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Full text of "Annual Report of the Trustees of the Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind"

American Foundation 1 
ForTheBlindinc. 






Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualreportoftr8692perk 




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A. M. ShotweH 



Perkins Institution 

And Massachusetts ^School 
For the Blind 




EIGHTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 
OF THE TRUSTEES 



1917 



BOSTON ^ jIt JZ ^ Jt 1918 
WRIGHT & POTTER. PRINTING CO. 



^ll^ ^xmmtatttii^alti; of MwsButl^asBnB. 



Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind, 
Watertown, October 22, 1917. 

To the Hon. Albert P. Langtry, Secretary of State, Boston. 

Dear Sir: — I have the honor to transmit to you, for the 
use of the legislature, a copy of the eighty-sixth annual 
report of the trustees of this institution to the corporation 
thereof, together with that of the treasurer and the usual 
accompanying documents. 

Respectfully, 

EDWARD E. ALLEN, 

Secretary. 






OFFICERS OF THE CORPORATION. 

1917-1918. 



FRANCIS HENRY APPLETON, President. 
GEORGE H. RICHARDS, Vice-President. 
ALBERT THORNDIKE, Treasurer. 
EDWARD E. ALLEN, Secretary. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



Mrs. GEORGE ANGIER. 

FRANCIS HENRY APPLETON. 

WALTER CABOT BAYLIES. 

WILLIAM ENDICOTT. 

THOMAS B. FITZPATRICK. 

Rev. PAUL REVERE FROTHINGHAM. 



ROBERT H. HALLOWELL. 
JAMES ARNOLD LOWELL. 
GEORGE H. RICHARDS. 
WILLIAM L. RICHARDSON, M.D. 
Miss ANNETTE P. ROGERS. 
RICHARD M. SALTONSTALL. 



STANDING COMMITTEES. 
Monthly Visiting Committee, 

whose duty it is to visit and inspect the Institution at least once in each month. 



1918. 

January, . Francis Henry Appleton. 

February, . Mrs. George Angier. 

March, . . Robert H. Hallowell. 

April, . . Paul R. Frothinqham. 

May, . James A. Lowell. 

June, . . Thomas B. Fitzpatrick. 



July, . 

August, . 

September, 

October, 

November, 

December, 



1918. 

Walter Cabot Batubs. 
Annette P. Rogers. 
George H. Richards. 
William L. Richardson. 
Richard M. Saltonstall. 
William Endicott. 



Committeo on Education. 

George H. Richards. 

Rev. Paul Revere Froteunqham. 

William L. Richardson, M.D. 



House Conunittoe. 

William L. Richardson, M.D. 
Mrs. George Angier. 
George H. Richards. 



Committee on Finance. 

Walter Cabot Baylies. 
George H. Richards. 
James A. Lowell. 



Committee on Health. 

Walter Cabot Baylies. 
Wiluam L. Richardson, M.D. 
Richard M. Saltonstall. 



Auditors of Accounts. 

George H. Richards. 
Robert H. Hallowell. 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION AND 
TEACHERS. 



EDWARD E. ALLEN, Director. 



TEACHERS AND OFFICERS OF THE UPPER SCHOOL. 
LITESART DEPARTMENT. 



Boys' Section. 

HAROLD MOLTER. 

MisB CAROLINE E. McMASTER. 

Miss JULIA A. BOYLAN. 

Miss JESSICA L. LANGWORTHY. 

FRED L. SAWYER. 

Miss FEODORE M. NICHOLLS. 

Miss ETHEL D. EVANS. 



Girls' Section. 

Miss ELLEN H. PACKARD. 
Mrs. VERA N. LOCKE. 
Miss GENEVIEVE M. HAVEN. 
Miss INEZ J. SWENSON. 
Miss LAURA A. BROWN. 
Miss JULIA E. BURNHAM. 
Miss ELSIE H. SIMONDS. 



Teacher of Housework. 

Miss MEREDITH PEIRCE. 



DEPARTMENT OP PHYSICAL TRAINING. 

LEWIS M. DILLINGHAM. | Miss INEZ J. SWENSON. 

Miss LENNA D. SWINERTON. 



DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC. 

EDWIN L. GARDINER. 



Miss FREDA A. BLACK. 
Miss HELEN M. ABBOTT. 
Miss MARY E. BURBECK. 
JOHN F. HARTWELL. 



Miss MARY E. RILEY. 
Miss ALVERA C. GUSTAFSON. 
Miss BLANCHE A. BARDIN. 
Miss MABEL A. STARBIRD, Voice. 



DEPARTMENT OF MANUAL TRAINING. 



Boys' Section. 

JULIAN H. MABEY. 
ELWYN C. SMITH. 
Miss MARY B. KNOWLTON, Sloyd. 



Girls' Section. 

Miss FRANCES M. LANGWORTHY. 
Miss M. ELIZABETH ROBBINS. 
Miss MARIAN E. CHAMBERLAIN. 
Miss ELIZABETH O. PIERCE. 



DEPAHTMEKT OF TXJNINO PIANOFOSTES. 

ELWYN H. FOWLER, Manager and Instructor. 



LIBRARIANS, CLERKS AND BOOKKEEPERS. 



Miss LAURA M. SAWYER, Librarian. 
Miss LOUISE P. HUNT, Asxiatant. 
Miss ANNA GARDNER FISH, Clerk. 



Miss DOROTHY A. TITUS, Assistant. 
Miss MAI L. LELAND, Bookkeeper. 
Miss WINIFRED F. LELAND, AssislarU. 



Mrs. SARAH A. STOVER, Treasurer for the Ladies' Auxiliary Society. 



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 

OSCAR S. GREELEY, M.D., Attending Physician. 

HENRY HAWKINS, M.D., Ophthalmologist. 

HAROLD B. CHANDLER, M.D., Assistant Ophthalmologist. 

ARTHUR WILLARD FAIRBANKS, M.D., Pediatrician. 

HOWARD ARTHUR LANE, DM.D., Attending Dentist for the Institution. 

REINHOLD RUELBERG, D.M.'D., Attending Dentist for the Kindergarten. 



DOMESTIC DEPARTMENT. 

FREDERICK A. FLANDERS, Steward. 



Housekeepers in the Cottages. 



Boys' Section. 

Miss CLARISSA A. DAWSON. 
Miss ANNIE W. BODFISH. 
Mk8. JOSEPHINE H. MANSUR. 
Mrs. ANNIE L. SMITH. 



Girls' Section. 

Mrs. ISABELLA P. HEARD. 
Mrs. CORA L. GLEASON. 
Mrs. AGNES C. LUMMUS. 
Mrs. BERTHA C. MAXWELL. 



PRINTING DEPARTMENT. 

FRANK C. BRYAN, Manager. 
Mrs. MARTHA A. TITUS, Printer. \ Miss MARY L. TULLY, PriiUer. 



WORKSHOP FOR ADULTS. 

FRANK C. BRYAN, Manager. 
Miss EVA C. ROBBINS, CUrk. 



TEACHERS AND OFFICERS OF THE LOWER SCHOOL. 



EINDERGABTEN. 



Boys' Section. 

Miss Nettie B. Vose, Matron, 
Miss Florence Cronkhite, Assistant. 
Miss Elsa M. Hackebahth, Kindergartner. 
Miss L. Henrietta Stratton, Teacher. 

Miss Henrietta Damon, Music Teacher. 

Miss Annie L. F. Edwards, Teacher of Manual Training. 

Miss Lenna D. Swinbrton, Assistant in Corrective Gymnastics. 

Miss Edith M. Taylor, Psychologist. 

Miss Eleanor E. Kellt, Field Worker. 



Girls' Section. 

Mrs. J. M. Hill, Matron. 
Miss Cornelia M. Lorino, Assistant, 
Miss W. R. Humbert, Kindergartner. 
Miss Alice M. Lane, Teacher. 



PBIMABY DEPABTMENT. 

Boys' Section. 



Misa Margaret F. Hughes, Matron. 
Miss Jane J. Walsh, Assistant. 
Miss Mary M. Hallett, Teacher. 



Miss ErFiE C. Saunders, Teacher. 
Miss Minnie C. Tucker, Music Teacher. 
Miss Rosalind L. Houghton, Sloyd. 



Miss Ada S. Bartlett, Matron, 
Miss S. M. Chandler, Assistant. 
Miss Bertha M. Buck, Teacher. 



Girls' Section. 



Miss Lizzie R. Kinsman, Teacher. 
Miss Naomi K. Grino, Music Teacher. 
Miss Gerda L. Wahlberg, Sloyd. 



LADIES' VISITING COMMITTEE TO THE KINDEBOABTEN. 

Mrs. John Chipman Gray, President. 
Miss Annie C. Warren, Vice-President. 
Miss Eleanor S. Parker, Secretary. 



Mrs. John Chipman Gray, 
Mrs. Harold J. Coolidge, 
Mrs. T. H. Cabot, . . 
Miss Annie C. Warren, . 
Mrs. John B. Thomas, 
Miss Ellen Bullard, 



January. 
February. 
March. 

April. 

May. 



Mrs. Ronald Lyman, . 
Mrs. Roger B. Merriman, 
Mrs. George H. Monks, 
Mrs. E. Preble Motley, 
Miss Alice Sargent, . 



June. 

October. 

November, 

■ December, 



General Visitors. 

Miss Eleanor S. Parker. 
Miss Elizabeth G. Norton. 
Mrs. Larz Anderson. 
Mrs. William R. Livermorb. 



Honorary Members. 

Mrs. KiNQSMILL Marrb. 

Mrs. Maud Howe Elliott. 



MEMBERS OF THE CORPORATION. 



Abbot, Mrs. M. T., Cambridge. 

Adams, Melvin 0., Boston; 

Ahl, Mrs. Daniel, Boston. 

Allen, Edward E., Watertown. 

Allen, Mrs. Edward E., Water- 
town. 

Angier, Mrs. George, Newton. 

Appleton, Hon. Francis Henry, 
Peabody. 

Appleton, Mrs. Francis Henry, 
Peabody. 

Appleton, Francis Henry, Jr., 
Boston. 

Appleton, Mrs. Francis Henry, 
Jr., Boston. 

Appleton, Dr. William, Boston. 

Bacon, Gaspar G., Jamaica Plain. 

Baker, Mrs. Ezra H., Boston. 

Baldwin, S. E., New Haven, 
Conn. 

Ballantine, Arthur A., Boston. 

Bancroft, Miss Eleanor C, 
Beverly. 

Bancroft, Robert H., Beverly. 

Barbour, Edmund D., Boston. 

Bartlett, Miss Mary F., Boston. 

Bates, Arlo, Boston. 

Baylies, Walter C, Boston. 

Baylies, Mrs. Walter C, Boston. 

Beach, Rev. D. N., Bangor, Me. 

Beebe, E. Pierson, Boston. 

Benedict, Wm. Leonard, New 
York. 

Black, George N., Boston. 

Blake, Miss Marian L., Man- 
chester, N. H. 



Blunt, Col. S. E., Springfield. 

Boardman, Mrs. E. A., Boston. 

Bourn, Hon. A. 0., Providence, 
R.I. 

Bowditch, Alfred, Boston. 

Bowditch, Ingersoll, Boston. 

Boyden, Mrs. Charles, Boston. 

Bremer, S. Parker, Boston. 

Brigham, Charles, Watertown. 

Brooke, Rev. S. W., London. 

Brooks, Gorham, Boston. 

Brooks, Peter C, Boston. 

Brooks, Shepherd, Boston. 

Bryant, Mrs. A. B. M., Boston. 

Bullock, Col. A. G., Worcester. 

Burnham, Miss JuUa E., Lowell. 

Burnham, William A., Boston. 

Burr, I. Tucker, Jr., Boston. 

Calkins, Miss Mary W., Newton. 

Callahan, Miss Mary G., Boston. 

Callender, Walter, Providence, 
R.I. 

Camp, Rev. Edward C, Water- 
town. 

Carter, Mrs. J. W., West Newton. 

Gary, Miss E. F., Cambridge. 

Gary, Miss Ellen G., Boston, 

Case, Mrs. Laura L., Boston. 

Chace, J. H., Valley FaUs, R. I. 

Chapin, Edward P., Andover. 

Clement, Edward H., Boston. 

Cochrane, Alexander, Boston. 

Colby, Miss Jennie M., Boston. 

Colt, Samuel P., Bristol, R. I. 

Cook, Charles T., Detroit, Mich. 

Cook, Mrs. C. T., Detroit, Mich. 



Coolidge, Francis L., Boston. 

Coolidge, J. Randolph, Boston. 

Coolidge, Mrs. J. R., Boston. 

Coolidge, T. Jefferson, Boston. 

Cotting, Charles E., Jr., Boston. 

Crane, Mrs. Zenas M., Dalton. 

Crosby, Sumner, Brookline. 

Crosby, William S., Brookline. 

Crowninshield, Francis B., Bos- 
ton. 

Cunningham, Mrs. Henry V., 
Grove Hall. 

Curtis, Mrs. Greeley S., Boston. 

Curtis, Horatio G., Boston. 

Curtis, Mrs. Horatio G., Boston. 

Curtis, James F., Boston. 

Cutler, George C, Jr., Boston. 

Dabney, George B., Boston. 

Dalton, Mrs. C. H., Boston. 

Davis, Charles S., Boston. 

Davis, Livingston, Milton. 

Day, Mrs. Frank A., Newton. 

Dewey, Francis H., Worcester. 

De Witt, Alexander, Worcester. 

Dexter, Mrs. F. G., Boston. 

Dex-ter, Miss Rose L., Boston. 

Dillaway, W. E. L., Boston. 

Dimick, Orlando W., Water- 
town. 

Dolan, William G., Boston. 

Draper, George A., Boston. 

Drew, Edward B., Cambridge. 

Duryea, Mrs. Herman, New York. 

Eliot, Rev. C. R., Boston. 

Elliott, Mrs. Maud Howe, Boston. 

Ellis, George H., Boston. 

Ely, Adolph C, Watertown. 

Endicott, Henry, Boston. 

Endicott, William, Boston. 

Endicott, William C, Boston. 

Ernst, C. W., Boston. 

Evans, Mrs. Glendower, Boston. 

Everett, Dr. GUver H., Worces- 
ter. 



Fanning, David H., Worcester. 

Faulkner, Miss F. M., Boston. 

Fay, Mrs. Dudley B., Boston. 

Fay, Henry H., Boston. 

Fay, Mrs. Henry H., Boston. 

Fay, Miss Sarah B., Boston. 

Fay, Miss S. M., Boston. 

Fay, Wm. Rodman, Dover, N. H. 

Fenno, Mrs. L. C, Boston. 

Fisher, Miss Annie E., Boston. 

Fiske, Mrs. Joseph N., Boston. 

Fiske, Mrs. Mary Duncan, Bos- 
ton. 

Fitz, Mrs. W. Scott, Boston. 

Fitzpatrick, Thomas B., Brook- 
line. 

Ford, Lawrence A., Boston. 

Foster, Mrs. E. W., Hartford, 
Conn. 

Foster, Mrs. Francis C, Cam- 
bridge. 

Freeman, Miss H. E., Boston. 

Frothingham, Rev. P. R., Boston. 

Fuller, George F., Worcester. 

Fuller, Mrs. Samuel R., Boston. 

Gale, Lyman W., Boston. 

Gammans, Hon. G. H., Boston. 

Gardiner, Robert H., Boston. 

Gardiner, Robert H., Jr., Need- 
ham. 

Gardner, George P., Boston. 

Gardner, Mrs. John L., Boston. 

Gaskins, Frederick A., Milton. 

George, Charles H., Providence, 
R. L 

Gleason, Sidney, Medford. 

Glidden, W. T., Brookline. 

Goff, Darius L., Pawtucket, R. I. 

Goff, Lyman B., Pawtucket, R. I. 

Goldthwait, Mrs. John, Boston. 

Gooding, Rev. A., Portsmouth, 
N. H. 

Gordon, Rev. G. A., D.D., Bos- 
ton. 



8 



Gray, Roland, Boston. 

Green, Charles G., Cambridge. 

Gregg, Eichard B., Boston. 

Grew, Edward W., Boston. 

Griffin, S. B., Springfield. 

Griswold, Merrill, Cambridge. 

Hall, Mrs. Florence Howe, New 
York. 

Hall, Miss Minna B., Longwood. 

Hallowell, John W., Boston. 

Hammond, Mrs. G. G., Boston. 

Haskell, Mrs. E. B., Auburndale. 

Hearst, Mrs. Phebe A., Cali- 
fornia. 

Hemenway, Mrs. Augustus, Bos- 
ton. 

Higginson, Frederick, Brookline. 

Higginson, F. L., Jr., Boston. 

Higginson, Henry Lee, Boston. 

Higginson, Mrs. Henry L., Bos- 
ton. 

Hill, Arthur D., Boston. 

Hill, Dr. A. S., Somerville. 

Hollis, Mrs. S. J., Lynn. 

Holmes, Charles W., Boston. 

Homans, Robert, Boston. 

Howe, Henry Marion, New York. 

Howe, Henry S., Brookline. 

Howe, James G., Milton. 

Howes, Miss Edith M., Brookline. 

Howland, Mrs. 0. O., Boston. 

Hunnewell, Francis W., Boston. 

Hunnewell, Mrs. H. S., Boston. 

Hunnewell, Walter, Jr., Boston. 

Hutchins, Mrs. C. F., Boston. 

lasigi, Miss Mary V., Boston. 

In graham, Mrs. E. T., Wellesley. 

Isdahl, Mrs. C. B., California. 

Jackson, Charles C, Boston. 

Jackson, Patrick T., Cambridge. 

James, Mrs. C. D., Brookline. 

Jenks, Miss C. E., Bedford. 

Johnson, Edward C, Boston. 

Johnson, Rev. H. S., Boston. 



Jones, Mrs. E. C, New Bedford. 

Joy, Mrs. Charles H., Boston. 

Kasson, Rev. F. H., Boston. 

Kellogg, Mrs. Eva D., Boston. 

Kendall, Miss H. W., Boston. 

Kidder, Mrs. Henry P., Boston. 

Kilmer, Frederick M., Somer- 
ville. 

Kimball, Mrs. David P., Boston. 

Kimball, Edward P., Maiden. 

King, Mrs. Tarrant Putnam, Mil- 
ton. 

Kinnicutt, Lincoln N., Worcester. 

Knapp, George B., Boston. 

Kjiowlton, Daniel S., Boston. 

Ivramer, Henry C, Boston. 

Lamb, Mrs. Annie L., Boston. 

Lang, Mrs. B. J., Boston. 

Latimer, Mrs. Grace G., Boston. 

Lawrence, Mrs. A. A., Boston. 

Lawrence, Mrs. James, Groton. 

Lawrence, John Silsbee, Boston. 

Lawrence, Rt. Rev. Wm., Boston. 

Leverett, George V., Boston. 

Ley, Harold A., Springfield. 

Lincoln, L. J. B., Hingham. 

Lincoln, Waldo, Worcester. 

Linzee, J. T., Boston. 

Livermore, Thomas L., Boston. 

Lodge, Hon. Henry C, Boston. 

Logan, Hon. James, Worcester. 

Longfellow, Miss AUce M., Cam- 
bridge. 

Lord, Rev. A. M., Providence, 
R. L 

Loring, Miss Katharine P., Prides 
Crossing. 

Loring, Miss Louisa P., Prides 
Crossing. 

Loring, Mrs. W. Caleb, Boston. 

Lothrop, John, Auburndale. 

Lothrop, Mrs. T. K., Boston. 

Loud, Charles E., Boston. 

Lovering, Mrs. C. T., Boston. 



Levering, Richard S., Boston. 

Lowell, Abbott LaT\Tence, Boston. 

Lowell, Miss Amy, Brookline. 

Lowell, Miss Georgina, Boston. 

Lowell, James A., Boston. 

Lowell, John, Chestnut Hill. 

Lowell, Miss Lucy, Boston. 

Luce, Hon. Robert, Waltham. 

Marrett, Miss H. M., Standish, 
Me. 

Marrs, Mrs. Kingsmill, Boston, 

Mason, Charles F., Watertown. 

Mason, Miss Ellen F., Boston. 

Mason, Miss Ida M., Boston. 

Merriman, Mrs. D., Boston. 

Merritt, Edward P., Boston. 

Meyer, Mrs. G. von L., Boston. 

Minot, the Misses, Boston. 

Minot, J. Grafton, Boston. 

Minot, WilUam, Boston. 

Monks, Mrs. George H., Boston. 

Morgan, Eustis P., Saco, Me. 

Morgan, Mrs. Eustis P., Saco, 
Me. 

Morison, Mrs. John H., Boston. 

Morse, Mrs. Leopold, Boston. 

Morse, Miss Margaret F., Jamaica 
Plain. 

Moseley, Charles H., Boston. 

Motley, Mrs. E. Preble, Boston. 

Motley, Warren, Boston. 

Norcross, Grenville H., Boston. 

Norcross, Mrs. Otis, Boston. 

Oliver, Dr. Henry K., Boston. 

Osgood, Mrs. E. L., Hopedale. 

Osgood, Miss Fanny D., Hope- 
dale. 

Parker, W. Prentiss, Boston. 

Parker, W. Stanley, Boston. 

Parkinson, John, Boston. 

Peabody, Rev. Endicott, Groton. 

Peabody, Frederick W., Boston. 

Peabody, Harold, Boston. 

Peabody, Philip G., Boston. 



Peabody, W. Rodman, Boston. 

Perkins, Charles Bruen, Boston. 

Perkins, Mrs. C. E., Boston. 

Phillips, Mrs. John C, Boston. 

Pickering, Henry G., Boston. 

Pickman, D. L., Boston, 

Pickman, Mrs. D. L., Boston. 

Pierce, Mrs. M. V., Milton. 

Pope, Mrs. A. A., Boston. 

Powers, Mrs. H. H., Newton. 

Pratt, George Dwight, Spring- 
field. 

Prendergast, J. M., Boston. 

Proctor, James H., Boston. 

Putnam, F. Delano, Boston. 

Putnam, Mrs. James J., Boston. 

Rand, Arnold A., Boston. 

Rantoul, Neal, Boston. 

Rantoul, Robert S., Salem. 

Reed, Mrs. Wm. Howell, Boston. 

Remick, Frank W., West Newton. 

Rice, John C, Boston. 

Richards, Miss EUse, Boston. 

Richards, George H., Boston. 

Richards, Mrs. H., Gardiner, Me. 

Richards, Henry H., Groton. 

Richardson, John, Boston. 

Richardson, John, Jr., Readville. 

Richardson, Mrs. John, Jr., Read- 
ville. 

Richardson, Miss M. G., New 
York. 

Richardson, Mrs. M. R., Boston. 

Richardson, W. L., M.D., Boston. 

Roberts, Mrs. A. W., Allston. 

Robie, Frederic H., Watertown. 

Robinson, George F., Watertown. 

Rogers, Miss A. P., Boston. 

Rogers, Miss Flora E., New York. 

Rogers, Henry M., Boston. 

Ropes, Mrs. Joseph A., Boston. 

Rowan, Alfred J., Boston. 

Russell, Miss Marian, Boston. 

Russell, Otis T., Boston. 



10 



Russell, Mrs. Robert S., Boston. 

Russell, Mrs. W. A., Mattapan. 

Russell, Wm. Eustis, Boston. 

Saltonstall, Leverett, Westwood. 

Saltonstall, Mrs. Leverett, West- 
wood. 

Saltonstall, Miss Nora, Chestnut 
Hill. 

Saltonstall, Richard M., Boston. 

Schaff, Capt. Morris, Cambridge. 

Sears, Mrs. Knyvet W., Boston. 

Sears, Willard T., Boston. 

Shattuck, Henry Lee, Boston. 

Shaw, Bartlett M., Watertown. 

Shaw, Mrs. G. Rowland, Boston. 

Shaw, Henry S., Boston. 

Shepard, Harvey N., Boston. 

Slater, Mrs. H. N., Boston. 

Snow, Walter B., WatertoAvn. 

Sohier, Miss Emily L., Boston. 

Sohier, Miss M. D., Boston. 

Sorchan, Mrs. Victor, New York. 

Sprague, F. P., M.D., Boston. 

Stanwood, Edward, Brookline. 

Stearns, Charles H., Brookline. 

Stearns, Mrs. Charles H., Brook- 
line. 

Stearns, Wm. B., Boston. 

Stevens, Miss C. A., New York. 

Sturgis, Francis S., Boston. 

Sturgis, R. CUpston, Boston. 

Thayer, Miss Adele G., Boston. 

Thayer, Rev. G. A., Cincinnati, 0. 

Thayer, Mrs. Nathaniel, Boston. 

Thomdike, Albert, Boston. 

Thorndike, Miss Rosanna D., 
Boston. 

Tifft, Eliphalet T., Springfield. 

Tilden, Miss Alice Foster, Milton. 

Tilden, Miss Edith S., Milton. 

Tingley, S. H., Providence, R. L 



Tuckerman, Mrs. C. S., Boston. 

Tufts, John F., Watertown. 

Underwood, Herbert S., Boston. 

Underwood, Wm. Lyman, Bel- 
mont. 

Villard, Mrs. Henry, New York. 

Wallace, Andrew B., Springfield. 

Ward, Mrs. May Alden, Boston. 

Ware, Miss Mary L., Boston. 

Warren, Miss Ellen W., Boston. 

Warren, J. G., Providence, R. I. 

Washburn, Hon. Charles G., 
Worcester. 

Washburn, Mrs. Frederick A., 
Boston. 

Waters, H. Goodman, Springfield. 

Watson, Thomas A., Boston. 

Watson, Mrs. T. A., Boston. 

Wendell, William G., Boston. 

Wesson, J. L., Boston. 

West, George S., Boston. 

Wheelock, Miss Lucy, Boston. 

Wheelwright, Mrs. Andrew C, 
Boston. 

White, George A., Boston. 

Whitney, Henry M., Brookline. 

Wiggins, Charles, 2d, Cambridge. 

Williams, Mrs. H. C, Framing- 
ham. 

Winsor, Mrs. E., Chestnut Hill. 

Winsor, James B., Providence, 
R. L 

Winsor, Robert, Jr., Boston. 

Winthrop, Mrs. Thomas L., Bos- 
ton. 

Wolcott, Roger, Boston. 

Wright, George S., Watertown. 

Young, Mrs. Benjamin L., Bos- 
ton. 

Young, B. Loring, Weston. 



11 



SYNOPSIS OF THE PEOCEEDIMS 

OF THE 

ANNUAL MEETING OF THE COEPOEATION. 



Watertown, October 10, 1917. 

The annual meeting of the corporation, duly summoned, 
was held to-day at the institution, and was called to order by 
the president, Hon. Francis Henry Appleton, at 3 p.m. 

The proceedings of the last meeting were read and ap- 
proved. 

The annual report of the trustees was accepted and or- 
dered to be printed, together with the usual accompanying 
documents. 

The annual report of the treasurer was presented, accepted 
and ordered to be printed. 

Voted, That acts and expenditures, made and authorized by the 
Board of Trustees, or by any committee appointed by said Board of 
Trustees, during the corporate year closed this day, be and are hereby 
ratified and confirmed. 

The corporation then proceeded to ballot for officers for 
the ensuing year, and the following persons were unani- 
mously elected : — 

President. — Hon. Francis Henry Appleton. 

Vice-President. — George H. Richards. 

Treasurer. — Albert Thorndike. 

Secretary. — Edward E. Allen. 



12 



Trustees. — Mrs. George Angier, Francis Henry Apple- 
ton, Walter Cabot Baylies, William Endicott, Robert H. 
Hallowell, James A. Lowell, George H. Richards, and Rich- 
ard M. Saltonstall. 

Mr. Philip G. Peabody was unanimously elected a member 
of the corporation. 

The Director spoke of his summons, just received, to go 
to Washington as a member of an advisory committee to the 
government, which is now considering preparedness for the 
war-blinded. President Appleton assured him that he might 
offer the use of the facilities of the Perkins Institution for 
such scheme of the re-education of these men as might ap- 
pear to him advisable. 

The meeting then adjourned. 

EDWARD E. ALLEN, 

Secretxiry. 



13 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES. 



Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind, 
Watertown, October 10, 1917. 

To the Members of the Corporation. 

Ladies and Gentlemen : — As we have previously- 
reported, a residential school like ours needs to be an 
instrumentahty for the socializing of its pupils. 
Indeed, we so planned the buildings at Watertown 
that they would lend themselves intimately to this 
kind of education as being our peculiar problem. 
The institution community of some 400 people all 
told, divided up as it now is, first, into two main 
groups and, second, into fifteen households, is no 
longer institutional in character but as normal and 
natural as conditions will admit. We doubt if the 
socialized education of so many blind children could 
have been much better planned for. In so saying 
we do not forget that the degree of our success with a 
given set of children depends mainly on the spirit 
which the director and his staff is able to infuse into 
their work of service. But the Perkins Institution 
has always commanded a singularly excellent corps 
of workers; and now that its government is less cen- 
tralized than ever through the placing of an im- 
mediate responsibility on to more shoulders than 
formerly, — twelve matrons instead of ten, for ex- 

14 



ample, and four masters with house duties instead of 
two, — the need of extreme care in their selection is 
greater than ever. The cottage family plan, as we 
aim to carry it out, necessarily means the inter- 
dependence of the taught and the teacher; hence, a 
given amount of responsibihty is intended to fall 
upon the children and youth, under which they should 
grow stronger and more efficient. We believe they 
must do so. 

All which this implies in the daily life at the school 
makes for the socialized education above referred to. 
But there are other influences tending to further it, 
especially the many and various ways that come to 
us or are sought by us for mingling in the life outside 
the institution. All save a very few of the pupils 
have homes and visit them as often as conditions 
permit, a few every day, more every week, almost all 
over the shorter holidays, and absolutely all each 
summer vacation. Those remaining over Sundays 
attend the church of their parents' choice, and wher- 
ever it can be managed those who attend Sunday 
schools mingle in classes with the young people of 
the neighborhood. Acquaintance naturally leads to 
some intervisiting, which is encouraged by us; also 
to mutual invitations to parties, for under restric- 
tions, the propriety of which our pupils are made to 
understand, they may and sometimes do invite to the 
school dances even young people of the opposite sex, 
much as happens at any modern, well regulated 
boarding-school. Our pupils often go down street 



15 



and through buying little things at the stores learn 
their cost. They travel about in car and train and so 
learn how to get about. We take them to many con- 
certs. They themselves give concerts to which the 
public is invited in. As a result they are invited to 
sing at many an affair outside. At most of these 
light refreshments are served, — no bad experience 
for blind people in handling themselves in such 
matters, especially when served standing. The daily 
cottage life involving not alone the contributory 
housework but the meeting at table or in the living 
room with house matron, teachers, and frequent 
guests, — the frequent intercottage visiting, the 
occasional little house-parties, especially at Hallow- 
e'en, at the Christmas tree festivities and when out- 
side friends come in to private theatricals and other 
entertainments, — all these experiences are most 
helpful, making as they do for a better mutual under- 
standing and an improved social ease. Additional 
affairs leading to ''community participation," as our 
Director calls it, occur each year. This year there 
have been an unusual number. The Hampton In- 
stitute Quartet and our choir sang for each other. 
A troupe of Tufts College undergraduates presented 
Percy MacKaye's ''Mater" on our stage. Following 
visits and talks to our pupils by Dr. and Mrs. Luther 
H. Gulick, our girls' Pequossette Camp Fire group 
was invited to lead the singing at a lecture and 
demonstration by Dr. Gulick in Ford Hall, Boston; 
and they did so. The same girls took part with 



16 



about 2,000 others in a Grand Council Fire and 
Masque in Mechanics Hall, Boston, one of them being 
called upon to sing the Sunrise Song in that vast hall. 
The camp fire groups from the neighboring city of 
Newton came twice to the institution to practise 
their marching for this Grand Council Fire with our 
own group of girls. The ladies of a Watertown music 
club gave in our fine hall a guest night musicale, to 
which many local people came who had not before 
visited the institution. Again, about 300 school chil- 
dren with their teachers came there to a special 
performance for them of our Christmas carols. Four 
patriotic lectures, given there under the auspices of 
the local camp of the Sons of Veterans, brought 
together large audiences both of inside and of outside 
people. Then this year timely and stirring talks 
were given to the school and guests, especially on 
''The League to Enforce Peace" by Samuel J. Elder, 
Esq., on ''The Service of the Y. M. C. A. Huts," by 
Rev. D. Brewer Eddy, and on "The Fighting Spirit" 
by Rabbi Levi. 

Participations of another sort were contributions 
of sewing for the Belgian children, and knitting for 
the soldiers, also suppUes sent to the Surgical Dress- 
ings Committee at the Peter Bent Brigham Hos- 
pital, the latter made by all the girls but the material 
paid for, at a cost of $48.60, out of our Pequossette 
Camp Fire funds, won summer before last as a prize. 
Following a vividly given lecture to the school and 
friends by Miss Winifred Holt on her work for the 



17 



war-blinded of France, there fell upon our pupils an 
added eagerness to be useful to their fellow sufferers 
in this great emergency; and so the boys who had 
lately presented with great success Shakespeare's 
'' Merchant of Venice" repeated it in two perform- 
ances for the benefit of the war-blinded and raised 
$900, for which amount they proudly sent their 
check. The girls proposed subscribing for a $50 
Liberty Bond and were able to do so. The blind men 
and women of our workshop at South Boston also 
subscribed, — nine of them individually and four 
collectively. 

Such co-operative activities as those indicated 
above cannot but help broaden the minds and hearts 
of the physically shut in, our pupils or employees, 
and extend their horizon and make them better 
citizens. They even raise the status of the institu- 
tion and should bind it more firmly than ever to the 
community. However, the spirit of the Perkins 
Institution has ever been noble, and its schooling not 
institutional but emancipatory and socializing. 

Throughout the year the Maria Kemble Oliver 
Fund has brought much pleasure and musical culti- 
vation to our serious students of music, to whom the 
opportunity of hearing the works of the best com- 
posers interpreted by the finest musicians is an in- 
valuable part of their training. Thus the privilege of 
attending the symphony concerts in Boston, the 
series of Sunday afternoon concerts in Symphony 
Hall, a choral concert in Mechanics Hall, recitals by 
Fritz Kreisler, Julia Gulp and Harold Bauer, and a 

18 



lecture by Mr. Havrah Hubbard have all come 
to our pupils through the wise expenditure of this 
fund. 

Life at the school is joyful. Every visitor perceives 
that. Whether or not it is also energizing depends 
very much on how many of the pupils are energiz- 
able. Some are unfortunately wholly unpromising, 
but of most much may be expected, and in proportion 
as they can acquire and hold a saving state of mind. 
Those who cannot do this join the unfortunate blind 
in the world, who need continued help of some 
kind and ought to have it. Such help might well be 
either financial or, better, in the form of definite 
and ample provision of opportunity for gainful em- 
ployment, or even, in the neediest cases, both. But 
we trust that in our community it will not come as 
special class legislation, the ^' blind pension," for 
which some of the adult blind and their mistaken 
friends have been clamoring even in Massachusetts. 

A good many of those who become our pupils and 
fail while at school, eventually join the ranks of the 
needy. It seems bound to be so among so many and 
such heterogeneous material. Yet we are always 
trying to do more to rouse all the hopeful to efficiency. 
A year ago we reported having placed four graduates 
in excellent positions. This year we placed another, 
a totally blind young man, as instructor of piano 
tuning and the industries at the Oregon School for 
the Blind. The placement agent of the Massachu- 
setts Commission has again secured permanent and 
temporary positions for several, and others have 

19 



obtained jobs for themselves. Of late years training 
in salesmanship has been given in our schools and 
encouragement imparted to earn while at home sum- 
mers instead of idhng the time away. Last summer 
this training bore larger fruit here than usual, for 
among other things eight boys have reported sales 
of brushes amounting collectively to $1,762.90. Now, 
as a consequence, those boys have grown immensely 
in importance both to themselves and to others. 
Two of them have developed ambition to attend the 
local public high school and now go there daily from 
the institution. Some of our older girls did splen- 
didly, too, as mothers' helpers and the like. As a 
direct result of all this our teachers report this fall a 
most promising outlook for the school year just 
begun. There is no question that a hopeful state of 
mind works magically in a community of handi- 
capped people. 

The Perkins Institution is a day and boarding 
school for blind and nearly blind pupils between the 
ages of five and nineteen. A few are gladly per- 
mitted to remain into manhood and womanhood in 
order to finish, but as most are children, so the 
conduct of all must accord with the system beheved 
best for them. Smoking, for example, is forbidden, 
and no young man may remain who is known to 
persist in breaking this rule. All three of our directors 
have been quite positive in this matter and have 
even been singularly fortunate in finding non-smoking 
men teachers. Mr. Allen explains to his boys his 
reasons for not allowing them to smoke and makes it 

20 



plain that, if they want to remain, they must refrain. 
These reasons are chiefly physiological and apply to 
youthful people; but he gives them moral and ad- 
ministrative reasons also. At any rate he expects 
those who are going to smoke to wait until after 
leaving school when, if they feel competent to add 
this liability to the liability of bUndness, they are at 
liberty to do so. This statement is made here and at 
this time, since last year four young men were sus- 
pended from school for smoking. Two of them have 
returned this fall. 

As the formal education of by far the most of our 
pupils stops when they leave us and as their means 
and opportunities of acquiring correct notions of 
many matters desirable for all voting citizens to have 
are uncommonly limited and as there has never been 
time enough for their consideration at school, the 
directors, superintendents and principals of a few 
schools for the blind have met twice within the year, 
as a self -constituted efficiency committee, for the 
purpose of discussing suggested changes in curricula. 
The principal teacher of our boys' school, Mr. Molter, 
who is tremendously interested in all this matter, has 
been carefully trying out the changes allowed, and 
he reports no little eagerness and enthusiasm on the 
part of his high school pupils affected. The experi- 
ment will continue. One of the topics which was in- 
spirationally treated here in twelve lessons is astron- 
omy. Only the most general conceptions were 
touched upon, and yet it was quite evident that the 
boys acquired an approximate understanding of 

21 



what the subject is all about, and certainly a better 
comprehension of infinite space than they ever had 
before and also a more reverential attitude of mind. 
Among the other topics similarly treated, though 
lending themselves more to historical treatment, are 
taxation, organized labor, trusts and monopolies, 
prison reform, and the development of western 
Europe. The quantities of fresh miscellaneous lit- 
erature which keep coming to the institution, — 
special articles, papers, reports of other schools and 
of new movements, books, pedagogical magazines, 
and periodicals of current history, — all such lit- 
erature lies for a while on the ''round table" in the 
library, and there the teachers spend many an odd 
half hour in looking it over. Residential schools 
which do not invite this sort of reading lose a very 
splendid opportunity of indirectly broadening their 
pupils' minds. 

Many of the pamphlets and clippings recently 
added to our Special Reference Library on Blindness 
and the Blind are on the subject of the re-creation and 
re-education of the war-blinded. The clippings alone 
already fill four thick volumes. As reported last 
year, this unique and rich library of ours is recognized 
by the American Library Association as ''sponsor" 
for the subject of blindness. Five people profession- 
ally interested in our subject have recently spent 
many hours reading and studying in it, one of them 
a week, one a month, and another six weeks; and 
furthermore they have had the continuous help of 
our extremely well equipped special librarian. What 

22 



vision Mr. Anagnos had when he started his collec- 
tion seventeen years ago! 

One of the above-mentioned students is a grad- 
uate of our school, who was invited to return to pre- 
pare herself for giving a course of lectures, under 
the auspices of the Special Aid Society for American 
Preparedness, on the general psychology of blindness, 
which course she has since repeated in Boston to 75 
women anxious to prepare themselves to answer the 
anticipated call to help hearten and re-educate the 
war-blinded men who may return to this community. 
The course included learning Braille and inspecting 
all the Massachusetts agencies in behalf of the blind. 
It will be resumed again this fall and will doubtless 
provide experience in personal service to those of the 
blind adult who are already in our midst. 

The Institution entertained also for a few weeks a 
young woman from New York who wished to prepare 
herself to teach blinded soldiers and is now en- 
gaged in this occupation in France. Naturally we 
are glad to be able to aid in such a cause, and we 
trust we may have other opportunities of doing so. 

While the school and lending library of embossed 
books continues to grow in numbers and in use alike 
— the total circulation for the year having been 
12,860 — yet the Howe Memorial Press has pub- 
lished but little that is new, except a mass of music 
scores, new editions of old matter, and a few books 
and stories on the great war; for the energies of that 
press have been drafted off to two matters: first, to 
a rehabilitation under its new manager — chiefly 

23 



the adding of much shelf room and the relocation 
and re-pigeonholing of its vast body of plates — and 
second, to the equipping of a machine shop for the 
making of new and improved appliances used by the 
blind and their instructors. Fortunately the former 
manager had so husbanded the resources of the Trust, 
which is separately endowed, that the indicated 
expenditure could readily be borne. 

Most of the classroom appliances used in our 
schools have heretofore been made to order at various 
places, and it so happens that little reliance could be 
placed on constant accuracy of workmanship, es- 
pecially in Braille slates or similar writing appliances. 
Now, nicety of registration, for example, between 
the parts of a Braille slate where the gauge is very 
small and where the position and number of the 
points are all that determine their meaning, is quite 
essential; and so the Howe Memorial Press, which 
was founded for the purpose of supplying appliances 
as well as music and books, has been asked by vote 
of the Uniform Type Commission to undertake to 
manufacture the former for the profession. And it 
has begun to do so, having turned out within the 
year about 1,000 Braille pocket slates, 650 of which 
have been sold at cost or given away. 

Reliable ■wTiting slates of the kind are likely to be 
in increasing demand, now that the turning towards 
a Braille type is general and manifest, and that 
diversity of systems is soon to disappear. At last 
summer's convention of the American Association of 



24 



Workers for the Blind, held in Portland, Maine, it 
was voted to endorse the recommendations of the 
Commission on Uniform Type, that all American 
agencies for the blind try to unite on British Braille, 
Grade One and a Half, the doing of which, while 
it would give all the English-speaking blind one 
and the same alphabet, would yet rid the Ameri- 
can portion of having to conform to the drawbacks of 
Grade Two — which code American schoolmen find 
to be cumbered with confusing rules and exceptions 
more difficult to bear in mind than all the rest of 
the system. Though the Perkins Institution long 
ago put forth and is still using the most perfect and 
efficient embossed alphabets of their kind, the Boston 
line type of Dr. Howe and the Improved or Ameri- 
can Braille system of Mr. Joel W. Smith, a valued 
former pupil and teacher, yet the demand for gen- 
eral uniformity is so loud that, all things considered, 
we and the other schools using it should not be doing 
right to persist in our narrower, though better path. 
Therefore, reluctant as we are to say it, whichever 
way the country goes Perkins must go too. This 
is the opinion of our present director who, as a 
former classroom teacher of the blind, both in Eng- 
land and in America, practically conversant with all 
systems, still feels that in giving up the simple and 
scientifically arranged American Braille the blind of 
the country are resigning a better tool for a worse 
one, — a thing people, who are already weighted 
down with a mighty handicap, can seldom afford to 



25 



do. However, uniformity, even though not a step 
in advance, will be in itself a distinct gain. 

Our workshop for adults at South Boston, in a part 
of which the new Braille appliances are being made, 
has passed a better year than was feared would be 
possible in these times of growing public thrift. The 
22 men and women there have been about as busy 
as usual, though not continuously so, and though 
they have been paid increased piece-work wages, 
nevertheless the total output has been such that the 
business has again practically taken care of itself. 
Reference has already been made to the fact that 
nine of these blind workers have each managed to 
buy a Liberty Bond and four of them another. 

There has died within the year one who for some 
time has been carried on the rolls of the institution as 
manager emeritus of our workshop at South Boston. 
We speak of Mr. Eugene C. Howard, whose fifteen 
years of managing that shop was of the consecrated 
and yet practical kind that we love to record. Before 
he took charge of it, the shop, which had been con- 
ducted since 1840, had always cost the institution 
considerable money to run. Afterwards, owing 
largely to the transfer of its salesroom to Boylston 
Street, Boston, where it still is, but partly also to 
Mr. Howard's thrifty business ways and long hours 
of personal devotion, the business of the shop has 
practically taken care of itself; that is, it has given 
steady work to about twenty-two blind adults with- 
out expense to the institution. There are few work- 



26 



shops for the blind of which such a statement can 
properly be made. 

Last year we were glad to furnish room, board and 
washing to a Harvard student from Oklahoma, a 
young man who through accident had newly become 
totally blind. The Pennsylvania Institution for the 
Blind had accorded him the same privileges while 
attending the University of Pennsylvania. The 
Massachusetts and the Pennsylvania schools have 
again exchanged pupil teachers and with mutual 
satisfaction as well as unquestioned advantage to 
the young women themselves. 

For some fifteen years the Howe Memorial Club, 
an organization of the boys, has held exercises at the 
school in November, the birth month of Dr. Howe 
and Mr. Anagnos. One or more members of the 
Howe family have always been present and spoken, 
as has a lifelong friend of the school and its directors, 
Mr. Frank B. Sanborn. Mr. Sanborn has likewise 
always spoken at the exercises of Founder's Day at 
the Kindergarten. His death last winter is a distinct 
loss, for the whole school had come to depend on his 
occasional visits and his delightful reminiscent talks. 

Upon receiving the resignation of the treasurer, 
Mr. William Endicott, in May, 1917, the Trustees 
took the following action: — 

Voted, to accept with deep regret the resignation 
of the Treasurer, William Endicott, and to approve 
the following statement, presented by Mr. Salton- 
stall and the Secretary : — 



27 



Mr. Endicott was elected Treasurer January 8, 1904. 
Although a very busy man, he always had time for any 
institution business. He has regularly attended the meet- 
ings of the Trustees and of the Corporation, freely giving 
the counsel and advice which he could so well give. He 
understood the principles of the institution and was jealous 
of its good, both spiritual and material. His interest in 
blind people was ever sympathetic and practical. We con- 
gratulate the American organization created to rehabilitate 
the devastated towns and villages abroad that it can com- 
mand his devoted services. 

The Director read papers last season as follows: — 
On ''The Problem of the Feebleminded Blind Child" 
before the Massachusetts Society for Mental Hygiene, 
on ''Present-Day Factors in the Schools for the 
Blind, as Emphasized at Perkins Institution" before 
the American School Hygiene Association, and on 
"The Education of the Blind," being the address 
given at the closing exercises of the Austine Institu- 
tion for the Education of the Deaf and the Blind, 
Brattleboro, Vermont. 

This Austine Institution, which has been running 
for the past five years, has now closed its department 
for the blind, both because the per capita expense 
of keeping it open was large and because the Super- 
intendent perceived that it is better for the deaf and 
the blind alike not to be thrown together at school. 
This fall Vermont has entered five of its state pupils 
with us. 

At the beginning of the current year, October 1, 

28 



1917, the number of blind persons registered at the 
Perkins Institution was 315, four more than on the 
same date of the previous year. This number in- 
cludes 76 boys and 79 girls in the upper school, 63 
boys and 61 girls in the lower school, 15 teachers and 
oJ95cers, and 21 adults in the workshop at South 
Boston. There have been 54 admitted and 50 dis- 
charged during the year. 

Causes of Blindness of Pupils admitted during the 
School Year 1916-1917, — Ophthalmia neonatorum, 
12; Interstitial keratitis, 1; Phlyctenular keratitis, 
2; Ulcerative keratitis, 1; Injuries, 3; Atrophy of 
the optic nerve, 7; Albinism, 1; Congenital, 1; Con- 
genital amblyopia, 1 ; Congenital cataracts, 5 ; Con- 
genital cataract and optic atrophy, 1; Congenital 
cataract and conical corneae, 1; Congenital ab- 
normalities of nerve, 1 ; Congenital microphthalmos, 
2; Congenital cyclitis, 1 ; Irido-cyclitis, 1; Buphthal- 
mos, 1; Retinitis pigmentosa, 1; Glaucoma, 1; 
Meningitis, 1; Progressive myopia, 1; Glioma, 1. 

We must not close this report without calling at- 
tention to the increase in the expenses of every kind 
in carrying on the Institution. The high cost of 
living is seriously felt in every family, and it must be 
remembered that there are housed in the Institution 
about four hundred persons who must be fed and 
kept warm. We therefore appeal to the friends of 
the Institution, who have made it what it is, to stand 
by it in its present needs and by their gifts so increase 
its income as to enable it to meet the situation with- 
out impairing its funds. 

29 



Death of Members of the Corporation. 
A. Parker Browne; Mrs. Helen Nichols, 
widow of Samuel Cabot; Hon. Jonathan Chace 
of Providence; Henry G. Chapin of Springfield; 
Mrs. Louisa F., widow of Zenas Marshal Crane; 
Mrs. Caroline Gardiner, widow of Charles 
Pelham Curtis; Livingston Gushing; Dr. San- 
ford Hanscom; Charles Henry Hersey; John 
Hogg; Mrs. Clitheroe Dean, wife of Charles 
L. James; Mrs. Helena M., widow of Barker B. 
Kent, M.D.; Mrs. Alice K., wife of Truman L. 
Quimby; Melvin Eugene Rice of South Sudbury; 
Mrs. Caroline R. Webb, wife of George K. Sabine; 
Franklin B. Sanborn; Prof. Charles Joyce 
White. 

All which is respectfully submitted by 

ANNIE GILMAN ANGIER, 
FRANCIS HENRY APPLETON, 
WALTER CABOT BAYLIES, 
WILLIAM ENDICOTT, 
THOMAS B. FITZPATRICK, 
PAUL REVERE FROTHINGHAM, 
ROBERT H. HALLOWELL, 
JAMES ARNOLD LOWELL, 
GEORGE H. RICHARDS, 
WILLIAM L. RICHARDSON, 
ANNETTE P. ROGERS, 
RICHARD M. SALTONSTALL, 

Trustees. 
30 



THE PROBLEM OF THE FEEBLEMINDED 
BLIND CHILD/ 



The wording of the topic given me to treat, describ- 
ing the particular blind child in question as feeble- 
minded, is not the wording which teachers of the 
blind prefer. Realizing as we do that feebleminded- 
ness is the real defect, we think of these doubly 
afflicted children not as the feebleminded blind but 
as the blind feebleminded. To be sure the same topic 
which I treated ten years ago in Philadelphia was 
worded as this one is, yet its conclusions showed that 
I had more or less unconsciously turned the title 
round; for they read as follows: ''What shall be 
done with these doubly afflicted children? Their 
principal [or central] defect is their feeblemindedness ; 
their blindness is but superficial. Like all other 
feebleminded children they need parental and per- 
manent custodial care. Hence some provision should 
be made for them at institutions for the feeble- 
minded. What form this provision should take 
must be left for the superintendents of those insti- 
tutions to determine." You see how nicely I 
shifted the burden from our shoulders on to those 
already supporting the burden of a most hetero- 
geneous group, — the idiots, the imbeciles and the 
morons. 

' This paper was presented by Mr. Allen at a conference of the Massachusetts Society 
for Mental Hygiene, Ford Hall, Boston, December 15, 1916. 



31 



When in the nineties some of us teachers of special 
children had begun to receive recognition by the 
National Education Association, the department, 
now known as that of Special Education, was termed 
''Department Sixteen, — The Deaf, The Blind, and 
The Feebleminded." Now, at a convention of those 
days, the room in which this department was to 
meet was marked with a sign too short for the whole 
title, and so the artist had added after the words 
"The Deaf, The Blind" the abbreviation ''etc." 
This was evidently too much for a teacher of the 
feebleminded present, for he remonstrated thus: 
"You needn't consort with us if you don't want to; 
but, if we are coming in with you, we object to being 
called the 'Andsoforths'." And yet the feebleminded 
are a miscellaneous people; but he might have as- 
severated that there are "andsoforths" among the 
blind and, I presume, among the deaf, not to men- 
tion others. Dr. Howe's first little group of feeble- 
minded children was known as the School for Idiots. 
It was taught in a part of the Perkins Institution 
but is said to have been soon removed elsewhere, 
largely because the blind pupils in the other parts of 
the house objected to being classed with idiots. And 
so it has been to this day, — both they and their 
educators have always made this objection; for as 
we say, on the one hand, the defect of the feeble- 
minded is central and unalterable; that, whether 
untrained or trained to the limit of their capacity, 
they eventually require permanent custodial care 
and restraint; — in short, that the feebleminded are 

32 



socially incompetent. And we say, on the other 
hand, that the defect of the blind is superficial and 
superable and that, when properly trained, they 
may be expected to make good in society at large; 
in other words, that the blind are socially competent. 
And it is so. The whole fabric of the education of 
the blind is woven on the assumption not only that 
the blind may be fitted for efficient citizenship but 
for contributing their own share to the world's 
progress. 

The problems of the bhnd and of the feebleminded 
being, then, wholly different, I still contend that 
where the double affliction appears in an individual 
child the problem is the problem of the feebleminded. 
But should the problem be handled as such in prac- 
tice? The following very competent authorities: 
two superintendents of institutions for the feeble- 
minded, one active and one retired; the principal 
of one of the largest and best equipped schools for 
the blind; a principal teacher of a school for the 
feebleminded; and a psychologist who has had wide 
experience in observing and testing feebleminded 
children of every grade; — meeting in Vineland to 
discuss this question two years ago, answered "Yes." 
Nevertheless and notwithstanding, the bhnd feeble- 
minded child is not yet commonly admitted into 
schools for the feebleminded, — not even into that 
training school where the consultation was held 
and the admission made. 

The reason for this state of affairs is obvious 
enough. The problem of the feebleminded is one of 

33 



numbers far beyond the provision for their care, 
while that of the bhnd is rarely one of great numbers 
but rather of adequate inspirational opportunities 
in their comparatively few and small day and resi- 
dential schools. Superintendents of the feebleminded 
institutions naturally word the problem as this 
paper has, the feebleminded blind child, and look 
to us blind-school men to receive and train our own. 
And indeed we have been doing more or less of this 
all along; that is to say, we have been admitting 
for trial those doubtful cases which had no other 
place to go to, in the behef that some of them would 
prove hopeful. And we have usually retained as 
pupils even the unpromising so long as their presence 
was not plainly harmful to others. There was room 
for them, and we pitied them and so, against our 
better judgment, we let the matter drift. Occa- 
sionally a low-grade boy or girl would be admitted 
by mistake, as in this single instance which I will 
cite: A boy, totally blind and without previous 
schooling, was admitted into an institution for the 
blind. Although twelve years of age, his develop- 
ment was that of a child of two or three years. He 
had many habits of motion, rocking his body furiously 
backwards and forwards, shaking his hands and 
tapping his feet when excited, as he easily became. 
He could not use his hands and therefore could not 
care for himself or engage in kindergarten games or 
occupations. And yet withal he was a winsome child, 
smihng sweetly when pleased, fond of music and 
listening to the reading of stories with quiet com- 

34 



posure, although not comprehending their meaning. 
It is obvious that such a child cannot be expected to 
gain much if anything through residence in a school 
for the bhnd or through the training which it affords, 
even in the simplest forms of manual work. What he 
requires is custodial care for life where the necessary 
attention and such training as he is capable of receiv- 
ing will fill his cup of happiness to the fullest extent. 
Some of us have even kept for a few weeks such 
cases as this one, inflicting its care upon a willing 
teacher and housemother, only to do at the end of 
those weeks what we should have done at the out- 
set, — send the child back whence it came. Oc- 
casionally, indeed, we have been repaid for our 
patience and forbearance; I have in mind more than 
one serious-minded simpleton of a boy, having a 
little useful sight, who developed into a willing and 
responsible manservant within the school for the 
blind, where he was employed on regular wages to 
the end of his days. Such people often make the 
best and most trustworthy servants in an institu- 
tion where they are understood and protected. The 
same boys would not have lived equally serviceable 
and happy lives within an institution for the feeble- 
minded, for there they would have been handicapped 
by having less sight than their companions, whereas 
in their institution for the blind they had the ad- 
vantage of more sight. In the realm of the blind 
the one-eyed man is often king. In my own school 
some of the dearest, most willingly helpful little 
boys are evidently little imbeciles. They can see a 

35 



bit and are so kind and useful to the brighter children 
who cannot that we do not find it in our hearts to 
turn them out, hoping that when they become older 
pupils their desire to do things will perhaps enable 
them to learn to do housework or recane a chair or 
perform some other simple craft by which they will 
be able to earn part of their support at home or 
within an institution. I recall the case of a little 
totally blind fellow of German parentage, who was 
retained despite the fact that he was irritable and 
violent at times and that he made the others afraid 
of him. We knew that his father was a wife-beater 
and that the home conditions were generally de- 
plorable. We kept him, for through a friend we 
learned that the changes we were able to make in 
this high-grade feebleminded boy had gradually re- 
formed the family who were ashamed to do in the 
presence of their child what he told them on his 
vacations they never did at the institution. Since he 
has grown up this boy has been employed in a work- 
ing home for blind men. 

Now training the blind feebleminded to be useful, 
or to reform his home may not be the business of a 
school for the blind, but it is gratifying, nevertheless. 
Every such school has done this and will continue 
to do it so long as it has the room and the heart and 
knows that there is no other way. Still, doing this 
with a few pupils only helps individuals. The prob- 
lem of the blind feebleminded child cannot be solved 
in this kindly manner. The Perkins Institution 
alone has discharged within the past twelve years 

36 



96 of its pupils, untrainable by its means and meth- 
ods, because they were feebleminded. This is an 
average of 8 a year. Of these 96, 63 belonged to 
Massachusetts. Most of them were returned to 
their homes, but admittance for a few of them was 
secured at Waverley and at Wrentham. At least two 
of these became most unhappy in their associations 
with the feebleminded only, missing the stimulating 
companionship of the bright. 

Why did the Perkins Institution do this heartless 
thing? Because its problem of the education of the 
blind is in itself a difficult and expensive undertaking 
and will be defeated if it is to be complicated by a 
wholly different one. For this reason I have ap- 
peared at recent legislative hearings and spoken 
in behalf of the establishment of a third institution 
for the feebleminded in Massachusetts, hoping that a 
department for the blind feebleminded might some- 
how be created there. 

In the Perkins Institution the few subnormals Hve 
distributed among the normals but go to school by 
themselves and are given much more manual than 
mental occupation. This they resent, being in- 
fluenced by their surroundings to wish to study the 
same things as the other boys and girls do. In the 
case of the boys there is a special teacher for them; 
in that of the girls all teachers take their turn, each 
plan seeming to work best as arranged. But, ''no 
feebleminded child should be admitted to any 
classes in which children are supposed to be trained 
to take independent positions in the world." In 

37 



the city of London the bUnd feebleminded children 
have latterly been removed from the day classes of 
the blind and instructed by themselves in a building 
known as Stormont House. The reports of the result 
of this temporary segregation are favorable. The 
same thing has just been done in one or two Ohio 
cities which maintain public school centers for blind 
children. But no American residential school has 
yet opened a special cottage in which to observe 
doubtful newcomers, though at least two of our 
schools, of which the Perkins Institution is one and 
the Pennsylvania school at Overbrook the other, have 
talked of having such an observation cottage, not as 
a solution of this whole serious problem but as a 
means of preserving and protecting from vitiation 
the sweetening and energizing environment which is 
a basic element in the successful education for 
eJEciency of the educable blind. Many a blind person 
has made his blindness a stepping stone to life suc- 
cess; but where blindness is coupled with feeble- 
mindedness the handicap is too great to be over- 
come. We believe, therefore, that the mingling in 
institution life of these two classes of pupils is both 
unwise and uneconomic. Besides, admitting them 
as pupils into a residential school for the blind is at 
best but a temporary expedient; for such schools 
have no custodial departments and the feeble- 
minded, whether blind or not, should not be returned 
into the world. Most of our institutions for the 
blind are public foundations (state schools) and 
have no moneys for separate work with feebleminded 

38 



children who are also blind. Three or four incor- 
porated schools, like the Perkins Institution, could 
establish separate cottages for their care and train- 
ing, but what would eventually happen? The cus- 
todial cases would remain with us, the children would 
in time become adult, and in two or three decades our 
custodial feebleminded department would outnumber 
the school department proper, thus using up the only 
funds available in our communities for educating the 
educable blind. Evidently, then, this is a solution 
not to be seriously entertained. 

We at Watertown are noticing with no little con- 
cern the gradual pressure for admittance of more 
and more applicants with mixed defects. The ma- 
terial seems to be averaging lower in the scale of 
hopefulness. This is due, doubtless, to the growing 
heterogeneity of our population, but surely also to 
efficient labors in the prevention of blindness. The 
Massachusetts Commission for the Blind is able to 
state that in the year 1915 it knew of but a single 
new case in the whole Commonwealth of total blind- 
ness in both eyes from that heretofore most damag- 
ing eye disease of infancy, ophthalmia neonatorum. 
Surely a magnificently hopeful showing for the com- 
munity. Now this disease has contributed to the 
Perkins and other institutions for the blind from 
one-fourth to one-third of their whole pupil bodies. 
Moreover, ophthalmia neonatorum resulting as it 
most often does in a merely superficial defect — a 
damaging of the eye alone — contributes pupils of 
the brighter, more hopeful kind. Hence, the gradual 

39 



lessening of new pupils blinded from this cause may 
be expected to leave with us a larger proportion of 
those rendered blind from other, much more serious 
and deep-seated causes, including cerebral troubles. 
Though at present Perkins has a fine lot of pupils, 
it may not always have so fine a one. 

Having in mind this possibility of a change in 
pupil material and being encouraged by Dr. Fernald, 
Dr. Fairbanks and others, I last year brought to 
Watertown a psychologist, trained both at Vassar 
and at Vineland, whose duties have begun with the 
mental testing of the present pupils. She has been 
applying as many tests of the usual Binet-Simon 
scale, recommended by Goddard, as are practical 
to the blind, together with such additional tests 
adapted to blindness as should be equivalent to those 
omitted. We are cooperating with others who are 
working with the same scale, tentatively standard- 
ized for the blind, and anticipate achieving results 
that may be illuminating and will at least give 
educators of the blind a clearer understanding of 
their pupils than has before been possible. We 
trust that our study will be a contribution to the 
solution of the question under consideration in this 
paper. 

These tests being taken only under the best of 
conditions, the work proceeds but slowly. I shall 
touch here upon a few of the findings. The whole 
number of pupils so far examined is 172. Of these 
exactly one-fourth or 43, lost sight from ophthalmia 
neonatorum. And of these 43 only 8, or 18 per cent., 

40 



fell to the mental level of four years below normal 
and are called feebleminded. The other figures here 
given apply to the block unit of 120 children, com- 
prising the lower school, — those from the kinder- 
garten to the fifth grade inclusive. Of these 12 per 
cent, tested feebleminded; 28 per cent, backward; 
and 60 per cent, normal. It is interesting to note 
that 15 children, or one more than tested feeble- 
minded, tested above age or supernormal; but par- 
ticularty significant in connection with the topic 
before us is it to learn that the totally blind showed 
more normal and fewer subnormal cases than did 
the partially sighted. Anthropometrical measure- 
ments are also being made and the family histories 
and the causes and period of blindness recorded for 
the future study. 

Whilst I have prepared the present paper under 
slightly unfavorable conditions, it yet reflects the 
somewhat hazy ideas which I have upon the im- 
mediate solution of the complex problem of the so- 
called Feebleminded Blind Child, which ideas of 
mine, as is doubtless evident to you, are not so 
positive and clear as they were ten years ago in 
Philadelphia, when I said the matter was the im- 
mediate business of the superintendents of the insti- 
tutions for the feebleminded. But I would have you 
understand that I still beUeve that the proper agency 
for the final solution of the problem would be indi- 
cated were the question worded, The Blind Feeble- 
minded Child. 

EDWARD E. ALLEN. 

41 



NINTH ANNUAL CONCERT 

By the Choir of the Perkins Institution and Massachusetts 
School for the Blind 

In a Program of Christmas Music in the Assembly Hall 
OF the School at Watertown 

Sunday Afternoon, December 17, 1916 (Public Rehearsal) 
AT 3.30 o'clock and 

Monday Evening, December 18, 1916 at 8.15 o'clock. 
The Program. 

PART ONE. 

Anthems and Carols. 
Anthem for Christmas-tide, "Sing, Heavens," . . . Tours 

The Shepherds' Christmas Song, Reimann 

The Sleep of the Child Jesus, Gevaert 

O'er the Cradle of a King, Old Breton Melody 

Christmas Hymn (Antiphonal) 17th century .... Jungst 

Sing We Noel, French Carol of the 16th century 

In Excelsis Gloria, Waddington Cooke 

Silent Night, Franz Gruber 

Song of Adoration, "Sleep, Holy Babe," . . J. B. Dykes 

Anthem for Christmas-tide, "Rejoice greatly," . John E. West 

PART TWO. 

The Holy Child, a cantata for mixed chorus and solo 

voices, with organ accompaniment, . . . Horatio Parker 

The Choir will have the assistance of 
Mrs. LoRA May Lamport, Soprano, Mr. J. Garfield Stone, Tenor, 

Mr. Frederic Cutter, Bass. 
Of the faculty. Miss Starbird, Mezzo-Soprano, Miss Bacon, Pianist, 

Mr. Hartwell, Oj-ganist, Mr. Gardiner, Director. 



42 



1832-1917. 
GRADUATING EXERCISES OF THE PERKINS INSTITU- 
TION AND MASSACHUSETTS SCHOOL 
FOR THE BLIND. 
Thursday, June 21, 1917, 10.30 a.m. 

Program. 

Organ, Fanfare, Lemmens 

Malcolm L. Cobb 

Chorus, "When Spring Awakes," Weinzierl 

Essays: 

The Violet, AdeUne Hambly Wood 

Experiences in Expression, .... Ellen Frances Welch 

Part Song, Barcarolle, Offenbach 

Girls' Glee Club 

"The Achievements of Luther Burbank" ^ 

Annie Elizabeth Minehan 
Essays : 

Lullabies, Rose-Alma Gadbois 

The Evolution of the Pianoforte, . Isaac Walter Phelps, Jr. 

Organ, Gavotte in E flat, Roeder 

Roger T. Walker. 

Address, Mr, Charles F. F. Campbell 

Superintendent, Ohio State School for the Blind. 

Presentation of diplomas and certificates. 

Chorus, "The Twenty-third Psahn," Neidlinger 



Graduates of the Class of 1917. 

Rose-Alma Gadbois. Ellen Frances Welch. 

Annie EHzabeth ^linehan. Adeline Hambly Wood. 

Pianoforte tuning department. 

Thomas Thompson McBride. Francis Charles Nelson, 

Isaac Walter Phelps, Jr. 

Class Colors: Green and Gold. 

Class Flower: The Violet. 

Class Motto : Veritas vincit. 

» Omitted. 

43 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS. 



I. — Acknowledgments for Concerts, Recitals, Lec- 
tures AND Plays. 

To Major Henry Lee Higginson, through Mr. C. A. 
Ellis, for thirty tickets for the course of symphony concerts 
in Sanders Theatre, Cambridge. 

To Miss Florence A. Goodfellow, for ten tickets for a 
course of lectures by Mr. Havrah Hubbard. 

To Mr. Charles R. Sturgis, for an invitation to two 
hundred pupils to attend a performance of "Little Women" 
at the Castle Square Theatre. 

To Miss Mary L. Ware, for two tickets for two recitals 
by The Edith Rubel Trio in Jordan Hall. 

To Mrs. L. D. Gibbs, for two tickets for a pianoforte 
recital by Miss Estelle Neuhaus. 

To Mrs. Eleanor Baldwin Cass, for two tickets for 
readings by Miss Adelle Hoes and assisting artists in Hun- 
tington Hall. 

To Miss Alice Shepard, for eight tickets for a concert for 
the Boston Seaman's Friend Society. 

To Mr. James Friskin, for twelve tickets for a pianoforte 
recital in Jordan Hall. 

To Mrs. G. H. Vidal, for six tickets for a pupils' recital at 
the Faelten Pianoforte School. 



44 



To Mr. Frank W. Sticher, treasurer, for two tickets for 
a concert of the Harvard Alliance for the Blind. 

To Mrs. Louis Rosenbaum, for an invitation to fifteen 
pupils to attend a musical comedy at the Boston Opera 
House. 



II. — Acknowledgments for Recitals, Lectures and 
Dramatics in our Hall. 

To Samuel J. Elder, Esq., for a talk on "The League to 
Enforce Peace." 

To the Rev. D. Brewer Eddy, for a lecture on "In 
Thirty Camps with Tommy Atkins." 

To Rabbi Harry Levi, for a lecture on "The Fighting 
Spirit." 

To Prof. Albert H. Gilmer and students of Tufts and 
Jackson colleges, for a presentation of Percy MacKaye's 
"Mater." 

To Mr. William Strong, for a pianoforte recital. 

To William Frye White, Esq., for a lecture on "Presi- 
dents I Have Known." 

To Mr. John E. Brewin, for two talks on "Salesman- 
ship." 

To Miss Winifred Holt, for a talk on her work in France 
for blinded soldiers. 

To Mrs. Maud Messer, for readings. 

To Prof. Henry Wilder Foote and the Hampton Quar- 
tet, for a concert; and to Mr. Frank A. Whipple, for a 
talk in connection with it. 

To Mrs. E. P. BuRTT, for a talk on her work in a school 
for the blind in China. 

To Miss Mabel Hanson, for a vocal recital. 



45 



To Mr. J. L. Harbour, for a lecture on "Blessed be 
Humor." 

To Dr. and Mrs. Luther H. Gulick, for lectures on 
"Physical Training" and on "The Camp Fire Movement." 

To Mrs. H. H. Powers, for a talk on China. 

HI. — Acknowledgments for Periodicals and News- 
papers. 

American Annals of the Deaf, California News, Christian 
Record (embossed). Christian Register, Christian Science 
Journal, Christian Science Sentinel, Colorado Index, Illu- 
minator (embossed), McClure's Magazine, Matilda Zeigler 
Magazine for the Blind (embossed), the Mentor, Michigan 
Mirror, Ohio Chronicle, Our Dumb Animals, The Silent 
Worker, The Theosophical Path, the Well-Spring, West Vir- 
ginia Tablet, Woman Citizen, Youths' Companion. 

IV. — Acknowledgments for Gifts and Services. 

Dr. Henry Hawkins and Dr. Harold B. Chandler, for 
professional services. 

Massachusetts Charitable Eye and Ear Infirmary, 
Massachusetts General Hospital, Peter Bent Brigham 
Hospital, Children's Hospital, and Psychopathic De- 
partment OF Boston State Hospital, for care and treat- 
ment of pupils. 

Mrs. Walter C. Baylies, Miss Elizabeth Atwood, "a 
sailor," and "the littlest children in the Sunday School of 
the Church of the Disciples," for gifts of money. 

Mrs. David A. Evans, Mrs. Louis Rosenbaum and 
friends, Mr. Abraham D. Sperber, Miss Eleanor T. Hart, 
and Ladies of St. Patrick's Church, Watertown, for parties. 



46 



sociables and entertainments for the pupils; and Mrs. Rosen- 
baum, for a summer outing of three weeks in the country for 
nine pupils. 

Mrs. RosENBAUM, Mrs. George H. Monks, Mrs. C. M. 
Boyd, Miss Belle Garner, Mrs. L. J. Lyons, and Mrs. 
George Moses, for clothing. 

Mr. H. D. Foss of the New England Confectioners' Club, 
Mrs. John Chipman Gray, Mr. John E. Brewin, Mr. 
Frank McLaughlin, Mrs. Harry Bryant, Mr. William 
S. Fielding, and Mr. Leroy S. Eaton, for gifts of fruit, 
confectionery, groceries and maple syrup. 

Mrs. C. M. Bond and Mr. L. W. Cronkhite, for toys; 
and Mrs. George H. Francis, for a pair of skates. 

Mrs. W. C. Ware, for musical instruments; and Miss 
Ratsey, for an "otophone." 

Lady Sophia Campbell, for a picture of Sir Francis 
Campbell and herself. 

The Bible Training School, South Lancaster, Mass., 
the Xavier Braille Publication Society, Mr. Harold 
T. Clark, Superintendent T. S. McAloney of the Pitts- 
burgh, Pa., School for the Blind, and the Watertown 
Free Public Library, for books. 

Miss M. D. Tappan, through Miss Helen S. Conley, for 
embossed maps. 



47 



LIST OF PUPILS AT THE UPPER SCHOOL. 



Adomaitis, Elsie, 
Allen, Margaret E. B. 
Anderson, Esther M. 
Bannon, A. Maud, 
Belanger, Dolores. 
Benoit, Josephine, 
Blake, Clarissa H. 
Bolton, Gladys M. 
Boone, Florence M. 
Burrough, Mary R, 
Butler, Alice May, 
Clancy, Elizabeth. 
Coffey, Angela L, 
Cohen, Alice, 
Collins, Veronica, 
Cordero, Loaiza. 
Cross, Helen A, 
Davenport, Anna A, 
Davis, Ruth M. 
Doucha, Armen. 
Drake, Helena M. 
Dufresne, Irene, 
Duke, Marion W, 
Evans, Lillian M. 
Farnsworth, Esther M, 
Fetherstone, Mae E, 
Fiske, Dorothy T, 
Fiske, Mattie E. L, 
Flynn, Marie E. 
Freeman, Edith M. 
French, Agnes G. 
Galvin, Margaret L, 
Graham, Marguerite A. 



Gray, Nettie C. 
Guild, Bertha H. 
Guiney, Julia. 
Hart, Doris L, 
Hill, Lila N. 
Hilton, Charlotte. 
Hinckley, Dorothy M. 
Irwin, Helen M. 
Kimball, Blanche E. 
Kimball, Eleanor. 
Lagerstrom, Ellen M. 
Lanoue, Edna. 
Linscott, Jennie M. 
Ljungren, Elizabeth. 
Locatelli, Adele. 
MacPherson, Mary H. 
Malatesta, Mary. 
Marceau, Yvonne. 
Martin, Lea. 
Martin, Libby, 
Matthews, Edith M. 
McGill, Marie. 
Menard, Angelina. 
Miles, Mildred C. 
Montgomery, Ethel A. 
Najarian, Nevart. 
Noonan, M. Loretta. 
Olsen, Mabel T. 
O'Neil, Annie. 
Perault, Yvonne A. 
Ramsey, Mildred M. 
Ross, Lena. 
Rowe, Margaret C, 



48 



Samson, Bertha. 
Samson, Rose Mary. 
Sannicandro, Josephine. 
Sibley, Marian C. 
Siebert, Bessie L. 
Sokol, Marion G. 
Spencer, Olive E. 
Stevens, Gladys L. 
Stewart, Alice L. 
Terry, Annie B. 
Thebeau, Marie. 
Thompson, Mary. 
Tuttle, Harriet C. 
Uhrig, Mary G. 
Vilaine, Mary C. 
Wallockstein, Annie. 
Weathers, Dorothy. 
Abbott, Charles A. 
Antonucci, Alberto. 
Baskin, Morris H. 
Beach, B. H. Sparling. 
Beavon, Burton. 
Blair, Herman A. 
Brooks, Harold D. 
Buck, Arthur B. 
Cobb, Malcolm L. 
Conley, Edward. 
Cooney, John. 

Craig, Edward J. 

Crowell, Arthur A. 

Curley, Joseph H. 

Cushman, Ralph. 

Davis, Sheldon. 

Depoian, Hrant G. 

Dorsey, Harold J. 

Dow, Basil E. 

Dugal, J. Ernest. 

Durfee, Sidney B. 

Eastwood, Thomas J. 

Evans, Frederic P. 



Fenton, Walter F. 
Ferguson, Milton W. 
Ferris, Sumner S. 
Ferron, Homer. 
Fingerhut, George C. 
Fiske, Martin H. 
Fournier, Eugene. 
Friberg, Ina J. 
Fulton, James. 
Gagnon, Albert. 
Ginsberg, Aaron. 
Gould, Francis E. 
Greene, George. 
Haggerty, Frederick. 
Hanaford, Clarence A. 
Hanley, Thomas A. 
Healy, Millard A. 
HolUster, Walter W. 
Holmberg, Arvid N. 
Howard, Thomas. 
Hoxsie, Asa T. 
Inglis, John S. 
Jacobs, David L. 
Jenkins, Edward W. 
Johnson, Emil. 

Katwick, Arthur D. 

Liberacki, Edward. 

Mack, Francis J. 

McLaughlin, Lloyd H. 

Moran, Francis. 

Munn, Daniel J. 

Navarra, Gaspere. 

Oliver, Joseph. 

O'Neill, Ralph L. 

Philpot, William R. 

Porter, Raymond L. 

Quirk, Arthur L. 

Rasmussen, Lewis A. 

Read, J. Elmer. 

Schoner, Emil. 



49 



Sharp, William F. 
Smith, Charles E. 
Stellaty, Alberte. 
Stone, Walter C. 
Sullivan, John J. 
Tansey, Frederick. 
Tobin, Paul. 



Vance, Alvin L. 
Vetal, Herbert M. 
Walker, Roger T. 
Ward, Leroy M. 
Wilcox, J. Earl. 
Youk, Kim K. 
Zalolsky, Hyman. 



50 



LIST OF PUPILS AT THE LOWER SCHOOL. 



Baker, Elsie. 
Bazarian, Mary. 
Beliveau, Leontine T. 
Bessette, Vedora. 
Bosma, Gelske. 
Brooks, Madeline D. 
Brown, Dorothy M. 
Byrne, Genevieve. 
Cambridge, Mollie. 
Cassavaugh, Nellie J. 
Coakley, Alice L. 
Cohen, Ruth. 
Colaizzi, Josephine. 
Connors, Margaret. 
Costa, Marianna. 
Cox, Annie E. 
Davis, Mary. 
De Dominieis, Edith. 
Demers, Germaine M. 
Doyle, Mary E. 
Duverger, Loretta V. 
Elliott, Ethel S. 
Elliott, Mary. 
Ferrarini, Yolande. 
Flanagan, M. Ursula. 
Gilbert, Eva V. 
Goff, Eva. 
Grent, Josephine. 
Hanley, Mary. 
Haswell, Thelma R. 
Hinckley, Geraldine. 



Ingersoll, Dorothy. 
Jefferson, Annie. 
Keefe, Mildred. 
Kelley, Beulah C. 
Landry, Edwina. 
Lanoue, Helen. 
Lyons, Mary L. 
MacDonald, Katherine. 
McGovern, Velma. 
McMeekin, Jennie. 
Miles, Winifred M. 
Minutti, Desaleina. 
Murphy, Ellen. 
Ogilvie, Hilda M. 
O'Neil, Charlotte. 
Poirier, Delina M. 
Pond, Flora E. 
Rapoza, Evangeline S. 
Riley, Helen I. 
Rose, Sadie. 
Rousseau, Lillian. 
Santos, Emily. 
Shea, Mary E. 
Simmons, Bertha. 
Skipp, Doris M. 
Smith, Dorothy L. 
Stutwoota, Mary. 
Wands, Hazel C. 
Wheeler, Theresa. 
Wilcox, Bertha M. 
Witham, Beatrice L. 



51 



Abbott, Dana H. 
Amiro, Gilbert. 
Barrett, Robert C. 
Caisse, George T. 
Costa, Manuel. 
Crapowitch, John. 
Cullen, George F. 
Cullen, William. 
Deslauries, Laurence. 
Donovan, Kenneth J. 
Dunbar, Kenneth A. 
Eaton, Charles P. 
Egan, John P. 
Egan, Robert J. 
Epaminonda, John. 
Evans, Walter C. 
Gagnon, Lionel. 
Goguen, Raoul. 
Gray, Wales H. 
Grime, G. Edward. 
Hebert, Arthur D, 
Holmes, Rutherford B. 
Houle, Walter. 
Keefe, Clarence G. 
Kelleher, Thomas A. 
Lamagdeleine, Armand. 
Lam in an, Oiva. 
Laminan, Toivo. 
Lemieux, Bertrand E. 
Libby, Arthur C. 
Logan, Walter J. 
MacGinnis, Raymond L. 
Maloney, Everett S. 



Matsson, Harry N. 
Maziall, J. Herbert. 
McDonald, Edmond J. 
McEachern, Donald M. 
McGillicuddy, John. 
Mennassian, Souran. 
Morse, Kenneth. 
Nelson, Ralph R. 
Noble, Clark W. 
Oldham, Milner. 
O'Neil, John. 
Paquette, Armel. 
Pearlstein, David. 
Peavey, Francis P. 
Perreault, J. Edward. 
Perry, Emerson C. 
Rego, Peter. 
Remington, Joseph H. 
Rubin, Manual. 
St. George, William. 
Silva, Arthur P. 
Silvera, Manuel. 
Simoneau, Henry J. 
Slaby, Peter J. 
Slade, Winton C. 
Smith, Jerome C. 
Spencer, Merton S. 
Stott, Lester W. 
Thibeault, Arthur. 
Thibeault, Joseph. 
Walsh, Louis. 
Wesson, Kermit O. 
Zybert, Tony. 



52 



SUBSCRIPTIONS FOR THOMAS STRINGER. 



Permanent Fund for Thomas Stringer. 

[This fund is being raised with the distinct understanding that 
it is to be placed under the control and care of the trustees of the 
Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind, and 
that only the net income is to be given to Tom so long as he is not 
provided for in any other way, and is unable to earn his living, the 
principal remaining intact forever. It is further understood, that, 
at his death, or when he ceases to be in need of this assistance, the 
income of this fund is to be applied to the support and education 
of some child who is both blind and deaf and for whom there is no 
provision made either by the state or by private individuals.] 

A friend, $50 00 

Income from the Glover Fund, ....... 100 00 

Seabury, Miss Sarah E., 50 00 

Sohier, Miss Mary D 25 00 



53 



STATEMENT 



Messrs. Wabren Motley, F. H. Appleton, Jr., Auditors, Perkins Institution 

Gentlemen : — We hereby certify that the following statements of the 
August 31. 1917. 



Statements of Albert Thorndike, Treasurer of the Perkins 

Year ending 



Institution Accoctnt. 

Balance on hand August 31, 1916, ..." $15,980 89 

Donations $4,695 67 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 30,000 00 

Other New England States 10,606 67 

Income from investments 30,490 63 

Kindergarten and Howe Memorial Press Fund, adjusting main- 
tenance, administrative and management expense accounts, . 38,670 24 

Miscellaneous income 5,858 07 

Works Department income, 32,131 79 

Legacies 9,150 00 

Securities sold and matured, 21,579 22 

183,182 29 



3199,163 18 



Howe Memorial Press Fund Account. 

Balance on hand August 31, 1916, ..." $1,012 89 

Income from investments, $10,884 59 

Miscellaneous income, 1,293 47 

Securities sold and matured, 42,394 55 



54,572 61 



$55,585 50 



Kindergarten Account. 
Receipts. 

Balance on hand August 31, 1916, 

Donations $32 50 

New England States 11,000 01 

Income from investments 69,346 99 

Interest on loan, 1,200 00 

Miscellaneous income, 5,627 34 

Legacies 7,233 76 

Securities sold and matured, 170,274 60 



9,224 78 



264,715 20 



$273,939 98 



54 



OF ACCOUNTS. 



Boston, October Eighth, 1917. 
and Massachusetts School for the Blind, Watertown, Massachusetts. 
Treasurer correctly show the income and expenditures for the fiscal year ending 

Respectfully subniitted, 

EDWIN L. PRIDE AND CO. (Incorporated), 
By Edwin L. Pride, 

Certified Public Accountant. 

Institution anb Massachusetts School for the Blind, for the 
August 31, 1917. 

Institution Account. 
Expenditures. 

Drafts to director, $157,700 00 

Add unexpended balance August 31, 1916, 13 17 

$157,713 17 
Less iinexpended balance August 31, 1917, 264 60 

$157,448 57 

Administrative and management expenses, $879 37 

Interest on loan 1,200 00 

Miscellaneous expenses, 758 66 

Invested 19,756 25 

22,594 28 

Balance on hand August 31, 1917, 19,120 33 

$199,163 18 

Howe Memorial Press Fund Account. 
Expenditures. 

Drafts to director $12,850 00 

Add unexpended balance August 31, 1916, 20 13 

$12,870 13 
Less unexpended balance August 31, 1917, 14 48 

$12,855 65 

Miscellaneous expenses, . . . . . . . $127 77 

New Printing Plant, Watertown, 302 85 

Invested 39,263 75 

39,694 37 

Balance on hand August 31, 1917, 3,035 48 

$55,585 50 

Kindergarten .Account. 
Expenditures. 

Drafts to director, $73,950 00 

Add unexpended balance August 31, 1916, 52 62 

$74,002 62 
Less unexpended balance August 31, 1917 60 06 

$73,942 56 

Maintenance, $3,755 18 

Administrative expenses, 1,026 28 

Miscellaneous expenses 629 17 

Invested 184,526 00 

189,936 63 

Balance on hand, August 31, 1917 10,060 79 

$273,939 98 



55 



The following account exhibits the state of property as 
entered upon the books of the Institution September 1, 
1917: — 



Investments, securities, 
Investments, real estate, 
Buildings and grounds, Watertown, . 
Equipment, Watertown, 
Music Department, Watertown, 
Library Department, Watertown, 
Tuning Department, Watertown, 
Building, Workshop, South Boston, . 
Equipment, etc., Workshop, South Boston, 
Rents and accounts receivable, . 

Stamp fund, 

Cash, Treasurer, 

Cash, Director, etc., .... 



$360,560 


15 


206,944 


15 


678,333 


95 


17,005 


26 


20,375 


00 


54,758 35 


389 


50 


8,647 74 


16,318 


26 


325 


85 


50 


00 


18,855 


73 


1,682 


31 




— $1,384,246 25 



The foregoing property represents the following funds and 
balances, and is answerable for the same : — 

-J 

INSTITUTION FUNDS. 

General fund $365,196 87 

Special funds : — 

Charlotte Billings $40,507 00 

Stoddard Capen, 13,770 00 

Harris Fund 80,000 00 

Benjamin Humphrey 25,000 00 

Stephen Fairbanks 10,000 00 

Mary Lowell Stone, 2,000 00 

Jonathan E. Pecker, 950 00 

Elizabeth P. Putnam, 1,000 00 

Frank Davison Rust 2,500 00 

Samuel E. Sawyer, 2,174 77 

Alfred T. Turner 1,000 00 

Anne White Vose 12,994 00 

Charles L. Young 5,000 00 

Richard Perkins 20,000 00 



Hobert C. Billings (for deaf, dumb and blind), 
Joseph B. Glover (for deaf, dumb, and blind). 



Maria Kemble Oliver, . 
Accrued interest on $3,000, 



Amount carried forward. 



