Skip to main content

Full text of "Annual report of the Town of Barrington, New Hampshire"

See other formats


M OF BARRINGTON 
HAMPSHIRE 




< oo 
O 

si" 

pq O '• 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



1980 



for the year ending 
DECEMBER 31.1984 



.UA'r/£F?J>]II OF NEW 



lAMPSHiR* 



1984 



The Cover 

Tit! cx)ver for this past year's Annual Huports features a graph showing 
Barrington's population growth from 1970 to the present. Fteadily appar- 
ent is the relatively steady increase in papulation over the years depict- 
ed. This increase represents in average growth rale of 242 people [xjr 
year. It is interesting to note that with the issuance of 60 building 
permits per year and an assumed occupancy of 4 persons per building, a 
rate of 240 people per yocir is obtained. 

If a shorter and more current tijrt; base is used, such as from 1977 
through 1983 which includes the nat.ional economic downturn period, 
the average rate of population increase turns out to be 243 people 
per year. 

To sensibly nanage growth it's inportant to conpare the growth in Harr- 
ington with the growth in Strafford County over the same tiiiie period. 
According to population data provided by the NH Office of State Plan- 
ning, Barrington's population has grown 181.98% since 1970 v\^ile 
Strafford County's population grew only 25.88% for the same period. 
A sinple coitparison for this period shows that Barrington's population 
grew 7 times faster than the county's. 

Ftxm 1980 to 1983 Barrington's population increased by 19.41% while 
Strafford County grew only 3.91%. Although the rate of growth has 
been slower since 1980 than in 1970 's, population numbers show that 
Barrington is still growing 5 times faster than Strafford County. 

The results of the 1984 Comnunity Attitude Survey show that a vast 
majority of the respondents feel that Barrington is growing too rapid- 
ly. Similar attitudes were expressed in previous surveys. These feel- 
ings are supported by the findings presented above. 

Itiis year's report of the Planning Board contains a summary of activ- 
ities and a discussion of what is being done to address this growth. 



Memo to the Town Govemment 

It can be said that 1984 was a pivotal year for Harrington. 

Resident population passed the 5,000 itark and using 1970 as base 
with data provided by planning, the 10,000 people plateau may come 
before the year 2,000. 

None of us are ready for this. Vie live in an environment we consider 
precious hoping that much of our town will stay as woods and wildlife, 
hoping that progress will pass us by. 

Not so! New Hanpshire is very attractive to both worker and industry 
alike. As indicated in recent news reports, -the seacoast is about the 
last socalled "virgin territory in the "southern tier" and those 
planning to relocate will be heading our way. 

If one accepts growth as a fact the one must also accept that with 
growth come increases in demands for service resulting in increases in 
cost of government. 

We v^o work for you try hard to keep costs down and under control. 
The question is - how much longer can your town agencies, police, fire, 
highway etc. designed to serve populations of around 2,000, serve popu- 
lations of 5,000 and growing. 

It will take all in town government working together to plan for what is 
to come to insure that our town remains an attractive and nice place to 
live. 

Our thanks to all departments for another job "well done". 



George T. Musler 

Chairman, 

Board of Selectmen 



ROGER LOCKE CALEF 

Roger Locke Calef was a quiet unassuming man, a friend to all and a man 
who found countless ways of doing things for others. 

He was bom in Barrington, July 31, 1924 and he spent his entire life 
in this town except for three years during World War II. 

He graduated from Barrington School, Dover High School and Macintosh 
Business College. As a boy, he worked at Calef 's Store after school and 
vacations and he found his natural place in the store with his grandfather, 
father and uncle. 

Years later he becaitie the owner and in the last few years was joined 
by his wife. Alberta, daughter, Andrea and oldest son Bill. 

In spite of his work at the store he was a Captain for the Barrington 
Volunteer Fire Department and its secretary for eighteen years, a Straf- 
ford County fire warden and a long time president of the Barrington Ceme- 
tary Association. He was Barringtons first Cub Scout director, and served 
on several school building committees. He was a member of the Barrington 
Congregational Church, a former charter member of Hanson-Kelliher VFW 
Post #6804, and in later years a member of the Barrington Library Associ- 
ation. 

Roger was Barrington and though he is sadly missed, his spirit lives 
on among those of us who knew and loved him. 





Earl Colby - 1917 



1984 



Selectman for two years 

Building Inspector for four years 

Resident of Harrington for 40 years 

Veteran of World War II 

Member of the Grange 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

Results of the 1984 Community Attitude Survey 1 

I. DIRECTORY 

Town Officers, Coimdttees and Boards 5 

Hours and Telephone Numbers 7 

II. TOWN MEETING 

Minutes - 1984 Town Meeting 10 

Minutes - Special Town Meeting 18 

Warrant/Budget - 1985 22 
III. TOWN FINANCIAL REPORTS 

Town Clerk 31 

Treasurer 32 

Tax Collector 33 

Trustees of Trust Funds 35 

Suimary Inventory of Valuation 36 

Statement of Appropriations 36 

Detailed Statement of Payment & Encumbrances 37 

Schedule of Town Property 42 

Conparative Statement 43 

Financial Statement 45 

Income from Departments 50 

IV. REPORTS OF TOWN OFFICERS, AGENTS AND ORGANIZATIONS 

Road Agent 52 

Animal Control 56 

Harrington Fire Department 57 

Town Forest Fire Warden & State Forest Ranger 58 

Police Department 59 



Page 

Elnergency Medical Services Coordinator 63 
Bnergency Medical Services Treasurer's Report 

Veteran's of Foreign War 66 

Librarian's Report 67 

Library Trustees Report 69 

Library Association Treasurer's Report 70 

Building Inspector 71 

Civil Preparedness 72 

Zoning Board of Adjustment 74 

Planning Board 75 

Fuel Assistance Program 76 

Historical Society 77 

Laitprey Regional Solid Waste Cooperative 79 

Conservation Conmission 80 

Rural District Health Council, Inc. 82 

Newmarket Regional Health Center 85 
V. SCHOOL DISTRICT MEETING 

Officers of the Barrington School District 87 

Barrington School District Elections 88 

Minutes - 1984 School District Meeting 89 

Warrant/Budget - 1985 95 
VI. REPORT OF SCHOOL OFFICIALS 

Statement of Revenues General Fund 103 

Statement of Revenues Food Service Fund 104 

Statement of Expenditirres General Fund 105 

Statement of Expenditures Food Service Fund 106 

Detailed Statement of Receipts 110 



Page 

Revenues & Credits Available to Reduce School TaiX 111 

Schedule of Salaries 112 

Food Service Program Report 113 

School District Balance Sheet 115 

School District Analysis of Fund Equity 116 

Report of School District Treasurer 117 

School District Tentative Calendar 118 

School District Balance Sheet 119 

Report of the Superintendent of Schools 121 

Salary of Superintendent/Assist. Superintendent 125 

Distribution of Money to be Raised by Districts 126 

School Board's Report to the School District 127 

Principals Report 129 

School Nurses Report 131 

Auditors Report 133 

Report of the Barrington School Study Committee 134 

VII. STATISTICS 

Births, Deaths and Marriages 141 



Results of the 1984 Corrmunity Attitude Survey 

Note: 470 questionnaires were returned. 

1. Please circle the number that expresses your evaluation of each of 
the following: 

Very Below Above No 

Poor Poor Average Average Good Excellent Opinion 

A. FIRE PROTECTION 4 7 36 79 213 92 44 

B. LAW ENFORCEMENT 23 32 77 89 171 38 35 

C. ROADS 25 35 126 126 124 11 18 



D. RECREATIONAL 
FACILITIES 69 86 114 56 72 14 44 

E. TOWN DUMP 12 16 40 92 196 52 57 

F. LIBRARY 8 18 70 92 171 45 61 

What do you like most about Harrington at the present time? (Mark one 
or more) 

329 A. UNCRCWDED LIVING CONDITIONS 



79 


213 


92 


89 


171 


38 


.26 


124 


11 


56 


72 


14 


92 


196 


52 


92 


171 


45 



50 B. SCHOOLS 



186 C. SCENERY 

336 D. RURAL CHARACTER 



92 E. ACCESS TO OUTDOOR RECREATION 



25 F. OTHER (People, No Pollution, Low Taxes, All the Above, 
No Comment) 

What kind of town would you like Barrington to be? (Mark one or more) 

335 A. RURAL 170 D. RESIDENTIAL 

55 B. CCM^ERCIAL 28 E. COMMUTER TOWN 



54 C. INDUSTRIAL 14 F. OTHER All Above , 

No Industrial 

What is your opinion of the present growth rate (population) of 
Barrington? (Mark one) . 

279 A. TOO RAPID 



153 B, ABOUT RIGHT 



15 C. NOT TOO FAST 



23 D, NO OPINION 



What worries you most about population growth in Harrington? (Mark 
one or more) 

212 A. INCREASED TOWN EXPENDITURES 



256 B. INCREASED SCHOOL ENROLLMENT 



124 C. INCREASED TRAFFIC CONGESTION 



332 D. RISING TAXES 

159 E. DECREASED PRIVACY 

218 F. LOSS OF OPEN, RURAL, AND FOREST AREAS 

208 G. WATER SUPPLY AND POLLUTION PROBLEMS 



37 H. OTHER Combinations of Above, Checked but no comment. 



6. Please circle the number that best describes your attitude toward 
possible new housing in Barrington. 

Strongly Strongly No 

Agree Agree Disagree Disagree Opinion 

SINGLE FAMILY HOUSES 
(INCLUDES MANUFACTURED 
HOUSING) 227 162 175 17 7 

APARTMENTS FOR 2 TO 10 
FAMILIES 23 97 82 171 14 

APARTMENTS FOR 10 TO 30 
FAMILIES 

ONE BEDROCM APARTMENTS 

SENIOR CITIZEN HOUSING 

CONDOMINIUMS 

CLUSTER DEVELOPMENTS 

7. Please circle the number that best describes your feelings toward 
the following types of growth. 

Present Favor 

Rate No 

Favor Favor About More No 

More Less Right Growth Opinion 

HEAVY INDUSTRY 

LIGHT INDUSTRY 



7 


23 


42 


273 


15 


34 


116 


54 


141 


34 


154 


176 


28 


31 


19 


32 


66 


57 


216 


19 


32 


66 


57 


214 


21 



46 


35 


68 


218 


14 


.95 


19 


114 


79 


10 









Present 


Favor 










Rate 


No 






Favor 


Favor 


About 


MDre 


No 




More 


Less 


Right 


Growth 


Opinion 


PROFESSIONAL OFFICES 


250 


20 


108 


36 


20 


BUSINESS 


171 


17 


148 


35 


10 


RECREATIONAL TOURISM 


122 


25 


131 


61 


17 


RESIDENTIAL 


99 


56 


144 


58 


14 


AGRICULTURAL 


240 


17 


97 


10 


20 



8. Would you be willing to fund a municipal water supply to attract 
industrial developnent? 

96 YES 350 NO 19 NO OPINION 

9. Do you think there is a need for additional recreational facilities 
in Barrington? 

228 YES 162 NO 15 NO OPINIOSI 

10. Please add any conments you have about Town planning. 



DIREXTTORY 



5. TCWN OFFICERS 

CaiMITTEES AND BOARDS 
For the year ending December 31, 1984 

SELBCIMEN TERM EXPIRES 
George T. Musler 1985 

Charles F. Soule 1986 

Patricia R. Nev^ll 1987 

TOWN CLERK 

Muriel T. Leocha 1985 

Valerie Gillen - Deputy Town Clerk Appointed 

TAX COLLECTOR 

Madelynn Faist 1985 

Jeanne Caforio - Deputy Tax Collector Appointed 

Catherine Mountain - Clerk J^pointed 

TREASURER 

Ronald P. Seaver 1985 

AUDITORS 

Clarence Gamett 1985 

Lynda Sanders 1986 

Avis Taylor 1987 

TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS 

Robert Drew 1985 

Barbara Hayes 1986 

Dorothy Berry 1987 

SPECIAL LIBRARY TRUSTEE 

Dorothy Berry 1985 

SUPERVISORS OF CHECKLIST 

Janet 'Varney, Chairman 1986 

Rose" Fogg 1987 

Marjorie Tinm 1988 

BUILDING INSPECTOR 

Stephen Bergstrom i^^pointed 

ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICER 

Sally Bigelow Appointed 

CHIEF OF POLICE 

Trafton Sprowl Appointed 

FIRE CHIE F 

Sumner Hayes Appointed 

FOREST FIRE WARDEN 

Sumner Hayes ^^pointed 

DEPUTY FIRE WARDENS 

George A. Calef, A. Harlan Calef, Russell Hayes Appointed 



ROAD AGENT TERM EXPIRES 

Ronald Landry ^pointed 

COORDINATOR OF EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES 

Joel Sherburne i^pointed 

HEALTH OFFICER 

Salvatore Farina Appointed 

TAX MAP 

Harold Flower Appointed 

CIVIL DEFENSE 

Francis Lanciano i^pointed 

TCWN ENGINEER 

Lawrence Ketchen ^^pointed 

TCWN MODERATOR 

Frederick N. Timm 1987 

John Barr - Assistant Moderator 1986 

CONSERVATION CCMMISSION 

David Allain 1986 

John Barr 1985 

Raymond Spinney 1987 

Stephen Bellucci, Chairman 1987 

Stephen Jeffery 1987 

Susan Frankel 1987 

Jeffrey Lowry 1987 
R. Douglas Reckard 
ZONING BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT 

Robert Shepherd, Chairman 1986 

Faith Wallace 1986 

Douglas Thoirpson 1986 

Richard Hobbs 1985 

Richard Brooks 1987 

Alternates: Fred Tinm 1985 

Richard Hill 1985 

ADVISORY BUDGET COMMITTEE 

Walter Goosens 1985 

Douglas Thortpson 1987 

Al Greenwood 1986 

Ben Andrews 

Wallace Flaherty 

Louis Monti 

PLANNING BOARD 

David Allain, Chairman 1987 

Dawn Hatch 1988 

Pat Newhall 1987 

Raymond Peters 1985 

Mary Gairelin 1986 

Wayne Beasley 1987 

Al Greenwood 1985 

Sidney Kotlus 1987 



7. TOWN OF BARRINGT^l 

HOURS AND TFT.RP HnNTK NUMBERS 

SELE)CmEN 

George T. Musler 664-2877 

Charles F. Soule 664-7747 

Patricia Newhall 664-2816 

TOWN OFFICE 664-9007 

OFFICE OF SELECIMEN 
Lois E. Newhall, Clerk 
Suzanne W. McNeil, Clerk 
Donna Hannigan , Clerk 
Jeanne Ca f or io, Bookkeeper 

OFFICE OF SELECIMEN Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday 

8:00 am - 4:30 pm Closed Wednesday 

OFFICE OF TAX COLLECTOR 

Madelynn Faist Monday, Tuesday, Thursday 9:00 am - 12:00 pm 

Wednesday 7:00 pm - 9:00 pn 

Telephone Number-Tax Collector 664-2230 

OFFICE OF TCWN CLERK 

Muriel Leocha Monday, Tuesday, Thursday 

Friday 9:00 am - 1:00 pm 

Wednesday Evening 7:00 pm - 9:00 pn 

ROAD AGENT 

Ronald D. Landry 332-0339 

BUILDING INSPECTOR 

Stephen Bergstrom 664-2121 

Wednesday Evening Hours 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm 

(By appointment only) 

ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICER 

Sally Bigelow 742-4968 

HEALTH OFFICER 

Salvatore Farina 332-6297 

POLICE 664-2700 

STRAFFORD DISPATCH 742-4968 

FIRE 
(For Fire Permits, call 664-2815 or 664-5554) 664-7700 

DUMP HOURS 

Sumner Hours - starting June 6, 1985 

Sunday 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm 

Wed. 11:00 am - 6t00 pm 

Sat. 8:00 am - 5:00 pm 

Winter Hour s Wednesday 11:00 pm - 6:00 pm starting Septemfcier 11, 1985 
Saturday 8:00 am - 5:00 pm 



II. TCWN MEETING 



We felt it vould be beneficial to all residents of Barrington to inpress upon 
everyone that anyone ccsning to the Town Clerk to register a car MUST have 
proof that his/her resident tax has been paid. It is really inportant to 
save all receipts for any and all taxes paid (including inventory receipt) . 
Motor vehicle registrations and fishing/hunting licenses require proof 
that your resident tax has been paid. 

We would also like to include the infometion that the Tax Collector has 
a separate telephone number in the office. To reach the Tax Collector, 
dial 664-2230 



CABLEVISION ACKNOWLEDGHyiENT 

The Selectmen want to take this opportunity to thank all the citizens 
who started on the Cablevision Advisory Comtiittee in 1982. Most attended 
several meetings and did contribute to the sessions. George Seaver did a 
fine job as Chainren of the Active Coimiittee v*iich carried out all the 
preliminary investigations and contacts with other Companies. 

The 3 - member Supervisory Cable Coimittee v^o carried on after the 
franchise agreement was signed need to be thanked for their willingness 
to continue in a frustrating situation. We are extremely sorry that 
Cablevision did not become a reality in Barrington, but we did try, and 
we learned a lot. Again, thank you to everyone who took part in this 
"learning experience". 



TCWN MEETING MARCH 13 - 14, 1984 10. 

At a legal meeting of the inhabitants of the Town of Barrington in the 
Coxonty of Strafford in said State, the following action was taken on 
the Town Warrant. On Tuesday, the 13th day of March the polls were open- 
ed at 10:00 A.M. and closed at 6:30 P.M. The Article of Business were 
acted upon on Wednesday, the 14th day of March 1984 at 7:00 P.M. 

The meeting was called to order by Moderator Frederick N. Tinm at 7:00 
P.M. 

Number of eligible voters on check list: 2389 
Number of votes cast by official ballot: 423 
Number of votes cast by absentee ballot: 14 

ART. 1 To vote by ballot on the following question: Are you in favor 
of the adoption of the amendments to the Building Code, and Zoning Ord- 
inance Regulations as proposed by the Planning Board. 

BUILDING CODE CHANGES 

ART. Ill Changed from: 

Section 1. All dwellings will be placed upon a slab, wall 
or pier type of foundation. Foundations shall be construct- 
ed of solid concrete, brick, concrete blocks, cinder blocks, 
stone or other durable materials and shall be carried below 
the frost line or to bedrock. 

ART. Ill Changed to: 

Section 1. All dwellings will be place on a slab or wall 
type of foundation. Foundations shall be constructed of 
solid concrete, brick, concrete blocks, cinder blocks, stone 
or other durable materials and shall be carried below the 
frost line or to bedrock. 

VOTES CAST: Yes: 198 No: 225 

It was voted by the Town not to accept the adoption of the 

proposed amendment. 

ART. IV Changed from: 

Section 4. Each application for a permit shall be accorp- 
anied by a plan or sketch showing the location of the dwell- 
ing or structure on the lot, dimensions and area of the 
dwelling or structure, and State approval of water and 
sewer services. (Ref . RSA 149-E) . 

ART.rv Changed to: 

Section 4. Each application for a permit shall be acconp- 
anied by a plan or sketch showing the location of the dwell- 
ing or structure on the lot, dimensions and area of the 
dwelling or structure, and State approval of water and 
sewer services, including state approved plan for septic 



systems. (Ref. RSA 149-E) 

VOTES CAST: YES: 306 NO: 113 

It was voted by the Town to accept the adoption of the proposed 

amendment. 

ZC»JING ORDINANCE CHANGES 

ART. XII 

Section 5a. Anyone failing to qualify for a permit, thru the 
point system for two, (2) consecutive months shall beccme 
#1 applicant for a permit the third month. 

VOTES CAST: YES: 305 NO: 72 

It was voted by the Town to accept the adoption of the 

proposed amendment. 

Section 5b. Change in a dwelling from seasonal to per- 
manent use would require inspection and approval by the 
Building Inspector and Water Supply and Pollution Control 
Comnission. (RSA 149-8) 

VOTES CAST: YES: 305 NO: 111 

It was voted by the Town to accept the adoption of the 

proposed amendment. 

Definition: 

Seasonal Dvielling - one that is normally used between 

i^ril 15 and Oct. 15. 

These changes to beccme effective on passage. 

ART. 2 The following Town Officers were elected: 

Selectman for three years 

Patricia R. Newhall 250 votes 

Auditor for three years 

Lynda Sanders 382 votes 

Town Trustee of Trust Funds for three years 

Dorothy B. Berry 398 votes 

Moderator for two years 

Frederick N. Tiittn 388 votes 

Supervisor of the Check List for three years 

Rose L. Fogg 415 votes 

The following candidate for Town Office was not elected 
Lawrence E. Dubois (Selectman for 3 years) 175 votes 

ART. 3 It was voted by the Town to continue the three year 

term of office for the Tax Collector, Town Clerk and Treasurer. 
Motion: G. Musler - P. Newhall 

ART. 4 It was voted by the Town to authorize the Selectmen to 
appoint all other necessary town officers. 
Motion: G. Musler - C. Soule 

ART. 5 A motion was made by Patricia Ne^Atiall, "I move the 

acceptance of the report of town officers and agents, as 
contained in the Town Reoort, with the following changes: 



12. 
Instead of reading on Page 25 in your Town Report under "Approved, 
1983 budget", it should read: "Detailed Stateinent of Expenditures. 
That is the detailed list of expenses for the year 1983. 

On Page 29, the total should read 558, now, the total that's 

in your book, that says: "total expended, one hundred and seventy- 
eight thousand," is the total for the highway departinent . 

The 'total, detailed statment of expenditures has no total. So, 
the total for the viiole statement should read: $558,596.84. 
Those expenditures do not include Granville Drive and the 
cemetery, since those are in-and-out items. 

On Page 53 is the BEMS report, treasurer's report; and there are 
a couple of minor changes in that report. 

Under the total column, the additional line, over on your right- 
hand side, the figure in there is $3,908. That three is a typo- 
graphical error. The total should read: $908.80. So, just 
scratch that three out of there. 

The heading under expenditures should read, instead of town, 
it should read appropriated. That was the amount that was 
appropriated for the BEMS. 

Instead of BHVIS, it should read spent. That's the total that 
the BSyiS spent out of their town budget. And the third column 
should be headed BWiS. That's the money that they spent out of 
their own treasury. Everything else is the same on that page. 
All figuring is okay. 

The only other addition that we would like to bring up at this 
point is: We would like to add $10,000 to the last line of 
your budget, v\*iich is Page 16, which reads: "state audit". 

We had figured that the state had given us a rough figure of 
$5,000 providing they did not find any problems or have to go 
back too far. Since the town has never been audited, they are 
having a rough time. We have already gone over the five thousand 
that they recommended. So., we would like to add $10,000 in 
that line item, to cover the state audit; and that would 
increase your total, under 1984 appropriations, to six five 
seven, two or five fifty. Motion seconded by G. Musler. 
the town voted to accept this article as amended. 

ART. 6 Mr. Soule; I move to amend ART. 6, "to see if the 
town will raise and appropriate and expend the amount of 
$574,573 to cover all items in the budget not covered by 
articles in the warrant. Motion seconded by P. Nev^iall. 

It was voted by the town to accept ART. 6 as aitended. 

ART. 7 It was voted by the Town to raise, appropriate and 
expend $35,000 to repair and renovate the Town Hall and drill 
a well. Motion: C. Soule - S. Bigelow 



13. 

ART. 8 It was voted by the Town to authorize withcirawal by the 
Selectjnen from the Federal Revenue Sharing Fund for use as a set off 
against the following debt services: 



Purpose 


Principle 


Interest 


International Truck 


$ 5,166.67 


$ 490.83 


IBM Conputer 


2,000.00 


215.00 


Anibulance 


3,200.00 


320.00 


Ccmpactor Site 


8,000.00 


1,240.00 




$18,366.67 


$2,265.83 



NkDtion: C. Soule - E. Thcsrpson 

APT. 10 It was voted by the Town to authorize the Selectmen to with- 
draw from the Federal Revenue Sharing Funds the amount of $2,000 to 
apply to the cost of the State Audit. 
Motion P. Nev^iall - D. Hatch 

ART. 11, 12, and 13, MODERATOR: The State Department of Revenue 
Administration has reccstmended that Articles 11, 12 and 13 are not 
needed. Therefore, we do not need to act on them. I hereby declare 
them invalid. 

ART. 14 It was voted by the Town to create a Capital Reserve Fund 
of $10,000 towards the purchase of a new fire engine. 
Motion: A. Calef - A Ihonpson 

ART. 15 It was voted by the Town to create a Capital Reserve Fund 
of $4,000 towards the purchase of a new ambulance. 
Motion: G. Musler - S. Bigelow 

ART. 16 It was voted by the Town to create a Capital Reserve Fund 
of $1,000 for the purpose of maintaining and repairing the conpactor 
and includes the provision that expenditures can be made in case of 
maintenance and repairs. 
Motion: P. Nevtell - M. Buxton 

ART. 17 "To see v^iat sum the town will vote to raise and 
^jpropriate, in support of the Lakes Region Association, for 
the purpose of publicizing and pronoting the natural advantages, 
as well as the preservation of the natural resources of the town, 
in cooperation with other towns in the Lake Region. 
The town voted this article, "Inexpedient to legislate" 
Motion: D. Stevenson - G. Musler 

ART. 18 It was voted that the Town will authorize the Selectmen 
to borrow in anticipation of taxes. 
Motion: C. Soule - P. Nevdiall 

ART. 19 It was voted by the Town not to discontinue the one percent 
discount of early payment of property taxes. 
Motion: C. Soule - P. Nev^iall 

ART. 20 It was voted by the town to authorize the Selectmen to 



14. 
apply for, accept, and expend, without further action by the 
Ttiwn Meeting, itoney from the state, federal, or other govemitient 
unit or any private source which becoines available during the 
fiscal year. This is a part of Chapter 31. 
^4^tion: G. Musler - A. Thonpson 

ART , 9 It was voted by the Town to authorize the Selectmen to 
withdraw from the Federal Revenue Sharing Funds the sum of $10,000 
for the purchase of a new police cruiser. 
Motion: C. Soule - E. Thoitpson 

ART. 21 A motion was made by P. Newhall that the town vote to 
put the tax collector on a salary of $6,500 and the deputy tax 
collector on a salary of $2,000. Motion seconded by G. Musler 
YES: 86 NO: 79 Motion carried 

ART. 22 It was voted by the Town to elect by majority vote, 
two members for three years to the Advisory Budget Committee 
Motion: G. Musler - P. Newhall 

Nominees: Louis Monti, Ben Andrews, Douglas Thonpson and 
Wallace Flaherty 

A request was made in favor of reconsidering the motion on 

ART. 22 Request was agreed upon by the Town. 

A motion was made that the Town elect by majority vote, 

four members for three years to the Advisory Budget Committee 

Motion: D. Thonpson - G. Musler. MOTION carried. 

Elected: L. Monti, B. Andrews, D. Thoitpson and W. Flaherty. 

