and uife him to institute negotiatipns with some of the piNI^ 
oflBurope, posseased of colonies on the coast of Africa, to gniA iii 
«^)mi^ to whiclk our emancipated blacks might be sent. A ne g^irtii t l l i l i 
liis dp^ned with the Sierra Leone Company, but without auci^eaa. "At 
18itf a reioliltion waa passed by the Legulature of Virginia, lequi irt ili 
fSe Bxecutite to correspond with the President <<for the purpiniiMif 
o^mng a tanritoiy on the coast of Africa, or at some other pli!oa0ittt 
^^i^ any of the States or territorial governments of the United 0^104" 

aim as an asylum for auch persons of color aa are now iM^iWl 

^Siibvi tho aame, and for those who may hereafter be emane^iltl 

I'fiSii Comaumwealth.** Thua the existence of the ewS oT^MH^ 

iod auiQiested its remedy. The public mind oalt£l|/w 

i^fUject, it was deemed wiie and p^per to ^im§% 

<rif4 O^bmisation Society. Acecidirigty , in ihe^ "^^ ^ 

a meeting waa caH^ it Waik^BgMi ' it'^ 

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1634.] COLONIZATION SOCIETY. 83 

were present Jadge Wwhin^n, Mr. Clay, John Randolph, Mr. Mer- 
0er, Mr. Fiiiley, Elias B. Caldwell, F. S. Key, &c. Most of these gen- 
tlemen addreOTed the meeting. Mr. Randolph said : ** If a place conld 
be prcnrided for their reception, and a mode of sending them henoe, 
there were hundreds, nay, fhoosands, who would, hy manumitting thebr 
dtree, reHeve themselres from the cares attendant on their possession." 
This meeting proceeded to form a Society, which was denominated th» 
" Ameriiaui Society for Colonizing the Free People of Color.'* Bushrod 
Wariiington was elected its first President. Among the Vice-Presidents 
were Mesnrs. Crawford, Clay, Rutgers, Howard, Gen. Jackson, ReT. 
R. Finley, Ac. The second President was Charles Carroll. The 
second, — which is the fundamental, — article of the Constitution of 
(he Society ayers : ** The object to which its attention is to he exclu* 
sirely directed, is to promote and execute a plan for colonizing, with 
flieir consent, the free people of color residing in our country, in Africa, 
or such other place as Congress shall deem most expedient And the 
Society shall act, to effect this object, in cooperation with the General 
Goremment, and such of the States as may adopt regulations upon ths 
tQl]9eet." It win thus be seen to be the policy of the Society, not to 
Interfere with Tested rights, — not to inrade the Constitution, — nor to 
act upon the slave population, except through the medium of the ma»- 
ter. It will also be seen, that from the first it has looked for the accom- 
pfishment of its objects, to any very extensive degree, to legislative aid, 
rather than to private liberality, while with the assistance of the latter,* 
it has been engaged in laying the foundations of a republic, which is 
destined, it is believed, to be a lasting blessing to the Continent of Af- 
rica, and an nndecaying monument to the honor of America. 

Any citizen of the United States, annually contributing one dollar to 
the funds of the Society, is entitled to membership. Thirty dollars 
eonsCitotes a life membership. 

There are three (General Agents now acting under the authority of the 
Society in the Northern, Middle, and Southern DepartmenU of the 
United States : the Rev. Joshua N. Danforth is in the- first ; Rev. Henry 
B. Bascom in the second; and John G. Birney, Esq. in the third. These 
officers have the general superintendence of colonization affairs in their 
respective districts, are invested with the power to appoint sub-agents 
for the States individually, are expected to visit ecclesiastical bodies, 
legislatures, and chief towns, to correspond extensively, and in general 
to advance the objects of the Society. 

In the year 1819, the Rev. S. J. Mills and Rev. E. Burgess visited Af- 
rica under a commission from the Society on an exploring expedition. In 

* The wholo torn expended bjr the Coeiety, during the lizioon years of iu oxiateoce, is 
abovt $160,000. 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



94 COLONIZATION 80CIETT. [1834. 

1821 1 the present site of the colony of Liberia was purchased, as affording 
the best prospect of health and prosperity to the colonists. It is situated 
on the western coast of Africa, in 6^ N. Latitude, and extends from Gall>- 
nas river to the territory of Kroo Settra, a distance of 280 miles alon^ 
the coast. About 3,000 emigrants have ^ne out from the United 
States, one thousand of whom were once slaves, but are now freemen 
m Africa. The chief town, Monrovia, is situated on Cape Montserado, 
and contains from 800 to 1,000 inhabitants. It is a port of entry, 
visited in 1831 by nearly GO vessels. The exports during the year end- 
ing May, 1832, amounted to $125,549; the imports to 80,000. Distant 
tribes visit the colony for purposes of trade, while those in the vicinity, 
to the number of 10,000, have voluntarily placed themselves under the 
government of the colony, and have begged that their children might 
be taught (to use their own language) *' after the wkiu man*s fashion" 
The number of natives embraced in the territorial jurisdiction of the 
oolony is upwards of 50.000. Caldwell, Millsburg, Stockton, and New 
Georgia are the names of four other rising villages, situated at suitable 
points for the advancing prosperity of the colony. The population of 
these places is gradually increasing. In the early years of the Society's 
history, the emigration to Africa was very limited. Indeed, a very 
large emigration was not desirable until the colony had acquired such 
a firmness of character, as would constitute a sufficient protection 
against those accidental evils to which colonial establishments are ex- 
posed. During the thirteen months ending Jan. 1, 1833, eleven hun- 
dred and thirteen colored persons emigrated from this country to the 
colony. Great numbers are now waiting to go, but are prevented by 
the want of means on the part of the Society. The sum of $30 is 
adequate to the transportation of one emigrant. 

The officers of the colony are the Governor, Dr. Mechlin ; Lieutenant- 
Governor or Vice-Agent, A. D. Williams ; Sheriff, Roberts ; and a 

Council of Three, which is about to be enlarged. The first named gen- 
tleman only is a white man. The Society makes laws for the colony, 
and will continue to do so while it remains under its guardian care, — 
those laws being regularly received and ratified by the government of 
Liberia. It is expected ultimately to be by mutual agreement, indepen- 
dent of the government of the Colonization Society. 

Slavery and the slave trade are prohibited by law. A high standard 
of morals is said to be maintained in the establishment. No white per- 
sons are allowed to settle in the colony except the governor, physicians, 
missionaries, and teachers. On the whole, the existence and prosperity 
of this African colony, founded precisely two hundred years afler the 
colony at Plymouth, are considered as marking an era in this age ; and 
should the doctrines of universal emancipation happily prevail, it would 
of immense importance to the peace and prosperity of the colored race. 



d by Google 



1834.^ PERIODICAL LITERATURE. 90 

PERIOD ICAL LITERATURE THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 

[From Um London New Monthly Ma^axine, for December, 1839.] 

" The fdUcmiMg TabU is sent to us by a gentleman, as translated from the 
Jmud€S d£0 Trarrtyj- * of the Paris Statistical Society, made up from 
rmfnrTnatJtin ihrfrttj by M. Balbif the well-knovm geographer. We sub- 
join it as a very curious memorandum, though we cannot vouch for its 
acatrmcy" 



~- ' ^ — 




li 




Popiilayofi.l^ 

1 1 ^ 




PopuJatiaB. 


5*5 


Cauii(ri>tt ^' 


E^varv, 




i^jii 




!|3, 


aa7,?w)^oiio 


2,141 


Gre«c, . 


l^OOOpflOO 


9 


rmee, . . 


39,n00,DDU 


4mi 


X.pali, . . 


lOfOOD 


1 


Fuif, . 


^m^m 


Yi^ 








H^!l1««^' . ' . ' 




la 


AlTHirCA, . 


^^,300,000 
IIUIOOJXIO 


07B 
S4G 


Brfiub likoda, 


33,400,^00 


483 


.SewY«tJ(» . . 


j(fiO^ 


30 


Liwiui, 


1^5^000 


w 


Caldiii tiin, . 


3^,000 

:io,wo 


SO 


tMblUf . . . , 


^a^m 


9» 


t^ttnU F« dq UofotiLf 


4 


Edhitovzifc, f 


\^^m^ 


lb 


MciieAR Con fed. 


7,500,fl00 


» 


6b^p«, p . 


HTpOOO 


14 


Mciico. 


liojnoo 


7 


BlaiKlMeiflr, , 


134,000 


19 


iiratil, . 


5,000,000 


« 


BtniUDJi^liara, > * 


1(^7 ^fWjO 


!.' 


Hjd JaitcirCt 


HO.IJOO 


UT«rpoDl, * * 


J IfljUiM} 


\y 


Ein^titfli AnicricBp 


s,s!ia,iM]u 


m 


0VLH CoflfMttrttion, 


1,960,000 


3D 


^'paditii AiDFtica, 


i,a*o,ti«o 


4 


Gvne^ft, 


^,wn 


4 


Dutch Aftieri^tip 


JI4/)(J0 


3 


AiutriMf . « 


3a'0oo,ooo 


eo 


Preficli Ainerictta > 


340,0i.iO 


3 


Vkma, . . 


doa,flOD 


94 


^l.>ii, . . . 


S5U,lW0 


5 


MiJkit, , . 


151,000 











Ftiufui, 


12,464,000 


fifib 


AftJA, 


30O,WTO,O0<J 


97 


6,143^000 


150 


CalciiiliL} . 


500,000 





iljiwterdi«f 


901,000 


35 


l^urat, ♦ 


45«».000 


1 


EmMelii^ . » # 


» 


^ 


E'i^lii, 


l^lKHJ^tlOO 


1 


GpimaDic Caiif<d> 


LlvfiOO^TO) 


m^ 


OcvurtcA, , 


ao,ooo,ooa 


9 


Sw#d«n U. ^onriy, 


?,Ht'p(i»lW)U 


m. 


HaUtIb^ , 


40 000 


9 


Deimiarlt, ^ * 


i.osa.wii 


eo 


Vnn Dir-tiicn'i Lujif| 


a^ 


J 


Cof«iiliaf9D, 


jop^oua 


« 


Otahoite, 


7,000 


1 


iCdrul/ . ' . ' . 


J3,9CK>,l»a 


XQ 








aoi,ofOO 


A 


Armcj, 


60,000,000 


19 


Pivtiiift], 


31^^30,000 


Ti 


Cairo, . * ^ , 


$i]0,000 


J 


Lubon, 


'200,000 


IS 








BuiilDU, . . 


4j3O0,IX)0 


I' 


BtfMMlilLT. 






Torui, 


J w^ma 


a 








4vtO^,fM»0 


h\ 


Euiapi., . , . 


927,700,000 


2,148 


Pfepal Territoriet, 


3&t,0Ot) 


3 


AmcrlcLii) 


;W;MMl,iJOO 


1 STS 


2„'50»J»JO 


fi 


Apin, 


3fii0,0fl0,0fl0 


87 


R«HI», . . , 


ir«,omi 


3 


Africa, . 


6tf,tlOO,flOO 


Ji 


Riuaia ami Pelfinilj 


56/ik\QO0 


14 


OcoHttira, 


90,000,000 


« 


M««eflw, 


330,000 
&50,000 


m 
i: 








Tat«] of ihe Globe, 


737,000,000 




WAiuir, - 


iSOfQOO 


la 









<* Upon these computations, the Journal of the Paris Statistical So- 
ciety thus remarks : *• The proportion to which the number of journals 
in each quarter of the world bears to its population is as follows : — in 
Asia there is one paper for every 14,000;(XK); in Africa, one fox ^^^rg 

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I la JLoq4mi9 ja IdSOy ««^fEia» IB 
I^MoliMe io£ Lttaios, vm t9Sr«id dwiiif Om y««r 1838, Umm wwra 
ttpHBMMMid M mftnj •• 60 new w«ekl/ ^riodiealf , moit of QmrktM 
Ar, « P^B&y Mtcli. Of Um 80 joorotls pobliihed in Denmark, $T an 
I byr tiw &i^ela|«Mlia ilum«rioaiia to Copen^^ 
I awabar of ntwapapera, ezchunve of other periodical poUicatiQafi 
latfieyaitedBtatea, waaeonqpatedyialSaSyatdOa: ainoe that tinMMl^ 
mmbet haa gveatlj increaaed ; and it ti probably now not leaa than l^Ml 
, ^na nnmber of newi^pera. and nootfalj magaiinea, without inolai^iiig < 
ppriodieai pnblusationa iaaned at longer interraUi, pabliahed in the dlf m 
Nftw ToriK in April, 1833» waa 65 ; and in the atate of N. York 263. fM 
aambavel aewapapera publiahed in Boaton in July, 1833, waa 43 ; •B^j^'f 
plherjoainala, pnblia^ at aho^r intenrala tiian a year, 36— totaly|i|i 
Tlia Feriodieal Pieaa, eoa^riatng aewi^peny magaiinea, vanMP% 
dbObi dai^ited to lefigion, poUtioa, Uteralore, arta, icience, intelUgiMlo^ 
aaniaaaieata, dse., fbnna a lemarkable feature of the modern atato 4if 
aooietfyaad ia one of the moat momentooa conaeqaencea of the hw a 
Hon of the ait of printing. Periodioal poblicationa, eapeoially noivi^ 
pen, diaaemiaato knowledge throughout aU claaaaa of aocie^, fal 
axert an amaaing influence in fbtming and giying effect to publlo ^pii^ 
iott ia aUciTilixed countriea. Thia branch of literature, 
eatfrely unknown in ancient timea, abounda eapeoially in Qiaai 1 
fHnee, Germanyi and the United Statea ;«and it haa been giaa%taF> 
i the oommencement of the preaent century. 







d by Google 



UNITED STATES. 



Tbm lecond volame of the American Almanac contains the Dedara- 
iMt of Bidtpendemeef with the names of the Signers (who were mem- 
bera of the Congreea that aisembled in 1776) ; the Constitution of the 
UtdUd StaUMf with the names of those who signed it \ the Successive 
JUmuustTiOionSf comprising the names of the Presidents, Vice- Presi- 
dents, and Heads of the several departments of government from 1789 
to 1631, which last names are also given, in a different form, in the first 
Toliinie of the Almanac. 

We now insert, in a series of tables, the names of the members of 
tbe colonial Congress of 1765, of the Congresses from 1774 to 1788; 
of the Convention that formed the Constitution ; and of all the sue- 
cenLve Congresses since the adoption of the Constitution. 

L M£MB£RS OF THE FIRST COLONIAL CONGRESS. 

21iff Congress was composed of Delegates from nine of the Colonies^ 
amd met at JVeio York on the 7th of October j 1763 : —Timothy Rug- 
gles, President ; John Cotton, Secretary. 



Musachusetts. 

Otis, James. 
Partridge, Oliver, 
Rnggles, Timothy. 

Bhodeldand, 

Bowler, Metcalf, 
Ward, Henry. 

CofmecdaU, 

Dj^Tf Eliphalet, 
Johnson, Wm. Sam. 
Rowland, David. 



JVhc York. 
Bayard, William, 
Cruger, John, 
Lispenard, Leonard, 
Livmgston, Philip, 
Livingston, Robert R. 

J{ew Jersey. 

Borden, Joseph, 
Fisher, Hendrick, 
Ogden, Robert. 

Pennsylvania, 
Bryan, George, 
Dickinson, John, 
Morton, John. 



Delaioare. 

M'Kean, Thomas, 
Rodney, Caesar. 

Maryland. 

Murdock, William, 
Ringold, Thomas, 
Tilghman, Edward. 

South Carolina. 

Gadsden, Chris'r, 
Lynch, Thomas, 
Rutledge, John. 



** The represenUtives of New Hampshire, from the peculiar situation 
of that colony, judged it imprudent to send representatives to this con- 
gieM, though they approved of the measure ; and the assemblies of 
Virginia, North Carolina, and Georgia, not being in session, the gov- 
ernors of these colonies refused to call special assembUes for a purpose, 
dMmed by them improper and unconstitutional." — Pitkin^s Hist. U. S. 
P 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



^< BL MgM ^M OF OON6EB80 FROM 1774 TO 1788. 
[CkipM Am te Xowndi of Cki^^ 

Uymvm mtB«pu6,1774;dillivl<^lT»,aPhlliddpy*jDM.t9,m«»«tBdti. 

It York, P*. 5 J«lj 8, XTTa, at PUIiidtlplito J JwM 30, 1788, rt Prliottoo i N«nr. «,Ma, 
■I AmiimliT } Oct. 90, 1784, at Traatoo; Jan. 11, 1785, at Naw.Totk, wUeh eootiaaad 
tabathtptMaoroMttiBftintlMadoptloaorifaaOMirtitiitlon. Prom 1781 to 1788, Ow 
0MiMlammallf,oatlMftivtMaBda7lttNoffWBb«r, ponauttotiM Aitidai of aa»> 
, wUoh wtia temd ia 1777, aod waat iato opantkw ia 178L] 



•Btftlett, Joalah, 
BUnchard, Jonathan, 

Fd«>m, Nathaniel, 



Hbw Hahpihibx. 

la. Oat. 

1775-79 

1783-84 

1774-75 

1777-78 

1779-80 

1783-85 

1777-79 

1783-83 

1786-88 

C 1775- 77 

{178G-87 

f779-80 

C 1780-83 

> 1785-86 

1784-86 

1779-80 

C1774-75 

11780-81 

1776-78 

1778-79 

1776-79 

1782-83 

1787-88 



Fo0ter, Abtel, 
Froat, George, 
^Gttman, John Taylor, 
Oilman, Niehoka, 

^Langdon, John, 

Langdon, Woodbury, 

liyetmore, Samael,' 

Long, Pierce. 
Peabody, Nathaniel, 

•SolliTan, John, 

Thornton, Matthew, 
Wentworth, John, jr. 
Whipple. WilUam, 
White, Fhillipa, 
Wingate, Paine, 

MaMACHUiXTTI. 

Adaaa, John, 
^Adaaa, Samuel, 
OwUttf , Thomaa, 

Dttna^FMBoia, 

0tttte,llithaa, 



-78 



Jaokaon, Jonathan, 
King.Ilnfha, 
LoTell. Jamea, 
Lowell, John, 
Oagood, Samuel, 
OtM, Samuel A. 
Paine, Robert Treat, 

Partridge, George, 

Sedgwick, Theodore,. 
^SuIuTan, Jamea, 
Thacher, George, 
Ward, Artemas, 

Rhode Islahd 
Arnold, Jonathan, 
Arnold, Peleg, 
*Collina, John, 
Cornell, Ezekiel, 

Ellery, William, 
Haxaid, Jonathan, 
Hopkina, Stephen, 



1783-6 
1784 -d7 
1776-89 
1783-83 
1780-84 
1787-88 
1774-78 
C 1779-88 
i 1783-85 
1785-88 
1783-8S 
1787-88 
1780-81 



84 
88* 



Howell, David, 
Manning, 



rllitiuiiiel. 



Merchant, Henry, 

Miller, Nathan, 
Mowry, — — , 

Vamum, Jamea M. 

Ward, Samuel, 

CONHICTICVT* 



1774 

1774 

1774-76 
C 1776-78 
> 1784-84 

1785-88 

1776-81 

1782-85 

1785-87 j ^^^°^» Andrew, 
1775-80 Cook, Joaeph P. 
1786-86 jDeaneySihM, 



1783 

1787 

1778 

1780-83 
C177d-d0 
M783-8R 

1787-88 
C 1774-7T 
)1778 

1788-86 

1785-88 
C 1777-81 
)1788-W 

1785-88 

1781-81 
C1780-.» 
1 1786-# 

1774^1)^ 



C 1777-88 
{ 1701 1^88 



lWil-83 
1784-85 



Edwaida, Pierpont, 
fiUaworth, Olirer, 
HiOhoiiaer Williaifpy 

Digitized by LjO^Q l^: 




■\«.:^ 



1834-1 



MXMBERS OF C05eRES9 FROM 1774 TO 1788. 



Hosmer, Titus, 

Himlington, Benj. 

*{ Huntington, Samuel, 
Johnson, William S. 

Law, Richard, < 

MitcbeU, Stephen M. < 

Root, Jesse, 
Sherman, Ro^r, 
Spencer, Joseph, 
Strong, Jedediah, 
Sturges, Jonathan, 
Treadwell, John, 
Trumbull, Joseph, 

Wadsworth, James, i 

Wadsworth, Jeremiah, 

Williams, William, f 

•Wolcott, Oliver, J 

New York. 
Alsop, John, 
Benson, Egbert, 7 

Boerum, Simon, 
•Clinton, George, 
De Witt, Charles, 
Dnane, James, 
Duer, William, 

Floyd, William, J 

Gansevoort, Leonard, 

Hamilton, Alexander, 

Haring, John, 

•§ Jay, John, 

Lansing, John, 
Lawrence, Jolm, 
Lewis, Francis, 
Liringston, Philip, 

Livingston, Robert R. 

Livinffston, Walter, 
Low, Isaac, 

L'Hommedieu, Ezra, 

Monis, Gouverneur, 
Morris, Lewis, 



M'Dougall, Alexander, 

Paine, Ephraim, 
Piatt, iSlephaniah, 

Schuyler, Philip, 

Scott, John Morin, 
Smith, Melancthon, 
Wisner, Henry, 
Yates, Abraham, jr. 
Yates, Peter W. 

New Jersey. 
Beatty, John, 
§Boudinot,£Iia8, 

Burnett, W. 
Cadwallader, Lambert, 

Clark, Abraham, 

Condict, Silas, 
Cooper, John, 
Crane, Stephen, 
Dayton, Elias, 
De Hart, John, 
Dick, Samuel, 

BImer, Jonathan, 

Fell, John, 

Frelinghausen, Fred. 

Henderson, Thomas, 
Hopkinson, Francis, 
Hornblower, Josiah, 

Houston, William C. 

Kinsey, James, 
'Livingston, William, 
Neilson, John, 
Scheurman, J. 
Scudder, Nathaniel, 
Sergeant, Jonathan D. 
Smith, Richard, 
Stewart, 

Stockton, Richard, 
Symmes, John C. 
Witherspoon, John, 



Id. Out. 
$1781-82 
> 1784-85 

1784-85 
1784-86 
51775-75 
\ 1778-81 
1780-83 
1785-88 
1774-76 
1787-88 
1785-87 

1783-85 
C 1777-78 
) 1781-84 

1780- 8J 

1784-87 

C 1776-82 

i 1787-88 

1781-84 

1776-76 

1774-76 

1787-88 

1774-76 

1783 - 84 

(1776-78 

J 1781 -84 

( 1787 - 88 

1778-80 

C 1778-79 

11782-83 

1779-80 

1776-77 

1785-86 

C 1779 -82 

I 1784-85 

1774-75 

1774 - 76 

1778-79 

1786-87 

1777-79 

1776-77 

1774 - 76 

1784-85 

1770-77 

1785-86- 

1776-83 



Pennsylvania. 



\IIen, Andrew, 

! Armstrong, John, 

A.tlee, Samuel, 
Bayard, John, 

! Biddle, Edward, 



1775-76 

C 1778-80 

J 1787 -88 

1778-82 

1785-87 

C 1774-76 



yGoogk 




•rfeMlUin,Beiij«aap, 
lliniiw^j. JoMph, 




BM117. WOliain, 




;, Timotiijy 
M 'ClAJie, Jamais 
Kawdith, , 

*$Mifflin, Thomas, 

Monis, Chmrlea, 
Morris Robert, 
~f onlgomery, John, 
torton, John, 
^nhlenberff , rVederiek A. 
Peters, Richard, 
^t, Charles, 

&,jMep&, 
Samaelf 
au, Daniel, 
J Qeoi]lpe, 
h, Benjainin, 
rle, James, 
Vblppen, William, 
fmith, James, 
^ kith, Jonathan R, 
BpJth,Thomas, 
IJEk. Q»ir, Arthur, 
flT, Geor|pe, 




1980-8$ 
ir74-96 

1784-8^ 

1784-86 
1774-76 
1780-81 
1786-88 
1785-86 
1780-81 
1778-80 
1787-188 
1774-76 
1788-84 
1783-84 
1776-78 
1780-84 
1774-77 
1778-80 
1782-83 
1786-87 
1787-88 
1777-78 
m4-75 
1777-79 
1774-77 
1776-77 
1778-80 
1778-80 
1776-78 
1777-78 
1780-83 
1786-87 
1776-77 
1775-76 
1775-78 
1782-83 
1786-87 
1771^-83 






C 1783-85 

1 1786-87 

1785-86 

11776-77 

11779-80 

'1782-88 

17W-.77 

1786-88 



..m-5 




1775-W 

178D-ii 

1783-ii 

[1774^9 

fl784-» 



yn:ei»,T how H b 
P«ltoa,lohm 
PeeiT, William, 
Reatf,G«Qige/ 

Rodi^jr, CMar, 

Rodocjf , Thomas, 

Srkaf, James, 
lllton, James, 
•Van Dyke, Nicho|ii» 
Vininf , John, 
WhaitoQ, Samuel/ 

Martlastd. 
Alexander, Robert, 
Ctrmichad, WilUam, 
Carroll, Chailes, ^ 
Carroll, Denial. 
Chase, Jeremiah T. 

Chase, Bamnel, 

Contee, Renj^nipi, 
Forbes, James, 
Forrest, Uriah, 
Goldsborongh, Roheit, 

HaU, John, 

§ Hanson, John, 
Harrison, WilUam, 
Hemsley, William, 

^Henry, John, 

Hindman, William, 

^Howard, John £. 

Jenifer, D. of St. Th«M(W» 17I8« 

*Johnson, Thomas, 

*l.ee, Thomas Sim, 

Lloyd, Edward, 

Martin, Lather, 

M*Hemy, James, 

*Paca, William, 

*Plater, George, 

Potto, Richard, 

Ramsay, Nathaniel, 

Ridgely, Richard, 

Rogers, John, 

Ross, Da?id, 

Rmnsej, RenjamiB, 

Scott, GostoTOi^ 

Seney, Joshna, 

Smith, WHliaoi, 



Stone, TImmiim» 

Digitized by Google 



{iiei--* 








^9pJ|^t, Rkhaid O. 
0WM^ John, 
W91iaaM» Jobn, 



1777.» 
1784-85 
1779-88 
1783-85. 
1787-88 
1778-70 
(088-85 
}1987-iB 
1786-88 



SovTH Gaboliva. 
Bm,TIioiiim, ' 1788-88 

Bttmifiyrd, Riekaid. . 1783-85 
BuU^John, 1784-87 

BdUer, Pierce, 1787- 88 

Drayton, Wttlnm Henr7)1778-79 
ETeleigli, Nichohe, 1781-88 

Oediden, Chrietopher, 1774 
Genrue, John L. 
Heywud, Thomae, |r. 
Hnger, Daniel, 
Hntaon. Richard, 
Ixard, Ralph, 
Kean^ John, 

.«d,Iienf}r, 

i, Thono, 
Lynch, Thomas, jr. 
fibtthewa,John, 



t, Arthur, 
gfiddleton, Henry, 

^Finekney, Charlea, 
^l«tt AA Bameay, David, 

t|Maadge,John, 
llriMiir, Panl, 



i7ai-tt 

1778-79 

1785-^ 

1777-80 

1774-78 

17T6-7t 

1778-88 

C 1776-78 

>17ai-^ 

1774-76 

1780-88 

1786-88 

1777-78 

1784-87 

1782-84 

1785-86 

1783-85 

1774-77 

J 1774-77 

{ 1788-83 

1777-78 

1787-88 



d by Google 



f 






^ , WiUiu&, 

VabtfilMiiii, Jblm, 



1784- W 
17TB -77 
1795-86 
1775-79 
177&«7ir 



Jen— yKobteWhifcwIr, 

rreUMK, £dwu4» 

Woo4» Joseph, 
Bnhlj^ John J. 




HI. CONVENTION THAT FORHjED THE CONSTfnmON^ 



JM qf A^Mmkmr^ qf <ibe Goierai CMMMiifiM wUcA oivmAWm MOi-' 

' UmI pi «eiMi» liV I4e 17l* if StpUmker^ teim it was adofitd mU 
' ^^fM^ ItfoU the mtmbeips t40i jra-«Miil, [S^e (jbe A w mc m 
/v li80» IT. 188^ iMibr 1831, IP. 118.] 



Nicholas, 
John. 








JTonjUMfeimiS- 



FitiummoQSfThos. 
IVmnklin, Bemmki, 
Ingersol, JareJ, 
MuUn, Thomuu 
Morris, GpuTwasur^ 
Ntonis, Robert, 
WihMMi, Jaines, 

JMoiostw, 
BMsel, Rksherd, 
Bedford, GtiBninf>|i. 
BioQgi> Jaooib. 
Oi^daisoii, ioiHi, 
Ree4»Ge<Mrge. 



JMiinin, i4iiuier, 
•* "• 7 , Jemes, 



HiiryJoiu^* 



Mason, George^ 
Washkiflsft^ dS^ 

Blonnt, "^ 

OaTM^WiUiaMil 

M«rliB,j" 





Botier,fiiiti^, 

Pindknegr^ll 
RntledgS;; 




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.^l, 







'.' ih&i>^^^k^'^ 



ci^.O' 






J' .•- - 'i' 

l|MlllfHB0tlMN^^Piiii4y| ( 



liT«npir», sfn^. W) 1718-1801 
Mmob. Jerao^, (T. "Sl^ 1»»^17 
"HoiiiB, Dayid L. )fti7«» 

CNeoftl, Simeon, (T. 'M) 16^-66 
Fufk«», Naham, 18QI7.lt 

PBrrott, John F. 181»«8i 

•Phmiw, Willkn, 180(i4W 

8hMlb,JMM,(H.7^ IStt^OI 
Slorar, ClenMot. 18I7^J» 

TliooipMii.T. W. (H. IS^lAM^^if 
WiBMtvFuiM* (H. m 13a».i« 



Allmtoa,C. ]!.(». 'M 1MU19 

BfefftWil. lolu^ (a '8>ilW.Si 

•" >,8ih%(]>.^ ]8i8-i7 

** DuiMl, 180»-11 

,J<^, 188»-88 

Bto«Ni,Tltiif, (M.*ll) 1886-98 

BiiAmh Mb, (D. '7) 18I8- 91 

Btilte, iMitb, (H. '3) 1817-98 

Curium, Peter. 1807-00 
ChoidMito, J. C. (fl. "SQ 1809- 11 

Ghmidler, Thomae, 1899-38 

Oa^^MnObxaj, 1813-17 

iji^aiiion, J}g?:S 

_,8«i^.^*88; 1811-18 
J»MlilM.(B.*9i) 1807^1 

I Nehemieh, 1886^| 

ieb,Cilt« 




||il«Bi^^el,(H.t^r {13^ 



y Google 



i 




-^ (H.'7?)17»7-1800 



1817*19 
{1809-11 
i 1813-17 
1811-13 
18S9-33 
1811-13 
1831-33 
1895-31 



• BunnoBd, JoMph, 
ttitrptiy John A. 
'Huptf, Joseph M. 
MmfKf* JoBsthftiii 
•HftTfSy. Bfotthow, (p. '6) 1821 -25 
H»T«ii,H»Uia. A. (H. 79) 1809- 11 
Botly/JoMph, 1895-29 

Hoa^^DmVid, 1803-07 

Habbiur^ Henry. (D. '3) 1829-33 
Hnnt^ Samuel, (H.'65) 1802-05 

jLfJiT6inioi6y Arthiir« < iqoS— ss 
^LiTwmora, 8. (P.* 52) 1789-93 
IfotiEmy' Aaron, 1821-25 

IPvnott, John F. 1817^ 19 

flMm,Joeeph, 1801-02 

~ • •.Wni.jr.JH.'9^ 1819-26 



b;Jamea,(H.74) 1799^01 
ime,J.8.(p.'96) 1793-97 
fltoiUi.JedediahK. 1807-09 

fBmhh, Jeremiah, 1791 - 97 

Smith, Samnel, 1813-15 

Bmgoe, Peleg, (D. '82) 1797-99 
imorar, Clement, 1807-09 

Sollifan, Geo^, (H. *90) 1811 - 13 
Tbnney, SamaeL (H. 72) 1800 - 07 
fThoa9«m,T. W.(H. '8^ 1805- 07 
«ph«m, Goo. B. (H. '89) 1801 -0» 
^Imm, Nathaniel, 1817-23 

fkMO^^Bogor, (H. '90) 1813-17 

1-29 

17 

»-ll 

-95 




JoBathan. 

Bfooea, Vm^i 

•p«r,i»v«^,«iotatio.(T.*97ll8n^1 
««mMi/tea^,(T.'81> 180i*ir 
Sirsft, Benjannn, 




1B3S- 

C 1796 -.97 
U815.n 




1813^11 



*Tichenor, I. (P. "75) 

EtfrumUMk 
Allen, Heman,(D. '95) 

Bradley, William C. 

Bock, Daniel, 

Buck, D. A. A. (M. '7) 

*Butler, Esra, 

Cahoon, William, 1829- 

Chamberlain, William, SigoQlii 

Chipman, Daniel, (D. *QBi leOS^tf 
•Chittenden, M. (D. '89) 1803 -M 
•Craaa, Sam'l. C. (M. '90) 1817^18 
Elliot, Jamea, 1808^# 

Eyerett, Horace, . 13W.^g 

JFidL, Jamea, {im-M 

Hubbard, H. Jonathan, 1809- U 
Hunt, Jonathan, (D. 1^ 1827-21 
Hunter, William, 1817 -Itt 

Jewett, Luther, (D. '95) 18IS«*# 
Keyes, Elias, Wt^M 

Lan^on,C.(T.'87) tm»^^ 
Lyon, Ami, (D. "90) iSm^ 

Lyon, Matthew, 1997^ 

Mallary, RoUin C. (M. '5)1819' 
Mareh, Charlea, (D. '86) IP' 

Mattocka, John, ^ 

Meeeh, Eira, 

Merrill, Qraamna C. 
Morria, Lewia R. 1' 

NUea, Nathaniel (P. '66) I 
Noyea, John, (D. '96) 
Olm, Gideon, 
Olin, Henry, 

Ricli, Charlea, f 

•Richatda, Maiki 
fiOiaw, Bamnel. 
*8kinner, Bicnaidt^ 
Blade, THllSam,^ (II. 7) 

t*8iiilthiLBid,(T.«81) 




Digitized by V3V-"L-fV l^ 



I 



nr eoir«RKi8 from 1769 to 1833. 



105 



In. Oot. 
LBenjunin, 1839-31 

i,GeorM£. 182&-29 

.Phineu, 1831-23 

mU, James, 1807^08 

Massaohusxtts. 
SauUart. 
m, John Q. (H. '87) 1803-08 
BO, Eli P. 1816-18 

, George, 1791-96 

1, TiMtram, (H. '55) 1789-91 
r, Smii'L (H. '81) 1799-1800 
•, Dwiffht, (Br. 74; 1800-03 
ine, Benj. (H. '66) 1796 - 1800 
,Chrii'r. (H. '76)1813-16 

, J«me»,(H. '87) | lagglae 
I, Jonathan, (P. '74) 1800-03 
1, PrentisB, (H. '84) 1818-20 
EUjahH.(W.'97) 1820-27 
larrison G. (H. '83) 1817-22 
tring, Tim. (H. '63) 1803-11 
rick, Theo. ( Y. '65) 1796 - 99 
a, Nathaniel, 1826-35 

If , Caleb, (H. '64) 1789-96 
mi,JoeephB. 1811-17 

tor,DameI, (D. '1) 1827-39 

Representatives, 
m^ Benj. (Br. '88) 
UM, J. Q. (H. '87) 
,Jo«jph,(H. '74) 
,8amaelC. (D. ^34) 
, Raher, (H. 74) 
iton, Nathan. 
i,E2ekiel,(Y. '94) 
1, John, 

f, John, (Br. '7) 
t, Joseph, (Y. 71) 
>w, Gideon, 
!tt, Bailey, 
, Isaac C. (Y. '2) 
w, Francis, 

IS, Wm. (Br. '95) i 

»n, Bama. (Y. '85) 
m, Abijah, (D. '95) 
>w, Lewis, (W. '3) 
p, Phanuel, 
le, S. (H. '64) 
ory, Geo. (H. '89) 
ary,Theop. (H. '57) 
8, George N. 
am, Elijah, (D. '78) 
1. Benjamin, 
», Stephen^ 



1816-21 
1831-33 
1810-11 
1817-29 
1789-97 
1831-33 
1807-13 
1801 - 03 
1823-31 
1805-09 
1821-23 
1797-01 
1827-35 
1821-27 
1805-09 
1813-17 
1805-07 
1810-15 
1821-23 
1799-07 
1791-95 
1813-17 
1795-97 
1831-33 
1811-16 
1815-17 
1797-99 



Carr, Francis, 
Carr, James, 
Chandler, John, 
Choate, Rufus, (D. *19) 
Cobb, David, (H. '66) 
Coffin, Peleg, 
Conner, Samuel S. (Y. '6) 
Cook, Orchard, 
Crowninshield, B. W. 
i Crown inshield, Jacob, 
Cushman, Joshua P. 
Cutler, Manasseh, (Y . '65) 
Cutts, Richard, (H. '90) 
Dana, Samuel, 
Davis, John, ^Y. '12) 
Davis, Samuel, 
Deane, Josiah, 
Dearborn, Henry, 
Dearborn, H. A. S. 
Dewey, Daniel, 
ttDexter,Sam'l.(H. '81) 
Dowse, Edward, 
D wight, Henry W. 
Dwight, Thomas, (H. '78) 
Ely,^miam, (Y. W) 

•tEustis, Wm.(H. '72) | 

Everett, Edward, (H. '11) 
Folger, Walter, 
tFoster, Dwight, (Br. 74) 
Freeman, Nath'l. (H. '67) 
Fuller, Timothy, (H. '1) 
Gage, Josiah, 
Gannett, Bariillai,(H. '85) 
Gardner, Gideon, 
•Gerry, Eldridge, (H. '62) 
tGoodhue, Benj. (H. '66) 

Gorham,Benj.(H.'95) 

Green, I. L. (H. '81) 

Grennell, George, (D. '8j 
Grout, Jonathan, 
Hastings, Seth, (H. '82) 
Hill, IMTark L. 
Hobart, Aaron, (Br. '5) 
Hodges, James L. 
Holten, Samuel, 
tHohnes, John, (Br. '96) 
Hubbard, Levi, 
Hulbert,JohnW.(H.'06) 
Isley, Daniel, 
Kendall, Joseph, 
Kendall, J. G. (H. '10) 
King, Cyrus, 
Kindsy, Martin, (H. '78;) 



Id. Oat. 
1812-13 
1815-17 
1805-06 
1831-33 
1793-95 
1793-95 
1815-17 
1805-11 
1823-31 
1803-08 
1819-21 
1801-06 
1801-13 
1814-15 
1825-33 
1813-15 
1807-09 
1793-97 
1831-33 
1813-14 
1793-95 
1819-20 
1821-31 
1803-05 
1805-15 
1801 -06 
1890-23 
1825-33 
1817^21 
1793-99 
1795-99 
1817-25 
1817-19 
1809-11 
1809-11 
1789-93 
1789-96 
1820-23 
1827-31 
1805-00 
1811-13 
1829-36 
1789-91 
1801-07 
1819-21 
1826-27 
1827-31 
1793-95 
1817-20 
1813-15 
1814-17 
1807-09 
1819-81 
1829-33 
1813--17 



d by Google 



106 



SENATORS AND REPKESENTATIVES 



[1834. 



In. Out, 
1804-05 



C1789-9S 
) 1795-97 
1799-01 
1818-21 
1807-1] 
1823-2& 



Lamed, Simeon. ^. 

Lathrop, Samuel, (Y. *92) 1819-27 
Lee, Silas, (H. '84) 17J>9 - 10 

Leonard, Geo. (H. '48) 

Lincoln, Levi, (H. '72) 
^Lincoln, Enocn, 
Liver more, Edward S. 

Locke, John, (H. '92) ,_ 

Lyman, Sam»l. (Y. '70) 1795-1800 
Lyman. William, (Y. '76) 1793-97 
♦Mason, Jona. (P. 74) 1817 - 20 
Matloon. Eben. (D. '76) 1800-03 
♦Mills, Elijah H. (W. '97) 1815-19 
Mitchell, Nahum, (H. '89) 1803 - 05 
Morton, Marcus, (Br. '4) 1817 - 21 

Nelson, Jer. (D. '90) i J^J^ ~ ^j 



Orr, Benjamin, (D. '98) 
♦Otis, Harrison G. (H. 'k 



, 1817-19 
83)1797-01 

Parker, James, {Jllgl^l 

Parker, Isaac, (H. '86) 1797 - 99 
• tParris, A. K. (D. '6) 1815 - 18 
Partridge, Geo. (H. '62) 1789 - 91 
ttPickering, Tim. (H. '99) 1813 - 17 
Pickman, Benj. (H. "84) 1809-11 
Quincy, Josiah, (H. '90) 1805-13 
Read, John, ( Y. 72) 1795 - 01 

Reed, John, (Br. '3) 

Reed, Nathan, (H. '81) 
Reed, William, 
Rice, Thomas, (H. '91) 
Richardson, J. (D. '2) *^*. - ^^ 
Richardson, W. M. (H.'97) 1811 - 14 
Ruggles, Nathaniel, 1813 - 19 

Russell, Jona. (Br. '91) 1821 - 23 
Sampson, Zabdiel, (Br. '3) 1817 - 20 
Seaver, Eben. (H. '84) 1803 - 13 
t§Sedgwick,T.(Y. '65) J 1789-96 

Sewall, Sam'l. (H. 76) 1796-1800 



I Thacher, Geo. (H. 76) 
Thacher, Sam'l. (H. '93) 
Turner, Charles, (H. '88) 
Upham, Jabez, (H. '85) 
Varnum, John, (H. '98) 
t^Varnum, Joseph B. 
Wadsworth, P. (H. '69) 
Ward, Artemas. (H. '48) 
Ward, Artemas, (H. '83) 
tWebster, Danid, (D. '1) 
Wheaton, Laban, (H. 74) 
White, Leonard, (H. '87) 

Whitman, E. (Br. '95) \ 

Widgery, William, 
Williams, Lemuel (H. '65) 

Wilson, John, J 

Wood, Abiel. 



Id. 
1789 
1802 
1809 
1807 
1825 
1795 
1793 
1791 
1813 
1823 
1809 
1811 
1809 
1817 
1811 
1799 
1813 
1817 
1813 



Oat. 
-01 
-05 

13 

10 

-31 

-11 

-07 

-95 

-17 

-27 

17 

13 

11 

13 
05 
15 
19 
15 



J 1813 -17 
i 1821 -33 
1800-03 
1811-15 
1815-19 
1827-31 



1817-21 
1797-03 
1823-25 
18J7-21 
i 1796-99 
i 1803-04 
1801-03 



Shaw, Henry, 
Shepard, William, 
Sibley, Jonas, 
tSilsbee, Nathaniel, 

Skinner, Thompson J. 
Smith, Josiah, (H. '74) .^, 
Stearns, Asahel, (H. '97) 1815-17 
Stedman, Wm. (H. "84) 1803 - 10 ' 
Story, Joseph, (H. '98) 1808 - 09 
Strong, Solo. (W. '98) 1815 - 19 I 
Taffgart, Samuel, (D. '74) 1803 - 17 , 
TaDman, Peleir, 1811-13 



Rhode Island. 

Senators, 1790. 

Bradford, Wm. (P. '72) 1793- 
Burrill, James, (Br. 'Sg) 1817- 
Champlin, C. G. (H. 'm) 1809- 
De Wolf, James, 1821- 

Ellery, Chris'r. (Y. '87) 1801- 
*Fenner, James, (Br. '89) 1805- 
Foster, Theodore, (Br. '78) 1790- 
Greene, Ray, (Y. '84) 1797- 
Howell, Jer. B. (Br. '89) 1811 - 
Rowland, Benjamin, 1804- 

Hunter, William, (Br. '91) 1811 - 
^•Knight, Nehemiah R. 1821 - 
Malbone, Francis, 1809- 

Matthewson, Elisha, 1807- 

Potter, Samuel J. 1803- 

Robbins, Asher, (Y. '82) 1825- 
Stanlon, Joseph, 1790- 

Reprtsentatives, 1790. 

Boss, John L. 1815 - 

Bourne, Benj. (H. *64) 1790- 
Brown, John, 1799- 

BurgesSjTristam, (Br. '96) 1825 - 
fChamplin, C. G. (H. '86) 1797 - 
Durfee, Job, (Br. 13) 1821 - 
Kddy, Samuel. (Br. '87) 1819- 
Hazard, Nath'l. (Br. '92) 1819- 
Tackson, Richard S. 1608- 

Kniffht, Nehemiah, 1803 - 

tMalbone, Francis, 1793- 

Mason, James B. (Br. '91) 1815- 
Pearce, Dutee J. (Br. '8) 1825- 

Digitized by VjO V-' V 1 1 



97 
21 
11 
25 
05 
07 
03 
01 
17 
09 
21 
35 
09 
11 
04 
33 
93 



19 
f>6 
01 
33 
01 
25 
25 
21 
15 
06 
97 
19 
33 



1834.1 



uf coNeucss FROM 1789 TO 1833. 



107 



rotter, Eliaha R. 
tStuklon, Joseph, 
TiJllnghMgtj Thomas, 
Wilbar, Isaac^ 

CoHJrKCTlCUT. 

SemUors. 



lo. Out. 

;i79H-97 

• 1809-15 

1801-07 

1797-01! 

ibOi-o:i 

1807-011 



BovdniAii, Elijah, 1821 - 2^^ 

Daggett, David, (Y. '83) 1813-lf 
Dana, Samuel W. (Y. 75) 1810-21 
•Ed^rarda, H. W. (P. '07) 1823-27 
Ellsworth, Oliver, (P. '(JG) 1780-96 
Fool, Samnel A. (Y. '97) 1827-33 
Goodrich, C. ( Y. '7G) 1«07 - 13 
Haihouse, James. (Y. '73) 1706-10 
Johnson, Wm. S. (Y. 44) 1789-91 
Lanman, James. (Y. '88) 1819-25 
Mitchell, S. M. (Y. '63) 1793-05 
Sherman, Roger, 1701-03 

Smith, Nathan, 1833-30 

Tomlinson, G. (Y. '2) 1831 - 37 
Tncy , Uriah, (Y. 78) 1706 - 07 
•Trumbull, Jona. (H. '59) 1705-1J6 
WiUey, Calvin, 1825-31 

Rqfresentatives. 

Allen, John, (H. '72) 1707 - 90 
BaJdirin, John, (Br. 97) lb25-29 
Baldwin, Simeon, (Y. '81) 1803-05 
Barber, Noyes, 1821-33 

Brace, Jona. (Y. '79) 1798 - 1800 
Burrows, Enoch, lf^l-21 

Champion, Epaphroditus, 1807-17 
Coit, Joshua, (H. '76) 1793 - 08 
IDana, Sam'l. W. (Y. '75) 1796-10 
Davenport, James, (Y. '77) 17U!^ - 98 
Davenport, John, (Y. '70) 1799 - 17 
Dwigbt, Theodore, 1806-07 

Edmond, Wm. (Y. '77) 1708 - 01 
lEdwards, H. W. (P. 'l»7) 1819 - 23 
Ellsworth, W. W. (Y. '10) 1829 - 33 

tFoot, S. A. (Y. '97) {}^:^ 

Gilbert, Sylvester, (D. '75) 1818 - 19 
Goddard, Calvin, (D. '86) 1801 - 05 
tGoodrich, C. (Y. '76) 1705 - 01 
Goodrich. Elizur, (Y. 79) 1709 - 01 
•Griswold, Roger, ( Y. '80) 1795 - 05 
IHiUhouse, Jas. (Y. '73) 1791-96 
Holmes, Uriel, (Y. '84) 1817 - 18 
Huntington, B. (Y. '61) 1789-91 

Huntington,E.(Y/75) j \^^Zll } 



In. Oot. 

Huntington, J. W. fY. '6) 1820 - 33 
IngersoTl. Ralph J. (Y. '8) 18S£> - 33 
Larned, Amasa, (Y. '72) 1701-95 
Law, Lyman, (Y. '91) 181 1 - 17 
Merwin, Orange, 1825 - 29 

Moseley , Jona. O. (Y. '80) 1805 - 21 
Perkins, Ellas, (Y. '86) 1801 - 03 

Phelps, E. (Y. 1800) {J^^I^ 

Pitkin, Timothy, (Y. '85) 1805-19 
•Plant, David, (Y. '4) 1827 - 29 
Russ, John, 
I Sherman, Roger, 



1810- 
1789- 



23 

91 



:S' 



•Smith, John C. (Y. '83) 1800-06 
Smith, Nathaniel, 1795 - 99 

Stephens, James, 181 9-21 

Sterling, Ansel, 1821 - 25 

Stoddard, Eben. (Br. '7) 1821-25 
Storrs, William L. (Y. '14) 1829-33 
Sturgcs, Jona. (Y. '59) 1780 - 93 
Starges, Lewis B. (Y. ^82) 1805 - 17 
Swift,Zephaniah,(Y. 78)1703-97 
Tahnadge, Benj. (Y. '73) 1801 - 17 
Terry, Nathaniel, (Y. '8ij) 1817 - li> 
^Tomlinson, G. (Y. '2) 1810 - 27 
tTracy, Uriah, (Y. 78) 
Wrunibull,J.(H. '50) 
Wadsworth, Jeremiah, 
Whitman, L. (Y. 1800) 
Williams, TIios. S. (Y. '04) 1H17 - 19 
Young, Ebenezer, ( Y. '6) 1 tj29 - 33 

New York. 

Senators, 



1703-06 
1780-05 
1780-95 
1.-23-25 



^Armstrong, John, 



1800-02 
1803-04 
Bailey, Theodore, " 1 803 - 04 

Burr, Aaron, (P. 72) 1791-97 
•Clinton De Witt, (C. '86) 1802 - 03 
Dudley, Charles E. 1828-33 

German, Obadiah, 1800 - 15 

Hobart, John S. (Y. '57) 1707-08 

King,Rufus,(H.'77) fl^fijl^ 

Lawrence, John, 1706 - 1800 

Marcy, Wm. L. (Br. '08) 1831-37 



Mitchell, Samuel L. 
Morris, G. (C. '68) 
North, William, 

Sanford, Nathan, 

Schuyler, Philip, 
Smith, John, 
Tallmadge, Nath'l P. 
*fVan Buren, Martini 



1804-09 
1800-03 
17i)8-98 
C 1815-21 
51825-31 
1789-91 
1804-13 
1833-39 



Digitized by \JKJKJWIK^ 



106 



SENATOmS AND REPRXSENTATIVKS. 



[1834 



In. Oat. 

Wateon,J. (Y. 76) 1798-1800 
Wright, SUM, (M. 15) 1833-37 



R^esenUtivM* 



Ad&nw, Farmenioi 
Adgate, David, 
Allen, Nathaniel, 

Angel, William G. 

Arnold, Benedict, 
Ashley, Henry, 

Avery David, 

Babcock, Will tarn, 
Badger, Luther, 

tB^iby, Theodore, 

Baker Cal«b, 
Barnard, D.D.rW. '18) 
Barstow, Gamaliel H. 
Beardiley, Saiuuet 
B^ekrtmn, Thoniasf^ 
Belden, Geo. O. 
Benson, Egbert, (C. '65) 
Bergen, John T. 
BettaSam'lR. (W/06) 
Bird. John, (Y. '86) 
Bir(l!in.li^ Jaines, 
Birdaeye, Viqt y, (W/4) 
Blake. John^ 
Bleeeker^ Hennaimfl, 
Bockec, AbraJiairij (U. *3) 
Borland, Charlei, 
Borat. Peter J. 
Boackt Jo«epb| 
Bower*, John M< 
Boyd^ Alexander, 
Broad heaiJ John C. 
Brooks, David, 
Brooks, Micah, 
Btiiiiur Ritdoipli,(C. '98) 
CadVj Da-nii*!, 
Cad>%Jt4mW. {V.y) 
Caiub re leng^, Churchill C 
Camptie!!, Hamiiet, 
Ca«e,Wdt^t, (U. '99) 
Chase, Samuel, 
Chjlds,Tim. (W. '11) 
Clark, Archibald S. 
Clark, John C. 
Clark, Lot, 
Clark, Robert, 
Clinton, George, (C. '93) 
Cockran, John, 
Golden, Cadwallader D. 



1823- 
1815- 
1819- 
1825- 
1829- 
1829- 
1825- 
1811- 
1816- 
1831- 
1«K>- 
1793- 
1799- 
1819- 
1827- 
1831- 
1831- 
1829- 
1827- 
1789- 

ia3i. 

1815- 
1799- 
1815- 
1H15- 
1805- 
1811- 
1829- 
1821 - 
1829- 
1831- 
1813- 
1813- 
1831- 
1797- 
1815- 
1827- 
1815- 
1823- 
1821- 
1821- 
1819- 
1H27- 
1829'- 
1816- 
1827- 
1823- 
1819- 
1804- 
1797- 
1821- 



Collins, £la, 
CoUyer, John A. 
Comstook, Oliver C. 
Conkling, Alfred, (U. '10) 
Cook, Bates, 
Cook, Thomas B. 

Cooper, Wm. < 

Cowles, H. B. (U. '16) 

Craitr, Hector, < 

Crocheron, Henry, 
Crocheron, Jacob, 
< ruger, Daniet, 
Cu^shman, John P. (Y. '7) 
Day* Rowland, 
UaV'i^'it CharleSy 
De'Graff. John T. 

Otf Witt, ChaileiiT. 
De Witt, Jacob H. 

Dickinson, J D. (Y.'85) J 

Dickaon, John, (M. '8) 
Donpyelles, Peter, 
Uoublfday UlysseB F. 
Dmkif Jolin R. 
Dwinell, JusUn, (Y. '8) 
Eager, S. W. 
Earie, Jonas, 
Eaton, Lewis, 
Klhc'fM, lU^nj^Lmin, 
KCiHt^Tni'-rTj Lucas, 

Fabtff, , 

Fay, John, 
Finch, Isaac, 
Fisher tieorgOi 

Fisk, Jonathan < 

Fitch, Asa, 
Floyd, William, 
Foote, Charles A. (U. '5^ 
Ford, William D. 
t'"-^ij]ck, ?iicolI, 
Fn^^l, Joel, 
Gardinler, Barents 
Garnsey, Daniel G, 
Garrnwf, NathaMiel, 
Gebhard, John 
Geddes, James, 
Gilbert, Kzekiel, (Y. '78) 
Glen, Henry, 

Gold,Tho»R.(Y.'86) J 



In. Oat 
823- 2f 
831-3: 
813 -IS 
821-23 
831-33 
811-13 
795-97 
799-01 
829-31 
823-25 
829-30 
816-17 
829-31 
817-19 
817-19 
823-95 
831-33 
827-99 
825-87 
»-31 
819-91 
819-23 
827-31 
831-36 
813-16 
831-33 
807-19 
823-25 
830-31 
827-31 
823-96 
817-19 
797-03 
809-13 
828-99 
819-21 
829-31 
829-30 
809-11 
813-16 
811-13 
789-91 
823-95 
819-91 
825-27 
823-96 
807-11 
825-30 
827-99 
821-93 
813-15 
793-97 
793-01 
809-13 
815-17 



d by Google 



r:ai3K 







I 



i,H.C.(W.18')18d3-tl 
»^I>ii4]ey, l@d3-» 



John, 

jRlehitfd, '1881- 

Andrew, 1803- 

i,WUUua, W9I^' 

Maigi. Henry, (T.^ im9- 

If«teiiif,Aruuah, l&ll- 

lliUerJohn, 1885- 

MiUer.M.S. (U. '96) 1313- 



tMitehin, Sunoal L. 

Moffiilt, HoflM^ 
Morgaiii John J. 

Morrell, Robert, 

Morrif, HiomM. 
Mnmlordy GtirdonS. 
mchplaon Johni 
Noirton, BbenMer F. 



OKkley.T.J. (Y. 1) 

lEMmi, Darid A. 
ramtr, BerUb, 
INUjB0ff, John. 
£»lterion, John, 
PMtonotn, Wtlter, 
PteiMliif, William, 

PendUefMit fkunnnd H. 
Phelpi|01iTer, 
PloiWMi; Jeremiah H. 
]^fMMi,Job, (W. 'U)1831 

^Mier, Nathaniel, HgJ 

fhlLJonae, 1799 

ipuif Benjamin, 1811 

iofti Jonathan, 1813 

Ihu^f Jamea, 1817 

P.B. (Y.^) Ji 



€1801. 

{l^O. 
1813- 
1881. 

|iaw- 

1801- 
1806- 
18Q&, 

imi^ 

1 1887- 
1817. 
1803- 
1817- 
1803- 
1821- 
1811- 
1819- 
. 1831- 
1803- 
1881- 



18 9- 



08 
» 
80 
13 
27 
18 
H 
13 
1? 
» 

m 

08 

u 
u 
m 

'16 

•88 
19 
06 
19 
05 
83 
13 
21 
33 
06 
83 



33 
-01 

13 
-16 
-19 
.13 



d by Google 



110 



SENATORS AND REPRESENTATITE8 



[1834. 



In. 
Porter, Timothy H. 1825 

Powers, Gershom, 1829 

Reed, Edward C. (D. '12) 1831 
Richards, John, 1823 

Richmond, Jonathan, 1819 
;1804 
► 1807 
1821 
ri803 
1809 
1812 
1815 
J831 
C1823 



Riker, Samuel, 
Rochester, William B. 

Root, Erastus, (D. '93) 



Rose, Robert S. 

Ross, Henry H. 
Ruggles, Cnarles II. 
Russell, John, 

Sage, Eben. (Y. 78) 

Sailly, Peter, 

Sammons, Thomas, 



)1829 
1825 
1821 
1805 
1809 
1819 
1804 
1803 
1809 
1803 
1825 
1830 
1815 
1815 
1791 
1805 
1817 
1817 
1823 
1813 
1813 
1789 
1799 



Sands, Joshua, 

Sandford, Jonah, 
Savage, John, (U. '99) 
Schenck, Abraham H. 
Schoonmaker, C. C. 
Schureman, Martin G. 
Schuyler, J. 
Scudder, Treadwell, 
Sharpe, Peter, 
Sherwood, Samuel, 
Shipherd, Zebulon R. 
Silvester, Peter, 
ISmith John, 
Smith,William S.(P. '74) 1813 
Soule, Nathan, 1831 

Spencer Ambrose, (H.'83) 1829 
Spencer, Elijah, 1821 

Spencer, John C. (U. '6) 1817 
Sterling, Micah, (Y. '4) 1821 

Storrs, H. R. (Y. '4) i }^ 

Stow, Silas, 
Stower, John G. 
Street, Randall S. 

Strong, James, 

Swart, Peter, 
Talbot Silas, 
Talhnadge,J. (Br. '{^) 
"" 'lor, J. W. 



iTaylor, J. W. (U. '3) 
TenEyck,E. rWUl'DD) 
Thomas, pavio, 
TbompaoD, Joel, 



1811 
1827 
1819 
(1819 
il823 
1807 
1793 

mi 

1813 
1823 
1801 
1813 



Ont. 
-2/ 
-31 
-33 
-25 
-21 
-05 
-09 
-23 
-05 
-11 
-13 
-17 
-33 
-27 

31 

27 
-23 
-09 
-15 
-20 
-07 
-07 
-13 
-04 
-27 
-31 
-19 
-17 
-93 
-07 
-19 
-19 
-25 

15 
-15 
-93 
-04 
-16 
-33 

31 
-23 
-19 
-23 
-21 
-31 
-13 

29 
-21 
-21 
-31 
-09 
-94 
-19 

33 
-25 

08 

15 



Thompson, John, 

•Throop, EnoB T. 

Tibbets, George, 

Tompkins, Caleb, 

Townsend, George, 

Tracy, Albert H. 

Tracy, Phinoas L. (Y. '6) 1^ 

Tracy, Uri, (Y. '8! 



(P. '64) 



In. Oat. 
U799-01 
) 1807-11 
1815-16 
1803-05 
1817-21 
1815-19 
1819-25 
33 
1805-07 
1809-13 



1791-95 
1823-25 
1807-09 
1793-99 
1793-09 
1811-13 
1793-95 
1801-03 



Treadwell, T. 

Tyson, Jacob, 

Van Allen, James I. 

Van Allen, John E. 

Van Cortlandt, Philip, 

Van Cortlandt, Pierre, 

Van Gaasbeck, Peter, 

Van Ness, John P. 

Van Rcnsselaer,J.(P.'58) 1789-91 

Van Rensselaer, Killan, K.ldOl ^ 11 

Van Rensselaer, Solomon, 1819 - 2S 

Van Rensselaer, S.(H.'82) 1822- 29 

Van Wyck, William, 1821 -25 

Verplanck, Daniel C. 1803 - 09 

Verplanck, G. C. (C. '1) 1825-33 

Walker, Benjamin, 

Walwortli, Reuben H. 



1801-03 
1821-23 
18^-29 
ia31-33 
1815-17 
1831-33 
1793-95 
1815-21 
1817-19 
1831-33 
1825-27 
1829-35 
1825-27 
1823-31 
1805-07 
1715-19 



Ward, Aaron, 

Ward, Jonathan, 
Wardwell, Daniel, 
Watts, John, (C. '66) 
Wendower, Peter H. 
Westerlo, Rensselaer, 
Wheeler, Grattan H. 
White, Bartow, 
White, Campbell P. 
Whittemore, Elisha, 
WhitUesey, F. (Y. '18) 
Wickes, Eliphalet, 
Wilkin, James W. 
Wilkin, Samuel I.(P. '12) 1831-33 
C 1814 -15 
Williams, Isaac, < 1817 - 19 

/1823-25 
1795-99 
1805 D 07 
1816-17 
1806-00 
1613-15 
1827 -» 
1819-89 
C 1821-83 
(1827-89 
1883-85 
89 
17 



Williams, John, 
Williams, Nathan, 
Willoughby, Westel, 
Wilson, N. 
Winter, Elisha J. 
Wood, John J. 
Wood, Silas, (P. »S 

Woodcock, David, 

Woods, William, 
t Wright, Silas, (M. '15) 1887 
\Yaie»,Jo\iiiB, CU. '2) 1815 

Digitized by V3V7VJV H^ 




8locktoa,IUchtrd, (P. Tftjiei^.] 
Swan, 8uiiael» ISXL -m^ 

ThoB^iiy Hedi{fy 1887 tM 

Thoamion, MarJi^ 1996f<^9t 

1Nick«ff. EbeiMier; 1^115^9^ 

PsmtmyAVU. 
V Stnaton. 



JfcimBEdi tiaae D. 

Buutelii Williun, 

•HaiiM.WilUun, 
t€tdiiAi. Albert, 

I G«org«| 
lyWalter. 

.Willkm. 

WiUkm, 

Boben, 



18S7.8I 
1796" 
10)1831- 




dbyGoOgli 





wmuUf 

J^CTTCfillffltftitf- 




Jl^uaiiy WiUiam, . 

AttflOtt, JUDMy 

jSiMm, Samael, 

Andanon, William, < 

Artnitroiiff James, 
Baldwin, Henry, (T. *97) 
JBankfiy John, 

]^«rd| Dayid, (P. 'TS) $ 

Barlow, Thomas, 
Boden, Andrew, 
Boode, Thomasi 
IBttek, Samuel, 
Brown, John, 
Brown, Robert, 
. Buchanan, James, 
Backer, John C. 
fiord, Geoiffe, 
Biimaide, lliomas, 
Chapman, John, 

Glay, Joseph, (P. *84) 
Clymer, Greorge, 
Coniad, Frederick, 
Conr^, John, 
Ocmlter, RMshard, 
Crawford, T.H. (P. '4) 
Cimwford.Wm.(P.'81) 
Cvonch, Edward, 
PufiofUui, Isaac, 

XNAttflMi, William, 



Oeorge, 




1825- 
1893- 
1831- 
1803- 
18S7- 
1809- 
1817- 
1793- 
1817- 
1831- 
1796- 
1803- 
1827- 
1817- 
1801- 
1823- 
1821- 
1798- 
1821- 
1831- 
1831- 
1815- 
1797- 
1820- 
180a. 
1789- 
1803- 
1813- 
1827- 
1829^ 
1809- 
1813- 
1817- 
1815- 
1819- 
1811- 
1819- 
1829:- 
1831- 
1819. 
1790- 
18B3- 
1«9. 



m 

.» 



f^jameni " * 

ffl^^«i^ ThooMii^ ' "^ ' 

f^rwiitf , Chaaiiaa^f 
Fdrwatd, Walter, 
Pfef, lose^ 
FttllOTtonyDaadd, 
f IQaUaOn, Albert^ 
Gilmore, Johii. 
Glai^w, Hugn, 
Green, James, 
tGren, Andrew, . 
Grion, Isaac, 
Gross, Samuel, 
Halm, John, 
Hamilton, John, 
Hanna, John A. 
Harris, Robert, 
Hartley, Thoma% 
Heister, Daniel, 
Heister, Daniel, 
Heister, John, 

'Heister, Joseph, 

Heister, William, 

Hemphill, Joseph, 

Henderson, Samuel, 
Hibshman, Jacob, 
Hiil, Thomas, 
Hoge, John, 

Hoge, William, 

Hopkinson, Joseph, 
Horn, Henry, 
Hosteler, Jacob, 
Humphrys, Jacob, 
Hyneman, John M. 
iKrie, Peter, 
Ingersoll, Charles I. 

tingham, Samuel D, 11 

Irvine, William, * 

Irwin, Jared, 

Irwin, Thomas, 

Jacobs, Israel, 

Jenkins^Robert, 

t Jones, William, 

Kelly, James, 

King, Adam, 

King, Henry, 

Kittera, John W. (F. llttr^ 

Kittera, Thomas, \r' 

Kreba, Jacob, /f\T 



«-9S I Kr«mar» Gaqffit 



Digitized by V^TrV^7\^7' 



'^'. 






'^Wh 



1834.] 



IF CONOREBS FROM 1789 TO 1833. 



tLaeoek, Aboer, 
LawrttDce, Joseph. 
h^ferre, Joseph, 
tLeib, Michael, 
Leip*r, George G. 
Lower, Chriititn, 
Lnoas, John B. 
l^le, Aaron, 
tSUclay, Samuel, 

tBfaebj, William, 

Maclaj, WUIiam P. 
Mann, Joel K. 
Marchand, David, 
Marklej, Philip 8. 
Marr, Alem, (P. '7) 
McClenachan, Blair, 
McCoj, Robert, (P. '6) 
McCreedy, William, 
McGullough, Thomas G. 1820 
McKean, Samuel, 1823 

McKennan, Thomas M. 1831 



In. 
1811 
1825 
1811 
1799 
1829 
1805 
1803 
1809 
1795 
C1815 
>1817 
1816 
1831 
1817 
1823 
1829 
1797 
1831 
1829 



McSherry, James, 
MiUer, Daniel H. 
Milncnr, James, 

Milnor, William, 

Miner, Charles, 
Biitchell, James & 
iiitchell,John, 
Montgomery, Daniel, 
Montgomery, William, 
Moore, Robiert 
Moore, Samuel, 
&MQhlenberg,Fred'k. A 
Muhlenberg, Henry A. 

IMohlenberg, Peter, 

Murray, John, 
Murray, Thomas, 
Ogle, Alexander, 
Qrr, Robert, 
Faterson, Thomas, 
Pawlding, Levi, 
Phillips, John, 
Phileon, Robert, 
Piper, William, 
Plnmer, George, 
Porter, John, 
Potts, Darid, 
Pugh, John, 
Rameay, William, 

Rea, John, 

10 • 



1821 
1823 
1811 
(1807 
J 1815 
M821 
1825 
1821 
1825 
1807 
1793 
1817 
1819 
1789 
1829 
1789 
1793 
1799 
1817 
1821 
1817 
1825 
1817 
1817 
1821 
1819 
1811 
1821 
180(5 
1831 
1805 
1827 
C1803 
^1813 



Oat. 
-13 
-29 
13 
-06 
-31 
-07 
05 
-17 
97 
16 
-19 
-21 
33 
21 
27 
-31 
-99 
-33 
-31 
-22 
-29 
-33 
-23 
-31 
-13 
-11 
-17 
-22 
-29 
-27 
-29 
-09 
-95 
-21 
-22 
-97 
-33 
-91 
-95 
01 
-21 
23 
19 
-29 
-26 
-19 
-23 
-21 
-17 
-27 
-11 
-33 
09 
31 
11 
15 



Richards, Jacob, 
Richards, John, 
Richards, Matthias, 
tRoberts, Jonathan, 
Rodman, Wm. 
Rogers, Thomas 1. 

Ross, John, 

Say, Beniamin, 
Scott, John, 

Scott, Thomas, 
Sergeant, J. (P. '95) 

Seybert, Adam, 

Sill, Thomas H. (Br. *4) 
Sitgreaves, Samuel, 
Slaymaker, Amos, 

Smilie, John, 

Smith, George, 
Smith, Isaac, 
Smith, Samuel, 
Smith, Samuel A. 
Smith, Thomas, 
Spangler, Jacob, 
Stephens, Philander, 
Stephenson, James S. 
Sterigere, John B. 

Stewart, Andrew, 

Stewart, John, 
Sutherland, Joel B. 
Swan wick, John, 
Tannehill, Adamson, 

Tarr, Christian, 

Thomas, Richard, 
Thompson, Alexander, 
Tod, John, 

Udree, Daniel, 

Van Home, Espy, 
Van Home, Isaac, 
Wallace, James M. 
Wain, Robert, 
Watmau^h, John G. 
Wayne, Isaac, 
Whitehill, James, 
Whitehill, John, 
Whitehill, Robert, 
Whiteside, John, 
Wilson, Henry, 
Wilson, James, 



113 

In. Out. 

180:i-09 
1795-97 
1807-11 
1811-14 
1811-13 
1818-24 
1809-11 
1815-18 
1808-09 
1829-31 
1789-91 
1793-95 
1815-23 
1827-29 
1809-15 
1817-19 
1829-31 
17!>5-98 
1814-15 
C 1793-95 
> 1799-13 
1809-13 
1813-15 
1805-09 
1829-33 
1815-17 
1817-18 
1829-33 
1825-99 
1827-31 
C 1821 -29 
11831-33 
1800-05 
1827-33 
1795-98 
1813-15 
51817-19 
i 1820-21 
17i)5-01 
1824-26 
1821-24 
(1813-15 
31820-21 
0^«^-25 
1825-29 
1801-05 
1815-21 
1798-01 
1831-33 
1823-25 
1813-14 
1803-07 
1805-13 
1815-19 
1823-26 
1823-98 



d by Google 



114 



SENATORS AND REPRESENT ATIYB 8 



Wilson, Thomas, 
Wilson, William, 
•Wolf, George, 
Woods, Henry, 
Woods, John, 
Wormon, Ludwig, 
Wurt, John, (P. 13) 
Wjnkoop, Henry, 

Delaware. 
SejiiUors. 

^BaBsetif Richard, 
Bajiird^JameBA. (P. '84) 
CJayton,J, M. (Y. 15) 
*CkylotJ, Joiilma, 
Cla3<'ton^ ThomiLB, 
Hoiiey. Ouli^rbndg«, 
Johnfl, Kensey, 
Lattiraer^ IJnnry, 
fMcL-vne. Louia^ 
NaudaiQ, Arnold, (P. '16) 
Beadf Geor^, 
Ridge ley, Henry M- 
Rodney, Cn'sar A. 
^Rodney^ Daniel^ 
Van Djke, N. (F. '88) 
Vining, John, 

Willes, William H. \ 



In. Out. 
1813-17 
1814-19 
1824 -2f) 
179i>-03 
1815-17 
1820-22 
1825-27 
1789 -yi 



White, Samuel, 

HepresenUUives. 
i Bayard James A. (P. *84) 
Broufiie, James M> (P. '94) 
{Clayton, ThomsA, 
Cooper, Thorn as* 
Hall, Williird,(H. W) 
tJohrii*, KetiM?y, (P. 10) 
i La 111 me r, IJenryp 
I tMcIjini?^ Louts^ 
MilUgan, John M, 

Paton, John, 

IRidgeley, Henry M. 

tRodney, Cssar, A. 

•^Rodney, Daniel, 
tVan Dyke. N. (P. '88) 
t Vining, John» 

Maryland. 
Senator i. 
Carroll, Charles, 1789 - 92 

Chambers, Ezekiel F. 1820 - 37 
Ooldsborough, Robert H. 1813- 19 
Hanson, Alexander C. 1816-19 



1789-93 
1804-13 
1829-35 
17J)8-99 
182:3 -2G 
1810-21 
1794 - 95 
1795-01 
1827 -2i) 
1829-3!! 
1789-93 
182G-29 
1821 - 2.\ 
1826-27 
1817-26 
1793 -J>8 
17t>9-04 
1813-17 
1801 - 10 

1797-03 
1805-07 
1815-17 
1813-17 
1817-21 
1827-31 
1793-95 
1817-27 
1831-33 
1792-93 
1795-97 
1811-15 
1803-05 
1821-22 
1822-23 
1807-11 
1789-92 



Harper, Robert G. (P 
Hr-iiry, John, ^P. ^GJ 
llindnian, Wilham, 
'Mouard. John E* 
*Kent, Joseph, 
*Lloyd, Edward, 
Lleivdt Jamesj 
Piiikne^, WilliaiOf 
Potld Richard, 
Hecdf Philjp, 

Smith, Samuel, 

•Wright, Robert, 



[1834. 

In. OoU 

•85)1815-16 

) 1789-97 

1800-01 

1796-03 

1833-39 

1819-26 

1797-1800 

1819-22 

1792-96 

1806-13 

C 1803-15 

^1822-33 

1801-06 



Representatives. 
Archer, John, (P. '60) 
Archer, S. (P. '6) i 

Baer, George, J 

Barney, John, 
Bayley, Thomas, (P. '97) 
Bowie, Walter, 
Brown, Elias, 
Hrown^ John, 
Uumpbell^ John, 
Carroll,, Daniel^ 

Christie I Gabriel, j 

Contee, Benjamin, 
Covington, Leonard ^ 
Cmhbf Jeremiah, 
Craik, William, 
Culbreth. Thomaa, 
DentiiiS, Jobn^ 
Difiit, George, 
Dorsey, Clement, 
nuvall, Gnbjriel, 
tdwards^ Benjamin, 
['orre«t, Uriah* 
Gale, George, 
Ciale, Levin, 
•Goldflborough, C. W. 
JHatison, Alejtauder C. 
Haywatdf William, 
Heistei', Danieli 
Herbert, John C- 
JFiindmaAt William, 
Howard, Benj. C, (F. '9) 
Jenifer, Daniel, 

*tKent, Joseph, I 

Kerr, John L, < 

Key, Philip, 
Key, FhiUp B. 



1801-07 
1811 - 17 
1819-21 
1797-01 
1815-17 
1825-29 
1817-23 
1802-05 
1829-31 
1809-10 
1801-11 
1789-91 
1793-97 
1799-01 
1789-91 
1805-07 
1795-96 
1796-01 
1817-21 
1797-05 
1793-01 
18^-31 
1794-96 
1794-95 
1793-94 
1789-91 
1827-29 
1805-17 
1813-16 
I»i3-S5 
1801-04 
1815-19 
1792-99 
1829-33 
1831-33 
1811-15 
1819-26 
1825-89 
1831-33 
1791-93 
1807-13 



y Google 



1634.] 



IK coireREss from 1789 to 18ddL 



115 



Le«, John, 

LUUe, Peter, 

•tUojd, Edward, 
Magnider, Patrick| 
Martin, Robert N. 
Hatthews, William, 
McCieaij, William, 
McKim, Alexander^ 
McKim, Isaac, 
'tfercer, John F. 

Bfitdiell, George £. 

Montgomery, John, 

Moore, Nicolaa R. 

Neall, Raphael, 
Nelson, John, 
Nelaon, Roffer, 
Nicholson; Joseph H. 

Peter, George, 

Pinkney, William, 
tPinkney, William, 
Pkter, Thomas, 

tReed, Philip, 

RutgB^^^} Samuel, 
Semmes, Benedict, J. 
Senej, Joshua, 
Sheredine, Upton, 

ISmith, Samuel, 

Smith, William, 

Spence, John S. 

Spencer, Richard, 
Sprigg, Michael C. 

Sprigg, Richard, 

Sprigg, Thomas, 
Sterrett, Samuel, 
Stone, Michael J. 
Stnidwick, William E. 
Stoart, Philip, 
Thomas, Francis, 
Thomas, John C. 
Van Home, Archibald, 
Van Murray, William, 
Warfield, Henry R. 
Washington, George C. 
Weems, John C. 
WilsMi, £. K. (P. '89) 
Wofrthington, J. T. H 



•tWright, Robert, 



Oat. 

1-13 
)-2& 
5-09 
>-07 , 

["^ •i Barbour, James, 
U09 Brent. Richard, 
■15 Eppes. JohnW. 



Id. 
CldlO 
il821 



Ont. 
-17 
-23 



Virginia. 
Senators, 



181 

1«09 

1817 



■ 25 •(iiles, William B. (P. »81) 1804 



- ^ Grayson , William , ' 
-27 Lee, Richard H. 
-35i Mason, Armisted C. 
-11 Mason, Stevens T. 
■11 I ^'tMonroe, James, 
" IC Moore, Andrew, 
-25 j •Nicholas, Wilson C. 



-10 
-0(i 
-19 
-27 
-9U 
-IC 
-05 
-19 
-23 
-15 
-21 
-33 
-92 
-92 



*Pleasant8, James, 
Randolph, John, 
Rives, Wm. C. 

Taylor, John, 

Tazewell, Henry, 
Tazewell, Littleton W. 
*Tyler, John, 
Venable, Abraham B. 
Walker. John, 

Representatives. 



1789 
1789 
1815 
1794 
]7fK) 
1804 
1799 
1819 
185» 
1832 
(1792 
<1803 
(1822 
1794 
1824 
1827 
1803 
1790 



-15 
19 
16 
-90 
-92 
-17 
03 
-94 
09 
04 
22 
27 
35 
94 
03 
24 
99 
35 
39 
04 
90 



Alexander, Mark, 
03 I Allen, Robert, 
22 Archer, William S. 
91 1 Armstrong, William, 
25 Austin, Archibald, 
33 Baker, John, 
31 , Ball, William L. 
- 31 ' Barbour, John S. 



1790-99! 
1801-02 
1793-96 
1791-93 
1789-91 
1796-97 
1811 - 19 
1831-33 
1799-01 
1807-11 
1791 - 97 
1819-25 
1827-33 
1626-29 
1827-31 
■ 33 



1819- 
1827- 
1820- 
1825- 
1817- 
1811- 
1817- 
1823- 
1814- 
1827- 
1805- 
1815- 
1821- 
ley, Thos. M. (P. '97)1813- 



§Barbour, Phihp P. 
Bassett, Barwell, 



Bland, Theodore, 
Bouldin, Thomas T. 
Breckenridge, James, 

^Brent, Richard, 

Browne, John, 
Burwell, William A. 
Cabell, Samuel J. 
Caperton, Hugh, 
Chmn, Joseph W. 



Worthington, Thomas C. 1825 - 27 | Claiborne, John, 



1789- 
1829- 
1809- 
5 1795- 
11801- 
1789- 
1806- 
1795- 
1813- 
1831- 
1805- 



33 
33 
33 
33 
19 
13 
24 
33 
25 
30 
13 
19 
31 
15 
90 
33 
17 
99 
03 



21 
03 
15 
33 
06 



d by Google 



116 



SENATORS AND REPRESENTATIVES 



[1834. 



Claiborne, Nathaniel II. 

Claiborne, Thomas, 

Clark, Cbiiitoplier, 
Clay J Miitthewj 

Clopton, John, < 

Coke, Richard, 

Coles, Isaac, < 

Cokton, Edward, (P, '6) 
Craig, Robert B. 
Crump, John^ 
Davenport, Thomas, 
Daw^oiit John, 
Doddridge, Philip, 

Draper, Joseph, < 

Eggleiton, John, 
tEpp«a> John W. ^ 

Estill J Benjamin J 
Evans, Thomas, 
*FIojd, John, 
Garland, David S. 
Gamett, James M. 
Garnett, Robert S. 
Gholfion, Thomas, 

•lGiles,Wm.B.(P/81) | 

Goods, Samnclf 
Goodwin, Peteraon, 
Gordon, William F. 
Graj, Edwin, 
Qraj, John C. 
Grimn, SiLmnel, 
Griilin, Thomas^ 
Hancock, George. 
Hairison, Carter B. 
Hawes, Avlett, 
Heath, Jonn, 
Holmes, David, 
Hungerford, John P. 
Jackson, Edward B. 



Jackson, John George, 

Johnson, James, 
Johnson, Joseph, 
Johnson, Charles C. 
Jones, James, 

Jones, Walter, 

Kerr, John, 



■\ 



•|Lee,Henry,(P. 71) 
e, Richara Bland, 



Lee, 



In. Out. I 

-'^.') - 'SA 

793 -l^J 
1801 - a5 
L804-06 
1797-13 

795-99 
L801 - 16 
.829-33 
1789-91 
1793-97 
817-19 
1829-33 
1826-27 
1825-33 
L797-14 

829-32 
1830-31 

833-33 
1798-01 
L803-11 

813-15 
1825-27 

797-01 

817-29 
1809-11 

805-09 
L817-27 
.808-16 
71K)-98 
1801-02 
.799-01 
1803-18 
1829-33 

7JI9-13 
1820-21 
.789-95 
1803-05 
1793-97 

793-99 
L811-17 
1793-97 
L797-09 
1813-^7 
1820-23 
1795-97 
.799-10 
1813-17 

813-20 
.823-27 
1831-32 
1819-23 
1797-99 
1803-11 
1813-17 
1799-01 
1789-96 



In. Out. 

lc21 - 25 
1803-17 
1817-19 
1807-11 
1831-33 
1797-99 



Lelller, Isaac, 

Lt*itwichj iabe», 

Lewis, Joseph, 

Lewis, William J^ 

Love, John, 

Loyskllt Gecirge, 

Machir, Jameis, 

1 Madison, James, (P. 71)1789-97 

t Marshall, John, 1799 - 1800 

Masop, John Y, 1831-33 

Mai well, Lewis, 1627-33 

M'Coy , William, 1811 - 33 

M Kinicy, William, 1810- 11 

Mercer, ChoB. F. (P. *97) 1817 - 33 

♦vr A ^ $1789-97 

•[Moore, Andrew, ^ 

Mcmre, Thomas L. 
Morgan, Daniel, 

JMnrrnvv, Jobn, 
Nt ls<iii, Hugh, 
Ml koii, Thomas M. 
Nt;vel, Joseph, 
NeWj AnlboDj, 

Newton, Thomas, 

** Nicholas, Wilson C. 
Nicholas, John, 
•Page, John, 
Pap:e, Robert, 
Parker, Joiiah, 
Parker, Severn E. 
Patton, John M. 
Pegram, John, 
Pindall, James, 
*tPleasants, James, 
Powell, Alfred H. 
Powell, Levin, 
Preston, Francis, 



t Randolph, John, 

'Randolph, Thomas M. 
IRives, WilUam C. 
Roane, John, 
tloane, John J. 
Roane, John T. 
Roane, Willmm H. 
Rutherford, Robert, 
Sheffej, Daniel, 
Smith, Arthor, 
Smith, Ballard, 
Smith, John, 
Smith, William, 

Smyth, Alexander, 



11803-04 
1820-33 
1797-99 
1805-09 
1811-23 
1816-19 
1793-95 
1793-05 
(1801-S9 
) 1831-33 
1807-09 
1793-01 
1789-97 
1799-01 
1789-01 
1819-21 
1830-33 
1818-19 
1817-20 
1811-19 
1825-27 
1799-01 
1793-97 
/ 1799-13 
I 1815-17 
) 1819-25 
11827-29 
1803-07 
1823-29 
1827-31 
1831-33 
1809-15 
1815-17 
1T93-97 
1809-17 
1821-25 
1815-91 
1801-15 
1621-87 
C 1817-95 
11887-90 



d by Google 



1854.1 



IK CONGRESS FROM 1789 TO 1833. 



117 



Sifphenson, James, 

fSterenson, Andrew, 
Stratton^ John, 
Strother, George F. 
8wearen|nn, Thomas V. 
Swoope, Jacob, 

Talia/eiTo, John, 

Tate, Ma^us, 
Taylor, Robert, (P. 'Do) 
ITazewell, Littleton W. 
Thompson, Philip K. 
TrezTant, James, 
Trigg, Abram, 
Trigg, John, 
Tucker, H. St. George, 
•tTyler, John, 
IVenable, A. B. (P. '80) 
Walker, Francis, 
WhiUt, Alexander, 
While, Francis, 
WiUiams. Jared, 
Wilson, Alexander, 
Wilson, Thomas, 



Id. 

(1803 

< 18(K) 

(1822 

1821 

1801 

1817 

. 1811) 

1809 

(1801 

J 1811 

(1824 

1815 

1825 

1800 

1801 

1825 

1797 

171 »7 

1815 

1816 

171)1 

1793 

178l> 

1813 

1819 

1804 

1811 



l\ 



Oat. 

-or> 
-1) 
-2r 

-3;i 
-oa 

-2<i 

-2y 
-ij 
-o:t 

-Kt 
-31 

-i: 

27 

OJ 

07 

31 

-01^ 

-04 

-25 

-21 

- IHJ 

-95 

-1)3 

-15 

-25 

-09 

-13 



Bethune, Laachlin, 
Blackledge, William S. 
tBloodworth, Timothy, 
Blount, Thomas, 

•ft Branch, John, 
! Bryan, Nathan, 
I Bryan, John H. 

Bryan; Joseph H. 

Burgess, Dempsey, 
I "Burton, Hutchins G. 
I Carson, Samuel P. 
! Clark, James W. 

Cockran. James, 

Conner, H. W. (C. '12) 

Crudup, Josiah, 

Culpeper, John, •< 



North Carolina. 



Senators. 
filoodworth, Timothy, 
*4 Branch, John, 
Brown, Bedford, 

^Franklin, Jesse, 

Hawkins, Benjamin, 
•Iredell, James, (P. '6) 
* Johnston, Samuel, 
Locke, Francis, 
Macon, Nathaniel, 
Mangum, Willie P. 
*Martin, Alexander, 
Stokes, Montfort, 

•Btone, David, (P. '88) 

•Turner, James, 



1795- 

1823- 

1829- 

(1799- 

Jl907- 

1789- 

1828- 

1789- 

1814- 

1815- 

1831 - 

1793- 

181(3- 

C 1801 - 

^1813- 

1805- 



Repre$erUatives. 
Alexander, Evan, (P. '87} 1805- 
<Alexander. N. (P. '76) 1803- 
Alston, Willis, 1799- 

Alfton, Willis, jr. J}^; 

Ashe, John B. 1790- 

Barringer, Daniel L. 1826- 



Davidson, William, 
Dawson, William J. 
Deberry, Edmund, 
Dickens, Samuel, 
Dixon, Joseph, 
Dudley, Edward B. 
Edwards, Wcldon N. 
Fisher, Charles, 
Forney, Daniel M. 
Forney, Peter, 
*tFranklin, Jesse, 
Franklin, Meshack, 
Gaston, William, (P. '06) 1813 
Gatlin, Alfred M. 1823 

Gillispie, James, ^ '* ' 

Grove, William B. 

Hall, Thomas H. 

Hawkins, M. T. 



In. 
1831 
; 1803 
1811 
'1821 
1790 
1793 
lc<05 
1811 
1831 
1795 
1825 
1815 
1795 
1819 
1825 
1815 
1809 
1^21 
1821 
1807 
1M3 
1819 
1823 
1827- 
1«18. 
1793 
1829. 
1810 
1799- 
1829- 
1816 
1819- 
1815- 
1813. 
171 >5- 
1807- 



Henderson, Archibald, 
Hill, William H. 
Hines, Richard, 

Holland, James, 

^Holmes, Gabriel, 

Hooks, Charles, 

Johnston, Charles, 
Kenan, Thomas, 

Kennedy, William, 



1803- 
1791 - 
C1817- 
) 18-27 - 
l831- 
1799- 
1799- 
1825- 
C1795- 
>1801- 
1825- 
C1816- 
5 1819- 
1801- 
1805- 
1803- 
1809- 



j 

I' 



Out. 

-33 

-uo 

-13 
-23 

-91 
-99 
-09 
-12 

-;« 

-98 
-27 
-19 
-98 
-24 
-33 
-17 
-13 
-33 
-23 
-09 
-17 
-21 
-25 
-29 
-21 
-95 
-31 
-17 
-01 
-31 
-27 
-21 
-18 
-15 
-97 
-15 
-17 
-25 
-99 
05 
03 
25 
33 
33 
03 
03 
27 
97 
11 
29 
17 
25 
02 
11 
05 
11 



dbyGoOgL 



e 



118 



SEITATOBS AND &BPBESENTAT1TE8 



[1834. 



tKingf William R. 
Locke, MattheWi 
Long, John, 
Lo¥e, William C. 
fAMafion, Nathaniel, 
tMnngumj Willie P* 
McJinde, Archibald, 

M'Dowell, Joseph, < 

MoFtirlandf Duncan, 
MeKay James J 

McNeill, Archibald, 

Mebane, Alexander, 

^Mumford, George, 
Murfree, Wm. fC 
OutloiM^% George B, 
Owi^Yif JmmeBr 
Fienson, Joseph, 
•Pickena, tBrael, 
Fotler. Robert^ 
Furr'tance, Samuel D. 
Rene her, Abraliam^ 
Saunders, Romulus M. 

Sawyer, Lemuel, 

Settle, Thomas, 
Sevier J JobriT 
BhiidwJck. WiHinjn, 
Sliepard, WilUora B, 
Sbeppi'rd^ AugualuB H. 
Slocum, Jesse^ 
Smith, iain&9 9, 
Spatffhl, Jifsae, 
•Spaiffbl, Richard D. 
Spaifht, Richard D. 
Stanrtfrd, Richard, 

Stanley, John, 

Sle«?le, John, 
Stewart^ James, 
|Si*ne, Duvid, (P. '88) 
Tatum, Absalom, 
Turner, Daniel^ 
Vance, Robert B. 
Walker, Fijlii, 
•Williafdi, Beajumini 
Willrnrne^ Lpwia^ 
Williams, Marmeduke^ 
Williiimii, RobeH, 
Williamson, Hugh, 

Winston^ Jo»ephj 

Wjnn, TliomaSf 
Yancey, Bartlett, 



In. Oat. 
1811-16 
1793-99 
1821-29 
1815-17 
1791-15 
I>^-26 
1809-13 
1793-95 
1797-99 
1805-07 
1831-33 
C 1821 -23 
) 1825-27 
1793-94 
1817-19 
1813-17 
1824-25 
1817-19 
1809-15 
1811-17 
1829-31 
1803-05 
1829-33 
1821-27 
(1807-13 
< 1817-23 
(1825-29 
1817-21 
1790-91 
1796-97 
1829-33 
1827-33 
1817-21 
1817-21 
1829-33 
1798-01 
1823-25 
17J)7-16 
C 1801-03 
> 1809-11 
1790 -!» 
1818-19 
1799-01 
1795-96 
1827-29 
1823-25 
1817-23 
1793-95 
1815-33 
1803-09 
1797-03 
1790-93 
C 1793-95 
i 1803-07 
1802-07 
1813-17 



South Caeolina. 



Senators. 



Butler, Fierce, 

f Calhoun, J. C. (Y. 74) 

Go ilia rd, John, 
Harper, Willin-m, 
^Hnjne, Robert Y. 
Hunter, John, 
IkiTmI^ Ralph, 
"Miller, Stephen D. 
^Pinekiiey Chiles ^ 
Read^ Jttcob, 

Smith, William, 

Sumter, Thomas, 
•Taylor, John, (P.*90) 



In. Oat. 
1789-96 
1802-01 
1801-09 
1833-35 
1804-28 
1826-26 
1823-33 
1796-98 
1789-95 
1831-37 
1798-01 
1795-08 
C 1816 -23 
> 1826-31 
1802-10 
1810-16 



Representatives. 

Alston , Lemuel J. 1807 - 11 

Barnwell, Robert, 1791 - 93 

Barnwell, R. W. (H. '21) 1829-33 
Bellinger, Joseph, 1817 - 19 

litiitori,LemueL 1793-98 

i C 1821 -23 

Blnir James, J 1829 -33 

Brnnnl JfiTnCs, 1819-21 

Burke, Edamus, 1789-91 

Butler, U iUiam, 1801 - 13 

f tCalhoun, J. C. (Y. '4) 1811 - 17 
Calhoun, Joseph, 1807-11 

Campbell, John, 1829-81 

Campbell, R. B. (S. C. '9) 1823-25 
Carter, John, (C. 11) 1822-29 
Casey, Levi, 1803-07 

Chappell, John J. 1813 - 17 

&Cheves, Langdon, 1810-15 

Davis. W. R. (S. C. '10) 1827-33 
Drayton, WUliam, 1825 - 33 

(1806-07 
Earle, Elias, ^1811-15 

< 1817-21 
Earle, John B. 1803-05 

Earle, Samuel, 1795 - 97 

Evans, David R. 1813 - 15 

Felder, John M. (Y. '4) 1831 - 33 
Farrow, Samuel, 1813 — 15 

Gallon, Alexander, 1793-94 

Gist, Jofiepli, 1421-27 

Gorirdin, Theodora, 1813-15 

n.m:„K A. R.{S.a'13) 1828-97 
Griffin, J. K. 1831-33 

•Hamilton, Jamei, 1833 - 99 



Digitized by KJKJKJWIK^ 



*^i^» f 



- WattMT Joliii. 1790.1NL 

^%«]|Mi. Omtm, 1796-96 






gr.a 




W^'^-/: 



Bl 



ite.« 



19Q0^>^ 



JByiiiiifrfBi 

AUMtl,Joel, 
tbaldwin, A. (T. '78) 
BtfMtLWiUImm, 
tKbli, inUiam W. 

Gwnct, TliMBai p. 

Caaytoii, AMJMtinit S. 
Cobb, Howtfly 

tCobb, TboMM W. 

Ctallteil, A. (P. 'S) 

€li«lilMt.MuiA. 
""SMhr. P«t«lr, (P.. 
floj^ Johiiy 

nVoMptfi,J.(P.'99) 
FofliVy jn»BUHi S. 



1817-95 

1788-99, 

1819-15 

1806-14 

1608-3 



1881-« 

1887-lt 

51817-81 

(I88S-9I 

i8ir-i9 

1814-17 

1891-97 

1819-91 

18Q9-0r 

1897-» 

C 1813- 18 

11893-87 

^1897-99 

1899-96 

;i891-;93 

1897-^99 



4 



120 



SENATORS AND &KPEE8EifTATlFS8 



[1834 



*MatthewR, Geor^, 
Meriwether, Daniel, 
Meriwether, James, 

•tMiUedge, John, 

Newman, Daniel, 
Re id, Robert B. 
Smi?It, Dennis, 
Spaliiin^, Thomas, 
TttI i El ft^rm J lie 11 j am i n . 
TalnalK Edward F. 
Telfair, Thomas, (P. '5) 
Terrill, William, 
Thompson, Wilej, 
•|Troup,Geo.M.(P. '97) 
Wayne, Anthony^ 
Wflvne, Jtimpa W. (P. '8) 
Wiftis, Francis, 

Wilde, Richard H. ) 



In. 
1789 
1802 
1825 
1792 
1795 
J 801 
1831 
1818 
1806 
1805 
1799 
1821 
1813 
J817 
1821 
1807 
1791 
1829 
179J 
1815 
1824 
1827 



Out. 
-91 
-07 
-27 

93 
-99 

02 

:« 

23 
11 
-0(i 
-02 
27 
-17 
-21 
-33 
-15 
-92 
-30 
-93 
-17 
-25 
-33 



In. Out, 
(1826-23 
J1829-2S 
Williams, Thomas H. 1817 - 31 



Read, Thomas B. 



Alabama; — 1819. 

Senators. 

Chambers, Henry, 1825-26 

Kelly, William, 1822-25 

Kinff, William R. 1819-35 

McKinley, John, 1826 - 31 

•Moore, Gabriel. 18:M - 37 

Walker, John W. (P. '6) 1819-22 

Representatives. 

Baylor, R. E. B. 1629-31 

Clay, Clement C. 1827 - a3 

Crowell , John, 1817 - 21 

tKelly, William, 1821-22 

Lewis, Dixon H. 1829 - 33 

Mardis, Samuel W. 1831 - 33 

M'Kee, John, 1823-29 

*| Moore, Gabriel, 1822-29 

Owen, George W. 1823 - 29 

Mississippi J — 1817. 



1802-03 
1826-28 
1828-31 
1801-03 
1803-07 
1813-17 
1831-33 
1807-13 
1817-19 
1819-26 



Senators. 



Adams, George, 
Blacky iDh]i| 

Ellis, Powhatan, 

''HolfneSf DaTid, 
*Leake, Walter, 
•Poindexter, George, 



{ 



1829-30 
1832-39 
1825-26 
1827-33 
1820-25 
1817-20 
1831-35 



Representatives. 

Greene, Thomas M. 
Haile, William, 
Hinds, Thomas, 
Hunter, Narsworthy, 

Lattimore, William, \ 
Plummer, Francis E. 
•IPo/Q dexter, George ^ J 
Rankin, Christopher, 

Louisiana; — 1812. 
Senators. 

Brown, James, {{fl^I^ 

Boul fgny , Dominique, 1824-29 

■Cldbonie, VVni. C. C. 1817-18 

Ffoujeritin^ EJiifius, 1813 - 19 

Mohostm, Henry, 1818-24 

J oil n slow , J osiah S . 1 S24 - 33 

f Livingston, E. (1\ '81) 1829-31 

Muirruder, Allan B. 1812-13 

I Posc^j. Tjiomas, 1812-13 

\\ a|rg4man, George A . 1831 - 35 

Representatives. 

Brent, WiUiani L. 
Buliard, Henry A. (H. '7) 
BuUur, Thomoa, 
Clark, Daniel, 
<Jiirley, Henry H. 
f Johnston, Joslah S 



f;Li\?mgBlDti, E. (P. 



*81) 



Overton, Walte. 
Poydms, Julian, 
"Robertson, Thomas B, 
Thorn as J Philemon, 
While, Edward D. 



1823-29 
1831-33 
1818-21 
1806-09 
1823-31 
1821-23 
1823-29 
1829-31 
1809 -IS 
1812-18 
1831-33 
1829-33 



Tennessee ; — 1796. 



Senators. 

Anderson, Joseph, 
•Blount, William, 

tCampbell, G. (P. »94) 
Cocke, William, 



1797-15 
1796-97 
n811-14 
f 1815-18 
f 1796-97 
f 1799-05 



dbyGoogk 



18311 



ni C01I«RE88 FROM 1789 TO 1833. 



lEaton, John H. 
Gnindj, Felix, 

Jackson, Andrew, 

Smith, Daniel, 

WhartoD, Jesw, 
White, Hugh L. 
Whiteside, Jenkin, 
Williams, John, 

Representaihes. 
Alexander, Adam R. 
Allen, Robert, 
Arnold, Thomas D. 
Bell, John, 
Blair, John, 
Blount, William 6. 
Bowen, John H. 
Bryan, Henry H. 
Campbell, G. W. (P. '94) 

Cannon, Newton, < 

Claiborne, Thomas, 
•CUiborne, Wm. C. C. 
Cocke, John, 
Crockett, David, 
Desha, Robert, ' 
Dickson, William, 
Kitzgerald, William, 
IGrundy, Felix, 
Hall, William, 
Harris, Thomas K. 
Henderson, Bennett H. 
Hoggf Samuel, 
'Houston, Samuel, 
Humphreys, Peny W. 
Isaacs, Jacob C. 
{Jackson, Andrew, 
Johnson, Cave, 
Jones, Francis, 
Lee, Prior, 
Marable, John H. 
Marr, George W. L. 
Miller, Pleasant M. 
Mitchell, James C. 
Polk, James K. 
Powell, Samuel, 

Reynolds, James B. j 

Rhea, John, j 

Sandford, James T. 
*8eTier, John, 

Standifer, James, i 

11 



In. Out. 

1818 -21» 

162i)-33 

; 1797- 98 

• 1823-85 

; 1798-99 

} 1805-09 

1814-15 

18^-35 

1809 -n 

1815-23 



1823- 

1819- 

1831- 

1827- 

1823- 

1815- 

1813- 

1819- 

1803- 

1814- 

1819- 

1817- 

1797- 

1819- 

1827- 

1827 

1801 

1831 

1811 

1831 

1813 

1815 

1817 

1823 

1813 

1823 

1796 

1829 

1817 

1827 

1825 

1817 

1809 

1825 

1825 

1815 

1815 

1823 

1803 

1817 

1823 

1811 

1823. 

1829 



27 
27 

33 
33 
33 
19 
- 15 
23 
09 
17 
23 
19 
01 
27 
31 
31 
07 
-33 
-14 
-33 
-15 
-17 
-19 
-27 
-15 
-33 
-97 
-33 
-2:J 
-31 
-29 
-19 
-11 
-29 
-33 
-17 
-17 
-25 
-15 
-23 
-25 
-15 
-25 
-33 



Thomas, Isaac, 
Weakley, Robert, 
tWharton, Jesse, 
White, James, 



121 

In. Out. 
1815-17 
1809-11 
1807-09 
1792-94 



Kentucky; — 1792. 
Senators. 



*Adair, John, 
Barry, William T. 

Bibb, Geo. M. (P. '92) 

Bledsoe, Jesse, 
Breckenridffe, John, 
Browne, John, 

t§Clay, Henry, 

Crittenden, John J. 
Edwards, John, 
Hardin, Martin T. 
Johnson, Richard M. 
Logan, William, 
Marshall, Humphrey, 
Pope, John, 
Rowan, John, 

Talbot, Isham, < 

Thurston, John Buckner, 
Walker, George, 

Representatives, 



1805-00 
1814-16 
1811-14 
1829-35 
1813-15 
1801 -a5 
1792-05 
180G-07 
1810-11 
1831 - 37 
1817-19 
1792-95 
1816-17 
1819-29 
1819-20 
1795-01 
1807-13 
1825-31 
1815-19 
1820-25 
1805-10 
1814 - 15 



Adair, John, 
Allan, Chilton, 
Anderson, Richard C. 
tBarry, William T. 
Bedinger, George M. 
Boyle, John, 
Breckenridffe, J. D.(P. 
Brown, William, 
Buckner, Richard A. 
Bullock, Wingfield, 
Chambers, John, 
Chilton, Thomas, 
Christie, Henry, 

Clark, Ja:nes, 

tt§Clay, Henry, 

Coleman, Nicholas D. 
Daniel, Henry, 
Davis, Thomas T. 
*Desha, Joseph, 
•Duval, William P. 



1831-33 
1831-33 
1817-21 
1810-11 
1803-07 
1803-09 
10)1821-23 
1819-21 
1823-29 
1820-21 
1828-29 
1827-31 
1809-11 
C 1813 -10 
> 1825-31 

ii^^n-i^ 

J 1815-21 
/ 1823-25 
1829-31 
1827-33 
1797-03 
1807-19 
1813 -\^ 



y Google 



122 



SEZTATORS AND REPRBSBNTATIVXS 



[1834. 



Fletcher, Thomas, 
Fowler, John, 
Gaither, Nathan, 
•Greenup, Christopher, 

Hardin, Benjamin, < 

Hawes, Albert G. 
Hawkins, Joseph W. 
Heniy, KokrrtP 
Bopkinsi Samuel, 
Howard, Benjamin, 
Johnson, Francis, 
Johnson, James, 
Johnson, John T. 

t Johnson, Richard M. i 

Kincaidf Jobn^ 
Leccimplje^ Joseph ^ 
Letcher* Roberi P. 
Ljon, Ghittecjdijii, 
Lyon, Matthew, 
>Iarshal1, Th. A. (Y. '15) 
MclluitJiJif Robert, 
McKee, Samuel, 

McLean, Alney, < 

•Metcalfe, Thomas, 

Montgomery, Thomas, i 

Moore, Thomas P. 

New, Anthony, < 

Ortnshy» Stephen^ 
Orr^ Aleiaudrr D, 
Qunrtea^ TtumtAH, 
Robertson^ Georj^e C. 
t Rowan, John^ 
Bnnibtdf Thoman^ 
Sharpe, Solomon P. 
Smith. John S. 
Speed, Thomas, 
Tftul, Micah, 
ThomOTon, rhilip, 
TompkinB, Cbfislophef , 
Trimble, Dnvid, 
Walker, David, 
Walton, Mathew, 
White, David, 
Wickliffe, Charles A. 
Woodson, Samuel H. 
Yancey, Joel, 
Young, William F. 



In. O I. 
1816-17 
1797-07 
1829-33 
1792-97 
1815-17 
1819-23 
1831-33 
1814-15 
1823-27 
1813-15 
1807-10 
1821-27 
1825-2G 
1821-25 
1807-19 
1829-33 
1829 -3:J 
185^-33 
1823-33 
1827-33 
1803-11 
1831-33 
lH2fi-29 
1809-17 
1815-17 
1819 -2J 
1819-29 
1813-15 
1821-23 
1823-29 
1811-13 
1817-19 
1821-23 
1811-17 
17<)2-97 
1817-20 
1817-21 
1807-09 
1803-07 
1813-17 
1821-2:^ 
1817-19 
1815-17 
182:^-25 

i8:n-:w 

1817-27 
1817-20 
1803-07 
1823-25 
1823- a3 
1820-23 
1^27-31 
1825-27 



Ohio. 

Senators. 

In. Ont. 

•Brown, Ethan A. 1822-25 

Burnet, Jacob, P '91) 1828-31 

Campbell, Alex&ndcr^ 1809- 13 

revving, Tbnmsis, 1831—37 

Oriywcjld, S, (Y. *8fi) 1809-09 

Harriflor*;WiHiam H- 1825-28 

Kerr, Joseph, 1814 - 15 
*MeigB, Return J. (Y. '85) 1808-10 

MorriH, Thomas, 1833-39 

"Monriw, Jeremiah, 1813-19 

iCuirgleHf Benjamin, 1815-33 

Hiinili, Jnhn, ' 1803-08 

•Tiffin. Edward, 1807-09 

Trimble, William A. 1819-22 

•Worthington,Th. {J^olll 



ReprcserUatives. 



Alexander, John, 

Ba her, Levi, 

Hartley, Blordecai, 
lit'iilLi Eeiia 

Beecher PhllemoD, 

Brush, Henry, 
Caldwell, James, 
Campbell, John W. 
(■hambcrs, David, 
(lie-ndenen, Davidt 
Cooke, EleulheriMi, 
Corwin, Thomas, 
Cfnne» Joseph H. 
Creightoii, William, 

Creighton, William, 

Davenport. John, 
Fearing, Paul, (H. '85) 
Findtay, James, 
Gazley, James W. 
Goodenow, John M 

niarrisou. W. H. 

'errkk Samuel, 

Hilchc.«k, Peler, (Y. '1) 1817- 19 

Irviii Willifim W 1829-33 

J« Tirsmsra, Di*vid, 1825-26 

Kennon, ^ViUinm^ 1829-33 

Kilborn, James, 1813 - 17 

Leavitt, Humphrey H. 1831-33 

•Mc Arthur, Duncan, 1823-25 

McLean, John, 1813-16 



1813-17 
C 1817-19 

> 1821 -23 
1823-31 
1813-15 

C 1817-21 
i 1823-29 
1819-21 
1813-17 
1817-27 
1821-23 
1815-17 
1831-33 
1831-33 
1829-33 
1813-15 
C 1815-17 

> 1827-33 
1827-29 
1801-03 
1825 -.33 
1823-25 
1829-31 

C 1791U1800 

M816-1819 

1817-21 



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f 












4831^98 



Afhl67, MTiUitiii I& 1881 - 83 

fi«tM,£dward, V3a7^!» 

Ewton, Rnlbii • 1314 -1# 

Uamstid, Edwtfd, 1811 - U 

Pettw, apeius^, . 18S0-ti 

Seott, Jbhn, 18ie-.«)r 



. DsutoATxa. 
wfrioHMt; — 189)6. 



Bat69tJ«iBea W. 
Omwi^. Heniy W, 
Srrier, Aml»w9 H. 






lYorub; — 1822. 

Ckle^RkOMidK; lf«ki-86 

Heniittdex, Joieph M. 1^13-23 
White; JoMph M. 18» - 33 

: Jlft«ft%ait;--1819. 

Bid^^lohn, 1829-31 

Rlohtti.Oftbriel, 1823-25 

9Mf!t, Solomon, (Br. '94) 1820-23 

WW.A.B.(W,14) {{^:g 

Woodbridge, William, 1819 - 20 






tMm of which «mM m 
wiUbaAfWidhitbellittf 



yGoogldB 

1 



*jf^s 



^.' 







d^MMl'M j 




Conn. 
N«w York, 
N«w Jenej, 
Bean. 

Vligiaia, 

0t Cbfolina, 
0eoifiA| 



Teonencei 
Kentacky, 
Ohio, 









4 

17 
IS 

17 
16 

16 

1^1 

17 

17 

15 

18 
14 
13 

31 

6 

7 
10 
13 
18 
14 

5 

5 

3 



7 

&iS 

7.3 

4.7 

5.2 

5.8 

5.1 

4.7 

5.4 

5.3 

6.1 

5 

6.6 

7.2 

4.5 
5.7 
4.9 

4.a 

5.8 
4.9 
4.7 
7.6 
75 
9.3 



Bin. 



If*. 



irbboef, 12 
LaiUHioni 12 
Bndley, 16 
Lloyd, 9 
Foiter, 13 
Hillboose, 14 
King, 19 
DicEeraon,16 
RoM, 9 

Honey, 12 
Smitil, 23 



OilM, 
Maeon, 
GaUlafd, 
Gunn, 



Wi 

Johnston, 

Anderson, 

Brown, 

Rufffles, 

Noble, 

Thoouui, 

Benton, 



11 

13 

22 

10 
16 
12 
13 
18 
13 
18 
15 
11 
12 




Mi ^ mt 



^. J^ 



tf BufT iH Ui M iots M Qmgrut from Ama 

yiviii 1789 to 1683. '^-^"i 







1834.1 AB99I0!IS op CONOaESS. 125 

VII. Tablb tftke Ststions of Congress showing the Commencement ajui 
Termination of each of the 22 Sessions, from 17K) to 183:). 
[From the National Calendar.] 




MirefaJ 



m 




H'^J Sept. 2iK 
ITUO Aug, 12, 
ITUO March J, 
1791 1 Maj B, 
ITM. Mmtch 2, 
ni>:i|jane 'J, 
17^4 Marcli l{, 
17% June 1, 
ITl^Mil Match 3, 
17^>7 July 10, 
I71I7 July la 
17*W March J, 
iTify Mar. U, 
If^m March a, 
I8iil hUy X 
im2 March :^, 
Mar 27, 
VlarcJ) 3^ 
April 21, 
March ;), 
April 2ij, 
Mafch 3, 
June 2H, 

"Way 1, 
March 2, 

July 0, 
March a, 
Aug % 
April 18, 
March :i, 
April 30, 
March 3, 
April 30, 
March 3, 
May 15, 
March 3, 
May 8, 
March 3, 
^lay 2iJ, 
\1arch 3, 
Mnv 21, 
M.irch3, 

March 3, 
May 31, 
iMarch 3, 
July 14, 
VJafcb 3, 



ie03 

15H}4 

li^jxi 

IdllT 

Idlu 
Idll 

I6l:i 
1813 
IdH 
1815 
|8tt» 
1^17 

181i!!! 