$13,000 00 
365 09 



4,000 00 
5,000 00 



13,365 09 



239,260 86 
,457 73 



56 



Amount brought forward $604,457 73 

Legacies, etc.: — 

Elizabeth B. Bailey, $3,000 00 

Eleanor J. W. Baker 2.500 00 

Calvin W. Barker 1-859 32 

Lucy A. Barker 5,953 21 

Francis Bartlett 2,500 00 

MaryBartol 300 00 

Thompson Baxter 322 50 

Robert C. Billings 25.000 00 

Susan A. Blaisdell 5.832 66 

William T. Bolton 555 22 

George W.Boyd 5.000 00 

J. Putnam Bradlee 268,391 24 

Charlotte A. Bradstreet, 10,508 70 

J. Edward Brown 100.000 00 

T. O. H. P. Burnham 5.000 00 

Fanny Channing 2.000 00 

Ann Eliza Colburn 5.000 00 

Louise F. Crane. 5.000 00 

Harriet Otis Cruft 6.000 00 

David Cummings 7,723 07 

Chastine L. Cushing 500 GO 

LW.Danforth 2.500 00 

Susan L.Davis 1.500 00 

Joseph Descalzo. 1.000 00 

JohnH.Dix. 10.000 00 

Alice J. H. Dwinell 200 00 

Mary E.Eaton 5.000 00 

Mortimer C. Ferris Memorial, .... 1,000 00 

Martha A. French. 164 40 

Thomas Gaffield 6.450 00 

Albert Glover 1.000 00 

Joseph B. Glover 5.000 00 

Charlotte L. Goodnow 6.471 23 

Hattie S. Hathaway 500 00 

Charles H. Hayden 20.200 00 

John C. Haynes 1.000 00 

Joseph H. Heywood 500 00 

Margaret A. Holden 3.708 32 

Martha R. Hunt. 10,000 00 

Charles Sylvester Hutchison, .... 2.156 00 

Catherine M. Lamson 6.000 00 

William Litchfield 7.951 48 

Hannah W. Loring 9.500 00 

Susan B. Lyman 4,809 78 

Stephen W. Marston 5,000 00 

Charles Merriam 1.000 00 

Amounts carried forward §575,557 13 5604,457 73 

57 



Amounts brought forward $575,557 13 $604,457 73 

Legacies, etc. — Concluded. 

Sarah Irene Parker, 699 41 

George Francis Parkman 50,000 00 

Edward D. Peters, 500 00 

Henry L. Pierce, 20,000 00 

Sarah E. Pratt, 1,000 00 

Matilda B. Richardson, 300 00 

Mary L. Ruggles 3,000 00 

Nancy E. Rust 2,640 00 

William A. Rust, 1,500 00 

Joseph Scholfield, 2,500 00 

The Maria Spear Bequest for the Blind, . . 15,000 00 

Joseph C. Storey 5,000 00 

Mary F. Swift 1,391 00 

William Taylor 893 36 

Joanna C. Thompson 1,000 00 

George B. Upton 10,000 00 

Horace W. Wadleigh, 2,000 00 

Joseph K. Wait, 3,000 00 

Harriot Ware 1,952 02 

Charles F. Webber (by sale of part of vested 

remainder interest under his will), . . 11,500 00 

Mary Ann P. Weld 2,000 00 

Opha J. Wheeler 3,086 77 

Samuel Brenton Whitney 1,000 00 

Mehitable C. C. Wilson, 543 75 

Thomas T. Wyman, 20,000 00 

736,063 44 

Loans payable. Kindergarten, 40,000 00 

Accounts payable, 3,489 82 

E. E. Allen, Trustee 235 26 



$1,384,246 25 



DONATIONS, INSTITUTION ACCOUNT. 

Clapp, Mrs. Robert P $10 00 

Hammond, Miss Ellen, 5 00 

The Rose Bud Club of Dorchester 144 67 



Through the Ladies' Auxiliary Society, . . . $4,423 00 

Iron fence fund, 107 00 

Organ fund, 5 00 

Clock fund 1 00 



58 



$159 67 



4,536 00 
$4,695 67 



WORKS DEPAETMENT. 

Profit and Loss Account for the Year ending August 31, 1917. 

Revenue. 
Sales, repairs, etc., » $32,838 68 

Expenditures. 

Material used $11,821 71 

Salaries and wages, 15,802 01 

General expense, 4,512 66 

Total expenditures 32,136 38 

Profit, $702 30 

Deduct: — 
Difference in inventory of tools and equipment, . $368 57 

Bad accounts written off, 240 06 

Total $608 63 

Less: — 

Recovered from bad debts, 80 52 

528 11 

Total profit for year ending August 31, 1917, . . . $174 19 

1 As by the books, actual cash receipts for the year, 132,131.79. 



59 



The following account exhibits the state of property as 
entered upon the books of the Howe Memorial Press Fund 
September 1, 1917: — 



Investments, securities, $217,027 52 

Machinery and equipment, 32,254 74 

Merchandise, raw and finished, 9,598 00 

Accounts receivable, 134 18 

Cash, Treasurer, 3,021 00 

Cash, Director 14 48 



$262,049 92 



The foregoing property represents the following funds and 
balances, and is answerable for the same : — 



HOWE MEMORIAL PRESS FUNDS. 

General fund, $245,409 28 

Special funds : — 

Joseph H. Center, $1,000 00 

Deacon S. Stickney 5,000 00 

6,000 00 

Legacy, Augusta Wells 10,290 00 

Accounts payable, 350 64 



$262,049 92 



The following account exhibits the state of property as 
entered upon the books of the Kindergarten September 1, 
1917: — 



Investments, securities, $1,028,207 00 

Investments, real estate, 419,946 43 

Buildings and grounds, Watertown, .... 526,856 00 

Equipment, Watertown, 19,928 44 

Rents and accounts receivable, 11,313 30 

Loans receivable, 40,000 00 

Cash, treasurer 10,000 73 

Cash, director, etc 398 00 

$2,056,649 90 



60 



The foregoing property represents the following funds and 
balances, and is answerable for the same : — 



KINDERGARTEN FUNDS. 

Generalfund, $594,316 91 

Special funds: — 

Samuel A. Borden $4,675 00 

M. Jane Wellington Danforth 11,000 00 

Catherine L. Donnison Memorial, . . . 1,000 00 

Caroline T. Downes 12,950 00 

Charles H. Draper 23,934 13 

Eugenia F. Farnham, 1,015 00 

Elisha T. Loring, 5,000 00 

Catherine P. Perkins 10,000 00 

Frank Davison Rust Memorial, . . . 14,100 00 

Abby K. Sweetser 25,000 00 

May Rosevear White 500 00 



Leonard and Jerusha Hyde Room, . . . 4,000 00 



Legacies, etc.: — 

Emilie Albee $150 00 

Lydia A. Allen 748 38 

Michael Anagnos 3,000 00 

Harriet T. Andrews 5,000 00 

Mrs. William Appleton 18,000 00 

Elizabeth H. Bailey 500 00 

Eleanor J. W. Baker 2,500 00 

Ellen M. Baker 13,053 48 

Mary D. Balfour 100 00 

Nancy Bartlett 500 00 

Sidney Bartlett 10,000 00 

Thompson Baxter 322 50 

William Leonard Benedict, Jr., Memorial, . 1,000 00 

Robert C. Billings 10,000 00 

Sarah Bradford 100 00 

Helen C. Bradlee 140,000 00 

J. Putnam Bradlee 168,391 24 

Charlotte A. Bradstreet 6,130 07 

Ellen Sophia Brown 1,000 00 

Rebecca W. Brown, 3,073 76 

Harriet Tilden Browne 2,000 00 

In memoriam A. A. C, 500 00 

John W. Carter 500 00 

Adeline M. Chapin 400 00 

Benjamin P. Cheney 5,000 00 

Helen G. Coburn 9,980 10 



113,174 13 



Amounts earned forward $401,949 53 $707,49104 



61 



Amounts brought forward, 

Legacies, etc. — Continued. 
Charles H. Colburn, 
Helen Collamore, . 
Anna T. Coolidge, 
Mrs. Edward Cordis, 
Sarah Silver Cox, . 
Susan T. Crosby, . 
George E. Downes, 
Eliza James (Bell) Draper 
Lucy A. Dwight, . 
Helen Atkins Edmand; 
Mary B. Emmons, 
Mary Eveleth, 
Susan W. Farwell, 
Sarah M. Fay, 
John Foster, . 
Elizabeth W. Gay, 
Ellen M. Gifford, . 
Albert Glover, 
Joseph B. Glover, 
Matilda Goddard, 
Maria L. Gray, 
Mary L. Greenleaf, 
Josephine S. Hall, 
Olive E. Hayden, . 
Jane H. Hodges, . 
Margaret A. Holden, . 
Marion D. Hollingsworth, 
Frances H. Hood, 
Abigal W. Howe, . 
Ellen M. Jones, . 
Maria E. Jones, . 
Moses Kimball, . 
Ann E. Lambert, . 
Emeline Morse Lane, 
Charles Larned, . 
William Litchfield, 
Mary Ann Locke, 
Robert W. Lord, . 
Sophia N. Low, , 
Thomas Mack, 
Augustus D. Manson, 
Calanthe E. Marsh, 
Sarah L. Marsh, . 
Annie B. Matthews, 
Rebecca S. Melvin, 

Amounts carried forward, 



Memorial 



$401,949 53 $707,491 04 



1,000 00 
5,000 00 
45,138 16 
300 00 
5,000 00 
100 00 
3,000 00 
1,500 00 
4,000 00 
5,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
500 00 
15,000 00 
5,000 00 
7,931 00 
5,000 00 
1,000 00 
5,000 00 
300 00 
200 00 
5,157 75 
3,000 00 
4,622 45 
300 00 
2,360 67 
1,000 00 
100 00 
1,000 00 
500 00 
9,935 95 
1,000 00 
700 00 
1,000 00 
5,000 00 
6,000 00 
5,874 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
8,134 00 
13,491 20 
1,000 00 
15,000 00 
23,545 55 



$624,640 26 $707,491 04 



62 



Amounts brought forward $624,640 26 §707,49104 

Legacies, etc. — Continued. 

Louise Chandler Moulton 10,000 00 

Mary Abbie Newell 500 00 

Margaret S. Otis 1,000 00 

Jeannie Warren Paine 1,000 00 

Anna R. Palfrey 50 00 

Sarah Irene Parker 699 41 

George F. Parkman, 3,500 00 

Helen M. Parsons 500 00 

Edward D. Peters 500 00 

Mary J. Phipps 2,000 00 

Caroline S. Pickman 1,000 00 

Katharine G. Pierce 5,000 00 

Helen A. Porter, 50 00 

Sarah E. Potter Endowment 425,014 44 

Francis S. Pratt 100 00 

Mary S. C. Reed 5,000 00 

Jane Roberts 93,025 55 

John M. Rodocanachi, 2,250 00 

Dorothy Roffe 500 00 

Rhoda Rogers 500 00 

Mrs. Benjamin S. Rotch 8,500 00 

Edith Rotch 10,000 00 

"William A. Rust 1.500 00 

Rebecca Salisbury 200 00 

Joseph Scholfield, 3,000 00 

Caroline O. Seabury 1,000 00 

Eliza B. Seymour 5,000 00 

Annie E. Snow 9,903 27 

Adelaide Standish 5,000 00 

Elizabeth G. Stuart 2,000 00 

Elizabeth O. P. Sturgis 21,729 52 

Hannah R. Sweetser 5,000 00 

Benjamin Sweetzer 2,000 00 

Harriet Taber 622 81 

Sarah W. Taber 1,000 00 

Mary L. Talbot 630 00 

Cornelia V. R. Thayer 10,000 00 

Delia D. Thorndike, 5,000 00 

Elizabeth L. Tilton 300 00 

Betsey B. Tolman 500 00 

Transcript ten dollar fund, .... 5,666 95 

Mary B. Turner 7,582 90 

Royal W. Turner 24,082 00 

Rebecca P. Wainwright 1.000 00 

George W. Wales, 5,000 00 

Amounts carried forward $1,313,047 11 $707,49104 



63 



Amounts brought forward, .... $1,313,04711 $707,49104 

Legacies, etc. — Concluded. 

Mrs. George W. Wales 10,000 00 

Mrs. Charles E. Ware, 4,000 00 

Rebecca B. Warren 6,000 00 

Jennie A. (Shaw) Waterhouse 565 84 

Mary H. Watson, 100 00 

Ralph Watson Memorial 237 92 

Mary Whitehead, 666 00 

Julia A. Whitney, 100 00 

Sarah W. Whitney, 150 62 

Betsey S. Wilder, 500 00 

Hannah Catherine Wiley 200 00 

Mary W. Wiley 150 00 

Mary Williams, 5,000 00 

Almira F. Winslow, 306 80 

Harriet F. Wolcott, 5,532 00 

1,345,556 29 

Accounts payable 3,226 60 

E. E. Allen, Trustee 12 11 

Leonard and Jerusha Hyde Room, Income, 363 86 



$2,056,649 90 



DONATIONS, KINDERGARTEN ACCOUNT. 



Brett, Miss Anna K $10 00 

Primary Department, Sunday School of the Union 
Congregational Church of Weymouth and Brain- 
tree, 21 00 

$31 00 



64 



CONTRIBUTIONS FOR THE PERKINS 
INSTITUTION. 



Through the Ladies' Auxiliary Society, Mrs. Sarah A. 
Stover, Treasurer : — 

Annual subscriptions, $2,389 00 

Donations, 1,686 00 

Donations for the Iron Fence, 107 00 

Donations for the small organ and the clock, . . . 6 00 

Cambridge Branch, 167 00 

Dorchester Branch, 90 00 

Lynn Branch, 51 00 

Milton Branch, 40 00 



$4,536 00 



ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTIONS FOR THE PER- 
KINS INSTITUTION. 

Through the Ladies' Auxiliary Society, Mrs. S. A. Stoveb, Treasurer. 



Abbott, Miss Georgianna E, 
Abbott, Mrs. J., 
Abbott, Mrs. P. W., . 
Adams, Mr. George, . 
Adams, Mrs. Henry J., 
Adams, Mrs. Waldo, . 
Alford, Mrs. O. H., . 
Allen," Mrs. F. R., 
Amory, Mrs. Charles W., 
Amory, Mrs. William, 
Amsden, Mrs. Mary A., 
Anderson, Miss Anna F., 
Applet on, Miss Fanny C, 
Archer, Mrs. E. M. H., 

Amount carried forward, 



, $1 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 


3 


00 


5 


00 


. 10 


00 


3 


00 


. 25 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 


3 


00 


1 


00 


. $70 


00 



Amount brought forward, , $70 00 



Bacon, Miss Mary P., 


5 00 


Badger, Mrs. Wallis B., 


2 00 


Baer, Mrs. Louis, 


5 00 


Bailey, Mrs. H. R.. . 


2 00 


Balch, Mrs. F. G., 


5 00 


Baldwin, Mr. E. L., . 


2 00 


Baldwin, Mrs. J. C. T., 


5 00 


Bartol, Miss Elizabeth H., 


20 00 


Batcheller, Mr. Robert, 


5 00 


Beal, Mrs. Boylston A., 


10 00 


Berlin, Dr. Fanny, 


1 00 


Betton, Mrs. C. G., . 


2 00 



Amount carried forward, . $134 00 



65 



Amuunt brought forward, . $134 00 



Bigelow, Mrs. Alanson, 


1 00 


Blackmar, Mrs. W. W., 


5 00 


Blake, Mrs. Arthur W., 


5 00 


Blake, Mrs. Francis, . 


5 00 


Boardman, Mrs. Alice L., 


2 00 


Boardman, Miss E. D., 


2 00 


Bond, Mrs. Charles H., 


5 00 


Boutwell, Mrs. L. B., . 


5 00 


Bradt, Mrs. Julia B., . 


2 00 


Bronson, Mrs. Dillon, 


2 00 


Brown, Mrs. Atherton T., 


5 00 


Brush, Mrs. C. N., 


. 10 00 


Bunker, Mr. Alfred, . 


2 00 


Burnham, Mrs. H. D., 


5 00 


Burr, Mrs. C. C, 


10 00 


Cabot, Mrs. Walter C, 


25 00 


Calkins, Miss Mary W., 


3 00 


Carter, Mrs. J. W., . 


10 00 


Cary, Miss Ellen G., . 


50 00 


Cary, Miss Georgina S., 


10 00 


Chamberlain, Mrs. M. L., 


5 00 


Chandler, Mrs. Frank W., 


5 00 


Channing, Mrs. Walter, 


5 00 


Chapin, Mrs. Henry B., 


5 00 


Chapman, Miss E. D., 


1 00 


Chapman, Miss Jane E. C. 


2 00 


Chase, Mrs. Susan R., 


1 00 


Clapp, Dr. H. C, 


2 00 


Clark, Mr. B. Preston, in 




memory of his mother 




Mrs. B. C. Clark, . 


5 00 


Clark, Mrs. Frederic S., 


10 00 


Clement, Mrs. Hazen, 


5 00 


Clerk, Mrs. W. F., . 


3 00 


Cobb, Mrs. Charles K., 


5 00 


Cochrane, Mrs. Alex., 


5 00 


Codman, Miss Catherine 




Amory, . 


5 00 


Conant, Mrs. Nathaniel, 


2 00 


Coolidge, Mrs. Francis L., . 


1 00 


Coolidge, Mrs. J. Randolph 


25 00 


Coolidge, Mrs. Penelope F., 


1 00 


Corey, Mrs. H. D., 


2 00 


Cox, Mrs. William E., 


10 00 


Craig, Mrs. D. R., 


5 00 


Craigin, Dr. George A., 


5 00 


Crane, Mr. Zenas, 


100 00 


Crocker, Miss Sarah H., 


5 00 


Cummings, Mrs. Charles A., 


10 00 



Amount carried forward, . $528 00 



Amount brought forward, . $528 00 



Curtis, Mr. George W., 
Curtis, Mrs. Horatio G., 
Curtis, Miss M. G., . 
Curtis, Mr. Wm. O., . 
Gushing, Mrs. H. W., 
Gushing, Miss Sarah P., 
Cutler, Mrs. C. F., . 
Cutler, Mrs. E. G., . 
Cutter, Mrs. Ellen M., 
Cutter, Mrs. Frank W., 
Dale, Mrs. Eben, 
Damon, Mrs. J. L., Jr., 
Daniels, Mrs. Edwin A., 
Davis, Mrs. Joseph E., 
Davis, Mrs. Simon, 
Day, Mrs. Lewis, 
DeLong, Mrs. E. R., . 
Denny, Mrs. Arthur B., 
Denny, Mrs. W. C, for 1916 

17, ... 

Derby, Mrs. Hasket, . 
Drost, Mr. C. A., 
DuBois, Mrs. L. G., . 
Dwight, Mrs. Thomas, 
Edgar, Mrs. C. L., 
Edmands, Mrs. M. Grant, 
Eliot, Mrs. Amory, 
Eliot, Mrs. Wm. Richards, 
Elms, Mrs. Edward E., 
Elms, Miss Florence G., 
Ehns, Mrs. James C, . 
Emmons, Mrs. R. W., 2d, 
Ernst, Mrs. C. W., 
Ernst, Mrs. H. C, 
Eustis, Mrs. F. A., 
Fay, Miss Sarah M., . 
Ferrin, Mrs. M. T. B., 
Field, Mrs. D. W., 
Fitz, Mrs. W. Scott, . 
Foss, Mrs. Eugene N., 
Frank, Mrs. Daniel, . 
Freeman, Mrs. Louisa A., 
Friedman, Mrs. Max, . 
Friedman, Mrs. S., 
Frothingham, Mrs. Langdon 
Frothingham, Mrs. L. A 
Gay, Mrs. Albert, (for 1916) 
Gibbs. Mrs. H. C, . 
GiU, Mr. Abbott D. (for 1916), 



Amount carried forward, . $795 00 



5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


2 00 


5 00 


5 00 


2 00 


2 00 


1 00 


5 00 


2 00 


1 00 


5 00 


3 00 


2 00 


2 00 


5 00 


. 10 00 


5 00 


. 10 00 


5 00 


1 00 


5 00 


. 10 00 


2 00 


. 10 00 


5 00 


2 00 


2 00 


. 20 00 


2 00 


3 00 


. 10 00 


. 10 00 


5 00 


5 00 


. 25 00 


. 10 00 


1 00 


3 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


. 25 00 


1 00 


1 00 


), 2 00 



66 



Amount brought forward, . $795 00 



Gill, Mrs. George F., . 
Goldberg, Mrs. S., 
Goldschmidt, Mrs. Meyer^H. 
Gooding, Mrs. T. P., . 
Grandgent, Prof. Charles H 
Gray, Mrs. Reginald, . 
Greeley, Mrs. R. F., . 
Green, Mr. Charles G., 
Greenough, Mrs. C. P., 
Grew, Mrs. H. S., ■>. 
Hall, Mrs. Anthony D., 
Harrington, Dr. Harriet L 
Harwood, Mrs. George S., 
Hatch, Mrs. Fred W., 
Haven, Mrs. Edward B., 
Haven, Mrs. Franklin, 
Hayward, Mrs. G. G., 
Herman, Mrs. Joseph M., 
Higginson, Mrs. F. L. (for 

1916), . 
Higginson, Mrs. Henry L., 
Hills, Mrs. Edwin A., . 
Holbrook, Mrs. Walter H., 
Holden, Mrs. C. W., . 
Homans, Mrs. John, . 
Hooper, Miss Adeline D., 
Hooper, Mrs. James R., 
Howard, Mrs. P. B., . 
Howe, Mrs. Arabella, . 
Howe, Mrs. George D., 
Howland, Mrs. D. W., 
Hubbard, Mrs. Charles W. 
Hyde, Mrs. H. D., 
Ireson, Mrs. S. E., 
Jennings, Miss Julia F., 
Jewett, Miss Annie, 
Johnson, Mr. Arthur S., 
Johnson, Mrs. Herbert S., 
Johnson, Mrs. Wolcott H., 
Jones, Mrs. B. M., 
Jordan, Mrs. Eben D., 
Josselyn, Mrs. A. S., . 
Kettle, Mrs. Claude L., 
Kidner, Mrs. Reuben, 
Kimball, Mrs. David P., 
KimbaU, Mr. Edward P., 
Kimball, Mrs. Marcus M., 
Kingsley, Mrs. Robert C, 
Kornfeld, Mrs. Felix, . 



Amount carried forward, SI, 127 00 



1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 


3 


00 


. 10 


00 


5 


00 


. 10 


00 


5 


00 


. 25 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


3 


00 


2 


00 


. 10 


00 


2 


00 


. 10 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


3 


00 


1 


00 


10 


00 


5 


00 


. 15 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 


. 10 


00 


2 


00 


, 25 


00 


1 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


. 10 


00 


. 10 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


. 10 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


. 25 


00 


. 10 


00 


. 50 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 



Aynounlhro-aghl forward, $1,127 00 



Lamb, Miss Augusta T., 
Lamson, Mrs. J. A., . 
Larkin, The Misses, 
Lautterstein, Mrs. Josie, 
Ledyard, Mrs. Lewis Cass, 
Lee, Mrs. George, 
Lee, Mrs. Joseph, 
Leland, Mrs. Lewis A., 
Le\'i, Mrs. Harry, 
Locke, Mrs. Charles A., 
Loring, Judge W. C, . 
Loring, Mrs. W. C, . 
Lothrop, Miss Mary B., 
Lothrop, Mrs. Thornton K 
Lothrop, Mrs. W. S. H., 
Lovering, Mrs. Charles T., 
Lowell, Mrs. Charles, . 
Lowell, Mrs. John, 
Mansfield, Mrs. George S., 
Mansfield, Mrs. S. M., 
Mansur, Mrs. Martha P., 
Mason, Mrs. Charles E., 
Mead, Mrs. Fred Sumner, 
Merrill, Mrs. L. M., . 
Merriman, Mrs. Daniel, 
Mixter, Miss Mary A., 
Monks, Mrs. George H. (for 

1915-16), 
Morison, Mrs. John H., 
Morrison, Mrs. W. A., 
Morse, Mrs. J. P., 
Morse, Miss Margaret F., 
Morss, Mrs. Everett, . 
Moseley, Miss Ellen F., 
Moses, Mrs. George, . 
Moses, Mrs. Joseph, . 
Moses, Mrs. Louis, 
Nathan, Mrs. Jacob, . 
Nathan, Mrs. John, . 
Nazro, Mrs. Fred H., . 
Niebuhr, Miss Mary M., 
Norcross, Mrs. Otis, . 
Olmsted, Mrs. J. C, . 
Orcutt, Mrs. W. D., . 
Page, Mrs. Calvin Gates, 
Paine, Mrs. Wm. D., . 
Parker, Miss Eleanor S., 
Pecker, Miss Annie J., 
Peckerman, Mrs. E. R., 



Amount carried forward, $1,570 00 



1 00 


2 00 


2 00 


1 00 


5 00 


5 00 


. 100 00 


1 00 


2 00 


10 00 


. 25 00 


. 25 00 


5 00 


, 50 00 


5 00 


. 10 00 


5 00 


5 00 


2 00 


1 00 


3 00 


50 00 


5 00 


2 00 


. 10 00 


5 00 


. 30 00 


5 00 


1 00 


1 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


1 00 


3 00 


1 00 


2 00 


5 00 


2 00 


1 00 


. 10 00 


2 00 


1 00 


2 00 


2 00 


. 10 00 


. 10 00 


2 00 



67 



Amount brought forward, $1,570 00 



Perry, Mrs. Clarabel N., 


5 00 


Pickert, Mrs. Lehman, 


2 00 


Pickman, Mrs. D. L., . 


25 00 


Pratt, Mrs. Elliott W., 


5 00 


Prendergast, Mr. James M. 


10 00 


Prince, Mrs. Morton, . 


5 00 


Putnam, Miss Ellen Day, 


1 00 


Putnam, Mrs. George, 


5 00 


Putnam, Mrs. James J., 


5 00 


Ratshesky, Mrs. Fanny, 


5 00 


Ratshesky, Mrs. I. A., 


5 00 


Raymond, Mrs. Henry E., 


2 00 


Reed, Mrs. Arthur, 


1 00 


Reed, Mrs. John H., . 


2 00 


Reed, Mrs. William Howell 


25 00 


Rice, Mr. and Mrs. David, 


30 00 


Rice, Mrs. Wm. B., . 


10 00 


Richards, Miss Alice A., 


5 00 


Richards, Miss Annie L., 


10 00 


Richards, Mrs. C. A., . 


10 00 


Richards, Mrs. E. L., . 


2 00 


Robbins, Mrs. Reginald L., 


2 00 


Roeth, Mrs. A. G., 


1 00 


Rogers, Mrs. J. C., 


5 00 


Rogers, Mrs. R. K., . 


5 00 


Rogers, Miss Susan S., 


6 00 


Rosenbaum, Mrs. Henry, 


1 00 


Rosenbavun, Miss Loraine, 


1 00 


Rosenbaum, Mrs. Louis, 


5 00 


Rosenfield, Mrs. Harry, 


1 00 


Rotch, Mrs. Wm. J., . 


25 00 


Rowlett, Mrs. Thomas S., 


1 00 


Russell, Miss Catherine E., 


2 00 


Russell, Mrs. Elliott, . 


2 00 


Sabine, Mrs. G. K., . 


4 00 


Saltonstall, Mr. Richard M. 




in memory of his mother 




Mrs. Leverett Saltonstall 


, 10 00 


Sanborn, Mrs. C. W. H., 


2 00 


Sargent, Mrs. F. W., . 


10 00 


Sargent, Mrs. Winthrop (fo 




1916), . 


. 25 00 


Schouler, Mr. James, . 


5 00 


Scudder, Mrs. J. D., in mem 




ory of her mother, Mrs 




N. M. Downer, 


5 00 


Scull, Mrs. Gideon, 


. 10 00 


Sears, Mr. Herbert M., 


. 25 00 


Sears, Mrs. Knyvet W., 


. 25 00 



Amount carried forward, $1,917 00 



Amount brought forward, $1,917 00 



Shattuck, Mrs. George B., 
Shaw, Mrs. G. Rowland, 
Shaw, Mrs. George R., 
Shepard, Mr. Thomas H., 
Short, Mrs. Y. S., 
Sias, Mrs. Charles D., 
Sias, Miss Martha G., 
Simpkins, Miss Mary W., 
Smith, Miss Ellen V., . 
Smith, Mrs. Phineas B., 
Snelling, Mrs. Howard, 
Sprague, Mrs. Charles, 
Sprague, Dr. F. P., . ' 
Stackpole, Miss Roxana, 
Stackpole, Mrs. F. D., 
Stearns, Mr. and Mrs. C. H 
Stearns, Mrs. Wm. Brackett 
Stearns, Mr. Wm. B., . 
Steese, Mrs. Edward, . 
Steinert, Mrs. Alex, 
Stevens, Miss Alice B., 
Stevenson, Miss Annie B., 
Stevenson, Mrs. R. H., 
Stewart, Mrs. Cecil, . 
Stone, Mrs. Edwin P., 
Stone, Mrs. Philip S., . 
Storer, Miss A. M., 
Storer, Miss M. G., 
Strauss, Mrs. Ferdinand, 
Strauss, Mrs. Louis, . 
Swann, Mrs. John, 
Talbot, Mrs. Thomas Palmer 
Thacher, Mrs. Henry C, 
Thomas, Miss Catherine C. 
Thomson, Mrs. A. C, 
Thorndike, Mrs. Augustus, 
Thorndike, Mrs. Augustus 

L 

Tileston, Mrs. John B., 
Tyler, Mr. Granville C, 
Vass, Miss Harriett, . 
Vickery, Mrs. Herman F., 
Vose, Mrs. Charles (for 1916 

17). 
Wadsworth, Mrs. A. F., 
Ward, The Misses, 
Ward, Miss Julia A., . 
Ware, Miss Mary Lee, 
Warren, Mrs. Bayard, 



Amount carried forward, $2,204 00 



5 


00 


10 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 


. 25 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 


. 10 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


, 10 


00 


3 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 


3 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


. 10 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


3 


00 


r, 1 


00 


. 10 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


6 


00 


. 15 


00 


4 


00 


5 


00 


. 10 


00 


5 


00 


. 25 


00 


. 25 


00 



68 



Amount brought forward, $'. 

Warren, Mrs. J. C, 
Warshauer, Mrs. Isador, 
Watson, Mrs. Thomas A., 
Weeks, Mrs. W. B. P., 
Weld, Mrs. A. Winsor, 
Weld, Mrs. Samuel M., 
West, Mrs. Charles A., 
Wheelwright, Miss Mary, 
White, Miss Eliza Orne, 
White, Mrs. Jonathan H., 
White, Mrs. Joseph H., 
White, Mrs. Norman, 
White, Mrs. R. H., 
Whittington, Mrs. Hiram, 



Amoimt carried forward, $2 



2,204 


00 


10 


00 


1 


00 


20 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 


25 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


1 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 


2,289 


00 



Amount brought forward, $2,289 00 



Williams, The Misses, 
Williams, Miss Adelia C, 
Williams, Mrs. Arthur, Jr., 
Williams, Mrs. Jeremiah, 
Williams, Mr. Moses, . 
Williams, Mrs. Moses, 
Willson, Miss Lucy B., 
Wingersky, Mrs. Harris, 
Winsor, Mrs. Ernest, . 
Withington, Miss Anna S., 
Worthley, Mrs. George H., 
Wright, Miss Mary A., 
Young, Mrs. Benjamin L., 



. 10 


00 


. 50 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


5 00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


5 


00 


3 


00 


. 10 


00 



S2,389 00 



Abbott, Miss Georgianna E., 
Alden, Mrs. C. H., 
Amory, Mrs. William, 2d, 
Bacon, Miss Ellen S., . 
Baker, Miss S. P., 
Bangs, Mrs. F. R., 
Bartol, Mrs. John W., 
Batcheller, Mr. Robert, 
Bemis, Mr. J. M., 
Bicknell, Mrs. Wm. J., 
Bigelow, Mrs. Henry M., 
Bigelow, Mrs. J. S., 
Bowditch, Dr. Vincent Y., 
Brewer, Mr. Edward M., 
Browning, Mrs. Charles A. 
Bruerton, Mrs. James, 
BuUens, Miss Charlotte L., 
Burns, Mr. Walter G., 

C 

Carpenter, Mrs. G. A., 
Carr, Mrs. Samuel, 
Gary, Miss Ellen G., . 
Case, Mrs. James B., . 
Clapp, Miss Helen, 
Clark, Mrs. John Dudley, 
Clark, Mrs. Robert Farley, 
Codman, Mr. Charles R., 
Codman, Miss M. C, 
Cole, Mrs. E. E., 



Amount carried forward, . $351 00 



DONATIONS. 




., $1 00 


Amount brought forward. 


. $351 00 


5 00 






. 25 00 


Converse, Mrs. C. C, 


. 10 00 


. 10 00 


Coolidge, Mrs. Francis L., 


5 00 


5 00 


Cotting, Mrs. C. E., . 


. 10 00 


. 10 00 


Cotton, Miss Elizabeth A., 


. 50 00 


. 10 00 


Crosby, Mrs. S. V. R., 


. 10 00 


. 10 00 


Curtis, Mrs. Charles P., 


. 50 00 


. 10 00 


Daland, Mrs. Tucker, 


. 10 00 


5 00 


Dwight, Mrs. Thomas, 


1 00 


3 00 


Edwards, Miss Hannah M. 


, 10 00 


. 10 00 


Endicott, Mrs. Wm. C, 


5 00 


5 00 


Estabrook, Mrs. A. F., 


5 00 


. 15 00 


Eustis, Mrs. Herbert H., 


25 00 


5 00 


Evans, Mrs. Charles, . 


1 00 


5 00 


F 


20 00 


1 00 


Faulkner, Miss Fannie M., 


10 00 


2 00 


Fay, Mrs. Dudley B., 


10 00 


5 00 


Fay, Miss Sarah M., . 


15 00 


3 00 


Fiske, Mrs. Joseph N., 


20 00 


. 10 00 


Flood, Mrs. Hugh, 


2 00 


. 100 00 


Forbes, Mrs. F. B., . 


5 00 


. 25 00 


French, Miss Cornelia A., 


10 00 


2 00 


Frothingham, Mrs. Ran- 




. 50 00 


dolph, . . . . 


5 00 


2 00 


Gardner, Mrs. John L. 


5 00 


. 10 00 


Ginzberg, Mrs. Barnard, 


1 00 


5 00 


Goulding, Mrs. L. R., 


5 00 


2 00 


Grandin, Mrs. J. L., . 


10 00 



Amount carried forward, . $661 00 



69 



Amount brought forward, . $661 00 



Gray, Mrs. John Chipman, 


. 10 00 


Gray, Mrs. Morris, 


5 00 


Grosberg, Mrs. 0., 


2 00 


Guild, Mrs. S. Eliot, . 


. 10 00 


Harris, Miss Frances K., 


3 00 


Harwood, Mrs. George S., 


5 00 


Heath, Mr. Nathaniel, 


5 00 


Hill, Mrs. Lew C., 


5 00 


Hobbs, Mrs. Warren D., 


2 00 


Houghton, Miss Elizabeth G 


, 10 00 


Hoyt, Mrs. C. C., 


. 10 00 


Hubbard, Mrs. Eliot, . 


10 00 


Hubbard, Mr. Gorham, 


5 00 


Hunnewell, Mr. Walter, 


25 00 


Hunt, Mrs. Thomas, . 


3 00 


Hutchins, Mrs. C. F., 


5 00 


Hyneman, Mrs. Louis, 


2 00 


lasigi, Mrs. Oscar, 


10 00 


In memory of Mrs. George 




H. Eager, 


10 00 


In memory of Mrs. Harriet 




L. Thayer, through Mrs 




Hannah T. Brown, . 


5 00 


Johnson, Mr. Edward C., 


25 00 


Jolliffe, Mrs. Thomas H., 


5 00 


Joy, Mrs. Charles H., 


10 00 


Keene, Mrs. S. W., 


2 00 


Kettle, Mrs. L. N., 


50 00 


Kimball, The Misses, . 


25 00 


Koshland, Mrs. Joseph, 


10 00 


Lawrence, Mrs. John, 


10 00 


Lincoln, Mr. A. L., 


5 00 


Linder, Mrs. George, . 


10 00 


Livermore, Col. Thomas L. 


10 00 


Lockwood, Mrs. T. S. (for 




1916), . 


5 00 


Loring, Mrs. A. P., 


10 00 


Lovett, Mr. A. S., 


5 00 


Lovett, Mrs. A. S., 


5 00 


Lowell, Miss Lucy, 


5 00 


Lyman, Mrs. George H., 


10 00 


Magee, Mr. John L., . 


10 00 


Mandell, Mrs. S. P., . 


10 00 


Manning, Miss A. F., . 


10 00 


Mason, Miss Fanny P., 


10 00 


McKee, Mrs. Wm. L., 


5 00 


Means, Mrs. W. A., . 


10 00 


Merriam, Mrs. Frank, 


10 00 


Mills, Mrs. D. T., 


5 00 



Amount brought forward, $1,075 00 



Amount carried forward, $1,075 00 



Monroe, Mrs. G. H., . 
Morrill, Miss Amelia, . 
Morse, Mrs. Henry Lee, 
Pearson, Mrs. Charles H., 
Perry, Mrs. Charles F., 
Pfaelzer, Mrs. F. T., . 
Pope, Mrs. W. C, 
Potter, Mrs. W. H., . 
Punchard, Miss A. L., 
Quincy, Mrs. G. H., . 
Ranney, Mr. Fletcher, 
Rice, Mrs. N. W., 
Richardson, The Misses, in 
memory of M. A. E. and 

C. P. P 

Richardson, Mrs. Edward C, 
Richardson, Mrs. Frederick, 
Richardson, Mrs. John, 
Riley, Mr. Charles E., 
Ripley, Mr. Frederick H., 
Rodman, Miss Emma, 
Rogers, Miss Annette P., 
Ross, Mrs. Waldo O., . 
Russell, Mrs. Isaac H., 
Rust, Mrs. W. A., 
Sanger, Mr. Sabin P., 
Saunders, Mrs. D. E., 
Seabury, Miss Sarah E., 
Sears, Mrs. Richard D., 
Sever, Miss Emily, 
Sherman, Mrs. Wm. H., 
SUsbee, Mrs. G. S., . 
Slattery, Mrs. Wm. 
Spalding, Miss Dora N. 
Sprague, Dr. F. P., . 
Spring, Mrs. Romney, 
Stevenson, Miss Annie B., 
Stone, Mrs. Edwin P., 
Thayer, Mrs. Ezra Ripley, 
Thayer, Mrs. WiUiam G., 
Thing, Mrs. Annie B., 
Tucker, Mrs. Alfred J., 
Tucker, Mrs. Wm. A., 
Vialle, Mr. Charles A., 
Vorenberg, Mrs. S., 
Walker, Mrs. W. H., . 
Warner, Mrs. F. H., . 
Warren, Miss Ellen W., 
Webster, Mrs. F. G., . 



5 00 

50 00 

5 00 

5 00 

2 00 
10 00 

3 00 
3 00 
5 00 

10 00 

5 00 

10 00 



2 00 
5 00 
5 00 

3 00 
25 00 



10 00 

5 00 

50 00 

20 00 

5 00 

5 00 

10 00 

2 00 

10 00 

10 00 

2 00 

2 00 
5 00 
5 00 

10 00 
10 00 

1 00 

3 00 
10 00 

2 00 
10 00 
10 00 
25 00 
25 00 



Amount carried forward, $1,499 00 



70 



Amount brought forward, $1,499 00 



Wesson, Miss Isabel, . 
Weston, Mrs. H. C, . 
Wheelwright, Miss Mary C. 
White, Miss Eliza Orne, 
Whiting, Miss Anna M., 
Whitney, Mr. Edward F., 
Willcomb, Mrs. George, 
Williams, Mrs. Arthur, Jr., 



Amount carried forward, $1,569 00 



3 


00 


10 00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


25 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


2 


00 



Amount brought forward, $1,569 00 



Williams, Mrs. Charles A. 
Williams, Mr. Ralph B., 
Williams, Mrs. T. B., . 
Willson, Miss Lucy B., 
Windram, Mrs. W. T., 
Wyman, Mrs. Alfred E., 
Zerrahn, Mrs. Franz E., 
Ziegel, Mr. Louis, 



5 


00 


. 25 


00 


5 


00 


5 00 


. 50 


00 


15 00 


2 


00 


. 10 


00 



$1,686 00 



DONATIONS FOR THE IRON FENCE. 



Baylies, Mrs. Walter C, 
Emmons, Mrs. R. W., 2d, 
Hill, Mrs. L. C, . 



$100 00 
6 00 
2 00 

$107 00 



DONATIONS FOR ORGAN AND CLOCK. 



Keene, Mrs. Jarvis B. (for small organ). 
Calkins, Miss Mary W. (for clock), 



$5 00 
1 00 



$6 00 



CAMBRIDGE BRANCH. 



Aldrich, Mrs. Charles 

(for 1916-17), 
Ames, Mrs. James B. (dona 

tion), 
Boggs, Mrs. Edwin P., 
Brewster, Mrs. William (do 

nation), . 
Bulfinch, Miss Ellen S., 

(donation), 
Cary, Miss Emma F., 
Chandler, Mrs. Seth C, 
Emery, Miss Octavia B., 
Farlow, Mrs. Wm. G. (do 

nation), . 
Francke, Mrs. Kuno, . 
Frothingham, Miss Sarah E 
Goodale, Mrs. George L., 

Amount carried forward. 



. $2 


00 


. 10 


00 


1 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


3 


00 


3 


00 


2 


00 


3 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


1 


00 


. $41 


00 



Amount brought forward, . $41 00 



Greenough, Mrs. J. B., 
Hayward, Mrs. James W., 
Hedge, Miss Charlotte A., 

(donation), 
Horsford, Miss Katharine 

(donation), 
Howard, Mrs. Albert A., 
Ireland, Miss Catharine I 

(donation), 
Kennedy, Mrs. F. L., . 
Kettell, Mrs. Charles W., 
Longfellow, Miss Alice M., 
Longfellow, Mrs. W. P. P., 
Morison, Mrs. Robert S., 
Neal, Mrs. W. H., 

Amount carried forward, 



1 


00 


. 10 


00 


5 00 


2 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


3 00 


3 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 



S96 00 



71 



Amount brought forward, . $96 00 



Perrin, Mrs. Franklin, 
Richards, Miss L. B., . 
Roberts, Mrs. Coolidge S 
Sargent, Dr. D. A., 
Saville, Mrs. Henry M., 
Sawyer, Miss Ellen M. (do- 
nation), . 



Amount carried forward, . $120 00 



1 


00 


2 


00 


10 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 


5 


00 



Amount brought forward, . $120 00 



Thorp, Mrs. J. G., 
Toppan, Mrs. Robert N., 
White, Mrs. Moses P., 
Whittemore, Mrs. F. W., 
Woodman, Miss Mary, 
Woodman, Mrs. Walter, 



. 10 00 


. 10 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


. 15 


00 


2 


00 



$167 00 



DORCHESTER BRANCH. 



Bartlett, Mrs. Susan E., 
Bennett, Miss M. M., 
Brigham, Mrs. Frank E. (do 

nation), . 
Callender, Miss Caroline S. 
Churchill, Mrs. J. R., . 

(donation), 
Cushing, Miss Susan T., 
Eliot, Mrs. C. R., 
Faunce, Mrs. Sewall A., 
Hall, Mrs. Henry, 
Haven, Mrs. Katharine 

Stearns, . 
Hawkes, Mrs. S. L., . 
Humphreys, Mrs. Richard C 
Jordan, Miss Ruth A., 
Murdock, Mrs. Harold, 
Nash, Mrs. Edward W., 
Nash, Mrs. Frank K., 
Nightingale, Mrs. C. (dona- 
tion), 
Pratt, Mrs. Laban, 



Amount carried forward. 



$1 


00 


1 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


1 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 


$33 


00 



Amount brought forward, . $33 00 



Preston, Miss Myra C. (do- 
nation), . 
Reed, Mrs. George M., 
Robinson, Miss Anna B., 
Sayward, Mrs. W. H., 
Stearns, Mrs. Albert H., 
Stearns, Mr. A. Maynard, 
Stearns, Mr. A. T., 2d, 
Stearns, Henry D., in mem- 
ory of , . 
Stearns, Mrs. Frederic P., 
Torrey, Mrs. Elbridge (do 

nation), . 
Whiton, Mrs. Royal, . 
Wilder, Miss Grace S., 
Willard, Mrs. L. P., . 
Wood, Mrs. Wm. A., . 
W^oodberry, Miss Mary, 
Wright, Mr. C. P., . 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 

00 
00 



30 00 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



$90 00 



LYNN BRANCH. 



Caldwell, Mrs. Ellen F., 


$1 00 


Chase, Mrs. Philip A., 


5 00 


Earp, Miss Emily A., . 


1 00 


Ehner, Mr. and Mrs. V. J., 


5 00 


Haven, Miss Rebecca E., 


2 00 


(donation). 


2 00 


Hollis, Mrs. Samuel J. (do- 




nation), .... 


10 00 



Amount carried forward. 



$26 00 



Amount brought forward, . $26 00 



Sheldon, Mrs. Chauncey C 
Smith, Mrs. Joseph N., 
Sprague, Mr. Henry B., 
Tapley, Mr. Henry F. (do- 
nation, . 



5 


00 


. 10 


00 


5 


00 


5 00 



$51 00 



72 



MILTON BRANCH. 



Brewer, Miss Eliza (dona- 
tion), 
Clark, Mrs. D. Oakes, 
Cliun, Mrs. AUston B., 
Forbes, Mrs. J. Murray, 
Jaques, Miss Helen L., 

Amount carried forward, 



$10 00 

2 00 

1 00 

10 00 

10 00 

S33 00 



Amount brought forward, . $33 00 



Klous, Mrs. Henry D., 
Pierce, Mr. Vassar, 
Rivers, Mrs. George R. R. 
Safford, Mrs. N. M., . 



2 


00 


2 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 



$40 00 



All contributors to the fund are respectfully requested to peruse the 
above list, and to report either to Albert Thorndike, Treasurer, No. 
19 Congress Street, Boston, or to the Director, Edward E. Allen, Water- 
town, any ojnissions or inaccuracies which they may find in it. 



No. 19 Congress Street, Boston. 



ALBERT THORNDIKE, 

Treasurer. 



73 



rORM OF BEQUEST. 

I hereby give, devise and bequeath to the Perkins Institution 
AND Massachusetts School for the Blind, a corporation duly 
organized and existing under the laws of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, the sum of dollars (S ), 

the same to be applied to the general uses and purposes of said 
corporation under the direction of its Board of Trustees; and I 
do hereby direct that the receipt of the Treasurer for the time being 
of said corporation shall be a sufficient discharge to my executors 
for the same. 



FORM OF DEVISE OF REAL ESTATE. 

I give, devise and bequeath to the Perkins Institution and Mas- 
sachusetts School for the Blind, a corporation duly organized 
and existing under the laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
that certain tract of real estate bounded and described as follows : — 

(Here describe the real estate accurately) 
with full power to sell, mortgage and convey the same free of all 
trusts. 



NOTICE. 



The address of the treasurer of the corporation is as 

follows: 

ALBERT THORNDIKE, 

No. 19 Congress Street, 

Boston. 




Bust of Michael Anagnos, dedicated November 7, 1917, in Anagnos Court, 
Kindergarten. 



AVJL. tJLlCJ 



^WBJf 



Perkins Institution 

And Massachusetts School 
For the Blind 




EIQHTY'SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 
OF THE TRUSTEES 



1918 



BOSTON jt J* Jt ^ jit 1919 
WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO. 



211^ (tsmmmtmBnitii uf Mwssmifm^tia. 



Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School fob the Blind, 
Watertown, October 21, 1918. 

To the Hon. Albert P. Langtrt, Secretary of State, Boston. 

Dear Sir: — I have the honor to transmit to you, for the 
use of the legislature, a copy of the eighty-seventh annual 
report of the trustees of this institution to the corporation 
thereof, together with that of the treasurer and the usual 
accompanying documents. 

Respectfully, 

EDWARD E. ALLEN, 

Secretary. 



OFFICERS OF THE CORPORATION. 

1919-1919. 



FRANCIS HENRY APPLETON, President. 
GEORGE H. RICHARDS, Vice-President. 
ALBERT THORNDIKE, Treasurer. 
EDWARD E. ALLEN, Secretary. 



BOABD OF TRUSTEES. 



Mrs. GEORGE ANGIER. 
FRANCIS HENRY APPLETON. 
WALTER CABOT BAYLIES. 
WILLIAM ENDICOTT. 
M168 ROSAMOND FAY. 
THOMAS J. FAY. 



Rev. PAUL REVERE FROTHINGHAM. 
ROBERT H. HALLOWELL. 
JAMES ARNOLD LOWELL. 
GEORGE H. RICHARDS. 
WILLIAM L. RICHARDSON. M.D. 
RICHARD M. SALTONSTALL. 



STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Monthly Visiting Committee, 

whose duty it is to visit and inspect the Institution at least once in each month. 

1919. 
Walter Cabot Baylies. 
Miss Rosamond Fat. 
George H. Richards. 
William L. Richardson. 
Richard M. Saltonstall. 
William Endicott. 





1919. 




January, . 


Francis Henry Appleton. 


July, . . . 


February, 


Mrs. George Angier. 


August, . 


March, . 


Robert H. Hallo well. 


September, . 


April, 


Paul R. Frothingham. 


October, . 


May, . 


James A. Lowell. 


November, . 


June, . 


Thomas J. Fat. 


December, 



Committee on Education. 
Gbobge H. Richards. 
Rev. Paul Revere Frothingham. 
William L. Richardson, M.D. 



House Committee. 

William L. Richardson, M.D. 
Mrs. George Angier. 
George H. Richards. 



Committee on Finance. 

Walter Cabot Baylies. 
George H. Richards. 
James A. Lowell. 
Robert H. Hallowell. 



Committee on Health. 
Walter Cabot Baylies. 
William L. Richardson, M.D. 
Richard M. Saltonstall. 



Auditors of Accounts. 

George H. Richards. 
Robert H. Hallowell. 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION AND 
TEACHERS. 



EDWARD E. ALLEN, Director. 



TEACHERS AND OFFICERS OF THE UPPER SCHOOL. 
LITE&ARY DEPARTMENT. 



Boys' Section. 

HAROLD MOLTER.i 

Miss CAROLINE E. McMASTER. 

Miss JULIA A. BOYLAN. 

Miss JESSICA L. LANGWORTHY. 

ARTHUR E. HOLMES. 

Miss FEODORE M. NICHOLLS. 

Miss ETHEL D. EVANS. 

Miss ETHEL WELLS. 



Oirls' Section. 

Miss ELLEN H. PACKARD. 
Miss ANNIE L. BRADFORD. 
Miss GENEVIEVE M. HAVEN. 
Miss INEZ J. SWENSON. 
Miss LAURA A. BROWN. 
Miss JULIA E. BURNHAM. 
Miss ELSIE H. SIMONDS. 



Teacher of Housework. 

Miss MEREDITH PEIRCE 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL TRAININQ. 

Misa INEZ J. SWENSON. I Miss LENNA D. SWINERTON. 



DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC. 

EDWIN L. GARDINER. 



Miss FREDA A. BLACK. 
Miss HELEN M. ABBOTT. 
Miss MARY E. BURBECK. 
JOHN F. HARTWELL. 



Miss MARY E. RILEY. 
Miss ALVERA C. GUSTAFSON. 
Miss BLANCHE A. BARDIN. 
Miss MABEL A. STARBIRD, Voice. 



DEPARTMENT OF MANUAL TRAINING. 



Boys' Section. 

JULIAN H. MABEY. 

ELWYN C. SMITH. 

Miss MARY B. KNOWLTON, Sloyd. 



Oirls' Section. 
Miss FRANCES M. LANGWORTHY. 
Miss M. ELIZABETH ROBBINS. 
Miss MARIAN E. CHAMBERLAIN. 
Miss ELIZABETH O. PIERCE. 



1 On leave of absence at United States Hospital No. 7, Baltimore. 



DEPARTMENT OF TUNING PIANOFORTES. 

ELWYN H. FOWLER, Manager and Ijistructor. 



LIBRARIANS, CLERKS AND BOOKKEEPERS. 



Miss LAURA M. SAWYER, Librarian. 
Miss HARRIET E. BOSWORTH, 

Assistant. 
MiSB ANNA GARDNER FISH, Clerk. 

Mrs. SARAH A. STOVER, Treasurer for the Ladies' Auxiliary Society. 



Miss ELLEN THOMPSON, Assistant. 
Miss MAI L. LELAND, Bookkeeper. 
Miss WINIFRED F. LELAND, Assistant. 



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 

OSCAR S. CREELEY, M.D., Attending Physician. 

HENRY HAWKINS, M.D., Ophthalmologist. 

HAROLD B. CHANDLER, M.D., Assistant Ophthalmologist. 

ARTHUR WILLARD FAIRBANKS, M.D., Pediatrician. 

HOWARD ARTHUR LANE, D.M.D., Attending Dentist for the Institution. 

REINHOLD RUELBERG, D.M.D., Attending Dentist for the Kindergarten. 



DOMESTIC DEPARTMENT. 
FREDERICK A. FLANDERS, Steward. 



Housekeepers in the Cottages. 



Boys' Section. 

Miss CLARISSA A. DAWSON. 
Miss ANNIE W. BODFISH. 
Mas. JOSEPHINE H. MANSUR. 



Girls' Section. 

Mrs. ISABELLA P. HEARD. 
Mrs. CORA L. GLEASON. 
Mrs. M. M. EASTMAN, Substitvte. 
Mrs. AGNES C. LUMMUS. 
Mrs. BERTHA C'^MAXWELL. 



PRINTING DEPARTMENT. 

FRANK C. BRYAN, Manager. 
Mrs. MARTHA A. TITUS. Printer. | Miss MARY L. TULLY. Printer. 



WORKSHOP FOR ADULTS. 

FRANK C. BRYAN, Manager. 
Miss EVA C. ROBBINS, Clerk. 



TEACHERS AND OFFICERS OF THE LOWER SCHOOL. 



KINDERGARTEN. 



Boys' Section. 

Miss Nettie B. Vose, Matron. 
Miss Florence Cronkhite, Assintant. 
Miss Hope Davison Kindergartner . 
Miss L. Henrietta Stratton, Teacher. 
Miss Sadie Turner, Teacher. 

Me3. Ruth R. Chase, Music Teacher. 
Miss Annie L. F. Edwards, Teacher of Manual Training. 
Miss Lenna D. Swinerton, Assistant in Corrective Gymnastics 
Miss Eleanor E. Kelly, Field Worker, i 



Qirls' Section. 

Mrs. J. M. Hill, Matron. 
Miss Cornelia M. Loring, Assistant. 
Miss W. R. Humbert, Kindergartner. 
Miss Alice M. Lane, Teacher. 



PRIMARY DEPARTMENT. 
Boys' Section. 



Miss Margaret F. Hughes, Matron. 

Miss Jane J. Walsh, Assistant. 

Miss Marguerite Whealon, Teacher. 



Miss Ida E. Stratton, Teacher. 

Miss Minnie C. Tucker, Music Teacher. 

Miss Rosalind L. Houghton, Sloyd. 



Miss Ada S. Bartlett, Matron. 
Miss S. M. Chandler, Assistant. 
Miss Bertha M. Buck, Teacher. 



Girls' Section. 



Miss Lizzie R. Kinsman, Teacher. 
Miss Naomi K. Gring, Music Teacher. 
Miss Gerda L. Wahlberg, Sloyd. 



LADIES' VISITING COMMITTEE TO THE KINDERGARTEN. 

Mrs. John Chipman Gray, President. 
Miss Annie C. Warren, Vice-President. 
Miss Eleanor S. Parker, Secretary. 



Mrs. John Chipman Gray, 
Mrs. Harold J. Coolidge, 
Mrs. T. H. Cabot, . . 
Miss Annie C. Warren, 
Mrs. John B. Thomas, . 
Miss Ellen Bullard, 



:) 



January. 
February. 
March. 

April. 

May. 



Mrs. Ronald Lyman, 
Mrs. Roger B. Merriman, 
Mrs. George H. Monks, 
Mrs. E. Preble Motley, 
Miss Alice Sargent, 



June. 

October. 

November. 

December. 



General Visitors. 

Miss Eleanor S. Parker. 
Miss Elizabeth G. Norton. 
Mrs. Larz Anderson. 
Mrs. William R. Livermore. 



Honorary Members. 

Mrs. Kingsmill Marrs. 
Mrs. Maud Howe Elliott. 



' On leave of absence overseas. 



MEMBERS OF THE CORPORATION. 



Abbot, Mrs. M. T., Cambridge. 

Adams, Melvin 0., Boston. 

Ahl, Mrs. Daniel, Boston. 

Allen, Edward E., Watertown. 

Allen, Mrs. Edward E., Water- 
town. 

Angier, Mrs. George, Newton. 

Appleton, Hon. Francis Henrj'-, 
Peabody. 

Appleton, Francis Henry, Jr., 
Boston. 

Appleton, Mrs. Francis Henry, 
Jr., Boston. 

Appleton, Dr. William, Boston. 

Atherton, Mrs. Caroline S., Grove 
HaU. 

Bacon, Gaspar G., Jamaica Plain. 

Baldwin, S. E., New Haven, 
Conn. 

Ballantine, Arthur A., Boston. 

Bancroft, Miss Eleanor C, 
Beverly. 

Bancroft, Robert H., Beverly. 

Barbour, Edmund D., Boston. 

Bartlett, Miss Mary F., Boston. 

Baylies, Walter C, Boston. 

Baylies, Mrs. Walter C, Boston. 

Beach, Rev. D. N., Bangor, Me. 

Beatley, Mrs. Clara B., Boston. 

Beebe, E. Pierson, Boston. 

Benedict, Wm. Leonard, New 
York. 

Bennett, Miss Gazella, Worces- 
ter. 

Black, George N., Boston. 



Blake, Miss Marian L., Man- 
chester. 

Blunt, Col. S. E., Springfield. 

Boardman, Mrs. E. A., Boston. 

Bourn, Hon. A. 0., Providence, 
R.I. 

Bowditch, Ingersoll, Boston. 

Boyden, Mrs. Charles, Boston. 

Bremer, S. Parker, Boston. 

Brigham, Charles, Watertown. 

Brooke, Rev. S. W., London. 

Brooks, Gorham, Boston. 

Brooks, Peter C, Boston. 

Brooks, Shepherd, Boston. 

Bryant, Mrs. A. B. M., Boston. 

Bullock, Col. A. G., Worcester. 

Burditt, Miss Alice A., Boston. 

Burnham, Miss Julia E., Lowell. 

Burnham, William A., Boston. 

Burr, I. Tucker, Jr., Boston. 

Callahan, Miss Mary G., Boston. 

Callender, Walter, Pro\idence, 
R.I. 

Camp, Rev. Edward C, Water- 
town. 

Carter, IMrs. J. W., West Newton. 

Gary, Miss Ellen G., Boston. 

Case, Mrs. Laura L., Boston. 

Chace, J. H., Valley Falls, R. I. 

Chapin, Edward P., Andover. 

Clement, Edward H., Concord. 

Cochrane, Alexander, Boston. 

Colby, Miss Jennie M., Boston. 

Colt, Samuel P., Bristol, R. I. 

Cook, Charles T., Detroit, IMich. 



Cook, Mrs. C. T., Detroit, Mich. 

Coolidge, Francis L., Boston. 

Coolidge, J. Randolph, Boston. 

Coohdge, IVIrs. J. R., Boston. 

CooUdge, T. Jefferson, Boston. 

Cotting, Charles E., Jr., Boston. 

Crosby, Sumner, Brookline. 

Crosby, William S., Brookline. 

Crowninshield, Francis B., Bos- 
ton. 

Cunningham, Mrs. Henry V., 
Boston. 

Curtis, Mrs. Greeley S., Boston. 

Curtis, Horatio G., Boston. 

Curtis, Mrs. Horatio G., Boston. 

Curtis, James F., Boston. 

Cutler, George C, Jr., Boston, 

Dabney, George B., Boston. 

Dalton, Mrs. C. H., Boston. 

Davis, Charles S., Boston. 

Davis, Livingston, Milton. 

Day, Mrs. Frank A., Newton. 

Dewey, Francis H., Worcester. 

De Witt, Alexander, Worcester. 

Dexter, Mrs. F. G., Boston. 

Dexter, Miss Rose L., Boston. 

Dillaway, W. E. L., Boston. 

Dimick, Orlando W., Water- 
town. 

Dolan, William G., Boston. 

Draper, George A., Boston. 

Drew, Edward B., Cambridge. 

Duryea, Mrs. Herman, New York. 

EUot, Rev. C. R., Boston. 

Elliott, Mrs. Maud Howe, Bos- 
ton. 

Ellis, George H., Boston. 

Ely, Adolph C, Watertown. 

Endicott, Henry, Boston. 

Endicott, William, Boston. 

Endicott, William C, Boston. 

Ernst, C. W., Boston. 

Evans, Mrs. Glendower, Boston. 



Everett, Dr. Oliver H., Worces- 
ter. 

Fanning, David H., Worcester. 

Faulkner, Miss F. M., Boston. 

Fay, Mrs. Dudley B., Boston. 

Fay, Henry H., Boston. 

Fay, Mrs. Henry H., Boston. 

Fay, Miss Sarah B., Boston. 

Fay, Miss S. M., Boston. 

Fay, Wm. Rodman, Dover, N. H. 

Fenno, Mrs. L. C, Boston. 

Fisher, Miss Annie E., Boston. 

Fiske, Mrs. Mary Duncan, Bos- 
ton. 

Fitz, Mrs. W. Scott, Boston. 

Fitzpatrick, Thomas B., Brook- 
Une. 

Ford, Lawrence A., Boston. 

Foster, Mrs. Francis C, Cam- 
bridge. 

Freeman, Miss H. E., Boston. 

Frothingham, Rev. P. R., Boston. 

Fuller, George F., Worcester. 

Fuller, Mrs. Samuel R., Boston. 

Gale, Lyman W., Boston. 

Gammans, Hon. G. H., Boston. 

Gardiner, Robert H., Boston. 

Gardiner, Robert H., Jr., Need- 
ham. 

Gardner, George P., Boston. 

Gardner, Mrs. John L., Boston. 

Gaskins, Frederick A., Milton. 

Geer, Mrs. Danforth, Jr., New 
York. 

George, Charles H., Providence, 
R. L 

Gleason, Mrs. Cora L., Water- 
town. 

Gleason, Sidney, Medford. 

Glidden, W. T., Brookline. 

Goff, Darius L., Pawtucket, R. I. 

Goff, Lyman B., Pawtucket, R. L 

Goldthwait, Mrs. John, Boston. 



Gooding, Rev. A., Portsmouth, 
N. H. 

Gordon, Rev. G. A., D.D., Bos- 
ton. 

Gray, Roland, Boston. 

Green, Charles G., Cambridge. 

Gregg, Richard B., Boston. 

Grew, Edward W., Boston. 

Griffin, S. B., Springfield. 

Griswold, Merrill, Cambridge. 

Hall, Mrs. Florence Howe, New 
York. 

Hall, Miss Minna B., Longwood. 

Hallowell, John W., Boston. 

Hallowell, Robert H., Boston. 

Hammond, Mrs. G. G., Boston. 

Haskell, Mrs. E. B., Auburndale. 

Hearst, Mrs. Phebe A., Cah- 
fornia. 

Hemenway, Mrs. Augustus, Bos- 
ton. 

Higginson, Frederick, Brookline. 

Higginson, F. L., Jr., Boston. 

Higginson, Henry Lee, Boston. 

Higginson, Mrs. Henry L., Boston. 

Hill, Arthur D., Boston. 

Hill, Dr. A. S., Somerville. 

Hohnes, Charles W., Toronto, 
Ont. 

Homans, Robert, Boston, 

Howe, Henry Marion, New York. 

Howe, Henry S., Brookline. 

Howe, James G., Milton. 

Howes, Miss Edith M., Brookline. 

Howland, Mrs. 0. 0., Boston. 

Hunnewell, Mrs. H. S., Boston. 

Hunnewell, Walter, Jr., Boston. 

Hutchins, Mrs. C. F., Boston. 

lasigi. Miss Mary V., Boston. 

Ingraham, Mrs. E. T., Wellesley. 

Isdahl, Mrs. C. B., California. 

Jackson, Charles C, Boston. 

Jackson, Patrick T., Cambridge. 



James, Mrs. C. D., Brookline. 

Jenks, Miss C. E., Bedford. 

Johnson, Edward C, Boston. 

Johnson, Rev. H. S., Boston. 

Joy, Mrs. Charles H., Boston. 

Kasson, Rev. F. H., Boston. 

Kellogg, Mrs. Eva D., Boston. 

Kendall, Miss H. W., Boston. 

Kidder, Mrs. Henry P., Boston. 

Kilham, Miss Annie M., Beverly. 

Kilmer, Frederick M., Somer\alle. 

Kimball, Mrs. David P., Boston. 

Kimball, Edward P., Maiden. 

King, Mrs. Tarrant Putnam, Mil- 
ton. 

Kinnicutt, Lincoln N., Worcester. 

Knapp, George B., Boston. 

Knowlton, Daniel S., Boston. 

Kramer, Henry C, Boston. 

Lamb, Mrs. Annie L., Boston. 

Lang, Mrs. B. J., Boston. 

Latimer, Mrs. Grace G., Boston. 

Lawrence, Mrs. A. A., Boston. 

Lawrence, Mrs. James, Groton. 

Lawrence, John Silsbee, Boston. 

Lawrence, Rt. Rev. Wm., Boston. 

Leverett, George V., Boston. 

Ley, Harold A., Springfield. 

Lincoln, L. J. B., Hingham. 

Lincoln, Waldo, Worcester. 

Littell, Miss Harriet A., Boston. 

Lodge, Hon. Henry C, Boston. 

Logan, Hon. James, Worcester. 

Longfellow, Miss Alice M., Cam- 
bridge. 
Lord, Rev. A. M., Providence, 

R.I. 
Loring, Miss Katharine P., Prides 

Crossing. 
Loring, Miss Louisa P., Prides 

Crossing. 
Loring, Mrs. Wm. Caleb, Boston. 
Lothrop, John, Auburndale. 



Lothrop, Mrs. T. K., Boston. 

Loud, Charles E., Boston. 

Lovering, Mrs. C. T., Boston. 

Lovering, Richard S., Boston. 

Lowell, Abbott Lawrence, Boston. 

Lowell, Miss Amy, Brookline. 

Lowell, Miss Georgina, Boston. 

Lowell, James A., Boston. 

Lowell, John, Chestnut Hill. 

Lowell, Miss Lucy, Boston. 

Luce, Hon. Robert, Waltham. 

Marrett, Miss H. M., Standish, 
Me. 

Marrs, Mrs. Kingsmill, Boston. 

Mason, Charles F., Watertown. 

Mason, Miss EUen F., Boston. 

Mason, Miss Ida M., Boston. 

Merriman, Mrs. D., Boston. 

Merritt, Edward P., Boston. 

Meyer, Mrs. G. von L., Boston. 

Minot, the Misses, Boston. 

Minot, J. Grafton, Boston. 

Minot, WilUam, Boston. 

Monks, Mrs. George H., Boston. 

Morgan, Eustis P., Saco, Me. 

Morgan, Mrs. Eustis P., Saco, 
Me. 

Morison, Mrs. John H., Boston. 

Morse, Mrs. Leopold, Boston. 

Morse, Miss Margaret F., Jamaica 
Plain. 

Moseley, Charles H., Boston. 

Motley, Mrs. E. Preble, Boston. 

Motley, Warren, Boston. 

Norcross, Grenville H., Boston. 

Norcross, Mrs. Otis, Boston. 

Noyes, Mrs. Lucia C, Jamaica 
Plain. 

Oliver, Dr. Henry K., Boston. 

Osgood, Mrs. E. L., Hopedale. 

Osgood, Miss Fanny D., Hope- 
dale. 

Parker, W. Prentiss, Boston. 



Parker, W. Stanley, Boston. 

Parkinson, John, Boston. 

Peabody, Rev. Endicott, Groton. 

Peabody, Frederick W., Boston. 

Peabody, Harold, Boston. 

Peabody, Philip G., Boston. 

Peabody, W. Rodman, Boston. 

Perkins, Charles Bruen, Boston. 

Perkins, Mrs. C. E., Boston. 

PhilUps, IVIrs. John C, Boston. 

Pickering, Henry G., Boston. 

Pickman, D. L., Boston. 

Pickman, Mrs. D. L., Boston. 

Pierce, Mrs. M. V., Milton. 

Pope, Mrs. A. A., Boston. 

Poulsson, Miss Emilie, Boston. 

Powers, Mrs. H. H., Newton. 

Pratt, George Dwaght, Spring- 
field. 

Prendergast, J. M., Boston. 

Proctor, James H., Boston. 

Putnam, F. Delano, Boston. 

Putnam, Mrs. James J., Boston. 

Rantoul, Neal, Boston. 

Rantoul, Robert S., Salem. 

Read, Mrs. Robert M., Medford. 

Reed, Mrs. Wm. Howell, Boston. 

Remick, Frank W., West Newton. 

Rice, John C, Boston. 

Richards, Miss Elise, Boston. 

Richards, George H., Boston. 

Richards, Mrs. H., Gardiner, Me. 

Richards, Henry H., Groton. 

Richardson, John, Boston. 

Richardson, John, Jr., Readville. 

Richardson, Mrs. John, Jr., Read- 
ville. 

Richardson, Miss M. G., New 
York. 

Richardson, IVIrs. M. R., Boston. 

Richardson, W. L., M.D., Boston. 

Roberts, Mrs. A. W., Allston. 

Robie, Frederic H., Watertown. 



10 



Robinson, George F,, Watertown. 

Rogers, Miss A. P., Boston. 

Rogers, Miss Flora E., New York. 

Rogers, Henry M., Boston. 

Ropes, Mrs. Joseph A., Boston. 

Russell, Miss Marian, Boston. 

Russell, Otis T., Boston. 

Russell, Mrs. Robert S., Boston. 

Russell, Mrs. W. A., Boston. 

Russell, Wm. Eustis, Boston. 

Saltonstall, Leverett, Westwood. 

Saltonstall, Mrs. Leverett, West- 
wood. 

Saltonstall, Miss Nora, Chestnut 
Hill. 

Saltonstall, Richard M., Boston. 

Schaff, Capt. Morris, Cambridge. 

Sears, Mrs. Knyvet W., Boston. 

Sears, Willard T., Boston. 

Shattuck, Henry Lee, Boston. 

Shaw, Bartlett M., Watertown. 

Shaw, Mrs. G. Howland, Boston. 

Shaw, Henry S., Boston. 

Shepard, Harvey N., Boston. 

Slater, Mrs. H. N., Boston. 

Smith, Joel West, East Hampton, 
Conn. 

Snow, Walter B., WatertowTi. 

Sohier, Miss Emily L., Boston. 

Sohier, Miss M. D., Boston. 

Sorchan, Mrs. Victor, New York. 

Sprague, F. P., M.D., Boston. 

Stanwood, Edward, Brookline. 

Stearns, Charles H., Brookline. 

Stearns, Mrs. Charles H., Brook- 
line. 

Stearns, Wm. B., Boston. 

Stevens, Miss C. A., New York. 

Sturgis, Francis S., Boston. 

Sturgis, R. Clipston, Boston. 

Thayer, Rev. G. A., Cincinnati, 0. 

Thaj'er, Mrs. Nathaniel, Boston. 

Thorndike, Albert, Boston. 



Thorndike, Miss Rosanna D., 
Boston. 

Tifft, Ehphalet T., Springfield. 

Tilden, Miss Alice Foster, Milton. 

Tilden, Miss Edith S., Milton. 

Tingley, S. H., Pro\^dence, R. I. 

Tuckerman, Mrs. C. S., Boston. 

Tufts, John F., Watertown. 

Underwood, Herbert S., Boston. 

Underwood, Wm. Lyman, Bel- 
mont. 

Villard, Mrs. Henry, New York. 

Wallace, Andrew B., Sprmgfield. 

Ware, Miss Mary L., Boston. 

Warren, J. G., Providence, R. I. 

Washburn, Hon. Charles G., 
Worcester. 

Washburn, Mrs. Frederick A., 
Boston. 

Waters, H. Goodman, Springfield. 

Watson, Thomas A., Boston. 

Watson, Mrs. T. A., Boston. 

Wendell, William G., Boston. 

Wesson, J. L., Boston. 

West, George S., Boston. 

Wheelock, Miss Lucy, Boston. 

Wliite, George A., Boston. 

Whitney, Henry M., Brookline. 

Wiggins, Charles, 2d, Cambridge. 

Williams, Mrs. H. C, Framing- 
ham. 

Winsor, Mrs. E., Chestnut Hill. 

Winsor, James B., Providence, 
R. L 

Winsor, Robert, Jr., Boston. 

Winthrop, Mrs. Thomas L., Bos- 
ton. 

Wolcott, Roger, Boston. 

Wright, George S., Watertown. 

Young, Mrs. Benjamin L., Bos- 
ton. 

Young, B. Loring, Weston. 



11 



SYNOPSIS OF THE PROCEEDINGS 



ANNUAL MEETING OF THE COKPOEATION. 



Watertown, October 9, 1918. 

The annual meeting of the corporation, duly summoned, 
was held to-day at the institution, and was called to order by 
the president, Hon. Francis Henry Appleton, at 3 p.m. 

The proceedings of the last meeting were read and ap- 
proved. 

The annual report of the trustees was accepted and or- 
dered to be printed, together with the usual accompanying 
documents. 

The annual report of the treasurer was presented, accepted 
and ordered to be printed. 

Voted, That acts and expenditures, made and authorized by the 
Board of Trustees, or by any committee appointed by said Board of 
Trustees, during the corporate year closed this day, be and are hereby 
ratified and confirmed. 

The corporation then proceeded to ballot for officers for 
the ensuing year, and the following persons were unani- 
mously elected : • — 

President. ■ — Hon. Francis Henry Appleton. 

Vice-President. — George H. Richards. 

Treasurer. — Albert Thorndike. 

12 



Secretary. — Edward E. Allen. 

Trustees. — Mrs. George Angier, Francis Henry Apple- 
ton, Walter Cabot Baylies, William Endicott, Robert H. 
Hallo well, James A. Lowell, George H. Richards, and Rich- 
ard M. Saltonstall. 

The following persons were unanimously elected members 
of the corporation : — Mrs. Caroline S. Atherton, Mrs. Clara 
Bancroft Beatley, Miss Gazella Bennett, Miss Alice A. Bur- 
ditt, Mrs. Cora L. Gleason, Miss Annie M. Kilham, Miss 
Mary H. Ladd,^ Miss Harriet A. Littell, Mr. Arthur Lyman, ^ 
Miss Lucia Clapp Noyes, Miss Emilie Poulsson, Mrs. Robert 
M. Read and Mr. Joel West Smith. 

The Director of the institution reported that, because the 
plans of the government for the re-education of its blinded 
soldiers involve bringing them together in a special plant 
for them, therefore he had not offered the government the 
use of special facilities at the Perkins Institution plant, as 
it was voted at last year's meeting he might do, but that he 
had been able to give aid through counsel and advice and 
through supply of special materials manufactured by the 
Howe Memorial Press. 

Upon presentation of the matter by the Director, it was — 

Voted, That in case of explosion or disaster in the vicinity of Water- 
town, the temporary use of such of the institution grounds and build- 
ings as the institution could properly relinquish, in view of its obliga- 
tions to its pupils and staff, be tendered to any organization such as 
the Shelter Committee of the Civilian Relief of the American Red 
Cross in Boston. 

The meeting then adjourned. 

EDWARD E. ALLEN, 

Secretary. 

1 Declined the election. 



13 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES. 



Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind, 
Watertown, October 9, 1918. 

Ladies and Gentlemen: — The number of pupils 
attending this school at any one time rarely exceeds 
270, but the number of the staff of teachers and 
officers and of the help in so complete a boarding 
school as the Perkins Institution remains constant, 
being 128, or nearly one half the number of the pupils. 
It is chiefly this necessarily large proportion of staff 
which lifts the pupil per capita cost above that of 
other kinds of institutions; for, though the salaries 
paid are moderate, their total makes a consid- 
erable budget. This past year the increased cost of 
food and coal and other supplies has been met rather 
anxiously by our treasurer, for his income from most 
sources has diminished. And the income seems likely 
to be still less this next year, which promises to be 
one of ever-growing expenditures. 

It should be noted that last year we had to draw 
upon our principal to the extent of $7,000. It is not 
true, therefore, as was publicly stated at a hearing 
in the State House before the Constitutional Con- 
vention, that the Perkins Institution is a great, rich 
school which accepts State aid and lays by an annual 

14 



surplus. This is not the fact, and it is markedly not 
true in recent years, looking at the three depart- 
ments together, although to be sure its large Kinder- 
garten Department, or lower school, which is a sep- 
arate trust, has not always spent all of its income. 
The Kindergarten has never received aid from the 
Commonwealth, the $30,000 which Massachusetts 
has been paying annually to the Perkins Institution 
having gone into the Institution funds proper, as a 
partial offset to the expense of caring for and teaching 
the State's pupils of that department. This contri- 
bution amounts to about $300 for each such pupil, 
whereas their actual per capita cost has exceeded 
that sum ever since 1896. While the Perkins Insti- 
tution has not had much concern over the knowledge 
that for all these years it has been giving unsurpassed 
care and training to the State's pupils without 
expectation or even desire of full financial return, 
the Trustees regret that, in a public debate upon 
an important constitutional amendment, greater 
care was not exercised in stating facts which, if 
accurately presented, would have shown the Insti- 
tution to have been doing work which would without 
its aid have had to be done at greatly increased 
expense to the public. 

However, the so-called Anti-Aid Act having be- 
come law, the Perkins Institution is now beginning 
its new school year with 180 Massachusetts pupils. 
The State having made its customary payment this 
past year, we have no doubt that a new and mutually 



15 



satisfactory arrangement can be effected between 
us and the Commonwealth, through the instru- 
mentahty of the Special Commission on Education 
and the State Board of Education, whereby we shall 
be enabled to continue the schooling of its youthful 
blind. As for those 80 or 90 pupils who come to us 
from other States, we have raised the per capita 
tuition charge for them from $300 to $350 at the 
lower school and to $400 at the upper school; sim- 
ilarly in the case of the few private pay pupils. 
From the responses of the New England State offi- 
cials concerned, there is no doubt that they are still 
glad to avail themselves of the unsurpassed facili- 
ties which the Perkins Institution agrees to furnish 
at considerably less than cost. 

All who are working in behalf of the blind feel that 
the present is a time of promise for all the physically 
handicapped; and the thoughtful among the blind 
themselves have been quickened by this feeling. A 
higher sense of the responsibility of government 
towards its unfortunate citizens seems to have been 
crystalized by the great war, together with a new 
recognition of the fact that the labor and the hap- 
piness of the handicapped can be public assets of 
tremendous economic value. Further, a spirit mak- 
ing for a new neighborliness is growing and spread- 
ing among the people, which is particularly evident 
among w^omen of leisure, several hundreds of whom 
are known to be preparing themselves for helpful- 
ness to the blinded soldiers alone. There have been 
over 200 of these women in and about Boston who 

16 



have actually studied into the matter of how best 
to help and, in so doing, have necessarily had their 
attention drawn to the condition and needs of the 
blind who are always with us. They have visited 
all the Massachusetts resources for the blind, among 
them our school, where the pupils appear at their 
best, and so been impressed with the varied capaci- 
ties of the blind under training. 

A matter of fundamental importance which we 
have emphasized to these new and potential workers 
is that blindness does not classify, that our pupils 
are individuals with very different possibilities and 
are thus just like other groups of boys and girls, and 
that for many of them manual occupations are by 
no means necessary or even best after school days as 
means of self-support. The fact that special shops 
for the blind are eventually resorted to by numbers 
of our pupils who could do far better elsewhere is 
merely a proof that the average employer doesn't 
want blind labor. This, naturally, is deeply dis- 
couraging to our graduates who have become con- 
scious of potential efficiency, and it serves measurably 
to embitter their lives. That the blind are commonly 
happy is doubtless true within limits. How much 
happier they would be if society would act towards 
them as if they were needed in this workaday world! 

The conditions indicated in the foregoing para- 
graph, — the reluctancy of the world to act the part 
of neighbor to the blind, which has always kept do\\Ti 
the morale of our schools for them, — promise 
definite change and improvement as a result of the 

17 



war. We must therefore see to it that the schools 
quicken the efforts of their pupils themselves through 
hope in their future, and so turn out ever greater 
numbers who can succeed in the world at large. 

That the pendulum has already begun to swing 
that way is shown by this: the placement agent of 
the Massachusetts Commission for the Blind has 
been increasingly successful in getting employment 
for our blind people among the seeing, having so 
placed twenty this past summer. Within the year 
she has placed five as office typists where the dicta- 
phone was in use. The immediate effect of such 
success has been magical upon the spirit of the school. 
It seems to teachers as though the pupils had never 
returned to their work with as much earnestness as 
they have this fall. And fewer have returned, — 
the attendance is smaller than usual, — a goodly 
number having obtained jobs for themselves and 
gone to work at them. 

In order the better to recognize fitness in our 
pupils and to develop it, there has been added to 
the Perkins staff this year a vocational counsellor 
who is likewise placement agent for those of our 
pupils from outside Massachusetts, and also inter- 
mediary between the institution and the parents of 
its pupils; in other words, she is both a student of 
the pupils and field agent and visitor at their homes. 
She has already visited the homes of sixty pupils 
between September, 1917, and June, 1918, mostly 
during the short vacations when the children were 
there, and this service was continued during the 

18 



long summer vacation in Maine, New Hampshire 
and Vermont. Being tactful, she has naturally 
succeeded in putting the school in touch with the 
parents as no amount of correspondence and termly 
reports of their children's progress can do. The 
message you carry is more potent than the message 
you send. This new worker has co-operated with 
the psychologist, who has been measuring the pupils 
for the past two years and has the latter's reports 
to help her. 

This psychologist has now studied 350 different 
pupils here and 166 at the New York State School for 
the Blind, Batavia, all of which records will swell the 
number so studied elsewhere and form a basis for 
standardizing a set of mental tests for blind children. 

The Director, having been called in counsel touch- 
ing certain new movements in behalf of the blind, 
has kept his staff and pupils in touch with them, — 
the grand project of the government to rehabilitate 
the war-blinded at Baltimore and that of the Red 
Cross Institute for the Blind, also at Baltimore, 
backed by all the funds needed; first, to hunt out 
and find occupations of any and all kinds which can 
be carried on without the aid of sight; second, to 
persuade employers to hire without prejudice candi- 
dates recommended for work; and third, to follow 
up the workers thus placed and to help them make 
good. In proportion as this latter project can be 
made to function will the whole status of the blind, 
civil and military, be lifted. 

The topic for special discussion by the Perkins 

19 



Alumnae Association at its 34th annual meeting in 
June was "How can we lift more and lean less?" 
Last winter the school body subscribed liberally to 
the Liberty Loans, the Red Cross and the Y. M. C. A. 
drives and the Thrift Stamp campaigns; every pupil 
contributed his bit towards a fund to be sent to Sir 
Frederick Fraser, Superintendent of the Halifax 
School for the Blind, to be used for the blinded of 
the explosion; and the older girls wrote Sir Frederick, 
offering to care for such of his pupils as he might 
need to send to Watertown to make room for the 
many expected newcomers at Halifax, for we have 
voted to receive temporarily, free of tuition charges, 
such as he should send. The girls knitted and made 
many an article for the war uses of the American Red 
Cross; and they bought a $100 Liberty Bond with the 
proceeds from a play entitled " Mrs. Tree." The boys 
repeated their play, "A Midsummer Night's Dream" 
for the benefit of the Y. M. C. A. and raised thereby 
$600. Altogether the year was very rich in endeavor. 
The Halifax explosion of December 6, 1917, made 
a powerful appeal to the blind everywhere. Sir 
Frederick Fraser, being himself blind and a former 
pupil of Perkins Institution, wrote Mr. Allen most 
graphic accounts of the catastrophe. Mr. Allen 
thereupon brought the matter to the attention of the 
American Red Cross with the result that he was 
made chairman of an American-Canadian committee 
to investigate the condition and prospects of the 
explosion blind and to make report with a program 
of recommendations for that society to consider 

20 



carrying out. Mr. Allen went to Halifax in January, 
remaining three weeks, and later wrote the com- 
mittee's report and carried it to Washington. 

At the time of the final meeting of this committee, 
which was held at Watertown, the school listened 
four successive mornings to a moving address by 
each of the three of its visiting members, — Prin- 
cipal Burritt of the sister school at Overbrook, Pa., 
Principal Van Cleve of that in New York and Supt. 
Fraser of that in Halifax, and to one by Supt. Wool- 
ston of the sister school for the blind at Jacksonville, 
Illinois. They were able to listen also to talks and 
readings by others from time to time, each of which 
is acknowledged elsewhere in this report. One of 
these was by Prof. Arlo Bates, an old and dear friend 
of the institution. Since Prof. Bates has died this 
fall, it is but meet to make especial acknowledgment 
of his services to the school. Within the past twenty- 
eight years, he has given a talk or lecture to the 
school every year but two, he being out of the country 
then. His coming has been looked forward to by 
teachers and pupils, and his evening has been among 
the most prized and valuable of any. 

An event of intimate interest to the institution 
was the completion and unveiling on November 7 
of a bust of our late director, Michael Anagnos. 
This bust was the last piece of work of the artist, 
Bela L. Pratt of Boston, and was a gift of gratitude 
and affection by former pupils of the kindergarten 
for the blind, of which Mr. Anagnos was founder. 
The commemorative exercises were held in the main 

21 



hall of the institution and were most impressive; the 
unveiling was in Anagnos Court of our lower school. 

Again the pleasure and the musical education of 
our pupils have been augmented through the oppor- 
tunity of hearing good music, made possible by the 
foundation of the Maria Kemble Oliver fund, a wise 
and beneficent gift to this institution. By means of 
its income tickets have been purchased for the Choral 
Symphony concerts, those of the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra and the Cecelia Society, and the Sunday 
afternoon concerts at Symphony Hall, the operas 
given by the MetropoUtan Opera Company, and a 
pianoforte recital by Percy Grainger. Such priv- 
ileges as these musical events represent to our 
young people are deeply appreciated. 

The special Reference Library of the institution 
has continued to gather in for present and future 
uses quantities of material on the subject of war 
blindness and the re-education of blinded soldiers 
and sailors. The Howe Memorial Press has kept on 
embossing books and stories on the great war, which 
have been widely and eagerly sought and read. The 
year's circulation of embossed books both inside 
and outside the institution reached the rather 
astounding total of 12,711, while the music library 
reported that sixty-six persons not connected with 
the school borrowed approximately 700 pieces of 
music and that the sale of music was unusually large 
during the past year. 

Among this year's publications touching the in- 
stitution the most unique and unexpected was a 

22 



little booklet issued by the Angier Chemical Com- 
pany, constituting an advertisement for that firm 
but appearing as a write-up of Perkins Institution 
with excellent views and text. We have been as- 
sured that no fewer than 126,675 of these little 
pamphlets were distributed by mail to a general list 
of practising physicians and surgeons throughout 
the United States and Canada and that an additional 
lot of 6,000 was sent out from the London office of 
the company to a selected list of similar practitioners 
in Australia and the British colonies in Africa. 