ART. 23 It was voted by the Town to authorize the Selectiten 
to dispose of those items designated as siorplus. 
Motion: G. Musler - P. Newhall 

ART. 24 It was voted by the Town to revoke the Barrington road 
ordinance of March 10, 1976, and delegate to the Selectmen the 
authority to accept, conditionally accept, or reject, on behalf 
of the town, any new street or road constructed in accordance with 
the street design and construction requirements of the Barrington 
Subdivision Regulations. 
Motion: C. Soule - P. Nev^^ll 

ART. 25 "To see if the Town will vote to upgrade from Class VI 
to Class V a section of Smoke Street running from that portion of 
Smoke Street currently maintained by the Town to a point just be- 
yond Cyr's driveway." 
Motion: C. Soule - G. Musler Motion did not pass 

ART. 26 "To see if the Town will accept a road called Mica 
Point Road as a town-owned and maintained Class V road. The 
road is laid out by the Planning Board in subdivision file 
number 87, dated May 11, 1978." Motion G. Musler - L Monti 
Motion did not pass. 

ART. 27 It was voted by the Town to accept Partridge Drive as 
a Town road. Motion: M. Richatd" G. Musler. 



15. 

ART. 28 It was voted by the Town to abandon a section of road known 
to some as the Pinkham Road, starting at Route 4, and running north 
by east, a distance of 300 feet to an iron pipe. 
Motion: G. Musler - P. Nev^-iall 

ART. 29 "To see if the town will accept a road called Boyle Lane 
as a town-owned and maintained Class V road. The road is as laid 
out by the Planning Board in an accepted subdivision file number 2, 
September' 9, 1974." A motion was made by S. Boyle that this 
article be inexpedient to legislate. Motion seconded by G. Musler. 
It was voted by the town inexpedient to legislate. 

ART. 30 "To see if the Town will accept a road called Caldwell Lane 
as a town-owned and maintained Class V road. The road is laid out by 
the Planning Board in subdivision file number 38, September 17, 1976, 
by petition." 

A motion was made by S. Boyle and seconded by G. Musler that this 
article be moved as inexpedient to legislate. The town moved that 
this article is inexpedient to legislate. 

ART. 31 It was voted by the Town to drop the bars on a portion 
of the Lee Road, beginning at the Province Road and proceding 
approximately 800 feet to a turn-around. By doing so, the 
town will reclassify the Lee Road, as designated and described, 
a Class V road, meaning that the Town will accept maintenance of 
the portion of Lee Road, as described. Motion: T. Hannigan - 
G. Musler 

ART. 32 "To see if the Town will accept a road called Lily 
Pond Road as a town-owned and maintained Class V road. The 
road is laid out by the planning board in subdivision file 
number 103, dated April 12, 1979. A motion was made by M. 
Bliss and seconded by P. Newhall that this article be 
moved as inexpedient to legislate. The town voted this 
article as inexpedient to legislate. 

ART. 33 "To see if the town will accept a road called Chesley 
Drive, as a town-owned and maintained Class V road. The road 
is laid out by the planning board in subdivision file number 
103, dated April 12, 1979." A motion was made by M. Bliss 
and seconded by C. Soule that this article be moved as inexped- 
ient to legislate. The town moved this article as inexpedient 
to legislate. 

ART. 34 It was voted by the town to authorize the Selectnen 
to sell the following town property as nonbuilding lots at a 
public auction. Long Shores Lot 246; Long Shores Lot 431; Long 
Shores Lot 433. Motion .G. Musler - Pat Newhall. 

ART. 35 It was voted by the town to send a message calling 
on the New Hampshire General Court to legislate protection 
from rate shock and inpositions of Seabrook project cost over- 
runs on the economy of the state, and all classes of electric 
taxpayers, to limit the cost allowed in the rate base, if the 
project is coitpleted, to the cost projected by Public Service 
Conpany, and approved by the Public Utilities Commission's 
site and facility permit. This is a matter of urgent public 



16. 
interest. The legislature should act without further delay. Motion: 
G. Musler - P. Newhall. 

ART. 36 A resolution was made by P. Newhall and seconded by Lou 
Monti that the Selectinen be directed to include in the 1985 warrant, 
an article to eliminate the elected office of town auditors and 
hire a certified auditor to audit the town books each year. The town 
voted to accept the resolution. 

A motion was made by G. Musler and seconded by P. Newhall to adjourn 
the meeting at 10:35 P.M. 

A true copy of the Warrant, attest: 

Muriel T. Leocha, Town Clerk 




PATROLMAN 



AL 



GREET-'OCD 



Al is tliO newest member of the Barrington Police 
Department joining the force in September of 
198^-. Al resides with his wife "Dell" at B.K.H.!:. 
and is employed at Janco's in P.ollinsford iw a 
supervisory capacity. He attended and sucessfully 
completed the Part-Time Officers Training school 
conducted by the Police Standards and Training 
Council, a must for all who wish to be Police 
Officers in the State of New Ham.pshire. 



^rLJLj- i'C.;i. i-»tx.r±i.G i«-Y 29. l^-^^ 18. 

iit a legal n.eeting of the inhabitaiits of Ba^ria^ton on Tutaaay, 
I'Jay 29, 1964, the followixiti votes of those present and qual- 
ified to vote, were by tnen: in open meeting 

given in to the moderator and said moderator, in said meeting 
in presence of the selectmen and clerk, sorted and coui.ted 
said votes, w nri at the close of the poll made a public aeclar- 
ation of the whole nvmiber of ballots given in, with the number 
of votes for 6uid against each proposed amendment, as follows; 

Nvunber of registered voteraj. 2,433 
Number of votes casti. 9^ 

The polls were opened at 10:00 a.w. and closed at 6130 P.M. 

The meeting was called to order by Moderator Frederick h, Timm, 

BUILDING C0DK3 

Are you in fsvor of the adoption of amendment //I as proposea 
by the Planning Board for the Town Building Code as follows; 

1, That ARTICLE III of the Building Code oe aiueuued 10 add 
the following section. 

*3. Every single fa-i.ily uv.ellin£; ur siniile-famiiy 
dwelling unit within a multiple-family d-fci-liiii^ ..iiich ia 
built or substantially rehabilitated after inarch 6, 196j 
shall be equipped with an automatic fire warning system 
consisting of smoke detectors or other appropriate fire 
warning devices.* 

YES: 81 NO: 10 

Are you in favor of the adoption of aoaendment ^2 as proposed 
by the Planning Board for the Town Building Code as follows: 

2. That ARTICLS IV of the Building Code be amended to add 
the folloviiig asotlont 

*8. No building permits will be issued within subdiv- 
isions, created after the passage of this addition to 
the Building Code, unless the sub-divider brings all 
roads up to and through the final gravel stage, accord- 
ing to town specifications* A bond must be then posted 
with the to¥a for the completion of the road; amount of 
boxul to be determined by Road Agent. 

Upon completion of 609g of the sub-division, either lots 
transferred or built upon, the sub-divider must complete 



19. 

the road, according to town specifications within six 
months. No further permits will be issued until the 
road is con^jlete. On completion of the road to town 
specifications, it will become a town road by thfe legal 
process of transfer from the sub-divider, to the town, 

YE3: 72 NO: 18 

ZGNmG ORDINANCE 

Are you in favor of the adoption of amendment #1, as pro- 
possd by the Planning Board for the Town Zoning Ordinance as 
follows J 

1, That Section 7,(a)l of the present Zoning Ordinance is as 
followsLi 

■The minimum lot area in an agricultural -resident iad 
district shall be 80,000 square feet with an adaitional 
40,000 square foot requirement for eacn adaitioxial 
dwelling unit under a coraaon roof." 

That the Planning Board recommends that iiection 7Ca)l 
be amended as follows t 

"That the minimum lot area in an agricultural-residen- 
tial district shall be 80,000 square feet with an 
additional 40,000 square foot requirement for each 
additional dwelling vmit under a common roof, this re- 
quirement includes one (l) bedroom apartments. 

The minimimi lot area in an agricultural-residential 
district for multi-bedroom aptirtLients arid condoiiiiniuias 
shall be 80,000 square feet v/ith an additional 8c,v:cc 
square foot requirei^ent for each aduitional awellin^ 
unit in an apartment building or on the condominxiun 
premises,* 

Tttas 57 NO: 34 

Are you in favor of the adoption of aaendment n>2, as proposed 
by the Planning Board for the Town Zoning Ordinance as fol- 
lows: 

2, That Section 7(a)8 of the present zoning Ordinance is 
as follows: 



■The maximum building hei^jht of any building in an a^i- 
cultural-residential district shall be forty (40) feet, 
and the fliaxLaum number of stories of any building with- 
in an agricultural -residential district shall be 2t 
stories," 



20. 
That the Planning Board recomiaenda that :iection 7(&)d be 
amended as follows: 

•The maxiirmm building heigrit to the base of the roof of 
any building in an at;ricaltural-re3iaentlal ^isi/riot 
shall be thirty-five ( ";S) feet, and the luaxin.uj aurjcer 
of stories of any buildinj^; within an aixi^ultura^-resi^ 
dential district shall be 2j stories." (proposed ai.ifcnd- 
ment is underlined) 

Yio; 66 NCj 23 

Are you in favor of the adoption of araendnient ttb* ss prc^.osed 
by the Planning Board for the Town Zoning Ordinance as fcllowa: 

3. That Section 7(c)3 of the present Zoning Ordinance is aa 
follows: 

"The maximum height of any building in Zone B shall be 
forty (40) feet.» 

That the Planning Board recommends that dec t ion 7Cc)3 
be amended as follows: 

"The maximum height of any building in an ai-yicul t viral - 
resic^ential -commercial district in Zone B shall be 
thirty-five (,35) feet." (proposed auendment is under- 
lined) 

yia: 63 NO: 27 

Are you in favor of the adoption of amendment ,tk% ^^ proposed 
by the Planning Board for the Town Zoning Ordinance as follows: 

4» That the Planning Board reccmmends that the folluwiiit^ 

amendment be added to the Ordinance and entitlea oection 

7(c)a2. 

" Th.at the provisions of Section 7(a)l through 7(fci)ll are 
incorporated into the within Section /j^overninfj: uses and 
lot sizes for Zone B fop any use of a non-cojiaiercial 
nature «"' (proposed amendment is underlines) 

YESr 56 NO: 28 

Are you in favor of the adoption of amendment ff-^^ as proposed 
by the Planning Board for the Town Zoning Ordinance as follows: 

5, That Section H of the Definitions section of the present 
Zoning Ordinance is as follows: 

"H. Lot . A parcel of land occupied by one builaiiig or 
Mobile home and the accessory buildings or uses oustom- 
arily incident to it. 



21. 



That the Planning Boai'd recoi.'raends that Section h of 
the Definitions section be attended as followa: 

•H, Lot A single tract or parcel of land in the same 
ovmerahip and occupied by, or designed t6 be occui)ied 
by, one principal building eind its accessory buixdin^js 
or uses customarily incident to it, with such other' 
open spaces and yards as ai-e required by this ordinunce, 

YLdi 63 NO: 23 



TrtUK COPY, ATPioT; wUrtlLL T. LbwJ;^ 



THE STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 22. 

TOWN WARRANT 

To the Inhabitants of the Town of Barrington in the County of 
Strafford in said State, qualified to vote in Town affairs: 

You are hereby notified to meet at the auditorium, Barrington 
Community Building in said Barrington on Tuesday, the 12th day 
of March next at ten of the clock in the forenoon. 

Polls open at 10:00 A.M. 
Polls close at 6:30 P.M. 

Articles of business to be acted on Wednesday, March 13, 1985 
starting at 7:30 P.M. 



Article 1. To vote by ballot on Tuesday for the following questions: 

1. Are you in favor of the adoption of Amendment No. 1 as proposed 
by the Planning Board for the Town Zoning Ordinance, as follows: 

The proposed Amendment is entitled a "Growth Management; 
Interim Regulation" and deletes and replaces the Growth 
Control Ordinance contained in Article XII of the present 
ordinance. The "Growth Management; Interim Regulation" 
shall be of a term of a maximum of one year so as to allow 
the Planning Board adequate tine to (1) ccstplete a capital 
inprovement program; (2) consider altering the Town's 
Master Plan, and; (3) consider a growth management ordinance 
for a term in excess of one year. The proposed Ordinance 
limits building permits for new single family residential 
units and mobile hares to 60 per year and limits building 
permits for new single bedrocm dvvelling units to 30 per 
year. 

2. "Are you in favor of the adoption of Amendment No. 2 as proposed 
by the Planning Board for the Town of Barrington, which will delete 
the present Section 7. (c) 11 and will replace this section with the 
following: 

"All land abutting a state highway is designed as being 
located in the Agricultural - Residential - Commercial 
Zone (Zone B) . Pursuant to Section 5.1 of the within 
ordinance, the specific area of said zone is delineated 
on the town zoning map." 



23. 



(BRIEF TOPICAL DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENT: Article 7. (c) 11 of the 
present Zoning Ordinance provides that all frontage of state high- 
ways has the potential for ccamiercial development, however, the 
present Ordinance contains a limitation that no more than a total 
of 20% of this frontage per lineal mile may, in fact, be developed 
for comnsrcial use. The Planning Board proposes that the 20% 
limitation in Section 7(c) 11 be deleted. The result of said 
deletion shall be that all frontage on all state highways nay be 
developed for comnercial use.) 

3. "Are you in favor of the adoption of Amendment No. 3 as 
proposed by the Planning Board for the Town of Barrington as 
follows: 

"That the present Section 7. (c) 3 of the Barrington 
Zoning Ordinance v^iich provides as follows: "The 
minimum street frontage requirement in Zone B for a 
cormercial use shall be 400 feet.", shall be deleted 
and replaced by the following: 

"The minimum street frontage requirement in Zone B for 
a comnercial use shall be 400 feet with the following 
exception: 

(a) Access to a parcel of land in Zone B may be provided 
over a right of way having a maximum length of 50 ft. wide right 
of way from a state highway, provided said parcel meets all other 
dimensional reqiurements of Section 7(c) of the within 
Ordinance. The right of way shall be contructed to town 
roadway specifications." 

(BRIEF TOPICAL DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENT: Under the present 
Section 7(c) 3, all comnercial uses are required to have 400 
feet of highway frontage. The proposed amendrrent permits 
com:nercial uses in the zone without highway frontage as 
long as the lot is serviceable by a right of way built to 
town specifications and conplies in all other respects with the 
zoning ordinance. 



Article 2. To choose all necessary Town Officers by ballot and majority 
vote, including: 

One Selectman for three years 

One Auditor for three years 

One Trustee of Trust Funds for three years 

One Town Clerk, for three years 

One Teix Collector for three years 

Oic Treasurer for three years 

One Special Library Trustee for three years 

Ai-ticle 3. To see if the Town will authorize the Selectmen to appoint 
all other necessary town officers. 



24. 
Article 4. To see if the Town will vote to accept the reports of its 
officers, and agents as contained in the Town Report. 

Article 5. To see what the Tovm wishes to do about the salaries of 
certain town officers. 

Article 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise, appropriate and 
expend the amount of $ to cover all items in the budget 

not covered by articles in the warrant. 

Article 7. To see if the Town will vote to authorize, as required under 
RSA 36:46 II, membership in the Strafford Regional Planning Coimission 
and appropriate the sum of Three Thousand Three Hundred Thirteen Dollars 
($3,313.00) as dues for membership in the Coitmission for one year. 

Article 8. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Planning Board 
to prepare and amend, as needed, a recommended program of municipal 
capital inprovement projects for a period of at least 6 years, as 
authorized under RSA 674:5. 

Article 9. To see if the town will vote to authorize withdrawal by 
the Selectrren from the Federal Revenue Sharing Fund the sum of $11,000 
to be used as the first payment on the lease /purchase agreement for a 
backhoe. 

Article 10. To see if the Town will vote to authorize withdrawal by 
the Selectmen from the Federal Revenue Sharing Fund the amount of 
$4,150 as Harrington's share of the cost of revitalizing the dispatch 
equipment operated by the Strafford County Sheriff's Office. 

Article 11. To see if the Town will authorize the Selectmen to spend 
up to $59,000 for a new town truck outfitted with plow and sander. 

Article 12. To see if the Town will vote to authorize withdrawal by the 
Selectmen from the Federal Revenue Sharing Fund an amount of $8,620 
for the use as a set-off against the following debt service: 

Coirpactor $8,000 + $620 = $8,620 

Article 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise, appropriate, and 
expend the amount of $5,500 in settlement of legal fees to the New 
Hanpshire Legal Assistance Association. 

Article 14. To see if the Town will vote to eliminate the Pine Grove 
Cemetery Trust Fund and authorize the management of all cemetery monies 
by the Town Treasurer ( in a cemetery fund . ) 

Article 15. To see if the Town will authorize the expenditure of $3,000 
from the Pine Grove Cemetery funds for cemetery maintenance. 

Article 16. To see if the Town will vote to raise the sum of $20,000 
to be added to the Fire Truck Capitol Reserve Fund. 

Article 17. To see if the Town will vote to raise the sum of $4,0UO 
to be added to the Ambulance Capitol Reserve Fund. 



25. 

Article 18- To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen 
to hire an auditing firm for 1985 at a figure of $5,000 to work with 
the town auditors until their present terms have e}<pired as scheduled. 

Article 19. "To see if the Town will layout and rebuild a section of 
the Beauty Hill Road beginning at the intersection of Hall Road, con- 
tinuing westerly for approximately one and three quarter miles to its 
intersection with Young Road and to see what sum of money the Town 
will raise and appropriate to rebuild the section of road or any 
portion thereof estimated to be $60,000 per mile or a total cost 
not to exceed $105,000. (By Petition). 

Article 20. To see if the Town will vote to raise, appropriate and 
expend the sum of $79,000 to upgrade and seal that portion of Wood 
Road (1.22 mi.) still gravel. (By Petition). 

Article 21. To see v*iat sum the Town wishes to appropriate to 
correct the seepage problem existing along the North wall of the 
Town House. (^ Petition). 

Article 22. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectiten 
to contract management and maintenance of the Town's auditorium to 
the Harrington School Board for the period of July 1, 1985 to 
March 1, 1986. 

Article 23. To see if the Town will vote to extend Social Security 
coverage to all workers. 

Article 24. To have the cemetery rules regarding f lovers be changed 
from "^k3 Planting Allov^ed" to "allow planting of flowers, no trees 
or shrubs, in front of stones or on sides up to 10 inches and the 
width of the base". (By Petition) . 

Article 25. To see what sum the Town will vote to raise, appropriate 
and expend in support of the Lakes Region Association for the purpose 
of publicizing and promoting the natural advantages, as v«ll as the 
preservation of the natural resources of the Town, in cooperation with 
other towns in the Lakes Region. 

Article 26. To see if the Town will vote to set aside a defined 
portion of the Town owned property adjacent to Smoke Street for use 
by the Veteran's of Foreign Wars. Said property to be used as a 
site for a building that the VIVJ will locate and maintain for their 
meetings and the meetings and activities of certain other local 
organizations. 

Article 27. To see if the Town will vote to authorize a 1% discount 
on property tax payments nade within 15 days after date of issuance. 

Article 28. To see if the Town will authorize the Selectmen to borrow 
in anticipation of taxes. 



Article 29. To see if the Town will authorize the Selectmsn to apply 
for, accept, expend, without further action by the Town fteeting money 
from the State, Federal or other government unit or any private source 
vv4iich becomes available during the fiscal year. (Ef RSA Chapter 31) . 

Article 30. To see if the Town will vote to elect by irajority vote two 
members for three years to the Advisory Budget Conmittc. 

Article 31. To see if the Town will authorize the Selcctnien to dispobc 
of those items designated as surplus. 

Article 32. To see if the Town will authorize the Selectmen to sell 
the following Town property as a non building lot at public auction. 

Long Shores Lot E-4 

Article 33. To transact any other business that may legally come before 
said meeting of the honorable Town government. 



Given under our hands and seal, the 19th day of February, in 
the year of our Lord Nineteen Hundred and Eighty Five. 

A true copy of Warrant - Attest: 

George T. Musler George T. Musler 

Ovaries F. Soule Charles F. Souel 

Patricia R. Nevdiall Patricia R. Nev^^lall 

Selctmen of Harrington Selectinen of Harrington 



27. 



BUDGET OF THE TOWN OF BARRINGTON, N.H. 



PURPOSES OF APPROPRIATIONS (RSA 31:4) 



APPROPRI- 


ACTUAL 


APPROPRI- 


ATIONS 


EXPENDI- 


ATIONS 


1984 


TURES 


ENSUING 


(1984-85) 


1984 


FISCAL YR, 




(1984-85) 


1985 
(1985-86) 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Town Officers Salary 

Town Officers Expenses 

Election & Reg. Expenses 

Ceireteries 

General Governinent Buildings 

Reappraisal of Property 

Planning 

Contingency Fund Coitpactor 

Tax Map 

Town Hall Renovations 

Zoning 

Strafford Regional Planning 



26,200.00 
42,375.00 
3,980.00 
2,500.00 
21,356.00 
5,000.00 
3,000.00 

200.00 

35,000.00 

1,250.00 



25,869.63 
45,493.66 
6,237.89 
2,447.11 
22,363.95 
5,871.72 
6,988.10 

264.00 

17,596.43 

2,051.11 



27,175.00 

53,872.00 

1,420.00 

21,600.00 

4,500.00 

5,000.00 

1,000.00 

300.00 

1,550.00 



PUBLIC SAFETY 

Police Departnent 
Fire Department 
Civil Defense 
Building Inspection 



47,030.00 47,065.01 54,520.00 

15,021.00 13,033.42 18,300.00 

450.00 450.56 450.00 

5,700.00 6,797.57 7,260.00 



HIGHWAYS, STREETS & BRIDGES 
Town Maintenance 

SANITATION 

HEALTH 

Health Departnent 
Ambulance BE>1S 
Animal Control 
Newmarket Health Clinic 
Rural District Health Clinic 



201,298.00 



36,950.00 



550.00 
6,250.00 
2,575.00 

250.00 
16,088.00 



209,609.48 257,793.00 
39,752,68 39,992.00 



536.85 1,000.00 

6,060.71 6,500.00 

2,332.42 2,744.00 

250.00 

16,087.50 17,091.00 



WELFARE 

General Assistance 
Old Age Assistance 



30,000.00 
11,000.00 



25,316.24 30,000.00 
6,957.37 11,000.00 



CULTURE & RECREATION 

Library 

Patriotic Purposes 

Conservation Coimission 



11,030.00 
450.00 
100.00 



11,030.00 
450.00 



13,000.00 
500.00 
100.00 



DEBT SERVICE 

Principal of Long-Term Bonds & Notes 25,866.67 



25,866.67 



SOURCES OF REVENUE 

TAXES 

'Resident Taxes 

National Bank Stock Taxes 

Yield Taxes 

Interest & Penalties on Taxes 

Inventory Penalties 

Land Use Change Tax 



ESTIMATED 
REVENUE 

1984 
(1984-85) 



34,210.00 

6,000.00 

15,000.00 

1,000.00 

2,500.00 



28. 

ACTUAL ESTIMATED 
REVENUE REVENUE 

1984 1985 

(1984-85) (1985-86) 



33,600.00 

207.90 

11,859.04 

46,817.91 

3,385.00 



33,600.00 



10,000.00 
25,000.00 



INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVENUES-STATE 

Shared Revenue-Block Grant 
Highway Block Grant 
Railroad Tax 



57,546.00 57,546.00 57,500.00 
56,482.00 56,481.92 56,500.00 
69.00 69.18 



LICENSES & PERMITS 

Motor Vehicle 

Dog Licenses 

Business Licenses, Permits, Filing Fees 



175,000.00 219,722.00 207,380.00 
2,500.00 2,433.85 2,500.00 
8,000.00 11,584.00 10,000.00 



CHARGES FOR SERVICES 

Income from Departments 
Rent of Town Property 



,000.00 
850.00 



5,449.35 5,000.00 
1,035.00 1,000.00 



MISCELLANEOUS REVENUES 

Interest on Deposits 
Sale of Town Property 
Refund on Uneitployment Conp. 
From Surplus 



32,000.00 71,625.41 45,000.00 

300.00 200.00 500.00 

5,900.00 5,900.00 4,500.00 

39,000.00 



OTHER FINANCING SOURC ES 

Withdrawal from Capital Res. Cemetery 2,500.00 3,000.00 

Revenue Sharing Fimd 32,632.50 32,632.50 23,770.00 



TOTAL REVENUES & CREDITS 



436,489.50 560,649.06 554,250.00 



29. 

Interest Exp. -Long-Term Bonds & Notes 2,865.83 2,865.83 

Interest Exp. -Tax Anticipation Notes 30,000.00 31,416.67 45,000.00 

CAPITAL OOTIAY 

Police Cruiser 10,000.00 10,000.00 

State Audit 2,000.00 



OPERATING TRANSFERS OUT 

Payments to Capital Res. Funds: 

Fire Truck 10,000.00 10,000.00 

Ambulance 4,000.00 4,000.00 

Compactor 1,000.00 1,000.00 

MISrKT.T.ANEOUS 

FICA, Retirement & Pension Contrih. 11,055.00 11,017.42 13,000.00 

Insurance 21,815.00 26,192.25 29,000.00 

State Audit 13,000.00 33,320.88 



Town Forester 1,440.00 

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS 659,205.50 676,593.13 665,107.00 



III. TOWN FINANCIAL REPORTS 



31 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 

FISCAL YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31 198^+ 



DEBITS : 

Motor vehicle permits issued 

Motor vehicle permit-Bad check unredeemed 

Dog licenses 

Filing fees 

Marriage licenses 



$219,860.00 

9.00 

2,^+33.85 

16.00 

62^.00 

222,92'+.»5 



CREDITS : 

Remittances to Town Treasurer 

a/c Motor vehicle permits 

a/c Dog licenses 

a/c Filing Fees 

a/c Marriage licenses 



219,851.00 

2,if33.85 

16.00 

62^^.00 

222,92'+.85 



Motor vehicles permits issued 

Dog licenses issued 

Filing fees 

Marriage licenses issued 

FEES AND SALARY: 



Motor vehicle permits 5,^+76 @ Si. 50 

f.alary for 198^ 

Dog licenses 5^8 @ S.50 

Recording and indexing original records 

of marriage: ^+9 ® $.50 
Recording and indexing official copies 

of marriages: 11 @ $.50 
Additional copies of marriage records 

8 @ $.25 
Recording and indexing original records 

of births: 1 @ $.50 
Recording and indexing official copies 

of births: 80 @ $.50 
Recording auid indexing original records 

of deaths: 1 @ $.50 
Recording and indexing official copies 

of deaths: 21 @ $.50 
TOTAL FEES AND SALARY: 
Total advanced fees: 
Balauice due: 



5,^+76 

11 
48 



1,21U.00 
500.00 

27'+. 00 

2'+.50 

5.50 

2.00 

.50 

ifO.OO 

.50 

10.50 



- 9,071.50 

5,500.00 

$ 3,571.50 



Treasurers Report 
For The Year Ending Dec. 31, 1984 



32. 