Irtl 

I8il 
1^22 
ld2:i 
Irtil 

] --ii . 

iHj; 
l^Md 
182y 
I6m 
1831 
1832 



178U 

17UI) 
17U1 
17tl!i 
17*13 
1?,M 
17iH5 
171 Hi 

I7y7 

17! >7 
I7yri 

m^i 

18UI 

ltHl3 
J8U4 

J8«5i 
18«Mi 
J81I7| 
1808 i 

18(W| 
I8JU 

J8n> 

1812; 

1813 
1813 
ldJ4 

18J7; 

18181 

181'I,| 

lJ?iO| 

1821 I 

Itf^l 

JitJ3l 

ld24 

le2;j 

ld2it 

18!^ 

18^^ 

18251 

IdiO 

18:11 

1832 



13 

14 I 

15 I 
llj 
17 
18 

v.} 

20 
21 
21 
22 
23 
24 

-r> 
27 

26 
21* 

3(1 
31 
32 

34 

33 
3(1 
37 
37 
38 
31* 
40 
41 
42 

4:i 
44 
4:, 

4[) 
40 
48 
4>l 
50 
51 
5i 
53 
54 
5r> 

5{i 

57 



210 > 

^it 

88> 

1*8} 
11!»J 
UMJJ 
i2J i 

irw > 

^^/ 
247 > 

my 
i*ir*t 

107 i 
138 > 

:i8i 
imi 
1111} 

J41 ) 

!J3 J 

183} 

1173 

1»4S 

im»^ 

]4!)| 

!(2i 

111 i 

177) 

87 I 

l(i8 4 

ml 
i7r» t 

575 I 
875 

2231 
01 i 



F- A* MuhleoUerg. 

Jonathan Trumbull. 
F, A, Mulilenb**rg» 
Jonathoji Dayton. 

Jonalhan najton. 

Tliechdore Sedgwick. 
Nathaniel Macon, 
Nathaniel Macon. 
N^athaniel Macoii^ 
Joseph H* Vaxnum- 

Joseph B. Vamum* 

Ifeufy Clay. 

H CUy* to Jan. 13, 
1814. Lan. CheTcv. 
Lanvdon Che^ei. 

Henry Clay. 

Henry Clay. 

Henry Clay, 
John VV. Taylor. 

Philip P. Harbour. 
Henry Clay. 
John W. Taylor. 
Andrew 3leven«on. 
Andrew SlerenAon. 
Andrew 3tcvtt^«oi^« 



JI* 



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128 



UNITED STATES. 



[1834. 



IX. EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT. 

The twelfth presidential term of four years began on the 4th of 
March, 1833 ; and will expire, with the 24th Congress, on the 3d of 
March. 1837. 

Salary. 
ANDREW JACKSON, Tennessee, President^ $25,000 

Martin Van Buren, New York, Vice- President, 5,000 

The following are the principal officers in the executive departmtnts of 

the government, who all hold their offices at the will of the President. 

Balary. 
Louis McLane, Delaware, Secretary of State, $6,000 

William J. Duane, Pennsylvania, S/tcretary of the Treasury, 6,000 

Lewis Cass, Ohio, Secretary of War, 6,000 

Levi Woodbury, New Hampshire, 6'ecretery o/"^ JVary, 6,000 

William T. Barry, Kentucky, Post-Master General^ 6,000 

Roger B. Taney, Maryland, Attorney General, 3,500 



Louis MXans, 
Daniel Brent, 
J. D. Craig, 
Alexander Mclntire, 



William J. Duane, 
Asbury Dickins, . 

Joseph Anderson, 
James B. Thornton, 
Richard Harrison, 
William B. Lewis, 
Peter Hagner, 
Amos Kendall, . 
Stephen Pleasonton, 
John Campbell, 
Thomas L. Smith, 
Virgil Maxcy, 

Elijah Hay ward, . 

Lewis Cass, 

John Robb, 

L. L. Van Kleeck, 



Department of State. 

Secretary, 

Chief Clerk, ^ 

Superintendent of the Patent Office, 

Clerk, do. 

Treasury Department. 

Secretary, 

. Chief Clerk, 

First Comptroller, 
. Second Comptroller, 

First Auditor, 
. Second Auditor, 

Third Auditor, 
. Fourth Auditor, 

Fifth Auditor, 

Treasurer, 
. Register, 

Solicitor of the Treasury, 

General Land- Office. 
. Commissioner, 
War Department. 

Secretary, 

Chirf Clerk, 

Clerk in the Requisition Bureau, 



Salary. 
$6,000 

2,000 

1,500 

1.000 

Salary. 
$6,000 

2,000 

. 3,500 

3,000 
. 3.000 

3,000 
. 3,000 

3,000 
. 3,000 

3,000 
. 3.000 

3,500 



3,000 

Salary. 

$6,000 

2,000 

1.600 



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::^:t,- 







a 






>m 




^ do. fid Divinon, 

Ckkfdhrk, . . . . 



9J500 
1,700 



'Or THll UNITED STATES. 
JXreeior; mhaj $8,000. 
1^^ MS, $3,401^; f 798,4tf Ui gold ooiM^ 
||^ |SM(0 in oopp«r i •^ eonidtluii of O^ldB^Sif 

i #80,000 weM ibm Ifexko, Smilii Ancriea, aad 

» flom AiriiM; f0)^000 ftom tlM gold region 

#12^)00 ftom wanm not Meertainad. 

laltiieMuitteoonuigo from North Carolinm 

i^^eoifod Horn 1604 to 1889 ww f 109,000. 

l«nf olhor StiOo till 1889. 

f^^Mi rmnotdfrom d^mmi Slaiet. 



^i»«: mo. 






mt 



'WSS5 86,000{ 34,000 



1831. I 1«31; 



86.500 
134;000|80li000|894;000 458;000|1,000,000 
3^500 80»000 88, 00^ 45,000 96,500 
' 819,0001.6,00140,000 688,000 
'^^ IJWO . . 1,060 

1,000 1,000 8^ 



I40/I00i466,000|sa0,000e78/W0 lj9Q4j«»V 



I «rM«iaM, #1,199,000, 

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* ' •• vi\i\\ 1tl»4lr*\t v/ ^ft«^v«'!^*-<- 



'%Ti '^IP' ^'^ Mooiiiit of tiM Jiiii«fiel|bft flf jm 0ii|«Bme Comt, t]i« CStovil 
l^i»ite| tad tiM Diftfkt CU>iirti» 0ee IIm Ame^^ 



"^iMiliitoij, 
fin^ liMNDpaon, 
Joim McLean, 
H^arjr BAldwin, 

Wmam T. Carroll. 
Henry Aahton, 



mehmomd, Va. 
Gharleaton, S. C. 
Harietta, Md. 
Cambridg«« Blaas. 
New York, N. Y. 

Cincinnati, Ohio, 

Pittiburg, Pa. 

Washington, D. C. 
do. 
do. 



dc. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 



4,500. 

4jm. 



Momey Cfmenl, ^^fi^^ 
Clerk, Fee*, dse. 

MmrsktU, Fees, Ae. 

la hf Id in the City of Washington, and has one ■Ni|Bi{t 
on the 9d Monday Jn January. 



DifCriclf. 



isssr 

N. HuBiiahira, Matttew Eum, 

Joba PitaMUi, 
Williui Drirtol, 
A. Oonkliof , 
4 _. ^. t. !*. R. Betto, 
NewHffMy, Wimam Ronel, 
(S.i>iK. Jot. Hopkiiioa, 
I W. out. Thomu Irwin, 
W\XUr4 HaU, 
BIImGImiii, 
P. P. BurlMMir, 

TInmbmLm, 
Jar. Caybr, 



biBtRlCT COltETS:— JUDGES, ATTOlinnni, 



— Kfl 

HmeiTtei. 



OooBMtleat, 
If «. (NTDial. 
"•^•JS. Uirt. 
IfewJafMy, 

DalMPaie. 

^••. Iw.lNvl 
North Cteottna, 
Soalli Ouoiaa, 
Ooocria, 

^** JN.l 
Mhilwlliiii, 









Portland, 

Hottkintoo, 

WiUiama own, 

Booton, 

ProYiilenco, 

Nuw Haron, 

Albany; 

Now York, 

MunoUT, 

Philadelphia, 

PilUlNirg, 



Bnitimoro, 

GordoogviUo, 

ClarkalMiM, 

pHypttoYilb, 

CharloMott, 

Saraonah, 

Mobilo, 

Wineboitor, 

NowOrloaot, 

NaahTille, 
Harrodtborfh, 



oaiom, 

Vandatta, 

Bt.JU»«it, 



J. ,80. 
1,000 
1,900 
9,500 
1,500 
1,500 
9,000 
3,500 
1,500 
9,500 
1,800 
1,500 
9,000 
1,800 
1,600 



9,500 

9rS00 

9,500} 

9,000 

S,0Q0| 

1,500 1 

1,500 
1,000 
1,000 



9,900 



1,900 ,,Poai|o 



D. M. DmoU, 
llaYidKelloa, 
Androw Doiuui, 
R.W.Qfoooo, 
AMChikIt, 
Nat. 8. Bontoe, 
A. Uanilum, 
G. D. Wall, 
H. D. Gilpia, 
BenJ. Patton. Jm. 
Ooo.Boad,Jii^ 
N. WiUuinM, 
Tb. B. Bntflbrt, 
W. A. Haniooa, ^ 
T. P. Dovoioaaz, 
E.B.OiMllil^ 
M. H. M'AllMUr, 



ElUol. 
Branooo, 



Gooiga Adaaa, 
Joba Slidoll, 
B. F. LIntoo, 
' A. ll*Kiao«r, 
Oollln|awoitt, 
Tb. B. HoMioo, 
N. H. Bwavna, 

David J. - ■ ' 



%B^M^ 




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1toi| Mr. JostioflrlJhMJ^. 
lir.Jiii(ttoefi9l4llfD. 
ifr. Juttiott DuvalL 

16. JtastiM JoimioiL 
Mr. Joirtidi if'iUiii. 

notida, MkhigMiy awl AftatuNW, 
€fmn m tlieM flevenl states and tm^ 
.;^ifi|ldifilidii of a Cirenit Conrt. 

1^ three Jndgei in the IKstRC^ of CkK 
pnrpoee. The Chief Jnetiee of that 
JJiigfkif.thatDiatrict. 



in ■i»M7i 
C. W. CottOT, 



O.^InMtNll, 



^¥« H* BsyWANMl} 



F. Hr.Liwi , 
!f.^ A. Mdrmiry, 



«?s5s: 



■.^.iif^ 



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Faaat!Lo. 




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Eotknd, 


do. 


BotU»,' 


do. 




do. 


Utloi, 
Nnw Voik, 


do. 


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ft 

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BnhimSn, 


do. 




do. 


SUoniott, 


do. 


CharlHiton, 


do. 
do. 


Savannah, 


do. 


Mobila. 


do. 


HonteTlIlt, 


'do. 


Fatohav, 
NawOrfaant, 


do. 
do. 


Knoxvilia, 


do. 


NafbriHa, 


do. 


Frankfort, 


do.i 


Oolombm, 


do. 


CorjdoQ, 


do. 


Vandalia, 


do. 


St. Louis, 


d<K 


Alanadtta, 


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133 



UHtTED STATES. 



[1834. 



Places and Times of holding the District and Circuit Courts 
OF the United States. 



Maine. 

N. Hampshire. 

Vermont. 
Massachusetts. 

Rhode Island. 

Connecticut. 

New York, 
S. District. 

New York, 
N. District. 

New Jersey. 

Pennsylvania, 
E. District. 

Pennsylvania, 
W. District. 

Delaware. 



Maryland. 

Columbia. 
Virginia, 

£. 15ISTRICT. 



Distria Courts. 

J ^i5ca5«cM— Last Tuesday in Feb. and IstTuesdav in 
I Sept. ; — Portland — First Tuesday in J one and Dec. 
C Portsmouth — 3d Tuesday in March and Sept. ; — £rc- 
( ter — 3d Tuesday in June and Dec. 

Rviland^^rh of October ;— fTinrfwr— 24 th of May. 
C Boston — 3d Tuesday in March, 4th Tuesday in June, 
( 2d Tuesday in Sept., and Ist Tuesday in Dec. 

5 Newport — 2d Tuesday in May, and 3d in October;— 
Providence — 1st Tuesday in Aug. and February. 
C Neto Haven — 4th Tuesday in February and Aug. ; — 
I Hartford — 4th Tuesday in May and Nov. 

< Xew York. — 1st Tuesday of each month. 

C jUbany—^d Tuesday in Jan. ;-^Ulica — Last Tuesday 

( in August. 

C New Brunswick — 2d Tuesday in March and Sept. ; 

< — Burlington — 3d Tuesday in May and Novem- 
^ ber. 

C Philadelphia — 3d Monday in February, May, Aug^ 
\ ust. an November. 

C Pittsburg— Isi Monday in May and 3d Monday in 
I October. 

{Neiecastle ^ Dover — alternately, on the 4th Tuesday 
in Nov. 1789 ; and three other sessions progres- 
sively, on the 4th Tuesday of every 3d calendar 
month. 
Baltimore — on the 1st Tuesday in March^ June, 
Sept., aud December. 



\ 

Washington — Ist Monday in June and December* 
C RiclimonJ — 15th of May and 15th of November ;- 



Norfolk — Ist of May and Ist of November. 

{Staunton — Ist day of May and Ist day of October ; — 
fVythe Court House— 'M Monday in April and 
Sept. ; — l^wislmrg — 4th Monday in April and 
Sept. ; Clarksburg — 4th Monday in May and Oct. 
C Edenton — 3d Monday in April and Oct. ; — Netebem 
< — 4th Monday in April and Oct.; — Wilmington^' 
^ Ist Monday a(\er ihe 4th Monday in April and Oct. 
(Charleston—^ Monday in March and Sept.; lat 
! Monday in July and 2d Monday in Dec. ; — Lau- 
\ rens Court House — the next Tuesday after the ad- 
L joumment of the Circuit Court at Columbia. 
Georgia. Savannah — 2d Tues. in Feb., May, Aug., and Nov. 

Ala.,N. District. Huntsville — 2d Monday in April and October. 
Ala.,S. District, Mobile— lai Monday in May and December. 



Virginia, 
W. District. 



N. Carolina. 



S. Carolina. 



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mM0^adin^ ^ lAty tad DeMmW. 
j^itll^y iBlimli Md-Beptowter. • 

Mi^^-» fTiMMNe— liirOiloUr. 
3lfay;-^ JB f Hw dU nOBloiw. 
H Ifej ;— HirffiMf Jd October. 
Ifof tad IGth October. ^ 

JoiM ;-rP» OT > i dwi c< 1 5th Norember. 
Uat Wedneidfty in April ;—HMt^brd«7 

MoAdiy in Feb., fint Moodi^^ in 
I Monday in Jnlj end Oeteber. 
•^let April end let Oetober. 

-Utb Apiil end nth Oetober. 
fpU l^weer, itteiiiemy»3diime end9nh 

i^r^.Aptfl end let November. 

t*l£i7,«ndiEMJNoTe9dber* , ' 
I May e^ IMi Norenitar. 
I MwMft Lf in April;— MMBMi-4th 
r i|iki lleylriBJbef » ' ^ 

ley after the fiietMonday in May ; 
•llinipdiy efter the fint Mondi^ 

-let MoadMp in Meichand Sept ^-bes- 
i Monday fak Oelober. 
rlet Meodair^ May and November.. 
'^aiiAm§ IMMMidayinJnlyandadMdndayinDee. 
t Moater Id Maieh end NoTeedber; 
iMi-l4iMeMiiy in May and October. 



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i 



134 



UMTED STATES. 



[1834. 



XII. IXTERCOUIISE WITH FOREIGN NATIONS. 



JFbrtigm State*. 




SlfOi, 


13tfa. 


*«^. 


1 


&1JOT7. 


Franco J 


Edw. LivitiliioD, iLa." 


9(HKI 


Til. P, JlartDn, 


3<MW 


KuuJQ, 


JuiDtfj BQcliin»n, Pa. 


ih:ii 


aoflo 


J. Rtuntuljih Cky, P». 


SiiiJO 


Spain, 




Va, 


1JK9 


9000 


ArlhcLf MidflLflUKi, 


£K)oa 


Grem Brjlain. 


A4ir<Mi Vail. 


NY. 


i^ 


4S00 






PbffmgiLtp 


Td, L- L* Btetii, 


Vt. 


igss 


4500 






N«lWrliia(]a| 


AujrUJlB UaVQUCt 


lA, 


I6:ij 


4»10 






Btlfiuin, 


lJu;i>t B. T^garoi 


s.c. 


iws 


am 








riiri^io. Hujfhetp, 


ftld. 


ISQO 


4,-KK) 






Hon 17 WbHLDiiit 


N.Y.| 


I^fT 


4[k]H} 






Tufki^y, 


Aiilhcfiiy BiitleFi 
11. U. AlcAfoQ, 






I5O0 






Jl|?»lci}, 






4S0O 






Colambjiii 






4A0O 






Btip. Cum Am. 


Etlinn A* BroMn. 


OKio. 




430i» 






Ch. 0. De W at, 






45W 






Bucmfi Avr^i^ 














Cliitl, 


John llamni, 


Ohio. 




450* 






Por«i 






4aou 







Principal Consuls. 



Austria, 



Barhnry, 

Belgium, 
Brazil, 



Chili, 
China. 
Colombia, 
Cuba, 
(( 

Denmark, 
England, 



France, 



Germany, 



, Vicuna, 
I Vonico, 
Triojtto, 
Tunis, 
,Trip«l«» 
Antwerp, 
Rio JnnHiro, 
San ii^alvador,! 
Pernambuco, 
Valparaiso, ] 
jCanion, 
Carthagena, 
Havunna, 
Mat inzaa, 
Coponhagon, 
London, 
Liverpool, 
Bristol, 
PariB, 
Havre, 
Marseilles, 
Bourdeaux, 
Hamburg, 
i Bremen, 



J. G. Schwart. 


iHayti, 


Pt. Au Prince, 


Charles Barnet. 




Cape Haytien, 


George Moore. 


Holland, 


Amsterdam, 


Samuel D. Heap. 


" 


Rotterdam, 


D. ti. McCaulcy. 


Italy, 


Leghorn, 


\Vm. D. Patterson. 


t» 


Genoa, 


J. M. Bnker. 


; Madeira, 




Odiiu VVoodbridge. 


'Mexico, 


Mexico, 


J. T. Mansfield. 


it 


Vera Crux, 


Th. B. Rus^ll. 


1 u 


Tampieo, 


J. H. Grosvenor. 


; Portugal, 


Lisbon, 


J. M. Macpherson. 


Peru, 


Lima, 


N. P. Irish. 


Prussia, 


Stettin, 


Lewis Shoemaker. 


Russia, 


St. Petersburg, 


John Raynals. 


Scotland, 


Glasgow, 


Th. Asjiinwall. 
*Ft. B. Offden. 
Herman Visger. 


Spain, 


Cadiz. 


tc 


Barcelona, 


It 


Malaga, 
Stockholm, 




Sweden, 


R. G. Beaslej. 
Fr. C. Fenwick. 


1 " 


Gottenborg, 


Turkey, 


Constantinople, 


George Strobel. 
John Cuthbert. 


ti 


Smyrna, 


Joshua Dodge. 







F. W. D mond. 
Samuel Israel. 
J. W. Parker. 
J. Wambersie. 
Th. Appletoo. 
R. Campbell. 
John Marsh. 

J. S. Wilcocke. 
James James. 

G. R. Robertsoa. 
J. P. Hutchinson. 
A. WorihiogtM. 
Fred. SchiUow. 
A. P. GibMHi. 
Alex. Thmnpson. 
Alex. Bunco. 
Wm. Sterling. 
G. O. Barret. 
David Erskine. 
C. A. Murray. 
F. £. Bunker. 
Darid Offlej. 



Ministers Slc. of Foreign Powers in the United States. 



Belgium, 

Brazil, 

Colombia, 

Denmark, 

France, 

G. Britain, 

Mexico, 



Baron de Behr, 

De Araujo Ribeiro, 

M. Domingo Acosta, 

M. Stein Bille, 

M. Serurier, 

Charles Bankhead, Esq. 

Don Jose Montoya, 



Minister Resident. 
Chargi d' Affaires, 

do, 

do. 
Envoy Extra, ^ Min, PUnip. 
Chargi d'AffaxreM, 

do. 



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l-t:C^3I»tCTIMIO 



08,735 



88^500 



96^ 

Zfi48 

46/160 
47^90 

9i;ioo 



MkAMtiD 



m.068 



137,968 
134^79 

154,416 

681,495 
96,968 

600^1 
llfllH 

706,789 



M6,064 
374/Q6 
955^ 
911^ 
.m,S19 
965444 
.610^ 
510,926 
$^1^166 
183^70 
U6J99 
4H208 

8919 
076 



TmaL 



Milw. 



741^13 #34,238.63 



mAm 



i/H9,445 
121,784 
661^491 

3,667,354 
690,850 

2,962,075 
103,096 
789^6 

1,931,532 

M88,371 
859,946 

.656,834 
764.030 
289,498 
173^76 
805^ 

M3M00 

1,739,985 
608,934 
303,484 
196,300 



152,048 
193,076 






18,845J9 

2o;n5.i6 

129;it220 

15,772J»1 

39,480.07 

344,206.78 

26,652. 

206,408. 

6,006i» 

7&,7W00 

93.767.36 

S1/S0.9] 

52,755.87 

61,786.06 

92^16^ 

17;i98.81 

48428.96 

85,544.19 

42,979.30 

65,400^ 

14,460.35 

9,764.17 

15,756.67 

6,722.21 

7a37i» 

2,726.13 

#15418.36 



y43|4»iW(4gW2,977ia3,685/)21 1,471,371.04 

dy IB « ktttr to a committee of the 

'0S9^ t^ H wie.ftn oeeurrence of almott 

t wSJiJtik of newipApen wae eaniedi.^ 

li iogiillier* The poetsge retunecl 4n 
Itt0»13^18a^ tmosgtea to «254^||| 



m 



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i 



136 



UNITED STATES. 



[1834. 



XIV. PRINCIPAL POST-OFFICES. 

A List of all the Distributing Post- Offices in the United Stales in 1831 ; 
and of all the othar Post-Ogirfs of ivhok the amount of Postage during 
the year ending March 3 Wm, cicttded $1000. 

[Those to which a i^tnr is prtifijcud are Di&tfibaling Offices.] 



Maine. 
Augusta, 
Bangor, 
Bath, 
Hallowell, 
•Portland, 

J^ew Hampshire. 



Dover, 

•Hanover, 

Portsmouth, 
•Walpole, 

VermonU 
•Bennington, 
•Brattleborough, 

Burlington, 
•Middlebury, 
•Windsor, 

Massachusetts. 

Andover, 
•Boston, 

Gharlestown, 

Lowell, 

Lynn, 

Nantucket, 

New Bedford, 

Newburyport» 
•Northampton, 

Pittsfield, 

Salem. 

Springfield, 

Taunton, 

Worcester, 

Rhode Island, 

Newport, 
•Providence, 

Omnecticut. 

Bridgeport, 
•Hartford, 

Middletown, 

New Haven, 

New London 

Norwich, 
•Stamford, 

A'ew York. 
•Albany, 

Auburn, 

Batavia, 

Brooklyn, 
•Buffalo, 

OanandaiguAf 



1,084 

31)5 

1,855 

2i) 

334 

G6 

1,204 



1,140 

62,270 

1.21M' 

2.5!)3 



Catskill, 1,138 

1,076 Geneva, 3,391 

2,325 Hudson, 1,761 

1,051 Ithaca, 1,884 

1,228 Lockport, 2,035 

4,777 Newburg, 1,083 

•New York, 160,203 

Ogden-iburg, 1,440 

•Oswego, 1,911 

Palmyra, 1,135 

Pouuhkeepsie, 1,007 

Rochester, 7,202 

Schenectady, l,92<i 

Sv'racuse, 1.1)89 

Troy, 6,616 

« 873 -Utica, 7,528 

476i Watertown, 1,371 

West Point, 1,236 

JVew Jersey. 

Newark, 3,543 
New Brunswick, 2,037 

J»'^ Princeton, 1,819 

S '^'""'^'^' ^'^« 

Qfv^o Pennsylvania. 

j^jy^l Carlisle, 1,420 

j'»^3,):*Chambersburg, 1,612 
5,W*E'«ton, 1,404 

l,6iK)i* *''"*'» 

1.317 Harrisburg, 9,287 

1469' Lancaster, 2.775 

' Lewistown, 1,014 

2 4ifi* hiladeiphia, 106.!'30 

Q 400 -Pittsburgh 13,798 

' Pnttsville, 2,855 

J q7j^ Reading, 2,473 

5!9l8*"^«shington, 

iIjKJG York, 1,278 
4,81 »9 Delaware. 

l,(>4i)*Wilmington, 2,041 
1,428 Maryland. 

Annapolis, 1.741 

•Biltimore, 54,923 

13,00a Frederick, 2,208 

2,74H»Hafirerstown, 507 
. M^^ District of Columbia. 

Alexandria, 5,401 

,.«„., Georgetown, 3,866 

2,235|*V\ ashingion, 5,817 



1,477 
4.068 



V'tT^niu. 
^\billgdon, 

Chadnttesville, 

Frederickflbufg, 

Lvucbbarg, 
^Norfolk, 
Tetcrsburg, 

Richrnonoi 

SliLUntoD, 

\V hireling, 

Winfli enter, 

J^ortk C^relina 
'AshevillCj 
'Pajelteville, 

Nf wbern, 

Salem, 
WJIiuingtoUp 



132 

1,029 
3,368 
3,369 
8,028 
3,928 
18,715 
1,358 
3,427 
1,765 



1,494 
1,631 
2,532 



South Carolina. 



3,068 



Camden, 
CharWftton^ 
Cheraw, 
C^Wumbtii, 
Georgetown, 
Tork C- H, 



1,806 
26,423 
1,326 
3,853 
1,620 
382 



Georgia, 
Athens, 1,022 

'Augyvta, 11,444 

Cofumbua, 1,796 

DLiritn. 1,198 

M^icon, 4,657 

MiJledg^viUe, 2,621 
Pt^tereburg, 72 

'Savannah. 14,278 

^iabama. 
Rorence, 1,648 

■Hmit*vine, 1,181 

,M labile, 9,375 

'Manlg^mory, 1,002 
TuscnliKisn, 2,341 

VVflahingtciti, 308 

Mississippi.. 
Natchez, 4,173 

Port Gibson, 1,555 
Vicksburg. 1,528 

i^ntisiana. 
Baton Rguit«, 1,369 
.New Odeans, «74W8 
Si. Franciivillei 1|010 

I by Google 



nmm! 







m « 10 •« 

. . 85 *• 

^ i; and of four pieoM, with fuadmpU, 
, j nklled u a latter, and waighing ams 
Vfsuubn^ poatage ; and at the aamo fatti 



iad out of tlie State is which it iajph* 

lit' rcNnit* 



Bi not eartied orair 160 mileat 
I Blala in whidv it ia pid»lUiad, l|aa&ti; 

.antaxoa^Ksff 100 « 4 'V . t ** 

100 « a « «' 

whieh eontaina mofe than 

'«r any dieet of luw dimanaiona, 

^ nafi ttamphkta, iifintad on a half 

(^ ifai aiia» ml ha ehargad with half tha 

iyerad at ^ offiea where the Teawl 
hj poi^ tiN Mnta in addition to tha 

^;^ jrvpHpyv^ jrm^Maa)^« 

irllM iBiiillltt||f QdScera of tha gorani* 

lajp adLly iw>at» frea of poatafla* 

k ofl^lJnjted Statea; Secretariea of 

' ' • ' ' General ; Poatmaater Gen- 

ollara, Aaditora, fftj^ 

r ? Tiaaanrar ; Cominiiaioner of tfii 

loftiMNayy Board; CommiaHajr 

Genend J^P*/™^ 




RmiJitii •• .ii' 



Kji fi^HMkar and^dar] 

d by Google 



i 




^^ «!* •aio0«l of woglt, esMM akiM to be mM for), wid all im^ 
iipiiii|»^H)t «i^«r «th«r H««k(», fltMl f& period of ^xty a^ 
i4i» lidMt In «wt in Ccn^pM, m tlie smI niMtiiig of OottgiiMt 
^ BUDMlBn oifljr Mul ftB4 roooive, fioo of pootago, lottoro uwAprnk- 
M|iMtoa^0Ofl4inf hilf an onaeo in weigbl; and thoy may receifo asa 
Jittf aowBpaper, oacJi, or what ia eqaivaioot thareto. 

Piintera or newapapof* jnay aeod ono papar to aach and aveiy ottar 
pi&i^ of nattapapera within the United Statea. frea of poatage, naiof 
■ooh f^gnlaliona aa tho Poatanater Gaaatal may provkta. 



XYL TARIFF OF DUTIES. 



i'\ 



Tho Aaarioan Almanae for 1833 oontaina tha Tariff of rhitiaa u^fm 
gfeiliiiBB^^ United Btotaa aftar the 3d>f Mait^, \9S^m 

dijtfipS % Inly 14, 183a.-Tha new Act OA!|b. 

MJki0 modify^ M^UU14iki^M^.lBa2, and da other ^^^ 
fating duties on In^orte. , 

8noT. 1. Ba il onaotedhy tha Sanato and Hooaa of Rapraaanla£iininof 
tito United atatoa of Amaiioa in Gafignaa aaaamblad. That Hon and nfiaff 
fjbtb 9lat day of Daoambar, lb'33, in ail oaaes wiiara dntiea ara im po aa d 
OBlbfaifnhgaporta fay tha act of tha 14th day of Jnly, 1681^ am>j^ 
<* An act to altar and amand tha aaverai acta impoaing datian an im^ 
fflrl^" or fay ai^othar aot» ahall ozoead twanty par oantmn on^^l^l^ 
tillf<itrf»-ona tenth part of aoeh azoaia ahall ba dadncted ; from i 
|||:|Mt day of l>aeonibar» 1835, another tenth par| thar^i 
k andalter tiM Slat day of I>aoanibory 1897, 1 
'Adlbadadoetad; ftom and after tho 91bI day of ! 
ta%iiMi;^«M^ tenth part thereof ahaU be dedtteted-; and 
Jigi^ ly dlf 9f Haoainbar, 1841, one half of the tamkm 
rAaaba dedbKttd; and from and after th^SOthd^ 

r half HiereofahnU be detested. ^^ 

^l^iAHd^knUtethat owiDtad, That ananoh of thi, 
l«il«i^jMlkaria]r albNaaid, a^izae tim into,^ 
bytiMnameaoTjlalip^ 
i^poil If Ihn onjfy mateiiili tht; ^ 
fnnqpmanyacd, aftftvo 






^^fmf*T^^vmim 




^^<^*mi^ 



r-^-^^f^. 




}^0i ilftw Urn duf IM 9Bmiuii4 



' It the port wlMie tk^.i 
I M aM^ be prMeiibed hgr Imv* 

It «M^|vl^» 1831, and Ui* 99m^ kmh 

[iiit JbOMiif utsdee ii^eftod ton aad 

Vi^iMi wad anta tiie 30th day of Jiiim, IMS, 

|r, .ftM.ftoiik duty, to wit: ^le«ch«d«i^ 

'^Uiktm m^ikiiiBy and linaii eambfioa, and 

i other manQftctureB of iih and worated, 

I ttlh ahall lie the oompoaeat aiateiial 

I lUa aide of the Qape ef Qeed Hope, •'^^ \ 

f 4iaiieted» Thai fioai aad after dke aiid aMh^ 

f articlee ahall be adadtled to entrfyfiilM , 

» yttchailfery aalphnr, erode aal^etre* giiad- 

5 opiom, lia ia |daiaa aad aheirta, goai AniN^» 

r^iiMMider root, aata aad b e wi aeyaed in d^ 

^^^iMmI or paatel, aitoee, aaihaifiia, Awfaadf piloh, 

I, aofiaa^er e^, eataop, ehiSLf poealoa iadl- 

%6k KeniBy ether boraa aad tipei ladia rabbet, 

r be<riee,Biiiai^ aata of all hiada, oil of Juai- 

f aall leedi, tortoiae tfiell, tia finl, ahelhM, 

^ i|^4]feiaf aad aea ^ oa ia g djea, weld, aad 

r fiidyeiaf eaeeptallaai, copperaa, biehio* 

ffiif poM^^^Ofanato'k'pota^ aad aitetettf 

idi. Aad all hapoffto oa whieh the iimi 

i^tmH ail dilMiae aow adaiitted to eatiy 

jilteifiy itid«i^ thaa tweatjrper eeotaai ad 

r of Itae, ISdS, fteaa aad HUr thai di^ 

dn^, Bot exeeediag'twea^ 

llbrbflaw. 

thai a(^ naeh of the ad of ^i 



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m 






l«ildllWi ■• IlllUPtlJiliolO IMNHl dto .: 

|i«Ni|tt.«f :iBf Mt, yilor Jl»4lM 9M«Ai9f oTJfiUMN 1819, u the po«i^ : 
Ipiqy aMim <iP eJWMe cr defieuo^ ef ^IvveiuM, idMiqf tte lilep :^. 
ll^^iitMM wliio^ Mli^tha Uth dayof JMbi^', 

mi^rapi Imljiel to a Urn nto «f 4iily tlHui twenty p^ oeotniD ad j«l%^ 

tMmA mMmamwM uoito encaedlhatnte, andeoMtoe^iiiit^^ 
mU^mmnotihB mad oontingeiMsieii. ^^,, 

ef DuHes mmdB an A§ M^ '' 
AU tf Con^ruB. [From tM^ 



IMIr jlewMif lie' 

Imrtuittif mfmnhf ik» 
i lo^pdier.] 



Arlicleib 



For ct. 



Seenu « piu*M( 
IPWI ojictriiiliov a cetitJ pt^r lb. &t 
lti« pUdu tif uxfiuriatiau, 4 ceiili 
pBT lb» ^T^ertlir, nod 4<) p<?r cent, 
«qilK) In ttV«<r4|,o - 

JTmIIm C/^iA^r, imlM, fulled, 
known by ih«i oninff of l*l«in»^ 
KafBcrya, oi KiuitUil Culton*^ nf 
which wimt !¥ thv mklv mulotial, 
Ukji veiiuu PKOcncliiig j^ eonU a 
■quAro irnr<t. i'^ pur cent. rniMKl 
by H. cUt*« but to - 

All oUi«t VVoollffM floUw - 

FTaititefji, PitckiHff, B#nf*y Iti cents 
tiKt atjutirc varJ. iif^ua! to fiVDra|e 

CkfUaiUf wUke, tutiUnj^ under 30 
tionta a iqiuife yardt vnluenl at 
30 oefiU, *iiil pny ^ per oenL 
«quft] t© nvortt^'o 

DMI«fWt eolart'd^ v«Iu«m] At USeonU 
A squiro y«ril, pny S5 per c«nt. 
equal lu tiv, uii!* , _ _ 

V^ pcf lb. c*^iial (<i 

per Ih. Pt^oal to 

1U<I, ?p\kv Rod, Sh««i, 
i I . SIttjOf BolM lnNi,3cenlt 
p«r lb. <»i]ual to avcfago 
fPtff trorif 50 OfffiU ftvt ewl. equal t® 
MBur Inm^ roDetl^ $I,;MI per cwt. 
I •qotJ to - - - - 
|A«r inm^ tiaminered, 90 ooitU pn 
«wt. eqtuJ to - 



50 
50 

5a 

78 
96 



123 
43 



1833, 
Doc.3l 



pot ct. 



free 



40.JIS 
72.90 
88 4(1 

ioa.70 

40.7^ 
3L70 



IR35, 
Dec. 31. 



MOlh. 
p9t CU 



ffee 



1837. 
I)c.31 



lM;f ct 



IdtdO 



1B39, 



lOtb. 
pofct. 



free 



40.40 



June 30^ 



De.3t 

reitk, of 
half ot'cicvti 
oicecf 
pfef n't. 



|ier,ct 
Bil vim 



44 
44 


41 
41 


44 


41 


38 


3S.7S 


38 


35.751 


(i<L4a 


fiO.60 


80 JO 


73J10 


94.40 
3t$.40 


BS^IO 
3^10 


<» 


79.50 


30.40 


aejo 



33^ 

54.90 
G5.e0 



75*80 
33*8U 



€5 
37.06 



mM 



90,75 

a5,7S 
37.40 
4a.80 



47.90 
96.90 



43.50 

J23.90 



90 



90 



SO 
90 
90 

90 

SO 

90 



m 






_,^1. 



s^^ 



1834.] 



COMMERCE. 

XVII. COMMERCE. 



141 



TaUe, exhibiting the Value of every Description of Imports from, and 
Exports to, each Foreign Country^ during the Year ending the ZQth 
SepUmber, 18^, 





I 


Vnlue of 


1 Vftlu* of V^pmu. \ 


1 Cotioeriaf. 


i llDJitettik 


r^iflifo 








ImporU, 


f Produro. ' 
1^1,111 


Pwdute. 
461.560 


54JS,ti§S 


i 


K*tmstm $ 


aj^Ufisa 


% 


PVu^^iA , . « , 


27,1147 


lljlfi 




11,116 




|y S«r«nd«!n and S&rmf 


U0iU7;)!N 


m*,04lA 


iaa,»d5 


autV-iJa 


i 


^wwliiji W«t Iodic! - 


5:t,4lD 


14J,ti-*9 


7,47H 


14^,7^ 


I 


, I!Mia«rh. 


6:t;MS 


IBI,4H13 


35<J,II5 


631,790 


I 


^ l>wiijib Whl Is^iem 


IfllllJUkl 


i;K>3,4yo 


^-I^Ml 


t,ffr5^1 




■ ?l«^tlwrlAiui« , . . . 


i;«o,tkSb 


2,9aJ,?92 


3,c'-a,ID0 


5,U>3.a{« 




^ Duich W. liiJin &^ Am. Cofooict 


yss,^a2 


, :m,m 


4LJ,U44 


4M,\m 




1 Duicti E*M% liidjei 


mi,V7A 


1 24,51fl 


.^03^1 


506^0130 


u 


* ^*r"*l. ... 


^},*MS,.V]a 


^,(^,068 


3^^75,i:r7 


W^Yt^iO^ 


1 


1 fientlwid ..... 


lp590,^19 


i,m,i*9e 


90,^!i&l 


i.an.im 


t 


1 InknJ 


4J&L,d0J 


isa^sia 


4,J15 


i57,oaa 


r. 


^ Onrrn'fifljp Jvin^y , ^c^ 


534 


3jno 


^ 


3,700 


} 


i l^vibmlittf ...» 


^d^eaii 


43e,a33 


isri,074 , 


iM'A^mr 


1 


> Smi«li Gul Indict . 


S,5aJ1,<KW 


IHO^JS 


339,235 


55^,4.^13 


1 


fj HiiUAb Wnt IndiQfl 


1,42^^17 


lAVM^e 


3:J,rt»i 1 


l,l>^,97tl 


i 


7 Bi iinb Afnerkjiii ColoDifri 


j,a39,Mfl 


! 3,5«iH,:ti« 


43^063 


3,tiJ li^ 


1 


<* CKli«r Bniuh Coiofiiei 


a,.wj 


7,ti40 


^ 


7;H4a 


i 


^ tiarvae Tii*-Jl;< . , . . 


9,mfi,(H»tT 


, 2,4r,,S4a 


1, 6^3,(^0 


4,fie?*,5ia 


^ 


i^ Francw vn I ho Ailnnlle . 


i(},a3i,9t^ 


^,(08,485 


l^}".i 


jo,:*-.-!.^^ 


9 


i F'ra.oee' on th? Meilit«iTaJieani| . 


J>W,r75 


' 9N,09I 


l,HO,^ti [ 


3/15 i.^O? 


'i 


fl Frt'fich W. Indict it Am« Uutaniei 


57«,fte7 


(aiftj^ga 


1L»,I^J 


t}'2*,WT5 


■2 


Li H*Tli 


a,o.'vri;»twj 


i^tw^m 


^te,4Ba 


1 i.H9,003 


i 


1 ^|i«in aa th» Atknlic 


«77,4e3 


aoa^.iai 


44,il^t 


347,965 


9 


i, Tftvriffe' aiid th"? dlhof Canniifi 


7*ojni 


itw,e&4 


MM 


lM7,yiH 




wi,Kr? 


M,51I7 


7,851 


99,416 




r7 VmiJIa imd fhLltppine tilandu 


3M,'33n 


90,906 


lUM'-t 


l34iQa 




g I'af'* ,..,.« 


7,afie(,sft7 


3,e» 1.397 


l.fl30,7&4 


5,319,151 






i,ed9,ii!S 


3a3,.1.'S!l 


^j;f»:<a 


yaA;iii 


c 


t^^it) 


38,*Jfa 


3INI 


^jm 


- 


ss»;iia 


H.-VjiiiT 


929 


Hti,5eo 


n 


la Fifal atiid lh« other Ax»t«t * 


9j,fias 


^,403 


li;36:9 


34JtiS 


' 


C»pt" d» Vffrd lFlan<iii 


H7,T(j6 


efi^A-ie 


19,707 


m^B5 


^1 


M iithcr PonugiiflM Af^teaA pofti 


aaj^f 




. 




] 


» i*ici>j . . . . - 


i,fiis,7«:i 


HH^ 


smjim 


6S7,5B3 


3 


I5e,6f7 


S.DD* 


^ 


3,IH« 


3 


17 Tni-*(« ft^ lilbBt Auatr. Adf * port! 


sfia.tiOT 


iPa.pri 


fr3«,77A 


i,i3tLfiaa 


3 


g Turk ff , Lbtmi, ajid %|pl 


ftsiis!) 


04,799 


ElUBtid 1 


T4*i,00e 


9 


f M#Ak-4!l . . , . . 


4,a9a,aM 


64f.,77T 


a,i®l,7ft4 


3,4fl734l 


« 


C<;iitrd K«puT)Uc of AAaerlcn < 


mijsie 


VM^m 


IWj^lOl 


33,^1 ;j07 


4 


1 Ciiloifihia . , , . 


1.4m fag 


40t^aS7 


TjrMR 


I,II7.0W 


4 


^ IffKuJiirBs, Campoiiehi'^ |i.c. 


^iji^ 


65.4,'M 


J7,3S7 


8a,«M 


'4 


J BnuiJ 


3»&ft),8-|5 


1,^59,077 


BIB ,7 17 


a,054,7!J4 


4 Ar^-mine Bi^pahltc . 


1,560,171 


464,R;a 


4SSi,40& 


9£f,a40 


i| 


5 CipplmiJnv Kepublie 




3;39.'i 


^ 


3^ 


-1 


a chui . . , , . . 


m4,fm 


57a,37fl 


041,740 


1^^1,119 


4 


■J fern ..... 


75»,036 


7 lihJ 


]0,B34 


J7.0fiO 


4 


9 South America, g^aenUf 
j$ Cap« of Ovod Hop* 




4t,309 


, 


41.309 


i 


{t,ni5 






, 


5 


(0 China ..... 


5f344,9n7 


m,im 


m;m 


1,360^ 


S 


1 Afitiw ..... 


94,iT95 








a 


H A^iftjfDDsmllf . . , , 


1I[,]»0' 


45,639 


-169,480 


5l4,337 


s 


13,740 


5.V:,4'R^ 


o,&ue 


sea.ss4 


9 


i4 Earape, ^Fncnllf 


, 


I74,lfia 


7,411 


]ii,ae9 


s 


fi A (Hot. |»Hii£iTally . 


33Iy53B 


S."i7,499 


106^9 


3fi3,9n 


s 


e !^ulh BflB* .... 


15,J7ft 


3(J,09G 


ia,B3B 


43,904 


I 


7 &fllHl!wif!^h [tbfidi . ^ 


930 






. 


i 


B Nof thwc*t Cottjt of AiDQTieA 




40,078 


5^,5816 


66,004 


5 


9 Uscailqln pof ti 


5,fla& 










101,1109 9Hti 1 


e^i3f7,47V 


S|4,(Kltt,«73 


m^ii^i^m 



dbyGoogk 



^^ 








17il,:il7 
423,1153 

345,408 
5,44I>,S95! 

77,79 r 



l»8.TI6 



491,(]4i| 
1115,77:2 



914,073 
18,118,900 



437,715 
53,814/" 

70,4 
10,67»,398 



10.7:U^017 



4»< . 
188,047 
653,639 
915,184 

1,913,795 
^4^7 
306,845 

8,871,6531 



107.787 
99 ,6<8 

101,flB9;wi 



,40915 




907,986 
115^ 
349«890 
4,656,635 
3n,656 
430,466 



Pi^^f DomettU jMidM eaq^orted during tk^ 

ISMlyedftom the Bern, . |M|A6« 

« fiom the FoiMty r^^W^ 

PSMtdiict of Animak, ^f j 

' Vegetahle Ibod, floor, wheat, rice, Indian corn, &c. 

, Cotton, . ^tVfyft 

T^ImmO).^ 
/Other AgiJG. piod. flaz-Med, hope, & hrown ragar, 




1834.] 



n7BI.IC LA5DS, MILITIA, PENS10NF.R9, &C. 



143 



XX. TaSfe shotting the Federal or Representative Population, the Shar€ 
in the Proceeds of the PtMic Ijands, the Militia in ld31, the Revolution- 
cry and invalid Pensioners in 1832, in ench State. 





fteprcMDid' 






R«toIu- 


rnvklid 


St*t««. 


tJTe PcrpuU 


MUlllL 


dofjflrjr 


l*«n«i«D- 




Udii* 


lie Unds. 

fk"*;:frt7j5? 




PpDtiuD- 

1 f^f*. 


fm, 


Maine, 


•MKib4 


41,i;mj 


H12 


147 


hVir fiampchire, . 


mm,:m 


57^57:1 71 


'^,\^M 


«m 


lrt3 


VcrjiMJRl, * 


s^^^av. 


:^i^mM^ 


27,<ir>;j 


{tu 


178 


MuaacbaselUt 


(ihjpt''^ i;i<),4-7,.j!i 


4E!i,31i^ 


i;teo 


3:t2 


Rhode Ulandi , 


U7VSJ. '^K777J!i 


[^.iRW 


14d 


Ifi 


i Copaeeljciil, 


2^i7M& 


m,imn 


24,51s 


(MMI 


l:^J 


New York, 


l,iaw/57o 


41042H.^. 


l."*t,ipl5 


2,444 


yi4 


fl«w Jertej, , 


aHM*gi 


08,3«».ri4i 


3t>,17l 


37:1 


m 


PeniitylTaAia, 


I^l8,il7^ 


sjHH.uii.a 


lf!t2,285 


HU4i 


3SiCi 


Di^ la ware. 


I'xiM 


lS^iaii:t 


ll;^?!» 


!7 


li) 


Mftfjland, . 


4<irj^*j 


l!*li,75ti dJi 


4^,2.'^ 


131 


2ai> 


Virginia, . 


um^iit 


' 2L^Jl*3.«ti! 


101, 4rl^ 


64j^ 


211 


Notth CuoUnSf . 


ti:iij,747 


i:jfi,7.'j8,4;i 


tM!/w2 


251 


m 


Sooth Carolinm, 


4f*riXJ*i5 


77,^nM 


4- 1,41 2 


113 


2^ 


Georgia, 


A2lhnU 


in^k^u 


42,-^*2 


m 


23 


AUbaiiiif 


mi/)Q7 


5Ciu;,ysJ 


:itMMH) 


W 


31 


Miiaiiajppi, 


Il»,ai? 


23/1! iijy 


13.724 


14 


7 


Lorn HI a na. 


171 ^KM' 


3l»,7oail5 


14,bOB 


i\ 


30 


Tenneuee, 


lMi,2<):! 


i;u,(^;:i.2i 


m;Mi 


977i 


143 


Kenlucky, 


mij^i 


ia^,lt2H77 


li^^m 


Am 


171 


Ohio, , 


^KJ7,*i1)l 


aiHKlMhl 54 


I2<i,471 


74(1 


2iiat}, 


Indiami, 


343,t>3t» 


73,:^i£j;>iJ 


40,(1410 


12e^ 


64 


lllJiiol»« 


157,l4li 


:i;i,5ini25 


27,584* 


m 


31 


Mi$sr»uri» 


130,411) 


2r,dr9.^ 


7,8as 


IG 


fid 


District of Colombia, 


. . . 


m <• 


1,756 


19 


58 


Floridn Territory, 




. . . 


H27 






1 Michigan Territorj, 


^ 4 • 


» * . 


5,470 


14 


39 


ArkaELsaBf . 




. . , 


2,028 




3,ti06 


Totml - 


t : 




1,306,047 


11,394] 



A bill to appropriate, for a limited lime, the proceeds of tlie Public 
Lands, bj dividing them among all the States according to tlieir Fed- 
eral Population, was introdu(5ed into the Senate by Mr. Clay ; and it 
passed both hoases of Congress jast before the close of the last session ; 
but it did not receive the signature of the President. The annual pro- 
ceeds were estimated at 63,000,000, from which 15 per cent, were to 
be deducted as an additional dividend for the State in which the land is 
ntuated : — $450,000 (or 15 per cent.) from 3,000,000 leaving j2,550,000 
to be divided among the several States, in shares as exhibited in the 
above Table. 



d by Google 




f^^^^&M^^^ 






















SUtoa. 


17U0, 


1600, 


1810, 


1820. 


1830. 




Miiine, 


tM},.>lll 


Jo J, 71 


228,705 


21*6,335 




New flampshirc, 


14l,dmi 


\f<:\76 


2I4,:j«Kl 


244.H;1 


2^i:^.:":- 




Vermont, , 


a>,41<' 


I'AA^ 


-2\7,7\A 


2:i'i,7t>4 


2-0,1 .:i2 




MassacbtisettSj . 


37b,7l7 


4^l'H 


47*2.04(» 


52:i2d7 


tilt), 41^-1 




Rhode Nlaiid, ; 


4111,110 


tit Ma 


■ 77.o:ti 


83,0511 


U7 ;ij^f 


. 


Conoecticut, 


\2:wj4i 


2.^1 ,<»0 


2t;'i,042 


275,2^12 


>>. , 


. 


Npw York, 


;yM,ra) 


r»d4i,76 


I»5I>,!*4^ 


l,:i72,.Hl2 


i;.M- -- 




New ierscy, 


n<i,i:t!» 


2II;m| 


a41l.55,'i 


277,575 


32VKfe23j 




Pentitavlvania, 


4'MM7:i 


t;o2,;;4i 


8l0,tlill 


l,04i>,45H| 


1,;W8,233 




I Deb ware. 


r>i),(>!M> 


t.l t27 


7'^ t;74: 


72,741* 


7C>.74a 




Mttrvl^tod, . 


3}\K7*J^ 


:yKMs 


:i-<j/j4(> 


407.:ri<» 


447,040 




Virijinia, . 


74^:Mm 


B'^i^iirHj 


1174.1 .2:^ 


l,lHi5.a7lf 


1,211,405 




Norili Uitrolina, , 


;^!):i7:ii 


478.1 o;t 


.virj,rwM! 


i;:4h,.s2*j 


737,5167 




Sou til Carolina, 


*i4!>,tl7;i 


'Mr^sm 


4i.Vi:. 


ri4)2,74l 


581,185 


Gporgia, . 


i<a,34H 


162,101 


252,43:^ 


340;.JH7 


5H;-'rt, 




Alabama^ 


« . 




2(»,845 


127,901 ' 


:i(M',,VjT'^ 


^ 


MirtsiHsippi, 


■ • 


t^,85« 


4(»,:i'i2 


75,448 


130,4.21 




LfMiisiana, . 


♦ « 


t * 


7i».r*r:<r. 


15:i,4(»7 


215,7:39 




Ti?n.n»f^see, * 


TiTi.Ttn 


ia5Xi02 


tH">J .727 


422,?^J3 


»>8l,t>04 




Kenluckjr, . 


1 73,077 


220.1155 


4iH>,:tii 


5li4jH7 


07,017 




Ohio, 


. 


4r>,:HM 


2:to,7i^) 


5c<U4:i4 


037.003 




Indiana, 


. 


4,i*75 


24 ..V2 


I47,17ci 


:J43,03I 




lUinoio, 


+ « 




\^2;i^2 


55.21 } 


157,455 




Missouri, 


, 


, 


20,H45 


{jU,58<i 


140.445 




District o( Columbia^ 


, 


14,099 


24.0533 


33,0311 


m»,K)4 


, 


1 Fl'tnd.1 T*'rrili>rv% 


• • 


, ^ 


^ , 




34,730 


1 Michiejnii Tt'TritorVr 




, . . 


4,7G2 


H,.MfKi 


31 ,t;:if» 


I 

i 
j 


Arkatiaas Territory, 




' ■ , 


. , 


14/273 


30,3.^ 


Total , 


3,t>2i»,H27 


(K^Wy^m 


7.2:111.814 


:>,tj3ba31 


i2,a4f^i 




* 








•* ^f\'^K \ 




SJII 



t£*^: 



*lfc^'{ 



[If* ^TJ- > • 



b1N^^%- 






^ OsiSBTATIOlia. 



t^«f sdiiottifm and titoniy ^optilatjbw ; 

I mide the prineipd dbjeeto of BotiM 

Indindual Statei. The limito of tho 

t the notices of these snbjeete more hrief 

|Jhil little matter that has been inserted in 

jjyiiifid repeated in this. The information here 

\jfl0nm yariely ci sonroes ; much of it hf ear* 

in all the States of the Union, and ikpi 

^ good deal firom <' The Aknerioan Qnarteiljr 

^^p|mIIaBeons sonrces. We hare not been aoo- 

r fbn and satia&otoiy information firom aU the 

literary Institntions > bnt we hsTO endevr- 

f iMAoe to ally as ftr as we hare been able. . 

~" » tet settlers of New England were partieu- 

L lor hanng their children instrueted ; and 

iMi alwajs been distinguished for its excellent 

I J aiid fiir some years peat, the state of New 

• honorable leal and liberality in the sup- 

i or New England Stotes and the state 

are divided into townships, which are 

I ef eonyenient siiey and in these districts 

at least, a part of the year, to whieh 

^fieh and poor, haTe an eqnal right to send their 

. flieee sidiools are supported partly by fonds, 

'^iik» InhiMltnls ; in M a t sao h n se tts, they are 

if I and in Connecticat, chiefly by a school 

wna of these several states, priyale 

^^y expended in the large towns npen 

IjSb&iolloofa. Many of the states to the wmth 

rlttAi have oonaiderable fhnds appropriated to 



Digitized by V3V7VJV H^ 



i 



14G I-NDIVIDUAL STATES. [1834. 

the support of free schools; and tlic cause of education has, within a 
few years, made considerable progress tlirougliout ahiiost all paits of 
the country : most of these states are, however, yet destitute of a thor- 
ough system of common education. la a great part of the country in 
the Southern States, the population is not sufficiently dense for the 
convenient support of district schools ; and private or domestic educa> 
tion is much in use. 

Jtcademiesj ^c. — Academies, grammar schools, high schools, and 
gymnasiums are terms applied to seminaries which hold an intermedi- 
ate rank between common schools and colleges. Some of these are 
classical schools, designed chiefly for preparing students for admission 
to college ; others are appropriated to English education ; and many 
are of a mixed character, having a part of their pupils pursuing the 
study of the ancient or modem languages, and more of them pursuing 
English studies. Some of these institutions are well endowed, and 
afford instruction and sometimes further aid, free of expense, to many 
of their pupils ; others have inconsiderable or no funds, and are sup- 
ported by tuition fees. 

Colleges, — Before the American Revolution, in 1776, only ten col- 
leges had been established in the colonies : the whole number of colleges 
and universities, now existing in the United States, is upwards of sixty. 
These institutions differ widely from each other with respect to funds, 
endowments, and the advantages which they afford for education. 
Some of them have very limited means, and are not worthy of the title 
which they assume ; while others are possessed of valuable endow- 
ments and able professors in the various departments of literature and 
science ; yet none of them are on so large a scale as many in Europe. 

In these colleges a course of four years* study is required in order to 
obtain the degree of bachelor of arts. In the course of study in most of 
them, there is a good deal of difference, and yet a good deal of similar- 
ity. With regard to the requisitions for admission, there is also much 
difference. For admission into the Freshman class in Harvard Uni- 
versity, the oldest institution in the country, '' candidates are examined 
in the whole of Virgil, Cicero's Select Orations, and Sallust; Jacob's 
Greek Reader, and the Four Gospels in the Greek Testament ; Adam*8 
Latin Grammar, and the Gloucester Greek Grammar ; both including 
prosody, (Buttman's Greek Grammar is also received) ; writing Latin ; 
Lacroix's Arithmetic, Euler's Algebra, and Worcester's Elements of 
Geography, Ancient and Modem." The requisitions for admission into 
the most respectable of the others do not differ widely from this. 

The notices of colleges are generally derived from official docu- 
ments ; but as the official statements are not all formed on the same 
principle, they are not always safe guides in giving [accurate compara- 
tive views of the institutions. 



d by Google 






i tirllii^'l^fiiflMNiUl 1^ 



IIOrlMi 









MiM itauti of tiM UBttod 8li^ 
mm^-^ (if IkMM MmhraiiM, « cOMlldIt*, 
Hf^rfumetor, trniit hare teeeitttd % 
iiMlil» maane of itmly in tho Uftobmxf 
uvu uiiioini 
piippiii OK nraigOBt •Ricieins. 



(Hip a PhUidelpltitt, wlikli wit fomaoa in 
lie of Tory reooBt origili; lukl widun 
uHi tutoB plftco Uttoifeploiil wtf ooviktipy 
1b order to oMafai * dogtoo Ib 
ooHogMy « OLD^dito If reqvlred lb 
if iMtiirosy «id to vliidy vndor wrnso fOfvlMr 
iMvdIaf tHe fkmt doToled to liM leOtaNg. 
of tlioMedUsd Society of the 8toto0f 
liBlli iB order to oMiuB a Uomum to pmKS H m 
eifttee of MBiBOy New BKuapiluM, TeCilMl, 
IMtBdi OenneetioQi) New Terk^ New Jonej, 
mmamm «f,tl looi^ three yem Otndy !■ reqniilto; 
mm ytastt; lb Muyluily AftteoiB, MfiMM^i 
t^ ladiMM, BBd nttBoie, « Hoeiiie to fm^S^ to 
•tttdy to ttol ipeeiiod ; tod iB FenBeylTtola, 
|C«it«eky, tod Mtoeoori, tbeto to bo togliki- 
iadtft ■ lieeBie to {inettoe aeoooMuy. 
mMUmtolB tow III tlie Uaited States IniTe hereto- 
itotofl wlMiIly IB Hio offloM of lawyera ; bat 
toiw iotaeoto ItoTO been eetri>ltohed in diflbt- 
* i Tho oldeal of tfaeee iBstitatioiui U the Law 
^i^CoBWBirtlcBtj wfaidii waa eetabltohed in ITBB, 
.iMHBbef tliaa aBy/)ther.> 
i'a ^'Irnrn Rogtotor/'pobitohed in 1888, in order to 
aa^ia attonoy In the etatea of Maine, New 
New York, New Jeney, Deto- 
If BfiBdnato of Mnie ooUefo, nmH 
with aome lawyer or in a hiw aokMl | 
in the etatea of 'Maiae, New IfaiByiMBif 



d by Google 



1 



J[^pppwP|dlP"'M^f'^^ pp^piMi^ .inP In. mww gi^i^f .mar. 

"^ twhw^iiflipciill lltoiij, tlqnnjKilhiiiti tiiJ iat&ihtmf btatiwt^ if a 

, llift litm of sM^ Tiritf la ^ffinmit e^wti frcNii two to tloM 
jfj^ll^,^ aad in MiMoaii it is two jeu*. In the otatoo of Virginitf MoA 
IQut^&Uy Booth Guoiiui, Ctoofgia, Ahtwrnii MumMippiy T enn<i o » 
jlJ^ilofllEj, Olii^ Indiana, and Illinoli,.can d| da t aa are admitted on •»» 
***i'1f t^^^j ;^**'^"^ *^'"f ^™'**<* to anj partieolar time of etndy. 

J!:^S^r0n$9»'^ are generally of alow growth; rtry large onoe 

il<e«itf|^ aocnmnlation of agea ; a new conntij mutt, therefine, be 
fSofsi^ neooj—nly deatitnte of them ; and, indeed, there, are few ooon- 
triee in which they are nomeroiu. Scotland, long distingaiahed Ibr 
llpmingi can boast of no libraries, (two in Edinburgh only excepted 
that contain more than about 40^000 Tolumes ; nor do the libraries of m 
fieatpart of the nnlTersities of Enrope, long as they have been aoeap 
nnlattngy exceed that number. 

/xEvwry Ameiioan scholar (^ much literary research must hsTe ftit 
himself emhaifaMsd in his inquiries for want of access to more eztea- 
iiff ind better ftunished libraries. This remark will be found to he 
trqe^wilh leapeflU to every part of America; though some sitiialieiii ' 
gPwd mnoh greater advantages than othera. Our literary institutions aai 
pnhBo libiaries are all of them of comparatiTely recent origin ; most sf 
them are very recent. There are a considerable number of estabHslb 
ments, noticed in the subsequent pages of this Tolume, which hsTo besji 
inoocpomted with the title of « aeminary," ^ college,** and even " wlir 
Tend^,'* that are sadly -deficient with respect to the means of kmawi^ 
edge. Their founders, in various instances, seem not to have besB 
awaie that a well fnmislM library forms an esiential part of a Ulpngr 
institation. But though ws have deficiencies of this sort, which it wefll 
Tihi to deny, and unwise to conceal, yet whoever will eompase Jlf 
pfSMBt condition of the oonntry, in this respect, with what it wwiil 
the/XMnmeDoement of the present century, will see that there has bett 
«,|pNiaft change Ibr the better ; and though many agea may pass n^|H^, 
beibie, then will be fbnnd on this side of the Atlantic, a libmy lliift 
V01 equal in extant some of the largest libraries in Europe; yet iMi 
ths spirit of enlsfprise and inquiry with respect U> the means of fi|% 
and kaowMgOi which ia now awake and active thmnghaii^ Jlib 
ff we have reaaon to hope that the aueoeeding age will mMp 
I iMigfess of improvement 4 v j^ ^ 

Iff the tihnries belonging to universities, college^ Jba^iiA 
^|liess where those institutions are iespeetively/tp||!iA 
|f^« VM»r of some of the largest Hbmiss in t6e l^|f 




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1834.] 



PEEI.lMIlfAaT OBSERVATIONS. 



149 



Vob. 
Plilladelphia Library, 42/)00 

Cmmbridge Univeraitj Lib., 40,000 
BostofQ Atheiueom, 26,000 

New York Societj Library, 22,000 
National Library, Waah'n, 16,000 
Cbailertim Soc. Lib., S. C. 14,000 



Georgetown College Lib., 
Andover Theol. Sem. Lib., 
Baltimore City Library, 
New York Hirt. Society, 
South Carolina College, 
St. Mary's Col., Baltimore, 



Vob. 
12,000 
11,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 



I. MAINE. 

GoyZRIfllE9T 

Tar ikt Tear ending an the 1st Wednesday in January j 1834. 

Samuel E- Smith, Governor, 

CoMnsellors; Nathaniel Clark, Robert P. Danlap, Amoe H. 
Hodgman, Alfred Pierce, John Hodgson, Thomas Saw- 
yer, jr., Jndah Dana. 

Roecoe G. Greene, Secretary of State, 

Mark Harris, Treasurer, 

Smmnel G. Ladd, Adjutant General, 

Joel Bfiller, Warden of the State Prison, . 



Salary. 
$1,500 



900 
900 
700 
700 



The Senate conaiats of 25 members ; Francis O. J. Smith, President. 
House oj Representatives, 186 members \ Nathan Clifford, Speaker. 

Judiciary. 



Supreme Judicial Court. 



Prentin Mellen of Portland 
Nathan Weston, jr. of Augusta, 
AUmod K. Parris of Portland, 
Jonathan P. Rogers of Bangor, 
John Fairfield of Saco, 



Chief Justice, 
Associate Justice, 

do. . 
Attorney General, 
Reporter, . 



£zekiel Whitman 
David Perham 
John Ruggles 



Court of Common Pleas, 

of Portland, Chief Justice^ 
of Brewer, Associate Justice, 

of Thomaston, do. 



Salary. 
$1,800 

1,500 

1,500 

IjOOO 

600 



1.500 
1,200 
1,200 



Law rxlating to tux Militia. 

According to an act of the Legislature of Maine, passed in 1833, 
there is to be hereafter but one military training in a year ; and that on 
the 2d Thursday in September. The officers of each brigade are re- 
quired to meet annually, two days in succession, for the purpoae of mili- 
taxy drJU snd instraction. 
J3' 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



150 MAINE. [1834 

Education. 

The first volume of the American Almanac contains a tabular view 
of the Academies of Maine, and also of the general state of education. 
The summary of Common Schools was derived from an official Report 
made to the legislature in 1825. Since that time there has been no 
new Report on the subject ; but an act has been passed by the legisla- 
ture, requiring such a Report to be made hereafter annually. By a law 
enacted soon afler Maine was erected into a state, every town is re- 
quired to raise annually for the support of schools, a sum equal at least 
to forty emts for each person in the town, and to distribute this sum 
among the several schools or districts, in proportion to the number of 
scholars in each ; and by another act, a sum received from a tax on 
banks, amounting annually to upwards of $20,000, is appropriated to 
the support of schools. The amount required by law to be raised and 
expended, in 1825, was $119,334 ; and the sum actually expended was 
$137,878 57. The number of persons between 4 and 21, 137,931 : — 
the number attending school, 101,325 : — the proportion of scholars to 
the whole population, computed in the proportion of 3 to 10. 

The article of the Constitution of Maine relating to education, is as 
follows : — '* A general diffusion of the advantages of education being 
essential to the preservation of the rights and liberties of the people ; 
to promote tliis important object, the legislature are authorized, and it 
shall be their duty, to require the several towns to make suitable pro- 
vision, at their own expense, for the support and maintenance of public 
schools ', and it shall further be their duty, to encourage and suitably to 
endow, from time to time, as the circumstances of the people may 
authorize, all academies, colleges, and seminaries of learning, within 
the state; provided that no donation, grant, or endowment, shall at any 
time be made by the legislature, to any institution now established, or 
which may hereafter be established, unless, at the time of making such 
endowment, the legislature of the state shall have the right to grant 
any further powers to alter, limit, or restrain, any of the powers vested 
in any such literary institution, as shall be judged necessary to promote 
the best interests thereof." 

B0W0015 College. 

Bowdoin College, at Brunswick, 26 miles from Portland, was incor- 
porated in 1794 ; the first class was graduated in 180C. It derived its 
name from the Hon. James Bowdoin, who gave it 6,000 acres of land 
in the township of Lisbon, and other benefactions. The legislature of 
Massachusetts endowed it with six townships of land, and an annual 
grant of $3,000 ; and this sum was continued, for a few years, by the le- 
^slature of Maine, after the separation from Massachusetts. The college 

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jTUtry oiMi PrtuOu qfPhfiU. 
httiwer an Amttomif tmd Surg&ry, 

en the Theory and Pmeiite qf Phytic 
.M^Pr^, BUi.midOrmL^0ndLea.Ckfa 

Prrf, Lamg. and CUtukel Utemnn, 

M^gPnf. J frt ay iyf . 4^ MMie» ; i' ItutnuL JM. 



:AiJ U.yPnf. Modem Languages and Lihmkm. 

qn Ih^ Gitfl^gne (April. 1833) 155 ; medi- 
iVriwIt nmnlier «f alimiii, 798; — alumni liviiig 

Alteiriyk W«dli«rfli7iik Sept. : — FoMfioy ;— l«t 

^^t'<#edDi:--Sdy ilMB tlie Friday after the 3d 

%edkst— 3d» fkAB the Friday after the 3d 



ikt^'iMiirgi^idMle^:*^ fS4; Toom rent, 

IIA!^; JMdenlid^idiairgea cm ^^^^ 

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158 MAINE. [1834, 

Watebville College. 

Watervilte College, founded by peraonB of the Baptist denomination, 
in 1820, is pleasantly situated on the west bank of the Kennebec, at 
Waterville, 18 miles above Augusta. Its principal buildings are two 
brick edifices ; and it has a good philosophical and chemical apparatus, 
a library of 2,000 volumes ; and libraries belonging to the students con- 
tain 600 volumes. — The Rev. Jeremiah Chaplin, D. D. the first Presi- 
dent of the college, resigned in 1 833. 

Officers of Government and histruetitm, 

, President. 

fj^rof. Greek and Ger. Lang, and Lit. 
George W. Keely, A. M., Prrf. Math, and Jfat, PhU. 
Rev. Calvin Newton, A. M., Prof. Rhetoric and Hebrew, 

, Prof Lot. and Eng. Lang, and Lit. 

Number of undergraduates, in 1833, 82. Whole number of alumni 
61. Commencement is on the last Wednesday in July : — Vacations; — 
Ist, from commencement, 4 weeks ; — 2d, from the last Wednesday 
in Nov., 4 weeks. 

Annual expenses: — tuition, room-rent, library, repairs, &c, $26; 
fuel and lights $4,50; washing $5; board in commons $1 a week, 
39 weeks $39 ; books and furniture $10 : >- total $85. There is a work- 
shop connected with the college, in which students are allowed to labor 
for hire three hours a day : — also an academy with about 80 students. 

A *' Clinical School of Medicine," established at Woodstock, Vt., 
has heretofore been connected with Waterville College. 

Maine Theological Institution. 

This seminary was incorporated, in 1814, by the name of the << Maine 
Charity School " ; was opened in 1816, at Hampden ; and not long after- 
wards was removed to Bangor. It was founded for the purpose of pre- 
paring young men of the Congregational denomination for the ministry. 
Its endowments, which arc not large, have been derived from private 
donations. The course of study is similar to that adopted at the theolo- 
gical seminary at Andover. The library contains about 2,000 volumes ; 
and a new and large building for the accommodation of students is now 
in progress. Number educated since the foundation 62 ; number of 
students in 1833, 6. The seminary was suspended afler the death of 
Prof Smith in 1831, and did not fully resume its operations till the 
summer of 1832. The present officers are — 

Rev. £noch Pond, A. M., Prof. Systematical Tkeol. and Pastoral Duties, 
Rev. Alvan Bond, A. M., Prof. BHAicaX Literature and Church History. 

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IHlW'iyit objeeto was to tdueito . 
jf0!^^m»^ ftt tlM nuaktiy. InFeK, 
]|,4^^|ci!ep of knd; atfd the amoiiiit 
(tho dobUi betni^ dedneted), 
Jan.; 1833, fm#lfl^U. Itiiia 
^^ogmeiit ■nffideni to diftajtho 
%r a^t dOftodonto; 60 of Ibein mm** 
a^ii^aKtonl. — Wbolo munber of atodenta 
r^ibnitt CaldweU, A. M., iVme^. ' 




Sm»-^ 



SOOIXTIXS. 



■■^m^ 



M^4 



[ lahabod Nkshok, D. D., PruidmU; Parker 
SeenUury, — llie Society liaa pdb- 

Iseorporated in 18S1. Samoel EmeiaoB, 



T^^& NEW HAMPSH^. 

5,"<;:>r. J .4 GOTMUIIIEMT. 



Concord, 
^^^^do. 

do. 



Bfthry. 

800 
600 



TVwuvreTi 



ip^rtamontb, C^mminmry General^ 

|jU»Mpter, Frmimtifthe SenaU. 
^iliuii^ ^f^akM' qftlU House qflUp. 






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i 









♦i«> *f 'Jit*. 



'. > KjLr*'s 



■ JThtiter f^itf Ihiliit-, 



y 1819, 
i9. 1833, 

i». 1833, 



i;uo 
i,m 



Jool Pajrk«r, KeenOt 

HHfaanidi 6. UphiiB, Gotioefd, 

CiMMtt i^ CdNNiioii Jfaof. ' ' ^^ 

%ttti aei oftttt fttte !«giBlatar^ of Dacember, 1832, th« foruMr^^l^ 
idf Odouttim ftbav Wn diicontinaed, and nem ooorUi wer« 6«hibnAJ4 
MHi&itmg of two juBlioet fbt each coimtyy and the judge! of tlio 84pN 
lior Court, who are, ex qfieio, jndgea of the Court of Commoii Pleaa^ iisk 
or more of them being required to attend the aeToral terma^ and ttA 
nedL aa aeuior or preaiding juaticea of the tereral oountj courta. 
JustictB qfthe CowrU qf Common PUas, aU appa h iUd in 1833. 



Gonntiat. 
Rockingham, 

Btfaflord, 

Merrimack, 

Hillaborough, 

Chaahire, 

Sulliyan, 

Qfafton, 



C Bradbury Bartlett, 
\ Dudlej Freese, 
( H. T. Stmpaon, 
I Henry B. Ruat, 
C Benjamin Wadleigh, 
{ Aaron \^ iiittemore, 
C Bimon P. Colby, 
I Frederick G. Stark, 
C Joeeph Weeka, 
^ Larkin Bkker, 
i Ambrose Coaiit, 
I £laanr Jackaon, Jr. 
C EUjah Blaisdell, 
( Samuel Boms, 
C Joshua Marahall, 
I John Pendexter, Jr. 



Nottingham, 

Deerfield, 

New HamploB, 

Wolfeborough, 

Sutton, 

Pembroke^ 

Weare, 

Manchester, 

Richmond, 

Westmoreland, 

Claremont, 

Comiah, 

Canaan, 

Rumney, 

Stratford, 

Bartlett, 



#lSB 
15D 

m 
jm 



t (StflfisfiMl t^fiU qfJf. H. hf Jh, Koah /. 7. George ; Jrn^^U^^ 





CtiUQt icm. 


Pop* 


i 


4.* 


jS 


i 


IS 


!• < 


i 






JKtO. 


o 


II 




*c5 

1 


■s 

5 


1 |S 


5 




Ruckitigbani^ 


44,-15*2 


3t) 


75 


44 


m 


1» 


9| ttl 


5 


'1 


Strafforij, 


58.1IU1 


:m 


95 


48 


88 


10 


3' G 


4 


k 


Merriniaek, . 


a4,(>ll> 


24 


58 


M 


58 


6 


' 2| 7 


5 


Hillsborough, 


:i7,7iia 


30 


54 


20 


55 


4 


2 4 


4 


^ 


Chvaliirt?, 


27;ni(; 


^1 


44 


18 


4SS 


4 


2 2 


3 


1 


SulliraUf . 


1L*,(>^T 


15 


:i4 


I& 


35 


3 


2 3 


3 


1 


GraRuii, 


'^6,{m 


37 


m 


30 


m 


4 


3 3 


S 




Coofl) 

Total . 


H;sm 


24 


6 


7 


10 


2 1 [ 







m»,53:i 


m 


4m 


200 


405 


41 


25 3:1 



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U4 

us 

170 

110 

75 

ICO 

58 
9^ 



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S4 

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SO 

43 
8 



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30 
94 
90 



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-^^ '^^ftlUiMMr Schools. 

thronghoot tho state, and are snp^ 

tax on the iniiabitanta. The anm anao- 

rfSlS/ amounts to $9p,000y which givas «r 

loim^ or nearly ene doUar to each penoai|i 

itUend school ; the noa^r of pexaoos h»* 

;|^cari, aeoovdiag to the eeasiis of 1830, Mi|g 

fi the income of a Literaiy Fond which arisee 

cqit per cent on the actual capital of the jct* 

jsid wlUeh amounts to upwavds of l^lO/WO^k. 

of schools. The amount of this inoome 

fU^iO; in iB32, •10,973; and in 1838, 

a» large portion cf the towns esm echoed tends» 

sMc of them^ the interest of which is dsToled 

cji^ known to he m the state at Wst as numy as 

m^ 1001 sehocl-^houses. From returns receired 

i« the county of Meniii^ack, it is computed 

porHon than 1 to 6 of the whole population 

\ and incliMling tiiose who attend priTSto 

tibal i^pn^ertion of 1 to 34 of the entire popula- 

jpplkw ^ eaeh year in schooL — Sm Rn, Jf. 



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Ipti or fi^fie leliooli wbieli •!• »oit iiiod^ponli^^ntt 
i^alief jof atntoitfln 90 offlMffB k oompiited it GO enolu 

OrMnbiid, \ 

Humpton, 
Haveriiill, 
Hillsborqpgfa, 
Hopkintoii, 



1619 
1791 

CaiMtarfidd, 1790 
ColobRiok, 1838 

0iB7kPiiili»rtoii)1814 
lknr«r,(Fniikliii)ldOS 
Effinglum. . 1819 

Exeter, (PhiUipe) 1781 
Fnmoettown, 1819 
Oitford, 1890 

Gilmantony 1794 



1894 

1810 
1794 
1881 
1817 

1806 
1838 
1838 



1681 
1789 
1819 



PenilMPoke* 
PliOBfield. 

(KimbdO 
Plyiiiotttli, 

(IlolmeiX 
Portamoiitlit 
Saliabiuy, 
Sanborntoiiy 

(Woodman) \ 
Rochester, 
Wakefield, 
Walpole, 
Wolfeboton^y 








Nelson, 
New Cheetor, 
New Hampton, 
New Ipswich, 
Newport, 

PkiBips Jieademy^ at Exeter, which is one of the oldest, host endowi|,r 
•nd most respectable institations of the kind in the United Sliii^ 
derives ite name from ite liberal founder, John Phillips, LL. D. i^ 
prodaeliTe fonds, besides other property, amount to as much as 
It has a good philosophical apparatos, and a libraij of 600 ra] 
The number of ,studento is now limited to 60. The whole m 
pupils during 40 years firom ito establishment, was 1,500. — 
Benjamin Abbot, LL. D. Prine^Md; Rot. Isaac Hurd, A. Mi 
•Ml hutmeior; Gideon L: Soule, A. M., Prtf, Jbu, limg.i 
Bowen, A. B., liutrmetor Math, end JftU, Phil. 

^ Tfte ActtAmdioBX Tkm^ogwd buUtutiim, at New Hampton, is 
dfaeetion of the Baptist denomination. Rev. Benjamin F. 
A.M.,Prine^; William Heath, I A. M., /Vo/ Maih. end MC 
with three other male and four female teachers. «— Stndenti til' 
96 efaMrioal^ 110 English, and 106 female ; — total 314 

' ISMteB Umon Academy, at Plainfield, has a Ami of flO, 
iatbomeof whieliis appropriated to aid young men prepak|iig 
mmtT' Mifterfon jaeademy, at Deny, has $15,000 ill Ibld^^ 
mdmUM^. Boane of the others have considerable fonds. ""^ ^ . ^ 

'^'"' ' DaeTMOUTB COLLXOI. 

I College, incorporated in 1769, and founded hf m^ 
IP 17^^ li pleasantly situated on Connectioul iifirJ 
** iWir. of Concord. It derives ite name fiotem' 

n» ftnub ooiMist of donations made by prifirttt Umi^, 
' '[ gnated faf the stales of New QampahiM wmUH ' 
three halls, containnig 1 
JUHSbtnjt eadJectoie mmmy 
ippumtiMi a QafefaMl4lf 







Digitized by VJiV7V.r 



18M.] 



irXW HAMPSHIRE. 



157 



a lihnrjr cfijSOO Tolamei ; aod the libraries belonging to the atadentt 
eoataiD 8,500 Toluines. — The Corporation is composed of the Preai- 
int of the eollege, the Governor of the state, ex officio^ and 10 elected 
■embers ; io|^ther with the Chief Justice of the state, the five Coan- 
laUon, the President of the Senate, and the Speaker of the House of 
Representatives, ez o^iao, in relation to the funds given by the state. — 
Hoor^s Charity School, which is connected with the college, has con- 
siderabJe funds. 



Sueeession of Presidents. 



Uv. E. WbMlock, D. D. 
Jdin Wbeelock, LL. D. 
ler. Fraacb Browo, O. D. 



1769 to 1779 
1779 to 1815 
1815 to 1890 



Rev. DftDiel^Dana, D. D. 
Rov. B«naet Tyler, D. D. 
Rev. Nathan Lord, D. D. 



1890 to 1891 
1899 to 1898 
1898 



Faculty in 1833. 



B«v. N. Lord, D. D., PresidemL 
t, AiauM, A M., Pr. Mat ^ AU. PkU. 
Uv.R. t«hartleff; A. M., Pr. Mo. Pk,, P. Ee. 
I. D. Money, M. D., Pr. JtnaLy Stir., Oba. 



Pr. Tksol. 



Rev. C. B. Baddock, A. M., Pr. JUaL, OrA 
Rev. Benj. Hale, A. M., Pr. Ck. ^ Mn. 
Alpheufl Crosby, A. M., Pr, Or. ^ Lot. 
Iru Young, A. M., 1\Uor, 

Evarts Wofcetter, A. B., 4». 



Nomber of undergraduates on the catalogue for 1832-3, 181 ; Medi- 
cal students 94. Whole number of alumni 1,702 ; alumni living in 1831, 
1^ ; ministers 429 ; ministers living 332. — According to the com- 
pntations of John Farmer, Esq., 548 persons belonging to New Hamp- 
diiie were, from 1800 to 1832, graduated at Dartmouth. 105 at Harvard, 
47ai Bowduin, 30 at Middlebnry, 21 at Amherst, 19 at Yale, 10 at WU- 
liuns, 8 at Waterville, and a few at several other colleges. The num- 
ber of students belonging to this state, connected with 9 of the Amer* 
ietn colleges, in 1832, was 188. 

Commeneement is held on the Wednesday preceding the last Wed- 
nesday in August. Vacations ; — 1st, from commencement, 4 weeks ; — 
2d, from the last Monday in December, 6J^ weeks ; 3d, fiom the Thurs- 
day preceding the last Wednesday in May, 2J^ weeks. 

JhunuU expenses; — tuition ^27; room-rent 9^,50; board from 
$1 to 51,50 a week, average for 38 weeks $47,50; wood, lights, and 
washing $9 : — total $91, exclusive of the use of the library, books, 
fumitore, and other incidental expenses. 

The course of Medical Lectures begins one week after the college 
eommencement, and continues 14 weeks ; 4 lectures, and sometimes 5, 
diilj. Fees 50 dollars, with a matriculating fee of 2 dollars. 

LXAIUKD SOCIETIKS. 

JVew Bmrnp^dre Medical Society, incorporated in 1791. Annul meetp 
iaf a Concord on the Tuesday preceding the ataU election. Daniel 
14 



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158 



NEW HAMPSHIRE. 



[1834. 



Oliver, M D., of Hanover, President ; Thomas P. Hill, M. D., of San- 
bom ton, Vice-President; Enos Hoyt, M. D., ofNorthfield, Secretary, 

Jfeio Hampshire Historical Society ; incorporated in 1823 ; has published 
three volumes of Collections. Annual meeting on the 2d Wednesday 
in June. — Matthew Harvey of Hopkinton, President, Moses Eastman, 
Esq., of Concord, Recording Secretary. John Farmer, Esq., of Concord, 
Corresponding Secretary. Acting members limited to 50. The Society 
has published three volumes of Collections. 



III. VERMONT. 
Government. 

For the Year ending on the 2d Thursday in October, 1833. 

8«]«nr. 
Wm. a. Palmer, of Danville, Governor, . . » J7o0 

Lebbeua Edgerton, of Woodstock, Lieut. -Governor, 

Timothy Merrill, of Montpelier, Secretary^ . . 450 

Benjamin Swan, of Woodstock, Treasurer, 

, Judiciary. 

The judiciary powers are vested in a Supreme Court consisting of 5 
judges chosen every year by the legislature ; in a County Court, con- 
sisting of 3 judges, chosen in the same manner, (one of the justices of 
the Supreme Court being chief justice.) who hold courts twice a year 
in their respective counties; and in justices of the peace appointed in 
the same manner. 

Supreme Court. 

Sahmr.- 
Titus Hutchinson, Chief Justice, .... $l,OaO 

Charles K Williams, Assist. Justice, 1,050 

Stephen Boyce, do 1,050 

Nicholas Baylies, do. 1,050 

Samuel S. Phelps, do 1,050 

EDUCATION. 

Common Schools. 

The townships in Vermont are all divided into school districts, of which 
the number, according to Thompson's " Gazetteer of Vermont,** is 1612 ; 
and each district is required by statute to support a school at least three 
montha in the year, independent of the public money. In every town- 
ship there in a school right, comprising from a 60th to a 70th part of it. 
These tracts of school land are leased, and the rents form a part of the 



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1834.] 



VERMONT. 



159 



public money, and the rest of it is raised by a tax of two cents on the 
dollar on the Grand List (the Valuation for Taxes), which is required 
\>y statute to be levied annually. In the month of March, the clerk of 
each district makes a return to the town-clerk of the children in his 
district between the ages of 4 and 18 years ; and the public money is 
divided among the districts in proportion to the number of children. 
The public money is supposed to pay generally about half of the ex- 
pense of the schools. . 

Academies and Grammar Schools. 

In all the townships, except the Jfew Hampshire Grants^ one right of 
land was appropriated to the support of County Grammar Schools, which 
are under the direction of trustees appointed by the county courts. 
The following is a list of the county Grammar Schools and Ac^emies, 
with the date of their incorporation ; but some of them are not at 
present in operation. 



Addison j 

Arlington, 

Bennington, 

Bradford^ 

Brandon, 

Brattleboro', 

Brownington, 

Caatleton, 

Cavendish, 

Chester, 

Concord, 



1810 
1817 

1820 
1806 
1801 
1813 
1805 
1813 
1814 
1823 



Craflsbury, 

Dorset, 

Fairfield, 

Guildhall, 

Hartland, 

Uinesburg, 

Hubbardston, 

Jericho, 

Londonderry, 

Lyndon, 

Montpelier, 



1812 
1807 
1808 
1824 
1821 
1824 
1812 
1828 
1822 
1831 
1813 



Peacham, 1795 

Randolph. 1806 

Royalton, 1807 

Rutland, West 1810 

St. Albans, 1799 

St. Johnsbury, 1824 

Shoreham, 1811 

Thetford, 1820 

Vergennes, 1822 

Windsor, 1823 



UmvERSiTY or Vermont at Burlington. 
This institution was incorporated in 1791, but did not go into opera- 
tion till 1800. It is finely situated on the east side of the village, a 
mile from Lake Champlain, on an elevation of 245 feet above the surface 
of the water, and commands a delightful prospect. A large college edi- 
fice of brick, which was completed in 1801, was burnt in 1824; and 
since that time three brick edifices have been erected ; two of them 
containing rooms for the accommodation of students, the other a chapel 
and other public rooms. The university possesses considerable endow- 
ments, consisting principally in lands. In every township in Vermont 
(except those granted by New Hampshire, 134 in number) a right of 
land was secured to the institution, of which only a small part has been 
leased, affording now an annual income of about $2,500. The corpora- 
tion have voted to raise, as soon as July, 1834, by subscription the sum 
of 1^25,000, of which 012,000 have been already subscribed in Burling- 
ton. — The Corporation consists of 17 members ; the Governor of Ver- 
mont, the Speaker of the House of Representatives, and President of tbf 
imiversity, ex officio, and 14 elected members. 



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. CVnaiWffiiWBiif Ml on tlie lit Wadnidfty in Aogiigt roMttonf ; — latp 



Bi^ UwMito, M. D., j J*]jg^-5g* •^ 
Wm. BwMlMr, 91. D., Fr. 



I ftowinftanoipoiit, 4 wmIw ; — Sd, from tbe Ut Wodneedaj in liiio> 
■iji 8 woekf. — Ammal taq^mM fiw tniUoii and room-rtnt gSR. 

M^ikiA Dipmrtmmd, The leetnrtt in the medieal aeiiool, wydl «iit 
given by Prafewon Beaediet, Lincoln, and Sweeteer, begin on tbeJii 
Mondaj after commencement, and continue 14 weeks. —* Feee M flte • 
iMlaiM f 45 ; ^ oontin|{ent bill f 3 ; — gxmdnation fee ;gl5. ^ 

MiDDLSBunr Coixxes. 
me ooOefe, iHiich wai inoorporated in 1800, if pitaeantly ahliiiH 
Mlddlebotj, 3S mitet 8. of BurUngton, and 51 S W. of Montpeiftt. W^i 
ftmde, which are not large, l»Te been wholly derlTed from pri^pjg|^ 
cAietions. The college boiidings consift of two haUe fbr the,i 
dbikm of atodenta and other porpoaea, one of wood, three i 
^ other of brick, four atories high. The college libiaty eontailili] 
Tolnmea ; the librariea belonging to the atndenta 3,100. The i 
tion now oonaiata of 26 members, 13 clergymen, and 18 laymen. 

' Ker. Jeremiah Atwater, D. D., PnmdmU from 1800 to 1809. 
B«V. Heniy Daru, D. D., ito. « 1810 « 1817. 

Rer. loahna Balsa, D. D., is. «< 1818. 

FaaJty in 1833. , 
B»?. Joshua Bates, D. D., PrendaU. 
tM. Jolin Hoo^, A. M., Fr^f, af Languagti. 
Bif. Wia. O rbwisr, A. M., Prqf. C^tmittry amd J^numJ nitamj^ 

T¥taT omd lik^rarian. 
a, in 1838-3, 188 : whole nttmbfr \ 

■8. ^ GMIBISACSSMPrt IS .09k wn r.^#fc> T 

: — 'la^ from coflunenoemanty 4 \ 
f la Jsi|.,7 weeks; — 84«^ froin limj 

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1834.] MASSACIIUSKTTS. 

IV. MASSACHUSETTS. 

Government 

For the Year ending on the Ut Wednesday in Jan. 1834. 



IGl 



LtETi Lincoln of Worcester, Governor ^ 

Saxnael T. Armstrong of Boston, Lieut.- Chver nor, 
£dward D. Bangs of Boston, 

Hezekiah Barnard of Boston, 
William H. Sumner of Boston, 



Sftkry 
$3,666.67 
533.33 
Sec. of the Commonwealth, 2,000 
Treas. and Receiver Qen. 2,000 
Adjutant General ^ . 1,500 



Judiciary. 
Supreme Court, 



Lemuel Shaw 
Samuel Putnam 
Samuel S Wilde 
Marcus Morton 
James T. Austin 



of Boston, 
of Boston, 
of Boston, 
of Taunton, 
of Boston, 



OctaTlns Pickering, of Boston, 



Chief Justice, 
Associate Justice, 

do, 

do. 
Attorney General, 
Reporter, 



Artemas Ward 
Solomon Strong 
John M. Williams 
David Cummings 



Court of Common Pleas. 
of Boston, Chief Justice, 

of Leominster, Associate Justice, 
of Taunton, do. 

of Salem, do. 

Municipal Court of Boston. 



Peter O. Thacher, Judge, 



Salary. 
$3,500 

3,000 
3,000 
3,000 
2,000 
1,000 



$2,100 
1,800 
1,800 
1^ 

$1^ 



EDUCATION. 
Common Schools. 

Massachusetts has no public fund for the promotion of education ; 
bat common schools are, in this state, supported wholly by a tax upon 
the people ; yet there is no state in the Union in which they are better 
maintained ; nor is there any other state in which so many, in propor- 
tion to the whole population, receive a liberal or college education. 

The laws require that every town or district, containing 50 families, 
■hall be provided with a school or schools equivalent in time to §ix 
nM>Dths for one school in a year ; — containing 100 fiunilies, 12 months ; — 
150 families. Id months : — and the several towns in the state are author- 
ized and directed to raise such sums of money as are necessary for the 
•upport of the schools, and to assess and collect the money in the same 
manner as other town taxes. Each town is also required to chooee 
annnally a school committee, of 3, 5, or 7 persons, to take the general 
eharge and superintendence of the public schools. 
14 • 



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162 MASSACHUSETTS. [1834. 

An '' Abstract of School Returns for 183*2" was made to the House of 
Representatives, from 1)9 towns distributed in tlie different counties. 
The whole number of towns in the state is 305, and the whole popula- 
tion 610,014; — the population of the 99 towns from which returns were 
made, 201,681. 

Mstract of the School Returru from 99 Towns. 

Number of public school districts, 701} 

Number of months during which > male teachers, . 2,586} 

schools are kept by 5 female teachers, . . 3,725| 

Number of pupils attending the public schools, 49,582 

Amount paid for public instruction in a year, . $98,085.43 

Number of academies and private schools, .... 395 

Number of pupils in the academies and private schools, 84284 

Estimated expense of instruction in acad. &, private schools, $81,294.39 
Number of persons over 14 and under 21 years unable to read 

and write, 10 

According to these Returns of 201,681 inhabitants, 57,866 attended 
public or private schools ; equal to the proportion of 1 to 3}. The Re- 
turns did not include the city of Boston, in which the expenditure, both 
for public and private schools, is much greater in proportion to the 
population, than in the other portions of the state. — The annual 
expense for instruction, fuel, books, &c. in the schools in Boston, ac- 
cording to an official Report of 1829, was $196,829. 

ACADEMIXS. 



Incor. 

Mmherst, 1816 

^°^*^ 5 Franklin 1803 
^"» /t Abbot 1829 
Ashfield, Sandn. 1821 
Billerica. 1820 

Boston « Salem-st. 1816 
^Bradford, 1804 

Bradford, E.,Mer. 1822 
•Bridgewater, 1799 
tCharlestown, 1833 
Chatham, 1829 

tConcord, M'sex. 1806 
'DeerBeld, 1798 

Dracut, Cen. Vil. 1833 
Dudley, "Nichols, 1819 
Dttxbury, Part'ge 1829 

Edgarto. I Ed^l^ 
*Framingbam, 1799 
fVanklin, 1833 

Greenfield, Fel'g. 1838 



lacor. 
*Groton, 1793 

Hadley, •Hopkins 1816 
Hanover, 1819 

Haverhill, 1828 

Hingham, Derby 1795. 
t Ipswich, 



Kingston, 1816 

Lancaster, 1828 

"Leicester, 1784 

•Lenox, 1803 

Lexington, 1822 

Lynn, 1805 

Marblehead, 1792 

Marlboro^ Gates 1830 
Middleborough, 1829 
•Milford, 1828 

•MUton, 1798 

*MonBon, 1804 

Nan- CNantiick.1801 

tucket, \ Sir I.C.Scl827 , 

New Bed. Friends 1812 Wobnm, Warren 1830 
Newbury, *Dnm'r. 1782 1 Wrentham, Day's 1806 



Incor. 
Newburyport, 1707 
•New Salem, 1795 

Northfield. 

•tPittsfield, 1807 

Plymouth, 1799 

Randolph. 1833 

•Sandwich, 1824 

Sherburne, 1828 

South Reading, 1828 
Southampt.Sheld. 1829 
Stockbridge, 1828 

Taunton, ^Bristol 1792 
Topsfield, 1828 

tWest Brookfield, 1826 
•Westfield, 1793 

•Westford, 1793 

Westminster, 1833 
Weymouth, 1828 

•Wilbraham,Wed.l824 
Williamstown, 1828 



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?▲»» U«tTSmSITT. 

"■•■■- y 

r •tjrM HtTYmrd Go11«fB,ftt Ounhridge, 
^l#i|lM oIAmI ud b«i« endowed ia Ameiiet. 
Coort adTaneed jS400 towards tfb 
^Mieb' was iaeorpofatid in 1638; and tlia 
IdiodyloaTiaf akgaej of it779 I7jr.ti. 
koTtldsdMalion was naoaad IlauM 
f Jha#« rineo, ftoin tin* to time, been gMtitfy 
[ the state, and many mnnificent priTato 
^Viiai^f ofMD|Hrises tb^ collegiate depa rt ment Ibr 
I <iflW|ifi, pMperly so called, and Om tlieokgiflal, 
It has fimr halls, four stoiiel h^, 
of nodei^ltadiiatee; two haUs oontaiaiaf Urn 
I tihe ehi^V^P^ Tenons jother public rooms; 
rp^ylilMt a niedioal hall (wbieh.kst is aitoated in 
The nniversi^ ^^^ contains npwaids 
95jm ^!i^ III the fleaeral Ubiary, 3,000 in 
, aMlQtoiiitliethe^ogioal library : aM 
to the sttadMMl' which contain 4^00 ttH- 
r^it'iA^ia^ and the cabinet ef 

t * wtv J "^ property in posiesMOS 
fi^ibais^ll^ libiary, appan^ 

/«b8ibrdiaf tothe 'IVeas«rM% 

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104 



MASSACHUSETTS. 



[1834. 



192,296 J» 



Funds pledged to Salaries and Professorships, 179,243.33 

Library Fund, 6,000 

Funds accumulating under the designs of do- i 

nors and not available, .... 7,052.92 ^ 

Leaving to the unreserved use of the College, . $149,171.62 
Annual expenditure of the College, distinct from the Law 
and Divinity Schools, for the year ending August 31,- 

1832, 41,054.09 

Income during the same period, 40,962.15 

Of this income a little more than one half was derived from 
term bills for instruction, room-rent, &c. 

The institution is under the legislative government of a Corporation 
consisting of 7 members, and of a Board of Overseers consisting of 30 
elected members, together with the Governor, Lieutenant-Grovemor, 
the members of the Council and Senate, the Speaker of the House of 
Representatives, and the President of the university, ex ofido. 

Succession of Presidents. 



B«v. Henry Dumter, 1640 to 

Rot. Charles Cbtuncy, B. D., 1654 " 
Rot. Leonard Hoar, M. D., 1673 " 
Rov. Urian Oakes, A. M., 1675 " 

Rev. John Rogers, A. M., 1683 " 

Rev. Increase Mather, D. D., 1685 " 
Rev.9.Willard,A.M.,r.Pr«#.,l701 " 
John Leverett, A. M.,F.R.8.,1708 ** 



l&A Rev. Benj. Wadiworth, A.M., 1795 to 1737 
1673 Rev. Edward Holjoke, A. M., 1TS7 *« 1769 
1675 Rev. Samuel Locke, D. U., r770 " 1773 
1681 Rev. Samuel Langdon, D.D. 1774 " 1780 
1681 Rev. Joseph Willard, D. D., 1781 " 1804 
1701 Rev. Samuel Webber, D. D., 1806 " 1810 
1707 Rev. J.T. Kirkland,D. D.,LL.D.l810 *< 1698 
1794 Josiah Uaioej, LL. D., 1899 



Members of the Faculty and other Officers. 



Josiah Uuincy, LL. D., Prtndent, 

, Mau. Prof. Natural Ottory. 

Rev. Henry Ware, D. D., Prqf. Divinity. 

S Pntf. MU. Rd.tMar, PAfl., 

* ! 4^ CMl PoUty. 

, Prqf. Oreek LU. 

Francis Sales, Iiutruct. #Wnc* t ^pwUh. 
Jas. Jackson, M. D., Pr. The. ^ Prae. Pk^. 
John C. Warren, M. D., Pr^. AmaL t Starg. 
Joseph Story, LL. U., Pnf, ^Law, 

, Prt(f. Bkb, t Orienial Lang. 

John Farrar, LL. D., Pr^. Math, t AkC. Ph. 
iacob BIgelow, M. D., Prqf, MaUria Mtdka. 



Tb.Nuttaii.A.M.,jj-tS.^£f2!;: 

0«,. Ticknor. A. M., j JSft^^J^i 
Waltor ChanBinc, M. D., j yii mS' * 
£d. T. CbaoDinf, A. M., Pr^, BMsL ^ Ont, 



Jona. Barber ,Soe. Col. Chir.Lood., | ^Jj^ 
Simon Greenleaf, A. M., Prtf. Law. 
John W. Wubster. M. D., Pr. Chtm. ^JOm. 
Rev.Henry Ware, jr., A. M.. j fj^,^^; 
John Ware, M.D.,jf4f. Pr. lieo.^ Prae. Phi 
Thaddeus W. Harris, M.D., Likrariam. 
Rev. John 6. Palfrey, A. M., Prof. Bib. LU. 
PietroBachi, A.M.,J.U. D., j ^ ^^ 
Ch. Pollen, J. U. D., Pr. Osr. Loii^. t ^ 
Charles Beck, P. D., Pr^. LaL 
Francis M. J. Soraalt, JaslruU. m fVtiuk. 
Cornelius C. Feltoo, A. M., Pr^. Ortak, 
Henry 8. McKoan, A. M., TaUr m LtOm. 
George Nichols, A. B., hutnut. Matk^ 
Joel Giles, A. B., TV. JfaC, JhtaL, Mar. PkU. 
Ben). Peirco, A. M., Pr. JlfaO. t JWrt. PIA 
Wm.G. Eliot, A. B., hulnuL HOrtm, 
Christopher Dnnkio, huSnuL Gred^ 



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]834.] MASSACHUSXTTS. 165 

Number of ondergradoates in 1833, 212 ; theological itadents 31 ; 
law stadeaU 50 ; medical Btudenta 82. The whole number of alumni 
5,863 ; alumni Hying 2,265 ; ministers 1,459 ; ministers living 350. 

Comnuncemenl is on the laRt Wednesday in August. — Vacations; — 
lit, from the Wednesday preceding the 25Ui of Dec, 2 weeks ; 2d, from 
the 1st Wednesday in April, 2 weeks > 3d, the 6 weeks preceding com- 
mencement. 

Annual expenses; — for instruction, library, lecture-rooms, steward*! 
department, rent and care of room, ^90 ; — board for 42 weeks, at $1,90 
a week, $79^80 ; » text books $12,50 ; — special repairs, <S&c. about $3 : — 
total $185.30. 

Divinity School. Instruction is giyen in the Divinity School by the 
ReT. Professors Henry Ware,D. D., Henry Ware, jr., and J. G. Palfrey, 
and also by the Prof, of the Germ. Lang. &, Lit. ; and the students are 
entitled to be present at all the public lectures of the university. — The 
annual expense for instruction, rent, care oi room, and use of furniture 
and books, amounts to about $66; and board about $1,75 a week. 
Indigent students are aided from foundations and other sources. 

Law dchool. The Law School is under the superintendence of Mr. 
Justice Story and Professor Greenleaf, who deliver lectures and hear 
recitations. The fees for instruction are $100 per annum ; and students 
hnre the use of the library, and lecture-rooms, and the privilege of a^ 
tending all the public lectures of the university gratis. — The three 
terms and vacations in the year, in the Divinity and Law schools, cor- 
respond with those of the undergraduates. 

Medical School. The Medical School, connected with the University, 
is in Boston, and has six Professors, Messrs. Jackson, Warren, Web- 
ster, Channing, Bigelow, and Ware. The lectures which are delivered 
at the Massachusetts Medical Hall, commence annually on the 3d Wed- 
nesday in October, and continue four months. — Fees for the whole 
coarse $70 : — graduation fee for one who is a bachelor of arts $18 ; 
ibr one who is not $23 : ~ fee for the dissecting-room about $5. 
Williams Collkox. 

Thb institution, which is situated at Williamstown in the northwest 
comer of the state, derives its name from Colonel £phraim Williams its 
founder. It was opened as a public school or academy in 1791 ; and in 
1793, it was incorporated as a college. The state has made some dona- 
tions to the college, and it has received nearly $57,000 from Wood- 
bridge Little, Esq., and some benefactions from other individuals. The 
Tslne of the buildings and other fixed property of the college, is stated 
in the " History of the County of Berkshire '* at $44,000 ; and the pro- 
ductive funds at $68,000. The college library contains 3,000 volumes ; 
and there axe libraries belonging to the students which contain 2,300 



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Nuoiber of •todenti in 1833, 133 : -> whole munber tJ-MUikjil^Wtf ^ 
-^mkwaad liTing 61t ;<*-iiii]iwtieffs S95. ; ^^ * 

CwMwencwwtfiit is on Um 3d Wednesdftj in A«f«li; I^MMil^N^ 
lst,.ftoin commeBoemeiit, 4 weeks ; — 9il, ftom tlie 3d W<i|iwpl|||I.V 
Oebember, 6 weeks ;— 3d, fiom Uie 1st Wednesday in Maji S IPIiIhIi^ i • 

JhnmuU K^peiu€9 ; — tuition $91 ; room-rant, libngy , nye ira, Jen*^^ 4fH 
bonrd (firom $1 to #l,50m week— ssy $lfK^) #48,71^; wnMltlil; 
woodabontflS:— .total 993,75. t c.^>W' 

BBEssBma MxDicAL IvsTinmov. .'A'< 'yt«ilr; 

This instHtttion, established at PittsfiM, is eonneeted 
CoBege ; and medieal degrees are conferred in December *ai 1 
the lectures, and also at the commencement of the ooUeft. - . "^"^^^ 

Medieal FaadJtyinVSS^, !^t 

ILILOhiM..lLD., }^^.^o»l. bie.terl^,j;.C»«,Bir^lS3E 

B.B«Uttt,M.D.,J^JItoJir««^Jir«l..^ , :4s 

The lectures commence on the 1st Thursday in HeplembMr, nil #g>^, 
tinne 14 weeks. — Fees for the course $45; Ibr fiadaaliM ^iPt^ 
bond f 1,75 a week. ^ ^J^ 

Ambxkst Colliob. . '^ : 

This insUtntion, which is very pleasantly situated at i 
northeast «f Northampton, was established in 1831, and i 
1835. It has four large brick .buildings, each fbur stories hl|^i 
Qfrsitt eontaifiiqg rooms for students, and the fourth eontaiai^#| 
JUNcaiy-nKHn, and rooms for a mineralogical cabinet, an4 oths^JK 
«|^«^,iilUi f4ifioe is abontito be erected. A snbscsr^ition of .#jB 
iip,||olltfe was imised in 1838. It has an eieellent j 
^ajyhniy ef 4,300 vdmnes, and the libnriee 

i^JW voluDies. This college has b^enveiy, I 
' kilo importanee. It is under the 
\$mmfWhl^U^ ttlsoted totheoAoe. Th(^4ii%| 
JL Moora, D. D., who dMiA.4 

\ Hamphiey, O^ 0. ^ i*i ^ t p^^m^k^ 

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(WMMNfaj in Aiifmt. TMciiMv;'-. 
-$tf, fhHB the adWedaeidiif itt 
r lit WMbiwdft^ ia Mfty, 4 we*|fc^ » : , 

it^^H^l^^fiO. Ib»l«iidll(|lt|i,10; iriib. 

rAimrABv AT AmKrrsm. . , 

\ in 1807, and opened in ld06 ; in4 it 
•itiuition, 19 miles N. of Bdeton. It ii 
>' l||^''tlM mnniftoence of Menen. Jolin Rorris of 
^«l Andorer, and Moaea Brown and William 
''iht whole amount of property beloiif* 
IHpnliij, buildinga, and lilirafy, ia atatod at alMrat 
ibfink edifioeay two of them for the aooom-' 
i.thftthifd eoDtaining a ohapel, library, and l^or»- 
I ftr the officers. The library is rery Taluable, 
%'%ijM lohimea; and a libraiy belon|png to the 
It was founded by the Congregationalittfl» 
i of eveiy denomination ; and ia onder th«^ 
kef a.board of fonr viiitors ; and of the hoard of 
^ of PhiUIpe Aoademy. 

I D* D.y Pr^mdmif end Ltetmrer on BomoUUe§, 
P^f Jhrqfutor ^ driffion Thmhgy, 
ProfM^m qf Sturtd Uterature. 
pr|J>. D.y Pnfifmr tf 8»red Bkeiorie, 

Prof. Bed. Hisi. 4^ Lea. Pott. DuHu, 

,111.1883, 145. Whole number educated 574. 

I^Hl^, fd Wednesday in September. VaeaUifmi ; — 

fj^'5.weeha>-- Sd, firom the kst Wednesday 



fOBt in the public buildings an 
ahoot two thirda of the prioe of 
require it. 



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mMrfS^ dlraetkni of the fii]^ d«ii«MiiiiiMi)Mi. |t kM titlijf 
Mkliagt, ftBd ft liteiff of IjBOO folmnft; hut UlMt jm^ I 
ft ftiiiii the priooipal aad mlentt ftf which will aappcirt tiNi! , 
fe jl^7ftft%ft|tid •M pftnoftoettl teholfttdiip. 

Bff^lHai Ctoftt A. M., Prrf. MutntU. ^ E€d. 

IUv.IiudmD. Kiiawleft,A.M., J'r^fttMrrfPagtandjDtttim.^ 

^ Number of rtudeots in the thieo dftMot, ia^W* ^ i lindi«iir J||(^ 

donts 10. Number educated 31. ./!« 

£qMJMeff. Tuition, room-rent, ftnd uee of the libraiy are ftfcMtttift 
of ezpenae to ell : — board is about $1,50 a week 

The JhmifD9r9airy if on the Thunda/ after the 9d WediMfl4«ar ** fff* 
liinher. FMeftont:— let, firom the anniTenary, 6 weekti Sid, fiem 
the Thonda/ after the 3d Wedneadaj in April, 6 weeka. 



NbW EVOLAIIO IllSTITUTlOV FOR TBC EdUOATIOV OF TBE 

Thia inatitntion was incorporated in 1820 ; and waa endowed in IM^ 
by Thomaa H. Perkins, Esq., with a house, talued at f80,000| -ft&d, ly 
Tftiiona individuals, with a fbnd of $50,000. « 

LSA&NED SOCISTIBS. 

ihwwfcew jifiodfiny i^f jfr(« oitd Seiendes; incorporated fai 1780L M^ 
tkuiiel Bowditeh, LL. D., F. R. 8., Pvsidem — lliia Acadeniy ina pik> 
llriied live quarto Tolumes c^ Memoirs. -"4 

J J Bsaad hiSrt f r HuiUkical SoeUt^ ; instituted in 1791 ; and i 
iA 1704. John Davis, LL. O. JPrefufeitf. — Thia aociety hui ] 
M fo)nmeft 6vo. of Collections. 

jtm&rkmj^ JhUipurian SoctOff; incorporated in ISISL ^ 

mnthro^y FruidmiL Thia aociety has published one vuli^^^ 





JMUai Soeieiyi incorporated in 1781. 
B.fPruiimL This tocietj haa ^blished a^Tenl i 

^~ 'iOlJ^Mumltetiona. ' ' ' "^^^"^^ 

l^hiimamti; founded In 1881. Wte.K«M||w 

M«lel7 kfta puUiahed S Tolmnea of Leefotii^ ^-^^mW^. 






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ISdL] MA88ACHU8XTT8. 169 

PXUOOICAX. PUBLICATIOirS III Ma88ACHU8XTT8 IN 1833. 






TVWM. 



r 

NewbuiTport, 

' HftrerhiU, 
LTnn, 

MarbiebMd, 
Gloocetter, 
Salitbary, 

LoweU, 

CharlntowD, 
Coocofd, 

New Bedford, 

Taunton. 
FaU River, 



Newspapers. 



I OraaliM. 



i Daily 10 
Beml-w'Uy? 
Weekly 96 
(Semi-w'kljS, 
Weekly 3 
fDaily l' 

^ Semi-w'kly 1 
1 Weekly 1 
Weekly 9, 
Weekly 1 
Weekly 1 
' Weekly 1 
Weekly 1 
(Daily 
I Weekly 
Weekly 
do. 
(Daily 
j Weekly 
do. 
do. 



Norfolk, 

Plymouth, 

Bamatable, 
Nantacliet, 

Worcefter, 

Hampehire, 

Hampden, 

Franklin, 

Berkshire, 



( Dedham, 
I Wrentham, 
e Plymouth, 
/ BridfBwatcr, 
( Hingham, 
Barnstable, 
Nantucket, 

{Worcester, 
Fitchbarc, 
Southbridge, 
Northampton, 

i Springfield, 
WettBeld, 
Greenfield, 

(PitUfield, 
Lenox, 



Weekly S 

do. 1 

do. 9 

do. 1 

do. 1 

do. S 
Semi-w'Uyl 

Weokiy 3 
do. 



do. 



do. 
do. 



do. 
do. 



ReoiewSf MagaxineSf ^. 

I r Once in 9 weeks 3 I Quarterly 
I { Monthly 23 | Semi-annual 

lie 



jBoetoo, 

I I { Once in 9 months 5 | Annual (inclndinf 6 

JAodorer, | Quarterly 1 | Newburyport, Monthly 

NewqMtpera 100 ; Other Periodical Publications 49 } — total 148. 



Tgtal 100 



7 
1 
,) 9 

1 



V. RHODE ISLAND. 

GOVXRNMXHT 

Far the Year ending on the 1st Wednesday in May, 1834. 



JOBII BkOWH FBANCI8y 

Jeffirey Hmxard, 
Henry Bowen, 
JoliB Sterne, 
Albert C. Greene, 



Salary. 
r400 



Governor, 0' 

Lieutenant' Oovemorf . 200 

Secretary of State, . . 750 & fees. 

Treasurer, 450 

Attorney General, .... Feet, 

The Senate is compoeed of the Goyernor, Lieatonant-Goyemor, and 
10 aenator*. 

The House of Representatives is composed of 72 memhers, elected 
fiiiii.«]muaUj, in April and August. Joseph L. Tillinghast, Speaker, 

JimiCIART. 