Quite a little energy of the manager and staff of 
the Howe Memorial Press Fund has gone this year 
into helping along preparedness for the general in- 
troduction of the new and uniform type of embossed 
reading and writing. They have issued a quantity 
of various alphabet sheets and cards, run off the 
press unusually large editions of a school primer for 
children and one for adults, using plates some of 
which had been made at the Overbrook school, some 
at our own. But perhaps the main achievement of 
the year in this department was its manufacturing 
of 1,500 Braille slates to meet the anticipated demand 
for such appliances all over the country. These and 
other products of this fund when sold are sold at 
cost. A comparison of the receipts of this with 
previous years will show increase which may not 
continue, since the present is really emergency pro- 
duction to supply a need which we are better pre- 
pared than any other agency to meet. 

At the very delightful gathering of members of 

23 



the American Association of Instructors of the Blind 
last June in Colorado Springs, as the guests of the 
Colorado School for the Deaf and the Blind, a vote 
was unanimously adopted to make Revised Braille 
Grade 13^ the official punctographic system of the 
Association. This was followed by a vote, carried 
also unanimously, at the July meeting of the trustees 
of the American Printing House for the Blind at 
Louisville, whereby it was resolved that all future 
plates embossed there out of government moneys 
should be in this uniform system. Thus, seemingly, 
ends a long controversy over which system or type 
should prevail for the use of the blind. As we re- 
ported last year, the decision represents a happy 
compromise between what is inherently the most 
efficient tool for the blind and what it seemed wholly 
impracticable for them and their workers to unite 
on. Obviously the soldier blind will be taught this 
system, and all books to be embossed especially for 
them will be in it. As for the libraries in the other 
types, they will continue to circulate until the books 
are worn out, for many old readers will never be 
weaned from the old to the new. However, as com- 
petition is the life of trade, so the past competition 
between the rival systems has resulted in an excel- 
lency of means and product such as would not have 
been attained without it. This, too, is a contribu- 
tion of America to the progress of the world. 

Existing agencies for the blind have been called 
upon to lend of their trained personnel to the govern- 
ment and associated enterprises in behalf of the war- 

24 



blinded, and these agencies have responded gen- 
erously, as they should do. The Perkins Institution 
has given leave of absence to the principal teacher 
of its boys' upper school, Mr. Harold Molter, to be 
acting educational director of United States General 
Hospital No. 7, at Baltimore, ''where blinded soldiers, 
sailors and marines in the military service of the 
United States are being fitted to 'carry on' in the 
battle of life;" and to Miss Eleanor E. Kelly, our 
field worker, to join the overseas unit of the Red Cross 
Institute for the Blind. The six others who have 
left us for sundry governmental service are as follows : 
— the psychologist to become a nurse; a gymnastic 
instructor, an engineer and a gardener to join the 
A. E. F. abroad; a general man to work in a ship- 
yard; and a very recent pupil with improved eyesight 
to become yeoman in the navy. 

The mattress, pillow and chair-rebottoming work 
has continued to come to our workshop for the twenty 
adults at South Boston in such quantities that, 
though the wages of the "hands" have been increased 
in conformity wdth the demands of the times, yet the 
business has held its own again, having been con- 
ducted without cost to the institution or the public. 
The exchange from the horse and team to the auto- 
truck means of transportation of goods has doubtless 
helped make this result possible. 

At the beginning of the current year, October 1, 
1918, the number of blind persons registered at the 
Perkins Institution was 303, twelve less than on the 
same date of the previous year. This number in- 

25 



eludes 68 boys and 75 girls in the upper school, 64 
boys and 61 girls in the lower school, 15 teachers and 
officers, and 20 adults in the workshop at South 
Boston. There have been 62 admitted and 74 dis- 
charged during the year. 

Within the six years since the institution moved 
to Watertown no greater change has visited it than 
the loss of four of the six splendid women who came 
with it from South Boston to mother an equal num- 
ber of its new cottage families. Two of these matrons 
resigned last year because of illness, — Miss Florence 
M. Stowe, who had presided with grace and devotion 
for ten years over Eliot Cottage and for five years 
and a half over May Cottage; and Mrs. Francis E. 
Carlton, who for over twenty years had presided 
with marked success over the management of the 
big building in South Boston and over one of the 
cottages in Watertown. 

Causes of Blindness of Pupils admitted during the 
School Year, 1917-1918. — Ophthalmia neonatorum, 
7; Ophthalmia neonatorum and congenital cataracts, 
2; Interstitial keratitis, 2; Phlyctenular keratitis, 1; 
Ulcerative keratitis, 1; Acute uveitis, 1; Injury, 3; 
Atrophy of the optic nerve, 6; Albinism, 5; Congenital 
amblyopia, 7; Congenital cataracts, 6; Microphthal- 
mos, 1; Progressive myopia, 3; High myopia, 1; Hy- 
peropia, 2; Buphthalmos, 1; Aniridia, 1; Glaucoma, 1; 
Glaucoma and panophthalmitis, 1; Panophthalmitis, 
1; Traumatic panophthalmitis, 1; Choroiditis, 4; 
Retro-bulba neuritis, 2; Corneal ulceration, 1; Corneal 
opacities, 1; Spinal meningitis, 2; Unknown, 1. 

26 



Death of Members of the Corporation. 

Mrs. Mary Tappan, wiie of Francis Henry Apple- 
ton; Mrs. Ezra H. Baker; Prof. Arlo Bates; 
Alfred Bowditch; Miss Emma Forbes Gary; Mrs. 
Charlotte Morse, widow of Joseph N. Fiske; Mrs. 
Emily Wells, wife of Elliott C. Foster; Mrs. Eliza- 
beth O., wife of Samuel J. HoUis; Francis Welles 
Hunnewell; Mrs. Mary Luce, widow of Edward 
C. Jones; John Torrey Linzee; Thomas L. Liver- 
more; Col. Arnold A. Rand; Alfred Julian 
Rowan; Miss Adele Granger Thayer; Mrs. May 
Alden, wife of William G. Ward; Mrs. Sarah 
Cabot, widow of Andrew C. Wheelwright. 

All which is respectfully submitted by 

ANNIE GILMAN ANGIER, 
FRANCIS HENRY APPLETON, 
WALTER CABOT BAYLIES, 
WILLIAM ENDICOTT, 
THOMAS B. FITZPATRICK, 
PAUL REVERE FROTHINGHAM, 
ROBERT H. HALLOWELL, 
JAMES ARNOLD LOWELL, 
GEORGE H. RICHARDS, 
WILLIAM L. RICHARDSON, 
ANNETTE P. ROGERS, 
RICHARD M. SALTONSTALL, 

Trustees. 
27 



i 



PRESENT-DAY FACTORS IN THE SCHOOLS 
FOR THE BLIND, AS EMPHASIZED AT 
PERKINS INSTITUTION.^ 



I have recently studied the life career of a blind man of 
remarkable achievements who, when he had sight, had been 
a reamer and a drifter but whom the oncoming of blindness 
had stabilized into efficiency. Some twenty years ago there 
came to the school of which I was Principal a lad of seven- 
teen who had newly lost both eyes and his right arm through 
a quarry explosion. A year and a half before the accident 
he had immigrated from southern Italy. He had never at- 
tended school there, and he had not learned to read and 
write even his own language. But, though he had been 
mutilated, he was attractive because affectionate, eager and 
brave. He made friends whose goodness he resolved to 
requite by amounting to something. He has amounted 
to something; is not merely a remarkable blind man but a 
remarkable American, well educated, highly useful, respected 
by all who know him. We used to say, half in earnest, that 
the fatal charge of dynamite seemed to have entered into 
his very being and remained his source of power. 

The efficiency of these two cases, as of that of Helen 
Keller, cannot be explained by the word environment, how- 
ever excellent and stimulating this may have been. To be 

* This paper was presented by Mr. Allen at a congress of the American School Hygiene 
Association, in Albany, N. Y., June 9, 1917. 

28 



sure the deaf and blind girl grew up under rather ideal 
surroundings, especially as to teacher; however, it was the 
pupil who always pushed ahead and the teacher who held 
back. But there attended the same schools with these and 
under identical influences plenty of companions, many of 
whom would be accounted better off and more promising 
because less evidently handicapped, and yet they amounted 
to much less as adults and citizens. What is the explana- 
tion? Is it not that the element of efficiency is primarily 
not physical but mental: — not ears and eyes and arms and 
legs, but ginger? Military trainers tell me that it is not so 
much a man's education and opportunities that lead to pro- 
motion as it is his natural capacity for leadership. 

Now, while we may admit the truth of the above proposi- 
tions, we will scarcely admit that potentiality is all and that 
environment is nothing, for we are unable to tell how much 
a contributory cause of success environment was even in 
such cases as the three cited. Environment, we believe, is 
so often a determining factor that educators strive to make 
the utmost use of it through the instrumentality of the 

school. 

It has long been a theory of mine that visual beauty can 
exert a shaping effect upon the blind, a hygienic effect that is 
tremendously worth while. Never mind attempting to ex- 
plain why this is so, but let us rather accept the statement 
as of fact. The first institution for the blind which was 
rehabilitated with simple beauty as one of the architect's 
requirements was that of Philadelphia. This was in the 
year 1899. Since then nine others have followed or are 
about to follow suit; for the Pennsylvania institution was 
soon seen to have set a pace that must be kept up with. 



29 



Within a bare half dozen years its efficiency seemed to have 
doubled. The single comprehensive explanation is that its 
atmosphere and influence had become dynamic. It had 
gone out into the suburbs, provided for a maximum of sun- 
shine and fresh air, surrounded itself with ample grounds, 
an athletic field, trees, gardens. In short, everything about 
it was so attractive that it soon became a great resort of 
visitors, and even the neighborhood that had at first resented 
the encroachment of an institution came to rejoice in its 
presence. And this was immediately reflected in the pupils' 
bearing and in an increased recognition of their oppor- 
tunities. 

One of the first things then for a worker in such a place is 
to recognize that light, color and visual beauty are tonic 
elements even with those who have no eyes to see them. 
The mere consciousness that these elements are present 
suffices. Besides, if the old adage "as is the teacher, so is 
the school" be true, and I am convinced it is, it requires 
attractive surroundings not only to keep the teachers fresh 
and sweet but to keep them there, — not needing to run 
away to other scenes for daily refreshment. The superin- 
tendent who favors having his teachers live outside, because 
they can be sources of trouble, does not know the sweetening 
influences, even to them, of an environment of beauty and 
concord; and how much these factors count in education 
that must be kept inspirational. The recent reconstruction 
of so many residential schools on the cottage plan hardly 
points to the extinction of the institution as an effective 
instrumentality of education but rather to the realization of 
the fact that there can be institutions and institutions. 

An educator once said to me: "I perceive that in order 



30 



for a child to get into the best kind of school for him he 
must be either black or red or deaf or blind, or an orphan, 
or at least be something unusual." Perhaps so. Certainly 
the unusual child needs an unusual environment. 

In order to understand something of how the present-day 
institution for the blind aims to educate its pupils, let us 
make a considerable visit to one of them, the Perkins In- 
stitution, and study its daily life and sense its atmosphere. 
This residential school is now located at Watertown, Massa- 
chusetts, a fair-sized town near enough to Boston and to 
several colleges to invite mutual visiting. Young people to 
be fitted for life must experience life conditions while grow- 
ing up. A few of the children live near enough to be day 
pupils. More go home over the week ends, and all during 
the long vacations. The school being necessarily unde- 
nominational, all who remain over Sunday attend some local 
church and Sunday school, where an ejffort is made to dis- 
tribute them in classes with other boys or girls. Acquaint- 
ances are thus made, and invitations follow as a matter of 
course. Our pupils go out to call, and their friends come in 
to see them. They have their own social affairs, musicales, 
dances and parties, to which they invite their inside and 
outside friends. These affairs they arrange and conduct 
entirely by themselves. Many of the pupils go to concerts, 
lectures and theaters in Boston; and whenever school con- 
certs, lectures and dramatics are given at the institution 
the public is invited in and comes. Twice have outside 
amateur dramatic troupes given performances on our stage 
for the pleasure of the school, and twice have the blind of 
Greater Boston, including the school pupils, been given 
special performances on the professional stage. 



31 



We have a Camp Fire organization which meets some- 
times in one of our cottages, often with a visiting "fire," 
but sometimes going as visitors to a neighboring town. In 
1916 the Council of Camp Fires of the adjacent city of 
Newton held its annual meeting at the institution, our own 
"fire" participating. In 1917 Dr. and Mrs. Guhck, after \'isit- 
ing at Watertown, invited our "fire" to participate, first in 
leading the singing at a large meeting of the organization in 
Boston and again in the Grand Council Meet of some 2,000 
girls from Greater Boston. The local post of Sons of Vet- 
erans has this winter of 1917 given four patriotic lectures 
in the institution hall; and a Watertown music society has 
given an invitation musicale there. The boys have twice 
repeated their performance of "The Merchant of Venice" 
for the benefit of the blinded soldiers abroad and have cleared 
$900 for them. The girls have done their bit, too, since 
the opening of the great war, by knitting and making nu- 
merous things for the Belgians and for the Red Cross. While 
speaking of the war let me add that we have been able to 
assist several women who were anxious to fit themselves for 
service among the war blinded. One of these women stayed 
a month with us. We have made for the blinded French 
over 1,000 adapted table games. The Perkins Institution is 
glad to be able to serve in any way and at any time. It has 
exchanged graduate pupils with a great sister school. It 
has entertained for longer or shorter periods students of the 
workings of its spirit. It has helped initiate and support 
classes of semi-sighted children in the public schools of the 
State. It has made possible sight-saving follow-up work in 
an eye hospital, and otherwise contributed to the prevention 
of blindness. Its kindergarten department, being adequately 
as well as separately endowed makes social service of the 



32 



kind possible to us. All this keeps the institution in touch 
with the world outside. 

It has been said that the keynote of our civilization is 
participation, not competition. The spirit of the Perkins 
Institution is in harmony with this note. It has also been 
said that the institution's gaze is now "outward, not inward, 
and that its relation to the world outside is a matter of prime 
importance in educational procedure." 

The atmosphere begotten through its cottage family plan 
both helps this matter along and is helped by it, I need not 
dwell upon this plan, though it is the fundamental feature 
of the new Massachusetts School for the Blind, of which I 
am speaking. As you know, the 300 possible pupils and the 
100 teachers, oflficers and servants live distributed in 13 
families, one of these the little one for the intensive practice 
of domestic science by the older girls. There is a minimum 
of servants because everybody contributes to the daily 
housework. The small bedrooms and dining rooms and 
pantries, repeated in each cottage as they are, can readily 
be cared for by the pupils. But the fact that everybody 
helps has a wonderful effect. A sense of ownership, part 
proprietorship is fostered, and with this much of the disci- 
pline usual in institutions disappears. The buildings are two- 
story, necessarily covering much ground. The \'irtue of this 
is that, while much walking on a level is had daily, there is 
little up and down stairs. The housework is also facilitated 
thereby; moreover, there is even less fear of fire than though 
the construction were merely fire-proof and first-class, which 
it is. There are no basement or congregate lavatories but 
two generous ones on the sleeping floors of each cottage, 
where there are also ample shower-bath facilities for the 
morning wake-up. There is nothing typical of the old-time 



33 



congregate institution. Even the administration is reason- 
ably decentralized, there being no single head matron, for 
instance, but rather twelve of them, each in full charge of 
her household. When a pupil is ill his matron telephones 
for the attending physician who goes to her house just as he 
would to any private house. There is in each of the houses 
a spare room where the patient, if not very ill, may be kept 
quiet and cared for by the motherly matron, just as a real 
mother would do. An occasional guest may occupy this 
spare room, — either a former pupil, a visitor from another 
school, a friend of matron or teacher, or some member of a 
pupil's family. At the time of a recent school play twelve 
relatives or friends of the boy actors spent the night at the 
school. All this sort of thing makes for a good wholesome 
spirit and atmosphere, — a hygienic factor of the first im- 
portance, it seems to me. 

Hopefulness, a state of mind very important to any one 
but essential to the blind who make good in anything, is 
dependent on physical vitality. This matter the new school 
has recognized by provision in every feature of its layout. 
The grounds in which all its boarding-school homes are set 
are ample, as stated. The boys have their boat on the 
Charles River near by; the girls, theirs on the institution 
pond. On this pond all hands may skate in winter; but 
they may enjoy skating in summer weather, too, using roller 
skates on the gymnasium roof. There a few boys at a time 
may also play hocke3^ There is a large central gymnasium 
and a swimming pool, both very popular. However, in fit 
weather all hands exercise under teacher leadership in the 
great out-of-doors, either on the athletic field or in hiking 
over the country roads. The cottage picnics come regularly 
in the month of June. 



34 



Intercottage contests for the greatest number of points 
have been held winters in the gymnasium and in June on the 
athletic field. There has come this spring an invitation to 
the champions in field sports of four institutions to meet at 
the Pennsylvania Institution where they will be entertained 
for three days, on one of which they will compete in running, 
jumping and shot putting. The school athletic societies will 
meet traveling expenses. 

There is a constant stream of visitors to the school, which 
fact, however, does not interrupt class-work but rather is 
made to serve a purpose of the institution, viz., the better 
mutual acquaintance of the public and the blind. This 
public, by the way, has got in the habit of dropping in 
between three and four, afternoons, when the school chorus 
rehearses. At that time and at the daily morning assembly 
the great Howe Building is filled with the harmony of song. 
Who can tell the morally hygienic effect it is to all of us 
who live, breath and have our being in so much melody? 

After morning assembly I speak for a few minutes daily on 
current events, and you may be sure the topics suggested by 
the world war have been seized and made as vital as possible. 
Besides, current events are treated as a school subject, every 
reasonable effort being made to keep our pupils, whose con- 
dition would naturally shut them in, not only in touch with 
the times but feeling themselves as part of them. 

The important functions of the classroom, — teaching 
young people by means of all the common English branches 
through high school, — are emphasized through demand for 
good work. And little excursions are even made into socio- 
logical topics and astronomy, — the latter seeming to 
broaden the conceptions of intellectual and moral laws. 
While these class studies are varied and balanced by the 



35 



abundant activities of manual training, and music, and 
physical exercise, the central factor of all is that of socialized 
education as participated in through living together and 
learning how to do so harmoniously and efficiently. Is it 
not true that a good mixer at school will the more likely 
remain a good mixer after school days? At any rate 
Perkins Institution strives and struggles to have its pupils 
grow up to be as much like other people as possible; and 
to a certain encouraging extent it succeeds. While its older 
pupils study and study hard, the vocational pursuits open 
to them, • — such as the handicrafts, housework, school and 
piano teaching, business salesmanship, and piano tuning, — 
the majority of those who finish its course making good in 
life, ■ — nevertheless, the emphasis while at school is for 
every one to be and become a contributing member of the 
institutional society. Its community, furnishing as it does 
one seeing adult to every three of its pupils, is a pretty 
normal community. There is the spur of making good in 
whatever department of the school one may be in; but just 
so there is the spur of being acceptable every day and every- 
where. The ideal of efficiency and the ideal of acceptability 
are held continuously before the pupils, and they can not 
but come to see the vital importance of attaining them. The 
Perkins graduate associations, the alumni and the alumnae, 
are welcome visitors, for the administration recognizes there 
is no more forceful encouragement to its pupils than ex- 
amples of the efficient blind themselves. 

As it is difficult for even the trained blind to get employ- 
ment, the institution tries to place those for whom it can 
find chances. Knowing this the pupils labor with redoubled 
ardor and perseverance. Working now with the institution 



36 



is a placement agent of the Massachusetts Commission for 
the Blind, whose success in securing jobs has become a 
factor of utmost encouragement. 

The ideal of the school is not that of knowing but rather 
that of being and of doing. And it works, making as it does 
for that continued state of mind, an all-important psycho- 
logical factor, resulting in life efficiency. 

Let me, then, summarize what I consider the present-day 
factors in the education of the blind, as emphasized at 
Watertown. These are: 

A beautiful, healthful environment. 

The cottage family plan. Pupils divided into small groups 
with one housemother, four teachers, all living together as 
one. 

Contributory housework on the part of teachers, officers 
and pupils. 

Physical exercise to increase independence and vitaUty. 

Ample opportunity through many departments to keep all 
pupils busy at varied and balanced work. 

Hopeful aspirations and confidence definitely encouraged 
through morning talks and keeping the student body in touch 
with successful alumni and alumnae. 

Pupils kept in touch with the world outside through simple 
social communication and as close association with their 
homes as possible. 

Training for society through unselfish, helpful living with 
one's fellows. 

Keeping in touch with former pupils as much as possible 
with efforts to place such as we are able. 

EDWARD E. ALLEN. 



37 



TENTH ANNUAL CONCERT 

By the Choir of the Perkins Institution and Massachusetts 

School for the Blind 

In the Assembly Hall of the School at Watertown 

Tuesday Evening, May 14, 1918, at 8 o'clock. 

The Program. 
Scenes from the Song of Hiawatha, . . . S. Coleridge-Taylor 

PART one. 
The Death of Minnehaha. 

PART TWO. 

Hiawatha's Departure. 

The Choir will have the assistance of 
Miss Ethel Frank, Soprano, Mr. Walter H. Kidder, Baritone, Mr. 

J. Garfield Stone, Tenor. 
Of the faculty Miss Gustafson and Mr. Hartwell, Accompanists, 

Mr. Gardiner, Director. 



GRADUATING EXERCISES OF THE PERKINS INSTITU- 
TION AND MASSACHUSETTS SCHOOL 
FOR THE BLIND. 
Tuesday, June 18, 1918, 10.30 a.m. 

Program. 
Chorus, "The Lost Chord," SvlUvan 

Essays : 
Ancient Story-Telling, . . . Ethel Elaine Montgomery 

A Famous Story-Teller Marie Eleanor Flynn 

Modern Story-Tellers and their Work, . . Alice Louisa Stewart 
Time's Changing Attitude toward Dancing, 

Mary Agnes Thompson 

The Growing Need of Studying Spanish, . . . Eleanor Kimball 

38 



Part Song, "Forget-me-not," Geise 

Girls' Glee Club. 
Essays : 

The Recapture of Jerusalem, Alice Cohen 

The Influence of the War on Fashion, . Angela Miriam Coffey 

"Farmerettes," Mary Catherine Vilaine 

The Perkins Library, Agness Gertrude French 

Organ, Grand Chorus in E Flat, Guilmant 

Malcolm Langdon Cobb, 
Essays : 
The Prohibition Movement in the United States, 

Arthur Bertrand Buck 
A League to Enforce Peace, . . . Emil Andrew Johnson 
The Development of Railroads in the United States, 

Burton Roger Beavon 

Facts about Uncle Sam's Coal Supply, . , Francis John Mack 

Causes of the Russian Revolution, . . Arvid Norman Hohnberg 

Presentation of diplomas and certificates. 

Chorus, "The Twenty-Third Psahn," . . . Schubert-Stainer 

Graduates of the Class of 1918. 
Burton Roger Beavon. Arvid Norman Holmberg. 

Arthur Bertrand Buck. Emil Andrew Johnson. 

Malcolm Langdon Cobb. E'eanor Kimball. 

Angela Miriam Coffey. Francis John Mack. 

Alice Cohen. Ethel Elaine Montgomery. 

Marie Eleanor Flynn. Alice Louisa Stewart. 

Agness Gertrude French. Mary Agnes Thompson. 

Mary Catherine Vilaine. 

Pianoforte Tuning Department. 
Arthur Bertrand Buck. Francis John Mack. 

Paul Aloysius Tobin. 

Class Colors: Blue and Gold. 

Class Flower: The Forget-me-nOt. 

Class Motto: Excelsior. 



39 



CHRISTMAS CAROLS 

By the Choir of the Perkins Institution and Massachusetts 

School for the Blind and the Children's Choir 

OF THE Kindergarten for the Blind 

In the Assembly Hall of the School at Watertown 

Tuesday Evening, December 18, 1917, at 8 o'clock. 

Thursday Afternoon, December 20, 1917, at half past 2 o'clock. 

Program. 
Anthem for Christmastide, "Rejoice Greatly," . John E. West 
Old English Carol, "The First Noel," . . . Sir John Stains 

Christmas Hymn, " Silent Night," Franz Gruber 

Four-part Chorus, "To us is born Immanuel," . . Prcetorius 
Besangon Carol, "Shepherds! Shake off your Drowsy Sleep," 

Harmonized by Sir John Stainer 
Noel Dauphinos, " Naught is so Sweet," . . . Michel Eymieu 
"O'er the Cradle of a King," .... Old Breton Melody 
Old French Noel, "Sleep of the Child Jesus," .... Gevaert 
Haytian Cradle Song, "Thou dear Babe divine," . Dickinson 

Anthem for Christmastide, "Drop down ye heavens," Joseph Barnby 
Christmas Carol, "The Shepherds' Song," . . Tertius Noble 
Old Normandy Noel, "Meadows and Woods," 

Arranged by Harvey B. GauL 
Austrian Folk Song, 1810, "Shepherds' Christmas Song," Reimann 
Song of Adoration, "Sleep, Holy Babe," . . . . J. B. Dykes 

Shepherds' Noel of 1750, Gevaert 

Christmas Carol, "In Excelsis Gloria," . . Waddington Cooke 

The Cornish Bells, Tertiics Noble 

The Virgin's Lullaby, Old Alsatian Carol 

Anthem for Christmastide, "Sing, Heavens," . Berthold Tours 



40 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS. 



I. — Acknowledgments for Concerts, Recitals and 

Plays. 

To Major Henry Lee Higginson, through Mr. C. A. 
Ellis, for thirty tickets for the course of symphony concerts 
in Sanders Theatre, Cambridge. 

To Mr. L. GooDBAR, for six tickets for a recital by Mrs. 
Goodbar and Mrs. H. H. A. Beach in Jordan Hall. 

To Mrs. Robert S. Sturgis, for one ticket for a piano- 
forte recital by Miss Estelle Neuhaus. 

To Mr. Charles J. Norris, secretary, for seventy-two 
tickets for one and thirty-six tickets for another of the 
concerts by the Cecilia Society. 

To Mr. G. F. Harwood, for two tickets for a concert by 
the Apollo Club. 

To Mrs. J. H. MoRisoN, for twenty tickets for a Sym- 
phony Pension Fund concert. 

To Mrs. Frances A. M. Bird, for eight tickets for a piano- 
forte concert by INIr. George Copeland. 

To Miss Celia R. Parks, for two tickets for the oratorio 
"The Redemption" by the Handel and Haydn Society. 

To Mrs. Louis Rosenbaum, for forty-eight tickets for a 
performance of '"The Wanderer" at the Boston Opera 
House. 

41 



II. — Acknowledgments for Recitals and Lectures in 

OUR Hall. 

To Prof. Arlo Bates, for a talk on his observations in 
China. 

To Miss Mary Boyle O'Reilly, for a lecture on "1000 
Days at the Front." 

To Miss Maria L. Baldwin, for a lecture on "Paul 
Laurence Dunbar." 

To Mr. John Orth, for a pianoforte recital and talk on 
"Liszt." 

To Dr. Oscar S. Creeley, for three lectures on medical 
subjects. 

To Mr. William Strong, for two pianoforte recitals. 

To Mrs. Lucia Ames Mead, for a lecture on "After the 
War What?" 

To Miss LoTTA Clark, for a lecture on "Patriotic Festi- 
vals." 

To Mr. Herman O. Templeton, for a talk to our Boy 
Scouts. 

To Miss Alice Allen, for a pianoforte recital. 

To Miss Rachel Snow, for a talk on her journey through 
Japan, China and Korea. 

To the Rev. Warren P. Landers, for a lecture on tem- 
perance. 

To Miss Myrtle O. Shane, for a talk on her work for 
the Armenians at Bitlis, Turkey. 



42 



III. — Acknowledgments for Periodicals and News- 
papers. 
American Annals of the Deaf, California News, Christian 
Record (embossed). Christian Register, Christian Science 
Journal, Colorado Index, Illuminator (embossed), McClure's 
Magazine, Matilda Zeigler Magazine for the Blind (em- 
bossed), the jMentor, Michigan Mirror, Ohio Chronicle, Our 
Dumb Animals, The Silent Worker, The Theosophical Path, 
The Well-Spring, West Virginia Tablet, Woman Citizen, 
Youths' Companion. 

IV. — Acknowledgments for Gifts and Services. 

Dr. Henry Hawkins, for professional services. 

Massachusetts Charitable Eye and Ear Infirmary, 
Massachusetts General Hospital, Peter Bent Brigham 
Hospital, and Psychopathic Department of Boston 
State Hospital, for care and treatment of pupils. 

Mr. and Mrs. William H. Claflin, for a sleigh ride in 
memory of Mrs. Thomas Mack and in kindly continuance 
of her gracious custom. 

Mr. H. P. Leighton, for an automobile ride for the 
kindergarten boys. 

Mrs. Walter C. Baylies, Miss Elizabeth Atwood and 
Mrs. Lucy E. Wright, for gifts of money. 

Mrs. John Chipman Gray, Mr. W. S. Fielding, Mr. 
Leroy S. Eaton, Miss Beulah O. Berry, Mrs. F. C. 
Bailey, and Mr. L. W. Cronkhite, for fruit, confectionery 
and maple syrup; and Mr. Cronkhite, for toys. 

Mrs. J. Verner Critchley and Mrs. Harper, for Christ- 
mas and Easter gifts. 



43 



Miss Emily Weeks, for bookcases; and Mrs. F. C. 
Bailey, for chairs. 

Mrs. F. Spears, Mrs. Charles Gossman, Mrs. Myron 
Silverman, and the Committee for the Blind of Temple 
Israel, through Mrs. Fannie L. Rosenbaum, Chairman, for 
clothing; and the latter committee, for parties for the 
several departments of the school, for gifts of embossed 
books and typewriter, and for a summer outing of three 
weeks in the country for eighteen pupils. 

The Jordan Marsh Company, for artificial flowers; and 
Mrs. David Evans, for a stuffed blue jay and for a party for 
the children. 

Miss Eleanor T. Hart, Mrs. S. K. Casso, and Miss 
RosNOSKY, for sociables for the pupils. 



44 



LIST OF PUPILS AT THE UPPER SCHOOL. 



Adomaitis, Elsie. 
Allen, Margaret E. B. 
Benoit, Josephine. 
Blake, Clarissa H. 
Bolton, Gladys M. 
Boone, Florence M. 
Brooks, Madeline D. 
Brown, Dorothy M. 
Brown, Marion S. 
Butler, Alice May. 
Casey, Rose. 
Clancy, Elizabeth. 
Collins, Veronica. 
Connors, Margaret. 
Davenport, Anna A. 
Davis, Ruth M. 
Dompierre, Inez. 
Doucha, Armen. 
Dufresne, Irene. 
Elliott, Ethel S. 
Evans, Lillian M. 
Farnsworth, Esther M. 
Fetherstone, Mae E. 
Fishman, Eva. 
Fiske, Dorothy T. 
Fiske, Mattie E. L. 
Galvin, Margaret L. 
Girouard, Blanche. 
Graham, Marguerite A. 
Guild, Bertha H. 
Guiney, Julia. 
Hart, Doris L. 



Hilton, Charlotte. 
Hinckley, Doroth}^ M. 
lazzetti, Emma I. 
Irwin, Helen M, 
Lagerstrom, Ellen M. 
Lanoue, Edna. 
Leppanen, Mary. 
Linscott, Jennie M. 
Locatelli, Adele. 
MacPherson, Mary H. 
Malatesta, Mary. 
Marceau, Yvonne. 
Martin, Lea. 
Martin, Libby. 
Matthews, Edith M. 
McGill, Marie. 
Menard, Angelina. 
Miles, Mildred C. 
Najarian, Nevart. 
Noon an, M. Loretta. 
Olsen, Mabel T. 
O'Neil, Annie. 
O'Neil, Charlotte. 
Perault, Yvonne A. 
Poirier, Delina M. 
Pond, Flora E. 
Ramsey, Mildred M. 
Ross, Lena. 
Rousseau, Lillian. 
Rowe, Margaret C. 
Samson, Bertha. 
Samson, Rose Mary. 



45 



Sannicandro, Josephine. 
Smith, Gladys B. 
Sokol, Marion G. 
Stevens, Gladys L. 
Terry, Annie B. 
Thebeau, Marie. 
Thompson, Mary. 
Thwaites, Ellen. 
Tuttle, Harriet C. 
Uhrig, Mary G. 
Weathers, Dorothy. 
Willey, Dorothy E. 
Antonucci, Alberto. 
Beavon, Burton. 
Blair, Herman A. 
Childers, Lemuel J. 
Cobb, Malcolm L. 
Conley, Edward. 
Cooney, John. 
Craig, Edward J. 
Cushman, Ralph. 
Deslauries, Laurence. 
Donovan, Kenneth J. 
Duffy, John J. A. 
Dugal, J. Ernest. 
Durfee, Sidney B. 
Eastwood, Thomas J. 
Evans, Frederic P. 
Fenton, Walter F. 
Ferron, Homer. 
Fiske, Martin H. 
Fournier, Eugene. 
Friberg, Ina J. 
Fulton, James. 
Gagnon, Albert. 
Ginsberg, Aaron. 
Gould, Francis E. 
Gray, Wales H. 
Hanley, Thomas A. 
Healy, Millard A. 



Hoxsie, Asa T. 

Inglis, John S. 
Jenkins, Edward W. 
Johnson, Emil. 
Katwick, Arthur D. 
Kelleher, Thomas A. 
Lamagdeleine, Armand, 
Le Roi, Francis H. 
Liberacki, Edward. 
MacGinnis, Raymond H. 
Maziall, John H. 
McLaughlin, Lloyd H. 
Moran, Francis. 
Munn, Daniel J. 
Navarra, Gaspere. 
Nesbitt, Hazen P. 
Oldham, Milner. 
Oliver, Joseph. 
O'Neill, Ralph L. 
Paquette, Armel. 
Pedersen, Edward M. 
Pendergast, Jerome. 
Perreault, John E. 
Philpot, William R. 
Quirk, Arthur L. 
Rasmussen, Lewis A. 
Read, J. Elmer. 

St. George, William. 

Sharp, William F. 

Silvera, Manuel. 

Soorkis, Morris. 

Stellaty, Alberte. 

Stone, Walter C. 

Tansey, Frederick. 

Tavlin, Alexander R. 

Vance, Alvin L. 

Vetal, Herbert M. 

Walker, Roger T. 

Ward, Leroy M. 

Youk, Kim K. 



46 



LIST OF PUPILS AT THE LOWER SCHOOL. 



Baker, Elsie. 
Bazarian, Mary. 
Beliveau, Leontine T. 
Bessette, Vedora. 
Bosma, Gelske. 
Buckley, Alice. 
Byrne, Genevieve. 
Cambridge, Mollie. 
Coakley, Alice L. 
Cohen, Ruth. 
Colaizzi, Josephine. 
Costa, Marianna. 
Coughlin, Helen. 
Cox, Annie E. 
De Dominicis, Edith. 
Demers, Germaine M. 
Doherty, Kathleen E. 
Doyle, Mary E. 
Du verger, Loretta V. 
Elliott, Mary. 
Ferrarini, Yolande. 
Flanagan, M. Ursula. 
Gilbert, Eva V. 
Goff, Eva. 
Hanley, Mary. 
Harasimowicz, Alice. 
Haswell, Thelma R. 
Hinckley, Geraldine. 
Ingersoll, Dorothy. 
Jefferson, Annie. 
Keefe, Mildred. 



Kelley, Beulah C. 
King, Erica. 
Kret, Amelia. 
Landry, Edwina. 
Lanoue, Helen. 
Lyons, Mary L. 
MacDonald, Katherine. 
McGovern, Velma. 
McMeekin, Jennie. 
McMullin, Beatrice M. 
Miles, Winifred M. 
Minutti, Desaleina. 
Murphy, Ellen. 
Ogilvie, Hilda M. 
Rapoza, Evangeline S. 
Rose, Sadie. 
Samon, Stacey. 
Santos, Emily. 
Scott, Arline R. 
Shea, Mary E. 
Simmons, Bertha. 
Skipp, Doris M. 
Smith, Dorothy L. 
Stanievicz, Mary. 
Stutwoota, Mary. 
Wands, Hazel C. 
Wheeler, Theresa. 
Wilcox, Bertha M. 
Wilcox, Ednamay L. 
Witham, Beatrice L. 
Abbott, Dana H. 



47 



Amiro, Gilbert. 
Barrett, Robert C. 
Caisse, George T, 
Case, William A. 
Conley, Michael J. 
Costa, Manuel. 
Crapowitch, John. 
Cullen, George F. 
Donovan, Thomas J. 
Dow, Ralph E. F. 
Dunbar, Kenneth A. 
Eaton, Charles P. 
Egan, John P. 
Egan, Robert J. 
Epaminonda, John. 
Evans, Walter C. 
Gagnon, Lionel. 
Gilmore, Clarence J. 
Goguen, Raoul. 
Grime, G. Edward. 
Hannon, James E. 
Hebert, Arthur D. 
Holmes, Rutherford B. 
Houle, Walter. 
Hurley, Arnold E. 
Jablowski, Joseph. 
Keefe, Clarence G. 
Krafve, Karl H. 
Laminan, Oiva. 
Laminan, Toivo. 
Lemieux, Bertrand E. 
Libby, Arthur C. 



Logan, Walter J. 
Maloney, Everett S. 
Matsson, Harry N. 
McDonald, Edmond J. 
McGillicuddy, John. 
Mennassian, Souran. 
Meuse, Lawrence A. 
Morse, Kenneth. 
Nelson, Ralph R. 
Noble, Clark W. 
O'Neil, John. 
Peavey, Francis P. 
Perry, Emerson C. 
Rainville, Ernest A. 
Rainville, Harvey L. 
Rego, Peter. 
Remington, Joseph H. 
Rubin, Manual. 
Shulman, George. 
Silva, Arthur P. 
Simoneau, Henry J. 
Slaby, Peter J. 
Slade, Winton C. 
Sliney, J. Francis. 
Smith, Lowell. 
Spencer, Merton S. 
Stott, Lester W. 
Thibeault, Joseph. 
Walsh, Louis. 
Wesson, Kermit O. 
Withers, Harold. 



SUBSCRIPTIONS FOR THOMAS STRINGER. 



Permanent Fund for Thomas Stringer. 
[This fund is being raised with the distinct understanding that 
it is to be placed under the control and care of the trustees of the 
Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind, and 
that only the net income is to be given to Tom so long as he is not 
provided for in any other way, and is unable to earn his li\ing, the 
principal remaining intact forever. It is further understood, that, 
at his death, or when he ceases to be in need of this assistance, the 
income of this fund is to be applied to the support and education 
of some child who is both Wind and deaf and for whom there is no 
provision made either by the state or by private individuals.] 

A friend, ........... $50 00 

Income from the Glover Fund, . . . . 75 00 

Seabury, Miss Sarah E 25 00 

Sohier, Miss Mary D 25 00 



49 



STATEMENT 



Messrs. Wabren Motley, F. H. Appleton, Jr., Auditors, Perkins Institution 
Gentlemen: — We hereby certify that the following statements of the 
August 31, 1918. 



Statements of Albert Thorndike, Treasurer of the Perkins 

Year ending 

Institution Accottnt. 

Balanceonhand August 31, 1917, ..." $19,120 33 

Donations $13,756 50 

Annuities, 1,200 00 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 37,500 00 

Other New England States, 12,892 60 

Income from investments, ........ 31,549 81 

Kindergarten and Howe Memorial Press Fund, adjusting main- 
tenance, administrative and management expense accounts, . 49,859 20 

Miscellaneous income, 7,703 09 

Works Department income, ........ 32,449 64 

Legacies, ........... 7,865 19 

Maria Kemble Oliver Fund (additional), . . . . . 1,543 40 

Loans 14,000 00 

Securities sold and matured, 38,801 18 

249,120 61 



$268,240 94 



Howe Memorial Phess Fund Account. 
Receipts. 

Balance on hand August 31, 1917 $3,035 48 

Income from investments, ........ $11,544 37 

Loans 9,000 00 

Miscellaneous income 2,493 80 

Securities sold and matured, 43,076 66 



5,114 83 



$69,150 31 



Kindergarten Account. 

Balanceonhand August 31, 1917, ..." $10.060 79 

Donations $32 00 

New England States 10,742 28 

Income from investments, ........ 71,668 52 

Interest on loans and notes, 593 00 

Loans, 13,600 00 

Notes receivable, .......... 3,700 00 

Interest on Martha R. Hunt legacy, 2,944 45 

Legacies 21,620 00 

Miscellaneous, 1,714 14 

Securities sold and matured, 171,626 77 

298,241 16 



$308,301 95 



50 



OF ACCOUNTS. 

Boston, October Ninth, 1918. 
and Massachusetts School for the Blind, Watertovm, Massachusetts. 
Treasurer correctly show the income and expenditures for the fiscal year ending 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDWIN L. PRIDE AND CO. (Incorporated), 
By Edwin L. Pride, 

Certified Public Accountant. 

Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind, for the 
August 31, 1918. 

iNSTirtmoN Account. 

Expenditures. 

Drafts to director , *'^^'?2? 22 

Addunexpendedbalance August 31, 1917, 264 60 

$177,264 60 
Less unexpended balance August 31 , 1918, 2M 90 ,,-„ ggg -q 

Administrative and management expenses S776 52 

Interest on loans. . ;•:::;;;: 14,000 00 

Legacy to Kindergarten (Martha R. Hunt) .... 10,000 00 

Interest on Martha R. Hunt legacy ^"44 45 

Miscellaneous expenses, ^I'lic \a 

I-ve«ted _J8796_06 ^^^^^^ ^^ 

Treasurer'sbalanceonhand August 31, 1918 ^'Jo^ ^ 

Director's balance on hand August 31, 1918 ^^* ^ 

$268,240 94 

Howe Memorial Press Fund Account. 
Expenditures. 

Drafts to director *-°'^?? ?2 

Add unexpended balance August 31, 1917 1^ ^" 

$20,114 48 
Less unexpended balance August 31, 1918 ^^^ ^"^ $19 845 61 

Miscellaneous expenses, « Jaa li 

Xjoans y.ouu w 

Note.HarryBest, ; oHm^n 

TnvBit^fi 33,700 50 

investea ^ ^.g gi 

Treasurer'sbalanceonhand August 31, 1918 ^'lllli 

Director's balance on hand August 31, 1918, '"° ''' 

?69,150 31 

KiNDEROARTEN ACCOUNT. 

Expendilures. 

Drafts to director •^^'^59 59 

Addunexpendedbalance August 31, 1917 60 06 

$88,860 06 
Less unexpended balance August 31, 1918 1^ ^^ J88 840 91 

Administrative and management expenses fx'^ll ji 

Loans 13,600 00 

Interest on loans, . . - • , oor rr 

Interest on Emeline Morse Lane Fund its 07 

Miscellaneous ion tIr ?q 

investea ; 197,012 93 

Treasurer'sbalanceonhand August 31, 1918 ^^'^Tq ?^ 

Director's balance on hand August 31, 1918, ^^ ^^ 

$308,301 95 

51 



The following account exhibits the state of property as 
entered upon the books of the Institution September 1, 
1918: — 

I ' ■ I 

Investments, securities, $421,837 66 

Investments, real estate, 211,144 15 

Buildings and grounds, Watertown 678,548 10 

Equipment, Watertown, 15,945 27 

Music Department, Watertown, .... 19,875 00 

Library Department, Watertown 55,722 92 

Tuning Department, Watertown, .... 389 50 

Building, Workshop, South Boston, .... 8,647 74 

Equipment, etc.. Workshop, South Boston, . . 19,483 83 

Rents and accounts receivable, 525 76 

Stamp fund 50 00 

Cash, Treasurer, 2,185 63 

Cash, Director, etc., 1,667 87 

$1,436,023 43 



The foregoing property represents the following funds and 
balances, and is answerable for the same : — 



INSTITUTION FUNDS. 

General fund $455,599 48 

Funds and legacies: — 

Frank Davison Rust Memorial, . . . $4,000 00 

Robert C. Billings (for deaf, dumb and blind), 4,000 00 

Joseph B. Glover Fund for Blind and Deaf, . 5,000 00 

Maria Kemble Oliver 15,000 00 

Elizabeth P. Putnam 1,000 00 



29,000 00 



Elizabeth B. Bailey $3,000 00 

Eleanor J. W. Baker 2,500 00 

Calvin W. Barker 1,859 32 

Lucy B. Barker 5,953 21 

Francis Bartlett 2,500 00 

Mary Bartol 300 00 

Thompson Baxter 322 50 

Charlotte Billings 40,507 00 

Robert C. Billings 25,000 00 

Susan A. Blaisdell 5,832 66 

William T. Bolton 555 22 



Amounts carried forward $88,329 91 $484,599 48 



52 



Amounts brought forward $88,329 91 $484,699 48 



Funds and legacies — Continued. 
George W. Boyd, . 
J. Putnam Bradlee, 
Charlotte A. Bradstreet, 
J. Edward Brown, 
T. O. H. P. Burnham, 
Stoddard Capen, . 
Fanny Channing, . 
Ann Eliza Colburn, 
Susan J. Conant, . 
Louise F. Crane, . 
Harriet Otis Cruft, 
David Cummings, 
Chastine L. Cushing, 
I. W. Danforth, . 
Susan L. Da\'is, . 
Joseph Descalzo, . 
John H. Dix, 
Alice J. H. Dwinell, 
Mary E. Eaton, . 
Stephen Fairbanks, 
Mortimer C. Ferris Memorial, 
Mary Helen Freeman, 
Martha A. French, 
Thomas Gaffield, . 
Albert Glover, 
Joseph B. Glover, 
Charlotte L. Goodnow, 
Harris Fund, 
Hattie S. Hathaway, 
Charles H. Hayden, 
John C. Haynes, . 
Joseph H. Heywood, 
Margaret A. Holden, 
Benjamin Humphrey, 
Charles Sylvester Hutchison, 
Catherine M. Lamson, 
William Litchfield, 
Hannah W. Loring, 
Susan B. Lyman, . 
Stephen W. Marston, . 
Charles Merriam, 
Sarah Irene Parker, 
George Francis Parkman, 
Jonathan E. Pecker, 
Richard Perkins, . 

Amounts carried forward, 



5,000 00 

268,391 24 

10,508 70 

100,000 00 

5,000 00 

13,770 00 

2,000 00 

5,000 00 

500 00 

6,000 00 

6,000 00 

7.723 07 

600 00 

2,500 00 

1,500 00 

1,000 00 

10,000 00 

200 00 

5,000 00 

10,000 00 

1,000 00 

1.000 00 

164 40 

6,450 00 

1,000 00 

5,000 00 

6.471 23 

80,000 00 

500 00 

20,200 00 

1,000 00 

600 00 

3,708 32 

25,000 00 

2,156 00 

6,000 00 

7.951 48 

9,500 00 

4.809 78 

5,000 00 

1,000 00 

699 41 

50,000 00 

950 00 

20,000 00 



$807,983 64 $484,699 48 



53 



Amounts brought forward $807,983 54 $484,599 48 

Funds and legacies — Concluded. 

Edward D. Peters, 500 00 

Henry L. Pierce, 20,000 00 

Sarah E. Pratt, 1,000 00 

Matilda B. Richardson, 300 00 

Mary L. Ruggles 3,000 00 

Nancy E. Rust 2,640 00 

Samuel E. Sawyer 2,174 77 

Joseph Scholfield 2,500 00 

Esther W. Smith, 5,000 00 

The Maria Spear Bequest for the Blind, . . 15,000 00 

Henry F. Spencer, 1,000 00 

Mary Lowell Stone, 2,000 00 

Joseph C. Storey, 5,000 00 

Sophronia S. Sunbury, 365 19 

Mary F. Swift, 1,391 00 

WUliam Taylor, 893 36 

Joanna C. Thompson, 1,000 00 

Alfred T. Turner, 1,000 00 

George B. Upton, 10,000 00 

Anne White Vose, 12,994 00 

Horace W. Wadleigh, 2,000 00 

Joseph K. Wait 3,000 00 

Harriot Ware, 1,952 02 

Charles F. Webber (by sale of part of vested 

remainder interest under his will) , 11,500 00 

Mary Ann P. Weld, 2,000 00 

Opha J. W^heeler, 3,086 77 

Samuel Brenton W^hitney, 1,000 00 

Mehitable C. C. Wilson, 543 75 

Thomas T. Wyman 20,000 00 

Charles L. Young, 5,000 00 

945,824 40 

Accounts payable, 4,494 14 

E. E. Allen, Trustee 190 52 

Income on special funds, 914 89 



$1,436,023 43 



54 



DONATIONS, INSTITUTION ACCOUNT. 



De Witt, Alexander $5 00 

Hammond, Miss Ellen, 5 00 

Kinnicutt, Lincoln N., 5 00 

Palfrey, Ann R 100 00 

Peabody, Philip G., gift of house and land at 1 and 

3 Pilgrim Place, Dorchester, .... 4,200 00 
Committee of the Permanent Charity Fund, In- 
corporated 5,000 00 

$9,315 00 

Through the Ladies' Auxiliary Society 4,441 50 



$13,756 50 



WORKS DEPARTMENT. 



Profit and Loss Account for the Year ending August 31, 1918. 

Revenue. 
Sales, repairs, etc., * $31,625 63 

Expenditures. 

Material used $9,671 12 

Salaries and wages, 16,666 43 

General expense 4,429 58 

Total expenditures, 30,767 13 

Profit $858 60 

Deduct: — 
Difference in inventory of tools and equipment, . $312 66 

Bad accounts written off 499 61 

Total $812 27 

Less : — 

Recovered from bad debts, 30 40 

781 87 

Total profit for year ending August 31, 1918, . . . $76 63 

1 As by the books, actual cash receipts for the year, $32,449.64. 



55 



The following account exhibits the state of property as 
entered upon the books of the Howe Memorial Press Fund 
September 1, 1918: — 



Investments, securities, $167,784 27 

Accounts receivable 447 40 

Note receivable, 1,300 00 

On account of new printing plant, .... 874 59 

Embossing 26,026 91 

Printing 11,647 22 

Appliances manufactured, 4,024 57 

Appliances purchased, ...... 555 02 

Machinery and equipment, 5,549 00 

Stationery for sale, 342 54 

Cash, Treasurer 4,979 62 

Cash, Director 318 87 

$223,850 01 



The foregoing property represents the following funds and 
balances, and is answerable for the same : — 



HOWE MEMORIAL PRESS FUNDS. 

General fund, $207,045 81 

Funds and legacies: — 

Deacon Stephen Stickney Fund, 5,000 00 

Joseph H. Center $1,000 00 

Augusta Wells 10,290 00 

11,290 00 

Accounts payable, 70 96 

Income on special fund, 443 24 



$223,850 01 



56 



The following account exhibits the state of property as 
entered upon the books of the Kindergarten September 1, 
1918: — 



Investments, securities, 
Investments, real estate, 
Buildings and grounds, Watertown, 
Equipment, Watertown, 
Rents and accounts receivable, . 
Note receivable, .... 
Cash, Treasurer, .... 
Cash, Director, etc 



$845,237 63 

419,946 43 

528,440 33 

18,860 56 

944 75 

2,300 GO 

22,428 96 

362 92 



$1,838,521 68 



The foregoing property represents the following funds and 
balances, and is answerable for the same: — 



KINDERGARTEN FUNDS. 

General fund $353,743 80 

Funds and Legacies: — 

William Leonard Benedict, Jr., Memorial, . $1,000 00 

In memoriam, A. A. C, 500 00 

Helen G. Coburn, 9,980 10 

M. Jane Wellington Danforth Fund, . . 10,000 00 

Eliza J. Bell Draper Fund 1,500 00 

Helen Atkins Edmands Memorial, . . . 5,000 00 

Mary Eveleth, 1,000 00 

Susan W. Farwell 500 00 

Albert Glover 1,000 00 

Mrs. Jerome Jones Fund 9,935 95 

Charles Lamed 5,000 00 

George F. Parkman 3,500 00 

Frank Davison Rust Memorial, . . 15,600 00 

Caroline O. Seabury 1,000 00 

Eliza Sturgis Fund 21,729 52 

Glover Fund (Albert Glover) 1,840 00 

Emeline Morse Lane 1,000 00 

Leonard and Jerusha Hyde Room, . . . 4,000 00 

94,085 57 

Emilie Albee $150 00 

Lydia A. Allen, 748 38 

Amounts carried forward $898 38 $447,829 37 



57 



Amounts brought forward $898 38 $447,829 37 

Funds and legacies — Continued. 

Michael Anagnos 3,000 00 

Harriet T. Andrew, 5,000 00 

Mrs. William Appleton, 18,000 00 

Elizabeth H. Bailey 500 00 

Eleanor J. W. Baker, 2,500 00 

Ellen M. Baker, 13,053 48 

Mary D. Balfour 100 00 

Nancy Bartlett Fund 500 00 

Sidney Bartlett 10,000 00 

Thompson Baxter, 322 50 

Robert C. Billings 10,000 00 

Samuel A. Borden, 4,675 00 

Sarah Bradford 100 00 

Helen C. Bradlee, 140,000 00 

J. Putnam Bradlee, 168,391 24 

Charlotte A. Bradstreet 6,130 07 

Ellen Sophia Brown 1,000 00 

Rebecca W. Brown, 3,073 76 

Harriet Tilden Browne 2,000 00 

John W. Carter, 500 00 

Adeline M. Chapin 400 00 

Benjamin P. Cheney 5,000 00 

Charles H. Colburn, 1,000 00 

Helen Collamore, 5,000 00 

Anna T. Coolidge 45,138 16 

Mrs. Edward Cordis 300 00 

Sarah Silver Cox, . , 5,000 00 

Susan T. Crosby 100 00 

James H. Danforth 1,000 00 

Catherine L. Donnison Memorial, . . . 1,000 00 

Caroline T. Downes, 12,950 00 

George E. Downes 3,000 00 

Charles H. Draper 23,934 13 

Lucy A. Dwight, 4,000 00 

Mary B.Emmons 1,000 00 

Eugenia F. Farnham 1,015 00 

Sarah M. Fay 15,000 00 

John Foster 5,000 00 

Elizabeth W. Gay, 7,931 00 

Ellen M. Gifford 5,000 00 

Joseph B. Glover, 5,000 00 

Matilda Goddard 300 00 

Maria L. Gray 200 00 

Mary L. Greenleaf 5,157 75 

Josephine S. Hall 3,000 00 

Amounts carried forward, 1546,170 47 $447,829 37 



68 



Amounts brought forward $546,170 47 $447,829 37 

Funds and legacies — Continued. 

Olive E. Hayden 4,622 45 

Jane H. Hodges, 300 00 

Margaret A. Holden, 2,360 67 

Marion D. Hollingsworth, 1,000 00 

Frances H. Hood 100 00 

Abigal W. Howe 1,000 00 

Martha R. Hunt 10,000 00 

Ellen M. Jones 500 00 

Moses Kimball 1,000 00 

Ann E. Lambert 700 00 

William Litchfield 5,000 00 

Mary Ann Locke 5,874 00 

Robert W. Lord 1.000 00 

Elisha T. Loring 5,000 00 

Sophia N. Low 1,000 00 

Thomas Mack, 1,000 00 

Augustus D. Manson, 8,134 00 

Calanthe E. Marsh 20,11120 

Sarah L. Marsh 1,000 00 

Annie B. Matthews 15,000 00 

Rebecca S. Melvin, 23,545 55 

Louise Chandler Moulton 10,000 00 

Mary Abbie Newell 500 00 

Margaret S. Otis, 1,000 00 

Jeannie Warren Paine 1,000 00 

• Anna R. Palfrey, 50 00 

Sarah Irene Parker. 699 41 

Helen M. Parsons 500 00 

Catherine P. Perkins 10,000 00 

Edward D. Peters 500 00 

Mary J. Phipps, 2,000 00 

Caroline S. Pickman, 1,000 00 

Katherine C Pierce 5,000 00 

Helen A. Porter 50 00 

Sarah E. Potter Endowment 425,014 44 

Francis L. Pratt 100 00 

Mary S. C. Reed 5,000 00 

Jane Roberts 98,025 55 

John M. Rodocanachi, 2,250 00 

Dorothy Roffe 500 00 

Rhoda Rogers 500 00 

Mrs. Benjamin S. Rotch 8,500 00 

Edith Rotch 10,000 00 

Rebecca Salisbury 200 00 

Joseph Scholfield, 3,000 00 



Amounts carried forward $1,234.807 74 $447.829 37 



59 



Amounts brought forward, 



$1,234,807 74 $447,829 37 



Funds and legacies — Concluded. 

Eliza B. Seymour 5,000 00 

Esther W. Smith, 5,000 00 

Annie E. Snow 9,903 27 

Adelaide Standish, 5,000 00 

Elizabeth G. Stuart, 2,000 00 

Abby K. Sweetser, 25,000 00 

Hannah R. Sweetser, 5,000 00 

Benjamin Sweetzer, 2,000 00 

Harriet Taber Fund, 622 81 

Sarah W. Taber, 1,000 00 

Mary L. Talbot, 630 00 

Cornelia V. R. Thayer, 10,000 00 

Delia D. Thorndike, 5,000 00 

Elizabeth L. Tilton, 300 00 

Betsey B. Tolman 500 00 

Transcript ten dollar fund, 5,666 95 

Mary B. Turner 7,582 90 

Royal W. Turner, 24,082 00 

Rebecca P. Wainwright, 1,000 00 

George W. Wales 5,000 00 

Mrs. George W. Wales, 10,000 00 

Mrs. Charles E. Ware, 4,000 00 

Rebecca B. Warren, 5,000 00 

Jennie A. (Shaw) Waterhouse, .... 565 84 

Mary H. Watson, 100 00 

Ralph Watson Memorial, 237 92 

May Rosevear White 500 00 

Mary Whitehead, 666 00 

Julia A. Whitney 100 00 

Sarah W. Whitney, . . . . . . 150 62 

Betsey S. Wilder, 500 00 

Hannah Catherine W^iley, 200 00 

Mary W. Wiley 150 00 

Mary Williams 5,000 00 

Almira F. Winslow, 306 80 

Harriet F. Wolcott, 5,532 00 

1,388,104 85 

Accounts payable 1,931 68 

E. E. Allen, Trustee 17 94 

Income on special funds 637 74 



$1,838,521 58 



60 



DONATIONS, KINDERGARTEN ACCOUNT. 



Brett, Miss Anna K., $10 00 

"Children of the King," Church of the Disciples, 

Boston, 3 00 

Hill, Mrs. Sarah A., by C. S. Hill 1 00 

Primary Department, Sunday School of the Union 
Congregational Church of Weymouth and Brain- 
tree 18 00 

$32 00 



61 



CONTRIBUTIONS FOR THE PERKINS 
INSTITUTION. 



Through the Ladies' Auxiliary Society, Mrs. Sarah A. 
Stover, Treasurer: — 

Annual subscriptions, $2,351 50 

Donations, 1,721 00 

Cambridge Branch, 210 00 

Dorchester Branch, 63 00 

Lynn Branch, 52 00 

Milton Branch, 44 00 



t,441 50 



ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTIONS FOR THE PER- 
KINS INSTITUTION. 

Through the Ladies' Auxiliary Society, Mrs. S. A. Stover, Treasurer. 



Abbott, Miss Georgianna E. 
Abbott, Mrs. J., 
Adams, Mr. George, 
Adams, Mrs. Waldo, 
Alford, Mrs. O. H., 
Allen, Mrs. F. R., 
Alley, Mrs. George R., 
Amory, Mrs. Charles W., 
Amory, Mrs. Wm., 
Amory, Mrs. Wm., 2d, 
Amsden, Mrs. Mary A., 
Appleton, Miss Fanny C., 
Archer, Mrs. E. M. H., 
Atkins, Mrs. Edwin F., 

Amount carried forward, 



, $1 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 


5 


00 


. 10 


00 


2 


00 


1 


00 


. 25 


00 


6 


00 


. 25 


00 


1 


00 


3 


00 


1 


00 


5 


00 


. $90 00 



Amount brought forward, 



$90 00 



Bacon, Miss Mary P., 


5 00 


Badger, Mrs. Wallis B., 


2 00 


Baer, Mrs. Louis, 


5 00 


Balch, Mrs. F. G., 


5 00 


Baldwin, Mr. E. L., . 


2 00 


Baldwin, Mrs. J. C. T., 


5 00 


Bangs, Mrs. F. R., 


10 00 


Barnard, Mr. Simon, . 


2 00 


Bartol, Miss Elizabeth H., 


20 00 


Batcheller, Mr. Robert, 


5 00 


Batt, Mrs. C. R., 


5 00 


Beal, Mrs. Boylston A., 


10 00 



Amount carried forward, . $166 00 



62 



Amount brought forward, . $166 00 



Betton, Mrs. C. G.. . 


2 00 


Bigelow, Mrs. Alanson, 


1 00 


Bigelow, Mrs. Henry M., 


3 00 


Blake, Mrs. Arthur W., 


5 00 


Blake, Mrs. Francis, . 


5 00 


Boardman, Mrs. W. D., 


5 00 


Boardman, Miss E. D., 


2 00 


Bond, Mrs. Charles H., 


5 00 


Boutwell, Mrs. L. B., . 


5 00 


Bradt, Mrs. Julia B., . 


1 00 


Brewer, Miss Lucy S., 


5 00 


Brown, Mrs. Atherton T., 


10 00 


Brush, Mrs. C. N., 


10 00 


Burns, Mr. Walter G., 


2 00 


Burr, Mrs. C. C., 


10 00 


Gary, Miss Ellen G., . 


50 00 


Gary, Miss Georgina S., 


10 00 


Cassoa, Miss Etta B., 


1 00 


Chamberlain, Mrs. M. L., 


5 00 


Chandler, Mrs. Frank W., 


5 00 


Channing, Mrs. Walter, 


5 00 


Chapin, Mrs. Henry B., 


5 00 


Chapman, Miss Jane E. C. 


2 00 


Chase, Mrs. Susan R., 


1 00 


Clapp, Dr. H. C, 


2 00 


Clark, Mr. B. Preston, ir 




memory of his mother 




Mrs. B. G. Clark, . 


5 00 


Clark, Mrs. Frederic S., 


10 00 


Clark, Mrs. John Dudley, 


25 00 


Clement, Mrs. Hazen, 


5 00 


Clerk, Mrs. W. F., 


3 00 


Cobb, Mrs. Charles K., 


5 00 


Cochrane, Mrs. Alex., 


5 00 


Godman, Miss Catherine 




Amory, . 


10 00 


Coolidge, Mrs. J. Randolph 


25 00 


Corey, Mrs. H. D., . 


2 00 


Cox, Mrs. William E., 


10 00 


Crnig, Mrs. D. R., 


5 00 


Craigin, Dr. George A., 


5 00 


Cummings, Mrs. Charles A. 


10 00 


Curtis, Mr. George W., 


5 00 


Curtis, Miss M. G., 


5 00 


Gushing, Mrs. H. W., 


5 00 


Gushing, Mrs. J. W., . 


2 00 


Gushing, Miss Sarah P., 


5 00 


Cutler, Mrs. C. F., 


5 00 


Cutler, Mrs. E. G., 


2 00 



Amount carried forward, . S477 00 



Amount brought forward, . $477 00 



Cutter, Mrs. Ellen M., 
Gutter, Mrs. Frank W., 
Cutts, Mrs. H. M., 
Dale, Mrs. Eben, 
Damon, Mrs. J. L., Jr., 
Daniels, Mrs. Edwin A., 
Davis, Mrs. Joseph E., 
Davis, Mrs. Simon, 
Day, Mrs. Lewis, 
Denny, Mrs. Arthur B., 
Denny, Mrs. W. C, . 
Derby, Mrs. Hasket, . 
Drost, Mr. C. A., 
DuBois, Mrs. L. G., . 
Dwight, Mrs. Thomas, 
Edgar, Mrs. C. L., 
Edmands, Mrs. M. Grant, 
Eliot, Mrs. Amory, 
Elms, Mrs. Edward E., 
Elms, Miss Florence G., 
Emmons, Mrs. R. W., 2d, 
Endicott, Mrs. Wm. G., 
Ernst, Mrs. G. W., 
Ernst, Mrs. H. G., 
Eustis, Mrs. F. A., 
Ferrin, Mrs. M. T. B., 
Field, Mrs. D. W., 
Fitz, Mrs. W. Scott, . 
Forbes, Mrs. Francis B., 
Foss, Mrs. Eugene N., 
Frank, Mrs. Daniel, . 
Freeman, Mrs. Louisa A., 
Friedman, Mrs. Max, . 
Friedman, Mrs. S., 
Frothingham, Mrs. Langdon, 
Frothingham, Mrs. Randolph, 
Gay, Mrs. Albert, 
Gill, Mr.Abbott D. (191 7-18), 
Gill, Mrs. George F., . 
Goldschmidt, Mrs. Meyer H., 
Gooding, Mrs. T. P., . 
Grandgent, Prof. Charles H., 
Grant, Mrs. Robert, . 
Gray, Mrs. Reginald, . 
Green, Mr. Charles G., 
Greenleaf, Mrs. L. B., 
Greenough, Mrs. G. P., 
Grew, Mrs. H. S., 
Hall, Mrs. Anthony D., 



1 00 



10 00 
5 00 
1 00 
5 00 

10 00 
3 00 
5 00 
1 00 

35 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 

10 00 
5 00 
5 00 

25 00 
5 00 

10 00 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



1 00 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



10 00 

10 00 

2 00 

5 00 

25 00 

2 00 



Amount carried forward, . $761 00 



63 



Amount brought forward, . $761 00 



Harrington, Mrs. Francis B. 


5 00 


Harrington, Dr. Harriet L. 


2 00 


Harris, Miss Frances K., 


2 00 


Hatch, Mrs. Fred W., 


5 00 


Haven, Mrs. Edward B., 


3 00 


Hayward, Mrs. G. G., 


10 00 


Herman, Mrs. Joseph M., 


5 00 


Higginson, Mrs. F. L. (foi 




1917), . 


10 00 


Higginson, Mrs. Henry L., 


5 00 


Hills, Mrs. Edwin A., . 


5 00 


Holbrook, Mrs. Walter H., 


3 00 


Homans, Mrs. John, . 


10 00 


Hooper, Miss Adeline D., 


5 00 


Hooper, Mrs. James R., 


15 00 


Howe, Mrs. Arabella, . 


2 00 


Howe, Mrs. George D., 


10 00 


Howland, Mrs. D. W., 


2 00 


Hubbard, Mrs. Charles W. 


25 00 


Hunnewell, Mrs. Arthur, 


25 00 


Hyde, Mrs. H. D., . 


1 00 


Ireson, Mrs. S. E., 


5 00 


Jacobs, Mrs. Fred W., 


3 00 


Jennings, Miss Julia F., 


3 00 


Jewett, Miss Annie, 


3 00 


Johnson, Mr. Arthur S., 


5 00 


Johnson, Mr. Edward C., 


25 00 


Johnson, Mrs. Wolcott H., 


5 00 


Jones, Mrs. B. M., 


10 00 


Jordan, Mrs. Eben D., 


10 00 


Josselyn, Mrs. A. S., . 


5 00 


Joy, Mrs. Charles H., 


10 00 


Kettle, Mrs. Claude L., 


1 00 


Kimball, Mrs. David P., 


25 00 


Kimball, Mr. Edward P., 


10 00 


Kimball, Mrs. Marcus M., 


50 00 


Kingsley, Mrs. Robert C, 


1 00 


Klous, Mr. Isaac, 


2 00 


Kornfeld, Mrs. Felix, . 


1 00 


Lamb, Miss Augusta T., 


2 00 


Lamson, Mrs. J. A., 


2 00 


Lane, Mrs. D. H., 


1 00 


Larkin, The Misses, . 


2 00 


Lautterstein, Mrs. Josie, 


1 00 


Ledyard, Mrs. Lewis Cass, 


5 00 


Lee, Mrs. Joseph, 


100 00 


Leland, Mrs. Lewis A., 


1 00 


Le\i, Mrs. Harry, 


2 50 


Lincoln, Mr. A. L., 


5 00 



Amount carried forward, $1,206 60 



Amount brought forward, $1,206 50 



Locke, Mrs. Charles A., 
Lockwood, Mrs. T. S., 
Loring, Judge W. C, . 
Loring, Mrs. W. C, . 
Lothrop, Miss Mary B., 
Lothrop, Mrs. Thornton K. 
Lothrop, Mrs. W. S. H., 
Lovering, Mrs. Charles T., 
Lowell, Mrs. Charles, . 
Lowell, Mrs. John, 
Lowell, Miss Lucy, 
Mansfield, Mrs. George S., 
Mansur, Mrs. Martha P., 
Mason, Mrs. Charles E., 
Mead, Mrs. Fred Sumner, 
Merrill, Mrs. L. M., . 
Merriman, Mrs. Daniel, 
Mixter, Miss Mary A., 
Monks, Mrs. George H., 
Morison, Mrs. John H., 
Morrison, Mrs. W. A., 
Morse, Mrs. J. P., 
Morss, Mrs. Everett, . 
Moseley, Miss Ellen F., 
Moses, Mrs. George, . 
Moses, Mrs. Joseph, . 
Moses, Mrs. Louis, 
Nathan, Mrs. Jacob, . 
Nathan, Mrs. John, 
Nazro, Mrs. Fred H., . 
Niebuhr, Miss Mary M., 
Norcross, Mrs. Otis, 
Olmsted, Mrs. J. C, . 
Page, Mrs. Calvin Gates, 
Paine, Mrs. Wm. D., . 
Parker, Miss Eleanor S., 
Pecker, Miss Annie J., 
Peckerman, Mrs. E. R., 
Peirce, Mrs. Silas, 
Perry, Mrs. Clarabel N., 
Pickert, Mrs. Lehman, 
Pickman, Mrs. D. L., . 
Pratt, Mrs. Elliott W., 
Prendergast, Mr. James M 
Proctor, Mrs. Henry H., 
Putnam, Mrs. George, 
Putnam, Mrs. James J., 
Ratshesky, Mrs. Fanny, 
Ratshesky, Mrs. I. A., 



Amount carried forward, $1,591 60 



. 10 00 


10 00 


. 25 00 


. 25 00 


5 00 


, 50 00 


5 00 


. 10 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


2 00 


3 00 


50 00 


5 00 


5 00 


10 00 


. 10 00 


4 00 


5 00 


1 00 


1 00 


5 00 


5 00 


1 00 


3 00 


1 00 


2 00 


5 00 


2 00 


1 00 


10 00 


3 00 


2 00 


2 00 


. 10 00 


. 10 00 


2 00 


1 00 


5 00 


2 00 


. 25 00 


5 00 


, 10 00 


2 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 



64 



Amount brought forward, $1,59150 Amount brought forward, $1,94150 



2 


00 


2 


00 


. 25 


00 


. 30 


00 


. 10 


00 


5 


00 


. 10 


00 


10 


00 


2 


00 


3 


00 


. 10 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


. 25 


00 


1 


00 


5 


00 



5 00 



Reed, Mrs. Arthur, 
Reed, Mrs. John H., . 
Reed, Mrs. Wm. Howell, 
Rice, Mr. and Mrs. David, 
Rice, Mrs. Wm. B., 
Richards, Miss Alice A., 
Richards, Miss Annie L., 
Richards, Mrs. C. A., . 
Richards, Mrs. E. L., . 
Robbins, Mrs. Reginald L 
Robbins, Mrs. Royal, . 
Roeth, Mrs. A. G., 
Rogers, Mrs. J. C, 
Rogers, Mrs. R. K., . 
Rogers, Miss Susan S., 
Rosenbaum, Mrs. Henry, 
Rosenbaum, Miss Loraine, 
Rotch, Mrs. Wm. J., . 
Rowlett, Mrs. Thomas S., 
Russell, Miss Catherine E. 
Sabine, Dr. G. K., in mem 

ory of Mrs. Sabine, . 
Saltonstall, Mr. Richard M. 
in memory of his mother 
Mrs. Leverett Saltonstall 
Sanborn, Mrs. C. W. H., 
Sargent, Mrs. F. W., . 
Sargent, Mrs. Winthrop, 
Saunders, Mrs. D. E., 
Schouler, Mr. James, . 
Scudder, Mrs. Charles L., 
Scudder, Mrs. J. D., in mem 
ory of her mother, Mrs 
N. M. Downer, 
Scull, Mrs. Gideon, 
Sears, Mr. Herbert M., 
Sears, Mrs. Knyvet W., 
Shattuck, Mrs. George B., 
Shaw, Mrs. G. Rowland, 
Shaw, Mrs. George R., 
Shepard, Mr. Thomas H., 
Short, Mrs. Y. S., 
Sias, Mrs. Charles D., 
Sias, Miss Martha G., 
Simpkins, Miss Mary W., 
Smith, Miss Ellen V., . 
Smith, Mrs. Phineas B., 
Sprague, Mrs. Charles, 
Sprague, Mrs. H. B., . 



Amount carried forward, $1,941 50 



1, 10 


00 


2 


00 


10 


00 


. 20 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 


5 


00 


10 


00 


. 25 


00 


. 25 


00 


5 


00 


. 15 


00 


5 


00 


5 00 


1 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


. 25 


00 


2 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 



Stackpole, Mrs. F. D., 
Stackpole, Miss Roxana, 
Stearns, Mr. and Mrs. C. H., 
Stearns, Mrs. Wm. Brackett 
Stearns, Mr. Wm. B., 
Steese, Mrs. Edward, . 
Steinert, Mrs. Alex., . 
Stevens, Miss Alice B., 
Stevenson, Mrs. R. H., 
Stewart, Mrs. Cecil, . 
Stone, Mrs. Edwin P., 
Storer, Miss A. M., 
Storer, Miss M. G., 
Strauss, Mrs. Louis, 
Sweetser, Mrs. Frank E., 
Talbot, Mrs. Thomas Palmer 
Thacher, Mrs. Henry C, 
Thomas, Miss Catherine C 
Thomson, Mrs. A. C, 
Thorndike, Mrs. Alden A 

(for 1917), 
Thorndike, Mrs. Augustus, 
Thorndike, Mrs. Augustus 

L 

Tucker, Mrs. Wm. A., 
Tuckerman, Mrs. Charles S 
Tudor, Mrs. Henry D., 
Tyler, Mr. Granville C, 
Vass, Miss Harriett, . 
Vickery, Mrs. Herman F., 
Wadsworth, Mrs. A. F., 
Ward, The Misses, 
Ward, Miss Julia A., . 
Ware, Miss Marj' Lee, 
Warren, Mrs. Bayard, 
Warren, Mrs. J. C, 
Warshauer, Mrs. Isador, 
Wason, Mrs. Elbridge, 
Watson, Mrs. Thomas A., 
Weeks, Mr. Andrew Gray, 
Weeks, Mrs. W. B. P., 
Weld, Mrs. A. Winsor, 
Weld, Mrs. W. G., 
Weld, Mrs. Samuel M., 
West, Mrs. Charles A., 
Wheelwright, Miss Mary, 
White, Miss Eliza Orne, 
White, Mrs. Jonathan H., 
White, Mrs. Joseph H., 



2 00 

5 00 

10 00 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



10 00 
10 00 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



10 00 
5 00 
5 00 

10 00 
5 00 



2 

5 

5 

2 

5 
15 00 

5 00 
10 00 

3 00 
25 00 
25 00 
10 00 

1 00 
5 00 
5 00 

10 00 

2 00 
5 00 

10 00 
5 00 

1 00 

2 00 
25 00 

5 00 
2 00 



Amount carried forward, $2,246 50 



65 



Amount brought forward, 

Whittington, Mrs. Hiram, 
Williams, The Misses, 
Williams, Miss Adelia C, 
Williams, Mrs. Arthur, Jr., 
Williams, Mrs. Jeremiah, 
Williams, Mr. Moses, . 
Williams, Mrs. Moses, 



Amount carried forward, $2,321 60 



$2,246 50 


1 


00 


. 10 


00 


. 50 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


$2,321 


60 



Amount brought forward, $2,321 50 



Willson, Miss Lucy B., 
Wingersky, Mrs. Harris, 
Winsor, Mrs. Ernest, . 
Wolcott, Mrs. Roger, . 
Worthley, Mrs. George H. 
Wright, Miss Mary A., 
Young, Mrs. Benjamin L., 



5 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


3 


00 


10 


00 


$2,351 


50 



DONATIONS. 



A friend, . 

Adams, Mrs. Charles H., 
Adams, Mrs. Henry J., 
Aiken, Miss Susan C, 
Alden, Mrs. Charles H., 
Allen, Mrs. Thomas, . 
Anderson, Miss Anna F., 
Appleton, Miss Fanny C, 
Bacon, Miss Ellen S., . 
Baker, Miss S. P., 
Bailey, Mrs. H. R., . 
Bartol, Mrs. John W., 
Batcheller, Mr. Robert, 
Baylies, Mrs. Walter Cabot 
Bemis, Mr. J. M., 
Bicknell, Mrs. Wm. J., 
Bigelow, Mrs. J. S., 
Bowditch, Dr. Vincent Y., 
Brewer, Mr. Edward M., 
Browning, Mrs. Charles A. 
Bruerton, Mrs. James, 
Bullard, Mr. Alfred M., 
Bullens, Miss Charlotte L., 
Bunker, Mr. Alfred, 
Burnham, Mrs. H. D., 
C. . 

Carr, Mrs. Samuel, 
Carter, Mrs. John W., 
Cary, Miss Ellen C, . 
Cary, Miss Georgina S., 
Case, Mrs. James B., . 
Chase, Mrs. S. R., 
Clapp, Miss Helen, 
Clark, Mrs. Robert Farley, 
Codman, Mr. Charles R., 
Codman, Miss M. C, 



$5 00 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



10 00 
5 00 
2 00 

10 00 

10 00 
5 00 

10 00 
5 00 

15 00 
5 00 

25 00 



10 00 

10 00 

10 00 

100 00 

5 00 

25 00 

1 00 

5 00 

5 00 

10 00 

5 00 



Amount carried forward, . $338 00 



Amount brought forward, . $338 00 



Cole, Mrs. E. E., 
Coolidge, Mrs. Penelope F., 
Cotting, Mrs. Charles E., 
Cotton, Miss Elizabeth A., 
Dwight, Mrs. Thomas, 
Edwards, Miss Hannah M 
Estabrook, Mrs. A. F., 
Eustis, Mrs. Herbert H., 
Evans, Mrs. Charles, . 
F., . 

Faulkner, Miss Fannie M., 
Fay, Mrs. Dudley B., 
Fay, Miss Sarah M., . 
Fiske, Mrs. Joseph N., 
Flood, Mrs. Hugh, 
French, Miss Cornelia A., 
Frothingham, Mrs. Louis A. 
Ginzberg, Mrs. Barnard, 
Goulding, Mrs. L. R., 
Gray, Mrs. John Chipman, 
Gray, Mrs. Morris, 
Grosberg, Mrs. O., 
Guild, Mrs. S. Eliot, . 
Harris, Miss Frances K., 
Heath, Mr. Nathaniel, 
Hobbs, Mrs. Warren D., 
Homans, Mrs. John, . 
Houghton, Miss Elizabeth G 
Hoyt, Mrs. C. C, 
Hubbard, Mrs. Eliot, . 
Hubbard, Mr. Gorham, 
Hunnewell, Mr. Walter, 
Hutchins, Mrs. C. F., 
Hyneman, Mrs. Louis, 



Amount carried forward, . $747 00 



1 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 


. 100 


00 


2 


00 


, 10 


00 


5 


00 


. 25 


00 


1 


00 


. 25 


00 


. 10 


00 


. 10 


00 


15 


00 


25 


00 


2 


00 


. 10 


00 


, 50 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


10 


00 


3 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


10 


00 


., 10 


00 


5 


00 


. 10 


00 


2 


00 


. 25 


00 


5 


00 


2 00 



66 



$747 00 



lasigi, Mrs. Oscar, 


. 10 00 


In memory of Mrs. Georg( 




H. Eager, 


. 10 00 


In memory of Mrs. Harrie 




L. Thayer, through Mrs 




Hannah T. Brown, . 


5 GO 


Johnson, Mrs. Herbert S., 


. 10 00 


JoUiffe, Mrs. Thomas H., 


5 CO 


Keene, Mrs. S. W., . 


2 00 


Kimball, The Misses, . 


25 00 


Koshland, Mrs. Joseph, 


. 10 00 


Linder, Mrs. George, . 


25 00 


Loring, Mrs. A. P., 


10 00 


Lovett, Mr. and Mrs. A. S. 


5 00 


Lyman, Mrs. George H., 


10 00 


Manning, Miss A. F., . 


5 00 


Mason, Miss Fanny P., 


10 00 


Means, Miss Anne M., 


10 00 


Merriam, Mrs. Frank, 


10 00 


Mills, Mrs. D. T.. 


5 00 


Monroe, Mrs. G. H., . 


5 00 


Morrill, Miss Amelia, . 


50 00 


Morrill, Miss Annie W., 


50 00 


Morse, Dr. Henry Lee, 


10 00 


Moseley, Miss Ellen F., 


5 00 


Nazro, Mrs. F. W., 


3 00 


Peabody, Mr. Harold, 


5 00 


Pearson, Mrs. Charles H., 


5 00 


Perry, Mrs. Charles F., 


3 00 


Pfaelzer, Mrs. F. T., . 


10 00 


Philbrick, Mrs. E. S., . 


3 00 


Pitman, Mrs. Benjamin F 




(for 1917-18), 


15 00 


Potter, Mrs. W. H., . 


3 00 


Punchard, Miss A. L., 


10 00 


Putnam, Mrs. James J., 


5 00 


Quincy, Mrs. G. H., . 


10 00 


Rand, Mrs. Arnold A., 


2 00 


Ranney, Mr. Fletcher, 


5 00 


Rice, Mrs. N. W., 


10 00 


Richardson, The Misses, in 




memory of M. A. E. and 




C. P. P 


2 00 


Richardson, Mrs. Edward C, 


5 00 


Richardson, Mrs. Frederick, 


5 00 


Richardson, Mrs. John, 


3 00 


Riley, Mr. Charles E., 


25 00 


Rodman, Miss Emma, 


10 00 


Rogers, Miss Annette P., 


5 00 



Amount carried forward, $1,178 00 



Amount brought forward, $1,178 00 



Rosenbaum, Mrs. Louis, 
Ross, Mrs. Waldo O., . 
Rust, Mrs. W. A., 
Sanger, Mr. Sabin P., . 
Saunders, Mrs. D. E., 
Seabury, Miss Sarah E., 
Sears, Mrs. Richard D., 
Sever, Miss Emily, 
Sherman, Mrs. Wm. H., 
Sherwin, Mrs. Thomas, 
Silsbee, Mrs. G. S., . 
Slattery, Mrs. Wm., . 
Spalding, Miss Dora N., 
Sprague, Dr. F. P., 
Spring, Mrs. Romney, 
Stevenson, Mrs. R. H., 
Stone, Mrs. Edwin P., 
Stone, Mrs. Philip S., . 
Swann, Mrs. John, 
Taylor, Mrs. E. B., . 
Temple Israel Sunday School 
Thayer, Mrs. Ezra Ripley, 
Thayer, Mrs. Wm. G., 
Thing, Mrs. Annie B., 
Thorndike, Mrs. Alden A., 
Tucker, Mrs. J. Alfred, 
Vialle, Mr. Charles A., 
Vorenberg, Mrs. S., 
Wadsworth, Mrs. W. Austin 
Walker, Mrs. W. H., . 
Ward, Miss Julia A., . 
Warner, Mrs. F. H., . 
Watson, Mrs. R. C, . 
Watson, Mrs. T. A., . 
Webster, Mrs. F. G., . 
Wesson, Miss Isabel, . 
Wheelwright, Miss Mary, 
White, Miss Eliza Orne, 
Whiting, Miss Anna M., 
Whitney, Mr. Edward F., 
Willcomb, Mrs. George, 
Williams, Mrs. Arthur, Jr., 
Williams, Mrs. Charles A., 
Williams, Mr. Ralph B., 
Williams, Mrs. T. B., . 
Willson, Miss Lucy B., 
Windram, Mrs. W. T., 
Withington, Miss Anna S., 
Wyman, Mrs. Alfred E., 



5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


. 20 00 


3 00 


. 75 00 


. 20 00 


5 00 


5 GO 


3 GO 


. 25 GO 


2 00 


10 00 


10 GO 


2 GO 


. 10 GO 


5 00 


1 GO 


5 GO 


5 00 


5 00 


. 10 GO 


. 10 GO 


. 10 GO 


5 00 


1 00 


. 10 GO 


2 GO 


, 20 00 


. 10 GO 


2 00 


. 10 GO 


5 GO 


. 20 GO 


. 25 GO 


5 00 


5 00 


. 10 GO 


. 25 GO 


. 10 00 


. 10 00 


2 00 


5 00 


. 25 GO 


5 GO 


5 GO 


. 50 00 


5 00 


. 15 00 


$1,721 00 



67 



CAMBRIDGE BRANCH. 



$20 00 
1 00 

10 00 
1 00 

10 00 



Agassiz, Mr. Max (donation), 
Aldrich, Mrs. Charles F., 
Ames, Mrs. James B. (dona- 
tion), 
Boggs, Mrs. Edwin P., 
Brewster, Mrs. William (do- 
nation), . 
Bulfinch, Miss Ellen S., 

(donation), 
Cary, Miss Emma F., 
Chandler, Mrs. Seth C, 
Emery, Miss Octavia B., 

(donation), 
Farley, Miss Christine A., 
Farlow, Mrs. Wm. G. (do- 
nation), . 
Foster, Mrs. Francis C 

(donation), 
Francke, Mrs. Kuno, . 
Frothingham, Miss Sarah E. 
Goodale, Mrs. George L., 
Green, Miss Mary A., 
Greenough, Mrs. J. B., 
Hayward, Mrs. James W., 



Amount carried forward, . $118 00 



6 00 



30 00 



3 


00 


2 


00 


1 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


10 


00 



Amount brought forward, . $118 00 



Hedge, Miss Charlotte A., 

(donation), 
Howard, Mrs. Albert A., 
Ireland, Miss Catharine 

(donation), 
Kennedy, Mrs. F. L., . 
Kettell, Mrs. Charles W., 
Longfellow, Mrs. W. P. P 
Neal, Mrs. W. H., 
Perrin, Mrs. Franklin, 
Richards, Miss L. B., . 
Saville, Mrs. Henry M., 
Sawyer, Miss Ellen M. (do- 
nation), . 
Thorp, Mrs. J. G., 
Toppan, Mrs. Robert N., 
Wesselhoeft, Mrs. Walter, 
Whittemore, Mrs. F. W., 
Willson, Mrs. Robert W., 
Woodman, Miss Mary, 
Woodman, Mrs. Walter, 



5 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 


3 


00 


3 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 


1 


00 


5 


00 


. 10 


00 


. 10 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


. 20 


00 


2 


00 



$210 00 



DORCHESTER BRANCH. 



Bartlett, Mrs. Susan E., 


$1 00 


Brigham, Mrs. Frank E. (do- 




nation), .... 


5 00 


Burditt, Mrs. Charles A., 


2 00 


Callender, Miss Caroline S., 


2 00 


Churchill, Mrs. J. R., . 


1 00 


(donation). 


1 00 


Gushing, Miss Susan T., 


1 00 


Eliot, Mrs. C. R., 


1 00 


Faunce, Mrs. Sewall A., 


1 00 


Hall, Mrs. Henry, 


1 00 


Haven, Mrs. Katharine 




Stearns, .... 