Balance Jan. 1, 1984 
Receipts Dec. 31, 1984 

Paynent Dec. 31, 1984 
Balance Dec. 31, 1984 



Balance Reg. C/A 

Summit C/A 

Revenue Sharing S/A 

Swains Dam S/A 

Ceiretery S/A 

Coirpactor Cont. S/A 
Swain Dam C. D. 
Balance Dec. 31, 1984 



347,582.38 
3,913,505.69 
4,261,088.07 
3,606,398.32 



2,954.21 
631,399.13 
9,043.28 
226.65 
4,316.99 
1,018.80 
5,730.69 



654,689.75 



654,689.75 



Respectfully Submitted 

Ronald C. Seaver 
Treasurer 



Schedule of Bonds & Notes Payable 



PRINCIPAL 



INTEREST TOTAL 



5/1 Coitpactor 



8000.00 



620.00 8620.00 



33. TAX COLLECTOR'S REPORT 

Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 1984 

Town of Barrington 

-DR- 

Levies Of: 
Uncollected Taxes - 
Beginning of Fiscal Year 1984 1983 Prior 

Taxes Coimiitted To Collector; 
Property Taxes $ 2,466,382.00 $305,945.08 $ 81,467'.59 



Resident Taxes 
National Bank Stock Taxes 
Land Use Change Taxes 
Yield Taxes 
Betterment Tax 


39,340.00 
207.90 

3,385.00 
13,899.94 

3,092.60 


10,420.00 
1,002.77 


4,857. 


,61 


Added Tax: 

Property Taxes 


14,712.00 








Overpayments : 
Yield Tax 
a/c Property Taxes 
Betternent Tax 


996.89 

958.40 

2,008.10 








Interest Collected on Delinquent 
Property Taxes: 


3,923.62 


33,037.74 


1,672, 


.64 


Penalties Collected on Res. Taxes 


77.00 


86.00 






Total Debits 


2,548,983.45 


350,491.59 


87,997 


.84 


-CR- 
Remittances To Treasurer During Fiscal Year: 


272,787.25 
920.00 

33,037.74 
86.00 


7,152 
1,672 


.26 
.64 


Property Taxes 

Resident Taxes 

National Bank Stock Taxes 

Yield Taxes 

Betterment Tax 

Land Use Change Tax 

Interest Collected During Year 

Penalties on Resident Taxes 


1,933,248.29 

29,750.00 

207.90 

11,959.04 

3,875.75 

3,385.00 

3,923.62 

77.00 


Discounts Allowed 


12,631.00 








Abatements Made During Year: 
Property Taxes 
Resident Taxes 
Yield Taxes 


23,628.58 

530.00 

1,896.25 


2,132.94 
10.00 


2,591 


.57 



Uncollected Taxes - End of Fiscal Year: 



34. 



Property Taxes 512,544.53 31,024.89 71,723.76 

Resident Taxes 9,060.00 9,490.00 

Yield Tax 1,041.54 1,002.77 4,857.61 

Bettenrent Tax 1,224.95 



$2,548,983.45 $350,491.59 $87,997.84 
SUMMARY OF TAX SALES ACCOUNTS 
Fiscal Year Ended Deceirfcer 31, 1984 
Town of Harrington 



-DR- 






Tax Sales on Account of Levies 


Of 


Previous 


1983 1982 




Years 


98,363.58 




109,479.14 



Balance of Unredeemed Taxes- 
Beginning Fiscal Year* 

Taxes Sold To Town During 
Current Fiscal Year** 149,601.16 

Interest Collected After Sale 407.99 5,810.27 5,930.86 



TDtal Debits 150,072.15 104,173.85 115,410.00 



Iteiidttances to Treasurer During Year : 

Redemptions 30,483.88 37,922.30 18,809.05 

Interest & Costs After Sale 407.99 5,810.27 5,930.86 

Abatements During Year 2,123.15 526.73 1,014.39 

Unredeeited Taxes - End of Fscl Yr. 116,994.13 59,914.55 89,655.70 



Ttotal Credits 150,072.15 104,173.85 115,410.00 



*These sums represent the total of Unredeemed Taxes, as of April 16, 1984 from 
Tax Sales held in Previous Fiscal Years. 

**AmDunt of Tax Sale(s) held during current fiscal year, including total 
amount of taxes, interest and costs to date of sale(s). 



Respectfully submitted, 

Madelynn Faist 
Tax Collector 



35. 




H ^ 

Ti T3 

^ M 



o u 






ro rM LT) 

00 m 00 
o o CTn 



S-4 U 



36. 



1984 SUMMARY INVENTORY OF VALUATION 

Land $ 48,351,235.00 

(Current Use) (6,710,135.00 

41,641,100.00 

Buildings 55,737,687.00 

Public Utilities 1,756,250.00 

Mobile Homes 6,529,960.00 

$ 105,664,997.00 

Elderly Exemptions (1,145,000.00) 

Wood and Wind Exemptions ( 3,200.00) 

$ 104,516,797.00 

Veteran's Exenptions 522 

STATEMENT OF APPROPRIATIONS 
TAXES ASSESSED AND TAX RATE 

Total Town Appropriation •$ 657,206.00 

Less Revenues and Credits 436,489.00 

Net Town Appropriations 220,717.00 

Net School Appropriation 2,042,462.00 

County Tax 265,933.00 

Total of Town, School and County $ 2,529.112.00 

Less Business Profits Tax Reimb. 108,179.00 

War Service Credits 33,250.00 

Overlay 38,543.00 

Property Taxes to be raised 2,492,726.00 

2,492,726 
104,516,797 = 23.85/$1000 - Tax Rate 

Rate is distributed as follows: 
Town 2.64 
County 2.46 
School 18.75 



37. 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF PAYMENTS AND ENCUMBRANCES 
1984 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 
TOWN OFFICERS' SALARIES 

Selectmen (3) 
Tax Collector 
Town Clerk 
Treasurer 
Auditors (3) 
Deputy Town Clerk 
Deputy Tax Collector 

TOWN OFFICER'S EXPENSE 

Clerks (2 part-time) 

Bookkeeper 

Expense Mileage 

Legal Elxpenses 

Town Report 

Post Office 

Office Supplies 

Forms & Printing 

Copies 

Dues (NHMA,Town Clerk, Tax Coll.) 

conferences 

Cost of Tax Sale 

Registry 

Statutes & Manuals 

Advertising - Public Notices 

Box Rental (Strafford) 

Telephone 

Town Meeting Recorder 

Equipment Maintenance & Rental 

Computer Ma int. Agreement 

Contracted Services 

Clerk Tax Coll. 

Re-Imb School Costs - Ron Seaver 

IRS - 1982 Error 

Petty Cash Tax Coll. & Town Clerk 

E LECTION & REGISTRATION 

Postage - checklist & PA Equip. 

Wages (Moderator, Supervisors & Workers 

Booth Set-Up 

Police Work 

New Election Booths 

CEMETERY 

BUILDING - TOWN HALL 

Wages - Custodian 



EXPENDITURES 
25,869.63 

2,775.00 
6,500.00 
9,071.50 
1,200.00 
900.00 
2,170.05 
3,253.08 

45,493.66 

10,574.95 

6,428.53 

284.14 

6,907.31 

2,425.20 

2,398.55 

990.21 

2,734.54 

1,589.16 

1,089.52 

654.69 

922.50 

103.70 

110.20 

573.31 

75.75 

1,729.04 

460.25 

1,514.16 

1,504.14 

250.00 

1,040.12 

50.00 

1,083.69 

200.00 

6,237.89 

572.34 

4,626.48 

200.00 

399.00 

440.07 

2,447.11 

22,363.95 

6,162.75 



38. 

Expenses - Mileage, etc. 88.80 

Heat - Oil 5,408.02 

Public Service Co. 2,833.77 

General Supplies 1,753.83 

Maintenance & Repair 177.99 

Alarm System 673.00 

Heating System Service 114.50 

Part-time help 159.53 

Emergency Overtime 183.71 

New Bquipment 2,077.31 

Inprovements 275.61 

Energency Equipment Repair 862.13 

New Oil Tank 1,593.00 

RENOVATIONS 



REAPPRAISAL OF PROPERTY (Pick-ups) 

STATE AUDIT 
PLANNING BOARD 



17, 


,596.43 




5, 


,871.72 




33, 


,320.88 




6 


,988.10 





Advertising 432.46 

Printing 82.80 

Supplies 

Certified Letters 343.49 

Legal 5,134.40 

Master Plan 

Hydrosciences 980.95 

Meetings 14.00 

CAPITAL RESERVE 

Conpactor Maintenance 1,000.00 

BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT 2,051.11 



Clerk 452.50 

Public Notices & Postage 372.32 

Supplies 36.00 

Legal 1,190.29 

TAX MAP 264.00 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 47,065.01 



Labor 33,284.32 

Clerk 2,192.13 

Clothing 1,179.04 

Telephone 1,955.22 

Cruiser 6,165.13 

Radio/Radar 376.04 

Canera/Film 144.23 

Forms /Supplies 990.68 

Heat 300.53 

Lights 218.24 

Dues/Publications 259.45 



39. 

FIRE DEPARIMENT 

Mileage 

Training,dues,regs, subs, etc. 191*81 

Supplies 5 7 9.' 3 3 

Bguipment 



HIGHWAY 

Summer 
Winter 

TCMN DUMP AND GARBAGE EIMJVAL 



Signs, Lockes Stickers 
Still Truck 



Cbst to Bum 

Disposal of Unburnables 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 



Health Officer 



B.E.M.S. 



Medical Supplies 
Bquipnent 



Ambulance Maintenance 



13,033.42 



66.00 



-.,-. . 3,453.51 

Utilities 4^;^^Q ^-^ 

Durham Dispatch 4' 071 00 

Forest Fires - Replacement Equip. 'l09!70 

F.F. Wages & Cost of fire 451. 66 

CIVIL DEFENSE 45Q ^g 

Personnel Safety Bquiprrent 450.56 

BUILDING INSPECTOR g 797.57 

Salary 

Supplies, dues, postage 



5,239.00 
300.65 



Cbnferences, Meetings, & Insp. 362.42 

Legal 

Mileage 



292.50 
603.00 

209,609.48 

168,078,56 
41,530.92 

39,752.68 



ot^^^ ... . 6,695.15 

Plowing & Bulldozing 3 5gQ 33 

Public Service ' 

Septage Disposal 

Telephone 469*31 

Tipping Fee 



797.91 
300.00 



19,796.84 



Hauling to Lanprey 5 2-72 37 



41.16 
422.00 



Maintenance of Unit 3^5 ^ 




1,732.00 



16,874.35 



536.85 



Newmarket Health Clinic 250 00 

Rural District Health Council 16, 08?! 50 



6,060.71 



Training 181.95 



1,321.21 
564.30 



Radio Repairs 3-7-7 33 



71.30 



Gasoline 517.55 



40. 

Telephone 1,331,43 

Heat 459.33 

Public Service 218.22 

Supplies 69.86 

Mass Casualty 148.23 

ANIMAL CONTROL 2,332.42 



Meetings 



Veterinary 



Wages 490.46 

Mileage 404.75 
Dog Licenses: 

A-Tags 100.06 

C-Licenses 51.56 

Printing 55.00 

Granite State Hunane 643.00 

Convent ions 117.50 



45.00 



Insurance 80.00 



40.00 



Supplies 42.59 

Dues 15.00 

Training 150.00 

Legal 97.50 

GENERAL ASSISTANCE 25,316.24 



Ibwn Poor 18,768.42 

Expenses 110.96 

Clerks 6,436.86 

OLD AGE ASSISTANCE 

LIBRARY 

PATRIOTIC PURPOSES 



6,957. 


.37 




11,030, 


.00 




450, 


.00 




25,866, 


.67 



PRINCIPAL LONG TERM NOTES & BONDS 

Outstanding Loans: 

Truck 5,166.67 

Ambulance 3,200.00 

Conputer 2,000.00 

Conpactor 8,000.00 

Swains Dam 7,500.00 

INTEREST LONG TERM NOTES & BONDS 2,865.83 



Outstanding on Interest: 

Truck 490.83 

Antoulance 320.00 

Conputer 215.00 

Compactor 1,240.00 

Swains Dam 600.00 

INTEREST EXPENSE - TEMPORARY LOANS 31,416.67 



41. 
FICA, RCTIRIMENT etc. 11,017.42 



INSURANCE 26,192.25 



Workers Cortpensation NHMA 9,027.00 

Group-Health BC/BS 4,706.52 

Unenployment Corp. NHMA 1,224.83 

Jenness (Vehicles) 4,456.00 

NHMA s/m Liability 1,294.00 

Conprehensive - Kendall 4,392.00 

Consultant Fee 1,091.90 



Yield Tax 5,526.00 

Social Security-Enployee Credit - 3.76 

Deferred Cortp. - 86.88 

Cable T.V. Refunds 6,776.85 

Taxes Bought By Town 149,601.16 

Discounts, Abatenents & Refunds 6,676.56 

Swains Dam 25.12 
Capital Reserve Fund: 

Trustees of Trust Fund 74,208.14 

New Equipment Cruiser 10,000.00 

State: 857.00 

Marriage Licenses 559.00 

Dog Licenses 298.00 

County Tax 265,933.00 

School District 1,835,092.00 

Tenporary Loans 600,000.00 



Total Expenditures 3,606,398.32 



SCHEDULE OF TOWN PROPERTY 42. 

As of December 31, 1984 

Town Hall, Lands and Buildings $ 405,700.00 

Furniture and Equipment 25,000.00 

Libraries, Furniture and Equipment 2,100.00 

Police Department, Equipment 18,500.00 

Fire Department, Lands amd Buildings 43,650.00 

Equipment 105,650.00 

Highway Departnent, Equipment and Building 77,000.00 

Ambulance 26,000.00 

Cortpactor 90,000.00 

Barrington Pine Tree Cemetery 54,050.00 

Swains Lake Dam 75,000.00 

All land and buildings acquired through Tax Collector's Deeds 

Stackpole Lot 3,050.00 

Trickey Lot 10,550.00 

Holiday Shores (7 lots) 15,000.00 

Town Dump 110,000.00 

Boat Landing and Parking Lot 13,800.00 

Berry Meadow, Province Rd. 1,850.00 

Land N/S Rte 126 13,650.00 

Long Shore Drive Lot D-99 1,750.00 

Berry River Rd. 1,500.00 

Long Shores Drive Lot 431 1,350.00 

Long Shores Drive Lot D-63 2,200.00 

Long Shores Drive Lot E-4 1,300.00 

S/S Berry River Rd. Lot 55 4,500.00 

$1,103,950.00 



43. 



§ 


^ 








03 


^ 


.5 


e 


l^ 


T) 




o 


5 

^ 








m 


Ui 


Sh 


^ 


<: 


^ 


■9i- 


^ 


s 


B 



c» .-H r- .-t ^ 
i-H r~- 'a* o >xi 

<7^ 00 G> 00 



ro (Ti (N 
r-< 00 "a- 



niwDCTii— ildcnoi— lO"— irNv£)r^ooooLni— t(NOO'^r~~oo 
i^^oo.-HCT\r-rH.-ioo'^Lnin'^>x>oor-^inocNnoo 


o o r- 

O O VD 


a^m^-^~^Or^oo.-^■^LJ-lno^-a^rN'^o^■J^-o^r-oo 
^a\ro'3<vor-ooLn<x>vomLn(T.oinonu3rocOLn.-iiDroir) 
oo'g*c^l'ynooa^or^JOO'^^^vD^-Lno^^otN^^a^O'^' 


O O kO 

in vD o 



LTlLniXSCNlfNLni^fNl 



















o> 


r-^ 






^ 


^ 


o 


o 


in 


00 


o 


in 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 










































o 














T ro 


ty. 


Li-l 


"^r 


o^ 


o 


CM 


fN 


in 


■"1 




r- 


LTI 


°1 


in 


CM 


in 


o 


(N 


■"1 


o 


o 


^ 


'~* 









1^ rsj ro fNj 



CM cr. 

in o 



oinoouDooooorHoooooooinooooooooooo 
o^^ooolnoolno^o^^Jlnoo^LnLnLnr~-oolnoo^oLnoooo 
(-Mroa\inrooo(NrMOO'=j'r~-fNicrimooinotNOOo-" .■'-■-^'-- 



.-I in vD o 



>X) CM ro rsi 1— I in n 




44. 



CM ^ o r- (N o 
ro a^ O 1-1 tTv (N 
ijD in o o t-H ro 



rg 


o 


o 


in 


V.O 


o 


ro 


o 


o 


in 


VO 


o 


^D 


o 


o 


o 


M" 


o 



s 


§ 


o 
o 


§ 


§ 


O 
O 


CM 


o 


o 
o 
o 


in 
in 
o 


in 
.-1 

CM 


O 
O 

o 


CM 

ro 


in 
n 


in 


:^ 


(N 


m 




45. 



.-1 00 

(Nin 

CNfSl 



t— 1 r~ 


00 


CTi O "^ O O 


n in 


(N 


CTi 00 ro IT) O 


m n 


n 


^ 00 [^ ro <N 


r-H O 


■^ 


r-l >-! in .-H VD 


T -^ 


o 


ro o cr\ r^ "3- 








r^ r- 


oT 


^ .-t U-) n CM 



s- 





+J (U QJ <U CU -C 
C C C -H U 
D D P >i W 



cn o 

00 IT) 
VO <N 



o o o 00 
o o o o 

O O O CM 



00 ro 

O LD 



ro 


in 


r\j 


ro 


■—I 


in 


o 


^ 


•^ 


"^r 


ro 


'^D 


a^ 




in 


00 


a> 


cr. 


rsi 












UD 


o^ 


ro 


en 




in 


ro 









rH ro 






o^ oj 






rn o 






in »H 






^^ 












r^oo 






(N o 






\£> lO 






^ 


VD CTi in 






fM 00 .-H 


'^ 




in "^ — 1 


OJ 




O CM TJ- 


00 




CN in '^ 


(N 










o in .-H 


o 




CM ro rsi 


in 





1 


55 
(0 




(D 


^ 


4-1 




uj u u; 



5 



.5 ^ 



0)10 



OO 00 



0) 

4-1 m iw 3 <U 
° ° ° 3 -6 



S3S 



.. >^ ro <N 
in 00 00 00 in 
(U cTi en a^ M 

^^-^^ s 
^^lglg>. 

^^^^^ 



g omaii: 



.H 4-) 

8 ^ 
B^ 



gg 



46. 



o in 

(N o 

■^ in 





r~- (Ti o o 
o in no 
rM <yi 00 00 



en 



— H 



0) 

g > >^ -S s 

CD S-l iH Eh 

0) ^ Eh IH C 

•rH CO I a^ C J^ 

>< M Q) O -r! 

to cn iji "^ -H _ 

La Q) (u c 13 U3 Ti 

CD • Eh CJ 0) -H 

X > u Q) m u) 

ITJ 0) -P -■ • ■■ 

• -' T3 ^-' iH 03 Q) 

o w q 4.) C X -H 

U ^5 C .fe ro 



-P 0) JH U (U QJ -H 
§ D O « +J fd c 



in ^ <Ti o o o 
(N 00 vo (N in -cT 
f^ M- o r~ o 




m O -3 rij 
Oi K « Cn [n O 




47. 



VD lD UD 
\D yo T-t 
CX3 CD ^ 




cxJUDogroooorsinLn 
lr)Ln'X>^sl^r)a^ ror- 



Ln ro o r-- 
KD m iTi <y\ 
o o -^ r- 



■^ o tNi r- 

r^ ^ ro <^ 
00 o n "^ 




VD O O O O 

1^ O O O O 

1— I o r\) o LD 

in i^ ro (N r^ 



48. 



O tn VD >^ 'sD V£> >X> 



u § 



P - 

5 



& & 



S 3 






tPOO 

■5 2 

1.^ 



Q OJ 
-P 



e d 



(N 00 CTi 00 
00 0>i 00 00 
00 ro >X> O 




49. 

LIABILITIES 1984 



Legal 4,997,93 

Cost of Tax Sale 399.00 

Highway 2,016.38 

7,413.31 



*From Page 1 under Assets - Accts. due Town 

Previous Ceitetery Funds 5,445.46 

Pierce " " 1,025.84 

Geer " " 459.84 

Beach Fund 10,661.50 

Wbod Fund for Library 1,000.00 

School Dist. Capital Reserve 17,420.93 

Itotal Accts. Due Town 38,474.57 



INCOME FROM DEPARIMENTS 50. 
1984 

Building Permits 10,537.00 

Permits Heater & Pistol 439.00 

Planning Board 1,094.95 

Zoning Board of Mjustunent 403.25 

Sale of Town Property 200.00 

Ibwn Hall Security Deposits 200.00 

Rental Itown Hall 1,035.00 

Ambulance 2,506.00 

Police 945.00 

Checklist 160.00 

Duitp Stickers 15.30 

Copies 122.65 

Itown Map 125.00 

Bad Check Charge 45.00 

17,828.15 



IV. REPORTS OF TCWN OFFICERS, AGENTS AND ORGANIZATIONS 



ROAD AGENT'S REPORT 1984 52. 

Through the funding of the Road Program over the past six or seven 
years the Town has maintained over fifty miles of Class V roads and im- 
proved certain roads selected each year. We have irtproved, rebuilt or 
paved all or sections of Smoke St. Brewster, Scruton Pond, MeadovAarook, 
Steppingstone, Goldencrest, Wood (including bridge replacement) ;Wood- 
havelji Lakeshore, Fogarty, 2nd Crown Point, Canaan, Back Canaan, Old 
Canaan, Brooks, To lend culvert and all bridge rails. Under the road 
seal program all tarred roads have been sealed at least once, ditched 
and brush cut. 

The 1985 Proposed Highway Budget reflects a continuation of an effort 
to keep up with road needs. Growth in Town has adversely irtpacted the 
roads; we must plan for increases in road use as well as other services. 
Motor vehicle registrations in Town have increased by more than 1000 
issued permits since 1980 or about a 25% increase. Since 1974 motor 
vehicle registrations have just about do\±>led and more than tripled 
since 1970. We only have to negotiate our fifty plus miles of Class 
V roads in the family auto to clearly irtpetrate the need for continued 
road inproveitents . 

Under separate article in the warrant we're asking for a new Town 
truck, plow and sander. This unit is a necessary addition to the de- 
partment and with the one Town truck now in service should allow better 
service in the winter months for hauling, plowing and sanding. We are 
also asking for permission to lease with intent to buy a backhoe. The 
sum to pay the first year's rent is asked for from the Revenue Sharing 
account. It cost us almost $10,000 in backhoe rental in 1984 and an 
additional $6000 for loader rental. We expect we can do more irain- 
tenance work with an inhouse backhoe in a more timely manner. 

This year the Town crew cleared land next to the duitp and with the 
help of local contractors and Charlie Soule built a two bay shed for 
cover and maintenance of vehicles 3 

I express the fullest measure of gratitude to finally have a place 
for maintenance of the Town's equipment out of the weather. To fully 
understand the town crews gratitude imagine yourself outside in below 
zero tenperatures changing the water pump on the old CMC being pushed 
along by the expectation of an irtpending storm. 

In accordance with Planning Board rule changes the Selectmen accepted 
several roads as class V Town roads including Muchado Drive, Lily Pond 
Road, Chesley Drive, Mica Point, Shady Lane, Caldwell Lane, Boyle Lane, 
Partridge Drive, Leeanna Drive. These amount to about 2.22 miles. 

Our crew, Mike Morrissey and Peter Cook, and I ask your continued 
support through your vote to fund the highway budget. 

Respectfully submitted 

Ronald Landry 
Road Agent 



53. 



o 


o 


o 


o 


m 


CX3 


a\ 




r- 


(N 






r~ 


r-~ 


in 


vo 


(N 





1^ ID o r- 
■=r (N 1^ n 
r- .-H ro o 



o in o o 
o r~ o o 
r~ vD M- o 

in a^ 00 in 



o o o o o 
o o o o o 
o o o o o 



>X> C3^ l£> O 

\£> ,-i cr\ o 

1— I r^ IX) o 

en r^ CO r^ 



o o '^ in CM 

in o 00 "ir r~- 

■=3" O i-H V£) >— I 

r\i m rM T-H 



O VD rH 


r- 


CN 


in o o 


cn r^ o 


^ 


in 




1^ a^ ix> 


in 


CTv 


'a' ^ r- 


^ .-H tn o 


00 


"^T o "^ in ro 


■-H CNI 1^ 


00 














(-- -^ .-H 


m 


en 


in r- .-H 


<— 1 "a" 1— < 


n 

















t^ 












(1) 












> 












fH 












3 


o o 


o 


o o o o 


O 


o o o o o 




o o 


o 


o o o o 


00 


O O 00 o o 


c 


ro o 


o 


o o d o 


CO 


o o 00 o in 


Q 


ro o o O 




o o o o 


a^ 


O O CM o >x> 


■H 


00 in 


in 


o in o o 


a^ 


o o in o "^ 


■P 












fO 


in fN 


in 


^ vooo r~^ 


o 


O fsT 00 o 


> 


-^ <-< 


^ 


r-i ro 


in 


CNl .-1 rH 


§§ 




CO o 

O 00 



54. 






0) U (0 

-g 4J en 



iS: 



in in 



55. 




New Town Barn 




Road Crew, Peter Cook, Ron Landry and Mike Morrissey 



REPORT OF THE ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICER 



56. 



We are concerned with the number of dogs that have been running loose. 
All dogs must be under the control of the owner. Any of these dogs 
caught are subject to a minimum of a $25.00 fine and a maximum of 
$100.00 fine. 

Also, dogs caught running deer can be shot by any Conservation 
Officer, State Police Officer, Dog Constable, or any New Hanpshire 
certified Police Officer. The owner or owners of any dog caught 
in the act may be fined up to $500.00. 

For your consideration, my activities in 1934 were as follows: 

COMPLAINTS 63 

Phone Calls 

Collecting Dog Licenses 

Cruelty Calls 

Restraining Orders 

Court Sunmons 

Dog Bites 

Dogs Killed by Cars 

Dogs Hit by Cars 

Dogs Lost 

Dogs Found 

Stray Dogs to Pound 

Claimed By Owners 

Lost Dog Back to Owners 
(Tagged) 



MILEAGE 2043 

178 


HOURS 130 

Dogs From Other Towns 

Horse Calls 

Cat Calls 

Cow Calls 

Raccoon Calls 

Skunk Calls 

Dogs to Vet 

Pig Calls 

Stray Goats 

Bat Calls 

Dogs Chasing Sheep 

Dogs Shot 


4 
5 


2 


2 


9 


3 




1 


8 




9 


2 


2 


1 


45 


1 


30 


4 


40 


1 


20 


2 


8 





Respectfully Submitted 

Sarah W. Bigelow 
Animal Control Officer 



To be reached call either the Town Hall and leave a message or Strafford 
County Dispatch, 742-4968 or 664-2700. 



57. THE BARRINGTON FIRE DEPARTMENT 

The Harrington Fire Departnent responded to 137 emergency calls 
during 1984. These included 31 chiinney fires , 25 accidents, 8 
structural and 9 vehicle fires, 24 woods and grass fires, 5 illegal 
bums, 8 smoke investigations, 8 service calls, 3 false alarms and 
1 bomb scare. 

We responded men and equipment out of Town mutual aid 15 times and 
received aid from the Towns of Rochester, Strafford, Northwood, Madbury, 
Lee and Durham 6 times. Neighboring town response depends on area of 
Harrington requiring assistance. 

The 664-7700 telephone number is the fire alarm and emergency number 
and is not to be used for information. 

Chimney fires are lonnecessary, large in numbers and reflect failure 
to properly maintain smoke pipe and chimney. 

The Fire Department cannot issue permits for outside fires. This 
is the responsibility of the Forest Fire Warden. We do not do 
swiimdng pools, wells or cats. 

Respectfully Submitted 

Sumner A. Hayes, Chief 



58. 