Th« jndidarj power is vested in a Supreme Court, and a Court of 
Common Pleas for each of the fiye counties. All the judges are i^ 
pointed annually by the General Assembly. 
15 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



•^/l' 




iBiuIi of tii« Cowta of 
|iM« afl) MJifiMi bat «• pdd by 



i of |OBOiml ednoatioii hai, till wfthin ft ftir ; 
Mi^)«eted in Rhodo Uaad. In ISte, Iho logbktoM i 



i|li<M[i 



010/MO uiniuilly for the rapport of pablie aehooli, witb i 
each town to sum by tax double the amount of ita p ro p o t ft wi of lk» 
$10,000. Alltho towna aTaUed themaelyaa of tbis appropciatiolL lib 
number of towna in the atate ia 31; the number of publie ■ahoeli^M 
IfiSl, waa 383 ; acholara taoffat in them 17,084 ; •* money eipend»igaW<| 
tbemfSl^OO, of which the aum of 1^11^90 waa raiaed bgr tlM 1 
and 910,000 drawn from the aohool fbnd. 

There ate aeToral aoademiea and good firifile aebocla pa 
ent placea. A respectable institution called the << Frienda' BoanBof 
School," belonging to the Yearly Meeting for New Englind, ia at 
Providence. The edifice is a spacious structure of brick, with a baaa- 
ment of granite. It has 5 male and 4 female teachera; 117 aalei tad 
70 female pupils ; and a small library. 

Brown Uirirxnsmr. 

This institution waa incorporated in 1764, by the name of ^ Tba Q||- 
Itge of Rhode Island," and finit eatablished at Wamn, wiMit jlp 
irat eommencement waa celebrated in 1769. In 1770, it waa MMif^. 
to PioTidenee ; and in 1804, ita name waa changed to << Blown U^^M 
l|^*> in honor of Nicholas Brown, its moat diatingnkhad b«M|S£ 
Hbaa two large brick halla, fbur atoriea high, havuBg anoMil^lSI 
^ aii nt altnation,alibraryof 6,000Tolumea, andagoodpi" "^ 
iMpaiataa;. and there an librariea belonging to the atodonti 
<i#0O ▼olnmta. Another Urge hall ia about to be enolad. 1 
tivo govnnunant ia Teated in a board of FellowBy of 18 wmfjfmUk^ 
Mite^ inotuding the president, must be Baptiata; and a hm^0 
iii. ^86 mambera, 88 of whom must b^Bapti^, 5 WMif^M 
i§^.tii44Coogro^atianali.ta. ;, ^^ 

.J^^ ^ AiMsaitsR ifPrmUma. 




^^''^^' 



b.Q.n«. .n«t»ini|itor.A«iiMM«i&it.,: ^ 



^i^^jijf- , 




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1S34.] RQODE ISLA.\D. 171 

Officers of Instruction. 



Rot. Solomon Peck, A. M., Prqf. Lot. Lan, 
Georgo I. Chase, A. B., Tuttrr, 
Chris. M. Nickels, A. B., do. 
William Gammel, A. B., do. 



Ser. Fnocis Wayland, D. D., PresidenL 
W. G. Goddard, A. M., Pr. Mo. Phi. ^ Met 
Rer. Romeo Elton, A. M., Pnff. Ln:,g. 
!«▼. Alexis Caswell, A. Al Iwf, ^.latk, 4* 
Nat.PkU. 

Namb«r of under.' jindaates, in 1832-3, 136. Alumni 1,219. Com- 
mencement is on the l;t Wednesday in September. — Vacations : — 1st, 
from commencemeii > , 4 weekR ; — 2d, from tlie last Friday in Decern- 
her, 6 weeks ; — 3d, U m\ tlu 'id Friday in May, 3 weeks. 

Annual expenses; — to* .i.Lion, room-rent, use of the library, and 
incidental expenses, $G4,i)0; for board, (from $1,00 to 1,01, for 39 
weeks,) from $39,00 to $64,00 : — total from $103,50 to $128,50. 

Learned Sociilties. 

Rhode Island Historical Society; incorporated 1822. James Fenner, 
LL. D., Presidtnt. Thomas H. Webb, M. D., Corresponding Secretary, 

FranJdin Society; formed at Providence, in 1821, for the purpose of 
promoting inyestigation in natural science ; incorporated in 1823. 



VI. CONNECTICUT. 
Government 

For the Year ending on the 1st Wednesday of May, 1834. 

Salary. 

HxsBY W. Edwards, Governor, $1,100 

Ebenezer Stoddard, Lieutenant-Governor, .... 300 

lasac Spencer, Treasurer, 1,000 

Thomas Day, Secretary, 84 & fees. 

EliflJia Phelps, Comptroller, 1,000 

Seth P. Beers, Commissioner of the School Fund, , 1,250 

CTharles Hawley, President of the Senate. 

Sunne] Ingham, Speaker of the House of Representatives. 

Judiciary. 

Supreme and Superior Court. 

Salary. 

DaTid Daggett, Chief Justice, $1,100 

John T. Peters, Associate Justice, 1,050 

Thomas S. WiUiams, do 1,050 

Clwk Bissau, do 1,050 

SMnoel Church, do l»050 

lliomas Day, Reporter, 350 

For other infonnation respecting the Courte, see Am. AUnanac fop 1832. 



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172 CONNECTICUT. [1884. 

Statistics of Cohnzcticut as betvritxd bt the Assessors for 1832. 



AcTCii of Ldnd, 
Neat CnttlD, 

HDr:if-i, Itc. 

Sheep J - * _ 

Mil la, - 

Siore«j - - - 

CUxka and WaIqIwi, 



Kumbftr. 


Y&lDir. 


3,GSa,<i70 


l50,7J*a,4'JS 


«,853 


91,918,740 


937 ,y»!) 


3^^ 


a4,250 


i,29o,ey4 


S71,(ia* 


S3a,56& 


J ,573 


&43«3I] 


1,820 


H(J,7-»8 


l^t 


1,637,143 


sea 


S4>«3^ 


mm 


]74,^4a 


5,196 


a3ei,T9et 


les 


m,m& 





VaJae. 


Quirnon,^ 


8 3S,3S0 


One Pflffy, 


^ 


fttali eiofik iji SlAte Bank*. 3.143,73^ 


Do. U, B. Biok, 


Jl>,fe4 




5a,*rt3 


Turnpiko Ftock, 


157,:W3^ 


Manej At liilfliejt, - 


- 5,6^7,a75 


Silvnt I'ljilc, ^ - 


]0,6H 


Thres FoJdi, * - 


I7,fMl! 




l47,»1iSli 


Pi,m .* - . 


- R8a,3I5 


TakdeftoiAt^lumTU 


t-^-,saa;j8s 



£xps5sz OF Goternment. 

" The population of the state by the last census, was 297,711 ; and the 
ordinary expense of the government was $60,852 ; being a proportionate 
expense of twenty cents and a half for each inhabitant. But the state, 
daring this time, received $27,053 interest on its three per cent, stock 
•mH HiviH^nds on bank stock ; $12,446 from the state prison, forfeitures, 
fines, &c. -f and $2,817 for taxes on bank stock ownea oy non-resIucZtT ^ 
all amounting to $42,316 ; which being deducted from the ordinary ex- 
penses of government, left the sum of $18,636 to be paid from direct 
taxes. This balance of $18,536 would require a contribution by each 
inhabitant of the state of less than six cents and three mills ; and a tax 
less than three tenths of a mill on each dollar of valuation and assess- 
ment returned by the assessor." — Comptroller's SUUemerU. 

EDUCATION. 

Common Schools. 

Connecticut has the greatest School Fund of any of the states in the 
Union. It arose from the sale of lands reserved by Connecticut in the 
state of Ohio. The following statement respecting this Fund has been 
recently made by the Comptroller of Public Accounts. — '* The whole 
capital of this Fund, productive and unproductive, was reported by the 
Commissioner, in 1832, to be $1,902,957.87. The interest arising from it 
is, by the constitution, " inviolably appropriated to the support and en* 
couragement of the public or common schools throughout the state ; ** 
and by law is apportioned to them, according to the ratio of persons be- 
tween 4 and 16 years of age belonging to the respective school societies. 
The whole number of those persons, in 1832, was 86,252 j and the 
amount of interest distributed for that year was $81,939.40, being 95 
cents for each of those persons, and equal to 28 cents for every inhabi- 
tant. Thus, while the state was distributing for the benefit of schoole 



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1834.] 



COIVNEOTICUT. 



173 



a sozD equal to 28 cents for each person in it, the ordinary ezpenaefl of 
the government require of the people only a ratio of contribution lest 
than 6 cents and 3 mills." 

The school districts are required to expend all the money which they 
receiTe from the Fund in payment for instruction ; incidental expenses 
of every kind are to be paid in some other way. In some districts an 
additional sum is raised to pay for instruction ; but in many there is 
none. It is a very prevalent opinion that the operation of tlie School 
Fund has been injurious ; that the length of time during which the 
schools are kept has not been generally increased ; that the interest in 
them has been diminished ; and that, with respect to education, Con* 
necticut now bears a less favorable comparison witli the other Eastern 
States, than before the present system went into operation. In the states 
of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, and Massachusetts, in which the 
achoob are supported almost wholly by a tax on the inhabitants, more 
money is expended for free schools, in proportion to the population, than 
in Connecticut. 

It is remarked by an intelligent citizen of Connecticut, in speaking 
of the school system of this state : — ** We know, from common and 
oniveisal experience, that little interest is felt in tiiat which demands 
neither expense nor attention. Our country is affluent, and pecuniary 
means may be commanded for whatever we have the will to perform. 
Few, comparatively, are so indigent as to need charitable aid in the ed- 
ucation of their children. A public fund for the instruction of youth 
in common schools, is of no comparative wortli, as a means of relieving 
want. A higher value would consist in its being mside a n,instrumerU for 
ezeitifig general exertion for the attainment of that important end. In 
proportion as it excites and fosters a salutary zeal, it is a public blessing. 
It may have, on any other principle of application, a contrary tendency, 
and become worse tlian useless. It may be justly questioned whether 
the School Fund has been of any use iu Connecticut. It has furnished a 
supply where tliere was no deficiency. Content with the ancient stand- 
ard of school instruction, the people have permitted the expense of sus- 
taining it to be taken off their hands, and have aimed at nothing higher. 
They expended ^bout an equal sum before the school fund existed. 
They would willingly pay ^70,000 more, if made a condition of receiv* 
ing the state bounty, and thus the amount would be doubled, for an object 
in which they would then feel they had some concern." 



ACADXMIKS AlfD HlOH ScHOOLS. 



Inc. 

Cheshire, lUOl 
Colchester 1802 
EUingion, 1829 



Inc. 
Goshen, 1824 

Litchfield, 1826 

Madison, Lee'B,1825 



Inc. 
Norwich, 1828 
Plainfield, 1783 
Tolland, I82a 



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WiJbBdrMBwMxd, Hew Hmren^uid otiNcpliiM 

■39id SIS vttiaMffponted wmitmami^ 



I of wiuek m •adowed wHIi ftudi.' 
I^Goikge WM MrtaUiihediB 1700 atSaybiook; 




■^Mf^ 



POl; a]i4miioTedtoJN.HaTeiiinl716:lhefintc 
bso^ WM m 1703 ; tlie fini at New Haveain 1717. It dtenwmU§mUm 
firom Elifau Tale of London (but a native of New HaToa), giiitiiiinilif 
the East India Company, who was one of its ptiaeipal heiiif|Mili>|if| ll 
reoaiTed from Bishop Berkeley 1,000 volumes of boo^; avAaiiippJIil 
firapdation it has, from time to time, reoetved benefiwtioas fim^ifniilp 
individuals, and also ffom the state. It has, for some yesn pMMi||l 
gieater number of students than any other college in the niiitidlj|||jjp» 
It possesses 10 valuable buildings, two of them of stona, ikif,j0l^:^ 
brick ; (bur of which are college halls, 100 feet by 40, Ibor 4rto^iMM4|||||b 
eotitaining 3S2 rooms each for students; and ano^er baB. ^fiM^|y|t 
erected. It has the finest cabinet of minerals in the Uiiilf4^l|dtt^^ 
good chemical and philosophical apparatus, and a libraiy t^,^!l^ii^||i^ 
limes; and there are libraries belonging to the stndeais a^p^||i||ttg 
10,500 volumes. The funds of this institution, considering ||ajci|^^^ - 
•nd number of students, are small; and it is supported ehii%^ 
tion fees. Th^ whole amount of the funds of the difixent 4 
exclusive of buildings, library, apparatus, Ac., is stated ait^ 
1^0,000. According to the statement of the treasurer, 
bj|ve latefy been made for the benefit of the college, hj Cli$ i 
^4107,000, of which $41,000 have already be«i paid.---^ 
i^»|ur the legislative government of a Corpovatioa < 
pp^dniof the oc^ge, the Governor and J 
.4|^«ad.tbi|^i 



17«llol7Q7iBev. 

tm <« Ximsv. |teia0lllMul|. 

IW '^ ISilllev. Jw. Itar, B. H., U^ 





1834.] 



CONIIECTICUT. 



175 



Eli Itos, 5L D., Pnff. Tkeo, and Prae. Pk. 
Wbj. TuUy, M. D., Prof. Mat. Med. 4^ Ther. 
tier. N. W. Taylor, D. D., Pr. Did. Theol. 
Jooa. Knight, M. D.,Pro/. .^nat. and Physiol. 
Timo. P. Been, M. D., Prof. Obstetrics. 
Joaiah W. Gibb*, A. M., Prqf. Sac LU. 
S. J. Hitchcock, A. M., Instructor in Law. 
Bev. Eleaz. T. Fitch, D. D., Prqf. Divinity. 
Rev. Chaancy A. Goodrich, A. M., Prof 

Rkttoricand Ormtory. 
Deninon Ohnsted, A. M., Prof. Math, and 

JTaLPha. 



Theou D. Wool«ey, A. M., Pr. Gr. Lan., IsL 
flonry Durant, A. M., 7\tor in Cfreek. 
Wm. Carter, A. M., TVtor in Math. 
Henry N. Day, A. M., TuUnr in Oreek. 
Flavcl Da«com, A. M. , l\itor in Latin, 
Alfred Newton, A. M., T^or in Math. 
Leverett Grigga, A. M., 7^. JtTat. Ph.yJUtr. 
Ant. D. Stanley, A. B., Tutor in Latin. 
D. C. Comitock, A. B., Tviurin I^tin. 
O. P. Hubbard, A. M., .^tsisL Prof. Chenu 
Eras. D. North, A. B.,Teacher in Elocution. 



Number of undergraduates on the catalogue for 1832-3, 354 ; theolo- 
gical students 49 ; law students 31 ; average number of medical stu- 
dents for the last 10 years, 73: — total 507. — Alumni 4,G09; alumni 
liTing 2,506; ministers 1 ,297 ; ministers living 559. 

Commmcement is on tlie 3d Wednesday in August: — Vacations; — 
Ist, from commencement, 6 weeks ; — 2d, from the 1st Wednesday in 
January, 2 weeks ; — 3d, from the last Wednesday in April, 4 weeks. 

Annual erpcnscs : — instruction $33; room- rent (average), 9; repairs, 
■weeping, contingencies, &c. $7; board (about $1, GO a week) G4; — 
total 0113; — exclusive of wood, lights, furniture, books, wash- 
ing, &c. 

In the Theological Department professors Taylor and Gibbs are exclo- 
sively employed, and two other professors also take part in the instmc- . 
tion. No charge is made to the students for tuition and lectures. 

The Law School is under the direction of Judge Daggett and Mr. 
Hitchcock. The terms for tuition are $75 a year, with an entrance 
fee of 05, and j[5 for the use of the library. 

In the Medical Institution there are 6 professors. The lectures com- 
mence 12 weeks from the 3d Wednesday in August, and continue 16 
weeks, during which from 50 to 100 lectures are given by each profes- 
sor. Fees paid in advance for each course 012,50, except that on Ob- 
stetrics, which is 06. Matriculation fee and contingent bill 07,50* 

Washington College. 

This institution, which has an elevated and pleasant situation, half 
a mile west of the state-house, at Hartford, was founded by the Episco- 
palians, in 1824, and held its first commencement in 1827. It has 
xeeeiTed about 060,000 from private subscriptions, and 011,000 from 
tiba state legislature, which sums have been expended in buildings, libraiy, 
Ac, It has no funds, but is nearly fre^ firom debt. The sum of 020,000 
fam recently been subscribed for the endowment of a professorship of 
Bellefl Lettres ; and an agent is now employed in raising 020,000 mora 
Ibr another professorship. Jt has a botaaic garden, a good philosophical 



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176 CONNECTICUT. [1834. 

apparatos, a library of 2,000 volumes ; and there are libraries belonging 
to the students containing 2,500 volumes. — Bishqp Brownell, the first 
president was succeeded, in 1831, by the Rev. Dr. Wheaton. 

Faculty in ^833. 



B«v. Nathaniel W. Wheaton, D. D., Frw. 
Wm. M. Holland, A. M., Prqf. Anc. Lang. 
Duncan S. Stewart, AM.^Adj. Pr. Ane.Lan. 
Rot. SilaaTotlen, A. M., Pr. Matk.,J\rat.Ph. 



J. S. Rofen, M. D., Pnf. Chem. and Jthu 
George Sumner, B(. D., Frqf. Botamy, 
Wm. W. Elbworth, A. M., Prqf. Law, 
Rev. S. F. Jaivis, D. D., Prqf. Orient. Lang. 



Number of students in 1833, 60. — Commencement is on the Ist 
Thursday in August. — Vacations ; — 1st, from commencement, 7 weeks ; 
— 2d, from the Thursday before the 25th of Dec, 2 weeks ; — 3d, from 
the Thursday before the 12th of April, 3 weeks. 

Annual expenses : — college bills about ^56 ; — - board 40 weeks, from 
^0 to 70 ; — fuel, light, and washing from 16 to 30 ; — use of books, sta- 
tionery, and fbrniture from 10 to 30 ; — taxes in classes from 5 to 8 : — 
total from $137 to 194. 

Wesleyan University. 

This institution, whicK was founded by the Methodists, is situated at 
Middletown, and occupies the site of the late military academy of Cap- 
tain Partridge. It has a respectable philosophical apparatus, and a li- 
brary of 3,000 volumes. 

Faculty in 1833. 



-, Pr(^. AncLang, 



Eetr. J. Fred. Huber, Prof, Mod. Lang. 



Rev. Wilbur Fiik, D. D., President. 
Rev. J. P. Durbin; A. M., Prqf. JVat. Sei 
Augustus M. Smith, A. M., Prqf. Math, 

Number of students, in 1833, 60. — Commencement is on the 2d 
Wednesday in August : — J^acations ; — 1st, from the Wednesday before 
Christmas, 7 weeks ; — 2d, the 5 weeks preceding commencement. 

Litchfield Law School. 

This institution, which is at Litchfield, 30 miles west of Hartford, was 
established, in 1782, by Tapping Reeve, chief justice of Connecticut; in 
1798, James Gould, some time a judge of the Supreme Court, was asso- 
ciated with him ; and since the death of Judge Reeve, Judge Gould has 
been, a part of the time, assisted in the school by Jabez W. Huntington, 
Esq. The whole number of pupils from 1708 to 1727, inclusive, was 730. 

According to the plan pursued by Judge Gould, the law is divided 
into 48 titles, which embrace all its important branches. Lectures are 
delivered daily, usually occupying an hour and a half, and examinations 
are held every Saturday upon the lectures of the preceding week. The 
whole course is completed in 14 months, including two vacations of 4 



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1834.] CONNECTICUT. 177 

weeks each, one in the spring, the other in the autumn. Tlie terms of 
instmction are $100 for the first year, and $00 for the second. No sta- 
dent can enter for a shorter period than 3 months. 

Asylum for the Deaf and Dumb. 

" The American Asylum for the education of the Deaf and Dumb " 
was opened at Hartford in 1817, Th. H. Gallaudet, A. M. being Princi- 
pal. The present Principal is Lewis Weld, A. M. ; and there are 9 aa- 
astants. 

The fonds of the Asylum have been derived from private donations, 
and from a grant of land in Alabama, made by the Congress of the 
United States, in 1819. These have furnished the institution with a 
large brick building for the accommodation of the pupils, a house for the 
principal, and out-houses, including two work-shops, in which the mala 
papUa work 4 or 5 hours daily ; and have enabled the directors to form 
a permanent fund of considerable amount, by means ef which the an- 
nual charge to each pupil has been reduced from $200 to 115. 

The following statement of the number of the former and present 
pupils, is copied from the 17th Report, May, 1833. 



Form**' I*"** 

Supported by their Friends, . . 98 

« by the sUte of Maine, . 20 . 

« by the sUte of N. Hampshire, 32 

" by the sUte of Vermont, . 35 . 

'< by the state of Massachusetts, 97 

" by the state of Connecticut, 33 . 

" by the United SUtes, . 1 



Total 



316 



PlMOQt PopU^ 

25 
16 
15 



38 

. 16 



130 



Of the 316 pupils who have left the Asylum, as many as 160 are stated 
to be supporting themselves by their own industry. — Annual expensea 
for each pupil, for tuition, board, lodging, washing, fuel, lights, station- 
ery, Slc. $115. No pupil can be received for a less term than 3 yean. 
Candidates for admission must not be under 10, nor over 30 years of 
age. — There are two vacations, of 4 weeks each j beginning on the 
last Wednesday in April and September. 

LSARVED SOCISTIZS. 

ComueUaU Academy : — Jeremiah Day, D. D., LL. D., President. 
ComuetUlU Historical Society: — Timothy Pitkin, LL. D., President ; 
Thomas Day, Secretary. 

CmmecHeut Medical Society. Wm. Buel, M. D., President. 



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178 



NEW TORE. 



[1834. 



VII. NEW YORK. 

Goy£R5MSirT. 



William L. Marct, < 

John Tracy, < 

Azariah C. Flagg, 
Philip Phelps, 
Abraham Keyser, 
John A. Dix, 
Archibald Campbell| 
Green C. Bronsony 
Simeon De Witt, 
Stephen Van Rensselaer, 
Samuel Young, 
William C. Bouck, 
Jonas Eaill, Jun. 



Governor ; term of office expires Jan, \ 
1, 1835. 5 

Lieut.- Gov. and Pres. Senate; pay > 
$6 a day during the sestion. j 

Comptroller J . . . r- . 
Deputy- Comptroller f 
Treasurer, ■ . . . . 

See. StatCj and Superint. Cam. Schools, 
Dep. Sec. fy Clerk of Com. of Land Offic 
Ailomey General, 
Surveyor Geiural, 
Canal- Commissioner, 

do. 
Acting Canal- Commissioner, 

do 



Salary. 
£4,000 



2,500 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
e, 1,500 
1,000 
800 



1,500 
1,500 



Le^lature. 

The Senate consists of 32 members, who are elected for four years, 
8 being chosen annually. Pay, $3 a day. John Tracy, President. 

The House of Representatives consists of 12d members. Charles L. 
Liyingston, Speaker. — Pay ^3 a day. 

JUDICIART. 



Court of Chancery, 








Residence. 


Salary. 


Reuben Hyde Walworth, Chancellor, 


Albany, 


#2,000 


James Porter, . . Register, 


. do. 


Fees. 


John Walw^th, . . Assistant Reg., 


New York, 


do. 


Alonzo C. Paige, . . Reporter, 


. Schenectady, 


500 


The eight circuit judges are vice-chancellors for their respective 


circuits. 






Supreme Court. 








Reaidence, 


Salary. 


John Savage, . Chief Justice, . 


. Albany, . 


;J2,000 


Jacob Sutherland, . . Associate Justice, 


do. . 


. 2,000 


Samuel Nelson, . , , do. 


. Cooperstown 


, 2,000 


John L. Wendell, . . Reporter, 


Albany, 


500 


Circuit Courts. 







There are eight Circuit Courts, with eight Judges, and the circuits 
correspond, in territory and name, to the eight senate districts. 



Digitized by Google 



:M^ 



7th * ..' * Onondaga, . . 
i^M m^ . . Rochaater, . . 

f^^ m^Ur Cm^^tke CU^rfJfew York. 

4e. . . . . 

BipCTter. 
CUrk. • 



^ria?f» V 




#2,600 

. 2,500 

9^ 



EDUCATION. 
i^li^ Jh Common Schools. 

iil9ivtkiii of public money for the nipport of common 

y fllilt^of Now York was made, and the present system of 

l1fa«bogim,in 1816 ; since which time education has madt 

Hm conditions on which the public money was otSei^ 

f were let, that each town should raise by a tax a sum 

t to the snitn appropriated to the town &om the state treae- 

lof bothsnmi to be applied to the payment of teachen' 

that before the inhabitants of a neighborhood could 

i te pviblio fbnd, they were required to organise a district, 

I a tohool-house, and have a school taught in it, at leaat 

, bgr a legally q[ttalified teachor. 

I money b apportioned by the Superintendent to 780 cltiea 

-ttlf Hhmey is paid to the treasurers of 55 counties, and by 

Ha tiba eotnmiasioners of 780 towns and cities, and by theaa 

to the trustees of 8,941 distriets. The trustees apply 

; for its application annually to the school oom- 

aers ma^ aa annoal report through tbt 

I to the Superhitendent, which contains an abstract 

f^orlSy as weU as an aoeount of tke moneys reeeiTed, 

I tD the distiiets, by the oommisBioners themselves. Tim 

i^Oelbber and November last, from the clerks of th* 

^MPteloed copies of the eommisaioners' reports from 

WmifitS hi Iho Btate.*' -» M^p^rtqfthB a^^tniUmidmiL 





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Mb^ M fihi|iefi»ledbiit of oquMtt^yitodli^ te «Mril mbm^ 
^^ nkluiglo telr ooodttioB md tbto eiqpMitfMtt^ of ftaiohMl 

«id from tiMi BapoKl oTtlM 0opMtet0iiiMiJBMtf*tii^^^ 
I iKWUflf ia88| the foUowiDf pirti^ilMt in extnetait 

, ftednetiTeoipltiloftlMSdioolFimd, . «* . fl,735475J» 

' I90011M of the Fund darii^ ^* J*** ending: Sept 80, 18S8y 03,756^ 

XitJmted inoome of the soGCMding jreer, 101,960i)0 

Aggfegetojoft|iitel of lootl eehool Ibnde dw^ • 950,000^ 

DnpfodaetiTe Sehod Fund in lends, 800,000 eeiei. 

iXifrieCff, dUUrMi, 4«. 

Gitiee, towne,end wudeintheSSconntieeofN. T., 811 

Orgenixed ■chool diitricti, compnted et 9,000 

Number of children from 5 to 16 yeen of ege, Deo. 30, 1831, 506;878 
Rnmber of children at ichool in the year 1838, . . 494,969 

ffince the jreer 1887, retartaji here been made annnally ftom every 
town; and in 1838, retoms were made ftom 8,941 diatricts, in which 
■ehooLi were open, on an average, 8 montha' in 18 ; and the nomber of 
aohoola in operation waa oompoted at 9^970. 

JSa^wndieiifiybr Cammam SehooU in 1838. 
Bom paid out of the atate treaaoiy (income of the F^d), ;f 100,0004)0 
8am raised by a tax on the people of the state, 188,384.68 

Sam derived fW>m local funds, 17,193iI5 

ToUd qfpuhUe moneff$ ditiribMted fry eostsMMtpiMfv, $306,668.78 

Additional som raiaed in the sevend districts, 368,388^ 

668|9Q8M 
Of this theif was raised by a special tax for bnllding school* 

hoasesinthecityof NewTorfcabOiit \ . 00/NXMNI 

TaUdmmpM/m'ieeehtn'wageg, . .• . f008|90M6 

The anaoont paid for teachera' wages is compnted aft only abawft^Hi 

half of the ^expense annnally incorred for the sappoit of MiOMtt 



i^lhe.umoal 



▼ahM of 9;a70 sehool^honses (these in thecity ) : 
Kork bemg computed aft $900,000) |8,O4O|00O, V fia8/M>MI> 
,^ _ . lal intereat of which at 6 per cent, is J , . 

|!lial fiv 9^ sch^ • ,.' /^'^fi^^ 

Jfigptnse of boohs fbir 494,969 sdiolani, aft 60 cenfei eaeli,' * 'ji^tM!^ 

"■-•■ - fbCaii .' •' . • . • ,' ■ .^ts^ii^i 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1834.] 



HEW TORK. 



161 



Comparative View of the Returns of Common Schools from 1816 to 1833. 



pt 

li 
lii 


lili 


3£ 
= £ 




Ill 


1 


ill 


ml 

-Jut 


iSliJ ,326 'Zp::^y a,OlU ' $55 ja0.i^6 




140,100:176^49; 14 to 15| 


l^ll ;3.%5 3,7i;J 2,H7:{ iJA^^MM 




170,:JB5HDM40 
ia*i253'21 Bulbil 


6 10 7 
5 to 6 


16111 !4()*i4,*il!:J.H4; tni.aiu.^ 




s^io;nii^'*r>,^7i 


Bto » 


\^m -115 5.7tu5 5,11^! 117,I5L07 




271^77'3l/i,7U3 


!)to id; 


1?1>1 .-^5i;.:i:iJ5:4t^M| l4(j,4iH.O;!S 




304^559|317,t3;i3' 24 to S© 
332,lTO.m^ 42 to 43 


lri^2-2 <H1 «i/r»tJ:K5??^'2 i57,M3G,tJ4 




l!^2:5 i4:»TjJril tL-i^ 17:i,4"j).(y) 




351,17:1 ;i'»7,U2*J 44 to 45 


1^4 <^^yi;Mi^y7\^'}\ \&2^tm.-^ 




377,0-^ :i7:i.2<H M to !I3 


\m:i\&Mj XAMyj67y\ Ir^l.lMM 




4n'i,!i4ii;Hi,:niuiiij to yti! 


\m\ 74)117,773 7,nr i^i^jsmjim* 




42~^ ,:i- 1 i : 1! ir, .5^1] 1 1 lo to JJ3 


lt*27 721 ^.114 7/150 L'^5,7-2<J.4t) 




4:11,1^131^11,^^-^.0 21 to so 


ld:ij| 742 r^/J: »H 7.r^06 222^>^»i>,77 




441,^^50419^16 mva 91 


1>^> ,757 rt/lD! > H J ( M a:i2Jt4a 21 




4<ia,2»5 441M13 25 to 31 


ItSl*) 77:1 ^ H7'i 8^2! 12 214,H-iO.] I 


^?%?n7,nHJ4 


4.-?n,il41 4tW,^-)7 40 to 41 


13*11 7<>:L(Mi:iHXi:ii ii:H,iH4lJi(i 


;Mr..-iir "i(^ 


lt<^»,4'iM!t7.{iO:i250to24H 


, L!E^2,7vi;K);W:ftH,!^4t 244,!)!)6.^ 


;n 4, mi 1.^4 


507,1115 &t*y,iio7; 


I«i3 eilUKtiCMJ^ANlt 3(r»3e:fi.7H 


358,a:d().l7 


AU4,^9hi)fiJ^7H 



Incorporated Academies. 



Altany, 

Albany, Fern. Acad. 

Albany, Fern. Hem. 

Anburo, 

Bridgewater, 

BaSalo, 

Cambrid^, Wash*n. 

Caoandaigua, 

Canandai^aa, Oiaa- 

ri» Fern. Sem. 
Canajohaiie, 

Cherry valley, 
Clinton, Oram. Sch. 
Delhi, beiaware^ 
E. Hampton, CliJUon, 
Fairfield, 



Flatbttsh, £r(M. £ra/{, 

Fort Covington, 

Franklin, 

Prodonia, 

Gainos, 

Gouvcrnour, Hi. Sch. 

Granville, 

Greenville, 

Hamilton, 

Haitwick, 

Homer, Cmtrtitutd, 

Hud^ion, 

Ithaca, 

Jamaica, Un. Holly 

Johnstown, 

Kinderhook, 

King* ton, 



Laniingbargh, 

Lewislon, 

Lovrville, 

M alone, JpiranUin^ 

Madison, jiem., Qem^ 

if Oneida Con. 
Middiebury, 
Montgomery, 
Monroe, 
Now burgh, 
North Salem, 
Onondaga, 
Ovid, 
Oxford, 
Owego,- 
OvBter Bay, 
Platuburgh, Franklin 



Fenn Tan, Ygtet Co, 
Aead. ^ Fern Sem* 
Potsdam, St. Late., 
Pompey, 

Poughkeepsie, Dutch, 
iTiook, 



Reditu 

Rochester^ Hijgh Sek. 

Sulum, fVashuigton, 

6chenectfl ' 

Sin^ Sing, 



Schenectady, 

. ig. Mt. 
Sprmgvilie, 



Pleoi. 



Sullivan Co. 
Union, 
(Jtica, 

Whitesborough, 
Whitestown, Ondia 
InstUuU, 



" In the erection and endowment of the incorporated academies/' 
according to the Superintendent of common schools^ " about $400,000 
have been expended by the state and individuals ; and to these acade- 
mies a revenue of $10,000 is distributed annually by the state." The 
■o^ of $1,200 is assigned to the institutions situated within each of the 
8 seaate districts. Besides the incorporated academies, there are 
16 

Digitized by KJKJK.fW IK^ 



182 VKW TORK. [1834. 

muij other flourishing aeminaries in difierent parts of the state, among 
which are the Brooklyn Collegiate Institute for young ladies, and they 
Troy Female Seminary ; and there are institutions for the Deaf and 
Dumh in the city of New York and at Canajoharie. 

Regents of the Universitt. 

In 1784, an act was passed instituting a university in New York ; and 
in 1787, that act was repealed, and a literary corporation or society was 
constituted, styled the *' Regrents of the University of the S(ate of New 
York," consisting of 21 members, who are all appointed by the legisla- 
ture, except the governor and lieutenant-governor, who are members 
€x officio. They meet annually (and oflener if necessary) at Albany, 
on the 2d Thursday in January. They have the power of conferring 
medical degrees, and other degrees of a higher order than that of 
Master of Arts, and of incorporating academies ; are authorized to 
visit and inspect annually all the colleges and academies in the state, 
and make a report of their condition and management to the legisla- 
ture ; and are also charged with the care of distributing the annual 
income of the Literary Fund in equal proportions in the eight senate 
districts, for the benefit of common schools, and among the incor- 
porated academies in proportion to the number of students pursuing 
classical studies. 

Columbia College. 

This institution, which is in the city of New York, was established 
by a royal charter, in 1754, under the name of King* s CoUegCj by which 
name it was known till the Revolution. Its operations were suspended 
during the revolutionary war, and in 1787, an act was passed confirm- 
ing its original charter ; but the name of the institution was changed to 
Columbia College, and its legislative government was Vested in 24 
Trustees. — The college library contains 8,000 volumes ; and the stu- 
dento* libraries 6,000. 

Succession of Presidents. 



Bev. Samuel Johnson, D. D., 1754 to 1763 
Rev. Mylcs Cooper, LL. D., 1763 to 1775 

Wm. S. Johnion, LL. D^ 1787 to 1800 



ReT. C. H. Wharton, D. D., 1801 to 1801 

Ri. ReT. Benj. Moore, D. D., 1801 to 1811 

Rer. Wm. Harris, D. D., 1811 to 1899 

Wm. A. Daer, LL. D., 1830 



Faculty in 1833. 

Wm. A. Daer, LL. D., PruOaO, 

Rev. John McVickar, D. D., Pr, Mor. PkiL, I 

Rhet., 4rc. 
N. F. Moore, LL. D., Prqf. Greek 4* Latin. 
Ch. Anthon, LL. D., Prqf. Oreek^ Lot., ^e, 
J. Renwiek, LL. D., /V. JTat. Pka.^Cktm. 

Number of students, in 1833,^ about 100. Alumni 1,150. Camrnrntt- 
ment is on the 1st Tuesday in August. Vaeaiion from commehcemeat 

Digitized by VJV7V.fV IC 



Wm. H. E]liot^ M. D., Pref. CKemu 
H. J. Anderson, M. D., Pn^, JMte*., ^ 
James Kent, LL. D., Prof, Lew, ' 
Lorenzo da Ponte, Pref. RaUan. 
Rev. Antoine Verren, Prqf. fHnek. 



I8ML] 2VKW YORK. 183 

Id tlM 1ft Monday in October; and receis from the 24th of December 
to the 2d of January. 

^UiiioN College. 
This instigation^ which is at Schenectady, was incorporated in 1794 ; 
and it deriyes its name from the union of several religious denominations 
in its establishment It is pleasantly situated to the east of the compact 
put of the city, on an eminence which affords a fine prospect. The 
boildiiigs consist of two brick edifices of four stories, each 200 feet long, 
mad each haying two wings extending 150 feet, containing upwards of 
100 rooms for students ; and two boarding-houses. The college has 
been liberally patronised by the state ; it has valuable funds, and a 
libraiy of 5,350 volumes , and the students* libraries contain 8,920 vol- 
■nes. The Trustees consist of the governor, lieutenant-govemoTi 
chancellor, judges of the supreme court, attorney- general, surveyor- 
general, comptroller, and treasurer, ex qffido ; and 13 elected members. 

Sueeesnon of Presidents, 

Est. Jobs B. Smitli, D. D., 1795 to 17991 Rev. Jonathan Maxey, D. D., 1801 to 1N4 
■•v. Jonttbaa £d wanb, a D., 1798 to laoi | R« y. Eliphalet NoU, D. D., 1804 

FacuUy in 1833. 



B«v. EUphakt Nott, a D., PreridenL 
ScT. B. Proodfit, D. D., Pr^. Oretk ^ Lot. 
Bar. A. Potter, A. M., Fr, Mor. PkiL, RheL 
& F. Joalin, M. D., Pr, JVU. PkU, ^ Math, 
htka A. Tatea, A. M., Pr^f- OrimU, Liu 



Iiaac W. Jacluon, A. M., JUnsUmt Pr^f, 

Math, t J\nu. PhO. 
Th. C. Reed, A. M., AuisUmi Pnf. PaML 

Ec t Intd. PkU. 
Cheater Averill, JtttUUaU Prqf. 
Silaa Tottao, A. B., TtUar, 

Number of students, in 1833, 223. Alumni 1,444 ; alumni living 
IJ39A ', ministers 308; ministers living 290. 

Cammeneem^ent is on the 4th Wednesday in July. Vacatums ; — Ist, 
from commencement, 6 weeks ; — 2d, 4 weeks, ending about the 5th of 
January ; — 3d, 4 weeks, ending about the 1st of May. 

Amuud expenses^ including all charges, $112.50; charity students, 
#49.50. 

Hamilton College. 
This institution, which is pleasantly situated near the village of Clin- 
ton, 9 miles W. by S. of Utica, was originally established as an acad- 
emy, styled Hamilton Oneida Academy, and was erected into a college 
in 1812. It has received benefactions from various individuals, and 
considerable patronage from the state. The college edifices, three in 
number, four stories high, stand in a line, on an elevated site, com- 
manding an extensive and beautiful prospect. The college library con- 
tains 2,500 volumes, and the students* libraries 3,700. A law professor- 
ship has lately been founded by a bequest of $20,000 firom Wm. H. 
Maynardy Esq. The board of Trustees consists of 94 members. 



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Wm*.a/^m» ». Pwtifct, i>»P^ i» ii < iw f ■ ;J9ii4iJiir«iyif.a,jy.ii«btJM.tfii. 

4£LiI«||MjPi^ — . fni.^pm, 

'ii^i^mrorgtadbitf^iniB^ 290; alimiiii fifing S57; 

-'%Saiiftfii«rf i» on tlie M W«dbMdiiy in Angiut. r«atfMf «wli^ 
^MD^oiiaiinencement, 5 wMfai;— dd, ftom Om ad WedneMiij in De- 
eemberi 4 w«elcs ; — 3dy from the 3d Wedneiday In April, A woeks. 

Ammd, expemtet of ttodento of the two higher ehuMM firom $81 to 100 ; 
in the two lower efawMs^ from f72 to 91. 

GnirxT4 CpiMbnns. 

Thii inntitotion,. whieh wee fiNUidod %j die Epiieofnlpne in 1885, in 
fleenirtiy litanted at Geneva. n# eoilefe fibiaty eontaine 890 t^ 
nmea ; the atudentp' libraries 1.1S0. Rer. Jfuper Adbme, Fruidmi,tkoak 
18SI»to 1888; — moceeded bythe Ret. IL 8. Maeon. 

JVMMify m 1833. 
Bey. RicfcMdg. Mmod, P. P., n r u U e n i . M. R HdMrfa, #lr^. JML XeMjr. 

JMvMd Catberii, IL O., IV. CShMi. t JWe.. JoliD M. BvB<n, A. IL, 9Mn 
Eev.HeMyMMidtvilki>JVtr«i i * rwfc IP. H. Fowlw, A. B., XWfrw * 

Nmnber of atodenta, in 1838, 44 : — alomm 18 ; minialeia 9. 

CtmunmeemmU if on the lat Wedneaday In Augaat. rapatfanti— 
in, from eonunenoement, 6 weeka;— 8d, at thedoae of thejranr,,S 
Woaka;-3d,inAiMriI,3weeha^* V 

BnOCKPOBT CoLLKoa. 

The Baptiita are now oonatmcting, at Brockport, a floorlahia^ ^ 
fafe, on the Erie Canal, 73 milea eaat of Bvlialo, a oollege ndlioe of 
flao atone* 100 ftet by 00, five atoriea high inolndiiy th#4 
yOMk JBrlo laontain 90 rooma Ibr the atiiManaiodatMMr «f ^ 

i a HamilteB, hi Madiaen oamily^ (» niHaa JOI^ 

T'Af ^tib.'«aplialii^ and in e n r p et i to d finlBMfirVi^ 

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in 1833,88; 



in tli9 pMp«z«tlbi|r ' 



lli1»^jnri|f.8|i«C.IKv. 



m.^ l«l WcdMiday in Jane. F«MtioiM ; — 
;i^#«a;— Sa, iW>m the 3d WMdaj inlv- 
:i«tt tie iM' Monday ill Jinoaiy, 3 weeks. 
I^lltttilft #16:— fbrbotfd, wmdiing, and lodging 

tenuiAnT or thb PKOtsstAKT Efhcofal 
«l JVeip ForlE ; /oiuuM tm 1819. 

D. D., JV^. C. C. Moora, LL. D., Fr^, Orimii. #• Or. 
Lie. 
B«r. J. M. Wainwrif ht, D. D., Fr^, Ail. 

B«T. F. L. Havki, D. D., P rtf, Ad. JBik 

in 1833, 50 : — wliole nomber educated 146. 

TfxinM^ from the last Report : — " The contributions 

the aeminacy ftoo Ita ftnt establishment down to the 

ta.f 166,988.67; of which there have been expend- 

|40;W0.60; for buildings $33,520; fill'mg up 

i|fiiil05; assesMBMita ler sIfeeU, &c. $1^325; invest- 

eeatributed lor sofaoiaiihips f 14,194.73; leaving a 

iUTSited in ptoehs» bQA^f and mortgages, jielding 

c/Cf3J600. The annual expenditure, with the utmost 

i6 $5,600, and the Mteieney, consequent^jr, of the 

etpendlhn^, !r f li406. Two large legacies have 

ile ittsktation, one of |60,000 by Mr. Sherred, and an- 

lijr Mr. Tndmjm KMm«i bat neither of them is yet 



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Nombftr of itndMito, in ia|3|#|:— whole 
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Hartwiok Thsolooical BsmvAmT. . ' '* 

Tb^B iiMlitiition, litaftted at Hwtwick, in OUogo ooniil^^ 70 niloo W. 
of Aliwny., , was ineoiporatad in 1815, and owm ito oitabJwIuQOttt to the 
tiborality of the Rev. John C* Hartirig, a Lutheran miniflor, who be- 
^pieathed a large estate in bnd for the purpoee of ^iuidi|i|( |^ ygiHiary 
fiif educating young men for the ministry, paftiedi|ttly in the Lntheran 
Chlfipofi: It csoosiste of two departments, the ti hioli f iwa aad the urn- 
den^eai. The fbnner had, in 1838, 9 studenti; the latter 80. 'The 
library eontains 1,000 Tolnmes. — Rev. O. B. Miller, A. M., Prmapti. 
Rev. C. fi. Thummel, A. M., JSMriMami. 

-» 

COLLSOS or PhTBXCUIIS AMD BOBftBOVS n TBB ClTT Of ff* IfattK. 

This instittolion was incorporated, in 1807, by the reoommendatioa^of 
the Regents of the University, under whoee government, it is placed, 
and by ^hom its degrees are conferred* The lectures commenot jptt 
the 1st of November, annually, and continue 4 monthe. EzpnmbiUm 
_^_. iflOO. Number ofstudente In 1832-3, 188. ^ ' ' 

PTtgmS99nh ' 4. • »<i 5 : t- 

Edwud D»lti«]d, M. P., IV^ 0Mjl;1iJ 

Jtte »Dmr, U.^ J5rt|f.^»«a. t«4. c 



J. A. imhk, M. P., Fr^, JtuML f Fk^tUL 

jAlMB ' WU nMV'HMi, K. P., rt^» AMrywy. 



Airp BcriMBdvs or TVS WsWlnorl^lilfMi^. 
l^hio«a k eetaUiah^d lit fki^ ^^^H^l^ 







■m 



Hit IbnHid «» « platt tiiBilMr to Mi 

loffKeMh. Itogofvn. 

of tt» omumh eoanoil of the eity of 

1m fids ,bo«id of Sl7 mombonii no qbo 

to iMye a majoiftf ; ud puMiMi of 

» aligiMo to all idBoof. TIm «iibmI 

yik OB tlM 1ft Monday in NoFondtor. 

two departmento; ono te tho higlitr 

i^ip^|i6|onee; the othtt embracaa wliat k oioanj 

i| of d^Miicaly philofophical, and mathematical in- 

^. jipnpleto coarie of English litorataie, of mathe- 

tiieir application to agrieultore, to the acte^ 

I'fitif^Muaj pnnuito of life. The ProfeMon (whoee 

^Ib^ph palaries and from feep) are divided into the 

\^^. Sdence and the Arte, of Law, and of Me^Bcinfi. 

IkihmUy in 1833, wae 137. 







PrqfkswoTB already ^ppomUd, 
R D., deMfilir, ^ 






B«v. John Mamgni, A. M., JV^T- Or., lA 
Win. Enenpmrtaeli, A. M., Pr^. €HnMm* 
Mif. Gtbram da N«tww, JV^. ^Maif*. 
Lormuo L. da Poala, JVfT. ilalte. 
Charlii FUtaeiitier, A^ M^ Atf. JHjmI. , 
O. OiGfevekad, A. M., Pr^. Ltm. 
Omuj Bottwieli, A. M., AmCt.^ JBH., OMfv. 
S«T. S. H. Cos, D. D., LteL Mrr. PJkil. 
FmwiiLMw, P. D., Xccf. aMii.,4rie , #». 




LSAXHSS efOOISTOt. 

SoeUiy; founded in 1804. Morgan Lewie, Pru- 
jDe PeyeteTy Jnn., Seermary, 

and PkUaaofhuai ptUty. D«jridfioetck,M.*D., 
de Peytter, Jon., Seetytory. 
«riteJ^<^;iNiUded inlSOa JohttTranSM^ 
BemagySeBrdt^yr . - «» 

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^ i £i iddS; iiiid ii ntmM ai tlit mOltiijr Mj|:^«^#«it 
^ I'bj^MaMm, at ita pumfe tliri>ii|)i H^ Blg)iJN^| plf^iiadr 
» wna cif land which waa ceded by tha atate of Naw Tw Iq^ 
Ji^teii'Stataa. The Chief Engineer of the Amj (to# li^alli^V 
a^ Charlea Gratiot) b, ex q/UUt, Injector of the Aeajliiiij|^« Iflia' 
MiUtarj Staff oompriaea the Superintendent mod 0omamaiitMf 9/^ 
alwat^ indiTidoalay conaiating of profoaaofa, aaaialiuilppioAiaBaf^ 
taaehain. The number of cadeta la limited to 9ML Candidatai fer 
iw a aitmition in the achool aa cadeta moat not Wliil^i4'iior«aboira 
I^Tcmof age; and each cadet proTiooaly to hia iafmOi^^ the 
^aidiiht of ttie ITnitad Stotea, muat, with the Oo^«M iif 1^^^ 
gwmui/aign artiolea by which he engagta to aei^ % ffiiii^'viiMki 
flCHmeK diae|iamd. The pay of a cadet ia f iq a moftth, alii IM ti- 
tiona a Jay/ fte regular coorae of atodiea bompriaaa 4 yean:. ' 



Vm. NEW JERSEY. 

GOYSBVMUrT. 

V 

ELt4a F. SsBLBT, Gtoairnar and CkanM^r ^Ma Slafa a^ 

otteio ; term of office ezpifea Oct 1833, 
Edward Condit, Vie^Prta. LeguUHw C&mM, ^wdi^f^ '3 ^ 
J«MiP,Weatoott» Smsr^mryrfSUUeandJMUor, 60 ft mM^ 



WltliaiB Giant, TVaoatirar, 

Jalm M. White, .AferiMy Genml, 
Slacgr G. Potta, CUrt tn CftmiMfy, 



i90 






JODICIABT. 

aaCNirt 



ti'??'*^.-'. 



• •«aiCMli «^iiCica, 



<ay%"4Nu 




■m. 




\j^l^ pyuMidlj dMtributMl «iM^ tht 

%^^i9f llfi tuMp pu4 for Om mijpfOflk«f 

^i^f|i|M'flf ttM Fond does nol amooiii tolld* 

|h^ ^ttldfMI dimir upon the «t«ta tra«|iii«r 

b maka ap the defidieiioy ; end that IImi 

<(|i^l|lNi^ e^ applied to pay teaahefajor 

^ klf alM '^ aafiboriiee " and " reeommaiiday" 

jd!at '* tfia eerexal tbwnahipa, at their ammal iowJh 

tax or otherwiie, each additional anmoraamof 

olij|e«ty aa they may" deem proper ; — and alao the 

^"ilkgripBly the earn received from the state, to acbool- 

fottr 4ir tile laid township, '^ they elect to do the same." 

with theee recommendations; others hare 

The town of Newark reoehred, in 1883, $410.79 

the additional snm of $1,750. 

^Etfeaetfiom Governor Soothard's Message to the La> 

Itt Janoary, 1633, presents a view of the present oon-' 

ascfiools in this slate. 

is eertainly inefficient It haa defteta whleh 

and which experience haa enabled the people of 

It needs a larger fhnd ; aad it is hoped thai 

ii^ beibrs long, be able to avgment it. It needs an intelH- 

nmissi<mer, whoso official doty it shall be to deyise, 

by the legislatare, to cany into execution snch nnl- 

4ptey be ealcolated to eflfect the great object ; and although 

nhietanee to the creation of new offices, yet that portion 

#}u^ may be doToted to his compensation, will be fonndto 

itnre. It needs more competent teachers, and cannot 

be adopted to provide them. It needs also the 

of the townships, in raiMng the money which is to be 

this be done, no amount of money which the state 

to add to the principal^fiind, will enable ua to ao^om- 

and we ehall fidl hi behind other statea, in our 

that proud consummation, when the doors of the 

be opMied 1o every ohild, and education and Hghl W 

att, on whom the right of aulE^ devolves, and onwhoa a 

^^rttta^^iia valda-aidVpermaaency ofour inslitullwia 

]jiwaa;wUl loquira tiiia ooopenrttoA} i» 



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190 



new JERsxr. 



[1834. 



neither unreasonable nor unjust. The benefit of the fund may, without 
wrong to any, be made to depend on a willingness to aid the purposes 
for which it was created, and to enjoy its advantages." 

ACAOEMIKS. 

There are few academies in this state which possess any considerable 
funds ; and public institutions of this kind have generally declined, and 
have been superseded by private schools, which are more popular and 
better supported. There are, in several of the towns and in different parts 
of the state, respectable and flourishing seminaries for the education of 
females, for preparing lads for college, and also for affording a good 
EngHsh education. Among the respectable institutions for these pur- 
poses, are the Edgehill Seminaj^ at Princeton, the Young Ladies' Insti- 
tute at Newark, the Mantua Manual-Labor Institute near Sergeantville, 
Lawrenceville High School, Bloomington Academy, and the Athenian 
Academy, at Rah way. 

College of New Jersey at Princeton. 
This college was established at Elizabethtown in 1746 ; the next year 
It was removed to Newark ; and in 1757, to Princeton. It has long 
been a highly respectable and flourishing seminary, and here many dis- 
tinguished men have received their education. The college edifice, 
•tyled Nassau Hall, is built of stone, four stories high, 175 feet by 50, 
containing a chapel, and 60 rooms for students. There are also build- 
ings for the library, philosophical apparatus, museum, refectory, recita- 
tion-rooms, &c. The college library contains 7,000 volumes ; and the 
students' libraries 4,000. The board of Trustees consists of the governor 
of the state (who is president ex officio), 10 other laymen, and 10 clergy- 
men. 

Succession of Presidents, 
1746 CO 1747 



Rot. Jona. Dickiason, 

Rer. Aaron Burr, 1748'" 1757 

Rer. Joaatban Bdwardf, 1757 " 1758 

Rot. Samael DuTiei, 1759 " 1761 

Rot. Samuel Fialey, D. D., 1761 " 176t 



Rer. J. Witheripoon, D.D.,LL.D. j ^^^95? 
Rot. 8. S. Smith, D. D., LL.D., 1795 to 1819 
Rer. Ath. Green, D.D.,LL.D., 1819 *< 1898 
Rev. Jamei Carnaban, D. D., 1833 



Rot. James Carnahan, D. D., PrtsidenL 
Rev. John Maclean, Fice-Pru- and Prof. 

Ancient Lang. 
Rev. Albert B. Dod, Prtf. Matktmatia, 
Joaeph Henry, Prof. IfaL PhiL 
John Torroy, M. D., Pr^f. Chom. 



Faculty in 1833. 

Sam. L. Howell, M. D., Prt^f. AnaL if Pk§9. 
Lewis Hargous, Prof. Fronek and ^^a$u 
Alexander, Adj. Prpf. Ancient Lang. 



Benedict Jager, Prqf. Oer, and JtaL 
S. H. McDonald, J. C. Edwards, and Johm 
S. Hart, Tntoro. 



Number of students, in 1833, 133 : — whole number of alumni 1,930 ; 
ministers 406; alumni living 1,190. 

Commencement is on the last Wednesday in Sept. VaaUions ; — 1st, 
firom commencement, 6 weeks ; — 2d, from the 1st Thursday after the 
Sid TuesdBjr in April, 5 weeks. 

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RinP«HU COLLSOB. 



I #ii Ibimdcd, in 1770, bj mlnisten of the Dutdh R«-. 

liitf iMtttofld Queen's Ck>Uege; bnt tome yeannneeit 

I in honor of a ditUngnuihed benefictor. The 

j^ii ef flone, three etoriee higlti* devoted to poblle pu* 

' febefKlly lodge in private familiee. The lihnijr 

» and the students' libraries 2,500. 



.Ptoifty m 1833. 

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Cvrrto, TtmUr te 0$ 



e,0.tt.,J 

I «M 4 dassee, in 1833, 70. V 

7%sof flftcel SeiiiMUM3f . 
I ii eonneeted with Rutgers College, and is onder tbt 
Mi* Dnteh Reformed Chnreh. Stodents, in 1833, 94. 

aer, D. D., Prof. DidMtie tffuf PoUmie TIeoI. 
. Cannon, D. D., Pref, EeeL HiM. and Church Chv. 
d, D. D./ Prqf. BiiUaA LiUratwre, 



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192 TENNSYLVAMA. [1834. 

PENxNSYLVANlA. 

Government. 

Sakrj. 
GzoBGB WoLF| OovemoTf (term of office expires on the 3d Taes- 

day in December, 1835,) . . . . $4,000 

Samuel McKean, Secretary, 1,600 

Alexander Mahon, SUUe Treasurer^ .... 1,400 

David Sturgeon, Auditor General, 1,400 

Jacob Spangler, Surveyor General, .... 1,400 

Samuel Workman, Secretary of the Land Office, . . . 1,400 

Ellis Lewis, Attorney General, . 300 and fees. 

Jesse R. Burden, President of the Senate. 

Samuel Anderson, Speaker ofUie House of Representatives. 

Judiciary. 
Supreme Court, 

John B. Gibson, Chief Justice, . $2,i5t56.G7 

Milton C. Rogers, . Associate Justice, . . 2,000 00 

Charles Houston, . .do 2,000.00 

John Ross, do. . ; . . 2,000.00 

John Kennedy, . ... do 2,000.00 

William Duane, . . Prothonotary for East District, Fees. 

The judges of the Supreme Court hold Circuit Courts throughout tlie 
state, for which they receive, in addition to their salaries, $4 a day 
while on the circuits. 

The jurisdiction of the following three District Courts for Philadelphia 
and for the counties of Lancaster and Allegheny, is the same as that of 
the Court of Common Pleas in other counties. 

District Court for the City and County of Philadelphia, 

Balarr. 
Joseph Barnes, . President Judge, . $2,000 

Th. McKean Pettit, . . Judge, 2,000 

Charles S. Coxe, . . do. 2,000 

John Lisle, . Prothonotary. 

District Court for the City and County of Lancaster, 

iayes, . President Judge, 

District Court for the County of Allegheny. 

T, . . President Judge, 

The State is divided into the 17 following Districts, for the sessions of 



Salary. 
Alexander L. Hayes, . President Judge, , , , $1,GU0 



Salary. 
Robert C. Trier, . President Judge, . $1,600 



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Edwmrd K|ag. ~ 
Walter FnnklUi. 
GuTiok MaUarj. 
Thomas BiiTiudde. 
Charles Shaler. 



I Mid Xislugb, 
I lUpm, Csatre, and dsatfield, 
^ and Allegheny, 
rJUereer, VenfDgOy md Warren, Henry Shippen. 
|^ilM%Qaieiy, . . John Fox. 

^ Lyeoming, Union, dt Colombia, 
^ Adams, and Perry, John Reed. 

I Indiana, Armstrong, Sl Can4>ria, John Yoang. 
tW^M, and Pike, Dayid Scott 

i:]L«^nott. and SchoylkiJl, Calvin filythe. 

, Bradibrd, Tioga, and McKean, Edward Herrick. 
a^Kayetts,. and Greene, Thomas H. Baird. 

r|i|d Oekware,> .... Isaac Darlington. 
^ Bedlbrd, and Somerset, Alex'r Thomson. 



EDUCATION. 

CoMHoH Schools. * 

to, at the commencement of the settlement of Pennsyl- 

published his " Preface to the Frame of Government,^' 

lltyi, *' That which makes a good constitution most keep it, 

^irisdom and virtue, — qnalities that, because they descend 

By inheritai)ce, must be carefully propagated by a virtu- 

r of youth." In the " Fhune " itself, he provides that the 

i provincial council shall erect and order all public schools. 

\ of the state, adopted in 1790, contuns the following 

»*'The legislature, as soon as oonvenienUy may be, shall 

r Uw, fiw the establishment of schools throughout the state, 

r that the poor may be taught gratis." 

pti s o d by the legislature, on the 2d of April, 1831, pro- 

eitabllshment of a general, mtem of education, by ere- 

EM>4i School Fund," and appointing three commissioners 

j^iiriigning to the* fund aU moneys due for unpatented 

lid tfM' state by mortgagee or ^en for purchase money, aal 

^IglliMtions, warrants, and patents for landi fbes in tte 

iiift Moeeds of a liK of one miU per dolkri lud lfaM!l 

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ifiini 



j ifaj ji p t l tifl Ai MPfMl iatiiigtlWI j iji flw i t l» »lgil/WI; •ftarwiidt 
|1m> luloiigt ii to b* iilllMl•^]p #ll|jiliiiMi INp ^ 4Q|ifaft of whgffl fj 
M dwll be provided by law. Aoeordiaf to 'tii# eUtemeiit of Samuel 
IMCeaii« Beq., Secretary of BuiU, in hii Report iektfre to Eilneatuii^ 
Fpof CWkreB (iSaxeh, 1833), the Sohool Fond amoiinted, on the 9d of 
Apitl • KS3y to iboQt ^904,000 ; and the income of the Fond will amoamt 
to tbefiopowd Miin of f 100,000 per aiiniiin hy the let of April, 1839, 
ffjhii^il irin be at the dlepoMl of the legialatafe for the promotion of 
ftoe edioola throoghont the state. 

Mr. Af cKean obeerree; — *' Since 1816, [in the state of New York J 
tiie nnmber of children taught and the amount of monej expended 
under the present system have regularly increased, until, in the last year. 
1832, we have the sublime spectacle of 507,106 pupils, withoat distino- 
tion, receiving regular and constant instruction, upon uniform princi- 
ples, under the direct supervision of the government, at an expense of 
•bout one million of dollars, or not much exceeding two dollars a schol- 
m\ whllil PeBOsylvania, Ibr tiie aanie year, with equal wealth, and a 
pwpitlalion m^ tu^y inferior in number to &at of New York, preeents 
the liinentshle contrast of 17,467 children not ediieafsd, but returned as 
subjects entitled to receive instruction, under a system condemned by 
universal public opinion and experience, and that too at an expense of 
f 48,46QJ25." In this statement the county of Philadelphia was not in- 
<duded. — The whole number of children returned by the a s s ess ors, as 
educated at the public expense throughout the state, in 1832, was 
83,582; at the expense of $81,116.70. — See Biasard't Pmm. R^gUUr, 
A]prU 6, 1833. 

According to a Memorial which was read before the Penniiylvania 
Society for the Promotion of Public Schools, at Philadelphia, Oct. 1830, 
«« There were at least 400,000 * children in Pennsylvania between the 
ages of 5 and 15 ; of these during the preceding year, there were not 
150,000 in all the schools in the state." 

Aooorjing to a Chronological ¥iew of the enactmento of the legisla- 
Isirei on the subject of education, since the first settlement of Pennsyl- 
VMii^ qooununicated to Hazard's Register of Pennsylvania, by Mr. W. 
R. Johnson^ the public acta relating to this subject amount to 220; the 
^hole imowit of ^ppropriaiions in money or in other interesta equiva- 
ijpf ffl( nion^, » #297416 ; the numbet of acres of land applied Ui aid 
^g^g^0l9^m^^!S^.'^ \ and the institotioBa created, endowed, or remodp 
tl^Pt ^B^iW"^ F'^neipa^ 




1834.] 



PXNNSTLYAIflA. 

Academies. 



195 



The following are the 55 academies in the state, with the date of their 
foundation or incorporation, as stated in tlie Register of Pennsylvania. 
These institutions have received small endowments from the state, from 
81,000 to $10,000 each. 



Allentown, 


1813 


Franklin, Venan 


. 1812 


Montrose, Susqu 


.1816 


Athens, 


1813 


Germantown, 


1784 


Newtown, 


1790 


Beachwoods, 


1813 


Gettysburg, 


1810 


Norristown, 


1804 


Beaver, 


1803 


Greensburg, 


1810 


Northumberland 


,1804 


Bedfoid, 


1810 


Greersburg, 
Hatboro', LoUer, 


1810 


Orwigaburg, 


1813 


Bellefonte, 


1805 


1812 


Philadel. Kpis. 


1787 


Butler, 


1810 


Harrisburg, 


1809 


Pittsburg, 


1787 


Carmich. Greene 


, 1810 


Huntingdon, 


1816 


Reading, 


1788 


Cbambersburg, 


1799 


Indiana, 


1814 


Smethport, 


1829 


Chester, 


1811 


Kittaning, 


1821 


Somerset, 


1810 


Clearfield, 


1827 


Lancaster, 


1H27 


Strasburg, 


1823 


Danville, 


1818 


Lebanon, 


1810 


Sti^oudsburg, 


1814 


Delaware, 


1813 


Le Raysville, 


1830 


Warren, 


1822 


Dojlestown, Un 


.1827 


Lewistown, 


1814 


Waterford, 


1811 


Dnndaif, 


1830 


Meadville, 


1807 


Wellsborough, 


1817 


£aston. 


1805 


Mercer, 


IHII 


Wilkesbarre. 


1807 


Ebensburg, 


1819 


Milford, 


18-27 


Williamsport, 


1811 


Erie, 


1811 


Mifflinsburg, 


1827 


York, 


1799 


Fraiiklin, Greenf 


1813 











At Bethlehem, Nazareth, and Litiz, there are Moravian Schools which 
have long had a good reputation. 

Universities and Colleges. 

The universities that have been incorporated in this state, are the 
University of Pennsylvania at Philadelphia, 1755 ; Western University 
at PitUburg, 1820. The Colleges; Dickinson College at Carlisle, 1783 ; 
Franklin College at Lancaster, 1787, now closed ; Jefferson College at 
Canonsburg, 1802; Washington College at Washington, 1806; Alle- 
gheny College at Meadville, 1815; Lafayette College at Easton, 1626; 
Madison College at Union Town, now closed^ 1827 ; Pennsylvania Col- 
lege at Gettysburg, 1832. 

University or Pennsylvania. 

This institution was incorporated in 1755, at Philadelphia, by the 
same of " the College, Academy, and Charity School "; in 1779 it was 
erected by an act of the legislature into a university; and in 1791, it 
was placed upon its present footing by an act uniting into one body the 
trustees of the university, and those of the college, academy, and char- 
ity achools of Philadelphia. The moneys granted to it by the state le- 
gislature at different times, amount to $ 69,666}, besides the exemp- 
tion, in 1832, of its real estate from taxation for 15 years. Its whole 



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PENN8TLVARIA. 



[1834. 



property, in 1830, as reported to the legislature, was $195,000; its an- 
nual income ^15,000; value of real estate ;fit 107,059. — See Register 
qf Ptnn.y Jan. 1833, Vol. XI. The institution comprises the medical, 
collegiate, and academical departments ; and charity (English) schools ; 
and is under the legislative government of 24 trustees, of whom the 
governor of the state is a member ex officio. 



Succession of Provosts. 



William Smith, D. D., 
John lowing, l>. D., 
JohD McDowell, LL. D., 



1755 lo 1779 John Andrewi, D. D., 
1780 " J 802 
ld06 «< 1810 



I8I0 lo 1813 
Frederick Beoley, D. D., 1813 " 1«H 

Wm. H. De Lancey, D D., 1828 " 1^33 



Faculty of Arts, or CoUtgiatt Department^ in 1833. 



ProvoH, 



Robert Adrain, LL. D., Prqf. Matk, 

Rev. S. B. Wylie, D. D., Prqf. Heb.y Greek 

and Latin Lang. 
Alex. D. Bacbe, A.M., Pr. Jfat. Ph. tf Ckem, 



Henry Reed, A.M., jf**t. Pnf. Mor.PkH.j^-c. 
Kev. Chr. P. Crus6, A. M., Assist. Prvf. 
Ku^. de Valvitle, Iiutnut. in French. 
Auguitui VVillii, do. in Spaniith. 
Hermann Bokum, do. in Oerman, 



Number of undergraduates, in 1833, 105. Whole number of alumni 
unknown : — number of those who received the degiee of bachelor of 
arts, in 1829, 11 ; in 1830, 8 ; in 183l,2u ; in 1832, 25; in 1833, 25. 

Covimencrment is on the last Thursday in July. The collegiate year 
consists of three terms : — Ist, from the 15th Sept. to the 22d Dec. ; — 
2d, from the 7th Jan. to the 15th April; — 3d, from the 1st May till 
Commencement. 

Expenses — for instruction ;j^l5 a term, with a moderate additional 
oharge for the modern languages : — board in the city from $2,50 to $3 
a week. 

Medical Department. 

The medical school, which forms a part of the university, is the oldest, 
most distinguished, and most numerously attended of any in the United 
States. 

Faculty of Medicine. 
Philip S. Physic, M. D., Emeritua Prqf. qf Robert Hare, M. D., Prqf. Chemistry. 



Surg, and Anal. 
John U. Coxe, M. D., Pr. Mat. Med.^ Phar. 
Natb. Chapman, M. D., Prqf. Inst, tf Prac. 

jved. 
Th. C. Jame«, M. D., Prttf. Midwifery, 



Wm. Gibaon, M. D., Prt^. Surgery. 
Wm. E. Homer, M.D., Prof. Anatomy. 
Wm. P. Dewees, M. D., Adj. Pn^. Midw. 
8amael Jackion, M. D., Assist. Prqf. hst. 
and Prac. Phys. and Clin. Med. 



The Lectures commence on the 1st Monday in Nov., and tlie com- 
mencement for conferring degrees is held about the 1st of April. 

Expenses : — matriculation (first year only) 9^ > lectures of the six 
professors $20 each, — j^l20; — ticket for the almshouse or hospital 
tprst year only) $10 : — total, the first year, $135. — Second year, lee- 
tures $120; graduation and diploma $40 :t~ total, for twb years, $295. 



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1891.] PENN9TLVA1IIA. 197 

Ji^edical ttadents, in 1833, 368 ; in the collegiate department 105 ; in 
The academical department 18G ; in the charity schools 164 : — total 
823. 

Jefferson Medical College. 

The Medical Faculty of Jefferson College (an institution grafled upon 
Jefferson College at Canonsburg) was incorporated in 1826; and its 
affairs are managed by a board of 10 trustees residing in Philadelphia, 
where the institution possesses a spacious and well furnished college 
edifice. 

Medical Professors. 
G. Sharp Pattuon, M. D., Prof. Anat. iSamM. Calhoun, M. D., Prqf. Mat. Med. 

GeoL McClellan, M. D., Prof. Surg. Uacob Greon, M. D., Prof. Chetn. 

John Revere, M. D., Prof. Tkeo. tf Pr. PAy*.;Sam'I. McClellaii, M. D., Pr«/. Midw.^ ifc. 

Number of students, in 1833, 121. — The lectures commence on the 
1st Monday in Nov., and end in March. 

Expenses : — lectures of the six professors, $1.5 each, $90 ; ticket for 
the almshouse or hospital $10 ; — total, first year, $100 *, — for the 2d 
year (with the graduation fee, $15) $115. — Fee to the dissector in 
anatomy $10. This ticket may be taken or not, at the option of the 
student. — Board of medical students, from $2,50 to $5 a week. 

Dickinson College. 
This institution, which is pleasantly situated at Carlisle, was incorpo- 
rated in 1783, and has received from the state donations at different 
times, amounting in all to $51,800, and 10,000 acres of land. It has, at 
some periods, prospered ; at others declined ; and at others, it has been 
entirely suspended. The principal building is a large edifice of stone ; 
and the college library contains about 2,000 volumes. 

Succession of Presidents. 



ReT. Charlci Niibot, D. D. 1784 to 1804 
Eev. Robert Davidson, D. D. 1804 " 1809 
Rev. Jeremiah Atwatet, D. D. 1809 



Rev. John M. Mason, D. D. 1831 to 1894 
Rev. Wiliiam Noill, D. D. 1829 

Rev. Samuel B. How, D. D. 1829 ** 1839 



The college was closed from about 1816 to 1822 ; also in 1829 ; and 
again in 1832. On tlic (ith of June, 1833, the land, buildings, library, 
apparatus, and other property were transferred to a joint committee of 
the Baltimore and Philadelphia Conferences of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, with the full consent of the old board of trustees, who resigned 
their of&ces, and a new board was elected, of which the Rev. John Em- 
ery, D. D.y a Methodist Bishop, was chosen president. — The new board 
elected the Rev. John P. Durbin, A. M., President of the college ; and 
John Reed, Professor of Law ; passed resolutions to make immediate 
arrangements for establishing a preparatory school, and took measures for 
raSpening the college without onnecessarj delay. 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



198 PEifirsTLVAiaA. [1834, 

JXFFERBON CoLLEOE. 

This institution, which is situated at Canonsburg, 28 miles SW. of 
Pittsburg, was incorporated in 1802. It has received the following do- 
nations from the sUte; — in 1806, $3,000; in 1821, $1,000 annually for 
five years; in 1826, $1,000 annually for four years; in 1832, $2,000 
annually for four years, — 6 indigent students to be educated for four 
years ; and afterwards, 24 to be prepared for school-teachers. — The 
ooUege library contains 1,000 volumes, and the students* libraries 2,400. 
The board of trustees consists of 30 members. 

Succession of Principals, 

ReT. John Watson, 1803 to 1809 Rev. Wm. McMillan, 1817 to 1832 

Rev. Jamet Dunlap, 1803 " 181 J ReT. Matthew Brown,D. D., 1833. 

Rot. AndrewWylie.D. D., 1813 " 1%W 

Faculty in 1833. 



Rot. Matthew Brown, D. D., PretidenL 
R«T. John McMillan, D. D., Prof. Tkeol, 
ReT. Jamei Ramsay, D. D., Prof. Hebrtw. 
h H. Kennedy, PrqT' Math. andJfat. Phil. 



Jacob Green, M. D., Pnf. Ckem. ^J^aL ITiM. 

Wm. Smith, Prtff. Lang. 

George Marshall, ) ^ru^h^m 
George M. Hall, J ^'^**^*- 



Number of undergraduates, in 1833, 155 : — alumni 404 ; alumni living 
371; — ministers 170. — Students in the preparatory school connected 
with the college, 77. 

Commencement is on the last Thursday in September. Vacations : — 
1st, from commencement to the 1st Monday in Nov. ; — 2d, from tho Ist 
of April to the 1st of May. 

Annual expenses : — tuition, fuel, library, repairs, &c. $25 : — board in 
college about 75 cents a week; in private families from $1 to 1,62]^. — 
There is belonging to the college a farm of 200 acres, on which 26 stu- 
dents nearly support themselves by laboring two hours a day. 

The Medical Faculty of Jefferson College, a branch of this institution, 
is under a board of 10 trustees, residing in Philadelphia, where the lec- 
tures are given. 

Washington College. 

This institution, which is pleasantly situated at Washington, 7 miles 
from Canonsburg, and 26 SW. of Pittsburg, was incorporated in 1806, 
and was newly organized in 1830. The state legislature endowed it 
with lands valued at $20,000, besides making other donations; one of 
which was by an act of 1826, granting it $1,000 annually for four years ; 
another in 1831, granting 5500 annually for five years. The college 
library contains 1,500 Tolumet. 



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1834.] P£NNSTLVA!<IA. 199 

Facrtliy in 1833. 



IvT.DsTsd HeCooaagby, A. M., Principal, 
mtr. Wn. P. Alrich, A. M., Pruf. Math., 

JfkL Pka., a»d Ckem 
Bobert Fulton, Prqf, Langtutgea, 



Joseph Ritaer, jr., A. M., Prqf. Eagin., 

PolU. Econ.y 4fc. 
\icli. Murray, AmisI. Teacher CUts. Dtpart, 
Albert Turrence, Aasiat. Teacher English 



I L. Gow, Prtf. Eng. ZAt. I Department. 

Number of students in the college in 1833, 47 ; in the English depart- 
ment, 72 : — alumni 146. 

Cammeneement is on the last Wednesday in September. There are 
two vaeatUmSf — during the months of April and October. 

Erpenses: — tuition fc20 a year ; — fuel, candles, and washing about 
$\d ; — board from $1 to 1 .50 a week. 

Westkrn Universitit. 

This institution, which is situated at Pittsburg, was incorporated in 
1819 ; and in 1820, it received from the state a grant of j|^,400, annu- 
allj for 5 years, in consideration of a relinquishment of land by the 
UDiversity. Persons of every religious denomination may be trustees, 
principals, and professors. 

Rev. R. Bruce, M. D., Principal; — with thiee other instructors. 
Number of students 50 : — alumni 45. Volumes in the library 500. 
Commeruement is on tlie last Friday in June. 

Allkgiieny College. 

This institution, which is at Meadville, was founded in 1815, incor- 
porated in 1817, with a grant from the legislature of $2,000 : in 1821, 
it received another grant of $1,000 annually for 5 years; and in 1827, 
$1,000 annually for 4 years. It has a college edifice of 3 stories, 120 feet 
by 40 ; and a library of 8,000 volumes, mostly the donation of the late Rev. 
Dr. Bentley, of Salem, Mass. — Whole number of alumni 10. — The 
operations of this institution have been, for some time, discontinued; but 
it has lately come into the possession of the Methodists, and is placed 
under the direction of the Pittsburg Conference of the Me ihodist Epis- 
copal Church. A professorship called the " Roberts professorship,'* in 
honor of Bishop Roberts, has been endowed, and the college will be 
opened for students on the 1st of Nov. — Rev. Martin Ruter, D. D., Pres- 
idtni; Rev. Homer J. Clark, A. M., yice-President and Prcf. Math.;' 
Auguatus W. Ruter, A. B., Prof. Lang. 

Pennsylvania College. 

This institution, which is at Gettysburg, 44 miles SW. of Harrisburgi 
was formed by erecting a gymnasium or preparatory school, connected 
with the theological seminary at the same place, into a college, and was 
incorporated in 1832. No disabilities are to be imposed on account of 
religious opinions. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



200 PENNSTLVAlflA. [1834. 

Faculty in 1833. 

Rev. Ernest L. Hazelius, D. D., Pres. ^ Prof. Latin Lang. ^ Ger. Ut. 

Rev. S. S. Schmucker, A. M., Prof. Intel. Phil, and Moral Science. 

H. Baucher, A. M., Prof. Greek Lang and Belles Lettres. 

M. Jacobs, A. M.. Prof Math., Chem., and JVatural Philosophy. 

J. H. Marsdeo, A. M., Prof. Mineralogy and Botany. 

Lafayette College. 

This institution, which is at Easton on the Delaware, was incorpo- 
rated in 18:26. No disabilities can exist as to professors or students on 
account of religion. — A college ediiice of stone is now in progress, 
three stories high with a basement ; 112 feet long and 44 wide, with a 
projection 4!) feet in length and 17 in width ; containing 54 rooms for 
students, a library-room, a hall, and recitation-rooms. 

The institution has commenced operations, and has 50 students, 
though the classes are not yet (Aug. 1833) properly formed, and the 
library and apparatus are scarcely begun. — Rev. George Junkin, Presi- 
dent; with three professors. 

Madison College. 
This institution was founded by the Methodists at Union Town, in 
Fayette county, on the Cumberland road, CO miles W. by N. of Cumber- 
land, and incorporated in 1827, . The legislature, in 1828, made a dona- 
tion to it of $5,000. — It was for a time in operation, but i^ now closed. 

Thi: Girako College for Orphans. 
The corner-stone for the principal building for this institution was 
laid on the 4th of July, 1833, on a tract of land containing 45 acres, 1^ 
miles from the city of Philadelphia. The order of the edifice is Gre- 
cian Corinthian; the material white and light-blue marble. The 
building is to be IGO feet in front, by 217 feet on the flank, including 
the porticoes, and its height 97 feet. The sum of $2,000,000 is specifi- 
cally appropriated to erect the buildings and support the college; and if 
this shall be found inadequate, such further sum as may be necessary is 
provided for in the conditions of other bequests by the founder. 

Bristol Collegiate Institdtion. 
This institution, which is situated on a farm called '' China Retreat,'* 
on the Delaware, 3 miles below Bristol, was established, in 1833, by 
gentlemen belonging to the Episcopal church ; and it is designed for the 
preparation of young men for the ministry, or for any of the liberal 
professions. The course of studies embraces 4 years ; and a preparatory 
school is to be connected with the institution. The collegiate year 
CQmmences on the 1st Wednesday in Oct., and ends on the 4th of Au- 
gust. The plan embraces a system of manual labor in shopf or on th« 
farm three hours daily. — Rev. Chtuncey Cotton^ Principal, 



)ogk 



It dspttioii offSyOOO ftom Om state, and •& 

t^lU'niii^iati and educaiion oUn^nijik^i. 

^iMlMInc of gfMiite, 94 fbet by 63, WM ercetod j» 

TIm tmrnal diftrge to pupils who paj, if 

F pttpil^ itt I8SO1 WM 7^, of wlioiii 32 were edaetted 

M^emieylTaiiia, }6 of Muyland, and 9 of New Jeraey. 

Tbsolo«ical SsmiiAuss. 

1(^0hl§M Semmmrf/ el Gm^^kwrg ; established in 1896, 

1191. f8S7. Aboot $12,000, toother with Tslnable books 

iljifis eollected ton it in Enrope. The building contains 

aiiiidento, a chapel and library, and lectare-rooms. Tlie 

7^000 Tolomes, mostly in the German language. Stu- 

^9P.— Rev. £. L. Hazelius, D. D., Prof, Oerman^ Greek, 

' d^irdi Hitiary ; Rev. S. S. Schmucker, Prof, 7%eoL, Pat- 

^Smmkuay ^ ih» Oemum Rrformed Ckurek, at York ; es- 
tn 18S4, removed to York in 1829, and incorporated 
^;^]ftsT. Lewis Mayer, D. D., Prof TkeoL; Rev. F. A. Ranch, 
Mi XIC-^ Students 20. — A Classical School connected 
, under the care of Dr. Rauch, commenced opera- 
te 1888. 
fUmldgieal Stmmary, at AVegheny-Toumy established in 
the caie of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian 
lift'edifioe of 4 stories, 150 feet long, and a library of 4,000 
i^ttOier HaU»y, D. D., Prof Theol,; John W. Nevin, 
ihU^ StttdenU 29.— Manual labor is combined with study. 
iemhiajry of the JlssoeUUe Rrformed Church, at Pittsburg ; 
i hi 1826. — Rev. Mr. Pressly, Prof — Studente 19. * 

LSARKSD SOCIBTIKS. 

<Hdh99fhieal Society; instituted in 1769; incorporated in 
'0. l>Uponceau, LL. D,, President. This society has pub- 
I Mof Transactions. 

j§aidemy qf Fine Jhrls; founded in 1805 ; incorporated 
iph Uopkinson, Pyeffdntf. 
fJ^^kmural Seimees; founded in 1812; incorporated iii 1817. 
^i«p pnUished 6 volumes of Transactions. 

^ftaiieed Society; formed in 1825. William Rawlt» 
11^^^, his published 4 half-volumes of Memoirs. 



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J 



909 



DELAWARS. 



[1834. 



X. DELAWARE. 

GOVERNMEKT. 

Caleb P. BENifRT, Governor; (term of office expires on the third 

Tuesday in January, 1837) ; salary f 1,333^ 

Joshua Burton, Speaker oftke Senate, 

John Raymond, Speaker of the House of Representatives, 



Judiciary. 



Thomas Clayton, 
James R. Black, 
Sam'l L. Harrington, 
Peter Robinson, 



Chief Justice, 

Associate Jus. for JVeivcastle county, 
do, for Kent county, 

do. for Sussex County, 



Kensey Johns, Jun. Chancellor, 



Salary. 
$1,200 

1,000 

1.000 

1,000 
1,100 



Outlines of the Constitution as amended, December 2, 1831. 

The supreme executive power is vested in a governor who is chosen 
by the citizens, and holds his office during 4 years from the third Tues- 
day in January next ensuing his election ; and he is not eligible a sec- 
ond time to the office. 

The legislative power is vested in a General Assembly, consisting of 
a Senate and House of Representatives; the senators being elected for 
4 years, and the representatives for 2. There are 3 senators and 7 repre- 
sentatives chosen in each of the three counties. Whenever a greater 
number is judged necessary by the General Assembly, then, two thirds 
of each branch of the legislature concurring, it may be increased ; but 
the number of senators can never be greater than one half, nor less than 
one third of the number of representatives. 

- The General Assembly meets on the first Tuesday of January, 
biennially, unless sooner convened by tlie governor. 

All elections for governor, senators, representatives, sheriffii, and cor- 
oners, are held on the 2d Tuesday in November, and are by ballot ; and 
in such elections every free white male citizen, of the age of 22 years or 
upwards, having resided in the state one year next before the election, 
and paid a county tax, which shall have been assessed at least six months 
before the election, enjoys the right of an elector; and every free white 
male citizen of the age of 21 years, and under 22 years, having resided 
as aforesaid, though not having paid a tax, (idiots, insane persons, 
and criminals excepted,) enjoys the right of an elector. 

The judicial power is vested in a Court of Errors and Appeals, a Su- 
perior Court, a Court of Chancery, an Orphans* Court, a Court of Oyer 
and Terminer, a Court of General Sessions of the Peace, and such other 
courts as the General Anemblj may from time to time establish. — To 



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1S34.] 



DELAWARK. 



203 



compose these several courts there are five jud^s, who are appointed 
bj the governor, and hold their offices during good behavior. The Su- 
perior Court is composed of the chief justice and the two associate 
justices who do not reside in the county where the court is held ; and 
the Court of Sessions is composed in the same manner. The Court of% 
Oyer and Terminer consists of all the judges, except the chancellor ; 
and the Orphans* Court, of the chancellor and the resident judge of tlie 
county. 

EDUCATION. 

There is no college in this state ; one was incorporated in 1803, at 
Wilmington ; but it never went into operation. There are respectable 
seminaries of learning for both sexes at Wilmington, and several acad- 
emies have been established at different places 

The state has a Scliool Fund of 5170,000, the income of which, 
together wilh a small tax levied on each school district of four miles 
square, at the will of the majority of the taxable inhabitants, is appro- 
priated to the support of free schools. No district is entitled to any 
share of the Fund, that will not raise, by taxation, a sum equal to its 
share of the income of the Fund. 



XI. MARYLAND. 

CrOVERNMEIfT. 



SnIaiT. 

$3,500 



Jahks Thomas, Gozemar ; term of office expires Jan. 1834 

William Potter, T. C. Worthington, Samuel Turner, Robert W. Bowie, 
and John S. Martin, Executive Council. 

Senators elected for 5 years, on the 3<f Monday in Sept. 1831. 



Benj. S. Forrest, President, 



John B. Morris, 
Benj. S. Pigman, 
Charles F. Mayer, 
John G. Chapman, 
Th. B. Sappington, 
James Montgomery , 
Wm. T. Wootten, 
Dennis Claude, 



Baltimore. 
Alleghany. 
Baltimore City. 
Charles. 
Frederick. 
Harford. 
Prince George. | 
Annapolis. 



B. S. Forrest, 
J. C. Groom, 
Thomas Emory, 
William Hughlett, 
Henry Page, 
Littleton P. Dennis, 
Samuel G. Osborn, 



Montgomery. 

Cecil. 

Queen Ann. 

Talbot. 

Dorchester. ' 

Somerset. 

Kent. 



The House of Delegates is composed of 80 members, elected annually, 
4 from each of the 19 counties, and two from each of the cities of An- 
napolis and Baltimore. Richard Thomas, Speaker. 



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«rii#^Uflf JQdfttJmd tir#^u^ 

i^^il^poMit of the ^x c}ii«f 1tt^%«i c^ ^'fbc ditfaieU fmnd ibm UModato 
^idgHof the Dietriet Cotutp ar» jiidgee ^f the Cenaty Conrte of eeeh 
' 004111^ within the dktriot. 

JVDIOIAmT. 

SftkiT. 
Theodoric Bland, CkmmedUtr 93,6iX) 

Court qf Appeai$. 

9di». 

John Buehennui, Chuf Judge, $2^ 

Blehard G. Eerie, Jiuodate Judge, .... . . 3,200 

William B. Martin, cie. , ., . \ . 2,200 

BteTenson Archer, i2o. (Baltimore) 3,000 

Thomaa B Doreey, do,, 2,200 

John Stephen, do 2;200 

Court of the City iff BoUimore, 

Nieholae Brioe, Ckitf Judge, if»,m 

J. D. WorthiDgton, Associate Judge, 1,500 

Aleocander Neebit, do. 1^500 

EUDCATION. 

A law in favor of primary schools in this state was paseed in 18Si5, 
and has been partially carried into effect in a few of the coilntiee. The 
whole amount of the public funds for the support of eommon echoole, 
(including ^7,293.66 belonging to different counties for the edooatioB 
of indigent children), was, Dec. 1, 1831, $142,063.76; and in additton 
to this, there is a tax for the same purpose on bank capital of 20 eeate 
on every IT 100. The state also appropriates annually the snm of |^,000 
to the University of Maryland, an annual sum amounting, in 1832, to 
^16,099.96 to other colleges, academies ($800 to each), and eohooli ; 
and aboat $3,500 for the support of the indigentnleaf and domb. 

St. j0Ulf*8 GOLLSGX. 

. Tim iaetatntion, which is )ileasantly situated at Annapolie, was ineor- 
fMilid ia 1784; opened in 1789; and the first commeooement was 
llilitltt 1799. It veeeiTed from the eUte, at the time of ila ifltompom- 
liil^V (|fiail nC itl,^ sterling per annum, on oondition that the ci^ 
"""ipMKPif tfttbe tnurteee a lot of 34 acres, the presenia^ lof the 
ll»d.heen given to the oovpofation by ImiMMmme. 
\ pf the kgielaliire In 1805; ^Btlh^eoBef hm 
^m Mteiy; aad an annual |nM^fl^ 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 




m 



ftrlliei 






TlM fibraiy 



Rer. 



wmBldiQpt Gin«fi and G|||t- 

C. HftDflon, and Chadaii Ctnoll of 

;— JobnMieDowell, LL.D., lUr. 

Wm. Raflbrtj, D. D., (died 1890) ud 



I D. P^ (iiiftiigiiimted 1831.) 
I of m ]hr0ridmU (Rot. Dr. Humphreys), and four 
of lilkdeiito in ^ four college claMes, in 1833, 
doputment aboat 40. — Whole nnmbor of 



r i$,m the 98d of Feb. raeaiunu; — let, firom Good 
^ .^ i IJlMpdaj following ; — 3d, ftom the htat Wednesday in 
» MiJmdaj itt Sept ; — 3d, from the 23d of Dec. to the 1st 



UvnrxBSiTT of Martlahd. 

Was established in Baltimore in 1807; in 1812| the 

^^Jftrykad was incorporated, of which the medical college 

i» lil^Mtftaent : at length a collegiate department, or faculty of 

F9i|^i^£fted with Uie expectation that it wonld go into operation 

VHie medioal and law departments are the only ones now 



f Medical Faculty. 

^ M. D., Pr^, PtitkoL mtfi Jaliofl T. Doeatel, M. D., Pr. CUm. t !««-. 

4^^ D., Ptnf. Ok$Ulriu. Robley Donf ItMo, M. D., Pr^. Jfat. jiM., 

I oommence on the last Monday in October, and continoe 
""of March. Expenses : — fee to each professor for each of 
( f 20 ; -r- graduation $ 20, 

Law Dspartmsitt, 
u, LL. D., Prcf, J^aLf Civile and Admiralty Law, and the 
f^JMons. 

-, Prof. CansUtutional ofid SUUnie Law of the U. 5., ^. 
■^fPrqf, Common Law, Law qf Pleading and Evidsneo, f«. 

Wasbhtotoii Medical College. 
^m* J^fPref. AvyMT. 18. Amm, M. D., Prtf. .AMtmny. 
» M^MfPn^'MU Mti, p« B, lUigMB, M. D., Pnf. Cktm. 
I.||. D.» J^. OMMrief. It. B. Bond, M. D., Pr^, TU9. t Aw. M. 
incorpoBilid in 1833, and is established in JkUi-^ 
eommenoo on the last Monday in Ostob^r,. «Bd 
fWi^ Fobmaiy. IBs^siims; •— for eaoh tidEMfl(||iia 
^Sy— tftHsiAr d£wMStion f 6;--gTadiiatki(yii%\<^ k 
18 ' ' 

Digitized by V3V7VJVl^ 



•«i^riliirt« IK^ti^ ^^'^^ —^ ^■^■- ~-^^^^ 

9<iiftivert fwt of" Baltunofe, sear tiM eoafinac (if !&• eil^y W^ Mi 
l^oofM M « Mminmiy m 17^ ^ M^ iitt 1709; an^ eiap ap ttSi d 

%^ ibm iegialmtiiie to oon^ degrees, u a umTeraitfy in Idds. Iti liaiUlp 
infi are auiBoieiit for the aoeoiimM>dation of 150 boardaril I| kaa a 
l|br^ of 10^000 Tolmnety and a good philoeoj^cal and cheteioll appa- 
xaliiau The ooone of etodiet fbr euch aa begin their elaiaied moKtoi, 
mbiioea 7 yeanu 

Number of papila, in 1831, 147 ; — 71 boarden, and 76 day aeholaia. <p- 
Number graduated, in 1833, 4. ^Rey. Samuel Eccleeton, i^reajtfaitf;— 
with 16 other instructor!. It has a theological department 

CommehcemaU is on the 3d Tuesday in July. Vaeatum, from oOtt- 
menoement to the 1st Monday in Sept 

Jtmual ea^^enses : — tuition $60; — board $140. 

Mount St. Mart's Collbos. 

- » 

This is also a Catholic institution, established in 1809, by Dr. Dubois, 
now Catholic bishop of New York, and incorporated as a college in 
1830. It has a beautiful and romantic situation, at the foot of a bnuMth 
of the Blue Ridge mountains, in Frederick county, 8 miles frona ]$m» 
mittsburg, 50 WNW. of Baltimore. It has a good philosophioal appa- 
ratus, and a library of 7,000 volumes. The Faculty consists of a prin- 
cipal, Tice-principal, 9 professors, and 16 associate professors and tatoip. 
Hbe course of studies for those who begin their classical edueatioi^ooai^ 
prises 7 years. The number of students, in 1831 , was 130. <— The nnm- 
her graduated, from 1830 to 1833, S21. — Rev. John B. Purcell,'JVineyal, 

C&mmeneemeiU is on the last week in June. — One Vaetiaffm^ frwoa tht 
1st of July to the 16th of August 

jtmnuU expmues: — board, lodging, and tuition $173; wi^eztni 
charges for certain branches of education. 



* XII. VIRGINIA. 
GoyxnirifBirT. 

^nrFi«ot»,OMMni0r; tmrm of offioeex^raaMaieh 31,1634, iitySSai 
^lU%eftao&| C w ai irff er, LL'Chv,; tennMpif«i> uu^ 

Digitized by Google 




'^^ihrtltilllT"' ' ^-^'r^' -■*'-* ^''-^iA^ 

**•. ^ . . ' 9J66o 

J*. . . . 9,Uo 

i*. i^ 

,. *^. %fioo 

^^Bi^^tiliftd to yeMvey in addition to Uieir nlariM, 95 
$'M( iceontry travtl. The Court of Appeals hokb two 
f^l yOft« at hemdmrgt Greenbrier conntj, for the eona- 
^dw Bloe Bidge, oommencing on the lit Mondijr in 
^90 diye, nnleie the bunneaa ihall be aooner dea- 
Pl|ip oIlMff at Bkkmmi^ for the counties lying east ^ the jnoe" 
\ at sooh times as the coart may, from time to time, 
leaB^amng 160 days, unless the business shall be sooner 



Qentral Court, 

divided into 10 districts, and each district into two cir- 
^^lCif€Wt Superior Court of law and chancery is held twice 
^lBL«««sh county and corporation ; the courts sitting until the 

~ > judges, hsTing each a salary of |fl,500, and their names, 
' of their respectire circuits, are as follows : 

^l^lor, 8. William Daniel, 15. Benjamin Estill, 

K^Mayi 9. William Leigh, 16. James EL Brown, 

rBpsbur, 10. Fleming Sannden, 17. Allen Taylor, 

iSfOwne, 11. Richard H. Field, 18. Edward D. Duncan, 

12. Lucas F. Thompson, 19. Lewis Summers, 

13. Richard £. Parker, 20. Joseph L. Fiye. 
r.llMlwnbiough, 14. Daniel Smith, 

EDUCATION. 

fctato r est i ng article in the London '< Quarterly Journal of Edu- 
^«irthe subject of '' Education in Vbginia," said to haye been 
k gentleman who was formerly a professor in the Uniyersity 
tie remarked ; — '< Education seems neyer to haye been an 
1 in Virginia, belSne her separation from Great 
ria Iheie a single statute in the colonial code in which the 
, unless, perchance, in some special enactment oon- 
iiOmeffa qf William and Mary." In accordance with^thls 
I' irihmkig extract from the answer of ^ WVI&H^Bwte- 



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-W,-» 






igpHii iwd BiMPii Afettair ofMerton OoDegt, is OzlbrdUa4v«i*iljO to tiw 
Omnittee Ibr the CokmiM'^^^.t teak 4lod tii»i« we no free adiools 
;m(, printing; and I hop9 we fhfdpi not hAtre, tb^ 
.mibtnung hias bronght ^isobemeno^, and ^resy, and jw^ 
iraSfdf and printing baa divulged them, and libela ^ffantl^'fSbk'ht^^ 
mnitfnt^* ;-,/.' 

«Biit ailar the declaration of independence," aa la atatod' in ibe 
arilele aboTtf mentioned, " education aeema to have been one of the 
ftal aidijeeta which engaged the attention of the leading pel^daiia of 
l^fglnia;" From the aame article we aeleet tiie following Ibata. A 
general ajatem of education for all claaaea of the community eompia- 
bending elementary achoola,4:olleges, and a univetaityi wia prepared by 
Mr. Jelforaon ; but it appeara to haye been too extenaiye for that eaily 
p^od. But Uie part of it which related to elementary aehoola, waa 
adopted by the legialature in 1796 ; yet it waa never earned into exeeti- 
tiooy apparently becauae it imposed a tax on the rich Ibr the education 
of the poor. 

In 1809, an act waa paaaed providing for a LUerary fVtnd, by appro- 
priating all finea, eacheata, and forfeiturea of every deaoription to a per- 
manent fund ** for the encouragement of learning." In 1616, IHrginia 
appropriated the principal part of a large claim on the govemmelit €i 
the United Statea, for military aervicea during tbe war wi& Great 
Britain, to thia Fund ; and commissionera were appointed to deviae a 
ayatem of education. In the leasion of the le^lature, 1817 -li^ It waa 
found that the Fund amounted to upwarda of $ 900,000, ^deldiiig an 
incdne of more than $50,000; and a permanent appfoprialMii was 
made of $15,000 a year for the inipport of a univenity, and ^dSyOOO, 
annually, for the education of the poor, to be diatributed among "iha 
aeveral countiea and corporate towna of the atato, acceding to Ihalr 
free white population; and to be placed under the management wid 
control pf aeAoo{ commiMsumen, who were to be annually appointed ^ 
the courte of the aeveral countiea and towna. IThe number of poor 
ehildren inatructed, in 18:22, in 48 countiea, under the operation of thia 
law, waa 3,398, at the average coat of $7.03, for each child; in the 
^pm, iSSHIkf Hm number of children inatrncted, in 95 conntMa, waa 
AMWi'Plite^varageooatof $2^ for each chUd.— Jt app«aralNn 
|bvA«^^ 1831, that the number of poor children l« ;|h0 

[ tojha retuma of the achod commiaalnnein, mBomM^ 
^;|i4|b«iu one 25th of the whole white popaialmi and 
] 6th of the wh<^ number of ehildrev haiiii^ ^the 
T Itaptlhe niaaa4)£«ddeBa^ exhibltad«iiMi^ci^ida. 
^ iM«a» ihal, aUh^i^Citili'liaii Ima 
Jrfpwoaaaitt * ^^- 



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iifafiMtwiMtfaitBaii^r^ \^^ 
onsiiif the •artwiikm^f thajgl^tt 
afl dHHMy^PBl iMTiog it difloreti 
»4a tfaa ■efaoei f wnmiwiww of eacll 



oretiMgpF Tidi 



rf mp oiit flf tdneaitioa would be thereby promoted, 
riilWlf into i&lriet%«f ftom three toeeTen miles square"; 
ItmlB of Mwh district shall have raised three- 
^ipptf i| ii |u l i'ed to baild a soho<rf-hoiMe in tho district, the 
imiMitfiMiied to eontiibate the other two-fifths, so, how- 
I4en per cent, c^ tlie county's annual qnota of tin 
kfiutiier anthorixed to pay a sum not ejcceedin|^ ^100 
»,i^lM(y of a teaeher, provided the inhabitants of the district 
|^'|lB,ji|(<irf or graater amount; and, at the school thus pro^ 
> child in the district may be taught gratis. Each 
I uadec the control of three trustees,, of whom the 
I are to appoint one, and the priyate contribnton 

JScademies and High Schools. 

ta^^kginia are private schools, commonly esUbliidied by 
isdiTidoals in a county or neighborhood, who erect 
and provide requisite teachers. The ordinary number 
a 90 to 50. There are about 55 of these aeademiea ia 
schools are conducted solely by their respeetiva 
itinioof tiiem Latin, Greek, and mathematios are taught 
pari of the youth of both sexes are taught in domestic 
can be procured for 200 or 300 dollars exclusive of 
the children of the neighbors will come in as scholars, 
10 boarders. The chief difficulty in carrying on any 
is that oi obtaining suitdble instructors. There has 
great improvement in femafo education in Virginia. 
Afastt twenty female acadanuea, of which there was not 
ilia JEUvdotion ; and thrae*lbHlhs of them have been e8tid»» 
laataOyoars. 



ir s<tt 



/^ 



J^l^iviasiTT ov ViBoiiru. 

¥ii«inia al tha MMian of 1817 - la, adopted i 
ia»iaslilii0on tkaai pcopoaad to be name 

■• appohitad la aalael a aita teiii 
a plaasaat and alavatad tpot naailf t\pti.«61a% 



^ Digitized by 



Google 



I 




hialSlty tad «tt«i^' wii» pwitd iBOMpm^^Saq^ tW'^irifen|te 

^96. Iltii(^enetMlaii4etida«e4^^llieftete;4H^ 
i^d^ pecviiar org«uuntifiii eiiiefl|r to llr. Jeflbimn; It ImIi t fHb Mfoo- 
tioa of iniUdinga} oonsistiiig of fonr puttUel ntnga* sImniI #00 lb«l la 
length, aail SOO ftet apart, ■oiled, to tha aeeommodatioa afUpeoftnora 
aad npwaida of SOO itudenU; which togathar with tha zaal Mato^ coat 
\$m^996. It poaaeaaea a yery valnaUa ISbraiy of 8»000 ▼chniBa^ind a 
-pluloaophical apparatoa, which together coat $36,948. The alaia gifca 
aAnnally |[15,000 for the aupport of tha inatitntf on. Tha whole aaanal 
income of .the oniTeraity ia about $18,500. The profaaaofa an paid 
partly by a fixed aalary and partly by feea receiTad from the atiidenta ; 
bat the auma which they aeyerally receiye are wideif dtfiareal, Taiy- 
ing in ordinary yeara from $1,600 to $ZJ500. 

The plan of thia uniyeraity difiera materially fitn^ thai of other inati- 
tntionB of the kind in the United Statea. The atndenta are aol diyided 
into ibnr claaaea, with a courae of atndiea eaBbraoing fim yitfi | bat the 
dtflbrant branchea of acienee and literature here taa|^ ate atjM 
sekooU. The following particulara are extracted from the *< Ragida- 
tiona,*' &c. Students are not admitted under 16 yean of age ; ayery 
one ii fi«e to attend 'the schoola of hii choice, and no other tbaa he 
diooaea ; proyided, that if under the age of 21, he ahaU. attewdial^leaBt 
tbne ptofeaeon, unless he haathe written authority of hja-^^jipiati or 
gaaalian, or the FacoUy shall, for good cause ahown, allow fain toiAtoBd 
Isn than three. In each achool then are three leg^lar leiimnM a 
week I beaidea which, there are in moat of them eztn leoliniM.OTiMto 
Uto aeyeral olaaaea into which the achool ia diyided. The Mia ^. la- 
atvnetioB ia by toxt-booka and ieetnna, accompanied by fipCaniilpir 




honorary diatinctiona are conferred by tide in8lila^iei|;«#jGi^ 

^Pn^^kOiicy,—- that of OradmaU of any ehMw»"»-iMMliiftal>ef 

^ JM»4tf tlu Um9er$Uff if virgimm. No pai^nlar fMoM'aT 

ii fKacribed for the acquimtbn of theae boaen. Tha ■f'niiBt 

#heneyer he can undergo the r^d -exaaiinalkalaillpli 

Ibr them an aobjeetod. ^ vi/uu^^^^iic 

ipti^l^le af DmIot iff Medidm ia eonftnad oa ^tte'-gleiliiilp Ajjii 

4[^i|«EtaMt -'-^^^i^-- 

III #ae eeariid^'iifliBiha%. edaunehebg an tike ) 




1834.] 



viRoirnA. 



211 



The first degree was conferred in 1828 ; — number of graduates in 
1328,10; inl621>, 12;inl830,30; in 1831,20; in 1832,46.— totol 118; 
of these 16 were graduates in tlie ancient languages ; 14 in mathematics ; 
23 in natural philosophy ; 9 in chemiBtry ; 17 in moral philosophy ; 22 
in medicine ; and 17 in law. — The title of " Master of Afts of the Uni. 
▼enity of Virginia" was conferred on one student at the conmience- 
ment of 1832. 



Namber of 



Ancient Languages 
Modern Languages, 
Mathematics, 
Natural Philosophy, 



stadents in<{ Chem. and Mat. Med , 



the school 
of 



Medicine, 

Anatomy and Surgery 

Moral Philosophy, 



from 1825 to 1833, 519 

" 182.') to 1833, 425 

<* lH2r> to 1833, 619 

" 1825 to 1833,410 

'' 1825 to 18:«,407 

« 1825 to 1833, 2:W 

, " 1825 to 18:«, 183 

" 1825 to 1833, 252 

" 1825 to 1833, 201 



; in 1833, 58 
; in 1833, 22 
; in 1833, 76 
; in 1833, 83 
; in 1833, 69 
; in 1833, 40 
; in 1833, 35 
; in 18:^3, 38 
; in 1833, 37 



Annual rrpenses ; — board, including bed, washing, and attendance, 
daring the session, from September 10 to July 20, $100; fuel and can- 
dles ^15 ; room-rent $8 ; use of library and public rooms $15 ; fees to 
three professors (to one only $50 ; to two 530 each; if more than two, 
$25 each) — $ 75 : — total $ 213. 



Faculty in 1833. 



Gesoer Harriiiun, Prof. Ane. Lang. 
G«orge Blxternmnn, Prof. Mod. Lang. 
Charlet Bonnyc«ttie, Prof. Math, 
Robert PaltcrDon, Prof. J^at. Phil. 



Thomas Johnson, Prof. Anat. 9f Surg. 
, Prof. Medicine. 



Gcorgo Tucker, Prof. Mor. Plul. 
John A. (r. David, Prof. Late. 
John P. Emtuctt, Prif. Chem. ^ Mat. Med. J. ilurvo, TiUor Mod. Lang. 

Chairman of the Faculty, in 1833, Professor Tucker. — The chairman 
is annually chosen from the professors by the rector and visitors. 

Board of Visitors. — James Madison, Rector; James Breckenridge, 
Chapman Johnson, Joseph C. Cabell, John H. Cocke, Thomas J. Ran- 
dolph, and William H. Brodnax.— Frank Carr, Secretory. — The Vis- 
itor! are appointed by the governor and council every four years. * 

College of William and Mary. 

This institution, which is at Williamsburg, formerly the capital of 
Virginia, and is, next to Harvard College, the oldest in the United 
States, derives its name from William and Mary, sovereigns of England, 
by whom its charter was granted in 1691. It received with its charter 
a grant of £1,985, 20,000 acres of land, and a penny a pound on tobacoo 
exported from Virginia and Maryland ; and it was further aided by pri* 
Tate donations, particularly by the munificence of the Hon. Robert Boyle. 
In 1693, the Assembly of Virginia ordered that it should be built at 
Williamsburg, and made some additional granta, so thai \Vi VDxmai 



Digitized by Google 



212 \iRGiMA. [1834. 

income became upwards of j£3,0U0; bat it was subsequently greatly 
diminished. — " The funds," as recently stated by the President of the 
college f ** consist of bonds, stocks, lands, and houses, amounting in all 
to about $150,000, not yielding, however, a revenue in proportion to 
the amount.'i — ** No regular list of students or graduates, has been 
kept till within the last few years ; the number, therefore, of alumm 
we cannot determine ; but it is certainly greater than from any other 
college south of the Potomac. Owing to peculiar circumstances, our 
graduates have always been few. Nine-tenths of our students have 
gone through one course without applying for a degree." Mbny of the 
most eminent men of Virginia were educated here. The condition of 
the college, at different periods, has been very variable ; but, after a 
period of declension, it has had, for some years past, a considerable de- 
gree of prosperity. — It is under the legislative government of a board 
of '24 trustees who supply vacancies in their own body. 

The college edifice is a large missliapen pile of building. The college 
library contains 3,500, and the students' library , GOO volumes. 

The Rev. James Blair, D. D., was named President in the charter, 
but is said not to have entered upon the duties of the office till 17^ ; 
he died in 1742, and was succeeded by the Rev. William Stith, who 
died in 1750. The Rev. James Madison, D. D., (Bishop of Virginia) 
was president from 1777 to 1812. His successors have been the Rev. 
W. H. Wilmer, Dr. J. Augustine Smith,and the Rev. Dr. Adam Empie. 

Faculty in 1833. 

Rov. Adam Empie, D. D., Pres. 4" Prof. Th. R. Dew, Prqf. HisL, Metapk., ^c. 
Mar. Phtl. ' Robert Saunders, jr., Prof. Mathematics. 

William B. Rogers, Pr. Chem. 4r A'ot. PkU. , Prqf. Laie. 

Dabnoy Brown, Prof. Humanity. 

Number of students in the Senior and Junior classes in 1833, 2G ; 
irregular students 15; law students 12; academical 37; — total 90. — 
Graduates in 1820, 5; in 1830, 7; in 183J, 15; in 1832, 11. 

Commencement is on the 4tliof July. — One Vacaiiont from commence- 
ment to the last Monday in October. 

Jlnnudl expenses; — for a Junior student; — board and lodging ^100 ; 
washing, fuel, candles, &c. $20; three fees for the moral, mathemati- 
cal, and chemical courses, and half a fee for the metaphysical course, 
$70 ; matriculation $5 : — total $195 : — for a Senior student $ 185. 

The Law Course commences at the opening of the college, and ter- 
minates on the Saturday before the last Monday in April. Expenses ; 
board, washing, and fuel $90; — tuition $20 ; — matriculation $5 : — 
total $115. 

The Grammar School openi on the 1st of October, and closes on the 
1st of August. Expenses; — board, including every thing, $ 100; tni- 
Uon $20 : ^toinl $120. 



d by Google 



* tOmtjr Htll Academy ; and in 1819 it wm 
r^iilliiiftoii Onlfege from Qenoral Waidi- 
^H^piitl^ 100 aharaa m Oia Jamta ftivar Qnal, 
i^fttuuvodliiioonia of $2,400. <'Tliii doMtion 
r (Mdy ipaH ef ttt ftmda thai are now prodoetiyey and wamy 
Mil f 9S^D00. lU other fhnds 'consist also of donationty 
>i^ a pnvi^ citixen of Lezingtoo, estimated at $50,000, 
rMMain ddits of the testator, and another from the 
|iomfy of Virginia, on their voluntarj dissolution, amonnt- 
MOOy hat nolyet drawn out of the hands in which it was 
in all $ 90,000." See Education m Virginia, There 
of brick, which afford accommodations for 50 or 60 
t • IS^rary of 1,500 Tolumes. It is pleasantly jitoated ; 
ii i^ education are not high ; but its students hfive never 
I, — . Xfumber in 1833, 46. 



^,Mi 



FaeuUy in 1833. 







J. W. fWnum, II. D., Pnf, Ckm. t AM. 

PkiL 
N. Brown S««brook, T^rtfr. 



Hampdbit-Sidhxt Collxgx. 

ion, which has an elevated and pleasant situation, a mile 

^lliiuri-hoase in Prince £dward county, 80 miles SW. of Rich- 

WM Ibnnded in 1774 ; and it owes its establishment altogether to 

enterprise. The annual income of its funds has not, till 

f^ been more than about $ 600, but within 5 or 6 years, a contri- 

been made to the funds of the mstitution of $30,000, of 

jpi&/lQO have been set apart as a permanent fund for the support 

I MO that the annual income of the funds is now stated to 

of $2,000. It has two buildings, both of brick, one 190 feet 

4itories, containing 48 rooms for students j a chapel, a library 

illd; other public rooms ; the other 45 feet by 40 of 3 stories, 

by the academy or preparatory school attached to the college. 