1 00 


Hawkes, Mrs. S. L., 


1 00 


Humphreys, Mrs. Richard 




C. (donation). 


5 00 


Jordan, Miss Ruth A., 


2 00 



Amount carried forward. 



$26 00 



Amount brought forward, 

Murdock, Mrs. Harold, 
Nash, Mrs. Edward W., 

(donation), 
Nash, Mrs. Frank K., 
Nightingale, Mrs. C, . 
Pratt, Mrs. Laban, 
Preston, Miss Myra C. (do 

nation), . 
Reed, Mrs. George M., 
Sayward, Mrs. W. H., 
Stearns, Mrs. Albert H., 
Stearns, Mr. A. Maynard, 
Stearns, Mr. A. T., 2d, 
Stearns, Henry D., in mem 

ory of , . 

Amount carried forward, 



$25 00 



2 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


3 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


. $48 00 



68 



Amount brought forward, 



00 



Whitcher, Mr. Frank W. 

(donation), . 5 00 

Whiten, Mrs. Royal, . . 1 00 

Wilder, Miss Grace S., 2 00 



Amount carried forward, . §56 00 



Amount brought forward, . S56 00 

Willard, Mrs. L. P., . 1 00 

Woodberry, Miss Mary (do- 
nation), . . . 1 00 
Wright, Mr. C. P.. . .5 00 



$63 00 



Blood, Mr. and Mrs. L. K 




(donation). 


$10 00 


Caldwell, Mrs. Ellen F., 


1 00 


Chase, Mrs. Philip A., 


5 00 


Earp, Miss Emily A., . 


1 00 


Elmer, Mr. and Mrs. V. J., 


5 00 


Haven, Miss Rebecca E 




(donation) , 


5 00 



LYNN BRANCH. 

Amount brought forward. 



HoUis, Mrs. Samuel J., 
Sheldon, Mrs. Chauncey C, 
Sprague, Mr. Henry B. (do- 
nation), .... 
Tapley, Mr. Henry F. (do- 
nation), .... 



Amount carried forward, 



$27 00 



$27 00 

10 00 
5 00 

5 00 

5 00 

$52 00 



MILTON BRANCH. 



Brewer, Miss Eliza (dona- 
tion), 
Clark, Mrs. D. Oakes, 
Clum, Mrs. Allston B., 
Cunningham, Mrs. C. L., 
Forbes, Mrs. J. Murray, 



Amount carried forward, . $24 00 



$10 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 


10 


00 



Amount brought forward, . $24 00 



Jaques, Miss Helen L., 




10 00 


(donation). 




5 00 


Klous, Mrs. Henr>' D., 




2 00 


Pierce, Mr. Vassar, 




2 00 


Rivers, Mrs. George R. 


R., 


1 00 



$44 00 



All contributors to the fund are respedfvily requested to -peruse the 
above list, and to report either to Albert Thorxdike, Treasurer, No. 
19 Congress Street, Boston, or to the Director, Edward E. Allen, Water- 
t<ywn, any o7nissions or inaccuracies which they may find in it. 

ALBERT THORNDIKE, 

Treasurer. 
No. 19 CoKGRESS Street, Boston. 



69 



FOBM or BEQUEST. 

I hereby give, devise and bequeath to the Perkins Institution 
AND Massachusetts School for the Blind, a corporation duly 
organized and existing under the laws of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, the sum of dollars ($ ), 

the same to be applied to the general uses and purposes of said 
corporation under the direction of its Board of Trustees; and I 
do hereby direct that the receipt of the Treasurer for the time being 
of said corporation shall be a sufficient discharge to my executors 
for the same. 



FORM OF DEVISE OF REAL ESTATE. 

I give, devise and bequeath to the Perkins Institution and Mas- 
sachusetts School for the Blind, a corporation duly organized 
and existing under the laws of the Conunonwealth of Massachusetts, 
that certain tract of real estate bounded and described as follows: — 

(Here describe the real estate accurately) 
with full power to sell, mortgage and convey the same free of all 
trusts. 



NOTICE. 



The address of the treasurer of the corporation is as 

follows: 

ALBERT THORNDIKE, 

No. 19 Congress Street, 

Boston. 




'*> fit 



fl« 



.2 *» 



5« 



Perkins Institution 

And Massachusetts vSchool 
For the Blind 




EIOHTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT 
OF THE TRUSTEES 



1919 



BOSTON J* ^ ^ ^ ^ 1920 
WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO. 



QIJ|f Ql0mtn0mtt0aItIj of maBaarljua^tta 



Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind, 
Watertown, October 20, 1919. 

To the Hon. Albert P. Langtry, Secretary of State, Boston. 

Dear Sir: — I have the honor to transmit to you, for 
the use of the legislature, a copy of the eighty-eighth annual 
report of the trustees of this institution to the corporation 
thereof, together with that of the treasurer and the usual 
accompanying documents. 

Respectfully, 



EDWARD E. ALLEN, 

Secretary. 






OFFICERS OF THE CORPORATION. 



1919-1920. 



FRANCIS HENRY APPLETON, President. 
GEORGE H. RICHARDS, Vice-President. 
ALBERT THORNDIKE, Treasurer. 
EDWARD E. ALLEN, Secretary. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



Mrs. GEORGE ANGIER. 

FRANCIS HENRY APPLETON. 

WILLIAM ENDICOTT. 

Mis8 ROSAMOND FAY. 

THOMAS J. FAY. 

Rev. PAUL REVERE FROTHINGHAM. 



ROBERT H. HALLOWELL. 
JAMES ARNOLD LOWELL. 
GEORGE H. RICHARDS. 
WILLIAM L. RICHARDSON, M.D. 
RICHARD M. SALTONSTALL. 



STANDING COMMITTEES. 
Monthly Visiting Committee, 

whose duty it is to visit and inspect the Institution at least once in each month. 



January, . 
February, 
March, . 
April, 
May, . 
June, . 



1920. 

Francis Henry Appleton. 
Mra. George Angier. 
Robert H. Hallowell. 
Paul R. Frothingham. 
J.\MES A. Lowell. 
Thomas J. Fay. 



August, . 
September, 
October, . 
November, 
December, 



1920. 

Miss Rosamond Fat. 
George H. Richards. 
William L. Rich.a.rdson. 
Richard M. Saltonstall. 
William Endicott. 



Executive Committee. 
George H. Richards. 
Mrs. George Angier. 
James A. Lowell, 
Richard M. Saltonst.^ll. 



Finance Committee. 
George H. Richards. 
Robert H. Hallowell. 
James A. Lowell. 



Auditors of Expenses. 

George H. Richards. 
Robert H. Hallowell. 
Edwin L. Pride & Co. (Incorpor.vted), Certided Public Accountants. 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION AND 
TEACHERS. 



EDWARD E. ALLEN, Director. 



TEACHERS AND OFFICERS OF THE UPPER SCHOOL. 
LITERABY DEPARTMENT. 



Boys' Section. 

Miss JESSICA L. LANGWORTHY. 

Miss CAROLINE E. McMASTER. 

ARTHUR E. HOLMES. 

Miss FEODORE M. NICHOLLS. 

Miss ETHEL D. EVANS. 

Miss ETHEL WELLS. 



Girls' Section. 

Miss ELLEN H. PACKARD. 
Miss ANNIE L. BRADFORD. 
Miss GENEVIEVE M. HAVEN. 
Miss ESTELLE M. HARRIS. 
Mrs. ELWYN C. SMITH. 
Miss JULIA E. BURNHAM. 
Miss ELSIE H. SIMONDS. 



Teacher of Home Economics. 

Miss MEREDITH PEIRCE. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL TRAINING. 

GEORGE S. CHAMBERLAIN. | Miss ESTELLE M. HARRIS. 

Miss LENNA D. SWINERTON. 



DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC. 
EDWIN L. GARDINER. 



Miss FREDA A. BLACK. 
Miss HELEN M. ABBOTT. 
Miss MARY E. BURBECK. 
JOHN F. HARTWELL. 



Miss ALVERA C. GUSTAFSON. 
Miss BLANCHE A. BARDIN. 
Miss MABEL A. STARBIRD, Voice. 



DEPARTMENT OF MANUAL TRAINING. 



Boys' Section. 
JULIAN H. MABEY. 
ELWYN C. SMITH. 
Miss MARY B. KNOWLTON, Sloyd. 



Girls' Section. 
Miss FRANCES :SI. LANGWORTHY. 
Miss M. ELIZABETH ROBBINS. 
Miss MARIAN E. CHAMBERLAIN. 
Miss ELIZABETH O. PIERCE. 



DEPARTMENT OF TUNING PIANOFOETES. 

ELWYN H. FOWLER, Manager and Instructor. 



LIBRARIANS, CLERKS AND BOOKKEEPERS. 



Misa LAURA M. SAWYER, Librarian. 
Miss HARRIET E. BOSWORTH, 

Assistant. 
Miss ANNA GARDNER FISH, Clerk. 

Mrs. SARAH A. STOVER, Treasurer for the Ladies' Auxiliary Society. 



Miss ELLEN THOMPSON, Assistant. 
Miss MAI L. LELAND, Bookkeeper. 
Miss WINIFRED F. LELAND, Assistant. 



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 

OSCAR S. CREELEY, M.D., Attending Physician. 

HENRY HAWKINS, M.D., Ophthalmologist. 

HAROLD B. CHANDLER, M.D., Assistant Ophthalmologist. 

ARTHUR WILLARD FAIRBANKS, M.D., Pediatrician. 

HOWARD ARTHUR LANE, D.M.D., Attending Dentist for the Institution. 

REINHOLD RUELBERG, D.M.D., Attending Dentist for the Kindergarten. 



DOMESTIC DEPARTMENT. 

FREDERICK A. FLANDERS, Steward. 



Housekeepers in the Cottages. 



Boys' Section. 
Miss CLARISSA A. DAWSON. 
Mrs. JOSEPHINE H. MANSUR. 
Miss LUCY B. GETCHELL. 
Mrs. FANNIE L. HEAD. 



Girls' Section. 
Mrs. ISABELLA P. HEARD. 
Mrs. CORA L. GLEASON. 
Mrs. M. M. EASTMAN, Substitute. 
Mrs. AGNES C. LUMMUS. 
Mrs. BERTHA C. MAXWELL. 



PRINTING DEPARTMENT. 

FRANK C. BRYAN, Manager. 
Mrs. MARTHA A. TITUS, Printer. I Miss MARY L. TULLY, Printer. 



WORKSHOP FOR ADULTS. 

FRANK C. BRYAN, Manager. 
Miss EVA C. ROBBINS, Clerk. 



TEACHERS AND OFFICERS OF THE LOWER SCHOOL. 
KINDERGABTEN. 



Boys' Section. 

Miss Nettie B. Vose, Matron. 
Mrs. Emma H. McCraith, Assistant. 
Miss Carolyn M. Burrell, Kindergartner . 
Miss L. Henrietta Stratton, Teacher. 
Miss Sadie Turner, Teacher. 



Girls' Section. 

Mrs. J. M. Hill, Matron. 
Miss Cornelia M. Lorinq. Assistant. 
Miss W. R. Humbert, Kindergartner. 
Miss Alice M. Lane, Teacher. 



Miss Louise E. Spencer, Music Teacher. 

Miss Margaret McKenzie, Teacher of Manual Training. 

Miss Lenna D. Swinerton, Assistant in Corrective Gymnastics. 

Miss Eleanor E. Kelly, Field Worker. 

Miss Kathryn E. MAXtiELO, Psychologist. 



PRIMARY DEPARTMENT. 
Boys' Section. 



Miss Margaret F. Hughes, Matron. 
Miss Jane J. Walsh, Assistant. 
Miss Reba M. Sawyer, Teacher. 



Miss Ida E. Stratton, Teacher. 

Miss Minnie C. Tucker, Music Teacher. 

Miss Rosalind L. Houghton, Sloyd. 



Miss ViNNiE F. FoRBUSH, Teacher to Deaf-Blind Pupil. 



Miss Ada S. Bartlett, Matron. 
Miss S. M. Chandler, Assistant. 
Miss Bertha M. Buck, Teacher. 



Girls' Section. 



Miss Lizzie R. Kinsman, Teacher. 
Miss Naomi K. Gring, Music Teacher. 
Miss Gerda L. Wahlberg, Sloyd. 



LADIES' VISITING COMMITTEE TO THE KINDERGARTEN. 

Mrs. John Chipman Gray, President. 
Miss Annie C. Warren, Vice-President. 
Miss Eleanor S. Parker, Secretary. 



Mrs. John Chipman Gray, . January. 
Mrs. Harold J. Coolidge, . February. 
Mrs. T. H. Cabot, . . . March. 
Miss Annie C. Warren, .1 
Mrs. John B. Thomas, . . J ^ ' 
Miss Ellen Bullard, . . May. 



Mrs. Ronald Lyman, 
Mrs. Roger B. Merriman, 
Mrs. George H. Monks, 
Mrs. E. Preble Motley, 
Miss Alice Sargent, 



June. 

October. 

November. 

December, 



General Visitors. 

Miss Eleanor S. Parker. 
Miss Elizabeth G. Norton. 
Mrs. Larz Anderson. 
Mrs. William R. Livermore. 



Honoraxy Members. 

Mrs. Kingsmill Marrs. 
Mrs. Maud Howe Elliott. 



MEMBERS OF THE CORPORATION. 



Abbot, Mrs, M. T., Cambridge. 
Adams, Melvin O., Boston. 
Ahl, Mrs. Daniel, Boston. 
Allen, Edward E., Watertown. 
Allen, Mrs. Edward E., Water- 
town. 
Angier, Mrs. George, Newton. 
Appleton, Hon. Francis Henry, 

Peabody. 
Appleton, Francis Henry, Jr., 

Boston. 
Appleton, Mrs. Francis Henry, 

Jr., Boston. 
Appleton, Dr. William, Boston. 
Atherton, Mrs. Caroline S., Grove 

Hall. 
Bacon, Caspar G., Jamaica Plain. 
Baldwin, S. E., New Haven, 

Conn. 
Ballantine, Arthur A., Boston. 
Bancroft, Miss Eleanor C, 

Beverly. 
Barbour, Edmund D., Boston. 
Bartlett, Miss Mary F., Boston. 
Baylies, Walter C, Boston. 
Baylies, Mrs. Walter C, Boston. 
Beach, Rev. D. N., Bangor, Me. 
Beatley, Mrs. Clara B., Boston. 
Beebe, E. Pierson, Boston. 
Benedict, Wm. Leonard, New 

York. 
Bennett, Miss Gazella, Worcester. 
Black, George N., Boston. 
Blake, George F., Worcester. 
Blunt, Col. S. E., Springfield. 



Boardman, Mrs. E. A., Boston. 

Bourn, Hon. A. 0., Providence, 
R. I. 

Bowditch, IngersoU, Boston. 

Bremer, S. Parker, Boston. 

Brigham, Charles, Watertown. 

Brooke, Rev. S. W., London. 

Brooks, Gorham, Boston. 

Brooks, Peter C, Boston. 

Brooks, Shepherd, Boston. 

Brj^ant, Mrs. A. B. M., Boston. 

Bullock, Col. A. G., Worcester. 

Burditt, Miss Alice A., Boston. 

Burnham, Miss Julia E., Lowell. 

Burnham, William A., Boston. 

Burr, I. Tucker, Jr., Boston. 

Callahan, Miss Mary G., Boston. 

Callender, Walter, Providence, 
R.I. 

Camp, Rev. Edward C, Water- 
town. 

Carter, Mrs. J. W., West Newton. 

Gary, Miss Ellen G., Boston. 

Chace, J. H., Valley Falls, R. L 

Chapin, Edward P., Andover. 

Clement, Edward H., Concord. 

Colt, Samuel P., Bristol, R. L 

Cook, Charles T., Detroit, Mich. 

Cook, Mrs. C. T., Detroit, Mich. 

Coolidge, Francis L., Boston. 

Coolidge, J. Randolph, Boston. 

Coolidge, Mrs. J. R., Boston. 

Coolidge, T. Jefferson, Boston. 

Cotting, Charles E., Jr., Boston. 

Crane, Zenas M., Pittsfield. 



Crosby, Sumner, Brookline. 

Crosby, William S., Brookline. 

Crowninshield, Francis B., Bos- 
ton. 

Cunningham, Mrs. Henry V., 
Boston. 

Curtis, Mrs. Greeley S., Boston. 

Curtis, Horatio G., Boston. 

Curtis, Mrs. Horatio G., Boston. 

Curtis, James F., Boston. 

Cutler, George C, Jr., Boston. 

Dabney, George B., Boston. 

Dalton, Mrs. C. H., Boston. 

Damon, Willard A., Springfield. 

Davies, Rt. Rev. Thomas F., 
Springfield. 

Davis, Charles S., Boston. 

Davis, Livingston, Milton. 

Day, Mrs. Frank A., Newton. 

Dewey, Francis H., Worcester. 

De Witt, Alexander, Worcester. 

Dexter, Mrs. F. G., Boston. 

Dexter, Miss Rose L., Boston. 

Dillaway, W. E. L., Boston. 

Dolan, William G., Boston. 

Draper, George A., Boston. 

Drew, Edward B., Cambridge. 

Duryea, Mrs. Herman, New York. 

Eliot, Rev. C. R., Boston. 

Elliott, Mrs Maud Howe, Boston. 

Ellis, George H., Boston. 

Ely, Adolph C, Watertown. 

Endicott, Henry, Boston. 

Endicott, William, Boston. 

Endicott, William C, Boston. 

Evans, Mrs. Glendower, Boston. 

Everett, Dr. Oliver H., Worcester. 

Fanning, David H., Worcester. 

Faulkner, Miss F. M., Boston. 

Fay, Mrs. Dudley B., Boston. 

Fay, Henry H., Boston. 

Faj-^, Mrs. Henry H., Boston. 

Fay, Miss Rosamond, Boston. 



Fay, Miss Sarah B., Boston. 

Fay, ISIiss S. M., Boston. 

Fay, Thomas J., Boston. 

Fay, Wm. Rodman, Dover, N. H. 

Fenno, Mrs. L. C, Boston. 

Fisher, Miss Annie E., Boston. 

Fiske, Mrs. Mary Duncan, Bos- 
ton. 

Fitz, Mrs. W. Scott, Boston. 

Ford, Lawrence A., Boston. 

Foster, Mrs. Francis C, Cam- 
bridge. 

Freeman, Miss H. E., Boston, 

Frothingham, Rev. P. R., Boston. 

Fuller, George F., Worcester. 

Fuller, Mrs. Samuel R., Boston. 

Gage, Mrs. Homer, Shrewsbury. 

Gale, Lyman W., Boston, 

Gammans, Hon. G. H,, Boston, 

Gardiner, Robert H., Boston. 

Gardiner, Robert H., Jr., Need- 
ham. 

Gardner, George P., Boston. 

Gardner, Mrs. John L., Boston. 

Gaskill, George A., Worcester. 

Gaskins, Frederick A., Milton. 

Gaylord, Emerson G., Chicopee. 

Geer, Mrs. Danforth, Jr., New 
York. 

George, Charles H., Providence, 
R. I. 

Gilbert, Wm. E., Springfield. 

Gleason, Mrs. Cora L., Water- 
town. 

Gleason, Sidney, Medford. 

Glidden, W. T., Brookline. 

Goddard, Harry W., Worcester. 

Goff, Darius L., Pawtucket, R. I. 

Goff, Lyman B., Pawtucket, R. I. 

Goldthwait, Mrs. John, Boston. 

Gooding, Rev. A., Portsmouth, 
N. H. 

Gordon, Rev. G. A., D.D., Boston. 



Gray, Roland, Boston. 

Green, Charles G., Cambridge. 

Gregg, Richard B., Boston. 

Grew, Edward W., Boston. 

Griffin, S. B., Springfield. 

Griswold, Merrill, Cambridge. 

Hall, Mrs. Florence Howe, New 
York. 

Hall, Miss Minna B., Longwood. 

Hallowell, John W., Boston. 

Hallowell, Robert H., Boston. 

Hammond, Mrs. G. G., Boston. 

Haskell, Mrs. E. B., Auburndale. 

Hemenway, Mrs. Augustus, Bos- 
ton. 

Higginson, F. L., Jr., Boston. 

Higginson, Mrs. Henry L., Bos- 
ton. 

Hill, Arthur D., Boston. 

Hill, Dr. A. S., Somerville. 

Holmes, Charles W., Toronto, 
Ont. 

Homans, Robert, Boston. 

Howe, Henry Marion, New York. 

Howe, Henry S., Brookline. 

Howe, James G., Milton. 

Howes, Miss Edith M., Brookline. 

Howland, Mrs. 0. 0., Boston. 

Hurmewell, Mrs. H. S., Boston. 

Hunnewell, Walter, Jr., Boston. 

Hutchins, Mrs. C. F., Boston. 

lasigi. Miss Mary V., Boston. 

Ingraham, Mrs. E. T., Wellesley. 

Isdahl, Mrs. C. B., California. 

Jackson, Charles C, Boston. 

James, Mrs. C. D., Brookline. 

Jenks, Miss C. E., Bedford. 

Johnson, Edward C, Boston. 

Johnson, Rev. H. S., Boston. 

Joy, Mrs. Charles H., Boston. 

Kasson, Rev. F. H., Boston. 

Kellogg, Mrs. Eva D., Boston. 

Kendall, Miss H. W., Boston. 



Kidder, Mrs. Henry P., Boston. 

Kilham, Miss Annie M., Beverly. 

Kihner, Frederick M., Water- 
town. 

Kimball, Mrs. David P., Boston. 

Kimball, Edward P., Maiden. 

King, Mrs. Tarrant Putnam, Mil- 
ton. 

Kinnicutt, Lincoln N., Worcester. 

Knapp, George B., Boston. 

Knowlton, Daniel S., Boston. 

Kramer, Henry C, Boston. 

Lamb, Mrs. Annie L., Boston. 

Lang, Mrs. B. J., Boston. 

Latimer, Mrs. Grace G., Boston. 

Lawrence, Mrs. A. A., Boston. 

Lawrence, Mrs. James, Groton. 

Lawrence, John Silsbee, Boston. 

Lawrence, Rt. Rev. Wm., Boston. 

Ley, Harold A., Springfield. 

Lincoln, L. J. B., Hingham. 

Lincohi, Waldo, Worcester. 

Littell, Miss Harriet A., Boston. 

Lodge, Hon. Henry C, Nahant. 

Logan, Hon. James, Worcester. 

Longfellow, Miss Alice M., Cam- 
bridge. 

Lord, Rev. A. M., Providence, 
R. L 

Loring, Miss Katharine P., Prides 
Crossing. 

Loring, Miss Louisa P., Prides 
Crossing. 

Loring, Mrs. Wm. Caleb, Boston. 

Lothrop, John, Auburndale. 

Lothrop, Mrs. T. K., Boston. 

Loud, Charles E., Boston. 

Lovering, Mrs. C. T., Boston. 

Lovering, Richard S., Boston. 

Lowell, Abbott Lawrence, Cam- 
bridge. 

Lowell, Miss Amy, Brookline. 

Lowell, Miss Georgina, Boston. 



Lowell, James A., Boston. 

Lowell, John, Chestnut Hill. 

Lowell, Miss Lucy, Boston. 

Luce, Hon. Robert, Waltham. 

Marrett, Miss H. M., Standish, 
Me. 

Marrs, Mrs. Kingsmill, Boston. 

Mason, Charles F., Watertown. 

Mason, Miss Ellen F., Boston. 

Mason, Miss Ida M., Boston. 

McElwain, R. Franklin, Holyoke. 

Merriman, Mrs. D., Boston. 

Merritt, Edward P., Boston. 

Meyer, Mrs. G. von L., Boston. 

INIinot, the Misses, Boston. 

Minot, J. Grafton, Boston. 

Minot, William, Boston. 

Monks, Mrs. George H., Boston. 

Morgan, Eustis P., Saco, Me. 

Morgan, Mrs. Eustis P., Saco, Me. 

Morison, Mrs. John H., Boston. 

Morse, Mrs. Leopold, Boston. 

Morse, Miss Margaret F., Jamaica 
Plain. 

Moseley, Charles H., Boston. 

Motley, Mrs. E. Preble, Boston. 

Motley, Warren, Boston. 

Norcross, Grenville H., Boston. 

Norcross, Mrs. Otis, Boston. 

Noyes, Mrs. Lucia C, Jamaica 
Plain. 

Oliver, Dr. Henry K., Boston. 

Osgood, Mrs. E. L., Hopedale. 

Osgood, Miss Fanny D., Hope- 
dale. 

Parker, W. Prentiss, Boston. 

Parker, W. Stanley, Boston. 

Partridge, Fred F., Holyoke. 

Peabody, Rev. Endicott, Groton. 

Peabody, Frederick W., Boston. 

Peabody, Harold, Boston. 

Peabody, Philip G., Boston. 

Peabody, W. Rodman, Boston. 



Perkins, Charles Bruen, Boston. 

Perkins, Mrs. C. E., Boston. 

Phillips, Mrs. John C, Boston. 

Pickering, Henry G., Boston. 

Pickman, D. L., Boston. 

Pickman, Mrs. D. L., Boston. 

Pierce, Mrs. M. V., Milton. 

Plunkett, W. P., Adams. 

Pope, Mrs. A. A., Boston. 

Poulsson, Miss Emilie, Boston. 

Powers, Mrs. H. H., Newton. 

Pratt, George Dwight, Spring- 
field. 

Prendergast, J. M., Boston. 

Proctor, James H., Boston. 

Putnam, F. Delano, Boston. 

Putnam, Mrs. James J., Boston. 

Rantoul, Neal, Boston. 

Rantoul, Robert S., Salem. 

Read, Mrs. Robert M., Medford. 

Reed, Mrs. Wm. Howell, Boston. 

Remick, Frank W., West Newton. 

Rice, John C, Boston. 

Richards, Miss Elise, Boston. 

Richards, George H., Boston. 

Richards, Mrs. H., Gardiner, Me. 

Richards, Henry H., Groton. 

Richardson, John, Boston. 

Richardson, John, Jr., Readville. 

Richardson, Mrs. John, Jr., Read- 
ville. 

Richardson, Miss M. G., New 
York. 

Richardson, Mrs. M. R., Boston. 

Richardson, W. L., M.D., Boston. 

Roberts, Mrs. A. W., AUston. 

Robinson, George F., Watertown. 

Rogers, Miss A. P., Boston. 

Rogers, Miss Flora E., New York. 

Rogers, Henry M., Boston. 

Ropes, Mrs. Joseph A., Boston. 

Russell, Otis T., Boston. 

Russell, Mrs. Robert S., Boston. 



10 



Russell, Mrs. W. A., Boston. 
Russell, Wm. Eustis, Boston. 
Saltonstall, Leverett, Westwood. 
Saltonstall, Mrs. Leverett, West- 
wood. 
Saltonstall, Richard M., Boston. 
Schaff, Capt. Morris, Cambridge. 
Sears, Mrs. Rnj^v^et W., Boston. 
Sears, WiUard T., Boston. 
Shattuck, Henry Lee, Boston. 
Shaw, Bartlett M., Watertown. 
Shaw, Mrs. G. Howland, Boston. 
Shaw, Henry S., Boston. 
Shepard, Harvey N., Boston. 
Slater, Mrs. H. N., Boston. 
Smith, Joel West, East Hampton, 

Conn. 
Snow, Walter B., Watertown. 
Sohier, Miss Emily L., Boston. 
Sohier, Miss M. D., Boston. 

Sorchan, Mrs. Victor, New York. 

Sprague, F. P., M.D., Boston. 

Stanwood, Edward, Brookline. 

Stearns, Charles H., Brookline. 

Stearns, Mrs. Charles H., Brook- 
line. 

Stearns, Wm. B., Boston. 

Stevens, Miss C. A., New York. 

Sturgis, Francis S., Boston. 

Sturgis, R. Clipston, Boston. 

Thayer, Charles M., Worcester. 

Thayer, Rev. G. A., Cincinnati, 0. 

Thayer, Mrs. Nathaniel, Boston. 

Thorndike, Albert, Boston. 

Thorndike, Miss Rosanna D., 
Boston. 

Tifft, Eliphalet T., Springfield. 

Tilden, Miss Alice Foster, Milton. 

Tilden, Miss Edith S., I^Iilton. 



Tingley, S. H., Providence, R. L 
Tuckerman, Mrs. C. S., Boston. 
Tufts, John F., Watertown. 
Underwood, Herbert S., Boston. 
Underwood, Wm. Ljmian, Bel- 
mont. 
Villard, Mrs. Henry, New York. 
Wallace, Andrew B., Springfield. 
Ware, Miss Mary L., Boston. 
Warren, J. G., Providence, R. I. 
Washburn, Hon. Charles G., 

Worcester. 
Washburn, Mrs. Frederick A., 

Boston. 
Waters, H. Goodman, Springfield. 
Watson, Thomas A., Boston. 
Watson, Mrs. T. A., Boston. 
Wendell, William G., Boston. 

Wesson, J. L., Boston. 

West, George S., Boston 

Wheelock, Miss Lucy, Boston. 

White, George A., Boston. 

Whitney, Henry M., Brookline. 

Wiggins, Charles, 2d, Cambridge. 

Williams, Mrs. H. C, Framing- 
ham. 

Winsor, Mrs. E., Chestnut Hill. 

Winsor, James B., Providence, 
R. L 

Winsor, Robert, Jr., Boston. 

Winthrop, Mrs. Thomas L., Bos- 
ton. 

Wolcott, Roger, Boston. 

Wright, Burton H., Worcester. 

Wright, George S., Watertown. 

Young, Mrs. Benjamin L., Bos- 
ton. 

Young, B. Loring, Weston. 



11 



SYNOPSIS OF THE PROCEEDINGS 



ANNUAL MEETING OF THE COEPOEATION. 



Watbrtown, October 8, 1919. 

The annual meeting of the corporation, duly summoned, 
was held to-day at the institution, and was called to order 
by the president, Hon. Francis Henry Appleton, at 3 p.m. 

The proceedings of the last meeting were read and ap- 
proved. 

The annual report of the trustees was accepted and or- 
dered to be printed, together with the usual accompanying 
documents. 

The report of the treasurer was accepted and ordered on 
file. 

Voted, That acts and expenditures, made and authorized by the 
Board of Trustees, or by any committee appointed by said Board of 
Trustees, during the corporate year closed this day, be and are hereby 
ratified and confirmed. 

The corporation then proceeded to ballot for officers for 
the ensuing year, and the following persons were unani- 
mously elected : — 

President. — Hon. Francis Henry Appleton. 

Vice-President. — George H. Richards. 

Treasurer. — Albert Thorndike. 

12 



Secretary. — Edward E. Allen. 

Trustees. — Mrs. George Angier, Francis Henry Appleton, 
William Endicott, Robert H. Hallowell, James A. Lowell, 
George H. Richards, and Richard M. Saltonstall. 

Voted, To authorize the Trustees to fill any vacancy on their 
Board. 

The following persons were unanimously elected members 
of the corporation: — Mr. Harry G. Fisk,^ Mr. William E. 
Gilbert, Mr. Willard A. Damon, Rt. Rev. Thomas F. Davies, 
Mr. Emerson G. Gaylord, Mr. Fred F. Partridge, I\Ir. George 
B. McCallum,^ Mr. R. Franklin McElwain, ]\Ir. Charles M. 
Thayer, Mr. Harry W. Goddard, Mr. George A. Gaskill, Mr. 
Burton H. Wright and Mr. George F. Blake. 

The meeting then adjourned. 

EDWARD E. ALLEN, 

Secretary. 

> Declined the election. 



13 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES. 



Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind, 
Watertown, October 8, 1919. 

Ladies and Gentlemen : — As reported last year, 
the institution reopened in September, 1918, with 
fewer pupils than usual. Two of its men teachers 
were absent in government service. For this double 
reason only three of the four boys' families of the 
upper school were run, the teachers of Tompkins 
Cottage and a few of the older boys keeping their 
rooms but going to the other cottages for meals. 
This arrangement answered very well because every- 
body, especially the three matrons affected, accepted 
the extra work in good spirit in spite of the anoma- 
lous situation of the servant question. As to this, 
most of the institution families were and still are 
inconvenienced but would have been much more 
troubled had we not built for group living in house- 
holds planned to further the participation in house- 
work by every member. The helpfulness of every one 
this past year cannot be too highly commended. 

In the absence on leave of Mr. Molter, Miss Jessica 
L. Langworthy acted as principal teacher to the boys 
and met her responsibilities splendidly. Indeed, all 

14 



departments of the institution were running well 
when, in October, the plague of influenza fell upon 
Watertown. But, though strict rules were quickly 
put in force against street-car riding or going into 
crowds — to church or even for a period to classes 
— and though the pupils were kept out of doors 
walking, rowing, playing, and competing in field 
sports and going off on long or short tramps, one 
after another of both pupils and staff succumbed 
until, within the three months affected, over one- 
third of the entire institution had had the malady, 
most of them fortunately in mild form. But two 
died, a pupil, Ellen Thwaites, at an outside hos- 
pital, and a teacher. Miss Inez Swenson, at the in- 
stitution, both of pneumonia. Special nurses relieved 
the cottage matrons as far as possible. Because of 
this epidemic the usual Christmas holiday period was 
extended to three weeks, the school singing its Christ- 
mas Carols in January. By February most things 
were again normal, and a good day brought a very 
large number of visitors to the Washington's Birth- 
day exhibition, held by custom every year at the 
Perkins Institution. In April Miss Langworthy and 
her boys presented "The Tempest," a Shakesperian 
play being another annual event, as are the Christ- 
mas Carols and the annual concert. The Director 
and staff of teachers felt that by the close of the 
academic year in June the school had practically 
caught up with its routine work and that the classes 
could justly be promoted. One boy and two girls 



15 



were graduated with high school diplomas, and two 
girls with certificates as piano teachers. 

One of the most beneficent special gifts that has 
come to our institution in recent years is the Maria 
Kemble Oliver Fund, the income of which is utilized 
for the purchase of tickets to certain concerts and 
recitals. This gives to our advanced music students 
an added opportunity to hear fine music splendidly 
interpreted, an opportunity which cannot fail to be 
broadening in effect and educational in value. Dur- 
ing the past year this fund has provided for a total 
number of 382 tickets for symphony concerts, for the 
Sunday afternoon concerts and recitals at Symphony 
Hall and for such special musical events as recitals 
by Harold Bauer and the Flonzaley Quartet, and the 
oratorios by the Handel and Haydn Society. 

The continued success of the placement agent of 
the Massachusetts Commission for the Blind in plac- 
ing with employers pupils trained at the institution 
is most gratifying. Her success obviously means that 
she has been careful in the choice of both work and 
worker; but it also means that these pupils have been 
well trained, especially in the fundamentals, one of 
which is the English language. A field into which 
the blind are entering is that of typists in offices where 
the dictaphone is in use. Fourteen of our graduates, 
mostly girls, are now so employed, and it is a fact 
that nearly every one of these made good from the 
start. The well-trained blind who have good per- 
sonalities usually have this advantage over the aver- 



16 



age wage-earner, — they know well what they know 
and they realize that they cannot afford to fail. Em- 
ployers wishing dependable assistants might well find 
them also among the physically handicapped, for a 
handicap often tends to strengthen, to deepen and 
to stabilize. 

Within the year the Massachusetts Civil Service 
Commission has admitted the blind to examination 
as dictaphone typists. This fact has profoundly 
affected the institution's viewpoint in teaching type- 
writing. It is now taught vocationally instead of 
avocationally, as heretofore. Even so, having bhnd 
pupils finish up with a short intensive course at a 
business school is almost imperative, the competing 
on equal terms with seeing students giving the ad- 
vanced student who is blind something which the 
institution can rarely supply. As a matter of fact, 
most of the typists above referred to were no longer 
our pupils and were given such a course by the Massa- 
chusetts Commission for the Blind; but we sent one 
pupil daily from Watertown. 

Fifteen of our former pupils are regularly employed 
by the Commission — not to give work to blind peo- 
ple but to get it done in the best manner. In certain 
fields the handicap becomes an asset. We are refer- 
ring here particularly to those who are employed on 
its staff as field agents, investigators, home teachers, 
and the like. One who until last year was employed 
there as head of the employment work for men is 
to-day director of the new Canadian National Insti- 



17 



tute for the Blind, with central office at Toronto. 
Two other Perkins ex-pupils are working under him, 
one of them having left for field work among the adult 
blind a good position as teacher of tuning in a school 
for the young blind. The former pupil who has been 
giving courses of lectures to women wishing to do 
social service among the blind has had her success 
recognized by a public luncheon given her at the 
Boston Woman's City Club. Another, a young 
woman of exceptional ability who has developed a 
gift in the use of spoken language, is conducting in 
different cities classes in current events. Another of 
our recent graduates, whom we sent daily for a year 
from Watertown to the Boston School for Social 
Work, has since risen to local prominence in the 
American Red Cross. 

A Perkins graduate of the class of 1883, who died 
last year, led so serviceable a life as a masseuse and 
physical therapeutist that the late Dr. James J. Put- 
nam of Boston, specialist in nervous disorders, pub- 
lished a remarkable tribute to her in the "Boston 
Medical and Surgical Journal" for October 31, 1918. 
Last June Amherst College conferred upon another 
graduate, a member of our class of 1890, the honorary 
degree of A.M. in recognition of his continued success 
as lecturer and writer. 

One of our lads who has been attending the Water- 
town High School was graduated in June a close 
second in his class of 80, and has now matriculated at 
Boston University, having won a scholarship through 

18 



the Augustus Howe Buck Beneficiary Fund, which 
may be held for eight years, — four of college, two of 
graduate study, and two of travel. He will have to 
maintain a certain standing to keep this scholarship. 
There is another lad of nineteen still at the institu- 
tion whose motive for making good is so strong 
that every one he meets wants to help him. One of 
his assets is a winning personality. Having spent 
his last Easter vacation rebottoming chairs at a 
nearby sanatorium, he was invited to spend his sum- 
mer there renovating mattresses, to the learning of 
which trade he had given his previous summer. He 
accepted, earned his keep and a good wage and is 
now back at school again, a far more self-respecting 
young man than if he had permitted others to care for 
him during vacations. He is a Korean, sent to Per- 
kins from Hawaii. He w^ill eventually return home 
having acquired the habit of success. A Perkins 
graduate of standing in the middle west, who both 
while a pupil and since as a teacher, has been a living 
inspiration to others, has now been one of several to be 
chosen for this very reason to become a part of the 
environment of the blinded soldiers at the Red Cross 
Institute for the Blind, Baltimore. He and three 
other examples of the successful blind are there to-day 
perhaps as a result of the public appearance in this 
country last fall of Sir Arthur Pearson and the proof 
to thousands which he gave in his own person that 
blindness may achieve some things which even sight 
seems unable to do. 



19 



It is a mistake to be amazed at such achievements. 
Few people do so well that they might not do better. 
What wonder then that those blind who have the 
motive to overcome a natural inertia should excel 
those of their seeing brothers and sisters who have 
not. Very many more of the blind would develop 
sufficient motive to make good than do were there a 
truly sympathetic understanding between them and 
people in general. 

The above are instances of what blind people from 
anywhere can accomplish if they but will it and go 
at it in the right way. Every school can point to 
similar successes. But there has been — there still 
is — a real prejudice against employing handicapped 
people. Many, perhaps most of those who are handi- 
capped by blindness, never succeed in overcoming 
that prejudice but accept it as insuperable. We are 
assured, however, that employers are more willing 
now to make trial of the blind in industry than ever 
before, and so we feel that out of the great evil of 
the war will come good to the general cause of the 
blind. It is for this reason that we watch with anxious 
hope the reconstruction work now being done for the 
war-blinded at Baltimore and elsewhere, knowing well 
that its success in the cases of these comparatively 
few will enlarge and extend the fields of employment 
now open to the blind in general and so make for the 
happiness of the many thousands whose bhndness 
should also be considered a public responsibility. 
Some permanentjnstitute or agency wisely run under 



20 



national auspices for trying out new, old or even 
abandoned fields and for fitting the civilian blind to 
enter them, also for persuading employers to hire 
them without prejudice — something of this sort the 
schools for the young blind, which are mainly pre- 
vocational in aim, would welcome as a much-needed 
adjunct to their work. 

We commented last year on the practical activities 
of the officers, teachers and pupils of our school for 
the blind in patriotically doing their part to help the 
government finance the war. The amounts sub- 
scribed this year again to the Thrift Stamp, Red 
Cross, Liberty and Victory Loan campaigns are very 
gratifying. 

Mr. Harold Molter, the boys' excellent and de- 
voted principal teacher for the past five years, re- 
signed last August in the spirit of continued duty to 
the war-blinded. We were as sorry to lose him as 
he was to go. To his place our Miss Jessica L. 
Langworthy has been deservedly promoted. Miss 
Louise P. Hunt, who was our faithful and accurate 
circulation librarian for ten years, has now left this 
for other work, and another Simmons College gradu- 
ate, Miss Harriet E. Bosworth, has been installed in 
her stead. 

Miss Julia A. Boylan, whose connection with the 
institution, as pupil and teacher, was perhaps longer 
than that of any person now living, felt obliged on 
account of failing strength to sever this connection 
last summer. Miss Boylan's character and attain- 

21 



ments made her a marked figure in the life of the 
school. Her self -development was so remarkable and 
her influence for high thinking and noble living was 
so vital that we expect later to have her story written 
up as a matter of record and of inspiration. 

The Centenary of the birth of Julia Ward Howe 
fell on May 27, 1919. The institution marked the 
occasion with private exercises. But the connection 
of this remarkable woman with the Perkins Institu- 
tion was publicly recognized by the church in Boston 
of which she was a member by making Mr. Allen 
chairman of its celebration in her honor, and by in- 
viting a select choir of blind pupils to furnish the 
music. 

Alike to the special reference library on the blind 
and to the teachers' library and round table have 
been added this year many books, pamphlets and 
other documents bearing on the rehabilitation of the 
war-blinded and allied topics. 

The librarian reports that there are 16,001 em- 
bossed books in the school library; that the year's 
school circulation of these books was 5,151 ; and that 
the number sent out to outside readers was 6,857, or 
1,174 more than in the previous year. This outside 
circulation, while smaller than that of several public 
libraries having departments for the blind, is yet by 
far the largest from any school library, as its field 
extends to all states of the United States and its 
possessions. 

This circulation is one of the main uses of the Howe 



22 



Memorial Press Fund, the others being the making of 
books and of appliances and the filling of orders for 
them. A matter for special note here is the recent 
increased output of these appliances for writing in 
the embossed type called Braille. There were 1,724 
''Braille slates" sold at cost or given away this year, 
800 to schools; and during the past two years, 3,091. 
Some went to South America. The manufacture of 
carefully made slates is a great boon alike to the blind 
and to their teachers. Our mechanics are now work- 
ing on an improved typewriter for writing Braille. 

''The Blind," a new and authoritative work on 
"their condition and the work being done for them 
in the United States," has recently been published 
by Macmillan. We welcome the coming of this 
timely and much-needed book. Its author, Dr. Best, 
acknowledges, in his introduction, the help he re- 
ceived from our librarian and from our special col- 
lection of literature on blindness and the bUnd. 

The demand for new and more embossed books 
having increased along with the cost of making them, 
Congress has been induced this year to increase the 
government grant to the American Printing House 
for the BUnd from $10,000 to $50,000. This fact 
seems to promise a new era in book production for 
the blind of this country. 

The Perkins Workshop Department for Adults has 
again carried on its work for the year without direct 
loss to the institution, the sales from this period hav- 
ing been $36,474.97, an increase over the previous 



23 



year of $4,826.51. The twenty blind men and women 
employed were paid $10,404.70, or more by $1,225.45 
than was paid them last year, the increase being due 
to advances in the piecework rate. 

The cost of carrying on the institution has advanced 
abnormally like everything else of late, and we would 
respectfully but urgently beseech the friends of the 
blind to continue giving as they have so nobly done 
in the past. We need additional funds and must get 
them somehow. We have asked and obtained from 
the Permanent Charity Fund timely aid and have 
raised the tuition fee for non-Massachusetts pupils 
from $300 to $350 at the loAver school and to $400 at 
the upper. We have also made a new arrangement 
with the State Board of Education whereby we shall 
receive the definite sum of $300 for each Massachu- 
setts pupil instead of the lump sum we had been ac- 
cepting ever since 1869. 

Causes of Blindness of Pupils admitted during the 
School Year, 1918-1919. — Ophthalmia neonatorum, 
5; Interstitial keratitis, 3; Interstitial keratitis and 
uveitis, 1; Ulcerative keratitis, 2; Injury, 4; Atrophy 
of the optic nerve, 7; Albinism, 1; Congenital am- 
blyopia, 5; Congenital cataracts, 6; Buphthalmos, 
2; Glaucoma, 1; Choroiditis, 3; Central coloboma of 
choroid, 1; Iritis bombe, 1 ; Leucoma, 1; Metastatic 
ophthalmia, 1; Purulent ophthalmia, 1; Hyperme- 
tropia, 1; Corneal ulceration, 2; Astigmatism and 
nystagmus, 1. 



24 



At the beginning of the current year, October 1, 
1919, the number of blind persons registered at the 
Perkins Institution was 310, or seven more than on 
the same date of the previous year. This number 
includes 77 boys and 76 girls in the upper school, 64 
boys and 60 girls in the lower school, 13 teachers and 
officers, and 20 adults in the workshop at South 
Boston. There have been 54 admitted and 47 dis- 
charged during the year. 

Death of Members of the Corporation. 

Mrs. Cora Crowninshield, widow of Charles Boy- 
den; Mrs. Laura L., widow of James Brown Case; 
Alexander Cochrane; Miss Jennie M. Colby; 
Orlando W. Dimick; Carl W. Ernst; Thomas B. 
Fitzpatrick; Mrs. Phebe A. Hearst; Patrick T. 
Jackson; John Parkinson; Frederic H. Robie; 
Miss Marian Russell; Miss Eleanor Salton- 
stall. 

It is with sorrow that we record the loss of a mem- 
ber of our Board of Trustees, Mr. Thomas B. Fitz- 
patrick, who brought to his duties a keen interest in 
all matters pertaining to education and served with 
faithfulness and loyalty in behalf of this institution, 
attending the meetings of the Board and visiting the 
institution in the performance of his duties, and in 
order to become directly acquainted with its per- 
sonnel. 

In the death of Mr. Patrick T. Jackson the Board 



25 



of Trustees recognizes the loss of one always ready to 
help in an emergency, he having served as Treasurer 
pro tempore on several occasions in the place of his 
brother, our former long-time Treasurer, Mr. Edward 
Jackson. 

All which is respectfully submitted by 

ANNIE OILMAN ANGIER, 
FRANCIS HENRY APPLETON, 
WILLIAM ENDICOTT, 
ROSAMOND FAY, 
THOMAS J. FAY, 
PAUL REVERE FROTHINGHAM, 
ROBERT H. HALLOWELL, 
JAMES ARNOLD LOWELL, 
GEORGE H. RICHARDS, 
WILLIAM L. RICHARDSON, 
RICHARD M. SALTONSTALL, 

Trustees. 



26 



ELEVENTH ANNUAL CONCERT 

By the Choir of the Perkins Institution and Massachusetts 
School for the Blind 

In the Assembly Hall of the School at Watertown, 

Tuesday Evening, May 27, 1919, at 8 o'clock. 

Program. 

The Vagabonds, Eaton Faning 

Chorus for Mixed Voices. 

Lelawala, Henry Hadley 

A Legend of Niagara. 

The Nights o' Spring, . Frances McCollin 

A Madrigal for Mixed Voices, 

(a) Robin Adair, Irish Air, " Eileen Aroon " 

(b) Alice, Wliere Art Thou? .... J. Ascher {1829-69) 

(c) My Old Kentucky Home, . . . Stephen C.Foster {1826-6 f^) 

Sonata in C minor, first movement (for the organ), . . Salome 
Mr. Malcolm Cobb (Class of 1918). 

Hiawatha's Wedding-Feast, S. Coleridge-Taylor 

A cantata for tenor solo and chorus with pianoforte accompaniment. 



27 



GRADUATING EXERCISES OF THE PERKINS INSTITU- 
TION AND MASSACHUSETTS SCHOOL 
FOR THE BLIND. 

Tuesday, June 21, 1919, 10.30 a.m. 

Peogram. 
Chorus, The Vagabonds, Eaton Faning 

Essays : 
The Importance of Beginnings 

Haeriet Chamberlain Tuttle. 

Julia Ward Howe, an Inspiration to Students 
Gladys Loraine Stevens. 

Organ, "Marche Religieuse," Gtdbnant 

Roger True Walker. 

Recitation, "A Message to Garcia," .... Elbert Hubbard 

John Cooney. 

Essay, The Development of the Organ 

Roger True Walker. 

Part Song, "A Psalm of Life," Pinsuti 

Girls' Glee Club. 

Address, Rev. Henry McF. B. Ogilby 

Presentation of diplomas and certificates. 

Chorus, "The Twenty-Third Psalm," .... Neidlinger 

Graduates of the Class of 1919. 
Gladys Loraine Stevens. 

Harriet Chamberlain Tuttle. 

Roger True Walker. 

Pianoforte Normal Department. 
Helen May Irwin. Marie Agnes McGill. 

28 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS. 



I. — Acknowledgments for Concerts, Recitals and 

Readings. 

To Major Henry Lee Higginson, through Mr. W- H. 
Brennan, for thirty tickets for the course of symphony con- 
certs in Sanders Theatre, Cambridge. 

To ]\Ir. Edward B. Hill, secretary', for twenty-five 
tickets for one and thirty-seven tickets for another of the 
concerts by the Cecilia Society. 

To Mr. Homer Humphrey, for six tickets for his joint 
recital with Mr. DeVoto. 

To Miss M. L. Ware, for six tickets for a pianoforte 
recital by Miss Virginia Wainwright, assisted by TNIr. Primio 
Montanari, tenor. 

To Mr. H. B. Williams, for sixteen tickets for a violon- 
cello recital by Mr. Alwyn Schroeder; and for three tickets 
for Miss Greta Mason's recital in Jordan Hall. 

To Miss Charlotte Woodruff, for sLx tickets for her 
song recital in Jacob Sleeper Hall. 

To ]\Irs. A. M. Peabody, Miss Mary Haskell, INIiss 
Annie Brown of the Lend a Hand Society, Mrs. J. G. 
Thorp and Ladies of the Red Cross Society, for tickets for 
"Birdland," a lecture-recital by Mr. Edward Avis, bird 
mimic. 

To INIr. Edwin Klahre, for eighteen tickets for his piano- 
forte recital in Jordan Hall. 

29 



To Mrs. S. S. Curry, for tickets for two dramatic read- 
ings at the Curry School of Expression. 

To Mrs. Robert F. Clark, through Miss Annie E. 
Fisher, for an invitation to six pupils to a concert by pupils 
of the South End Music School. 

To IMiss Eleanor Brigham, for twenty tickets to a "Pro- 
gram of Italian Music" by the Junior Practice Club at 
Jordan Hall. 

II. — Acknowledgments for Recitals and Lectures in 

OUR Hall. 

To Prof. Dallas Lore Sharp, for readings from his 
writings. 

To the Rev. M. F. Allbright, for a talk on his experi- 
ences at the front with the 103d Artillery. 

To Mr. William Strong, for a pianoforte recital. 

To Mr. Frank Kalopothakes, for a talk on present-day 
conditions in Greece. 

To Prof. Edward Thompson, for dramatic readings. 

To Miss Alice Allen, for a pianoforte recital. 

To Mr. Arthur F. Sullivan, for a talk on his reclama- 
tion work for the American Red Cross Society. 

To Miss Rena Flardo, for a vocal recital. 

III. — Acknowledgments for Periodicals and News- 

papers. 
American Annals of the Deaf, California News, Christian 
Record (embossed), Christian Register, Colorado Index, Il- 
luminator (embossed), Matilda Zeigler Magazine for the 
Blind (embossed), the Mentor, Michigan Mirror, Ohio 
Chronicle, Our Dumb Animals, The Silent Worker, The 
Theosophical Path, West Virginia Tablet, Woman Citizen. 

30 



IV. — Acknowledgments for Gifts and Services. 

Dr. Henry Hawkins, for professional services. 

Massachusetts Charitable Eye and Ear Infirmary, 
for care and treatment of pupils. 

Mr. Fred M. Blanchard, for a pianoforte and chair. 

]Mr. Wallace L. Pierce, for flowers "in memory of Mr. 
Anagnos." 

Mrs. George H. Monks, for a pair of andirons. 

Mrs. W. B. Wescott, for a knitting machine. 

Mrs. Walter C. Baylies, for a gift of money at Christ- 
mas time. 

Dr. and Mrs. Harry Levy, and Marks Brothers Com- 
pany, for dolls and toys. 

IMrs. David Evans, Masters Robert and Harry Levy, 
the Erema Club, through the Misses Meyers and Selig, and 
the Committee for the Blind, Temple Israel, through Mrs. 
Louis Rosenbaibi, for parties and sociables, and for a sum- 
mer outing for some of our pupils through the latter com- 
mittee. 

;Mrs. RosENBAUM and ^Irs. J. Verner Critchley, for 
clothing. 

Mr. John P. Cambridge, for plants. 

Mrs. L. M. Young and Dr. W. D. Inglis, for fruit and 
confectionery. 

Mr. A. F. Salmon, for books and a spelling board. 



31 



LIST OF PUPILS AT THE UPPER SCHOOL. 



Adomaitis, Elsie. 
Benoit, Josephine. 
Bessette, Vedora. 
Blake, Clarissa H. 
Bolton, Gladys M. 
Boone, Florence M. 
Bosma, Gelske. 
Brooks, Madeline D. 
Brown, Dorothy M. 
Butler, Alice May. 
Byrne, Genevieve. 
Clancy, Elizabeth. 
Cohen, Ruth. 
Collins, Veronica. 
Connors, Margaret. 
Davenport, Anna A. 
Davis, Ruth M. 
Doucha, Armen. 
Dufresne, Irene. 
Dunn, Mary C. 
Elliott, Ethel S. 
Evans, Lillian M. 
Farnsworth, Esther M. 
Fiske, Dorothy T. 
Flynn, Marie E. 
Galvin, Margaret L. 
Gilbert, Eva V. 
Girouard, Blanche. 
Graham, Marguerite A. 
Guild, Bertha H. 
Guiney, Julia. 
Hall, Jane A. 
Hallock, Flora B. 
Hanley, Mary. 



Hilton, Charlotte. 
Hinckley, Dorothy M. 
lazzetti, Emma I. 
Irwin, Helen M. 
Lagerstrom, Ellen M. 
Lanoue, Edna. 
Leppanen, Mary. 
L'Heureux, Juhette. 
Linscott, Jennie M. 
MacPherson, Mary H. 
Malatesta, Mary. 
Marceau, Yvonne. 
Matthews, Edith M. 
McMeekin, Jennie. 
Menard, Angelina. 
Miles, Mildred C. 
Minutti, Desaleina. 
Montgomery, Ethel A. 
Najarian, Nevart. 
Noonan, M. Loretta. 
Olsen, Mabel T. 
O'Neil, Annie. 
O'Neil, Charlotte. 
Perault, Yvonne A. 
Person, Erine A. 
Poirier, Delina M. 
Pond, Flora E. 
Powers, Dorothy. 
Rollins, Mary L. 
Ross, Lena. 
Rousseau, Lillian. 
Samson, Bertha. 
Samson, Rose Mary. 
Shea, Mary Ellen. 



32 



Stevens, Gladys L. 
Terry, Annie B. 
Thebeau, Marie. 
Tuttle, Harriet C. 
Uhrig, Mary G. 
Weathers, Dorothy. 
Willey, Dorothy E. 
Wilson, Ruth Edris. 
Antonucci, Alberto. 
Beavon, Burton. 
Blair, Herman A. 
Caisse, George T. 
Childers, Lemuel J. 
Cobb, Malcolm L. 
Conley, Edward. 
Cooney, John. 
Cornelissen, Henry L. 
Craig, Edward J. 
Cushman, Ralph. 
Donovan, Kenneth J. 
Dugal, J. Ernest. 
Durfee, Sidney B. 
Eastwood, Thomas J. 
Evans, Frederic P. 
Fenton, Walter F. 
Ferguson, Milton W. 
Ferron, Homer. 
Fournier, Eugene. 
Friberg, Ina J. 
Fulton, James. 
Gagnon, Albert. 
Goguen, Raoul. 
Gould, Francis E. 
Gray, Wales H. 
Hague, Raymond A. 
Hanley, Thomas A. 
Hassett, William H. 
Healy, Millard A. 
Inglis, John S. 
Istas, Henry T. 
Jenkins, Edward W. 
Katwick, Arthur D. 
Kelleher, Thomas A. 



Kim, Kong Y. 
Lamagdeleinc, Armand. 
Laminan, Oiva. 
Laminan, Toivo. 
Lemieux, Bertrand E. 
Le Roi, Francis H. 
Liberacki, Edward. 
MacGinnis, Rajnnond H. 
Maziall, John H. 
McCarthy, Eugene C. 
McLaughlin, Lloyd H. 
Moran, Francis. 
Muim, Daniel J. 
Navarra, Gaspere. 
Nesbitt, Hazen P. 
Oldham, Milner. 
Oliver, Joseph. 
O'Neill, Ralph L. 
Paquette, Armel. 
Peavey, Francis P. 
Pedersen, Edward M. 
Pendergast, Jerome. 
Perreault, John E. 
Philpot, William R. 
Quirk, Arthur L. 
Rainville, Ernest C. 
Rasmussen, Lewis A. 
Read, J. Ehner. 
Rego, Peter. 
Retting, Buryl W. 
St. George, William. 
Slade, Winton C. 
Soorkis, Morris. 
Stellaty, Alberte. 
Stone, Walter C. 
Tansey, Frederick. 
Vance, Alvin L. 
Vetal, Herbert M. 
Walker, Roger T. 
Ward, Frederick C. 
Ward, Leroy M. 
Zalolsky, Hjonan. 



33 



LIST OF PUPILS AT THE LOWER SCHOOL. 



Allen, Elizabeth M. 
Baker, Elsie. 
Bazarian, Man'. 
Beliveau, Leontine T. 
Buckley, Alice. 
Cambridge, Mollie. 
Coakley, Alice L. 
Colaizzi, Josephine. 
Costa, IMarianna. 
Coughlin, Helen. 
Critchley, Rosamond M. 
Daniels, Dorothj^ D. 
De Dominicis, Edith. 
Demers, Germame M. 
Doherty, Kathleen E. 
Doyle, Mary E. 
Duverger, Loretta V. 
Edwards, Eleanor B. 
Elhott, Marj'. 
Ferrarini, Yolande. 
Flanagan, M. Ursula. 
GljTin, Helen. 
Goff, Eva. 
Gray, Emma R. 
HasweU, Thelma R. 
Hinckley, Geraldine. 
IngersoU, Dorothy. 
Jefferson, Annie. 
Kazan] ian, Zaroohie. 
Keefe, Mildred. 
Kelley, Beulah C. 



King, Erica. 
Landry, Edwina. 
Lanoue, Helen. 
Lenville, Eva Hilda. 
Lincoln, Grace D. 
Lyons, Mary L. 
MacDonald, Katharine. 
Macdougall, Mildred D. 
McGovern, Velma. 
McMuUin, Beatrice M. 
Miles, Winifred M. 
Murphy, Ellen. 
Ogilvie, Hilda M. 
Peppers, Mary H. 
Pimental, Mary V. 
Rankin, Margaret D. 
Reese, Helen. 
Rose, Sadie. 
Samon, Stacey. 
Santos, Emily. 
Scott, Arline R. 
Simmons, Bertha. 
Skipp, Doris M. 
Smith, Dorothy L. 
Stanievicz, Mary. 
Stutwoota, Mary. 
Wheeler, Theresa. 
Wilcox, Bertha INL 
Wilcox, Ednamaj^ L. 
Witham, Beatrice L. 



34 



Amiro, Gilbert. 
Barrett, Robert C. 
Campbell, Peter F. 
Case, William A. 
Conley, Michael J. 
Cormier, Alfred. 
Costa, Manuel. 
CuUen, George F. 
Donovan, Thomas J. 
Dore, Charles W. 
Dow, Ralph E. F. 
Dunbar, Keimeth A. 
Eaton, Charles P. 
Egan, John P. 
Egan, Robert J. 
Epaminonda, John. 
Evans, Walter C. 
Gagnon, Lionel. 
Gagnon, Ren6. 
Gomes, Sebastian. 
Grime, G. Edward. 
Hannon, James E. 
Hebert, Arthur D. 
Hohnes, Rutherford B. 
Houle, Walter. 
Hurley, Arnold E. 
Jablowski, Joseph. 
Keefe, Clarence G. 
Keller, Frederick H. 
Krafve, Karl H. 
Lamonica, Joseph. 
Libby, Arthur C. 



Logan, Walter J. 
Maloney, Everett S. 
Matsson, Harry N. 
McDonald, Edmond J. 
McGillicuddy, John. 
Medeiros, John. 
Mennassian, Souran. 
Meuse, Lawrence A. 
Meuse, Paul R. 
Monroe, Franklin G. 
Morse, Kenneth. 
Nelson, Ralph R. 
Noble, Clark W. 
O'Neil, John. 
Perry, Emerson C. 
Rainville, Harvey L. 
Remington, Joseph H. 
Reynolds, Waldo F. 
Rubin, Manual. 
Shaw, Harris E. 
Shulman, George. 
Silva, Arthur P. 
Simoneau, Henry J. 
Slaby, Peter J. 
Smith, Ernest. 
Spencer, Merton S. 
Stott, Lester W. 
Summerhayes, Paul R. 
Thibeault, Joseph. 
Wesson, Kemiit 0. 
Withers, Harold. 
Yetter, Charles A. 



35 



SUBSCRIPTIONS FOR THOMAS STRINGER. 



Permanent Fund for Thomas Stringer.' 

[This fund is being raised with the distinct understanding that 
it is to be placed under the control and care of the trustees of the 
Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for the Bhnd, and 
that only the net income is to be given to Tom so long as he is not 
provided for in any other way, and is unable to earn his Uving, the 
principal remaining intact forever. It is further understood, that, 
at his death, or when he ceases to be in need of this assistance, the 
income of this fund is to be applied to the support and education 
of some child who is both blind and deaf and for whom there is no 
provision made either by the state or by private individuals.] 

Seabury, Miss Sarah E., $25 00 



36 



STATEMENT OF ACCOUNTS. 



INSTITUTION. 

Balance Sheet Year ending August 31, 1919. 
Assets. 



Plant: — 

Real estate, South Boston, . $8,647 74 

Real estate, Watertown, . . 678,677 37 



$687,325 11 



Equipment: — 

Furniture and household, 
Music Department, 
Library Department, . 
Works Department, 
Tuning Department, . 



$20,415 77 

20,075 GO 

56,984 41 

17,251 30 

389 50 



115,115 



Investments: — 

Real estate $211,888 19 

Securities 438,625 66 



Rents and accounts receivable, 
E. E. Allen, Trustee, . 
Cash on hand, 



,441 09 



650,513 85 

2,641 22 

733 90 

19,490 45 

$1,475,820 51 
Liabilities. 

General account $438,530 66 

Funds (see page 39). 

Special, $51.667 00 

Permanent 201,328 77 

General, 1 778,627 02 



Unexpended income, special funds. 
Gifts for fence, clock and organ, 
Vouchers payable, 



1,031,622 79 

1,601 10 

225 00 

3,840 96 

$1,475,820 51 



> $381,108.94 of general fund invested in plant. 

37 



Condensed Treasurer's Income Account, Year ending August 31, 1919. 

Rent net income $10,958 98 

Interest and dividends, general purposes, 16,556 40 

Interest and dividends, special funds, 2,259 40 

Annuities, 1,200 00 

Donations, 6,699 50 

Tuition and board, Massachusetts, .... $17,895 00 
Tuition and board, others, 17,152 63 

35,047 63 

Income 872,721 91 

Less special fund income to special funds accounts, $2,259 40 
Less Treasurer's miscellaneous expenses, . . . 342 76 

2,602 16 



Net income, $70,119 75 

Net charge to Director $82,582 44 

Additional equipment and supplies, .... 4,470 50 

Repairs, faulty construction, 1,360 05 

Income overspent 18,293 24 

$88,412 99 $88,412 99 

Income, Special Funds. 

On hand September 1, 1918, $914 89 

Income 1918-19 2,259 40 

Distributed 1918-19 $1,573 19 

On hand August 31, 1919, 1,601 10 



$3,174 29 $3,174 29 



Condensed Director's Expense Account, Year ending August 31, 1919. 

Administration : — 

Salaries and wages, $5,378 91 

Other expenses, 812 83 

$6,191 74 

Maintenance and operation of plant: — 

Salaries and wages, $18,399 56 

Other expenses : — 

Provisions $16,478 64 

Light, heat and power, . 12,342 31 

Household furnishings and 

supplies 2,236 66 

Insurance and water, . . 1,351 27 

Repairs 2,681 42 

Miscellaneous, . . . 512 10 

35,602 40 

54,001 96 



Amount carried forward, $60,193 70 

38 



Amount brought forward, $60,193 70 

Instruction and school supplies: — 

Salaries and wages, $21,799 74 

Other expenses, 1,175 22 

22,974 96 

Total $83,168 66 

Less net income. Tuning Department, . . . $447 48 

Less net income. Works Department, . . . 138 74 

686 22 

$82,582 44 



INSTITUTION FUNDS AND LEGACIES. 

Special funds : — 

Robert C. Billings (for deaf, dumb and blind), $4,000 00 

Joseph B. Glover (for blind and deaf), . . 5,000 00 

Harris Fund (Outdoor Relief) 26,667 00 

Maria Kemble Oliver 15,000 00 

Elizabeth P. Putnam, 1.000 00 

Permanent funds: — 

Charlotte Billings, $40,507 00 

Stoddard Capen 13,770 00 

Jennie M. Colby, in memory of, ... 100 00 

Ella Newman Curtis Fund 2,000 00 

Stephen Fairbanks 10,000 00 

Harris Fund (General Purposes) , . . . 53,333 00 

Benjamin Humphrey, 25,000 00 

Prentiss M. Kent 2,500 00 

Jonathan E. Pecker, 950 00 

Richard Perkins, 20,000 00 

Mrs. Marilla L. Pitts, in memory of, . . 5,000 00 

Frank Davison Rust Memorial, . . . 4,000 00 

Samuel E. Sawyer 2,174 77 

Timothy Smith, 1.000 00 

Mary Lowell Stone, 2,000 00 

Alfred T. Turner 1.000 00 

Anne White Vose, 12,994 00 

Charles L. Young 6.000 00 

General funds: — 

Elizabeth B. Bailey, $3,000 00 

Eleanor J. W. Baker 2,500 00 

Calvin W. Barker, 1.859 32 

Lucy B. Barker 5,953 21 

Francis Bartlett 2,500 00 

Mary Bartol 300 00 

Thompson Baxter, 322 60 

Robert C Billings, ." 25,000 00 

Susan A. Blaisdell 5.832 66 

Amounts carried forward, .... $47,267 69 

39 



$61,667 00 



201,328 77 



$262,995 77 



Amounts brought forward, $47,267 69 $252,995 77 

General funds — Continued. 

William T. Bolton 555 22 

George W. Boyd 5,000 00 

Caroline E. Boyden 1,898 39 

J. Putnam Bradlee 268,391 24 

Charlotte A. Bradstreet 10,508 70 

J. Edward Brown 100,000 00 

T. O. H. P. Burnham 5,000 00 

Edward F. Gate 5,000 00 

Fanny Channing, 2,000 00 

Ann Eliza Colburn 5,000 00 

Susan J. Conant 500 00 

Louise F. Crane 5,000 00 

Harriet Otis Cruft 6,000 00 

David Cummings, 7,723 07 

. Chastine L. Gushing, 500 00 

I. W. Danforth 2,500 00 

Susan L. Davis 1,500 00 

Joseph Descalzo 1,000 00 

John H. Dix, 10,000 00 

Alice J. H. Dwinell 200 00 

Mary E. Eaton 5,000 00 

Mortimer G. Ferris Memorial 1,000 00 

Mary Helen Freeman 1,000 00 

Cornelia Anne French 8,500 00 

Martha A. French 164 40 

Thomas Gaffield 6,450 00 

Albert Glover, 1,000 00 

Joseph B. Glover 5,000 00 

Charlotte L. Goodnow 6,471 23 

Hattie S. Hathaway 500 00 

Charles H. Hayden 20,200 00 

John C. Haynes 1,000 00 

Joseph H. Heywood, 500 00 

Margaret A. Holden 3,708 32 

Charles Sylvester Hutchison, .... 2,156 00 

Catherine M. Lamson 6,000 00 

William Litchfield 7,951 48 

Hannah W. Loring 9,500 00 

Susan B. Lyman, 4,809 78 

Stephen W. Marston 5,000 00 

Charles Merriam, ' 1,000 00 

Sarah Irene Parker 699 41 

George Francis Parkman 50,000 00 

Philip G. Peabody 4,200 00 

Edward D. Peters 500 00 

Henry L. Pierce 20.000 00 

Sarah E. Pratt 1,000 00 

Matilda B. Richardeon .' 300 00 



Amounts carried forward $659,154 93 $252,995 77 

40 



Amounts brought forward $659,154 93 8252,995 77 

General funds — Concluded. 

Mary L. Ruggles 3,000 00 

Nancy E. Rust 2,640 00 

Joseph Scholfield, 2,500 00 

Richard Black Sewall 25,000 00 

Margaret A. Simpson, 800 00 

Esther W. Smith 5,000 00 

The Maria Spear Bequest for the Blind, . . 15,000 00 

Henry F. Spencer 1,000 00 

Joseph C. Storey 5,000 00 

Sophronia S. Sunbury, 365 19 

Mary F. S^vift 1.391 00 

WUliam Taylor, 893 36 

Joanna C. Thompson 1,000 00 

George B. Upton 10,000 00 

Horace W. Wadleigh 2,000 00 

Joseph K. Wait 3,000 00 

Harriot Ware, 1,952 02 

Charles F. Webber (by sale of part of vested 

remainder interest under his will), . . 11,500 00 

Mary Ann P. Weld 2,000 00 

Cordelia H. Wheeler 800 00 

Opha J. Wheeler 3,086 77 

Samuel Brenton Whitney 1,000 00 

Mehitable C. C. Wilson 543 75 

Thomas T. Wyman 20,000 00 

778,627 02 



$1,031,622 79 



DONATIONS, INSTITUTION ACCOUNT. 

Hammond, Miss Ellen $5 00 

Kilhan, Annie M 10 00 

Committee of the Permanent Charity Fund, In- 
corporated 2,500 00 

$2,515 00 

Through the Ladies' Auxiliary Society, 4,184 50 

$6,699 50 
Organ Fund, 2 00 

$6,701 50 



41 



HOWE MEMORIAL PRESS FUND. 

Balance Sheet Year ending August 31, 1919. 

Assets, 
Equipment: — 

Printing plant $874 69 

Printing 10,688 33 

Machinery and equipnaent, .... 5,583 38 

Embossing 22,815 57 

Appliances manufactured, 2,369 36 

Appliances purchased, 469 80 

Stationery for sale, 308 80 

$43,109 83 

Investment: — 

Stocks and bonds 172,688 87 

Notes and accounts receivable, 1,926 85 

Cash on hand, 1,534 64 

$219,260 19 

Liabilities. 
General account $202,689 98 

Funds: — 

Permanent: — 

Deacon Stephen Stickney, .... $5,000 00 
General : — 

Joseph H. Center, . . $1,000 00 
Augusta Wells, . . . 10,290 00 

11,290 00 

16,290 00 

Vouchers payable, 280 21 



$219,260 19 



Condensed Treasurer's Income Account, Year ending August 31, 1919. 

Income : — 

Interest and dividends, $10,453 50 

Other income 49 91 

Income $10,503 41 

Less Treasurer's expenses, 40 00 

Net income $10,463 41 

Net charge to Director, $8,508 57 

Additional equipment and supplies, .... 855 55 

9,364 12 



Balance of income, $1,099 29 

42 



Condensed Director's Expense Account, Year ending August 31, 1919. 



Maintenance and operation of plant 
Salaries and wages. 
Other expenses: — 

Embossing, 

Printing, 

Appliances manufactured, 

Appliances purchased, . 

Stationery purchased, . 

Miscellaneous, 



$8,697 36 



$65 87 
906 64 
846 88 
374 98 
449 19 
673 66 



3,317 22 



$12,014 58 

Library : — 

Salaries and wages, 669 18 

Total $12,683 76 

Less: — 

Discounts S3 14 

Income from sale of appliances, . $2,572 56 
Income from sale of books, 

music, etc 1,599 49 

4,172 05 



4,175 19 



$8,508 57 

During the year the Press has given to the Institution, and to others, books 
and appliances worth, at the prices charged by the Press, $1,597.26, the actual 
cost of which was about $4,000. 



43 



KINDERGARTEN. 

Balance Sheet Yeah ending August 31, 1919. 

Assets. 
Plant: — 

Real estate, Watertown $529,265 24 

Equipment : — 

Furniture and household, . . $19,934 71 
Music Department, . . . 2,945 00 

22,879 71 

$552,144 95 

Investments: — 

Real estate $419,946 43 

Stocks and bonds 909,637 60 

1,329,584 03 

Rents and accounts receivable, 3,897 94 

E. E. Allen, Trustee, 175 83 

Cash on hand, 2.938 92 

$1,888,741 67 
Liabilities. 
General account, $367,566 95 

Funds (see page 45) 

Special, $6,840 00 

Permanent 170,319 70 

General, i 1,340,954 20 

1,518,113 90 

Unexpended income, special funds, 816 84 

Vouchers payable, 2,243 98 

$1,888,741 67 



Condensed Treasurer's Income Account, Year ending August 31, 1919. 

Rent net income, $14,991 02 

Interest and dividends, general purposes, 43,144 36 

Interest and dividends, special funds, 349 55 

Donations, 60 00 

Tuition and board, Massachusetts, .... $18,675 00 

Tuition and board, others 10,926 33 

29,601 33 

Income $88,146 26 

Less special fund income to special funds accounts, $349 55 

Less Treasurer's miscellaneous expenses, . . . 349 58 

699 13 

Net income $87,447 13 

Amount carried forward, $87,447 13 

I $188,529.87 of general fund invested in plant. 

44 



Amount brought forward, S87,447 13 

Net charge to Director, 871,904 89 

Additional equipment and supplies 4,019 15 

Repairs, faulty construction, 2,563 96 

78,488 00 

Balance of income, $8,959 13 

Income, Special Funds. 

On hand September 1, 1918 $637 74 

Income 1918-19 349 55 

Distributed 1918-19 $170 45 

On hand August 31, 1919, 816 84 

$987 29 $987 29 

Condensed Director's Expense Account, Year ending ArcusT 31, 1919. 

Administration : — 

Salaries and wages, $5,361 99 

Other expenses, 1,728 75 

$7,090 74 

Maintenance and operation of plant: — 

Salaries and wages $21,055 56 

Other expenses: — 

Provisions, .... $15,180 57 
Light, heat and power, . 11,884 22 
Household furnishings and 

supplies 1,407 23 

Insurance and water, . . 1,273 12 

Repairs 2,600 31 

Miscellaneous, . . . 2,698 81 

35,044 26 

56,099 82 

Instruction and school supplies : — 

Salaries and wages, $8,057 50 

Other expenses 656 83 

8,714 33 

Total, $71,904 89 



KINDERGARTEN FUNDS AND LEGACIES. 

Special funds: — 

Glover Fund (Albert Glover) $1,840 00 

Emeline Morse Lane, 1.000 00 

Leonard and Jerusha Hyde Room, . . . 4,000 00 

$6,840 00 

Amount carried forward, $6,840 00 

45 



Amount brought forward, $6,840 00 

Permanent funds : — 

William Leonard Benedict, Jr., Memorial, . $1,000 00 

Samuel A. Borden 4,675 00 

A. A. C, In Memoriam 500 00 

Helen G. Coburn 9,980 10 

M. Jane Wellington Danforth Fund, . . 10,000 00 

Caroline T. Downes 12,950 00 

Charles H. Draper 23,934 13 

Eliza J. Bell Draper Fund 1,500 00 

Helen Atkins Edmands Memorial, . . . 5,000 00 

George R. Emerson 5,000 00 

Mary Eveleth 1,000 00 

Eugenia F. Farnham 1,015 00 

Susan W. Farwell 500 00 

Albert Glover, 1,000 00 

Mrs. Jerome Jones Fund, 9,935 95 

Charles Larned 5,000 00 

George F. Parlanan 3,500 00 

Catherine P. Perkins 10,000 00 

Frank Davison Rust Memorial, . . . 15,600 00 

Caroline O. Seabury, 1,000 00 

Eliza Sturgis Fund 21,729 52 

Abby K. Sweetser 25,000 00 

Mary Rosevear White, 500 00 

170,319 70 

General funds: — 

Emilie Albee $150 00 

Lydia A. Allen, 748 38 

Michael Anagnos 3,000 00 

Harriet T. Andrew 5,000 00 

Mrs. William Appleton 18,000 00 

Elizabeth H. Bailey 500 00 

Eleanor J. W. Baker 2,500 00 

Ellen M. Baker, 13,053 48 

Mary D. Balfour 100 00 

Nancy Bartlett Fund 500 00 

Sidney Bartlett 10,000 00 

Emme M. Bass, 1,000 00 

Thompson Baxter 322 50 

Robert C. Billings, 10,000 00 

Sarah Bradford 100 00 

Helen C. Bradlee 140,000 00 

J. Putnam Bradlee 168,391 24 

Charlotte A. Biadstreet 6,130 07 

Ellen Sophia Brown 1,000 00 

Rebecca W. Brown 3,073 76 

Harriet Tilden Browne 2,000 00 

John W. Carter 500 00 

Adeline M. Chapin 400 00 

Amounts carried forward $386,469 43 $177,159 70 



46 



Amounts brought forward $386.469 43 $177,159 70 



General funds — Continued 
Benjamin P. Cheney, 
Charles H. Colburn, 
Helen Collamore, . 
Anna T. Coolidge, 
Mrs. Edward Cordis, 
Sarah Silver Cox, . 
Susan T. Crosby, . 
James H. Danforth, 
Catherine L. Donnison Memorial 
George E. Downes, 
Lucy A. Dwight, . 
Mary B. Emmons, 
Mary E. Emerson, 
Annie Louisa Fay Memorial 
Sarah M. Fay, 
Charlotte M. Fiske, 
John Foster, . 
Elizabeth W. Gay, 
Ellen M. Gifford, . 
Joseph B. Glover, 
Matilda Goddard, 
Maria L. Gray, 
Mary L. Greenleaf, 
Josephine S. Hall, 
Olive E. Hayden, . 
Jane H. Hodges, . 
Margaret A. Holden 
Marion D. Hollingsworth, 
Frances H. Hood, 
Abigal W. Howe, . 
Martha R. Hunt, . 
Ellen M. Jones, 
Moses Kimball, 
Ann E. Lambert, . 
William Litchfield, 
Mary Ann Locke, 
Robert W. Lord, . 
Elisha T. Loring, . 
Sophia N. Low, 
Thomas Mack, 
Augustus D. Manson, 
Calanthe E. Marsh, 
Sarah L. Marsh, . 
Waldo Marsh, 
Annie B. Matthews, 
Rebecca S. Melvin, 
Georgina Merrill, . 
Louise Chandler Moulton, 

Amounts carried forward, 



5,000 00 

1,000 00 

5,000 00 

45,138 16 

300 00 

5,000 00 

100 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

3,000 00 

4,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

15,000 00 

5,000 00 

5,000 00 

7,931 00 

5,000 00 

5,000 00 

300 00 

200 00 

5,157 75 

3,000 00 

4,622 45 

300 00 

2,360 67 

1,000 00 

100 00 

1,000 00 

10,000 00 

500 00 

1,000 00 

700 00 

5,000 00 

5,874 00 

1,000 00 

5,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

8,134 00 

20,111 20 

1,000 00 

500 00 

15,000 00 

23,545 55 

4,628 42 

10,000 00 



$634,972 63 $177,159 70 



47 



Amounts brought forward $634,972 63 $177,159 70 



General funds — Continued. 
Mary Abbie Newell, 
Margaret S. Otis, . 
Jeannie Warren Paine, 
Anna R. Palfrey, . 
Sarah Irene Parker, 
Helen M. Parsons, 
Edward D. Peters, 
Henry M. Peyser, 
Mary J. Phipps, . 
Caroline S. Pickman, 
Katherine C. Pierce, 
Helen A. Porter, . 
Sarah E. Potter Endowment, 
Francis L. Pratt, . 
Mary S. C. Reed. 
Jane Roberts, 
John M. Rodocanachi, 
Dorothy Roffe, 
Rhoda Rogers, 
Mrs. Benjamin S. Rotch, 
Edith Rotch, 
Rebecca Salisbury, 
Joseph Scholfield, 
Eliza B. Seymour, 
Esther W. Smith, 
Annie E. Snow, 
Adelaide Standish, 
Elizabeth G. Stuart, 
Hannah R. Sweetser, 
Benjamin Sweet zer, 
Harriet Taber Fund, 
Sarah W. Taber, . 
Mary L. Talbot, . 
Cornelia V. R. Thayer, 
Delia D. Thorndike, 
Elizabeth L. Tilton, 
Betsey B. Tolman, 
Transcript, ten dollar fund, 
Mary B. Turner, . 
Royal W. Turner, 
Rebecca P. Wainwright, 
George W. Wales, 
Mrs. George W. Wales, 
Mrs. Charles E. Ware, 
Rebecca B. Warren, 
Jennie A. (Shaw) Waterhouse, 
Mary H. Watson, 
Ralph Watson Memorial, 

Amounts carried forward, 



500 


00 


1,000 


00 


1,000 


00 


50 


00 


699 


41 


500 


00 


500 


00 


3,000 


00 


2,000 


00 


1,000 


00 


5,000 


00 


50 


00 


425,014 


44 


100 


00 


5,000 


00 


93,025 


55 


2,250 


00 


500 


00 


500 


00 


8,500 


00 


10,000 


00 


200 


00 


3,000 


00 


5,000 


00 


5,000 


00 


9,903 


27 


5,000 


00 


2,000 


00 


5,000 


00 


2,000 


00 


622 


81 


1,000 


00 


630 


00 


10,000 


00 


5,000 


00 


300 


00 


500 


00 


5,666 


95 


7,582 


90 


24,082 


00 


1,000 


00 


5,000 


00 


10,000 


00 


4,000 


00 


5,000 


00 


565 


84 


100 


00 


237 


92 



$1,313,553 72 $177,159 70 



48 



Amounts brought forward, .... $1,313,55372 $177,15970 

General funds — Concluded. 

Isabella M. Weld 14,795 06 

Mary Whitehead, 666 00 

Julia A. Whitney 100 00 

Sarah W. Whitney, 150 62 

Betsey S. Wilder 500 00 

Hannah Catherine Wiley 200 00 

Mary W. Wiley, 150 00 

Mary Williams 5,000 00 

Almira F. Winslow, 306 80 

Harriet F. Wolcott, 5,532 00 

1,340,954 20 



Sl,518,113 90 



DONATIONS, KINDERGARTEN ACCOUNT. 

Brett, Miss Anna K $10 00 

"Children of the King", Church of the Disciples, 

Boston, 3 00 

Marrs, Mrs. Kingsmill, 25 00 

Primary Department, Sunday School of the Union 
Congregational Church of Weymouth and 

Braintree, 20 00 

Sabin, G. K., 2 00 



$60 00 



The securities in the hands of the Treasurer August 31, 1919, were 
examined by the Auditing Committee and found to be as called for 
by the books. The income and expenditures for the year were audited 
and certified by Messrs. Edwin L. Pride & Co., Incorporated, Certified 
Pubhc Accountants. 



49 



CONTRIBUTIONS FOR THE PERKINS 
INSTITUTION. 



Through the Ladies' Auxiliary Society, Mrs. Sarah A. Stover, Treasurer: — 

Annual subscriptions $2,066 50 

Donations 1.754 00 

Cambridge Branch 211 00 

Dorchester Branch, 66 00 

Lynn Branch 42 00 

MUton Branch 45 00 

Donation for small organ 2 00 

$4,186 50 



ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTIONS FOR THE PER- 
KINS INSTITUTION. 

Through the Ladies' Auxiliary Society, Mrs. S. A. Stover, Treasurer. 



Abbott, Miss Georgianna E., 
Adams, Mr. George, 
Adams, Mrs. Waldo, 
Alford, Mrs. O. H., 
AUen, Mrs. F. R., . 
Amory, Mrs. Charles W 
Amory, Mrs. Wm., 
Amory, Mrs. Wm., 2d. 
Amsden, Mrs. Mary A., 
Anderson, Miss Anna F 
Appleton, Miss Fanny C, 
Bacon, Miss Mary P., 
Badger, Mrs. Wallis B., 
Baer, Mrs. Louis, . 
Balch, Mrs. F. G., 
Baldwin, Mrs. J. C. T., 
Bangs, Mrs. F. R., 
Barnard, Mr. Simon, 
Bartol, Miss Elizabeth H., 
Batcheller, Mr. Robert, 
Batt, Mrs. C. R., . 



Amount carried forward, . $149 00 



$1 00 


Amount brought forward, . 


$149 00 


1 00 






5 00 


Beal, Mrs. Boylston A., 


10 00 


10 00 


Berlin, Dr. Fanny, 


1 00 


2 00 


Betton, Mrs. C. G., 


2 00 


25 00 


Bigelow, Mrs. Henry M., 


3 00 


5 00 


Blake, Mrs. Arthur W., 


5 00 


25 00 


Bond, Mrs. Charles H., 


5 00 


1 00 


Boutwell, Mrs. L. B., . 


5 00 


2 00 


Bradt, Mrs. Julia B., . 


1 00 


3 00 


Brewer, Miss Lucy S., . 


5 00 


5 00 


Brown, Mrs. Atherton T., 


10 00 


2 00 


Bunker, Mr. Alfred, 


1 00 


10 00 


Burns, Mr. Walter G., . 


5 00 


5 00 


Burr, Mrs. C. C, . 


10 00 


5 00 


Carr, Mrs. Samuel, 


10 00 


10 00 


Gary, Miss Ellen G., . 


50 00 


2 00 


Gary, Miss Georgina S., 


10 00 


20 00 


Casson, Miss Etta B., . 


1 00 


5 00 


Chamberlain, Mrs. M. L., 


5 00 


5 00 


Chandler, Mrs. Frank W., 


5 00 



Amount carried forward, . $293 00 



50 



Amount brought forward, .$293 00 Amount brought forward, .$575 00 



Channing, Mrs. Walter, 
Chapin, Mrs. Henry B., 
Chapman, Mis.s Jane E. C. 
Chase, Mrs. Susan R., . 
Clapp, Dr. H. C, . 
Clark, Mrs. Frederic S., 
Clerk, Mrs. W. F., 
Cobb, Mrs. Charles K., 
Codman, Miss Catherine 

Amory, 
Coolidge, Mrs. J. Randolph 
Corey, Mrs. H. D., 
Cox, Mrs. William E., . 
Craig, Mrs. D. R., 
Cummings, Mrs. Charles A. 
Curtis, Mr. George W., 
Curtis, Miss M. G., 
Cushing, Mrs. H. W., . 
Gushing, Mrs. J. W., 
Cushing, Miss Sarah P., 
Cutler, Mrs. C. F., 
Cutler, Mrs. E. G., 
Cutter, Mrs. Ellen M., . 
Cutter, Mrs. Frank W., 
Cutts, Mrs. H. M., 

Dale, Mrs. Eben, . 