REPORT OF THE TOWN FOREST FIRE WARDEN AND STATE FOREST RANGER 



Our first forest fire prevention law was enacted by our State 
Legislature 90 years ago. This early law set in place a cooperative 
forest fire prevention and suppression effort between city and town 
govemnients and State govemitient. It sinply stated that no open 
fire could be kindled, when the gound is free of snow, without the 
written permission of the town/city Forest Fire Warden. This law 
also stated that anyone kindling a fire without written permission 
shall be liable for the damage caused and subject to a $1000 fine. 

During the past 90 years, this law has worked so well that it has 
remained unchanged. All open fires when the ground is not covered 
with snow must be authorized by the local Forest Fire Warden. Persons 
kindling a fire without a permit v^en one is required are liable for 
damages caused, fire suppression costs and subject to a $1000 fine. 

This cooperative fire prevention law has contributed significantly 
to our nationally recognized annual forest fire loss record. 

1984 STATISTICS 





State 


District 


City/Town 


. of Fires 


875 


25 


8 


. of Acres 


335 


19 

Alfred Grimes 
District Ranger 

Sumner A. Hayes 

Town Forest Fire Warden 


3 



59. 3ARRIMG'^0N POLICE DEPARTMENT REPORT I'^^A 



Town growth created an ever, greater impact on the Police Department 
in 19?'* than previous years. Along with more private roads being accept- 
ed js Town roads increasing mileage on patrols, all other services in- 
crease by direct relationship. A very good example of this is the fact 
that our case load in Dover Court increased to the point that the Dover 
Prosecutor could no longer do our prosecuting for us. The direct result 
of this to the Harrington Police m.eant that we had to do our own prosecut- 
ing, not being practical to hire an attorney to do this for us, wc were 
forced to train a prosecutor, which meant it had to be someone free in the 
daytime, as Dover Court does not hold night sessions. The position of 
Prosecutor was added to other job responsibilities and it became a multi- 
faceted job combine as Prosecutor/Investigator and Juvenile Officer, which 
are positions that are normally handled by individual officers, but be- 
cause actions under these headings usually end in court, they were com- 
bined as a single responsibility. This position with the Harrington 
Police is aptly handled by Officer John Enos , who joined the department 
May 1, 19R2 and resides with his parents. Officer Enos went to and jtc^cs- 
fvilly completed basic and advanced Prosecutor School in Concord, conducted 
and certified by the Standards and Training Council. In conjunction with 
prosecutor training. Officer Enos also attended and completed a class on 
Affidavits and Warrants and has been prosecuting cases f'6r Harrington 
since January 1984. 

Growth of the Town has created even a greater impact on the number 
and amount of records that have to be kept. Records for UCR or Uniform 
Crime Reporting to State Police Headquarters has grown in proportion 
along with all other police records. Records that have to be kept include, 
but are not limited to, Juvenile records, records of Warrants and Arrest, 
Accident records, files and records of Court Cases pending, house checks, 
pistol permits and purchase of handguns from the various gun dealers 
throughout the State. Along with all of these records it is also neces- 
sary to keep the forms that are required in relation to the records that 
are kept. Gordon U'clner has returned to the department as Police Clerk 
to aid in keeping the files and records in order. In 1976 one file drawer 
kept all the police records--in 1984 three file cabinets of 4 drawers each 
are required. 

1984 saw some change in manning, with Officers Bertrand and Verity 
leaving the department, a new Patrolman was put on. Patrolman Al Greenwood 
joined the ranks on the 5th of September. He sucessfully completed his 
training and is certified by the Police Standards and Training Council. 

A new cruiser was purchased for 1984 replacing the 1982 Ford which 
had 89,000 miles on it. Although a 1984 Ford was ordered under the same 
specs that the State Police cruisers are purchased, a mixup by the dealer 
on the purchase order submitted by Harrington failed to produce a cruiser. 
It was decided to try another "Police Package" from a different manufacturer 
and .1 198^ Plymouth Gran Fury was purchased for a little less money and a 
little more standard equipment. Thus far the Plymouth has worked out very 
veil and it is hopeful that it will continue to give us the trouble-free 



-2- 



perforrr.arice. in the future that the first 14,000 miles has produced. 

Keeping up \>i th the constantly changing laws through continuous 
training sessions has been the primary goal for Harrington Police for 
1"84, Not only do the laws change either by additions or deletions, but 
the Standards & Training Council in Concord are adding stiffer requirements 
by increasing the qualifications a Police Officer must have to stay a 
Police Officer and/or become one. Examples of this are the number of hours 
has been doubled that a potential officer must attend school to certify 
and that each officer must qualify with the handgun he carries on duty 
as a yearly basis. The responsibility of training sessions, along with 
patrol scheduling ,jre the duties of Sgt. Robert Brown. 

The Road Agent and his crew are deserving of a special thanks for 
their response to emergency areas. Trees down in high winds, roads washed 
out in heavy rains and areas for sanding at accident scenes are a few of 
the situations that they readily answer to. 

The Fire Department and Ambulance personnel continue to do a great 
job in their respective duties when toned out for accidents. Their assist- 
ance is greatly appreciated. 

The Activity Statistic Chart is again included as part of the Police 
Report. Again this reflects most of the activities that the Harrington 
Police are engaged in throughout the calendar year and allows anyone 
interested, to compare activities on a yearly bases. This also establishes 
a method of analizing a trent for crime, that is to say, which crimes are 
rising and which are dropping, whatever the case may be. 

Communications is still the prevailing answer for good relations 
between the Police and the Board of Selectmen, George Musler, Charles Soule 
and Pat Newhall. Another pleasant and productive year has gone by, serv- 
ing the Board and the Townspeople of Harrington. 

Respectfully submitted, 

"Bud" Sprowl, 
Chief of Police 



,61. 



CRIMINAL ACTIVITY 
Bur£laries 



Theft 


Ot? 




\ 


t 


Vandalism 


3f, 




'- 




Auto Theft 


7 




- 




Bicycle Theft 







' 


" 


Boat Theft 


'■ 


" 


^ 




Attempted Burglaries 


'■^ 


-" 


' 


r 


Criminal Arrest 


-0- 


1"' 


12 


1 


Restraining Orders 








''- 


Attempted Suicides 


1 


'. 


"! 


f 


SERVICE CALLS 
Medical Calls 




-0 


,. 


., . 


Fire Assist 


'.2 






1 r 


Response to Alanr.s 




' c 




J^ 


Pistol Permits 




- 


'^^ 


n- 


Bank Deposits 


-n 








Missing Persons 


- 


-"- 


^ 




House and Buisness Checks 


(2^.- 








Attempt to Locate 


^■2 




r 2 


6" 


Assist other Dept's. 


IC^ 


1 "'' 


o.- 


-. lo 


Warrants other Dept. 


--- 


_n _ 




'■^^ 


JUVENILE CASES 
Petitions to Court 










Runaways 


-?- 


• 1 


" 


1 


Uncontrolable 


_"_ 




2 


2 


Thefts 


-'^- 




" 


° 


Burglaries 


-"- 




^ 


■■ 


Criminal Threatening 


-"- 


: 


•^ 


Assaults 


.o. 


-. 




2 


MOTOR VEHICLES 
D.W.I. 


^ , 


^- 


, r, 


1^ 


M.V. Violations 


l''^' 


221 


?■"■' 




M.V. Routine Stops _| 




?y 


'• " ~ 


-'• ^2 


M.V. Accidents PI 


- 


- 


- 


2' 


M.V. Accidents Dair.age 




- 


- 




TOTAL 


51 


Gf 


( "" 


on 


Income to ?D 
Insurance reports 








'^'.60.00 


Parking Tickets 


_ 




- 


■"■■''OO.OO 


Pistol Permits 


- 


- 




'380.00 


Insurance (accident paymen 


t'! 


.- 




$^^29.00 


TOTAL 


_ 


. 




'^I'^^^.OO 


Telephone calls 
(through dispatch) 


,.:., 


o;. -lo 


QT-,! 




Complaint Control Cards 


21 U2 


2,o. 


2'.^1 





BARRINGTON POLICE ASSOCIATION 



1984 Activities 



62. 



The 1984 Barrington Police Association activities saw a continuance of 
two pet projects of the Police Association. By setting up at the Barr- 
ington Spring Fest we were able to continue with the finger printing of 
children of Barrington and to offer bicycle registrations to all who de- 
sired their bike to be registered. Both of these services are free. We 
are planning at this time to join the 85 Spring Fest and to again offer 
the Barrington populace the opportimity of both free services. 

The monthly dances that were held at the Town Hall by the BPA have been 
discontinued and turned over to the HEMS group. Hope they have the sane 
success as the B.P.A. 

With the Towns purchase of a new cruiser, a 1984 Plymouth the B.P.A. 
purchased a new radio for it at a cost of $833.00 installed. The radio 
was purchased from Strafford Communication owned and operated by Dick 
Ross who is also a new resident of Barrington and a very competent 
radio technician. Dick resides on Green Hill Road with his wife and 
family. 

As in the past years the December Association iteeting was held at the 
Chief's house and a pre-Christmas dinner was served by Mae and Crystal 
Sprowl. Turkey with all the fixings was the nenu for the dinner, topped 
off with a dessert of stravtoerry shortcake - a great evening was had by 
all. 

Respectfully submitted. 

Bud Sprowl 
Association President 



63. 



REPORT OF EMERGENCY MEDICAL SEMHiCES COORDINATOR 



Ambulance runs from January 1, 1984, to December 31, 1984, totaled 114. 
Ife cire still covered with backup service by Benoit Medical, Frisbie Mem- 
orial Hospital Ambulance, and Northvood Ambulance. 

Our responders have been very active in covering events such as the walk- 
a-thon, horse shows, etc. 

iSie Mass. Casualty Ccannission has set up standard procedure with Strafford 
Dispatch in the event of a mass casualty situation in Harrington. We are 
currently in the process of establishing protocols with area services that 
can be on file. 

Our new telephone number, 664-2896, is in direct contact with Strafford 
Dispatch and is working out well. 

BEy\S and the Harrington Snow Goers have the rescue sled available for 
accidents - sledding, hunting, etc. And also, is available on mutual aid 
basis for surrounding towns. 

The Dance Committee is working out well with much time and effort put into 
it. Attendance has been good. 

The new Directory is out with new articles, photos and general information. 
It is available at the Town Hall (Selectmen's Office), Calef's Country store, 
Barrington Paint & Hardware and First Barrington Video located in the Mall. 

I wish to express my gratitude to individuals and organizations vdio have 
donated to BEMS and thank them for their support. 

As the cover shows on our new directory the door will always be open from 
BEMS volunteers dedicated to total pre-hospital emergency medical care to 
serve you. 

Itemeraber, in case of an emergency, use this procedure; 

1. Remain calm. 

2. Call 664-2896, ambulance. 

3. Speak clearly.. 

4. State your name. 

5. Explain (medical) problem. 

6. GIVE YOUR LOCATION, 



64. 




BEMS members of Mass. Casualty Committee are left to right - 
Carolyn Bliss, Joel Sherburne and Helen Musler 




Members of the Barrington Emergency Medical Services and 
members of the Barrington Snow Goers show off a new snow 
sled for off-road rescue work. The patient would be placed 
within the sled and brought out to a waiting ambulance. In 
foreground are Jay Van Billiard (left) , BEMS supply officer 
and Don Lawry, BEMS president. Standing behind the sled 
(from left) are Selectman Charles Soule;Gary Musler, in charge 
of BEiyiS ambulance maintenance; Eric Elliott of BEMS; Richard 
Brooks, Snow Goers vice president; Raymond Danby, Snow Goers 
treasurer; Joel Sherburne, BEMS coordinator, and Michael 
Page. 



BEMS TREASURER'S REPORT 
65. 

Balance on Hand 
January 1, 1983 

Checking Account (s) 815.91 

Bank Account 908.80 

Income thru 1984 

Ttown Appropriation 6,250.00 

Fund Raisers 
Booklet (s) 
Dances 

Other ^ 

Misc. 
Refunds 
Seminars 
Donations 
General 
Memorial 
Interest on Accounts 

Less 1984 Expenses 

Returned to Gen. Fund 
Balance on Hand (12/31/84) 

Breakdown of 1984 Expenses 





1,495.00 






4,261.42 






499.50 






32.69 






180.00 






820.34 


570.00 
60.74 


6,250.00 


8,104.86 


1,539.54 


6,060.71 


4,978.61 


500.00* 


189.29 








3,126.25 


1,039.54 


Town Funds 


BHyiS Funds 




181.95 


24.95 




1,321.21 






564.30 


1,564.21 




377.33 






871.30 


52.50 




517.55 






1,331.43 






459.33 






218.22 






69.86 


97.80 




148.23 


95.00 

50.00 

600.00 

1,759.28 

734.87 





Training 

Medical Supplies 

Equipment 

Radio Repairs 

Antoulance Maintenance 

Gasoline 

Telephone 

Heat 

Public Service 

Supplies 

Mass. Casualty 

State Fees 

Membership Fees 

Printing 

Dance Project 

Misc. 

"6,060.71 4,978.61 

* Transfer to Spcl. Ck. Account to start Dance ( Fund Raising) Project. 



HANSON KELIHER VFW POST 6804 66. 

Barringtpn, New Hanpshire 03825 

Our post membership was saddened by the passing of two comrades in 
1984. Mr. RDger Calef and Mr. Earl Colby, both charter members of the 
Hanson Keliher Veteran's of Foreign Wars Post 6804, were veterans of 
World War II. On a happier note, many of our nembers helped our 
oldest member, Mr. Herb Clark, celebrate his 90th birthday. Herb 
is a World War I veteran. 

Our post donated a new flag to the town and provided lighting so the 
flag may be flown around the clock at Town Hall. We also presented a 
new flag to the Girl Scout troop for use in their meetings. 

Our post continued in its role in organ izinc^ and conducting the 
Town's observence of Memorial Day. 

REPORT OF MEMORIAL DAY, 1984 

Expenses: Marching Band $ 280.00 

Flowers and wreaths 23.50 
Flags for Veterans Grave s 148.57 



Ibtal 


452.07 


1983 Balance 


6.85 


Town /^propriation 


450.00 


1984 Balance 


4.78 



Receipts: 

Balance : 

Our guest speaker for the day was Lieutenant Eleanor A. Hunter, 
Public Affairs Officer at Pease Air Force Base. She reminded us that, 
"Democracy with all its checks and balances is the strength of our way 
of life". Reverand Rick John of the Evangelical Free Church gave the 
invocation and benediction, and Daniel Scruton, Choir Director sang a 
special selection. 

The post would like to thank everyone who participated to honor our 
departed comrades. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Richard D. Bottom, Commander 
Robert V. Drew, Quarterroaster 
VFW Post 6804 



LIBRAFIIAN'S REPORT 

67. 

Several series of story times were held throughout the year for pre- 
schoolers, and there were two special story times presented at the request 
of a local day care center. The Librarian, Karen Littlefield, also told 
stories to the first and second graders of the Elementary School as part 
of Arts Day. The Library presented a summer series of film programs and 
co-sponsored, with BEST, a fall film program in the school. 

Many people donated books and magazines; some were added to the Library, 
while others were sold to add to the book funds. Duplicate gifts and dis- 
cards of children's books were given to the school library. Other gifts 
included a new bookcase for juvenile paperbacks. All gifts are gratefully 
acknowledged. 

The Librarian contined to be active in the Children's Librarian Sec- 
tion (CHILIS) of the New Hampshire Library Association (NHLA) and the 
New England Roundtable of Children's Librarians (NERTCL) of the New Eng- 
land Library Association (NELA) , attending several programs sponsored by 
those professional organizations. She is also Secretary of the Rochester 
Area Libraries (RALI) Go-op, of \«*iich Harrington Public Library is a mem- 
ber. RALI joined the Merrimack Library Co-op this year in order to in- 
crease the library discount through co-operative book purchases. 

Because of several patrons' requests, the Library again purchased a 
pass to the Children's Museum of Portsmouth; it has been fairly well used. 
Good Shepherd School continues to use the Library on a regular basis, 
sending four classes a week. And once more, special thanks go to volun- 
teers: Louise Williams, v^o kept the Library open on Sundays; Sally Big- 
elow and Ellen Walker for their excellent help in a variety of tasks. 

Respectfully Submitted 

Karen A. Littlefield 
Librarian 



LIBRARY STATISTICS FOR 1984 



68. 



CIRCULATION 



Adult Fiction 
Adult Non-Fiction 
Juvenile Fiction 
Juvenile Non-Fiction 
Periodicals 



Total 



2990 
1034 
3126 
1164 
354 

8668 



LIBRARY RESOURCES 

No. volumes beginning of year 
No. volumes added 



Discarded 

No. voluires end of year 



6349 
627 

6976 
199 

6777 



Periodicals received: Adult 

Juvenile 



24 



Paperbacks added (Uncataloged) 
Discarded 



336 

43 



293 



New Registrations 



263 



69. 



1984 TOWN LIBRARY TRUSTEE REPORT 



Early in the Library year, our Library conducted and categorized a 
survey of townspeople to try to learn in what areas we could better 
serve the coimrunity . The results were of great interest, and we have 
tried to incorporate your suggestions into our system whenever possible. 
Our thanks go to all v\*id participated. 

Throughout the year. Association meetings have been held on a reg- 
ular basis, and at many of these there has been a special program pre- 
ceding the meeting in an attempt to interest more people in our act- 
ivities. 

We are happy to report that Karen Littlef ield continues to be our ex- . 
cellent Librarian. I will not intrude upon her report vd-iere you will 
find the details of our year. 

Louise Williams has continued to conduct our Sunday afternoon hours 
on a volunteer basis, and Rachel Sturtevant has continued as our Assist- 
ant Librarian. 

In early summer, the Library, along with the entire Town, suffered the 
loss of a good friend and patron when Roger L. Calef passed away. The 
response to the suggestion of a fund in his memory has been a great 
tribute to a fine young man. Books by Roger's favorite authors have been 
added to our collection. 

Once again, I invite one and all to visit our Library where your 
suggestions are always welcome. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Dorothy E. Berry 



1984 HARRINGTON LIBRARY ASSOCIATION TREASURER'S REPORT 



70. 



Receipts for the year 1984 

Appropriation from Town of Harrington 

Sale of Books 

Book Replacement For Lost Books 

Interest 

Wood Fund 

Gifts 

EXies 

Fines 

Miscellaneous 

Total Pteceipts 



11,030.00 

587.68 

5.20 

346.21 

143.38 

25.00 

10.00 

707.22 

52.00 

12,906.69 



Operating Expenses for the year 1984 



Salaries 

Social Security Tax (Library Share) 

Books 

Professional Dues, etc. 

Telephone 

Supplies 

Magazines 

Total Operating Expenses 

Total Receipts over Expenditures 

Roger L. Calef Memorial Fund 



5,705.54 
327.71 

3,870.77 
116.20 
198.26 
561.26 
570.31 

11,350.05 
1,556.64 
1,185.00 



Respectfully Submitted, 

Dorothy B. Berry, Treasurer 

Phyllis Haywood, Assistant Treasurer 



71. BUILDING INSPECTOR 

ANNUAL REPORT - 1984 



Houses 


53 


Mobile Hones 


7 


Additions 


33 


Renovations 


14 


Storage Structures 


46 


Replacement M/H 




Structures 


13 


Etools 


3 


Seasonal Cottages 


1 



Connercial Structures 3 
Razed Structures 1 

Relocate Structures 1 

Sign Permits 2_ 

180 



The above statistics illustrate a 24% increase over oer"rLts issued' in 
1983; in particular those issued for storage structures and houses. 

The dollar value of construction in 1984 was $5,051,500.00 canpared 
to ?3,533,67C .00 in 1983 a 43% increase. 

The amount collected for permit fees and violation penalties in 1984 
was $11,190.00 CCTipared to $7,793.00 in 1983 a 44% increase. 

My operating expenses for wages, mileage, meetings, supplies and legal 
cost were $6,797.57 cortpared to $5,693.14 in 1983 a 19% increase. 

I would like to continue to express ray appreciation to our Board of 
Selectmen for their continued support and guidance and also thank 
the Planning Board for their proposed changes. 

Respectfully, 



Stephen Bergstrom 
Building Inspector 



ANNUAL REPORT-1984 



72. 



HARRINGTON CIVIL PREPAREDNESS 
(CIVIL DEFENSE) 



Francis "Lucky" 
Doris Lanciano 
Richard Brooks 
Wilber Heath 
Richard Hill 
Sid Kotlus 
Rod Hudson 
Ray Caswell, Jr. 
Dianne Caswell 



Lanciano 



Director 

Dispatcher 

Communications Officer Ass't Director 

Ass't Supply Officer 

Supply Officer 

Public Relations Officer 

Ass't Dispatcher 

Ass't P/R Officer Ass't Secretary 

Secretary 

\fl^ich in the case 



It has been a fairly quiet year for Harrington C.P 
of an einergency group such as this, is good news. 

The following is a list of calls, exercises, and functions in which 
B.C. P. was involved: 

1. Flooding this spring: Assisted Dover C.P. at their request in flood 
watch. 

2. Participated in "Firestorm 84", a tabletop exercise involving Barr- 
ington C.P., Dover C.P., N.H. National Guard, Civil Air Patrol, Boy 
Scouts of America, and R.A.C.E.S. Ham Operators. Monitoring were rep- 
resentatives from the State Civil Defense Office, Gov. Sununu, Dover 
P.D., Dover F.D. , Somersworth F.D., Portsmouth P.D., and N.H. State 
Police. 



The exercise involved search and rescue, a high magnitude forest fire, 
evacuation routing, hazardous spills, and other natural and man made emer- 
gencies that could arise during a forest fire that travels at tremendous 
speed. 

Each participating member received a Thank You letter from Gov. Sununu. 

3. Due to the unexpectedly large turnout of voters on Election Day 
B.C. P. was asked to provide traffic and parking control by Chief 
Sprowl of Harrington P.D., which was provided. Letters of Thank You 
were received from Chief Sprowl and the Selectmen for the quick re- 
sponse and professionalism with which this action was carried out. 

4. Dover C.P. asked the group to help provide communications for the 
Annual Dover Christmas Parade. Director Lanciano, Ass't Director 
R. Brooks and Supply Officer R. Hill also escorted several units in 
the parade. 

5. Received a call from the Harrington P.D. via Strafford County Dispatch 
to relieve the Harrington cruiser in closing the Barrington end of 
Tolend Rd, an automobile accident do^/med power lines, making the road 
inpassable. Two members responded allowing the cruiser to go back on 
patrol. Response time: Aprroximately 8-10 minutes. 



73. 
B.C. P. was provided an area in the Town Hall for office space and event- 
laally, an emergency operations center. 

At the last rreeting of 1984, the group was assigned new unit nun±)ers. To 
reflect the chain of conmand and the state designated town number the 
present number assigned the duties stated at the beginning of this report. 
Chief Sprowl cane by to give a personal Thank You for Election Day cover- 
age. 

Planned and proposed for 1985: 

1. Acquiring the needed equipment and supplies for a federally qualified 
and approved emergency operations center. 

2. Three nembers will be attending a radiological monitoring and radio- 
logical reaction team, 45 hour course at New Hampshire Vocational- 
Technical College in Stratham. F. Lanciano, R. Hill, R. Caswell were 
chosen to attend this course. 

3. Training exercises in search and rescue. 

4. A C.P.R. coiarse. 

5. A standard first aid course. 

6. Radiological monitoring in community. 

7. More direct involvement in corarmmity. 

Harrington Civil Defense also monitors citizen's band Channel #8, offer- 
ing assisteince to the general public. The monitoring coverage has re- 
sulted in several calls for aid which may not have been answered had not 
B. C. P. been there. 

As always new membership applications are welcomed. If you have wondered 
v^Tat you could do to help your community, contact Director 'Lucky' Lanciano 
or Ass't Public Relations Officer Ray Caswell at 868-7380 or 868-5430 res- 
pectfully for more information and an application or come to one of our 
neetings. Barrington C.P. neets the last Wednesday of every month in the 
Conrnunity Room of the Town Hall at 7:00 P.M. 

Respectfully Submitted, 
Francis 'Lucky' Lanciano, 



ZONING BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT 74. 

The Board held six regular meetings during which one of two Special 
Exceptions was granted; two or three variances were granted; and one Rehear- 
ing was denied. In addition, the Board held a special ireeting with the 
Selectinen, Planning Board and Building Inspector. 

Faith Wallace, who served on the Board from its inception, regretfully 
resigned at the end of the year. Mrs. Wallace offered much helpful insight 
into solving difficult decisions. The Town owes her great gratitude for 
her loyal service. 

The Chairman offers thanks to many dedicated town officials who are 
attempting to create workable zoning laws, and to the members and alter- 
nates of the Board. 



Respectfully submitted, 
Robert S. Shepherd 



Members: Fdchard Brooks Douglas Thonpson 

Richard Hill Lucille Siitpson 



Alternates: Fred Timm Richard Hobbs 



'^^' Report of the Planning Board 

The Planning Board held twenty eight scheduled meetings in 1984. Thir- 
teen of these meetings were to consider 16 subdivisions and 7 site re- 
views . 

Ninety one lots were approved with most lots larger in size than, the town's 
80,000 square feet minimum. In general, subdividers have worked well with 
the Board with some willing to schedule lot transfers over a period of 
years rather than flood the town by selling all approved lots within a 
year. 

The remaining fifteen meetings were work sessions. Rmy of these sessions 
were devoted to formulating a coimunity attitude survey. The results of 
this survey have been used in part to assist the Board in proposing changes 
in the growth ordinance and in the Agricultural-Residential-Coramercial zone 
and will be incorporated into revisions of the Master Plan. The results 
of the survey can be found at the end of this report. 

Most of the vork sessions involved discussions of Harrington's increasing 
growth pressures. As a result, the Planning Board is sponsoring five 
articles to be voted on by the town. We feel that these articles are an 
extremely inportant beginning and are necessary if the town is to proper- 
ly manage its future. 

The two that deal directly with growth are the Growth Management; Interim 
Regulation article, and the Capital Inprovements Program article. Current 
state planning and zoning laws allow, in part, that a town may adopt an 
interim growth management ordinance only if the Planning Board: 1) deter- 
mines that unusual circumstances exist requiring pronpt attention and 
makes findings of fact so indicating; 2) needs some time to alter a 
master plan; and 3) proposes a capital improvements program. If the town 
does not approve both of these articles, then Barrington will be opening 
its doors to uncontrolled growth, ^proving both articles will give 
the town another year to plan for its future. 

Another article proposes the expansion of the present Agricultural- 
Residential-Commercial zone B. At present, only 20% of each mile of 
property along state highways in this town can be used coirmercially 
without a variance. The 1984 Coimtunity Attitude Survey shows that a 
vast majority of those responding favor more businesses and professional 
offices. The Board feels that if the tax base is to expand so that taxes 
can be made more affordable, then areas where business and professional 
offices are allowed to locate must expand. Please note that land owners 
in zone B would still have the right to keep their property residential 
or agricultural. 

Finally, the Board is asking the town to join the Strafford Regional 
Planning Conriission. At present most of the Planning Board Budget is 
used to pay legal expenses. Many legal chiallenges could be avoided 
and a great deal of time, money and effort saved with professional 
planning assistance. 