^fjiliMible philosophicaT apparatus, and a coniriderable library^ 

iiw government is vested in 27 trustees who fill up vacan- 

^||||r o#a body. Number of students for several years past varia- 

' |Q|» tft^l40;— in 1832, 60. Jinnual sajwiwes/^for tuition, 

waahing $150. OmmauoHmU is on the 4th Wed- 

Viuatiou;^ Ut, the month of Oetpbw)— 

^May. ■ . _.. ., ^. . . ,: V: 




yGoogk 



214 VIRGINIA. [1834 

Jonntlian P. Cashing, A. M., President 4' Prof. Mcnt. V ^for. Phil., 

There are profeBsorships of Mathematics, Languages, and Chemistry. 

Randolph-Macon College. 

This institution was founded by the Methodists, in 1831, at Boydton, 
in Mecklenburgh county, 88 miles SW. of Richmond, and tlie sum of 
$50,000 is said to have been raised for it. 

Officers Elected, 

John Emory, D. D., Premdent. I Lorenzo Lea, Prin. Prepar. School. 

Martin P. Parkg, Prqf. Math. \ 

Union Theological Seminary. 

This institution, which is situated in the vicinity of Hampden Sidney 
College, was founded by the Presbyterians. It went into operation in 
1834; and on the 1st of January of that year the Rev. John H. Rice, 
D. D., was inaugurated professor of theology. It haa three handsome 
buildings for the accommodation of the professors and students, a library 
of 3,000 volumes, and the income of the funds is sufficient to support 
two professors. The Directors consist of 8 clergymen and 4 laymen 
of the Synod of Virginia, and 8 clergymen and 4 laymen of the Synod 
of North Carolina. — Number of students, in 1833, 33 : — whole number 
educated 71 . 

Faculty in 1833. 
Rev. George A. Baxter, D. D., Prof. ChrLftA , Pnf. Church Hist. 

TheoL Eliaha Ballentino, JSssistaM Treacher. 

Rer. H. O. Goodrich, D. D., Pr. OrienU LUj 

Protestant Episcopal Seminary. 

This theological seminary, which is under the care of the diocess of 
Virginia, is pleasantly situated 3 miles from Alexandria, and 6 from 
Washington. The building is of brick, 42 feet by 30, three stories high, 
and will accommodate 30 students. The library contains 2,000 volumes. 
Rev. Reuel Keith, D. D., Prof. Sygt. £>t«m.| Rev. Edward R. Lippitt, Prtf. Sae. LU. 

Virginia Baptist Seminary. 

This institution, about 4 miles from Richmond, has been recently 
established ; — had in 1833, 14 students, all preparing for the ministry, 
and devoting 3 hours 5 days in the week to manual labor. 

Annutd expenses;^ $95. Rev. Robert Ryland, Principal. 



Virginia Histarieal and Philosophical SodUy ', formed in 1832. John 
Marshall, LL. D., President. 



d by Google 




m 



t«n^«jqpimDMMiiaiMr,1834; 9^,000 

. 1,600 




tjm 



A$9oeiaU Juttiee, 



Jiyi^teva. 



. . . ' wm 

. . . . 9,600 
UJSOO 

Jmigm ^tkM ^t^Mfior or dreuii Cowrt. 

Robert Strange, Henry Seawell, 

IKNupaU, Junes Martin, . Thomaa Settle. 

|9,4ivided into nz circuits, in which the ooort is held half 
• iSTeral counties ; so that each judge attends in about tea 
mid hm li paid $ 90 for erery court which he holds ; in all 

Sanders, JiUamey GeneraL John Scott, SolieUor GmunL 
Miller, William J. Alexander, a|id John Lh Baiky, 



Edvcatioit. 





I Carolina hm no system of common or free schools ; and noth- 
I yet been done by the government to promote them. The coun- 
flfae state general^ eontatn one or more academies ; but the high 
» of tuition is a great obstacle to a general diffusion c^ education 
I the lower orden of tta people. The state possesses a Literary 
ad arising ftom bank dlipidends, entries of Tacant lands, &c., amount- 
g, Noveniber, 1838, to $8Mi6Mli The Income of this fond when it 
[ be soffieiently large, is to be appropriated to the support of whools, 
*itJrtiM according to the free population. 

<^^nft Book EMMUmmt of MeMna. Tomer and Hughes has done 

k ffltfiin a ftw years past, to difibae useful knowledge, and pro- 

i in North Cuolina. IVom their eztensiTe book-store, at 

f tfiay IUTa been i» the habit of sending forth, throughont the 

, and especially' sehool-bo<^ ; and by a syiteai 

r-a oonatant oommnnication with all 



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^.f'^f^M^. 



«ilHl ISriiDp of North C««d^ Hm iiliJMt«rjM 

i l llil t wit to n k to affi>rd a good odoMtion at a nnaU ozpeiUM. 

UiriTXRtlTT oir NOKTH CmOXJVA. ,..ij(, . 

Xkis iMtitatioii, wliicli is at Chapd Hfll, 96 milM WNW. dPSdd|li» 
im Jbonded in 1791, incorpormted in 1798, and it first eonfarfid dognoa 
in 1797, lU fiinds, a few yean since, consisted of $ 90,000, or $40,000 
in bank stock, 50,000 or 60,000 acres of land, and all escheated ffopnty 
iaihe state. It has three college edifices, a good chemical apparttna, a 
lilNniy'of 1,800 yolomes; and the students' libraries contain ZflOO 
Tolnmes. 

JPaeii% m 1633. 

BCT. JoMph Caldwsll, D. D., Pru. t Prtf. Walker Andsnoo, JV^. RUL ^BA UL 

Mtr. Pfttf. , Pr^, JMnL £sv 

BCT. I^ha MlUAmn,AM.,Pf^Ckm,^ JMI*. De Beraim HooiMr, A^ B., 7Ww. 
BcT. Wm. Hooiper, LL. D., Pr. Jine. LmgJj. ThompwHi, A. B., T^irw 
Juom Phfflipi, A. M., Pr, Mttk, t MU. JPft.!6UM IfabuM, A. a, TUm*. ^ 

!lninber of regular students, in 1833, 96 ; irregulsr students 5. — 
Alumni about 450. 

CommmumtfU is on the 4th Thursday in June. Foeaiiim; — lit, 
firom commencement, 6 weeks ; — 2d, from the 15th of Deodoibtf, 4 

weeks. 

jSmuud expenses; — tuition, room-rent, damages, d^s. $48;-*boaid 
firom $5 to 8 a month; — washing, &c. 9 16. 



Mnth CaroKna InstUvJU; formed in 1831 ; meets annually at Qh^pel 
Hin at the time of the commencement of the university, and hears loo- 
tuies and addresses on the subject of education. Simmons Jones BiikiTi 
IL D.y IVefidsnl. 




xnr. SOUTH Carolina. 

GoTzmHifiirT. 

. HAfKBi Ctavsmor, eleetdd Deoamber, 183aS; tenn of 

,1834, .... l^jMi 

WMdit^y >lM»f..aoMriiof . Wimam Lml, tmtk tUu 

ato. Th. Lehre, Jttn.^ |; llii^ ^ 

TttdyWtB^i-f^ 



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■m^^ 




mmm^t^t ^ippomud, 1808 ^ll^ 

v«v- ^ 1830, . f . . . 3,000 

*e»^<^^» ^ ^ tteniy Bailey, ilgjorfer. 

iy^4km Otnmml SesnamM.amd C om tm n Plmt. 

^'^^ 't^^nied 1791,' . . . . 
' 'do, 1815, , ' . . . • 

^,do. 1818/ \ ' ; • • Tp^ 

imm, ' do. 18», . . ^^ . . ' 2,800 

?MiMh; i^. 1830, . . . . . SijM 

^.^'^'^ •■'^'•' - -riittr BibHooLB. ' ''■^' 

I lint ftM wbool in Sooth Ctroliiia mm eitablialMd at Charleaton 

1(9 ; but tfae^rateui bf ilr^''ai^ii6<^ throaghoat tlw state, waa not 

bed till lleeebiMri 18^^ ^tjMOtk time, by an act of the legiphi. 

> ttattbw^a^UMi*Wttl«%flM|laM election diatrictt, and 

f tiio-^itfa of eO ui il #aiil<i t ii apfiifated for three yean. The 

I tibi; <* when^ noiii! dfcildMHi iiMl a|^^ admiononat 

rmhool thaih oaii be eaii^aiii^t^f eimtmd therein, a pnforenoe 

r 1^ ffYeal tapoptforfdiantt^iBid^^ children of indigent and 

I ^H^iiti;:'^ lWtt d fn iAiirf c ^ i»:ln aleo nqnired to make an 

l%|Unctf^thoi^ InOcto- 

^ I^MNi'liiibeMiM^^ of the flee lehM 

•^itftfl«f f 44l>^JIt "Itttf Mlal annual appropriatiotf it 

Digitized by LjOOQIC 










teta iiiooriMprtted liiioe fiiie pobKeiAi^ 



JHpvBwvUy 



efBettte'nt 

Ounbridge, 
Camden, 2 
Cedar Soriofi, 



Obaalemlle, a 
OolitnuNa* 9 
Edgefield, . 
Eduto laAandy 
Fair- View, 
Oilesboroagli, 
6reen?i]]e, d 
Laneaatemlle, 
Long Town, 



MiuMmiTfll6» 
MontiotoUo, 
MoQttt Ari^y 
Moant CUb, 
Newberrj, 
Pendleton, 
Pitterille, 
Platt*» Springs, 



Whm&Mocigh, 

WoodriUe, 

Tor^TiUe, 





. In iT96, a oharter wia granted for a,ooUege at Smiifni^ i^bMndmnm^ 

•difiee waa erected; and << the college fond," aMord&ig to MOla, 

'< amonnta to abont $60/)00 or $70,000; " Imt fl|e iMliiiilioii lias not 

aiimned a lOgtwrform than that of a reepeotaMa a(^pda^ain,V ;: 

:^' JL oharter was granted for a college at CatmMdgBy in Ajlf 

, Ipiet, in 17^ ; hot it has never gone into operation as a i 

rWfKftt to the institotion at Whmshormi^, it ia itetod ,bj^liy^ j 

f Honnt Zion College was established at this plaM bfWMp 

|||i4 receiTed an act of incorporation in 1777. li i 

. jj^te, and conferred degrees — It Jias gone sgpin ii|tp | 

ration, and realised considerable funds to enable, it to be pot opoflit 

most respectable footing.*' But^ as is stated by aoorre|poiideat^^fH|lt.!9 

1833), '^ It has long ceased its operatixilis as a college, and ^^ ||^ 

innelj a respectable academy." ^ /^^ 

?.,.,.. CoLiaoa or South Cabolisa. , r\W 

.^4 !|Ui iiMtitalicii, which is pleaaaatl^ sitnaled «l Col«in|bip«,««ff Si||^ 
flii^iii limi bat did notgointoopmtioB tiU laMf i^4f^|ip ^ 
^i^ «fil coafermi in 1|907. Ithas be^a Wf Ubeiallj palE^^i^^ 
j^lKiiilR Inick edifices, three atones hic^i|««^|P/ 

'^ " " ; containing rooms #Nr stmdenta, recfM* ' 

ar bnildimga ibr, the ojBcei;^ the |il| 




:.%fe^ 



i^f. 'f*f^ 








rt iiiyyi l | i#;ii» 



iflhif 









nittff 1. 1IM^ J"^. L«Cie t i^ 

yia 188^93. 

Ghabumtov Coi.i.Bas. 

vhioh k in tiM eitf of CharlMton, and which ww 

iloh«ft fifliiUii D. D.y miierwards bishop of Sooth 

p ofaarttred in 1785 ; bai-tt was for about 40 yean 

da grammar lehool : and thoogh a oonsidaxable 

:mo0t diatinguiriiad men of Sonth Carolina recei?ed 

.'iHthin its walls, yet only sis degrees in the arts were 

i 1896. Its funds were originally large; but, through 

, they were much diminished; and after having been 

(f#e^ in a state of depression and neglect, it was organiaed 

iltal of January, 18M, by the Roy. JTohn Diekson/the Rer. 

iiiid Wm. S. Bailey, Esq., who, having been instructors in 

appoihted professors, and brought their schjoob together In 

buildings: tho same year the Rer. Jasper Adams was eleef- 

and the institution was placed on a respectable footing as- 

It recelTsd, tome years since, the sum of |^10,000 itom 

^rf^^j9 Esq., and 012,500 fh>m Thomas Hanscome, Esq. Its 

i property is now «|limalsd at f 60,000 ; and ito income fronf tui- 

iaa, since IBEM, amcoiitad anouaily to as much as $10,000. It has 

oommo&us coQege 9^^$im^ ^V!^ philosophical apparatus, and 

of d,iW UImMm belonging to the stu- 

edktainiilg laranl biilftr^ " * 




A^UBt, D. D., . ISi spfp rf s srf. O k fcCfegtoan, jr., A. B,,MkaUr Eiig.Dtf. 
«ui Al^ML \mimifwLnmnM,A.B., 1\BUr idO. ^ Ormk. 

I t a »im§ m ^ ' '^ teiwyr M. 8wiHi, a. B., Vattr fa LhUm. 

AriyHrtk ♦J^JiMfclilliiml A. Bam, A. B., Tbtor is AifliiA. 

-^^^kit^Mi n^pia^em <lbur classes) 46; — assrioat 
^ ^ilj^0i|MtoMiit55;-^ 177. Alumni Sl.^ 



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dliiimbiby any itndy tbo aekmee* withoat gMng tttantioii lo «i^i«iit 
litenlim fot they may fliodj Latin or OMk in the oluaietli iiwl luif 
of^)db« ■t^enoee in the eeMAtille depi^toie&t The «at|p vlMdUne 
iiilfffif 1111 in an equable coone ; — if anj do not chooee tn «^ri^f^«n* 
UttfUiio it doting the whole wdj, they may attach thenMeifi|^j0iili^^ 
Mieh a part of the coarse ae toite their pnrpoee. Tlie pnoe of tojitipa 
is f 12 per quarter in the^ three lower Englieh claMea, aiid ^ 15 m Iha 
highest Mathematical and chesical students are charged $ 20 ; except 
that mathematical students who have advanced no ftrther tiian thHiiigh 
qoadratic equations in algebra, are charged but $15; Btatiosery $1. 
Btndents in the scientific, and in the first class of the e&Uil«U deparf ment, 
piy '$ 25 per quarter. By an arrangement made with Hii' ii»il(Ml obllege, 
thi ifodentsof Charleston College attend the lectures of itte yniftMMlrv 
/ ol" ^heinistry, natural history, and physiolog][^y of thit ini6Mry«ilP* ^ 
Medical Collxobb. 
By a legislatiye act of Dec, 1823, the Medical Society of Soutti Can£iw. 
was " authorized to organise a Medical 6chool and to confer mediQil 
degrees.*' In 1824, professors were elected and the school wasoiyinjite^y 
In 1825, the city council of Charleston appropriated $15,000 to •rse|,S. 
building for the school ; and accordingly a handsome edifice waa b«il|^ 
The legislature appropriated in aid of the institution, in 1^, the f 
of $10 fiO^ ; and, in 1830, an additional sum of f 7,000. In c 
of difficulties between the medical society and the professors, the Isgif- 
klhre created, in 1831, a new corporation with 13 trustees, and trxiMh 
ftrred to and Tested in the new corporation ** all the rights, powers,^ ai^l^ 
duties, before oonfiirred on, or required of, the medical society iin n^ 
t«Mi to the Medical College." A suit of law arose under thb tQ^ ffMl 
Iftl892,it wwdedded by the Court of Appeals to be uncoiisiitu^ili^ 
III 0e»^ lim» the Jegiaktme established a new Medical College, OiMS^ 
ef tht Medical Soeioty, consisting of a board of UuMM ' 
^^EHfm jmfymon under the former organixatlon ntSgiiA:' 
t«»a jMa by thunew act the professofs oCll^^lp^ 
»^liliillli^lh»^xia«fe edifice, which h«s ^miftkmMim^ 




the Medieal Soeiefrf ^ 
■pdlmd Mhoole are ai^ 
^fll^dMC^iBkvaiQf^ 

^IW^ ColJeic^;!^^- 

rtl» 8d Mondiiy in October, 






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1834.] SOUTH CAROLINA. 221 

FaeuUy of the Medical College of the State of South Carolina, 



Stanwl H. Diekton, M. D., Deam 4r Fn^. 

UnLmrndPracMtL 
1. Ed. Ilolbiook, M. D., Prof. Jinat, 
Tk. C. Priolcaa, M. D., Prof, Obst§L 



Edmund Ravenel, M. D., Prof. Ckem. 
Henry R. Froat, M. D., Prtf. Mat. Mod, 
John VVapier, M. D., Prcf. Surgery, 
James Moultrie, jr., M. D., Prof. Pkyswl. 



The session begins on the 2d Monday in November, and ends on the 
1st Saturday in March. 

Theological Seminaries. 

7%eological Seminary, at Columbia; founded in 1829; incorporated 
in 1832 ', under the care of a board of directors appointed by the Synod 
of South Carolina and Georgia. The permanent fond, embracing 
houses, land, money invested, and subscriptions, amounts to about 
f 55,000. The Charleston Union Presbytery stands pledged for the sup- 
port of one professorship, but the whole amount is not yet subscribed ; 
and the sum of ^ 28,000 has been raised by subscription in Georgia for 
the support of a second, called the *' Georgia professorship." The sal- 
ary of a professor is ^1,500 per annum. Funds are provided for two 
■eholarships, — $2,500 for each ; and provision is made for the support 
of several other students. — The library contains l,tiOO volumes. — 
Number of students, in 1833, 22. 

Rev. Thomas Goulding, D. D., Prof Eccl. Hist, and Church Gov. 
Rev. Wni. A. McDowell, D. D., Prof Theology. 
Rev. George Howe, Prof Biblical Literature. 

First session, from the 1st of Jan. to the 15tli of April; — 2d, from 
the 1st of June to the 1st of December. 

Lutheran Theological Seminary y at Lexington ; incorporated in 1832. — 
Rev. John C. Hope, Professor. Salary $700 and a house. — Stu- 
dents, in 1833, 9. — A classical school is to be attached to it, in which 
young men are to be prepared for admission into the seminary. 

Furmnn Theological Seminary, at the High Hills on the Santee, 40 
miles £. of Columbia ; under the direction of the Baptists. It has a 
library of 1,000 volumes, and 20 students. — Rev. Samuel Furman and 
Rev. Jesse Hartwell, Professors ; with a salary of $1,000 each. 

Learned Societies. 
Literary and Philosophical Society of South Carolina; organized in 
1813; Stephen Elliot, LL. D., 1st President; Timothy Ford, the 2d; 
and Joel R. Poinsett, LL. D., the 3d ; appointed in 1831. 

Medical Society of South Carolina; formed in 1789; incorporated in 
1794 ; and by an act in 1817, it was constituted a Bosrd of Physicians 
to •zamine and license candidates to practice physic and surgery. 

V Digitized by V3 VJVJ V l^ 



222 GEORGIA. [1834. 

XV. GEORGIA. 

Government. , 

Salary. 

Wilson Lumpkin, Governor; term of office expires Nov. 1833, $3,000 

E.Hamilton, Secretary of State, 2,000 

John Willams, Treasurer, 2,000 

I. Bethune, Surveyor General, 2,000 

T. B. Howard, Comptroller General, .... 2,000 

Thomas Stocks, President of the Senate, 

Asbury Hall, Speaker of the House of Representatives. 

The Senate consists of 78 members ; the House of Representatives of 185. 
Judiciary. 

Superior Court. 

Balary. 

William K. Crawford, Judge oj the Northern Circuit, $2,1 (K) 

Thaddeus G. Holt, do. Southern Circuit, 2,100 

William Law, do. Eastern Circuit, 2,100 

Charles Doughurty, do. Western Circuit, 2,100 

Lucius Q C. Lamar, do. Oakmulgee Circuit, 2,100 

Christopher B. Strong, do. Flint Circuit, 2,100 

Lot Warren, do. Middle Circuit, 2,100 

G. E. Thomas, da. Chatahoochee Circuit, 2,400 

John W. Hooper, do. Cherokee Circuit, 2,100 

Inferior Court. 

An Inferior Court is held in each county, composed of five justices, 
elected by the people every four years. These Courts possess the 
powers of Courts of Probate. The justices have no salary. 

Education. 

This state has a fund of $ 500,000 for the promotion of education ; 
one half of which ($250,000) forms an academic fund, the fnterest of 
which is annually divided among the incorporated academies : — the 
Other half is appropriated to the education of the poor, and the interest 
of it is divided among the several counties according to their popula- 
tion ; but no general system for rendering tliis fund useful to those for 
whom it was designed, has been devised and carried into effect. There 
are flourishing and well endowed academies at Savannah, Augusta, 
and some other places. A number of manual-labor schools have been 
established in different parts of the state, which are flourishing ; and 
an increasing attention is now paid to education. For some further 
notices of education in Georgia, see the American Almanac for 1832. 



d by Google 



1834.] oEORoiA. 223 

Frakklin College, Univkrsity of Georgia. 
This institution, which in at Athens, 92 miles NW. of Augusta, was 
founded by an act of the legislature in 17&8-0, and was at the same 
time endowed with 30,000 acres of unappropriated land, which was to 
be leased, but not sold. According to the plan of the charter, the uni- 
Tsrsitjr was to embrace the whole system of public education in the 
state, including an academy to be established in each county ; but the 
design has never been carried into efiect. In lti02, the University of 
Georgia, or as it is otherwise called, Franklin College, was established at 
Athens, and the first president appointed The institution languished 
for want of means ; and in IdlG, the trustees obtained leave to sell the 
onirersity lands, and vest the proceeds in stocks. By tlie sale of the 
lands the sum of $100,000 was realized, and invested in the state bank 
of Georgia ; and the legislature guarantied that it should yield 8 per 
cent., or an annual income of $8,000; and, in 1830, it granted an addi- 
tional annuity of $ G,000. The income from tuition varies from $ 3,500 
to $ 4,000 : — total annual income about $ 17,500. 

In 1830, one of the college buildings, which cost $25,000, together 
with the library, was burnt; but it has since been rebuilt by the state, 
and a library of 3,200 volumes has been procured ; and the students' 
libraries contain 3,000 volumes. It now has two brick edifices of three 
stories, 120 feet by 50, for the accommodation of students, having also 
recitation-rooms ; a chapel, 84 feet by 50 ; a philosophical hall ; a hall 
for the meetings of the trustees, with rooms for the library and cabiuet 
of minerals ; two society halls ; and the president's house. The philo- 
sophical apparatus and the chemical are well furnished ; the cabinet of 
minerals contains 3,000 specimens ; and there is also a botanic garden. 
The t>oard of trustees consists of 28 laymen ; the board of visitors of 
10 laymen and 5 clergymen. 

Succession of Presidents. 

JosUh MeigB, LL. D., 18^ to ISOdrRev. N. S. S. B«inan, D. I)., 1618 to 1818 

Bev. John Brown, D. D., IdOO " 1817 Rev. Mosos VVaddel, D. D., 1819 '* 1839 

BsT. Robert Finley, D. D., 1817 «» Idn'Rev. Alonzo Church, D. D., 1829 

Faculty in 1833. 



Mer. Alonzo Church, D. D., Presidtnt. 
Jane* Jackson, A. M., Prof. J^at. Phil. ^ 

Ckemistrj/. 
S«T. Iftmes Shannon, A. M., Prqf. Anc, Lan. 
Henry Hull, M. D., Prof. Matk.^ JlHrtm, 



Rev. 8. Olin, A. M., Pr. Mar. Phil. ^ Rhtt. 
Malthu* A. Ward, M. D., Prqf. J^at. HiH. 
Wm. Lebmann, A. M., Prof, Mod. Lang, 
Wm. L. Mitchell, A. M., TnUtr Math. 
VVm. II. Hunt, A. M., Tutor Anc. Lang, 



y. Number of students, in 1833, 97. Number of alumni 286. 

Cfommenetmtni is on the Ist Wednesday in August. Vacations; — 
Isty from commencement, 1 week ; — 2d, from the Wednesday before 
the 2d Monday in Nov., to the Ist of Jan.; — 3d, the first half of the 
month of April. Expenses: — tuition, library, and servants' hire |38 
per annum. — Board in families from S3 to 10 a month. 

Digitized by VJVJV^'V H^ 



224 GEORGIA. [ia34. 



MkDICAL Cor.LK.r.E of (iKoKOlA, AT AlGlJiTA. 

M. Aiiloiiv, M. D., Prof. OhiUlrics^ ^c. 
A.Cunniosham, M.D., Pr. Iiut.^ Prac. Med, 
Paul F. Eve, M. D., Pr. InsU ^ Prac. Surg. 



L. A. Dugas, M. D., Prof.Anat. S[ PhysuU, 
J. A. Eve, M. D., Prtf. Tktreu^MoL Med. 
D. Ford, M. D., Prof. Chem. und Pharm, 



The lectures begin on the 3d Monday in October. Fees for six 
tickets $100 : — graduation $10 : — matriculation $5. 



XVI. ALABAMA. 

Government. 
• Salary. 

John GaylK| GirtJemor; term of office from Nov. 1831, ) ^oatia 
toNov.ia33, . . \ ^^'^ 

James I. Thornton, Secretary of State ^ .... 1,000 

George W. Crabb, Comptroller of Public Aeeounts^ 1,000 

Hardin Perkins, State Treasurer, 1,000 

Peter Martin, Mtomey General, ^425 and perquisites. 

The Senate consists of 22 members ; the House of Representatives of 

72 members. The pay of the members of both Houses is $4 a day each. 

Judiciary. 
Supreme Court, 
The Supreme Court was formerly composed of the seven judges of 
the Circuit Courts, but in January, 1833. the legislature established a 
separate Supreme Court, composed of three judges, who are elected by 
a joint vote of both houses of the General Assembly, and hold their 
office G years. 

Judges of the Supreme Court. — Abner S. Lipscomb, Chief Justice ; 
Reuben Safibld, and John M. Taylor. 

Circuit Courts. 

Baluj. 
Ptolemy S. Harris, Jud^e of the 1st Circuit, $1,750 

Horatio G. Perry, do. 2d do 1,750 

Henry W. Collier, . . Ai. 3d do. ... 1,750 

John White, . . do. 4th do 1,750 

William J. Adair, . . do. 5th do. ... 1,750 

Anderson Crenshaw, . do. 6th do 1,750 

Sion L. Perry, .. do. 7th do. ... 1,750 

EDUCATION. 
Common Schools. 
In 1820, the Congress of the United States granted one section of 
land to the inhabitants of each township * in the state for the use of 

* A ttwiuhip i» 6 milea sqaare and contains SI3,040 acret, and i« diridad by tinea eroaa- 
lof aaeh other at riisht anglof into 96 equal porta or aqnara ntilea, called stetiotu. A 
aection containa C40 acrea. 



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ftrOM 







tMTof eeiodls wilbiii eaieh townihip in tliii ftatet 
whi^ miy be mmd ftom loeh lands in strict con- 
oiji^ of soch i^nnt*' . The same provision was mads 
lands granted* ** Ibr the support of a seminary of 



of each township was Tested in three school ( 
'3fti> were empowered to lease the lands, and whiise dntjr It 
Ifk ^ townehips into conrenient school districts, so that 
f dlitl! not contain more than 40, nor less than 30 scholars, 
„,^ t noinber as may be practicable. Three trastees are to be 
^f^<q(ttalified Toters of each district, whose duty it u to em- 
'~i «t an annaal salary or stated price for each; to cause a 
/to be built; to make regrolations ; and to determine what 
^ Readmitted without tuition fees. The teachers must be 
* tfce commissioners. — By an act pas^d, in 1838, the lands 
['with the consent of the qualified voters of the townshipi 
I vested in some productive stock. -- The benefits ia* 
^tiiis grant ^ave notes yet been realiied; and they must of 
' I very unequally dirtributed, as the section in one township 
rSf great value, and in another of very little. 

AoADxmss. 
IbUowing academies were all incorporated as early as January, 




FsM. do. 

Jackson 
Wilcox 
Monroe 
Green 
Autauga 
L,Ras*elville^ 



0reeavaie, BwUer 
JeifiMnioii, Jeiecaon 
La&yette, Fnnklia 
Manon, Perry 
Mfiton,lfeDlgeiMilry,t. 
Moulton, Lawrence 
Oak Gtove, Feinr 
Poplar Spring, Mor- 



CosiiUei. 
Rocky Mt., Autauga 
St. Stephen's, 6t..Ste* 

phen ■ t 
Sims Fe Tuscaloosa t. 
Solon Grove, Monroe 
Spaitai Conecuh, 
Tuscumbia, Tuscumb. 
Tutcumbia, Fem. do. 
Valley Creek, Dallas, 



gVMNdly thn Qfeek and Latin languages an 
«he>vtri0iMibnnehes of English education. — Than 
miea of good reputation chiefly under the nuMp 
pteefe j i t tesiae Bern the aorthem statet. 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



226 ALABAMA. [18:34. 

U.MVKKSrrV OF Ai.aimmv. 

This institution was incorporated by the General Assembly, Dec, 1620, 
under the title of the *' University of the State of Alabama " ; and, in 
1821, two trustees from each judicial circuit were elected by the legisla- 
ture for three years, the governor of the state being ex officio president 
of the board. The trustees were authorized and required to sell by auc- 
tion or to rent the university lands ; to select a site for the institution ; 
to superintend the erection of the buildings ; to appoint officers and fix 
their salaries ; to prescribe the course of studies, and make regulations 
and laws for the university ; and to make an annual report of its finan- 
cial concerns to the legislature Jn the session of 1827-8, the univer- 
sity was placed by the legislature in a fine, healthy situation, about a 
mile and a half to the east of the state-house in Tuscaloosa, 2G8 miles 
NN£. of New Orleans. According to an official report, dated Jan. ]4, 
1830, 21,8451 acres of the land had been sold for the sum of 5304,()51.0G, 
of which ^111,712.59 had been invested in G per cent, stock; and 
24,234.^ acres remained unsold. — The buildings already erected consist 
of a Rotunda, a circular edifice of three stoiies, in the centre of the 
grounds, 70 feet in diameter, and 70 in height. — the ground floor or lower 
story being used for a chapel, for commencements, examinations, &«., 
the 2d story forming a circular gallery for spectators, — and the 3d story 
forming the library robm ; — of three edifices or dormitories, all three 
stories high, for the accommodation of students, two of them GO feet by 
30, and the other 90 by 30, — the two former affording accommodations 
for 48 students each, the latter for 72; — of a laboratory containing the 
chemical and philosophical apparatus, cabinet of minerals, and several 
lecture-rooms; — of a hotel in which the steward resides; — and of 4 
houses for professors. The cost of tliese buildings has not exceeded 
J100,000. In order to complete the plan, there are required three more 
dormitories, four more houses for professors, and another hotel. The 
university went into operation inApril, 1831, a president and three pro- 
fessors having been previously appointed ; and the first commencement 
was held in Dec, 1832. The library consists of 2,000 volumes, and about 
a thousand additional volumes have been ordered. 

Faculty in 1833. 



Rev. Alva Wood, D. D., Prendent ^ Prof. 

Moral PkU, 
John F. VValHa, Prqf. JWrf. IfuL ^ Oum. 
Henry Tuiwiler, Prqf, Jtne Lang. 
Baavear F. Bonfils, A. M., Pn^f. Mod. Lang. 
RsT. Heory W.Hilluird,/V^.£{ae.,£iif.Li(. 



Wm. W. Had«OD, A. M., Prof. Math, and 

Nat. PkU. 
Cdlvin Jonet, A. B., TWor Ane. Lang. 
John G. Davenport, Librarian, 
Robert B. MoMullen, As9UL Pmf. ObM. 
Bobert A. Tajflor, Eaq., Steward, 



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fim hnd of ilMiBbcNit wnrffation on the Tennife, in 
1M cMlfitM pitteilMdly by Um MeChodtfto j Mid 
lii^ 1630; bmilhMBol rceeWed an/pobli^ •ndd^v 
iiMiv*bMB cfWlMl^aphUoMyphiMl apptimtavproottred, 
S^'-^'Hm the«Hj eootttto of iwo pwifc«iort» €Q0 
natofri phikMopby, the other of the tneient ka- 



COLLSOS OF SfEIXO HlLL. 

' VCiilholie iBsUtotfton under the direction of the bieht^of 
r fbunded, and hae an elcTated and pleaeant attnationy 7 
iobile. The faculty eoneiate of 'two ftctemon of the 
,IWo of the French, two of Latin, on^ dflipiBiiii, 
atice, and a director general of the itndiee. IV6 
[who is more than 12 yean old. — the anniu} ezpenae 
^ hMiy hooka, atotioneiy, dkc., i« $960. 






JL^rO. MISSISSIPPI. 



.tebMi^ «yMiir#i|ii||ft|4^^^ for 51 yean, 

ridDiehaoB, - M i iw«K »' |f 4f aii^ tfe. . 

fmtdiuf; dfiK^if A|iiiraiMi«i«^ do. . 

\^ • '' ' '"' ' 'till* OMirl #J5iiii!»lilif ^JRpioIr. 

h:;i«tfC-l ,fiA^ €111 ^i^UJ. J^iM- !••■:'.•■ 



. i;m 
i;m)o 

. 1|200 



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MSmo 



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^v^jrwVfart* 

It jBrnignlMhii Ui<ft 
I ammallfi bt^^niiig dft the fint Monday Itf 

'^ IRm iUito ki dtfided talo 4 diitriete ot ciiqait<<..«wfc|wir^a^.iwlii 
4iitrlel ttttbrarf «r» ehoMa bythe ftlectowaf i di.i llrt iMi i 
-Mft«o«rii9 held in ««eh eonnij i«rioe eTery yMft «^ 
jniWiotuin in civil omm in wluoh t^ Mun in 

(MliMifftftiU CtnutkMium a$ rented hyu CwM»ftilfen il J lidb w u 

.iJIImi «lriiftf.f^eontiy«^wer it yesUd in a Qorem^.^^ 
i^i|i^li6ed electors., f<ir two years, ud cannot, ^olfd 
(l^pn Coiir, j^aca in any term of siic yearp. tlie Secietiu^ <Sf1i^ 
|||af||.ft9d,Aud^tor of Public Acconnts, are all choien W^'^ 

two years. . ., ^... t^.j^'^r , 

The legislative power is vested in a Senate and fiionse of 1 
tatives, bodi together being styled " The LeglaUtare of J 
Tfhm re]iresentatives are chosen every two yearsy on the! si J 
Jlovoniber and the day fbllowing ; their nniiiber not to be leosi 
«or. more than 100. The senators are chosen for 4 y<|«ts, oppa 
li|||m|rioeiod biennially, at the same time with the govenior miji^ 
l^llMi^ 4«ir^ csnnoihd lesatl^Mi oiii>^%iK||hj '^ 

|ft|iHi^tfi^.of the whole number qCnpi^NMmtiTes. . . ,f,.K^j 
^dl^ l<#ilftt«pe BMOls every two yean ait th^ Ipwn of JTf ~ 
i aa |lie>iisU,of fOTernpsniliU 18^), at s^ 
iQr law. Time of ihe meeting of the first i 

p 3d Moadny Iftr llovefflbery 1888. ' . .1^ ij£t. , 
kiat^rliMigpi <?9B>t of .^rioia nnd i 

iiiSk ooantK .^ 

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^|jPm»;--^mI^» BnunA of Potiea Ibr atilr oovn^y 

ftrSjwm. JiMtieM orthe Pmm and 

l%r 9 jiMnu No pflffon em •▼•r be afpefan- 

ri«^J^^ff^lbf^cr dqriBiffeod behaTier. 

» nele pe«m <« the age of SI yean or iipwar4a» wiM> 

I ef the UaiAMllMeet.aiid ahaU htYO raaided in tUa 

1^ pieoediiif aa eleetioiiy and the kat four numtha 

f^^fiiiyr^ or towa^ jbi whkh he offera to vote, ia a qoali- 

> inode oCc3ioii|>g ia bj ballot 

S0IJGATiO]ff. 

a Literaiy Fond for the eaeonragemeiit aiofd 

r eeli^Uahed bj an aat of the legiaUliire paaacd in 

KiilM, the Fond haying amounted to the avm of ^50,000, 

an act for annnallj diatributing the income of 

taereral conntiea according to the white popnlation. 

^tt-ttb etate appropriated bj Congreaa to the anpport of 

i to 800|000 aorea. In 1^, an act waa paaaed by the 

I mtibiffiiing the troateea of the s^iool Umdt in each townabip 

j'of the 16th aeetion) to leaae theae landa (when a majority of 

jfiaHbauliee within the townabip ahoold requeat it) for the term 

I yD4 *pplj ^^ inoome of the proceeda to the aapport of 

JarrsBsoH Collzoz. 
||j|i^$o|Di| which ia at Waahington, 6 milea eaat of Natchezi^ waa 
IJm i8(K^and reoeiyed from Congreaa yalnabk^ endowmeiUa 
Voollege e^i^aei 170 feet by 40, capable of accommodating ^ 
I IQO atodenta waa erected ; hot for more thui 20 yeara, the 
(did not take a higher i^anh than an ordinary academy. In 
IddO, it waa o^gajiitae4 on a mititaiy plan aimilar to that of 
r aohQpl gt WMt^oil^ 'nflder the direction of Major John 
k/Sofeikteodeat an4 Pvql^^ Mr. £. B. WiUiston, Prea- 
\pph9^ endin 

ftif — MM^ aA, ihc cmni0 1832, the degree of 

I eoi^^ atnde^tat/ . .^J [\ 

i8$lk,lk.B. ,WiIfiaton, Al.tt^ li|iy^ reaigned the office of 
waa raoceeded by John ffdl^lc, A. M., who died on the 
f^BepCeiidier loUowingy and wai iraee ee d ed by €aptain Alden Part- 
g^^arho look ehaige of the inililtittdtf in January, 1833 ; bat on the 
llhat dpataa afinirailNilii^ alter, the opeimtiona of the 
a«d Ghqp<tilii Paitridge rea^ned lbe^pip||- 
ivM^biMltteA la ^troateea % gea^ flaa > All „ 
90 



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,; :;'- '•:■- .- • ■ ': , '. ;: It 

Searkary of S^aU^ I O^oiga fioitbi,-.^' 
F. Gttdere, ' TVdMtirflr. | Loob Briii|{ier/ 

The SauOe combte of 17 mMaWn Moikd for fiior yotm. 

' - Alexftiiil«r Porter. ^ 

Crimmal CmarUffMw <Mmm$, F. Oiimay Jiid||r«. ^ t > 

7. J. H. 

8. Clark Wo( 



fL Benjai] 



3. Cfaarlet BualmeUi 

4. CharlM Watta, 



7. J. H* Oraiilopu 



enjamin Wineheater, 5. Seth Lewia, 

Tfi9 9iq»r«ma Cowrt aita in the citj of JVaio Orleaiw/ for. tbe Eiuilta 

Diatriot of th,e atate, dnrinif the montha of NoTember, Deoendb^, Jan> 

. Mfeiy, Fehmaiy, March, April, May, Janet, and Jnly ; apd for thiiltdlttiir 

«fti Diatriot at Opeiouioi and ^itakapas^ during the moiith»of Ai^j^ii^ 

0epteiid>er, and Ckitoher, and at ^ Baton itoi^e, ooflduneBe2ii|^ m l^t 

Monday Jtt Atsgnat The Di^riet Courts^ with the exeejpl£a <b^J 

C^ortaiii the Fliat Diatrict, hold, in eaoh parith, iwojMmMii ^^ 

^.)W, to try baoaea ori^^nally inatitnted before thttn, aiid 

l|l|i tb/|R^^ Gonrta. The Pwrith Courtg hold their x^g[«t]itf m 

iMtthfi^NtA Monday in eaeh month. t)ie C6iif<i 

InNAMikiH ^poei^ of the DiatriBt, f'aruh, aiid C&n^ 

^ Fkohete, are in aeaaien dmri^ {he wh ^^ ^ " " 

^^^ jr^ Afiual, Sefilamber, and Odlober^'^M WMo|1 

4IVID00 1 
ffirthri 






yGoOgl 



1634.] 



LOUISIANA. 



231 



but there is a great deal of miflmanagement in the distribution 
and application of this money ; and it has become a subject of interest- 
ing inquiry to devise a new and improved system for managing it. 

COLLEQE OF LOUISIANA. 

This insUtution, which is at Jackson, in the parish of EastVeliciana, 
was incorporated in 1825 ; and it receives annually the sum of $ 7,000 
from the state treasury for its support. The college buildings are of 
wood, four in number, two stories high, with galleries or piazzas to each 
■tory ; one 100 feet by 40 ; another 60 by 40 ; the other two 32 by 26. 
The library contains 350 volumes. 

Faadty; H. H. Gird, Prof. Math.^A'at. Phil., fy Pres. ad interim; 
M. F. Benet, Prof. Mod. Lang. ; C. M. Smith, and the Rev. A. D. 
Wooldrige, Tutors. Number of college students, in 1833, 15 ; in the 
preparatory department 45 ; — total 60. None have yet been graduated. 
— Commencement on the 2d Wednesday in June. Vacations^ — 1st, 
£rom commencement, 4 weeks ; — 2d, from the 20th of December to the 
10th of January. 

:.Annunl expenses, for tuition, room-rent, fuel, &c., |^30.75 ; board, 
washing, &c., $68 : — total $98.75. 

• An institution styled Franklin CoUege^ has been incorporated by the 
legislature, to be established at Opelousas ; and there was formerly a 
Catholic college at New Orleans. 



XIX. TENNESSEE. 

Government. 

8alanr. 
William Carroll, Oovernor; term of office expires Sept. 1, 1835, ^2,000 

Senators; elected for 2 years ^ August, 1833. 

Stephen Adams, Joseph Coe, Wm. Moore, L. H. Simms, 
CuUen Andrews, Henry Frey, B. T. Motley, Thomas Smith, 
David Burford, J. F. Foute, J. R. McMeans, Miles Vernon, 

Robert Cannon, S. Jarnagin, J. Netherland, Jas. W. Wyley, 
Jacob P. Chase, £. B. Littlefield, John Rayburn, Geo. S. Yerger. 

The representatives were elected at the same time, also for 2 years. — 
Pay of the senators and'representatives |^4 a day. 
Judiciary. 

Supreme Court of Errors and Appeals, 

Salary. 

Robert White, Judge, $1,800 

John Catron, do 1|800 

Jacob Peck, do 1|800 



y Google 



232 



TENNESSEE. 



[1834. 



Ckuncellors, Nathan Green, and W. A. Cook — Salary 51,500 each. 
Judges of the Circuit Courts, — Salary $1,300 each. 
Samuel Powell, J. C Mitchell, J. C. Hamilton, 

Edward Scott, Thomas Stuart, Joshua Haskell, 

Charles F.«Keith, William E. Kennedy, William B. Turley. 

N. W. WiUiams, P. W. Humphreys, 

EDUCATION. 

A correspondent in Tennessee has furnished the following state- 
ment respecting the provision which has been made by the legislature 
of the state for common schools. — *' All the capital and interest of the 
new state bank, except one-half of the principal sum already received; 
the sales of the Hiwassee lands, and all moneys due, and which will here- 
after fall due, for lands sold in the Hiwassee district of country ; all 
lands which have heretofore been appropriated in this state to the use 
of common schools, as well as all the vacant and unappropriated lands 
within the limits of the same ; all the funds denominated School Funds, 
which have accrued from the sale of lands at 12^ cents per acre, and at 
1 cent per acre, together with the interest which has accrued on this 
und ; the donation of John Rice of 5,000 acres of land to the schooling of 
the poor of Cumberland (now Tennessee) ; all other donations by devise 
or otherwise, which have been made to the state, and not designated to 
any other purpose ; all the stock owned by tl.e state in the old bank of 
the state at Knoxville, namely, 400 shares, are appropriated to the en- 
couragement and support of common schools. 

" It is made the duty of the several county courts to appoint one 
commissioner in each captain's company in the county. The commis- 
sioners so appointed, are required to meet at the muster-ground of the 
county, lay off the county into convenient school districts, and order an 
election, in each district, of five trustees for the same ; who shall be 
chosen by voters qualified to vote for members of the General Assembly 
of the state. The chairman of each board of trustees so elected is re- 
quired to repair to the court-house of the county on the 1st Saturday of 
June every year. And the chairmen thus assembled are to choose not 
less than five nor more than seven discreet and intelligent citizens for 
common school commissioners of said county. 

^* The School Commissioners and the district Trustees are both incor- 
porated bodies ; and each member is bound by an oath of ofiice. 

" The Commissioners receiving the moneys are required to distribute 
the interest thence accruing in proportion to the number of white 
children between the ages of 6 and 18 years in the respective districts, 
when the chairman of the trustees of the districts shall have given to 
said Commissioners satisfactory evidence, that a comfortable ichool- 
house is erected in his district, and shall have given them a bond, that 



y Google 



» mim^,mt tli» iMii if jA* 

roftltoflliite.' 
I are Mfoirid to report enmielly to the oomiiiie- 
r-wiui reeeite eoMiipliooe for their dktiiot, employ 
^vtoto. iiidvee a0 irilhin the specified agee to attend 
' to Umakm teedbeii for negleet of dnif, and tdhol* 



at of ftade reoeiTod hy the comnoUHMhoel eeiBH 
1 the iliti» fimoi (he beet eetimato that can now be 
>; and it ie probable that $200,000 more will be paid 
I the abore law. 
iv eaeh county, were long aince eatabliahed nomi- 
) appropriation of land. They have not all of them gone 
ti^eiatipn. Bat the fond now amounts to an active' ayailable 
^l|fiOO for each county, in the hands of trustees duly appoini- 

» of the same.*' 

^'eorrespondent writes: — "There are many good schools in 

» of the state — particularly in the towns and Tillages. Al- 

k j|Mi goTemment has done nothing worthy of notice in 

itton, it is rare to meet with a native who cannot read and 

^^fheie are two yery re«pectable classical seminaries for boys 

a, and seTeral excellent female institutions; p;^rticnlarly the 

.Female Academy: — iCnd in Maury county, SOmUes 8* of 

ia^ft manual4abQr school, with 6 instructors, has been recently 



tfjClTBUmr OF NA8HVII.LX. 

ri!i|st inatHotieD, whi^is aitnatod at NashTiUe, was originally incor- 
' \iil lip6^ by the iiame of *vCnmherland College." Itwasreor- 
1 hi 18S4 ; and in 1897, its name was changed by an act of the 
Iflt 'MTha Unireraity of-NasliTilie.'^ It is the most important 
^, T«meiiee. Its boUdiiigaioonsist of a college edifice, three 
^900.laet lippg^andSO bnp^eontoining a chapel, recitotion 
^^ I9(p» fyiiKtad%B^'^^h^ of one story, 100 feet by 
-*-§ -» laboratofy, apparatoa, Ac. ; a house for the steward, 
. ; j|i4 A hiinpe fo^t^ present ; all of brick. The miner- 
(•iJogiMgi .Hy 'g lii^ of lOyOPO specimens ; the phikN|ep|^* 
t #e^; «b«viaa goodchemieal appaiatae;«iid f^ 
^* *^S^^' ^^ l^Jfwy Gontoini 2/WQ ^^ifp^,,^ 

Digitized by VjGOQk 



234 TEfVNESSES. [1834. 

there are libraries belonging to the stadents containing l^SOO Yolomes. 
The university has no productive funds. The value of its property in 
and near Nashville, exclusive of the collegre buildings, &c., is stated at 
about ;^50,000 ; and it owns 25,000 acres of land in the Western Dis- 
trict, it has hitherto been supported by tuition-fees, the occasional sale 
of land, and private benefactions. 

Faculty in 1833. 

Rev. P. Lindsley, D. D., Pres. ^ Prof. Mor. PhU., Rket., PoUt. Ec., ^. 
Gerard Troost, M. D., Prof. Chemistry, Mineralogy^ ^ Geology, 
James Hamilton, A. M., Prof. Mathematics ^ Natural Philosophy. 
N. S. Parmantier, Prof. French Language and IMenUure. 
C. Parish, A. M., and A. Stephens, A. B., Tutors in Qreek and Latiu. 

Number of students in the four classes, in 1833, from 70 to 100. — 
Whole number of alumni 118. 

Commencement is on the 1st Wednesday in October. Vacations ; — 
let, from commencement, 5^ weeks; — 2d, from the 1st Wednesday in 
April, 5<| weeks. 

Jinnual expenses; — tuHion, room-rent, servants' hire, &c. $50;->- 
for board $1,75 a week ; for the year $70 : — total f 120. — Candidates 
fur the ministry of all denominations are admitted at half price. 

Greekeville College. 

This institution, which is situated 3 miles S. of Greeneville in 
Greene county, was founded chiefly by the exertions of the Rev. Hei- 
ekiah Balch, and was incorporated in 1704. It has received no aid from 
tlie national or state government ; but the funds necessary for erecting 
a respectable college edifice, procuring « library, &c., have been derived 
from private liberality. It has a productive fund of about $5,000 ; and 
a library of 3,500 volumes. Though limited in its means, it has exert- 
ed, since its foundation, a salutary influence in the part of the country 
in which it is situated. Succession of Presidents; — Rev. Hezekiah 
Balch, from 1704 to 1810 : — Rev. Charles Coffin, D. D., from 1810 to 
1827 : — Henry Hoss, Esq., 1827, who is now in office, and there is no 
other permanent professor. 

Number of students, in 1833, 47. The students are divided into four 
classes ; and no qualification for admission is required except in Enirlish 
studies. The records of the college do not furnish the means of ascer- 
taining the number of graduates or alumni ; but the number is estimated 
at about 100. 

Commencement is on the 2d Wednesday in September. Vacattons^ — 
1st, from commencement, 5 weeks; — 2d, from the 3d Wednesday in 
March, 5 weeks. 

,Anmtal expenses ; — tuition $20; — library $2; — forbo«nl $ljB/OtL 
week. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1 S34. ] T K N > K 5 S K i: . ^,].") 

East Te.nnesske College. 

This institution, at Knozville, was founded in 1807. It possesses 
funds to the amount of about $25,000 -, a tract of about 15,000 acres of 
bud in the Western District of the state ; and a library containing 1,400 
Tidiinies. — Number of students, in 1833, 28. • 

ReT. John H. Piper, President. Rev. Stephen Foster, Professor. 

An institution styled Washington College ^ has been established in 
Washington county in East Tennessee. 

Southern and Western Theological Seminary. 

This institution, which is at Mary ville, East Tennessee, was estab- 
lished, in 1821, by the Presbyterian synod of Tennessee. It has both 
a theological and literary department. A boarding-house is connected 
with a farm which is cultivated by indigent students. The library con- 
tains about G,000 volumes. — Rev. Isaac Anderson, D. D., Principal. 

Number of students, 1833, 22. Whole number educated 50. 



XX. KENTUCKY. 

Government. 

John Breathitt, Cotcmor ; term of office expires in Sep- Salar/, 

tember,1836, $2,000 

James T. Morehead, Lieut.- Governor and Speaker of the Senate, — pay $4 
a day, while presiding over the Senate. 

Lewis Sanders, Jun. Secretary of State, 750 

Porter Clay, Auditor of Pttblie Accounts, 1,500 

John M. Foster, Register of the Land Office ^ . 1,500 

James Davidson, Treasurer 1,200 

Joel Scott, Keeper of the Penitentiary. 

JUDICIARV. 

Court of Appeals. 

Salanr. 

George RoberUon, Chief Justice, .... #1|5Q0 

Joseph R. Underwood, Judge, 1,500 

Samnel S. Nicholas, do 1,500 

Charles S. Morehead, attorney General, .... 400 
James O. Dana, Reporter, 

Circuit Courts. 
The state is divided into 16 circuits ; salary of each Judge $1,000. 

William P. Roper, 1j< District. \ Henry O. Brown, 8d JHiinei. 

i 



d by Google 



236 


KENTUCKY. 




[1834. 


Thomaa M. Hickey, 


2d District. 


Richard French, 


IMDisiriet. 


David White, 


4th do. 


Silaa W. Robbins, 


im 


do. 


John M. Herritt, 


M do. 


John L. Bridges, 


12th 


do. 


Asher W. Graham, 


6tk do. 


A. H. ChurchiU, 


I2th 


do. 


Benj. Shackleford, 


7th do. 


Alney McLean, 


Uth 


do. 


Benj. Monroe, 


eth do. 


Joseph Eve, 


15th 


do. 


WUliam L. Kelly, 


9th do. 


Rezin Daridge, 


IGth 


do. 




. EDUCATION. 







Statistical View of Common Schools in Kentucky. 

The Ist column shows the number of schools ; the 2d, the average 
number of pupils in each ; the 3d, the whole number of pupils ; the 4th, 
the number of children, between the ages of 5 and 15, not at school ; the 
5th, the whole number of children, in 1830, between the ages of 5 and 
15 ; the Gth, the average annual income of teachers ; the 7th, the 
amount paid for education ; the 8th, the average cost of tuition. [From 
the Lexington Journal of Education, 1832.] 



Atiderson, • 

Bmrreai 

"Balb, . 

Boone, 

Bourbon, 

Bn&ckeD, . 

Bieckenridgei 

Butler, 

tit] 11 ill, tiDi reported.! 

Caldwellj . 

Callownv, 

CanipbeH, 

Case V , 

Qaristian, « 

Clarke, 

Clay, 

Cumbeflaiid| « 

Daviess, . 

^dinondson, 

E^Ull, not reportcdi 

Foyelte, , ^ 

Flcimjpg, I , 

Floyd, 

Franklin, 

Galktin, , 

Garrjird, 

Gmnit 



No, 


Uv.l 


5c k hq.Vj 


13 


'^i 


12 


24 


9 


33 


24 


27 


IS 


3a 


m 


31 


AB 


20 


12 


27 


16 


m 


7 


22 


Id 


m 


M 


22 


17 


21 


6 


21 1 


20 


3J 


21 


40 


3 


17 


& 


27 ' 


9 


25 


2 


31 


39 


^ 


23 


31 





S5 


in 


30 


14 


m 


15M) 


S3 


9 


33 



No, 
CJiiklr 



No. 
Cbilii. 
nat bI 



2^11,350 
3021,044 

iJA42Iy7S 



To(ftJ 
No. 



of 
Tettr*f4. 






1,541^ 

i,ci>al 

4WH.:}I:j 

i*>^i G^u 



45:ii,asn 

ii45 1,l37f 
44:] -2,113' 

ti\[}2A7C- 
511 Ult* 



241 
02 



1,754 
835 
005 



1,1222,748 

870 2,477 

I5I, 1,250 1,307 

'"■'1,144 l,im 

51lj[ 810 



4651,144 

300 

450 



1,^} 
1,042 

940 
3,222 
2,002 
l,y55 
3,0lt> 
\ S}i7 
1,T15 

7tid 

1,382 
2,010 

2,m 

051J 
2,005 
1,009 

727 

3,870 
3,347 



A ver»f4 1 Amouoi j 

Mitl for lATerage 
EducA- Cost of 



290 



$173 
181 

275 
275 
210 
270 
253 
3^7 
21G 
184 

2G7 

100 
187 

145 
:^t04 

:u»4 
m6 

372 



217 

mi 

224 
1^ 
334 



lion. 



2,m8 
2,*30 
5,603 

&a3u 

12,134 

2j3O0 
3,45^2 

1^4 

4.270 

2,064 

3,18B 

H72 

e,oii3 

0,383 

540 

2,044 

2,140 

744 



300 ll,4(r7 



0,102 

4,638 
3,107 
3,945 

2,IW 



TuiUoa. 



#7,75 
7^ 
6.20 
B.40 
7J25 

a.57 

7.73 

7,23 

6J5 

043 
8.51 
7,03 

0.1^2 
!I.7G 

7,88 
10,5D 

84a 

li.34 

12.00 

10.^ 

7.00 
8,00 
0.56 

sm 

8,50 
7,11 



dbySOOgk 



i@3l.] 


KEWTUeST. 




wn 




No. 


At. 


Child- ^ '*"**• 


Toud 
No. 


Average 
incomo 


Aiuuuat 
paid for 


AToram 


Countiec. 


Sch. 


no. P. 


'^"- SchM. 
"102; 5431 


Child'»ii. 
~1>45 


of 
Teao'rt. 

$i255 


Lduca- 
tion. 

51,020 


coat of 
Tuition< 

$10.06 


Graves, 


" 4", 25" 


Grayson, . 


8 


31 


252 


825 


1,080 


207 


2,140 


8.49 


Greene, 


14 


23 


32t) 


2,52I» 


2,858 


232 


3,314 


10.07 


Greenup, . 


.» 


30 


270 


1^>70 


1,541 


208 


2,418 


8.95 


Hancock, 


3 29 


m 


240 


327 


271 


814 


9.46 


Hardin, 


%\ i :«) 


G93!2,521> 


3,2: J4 


277 


0,372 


9.19 


Harlan, 


3 j 21 


(J4; 777 


841 


214 


042 


10.03 


Harriflon, . 


24 1 :^ 


8:i5 2,157 


3,(HX) 


308 


7,373 


8.82 


Hart, . 


() ' a; 


155 1,207 


1,372 


230 


1,381 


8.90 


Henderson, 


12 ! 2() 


243 910 


1,153 


241 


2.81H> 


11.09 


Henrj, 


2:^ i 2<> 


(KK> 1.915 


2,521 


195 


4,557 


7.51 


Hickman, 


5 25 


127 1,N2 


1,2()9 


220 


1,112 


8,75 


Hopkins, 
Jefierson, not report- 


13 


20 


200 1,327 


1,587 


101 


2,240 


8.02 


















ed in fuU. 


















Jeesamine, 


IS 


29 


520 


1,27!) 


1,789 


254 


4,416 


8.49 


Knox, . 


4 


2r^ 


113 


J»91 


1,104 


259 


1,038 


9.18 


Laurel, 


2 


20 


41 


541 


582 


164 


328 


8.00 


Lawrence, 


9 


20 


179 


945 


1,124 


150 


1,340 


7.52 


iLewis, 





27 


242 1,123 


l,3lK> 


189 


1,(^10 


0.97 


LiTingston, not rep. 


24 


22 


537 


1,491 


2,028 


203 


4,890 


9.11 


















McCracken, not rep. 


IG 


23 


393 


1,928 


2,331 


297 


6,040 


1291 


















Madison, 


33 


32 


1,054 


2,392 


3,440 


248 


8,197 


7.77 


Mason, 


39 30 


1,180 


J, 900 


3,080 


241 


11,089 


9.57 


Meade, 


8 , 32 


25(; 


401 


81H> 


284 


l,f)84 


7.75 


Mercer, . 


30 28 


1,043 


2,010 


3,441 


250 


9,737 


9.33 


Monroe, 


7 :^> 


2.-)2 


1,121 


1,483 


282 


l,i»70 


7.84 


Montgomery, . 


15 3G 


551 


1,595 


2,M0 


279 


4,251 


7.71 


Morgan, 










^93 








Muhlenberg, 


12 


21 


258 


990 


1,248 


150 


1,JH)0 


7.36 


Nelson, 


23 


35 


8572,016 


2,8r3 


301 


8,n20 


10.31 


Nicholas, . 


IG 


38 


012!l,5()8 


1,180 


277 


4,4:i5 


7.26 


Ohio, . 


7 


24 


1(W 953 


1,121 


212 


1,485 


8.84 


Oldham, . 


17 


2G 


440 


1,538 


1,984 


215 


3,089 


8.27 


Owen, 


12 


25 


2JH) 


1,190 


l,4r)8 


175 


2,108 


7.05 


Pendleton, 


8 


40 


318 


708 


1,020 


300 


2,37?) 


7.48 


Perry, . 


3 


17 


52 


940 


992 


102 


498 


9.58 


Pike, . . 


3 


17 


53 


732 


785 


155 


404 


8.75 


Pulaski, 


23 


20 


599 


1,847 


2,438 


170 


4,03« 


6.74 


Rockcastle, 


7 


21 


145 


539 


784 


177 


1,200 


8.28 


Rossel, 


1 


28 


28 


8J)8 


920 


244 


224 


6.00 


Scott, 


18 


38 


C90'1.8:^5 


2,523 


3<K) 


7,288 


10i36 


Shelby, . . 


43 


2() 


1,125 2;370 


3,704 


235 


8,852 


6.67 


Simpson, . 


12 


33 


3931,025 


1,418 


301 


3,013 


9.19 


mr- . • . • 


12 


23 


282.1,202 


1,544 


197 


2,170 


7.71 


10 




3(J3 




i;471 








Union, 


13 


24 


318 


981 


1,294 


228 


3,053 


9ifl 


8 


31 


252 


073 


923 


254 


2.470 


8.20 


Warren, t 


13 


31 


405 


1,880 


2,291 


237 


3.112 


7.68 


Washington, 


34 


27 


907 


3,212 


4,119 


257 


8,551 


9.4S 


wSS^y, . ' . ' 


9 


34 


307 


2,041 


2,350 


272 


2,050 


6\ \\.^ 


7. 


28 


J»5 


801 


1,086 


22B \ \AS 

304\ 7?n 


Woodiord. . . / 


231 29 \ 


6G6'1,141 


1,812 


9 










Digit 


zed by V3\ 


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236 



KENTUCKY. 



[1834. 



" Our facts, on this subject/' s&ys the Lexington Joamal of Educa- 
tion, " are deduced from returns made by the assistant marshals engaged 
in taking the last census. Full certified reports were received from 78 
of the 83 counties of the state, \vhich show that there are, in these coun- 
ties, between 1,100 and 1,200 schools, in which there were in the sum- 
mer of 1830, 31,834 children out of 139,242, in all the counties, between 
the ages of 5 and 15 ; leaving 107,328 of the same ages reported not at 
scshool. 

** The sum paid by these counties for common-school education, in 
1830, was (supposing the same number of children to continue at school 
during the whole year), $278,592. — One county (Morgan) was re- 
ported not to have a single school in it, or not a child at school out of 
893 in the county. — The proportion of the children at school of the 
county of Bourbon, the highest in the scale, was as 10 to 23.*' 

The state has a Literary Fund of $140,000. There is an asylum for 
the deaf and dumb at Danville; respectable academies or high schools 
aft Lexington, Louisville, and various other places. 

Transylvania Universitv. 

This institution, which is at Lexington, is the oldest of the kind in 
tile Weatern States. In 1780, the legislature of Virginia made a grant of 
8^000 acres of land to endow a public school in Kentucky, which, in 
1783, was denominated the *' Transylvania Seminary ; " in 1788, it 
was fixed at Lexington ; and in 1793, the Rev. James Moore was elect- 
ed the first president. With the Seminary, the Kentucky Academy, 
which was founded in 1794, was united, in 1798, and the institution 
was incorporated under the name of the ** Transylvania University." 
It is very favorably situated, but its prosperity has been variable. In 
1829, the principal edifice was burnt; the loss, including the books 
consumed, was estimated at $ 38,000 ; but it has been since rebuilt. 
The library, before the destruction of the edifice, contained 6,000 vol- 
umes : it now contains about 2,400 ; and libraries belonging to the sto* 
dents, 1,500. 

Succtssion of PreaidenU. 

BoT. Hormce Ilolley, LL. D., 1618 to 1897 
ner. AIra Woodi, D. D., 1887 »* 1830 
Rev. Benj. O. Peers, 1833 



Aer. James Moore, 
Rer. Henry Toulmao, 
Rer, James Moore, 
Rer. James Blythe, D. D^ 



179910 1794 
1794 »* 1796 
1796 « 1804 
1804 « 1817 



Faculty of Arts in 1833. 



Rot. Benj. O. Peers, PretidettL 
John LuU, D. P., Prof, Math, 



I E. Rovel, Prqf. Long. 

I Charles £. Bains, Prin, Pr^qr. Depati, 



Number of college students, in 1830, 81 ; medical students 200; law 
■tudents 19 ; students in the preparatory department C2 : — toUl 362. 



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#iQri^ tlM oouim; the olhAr PrafteiM idxlMiiif 

^^Vft;^#itfQi^iMn990. TlM mediod d^tttaMiiief 
pevtral jMn, teen n flonikhing institntifiii. in 
■Indenta. 



"Rie foUowing genflemea hare eneoeeriTely Md 

of law in tbe nniirenity, tIs. ; 1799 George ^Mp 

>im; — Henry Clay ; 1807 John Monroe; •-«-18|il4 

KT^Bany— JeeM Bledsoe. — 1829 John Boyle ^-«- 

The number of etudents in the law echool in the 

Sr ld32--3, was 99; in tbe private ieeiion 25. The pri- 

MUBonoef on the let Monday ii^ May, and continnee 6 

T1m» poldio eeeeioa begine on the let Monday in November, 

4 monthe. Commeneenunt is held on the last Satorday 

Ijfb student can be a candidate for gradoation who has 

«l 1m^ tiro public sessions, or who has not been two yeaie 

jj^aetitioner, and attended <«ne session. Ea^MMt:— > 

Maion $25; library $5; matriculation fee "^S. 

CarrRS Collbos. 

If. wldeh is at Danville, 34 miles 8SW. of Lezlagta, 

1^ ihe Fcesbyterian church, and ineorpomted in 1618. 

yafi <aaanaged by a board of 11 trastees appointed by the 

^ynod of Kentucky. The legislature gave up aA eonlrol 

lems, and surrendered it into the hands of the Synod, in 

of their endowing it without legislative assistance. The 

hofi^evet, stipulates that no sectarian peculiarities shall be 

;^ pi^ssors, and that all aeets shall have free access fbr 

the instKution.'* The Synod promised the college 

an equivalent for the right of choosing the trustees, only 

of irliich had been received in 1^. The college is pleae- 

in a central part of the state, ^d has a library of 1,600 

aBdaehemieal and philosophical apparatus. The buildings 

of a brick edifice of two stories, a refectory, and a dormitcny. 

echool connected with the college. The Rev. 

I, i>. D,f WIS the first president. 





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940 



KENTUCKT. 



[]8d4. 



Offieers of GavemmaU and InstruetUm in 1833. 



Rav. John C. Toaof , A. M., Prwideia and Lake Monsell, M. D., Pt^, Ch*m,, Mht^, 



and JVaL PUL 
Rev. Joeeph Haber, Ptqf. Mod. iMkg, 
Wm. Y. Allen. \ Tktara </ the Gram- 
Henry G. Conung o, ) nor SehooL 



Pntf. Logic and Mor, Phil. 
James M. Bachanan, A. M., Pruf. Matk. i 
Rev. Wm. L. Breckenridge, A. M., Prqf. 

JIne. Lang. 
X^awii W. Green, A. M., Prqf. BOIuLet- 

ttes and PoUt. EeoH. 

Number of etudents, in 1833, (56. Commencement is on the Tharsday 
following the 3d Wednesday in Sept. Vacation^; — 1st, from com- 
mencement to the Thursday after the 3d Wednesday in Oct'; — 2d, 
after a session of 21 weeks, 4 weeks. 

ExpenseSf for tuition $ 30 per annum in the college, and ^ 24 in the 
grammar school ; for board, (the common price with washing and lodg- 
ingj) $1,50. — "Exclusive of books and clothing, a student may sup- 
port himself on from $80 to $ 100 per annum." — Near the college is a 
farm on which a student, intende for the gospel ministry, by laboring 
two hours daily, may obtain his entire support, except books and cloth- 
ing, for ^60 per annum. 

St. Joseph's College. 

St. Joseph's College, at Bardstown, which was founded in 1810, is 
under the direction of Roman Catholic clergymen. The college build- 
ings are sufficient to afford accommodation for 200 pupils. " The insti- 
tution has no endowment, but is supported by the tuition-fees and board 
of thie students; the faculty and most of the professors and tutors hav- 
ing generally labored gratuitously." — " Catholic pupils are required to 
practise the religion they profess ; but students of other denominations 
are received upon the sole condition of submitting to the general laws 
of the institution and (as far as pertains to religion) of attending morn- 
ing and evening prayer daily, and catechism and divine service on Sun- 
days and holy-days." The library contains about 5,000 volumes, and 
there is a good philosophical apparatus. 

Officers of Government and Instruction in 1833. 



Rev. Geo. A. M. Elder, President and Prqf. 

m8t.f Belles-LeUres, and Mental Phil. 
Joseph I!aieltino, Fice-President. 
Rev. Mr. Delayoe*, Prqf. Theol. ^ French. 
Rev. Mr. Powell, Prqf. Latin and Prefect. 
John Cheshire, Prqf. J/iu. PhU. emd Chem. 
Richard Spalding, Prt^f. Math. 
>ev. Mr. Clark, Prqf. Greek. 



John McGill, AaH. Teacher ef OreA. 

Dr. A. A add, As^L Teacher of Latin. 

Rev. Mr. Chambige, Ast. Teacher qf Frptch. 

Paul Santas^, Prqf. Spanish. 

Col. B. S. A. Lowe, Instructor qf Cadets. 

Messrs. Francis, Abell, ) TVtors qf Prepay 

Grayham, & McMulloo, | atory DepartmenL 



The number of students, in 1833, 130 ; whole number graduated abotU 
80. Vacations, the month of August, and one week at Christmas and 
Easter. 



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1S34.] KF.VTLTKV. '.>4 1 

.Jnrtufi! cjrpenjfcs, for tuition in rcadintr, writinfr^ nnd aritlunctic, JjjJ '^0 ; 
— in English grammar, geography, and surveying $ 30 ; — in the lan- 
guages and higher branches $50, with $10 extra for the class in natural 
philosophy ; — for board and washing $100, with a charge of $8 for bed 
and bedding. 

St, Thomases Seminary ^ which was established in 1811, situated 4 
miles from Bardstown, is under tlie direction of the bishop of Bards- 
town, and is an appendage to St. Joseph's College. — Rev. Walter 
Cooms, Superior. Annual expense for tuition $ IG ; — board $ 72. 

St. Mary's Seminary, in Washington County, was established about 
10 years since by the late Rev. Wm. Byrne ; and it is now governed by 
the Jesuits under the superintendence of the Rev. Father Chasel. It is 
a very cheap school, and has annually educated about 100 of the middle 
class of society. 

Augusta College. 

This institution, which is pleasantly situated at Augusta, on the 
Ohio, 22 miles below Maysville, was founded, in 1822, by the Ohio and 
Kentucky Annual Conferences of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 
It was originally incorporated as a college, but was conducted as an 
academy till 1827, when it went into operation as a college ; and the 
first commencement was held in 1821). The college edifice is 80 feet by 
40, three stories high. The college library contains 2,000 volumes ; and 
there are libraries belonging to the students which contain 500 volumes. 
There is a grammar school, or preparatory department, connected with 
the college. It is under the legislative government of 23 Trustees. — 
The Rev. Martin Ruter, D. D., the first president, resigned in 1832. 

FatvUy in 1833. 



Sev. Joseph S. Tomliason, A. M., Pres. 

, Pr<f. Math, and J^at. PkU. 

Rot. HeorjB. Daicom, A. M.,Pro/. Mor.Sc. 
ReT. Burr II. Mct'own, A. M., Prof. Lang. 



Fred. A. W. Davis, M. D., Pr. Ch9M. ^ Boi. 
Precept. Acad. D^ariment. 



Solomon Howard, AsH. Acad. Department. . 
John Vincent, Teadur Primary Scho<iL\ 

Number of students in the collegiate department, in 1833, 75 ; in the 
academical department, in 1832, 30 ) in the primary school 45 : — total 
146. Number of alumni 60. 

Commencement is on the Thursday succeeding the Ist Wednesday in 
August. Vacations; — 1st, from commencement, 6 weeks; — )2d, at 
the close of a session of 21 weeks, 4 weeks. 

Cumberland Collxoe. 

This institation, which is at Princeton, in Caldwell coanty, was 
fimnded by the Cumberland Presbyterians, and incorporated in 1824. 
It has two college edifices of two stories, one of them 60 feet by 22 ; 
21 



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Non^ of-itataitt} in 1833, 79. Number of gndoilBf S8. 
is on the lit Wednesday in Dec Vaettimi'-^^m 
t to the lit o^Feb. 

: — $80, with two hoars* mannal labor Ufy. 

Gboroxtows Collsos. 

Georgetown College, at Georgetown, 12 n^es N. of Lesdngtoa, ww 
founded, in 1830, by the BapUst denomination, and went into operatioB 
vnder the Rot. Joel S. Bacon as president The college Ins # ftiad d 
in 4S,000, and a library of 1^ yolnmes. 

C^feersqfChnfernmeniOMdhutruetimim'lSSS, 

BsT. 80m M. Noel, D. D., Pn$UniL i Wm. Cndf , A. M., Pr^, Lmg, 

!•▼. Gm. W. Eaton, A. M., Fnf, JMUL SudmI Hatch, M. D., Pnf. GMsi. 
mdMkt.PhBU I 

Nomber of students, in 1833, 36. 



XXI. OHIO. 

GoYxnimsvT. 

RoBSBT Lucas, Ovwnwr; term of office expires on the 1st 
Monday in December, 1833 #1/100 

Moses H. Kirby, Secretary qfStaU. 

John A. Bryan, Auditor of SHaU, .... l/M) 

Homy Blown, Treanrer, 

The SmuOB consists of 36 members, elected biennially; Bamnel R. 

Miner, 4Mdbr. 
The gwt fs itf JR^fffciifalteet consists of 73 members, elected ] 

^i Dvrid T. Dfaoey, apeaker. 



im^ 



JuDiciAmr. 

Svprome Ontri, 

Cki^Judge, . 

iJudge, . 



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1834.] OHIO. 243 

Courts of Common PUus. 

For holding the Courts of Common Pleas, the state is divided into 9 
districts or circuits, in each of which there is a presiding judge, whose 
salary is $ 1 ,000. These judges are severally assisted by three associate 
judges in each county, who receive $2,50 a day during their attendance 
at court 

The names of the present presiding judges are as follows. 



George B. Holt, 


1st Circuit. 


George I. Smith, 


Gth Circoit 


F. A. Grimk^, 


2d do. 


David Higgins, 


7th do. 


Matthew Burnhard, 


3d do. 


Thomas Irwin, 


8th do. 


Alexander Harper, 


4th do. 


John M. Goodenow, 


0th do. 


J. H. Hallock, 


5th do. 







All the judges of the Supreme Court and the Courts of Common 
Pleas are elected by the General Assembly for the term of 7 yean. — 
The Supreme Court Bits once a year in each county, and the Court of 
Common Pleas three times. 

For other information concerning the Courts of Ohio, see the Ameri- 
can Almanac for 1832. 

EDUCATION. 

Common Schools. 

A system of common schools was established by law in this state in 
1625, by which an ad valorem tax of a mill upon a dollar is asaesaed 
upon all the taxable property in the state. This tax is united with the 
school fund arising from the land appropriated by congress for the sap- 
port of schools ; and a general system of free schools similar to that of 
New England has been carried into operation throughout the statei 
and is becoming useful and popular. 

ACADXMIXS. 

''There are," according to Kilburn*s Ohio Gazetteer, 1831, '< 15 or 90 
incorporated academies in various parts of the state. But few if any of 
them have regular classical schools kept in them, and not one of them 
is endowed with any permanent fund for its support." — There are now 
respectable academies at Cincinnati, Chillicotbe, Dayton, Columbus, 
and several in the Western Reserve ; and at Columbus there is an asy- 
lum for the deaf and dumb. 

^ Ohio Ukivirsitt. 

This institution, which is at Athens, 40 miles W. of Marietta, is the 
oldest in Ohio ; it was founded, in 1802, by the Territorial Legislature, 
and endowed by congress with two townships, or 46,000 acres, of land ; 
in 1804, the act of the territorial goyernment was confirmed by th« 



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:illidf ibor itofiM Inelndiiig a tMMUMiit stoty ; jintf lt|^^ 
ItieklmildiiigoftwofftoriM. The pbUoMphioal a^puiW^ 
ikm Vbnxy contaiiifl 1,000 Tolnmet ; and thete are twd fibiritiee iHlMif- 
i&g to the ■tudenta which contain 500 rolomee eeoh. The fente iSf Iha 
hmde amount at preeent to ahont #3,S00 per anniim. 

Faadty in 1833. 

Mm. Bobwt Wi]Mn» D. D^ PruUmO. lEeT. Wm. Wall, Fnf. JMM. 

Tlu M. Dtttlw, M. D., Ffif. JVbfural PAi/.ljoMph Daoa, Bw|., IVfT. OtmI miXelto. 

y,|>e. iDaniel Eead, A. M., 



Number of students, in 1833, in the college classes 45; in the aoade- 
my 89. — Whole number of alumni 72. 

CammeneemeiU is on the Wednesday after the 3d Tuesday in Sept. 
Vacations: — 1st, from commencement, 6 weeks;— 2df from the 
Wednesday after the 2d Tuesday in April, 4 weeks. 

Amaal expeMes: — Cor tuition $SX); — room-rent* wood, oodles, 
dsc., ||15; — board from $1,25 to 1,50 a week. 

Miami Ukiverbitt. 

This institution, which is at Oxford, 37 miles NW. of Cincinnati»was 
incorporated in 1809 ; first opened in Not., 1824 ; and the first com- 
mencement was held in Sept., 1826. The township in which it ie stl- 
vatedy was granted by Congress for its support ; and the annnal income 
deriyed from the lands which are now let out on perpetual leases^ 
amounts to $5,000; and the yearly income firom tuition is ahovt 
$2,000;— total $7,000. There are two college edifices, one 100 feet by 
40, containing 24 rooms for studenU; the other, 85 feet by fi5» oontalB- 
inga chapel, library, laboratory, and recitation-rooms; with a wing 
eontaining rooms for students. The library contains 1,200 voliimcft; 
m4 there are libraries belonging to the students containing '^HjBOO 



FaeuUy m 1833. 

i«r. B. H. WAapt D. D., PruiinL 
m&t% via B. MdOoAifi A. M. 

^>|IWj^^t*'**» ^ ^ JPnf. JWrt. pw., 



a«T. Tb. AmMtioBf , A. B., iV. UL^ Qrmk* 

/Vqf. JTmCoI San>l. MeCraeken, A. B., IV^r -Mitt. 

W. F. PcrgoMMi, A. M., ^buttt iJrmm, lUL 
B. Clark. C. Miller, W. P. KoWt- f Stt^L 
too, if. Moorobaail, J. O. Mootlbid, | TJmA. 



^U in the fimr college classes, in 1833, l^i^p-fj 
^ laiident gra^tetM 6 ; — 8^ 
pv ]l|n«^ar^«iimi,«oml6M 



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I 

r li Ifeumh to tiM Ul Itadi^ ia Mty^ 

I ia tiM ooB«fB f90} iatlMcramiiMr ieliool> 
ifltol^ftirMk. 

^^ '. WXITJUUI &BSXETX CoLLXttX. 

Ijirftiition, whioh it At Hndfon, 25 milet filte.of detTeluul, ww 

I In 18W ; and H wis Ibiiiided bj beneTolent iadiTiditalf , 

^Willi a Tiew to th« edaeatkm of joang men denized for tlw 

;|fP|iili^9 la onbr to lopplj the wuito of the wMtam coantij. Ita 

^^ll|ifti#iilnat wholly of priTato benelaetioiia; and it haa a theological 

iilifiapaiatory depaitment The college library eontaina 1,600 roL' 

'^9l$!iH-'nid the atndents' librariea 300. — Manual labor ia introdactd aa 

#|iiifll«he general ayetem of diacipline.-^ReT. Clnriea B. Stom, 

.\tfKiM pvaaldeat, died in 1833. 

'^ ' Faculty in 1833, 

fsm^' , PrwridmiL lEUsor Wrigll^ Jr., Pr^. JMrtft. t JM. FkU. 

liilfcltll Onmi, Pr^f: &w. UL Rot. Danwl Coe, d«M<f(. AjCmeter. 

Mvltlag, JVtT- i^#* I 

of atndenta in the college 46 ; b the preparatory department 



HIl Hanber <xr alamni 10. 

'f^mmmumtnJt ia on the 4th Wcdneiday in Aogoat PoeelJoiw; — 

I iftton commencement, 5 weeks; — 2d, fiom the 2d WednaMayia 

f, 2 weelLa;— 3d, from the 1st Wednesday in May, 3 weeks. 

Kurrov Coixsaa. 

iliis institntioB, which is at Gambler^ in the central part of a tract of 
<llmd belonging to it, 5 miles £. of Mount Vernon, and 52 ME. of Colonk> 
bnSy waa founded. In 182B, by the exertions of Bishop Chase, who went 
to England in 1823, and returned in 1825, having there obtained for it 
about $ 30,000 ; and he gave to the college the name of *<Kenyon," 
from Lord Kenyon, one of its principal benefketors, and to the town the 
luune of '' Gambler," from Lord Oambier, another of its beneiketors. 
It haa receiTcd considerable addltloaa to its Ibnds from individuals in 
^ilfvenl of the statee ; and it possesses 8^000 acres'of land. The college 
I, which is of stone, contains 36 rooms, and forms only one third 
cf the entire design. The libraiy ciontains 2,300 volumes. The col- 
^_ b under the directioa <^a bdard cf 16 trustees, of which the bishop 
Olio is president fx (^fimo* This college haa connected with H a 
department and a graamiar school. 

of a r^nMttd (the Bldiop of Ohio, Df. €. P. 
I, wiitluttteiifyagiaiefal auperintendence,) m FSaa^lMM^ 





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246 OHIO. [1834. 

of Oreekf of Latins of Chemistry and Mineralogy, of Intellectual and 
Moral Philosophy and Rhetoric ; and three of Theology. 

Number in the college classes, in 1831-2,48; — irregalar students 
11 ; — theological students 3 ; — students in the grammftr ichool 82 : — 
total 144. Totol number, in 1833, 132. 

Commencement is on the 1st Wednesday in September. Vacations; 
— 1st, from commencement, 8 weeks; — 2d, after the close of the first 
session of 20 weeks; 4 weeks. 

Annual expenses for two sessions of 20 weeks each, for board, tuition, 
room-rent, fuel, and lights, — for a theological student $50, — for a col- 
lege student $ 70, — for a member of the grammar school $ GO. 

Franklin College. 

This institution, which is at New Athens, in Harrison county, 18 
miles NW. of Wheeling, Va., was founded by the Rev. Wm. McMillan, 
the first president ; was incorporated in 1824 ; and went into operation 
in 1825. The college edifice is a brick building of two stories, GO feet by 
30, and was built by private subscription. The college has no endow- 
ments, but is supported wholly by tuition. The library contains 1 ^0 
volumes. " The charter prohibits the professors from teaching secta- 
rian views." — It is under the direction of a board of 21 trustees. 

Faculty in 1833. 

Rev. Richard Cajnpbell, PresidenL I John Armitrong, Pro/. Matkemntics. 

Eev. John Walker, Flce-President. 'George W. Jeakina, Prqf. Language*. 

Number of students, in 1833, 40 ; — alumni 7. 

Commencement is on the last Wednesday in September. Vacations ; 
^— Ist, the month of October ; — 2d, the month of April 

Annual expenses : — for tuition, &c. ^^10,75 : — for board from $ 1 to 
( 1,25 it week. 

Lane Seminary. 

This institution, which is situated on a small eminence or elevated 
ground, called '* Walnut Hill," 2 miles from Cincinnati, was founded, 
in 1821>, chiefly for the promotion of theological education : and it de- 
rives its name from Messrs. £. and W. A. Lane, merchants of New 
Orleans, its earliest benefactors. A donation of $ 20,000 has been made 
to it by Arthur Tappan, Esq., the sum of $20,000 has been subscribed 
in Cincinnati and its vicinity ; and consideiable sums been obtained in 
Philadelphia, New York, and other places. In 1832, an edifice of 4 
stories, with a basement, 100 feet long and 40 wide, containing upwards 
of 100 single rooms for students, was erected ; and there is a building 
for the preparatory school which was previously built. A valuable 
ifirm is comiected with tjle uwtitutiop, and the manual-Ubor syttam ii 



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f thMlofkal djeptrtmeiit, a Utecuy or ^a^ 
liiMl.a 4^fp«rtiiieBl ibr the f«ep«ntictt of adiool* 
^ traitoof oODititi of S5 moiBlMif . 

fteutt^ cm! JkffriMloiv m 1833. 
0.D., 



»^Jfc.iJ|P,A. M., Prqf. Gtera JSSH. 




^- 



JPkiM. t Fr^. >•▼- Calrio E. Blow*, A. M., Pr^. JKI. MM. 

BeT. N. H. Fttbom, A. M., iV^. I«^r> 
Th. D. Mitdiell, M. D^ Pr^f, Cham. 
I. Wbitney, A. H., TtatherEng, Depmt. 

\ of 6 weeks each ; the 1st commencing from the 1st 
bj in Majr; — the 2d, from the last Mondaj in October, 
djieajes: — for board ($1 a week) $40; room-rent $3; 
\ $7 ; fbel and lights ( 8 \ contingent expenses $ 3 ; — total $60. 
•Btain the theological department pay nothing for tuition ; thoae 
jGi^illia, lUaraiy department pay $20 per annam. — Whole nnmber of sta- 

^-^ Gaahtills Litxrart and Theological IssTrrcTioir. 

^tkSm instttation, which was founded by the Baptists at Granville, 30 
Jiijlldi; W«€i^ZanesYille, went into operation in December, 1831. There 
il^imBb^ IP it a large and valuable farm, and the manual-labor system 
k winidiieed. It consists of two departments, — one literary, in which 
Tft-Brgfr** u^d classical education is given ; — the other theological, in 
f^pi young men of the Baptist denomination are educated for the 
■iiliiiiij — The annual expense for tuition, boarfi, washing, rooqi-rent, 
||B^ Ae. ja.only $ 70.— Commencement on the 2d Wednesday in Aug. 

Thk Mxdical Collkob of Ohio, at CfHCivirATr. 

This institution was founded in 1818 ; remod'elled by the legislature 
in 1884 - 5 ; and it has since been flourishing. It has a valuable library 
of 1|500 Tolmnea. 

JlMieal FacuU^. 

^ Jiiadlab Cobb» II.D., JV^T* ^>Mt*t i%>M.|Chsrl«i B« Piaiaoii, M. D., Pn^. Mai, MU. 
. tl* D. MitdMO, ILD., IV. Ckm. ^Pket. Lloln MevWad, M. D., Pr^T- OImML, «». 

■y^0l$m wiater eonne of lectorea eommeoeM on the last Monday in Oet , 
i^lii«iis in the last week in Feb. O^teea are conferred in Marek. 
me? eoorse begins in May, aiul ends in Oct., having a recess 
The aggregate coal of the iriiiler eoorse is $ 96 : of the snn- 
ft$M 

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248 OHIO. [1834. 

Ohio Riformed Medical School. 

This institution was established at Worthington, 9 miles N. of Co- 
lumbus, in 1830. — The lectures commence on the Ist Monday in Octo- 
ber, and continue 6 months or longer. There is no specified time for 
completing a course of study, but when a student is qualified to pass 
an examination, he recelTes a degree. — Expense of the course $ 140, 
with $ 10 for a diploma, fioard $ 1 a week. 

Law School at Cincinkati, established in 1833. 

Professors. Messrs. John C. Wright, John M. Groodenow, Edward 
King, and Timothy Walker. 

The Historical and Philosophical Society of Ohio; established at 
Columbus in 1830. — Benjamin Tappan, PresideiU, P. B. Wilcox, 
Secretary. 



XXII. INDIANA. 

GOYERNMEKT. 



Salary. 

Noah Noble, Governor; term of oflSce expires in Dec., 1834 ; $1,000 

David Wallace, Lieut.- Governor. — Pay $2 a day during the session of 
tlie General Assembly. 

James Morrison, Secretary of State ; elected by Gen. Assembly for 4 years. 

Samuel Merrill, Treasurer of the State ; elected by the General Assem- 
bly for 3 years. 

Morris Morris, Auditor of Public .Accounts; elected by the General As- 
sembly for 3 years. 

Judiciary. 
Judges of the Supreme Court. 
Isaac Blackford, Stephen C. Stevens, and John T. McKinney ; — 
who hold their offices for 7 years from the 28th of January, 1831 : — 
salary, $700 each. 

President Judges of the Circuit Courts. 

John R. Porter, Amory Kinney, J. R. E. Goodellet, John F. Ross, B. 
F. Morris, Miles C. Eggleston, and Charles Test. Salary of each, ^700. 
The .Associate Judges receive $2 a day. 

EDUCATION. 

The Constitution of Indiana contains the following important provis- 
ion respecting general education. " It shall be the duty of the General 
Assembly, as soon as circumstances will permit, to provide by law for a 
general system of education, ascending In a regular gradation, from 

Digitized by V3VJVJV H^ 



1834.] iM.iv.vA. '^1!> 

township schools to a .'>t;ite unl\ rrsity, whcit in luill*'!i sh.i 11 be i' /•«//>, 
and equally open to all." The 3Gtli part of every townshiji of land is 
reserved for the support of education ; but no general system has yet 
been devised and carried into eflbct. 

Indiana College. 
Tliis institution, which is situated at Bloomington, about GO miles 
SSW. of Indianapolis, was incorporated in lJ::*27, and endowed by Con- 
gress with two townships of land. About two thirds of the land have 
been sold, and the proceeds form a productive fund of jfffG(),(MjO. There 
are two college buildings, one 'M) feet by *2ri, containing recitation- 
rooms ; the other 75 feet by 'A), of three stories ; the lr»wer story form- 
ing a chapel, tlie 2d, recitatlon-roonis ; the lid, rooms for literary socie- 
ties. The library contains 40<) volumes ; and the students' libraries 200. 
Facnhij in l^:lX 

Rev. Andrew Wylic, D. I)., President. IFtouurnonl P.irks, Prof. fMHir. 

Ebenezcr Elliott, Prof. Math. |.Maltlir\v Caiiii»b);ll, Tutor. 

Number of students in the college classes, in 1^:];}, 34 ; and 10 in the 
English department. — Whole number graduated 10. 

CommcHcrmcrU is on the last Wednesday in September. Two Vaea' 
tions ; — October and May. 

Annual expense of education about $100. 

South H.vnover College. 

This institution, which is at South Hanover, G miles below Madison, 
was founded in 1^25, by the Kev. Messrs J. M. Dickey and J. F. Crowe, 
and incorporated in 1^2*^ It is styled '* South Hanover College and 
Indiana Theological Seminary ; " and ccmiprises a collegiate, a theolog- 
ical, and a literary department. The princip'jl college edifice is 100 
feet by 40, and three stories high. The system of manual labor is intro- 
doced. The corporation consists of lU members. 

Faculty in 1833. 
RcT. iamo* Blytho, D. D., Ptcs. \ Prof. M. A. H. Nilc«, .\. B., Pnf. Lans(. 
Rer. J. F. Crowe, Vice- President tf Prof Kov. John Mutlhtw*, I). I)., Prof. ITieol. 

Logie^ 4'e. Ilev. J. \V. Cuiininglmm, A. B., Prof. Bibl, 

JoTiQ 11. llarncy, A. M., Prof. Math. I Lit. 

Number of college students, in lti33. .35; tiieological 5; students in 
the preparatory department 52; — total 92. 

Vacations; — Ist, from the last Wednesday in September to the Ist 
Monday in November; — 2d, from the last Wednesday in March to the 
1st Monday in May. 

Annual expenses ; — college bills $15 ; board ( $1 a week) ^42 ; rooiJl- 
rent ^1; fuel and lights $5; washing $4:— total $G7. For 
mannal labor deduct $25 — leaving $42. 

Indiana Hihtorital Society; organized in 1830; incorporated in 1831. 
Benjamin Parke, President. 



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*60 ILLINOIS. [1834. 

XXIII. ILLINOIS. 

G0T£B9ME1IT. 

John Reynolds, Governor; term of of&ce expires on the Ist Monday 

in December, 1834 ; salary, $ ] ,000. 
Zadoc Casey, Lieutenant-Governor, 

Present number of Senators, 2G; Representatives, 55 j pay of each, 
usually 53 a day. 

Judiciary. 

Supreme Court, 

Salary. 
William Wilson, Chief Justice^ .... $1,000 

Samuel D. Lockwood, Associate Judge^ . . 1,000 

Thomas C. Browne, do 1,000 

Theophilus W. Smith, do 1,000 

R. M. Young, Judge of the Circuit north of Illinois river, 700 

The judges of the Supreme Court officiate also as judges of the 
Circuit Courts. 

EDUCATION. 

A thirty-sixth part of every township of land is granted to the support 
of schools -f and three per cent, of the net proceeds of the United States* 
lands, sold within the state, is appropriated for the encouragement of 
earning, of which a sixth part is required to be bestowed on a college 
or university. But the state has not yet done any thing for the estab- 
lishment of schools ; and no system of general education has been 
formed. Funds from the sale of lands, have been received to a consid- 
erable amount ; but instead of being applied to the support of schools, 
they have hitherto been employed to meet the demands of the state. 
The subject, however, arrests the attention of individuals ; and in Feb- 
ruary, 1833, a society w^as formed, at Vandalia, styled tlie '< Illinois 
Institute of Education," the object of which is the promotion of educa- 
tion in tlie state. 

Illinois Collkoe. 

This institution, which was founded in 1830, is pleasantly situated at 
Jacksonville, a flourishing town, in a very fertile district of country, 
which is very rapidly increasing in population. The sum of $40,000 
has been raised, wholly from private benevolence, to be expended in 
the purchase of land, the erection of buildings, tlic procuring of a library, 
apparatus, &c., the support of instructors, and the putting in operation 
Uie system of manual labor ; but no provision has yet been made for 
permanent endowments. There are two college edifices, one 65 feet 
h/ 30, of two stories, containing a chapel, 4 recitation-iooms, and 9 



dbyGoogk 



18^34.] ILLINOIS. 2.')1 

rooms for students ; the otlier 104 feet l»y 40, four stories lii^Hi, besides a 
basement story, having two wings 3G feet by 27, of two stories, occu- 
pied by the families of the president and professors. The main body of 
the building contains 32 rooms, having each two bed-rooms, for stu- 
dents;' and the basement contains a kitchen and dining-hall. The 
library contains about 1,200 volumes ; the chemical apparatus is tolera- 
bly complete ; the philosophical is yet very limited. A farm of 228 
acres of very excellent land, with three work-shops, belong to the insti- 
tution. This institution comprises two departments, the collegiate and 
the preparatory. 

FaciiUy in 1833. 

Rev. Edward Becchcr, A. M., President. .J. Toroor, A. B., Intl. Greek ^ Latin* 
Rev. <]. M. Sturtevant, A. M., Prof. MaL^ Eraatua CoUon, A. B., Iiutruetor Prtfor. 

t JVot. PkO. I DqfartmenL 

Tniman M. Post, A. M., InsL Or. 4* Latin.\ 

Commencement is on the 3d Wednesday in August. Vacations; — 
1 sty from commencement, G weeks; — 2d, from the Wednesday before 
December 25th, 2 weeks ; 3d, from the 2d Wednesday in April, 4 weeks. 

Annual expenses; — tuition $10,50; room-rent from $5 to jlO ; 
repairs and recitation- rooms $3; board and washing from ^45 to 
f CO :— total from $ 69,50 to $ 89,50. 

No students have yet been graduated, and only two classes (the So- 
phomore and Freshman, each having 4 members), had, previous to the 
■ummer yacation of 1833, been formed. The following remarks are 
given from the best authority : Aug. 1833. — " Our average number of 
students has been G5, including both departments. The greater part 
are yet in the preparatory department ; but a considerable number will 
enter college this fall. Three years ago, there were none in the state 
fitted to enter college, and no preparatory schools. Hence the necessity 
of fitting our own scholars for college, and the small number yet in 
the college classes." 

Alton Literarv and Theological Skminart. 

This institution was founded by the Baptists in 1833, at Alton, on the 
east bank of the jVIississippi, 4 miles above the junction of the Missouri, 
and 20 miles above St. Louis. It is designed to comprise both a college 
and a theological seminary. A brick edifice is now in progress ; and 
arrangements have been made to obtain the library (1,200 volumes) at 
Rock Spring, where there has heretofore been a Baptist seminary. 



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•ml 



<3Qraur;iiupf , 






VfMkm MoOirk, 
Geoffa TompkiiM, 
Bobert Wash, 



1^ 



Judiciary. 
Svgfrmne Cwrt. 

Presiding Judge, 
jSssociate Judge^ 
do. 
Judges, William C. Carr. David Todd, John D. Cook, ¥d»^B^ 
McB^de, John F. Rjland. Salary of each $1,000. 

POPULATIOH. 

Popoktion of Miaaoori according to a censua taken mdcr th« «irtlMr> 
i^ of the state government, in 1833, 176;236, inekidfBf 9MM abnrea, 
uA 661 free peraona of color. 

EDUCATION. 

Public lands have been granted by Congress of eonsideiiUe 0Z|«bI 
in this state for the support of education ; but no system of free MhosJs 
has yet been put in operation. There are flourishing female •oadd- 
mies at St. Louis, St Cliarles, St. Ferdinand, and Apple Creek, midcr 
the direction of Catholic ladies. A number of other academies hifm 
been incorporated, and a college in Marion county is about to be eopi- 
menced. 

St. Louis Uhivxrsitt, 

This institution, which was founded in 1829, and styled .SIT. Ltmit 
CdlUge, was incorporated December, 1833, under the name and ittjihb of ' 
8i, Louis OniversUy, and it is conducted by the Fathers of the 8deii^ 
of the Jesuits. It has an elevated and pleasant attuatioii just on f|Mr 
•onfines of the eiij of^St Louis. The edifice is 130 feet by 40, U 4 
stories, including the basement; and the library contains between 4,UQ(^ 
and 5,000 volumes. The oourse of instruction embraces both a bmv> 
«lMle and a classical education. The instructors consist of flfiaJlp ^ 
lilftiWhoare Catholic clergymen, and 5 assistant tutors. Rer.Plalpt. 
^"m^misgn^Fresidsia. 

^^^^|fiiliiAiits, In 1838, consisted of 86 boarders, 8 half bottden» a&d 

■^'^^ i;^total 164. The scholastic year eommeaees oiHii 

Ir, and ends on the Slst of July, on which day iili|Mift&a 

Jhttuud expmses^ for tuition, Wtti tifi* 

irfTJ^K^ih edo^ in Greek, La^ WmO^mtA 

^iifeMOi, Wttdilag, dM. «150, and 1 10 aalMMa. 



Digitized by KJKJVJWIK^ 



1634.] MISSOURI. ti53 

St. Mary's College. 

This institution, which is situated at the Barrens in Perry county, 
was established in 1822, by Dr. William Du Bourg, Catholic Bishop of 
New Orleans, and has lately been incorporated. It haa- received no 
endowment or foreign assistance. As the power of conferring degrees 
has been but recently granted, there are yet very few graduates, though 
many have finished their education here. It has a library of about 
6|000 volumes ; is under the government of a president, prefect, and 14 
professors and assistants ; and it had, in August, 1633, 124 students. 
Cknnntencement is at the end oi September ; after which there is a 
vacation till the 1st of November. Annual expense for tuition, board, 
washing, &€., |(112. 

Rev. John M. Odin, President, Rev. Joseph Paquin, Prefect. 

St, Mary's Seminary ^ a diocesan clerical seminary or theological 
school, connected with the college is under the care of the priests of the 
Congregation of the Mission founded by St. Vincent of Paul. Young 
men designed for the clerical profession, are educated here without 
rendering any other compensation than some assistance in teaching such 
classes in the college as may suit their capacity. The present number 
of students is 15 ; but the number has been much greater. — There are^ 
6 priests and5 lay brothers, all under the direction of the Superior. 

Rev. John B. Tornatore, Superior^ who is also Vicar General, 



XXV. DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. 

The District of Columbia is under the immediate government of 
Congress. The city of Washington became the seat of the govern- 
ment of the United States in 1800 ; and it is the residence of the Pres- 
ident and the other chief executive officers of the national government. 

The Congress of the United States meets every year at Washington 
oo the 1st Monday in December, unless it is otherwise provided by 
law : and the Supreme Court of the United States meets here annually 
on the 2d Monday in January. 





Circuit 


Court. 






Residence. 




Hftltry. 


William Cranch, 


Washington, 


Chief Judge, 


$2,700 


Buckner Thurston, 


do. 


Assistant Judge^ 


2,500 


James S. Morsel, 


Georgetown, 


do. 


2,000 


Francis S. Key, 


Washington, 


Attorney, 


Fees, &e. 


Henry Ashton, 


do. 


Marshal, 


do. 


William Brent, 


Clerk for Washington County. 


do. 


Edmimd I. Lee, 


Do, for Alexandria County, 


do. 



The chief judge of the Circuit Court holds also a District Court 



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254 DISTRICT OP COLUMBIA. [1834. 

Georgetown College. 

This institution, which is pleasantly situated at Georgetown, is under 
the* direction of the incorporated Catholic clergy of Maryland, and is 
the oldest Catholic seminary in the United States : it was first incorpo- 
rated in 1799 ; and in 1815, it received an extension of its privileges 
from Congress, and was authorized to confer degrees. The college 
library contains 12,000 yoluines. The coXirse of ordinary studies is 
completed in 7 years. The academic or college year commences on the 
15th of September, and ends on tlie 31st of July; and cominencemcni 
is near the last of July. The number of students is usually about 140 
or 150 ; a considerable part of them being day scholars. The number 
of graduates is not great. The number graduated at the commence- 
ment of July 25, 1833, was 7. — There are 19 professors and tutors, of 
whom three are professors of theology. — Rev. Thomas F. Mulledy, 
President. 

Columbian College. 

This institution, founded by the Baptists, and incorporated by Con- 
gress in 1821, went into operation in 1822. It has an elevated and 
pleasant situation to the north of the city of Washington, one mile from 
the President's House, and 2J^ miles from the Capitol. Its buildings 
consist of a college edifice of 4 Tories, 117 feet by 46, having 48 rooms 
for students, a chapel, &c. ; another edifice of the same dimensions, 
but partially erected, which is connected with tlie first by a building of 
one story, 80 feet by 40, designed for a refectory ; a philosophical hall, 
and two houses for professors. The college has a good philosophical 
apparatus, and a library of between 3,000 and 4,000 volumes. The 
only public aid which it has received was a grant from Congress of 
$ 25,000. A preparatory school is connected with the college ; — also a 
medical department. 

Faculty in 1833. 



Wm. Boulwarc, A. M., Prqf. Anc. Lamff^ 
Philip Leon, Tecchcr of French. 
WoRliington Lovorctt, A. B., Tutor. 
D. J. Noyes, A. B., Tutor Prep. School. 



Rov. Stephen Chapin, D. D., President. 
Thoraas Bewail, M. D., Pr. jSnct. If Physiol. 
Wm. Ruggloa, A. M., Prof. Math, 4* Nat.Ph. 
Alex. McWilliami, M. D., Pnf. Botany. 
Th. P. Jonei, M. D., Prqf. Chemistry. 

Number of students about 50. Annval expenses, exclusive of books 
and stationery, $ 167. 

Commencement is on the 1st Wednesday in October. Vacations; — 
Ist, from commencement to the 1st Wednesday in November; — 2d, 
from the 1st Wednesday In May to the 1st Wednesday in July. 

Medical Department. 
Thomai Sewall, M. D., Pr.AnaL ^ Pk9sioL\Fxedenck May, M. D., Prof. Obstttriea, 
Tb. Uendenon,M.D., Pr. TTUo. ^PraeJlied.\Th. P. Jones, M. D., Pntf. Oktmistrg. 
N.W. WorthioftOD, M.D.,IV^.JIfo/.JIM.:JamM O. Hall, M. D., Pnf. 8Krgtrf, 

Digitized by VJVJV^^V IC 



1334.] DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. 255 

The medical department was organized in 1824, and a large and com- 
modious building has been erected for the use of the institution in 
the city of Washington, on Tenth Street, about equidistant from the 
Capitol and the President's House. The lectures commence on the Ist 
Monday in November, and continue till the last of February. The fee 
for the lectures on each branch, is $ 15, or $00 for the whole course ; — 
the matriculating fee $5 ; — graduating fee $20. 

Columbian Institute. 
The " Columbian Institute for the promotion of the Arts and Sci- 
ences," was formed at Washington in 1816, and incorporated by Con- 
gress in 1818. It consists of five classes, viz. mathematical sciences, 
physical sciences, moral and politicpJ sciences, general literature, and 
th^e fine arts. The annual meeting is held on the last Saturday in each 
year. 



XXVI. FLORIDA TERRITORY. 

Government. 

Salary. 
William F. Duvall, Governor ; first appointed in 1822; term 

of office expires in April, 1834 ; $2,500 

James D. Westcott, 1,500 

Judiciary. 
Judges. Salary. Attorncyi. Marihals. 

West Florida, J. A. Cameron, $1,500. Geo. Walker. James W. Exum. 
Middle Florida, Th. Randall, 1,500. T. E. Randolph. 

East Florida, Robert Rice, 1,500. Th. DouglaA. Samuel Blair. 
South Tlorida, James Webb, 1,500. Ed. Chandler. Th. Eastin. 



XXVII. MICHIGAN TERRITORY. 

Salary. 
Geo. B. Porter, Governor ; term of office expires Feb., 1835; . . $2,000 

Judges. George Morell, Solomon Sibley, Ross Wilkins, and David 

Irvine. — Salary of each $1,200. Daniel Leroy, Attorney, Peter 

Desnoyers, Marshal, 



XXVIII. ARKANSAS TERRITORY. 

Salary. 
JoHH Pope, Governor; term of office expires Feb. 1835; ... $ 2,000 
Judges. Alex. M. Clayton, Benj. Johnson, Th. P. Eskridge, and Ed- 
ward Cross. ~ Salary of each $1,200. Samuel C.Roane, AtUnmey, 
EUas Rector, Marshal. 



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y^ i^^|bfi^ diTMipii of tlie Jli^i^^ 



>ibMrt tl|«m Iwre on aeemmt of 
^_^^ idKBjr opntoin more recent and/ ooii^l^ tbpiii 
doMi if they had been introdooed eerlaor. 




TABLES RELATING TO THE LEGISLATION, LITERAR7 
INSTITUTIONS, AND RELIGIOUS DENOMINATIONS OT 
THE UNITED STATES. 



L Tabls 



the StatM of G^eemmatf, tks Timm of Joliivl 
V ^t«t« Qgusm^g^ tmd the J¥me ^ l>o Mptlitig .#48^ r 
LBgidatmreofthestfoeralSttUet, 



N. Hampfhiie, 
Vermont, 



RbodeUlaiid, 

Connecticut, 
New York, 
New Jeraej, 
Penosjrlvanio, 
Oelawara, 
''irjlaad, 

N.^flTMina, 
a<€Maliniy 
QeniKa, 




8Mts ofOoTvro- TUnaorbolduf oko^ Tii«» ef IM IbetllMl^'^ 



Augusta, 

Concord, 

Montpelier, 

Boston, 

C Providence, 

idtNewpori, 

Hari.&N.Uav. 

Albany, 

Trenton, 

Ilarrisbur^g^, 

Dover, 

AnnapoKfl, 

Ricfainond, 

Raleigfa, 

CelttDbfa, 

ilittedpviUe, 

Tbteafooea, 

lackaoa, 

NewOrieaai, 

Naihvfile, , 



2d Monday m Sept. 
2d Tuesd. in March, 
Ist Tnesday in Sept, 
dd Mond. in Novem. 
Gov. k. Sen. in Ap. 
Rep. in Ap. dt Aqg. 
Iftt Mond. in April, 
In October or Nov. 
2d Tuesday in Oct. 
2d Tuesday in Oct. 
2d Tuesday in Nov. 
Ut Monday in Dot. 
In ihe month of April. 
Commonly in Augostj 
ad Moudi^ In Oct. 
1st Monday in Oct. 
1st Mond. in August, 
1st Mood, in Nov. 
let Monday in July, 
let Tburs. in Aug. 
.let Mood. In Anr. 
SdTiietcfeyinOct. 



liKMond. in Angcwt, let Mondfiy.in 
laitliend. in Angost, • - ^^-^- ^ 



IWtiijind. hi Angiitjlet Mond. ft 



1st Wednesday m Jan, 
1 St Wodaasday in JwOi 
Sd Thttftday in Qeu 
litWadneid^hiJift^ 
latWed.May«lniNW 
lasi Wed. Ocu Jt^ilMN 
lttWedaesdajinl%. 
1st Tuesday in Jai^l^r 
4th Tuesd. in October. 
1st Tuesday in Deeeaa. 
1st Tiies. in Jaa. kiemk 
laal Monday in Decw. 
1st Bfonday in Dmaa. ! . 
MMoBd.Jnl l tt vi (j ft i r^ i> 
4ilt Monday^ N 
1st Mondaf in^ofnn^ t ^ 
4di Mondln Odebeiv ^ 
3d Monday fnNvMi;' 
1st Monday in JaaiiMM 
8d Mond. in SepcW 
Ifi Monday in ittfKNHk 
IstMondky hi " 



1st Mond. IB, 




^f 



- t^-^^JH^^ 



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ib2i: 



UNITED STATES. 



II. Governors of the several States and Territories, 

tpitk the Manner of their Election and the Commencement and Expiration 

of their respective Terms of Office. 



States. 


Go^eroArs. 


Elected 
by the 


Tennbcin..; Jj;;- 


Maine, 


Samuel E. Smith,* 


People. 


Jan. 


1^3:2 Jan. 1834 


New liompshirc, 


Samuel Dinsmoor, 


do. 


June 


IbSyJune 1834 


Vermont, 


Wm. A. Palmer, 


do. 


Oct. 


1831 Oct. 18:W 


Massachusetts, 


Levi Lincoln, 


do. 


Jan. 


l8:WJan. 1834 


Rhode iHland, 


John B. Fr.mcis, 


do. 


Jan. 


18.31 May 1834 


1 Connecticut, 


Henry W. Edwards, 


do. 


May 


183-JMay 1834 


New York, 


Wm. L. Marcy, 
Elias P. Seeley, 


do. 


Jan. 


1831 Jan. 1835 


New Jersey, 


Legislat. 


Oct. 


1831 Oct. 18:33 


Pennsylvania, 


George Wolf, 


People. 


Dec. 


l82iJDec. 1835 


Delaware, 


Caleb P. Bennett, 


do 


Jan. 


183:iiJan. 1837 


Maryland, 


James Thomas, 


Legislat. 


Jan. 


l832Jan. 1834 


Virginia, 


John Floyd, 


Mar.31,l«:n!Mar. 1WM| 


North Carolina, 


David L. Swain, 


do'. 


Dec. 


l83:2Dec. 1833 


South Carolina, 


Robert Y. Hayne, 


do. 


Dec. 


1830 Dec. I83a 


Georgia, 


Wilson Lumpkin, 


People. 


Nov. 


183J Nov. 1833 


Alabama, 


John Gayle, 


do. 


Nov. 


1831 Nov. 1833 


Mississippi, 


Hiram G. Runnels, 


do. 


Jan. 


J834Jan. 1830 


Louisiana, 


A. B. Roman, 


do. 


Jan. 


1831 Jan. 1835 


Tennessee, 


William Carroll, 


do. 


Sept 


1831 Sept. 1835 


Kentucky, 


John Breathitt, 


do. 


Sept. 


l832Sept. 183G 


Ohio, 


Robert Lucas, 


do. 


Dec. 


1833 Dec. 1833 


Indiana, 


Noah Noble, 


do. 


Dec. 


1831 Dec. 1834 


Illinois, 


John Reynolds, 


do. 


Dec. 


IKlODec. 1834 


Missouri. 


Daniel Dunklin, 


do. 


Nov. 


l83iix\ov. 1836 


Territories. 










Florida, 


William P. Duvall, 




April 


1831 April 1834 


Michigan, 


George B. Porter, 
John Pope, 




Feb. 


183:>Feb. 1835 


Arkansas, 




Feb. 


le3-iiFeb. 1835 



With respect to those Governors who have been elected more than 
oncCf the commencement of the term for which Ihey were last elected, 
is here given. 

In all the states except New Jersey, Maryland, Virginia, North Caro- 
lina, and South Carolina, the Governor is voted for by the people ; and 
if no one has a majority of all the votes, in Uie states in which such a 
majority is required, the legislature elects to the office of Governor one 
of the candidates voted for by the people. In the state of Louisiana, 
the people give their votes, and the legislature elects one of the two 
candidates who have the greatest number of votes. 

The Governors of the Territories are appointed by the President of 
the United States, with the consent of the Senate, for the term of three 
years. 