Damon, Mrs. J. L., Jr., 

Davis, Mrs. Joseph E., 

Davis, Mrs. Simon, 

Day, Mrs. Lewis, . 

Denny, Mrs. Arthur B., 

Denny, Mrs. W. C, 

Derby, Mrs. Hasket, 

Drost, Mr. C. A., . 

Dwight, Mrs. Thomas, . 

Edgar, Mrs. C. L., 

Edmands, Mrs. M. Grant, 

Eliot, Mrs. Amory, 

Elms, Miss Florence G., 

Emmons, Mrs. R. W., 2d, 

Endicott, Mrs. Wm. C, 

Ernst, Mrs. C. W., 

Ernst, Mrs. H. C, 

Estabrook, Mrs. Arthur F., 

Eustis, Mrs. F. A., 

Ferrin, Mrs. M. T. B., . 

Field, Mrs. D. W., 

Fitz, Mrs. W. Scott, 

Foss, Mrs. Eugene N., . 

Amount carried forward, 



5 00 
5 00 
2 00 

1 00 

2 00 
10 00 

3 00 
5 00 

10 00 
10 00 

2 00 
10 00 

5 00 
10 00 



5 00 


5 00 


2 00 


2 00 


5 00 


5 00 


2 00 


2 00 


1 00 


1 00 


5 00 


2 00 


5 00 


3 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


10 00 


1 00 


5 00 


10 00 


2 00 


2 00 


35 00 


5 00 


2 00 


5 00 


5 00 


10 00 


5 00 


5 00 


25 00 


10 00 


S575 00 



Frank, Mrs. Daniel, 

Freeman, Mrs. Louisa A. 

Friedman, Mrs. Max, . 

Friedman, Mrs. S., 

Frothingham, Mrs. Langdon 

Gibbs, Mrs. H. C, 

Gill, Mr. Abbott, . 

Gill, Mrs. George F., . 

Ginzberg, Mrs. Barnard, 

Goldberg, Mrs. Simon, . 

Goldschmidt, Mrs. Meyer H. 

Gooding, Mrs. T. P., . 

Grant, Mr. and Mrs. Robert 

Gray, Mrs. Reginald, . 

Green, Mr. Charles G., 

Greenough, Mrs. C. P., 

Grew, Mrs. H. S. . 

Hall, Mrs. Anthony D., 

Harrington, Mrs. Francis B. 

Harris, Miss Frances K., 

Hatch, Mrs. Fred W., . 

Haven, Mrs. Edward B., 
Hayward, Mrs. G. G., . 
Herman, Mrs. Joseph M., 
Higginson, Mrs. F. L. (for 

1918-19), . 
Higginson, Mrs. Henry L., 
Hills, Mrs. Edwin A., . 
Holbrook, Mrs. Walter H., 
Homans, Mrs. John, 
Hooper, Miss Adeline D., 
Hooper, Mrs. James R., 
Howard, Mrs. P. B., . 
Howe, Mrs. Arabella, . 
Howe, Mrs. George D., 
Howland, Mrs. D. W., . 
Hubbard, Mrs. Charles W., 
Hunnewell, Mrs. Arthur, 
Johnson, Mr. Arthur S., 
Johnson, Mr. Edward C, 
Jones, Mrs. B. M., 
Jordan, Mrs. Eben D., . 
Josselyn, Mrs. A. S., 
Joy, Mrs. Charles H., . 
Kettle, Mrs. Claude L., 
Kimball, Mrs. Da\4d P., 
Kimball, Mr. Edward P., 
Kimball, Mrs. Marcus M., 
King. Mrs. S. G., . 



Amount carried forward, . $976 00 



1 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 


10 


00 


. 10 


00 


5 


00 


. 25 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 


3 


00 


5 


00 


3 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


r 

. 40 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


3 


00 


. 10 


00 


5 


00 


. 15 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


. 10 


00 


2 


00 


. 25 


00 


. 10 


00 


. 10 


00 


. 25 


00 


5 


00 


10 


00 


5 


00 


. 10 


00 


1 


00 


. 25 


00 


K 


00 


. 5C 


00 


r 


00 



51 



Amount brought forward, . S976 00 Amount brought forward, $1,356 50 



Kingsley, Mrs. Robert C, 
Klous, Mr. Isaac, . 
Kornfeld, Mrs. Felix, 
Lamb, Miss Augusta T., 
Lamson, Mrs. J. A., 
Lane, Mrs. D. H., . 
Larkin, The Misses, 
Lauferty, Mrs. A. S., . 
Ledyard, Mrs. Lewis Cass, 
Lee, Mrs. Joseph, . 
Leland, Leslie F., . 
Leland, Mrs. Lewis A., 
Levi, Mrs. Harry, . 
Lincoln, Mr. A. L., 
Little, Mrs. D. M., 
Loring, Judge W. C, 
Loring, Mrs. W. C, 
Lothrop, Miss Mary B., 
Lothrop, Mrs. W. S. H., 
Levering, Mrs. Charles T., 
Lovett, Mr. A. S., . 
Lovett, Mrs. A. S., 
Lowell, Mrs. John, 
Mansfield, Mrs. George S., 
Mansur, Mrs. Martha P., 
Mason, Mrs. Charles E., 
Mead, Mrs. Fred Sumner, 
Merrill, Mrs. L. M., 
Merriman, Mrs. Daniel, 
Mixter, Miss Mary A., 
Morison, Mrs. John H., 
Morrison, Mrs. W. A., . 
Morse, Mrs. Joseph P., 
Morss, Mrs. Everett, 
Moseley, Miss Ellen F., 
Moses, Mrs. George, 
Moses, Mrs. Joseph, 
Moses, Mrs. Louis, 
Nathan, Mrs. John, 
Nazro, Mrs. Fred H., . 
Niebuhr, Miss Mary M., 
Norcross, Mrs. Otis, 
Olmstead, Mrs. J. C, . 
Page, Mrs. Calvin Gates, 
Paine, Mrs. W. D., 
Parker, Miss Eleanor S., 
Pecker, Miss Annie J., . 
Peckerman, Mrs. E. R., 
Perry, Mrs. Clarabel N., 



Amount carried forward, $1,356 50 



1 00 


2 00 


1 00 


1 00 


2 00 


1 00 


1 00 


1 00 


6 00 


. 100 00 


1 00 


1 00 


2 50 


5 00 


5 00 


. 25 00 


. 25 00 


5 00 


5 00 


. 10 00 


6 00 


5 00 


5 00 


2 00 


3 00 


. 50 00 


5 00 


5 00 


. 10 00 


5 00 


5 00 


1 00 


1 00 


. 10 00 


. 10 00 


1 00 


5 00 


1 00 


5 00 


2 00 


1 00 


. 10 00 


3 00 


2 00 


2 00 


. 10 00 


. 10 00 


2 00 


5 00 



Pickert, Mrs. Lehman, . 
Pickman, Mrs. D. L., . 
Pratt, Mrs. Elliott W., 
Prendergast, Mr. James M. 
Prince, Mrs. Morton, . 
Putnam, Mrs. George, . 
Putnam, Mrs. James J., 
Ratshesky, Mrs. Fanny, 
Ratshesky, Mrs. I. A., . 
Read, Mrs. Robert M., 
Reed, Mrs. Arthur, 
Reed, Mrs. John H., 
Reed, Mrs. Wm. Howell, 
Rice, Mr. and Mrs. David, 
Rice, Mrs. Wm. B., 
Richards, Miss Annie L., 
Richards, Mrs. C. A., . 
Richards, Mrs. E. L., . 
Richardson, Mrs. Frederick 
Robbins, Mrs. Reginald L., 
Roeth, Mrs. A. G., 
Rogers, Mrs. R. K., 
Rogers, Miss Susan S., . 
Rowlett, Mrs. Thomas S., 
Russell, Miss Catherine E., 
Saltonstall, Mr. Richard M., 
in memory of his mother, 
Mrs. Leverett Saltonstall, 
Sargent, Mrs. F. W., 
Saunders, Mrs. D. E., . 
Schouler, Mr. James, 
Scudder, Mrs. J. D., in mem- 
ory of her mother, Mrs 
N. M. Downer, . 
Scull, Mrs. Gideon, 
Sears, Mr. Herbert M., 
Sears, Mrs. Knyvet W., 
Shaw, Mrs. G. Howland, 
Shaw, Mrs. George R., 
Shepard, Mr. Thomas H., 
Sias, Mrs. Charles D., . 
Sias, Miss Martha G., . 
Simpkins, Miss Mary W., 
Sprague, Mrs. Charles, 
Stackpole, Mrs. F. D., . 
Stearns, Mr. and Mrs. C. H., 
Stearns, Mrs. Wm. Brackett, 
Steams, Mr. Wm. B., . 
Steinert, Mrs. Alex., 



2 00 
25 00 
10 00 
10 00 



25 00 
30 00 
15 00 
10 00 



10 00 

10 00 

5 00 

5 00 



5 00 
10 00 
25 00 
30 00 
15 00 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



10 00 
3 00 

2 00 

3 00 



Amount carried fonvard, $1,710 50 



52 



Amount brought forward, $1,710 50 Amount brought forward 



Stevens, Miss Alice B., 
Stewart, Mrs. Cecil, 
Stone, Mrs. Edwin P., . 
Storer, Miss A. M., 
Storer, Miss M. G., 
Strauss, Mrs. Ferdinand, 
Strauss, Mrs. Louis, 
Sweetser, Mrs. Frank E., 
Talbot, Mrs. Thomas Palmer 
Taylor, Mrs. Wm. O., . 
Thacher, Mrs. Henry C, 
Thomson, Mrs. A. C, . 
Thorndike, Mrs. Augustus L 
Tileston, Mrs. John B., 
Tuckerman, Mrs. Charles S. 
Tyler, Mr. Granville C, 
Vass, Miss Harriett, 
Vickery, Mrs. Herman F., 
Vose, Mrs. Charles, 
Wadsworth, Mrs. A. F., 
Ward, The Misses, 
Ward, Miss Julia A., 
Ware, Miss Mary Lee, . 
Warren, Mrs. Bayard, . 



5 00 

5 00 

5 00 

5 00 

5 00 

10 00 

5 00 

3 00 

1 00 

10 00 

10 00 



15 00 
2 00 
5 00 

10 00 
2 00 

25 00 

25 00 



Amount carried forward, SI, 885 50 



Warren, Mrs. J. C, 
Warshauer, Mrs. Isador, 
Wason, Mrs. Elbridge, . 
Weeks, Mr. Andrew Gray, 
Weeks, Mrs. W. B. P., . 
Weld, Mrs. A. Winsor, . 
West, Mrs. Charles A., 
Wheelwright, Miss Mary, 
White, Miss Eliza Orne, 
White, Mrs. Jonathan H., 
White, Mrs. Joseph H., 
White, Mrs. Norman H., 
Williams, The Misses, . 
Williams, Miss Adelia C, 
Williams, Mrs. Arthur, Jr., 
Williams, Mrs. Jeremiah, 
Williams, Mr. Moses, . 
Williams, Mrs. Moses, . 
Willson, Miss Lucy B., 
Winsor, Mrs. Ernest, 
Withington, Miss Anna S., 
Wolcott, Mrs. Roger, 
Wyman, Mrs. Alfred E., 
Young, Mrs. Benjamin L., 



81,885 


50 


. 10 


00 


1 


00 


5 


00 


. 10 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 


. 25 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


1 


00 


. 10 


00 


. 50 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


6 


00 


2 


00 


1 


00 


5 


00 


. 15 


00 


. 10 


00 



$2,066 50 



DONATIONS. 



A friend, .... 
Abbott, Miss Georgianna E. 
Adams, Mrs. Charles H., 
Adams, Mrs. Henry J., 
Alden, Mrs. Charles H., 
Allen, Mrs. Thomas, 
Archer, Mrs. Ellen M. H., 
Bacon, Miss Ellen S., . 
Bailey, Mrs. H. R., 
Baker, Miss Susan P., . 
Bartol, Mrs. John W., . 
Batcheller, Mr. Robert, 
Baylies, Mrs. Walter Cabot 
Bemis, Mr. J. M., . 
Bicknell, Mrs. Wm. J., . 
Bigelow, Mrs. J. S., 
Blake, Mrs. Francis, 
Boardman, Mrs. W. D., 



Amount carried forward, . 81 



$1 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 


10 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


5 


00 


10 


00 


5 


00 


10 


00 


25 


00 


5 


00 


21 


00 



Amount brought forward, . $121 00 



Bowditch, Dr. Vincent Y., 
Brewer, Mr. Edward M., 
Bronson, Mrs. Dillon, . 
Browning, Mrs. Charles A., 
Bruerton, Mrs. James, . 
Bullard, Mr. Alfred M., 
Burnham, Mrs. H. D., . 
C 



Carpenter, Mrs. G. A., 
Carter, Mrs. John W., . 
Gary, Miss Ellen G., . 
Gary, Miss Georgina S., 
Clapp, Miss Helen, 
Clark, Mrs. Robert Farley, 
Codman, Miss M. C, . 
Cole, Mrs. E. E., . 



5 00 
25 00 



10 00 
50 00 
5 00 
5 00 
15 00 
5 00 
1 00 



Amount carried forward, . $271 00 



53 



Avwunt brought forward, . $271 00 Amount brought forward, . S916 00 



Coolidge, Mrs. Francis L., 
Coolidge, Mrs. Penelope F. 
Cotting, Mrs. Charles E., 
Cotton, Miss Elizabeth A., 
Crocker, Mrs. U. H., 
Crosby, Mrs. S. V. R., . 
Daniels, Mrs. Edwin A., 
Edwards, Miss Hannah M. 
Endicott, Mrs. Wm. C, 
Eustis, Mrs. Herbert H., 
Evans, Mrs. Charles, 
Evans, Mrs. Glendower, 
F 



Faulkner, Miss Fannie M., 
Fay, Mrs. Dudley B., . 
Fay, Miss Sarah M., 
Frothingham, Mrs. Louis A., 
Frothingham, Mrs. Randolph 
Gardner, Mrs. John L., 
Goulding, Mrs. L. R., . 
Grandgent, Prof. Chas. H., 
Gray, Mrs. John Chipman, 
Gray, Mrs. Morris, 
Green, Mr. Charles G., 
Guild, Mrs. S. EUot, . 
Hersey, Mrs. A. H., 
Hobbs, Mrs. Warren D., 
Houghton, Miss Elizabeth G 
Howard, Mrs. P. B., 
Hoyt, Mrs. C. C, . 
Hubbard, Mrs. Eliot, . 
Hubbard, Mrs. Gorham, 
Hunnewell, Mr. Walter, 
Hutchins, Mrs. C. F., . 
Hyneman, Mrs. Louis, . 
lasigi, Mrs. Oscar, 
In memory of Mrs. George 

H. Eager, 
In memory of Mrs. Harriet 
L. Thayer, through Mrs 
Hannah T. Brown, . 
Jenks, Miss Caroline E., 
Johnson, Mrs. Herbert S., 
Jolliffe, Mrs. Thomas H., 
Keene, Mrs. S. W., 
Kimball, The Misses, . 
Koshland, Mrs. Joseph, 
Lee, Mrs. George, . 
Linder, Mrs. George, 



Amount carried forward, . $916 00 



2 00 
1 00 

5 00 
100 00 

6 00 
10 00 

1 00 
10 00 

5 00 
50 00 

1 00 
5 00 

20 00 
10 00 
10 00 
25 00 
50 00 
5 00 

2 00 
5 00 

3 00 
25 00 

5 00 

100 00 

10 00 

5 00 

5 00 

10 00 

1 00 
5 00 

10 00 
5 00 

25 00 
5 00 

2 00 
10 00 

10 00 



5 


00 


5 


00 


10 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


25 


00 


10 


00 


5 


00 


20 


00 



Locke, Mrs. C. A., 
Loring, Mrs. A. P., 
Lowell, Miss Lucy, 
Lyman, Mrs. George H., 
Magee, Mr. John L., 
Manning, Miss A. F., . 
Mansfield, Mrs. S. M., . 
Mason, Miss Fanny P., 
Means, Miss Anne M., 
Merriam, Mrs. Frank, . 
Mills, Mrs. D. T., . 
Morison, Mrs. John H., 
Morrill, Miss Annie W., 
Morse, Dr. Henry Lee, 
Morse, Mrs. Leopold, . 
Otis, Mrs. Herbert F., . 
Peabody, Mr. Harold, . 
Perry, Mrs. C. F., . 
Pfaelzer, Mrs. F. T., . 
Philbrick, Mrs. E. S., . 
Pitman, Mrs. Benjamin F., 
Potter, Mrs. W. H., 
Punchard, Miss A. L., . 
Quincy, Mrs. G. H., 
Rand, Mrs. Arnold A., . 
Ranney, Mr. Fletcher, . 
Rice, Mrs. N. M., . 
Richards, Miss Alice A., 
Richardson, Mrs. Edward C 
Richardson, Mrs. John, 
RUey, Mr. Charles E., . 
Ripley, Mr. Frederick H., 
Rodman, Miss Emma, . 
Rogers, Miss Annette P., 
Rogers, Mrs. J. C, 
Rosenbaimi, Mrs. Henry, 
Rosenbaum, Miss Loraine, 
Rosenbaiim, Mrs. Louis, 
Ross, Mrs. Waldo O., . 
Rotch, Mrs. Wm. J., . 
Rust, Mrs. Wm. A., 
Sanger, Mr. Sabin P., . 
Seabury, Miss Sarah E., 
Sears, Mrs. Richard D., 
Sever, Miss Emily, 
Sherman, Mrs. Wm. H., 
Sherwin, Mrs. Thomas, 
Slattery, Mrs. Wm., 
Smith, Mrs. Phineas B., 



Amount carried forward, $1,366 00 



. 10 00 


. 25 CO 


5 00 


10 00 


. 25 00 


3 00 


1 00 


. 10 00 


10 00 


10 00 


5 00 


5 00 


. 10 00 


. 10 00 


. 10 00 


2 CO 


5 00 


3 00 


. 10 00 


3 00 


. 10 00 


3 00 


. 10 00 


. 10 00 


2 00 


5 00 


. 10 00 


. 10 00 


5 00 


3 00 


. 25 00 


2 00 


. 10 00 


5 00 


5 00 


1 00 


1 00 


5 00 


5 00 


. 25 00 


5 00 


. 10 00 


. 75 00 


. 20 00 


5 00 


5 00 


2 00 


2 00 


2 00 



54 



Amount brought forward, SI, 366 00 



Spalding, Miss Dora N., 
Sprague, Dr. F. P., 
Spring, Mrs. Romney, . 
Stone, Mrs. Philip S., . 
Temple Israel Sunday School 
Thayer, Mrs. Ezra Ripley, 
Thayer, Mrs. Wm. G., . 
Thing, Mrs. Annie B., . 
Thorndike, Mrs. Alden A., 
Thorndike, Mrs. Augustus, 
Tucker, Mrs. J. Alfred, 
Vialle, Mr. Charles A., . 
Vickery, Mrs. Herman F., 
Vorenberg, Mrs. S., 
Wadsworth, Mrs. W. Austin, 



Amount carried fonvard, $1,508 00 



. 10 


00 


10 


00 


3 


00 


1 


00 


, 10 


00 


. 10 


00 


. 10 


00 


10 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 


. 10 


00 


35 


00 


2 


00 


. 20 


00 



AmourU brought forward, $1,508 00 



Warner, Mrs. F. H., . 


10 00 


Watson, Mrs. Thomas A., 


15 00 


Webster, Mrs. F. G., . 


50 00 


Wheelwright, Miss Mary C., 


5 00 


Whiting, Miss Anna M., 


25 00 


Whitney, Mr. Edward F., 


10 00 


Willcomb, Mrs. George, 


10 00 


Williams, Mrs. Arthur, Jr., 


1 00 


Williams, Mr. Ralph B., 


25 00 


Williams, Mrs. T. B., . 


5 00 


WiUson, Miss Lucy B., 


5 00 


Windram, Mrs. W. T., . 


50 00 


Winthrop, Mrs. Thos. Lindal 


1, 25 00 


Ziegel, Mr. Louis, . 


10 00 




J1.754 00 



CAMBRIDGE BRANCH. 



S20 


00 


1 


00 


10 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


3 


00 


2 


00 



Agassiz, Mr. Max (dona- 
tion), .... 

Aldrich, Mrs. Charles F., 

Ames, Mrs. James B. (dona- 
tion), .... 

Boggs, Mrs. Edwin P., . 

Brewster, Mrs. William (do 
nation), 

Bulfinch, Miss Ellen S., 

Chandler, Mrs. Seth C. (do 
nation), 

Emery, Miss Octavia B., 
(donation), . 

Farlow, Mrs. Wm. G. (dona 
tion) 

Foster, Mrs. Francis C. (do 
nation), 

Francke, Mrs. Kuno, 

Frothingham, Miss Sarah E. 

Goodale, Mrs. George L., 

Greenough, Mrs. J. B., . 

Hayward, Mrs. James W., 

Hedge, Miss Charlotte A., 
(donation), . 



Arnount carried forward, . $107 00 



5 00 



30 


00 


3 


00 


9 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 


10 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 



Amount brought forward, . $107 00 



Horsford, Miss Katharine M 

(donation), . 
Howard, Mrs. Albert A., 
Ireland, Miss Catharine I 

(donation), . 
Kennedy, Mrs. F. L., . 
Kettell, Mrs. Charles W., 
Longfellow, Miss Alice M., 
Neal, Mrs. W. H., 
Richards, Miss L. B., . 
Roberts, Mrs. Coolidge S., 
Sargent, Dr. D. A., 
Sa\-ille, Mrs. Henry M., 
Sawyer, Miss Ellen M. (do 

nation). 
Thorp, Mrs. J. G., 
Toppan, Mrs. Robert N., 
Wesselhoeft, Mrs. Walter, 
Whittemore, Mrs. F. W., 
Willson, Mrs. Robert W., 
Woodman, Miss Mary, 
Woodman, Mrs. Walter, 



5 


00 


5 


00 


3 


00 


3 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 


. 10 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 


5 


00 


. 10 


00 


. 10 


00 


2 


00 


6 


00 


5 


00 


. 20 


00 


2 


00 



$211 00 



55 



DORCHESTER BRANCH. 



E 



Bartlett, Miss Susan E., 
Brigham, Mrs. Frank 

(donation), . 
Callender, Miss Caroline S., 
Churchill, Dr. Anna Quincy 
Churchill, Mrs. J. R., . 

(donation), . 
Cashing, Miss Susan T., 
Eliot, Mrs. C. R., . 
Faunce, Mrs. Sewall A., 
Hall, Mrs. Henry, . 
Haven, Mrs. Katharine 

Stearns, 
Hawkes, Mrs. S. L., 
Humphreys, Mrs. Richard C. 
Jordan, Miss Ruth A., . 
Murdock, Mrs. Harold, 
Nash, Mrs. Edward W. (do 

nation), 
Nash, Mrs. Frank K., . 
Nightingale, Mrs. C, . 



$1 00 



1 00 



00 
00 
00 
00 

00 

00 

00 

2 00 

2 00 

1 00 
5 00 
1 00 



Amount carried forward, . $33 00 



Amount brought forward, . $33 00 



Preston, Miss Myra C, 
Reed, Mrs. George M., 
Sayward, Mrs. W. H., . 
Sharp, Mr. Everett H., 
Stearns, Mrs. Albert H., 
Stearns, Mr. A. Maynard, 
Stearns, Mr. A. T., 2d, 
Stearns, Henry D., in mem- 
ory of, . 
Whitcher, Mr. Frank W 

(donation), . 
Whiton, Mrs. Royal, 
Wilder, Miss Grace S., . 
Willard, Mrs. L. P., 
Wood, Mrs. Wm. A., . 
Woodberry, Miss Mary (do- 
nation) , 
Wright, Mr. C. P., 



1 00 



5 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 


1 


00 


3 


00 


1 


00 


5 


00 



$66 00 



LYNN BRANCH. 



Caldwell, Mrs. Ellen F., 
Chase, Mrs. Philip A., . 
Earp, Miss Emily A., . 
Elmer, Mr. and Mrs. V. J., . 
Haven, Miss Rebecca E. (do- 
nation), . . . . 
Sheldon, Mrs. Chauncey C, 

Amount carried forward, . 



$1 00 
5 00 
1 00 
5 00 



$22 00 



Amount brought forward, . $22 00 

Smith, Mrs. Joseph N., . 10 00 
Sprague, Mr. Henry B. (do- 
nation), .... 5 00 
Tapley, Mr. Henry F. (dona- 
tion) 5 00 



$42 00 



MILTON BRANCH. 



Brewer, Misa Eliza (dona- 
tion), .... 
Forbes, Mrs. J. Murray, 
Jaques, Miss Helen L., 
Klous, Mrs. Henry D., . 
Pierce, Mr. Vassar, 

Amount carried forward. 



$10 00 

10 00 

10 00 

2 00 

2 00 

$34 00 



Amount brought forward, . $34 00 

Rivers, Mrs. George R. R., . 1 00 
Ware, Mrs. Arthur L. (dona- 
tion) 10 00 



$45 00 



56 



All contributors to the fund are respectfully requested to peruse the 
above list, and to report either to Albert Thorndike, Treasurer, No. 
19 Congress Street, Boston, or to the Director, Edward E. Allen, Water- 
town, any omissions or inaccuracies which they may find in it. 

ALBERT THORNDIKE, 

Treasurer. 

No. 19 Congress Street, Boston. 



57 



FORM OF BEQUEST. 

I hereby give, devise and bequeath to the Pekkins Institution 
AND Massachusetts School for the Blind, a corporatioii duly 
organized and existing under the laws of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, the sum of dollars ($ ), 

the same to be applied to the general uses and purposes of said 
corporation under the direction of its Board of Trustees; and I 
do hereby direct that the receipt of the Treasurer for the time being 
of said corporation shall be a sufficient discharge to my executors 
for the same. 



FORM OF DEVISE OF REAL ESTATE. 

I give, devise and bequeath to the Perkins Institution and Mas- 
sachusetts School for the Blind, a corporation duly organized 
and existing under the laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
that certain tract of real estate bounded and described as follows : — 

(Here describe the real estate accurately) 
with full power to sell, mortgage and convey the same free of all 
trusts. 



NOTICE. 



The address of the treasurer of the corporation is as 

follows: 

ALBERT THORNDIKE, 

No. 19 Congress Street, 

Boston. 



Perkins Institution 

And Massachusetts vSchool 
For the Blind 




EIGHTY-NINTH ANNUAL REPORT 
OF THE TRUSTEES 



1920 



BOSTO N ^ ^ ^ .>» .^ 1921 
WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO. 



JSilt CUmmmittmpaltli of ilaaHarlptB^tta 



Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School fob the Blind, 
Watertown, October 20. 1920. 

To the Hon. Ax,bert P. Langtry, Secretary of State, Boston. 

Dear Sir: — I have the honor to transmit to you, for 
the use of the legislature, a copy of the eighty-ninth annual 
report of the trustees of this institution to the corporation 
thereof, together with that of the treasurer and the usual 
accompanying documents. 

Respectfully, 

EDWARD E. ALLEN, 

Secretary. 






OFFICERS OF THE CORPORATION. 

1920-1921. 



FRANCIS HENRY APPLETON, President. 
GEORGE H. RICHARDS, Vice-President. 
ALBERT THORNDIKE, Treasurer. 
EDWARD E. ALLEN, Secretary. 



BOABD or TRUSTEES. 



ROBERT AMORY. 
Mrs. GEORGE ANGIER. 
FRANCIS HENRY APPLETON. 
WILLIAM ENDICOTT. 
THOMAS J. FAY. 
PAUL E. FITZPATRICK. 



Rev. PAUL REVERE FROTHINGHAM. 
ROBERT H. HALLOWELL. 
JAMES ARNOLD LOWELL. 
GEORGE H. RICHARDS. 
WILLIAM L. RICHARDSON. M.D. 
RICHARD M. SALTONSTALL. 



STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Monthly Visiting Committee, 

whose duty it ia to visit and inspect the Institution at least once in each month. 



1921. 

January, . . Francis Hbnbt Appleton. 

February, . Mrs. Georqe Angibr. 

March, . . Robert H. Hallowell. 

April, . . Paul R. Frothingham. 

May, . . . James A. Lowell. 

June, . . . Thomas J. Fay. 



July, . . 
August, . 
September, 
October, . 
November, 
December, 



1921. 

Paul E. Fitzpatrick. 
Robert Amort. 
George H. Richards. 
William L. Richardson. 
Richard M. Saltonstall, 
William Endicott. 



Executive Committee. 
Francis Henbt Appu:ton, President, ex 

officio. 
Albert Thorndike, Treasurer, ex officio. 
Edward E. Allen, Secretary, ex officio. 
George H. Richards. 
Mrs. George Angier. 
James A. Lowell. 
Richard M. Saltonstall. 



Finance Committee. 

Albert Thorndike, Treasurer, ex officio. 
George H. Richards. 
Robert H. Hallowell. 
J.^mes a. Lowell. 



Auditors of Expenses. 

George H. Richards. 
Robert H. Hallowell. 
John Montgomert, Certified Public Accountant. 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION AND 
TEACHERS. 



EDWARD E. ALLEN, Director. 



TEACHERS AND OFFICERS OF THE UPPER SCHOOL. 
UTERABT DEPASTMENT. 



Boys' Section. 

MiSB JESSICA L. LANGWORTHY. 
Miss CAROLINE E. McMASTER. 
CHESTER A. GIBSON. 
BURTON A. WELCOME. 
Miss LIZZIE R. KINSMAN. 
Miss REBA M. SAWYER. 
Miss FRANCES KELLERT. 



Girls' Section. 

Miss ELLEN H. PACKARD. 
Miss ANNIE L. BRADFORD. 
Miss GENEVIEVE M. HAVEN. 
Miss ESTELLE M. HARRIS. 
Mrs. ELWYN C. SMITH. 
Miss JULIA E. BURNHAM. 
Miss ELSIE H. SIMONDS. 



Teacher of Home Economics. 

MiBS MEREDITH PEIRCE, 



DEPABTMENT OF PHYSICAL TBAININa. 

GEORGE S. CHAMBERLAIN, | Miss ESTELLE M. HARRIS. 

Miss LENNA D. SWINERTON. 



DEPABTSIENT OF MUSIC. 



Miss FREDA A. BLACK. 
Miss HELEN M. ABBOTT. 
Miss MARY E. BURBECK. 
JOHN F. HARTWELL. 



EDWIN L. GARDINER. 

Miss ALVERA C. GUSTAFSON. 
Miss BLANCHE A. BARDIN. 
Miss MABEL A. STARBIRD, Voice. 



DEPABTMENT OF MANUAL TRAINING. 



Boys' Section. 

JULIAN H. MABEY. 

ELWYN C. SMITH. 

HAROLD W. STANTON. 

Miss MARY B. KNOWLTON, Sloyd. 



Girls' Section. 

Miss FRANCES M. LANGWORTHY. 
Miss M. ELIZABETH ROBBINS. 
Miss MARIAN E. CHAMBERLAIN. 
Miss ELIZABETH V. PIERCE. 



DEPAKTMENT OF TXTNINQ PIANOFOETES. 

ELWYN H. FOWLER, Manager and Imtructor. 



LIBRARIANS, CLEBKS AND BOOKKEEPERS. 



Miss LAURA M. SAWYER, Librarian. 
Miss HARRIET E. BOSWORTH, 

Assistant 
Miss ANNA GARDNER FISH, Clerk. 

Mbs. SARAH A. STOVER, Treasurer for the Ladies' Ainiliary Society 



Miss ELLEN THOMPSON, Assistant. 
Miss MAI L. LELAND, Bookkeeper. 
Miss WINIFRED F. LELAND, Assistant. 



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 

OSCAR S. CREELEY. M.D., AUending Physician. 

HENRY HAWKINS, M.D., Ophthalmologist. 

HAROLD B. CHANDLER, M.D., Assistant Ophthalmologist. 

ARTHUR WILLARD FAIRBANKS, M.D., Pediatrician. 

HOWARD ARTHUR LANE, D.M.D., Attending Dentist for the Institution. 

REINHOLD RUELBERG, D.M.D., Attending Dentist for the Kindergarten. 

Miss WINIFRED MANTON, AUending Nurse. 



DOMESTIC DEPARTMENT. 

FREDERICK A. FLANDERS, Steward. 



Housekeepers in the Cottages. 



Boys' Section. 

Miss CLARISSA A. DAWSON. 
Mrs. JOSEPHINE H. MANSUR, 
Mbs. CHESTER A. GIBSON. 
Mbs. ETHEL M. PIKE. 



Girls' Section. 
Mrs. ISABELLA P. HEARD. 
Mrs. M. M. EASTMAN. 
Mrs. AGNES C. LUMMUS. 
Mrs. MINNIE C. JENNESS. 



PRINTINa DEPARTMENT. 

FRANK C. BRYAN, Manager. 
Mrs. MARTHA A. TITUS, Printer. I Miss MARY L. TULLY, Printer. 



WORKSHOP FOR ADULTS. 

FRANK C. BRYAN, Manager. 
Miss EVA C. ROBBINS, Clerk. 



TEACHERS AND OFFICERS OF THE LOWER SCHOOL. 



KINDESGABTEN. 



Oirls' Section. 

Miss CoRNBLiA M. LoRiNG, Matron. 
Mrs. Mart E. Whitney, Assistant. 
Miss W. R. Humbert, Kindergartner. 
Miss Alice M. Lane, Teacher. 



Boys' Section. 

Miss Nettie B. Vose, Matron. 
Mrs. Emma H. McCraith, Assistant. 
Miss Carolyn M. Burrell, Kindergartner. 
Miss L. Henrietta Stratton, Teacher. 
Miss Sadie Turner, Teacher. 

Miss Louise E. Spencer, Music Teacher. 

Miss Margaret McKenzie, Teacher of Manual Training. 

Miss Lenna D. Swinerton, Assistant in Corrective Gymnastics. 

Miss Eleanor E. Kelly, Field Worker. 

Samuel P. Hates, Ph.D., Psychologist. 

Miss Kathryn E. Maxfield, Assistant Psychologist. 



PBIMABY DEPASTMENT. 
Boys' Section. 



Miss Margaret F. Hughes, Matron. 
Miss Jane J. Walsh, Assistant. 
Miea Ethel D. Evans, Teacher. 



Miss Ida E. Stratton, Teacher. 

Misa Minnie C. Tucker, Music Teacher. 

Miss Rosalind L. Houghton, Sloyd. 



Miss Florence W. Towne, Teacher of Expression, 



Mies Ada S. Babtlett, Matron. 
Miss S. M. Chandler, Assistant. 
Miss Bertha M. Buck, Teacher. 
Miss Margaret Miller, TecLcher. 



Oirls' Section. 



Miss Naomi K. Gring, Music Teacher. 
Miss Gerda L. Wahlberg, Sloyd. 
Miss Esther L. Holmes, Substitute. 



LADIES' VISITINa COMMITTEE TO THE dNDEBQABTEN. 



Mrs. John Chipman Gray, President. 
Miss Annie C. Warren, Vice-President. 
Miss Eleanor S. Parker, Secretary. 



Mrs. Algernon Coolidge, 
Mrs. Harold J. Coolidge, 
Misa Elizabeth G. Norton 
Miss Elizabeth Ward, . 
Miss Ellen Bullard, 
Miss Annib C. Warren, 



January. 
February. 
March. 
April. 

May. 



Miss Eleanor S. Parker, 
Mrs. John Chipman Grat, 
Mrs. Ronald T. Lyman, 
Mrs. George H. Monks, 
Mrs. E. Preble Motley, 



June. 

September, 

October. 

November, 

December. 



Oeneral Visitors. 

Mrs. Roger B. Merriman. 
Mifls Harriett Dexter. 



Honorary Members. 

Mrs. Maud Howe Elliott. 
Mrs. KiNGSMiLL Marrs. 
Mrs. Labz Anderson. 



MEMBERS OF THE CORPORATION. 



Abbot, Mrs. Edwin H., Cam- 
bridge. 

Adams, Karl, Boston. 

Ahl, Mrs. Daniel, Boston. 

Allen, Edward E., Watertown. 

Allen, Mrs. Edward E., Water- 
town. 

Amory, Robert, Boston. 

Anderson, Mrs. Larz, Brookline. 

Angier, Mrs. George, Newton. 

Appleton, Hon. Francis Henry, 
Peabody. 

Appleton, Francis Henry, Jr., 
Boston. 

Appleton, Mrs. Francis Henry, 
Jr., Boston. 

Appleton, Dr. William, Boston. 

Atherton, Mrs. Caroline S., Grove 
HaU. 

Bacon, Caspar G., Jamaica Plain. 

Baldwin, S. E., New Haven, 
Conn. 

Ballantine, Arthur A., Boston. 

Bancroft, Miss Eleanor C, 
Beverly. 

Barbour, Edmund D., Boston. 

Bartlett, Miss Mary F., Boston. 

Baylies, Walter C, Boston. 

Baylies, Mrs. Walter C, Boston. 

Beach, Rev. D. N., Bangor, Me. 

Beatley, Mrs. Clara B., Boston, 

Beebe, E. Pierson, Boston. 

Benedict, Wm. Leonard, New 
York. 

Bennett, Miss Gazella, Worcester. 



Black, George N., Boston. 

Blake, George F., Worcester. 

Blunt, Col. S. E., Springfield. 

Boardman, Mrs. E. A., Boston. 

Bourn, Hon. A. O., Providence, 
R. I. 

Bowditch, IngersoU, Boston. 

Bremer, S. Parker, Boston. 

Brigham, Charles, Watertown. 

Brooke, Rev. S. W., London. 

Brooks, Gorham, Boston. 

Brooks, Shepherd, Boston. 

Brj^ant, Mrs. A. B. M., Boston. 

Bullard, Miss Ellen, Boston. 

Bullock, Col. A. G., Worcester. 

Burditt, Miss Alice A., Boston. 

Burnham, Miss Julia E., Lowell. 

Burnham, William A., Boston. 

Burr, I. Tucker, Jr., Boston. 

Cabot, Mrs. Thomas H., Boston. 

Callahan, Miss Mary G., Boston. 

Callender, Walter, Providence, 
R. L 

Camp, Rev. Edward C, Water- 
town. 

Carter, Mrs. J. W., West Newton. 

Gary, Miss Ellen G., Boston. 

Chace, J. H., Valley Falls, R. L 

Chapin, Edward P., Andover. 

Colt, Samuel P., Bristol, R. L 

Cook, Charles T., Detroit, Mich. 

Cook, Mrs. C. T., Detroit, Mich. 

Coolidge, Mrs. Algernon, Boston. 

Coolidge, Francis L., Boston, 

Coolidge, Mrs. Harold J., Boston. 



Coolidge, J. Randolph, Boston. 

Coolidge, Mrs, J. R., Boston. 

Getting, Charles E., Jr., Boston. 

Crane, Zenas M., Pittsfield. 

Crosby, Sumner, Cambridge. 

Crosby, William S., Brookline. 

Crowninshield, Francis B., Bos- 
ton. 

Cunningham, Mrs. Henry V., 
Boston. 

Curtis, Mrs. Greeley S., Boston. 

Curtis, Horatio G., Boston. 

Curtis, Mrs. Horatio G., Boston. 

Curtis, James F., Boston. 

Cutler, George C, Jr., Boston. 

Dabney, George B., Boston. 

Damon, Willard A., Springfield. 

Davies, Rt. Rev. Thomas F., 
Springfield. 

Davis, Charles S., Boston. 

Davis, Livingston, Milton. 

Day, Mrs. Frank A., Newton. 

Dewey, Francis H., Worcester. 

De Witt, Alexander, Worcester. 

Dexter, Mrs. F. G., Boston. 

Dexter, Miss Harriett, Boston. 

Dexter, Miss Rose L., Boston. 

Dillaway, W. E. L., Boston. 

Dolan, William G., Boston, 

Draper, George A,, Boston. 

Drew, Edward B., Cambridge. 

Duryea, Mrs. Herman, New York. 

Eliot, Rev. C. R., Boston. 

Elliott, Mrs. Maud Howe, Boston. 

Ellis, George H., Boston. 

Ely, Adolph C, Watertown. 

Endicott, Henry, Boston. 

Endioott, William, Boston. 

Endicott, William C, Boston. 

Evans, Mrs. Glendower, Boston. 

Everett, Dr. Oliver H., Worcester. 

Fanning, David H., Worcester. 

Faulkner, Miss F. M., Boston. 



Fay, Mrs. Dudley B., Boston. 

Fay, Mrs. Henry H., Boston. 

Fay, Miss Rosamond, Boston. 

Fay, Miss Sarah B,, Boston. 

Fay, Miss S. M., Boston. 

Fay, Thomas J., Boston, 

Fay, Wm. Rodman, Dover, Mass. 

Fenno, Mrs. L. C, Boston. 

Fisher, Miss Annie E., Boston. 

Fiske, Mrs. Mary Duncan, Bos- 
ton, 

Fitz, Mrs, W, Scott, Boston, 

Fitzpatrick, Paul Edward, Brook- 
line. 

Ford, Lawrence A., Boston. 

Foster, Mrs. Francis C, Cam- 
bridge, 

Freeman, Miss H, E., Boston. 

Frothingham, Rev. P. R,, Boston. 

Fuller, Geoi^e F., Worcester. 

Fuller, Mrs. Samuel R., Boston. 

Gage, Mrs. Homer, Shrewsbury. 

Gale, Lyman W., Boston, 

Gammans, Hon, G. H., Boston. 

Gardiner, Robert H., Boston. 

Gardiner, Robert H., Jr., Need- 
ham. 

Gardner, George P., Boston, 

Gardner, Mrs, John L., Boston. 

Gaskill, George A., Worcester, 

Gaskins, Frederick A., Milton. 

Gay lord, Emerson G., Chicopee, 

Geer, Mrs, Danforth, Jr., New 
Jersey, 

George, Charles H., Providence, 
R.I. 

GUbert, Wm. E., Springfield. 

Gleason, Mrs. Cora L., Water- 
town. 

Gleason, Sidney, Medford. 

GUdden, W. T., Brookline, 

Goddard, Harry W,, Worcester, 

Goff, Darius L., Pawtucket, R, L 



Goff, Lyman B., Pawtucket, R, I, 

Gold th wait, Mrs. John, Boston. 

Gooding, Rev. A., Portsmouth, 
N. H. 

Gordon, Rev. G. A., D.D., Boston. 

Gray, Mrs. John Chipman, Bos- 
ton. 

Gray, Roland, Boston. 

Green, Charles G., Cambridge. 

Grew, Edward W., Boston. 

Griffin, S. B., Springfield. 

Griswold, Merrill, Cambridge. 

Hall, Mrs. Florence Howe, New 
York. 

Hall, Miss Minna B., Longwood. 

Hallowell, John W., Boston. 

Hallowell, Robert H., Boston. 

Hammond, Mrs. G. G., Boston. 

Haskell, Mrs. E. B., Auburndale. 

Hemenway, Mrs. Augustus, Bos- 
ton. 

Higginson, F. L., Jr., Boston. 

Higginson, Mrs. Henry L., Bos- 
ton. 

Hill, Arthur D., Boston. 

Hill, Dr. A. S., Somerville. 

Holmes, Charles W., Toronto, 
Ont. 

Homans, Robert, Boston. 

Howe, Henry Marion, New York. 

Howe, Henry S., Brookline. 

Howe, James G., Milton. 

Howes, Miss Edith M., Brookline. 

Howland, Mrs. O. 0., Boston. 

Hunnewell, Mrs. H. S., Boston, 

Hunnewell, Walter, Jr., Boston. 

Hutchins, Mrs. C. F., Boston. 

lasigi. Miss Mary V., Boston. 

Ingraham, Mrs. E. T., Wellesley. 

Isdahl, Mrs. C. B., California. 

Jackson, Charles C, Boston. 

Jenks, Miss C. E., Bedford. 

Johnson, Edward C, Boston. 



Johnson, Rev. H. S., Boston. 

Joy, Mrs. Charles H., Boston. 

Kasson, Rev. F. H., Boston. 

Kellogg, Mrs. Eva D., Boston. 

Kendall, Miss H. W., Boston. 

Kidder, Mrs. Henry P., Boston. 

Kilham, Miss Annie M., Beverly. 

Kilmer, Frederick M., Water- 
town. 

Kimball, Edward P., Maiden. 

King, Mrs. Tarrant Putnam, Mil- 
ton. 

Kinnicutt, Lincoln N., Worcester. 

Knapp, George B., Boston. 

Knowlton, Daniel S., Boston. 

Kramer, Henry C, Boston. 

Lamb, Mrs. Annie L., Boston. 

Lang, Mrs. B. J., Boston. 

Latimer, Mrs. Grace G., Boston. 

Lawrence, Mrs. A. A., Boston. 

Lawrence, Mrs. James, Groton. 

Lawrence, John Silsbee, Boston. 

Lawrence, Rt. Rev. Wm., Boston. 

Ley, Harold A., Springfield. 

Lincoln, L. J. B., Hingham. 

Lincoln, Waldo, Worcester. 

Littell, Miss Harriet A., Boston. 

Livermore, Mrs. Wm. R., New 
York. 

Lodge, Hon. Henry C, Nahant. 

Logan, Hon. James, Worcester. 

Longfellow, Miss Alice M., Cam- 
bridge. 

Lord, Rev. A. M., Providence, 
R.I. 

Loring, Miss Katharine P., Prides 
Crossing. 

Loring, Miss Louisa P., Prides 
Crossing. 

Loring, Mrs. Wm. Caleb, Boston. 

Lothrop, John, Auburndale. 

Lothrop, Mrs. T. K., Boston. 

Loud, Charles E., Boston. 



Lovering, Mrs. C. T., Boston. 

Lovering, Richard S., Boston. 

Lowell, Abbott Lawrence, Cam- 
bridge. 

Lowell, Miss Amy, Brookline. 

Lowell, Miss Georgina, Boston. 

Lowell, James Arnold, Boston. 

Lowell, John, Chestnut Hill. 

Lowell, Miss Lucy, Boston. 

Luce, Hon. Robert, Waltham. 

Lyman, Mrs. Ronald T., Boston. 

Marrett, Miss H, M., Standish, 
Me. 

Marrs, Mrs. Kingsmill, Boston. 

Mason, Charles F., Watertown. 

Mason, Miss Ellen F., Boston, 

Mason, Miss Ida M., Boston. 

McElwain, R. Franklin, Holyoke. 

Merriman, Mrs. D., Boston. 

Merriman, Mrs. Roger B., Cam- 
bridge. 

Merritt, Edward P., Boston, 

Meyer, Mrs. G. von L., Boston. 

Minot, the Misses, Boston. 

Minot, J. Grafton, Boston. 

Minot, James J., Jr., Boston. 

Minot, William, Boston. 

Monks, Mrs. George H., Boston. 

Morgan, Eustis P., Saco, Me. 

Morgan, Mrs. Eustis P., Saco, Me. 

Morison, Mrs. John H., Boston. 

Morse, Mrs. Leopold, Boston. 

Morse, Miss Margaret F., Jamaica 
Plain. 

Moseley, Charles H., Boston. 

Motley, Mrs. E. Preble, Boston. 

Motley, Warren, Boston. 

Norcross, Grenville H., Boston. 

Norcross, Mrs. Otis, Boston. 

Norton, Miss Elizabeth G., Cam- 
bridge. 

Noyes, Mrs. Lucia C, Jamaica 
Plain. 



Osgood, Mrs. E. L., Hopedale. 

Osgood, Miss Fanny D., Hope- 
dale. 

Parker, Miss Eleanor S., Boston. 

Parker, W. Prentiss, Boston. 

Parker, W. Stanley, Boston. 

Partridge, Fred F., Holyoke. 

Peabody, Rev. Endicott, Groton. 

Peabody, Frederick W., Boston. 

Peabody, Harold, Boston. 

Peabody, Philip G., Boston. 

Peabody, W. Rodman, Boston. 

Perkins, Charles Bruen, Boston. 

Perkins, Mrs. C. E., Boston. 

Phillips, Mrs. John C, Boston. 

Pickering, Henry G., Boston. 

Pickman, D, L., Boston. 

Pickman, Mrs. D. L., Boston. 

Pierce, Mrs. M. V., Milton. 

Plunkett, W. P., Adams. 

Pope, Mrs. A. A., Boston. 

Poulsson, Miss Emilie, Boston. 

Powers, Mrs. H. H., Newton. 

Pratt, George Dwight, Spring- 
field. 

Prendergast, J, M., Boston. 

Proctor, James H,, Boston. 

Putnam, F. Delano, Boston. 

Putnam, Mrs. James J., Boston. 

Rantoul, Neal, Boston. 

Rantoul, Robert S., Salem. 

Read, Mrs. Robert M., Medford. 

Remick, Frank W., West Newton. 

Rice, John C, Boston. 

Richards, Miss Elise, Boston. 

Richards, George H., Boston. 

Richards, Mrs. H., Gardiner, Me. 

Richards, Henry H., Groton. 

Richardson, John, Jr., Read\alle. 

Richardson, Mrs. John, Jr., Read- 
ville. 

Richardson, Miss M. G., New 
York. 



10 



Richardson, Mrs. M. R., Boston. 

Richardson, W. L., M.D., Boston. 

Roberts, Mrs. A. W., Allston. 

Robinson, George F., Watertown. 

Rogers, Miss Flora E., New York. 

Rogers, Henry M., Boston. 

Ropes, Mrs. Joseph A., Boston. 

Russell, Otis T., Boston. 

Russell, Mrs. Robert S., Boston. 

Russell, Mrs, W. A., Boston. 

Russell, Wm. Eustis, Boston. 

Saltonstall, Leverett, Westwood, 

Saltonstall, Mrs. Leverett, West- 
wood. 

Saltonstall, Richard M., Boston. 

Sargent, Miss Alice, Brookline. 

Schaff, Capt. Morris, Cambridge. 

Sears, Mrs. Knyvet W., Boston. 

Shattuck, Henry Lee, Boston. 

Shaw, Bartlett M., Watertown. 

Shaw, Mrs. G. Howland, Boston. 

Shaw, Henry S., Boston. 

Shepard, Harvey N., Boston. 

Slater, Mrs. H. N., Boston. 

Smith, Joel West, East Hampton, 
Conn. 

Snow, Walter B., Watertown. 

Sohier, Miss Emily L., Boston. 

Sohier, Miss M. D., Boston. 

Sorchan, Mrs. Victor, New York. 

Sprague, F. P., M.D., Boston. 

Stanwood, Edward, Brookline. 

Stearns, Charles H., Brookline. 

Stearns, Mrs. Charles H., Brook- 
line. 

Stearns, Wm. B., Boston. 

Stevens, Miss C. A., New York. 

Sturgis, Francis S., Boston. 

Sturgis, R. Clipston, Boston. 

Tha>^r, Charles M., Worcester. 

Thaj-er, Rev. G. A., Cincinnati, 0. 

Thayer, Mrs. Nathaniel, Boston. 

Thomas, Mrs. John B., Boston. 



Thorndike, Albert, Boston. 

Thorndike, Miss Rosanna D., 
Boston. 

Tifft, Eliphalet T., Springfield. 

Tilden, Miss Alice Foster, Milton. 

Tilden, Miss Edith S., Milton. 

Ttngley, S. H., Providence, R. I. 

Tuckerman, Mrs. C. S., Boston. 

Tufts, John F., Watertown. 

Underwood, Herbert S., Boston. 

Underwood, Wm. Lyman, Bel- 
mont. 

Villard, Mrs. Henry, New York. 

Wallace, Andrew B., Springfield. 

Ward, Miss Elizabeth, Boston. 

Ware, Miss Mary L., Boston. 

Warren, Miss Annie C, Boston. 

Warren, J. G., Providence, R. I. 

Washburn, Hon. Charles G., 
Worcester. 

Washburn, Mrs. Frederick A., 
Boston. 

Waters, H. Goodman, Springfield. 

Watson, Thomas A., Boston. 

Watson, Mrs. Thomas A., Boston. 

Wendell, WUliam G., Boston. 

Wesson, James L., Boston. 

West, George S., Boston. 

Wheelock, Miss Lucy, Boston. 

White, George A., Boston. 

Whitney, Henry M., Brookline. 

Wiggins, Charles, 2d, Cambridge. 

Winsor, Mrs. E., Chestnut Hill. 

Winsor, James B., Providence, 
R. L 

Winsor, Robert, Jr., Boston. 

Winthrop, Mrs. Thomas L., Bos- 
ton. 

Wolcott, Roger, Boston. 

Wright, Burton H., Worcester. 

Wright, George S., Watertown. 

Young, Mrs. Benjamin L., Boston. 

Yoimg, B. Loring, Weston. 



11 



SYNOPSIS OF THE PROCEEDINGS 



ANNUAL MEETING OF THE COEPOEATION. 



Watertown, October 13, 1920. 

The annual meeting of the corporation, duly summoned, 
was held to-day at the institution, and was called to order 
by the president, Hon. Francis Henry Appleton, at 3 p.m. 

The proceedings of the last meeting were read and ap- 
proved. 

The annual report of the trustees was accepted and or- 
dered to be printed, together with the usual accompanying 
documents. 

The report of the treasurer was accepted and ordered on 
file. 

Voted, That acts and expenditures, made and authorized by the 
Board of Trustees, or by any committee appointed by said Board of 
Trustees, during the corporate year closed this day, be and are hereby 
ratified and confirmed. 

The corporation then proceeded to ballot for officers for 
the ensuing year, and the following persons were unani- 
mously elected : — 

President. — Hon. Francis Henry Appleton. 

Vice-President. — George H. Richards. 

Treasurer. — Albert Thorndike. 

12 



Secretary. — Edward E. Allen. 

Trustees. — Mrs. George Angier, Francis Henry Appleton, 
William Endicott, Paul E. Fitzpatrick, Robert H. Hallowell, 
James A. Lowell, George H. Richards, and Richard M. 
Saltonstall. 

The following persons were unanimously elected members 
of the corporation: — Mr. Karl Adams, Mrs. Larz Anderson, 
Miss Ellen Bullard, Mrs. Thomas Handasyd Cabot, Mrs. 
Algernon Coolidge, Mrs. Harold J. Coolidge, Miss Harriett 
Dexter, Mr. Paul E. Fitzpatrick, Mrs. John Chipman Gray, 
Mrs. William R. Livermore, Mrs. Ronald T. Lyman, Mrs. 
Roger B. Merriman, Mr. James J. Minot, Jr., Miss Eliza- 
beth G. Norton, Miss Eleanor S. Parker, Miss Alice Sar- 
gent, Mrs. John B. Thomas, Miss Elizabeth Ward and 
Miss Annie C. Warren. 

The meeting then adjourned. 

EDWARD E. ALLEN, 

Secretary. 



13 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES. 



Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind, 
Watertown, October 13, 1920. 

Ladies and Gentlemen : — Soon after the re- 
opening of school last fall, a Watertown historical 
pageant was enacted alongside the grounds of the 
institution. In this several of our officers and 
teachers and twenty-four pupils took part. Com- 
munity participation of this and other kinds by in- 
stitution people, especially the pupils, is one of the 
best things in the world for them. The association 
may also be helpful to the townspeople. In this 
instance the institution could lend some of its facili- 
ties and did so, — the use of its large hall for re- 
hearsals and as a distributing center for hired cos- 
tumes, also its power plant and engineer for helping 
light the scene of the pageant itself. The people of 
Watertown, Newton, Waltham, Brookline, Belmont, 
Cambridge and other western settlements of greater 
Boston visit the school from time to time, attend 
its exhibitions, concerts, and plays. They are very 
welcome, just as our institution people are made 
welcome to participate in the social and religious Hfe 
of the town in which we are located. This is mutually 



14 



educating and socializing. The institution grounds 
until now have been left open to outsiders, but this 
has been found to be a mistake. Had there been a 
fence about the grounds from the beginning, the 
privilege given might have been respected and kept 
under control. As it was, our thirty-four acres, in- 
cluding playgrounds, orchards and gardens, have 
been overrun by irresponsible young people, against 
whose further trespassing we have now erected a 
barrier on three sides in the form of a seven-foot 
iron fence. We shall hope soon to be able to carry 
this fence all the way around and to erect gates and 
gateways. 

Fence and gates are not needed to shut our own 
people in. Most of these are too much shut in al- 
ready by their bUndness and need frequent contact 
with the world. The pupils are free to visit the village 
often. For some six weeks together last winter this 
privilege was almost cut off through ice and snow; 
and had it not been that most of the boys had their 
free time pretty much taken up then in rehearsals 
for a performance of " JuUus Csesar", the restlessness 
which they had caught from the rest of the world, 
accentuated as it was through unwonted restraint, 
might have made our winter a somewhat difficult 
one. As it was, we passed a successful year of social- 
izing school Ufe, with much strenuous work and play, 
and at its close graduated with high-school diploma 
a class of thirteen, certificated two as piano tuners 
and one as teacher of the piano. 



15 



The year's choir was an especially strong one. Its 
singing of the Christmas carols, twice at the school 
and once in Boston, also of its annual concert in 
May, was enjoyed by large and enthusiastic audi- 
ences. 

The girls and the boys of the upper school were 
well drilled in gymnastic exercises and marching, as 
they proved when put to the test on Washington's 
Birthday. The champions of the boys who visited 
Philadelphia in June to meet the champions of the 
Pennsylvania school in field sports returned bringing 
the cup with them. 

Our teacher of dancing steps to the lower school 
children, and her helpers, gave in May a very credit- 
able pageant in the institution hall. It had been 
prepared for out of doors, but because the day was 
cold it had to be transferred to the hall, — not an 
easy thing to do with bUnd children. 

A very great deal of credit is always due all our 
teachers of the lower school for their success in train- 
ing their Uttle people to be Hke others. When these 
children first come to the kindergarten they are rather 
a nondescript lot, nearly always self-centered or with 
very httle idea of give and take. It is the happy 
function of this school to ''adjust them to their en- 
vironment" early. As an initial sociaHzing agent 
the kindergarten is singularly successful. A Httle 
bUnd child ought rarely to be kept away from such 
correcting influences. 

We have two kindergartens, a girls' and a boys'. 



16 



With each family of about thirty children there 
are four teachers and two housemothers. Most of 
these latter have served for many years, having 
begun such service at Jamaica Plain. Much might 
be said of their devotion, for it has been deep and 
strong; and perhaps it is especially so because de- 
veloped in the early years of the kindergarten, when 
that organization was struggUng with its beginnings. 
All the housemothers or matrons who knew Jamaica 
Plain were still with us last year. But when the 
time came for reopening this fall Mrs. Josephine M. 
Hill had to give up. She has been matron of Brad- 
lee Cottage for twenty-eight years, or from the open- 
ing of the girls' kindergarten in 1892. Since then 
304 children have passed through her hands and 
been corrected, shaped and started right. She is 
proud of this record, and well she may be, for it is 
a splendid one. It has been surpassed by only one 
other matron who is still with us and as faithful as 
ever, — Miss Nettie B. Vose of Anagnos Cottage. 
She has served thirty-three years, a whole genera- 
tion, for the children of others. 

There is many another member of his staff whose 
praises our Director would Hke to sing, and some 
are newcomers though most are old in service. There 
is one, however, who, though she may come back to 
him some day, has now withdrawn because of her 
health, — Mrs. Cora L. Gleason, for eighteen years 
matron of B House at South Boston, hence lovingly 
called by her girls ''Mother B," and six years matron 



17 



of Brooks Cottage at Watertown. The Perkins 
Institution has enjoyed and still enjoys the services 
of many consecrated Uves. It has rarely had one 
whose joy in her girls and whose responsibility 
towards maintaining the good old Perkins spirit has 
been so tactfully and yet so effectively appUed as by 
Mrs. Gleason. Her influence spread not only beyond 
her immediate family and duties but into the other 
famines and continued to follow the fortunes of 
most girls after leaving school. Hers was a compre- 
hensive interest, and though she is bodily absent 
her influence abides. 

The old Perkins plan of bringing the home in 
touch with the school has been, first, to try to in- 
duce some member of each child's family to visit 
the institution and see it for himself. Many a parent 
has been entertained there at a meal or over night. 
Secondly, it has been and still is customary for the 
matrons to correspond from time to time with the 
parents of their girls or boys. In this way a more 
intimate understanding follows than if all communi- 
cation passed through the office. Thirdly, the grad- 
uation exercises are so timed that parents and friends 
will be the more likely to attend them when fetching 
their children home for the vacation or at the end 
of these children's school careers. 

While retaining the old plan, which is excellent so 
far as it goes, the new one, in practice for the past 
year, goes a step further, following the principle 
that the message you carry is more potent than the 



18 



one you send. The institution now has a field- 
worker for prospective, present and past pupils. 
Miss Eleanor E. Kelly, this ''home- visitor," is also 
pupils' vocational guide at the school. In term time 
she lives there, and, becoming thoroughly acquainted 
as she does with all pupils, she learns their indi- 
vidualities, their capacities and their aspirations. 
She spends many hours counseling the older ones 
A^ho go to her for advice. She also places some in 
vacation positions, in this particular co-operating 
with the placement agent of the ''Division of the 
Blind," now working under the State Department 
of Education. She does most of her home-visiting 
in vacation time, confining herself mainly to the 
New England states outside of Massachusetts, since 
these remoter homes are apt to be least in touch 
with the school. She reports being invariably wel- 
comed by parents, who have numerous questions to 
ask; and she says she has been able to straighten 
out so many natural misunderstandings that her 
home-visiting opportunities seem to her to transcend 
her vocational guidance and placement ones. One 
of her objects is to see what the pupils are doing in 
vacation, or after quitting school, — how utilizing 
their time and powers; and she has often been able 
to bring about an immediate improvement. Miss 
Kelly made 140 calls this past summer in Maine, 
New Hampshire and Vermont. 

The work of the psychologist, now employed at 
the school under the guidance of Prof. Samuel P. 



19 



Hayes of Mt. Holyoke College, who is also a mem- 
ber of our staff, is becoming more and more effective 
as it is more and more understood. Office and 
classroom have alike come to rely upon her findings 
as to each pupil's capacities and promise. And the 
pupils themselves are interested. The tests are both 
individual and group, the latter serving to supply 
quickly answers to certain doubtful questions. For 
example, the Efficiency Committee of the American 
Association of Instructors of the Bhnd, of which 
Mr. Allen is chairman, needed last spring to have 
data on which to base modifications of the school 
curricula. These results of testings of groups of 
pupils supphed the data; that is, told how the old 
plans and methods were working and suggested 
possible changes and improvements. The psychol- 
ogist and the field-worker are doing excellent team- 
work. 

We have not made recent report on our depart- 
ment of piano tuning. This department teaches a 
vocation which has proved about the best one for 
the competent bhnd man to follow. There is at the 
school a Hst of 75 men whom it has certificated as 
tuners since 1885, — averaging two a year. Of these 
69, or 92 per cent, are considered to have succeeded 
and are either still following the vocation or have 
used it as a stepping-stone to something individu- 
ally more suitable. Many have added piano selling 
— a few, phonograph selhng — to piano tuning. 
These men are scattered over the country, tuning 



20 



either in private homes, in factories or warerooms. 
One wrote last summer that he was president of a 
club of bUnd tuners in Chicago and asked for a sen- 
timent to be used at their annual dinner. Blind 
tuners are often unsurpassed in their calHng, as some 
professional pianists know; for they sometimes send 
for one when desiring a particularly nice job. 

Mr. Fowler, a Perkins graduate and for the past 
nine years instructor and manager of our depart- 
ment of piano tuning, took the course four years ago 
in the care and tuning of the piano player at the 
Danquard School in New York City, and since then 
four of his pupils have taken it, — all five having 
passed the examination with the highest group 
rating and having received gold-seal diplomas. Mr. 
Fowler finds that about half of his pupils who are 
capable of gaining the Perkins certificate for caring 
for and tuning pianos are also capable of under- 
taking piano player work, and after initiating these 
at Watertown he encourages them to finish at a 
player-action school. Mr. Fowler has given to a 
class of his graduate tuners a course of evening 
lectures with demonstrations on the care and tuning 
of the piano player. 

The Howe Memorial Press, which manufactures 
its 'tangible appliances" at South Boston and its 
tangible books at Watertown, has had a busy year. 
It spent during the year about $14,000 and received 
back about $4,000. That is, from its income it de- 
voted about $10,000 to the cause of the bhnd, — 



21 



say, in round figures, $4,000 used for books, music 
and appliances given away, $3,800 loss on the same 
sold at less than cost, and $2,200 in the circulations 
of books. The appliance on which it labored most 
is its new Braillewriter, concerning whose appear- 
ance on the market there is eager inquiry. This 
"Press" supphed schools and individuals with 1,579 
Braille slates. It embossed 3,180 brass plates and 
from these struck off 106,000 sheets, which it has 
collated and fastened into books and pamphlets, as 
well as 62,000 sheets which were reprints. Much 
time and care is required to fill orders for suppHes, 
which come in from all over the country and even 
from foreign lands. It sends twelve copies of all 
new publications to the Perkins Institution Ubrary, 
for general circulation. People borrow these books 
from far and near, this hbrary being the circulation 
center for New England. The full time of one of 
the two Hbrarians is given to circulation. Last year 
its outside borrowers numbered 827. To these it 
sent out 7,142 books, and to pupils 5,151 books for 
voluntary reading and class work. 

Though these figures mean a growing circulation 
and look large, they are really not so, especially 
those indicating the reading done by the bUnd at 
home, where the vast majority are. About one- 
quarter of our outside borrowers were once pupils 
at the school; most of the rest have been taught by 
traveling home teachers sent out by the state. Only 
about three-eighths of our former pupils continue 



22 



to draw out books. Yet we are constantly em- 
bossing new and attractive fiction, and we publish 
the fact in many ways. We have just imported 
from England 705 volumes embossed in Moon's 
type, the big, coarse system demanded by the aged 
blind and those other of the adult blind who have 
neither courage nor patience to learn Braille. These 
705 volumes represent 196 titles or complete books. 
Twenty-two of these are new pubhcations, the rest, 
old ones, having been ordered either to increase the 
number of copies of the more popular works or to 
replace those worn out by use. 

The Perkins workshop at South Boston, repre- 
senting as it has done for many years our chief 
direct labors for the adult bhnd, has this past year 
been kept fully as busy as usual. Its main rehance 
is still mattresswork. It conducts a shop and a 
salesroom, employs in its business twenty-two bhnd 
and eight seeing people, runs two automobile trucks, 
and, unlike most shops for the bhnd, meets its own 
expenses. Of this fact we are naturally proud. The 
increased cost of running the business has been met 
by the increased income, so that the workers have 
been paid in wages this year 50 per cent more than 
in any year before the war. It is now not uncommon 
for a bhnd man to receive during the busy season 
$100 for a month's piecework. 

The late Dr. Henry Kemble Oliver of Boston, 
who in his later years was blind, gave to the Perkins 
Institution between the years 1909 and 1918 $15,000 



23 



to be called after his sister the Maria Kemble Oliver 
Fund. She had once been a pupil of this school, 
had been musical, and had evidently derived profit 
as well as solace from attending concerts. Dr. 
OUver stipulated that the income of this fund was 
to be used primarily for the purchase of tickets to 
such musical events in Boston as our students of 
music would not be likely to attend otherwise. For 
eight years, then, parties of our advanced pupils 
have been taken to all the best operas and concerts 
given in Boston. The opportunity has really been 
a wonderful extension of our instruction in music. 
Indeed, we feel that no talented student of music 
who is bhnd could find elsewhere in America con- 
ditions superior to those afforded at Perkins Insti- 
tution, coupled as they are with the opportunities 
of the OHver music fund and those of the New 
England Conservatory of Music. Three of our ad- 
vanced pupils, two of whom are from the west, are 
to-day attending this Conservatory from Water- 
town. Promising pupils now in schools for the blind 
which happen to be located in small towns of the 
north, south and west might well be sent for a year 
or two to Perkins if we had a few scholarships which 
would make this possible. Such an experience would 
be of utmost service to them. Connecticut, which 
has a school of its own, sends its most talented 
music students to Perkins Institution. 

In sundry ways an estabhshed institution like 
ours is able to initiate or help along new ventures 



24 



for the blind in other places. A pupil from Porto 
Rico whom we entertained at Watertown for the 
two school years from 1917 to 1919 has since opened 
the first school for bhnd children in her native land. 
She came to us in order to prepare herself for this 
very thing. We have sent her appliances, and one 
of our matrons has visited her school. She is strug- 
ghng along as best she can, but is in sore need of 
additional help and encouragement. 

The institution is never quite full, and while most 
of the pupils are good material others are not so. 
Since we have the room we often retain longer than 
otherwise would be expedient some who, because 
unable to progress, do not belong at Perkins. All 
our institutions for bhnd youth do this, and they do 
it because there is no school for the bhnd defective. 
So to do is poor economy and false charity. The 
two kinds, the hopeful and the hopeless, whether 
bhnd or seeing, should never be domiciled and taught 
together. The association is depressing for both. 
We always have a few private pay pupils from out- 
side of New England. Applications from others 
who would like to come to us are not infrequent, 
but these young people can rarely be admitted be- 
cause they cannot pay our tuition fee of $400. (The 
actual cost is over $600.) Had the Perkins Institu- 
tion adequate income to cover ordinary expenses 
and improvements, it could not do better than to 
create a number of scholarships, tenable by young 
blind people of proved capacity and promise and 



25 



hailing from anyivhere. Why not? We have pupils 
now from Arkansas, California, Michigan and South 
Dakota; from Asia Minor, China and Hawaii. 
Scholarship pupils are not only promising pupils; 
they are likely to be real students — those who 
appreciate their opportunities the more because 
they have merited them and are self-urged to con- 
tinue to merit them. 

There is little doubt, as the late WilUam James 
asserted, that men habitually use only a small part 
of the powers which they actually possess and which 
they might use under proper conditions. Now, 
while knowledge of this fact does not seem to affect 
seriously the careers of people in general, it does 
often profoundly affect those of the handicapped, — 
particularly the bUnd. It can foster a state of mind 
which is the best earnest of victory. The system 
of scholarships held by a great sister school in Eng- 
land, the Royal Normal College and Academy of 
Music for the Blind, has done just this thing there. 
A similar system would do the same here. The 
talented bhnd not only merit special scholarship aid 
quite as much as the talented seeing, but they need 
it vastly more. May this explanation meet with 
response from readers of this report, the friends of 
Perkins Institution, who have done so much for it 
already. 

The Board of Trustees has drawn up and put in 
operation a new set of rules and regulations for the 
conduct of its affairs; has rearranged its standing 
committees, having created a new one, the Execu- 

26 



tive Committee, to meet statedly once a month; 
while the Board itself continues to meet quarterly 
as hitherto. 

The tuition for all resident pupils is now $400 a 
year, which is about two-thirds of the actual cost. 

At the beginning of the current year, October 1, 
1920, the number of bhnd persons registered at the 
Perkins Institution was 304, or six fewer than on 
the same date of the previous year. This number 
includes 78 boys and 78 girls in the upper school, 55 
boys and 57 girls in the lower school, 14 teachers 
and officers and 22 adults in the workshop at South 
Boston. There have been 67 admitted and 73 dis- 
charged during the year. 

Causes of Blindness of Pupils admitted during the 
School year, 1919-1920. — Ophthalmia neonatorum, 
13; Interstitial keratitis, 2; Old kerato-irido-cyclitis, 
2; Purulent conjunctivitis, 1; Retinitis pigmentosa, 
1; Injury, 5; Atrophy of the optic nerve, 10; Al- 
binism, 1; Congenital amblyopia, 2; Congenital 
defects, 4; Congenital cataracts, 8; Congenital 
cataract and aniridia, 1; Microphthalmos, 2; Buph- 
thalmos, 2; Glaucoma, 1; Staphyloma, 1; Corneal 
ulceration, 2; Disorganized globes, 1; Separation of 
retina, 1; Coloboma of choroid, 1; Optic neuritis, 
1; Hemorrhages, 1; High myopia, 1. 

Death of Members of the Corporation. 
Melvin 0. Adams, a member of our Board of 
Trustees from 1901 to 1903; Peter C. Brooks; 
Edward H. Clement; Mrs. Mary McGregor, 

27 



wife of Charles H. Dalton; Henry H. Fay; Fred- 
eric Higginson; Henry Lee Higginson; Mrs. 
Clara Bertram, wife of David P. Kimball; Dr. 
Henry K. Oliver; Miss Annette P. Rogers; 
WiLLARD T. Sears; Mrs. Harriet Caverly, widow 
of George W. A. Williams. 

In recording the death of Miss Annette P. Rogers 
we desire to pay tribute to the helpfulness of this 
member of our Board of Trustees from 1907 to 1918. 
Always sympathetic but practical in her sympathies, 
she devoted her days to the service of others, with 
special helpful regard to the problems of the sight- 
less, whose affliction she shared in her later years. 
Her loss will be felt by many who had come to 
depend upon her wise counsels and generous spirit. 

All which is respectfully submitted by 

ROBERT AMORY, 
ANNIE OILMAN ANGIER, 
FRANCIS HENRY APPLETON, 
WILLIAM ENDICOTT, 
THOMAS J. FAY, 
PAUL E. FITZPATRICK, 
PAUL REVERE FROTHINGHAM, 
ROBERT H. HALLOWELL, 
JAMES ARNOLD LOWELL, 
GEORGE H. RICHARDS, 
WILLIAM L. RICHARDSON, 
RICHARD M. SALTONSTALL, 

Trustees. 



28 



ANSWERING MANY QUESTIONS THAT 
HAVE BEEN ASKED IN RELA- 
TION TO THE TEACHING OF 
MUSIC IN THE PERKINS 
INSTITUTION. 



The Perkins Institution a Boarding School. 

The Perkins Institution is a boarding school where pupils 
between the age of five and twenty who have defective sight 
or who are without sight are received for educational training. 

The school year coincides with that of the public schools 
and the pupils go to their homes during the vacation periods. 

The hours of study, practice, and recitation begin at 
8.15 A.M., directly after the morning assembly, and, with suit- 
able provision for the dinner hour, continue until 5 o'clock. 
One hour of study in the classrooms is required in the even- 
ing, and regular school work is conducted on Saturdays until 
12 o'clock, noon. 

The Music Department One of Several. 
The music school is one of several departments, each of 
which has its peculiar value and place in the general curricu- 
lum. Music is taught for its educational value, and practice 
and lessons are conducted exactly as study and recitations 
in grammar and mathematics might be. Pupils go to their 
appointed music study, lessons or supervised practice as they 
go to their geography classes or to the gymnasium. From 
this regular study and practice there is no escape. 

29 



The Music Faculty. 
The music faculty numbers twelve teachers, each one of 
whom is trained for special instruction in some particular 
branch of music. 

The Organization. 

We are organized in three groups as follows : — 

The kindergarten and primary group of three teachers; 

the girls' upper school with four teachers; and the boys' 

upper school with four teachers. 

The music director and the teacher of musical science have 

classes in both the girls' and the boys' schools. 

The Equipment. 
We have 45 music rooms, 61 pianofortes, and 1 large three- 
manual pipe organ. In addition we have a very fine collec- 
tion of orchestral instruments which are used in the theory 
classes to familiarize the pupils with their tone qualities, their 
use in orchestral writing, and their size and shape. 

Music Library. 

Our music library is a large one and is valued at approxi- 
mately S4,000. It is well housed in a fine large room equally 
accessible to both the boys' and the girls' music corridors. 
It is conducted by the teacher of musical science, who finds 
it a most convenient place in which to receive classes from 
either the girls' or the boys' music departments. 

The Braille music of this library is freely loaned without 
charge to blind musicians throughout the country and its 
usefulness is very great. 



30 



Course of Study, First Lessons. 

Our music course is conducted on logical methods. The 
first lessons are devoted to the study of ear training and of 
solfeggio. To this are added tone production, staff, and 
Braille notation of music, and music fundamentals. Chorus 
singing is also included in this early training. 

Pupils in small classes, during their connection with the 
kindergarten and the primary schools, have daily appoint- 
ments with the teacher of solfeggio and singing, and they 
are not permitted to begin the study of the pianoforte until 
recommended by this teacher as qualified for instrumental 
instruction. 

Pianoforte Instruction. 

When prepared for it, pupils may begin the practice of the 
pianoforte, at first in small classes which meet the teacher 
daily, and afterward in still smaller groups or, it may be, 
individual instruction is given on alternate days. 

Chorus singing and solfeggio are still required, however, as 
well as thorough grounding in scale and chord formation, 
rhythm and general music fundamentals. Proficiency in 
writing, reading, and singing music is required. 

Promotion to the Upper School. 

With promotion to the upper school the study of solfeggio 
is discontinued. The girls are immediately drafted into the 
large chorus, while the boys delay chorus singing until their 
voices change and become settled. 

The pupils quite generally continue the study of the piano- 
forte when promoted and a very few begin the study of the 
pipe organ, while a much larger number receive special 

lessons in singing. 

31 



Music Science Study encouraged. 
Pupils are encouraged to study the science of music, and 
to obtain an intimate knowledge of its content and structure. 
Talented pupils may, with consent of the faculty, elect to 
study harmony, counterpoint and theory after completing a 
course in algebra, and credits are given them toward the 
school diploma for work done in these subjects. 

Chorus Singing. 

Chorus singing is required of all music pupils and of 
others who may have received sufficient training in solfeggio 
and tone production to make them efficient members of the 
choir. 

The large chapel choir numbers from eighty to one hun- 
dred singers. They meet for rehearsal on Mondays, Tues- 
days, Thursdays and Fridays at 3.15 p.m., when visitors are 
always welcome. They also sing every day, except Sunday, 
at the morning assembly of the school. 

The music used by this choir is the Braille, which is read 
by the sense of touch, and the young singers commit it to 
memory paragraph by paragraph as directed. 

Girls' Glee Club. 

On Wednesdays and Saturdays the singing hour is given 
to the Girls' Glee Club, whose membership is composed 
largely of the older and more experienced singers of the 
girls' school. 

Participation of this club in church socials, public meet- 
ings of women's clubs and the like has elicited favorable 
comment and afforded the club girls much enjoyment. 



32 



Pianoforte Normal Department, 
Post graduates who wish to adopt music as a vocation in 
Hfe are required to participate in the three-year course of the 
Pianoforte Normal Department. Seeing children from sur- 
rounding towns visit our school twice each week for instruc- 
tion in music from these post graduates who conduct this 
teaching under the immediate direction of a qualified member 
of our faculty. With the satisfactory completion of this 
course the young teacher is given a certificate, and should 
the recipient also complete the instrumental course at the 
New England Conservatory of Music, this certificate is ac- 
cepted by that school in lieu of the normal work required 
there. 

Concert Attendance. 

Through the kindness of friends, our pupils have for years 
enjoyed the privilege of attendance on the opera, symphony 
concerts, and recitals in Boston. This invaluable advantage 
has recently been very greatly enlarged by the generosity of 
another friend who has invested for us the sum of $10,000, 
the income from which we are at liberty to use in the pur- 
chase of tickets to such musical events as the director deems 
advisable. 

This frequent hearing of good music given in the best pos- 
sible manner, coupled with thorough study, is largely respon- 
sible for the superior average musicianship found among our 

pupils. 

Lack of Sight not a Sign of Talent. 

The lack of sight in no way increases the amount of 
musical talent in any individual, and our pupils are neither 
more nor less talented than the average public school children. 

33 



They all do, however, live in an atmosphere of music and 
they may have a keener zest in the pursuit of musical at- 
tainment than most young people, and yet, other things 
being equal, this last statement is open to debate. 

While large numbers of our pupils do become more or less 
proficient in instrumental music, in singing, or in musical 
science, only a limited number who show decided aptitude 
are encouraged or permitted to continue the advanced study 
of music as a vocation. 

Music as an Avocation. 

As an avocation, for its invaluable merit and worth in the 
building of character, — as a social asset, — music study is 
permitted and encouraged up to a point where pupils should 
begin to devote their maximum time and effort to their life 
pursuit. 

Thus, if our pupils generally appear to know more about 
musical subjects than other children, it is because of their 
training, and opportunities for hearing and practicing music 
under exceptionally advantageous circumstances. 

Stereotyping Music. 
In order that our department may be truly eflBcient, and 
that self-reliance shall be promoted, we are obliged to spend 
much time and money in embossing music into the Braille 
system for general use in the school. With the aid of a 
power machine, music is translated into the Braille on brass 
sheets which are proof-read until all errors are eliminated, 
after which these plates are forwarded to our press room, 
where paper editions in quantity are made. 



34 



Final Word — why we teach Music. 
In teaching music to so many of our pupils in this logical, 
systematic, and thorough manner we wish it to be under- 
stood that no attempt is being made to urge many of them 
into the field of music as a profession. In fact there are com- 
paratively few, whether with or without sight, who should 
attempt the study of music as a vocation. We teach music 
to our pupils because it is the only fine art which they can 
pursue on an equality with the seeing, and because we be- 
lieve that any system of education which omits this subject 
or which leaves it to chance is seriously defective. We teach 
music logically, systematically, and thoroughly because we 
know that anything that is worth doing at all is worth doing 
well. We hope that all our pupils may have an intelligent 
and discriminating appreciation of music. We wish for them 
to play or to sing well, but we sincerely advise that only 
those with genuine talent and all-round ability should under- 
take the mastery of music as a vocation. 

EDWIN L. GARDINER. 



35 



TWELFTH ANNUAL CONCERT 

By the Choir of the Perkins Institution and Massachusetts 

School FOR the Bund 

In Jordan Hall, Boston, 

Sunday Afternoon, May 16, 1920, at 3.30 o'clock. 

The Perkins Choir, with the assistance of — 
Miss LoRETTA NooNAN, ^ Sopmiio. 
Mr. Antonio Martone, ^ Tenor. 
Mr, Walter H. Kidder, Baritone. 
Miss Gustafson, Pianist, "i 
Mr. Hartwell, Organist, > of the faculty. 
Mr. Gardiner, Director, J 

The Program. 

PART I. 

Out of the Silence, Galhraith 

Part song for mixed chorus with pianoforte accompaniment. 

Hymn to the Madonna, Kremser-Spicker 

For soprano solo and chorus with accompaniment of organ and 

pianoforte. 

By Babylon's Wave, Gounod 

Chorus for mixed voices with organ accompaniment. 

PART II. 
Messe Solennelle (St. Cecilia), Gounod 

For mixed chorus and solo voices and accompaniment of organ 
and pianoforte. 



1 Graduate of this achool. 

36 



GRADUATING EXERCISES OF THE PERKINS INSTITU- 
TION AND MASSACHUSETTS SCHOOL 
FOR THE BLIND. 

Tuesday, June 22, 1920, 10.30 a.m. 



Program. 
Chorus, "Prayer of Thanksgiving," .... Dutch Folk Song 

Essays — Humor and the Humorists: 

Famous Definitions of Humor 

Josephine BENorr. 

The Modern Demand for Hiunor 

Lena Ross. 

"Laughter Holding Both His Sides" 

Marie Angelina Menard. 

"Heart-Easing Mirth" 

Margaret Lillian Galvin. 

"Youthful Jollity," at Perkins 

Mabel Olson. 

"To the Well Trod Stage" 

Bertha Helenea Guild. 

The Serious Purpose of the Humorists 

Edith Mary Matthews. 

Pianoforte solo, "Rondo Capriccioso" .... Mendelssohn 

Anna Alling Davenport. 
Essays: 
The Golden Age of Song 

Annie Elizabeth O'Neil. 

37 



The Development of the Pianoforte ^ 

Anna Alling Davenport. 

The Plymouth Colony 

Frederick Joseph Tansey. 

Reconstruction Problems in Europe 

Ralph Hazen Cushman. 

The Reindeer Industry in Alaska 

Sidney Borden Durfee. 

How the World Plays 

John M. Cooney. 

Soprano solo, "With Verdure Clad," from "The Creation," . Haydn 
Edith Mary Matthews. 

Presentation of diplomas and certificates. 

Chorus, "The Twenty-Third Psahn," .... Neidlinger 

Graduates of the Class of 1920. 
Josephine Benoit. Bertha Helenea Guild. 

John M. Cooney. Edith Mary Matthews. 

Ralph Hazen Cushman. Marie Angelina Menard. 

Anna Alling Davenport. Mabel Olson. 

Sidney Borden Durfee. Annie Elizabeth O'Neil. 

Margaret Lillian Galvin. Lena Ross. 

Frederick Joseph Tansey. 

Certificate from the Pianoforte Normal Department. 
Marian Loretta Noonan. 

Certificates from the Pianoforte Tuning Department. 
James Fulton. Emil Andrew Johnsen. 

• Reading omitted. 

38 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS. 



I. — Acknowledgments for Concerts, Recitals and 

Dramatics. 

To Mr. W. H. Brennan, for thirty tickets for the course 
of symphony concerts in Sanders Theatre, Cambridge. 

To Mr. Edward B. Hill, secretary, for thirty tickets for a 
concert by the CeciHa Society. 

To Mr. H. B. Williams, manager, for six tickets for a 
pianoforte recital by Mr. Lee Pattison. 

To Mrs. N. P. Hallowell, for sixteen tickets for a con- 
cert by Mme. Sundelius and Mr. Pablo Casals in Symphony 
Hall, Boston. 

To the Junior Red Cross Society, through Mrs. George 
S. Derby, for an invitation to thirty children to attend 
Marie Dressler's performance of " Tillie's Nightmare," given 
for handicapped children at the Boston Opera House. 

To the Boston Conservatory of Music, through Mr. 
Agide Jacchia, director, for fourteen tickets for the pop 
concert of June 29 in Symphony Hall, Boston. 

IL — Acknowledgments for Recitals, Lectures and 
Readings in Our Hall. 

To Mr. Thomas A. Watson, for a talk on " The Birth and 
Babyhood of the Telephone." 

To Mr. Robert J. White, historian of Watertown Post, 
American Legion, for a talk on the American Red Cross 
Society at the war front. 

39 



To Prof. P. Rice, for a talk on "The Peace Legion." 

To Mr. Alfred Bunker, for readings of poetical selec- 
tions. 

To Mr. William Strong, for a pianoforte recital. 

To Mrs. Lucia Ames Mead, for a lecture on " The League 
of Nations." 

To Mr. William Justin Mann, for a talk on "Abraham 
Lincoln." 

To Miss Adeline Packard, violinist, and Mr. Chester 
Cook, pianist, for a recital. 

To Mr. L. W. Wallace, director of the Red Cross In- 
stitute for the Blind, Baltimore, Md., for an illustrated 
lecture on "The Blind in the Industries." 

III. — Acknowledgments for Periodicals and News- 
papers. 
California News, Christian Record (embossed), Colorado 
Index, Illuminator (embossed), Matilda Zeigler Magazine 
for the Blind (embossed), the Mentor, Michigan Mirror, 
Ohio Chronicle, Our Dumb Animals, The Silent Worker, 
The Theosophical Path, West Virginia Tablet, Woman 
Citizen. 