The Board is always looking for willing volunteers to serve on the 
Board, do research, serve on fact finding comnittees and present any 
input to the Board for consideration. The meetings are always public 



aiid WG extend an invitation to attend and to express an opinion. '^' 
Respectfully Submitted for the Planning Board 
David J. Allain, Chairman 



FUEL ASSISTANCE PROGRAM 



The Strafford County Community Action Committee, Inc. continued 
to be a source of assistance to the Barrington community. In 1984, 
120 households were served with Fuel Assistance at a total dollar 
value of $61,974.00. A total of 23 homes were weatherized through 
the Agency Weatherization Program. Four residents received itajor 
home repair and one household had a heating source repair. The ben- 
efits to these clients totaled $13,110.00. In other services pro- 
vided, including Information and Referral, Christmas Program, Commo- 
dities Distribution and Hypothermia, 1,388 households were assisted. 
The ainount of these services total $4,500.00. 

The staff of the Strafford County Community Action Committee, 
Inc. wishes to thank the town officials and the staff at the town 
offices for their help and cooperation in the past year. Special 
appreciation is extended to the volunteers from the coimrunity \^o 
assisted with the commodities distribution. 

Fran Masi 
Coordinator 



77. 

BARRINGTC»J, NEW HAMPSHIRE HISTORICAL SOCIETY REPORT 1984 



Many interesting programs were presented to the Harrington, New Hanp- 
shire Historical Society during the past year. 

A description of "Harness Making" was presented at the March meeting 
by Clayton Lord of Rochester. 

In April, Mary Booth of Lee spoke to the group about the life of 
President Franklin Pierce. She explained that her interest was piqued 
v^en she discovered, in an antique shop, a rare campaign book used during 
the Pierce canpaign. 

The ever popular "Show and Tell" was the program at the May meeting. 

In June, Mrs. Deborah Kerevin of Kingston, who works at the branch 
library of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in Nashua, 
shared infornation on the subject of genealogy. 

Mrs. Ruth Sawyer of Concord brought her extensive antique button 
collection to the September meeting. 

The program in October was presented by Mrs. Doris Zakon of Barring- 
ton. Mrs. Zakon who has been a teacher at the Hebrew School in Dover, 
traced the tradition and history of the Jewish religion. 

Richard Sanborn addressed our group in November. His "History of 
Railroads" brought back many nostalgic menories. 

In December, Alfred Grimes, a New Hampshire Forest Ranger, reminded 
us that this was the year of Smokey Bear's 40th birthday. He gave a most 
informative talk about the origin of the symbol of Smokey and the results 
of the symbol. 

Service projects acconplished by the society include clearing brush 
and small trees from the Berry cemetery in the Beauty Hill section of 
town. 

Five or six members assisted the Beals at the Black Powder Shoot 
vAiich were held in the spring and fall and are yearly events. 

After the Canaan Chapel fire, some of the numbers assisted with the 
repairs of the Chapel, v*iich is listed in the National Register of Hist- 
oric Places. This Society also made a monetary contribution to the resto- 
ration fund. 

During the suntner, four people served on the panel of the Sumner 
Institute, a combined group of Harrington, Strafford, Northwood and Notting- 
ham students, who with their teachers worked on various projects. One with 
which the students were involved, was clearing a cemetery, tracing geneal- 
ogy of the family in that particular cemetery, and searching the land 
deeds as far back as possible in an effort to bring the past and present 
together . 



78. 
Sales of Society items were held at the town hall during the March 
voting hours, primary day and November election. Bessie Shiere and Louise 
Williams, co-chairman of the Ways and Means Committee conducted the sale 
assisted by other members of the Society. 

The Barrington Historical Society becaire incorporated in 1984 through 
the efforts of the president \^*lo also arranged with the Strafford Histori- 
cal Society to store our artifacts in their building. 

Also in 1984 the Society received from the Dover Baptist Church a trust 
fund for the Daniel Gear cemetery, on France Road. The fund had been left 
with the church many years ago, they were unable to continue with the re- 
sponsibility. After conferring with the Selectmen, the money was added to 
the town trust fund and the maintenance work will continue. 

Meetings of the Historical Society will resume the first Wednesday of 
March and will continue through June 1985. All meetings are open to the 
public. 



Frederic R. Shiere 
President 



79. REPORT OF THE LAMPREY REGIONAL SOLID WASTE COOPERATIVE 

The Directors of the Laitprey Regional Solid Waste Cooperative are pleased 
to report that the incinerator /energy recovery plant located on the Uni- 
versity of New Haitpshire canpus is operating on a continuous twenty-four 
hour, seven day a week schedule. 

The day-to-day operation is carried out under the supervision of the 
cooperative's Administrator, under the general supervisory control of the 
three-msinber Operations Committee from the Joint Board of Directors. The 
plant personnel, in additon to the Administrator, includes two mechanics, 
a truck driver, two daily shifts of 12 hours each involving 8 persons, 
plus daily clean-up crew. This organization operates the incinerator sys- 
tem, maintains records, and coordinates with the University's Power Plant 
staff to monitor the boiler and steam production elertents of the plant. 
The Cooperative's organization also handles the collection of refuse from 
the transfer stations of five cornmunities, and handles the ash removal 
and its transfer to the landfill site. 

During 1984 modifications were made to plant piping which has increased 
steam production and revenue. Preventive maintenance during the year in- 
cluded replacing the refractory in the three lower chambers and it is 
anticipated that the upper chambers will be done in 1985. 

The latest word received from the University concerning Cogeneration is 
that UNH will quite likely purchase and maintain the turbine and genera- 
tor which will provide the Cooperative with a market for excess steam 
during the warmer months. 

The operations coiimittee welcomes Norman LeClerc of Soirersworth as a 
member and wishes to say Thank You to Robert Lowe of Northwood for his 
years of assistance on the Committee. 

The Directors of the Cooperative wish to express their deep appreciation 
for the assistance given their efforts by the University's staff as well 
as the officers and personnel of the cooperating towns. Every effort will 
be continued to keep the residents of the region informed of the progress 
in the collection, processing and disposal of the waste which is being 
handled at the plant. 



Joint Board of Directors 

Lanprey Regional Solid Waste Coop. 

/s/ Ranee G. Collins, Chairman 



HARRINGTON CONSERVATION COMMISSION 80. 

Annual Report 

During 1984 the Harrington Conservation Commission experienced a period 
of reorganization. Previous Chairperson John Barr stepped down during the 
summer after many years of Commission leadership. We of the Commission 
wDuld like to extend a special "Thank you" to John for his many years of 
dedicated service. 

The newly organized Commission is presently establishing direction and 
goals as well as recruiting additional members. In keeping with the theme 
of this years town report and with concerns of the commission members the 
coming years projects include: 

1. Consulting with the Harrington Planning Hoard concerning ground 
water protection studies. 

2. Conducting natural resource inventories of town owned lots as an 
aid in establishing best use policies. 

3. Identifying and analyzing current and future problems of growth 
in Harrington. 

The Conmision continues to monitor the use and abuse of Harringtons 
wetlands by reviewing Dredge and Fill Permits when submitted. This past 
year several permits were reviewed and one onsite investigation was con- 
ducted. 

The Commission will also be reviewing the proposed Portsmouth-Concord 
highway. With this information we hope to be able to assess the inpact 
the proposed highway will have on landowners and the Town of Harrington. 

The Harrington Conservation Commission meets each fourth Tuesday of 
the month in the Town Hall at 7 o'clock. The Commission is concerned 
with issues affecting our environment and issues affecting the rural 
nature of Harrington, its clean water, clean air, and open space. 



81. 

Questions, coinments and suggestions may be directly addressed at the 
monthly meetings or mailed to the Barrington Conservation Comnaission Harr- 
ington Town Hall. 



Current Members: 
Stephen Bel luce i 
Susan Frankel 
Stephen Jeffrey 
Dave Alia in 
Doug Reckard 
Doug Stevenson 
Raymond Spinney 
Kate Jeffery 



Chairperson 
Recorder 
Town Forester 



Respectfully submitted, 

Stephen Bel luce i 
Chairperson 



RURAL DISTRICT HEALTH COUNCIL, INC. 82. 

ANNUAL REPORT - 1984 

The Board of Directors of the Rural District Health Council has vot- 
ed to hold the per-capita tax for its irember towns of Harrington, Straff- 
ord, Milton, New Durham, Middleton, Farmington, Northwood, Nottingham, and 
Deerfield to $3.25. Even though the budget is up a little over 12% the 
agency has added funding from the United Way of Strafford County, State 
Council on Aging, State Bureau of Maternal and Child Health, billing pro- 
cess, generous donations and memorial contributions. 

The agency is a certified home health agency and provides skilled 
nursing, physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, nedical 
social services, home health aides, and has a corrprehensive Hospice pro- 
gram, certified by Blue Cross-Blue Shield and GE insurance. 

The staff has made 5,604 visits in the Care of the Sick program and 
74 skilled nursing visits and 767 home health aide hours in the Hospice 
program. 

With the DRG'S (Diagnostic Related Groupings) being iirplemented in 
the hospitals, home care has seen an increase with a change in the type 
of referrals made. More Hi-Tech nursing is being done in the home. The 
agency has a 24 hr. answering service with a nurse available 24 hrs. a 
day. 7 days a week and home visits made as indicated. 

The agency also provides an elderly maintenance health program. 
There are 211 patients enrolled in this program which includes health 
counseling of medications, monitoring blood pressure, weight checks, 
diet teaching for weight loss and blood testing of diabetes. 521 visits 
have been provided. This year the council administered 131 influenza 
shots to the elderly and found this to be a great success and will be 
inplemented as on ongoing service in this program. 

The agency also provides a Child Health program with 746 children 
enrolled frcm the ages of 0-6 years. This program includes physical 
examinations, immunizations, growth and developnent, counseling with 
referrals made to other community and state agencies for direct services 
as needed. The agency also works closely with the school nurses and 
provides immunization for school children. There have been 1,035 
children seen at clinic with 556 home visits made. The program also 
offers a Dental Clinic twice a year for children 3-6 years of age. 

A bequest to the Council may be made to further the general 
purpose of the Rural District Health Council. In lieu of flowers a 
memorial donation may be made in memory of a loved one. 

" When it cones to Home Care, there's no place like home". 

We think that says it all. 

For more information call the office at 37 No. Main St., Farming- 
ton, N. H. - 755-2202. 

Ardala Houle, R.N. 
Executive Director 



83. 



RURAL DISTRICT HEALTH COUNCIL, INC. 
ADOPTED BUDGET 1985 



DISBURSEMENTS 


ADOPTED 1984 


Salaries 


$158,170.00 


FICA 


10,598.00 


INSURANCE 




Workmen's Conp. 


3,000.00 


Director-Office Liab. 


500.00 


Unenployrtent 


1,400.00 


Prof, & Build. Liab. 


800.00 


Enployees Ins. 


3,600.00 


Travel 


27,000.00 


Telephone 


3,000.00 


Answering Service 


1,100.00 


Electricity 


1,200.00 


Fuel 


1,500.00 


Rent 


6,520.00 


Postage 


1,200.00 


Office Expense 


1,800.00 


MCH Expense 


750.00 


Medical Supplies 


750.00 


Physicals & Uniforms 


1,040.00 


Dues & Subs 


3,200.00 


Auditor 


3,300.00 


Continuing Education 


750.00 


Public Relations 


500.00 


Professional Fees (MCH) 


8,216.00 


Subtotal 


$239,894.00 


CONTRACTED SERVICES 




Social Worker 


1,850.00 


Hone Health Aide 


100.00 


Physical Therapy 


14,700.00 


Occupational Ther. 


5,750.00 


Speech Therapy 


3,450.00 


Admin. Expense 


5,575.00 


Subtotal 


$ 31,425.00 


GRAND TOTAL 


$271,319.00 


INCOME 


ADOPi'EU 1984 


Town Approp. @ $3.25 


$ 73,229.00 


Cert, of Deposit 


10,141.00 


Eltployees Ins. 


900.00 


GRANTS-MCH incl. Prof. Fee 


37,992.00 


SCOA 


7,742.00 


Interest 


2,000.00 


Medicaid-Clinic 


1,200.00 


United Way 


6,000.00 


SCTI Grant 


1,000.00 


Donations - B/P clinic 


1,100.00 


Unenploy./W.C. rebate 


1,000.00 



ADOPTED 1985 

$185,580.00 
13,020.00 



3,500.00 

500.00 
1,200.00 

900.00 
4,000.00 
24,000.00 
4,000.00 
1,100.00 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 
7,620.00 
1,300.00 
2,000.00 

750.00 
1,200.00 

800.00 
3,400.00 
3,500.00 
1,500.00 

800.00 
8,000.00 

$270,670.00 



1,850.00 
100.00 
17,600.00 
5,400.00 
1,645.00 
4,000.00 

$ 30,595.00 

$301,265.00 



ADOPTED 1985 

$ 75,147.00 

13,279.00 

900.00 

38,682.00 

8,462.00 

2,500.00 

1,500.00 

8,000.00 

1,100.00 
500.00 



SERVICE FEES 



84. 
ADOPTED 1984 ADOPTED 1985 



Skilled nursing $ 66,010,00 $ 78,500.00 

Maintenance 3,080.00 6,000.00 

Medical Supply 600.00 

3rd Party Ins. 19,000.00 24,000.00 

Part Pay 4,000.00 6,000.00 

Hone Health Aide 5,500.00 5,500.00 

Subtotal $239,894.00 $270,670.00 

CCWTRACTED SER\/ICES 

Social Worker 1,850.00 1,850.00 

Home Health Aide 100.00 100.00 

Physical Therapy 18,200.00 20,800.00 

Occup. Therapy 7,750.00 6,200.00 

Speech Therapy 3,525.00 1,645.00 

Subtotal $ 31,425.00 $ 30,595.00 

GRAND TOTAL $271,319.00 $301,265.00 



85. 



NEWMARKETT REGIONAL HEALTH CENTER 



The Newmarket Regional Health Center is a non-profit coititiunity organ- 
ization. In July of 1984, Karen Brainard, M.D., a family practitioner, 
joined the medical staff. The staff of the Health Center now consists of 
four physicians — tWD family practitioners, one pediatrician and one ob- 
stetrician/gynecologist. The Health Center has very active pediatric, pre- 
natal and adult medicine programs providing in-office, home and hospital 
care. Utilization of medical services by Harrington residents will exceed 
241 office visits in 1984. 

Preventive health services offered by the Newmarket Regional Health 
Center include nutritional counseling and prenatal classes for pregnant 
women, health education, health screenings for diabetes, glaucoma, cancer, 
and hypertension. Also offered are educational workshops, work site health 
promotion, school physicals and irmtunizations . In October, 1984 the Health 
Center offered a flu clinic in Barrington and 11 residents attended. 

The Newmarket Regional Health Center continues to offer a Self-Care 
Program for the Elderly. The program is a cooperative effort with the 
Occupational Therapy Department of the University of New Hanpshire School 
of Health Studies. The purpose of this program is to provide specific 
services to senior citizens to enable them to reitain independent and funct- 
ioning at their best level within their home and coimrunity. The Self-Care 
team includes a nurse practitioner, an occupational therapist, occupational 
therapy students, and community health workers. The team receives referr- 
als and provides services to irtprove safe functioning at home, to teach 
self-care skills and to analyze problems in functions before they occur. 

The Senior Citizen Transportation Service has enabled seniors to re- 
main independent, self-sufficient and active through the provision of trans- 
portation to needed services, including medical, shopping and recreational 
trips. It is the goal of this service to eliminate barriers v^ich frequent- 
ly obstruct elderly and handicapped individuals from maintaining self-suff- 
iciency. 

The Newmarket Regional Health Center now has five vans, three of which 
are equipped with hydraulic lifts to accommodate individuals confined to 
v^ieelchairs. This service is available to Barrington residents. 

Funds appropriated for the transportation program are used as matching 
funds. Each dollar appropriated by Barrington has enabled the Newmarket 
Regional Health Center to provide these services to your town. We would 
appreciate your continued support and would be more than happy to provide 
any additional information v^ich you may need. 

Ann H. Peters 
Executive Director 



V. SCHOOL DISTRICT MEETING 



87. 



OFFICERS OF THE HARRINGTON SCHOOL DISTRICT 

1984-85 

I 

SCHOOL BOARD 



Mr. Richard Bottom 
Dr. Heather Carney 
Mr. Peter Pa i ton 



Term Expires 1983 
Term Expires 1984 
Term Expires 1985 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 
Barry L. Clough, B.Ed., M.A. , M.Ed. 

ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENTS 
Leon R. Worthley, B.A. , M.A. 
Bernard R. Davis, B.A., M.A. , C.A.G.S. 

TREASURER 
Katherine C. Swain 

CLERK 

Lee Irons 

MmERATOR 
Frederick Tinro 

AUDITORS 
Dorothy Berry 

ATTENDANCE OFFICER 
James Bertrand 



SCHOOL NURSE- 
Carol Edmunds, R.N. 



THE BARRINGTON SCHOOL DISTRICT ELECTIONS 

MARCH 13, 1984 

At the legal neeting of the inhabitants of the Town of Barrington 
qualified to vote in district affairs the following action was 
taken on the thirteenth day of March, nineteen hundred eighty four. 

The rteeting at the Town Hall in Barrington was called to order by 

Moderator Frederick Tiinm, at ten o'clock in the forenoon, the sane 

tine the polls opened. The polls closed at six thirty in the afternoon. 

Nurtiber of eligible voters on the checklist 2,389 
Number of regular ballots cast 437 

Nimiber of absentee ballots cast 7 

The following persons were chosen as officers of the school district: 

School Board Peter Paiton (3 years) 318 

Moderator Frederick Tinm (1 Year) 373 

Treasurer Katherine Swain ( 1 Year) 381 

School Clerk Lauren Chase-Rowell (1 Year) 10 

Auditor Lynda Sanders (1 Year) 20 



Respectfully submitted, 

Lauren Chase-Rowell 
School District Clerk 



89. BARRINGTCN SCHOOL DISTRICT MEETING 

March 19, 1984 

At the legal meeting of the inhabitants of the Harrington School Dis- 
trict the following action was taken on the School Warrant on Jtonday, the 
nineteenth of March, nineteen hundred eighty four. 

The meeting at the Harrington Town Hall was called to order by Moder- 
ator, Frederick Timm, at seven thirty in the afternoon. 

Article 1 : On notion made by Richard Bottom and seconded by Lawrence 
Dubois it was voted by secret ballot to see if the school district will 
raise and appropriate the sum of eight hundred fifty thousand dollars 
($850,000) for the construction of an addition to the Barrington Element- 
ary School v^ich will provide eight additional classrooms and an enlarged 
cafeteria, for originally equipping said addition, for architectural and 
other service fees, for site development including septic system and for 
any other items incidental to and necessary for said construction; to de- 
termine whether said appropriation shall be raised by issuance or sale 
of bonds or notes on the credit of the Barrington School District in 
accordance with the provisions of RSA Chapter 33 amended; to authorize 
the School Board to invest said monies and use the interest earned there- 
on for said project; to authorize the School Board to obtain State or 
other aid which may be available; to authorize the School Board to deter- 
mine the time and place of payment on principal and interest, fixing the 
rate of interest, the provision for the sale of notes and or bonds, and 
all other matters in connection therewith; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. 

The meeting continued as the ballots were counted. 

Article 2 ; On motion made by Lawrence Dubois and seconded by Richard 
Bottom, it was voted to hear the reports of agents, auditors, committees, 
or officers chosen, and pass any vote relating thereto. 

Article 3 : Article 3 was read by the Moderator as follows: To see 
if the school district will authorize the school board to withdraw after 
July 1, 1984 in accordance with the provisions of RSA 35, an amount not 
to exceed sixteen thousand four hundred forty-three dollars and forty 
cents ($15,000 in principal and $1,443.40 in interest) from the school 
district Capital Reserve Fund for the purpose of financing part of the 
cost of constructing an addition to the Barrington Elementary School. 
Passage of this article will reduce the amount of the bond voted in 
Article 1 by a like amount. 

On motion made by Lawrence Dubois and seconded by Robert McChesney, 
it was voted to table Article 3 pending the results of Article 1, and 
to move on to Article 4. It was carried. 

Article 4 : On n,\ion made by Lawrence Dubois and seconded by Richard 
Bottom it was voted to see vihat action the school district wishes to take 
on the report of the High School Comtnittee. 

A report with recomnnendations was then explained by Peter Paiton, 
the Chairman of the High School Study Committee. After much discussion 
concerning available high school choices, current and future enrollment 
of high schools, transportation, tuition payments, contracts, and laws 



90. 
(see Annual Report, pages 125 to 134) a motion was made to move the pre- 
vious question. 

On motion made by Burt Andrews and seconded by Julian Olivier it was 
vcted to approve the action of the Harrington School District's High School 
Coitinittee. It was carried. 

On motion made by David Edsall and seconded by Patricia Nev^ll it was 
voted to direct the school board to implement the recoirmendations beginning 
on page 132 and .ending on page 134 of the 1983 Town of Barrington Annual 
Report, 

An amendment was then made by Julian Olivier as follows: that the 
previous motion would remain the same with the exception of changing 
the existing sentence: "The contract should be for a four to five year 
period with a five year option," to: "The contract should be for the most 
favorable time period negotiated by the Barrington School Board." And 
that the next three lines on page 133 in the Annual Report be deleted. 

The amendment was seconded by Sandra Dodge and passed by a show of 
cards. 

The motion made by David Edsall with the added aitendn^nt by Julian 
Olivier was seconded by Patricia Nev*iall. It was also carried by a 
show of cards. 

The results of Article I were ready to be announced. The polls opened 
at 8:52 P.M. A total of 290 ballots were cast, and a 2/3rds vote required. 
The results were as follows: YES: 192; NO: 98. Artilce I was defeated. 
The polls closed at 10:33 P.M. 

On motion made by John Parsons and seconded by Clinton Lane it was 
voted that the school district reconsider the vote taken on Article I, 
and that said reconsideration be taken in accord with RSA 33.8-A and that 
after all business has been transacted under the other articles in the 
warrant the meeting be recessed until 7:30 P.M. on Monday, i^^ril 9, 1984 
at the Town Hall in Barrington, N.H. at which time the school district 
will reconsider Artile I. 

On motion made by Lawrence Dubois and seconded by Julian Olivier it 
was voted to table Artile 3 until ^ril 9, 1984 v^en Article I will be 
reconsidered. 

Article 5 : On motion made by Heather Carney and seconded by Richard 
Bottom it was voted that the school district will raise and appropriate 
the sum of nineteen thousand dollars ($19,000) to add a seventh school 
bus for the Elementary and Middle Schools in order to reduce the length 
of the present routes. The motion was not carried. 

Article 6: The Moderator read Article 6 as follows: to see what sum 
of money the school district will raise and appropriate for the support 
of schools, for the salaries of school district officials and agents, 
for capital construction, and for the payment of statutory obligations 
of the district. 

On motion made by Lawrence Dubois and seconded by Heather Carney it 
was voted to table Article 6 until Pipril 9, 1984 v^en Articles 1 and 3 
WDuld also be reconsidered. 



91. 

Article 7 : On motion made by Richard Bottom and seconded by Darrell 
Ford it was voted to authorize the school board to make application for 
and to receive and expend in the name of the school district, such ad- 
vances, grants in aid, or other funds for educational purposes as may 
now or thereafter be forthcoming from the United States Government, and/ 
or State Agencies; private agencies; and/or other sources in accordance 
with the provisions of RSA 198: 20-b. 

Article 8 : The Moderator read Article 8 as follows: to choose agents 
and comiittees in relation to any subject embraced in this warrant. 

On motion by Lawrence Dubois and seconded by when Articles 

1,3, and 6 would be reconsidered. 

Article 9: On motion made by Lawrence Dubois and seconded by Patricia 
Newhall it was voted to transact any other business which may legally come 
before this meeting. 

The school board agreed to make their best effort in acquiring a dec- 
ision from the Water Supply and Pollution Control Board on the septic 
system for the proposed addition to the Barrington Elementary School. 

There being no other business to corns before this meeting, it was 
adjourned at twenty seven minutes past eleven o'clock in the afternoon. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Lauren Chase - Rowell 
School District Clerk 



BARRINGTON SCHOOL DISTRICT MEETING 92. 

I^ril 9, 1984 

At the legal meeting of the inhabitants of the Harrington School District 
the following action was taken on the School Warrant on Monday, the ninth 
of i^ril, nineteen hundred eighty- four. The legal meeting held on this 
night had been recessed from the March nineteenth, nineteen hundred eighty 
four meeting. 

The meeting at the Barrington Town Hall was called to order by Moderator 
Frederick Tinin, at seven thirty in the afternoon. 

Article 1 : Having previously been presented numerous times, the read- 
ing of Article I was waived without objection. Then, on motion made by 
Lawrence EX±)ois and seconded by Heather Carney, Article I was voted in- 
expedient to legislate. 

During the discussion concerning Article I, Richard Bottom explained 
the failure for the approval of the septic system design of the Elementary 
School and briefed the audience in the alternative of facilatating modular 
units to be attached to the Middle School for usage by two fourth grades. 

Article 3 ; The Moderator read Article 3 as follows: To see if the 
school district will authorize the school board to withdraw after July 1, 
1984 in accordance with the provisions of RSA 35, an amount not to exceed 
sixteen thousand four hundred forty-three dollars and forty cents ($15,000 
in principal and 1,1443.40 in interest) from the school district Capital 
Iteserve Fund for the purpose of financing part of the cost of constructing 
an addition to the Barrington Elementary School. Passage of this article 
will reduce the amount of the bond voted in Article 1 by a like amount. 

On motion made by Lawrence Dubois and seconded by Heather Carney, 
Article 3 was voted inexpedient to legislate. The vote was carried by a 
show of cards. 

Article 6 ; The Moderator read Article 6 as follows: To see v^iat sum 
of money the school district will raise and appropriate for the support 
of schools, for the salaries of school district officials and agents, for 
capital construction, and for the payment of statutory obligations of the 
district. 

Lawrence EX±ois moved Article 6. Richard Bottom seconded it, and 
offered the following amendment: "I move that the budget figure of two 
million, two hundred and thirteen thousand, eight hundred eighty four 
dollars (2,213,884.00) be increased by forty two thousand dollars 
(42,000.00) and the school board be authorized to lease-purchase a two 
classroom modular unit and add two new teachers to the Elementary School 
staff." The motion to the amendment was seconded by Lawrence Dubois 

After some discussion Robert Shepard questionned the comment in 
Article 6 concerning the phrase "for capital construction", 
and requested clarification. Richard Bottom explained that the phrase 
was intended to cover actions necessary for the addition to the Elementary 
School, and since it had been voted inexpedient to legislate an amendment 
should be considered to delete the phrase "for capital construction" 
from the motion. 



93. 

The result was an aitendment itade by Robert Shepard and seconded by 
Richard Bottom to delete the words " for capital construction " frcxn the 
article. It passed. 

A motion was made by Charter Weeks to move the amendment on the floor. 
A vote was taken and it was carried by a show cards. 

The original motion was read by the Moderator. .An amendment was made 
by Jane Olivier i as follows: "to delete the words from the motion of hiring 
two new teachers." She then reamended the motion to read: "to consider 
the matter of leasing the modular units separately from the main budget." 
The amendment was seconded by Ken Grossman. It was not carried. 