♦ Robert P. Dunlap hai been choeen by the people GoVeraor of Mahie for the year 
beginning in Janoary, 1834. 

22« 



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258 



UNITED tTATBS. 



[1834. 



III. Table erkibUing 




of Senators and 


Representatives with their respective Terms and 


Pay, and the Modeof choosing Electors of President and Vice-] 


President 


f in the several States. ' 


1 










Tirni lE 




c ■ ' 


S t;reeioi*»r| 




Got, 








£•£-! 


•^f. pTH'iirfpnt 


Stiisi. 


Tatia. 


8alB7* 


S«a^ 


TflTTO 


i*«< 


I^S 


mud Vico- 




Yem. 




alon. 


Y'r*.' S^i 


V'n. 


1^ 

211 


a,"-* 


PrntJilPjit 








^ 


«3 




• 
2.00 


cl.o*«nbjr$ 


Maine, 


1 


1,500 


1 


leo 


G I Tick. 


New Hunpsblfei 


1 


1^200 


12 


1 


230 




»^12 


2.00 


do. 


Vernioul,* 


1 


7oQ 


none 




^ 




230 


1.50 


do. 


Mn«ftacbus*ltJi,t 


1 


3,6GG| 


40 


1 


561 




SIO 


2.00 


do. 


Kbodo UiMXkdf 


J 


40O 


10 


1 


72 




B2 


L50 


do. 


ConnccycaLt 


1 


1,100 


21 


I 


208 




223 


2.0O 


da. 


Ne« York, 


2 


4.000 


22 


4 


I2S 




100, 


3.0O 


do. 


New JorBey J 


1 


2^000 


14 


1 


go' 




64 


3.00 


<lo. 


Peniisjlvaiiiaj 1 


3 


4,000 


33 


4 


100 




ml 


3.0O 


do. 


Delaware, 


3 


l,333i 


S 


4 


21 




30 


olso 


do. 


Mofjlundj 


1 


3,500 


n 


5 


m 




%.i 


4.00 


Oifitrieti. 


Vir^miiL, 


3 


X^^ 


32 


4 


154 




166 


4.00 


tVl TiclE, 


North Cnrolinii, 


1 


'i,ooo 


04 


1 


134 


1 


196 


300 


do. 


South C^roUaaj 


-2 


3.500 


45 


4 


124 




160^ 


4,00 


Legblat. 
GTTick. 


Geofgiiir 


2 


3,000 


?a 


J 


im 




3^' 


400 


Akbama, 


2 


2,0(KJ 


22 


3 


72 




94, 


4.00 


do. 


MitigJMippi, 


2 


%^m 


11 


3 


3«1 




47 


urn 


da. 


1 Loybmuap 


4 


7,bm 


17 


4 


5i> 




G7 


4.00 


do. 


Tennei««ej 


2 


%mi 


20 


2 


00 




eo 


4,00 


do. 


Kenluckjt 


4 


2jm 


38 


4 


100 




138. 


2,00 


do. 


Ohlo» 


2 


1,^00 


30 


2 


TJ 




106 


3.00 


do. 


Indmtia, 


3 


1,000 


30 


3 


02 




92 


2.00 


do. 


Illinois^ 


4 


LOOO 


20 


4 ; 55 


2 


71 


3,00 


do. 


Mifi^Durif 


4 


1,500 


16 


4 { 411 


2 


<>7 


3.00 


do. 



* There is no Senate in the Legislature of Vermont ; but the Execu- 
tive Council, consisting of the Governor, Lieutenant-Governor, and 12 
Counsellors, elected by the freemen, Ere empowered to lay before the 
General Assembly such business as shall appear to them necessary ', 
also to revise and propose amendments to the laws passed by the House 
of Representatives. 

t The number of Representatives in the Legislature of Massachusetts 
in 1833, was 501 ; but the number is very variable. 

t The pay of Uie Senators j in the Legislature of Connecticut, is $ 9 a 
day } that of the Representatives ^ $1.50. 

II The Upper House, which forms an independent branch of the Legis- 
lature of New Jersey, is styled the " Legislative Council.'* 

§ Three different modes of choosing the electors of President and 
Vice-President in the different states, are authorized by the Constitu- 
tution, viz. by the people by districts, by the people by a general ticket, 
and by the state legislatures. The same states have not all uniformly 
adhered to the same mode ; and the mode may be varied at the pleasure 
of the state iegislatures. The tab\« es]bi!b\\a \)m mcA« ^t^<il\a«d at the 
last preMideniinl election. 



Digitized by V3V7VJV H>. 



•■:V- 






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b. 8€BitMi|r« 

imintiT. ^ 

eatTk Smb. 






I of AoMMni* 
^D^IUf/Oli. 
k Befinmod, 



A. H^ipipii,,4:t. 

AiAtuni| ^ do. 

.flftinatatt, do. 

UaiMnek, do. 

Prln e^tea, do. 

¥<ukf do. 

Aller*f}T.do. 




i.Va, 
Pr. Ed. Co. dD 
Colonliifty 6.C, 
Lflz'ttOB, 0. C 

Maiyville,Teji. 
Cinefam>ti,0. 



CaiK44| 

iCoiig. ltJ82S3 
!ProLEpi8:il8196 
iPreisbyL ffiSIl 3 

Lutheran, |a61«|3' 
iJiilcli Re, 
Pre»byt. 
Kvang^ L 
,G.Rer,Cli. 
i^reabyt, 
Trot, EpiB, 
Presbyt. 

I Lu Lite ran, 
BnpliBi* 

Do: 



18123 



16262 
18252 
18282 

2 

1624 2 
18293 
18322 

2 

18211 
18293 



50 

M 

38 
B 

24 
136 
''^) , 
. iJii i, 



i4» mk 



61^ 



1 I 9 
30 
22 



2,006 

m. 

1,066 
6^ 



■4^# abriMli%#. 0., Mkr AtIiCmmi. and in W m tMmg i §m Omaly, 



PyKj^, Miln My 



V. MEDICAL 8CHOOIi9. 




CuUeUm, 

Booton, 

PUtafieia, 

MowHmven, 

nirwToik. 

Ipifield. 

Piiladelpbli^ 



IfodicalBcbool, Brunswick, 

ipthiieJAed. Sehool, Hanover, 
It Med. 8eliOQl,UBiT.1H. Burlington, 
IHi Aeademy of Medicine, 
Ki^ Med. Qehool, Hprf. Vnir. 
BeiUiIre Med. faist.; WmwCAl. 
M^fieal Bchool, Tale CIoNm. 
CdL Pliys. d& Bnrgeona, N/x. 
CfiOL Pfays/^^fiurt; Weirtp Di^ 
Bf«4Dep.Jer.C^ 

Dep. Univ. feiin. 

Dep. Unii". Md. 

ington Med. CoH 

^ep. Cdnmbian College, 

"- UniVi Va. 

€ot a iC ^o t f ia . 
iil Col» IVanai t^itT« 
;l»do, 




BllfinMirt, 

Baltimoie, 

WaabtngliiBt 

Caiarlott Vf i B e J jteplembef) 



lieSngton, 
dnetnnaU, 



LMlentegai. 



February j^ 

2ireekaw#Coo^v 
2dWed. i>e9«, 
3dTbun.inAag. 
3d Wed. in Oct 
l«tTban..Bept 
bat week in Ooi. 
let Mond., Ker. 
let Tuee., Oct. 
let Mond., Not. 
let Mond., Not. 
laat Mond., Oct 
lift Mond , Oct. 
let Mond., Il«r.^ 



Ut Mond., Not; 

adM6nd.Oet 
' let Mond. N^* * 
iitMofkd.«'ll^« 



65 
73 

t9d 



9 



iri^ IJJi flCHOOIA 

will ■tlKfipBMfa.QU«%Y" 
Pft.; at BdtinMOiUL\iib! 
Mer aa4 » aMMte) ia& 1 



Pral flHk 

XiB 

a, M 
a 

6 

5 
5 
7 
6 

61121 
368 



IBQ 



6 -ri 

19 



*t 



SfraAMW* iad M •tadwtis at IKm 

Digi 



a\ii 



260 



UNITED STATES. [1894. 

VII. COLLEGES IN THE 



Name. 



1 Bowdoin, 
S Waterville,* 



3! Dartmouth! 



4 Univ. 



of Ve 

5 Mifldloburjr, 

Uni 



Place. 



erroont, 



6 Harvard Univertity, 

7| Williams, 

S! Amherst. 

9, Brown ifniTenityi* 

10 Yale, 

11 Washin^on,t 

15 Woslcvan UDivenity,!; 
13 (?oIumuia,| 

14. Union, 
15: Hamilton, 

16 Geneva, t 
17;Univti»itvofN. Y., 

18 College of New Jersey, 

19 Rutgers, 

SO' University of PeonsyL 

91 Dickinson,^ 

99 Jeffor-fon, 

93 Washington, 

94.AIIeghMiV2t 

95! Western Unlrersity. 

96 (TnivcrMJty of Maryland, 

97iSt. John'!*,f 

98 St. Mory's,$ 

99 Mount tst. Mary*s,$ 

30 Columbian,* 

31 Gcor|'etown,$ 

39. William and Mary, 

33^ IInm|Mlen-8ydney, 

34' Washington, 

35 University of Virginia, 

3G Univ. of North Carolina, 

37 Charlo«ton,t 

38 ColleRo of South Carolina, 

39 University of Georgia, 

40 Alabama University, 

41 Jcfft^rson, 

49 lK)uisiana, 

43 Greenville, 

44 University of Nashville, 
45! East TiMinessee, 

46 Transylvania, 

47 Centre, 

48 Augusta,^ 
4d Cumberland, 

50 St. Joseph's,* 

51 Georgetown,* 

59 University of Ohio, 

53 Miami University, 

54 Western Reterre, 

55 Konyon,t 

56 Franklin, 
57;lDdiana, 

58 Soatli lianorer, 

59 Illinois, 

AO St. Mary*s.« 

6i;St. Louis UniTenity,^ 



Brunswick, Me. 

WaterviUe, do. 

Hanover, N. H. 

jBurlinctoo, Vt. 

Middlebury, do. 

Cambridge, Mass. 

Williamstown, do. 

Amherst, do. 

Providence, R. I. 

New Haven, Con. 

Hartford, do. 

Middletown, do. 

Now York. N. Y. 

Schenoctady, do. 

Clinton, do. 

Geneva, do. 

New York, do. 

Princeton, N. J. 
New Brunswick, do. 

Philadelphia, Penn. 

Carlisle, do. 

Canonsbarg, do. 

Washington, do. 

MeadvilTe, do. 

Pituburg, do. 

Baltimore, Md. 

Annapolis, do. 

Raltimoie, do. 
Near Emmitsburg. do. 

Washington, 1). C. 

Georgetown, do. 

Williamsburg, Va. 

Prince Ed. Co. do. 

fjezington, do. 

Charlottesville, do. 

Chapel Hill, N. C, 

Charleston, S. C.I 

Columbia, do. 

Athens, Ga. 

Tuscaloosa, Alu. 

Washington, Mi. 

Jackson, La. 

Greenville, Tenn. 

Nashville, do. 

Knoxville, do. 

Lexington, Ken. 

Danville, do. 

Augusta, do. 

Princeton, do. 

Bardstown, do. 

Georgetown, do. 

Athens, Ohio. 

Oxford, do. 

Hudson, do. 

Gambior, do. 

New Athens, do. 

Bloomington, Ind. 

South Hanover, do. 

Jacksonville, Illi. 

Barrens^ Mo. 

St. Louis, do. 



ProaidenU. 


Foun- 
ded- 


WiUiam AUen, D. D. 


1794 




1890 


Nathan Lord, D. D. 


1770 


James Marsh, D.D. 


1791 


Joshua Bates, D. D. 


1800 


Josiah Quincy, LL. D. 
Eilward D. (iriffio, D. D. 


1038 


1793 


<Heman Humphrey, D. D. 
Francis Way land, D. D. 


18^1 
17C4 


Jeremiah Day, D.D. 
Nathaniel S. Wbeaton, D. D. 


17(K) 


1824 


Wilbur Fiak, D. D. 
William A. Duer, LL. D. 
Ehphalett Noit, D. D. 


1831 


1754 


1795 


Soreiio E. Dwight, D. D. 


181-2 


Richard S. Mason. D. D. - 
J. M. Matthews, D. D. 


1823 


18:11 


James Carnahan, D. D. 


I74G 


Philip Milfcdolcr, D. D. 


1770 
1755 


John P. Durbin, A. M. 


17K} 




180-i 


David McConanghy, 
.Martin, Ruter, D. D. 


1820 
1806 


Rotwrt Bruce, M. D. 


1>*15 


Charles Williams, D. D. 


1812 


ilertor Humphreys, D. D. 


17d4 


Samuel Eccleston, 


1799 


John B. Furcell, 


1830 


Stephen Chopin, D. D. 


isai 


Thoniafi F. .M ulledy. 


1799 


Adam Empie, l>. D. 


l&Xi 


J. P. Cu-fhing, A. M. 
Louis Marshall, M. D. 


1774 


H12 


Prof. Tuckor, Chairman. 


1819 


Joseph CahUvfll, I). D. 


1791 


Jasper A<lams, D. D. 


1785 


Thomas Coopor, M. D. 


1804 


AIoniEO Church, D. D. 


1785 


Alva Wood*, D. D. 


1838 




1809 


H. H. Gird, 


1^-25 


Henry Ho:«s, Esq. 


1794 


Philip l,indsIey,D.D. 


1806 


John H. Piper, 


1807 


Benj.O. Peers, 


1798 


John C. Young, A. M. 


1829 


J. S. Tomlinson, A. M. 


182:1 


F. R. CoHsit, 


li^O 


George A. M. Elder, 


1819 


Silas .M. Noel, D. D. 


1830 


Robert (i. Wilson. D. D. 
R. H. Bishop, D. 1). 


1821 


1894 
1836 
1898 


C. P. Mcllvaine, D. D. 


Richard Campbell, 
Andrew Wylie, D. D. 


1894 
1897 


James Blythe, D. D. 
Edward Reecher, A. M. 


1899 


1890 


John M. Odin, 


1889 


P. J. Vorhaegen, 


1899 



Under the direeUoD ofBaptiits (•) ; Episcopalians (f) ; MetbodisU (|) ; Catholios ($). 
The greater part of Um ttiMtonts in Um Catholic CoUofea belong to the prqfantorjf do- 
pn rtwi ont. 



y Google 



1834.] 






UNITED STATXt. 961 


UNITED STATES. 








~ 


Init 

ract 


No, of 
AlumnL 


Minis- 


Sliul- 


Vok. If) 
Colt^K* 




CotdioencaKteiiU 




TT 


7^ 


«l 


tA!^ 


B,rKIO 


6,000 


I.Afi WodtiManr in JnLj, 


Q 


5 


»il 


li 


tfa 


«,fHIO 


000 


3 


10 ' 


1.7tW 


439 


101 


4^r 


B,riOO 


Lmt VViNint^idnj Jjut one in Ay|, 


4 


^ 


2oa 


. 


M 


i,mw 


um 


Fim VViirliM»djiv in AuKust. 


5 


5 


r^T3 


SEM 


la* 


s;t30 


3,100 


Thinl V\^i.(Jno«il*y io Awjfini 


U 


^ 


5,aia 


1^'UI 


aia 


4i>,OflO 


4,500 


J^il VVriloonlajf in Aufupt^ 
Tliifd VVedEiDddAjf in Ayj^ual, 


7 


7 


T?J 


23a 


i:« 


:},tKNi 


a^ 


* 


!) 


»M 


G6 


337 


4^100 


fi^iO 


Foitflli \\\'rlnciilaT m Amrml. 
Fir#l Wt^dnyiJiit 111 dflj lAsmbar, 


9 


K 


i^rs 


4^ 


r^'. 


fi.O00 


5,000 


ID 


3d 


4,IM> 


1^ 


33* 


B/,.iO 


' 10,500 


Tliifd WiHlnesiUi in AoRuit, 


11 


i? 




b. 


Gil 


Q^flflO 


a,5oo 


Fir»t 'J huTifiay ifi Au^uii. 


13 


5 


* 


,. 


fit} 


3,«KKI 




Fir»l Tuofduy in Ausun. 


13 


in 


1,1 M 




ino 


B.flOO 


ft^OOO 


J4 


9 


1,144 


m 


3itJ 


5,:tio 


a,99Q 


Ftmrili UVfltiwiitay in Jnfj. 


15 


G 


270 


m 


97 


s.-'wr* i 


3,700 


Firtt W<Mini»day m Aoguti, 


17 


(1 


* H 


9 


41 
137 


1^ 


l,IOtl 


la 


\-j 


Jttbo 


406 


133 


Tiooft 


4*000 


Laitt Wedn«t([nv in Bunt umber. 


ly 


4 






TO 


3,75[» 


2,500 


Thii'l U'«lti*fcioy iti Jiily- 


^J 


17 


, 






105 


a,(¥trj 


, 


Lut TliuwJay in Jnljr 


21 










, 


a,(3oii 


» 


1 


9J 


H 


4ft4 




70 


IfiS 


l,n^N> 


2,400 


[^■t Thnndny in eonlrmtwr. 


93 
31 


7 
3 


14U 
10 






47 


l,r»Oft 

a.ooo 

500 




t5 


4 


1 ^ 






50 


■" 


LmI FridAT in Judo- 
Tbii.l VV6dn*i4jiiT in July* 


2fi 


7 


» 








, 


. 


27 


fl 


WO 






m 


a,7oo 


100 


Th(< iJil of February. 


se 


let 


, 






140 


10,000 


, 


TiiirdTijwdmytrtJiily. 


as 


*1j 


21 






i3n 


7,000 


, 


I^ait wttnk ii} Juoft. 


3IJ 


9 


_ 






S<i 


1,000 


^ 


Pint Wedni'iday in Oolatwr* 


51 


l'» 


, 






ISO 


i3,or)o 


, 


July 4tU. ^ 


32 


(i 


, 






41 


3,rjoo 


doo 


m 


€ 








00 


n,r,oo 


, 


Thirii WodMKUy 10 A|iriL 


31 


4 


i^o 






4fi 


i^m 


. 


35 


10 


u>^ 






157 


H.OOO 


. 


July ^ith. , 


3S 


7 


434 






r*9 


1,^0 


3,000 ! 


Fourth TbanMlay la June, 


37 


7 


aa 






■1^! 


3,(m 


, 


Lmt Thui*day in Ucurfiei. 


38. 


7 


, 




■ 


93 


10,000 


^ 


ad yimi. aAf^r 4ili Mond, in Nov. 


3n 


» 


1^ 






07 


: 1,900 


3,000 


First Wudo$«dAir La Aiij;u»t- 
{rcC4jnd Moniinj m Alixu«t, 


40 
41 


9 


' 




• 


gj 


9,000 


' 


-ffi 


4 


; 






15 


'aso 


; 


Betioml W<7tlo(^da¥ in Juno, 
Ttitd ^VodaeKtiiy in tfppti:snit»T. 


4a 


J 


imi 






47 


3,500 


, 


44 


e 


lid 






n 


3.00O 


1,000 


Fir^l V^'cdneidnT in DriolMtr. 


45 


3 


^ 






9B 


140Q 


200 Pirat TihiiridAV in OclolH^f. 


ifi 


11 








, 


S,4DU 


47 


H 


^ 






m 


I/iOO 


ThuT#r3tty rt*r M WbiI . k ^ piiI, 


U 


(i 


ffl 






75 


3,000 


600 


ThuritJny tfttir Lit Wed. in Auf. 


4*J 


3 


Qij 






75 


.^K> 


^ 


Fij^t Wc-inftidBy in Ootenjiwr- 


SO 


14 


3<» 






lao 


5,000 


, 


Aiifu«L lit. 


51 


4 


« 






3ft 


|,3iW 


, 


W«d. nft^f 3il Tufli. in Bcpi^ 


S9 


5 


73 


m 


45 


1,1100 


1,000 


S3 


B 


»1 


u 


JiM 


1,000 


<500 




' 54 


5 


]<1 


I 


4ft 


i.ftoa 


300 Fogrth WwsJnytJay in Au^u-t. I 


M 


» 


^ 


* 


4a 


a,30o 




Firmi WuduiiwlMy in i^^iitciutAr, 


54i 


4 


7 






40 


1,000 


* 


Lnit Woflncidflr Io PfipieinboT. 


57 
5^ 


4 

6 


10 








400 


flOO 


Lut WViiiientsv io SepltimW* 


m 


.■* 


* 






l,w 




TWrI WfldnwMliy Ln Anjjunt 
Niiir Ibfl bit «tf dfl^cmbiir. 


60 


l.-i 


^ 






iSM 


fl.OOO 




61 


U 


» 






154 


4S00 


: 


JulySlit. 



t Umderfradumtety not inclndipg medical, tlM<tlo|fical, ftai Jaw •tuilcmti. 
Bereral collogef , not inclnded in thia tmble, have been rie«t)t]]r c^iAblitli^d fai New York, 
Psnnsjlvania, Virginia, and Alabama, wbich are notioad ODdtr tbaee diflbrrat itatea. 



d by Google 



UNITED STATES. 



[1834. 



VIII. Vacations in Colleges. 

Bowdoin. 1. Com., 3 weeks ;~ 2. Friday after 3d Wod. Deo., 8weeki; — 3 

Friday after 3d Wed. Hay, 3 weeks. 
Watervilie. 1. Com., 4 weeks ; — 3. Last Wed. Nov., 9 weeks. 

Dartmouth. 1. Cora., 4 weeks j — 2. last Mon. Dec, 6 1-9 weeks ; — 3. Thursday 

preceding the last Wed. May, 3 1-3 weeks. 
Vermont Unir. 1. Com., 4 weeks ^ — 3. 1st Wed. Jan., 6 weeks. 
Middlebury. 1. Cum., 4 weeks ; —3. 1st Wed. Jan., 7 weeks ; — 3. 3d Wed. May, 

S weeks. 
Harvard. 1. Wed. proooding 25th Dec, 3 weeks ; — 3. 1st Wed. April, 2 weeks ; 

— 3. preceding Commencement, 6 weeks. 
Williams. 1. Com., 4 weeks ; — 2. Wed. after 3d Wed. Dec, 6 weeks ; — 3. 1st 

Wed. Alav, 3 weeks. 
Amheist. 1. Com., 6 weeks ; —2. 3J Wod. Jan., 2 weeks ; — 3. 1st Wed. May, 

4 wteks. 
Brown. 1. Com., 4 weeks ; — 2. lost Friday in Dec, 2 weeks ; — 3. 2d Friday 

in May, 3 weeks. 
Yale. 1. Com., 6 weeks;— 2. Ist Wed. Jan., 2 weeks;— 3. last Wed. 

April, 4 weeks. 
'Washington. 1. Cora., 7 weeks: — 2. Thurfldny before Christmas, 3 weeks; — 3. 

Thursday before IQtli April, 3 weeks. 
Wesleyan Univ. 1. Wed. before Christmas, 7 wcpk»» ; — 3. preceding com., 5 weeks. 
Columbia. 1. Com. to the Isl Monday in Uctolier. 

Union. 1. Com., 6 weeks ; — 3. in Dec. 4 weeks ; — 3. in April, 4 weeks. 

Hamilton. 1. Cum., 5 weeks j — 3. 3d Wed. Dec, 4 weeks ; — 3. 3d Wed. April, 

4 weeks. 
Geneva. 1 Com., 6 weeks ; — 3. at Christmas and New Year, 3 weeks ; — 3. 

in April, 3 wcckn. 
College of N. J. 1. Com., 6 weeks ;— 2 1st Thurs. after 2d Tuesday April, 5 weeks. 
Rutgers. 1. Com. to Sept. 15; — 2. Dec. 21 to Jan. 7 ; — 3. April 7 to May 1. 

Pbnn. University. 1. Com.. G weoks ; — 3. Dec. 3 weeks : — 3. April 3 weeks. 
' Jefft)r«on. 1. Month of October ; — 2. Month of Aluy. 

Washington. 1. Month of Ociobcr ;— 3. Month of May. 

Bt. John's. 1. Good Friday, 10 days ; — 2. Last Wed. July to 1st Mond. Sept. ) — 

3. Doc 33 to 1 fit .Mond. Jan. 
St. Mary's. 1. Com. to the liit Monday in Sept. 

Mt. St. Mary*s. 1. July 1 to Aujrusi 16. 

Columbian. 1. Com. to Ist Wed. Nov. ; — 2, 1st Wed. May to Ist Wed. in July. 

William and Mary. 1. Com. to the Ir.sl Monday in Oclofier. 
Hamp. Sydney. 1. Month of October : — 2. Month of May. 
WashiiiiTton. 1. Com. to 3d Wed. .May ; — 2. 3d Wed. OcU to 3d Wed. Nov. 

Univ. Virginia. 1 July 30 to SopU-mlKr 10 
Univ. N. Carolina. 1. Com.. 6 weok? ; — 2. Dec. 15, 4 weoks. 
Charlofftou. 1. Montn of December ;'— 3. in April, 3 weeks. 

Coll. S. Carolina. I. July 1 to the 1st Monday in October. 
Univ. Ck'orgia. 1. Com., 1 week ; — 2. Wed. before 3d Monday Nov. to Jan. 1 ; — 3. 

Apiil 1 to April 15. 
Univ. Alabama. 1. Com. to tho 3d Monday in October. 
Louiaiarra. 1. Com., 4 weeks ; — 2. I)ec. 20 to Jan. 10. 

Greenville. 1. Corp., 5 woek^; — 2. 3d Wed. March, 5 weeks. 

Nashville. 1. Com., 5 1-2 weeks ; — 2 l««t Wed. April, 5 1-2 weeks. 

E. Tennessee. 1. Com., 4 weeks ; — 2. Ist Thursday April, 4 weeks. 

Transylvania. 1. Com. to Isl Mond. Nov. ; — 2. 2d Mond. .March, 6 weoks. 

Centre. 1. Com. to Thurs. aft«r 3d Wed. Oct. ;— 3. After a session of 21 

weoks, 4 weeks. 
Augusta. 1. Com., 6 weeks ; — 2. in Feb. 21 weeks from 1st vacation, 4 weeks. 

Cumberland. 1. Com. to the Ist of February. 

6t. Joseph's. 1. The month af Augu.^t. 

Georgetown. 1. Com. to 3d Monday Oct. ; — 2. 1st Monday March, 6 weeks. 

University of Ohio. 1. Com., 6 weeks ;— 2. Wed. after 2d Tuesday April, 4 weeks. 
Miami. l.-Com. to 1st Mond. Nov.: — 2. last Wed. March to 1st Mond. in .May. 

Western Reserve. 1. Com.,5 wks.: — 2. 2<I\Ved. Jan.,2wk8.;— 3. 1st Wed. Mav,3 wks. 
Kenyon. 1. Com., 5 weeks ; — 2. 2d Wed. Jan., 2 weeks ; — 3. 1st Wed May, 

3 weeks. 
Indiana. 1. Month of May ; — 2. Month of October. 

Illinois. 1. Com., 6 weeks; — 2. Wed. before Dec 25, 2 weeks; — 3. 5id 

Wed. April, 4 weeks. 

EzpLASTATioif. Vacations of Bowdoin College. Ut, from Comwuneenunt^ Sweefctf;— 
ad, fritm the FYidajf qfter the 2d Wednuda^ in Duemher^ 6»eek*}—3d,fitm tlu .FVuky 
qfter the 3d fTediutdt^ m Jfey, 9 weJu. 



d by Google 




p6^;.>A*>; 



f^BHm 



im 'ffhtMOH f9r tki 






p 


'^ffn* V. & BvOrt AnBiaa Ba^rtit n fc I8B.J 


|. i 


~ ■;* J : , 


j^itftte/i 


V 


i«J^rr^v ••,-... .^ 




. • ^ ,:.^:iT^l,N^ 


"' 


It?. Hi- ■. .■.'■, 

^1 ftatMUdTwiitOriM. 


|i 


1 


n 


lltl 


1^ 


I 


t 




M^Jft^:':' 


9 
8 
10 


att 

. 90 
U9 


m 

96 
50 


145 
M 

160 


93 

14 
60 


1,909 
9,009 


90SoO 




Ebode ItUmd, . . . 


1 


90 


5 


17 


3 


949 


3,971 






9 


005 

«1 


175 
17 


77 


90 


967 


10^ 






7 


78 

448 

53 


9 
97 
7 


1,631 


10,586 




>a» 


IB7 


64 


96 


96 


1,7417 


li^ 




1 


9 


3 


3 


9 


13 


480 




SiS^r&CoinBUa, ** . 


s 


34- 
5 


7 
1 


91 

4 


9 


66 

11 


633 




tmi&to^ * . ' .- 


S9f» 
19 


435 
339 


446 
177 


995 
165 


36 
46 


'« 


54,309 
18,918 




8MtlkCuonh!Z . . 


10 


973 


il8 


155 


43 


7,906 


98^496 




oitttiiA, r^. . . 


18 


509 


978 


906 


49 


95l9 


38,3rti 




AlubSS, .... 


13 


950 


149 


109 


36 


1»445 


11,445 






3 


84 


31 


34 


v5 


978 


3199 




IM^' . . . 


1 


16 


4. 


19 


1 


77 


798 






90 


413 


178 


919 


94 


806 


90,4f79 




MiMQurf,*' . . - . 


13 


146 


60 


86 


7 


9B8 


1&79 




KeDtoekf, ... . 
UUoois, . ... 


34 

16 


484 
161 


999 
60 


936 
107 


9B 

16 


831 
197 


"^ 




Indiaiia, . . ^ u . 


91 


999 


140 


158 


40 


421 


imi 




OUo, . . . ,. 


91 


960 


115 


149 


94 


896 


imS 




aSSuwm, . . • 


9 


17 


7 








^Sl 




Mkhigiir, . . . 


1 


17 


5 


11 


9 


108 


667 




UpfwrCwMda, 


4 


37 


5 


39 


16 


914 


1.52 






1 


44 


3 


31 


7 


353 


3,633 






1 


31 


19 


8 


9 




y&: 




JUMlM, 

InefiiN '• • 


1 

1 
1 


94 
39 
93 


11 


14 
39 
19 


9 


643 
119 


m 




311 
300 


5,513 
5,075 


9,457 


3,153 
9,934 


657 
436 


49,517 

3i;4a 


^^ 




U 


438 


919 


991 


11,055 


«m 



RXCAPITULATIOH. 




ttElKriiJ': 



Digitized by V3V7V.J\ 



iM UNITXD 8TATX8. 

X. PROTKSTAirr Episcopal Chttbch. 



[1834. 



Dlooent. 


Bifhopi. 


Cuiu. 


^ 


, DlQfitUM. 


Bbbopi, 


CtiOB. 


1 


Vrntmnt, 


j; 11, liapkbi. D. D. 


Ig^ 


15 


1 








£.DUic«i«t^A. V. Gri#w»R B. D, 


leii 


57 


Viisifli*,} 


R.C.M«Ki»,D.D, 




ISG 


OsPttwr't, Th* C. flfownoM, D. D. 


leia 


It? 




Iffev York, B, T. Ouiterdotik, 0. D.';I&K» 


Hi3 


Si.Ctmlln*, 


m& ]u\ 


Ifj 


Giwriim, 






3 


,.^,_, \ wmiMa White. 1), J), ina? i 


m 








3 


™*»^'' ( H. U. OodoHook, D. 0. 


JSI7i 


MiiilHiippi, 






1 


DbIiwu«, 




G 


TeiiiMiiiitei 






af7 




L830 


^ 


Kentuckr. 


B,B.Bffiith,D,U. 


les^ 


fl 


1631 


le uhiJK " 


G. McltniDc.D.D. 


1B39 ml 



XI. Methodist Episcopal Church. 

The following statistical view of the Methodist Episcopal Charch In 
the United States, is extracted from the " Minates of the several An- 
nual Conferences/' for 1832. 



CanfsiBacGi. 


No, 
of 


Whitei, 


ColofiHl. ImlidDi. 


Toul. 


Trmir, 


SupOTU)- 


Main^t 


(i 


14/3^7 


rJ. . , 


14;3&5 


IU4 


e 


Kew Hampshire, 


& 


14. .m> 


tl . . 


I4^n 


1-^3 


3 


Hew England, 
New York, 


u 


15^j7 


2m\ , . 


15,540 


121 


8 


5 


40,471 


015| , . 


47jm 


123 





Tfoj, 


4 




! * « 




8d 




Oneida, 


7 


31,449 


nil , , 


ai,5G0 


123 


U 


Genenee, . i 


5 


*^1,415 


mi, . . 


:ai,47i 


Hi4 




Philadelphia p 





3y,5^J 


a^iG . . 


48,y4a 


145 




Fitlaburgr 


5 


25,^74 


Ig7l . , 


m,mi 


107 




BaltLmore^ . 


4J 


3a,424 


ll^MJ: . . 


i:m^ 


121 


17 


Virginia, 


6 


3^2,5:3*; 


S,2U}\ . . 


4i\74*I 


114 


13 


South CPLTolJoa, 


5 


21,731 


20,U*7j , . 


41, Dad 


74 




Georgia, 


5 


24^1 


7,330l . . 


31^71 


80 


11 


Alabama, 


4 




' 




38 




Miasiflfiippi, 


5 


13,1^ 


5,lSy| 1^12 


lf>,432 


42 




Holsieiti, 


5 


19,257 


2.311»' 


21^76 


52 




TenoiMee, 





2i*,4:ja 


3,<J24 855 


211,911 


im 




[CenLuckj, 


a 


31,>13 


4,51*4' . , 


mjm 


m 


15 


Miucmri, 


a 


4,754 


45li , , ' 


5^205 


44 


2 


UlLHOb, . 


s 


27,349 


mu . . 


27,553 


ft5 


3 


Ohio, 
ToUtl 


7 


44,aiK) 


344, 24^ 


44,879 


135 


13 


112 


472,304 


73317 2,412 


548^113 


2,057 


143 



The Bishops of the Metliodist Episcopal Church of the United States 
have no particular provinces or districts. Each one is bishop of tha 
church throughout the whole United States. The Annual Conferences 
are severally defined by geographical limits ; and the Bishops, by an 
arrangement of their own, so interchange their visits ;to the different 
Annual Conferences, that each Bishop visits each Conference once in 
four years. The General Conference, which is composed of delegatM 
from the 31 Annual Conferences, meets once in foor yean. 

Digitized by Google 



1834.] 



UNITED STATES. 



265 



There are six Biibopi, and their names and the places where their 
families reside (for the Bishops themselves are most of the time travel- 
lingr), are as follows : — 
Elijah IledtUnf, D. D., Lynn, M«m. Wm. McKondrio, D. D., Nashvillo, Ten. 



John Emory, D. D., Baltimore, Md. 
Jamea O. Andrews, D. D., Aof luu, Geo. 



Joshaa Soule, D. D., IxiUanon, Ohio. 
Robert R. Roborti, D. D., Bono, Ind. 



XII. Roman Catholic Church. 





Compriatng 


Bishops. 


Boston, - - 


New England, 


J. B. Kcnwick, D. U. "* 
J. Dubois^ D. D. 1 


New York, 


N.York and part of N.Jeney 


Phibdeiphia, . 


1 Penn. and part of N. Jersey 
1 and Delaware, 


( H. Conw«ll, I>. D. 

JT. P.Kenrick, D.D., Ctfol;. 


Baltimore, - 


Md., Va., «c Dist. Columbia, 
N. Caro., 8. Caro., & (Ja., 


Jas. \Vhitcfiold,D.D.,ji^. 
J. England, l>. 1). 


Charleetoo, 


Mobile, • - - 


Alabama and Florida, 


M. Porticr, D. D. 


New Orleam, . 


Louisiana and Mississippi, 




Bard«towo, - 


Kentucky and Tennessee, 


i B. J. Flaaet, D. D. 

j J. B. Dovide, D. D., Coa4f, 


Cincinnati, 


Ohio and Indiana, 


8t. Louii, 


Missouri, &.c. 


J. Rosati, D.D. 


Detroit, - 


Michigan, 


Frederick Rese, D. D. 



XIII. Orthodox Congregationalists. 
[American Q,uartcrly Register.] 











1 Added in 


SUtee. 


Ch»ches. 


Pastors. 




tho year 
; lb3l-39. 


Maine, 


172 


Ill 


13,000 


2,547 


New Hampshire, . 


152 


117 


18,0«0 


3,913 


Vermont, . 


195 


IIH 


22.(>33 


5,:^ 


Massachnsetts, 


289 


257 


39,9^2 


7,019 


Rhode Island, . 


10 


10 


12 or 1300 




Connecticut, . 


226 


190 




7.007 



XIV. Several Denominations. 





Synods. 


Presbyt. 

"ifo" 


Chh. or 
Cong. 


Ministers. 


Licen. 


Commun. 


Precbyterians, . 


21 


2,381 


i,r.w 


205 


217,:J48 


Associate Presbyterians 




classes. 


151 


73 




12,033 


Ref. Dntch Church, 


2 


16 


190 


132 


28 


20,186 


German Ref. Church, 


3 




570 


160 






Cumberland Presbjt., 






100 


60 




10,000 


Lutheran Church, . 












44,356 


United Brethren, . 






24 


33 




4,000 


Unitarians, 






193 


150 






Universalists, 






600 


600 




3 or 4,000 



Friends or Quakers 462 societies ; Mennonites 200 ministers ; Tnn- 
I^IBTS 40 congregations ; Millennial Church or Shakers 15 congregations ; 
New Jerusalem Church 28 ehurches. 
23 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



BRITISH AMERICAN PROVINCES. 

Lower Canada, in 1831, 

Upper Canada, in 1832, 

Nova Scotia .... estimated, in 1833, 

New Brunswick, .... estimated, in 1832, 
Cape Breton, Newfoundland, 6l Pr. Edw. Isl., est, in 1832, 

ToUd 



Popuktfon. 
511,917 

261,500 

140,000 

90,000 

100,000 



1,103,417 

Lower Cofuuia. — Roman Catholics, in 1831, 403,472; belonging to 
the Church of England 34,620 ; Church of Scotland 15,069 : — Houses 
82,437 ; common schools 1,099 ; colleges, academies, and convents 38. 



L. Canada, 
^ewfland, 
Bermuda, 
Jamaica, 
Barbadoes, 
Antigua, 
'Dominica, 
St. Lucia, 
Bahamas, 

British 
Guiana 



Governon. 
Lord Aylmer 
Sir Th. J. Cockrane 
Sir Step. R.Chapman 
Earl of Mul grave . 
Sir Lionel Smith 
SirEvan J.M.Macgregor Tobago, 
Sir Ch. M. Schomberg 
Jas. A. Farquharson 
Sir Ch. C. Smyth 
Demarara, 
Espiquibo, 
& Berbice 



Sir Benj. 
D'Urban 



-■ LieuL-Governora. 
U. Canada, Sir John Colbome 
Nova Scotia, Sir Pereg. Maitland 
N. Brunswick, Sir Arch. Campbell 
St. Vincent, George Tyler 
Grenada, Greo. Middlemore 

Henry C. Darling 
Montserrat, Samuel P. Steward 
St. Christopher, Lewis Nixon 
Nevis, John L. Nixon 

Trinidad, Sir Geo. F. Hill 



A Siattmmt 0/ihr I'ifpuhtiion, Produce ^ and Imports and Efp&riSt ojtkw 


British 


Uciil Indies, compiled ftmn. qffictM d^cumcfUs. 




i 


1^ 








Value of 


ValuQ of 


likntlf* 




SlavBi. 


Svisy-P 


Cafl^«. 


Rum. Eaiiyri* 


I'fnport* ' 




$ 


ei 








lut^retil 


J'rinii G. 




^b 








Uriiuiiu 


nntaid. 










Cwt. 


Lb, 


GftJloni. ' £ 


£ 


Anti^A, 


9,000 


:),ooo 


30,000 


]63,00D 




1GO,000 STOpOOD 


115,000 


BihimtSf 


4^X) 


u,(m 


0,3IH) 




" §a,ioo 


, , Sl,00(r» 


5t»,0O0 


BarlmiJoi3f, 


is.ooa 


&,\w 


RQano 


^M 




37,000 5<S,P00 


36fl,mi0 


Berbic«», 


5M 


i|iM) 


$i;3ij0 


1^,000 


1,585,000 


SS0,O0O ^l,OiM» 


T4,000 


BprmuilQLj 


n,{ioo 


740 


4,000 


, 




, * 1 '1,0(}0 (50,000 j 


Dotni^raia^ 


3,uoa 


G,4oa 


70,000 


T.f7,000 


1 '940 ,600 


^3,2E30,OOo'l,Ga7,atjy 


450,000 


Dumlniea, 


650 


3«6ao 


15,400 


5(LQQ0 


013,000 


(53,000 J50,00(t 


ltl,O0O 


Gtf>rtQiJn, 


&m 


9,300 


M,000 


1@0,OOO 


0,000 


330,000, xmm^ 


Tl^t.OOO 


Ifotid'urcii, 


350 


9p300 


a/ioo 


, * 


w 


. . 1 sasLwio 


572,000 


JainuicD,^ 


37,000 


G&jam 


333,iJ0O 


t,%^,Q0O 


I5,4GO,OO0 


3, 5ori,ooo 3/15:1,000 


1,*«00,OW 


MootgerraL 


3^ 


mo' %mf) 


£U,(K» 


. 


41,0(»0 :t:i,iMHi 


H,00O 


i\cvUt 


7m 


s,nw> (t/iiio 


50,(»QO 


. 


l.'iO,wi> Hj,oini 


14,000 


Sl.ChttttoY^. 


I/4KI 


3,oott i^jim 


If^J/KW 


. 


2rp7p000 i><K1,OLi(i 


70,000 


m* Lueiiif 


fm 


3,70(1 rn.fMii. 


riii,iilir) 


63,000 


la in»o' i4i>,OL»o 


:»a,cj<wi 


Bi. Vjnocnu, 


i;3m 


a,HO(.> sa/iJUi, L'j'^.diiii 


« I 


K{O,0flfli 31l5j0fl0 


S2,000 


Tobn'o, 


nao 


1,901) 


I'^jMt l-^l.iHKI 


. 


50O,0O(lJ ]fi5,000 


41,000 


Tdrtctl*, 


iSO 


1,300 


5,401 r ill, nun 




. . i 


25,000 


3,000 


ToUd 


4«oo 


](ifim 


3.|,(»!f; ifl,iP'iOJ . 


®,000 


a55,uoo <ioo;oQo r 


n.4aj 


i (3,aKlJll0a,7O0la,ftIti,01Ml m,709,MO 


7,aoe,ooo s,oo3»ooo| 4,035,000 [ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



oixms: 



V\ ^.%\' ■•': ',i(. 






J.-„tlV"^ 






s 




Geogimn 


Pop. 


Eevenuu 


B6bt 


Army 




BtlllM. 


•ciuoro 


Fotxitur- 


io*n. 


jy 


iD 


orCW. 






IDltttl. 


tiod. 


mLlo. 


Fraoei. 


Fr»D«i. 


UiJfeol 




. \ 


WstrKKK EnnoFK. 












C^mtral Pari, 


















France, 


154,0(K139,OOQ,OW 


9fle 


997,f590,(K)0 


3,9O0,0O0,0Oo;279.937 




J 


Switzetlandi 


U^\ J,95!0,0W 


177 


1",1JOJKJO 


* 


33.758 






0«fHi. CotrfudcratiiKJ, 


6«,500,i:» 0(}JJ<J<> 


lua 


9 K>, 119,000 


7O3,KC2,000 1Q9.219 






Uairaria, . 


22,1301 4,070,000 


184 


ti!*,733,O(J0 


9(i5,afK>,000 


35,tiO0 






Wurtomborg, 


5,790 1 I,5go,000 


386 


20,000,000 


60,000,000 


13,1)55 




• 


Uanuvor, . 


11,135 i^jsao.ixw 


vm 


27,04)0,000 


64,000,000 


13,054 






Suotiy, 


*«^ 


Um\,im 


aM 


2tf,0O0,0t>W 


70,tlO0,000 


12,000 






Baden, . , 


4,480 


i,m\m 


ii^i 


20,000,000 


39,000, 0(h) 


10,000 






Il««sO'Dannitiidt, 


9,096 


7I«>,0€O 


2IJ- 


I'ijiHJO.fW© 


97,000,000 


fi,l95 






IJe«o-Ca4»oJ, 


3,344 


5SW,000 


171 


11,000,000 


6,0<XI,(t0(l 


5,679, 






iSar43-\Veiiijar, . 
BlQcklotihurg-schw, 


1,»>70 


5£H,(>t30 


9)4 


4,913,000 


16,9!J 1,000 


2,100^ 
3,580 




Jl 


3,5a* 


4:n,0(K/ 


120 


6,000,000 


20,500,000 




1 


Mec k k- n tiu rg-StrftliU, 


578 


77,000 


i3:t 


1,500,000 


3,000,000 


Vl7 




OldoijUufj^, 


1,880 


241,0011 


13b 


3,9011,000 


, , 


IjtiSO 




_? 


Nojiau, 


1,446 


;w7,<>jtj 


%t\ 


6,000,000 


9.500,000 


3,02ii 




-^5 




l,13ei 


a^a^ooo 


SIS 


0,300,000 


8,000,000 


9,096 




'1 


73 J 


14;'»,00«J 


JOT 


9,500,000 


lJ,tiO0,O0O 


i;3M 






Saio-Mpiiuo^o, 


691 


130,000 


lew 


1,939,01(0 


B,0O0,000 


]^6S 






g4x«-AIU?nburg, 


39f7 


l07,0iKJ 


^0 


1,5-311,000 


3,Wm,O00 


1,096 




1 


AntiahDuttnu, • 


961 


5a,oo<i 


915 


1,41X1,000 


1, (XXI, 000 


590 






Anhali-UornliUTff, 


333 


38,000 


1J41 


1,100,000 


1,700,000 


370 






AnhuU-CoUiftn, , 


940 


34,000 


N*i 


100,000 


3,103,000 


394 






loy 


ai,ioo 


231 


3(a,oix« 


517,000 


900 






Beur?, VountorUno, 
Heats, Loben.-Eb»rf 




30,000 

27^X» 


1 J9I 
151 


XJti.OOO 


j 1,810,000 


380 
900 




j 


acliw. Ruaobtuilt, 


305 


57,000 


H<7 


800,009 


600,000 


539 






£l«bw. ?on<J(^rhaiucn, 


270 


4<?,CK)0 


171? 


€00^ 


540,000 


451 




L}ppe-8chauenhurjf, 


aw 


?o,ow; 


230 


1^7,000 


1,500,000 


OOO 




j 


157 


ai3,iwo 


m) 


sSs^jo 


1,031,000 


940 




■4 


W^l.lock, 


3^7 


54,000 


15t; 


i,034,noo! 


3,m3,ooo 


518 






Uohonzd. SifmM^n, 


9K) 


ae/wu 


130 


500,000 


9,r*o,ooo 


390 






Hoheniol.-H«chiii»ii. 


fli 


is.mi 


i8;i 


310,000 


700,000 


145 




■^ 
* 


Uciitenttcin, . 


40 


6,000 


IM, 


50,000 


. 


55 






1 flpsae-Hoiaborf, . 


i3r> 


21, wo 


1GB 


4O0,(iO0 


I,t64,000 


900 






Fiankfort, 


IK* 


5^J,oj> 


783 


l,Kit,00i^ 


17,000,(KW 


473 






Brcuie*n, , 


51 


50,tW0 


Oao 


i,ai 1,000 


7,800,000 


38* 






' llomliur^L^t . 


114 


MS,(M)0 


J,30-i 


5,600,1)00 


40,000.000 


1.398 




Lu|>erk, . . 


88 


40,0S)0 


5SKJ 


1,03^,000 


9,000,000 


408 






Kiiij^ihaLi«eOf i/djtkip^^ 


in 'j.Hsa 


££20 


40,000 


. 


oa 




-, 


Au^uiu, 


' . . M >.LKM> 


165 


44fl,QOO,m)0 


1,700,0410,000 


271,404 




: 


l'xn-"M. 


f.Hiht 


155 


215,000.000 


79i),li*0,O4)O 


169,600 




- 


Jlull'.ir^-I, . 


r^JJl>l> 


277 


85,000,000 


a,e;»H,ofhi,ooo 


90,000 




^ 


H4.Iifiuii., . , 


Ujoi* ;t;-i|iJ,uo(j 


303 


90,QO0»0O0 


tJ49,445,0O0 


47,000 




1 


SifUtM^m Part, 














z^ftf^inin. 


31,000 4,3«>ll,(MK| 


205 


70»000,000 


100,000,000 


4fi,857 




^ 


Parma, » 


l,fliSO AAi},ym 


964 


0,50O,0OG 


19,000,000 


l,fl0Q 




■•^ 


Mtxlvna, . 


l,f»70 3Hfl,<NHi 


338 


s,ooo,ooo 


1,500,00*)! 


1,780 




•.<, 


Lurv., \ , . 


319 


i4;i,'J0[i 


] m 


1,700,000 


1,000,000 


800 




^j 


M fM, . . . 


isa 


6^10 


171 


190,000 


? 








> in ^larifio, ♦ 


17 


7,000 


419 


70,000 


. 


40 




>SB 


'['ii.'-aut. . 

Ml- uV tiM. Chureh, 


B,3a4 


l,fl7i»,000 


303 


17,000,000 


. 


4,000 






13,000 


3,500,000 


199 


45,000,000 


350,000,000 


7,400 






Tv,^.-"jr,itie«, . 


31,4iiO 


7,430,000 


936 


e4,0ffl),lXJO 


5<JO,000,000 


51,510 




*!• 


IVrln^al, , , 


ay, 150 


:^jmsm 


121 


54,0D6»00O 


lt}0,0O(l,0O(! 


99,645 






S^l'ijiki^ , . , 


I37,400il3,*100,000 


101 


178,600,000 


4,O0O,0W,04X) 


\':^\^mK 




'Ai»1t;irFOi 


144 1 15,000 


104 


? 


\ 


^<J 


^HPHI^-^'*- 










'^■- 








268 



STATISTICAL VIEW OF THE GLOBE. 



[1834. 



i 


GcK]fra*J 




Pop. 


Rvrenutt 


Debt L Armv 


BtAta^ 


jqu&rs 


Papalft- 


ta»q. 


la 


Ln Dt Cq[i 




milet. 


tJan- 


mtb» 


Fnnct. 


Pmaef, [LiogonL 


KartMarn Part* 








1 


Swedcm and Nonrajr, i 


223,000 


a^^M^ooo 


17 


40,300,000 


Sl,0O0,OC» 4.^,2n3 


iwedcQ, . 


lar^ooo 


2,^i0l],IX){» 


'iti 


4J,OllO,(Mia 


^,IM>0,0{H) :u,jM 


NDrvny^ 


SKifiJOij 


l,fj!50,000 


1 1 


e,300,0t)t} 


5i7,oao,mJii 13, HM 


D«nm»f)i, 


lii,3iK) 


J ,9:]i}]Ouo 


\l^ 


3ii^(]iH>tOUt^ 


I50,ooo/mi :m,K^'- 


Qfflai Britaiflf 


90^ 


33,400,000 


i*57 


l^Sd5,UOU,O00 


SO,345,O0O,(XK3 im,iiB3 


1 EA*TEil7t KtrBorK. 










' 


lEuf«iQ| - _ - 


l;5a5,7W 


56^500,000 


m 


434,000,000 


|^75,nO(K,OOfi 710>»00 


RuMia FrujiDr, 


1.409,000 


3a^75i000 


Ua 


4(liJ,UUll/X}0 


L ,440,OUll,(MXf 1774 ,CKHl 


PuUufJ, , - - 


aejoti 


3,000,000 


im 


3^,lKHJ^UtS0 


i;i&,pya,oiK}' in.wQ 


|(^mcow. 


373 


U4,0(K) 


IMM 


eei.cKio 


3 


Kl 


Turfceff ^ , - 


laa^] 


7,100^UO(J 


iSi 


3eo,o<Mj,ooo 


, 


300.000 


Pervi«, 


9,000 


^>,(KIO 


4'4 


3,wrs«ua 


* 


rtVunncbw, 


21 ,€00 


ma^mo 


4^ 


pjwu.em 


. 


> 


iMr>!ld:iviij 


lUBOU 


4^,ih3g 


39S fi,W),*MK) 


, 


"r 


Gri>iic<T^ ^ _ . 


li^Sfltt 


tioo^nmi 


5J ; ti,i HN}^(>ua 


70,OtlO,()00, 11^8001 


Plonuin blfti, 


?M 


nS,CM30 


S34' 3,(!S«JtOnO 


i i,a)o| 



ASIA. 





G«ofr»pbM 




Fop. 


A«TK|lfl9 




StatEV> 


tqumrai 


Populatbq. 


IQ nq^ 


in 


Aim J. 








lnil«. 


Frmitw. ' 


nfi^^uoo 


CliinoM! Ii^mpire, 


17(5,l]Otl,UUI 


42 


Hmpifo of lajiiiD, 


160,000 


S5,IX»0,000 


139 


350,000,000 


t!&>,000 


Empiro of Arnnam, 


*^Kt,n(W 


tt,0UO,O[MI 


57 


90,000 JOU 


90,000 


Kinj;*l0'ni of Siam, - 


!&2,0fJfl 


a/mi,oiiCi 


21 


4O,0WjHeO 


30,000 


Brriuan Empira, ~ - - 


J.53,00EI 


3,7(Ht,U00 


34 


4S,ooo,oeo 


Sl,000 


30,7(JU 


4,WXl,tJ0(l 


13^1 


2*i,OTfJ,000 


30,000 


Kinijiloni of Nc'piil, 


40,000 


2,5<]o,iino 


m 


i:^,iHH«,«)fi 


17,000 


U ail lull i^rht ion 4uf S<^il(b», 


130,1300 


e,|]flO,(i(M) 


m 


70,1 UK), (100 


«MJOo 


Frin<:''[|:i<a9iijr of ^inilliy, * 


40,0LK1 


I,O00,t>«(f 


a.^. 


l^tl'MjUOlJ 


5&0 


Kk^j^iiofii of Cadulj, 


niLOOO 


4^),0W 


i*W 


27,liU0,OU0 


150,(100 


CmilcHiiHion H'llie Bclauoliet, 


IIO/HIO 


a,*)ttj,(MMj 


1^ 


?/ 


150,000 


KincjifflTn of lt<<'riii, 


SftjOOO 


1 ^),[MJO 


nil 


e,ooo,iino 


f,000 


Kin^ilu«)i of Feriia, ^ 


338,000 


9.*iw>,0(»o 


SG 


B0,0iW,0(nj 


PO,000 


KhnnnL of RiikharU] 


ttJ,000 


9r5«Hi,0tMl 


^ 


12,01 K1,liOO 


9S,000 


Khun 0.1 tif Klika^ 


110,000 


gJW,000 


7 


1 


100,000 


iKlmmm of Khoklian, 


msm 


],«Hj,ai«j 


n 


f 


100,000 


itnimmut of Yerneii, 


40^000 


ujm^m 


Ci3 


15,(100,00© 


6,0WJ 


1 Imiiiua t cf hAaa eat j 


39,000 


1,000.000^ 


41 


4,000,000 


9,500 


Fhrrifrm Ftntmurimi*. 




4 








Ecflivh Empires id In^tia,. 


@4d/]50 


114,430,000 


135 


, 


. 


'lemiory of Ed)f„£* fnd, Co* 


349,oeo 


80,800,000 


St3l 


597,^36,000 


210,000 


CountHi?'* trib. lo E, Ind. Co. 


485,000 


J8,B0O,a«O 


\^ 


. 




KJn^dgni al'thfr NLiani^ 


72,(100 


lu,IMKi,iJ<irr 


VM 


4e,ooo,ono 


30,000 


Kinplndi of Noifpoar, 


53,000 


3,001 »#H» 


57 


14,000,(100 


J«,000 


Kf n|i(o<ni of My nore, 


90,IXW 


3J»K),lKH) 


14B 


37,(KM^,000 


e,ooo 


Kin|don] of CMido^ 
1 K 1 Afftom tif OuicowmTf 


15,000 


3^i)00,«0(j 


2rJl 


45,000 ,OlX> 


5,000 


13,000 


s,iMxi,mMi 


N7 


JP DIR),(100 


23,000 


. Kintgdofn of Tudofv, 


8,»i00 


l,*?rjo,ocw 


J 40 


19,000,000 


34,(]00 


Rl^gdom of S^ttafah, 


B,000 


l,5OU,000 


163 


4,400,000 


4,0(K} 


Kinfdvrn oriViiVHiicoro, 


5,«?00 


9lMt,(XKr 


155 


7,900,000 


11,000 


l*l*iid ofCtjJpTj (Englifh), 


is,tt5a 


e30,OOD 


^ 


, 


, 


Anatfe Turkey, wiUj pwt of 












Ambiiij 


55G,noo 


12,500 ,000 


^ 


* 




jS*ialic Hu4*ia^ 


4,010,000 


3,00t>,(K»o 


0.89 


■ 




pprliii?f]p>if* t^o^iflfijontf - 


3.700 


500,0110 


la^i 


* 




Yvc-\\t\\ Pi.MVfiiiionti, . 


*400 


300,000 


5^ 


. 




n.jiM-iii I^K,^F.>jitifiDi| 


n 


I 35,000 


500 


» 





d by Google 



1834.] 



STATISTICAL VIEW OF THE 6L0BE. 
. AFRICA. 



269 





0«Qfr»phH 




Pop, 


RevflQUA 




Stal«i. 


■I^UAIH 


PopulAdon. 


ro*(i. 


in 


Annf* 




miJet. 




Dihl, 


Francis 




£ltl{liT«l of M~DIDCCD, 


i30,auo 


0,000,009 


4d 


9a,iKKJ,iXH) 


tJli.lMWJ 


gt&to ofTwnU, 


4%^m 


i.awj,ooo 


45 


7,0iHl,U0U 


i),llO0 


at4tJsofTfi|»lj, - 


308,ijaa 


mi^rn 


3.a 


a ou(i,ooo 


4^000 


irri>,mx> 


1,PH>,(JOO 


m 


GttipJnDrilonu>iii - 


5(»,tHJ(* 


i,*jr*3,oou 


I2S 






70,i>iX> 


l,7lW,lX>ft 


3* 






aepulilie of FuuU-Topftj 


I5,mn> 


T'tMjjIJOll 


<7 






Ejnp4fs of /hibantefli, - 


ItM^.iWO 


]],1MKI,IM|ll 


LW 






Kjn^damaflfaB EUt^louu, 


aw.fifio 


J,U(KI,UUU 


i ^ 






Kingiidoi of CtUAgsmermf 


S(»,IJOO 


50U,OOU 


10 






Kto^ldcn oi MAilB^uo4r| 


13U,0U0 


3,000,000 


17 






FW^iiffi. /■oAfMJaflw- 1 












TuTkiili Po!i«#iioni, 


3ff7,0Ui» 


3,000,000 


3JI 


100,000,000 


?0,000 


French roiMtiiofHi - 


BSU^IO 


I,4«U,U00 


y.li 






74,0(Mt 


lJMtO,OOll 


93 






E^filhh Poi-t^mnoa3j 


Ol,tKM» 


370»or« 


3 






Sp&Diih rusMUJOCU, - 


3,430 


so&.ooo 


86 






lldUb PBwawlpqtt - 


m 


|5,0Ull 


m 






Danlib Powhiuniii, - 


480 


aw^two 


03 






AracFicafi fonHtiufUf - 


.1,000 


Mfl/Wc> 


8.3 






Anbrnn PoiMSiiom, - 


4,fm 


IWjWKl 


S5 







AMERICA. 





Geqyrii'l 




Pep. 


RffTcnuo 


PuUlic 




Statei. 


tqUlirf) 


Fonuk- 


l«ni. 


ill 


Dfibt Jn 


Aimj, 




mitMi. 


mik. 


FrBQ 01. 


franci. 




ITnilea i^tntM, 


i^T^jim 


H,*KI,lj!W 


7^ 


l:W,4|W,f>00 a9i5,30O,Q0O 


5,779 


M^xko^ _ , , . 


l,^43,iwxi 


7,ifii^<Wu 


<; 


Ui.OtKi,iHH) 9,fjli0,00l( 
43 ,,11 ni,ihHhj.>| ,00,6000 


*11,7S0 


Cffntriil Amftdca, - 


i:Fi,iHJfl 


t,fj;rj.'i,iH> 


IJ.O 


3,500 


Cotoflibizi - - , - 


e3«.iN)() 


a,aO'>,{KMJ 


:i.4 


33,3(16 


Peffl, . , , ^ 


:*7.i,oi}y 


i,7m^tm\ 


4,fi 


3n,ikHj,inni ii7,4K??.ooi:i 


7,500 


BalStift, - . - - 


3ltt,ihlO 


J,3iii|,uU(' 


4.2 


H,iJii''v5iJii MM".Ht,0O(l 


? 


Ultili, - - . - 


lao/Mt 


J,4ni!,(ji*ii 


loa 


):h,,hti,0!jii inj^rjoo ,000 


ei>,oo 


aiKJ,oixj 


7t»ll,lM> 


I 


l.'->,oija,oni.i i;.ii,EJ0OUO0 


141,000 


n^iniJa OriacLtMl, 


6o,mj<j 


70,iH[0 


i.a 


j.-;<M,ijii..i f 1 


i 


Patt&;;ilE|.f, , ^ * , 


er/ivi 


a'ifl,(nh^ 


:*.7 


f«,(«hi/uhi>' 


5,000 


Bruir, - - - - 


a^-k3,iN>i» 


5jm>i<,<NXi 


'2.a 


tJO,Emr,U10,*233 ,000,000 


3t>,000 


HftjU, . . , _ 


lt2,!00 


HlK>JMJI» 


mi 


15,000,000 


130,000,000 


45,000 


6^ULH>jt»i>0 


J,3mi,(X»lt 


0.3 








^WW4#A PMNtAPKt. 














K^fliih Punish Jaoi, - 


1,930,000 


1,900,000 


OM 








Pmieli Pa«ia«!oni| - 


35,4 Kl 


],ui»a,iiQi> 


m 








3l,«rK> 


a 10 ,0011 


e 








Uoleli Pofuuiofif, 


Sl^OJO 


HO,(KKJ 


3.S 








Ocnlib PcMn«ni(iiKi, - 


3EH,0Lli* 


iKi.Oini 


o.a 








BuipUft PtHwvioiu, 


37t>,0W 


ifJ,tMK3 


oa 








Sv«duh P^MMMalaiM, - 


45 


16,0(J0 


330 


1 





*,* Presidents of the Republics of America : — United States, An- 
drew Jackson; Mexico, Santa Anna; Central America, Morazan; 
Colombia (New Grenada, Obando ; Venezuela, Paez) ; Peru, Gamam ; 
Bolivia, Santa Cruz ; Chili, Prieto ; Rio de la Plata, or Buenos Ayre«» 
Joan- Roman Balcarce; Banda Oriental, Lavalleja; Hayti, Boyer; Par- 
gOMjf Francia, Dictator ; Brazil, Pedro II, Emperor, 

^^ Digitized by Google 



270 STATISTICAL VIEW OF THE GLOBE. 

OCEANICA. 



[1834. 



Sutet. 


GeograM 

st^uare Popula- 

miles. tion. 


Pop. 
to sq. 
mile. 


Kingdom of Siak, (Sumatra) 

Kingdom of Achem, (Saraatra) . - . - . 
Kingdom of Borneo, (Borneo) . -- - 
Kingdom of Houlou, (part of Borneo) .... 
Kingdomof Mindanao, (Mindanao) .... 
Kingdom of Hawaii, (Sandwich Itlos) ... 

Dutch Isles ; Java, Sumatra,Bomeo, Celebes, Timor, &c. 
SpuniBh liles; Philippine and Mariana Isles 
English Islet) ; Australia, Van Dicmen's Land, fcc. 
Portuguese Ixics ^ — the most of Timor, &c. - 


9i),000 
17,500 
30,000 

8,000 
12,100 

5,100 

203,000 

39,000 

1,496,000 

8,000 


600,000 
500,000 
400,000 
900,000 
360,(*00 
130,000 

9,360,000 

2,(»40,000 

100,000 

137,000 


30 
29 
13 
25 
30 
20 

46 

68 1 
0.051 

! 17 t 



*J' The ** Abr^g^ de G^ographie '* of Balbi, from which these Tables 
are extracted, was published in 1832 ; but the statistical statements refer 
generally to the year 1826. The Table of Europe was inserted in the 
American Almanac for 1832 ; but it has been thought advisable to give 
here the entire summary of this learned and laborious geographer. — 
The statement of the *irmy relates to the time of peace. — The French 
franc according to the rate of exchange, is nearly equal to 20 cents. 

Population and Extent of the Globe. 



Balbi. Weimar Almanac, lt533. | 




Population. 

227,700,000 

390,000.000 

60,000,000 

39,000.000 

20,300,000 


GeographaM 
aq. milei. 

~2;793;()00 
12,118.000 

8,500,000 
11,146,000 

3,100,000 


Pop. 
to sq. 
mile. 

82 

32 
7 

3,5 
6.5 


Population. 


English 
■q. miles. 

371347)52 
17,238,881 
10,787,063 
14,755,006 

3.347,840 


Pop 
toaq. 
mile. 

61 

26,7 
9,9 

2,8 
0,8 


Europe, 
Asia, . 
Africa, 
America, 
Oceauica, 


221 ,9U6,iH54 

461,196,400 

107,615,048 

42,164,410 

2,695,400 


Total 


737,000.000 37,673,000 


19,6 835,578,222149,263,448 


16,9 



Numbers of the Different Religions. 



Malte-Brun. 



Christianity 

Judaism 

Mahometan. 

Bramanism 

Buddhism 

All others 



228,000,000 
5,000,000 



Graberg. 



PinkertoQ. 



236.000,000:235,000,000 

5,000,000 5,000,000 

1 1 0,000,000, 120.000,000 120,000,000 

60,000,000| 60,000,000; 60,000,000 

15(>,000,000il50,000,000 180,000,000 

100,000,000 115,000,000 100,000,000 



Total 1653,000,000 686,000,000i700,000,000 



Hassel. 



Balbi. 



252,000,000 260,000,000 
3,930,0001 4,000,000 
120,105,000 96,000,000 
111,353,000 60,000,000 
315,977,0001 1 70,000,000 
134,490,0001147,000,000 



938,421,000!737,000,000 



Digitized by V3VJVJV It 



EUROPE. 



REIGNING SOVEREIGNS OF EUROPE. 











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nod the King of Belf inm ia a Proiutant, though hia inbjeett 



af t!i*ir iohja^ti afe Pnttfjffajttji 

BT0 QDwtly OakoiicM ! — FrodciTJck Aufiietus & Mnt regent of Saxony. 

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i. Malta^ron, in tlie fint rolume of hif wjtktMB OoogimplijA 1 
tbji population of Europe Kt 170 nulfioiit; tratinllie #illi ^lMi^«^:il 
MO or 205 miUiona, whioh k doubtiew nearer tlie ttoe amOBat,^ He jfeg. 
UuHL'^the mean annual inereaae of the whok J^e^peMi po^^ 
fllpiot,' according to the lowest estimate, belppl^^ t^^ 
IImI belbre the year 1900, it may amount to 809^iflViM».*'; V , ^* : ! 

% Haasel, a late learned geofraphical and stidrilNl wdttir^ooiBpirt^ s 
thf population of Burope, in 1824, at 206,77!^; uaA in ISIS, li^!* 
816^,463; and Baibi, in^lB26, at 227,700,000. The pi^eent aMg^ 
poj^tioA oTEurope, taking European Ru«nn in Ha Iai|sit mum^ ^^imi ' 
not probiUrMi abort of 830 mUtions. . : v i^^^f^yj 

JU Ae«M4lnf Jto^ Jialte-Brun, the agriemthtnU da§9» ui 9n^^ 
p^ffimiilfoliw^ la JNoiiciyiia 

fjgi^inxllfja^ in Engfamd, it embimMu mjly abM 

' ^iKltpy uhiel^ supported byoiiauiwtaiiii 

I^WA^the fiiat oomoi^ioiil eoui^i 

fewa,#)a Aanifanna u^elwj 

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By on an aTef«ig«y by «aoh individaal 19 tha 4^f^i«ni ISapo- 
iplfcllilM; and ilbgreatmr nnd«r eonatiintional goTemmenta, tban 
rlliMtt'^aiedai|i«lSfti ffote gcrrtnuneata ara loaded with in^ 
, and alia wbAk tha neeemtj of impoauig. t^ji-lii^ 
rjliiii on thnir aii1i(iaota. Biichiatbe oaae.witfi f^gtenA^wlMpa 
' *''' yifwynnling to. nigariy 800 million pounda atef ling* ejEO«e<|a 
<^j||tv.4^liof a&tha olker atotea; ai^ yet England ia tfeia 
^ jBOfiitiy Jai Eoiope. 

..itatement ezbibita the amount wbieb oaob indiTid* 
|<li» tiia poblio rerenue, acoording to MaUa-Bnm : — - 





In BmopOy 



^ttttombttfgy 
HfiftiBanmy, 



$16,|»|Bortagal, . 
11|88 Anstriai • - • 

6«15Rn8aia, • • 

6^1 Sardinian Stataa, 
4,S6r Sweden, 
4,07 Statoa of tbe Chnrohi 
9|f^TheTwo8iciUaa, . 

. 3,33Ta8oany, , . « 
3,1a 



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yraoediflg volnmea.of the American Almanac, eapeelaBy 

poah tnfoiBMition, ta giyen reapecting the goyenunent 

of tiie difiereni conntriea of Eorope; but it baa boon 

OSpodtont to oaoit giving, in thia Tcdnme, a aeparato artlelo! W 

Ewopaoii atatea, in oidor tomake room for af«ll;vlavripf 

Fadko^ft inolnding both the Honaa of i'Qf4il ||||«r(|B 

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Jiciitizecl by VJiV7V.'V It 



274 GREAT BRITAIN. [1834. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

Government. 

The government of England is a constitutional hereditary monarchy, 
in which the power of the sovereign b controlled by the influence of 
the aristocracy in the House of Peers, and by that of the democracy in 
the House of Commons. The executive authority is vested in the 
King J the legislative, in the King and Parliament. The King has the 
power of appointing all the great officers of state, and all the executive 
acts of the government are performed in his name > but his ministers 
only are responsible for them. 

TuE King's Ministers. 

Sahry. 
Earl Grey, .... First Lord of the Treasury, jC 5,000 

Viscount Althorp, . . Chancellor of the Exchequer , 5,000 

Lord Brougham, . . . Lord- Chancellor, . . 14,000 

Marquess of Lansdowne, . PresidejU of the Council, 2,000 

Earl of Ripon, .... Lord Priry Seal, . . 2,000 

Viscount Melbourne, . . Sec. State for the Home Dep. 5,000 

Viscount Palmerston, . Sec. State for the Fofeign do, 5,000 

Rt. Hon. Edward G. S. Stanley, See. State for the Colonial do. 5,000 

Rt. Hon. Sir Jas. R. G. Graham, bt First Lord of the Mmiralty, 4,500 

Rt. Hon. Charles Grant, . Pres. of the Board of Control, 3,509 

Duke of Richmond, . . Post-master General, . 2^500 

Lord Holland, . . . Chan, of Duchy of Lancaster, 3,563 

Lord John Russell, . . . Paymaster of the Forc^, . 2,000 
Edward J. Littleton, . Chief Sec. of State for Ireland, 5,500 
Earl of Carlisle, 

•^* The above form the Cabinet. 

Rt. hon. Edward EUice, - . Secretary at War, . . 2,980 
Lord Hill, .... Com. in Chief of the Forces, 3,458 

Rt. Hon. Sir James Kempt, . Master General of the Ordnance, 3,000 
Lord Auckland, . . . Mast. Mint ^ Pr. Board of Trade, 2,000 
Duke of Devonshire, . . Lord- Chamberlain, . . 3,058 
Marquess Wellesley, . . Lord-Steieard^ . . . 2,436 

Earl of Albemarle, . Master of the Horse, . . 3,350 

Marquess of Winchester, Groom of the Stole, . .2,130 

Viscount Duncannon, . . First Commis. of Land Revenue, 2,000 
Rt. Hon. Ch. Poulett Thompson, Treasurer of the JVavy and Vice- 

Pres. Board of Trade, 2,000 

Sir William Home, kt . Momey- General, , . 6,200 

Sir John Campbell, kt . . Solicitor- General, , . 4,000 



d by Google 



1834.] 6RBAT BRITAIN. S75 

Irxland. 

Balanr. 
Marqaess of Angleiey , . Lord-Litutenant of Ireland, 20,000 

Lord Plunket, .... Lord-Chancellory 8,000 

Rt Hon. Sir Richard H. Vivian, Commander of the ForeeSy 3,607 

Rt. Hon. Sir Francis Blackburn, Attorney- General, . 3,000 

Philip C. Crampton, Esq. Solicitor- General, . . 3,000 

PARLIAMENT. 
The Parliament of Great Britain consists of the House of Lords and 
the House of Commons. 

House of Lords or Peers. 
The Lord High Chancellor Brougham^ Speaker. 

The House of Lords is composed of all the five orders of nobility of 
England, dukes, marquesses, earls, viscounts, and barons, who have at- 
tained the age of 21 years, and labor under no disqualificatiou ; of 15 
representative peers from Scotland ; 28 representative peers from Ire- 
land ; 2 English archbishops and 24 bishops ; and 4 representative Irish 
bishops : — The number of each, in 1833, being as follows : 

Dukes (4 Royal Dukes), . . 25'Representative Peers of Scotland, 16 
Blarquesses, . . . 19| Representative Peers of Ireland, 28 

Earls, 106 English Archbishops and Bishops,2(> 

Viscounts, .... 18 Irish Representative Bishops, 4 

Barons, 1851 

Total of the House of Peers, 427 

The Lords Temporal are Peers of the Realm, and are hereditary 
Counsellors of the Crown : their honors, immunities, and privileges 
are hereditary. A Peer may vote by proxy : when sitting in judgment 
he gives his vote not on oath, like a Commoner, but upon his honor. 
The persons of Peers are for ever sacred and inviolable from arrest and 
imprisonment for debts, trespasses, &c. They cannot be outlawed in 
any civil action ; nor can any attachment lie against their persons ; and 
they are possessed of various other privileges and immunities. 

The number of the Lords Temporal is indefinite, and may be increas- 
ed at the pleasure of the Crown. The ancient nobility sit in the house 
by descent; the new-made peers by creation; the 16 representative peers 
for Scotland, and the 28 representative peers for Ireland, by election- 
the former are elected for each parliament ; the latter for life. 

The prerogative which the King enjoys of increasing the peerage at 
liiji pleasure, is, when properly exercised, made use of for the purpose 
of rewarding such as are eminent for their public services; but there 
•re too many instances on record of its application to purposes of favor- 
itism ; and not a few to the unworthy one of insuring votes in the 
Upper House, for the carrying of an obnoxious and oppressive measure. 

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p|M MliXfl^ k inbjoiotd. ,.»•». 

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Pkkks or, Scotland. — ^ 16. 
EUtUd Jan. 1833. — M Consenaihes. 




Downahira, M., «m Hilliboro* 
Drcfhoda, M., Mf Moota 
Gf]intoan,B., MaArdroann 
l^finoat, £., M9§ Lorall 
mtj. Mm «m Loftot 
Errol, E., jm Kilmaraoek 
EnnukillaD. B., m« Orinatoad 
Fklkland|V., «•« Honadon 
Farrard, v.. m« Orial 
Gallowaj, E., •«« Stavmrt 
Obufov, E., Mf Rom 
GordoQ, D., M« Norwick 
Haddington, E., ne Blalrata 
Hamilton, D., ««• Braodoa 
Baadfort, M., tf Kalilia 
KinoainJ, E., m» Sonia 
Kinnoni, B.,ai» Hay 



, , BhKlrick 
MoniroM, D. . «•• Oimham 
Moray, E., jm Stnari. 
Rodan, E., JM ClanbraMU / 
Shannon, E., jm Carlatos 
Sligo,M..MfMoiintoiilt 
StpiSbrd, M., fM Oowar ' 
Straqgfbrd, V., aM Pnnkvrft 
Tariatoek, M., jm Howluid 
TbonKmd, M., Mt Thdoant« 
Uzbridaa, B,. aia PUM 
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J. B. Jcnkinson, D. Ik 
•Robert Oray, D. Dk 
•Roffb Percy, D. D. 
•George Murray, 0. 0. 
•Edw. Cepleston, 0. 0. 
J. Bird Snnner, 0. 0. 
•Riebard Bngot, 0. 0. 
f J. H. Moob, 0. 0. 
•H. PbillBoits,0.a 
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tWn. Waid, 0. 0. 




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282 



GREAT BRITAUr. 



[1834. 



House of Cummons. 

The Hoase of Commons coDsists of knights, citizens, and burgesses, 
respectively chosen by counties, cities, and boroughs. It is not accu- 
rately and satisfactorily ascertained at what precise period the Parlia- 
ment, as it is now constituted, was formed ; that is, when the Commons 
first began to compose a distinct assembly from the Lords ; but the 
generally received opinion is, that the Parliament was, on the whole, 
much the same as it now is, so long ago as the 17th year of King John, 
A. D. 1215. (See *» New Edinburgh Encyclopedia," Vol. VJII. p. 
616.) The first Speaker certainly known was Petrus de Mountford, 
chosen in 1260, in the reign of Henry III. See " Key to Botli Houses 
of Parliament.** 

Since the period when the House of Commons was first constituted, 
various changes have taken place with respect both to the number of 
members, and the places represented. In the reign of Henry VI. the 
number of members was upwards of 300 ; in the first parliament of Hen- 
ry VII, 298 ; in the time of Sir Edward Coke, 493 ; and since the union 
of Ireland with Great BriUin, in 1801, 658. 

The duration of Parliament was formerly for three years ; but the 
Septennial Act, in 1715, extended the duration to seven years, unless 
dissolved by the King ; but it seldom happens that Parliament sits out 
this period. The union with Ireland was carried into effect, January 
1, 180], and the Parliament, which met the same month, and which 
included the members from Ireland, is styled the First Imperial Pariia- 
ment, or the First Parliament of the United Kingdom. The following 
Parliaments have since been elected : 





Whan Msembled. 


When dUfolved. 


Existed. 


2d Imnerial Parliament, 


August 31, 1802 


October 24.1806 


V. M. D. 
4 1 25 


3d do. 


do. 


Nov. 25, J 806 


May 27, 1807 


6 2 


4th do. 


do. 


Nov. 27, 1807 


Sept. 29, 1812 


4 10 2 


5th do. 


do. 


Nov. 24, 1812 


June 10, 1818 


5 6 16 


6th do. 


do. 


August 4, 1818 


February 29, 1820 


1 6 25 


7th do. 


do. 


April 23,1820 


June 2, 1826 


6 19 


8th do. 


do. 


Nov. 14, J 826 


July 24, 1830 


4 1 22 


9th do. 


do. 


Oct. 26, 1830 


April 22, 1831 


5 27 


10th do. 


do 


June 14, 1831 


Dec, 3, 1832 


5 20 


11th Im. or 


IstRef. Par. 


Jan. 29, 1833 







•^* For a view of the Act of Parliamentary Reform of 1832, see the 
American Almanac for 1833. The number of members added to tlie 
representation of Scotland by the Reform Act is eight instead of five, 
the number atated in the American Almanac for 1833. 



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io jgMd|t to or a^dreM the King la tbt iMM of 

and toriDUMtion of tho MMtoa ; M wttil 

gmnto^f ifumoy l>y the t^ominoBe to the 

^ and .when the royat aaaent ie ghren to Ulla. In 

ae m.odeimior or ehurman of the aaaemblj. In 

L|ii hot little'entiUed to the appellatien of Speaker, tm he 

when he interpoaee the authority with which he ie 

i^M[|do0^<>hitfnranee of the rulee and naages of ParUament, 

^Mi^o^eaaloaallf angiy paaiiiooa of the debaten. 

I^aker'f aAenoe, no boeineta can be tranaacted, nor anj 

Ijl hot that of adjoonunent. When the mace ta mi the 

• being preaent) the aaaemblj ia " a Hooae ^* ; when 

P4il#i it ii " a Gbmmittee.** On the latter oecaaion the Speak- 

|iit .'^batr, and takea hia aeat 'among the members, and iqieaka 

in hand aa any other member. In the meantime, another 

tviCedi to the chair, where he aits, pro tempore^ aa chairman of 



J!^f|li'llSifM^? i* ^^ g^^^^ functionary of the House of Conunona, 
'^ibi^Jf^Mi^ reapeots entirely regulated by him ; and by the Speah* 
ef nn^afoiiMriHi, a great .portion of the publio bnaineaa is tranaacted. 

: 19'liii'llM^ ^^ ^^^ formerly amount to more than £3,Q0O |»er an* 
n^H J Jy i ipliai ip 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 of which some spea leers held offices nnder the 
ft^0m»n^ihim Heuae, however, became so sensible of the inadequacy of 

'.jrifdtf^^ifikitft and ao jealous of the dependence of their Chairman on 
tlw tawiitifin |Hirl of the government, that the abm was doubled. 

I tl^jilJSlion to his salary and fees (altogetber about £8,000 per an- 
vtiA^^' BftiAitT receivea £1,000 of equipment money, and 2,000 

'^«i|liltllft'<oi?-*pnle, immediately on his election; 2 hogsheads of claret 
a4*i»4iii4! <^|00 for atationery, annually; besides a house, with exten- 

> nifMitoetoi the principal entrance to which is from the New Palaee 

I ''||mi|i jthe aefaion he holds parliamentary leveea, and givea dinners 
I IllMmoely^le, to which all the members are in turn invited. The 
i lt>i|i iil' ilhiiiTi theae banqueta are aerved ia aitaated immediately nnder 
I lif JPIflttff of Commons. ^ The Speaker takea rank neit to the Peera of 
i OMil^Mtain, and h^a alao the aarae precedence at the King*a Conneil- 

^at>eafer4^<Ae Jfoitte qf Commome, Rt. Hon. Oharlea Maanera 



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J. B. Cbic«*ter 
C.-Sti J. Fanconrt 
G«a. Palmer 
1. Aw Boeboek 
W. B. Whitbrawl 

iraal Crawley 
Sir R. Donkin 
Sir F. Blake 
Boo. C. Langdale 
tfeimr Burton 
Sir T. Wlnniofton 
Tb. Attwood 
i. Sebolefield 
Win. Fielden 
Wm. Turner 
*Wm. Peier 
S. T. Sprr 
CokMwl v. Torreni 
Wm. Bollioy 
Jobn Wilk* 
Benjamin Bandley 
E.cr Lister 
John Bardj 
'^Robert Pigott 
«T. C. Whitmoie 
C. K. K. Tyoto 
W. Tayleme 
B. Warborton 
John Romilly 
J. N. Wigoay 
Georn Falthftal 
•Sir R. R. VjTyan 
J. B. Baillie 
*Sir H. Vemoy « 
Sir T. Fteemimlle 
Lord C. Piuroy 
•Earl Jerqiyn 
Eicbarvl Walker 
Rarl of Kerry 
O. Piyme 
T. S. RIee 
^tI« Ooiilboiira 
,*Ch. Mannrrt Sutton 



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106 Chippenham, 



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103 Cbeeter (city), 

104 
105 



111 Cofohetter, 

119 

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John Jerrie 
Bon. C. Berkeley 
Lord A. Lenooi: 
J. A. Smith 
«JoMpb Neeld 
W. H. r. Talbol 
6. W.Tappe 
•Lord Apeley 
Joe(<ph Crippe 
John Fort 
P. L. Dykoi 
B. * ' 
D. 



Corentry, 
CricUade, - 



114 
115 

116 

117 

118 

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190 
191 
199 

199 

194 



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HeniV L. Bolwer 
Tb. Galley 
RobeitGoidoo 
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Edward Stnitt 
Hon. B.Cavendiah 
Wadham Locke 
M ontafoo Gore 
Sir Geo. Grey 
dir E. Codrinctoo 
•R. Wtlltami 
•A.B. A. Cooper 
•Sir J. R. Reid 
Jobn Baleombe 
J. H. Foley 
Sir J. Campbell 
W. C. Bailand 
W. Chaytor 
Sir C. Coekerell 
Th. Bodeoo 
J. W. Bolter 
Edward DiveU 
•Sir E#*KefriMQ 
Robert Gmnt 
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Th. Sbepard 
C. Rippoo 
H. Th. Bope 
J. Phillpoitt 
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FIRST REFORMED PARLIAMEIIT. 



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988 



GREAT BRITAIN. 



[1834 



259 Anglenwi, . . .^ir R. Rulkolpj? 

260 Bn-cknockshire, 'Ci»l. Th. WotHl 
961 Cardigaiitbtro, .,i'4iL \\\ El. Vowell 

CarinarthaiiHhire, •ttic« Trt.'Vor 
^i H. Adioii 
863 Carnarvonshire, '*T. A. &inHh 
•364 Donbishahiro, . •Sir VV. W. Wjnn 
R. M. DtcMulpti 



s271 Beaamarit, fltc. Pjredtiric Paget 
•272 Brecknock, . , J. L. V. Watkioa 

273 Cardiff, &o. . *Jtthii Nicholl 

274 Cardigan, Sec . rryte Prytn 

275 Carniuithen, Ate. Han. W. II. H'f^fvbftrin 

276 Carnarvon, &c. >Q* J« El< Nanney 

277 Denbigh, Jcc. , 1. Maddockt 
Reforming members II. — ConscrTatives 3, 
Total of repretentativea for Wales 29, of ^ 



Wales. 
Counties. 



Mmbera, 



Members. 



2S5 Flintshire, . 

266 Glamoigauihiro, 

267 Merionethshire, 

268 Montgomery- ) 

(■hire, . . \ 

269 Pembrokeshire, 

270 Radnorshire, 



Hon. Edw. MoUya 
C. R. M. TallKjt 
L. VV. Dillwynn 
•Sir R. VV. Vaughan 
»C. VV. VV. VVyon 
Sir John Owen 
»Th. F. Lewis 



Reforming membera 8. — Conservalivet7. 



Webb county represent ati%'os 15. 



Members. 



Borough Districts. 



278 Flint, tc- 

279 llnve^rrDrdwBst . 
281) Mtirtliyr Tvd«'ini 



Members. 

Sir S. R. Glvnne 
s^tf a. B. Phillips 
J. J. Guest 



281 Montj?o!iie"i?¥si.Cv Jcihrt Edwjints 
2*^2 Pr in brake, Ilc "" 
2<J tiadnor, Itc, * 
284 £3wuii«aA| kc. « 

Welsh borough represeniatirea 14. 
'bora five were added by the Reform Act. 



H* O, Owen 
*lt(rLttard Price 
J, H, Vivian 



Scotland. 



285 Aberdeen, 

286 Argyll, . . . 

287 Ayr, . . . 

288 Banff, . . . 

289 Bute, . . . 

290 Berwick, . . 

291 Caithness, 

292 Clackmannan 
At Kinross, 

293 Dumbarton, . 

294 Dumfries, . . 

295 F^iinburgh, 

296 Elgin Sc Nairne 

297 Fife, ... 
293 Forfar, . . . 



Counties 
Members. 

*fIon. VV^m. Gordon 
J. H. Callondfr 
R. A. Oswald 
*G. Fergu-<on 
*C. Stuart 
G. Majoribanks 
G. Sinclair 



Admiral Adam 



300 Invc^ness, 

301 Kincardine, 
3!)2 Kirkcudbright, 

303 Lanark, . . 

304 Linlithgow, . 

305 Orkney, &c. 
Shetland, 

306 Peebles, . . 
3t)7 Perth, . . 

308 Renfrew, . . 

309 Ross St Cro- 
niurty, . . 

310 Roxburgh, . 

311 Selkirk, 



i. C. Colquhoun 
J. J. II. Johnstone 
Sir J. Dalrympio 
♦Hon. F. W. Grant 
Capt. J Womvsa 

Hon. D. G. llallybur- ;3I2 Stirlinc', . 
ton 313 Sutherland, 

299 Haddington, . . *J. Balfour |314 Wigtown, 

Reformiog members Q^. — Conservatives 8. Scottish county representatives 30. 

Boroughs^ Cities, and Districts. 
MtmJt^ir. Members* 



Members. 

Cliarles Grant 
*Gon. H. Arbuthnot 
R. C. Ferguson 
J. Maxwell 
*Sir A. Hope 

George Trail 

*Sir J. Hay 
Lord Oimolie 
Sir M. S. Stewart 

J. S. Mackenzie 

Goo. Elliot 
R. Prin^le 
\dm. Fleming 
R. Macleod 
Sir A. Agnew 



315 AUi^nlofin (tit)') 

316 Ayr District, . 

317 llmnrri<»» IH^Uict 



A. nannor^Eiii 
T, F. Kt-nnPiJy 

G40. M«i. £^lii4irpe 



318 [>iinikM) {town} i^ir Henry Parriell 



319 Eiliiiburgb (eiiy^ 

320 filgin ULitriet, . 

321 F«Jkirk,oiLii>- } 
llthgDW Di«l. ( 

322 Gltigow (city) 

323 Gfoonoek flown) 

324 Hadilington Pist. 

325 IiiireriiAtA Dj«t. 



P. Jolfrcy fr^d. Ad.) 
J. Aberr!f(jiuby 
Col. A. Lckh Hay 

W. D. Gillon 

JAmei 0«wml4 

Ralx^rt WallHCe 
Rohffrt SU'wart 
tCoL Bailoy 



1326 
:«7 
328 

329 
330 
331 

332 

:«3 

334 



KircudbriglilDis. 
Leith District, 
Inrerborvie or i 

Montrose l)i<i. ) 
Paisley (town) 
Perth (town) . 
Renfrew, Kil- { 

mrirnocKj&r. \ 
St. Andre w^s Dis 
Stirling Diiilrlct, 
Wick, or Kirk- 
wall Ili$.t. I 
Wigiown Dist. 



R. Fer?usson 
.\. Murray 

I loratio Ross 

-ir J. Maxwell 
L. Oliphant 

John Dunlop 

A. Johnston 
Lord Dalnicny 

James Loch 

C. Stewart 



' Tetttl or * 



^Qtgh rp prfnonlirtiyw 58^ oigh t of whnm Wfjv nfldH by the Roffirm AcH. 



dbyGoOgk 



1834. 



FIRST REFORMED PARLIAMENT. 
luLLAMJ. 



ti:;0 



Counties, 
Members. 

336 Antrim, . . . Hon. Gen. O'Noil 

Earl of BeUut 

337 Armurh, . . I<ord Achesoa 

•Col. Wm. Verner 

338 Carlow, . . . fVV. Blackoey 

T. Wallace 

339 Cavui, ... *H. Maxwell 

•John Yoonj 

340 Clar«, .... fMajor Hacnamara 

fC. U'Brien 

341 Cork, ... f K. O'Connor 

to. 8. Barry 
349 Dooeca], ... •Sir E. Hayei 
•E. M. Conolly 

343 Down, . . . Lord A. Hill 

•Vii. Cutlereagh 

344 Doblin, . . . Geo. EVana 
[C. Fitztimon 
•Geo. M. Archdall 
♦Vb. Cole 
•Jamefl Daly 
Th. MarUn 



345 Fermanafh, . 

346 Galway, . . 

347 Kerry, • . . 

348 Kildare, . . 

349 Kilkenny, . . 

350 Kin;*! County, 

351 Leitrim, . . 



tC. 0*OonneU 
F. W. Mullins 
♦R. M. 0»Ferrall 
fBdw. Rulbven 
fHoo. P. Butler 
fW. F. Finn 
Lord Oxmantown 
\S. Fituimon 
Vis. Clemenu 
Col. Samuel White 



j352 Limerick, . 

353 Londonderry, 

354 Longford, . 

355 Loutb, . . 

356 Mayo, . . . 

357 Meath, . . 
356 Monaghan, . 

359 aueen'a County, 

360 Roscommon, 

361 Sligo, . . 
369 Tipperary, . 

363 Tyrone, . . 

364 Waterford, . 

365 Weatmeath, 

366 Wexford, . 

367 Wicklow, . 



Mewtbtr*» 

Col. Fitzgibbon 
Hon. 8. O'Grady 
«Sir R. Bateaon 
•Capt. Tbeob. Jonas 
Viscount Forbes 
tAnth. Lefhiy 
[T. Fitrgerald 
k. M. BoUew 
John Browne 
D. Browne 
\H. Graltan 
fM. O'Connell 
♦Hon. C. Blaney • 
Sergeant L. Porrin 
Sir Ch. U. Coote 
rP. Lalor 
Fitzatoph. French 
Dennia O'Connor 
•E. J. Cooper 
♦Col. Perceval 
G. O'Callaghan 
tR. L. Shiel 
♦Hon. H. T. L. Corry 
•Sir H. Stewart 
Sir R. Koane 
fJ. M. Galway 
M. L. Chapman 
tSir. R. Magle 
R. S. Carew 
H. Lambert 
R. Howard 
J. Grattan 



Reforming members 98. •— Conaerratives 16. — Repealera 90. 
Total of Iriah county members 64. 



368 Armagh, • 
3e9Athlooe, . . 

370 Baodon, • . 

371 BelfMt, . . . 

379 Cerlow, . . 
373 Carrickfergus, 
374C^hel, . . 

375 Clonmel], . . 

376 Coleraine, . 

377 Cork (city) . 

378 Downpatrick, 

379 Drocheda, . . 

380 Doblin Unir. 
IstRetom, 

381 Dublin (city) 

369 Dundalk, . . 

383 Dungannon, . 

384 Dunganron, . 



Boroughs, CUieSf and University. 

Membert. 
i385 Ennis, . . . |tF. Macnamara 

386 Enniakillen, . . *Hon. A, Cole 

387 Galway, . 



JuEii^ Talbot I 

. •Uoji. W. S, Doraard 

iLord A* Chlrheiier 

J. ^. ToniiDDt 
. tN, A. Vigofi 

\*l\ It. Dobbi 
. tJariiea Roc 

jtD. Konnyne 
. *?5ir J. Beieiford 

fDf. H. Bald will 

ItD. CttHa^han 
. «J. W. Max wall 

;tA.l!, O'Owyor 
J *Th.l*(Toy 
I I •Prod, Shaw 
. fE. S. Rmh^oQ 

itW. O'Kalll/ 

. Hon. J.J. Knot 

HoQ. G. Lanb 



388 Kilkenny, . . 

389 Kinaale. . . 

390 Limerick, . . 

391 Lisbome, 

399 Londonderry, . 

393 Mallow, . . 

394 Newry, . . . 

395 Portarlingtoo, 

396 Ross (New) . 

397 Sligo, . . . 

398 Trakw. . . . 

399 Waterford, . 

400 Wexford, . . 

401 Tooghall, . 



fA. H. Lynch 
tL. M'Laughlin 
tRichard Sullivan 
Col. S. SuweU 
Wm. Roche 
tDavid Roche 
•Henry Meynell 
SirR. A. Ferguson 
tW. J. Daunt 
Lord M. HiU 
tl\ Gladstone 
J. H. Talbot 
John Martin 
tM. O'ConneU 
tH. W. Barron 
W. Christmas 
C. A. Walker 
O'ConneU 



Irish boroQgh members 41. 

TbUl 106, of srhom fivv were added by the Reform Aet. 

Modarmte Reformers, who support the nresent Minbtry (ezeept •■ to tithes), 49 ; 
Pledged Repealers (i. e. of the Unioo) 38 ; and Conserratives 95. 



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800 OmiMii, 
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179CaUo7, 
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186 Ftonton, Lowii 14IB1 

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mil Geo. &* 46 LunbLaq, H. 16 ^tjllet Sir E. Jf^iPrjixie, Goorga d& 

i^e, Sir 11. 1^ Lfimont, Norowo 949 Nmoby^ O, J. K. ^2U>Pryn, PrjM ^4 

, J. m i,,mn^dahiVh. Gl Nfikb, t^it H. B. ]tT4,ftiu]»baltam, J.aSSS 

id, W.C, 12a Lftiifr*ton| J. U- l*f? NoeW, Joioph ^ 

f, l>. M- 111 Uxi^on, Win. Q. Ml>'ewiifk, Vii. 

I, Bern. 15U L««, John L«q SI'JS.NIclial], Joliq 

Andrew L« 391) L^fijirTeT Ch< B. SQ'Niirrvyi, Lord ^njiBivuvEu^f ^vma 

a^irJuliD 396 Ijefroy, Anihooy 354|N4>nbi f r^ileiJc^ 138 Ki&kriifd, Wtn, 

f Sjf £dm* 3^1 Lfjf rtjy t Thu maj 38o O ' Brien ^ U. 340 ' Kidsr Tbumu 



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46 gjchardj, John Hd 

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ci?t», John 331 1 Lemon, i^k Ch. ^.0'Ci.ll*ighiia, C 3091 Riaiiy, Str M. VVJ7» 

eot« ^ G, J . :i£ Lq 19 n ft ra^ i^ I r Th. Ig : U ' Con ne 11 , d. 3ai Ritipon, Cmhbfjrt lIK 

coiD;SiiG< 47 Lenn&rd^Th. D. 1{^ 0*Cann<v|J, J. 401 RolMrta, A. W. W 

get Ge<i. F. ]5t$ tjannox, Lord A. U^ O'Condollj &L ^157 RobiAffon^ G, K. !a56 

kisr, L^rd 54 L«niwi, Ld. J.G. I»y O'Connell, Bl, 39d Rttrht^, iiavjd 3^ 

ft^^idtiBf e3 La n nai , U . W JM G6 0»C«an« I J , Ch . 347 Hoe be, W m, 3!JW 

f Sir E. l9U.Lcjitt;r, B^nj. L. 1 94 1 'Can nor, F. 341 Roo. Jamei 3i4 
4, JdJiii Cb- 135 Lewi*, Th. P. S7o'0*ConooT| Dennli 3*50 Eootuch, John A, iB 

d. A.M.W. 3^Uiin<;i)in, l:^rl of 45 0*[>wver, A. €. ^fTQ fioiru, Koberl M. 139 

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1 77 hUborfcj', W, L. H *^ ,0»ma nlDwn, Lord 35<J, R u m^ II , VVm . C. fiS 

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10 J I ^ ftcMnwflt J . A.S.atit) Palinc t, Cii . 78 R u i liFeo , Edw. 34S 

42I Mutiehtui, L. 387 E*a Imer, U h . F. l?7 ; R/ Id, John ] 

iS^iMftcleod, R. 3i;i PaLuor, Robert S.^fBudersoq, R. Ill 

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1 F. ,'bi:i Parkor, Sir IIjdA 55l@A[Klon, Viicouol l^ 

jHMoea, John 277'PEirkpr^ Jobii SIO Scmle, Jobn IL 114 

Mitiglifl, JniDafl l:);} farnell, BirHrtiT^ 31^1 3f&rl«t, Bii Jiunet l$4 

x^lshon, VUc, 134VP«frot^ Jasp«r S33 gcbolehold, J, 83 

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Pttliell, Sir J. B, 25a^ebriifhl. Sir J. S ftS 

Pael, Jonnthao I'lSpiharpe, MEiithow 317 

PcpIj Sir Rolicrt 225 l^baw^ Frederick 380 

Pellmin, C. A. W. 34 Qlmw^, Rohan N. M 



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^iitl^ BMMKt Cngw, I«ra Cragie ; D. R. W. Ewart, Lard Balgny ; 

idtertj^iiii, L9rd GiIUm; Geo. Crtnetoim, I«ra Gorelioiiief John 

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FRANCE. 



Government. 

The goveroment of France ie a conatitational monarchy, the legisla- 
tive power being vested in the King, a Chamber of Peers nominated for 
life bj the King, and a Chamber of Deputies chosen bj the electors. 
A Frenchman, in order to be an elector, must pay a direct tax of 200 
francs. The volume of the American Almanac for 1831 contains the 
French Constitutional Charter; and the volume for 1833, contains much 
etatistical information relating io France. 

Cumber of Peers. The Chamber of Peers, according to the " Alma- 
nach National pour TAnn^e 1832," then consisted of 259 acting mem- 
bers. The Chambers were convoked for the 19th of November, 1832, 
and a royal ordinance was published containing a list of G3 individuals 
newly created Peers of France. — fiaron Pasquier, PresidaU of th$ 
CkanUfer qf Peers. 

Chamber of Deputies. The Chamber of Deputies is composed of 430 
members. — M. Charles Dupin, President. 

Ministry : — formed in Oct, 1832. 

Marshal Soult, Minister of War and President qfthe Council. 

Duke de Broglie, Minister of Foreign .Affairs. 

Count D*Argou, Minister qf Commerce and Public Works. 

M. Humann, Minister of Finance. 

M. Thiers, Minister of the Interior. 

M. Guizot, Minister of Public Instruction. 

M. Barthe, Minister of Justice and Ecclesiastical Affairs. 



Admiral de Rigny, Minister of Marine. 

Ecclesiastical Establishment. 

The Constitutional Charter declares that ** Every one may profess his 
religion with equal liberty, and shall obtain for his religious worship the 
same protection. The ministers of the Catholic, Apostolic, and Roman 
Religion, professed by a majority of the French people, and those of 
other Christian worship, receive stipends from the public treasury." 



Archbishops of France, 14 

Bishops, 66 

Vicars-General, . .174 

Canons, . . . . C 

Rectors of the First Class, 767 

Do. Second class, 2^ 



Curates, 26,766 

Vicars, .... 6,184 
Chapters of St. Denis, . 71 

Choristers, . .16 

Seminarists, . 3,500 

'^»««' (^!^gy) 40,712 

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Cholxxa. 

On dM Mh of Mueh, 1838, the ehoten ftppetNd ia 1^^ 
itopKTalenet in tilM ommti7,S89,B34penoiui in Fkmiwi Ajy fNllifciii jL 
•nl94|0e6dMd. In the dopTtmant of tha Seiiie, tha momi l^ WM imA- 
fill ; oat of 44,811 omm, 81,331 pxoTod fiital. In Paxii/oiM ^ if IM tt 
tba population died. The earn of 14^,860 firaneewaaeipe^liff^^ 
fovenunent daring the preTalence of the diaeaae. ■* /fiwe J f (W l% J|ii||^ 

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NOTICES OF DISTINGUISHED PERSONS 
DECEASED IN 1832. 



A NEW department of the Almanac ie here opened, in which it b de- 
signed to give, not only an annual obituary of distinguished persons, 
but also brief biographical notices of some of the most eminent. 

The year 1832 was remarkable for the death of many illustrious men, 
brief notices of whom are here given. 

THE YEAR 1832. 
1. Andrew Bell, D. D. 

Jan. 27. At Cheltenham, in his 80th year, the Rev. Andrew Bell, 
O. D., LL. D., F. R. S. £., Fellow of the Asiatic Society, Prebendary 
of Westminster, and Master of Sherbom Hospital ; the founder of *^ tbo 
Bell or Madras System of Education." His remains were removed to 
London, and deposited in Westminster Abbey. 

Dr. Bell was born and educated at St. Andrew's, in Scotland, and 
spent some part of his early life in America. In 1789, he went to In* 
dia, and resided as a minister at Madras, where, having undertaken ttm 
anperintendence of the Military Male Orphan Asylum, he formed and 
introduced the system of mutual instrucCion. In 1796, he returned to 
England and submitted his Report to the authorities at home. The sys- 
tem was soon aflerwards adopted in that country, and has since been 
widely diffused over the civilized world. ** The cfstablishment of 10,000 
schools in Great Britain alone, without any legislative assistance, 
wherein 600,000 children are educated by voluntary aid and charity, 
speaks volumes in his favor." He had amassed a large fortune in 
India, which before his death he distributed among the institutions of 
Scodand. To his native city of St. Andrew's he leH £10,000, besides 
a sum of £50,000 for the building and endowment of a new college at 
that place. 

2. BONSTETTEN. 

Februarys. — At Geneva, Charles Victor de Bonstetten, aged 87; a 
native of Berne ; and distinguished as a moralist, a politician, a meta- 
physician, a geologist, and a traveller. 

3. Rev. George Crabbe. 

February 8. — At Trowbridge, in Wiltshire, aged 77, the Rev. Georgs 
Crabbe, LL. B., a distinguished poet He was born at Aldborough, in 

Digitized by V3 VJVJ V H^ 



298 NOTICXS OF DISTIIieUISHED PERSONS [1834. 

Suffolk, Dec. 24, 1754 ; and, after having received a very limited claMJcal 
education, he was apprenticed to the hunness of a surgeon and apothe- 
cary ; but he had little fondness for his profession ; and having cultivated 
ft taste for poetry, he repaired to London, at about the age of 24, as a 
literary adventurer. After having attempted in vain to gain the &vor- 
able notice of the public, the << youth to fortune and to fiune unknown" 
ventured, without an introduction, to make application to the celebrated 
Edmund Burke, and committed to him a large quantity of miscellane- 
ous composition. Mr. Burke received him with kindness; selected 
from among other poems " The Library " and " The Village," (the 
former of which was soon afterwards published, and the latter in 1783) ; 
and introduced him to the acquaintance of Mr. Fox and Sir Joshua 
Reynolds. Sir Joshua submitted to Dr. Johnson the manuscript of 
'* The Village," '* which," said the famous critic, in his letter on return- 
ing the poem, ** I read with great delight ; it is original, vigorous, and 
elegant." 

After a short preparation, in which he was assisted by Mr. Burke, 
Mr. Crabbe was ordained a deacon in 1781. << The Newspaper" was 
published in 1785 ; « The Parish Register " in 1807; « The Borough ** 
In 1810 ; " Tales in Verse " in 1812 ; and « Tales of the Hall " in 1819. 

Mr. Crabbe has been characterized by the Edinburgh Review as 
** the satirist of low life." « He is a writer," says Mr. Hazlitt, « of great 
power, but of a perverse and morbid taste. — His poems are a sort of 
funeral dirge over human life, but without pity, without hope. He has 
neither smiles nor tears for his readers." 

4. Champollioit. 
March 4. — At Paris, in his 42d year, John Francis ChampolUon, 
celebrated for his works on the antiquities of Egypt He was bom at 
Figeac, in December, 1790 ; and became professor of history at Grenoble. 
Having devoted much attention to the study of Egyptian antiquities, he 
was, in 1826, appointed to superintend a department in the royal mu- 
seum at Paris, which contains the antiquities of Egypt ; and in 1828, 
went with an expedition of learned men to that country. — The results 
of this journey are regarded as of great importance in relation to the 
Egyptian hieroglyphics. The Egyptian Manuscripts belonging to 
Champollion have been purchased by the French government for 
50,000 francs. 

5. GOSTHE. 

March 22. — At Weimar, aged 82, John Wolfgang von Goethe, an 
eminent author and a romantic poet, held in great repute by his coun- 
trymen and admirers ; and styled " the patriarch of German literature " ; 
according to a writer in ** The Foreign Quarterly Review," ** the first 
man of his nation and time " ; and according to Prince Puckler Mus- 
kau, « the third in the great triumvirate with Homer and Shakspear*.** 

Digitized by V3V7VJV It 



1834.] DKCEASBD IN 1832. 299 

He was born on the 28th of AujtuA, 1749, at Frankfort on the Maine. 
At the age of 15, be went to the Uniyersitj of Leipsic ; and after paift- 
ing fbor jean there, he resided a while in Alsace, and then returned 
to his native citj. About the year 1776, on the invitation of the Grand 
Duke, he went to Weimar, where he passed the remainder of his 
life, loaded by his patron with honors, ennobled, made a privy counsel- 
lor, and for many years prime minister. Owing in part to the liberal 
patronage of the Grand Duke, the little court of Weimar was a distin- 
guished focus of German literature ; and in the early years of the present 
century, this place reckoned among its resident! more than 20 writers 
of note, at the head of whom were Goethe, Schiller, Wieland, Herder, 
and for a time, Kotzebue. Some of the most celebrated of the produc- 
tions of Goethe are the " Sorrows of Werther," " Faust," and « Wil- 
helm Meister's Apprenticeship." The edition of his works published 
at Stuttgard and Tubingen, in 1830, comprises 40 volumes. He left his 
MSS. to the care of Dr. Eckermann, whom he appointed editor of his 
posthumous productions ; and an edition of his whole works now pub- 
lishing, will comprise 55 volumes. — He maintained for many years a 
tranquil empire over the literature of his country, which was implicitly 
acquiesced in by the candidates for literary fame ; yet his works have 
been much complained of as characterized by unintelligible mysticism, 
and as of irreligious and immoral tendency. 

6. Clementi. 

April 16. — At his cottage in the vale of Evesham, Worcestershire, 
Muzio Clementi, the celebrated pianist, who, according to Dr. Crotch, 
«< may be considered as the father of piano-forte music, for he long ago 
introduced all the beauties of Italian melody into pieces calculated, by 
their ornamental varieties, to elicit the power of the instrument, and 
display the taste, as well as the execution of the performer." He was 
bom at Rome, in 1752; practised in his profession as a musician with 
great applause in the principal cities of Europe , took up his residence 
in England in 1810 ; but afterwards ceased to take pupils and to play in 
public. He was buried in Westminster Abbey. 

7. C. C. COLTON. 

April 28. — At Fontainebleau, in France, the Rev. Charles Caleb Col- 
tan, author of << Lacon." He was graduated A. B. at King*s CoUege, 
Cambridge, in 1801 ; was afterwards chosen a Fellow ; took orders, and, 
in 1818, obtained the vicarage of Kew and Petersham. He was noted 
ibr his eccentricities, irregularities, and inveterate attachment to gam- 
ing, which reduced him to beggary ; and his excesses brought on a dis- 
ease which required a surgical operation, to avoid the pain of which be 
blew out his brains. He is chiefly known as the author of ** Lacon; or 
Many Things in Few Words, addressed to those who think," of which 

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||»4aiiir^WartMrimf,teiiMNriiidbttM iaihftlMMMtbil 
if *»^I^HirIUiiw)» itt AvffMt, 17ea^« Ha 
ftrlht okfiodpnrfbiiion; but ksviiv 
TiniiMiH ■ nlffriprTTT-, 1m devoM UnMlf to tfar ilidli cif i 
I017; Kt a» eulj age ha was invited ta Paiialo fill the fhMii4 
of aompaiatiTa anatoniy ai tha Jmim d§9 
tiM highaal diatioetian aa a Batmaliat Tba Cahiaat tii 
Aaatonqr w tha ArdiR dM Ptatet^ Ibmad whal^ h|r hiiit|4 
TMEioaB ipoiha on aatonl hiitoijr, fixm ittpariahaUa 
fauaa. Tha bndn of Caviar waa aoo^aiad bj ] 
aavani of Iha moat yohmiBova biaiaa ha oaoldftid; 1 
aU of tham 1b weight nI^ 

Tha paianla of Baioa CuTiar wera of tha 
waa hinuelf a Protestant; and bea&dea other imp 
he waa aacoeaaiTely calledy he held the office of Direoter of ] 
worahip. ** The Christian part of his oonntiTnian," aagra ob»> 
ankgists, << lajc^oed to see in tha kibots which aonsHtalad ttiiil 
his Ikme, none of thoae elements of fragilitj whieh matic H 
of adenee, when opposed to the word of God.**— Cuiievl 
oaeded in tha office of Prolbasor of Natural Hlataiy hi flia t 
f^nmoa by M. ilia da Beamnool; and his librarf haa haas ] 
Iha IVsBoh govammant for the aom of 73,000 firaaaa. 