IV. — Acknowledgments for Gifts and Services. 

To Dr. Henry Hawkins and Dr. Harold B. Chandler, 
for professional services. 

To the Massachusetts Charitable Eye and Ear In- 
firmary, for care and treatment of pupils. 

To Mrs. George H. Monks, for three pairs of andirons. 

To Mr. Herbert S. Tapley, executor of the will of Miss 
Jessie P. Fuller, for embossed books, typewriter and Braille- 
writer, bequeathed to the institution. 

40 



To Miss Susan Upham, for embossed books. 

To Mr. C. D. GuRNEY, for a flute. 

To Mr. Wallace L. Pierce, for flowers " in memory of 
Mr. Anagnos." 

To Mrs. Walter C. Baylies, Mrs. Dacre Bush and Miss 
LoTTA McCrea, for gifts of money at Christmas time. 

To Mr. and Mrs. William H. Claflin, for a sleighride 
for the children " in memory of Mrs. Thomas Mack." 

To Mrs. John Chipman Gray, Mrs. James H. Proctor, 
Dr. Francis I. Proctor and Dr. W. D. Inglis, for fruit. 

To Mrs. Alice M. Farnham, for a doll house. 

To Mrs. Lucius Barnet, for clothing. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Albert C. Burrage, Mr. S. J. Kafelas, 
and Mr. John P. Cambridge, for flowers and plants. 

To Miss Emma L. Byam, Mrs. Walter H. James, Mrs. 
David Evans and the Committee for the Blind, Temple 
Israel, through Mrs. A. Kopf, chairman, for parties, sociables 
and entertainment of pupils, and for a summer outing for 
some of our pupils through the latter committee. 



41 



LIST OF PUPILS AT THE UPPER SCHOOL. 



Adams, Louise. 
Adomaitis, Elsie. 
Bessette, Vedora. 
Billow, Ruth K. 
Blake, Clarissa H. 
Bolton, Gladys M. 
Boone, Florence M. 
Bosma, Gelske. 
Brooks, Madeline D. 
Brown, Dorothy M. 
Brustuen, Sonora I. 
Butler, Alice May. 
Byrne, Genevieve. 
Clancy, Elizabeth. 
Coakley, Alice L. 
Cohen, Ruth. 
Collins, Veronica. 
Connors, Margaret. 
Critchley, Rosamond M. 
Davis, Ruth M. 
Dawley, Sarah F. 
Doyle, Mary E. 
Dufresne, Irene. 
Dunn, Mary C. 
Eastman, M. Albertina. 
ElUott, Ethel S. 
Farnsworth, Esther M. 
Fiske, Dorothy T. 
Flanagan, M. Ursula. 
Flynn, Marie E. 
Gilbert, Eva V. 
Girouard, Blanche. 
Graham, Marguerite A. 
Guiney, Julia. 
Haigh, Laura A. 
Hall, Jane A. 



Hallock, Flora B. 
Hanley, Mary. 
Hilton, Charlotte. 
Hinckley, Dorothy M. 
Jefferson, Annie. 
Kababdjian, Nouritza. 
Keefe, Mildred. 
Kelley, Beulah C. 
Lagerstrom, Ellen M. 
Lanoue, Edna. 
Leppanen, Mary. 
L'Heureux, Juliette. 
Linscott, Jennie M. 
Lyon, Hazel. 
MacPherson, Mary H. 
Marceau, Yvonne. 
Matthews, Edith M. 
McMeekin, Jennie. 
Miles, Mildred C. 
Miles, Winifred M. 
Minutti, Desaleina. 
Montgomery, Ethel A. 
Murphy, Ellen. 
Najarian, Nevart. 
O'Neil, Charlotte. 
Perault, Yvonne A. 
Person, Erine A. 
Poirier, Delina M. 
Pond, Flora E. 
Rollins, Mary L. 
Rowe, Margaret C. 
Saladino, Rose M. 
Samson, Bertha. 
Severance, Georgia M. 
Shea, Mary Ellen. 
Shepard, Priscilla. 



42 



Skipp, Doris M. 
Stevens, Gladys L. 
Terry, Annie B. 
Thebeau, Marie. 
Trudel, Olive C. 
Weathers, Dorothy, 
Willey, Dorothy E. 
Wilson, Ruth Edris. 
Adams, Lyman H. 
Amiro, Gilbert. 
Antonucci, Alberto. 
Blair, Herman A. 
Bowen, Frederick W. 
Cobb, Malcolm L. 
Conley, Edward. 
Craig, Edward J. 
DiMartino, Matthew. 
Dugal, J. Ernest. 
Durfee, Sidney B. 
Eaton, Charles P. 
Egan, John P. 
Epaminonda, John. 
Evans, Frederic P. 
Frende, John. 
Gaffney, George J. 
Gagnon, Albert. 
Gagnon, Lionel. 
Gallant, M. John. 
Goguen, Raoul. 
Gould, Francis E. 
Gray, Wales H. 
Hanley, Thomas A. 
Hebert, Arthur D. 
Hussey, Juhan H. 
Inglis, John S. 
Istas, Henry T. 
Jenkins, Edward W. 
Katwick, Arthur D. 
Keefe, Clarence G. 
Kelleher, Thomas A. 
Kim, Kong Y. 
Krafve, Karl H. 
Laminan, Oiva. 
Laminan, Toivo. 



Le Roi, Francis H. 
Liberacki, Edward. 
Logan, Walter J. 
MacGinnis, Raymond H. 
Maziall, John H. 
McCarthy, Eugene C. 
McGilUcuddy, John. 
McLaughlin, Lloyd H. 
Medeiros, John. 
Mennassian, Souran. 
Munn, Daniel J. 
Navarra, Gaspere. 
Nelson, Ralph R. 
Nesbitt, Hazen P. 
Oldham, Milner. 
Oliver, Joseph. 
O'Neill, Ralph L. 
Paquette, Armel. 
Paraboschi, Joseph. 
Peavey, Francis P. 
Pedersen, Edward M. 
Pendergast, Jerome. 
Perry, Emerson C. 
Philpot, William R. 
Quirk, Arthur L. 
Rainville, Ernest C. 
Rasmussen, Lewis A. 
Read, J. Elmer. 
Retting, Buryl W. 
Rubin, Manual. 
St. George, WiUiam. 
Silvera, Manuel. 
Slaby, Peter J. 
Smith, Ernest. 
Smith, Louis W. 
Soorkis, Morris. 
Stellaty, Alberte. 
Stone, Walter C. 
Vance, Alvin L. 
Vetal, Herbert M. 
Walker, Roger T. 
Ward, Leroy M. 
Winton, Henry W. 



43 



LIST OF PUPILS AT THE LOWER SCHOOL. 



Allen, Elizabeth M. 
Baker, Elsie. 
Bazarian, Mary. 
Beliveau, Leontine T. 
Bolduc, Rose. 
Braley, Ruth I. 
Buckley, Alice. 
Cambridge, Mollie. 
Colaizzi, Josephine. 
Corsi, Angelina. 
Costa, Marianna. 
Coughlin, Helen. 
Curran, Catherine. 
Daniels, Dorothy D. 
De Dominicis, Edith. 
Demers, Germaine M. 
Doherty, Kathleen E. 
Duverger, Loretta V. 
Edwards, Eleanor B. 
Elliott, Mary. 
Fanning, Gladys L. 
Ferrarini, Yolande. 
Goff, Eva. 
Goodwin, Helen J. 
Gray, Emma R. 
Harasimowicz, Alice. 
Haswell, Thelma R. 
Hinckley, Geraldine. 
Holland, Doris A. 
Ingersoll, Dorothy. 
Kazanjian, Zaroohie. 
Knap, Oi Lin. 
Landry, Edwina. 
Lanoue, Helen. 
Laurenzo, CaroUna. 



Lincoln, Grace D. 
Lyons, Mary L. 
MacDonald, Katherine. 
Macdougall, Mildred D. 
McGovern, Velma. 
McMuUin, Beatrice M. 
Ogilvie, Hilda M. 
Pimental, Mary V. 
Rankin, Margaret D. 
Reese, Helen. 
Rose, Sadie. 
Samon, Stacey. 
Santos, Emily. 
Saverino, Maimie. 
Scott, Arline R. 
Simmons, Bertha. 
Smith, Dorothy L. 
Stanievicz, Mary. 
Stutwoota, Mary. 
Tirrella, Helen. 
Wheeler, Theresa. 
Wilcox, Bertha M. 
Williams, Dorothy M. 
Barrett, Robert C. 
Berube, Walter. 
Butt, Lawrence W. 
Campbell, Peter F. 
Carlos, Antone F. 
Case, William A. 
Casella, Charles. 
Combs, Raymond L. 
Cormier, Alfred. 
Costa, Manuel. 
CuUen, George F. 
Davy, Horace. 



44 



Donovan, Thomas J. 
Dore, Charles W. 
Dow, Ralph E. F. 
Dunbar, Kenneth A. 
Egan, Robert J. 
Evans, Walter C. 
Ferguson, George A. 
Fletcher, Earl H. 
Gagnon, R^ne. 
Grime, G. Edward. 
Hannon, James E. 
Hatch, Arthur F. 
Hendrick, Horatio W. 
Holmes, Rutherford B. 
Houle, Walter. 
Hurley, Arnold E. 
Jablonski, Joseph. 
Keller, Frederick H. 
Lamarine, William L. 
Leone, Amadeo. 
Libby, Arthur C. 
Maloney, Everett S. 
McDonald, Edmond J. 



Meuse, Lawrence A. 
Meuse, Paul R. 
Michaud, J. Armand. 
Morse, Kenneth. 
Munro, George H. 
Naatz, John K. 
Noble, Clark W. 
O'Neil, John. 
Pike, Norman N. 
Rainville, Harvey L. 
Remington, Joseph H. 
Reynolds, Waldo F. 
Shaw, Harris E. 
Shulman, George. 
Silva, Arthur P. 
Simoneau, Henry J. 
Spencer, Merton S. 
Stott, Lester W. 
Summerhayes, Paul R. 
Wesson, Kermit 0. 
Withers, Harold. 
Yetter, Charles A. 



45 



SUBSCRIPTIONS FOR THOMAS STRINGER. 



Permanent Fund for Thomas Stringer. 
[This fund is being raised with the distinct understanding that 
it is to be placed under the control and care of the trustees of the 
Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind, and 
that only the net income is to be given to Tom so long as he is not 
provided for in any other way, and is unable to earn his living, the 
principal remaining intact forever. It is further understood, that, 
at his death, or when he ceases to be in need of this assistance, the 
income of this fund is to be applied to the support and education 
of some child who is both blind and deaf and for whom there is no 
provision made either by the state or by private individuals.] 

Seabury, Misa Sarah E., $25 00 

Sohier, Miss Mary D 25 GO 



46 



STATEMENT OF ACCOUNTS. 



Boston, October Ninth, 1920. 

Messrs. Warren Motley, F. H. Appleton, Jr., Auditors, Perkins 
Instityiion and Massachusetts School for the Blind, Watertown, 
Massachusetts. 

Gentlemen: — I have audited the accounts of Albert Thorndike, 
Treasurer of the Institution, for the fiscal year endmg August 31, 
1920, and have found that all income from investments and proceeds 
from sales of securities have been accounted for, and that the dona- 
tions, subscriptions, and miscellaneous receipts, as shown by the 
books, have been deposited in bank to the credit of the Treasurer of 
the Institution. 

I have vouched all disbursements, verified the bank balances as at 
the close of the fiscal year. 

The stocks and bonds in the custody of the Treasurer on August 
31, 1920, were counted by the Auditing Committee, and the schedules 
of the securities, as examined by them, were then submitted to me 
and found to agree with those called for by the books. 

I hereby certify that the following statements covering the Insti- 
tution, Howe Memorial Press Fund, and Kindergarten correctly set 
forth the income and expenditures for the fiscal year ending August 
31, 1920. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN MONTGOMERY, 
Certified Public Accountant. 



47 



INSTITUTION. 

Balance Sheet, August 31, 1920. 
Assets. 
Plant: — 

Real estate, South Boston, $8,647 74 

Real estate, Watertown 678,917 37 

$687,565 11 

Equipment: — 

Furniture and household $12,423 83 

Tools, etc., 706 73 

Music department 20,325 00 

Library department, 59,028 80 

Works department 19,205 94 

Tuning department 500 00 

112,190 30 

Investments: — 

Real estate, $207,688 19 

Stocks and bonds, . . . $479,901 66 

Stocks and bonds: — 

Varnum Fund, . . . 82,201 75 

562,103 41 

769,791 60 

Inventory of provisions and supplies, 1 ,326 25 

Accounts receivable 2,072 75 

E. E. Allen, Trustee 733 90 

Cash on hand 11,919 31 

Total, . $1,585,599 22 

Lidbilities, 

General account, $434,150 76 

Funds: — 

Special, $52,667 00 

Permanent, 284,638 40 

General, 804,144 40 

1,141,449 80 

Unexpended income, special funds, 8,148 35 

Gifts for fence, clock and organ, 244 00 

Vouchers payable 1,606 31 

Total, $1,585,599 22 

48 



Condensed Treasurer's Income Account, Year ending August 31, 1920. 

Rent net income $9,502 74 

Interest and dividends, general purposes, 25,360 90 

Interest and dividends, special funds, 2,482 87 

Annuities, 1,200 00 

Donations, 9,270 50 

Tuition and board, Massachusetts $36,135 00 

Tuition and board, others, 18,753 85 

54,888 85 

Total $102,705 86 

Less special fund income to special fund accounts, $2,482 87 
Less Treasurer's miscellaneous expenses, . . 569 37 

3,052 24 

Net income $99,653 62 

Net charge to Director, $97,540 12 

Repairs, faulty construction, 887 19 

98,427 31 

Balance of income, $1,226 31 

Income, Special Funds. 

On hand September 1, 1919, $1,601 10 

Income of prior years not credited, .... 5,893 33 

Income 1919-1920 2,482 87 

$9,977 30 

Distributed $1,828 95 

Onhand August 31, 1920 8,148 35 

$9,977 30 

Condensed Director's Expense Account, Year ending August 31, 1920. 

Administration : — 

Salaries and wages, $5,594 93 

Other expenses 744 13 

$6,339 06 

Maintenance and operation of plant : — 

Salaries and wages, $22,232 02 

Other expenses: — 

Provisions, .... $18,291 61 



Light, heat and power, 
Household furnishings and 

supplies. 
Insurance and water, . 
Repairs, .... 
Depreciation on furniture 

and equipment. 
Miscellaneous, 



14,561 28 

2,215 21 
1,349 84 
3,606 70 

1,353 57 
1,026 56 

42,404 67 

64,636 69 



Amount carried forward, $70,975 75 

49 



Amount brought forward, $70,975 75 

Instruction and school supplies: — 

Salaries and wages $25,681 00 

Other expenses . . 1,703 29 

27,384 29 

Total, $98,360 04 

Less net income. Tuning Department, . . . $261 80 

Less net income, Worka Department, . . . 558 12 



Net charge to Director, 



819 92 



$97,540 12 



WORKS DEPARTMENT. 

Profit and Loss Account, Year ending August 31, 1920. 

Revenue. 

Sales, repairs, etc., $51,613 80 

Expenditure. 

Materials used $21,367 28 

Salaries and wages, 22,738 28 

General expense, 5,711 40 

Depreciation and loss from bad accounts, . . 1,238 72 

Total expenditures, 51,055 68 

Profit for the year, $558 12 



INSTITUTION FUNDS AND LEGACIES. 



Special funds: — 

Robert C. Billings (for deaf, dumb and blind), 
Joseph B. Glover (for blind and deaf), 
Harris Fund (Outdoor Relief), . 
Maria Kemble Oliver (Music), . 
Elizabeth P. Putnam (Higher Education), 
A. Shuman (Clothing Fund), 



Permanent funds : — 
Charlotte Billings, 
Stoddard Capen, .... 
Jennie M. Colby, in memory of, 
Ella Newman Curtis Fund, 
Stephen Fairbanks, 
Harris Fund (General Purposes), 



$4,000 00 

5,000 00 

26,667 00 

15,000 GO 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 



$40,507 00 

13,770 00 

100 00 

2,000 00 

10,000 00 

53,333 00 



$52,667 00 



Amounts carried forward. 



$119,710 00 $52,667 00 



50 



Amounts brought forward, $119,710 00 $52,667 00 

Permanent funds — Concluded. 

Benjamin Humphrey 25,000 00 

Prentiss M. Kent 2,500 00 

Jonathan E. Pecker 950 00 

Richard Perkins, 20,000 00 

Mrs. Marilla L. Pitts, in memory of, . . 5,000 00 

Frank Davison Rust Memorial, . . . 4,000 00 

Samuel E. Sawyer 2,174 77 

Timothy Smith 2,000 00 

Mary Lowell Stone, 2,000 00 

Alfred T. Turner 1,000 00 

Anne White Vose 12,994 00 

Charles L. Young 5.000 00 

William Varnum Fund 82,309 63 

284,638 40 

General funds: — 

Elizabeth B. Bailey $3,000 00 

Eleanor J. W. Baker 2,500 00 

Calvin W. Barker, 1 ,859 32 

Lucy B. Barker, 5,953 21 

Francis Bartlett 2,500 00 

Mary Bartol 300 00 

Thompson Baxter 322 50 

Robert C. Billings 25,000 00 

Susan A. Blaisdell 5,832 66 

William T. Bolton 555 22 

George W. Boyd 5,000 00 

Caroline E. Boyden, 1,930 39 

J. Putnam Bradlee 268,391 24 

Charlotte A. Bradstreet 10,508 70 

J. Edward Brown. 100,000 00 

T. O. H. P. Burnham 5,000 00 

Edward F. Gate 5,000 00 

Fanny Channing 2,000 00 

Ann Eliza Colburn, 5,000 00 

Susan J. Conant 500 00 

Louise F. Crane, 5,000 00 

Harriet Otis Cruft 6,000 00 

David Cummings, 7,723 07 

Chastine L. Gushing 500 00 

I. W. Danforth 2,500 00 

Susan L. Davis 1,500 00 

Joseph Descalzo, 1,000 00 

John H. Dix, 10,000 00 

Alice J. H. Dwinell 200 00 

Mary E. Eaton. 5.000 00 

Mortimer C. Ferris Memorial. .... 1 ,000 00 

Mary Helen Freeman, 1,000 00 

Cornelia Anne French 10,000 00 



Amounts carried forward $502,576 31 $337,305 40 

51 



Amounts brought forward, $502,576 31 $337,305 40 

General funds — Continued. 

Martha A. French 164 40 

Jessie P. Fuller 200 00 

Thomas Gaffield, 6,685 38 

Albert Glover, 1,000 00 

Joseph B. Glover 5,000 00 

Charlotte L. Goodnow 6,471 23 

Hattie S. Hathaway 500 00 

Charles H. Hayden 20,200 00 

John C. Haynes. 1.000 00 

Joseph H. Heywood 500 00 

Margaret A. Holden 3,708 32 

Charles Sylvester Hutchison 2,156 00 

Ernestine M. Kettle, 10,000 00 

Lydia F. Knowles 50 00 

Catherine M. Lamson 6,000 00 

WUliam Litchfield 7,951 48 

Hannah W. Loring 9.500 00 

Susan B. Lyman 4,809 78 

Stephen W. Marston, 5.000 00 

Charles Merriam 1.000 00 

Joseph F. Noera 2,000 00 

Sarah Irene Parker 699 41 

George Francis Parkman, 50,000 00 

Grace Parkman 500 00 

Philip G. Peabody 1.200 00 

Edward D. Peters 500 00 

Henry L. Pierce 20.000 00 

Sarah E.Pratt 1.000 00 

Matilda B. Richardson 300 00 

Mary L. Ruggles 3,000 00 

Marian Russell 5,000 00 

Nancy E. Rust 2,640 00 

Joseph Scholfield 2,500 00 

Richard Black Sewell, 25,000 00 

Margaret A. Simpson 800 00 

Esther W. Smith 5,000 00 

The Maria Spear Bequest for the Blind, . . 15,000 00 

Henry F. Spencer. 1.000 00 

Joseph C. Storey. 6.000 00 

Sophronia S. Sunbury. ^65 19 

Mary F. Swift 1-391 00 

WUliam Taylor 893 36 

Joanna C. Thompson, 1,000 00 

George B. Upton 10.000 00 

AbbieT.Vose. 1.000 00 

Horace W. Wadleigh 2,000 00 

Joseph K. Wait ^ 3.000 00 

Harriot Ware 1.952 02 



Amounts carried forward $757.213 88 $337,305 40 

52 



Amounts brought forward $757,213 88 $337,305 40 

General funds — Concluded. 

Charles F. Webber (by sale of part of vested 

remainder interest under his will) , . . 11 ,500 00 

Mary Ann P. Weld 2,000 00 

Cordelia H. Wheeler 800 00 

Opha J. Wheeler, 3,086 77 

Samuel Brenton Whitney 1,000 00 

Mehitable C. C. Wilson, 543 75 

Thomas T. Wyman 20,000 00 

Fanny Young, 8,000 00 



804,144 40 



1,141,449 80 



DONATIONS, INSTITUTION ACCOUNT. 

Clapp, Mrs. Mary L $10 00 

Kilham, Miss Annie M., 10 00 

Committee of the Permanent Charity Fund, In- 
corporated, 4,750 00 

Phelps, Miss Evelyn Y., 1 00 

Seabury, Miss Sarah E 75 00 

$4,846 00 

Through the Ladies' Auxiliary Society, 4,424 50 



$9,270 50 
Organ Fund: — 

Dunbar, Mrs. Harriet W $10 00 

Mayo, Helen 1 9 00 

19 00 

$9,289 50 



53 



HOWE MEMORIAL PRESS FUND. 
Balance Sheet, August 31, 1920. 

Assets. 
Equipment: — 

Printing plant, $874 59 

Printing inventor5% 13,985 02 

Machinery and equipment, .... 5,210 41 

Embossing inventory, 20,978 68 

Appliances manufactured 5,180 73 

Appliances purchased, 459 08 

Stationery 575 55 

$47,264 06 

Investments : — 

Stocks and bonds, 169,200 84 

Notes and accounts receivable 2,359 51 

Cash on hand, 737 48 

Total, $219,561 89 

Lidbilitiea. 

General account, $203,201 13 

Funds: — 

Permanent: — 

Deacon Stephen Stickney $5,000 00 

General : — 

Joseph H. Center, . . $1,000 00 
Augusta Wells, . . . 10,290 00 

11,290 00 

16,290 00 

Vouchers payable 70 76 



Total, $219,561 



Condensed Teeasurer's Income Account, Year ending August 31, 1920. 

Income: — 

Interest and dividends, $10,628 18 

Other income 53 56 

Total, $10,681 74 

Less Treasurer's expenses, 65 81 

Net income, $10,615 93 

Net charge to Director, . . 10,049 18 

Balance of income, §566 75 

54 



Condensed Director's Expense Account, Year ending August 31, 1920. 

Maintenance and operation of plant: — 

Embossing, wages and expenses, . . . $4,387 61 
Printing, wages and expenses, .... 784 91 
Appliances manufactured, wages and expenses, 3,019 34 
Appliances purchased, merchandise and ex- 
penses, Ill 63 

Stationery purchased, 57 07 

Depreciation on machinery and equipment, . 635 93 

Library wages and expenses 2,236 63 

Scale of type tests 96 93 

Miscellaneous, wages and expenses, . . 2,916 77 



$14,246 82 



Less: 



Discounts, 

Income from sale of appliances, . 

Income from sale of books, music, 

etc 



Net charge to Director, 



$2,587 74 
1,594 83 



$15 07 



4,182 57 



4,197 64 



$10,049 18 



55 



KINDERGARTEN. 

Balance Sheet, August 31, 1920. 

Assets. 

Plant: — 

Real estate, Watertown $530,462 93 

Equipment: — 

Furniture and household $12,362 10 

Tools, etc., 656 64 

Music department 2,945 00 

15,963 74 

Investments : — 

Real estate $419,946 43 

Stocks and bonds 945,722 22 

1,365,668 65 

Iron fence (cost to date) , 1,008 06 

Inventory of provisions and supplies, 1,326 25 

Accounts receivable 1,229 30 

E. E. Allen, Trustee 175 83 

Cash on hand 5,754 86 

Total $1,921,589 62 

Liabilities. 

General account $391,846 44 

Funds: — 

Special $6,840 00 

Permanent 180,319 70 

General 1,340,099 58 

1,527,259 28 

Unexpended income special funds, 1,151 93 

Vouchers payable, 1,278 41 

Account payable, 53 56 

Total $1,921,589 62 



Condensed Treasurer's Income Account, Year ending August 31, 1920. 

Rent net income $17,728 96 

Interest and dividends, general purposes, 49,286 41 

Interest and dividends, special funds 337 80 

Donations, 101 75 

Tuition and board, Massachusetts, .... $31,185 00 

Tuition and board, others 11,821 68 

43,006 68 

Total $110,461 60 

Amount carried forward $110,461 60 

56 



Amount brought forward, $110,461 60 

Less special fund income to special fund accounts, . S337 80 

Less Treasurer's miscellaneous expenses, . . 595 73 

933 53 

Net income $109,528 07 

Net charge to Director, $83,463 27 

Repairs, faulty construction, 1,536 42 

84.999 69 

Balance of income $24,528 38 

Income, Special Funds. 

On hand September 1. 1919. $816 84 

Income of prior years not credited. .... 123 33 

Income 1919-1920 337 80 

$1,277 97 

Distributed 1919-1920 $126 04 

Onhand August 31, 1920. 1,15193 

$1,277 97 



Condensed Director's Expense Account, Year ending August 31, 1920. 

Administration : — 

Salaries and wages, $5,634 94 

Other expenses 1,420 00 

$7,054 94 

Maintenance and operation of plant : — 

Salaries and wages $25,222 44 

Other expenses: — 

Provisions, .... $17,375 56 
Light, heat and power. . 14.013 17 
Household furnishings and sup- 
plies 1.154 28 

Depreciation on furniture and 

household equipment, . 1.318 09 

Insurance and water, . . 1,252 77 

Repairs, 2,339 93 

Miscellaneous 3,636 87 

41,090 67 

66,313 11 

Instruction and school supplies: — 

Salaries and wages $9,220 00 

Other expenses, 875 22 

10,095 22 

Net charge to Director $83,463 27 



57 



KINDERGARTEN FUNDS AND LEGACIES. 

Special funds: — 

Glover Fund (Albert Glover, Blind deaf 

mutes), S1.840 00 

Emeline Morse Lane (Books), .... 1,000 00 

Leonard and Jerusha Hyde Boom, . . . 4,000 00 

$6,840 GO 

Permanent funds: — 

William Leonard Benedict, Jr., Memorial, . $1,000 00 

Samuel A. Borden, 4,675 00 

A. A. C., In Memoriam, 500 00 

Helen G. Coburn 9,980 10 

M. Jane Wellington Danforth Fund, . . 10,000 00 

Caroline T. Downes, 12,950 00 

Charles H. Draper 23,934 13 

Eliza J. Bell Draper Fund 1,500 00 

Helen Atkins Edmands Memorial, . . . 5,000 00 

George R. Emerson, 5,000 00 

Mary Eveleth, ....... 1,000 00 

Eugenia F. Famham 1,015 00 

Susan W. Farwell, 500 00 

John Foster, 5,000 00 

Albert Glover, 1,000 00 

Mrs. Jerome Jones Fund, 9,935 95 

Charles Lamed 5,000 00 

George F. Parkman, 3,500 00 

Catherine P. Perkins, 10,000 00 

Frank Davison Rust Memorial, . . . 15,600 00 

Caroline O. Seabury, 1,000 00 

Eliza Sturgis Fund, 21,729 52 

Abby K. Sweetser 25,000 00 

Hannah R. Sweetser 5.000 00 

Mary Rosevear White 500 00 

180,319 70 

General funds : — 

Emilie Albee $150 00 

Lydia A. Allen 748 38 

Michael Anagnos, 3,000 00 

Harriet T. Andrew 5,000 00 

Martha B. Angell, 7.500 00 

Mrs. William Appleton 18,000 00 

Elizabeth H. Bailey 500 00 

Eleanor J. W. Baker 2,500 00 

Ellen M. Baker, 13,053 48 

Mary D. Balfour 100 00 

Nancy Bartlett Fund 500 00 

Sidney Bartlett, 10,000 00 

Emma M. Bass, 1,000 00 

Thompson Baxter 322 50 

Amounts carried forward, .... $62,374 36 $187,159 70 

58 



Amounts brought forward $62,374 36 $187,159 70 

General funds — Continued. 

Robert C. Billings, 10,000 00 

Sarah Bradford 100 00 

Helen C. Bradlee 140,000 00 

J. Putnam Bradlee 168,391 24 

Charlotte A. Bradstreet 6,130 07 

Ellen Sophia Brown, 1,000 00 

Rebecca W. Brown, 3,073 76 

Harriet 1 ilden Browne, 2,000 00 

John W. Carter 500 00 

• Adeline M. Chapin, 400 00 

Benjamin P. Cheney, 5,000 00 

Charles H. Colburn 1,000 00 

Helen Collamore 5,000 00 

Anna T. Coolidge 45,138 16 

Mrs. Edward Cordis 300 00 

Sarah Silver Cox 5,000 00 

Susan T. Crosby 100 00 

James H. Danforth 1,000 00 

Catherine L. Donnison Memorial, . . . 1,000 00 

George E. Downes, 3,000 00 

Lucy A. Dwight, 4,000 00 

Mary B. Emmons, 1,000 00 

Mary E. Emerson, 1,000 00 

Annie Louisa Fay Memorial, .... 1,000 00 

Sarah M. Fay 15,000 00 

Charlotte M. Fiske, 5,000 00 

Elizabeth W. Gay 7,931 00 

Ellen M. Gififord 5,000 00 

Joseph B. Glover, 5,000 00 

Matilda Goddard 300 00 

Maria L. Gray, 200 00 

Mary L. Greenleaf, 5,157 75 

Josephine S. Hall, 3,000 00 

Olive E. Hayden 4,622 45 

Allen Haskell 500 00 

Jane H. Hodges, 300 00 

Margaret A. Holden, 2,360 67 

Marion D. Hollingsworth, 1,000 00 

Frances H. Hood, 100 00 

Abigal W. Howe, 1,000 00 

Martha R. Hunt 10,000 00 

Ellen M. Jones 500 00 

Moses Kimball 1,000 00 

Ann E. Lambert, 700 00 

William Litchfield 5,000 00 

Mary Ann Locke, 5,874 00 

Robert W. Lord 1,000 00 

Elisha T. Loring 5,000 00 



Amounts carried forward, .... $553,05346 $187,159 70 

59 



Aw ounts brought forward, $553,053 46 $187,159 70 

General funds — Continued. 

Sophia N. Low 1,000 00 

Thomas Mack 1,000 00 

Augustus D. Manson, 8,134 00 

Calanthe E. Marsh 20,111 20 

Sarah L. Marsh, 1,000 00 

Waldo Marsh 500 00 

Annie B. Matthews, 15,000 00 

Rebecca S. Melvin, 23,545 55 

Georgina Merrill, 4,773 80 

Louise Chandler Moulton 10,000 00 

Mary Abbie Newell 600 00 

Margaret S. Otis, 1,000 00 

Jeannie Warren Paine, 1,000 00 

Anna R. Palfrey 50 00 

Sarah Irene Parker 699 41 

Helen M. Parsons, 500 00 

Edward D. Peters 500 00 

Henry M. Peyser 3,000 00 

Mary J. Phipps 2,000 00 

Caroline S. Pickman 1,000 00 

Katherine C. Pierce 5,000 00 

Helen A, Porter 50 00 

Sarah E. Potter Endowment, .... 425,014 44 

Francis L. Pratt 100 00 

Mary S. C. Reed, 5,000 00 

Jane Roberts 93,025 55 

John M. Rodocanachi 2,250 00 

Dorothy Roffe, 500 00 

Rhoda Rogers 500 00 

Mrs. Benjamin S. Rotch 8,500 00 

Edith Rotch 10,000 00 

Rebecca Salisbury 200 00 

Joseph Schol6eld 3,000 00 

Eliza B. Seymour 5,000 00 

Esther W. Smith 5,000 00 

Annie E. Snow, 9,903 27 

Adelaide Standish 5,000 00 

Elizabeth G. Stuart 2,000 00 

Benjamin Sweetzer 2,000 00 

Harriet Taber Fund 622 81 

Sarah W. Taber 1,000 00 

Mary L. Talbot, 630 00 

Cornelia V. R. Thayer 10,000 00 

Delia D. Thorndike 5,000 00 

Elizabeth L. Tilton 300 00 

Betsey B. Tolman 500 00 

Transcript, ten dollar fund, .... 5,666 95 

Mary B. Turner 7,582 90 



Amounts carried forward $1,261,713 34 $187,159 70 

60 



Amounta brought forward $1,261.713 34 $187,159 70 

General funds — Concluded. 

Royal W. Turner 24,082 00 

Minnie H. Underbill, 1,000 00 

Rebecca P. Wainwright, 1,000 00 

George W. Wales 5,000 00 

Mrs. George W. Wales, 10.000 00 

Mrs. Charles E. Ware 4,000 00 

Rebecca B. Warren 6,000 00 

Jennie A. (Shaw) Waterhouse, .... 565 84 

Mary H. Watson 100 00 

Ralph Watson Memorial 237 92 

Isabella M. Weld 14,795 06 

Mary Whitehead 666 00 

Julia A. Whitney 100 00 

Sarah W. Whitney 150 62 

Betsey S. Wilder 500 00 

Hannah Catherine Wiley 200 00 

Mary W. Wiley 150 00 

Mary Williams 6,000 00 

Almira F. Winslow 306 80 

Harriet F. Wolcott, 5,532 00 



1,340,099 58 
$1,527,259 28 



DONATIONS, KINDERGARTEN ACCOUNT. 

Brett, Miss Anna K $10 00 

"Children of the King", Church of the Disciples, 

Boston 5 00 

Concert given at Monument Beach by Muriel 
Parker. Ursula Hollander, Virginia Beatey, and 

Betty Parker 52 75 

Crane. Mrs. Charies T 20 00 

Sabine, George K 14 00 

$101 75 



61 



CONTRIBUTIONS FOR THE PERKINS 
INSTITUTION. 



Through the Ladies' Auxiliary Society, Mrs. Sarah A. Stover, Treasurer : — 

Annual subscriptions, $2,182 00 

Donations, 1,906 50 

Cambridge Branch . 195 00 

Dorchester Branch, 53 00 

Lynn Branch, 40 00 

Milton Branch, 48 00 

Donations for small organ 19 00 



$4,443 50 



ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTIONS FOR THE 
PERKINS INSTITUTION. 

Through the Ladies' Auxiliary Society, Mrs. S. A. Stover, Treasurer. 



Abbott, Miss Georgianna E. 


$2 00 


Adams, Mr. George, 


1 00 


Adams, Mrs. Waldo, 


5 00 


Allen, Mrs. F. R., . 


3 00 


Amory, Mrs. Charles W., 


25 00 


Amory, Mrs. Wm., 


5 00 


Amory, Mrs. Wm., 2d, 


25 00 


Amsden, Mrs. Mary A., 


1 00 


Anderson, Miss Anna F., 


2 00 


Atkins, Mrs. Edwin F., 


5 00 


Bacon, Miss Mary P., . 


3 00 


Badger, Mrs. Wallis B., 


5 00 


Baer, Mrs. Louis, . 


10 00 


Balch, Mrs. F. G., 


5 00 


Baldwin, Mrs. J. C. T., 


5 00 


Bangs, Mrs. F. R., 


10 00 


Bartol, Miss Elizabeth H., 


20 00 


Batcheller, Mr. Robert, 


10 00 


Batt, Mrs. C. R., . 


5 00 


Beal, Mrs. Boylston A., 


10 00 


Berlin, Dr. Fanny, 


1 00 



Amount carried forward, . $158 00 



Amount brought forward, . $158 00 



Betton, Mrs. C. G., 
Bigelow, Mrs. Henry M., 
Bigelow, Mrs. J. S., 
Blake, Mrs. Arthur W., 
Boutwell, Mrs. L. B., . 
Bradt, Mrs. Julia B., . 
Brewer, Miss Lucy S., . 
Brown, Mrs. Atherton T. 
Brush, Mrs. C. N., 
Burns, Mr. Walter G., . 
Burr, Mrs. C. C, . 
Carr, Mrs. Samuel, 
Gary, Miss Ellen G., 
Gary, Miss Georgina, 
Chamberlain, Mrs. M. L. 
Chandler, Mrs. Frank W. 
Channing, Mrs. Walter, 
Chapin, Mrs. Henry B., 
Chapman, Miss Jane E. C, 



Amount carried forward, . $316 00 



2 


00 


3 


00 


10 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 


5 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


5 


00 


. 10 


00 


. 10 


00 


50 


00 


10 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 



62 



Amount brought forward, . $316 00 



Chase, Mrs. Susan R., . 


1 00 


Clapp, Dr. H. C. . 


2 00 


Clark, Mrs. Frederic S., 


10 00 


Clement, Mrs. Hazen, . 


5 00 


Clerk, Mrs. W. F., 


3 00 


Cobb, Mrs. Charles K., 


5 00 


Codman, Miss Catherine 




Amory, . . . . 


10 00 


Coolidge, Mrs. J. Randolph 


25 00 


Cox, Mrs. William E., . 


10 00 


Craig, Mrs. D. R., 


5 00 


Craigin, Dr. G. A., 


5 00 


Cummings, Mrs. Charles A., 


10 00 


Curtis, Mr. George W., 


5 00 


Curtis, Mrs. Horatio G., 


5 00 


Curtis, Mrs. James F., . 


5 00 


Curtis, Miss Mary G., . 


10 00 


Gushing. Mrs. H. W., . 


5 00 


Gushing, Mrs. J. W., . 


2 00 


Gushing, Miss Sarah P., 


5 00 


Cutler, Mrs. C. F., 


5 00 


Cutler, Mrs. E. G.. 


2 00 


Cutler, Mrs. Ellen M., . 


2 00 


Cutts, Mrs. H. M., 


1 00 


Dale, Mrs. Eben, . 


5 00 


Damon, Mrs. J. L., Jr., 


2 00 


Daniels, Mrs. Edwin A., 


2 00 


Davis, Mrs. Joseph E., 


5 00 


Davis, Mrs. Simon, 


3 00 


Denny, Mrs. Arthur B., 


5 00 


Denny, Mrs. W. C., 


5 00 


Derby, Mrs. Hasket, 


5 00 


Drost, Mr. C. A., . 


10 00 


Dwight, Mrs. Thomas, 


1 00 


Edgar, Mrs. C. L., 


5 00 


Edmands, Mrs. M. Grant, 


. 10 00 


Eliot, Mrs. Amory, 


5 00 


Elms, Miss Florence G., 


2 00 


Emmons, Mrs. R. W., 2d, 


35 00 


Endicott, Mrs. Wm. C, 


5 00 


Ernst, Mrs. C. W., 


5 00 


Ernst, Mrs. H. C, 


3 00 


Estabrook, Mrs. George W. 


1 00 


Eustis, Mrs. F. A., 


. 10 00 


Faulkner, Miss Fannie M., 


10 00 


Ferrin, Mrs. M. T. B., . 


10 00 


Field. Mrs. D. W., 


5 00 


Fitz, Mrs. W. Scott, . 


. 25 00 


Foss, Mrs. Eugene N., . 


. 10 00 


Frank, Mrs. Daniel, 


1 00 



Atrtount carried forward, . S639 00 



Amount brought forward, . $639 00 



Freeman, Mrs. Louisa A., 
Friedman, Mrs. Max, . 
Frothingham, Mrs. Langdon 
Gay, Mrs. Albert, . 
Gibbs, Mrs. H. C, 
Gill, Mr. Abbott D., . 
Gill, Mrs. George F., . 
Goldberg, Mrs. Simon, . 
Goldschmidt, Mrs. Meyer H 
Gooding, Mrs. T. P., . 
Grandgent, Prof. Chas. H., 
Grant, Mr. and Mrs. Robert 
Gray, Mrs. Morris, 
Gray, Mrs. Reginald, . 
Greenough, Mrs. C. P., 
Grew, Mrs. H. S., . 
Hall, Mrs. Anthony D., 
Harrington, Mrs. Francis B 
Harris, Miss Frances K., 
Harwood, Mrs. Ellen A., 
Hatch, Mrs. Fred W., . 
Haven, Mrs. Edward B., 
Hayward, Mrs. G. G.; . 
Herman, Mrs. Joseph M., 
Higginson, Mrs. Henry L., 
Hills, Mrs. Edwin A., . 
Hoi brook, Mrs. Walter H., 
Homans, Mrs. John, 
Hooper, Miss Adeline D., 
Hooper, Mrs. James R., 
Howe, Mrs. Arabella, . 
Howe, Mrs. George D., 
Howland, Mrs. M. M., 
Hubbard, Mrs. Charles W., 
Hunnewell, Mrs. Arthur, 
Hyde, Mrs. H. D., 
Johnson, Mr. Arthur S., 
Johnson, Mr. Edward C, 
Johnson, Miss Fanny L. (for 
1917, 1918, 1919 and 1920), 
Jones, Mrs. B. M., 
Jordan, Mrs. Eben D., . 
Josselyn, Mrs. A. S., 
Joy, Mrs. Charles H., . 
Kettle, Mrs. Claude L., 
Kimball, Mrs. David P., 
Kimball, Mr. Edward P., 
Kimball, Mrs. Marcus M., 
King, Mrs. S. G., . 
Kingsley, Mrs. Robert C, 



Amount carried forward, $1,030 00 



3 00 


5 00 


5 00 


1 00 


1 00 


2 00 


1 00 


2 00 


1 00 


3 00 


3 00 


5 00 


5 00 


. 10 00 


5 00 


. 25 00 


2 00 


5 00 


3 00 


. 10 00 


5 00 


3 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


3 00 


10 00 


5 00 


. 20 00 


1 00 


. 10 00 


2 00 


. 25 00 


. 25 00 


1 00 


. 10 00 


. 25 00 


), 4 00 


5 00 


. 10 00 


5 00 


. 10 00 


2 00 


. 25 00 


10 00 


. 50 00 


3 00 


5 00 



63 



Amount brought forward, $1,030 00 



Klous, Mr. Isaac, . 
Kornfeld, Mrs. Felix, . 
Lamb, Miss Augusta T., 
Lamson, Mrs. J. A., 
Lane, Mrs. D. H., . 
Ledyard, Mrs. Lewis Cass, 
Lee, Mrs. Joseph, . 
Leland, Leslie F., . 
Leland, Mrs. Lewis A., 
Levi, Mrs. Harry, . 
Lincoln, Mr. A. L., 
Loring, Judge W, C, 
Loring, Mrs. W. C, 
Lothrop, Miss Mary E., 
Lothrop, Mrs. W. S. H., 
Levering, Mrs. Charles T., 
Lovett, Mr. A. S., . 
Lovett, Mrs. A. S., 
Lowell, Mrs. Charles, . 
Lowell, Mrs. John, 
Macurdy, Mr. Wm. F., for 

Otis Brothers Co., 
Mansfield, Mrs. George S., 
Mansur, Mrs. Martha P., 
Mason, Miss Fanny P., 
Merrill, Mrs. L. M., 
Merriman, Mrs. Daniel, 
Monks, Mrs. Geo. H. (for 

1918, 1919, 1920), . 
Morison, Mrs. John H., 
Morrison, Mrs. W. A., . 
Morse, Miss Margaret F., 
Morss, Mrs. Everett, . 
Moseley, Miss Ellen F., 
Moses, Mrs. George, 
Moses, Mrs. Joseph, 
Moses, Mrs. Louis, 
Nathan, Mrs, Jacob, 
Nathan, Mrs. John, 
Nazro, Mrs. Fred H., . 
Niebuhr, Miss Mary M., 
Norcross, Mrs. Otis, 
Olmsted, Mrs. J. C, . 
Page, Mrs. Calvin Gates, 
Paine, Mrs. W. D., 
Parker, Miss Eleanor S., 
Pecker, Miss Annie J., . 
Peckerman, Mrs. E. R., 
Pickert, Mrs. Lehman, . 
Pickman, Mrs. D. L., . 

Amount carried forward, 



3 00 


1 00 


1 00 


2 00 


1 00 


5 00 


. 100 00 


1 00 


1 00 


5 00 


5 00 


. 25 00 


25 00 


5 00 


5 00 


. 10 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


r 

. 10 00 


2 00 


3 00 


. 10 00 


5 00 


. 10 00 


45 00 


. 10 00 


1 00 


2 00 


5 00 


. 10 00 


2 00 


5 00 


1 00 


2 00 


5 00 


2 00 


1 00 


. 10 00 


3 00 


3 00 


2 00 


10 00 


10 00 


3 00 


2 00 


25 00 


$1,444 00 



Amount brought forward, $1,444 00 



25 00 

25 00 

15 00 

10 00 

5 00 

2 00 

5 00 

20 00 



Pratt, Mrs. Elliott W., . 10 00 

Prendergast, Mr. James M., 10 00 
Prince, Mrs. Morton, . 
Putnam, Mrs. James J., 
Rand, Mrs. Arnold A., . 
Ratchesky, Mrs. Fanny, 

Ratchesky, Mrs. I. A., . 

Reed, Mrs. Arthur, 

Reed, Mrs. John H., 

Reed, Mrs. Wm. Howell, 

Rice, Mr. and Mrs. David, 

Rice, Mrs. Wm. B., 

Richards, Miss Annie L., 

Richards, Mrs. C. A., . 

Richards, Mrs. E. L., . 

Richardson, Mrs. Frederick, 

Robbins, Mrs. Royal (for 
1919-20), . 

Roeth, Mrs. A. G., 

Rogers, Mrs. R. K., 

Rogers, Miss Susan S., . 

Rosenbaum, Mrs. Henry, 

Rosenbaum, Miss Loraine, 

Rowlett, Mrs. Thomas S., 

Russell, Miss Catherine E., 

Salomon, Miss Rena K., 

Saltonstall, Mr. Richard M., 
in memory of his mother, 
Mrs. Leverett Saltonstall, 

Sargent, Mrs. F. W., 

Saunders, Mrs. D. E., . 

Schouler, Mr. James, 

Scudder, Mrs. J. D., in mem- 
ory of her mother, Mrs 
N. M. Downer, . 

Scull, Mrs. Gideon, 

Sears, Mr. Herbert M., 

Sears, Mrs. Knyvet W., 

Shaw, Mrs. George R., 

Shepard, Mr. Thomas H., 

Sherwin, Mrs. Thomas, 

Sias, Mrs. Charles D., . 

Simpkins, Miss Mary W., 

Sprague, Mrs. Charles, 

Sprague, Dr. F. P., 10 00 

Stackpole, Mrs. F. D., . 5 00 

Stackpole, Miss Roxana (for 

1919-20), . . 10 00 

Stearns, Mr. and Mrs. C. H., 10 00 

Stearns, Mrs. Wm. Brackett, 3 00 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



10 00 

10 00 

5 00 

5 00 



5 00 
10 00 
25 00 
25 00 



Amount carried forward, $1,780 00 



64 



Amount br ought forward, $1,780 00 Amount brought forward, $1.942 00 



Stearns, Mr. Wm. B., . 
Steinert, Mrs. Alex., 
Stevens, Miss Alice B., 
Stewart, Mrs. Cecil, 
Stone, Mrs. Edwin P., . 
Storer, Miss A. M., 
Storer, Miss M. G., 
Strauss, Mrs. Ferdinand, 
Sweetser, Mrs. Frank E., 
Thomson, Mrs. A. C, . 
Thorndike, Mrs. Augustus L 
Tileston, Mrs. John B., 
Tuckerman, Mrs. Charles S, 
Tyler, Mr. Granville C, 
Vass, Miss Harriett, 
Wadsworth, Mrs. A. F., 
Ward, The Misses, 
Ward, Miss Julia A., 
Ware, Miss Mary Lee, . 
Warren, Mrs. Bayard, . 
Warren, Mrs. J. C, 
Warshauer, Mrs. Isador, 



80 


00 


2 00 


6 00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 



10 00 
5 00 
25 00 
25 00 
10 00 
1 00 



Amount carried forward, $1,942 00 



Wason, Mrs. Elbridge, . 
Weeks, Mr. Andrew Gray, 
Weeks, Mrs. W. B. P., . 
Weld, Mrs. A. Winsor, . 
Weld, Mrs. Samuel M. (for 

1919-20), . 
West, Mrs. Charles A., 
WheelwTight, Miss Mary, 
White, Miss Eliza Orne, 
White, Mrs. Joseph H., 
White, Mrs. Norman H., 
Whiting, Miss Anna M., 
Williams, The Misses, . 
Williams, Miss Adelia C, 
Williams, Mrs. Arthur, Jr., 
Williams, Mrs. Jeremiah, 
Williams, Mrs. Moses, . 
Willson, Miss Lucy B., 
Winsor, Mrs. Ernest, 
Withington, Miss Anna S., 
Wolcott, Mrs. Roger, . 
Young, Mrs. Benjamin L., 



5 


00 


10 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 


10 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 


. 25 


00 


2 


00 


1 


00 


. 25 


00 


. 20 


00 


. 100 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 


5 00 


2 


00 


1 


00 


5 


00 


. 10 00 


$2,182 00 



DONATIONS. 



A friend, .... 
Abrahams, Miss Rosa, . 
Adams, Mrs. Charles H., 
Adams, Mrs. Henry J., 
Aiken, Miss Susan C, . 
Alden, Mrs. Charles H., 
Allen, Mrs. Thomas, 
Anderson, Miss Anna F., 
Bacon, Miss Ellen S., . 
Bailey, Mrs. H. B., 
Baker, Miss Susan P., . 
Barnard, Mr. Simon, 
Bartol, Mrs. John W., . 
Batcheller, Mr. Robert, 
Baylies, Mrs. Walter Cabot 
Bemis, Mr. J. M., . 
Bicknell, Mrs. Wm. J., 
Blake, Mr. Wm. P., 
Boardman, Mrs. W. D., 
Bowditch, Dr. Vincent Y., 
Browning, Mrs. Charles A., 



SI 00 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



25 00 

5 00 

5 00 

2 00 

10 00 

10 00 

10 00 

10 00 

5 00 

10 00 

5 00 

5 00 

5 00 



Amount brought forward, . $128 00 



Bruerton, Mrs. James, . 
BuUard, Mr. Alfred M., 
BuUens, Miss Charlotte L., 
Bunker, Mr. Alfred, 
Bunker, Miss Alice M., 
Burnham, Mrs. H. D., . 
Bush, Miss Mary L., . 
C 



Amount carried forward, . $128 00 



Carter, Mrs. John W., . 
Cary, Miss Ellen G., 
Clapp, Miss Helen, 
Clark, Miss Alice, . 
Clark, Mrs. Robert Farley, 
Codman, Miss Martha C, 
Coolidge, Mrs. Francis L., 
Coolidge, Mrs. Penelope F 
Cotting, Mrs. Charles E., 
Cotton, Miss Elizabeth A., 
Crocker, Mrs. U. H., 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



20 00 
50 00 
15 00 



3 
5 
5 
3 

2 

10 00 

200 00 

5 00 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



Amount carried forward, . $476 00 



65 



Amount brought forward, . $476 00 



Crosby, Mrs. S. V. R., . 
Daland, Mrs. Tucker, . 
Dwight, Mrs. Thomas, 
Edwards, Miss Hannah M 
Estabrook, Mrs. Arthur F., 
Eustis, Mrs. Herbert H., 
Evans, Mrs. Charles, 
Evans, Mrs. Glendower, 



Faulkner, Miss Fannie M., 
Fay, Mrs. Dudley B., . 
Fay, Miss Sarah M., 
Frothingham, Mrs. Louis A., 
Frothingham, Mrs. Randolph 
Gardner, Mrs. John L., 
Goulding, Mrs. L. R., . 
Gray, Mrs. John Chipman 
Green, Mr. Charles G., 
Guild. Mrs. S. Eliot, . 
Harris, Miss Frances K., 
Homans, Mrs. John, 
Hotchkin & Co., Messrs., 
Houghton, Miss Elizabeth G 
Howard, Mrs. P. B., 
Hoyt, Mrs. C. C, . 
Hubbard, Mrs. Eliot, . 
Hubbard, Mr. Gorham, 
Hunnewell, Mr. Walter, 
Hutchins, Mrs. C. F., . 
Hyneman, Mrs. Louis, . 
lasigi, Mrs. Oscar, 
In memory of Mrs. George 

H. Eager, . 
In memory of Mrs. Harriet 

L. Thayer, through Mrs 

Hannah T. Brown, 
Jolliffe, Mrs. Thomas H., 
Keene, Mrs. S. W., 
Kimball, The Misses, 
Koshland, Mrs. Joseph, 
Lawrence, Mrs. John, 
Lee, Mrs. George, . 
Loring, Mrs. A. P., 
Lowell, Miss Lucy, 
Lyman, Mrs. George H 
Magee, Mr. John L., 
Manning, Miss A. F., 
Mason, Mrs. Charles E 
McKee, Mrs. Wm. L., 
Merriam, Mrs. Frank, 



10 00 
5 00 
2 00 
25 00 
10 00 
50 00 

1 00 
5 00 

20 00 
25 00 
10 00 
25 00 
25 00 
5 00 

5 00 

6 00 
25 00 

100 00 
10 00 

2 00 
10 00 
20 00 
10 00 

2 00 
10 00 
10 00 

5 00 
25 00 

5 00 

2 00 
10 00 

10 00 



5 00 

5 00 

2 00 
25 00 
10 00 
10 00 

5 00 
25 00 

5 00 
10 00 
25 00 

5 00 
50 00 

5 00 
10 00 



Amount brought forward, $1,157 00 



Amount carried forward, $1,167 00 



Mills, Mrs. D. T., . 
Morison, Mrs. John H., 
Morrill, Miss Annie W., 
Morse, Dr. Henry Lee, 
Morse, Mrs. Leopold, . 
Moseley, Miss Ellen F., 
Norcross, Mrs. Otis, 
Peabody, Mr. Harold, . 
Peirce, Mrs. Silas, . 
Perry, Mrs. C. F., . 
Pfaelzer, Mrs. F. T., . 
Philbrick, Mrs. E. S., . 
Pitman, Mrs. Benjamin F., 
Potter, Mrs. W. H., 
Powell, Mrs. Wm. B., . 
Punchard, Miss A. L., . 
Putnam, Mrs. James J., 
Quincy, Mrs. G. H., 
Ranney, Mr. Fletcher, . 
Rice, Mrs. N. M., . 
Richards, Miss Alice A., 
Richardson, The Misses, in 

memory of M. A. E. and 

C. P. P., . 
Richardson, Mrs. Edward C, 
Richardson, Mrs. John, 
Riley, Mr. Charles E., . 
Ripley, Mr. Frederick H., 
Rodman, Miss Emma, . 
Rogers, Miss Annette P., 
Rogers, Mrs. J. C, 
Rosenbaum, Mrs. Louis, 
Ross, Mrs. Waldo O,, . 
Rust, Mrs. Wm. A., 
Sanger, Mr. Sabin P., . 
Sears, Mrs. Richard D., 
Sever, Miss Emily, 
Shaw, Mrs. G. Howland, 
Sherman, Mrs. Wm. H., 
Sias, Miss Martha G., . 
Slattery, Mrs. Wm., 
Spalding, Miss Dora N., 
Spring, Mr. and Mrs. Rom 

ney 

Stevenson, Mrs. R. H., 

St. John, Mrs. C. Henry, in 

memory of her mother, 

Mrs. Isaac H. Russell, 
Stone, Mrs. Philip S., . 
Storrow, Mrs. James J., 



5 00 

10 00 

10 00 

5 00 

5 00 

5 00 

25 00 

5 00 

1 00 

3 00 

10 00 

3 00 

10 00 

3 00 

5 00 

5 00 

5 00 

10 00 

5 00 

20 00 

10 00 



3 00 
5 00 
3 00 

25 00 
2 00 

10 00 



10 00 

20 00 
5 00 

20 00 
5 00 
5 00 
2 00 

10 00 

5 00 
20 00 



5 00 

2 00 

10 00 



Amount carried forward, $1,509 00 



66 



Amount brought forward, $1,509 00 



Strauss, Mrs. Louis, 


5 00 


Swann, Mrs. John, 


10 00 


Talbot, Mrs. Thomas Palmer 


1 00 


Thayer, Mrs. Ezra Ripley, 


10 00 


Thayer, Mrs. Wm. G., . 


10 00 


Thing, Mrs. Annie B., . 


10 00 


Thorndike, Mrs. Alden A., 


10 00 


Thorndike, Mrs. Augustus, 


5 00 


Tucker, Mrs. J. Alfred, 


1 00 


Vialle, Mr. Charles A., . 


10 00 


Vickery, Mrs. Herman F., 


50 00 


Vorenberg, Mrs. S., 


2 00 


Vose, Mrs. Charles, 


2 00 


Wadsworth, Mrs. W. Austin 


20 00 



Amount carried forward, $1,655 00 



Amount brought forward, $1,655 00 



Walker, Mrs. W. H., . 


10 00 


Warner, Mrs. F. H., 


10 00 


Watson, Mrs. Thomas A., 


10 00 


Webster, Mrs. F. G., . 


50 00 


Whitney, Mr. Edward F., 


10 00 


Willcomb, Mrs. George, 


10 00 


Williams. Mrs. C. A., . 


5 00 


Williams, Mr. Ralph B., 


25 00 


Williams, Mrs. T. E., . 


5 00 


Windram, Mrs. W. T., . 


50 00 


Winthrop.Mrs.Thos. Lindal 


, 25 00 


Wright, Mrs. J. H., 


1 50 


Wyman, Mrs. Alfred E., 


15 00 


Ziegel, Mr. Louis, . 


25 00 




51.906 50 



CAMBRIDGE BRANCH. 



Agassiz, Mr. Max (donation) 


, $20 00 


Ames. Mrs. James B. (dona 




tion). .... 


10 00 


Boggs. Mrs. Edwin P., 


2 00 


Brewster, Mrs. William (do 




nation), 


5 00 


Bul6nch, Miss Ellen S., 


2 00 


Chandler, Mrs. Seth C. (do- 




nation). 


2 00 


Emery, Miss Octavia B., 


3 00 


(donation), . 


2 00 


Farlow, Mrs. Wm. C. (do- 




nation), 


5 00 


Foster, Mrs. Francis C. (do- 




nation). 


30 00 


Francke, Mrs. Kuno, 


3 00 


Frothingham, Miss Sarah E. 


2 00 


Goodale, Mrs. George L., 


1 00 


Greenough, Mrs. J. B., 


2 00 


Hayward, Mrs. James W., 


10 00 


Hedge, Miss Charlotte A., 


7 00 



Amount carried forward, . $106 00 



Amount brought forward, . $106 00 



Horsford, Miss Katharine M 

(donation), . 
Howard, Mrs. Albert A., 
Ireland, Miss Catharine I 

(donation), . 
Kennedy, Mrs. F. L., . 
Kettell, Mrs. Charles W.. 
Longfellow, Miss Alice M 
Neal, Mrs. W. H., 
Richards, Miss L. B., . 
Sargent. Dr. D. A.. 
Sawyer, Miss Ellen M. (do- 
nation). 
Thorp, Mrs. J. G., 
Toppan, Mrs. Robert N., 
Wesselhoeft. Mrs. Walter, 
Whittemore. Mrs. F. W., 
Woodman, Miss Mary, 
Woodman, Mrs. Walter, 



5 


00 


5 


00 


3 


00 


3 


00 


10 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 


20 


00 


2 


00 



$195 GO 



67 



DORCHESTER BRANCH. 



Bartlett, Mrs. Susan E., 


$1 00 


Bennett, Miss M. M. (dona- 




tion), 


1 00 


Brigham, Mrs. Frank E. (do- 




nation) 


5 00 


Callender, Miss Caroline S. 


2 00 


ChurchUl, Dr. Anna Quincy 


1 00 


Churchill, Judge J. R., . 


1 00 


Churchill, Mrs. J. R., . 


1 00 


(donation), . 


1 00 


Gushing, Miss Susan T., 


1 00 


(donation), . 


1 00 


Eliot, Mrs. C. R., . 


2 00 


Faunce, Mrs. Sewall A., 


1 00 


Hall, Mrs. Henry, . 


1 00 


Haven, Mrs. Katharine 




Stearns, 


1 00 


Hawkes, Mrs. S. L., 


1 00 


Humphreys, Mrs. Richard C 


, 2 00 


Jordan, Miss Ruth A., . 


2 00 



Amount carried forward, . $26 00 



Amount brought forward, . $25 00 



Murdock, Mrs. Harold (do- 
nation), . . . . 
Nash, Mrs. Edward W. (do- 
nation), 
Nash, Mrs. Frank K., . 
Preston, Miss Myra C, 
Reed, Mrs. George M., 
Sayward, Mrs. W. H., . 
Stearns, Mrs. Albert H., 
Stearns, Mr. A. Maynard, 
Stearns, Mr. A. T., 2d, 
Stearns, Henry D., in mem 

ory of, . 
Whiton, Mrs. Royal, 
Wilder, Miss Grace S., . 
Waiard, Mrs. L. P., 
Woodberry, Miss Mary, 
Wright, Mr. C. P.. 



2 00 



1 00 



5 


00 


2 


00 


1 


00 


3 


00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 


5 


00 



$53 00 



LYNN BRANCH. 



Caldwell, Mrs. Ellen F., 
Chase, Mrs. Philip A., . 
Earp, Miss Emily A. (dona 

tion), .... 
Elmer, Mr. and Mrs. V. J., 
Haven, Miss Rebecca E. 

(donation), . 
Sheldon, Mrs. Chauncey C, 



Amount carried forward, . $20 00 



$1 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 



Amount brought forward, . $20 00 

Smith, Mrs. Joseph N., .10 00 
Sprague, Mr. Henry B. (do- 
nation) 5 00 

Tapley, Mr. Henry F. (do- 
nation), .... 6 00 



$40 00 



Brewer, Miss Eliza (dona- 
tion), $10 00 

Clark, Mrs. D. Cakes (for 

1919) 1 00 

Cunningham, Mrs. Caleb L. 

(for 1919-20), ... 4 00 

Forbes, Mrs. J. Murray, . 10 00 

Jaques, Miss Helen L., . 10 00 



MILTON BRANCH. 

Amount brought forward. 



Amount carried forward, . $35 00 



Klous, Mrs. Henry D., 

Pierce, Mr. Vassar (dona- 
tion), 

Rivers, Mrs. George R. R., . 

Ware, Mrs. Arthur L. (do- 
nation), .... 



$35 00 


1 00 


5 00 


2 00 


5 00 



$48 00 



68 



All contributors to the fund are respectfully requested to peruke the 
above list, and to report either to Albert Thorndike, Treasurer, No. 
19 Congress Street, Boston, or to the Director, Edward E. Allen, Water- 
town, any omissions or inaccuracies which they may find in it. 

ALBERT THORNDIKE, 

Treasurer. 
No. 19 Congress Stkeet, Boston. 



FORM OF BEQUEST. 

I hereby give, devise and bequeath to the Perkins Institution 
AND Massachusetts School for the Blind, a corporation duly 
organized and existing under the laws of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, the sum of dollars ($ ) 

the same to be applied to the general uses and purposes of said 
corporation under the direction of its Board of Trustees; and I 
do hereby direct that the receipt of the Treasurer for the time being 
of said corporation shall be a sufficient discharge to my executors 
for the same. 



FOBM OF DEVISE OF BEAL ESTATE. 

I give, devise and bequeath to the Perkins Institution and Mas- 
sachusetts School for the Blind, a corporation duly organized 
and existing under the laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
that certain tract of real estate bounded and described as follows: — 

(Here describe the real estate accurately) 
with full power to sell, mortgage and convey the same free of all 
trusts. 



NOTICE. 



The address of the treasurer of the corporation is as 
follows: 

ALBERT THORNDIKE, 

No. 19 Congress Street, 

Boston. 




SAMUEL G. HOWE, ABOUT 1859. 



Perkins Institution 

And Massachusetts vSchool 
For the Blind 




NINETIETH ANNUAL REPORT 
OP THE TRUSTEES 



1921 



BOSTON jt jt Jt jH ^ 1922 
WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO. 



®l)e €^0mmonu)ealtl) of iHa0Bacl)U0ett0 



Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind, 
Watertown, October 20, 1921. 

To the Hon. Frederic W. Cook, Secretary of State, Boston. 

Dear Sir: — I have the honor to transmit to you, for 
the use of the Legislature, a copy of the ninetieth annual 
report of the trustees of this institution to the corporation 
thereof, together with that of the treasurer and the usual 
accompanying documents. 

Respectfully, 

EDWARD E. ALLEN, 

Secretary. 



M4S-5- 



OFFICERS OF THE CORPORATION. 

1921-1923. 



FRANCIS HENRY APPLETON, President. 
GEORGE H. RICHARDS, Vice-President. 
ALBERT THORNDIKE, Treasurer. 
EDWARD E. ALLEN, Secretary. 



BOABD OF T&nSTEES. 



FRANCIS HENRY APPLETON. 

WILLIAM ENDICOTT. 

Miss ROSAMOND FAY. 

THOMAS J. FAY. 

PAUL E. FITZPATRICK. 

Rev. PAUL REVERE FROTHINGHAM. 



ROBERT H. HALLOWELL. 
JAMES ARNOLD LOWELL. 
MISS MARIA PURDON. 
GEORGE H. RICHARDS. 
WILLUM L. RICHARDSON, M.D. 
RICHARD M. SALTONSTALL. 



STANDING COMMITTEES. 
Monthly Visiting Conunittee, 

whose duly it is to visit and inspect the Institution at least once in each month. 





1922. 




1922. 


January, . 


Francis Henry Appleton. 


July. . . 


Paul E. Fitzpatrick. 


February, 


Misa Maria Purdon. 


August, . 


Miss Rosamond Fay. 


March, . 


Robert H. Hallowell. 


September, 


George H. Richards. 


April, 


Paul R. Frothinoham. 


October, . 


William L. Richardson. 


May, 


James A. Lowell. 


November, 


Richard M. Saltonstall 


June, 


Thomas J. Fay. 


December, 


William Endicott. 



Executive Committee. 
Francis Henry Appleton, President, ex 

officio. 
Albert Thorndike, Treasurer, ex officio. 
Edward E. Allen, Secretary, ex officio. 
George H. Richards. 
Robert H. Hallowell. 
James A. Lowell. 
Richard M. Saltonstall. 



Finance Committee. 
Albert Thorndike, Treasurer, ex officio. 
George H. Richards. 
Robert H. Hallowell. 
James A. Lowell. 



Auditors of Expenses. 

George H. Richards. 
Robert H. Hallowell. 
John Montgomery, Certified Public Accountant. 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION AND 
TEACHERS. 



EDWARD E. ALLEN, Director. 



TEACHERS AND OFFICERS OF THE UPPER SCHOOL. 
LITERABT DEPARTMENT. 



Boys' Section. 

MiBS JESSICA L. LANGWORTHY. 

MiBS CAROLINE E. McMASTER. 

CHESTER A. GIBSON. 

FRANCIS W. DANA. 

Miss LIZZIE R. KINSMAN. 

Miss CLARA L. PRATT. 

Miss FRANCES KELLERT. 



Qirls' Section. 

Miss ELSIE H. SIMONDS. 
Miss ANNIE L. BRADFORD. 
Miss GENEVIEVE M. HAVEN. 
Miss MARY H. FERGUSON. 
Mrs. ELWYN C. SMITH. 
Miss JULIA E. BURNHAM. 
Miss GERTRUDE S. HARLOW. 



Teacher ot Home Economies. 

Miss MARY C. MELDRUM. 



DEPABTMENT OF PHYSICAL TRAININO. 

GEORGE S. CHAMBERLAIN. | Miss MARY H. FERGUSON. 

Miss LENNA D. SWINERTON. 



DEPABTMENT OF MUSIC. 



Miss FREDA A. BLACK. 
Miss HELEN M. ABBOTT. 
Miss MARY E. BURBECK, 
JOHN F. HARTWELL. 



EDWIN L. GARDINER. 

Miss BRYAN STURM. 

Miss BLANCHE A. BARDIN. 

Miss EDITH RANDALL. 

Miss MABEL A. STARBIRD. Voice. 



DEPABTMENT OF MANUAL TBAININO. 



Boys' Section. 
JULIAN H. MABEY. 
ELWYN C. SMITH. 
HAROLD W. STANTON. 
Miss MARY B. KNOWLTON. Sloyd. 



Oirls' Section. 

Miss FRANCES M. LANGWORTHY. 
Miss M. ELIZABETH ROBBINS. 
Miss MARIAN E. CHAMBERLAIN. 
Miss ELIZABETH V. PIERCE. 



DEPABTMENT OF TUNING PIANOrORTES. 

ELWYN H. FOWLER, Manager and Instructor. 



UBRAKIANS, CLEBKS AND BOOKKEEPERS. 



Miss LAURA M. SAWYER, Librarian. 
Miss HARRIET E. BOSWORTH. 

Assistant 
Miss ANNA GARDNER FISH. Clerk. 

Mrs. SARAH A. STOVER, Treasurer for the Ladies' Auxiliary Society 



Miss ELLEN THOMPSON, Assistant. 
Miss MAI L. LELAND, Bookkeeper. 
Miss WINIFRED F. LELAND, Assistant. 



DEPABTMENT OF HEALTH. 

OSCAR S. CREELEY, M.D., Attending Physician. 

HENRY HAWKINS. M.D., Ophthalmologist. 

HAROLD B. CHANDLER, M.D., Assistant Ophthalmologist. 

ARTHUR WILLARD FAIRBANKS. M.D., Pediatrician. 

HOWARD ARTHUR LANE, D.M.D., Attending Dentist for the Institution. 

REINHOLD RUELBERG, D.M.T)., Atteriding Dentist for the Kitidergarten. 

Miss WINIFRED MANTON, R.N.. Attending Nurse. 



DOMESTIC DEPABTMENT. 

FREDERICK A. FLANDERS, Steward. 



Matxons in the Cottages. 



Boys' Section. 

Miss CLARISSA A. DAWSON. 
Mrs. JOSEPHINE H. MANSUR. 
Mrs. CHESTER A. GIBSON. 
Mrs. EMILY T. TURNER. 



Qirls' Section. 
Mrs. ISABELLA P. HEARD. 
Mrs. M. M. EASTMAN. 
Miss KATHERINE M. LOWE. 
Miss LENA GEISER. 



PBINTINQ DEPABTMENT. 

FRANK C. BRYAN, Manager. 
Mrs. MARTHA A. TITUS, Printer. \ Miss MARY L. TULLY, Printer. 



WOBKSHOP FOB ADULTS. 

FRANK C. BRYAN, Manager. 
Miss EVA C. ROBBINS, Clerk. 



TEACHERS AND OFFICERS OF THE LOWER SCHOOL. 



KINDEBGABTEN. 



Qirls' Section. 
Miss Cornelia M. Lorinq, Matron. 
Mrs. Mart E. Whitney, Assistant. 
Miss W. R. Humbert, Kindergartner. 
Miss Alice M. Lane, Teacher, 



Boys' Section. 

Miss Nettie B. Vose, Matron. 
Mrs. Emma H. McCraith, Assistant. 
Miss Carolyn M. Burrell, Kindergartner. 
Miss L. Henrietta Stratton, Teacher. 
Miss Sadie Turner, Teacher. 

Miss Edith Randall, Music Teacher. 

Miss Margaret McKenzie, Teacher of Manual Training. 

Miss Lenna D. Swinerton, Assistant in Corrective Gymnastics. 

Samuel P. Hayes, Ph.D., Psychologist. 

Miss Kathryn E. Maxfield, Assistant in Psychology and Personnel 

Miss Ruth Colburn, Assistant Psychologist. 



PBIMABY DEPABTMENT. 
Boys' Section. 



Miss Margaret F. Hughes, Matron. 
Miss Clossie E. Clark, Substitute. 
Miss Flora C. Fountain, Assistant. 
Miss Ethel D. Evans, Teacher. 



Miss Beth A. Easter, Teacher. 

Miss Minnie C. Tucker, Music Teacher. 

Miss Rosalind L. Houghton, Sloyd. 



Miss Ada S. Bartlett, Matron. 
Miss S. M. Chandler, Assistant. 
Miss Bertha M. Buck, Teacher. 



Girls' Section. 



Miss Margaret Miller, Teacher. 
Miss Naomi K, Gring, Music Teacher. 
Miss Esther L. Holmes, Sloyd. 



LADIES' VISITING COMMITTEE TO THE KINDEBGABTEN. 

Mrs. John Chipman Gray, President. 
Miss Annie C. Warren, Vice-President. 
Miss Eleanor S. Parker, Secretary. 



Mrs. Algernon Coolidoe, . 
Mrs. Harold J. Coolidge, . 
Miss Elizabeth G. Norton, 
Miss Harriett Dexter, 
Miss Ellen Bullard, 
Miss Annie C. Warren, 



January. 
February. 
March. 
April. 

May. 



Miss Eleanor S. Parker, . June. 

Mrs. John Chipman Gray, . September. 

Mrs. Ronald T. Lyman, . October. 

Mrs. George H. Monks, . November. 

Mrs. E. Preble Motley, . December. 



General Visitors. 

Mrs. Roger B. Merriman. 
Miss Maria Purdon. 
Miss Alice Sargent. 



Honorary Members. 

Mrs. Maud Howe Elliott. 
Mrs. Larz Anderson. 



MEMBERS OF THE CORPORATION. 



Abbot, Mrs. Edwin H., Cam- 
bridge. 

Adams, Karl, Boston. 

Allen, Edward E., Watertown. 

Allen, Mrs. Edward E., Water- 
town. 

Amory, Robert, Boston. 

Anderson, Mrs. Larz, Brookline. 

Angier, Mrs. George, Newton. 

Appleton, Hon. Francis Henry, 
Peabody. 

Appleton, Francis Henry, Jr., 
Boston. 

Appleton, Mrs. Francis Henry, 
Jr., Boston. 

Appleton, Dr. William, Boston. 

Atherton, Mrs. Caroline S., Grove 
HaU. 

Bacon, Caspar G., Jamaica Plain. 

Baldwin, S. E., New Haven, 
Conn. 

BaUantine, Arthur A., Boston. 

Bancroft, Miss Eleanor C, 
Beverly. 

Barbour, Edmund D., Boston. 

Bartlett, Miss Mary F., Boston. 

Baylies, Walter C, Boston. 

Baylies, Mrs. Walter C, Boston. 

Beach, Rev. D. N., Bangor, Me. 

Beatley, Mrs. Clara B., Boston. 

Beebe, E. Pierson, Boston. 

Benedict, Wm. Leonard, New 
York. 

Bennett, Miss Gazella, Worcester. 

Black, George N., Boston. 



Blake, George F., Worcester. 

Blunt, Col. S. E., Springfield. 

Boardman, Mrs. E. A., Boston. 

Bourn, Hon. A. 0., Providence, 
R.I. 

Bowditch, IngersoU, Boston. 

Bremer, S. Parker, Boston. 

Brighara, Charles, Watertown. 

Brooke, Rev. S. W., London. 

Brooks, Gorham, Boston. 

Brooks, Shepherd, Boston. 

Bryant, Mrs. A. B. M., Boston. 

Bullard, Miss Ellen, Boston. 

Bullock, Col. A. G., Worcester. 

Burditt, Miss Alice A., Boston. 

Burnham, Miss Julia E., Lowell. 

Burnham, William A., Boston. 

Burr, I. Tucker, Jr., Boston. 

Cabot, Mrs. Thomas H., Boston. 

Callender, Walter, Providence, 
R. I. 

Camp, Rev. Edward C, Water- 
town. 

Carter, Mrs. J. W., West Newton. 

Gary, Miss Ellen G., Boston. 

Chapin, Edward P., Andover. 

Cook, Charles T., Detroit, Mich. 

Cook, Mrs. C. T., Detroit, Mich. 

Coolidge, Mrs. Algernon, Boston. 

Coolidge, Francis L., Boston, 

Coolidge, Mrs. Harold J., Boston. 

Coolidge, J. Randolph, Boston. 

Cotting, Charles E., Jr., Boston. 

Crane, Zenas M., Pittsfield. 

Crosby, Sumner, Cambridge. 



Crosby, William S., Brookline. 

Crowninshield, Francis B., Bos- 
ton. 

Cunningham, Mrs. Henry V., 
Boston. 

Curtis, Mrs. Greeley S., Boston. 

Curtis, Horatio G., Boston. 

Curtis, Mrs. Horatio G., Boston. 

Curtis, James F., Boston. 

Cutler, George C, Jr., Boston. 

Dabney, George B., Boston. 

Damon, Willard A., Springfield. 

Davies, Rt. Rev. Thomas F., 
Springfield. 

Davis, Charles S., Boston. 

Davis, Livingston, Milton. 

Day, Mrs. Frank A., Newton. 

Dewey, Francis H., Worcester. 

De Witt, Alexander, Worcester. 

Dexter, Mrs. F. G., Boston. 

Dexter, Miss Harriett, Boston. 

Dexter, Miss Rose L., Boston. 

Dillaway, W. E. L., Boston. 

Dolan, WilUam G., Boston. 

Draper, George A., Boston. 

Drew, Edward B., Cambridge. 

Duryea, Mrs. Herman, New York. 

Eliot, Rev. C. R., Boston. 

EUiott, Mrs. Maud Howe, Boston. 

Ellis, George H., Boston. 

Ely, Adolph C, Watertown. 

Endicott, Henry, Boston. 

Endicott, WiUiam, Boston. 

Endicott, William C, Boston. 

Evans, Mrs. Glendower, Boston. 

Everett, Dr. Oliver H., Worcester. 

Fanning, David H., Worcester. 

Faulkner, Miss F. M., Boston. 

Fay, Mrs. Dudley B., Boston. 

Fay, Mrs. Henry H., Boston. 

Fay, Miss Rosamond, Boston. 

Fay, Miss Sarah B., Boston. 

Fay, Thomas J., Boston. 



Fay, Wm, Rodman, Dover, Mass. 

Fenno, Mrs. L. C, Boston. 

Fiske, Mrs. Mary Duncan, Bos- 
ton. 

Fitz, Mrs. W. Scott, Boston. 

Fitzpatrick, Paul Edward, Brook- 
line. 

Ford, Lawrence A., Boston. 

Foster, Mrs. Francis C, Cam- 
bridge. 

Freeman, Miss H. E., Boston. 

Frothingham, Rev. P. R., Boston. 

Fuller, George F., Worcester. 

Fuller, Mrs. Samuel R., Boston. 

Gage, Mrs. Homer, Shrewsbury. 

Gale, Lyman W., Boston. 

Gammans, Hon. G. H., Boston. 

Gardiner, Robert H., Boston. 

Gardiner, Robert H., Jr., Need- 
ham. 

Gardner, George P., Boston. 

Gardner, Mrs. John L., Boston. 

Gaskill, George A., Worcester. 

Gaskins, Frederick A., Milton. 

Gaylord, Emerson G., Chicopee. 

Geer, Mrs. Danforth, Jr., New 
Jersey. 

George, Charles H., Providence, 
R. I. 

GUbert, Wm. E., Springfield. 

Gleason, Mrs. Cora L., Boston. 

Gleason, Sidney, Medford. 

GUdden, W. T., Brookline. 

Goddard, Harry W., Worcester. 

Goff, Darius L., Pawtucket, R. I. 

Goff, Lyman B., Pawtucket, R. I. 

Goldthwait, Mrs. John, Boston. 

Gooding, Rev. A,, Portsmouth, 
N. H. 

Gordon, Rev. G. A., D.D., 
Boston. 

Gray, Mrs. John Chipman, Bos- 
ton. 



Gray, Roland, Boston. 

Green, Charles G., Cambridge. 

Grew, Edward W., Boston. 

GriflEin, S. B., Springfield. 

Griswold, Merrill, Cambridge. 

Hall, Mrs. Florence Howe, New 
York. 

Hall, Miss Minna B., Longwood. 

Hallowell, John W., Boston. 

Hallowell, Robert H., Boston. 

Hammond, Mrs. G. G., Boston. 

Haskell, Mrs. E. B., Aubumdale. 

Hemenway, Mrs. Augustus, Bos- 
ton. 

Higginson, F. L., Jr., Boston. 

Higginson, Mrs. Henry L., Bos- 
ton. 

Hill, Arthur D., Boston. 

Hill, Dr. A. S., Somerville. 

Holmes, Charles W., Toronto, 
Ont. 

Homans, Robert, Boston. 

Howe, Henry Marion, New York. 

Howe, Henry S., Brookline. 

Howe, James G., Milton. 

Howes, Miss Edith M., Brookline. 

Howland, Mrs. 0. 0., Boston. 

Hunnewell, Mrs. H. S., Boston. 

Hunnewell, Walter, Jr., Boston. 

Hutchins, Mrs. C. F., Boston. 

lasigi, Miss Mary V., Boston. 

Ingraham, Mrs. E. T., Wellesley. 

Isdahl, Mrs. C. B., California. 

Jackson, Charles C, Boston. 

Jenks, Miss C. E., Bedford. 

Johnson, Edward C, Boston. 

Johnson, Rev. H. S., Boston. 

Joy, Mrs. Charles H., Boston. 

Kasson, Rev. F. H., Boston. 

Kellogg, Mrs. Eva D., Boston. 

Kendall, Miss H. W., Boston. 

Kidder, Mrs. Henry P., Boston. 

Kilham, Miss Annie M., Beverly. 



Kilmer, Frederick M., Water- 
town. 

Kimball, Edward P., North An- 
dover. 

King, Mrs. Tarrant Putnam, Mil- 
ton. 

Kinnicutt, Lincoln N., Worcester. 

Knowlton, Daniel S., Boston. 

Kramer, Henry C, Boston. 

Lamb, Mrs. Annie L., Boston. 

Lang, Mrs. B. J., Boston. 

Latimer, Mrs. Grace G., Boston. 

Lawrence, Mrs. A. A., Boston. 

Lawrence, John Silsbee, Boston. 

Lawrence, Rt. Rev. Wm., Boston. 

Ley, Harold A., Springfield. 

Lincoln, L. J. B., Hingham. 

Lincoln, Waldo, Worcester. 

Littell, Miss Harriet A., Boston. 

Livermore, Mrs. Wm. R., New 
York. 

Lodge, Hon. Henry C, Nahant. 

Logan, Hon. James, Worcester. 

Longfellow, Miss Alice M., Cam- 
bridge. 

Lord, Rev. A. M., Providence, 
R.I. 

Loring, Miss Katharine P., Prides 
Crossing. 

Loring, Miss Louisa P., Prides 
Crossing. 

Loring, Mrs. Wm. Caleb, Boston. 

Lothrop, John, Aubumdale. 

Lothrop, Mrs. T. K., Boston. 

Lovering, Mrs. C. T., Boston. 

Lovering, Richard S., Boston, 

Lowell, Abbott Lawrence, Cam- 
bridge. 

Lowell, Miss Amy, Brookline. 

Lowell, Miss Georgina, Boston. 

Lowell, James Arnold, Boston. 

Lowell, Jolm, Chestnut Hill. 

Lowell, Miss Lucy, Boston. 



Luce, Hon, Robert, Waltham. 

Lyman, Mrs. Ronald T., Boston. 

Marrett, Miss H. M., Standish, 
Me. 

Marrs, Mrs. Kingsmill, Boston. 

Mason, Charles F., Watertown. 

Mason, Miss Ellen F., Boston. 

Mason, Miss Ida M., Boston. 

McElwain, R. Franklin, Holyoke. 

Merriman, Mrs. D., Boston. 

Merriman, Mrs. Roger B., Cam- 
bridge. 

Merritt, Edward P., Boston. 

Meyer, Mrs. G. von L., Boston. 

Minot, the Misses, Boston. 

Minot, J. Grafton, Boston. 

Minot, James J., Jr., Boston. 

Minot, William, Boston. 

Monks, Mrs. George H., Boston. 

Morgan, Eustis P., Saco, Me. 

Morgan, Mrs. Eustis P., Saco, Me. 

Morison, Mrs. John H., Boston. 

Morse, Mrs. Leopold, Boston. 

Morse, Miss Margaret F., Jamaica 
Plain. 

Moseley, Charles H., Boston. 

Motley, Mrs. E. Preble, Boston. 

Motley, Warren, Boston. 

Norcross, Grenville H., Boston. 

Norcross, Mrs. Otis, Boston. 

Norton, Miss Elizabeth G., Cam- 
bridge. 

Noyes, Mrs. Lucia C, Jamaica 
Plain. 

Osgood, Mrs. E. L., Hopedale. 

Osgood, Miss Fanny D., Hope- 
dale. 

Parker, Miss Eleanor S., Boston. 

Parker, W. Prentiss, Boston. 

Parker, W. Stanley, Boston. 

Partridge, Fred F., Holyoke, 

Peabody, Rev. Endicott, Groton. 

Peabody, Frederick W., Boston. 



Peabody, Harold, Boston. 

Peabody, Philip G., Boston. 

Peabody, W. Rodman, Boston. 

Perkins, Charles Bruen, Boston. 

Perkins, Mrs, C. E., Boston. 

Phillips, Mrs. John C, Boston. 

Pickering, Henry G,, Boston. 

Pickman, D. L., Boston. 

Pickman, Mrs. D. L,, Boston. 

Pierce, Mrs, M, V., Milton. 

Plunkett, W. P., Adams, 

Pope, Mrs, A, A,, Boston. 

Poulsson, Miss Emilie, Boston. 

Powers, Mrs. H. H,, Newton. 

Pratt, George Dwight, Spring- 
field. 

Proctor, James H,, Boston, 

Purdon, Miss Maria, Boston, 

Putnam, F, Delano, Boston, 

Putnam, Mrs, James J., Boston, 

Rantoul, Neal, Boston. 

Rantoul, Robert S., Salem. 

Read, Mrs. Robert M., Medford. 

Remick, Frank W., West Newton. 

Rice, John C, Boston. 

Richards, Miss EUse, Boston. 

Richards, George H,, Boston. 

Richards, Mrs. H., Gardiner, Me. 

Richards, Henry H,, Groton. 

Richardson, John, Jr,, Readville, 

Richardson, Mrs, John, Jr,, Read- 
ville, 

Richardson, Miss M, G., New 
York. 

Richardson, W. L., M,D., Boston. 

Roberts, Mrs. A, W,, AUston, 

Robinson, George F,, Watertown. 

Rogers, Miss Flora E., New York, 

Rogers, Henry M,, Boston, 

Ropes, Mrs. Joseph A., Boston. 

Russell, Otis T., Boston. 

Russell, Mrs, Robert S,, Boston, 
Russell, Mrs. W. A,, Boston, 



10 



Russell, Wm. Eustis, Boston. 

Saltonstall, Leverett, Westwood. 

Saltonstall, Mrs. Leverett, West- 
wood. 

Saltonstall, Richard M., Boston. 

Sargent, Miss Alice, Brookline. 

Schaff, Capt. Morris, Cambridge. 

Sears, Mrs. Knyvet W., Boston. 

Shattuck, Henry Lee, Boston. 