After much discussion, many questions and comments, George Musler re- 
quested that the parlimentary situation be sited for the record. 

Moderator Frederick Tinm proceeded with the amendment on the floor. 
The vote was carried to increase the budget figure $2,213,884.00 by 
$42,000.00 and to authorize the school board to lease-purchase a two 
classroom modular unit and add two new teachers to the Elementary School 
staff . 

With Article 6 now having been amended, on motion made by Lawrence 
Dubois and seconded by Richard Bottom it was voted that the school district 
will raise and appropriate for the support of schools, for the salaries of 
school district officials and agents, and for the payment of statutory 
obligations of the district; and that the figure of $2,213,844.00 be in- 
creased by $42,000.00 and the school board be authorized to lease /purchase 
a two classroom modular unit and add two new teachers to the Elementary 
School staff. It was passed. 

A motion was then made by Sam Chittick and seconded by George 
Skoolicas to amend the article to read: "that $42,000.00 be added to 
the 1983-1984 figure of $1,904,116.00 on page 11 of the Barrington District 
Budget. This amendment was withdrawn by Sam Chittick and George Skoolicas 
shortly- afterwards . 

On motion made by Paul Gasowski and seconded by Sally Ferullo voted 
to propose an amendment to add $30,000.00 to the budget for the intent 
of hiring full time aids to augment the teachers in the high teacher to 
pupil ratio. A count of cards was taken and the amendment was not carried: 

YES: 67 NO: 158 

The amended Article 6 with a budget totaling $2,255,884.00 was voted 
on and carried. 

Article 8 : On motion made by Lawrence Dubois and seconded by 
Heather Carney it was voted to choose agents and committees in relation 
to any subject embraced in this warrant. 

Lawrence IDubois then requested volunteers for conmittees to study 
new proposals for an addition to existing school, a new school, new loc- 
ation, an addition to the Middle School and a high school. Heather 
Carney added that these conmittees would work closely together. 



94. 
On notion made by Bill Dean and seconded by D. Cas?well it was voted 
by anendnent that the district members present would select a building 
committee to carry out the following: 

1. to evaluate recent coimiittee reports regarding school 
population growth and projections for the Town of Harr- 
ington and appropriate nearby towns; 

2. to investigate all practical ways by which the Barr- 
ington School District could provide the necessary 
classroom space for continuing quality education of 
our entire growing student population. 

3. to consider possible approaches to school building 
construction that could provide the necessary educat- 
ional facilities to meet present and future school re- 
quirenents, including consideration of various building 
sites, 

4. to inquire in detail into forming a cooperative school 
district with the Town of Strafford and other adjacent 
towns, and to fully evaluate practicality of constructing 
a Junior High - high school facility for such district, 
and of purchasing and iitproving the buildings and 
grounds of the Austin Gate Acadeit^ property; 

5. to report their findings and recommendations to the 
Harrington School District at the earliest possible 
time. 

The aitendment was then modified to read that the Harrington School 
District would have the power to appoint a building committee to carry 
out numbers one through five (1-5) in the proposed amendment stated 
above. It was carried. 

Article 9 ; On motion made by Lawrence Dubois and seconded by 
Heather- Carney it was voted to transact any other business which legal- 
ly come before this meeting. 

On behalf of the School Board, Lawrence Dubois thanked the various 
conmittees for their time and effort in searching for the embettering 
of the education in Harrington. These conmittees included the high 
school study committee, the growth study committee, the building com- 
mittee arid the space needs comnittee. 

There being no other business to come before this meeting, it 
was adjourned at six minutes past eleven o'clock in the afternoon. 

Respectfully sulanitted, 

Lauren Chase-Rowell 
School District Clerk 



95. 



The State of New Hampshire 



To the Inkabitanli oj the School district in the tovm of B.irrlnRton 
qualified to vote in district affairs: 

You are hereby notified to moot at the Town llnll In snid district on the 

12th day of March 1985 . at 10:00 O'clock In the foru noon, 

to act upon the following subjects: 

1. To choose a Moderator for the coming year. 

2. To choose a Clerk for the ensuing year. 

3. To choose a Member of the School Board for the ensuing three years. 



To choose a Treasurer for the ensuing year. 



5. To choose Auditors, and all other necessary officers and agents for 
the ensuing year. 



Given under our hands at said liarrlngton this seventh day of Jnnuary 19 85 
Heather Carncv S School Board 

::■".;■:'■■;'" ) 

A true copy of Warrant— Attest: 

;^Wh';4 .iiqt.t.4") 

Heather Carney ) School Board 

Peter Paitoii 



The State of New Hampshire 



96. 



To the Inhabitants of the School district in the town of BARRINGTON 
qualified to vote in district affairs: 

You are hereby notified to meet at the TOWN HALL in said district on the 
18th day of March 1985 , at 7:30 o'clock in the after noon, 
to act upon the following subjects: 

1. To hear the reports of agents, auditors, committees, or officers chosen, and 
pass any vote relating thereto. 

2. To see if the School District wishc:; to authorize the School Board by and through 
a committee to conduct a search for a minimum of twenty (20) acres of land to 
satisfy the future construction/space needs of the District, said committee to re- 
port back to a Special School District Meeting with purchase recommendations, and 
further to authorize and direct the School Board, prior to said Special School 
District Meeting, to acquire an option or options on suitable parcels of land in 
accordance with terms and conditions which the School Board deems necessary and 
appropriate, and further raise and appropriate the sum of ten thousand dollars 
($10,000) to be used for the acquisition of said option, soil analysis, legal 
research, site preparation and all other matters in connection therewith. 

3. To see if the School District wishes to raise and appropriate the sum of five 
thousand dollars ($5,000) for the purpose of retaining a consultant to conduct 
a space utilization study of the Elementary School. 

4. To see if the School District will vote to authorize the establishment of a 
cooperative school district planning committee to study the advisability of 
establishing a cooperative school district with Barnstead and/or Nottingham 
in accordance with RSA 195:18. 

5. To see if the School District will vote to increase the Barrington School Board 
from three members to five members, said new members to be elected at the 1986 
School District elections for a two year term and a three year term respective- 
ly- 

6. To see what sum of money the School District will raise and appropriate for the 
support of schools, for the salaries of School District officials and agents, 
for capital construction, and for the payment of statutory obligations of the 
District. 

7. To see if the School District will authorize the School Board to make application 
for and to receive and expend in the name of the School District, such advances, 
grants-in-aid, or other funds for educational purposes as may now or thereafter 
be forthcoming from the United States Government, and/or State agencies; private 
agencies; and/or other sources in accordance with the provisions of RSA 198:20-b. 

8. To choose agents and committees in relation to any subject embraced in this 
warrant. 

9. To transact any other business which may legally come before this meeting. 
Given under our hands at said this day of February 19 85 

Richard Bottom, Chairman \ 

. . .H.eather_ Carney ) School Board 

■ ■ -Pe.ter. -Bai.tion | 

A true copy of Warrant--Attest: 

Richard Bottom, Chairman 



.y?.^?!\e.^ . .Carnev ^ School Boar 

Peter Paiton 



H O 



U oo 









^ 




















in 




ss 




4) 
00 








u 








n 














i) 


<-> 


C 


ID V 













•o 






nj 






a-H 








O. 3 


CO 




3 


3 cr 


to 


(V. 


H 


t/l w 



dJ •'-' o 



m 0) > 



»3- m in 

in in 00 



98. 



< 4J u 



O O 



99. 



47,790 

35,158 

45,000 

1,095 

175,158 

38,000 

5,160 


356.665 
38,931 


38,931 

637.504 

48,170 


o o 

oo' -J 
vr in 


54,050 

138,029 
6.900 



8.650 
36,285 
24,486 
46,500 

4,026 
170,136 
30,000 

2,950 


323,033 
30,971 


30,971 

576,247 

17,020 


o o 

O (N 


56,270 

82,058 
6,900 

88,958 



•H D. U U 

u cr CO nj 



c c c c 0) D. X 

n) n3 <n fi oC <yi iii 

(X. cu a, cu • • • 

t- u ^- k. c c c 

u u 01 01 ID n m 



^ ^ 



•5 ^ 



100. 



a> o 

tsi O 

O CT^ 

OO vO 



- r~. o O 

n (N O CN 


O O CT- 


T> -O r- vD 
n in 


O S 



101. 






<J>u^tOOOr^OOOOOO 


?3 p^ ?i 


o 

3 


,,„,,. ^ ^ , ,1 


213 

2.258 
- 213 


i 



3 -H -H 



rt J^ ^ 



VI REPORT OF SCHOOL OFFICIALS 



103. 



BARRINGTON SCHOOL DISTRICT 

GENERAL FUND 

STATEMENT OF REVENUES 

TOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1984 



Federal Aldi 

ECIA - Chapter 2 (Block Grant) 



7,285.16 



SUte Aldi 
Sweepstakes 
School Building Aid 
Area Vocational School Aid 
Handicapped Aid 
Gas Tax Refunds 
Other (Poeto in the Schofcl Project) 

Local Taxation 

Other Sources I 

Interest on Savings 
Capital Reserve Interest 
Regular Day School Tuition 
Filing Fees 
Capital Reserve Transfer 

TOTAL REVENUE 



$ 15,010.60 

9,079.73 

14,426.59 

46,423.01 

4,041.66 

500.00 


89.481.59 




1,706,892.00 


$ 7,984.10 

1,483.79 

1,996.63 

3.00 

15,000.00 


26.467.52 




$ 1.830.126.27 



HARRINGTON SCHOOL DISTRICT 104. 

FOOD SERVICE FUND 
STATEMENT OF REVENUES 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1984 



REVENUE 

Federal Aid - Child Nutrition $ 41,099.00 

Local Taxation 200.00 

Other Sources: 

Daily Sales $51,641.19 

Interest on Savings 513.29 52,154.48 

Total Revenue $ 93,453.48 



Harrington, N.H. School District Capital Reserve Fund 

Record of Trust Fund Income and Expenditures 

Name of Fund Harrington, N. H. School District Capital Reserve Fund 

Naive of Donor Harrington, N. H. School District 

Purpose of Creation To finance all or part of new School District 

construction, HankEast Term deposit certificate. 
No. 508845 % 11.05% for lb years (Aug. 23, 1983) 
Income to accumulate. 

As of June 30, 1984 P 15,000.00 I 1,483.79 



105. 



Q 






ggs 



v;^vna^^O O O f^OO O 


^<sj rg 




^_^S 








oo"c^ 


g^^ ^r> 


4» -< 



O^OQiAOCOvOOO CO— O U~\C^^OO 

,_^00^O^^O<*^^AO^O ^*A^ CviJCMVA 



CSI vO _ 

^ o o 



"^^. 


?R^g 


:o§^^ 


SS82 


s^s 


mSS 


P^§ 


£gJS 


vo'vA-" 


if"o 


vA 


>A 



..QM « ....--, .. .. . ... 






E^^ S 



;§ 



£ 



8 


§ 


8§ 


8 


888 


c^ 
o 


l^^g 


^s;^ 


>A 


C\J 


Ov « 


- 


Os^ w 



E e-irc t- f^r-\r^r--CTs<Nj r\so S csi o o i 

< cot- < o^<^c^r^o^oco cjvo^— < 



p e Id < u oj E 

nj 0)0) trrt (Ji"HoJ> 

CrHlH-fJqf -^ l^rHtJ^jP. -^ C H3-P-H3 S&l 



OCO^f^-^O lOp 0-yS^H30 IOC ti 

V p^i-H»iou) 4) J3 .H.HOJ CO h^-^^^+J oix: 



s.^ 



■3 3S 



rl U lA I 



5pa>.rHr^a)03aio-*-» o«-h(*>co34)o rtP 

&JH<0(C(^/lf-<MO «)t-.<Oi-cOt/lHcvj OH 

♦"0) --^^v ^ p. "-^-^ --..o 

IJCMOOOOOO Vlfvj^rvJOOOOO 



o. u 



00pC?^00--0 I'oOpQr^OO-:" 



O »-< — r-. ^ vA^ vO 



O -1 •-< O O Q < 

C^^ O vO o -• — -J • 

\or^ o*A Q — r>(^s 



106, 



» CD v^ y> \^ ^^ v>j V 
o o 6u) o o - 



o o o o I 



Ti z > ti c/^ tn 3 

^ n r* > n n n 

CLOt) f c 3- D- M 

(too o o Hi 

l-J c* M PI O O 1-' 



o o o 

H c/5 m 
<t c o- 



S 3 






oo 
o o 



vj >oJ 6 
o o 
o o M 



I M (t 

•id « 

O M 



■- o 

o 



It c 



(o o 

►- o 

^*) VJ — 
^jj vj o to 
o o c 

O -3 13 O 

C 3 I 3 
Be* W 

H O c* W 



g£l 



o o o o o o o - 



O CD O *r 



o o 



ooooooooo 
ooooooooo 



1^ 00 00 O vD 
VJ ►- )-■ O Vj\ 



N) O 

O^ CD CT' 
O ^ VJ M CD C^ C^ 

c^ o >^ 5 ' 



o •-' o o V 



VJ V^ OD O O^ 



vo ►- O ^ ~0 OdC 
l\> O VJ vO -J O C 



)0 OOO-'OOO'-'O 



vO o 



CT^ O 



107. 



OvOOOPJW^O->c\J>/^u^ 
OvOO>r\^OOONOCN-(\JCN- 

O-iOv0O>A(vj>AC0O00 
ooo or^c^c^o -hCOO^ 



O J -* -H ON ( 



^S 8 



r^ On O I 



lAON (\4 ON NO (\i 



QnOOOn^CNIO-hnOCNJ? 

5 v^^ rt S)^cjonOnoo^ 



^ ^oooo:N?3,ggJ^g^5S'^ 


?lg^S§ 


^.-iO^COvoOU>'AQC^t^rt>r\r^CNJ 

c^cNjoo ^<^^^ cC^^:X. rNrN^ o ON 


■3 ^^c^° 



Q « On^ <NJ 3- O CM c^ 

NO oo tNJ U^^ inOO (NJ 



B^S 


SR 


§88^gS 


3- o o NO S ^ 


^S 


D CN- UN, 


P 


-S^H 


u-^ fN- rN r^ On r\ 


§^ 



88 



O O O O O O O I 
O O O O O O O ' 



OOOOOOQvA-JCDO Oi 

O'-'<M»A000>l<*v>A-iC\J.-i vr,^ 



oooooooooooooooo 
oooooooooooooooo 

odooovnoocAooooooo 

OOOtN-u^oOOOrMACOOOCMOOO 
ONOCTvr^^(M»naowNOrNovr,j-orN. 

^ rt wr-j u-\orN^CNj 




^ i/>\0 NO vO NO CN- 



• O (0 






108. 



I 1^ 




§ 


§ 


? 


° 


o 


S 


w 


</^ 


*4 







r>j 








'-' 




s^ 


s 


vO 


^ 






















(^ 










^0 


*» 


«»] 


«»] 


«»| 



? ^ 



c^ r^ 


s 


r-\ 


rvi 


o (•■ 






















































<A 


f» 


<» 


v> 



o o o o 
o o o o 

^ lA ^ O 
OD J- lACO 
J- 00 CT^v^D 

so r^ oj o 



^ - 



o o 


o 


o 


8 










^ 


Q 








g 


















(^ ON 






\o 








s 


t>* 




<A 


»>l 



t> 3 a 1) 
h u) o cc 

n (1) 



O O Q O Q 1 

O ^ -H ?J (^S 

O CVJ <M CM CSI < 







e^ 



109. 



g§S5 

o o s: M 

£ ?S 

■< CO H 



?:§SS58§ 


2^£ 


^ 




^§H^S^ 


^Sl 


i 








§■ 




^§2^^§§ 


£g^l 


s 




5 w a cv ^_ 


iii 


^ 




2* cC"^ 


-^ 


3 




w 




60 





vO O O 'H c^ o o 
(*\ O vO u^ c^ o o 

r^ O CT- CD CO C7^ >A 
X-, »n ^ -4 !\J vO r^ 





1 










o o 


o o o 


o 


Sg|| 


H 


o o 


O C3 O 


o 


HOOL 
VICE 
EXP 
ED J 


< 


ii 


(N 5 >/^ 




<J) OC u. O 




« 


c^-^-c^- 




5^lr„ 


^ 


<A 




«H 



T3 

O -C 
O t> 



cx e 



I J m -o P- P. 
u o 3 -H 

in rH O rH p CO 3 
U) o -H « b. ,0" • 
4) O > > T) W C-> 

c £ (h « c o in 
^ u V ft o p o -^ 
to CO CO f- z t ovi i; 
(hct-oooooo 



t Si g 

o c o >i 



For 0«.ce Use Only 


" 


110. 
ATEMENT OF RECEIPTS 




1 1 




Ci 


;U Uoc Dist 














i L 


FROM WHOM 


DESCRIPTION 


AMOUNT 


OFFICE 
USE 
ONLY 


, 


fl7-n»-83 


Town of BarrlriRtoii 


Appropriat Ions 


1,707,092 


no 




? 




State of Nil 


School Luncli 


3f,,722 


00 


rvdcT.ii 


3 


! CD 


State of m 


Unemployment Comp . 


176 


00 




i 




SL.ite of NH 


Poets in School Pro] . 


500 


00 




5 


06-5D-8i 


State of NH 


Block Grant 


7,285 


16 




6 




State of NH 


Reira. Transportation 


14,426 


59 




7 


; 


State of NH 


Catastrophic Aid 


4,853 


29 




8 




State ol NH 


Sweepstakes 


15,010 


60 


92,901.0' 


9 


, 


State of Nil 


School BldR. Aid 


9,079 


73 




10 


i 


State of NH 


Special Ed. 


41,569 


72 




n 






Tuition 


6,687 


89 


6,687.8' 


12 
13 




Barrlngton Schools 


Lunch Program 


51,842 


22 






! 


Strafford Nat'l Banl< 


Interest 


8,497 


J9 




1 




D. Cius:,/E. ;;i,lcld 


2,332 


oS 




15 


! i 




B. Cross/B. Shield 


«9 


u — 




16 






B. Cross/B. Shield 


66 


4T 




17 


; 1 




B. Cross/B. Shield 


179 


31 




18 








2,517 


93 - 




19 


. 1 


SAU #44 


Reim. School Lunch 


24 


62 




70 


1 


SAU #AA 




13 


85 




21 


1 


SAU //44 


Siippl i PS 


7 


40 




72 




SAU #44 




172 


00 




22 


i j 


Assoc. School Principals 




45 


00 




24 




Charles W. Varney Co. 




1,475 


00 




26 


! 


D. Phillips 




17 


88 




26 


i 


Middle School 


Supplies 


37 


06 




27 




Middle School 




22. 


00 


1 


28 




Radio Shack 




1 . 


21 


1 


29 






Library 




7. 


50 




30 






Miscellaneous 


Text Books-Furniture Da 


lage 339. 


99 




31 






Watson Transporfation 


Refund 


341. 


00 




32 




Kotex machine 


Refund 


16. 


40 




13 




C. Clements 


Soccer Uniforms 


3 


35 




34 


1 


NH Retirement 


Reim. Deduction 


3. 


00 




35 






Delta (IJental 


Reim. Deduction 


79. 


II 




36 


r 1 




IRS ' 


Reim. Excise Tax-Tel eph 


.ne 25. 


40 




37 






Individuals 


FilinR Fees 


3. 


00 




38 






Exeter Handkerchief 


Reim. 


10. 


95 




39 






A Jennison 




89. 


00 




40 






D. Terry 


Ck. Returned-Insufflcie 


It 12. 


60 




41 






H. Allen 


Ck. Returned-Insufficie 


It 5. 


56 


68,481.3^ 


42 
















43 
















44 
















45 
















46 
















47 
















48 
















49 
















50 
















51 
















52 
















53 
















54 
















55 






















TOTAL RECEIPTS 


DURING YEAR 


1.911.884. 


32.„ 





111. 

DEPARIMENT OF REVENUE ADMINISTRATION 

Concord, N.H, 03301 
TO: Mr. Richard Bottcro 

Barrington School Board 
6 Lake shore Drive 
Barrington, N.H. 03825 

Your report of appropriations voted and property taxes to be raised for 
the 1984-85 school year has been approved on the following basis: 



TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS 



REVENUES & CREDITS AVAILABLE 
TO REDUCE SCHOOL TAXES 



$2,255,884.00 



Unreserved Fund Balance 41,129.00 

Revenue From State Sources: 

Sweepstakes 15,205.00 

School Building Aid 8,463.00 

Area Vocational School 11,000.00 

Handicapped Aid 41,570.00 

Other Catastrophic 6,097.00 

Revenue From Federal Source: 

ESEA - Block Grant 6,900.00 

Child Nutrition Program 38,000.00 

Other Federal Sources Inpact Aid (PL874) 1,000.00 

Local Rev. Other Than Taxes: 

Other Local Sources Sales 44,058.00 

TOTAL SCHOOL REVENUES & CREDITS 213,422.00 

DISTRICT ASSESSMENT 2,042,462,00 

TOTAL REVENUES AND DISTRICT ASSESSMENT 2,255,884.00 

David J. Power, Commissioner 



BARRINGTON SCHOOL DISTRICT 

SCHEDULE OF SALARIES 

FDR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1984 



112. 



Mason, Bernard - Supervising Principal 

Rice, Constance - Elementary Principal 

Brinknan, Beverly 

Brown, Brenda 

Burkhardt, Ernest 

Clarke, Carl 

Gram, Frances 

Cullinan, Kim - Sp. Ed. 

Daenz, Cathlen 

Davison, John 

Day, Nancy 

Donahue, Dorothy 

Edington, Gretchen 

Edmunds, C^rol - Nurse 

Felker, Shirley 

Fortier, John 

Halliwell, Jeannae 

Hart, Walter - Guidance 

Huckins, Sarah 

Kelly, Denise 

Kershaw, Stephen 

Kurtz, Susan 

Lenzi, Pamela 

Long, Janice 

Lund^ren, Heidi - Sp. Ed. 

McGrail, Kathleen - Sp. Ed. 

McGrath, Catherine 

McRae, Bianca 

Monteith, Joyce 

Moreau, Abigail 

Morrill, Christopher 

Nye, Brenda 

O'Keefe, Janice 

Olivier, Jane 

Parks, Bobbl 

Ross, Gwen - Sp. Ed. 

Sheaff, Althea 

Tlbbetts, Heidi - Speech 

Vallee, Pamela 

Vallery, Emily 

Wall, Christine 



$ 27, 400.00 
17,600.00 
15.555.00 
15.075.00 
11,715.00 
16,635.00 
16,235.00 
13.775.00 
13,635.00 
16,435.00 
10,868.88 
16,035.00 
14,595.00 
10,046.00 
14,595.00 

6,780.40 
12,315.00 

2,010.97 
16,035.00 
11,235.00 
13,285.00 
10,755.00 
13,155.00 
16,035.00 
11,080.58 
11,255.00 
10,275.00 
11,715.00 
732.27 
13.755.00 

5,109.68 
11,715.00 
14,715.00 

5,838.00 
13.155.00 
12,815.00 
15.675.00 
11,735.00 

4,110.00 

12,089.55 

166.62 

$497.742.95 



FOOD SERVICE PROGRAM REPORT 
19 83-1984 



During thl8 past year, I have attended numerous workshops with the NHSFCA and 
State Department of Food and Nutrition Service. These workshops focused on the Type 
A meal pattern, its requirements, changes and new concepts other schools in the 
National Porgram exchange with each other. 

Our Breakfast Program was Introduced to the Harrington Schools three (3) years 
ago. We have found this program beneficial to the students. Children come into tha 
cafeteria directly from their busses, and enjoy eating breakfast in a relaxed, un- 
hurried atmosphere. We serve breakfast to over. 100 students daily. Some of the old- 
er children purchase two or have breakfast at home, arrive ac school and find they 
are still hungry and will come In to eat breakfast again. 

Our Lunch Program participation has increased considerably. We are serving 
approximately SOX of the students daily. Offering the students choices of menus 
(soup and sandwich lunch, chef salad lunch or regular hot lunch) has I feel, attrib- 
uted to this. This supplement gives the students greater variety in choosing their 
noontime meal. 

The program menus are prepared from "scratch recipes" rather than the ready-to- 
serve products on the market today. Using this method we can control salts, fats 
and unnecessary additives in our children's diets as well as keeping the cost per 
plate to a minimum. 

In the Middle School the eighth grade Home Economics students have been plan- 
nlhg, preparing and serving the lunches for both Elementary and Middle Schools. 
One day each month a unit (18 students) is responsible for the entire operation for 
one day. In addition to planning a nutrious and attractive meal in class, they pre- 
pare, serve and clean-up with the supervision of cafeteria staff. This experience 
provides greater understanding of the Hot Lunch Program and nutricion and instills 
the pride of accomplishment. We have been very proud of the positive attitudes 



(» !"• 



shown by the students and the satisfaction they have found In a Job well done. The 
entire cafeteria staff have enjoyed working with these students and look forward 
each year to new students involvement in the Food Service Program. 

In the Elementary School students are preparing class menus with the help of 
their teachers. Students may then submit to the Lunch Manager a balanced menu that 
they would like to have served. On that day they may help prepare and serve this 
meal. We hope to have parents come in and have lunch with their children. 

Students at the Elementary School may purchase a morning snack at recess con- 
sisting of several choices sOch as crackers with peanut butter, fruit slices, milki 
Juice, hot cocoa and Yogurt. 

Recently the School Board approved the purchase of a Stainless Steel Prepara- 
tion table for the Elementary School kitchen from the program funds in an effort to 
utilize limited space in this facility. 

Again this year, with the approval of our Principal, Mr. Bernard L. Mason, we 
have developed a program for Special Education students to work in the cafeteria 
serving meals. When these students work in the cafeteria, they are reimbursed on 
Fridays as a payroll type bookkeeping procedure that the students handle themselves. 
This Includes counting money, making change, signing receipts, learning responsibility, 
reading schedules and following directions. This program has been very successful for 
the students. 

I have enjoyed working for the Harrington School District as Director of our Food 
Service Programs and will continue to improve these programs through workshops and 
various types of Information and literature offered by the State Department of Food 
and Nutrition Services and NHSFSA. 

I wish to express my thanks to my staff: Mrs. Janet Letendre, Mrs. Chris Fogg, 
Mrs. Pat Minor, Mrs. Bev Heffernan, Mrs. Sue Dombroski, Mrs. Donna True, Mrs. Gail 
Lavole and to Mr. Mason and Mrs. Rice for their assistance and support. 

Carmelle Morrison 
Food Service Director 



115. 



BAHRINGTON SCHOOL DISTRICT 
BAUNCfc; SHtET 
JUNE 30, 1984 



ASSCTS 

Current Assets 
Cash 

Investments 

Intergovermantal Receivable 
Other Receivables 
Inventory 

Total Current Assets 

LIABILITIES Ic RIND EQUITY 

Current Liabilities 
Other Payables 
Accrued Expenses 
Payroll Deductions 

Total Current Liabilities 

Fun d Equity 

Unreserved Retained Earnings 
Reserve for Special Purposes 
Unreserved Fund Balance 

Total Fund Equity 

TOTAL LIABILITIES 4 FUND EQUITY 



CAPITAL 
RESKRVE 

$ 0.00 
16,483.79 


GENERAL 

$ 62.090.52 

4,041.66 
1,936.40 


FOOD 

SERVICE 

$ 8,029.86 
12.606.00 
6,507.00 


1 16.483.79 


$ 68,068.58 


$ 27,142.86 



$ 16.483.79 

^ 16.483.79 
^ 16,463.79 



$ 1.488.48 

24,095.51 

1.355.69 

$ 26.939.68 



i 41.128.90 
$ 66.068.58 



1,430.83 

1 L42CU82 

$ 25,712.03 

^ 2?.712.03 
$ 27,142.86 



116. 