9. Casuiib Pxbiul 



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lii^ia— At Paris, of oholara, aged 64, If. 
Wiiiatar of Franca. He was bom October US, 1777, al < 
aoii of a rich merohant. He emfaraced, at an early ago, the 
I aarvad as a military engineer in the Italian oampai|p» 1 

tbtttlMMBtyMrtbalgav* bfathto Booapule, tht 1 
ipttist i i ia^ ai m of awden tlMi, sbo garobifilito Oel 

iWaaa » il H | to N«f, 8«di, tad Tiaiii, mmffmH 
^MalasaaidAllFlMha, Tietnf or mhera 

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, mrlitmef ^la^kinUMli, tiL, M. P., D.l<. lE?; 

^tdber 24^ 1765, ai Alldowrie in flue ooonif of 

I, ind vfta educictad at ^ng's College^ Al>erclo<lii, 

Ibr^a Mow-fttidetit the celebrated Robert tiali,' With 

an Ultimate f^endihip, which continaed throngh lift. 

ytkbeideen, he fepaired to Edinburgh as ajmedioal student, 

iHiiM of M. D. in* 1787. His attention, howerer, was 

ftla^tofessional studies to the sQience of politics ; and in, 

tfodden^ acquired celebrity as the antagonist of Burke, in 

QtSicm, or a Defence of the French Revolution and Its 

I, agdnst the Accusations of the Rt. Hon. Edmund^ 

some Strictures on the late Production of Bfonsienr 

** an oetaTo Tolume of 379 pages, an able and cfloquent pio- 

Maee4 through three editions within a few months, and 

n -ibn acquaintance of some of the leaders of the Whij^ 

ilAerwirds applied himself to the profession of law. In 

iVM appointed Recorder of Bombay; resided in Jndla till 

1811 ; and first became a member of parliament in 1813. 

the History of England, but died before he had com- 

trelume. He was a distinguished contributor to the Edin- 

Monthly Reviews, possessed great merit as a speaker and 

indwia highly esteemed for his prirate and social virtues. 

11. Cbarlks Bo,tlb&. 

itjk«-^fn London, aged 8d, Cha^lM Butler, Esq., a voluminoas 

aoonsel, and a conveyancer of extensive practice. He 

€S«tholie, and a nephew to the Rev. Alban Butler, anthor 

ll^^Skft^di-Ute Saints." He was educated at the Eng^sh coHegb 

^4ifi altetfwards became -a member of Lincoln's fnii'. '^IHt 

<lo Roman O&tholiee till the passing of the reUttPti^ 

Smilii^; iBntler WMthe fimt barrisler of his 

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(Bif tip Jlny m iti On ttiffitjte. y?i||iff^|" mad 'f BiminliiiiBfUii T .\.^r « 

i||ipg^ stfslMBnIie diT»oii of hi* time, alwIiiMBM ftooi iH^^ 
«iiijNmi«U lUvniilowiiot liMy toMMMi&alri^ilj^>^A^ 
«fitiii|[, mr •ybmi thinking on modem pKt^ pq t^ fjPii rrj WB | \j 
never permitting a bitor ■eimp of time to l»e mw^ijlsgii^* 
ed bim with an abnndanee of literary houn, Btti Vi^fgf^ 
a|« prtneipallj owin)^ to the rigid dbeervanoe ^.iRmt^}pfiij^>^i^^ 
luMiltentipn to one Uieiaiy object only at a ame^^r^,^f9|ld^|l|^^^^^ 
h^ vpon it, oonmlting othm aa Uttle aa pommm^g ^ /f i^ 
,wm <^tatiotu, to read the beet book on eadi |||§^||pjl.^ 
BiiB^inlqnnatloa, andf-when in their eoeiefy, to JiifliHiMi^^^ 

JnneS. — At Paria, M. J, P. Abel-Remn«ily XeepiV'^ll "^-^^ 
Library, Profeeior of the Cfaineee and Tkrtar langnagMi jii|||ft i 
of Franeei and one of the moit difltin|piished lingaieta. p 
of Enrope. He waa bom at Paris, Sept. 6, 1788; wa» ;i 
Amot <^ Chinese in 1814 ; was long Secretary of Uie Adatlel 
Parii, and some time president. He has been sneceeded fiOj i 
Ijy H. Stanislas Jolien. 

13. Jbrxmt BmwmjLMp 

June 6. — In London, aged 85, Jeremy Bentham, Esq.. 
jorist He was bom Febraary 15, (old style) 1747 -8, in J 
edncated at Queen's College, Oxford, attained the degree of 
1707, attended the lectures of Sir William filaekstone, 
ed at Lincoln's Inn, and was called to the bar, but soon 
profession, and devoted himi4lf to the compoeition of his 
writings on jurispradenoe, government, and various braaohii 
eal and moral science. Mr. Bentham had a higb reputaUoifr 
cn4 ^M i^oorre^Kmdaioe with many of the most 
awn of Europe. Aa a writer, he was very obsenra^ bft k^i^^ 
4ieada who attempted to render some of his nni 
Ua. A ]i«t <(if IhemlMve bm atmnged and tianshite^ Inia 
mm^J^ pdpiw M, itl^ Dnmimt, of Omm, 
r and |Mi% ia London. Thia eocentrie itti 

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liSt. DmEX'OV lUlCHfTADT. 

I Af ihia palaea of 8ohoaAhitiii&, near Vienaai of eooamnp- 
HqpolaoB Chailaa-fVaiicia-Joieph, Dake of Reiehetadt 
Emperor of Franco. He wai hattk at iParie, March 90 
of the marriage of Napoleon with the Areh- 
, and immediately npon hie birth he receiTed tha 
ii<fciiliJiiy-<f-lt<Mne ; bot the downfall of the father entirely dumged 
^ittd pioepects of the eon. Hia name waa changed Aona 
liir FfMndo-Charlea-Joeeph ; and in 1818, he waa ereaCed 
" He ia said to haTO been 4ttended by the aieli-' 
'great affi^tion during hia fast illnew. Bat the parent^ 
ilHNIill'iid been eetranged ftom each other; and the large HunOy 
' i^'ifiuria LoQiaa to her lecond hnaband (the late Coant Neip- 
I aMBMied to haTe, in some degreoi alienated her imperial high* 
m wp aolitary pledg* of her first nnptiale."^The Onke waa 
r^tpre ; poeaeieed of die tinguished talent and great kindi> 
Ution, and early gaTe indicationa that hie ruling pasnon 
^'ainbition. 

16. Coujrr Chaptal. 

re.At Paris, Conht Chaptal, celebrated for his knowledge of 

|d for his numerous and Taluable works on that science^ 

at Nosaret in 1756 ; became distinguished as a physieian. 

and was called to Paris in 1793, where, besides prodncing^ 

it works on Chemistry and 4>ther practical branohea of 

Jl^. ialenees, he was made minister of the interior by Bona* 

' Hye ap si foly filled many other important iQtnationa. 

17. SAnrr MAETia. 

U^AI Pbrii» of the cholera, aged 4S, M. Jean Saint Martbi^ 
4»f '^iS^ ^iNfriMil JbAaaifUf an eminent orientalu^ vodL^ 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 




304 NOTICKS OF DISTINGUISHED PERSONS [1834. 

particularly disiiDguislied for bis knowledge of the languages of Weatetn 

Asia. 

18. Adam Clarkb. 

August 26. — At Bajswater, near London, of the cholera, aged 72, 
the Rev. Adam Clarke, LL. D., F. S. A., &c., a distinguished Metho- 
dist preacher and divine, a man of great talents and extensive learning, 
particularly in the oriental languages and biblical literature, and author 
of a well known and learned commentary on the Scriptures, and vari- 
ous other publications. 

He was born in 1763, in the county of Londonderry, in Ireland, his 
father being of an English family, and his mother a Scotchwoman. By 
invitation of Mr. John Wesley he became a pupil in Kingswood school, 
then recently established, and was sent out by Mr. Wesley an itinerant 
preacher in 1782, at the early age of 19. He was greatly admired as a 
preacher : at first his youth attracted great numbers of hearers ; but 
afterwards the extent of his resources, from the gifts of nature and the 
fruits of study, commanded attention wherever he went; and hardly any 
man ever drew so large congregations, or of so mixed a character. 
He continued to travel in various circuits, till 1805, when he took up 
his residence in London, where he passed a considerable part of his 
subsequent life. To his great talents and learning he united the virtues 
of the humble Christian ; was greatly respected by all denominations ; 
and though catholic in his feelings, he was strongly attached to the 
body of Christians with which he was connected. 

19. Sir Eyerard Home. 
August 31. — At Chelsea College, England, in his 77th year. Sir 
Everard Home, Professor of Anatomy in the College of Surgeons, and 
for many years president of the college. He was one of the most emi- 
nent medical men of his day ; and his publications are numerous and 
of high repute. 

20. Baron de Zach. 

Sept. 2. — At Paris, of the cholera, in his 79th year, Francis Xavier, 
Baron de Zach, one of the most eminent astronomers of the age. He 
was born at Pest, in Hungary, on the 15th of June, 1754. After hav- 
ing travelled through various countries of Europe, he was appointed, in 
1786, by the Duke of Saze-Gotha, to construct the observatory oT See- 
berg near Gotha, which he superintended for several years. He pub- 
lished, in 1792, tables of the sun with a catalogue of 381 stars; he com- 
menced, at Weimar, in 1800, the publication of his ** Geographical 
Ephemerides " ; having led Grermany and taken up his abode near 
Marseilles, he published in French, in 1814, his work on the Attraction 
of Mountains ; — afterwards, having established himself at Genoa, lie 



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1834.] DECEASED IN 1B3SL 305 

began there, in 1818, the publication of a new astronomical Recueil^ 
entitled " Correspondanee astronomiquef geographiquty hydrographique, 
et sUUistiqiUf'* of which 14 volumes in 8vo. were issued prior to 1826. 
The disease of the stone compelled him to discontinue this work, and 
was the occasion of his repairing to Paris, where he died by an attack 
of the cholera, after 24 hours' illness. 

21. Priscilla Wakefield. 

Sept. 12. — At London, Mrs. Priscilla Wakefield, in her 82d year, 
author of many popular and useful works for children and young per- 
sons, and one of the earliest promoters of those provident institutions, 
called Savings Banks. She was the eldest daughter of Daniel Bell 
and Catherine Barclay, grand-daughter of the celebrated Robert Bar- 
clay, author of the " Apology for the Quakers " ; was married to Mr. 
Edward Wakefield, a merchant of London, in 1771 ; was a member of 
the Society of Friends, and aunt to Mrs. Fry, so well known for her 
benevolent labors in behalf of prisoners. 

22. Sir Walter Scott. 

Sept. 21. — At Abbotsford in Roxburghshire, Scotland, Sir Walter 
Scott, Bart., tlie most popular writer of his age, and the most distin- 
guished novelist in English literature. He was born at Edinburgh on 
the 15th of August, 1771, the birth-day of Bonaparte, who was born 
two years before him. His father was a writer to the signet, of great 
respectability and considerable wealth, and his mother was a woman of 
talent. He was educated at the High School of Edinburgh under Dr. 
Adam,andattheuniversity ; buthe was little distinguished in the ordinary 
branches of educaticoi ; tliougli he early acquired a large stock of mis- 
cellaneous reading. Af\er having completed the preparatory studies, 
he was called to tlie bar, in 1792, but his literary taste diverted his at* 
tcntion from the practice of his profession to more favorite pursuits. 
In 1800, he was appointed sheriff of Selkirkshire; and in 1806, princir 
pal clerk in the Court of Session. 

His first original work, of considerable size, was " The Lay of the 
Last Minstrel," which was published in 1805, and was received with 
great apphuse. " Marmion " followed in 1808; "The Lady of the 
Lake " in 1810 ; " The Vision of Don Roderick " in 1811 ; " Rokeby " 
in 1812. Upwards of 30,000 copies of the " Lay " were sold by the 
trade in England previously to 1&29 ; and 3G,000 of " Marmion *' before 
1825. But it was in the character of an historical novelist that he ac- 
quired the greatest celebrity. His fictitious prose compositions, as. 
published in Edinburgh, comprise no less than 74 volumes. " Waver- 
ly" was published in 1814, " Guy Mannering " in 1815, the <<Antfn 
quary " and the First Seriei of the " Tale* of My Landlord " in 1816, 
26* 

Digitized by VJVJ\^'V It 



906 NOTICES OF DISTINGUISHED PERSONS [1834. 

These were followed in rapid succession by various other works, which 
were received with ^eat applause, but were all published anonymous] j ; 
nor was his authorship publicly acknowledged by himself, till 1827, 
when, in consequence of the bankruptcy of his publishers and his own 
embarrassments, the fact could no longer be concealed. Besides his 
poems and novels, he was the author of the '* Life of Napolepn Bona- 
parte/* and various other works, and was a contributor to periodical 
journals. 

The health of Sir Walter having for some time been declining, in 
the winter of 1830-31, symptoms of a gradual paralysis began lobe 
manifested. In October, 1831, he sailed from England for Italy; re- 
turned to Abbotsford in a state of alnfost entire insensibility in July, 
1832; and died on the 21st of September. Sir Walter was In stature 
upwards of six feet, and had a lameness in his right foot which required 
the support of a staff. He was distinguished for uprightness &nd pu- 
rity of character in private life, for great simplicity and kindliness of 
manners, and benevolence of heart. 

23. Jamf.8 Stephen. 

October 10. — At Bath, aged 73, James Stephen, Esq., a late master 
in chancery. He was born at Poole, educated for the bar, practised 
many years with great success in St. Christopher's, W. I., aflerwards 
in London ; wrote the anonymous pamphlet entitled " War in Dis- 
guise*'; became a distinguished member of parliament; and suggested 
and arranged the whole system of continental blockade, which for a 
long time occasioned great embarrassment to Bonaparte. *He retired 
from parliament in 1815. While residing in the West Indies, he im- 
bibed that abhorrence of the colonial system which led him to become 
one of the most zealous and formidable opponents of slavery ; and his 
anti-slavery writings and speeches exerted a powerful influence on the ' 
subject. He was nearly connected with Mr. Wilberforce by marriage, 
as well as by congeniality of religious principles and character, and 
aversion to slavery. 

24. Madame Bonaparte. 

Oct. — At Rome, aged 82, Madame Letitia Bonaparte, mother of the 
emperor Napoleon. Her maiden name was Letitia Ramolini. She was 
born at Ajaccio, Aug. 24, 1750 ; was one of the most beautiful young 
women of Corsica, was married in the midst of civil discord and con- 
tention to Charles Bonaparte, an officer who fought with Paoli ; was 
possessed of great firmness of character; and was left a widow in 1785, 
having borne 13 children, of whom 5 sons and 3 daughters soryived 
their father ; all of whom became celebrated. The following list ezhib- 
ats their names, titles, &c. 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



1834.] DECEASED IN 1832. 907 

1. Joseph, born Jan. 7, 17G8; fonnerlj King of Spain; now Coont 

Sarrilliera; resident for several years in New Jersey. 

2. Napoleon, bom Aug. 15, 1769; formerly Emperor of France; died 

at SU Helena, May 5, 1821 : — lefl an only son, Dake de Reich- 
stadt. See page 303. 

3. Locien, bom in 1772 ; Prince of Cassino, an estate, in the Papal Ter- 

ritory. 

4. Maria-Anne-Eliza, born Jan. 8, 1777; married Baccioccbi, Prince of 

Luna and Piombino ; died Aug. 7, 1820. 

5. Louis, bom Sept. 2, 1778 ; formerly King of Holland ; now Count 

de St. Leu ; resident in Italy. 
G. Paulina, born Oct. 20, 1780 ; married (1st) to General Leclerc ; (2d) 
to Prince Borghese (who died in May, 1832) ; died June 9, 1825. 

7. Caroline, born March 26, 1782; married (1st) to Joachim Murat 

[formerly King of Naples, — shot in 1815] ; married (2d) to Marshal 
Macdonald : — now resident in Austria as Countess of Lipano. 

8. Jerome, born Dec. 15, 1784 ; formerly King of Westphal^^ ; now 

Prince of Montfort, in Wurtemberg, having married a sister of the 
King of Wurtemberg. 

25. Antomio Scarpa. 

October 31. — At Pavia, aged 86, Antonio Scarpa, Professor of Anat- 
omy in that city, and for the last half century placed, by the common 
oonsent of his countrymen, at the head of their anatomists and surgeons. 

26. Sir John Leslie. 

Nov. 3. — At Coates, in Fifeshire, Scotland, Sir John Leslie, Pro- 
fessor of Natural Philosophy in the university of Edinburgh, an emi- 
nent chemist, mathematician, and natural philosopher, the inventor of the 
differential thermometer, and author of various scientific works. He 
was born of parents in humble life, in April, 1766, at Largo in Fife- 
shire, educated at the universities of St. Andrews and Edinburgh, 
elected to the mathematical chair of tlie university of Edinburgh in 
1805, and succeeded Professor Playfair in the chair of Natural Philosophy 
in 1819. He was knighted on the 27th of June, 1832. His successor is 
Mr. James Forbes. 

27. Dr. Spurzheim. 

Nov. 10. — At Boston, Mass., John Caspar Spurzheim, M. D., the 
celebrated phrenologist, and author of various works on the science of 
phrenology. He was bora on the 31st Dec, 1776, at the village of 
Liongvich near Treves, on the Moselle, in Germany, was educated at Um 
uniTeraity of Treves, became acquainted, about the year 1800, with Dr. 
Gall, the founder of the doctrine of craniology, as it was then called, 

Digitized by V3VJVJV It 



306 NOTICES OF DISTINGUISHED PERSONS [1834. 

and afterwards became an associate and fellow-laborer in defending 
and propagating their opinions in different countries of £urope. After 
luvving given lectures in various cities on the continent of Europe, and 
in Great Britain and Ireland, he sailed to America, and on tl^e 17th of 
September commenced a course of lectures on phrenology at Boston, 
and soon after another course at Cambridge ; and died aft«r an illness 
of about three weeks, much lamented by those who had made bis ac- 
quaintance. 

28. Barnaba Oriani. 

Nov. 12. — At Milan, in his 80th year, Barnaba Oriani, director of the 
Observatory of Brera in that city, with regard to whom it was remarked 
by the Duke of Sussex, in his last Anniversary address to the Royal 
Society, <Mf the union of practical with theoretical science be consid- 
ered, we shall be justified in pronouncing him to have been, after Besse], 
the most accomplished astronomer of the present age." 

29. Say. 

In Nov. — At Paris, Jean-Baptiste Say, Professor in the School of 
Mechanics, and an eminent writer on the science of political economy. 
He was born at Lyons in 17G7 ; but at an early age removed to Paris. 
His principal work on Political Economy has been translated into most 
of the languages of Europe. 



FOREIGN OBITUARY— 1832. 

Jan. — At Dublin, aged 49, Alexander JVlmmo, F. R. S. E., a man 
of science, and a distinguished engineer 

Feb. 20. — At Gosport, England, in his 70tli year, William Bumey, 
LL. D., author of the Marine Dictionary, and other works. 

Feb. 22. — At Finningby, near Doncaster, England, aged 82, John 
Bigland, author of the " View of the World," " History of England," 
and many other works. He spent a great part of his life in the occu- 
pation of a village schoolmaster, and did not commence author till be 
was upwards of 50 years of age. 

April 2!). — At Winchester College, in his 84th year, George Isaac 
.Iluntini^uidf D. D., Bishop of Hereford, and author of various publica- 
tions. 

May 25. — At Dawlish, England, aged 77, Sir IVm. Grant, formerly 
Master of the Rolls. 

May 29. — In London, aged 80, Rev. George Burder, for many years 
secretary of the London Missionary Society, Editor of the ** Evangelical 
Magazine," author of the '^ Village Sermons," 6 vols., and other reli- 
gious publications. 

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AlBaoknojr, BnglMid, •ged62, 7%mmm JBMrMHUitibor if 

Bmm^Uo PkMM in tho worlil/' 
;4ft Biduioir^agedSI,.^^ (Xiiniy Artl«r, mUmv «f ^ 
oTUie Globe." « 

•^ At Piria, Fn^esmr Umaira, Editor of the «« LiSin 

Wife»Londoi^aged70, CSbM^erjElMoC^l^wrfTlmil^ Oiicl 

ijplIlK Ikncl of the Kind's Bench. He waa the aenof abapt^ 

jHlto at Gantarbuiy, Oet. 7, 1768, — edncaftpd at OxiMrd,-*nMd» 

itlfc CatHoion Pkaa in 1816,— and imiaed ta- Ae oflae^f 

«f th» King'a Beneb in 18ia 
>^jmi^a9d Btmke, D. D., aged 6&, Biabop of Waterfbid aatf 

^m-M Bombay^ aged 38, Fitior MefmmmU, a diattegiiahetf 

At l^|heen in Somy, England, fai hia 97th year, Wm. JNiy, 
■miMnt antifaary . 

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Idiit^ln London, aged 72,./ej*iM Bf«efte#, F. R. 8., Ac, 

—At Gottingen, Profesior Em^ti Sehulza, ' 
•i^9kmt liYOfpooly EngUuid, aged 78, Gen. Sir Bmuuire 
In the Ameriean Revolationary war, he oommanded, in tho 
tfi* BliMI oaTtliy witii lank of JUeutenanl-Cel^eL 
llb^^TbighuMVlh, Eiighndk in hia 76^ year, jMmM 
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t^wily bfothw ofStenislaiu Aogiutiit^ Um lii^ 
ifUdmrad himMlf UlostriotM lif being tbe fint 
4ltoaghoai h» •ztenmve estates. - r • ^ l^ "4^;^ 

Msich 6. -^ At Norwood, England, aged M, JUhi 
SfiOMfi Beeretary of Stale for Fofeign A&in 
imlsraan noted for talent and eccentricity. 
^ lfaieii99.~AtHe]sion, Cornwall, aged 68, 
goiahed metaphystcal writer, and editor of the Impenal 

J^ltil 3.— ^ At Odessa, aged abont 85, MdbJM 
Alexander Ipsilanti, and an officer under him in the Qtw&i 

ApvX 11. — In London, in his 89th year, the Rb^ 
oMbrated minister of Surrey ChapeL He was the soft 
laodBill, andonole \o the present Lord HilL He wai 
daaeon's orders, bnt nsTer attained any higher rank ki Hi 
He, howe?er, regarded himself as an Episcopal cler|j^aW| 
Udniag an independent and ambiguous positloii, 
Ghniehman, but practically a Dissenter. He was distingnSahedi 
fttd eoeetttrinity, and had long to contend against ieUgi«iis 
hot his i|^rm-hearted philanthropy, generous beneroleaoe, 
r overcame opposition, and gained him 
He usually spent a considerdile part of the 
ith% varioas parts of Gieat Britain, preaching in plaoes of 
•faDMt «veiy denomination that would admit of his setfioety 
491^ tpJufe iMMMnblies in the open air. He pieaefced te 
tlviaio an immense audience bnt three days before his death, w 



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• 1 '^IWIIIl ^* irirlimnnili Hffiil 45, Edmmmi JEms, tliA nwgto»HtoaM 

Hm total ranr wMoh ho tvoeiTed for oetlaf liaep 

km iB176,MD, ftvtnfiiig upwards of £9,00^ por ummii 

^fit Iw 4ie4|Krar. " With a genius to hate been more than 

,^M||iiiL3ttitea uL ^he had/* sajs the New Monthly Magaiine, ••the 

I at tiroei to reduce him elmoel beneath a Cooke in 

feiit^^in London, aged 42, Th. Eyre JUuldif LhinggUmf M 

•^in London, aged 64, Sir John Malcolm, Major-Ocnenl in 

tef ttie Cast India Com|>anj, and late Governor of Bombay. 

i Baffneej, near London, fFm, Morgan, F. R. 8 , a diatin- 

' aiaaileian, engaged for the ipace of 56 years in condnct- 

ifof the Equitable Airarance Society, of which he was 

'il^^ria, aged G9, BetU Smaryt Duke, of Rorigo, one ci 
ef France under Bonaparte. ^ 

1^ London, in his 58th year, F«fer Rng, 7ik LordKhg, 
Life of John Locke." 
'^«»7Af Edinburgh, Rev, James Andrew^ LL. D., F. R. 8., 
'wt'lUb East India Company's Seminary at Addiscombe, and 
Hebrew Grammar and Dictionary. 

^ At Brighton, England, aged 36, Jokm Jamee Park^ Flo- 
at King's College, London. 
'^hkl^Wnd, in his 63d year, Tk. Wm, Formor, 4f4 Earl 

•^1 Ileplfoid, aged 44, 0.A. Whtdoor^M Earl tfPl^mouA. 
i L^don, In his 3?th year, Qeorge James Wdhore Jl§m 
Vi aithor ef farioue pnl^cattons. ^ ^ 

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319 FOREIGir OBITUART. [1834 

He was formerly known as Marquis of Stafford, bat was, on the 14fh of 
January, raised to a ducal coronet. '< His grace was regarded aa enjoy- 
ing one of the largest incomes in Europe, — report affirmed that it ex- 
ceeded £300,000 per annum." — JVeu> Monthly Magazine. 

Jtxly 28. — In London, in his 74 th year, WiUiam WUbetforce, one of the 
most celebrated philanthropists of modem times, and whose able, zeal- 
ous, long-continued, and ultimately successful exertions in favbr of the 
abolition of the slave-trade, have given him a high rank among the bene- 
factors of the human race. He was bom, Aug. 24, 1759, at Hull ; was edu- 
cated at St. John's College, Cambridge, where he formed an intimacy with 
William Pitt ; was elected a member of parliament for Hull in 1780 ; for 
the county of York in 1784 ; and in 1787, he brought forward a motion 
for the abolition of the slave-trade, and the question, after a long and 
laborious struggle, was finally carried during the ministry of Mr. Fos, 
June 10,1806. In 1797, Mr. Wilberforce published his celebrated « Practi- 
cal View,** a work which has been translated into most European lan- 
guages, and of which about fifty editions have been printed in Great 
Britain and America. His remains were consigned to the sanctuary ol 
tlie illustrious dead in Westminster Abbey ; and his '* funeral train in- 
cluded the great and the good of all parties." 



AMERICAN OBITUARY. — 183-;>. 

Sept. 13. — At Detroit, aged (58, the Rev. Gabriel Richard^ a CatboUc 
priest, and a man of extensive learning. He was born at Saintes in 
France; came to America after the commencement of the French Revo- 
lution ; was senCas a missionary to Illinois ; went to Detroit 4|i 1798; 
and was elected a delegate to Congress in 1823. 

Sept. 10.- At Boston,, aged 81, Major Thomas Melville, who took 
an active part in the Revolution, and formed one of the Boston ** Tea 
party." 

Oct. 13. — At Norfolk, Va., John E. Holt, nearly twenty years mayor 
of that borough. 

Nov. 14. — At Baltimore, in his 90th year, Charles Carroll of Carroll- 
ton, the last surviving signer of the Declaration of Independence. He 
was born at Annapolis, on the 20lh of September, 1737; was descended 
from a respectable Irish family ; was of the Catliolic religion, and in- 
herited a very large estate. He was sent at an early age to St. Omers to be 
educated ; thence he was removed to Rheims. Afler having studied the 
civil law in France, he passed over to London and pursued the study 
of common law at the Temple ; and returned to America at the age of 
27. He was soon known as an advocate for liberty, and as one of the 
ablest political writers of Maryland. In 1776, he was elected a delegate 

Digitized by LjOOQIC 



1834.] AMERICAir OBITUAKT. 313 



to Congress, and subscribed his name to the Declaration of Independ- 
ence. In 1778, he left Congress, and devoted himself to the councils of^ 
his native state ; in 1789, he was elected a senator in Congress ; and in 
1810, he quitted public life at the age of 64, and passed the remainder 
of his days in tranquillity, beloved and revered by his friends and neigh- 
bors, and honored by his country. ** His mind was highly cultivated. 
He was always a model of regularity in conduct, and sedateness in 
judgment. In natural sagacity, in refinement of taste and pleasures, 
in unafiected and habitual courtesy, in vigilant observation, vivacity of 
spirit and tone, susceptibility of domestic and social happiness in the 
best forms, he had but few equals during the greater part of his long 
and bright existence." See the XatUmal Gazette. 

Nov. 19. — At the city of Washington, aged GO, Philip Doddridge^ 
8 representative in Congress from Virginia ; a distinguished lawyer, 
and one of the ablest men in the body of which he was a member. 

Nov. 20. — In Saratoga county, N. Y., aged about 85, Col, James 
lAvingston, a soldier of tlie Revolution. 

At New Holland, Lancaster county. Pa., aged 103, Peter HUdC' 

krand. 

In Columbia county, Georgia, aged 110, Captain Thomas 

Cobb, a native of Buckingham county, Virginia. He removed to 
Georgia about the year 1783 ; — was an agriculturist, and an excellent 
manager of his plantation. 

Dec. IC. — At New York, in his 34th year, Robert C Sands, one of 
the editors of** The Commercial Advertiser.*' and the principal author of 
the poem ** Yamoyden." He was graduated at Columbia College in 
1815 ; was a man of genius, a scholar, and an elegant writer. 

Dec. 18. — At Freehold, N. J., aged about 80, Philip Freneau, o. poet 
of the American Revolution. He was educated at the College of New 
Jersey, at Princeton, where he was graduated in 1771. He died in con- 
sequence of losing his way and getting mired in a bog in the evening, 
where he was found lifeless the next morning. His poems, as it is 
stated in the Advertisement to the 3d edition, ^* were originally written 
between the years 17G8 and 1793 ; and were partly published in the 
transient prints of the times, and aflerwards collected into two edi- 
tions of 1786 and 1795." The 3d edition was published in 1809, 
in two volumes, under the title of " Poems written and published 
daring the Revolutionary War." 

Dec. 19. — At Boston, aged 79, Gardiner Greene, a man of great 
wealth, and president of the Branch Bank of the United States. 

Dec. 29. — At New Haven, Conn., in his 79th yeta, James HUlhousey a 

man very highly respected for his private virtues and his great and long 

continued public services. He was bom at Montville, Conn., Oct. 21, 

1754; was graduated at Yale College in 1773; afler due preparation, 

27 

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fitehMl Piind of Oonncetieiit, irhieli lie 

tiy# «niMniiBlloii of the FmnidiqfUm 
ilkoiiiB trMMnuer of Yde CoUei^ In 17891, iad 
oCee tiU his de^ih, a Uttle mora than 60 y^ksiMyim^ 
pioioote theM^teraiUofthaimititntion. '.'^ J^ 

One of the meet remarkahle mctdenUi in tim fMtkf 
eonne^on with the nati<mal legislatnra, was hi* 
Gbnsmiitton of the United SUtes, which 
April 12y 1806. He proposed a House of Reprssentati' 
bjr the people ; a Senate, the members of whioh 
in three years; and a President with powers moch 
now eommitted to that magistrate, who should' be 
amonit the Senators. 5es Mr, BmemCt «« SktlUk rf lis l^f$^ 
tif the Hon. Jamu HUJOwuttr ' '^ 

At Middletown, Conn., Rev. John M, 

Aneient Langoages in the Wesleyan Unirerai^. 

1838. 

Jan. IQ.— At Boston, aged 65, Qd, Jhnoi Bmnour l#f 
for the port of Boston. He was bom at Hall, M( 
left an ori^ian at an early age, he enterad npoh the 
Ii6i without the advantage of a single day's instmotioft 
notwithstanding his early disadvantages, he became % 
gn^, enterprise, and success in his business.' He wsa a^* 
member 'of Uie'teethodist Episcopal church, and a l&^fi^ 
pojUic and priT«le charities. 

Jin. aa^-At Pleasant HIU in Warren county. N< 
year, <H Mfleaien HMnm, the last surriTing 
I o^tlw State of North Carolina in 1776. 
^^r^r At Wairanlon, N. C. in his 64th year, Mim, 
Court of North Carolin% ,i^ 
»; and in his 86d yw^ 
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I., ll.C.,j|frf. iEZtMMkPMra,«89daboot HI., 
W^Vl^ Hiivu^ff MPM 36, Jtew BmoMm, of Bo0^^ 
, ^41 Bnlll0]^ BiUiM, in liis 66th jevy C^^ 
pM iMm at Mitfbkhaady ia 1747 ; wai •ppitnticcd to tbe 
t^flMtgo of 11 joan; reeeircd m coouaiMion at oonunodopi 
ja^rtof tho fOTolntionaiy war; and waadiatingoialiadiia^ 
ftad ■ocoeaafnl commander. He la aaid to liare beeui^ llie 
daaSl^ next to General Lafitjette, the higheat anrviTing 
^;ilio RaTolntion. 
f.|^-*'At Weai Farma, Weatcheater eonntj, N. T., aged 62, 

.{pL^T-At &T«nai of cholera, WiUiam Skaler, American 
j|(a kmg Recharged the office of Consul General at Algier8| 
HlbtlHj and firmneas in trying circumatancea, and tliar# 
^r^kotchea of Algiera," the atatementa and anggeptiona in 
^lfll^Ajffrik^^f» 9f important oie to the French govvrnmentin thair 

w4|pi(,>]^,At Candliridge, Maaa., in hb 8Sd year, Jok» HoaUr 
JMypgtj^Nfcifpr' of Law in Hanrard Univeraity. He waa bom 9i 
S^^JI^t on the 3d of July, 180O; waa gradoated a| Camhii4gt, 
S^ltl^P^' wpi appointed Frofeaaor of Xiaw in 18S9. << The honofaof 
IpJI^Mifiii^l^' *^7* ^' Jnatice Story, in hia Funenl Diaconrae, " were 
M§P| j^m||^^||Wirthily beatowed, never more meekly worn, and ne?eff 
*f ji^btened. — If we look to hia yeara, it aeema almoat 
||j^ ha ahoold haye attained ao high a diattnetion in ao short 
. Lgi it be recollected that he died before he had attained the 
j^^Mpd ibat he had gatbared aboot him all the honors, which 
^thf barfeat of the ripest life." 
^AX Hollia, N. H., aged 102, Capt. CaUp Farley. 

frfa Uwiaiana,. /a»ia4 8, Mkmsimtt a aenator of the United 

m killed by the ezploaion of the ateamhnat lioneaa 

^, oi| Had iUftr, 40 mika above Alexandria ; 14 or 15 

l^hpei^t the aame time, and many othera wounded. lfr« 

innativia of ConnccticQt, but waa taken by hia father Ji| 

;;j|fb Kii^tiio|qf«, ^ f migFnle4 to JU»9iai«na in 1604 or 16Q|| 

1! appointed a jad|ey twice el^d a repraaeniatiL^« ^ C«Qr 

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MA 1809; wu ieapp(MiiWd chidT ]iifllip« in 1881, «i»l 
m^Mndl Mitp^^d fbr hii pttblle aer^bc^'^: 
' Umj M: ^ At PHilmdelpliift, aged 80, J^Mk miM0, 
ifimm ikitoe. JaJbi MtmMj^ if BMrnAts^ i ^; 
lii^hlli, elo^iioe, and eeeentricitf. Haatri^M-fil ' 
diya before hia death, in a atate of extreme debffij^i 
6c<mI to Eofope, witii tha hope of a partial reatoNSfian 
' B» waa botn m Virginia, on the Sd of Jane; ITTSf^ 
tfflrottt Poeaiiqntaa, the daughter of Powhatan, i 
throogh ilia grandmother, whoae maiden name 
. ^iial' giloddanghter of Jane Rolfe (married to 
daoj^ter of Jolm Rolfe and Fooahontas \ ao that he 
ilion flwm Pdcahontaa. Hia father died in 1775, ^i 
ft large eatat»; and liia mother waa married in 17811^ 
Tlieker, wlio waa the guardian to Randolph dntfihg Mi 
Bandolph*a early life waa apent at diflbreiht plibei^iiUli' 
dimetors, of moat of whom he aaid he *■ narer toaiteifd'Alffj 
paaaed a ahort time at Princeton College, at OolomMia' 
IRfBfiam ind Bfiary Collc^ge, and waa a littla whOa a 
ttider Edmund Randolph. Of himaelf he retnaiki^ 
•aidafeetiVe education, I commenced politician.^' 
iaattd^«f Obngreai in 1799» and continued ti'toKsM^tW 
li|tteaMitaiitaa, with the exception oT three tnterrall af' 
fiitttef one of theae hitenrala he waa in the U. 8. 
iiiilie ina iftarwarda appmnted miniater pleidpiililttiify^ 
iilt^ Randiol^ t>aa ne^er married. Ha waa p cm i a a aad 
liiliftlii aiihiiNiniha Roanoke, and had, at thetimiliir 
liWii,.ilid-«» fcecaai^ of wMdi ibtmt 1» were hIaMi 
k taken fiom a ooliaaf tt# hini iH lll#i 

uttd' Mio^tla6ea fotaa - a-^^ 
niittfc araa dtarnaaiirt \ 
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1834.] AMERICAN OBITUARY. 317 

toever spoke without commanding the most intense interest. At his • 
first gesture or word, the house and galleries were hushed into silence 
and attention. His voice was shrill and pipe-like, hut under perfect 
command ; and, in its lower tones, it was music. His tall person, firm 
eje, and peculiarly ' expressive fingers * assisted very much in giving 
effect to his delivery. His eloquence, taking its character from his un- 
amiable disposition, was generally exerted in satire and invective ; but 
he never attempted pathos without entire success. In quickness of 
perception, accuracy of memory, liveliness of imagination, and sliarp- 
ness of wit, he surpassed most men of his day ; but his judgment was 
(eeble or rarely consulted. The measure of his capacity and his acqui- 
■ttions have been the subject of some dispute. But it is undeniable that 
he had read much and remembered every thing he had read ; and that 
he was well versed in classical literature, in English history, and espe- 
cially in the English tongue. It has often been said that he drew his 
illustrations from his common-place book. That book was his tenacious 
memory. He has been heard to say, that whatever he read in his youth 
had, in after life, come thick and fresh upon his memory ; and that his 
earliest studies had stood him in better stead, for ready quotation and 
application, than any subsequent acquisition. 

" It will not be forgotten, however, that he was capable of kindness, 
generosity, and courtesy. He was a kind master, a good neighbor, and, 
amongst his immediate constituents, was even popular. His friends 
have said that he possessed a deep vein of piety, which was, on some 
occasions, strongly developed. One of his most striking characteristics 
was, perhaps, his economy, — which he rigidly practised, and, both in 
public and private affairs, diligently inculcated. His inheritance was 
inconsiderable, and heavily incumbered with a British debt ; but, by a 
long course of economy, he relieved his estate, and acquired wealth. 
Under the shade of his patrimonial oaks, where he often indicated his 
wish to be buried, let the orator of Roanoke rest in peace." 

May 31. — At Nashville, of cholera, aged G2, Joaiah Mchol, president 
of the Branch Bank of the United States. 

May. — At St Louis, in his 4Gth year, of cholera. Col, William 
JieRee. He was a native of Wilmington, N. C. ; was educated at West 
Point 'f and was an accomplished officer. He retired from the army in 
1819, and aflerwards accepted the office of surveyor-general of Missouri. 

. At Granville, N. Y., in his 100th year, Thomas Porter, He 

was in the British army at Lake George in the year 1755 ; and officiated 
■a a judge about ten years in Vermont. 

. In Mbsouiiy Alexander Buckner, a senator in Congress from 

Missouri. 

Jane 1. — At New York, in his 74th year, Oliver WoleoU^ a native of 
Litchfield, Connecticut, the son of Oliver Wolcott, who was one of the 
27* 

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Jll»v7<itii^ to be ia tiM ncmitf «f ki»oi|i|if<e«|..^ti;: 
1 8.r-* At fikdeiB, Ma«k, Afwl 66, JMs J 
»10^-.NMr Knoxvilk, T«nattlMft| JVMiiiiiJ 
jMupift jmlgf of tlMCif^oit C««rt ia Itoli 
, JmM 13.-111 T#Bii«nM, on hmfd the 

.#iiB0<14'»*-Ia tlM poor-hoofle,, IfeQiy ooimfyvl 
* Bt^gmtk nM ^^ 3!***> *>^ ^ ^y" 9 * iMtifo of tiMiMHI 
Jvao 15. — At Churlestmii S. C.« aged eO, JMvi s 
of taknfai, ond tefHited. tbe eUeot writer in ^mi^^jil 
''anllifimtioii." «< Whotefwr diflbieaoo of opiaiwn^^ 
'^jBMjF exift aoMoig his ftUow-eiiiien» at klio aPi' 
lite iwtiliedi ^piaiMia, tbeie wlU be 9(mb aa $oJ 
•liauMl^iuiile ia dMg bomage to b$» geniwi^ J|li}i 
«B|Rl,vifliiaa/V..-. . . ^ - r . u.-..^ M^ri-J-Ji 

liuiiaiQI.^ Al Hew T«^ JSIidU rfllMmf of I 
^1^ t^-^Atr BaltiflMre» aged 91, JP. ^l^ftuft^a^n JMi^ 
* ^ JMr7;«rNear Flofeiioe» Alabwa, in hia m 
<||b»r> Jte^inwn dlalingiiiahe^ ^agper nadw 










1834] AMERICAN OBITUARY. 819 

He led U or 12 8urviving children, the oldeit 91 jetn of nge; the 
youngest 25. 

July 25. — At Knozville, aged 106 years, James Martin, a revolution- 
ary soldier. 

July 27. — At Philadelphia, in his 60th year, Commodore WUUam 
Bainhridge, a distinguished commander in the American navy. He 
was horn at Princeton, N. J., on the 7th of May, 1774, was apprenticed to 
the sea-service at an early period of life, and at the age of 19 years, rose 
to the command of a merchant vessel. In 1798, he entered the naval 
service with the rank of lieutenant. In 1800, he sailed for Algiers as 
commander of the frigate George Washington ; and in 1803, he sailed 
for Tripoli as commander of the frigate Philadelphia, in consequence ci 
the grounding of which he was captured. On the 29th of Decemberi 
1812, having the frigate Constitution under his command, he captured, 
after a severe action, the British frigate Java; and his generosity to 
the prisoners gained for him a strong expression of their gratitude. 
Since the close of the war Commodore Bainbridge has commanded, with 
great reputation and popularity, at several naval stations ; and for sev- 
eral years filled the office of a Commissioner of the Navy Board. 

July 27. -— At New York, aged 72, Felix A, OuvUre PascaUs, M. D. 

July 22. — At Nashville, Jesse Wheaton, formerly M. C. from Ten- 



July.— At Pittsburg, Pa., Bev. Charles B. Maginre, D. D. 

July. — At New York, aged 75, Colonel JVUholas Fish, an officer of 
the Revolution. 

July. — At Acworth, N. H., aged 80, CapL Samuel Bradford, an officer 
of the Revolution. 

July. — - At Burlington, N. J., aged 86, the Bev. Charles Henry Whar* 
Urn, D. D. 

July. — At Cincinnati, Ohio, Jtsse Smith, M. D., a much respected 
physician. 

August 3. — At Newbem, N. C, John Stanley, formerly a distin- 
guished member of the legislature of North Carolina and of Congress ; 
an eloquent and able debater ; greatly respected for his talents and his 
public and private character. While delivering a speech in the legisla- 
ture of North Carolina, in the session of 1826-7, he was suddenly 
arrested by an attack of the hemiplegia ; was borne out of the house in 
a helpless state, having lost the use of one side and almost the power of 
speech ; and in this painful condition he remained till his decease. 

Aug. 5. — At Newtown, near New York, aged 57, Col. George Qihbs, 
a mineralogist, and the importer of the extensive cabinet of minerals 
now in Yale College. 

August 8^— At Cincinnati, James M, Stavghton, M. D., 



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gMdf TCtpeeted Ibr liii Utentt mttd •zo^UeBt dliiriMii. ^ '^ ^ ise^li^^ ^ 
Bept.— At Deiawtra, Ohio, Jakm W. Cmm^, ^aA^^ ^^^()9$llM 
8ta«ea Diatriot C6ttrt of Oliio. '' ff" » ?A -- tfift 

HEKi^']^ At Lazkigtoii, KoD., aged T^k^Qm^A W Ul ^mllt i ^A l M i ii^ f ^K ' 
8^.-rAtGeorfetow&, D. C, in hb 87th year, tte JM^^IfgNMli^ 
AM^b;d. '■'^' •■■:..•• -.A rA.^.tW|v^ 

Sept-At Saliaboiy, N. C, LaMord JSPwdei^ii, ^iidft^ jttilil*!^ 
Nortii Gwolliia. r - v r«i> 

8^t.— At Randolph, Vt., C^iMi Eimm, oallad tiia «<ff|i|i|f^ 
tM.*» Hia weight, at the doM of hia doalli» waadaltdN ~ 
ponnda. 

#i|it. — At New OriaaiMi the. JBm. £m d« JVteliri/ D^ Sf;< 
GittHatoMkopofNa#OriaaliB« -iMiim^ 








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SEPTEMBEB, 1898. 



JNi$v%-. 



A Qmfw^im, itjlvi: ,'^ The Union an4 dtoto Righto Ckni- 
«.>,<.W|ilm|f >e^ in teM^n ^tmiI dari ^i Colambti., %'^** 
■^oiia^lb^iM^ ftfter taring 8ii1>miMaii l0m ^ ^ pji^ «< . 
. MiitjilnpC 1^^ ado^ ttkiB Mowing oniong o1^ i^t^titldte :" 
^^^Xtiii^ we depr^to ntiliifi<Utiob^ i« lboil<ti^ i^ 

i^ringJBtof , p4>^omro of the Conatitution, we would wiltihgiy and ;dofi^ 
S|))^1ttSto iritt^ oitr Mow-^itixenB of the fVee-trade aiid etate-righto 
.Jgfff. ^ tliia flpiljpy on any ground which promisee a riidifMi of out 
gypHM^Ay wit&Mit iUToMng a ^dotation of the Constitution of the 

'^jSto^df, That in case of the eonenrirenee of the iUlei of Virgin^ 
liMilf^ Georgia, Alabama, and ifienislppi>; tfiis CdaVeiitioil tf 

mtti^ rtteommend^ to the citizens of this stots to meet in ^leii^ Wff^ 
^^Wi^,wM eteet delegates to attJend a gin^rd liMtbiigonLb 
'di|mirti#%eBdd states ii^ to take ibto eott^dertitiiff flii 

\ under which we labor, and the means and measureii of i^ 



^SuqbMd, That we solemnlj pledge ourselves to adOpl^idiiibtvyf 
Cil |M|t^ ineaMr^ in rektioii tO^ our grietaiiee» ai the md 

Coiifeiitioii Uiall reeommend. 
^WidM^' That a committee of nine be appointed to correspond 
^ilft their fl^Qonreittsens of the said states, and in case of their eoneuf- 
Mi^intbb|^idpoiedoOiiTention,to giro notice of the time and placer 
ig^hMiitg tii«'sameV«ttd iz a day for the election of delegates from 
l^y il#Tertl Astricte of this state, and that a majority of the acting 
J l li pjfli Jii df itha oommfttiy be attthori«ed to supply any yacan^es |i^ 

.t!0irWiMl^ ai the same may occur." 
^^^.«'IIM^ift^iiti of Don Miguel titoiek Oporto and ai^ repu^Mtdy 

, mifMiitiiip ^dohtest, with conifderaMb foes on each side. 
^'1$:^^'ilbllk is Mveired to the Lcudoh C;k»ttf^rence, contahiing tht 

'^(MiiiiMf^Mitiial of ^ l^g of HoHand to accede to the treaty oihiwi 

^^-^Oie^HW-Fowers. 

,^1^'^HMt hpik(»ptiii6,hjjkm lfiguef,in which hi lit repulsed #Sft 

»#miofl|500nieii. Don Pedro's loss 500. 

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322 CHRONICLE OF EVENTS, 1832. [1834. 

27. A battle is fought at Galeneta, Mexico, between Gen. Monte- 
zuma within army of 5,000 men, and Gen. Bustamente with 3,500 men, 
in which the former is completely defeated. 

29. Report of the Sanatory Commission of Paris published, staUng 
the number of deaths in the city, from Cholera, between March 26 and 
August 30. to have been 18,000. 

30. The Spasmodic Cholera appears at Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Change in the Spanish Ministry. The late Prime Minister, M. 
Calomarde, is sent into exile, and M. Zea fiermudez is appointed in his 
place. 

OCTOBER. 

7. Gen. Santander inaugurated as President of New Grenada. 

7. Gen Pedraza, having been invited by Gen. Santa Anna to 
return to Mexico and assume the administration of the government, 
arrives at Vera Cruz. 

8. Otho proclaimed and installed king of Greece at the palace of 
Preysing in Bavaria. 

11. A new French Ministry formed, with Marshal Soult at its head. 

14. Treaty concluded between the United States and Naples. 

15. Earl Grey directs a circular to be sent to all the foreign ambassa- 
dors, in London, acquainting them with the resolution of the British 
Cabinet to eject the Dutch, vi et armis, from the citadel of Antwerp. 

22. Convention between France and England, signed at London, to 
carry into efiect (he Treaty relative to the Netherlands concluded Nov. 
15, 1831. 

24. The 150th anniversary of the landing of Wm. Penn is celebrated 
at Philadelphia. 

25. The Queen of Spain appointed Regent during the King's indis- 
position, and a complete change made in the Ministry. 

25. An act passes in the Legislature of South Ceu-olina, (in the Senate 
by a vote of 31 to 13, and in the House of Representatives, by a vote of 
9G to 25,) requiring a *' Convention of Delegates of the people of that 
state to assemble at Columbia on the 3d Monday of Nov., then and 
there to take into consideration the several acts of the Congress of the 
United States, imposing duties on foreign imports for the protection of 
domestic manufactures, or for other unauthorized objects ; to determine 
on the character thereof, and to devise the means of redress ; and 
further, in like manner to take into consideration such of the acts of 
said Congress, laying duties on imports, as may be passed in amendment 
of, or substitution for, the act or acts aforesaid, and also all other laws 
and acts of the government of the United States, which shall be passed 
or done for the purpose of more effectually executing and enforcioj^ 
the same." 



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in Swedw ill hoiM^ df GiwtaT^ 4d9lj^pt^^. 

IpCoonbil k|rabiU»c|]B««lli« I^^ 
W^ Diiteli vMNb. 

foi Berri, who l^id Humtmn tim baeii nuddnff 6ffor|ii 

in tli(B wMtotn depMrtinei^f of Fmnoe in fkri9f of 

— In the doomn«nte aftierwmrds pQUiab94 ill tolp^Qfll 

WM m deeUur^on^ made hy Dr. Deneoz, her /^#4»n|jiT 

■be WM Uie lawfiil wife cmT Count Luoheei PmlU, eon of 

Plin^ of Campo Franco. 

Aaili-'ftoiff Convention meete at M iUedgeTille, Georgia, coi^ 

19(1 delegates. 

IVeneli armj (75,000) under Manhal GenCrd enten Belgium, 
fleetly forward and encamped before Antwerp ; and hoe- 
on the 90thy by the Dutch garrieon firing on the 

^tion of Mount Etna. The town of Bronte, imm»- 

inhahitanta, destroyed, but with the loss of few liVes. 

npt i|i made to assassinate the King of fVaiiee. 

^^JtWi^kh Chambers commence their session. 

"J^IjICSm^^ of Delegates of the sUte of South Carolina w- 

and pass an Ordhumee (by a rote of 136 to fK, to 

the 1st of February, 1833, unless the acts of Congress 

on imports should be repealed), declaring and ordain- 

soTetal acts and parts of acts of the Congress of the 

purporting to be laws for the imposing of duties and 

We^ importal^si of foreign commodities, and now haying 

and effect within the United States, and more espe- 

>a^aci entitled an act in alteration of the seTeral acts imposing 

hn^OTts approTod on the 19th of M^y, 1828, and also as act 

' lidl io alter and amend the sereral acts imposing duties on 

on the 14th of July, 1833,* are unauthorised by the 

of the United States, and Tiolate the true meaning and 

and are null, yoid, ^d^ho law, nor binding upon this 

or eitisens ; and all promises, contracts, and obligi* 

'teii catered into, or to be made or entered into will 

Ifr eseiire the duties imposed bjr the said acts, and dl j» 




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The UiUTerrft^ of Warsaw, efip«p| 
«atS tlieolog7y kaboliahedy and the lihraiy an^ 
0)iered to be tranipofted to St Petenbnrg. 

80. A Ihrmal ■ominona ia made by Marihal 
IkfOMei aadEfiend, diat Antwerp ahoiild.be.delb 
lih ptomijpay reMid by Oen. Chaas^. The batch 
MBM da^ fto^i the Qudel, and. war commenoei. 

DECEMBER. 

S. The Britiih Parliament ia diasoWed, aild a ftew 
ed to meet on the 99th of Janaary . 

8. The 8d feanon of the 2dd CongreM of the XI. B,] 
*'■' 6. Otho leayea Munich to take posaeieion of the aovei 

10. President Jackson isstt^ his ProcUmation, 
Q|0 CoQStitatiQii and laws applicable to the meaaoMS 
OoiiTentioa of South CaroUuAy end to the reaso^ jnilj 
illfKf^ decltring the course which duty wiU re^^iire luiii .to, 
, flfpaMng the people el 8. C. of the consequeh^ wM<^f 
^fjpi Ihe obeemiice of the dictates of the GonTecjiUeii^ 
Vj^^^^^^^ Union and State l^hts !hi^^ 

^ epeipiile »t CnliiBibiiu 

,^A?iim^ i&d Commerce oon^ljo^ 

^4Eii|W,)0f jBouth CaroUna, afiee4»ll^ to^ 

'i^^,.fiMj^timi- in! Mvww |o:^^. " 





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1834.] CHROMCLE or ETENT8, 1832. 325 

24. Baron ChaaB^, aAer a brave resistance of 20 days, tiinenders the 
Citadel of Antwerp to the French, with 3,467 troope. The number of 
metres of trenches thrown up by the French was 14,009. The number 
of wounded G1K> ; of killed 108. The rounds of ammunition fired by 
the artillery, (J3,000. 

2d. John C. Calhoun resigns the office of Vice-President of the Unit- 
ed Stotes. 

1833. 
JANUARY. 

12. Gen. Santa Anna enters the city of Mexico. 

14. The Missionaries imprisoned in the Georgia Penitentiary, for 
remaining, contrary to a law of the state, on the territory of the Chero- 
kee Indians, discharged from prison. 

15. A Bill for distributing the proceeds of the public lands passes in 
the Senate of the U.S., — yeas 24, nays 20. — It passed the Mouse of 
Representatives, March 1st, (yeas 9C, nays 40;) but it did not receive 
the signature of the President. 

16. President Jackson communicates a Message to Congress, laying 
before it the acts and proceedings of South Carolina, giving information 
respecting the measures which he has already taken for the collection 
of the revenue, and suggesting such further measures as he deems 
necessary. 

17. Mr. O'Connell's National Council meets at Dublin, Ireland; 29 
members of Parliament present. 

26. Afler an animated and prolonged debate in the legislature of 
Virginia upon the Federal Relations of the States, various resolutions 
are adopted, and Benjamin Watkins Leigh is appointed Commissioner, 
to proceed immediately to South Carolina in order to communicate them 
to the Legislature of that state. 

29. Meeting of the British Parliament. Charles Manners Sation 
elected Speaker of the House of Commons, by a vote of 241 to 31. 

FEBRUARY. 

6 Otho 1, King of Greece, arrives at Napoli di Romania, and on the 
7th issues a Proclamation to the Greeks in which he states, that he is 
called among them by the confidence of the high mediating powers, 
and by their free sufirages, and (hat he ascends the throne to fulfill the 
engagements he contracted, on accepting the crown ; and he promises 
to protect their religion, to maintain the laws, to administer Impartial 
justice to all, and to preserve their independence, liberties, and rights. . 

12. Centennial celebration of the settlement of Georgia at Savannah. 

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to ilni|i| ; fil]»hin to Kihnoro ; KiUala to Toial^^ 
Qoiicto C^Bo; Waterftcd to Cnbol ; OMMjr itoltj 
0iHldi9«^^9. A guwml tax on sll biahopiiety 
MBly^to bolmpoied tmiiiedifttely.— 4. An' 
tho fiidiopiio of Deny, and a proapootlTe rednetlQftl 
in addition to ^ tax ; tlie amount to bo p^ to 
Vnad. — 'K.B. Tbo not incomMi of all tho 
Ivdand amoont to £ 130^000. The plan will affeet a 
:£60,000. — 5. An inunediato tax on all benefioee, ftWr, 
pH Aontin Men of fifat^fruita, which are hwreaflsr to* 
wider X900 to be exempt^ and. the tax to bo giadi 
the. Yidoe. Total laeome of paroohial elergj nndef iEci 
dtoMtion 9i mmamrt ^HgmtiUf and the appropriation af 
to a general fund. — 7. Commianonen to be appointed to 
Aipd and applj It, f*- let, to ordinary ehuroh oeai ; 
tiott of poor living!, asaiitance in building glebe 
aiding imioiiiy &o.-— 8. Commiaaionera to have the 
annt of Privy Ihe Council, of dividing and alteriaf Mm(^ 
9i» JJaOf where no duty hea been performed, n^. 
IhitTOlMi M<B«9'tho ?a«ri^ <^ the act; 
to KHptn d ^pototment (if in the gift of Grown or 
pmii t x im^mm^ iww4> — l^ Tenanta of biahopif 
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ijipA (iiiii^^ III wtlim 
;ii^tMitt«aiilprBffl (Mr. Cky'ii) pwM te Hmm of B^pnMM. 

^Wfi^ektBimk hnakM out at Havwia; aad oa Ola aOth af lil^ 

■ ^^^-.y. MARCH. '> 

\ new TtttfT BUI paaMf in the Senate of the United Btatea;^ 

p IM^ 16j and if ngned by the President 
'4^,Bn Ibr eoUeeting the reTenoe caHed the ** enfiwcing Billi'' 
' iyba ildiiee of RepreeentatiTee of the United Btatei:— yeaa 

' \%lMnmttfy eoU weather. The thermometer fUle al BoaloiiVto 
H i||tiae bi^bw eypheri mueh lower than on any preoedinf diqr dnilig 

r Jaekeon inaugarated Pretident, and Ifertia Tan BnreQ 
, efthe United BUtei. 
Conrention of Sooth Carolina aeeembley aii4 on Ao 
I hairiag paiio d two Ordinance!. The jSnt repeaip Ihe nidfi- 
' I ol the preceding NoTember, and the lawa pawed 
l^lti»^0Mu9 hi ponoance thereof (excepting that relating to the 
"Tift aeoond is an " Ordinance to nnUify the act of Congress ol 
:|i(il|ijiai fbrther to provide for the collection of duties on im- 
, called the « enforcing bill.' " 
i^JfS^ ibr tha snppresnon of Lotteries in Blaasachnsetta, haying 
*^ If Ihe legislature, approTcd by the governor. 

Ifiu^ Anna elected Presideiit,,and Facias Vipe-Pmident, 

of the Treasory Department al Washingtoii bamt. 
APRIL. ^. 

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14. Greet fire at Gamberlaad, Md. ; 71 di 
«eli||nledet$871>XN). 

SO? Doa Gerloe, brother of the KUif of 8petA| 
iueee to the PrinoeM of Aetoriae. . ^^ ,^v 

^9. The fimndetion etoiie o( the fint Protestaat '^ ~ 
mfwt buStt ia Perie, IVaaee, ie laid. 
' it6. The B^lieh BItiiietry, being defeated on a notki|l 
do^ on malt, tender their reiignations, whieh are aioi 

30. Fire in Mew Torki 70 houaeejmmt. 

. MAY. 

L Meeting of the Britldi and Foreign Hble Sooie^'JlB 
Inoome of the Society daring the year preceding JtilSjit 
Teetamente dietriboted 536,811 ; — making a total aiiiie 
arthe8odetyef8445^. v 

t-1 Fbtr ia Beaton lor the benefit of the l^imm\ 

I ^ % Aaaaidt on Preddent Jaokaon by Lieot Raad^^ .?rC. i, 
Vi^ iPhe Her. E. K. Anery brought to trial, at Nen^poitiy 1 
pnider ct Sarah M. ComeU. — The ^el eontinned Oft W^ 
j|j|«flra iM<diet of aefaittel wae r|Bndered by the jjiaitf. 
'^ iite^d< ifae Aiiierleaa BOble Society. — laeoioii 
|J03ft; Bibiee and Teetattealaiicli"^ 
^ Aft Ati^illcii of the Sd^«^ erl;i 
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18d4.] CRftONICL'B OF KVENT8, 1833. 3^ 

the condition of the negroes, as may combine their welfare with the 
interests of the proprietors. — 2. That it is expedient that all children 
bom afler the passing of any Act, or who shall be under the age of six 
years at the time of passing any Act of Parliament for this purpose, be 
declared free, — subject, nevertheless, to such temporary restrictions as 
may be deemed necessary for their support and maintenance. — 3. That 
all persons now slaves be entitled to be registered as apprenticed labor- 
en, and to acquire thereby all the rights and privileges of freemen, sub- 
ject to the restriction of laboring under conditions and for a time to be 
fixed by Parliament, for tlieir present owners. — 4. That to provide 
against the risk of loss which proprietors in bis Majesty's colonial pos- 
sessions might sustain by the abolition of slavery, his Majesty be en- 
abled to advance, by way of loan, to be raised from time to time, a sum 
not exceeding in the whole, jC 15,000,000, [afterwards raised to 
JC 20,000,000,] to be repaid in such manner and at such rate of interest, 
as shall be prescribed by Parliament. — 5. That his Majesty be ena- 
bled to defray any such expense as he may incur in establishing an 
efficient stipendiary magistracy in the colonies, and in aiding the local 
legislatures in providing for the religious and moral education of the 
negro population to be emancipated." 

** The apprenticeship it is proposed should last 12 years, and the ap- 
prentice is to be entitled to all the rights of a freeman. He is to work 
10 hours a-day, 7i| for his master, and 2^ for himself, for which last he 
is to be entitled to wages. It is for this one-fourth of his time that the 
fifteen millions, which will in all probability turn out to be a gift to the 
planters, are to be advanced. The master is to be deprived of the right 
of flogging his slave. With regard to children under six years of age, 
it is proposed that they should be maintained by their parents, or if not, 
that they should become apprentices to the masters of their parents, the 
males till 24, and the females till 20, in consideration of food, clothing, 
and education." — Tail's EULinburgh Magazine. 

15. Great rise of the Hudson and other streams. 

16. Gen. Santa Anna inaugurated President of Mexico. 

19. Loss of the steam-boat Lioness on Red River, and 16 persons 
killed, and among them J. S. Johnston, U. S. Senator. 

20. A preliminary Treaty (afterwards ratified) is signed by the Pleni- 
potentiaries of England, France, and Holland, by which the English 
and French embargoes are to be taken off. The interconrse of the 
respective parties is to assume the same posture as before the French ex- 
pedition of November last, and the services of the French and English 
•qoadrons are to be dispensed with. The Dutch garrison of Antwerp, 
prisoners of war, are to be sent home. The armistice between Holland 
and Belgium is to be continued till the settlement of a permanent aepa» 
rmtion. The navigation of the Scheldt in the mean time ie to remihi 

as* 

Digitized by VJVJV^'V H^ 



380 CBAOinCLB OF EVBlfTB, 1833. (1831. 

free, and that of the Meuae la to be opened, aubjeet to the tariff settled 
by the treaty of Mayence. 

21. Lord Althorp bringa forward, in the Britiah Parliameat, the Bill 
for recharteringr the Bank of England. The terma on whash the charter 
was renewed contain the following proriiiiona : — '' 1. That the 
Charter of the Bank be renewed for 21 yeara, subject to this eoaaidera- 
tion, — that if at the end of 10 yeara the then existing government 
should so think fit, they may give twelve months* notice to the Bank 
that it is their intention the Charter should expire at the end of the 
eleventh year. — 2. No banking company consisting of more than mx 
partners shall issue notes payable on demand in the metropolian ot 
within sixty-five miles thereof. Banking companies consisting of a 
greater number of partners than six, carrying on buaineaa at a greater 
distance than sixty-five miles from London, shall have the right to drair 
bills on London, without restriction as to their amount, and to iasoe 
notes payable in London.*' 

JUNE. 

1. The cholera breaks out at Lexington, Ren. : deaths by it from 
June 1 to August 1, 5tl2. 

6. President Jackson commences his tour to the North-eastern 
SUtes. 

13. Mr. Charles Grant brings forward, in the British Parliament, the 
following Resolutions, proposed by government for the renewal of the 
East India Charter: — ^* 1. That it is expedient that all his Majesty's 
aubjecta should be at liberty to repair to the porta of the empire of 
China, and to trade in tea, and in all other productions of the said emr 
pire, subject to such regulations as Parliament shall enact for the pro- 
tection of the commercial and political interests of this country. — 
-2. That it is expedient that, in case the East India Company shall 
transfer to the Crown, on behalf of the Indian territory, all assets and 
claims of every description belonging to the said Company, the Crown, 
on behalf of the Indian territory, shall take on itself all the obligations 
of the said Company, of whatever deacripiion; and the said Company 
ahall receive from the revenues of the said territory, such a sum, and 
paid in such a manner, and under such regulations, as Parliament ahall 
enact. 3. That it is expedient that the government of the British posses- 
sions in India be inti;psted to the said Company, under auch conditions 
and regulationa as Parliament ahall enact for the purpose of extending 
the commerce of this country, and of securing the good government, 
and promoting the moral and religious improvement, of the people of 
India." The Company are to retain the government of India for a fixed 
term of twenty yeara ; an additional Presidency is to be establiahed in 
■the north-western distriets, now included in the jurisdiction of ths 
JSengal Preaidency ; and a body of Commissioners are to be aent to 

Digitized by V3V7V-JV H^ 



1834.] CHRONICLE OF EVENTS, 1833. ZSk 

Canton to watch over and protect BriUih interests in the place of tth^ 
Company's Factory. All distinction between Europeans and the nft- 
tives is to be removed, and both subjected to the same laws. Instead 
of discouraging the settlement of natives of Britain in India, according 
to the narrow policy hitherto adopted, such settlement is to be pro- 
moted. There is to be a new Presidency for the Western Provinces, and 
two suffragan Bishops are to be appointed to assist the Bishop of Cal- 
cutta. 

18. The Spanish Cortes assemble for the purpose of swearing alls- 
giance to their future Queen, the Princess of Asturias. 

18, 19. Insurrection at Para, Brazil. 

20. Capt. Charles Napier is appointed Admiral of Don Pedro's fleet, in 
place of Sartorius resigned. The Count de Saldanha succeeds to the 
command of the army. 

24. Villa Real attacked and taken by Don Pedro's forces. 

JULY. 

3. Naval battle between the fleet of Don Pedro, undar the command 
of Admiral Napier, and that of Don Miguel, in which the latter are 
defeated with the loss of 2 ships of 74 guns, a frigate of 56, a storeship 
of 48, and 2 smaller vessels. 

4. The comer-stone of Girard College at Philadelphia is laid. 

6. Attack upon Oporto by the army of Don Miguel, which is repelled 
with great loss. 

16. I'he corner-stone of the University of New York is laid. 

22. A Bill to remove the Civil Disabilities of the Jews passes to a 
3d reading in the English House of Commons by a vote of 189 to 52; 
but it is lost in the House of Lords (July 20) by a vote of 104 to 54. 

24. Lisbon surrenders to the troops of Don Pedro uuder the com- 
mand of the Duke of Terceira. 

26. The East India Company Charter Bill passes in the House of 
Commons, England. 

30. The Irish Church Reform Bill (having, July 8, passed in the 
House of Commons by a vote of 274 to 94) passes in the House of 
Lords, Eng., by a majority of 54. 

AUGUST. 

29. The British Parliament prorogued aAer a long, laborious, and 
important session. By the King's Speech it appears that the govern- 
ment of Donna Maria of Portugal has been fully recognised by that of 
England. Some of the important measures of this session, enumerated 
in the Kings Speech, are the renewal of the Charter of the Benk of 
England, the adjustment of the Afiairs of the East India Company, with 
the opening of the China trade, the Abolition of Slavery in the Biftish 
Colonies, the Reform of the Irish Church, and amendm^nXa i£ Vki%\iim * 

Digitized by V3VJV-fVH^ 



TWENTY-THIRD CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES. 

The Congrress of the United States consists of a Senate and House 
of Representatives, and must assemble^ at least, once every year, on 
the first Monday of December, unless it is otherwise proyided by law. 

The Senate is composed of two members from each state ; and of 
course the present regular number is 48. They are chosen by the legis- 
latures of the several states, for the term of six years, one third of them 
being elected biennially. 

The House of Representatives is composed of members from the 
several States, elected by the people for the term of two years. The 
representatives are apportioned among the different states according to 
population ; and the 23d Congress was elected in accordance with an 
act of Congress of 1832, one representative being returned for every 
47,700 persons, computed according to the rule prescribed by the 
Constitution. The present regular number is 240 representatives, 
and 3 delegates. 

The pay of the members of both houses is 58 a day, and $ 8 for every 
twenty miles' travel in going to and returning from the seat of govern- 
ment 

Senate. 

The figure! denote the expiration of the terms of the Senators. 



Maine. 
Peleg Sprague, 
•Ether Shepley, 



1835 
1839 



JVetc Hampshire. 

Samuel Bell, 1835 
Isaac Hill, 1837 

Vermont. 
Samuel Prentiss, 1837 
•Benj. Swift, 1839 

Massachusetts. 
Nath'l Silsbee, 1835 
tDaniel Webster, 1839 

Fhode Island. 

Nehe.R. Knight, 1835 
t Asher Robbins, 1839 

Connecticut, 
Gid. Tomlinson, 1837 
•Nathan Smith, 1839 

Jiew York. 
Silas Wright, 1837 
•N.P.Tairmadge,1839 

J{ew Jersey. 
T. Frelinghuysen 1835 
•8. L. Southard, 1839 



Pennsylvania. 
Wm. Wilkins, 1837 
One vacancy. 

Delaware. 
John M.Clayton, 1835 
t Arnold Naudain,1839 

Maryland. 
E. F. Chambers, 1837 
•Joseph Kent, 1839 

Virginia. 

Wm. C. Rives, 1835 
John Tyler, 1839 

JVbrfA Carolina. 
Bedford Brown, ia35 
Wm.D.Mangum,1837 

South Carolina, 
J. C. Calhoun« 1835 
Steph. D. Miller, 1837 

Georgia. 
Geo. M. Troup, 1835 
John Forsyth, 1837 

Jllabama. 
Wn. a. KiBg^ 1635 
Gabriel Moore, 1837 



Mississippi. 
Geo. Poindexter, 1835 
One vacancy. 

Louisiana. 

G.A.Waggaman, 1833 
One vacancy. 

Tennessee. 
Hugh L.White, 1835 
FeluE Grundy, 1839 

Kentucky. 
George M. Bibb, 1835 
Henry Clay, 1837 

Ohio. 
Thomas Ewing, 1837 
•Thomas Morris, 1839 

Indiana. 
Wm. Hendricks, 1837 
t John Tipton, 1839 

Illinois. 

J. M. Robinson, 1835 
Elias K. Kane, 1837 

Missouri. 

tTh. H. Benton, 1889 
One vaeancff. 



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*Hoiiteii,I B.Vaii MaUenberff. H.A 
*Ii«^irill, Edward Potto, David, jr. 
■^mitiafUm. A. *RaiiMej, BJAnl 
^Jobnaon, X. 
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liawia]ioa,C.W. 

Lay, Geo. W 
I^M'Vaan. Ch. 

fiCann^Ahgaii, 
•Mattijidale.H. 
^MitehaU, Henry 

^Page, Slianiiaii 
Pieraon, Job 
'Seidell, Dudley 
Tbylor,Wm. 
*Terrell,Joel 
*Vaiiderpoo]y A. 
'Waid^ Aaron 
Wa»d««llJ>aniel 
*Wiialon.Kenben 
Wkite, Oundb.P. 
Whittabay,Fred. 



•Wiaa, 

MrthSmfOm 

Barriagab D»L 

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Sotherland. J. B. 
Wegener, D. B. 
Watmoogh, J. G. 

JMemara. 
aiilUgaByJohnJ. 

*CarDiiehael33. 
^Dannie, ii. P. 
Franeia» Thomaa 
*Heatli, Jamee P. 
*Jolinaon,Wm.C. 
*MoKim« laaao 
•Stoddard. J. T. 
"Tomer, Ji 



*»- •DIokeraoB, P. 

mW^yf^ *Fowler, BamMl 
-/^ *Liae, Tlmnaa 
h9^X •fwfceri Jamea 

*pi^ini, Wm. N. 




Virgkna, 

*Allen,John,J. 
Areher, Wm. 8. 
*Beale, Jamea U. 
BoaldlB, Tb. T. 
Ciaibtmie, N. H. 
CbinttfJ. W. 
DaTenport, Tb. 
'"Foltaa, JobnH. 
'GbelMn, J. H. 
pSorden. Wm. P» 
J.B..*L€7aIl,Geo. 
•Lnoaa, Edw. 
•M^Gomi^Wiii. 



iUiama,Lewia 

Bbk, Jamea 

uvru^ wanwi'Mri 

Felder,JobnM; 

«aiiayeoa,WmJ. 

Otiflui, Jobn K. 

M*Daffie»Oeo. 

*Pinekiiey,S.IiJ 

•SiiigletoatT.D. 

Gaeryia. 
Clayton, A. 8. 
•Ceibe,Job& 
Footer, T.M. 
•Gamble, SL L. 
•Gilmore. G. R. 
Jonea, Seaborn 
•Sebley, Wm. 
Wayne, J. IC 
Wlldir,».H. 



^.■... 



-;?# 75 <y. 







thift; .t^.n 



kit. ' 














CORRECTIONS AND aBdITIONS. 



Page 103. — Senators and Repreientatiyes in CoD^eas from 1789 to 
1833; corrected, not "copied" from the Treasurer's Accounts. — The 
reader is requested to make the following corrections in this list 

N. H. For Sherburne, J. S. (D. '96) read Sherhume, J. S. (D. 70.) 

Mass. For Allen, Samuel C. (D. '34), read Mfn, Samuel C. {D. '94.) 
After Brown, Benjamin, insert Bruce, Phineas, (Y. '80) 1803-05. For 
Lee, Silas, ( H. '84) 17J)9 - 10, read Ue, Silas, (//. '84) 1799 - 1801. For 
•t Paris, A. K., read * Paris, A, K. 

Con. For Burrows, Enoch, 1821 -21, read Burrow, Enoch, 1821-23. 
For •Griswold Roger, read *\Griswold, Roger . For •Plant, David, read 
PlarU, David. 

N. Y. For *Marcy, Wm. L. (Br. '08) 1831-37, read *Marey, W. i. 
(Br. '08) ia31-32. — Dele Hard, Gideon. For Port Jonathan, read 
Post, JonaUtan. For Whittlesey, F. (Y. 18) 1823-31, read WhitUesey, 
F. 1831-33. 

Pa. For Denny, Harman, read Denny, Harmar. For Green, James, 
read Green, htnis. For Wurt, John, read li'urtx, John. 

Md. For Van Murray, William, read Vans Murray, William. 

Va. For Tazewell, Littleton W. 1824-37, read Tazewell, Littleton 
W. 1^24 - 32. 

N. C. For Conner, H. W. (C. '12), read Conner, H. W. (5. C. '12) 
— i. e. the College of South Carolina. 

S. C. For tCulhoun, J. C. (Y. '74) &c., read Calhoun, J. E. (P. 74) 
1801-2, and ] Calhoun, J. C. (F. '04) 1832-5. For Gist, Joseph, 
1421-27, read Ght, Joseph, 1821-27. 

Georgia. For Wayne, James W. 1829-30, read Wayne, James M. 
1829 -3;J. 

Indiana. For "Ilendiicks, W. (Pa. '10), read "^ Hendricks, W. {Jeffer- 
son Col. y Pa., '10.) 

Page 124. — As the Table giving the number of Representatives in 
Congress from the several States, contains some errors, it is here re- 
printed. 





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9; In Ifl93, an J in 18;©, 340.' 



Pfl^e ia3. — i?o^fr B. Taney, late Attorney- General, has been 
recently appointed by the President, Secretary of the Treasury, instead 
of Wm. J. Duane ; and Peter V. Daniel, of Richmond, Va., imi been 
appointed Attorney- General. 

Digitized by Google 



336 CORRECTIONS AND ADDITIONS. 

Pojg% 129. — Commodore Isaac Chauncey has been appointed a Com- 
Biiflsioner of the Navj Board instead of dominodore Stewart. 

Pages 130 and 131. — Benjamin Tappan has been appointed Judge of 
the District Court of Ohio, instead of Judge Campbell deceased ; and 
WUliam M. Gtoin, Marshall of the District of Mississippi, instead of 
S. W. Dicks. 

Page 134. — The Rt. Hon. Charl^ Richard t^aughany is Envoy Extra- 
ordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary in the U. ti., having retarned to 
this country from his late visit to England. 

Page 14!). — The Philadelphia Library contains 42,000 volumes in- 
stead of 35,000, as stated in some copies of this volume. 

Page 152. — The Rev. Ritfus Babeock has been appointed President 
of Waterville College. The 2d vacation in this college, from the last 
Wednesday in Nov., is nine weeks. 

Page 157. — The Rev. George Busk has been appointed Professor of 
Divinity in Dartmouth College. 

Page 158. — William A. Palmer has been reelected Governor, and 
Lebbeus Edgerton^ Lieutenant-Governor, of Vermont for the year begin- 
ning on the 2d Thursday in Oct. 18;)3. 

Page ICO. — The Bcv. John Wheeler has been appointed President of 
the University of Vermont ; and the Rev. Dr. Marsh, who was President 
and Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy, has resigned ths 
presidency, but retains the professorship. 

Page 213.— The Presidents of Washington College : — Rev. Wm. 
Graham, elected in 1780, retired in 171»5 : — Rev. George Baxter, D. D., 
elected in 17D8, resigned in 1821) : — Louis Marshall, M. D., elected in 
1630. 

To the notice of Hampden-Sydney College it may be added that it 
wta founded in 1773, and was incorporated in 1784. 

Succession of Presidents. 

B«T. 9ainne1 SUnhone Smith, J774 to 17791 Rev. Azah Alexander, D. D., 1779 " IWC 
R«T. John Blair Smith, 1779 " 1789 Rev. Mosei Ho^, I). I)., 1807 " 1390 

PruidenUpro Umpore, 1789 ** 17971 Jonathan P. Cashing, A. M., Id21 

Faculty in 1833. 

Jonathan P. Ciwhing, Prendcmt, I Albort L. Hollada/, Prqf. Langmagn. 

Peter McViccar, Prtf. of Mathematic». | William L. Harris, Tutor, 

The college library contains about 5,000 volumes ; the philosophical 
apparatus and the chemical ore extensive and valuable. Students in 
the four college classes in 18:W, 08; and G in the preparatory depart* 
ment. The average number of students, during the last 15 years, has 
been about 100 ; sometimes the number has amounted to 100. 

Page 243. — For " Matthew Bumhard, 3d do." read •* Matthew Bnr- 
eharcl, 3d do." 

Pages 246, 2CAjand 2(>2. —The time of the CommencemeiU of Kenyon 
College has lately been altered to tlie 1st Wednesday in August. There 
is hereafter to be but one vacation, which is to continue 12 weeks from 
Commencement. 

Page 205. The Rev, J. B, Pureell has been consecrated Bishop of 

Cincinnati. 



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REPOSITORT 



irSBFUL KNOWLEDGE, 



■ *; .V 






FOR THE YEAE 






1835. 



r-jSA 



BOSTON: 
i>I>lVHBD BT CHABI.K8 BOWIM. 



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Entered according to act of Congress, in the jear 1634, 

Br Charles Bowkn, 

in the Clerk's office of the District Court of the District of Bfassachusettit. 



C ▲ MBRI DO k: 

CHARLES F0L80M, 

PriotMT to th« UniTsnitx. 



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1 « ijo ii *m toll I [ bilnori^^^s tiiidSh 

•%ip ^^lll^i ^ii• MOMfr in HfitoH 1^ AiMteaH i«iiiiiMi^-«iii 

I m Mooimgtt li eofiChrnktiott of th^ #orib 'IM ii- 
1 daptitniMii has again beeii prepared by &• T. MmI, 
l||»|i» i>>qie FfelwiBafy Obeerfaltoiia we wotid reiiiryMiiea- 
^ fipiaaatioM., flueli wplanaliMy lemariw In lehtiap t»lhie 
I whkh are treated e^ will Ve fbttod in 
IP||iefyMi«e]«ne^ae render it ttBBeceMury tei 



.' 1iy^«tt^|e6ti' li^ieh kave received the most attendim in due vol- 
tiy^ li^ ianka and the Periodical Presa ; bat in addition to theae^ 
dlliii>«ritf ki feund a ▼arie^ of niaoellaneoaa mattery together 
wtttiMnaaal register of the general and etnle gewfemftMtab^ * 

Peiiodieal Pablieationa of Tariooa deacriptiona hare, within a 
Ihw xeaia» increased with surprising rapidity ; but from the 
^^iMBeral character of a great part of these prodoctions, as well 
as ftoBi their nombery it is impossible to give an accnrate aceonnt 
of liMMB for anj aasignable time, as some are constantly starting 
kilo exiatence, and others are disappearing. With respect to a 
§9w of the states, oor, efforts to obtain information have not been 
attended with the aocceos that we coold wish ; yet the volanie will 
be ftnnd to contain moch information on thia snbject ; and in the 
ne«l^ we hope to give fhrther notices in relation to those statea, 
wUafc have least justice done them in this. 

It lean midertaldng of no small labor and difficulty to render 
^ec|Hite e work, which treats of such a variety of mattersy many 
of then ecustantly changiug, and which embracea such amnhi- 
fM^ eriict% as the American Almanae. The beat efbrta to 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



IV 



PKXFACI. 



obtain authentic information will sometimes prove iaeffisctaal ; the 
best guides that can be found will sometimes lead astray ; and 
one will sometimes copy errors which he has no means of detect- 
ing. It has been our endeavor to give to every matter that comes 
within the plan of the work a correct and fair representation^ un- 
biased by local or party prejudice ; and we always receive with 
gratitude the friendly assistance of those who are so kind as to 
furnish us with the means of correcting errors or supplying 
defects. 

In the next volume, in addition to the usual variety of miscella- 
neous matters, and a further notice of some topics that are left 
incomplete in this, we purpose to give a view of the ecclesiastical 
statistics of the different religious denominations in the United 
States, together with the number of clergy, the prolusion made 
for their support, &c., and also an account of some of the most 
important benevolent institutions and societies, which form so 
prominent a feature in the modern movements and state of society. 

Cambridge^ Massaehumts, 
October 10, 1834. 



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•BdI<MtftBll««rPlMM,U.S. 96 

OAL£MDAE$— JuMtfyaM. . . 3» 
IjrtiiMiirtfftlwBMtt .. • , U 



« 
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AnMimit piMM of 98 FiMd Stan 
llMiMti •f iIm Iteiwit of Mwevy 
Dr, TooBi's X«llr»etioM 



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r«iA«lh«rTakM 
^ att, or. 8., dMMd 

&iitiSUIk%Ua •€* tte MMUlitj'iB 
^ _,,filiow CooatriM In Bwope 91 

#|lkMlM LitMston « . .97 



PABT II. 

MtfeUAAVBOvi DarAmninr. 

^ Fofaisp BaalBi mmI OwMsay, 



Fofain Bt „ 
5. BtMUBboat ExplotioM 
e. AfrioollBrawMimHtJ 

7. PonetMlhT orOoMnl W« 

8. Dr. FnukBii*! Moral Cods 

9. Mt.MBummHrnnnkBonJh 



C7nTa» Btatbi. 



«ihit Qot 



9* Mmmmiamwkk] 



. . 1S5 

. . .130 

. . 136 

.138 

Ntttow 141 

. . 143 

. . 145 



8. FinanoM of the Unitod 

9. Commeroe . • 

10. OpentioM of the Mint 

11. BilbrolathictoGoldaft 
19. Tablo of Gold CoIm 
IS. Btatistiotl TaUaa 



ImpimvAL Statu. 



1. 

M. 

1. 
4.- 

7. 

a. 



MnrllMipiUra 
V i ipaop t 

IfiMMkdHMtttf 

llMde Island 
OraoocUeiit - . 

Fmaaflfaoia 



IfaDryiaiid 
IMIiOi 



. 1681 

164 

.^67 



183 

> 187 



914 

.916 



KSMih 



997 



15. Goorgia 

16. AlaUma . . 

17. Miauwippi . 

18. Lomaiana 

19. TeBooaMO 

90. Kantneky 

91. Ohio . . . 
'99. Indiaaa • 

S3. IlUnoia 

94. Miaaooii 

95. DiatrietoTColiMibla 

96. Florida Ttefritory . 

97. MiehigaaTaRitory 

98. Afkaama Tanitory 



US 

,M4 

194 



145 
146 
150 

m 

m 

156 



981 



Ml 
.915 

948 
.951 

951 



l.TMaori 

Ik Oaviiraon of the Sataral Statia, *e. 906 



4.Tlwaiafla 



a and Salary, *e. 960 

lianiaa . . 961 

961 



H * CMadieal awl La w BalMala 
. «. CMkMb hi ttn OTaitad SiMaa 

€> ▼•eaaaoa4a Oollafaa . 

9l glU aa wt • B p l aaa p a l Chwek 
19. jlnhif Ihjl IjiJMiiiirChawli 



It' Bpiaaapai Chi 
I^CaanlChw 
hwallaOhanh 



Umvaa Statbi. 

Nawipapara pnhliahad in 1775 
Nawapapara pobliafaad in 1810 
Paitodieal Joarnab hi 1634 . 
Agrienltaral Nawqwpani 
Tamparaneo Nawapapan • 
Baligiooa Nawapapara . 
964^ 18. Banfca .... 
*^ Ganaral Tlaw of Btoaka 



.8.,lBim0 967 



SaoMnary of SlaU Banka . 

Dapoait Banka 

Bank of tha Unitad Btataa 



Baam AmmeAir Vm&ftwmm 800 

' ~ an 

. an 

810 



^"'SSftfiSSI*^ 



FoialfliO 
AaMman 



Obitaaif 
ClwoBialaQf r 






956 
.957 



975 
978 

918 
978 



.-iu 



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INDEX. 



Pa«e. 
Agricultural Newspapors 378 

Agriculture and Rural Ecouoiny 116 

AlabAina, — Governmeut j Judiciarjr ; 

Banks; Newipaperi 334,335 

Arktinsai — Government ; Judiciary ; 

Newipapers .... 257 

A«pocUuf the Planets in 1835 .31 

Banks, in Uie United States 383 

Banks, Aggregate Capital of, in U. S. 294 

Banks, Deposit 293 

Bank of the United States 397 

Banks, Foreign, — and Currency . 107 
Bilb relnting to Gold and Silver Coins 151 
Bouldin, Tfa. Tyler ... 336 

British Provinces of N . America 300 — 302 

Calendar 30 

Calendar, Jewish .... 5 

Calendar, Mahometan, ... 6 
Canada, Lower & Upper 300 

Catholic Church .... 265 

Ohronicio of Evenu ... 330 

Ohroaolozical Cycles .... 4 
Colden, (Jadwallader D. . . .335 
Columbia, District of — Judiciary; 

Banks ; Newspapers ; Journals . 253 
Colleges in the United States 262 

Commerce, United States . . 14G 

Congres 130 

Connecticut— Government ; Judiciary ; 
Banks ; insurance Companies ; News- 
papers and Journals . . 183 — 187 
Conntitutionality of a National Bank 395 
Consuls, United States . .142 

Courts, United States ... 138 

Cormncy 107 

Debt, United Sutes ... 145 

Dolawaro — Government ; Judiciary ; 
Banks ; Newspapers : Edacation ; 
N«wark Coll -ga . . . 814—316 

Dow, Lorenzo 336 

Dower, Value of the Right of . K7 

Dofinf, N. 323 

SelipsHs in ia35 . . . . 6 

Eclipses of JupiterN Satellites, 1835 . 18 
Elections in the several States 358 

Eocko*N and Halley's ComcU . 13 

Bphemnris of the Sun ... 54 

l^iRCopal Church .... 865 
Bsterliasv, Prince .... 317 
Europe^ Reigning Sovereigns of . 303 

Expcutiv« Govornmeat, Uaited States 135 
Ezporu. United States . . .148 
Fastivals of the Churok ... 5 

Field, Gen««ral Martin ... 334 

Finances, United States 145 

Fixed i4tar«, Apparent Pheot of 98 . 60 
Florida -Government ; Jodician^ ; Banka : 
Mewapapofs } Edocatioa . 965 



Page. 

Flowering of Fruit Ti ees . . G9 
Foreign lulorcourse .... 142 
France — Government : Chamber of 
Peers ; Chamber of Deputies ; Min- 
istry 309 

Franklin's Moral Code . . . 124 
Georgia — Government ; Judiciary j 

Banks, &c. ; Rail-roadd . 831 — 234 
Gold and Silver Coin Bills . . 151 

Gold Coins, Table of ... 153 
Governors of the several States . . 5259 
Great Briiuin — Premiers ; Blinistry j 
Parliament; Newspapers ; Judiciary ; 

Bishups 304 

Gienville, Lord 330 

Uauser, Caspar .... 318 

Heber, RiclmrJ 317 

Huntington. Gen. Ebeuezer . . 329 
Illinois — Government ; Judiciary ; 

Kanks ; Nownpapcrs . . . 251 
ImporU and Exports, United States 147 

Indiana — Government ; Judiciary ; 

Bank ; Newspapers . . . St51 
Individual ^^lates . . . .161 

lutorcuurso with Foreign Nations . 143 

Jebb, Bishop 318 

Jefferson's Ten Rules of Lifo . 134 

Johnson, Wm 339 

Jourdan, Marshal .... 317 
Journal)*, Periodical . 104, 967, 375 

Judiciary 138 

Kcnts, Admiral . . . . 331 

KetUucky — Government ; Judiciary ; 

Bankji, &.c. ; Newspapers, &.c. 34;^ — 247 
Lafayette, General .... JQQ 
Latitude and Longitude of Place*, U. S. 96 

Law Journals 275 

Law Schools 261 

Legislatures of the several States 2^, 3G0 
Life-Annuity and other Tables . 83 

Literary and Miscellaneous Journals 270 

Lloyd; Edward 329 

Louisiana — Government ; Judiciary ; 

Bank ; Newspapets . . 23d— 340 
Magazines in 18l0 . . . 3G7 

Maine — Government ; Judiciary f 

Banks ; Newspapers^ fcc. IGQ — 164 

Mars, illuminated portion of his Disc 20 

Martin, Wm. D 334 

Maryland — Government ; Judiciary ; 
Banks, <u:. ; St. John's College ; 
Newspapers and Journals . 216 — 320 
Massachusetts — Government ; Judicia- 
rr ; School Fund ; Banks ; Insuranco 
Companies ; Newspapers ; Periodical 
Journals, aic. . . .169 — 180 
Medical JouniaJa .... 975 

Medical Schools .... 961 



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Pftge. 
Meteorological Informatioa . 06 

Meteorological Tablet ... 66 

Meteors of Nov. 13, 1633 ... 70 
Methodist E|iiscopal Church . 5265 

Micbtfan — Governmeot ; Judiciary ; 

Banks; Nowspaperi . . . 256 
Mioisteis, Foreign . . . 143 

Mint, operaiions of. United Stutes . 150 
Mississippi — Goveromeai; Judiciary; 

Banks ; Newapiipcrs . . 330 — 238 
Missouri — Governmoot ; Judiciary ; 

Newspapers .... 232 

Moon, Alean Time of greatest Libia- 

tioD of lier Disc .... 20 
More, Hunnub . . . 313 
Mortality in vuriou* Countries in Europe 91 
Navy, UuJtud Statuj . . . 143 
New Brunswick . . . . 3UQ 
New Hampshire — Government ; Judi- 
ciary ; Banks : Newspapers : Jour- 
nals 164 — 166 

Now Jersey — Government ; Judiciary ; 
Expense of Government ; Banks ; 
Newspapers and Journals . 202 — 205 
New York — Government ; Judiciary ; 
Banks} Insurance Companies; Ca- 
nals ; Ministers, tic. ; Common 
Schools ; Newspapers and Jour- 
nals 167—202 

Newspapers, Origin 'ind History «f, &,c. 96 
" American, 1775 . . 266 

" United States, in 1810 . 2(9 

" Religious ... 278 

" Summary of, U.Sutes 980 

North Carolina — Government ; Judi- 
ciary ; Banks ; Gold Mines ; News- 
fapers ; Mecklenburg Declaration of 
ndependrnce . . .223-227 

NoraSeotia 301 

Obituary, American . . 323 

Obituary, Foreign . . .313 

OcculUtions 12 

Ohio — Government ; Ju(!icinry ; Banks ; 

Canals ; Newspepers &. Journals 248—250 
Peonsylvania — Governmont ; Judiciary ; 
Banks, &c. ; Common Schools ; 
Newspapers and Journals 205 — 214 

Periodical Journals 267 ti 275 

Periodical Literature, Foreign . 97 

Periodical Pre:*s .... 266 

Polk, Col. Wm 336 

Portugal 311 

Poetage, Rates of . . 136 

Protestant Episcopal Church . . 265 
Public Debt, United Stales . . 145 



▼U 

• 68 
314 

. 136 
60 

. S»77 
978 
133 



Rain at Key Woat 
Rammohuu Roy 
Rates of Postage 
Refractions, Dr. Young's 
Religious Journab 
Religiouj Newspapers 
Rcpro^ntatives, Congress 
Uhode Island — Government; Banks; 
Judiciary ; Newspapers ; Jour- 
nals 180—183 

Roman Catholic Church . 965 

Saturn, Position and Magnitude of 

Rings of 19 

Seasons, Beginning and Length of 4 

i^euato. United States . . . 131 
Sidereal Time, Increaao of . . 99 

Signs of the Zodiac . . * 4 

Sotheby. Wm 319 

South Carolina — Government ; Judi- 
ciarr ; Banks, &c.; Finances ; Rail- 
road : Newspapers and JouroaUi 927 — 930 
Sovereigns of Europe . . . 303 

Spain - 310 

Spring Tidee .... 98 

Stuck, General .... 319 
Statistical Tables, United Stotea 156 

Steamboat Explosions . . . IIS 
Stocks, General View of. in U. Sutea 990 
Sun's Parallax in Altitude . 67 

Teignraoutb, Lord . . 390 

Trantham, Betsey .... 395 
Temperance. Newspapers 978 

Tennessee — Government ; Judiciary ; 
Banks ; Statisiica ; Newspapers, 

aic 941 — 945 

Theological Seminariea . 961 

Tide Table 94 

Tides, Height of Greatest 99 

Todd, Dr. EU 8SM 

Tonnage, United Stotea . 147 

Transit of Mereury , . . 8, 65 

United Stotea . 195 «b 258 

Vacations in Colleges . 964 

Value of the Right of Dower 87 

Venus, illuminated portion of her Diac 90 
Vermont — Government ; Judiciary ; 

Banks ; Newspapers . 167, 168 

Vessels of War, United Stotea 144 

Virginia — Government ; Jndiciauy ; 
Banks, tic; Mining Companies: 
Newspapers : Journals 920—993 

Washington, Punctuality of . ISO 

White Inhabitanto of the United Stotea 

classed according to age 90 

Wirt, William 396 



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COSRICTIOKS AXB AoDIVIOXk 

Page 89. Vinoennes, Ind., is 693 mUei, and W«i^(i||i^ 

1146 miles, Ircmi WMhingion, D. C. 
^ ' 194* The vaamof in the repraMntetiTM of I 

Bo^plied by tbe election of HeHrjf Mtmm, , . 
^ 138, Wm.Jokn»(m,V. B. AMoeiate Jostioo, diiiA! 

Soo ptge 389. 
<< 139, bottom line, add jOttoiidlarJEhiiiter^lfjKiUil 

nmbia. 
<" 188, Add Hiram Denio of Utioa, Judge of «fc»6^ J 
'< 831, IFm. H. Cra^ord, Judge of the Northern V 

died in September, 1834. See page 330<> '^X^^iTl 
„,** ' 836, In some oopies, instead of the bottom line^f^^ .^MS&J 

now pnbliabed in Alabama 85 newa pap e wf l 

Mobile) are published daily. /* ^, i^ 

^*^ 840, Inrtead of the last three Hues, ttBd-^thm^Jj^^ 

iidied in Looiaiana 31 newapapem of i 

Orleana) are pnbliahed dailj. 






' Z* 



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rli^fl^fl^ o» THE iuernu»r<ig. 

«^ V. CAL OEJ^ARTMENT. 




.^KpjMl PMiaiWrie of die |»li«iioiiieiia Imppeiiing in 1836 and TiaiUe 
l| flit a#l4 tatM, it dM TnwMit ofMeicury^oD Stttmlay tbo 7lbof 
Hmnbar. Ahhougb, on •ccouot of the distonce ^ this idttiot frontdio 
Xm^y Jm ^tBrila am of Uido use in dotenniniog die Siin> paralfaui and 
1km diaiaiiiona of die aolpr tyatenit tbey, from die veiy great preeiilon 
wMi wlidb tlia contacta can be obaerved and die alight change in the «^ 
ffMl^lPft ef baglnnliw and end, in a large extent of counUy, aflbrd dw 
Ml i|MM of aaeertainiiig die longitude of any place on die Earth** mw 
* dM tianalt of tfia year, aa la remarked on die 9th page, the 
% tipollitedme of iu beginning r -- -- 



diroughout die United Btal^ 
Ji t&ai the fimt contact wiU lake place at New Orieani onlr4 
lllor^dmn k^Boatoo. 

the phmet can be seen during the transit without thn aid of a 

; but viewed dirough that instrument it will appear aa 

dark body paadnc acioas the Sun» 

;dons of the Moon widi diose plaaeta and ataisa of 

magnitude, which may prove to be oocoltatloni la 

eountry^ wiU be feond on die 13di page. Qceiiilvmne 

' ^ iaiger stara will this year be lar from num^iOVB^. Jb- - 

pad in die evening of April 8(Hh,aiMi Saturn hi the ino«»- 

November. 

^ die ImoBersion or Emersion of anv star, however shmII, 

jliie dark sMe of the Moon, can he deterinlned widi precU 

etar ia small, great difficulty is experienced In sadiAMSlo* 

when the phenomenon takes place on the side thai Is 

wnwod, it baa been found by Proiesaor Struve, even with 

of the eclebfated telescope in his p o ssess i on, by Fraunhofer, 

kspoaslble, that he recdmmends measuring with a micrometer 

mataaee from the limb of the Moon, some minutes before or after 

\M. coolact, and when its light is, comparatjvely, but little di- 

J^ her Boperior luatre. Those conjuncdons* however, of the 

M^llilfi of less than the fourth magnitude, which may be ooeulu- 

' part of the United States, are noted in the Calendar pages by 

llead of the osual symbol of conjuncdon. 

1835, the comets bearing the names of the celebrated 

je are exnected to return to the pointa in their orbits leaat 

Ann and from the Earth. An ephemeris of the former^ to- 

represendng ita predicted path amidst the fixed 

ISdi, I4di, 15di, ISdi. and 17di pafns. The eer^ 

' of the latter, puMished by PiofLEnflke»hae 




'ingr« 
ttSv] 



but, aa it ia probable there le not a teleac«M|»l|Mi 
_„ Jy powerful to render iSb» cooMt vialblft OmI4 
of IM place hi dM heavens at the dme of itilWHl 
CO. Mendon has been made hi dia IS^ 
Ihal leaiaed aatronomer^ of di» eiriHeiM 




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m 



##■1 oDDOfitton tb eonjuDctlon, the EoMniosp Mir I nil I 
mi^fbb ad tnd 4Ui MUMlMtio MNIiMfaMi MiMfi ^ 
ifit, of the greet ktltude of tile iMirlii mMk^jW^ 
einwd befeie the I6th of Mofemher. 

*Ae ecMiiMt tike pkee fiutheet from the hodf ^ J 
itlurey and neerMl when to oppotMloBor eoi ' 
Mbve and after he le to the hrtter potitkM, 1 
iJ9 the phMMt and ratemtea hdag leodeied tofWMe-|f ^Mi^lj 
eflhe 8im.« Aa theae eelipaea appear to take rtaee tt'Mf i 
of oftfoliili tirae to eveiy pert of the Earth Mate ilMlgr Hi 1 
llmiiie the approitoiate ttaie, at whieh eny 01 
pei to aay ptoee to the Unltad Slatee, It ia \ 
tko ealtoiated Longltudeof that place from the I 
awi at Gnenwtdb- 

UkUm toUe of Latltiide and LoogHodo of ion# oC 1 
to the United Statea (page 90, dke.» wtt he Mid ttle 
Oi decermtoed fav the edibr» hy reeent oheervatiOHa MM 




aoppoaed 

of the CMtol fs the mean of the raovhi, 

on the anmitoreeUpaeaof 1791. iail»eK# 

hy the editor, by 

of Vlfginte and the dty of 

i» totbe eonatraetioo of fOToral mape of tli6 

of tiM Cnaiiol (6h. V 4»*). reported by an ' 

eC a Beeolve ofCongreaa. Imi cauaed an 

iMvein. Stoee tbia table went topreaa,the, 

to MaaaaehyaottB and New York haa been deleiin 

of wMch HMMt be deferred imta anottiir 

of the Catondar pegea there la wr 

efte 



of te ilainr and aeCttog of tlh Mil 
toto the Aknanee lor thela^yte. 
Jll tte^ftec of lofiactieii to eaiMtog UmWi 
irlttte momtog and later ^ IhiHi 
pBtt % tetemi between Jba MAig'ot 




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t not (aeheiofelbre) of UllB^iliiN^ 
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HMkii^ i#nail» Me teoiiBlMMT 



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iHiW •! HMi Water it conMted Am 
Mitf *• •Sd nd Moomnd die 
u TIm tiM 0f dM tide fininedlttel 




& 



fiir the diflfareoee of theRiglitAt- 
lie diflence of the Meoii Mm QhI 
itely piecedteg tlie eontMBs of ni 



en ctven, it liioold do eorre^ted by the 



ofl 

tinie (tf the other tide is r^uired. 
m p lee e d io tlie oidor of tlieir sieen distancet from the Sdn^ 
Bttfone ate eom|pated tor the moment of their pemefe over 
of WasMncitoiiw 

' of the Sun (pegee 64 to 60)» is partly taken ftom die 
i ol Professor Eiieire and part^ from the EngHsh Nanti- 
■Heontains the Smi*s Semidiameter, Horixontal ParaOaz, 
Mil the time (mtam, which by the addition of 0.19 see. wiB 
hi eeiivettidlBto aid«ruUf) occupied by (he Semidiameter in culniinathig 
Bit peillili^' <Wr metMian, the Equation or reduction of apparent to 




.<»li'igirilBd to apparent time in the manner indicated, the Sidereel 
tbitrfiA^lMmlM of the Ecliptic.. The epoch of all is Oh. Cm., «sm| 
of Greenwieh. 

OS of 28 prindpal stars, as determined by ProfeHOf' 
Jy (p^gM w> to 06) will be Tory useful In deteimfaiiQg. 

m of some of them will be found to differ from that giveii 

Nmilieal Almanac, as much as four seconds ; which is cer- 

qpentity than was to be eipected In the present improved 

' instruments, and cannot be altogether ascribed (o thii 

s of Irefraetion. 

Mi( ttM0 flf iUfraetions (pages 66 and 67) was computed on priodpiet 
MMM# If^ bte Dr. Yoong, and is recommended by its great ma- 

tliyfrlilli oiieidMions in this Almanac have been adapted to meeii sokff 
lfi% or tettilHo which shoold be indicated by a well regulated dock. 
qTO f liM i t tf^t&o eccentrfdqr of the Earth's oA>it and the Inclination of 
'» fo te Equator, ttie motion of the Earth in Right Ascenskm 
t9ip,'&ad eoniseqaently the solai* da]r* Are not equal, about half 
I abottt as many less, than 24 houra, and requiring a clock, 
I or sohur time, to be frequently adjusted. To avoid (Ua 
i fiction of mean time has been invented ; which hii 
i very g^ttonl ose and probably will soon superoede th* 
Us nano from the ctrcumstanee, that die leni^of a 
ir, Ac, la the fReon or average length of ail the i 
\ Acy lb ft tropical year. . 




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AMERICAN ALMANAC 



1835. 



PART I. 



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1835, 



Beiog tke latter part of the Sethf and tlie begiimiiig of te 

of the Indepfodeoce of the Umted atateaof AoMiieas 

« the 6548th year of the Joliaii Period; 

« the latter part of the SSOSOh and the heginning Vif Ike 
5506th, year aince the creation of the woildt aceordinf to 
the Jewa i 

^ Ae 9888th year dnce the foandation of Rome, aocoidiog to 
' Varro; 

^ tiM 958U year nnce the era of NahonaMnry which haa 
beenaarigned to Wednesday, February Mh, 9067 of the 
JoMan Period, (747 years before Christ according te the 
^Sonoiogists, and 746 according to the airtronomtea ;) 

« dbeJSllth year of the Olympiads, orthe third yearof fte 
653d Olympiad will begin in Jdy, 1835^ by fidng the era 
of the first Olympiad at 775| yean before Christ, or at 
ebeat the first of Joly, 8038 of the Julian Period ; r 

^ the latter part of the 1250th, and the beg&ning of the 
196lit Oonar) year since the Hegira, or flight of MaheiMi^ 
whkh has been assigned to Joly 16di, of the year 602 
after the Urth of Christ 



L THE CALENDAR 
AND CELESTIAL PHENOMENA FOR THE TEAR, 



SIGNS OF THE PLANETS, Ac. 





t Cares. 
Jupiter. 
SSatim. 
Hezsehd erUianns. 



I, or Ipring the sunt Loitftlads or BUt 
u or diSniMktt 90^ in " ** 

M uBo^ in '^ *' 

, U tbs dewwnding node. 






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4 CHAOROLOeiCAI. CTCIiKSy Sien* OF THE ZODIAC, dto. [I888L 

An Efterisk (*), prefixed to the conjanction of the Moon with a atar or 
planet, indicatet that the itar or planet may he eclipsed in some part of 
the inhabited portion of the United Statee. 

The fligrn + is profiled to the latitode, or deelination, of tiM Bon or 
other heavenly body, when norik, and the sign — when south; bnt the 
former, prefixed to the hoarlj motion of the Moon in Latitude, indicatei 
that she is approaching, and the latter that she is receding from, the 
north pole of the ecliptic. 

The letters AT. Ji., m. a., denote Mondng and JiJUmwm. 



CHRONOLOGICAL CYCLES. 

Dominical Letter O i Solar Cycle 

Lnnar Cycle, or Gk>lden Number 12 Roman indiction 
Epaet I I Julian Period 



24 

8 
6548 



SIGNS OF THE ZODUC. 



Spring 
signs. 

Bummer 
signs. 



m 



Aries. 

Taurus. 

Gemini. 

Cancer. 

Leo. 

Virgo. 



Autumn 
signs. 

Winter 
signs. 



7. ^ Libra. 

8. nt Scorpio. 

9. / Sagittarius. 

' 10. yjf Capricomos. 
: 11. m Aquarius. 
: 12. H PiMes. 



BEGINNING AND LENGTH OF THE SEASONS. 

Vf (Winter begins) 1834, Dec. 21st, 13 21 57 M. T. Wash. 



c|> (Spring << 

G (Summer " 

£^ (Autumn " 

Vy (Winter " 



1835, Mar. 20th, 14 47 48 
*«^ June 21st, 11 46 11 
« Sept. 23d, 1 41 13 
« Dec. 21st, 19 10 32 



d. b. m. •. 
89 1 25 51 

. 92 20 58 23 
93 13 55 2 

. 89 17 29 19 
« north of Equator (Spring and Summer) 186 10 53 25 
« south •« (Winter and Autumn) 178 18 55 10 



km in the Winter Signs 
" « Spring . 
" *' Summer 
*• " Autumn 



length of the tropical year, beginning at) 
the winter sobtice 1834, and terminating > 966 5 48 35 
at the winter solstice 1835, ) 

Mean or average length of the tropical jear 365 5 48 48 



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Qnryu Clnkti day «* li& 

Adraaft l^nndaj 



HMmyd^ 






QUARTER DATS. 



Marah 11th, IStli, ind 14tik. 
J«M Wh, 19lli, lath. 



September 16tli, IMi, aMd idUk 
DecemlMr 16th, letb, and IMi. 



JEWISH CALENDAR. 

/* fTWMBlT«MaiMmMUdwHliaauterisk(*)uoitriell7obMiTtd;] 

TMt. lfMN0«rtk0MoatlH. 

6605CS||ialaiibagi|ui I>m. 3; 1834. 

<« ** 9Glh ConaeantionoftbaTttmple . 27, •< 

«« /RMbalbegiiM .... Jan. 3,1835. 

** ** ' lOth Fkat on account of the Biage af 

Jerofalam • . ; • . 11, 
........ 81, 

. i March S, 

Fast of Either . ' . . ; 12, 

*Purim i i . . . 15, 

Schniean Pnrim . . ^ 16^ 



** Bebatbagina 

«* Adar *« 

«« M lllh 

« « 14th 

M «l ]5||| 

«f qKanlMi^ 
: 15tfi 
> leni 






U 



« 41 2QUt 

•* JSiKbacJaa 

ft >•< ifith 

^ ^^bagini 



^Beginning of die Pasaoyer •* 
*Beoond Feaat or Morrow of the 

Paaaoyer 

*SeTenth Feast 

*End of the Paaaoyer 4 



AprU 14, 



Lagbeomer 

*Feast of Weeks or PenteCoat 
*8aooadFBast ^. 



u 

M 

M 
U 
U 



15, 
. 20, 
• 21, 
. 30, 
May 17, 

29, " 
June 3, ** 

4. " 

ibeipns . . . . ^ . . 28^ «• 
'< ** /17th Fast on account of ^Taking of 

v^:-! 1 theTtoiple . . / J^14, <«, , 

. -^^^ st^Miiitoi. . •• • . . ; ;-; . ;-.: . * ■ . •... ;;iRi|!»^;,^ 
«$nu#i4Hl < •IM on. acoonat of the Boning^ . •. us »4ti^ 
viHIO t^rn <|f the Tampto • • • .^ iil%M^% 

Digitized by VJV.JV_^VL 



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m- 


M 


ISUi 


¥ 


M 


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u 


M 


21it 


u 


« 


SM 



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AtonemtMit . 
*FeMt of the fitute 4 
*8econd Feast of Um Tbb«niMl«i 
Feast of Palmi or BBriBOhes 
rrhe FeathrU i^tba flNi <it€of*^ . in f 
gregatioii anda . . » ^'* 41 

** flSd ^RejoioiDg fo Um Piaeovoiy of ^ ^:';;( 

tbe JUw ... . . . tt^^ 

Marehearan begina ' M^ ^. 

CShiateabe^na . . . Il0#a^*« 

« 25th Conaeorationi^ the Taot^ Oan^li^ <«i^^ 

Thabat begina \' ■ '^'''^^i)ti''f^ 

•« 10th Faat on aocooBi of tiM l^Mga of *"* 

Jeroaalem . ... ^^^. ^ 

Sebat begina ... 



Tatt 

1960 
a 

M 



»4- 



mm >"'m ^^' 
Mr !•, - ■ 



**r.Jif., 



MAHOMETAN CALENDAR. 

■ad Nmdm of tlM Moathi. 
Ramadan begina (Month of Faating) 
flchewaU « ^ (Month of Rejoiehig) 
Daa'l-kadah «< 
Oavn-hejjah " 
Mohamm " 
flaphar ** 

I. " 

n. « 

loondhil. ** 

ioBuiain. « 



(Mo&tiioffMiiig) 



QF THB i9UII ANP MOON IN 18K % 
kin Hm eonna of thia yaat^ 
I'lAlM «rMte^«tti| tM of tho Mikr 
Iip^*a»i4l tlii%f tiM flanat lfalwl^ 

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XCLIPtIt OF HAT 37th AND JUJIS IOtH. 



four, only one, tii. the Xruiiit of Mercmy, will be ▼iaiUe in anj ptrt 
of the United SUtee. 

I. Wednesdaj, May 27th, an annular Eelitne of the Snn ; inTinbl* 
throughout the United States. 
The Penumbra first touches the Earth, or beginning of the Greneral 

Eclipse on the Earth, at 5h. SGm. M. (M. T. at Washington,) in IaI. 

24» 37' South. Long. 58o 5C' West from Greenwich. 
The Centre of the Penumbra first touches the Earth, or beginning of the 

Central Eclipse, at Gh. 34m. M. in Lat 30^ & South ; Long. 7^ 20^ 

West. 
The Sun centrally eclipsed on the meridian of the place, atSh. 18m. M., 

in Lat. 4o 2* North, Long. 22© 14' West 
The Centre of the Penumbra leaves the Earth, or end of the Central 

Eclipse at lOh. 2lm. M., in Lat. O^' fi& South, Long. 36<' 54' East 
The Penumbra leaves the Earth, or end of the whole Eclipse, at llh. 