Shaw, Bartlett M., Watertown. 

Shaw, Mrs. G. Howland, Boston. 

Shaw, Henry S., Boston. 

Shepard, Harvey N., Boston. 

Slater, Mrs. H. N., Boston. 

Smith, Joel West, East Hampton, 
Conn. 

Snow, Walter B., Watertown. 

Sohier, Miss Emily L., Boston. 
Sohier, Miss M. D., Boston. 
Sorchan, Mrs. Victor, New York. 
Stanwood, Edward, Brookline. 
Stearns, Charles H., Brookline. 
Stearns, Mrs. Charles H., Brook- 
line. 
Stearns, Wm. B., Boston. 
Stevens, Miss C. A., New York. 
Sturgis, Francis S., Boston. 
Sturgis, R. Clipston, Boston. 
Thayer, Charles M., Worcester. 
Thaj^er, Rev. G. A., Cincinnati, 0. 
Thayer, Mrs. Nathaniel, Boston. 
Thomas, Mrs. John B., Boston. 
Thorndike, Albert, Boston. 
Thomdike, Miss Rosanna D., 

Boston. 
Tifft, Eliphalet T., Springfield. 



Tilden, Miss Alice Foster, Milton. 

Tilden, Miss Edith S., Milton. 

Tuckerman, Mrs. C. S., Boston. 

Tufts, John F., Watertown. 

Underwood, Herbert S., Boston. 

Underwood, Wm. Lyman, Bel- 
mont. 

Villard, Mrs. Henry, New York. 

Wallace, Andrew B., Springfield. 

Ware, Miss Mary L., Boston. 

Warren, Miss Annie C, Boston. 

Warren, J. G., Providence, R. I. 

Washburn, Hon. Charles G., 
Worcester. 

Washburn, Mrs. Frederick A., 
Boston. 

Waters, H. Goodman, Springfield. 

Watson, Thomas A., Boston. 

Watson, Mrs. Thomas A., Boston. 

Wendell, William G., Boston. 

Wesson, James L., Boston. 

West, George S., Boston. 

Wheelock, Miss Lucy, Boston. 

White, George A., Boston. 

Whitney, Henry M., Brookline. 

Wiggins, Charles, 2d, Boston. 

Winsor, Mrs. E., Chestnut Hill. 

Winsor, Robert, Jr., Boston, 

Winthrop, Mrs. Thomas L., Bos- 
ton. 

Wolcott, Roger, Boston. 

Wright, Burton H., Worcester. 

Wright, George S., Watertown. 

Young, Mrs. Benjamin L., Boston. 

Young, B. Loring, Weston. 



11 



SYNOPSIS OF THE PKOCEEDINGS 

OF THE 

ANNUAL MEETING OF THE COEPOEATION. 



Watehtown, October 13, 1921, 

The annual meeting of the corporation, duly summoned, 
was held to-day at the institution, and was called to order 
by the president, Hon. Francis Henry Appleton, at 3 p.m. 

The proceedings of the last meeting were read and ap- 
proved. 

The annual report of the trustees was accepted and or- 
dered to be printed, together with the usual accompanying 
documents. 

The report of the treasurer was accepted and ordered on 
file. 

Voted, That acts and expenditures, made and authorized by the 
Board of Trustees, or by any committee appointed by said Board of 
Trustees, during the corporate year closed this day, be and are hereby 
ratified and confirmed. 

The corporation then proceeded to ballot for officers for 
the ensuing year, and the following persons were unani- 
mously elected : — 

President. — Hon. Francis Henry Appleton. 

Vice-President. — George H. Richards. 

Treasurer. — Albert Thorndike. 

12 



Secretary. — Edward E. Allen. 

Trustees. — Francis Henry Appleton, William Endicott, 
Miss Rosamond Fay, Paul E. Fitzpatrick, Robert H. Hallo- 
well, James A. Lowell, George H. Richards, and Richard M. 
Saltonstall. 

The meeting then adjourned. 

EDWARD E. ALLEN, 

Secretary. 



13 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES. 



Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School fob the Blind, 
Watertown, October 13, 1921. 

Ladies and Gentlemen : — It is interesting to 
note that our pupil attendance, which has averaged 
290 for the past ten years, does not grow with the 
population but keeps fairly constant; also that, while 
many boys and girls remain twelve and even more 
years, the average length of their stay is only about 
six years. There is, indeed, a rapid exchange in pupil- 
age, about 50 entering and 50 leaving for one cause 
or another during any year. The school has never 
been quite full. And for this reason we welcome an 
occasional student who is over twenty-one years old, 
if both the pupil and we are convinced that he will 
fit in with a routine arranged for younger people. 
And we often give trial also to boys and girls who are 
"borderline" because of too much sight to become 
finger readers. These get here the respite from eye 
strain they need and often benefit in education while 
gaining in courage, though as a rule it is not stimulat- 
ing for them to remain long among people who are 
really bhnd. Therefore, our Director is deeply inter- 
ested in furthering the new movement for having 
classes of semi-sighted children in the public schools. 



14 



Ten of our Massachusetts cities already conduct such 
classes; and last year 240 pupils attended them. 

In general, our pupils enter from all over New- 
England; but some of them come from afar, seven 
states outside of this section having been represented 
last year. The seven pupils indicated were mostly 
older girls and boys, who came for the vocational 
study of music. Some of these also took a course or 
two at the New England Conservatory of Music, and 
all shared in the very unusual opportunities of hear- 
ing the best music of Boston, which our splendid 
Maria Kemble Ohver Fund makes possible. Since 
1895, when Mr. Gardiner first directed our music 
department, 19 Perkins students have studied at the 
New England Conservatory; and he has otherwise 
been able to keep up no Httle affiUation between the 
two schools. For example, in 1915 he could say that 
''with the satisfactory completion of our pianoforte 
normal course the young teacher is given a certificate, 
and should the recipient also complete the instru- 
mental course at the New England Conservatory of 
Music, this certificate is accepted by that school in 
lieu of the normal work required there." Then, this 
past season Mr. Gardiner was invited to bring the 
Perkins choir to assist the Conservatory chorus at 
the latter's annual concert, and he did so. In 
December last our choir sang its Christmas music to 
help the Watertown PubHc Library raise its quota 
for the American Library Association ''Books for 
Everybody" fund. The proceeds were $245.70. 



15 



Of the thousands of visitors who continue to come 
to Perkins every year many remark: ''What a pity 
it is the pupils cannot see the beauty of the place." 
Yes, it is beautiful, though very simply so; much of 
that which attracts being site, layout and setting 
in an old estate. Mr. Allen became convinced, while 
at the Royal Normal College in London, that bhnd 
people somehow respond to an environment of visible 
beauty, as of course their teachers do — they who 
make up the very important indirect environment of 
the school. This idea he was able to impress first 
upon his reconstruction of the Pennsylvania Institu- 
tion at Overbrook, and later upon that of the new 
Perkins at Watertown. In both cases the architects 
knew how to combine simpHcity and practicability 
with beauty, and make each plant a model of its kind 
for others to follow. Both institutions provide prima- 
rily for physical well-being and only secondarily for 
the esthetic. The two factors in a life are inheritance 
and environment. The inheritance of most of our 
pupils is poor. All we can give them then is the best 
possible environment. And this comparatively ex- 
pensive environment — if the pubhc will call it so — 
has proved itself in the years of our existence some- 
thing which transforms and makes of many rather 
helpless waifs noble men and women. 

Between the years 1882 and 1907 the Perkins In- 
stitution gave annually in early June a pubhc exhibi- 
tion of its activities. This it did in Boston Theatre 
or Tremont Temple, before large and enthusiastic 



16 



audiences. The present Director has preferred to do 
his exhibiting at the institution, chiefly because he 
could present a much better demonstration there. 
But, although many more and fully as enthusiastic 
audiences have been coming to Watertown, the Bos- 
ton public did not attend as formerly, and these old 
friends are still the ones we most wish to impress both 
with the excellence of our achievements and with 
our continued need of assistance and support. So 
last May we resumed the town exhibition, giving it 
in Jordan Hall before about 800 guests, most of whom 
seemed surprised that blind children could be trained 
to such precision in gymnastic drill and eager freedom 
in games of competition as they saw them capable of 
that afternoon. During the exercise in sewing and 
knitting by little children the Rev. Francis E. Webster 
of Waltham spoke stirringly of the efficiency and 
needs of the Perkins Institution. Indeed, it must 
not be supposed that, because we have now moved 
our shut-in children to fireproof buildings and spa- 
cious grounds, we can get along without the oldtime 
affection and support; for we cannot. We need this 
all the more imperatively these times when most 
educational institutions have had to have recourse to 
endowment drives. We should prefer not to resort 
to this sort of thing. Hence, we welcome such gifts 
and bequests as come in from time to time, even 
though these are no longer so frequent or so large as 
they used to be. Were it not that the Common- 
wealth pays us the increased per capita tuition fee 



17 



of $400, we should have to retrench greatly. As it 
is we have not only not done so but have even 
continued to extend and improve our course of 
study and our facilities for the socialization of the 
pupils. Our teachers have generally remained with 
us stanchly and loyally, though by no means receiv- 
ing the same large increases in salary other edu- 
cators are now paid. Even so, our pupU per capita 
maintenance cost has exceeded $600 since 1918- 
1919. 

The Perkins Institution is rich not in funds but 
in facihties, — very unusual faciUties, in fact; and 
many are the requests from young bhnd people out- 
side of New England who yearn to become its pupils. 
Now, it would gratify the trustees beyond measure 
could we afford to invite more of these appUcants to 
come to Watertown. We generally do have one or 
two guest pupils stud3dng with the rest. There is 
one there now, a Corean from the Hawaiian Islands, 
who will soon carry home the self-reliance he has 
acquired at school. There was a Chinese child visit- 
ing our kindergarten all last year. The Porto Rican 
who was our guest between 1917-1919 has since then 
opened the pioneer school for bhnd children of her 
island. It is a vast satisfaction to be able to project 
abroad the light of our httle candle. Will not some 
good friends create scholarships to multiply its rays? 
In our last year's report we enlarged somewhat upon 
this matter of scholarships for a few worthy outside 



18 



blind, struggling to mount the stepping stone to 
success. 

Some years ago a former Perkins pupil left us 
$1,000, 'Hhe income thereof to be used in aid of such 
of the graduates of the school as may be chosen by 
the authorities of said institution as worthy of as- 
sistance to continue their education in any of the 
Universities and Colleges of New England, or to 
pursue a higher course in the study of music." Last 
year a part of the accumulated income of this Put- 
nam Scholarship Fund, so called, was used in send- 
ing for lessons at the New England Conservatory of 
Music a graduate of the class of 1920, who was 
especially recommended by our department of music. 

We were very glad indeed to be able to further the 
new project taken up last year by the Graduate 
School of Harvard University, — that of giving a 
half-year extension course on the Education of the 
Blind and the Semi-sighted. Our Director suggested 
the undertaking to Director Hayes of the Massachu- 
setts Division of the Bhnd, who first proposed it to 
the Dean of that school and then persuaded the 
Massachusetts Association for Promoting the Inter- 
ests of the Adult Blind to help finance it. Though 
the 32 different lecturers gave their services, there 
were necessary expenses in getting and keeping such 
a project going, which was efficiently done by its 
Executive Secretary, Miss Lotta S. Rand. Some 30 
of the Perkins Institution teachers registered for the 



19 



course, and they, with about as many more workers 
for the blind, imparted no Httle enthusiasm to it. It 
was so successful, indeed, that the University of 
Pennsylvania was readily persuaded to repeat the 
course in Philadelphia, which it was enabled to do 
quite as successfully through the active co-operation 
of President Cadwalader of the Board of Managers 
and of Principal Burritt and his staff of teachers, of 
the School for the Blind at Overbrook. 

The incentive and recognition which these courses 
gave the work for the bUnd seems to have acted as 
a leaven elsewhere also. Columbia University car- 
ried out a course this past summer for home teachers 
of the adult bUnd, and Peabody College for Teachers 
at Nashville, Tenn., likewise had a summer course 
for instructors of the young bhnd. This latter was 
taught by two teachers from our Perkins staff. Miss 
Jessica L. Langworthy and Miss Wilhelmina Hum- 
bert. All four of the courses above mentioned have 
been successful beyond expectation. And now the 
Harvard Graduate School of Education has an- 
nounced for this fall and winter a half-year exten- 
sion course to be conducted by our Director, Mr. 
Allen. It will be more academic, systematic and in- 
tensive than the one given a year ago, and will in- 
volve for those desiring credit, not only the visiting 
of all local agencies for the bhnd, but also much re- 
quired reading and the passing of a written exam- 
ination. The rich collections of Perkins Institution 
will be thrown open to the students, some of whom 



20 



will even reside there for close observation of the 
work and practice in its classes. So far as we know 
no systematic courses for teachers of the blind have 
ever been given before, — unless perhaps in Vienna, 
Austria, where Director Mell and staff of the Imperial 
Institution for the Blind did it for some years before 
the war. There is not much literature in English on 
the pedagogy and psychology of the bUnd and not 
much in any language; the most of what there is is 
in German. However, all that there is may be con- 
sulted in our special hlindiana library. 

Another most promising step affecting the blind of 
this country is the recent passage of the Industrial 
RehabiUtation Act, by which people injured in in- 
dustry or otherwise are to be helped to get on their 
feet again. Any re-education involved is to be given 
by the several states, which may then collect half the 
cost from the federal government. This act, already 
accepted by most of the states, including Massachu- 
setts, embraces those bUnded from whatever cause 
and would seem to promise a lifting of the economic 
status of the bhnd and, with it, their social status. 
While neither poverty nor blindness can be legis- 
lated out of existence, both may be wonderfully miti- 
gated and lessened and, we beUeve, are destined to 
be. When the blind are no longer permitted to beg 
upon our streets the education of the young bUnd 
will have been advanced as if by magic. 

Still another bit of legislation that has already 
helped in these matters locally is the appropriation 



21 



by the 1919 Massachusetts legislature for aiding the 
needy bUnd. This money is not bestowed in the form 
of pensions but of relief, being dispensed month by 
month according to the best judgment of the Division 
of the Bhnd. 

The recent prominence given the rehabiHtation of 
the war-bHnded, both in this country and abroad, 
especially in England, has in various ways helped 
along the cause of the civiUan bUnd. Several of our 
schools have contributed through release of their 
trained instructors, our own school by giving up 
first Mr. Harold B. Molter and then Mr. Arthur E. 
Holmes, both to become supervisors of the blind for 
the Federal Board for Vocational Education. Then 
Miss Gerda L. Wahlberg, teacher of sloyd for the 
past fifteen years to our girls' primary school, left 
us to become Reconstruction Aide in the Occupa- 
tional Therapy Department of the United States 
PubUc Health Service. Not only has good to the 
civilian bhnd come out of the war, but more good is 
to follow. The burden of last summer's convention 
of the American Association of Workers for the Bhnd 
was the creation of an American Foundation in be- 
half of all the bUnd, an agency that is of splendid 
potentiality. 

We have dwelt upon the above-mentioned larger 
aspects of the cause of which we are but a part, 
since these events have affected and fostered every 
part. Mr. Allen has treated these at greater length 
in his bulletin on ''Special Features in the Educa- 



22 



tion of the Blind during the Biennium 1918-1920," 
contributed to the Bureau of Education for its Bien- 
nial Survey of Education in the United States. 

The condition of blindness is one of much shut- 
inness. The invention of the telephone, suggested 
as it was through efforts to render the vibrations of 
the human voice visible to deaf students of speech, 
has proved far more liberating to the bhnd, who take 
vast comfort in visiting by wire. And now has come 
the ''wireless," which is destined to broadcast over 
the world music and messages of many sorts, and so 
help even more to emancipate the bUnd from their 
shut-inness. A former pupil of ours, Clarence 
Hawkes, the nature writer, tells us that his wireless 
outfit proved a blessing to him last winter, and re- 
marks: "I can think of nothing else which would so 
appeal to the imagination of the bhnd as the wireless 
telephone, and which would so connect them up with 
the world." 

It so happens that our teacher of science, who had 
become enthusiastic over radio work during the war, 
was encouraged last fall to set up a station at Perkins 
and to introduce the subject to his older boys. This 
he did with most satisfactory results. The school 
career of the average blind person is rarely punctuated 
with the enthusiastic pursuit of pastimes, and of all 
young people he needs to cultivate them then if ever. 
Science and club activities, when well-conducted and 
controlled, open up fields of interest and education 
which no school like ours can afford to ignore. Ahke 



23 



for conduct and accomplishment, no recent year in 
the boys' department has been a better one. 

Indeed, the year in all departments was singularly 
effective. The general health was excellent, and the 
atmosphere and spirit wholesome and productive. 
Since fencing-in the kindergarten playgrounds we 
have been able to re-introduce much of the old play 
apparatus and have added hatches for a few pets, 
such as guinea pigs and rabbits, for which some of 
the children, under an enthusiastic teacher, have 
grown carrots, turnips and such like crops. 

This past summer Miss AUce M. Lane conducted 
for the sixth season her camp for twelve Uttle blind 
girls on the shores of a pond at Georgetown, Mass. 

In June five pupils were handed their high school 
diplomas and two their certificates on having com- 
pleted the course in piano teaching and two that 
in piano tuning. 

During the summer Miss Ellen H. Packard, who 
for the past five years had been principal of the girls' 
school, resigned to accept the deanship of Hebron 
Academy. Her place will be taken by Miss Elsie 
H. Simonds, a graduate of Mount Holyoke College, 
who has taught for us since 1908. 

For two weeks in July Mr. Fowler, instructor and 
manager of our tuning department, held at the insti- 
tution an all-day summer school course on the care 
and tuning of the piano player. Seven certificated 
piano tuners attended, all of them former pupils of 
his department, two being home on their vacation 



24 



from the schools for the bhnd in Salem, Oregon, and 
Vancouver, Washington, where they are instructors. 

One former pupil of the institution has recently 
graduated from the Harvard Law School and is 
now practicing his profession. Another is a student 
there. Still another is studying law at Northeastern 
College. Three others, young women, were selected 
by the Division of the Blind to do pioneer work for 
the blind in selling over the counter in Boston de- 
partment stores; and they have made good. Given 
the background of education and also good person- 
ality and initiative, blind individuals can do this 
thing acceptably with the material help of the same 
certograph which the other salespeople use and, of 
course, the personal co-operation of the employer. 
The reason why so many educated blind people still 
follow simple handicrafts is that the general public 
is unwilhng to grant them openings where intelligence 
is the main factor. 

Among the very first blind children taught by Dr. 
Howe at the home of his father, back in 1832, was 
Sophia Carter of Andover. Her surviving sister. Miss 
Emily Carter, has presented the institution with an 
oil portrait of this child, which has already become 
a possession of interest and value. 

The Perkins Institution Hbrary of embossed books, 
though primarily for the use of present pupils of the 
school, has become more and more the regional lend- 
ing library for the bhnd of all New England. Believ- 
ing as Mr. Allen does that finger reading is as great 



25 



a boon to the blind as any other avocation can be, 
he has continually sought to create new incentives 
for it. First, he enormously increased the yearly 
output of the Howe Memorial Press in the form of 
choice short stories in Braille and heralded the fact 
through printed announcements and through the 
travehng home teachers to the adults. This past 
season he has met the five Massachusetts home teach- 
ers and received from them certain recommendations 
which he has put in practice. He has also caused the 
library to be kept open all summer rather than to 
continue sending out in advance all the books desired 
for summer reading. While this has meant the em- 
ployment of a summer circulating librarian, it has 
immediately justified itself, for the circulation has 
jumped from 363 in the summer of 1920 to 1,225 in 
that of 1921. The outside circulation for the school 
year 1920-1921 was 8,922. 

Mr. Bryan, manager of the Howe Memorial Press, 
reports that this past year's product was 3,128 em- 
bossed plates, and 153,000 printed pages. He also 
dispensed 1,921 Braille slates and 4,393 writing sty- 
luses; and he has sold 18 of the new Perkins Institu- 
tion Braillewriters at $49 apiece, which is something 
less than actual cost. 

Mr. Bryan, who is also manager of our workshop 
at South Boston, reports a very successful year, with 
ample employment for his 22 bhnd people in mat- 
tress and pillow making and in chair caning. This 
workshop carries on a brisk little business of about 



26 



$50,000 a year, and in a certain restricted sense is 
self-sustaining. This year its blind workmen and 
workwomen were paid in round numbers $14,000 in 
wages as against $7,000 to the same number for no 
more work in 1914. 

At the beginning of the current year, October 1, 
1921, the number of bUnd persons registered at the 
Perkins Institution was 315, or eleven more than on 
the same date of the previous year. This number 
includes 78 boys and 85 girls in the upper school, 54 
boys and 61 girls in the lower school, 15 teachers and 
oflficers and 22 adults in the workshop at South Bos- 
ton. There have been 64 admitted and 53 discharged 
during the year. 

Causes of Blindness of Pupils admitted during the 
School Year 1920-1921. — Ophthalmia neonatorum, 
10; Interstitial keratitis, 3; Ulcerative keratitis, 3; 
Keratitis, 1; Iritis, 1; Accident, 8; Optic atrophy, 
9; Congenital optic atrophy, 3; Congenital cataract 
and optic atrophy, 1; Congenital cataracts, 5; Con- 
genital defects, 3; Congenital amblyopia, 2; Con- 
genital optic neuritis, 1; Congenital hypermetropia, 
1 ; Aniridia, 1 ; Buphthalmos, 1 ; Ectopia leutes, 1 ; 
Corneal opacities, 1. 



27 



Death of Members of the Corporation. 

Miss Mary G. Callahan; James Harvey Chace; 
Samuel P. Colt; Mrs. Julia, wife of J. Randolph 
Coolidge; T. Jefferson Coolidge; Miss Sarah 
M. Fay; Miss Annie E. Fisher; Mrs. C. Estelle, 
widow of James Lawrence; Charles Elliot Loud; 
James M. Prendergast; Mrs. Grace E., widow of 
William Howell Reed; James B. Winsor. 

All which is respectfully submitted by 

ROBERT AMORY, 
ANNIE GILMAN ANGIER, 
FRANCIS HENRY APPLETON, 
WILLIAM ENDICOTT, 
THOMAS J. FAY, 
PAUL E. FITZPATRICK, 
PAUL REVERE FROTHINGHAM, 
ROBERT H. HALLOWELL, 
JAMES ARNOLD LOWELL, 
GEORGE H. RICHARDS, 
WILLIAM L. RICHARDSON, 
RICHARD M. SALTONSTALL, 

Trustees. 



28 



SAIVIUEL GRIDLEY HOWE: A BRIEF 
SKETCH.^ 



" He was, for half a century, one of those few persons who 
could not be omitted when Boston was described," says 
Frank Sanborn in his biography of Dr. Howe. Even while 
living he was "The Hero" of song and of sermon, and when 
dead was given a great public funeral. Twenty-five years 
afterward, in 1901, upon the centenary of his birth, there 
was arranged a splendid memorial meeting to which our 
greatest and best came to do him honor. To-day, throngs 
of children attend the Samuel Gridley Howe public school in 
South Boston, where he lived; and any one who looks on the 
Boylston Street walls of the Boston Public Library may see 
there the name of Howe carved with those of Pestalozzi, 
Froebel, Mann and Harvard. 

Dr. Howe has been likened to a chevalier of the Middle 
Ages, — handsome, fierce when roused, otherwise gentle and 
kind. His most intimate friends called him "Chev." This 
title he earned over and over again: first, in going like 
Byron, to fight for the Greeks in their war of revolution 
against the Turks; then, again, nearly losing his life in be- 
half of the downtrodden Poles. Next we read of his coming 
home to make a whirlwind appeal for money and clothing 
for the impoverished Greeks, and later for the Cretans; 
in both cases obtaining it readily and going to oversee its 
distribution in person, — not just giving it away, but wisely 

> Revised and reprinted from an article in The Christian Register, Boston, Mass., March 
31, 1921. 

29 



using much of it in payments for labor upon public works, 
such as rebuilding the devastated villages. Here we see, 
coupled with his native humanitarianism, the origin of his 
common-sense molding of the public charities of Massachu- 
setts, touching which Chapman, a keen student of affairs, 
writes: "His work in charity will never be superseded. Suc- 
ceeding penologists will recur to it to save them from the 
science of their times." 

Indeed, Dr. Howe was always original and practical. 
When asked in 1831 to take charge of the proposed first 
school for the blind, in Boston, he accepted the call of the 
helpless as a true knight would, went abroad to study the 
few schools there, and upon returning brought along not 
only a knowledge of the best that had been done in this 
field, but also two brilliant young instructors, one of them 
blind, who demonstrated in his own person and at once what 
training can achieve. He had observed keenly the foreign 
schools, disapproving of much he found in them; and he laid 
down for his pioneer American enterprise wise fundamental 
principles from which there has been no departure to this 
day. At the outset he established the principle that the 
young blind can become, and therefore should be trained to 
be, economically and socially competent. This principle was 
then denied in Europe and is by no means generally ac- 
cepted there now. The difference this makes to the young 
blind themselves is the difference between school life with 
hope and school existence without it. Hopefulness is an 
educational factor of prodigious power. Years afterward Mr. 
(later Sir) Francis Campbell, and others of Dr. Howe's 
teachers, generously released for the purpose, took these 
ideas overseas and on them carried on the world-famous 
Royal Normal College for the Blind in London. 

30 



Dr. Howe returned from Europe determined to provide 
blind children with the same fundamental training that other 
American children were receiving, and therefore to give them 
books. The three embossed books which he brought back 
with him, and which he declared represented the only ones 
in the English language, are still preserved. The character 
of their type seeming to promise ill as models to follow, he 
immediately set himself to create on a principle of his own, 
first, a better — that is, more generally tangible — alphabet, 
and then proceeded to turn out volume after volume until 
he soon had more and better and cheaper books than existed 
anywhere else; in fact, he came to fill orders for them from 
Europe. His books took the gold medal over all others at 
the Exhibition of the Works of Industry of all Nations, held 
in London, 1851. And the Boston "line type" continued to 
lead here until, over a half-century later, it was superseded 
by an arbitrary " point " system which the blind can wTite as 
well as read. He states somewhere that seeing blind children 
read with their fingers did more to promote the growth and 
prosperity of his own and similar schools in this country than 
any other one thing. His was the practical vision sometimes 
called prophecy. He well understood that "seeing is be- 
lieving," and that only conviction could open purses for 
this new and untried cause. Promptly following such dem- 
onstrations of reading by touch, one after another of the 
States themselves established schools of their own. The edu- 
cation of the blind of the United States to-day (1920) em- 
braces 5,386 pupils, 728 teachers, 149,621 embossed books, 
and is represented by a capital of $11,586,064. Of all this 
Dr. Howe is the acknowledged pioneer. 

While thinking out new projects and processes Dr. Howe 
showed his creative genius by evolving a plan for teaching 

31 



a child who is both deaf and blind; for one so shut in was 
then considered unteachable, since its mind could not be 
reached, and legally was held to be non compos mentis. His 
finding and teaching of Laura Bridgman was the result. 
Every doubter should read the story of this wonderful 
achievement and so come to believe that everything is pos- 
sible to him who both wills and labors perseveringly in the 
right direction. Hearing this story has saved many a des- 
perate person from suicide. Indeed, the education of Laura 
Bridgman is the emancipation of a soul. It made her liber- 
ator famous, and the Perkins Institution the Mecca of many 
notable men and women. One of these was Charles Dickens, 
who describes the visit in his "American Notes," and another 
was Miss Julia Ward, who as a result of the acquaintance 
then formed became Julia Ward Howe. 

While Dr. Howe's chief work was the education of the 
blind, in which field he was the recognized leader as long as 
he lived, he also helped release the deaf and dumb from their 
isolation by furthering the teaching them speech and lip- 
reading; and he also fathered the project in this country of 
training the feeble-minded, then called idiots. For propos- 
ing to do this he was at first dubbed one of them; but, 
having already done it with a few, he persevered, founded 
a school for them, and located it near the Perkins Insti- 
tution, both of which places he superintended as long as he 
lived. Dr. Fernald, the present head of this world-famous 
school, now moved to Waverley, considers Dr. Howe's labors 
in behalf of the feeble-minded to be his chief claim to fame, 
so novel was the idea, — years ago, when he developed it, — 
and so saving an instrumentality has it since become every- 
where. 

Dr. Howe did not confine his noblesse oblige to the educa- 

32 



tion of the handicapped. He was interested in all education; 
and serve'd on Boston's School Committee when Horace 
Mann was Secretary of Education. Such service by him 
meant reforms in the public schools. Mann said of one of 
them, the introduction of WTitten examinations, which was 
at first violently opposed, " It could only have been done by 
an angel — or Sam Howe." It is said that Horace Mann, 
during his whole career as a reformer of public schools in 
New England, had no more intimate friend than Dr. Howe, 
nor one whose support was more indispensable to him. 

The Perkins Institution had a city office on Bromfield 
Street. This, Frank P. Stearns, in his paper on "Chevalier 
Howe," calls "historic ground," declaring that "between 
1850 and 1870 some of the most important national councils 
were held there in Dr. Howe's private office. It was the 
first place that Sumner went to in the morning and the last 
place that Governor Andrew stopped at before returning to 
his home at night. There Dr. Howe and George L. Stearns 
consulted with John Brown concerning measures for the de- 
fence of Kansas." 

He was too old to go to the Civil War, but he could throw 
his great energies into helping the Sanitary Commission, and 
he did so. 

Between 1866 and 1874 he was chairman of the Massa- 
chusetts Board of State Charities and wrote its annual re- 
ports. They are and will remain classic textbooks on the 
subject of public charity. His general principles may be 
called maxims. One of these is "that it is better to sepa- 
rate and diffuse the dependent classes than to congregate 
them;" not only better for each dependent, but for the 
community. It was a novel idea to the people, who found 
themselves called upon to take up the work of public char- 

33 



ity instead of leaving it to official persons. This they have 
since done to a great extent. For example, the so-called 
"placing-out" system has resulted, whereby the State places 
its "minor wards," not in asylums, but in families, there to 
be faithfully followed up, protected and educated until able 
to take care of themselves. This system has become uni- 
versal throughout the United States; and such organiza- 
tions as the Child Welfare Department of the American 
Commission to Serbia are now applying it abroad. It is 
these reports of Dr. Howe's, filled as they are with the sug- 
gestions of common sense and the duty of the strong to the 
weak, whose reading led to the statement already quoted: 
"His work in charity will never be superseded." 

A report of all the services of this "Servant of Humanity" 
would expand this sketch unduly. Sanborn, in the index of 
his "Life," condenses these on two pages, among which one 
may read, in addition to those already enumerated, the fol- 
lowing: "debates prison discipline; organizes a movement 
for the fugitive slaves; chairman of the Vigilance Committee; 
helps elect Charles Sumner senator; edits a Boston daily; 
a member of the Bird Club; aids Kansas; meets John 
Brown; his part in the Civil War; work among the f reed- 
men; advocates separation of the poor and the defective; 
visits the insane at Gheel; opens work-schools at Athens; 
sums up work of Cretan charities." 

"Dr. Howe was never the hero of his own tale," says Dr. 
F. H. Hedge. "Excepting him only, I have never known a 
philanthropist — I mean an active, reforming philanthropist 
— who was also a fair-minded, tolerant man." A good 
many people develop original ideas, but, as has been in- 
timated, those of this "original first cause," as Sanborn 
calls him, were also practical. He had the rare gift of 



34 



knowing whether or not any plan of his would work. When 
he had carried one of them well along and perceived success 
ahead he handed it over to another to finish and turned 
his mind to fresh fields. He selected his assistants with 
acumen, infusing into them his own confidence and conse- 
cration. It was because of this that he could drive so 
many teams abreast and have them all reach their goal. 

The education of Laura Bridgman remains doubtless Dr. 
Howe's unique achievement. It still adds luster to a city 
that proudly boasts a galaxy of celebrated sons. Boston 
keeps alive the discovery of etherization by one of them in 
a monument in its Public Garden. A companion-piece would 
appropriately help hold before the people, who seem in 
danger of forgetting it, that this city, through another cre- 
ative genius, also first gave equally practical aid to those 
laboring under disability, and so would help impress the 
ever-needed lesson of faith in human possibilities. Dr. Howe 
was "born to benefit others, and by choice he selected for 
his benefactions those who could least repay his service with 
their own — the blind, the deaf, the insane, the idiotic. He 
thought it unsuitable to practice medicine and surgery for 
money; nor was he at any time very willing to sell his 
service, preferring to bestow it without recompense. He 
would have agreed heartily with that definition of his class 
among men which said, 'A gentleman is one who has some- 
thing to give, not something to sell.'" 

Says one of his biographers: 

There grew up in Boston and its neighborhood in Dr. Howe's 
early and middle life a group of remarkable men. . . . Such were 
Channing, Emerson, Webster, Everett, Allston, the Danas, Alcott, 
Hawthorne, Longfellow, Lowell, Margaret Fuller, Garrison, Theodore 
Parker, Horace Mann, Sumner, Agassiz, Choate, Andrew, Wendell 



35 



Phillips, James Freeman Clarke. . . . Among all these, and others 
whom I have not named, Dr. Howe stood forth as individual and al- 
most as conspicuous as any. He was neither saint, nor poet, nor 
orator, nor matchless prose writer; neither great lawyer, nor man of 
unquestioned eminence in science, nor artist, nor seer, nor persistent 
champion of a single great cause; but his own work, such as it was, 
drew the attention of all. He was known and welcomed, and he re- 
flected as much luster on his native city as most of those enumerated. 
He was of their time and endowed with a portion of their spirit. He 
gained distinction without seeking it and valued it but httle. . . . New 
England wiU see many illustrious men hereafter, but hardly any like 
him, so pecuhar was Dr. Howe in his talents, in the circum- 
stances of his career, and in the far-reaching results of his philan- 
thropic activity. 

As husband and father Dr. Howe was both guide and lov- 
ing counsellor. At his school he always conducted in person 
"morning prayers," where his reading of scripture is said to 
have been beautiful and impressive. Simple in his life, he 
exemplified the substance of Christianity as happily as most. 
James Freeman Clarke, his pastor, spoke of him as "emi- 
nently Christian." "The Unitarian Review," at the time of 
his death in 1876, refers to his life "as a very literal following 
of His example who said that it was the purpose of His 
coming to heal the broken-hearted, to preach deliverance to 
the captive, to open the eyes of the blind, and to set at 
liberty those that are bruised." 

EDWARD E. ALLEN. 



36 



Selected Bibliography. 
Dr. Samuel Gridley Howe, the Philanthropist. By Frank B. Sanborn. 

Funk & WagnaUs. 1891. 
Journals and Letters of Samuel Gridley Howe; edited by Laura E. 

Richards. 2 vols. Dana Estes & Co. 1906, 1909. 
Dr. Howe in "Learning and Other Essays," By John Jay Chapman. 

Moffat, Yard & Co. 1910. 
Chevalier Howe in "Cambridge Sketches." By Frank P. Steams. 

J. B. Lippincott. 1905. 
A Paladin of Philanthropy. By Rev. F. G. Peabody, in "Hibbert 

Journal," October, 1909. 
Samuel Gridley Howe in "The Charities Review." December, 1897. 
Laura Bridgman, Dr. Howe's Famous Pupil, and what he taught her. 

By Maud Howe and Florence Howe Hall. Little, Brown & Co. 1904. 



37 



SOPHIA CARTER: A MEMBER OF DR. 
HOWE'S FIRST CLASS. 



Upon Dr. Howe's appointment in 1831 to the directorship 
of the "New England Asylum for the Blind," as Perkins 
Institution was then designated, he went abroad to study the 
methods of institutions for the blind in Europe. Returning 
in July, 1832, he set himself at once to the actual beginning 
of the task for which he had been preparing, being authorized 
by the Board of Trustees to select "six individuals of suitable 
age and character to form a class for the purpose of com- 
mencing the instruction of the Blind." In search of these 
selected pupils Dr. Howe traveled personally through many 
towns and country places of Massachusetts, and he thus re- 
lates his success on one such expedition: — 

In the year 1832, while inquiring for blind children suitable for 
instruction in our projected school, I heard of a family in Andover 
in which there were several such, and immediately drove out thither 
with my friend and co-worker, Dr. John D. Fisher. As we approached 
the toll-house, and halted to pay the toll, I saw by the roadside two 
pretty Uttle girls, one about six, the other about eight years old, tidily 
dressed, and standing hand in hand hard by the toll-house. They had 
come from their home, near by, doubtless to listen, as was their wont, 
to gossip between the toll-gatherer and the passers-by. On looking 
more closely, I saw that they were both totally blind. It was a touch- 
ing and interesting scene — that of two pretty, graceful, attractive 
little girls, standing hand in hand, and, though evidently blind, with 
uplifted faces and listening ears, as if brought providentially to meet 
messengers sent of God, to deliver them out of darkness. If there were 
depth of soil enough in my mind to nourish superstition, the idea of 

38 




SOPHIA CARTER 
At the age of six years. 
A member of Dr. Howe's first class. 



a providential arrangement of this meeting would have taken deep 
root. It would, indeed, be hard to find, among a thousand children, 
two better adapted, irrespective of their bUndness, for the purpose of 
commencing our experiment. They were shy of us at first; but we 
gained their confidence with some difficulty; after which they led the 
way to their home in a neighboring farm-house. They were two of 
a numerous family, the parents of which were substantial, respect- 
able people, and particularly good samples of the farming class of 
New England. The mother was especially intelligent, and devoted 
to her children; and much concerned about the barrier which blind- 
ness placed in the way of educating the five who were blind. She was 
much interested in the novel plan for educating the blind, which 
we explained to her. She had never thought of instructing children 
through any sense but that of sight ; but she soon saw the practicabihty 
of the thing, and, being satisfied about our honesty, she consented with 
joy and hope to our proposition of beginning with her two girls, Abby 
and Sophia Carter. In a few days they were brought to Boston, and 
received into my father's house, as the first pupils of the first American 
School for the Blind. 

The children were naturally so bright, and docile, and apt at learn- 
ing, that they easily comprehended our purpose in making them feel 
of strange signs or types, representing the letters of the alphabet, and 
tried eagerly to learn. . . . They were deUghted and eager to go on 
with tireless curiosity. And they did go on until they matured in 
years, and became themselves teachers in our school. They have 
continued up to this day [1874], maintaining excellent characters, 
supporting themselves comfortably, and helping support their parents 
as they declined in strength. 

On the many tours of exhibition which Dr. Howe under- 
took for the purpose of convincing legislatures of various 
states of the feasibility of providing for the education of the 
blind, these girls were foremost exponents of his experiment, 
and, as has been said, "provision for the education of the 
blind was made in those states before the representatives of 
the people had time to wipe the tears from their eyes." 

39 



Throughout their lives the friendly relations of these early 
pupils and their alma mater were maintained without a break. 
Abigail died in 1875. When the semi-centennial of the open- 
ing of the school was celebrated in 1882, one of the most 
striking tributes to it came from Sophia, who wrote to her 
friends at the school that if as much were done in the next 
half-century as in the last, " blindness will almost cease to be 
a calamity." 

Her death in 1888 seemed to close a long chapter of 
fruitful work and achievement, but the memory of those 
early days and Sophia Carter's part in them is revived by 
the gift of a charming portrait of her as a little child, which 
has been presented to the institution by her surviving sister. 
Miss Emily Carter, and which is reproduced with this sketch. 
This portrait shows Sophia at the age of six years, just when 
she became one of Dr. Howe's first little class, gathered in 
his father's house in Pleasant Street, Boston. It was painted 
by an eminent artist of Boston as a contribution to a fair 
which was held in 1833 for the benefit of Dr. Howe's new 
enterprise of teaching the blind. This painting was pur- 
chased by a wealthy man, and after his death and the 
breaking up of his household it was bought by teachers of 
the Perkins Institution and presented by them to the mother 
of the little Sophia, who regarded it as one of her choicest 
possessions. She declared it to be a true likeness of the 
child and delighted in pointing out the upturned thumb of 
the dainty little hand holding the rose. The portrait now 
finds an appropriate final resting place among the institution's 
articles of historic and intrinsic value. 



40 



THIRTEENTH ANNUAL CONCERT 

By the Choir of the Perkins Institution and Massachusetts 
School for the Blind 

Assisted by the Orchestra of the New England Conservatory 

OF Music 

In Jordan Hall, Boston, 
Friday Evening, May 27, 1921, at 8.15 o'clock. 

The Soloists are — 

Miss Edith Matthews, Soprano. 
(Graduate, 1920; Post Graduate, Music Department, 1921.) 

Mr. Tom Williams, Baritone. 
(New England Conservatory of Music.) 

Mr. Malcolm Cobb, Organist. 

(Graduate, 1918; Post Graduate, Music Department; Member Junior 

Class, New England Conservatory of Music, 1921.) 

Mr. Edwin L. Gardiner, Conductor. 

PROGRAM. 

Land-Sighting Grdg-Spicker 

Chorus with baritone solo. 

Three Pictures from The Tower of Babel, .... Rubinstein 

Chorus of the Sons of Shem. 
Chorus of the Sons of Ham. 
Chorus of the Sons of Japhet. 

Aria— "With Verdure Clad," from "The Creation," . . Haydn 
Miss Matthews. 

41 



TheElfhoms, Bullard 

Chorus — a cappella. 

A Red, Red Rose, Hadley 

Chorus — a cappella. 

Chorus of Bacchantes, Gounod 

Allegro from the Sixth Organ Symphony, Wider 

Mr. Cobb. 

Chorus of Homage, Gericke 

The Nights 0' Spring, McCollin 

Chorus — a cappella. 

The Night has a Thousand Eyes, Nevin, E. 

Violin obligate. 

The De'il's Awa, Lamater 

Chorus — a cappella. 

Fair Ellen, Bruch 

A cantata for chorus with soprano and baritone solos. 



42 



GRADUATING EXERCISES OF THE PERKINS 

INSTITUTION AND MASSACHUSETTS SCHOOL 

FOR THE BLIND. 

Tuesday, June 21, 1921, 10.30 a.m. 

PROGRAM. 



Organ — Choral in A minor, .... 

Roger True Walker. 
Essays: 
Opportunities of Alaska 

Herman Alfred Blaik. 

The World's Oil Supply 

Arthur Lawton Quirk. 



Folk Music 



BuRYL Wilson Retting. 



Pianoforte solo — "Cracovienne Fantastique, " 

Marguerite Aileen Graham. 



Essays: 
Americanism 



Henry Troy Istas. 



Cisar Franck 



Paderewski 



World Disarmament 

Edward Joseph Craig. 

Violin solo — Fantaisie in C, Vieuxtemps 

BuRYL Wilson Retting. 



Presentation of diplomas and certificates. 
Chorus — "The Twenty-third Psalm," 

43 



Neidlinger 



Graduates of the Class of 1921. 

Herman Alfred Blair. Henry Troy Istas. 

Edward Joseph Craig. Arthur Lawton Quirk. 

Buryl Wilson Retting. 



Certificates from the Pianojorte Normal Department. 
Malcolm Langdon Cobb. Marguerite Aileen Graham. 

Certificates from the Pianoforte Tuning Department. 
Herman Alfred Blair. Sidney Borden Durfee. 



44 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS. 



I. — Acknowledgments for Concerts, Recitals and 
Dramatics. 

To Mr. W. H. Brennan, for thirty tickets for the course 
of symphony concerts in Sanders Theatre, Cambridge. 

To the National Civic Federation, for twenty tickets 
for a concert by Mr. Emilio De Gogorza and Mr. Richard 
Burgin in Symphony Hall, Boston. 

To Mr. Grant Mitchell, for a general invitation to a 
special performance of his play, "The Champion," at Park 
Square Theatre, Boston. 

To Mr. Wendell H. Luce, for eight tickets for a recital 
by Mr. Louis Bennett, baritone, in Jordan Hall, Boston. 

To Mr. Aaron Richmond, for twelve tickets for a song 
recital by Miss Esther Claff in Jordan Hall, Boston. 

To Mr. H. B. Williams, manager, for six tickets for a 
pianoforte recital by Mr. Lee Pattison in Jordan Hall, 
Boston. 

To Mrs. Anna May Peabody, Miss Emilie Poulsson 
and Miss Harriet Littell, for a general invitation to the 
pupils to attend Mr. Edward Avis' "Bird Song Recital" in 
Bulfinch Place Church, Boston. 

To Mrs. A. Lincoln Filene, for ten tickets, and Miss 
Josephine R. Harrington, for four tickets for a concert 
by pupils of the Boston Music School Settlement at Copley- 
Plaza Hotel, Boston. 

45 



II. Acknowledgments for Recitals, Lectures and 

Dramatics in Our Hall. 

To Prof. Carl Faelten, for a pianoforte recital. 

To Mr. William Strong, for a pianoforte recital. 

To Mrs. Cleveland-Lewis, for a lecture on "Present- 
Day Problems on the Pacific Coast." 

To Prof. Harold Whitehead, for a talk on "Business 
Fundamentals." 

To Mr. John Orth and Miss Phyllis Lations, for a 
pianoforte recital. 

To Mr. Arthur F. Sullivan, for a talk on the American 
Red Cross of to-day. 

To Mrs. Lucia Ames Mead, for a lecture on "The New 
Education." 

To Prof. Albert H. Gilmer and pupils from Tufts and 
Jackson colleges, members of "The Masque," for a presenta- 
tion of Clyde Fitch's "The Truth." 

III. — Acknowledgments for Periodicals and News- 

papers. 

California News, Christian Record (embossed), Colorado 
Index, Florida School Herald, Illuminator (embossed). In- 
dustrial Enterprise, Matilda Ziegler Magazine (embossed). 
The Mentor, Michigan Mirror, Ohio Chronicle, Open Road, 
Posse Gymnasium, Red Cross Bulletin, Rocky Mountain 
Leader, The Theosophical Path, The Utah Eagle, West 
Virginia Tablet, Woman Citizen. 



46 



IV. — Acknowledgments for Gifts and Services. 

To Dr. Henry Hawkins and Dr. Harold B. Chandler, 
for professional services. 

To the Massachusetts Charitable Eye and Ear In- 
firmary, the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, the Massa- 
chusetts HoMCEOPATHic HosPiTAL and the Vincent Me- 
morial Hospital, for care and treatment of pupils. 

To Miss Marion Johns, for embossed books. 

To Miss Julia A. Burnham, for mounted birds and 
shells. 

To the Committee for the Blind, Temple Israel, Bos- 
ton, for clothing, for parties given in our cottages, for trans- 
portation of pupils, and for a summer outing for some of 
our pupils. 

To Mrs. Adams of Woolson House, Cambridge, Mrs. 
Walter H. James of Waltham, Mrs. David Evans of 
Watertown and the Belmont Unitarian Girls' Club, 
through Miss Tileston, for the entertainment of pupils. 

To Mrs. Walter C. Baylies, Mrs. Allen Danforth 
of Plymouth, Mr. Frederick Walsh and Miss Lillie 
Walsh, Mrs. E. E. Rogers, and a club of eight boys 
through Charles Weil Dreyfus, secretary, for gifts of 
money for special occasions; and to a class of boys in 
Hudson, Mass., through Mrs. M. E. Ricker, the Hudson 
Campfire Girls, and Phillips School, Wellesley Hills, for 
gifts of mone}', fruit and candy. 

To Mrs. John Chipman Gray, Dr. Francis I. Proctor, 
Mrs. C. Bancroft Davis, Mrs. George H. Monks, Mrs. 
E. Preble Motley, and Mr. Moses E. Ferguson, for 
fruit and preserves. 



47 



To Mr. and Miss Walsh, Miss Mary Adams, Mrs. 
J. Verner Critchley, Miss Elizabeth Ward and the 
Wellesley Junior High School, for Christmas toys and 
joys. 

To Mrs. Critchley, Mrs. Benjamin Stern, the Misses 
Slocum, Mrs. L. L. Hicks, Mrs. Edward Lane, Mrs. 
Robert Fowler, Mrs. F. J. Durgin, Mrs. F. W. Col- 
burn, Mrs. and Miss Manton, Miss Eleanor F. Kelly, 
Mrs. Louis Rosenbaum and St. Mary's Guild of the 
Church of the Good Shepherd, for clothing; and to Mrs. 
Rosenbaum, for dolls' beds and for hair ribbons. 

To Mr. C. H. Bird of New Haven, Conn., for a chess- 
board and men. 

To Mrs. Harold J. Coolidge, for andirons, pictures and 
confectionery. 

To Temple Ohabei Shalom, through Mrs. Edward 
Goldman and Mrs. Jacob Wachtel, for a Victrola. 

To Miss Eleanor S. Parker, Miss Annie E. Fisher, 
Mr. and Mrs. Perry of Cambridge, Mr. Parker B. Field, 
Mr. F. H. Pratt and the White Star Touring Line, 
for transportation of pupils on pleasure jaunts. 

To Mr. S. J. Kafelas, for plants. 

To Mr. Horace Davy, for three Belgian rabbits. 



48 



LIST OF PUPILS 

October 1, 192 L 



Upper School. 



Adams, Louise. 
Adomaitis, Elsie. 
Baker, Elsie. 
Bessette, Vedora. 
Bierman, Mary. 
Billow, Ruth K. 
Blake, Clarissa H. 
Bolton, Gladys M. 
Boone, Florence M. 
Bosma, Gelske. 
Bradbury, Thelma M. 
Brooks, Madeline D. 
Brown, Dorothy M. 
Brustuen, Sonora I. 
Buckley, Alice. 
Cherlin, Mary. 
Clancy, Elizabeth. 
Coakley, Alice L. 
Cohen, Ruth. 
Comtois, Eva. 
Connors, Margaret. 
Critchley, Rosamond M. 
Demers, Germaine M. 
Doyle, Mary E. 
Drake, Helena M. 
Dufresne, Irene. 
Dunn, Mary C. 
Duquette, Irene. 
Eastman, M. Albertina. 
Elliott, Ethel S. 
Ennis, Ethel F. 
Farnsworth, Esther M. 



Fiske, Dorothy T. 
Flanagan, M. Ursula. 
Fl3Tin, Marie E. 
Gilbert, Eva V. 
Goff, Eva. 
Gray, Emma R. 
Guiney, Julia. 
Haigh, Laura A. 
Hall, Jane A. 
HaUock, Flora B. 
Harael, Irene. 
Hanley, Mary. 
Hilton, Charlotte. 
Hinckley, Dorothy M. 
Jefferson, Annie. 
Kababdjian, Nouritza. 
Keefe, Mildred. 
Kelley, Beulah C. 
Lagerstrom, Ellen M. 
Lanoue, Edna. 
Leppanen, Mary. 
L'Heureux, Juliette. 
Linscott, Jennie M. 
Lj^on, Hazel. 
Matthews, Edith M. 
McMeekin, Jennie. 
Miles, MUdred C. 
Minutti, Desaleina. 
Montgomery, Ethel A. 
Murphy, Ellen. 
Najarian, Nevart. 
O'Neil, Charlotte. 



49 



Perault, Yvonne A. 
Person, Erine A. 
Peteroff, Sarah. 
Poirier, Delina M. 
Pond, Flora E. 
Rollins, Mary L. 
Rose, Sadie. 
Rowe, Margaret C. 
Saladino, Rose M. 
Severance, Georgia M. 
Shea, Mary Ellen. 
Skipp, Doris M. 
Smyth, Eva H. 
Sullivan, Ellinor. 
Terr}', Annie B. 
Thebeau, Marie. 
Trudel, Olive C. 
Turner, Mildred H. 
Wall, Agnes M. 
Weathers, Dorothy. 
Wilcox, Bertha M. 
Adams, Lyman H. 
Amiro, Gilbert. 
Antonucci, Alberto. 
Belinsky, Samuel. 
Bergeron, Albert. 
Blair, Herman A. 
Bowen, Frederick W. 
Cobb, Malcolm L. 
Conley, Edward. 
Craig, Edward J. 
Curtiss, Miles B. 
Cushman, Ralph. 
DiMartino, Matthew. 
Eaton, Charles P. 
Egan, John P. 
Epaminonda, John. 
Evans, Walter C. 
Frende, John. 
Gaffney, George J. 
Gagnon, Albert. 
Gagnon, Lionel. 
Gallant, M. John. 



Goguen, Raoul. 
Gould, Francis E. 
Gray, Wales H. 
Hanley, Thomas A. 
Houle, Walter. 
Inglis, John S. 
Istas, Henry T. 
Jablonski, Joseph. 
Jenkins, Edward W. 
Katwick, Arthur D. 
Keefe, Clarence G. 
Kelleber, Thomas A. 
Kierstead, Edward L. 
Kim, Kong Y. 
Krafve, Karl H. 
Laminan, Oiva. 
Laminan, Toivo. 
Le Roi, Francis H. 
Liberacki, Edward. 
MacGinnis, Raymond H. 
Maloney, Everett S. 
McCarthy, Eugene C. ' 
McGillicuddy, John. 
McLaughlin, Lloyd H. 
Medeiros, John. 
Mennassian, Souran. 
Munn, Daniel J. 
Munro, George H. 
Navarra, Gaspere. 
Nelson, Ralph R. 
Oldham, Milner. 
Oliver, Joseph. 
O'Neill, Ralph L. 
Paquette, Armel. 
Paraboschi, Joseph. 
Peavey, Francis P. 
Pedersen, Edward M. 
Pendei^ast, Jerome. 
Perry, Emerson C. 
Rainville, Ernest C. 
Rasmussen, Lewis A. 
Rosenbloom, Robert. 
Rubin, Manual. 



50 



St. George, William. 
Schoner, Emil. 
Silva, Arthur P. 
Slaby, Peter J. 
Spencer, Merton S. 
Stone, Walter C. 
Vaillancourt, Maurice A. 



Vance, Alvin L. 
Vetal, Herbert M. 
Walker, Roger T. 
Weston, Gordon W. 
Winton, Henry W. 
Withers, Harold. 



Lower School. 



Allen, Elizabeth M. 
Barnard, Eliza B. 
Bazarian, Mary. 
Beliveau, Leon tine T. 
Braley, Ruth I. 
Buckley, Frances A. 
Busbyschell, Barbara M. 
Cambridge, Mollie. 
Games, Florence I. 
Casella, Frances. 
Colaizzi, Josephine. 
Corsi, Angelina. 
Costa, Marianna. 
Coughlin, Ethel. 
Curran, Catherine. 
Daniels, Dorothy D. 
De Dominicis, Edith. 
Doherty, Kathleen E. 
Du verger, Loretta V. 
Edwards, Eleanor B. 
Elliott, Mary. 
Fanning, Gladys L. 
Famham, Barbara E. 
Ferrarini, Yolande. 
GljTin, Helen. 
Goodwin, Helen J. 
Harasimowicz, Alice. 
Haswell, Thelma R. 
Hinckley, Geraldine. 
Holland, Doris A. 
IngersoU, Dorothy. 
Kazanjian, Zaroohie. 
Landry, Edwina. 



Lanoue, Helen. 
Laurenzo, Carolina. 
Lyons, Mary L. 
MacDonald, Katherine. 
Macdougall, Mildred D. 
McCusker, Margaret M. 
McGovem, Velma. 
McMullin, Beatrice M. 
Nadeau, Olivina M. 
Nowicki, Janina. 
Ogilvie, Hilda M. 
Pimental, Mary V. 
Poirier, Emma. 
Rankin, Margaret D. 
Reese, Helen. 
Saladino, Beatrice L. 
Samon, Stacey. 
Santos, Emily. 
Saverino, Maimie. 
Scott, Arline R. 
Silvia, Emma. 
Simmons, Bertha. 
Smith, Dorothy L. 
Stanievicz, Mary. 
Stutwoota, Mar}\ 
TirreJla, Helen. 
Wheeler, Theresa. 
Williams, Dorothy M. 
Barrett, Robert C. 
Berube, Walter. 
Cammarano, Angelo. 
Campbell, Peter F. 
Carlos, Antone F. 



51 



Caroselli, Andrea. 
Case, William A. 
Casella, Charles. 
Chombeau, Bertrand. 
Combs, Raymond L. 
Cormier, Alfred, 
Cowick, Orville H. 
Cullen, George F. 
Davy, Horace, 
Donovan, Thomas J. 
Dore, Charles W, 
Dow, Ralph E. F. 
Dunbar, Kenneth A. 
Egan, Robert J. 
Ferguson, George A. 
Fletcher, Earl H. 
Gagnon, Rene, 
Giuliano, Paolo, 
Goodwin, Earl E. 
Grime, G, Edward, 
Hannon, James E, 
Hatch, Arthur F, 
Hendrick, Horatio W. 
Henry, Paul W, 
Holmes, Rutherford B. 



Hurley, Arnold E, 
Keller, Frederick H, 
Lamarine, William L. 
Leone, Amadeo, 
Libby, Arthur C. 
Lippitt, Raymond A. 
Meuse, Lawrence A. 
Meuse, Paul R, 
Michaud, J. Armand. 
Morse, Kenneth, 
Paquette, Armand. 
Pike, Norman N, 
Pratt, Marston T, 
Rainville, Harvey L. 
Remington, Joseph H, 
Reynolds, Waldo F. 
Shaw, Harris E. 
Shulman, George, 
Simoneau, Henry J, 
Stott, Lester W. 
Summerhayes, Paul R, 
Thompson, R, Lawrence. 
Tobey, Arthur W. 
Wesson, Kermit 0. 



The places from which these pupils come and the number 
from each place follows : — 



Massachusetts, 
Rhode Island, 
Maine, . 
New Hampshire, 
Vermont, 
Connecticut, . 
New York, . 



191 
30 
]8 
14 
12 
4 
2 



Hawaii, . 

Virginia, 

Ohio, 

South Dakota, 

Canada, . 

Turkey, . 



52 



SUBSCRIPTIONS FOR THOMAS STRINGER. 



Permanent Fund for Thomas Stringer. 

[This fund is being raised with the distinct understanding that 
it is to be placed under the control and care of the trustees of the 
Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind, and that 
only the net income is to be given to Tom so long as he is not provided 
for in any other way, and is unable to earn his hving, the principal re- 
maining intact forever. It is further understood, that, at his death, 
or when he ceases to be in need of this assistance, the income of this 
fund is to be applied to the support and education of some chDd who is 
both blind and deaf and for whom there is no provision made either 
by the state or by private indi\dduaLs.] 

Seabury, Miss Sarah E., $25 00 

Sohier, Miss Mary D 25 00 



53 



STATEMENT OF ACCOUNTS. 



Boston, October 13. 1921. 

Messrs. Warren Motley, F. H, Appleton, Jr., Auditors, Perkins 
Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind, Watertown, 
Massachusetts. 

Gentlemen: — I have audited the accounts of Albert Thorndike, 
Treasurer of the Institution, for the fiscal year ending August 31, 
1921, and have found that all income from investments and proceeds 
from sales of securities have been accoimted for, and that the dona- 
tions, subscriptions, and miscellaneous receipts, as shown by the 
books, have been deposited in bank to the credit of the Treasurer of 
the Institution. 

I have vouched all disbursements and verified the bank balances as 
at the close of the fiscal year. 

The stocks and bonds in the custody of the Treasurer on August 
31, 1921, were counted by the Auditing Committee and the schedules 
of the securities, examined by them, were then submitted to me and 
found to agree with those called for by the books. 

I hereby certify that the following statements covering the Insti- 
tution, Howe Memorial Press Fund, and Kindergarten, correctly set 
forth the income and expenditures for the fiscal year ending August 

31, 1921. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN MONTGOMERY, 

Certified Public Accountant. 



54 



INSTITUTION. 

Balance Sheet, August 31, 1921. 

Assets. 
Plant: — 

Real estate, Watertown $680,049 22 

Real estate. South Boston 8,647 74 

$688,696 96 

Equipment: — 

Furniture and household, $12,365 17 

Tools, etc 655 96 

Music department, 20,300 00 

Library department, 63,695 17 

Works department 14,142 77 

111,159 07 

Investments: — 

Real estate $208,078 74 

Stocks and bonds 490,749 91 

Stocks and bonds — Varnum Fund, . . 82,278 28 

781,106 93 

Inventory of provisions and supplies, 510 00 

Accounts receivable, 16,522 28 

E. E. Allen, Trustee 733 90 

Cash on hand, 11.461 41 

Total $1,610,190 55 



Liabilities. 

General account, $438,682 81 

Funds: — 

Special, $52,667 00 

Permanent 294,283 95 

General 814,160 35 

1,161,111 30 

Unexpended income, special funds, 8,823 73 

Gifts for clock and organ, 27 00 

Vouchers payable, 1,545 71 

Total, $1,610,190 55 



55 



Condensed Treasurer's Income Account, Year ending August 31, 1921. 

Rent net income $10,296 87 

Interest and dividends, general purposes, 26,318 28 

Interest and dividends, special funds 2,578 90 

Annuities, 1,200 00 

Donations, 7,803 00 

Tuition and board, Massachusetts, .... §37,400 00 
Tuition and board, others, 33,442 24 



70,842 24 

Total $119,039 29 

Less special fund income to special fund accounts, $2,578 90 
Less Treasurer's miscellaneous expenses, . . . 484 71 



3,063 61 



Net income, $115,975 68 

Net charge to Director, $109,953 89 

Repairs, faulty construction, 2,489 09 



112,442 98 

Balance of income, $3,532 70 

Income, Special Funds. 

On hand September 1, 1920 $8,148 35 

Income 1920-1921 2,578 90 

Total $10,727 25 

Distributed, 1,903 52 

Unexijended income August 31, 1921, $8,823 73 

Condensed Director's Expense Account, Year ending August 31, 1921. 

Administration: — 

Salaries and wages, $6,200 84 

Other expenses, 818 17 

$7,019 01 

Maintenance and operation of plant: — 

Salaries and wages, $23,415 32 

Other expenses: — 

Provisions, $18,708 01 

Light, heat and power, . . 18,309 80 

Household furnishings and sup- 
plies, 3,513 78 

Insurance and water, . . 1,786 51 

Repairs 3,899 56 

Publicity 1,070 04 

Depreciation on furniture, 
household equipment, tools, 
etc., ...... 1,350 94 

Miscellaneous 1,440 36 

50,079 00 

73,494 32 



Amount carried forward, $80,513 33 

56 



Amount brought forward, $80,513 33 

Instruction and school supplies : — 

Salaries and wages, . . > . . . . $28,714 02 
Other expenses, 1,159 94 

29,873 96 

Total $110,387 29 

Less net income. Tuning department, . . . $350 72 

Less net income. Works department, ... 82 68 

433 40 

Net charge to Director $109,953 89 



WORKS DEPARTMENT. 

Profit and Loss Account, Yeab ending August 31, 1921. 

Revenue. 
Sales $49,661 84 

Expenditures. 

Material used, $15,478 60 

Salaries and wages, 26,587 03 

General expense, 5,977 53 

Auto expense, 684 33 

Total expenditures 48,727 49 

Profit $934 35 

Deduct: — 

Difference in inventory of tools and equipment, $878 06 

Bad accounts written off, 98 10 

Total, $976 16 

Less: — 

Recovered from bad debts, . . . . 124 49 

851 67 

Total profit for year ended August 31, 1921, ... $82 68 



57 



INSTITUTION FUNDS AND LEGACIES. 



Special funds: — 

Robert C. Billings (for deaf, dumb and blind) 
Joseph B. Glover (for blind and deaf), 
Harris Fund (Outdoor Relief) , . 
Maria Kemble Oliver (Music), . 
Elizabeth P. Putnam (Higher Education) , 
A. Shuman (Clothing Fxmd) .... 

Permanent funds: — 

Charlotte Billings, 

Stoddard Capen, 

Jennie M. Colby, in memory of, 
Ella Newman Curtis Fund, 

Stephen Fairbanks, 

Harris Fund (General Purposes) , 

Benjamin Humphrey 

Prentiss M. Kent, 

Jonathan E. Pecker, 

Richard Perkins, 

Mrs. Marilla L. Pitts, in memory of, 
Frank Davison Rust Memorial, 

Samuel E. Sawyer, 

Charles Frederick Smith 

Timothy Smith 

Mary Lowell Stone, 

Alfred T. Turner 

Anne White Vose, 

Charles L. Yoimg, 

William Varnum Fund, .... 



General funds : — 

Elizabeth B. Bailey, 
Eleanor J. W. Baker, . 
Calvin W. Barker, 
Lucy B. Barker, . 
Francis Bartlett, . 
Mary Bartol, 
Thompson Baxter, 
Robert C. Billings, 
Susan A. Blaisdell, 
William T. Bolton, 
George W. Boyd, . 
Caroline E. Boyden, 
J. Putnam Bradlee, 
Charlotte A. Bradstreet, 
J. Edward Brown, 
T. O. H. P. Burnham, 



$4,000 00 

5,000 00 

26,667 00 

15,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 



507 00 
770 00 
100 00 
000 00 
000 00 
333 00 
000 00 
500 00 
950 00 
000 00 
,000 00 
,000 00 
174 77 
,663 00 
,000 00 
000 00 
.000 00 
994 00 
,000 00 
,292 18 



$3,000 00 

2,500 00 

1,859 32 

5,953 21 

2,500 00 

300 00 

322 60 

25,000 00 

5,832 66 

555 22 

5,000 00 

1,930 39 

268,391 24 

10,508 70 

100,000 00 

5,000 00 



$52,667 00 



294,283 95 



Amounts carried forward, $438,653 24 $346,950 96 



58 



AtnounU brought fortcard $438.653 24 $346,950 95 

General funds — Continued. 

Edward F. Gate 5,000 00 

Fanny Channing 2,000 00 

Ann Eliza Golburn 5,000 00 

Susan J. Gonant 500 00 

William A. Gopeland, 1,000 00 

Louise F. Grane 5,000 00 

Harriet Otis Gruft 6,000 00 

David Gummings, 7,723 07 

Ghastine L. Gushing 500 00 

I. W, Danforth, 2,500 00 

Susan L. Davis 1,500 00 

Joseph Descalzo, 1.000 00 

John H. Dix 10,000 00 

Alice J. H. Dwinell, 200 00 

Mary E. Eaton 5,000 00 

Mortimer G. Ferris Memorial 1,000 00 

Mary Helen Freeman, 1,000 00 

Gornelia Anne French, 10,000 00 

Martha A. French 164 40 

Ephraim L. Frothingham 1,700 00 

Jessie P. Fuller 200 00 

Thomas Gaffield 6,685 38 

Albert Glover 1.000 00 

Joseph B. Glover 5.000 00 

Gharlotte L. Goodnow 6.471 23 

Ellen Hammond 1,000 00 

Hattie S. Hathaway. 500 00 

Gharles H. Hayden 23.050 63 

JohnG. Haynes 1,000 00 

Joseph H. Heywood, 600 00 

Margaret A. Holden, 3,708 32 

Gharles Sylvester Hutchison 2,156 00 

Ernestine M. Kettle 10,000 00 

Lydia F. Knowles 50 00 

Gatherine M. Lamson 6,000 00 

William Litchfield 7,951 48 

Hannah W. Loring 9,500 00 

Susan B. Lyman, 4,809 78 

Stephen W, Marston 5,000 00 

Gharles Merriam 1.000 00 

Joseph F. Noera 2,000 00 

Sarah Irene Parker 699 41 

George Francis Parkman, 50,000 00 

Grace Parkman 500 00 

Philip G. Peabody 1,200 00 

Edward D. Peters 500 00 

Henry L. Pierce 20,000 00 

Sarah E. Pratt 1.000 00 



AmourUs carried forward, .... $676,92294 $346,95095 

59 



Amounts brought forward S676,922 94 $346,950 95 

General funds — Concluded. 

Matilda B. Richardson 300 00 

Mary L. Ruggles, 3,000 00 

Marian Russell 5,000 00 

Nancy E. Rust 2,640 00 

Joseph Scholfield 2,500 00 

Richard Black Sewell 25,000 00 

Margaret A. Simpson 800 00 

Esther W. Smith, 5,000 00 

The Maria Spear Bequest for the Blind, . . 15,000 00 

Henry F. Spencer 1,000 00 

Joseph C. Storey, 5,000 00 

Sophronia S. Sunbury, 365 19 

Mary F. Swift 1,391 00 

WilUam Taylor 893 36 

Joanna C. Thompson 1,000 00 

William Timlin 3,000 00 

Mary Willson Tucker 465 32 

George B. Upton 10,000 00 

Abbie T. Vose 1,000 00 

Horace W. Wadleigh 2,000 00 

Joseph K. Wait 3,000 00 

Harriot Ware 1,952 02 

Charles F. Webber (by sale of part of vested 

remainder interest under his will) , . . 11,500 00 

Mary Ann P. Weld 2,000 00 

Cordelia H. Wheeler 800 00 

Opha J. Wheeler 3,086 77 

Samuel Brenton Whitney 1,000 00 

Mehitable C. C. Wilson 543 75 

Thomas T. Wyman 20,000 00 

Fanny Young 8,000 00 



814,160 35 
1,161,111 30 



DONATIONS, INSTITUTION ACCOUNT. 

Committee of the Permanent Charity Fund, In- 
corporated, $3,375 00 

Everett, Henry C, Jr 5 00 

Plummer, Charles A .... 5 00 

Ropes, Mrs. Mary G 100 00 

Rosenthal, Morris 200 00 

Shattuck, Henry L 50 00 

$3,735 00 

Through the Ladies' Auxiliary Society, 4,068 00 

$7,803 00 



60 



HOWE MEMORIAL PRESS FUND. 

Balance Sheet, August 31, 1921. 

Assets. 
Equipment and supplies : — 

Printing plant, $874 59 

Machinery, 4,864 78 

Printing inventory, 13,057 30 

Appliances manufactured 8,031 48 

Appliances purchased, 343 38 

Embossing inventory 1 ,396 64 

Stationery, etc., 777 88 

$29,346 05 

Investments: — 

Stocks and bonds, 161,961 21 

Notes and accoimts receivable 3,040 75 

Cash on hand 4,144 83 

Total $198,492 84 

Liabilities. 

General account $181,847 03 

Funds: — 

Permanent, $5,000 00 

General, 11,390 00 

16,390 00 

Vouchers payable, 255 81 

Total, $198,492 84 



Condensed Tbeasubee's Income Account, Year ending August 31, 1921. 

Interest and dividends $10,535 90 

Donation 50 00 

Other income 53 03 

Total $10,638 93 

Less Treasurer's expenses, 52 50 

Net income $10,586 43 

Net charge to Director 10,860 60 

Deficit $274 17 

61 



Condensed Director's Expense Account, Year ending August 31, 1921. 

Maintenance and operation of plant: — 

Embossing $1,048 46 

Printing 4393 43 

Appliances manufactured, 3,972 16 

Appliances purchased 215 35 

Stationery, 725 OO 

Library 2,767 31 

Depreciation on machinery and equipment, . 690 14 

Loss on bad accounts, 2 01 

Miscellaneous appropriations, . , . . 110 00 

Miscellaneous salaries and expenses, . . 2,201 42 

$16,525 28 

Less : — 

Discounts $15 83 

Income from sale of appliances, $3,936 31 

Income from sale of books, music, 

etc., 1,712 54 

5,648 85 

5,664 68 

Net charge to Director $10,860 60 



HOWE MEMORIAL PRESS FUNDS AND LEGACIES. 

Permanent fund : — 

Deacon Stephen Stickney Fund, $5,000 00 

General funds : — 

Beggs Fund $100 00 

Joseph H. Center, 1,000 00 

Augusta Wells, 10,290 00 

11,390 00 

$16,390 00 



DONATIONS, HOWE MEMORIAL PRESS. 

Family, $50 00 



62 



KINDERGARTEN. 
Balance Sheet, August 31, 1921. 

Assets. 

Plant: — 

Real estate, Watertown, $534,441 83 

Equipment: — 

Furniture and household, $12,333 33 

Tools, etc 892 49 

Music department 2,650 00 

15,875 82 

Investments: — 

Real estate $419,946 43 

Stocks and bonds 968,605 26 

1,388,551 69 

Inventory of provisions and supplies 510 00 

Accounts receivable 838 88 

E. E. Allen, Trustee 175 83 

Cash on hand 10,945 92 

Total $1,951,339 97 

Liabilities. 

General account $390,632 64 

Funds: — 

Special, $6,840 00 

Permanent 183,319 70 

General 1,355,499 58 

1,545,659 28 

Unexpended income special fimds, 1,260 31 

Vouchers payable, 813 47 

Account payable 12,974 27 

Total $1,951,339 97 



Condensed Treasurer's Income Account, Year ending August 31, 1921. 

Rent net income $20,744 91 

Interest and dividends, general purposes, 50,516 91 

Interest and dividends, special fimds 265 16 

Donations 48 00 

Tuition and board, Massachusetts $31,400 00 

Tuition and board, others, 11,560 00 

42,960 00 

Total S114.534 98 

Amount carried forward, $114,534 98 

63 



Amount brought forward $114,534 98 

Less special fund income to special fund accoimts, $265 16 

Less Treasurer's miscellaneous expenses, , . . 479 42 

744 58 



Net income, $113,790 40 

Net charge to Director, $109,166 66 

Repairs, faulty construction, 1,518 38 

110,685 04 



Balance of income, $3,105 36 

Income, Special Funds. 

On hand September 1, 1920, $1,151 93 

Income 1920-1921, 265 16 



Total, $1,417 09 

Distributed, 156 78 



Unexpended balance August 31, 1921, $1,260 31 

Condensed Director's Expense Account, Year ending August 31, 1921. 

Administration : — 

Salaries and wages, $6,200 83 

Other expenses, 1,896 44 



$8,097 27 



Maintenance and operation of plant: — 

Salaries and wages $27,337 69 

Other expenses: — 

Provisions, $17,064 56 

Light, heat and power, . . 17,328 29 

Tuition and board, . . . 12,921 24 

Household furnishings and sup- 
plies 1,545 58 

Depreciation on furniture, 
household equipment, tools, 
etc 

Insurance and water, . 



Repairs, . . . . 
Printing appropriation. 
Publicity, 
Miscellaneous, 



1,367 54 
2,021 61 
3,892 47 
691 22 
652 53 
3,882 35 



61,367 39 
88,705 08 



Instruction and school supplies: — 

Salaries and wages $11,498 00 

Other expenses, 866 31 



12,364 31 

Net charge to Director $109,166 66 

64 



Perkins Institution 

And Massachusetts School 
For the Blind 




NINETY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT 
OF THE TRUSTEES 



1922 



BOSTON Ji ^ ^ jIt jt 1923 
WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO. 



CJ)e Commontoealtb of Qia00acl)U0ett0 



Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind, 
Watertown, October 21, 1922. 

To the Hon. Frederic W. Cook, Secretary of State, Boston. 

Dear Sir: — I have the honor to transmit to you, for 
the use of the Legislature, a copy of the ninety-first annual 
report of the trustees of this institution to the corporation 
thereof, together with that of the treasurer and the usual 
accompanying documents. 

Respectfully, 

EDWARD E. ALLEN, 

Secretary. 






OFFICERS OF THE CORPORATION. 

1922-1923. 



FRANCIS HENRY APPLETON, President. 
WILLIAM L. RICHARDSON, Vice-President. 
ALBERT THORNDIKE, Treasurer. 
EDWARD E. ALLEN, Secretary. 



BOABD OF TBUSTEES. 



FRANCIS HENRY APPLETON. 

WILLIAM ENDICOTT. 

PAUL E. FITZPATRICK. 

Rev. PAUL REVERE FROTHINGHAM. 

G. PEABODY GARDNER, Jb. 

ROBERT H. HALLOWELL. 



JAMES ARNOLD LOWELL, 
CHARLES E. OSGOOD. 
Miss MARIA PURDON. 
Mrs. GEORGE T. PUTNAM. 
WILLIAM L. RICHARDSON. M.D. 
LEVERETT SALTONSTALL. 



STANDING COMMITTEES. 
Monthly Visiting Committee, 

whose duty it is to visit and inspect the Institution at least once in each month. 



1923. 

Paul E. Fitzpatbick. 
Mrs. Gek>rge T. Putnam. 
G. Peabodt Gabdnek, Jr. 
William L. Richabdson. 
Leverett Saltonstall. 
William Endicott. 





1923. 




January . 


Francis Hknrt Appleton. 


July . . 


February 


Miss Maria Pubdon. 


August 


March 


ROBEBT H. Hallowbll. 


September 


April . 


Paul R. Fbothingham. 


October . 


May . 


James A. Lowell. 


November 


June . 


Chables E. Osgood. 


December 



Ezecutive Committee. 

Francis Henry Appleton, President, ex 

officio. 
Albert Thorndike, Treasurer, ex officio. 
Edward E. Allen, Secretary, ex officio. 
Paul E. Fitzpatrick. 
Robebt H. Hallowbll. 
James A. Lowell. 
Mias Mabia Pubdon. 



Finance Committee. 

Albebt Thorndike, Treasurer, ex officio. 

William Endicott. 

James A. Lowell. 

G. Peabodt Gabdneb, Jr. 



Auditors of Expenses. 

G. Peabodt Gabdner, Jr. 

Robert H. Hallowell. 

John Montgomebt, Certified Public Accountant. 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION AND 
TEACHERS. 



EDWARD E. ALLEN, Director. 



TEACHERS AND OFFICERS OF THE UPPER SCHOOL. 
LITEKAKT DEPAETMENT. 



Boys' Section. 

Miss JESSICA L. LANGWORTHY. 

MiBS CAROLINE E. McMASTER. 

CHESTER A. GIBSON. 

FRANCIS W. DANA. 

Miss LIZZIE R. KINSMAN. 

Miss CLARA L. PRATT. 

Miss FLEDA CHAMBERLAIN. 



Olrls' Section. 
Miss ELSIE H. SIMONDS. 
Miss ANNIE L. BRADFORD. 
Miss GENEVIEVE M. HAVEN. 
Miss MARY H. FERGUSON. 
Miss MARION A. WOODWORTH. 
Miss JULIA E. BURNHAM. 
Miss GERTRUDE S. HARLOW. 



Teacher of Home Economics. 
Mibb MARY C. MELDRUM. 



DEPASTMENT OF PHYSICAL TRAININO. 



C. BENJAMIN MINNER. 



Miss MARY H. FERGUSON. 



MiBS LENNA D. SWINERTON. 



DEPABTMENT OF MUSIC. 

EDWIN L. GARDINER. 



Miss HELEN M. ABBOTT. 
Miss MARY E. BURBECK. 
JOHN F. HARTWELL. 
Miss BRYAN STURM. 



Miss BLANCHE A. BARDIN. 

Miss EDITH RANDALL. 

Miss MABEL A. STARBIRD, Voice. 



DEPARTMENT OF MANUAL TBAININa. 



Boys' Section. 
JULIAN H. MABEY. 
HAROLD W. STANTON. 
Miss MARY B. KNOWLTON. Sloyd. 



Girls' Section. 

MiBS FRANCES M. LANGWORTHY. 
Miss M. ELIZABETH ROBBINS. 
Miss MARIAN E. CHAMBERLAIN. 
Miss ALTA M. LUX. 



DEPARTMENT OF TUNINQ PIANOFORTES. 

ELWYN H. FOWLER, Manager and Instructor. 



LIBRARIANS, CLERKS AND BOOKKEEPERS. 



Miss LAURA M. SAWYER, Librarian. 
Miss FLORENCE J. WORTH, Assistant. 
Miss ANNA GARDNER FISH, Clerk. 



Miss Mai L. LELAND, Bookkeeper. 
Miss WINIFRED F. LELAND, Assistant. 
Miss LUCY E. YEGANIAN, Assistant. 



Mrs. SARAH A. STOVER, Treasurer for the Ladies' Auxiliary Society. 



DEPARTMENT OF BUILDINGS. 

FREDERICK A. FLANDERS. SupennUndent. 



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 

OSCAR S. CREELEY, M.D., Attending Physician. 

HENRY HAWKINS, M.D., Ophthalmologist. 

HAROLD B. CHANDLER, M.D., Assistant Ophthalmologist. 

ARTHUR WILLARD FAIRBANKS, M.D., Pediatrician. 

Db. FRANK R. OBER, Orthopedic Surgeon. 

HOWARD ARTHUR LANE, DM-B., Attending Dentist for the Institution. 

REINHOLD RUELBERG, D.M.D., Attending Dentist for the Kindergarten. 

Miss ELLA L. LOOMER, R.N., Attending Nurse. 



DOMESTIC DEPARTMENT. 

WALTER S. GOSS, Steward. 



Matrons in the Cottages. 



Boys' Section. 

Mrs. JOSEPHINE H. MANSUR. 
Mrs. CHESTER A. GIBSON. 
Mrs. AGNES C. LUMMUS. 
Mrs. FLORENCE T. MINNER. 



Oirls' Section. 
Mrs. ISABELLA P. HEARD. 
Miss ICATHERINE M. LOWE. 
Miss SHARLIE M. CHANDLER. 
Mrs. HATTIE S. ADAMS. 



PRINTING DEPARTMENT. 

FRANK C. BRYAN, Manager. 
Mrs. MARTHA A. TITUS, Printer. I Miss MARY L. TULLY, Printer. 



WORKSHOP FOR ADXTLTS. 

FRANK C. BRYAN, A/onager. 
Miss EVA C. ROBBINS, Clerk. 



TEACHERS AND OFFICERS OF THE LOWER SCHOOL. 
KINDEBQARTEN. 



Boys' Section. 

Miss Nettie B. Vose, Matron. 
Mrs. Emma H. McCraith, Assistant. 
Miss Carolyn M. Burrell, Kindergartner. 
Miss L. Henrietta Stratton, Teacher. 
Miss Sadie Turner, Teacher. 



Oirls' Section. 

Miss Cornelia M. LoRma, Matron. 
Miss Mildred I. Hillner, Assistant. 
Miss W. R. Humbert, Kindergartner, 
Miss Alice M. Lane, Teacher. 



Miss Edith Randall, Music Teacher. 

Miss Margaret McKenzie, Teoxher of Mantud Training. 

Miss Lenna D. Swinerton, Assistant in Corrective Gymnastics. 

Samuel P. Hates, Ph.D., Psychologist. 

Miss Kathrtn E. Maxfield, Assistant in Psychology and Personnel. 

Miss Ruth Colburn, Assistant Psychologist. 



PBIMARY DEPABTMENT. 
Boys' Section. 



Miss Margaret F. Hughes, Matron. 
Miss Clossie E. Clark, Substitute. 
Miss P^ORA C. Fountain, Assistant. 
Miss Ethel D. Evans, Teacher. 



Miss Beth A. Easter, Teacher. 

Miss Minnie C. Tucker, Music Teacher. 

Miss Rosalind L. Houghton, Sloyd. 



Oirls' Section. 



Miss Ada S. Bartlbtt, Matron. 
Miss Eleanor Foster, Assistant. 
Miss Bertha M. Buck, Teacher. 



Miss Margaret Miller, Teacher. 
Miss Naomi K. Grinq, Music Teacher. 
Miss LiNNEA Bero, Sloyd. 



LADIES' VISITING COMMITTEE TO THE EINDEBGABTEN. 

Mrs. John Chipman Gray, President. 
Miss Annie C. Warren, Vice-President, 
Miss Eleanor S. Parker, Secretary. 



Mrs. Algernon Coolidge 
Miss Eleanor S. Parker 
Mrs. Harold J. Coolidge 
Miss Maria Purdon . 
Mrs. Ronald T. Lyman 
Miss Ellen Bullard 
Miss Annie C. Warren 
Mrs. Roger B. Merriman 



> January. 

February. 

March. 

April, 

May, 



Miss Alice Sargent . . June. 

Mrs. John Chipman Gray . September, 

Mrs. George T. Putnam . October, 

Mrs. George H. Monks . November, 

Mrs. E. Preble Motley . December, 



General Visitor. 

Miss Elizabeth G. Norton 



Honorary Members. 

Mrs. Maud Howe Elliott. 
Mrs. Larz Anderson. 
Mrs. Kengsmill Marrs. 



MEMBERS OF THE CORPORATION. 



Abbot, Mrs. Edwin H., Cam- 
bridge. 

Adams, Karl, Boston. 

Allen, Edward E., Watertown. 

Allen, Mrs. Edward E., Water- 
town. 

Amory, Robert, Boston. 

Anderson, Mrs. Larz, Brookline. 

Angler, Mrs. George, Newton. 

Appleton, Hon. Francis Henry, 
Peabody. 

Appleton, Francis Henry, Jr., 
Boston. 

Appleton, Mrs. Francis Henry, 
Jr., Boston. 

Appleton, Dr. William, Boston. 

Atherton, Mrs. Caroline S., Grove 
Hall. 

Bacon, Caspar G., Jamaica Plain. 

Baldwin, S. E., New Haven, 
Conn. 

Ballantine, Arthur A., Boston. 

Bancroft, Miss Eleanor C, 
Beverly. 

Barbour, Edmund D., Boston. 

Bartlett, Miss Mary F., Boston. 

Baylies, Walter C, Boston. 

Baylies, Mrs. Walter C, Boston. 

Beach, Rev. David N., Guilford, 
Conn. 

Beatley, Mrs. Clara B., Boston. 

Beebe, E. Pierson, Boston. 

Benedict, Wm. Leonard, New 
York. 

Bennett, Miss Gazella, Worcester. 



Black, George N., Boston. 

Blake, George F., Worcester. 

Blunt, Col. S. E., Springfield. 

Boardman, Mrs. E. A., Boston. 

Bourn, Hon. A. 0., Providence, 
R.I. 

Bowditch, IngersoU, Boston. 

Bremer, S. Parker, Boston. 

Brigham, Charles, Watertown. 

Brooke, Rev. S. W., London. 

Brooks, Gorham, Boston. 

Bryant, Mrs. A. B. M., Boston. 

Bullard, Miss Ellen, Boston. 

Bullock, Col. A. G., Worcester. 

Burditt, Miss Alice A., Boston. 

Bumham, Miss Juha E., Lowell. 

Burr, I. Tucker, Jr., Boston. 

Cabot, Mrs. Thomas H., Boston. 

Callender, Walter, Providence, 
R. L 

Camp, Rev. Edward C, Water- 
town. 

Carter, Mrs. J. W., West Newton. 

Gary, Miss Ellen G., Boston. 

Chapin, Edward P., Andover. 

Cook, Charles T., Detroit, Mich. 

Cook, Mrs. C. T., Detroit, Mich. 

Coolidge, Mrs. Algernon, Boston. 

Coohdge, Francis L., Boston. 

Coohdge, Mrs. Harold J., Boston. 

Coolidge, J. Randolph, Boston. 

Cotting, Charles E., Jr., Boston. 

Crane, Zenas M., Pittsfield. 

Crosby, Sumner, Cambridge. 

Crosby, William S., BrookUne. 



Crowninshield, Francis B., Boston. 

Cunningham, Mrs. Henry V., 
Boston. 

Curtis, Mrs. Greeley S., Boston. 

Curtis, Horatio G., Boston. 

Curtis, Mrs. Horatio G., Boston. 

Curtis, James F., Boston. 

Cutler, George C, Jr., Boston. 

Dabney, George B., Boston. 

Damon, Willard A., Springfield. 

Davies, Rt. Rev. Thomas F., 
Springfield. 

Davis, Livingston, Milton. 

Day, Mrs. Frank A., Newton. 

Dewey, Francis H., Worcester. 

De Witt, Alexander, Worcester. 

Dexter, Mrs. F. G., Boston. 