BARRINCTON SCHOOL DISTRICT 

ANALYSIS OF FUND EQUITY 

JUNE 30, 1984 



Fund Equity July 1, I983 

Additional 
Hevenuo 

Adjustment of 6/3O/83 Payables 
Inventory Adjustment 
Underestimate ol Receivable 


$ 


CAPITAL 

RESERVE 

0.00 

16.483.79 


$ 


GENERAL 
61,462.97 

1.806,357.32 
2,272.31* 


POOD 

SERVICE 
$ 18.722.42 

93,453.48 

2,520,51 
1.00 


Total Additions 

Deletions: 
Expenditures 
Catastrophic Aid Adjustment 


i 


16,483.79 


$ 


1,808,629.83 

1,824,110,61 

4,863.29 

1.828,963.90 


$ 95.974.99 
88.985.38 


Total Deletions 




0.00 


88,985.38 


Fund Equity June 30, 1984 


1 


1-6,482.79 


L 


1*1.128.90 


$ 25.?12.03 



Notesi 

• 6/30/83 Payables not paid 



117. 



.-H O O O 

r-H o ro r- 

(Ti O CTi 



I— I fN r- 
o rM 00 
cTi r^ >^ 




118. 



HARRINGTON SCHOOL DISTRICT TENTATIVE CALENDAR 
1985 - 1986 



September through January - 95 days 
February through June - 87 days 

September 2 Labor Day 

*November 11 Veteran's Day 

November 28-29 Thanksgiving Recess 

(28 Thanksgiving Day) 



December 23 - January 1 

February 24-28 

i^ril 28 - May 2 
**May 30 



Christmas Vacation 
Winter Vacation 
Spring Vacation 
Memorial Day 



*By statute (RSA 288:4) these two days are required days out of 
school . 



Other holidays observed by the State are October 14 Columbus Day 

February 17 Washington's B'day 
;>pril 28 Fast Day 



119. 











a 
























a 




































t^ 




















































1 


1e" 

•H Q) 






a 
























a 




























2^ 


Ou tn 






'^ 
























■x 




























.5 


5.S 






























































IJ 








o 






o 




T~ 








>X! 


















ro 








ro 








o 






"^ 






q 










00 


















CO 








0(5 




?^ 




o 






u; 






r- 










f\l 



























d 




y 




c^ 








Ol 






q 




































ro 




•rH 












VDl 




i7? 








































Q) 












oj 






VD 






























.H 








'"' 




S W 




























































U} 














— 




















— 
























4J 


.-H 4J 


























































u 

-H 


5^ 


























































U 


-rH -1- 


























































4-1 


a o 
























































.2 


5^ 


























































Q 
































~ 




























iH 


tn 
















1 










































_Cj 


i-H 4-1 


























































" 


38 
































— 


































<N 








^ 


o 




" 












00 










00 








rH 


cr\ 






"IJ 








LT 








vo 


















in 


















in 


^ 




'^i 




1^ 




O 








^ 


VC 
















CO 










o^ 






iA\in 




o;i 




i^> 




a^ 










ro 
















<D 










00 








(j\ in 






ro 




Q) 




o 








o 


O^ 
















O 





















ro 






CTi 




1 




rsj 








'^T 


i-H 
















00 










rH 
















VDj 






^ 


























^ 


















r^j 








CN' 




S 




_ 




_ 
















































! 








o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 






o 










































_jj 




§ 




(N 


n 


■^ 


LTl 


U3 


r- 


00 


(T\ 






•<* 













CN 


n 


^ 


in 


>XI 


r- 


00 


cr> 






o| 




■-H 






















(N 








^ 


^ 


'=}' 


■^ 


^ 


•^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 


-:*• 






^ 














































~ 








_ 


j 


























o 
































ro 


























2 
5 






CM 


























2 
5 


























'-' 
































■<3< 


























Cfi 






TJ 




















tn 
































s 






§ 




















H^ 






tn 


























• H 


























■H 






(U 


























rH 






^J 




















3 






c 

•rH 














w 












4-1 
































^q 














0) 

1 




(U 










3 






C 


>i 






tn- 












•:^ 




tn 

tu 


l4-( 

















•rH 




? 
■g 






^ 


(n 

4-) 




4-J 
C 


^ 


4-1 

! 






1 

1 












1 




'4-1 

•H 


3 












^ 


r-H 


Ifi 








^ 


SJ 




! 


3 






tn 

tu 


^ 




(U 








tn 

C 


tn 


"S 


s(i; 










CD 


1 
(U 

1 


5 


■9 


! 




1 

T3 


4-1 


4-1 




g 


1 


en 
0) 
•H 
4J 


1 


5 


tn 

OJ 


1 


OJ 


0) 

1 


tn 




•H 

4-; 


1 


■P 


4J ' 

•r4 




0} 
4-1 




^ 


1 


(U 


•H 


j-i 


0) 


1 


s 


4J 


OJ 


02 

4-J 
0) 
en 

<: 


1 

en 

OJ 


■ H 

1 


1 


0) 


1 


s 

tn 

4-1 

u 


1 


> 

4-) 


I 


? 


> 


i 


-H 

1 

•rH • 




i 

S-l 














Clj 


ij 


■ H 






m 


c 






J 


14-1 






tj 




(U 




u 








5 


i 


i 


c 


c 

H 


^ 






1 

U 


i-l 


M 

5 
e 


'8 


'-6 


3 


'4J 


4-J 


V4 

0) 

4-) 

c 


0) 

4-) 




S-l 
4-1 

8 


tn 


i4 

c 

H 


I 


s 
1 


u 

U-l 


u 

1 


rH j 




g 




04 


rA 


^ 


U-) 


VO 


r-* 


00 


CT> 


O 




.a 


fNJ 


(T 


S 


^- 


in 


'X 


f^ 


OtD 


O^ 


CD 


^ 


(M 


r~i 


>* 




























<— t 




>— 1 


■— 1 






"— ' 


'— ' 


■"I 


'"' 


'~* 


""* 


(N 


(N 


CN 


(N 


!N 



120. 











o 




a 


(T 




r-HO) 






r 




r- 


r~ 




•S 






c 






r< 










a 




a 


a 




















^ 






u 




u 


s 






~ 




"" 




"7 


^ 




, q 






<=1 


a 






t^ 






^ 


„ 




''^ 










.- 


■=3 
























1 




en 










1 




.-H-l 






1 1 




fOU 












+J(U 




1 






•Hr-. 








1 1 
















1 




tn 
















^HP 
















fOU 
















UQ) 
















(Bn 
















^2 
















tA( 














-^ 




■"" 












+j 










c 


c 


00 




-H 








a 


a- 


ID 




Ifl 










• 1 


o 


V^ 








a 


a 


00 


"^ 


1 








^^ 


O . 












.- 


00 


1 








^ 


^ 


^ 


03 


d 






" 








8 


2 














z 


-P 


o 


ro 


o 


o 












LTl 


^ 


1^ 






2 


s^ 


^ 




r^ 


t^ 




















1 














CM 












CO 














(N 


S-^ 












"2 


•H (y\ 












,-1 rsl 












5 


-P 












in 


g 












CO 
















>i 












c 


jj 












■1- 


■H 




U) 




w 










tJl 















c 














■H 








i-H 


g 




e 


U5 






n: 






C 


d) 


+J 


Cm 




s 


§ 


1 


§ 


e 


1 




1 


V-l 




3 


> 




•H 


>-l 


M 




-P 


0) 
■H 
-P 
•H 

■H 




% 


a 


^ 


'? 


■^ 


^ 


> 


^ 


OJ 


0) 


^ 


(2 




■H 


^ 


^ 


g 


Si 


^ 


^ 


1 


E! 


^ 




ei 


_j; 






^ 


^ 


g 


^ 


g 


'C 














£ 


IT 


^ 


r- 


00 


O' 


O 




Cm 




rs] 




CM 







121 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 
To the School Board and cltlzena of the Harrington School District: 

As of October 1, 198A, the enrollment in the Harrington Schools was distributed as follows: 
GRADE R 1 2 3 4 5_ 6 7 8 TOTAL 



Elementary 16 


75 


69 


79 


A7 










286 


Middle School 










72 


59 


74 


66 


271 



16 75 69 79 47 72 59 74 66 557 

In addition the Harrington School District transports the following numbers of pupils to 
the Spauldlng High School under the provisions of a ten-year tuition contract: 



62 44 26 37 169 

This does not include the 104 tuitioned to Area Vocational and other schools. 

When school opened In September, 1984, the Elementary and Middle Schools were organized 
follows: 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOL EMPLOYEES 




ASSIGNMENT 


Constance Rice 






Assistant Principal 


Patricia O'Shea 






Secretary 


Gretchen Edington 






Readiness 


Cathlen Daenz 






Grade 1 


Patrice Lenzi 






Grade 1 


Janice O'Keefe 






Grade 1 


Althea Sheaff 






Grade 1 


Laura Allaire 






Grade 2 


Shirley Felker 






Grade 2 


Pamela Lenzi 






Grade 2 


Stephen Kershaw 






Grade 3 


Susan Kurtz 






Grade 3 


Hrenda Nye 






Grade 3 


Dorothy Donahue 






Grade 4 


Catherine McGrath 






Grade 4 


Walter Hart 






Guidance Counselor 


Jane Olivier 






Music 


Steve Lavorgna 






Physical Education 


Elinor Kelly 






Art 


Kathy McGrail 






Special Education R-2 


Gwen Ross 






Special Education 3-4 


Heidi Tibbetts 






Speech/Language 


Karen Schuster 






Chapter 1 


Carol Edmunds 






Nurse 


Janet Clark 






Teacher Aide 


Madeline Greenleaf 






Sub/Aide 


Claire Ivery, Kathy Monaghan 




Special Education Aides 


Barbara Hayes, Carol 


Savltts, 


Anita Stone Chapter I Aides 


Ramona Cook, Douglas 


Trott 




Custodians 


Beverly Hefferman, Susan Domb 


roskl 


Lunch Workers 


MIDDLE SCHOOL EMPLOYEES 




ASSICNMENT 



Bernard Mason 
Jacqueline Porter 



Supervising Principal 
Secretary 



122. 

page 2 



ASSIGNMENT 

Grade 5 

Grade 5 

Grade 5 

Grade 6 

Grade 6 

Grade 6 

Grade 7 Science/Math 

Grade 7 Lang. Arts/Social Studies 

7-8 Math/Social Studies 

7-8 Lang. Arts/Social Studies 

7-8 Science/Social Studies 

5-8 Reading 

5-8 Art 

5-8 Music 

5-8 Physical Education 

7-8 Industrial Arts 

7-8 Home Economics 

Guidance Counselor 

5-8 Special Education 

Special Education-Self Contained 

Nurse 

Clerk/Buyer 

Librarian 

Sub. /Aides 



MIDDLE SCHOOL EMPLOYEES con't . 

Carl Clarke 

Frances Cram 

Scott Harris 

Sarah Hucklns 

Bianca McRae 

Mary Tebo 

Bruce Bacon 

Gregory Eddy 

Brenda Brown 

John Davison 

Janice Long 

Jeannae Halllwell 

Roberta Slavin 

Denise Kelly 

Christopher Morrill 

Ernest Burkhardt 

Beverly Brinkman 

Walter Hart 

Kim Culllnan 

Heidi Lundgren 

Carol Edmunds 

Elizabeth Carlson 

Irene Saunders 

Patricia Akerson, Louise Nevnnan 

Francesca Barrett, Janice Dobson, Joanne Vachon Special Education Aides 

Calvin Swain Head Custodian 

Joh^n Boyle, Douglas Trott Custodians 

Carpelle Morrison Lunch Program Director 

Gall Lavole, Janet Letendre, Christine Fogg Lunch Workers 

During the past year we have seen continuing discussion concerning the present state 
and future direction of public education. The deluge of national reports, newspaper 
articles, discussion programs and major state reform proposals concerning education have 
occuppied a prominent position In the media. During this period of time we have con- 
tinued a process of refining goals and objectives for the Harrington School District, 
conducting an ongoing curriculum review focusing on the areas of social studies, math, 
gifted and talented and computer education, and evaluation of present planning and 
teaching techniques. 

The continued progress of the Summer Institute program for a second year under the 
supervision- of Assistant Superintendent Worthley has been an especially gratifying de- 
velopment. I full expect the Summer Institute-85 program will involve an in-depth evalu- 
ation project conducted In conjunction with the Department of Education, University of 
New Hampshire at Durham. Mr. Worthley and I strongly believe School Administrative Unit 



123. 



#44 may be on the cutting edge of a movement in public education to re-introduce thinking 
skills. As Edward DeBono SiatfiS in his article entitled, CRITICAL THINKING IS NOT ENOUCH 
published in the September, 1984 Issue of EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP, "More and more schools 
in Canada, the United Kingdom, Eire, Australia and New Zealand are teaching thinking. " 
School Administrative Unit #44 is one of the first School Administrative Units in Llie 
State to provide such experiences for its students. It is extremely important we cuntinue 
our commitment to this program. 

As I have stated in previous reports, it is generally agreed effective schools must 
usually have five factors associated with them; building leadership, instructional leader- 
ship, a pleasing school climate, implied expectations of students and an effective moni- 
toring system. We have continued to work closely with the principals and faculties to 
continue these characteristics and to improve and enhance professional growth activities. 
We liave strongly encouraged principals and teachers to enroll in college courses, attend 
conferences and Join state, regional and national professional organizations such as the 
New England Reading Association and the Principals Center at Harvard University. 

A review of the Science Research Associates achievement test results convey a continu- 
ation of student growth in such areas as math, language arts and reading. Harrington has 
consistently registered above National and School Administrative Unit norms as a result 
of this annual evaluation process. In fact, Harrington has consistently been one of tlie 
top three achieving districts in the Unit on the basis of the Science Research Assoii.ices 
results. Primary grade scores have shown markedly strong patterns. We will r(>ntiniie to 
focus on the development of a variety of effective program evaluation prucedures. 

1 respectfully urge you to give serious attention to tlie reiommcndat i mi roiil a i iirtl in 
the Study Committee report. While every individual may not be in total agreiiment on some 
recommendations, it is quite evident the Conuiiittee has spent considerable time and eflort 
in researching and (Rebating the issues confronting the District on both a short and long 
term basis. Comprehensive, indepth planning tends to result in better decisions. As you 
debate the issues this year, I believe you can be both proud and thankful with tlu- calihei 
of civic participation and involvement displayed by members of the Committee. 



124, 



One of the major areas of public discussion is the issue of how we finance our schools. 
As many of you are aware, the Legislature is in session this year and one of the major 
pieces of legislation to be debated this session deals with the consolidation and reform 
of four current State Financial Aid programs for school districts known as the Augenbllck 
Plan. This Plan provides for the consolidation of the current Foundation Aid, Sweepstakes, 
Direct Special Education and Business Profits Tax support programs. In addition to the 
consolidation of these four Financial Aid programs, the Augenbllck Plan proposes an equit- 
able method of distributing State funds to school districts. However, in order to fully 
implement the Augenbllck Plan, the State must provide an additional 14 million dollars. 
If the Legislature passes the Augenbllck Plan and the necessary 14 million dollar appro- 
priation, the Harrington School District would receive over and above its current State 
revenue of $123,892, the additional sum of $122,281. I believe the implication for 
property tax relief is obvious. I strongly encourage all citizens to contact their Legis- 
lators and urge the adoption of these measures. 

The School Administrative Unit staff has continued to provide support and assistance 
in such areas as business management, special education coordination and supervision, 
negotiations, curriculum development and staff development programs. 

Once again, we wish to express our appreciation to the members of the school board, 

principals, teachers, pupils and citizens for the cooperation exhibited during the past 

year. We look forward to a long and productive relationship in which our mutual goals 

will continue to be the best possible education for our young people. 

Respectfully submitted, 

BARRY L. C LOUGH 
Superintendent 



125. 



3" 


in 


in 
n 


in 


in 

00 


in 


in 


in 


§ 


-I 


^ 

^ 




CM 

in 


s 

^ 




C5> 


in 


o 
o 
in 




















n 

0- 


<D 




m 


m 


m 


(N 


^ 


CO- 



D 


O 
1^ 


O 
00 


o 
o 


o 

00 


§ 


o 

00 


o 


o 
o 


n 


o 

ID 


00 


00 


00 


00 

in 


o 


00 


s 

o 




















D 


<o 








m 


m 




rsj 




r^ 


r- 


.-1 


in 


^ 


^ 


^ 


r^ 


O 




n 


CT\ 


00 


^ 


tn 


in 


00 


o 


m 


^ 


m 




■^ 


T 








.-1 






^ 


CM 


CM 


00 




o 


m 


CM 


00 


'^ 


^ 




r- 


o 


CTs 




















•^ 


00 




^ 


"^ 


^ 


ro 


<D 


a^ 



§ § 



126. 



SCHOOL ADMINISTRATIVE UNIT #44 



AMOUNT TO BE SHARED BY DISTRICTS . . . 
Dtscrlbutlon of $ 325.663.00 «co be 
raised by DiscricCi>. 



3^5,663. 



*Encrl£ii in<nrkee! wlch ascerlsks mutiC be che 



Dlscrlcc 
BARKINCTON 
FARMINCTON 



1983 
Equalized 
Valuacion 

107.731.35 3 
82.115.98 9 
25,239.696 
53,7^4.883 
73.153.33 ^ 
70,639,368 
64,270,985 

122,290.532 



60-'.,186.691 



Valuation 1983-84 
Pupils 



802.2 



11.70 



Pupil 
I'urcenc 



19 


.84 


27 


.67 


-0- 


12 


.58 


11, 


.07 


10, 


,47 


8. 


34 


10. 


03 






100. 


00 





Combined 
Percent 



37.67 



4.18 



18.98 



Di3trlcc 
Shure 



61.322.34 



36.311.42 
37.711.78 
36,116.02 
30.905.42 
49,305,38 



14 Novfinber 1984 
bate 



uin, School AJminlttcracive Un 



Unlc Board 



DUB: eh 

10-5-84 

(175) 



127. 

REPORT TO THE BARRINGTOSI SCHOOL DISTRICT 

There is no argument that Barrington is a town undergoing change. Your 
school system is also undergoing change and most of it is positive. The 
members of your school board wish to take this opportunity to highlight 
some of these changes and try to put them in perspective. 

Some years ago, the Barrington School Board announced the philosophy of 
returning to basics to assure that our students had the necessary foundation 
for greater achievement in their lives. The voters of the district should 
be pleased to note that this enphasis is paying off. Barrington students, 
on average, consistently score above the national norm and at or near the 
top in SAU 44 on the standard achievement tests. This is especially true 
in the elementary grades. 

This enphasis is also evident in other programs. We participated in the 
Sunnier Institute for the second year. Four teachers and 15 students took 
part in this exciting project vvhich enphasizes critical thinking skills 
and creativity. The Odessy of the Mind program is another v\here our students 
are exposed to new ideas and develop new skills in an environment rich in 
opportunity for the individual. On the local level there are scores of 
activities to supplenent classroom studies. The Conputer Club, the French 
Club, Junior Great Books, and many others are designed to wet the students 
appetite for learning and make the students school days fun as well. 
Your current board established a policy to reduce class sizes from upwards 
of 35 students per classroom to levels which are more conducive to good 
education. It was not an easy task v^en faced with our space constraints. 
The administration and staff worked many hours to solve the problems 
associated with such a change in policy. The result is noteworthy. Vfe 
achieved our goal and have provided a much better educational environment 
for our students. 

We must mention the fine performance of our teachers and staff. Morale is 
high and the current board enjoys an excellent relationship with the staff. 
Our turn over is low and we are able to work in harmony for the benefit of 
all the students in our schools. 

Over the past several years your school boards have worked hard to achieve 
full conpliance with state standards for elementary and middle schools. For 
the 1984-85 school year, these descrepancies have been reduced from a long 
list to one relating to the library. Action is underway to rectify this 
descrepancy and we look forward to full conpliance soon. 

We know the majority of the town's taxes go to support our schools. As 
taxpayers, we share your desire to keep the tax rate as low as possible 
while still providing quality educational services to our children. One 

yardstick we use to check on our expenditures is conparison with the rest 
of the state. The average per pupil cost for elementary students in 
New Hampshire is $2,147; our cost is $1,455.12. We rank 144 out of 155 
districts or, in other words, only 11 elementary schools in the state spend 
less than we do per pupil. At the middle school level the state average 
is $2,364; our cost is $1,462.34. We rank 26 out of 26 middle schools. 

A large part of our budget is expended to meet the needs of students with 
special needs. Your school board maintains an aggressive cost containment 



128. 

effort regarding Special Education expenses. As a rule, out of district 
placements are very expensive. Part of our effort is to serve our special 
needs students locally vv^enever possible. It proved cost effective to fund 
a full time guidance counselor this year and return students to our schools 
from regional programs. 

As an adjunct to this cost containment effort, we requested an evaluation 
of our in-house special education programs by the Strafford Learning 
Center, our regional special education agency. The staff of the center 
worked at length with our administration and staff to analyze our programs. 

As of this writing their final report has just been received and is being 
evaluated for further action. We feel certain that the result will be a 
more responsive program, with better control and, in the long run, better 
use of our resources. 

The growth in the cost of our educational systems is a tremendous burden. 
Vfe regret these increases but have little control over must of these costs, 
especially in the case of special education. We are firmly convinced that 
some kind of alternative funding is required for our school systems if we 
are to maintain our level of achievement and services. We urge the 
voters of the Harrington School District to express their support for 
alternative funding proposals currently before the legislature. 

We v^uld be remiss if we did not comment on the exceptional performance 
of your Space Needs Committee. They proved to be a dedicated, tenacious, 
hard working body with a sincere interest in conducting an in-depth 
investigation of our problems and potential solutions. Although their 
final report is not available v\^en this is written, the board is unanimous 
in endorsing their preliminary recommendations, with one exception. The 
board majority feels the library should be kept in its present location. 

Vfe close this report with one final thought. You, the voters of district 
have every right to be proud of your schools. But schools are too im- 
portant to be left to the educators. We urge you to become involved in 
your schools. Please attend thedistrict meeting and share in the decision 
making process. 

The Harrington School Board 

Richard D. Bottom 
Heather Carney 
Peter Paiton 



1983 - 19B4 
To the School Board and Cltlzena of the BarrlnKton School District 

The Barrlngton Schools opened on September 5th with a "shift" in grade populations 
which required some changes in the organization of both schools. In order to accoiBO- 
date the first grade students at the Elementary School, a small room which previously , 
was used for special education became a classroom for fifteen first graders. A Special 
Education class and Chapter I were relocated in other areas of the building making use 
of what had been a kitchen work/storage facility. The "shj-ft", also felt at the Middle 
School required the installation of a modular unit providing much needed space for two 
additional classrooms. These classrooms have made it possible to have a third section 
of sixth grade, lowering the teacher/student ratio and providing space for a third 
special education class as well as an area for remedial reading students. In order Co 
provide for these needs, dividers were installed in the room housing the Special Edu- 
cation and Remedial Reading programs. The enrollments at both schools continues to 
fluctuate with 293 at the Elementary School while 270 are enrolled at the Middle School. 

An ongoing educational goal of both schoola is to develop and maintain programs which 
benefit students with varying learning styles as well as abilities. In order to achieve 
this goal, the core curriculum is constantly being updated and improved. New resource 
materials as well as additional computers are located in the Library/Media Center and 
are available to all students. The on-going enrichment strand consists of the Jr. 
Great Books program under the direction of Barbara Hayes and the Young Authors Creative 
Writing progrum under the direction of Karen Schuster and Frances Cram. Math-a-lons 
provide an opportunity for students at the Middle School to participate competively 
against other math teams in our area, and both schools will again have teams entered in 
the Odyssey of the Mind competition. The Artist in the Schools program will host folk- 
lorlst, Linda Morley, in conjunction with a grant from the N. H. Commission of the Arts. 
Also, a Foreign Language Club has been established for students in grades three and 
four. The Summer Institute for Critical Thinking Skills involved not only Middle School 
students but also staff members from both schools. The development of creativity Is 
stressed at all grade levels in all areas of the curriculum and in music and art as 
well. 

Many extra-curricular activities are planned and supervised by dedicated staffs at 
both schools, and they are to be commended for their efforts. The Middle School students 
have the opportunity to participate in Inter-scholastic and intra-mural athletics and to 
take part in musical and dramatic productions. The Elementary students have the oppor- 
tunity to participate in seasonal concerts and the gymnastics program. 

A full time guidance counselor has been added to the Elementary and Middle School staffs. 
Having the services provided by Walter Hart has prevented some Special Education students 
requiring counseling from being placed out of district as well as allowing for the re- 
turn to the local school setting for others. 

We are extremely appreciative of the support given to the schools by the people of Barr- 
lngton. Tlieir attendance at concerts. Open House, special events and musicals is im- 
portant to the students and tlie staff. We would also like to thank Dave Zakon and Jean 
Cioffl, co-ordlnators of the volunteer program. Our sincere thanks to all the volun- 
teers who give so freely of their time to assist not only in the classrooms but on field 
trips and nt special events. 

B.E.S.T. (J^arrlngton, Wucators, Students and Townspeople), continues to play an impor- 
tant role In the Elementary School. We would like to thank Sid and Anne Kotlus, co- 
chjlrpersons and tlic members of B.E.S.T. for the contributions they have made to our 
school programs. 



130. 

Page (2) 



The educational atmosphere in our schools is one of caring, and many people contribute 
to this feeling. We would like to recognize and thank our highly dedicated and skill- 
ed secretarial, custodial and cafeteria staffs. We also wish to thank our School 
Board members, Mr. Richard Bottom, Dr. Heather Carney and Mr. Peter Paiton for their 
dedicated service and interest in the educatio of the students in Harrington. 

We wish to thank the SAU #44 administrative team of Superintendent Barry Clough, 
Assistant Superintendents, Leon Worthley, Eugene Roddy, and Special Education Coordin- 
ator, Paul Campella for their continued interest, support and guidance. We sincerely 
appreciate their educational leadership. 

Above all, we wisk to thank the highly professional and dedicated staffs of both 
schools who work so diligently and cooperatively with us. Their hard work and sin- 
cere efforts are of a great benefit to our students and to our school. 

It is a pleasure to serve the comniunity of Harrington. We appreciate the support 
and cooperation that we receive from the people. We sincerely hope that you will 
continue to cal|^ on us at any time we can be of service to you. 

Respectively submitted, 



Bernard Mason, Supervising Principal 
Constance Rice, Assistant Principal 
Harrington Schools 



131. SCHOOL NUKSE Kia'OKT 

1983 - 198^ 

As school got underway in September, I was very busy with health screenings. 1 
started in the elementary school and continued through the middle school. Screen- 
ings included height, weight, vision, dental, hearing, nutrition and Immunization 
updates. 