29m. in Lat. 5° 12' North, Long. 21° 50' East 



Path oftbe Northern 


Path of the Central 


PathoftheSonthem 


boundary 


of the bk:lipte. 


EclipM. 


boundary of the Eclipse. 


Lat. 


-Lin,. 


Lat. 


73'9f' W. 


Lat. 


45'sS'W. 


2*36'N. 


81- 5' W. 


30- 6* S. 


63* 19' 8. 


13 96 


(9 90 


13 54 


44 30 


53 40 


39 90 


93 13 


49 53 


5 14 


33 57 


47 30 


94 57 


36 9 


31 f3 


50 N. 


96 41 


38 3 


19 58 


49 31 


890 


4 9 


93 14 


39 34 


005 E. 


41 55 


9 39 E. 


5 18 


90 7 


33 55 


16 90 


37 51 


97 46 


829 


13 7 


37 58 


98 30 


39 37 


43 7 


9 48 
845 
96S. 


439 
8 E. 
36 54 







By drawing curved lines on a map, through the places having th« 
above Latitudes and Longitudes, we shall obtain the Northern and 
Southern limits of the Eclipse, and the line or path of the Centre. Th* 
Eclipse will be visible throughout South America, Africa, and the 
ocean between. It will also be visible (but the obscuration will btt 
verj small) to nearly all Spain, the southern part of Italy, Asia Minor, 
and Arabia. In the north part of America and Europe, and in nearly 
the whole of Asia there will not be any Eclipse. 

IL Wednesday, June 10th, a small Eclipse of the Moon, invisible 
throughout the United States and the continent of America. 

h. m. 
Bepnninjr of the EcUpw . . 4 58.9 A. ^ Mew -nine H 

At the greatest obscuration about one-thirteenth only of the Moon'i 
■urface will be eclipsed. The Eclipse will be visible thronghoat Ea- 
rope and Africa and part of Asia. 



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8 fKAS^lt OF nOYZUBWk 7tll. (iflMl 

ni. Satnrciay, November 7th, the San eclipefdby the planet Mercniy, 
(otherwise called a Transit of Mercury over the disc of the Son,) viiiUt 
wholly or in part throughout the United States. 

The whole Transit will be visible from the western half of North and 
South America. The beginning of the Transit will also be viaible ts 
the eastern half of America and the western extremity of Africa. Tbs 
lend of the Transit will also be visible from Australia and the eastan 
«j[tremity of Asia. 

The phases will be as follows, (the Q's diameter being reduced 5^' 
for irradiation.) * 

Phases of the Transit as seen from the centre of the Earthy (the se mid im u " 
eter of Mercury at the mean distance of the Earth from the Sun being 
xissumed to be 3.35".) 



First External Contact 

First Internal Contact 

Ecliptic Conjunction 

Nearest approach of Mercury to the 

centre of the Sun. Distance 

§ then 5' 34.62' South 
Second Internal Contact 
Second External Contact 

Duration of the Transit 



be) 



h. m. f. 
22 14.1 A. 
24 1.4 
2 48 42.8 

2 57 4.0 

5-30 15.0 
5 32 2.4 

5 9 48.3 



Mean Time at 
Waahington. 



CUy of BosTOH. Lat. 42« 21' 15" N. Long. 71® 4' 9" W 
*■' h. m. f. 

First External Contact, or beginning i o 46 25 3 A 

of the Transit, ) 

First Internal Contact . . . 48 12.5 
Apparent d in the Ecliptic \ 
(9 South 5' 41.92") 5 

True c5 in the Ecliptic 
Nearest approach of the Centres ) 
(distonce of Centres then 5' 38.26") > 
Sun's lower limb sets, eclipsed 4 44 

Transit ends . . 5 55 19 

Transit begins at a point in the left sidet of the Sun, 122^ 39^ frtMB 
the vertex. 



3 12 19.6 
3 12 33.4 
3 20 47.3 



Mean Time at 
Boston. 



* If thifl oorraetion be rejected, the two fint eoataets will take place looiMr, and Iks 
two last Uter, by 97.0 lec. } end ooofeqaently the daratioo of the Tnaait will be greater 
by 64 Mooodi. 

t An EcUpee of the Sun by the Moon osoally beyini on the right ilde of the Sod ; bat 
a Transit of Venoi or Alercury begioi on the left, the apparent motion of these plaaslB 
beiag nCrograde at the time of the inferior oo^junctJoo. 



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1835.] 



TftAlftrr OF KOTKMBXA TtV. 



CUy of JHewOrl^avs. Lat. SO® 57' 45" N. Long. OO^ G' 49" W. 

The whole Transit will be Tisible as follows, tiz. 

h. m. f. 
First External ConUct . .11 30 18.2 M. 

First Internal ConUct . . 11 32 5.5 
Apparent Conjunction . . 1 56 12.2 A. 

Nearest approach of Mercnrj to the f I Mean Time at 

Sun's centre. Dist. of Centres > 2 4 37.4 f New Orleana. 

then of 37.74" > 

Second Internal Contact . . 4 37 SI. 
Second Bzternal Contact . . 4 39 7.9 

Duration of the Transit . .58 49.7 

Son's Lower limb sets . 5 6^ 

The Transit will begin at a point in the left side of the Son, 140® 8^ 
from the vertex. 

The Transit will end at a point in the right side of the Son, 141^ Sd' 
from the yeflez. 

The phases of the Transit at the following places were not strictlj 
calculated, but were estimated from the preceding ; no error of impor- 
tance, however, can thus have been made, since so trifling is the Taria- 
tion in the effect of parallax at Boston from that at New Orleans, i^tX 
the Transit may be said to commence at the same moment of abscimU 
time at both places. The effect of parallax will be to cause the first con* 
tact to Uke place later, at Boston, bj 20.6 sec, and at New Orleani by 
24.2 sec, than at the centre of the Earth; tha difference (3.6 see.) 
being the difference between the times of the beginning of the Traniit 
at the two cities, a quantity too small to require a rigid calculation for 
any other place in the United States. By comparing the times of be- 
ginning and end as seen at New Orleans, and from the centre of the 
Earth, it will be observed that the former will take place at New 
Orleans later by 24.2 sec, and the end earlier by 34.4 sec, than At the 
Earth's centre. Consequently, the whole effect of parallax at New 
Orleans will be to shorten the duration of the Transit 58.6 sec. 

The whole Transit will be visible at those places in the following table 
which are marked with an asterisk, it will be seen that all of them 
are situated in the southwesterly extremity of the United States, and 
that even at them, the second external contact will take place but a 
few minutes before the setting of the Sun. 

The time of the second internal contact, which is not given in the 
following table, can be easily obtained from the second external, bj 
eabtracting from the latter Im. 47 sec. 

The time of the phases of the Transit at any place not contained in 
the following table, may readily be ascertained by adding to, or subtraci- 
ing from, the time of the phases at Washington, the difference of lon^ 



d by Google 



8.0. 



Dttroit 

^DoMUMIITil]* 

Dover, DsL 
BUiAuc, N. 8. 



i,M»ri. 
|nittltB4»ek 

llMi^eliOT.yt. 

itotiMi, L.C. 

•NatehM 
IfvwBwIlM 
M«ir Ii«T«o 
New York 
Va. 



nfkdelphift 
Pittibvarg 

FloitiMMiith. N. H< 
Pkfnottoo, N. J. 



L.O. 

i 

SLAqgnitiiia 



8ftT«noeh 
[ield 



Uaiv.ofV*. 
WkMngtan 
Woweeter, Meie. 



4^ 



tfllMtta lllOiMlSL 'in 



51 M 
084 18 
15 4 

10 40 

11 S3 16 M. 
II SB m 
1196 36 
OSS 44 A. 
iltt 4K. 

1 16 17 A. 
030 94 

11 46 94 M. 
1199 19 
119156 

Ufi7 94M. 
1188 

40 90 A. 

036 94 

U 43 9B1C. 

1195 5M. 
47 A. 

038 58 
034 40 
095 98 

080 OA. 
10 19 
048 99 
047 44 

039 94 

045 OA. 

046 56 
15 83 
090 54 
494 

11 99 90 M. 

047 8A. 
639 

040 90 
11 53 90 M. 

11 do 56M. 
16 38 A. 
099 87 
43 9S 



a8iu 

096 

Ottsr 



^f\ 



1165 SM. 
D30A. 
11 98 98 M. 

80 31 A. 
11 58 SIM. 

1 18 4A. 

41 11 
1148 11 M, 
1193 50 
1193 43 

1150 IIM. 
1180 47 

49 7 A. 

36 11 
J145 1AM. 

11 96 SSM. 
048 47 A. 
040 40 
036 97 
097 18 

81 47 A. 
Oil 50 
51 9 
40 81 
34 11 

46 47 A. 
048 45 
17 19 
99 41 
6 11 

11 34 7M. 

048 55 A. 
8 19 

049 7 
1154 7M. 

11 41 46m. 
18 95 A. 
094 94 
045 lA 



■i:»rr^¥ 



85d 87 
813 44 
996 44 

156 8i 
156 16 

9 31 44 
9 19 90 
314 40 

8 10 44 

9 17 48 

180 95 
891 96 
3 13 IS 
3 
950 40 

8 4 90 
944 88 
398 49 
398 04 
3 6 44 

3 10 96 
3 91 18 
940 59 

9 55 14 
938 44 

9 6 40 

8 91 98 

9 40 59 

8 14 40 

9 96 40 

9 14 16 
9 50 58 
9 56 87 
8 17 48 



4 80 417 



5 88 n 
5 88^" 

I8S 

8 8483 
5 90« 
5 18 18 

4 41 U 
8 88 68 

5 18 93 
8 40 U 
5 I U 

4 48 47 

5 95 90 
5 81 98 
5 88 18, 



At the nearei t approach of Centres the apparent diametor f 



will be ^ of that of the Sim 



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UttftaliiMW hwm Urn EntOi al TK 5n. M.» k 

I ksTM tliA Earth, or tlM G«Mial fSoIipM orfi, al 
^m ||i#l|^m % huL U? tS& Boaih, Img. n^» Eait 

r tM GwMra of ite aitt^ oft i 

tlMf 



fMk oTdM SMllHnrLiiA^r 
ih« BdipM ot of tlw Mtttn 
•df»orib«lloM*tr 





> If w# lfM» M a map lb« ateif* Jaec rib t d pttka, w Aril 
Bintiv* that tlM Hm oC tlM N^rthws IkA of tte, iBliit 

iMM TtiSt tlM Hm Of tiMOralnl Edtpn pMMt im Iha 
AtlMMk MfoM dM wlwto MiMtt «r AMm, ite^Eai aflM** 
Btff.iMnMrl]rMmf«h«l'Mt ladttBOMas udlteilhi 

lkMMMiiputbrBpruQ,MdthMM wnm £8o«ik Ath»- 
_ ud fodtea MHM. !!• Bd^ iriil, thM«tM«, b« M«« ll 
aMil put oraiMt M^ IjMM, M|j,AnM^aiii|n^| 

l|i«,artlw c p B tfa wa t ' of Amo iX tbo ■iHoMOt MoadM Ml 
Mwlwot « vsiT hiM part of tM iUlurtfe uA lodiM oeMiM. 
i^wiik tto oiM|i& ofthi MtiwMlM ovtiMritj ofBiAi; 

hlM M^ wUt W tefWUt tkn^hoot thi (WMiMiit of AMf» 



KoftlMi Btti at aaj partleiilaf placa ia a ] 
; it k ibm^dbf wprthj ofiiotliBa, thit at a wj^ mmm 
mf of AAiea, aitoats iii Lat aWt » North, ani 
baigi klmkf^ ^aat fton OffoaawM, bath oi tiia polar SaUpaaa thi* 
'Wi^'iKf^'^''9iilXi ha oantral* and thaia alao will ha wbiSU Ite 



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iknb iUr ofthe fint or McoiiA^miig^$|i^ 




;.,to,; ^*Ua»^^ 




1U) iifti. 



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or to ^ DomlB iiMHMiri^l 




ic^lfiflj^^ kiouMM wliotilior oitiior oTiio 

bo ittiWo to Hio ttdi4 ojFo, o^^Mbod, wJ^MJIfel^tte tMiMlibo 
*.«i^|r. pomlb!t^loloo^pe! ! . . „ 1 

r^tlm not j^ WftoliMtliao ooiuiWy,^^ wll^ MB% 
i^ia tti MioA to bo jBiierfed itt tbo VnUaturnxf Obo^rfoOo^s, 

■1^ 15 wookil ;1$^ i«tlui» will li^NNlli^ bo daxiomfy 
, ootlmomon, 00 iimridiiig tlio loa^tot 
i^giMicbrtiaittit tho oorreetpoio c^the tliooiy, pcomidgotod bjp 
Eii^o^of ^6 oziftenoe of » inediiim whieh roowto tho motion 
" ' i^alring urooiid tbe Sim ; -7- a modinm (wbooo ojdo&fiibjB 
thirOomot boTo lod moiiy to boUoTo) wbioli 
Oillj eiilio overj Comet, but finally aft^ tbe 1«^ of ifM, 
^|loiii|11ntotbe8an. ^^. ^ 

I Cbmfti is ie weU known» wi^ tbe fixi| idiooo Mtun wne 
lfkwlola,(iA4^^ retttrn to its peribelion in 1760, aoootdinf to^ 
I ^$l§P^n>t- H«tt*y> cdndnntelj patore^ it to be eotiip^ of 4ik- 
W^^9:^f^y^^ pkmeU, tbe ]awe of gimvitatioli: llie period 
lHag^ aboot 76 yean* ita letom in tbe avtnmn of tiiii 
tte^ipl iinee ibai in tbe tjfOkg oTlTSO. ' 
i^lMineareit'tbe EaHb on m'7i]i\it6^i^^^i^ 
iMihmitbm 98 mdlione of pike, or e^:f|bat!leii^^ban OM 
eC tfi^diatanee fiom tbe Son. Ita brillianey will bo brigbltit 
1Mb, ad4irbr a few^yi ailerwianii; *qd ^ben^bir- 
of iipwai4> <^fii^ dbgreea^ U'llUl^in tiie Noil^ 
iKllii i&rcie efpei^tiial ii^pprition, nnj.eonp eqtt e ntly win 
~ tfMipo^WitbooidMendinf below tbe bdrison. 
t\hk ]I^^Ub[|ieria>r tbe' Comei (i^n Ul6w, it win 
part of tbe time it ia expected to bo vwible from tbe 
tat to IIM HMi of Oelober, ita apparent motiea in 
D»e&Bli0tifa 1^ Hit 









inMriO'ettbi^ Oamet waa eiipyntod hf ifr. Wod^ 
oTlt^ orbit fiMn by Hide PooMlooQkpt.. 
'I^ieym^ lHtb.gfek;«iMinll'&^ 
ed njatfi ema^ da naj TJat^Baiw MunaJit i Mi { 

Digitized by LjOOQIC' 



m^^m^^y 



^rm^! 






'.kA 






Gi^wi0^< 



IjfTi 



7 

11 

, 15 
:, 19 

87 

7 ai 



P^ 



Oct, 



ir»T. 



Dee. 






4 
8 
IS 
16 
90 
24 
98 

9 
6 
10 
14 
16 
89 
96 
80 

8 
7 
11 
16 
19 
93 
97 

1 

6 

9 

18 

17 

i 

83 



6 94.51 
5 97:93 
5 81.43 
5 36.09 

5 38.79 

6 49.56 
5 46.69 
5 60.99 

5 66.80 

6 1.30 
6 7.86 
6 16JK 
6 27.94 

6 46.03 

7 18.69 

8 40.67 
19 6.49 

14 67.41 
16 59.43 
16 96.31 
16 37.72 
16 43.66 
16 46.69 

a6 46^ 
16 43.10 
16 39.86 
16 36.99 
16 31.73 
16 97.63 
16 93,46 

16 19.61 
16 16.77 
16 19.23 
16 8.76 
16 5^ 
16 \M 
I55B.34 
^15^ 

15 60J68 



Ifrfi^iilliiffl^ii 



99 69.9 
9S99A 

93 467 

94 14.3 
94 46.3 
96 91.1 
96 34 

96 53.7 
27 6^j2 
99 164 
31 0.8 
33 96.9 
36 57.7 
49 98.1 



60 37.7 

61 63.3 
99 3.3 

10 21.7 
34.8 
4 58.5 
8 31.0 

11 0.6 



19 54.4 
14 96.9 
16 49.6 

16 48.8 

17 47.8 

18 41.0 

19 99.9 

90 16.7 
90 69.0 
9140.5 
99 90.8 
93 0.0 

93 8a6 

94 16.9 
94 66.0 

9&^A 



0J3749 

0.3899 

0.3976 

0.3007 

0.9719 

0Ja87 

0.9099* 

0.1699 

0.1181 
0.0679 
0.0087 
9.9404 
9.8691 
9.7601 
9.6369 

9.4678 
9.3631 
9.4073 
9.6593 
9.7Q01 
9.8135 
9.9046 
9.9789 

0.0401 
0.0906 
0.1391 
0.1650 
0.1931 
09150 
0^2329 

0JM66 
0.9657 
09629 
0.2678 
0J2704 

ojmi 

OJ3701 
0JB674 

09639 



foemx 








Digitized by V3V,.?VJV It 



^^V 



1835i] 



XYHXlfXAU or HALLBT'S COKST. 



15 



Mean Noon at Greenwich, or 6b. 52m. M. at Washington. 










Maridiaa 
Panaga. 




Rifht 
Aac«iuion. 




Logarithm of the Distanee 


Date. 


DeclinmUon. 


^ froc 
Earth. | 


a the 
Ban. 




1836. 


h. m. 


• 1 






b. m. 


Jan. 2 


15 50.63 


S. 25 3:^.2 


0.2632 


0.1001 


21 1.6 


6 


15 46.24 


26 11.4 


0.2577 


0.1210 


20 41.4 


10 


15 41 42 


26 49.7 


0i2509 


0.1406 


20 20.7 


14 


15 35.96 


27 28.0 


0.2430 


0.1593 


19 59.4 


18 


15 2!).8d 


28 6.1 


0.2.140 


0.1772 


19 37.5 


22 


15 22 93 


28 43.8 


0.2240 


0.1942 


19 14.7 


2G 


15 15.06 


29 20.6 


0.2132 


0.2104 


18 50.9 


30 


15 6.03 


29 55.4 


osmo 


0.2259 


18 26.0 


Feb. 3 


14 55.81 


30 27.5 


0.1904 


0.240r 


17 59.8 


7 


14 44.^ 


30 55.6 


0.1786 


02549 


17 32.4 


11 


14 31.24 


31 17.6 


0.1672 


02685 


17 3.5 



JEpkemeris of Halley*s Comet, for Variationt of dz 4 Days, in the Tinu 
of the Perihelion Passage, 





+ 4 day. 


— 4 


days. 




+ ^ 


I dayi. 


— 4dayi. 


R.A. 


Dec. 


R.A. 


Dec 


R.A. 


Deo. 


R.A. 


Dec. 


1835 










1R!U> 










Aaff.7 


h. m. 
5 29 


+25 42 


h. m. 
5 27 


+23 i8; 
24 10 


Nov. 3 


b. m. 
16 59 


— ll ^16 31 


-lS49 


15 


5 de\ 


23 25 


534 


11 


16 55 


14 58,16 25 


16 21 


23 


5 43 


24 18 


5 42 


25 151 


19 


16 47 


17 1416 17 


1817 


31 


5 51 


25 27 


5 52 


26 431 


27 


16 38 


19 3 


16 10 


19 62 


Sept. 8 


5 59 


27 5 


6 4 


28 54, 


Dee. 5 


16 29 


20 37 


16 5 


2117 


16 


6 11 


29 39 


622 


32 36, 


13 


16 21 


22 315 57 


22 34 


24 


6 31 


34 25 


7 9 


40 3, 


21 


16 14 


23 24|15 50 


23 50 


28 


6 51 


38 43 


8 10 


47 26 


29 
1836. 


16 6 


24 43 15 44 


23 4 


Oct 2 


7 31 


45 48 


10 38 


51 20 
36 42 


Jan. 6 


15 58 


26 115 35 


2618 


6 


9 28 


56 3 


13 53 


14 


15 47 


27 22115 25 


27 31 


10 


13 50 


47 59 


15 22 


+15 53 


22 


15 35 


28 41 15 12 


28 43 


18 


16 30 


+ 5 45 


16 19 


— 30 


30 


15 18 


29 59 14 55 


29 49 


96 


16 55 


— 6 37 


16 32 


-10 2!!Feb. 7 


14 56 


—31 714 33 


-30 42^ 



Elements of the Orbit, according to M, de Pontecoulant. 
Pamge of the Perihelion 1835, Not. 7.2, Paris Mean Time from Noon. 

Plaoe of the Perihelion on Me or6tl dSi 31 A 

Longitade of the ascending node . . . . 55 30 

InelinatioD of the orbit 17 44 24 

Ratio of the eccentricity to the semi-azis major . . 0.9675218 

8emi-axis major 17 96706 

Motion retrograde. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



-!g|gif<4i«?*».r'-' 



ifftmm/t^n^mf 




^''m%^ 



iMitt Midnight 

•PlMetftliePiBigielioii an t&aorilr . • 
LoBgitude ofthe tMsendlBf nede> . • 
lEeUntlionof the orbit • • . • 

Rstio oirthe ecocntrioitf to the Mini-tiif inijor 

Bemi-azit Bii^or 

Motion letrognde. 
On comp«ring the difierent elemental the vrip^ipd 
to be in the' time of tfie periheltcm paeeege ; and jnrli 
llMitthe efurlieat infonnation aJiooM bo obteinod of 
Comet, the annexed ehiurt haa been formed, 
the fixed atara, acoording to each aet of elementa, 
^bte^ the direction of the aweeping line, in whtah 
piobabl/ be found. The path indicated by Pi 
ytown from the Ephemeria. The patha by 
from poaitiona determined by interpolating the £^ 
and 7 daya' Tariation of the perihelion paaaage. 

. V 'I>«}*^^**^^P^<ll><>^moftheotet 
Bight Wauon; the figiute at the aidea, the ^^gMb 
Clottl^ DwrUnatioB. ' ^ 



Vy <■-■ 
la J^i \l 



LOf , 




Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



j«ntt^e>|B|^ jj^Tita Atiapi <Mr 



^igm^ 



gS^SiSS c 


' s § g s 


. 




*? 


"* i 


It 














> 




4 








\ 


« M 


^1 






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' 


1 


y 


^ % 

w 


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4. 




> 


L ' 


^ 




<ti 


En 








*^ 


- 


/ 




'ir 


f§ 


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> 


> 


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, / 
















> 


ij* 


1 








! 




d 


-t - 


W 


s< 


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"^J 


li 




r 


2 














« 


^S 


/^^ 




^ 














M 


n4 


■»;' 


^ 


















^ 


« 


1!^ 


IJ 




K* 
















X 


■ V 


tv' 


1 

1 










u 


J 




K 


-^»« 


S^l\\ 


, 










? 






> 


_ ^ (Jl 


* jy 


^ 




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- 


> 

> 




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^ : 


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m 




1 


X 




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^i. 


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Hi 9I 


^ 


// 


i-_ 


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> 


- 


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4< 


H* 


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> 


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a 


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r : 


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'*ff 


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1— 1 


^ r-* o iq ^ ^ CI »-* '^ 


' s s s s5 1 



.. ,it, , 



jui»iiJ» -"#**• ' ; i '.*'j' ''i '•« i K. * I , 



yGoOgle 



18 



XCLIPSBt OF TBB 8ATKLLITX8 OF JUPITER. 



ivm. 



* ECLIPSES OF THE SATELLITES OF JUPITER IN 1835, 

Visible throughout^ or in some part of^ the United States, in Mtan Tiwu 
for the Meridian of Greenwich , reckoned according to the tnamner of 
astronomers f who begin the day at the Noon of the civil day^ and cowd 
the hours up to 2if or to the succeeding Noon^ when another day it 
commenced. 





d. 


h. 


m. 


1. 




Sat. 




d. 


h. 


m. 


■. 




StL 


Jan. 


2 


10 


8 


12.7 


Em. 


1 


March 10 


16 


27 


28.7 




1 


ti 


4 


16 


57 


52.3 




2 


c< 


12 


10 


56 


289 




1 


u 


5 


23 


5 


53.8 




1 


tt 


16 


16 


36 


52.7 


Im. 


S 


tt 


7 


9 


27 


58iJ 


Im. 


3 


tt 


19 


12 


52 


18.6 


£m. 


1 


« 


7 


11 


54 


33.3 


Em. 


3 


tt 


26 


14 


48 


7.0 




1 


tt 


7 


17 


34 


47.4 




1 


tt 


27 


10 


54 


17 8 




s 


tt 


9 


12 


3 


36.5 




1 


AprU 


2 


16 


43 


52.3 




1 


tt 


11 


19 


34 


36.3 




2 


It 


3 


12 


18 


18.3 




3 


tt 


14 


13 


29 


21.3 


Im. 


3 


tt 


3 


13 


29 


54.1 


Em. 


S 


tt 


14 


15 


56 


48.4 


Em. 


3 


tt 


10 


13 


41 


51.4 


Im. 


3 


tt 


14 


19 


30 


17.0 




1 


tt 


10 


16 


5 


251 


Km. 


2 


tt 


16 


13 


59 


7.5 




1 


tt 


10 


16 


19 


52 3 




3 


i( 


18 


22 


11 


15.3 




2 


tt 


11 


13 


8 


27.7 




1 


tt 


21 


17 


30 


24.6 


Im. 


3 


tt 


18 


15 


4 


5.1 




1 


tt 


21 


19 


58 


41.0 


Em. 


3 


May 


4 


13 


24 


045 




1 


tt 


21 


21 


25 


52.3 




1 


«« 


5 


13 


9 


14.9 




2 


tt 


22 


11 


29 


29.0 




2 


t( 


16 


12 


28 


15.6 




3 


tt 


23 


15 


54 


45.0 




1 


June 


15 cJ of U « 


nd©. 
51.6 






tt 


25 


10 


23 


41.7 




1 


July 


19 


21 


43 


Im. 


3 


tt 


28 


21 


31 


49.8 


Im. 


3 


tt 


24 


21 


12 


533 




1 


tt 


29 


11 


43 


55.2 




2 


Aug. 


5 


20 


17 


30.6 




2 


tt 


29 


14 


6 


0.8 


Em. 


2 


u 


9^ 


19 


29 


187 




1 


tt 


30 


17 


50 


26.3 




1 


tt 


12 


22 


52 


52.4 




2 


Feb. 


1 


12 


19 


24.6 




1 


«* 


16 


21 


23 


7.6 




1 


<( 


5 


14 


20 


6.5 


Im. 


2 


« 


24 


20 


34 


55.3 


Em. 


3 


tt 


5 


16 


42 


25,9 


Em. 


2 


tt 


31 


21 


3d 


2.6 


Im. 


3 


tt 


6 


19 


46 


11.9 




1 


Sept 


1 


19 


38 


53.3 




1 


tt 


8 


14 


15 


10.7 




1 


•« 


6 


19 


57 


42.3 




2 


tt 


12 


16 


56 


10.7 


Im. 


2 


tt 


8 


21 


32 


23.8 




1 


tt 


12 


19 


18 


45.3 


Em. 


2 


tt 


13 


22 


33 


29.2 




2 


tt 


15 


16 


10 


59.9 




1 


tt 


17 


17 


54 


106 




1 


tt 


17 


10 


39 


55.1 




1 


tt 


24 


19 


47 


32.1 




1 


tt 


19 


9 


34 


28.3 


Im. 


3 


Oct. 


1 


21 


40 


51.0 




1 


tt 


19 


12 


6 


11.0 


Em. 


3 


(( 


6 


17 


31 


19.8 




3 


tt 


19 


19 


32 


5.1 


Im. 


2 


(1 


6 


20 


31 


46.9 


Em. 


3 


tt 


22 


18 


6 


50.5 


Em. 


1 


tt 


8 


19 


38 


56.6 


Im. 


3 


tt 


23 


11 


13 


0.9 




2 


tt 


8 


23 


34 


7.3 




I 


tt 


24 


12 


35 


46.1 




1 


tt 


10 


18 


2 


27.3 




2 


u 


26 


13 


35 


28.8 


Im. 


3 


II 


13 


21 


29 


26.5 




3 


it 


26 


16 


8 


6.8 


Em. 


3 


tt 


15 


22 


15 


6.8 




8 


March 2 


11 


25 


44.4 


Im. 


2 


tt 


17 


19 


55 


42.5 




1 


tt 


2 


13 


49 


2.3 


Em. 


2 


tt 


24 


21 


48 


56.5 




I 


tt 


3 


14 


31 


37.8 




1 


it 


26 


16 


17 


13.9 




1 


tt 


5 


17 


37 


7.1 


Im. 


3 


tt 


31 


23 


42 


10.8 




1 


u 


9 


14 


1 


22.4 




3 


Not. 


3 


16 


46 


252 




3 


tt 


9 


16 


24 


57.3 


Em. 


3 


It 


2 


18 


10 


29.3 




1 



* Bm raawki oo tliiM •eUpew ia tiM FnlimfaMry ObMnratioot. 



Digitized by V3V7VJV H.. 



1885L] PosiTioir Atfu HAasiTimi of Tax wlukob or saturn. 19 





d. 


h. 


in. 


f. 




Bat. 




d. 


h. 


m. 


■. 


BftU 


OT. 


9 


19 


22 


52.3 




2 


Dec. 


4 


14 


40 


50.3 


I 


(i 


9 


20 


3 


47.7 




1 


(C 


4 


16 


30 


29.7 


S 


9i 


11 


14 


32 


8.1 




1 


c< 


9 


23 


6 


2.7 


1 


CI 


11 


16 


27 


31.9 


Em. 


3 


tt 


11 


16 


34 


29.3 


1 


«c 


15 


23 


58 


49.9 


Im. 


4 




11 


19 


7 


18.5 


3 


«< 


16 


21 


57 


8.3 




1 




13 


11 


2 


54 


1 


<c 


16 


21 


59 


24.0 




2 




16 


23 


59 


47.3 


1 


it 


18 


16 


25 


29.5 




1 




18 


18 


28 


15.9 


1 


« 


18 


17 


21 


28.9 




3 




18 


21 


44 


9.2 


Im. 2 


c« 


18 


20 


26 


49.0 


Em. 


3 




19 


11 


53 


16.7 


4 


« 


23 


23 


50 


33.7 


Im. 


1 




19 


14 





13.0 


Em. 4 


M 


2o 


18 


18 


54.8 




1 




20 


12 


56 


42.7 


Im. 1 


ff< 


25 


21 


20 


12.3 




3 




22 


11 


3 


7.0 


2 


« 


26 





26 


18.0 


Em. 


3 




24 


13 


14 


23.6 


3 


« 


27 


12 


47 


17.9 


Im. 


1 




25 


20 


22 


104 


1 


•C 


2 


17 


55 


12.0 




4 




27 


14 


50 


39.3 


1 


<« 


2 


19 


45 


356 


Em. 


4 




29 


13 


40 


10 


S 


« 


2 


20 


12 


25.8 


Im. 


1 


It 


31 


17 


14 


2.7 


3 



Position and Magnitude of the Rings of Saturn^ according to Dessel and 
StruvCffor every fortieth day in the year. 



6h. A. 




p- 


L 


a. 


h. 


M. 


«'. 


M. T. at Wa»hiogt«>n. 


• / 


^ 


n 


^, 


^ 


• / 


1834 Dec. 


31 


— 1 60 


-f- 18 86 


88.95 


9.16 


365 46 


313 4S 


laSS Feb. 


9 


— 1 43 


13 45 


41.69 


9.91 


356 86 


313 83 


March 


21 


— 1 56 


13 54 


48.75 


9.77 


354 56 


311 58 


April 


30 


— a 16 


11 41 


48.73 


8.86 


35S 10 


309 6 


June 


& 


— a» 


11 a 


41.65 


7.96 


350 36 


307 38 


July 


19 


— 235 


11 as 


88.93 


7.74 


350 58 


307 56 


Aug, 


28 


— a 5 


13 50 


86.74 


8.16 


353 43 


310 88 


Oct 


7 


— 1 84 


14 40 


85 69 


9.04 


357 51 


314 47 


Nov. 


16 


— 059 


16 38 


85.95 


10.19 


363 37 


319 38 


Dec. 


26 


— 039 


17 47 


vija 


11.46 


366 30 


333 16 



p. Angle of the semiconjugate axis of the ring ellipae with the 
circle of declination, positive when east, negative when west 

I. Angle of elevation of the EarCh above the plane of the rings, as 
seen from Saturn, positive when north, negative when south. 

a. Semitransverse axis of the rings. 

h. Semiconjugate axis of the rings; positive when their northern 
■nrface is visible, negative when their southern. 

«. Longitude of the Earth as seen from Saturn, reckoned on the 
plane of the rings and from their ascending node in the equator. 

«'. The same longitude reckoned from their ascending node in the 
ecliptic. 

*«* It has been recently discovered, that Saturn is not placed exactly 
in the centre of the rings. This singular circiunstance was for some 
time considered an optical illusion, occasioned by the shadow of the 



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« 29 9 36 M. 

Ml. 10 3 4« A. 

84 9 7 M. 

MmhlO 9^ 41 A. 



83 
April 7 
^ 80 

7^ 18 

JtUM 3 
a 



3 27 M. 

7 33 A. 

19 M. 

68 M. 
5 7 M. 

1 26 M. 
15 10 18 M. 
30 10 38 BL 



^ Tlie Mooti*i~ Libralion if hera loppoMd to iakt liMp 1 
oTher orbit, and by the Time of the greatert Ubnti^ of^ 
Dm6 V to andentood ^e inetast at which, to a^ pbtyyetj 
of the Earth, the Tariation of the Diae from ite moa 
itp mazimanL The liffat handjoolvom indicates IhO j 
Biaon'e Oiae in which the Libration takeapkoe, ilp 
gveateet change of the Moon'i ■orface will become ▼iAI^.*' 



J. JkttlU^skovimgthtmumimUd portion qftUDucg^Fi 

Tito ftHlowliif mmlMn are the vvned tlDM of tb« portk 
ai f tar io b« iliuaiMtcd, to an obMnm oa the Eutli ; the 
ptaMli, at any tima baieg eooaldarad J.O. To a qpaetator 
ifpiar laaat britliaat oa Iba 11th of Fabmaiy, aed Mata t 
tiaa oTUa eooiai iato <»|ipoiitUNi to tba fidia. 



Jaanaiy 






15 
14 

, if 



Vairaa. 


Man. 


0.168 


Q.991 


0.403 


0.940 


0JS61 


0.907 


0.686 


0.890 


0.788 


0.908 


0^ 


0.985 



o 2835 
Jolj 
Aug. 
Sept. 
Oct 
Not. 
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an |»4ir«v«iilig after tlie Son. Baf dw lidb%r piMl& J 

to iftjioi oonJaiiotkMi, and ^ otken fhun eonJiiBetiim to oppori^om 

tt»|N»mU»votiiUig. . 

l^lBf" 80 Fcbriiary 2St^ ; ftpjOoowf JNUnh lit; in infeiiori^ UVtH^ 

' If uch S3d ; al gmi^it Rtn^jm jPloaigiJSan jgP^SO 

•npi^rfif d HayjlTti^iatgr^teattMten^ ^ofl^tifyai^ff 

t •latkmaiy Joly l^th ; in mfsiior jc5 Jnly. 17th ; atatli^fiy 

t western el(nigatlon<i^9» 4^) AngWt5th ; in attiji^ 

•f 1^; at ifrttateat eaftef^ elo^^^on '{SM^' 4|0 wt 

bietober 97th ^, in inlimor ooiy^etioh (when, it ji^ 

ijitiie.auO NoTembor 7th; atimonaiy Nownber IGlh^it 

" i elo||gaUon (19^^(80 NoTember ilth. < 

ble opportaqitiea iuM^^yfns^ ibk planet, thia je|^J||^ 

p^lbein thi» pvttmngh^$ nmrm% in thebq|j|^ 

L and last of Nosrember, and in ih*- evening tfiet j— fMt 

" 1 1^ n^ itpipis^it ejtongatio^ ft^^ tf^i J^ Wm^A^ 

^l||i$alionar7 Jf^m ^ft^i m^Wfi^^t^ miif^ng^ 

tir^W » WlHMft»»^«#wW^!^ |rtatJpnwy,Febniiinr W»S<1n 
^4ff^ 7jth; fn ciQiya|wtion^Peoei9h^ 9jM^ 
will be atationaiy Jannary 26th; in qnadrattpii^ Ffbi^iQi 

^J|p li^ ^pMAmUvp J^namj I3th ; ftaOoMqr F^brnafp (Hi 

kQetpbiirl^ 

iUi^l In omipi^ iAnfMl »i; aia ii wi my - 
I qnadratnre November 10lh. .9|^ 







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foUHoon, Jan. 14, 4 A 

•»*- " " 88, 4 A 

F0b. 13, 6M 

27, 7 M 
Bfareh 14, 5 A 

S8»11A 
April 13, 2 M 

27, 4 A 
Maj 12, 10 M 

27, 8 M 
June 10, 6 A 

25, 11 A 



i€ 

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FiiU ** 
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Full " 
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114 
082 
106 
0.75 
0.94 
0*73 



New 
FoU 
New 
Fdl 
New 
FnU 
Mew 
FuU 
New 
Fall 
New 




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The unit of altitude at any place, ia the riee It diil _ 
iriiieh arrivea jibout a day and a half af^r Ihe tiiii^ lit^ 
Moon, the Sun and Moon at the moment of conju^ttiii^^ 
hATing" been at their mean diatanee horn the Ea^'^iMI' 
of the ceieatUl equator. ^' 

' The unit of altitude at any place (which can be 
nation only), multiplied by'the quantitiea in the above 
the height of the apring tides at that place during the 

It wiU be leen ihat the tides of March 15th, April 
September 23d, October 23d, and Norember 21st, will 
efeli in 1835. 

file aotnal rise of the tide, however, depends ip mlodi 
■ttdt Creation of the wind, that it not unfrequently 
wUflb "weald, tnidependently of these, have been emaS, 
yOtlierwiBe ma^ greater. Bot when a tide, wIAA 
BfUL and Mooi^ are in a fiiTorable position for 

I te «ll]l ftirthM* in cr e ai i d by a 1^17 eHong wMti- 
rwai lie tt»MMnk[ioi4y float, aiifflcient periiapy. 



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5 

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0<ii^Aiwa]Mlb . '.' ' 
GlBtofGuMr . 

HaoqitoiifiMdt , \ ; 
HiUfboroiigii Inlet 
HdiiiM*iHole . . ; 
Jiha'vSt. (N. B.) 

V S4.(N.F.) . . 
Knmfebee . ' ' . . 

^ir IiduMi Sound 

Lcmitbi^f (C.B.) . . 

Maehiai 

Bfaiblehead 

Muy'a, St. Bar . . 

Monomoy Point 

Mtoe lUw (Bay of Fjmdy) 

««. JUandCMe.) V 
MbUBt Demrt . 
Mootha of the MiaaiaBiiipi - 
Nantnaket (Shoal and town) 
NaaBa»(N.P,) 
NavBodfbrd . .. . 
Nawbaiyport •-'■', 

NawH^Taa . , . , ^ 

NlftWpOlt > .. ;, 

Nbw YOEX * i 

Norfolk 







6 

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m 

7 

IB 
11 

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6 

w 

\^ 

1* 
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PttMunaqaoddy Birar 
Penabaoot River . 
SO PtfiiKnilh 
Portland t • 
(Port Hemer 

« Hood . . 

■** Jaekaoii 

*• BoMwaj 
PoffHomtkClf.H^) 



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^ Vlie (bUowing TUO^ eimUiiurtli^ diMBtftin ^ 
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bjr which thp tima «t tnjF of thm^maj Im euilf i 
iHMCti^ tha diffiBreaqe M the piaof U qoavdon from 1 
lv|^ the lifn -;>ia pfafiked^to H ;^d V bidding it, wh 

fflie time of high wat«?, ia|tha ,efd(uidBr pages', is 4 
iflUneidiately preesdu te sontbiagtvf t^ Moon.' 



AVSkny 
AtHinwn, St 
AUiapoHs (N. 8.) 
Mnapolii (lid;> 
AAg«istiii#,€t'v 
Btj, Brieted . 



ft' 



Broad . • 

Casoo 

Chebaeto . 
OeneTieTO, and > 
StBarbe 5 

Basnrd's 

j^istelet • « 
*.Miry'i 
fMdiiiph (N. a) 





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-^0 46 
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-^3 50 



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— S 
•^2 30 



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4:^ 4 19 Cape Chni^MlI^ , £^ ^ 
Cod , 
Fear , , 
Hattexas 
Henlopen 
Henry 

Lookont • 
IdtMaiy • 
May . ; 
Romain (8. C.}' 
Sable (N. 8.) 
SpUt 



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^OaOtOidPolillOMrfM 
—0 461 
—4 PljrflMNitli 
--1 90 Portknd 

— 1 80 Poftemmrtii (K.&) 
+4 OFortCttBptoll 

— 916 « Hood 
— S 63 <* fidwo 
-^4 40 
—9 60 

— 45 ** Hogria 
—9 60 PnmdMioo 

Qaebee 
—1 ORmoPoIbI 
— 4 46RidtaflMid 
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4-5 6 

4-0 80 

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—0 46 

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—0 80|euid7 Hook 

SoTbumfi 

St SuBon'o Btr . 
•i OAog 
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twilliin a ftw monUiit bii4 mfif N iflie4 qn i^tlilM 
/fh* Latitude of the pUeet niMicod vith m t Im 
Uted by otherf, «id toiviBmoMd Ibr poMiaitio^. 
O^^b LM^iliuleof ^ plMM VMtfked with j^* ;irw 
Cidllor from obMrrationi on t|ie Annuls TSxXtpmyt, " 
ii/,. 1831, after correotiMi ibr the enoni of thelfoapi^* 
% Iha tables of jpwMKMMAU The LmgiiMd^ ^£ i^'om 
Btlj determuMd V Ihe Ed^or 1^ 
in qnetrtion nith Waehiii|t^,. the U] 
FhlMelphia, or Boaton; A« 9qM9tioB of which ia 
ttofiy aicerCained. 

' ISha Latitude and lioaigit^de* hQweTar, of YeiUff, 
Itt tb« following table, whi^ve no lecant obae^?at&i|ii^ 
«fa t» be ooneidared onfy aa rovgh approzunatiQna. , 






JbtnapoUtt 

Aiil^uniy • 

Aqgiiata, 

^tevfto (Stole Hooae), 
BiipuDore (Bat Mon't]^ 
Miuror (Court Houae), 
Biimtoble(01dC.H.X 
Bttotia, 
AfliMifbrt, 

fiMan, (State Houae), 
rSiirtd! (Hotel), 
~ "'n (Navy Yard), 
ick (College), 




3riBibridge(Harv.Ha]l), 
Camden,- 
CaHandaiffua, . 
Cape Cod (Light Houae), 



N.V. 

D.a 

Md. 

N. YJ 

6a. 

Me. 

Md. 

Me. 

Masa. 

N.Y. 

8.C. 

Maaa. 

R.L 

N.Y 

Me. 

N.Y, 

Maaa. 

S.C. 

N.Y, 

Maaa. 



lAtifadft LoogiMiii, 



, • « ti ... 



^43 S9 

88 49 

89 
49 86 

88 98 

*89 17 18 

*44 47 to 

♦4143 9 

43 89 

89 38 
^49 91 18 
*4ia9 8a 

40 4110 

a.88 

49 88 
^48SI16 

84 17 

49 64 
^49 9 10 




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TABLB or JLATITUDK A]f0 LONGITUDE. 



Charleston (Ccillege), 

Charlestown (Navy Y'd), 

Cincinnati, 

Columbia^ 

Columbus, . 

Concord (State House), 

Dedhara (Court House), 

Iktroit, 

DonaldsonvUU, 

Dorchester (Ast Obs.), 

JJOVtTy • • • 

Dover, 

Easton (Court House), 

Eastport, • 

£denton, 

Exeter, 

Drank/ort^ 

Fredericksburg, . 

Dredericklonj . 

Frederickstown, • . 

Georgetown, . 

Gloucester, 

Greenfield, 

Hagerstown, 

Hafifaz, 

Hallowell, . 

Harrislmrgf . 

Harfford^ , 

Hudson, . 

Huntsville, 

Indianapolitf . 

Jackson^ 

JtfftTson^ • . 

^nnebunk, 

Kingston, 

Knoxville, . 

Lancaster, • 

Lexington, 

LUtieRock, . 

Lockport, • 

Louisville, . 

Lowell (St Ann's Ch.), 

Lynchburg, 

Lynn, • • • 

Marblehcad, . 

Middletown, 

JHUUdgevilU, • 

Mobile, 

MotUpditTf • 





Latitade 


Loniilnde, Wen, f 




North. 


in d«groea. 


in time. 




• / n 


• /' f • 


h. m. •. 


S.C. 


tM47 


•so 53 


*5 90 8.5 


Mass. 


43 23 


71 8 88 


4 U 14.3 


Ohio. 


89 6 


84 il 


687 38 


S.C. 


33 57 


81 7 


534 38 


Ohio. 


39 47 


88 8 


5 89 13 


N.H. 


•43 13 39 


71 39 


445 56 


Mass. 


43 16 


71 11 


4UU 


Mich. 


43 34 


83 58 


5 81 53 


La. 


30 3 


91 3 


6 4 8 


Mass. 


t43 19 U 


71 4 16 


4U17 


Del. 


39 10 


75 80 


5 3 


N.H. 


43 13 


70 54 


443 86 


Md. 


*38 46 10 


76 8 


5 48S 


Me. 


UM 


66 56 


437U 


N.C. 


36 


77 7 


538 38 


N.H. 


43M 


70 55 


443 40 


?/• 


38 14 


84 40 


688 40 


Va. 


38 84 


77 88 


6 10 83 


N.B. 


46 3 


66 45 


437 


Md. 


39 34 


77 18 


5 9 13 


S.C. 


33 31 


79 17 


5 17 8 


Mass. 


49 86 


70 40 


449 40 


Mass. 


43 87 


73 86 


450 34 


Md. 


89 87 


77 85 


6 10 90 


N.S. 


tU39 90 


•68 86 40 


*4 14 37 


Me. 


U 17 


69 50 


489 80 


Pa. 


40 16 


76 50 


• 790 


Conn. 


41 46 


73 50 


4 6190 


N.Y. 


43 14 


78 46 


455 4 


Ala. 


34 36 


86 57 


6 47 48 


Ind. 


39 66 


86 5 


5U90 


M'pi. 


33 33 


90 8 


6 089 


M'ri. 


38 36 


93 8 


6 839 


Me. 


43 35 


70 33 


449 8 


U.C. 


U 8 


76 40 


6 640 


Tenn. 


35 59 


8)54 


635 36 


Pa. 


40 336 


76 30 33 


5 5 93.9 


Ky. 


88 6 


84 18 


5 37 19 


Ark. 


34 40 


99 13 


6 848 


N.Y. 


48 11 


78 46 


5 15 4 


Ky. 


38 8 


85 80 


549 


Mass. 


*43 3S45 


171 18 45 


I445 15 


Va. 


87 36 


79 33 


5 17 98 


Mass. 


43 38 


70 57 


448 48 


Mass. 


43 30 


70 53 


4 48 38 


Conn. 


41 34 


73 39 


450 86 


Ga. 


38 7 


83 30 


588 90 


Ala. 


80 40 


88 11 


559 44 


Vt 


44 17 


79 86 


450 94 



Diflt.llro« 
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JM^||||(II]li -i^' i"*' . • • ii*C* 
H#f|lMvgfi9 • i • N.Y. 
IffNpiMrypoitpUi Prei. CA Mu 
N6Wontle» ) ; • DeL 
Mw^Mavm (OoUei^)^ Conn. 
Nmn^ijoiidoiit • Ootrn. 

Heir4>rImiii(C%), La. 

N6W;¥ork (CHtgr HaU V ^ N. Y. 
Norl^ (FarOMT'i Bank), Va. 
Nortkan^Hon (Maii% IL),MaB8. 
Norwicby • • " CSoiiii« 
Peiiai6Qla» • • Fa. 

Petefibttnr, * , > Va. 
Philadelphui (Iodise R.\Fth 
PitUborgh, . .Pa. 
Pittaftald (lot Con. Ch.), Mass. 

N.Y. 

Mass. 

M6. 

N.H. 

N.Y 

N.J. 

R.I. 

L.C. 

N.C. 

Va. 

N.Y 

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Me. 

Fa. 

M'ri. 

Mass. 

Oa. 

N.Y. 

Mass. 

J'a. 

Ml 

U. C 

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Pkttsborg, 
PlyoionUi /Court iL), 
PorUaod (Town H.), 
PMsttooth (CkmiC H.), 
Poogsbkesfsie, 
PruMMtoni ^ . 
Providmee (Old Col), 
QuelMo, (Castle), . 

Bidmwd (Capitol), 
Rocfaaeter (RV House), 
8«ble4€aoe)ft . . 
Saekett'ii Hafbonr, 
Sa^iv'^ • • ! . • ' . 

8t,AMfB«iM, . 



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f 41 47 11 

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4147 IT 
18 47 

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114110 

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48 U 
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%8 448 

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TIM 

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70MM 

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T8 48 
fTTMM 

11 18 
T187 
70 M 
11 M 
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t^TOM 
81 1 
TIM 
71M 
84M 
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74 M 
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32 February, Sico ' 'J fh, (fegins on Sunday. [ttm 


Twi ioAwaa. MetnUitie. 




ill. m. |li. in. 


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h. ra. (w u 




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h.m. b.in. 


Boflon, 


5aam. 


6 90 a. 


A asm. 6 56 a. 


a 20m. 7 3 a, > ism 


7 10 fl. 


A Omi VJIL 


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fi 81 


6 67 


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FknUuttricr, 5tli day* 9li. 37Jin. A. Lul Uuarwr, 19th da r, inK43.amA 
Full 31o.»n, i;Hh •' 5 5L6. M. Now Moon, 27lh ** 7 JO.fl M 


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36 Aprii, Fourth Month, begins on Wednt^day, [183^ 


Twiliflit be%ioM aod eniti. Moan tim«. 




lit il«y. 


7th day, [| 


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4 Tm,8 I a. 


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1886.] Aprii has Thirty Dayt. 37} 


PWMt* oftlM M«Mi4i (BMU tin*) ud DwUoation ofUw PlucU. | 




Utday. 1 


7th day. 


13th day. | 


19th day. | 


S5ih day. 1 


SmUh,, 


Doc 


Sm£*«. 


Dec. 


SmUka 


Hmt, 


HmUkM. 


llM. 


.«MUA«.| 


Dee. 




h.m. 


• r 


b.m. 


• 1 


h. m. 


• / 


h.m. 


• ; 


Ih.m. 




9 


10 97m 


— 7 3 


10 98m 


— »6€ 


1 10 360 


1 — 8 61 


10 8im 


— 63 jio 4im 


-(-3« 


V 


9 19 


—19 99 


9 91 


—10 81 


934 


— 830 


997 


— 669: 9S9 


— 8 81 


i 


8 98a. 


--95 1 


8 169. 


--24 3« 


6 3a 


.--94 7 


6 6ia. 


--3S86 


640a. 


--99l# 


a 


SM 


--90 7 


838 


--90 81 


333 


--91 6; 


3 8 


--31 30 


966 


--4118 


a 


iisom 


— 19 


11 18m 


--04(1 


11 70 


1-- 139 10 66m 


--3 38, 


10 44m 


--884 


* 


4ft7 


-|-15 91 


436 


--18 8S 


4 13 


--17 66!| 3 48 


- -19 13 


3 93 


--90 96 


? 


4 8 


—19 60 


449 


— 90 I 


1 ^^ 


— 90 J4i 3 67 


—90 961 


383 


—30 88 


u 


3 47a. 


-|-91 14 


3 98a.;-|-9l 93 


' 3 9a 


.-|-9188! 9 6ia. 


+91 46 


9 89a. 


-f3167 


h 


4410 


^698 


loro — 6 17 


,1160 


— 6 6M11 96 


-466 


10 60 


— 446 


¥ 


938 


—19 81 


9 6 1— 19M 


6 43m I— 19 31 II 8 30m| 


—13 16| 


768m 


—13 19 


^ 


m . 


Moon rites or nu. Mi'an time. 




1 


il 


4 




1.. 


1 


h 


PHENOMENA AND OBSERVA^ 
TIONS. 


o 


II 


1 


1 


r 


u 


a 


Sundayt and other RejnarkabU 


<s 


li 


s 


s 




Daye. 






»eu. 


9€ti. 


nts. 


$eu. 


$et$. 








b.m. 


h.m. 


h.m. 


h.m. 


h.m. 


h. m. 




1 


3 88a. 


9 66a. 


963a. 


9 49a. 


9 868. 


9 33a. 


C5 9 f «. distance V, 


2 


833 


10 66 


10 64 


10 49 


ID 33 


10 98 


Battle ofCopenhageD, 1801. 


8 


4 10 


1168 


11 63 


U 47 


11 30 


11 94 


d^U- d$9. 1^44' Sooth 


4 


5 


. . . 


. « • 


... 


... 


• • . 


[of?. 

6th Sunday in Lent. 


6Ma. 


66m 


60m 


43m 


9dm 


19m 


6 


840 


1 60 


1 44 


1 37 


1 18 


1 13 


d J ^. Rev. in Braxil, 1881. 
OSQ' 9 al greai. weft. eloD|r. 


7 


7 40 


9 38 


938 


927 


9 9 


9 8 


8 


888 


3 19 


3 16 


3 10 


964 


9 48 


French entered Spain, 1828. 


9 


996 


864 


3 61 


3 47 


334 


8 30 


Insurrection at Lyons, 1834. 


10 


10 18 


496 


498 


490 


4 11 


4 9 


8 hO- Bank U. S. incor. 1816. 


11 


11 9 


mef. 


me*. 


ruet. 


ruM. 


rigeM. 


CJ?i« distance 10'. 
Palm Swtday. d ^ h- 


5. 


s 


8 9a. 


6 9a. 


6 3a. 


6 08. 


6 oa. 


18 


SID. 


793 


799 


730 


7 18 


7 11 


Insurrection in Parif, 1884. 


14 


OM 


8 44 


8 41 


638 


836 


893 


BatUeofAlmanza, 1707. 


15 


143 


10 4 


969 


964 


989 


9 36 


17tb. Pres. Jackson proteitad 


16 


9 61 


11 19 


11 14 


11 7 


10 60 


10 46 


[against the Senate, 1884. 


17 


8 43 








11 66 


11 60 


Good Friday, d ? f m. 
19th. Byron d. 1824, aged 86. 
Easter Sunday. Bat. of Lexiof • 


18 


468 


97in 


9im 


um 




49m 


S 


6 69m. 


1 98m 


190m 


1 um 


66m 


20 


• 47 


9 IS 


9 8 


3 8 


1 48 


140 


[ton 6l begin, of Am. Rev. 1775. 


21 


789 


9 60 


946 


343 


397 


933 


d ]> ]^. Insurrection at Moa- 


22 


896 


8 91 


3 17 


8 14 


3 3 


3 


[treal, 1882. 




910 


8 47 


846 


843 


884 


333 


St. George. dj>?. 


24 


968 


4 10 


4 10 


4 7 


4 3 


4 3 




25 


10 88 


480 


4 31 


430 


439 


480 

4 6em 


Lou, Sunday. St. Mark. 


S. 


11 18m. 


4 6im 


4 63m 


464m 


4 67m 


tt 


1164 


Mte. 


•eta. 


9€tS. 


M(«. 


»ets. 


York, (Toronto) U.C. tak. 1818. 


28 


88 a. 


760a. 


7 47a. 


7 44a. 


78sa. 


7 39a 


Mahometan year 1851 bcgiiM. 




190 


860 


848 


8 43 


897 


838 


Epervier taken. 1814. [178t. 


ml 


9 7 


960 


9 40 


940 


938 


9 17 


•d J U- Washington ivMiL^ 








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, 






J*as- 

1 A 


6 IS 140^ > Bl m- 

186 MT *» 


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ass- a'«-»»-^iTKlB?'.3 


t 


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A«i^ iVfir iU riMt and MU, (oor. ftr rtftMi.) 1I(9!.U 




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1 


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m 


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1 


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K^J: 


MU. 


HMf. 


•ite. 


Kfif. 


Mte. 


rbM. 


«ftt. 


H(m. 


iite:. 




£ir 






h.B. 


h.m. 


km. 


h.m. 


b.m. 


b.ak 


h.m. 


kHm. 


h.m 


^m 






IP. 


4f4 


eaa 


4SS 


6 66 


6 a 


668 


6U 


6 41 


617 


•*f 


§r?l: 


■■ 


la 


« 


7 « 


16 


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1 


66 


19 


a 


16, 


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«v 




iSC 


4« 


7 1 


467 


6 67 


6 


664 


6 11 


6 46 


6 16. 


6 86.. nmm 


1 




4M. 


«0 




66 


66 


4 66 


66 


10 


44 


16 


^\^M. 


i 




• To. 


4» 




66 


66 


66 


66 


10 


46 


w 


m 


^'Jl& 


r 




6W. 


48 




64 


7 


67 


66 




46 


IS 


41^ 


fl^ 


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TTh. 


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66 




66 


67 




46 




48 


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8 P. 


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66 


66 




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MX- 


46. 


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61 




64 


660 




47 




a 


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4 44 


t 8 


466 


7 4 


4 66 


7 


6 6 


6 46 


6 11 


6 44 

u 


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lie. 


43 




46 




68 






48 


1A 


^^ 






aiHi. 


a 


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48 




61 






40 




66 


M^at 


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»w. 


41 


11 


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66 






00 




46 






4Th. 


10 


IS 


46 




46 






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^ 


Hf;- 


] 


• P. 


ao 


la 


44 




48 






61 




46 


oif^ 




<a 


«8 


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46 

4a 


10 
7 11 


47 






68 




47 


1;4VJ 






tse: 


417 


71S 


4 46 


7 6 


6 


08 


6 6 


646 






aM. 


as 


16 


41 


19 


4ft 






06 




66 


'i'^^ 


1 


Ilk 


as 


W 


40 


16 


46 




460 


64 




61. 


rri*' 


1 


iir. 


.81 


IS 


as 


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44 




iO 


64 




46 


^^"Oi 


1. 


ca2 


u 


» 


as 


U 


a 




66 


66 




66 


:««C& 


i 


IH^. 


M- 


SO 


67 


16 


a 


10 


67 


66 




66 


TJi^tB 


f 


MC 


m 


^1 


as 


16 


48 


11 


67 


66 




61 


iLSJ 




1 


BE 


4ai 


7 IS 


486 


7 17 


4 41 


7 18 


4 66 


6 66 


6 t 


6 61 


^#«M 


1- 


.'l;j 


:m 


IS 


S6 


16 


41 


U 


66 


67 




68 |6ilii£| 


1^ 


«ti^ 


*# 


.ii 


64 


16 


40 


is 


. M 


67 




«^ 


ihijjL'in 




i4li 


m. 


-M. 


86 


66' 


14 


66 


06 




88. 


ii('£^ 


♦■•SV* 


in 


:;M 


» 


, as 


16 


64 


66 




68 


^f jiBi 


'„^, t _1^ 


^m^ 


88 


86 


U 


64 


66 




66.' 


4iE^H| 


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1835.] Majf has Thirty-one Days. 39 




Pun(« oTtb* MMiikiu (mraa tim«) and l>*eIuwuoD of th« PlaMto. 






lit. day. 1 


7th day. 


13tb day. 


19tb day. , 


95tb day. 




SouUu. 


l>«e. 


SmithM, 


Dee. 


SoMtkt 


Dee. 


~ South,. 


Dec. 


Souths. 


Dec. 






h. m. 




h. m. 


• 


b. m. 


• 


, h.iD. 


• 1 


b. m. 






V 


louin 


-hT 9 


11 13m 


--U 60 


11 87n 


1 - -18 a 


4 oa. 


--90 60 


87a. 


--28 6S 




? 


933 - 


-066 


934 


--140 


9 37 


--4 1 


oj 9 89m 


--8 66: 


9 49m 


--980 




J 


6 28a.- 


- -92 18| 


6 18a. 


--91 33 


6 7a 


.--904 


4 468a. 


- -19 63 


4 46a. 


--18 66 




fi 


2 41 - 


-92 16, 


928 


--99 33 


9 16 


--994 


8 9 9 


--98 1 


149 


--93 11 




a 


10 asm - 


--4 80, 


10 22m 


--596 


1 10 110 


1--8 1 


9 10 om 


-7 10J 


949m 


--7 69 




$ 


256 • 


- -21 34 


2 31 


--93 37 


' 9 4 


--938 


8 187 


--94 90 


1 9 


--94 67 




i 


8 9 - 


— 90 62i 


243 


— 91 6 


9 18 


— 912 


1 1 49 


—91 87 


1 90 


—91 64 




n 


2 14a. - 


-f22 71 


1 66a. 


-j-99 17 


188a 


.-H«26||l90a.j 


-HB34| 


1 9a. 


-j-99 49 




h 


10 34 1- 


-4S8| 


10 9 


— 498 


9 44 


— 49 


3 9 19 


— 4 16: 


866 


— 4 11 




w 


7 85m! 


—12 9, 


7 12m 


-—12 6 


1 6 49m' — 19 


3 6 96m— 19 1' 


6 9m 


-19 




"S ' - 


Moon rises or set*. Mean-timo. | 






s 

S 


11 
II 










PHENOMENA AND OBSERVA- 




o 

a 
o 


i 


fi 


So 


h 


TIONS. 
Smidayt ctnd other Remarkable 




1 




S5 


I 


S 


^ 


Daye, 








•eU. 


»tt». 


«eu. 


teU. 








fa. m. 


b. on. 


h. m. 


b. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 






1 


2Ma. 


10 49a. 


10 43a. 


10 37a. 


10 19a. 


10 13a. 


St. PkUip and St. Jamee. 




2 


8 47 


11 46 


11 39 


11 32 


11 13 


11 7 


d ]> 1 n. Bat. of Luizeo, 1818. 

M Sunday a/Ur EasUr, 

d J <y. [died, 1827. 




5L 
4 


4 88a. 






11 68a. 




«83 


34m 


28m 


22m 


4m 




6 


• 94 


1 16 


1 12 


1 6 


049 


44m 


Bonaparte died, 1821. Laplace 




6 


7 1« 


1 63 


1 49 


1 46 


1 30 


1 96 


[Presideot't protest, 1884. 




7 


8 « 


226 


229 


2 19 


2 8 


9 6 


The Senate refosed to receive 




6 


8M 


263 


2 62 


960 


248 


9 49 


Ship Astrea lost, with 208 out of 




9 


940 


820 


3 20 


3 19 


3 17 


3 17 


[til penoni, 1884. 
3d Sund. a/Ur Eaeter. d D h* 




A 


10 ssa. 


8 46m 


3 48m 


3 48m 


3 60m 


3 69m 




11 


11 83 


ri$9». 


rwM. 


riseg. 


ri$e». 


rites. 


L. of Lake lost, with S16 persons. 




12 


S 


7 33a. 


780a. 


7 2«a. 


7 12a. 


7 8a. 


Bat. Phanalia,48B.C. [1833. 




18 


82m. 


866 


8 61 


846 


828 


8 93 


Virginia settled, 1607, O. S. 




14 


184 


10 10 


10 4 


968 


9 39 


983 


Vaccination first applied, 1796. 




15 


287 


11 14 


11 8 


11 1 


10 49 


10 86 


Cape Cod discov. 1602, O. S. 




16 


889 


... 




11 66 


1138 


11 32 


15th. Severe frost in U. S. 1884. 




S. 


4 880). 


7m 


im 


. . 


. . . 


... 




18 


688 


049 


046 


39m 


24m 


19m 


17th. Sup. d90. 




19 


828 


1 23 


1 90 


1 16 


1 3 


69 


d^^. [fiiyetted.l834,a.77. 




20 


7 9 


1 61 


1 49 


1 48 


137 


1 34 






21 


769 


9 16 


9 14 


9 19 


9 7 


9 6 


d 9 1 y 8 dist «'. 




22 


888 


930 


936 


930 


934 


934 


D ¥ ©• '^^^P* ^^"^9 1^^' 




28 


9 18 


9 67 


968 


2 60 


8 1 


3 9 


Battle of RamiUies, 1706. 
Ragatiom Sunday, d P ¥• 




& 


9 68m. 


8 ism 


3 9im 


3 23m 


3 98m 


3 8im 




26 


10 86 


8 41 


846 


3 47 


860 


4 


Rogation Monday. 




2tf 


11 18 


MU. 


hU. 


Mto. 


Mte. 


Htt, 


Rogation Tuesday. 




27 


4a. 


7 43a. 


7 89a. 


7 33a. 


7 loa. 


7 iia. 


eclipsed, invisible in U. S. 




28 


062 


844 


886 


889 


8 14 


8 8 


Atcemion Day. d P 9 & U* 




18 


148 


9 41 


986 


9 38 


9 9 


9 8 


28th. Wm. Pitt bom, 1769. 




80 


S86 


10 89 


10 96 


10 19 1 


10 1 


966 


Sir J. Mackintosh died, 18SI. 


^. 


*L 


898a. 


11 loa. 


11 ua. 


11 6a. 10 488.1 


10 43a. 


Smdai^ o/ter Atcciuioa. 





Digitized by V3V7VJV H^ 



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Utclip,ia*b; ^90 





• • • ||18p. B^ifl^ 4i; wmria^^tflf 



42 July, SevtHih Month, he^ins on IVednesduy. [1835. 1 


Twlli^hl begim ■ihI vuti*. M«iiii Iiiji«. | 




liUiiif. 1 


7lJi day. 1^ 


13lb day. 
aefinf. End*. 


1 i^k d»y. 


^bd.,. m 


BsfiiM. 


li.><l«. 


Oftgiiit. 


blodM, 


^H^n»*,Ead: 


?"»^ 


bpH. ■ 




b* m* 


h.m 


b. tn. 1 


h. m. 


h. ni. h. ID. 


h. m» |b. 111. 1 


h. n. 


h.». ■ 


Borloo, 


a ijm. 


9 Ma. 


t lom. 


3 43 a. 


i 3601. 9 44 a.! 


3 3AID' 3 3T a. 


9 44m. 


898a 1 


N-York 


196 


9 40 1 


da^ 


»38 


ii» 


9 31 


3 4S 9 31 1 


iii4 


818 I 


W«h, 


tS9 


t37 


J44 


9 34 


3 Al 


3 13 


300 


9 U 1 


1* * 


8T I 


ChtH«i. 


S 13 


ifta 


a 17 


a Al 


3 39 


B4B 


327 


8 4ft 


^n 


918 I 


N. Orl'i 


935 


8 41 


b^s 


a 39 


a 33 It f7 


337 


6S4 


9 41 


898 I 


/'*r^fw««<./!^irw«/«A*^««- , .^ ^ ■ 


Pftri«f«, 7th,4li,A. 1 Apoiew, I9ih, Ih. A. ■ 


t'UAiLs *tf Uu ,m»H. m 


Fint auirler, 3d daj, 9h. 33.3id. M. | Liui auArter, 17tti daj, lOh. 36.0m. If. ■ 


Full M*^o<^, lOfh '' 1 ^.7 M. 1 ^Pw mmn, 2Hh »• 6.1 A, H 


1 


11 


tiujj n itftper kmn ru»§ uid >«lt| (cur. ti»r rulracl.J M. 1 . 1 


llijjii wttiar. M. IomH 






i 




f 


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§ 


a 


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1 




1 




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«<iti. 


5 


^ 




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1 




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rwijv 


«i^. 


n#M. 


sU». 


ruftf.' 


MtU. 


ruejr. 


mc«. 






■ 






h. r». 


h. tn. 


h. ta. 


Ii. en. 


It. m. 


h. m. 


h. tn. 


h, m. h. taJ 


tl. Qt. 


h. m. 


h.m. 


h.i,. ■ 


I 


W. 


4 9C 


140 


4 31 


7 84 


4rr 


7 33 


4 A3 


7 11 


A 1 


7 A 


3 A7H, 


3<ia. 


tofnuH 


2 


Th. 


96 


40 


as 


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u 


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4-33 38 


3 om 


-(-93 48 


1 331] 


Q-f^HI * *"" 


-f-33 53 


40m 


+99 18 




h 


930 


-940 


858 


— 9 53 


837 


—10 


3 8 16 


— 10 13 


764 


—10 99 




W 


5 na. 


—13 15 


4 54a. 


— 13 13 


4 318 


I. —18 


91 4 8a. 


—13 4 


8 40a. 


—18 




* 
1 


. 


Moon rises or mU. M«ao time. | 






II 




• 


* 


^ 




PHENOMENA AND OBSERVA- 




-!{ 


i 


.5 w 


1. 
15 

5 


S5 


TIONS. 

Sundays and other Remarkable 
Day*. 








»ets. 


seU. 


sets. 


seU. 


sets. 








h. m. 


h. m. 


b. m. 


h. in. 


1. m. 


h. m. 






1 


9 85a. 


3 39m 


3 38m 


3 30m 


8 3im 


3 30m 


2d. Ronaparte crcmned, 1804. 




2 


10 18 


4 31 


439 


430 


4 17 


4 16 


Battle of Austerlitz, 1805. 




8 


11 3 


533 


530 


530 


5 14 


5 10 


Revolution in England, 1688. 




4 


1149 


rises. 


rises. 


rises. 


rises. 


rises. 


*dDTa. 




5 


a 


4 7a. 


4 15a. 


4 3ia. 


4 39a. 


4 47a. 


2d Sunday in Advent, [begins. 




^ 


86m 


4 43a. 


4 6ia. 


4 68a. 


5 18a. 


6 36d. 




7 


1 39 


5 30 


534 


5 41 


6 1 


9 


d D U- Istsess. 24ih Congress 




8 


S30 


18 


8 30 


33 


050 


058 


Rhode Island taken, 1776. 




9 


3 11 


7 16 


733 


7 38 


7 46 


759 


J. Milton b. 1608. [S.C.,18S2. 




10 


4 


8 18 


834 


838 


8 43 


848 


Pres. Jackson's proclamation vs. 




11 


4 48 


934 


938 


9 31 


9 41 


9 40 


da^2cOph.dist.i',*(JlH?ft. 




12 


6 35 


10 31 


10 34 


10 30 1 


41 


10 45 


Gay died, 1732. 

3d Sunday in Advent. ^ I» v !!(• 




S. 


6 3im 


11 39a. 


11 4ia. 


11 43a. 1 


1 43a. 


11 45a. 




14 

15 


7 7 
755 












Washington died, 1799, a. 68. 
, [ton, 1778. 




49m 


50m 


49m 


40m 


47m 




16 


840 


3 3 


3 1 


1 58 


1 51 


1 50 


d D h- Tea destroyed in Bos- 




17 


9 41 


3 17 


8 15 


3 11 


3 59 


9 50 


Simon Bolivar died, 1890. 




18 


10 41 


430 


4 33 


430 


4 11 


4 


d D 9 . [1818. 




19 


11 40 


5 58 


5 53 


540 


5 38 


6 33 


d D ^. Fort Niagara taken, 
Ath Sund. in Advent, d iQ- 




& 


53a. 


sOs, 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 




21 


1 57 


5 13a. 


5 30a. 


6 36a. 


6 44a. 


5 53a. 


St. Thomas. dD?. [1620. 




22 


S58 


630 


33 


6 38 


64 


7 


Winter begins. Land. Plymouth, 




28 


8 53 


7 41 


740 


750 


S 3 


8 7 


d D ^' Washington res. eom. 




24 


4 43 


855 


8 59 


9 1 


9 9 


9 13 


Antwerp surrend. 1882. [1788. 




26 


538 


JO 


10 8 


10 9 1 


18 


10 10 


Christmas Day. ^dDrH- 




26 


« 11 


11 13 


11 14 


11 14 1 


1 14 


11 10 


St. Stephen, Bat. Trenton, 1776. 
8t.Joh$i. 1st Sund. aft. ChrisL 




S. 


«fi9a. 
7 S3 














oism 


18m 


17m 


18m 


18m 




29 


8 15 


1 33 


1 30 


1 18 


1 11 


1 9 


Java taken, 1812. [1814. 


80 


860 


334 


3 31 


3 18 


3 7 


S 4 


31it. Ist N. A. Bank est. ITSLA 


81 


045 


836 


8 31 


8 17 


8 3 


358 


(3 9J*<5^T^. \ 


1^^. 






5* 



















Digitized by V3V7VJV H^ 



56 



XPHKIIXKI8 or THX SUV. 

^l mean noon at Gretnmch. 



[1839^ 







MAY, 






-Tujjf%. 








IT 


aBml DiKm. 


a D. calm. 

m, ieo. 


b i 


u. 


Semi Biun, 


8. D. culm. 
m. fee. 


^ 






I 


lb stM 


1 5.T0 


i ^ 


it 


10 47.03 


1 3.17 


1 -• 






3 


%%J^'\ 


A,» 


1 


4 


4fl.70 


8.37 


.a ? 






5 


W.II 


e^oe 


s f; 


404»0 


8.30 


S ^ 






T 


M^ 


ft.Si 


.S '•' : " 


e 


40JSA 


8.40 


^.. 4 






n 


00.61 


0.41 
0^7 




10 

13 


40.10 
4a.P0 


8.33 
8.03 








la 


mM 


fi.73 


^.-^la 


14 


43.70 


8.63 


-1-= «^3 






15 
17 
1% 


BO.OO 
494S:t 


O.i0 

7,00 

i 7.31 


■553 ^"^ 

•5=:- ir 


16 

le 


4S,03 
43.00 
43,39 


3.OT 

3,e« 

8*70 








21 


M.BS 


7.37 


55 ==• 


n 


1 45.39 


0.70 


i' *9 






S3 


4f.M 


7*W 


°- = 


n 


43.30 


8- DO 


o- i 






S& 


48^ 


rao 




■26 


45.13 


3.63 


\^- 






t7 


47.00 


7.30 


m 


43.00 


3.01 






29 


47.i0 


7.^ 


m 


43,00 


e.30 


jq" 






31 


47.3i 


S.M 


i - 


;ta 


43.03 


8^ 


1 






dT 


y<>chnalloi) 


l^quiit, of T. 


tjidenul 


ii. 


UKtinutiDii 


f.olT. tubt. 


Side Ml 








north. 


\im<^. 




r^orib. 


fr,^^,liltllJlh, 


liDl«. 








» t if 


■n. i^c. 


h, ui. lec. 




■ i a 


ID. sec. 


h. fn. t«c. 






1 


14 ifi 4 -* 


a e«.oi 


8 34 40.77 




^ 9,E 


S 37.03 


4*7 OJM 






2 


lA 14 43.3 


3 7.aO 


33 43.33 




33 3 1S.7 


30.07 


40 Of. en 






9 


Ifi 13 37.0 


3 l4.iS« , 


4^ .UGt 


:i 


Si 10 3.1 


3 19.33 


44 33.13 






4 


la M U.l 


3 31^ 


40 3 40 


4 


33 S3 S&.3 


'J j>.«e 


40 4».71 






fi 


la T374 


3 37.09 


00 33.0J 


5 


aa m 37.7 


1 09.60 


Ofi4«.a9 






i 


16 34 43.7 


3 3340 


04^.50 


C 


3-J37 XO 


1 49J« 


0« 43.31 






7 


1« 41 Sa 7 


37,30 


A3 S6.13 


7 


33 43 16,7 


13030 1 


ft 3S.3fi 






§ 


Jtaa 6.9 


3 4t.T3 


3 3 33.ff7 


?^ 


^ 49 3.0 


1 S7.71 


4 3S »a 






9 


J7 U M41 


8 40 01 


1»,5I3 


U 


33 04 3i.l 


1 1M» 


8 33,4t^ 






^« 


17 M 111.7 


3 40.73 


10 15.TT 


10 


33 A3 38*3 


1 0.01 


13 9».04 






11 


17 40 4.0 


tSlJfT 


3 14 10 as 


II 


S3 4 4.1 


oos.aa 


10 U 01 






12 


IS 1 !IS.4 


03.40 


13 0.07 


12 


n e 13,7 


4143 


3*aa.ni 






13 


IS 10 »1^ 


3 04 09 ! 


S3 ft.43 


13 


33 1*3 3-9 


0S9.S3 


34 10*73 






14 


la 31 IB.8 


3 63.87 


30 1.0s 


U 


S3 n ii3.7 


lOJO 


38 10.^ 






15 


la 4i 41.1 


3M.^ 


39 06^ 1 


15 


n 18 34.0 


_ffi 4,41 


33 11^ 






16 


10 Ml m.^ 


3 0^.00 


33 33.13 


If. 


33 30 07.0 


-^ 8^33 


30 3.41 






17 


19 13 47.3 


aoaafi 


37 frl*OS 


17 


S3 S3 6.0 


SLOl 


40 4.i« 






IS 


10 OT 18d 


33.77 


41 48.34 


16 


33 U 00.9 


33.W 


44 131 






li 


10 40 30.4 


3 01.70 


40 44,79 


III 


31 30 10.4 


40.83 


47 3*07 






id 


10«»%^ 


3 49130 


4:) 414^ 


30 


S3 27 0.3 


03.30 


01 UJ^ 






11 


SO « 01 .0 


3 40.13 


3 03 37.90 


21 


33 S7 33.3 


1 IS.Ol 


« 00 OUli 






22 


90 18 3.0 


3 43,40 


07 34.40 


t^ 


33 37 40.8 i 


1 3»»7 


39 4T.T4 






29 


so30fta.o 


3 33.03 


4 1 31.00 


i£) 


!»37 30.3 1 


1 10^ 


a44.» 






24 


!10 41 SI.O 


3S3,4S 


37.00 


iJl 


33 SO 30,3 


i,oa.Di 


7 40.M 






2& 


^H^.% 


3 93,10 i 


34,11 


25 


31 30 37,1 


3 4,99 


II VIM 






n 


tl S \AA 


3 91,30 


13 90,07 


26 


33 33 33,1 


a 17.70 


lonji 






n 


31 It 40^ 


3 10.00 


17 17.33 1 


27 


33 31 34,4 


9 30,44 


WIMI 




JS$J 31 33 4%B 


3 a.tie 


31 lt.7« 


a& 


33 10 31.1 


3 43^ 


2Sflr.ti 




Iml n xi ^0 


3 l.» 


to\ft:i&^ 


y ga \^ a.i 


I -i.^^ 


. «t«i 




/ja/ f J 43 4J.0 




I aa «j»vf» 


\ T»V*»fc.l 


\ % \m 


\ ^XlfcJ 


^ 


/«/ fl! ftJ ?i-f 


% «e.i« 


I la %Jk^W 


tv\ la ^ «*■' 


C\ ^\^*& 


\ 'W^ VifcSW^ 



58 




EPHBME&IS OF THE 8tJN. 




[18351 








M mean noon at Greenwich. 










^' ' ^Err\^mn:\i. \ 


octoMeh. I 






U. Seinl lliam, h 


S. l>. calm. 


1 


D. 


eijffli d™. 


8. IK culm. 


.. 








jd 


m, lao. 


il 




,4 


m. tec. 


ffi 






2 


ta 53.91 


1 4.10 


2 


If 0*74 


1 4.13 


5 . 

A i 






4 

6 
S 




4,00 
4.0t 
3.1M 


4 
8 


1.S0 
KU 1 

a.4i 


4M 
4 33 

4.48 






10 


M.j^ 


3.91 


i-b i8 


10 


s,]>a 


4 31 








12 


6J.37 


a. ST 


wi ^.■- 


12 


a.sa 


4.73 






14 


^,4S 


3,sa 


j^-£s 


14 


4.0T 


4,90 


j^- i-^ 






16 


ee.io 


a.aj 


i^ st 


1@ 


4.Qa 


3.03 


i^ 2=1 






16 


&fi.9l 


3ia 


-s" IS 


18 


a 10 


4*33 


k^ II 






20 


«7^T 


BS4 


is sT. 


120 


a.70 


3*41 


1^ 1" 






22 


&B^] 


t.i<l 


f3=L 


22 


da3 


4.00 








24 


fte,w 


3P0 


°* 2 


24 


e.-fl 


3.e4 






m 


».O0 


3.IU 


S -s' 


2fi 


1-^ 


0.00 


£^ -fi- 






38 


1A&9.S4 


4*00 


!■ ' 


28 


7.80 


3.91 


fe * 






BQ 


15 QAQ 


4.07 


30 


B.31 


HM 


.a* 






n 


0,74 


4.ja 


f 


n 


8Jl 


e.s3 


^ 






~ 


iiiMjitiJiitiiin 
mirth. 


rr. ap. mf. lit, 


lima. 


V. 


Ituclhmiiuii 


Ikifiai. of T. 










B 4 M 


jn* Mc. 


b. ICt. ICC. 




« . 


m. IPC. 


h, m* <e. 






1 


I«e 7.» 


J_0 L44 


10 as 41,^ 


I 


3 39.a 


10 9,4!4 


13 37 fifi.0T 






2 


e VJ.9 


P_o n^i 


43 39. B3 


2 


3 S3 m.i 


10 3^43 


41 3&43 






3 


7 44 S3.a 


0B3 3a 


47 3fl.a7 


3 


a 47 16 3 


10 47.33 


4a43.oa 






4 


7 aa 90.? 


OA^W 


AJ 3£r.»3 


1 ^ 


4 10 30.7 


11 4.ffi 


49 49^ 






5 


7 10^ 


1 Ib.*JO 


Aft39.4» 


5 


4 SrS 41*1 


11 mos 


S3 40.01 






« 


37 £3.1 


1 U44 


M!Hi.04 


6 


4a3fi0.1 


11 41.78 


37 45 «I 






7 


la 89 * 


1 M.10 


11 B f^Jf& 1 


7 


A IB fr4.4 


11 ao.ai 


13 1 30.17 






8 


A 5-2 3P fi 


3 10^4 


7 1943 1 


8 


a 4^ M.7 


la 13.23 


3 34.73 






B 


a AO £^.& 


9 sa.ss 


11 1&*05 


9 


3 ft fiO^ 


13 ^%Si 


33,39 






10 


a 7 41* 


siei.47 


la 14.^ 


10 


1} 38 4Lft 


13 49.00 


]3 3S,83 






11 


4 44 56.B 


3 Il49 


11 10 e.7e 


1] 


A Al 97^ 


13 4,38 


13 17 34^ 






12 


4 aa 4*j 


3 3HJ03 


» a.a4 


12 


7 U B.I 


13 19^ 


3i ai.!»4 






13 


3. -HI 7^ 


MtSM 


31 ].eo 


'Ls 


T 3fl 45l.i 


13 34.3A 


93 18.30 






14 


3 30 7,1 


4 tt.04 


30fie.4« 


14 


7 A9 11.4 


13 48*39 


39 13.00 






U 


3 la a^ 


4 40 99 


34 ^m 


15 


8 21 33,4 


14 a*30 


13 ll.OS 






1€ 


9 4P fri.g 


A ^M 


39 JI14T 


W 


43 la.d 


t4 14.33 


37 0,18 






17 


3 9ft 43^ 


A S3. 11 


4Q 49. la 


n 


9 Aae.a 


14 m.w 


41 4.13 






18 


a 3 3t.i 


44.19 


46 44.S8 


IS 


Ba7M,S 


U 39.00 


43 ijm 






12 


140 S^ 


a &M 


00 41.34 


It 


9 49 4a.] 


14 00*83 


43 37^ 






20 


1 ]3 4».T 


emjm 


W 37.79 


20 


10 11 3M 


13 1.43 


B9B4J8 






21 


63 27.fi 


a 47.15 


6§ 34.33 














22 


W 4r4 


7 S.Ofl 


It 9 30.Bi 


21 


10 33 3.1 


13 11.Jft 


If 39 BSM 






2S 


« '9.1 


T9S.ffl 


3 31*43 


22 


10 M S0.7 


iaiO.OT 


14 47-48 








ioutk. 






23 


11 13 4B.9 


13 m^ 


4 44.03 






24 


lfl4&.9 


7 49^ 


la 10 ^m 


24 


1 !1 3fl 30.8 


la 37;^ 


i 40.30 






26 


4«13.1 


S 10.01 


I4«}.aj 


25 


U A7 43.3 


14 44.31 


19 37.13 






1« 


1 3ia^ 


«3049 


le ]7.o» 


2$ 


It 18 58*4 


IS ai.08 


13 13.7I 






27 


1 fT 4 4 


«io.«o 


M 13.34 


27 


13 30 0.4 


]« 43,91 


90 30WVI 






IS 


J mmj^ 


» 10^ 


Si lom 


28 


13 »a 30^ 


13 9*04 


AiSMi 




IW 9 ft us 


BiMS 


» ft-i«\\^ 


i \% W ^DWi 


\ \* %A\ 


\ nfeifcm 


k 


iMa 9 if J7.B 


9 torn 

30 0*49 


U »,»*l2 




1 \ \ft\«U« 


1 \ IfcVfcJ 



1835.] 



IPHEMXRIS OF THE SUN. 



59 



wft mean noon at Greenwich, 



UECmmER. 



"^mi 



NOVEMBER 



1 

3 
5 
7 
9'l 
11 
13 
15 
17 
1^ 
21 
23 

2rl 



9,3) 
9.19 

]ia7 

11^1 

U.Pft 
1 4,^3 



m. »cc 

o.aa 

7.11 
lr34 

7.A!J 

S.A3 
8,76 

O.fll 



a" 



D.I Btiiii Di) 



1 


16 UM 


3 


15,^1 


t» 


ia-4» 


7 


ia.7& 


9 
11 
13i 
15 
17 


ifl.ve 
id.71 


19 


ift.87 


21 


1«.W 


123 


17*10 


25 


17.19 


27 


ivn^ 


29 


17.37 


31 


nj» 



S. I>. culm, 
m- iec. 

1 9m 

10.14 
10.33 
10.46 

10.70 

lO.so 

10.S7 
10.09 

11.00 
ILOl 
11. OO 
10.07 



.1 ^ 




60 

5rVue Jippavtni Piatu of ^ of tht principal IHxed Slarg^ aecmdi^g I 
Btssd.for crcT^/ tudh da^ of the ytar. 





cc UrMBMinorii. 


a Arietis. 


a Ceti. 


; O T.uri. 


a Auris^ 




8 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


i 


1 


4 


i 




1 


1 


1 


1 




6 

& 




1 


1 » 


i 


Jl. 




li, m. 




Jl. m. 




b. m. 




' h," ^ 




18aa 


D 


8& 


1 1 fi7 


aa 


a a3 


3 


4 30 


ja 


S 4 


41 




m* «3C. 




Mf«. 


M 


tee. 




iec. 


r H 


■fiC. 




Jan. 0, 


§0 47 IJ 


15 £0.7 


fii.61 


4a 43.7 


a0.4^J 


-26 1041 


^ 77-60 


m 13 .3 


31.3t«* 


10, 


1 $sm 


n 0*3 


b3,AG 


43.4 


30 34 


10 3 


' 37.b4 


13 1 


SK04. 114 


20, 


30.6: 


0.4 


fii3T 


43.0 


39 ^ J 


».7 


37.i^ 


14.9 




30, 


*i3.i0 


a5 ^.i 


»j.^ 


43.4 


30.]] 


9,Q 


37.48 


14.7 


Feb. 9, 


ISU 


fi&.a 


M.m 


417 


mm 


6.e 


37-33 
! 37.10 


J4 3 


90.G»| 33J 


19, 


' «-40 


m,6 


auftj 


409 


M^i 


i.4 


14.4 


30 43 iLI 


Mar, I, 


1 3,1f 


auA 


M.SO 


40,0 


33.37 


S4) 


3709 


14.2 


30.13 Si 


11, 


09 i&.m 


fil.V 


ftl.QS 


30.!l 


39-et 


SJ 


, 30^33 


14 


aa^v «i 


SI. 


57. 3i; 


49,» 


al-flS 


30.3 


3«.43 


B*3 


I 30.ei> 


13.3 


^.73 »: 


31, 


O^.ti-.' 


4AJ) 


£1^7 


370 


3^34 


6.6 


90.34 


J3 7 


^.34 «y 


April 10, 


fl4,H6 


11.$ 


fiJ.Ag 


37.0 


86.129 


9Ai 


30.43 


13.3 


29.^ itl 


20, 


67. W 


30.7 


S1.G3 


30. a 


3e.2i 


0.1 


36.34 


I3.d 


«i.ti 


»l 


30, 


60 Un 


3fiff 


fll.74 


3B.3 


3S.a9 


10^3 


M.30 


13.G 


a9«i 


m 


May 10, 


a,w 


34 a 


J|l,i9 


36 4 


a«j.4] 


11.7 


93.^3 


I3.g 


aopo 


mi 


20, 


JD.TA 


B1.1 


&24m 


30.^ 


33.63 


w.o 


1 33.33 


14.1 


^^.01 


1 Hi 


30, 


n.ii 


m.-i 


m^ 


37.6 


S&.73 


14 3 


1 36.43 


14.7 


9»je» 


w 


June 9, 


34*33 


30,1 


ft-ieo 


3a.4 


3ti.&3^ 


10.] 


HS.Si 


13J 


a».t4 


m 


19. 


31.40 


^*& 


r^ffj 


3S6 


311 IS 


17*0 


'; aflTn 


16.1 


9944 


\ tu 


S^. 


i3Hi 


30.0, 


A3,23 


41.0 


3g.ta 


19.7 


3T.01 


17.0 


t»a» 


%a 


July i». 


■jT.iti 


30,tt^ 


^.^ 


43.A 


3&,7A 


ai.a 


97 37 


iei.0 


fi«39 


JM 


UK 


&1 &\ 


31, B 


£300 


44-3 


40 03 


aJ4 


27.34 


19.0 


10 9t 


wt 


20, 


41 l.Gi. 


3^6 


A4 34 


4111 


40 3d 


*25 1 


37.S3 


30.1 


»UD8 


nJ 


Auff, 8, 


sm 


sat 


ua-i 


4«.0 


40.67 


96.7 


3S.14 


913 


»J4f7 


si' 


18, 


11,50 


^4 


fii-B^i 


49 


40 t7 


a§^ 


93 44 


33.^ 


31 ^T 


13.1 


lis. 


19.f^i| 


4].i 


U.13 


91 7 


4123 


304 


31.77 


93.3 


31^ 


IM 


Sept 7, 


34,:i.t 


41.7 


A4.^ 


A3.£ 


4um 


303 


30.07 


94.1 


»JH> 


PI 


17, 


3sn 


19,3 


M.dO 


a^J, 


4177 


31.2 


29,37 


94.» 


99 71 


IW 


^r 


30,04 


£1.S 


fld.7n 


5(1.7^ 


41,90^ 


3(7 


!^oe 


S3.3 


St.lf 


13.1 


(3ct 7, 


31 64 


W.7 


Afl^ 


09 ]' 


4-2. IP 


3-2.0 


39 93 


96 


33^1.: 


(fJ 


1?. 


njb:* 


A9J 


66 C7 


*.,4; 


iiM 


3-2.P 


30.10 


90.3 


1I««9 


ItJ 


Kr ^' 


3i.in 


iS S.4 


ftcn 


41 0.4 


412.40 


31.3 


33.4;i 


m& 


t4«^ 


lU 


Nov, (J, 


39.71 


IB 


boas 


L3 


4sMl 


314 


3A.64 


se.3 


14 -8« 


IM 


JG. 


7A.m 


10^4 


fte.sfi 


3.1 


49.® 


30 Jl 
30.3 


MSi 


9&3 


u.m 


IM 


26, 


■Mi.m 


is.c; 


50.^1 


9ft 


43.74 


m.9S 


9S.4 ! 


ta.n 


«J 


Dec, 0, 


]»,i4 


Jfi.-J 


M.^ 


3.0 


43.7fi 


^e 


31.10 


33.3 


33 S4 


»4 


16. 


e^i 


]i,3 


5A,tfl 


1^' 


43,74: 


93.9 


91.13 


te.i' 


33*40 


93J 


20, 


J. 00 


flO,i 


M.1I 


3^9 


43.72 1 


38.3 


:;.':' 


930! 


i&.m 


ns 


30, 


eO 63.^} 


3l.a 


AA,OI 


3.0 


4^aa' 


37.6 


93.3 




93Jj 



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61 



TVue Apparent Places of ^ of the principal Fixed Stars, according to 
BtastlJoT every tenth day of the year, (Continued.) 





? Orionw. 


a OrioDit. 


aCuiu 


Majori*. 


aCaubMiooru. 


i9 OcmiDonuB. 




i 


i 


I 


1 


i 


1 


i 


1 


Si 


1 


1835. 




& 


I 


Q 




1 




i 




i 


h. in. 


^ 


h. m. 


^ 


ta. lu. 


, 


h. m. 


o 


b. m. 




6 6 


8 


6 46 


7 


6 87 


16 


7 80 


6 


7 86 


96 




•ec. 




iec. 




■cc. 


1 


•cc. 


^^ 


wc. 




Jan. 0, 


36 96 


•i 67.1 


14.72 


n 9.6 


58.06 


•29 48.6 


89.96 


3iB80.9 


12.89 


96 44 


JO, 


36 97 


63 6 


14 77 


6.9 


63.11 


46.7 


40.10 


29.7 


12.9( 


4.S 


20, 


86^i 


69.6 


14.76 


8.8 


63.13 


47.8 


40.19 


2S.7 


13.11 


4.7 


30. 


30.84 


•24 8 


1472 


7.8 


68.11 


49.6 


40.28 


27.8 


18.11 


6.9 


Feb. 9, 


86 7a 


)7 


14.68 


7.4 


63.03 


61.1 


40.22 


27.1 


13.17 


6.0 


, 1». 


86.67 


2.8 


14.60 


7.1 


62.92 


624 


40.17 


26.7 


18.19 


0.8 


Mar. 1. 


26 40 


2.6 


14.36 


6.9 


62.77 


684 


40.07 


26.8 


18.03 


7.8 


11, 


38.« 


2.7 


14.19 


6.8 


62 60 


64.0 


39 94 


26.2 


12.90 


8i> 


ai. 


36.05 


2o 


14 01 


6.9 


62.41 


64.4 


39.60 


26.1 


12.72 


8.6 


31, 


36 86 


2.1 


18.86 


70 


62.23 


64.4 


39.63 


36.2 


12WM 


0.9 


April lU, 


36.73 


1.4 


13.69 


7.2 


62.U4 


64.1 


39.47 


26.4' 


12.36 


94 


20, 


36.61 


0.6 


13 66 


76 


61.87 


63.6 


89.81 


26.7 


12.19 


9.8 


30, 


36.63 


23 69.4 


13.46 


8.0 


61.7-2 


62.6 


39.17 


27.1 


12.03 


10.0 


May 10, 


36.48 


68.1 


13.40 


8.6 


61.60 


61.4 


39.06 


27.6 


11.89 


lOU) 


20, 


35.46 


66 5 


13 37 


9.2 


61.62 


600 


38.96 


28.2 


11.79 


9.0 


30, 


^36.53 
^3.^.62 


648 


13 40 


10.0 


61.47 


48.4 


88.91 


28.8 


11.73 


9.7 


June 9, 


6a.b 


^U.46 
13.57 


10.9' 


614- 


46 6 


38.88 


29.6 


11.70 


9.4 


19, 


86.7S 


60.6 


12.0 


61.61 


44.6 


38.89 


30.8 


11.72 


9U) 


29. 


36 91 


48 8 


13.72 


18.1 


61.67 
O 61.70 


42.5 


86.94 


31.1 


11.77 


8.8 


July 9, 


36.11 


46 8 


13.90 


14 9 


40.1 


^39.02 
^39 16 


81.9 


^11.86 
124)1 


8.9 


19, 


36.34 


44.8 


14.11 


16.3' 


61.84 


88.0 


32.8 


7.8 


29, 


36.69 


43 


14.34 


16.4 


62.02 


86.0 


39.29 


836 


12.17 


7.1 


Aug. 8, 


36.86 


41.3 


14 60 


17.4 


62.22 


84.2 


89 46 


84.8 


12 87 


SA 


18, 


37.14 


39.9 


14.87 


18.8 


62.46 


82.6 


89U» 


34.9 


12.69 


6.0 


5^8, 


87.43 


33 8 


16 16 


I9.I 


62.70 


31.2 


89.88 


86.8 


12.84 


6.S 


Sept 7, 


87.7-2 


88 


15U4 


19.7 


62 96 


30.2 


40.12 


86.6, 


18.19 


4.7 


17, 


38 01 


87.6 


1674 


20.0 


63.24 


29.6 


40 88 


86U»i 


13.41 


8.9 


27, 


33.29 


37.6 


16.03 


20.2 


68.63 


39.6 


40.65 


368 


13.72 


8.9 


Oct 7, 


38.67 


37.S 


16.33 


20 1. 


63.83 


29.8 


40.94 


34-8; 


14.06 


9.4 


17, 


88.83 


Z%A 


16.61 


1971 


64.18 


80.6 


41.24 


84.li 


14419 


1.8 


27, 


89.08 


89.41 


16.89 


19 2 


64 41 


81.7 


41.64 


88.1J 


14 74 


0.8 


Nov. 6, 


89.30 


40.7; 


17.16 


18 6' 


64 69 


839 


41.66 


32.0' 


16.09 


0.0 


16, 


89 60 


42.2; 


17.40 


17.7, 


64.96 


86.1 


42.16 


80.7 


16.48 


24 69.4 


26. 


89.08 


43.81 


17.62 


16.8 


66.21 


87.3 


42.44 


29.3 


16.77 


68.8 


Dec. 6, 


39.61 


46.6 


17.81 


16.9 


66 42 


89.6 


42 71 


27.8 


16.08 


68.4 


16. 


89.9J 


47.2 


17.96 


14.9 


66.01 


41.9 


42.96 


26.8 


16.80 


68.1 


26, 


39.96 


489 


IP.M 


14.1, 


06.76 


44.2 


48.17 


24.9 


16.61 


68.0 


36, 


40.00 


60.81 


18.16 


18.2, 




46.0 


48.88 


23.7 


16.81 


681 



y Google 



IVtM ^^ippareni Placet of2Bofihe principal Fixed SHan^ aetoriing 
BeMselj for every tenth day of the year. (Continued.) 





aBjrdiB. 


a Leonii. 


aUrae BUjorit. 


|9 Leonii. 


a Vir|iox 




i 


, 


1 


1 


i 

< 


i 


1 


1 


i \ 




«« 
















t 


1 


1 

at 
h. in. 


i 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 J 


h. m. 


e 


li. m. 




h. m. 




h. ». . 


1835. 


9 19 


7 


9 69 


13 


10 63 


63 


11 40 


16 


18 16 1 11 




■ec. 


1 n 


■ec. 




tec. 




■ec. 




•cc. ^ . 


Jon. 0, 


98.7S. 


66 44.8 


34.49 


46 16.1 


394)3 


a» 18.1 


87.64 


»88.6 


1 9B.34n4i 


10, 


984M 


47.0 


34.76 


13.8 


39.69 


13.6 


37.97 


80.8 


9».« 1; 


80, 


39.14 


49.1 


34.99 


13.6 


90.10 


14.4 


38.37 


86.4 


1 30.01 H 


30, 


29.37 


61.0 


36.19 


11.8 


80.63 


15.7 


38.66 


ft4.3 


S0.», 11 


Feb. 9, 


39^ 


62.7 


86.38 


11.3 


30.89 


17.6 


38.78 


33.6 


30.61 1 


19, 


39.40 


64.1 


36.43 


10.9 


31.16 


19.8 


38.97 


33.1 


' 30.07; » 


Mar. 1, 


39.39 


66.4 


86.46 


10.9 


31.31 


23.3 


39.12 


330 


31419 « 


ilJ- 


39.86 


66.3 


36.46 


114) 


81.39 


34.8 


39.XI 


SS.S 


31.98^ • 


!• 


39.36 


67.1 


36.41 


11.3 


81.36 


37.6 


89.27 


33.7 


j 8l.43i 1 


31, 


39.16 


67.6 


36.84 


11.7 


81.35 


804) 


39.29 


34.3 


i 314616 


AprillO, 


39.03 


67.8 


86.34 


13.3 


31.07 


33.4 


39.29 


36.1 


I 3143' 


SI' 


38.S0 


67.8 


36.13 


13.9 


80.83 


34.6 


39.23 


30.0 


i S149- 


30, 


38.76 


67.7 


36.00 


1S.A 


30.55 


36.3 


39.17 


3741 


i S1.72' 


May 10, 


38.83 


67J 


34.86 


14.1 


30.33 


87.7 


394)0 


37.9 


ai.TK 


20, 


38.49 


66.7 


34.76 


14.6 


39.90 


386 


39.00 


384» 


1 31.7D: 


T ^' 


38.39 


664) 


34.66 


16.3 


39.68 


39.1 


38.90 


39.0 


1 3140| 


Jane 9, 


38.30 


66.1 


34.66 


16.6 


39.36 


394) 


38.80 


40.3 


! 1 

3141 


]S' 


38.33 


64.1 


34.48 


16.1 


28 96 


38.5 


38.70 


40.9 


3144; 


29, 


38.19 


63.1 


34.43 


16.4 


38.69 


37.5 


38.60 


41.8 


31.46. 


July 9, 


38.17 


61.9 


34.39 


16.6 


38.45 


36.1 


38.63 


41.6 


31.36 n 


^• 


38.17 


60.7 


34 J8 


16.8 


38.37 


34.3 


38.41 


41.7 


31.16- 


. ^' 


38.31 


49.6 


34.89 


16.8 


38.13 


83.1 


38.37 


41.7 


Aag. 8, 


^38.37 


48.3 


34.43 


16.S 


384)3 


39.6 


38.33 


41.6 


S144 




18, 


47.1 


^8449 
"^ 34.68 


I64t 


384)0 


26.9 


38.38 


41.0 


M.M 




28, 


38.48 


46.3 


16.1 


.28.02 
,^i8.11 


23.9 


38.37 


40.4' 


30.86 




Sept 7, 


38.63 


46.6 


34.70 


16.6 


20.4 


89.38 


39.0. 


30.77 




«• 


38.81 


46.1 


34.86 


14.8, 


1 2828 


17.2, 


.884)3 
^38.41 


38.6, 


30.Tt 




2r, 

Oct 7, 


39U>S 


484) 


364)4 


13.9, 


1 28.40 


13.9| 


37.1 i 


30.70 




39.39 


«•«, 


36.36 


13.7 


28 80 


10.6' 


38.63 


364i; 


^30.Tt 




il> 


39.61 


46.8' 


36.49 


ll.4| 


39.16 


7.41 


88.60 


33.8 


30.79 


27, 


39.80 


46.7, 


86.77 


9.8> 


29.58 


4.4; 


38.89 


31.9! 


3oa)oj 


Nov. 6, 


30.10 


48.0 


36.07 


8.li 


80.07 


1.6 


39.13 


294»' 


3I4M| 


16, 


80.49 


49.6* 


36.89 


6.3; 


3060 


r7 50.1 


39.40 


27.6: 


3130' 


,^ ^ 


30.74 


61.4' 


86.73 


4.4: 


31.18 


67.1 


39.70 


»^l 


31. io' 


Dec. 6, 


31.06 


68.4; 


374)6 


"i 


31.79 


66.6 


40.03 


33.1, 


31.79{u 


iS' 


31J7 


66.6 


37.39 


0.8' 


32 41 


64.4 


40 J7 


20.8i 


33.10; 


2^' 


3146 


674)1 


87.71 


i»69.1> 


83.03 


63.8 


40.73 


18.8: 


324S 


36^ 


81.90 


60.ll 


304)1 


67.7i 


33.61 


63.8 


414)6 


10.91 


».ttI 



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Dr. Young's Refractions^ the Barometer being at 30 inches, and tJke inter 
nal Tfiermomeier at 50, or the external at 47, degrees; with the, corrections 
for + one inch in tiie barometer, and for — one degree in the thermom- 
eter of Fahrenheit, From page 19 of Vol. \st of Pearsons Fractieal As- 
tronomy. 



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The Table of Refractiona, continued: 










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The correcUoD for an increase of altitude of one inch in the barometer, 
or for a depression of one degree in the thermometer, is to be added to the 
tabular refraction ; but when the barometer is lower than '30 inches, or the 
thermometer higher than 47 degrees, the correction becomes subtractive. 

When great accuracy is required, 0,003 inch should be deducted from tbo 
observed height of the barometer, for each degree that the thermometer near 
it, is above 50 degrees, and the same quantity added, for an equal depression. 







Jl Table 


of the Sun*8 Parallax in 


Altitude. 






San*« 
Altit. 


Sun*> HortMntal Parallax. 


8un»« 
Alttt. 


8un's Uoiixontol Parallax. 




^, 








II 




// 








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8.4 


8.6 


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8.40 


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6.22 


5 


8.87 


S.47 


S.97 


8.67 


8.n 


50 


5.40 


A.46 


b,:^ 


6.aa 


666 


10 


8.27 


SJ7 


8.47 


8.A7 


8.67 


65 


4.82 


4.S3 


4.S3 


AM 


5 05 


15 


8.11 


8.31 


8 31 


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8.50 


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4-29 


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04X) 



Logarithm for converting Sidereal into Mean Solar Time + 9.9968126 
<' « << Mean Solar into Sidereal Time + 0.0011874 

A second of time, at the Equator, containi 1521 feet. 



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. qb««y. 


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■ ■ •, -■ ■ 


Biy 14 


Mny • *t - ^ 


CluDa, do. 






do. 88. 


••CoBeotd, K. H. 


Mayia, 


May 16, 


do. 88. 


HoUit, dp. 


dof 1^5, 


do. 6-8, 


do. 6-10. 


*BiirHiiflton, Vt. 
Gftmbndfle, Mbm. 


dttL 8*11, 


do. 4-^7, 


do. 17-88. 


rs:*' 


April 86-80, 


do. 7-18. 


Detroit, Mich. 


do. 17,, 


do. 1. . 


WilminfftoD. Del. 


do* <, 


do, 7* 


April 14. - 
May 10.-^ 


Bdtimore. Md. 


do. 1, 
do 6,(fiillbl.) 
Maicli47, 


Match 86, 


Antiapolie, do. 
WeehiiurUm, D C. 
PerryviQe, Mo. 


Anril 7(l4llbl.) 
March 81, 


do.n(fiinhi) 


do. 90, 


r a 


Anril 10. 


Upper Country, N.C. 


Anril 1. 
March 18, 


Lofper Country, do. 
dwrlreton, 8. 


March 1, 


do! 7. 


Feb. 18, 


F..b. 16, 


do. 1. 


Entonton, Geo. 


do. 18, 


do. 81, 


March 10. 


Netehei, Mie. 


Feb. 6-18. Pea 


ches ripe June 


18-16. 


Baton Ronge, La. 


do. 1, 






KnozvUle, Ten. 


March 8, 


March 19, 


March 88, 


Greenville, Ten. 


do. 16. 


do. 80, 
Feb. k March. 


April 18. 


little Rock, Ark jFeb. 


March 



At Savannah, ripe peachee of eseelknt flavor were eold in tfaenuniiti 
on the 9th of June ; and at Tkllihanee, in Florida, •tfawberriei' iM 
now potatoee were in the market in March. 

The flowering of fruit-trece affiwds a tolerably good coni|MraliTe 
▼few M* the forwardneee of the eeaeons in different places ; it is subjootj 
however, to considerable irregolaritiee in all parts of the country, bat 
more eepecially In the south. — A oorroppondenl from Savannah, in 
Oooif ia, remarks ; — *< With respect to the eompamllve forwardneii^ 
tlw eeaeons, an eetimate cannot be formed from the tiow of the flowom 
iaf of firoii-tfees any where south of Virginia, bec4nse during any timo 
in ttm winter, after eight or ten days of ooMw weather than nonri, 
Ihtf tttfne number of warm days will cause varions kinds of Ihiit trese 
' In blossom ; this is exceedingly common, to the complete destnw* 
lioil:oir tin greatsst part of the flmit for that year ; end it not unlhh 
4ilMl|i% hinpiis that one Umb of a peach tree will be in foil bloom sis 

vrnwhdbie the rest of the tree begins to bloesom.*' ** 

— P^l\ r ' l • ' 



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wg^thA'T^m^mid0A 


i^'WlPfcl 


'^^J^wS 


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4ftM. 


i^ 


Bmt. 


rl 




^8ir 

1890 
1891 

't9BH9 
1893 


April' e 
" 14 
u 96 
•1 14 

" 18 


" 91 
II 29 

« 95 

II S3 


M%j 4 


May M 

" 1 
« 9 


1^ m 


lA. ^^1 


1891 


" 14 


« 90 


<i 26 


w 1 


• m 




1895 
1896 
1897 


•• 9 
- 18 


" 19 
a 27 

M 10 


«« 96 
Mat 3 
ApA 14 


April 96 
l£y 6 
Apnl 99 


•• ^11 




1896 


IfarchaO 


« 9 


(1 28 


May 3 


« fk 


X|ipM 


1899 
1890 
1881 


AprU 9 
" 9 

" 9 


.. 27 
II 20 
« 19 


May 4 

ApirU m 
" 90 


II i 

April 98 

" 94 


«* 90 

- 90 


^ 


1889 


}Apr.l4 
•' Ifi 


Ap. 91 
.. 24 


Aprn 97 
« 24 


Bffay 9|Aprfl 91 
«• 41 « 9£ 


^ 



HI. THE METEORS OF MOVEMBE& ] 






[IVn Ibllowioff pcpOT on the ramarkabfe M«twrie ] 
ofir all put! of tlM Uiritod SlatM m Om noraiof af tte 1 
hii kMn forablMd bj iV^tefor (NaMtei, of TaW CWkg% Mmp.4 
Mfisw ud iatarMliiif eouuamieaUooi on Om Ml^iot la lJi»*f i 
9>iiMHii,'» pablithod io TolooMt XXV. and XXVL of tkat «a«|^J|| j 
linftnad fa a mora ftiU and alabonita aecoont.] 

Oil eomparing tbe acooanti that ware gi?an of Ihi **j| 
ia Tirioot pUoea, it i» found, that the appearaooaa i 
BMriy tli9 fame* being, with alight variattona, ap ftlk^ip^^ 
bigaa to attract notice by their fVeqaency, aa atriy mi' 
tJltsfwoading evening ; the exhibition beeana alriUaiiAf^ 
•iMii Wt aoal aplenifid of aU abont lbi|r o'olaik ; nail 
hmm^ dimfaiation, nntU merged in the Ught of day.^Jlk,| 

'^n.*9ifeaifleitiApvflaih,0tb.ai^9^ Saev 



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lvM7 wtew iriaibi Ibft^^i^ mm^ Vvm, IN 4lit •vftiSum 

««• «ttaiili^ iiii^p0e<i«9 H wif aMi^^lirt the iiMtMQi«xti|^ 
difltinet WMliM; Um finrt» ewMriiliac of |iAp9Jk»rw luiMf, 4|i|i«iKli^ 
daMribedliy a poini; the itciMd^ «f ]«igB Jir<4«ttfy tkttt at iBt#imi 
daftod along tha i^« laavinf lomiaoiia tiaiiia wiiieh oecaaiim)br 
mnaiaad in viawfe aMwter of minalea, and,iii aoma Qaaaa,ibt Wf 
•a liaiir or aKiyaitfaa tIMyOf widalhiad townoiif Ao^Mf, wfakHraiaiMiii- 
ad aaaiiy alafioiaiy la ihe haarana fiwr a loogtiBae. Thoaa of tha iiil 
fuiofgr waiatiia moat nmnarooa, and raaamblad a ahowar of fiaiy anpw 
drivaa with inconeaivabla relooitf to tbe north of waat. Tha aaoopid 
hbkitiffmx^ mofo like falling atara, giviag to many paraona tba^i^h 
pgawion that the atara wara aotnalljr &Uiog ftooii tha ahf » a j^paof^aja 
wUoh waa oontmnplatad hjr tha noia nnanlightanad . heholdata vflh 
ggaal amaaaaiaiit and taisot. Thaaa fim<hatta waia oaoaaiaiiailf aCiiMI- 
■rahfaiaa. Dr. 8oiiith|0f NofthCaiQiiaa,daaNampwiw|tfdia||^^ 
largar than tha full moon rtiing. ** I waa/.' laya he, '< atartlad bj tha 
aplendid light in wbioh tha anrroonding aoana waa ezhilttted, randering 
avaa amall objeeta qoite Tiaibla.*' 

One of tha moat reniarkai^te oiroimatanoaa attanding thJa d^pfaf 1^^ 
that tha mataon all aaamad to aaaanata fiom ona and tha aan^ |miii|{ 
that ia»if thair linea of diraotion had bean aontionad |i«9kward, Ihn^ 
wmMhavtt mat in tha aarao point, aoatheaat a Uttla ilnm ^ laalU^ 
ittwipaal mi aft dilbrant dialaacM ftom thia point, and* fbaowlfltg tibi 
aifcafliliahy, ran along tha ranlt with immanw valod^, daaerib^g 
Ittliqpa liMrtanaaa ^ aro of 80* or 4(^ in laaa than fear aa Tha 

IpiliaiWhidh thay laft waia oomnionlj wbatot bnt wan aopatimaa ti^ 
•A^pilh vtfiaimpriamalio eokok Ona ball (aaaa at Now HaTonyand 
min09^m;i0i^ baan idantaeal with ana daaoiibad bgr «iilp«i obaari* 
■ii»i||liprt^lntha northwaat dimalaon, and aX|dodad a Ultle MOfi^ 

E OapdK laft,^ JQBt balOnd Iha lOiiaa of ejCfMoB, A 9h^ 

lafpacnltarbaanlj. Tha liaaaf db^ae^ wna pi|^ 

II httft ilaoon bagaa to eaolml ittilili|i^|o 4ilMt » 

I io^aarama tha igM afa «i|#al diiN»l^g him(|^;jjj^ 

1 Jha.» wmmTi lamiaaai a<aad^>i^|ar> ^f^^ki$mjfjl^ 

I <lf^lha wind, at waa 




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^JtHCT'-".'^ .. 



72 THE METEORS OF NOVEMBER 13tH^ 183). [183S. 

gently in that direction) opposite to the course in which the meteor had 
proceeded, remaining in sight several minutes. 

Of the third variety of meteors, the following are remarkable exam- 
ples. At Poland, Ohio, a luminous body was distinctly visible in the 
northeast for more than an hour. It was very brilliant, in the form of 
a pruning-hook, and apparently twenty feet long, and eighteen inches 
broad It gradually settled towards the horizon, until it disappeared. 
At Niagara Falls, a large, luminous body, shaped like a. square iMe. wu 
seen nearly in the zenith, remaining for some time almost stationary, 
emitting large streams of light. At Charleston, S. C, a meteor of 
extraordinary size was seen to course the heavens for a great length of 
time, and then was heard to explode with the noise of a cannon. 

The apparent radiant, or the point from which the meteors seemed to 
emanate, was observed, by those who fixed its position among the stars, 
to be in the constellation Leo. At New Haven it appeared in the beod 
of the aicldt (a collection of stars in the breast of Leo), a little to the 
westward of the star Gamma Leonis. By observers at other places re- 
mote from each other, it was seen in the same constellation, although 
in different parts of it, a change of position supposed to be owing to 
the effect of parallax. An important observation, first published by the 
writer of this article, and since confirmed by the concurrent testimony 
of all the observers who remarked the position of the foregoing radi- 
ant point among the fixed stars, is, thart this point was staiioitary ^mong 
the stars, during the whole period of observation ; that is, that it did not 
move along with the earth, in itd diurnal revolution eastward, but ac- 
companied the stars in their apparent progress westward. 

According to the testimony of by far the greater number of observers, 
the meteors wore unaccompanied by any peculiar sound; but, on Uie 
other hand, such a sound, supposed to proceed from the meteors, was 
said to be distinctly heard by a few observers in various places. It is 
well known, however, that persons unaccustomed to making observa- 
tions in the stillness of night, are apt, when listening at such times, to 
hear sounds which they associate with any remarkable phenomenon 
that happens to be present, although wholly unconnected with it. The 
question, therefore, whether any sound proceeded from the meteors, 
must rest, for its decision, on the circumstances of the case; such as 
the peculiarity of the sounds, and their uniformity as described by dif- 
ferent observers. In the present case, the sounds supposed to have 
been heard by a few observers, are represented either as a hissing noiu^ 
like the rushing of a sky-rocket, or as sliffkt explosions^ like the burst- 
ing of the same bodies. These comparisons are thought to occur too 
vniformly, and in too many instances, to permit the supposition that 
they were either imaginary, or were deriv^ from extraneous sources. 
It is not held as a fact well established, that any substance reached 

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Haw qlliati. 

«»ft WpbM Oft iiMoi4«» mmtmm i^tlr^Artafs < 

IvitiM hadMif OMUMotiMiirilh tlM pIimmnmi* in 

at Miehiljmf hiMfl, •• mmmmmif ttM wm tlw i 

tlie latter jpait rf | l > ip ii | l »» ini Iha wMe of D#Mflib8r» Owl lb« 

IndiiM mUm iiwyhi wgtl'^iimiit tliia awnth, aadi 

lai ltt*aatb0 3d of Jaawrj. At tiia i 




tha aooMiwaalani Stataai aa fitf aa NairOflaaiia» ir^ 
In noat jMrla of New Eoglaad, aa vaaomaMBljr nuM 
bjr a raauurkably oold and baokwaid ipfing^ 
I domaaUc firaa to ba kindlad throoghout the AMath of Maf^ 
, ftaqueatly ia tka aaaalli of Joa». A aaooaariaa of falap mom^ 
d abpot tJie tiaia of tha awtoatio afaowar. fii8tl»Tll 
» aak fftcrwarda ia ipatioaa parta of tha OaHod Siitai^ 
BiiaifiilM in thia ooaatiy fhs thair fteqnaaojr and violaaoa* 

bi aatering oa tha aiplanatloB ol thaaa aayatadoaa phiBoaiaaa> It ia 
atgaad, in the fint place, tkmt ik$ aieeaora kmd ikrir origm Ujfomd A§ 
MmiU 9f m$r mtwko^hen; that thej, of ooaraa, did not balonf to tida 
aaith* bat to the ragiona of qpaoa aatlarior to it All bodiaa aaar tha 
aaith, iaclodlbg the atnloaphare ItMlf, have a ooanaao aioCioa with tha 
aartli loand iti azia from waat to aaat; hat tfia rmihmi poba, thai 
Mteatad tha aooioe from whieh tha metaoia omaaalad, IbOdwad tiai 
aapiia of the atara ftom aaat to weat; tharaibto It waa iadapiadaat of 
iKiaaith^a fotaiioa, aad ooaeeqaaatlj at a |^aa diataaaa firom Hi and 
ftha KpHa of thb ataioaphara» 

I thia poial, tha aazt liupkiy H 11^ if llf i^f^ 
'^wkme^ A9 mtUmra prvtmiUf that la, tha height of tiai 
(aoto apeah) ahoYo thraaHheaoffbaaafihr If thii 
tiit loo diataat ftom tho aailh to hata a paiaUax, qpaetatom 
III aaeh other woaMfalhr It to diflhtaat paiata la tha haar- 
«4i> lCflita«aaipktaa'obaarvaratBoato»BMalMdlbaparilioBOf tte^^ 
djppdl^ ftaiiUda alar, one ia Santh Oaioliaa woald laibr H lo'a ] 
£Mlt;«9i^ aad one ia Ohio woaU aea H ftrthar aaat Thai 
I af piaaadi aaliad jianiyif ia iiiliiilfmi, ani Off frttar ] 
7 

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Iiiii^4€lh«m0toorioeload. Tha 
iMlnitiiinlling dHBsnnom of riglil 
fSfittiBf * ii of tbe opinion, tlwt tho olttlhfasf ^ 
iMAfviM in odvaneiBf from north to aovlh/irill' 
oamo Uim pormllax. Wo nito ooniidw tUt 
dM-metooffe oload, «■ mfy «i ■pproiimi.tioniiiiO'' 
•d from dota thot are imporfoot and lomotiii 
It at probaUo, that the real eooreo of the 
more dietant than the limit here amigned. 
- Malexial eabetanoee eomparatively eo near tfie 
Aemaad mSlea, would be etrongly dFeeted bj te 
hodioi'oonetitatod of eaEoeedingly light materiahi'Oto 
preoeatly be ahown to hav^ been) would be readUy- 
^ earth from aoeh a height. Grarity , therefore* belag 
an adeqoate eauee, ie aseigned aa the ibree by 
drawn or impelled towarda the earth ; and henee file 
fell in parallel lines direoted to the centre of the eifti 
for their apparent radiation from a common oenti^i' ai^' 
undeiatood from the iuuMMd repieoentation. ' - 



,AH 







i; tiMl 

UMiibfftlMr float Hm MUM «dt,wo«]d app ei r to 4tem i i M 1 
mA to aofovifiiii gfatotvgtodljp; ihai tlM iMtoen ^nold aU iNwito 
wtoto fcmi> BBMWiiM^^— tin, JHMnelyy ih% poitd wh&nitm ukr nf 
«iMoa» IMBy BM* ili^^ilMliil nMl4; and tluil If any mitoflr ehaiiMd to 
«0!ift jBwitlyto Hm Mae «f vlnoay it wobM be mmi w 4'loflitoo«i 
bod^ ■tiiitoiMuy Ibr a lb w Moonda at the oentre of radialioB. . Aft theae 
ntoriHImn aio ia peiliMt aeeordance with the af^poafaMea of the oMto- 
oiil^iadaaoiihedby vafioaa obaenren. . 

i It ia doohtfbl, ftooi the want of the lofiiiiito dila».^ 
of the mateoaiy or the height of the a 
! aeeaiataljr aaeertaiaed; yet the liaiit ahopa iBttiatid iiJi 
^Mlf' belioTad Boft to jaaaBed the aoti^ diataaooi . Aoaoidlut to 
^ oatabliahed kwa of ftUiag bodioa, the iaqfoky la aoiii laalHatoi, 
<dbK iW d o tii f 4k$ mdmnwmld aapiira to fMmg ffwm a ptimi flB8 
atOtt otoof^ tAa aaitft to wriOm Jifly anlw ^ t«9 mr^, tfaia heiaf 
aaaaidntedoa aearly the height of the ataMi^eie. The ottodlatiaa 
§i«ia aaarijr a foloelty of foar aiUea per i e eoa d,aa that with ^ 
\entoied the .earth'a atmoapheie^ a Teloaitj 
r tho toaxiBiam reloei^of aoaaaoanballt and ahoat i 
'.eoand. it ataat he raeolieeted that the ati 
fa^daaai^ faiy lapidly aa we aaeead floai theeaith^ aatOaft the height 
aff if|p aiyaa» it Ja ao rare mm hardly to oppoae the leaat reaiitaaee to a 
Mto«Mi9ii|ghiit. It ia well haowB that when air iaaaddea^eoaa- 
jH^jkm mmliJfnMii^ of heatia eatrioated ftoaiiit A little i 
. oa thia priafllple fta Ughttog liadar» hy 
apaa. a eoafiaod oohuaa of air to a apatt. baifiLi 
A ipi#j|pilliHiii whiah jgaitta.aader at the hottiaa of the hanal. Ia 
Iha BMtaoiai oa -.aatonaig tha ataipapaiiai. praaaoaa fk 
wMliiifltp aapjil eaaipiaaiimi of theahr Iwfeie ti|aai»lhaa^airiiitti^ 
lijAjpiiiipiHt toifrodaeo to thMaVitttaaaa igBitlaA»aa4 if ^Ifk 
ppPfiPPP^piPaaaii la aei laeia oa iiw» "'.rjiutfi* 




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r of iMttk^KlrieaM ftoa tlie tta^^^kmi 
tJMtrf iWhittMt fiuaM«f» Alii €aa b*« 

I digTMt of iMtftfrodiMcd IP thai 
I whieh lh« flSQil veAiAiory i 
1 MiT»par; wa/i of ooiino H wm i 
i» «U tlw dfeeli of ifBitioD asd 
M fT o d. Mr. Twiniiig, i od oody oo ppo wi Iho^ 
MlHifii YoloeK|ry winnf Awn <lit Mutii'oi 
pMidftvl^ tte WMtioB hoio wi y p oo od to wrim \ 
iknj foil towanb tho earth with a w^Mktf of i 

Bbottld this MtinMto prove 4iM i 
I eonohMioM Imed opott liw id 
ittto the at^Mophere with jwj great reloeity, 
eanaei and its adequaej to prodaoe the eAboto < 
pieporliaDally augmented. ■■■^ i 

. flome of the larger ineleois moat have been bodiee o#^ 
If we Ineur the aotnal diatanoe of a liuninono bodfy «ni^ 
r oompared with that of the moon, it is eeejf li^'^i 
In the preeent eaae, we have no Wmmmii 
the etaet diatanoe of any meteor firom the oheerver, 
peoheble anppoaitions. Dr. Smith of North CSarDlin%'«H|4 
hi variona pkeea, aaw a meteor which ai^peared ae ^ 
If thia body were at the diatanee of 110 nri 
er, it moat have had a diameter of one mile ; If at I 
, Hi diameter waa 508 feet ; and if only one «uie^oi|1 
been 46 Ibet in diameter. Theae ooniideratlofia liive'^ 
muSf of the meteora wete bodies of ler^e ane, thoi^ il4 
enh to say precisely how hurge. The fact that they t 
» of the air, proves that they were i 
I ; etiU the quantity of amoke or reaidynm, vMdiri 
thebr deetraetlon, indioatea that their qoantily of i 
aMe. The momentum of even light bodiee <€ i 
anmbeia, traversing the atmosphere with oneh i 
Janet have prodneed extensive derangements in the i 
lihriiiffl. 



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etuii;y)p,«f lippni i9«liLli»« *k* ««Mj|qi>«ioii. tad jM!UBM^ai,«ii4 jtIi^ 
Jtent-jMlfg ii^'9jinM M p§y| j| l |bE % btf^g f''"Tj "^1^^? *IHh .fif^i t^^w ^ f^ f ^ffl iW 
l|»y^fflpMii<d it< f<^^iKlM^jnw^ TtvU tl^ t^tto of IIm viiiaMff 
fPjmdition of till myifit tbit IUIov«4 the m«laoriii» tlv^irtfy 0911% 
SJMMided .I9.U16M iwwjiiMi'Biftiiftw of ih* difltnudMBos '*f fhft *1iiiir*|ifiwiniiif 
•quUilirioiDy . }« a mf a wk i M f ftet, . tnd fimn Um opliiioii^«M%r 
soggestedy tluit meh duftoflMiice.M a natainl eAct of the -oi^MiM 
■hower, and it » # eqtOfMqiieii^y from which the meet ibnaidablf dsft* 

gen ittending ifbe^iiomuia of thb kind are ta be epiirehended. . , 

AitbongliL it «• doid>tfiil whether the meteon, in tnjr eaee. iieachi4 thf 
g^Qlid, x^t tjbereisreaaon to bellere that they eometimee deece9ded 
Tftj low. . A orediUe witnew Informed ns, that he law one explode 
mm^ ]<|eve ile train betweon his eye and an oppoiite precipice eeverel 
hoiidred leet in height The remarkable meteor before mepti|Mied>ti 
l0l,f ing exploded near the itaf Capella, left a train whioh e,iyhibited.agy 
peaifBcea eo peculiar^ thai it was a fit object upon whiisli^Ktl^ mW. 4l9 
m^pitjf whether the same, meteor. was seen bj persons, ijiiii^lf^ftoill 
each other. If this were the ikct, then the dilforeni p<»nt« Ui.tlbe-hfir 
W9im to which different obserYnn would refer it, would fornieh data^ 
•— timsting its heig^ Mr. Twining has rendered it probable that thi| 
ikol was sOy and grounded upon it the estimate that the place where thl| 
metier exploded was 29i miles above the snrfiice of the earl^.,^|[optf 
dSrciomstancesy howerer, mentioned by the writer of the ar^^ %^^ 
"American Journal of Science/' still render UjninewMtdi^qii^^ 
lAetber any single meteor could be identified as seen by dilEerei^^an4 
4Wfauit obserrefs ; and other fiicii strongly indicate, that the p^fli ^^T 
jjiotbm was much nearer to the earth, than the limit asai|pi^d by w, 



IMlA i<tgixd to the iui<icfs of the meteois, after estahlishing. the, ihel^ . 
thit Jt^ ir«ro combustible, Ught, and transparent bodies, it is in* 
fttiiil^'Vl^.tfae doud which produced the| fiery shower, oonsistid 
o^ j^MW aatler, analogous to that which composes the ta^ 
cf o^PMb .^'#e do not know, indeed, precisely what it ttie. ccHiiitai 
tf^ «ll& Mierial of wluoh the tetter are cempcM; h«t W ! 
mt fifWifiiif' Ugki, since it meets no appmlal^ l^i V 
m 'itilf jpibi^moTiQg eren among the sateUites of jli|ilnf i 
iiiiii|tt% iOii^ motion8|ahhoagh'itsownnotioaS|in aim cfi 
Jiiiiiy IliiiBfted, iSum proving its materiality; and we kttnT 
?• 

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4 



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i~iiwteon,ibr the molhNuiiMilii 
' wUeii tii«jr, in miuiy utetaaeci, i 
tfenl be mippoMd to have tome oonnwiiiil^ 
trfaieh they exhibited, it nmy b^ repliei, 
■f whimi iiiiMit feealt nooi the inpid ptofpati^i^ 
hia eofteieBt eauee of theee. Indeed, deetridiy I 
aaet nHoiud Tiew, owee iti light tnd heat to llli:ii 
IfM has aleo been aaeigned as the prinoiiial afcBl I 
Oa meteoric ahower. TheAaroraBoreaIiiyandth#t| 
Afohoi wbieh oceaah>nally appear in the aky*] 
yiwdia> relationa to Uie magnetiam of the eartl^^ 
in obedienee to the lawa of magnetic atttietla|u 
kind waa avppoaed by aome to appear daring the i 
Mpecudiy in the poaition of the apparent radiaiitt f 
by many obeervera, veiy nearly in the place towai4kl 
needle ia directed. From other obserrationa, bowtf 
the radiant point was not atationary with raapeet fili^^ 
aeooDpanled the stars iu their weaterly (nogreaSy'i 
such an apparent coincidence with the pole«of the i 
pnrely accidental. Moreover, were magnetism < 
the dtredion of the meteors, it would still leave theS^ J 
eoonted for. 

J^^drsifen gas, or'phosphoretted hydrogen, has betii I 
eansa of the meteoric shower. Collections of this i 
anp p ose d , were eihaled into the higher regiona 4 
cording to this hypotheais of the formation of ^ 
inflamed, eachibited the appearance of falling atara. 
timoi been eaUed in to aid the entire explanation, 
of this hypotheaia, that it ia assigning a cause not Igioi 
whiehi if its existence be granted, is not aufficient 
fheBoneaa. According to the view that has beeft 
fl^Jfaiooiio Stones, namely, by aacribing them to I 
^ypBthijiii baa been eoggested, that the meteors in V 
% jpiil^ Ofigfai. Bat the body which aflbrded thoi 
IJiflfa been of the nature of a aatelliie to th^\ 
iifthng aliiioiMiy with respect to thetirili^' 




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^Itt mpiSM to' •■§-'6flHlly -MNP Vfc i 

hvH «iffM mt MMrif vooBd Um •uIIi Ib »i 

MMiy d«gfw < of > p i r i tedto gfWt, '^> 

Hot eta i»t iuppoit lifct tto ewtfc, ia Hi mmm^ ptogmaj'ttk 
tfM Tieiiiily of > i i i iK lg ,irhkh wm eiaier ftaEteMiy, ori 
%tm iHuon^ wpmi». BMi m eoUcetlMi of awHer edttM not 
tionaiy within the lohr •jrttem, in an ininlsted^ttto; tad hid it iMMi 
iamolicaiiiiM^etfMrAKetientlian th«t in wUeh tiie Motik irfti aivr- 
iBf » it wmil# iMii luite been eepenited from tlie eerlil, ibiee» ^ta^ lii» 
eifilt hem while the meteoric shower lasted (and perhape li huMed 
inneh kmger), the 6arth moved in its orbit through the epeee of nmAf 
€60,OiN^ milef. 

Oil projecting a diagram to reproaent flie reepeetiTe pkeeaoflM^ 
Mtffh hi ita orbit, and the plaee of the body wfaiah aiM^ the metooHb 
tfww^, on the morning of the 13th of Norember, there hi HitaSlitiWk 
s^^ilaAable (ket, fta ^ eorfl, <ii ftr akmUA ftpdbSm.inluf'mwm^W' 
meef UruUy tmoariM ikBpoka frmm inAldl fie mtUonrfrU9tiM^'^Kiji/i^ 
ftom it but 8| degrees. Now the meteoric clond remained apparently 
at rest, and of oonrse, nearly in the earth's path, for at least two honrs. 
ninilcoald not have done; anlesa it had been iMTing nearly itothe 
\ direetion as the earth, and with^ nearly the same angrtiy » i imi) 
t the sen. For, had it bee» at rost, the earth, mwinf ttOlP Mlb 
ctf 19 miles per second, would hare overtaken it in kwe thai! Iwd iifal^ 
Vita %:m had it been movinf in the opposite direction, the medinf iranld 
inniilMettmdin etiU.lees time; or, had net the angnkr velooitiit of 
te tfitibipdiee been nearly e%iial, they oonld not have temalMdM kut 
nMfilMryiwith reapeet le each other. Henee it is inlbned, (1^ flit 
Ifte ie%t wkitk tigirdcd tk$ meUergt leae jwrsaj^f il» «iay akagr ^fkk Ha 

Tip JlriNffflM presentaitio]edpno«tp«Mtfw WjMhihit,iBfidl|.IM 
rm ig ^ ffji ^ the othw.^PPc h ittoPf ■ nyntip^f^ in tiwi 

A$'nmm m iOqrtiMl eiM, H^ l^ e j wpfft i i i i laliifl^,^dtpi <sip||» 
miHwiag^t^kdimmkmrtksm^rftkMiariL <&) fief fie M||tifir 
ijmM ^ NHaip Jis MfiflU, and ffii perttsKMi a lillls liie» 



dbyGoOglt 



r 



iMMMlMiMliiii^^ 



. T itf ) <h i 4&WK<g.- .y M mf ta mi i ^i 



mmmt^ 



haii^ mw^Mmg 



iMif tiM Act would aibfd a itrikiBg 

Uw tlMOffj w fbnnded on eTidence i nd t pMi d iWl nfj 

tion. It it mko migfeitod, that tkii Uglrt ai9im|I||| 

oiuve M tU 2S9dMco< %*(, and that Um l«llMr 

BOO parlia|Ni zemilUi fiooi a nobnloiif hodf mnlMflgi 

iaterior to the orbit of the earth. 

We oannot eonclade this akateh, without adyafttaf 
the proTident oare, which the Creator haa dlapleji^^ 
«fttth fiFom the direful eflbcta whieh the « &uy ahowerff , 
apMh eare» hare nnqoeationaUj produced. Had tfaie 
•titttted of materiahi a little more denae, their 
enahled them to reach the earth ; and had thej 
thnee* aeeonde longer, it is impoaeiUB to 
which'would have ensued by the deeoent to the 
magnitude, glowing with the most intenae heat MfXf^^ 
must hare been involved in one common deatruotioii.:,., 

OccuBAZircKfl or Similar PexxoMfRi^ 

1799. On the 18th of November, at Cnmana M 
thouaanda of meteors or ftUing stars were seen In 
during four hours. Of this exiiibition an acooont Is 
holdt and Bonpland. 

1803., «In the month of April, in some partii of Oit 
■ImQar i^enomenon presented itself. According <o 
iQaielte (Viiginia), << From one until three in the 
IMS Mffined to fiJl ftom every point in the heaveiMi Ift^ 
it Id laa e inble a shower of sky-rockets. " *^>iJ^ 

ISSSL On the 13th of November remarkable 
«Mi^%^ were seen at Mocha in Aralna, Ind, 0^ 
h^ in virions parti of Enghmd. For 

I aee the arUcle in ^e «« iMHil^ 





f l^m It, pigi 139-137. 




^■^Hs?^^i>\yn*i^^:;■: 



.>'pi^ . 



AMERICAN ALMANAC. 



PART n. 






d by Google 



I 



'm 

y^^^ 



*. -ii^i 



d by Google 







MISCELLANEOUS DEPARTMBNT. 



1 UFB-AMNUITT AKD OTHER TABLES. 



Tbi foUowing Iffa-ytfmwtfy TkUw, the IMtskmsmgAs FUm V 
lib JUiiffc ef i'Moefy ud the two 7MU$ toMiihig tk» JAnnkr ^ MFMg 
JhlaMffflMfi ^ ike UMtmt ACitMy cHofiMl Mcoriimg to Jfgt^ are iMtftnltill 
from the ** Memoin of the Amorieia Aeodomj of Arts and 8eiwigot> 
Now Sorieo, VoL I."; and thoj woro ftimkhod for that pdUioMioB 
by Mr. J. IngerMU Bowditeh. 



T]ba TWoy tihMtf^g tha Law of MortaUtsp In thaaorthtn: |MKi of 
thoUaiMBtatoaygtvtii hyl>r. Wifi^eoworthy In tho aaoond tOhnM 
oTtho MiiMoiiaof tlMAmaiieanAoadoflij/'balBf gaMnlljwadto 
y lo aaoortain tho Tahio of a Dowor>rigfat, it waa thov^ 
itoooaalraet tha Ibnowing TUblaa to fteilftato I 




tho Btptftttttfliir ^ ?-»<»>, ■i|'iiiii in 
^w^in tho U&Mod 8liitoa,aad hi flpoCHyof < 
islafffak of flfo jmshu Thoaa •iM^Mal||r;«Hll< 

ia» hat thaw k a ooBa Un a lla iMto > H > in 9(Mm, 
; tha Oufliato IriSof >MlaB«r #«tet m i^ 



y Google 



^j^-fcTllM.w. 



i9fM par MBt HeiBM/ff Um 
kTiaaeoftlM liftHriglHwwBUbt#«i«r%«lii4 

Tabu IV. ozhiblte tli* mAw of a Widow't Dttwitll 
$100. liisozieayoiiethirdof theTaliMgiTMlf inil^ 

Tbiii, if a widow htm a right of dower in aa wMliB iMk 
afe Mug 40 joan, and the rate of intereet 6 per oaatf UNI 
bf the TVble the preeent Talne <rf'her life*nfl«tJlOr^^^|i^^ 
heaee we get the preeent Tiliie of her dower, f030. 
Mune reenlt from TUilelll., where the lifb-rightk 
hu thlid part of fdOOO, or f 1000 eet off to her Ibr 
preeent valne f689^. 

Tjlml± T. ezhibite the valae of aa annai1|s oo a i 
age. Thne, a pereon at the age of 30 mnet pi^ 19^>lll ^ 
anltf of one dollar per annam, intereet being tit ippf^4^^j||4^ 
inlereet being at 6 per oent . r,,,y ^i^^\ 




:.-.^fy^^ 



eerfing le ike TakU of Dr. Wiggleiwartk fur ifa 
Cfta<>^ Jfibe ^ Ifte CtCy ^ CWiwIe ia £^glMi. 



. •'^•'H^e 



Alt. 


ir. State.. 


Carliiiltt. 


1^- 


U. StatM. 


Carlisle. 


1^- 




1 


JEIi 


^^ 


'T 


'^ 


SfSo 


r^ 


5& 


40 88 


51.25 


40 


96.04 


«7.61 


70 




n 


99i8 


48.82 


45 


23.92 


24.46 


75 


?S» i 


i*» 


36.17 


45.00 


50 


21.17 


21.11 


80 


"' gSSv 


IS* 


r\UM 


41.46 


55 


18.35 


17.66 


86 


' '''4ff« 


w 


f^ 


37.86 
34 34 


60 


15.45 


X4M 


mi 


' :i(iiii.tte 



dbyGoogk 



an.^^d 


«• ' -* •' '■*-■■ 


^ji^ 




A---:r -^ , w*r ^^ )ft 4JiPi!lf%^ 


ljM|(lJIW'illl|M'H-i.'» » 


i)tK V.'V^"^-; '-•> 








m^^iiuS' 


ti^aV 


t;r ^ ;.'■•.-*•. 


i>j>" 


1 -\i «.-?lr 


Aft. 


\. ' I 


11 


' f ' L» 




avMiitfas. 


Aft. 


-XiBftalaMaa 


*T 


fi^- 


^ 


''^m\- 


m 


^ 


^' '^. 


1 


; MP'i-. 


m 


3M8| ^ 


49 


21.19 


73 


%m 


d 




».» 


s 


sa,i7 


74 


8.25 


a 


27 


iJ! 


20.61 


75 


7« 


4 


• 4lk73 


28 


62 


20.65 


76 


7.40 


« 


mjBB 


29 


30.66 


53 


19.^, 


77 


6,99 


6 


40.69 


30 


3026 


54 


18.98 


78 


^6» 


7 


4047- 


31 


29.83 


55 


18.35 


79 


&n 


6 


40.14 


32 


29.^ 


56 


17.78 


80 


£* ; 


9 


39.72 


33 


2902 


57 


17.20 


81 


6US0 


10 


msa 


34 


28.62 


58 


. 16.63 


82 


5.16 


11 


38.64 
iLOS 


35 


28.^ 


59 


16.04 


83 


4.87 


12 


36 


27.78 


60 


15.45 


84 


4.66 


13 


37.41 


37 


27.34 


61 


14.86 


85 


4.57 


14 


36.79 


38 


26.91 


62 


14.26 


86 


AM 


15 


36.17 


39 


26.47 


63 


13.66 


87 


3.90 


16 


d&.76 


40 


2604 


64 


13.05 


88 


3.67 


17 


35.37 


41 


25.61 


65 


12.43 


89 


3.56 


18 


34.98 


42 


25.19 


66 


1196 


90 


a73 


19 


34.59 


43 


24.77 


67 


11.48 


91 


3.32 


20 


34.22 


44 


24 35 


68 


11.01 


92 


3.12 


21 


33.84 


45 


23.93 


69 


10.50 


93 


240 


22 


33.46 


46 


23.37 


70 


10.06 


94 


1.98 


23 


33.08 


47 


2283 


71 


9.00 


95 


1.62 



Tablx III. Skowmg th§ pr98mU Value uf a Lffe-Righi in the Jneoms 9f 
f 100, of eoary Agt^ calcultUing the Inierut at five atiA mt six per cenC., 
aeeordimg to Dr. ffiggtenoorth's lUhU tf Mortality. 



Xgo. 


Inl'ft. 


In fit. 


Afi.. 


lia'ii. 


In I'll. 


Ajr«. 


lot'it. 


Int'<l. 


At^, 


Int'tU 


Int'it. 




6 (3. cl. 6 p. cU 


5 |i. ci. 


ft Jl. Cl, 


S^cu 


U p. CI. 


5p. d. 


6 p. ct. 




"F 


4[».0I 


5I.WI 


^§r 


m.nd 


72.31 


' 48 


50.02 


ft4.94 


^W 


31.04 


:15.95 




1 


61.39 , 


d7.fJI 


\ 25 


m.tn 


73 J 4 


49 


58.35 


iiXM 


73 


30.33 


34.51 




a 


r58J3 1 


71.51 


1 SO 


&m 


7192 


50 


57.44 


tiSk73 


74 


4>it nl 


'II If 




3 


7ri.78 1 


71.30 


1 27 


67.311 


7L(i3 


51 


66.60 


61.90 


75 




. 1 


4 


79.55 1 


7fi.l9 


fiS 


60.98 


71.34 


53 


55.73 


61.W 


70 








5 


73.34 


77 .(Nj 


99 


66.06 


7r.wi 


53 


54.83 


60J6 


77 


2,,,i, , 


>, ..h 




6 


73.."W 


77,32 


30 


0(L35 


70.78 


1 ^ 


M,»9 


mm 


78 


9:*!?P 


a? .30 




7 


73.73 


77.55 


31 


mM 


70.51 


55 


58.01 


58SS 


n 


$fi.5'.2 , 


^m 




8 


rJ.T3 


77.59 


32 


65,74 


70,25 


60 


61.^ 


57.93 


SO 


91 .:w, 


94.50 




9 


rx.'vr* 


77 44 


:i3i 


ryi.45 


69.99 


57 


54).t« 


56.15 


81 


ao.oe 


93.IS 




10 


ij.m 


77.17 


:h 


05.17 


69.75 


1 &* 


49.7IJ 


AS.ng 


«9 


t8.S8 


91.80 




H : 


n.m 


7f..fi5 


( 3S 


04.89 


mjfi 


69 


48-'S3 


.VU«3 


83 


I7.S4 


90.fi3 




12 


THAO 


7fiJ>7 


' 36 


64.61 


66.17 


€0 


47.31 


ea.5e 


84 


17.11 i 


ia,8i 




13 


71.48 


75J7 


37 


M.ia 


6R83 


ei 


44i.OS 


51.23 


85 1 


10.90 


I9.t.0 




H 


inM 


74.«9 


( 38 


63,75 


m,m 


69 


44.68 


40.84 


m 


\:y.t^\ 


ie.03 




15 


70.10 


74.14 


39 


63.37 


68.16 


03 


43,«7 


46,30 


87 


14.3.'} 


10.66 




10 


tIB.ftj 


73-89 


40 


69.90 


67.84 


W 


41.76 


46.78 


^ 


13,48 


15,60 




n 


eg.*H 


73.Q 


41 


f^M 


07-53 


65 


40.91 


45.10 


KJ 


13 1)9 


r5.Si5 




la 


mAi 


T3.4B 


4Q 


mm 


mm 


m 


39.07 


43.90 


m 


14.03 


10,39 




19 


69 J d 


73.37 


43 


Ol.fll 


OSJl 


67 


37.90 


49.00 


91 


1-3.41 


14.53 




90 


es.sw 


73.07 


44 


OLW 


86.63 


68 


30.70 


41.39 


SM 


10.49 


19.31 




91 


WJ5 


nM 


45 


oi.m 


06.31 


m 


35.4M 


40.08 


93 


8.58 


10.10 




22 


m.ht 


72J]8 


40 


00.40 


65,05 


70 


34.^ 


38.74 


94 


0.75 


7.^ 




S3 


{»M 


73.49 


47 


59,77 


64.90 


71 


32.95 


37.36 


% 


\ ^A^\ ^\i 






8 













Digitized by V_Tl^7\^7V IV^ 



Ay f» Dr. Wiggt^Mrtk'* TtSbji 







Tablb v. Showing the Value qf an Jwmdhf Ml * i 
JigBf deduced from the TaHes hy Dr, 



Ac* 



5pr.eL6pr.et. 



1 
a. 

3 
4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

1« 

13 

14 

16^ 

16 

1? 
16 



'WSSi 

12.877 
13.625 
14.165 
14.509 



14.711 



8.584 
11.968 
LL919 
12 384 
12.098 



14.668 12^3 



12887 



14.74512.925 
14.74ai2.931 
14.70612.906 
14.64612.662 
14.53812.775 
14.42012.679 
14J»6 12)578 
14007 12470 




Ac* 

26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
66 
37 



.Upr.et 

133?4 
13.523 
13459 



Opr.eU 



12:1^ 

11.987 

11.938 

13.39511.890 



13.332 
13.270 
1^208 
13.148 
13090 
13.033 
12.978 
12.901 
12.825 



11.843 
11.797 
11752 
11.708 
11.665 
11.625 
11.587 
11.529 
11.472 



Age. 5 pr. 91.19%) 



1^74911.416 



12.678 
12.598 



12^25 
12.452 
19382 
lS.tl3 

4i i9um 

40 194W 10942) 
4a lU 



11.360 
11.306 
11J253 
llJWl 
11.152^ 
11405 
11.058 



4»\U 



10«7 






7t 
71 



nlSt 

113201( 
11.146 lOil' 
10.966 lOMT 
10.777 9" 
10.581 
10.396 
10.163 ^ 

^^939 U 

9i706 MiUt 

9 Am $; 

9.905 

a9a6 

a664 
8.356 

&0I9 7317^ 
7;^ 

6j6M 




Digitized by V3V,-?VJS, 



LivnuiA 6 ^^y 



^,^- l-*V-l m«*l'A '*M^X^U^'*^^»\^P.f-X- 



.V 



f 



■ ■ ' « n If J. 

.. .>.^../.-sii J 






o# 



Tkam, Humkii Jto J P^ i m w I Mm ef ^ JSUki ^ 



Ail' Jih 



Hm kwt of HflMAhnMtto, «]i4 of wTftral ottier Btitoi^ iS»i^ i%0t 
of dower to a maniodl womtHi jiroviilod liio ip a nrite g hor btfibiiii» M^ 
a lif<i-iight in oao HiM of all the Mai attato ha at aay tima pommmm. 

In baiaf of iniolTiftey, and in ▼•irioiit other tiuitaiieaii» iiia AannMa 
lo aa^erfala «&a pusMiit valua of tfaii tight Thie may ba dona by thb 
IbUowing table. 

llie table ie to be entered at the top with the age <^lhe hnebejidy ahd 
tfl tiia etde with the age of the wifo; onder the Ibrttiar ami o|>po4t^ Itt 
the latter ie th« preeeat yaloe of the dower right in an eitata worth Otti 
bondied dollan. . 

Thuf, if the age of the baebatid ba 50 yoare, aad that of lift mib III 
y^ara, the preeeat ^alae oi the dower, ia $100, it f6,70; ia Ibai'tf ^ 
«itite be worth flO,0OO, the praeat Talnaor the doWer ti|bl iiHidd bb 
f^O. 



tmu, letfct ft|]MMet^nMe,ueif«nbyinNaoir«le^ Ibeliidrttal 
in* Iftftt tf tiM Wifr, b^faM wiUi 16 jwn, ud MnbrtoM an 1^ 
bper W yfen* leelMlte I lietwithNiptettot]Mlfaifa«Nl,a»aiail4l0»ii*)Kii» 
P % SB, 188, ead M, «• ktfti tttiiud, ia oMm to MdOM "die 1>|l4e Id lie #IAb ^ 
the HM BM Ite tire otMiiie en tbM wMsk wiU to MMt lifl^ ti^^ 
iVbhlib] 



;-i: 



dbyGoogk 



m 



YAhUZ or THV 



Ta^SI.^, ahtnoing the FrtsaU Value af ihs Rigki of Ihwct <jf m M^rmi 
Aga of tbn HuilMnd. 




Ag« of Hh' 



y Google 



wfm^ 















.^ 


»i>ir 


UT -.-^Z "i 


'• » t I 














A 




Ag« or th» Hiiflmnif. 






16 


&4 


56 1 56 


GO 1 


OS &4 
lX3Ul'J.fciO 


OtJ t>8 


70 
10.02 


J 7,74 


74 71S 


«, 


&4 
■JS.IO 


10 




M.tJT J5.tia 


Jtt.53 19J7 ao.Te 




la 


9.7J 


1031 1J,4U 


13,94 


12.96 la.fhJ 


14.45 I5.;*9 16,4J 


J?..'!! 


18 31 19 113 2<).4^21. soils 






so 


e.49 


lolmiliTfiis 


12.0:1 ! 


ta 73 13.40 
I3.4B 13.17 


i4,22 m.l5 IGJ^ 

r^M 14.00 jo.ifci 


l7,2Li 

■ 

I0.U9 


mm ld.78 
17.85 ia.s<j 


2oai4 

I9.tf7 


9i.tJ8 


90 


41,34 




»4 


«.oa 


i>tlOUl.7l 


UJ\i 


l2.*j;Ji*iiU 


tJ.TU U.(j;J 15 Wi 


1(5.74 


17.00; 15.S& 


l»,57 


21,05 


94 






90 


8.83 


9.<a KL IT 


ii.ati 


iLaTi-iXrit 


ILl.KJ (4.:t3 \5J7 


10,40 


17,94 17 J({ 


mm 


20,77 


2^ 




9S 


8.IM} 


9.37 


lOJiJ 


1 1.0.1, 


ij.Ti»ia,4*j 


CI.ISH.oa 15.00 


16.15 


I7JM 17.00 


|8Jii|20,47l99l 




?? 


«.3S 


g.u 


u.iw 


10.75 


11.43 12. |:» 


12,!^ 13,74 14.74 


l5.tS8 


10,75 17.341 Ifi.65 


20.1430 






aa 


e.cH'-: 




1 " 'ii.iifu^a 


i2..'j7KU4J ,.L4I 


154(5 


lfl.40 I7.0r) ,- - H-. ..1 






34 


7..-- 


\<K&2 tl.;V» 


l'J.55 la <n» I4.U7 


15.12 


10.01 |j«u<ir. . 1 






36 


f.l>: 


.'^.^t^ll.1f! 


II. ?« l*JJ.^iKUI 


H.74 


Ift.CfQ lM,*i' ! 






3B 


IMii -.-' 


c.... ...1 so.ia jiK«(i n.:#7 j±JiiKi.;tj 


M.T^r'''."^' '' ^- ■ . -.-■=- 






40 


I e.fswi r.wi 


VA\\ il.j;*, 9.7(U0.45Jll.ll> J^J.UOpiltl 


I3.'A , ^^ -.J-- 3'''; 




^ 






— - - - - 1 




43 


(J.-.r - ^^ 


'^ '' " " -■■ " ■'" '" '>' '■' ^-^ ' t '--- 1 , , . . ••,. ; i^j'l 




44 


IL'IM 




■ ■..;. ■ •-■; 1 '(' 


4 


48 


&.»?; 




< .'. 1 \ '> 


48 


5,4., .., 


,.,. , , , ^,, i^.^,,., 


,„, _,, ,„ ,,,. , _, ■ :■ '} 


& 


90 


5.05j 5.1.1 


tiJ7 


7^1 ii 7.a!i 


tt.l2 « Kl| 1(,IJ1 fO 1 r 


% 


54 


4,63 5.2^ 


S.STt 


' ., ..>. -1..* u . - 


% 


64 


4.9} l.Tc 


5.]!^ 






k 


^ 


:i.8ii 4.:io 


•1.^1 






5e 


3.37 3J1» 


4,:rp 


■1. 


l.,-„,r ,,. i,,, ,,., .| ,,,,,,-, .. ,,,.- . , l .1., ,„• ni 


CD 


2.8» 


3.:ii 


:LB,t 


4,4 1|| 4.0a 


54? 


5,iK*| ii.4e 


1 ' 






€8 


1^ 


U.07 


3.3i; 


:< -i 4 r( 


Ti? 


5.4;<. fi,(Hi 


0,57'| 7.1:. ",-*''' f'*:>?'fi9 






m 


il.4l 


itTO 


3JW* 


12^ 


4.7 r ,^25 


5.t^l,' fi.-r 1 :-. r.i 






m 


itia 


2,4:( 


a.74 


;«.74 


4.J2 4.,V. 


5.04 5" '<» 






m 


l.7» 


»,ot) 


3,44 


2 < P .■.'■■■. 


;i.3iH 


J.«JS» 4.fW 


4..T9 4.tfJ ...... .n-.' -..- o.u^i^. 






70 


1.4a 


1.0? 






a.70 
a. 17 


3,01 


3.32 3.65 


3,94 4.27 4.05 a-tW^ lUb 7.13 70 

' » '-" ' M 4.f.l 5.:>* «.2:i72 




5 


Lsa 


l.»rt 


'-.i;v '■I Hi -J 1.. 




74 


IM 


t^i 


LX* 


L54 


1.77 


4.H' 4.*>| 5u 10,74 






76 


OSA 


l.w 


t.*l\ 


i.ii 


1.5ft 


1 :M«> 4,it>' 5 03|T0 






78 


0.7V O.iH 


L12 


i.'jy 


1.4A 


K -. . ...-, -...-■■ -..-., ^.^n, a.9H 3,7^1 4.4H,73 






W 


O.W| 0,77 


OM 


1,10 


1.2l> 


1.41 


Uo4>, I 7) 


I.ti7, &06 


akflei 


2^1 3,20 


3.85 


60 






89 


o..'a oxii 


71 


0.«l 


10* 


l.ir. 


l.Xl'7^1 


l.lld I.P7 


3.07 


S.20 2.75 


328 


M 






84 


0.45 O..1O 


0.5?i 


O.fiH 


(».7» 


0.00 


l.ft;*. ijH 


i.:m ' r.*>7 


1.61 


2 04 9.45 


2.80 


^ 






m 0.401 0,15 


0.51 


O.-V* 


0.66 


0J4 


o.h;*, fttN 


\.m: i.'2r. 


1.44 


1 m, 8.08 


2^48 


m 






88 0^ iKAl 


0,4H 


0.5:1 


0,02 0,<iO 0,7rt. o.ai 


0.02 i 1.04 


IJ30 


L3»! l.TV 


2.17 


m 






eo ojaaj 0.35 


0.4^ 


0.51 


0,60^ 0.68 0,75! 0.8t 


0.87 


0,96 


1.08 


1,83 


1J7 


i.^no 




i 


M| 5a 


*:< 


tiO 


ea j &I 1 ott 1 68 


70 1 


73 


74 


7fi 


80 


'aT 




r Ac« or tii«iiu.i>fr»d. 








1 .v..> 


■• »"" . ' 
































«BFtfciCftlltltTiMM. 



*• 



i./ 



K^A 



i.'t 



yGoogk 









]iMl jiw swbeni «n inregakr, aad'HNit;! 
ai i ii i b e i ftow birth to 19 yean, withoitti 
IntowhlehititdiTided. This irregiOarityiii^liilp 
ft wtitftetory table for theae yeara; biitif ||i#|||g 
ttMration be eontmiied with more xnimiieiiew j^jT 
#ft aball probably acquire anfficient data to iiMMf!! 
of Mortally for thia oountry, than any now < 

Ttom thia table the expectatioa <^life might Wt 
the nnmber of inhabitanta did not Tary ; bnt It init 
eoiimerationa made within Ibrty yeara, that thete |Nii| 
iofiieaae of about three per cent If we apply Jo i 
Tible II| aboye 90 yean, a oonection for thii i 
of life will be nearly aa folio wi : 

Afe. Exp. Afa. 

20 36.32 eO 

30 32.20 70 

40 28J21 80 

50 21.77 00 

iHiich numben agree nearly with the tablea hj Dr. ^ 

Tabu I. Containing the J{kmber of Whke Permmt^i 
the United States, according t6 tfta Cnum^l 















Under 


6 


yean of age 




u 


Of 


5 


and under 


10 : 




M 


10 


« 


(( 


16 J 


- 1 


<l 


15 


(1 


(( 


20 




C( 


20 


(( 


« 


30 




<c 


30 


ti 


f( 


40 


J 


u 


40 


u 


i< 


50 




u 


50 


cc 


u 


60 




u 


60 


l< 


u 


70 


.;■• 


<c 


70 


M 


€( 


60 




« 


80 


U 


u 


iSI 


'^ 


M 


90 


u 


II 


•/ 


Mi> ^ ■ • 


100 


and 


upwarda 






m^: 










li 


■iL 













yGoOgl- 







1 

8 

3 

4 

6 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

U 

13 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 



TZn oT f ^tm 



3:!f. 



274,?^ 15 
ti7n,4*»5 

2<JI.72n 
*257,2(m 

24r>Jtiol 
237/Ji:i|t39 




196J88 
190lm 
181.305 
173^ 
164333 

r.7,04r 

i4'>,:m 
ia"i.4*i5 

i 25.786 

22>4^ 

i^ 110^34 

36 106;»7 

37 100,259 
96,398 
90,854 



•Mi 



mm 



mm 



Of 100 y—n L 
Totat nuinbw 



7<Kr,:.7 
01.574 

5(nMU 

50,986 
48*555 

46,170 
43^77 
5ij 41,695 
57 39^11 
ri« 37,486 
511 35,506 

Inpwmrd* 




90,68n 

7n 19,168 

tf 17,594 

7ii 15,793 

t 13,857 



: ii 


12,014 




10.258 


^u 


8^682 


77 


7,333 


rs 


6,208 ' 


79 


5,268 



1.013 

674 

448 

298 

198 

138 

88 

69 

44 



n. STATISTICAL VIEWS OF THE MORTAUTT IN.VARI- 
OaS COUNTRIES IN EUROPE. . 



[TlMflbltowiogutMebm 
catod Iqr M. A. Monra 

Ml4ifM^l83^.] 



(Ibr mBi«IMi J«vmI) of apiyw i.i ii|ii||i- 
to tli9 «< BMW BMydop44ivM^»* <Ftelt,) ftr Jli|f 



Iw eomidering how limited and ftw tha diffareneaa ara wUeh eadai 
•mqi^i tha naUoaa of Eniopa, aither in their phjaioal ar monl coiiditioB» 
ita|9iila at fint aight that tha laws to which tha duration of human lift 
mnWilfiiMii cannot axperiance any rtrj great rariationa aran in tli4 
moil'ititfcnt oonntriae. It would be erroneone, howeyer, to beliera 
dlitll^Nii^; ftr in tfia group of Eteopean nationa who Hva nndar tha 
MdiiM» jiittj an^ whoee primitiTe ibatnraa are gradnaSj aiRwad by oiTifi^ 
)dtoi6(l(milfr^ etperienoea <a long a eeriea of Mbiant tanna aa hi 
|ii|i6i fti|i i |illtf)il tij itiffifnnt rtnrf -f rntr, mf ^tritTlfaiTll miHil i i 
liiitii jjl^iiMlii mill (illiiii 'f 

^ «iN|tfbf%Udi aflbet thattoraaittili af tfM »i|Wililtoif1fc 1 
HWii Hlfll^ikiM powaiM infloenea mi wMOSIf 4m 
.tMl^S#liite >fllM gnafiffc it naartf iwiit ai i#aitMl^>«b^^ 
M|ilfl»ri>iffli^ Itt flMmj dUtrieli, Om aawMl wpia^ «1 




y Google: 



luki^Lkt*. 



^Wai^^P^ff^^^^^^^W^ 



fitl«b,th* 



^ 



'iM 






^mm 



i^ ia'g niUlfMlar Mio WliMi^ 



_^i^io||»fitt fitted 



*Mti^.;j': 



^^,iim^i 



tMmuMoftJU 






r.rtrtj 







i".i 




■ 




PMkMbor 


Av«raMK«a^ 
bwoflWtlit^ 


.'lUiiiaUMH 


CottDtliM. 


«pocl». 


iSS^^ 


Sweden andX^orwayi 


itel-ldsS 


79/)b0 


' ■ Xyl^fiTH 


Deamark, 


1810 


33,800 


X." ; A'BI 


European Ruseia, 


1896 


960,000 


■ T ' S ^E 


Rioffdom of Poland, 


18S9 


93,000 


i' ^ffJB 


Britiah lalandr, 


1818-1821 


378,000 


^1 '^ttjEE 


Netherlandi, . . 


1827-1828 


163,900 


1 * "Ir^E 


Germanj Proper, 


1825-1H2H 


290.000 


1 S PJ 


Pruuia, 


1821-1826 


303,500 


1 89 #4 


Anstrian Empire, • 


1828 


675,000 


1 4^ Ai 


Praiiee, 


t8S5-i8er 


808;m 


1. ; .'-.JU'llll 


Switierland, i. « 


1887^1898 


00,000 


It : 48)^4 


g 


Portugal, . 


1815-1819 


92,000 


.1 « 


(^ 


Spain, . 


18(»1-1836 


307,^KX) 


1 ' -^ 


li 


ifi/T. . . 


1822-1828 


660,000 


^ J^ 




Greece, . 


1828 


33,000 


1 Wi 


1 


Turkey in Europe, 
Nerthem Europe, 


1828 


334,800 


1 ao^ 




2.972,100 


1 


BoQthern Europe, 




2,284,200 


ft^ 


• . 








i;1 


. srwirf, . . 




5^956,300 


1 »> 


i 



JUoBtdIng to thb tabk, and many othen of a muf ^ 
Hiia MinMUjf die* f ^ 

;v4JAil|^!U^ \mm ia the Roman Stotea, and tha v 
i W ^I^ la Italj in general, Greeea^ wiA \ 

' ' ' t Fnaoe, and Pmaaia; 1 in 40 iBtf 
%aiailiB44 Mr; 

.lMiiB9iaSagliBd>ll 



Digitized by VjOv 




'^1 








that 11^ k mdn«#ii^ llf Mi^i^ #3£lliaC ' ^ til^ 

Bcotfauiidi %ilMr%iiai «tltiai M» g^tMt tg». 

or aS iHa S^iifopMtt Stated tiM Adtiill lilii tM, iii tUip Mi|ie«t^ittl 
most Stored; of eaeh mOlioii <^ inhaBita&Cii/^iey loaa oulf 18JMiy 
. whilit the mortality it almost doable In tko wmMn ti«Mt ^^ili- 
Mediterrenean. ^ u, ^^ / 

Next to these, life is moot eertaln !n Norway ai»d Sw<Mli. dliM^ 
paribus, three people die in the aouth of Evropoy whilet two onfy ill 
hardly that, die in anoiept Soandinayia. Denmark and Germany alijoj 
elmilar adtantagee. \ 

Rneeia and Poland, where natore and fortune have not been laiiik 
of the neeeatariee of 1^, enjoy, howeyer, an aitonishing longerffy. 
The popnlation, compriaing a maaa of nearly aiz^ millions, spin out 
their existence almost one half longer than that which is enjoyed by the 
inhabitants of Italy, and exactly twice the length oi time whli^ iny 
one can expect to liye in the capital of Anstria. 

The aYerage time of life which cnts olf only one in' 40 aaniall^. 
is to be found in the Cantons of Switierlaikd, and AnstKten titirf^ 
inces, and in the Spanieh Peninsnla, in oonse^ence of the son and the 
drynees of the air. 

France, the Netherlands, and Prussia, nearly reach the same lerra^ 
•nd wUl soon^get beyond it, unless war or some other scourge arrejits 
the progress of Uieir social improvement. , ^ • 

In the rest of Europe, the mortality amonnti to one«thlftletli of |he 
popvktion, and is frequently increased by accidental eansesi w)iieh 
have fiir a long time endangered the proeperity of the.8horee of the 



. jQMie whole, we reckon, one year with another, 6JSI6$filOO deaths i9 
apjfflf^l^ people^hjr a mortality of one-fortieth part, whidb is ha- 
e^Pl^l^^mstfibnted among the northern and southern states. The Ibf^ 
death iA44» the latter, one in 36 persens. Of Me 
Bts in dtstdsts situated In the north of Fkanee, 9iU2QI 
I in thoee whiehJie towarda the ee«th^ . TUe ie n dtflbi^ 
iMOO aealhe,.efHliPalefil te^w t«o-hiio4«»dai mk ^ 

MM^H^i^. Mamine these niwOiem m4 1hee«/;^ JiliiL^ 
ever att llM otlMMi^ df#iii^ 

^ ; Digitized by V3V,.?VJ% 










I of ike M k ADi^Uiied «ilb 

t|if MbMHiM of climate it nol ttM^l^f.;^ 
ipffioiiMit to MWtftt Umg life to BULiikio^. V ojtfUiik 

Conntries where the heat is moderate, are WB^m 
among thoee which.poeeeef the adTantege of <|k 
laiA it. they mnet aeqwie the beoefiti of a l^g^i 



The eoathern countriee, the mild climate of < 
frvonble to the human race, are, on the cont^iu^t: 
ezpoied to the greateet dangen. In the nmlioi 
chai;ce of djiag it one-half greater, than in ^<4449^J 
and wider the beantilul ekiee of Greece^ the < 
leee than among the icec of Iceland. 

The places of the torrid tone, the mortally df .wy^f 
lated, ihow the pernicious influence which ia exeil^lijiill 
ence of mankind bj a high temperature. 



loeitaialirj 



m. 



00 1(K BaUm, . 
10» l(y Trinidad, . 
130 54/ St. Lucia, 
14« 44' Martinique, . 
150 69^ Guadaloupe, 
I80 6& Bombaj, 
939 IV Hayannah, 



D«OIMM«f 

Inliabitviii. 



T15^^ 



27 
27 
28 
87 
20 



Hh.9 resistance of the vital principle in the trcjptoa, i 
to the races oi men ; and its duration in some pfatM 
doable or triple that for the others. The felloviai|^<j 
tbifrTariations — >> 

BateTim ia 1806 — Europeans, 1 in 11 indiT 
Obhttaoi 1 laiH; Javaneee, 1 in 46. Bombaj, In 
it'l* Mil Mossalmans, 1 in 17i ; Parseee, 1 ia ##; 
l» MM-^WhUM), 1 in 231 ; FMedmca, 1 iaSI. 
IIMtoiRi 1 bi 24 ; Fkeedmen, 1 in 33. Gmnadlk,.18Uf^ 
ll8Q2Mgl«v«a, 1 ift 20. ^ v> , 

I^At lindeim, iba ob^ <i 







The ttunte of di«th« MBpfti«i nJlh that oTtlM iaUbilittt^m^^ 




Swodnt. . • 
Denmarky 
Germany, 
Fnuwia, . 
WiurUmb«rg» 
Anatria. • 
Uollano. 
Englano^^ 
. Qreai Britain, 
Frati06( • 
Canton of Valid, 
liombardy, 
Roman Statoa, 
BeoUandy 



175i-1763» li 

17S1-1766, 1 

1788, 1 

1717, 1 

1749-1754, 1 

1822, 1 

1800, 1 
109^ 1 
1785-1789, 1 
1776, 1 
1756-1766, 1 
17e9-1774> 1 
1767, 1 

1801, 1 



34, 


lesu- 


3> 


1B19, 


», 


1686. 


80, 


Mtt- 


sa. 


1686. 


40, 


1888- 


», 


1884, 


9^ 


1881, 


& 


1800- 
1886- 


36, 


18M. 


WJ, 


1887- 


»i. 


188^ 


44, 


1881^ 



^ms^mm. 



1811^ l! 

1 

1890; 1 

1 

1 
1804^ 1 
1827, 1 

1828» 1 91 
I 98 



58 



Thna the mortality haa diminUhed :— 

fn Swaden, nearly one-tbird in 61 yeara ; in OennaHc, two-ifBif in 
66 yeara ; in Oermany, two-fiflha in 97 yeara; in Proaria, oiM-tti|diJf 
106 yeara; in Wnrtcmberg, tiro-fiftha in 73 yearr; in Anatria, oiNK 
thirteenth in 7 yeara; in Holland, one-half in twen^«firaryeaM; bk 
England, firar-fliUia in 131 yeera ; in Great Britain, one-eleventh in 19 
yeara ; in Ffinee, one-half in 50 yean ; in Canton of Taiid, one^hiidf 
in 64 yeara;- in Lomhardy, one-aerenth in 56 yeara; Rbmui Stictii^ 
OM-tMid in 62 yeara. 

|W thbty yeara, the mortality haa been atationaiy in Rnpiili and * 
fUtnmf ; H haa inoreaaed hi the kingdom of Napleai 
• 9nctha irhok, tiieie haa been, for 89'yeara» a mortdity of liiidMdaal 
hi 86 thrasghoat Europe, aeoofding to Sfiaamildi ; our eil6n]aiion» db 
1^1^ la 41^, aeeerdittg to the aTerage of later yeasa. Oil tiia 
of Europe there haa, therefore, been a diminntlon of one* ' 
F^of the^aggtegaia i^'the people, if we eaa r^oa 
fiatleai We ate, however, tneiined to tU^ 
e^ the merliiify generatty waa feM iSbttt <me«thfcrtiithr 
whieh^npiiaiea Uuttit ia owie llMrluMi^tbM'iiaatt 
^ to the aagnMUiialida «ftli |iap 
rdtehanilioft of'ttOitali^^ariM liNiiii ( 

^ at^dliiiiit" dpooha^ gJTJr JWt' 

■ ' ; :>. ;• .1 ■• . ' f'. 

Digitized by VjOOQlt 



:^ 






-^ 





,Jti •**!*= 'I >•.>-»■• 



. . 17 

. . 1800,1 
. . 1788' 1 
in 19«8- 1783,1 



ml'- 



Tliaafmiitl mortilityhu ftlao diini]iiilM31^ ] 
Hujaj in 80 yMuni ; in London more thm ono-)i 
aitf'JMUi, or noarly ono-fonrth, in 7S yean ; ifl( < 
9Sl yem ; in ViennAi one-fourth in 80 yeart ; In I 
jMin; in Amaterdam, qne-aizth in 84 yeara,; fHoii 
ip 10 ytUB i in Norfolk, one-fiflh in 10 yeara | in 
Mill in 84 yoara; in Birmingham, nearly two-4 
lifi^pool^ one-half in 38 yeara ; in Portamovth moroi 
11 yearn; in St. Peterabnrg, nearly two-thirda in: 40 ; 
holm, more than one^third in 87 yeara. ^ ^ . 

The eanaea of the greateat mortality in Enzopean i 
are chiefly, — .v. -v 

. The marahy humidity of the air, eapeoially an JmI 
efieota of privation on the lower clasaea of aooiety ;. Hiei 
amna of anbaiatenGe, or at leaat, their rtae in priee pttf 
the wagea of labor; peatilential diaeaaea; un&vombi||r,i 
dally abrupt changea in the temperature ; the c loaeniw% t.ii 
onhealthinest of private houses, prisons, infirmariea, aod | 
ezeeanve use of spirituoas liquors, and indnlgence Sa J^ 
unwholesome or unremitting labor, especially in duldlianl^f 
lastly » war, but leaa in consequence of battlea than foioeii 
frequently the male-adminSstration of §rmie&^ 
. Thecauaea of the diminution of mortality whom ^ 
gnaaive,are,— « ui 

The draining of marsbea, and the embanking of r^TIVtlt^ 
thefovorable diviaion of public wealth, which affiMrdt Oi^liYi 
Iftbor and aubaiatenoe ; the abundance and good qualil>y 0ii 
fjbe people, the attention bestowed on children from bivlki^l 
nod in achoola, and manufactories, and public 
tlon^ aad ai^utary arrangementa, which prevent thft 
devdof^BMBt of oontagioua diaeaaea } the low priee of 4w) 
of induatiyy allowing the leaa affluent claaaea to ovjegr!! 
{Qtmniintm whioh were equally unknown and beyond thflfr I 



"\ 



yGoogk 






iiliBriliniji ]>»itiiiliitf1f iHihi 





iMW^OMiiaMiftobvfiMli^ JCiie«iUiflklBgittpi»i 

giMil Mid popoloof ragiooy was forawrly 1 in 90 jft^fim^i 
a9t,mtipra«nt,iB«mthMili&88^ Thbi 
of deatlM Uurmigii^ot tlMi* emiiiUkMi> fttooi IfiOOfiU^ «»i 
i;m.000 peMittrmiid TOO^QOa Jiimi, or lin 83 aanadyro^ 
prMerration to Hhm^mKM msMoMtioM offbetod is Um tkfM i 
of wMtorsL SiiflOfOi^ wlMMoibfli to (rfiteia tkb objtetJimrftbOHii 
od intli'lii*.«roiylMl rooetML .: 'v^ «r:im; 

The life of mail k Urns not onlj ombollMhod in iti ooiiiM lifted 
adynoo— nt of oivU«Mitioa, but io ovon oztended hj it, anirMidmM 
loao donbtfnL * The e Acta of tho amelioraUon of tlw mtal eottdilioA^ 
afo to foatiain and diminiali, in proportion to tlw popolation* tteHBanai 
simbor of birtbs, and in a otiU frcAlar dogroo that of doalUr; oirHw 
eoQiraiy, a groat nnmbor of Wrtha« oqualM or otoh oao atdad kf Hiife 
of4oaUM,iaooliaraetoristio8icnof,oalatoofbarbariHi^ UtlHimibmmm 
eaaoi m men in a man loaeh tlw pknitndo of tiioir phfrieal mt^mM 
do¥i^bpment, tho population ia alrong, intolligonti and manly; whyn 
H romaiaa in porpolaal inftnoj whoro geaerationo aroawoptoff witlio«l 
hiinf nhlo to profit hj the past^ to bring aooial ooonomy to j 



III. PERIODICAL UTSRATCUtB. ' 

Tho poriodioal prooa, ombraoittg Newapi^ri, Magatinoo*' aad 
Ht«% dtvoted to roliglon. litoratoro, arta, sdoBOoO, pditfw, 
ganooy and amnaomonta, oompriaoo a apeoiea or Ibmi of litoratmo 
kmniql to tho aneionta, and oonatitatea a romarkaMo Mtura of 
of aoeioty; and it ia ono of tho moot 
I of tho art of printtag. Tho folnmo of tho Amorioan 
ftr^BI. aoataina a TOilo of «« Poriodioal UtMtaro thiovghovt 
Wotld^*^ Thia TMm, thongh not altogothor tfOrraot, oAlidi in 
u^ gananl viow of tho manaor in whieii thhi 
bin diAiant parta^of tho i^oho. 



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foliliotl 
' and kav« 
withnMK 

. N«wi^peni» in their legitiflMto «m, angr^^ 
t— ftfllow of Bnakind, — tbefiriMidtof] 
■li €fd«r, — IIm pttroot of every i 
IbhoMBl of liie,-*eo«reee of daily ueefiil \ 
MMHMMBt; but in the abvee of their mifh^i 
menti of tyranny and oppreauon, of irreligftiMirin|.i| 
■id^TaleaBimoaity and degradation. ' - ' ir «f 

>Hie & uro| wa B ooontriee in which 
Greai Britain, France, Netherianda, and the ' 
In meet of the other countriea in Europe, the jw« 
paratiTely hot little power, and ie under each i 
djeonnwon of political eabjects is not praetieed. ' hk'i 
preae ia nnder great reatriction with retpeet to j 
in France, and more especially in Great Britain/ %M 
dom, — a freedom which oflen degenerates into I 
The aewspapera pnblished on the continent of 9 
email eiae, and generally contain bnt few advert 
English newspapers are of much larger siie, and ahoQAd | 
adTertisements ; although advertising in England ia. 
heavy tax. 

Bo t there is no country in the world whiohao. 
newspapers as the United States, nor is there any ; 
adfertiaing in them ia so much practised* The i 
in this country the press is free, and newspapem m^A 
any stamp duty, nor advertising to any tax; thal^ 
and. the rights of fireemen are more widely diilheed itkMR. I 
peai^ noootry | newspapers, therefore,^ are cheap, ilhe^^ 
H4KM^«P^ the habit of reading them alaoKNil 1 
hfiff^mmt'M. fium being eo well conducted aa mM ^4 
m l0i kniM M^Wff^ ^^ ^ circulation of eaeh^ Ihi! <h|r^ 
I4hit publishera of them to eastalB Iha^^ 
I them with sufficient ahilify. ; And^ 
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«ttioaiiM€alM. Thf origto rf ni yip if w ili i 
i»^mAmyud tha iniyeiMtiiii Ouetto k niA |»T]mr« i^ 
4liM«d in 1596; ImlH was for a aariaa af yawa oaly ^'Mil.' goliaavfi 
that jealoaa govamnant did not parmil tha eireiiktiaii ol^pi#liiMH^ii$ 
•ad 30 voliuiiaa af tikaaa gaiattaa, from tbair oonmiaiiaaoiaiil^' toi mM 
BOW to bo foond in tha Maf liabaaebiaii library. — Tlia tam IXiaMila 
oomnumlj aoppoaad to hava baan darivad from a anall Vaaatkn jp oy y ar 
ooiB, famta, whiab waa tba priaa of tha papar. Gotgtava ia Ua 0kK 
tiooarj, first pobUahad in 1616, tlma definaa gaiatta; «« A Bill af Naw% 
«r m abort valalion of ganaral ocaarraaeaaof tha timaa^ibrgad aaatnMiily 
•ft Vanioay and Cbanea diaparwd, arary month, iaia maat parta of 



Tha fifat frimUd nawapqpar, acooidipg ta Cbabnanii appaaitd la 
fiailahd in 1668. whan Iha wiaa poUoy of Bnikigh look pahiatopa^ 
iraal tha otiaalatian af ^te^ rapdvia al* tha. fiwaudabla paii a d dmiiH 
wldahthaBfitiahGhanoel waaawaptbythaSpanLriiiffmada: It«ii 
4Rit&lad, ^ Tha Baf tbb Maroiniai pabliahad by aaOKMrity, hapftMid at 
JUoodoB by Cbriatophar Barker, har lliji^HiaaM'a pnnlar, 1566;:" Thm 
iaiHaat af thaaa nawapapara^ now • known to . ba in amttnaai la No. 5(^ 
whiafa ia proMrvad in the British Museum, and biravs tha date df JalyiM^ 
1668.; These papers, which were ia the shape of a piuaphlat, mpn 
aoi pabEihed at regahur pwioda; and they were diiDOfitMiv*^ tftfC tha 
daafir that gava them Inrth had paased away. 

l£i totwedUy newspaper appeared in London, \a 16Sn, aadariha 
tiUa of " Tha C^oarant qt Weekly Newes from Foreign ^arta," printed 
by liithaniel Batter. Tha earliaat French newspaper appeared in 1631 » 
fAMad by Theophrast Benandot, a physician, who obtained froa^ 
CMBaal Biahaliea a patent for a weakly Pans Oaaetta^ 

Itbp^iiodof the ciril wan in England waa frvltflil in oeoaaioaal 
llii^i|iiiior Merenriea, which were, however^ auwa |^ tha eharaetar 
af pap|liaia, than of modem newspapers. In 1663, " Tha Intel- 
l(fM|Mir^' and '<Tha Newea*' (the one pobliahad oa Mondaya, tha 
•IhatJi^iaaadays,) were nndertaken by Bofer L'Eainiaga, a paawa 
•flailto'da kaightad, aad better known aa Bif Ba#iff) and aotad m 
Aia:;tfciifcaiff aad pablioly aceiaditad paiaecntor of the; liberty of tiyl 

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hf Urn maAimtj of Um foremcneAt; iliA«ll 

:yM fini in EnglMid to whieh the.tanan^ 

IIm Utkai. of BO k«i tbui 344 Tobiolts of ^ 

JTidMliS (MO << Lltoimiy AneedolM»" YAm^M 

4t$»f or wmoh wtro poUiohod bolwooBlte^ 

Molt of them, however, were of y%Ty wkm 

Ifaom a aiiigle number only wee piibliahed. . 

V flo kto to 1709, thero wm Irai one dell^' 

iMMto ; '-*-tliii wae the ^ Duij CounafL ^tJtAtMmi 

appeared in that metropolie (three timea a week, an4 4 

In 1718, aatamp duty waa ioipeaed on Enflipb.i 

there were pnbUahed in jLondon 3 dailf aei 

timea a week, 1 twiee a week, and 3 hall^nnjpti 

week. The annual aale of newapaper% in 

in 1753, at 7»411,757 oopiee ; in 1790> al 

i9,7G2,764, and in 1830, at 30^93^1. . rt.^^« 

/ The fbUowing atatement ezhihita the i 

fha Bcitirii lalanda in 183SI. ;.^ fmrt 

iDaHy . . ST ?«»<?i« 
Three timea afrn ah -r w«^ 
Twice a week 
Weekly 
Country Papen, weekly . 

twiee a week(C 
Gttem8ey,«ild < 

^ ^^ r-Mf^it 

Thrieeiliitteaaweek J' \^^ 



Enghwd, 



London, 



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Daily (all in Dublin) 
Three timea a week 
1 Twiee a week 
tWeekly . . 



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^abm EoejeloiMNlbilalniiiaMtea^ la IMI^ fik 

dttft** [ITBQ, «kj» H^ EM^opedbk If etioiMfitiaif « i 
tlM MMNriBowtiieffiaM ui eiftnlatitti offtM letding^MwaptpMSy «i#tb» 
more than eommaiuninito improTameiil in eTcry dej^vtaieiit eottiicetod 
with* them, the nomber publiehed ia Um oapitil hat fay iM ueami 
Inereteed in profKNrtioa. The mmw Is obviooe i the eifOttlttiMl;le 
moDopoliied by newspftpen of eeubliehed ehtraelery akid th* ea^MMM 
of competition, eompered with tho chaaoee against ■neeem, ia by fi^ too 

great to be rashly haiarded The sale of the TVmes, the leadiof 

joamal of London, eseeeds i1,CNM) a day, and its profits have been eon- 
puted at £30,000 a year. It has three editors, the highest salaiy «f 
whom has been stated at £1,500 a year; 13 regular rep<Mrters, and 8 
supernumeraries are employed by it at 5 guineas a week, 3 readeia, 
2 publishers, a cashier and 3 clerks, 50 compositors on an arerage, IS 
attendants on ^the machinery, news collectors, foreign correspondenliy 
and agents ; — together about 100. The Morning HertUd establishment Is 
aeitfciely less ezpensiTe than that of the Ttmes, and its latter cireuktlQa 
has'amounted to between 9,0001and 10,000 daily. The lowest priee of w 
adfisHisement is 7#., and, abore ten lines, 1#. is charged fan erery tipiae 
€t fimr more. A column in the 7mef cannot be purehaaed for Um 
than fiom 10 to 15 guineas." The stamp duty on English newspapers ia 
4d. each, and the common price of a London newspaper is 7d. steriing. 
The publication of newspapers is adduced by Mr. Babbage as « 
ramailukble instance of the application of machinery. ** In the puhUoa- 
iloii of our daily newspapers,*' he says, " it frequently happens that the 
debates in the House of Parliament are carried on to three or fiwir 
o^elbek hi the morning, that is, to within a few hours ef the time of 
the publication of the newspaper. The speeches must be taken down 
1i(f Wporters, conreyed by them to the establishoMnt of the newspaper, 
|iiefili|Mr at te distaaee of one or two milesg transcribed by them in the 
diiM, iit up by the compositor, the press corrected, and the pikers 
pikiM'iiraBd distributed, before the public can read them. Some ef 
llhMII JMietMOe hare a ciiealaUon of from 6/M)0 to lO/MO daily. The 
' iiujpto^ li iti^ of the printing nwehines has been to great, that 4^ 
eoidii#Ma^li(^ printed on one side in an hour. 
V ^^'^liiJ^^liliUiihnieatof ^ 'TlflMa* newepapet iaaa i 
;f|tt§»^ibiM|iy ef amanaftetory ia whieh the diirisioa ofhiherfibolh i 
^m0^0V$» ii idfflinbly Ulwrtreted, and ia whioh ate ihmwm»mg4im 
lllikim&rmmmj M w^ aiemplifted. It ii eeoaely i«ig i M ltlii i » 

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103 PEHIODICAI. LITERATURE. [I83& 

thootands who read that paper in various quarters of the globe, what a 
•cene of organized activity the factory presents during the whole night, 
or what a quantity of talent and mechanical skill is put in action for 
their amusement and information. Nearly a hundred persona are em' 
ployed in this establishment, and during the session of Parliament, at 
least twelve reporters are constantly attending in the House of Com- 
mons and Lords ; each in his turn, after about an hour's work, retiring 
to translate into ordinary writing, the speech he has just heard and 
noted in short-hand. 

*< In the mean time 50 compositors are constantly at work, some of 
whom have already set up the beginning, whilst others are committing 
to type the yet undried manuscript of the continuation of a speech, 
whose middle portion is travelling to the office in the pocket of the 
hasty reporter, and whose eloquent conclusion is, perhaps, at that very 
moment, making the walls of St Stephen's vibrate with the applause 
of its hearers. These congregated types, as fast as they are compocred, 
are passed in portions to other hands ', till at last the scattered frag- 
ments of the debate, forming when united with the ordinary matter, 
eight and forty columns, reappear in regular order on the platform of 
the printing press. 

<< The hand of man is too slow for the demands of curiosity, but the 
power of steam comes to his assistance. Ink is rapidly supplied to the 
moving types, by the most perfect mechanism : — four attendants inces- 
santly introduce the edges of large sheets of white paper to the junction 
of two great rollers, which seem to devour them with unsated appetite ; 
other rollers convey them to the type already inked, and having brooght 
them into rapid and successive contact, redeliver them to four other 
assistants, completely printed by the almost momentary touch. Thus, 
in one hour, 4,000 sheets of paper are printed on one side ; and an im- 
pression of 12,000 copies from above 300,000 movable pieces of metal, 
is produced for the public in six hours." 

*' One of the things that strike me most," says Mr. Rush, in his 
' Memoranda of a Residence at the Court of London,* *' is the daily 
press. 1 live in the north of Portman Square, nearly three miles from 
the House of Commons. By nine in the morning, the newspapers arc 
on my breakfast table, containing the debate of the preceding night 
This is the case, though it may have lasted to one, two, or three in tbt 
morning. There is no disappointment ; hardly a typographical error. 
The speeches on both sides are given with like care and fulness. The 
cost of a daily paper to a regular subscriber is about jC 10 a year ; but 
subdivision comes in to make them cheap. They are circulated by 
agents at a penny an hour in London : when a few days old, they 
are sent to the provincial towns and through the country at reduced 
prices. In this manner, the parliamentary debates and proceedings, 
impartially and fully reported, go through the nation." 

Digitized by Google 




•••W'rfciai^l|ilMii<>i''1iif iigttii'U-^ . 

nine. Up to ITSft, it focoui « MriM of l€$ irohwMB. 

lively wtek'^i^^iMi^ iInI Mlgii'di^ftlMn^^ld*; k «iui ili#i^ 
3^ diii^ A gi^natiptn of ili» btl lbit]Nif« yMii^il &iib<fei'i>|iiii|i 
iBgly Mif ftftd piyiv^fllil i 9»4 iBttijr eflli* ttiMt ^H iUaf i flahii MmA 
writen liave been oontillivtfof* to llM iftilliMbt 1 



The McniUur^ whioh ww eemmefioed in ItSB, tMui, rfnoe itfiejrMf 
1800, been tlia onJj official joiinMa of the foremqwaL 1^ ##• 
papon Uiat hava for a conaiderahia time bee^ tlia moal »Wj .C|li|j|iplli| 

and widely circulated, are ^the C cai fpiUma p iiMf and Hm ^jgi ifi if i dUe ilij{ii^ 
Theee papera treat qf a^ great variety of topioa, embracing nc^only na«p 
- and politica» bpU alao <tlie scipneeey litoratare^ aad the arte. The rdymiljii 
<tOTMM< haa, ^ ^a different branchea, 10 or 12 editora, and empli^ $.jfg 
10 p wa a ee day and night; and probably no other daily paper %j^ 
obtained ao nomerooa a aabacription. The circulation of the diflbren^ 
pi^peia ia aubject to great Tariation. The number of aulilkribera of 9W 
era! of the papera of Paria waa atatod in 1889, aa foUow^a : — , . . ./ 

lie Conatitutionnel 16,000 to 90,0001 LeCourrierlVan^a 4JBC0 

X« Jour, dee Debate 13,000 to 14^)00 LeXournalduCommeroa tfiilb 
la Gaiette de France . ' 7,000 Le Moniteur j^M^-^iMt 

Ia <t|iotidienne, . 5,000>Le Meaaager dea ChanibtM SI^M6 

Vm»qftke^^kmgpmpenfuUM0dmFrmu$ml8aSL 

Daily Kewapapera in Paria 34 

Other Jcornala in Paris, beaidea tiie daily papera . 136 
Vawipi^rl in France ont of Paria . . 1T8»— ««flhia»^ 

90'lvere publiahed once a week ; 46 tWiCe a week ; 36 thtee fSmnt 
#ihfc ; 19 eVeiy other day; 1 four timee a week ; 1 Aw^ timea a week ; 
9 aix timea a week ; 10 daily ; and 96 notatoted how often.-- In Fkfaaoa^ 
At iiil^ ne^W^apera ara pubUahad «Mry day, Aniday not ejieepted; 
Iniliilf Ki|^«|id» M in the tJnited SUtea, tha daiJ^y papera are aotpnh- 
liaM^^lion^ayt. 

'" 'indlSal iiawwpaper printed In the Britiah edloalea ia Amaiiea, wii 
^yailii^itt Bo^n in 1704, entitled « The Boetob Newa-LettoTi^ 
t«ii8#^WttikuedtiU1774. Thia Sa juppoaed to hav» beaa the flrtl 
iii^igfeijjbi^blMhcd on thia ediltinent; though It la b«^f«i >y wsm 
||i||l^^were printed at an earlier date at Mexioo. THa »^Bdiiail 
li^lllta^^ the aecond American aewapaper, awdeita appMiafaaalii 1419^ 
^^"^'^011^ Asaritea Waaiif lii^ 

The firat <^lVi#Tadi Giaaltoi'' 



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The [p«riodieaI jodhialt, luoaUy ft/ted I 
a eootfpioiiofii porUon of modern UtentaM,MAi 
witfOMt ill men of ■cienee and litentiirt. 3 
vidalj diffbied, and treating lesa of polities i 
iatMoat, than newspapers, they admit of meil 
enssions on all sabjects of intellectnal inqidrf « #41.1 
•me among the better educated classes, in fenBit%4 
iag opinion^ wUh respect to religion, literaliiftti 4 
The eonntries in which these Journals most abeRrtaid ii 
Germany, France, Holland, Italy, and the Unitedl 

The first publication of the character of a rspijy : 
dss SavanU,*' established at Paris, in 1665, byX ' 
at first published weekly, and contained analyses'^ 
works, whic^ were so severe as to gire maeh 
in 1669, and the journal was afterwards edited by < 
and Cousin. From 1715 ta 1793, it was condncM %]! 
ed men, and appeared in monthly numbers ; mad,^ 
1665 to 1792 forms 11 1 volumes 4to. In i7«S, it wm i 
in 1816,.it was revived, and has had a number of i 
its contributors, as De Sacy, Langl^s, Bimusati 
Niimerous other literary and scientific joomals fa|^^l| 
at Paris within a few years. * ^ .^^ 

Hie OenOenuM** Magaxine, which first appeaMi 
MomMy Hemets, in 1749, were the first works of tlWl 
-London, that obtained any great degree of permanen^^ 
Ilia JQQinals which preceded the Gentleman's Jfi^ 
•laiiWflaewitsd by Nichols ; vis. « Weekly Me 
lkMrik*lBloly set forth," 1688-9; "Memotrs^f ] 
fi^ Itair "^ New Memoirs of Literature," 6 ^r^^ 
ti||Jiii|.jg|ate.of the RepubUc of Letters," 18 inA^j 
'4Tels.,I7a0tol738. 

I was established ialV 
mttrUf leating the w^rkN^ii 



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tiM early eoiuMOtioB of Dr« JohnwfB willi Um Hn^ fditon ^i|ad ifi^ ^ 
iiotioe of tli# pi ot i^fe, imM^ »! iTSii; bnlJ^^ 
nogaxiiMt ithiU iU -' tohen^e is knowD wherovor tho.i ^.,,.^. , 
IfpokoDi -* that it it pne of the most K|coewfat and loeialttvo ; 
l^iioh literary histoiy haa upon reoprd.** A new aeriea 6f ^ 
waa beynn January^ 1834; the ^t aoriea having been cofi^i; 
103Tolumea. 




ThtMrnM^iMmn^ the earlieal regidar work ef the }0fd ili:B«f» 
land, wee eetaMiduid in I749» by Ralph Griffitha, LU IX, who^i*- 
liliiaedio eoBdnelit 54 yean, aaaiated by hie eon in the latter yeaiv^ 
lUft mb, Thie work, fHiieh ia atill eoiitinaed» haa had nany aUe 009* 
4rih!tH<i> In lie prineiplee it Iumi been eomewhal ▼ariabie ; biMt H KHqr 
be generally oliaraeteriaed aa liberal in poUtiot, and lalitndifpgipi;i|p 
.thp^lqgy. The Ffrat ^eriee, from 1749i to 1789 Ineliiai^^ jeoi|lfi]|^ 
T«lm^rSe«9Bf ^rWa^^n^^ii^^ ,. i xo^i 

^ 'ttitfCydJMtill^iifi^tLrfmdon] waaeatab^ la 19t^ b^ Ar^liittil 

jBMitillbte, with tiie aaahAaboe of Dr. SmoOett and ell^r -m^iaSL 
iWlim 11m tb 1785, the Rot. Joa^h RobaMnon waa a liberal eoblribQUir, 
ISMflg iUtiitafaed npwarda of 2,6SD artiolea. Thia work waa ^ttieoii. 
limidiiiYMi yeiara ainee. Firal Beriea, ftom 1756 to 1798^ faldvfi^ 
70 Tolnmea; 2d Seriea, from 1791 to 1803, ineluaiT^, 39 "tuyiMV; 
HI BaHei^ ftom MM to 18U, ineluaive, 94 yolaoMit 4tii 8efiio»<llbm 
Mtt^th 1814, inolaatTOi e ivolomea:-^inaU,139 voliimea. 
' "yidBrkidk OrUU [London] waa eatabliahed ia 1793; aatf Ka Mt 
/yiitaM %eM the Rot. Meaara. Robert NaiM and WIHiam BeM; Hie 
^IlifiiHif^ilMiomdfed hi 18171 and the fimner In 1899, having tetdaed 
l i iawimiefttion with the lirork tin the Oomplelioa of the «td tohotte. 
i»t||«|»«p| tte piiyiahed ia monthly nnmbeii; bat ainee 18^^ H haa 
rfy, ander jihe Ude 4^ M The Britlah Crifki imd TlMal» 
.'* It la eondaeted by the nMubeitt of the nuujirfiitlpii 
i\ ioad It iaaintaiaa loi^ aad hiilr ahnreh p Haeiyl e l ik ^'^^ 
Xl| iffiriA^ of the MUUmhttgk JtMiie, im%Bm^%MiA^m^0i^ 

1 a Juahec toae» belh ia.liteaytB» i 
Vtk^Mai Ithii^ 
«|liygocBaftrab>iF>iM|te. Ita.4 





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pMilBaf ^illniM irart r^prilatMl il 

^ ^|1m' ^MTteHy JI09IM0 [Loncba] «iiii 
M 1818, it b md to hare obuioed a 
It may be regarded as a rival 
maiBteiniQg, in a manner equally 
tory principles. It wat edited from Ua 
trUliam Oiffbrd ; then by H. N. Coleridge ; 
hart. Among iU wrltera are nnmbered fl^ 
•ad Croker. It has had many able and leMei^ 
whom are understood to hare been oonMieM 
Hdb Review bar been regularly repabHilieii ^ 
IPie pMeeding vohiraes were reprinted at N«ir' 
)oiiniafai of aay repirtation, it is the most fanHiiV' 
this oomitfy. 

The EeUcUeHemat [London], a mdntlily 
1806. It is conducted by Protestant Dissel^t^fly' 
folloal principles in religion, and liberfd or 
poUtlCf. 1% b«9 had many able contributont 
bend Adam Clarke, Robert Hall, and Johp f < 
Josiah Condor. — First Series, from 1805 to 1813^ 
9d Series, from 1814 to laSd/inclasiTe, 30 
was begun in 1829. 

The Ckristian Observer [London], a monthly 
members of the established church, was 
I what are commonly styled evangeUcal 
r of able contributors. The first editofi 
fffOi^nt, the Rot. Samuel Charles Wilks.— Moit 
tfeip work hare been republished in this country. 

Vs Editdmrgk Magaxm$f a monthl^ir 
I In 1817. It is edited by Professor Joha 
j^lfli JMyr -polities. The number of oopiee 
'"ii^^ An American o^tiepi 

tatliaw Haven in 1833. 

* StiieWf eitaUiahed, in 169I, by 1 
antraaoooe advocate ibr 

Editor, Joha Bowrinf , LLjI 

liKMlV win %t^9i at New Ha««n lii J 



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1ritliBioie<NrIe«miiij. ; ... a. ...w.fcHttf. 

laUirii nligiow mnd UlMiiy*^ J^^ 

pwtioidwly BoMii, Mw T«fk» audi FiiiMel|dil»| Imiwim of 1 

obtaiiMd a tibanl Mppmt or litd a long donlkm. 8ta^ tho . 

Umi, and More eapaeiallj aliioo tho eommeooonioiiiof Hio | 

tniy, tntoqNriMo of tbio mIuo hare boon gnatly avh^^iad. ' 

of tlftB reUgioos denomiaationa hava av|p|iofftad joaraala wbieh baiv^ ImA 

a pretty wide cifoiilatioii y and thefo liare dae appaarad a naaobaf «f 

literary, aeientific, and aieeellaiieoaa joomale that haTe bean taai^a^ 

ably euppotted; boi itia with tham ea with naw8papefa,.thay are to* 

nomerooa ta admit of their aeverally eommanding ao eaUeaatva a pit* 

nonage aa ia re^niflto in order to plaoe them on the moet adTantagaoiM 

fiioting. 

Aoeong the moet reapeotablo literary and ecientifio Ameriean jdomakf 
may be'^OMntioned the ••Port FoUO|" eatabliabcd at Fhiladelpfaiat bgr 
> Jooaph Oennie, in 1801,-(diecontinued a few yean ainee) ; << The Nof^ 
Ameriean Reriew/* eatabli^M at JBoeton in 1815, by William TadM^ 
tlmfim editor ; ^ The Ameriean Joornal of Soienee,*' eataUiahed acHiw 
Havm. by Benjamin Siltimaa, in 1917 ; and ^ The Ameriean Qoai«ei||y 
BaHaw,** eetabliebed at Philadelphia, in 1887; and edited by Robwt 
Walahu-^Foramore partaenUr aoeoantof the literary and religiooa 
jonmala in thia eonntry, eeo the noticea of the IndiTidnal Statea. 



FOKEION BANKS AND CURRENdr. 

Aa thia Tohime of the Almanac contain! a particnlar aoooimi ef tha 
IHflk^ inatitntioaa ef the Uniled Statea, it ia thooght proper to glfo 
IpfPt %v«7 ^^ notioe of aome of the moet celebrated Foreign Banha^ 
aiid i^.aztraata on Correney and the Preeioaa Melala, from Mr. Gal* 
]iau!^;iy9^|iae» entitlad << Conaidaratioaa oa the Carreney and Ranbiag 
Sjpiaat^iCtlm United Statea.'* 



\ of depoeit Ibr money ; and aia oommaicial i 
tiailM^iifrbf aflbrdhig credit and iaeaing notea, aa the repreadiitativti' 
oTttiftilSfttlibian 

le and abroad. ' ' ^'^" 

▼mioB^ tha aitllaat ittatilntioii tf m-Wmpm^^M^ 

a^ddlaaf the 19iii centw^, ia te tfaii'#tifc1l ^ 

Id a^HOr it a^aoiiifattiti IMJ 




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^^.^,^4, 



^'Hiiif'lifyB^ii'^M^i' 



MiM, nm eoMMMid io 1407. 

qogla AfttlM leli^ptA «M m 
iMtSAlfaif valM«Mll]j«etMl tbe i 
ttii wMertaioly. It beeama a 
llHiagli tlw auMMnt of ite eapital was i 
aiippniiirrt tA nlain ia itt ittpositortM i 
MlablMhaMBl of tlw kiod in Earapa. 
Aid tnaafar ; It naUhar BMkaa loana aai 

Tha Bavk jor Hambuao waa aitabliahair^ 
AoailBidani, U ia maraly a bank of daporil Mid t 

Tha Base or EaoLAVD, whioh ia a baakiifii 
ataaalplioni waa ohartarad in 1G94, diifiii|pj<] 
Mary, and tlw original capital ■ubaeribad kj 
iftl^m/IOOalariingfWhioliwaa lodgad inlllaii 
8 par oaat^ iateraiL Ita €a|utal ho baan 
and wia, in 1710, i&6,569,996; ia 1748, £^ 
i& 11,642,000. 

In 1781, tha charter of the bank waa '•z 
charter waa reoewed and continaed tol83&,oil4 
to tha public aenrice £3,000,000 without intared^J 
in 1806; and in 1633, the charter wae again i 
American Almanac for 1834, p. 330. .'^MV 

The circulation of the notes of tliii bank at i 
aa follows: 1 787, ^i& 8,688,570 or $38,615,006^^;^ 
or $81,786,355.55; 1795, £13,539,160 or $1 
£91,000,0(10 or $93,333,333.33. 

This bank ho been, erer since its eitabliaha 
with the government, to which its loans kara i 
Basidea being a creditor of the government to kt ^ 
1817, £98,300;W), tlie tnsUtution is an importaiit i 
agamaat of the public debt, and the coUeatikNl ii#1 
whoia of which, amounting to £50,000,000 p«r aa^ 
t|Mi^lMiak ; ia addition to this, in its character aa a )| 
eoi^^aiMl oifenlalion, it ia a powerful anzilhrj lii>K 



^lillfortaat aveat ia the hiatoij of ^thk^ J 
^iHf^ P^jmntf in February, l7S^i,\ 

f1^^^wW^m''^^f^^^^*^ aim wi 



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<hipf^^^^^?: 



-«i**'^<|rf#f«^^^.'^^tf 








•QfMflainliipf, wttiuwi aay i|ffffrwfm>i< wigftrtr lfc» I 
•» lkU« to tlie MVM iiMi^iiilMmiii ip tajr 
With tlM 6iMptkttV>|f. I^«r tHihm UjJIsiimi^^ 

•d in the UnitMl GMm; m >li| «lMk ef«HMUiiM ^ i^^ 
law, with a^ixH «itM> to «iM «^iliior prhSah €«|r »# mMfHHm 
•ra gMiefdl/ iiMiiiO^H^^ 1H» hiMiaww of all thme bmhi flinrfUji jn 
MOillTiiif moMy m dtpont, in ipoiiif bank notaay and^jgn i 
sotaa of hand or hiHa of ezehan|^. A portioa of dbo oapit^ hi 
HmotTiirtod in pidblie atoeki; bat thia U nofobtifatorj} a«liAjtti| 
^qf^^^r oMentially from tha Baah of £ag|mi Tho ^lyllrioif jlii 
tMiliitlon being boimd u^ i^w^fimfmn^%t^u4 n^ 
m^tt the paiNHr dieeov^lMl, i^iidy a^atiiUe joaii^ 
of 90Im, andd^MMUjOfi.** ' . •' . .r ■'•UAinj tM vlttie^iii*.'-* 

The Ears or FnAvcs wae aatahhehed in4fiM» at Faiii^|gr|iM|il^ 
fli^ lima priTate banking institationa, with a o^ilid if. 
^^fSMy and 45,000 ahatee, 1000 fttpiee « ahai^i tt» ooMiniia 16 
Jitiffi(»;1ha Oi^ wae doobl^, 1^ 
Mi Ihaohtttef extended to dOjreiii. In tfOg, thp bi||| ipip Jjijii^ 

^ ^ " e of tba ooDiaimipa^^wiia of.|^HMio. VimjA^mk^ 

abankof d^jt»di||oowt, aii4oiiei&l^ li^^tittH^. 

ito^em^ ai tho govemoiMnt appoiirta tb^jpfvyiM^^ij^l^ 

; asd ttieee ofilooni iHPi^Biai Dl* hAffw «4lM»iaf Uto. 

Ift letti, tiie^ dileowita amcmted |ot mm^^ 

7!km ^ 

^«|d^i 




'KT'^-irj 




iidiilinetifin iirlb. lAaat (fleliniii 



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I of !tn wiitiy ^ 






tlitf «r llto diiaM «r fiibttift, alMt ( 
dwl^ imd Ibr tiM prodnot of flw mbiiil I 
§^000,600 ft ^Mr in A« btgiimisif < 
of AilMiiea to tiiii day, and $900/NA|jtW^| 
]BttR>po» pffioi' to tlio difooniy of AinmiMy ' 
dlMBg flom UnB Ikot, c^ 1 7fiO0fif»fillik 

"^ItimiQeli mora dHBeoh to laeattibl :^ 
^liuittifaiEaropeiiidAiDetieatogetlifir. 1|^ j 
teltl ttigiit be oittniatod, and raatttoliM ; 
ainoltiit wUdi ins Iwen ezptfted to ebv&tdiM 1 
Hope; Wilt tM wbieh baa been acfaally 
wara, and otber mannfketons of this saibe 4 
aeeertained. Frbm tbe imperfbet data ilrfyi&^ 
tbink, be alllrmed» tbat tbe amount etm estktiii|:tt1 
oertainly exceeds $4,000,000,000, and most ^'" 
f Sfi&OfldOfiW. Of tbe mediom « ipOOjM^ 
•onedi it appears tiiat from one qoarter to jmii^i 
rsneft and that tbe resldne eonsists of plate/j 
tnred artieles. It is known, tbat of tbe frbes i 
abont $ 1,800,000,000, or one quarter of the' 
fei^-elgbtii in weight, consisted of gotd. 6f i 
^tmraned remaining amount in gold and^ iSI^^ 
isftobaMj greater, on account of the txpoiitiMij 
hMli^ been ezclusiTely in silver, and of tbe\ ^"^ 
jmnr poaiible waste in an article so tdwOiIe tf ^ 

^^^Pbe total sinount of currency in fiuropo < 
MMilftw f 8,000,000/N)0 to t9,300,(Wb,0^^ 
iiitlit tf the praeions metals, and the' 
iMiiiiililM^'iiinMr monev. 

f'Pm aiimnit in weight or quantity ef gqe^ iii||| 

Bttt the §900/10*^ j 

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wofmqty 

ffOMlO^ ttm mm vWVr osnPnMli^avpB fp&OmUf Wtm Wtmu^m 

IwMi gntlw OuttlliiaiiBte ezfiiiiifc^ i^ tile fiMffNbl 1 
caiiMd bj the diMo^eij of AflMvitta. JfmwtM£kma^t^ikimA 
of Ameiiom AA, iiid Eittope, tM mAM'i&mfiA ji^ lo'^tfce 
jMii 1803-1810, iiid emoiiiited tiMa toj|i{#tt^ ei^tt mM^ 
iper cent, of the wMe qneiiti^ of pte«Me ntefitrliM i^^^ 
fdpe and Ameriea. The euiTihddai of ter fttioMr S|^wlilll'«jlOTi 
hare, for the Itrt 90 yem^ redoe^ Ibi lolal aaitttal «ii|^l» lliitt 
$97,000,000. er to •hoitCllueeftlQttptf'eeiit tf the whaB^^pKuM^ 
now eziitinf. .■-.-;:■ r^-r 

<< The eoMilatioli of a pifiir enmiicpr Ibr ^ ]pieeioile mitftfi^ iIMb ' 
not appear to he attended with any otheir rabetaatfal adraat^g^ita&'.tli 
eheapneea; and the aetnal benefit mmj be eaknkted with tolerable ae- 
coraDj. If in a ooontiy, which wante and doee pommm a metalUo 0|i|»- 
rem^ of $ fOjiOOfiOO, a paper cnrrency to the Munf amoont ehoii^d jnp 
ai^tnled,the$70,000,db0ingold and lilTer, being no hingw WfO^ 
1^ that pnrpoee, will be ezported,^ ud the letaina maj be ooiiwiMl,^ 
^ffodaetlTo oapitai, and add an eqoal amount to ^'^ymit^'iiffj^ 
eotmtry. If the banking eyetem fennded mi the prtnoiple of a |i|er 
ctmEeney, eonTerttble at will into epeeiei ehoold be edopledy and nolie 
«f a reiy low denomination be ezolnded, it will be Ibnnd that the dTea<> 
latioa would eoneist of aboat 00 millionein bank notee,and 10 miUioae in 
idhrer. But in that caee the banke, in order to enitain epede J^yn^ato, 
onek, on an average, have in their Tanlte about 90 nfifione la p|Mm. 
Ilfie ie believed to be nearly the etoto of thiage at «b^^^ 
^ Uaited Slatee, i( adeordiag to emnmon mage, we eonmder bank 
00ym fl eoaiilxtatbig the whole of the paper ennreaey. Thefe hare 
iaea^ tliMMifore, oa that' prinolple o^y, $40^^ eaved' aad 
to the prodaetive capital of the eountiy. TUy al the lafte of 5 
r, itaay be eoaddined ae eqoal to ea adrenal aaaoal 
i^$1^WfM. TheiabetiwaoaorbiiJ^aotoelbfaiBe. 
r |i%diieee the eeato eibct, ai aa mS^tdm of iwo iaOt^ 
MJinorte of the Itaiied Btatee, or ai a'iteiil^riijMl^ ttiii 
'^-' -'-■-- . •* ^^^>-- ' -■■ ^'^--- ■ --^ -■-•■•• 





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.i^|rtt: qir i |^tiillh i iih IJ H T'i i ^ H W '- .^ 

.i^Pto Siii glw Aort «ti«>to ^ fkMi 

spAjMi of th« oxiilMimi of boUiai inl 
^i««i ft « Ij«* of fttfffiifihiyiif RtnliwifiMi 
|lc.Bo4fidld, of New Toik» tgont of itt^f 
|!09tj^ whloli tooonpftOMd the Bepott A j 
ploitoiio hftfo hippenod imoe Um dote of ( 
RopocI on thio MibjoGi wio mide to Iho | 
||r,30Btli»|d, OMKiho oloio of tlio ]a«i I 



'^Ibalmifdtj into the ei^aaoo whhh piodineib 'tt*^ 
boOen, luwongai^, for a ioiiot of yoon, Ifao " "" *' 
, ioiontifie mon. The oommittee do not piop<Ni 
bj obtradtng any opinions or epeeiilalione ef 
oontent themielvee by itating, in brief, «U tibe 
effect of steam luui been aecribed by practietl 
gaton. 
''let The fiuilty oonttmetion of boilem, 
''dd. The defectiTO material of which they kw 
** 3d. Long use, by which the original etienglh 
weakened, and thereby rendered inoapaUe of 
of steam for which they were originally oonstnwtod. 
'' 4th. Carelessness and want of skill in the^ea 
** 5th; An undue pressure of steam beyond 
strength of the boiler, no matter how perfect its 
its material originally may haTO been. 

*' ^Hk. From a deficiency in the eupply of wat6r| 
heated steam, and increasing the hMt of the floea 
when brought into sudden contact with water, 
the supply pump, in increased quantities, prodooes jl 
which often causes explosions the most dangerouaiuoiil 

" No legislation is competent to annihilate 
scribe and enforce the means of proTenting their 
Steam, with the mode of its application to maohiaery, 
must be left to the control of intellect and practical 
belongs to legidation to excite, by rewards and 



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t5.] mAMBOAT EXPLOBIOM. 118 

application of thOM engaged in iU use, which will best guard againat 

dangers incident to negligence. 

The melancholy incidents which hare occurred by the explosion 

iie boilers of manj steamboats in the waters of the United States, 

the shock which is universally felt on these occasions, had impressed 

committee with an opinion, that the destruction of human life had 

1 much greater than it turns out to be upon further and more minute 

^stigation. 

The whole number of explosions in the United States is ascertain- 

be fifty- two ; number of killed, 256 ; and number of wounded, 104. 
The committee propose to proride, by legislation, some safeguard 
nst explosions produced by the 1st, 2d, 3d, and 6th causes stated 
re. Against the 4th and 5th causes, viz., carelessness and want of 

1 in the engineer ; and an undue pressure of steam upon the boiler 
ond its capacity; no adequate remedy, through the legislation of 
igress, can be afforded. The remedy for this evil, if it belongs to 
slation at all, must be furnished by the legislation of the several 
es. It would, in the opinion of the committee, be wiser, however, 
ave it to be supplied by the interest and discreet judgment of the 
ers and masters of steamboats, which will always dictate the em- 
ment of those best skilled as engineera ) whose characters would 
pel them to the performance of their duties as such, in a manner 
t advantageous to their employers, and most reputable to them- 



of Steamboat Explosions which have occurred in the United States, 
with Remarks thereon, by W. C. Re^field, 



High Pressure. 


en 
>'d. 

vT 


1 NameB. 

1 


Plaoo of Explosion. 


Killed, &e. 


Wounded. 


Constitution, 


Mississippi, 


13 killed. 




! General Robinson; 


Do. 


9 




Yankee, 


Do. 


4 




'Heriot, 


Do. 


1 




M 


Etna, 


New^orkbay, 


13 




S3 


Grampus, 


Mississippi, 
Lon^ Isi. Sound, 


unknown. 






Barnet, 


1 killed. 




H) 


Helen McGregor, 


Mississippi, 


33 


14 




Caledonia, 


Do. 


11 


U 




Car of Commerce, 


Ohio River, 


28 


29 




Huntress, 


Mississippi, 


unknown. 






Fair Star, 


Alabama, 


2 killed. 






Porpoise, 


Mississippi, 


unknown. 






115 


54 



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114 



STEAMBOAT EXPLOSIONS. 
Low Pressure. 



[183& 



When NaiDet. 
explo'd. 


Place of Ezplofion. 


Killed, 6ui. 


WoQDdod.' 


Pro. to > , ., ! 
1825 Enterprise, cop. boiler] 


Charleston, S.C 


9 killed. 


4 




Paragon, do. 


Hudson River, 


1 


1 




Alabama, 


Mississippi, 


4 






Feliciana, 


Do. 


2 






Arkansas, 


Red River, 


4 






Fidelity, cop. boiler 


N.York harbor. 


2 






Patent, do. 


Do. 


5 


^ 1 




Atalanta, do. 


Do. 


2 


1 




Bellona. do. 


Do. 


2 


1 


iMaidofOrleRns, do. 


Savannah River, 


6 


, 


Raritan, unknown 


Raritan, 


1 






Eagle, do. 


Chesapeake J 


2 


seven]- 




Bristol, 


Delaware River, 




1 




Powhatan, cop. boiler 


Norfolk, 


2 




1824 Jersey, " do. 


Jersey City, 


2 


1 


1825 Tesch, 


Mississippi, 


several. 


1 


Constitution, 


Hudson Kiver, 


3 


1 


Legislator, 


N. York harbor, 


5 


2 


1826 


Hudson, 


East River, 




1 




Franklin, 


Hudson River, 


1 


1 




Ramapo, in Jan. 


New Orleans, 


5 


2 




Do. in Mar. 


Do. 


1 


1 , 


1827 


Oliver Ellsworth, 


Long Isl. Sound, 3 
N. York harbor, 1 


1 


1830 


Carolina, 


1 




C. J. Ma«ihall,c. boiler 


Hudson River, 11 


2 ! 




United SUtes, 


East River, 9 




1831 iGeneralJackson, 


Hudson River, 12 supposed 


13 






95 


29 



N. B. Of the above low-pressure explosions, ten were copper boilen, 
from which were killed 42, wounded 7 

8 iron boilers, do. 35, do. 3 

9 boilers, metal unknown (probably iron) do. 1^ do. 19 
The number of copper boilers in use is now very small compared with 

those of iron. 

Character or Engines rot specified. 



When 
explo'd. 


Namet. 


Place of Explosion. 


Killed, fcc. 


WottBdad.^ 




Cotton Plant, 


MobMe, 


unknown. 


unknown.! 


181G 


Washington, (high p.) 


Ohio River, 


7 kUled. 


9 ! 


1826 


Macon, 


South Carolina, 


4 


1 


1827 


Hornet, (low) 


Alabama, 


2 


s 


1826 


Susquehannah, 


Susquehannah, 


2 




1827 


Union, (high) 


Ohio River, 


4 


7 ! 


1830 


W. Peacock, stovepipe 
Tally-ho, (high) 
Kenhawa, (low) 


Buffalo, 


15 






Cumberland R. 








Ohio River, 


8 


4 




Atlas, 


Mississippi, 
Savannah River, 


1 






Andrew Jackson, 


2 


1 


1831 


Tri-color, (low) 


Ohio River, 

\ 


8 


8 


46 [53?] 


21 [30.'] : 



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' A .-»;>^"'l«54 fcll \ T V |H||| 







69 Mtof, ^ fM 10i! 

<<ln ■ome of the priifeip«l ao^daftti wmptkit io tfiifi|iRig«li^^ 
th« number of lulled iiieludei all whodid not feco7wftfNn.tli9if i 
In other caaee, the numbers klUed are ■■ giTtn ist'tibe i 
the day, and aome of the wounded ahould perhapa be alM. ' ^ f -^ 
ftw instanoea no liathaa been obtained, and poaaibly ini|OtBe ab loia W 
Ufe has occurred. The aeebunts of some of the ininor aockleatami^ 
hare been loat aif ht'of* or orerloohed in my files. In malting an a^ 
proximate estimate of Che whole number of Ufos whidi haTe.l^eii kit 
in the United States by these accidents, I should ^ it at three hundred. 

'' Although thia is a melancholy detail of casualties, yet it seems leas 
fi>nnidable when placed in comparison with the ordinary eausea of 
mortality, and especially when contrasted with the insatiate demaada 
of intemperance and ambition. It ia believed that it will appear smaS,* 
when compared with* the wlu^e amount of injury and lose,, ^liifili hia 
been auatained by travelling in atages and other kiiids of (D«iEia||pi. 
More Uvea have probably been loat from aloopa and packets on ibe ii^ 
ters of this State aince the introduction of ateamboata, Ihan bj all the 
aeeidenta in the latter, though the number of passengers exposed haa 
been much amaller. In one case that happened within a few y^ars, 
thirty-aix persons were drowned on board a aloop in the Hudson rivar» 
and many inatances occurred, involving the loss of a amaller anad^r 
of lives; and one ease not long since, on l4>ng la^ifid Souady whieh 
resulted in the loss of twelve or fourteen individuala. 

<< II will be seen, by relerenoe to the foregoing Hat, that, of Itwanty- 
tialivea that have been iDst mi board of New York aCeambeata, pre* 
vkuale the oaae of the Chief Juatiee Marahall, and exoluding the ease 
Hf tl)ka Etna, only one fassenger ia included in the namber. Even ia 
tha more &tal caaea which are here excluded, and in all aeeidenta of 
ijih iAfftf the chief loaa is sustained by the crew aad c^cera attai^bM|^ 
19 iha'lb^ijita, who, by the aature of their employaiea^ are ooiap^fd tfli 

^jiaSt^^ tol^Maaft^jf aiiMun^oa^ 

amf jitt^' peiioaal inquiry info' ^e aeddenis wj^^lftt^ C^^ 
diiiLi^'to sUfo frarlessly, thcaigii ^ oppoaition lii iprva^ j " " 
) the yea^ 1891, no ioeadeiit ia.thii^^ 
i^iiii«r4owaatof water ia the boikri of > '^* 




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^ NolwitlMteiuUiig the mnltipli 
illft kit and jNTtwnt letiotts, ■till Hntl 
«NuUatlj diminiihtiig, wad will jprobi^iljr fO^ii 
gl(|»(iter ntio, m Mon m the luge, UIh 
wl3eli were in TOfue a few yeere eiiioe, ondlir i 
of lev-jpreemre boilen, aliall litTe beea Hufl^yi 
Mialt ooneidenUe p rogree e liae eli eedy Veen i 

*fTbe wnoaat of ateamboet bnaiiieaa kt 
oMaaed immenaely liinee 1894 ; and perbi^ i 
pieoediiD( period by fifty or one hundred ft]4* 
but one ateamboat ran in the watera of 
from New York, eaatward, and with a amall an 
pared with what thej now carry. Now we hatu j 
full activity in tliat direction. One boat on the 8^ 
haa carried near two hundred thoniand paaaeftf^i 
teen or eighteen boata plying on the HudaoBi iii^ 
Chia ei^i the change haa been equally great" 



VI, AGRICULTURE AND RUBAt 

[The following article haa been fiimiahed hj^ 
Eaqh A^tor of the << New Engknd FarmOT.** A ' 
eaUaial aotieea and unprovementa may be < 
UMa of the Ahnaaae.] 

TiRi dbfeot of agriculture ia to increaae the (^m^^*^^ ,4 
^nall^ of lileh TegeUble and animal produettona ^\ 
"'"*''•" I in a aUte of ciriliiaUon. AU^«||l^ 
evertheleaiy one of thoee in wh)i^ ^^ 
ent are moat atrikia^y ] 
J ozteariTe, aad ombraeeiy 
i of homaa ki|owlMl|go. 

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1835.] AeaicuLTURE aud rural economy. 117 

Bat, thoagh its topics are numberleBs, and its views boundless, the 
slightest sketches and the most limited glances maj prove useful. One 
may obtain refreshment from a fountain, without drinking, or appropri- 
ating the whole of its waters. 

The science of agriculture is becoming more and more important as 
mankind advance in civilization. The practical farmer, especially in 
the older and more populous parts of the country, must not only under- 
stand, but put in operation many of the modern improvements in the 
art by which he obtains his livelihood, or, by neglecting to make the 
most of his means, he will take so many retrograde and downhill steps 
in the journey of life, that old age will find him in the vale of poverty. 
The cultivator, who does not keep pace with his neighbors, as regards 
agricultural improvement and information, will find himself to be the 
poorer in consequence of the intelligence and the plenty which sur- 
round him. He will be like a stunted oak, w