I am very pleased since the new immunization laws, most children are up to date and 
new enterers have had complete and accurate records. Some students were transported 
to the Congregation Church for needed immunizations, sponsored by the Rural District 
Health Council. This year the number was very small. 

This year all schools were sent a letter from the Department of Education, stating 
that Scoliosis (curvature of the spine) screenings will be required on all students 
grades five through eight, beginning the 198^-85 school year. Approximately two- 
thirds of all N. H. schools have currently provided this screening and Harrington 
has been screening for several years. The screening procedure is a simple one in 
which the school nurse looks at the childs back in a standing position and the for- 
ward bending position and observes for any curvature. All questionable defects are 
reportud to parents and asked to make an appointment with their family physician. 

The Department of Education will be providing training sessions for all school nurses 
who have not been involved in Scoliosis screenings. 1 have attended screening sessions 
in New Hampshire and Vermont. This year there were no new referrals. 

Hearing tests resulted in seven (7) elementary and six (6) middle school students with 
hearing problems and all were referred to parents for possible correction. 

All students were tested for vision. This year a new slide was available to test stu- 
dents for near vision. There were eight (8) elementary and seventeen (17) middle 
school students referred. 

Ninety-nine percent of all elementary school students participated in the Fluoride 
Rinse Program once again tlii!> year. This is a most important program and 1 am pleased 
to see so many participating. 

This year there seemed to have been a virus that swept through all classrooms. The 
virus appeared to stay with us all through the school year. Many days 10-12 students 
were sent home with the same symptoms. Pneumonia also affected many students and 
faculty. 

In the spring chicken pox prevailed affecting 75 elementary and 5 middle school stu- 
denis. Strep thru.it was .il-.u .1 l.irge problem, siireading from student to student and 
including faculty. Any student found to have symptoms of any communicable disease or 
condition which can easily pass from person to person must be sent home immediately 
to prevent further spreading. 

Once again this year we had only a slight problem with head lice, scabies, impetigo 
or conjunctivitis. An average day brought many students to the office in each school. 
Most visits were for minor illnesses or injuries, with the exception of four (4) elem- 
entary and six (6) middle school students being injured seriously enough to seek medi- 
cal or dental attention. Injuries included sprains, strains, lacerations, sutures, 
injured teeth and bruises. 



132. 

Page (2) 

Pre-school screenings were done this year on fifty-nine pre-schoolers. Screenings 
included heights, weights, hearing and vision. Parents were interviewed in regards 
to tlie childs medical history, nutrition, dental care and immunization requirements 
and physical exams requirements for students to attend Harrington schools. 

Health teachings were done in both schools through cooperative efforts of the tea- 
chers and school nurse. Many parent conferences were held and some home visits 
were made. 1 attended workshops and seminars on Alcohol/Drug Abuse Prevention and 
Smoking Cessation School Education. 1 also had the opportunity to tour the Berlin 
Meddac Hospital in Berlin, Germany this summer. 

M.iny thanks to parents, faculty and school board members for their cooperation, help 
and understanding in making this a most productive and extremely busy year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Carol Edmunds, R.N. 
Harrington Schools Nurse 



133. 



Report of School Auditors for 1983-84 



Barrlngton Scho61 Board 
Barrlngton, N. H. 

Gentlemen and Lady: 

This letter will Inform you that Lynde Ssndai>9 and I have completed 
our mathematical audit of the School District books as furnished to 
us by your treasurer, bookkeeper, and lunch manager, and find them 
correct. 

As always, your treasurer's books are excellently kept. Your bookkeeper 
seems to be doing a fine job of keeping?, the books to meet the requirements 
of the State Bourd-- no small Job. She is a pleasant person, ana most 
cooper .tive with us. Her system of filing bills and manifests makes the 
auditing much easier. The lunch accounts ap|)ear to be in jjood ord^r, and 
has the program well In hand. 

We are Bonoerned that the district has for several years ended the year 
with such a large surplus, and would recommend that you make an effort 
to bring your budget proposals for the coming year more closely In line 

w*th what actual expenditures will probably be not an easy taskl 

One item I have noticed is that I do not seem to see listed in your 
proposed revenues , PX-16 in the 1983 Town Report, any item of pIToposed 
savings banx interest which has been a tidy sum Cor several years, thanks 
to your treasurer's management. 

We also feel concerned about your keeping your current year books open 
for so long into the next year. Sixteen days appears to be at l^iast a 
little too much. 

Since your appropriation is always Ipbelled for the current year, we 
question that a true picture of the year Is presented if bills for the 
ensuing year are paid from the current yenf'»3 moneys, and would advise 
your looking into this matter. 

These concerns are offered in the friendliest sj irit, ,ind appreclfit Ion 
of your difficult Job of managing our educational system; however , it 
seems certain that' they would be considered in the event of an audit by 
State or professional auditors. 

Very ti^uly yours, 



September 8. 1984 






134. 



REPORT OF THa BARRIHGHON SJriOOL S'lUOY JOMMITa .ij] 

Our committee of l6 volunteer members, mandated by the 
voters at the School District Meeting of Liarch, 1984, has in- 
vested substantial time over 10 months assessing the problems 
outlined in our charge. V/e looked at a broad spectrum of solu- 
tions ranging from double sessions to off-site seweraje dis- 
posal to tuitioning 8th graders and at least a dozen other 
options. 

After an in-depth look at the population projections sup- 
plied us, we realized that our decisions and recommendations 
were based on information which had statistical merit but lacked 
plain old common sense. 

Our earlier work, however, was not fruitless. »Ve were able 
to look at an extraordinary number of options, evaluate them 
carefully and arrive at what we believe to be sensible conclu- 
sions. Our current recommendations are not substantially different 
from our earlier ones. The important difference is the time we 
have in which to implement them. 

The most significant thing we discovered in re-evaluatin'^ 
the basic assumptions was the fact that there is not a direct 
relationship between general town population r;;rov;th and 'growth 
in school enrollment. We have provided a number of graphs and 
charts to illustrate this point. Ihe original figures provided 
to the committee fail to recognize this important point and thus 
produce enrollment projections that are much higher Ihun what 
we believe the realistic numbers should be. 

Does this mean that scJiool enrollment will not increase, 
or that we do not have a problem that requires a solution? 
Certainly not. What it does mean is that we have a somewhat en- 
larged time frame in which to solve our problems. 

Committee members are of tv/o minds with regard to our 
present situation. Some members believe our existing schools 
are overcrowded, and some believe there is room for modest growth. 
The compromise position on which we were able to agree is that, the 
schoola are full - that is, at or close to capacity. 



135. 



If the population patterns of the previous five years were 
to remain the same in the near future, then it is our opinion 
that we have approximately three years in which to create and im- 
plement a plan for new school construction. 

V/e realize there is no way to truly forsee the future, but 
we have attempted to put together a plan of action which, if en- 
acted, will allow Barrington to reorganize its school system in 
a well planned and cost effective manner. 

PROPOSALS OF TH2 BAHRINGION SCHOOL 31 UDY COlvJ.lI'r'l I:;!^ , 
1. The Committee recommends that the School Board place a warrant 
article before the Annual School District Meeting to see if the 
voters will raise and appropriate the sum of :; 10,000 to purchase 
an option on a parcel of land for future school construction and 
to provide for necessary engineering. 

The acquisition of a suitable building site is the first 
step in what should be an orderly planning program for 
the construction of a new school. Ihe site would be chosen 
with a variety of criteria in mind including: access 
without major road construction; the ability to expand 
over the next 25 years as growth demands; adequate drain- 
age to accomodate expansion; minimal • investment in site 
work for playing fields, etc. .^e would expect the School 
Board, or a Site Search Committee appointed by the Board, 
to option a suitable site within six months of the ap- 
propriation of funds. 

It should be assumed that a purchase price of s 100,000 
would be a maximum sura, and that the actual cost, if 
any, will reflect the size of the parcel, its location, 
and other factors which could lead to spending sub- 
stantially less than the appropriated sum. 

This recommendation reflects a conscious choice betv/een 
short term investment at our present site and long term 
investment at a new site. 

We would remind the voters of three things: (1) deci- 
sions made in the heat of crisis are seldom well made; 
(2) there is no rational reason to believe that land 
prices will decline at any time in the immediate future, 
and are, in fact, likely to increase; and (3) in the un- 
likely event that our school population should decline, 
the land may be placed back on the market to recoup our 
investment. .. in all likelihood at a profit. 

We believe that this recommendation constitutes prudent 
planning, and will serve our town's needs into the early 
part of the next century. 



136, 



2. The Committee recommends that the School Board immediately make 
preparations for the utilization of the land which will be purchased 
for the construction, of a new school. 

V^fithin six months of the purchase of an option, the Board, 
or an appointed committee, would complete the process of 
site design; soil surveys, charting of future utilities, 
location of buildings, drives, parking, and playing fields, 
etc. In short, developing a Master Plan for future land 
use. Concurrently, work could be done on developing a de- 
sign of core facilities and plotting location of possible 
classroom expansions, 'ihe intent is for us to be prepared 
to build within a short time after realizing the need, 
and to be aware of the problems associated v/ith the site. 

3. The Committee recommends that the possibilities of a Uooperiitive 

School District be actively pursued. 

We recommend the formation of a Cooperative School Jistiict 
Planning Committee under PiSA!l9! to investigate the for;a- 
ation of a Cooperative School District. RSA:1)_^' is a lav; 
that legally empov/ers the committee to work with otner in- 
terested towns toward the forming of a new school and tlie 
betterment of our collective students' education, possibly 
offering them more at less cost than if we tried to do it 
on our own, V/ithout this legal committee, a Cooperative 
School District cannot become a reality. 

^. The Committee recoromends that the School Board yearly update the 
school population projection graphs as presented by this coinmittee, 
and report their findings at the Annual School District i.;eeting. 

If this recommendation is implemented, it v;ill require 
the School Board to provide to tlie Annual School Dis+ric' 
Meeting updated enrollment graphs as well as undated dem- 
ographic data as contained herein, iinrollmenl-, "j,rt. ahs v/ill 
contain pro jed ions, by whatevei- nethod '.he Scliool Com- 
mittee deems appropriate, for a minimum of three Hears 
into the future. 

These graphs and data will give the voters at xhe School 
District Meetings some basic historical informal; ion as a 
foundation for making the necessary decisions called for by 
the projected enrollment figures, while "he +hree years of 
enrollment projections will give the school district i:i;e 
minimum lead time required for change to the physical ;il:.nt. 



137. 



5. V/e reconunend that the School Library be relocated, possibly 
to the Town Library in the 1 own Hall. 

The relocation of the oohool Library would mnke avail- 
able one additional classroom at the Middle school 
without creating the need for new construction or the 
use of a modular unit. 

6. \/e recommend that the School Board be increased from 3 to 5 
members. 

J he Study Coiniiiittee has found how time consuming i.his 
work is. If I he Board were larger it v/ould make it pos- 
sible to subdivide for special studies as needed. Also, 
the additional members would ^ive a broader rierspective 
to issues at hand. 

?. The Committee recommends that the School IJistrict raise and 
appropriate the sum of :,':.,000 to hire a professional con^iulianl 
to provide documentation for improvin^j; space utilization of the 
Elementary School. 

While the Elementary School has a crowded appearance, 
the actual space per pupil is within Staie recommenda- 
tions. We believe the reorganization of stoi'ajje and 
classroom spaces could, without major modifications, 
result in improved sijace utilization. 

8. The Committee recommends acquisition of the '^ own Hall for use 

as part of the School System at some future date. 

Since the 1 ov/n Hall building is on an abut + ing lot to 
both the Elementary and Middle Schools, and it has the 
gymnasium used by the school, it makes sense that this 
building become part of the school properties at some 
future time, 'j he advantages would be: 

1. additional space for special needs students 

2. full time availability of the gymnasium 

3. possibility of being used for state-mandated 
kindergarten 

'+. centrally located 



138. 



IN SJrviI.lAKYi 

The overall intent of our recommendLitions is to set the 2ta.f;e 
for an orderly transition from our present situation to one in 
which the top of the hill becomes completely tilementary ana a new 
Middle School is constructed at a new site suited and planned for 
expansion. 

V/e have specifically avoided adding to our present schools 
for several reasons. An addition would require pumping sewage "^o 
an off-site location. An addition would only be adequa'e for "he 
next '■ to 7 years, and it v/ould then become impossible to m^dte any 
further additions. If, as seems likely, we would then h.tve to build 
a new school at a new site sometime ear-ly in the l^^O's, ii nalies 
more sense, in our opinion, to invest our money .it one loca'ion 
which is capable of bein^ expandeu over a lon^ period oi xIaq to 
meet the needs of our community as they arise, lurijier, we believe 
that the debt burdens created by an im;:iedidi,e addi.ioji to lur pres- 
ent schools, coupled wit,h rie\,' school coiiotruci ion be^innin;^ in he 
early 19^0 's, would produce unacceptable tax rates. 

In order to deal with sliort term nrublems, \.'e lu^ve riiAi'e .-iome 
modest proposals that require minimtim canital investn.en" : 

Our recommendation ,,7 - to r. llocate funds to hire a -iroies- 
sional space planner - assumes thai soine etfec'.ive reoi'j..ni;:M Mon 
would provide significant relief a', the ;j;lementai-y Jciiool. votcia 
should note that we have liiade no provisions to fund iiuplenieiit i .ion 
of space reorganization. 

Recommendation if j - to move the School Library i.o jo.,ie loca- 
tion at the 't'own Hall, possibly at the t own Library v/here ii vre- 
viously was - will free one complete classroom at the ;-..iddle Jchool. 
'i/e realize that this idea is frau^^ht with politic.il com.jlic.;. ^ ions 
and has drawbacks from an educational perspective, but i., is an 
interim measure to get us through to tlie point of a complex ed 
building program. 

Our Committee represents an unusually broad cross Led ion 
of our community. At the start l here were many personal agendas, 
from coitting taxes to immediately adding to the iilemen..ary Jchool. 
We think we've looked very carefully at the choices ami 'heir 
implications. In the end, it is Harrington's peculiar oi'.iern ol' 
population growth that has led ue to make relatively cotiservai ive 



139. 



recommendations, v/e hope ihat the school Board and the voters will 
find them to be measured ani responsible. 

nespectfully submitted, 

Anthony Irons, Chairman 

Lee Chretien 

Samuel Cioffi 

Barbara Croft 

v/illiam Dean 

Robert DiBerto 

Darrell Ford 

Grace Haley 

Crai^ Hardy 

Alan Kelly 

Susan Laierte 

Julien Olivier 

Carol ;.ohrer 

williaiii \ ance 

'• imo'.hy Varney 

Charter ..eeks 



VII. STATISTICS 



141. 



s 

fo 


ILAS 
DORA] 
OPKIl 
ON 


o 




o s C5 




> u o 


s 


£-1 W m 
W fn J 


§ 


ZANN 
ARLO 
CHEL 
IS V 


Q 




g 


t. K M O 


n u s hj 



^ 2 






O H >H . 

H < w J kJ S 2: ^ 

2l-lD:;^qE-lwa<QS^acc:s&>M<!:e-lMM 
Sec jQ<aS2 oi-io<<:^ scocu 

cst=>wo«sx< <ooo<i:>J<w<3; co 

So, r)goUOh3 S: S CO Eh SiJW 

?:QMI<iiiEH<a:hqMW cc saO^WiJ 

2 S S W 2:< W02«3:'-D 

KjnMEH2:<2:g>HMWEH<E2:wt3jJMeH 

QOWGQ-a:<>-qOHl-HQWM2ClWScO< 

-■ccscd2WNtJiaEHQ2Hqa<a;sto>Hco 
M<i:<;Mt>tiHMiytr5MMOM<H<cci-H 

>'-o^JcOWi^>pq'-3>JWOQSDH>-:)UiJ 



w 





PQ 

2: 


>H 


X 


w 


R^g 


z J 


DOLA 
ROCK 
ONZI 
STAP 


^ag§ 


ggwm 


J 


^ < to 


m 3: < OS 







Q uq to 


N h3 2 3 


NIS 
ES E 
RANG 
DDEU 


5 S <s o 


ggSB 


DEN 
JAM 
TER 
TM 


H CO CQ Q 



M hJ IS H 

t-^ z J S OS s ex 

l^go MN] MEH w<c o 

W<tDcOg:EH2EH2!>Hl-lWmWS 
PQ:£0<W^J0W<^JEH'-:)H2;£ 
CUMWg>BcQ02jCS .Mgo 

5:h:)3owE«:^owoEHS<i:t3 

< ffiWOO KShCOCoC^Q 

OS>EhcOcOOcoWcO ,,<S_ 

:3 <£ w J m 
ocoShHi<:b=;^iJWiJ 

W< WEH toQS>-^K 

WiJMtQ2SS<:W>H^^j)E K 

ci:2M<Kci:;<MMw?:otH5o 



ii 



o 



S t, (i< Ii. 2: S 




o w 

Q 

2 2 « Q to 

< :3 H < M 
y <£ ffi Si Eh 

H^ Q E Eh c: 

O J=) 

^ < EH J O 

Q to CO W 

2 to M g 2: 

< >H a S < . rn — • ■ 

< <« U CO a .-:■ jS <C ixi 



a « a H 
www :=) 

Eh EH EH O 




w w w w w w 

Q EH ^ EH EH Eh H 

- -- W K m ffi K 



QQQQQCCDSCCQOiQoCCWQCCCiaaPSa 



wwwwCTN«3:<<<:<<'a:«3:<<<wwp<a:<<<<ciHi^ 

,HQQQQrH'-3'-3>-3*-3»-3>-D'-Oi-5'-3'D'-Dfcfct>HSS5:2:2:<< 



142. 





SSSSSP^tMSSSSSSfcfxH^P'^SPr^fxsfeti-iSSP^SC'^^SSSS 



w 



1^ 

o o 

MO W hJ M q 



MM||ag 

§ i 1 1^ -^ 5 ^ § g S g g " S ^ 

M MW<Q Q W WWW 

rn E rn ffi ;^ CO O 
O. 2 W M 

WOK2SCOK3<MS 
W«OS<MOMEhS< 

o<i:sw>HjMa<<a;« 
i-o<<c>awsw20PQ 



g; cq M 

l-q M S 



S w 



^ :: 1 1 g ■ ■ 

CO Eh 



^^^l^ciil 



« < E-i M W tri W 

COW KS^qOOPQ 
i_;MO>hW hJ^jWO 
2^JC» jJpQWo: 3« 
H ►J J S O EH K 

- >H HwaEHffig>HCJ 

HjiWMgg wehSqh 

Ki-:icosssNMeHS<5 

^:w>-:>Ob£i^ntot«i<i:wo 




cof^JvDO^'^!^-ooLf^oor^r^r^ cxDO^ooNi-trHojvi^LrN cooo^ooLr^tr^^^oooo 

K iHiHrHiHOJOJ CO iHiHiHrMf\Jf\JOJ v£> MMfM 

a>H>H>H>H>H><>H>H222g22222gg2t3|J|JJJJC20C2C5C3 



143. 




w o rt < 

M l-H .i ffi < 

hJ a: 2 00 CL, 







I 
o i<: >H 



o o § 
2 a J 
< K 1-^ 



KhJ WO. <t;«E«2;CxqM 

cuOi-iQ zukEwwRou 
wa5w>HSKoEo2CQ>:32 

tOKCL,PI-,c'^sS'-^'^<i^PQ> 






5| 

|8 



SPx^Sli^SSfcSSPMSSf^pMSfx^sCufx^sSSSfc s 



l-H 

< < < 

mW<3:5o oHzEh:! 

^ H h^ a 
S 



M qc;«Q>-(H2Mtca::w^„^ 

S2<ptr,><0(Qu5Heitr:tr;y2KH 
OWQ<W<HOOW<<cQWC5<tr 



< < >-i o 

M CJ 2 vJ g CO W 

MpgcCy5>'^2vJWH3 < 
(S>hKpQcO>-i ow 



weL,mo2woo 



M 2 H c: 



W 2 hJ 

cq < .:i 

2 O >H O 

< CC K W 







loooo rHvx3 r^-oj- ON-rj- mrH o^r-too mo 



^ (— 1 > \J « ^J I' \ I — I i\J\\J\\Jf"\ I II ixvjvvr— 111 .11. 

aOC^OOOP^CL,ClHa,CUCua.euCl.E^E^E-lE^E^E^>>Up O 

Mr.t3t3c3t3wwwwwwwwwuuoouooogg g 

eQ<<<<<WC/3WWu:t0Wt0t/3OOOOOO22QQ H 



144, 




CD a. ■ ~ 



>^ s Q :s :s Q s 

xls fxH S S ["4 s 






^1 



z s w 

W < «a: M 

2 o o :2 



ggg 







OS en S 3 cri be z 
w w o w o t; t>H 

<o<i:<fc>J<opo 



o < 

o a 



o s 



w 


gn 


^w 


SS 


8 


^ ^ 


i 


no S 


M Q 


3g 

pq PQ 



w 



a o 

W EH 

H a g 



:=! E-t 

o o 



W O Q 
E-i ^ 2 
W O < 



K 



CQ 



« CQ o w a 2 



gg 



W ffi O 

8§ 



88 



0) X) 






H 5S 



CT AJ OC OJ 



oo OCr--l- OK>r^t<^^X5 r^LfAOOJ" 



pq ffi a >H 






145. 



Q O 

w o 

St. 

s o 



K W ffi 

J fe a: 
o 

Eh < 



a to 






w 



w 



hJ r- —. 

< fc pt< 2; 
W O • O < 
W W ^ t] Q 

O rf O CK 

hJ M W M <i; 

O t^ M H ffi 

03 t/5 a W O 

< f f t3 l-H 
U ^t) S "-a OS 



i ligil a 



w 



a- z Q. 

o 
wow 

K W ffi 

Eh 2 Ph >H 

wgw| 

w "^ w " 

O 2 O CJ) 

M P M 

f-* ri ^ S 

w w w g 

p p. t3 o 

b W "-0 '-3 



w w 

o o 

a, 2 &. 

w > w z < 

O M Q 

w Q w pa M 

O O 3 

WW U 

U g O Eh Eh 

H W E^ W ^ ^ 

u5 ca t/3 03 M s: 

to O G O OS < 

•-o D3 •-D a; cu to 



wow 



3 03 
(X 





w 




o 


Cd 


< 


o 


M 


a 


05 
03 


Cx< 


g 


O 






W 


w 


o 






g 


w 


Q 




M 


H 


^Ql 


EH 


2 





o o 

O O 



O O 

Eh tH 

O O 

2 2: 



g§ 



o o 

H EH 
O O 



O O 
EH 8H 
O O 



o o 
o o 



2 2 2 2 

o M i-H cn M 

~ t^ 03 (X 

03 k3 03 03 

•a: M <£ < U4 <i: <t 

pa Eh CO PQ Eh CQ CQ 



O O MH w v^ l_^ 

Eh Eh Eh H H H 

O O CO O O O 

W 2 S 2 



t) EH H 

O O O 



o o 

O O 
2 2 



l§ 



g[:;a 



as 

a o 



W 2 

M O 



W 

Q 
03 O 
O O 

►J W 



M M ^4 2: ffi 2 

Q Q < W CO 

:3 03 Q EH w <: D 

C/J Cy ci 2 W 2 CO 

W O « < S 2 



X <£ Eh > 



<C -T) a H C/^ > 2 
►^ 03 O W O 

Q < 03 i<; EH 
^q Q 03 pa X 

3 J 2 < g O 

WW02»-'fc*2M 
23WPWQ<W 
00<ci;EhOWS 
<a,iJScOEHQO 




fc< 


w 


o 


o 




< 


w 




o 


03 


<£ 


03 


^gl 



g g 



2 S 





w 


1^ 


o 


o 


< 






g 


1 


< 




Q 


•z. 



ON 


O 


C^ 


ON 


J- 


OO 


rH 


M^ 






f^J 


ro 


KN 




J- 








^a 


a 


%^ 


2 
< 


2 


2 


r-H Q 


Q 


iH --a 


•-3 


^ 


•-D 



146. 




o 

MM<i;MMI-lHi-iMI-IMMMMWMMMMO 



II 



Q CQ CQ 



CQ CQ CQ CQ CQ CQ a 



EH H W 
O O Eh 






.8 



M^§ 




. . < w a hj 
pa >Ehw<m^,^.,„ 

^q CO Q m iJ ►-s s 

a CO a < (-3 

m oehqq OS o 

,..c-M-M-,EHt/3bafcH2«0<s as^iw 

►-^^y>-<WE-i<EH50SN SPi^Z 

<SKi5SQ?H<i;i-qeqooQBBS 

CO O CQ Q E-f 



§8 



S @ 



M O 



o o 

Eh Eh 



g § s 



IS 



g g g g 



g g g 



147. 



1^ 



EH O 
H 












Il^ggs 



CO >! 



^3 



o w 

H M 






p < < < M W 

fo Q (X i-o S CQ 



e: Eh 



o o 

Eh H 



oo 660060 

tHHSfHEHHEHHEH 



2 2 2 2 2 S 

o 00000 

tHtr-i«i.ir-'tHi7-<tr-'c-it-i Eh EhEhEhEhEh 

000000000 o 00000 

S2CQSSSSS222 S222S 

MUSt-HHHMMMMOM MMMMM 



2 S 2 

K O O O 

W Eh Eh Eh 

EH O O O 



^«G:S3SS^Ja 2S2SS y««S 

Eh<<£<<<<m<W<C<<<<C<<0<<<CEhEh<< 
^pQCQpQpqcQppHmSPQCQCQCQfflSSCCCQCQpaooSS 



'^ 22 

2 <£ w r=i 

U M 3 

EH Q 2 

W ^ <i 

•o EH a. 

05 CO 

W < D> 

CO CO ^t w 

t, a CO 5 



go 

W Q 
2 CO 

o w 
o o 



ig 



►J o 



< to S CO 
<£ W Eh 

H CO >^ w o w 
. , . . K W M 2 M pa 

aK2waijS3S 
o(x<inwoH3'3 

2WOOffi<CK< 
H f^ « tH S < g 

CO Eh 

g M fH H Q CO 

Q2WWCCC0222 

20<:KJWMfeow 



s: o 2 o m 




g g 



^ ^ ^ 



148. 




Eh WEHEHEHWtitH 



OOOOOOOKOOOOOOp 

EHEHtHtHtHt^HMFHEHEHE-lEHEHe-l 

C300000C5E-<OOOOOOC5 



KCQgeqaa^cq^paeQCQCQpqmcqacQpqcQCQpqpQcq 



Eh Eh H EH H 
M M M H M 




.. l-q >H EH 

t3 ^Ji to W 

ONWc2>-:i--,r-, „,„„,.„ 

^,_,c-»-iSMOKqQ<COMSCQM 

0MWW<i;««<WM0sw<w 



^ 





2 




2- 










y_^ 


g 


O 

Eh 




g 




!^ 


@ 


8 


[l^ 


tn 


O 


> 


o 




o 


Eh 


> 


1 


M 


M 


« 


O 


^ 


3 


S 




1 


o 


Oh 


w 


<c 


sd 




S 

g 


1 


s 

g 


< 

CQ 




Ph 


8 


o 

2 



cx 


CL, 


Oh 


cu 


a. 


a, 


w 


w 


w 


w 


w 


w 


w 


w 


w 


w 


CQ 


w