Dexter, Miss Harriett, Boston. 

Dexter, Miss Rose L., Boston. 

Dillaway, W. E. L., Boston. 

Dolan, WilUam G., Boston. 

Draper, George A., Boston. 

Drew, Edward B., Cambridge. 

Duryea, Mrs. Herman, New York. 

Eliot, Rev. C. R., Boston. 

Elliott, Mrs. Maud Howe, Boston. 

EUis, George H., Boston. 

Ely, Adolph C, Watertown. 

Endicott, Henry, Boston. 

Endicott, William, Boston. 

Endicott, WiUiam C, Boston. 

Evans, Mrs. Glendower, Boston. 

Everett, Dr. OUver H., Worcester, 

Fanning, David H., Worcester. 

Faulkner, Miss F. M., Boston. 

Fay, Mrs. Dudley B., Boston. 

Fay, Mrs. Henry H., Boston. 

Fay, Miss Sarah B., Boston. 

Fay, Thomas J., Boston. 

Fay, Wm. Rodman, Dover, Mass. 

Fenno, Mrs. L. C, Boston. 

Fiske, Mrs. Mary Duncan, Bos- 
ton. 



Fitz, Mrs. W. Scott, Boston. 

Fitzpatrick, Paul Edward, Brook- 
line. 

Ford, Lawrence A., Boston. 

Foster, Mrs. Francis C, Cam- 
bridge. 

Freeman, Miss H. E., Boston. 

Frothingham, Rev. P. R., Boston. 

FuUer, George F., Worcester. 

Fuller, Mrs. Samuel R., Boston. 

Gage, Mrs. Homer, Shrewsbury. 

Gale, Lyman W., Boston. 

Gammans, Hon. G. H., Boston. 

Gardiner, Robert H., Boston. 

Gardiner, Robert H., Jr., Need- 
ham. 

Gardner, George P., Boston. 

Gardner, G. Peabody, Jr., Brook- 
Une. 

Gardner, Mrs. John L., Boston. 

Gaskill, George A., Worcester. 

Gaskins, Frederick A., Milton. 

Gaylord, Emerson G., Chicopee. 

Geer, Mrs. Danforth, Jr., Short- 
hiUs, N. J. 

George, Charles H., Providence, 
R. L 

GHbert, Wm. E., Springfield. 

Gleason, Mrs. Cora L., Boston. 

Gleason, Sidney, Medford. 

GUdden, W. T., Brookline. 

Goddard, Harry W., Worcester. 

Goff, Darius L., Pawtucket, R. I. 

Goff, Lyman B., Pawtucket, R. I. 

Goldthwait, Mrs. John, Boston. 

Gooding, Rev. A., Portsmouth, 
N. H. 

Gordon, Rev. G. A., D.D., 
Boston. 

Gray, Mrs. John Chipman, Bos- 
ton. 

Gray, Roland, Boston. 

Green, Charles G., Cambridge. 



Grew, Edward W., Boston. 
Griffin, S. B., Springfield. 
Griswold, Merrill, Cambridge. 
Hall, Miss Minna B., Longwood. 
Hallowell, John W., Boston. 
Hallowell, Robert H., Boston, 
Hammond, Mrs. G. G., Boston. 
Haskell, Mrs. E. B., Auburndale. 
Hemenway, Mrs. Augustus, Bos- 
ton. 
Higginson, F. L., Jr., Boston. 
Higginson, Mrs. Henry L., Boston. 
Hill, Arthur D., Boston. 
Hill, Dr. A. S., Somerville. 
Holmes, Charles W., Toronto, 

Ont. 
Homans, Robert, Boston. 
Howe, Henry S., Brookline. 
Howe, James G., Milton. 
Howes, Miss Edith M., BrookUne. 
Howland, Mrs. O. 0., Boston. 
Hunnewell, Mrs. H. S., Boston. 
Hunnewell, Walter, Jr., Boston. 
Hutchins, Mrs. C. F., Boston, 
lasigi. Miss Mary V., Boston. 
Ingrahara, Mrs. E. T., Wellesley. 
Isdahl, Mrs. C. B., CaUfornia. 
Jackson, Charles C, Boston. 
Jenks, Miss C. E., Bedford. 
Johnson, Edward C, Boston. 
Johnson, Rev. H. S., Boston. 
Joy, Mrs. Charles H., Boston. 
Kasson, Rev. F. H., Boston. 
Kellogg, Mrs. Eva D., Boston. 
Kendall, Miss H. W., Boston. 
Kidder, Mrs. Henry P., Boston. 
Kilham, Miss Annie M., Beverly. 
Kilmer, Frederick M., Water- 
town. 
Kimball, Edward P., North An- 

dover. 
King, Mrs. Tarrant Putnam, Mil- 
ton. 



Knowlton, Daniel S., Boston. 

Kramer, Henry C, Boston. 

Lamb, Mrs. Annie L., Boston. 

Lang, Mrs. B. J., Boston. 

Latimer, Mrs. Grace G., Boston. 

Lawrence, Mrs. A. A., Boston. 

Lawrence, John Silsbee, Boston. 

Lawrence, Rt. Rev. Wm., Boston. 

Ley, Harold A., Springfield. 

Lincoln, L. J. B., Hingham. 

Lincoln, Waldo, Worcester. 

Littell, Miss Harriet A., Boston. 

Livermore, Mrs. Wm. R., New 
York. 

Lodge, Hon. Henry C, Nahant. 

Logan, Hon. James, Worcester. 

Longfellow, Miss Alice M., Cam- 
bridge. 

Lord, Rev. A. M., Providence, 

R.I. 
Loring, Miss Katharine P., Prides 

Crossing. 
Loring, Miss Louisa P., Prides 

Crossing. 
Loring, Mrs. Wm. Caleb, Boston. 
Lothrop, John, Auburndale. 
Lothrop, Mrs. T. K., Boston. 
Lovering, Mrs. C. T., Boston. 
Lovering, Richard S., Boston. 
Lowell, Abbott Lawrence, Cam- 
bridge. 
Lowell, Miss Amy, Brookline. 
Lowell, James Arnold, Boston. 
Lowell, John, Chestnut Hill. 
Lowell, Miss Lucy, Boston. 
Luce, Hon. Robert, Waltham. 
Lyman, Mrs. Ronald T., Boston. 
Marrett, Miss H. M., Standish, 

Me. 
Marrs, Mrs. Kingsmill, Boston. 
Mason, Charles F., Watertown. 
Mason, Miss Ellen F., Boston. 
Mason, Miss Ida M., Boston. 



McElwain, R. Franklin, Holyoke. 
Merriman, Mrs. D., Boston. 
Merriman, Mrs. Roger B., Cam- 
bridge. 
Merritt, Edward P., Boston. 
Meyer, Mrs. G. von L., Boston. 
Minot, the Misses, Boston. 
Minot, J. Grafton, Boston. 
Minot, James J., Jr., Boston. 
Minot, William, Boston. 
Monks, Mrs. George H., Boston. 
Morgan, Eustis P., Saco, Me. 
Morgan, Mrs. Eustis P., Saco, Me. 
Morison, Mrs. John H., Boston. 
Morse, Mrs. Leopold, Boston. 
Morse, Miss Margaret F., Jamaica 

Plain. 
Moseley, Charles H., Boston. 
Motley, Mrs. E. Preble, Boston. 
Motley, Warren, Boston. 
Norcross, Grenville H., Boston. 

Norcross, Mrs. Otis, Boston. 

Norton, Miss Elizabeth G., Cam- 
bridge. 

Noyes, Mrs. Lucia C, Jamaica 
Plain. 

Osgood, Mrs. E. L., Hopedale. 

Osgood, Miss Fanny D., Hope- 
dale. 

Parker, Miss Eleanor S., Boston. 

Parker, W. Prentiss, Boston 

Parker, W. Stanley, Boston. 

Partridge, Fred F., Holyoke. 

Peabody, Rev. Endicott, Groton. 

Peabody, Frederick W., Boston, 

Peabody, Harold, Boston. 

Peabody, Philip G., Boston. 

Peabody, W. Rodman, Boston. 

Perkins, Charles Bruen, Boston. 

Perkins, Mrs. C. E., Boston. 

PhilUps, Mrs. John C, Boston. 

Pickering, Henry G., Boston. 

Pickman, D. L., Boston. 



Pickman, Mrs. D. L., Boston. 
Pierce, Mrs. M. V., Milton. 
Plunkett, W. P., Adams. 
Pope, Mrs. A. A., Boston. 
Poulsson, Miss Emilie, Boston. 
Powers, Mrs. H. H., Newton. 
Pratt, George Dwight, Spring- 
field. 
Proctor, James H., Boston. 
Purdon, Miss Maria, Boston. 
Putnam, F. Delano, Boston. 
Putnam, Mrs. George T., Brook- 
line. 
Putnam, Mrs. James J., Boston. 
Rantoul, Neal, Boston. 
Read, Mrs. Robert M., Medford. 
Remick, Frank W., West Newton. 
Rice, John C, Boston. 

Richards, Miss Elise, Boston. 

Richards, Mrs. H., Gardiner, Me. 

Richards, Henry H., Groton. 

Richardson, John, Jr., Readville. 

Richardson, Mrs. John, Jr., Read- 
ville. 

Richardson, Miss M. G., New 
York. 

Richardson, W. L., M.D., Boston. 

Roberts, Mrs. A. W., Allston. 

Robinson, George F., Watertown. 

Rogers, Miss Flora E., New York. 

Rogers, Henry M., Boston. 

Russell, Otis T., Boston. 

Russell, Mrs. Robert S., Boston. 

Russell, Mrs. W. A., Boston. 

Russell, Wm. Eustis, Boston. 

Saltonstall, Leverett, Chestnut 
Hill. 

Saltonstall, Mrs. Leverett, Chest- 
nut Hill. 

Sargent, Miss Alice, Brookline. 

Schafi^, Capt. Morris, Cambridge. 

Sears, Mrs. Knyvet W., Boston. 

Shattuck, Henry Lee, Boston. 



10 



Shaw, Bartlett M., Watertown. 

Shaw, Mrs. G. Howland, Boston. 

Shaw, Henry S., Boston. 

Shepard, Harvey N., Boston. 

Slater, Mrs. H. N., Boston. 

Smith, Joel West, East Hampton, 
Conn. 

Snow, Walter B., Watertown. 

Sohier, Miss Emily L., Boston. 

Sorchan, Mrs. Victor, New York. 

Stanwood, Edward, Brookline. 

Steams, Charles H., Brookline. 

Stearns, Mrs. Charles H., Brook- 
line. 

Steams, Wm. B., Boston. 

Stevens, Miss C. A., New York. 

Sturgis, R. Clipston, Boston. 

Thayer, Charles M., Worcester. 

Thayer, Rev. G. A., Cincinnati, 0. 

Thayer, Mrs. Nathaniel, Boston. 

Thomas, Mrs. John B., Boston. 

Thorndike, Albert, Boston. 

Thomdike, Miss Rosanna D., 
Boston. 

Tifft, Eliphalet T., Springfield. 

Tilden, Miss Alice Foster, Milton. 

Tilden, Miss Edith S., Milton. 

Tuckerman, Mrs. C. S., Boston. 

Tufts, John F., Watertown. 

Underwood, Herbert S., Boston. 



Underwood, Wm. Lyman, Bel- 
mont. 

Villard, Mrs. Henry, New York. 

Wallace, Andrew B., Springfield. 

Ware, Miss Mary L., Boston. 

Warren, Miss Annie C, Boston. 

Warren, J. G., Providence, R. I. 

Washburn, Hon. Charles G., 
Worcester. 

Washburn, Mrs. Frederick A., 
Boston. 

Waters, H. Goodman, Springfield. 

Watson, Thomas A., Boston. 

Watson, Mrs. Thomas A., Boston. 

Wendell, William G., Boston. 

Wesson, James L., Boston. 

West, George S., Boston. 

Wheelock, Miss Lucy, Boston. 

White, George A., Boston. 

Whitney, Henry M., Brookline. 

Wiggins, Charles, 2d, Boston. 

Winsor, Mrs. E., Chestnut Hill. 

Winsor, Robert, Jr., Boston. 

Winthrop, Mrs. Thomas L., Bos- 
ton. 

Wolcott, Roger, Boston. 

Wright, Burton H., Worcester. 

Wright, George S., Watertown. 

Young, Mrs. Benjamin L., Boston. 

Young, B. Loring, Weston. 



11 



SYNOPSIS OF THE PROCEEDINGS 

OF THE 

ANNUAL MEETING OF THE CORPORATION. 



Watertown, October 11, 1922. 

The annual meeting of the corporation, duly summoned, 
was held to-day at the institution, and was called to order 
by the president, Hon. Francis Henry Appleton, at 3 p.m. 

The proceedings of the last meeting were read and ap- 
proved. 

The annual report of the trustees was accepted and or- 
dered to be printed, together with the usual accompanying 
documents. 

The report of the treasurer was accepted and ordered on 
file. 

Voted, That acts and expenditures, made and authorized by the 
Board of Trustees, or by any committee appointed by said Board of 
Trustees, during the corporate year closed this day, be and are hereby 
ratified and confirmed. 

Voted, That Article II of the by-laws be amended by substituting 
the words "the first Wednesday of November" for "the second 
Wednesday of October." 

The corporation then proceeded to ballot for oflBcers for 
the ensuing year, and the following persons were unani- 
mously elected : — 

President. — Hon. Francis Henry Appleton. 

Vice-President. — William L. Richardson. 

12 



Treasurer. — Albert Thorndike. 

Secretary. — Edward E. Allen. 

Trustees. — Francis Henry Appleton, William Endicott, 
Paul E. Fitzpatrick, G. Peabody Gardner, Jr., Robert H. 
Hallowell, James A. Lowell, Mrs. George T. Putnam, and 
Leverett Saltonstall. 

Mrs. George T. Putnam and Mr. G. Peabody Gardner, 
Jr., were unanimously elected members of the corporation. 

The meeting then adjourned. 

EDWARD E. ALLEN, 

Secretary. 



13 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES. 



Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind, 
Watertown, October 11, 1922. 

Ladies and Gentlemen : — The distinctive fea- 
ture of Perkins Institution is its grouping by families. 
The term "cottage system" does not describe it. 
A typical cottage or ''pavilion" plant is that at 
Chemnitz, Germany, where the hundreds of bUnd 
pupils live in many separate dormitory houses ac- 
cording to sex, age and occupation, but assemble 
three times a day in a huge building for meals. Their 
caretakers Uve with them, but their teachers do not, 
nor do they eat with them. To one familiar with 
the small family plan, this mass eating suggests that 
meals are a business to be put through, not a time 
for social communion between the pupils and their 
teachers; and somehow we felt that, if Perkins was 
to continue to stress sociaHzation as the chief need of 
the young bhnd, we could not attain this so well by 
any system of compromise. So when we rebuilt in 
the suburbs we embodied the plan of bringing both 
teacher and taught together in complete Uttle famihes 
for Uving and of requiring them to leave their houses 
daily only for schooling, outdoor recreation, etc. 
This plan avoids some of the unsociahzing effects of 

14 



congregating young ''socially competent" people 
having a common handicap and in our judgment 
justifies itself. 

No money was expended unwisely on our present 
plant. We might have spent much more without 
commensurate benefit, had we deemed a lot of dis- 
tinct houses better than the same accommodations 
under a few roofs. And now after ten years of use 
the grouping of our buildings seems to us masterly 
both in utiUty and design. As regards their beauty 
the architect was "required" to produce beauty in 
simplicity, and this he accomplished through his 
layout quite as much as through his materials. 
The whole plant is beautiful alike in simplicity and 
setting, and is eminently practical because planned 
to foster the need of those who Uve in it — the need 
of participation, sociaHzation and optimism. Even 
the lofty tower is an asset of the highest value, in- 
viting as it constantly does the passing public to 
learn what goes on under it. 

The Perkins Institution community at Watertown 
consists of about four hundred people, three-fourths 
being pupils, the rest officers, teachers and helpers. 
Its essential buildings are under seven roofs : — 
Howe Hall, the boys' close, the girls' close, the 
kindergarten, the power house, the hospital, and the 
director's house. Last year we added a steward's 
house, a head gardener's house and a garage. There 
are six schools, — two kindergartens, two primary 
schools, and a boys' and a girls' upper school. The 

16 



departments are: fundamental and general class 
training in the English branches, physical and 
manual training, music and contributory housework. 
There are fifty teachers and twelve housemothers, 
and sundry others, who live with the pupils, this 
arrangement necessitating the daily commingling of 
the immature with the mature minds, in the pro- 
portion of four to one. Everybody participates some- 
what in the housework, a continuing means of foster- 
ing the sense of being useful and responsible. No 
study or practice is assigned to the dwelling house, 
but all to the schoolrooms. The school day is from 
eight o'clock a.m. to five p.m., with an hour's study 
or reading in the evening. But these hours are 
so diversified in pursuit and broken by recesses that 
they do not seem long. Indeed, there is not time 
enough to get in all the teachers wish for. The 
course is well balanced and thorough — slow, per- 
haps, but sure, the pupils who graduate from the 
high school being about twenty years old. How- 
ever, most of these begin school later and cover more 
subjects than children ordinarily do, not a few of 
them having already begun such vocational studies 
as piano tuning and music teaching, typewriting 
and housekeeping which they may remain to finish. 
For most, however, the course above the elementary 
is that of the secondary school having many depart- 
ments, and is fundamentally pre- vocational. 

Graduates of Perkins Institution and similar 



16 



KINDERGARTEN FUNDS AND LEGACIES. 

Special funds: — 

Glover Fund (Albert Glover, Blind deaf mutes) , $ 1 ,840 00 

Emeline Morse Lane (Books), .... 1,000 00 

Leonard and Jerusha Hyde Room, . . . 4,000 00 

Permanent funds : — 

William Leonard Benedict, Jr., Memorial, . $1,000 00 

Samuel A. Borden 4,675 00 

A. A. C., In Memoriam, 500 00 

Helen G. Coburn, 9,980 10 

M. Jane Wellington Danforth Fimd, . . 10,000 00 

Caroline T. Downes 12,950 00 

Charles H. Draper, 23,934 13 

Eliza J. Bell Draper Fund 1,500 00 

Helen Atkins Edmands Memorial, . . . 5,000 00 

George R. Emerson, 5,000 00 

MaryEveleth, 1,000 00 

Eugenia F. Farnham 1,015 00 

Susan W. Farwell, 500 00 

John Foster, 5,000 00 

The Luther and Mary Gilbert Fund, . . 3,000 00 

Albert Glover 1,000 00 

Mrs. Jerome Jones Fund, 9,935 95 

Charles Larned 5,000 00 

George F. Parkman 3,500 00 

Catherine P. Perkins 10,000 00 

Frank Davison Rust Memorial, . . . 15,600 00 

Caroline O. Seabury 1,000 00 

Eliza Sturgis Fund 21,729 52 

Abby K. Sweetser, 25,000 00 

Hannah R. Sweetser, 5,000 00 

Mary Rosevear White, 500 00 

General funds: — 

Emilie Albee, $150 00 

Lydia A. Allen 748 38 

Michael Anagnos, 3,000 00 

Harriet T. Andrew 5,000 00 

Martha B. Angell 10,500 00 

Mrs. William Appleton 18,000 00 

Elizabeth H. Bailey 500 00 

Eleanor J. W. Baker, 2,500 00 

Ellen M. Baker 13,053 48 

Mary D. Balfour, 100 00 

Nancy Bartlett Fund 500 00 

Sidney Bartlett, 10,000 00 

Emma M. Bass 1,000 00 



$6,840 00 



183,319 70 



Amounts carried forward, 



$65,051 86 $190,159 70 



65 



Amounts brought forward $65,051 86 $190,159 70 

General funds — Continued. 

Thompson Baxter, 322 50 

Robert C. Billings 10,000 00 

Sarah Bradford, 100 00 

Helen C. Bradlee, 140,000 00 

J. Putnam Bradlee 168,391 24 

Charlotte A. Bradstreet, 6,130 07 

Sarah Crocker Brewster, 500 00 

Ellen Sophia Brown, 1,000 00 

Rebecca W. Brown 3,073 76 

Harriet Tilden Browne, 2,000 00 

John W. Carter, 500 00 

Adeline M. Chapin 400 00 

Benjamin P. Cheney 5,000 00 

Charles H. Colburn 1,000 00 

Helen Collamore 5,000 00 

Anna T. Coolidge 45,138 16 

Mrs. Edward Cordis 300 00 

Sarah Silver Cox 5,000 00 

Susan T. Crosby, 100 00 

James H. Danforth 1,000 00 

Catherine L. Donnison Memorial, . . . 1,000 00 

George E. Downes, 3,000 00 

Lucy A. Dwight, 4,000 00 

Mary B. Emmons, 1,000 00 

Mary E. Emerson, 1,000 00 

Annie Louisa Fay Memorial 1,000 00 

Sarah M. Fay 15,000 00 

Charlotte M. Fiske, 5,000 00 

Elizabeth W. Gay, 7,931 00 

Ellen M. Gifford 5,000 00 

Joseph B. Glover 5,000 00 

Matilda Goddard 300 00 

Maria L. Gray 200 00 

Caroline H. Greene, 1,000 00 

Mary L. Greenleaf 5,157 75 

Josephine S. Hall, 3,000 00 

Olive E. Hayden, 4,622 45 

Allen Haskell 500 00 

Jane H. Hodges, 300 00 

Margaret A. Holden 2,360 67 

Marion D. Hollingsworth, 1,000 00 

Frances H. Hood, 100 00 

Abigal W. Howe, 1,000 00 

Martha R. Hunt 10,000 00 

Ellen M. Jones, 500 00 

Clara B. Kimball 10,000 00 

Moses Kimball, 1,000 00 

Ann E. Lambert, 700 00 



Amounts carried forward $550,679 46 $190,159 70 

66 



Amounts brought forward $550,679 46 S190.159 70 

General funds — Continued. 

WUliam Litchfield 5,000 00 

Mary Ann Locke, 5,874 00 

Robert W. Lord • 1,000 00 

Elisha T. Loring 5,000 00 

Sophia N. Low 1.000 00 

Thomas Mack 1,000 00 

Augustus D. Manson, 8,134 00 

Calanthe E. Marsh 20.11120 

Sarah L. Marsh 1.000 00 

Waldo Marsh 500 00 

Annie B. Matthews 15,000 00 

Rebecca S. Melvin 23,545 55 

Georgina Merrill 4,773 80 

Louise Chandler Moulton 10,000 00 

Mary Abbie Newell 500 00 

Margaret S. Otis 1,000 00 

Jeannie Warren Paine, 1,000 00 

Anna R. Palfrey 50 00 

Sarah Irene Parker, 699 41 

Helen M. Parsons 500 00 

Edward D. Peters 500 00 

Henry M. Peyser 3,900 00 

Mary J. Phipps 2,000 00 

Caroline S. Pickman 1,000 00 

Katherine C. Pierce 5,000 00 

Helen A. Porter 50 00 

Sarah E. Potter Endowment 425,014 44 

Francis L. Pratt 100 00 

Mary S. C. Reed • 5,000 00 

Jane Roberts 93,025 55 

John M. Rodocanachi 2,250 00 

Dorothy Roffe 500 00 

Rhoda Rogers 500 00 

Mrs. Benjamin S. Rotch 8,500 00 

Edith Rotch 10,000 00 

Rebecca Salisbury 200 00 

Joseph Scholfield 3,000 00 

Eliza B. Seymour 5,000 00 

Esther W. Smith 5,000 00 

Annie E. Snow 9,903 27 

Adelaide Standish 5,000 00 

Elizabeth G. Stuart 2,000 00 

Benjamin Sweetzer, 2,000 00 

Harriet Taber Fund, 622 81 

Sarah W. Taber 1.000 00 

Mary L. Talbot 630 00 

Cornelia V. R. Thayer 10,000 00 

Delia D. Thorndike 5,000 00 



Amounts earned forward $1,263,063 49 $190,159 70 

67 



Amounts brought forward, . . . $1,263,063 49 $190,159 70 

General funds — Concluded. 

Elizabeth L. Tilton 300 00 

Betsey B. Tolman, 500 00 

Transcript, ten dollar fund, .... 5,666 95 

Mary B. Turner 7,582 90 

Royal W. Turner 24,082 00 

Minnie H. Underbill 1,000 00 

Rebecca P. Wainwrigbt 1,000 00 

George W. Wales, ...... 5,000 00 

Mrs. George W. Wales, . . . . . 10,000 00 

Mrs. Charles E. Ware 4,000 00 

Rebecca B. Warren 5,000 00 

Jennie A. (Shaw) Waterhouse 565 84 

Mary H. Watson 100 00 

Ralph Watson Memorial, 237 92 

Isabella M. Weld 14,795 06 

Mary Whitehead 666 00 

Julia A. Whitney, 100 00 

Sarah W. Whitney 150 62 

Betsey S. Wilder 500 00 

Hannah Catherine Wiley, 200 00 

Mary W. WUey 150 00 

Mary Williams 5,000 00 

Almira F. Winslow 306 80 

Harriet F. Wolcott 5,532 00 



1,355,499 58 



$1,545,659 28 



DONATIONS, KINDERGARTEN ACCOUNT. 

Brett, Miss Anna K $10 00 

"Children of the King," Church of the Disciples, 

Boston 4 00 

Sabine, George K. (In memory of Caroline R. 

Sabine), 9 00 

Union Church of Weymouth and Braintree, . . 25 00 

$48 00 



68 



CONTRIBUTIONS FOR THE PERKINS 
INSTITUTION. 



Through the Ladies' Auxiliary Society, Mrs. Sarah A. Stover, Treasurer: — 

Annual subscriptions, SI, 728 00 

Donations 2,028 00 

Cambridge Branch 177 00 

Dorchester Branch, 64 00 

Lynn Branch, 38 00 

Milton Branch 33 00 

$4,068 00 



ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTIONS FOR THE 
PERKINS INSTITUTION. 

Through the Ladies' Auxiliary Society, Mrs. S. A. Stoveb, Treasurer. 



Abbott, Miss Georgianna E, 
Adams, Mrs. Waldo, 
Alford, Mrs. O. H., 
Allen, Mrs. F. R., . 
Alley, Mrs. George R., . 
Amory, Mrs. Charles W., 
Amory, Mrs. Wm., 
Amory, Mrs. Wm., 2d, 
Bacon, Miss Mary P., . 
Badger, Mrs. Wallis B., 
Baer, Mrs. Louis, . 
Balch, Mrs. F. G., 
Baldwin, Mrs. J. C. T., 
Bangs, Mrs. F. R.,. 
Barnet, Mrs. Solomon J., 
Bartol, Miss EUzabeth H., 
Batcheller, Mr. Robert, 
Beal, Mrs. Boylston A., 
Beale, Mrs. Wilbur F., . 



. $2 


00 1 


5 00 1 


. 10 


00 


3 


00 


1 


00 


. 25 


00 


5 


00 


. 25 


00 


3 


00 


5 


00 


. 10 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


. 10 00 1 


5 


00 


. 20 


00 


. 10 


00 


. 10 00 1 


2 


00 



Amount brought forward, . $161 00 



Berlin, Dr. Fanny, 
Betton, Mrs. C. G., 
Bigelow, Mrs. Henry M., 
Bigelow, Mrs. J. S., 
Boardman, Mrs. W. D., 
Boutwell, Mrs. L. B., . 
Brewer, Mrs. D. C, 
Brewer, Miss Lucy S., . 
Brown, Mrs. Atherton T., 
Brush, Mrs. C. N., 
Burr, Mrs. C. C, . 
Carr, Mrs. Samuel, 
Chamberlain, Mrs. M. L., 
Chandler, Mrs. Frank W., 
Channing, Mrs. Walter, 
Chapin, Mrs. Henry B., 
Chapman, Miss Jane E. C. 



1 


00 


2 


00 


3 


00 


. 10 


00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


. 10 00 


. 10 


00 


. 10 00 


. 10 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


. 10 


00 


2 


00 



Amount carried forward, . $161 00 Amount carried forward, . $264 00 



69 



Amount brought forward, . $264 00 



Chase, Mrs. Susan R., . 


1 00 


Clapp, Dr. H. C, . 


2 00 


Clark, Mrs. Frederic S., 


10 00 


Clerk, Mrs. W. F., 


3 00 


Cobb, Mrs. Charles K., 


5 00 


Codman, Miss Catherine 




Amory, 


10 00 


Corey, Mrs. H. D., 


2 00 


Cox, Mrs. William E., . 


10 00 


Craig, Mrs. D. R., 


5 00 


Craigin, Dr. G. A., 


5 00 


Crocker, Mrs. U. H., . 


5 00 


Cummings, Mrs. Charles A., 


10 00 


Curtis, Mr. George W., 


5 00 


Curtis, Mrs. Horatio G., 


5 00 


Curtis, Miss Mary G., . 


10 00 


Gushing, Mrs. H. W., . 


5 00 


Gushing, Miss Sarah P., 


5 00 


Cutler, Mrs. C. F., 


10 00 


Cutler, Mrs. E. G., 


2 00 


Cutter, Mrs. Frank W., 


1 00 


Cutts, Mrs. H. M., 


1 00 


Dale, Mrs. Eben, . 


5 00 


Damon, Mrs. J. L., Jr., 


2 00 


Daniels, Mrs. Edwin A., 


1 00 


Davis, Mrs. Joseph E., 


5 00 


Davis, Mrs. Simon, 


3 00 


Denny, Mrs. Arthur B., 


5 00 


Denny, Mrs. W. C, 


5 00 


Derby, Mrs. Hasket, 


5 00 


Drost, Mr. C. A., . 


10 00 


Dwight, Mrs. Thomas, 


1 00 


Edgar, Mrs. C. L., 


10 00 


Edmands, Mrs. M. Grant, 


10 00 


Eliot, Mrs. Amory, 


2 00 


Elms, Miss Florence G., 


2 00 


Emmons, Mrs. R. W., 2d, . 


35 00 


Endicott, Mrs. Wm. C, 


5 00 


Ernst, Mrs. C. W., 


5 00 


Ernst, Mrs. H. C, 


5 00 


Eustis, Mrs. F. A., 


10 00 


Faulkner, Miss Fannie M., . 


10 00 


Ferrin, Mrs. M. T. B., . 


10 00 


Field, Mrs. D. M., 


5 00 


Fitz, Mrs. W. Scott, . 


25 00 


Foss, Mrs. Eugene N., . 


10 00 


Frank, Mrs. Daniel, 


1 00 


Freeman, Mrs. Louisa A., . 


3 00 


Friedman, Mrs. Max, . 


5 00 



Amount carried forward, . $571 00 



Amount brought forward, . $571 00 



Frothingham, Mrs. Langdon, 
Gay, Mrs. Albert, . 
Gill, Mr. Abbott D., . 
Gill, Mrs. George F., . 
Goldberg, Mrs. Simon, . 
Goldschmidt, Mrs. Meyer H 
Gooding, Mrs. T. P., . 
Grandgent, Prof. Chas. H., 
Grant, Mr. and Mrs. Robert, 
Gray, Mrs. Reginald, . 
Greenleaf, Mrs. L. B., . 
Greenough, Mrs. C. P., 
Hall, Mrs. Anthony D., 
Harrington, Mrs. Francis B 
Harris, Miss Frances K., 
Hatch, Mrs. Fred W., . 
Haven, Mrs. Edward B., 
Hayward, Mrs. G. G., . 
Herman, Mrs. Joseph M., 
Higginson, Mrs. Henry L., 
Hills, Mrs. Edwin A., . 
Holbrook, Mrs. Walter H., 
Homans, Mrs. John, 
Hooper, Miss Adeline D., 
Hooper, Mrs. James R., 
Howe, Mrs. Arabella, . 
Howe, Mrs. George D., 
Howland, Mrs. M. M., 
Hunnewell, Mrs. Arthur, 
In memory of Mrs. David P 

Kimball, 
Jennings, Miss Julia F., 
Johnson, Mr. Arthur S., 
Johnson, Mr. Edward C, 
Johnson, Mrs. Wolcott H., 
Jones, Mrs. B. M., 
Josselyn, Mrs. A. S., 
Joy, Mrs. Charles H., . 
Kettle, Mrs. Claude L., 
Kimball, Mr. Edward P., 
King, Mrs. S. G., . 
Kingsley, Mrs. Robert C, 
Kornfeld, Mrs. Felix, . 
Lamb, Miss Augusta T., 
Lamson, Mrs. J. A., 
Lane, Mrs. D. H., . 
Larkin, The Misses, 
Ledyard, Mrs. Lewis Cass, 
Leland, Miss Ernestine H., 



Amount carried forward, . $849 00 



1, 5 00 


1 00 


2 00 


1 00 


2 00 


1 00 


2 00 


3 00 


t, 5 00 


. 15 00 


2 00 


5 00 


2 00 


5 00 


3 00 


5 00 


3 00 


. 10 00 


5 00 


5 00 


. 10 00 


3 00 


. 10 00 


5 00 


. 20 00 


1 00 


. 10 00 


2 00 


. 20 00 


. 25 00 


3 00 


. 10 00 


. 25 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


. 10 00 


2 00 


5 00 


3 00 


5 00 


1 00 


1 00 


2 00 


1 00 


1 00 


5 00 


1 00 



70 



Amount brought forward, . 


$849 00 


Amount brought forward, $1,200 00 


Leland, Mrs. Leslie F., 


1 00 


Rogers, Miss Susan S., . 


5 00 


Leland, Mrs. Lewis A., 


1 00 


Rosenbaum, Mrs. Henry, 


1 00 


Leland, Miss Mai L., . 


1 00 


Rosenbaum, Miss Loraine, . 


1 00 


Leland, Miss Winifred F., . 


1 00 


Rosenbaum, Mrs. Louis, 


5 00 


Levi, Mrs. Harry, . 


5 00 


Rowlett, Mrs. Thomas S., . 


1 00 


Lincoln, Mr. A. L., 


5 00 


Russell, Miss Catherine E., 


5 00 


Locke, Mrs. C. A., 


10 00 


Saltonstall, Mr. Richard M. 




Loring, Judge W. C, . 


25 00 


in memory of his mother 




Loring, Mrs. W. C, 


25 00 


Mrs. Leverett Saltonstall 


10 00 


Lothrop, Miss Mary B., 


5 00 


Sargent, Mrs. F. W., . 


10 00 


Lothrop, Mrs. W. S. H., 


5 00 


Saunders, Mrs. D. E., . 


5 00 


Lovering, Mrs. Charles T., . 


10 00 


Scudder, Mrs. Charles L., 


1 00 


Lowell, Mrs. John, 


5 00 


Scudder, Mrs. J. D., in mem- 




Macurdy, Mr. Wm. F., 


10 00 


ory of her mother, Mrs 




Mansfield, Mrs. George S., . 


2 00 


N. M. Downer, . 


5 00 


Mansur, Mrs. Martha P., . 


3 00 


Scull, Mrs. Gideon, 


10 00 


Mason, Miss Fanny P., 


10 00 


Sears, Mr. Herbert M., 


25 00 


Merrill, Mrs. L. M., 


5 00 


Sears, Mrs. Knyvet W., 


30 00 


Merriman, Mrs. Daniel, 


10 00 


Shaw, Mrs. George R., 


5 00 


Morison, Mrs. John H., 


5 00 


Sherwin, Mrs. Thomas, 


2 00 


Morrison, Mrs. W. A., . 


1 00 


Sias, Mrs. Charles D., . 


5 00 


Morse, Miss Margaret F., 


5 00 


Simpkins, Miss Mary W., 


5 00 


Morss, Mrs. Everett, 


5 00 


Sprague, Mrs. Charles, 


1 00 


Moseley, Miss Ellen F., 


5 00 


Sprague, Mrs. H. B., 


1 00 


Moses, Mrs. George, 


2 00 


Sprague, Dr. Francis P., 


. 10 00 


Moses, Mrs. Joseph, 


5 00 


Stackpole, Miss Roxana, 


5 00 


Moses, Mrs. Louis, 


1 00 


Stearns, Mr. and Mrs. C. H 


, 10 00 


Nathan, Mrs. John, 


5 00 


Stearns, Mrs. Wm. Bracket! 


3 00 


Nazro, Mrs. Fred H., . 


2 00 


Stearns, Mr. Wm. B., . 


2 00 


Niebuhr, Miss Mary M., 


1 00 


Steinert, Mrs. Alex., 


5 00 


Norcross, Mrs. Otis, 


10 00 


Stevens, Miss Alice B., 


5 00 


Olmsted, Mrs. J. C., 


3 00 


Stevenson, Mrs. R. H., 


. 20 00 


Page, Mrs. Calvin Gates, 


2 00 


Stewart, Mrs. Cecil, 


5 00 


Parker, Miss Eleanor S., 


. 10 00 


Stone, Mrs. Edwin P., . 


5 00 


Pickman, Mrs. D. L., . 


, 25 00 


Storer, Miss A. M., 


5 00 


Pitman, Mrs. Benjamin F., 


. 10 00 


Storer, Miss M. G., 


5 00 


Potter, Mrs. Wm. H., . 


3 00 


Thomson, Mrs. A. C, . 


5 00 


Prince, Mrs. Morton, . 


5 00 


Thorndike, Mrs. Alden A., 


. 10 00 


Putnam, Mrs. James J., 


5 00 


Thorndike, Mrs. Augustus, 


5 00 


Ratchesky, Mrs. Fanny, 


5 00 


Thorndike, Mrs. Augustus ] 


.., I 00 


Ratchesky, Mrs. I. A., . 


5 00 


Tileston, Mrs. John B., 


5 00 


Reed, Mrs. Arthur, 


2 00 


Tuckerman, Mrs. Charles S 


5 00 


Reed, Mrs. John H., 


2 00 


Vass, Miss Harriett, 


5 00 


Rice, Mr. and Mrs. David, 


. 50 00 


Wadsworth, Mrs. A. F., 


5 00 


Rice, Mrs. Wm. B., 


. 25 00 


Ward, The Misses, 


. 10 00 


Richards, Mrs. E. L., . 


2 00 


Ward, Miss Julia A., 


2 00 


Richards, Mrs. Frederick, 


5 00 


Ware, Miss Mary Lee, . 


. 25 00 


Roeth, Mrs. A. G., 


1 00 


Warren, Mrs. Bayard, . 


. 25 00 


Rogers, Mrs. R. K., 


5 00 


Warshauer, Mrs. Isador, 
Amount carried forward, 


1 00 


Amount carried forward, 


$1,200 00 


$1,517 00 



71 



Amount brought forward, $1,517 00 



Wason, Mrs. Elbridge, . 
Weeks, Mr. Andrew Gray, 
Weeks, Mrs. W. B. P., . 
Weld, Mrs. A. Winsor, . 
Weld, Mrs. Samuel M., 
West, Mrs. Charles A., 
Wheelwright, Miss Mary, 
White, Miss Eliza Orne, 
White, Mrs. Joseph H., 
White, Mrs. Norman H., 
Williams, The Misses, . 
Williams, Miss Adelia C, 



Amount carried forward, $1,691 00 



5 


00 


. 10 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 


5 00 


1 


00 


2 


00 


. 25 00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


. 15 


00 


. 100 


00 



Amount brought forward. Si, 691 00 



Williams, Mrs. Arthur, 


1 00 


Williams, Mrs. C. A., . 


5 00 


Williams, Mrs. Jeremiah, 


2 00 


Willson, Miss Lucy B., 


5 00 


Wingersky, Mrs. Harris (foi 




1920) 


1 00 


Winsor, Mrs. Ernest, . 


2 00 


Withington, Miss Anna S., 


1 00 


Wolcott, Mrs. Roger, . 


5 00 


Worthley, Mrs. George H., 


5 00 


Young, Mrs. Benjamin, 


10 00 




51,728 00 



DONATIONS. 



Adams, Mrs. Charles H., 
Adams, Mr. George, 
Agoos family, . 
Aiden, Mrs. Charles H., 
Alien, Mrs. Thomas, 
Bacon, Miss Ellen S., . 
BaUey, Mrs. H. R., 
Baker, Miss Edith G., . 
Bartol, Mrs. John W., . 
Batcheller, Mr. Robert, 
Batt, Mrs. C. R., . 
Baylies, Mrs. Walter Cabot, 
Bemis, Mr. J. M., . 
Bicknell, Mrs. Wm. J., 
Blake, Mrs. Arthur W., 
Blake, Mrs. Francis (for 

1920) 

Blake, Mr. Wm. P., 
Bolster, Miss May G., . 
Bond, Mrs. Charles H., 
Bowditch, Dr. Vincent Y., 
Bradt, Mrs. Julia B., . 
Brewer, Mr. Edward M., 
Browning, Mrs. Charles A., 
Bullard, Mr. Alfred M., 
Bullens, Miss Charlotte L., 
Bunker, Mr. Alfred, 
Burnham, Mrs. H. D., . 
C 



$5 00 
2 00 

75 00 
5 00 
5 00 

25 00 
5 00 
2 00 

10 00 

10 00 
5 00 
5 00 

10 00 
2 00 
5 00 

20 00 

10 00 
1 00 

10 00 
5 00 
5 00 

10 00 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



Amount carried forward, . $255 00 



Amount brought forward, . $255 00 



Carpenter, Mrs. George A., 
Carter, Mrs. John W., . 
Cary, Miss Ellen S., 
Cary, Miss Georgina S., 
Clark, Mrs. Robert Farley, 
Codman, Miss Martha C, 
Coolidge, Mrs. Francis L., 
Coolidge, Mrs. Penelope F., 
Cotting, Mrs. Charles E., 
Cotton, Miss Elizabeth A., 
Crowninshield, Mr. Francis 

B., .... 
Daland, Mrs. Tucker, . 
Deland, Mrs. Lorin F., 
Edwards, Miss Hannah M., 
Endicott, Mrs. Wm. C, 
Estabrook, Mrs. Arthur F., 
Eustis, Mrs. Herbert H., 
Evans, Mrs. Charles, 
Evans, Mrs. Glendower, 
F 



Fowle, Mr. L. Orlando, 
Frisch, Dr. E. H., . 
Frothingham, Mrs. Louis A 
Gardiner, Miss Eugenia, 
Gardner, Mrs. John L., 
Goulding, Mrs. L. R., . 



Amount carried forward, . $865 00 



5 


00 


10 


00 


100 


00 


10 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


3 


00 


3 


00 


5 


00 


200 00 


20 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


25 


00 


10 


00 


5 


00 


50 00 


1 


00 


2 


00 


20 


00 


6 


00 


2 


00 


100 


00 


5 00 


5 


00 


6 


00 



72 



Amount brought forward, . $865 00 



Green, Mr. Charles G., 
Guild, Mrs. S. Eliot, . 
Hall, Mr. Wm. Franklin, 
Harris, Miss Frances K., 
Harwood, Mrs. E. A., . 
Houghton, Miss Elizabeth G 
Hoyt, Mrs. C. C., . 
Hubbard, Mrs. Eliot, . 
Hubbard, Mr. Gorham, 
Hunnewell, Mr. Walter, 
Hutchins, Mrs. C. F., . 
Hyneman, Mrs. Louis, . 
lasigi, Mrs. Oscar, 
In memory of Mrs. Harriet 
L. Thayer, through Mrs 
Hannah T. Brown, . 
Johnson, Mrs. Herbert S., 
JoUifife, Mrs. Thomas H., 
Kimball, The Misses, . 
Kimball, Mrs. M. M., . 
Koshland, Mrs. Joseph, 
Lawrence, Mrs. John, . 
Lincoln, Mrs. Jacob S., 
Linder, Mrs. George, in mem 
ory of Miss Jennie M 

Colby 

Loring, Mrs. Augustus P., 
Lovett, Mr. A. S., . 
Lovett, Mrs. A. S., 
Lowell, Mrs. Charles, . 
Lowell, Miss Lucy, 
Lyman, Mrs. George H., 
Magee, Mr. John L., 
Manning, Miss Abbie F., 
Marrs, Mrs. Kingsmill, 
Mason, Mrs. Charles E., 
May, Miss Mary C. S., 
McKee, Mrs. Wm. L., . 
Means, Miss Anne M., 
Merriam, Mrs. Frank, . 
Mills, Mrs. D. T., . 
Morse, Dr. Henry Lee, 
Morse, Mrs. Leopold, . 
Moseley, Miss Ellen F., 
Peabody, Mr. Harold, . 
Peirce, Mrs. Silas, . 
Perry, Mrs. C. F., . 
Pfaelzer, Mrs. F. T., 
Philbrick, Mrs. E. S., . 



50 00 
10 00 
15 00 

5 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 

5 00 
25 00 

5 00 

2 00 
10 00 



5 00 
10 00 

5 00 
25 00 
50 00 
10 00 
10 00 

1 00 



25 00 

25 00 

5 00 

5 00 

5 00 

5 00 

10 00 

25 00 

10 00 

10 00 

50 00 

10 00 

5 00 

10 00 

10 00 

5 00 

5 00 

5 00 

10 00 

5 00 

2 00 

3 00 
10 00 

3 00 



Amount brought forward, 

Powell, Mrs. Wm. B., . 
Pratt, Mrs. Elliott W., 
Prince, Mrs. Morton, , 
Punchard, Miss A. L., . 
Putnam, Mrs. James J., 
Quincy, Mrs. G. H., 
Rand, Mrs. Arnold A., . 
Ranney, Mr. Fletcher, . 
Rice, Mrs. N. M., 
Richards, Miss Alice A., 
Richardson, The Misses, and 
Miss Mary C. Shute in 
memory of M. A. E. and 

C. P. P 

Richardson, Mrs. Edward C 
Richardson, Mrs. John, 
Riley, Mr. Charles E., . 
Ripley, Mr. Frederick H., 
Rodman, Miss Emma, . 
Rogers, Mrs. J. C, 
Ross, Mrs. Waldo O., . 
Rust, Mrs. Wm. A., 
Sanger, Mr. Sabin P., . 
Sargent, Mrs. L. M., 
Seabury, Miss Sarah E., 
Sever, Miss Emily, 
Shaw, Mrs. G. Howland, 
Sherman, Mrs. Wm. H., 
Sias, Miss Martha G., . 
Slattery, Mrs. Wm., 
Spalding, Miss Dora N., 
Spring, Mr. and Mrs. Rom- 

ney, 
Stackpole, Mrs. F. D., 
St. John, Mrs. C. Henry, in 
memory of her mother, 
Mrs. Isaac H. Russell, 
Stone, Mrs. Philip S., . 
Strauss, Mrs. Louis, 
Talbot, Mrs. Thomas Palmer 
Thayer, Mrs. Ezra Ripley, 
Thing, Mrs. Annie B., . 
Thorndike, Mrs. Augustus L 
Trainor, Miss Mary E., 
Traiser, Mrs. R. E., 
Tucker, Mrs. J. Alfred, 
Tyler, Mrs. H. Blake, . 
Vialle, Mr. Charles A., . 
Vickery, Mrs. Herman F., 



$1,406 00 


5 


00 


. 10 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


. 10 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 


. 25 


00 


10 


00 



3 00 
5 00 
5 00 

25 00 
2 00 

10 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 

10 00 

10 00 

75 00 
5 00 

15 00 
5 00 
5 00 
2 00 

10 00 



5 00 
2 00 
2 00 
1 00 
10 00 
10 00 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



10 00 
50 00 



Amount carried forward, $1,406 00 | Amount carried forward, $1,801 00 



73 



Amount brought forward, $1,801 00 



Vorenberg, Mrs. S., 
Vose, Mrs. Charles, 
Wadsworth, Mrs. W. Austin, 
Walker, Mrs. W. H., . 
Warner, Mrs. F. H., 
Watson, Mrs. Thomas A., 
Wheeler, Mrs. A. S., 
Wheelwright, Miss Mary C 
Whitney, Mr. Edward F., 



Amount carried forward, $1,888 00 



5 


00 


2 


00 


, 20 


00 


. 10 


00 


. 10 


00 


. 10 


00 


. 10 


00 


, 10 00 


. 10 


00 



Amount brought forward, $1,888 00 



Whitwell, Mrs. F. A., . 
Willcomb, Mrs. George, 
Williams, Mr. Ralph B., 
Williams, Mrs. T. B., . 
Willson, Miss Lucy B., 
Windram, Mrs. W. T., . 
Wyman, Mrs. Alfred E., 
Ziegel, Mr. Louis, . 



5 00 


. 10 00 


. 25 00 


5 00 


5 00 


. 50 00 


. 15 00 


. 25 00 


$2,028 00 



CAMBRIDGE BRANCH. 



Agassiz, Mr. Max. (dona- 
tion), 

Ames, Mrs. James B. (dona- 
tion), .... 
Bogg, Mrs. Edwin P., . 
Chandler, Mrs. Seth C 

(donation), ... 
Emery, Miss Octavia B 

(donation), . 
Farlow, Mrs. Wm. G. (dona- 
tion), .... 
Foster, Mrs. Francis C 

(donation), . 
Francke, Mrs. Kuno, 
Frothingham, Miss Sarah E 
Goodale, Mrs. George L., 
Greenough, Mrs. J. B., 
Hayward, Mrs. James W., 
Hedge, Miss Charlotte A., 



Amount carried forward. 



$10 00 


10 00 


2 00 


2 00 


5 00 


6 00 


30 00 


5 00 


2 00 


1 00 


2 00 


10 00 


5 00 


$89 00 



Amount brought forward, . $89 00 



Horsford, Miss Katharine 

M. (donation), . 
Howard, Mrs. Albert A., 
Ireland, Miss Catharine I 

(donation), . 
Kennedy, Mrs. F. L., . 
Kettell, Mrs. Charles W., 
Longfellow, Miss Alice M., 
Neal, Mrs. W, H., 
Richards, Miss L. B., . 
Thorp, Mrs. J. G., 
Toppan, Mrs. Robert N., 
Wesselhoeft, Mrs. Walter, 
Whittemore, Mrs. F. W,, 
Willson, Mrs. Robert W., 
Woodman, Miss Mary, 
Woodman, Mrs. Walter, 



$177 00 



5 00 


5 00 


3 


00 


3 


00 


. 10 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 


. 10 


00 


. 10 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


. 20 


00 


2 


00 



74 



DORCHESTER BRANCH. 



Bartlett, Mrs. Susan E., 
Bennett, Miss M. M., . 
Brigham, Mrs. Frank E., 
Callender, Miss Caroline S., 
Churchill, Dr. Anna Quincy 

(for four years), . 
Churchill, Judge J. R., . 
Churchill, Mrs. J. R., . 
Cushing, Miss Susan T., 
Eliot, Mrs. C. R., . 
Hall, Mrs. Henry, . 
Haven, Mrs. Katharine 

Stearns, 
Hawkes, Mrs. S. L., 
Humphreys, Mrs. Richard C 
Jordan, Miss Ruth A., . 
Nash, Mrs. Edward W 

(donation), ... 
Nash, Mrs. Frank K., . 
Preston, Miss Myra C, 

Amount carried forward. 



u 


00 


1 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


6 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


.. 2 


00 


2 


00 


1 


00 


5 00 1 


2 


00 


$36 00 



Amount brought forward, . $36 00 



Reed, Mrs. George M., 
Sayward, Mrs. W. H., . 
Sharp, Mr. Everett H 

(donation), . 
Stearns, Mrs. Albert H., 
Stearns, Mr. A. Maynard, 
Stearns, Mr. A. T., 2d, 
Stearns, Henry D., in mem 

ory of, . 
Whitcher, Mr. Frank W 

(donation), . 
Whiton, Mrs. Royal, 
Wilder, Miss Grace S., . 
Willard, Mrs. L. P., 
Woodberry, Miss Mary 

(donation), . 
Wright. Mr. C. P., 



1 00 



5 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


5 


00 



$64 GO 



Caldwell, Mrs. Ellen F., 
Chase, Mrs. Philip A., . 
Earp, Miss Emily A., . 
Elmer, Mr. and Mrs. V. J., . 
Sheldon, Mrs. Chauncey C, 
Smith, Mrs. Joseph N. 
(donation), . . . . 

Amount carried forward, . 



LYNN BRANCH. 

Amount brought forward, . 

Henry B. 



$1 00 
5 00 
2 00 
5 00 
5 00 



10 00 



i28 00 



Sprague, Mr. 

(donation), . 
Tapley, Mr. 

(donation), . 



Henry 



528 00 

5 00 
5 00 



$38 00 



MILTON BRANCH. 



Brewer, Miss Eliza (dona- 
tion) 810 00 

Forbes, Mrs. J. Murray, . 10 00 

Jaques, Miss Helen L., . 10 00 



Amount carried forward. 



$30 00 



Amount brought forward, . $30 00 



Klous, Mrs. Henry D., 
Rivers, Mrs. George R. R., 



1 00 

2 00 



$33 00 



75 



All contributors to the fund are respectfully requested to peruse the 
above list, and to report either to Albert Thorndike, Treasurer, No. 
19 Congress Street, Boston, or to the Director, Edward E, Allen, Water- 
town, any omissions or inaccuracies which they may find in it. 

ALBERT THORNDIKE, 

Treasurer. 
No. 19 Congress Street, Boston. 



76 



FORM OF BEQXTEST. 

I hereby give, devise and bequeath to the Perkins Institution 
AND Massachusetts School for the Blind, a corporation duly 
organized and existing under the laws of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, the sum of dollars ($ ), 

the same to be applied to the general uses and purposes of said 
corporation under the direction of its Board of Trustees; and I 
do hereby direct that the receipt of the Treasurer for the time being 
of said corporation shall be a sufficient discharge to my executors 
for the same. 



FORM OF DEVISE OF REAL ESTATE. 

I give, devise and bequeath to the Perkins Institution and Mas- 
sachusetts School for the Blind, a corporation duly organized 
and existing under the laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
that certain tract of real estate bounded and described as follows: — 

(Here describe the real estate accurately) 
with full power to sell, mortgage and convey the same free of all 
trusts. 



NOTICE. 



The address of the treasurer of the corporatfon is as 

follows: 

ALBERT THORNDIKE, 

No. 19 Congress Street, 

Boston. 



schools follow many of the varied calUngs of other 
young people. For some years before our pupils 
leave school the placement agent of the Massa- 
chusetts Division of the Blind has been coming out 
to Watertown to advise them vocationally. Natu- 
rally she has been the more happy in finding them 
positions into which they fit. They do hand assem- 
bling in factories and warerooms, ticketing, wrap- 
ping, inspecting, selling, office typewriting, making 
household articles, serving as mothers' helpers, 
teaching, lecturing, entertaining, operating tele- 
phone exchanges, piano tuning, practising law, medi- 
cine or massage, preaching, and what not. There is 
httle that some one or more of them cannot do or 
direct, when given the native capacity, the train- 
ing and the chance. Indeed, in proportion as bUnd- 
ness is considered both by its subject and the public 
not so much Uability as potential asset — a condition 
capable of begetting and enforcing strength rather 
than weakness — will it be seen and understood that 
even this "condition of evil" may be made to take 
its place in the scheme of things from which man- 
kind in general is meant to profit. 

There are several former pupils of ours employed 
by the Division of the BHnd who do their work so 
well that it seems as though no seeing people could 
do it as well. That most bHnd people do not make 
good economically is true enough, but the fact that 
many do proves that it is not blindness but some 



17 



other handicap which controls, such as incapacity, 
unacceptabiUty, wrong occupation or prejudice. 

He who loses sight in adulthood when his habits 
are formed finds it difficult to adjust himself to so 
bewildering a change. However, it has been done in 
instances too numerous to mention. A visit of a 
newly bUnded man or woman to such a school as 
ours is often enough to give the impetus producing 
hopefulness, the state of mind which leads on to 
success. Such a person with help is in many re- 
spects better off than the child who is bhnd. He 
knows the world as it is and not as it seems to be, 
understands how things are done and can use his 
knowledge and capacity again. The blind child must 
acquire what he gets in a less direct and natural 
way; and some things he never learns. What he 
does learn, however, and how well he comes to do 
things is ever astonishing, even to those who are 
his teachers. And so, fortified with the knowledge 
that most things are possible because they have 
already been done, the education of the young bhnd 
goes on hopefully and successfully. 

The bhnd child of six years, when received at the 
kindergarten learns first of all adjustment to con- 
ditions. He is no longer the exceptional member 
of the family; for there all are treated aUke, have 
an equal chance, and must learn to give as well as 
take. The regimen of their daily experiences is always 
helpful and developmental. Much that the seeing 
child sees, the blind child handles in the kinder- 

18 



garten room or on the playground. In the former 
he is shown how to make things; on the latter he 
discovers lumber of one kind or another to build 
with. For example, when two years ago we sub- 
stituted an iron for a wooden fence, the old wooden 
posts were left for the Httle fellows to play with, and 
they have made the most of them, — building huts 
and houses and forts, repeatedly tearing them down 
and rebuilding them anew in some other spot. 
Our swings and fixed play apparatus are all very 
well for the joy and exercise they beget, but for 
the development of imagination and resourceful- 
ness what can compare with actual construction? 
Of course the partly seeing boys lead off in this 
sort of thing; but the bhnd ones follow and grow 
mightily in the process. 

Last year an enthusiastic lower-school teacher 
cleared a garden patch with the help of her boys, 
planted it with vegetables and actually furnished 
meals for her household. Primarily this garden was 
to grow roots for rabbits, of which these boys had 
as many as sixteen within the year. Those who had 
them in charge developed as any boys must who 
meet such responsibihty. This fall the boys have 
begun with two young gray squirrels caught on our 
grounds, and already they have prospected about 
and gathered nuts for them. As it happened one of 
the squirrels soon died. The burial was a most in- 
teresting affair. The httle fellows sang and wailed, 
and one of them preached the funeral sermon. 

19 



A teacher of the Httle girls has carried out for the 
past seven years an all-summer camp for from twelve 
to fifteen of them who would otherwise go home 
to the hot city or be boarded out. There on the 
shore of a large pond and in the midst of woods, 
hills and fields and berry pastures and the daily 
housework these fortunate ones experience a sup- 
plemental training of the highest value. 

Obviously the more we can bring our young people 
in contact with nature the better; as it is they get 
Uttle enough of it compared with other children. 
In our large grounds they experience the changing 
seasons and all that these bring — wind, sunshine, 
rain, snow, slush, ice — and they build snow forts, 
have snow fights, coast and skate, get hurt and get 
well again, and so pass glorious days. An inde- 
pendent, self-sustaining blind man, who as a child 
attended our Jamaica Plain kindergarten, has said 
that no matter how poor and unhappy his Ufe might 
become no one ever could take away from him the 
recollection of the vigorous, free and happy child- 
hood he had had at the kindergarten. How much 
the recollection of a happy past Hghtens and 
brightens up the present! 

But playground contact with nature is limited. 
To enlarge this we need only investigate what the 
diversified home grounds and their equipment fur- 
nish, — pond, truck and flower gardens, groves, 
orchards, nursery, shrubbery and other new and 
old plantings, apiary, poultry houses, stable and 

20 



garage, besides all the implements used in their 
development and upkeep ;— these many and varied 
experiences the pupils get through conducted walks 
with teachers interested in such things — and every 
school can have such helpers. Then too some one 
must tell the school what is going on and where to 
look for it. This the Director does at morning 
assembly and so plants and keeps alive the natural 
curiosity to prospect about and see for oneself. We 
must also encourage excursions and hikes outside, 
of course. We should collect all kinds of things and 
specimens, label them and make of them an object- 
teaching museum. This we do in the lower school, 
adding to it from time to time by purchase with the 
income of the Leonard and Jerusha Hyde Fund. In 
the upper school we fortunately have a large and 
superior collection arranged around alcoves, each 
one of which becomes a daily classroom for certain 
groups of pupils and their teacher. 

All the girls of our lower school jump rope. This 
season both they and the upper school girls are walk- 
ing on stilts, a novel experience for them. In Octo- 
ber these girls had a grand outdoor field meet in 
which the members of the different cottages com- 
peted for excellence in running, jumping, archball, 
tug of war, etc., and at the year's close the cottage 
which had won the most points in this and other 
tournaments proudly hung up in its living room a 
specially made banner recording its prowess. Each 
fall and winter the boys wage intercottage football 



21 



and other contests, and in June the individual 
champions of the school meet those of the local high 
school and the team of the Pennsylvania School for 
the BHnd, either here on the home grounds or at 
Overbrook. Carried out with moderation, as our 
athletics are, they are tonic in the best sense, for 
they nourish enthusiasm, capacity and loyalty. 

Such experiences as the above which go with any 
boarding school community, — and Perkins has an 
abundance of them, — we dwell upon in annual 
reports rather than upon routine school matters. It 
is not difficult to instruct the bhnd; in fact, it is easy. 
Their all-round education it is that is difficult, and 
it is that which we stress. Accounts of other activi- 
ties and events occurring last fall will be found on 
pages 39 to 43 of this pamphlet. 

From time to time we have been graduating a 
few pupils into the Watertown High School where 
they have fitted into a senior or fourth year and 
where they have found no difficulty in holding their 
own. It is good for bhnd youth to measure them- 
selves with the seeing in school before they try it 
in real life. The experience both as to pace and com- 
prehensiveness of the work covered is illuminating 
to them. When they bring home high marks Mr. 
AUen says: ''That is right; I expect you to do well. 
You are older than most of your classmates, you 
know, and better grounded in your studies. But 
remember, they are broader than you, even if they 

22 



are not so deep." By so saying he hopes to 
keep down the conceit which the injudicious praise 
of others, — even teachers, — tends to develop. 
Of our two boys who finished the local high school 
last June one has entered Boston University, the 
other Yale. From our own high school six received 
the Perkins diploma, three the Perkins certificate as 
teacher of the piano and four its certificate as piano 
tuner. Four studied at the New England Conserv- 
atory of Music, one of whom, Malcolm Cobb of 
New Hampshire, graduated with the highest mark 
in organ playing that his teacher had ever given. 
Of those studying at this Conservatory two paid 
for their lessons and two earned Conservatory schol- 
arships which covered tuition. 

It is imperative that Perkins Institution should 
hold income-bearing scholarships with which to 
bring to a few deserving bhnd students opportunities 
they cannot otherwise get. We have enlarged upon 
this matter in preceding reports; and certain moneys 
have begun to come in, but not yet enough for a 
single scholarship. At our trustee meeting of April 10, 
1922, the following vote was unanimously passed: — 

"Voted, That a fund be established and named 
'John D. Fisher Fund' in honor of Dr. John D. 
Fisher, who first started work in Boston for the 
bhnd; that the principal of this fund be kept in- 
vested; that its income be at the disposal of the 
Trustees — (a) for instruction, either at the Perkins 
Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind 

23 



or elsewhere, of the bhnd, either children or adults, 
and especially those coming from outside New Eng- 
land; and (6) for any expenses the Trustees may 
wish to incur in aiding education of any such; that 
the money collected by the Director for scholarships 
and turned over to the Treasurer in accordance with 
the vote of the Executive Committee at its last 
meeting be placed in this fund." 

Dr. Fisher in whose memory the fund is named 
was he who first brought to Boston a report of the 
achievements of the Paris Institution for the Youth- 
ful Blind, and through meetings and other urgings 
became the founder of our school ninety years ago, 
which was the earliest to be incorporated in America. 
The interested pubUc is urged to add to this fund. 

The department of mental testing which the 
Pennsylvania and Perkins institutions are main- 
taining have now measured about 1,200 pupils in 
six different schools for the blind, and from the 
findings Dr. Hayes, the departmental head, is not 
only drawing important conclusions but also stand- 
ardizing the questions under the name Irwin-Binet 
Scale for the Blind. He has written papers on this 
and that problem, lectured to our teachers and to 
other students of the Education of the Blind, and 
he has prepared a Teachers' Manual of Testing, 
which has been pubhshed by the Pennsylvania 
school. It is too soon to generalize much from his 
findings. Nevertheless, we have already modified 

24 



our pupil classification, regrouping them not only 
according to capacity but according to rate of ac- 
complishment. We are also promoting them by 
subject and at any time. This serves to break the 
usual lockstep pace of the school grades and spurs 
on to individual endeavor. The psychologists have 
held classes of the older pupils and of the teachers 
in the subject of attention, — how to strengthen 
this, how to make the most of one's mind, how to 
study; and both these students and their regular 
teachers have taken hold with interest and result. 

Our teachers have shown commendable interest 
also in the history of the Education of the Bhnd, 
which for the past two years has been brought to 
their attention through the lectures given to the 
students of that topic, in the extension half-course 
conducted by our Director under the auspices of the 
Graduate School of Education of Harvard Uni- 
versity. A part of these lectures were deHvered in 
our Perkins library. Last season the regular stu- 
dents of the course numbered eleven, — one student 
of Social Service, one blinded ex-soldier, three 
teachers of semi-sighted classes in and about Bos- 
ton, and six who Uved at Perkins Institution. 
Thirty lectures were given them, a vast amount of 
reading assigned, and practice teaching required. 
All who took the final three-hour written examina- 
tion passed it and received a certificate of credit, 
signed by the Dean of the Harvard Graduate School 
of Education and the Directors of the Massachu- 

25 



setts Division of the Blind and of the Perkins Insti- 
tution. All but one of the older ones who received 
this certificate are now teaching the bUnd, — three of 
them so far away as Oregon, Porto Rico and Hawaii. 

Both in this course and in that repeated last 
summer at the Peabody College, Nashville, Tenn., 
which was taught by three Perkins instructors, our 
Director is heartily promoting the cause of the train- 
ing of teachers of the bUnd. He has prepared a paper 
on it that will be printed in the proceedings of the 
26th convention of the American Association of 
Instructors of the BHnd, The Outlook for the Blind 
and The Beacon, and that has been translated for 
Der Blindenfreund. The Perkins Institution regards 
it as an honor and privilege to be able to do such 
things as are indicated above. 

The system of tangible reading and writing termed 
BraiUe Grade 1|, which was adopted in 1919 as 
the uniform type for our schools, has already 
materiaUzed in nearly 400 different book pubUca- 
tions, copies of all of which are in the Perkins U- 
brary and are in circulation. The Perkins music 
department and the Howe Memorial Press have 
recently made and issued a lot of new, and re-issued 
much old, music in the Braille notation but with 
titles, expression marks and all words in Grade 1|. 
Thus it has become for the first time feasible to in- 
troduce the new system of Braille to our Uttle be- 
ginners of both reading and music; and this will be 
done at once. 

26 



The rather rapid accession of the new books from 
the several printing houses has increased the general 
circulation to finger readers alike inside and outside 
of school, and so likewise has the keeping of the 
library open all summer. Our hbrarian circulated 
16,272 embossed books last year. 

All these books have been dupHcated from em- 
bossed plates, a necessarily slow and expensive 
process. About the time when some of our soldier 
boys were coming home from the great war, bhnded, 
there were so few books in the newly adopted system 
that recourse was had to writing out single stories 
by hand for them. The idea took readily among 
certain women of leisure, who found contributory 
labor of the kind, which they could do at home and 
at odd moments, even fascinating. The movement 
has grown to considerable proportions, one of the 
largest centers of it, that at the Library of Congress, 
Washington, having now as many as 200 individ- 
ual transcribers throughout the country, who have 
already contributed 60,031 pages. These, which 
have been bound into 987 books, are sent first to 
the Evergreen school for the bhnd, whence after the 
soldiers have done with them they are to be cir- 
culated elsewhere. No one who has taken the pains 
to learn and transcribe a volume for the bUnd to 
read can ever again be indifferent to those so handi- 
capped and shut in. Besides multiplying the variety 
of reading the general effect of the enterprise is 



27 



therefore of enormous service to the cause as a 
whole. 

The demand of these transcribers for Braille slates 
and writing machines, plus the orders from schools, 
has almost exceeded the supply, Perkins alone having 
made and disposed of, this past year, 63 Braille- 
writers and 2,196 Braille slates, of which latter num- 
ber 777 were bought by schools for the bhnd, 1,057 
by various societies for use in transcribing for the 
bUnd, and 362 by individuals. In addition to these 
there have been sold 4,958 styluses, 417 pencil-writ- 
ing boards, 26 wire signature guides, 55 packs of 
plajdng cards marked in Braille, 140 games of 
checkers, 92 games of dominoes and 13 games of 
tit-tat-too. The manufacture and distribution of all 
these articles, together with the embossing of 1,313 
brass plates and the production and binding of 
101,907 printed pages, is the record of a busy year 
at the Howe Memorial Press. 

Since our apphances are sold at less than cost we 
have urged individual transcribers of Braille, buying 
Braille slates and writers, not to lay them aside 
when done with but to turn them over to some one 
else for active service. 

Our workshop for adults in South Boston, which 
is furnishing full and regular employment to nine- 
teen and part-time work to six bhnd men and 
women, is able to report that the largest amount 
ever paid to its workers was reached this year, — 
the sum of $14,856.51 ; and that the balance sheet 

28 



shows a small profit, which is indeed an achieve- 
ment for this special kind of activity for and by the 
blind. The number of mattresses made over this 
year is 2,989. An interesting fact is that the aver- 
age length of service by the nineteen full-time 
workers is more than seventeen years. 

The fine old shade trees of the Stickney estate, 
which is now the site of Perkins Institution, impart 
not only beauty but dignity to the rather new build- 
ings and grounds. These trees suffered considerably 
in the ice storm of November last, but have since 
been pruned and otherwise scientifically attended to. 
Additional trees have been planted, especially a lot 
of evergreens along the North Beacon Street bound- 
ary fence, most of them purchased but not a few 
transplanted from our little tree nursery. A new 
orchard of 60 apple trees has been set out, and 
various kinds of grafted nut trees placed here and 
there. The children greatly enjoy such pears, plums, 
peaches and vegetables as we raise, also the fresh 
eggs from the institution hennery of some 500 White 
Leghorn fowl. 

Under an enthusiastic master a class of older boys 
elected poultry keeping last year and pursued it 
both theoretically and practically, having devoted 
much of their free time to henhouse construction and 
the raising of 100 chicks. 

Miss Clarissa A. Dawson retired at the close of 
the year because of failing health. She was matron 
for the whole boys' department at South Boston and 

29 



came to Watertown with us ten years ago to be 
matron of Bridgman Cottage. She had had associa- 
tions with the institution many years before becom- 
ing an officer in it. Her home had been open to 
certain of our older graduates, and there they had 
reading aloud when embossed books were few and 
jolly social evenings. She was one of the few of our 
people who knew Dr. Howe personally. She had 
been a kindly foster mother to her many boys, and 
they cannot but remember her tenderly. 

Another good and faithful servant of the institu- 
tion, also associated many years with it and for the 
past 25 years as steward, Mr. Frederick A. Flanders, 
last season asked to be reUeved of his stewardship. 
We did not feel that we could let him go. The new 
place needed to keep all it could of the good old 
spirit of loyal disinterested devotion which Mr. 
Anagnos had gathered around him at South Boston 
and Jamaica Plain. And so, while caUing a new 
steward, we have made Mr. Flanders superintendent 
of buildings. The position is no sinecure, since ex- 
cellent as these structures are in design they suffer 
from faulty construction and are Hkely to do so for 
some time to come. The new steward is Mr. Walter 
S. Goss of Barre, Vermont, and him we have wel- 
comed with a new house and so attached him to 
the institution soil. 

Three long-time instructors have resigned. Mr. 
Elwyn C. Smith has taught in the upper school 
since 1896 and been master in Eliot Cottage family 

30 



since 1912, where his sterling character and his 
example became of the utmost service; Mrs. Smith, 
who as Miss Laura A. Brown began teaching Tommy 
Stringer in 1892, has subsequently taught in the 
girls' department. Both loved their work, throw- 
ing themselves into it wholeheartedly, even in free 
time. Miss Freda A. Black had been connected 
with the school ever since 1856 when she was a pupil 
of it. For the past fifty years she has been its organ 
instructor. Modest in character, quiet in manner, 
she was nevertheless a careful and exacting teacher 
of her beloved instrument, as her many pupils must 
testify. 

At the beginning of the current year, October 1, 
1922, the number of bhnd persons registered at the 
Perkins Institution was 309, or six less than on the 
same date of the previous year. This number in- 
cludes 82 boys and 79 girls in the upper school, 55 
boys and 59 girls in the lower school, 12 teachers 
and officers and 22 adults in the workshop at South 
Boston. There have been 45 admitted and 51 dis- 
charged during the year. 

Death of Members of the Corporation. 
Shepherd Brooks; Charles S. Davis; Mrs. 
Florence Howe, \vddow of David Prescott Hall, 
and Henry Marion Howe, daughter and son of the 
first director of Perkins Institution, the latter hav- 
ing been a member of the Board of Trustees from 
1893 to 1902; Lincoln Newton Kinnicutt; Miss 

31 



Georgina Lowell; Robert Samuel Rantoul; 
George Henry Richards; Mrs. Mary Gill, 
widow of Joseph A. Ropes; Richard Middlecott 
Saltonstall; Miss Mary Davies Sohier; Dr. 
Francis P. Sprague; Miss Elizabeth J. Ward. 

The Board of Trustees has met with a heavy loss 
in the death of George Henry Richards and Richard 
Middlecott Saltonstall, both members of the Board 
for many years, active in the furtherance of its plans, 
unstinting in service, deeply and personally inter- 
ested in all that concerned the welfare of the Perkins 
Institution and of those for whom its efforts are ex- 
pended. 

All which is respectfully submitted by 

FRANCIS HENRY APPLETON, 
WILLIAM ENDICOTT, 
THOMAS J. FAY, 
PAUL E. FITZPATRICK, 
PAUL REVERE FROTHINGHAM, 
G. PEABODY GARDNER, Jr., 
ROBERT H. HALLOWELL, 
JAMES ARNOLD LOWELL, 
MARIA PURDON, 
GEORGE H. RICHARDS,^ 
WILLIAM L. RICHARDSON, 
RICHARD M. SALTONSTALL,^ 

Trustees. 

I Deceased. 



32 



THE BLIND AS TEACHERS.^ 



Any one who has watched for many years the steady and 
splendid growth of the Perkins Institution must be glad of 
the opportunity to congratulate its friends to-day. When 
one recalls that adventurous young American who returned 
ninety years ago from fighting the battles of the Greeks and 
threw himself into the new battle for the blind, gathering 
up all the science which France had to offer and applying it 
to a few children in his own home, and then inspects the 
noble buildings at Watertown which are the consummate 
fruit of this modest beginning, it must appear one of the 
social miracles of our time, as it has become a monument of 
our Commonwealth and distinguished throughout the world. 

The years and generations pass so swiftly that the history 
of institutions is easily forgotten. I have heard that a young 
woman in England found herself sitting at dinner next to 
Mr. Lecky, the historian, and being, after the manner of 
English hospitality, not presented to each other, asked him, 
as a stranger, "And what do you go in for?" to which the 
distinguished scholar replied, "Oh, I go in for history a 
little." Whereupon the girl commented, "Oh, I am sorry to 
hear that. I don't care for history; I say, 'Let bygones be 
bygones.'" The Perkins Institution cannot afford to "let 
bygones be bygones," for behind the development which it 

» Address by Professor Francis G. Peabody at the Exhibition of Activities of Pupils of 
Perkins Institution, Jordan Hall, Boston, May 17, 1922. 

33 



has achieved under the masterful and sympathetic care of 
its present administrators, stands the most notable figure in 
the history of American philanthropy, — a crusader of irre- 
sistible courage and audacity, but with, a sanity and sagacity 
very rare in a reformer's mind. "It is to Dr. Howe," one of 
the most competent observers has said, "more than to any 
other, that Massachusetts owes what is best in her chari- 
table system." He was, as Whittier wrote of him — 

The Cadmus of the blind, 
Giving the dumb lip language, 
The idiot clay a mind. 

Knight of a better era, 
Without reproach or fear! 
Said I not well that Bayards 
And Sidneys still are here? 

At Hampton Institute we celebrate each year the birthday 
of General Armstrong, that great discoverer of the principles 
of modern education, under the title of "Founders' Day," 
when a distinguished visitor recalls the beginnings of that 
memorable institution. In the same spirit the Perkins In- 
stitution does well to celebrate its "Founders' Day" and to 
keep alive the memory of a paladin of philanthropy like Dr. 
Howe. 

Such is the first thought with which one listens to the 
delightful evidences which we have heard to-day of the work 
of the Perkins Institution; but one cannot help being led a 
little further, as he reflects on the nature of the dark prob- 
lem with which the school has to deal, and on the lessons 
which it has to teach to more favored lives. When one first 
approaches the calamity of blindness, it seems to be the most 
overwhelming physical disaster which can come to any 

34 



human life. Most physical misfortunes, such as deafness, 
lameness, or disease, are partial or gradual or curable, but 
blindness is so irreparable and complete that it might seem 
to crush the very capacity for courage, and to banish all 
cheerfulness and hope. Milton's Samson utters this deep 
lament : — 

0, dark, dark, dark, amid the blaze of noon. 
Irrecoverably dark, total eclipse, without all hope of day! 

And even when, in a calmer moment, Milton reflects on his 
own blindness, he can go no further than to pass from a 
mood of despair to one of resignation. The talent which is 
death to hide is still lodged with him useless, and he can 
only claim that "they also serve who only stand and wait." 
What does it mean then that, instead of this abandon- 
ment to despair, the blind are so generally blessed with a 
singular serenity, determination, and ambition? Deaf peo- 
ple are very likely to be provoked to irritation, despondency, 
and suspicion; but blind people are, as a rule, extraordi- 
narily inclined to resolution, self-culture, and even light- 
heartedness. They do not stand and wait; they rise and 
learn; their talent is not lodged with them useless. They 
set out to work and to serve, and even if they have to grope 
their way, they sing as they go. One of the most cheering 
sights that I meet on my daily walks is a French soldier, 
totally blinded in the war, still wearing his sky-blue uniform, 
and marching to his studies in the Harvard Law School, 
with fearlessness and firmness of step, and with as cheerful 
a countenance as ever he had when he tramped among the 
trenches. This triumph of character over circumstances, of 
the inner life over the outer world, may have its effect even 
. on the countenance of the blind, and instead of stamping 

35 



a face with a look of despondency may adorn it with a singu- 
lar serenity and charm. One of the most devoted and 
generous supporters of this school, my dear friend Annette 
Rogers, while her face always expressed refinement and 
nobility of character, was in her youth of a plain and severe 
dignity; but when the great affliction of blindness shut out 
from her many ways of activity and enjoyment it brought 
with it a graciousness and sweetness of expression which gave 
her an almost startling effect of beauty. 

What, then, is the cause of this moral triumph which is 
so characteristic of the blind? How is it that an absolute 
physical loss may be transformed into a spiritual gain? There 
are, no doubt, many contributory causes for this moral mir- 
acle; but must they not all in the end be traced to the 
tremendous demands which are made on the best there is in 
one to meet so unparalleled a test of moral determination? 
The blind must have indomitable patience, and the resolu- 
tion to be the masters of their fate and the rulers of their 
souls. Here is one of the most extraordinary and least con- 
sidered facts in human Hfe, — the fact that the harder ex- 
perience becomes, the more the power to resist and overcome 
grows to meet it; that people often shrink or surrender be- 
fore slight tests or risks, but can be strong to meet the great 
events of sorrow or danger or pain. Many a woman has 
run from a mouse, and borne without flinching a devastating 
bereavement or a surgeon's knife. Many a man has been 
depressed or nervous about a petty mishap and met com- 
mercial or domestic disaster as a hero. In other w^ords, the 
best in character is often submerged or ignored in prosperity 
or health, and is summoned from the depths of the sub- 
conscious self at moments of the greatest need. Never was 
there such a convincing demonstration of this unutilized 

36 



capacity as that which has lately been given during the 
tragedy of war. Thousands of men were Hving undeter- 
mined or unresisting hves, drifting into the current of a 
materiaHzed world, and suddenly the call came to them for 
sacrificial heroism, and they met that unanticipated test, not 
merely with resignation, but with the gladness of those who 
had found something at last worth all that they could do. 
Thousands of women who had seemed irretrievably involved 
in frivolity or aimlessness heard the same summons, and 
found no task too humble or squalid, and felt no fear except 
that some slight duty might be left undone. And behind 
this heroism in the young was the silent sacrifice of parents 
and wives and sweethearts, who, without a tear, watched 
their beloved march away, and met even the supreme test 
with an amazing serenity and pride. What does all this 
teach concerning human character except that there are 
reserves of strength which in tranquil times are not drawn 
on, but which take command of life in times of need? In 
short, it is often more practicable to do hard things than to 
do easy things; to endure hardness than to overcome soft- 
ness; and the forces of moral resistance are often not dis- 
covered until the fight gets hard, and defeat seems near. 

Now the case of the blind is the great illustration of this 
bringing up of the reserves. No external calamity can be 
worse, and for that very reason resistance is most firm. The 
serenity and cheerfulness of the blind are the best of evi- 
dences that character is built, not on the shifting sand of 
comfort, but on the rock of hardness; that cheerfulness and 
patience are not so much the products of prosperity and 
ease as of trials met and afflictions overcome. He that 
overcometh, it is written, inherits all things. The rub of 
life is what makes life move. 

37 



It is a curious fact that we are in health and strength so 
richly endowed with resources that we fail to use most of 
them, except in the most trij3ing ways. Consider, for in- 
stance, the five senses which nature gives us. Most animals 
are directed in every detail of life by the sense of smell, but 
with human beings that sense is practically unused, except in 
extreme cases of unpleasant or agreeable odors. Hearing, 
also, is in animals a chief weapon of defence; but we hardly 
hear what is said to us, even if it be an instructive address! 
In short, of our five senses only that of sight is constantly 
and effectively employed; while the blind, deprived of this 
sense, become incredibly alert by the use of other channels. 
Hearing detects what they are denied from seeing, and touch 
becomes a constant and trustworthy guide. Here, again, 
in their victory over disability, the blind are teachers, who 
report to us the resources of life which are for the most part 
unused just because of their abundance, and which seem to 
wait for adversity to recover and employ. It is not so much 
an exhibition that is offered to us to-day, or a concert for 
our enjoyment, as a sermon which is preached concerning 
the reserves of the spirit; and if the need of such reinforce- 
ment should come to any one of us, it may be a help to 
remember that these boys and girls have done something 
much more heroic than is ever likely to be asked of our 
favored lives. 



38 



ITEMS ON THE PERKINS INSTITUTION 
WHICH APPEARED IN ''THE OUTLOOK 
FOR THE BLIND," FALL NUMBER, 1921. 
VOL. XV. NO. 3. 



It has been a full as well as a frolicsome fall at Perkins. 

The new instructor in physical training to the girls has 
introduced a field day on which Fisher, Brooks, May and 
Oliver families have competed for points. There was arch- 
ball, passball, sprinting, jumping, etc. Brooks won amid the 
wildest enthusiasm. 

Each of the twelve school families had its own Hallowe'en 
party this October, as usual, and each differed from all the 
rest; for among all the many people at Perkins there is no 
lack of resourcefulness. Our young folks like to dress up in 
costume quite as much as others. Mr. Allen visited all the 
parties, and doing so kept him busy. These many family 
affairs are most helpful in the socializing attempts of the 
institution. 

Mr. Anagnos's birthday, November 7, is observed yearly 
at the Kindergarten as Founder's Day. There are always 
appropriate exercises in which the little children have chief 
part. Dr. Howe's birthday, too, November 10, is observed 
at the upper school. This year the girls took as their theme 

39 



Dr. Howe as printer, and the boys Dr. Howe as Philhellene. 
Julia Ward Howe used to come and speak; recently two or 
more members of the Howe family have done so. This year 
but one of them came, Mrs. Laura E. Richards. The 
Perkins Institution is aware of its traditions and purposes 
to keep them alive. 

Our observance of Armistice Day was most impressive. 
At 11.40 the school assembled to the tolHng of one of its 
great bells and, after saluting the flag, listened first to a talk 
on the significance of the day and then to the rolling of a 
drum and the playing of taps, all by uniformed men whom 
the school realized to be veterans of the late war. Every- 
body here stood with the nation at attention during the two 
minutes of pause at noon, when they joined in singing "The 
Star Spangled Banner." 

At the request of the Perkins Alumnae Association the 
gymnasium at the Kindergarten has just been named the 
Colby Gymnasium after a fellow alumna who recently died. 
Miss Jennie Colby had made a career in the field of curative 
gymnastics and, dying, had left behind her the gratitude of 
a generation of Boston people whom she had helped. It 
was at her suggestion that Mr. Anagnos originally employed 
the assistant in corrective gymnastics who has labored in 
the interests of its special children for the past eighteen 
years. 

The Watertown site was chosen partly because of the 
nearness to several colleges. Wellesley sends yearly classes 
to visit us, and so do Radcliffe and Harvard. This fall three 
Radcliffe and four Harvard groups of students in Social 

40 



Ethics, in all over 159 undergraduates and graduates, have 
spent whole afternoons with us, usually accompanied by 
their professor, Prof. James Ford or Dr. Richard C. Cabot. 
Mr. Allen has personally conducted them about, showing 
and explaining the following: — Kindergarten boys climbing 
in their new Junglegym; primary boys swinging on the 
" Great Eastern," enjoying their trolley coaster or their roller 
skating rink and rabbitry; kindergarten girls telling things 
by sound and feeling; primary girls reading, writing, and 
studying stuffed animals or working at sloyd; upper school 
chorus singing "at sight" — from the Braille score, — one 
or more pupils playing cards, dominoes, checkers or chess, 
drawing diagrams, typewriting, sewing, darning, weaving, 
rush-seating, etc., etc., dancing, jumping, playing several 
competitive gymnastic games, and finally swimming and 
diving. Harvard has brought such groups yearly for a gen- 
eration to be impressed by seeing what children handicapped 
by blindness can accomplish under training. Demonstrating 
thus to the world is only secondary in importance to the 
training itself. 

The Junglegym above mentioned is something new in play- 
ground apparatus. It is like four eight-rung ladders of gal- 
vanized piping laid side by side and repeated in four stories, 
two feet apart, — the whole structure resembling the metal 
framework of a miniature building, standing ready for the 
masonry. Our whole household of thirty kindergarten boys 
at once can and do climb in and out and up and over it, 
while some of the more daring hang by their legs or even 
"skin the cat." 

The primary boys deride the Junglegym as being too baby- 
fied and fool-proof for them; but they were willing enough 

41 



to perform on it for the moving picture man who told them 
that the film would soon be shown all over the country. 

New York, Virginia, Kansas, Porto Rico, Holland and 
Hawaii, — each has contributed a student to the course on 
the Education of the Blind, which we are conducting for 
the Graduate School of Education of Harvard University. 
These six, who are young women, live at Perkins Institution 
where they read, observe and do practice teaching. The 
others enrolled are a blinded ex-soldier and his wife, a student 
of social affairs and three teachers of local semi-sighted 
classes. Abundant reading of blindiana is required, and for- 
tunately there is plenty at hand. 

The Howe Memorial Press has issued in American Braille 
a final list of all the publications available in American 
Braille and sells these as follows: — Fiction, 20 cents; non- 
fiction, 30 cents; both postpaid. 

The Bureau of Education has recently issued "Bulletin, 
1921, No. 16, being Special Features in the Education of the 
BHnd during the Biennium 1918-1920," by Edward E. Allen. 
Copies may be procured from the Superintendent of Docu- 
ments, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C, at 
five cents apiece. 

Last year our teacher of science to the boys put in a wire- 
less receiving apparatus and thereby uncovered for us one 
of the very best means imaginable of putting the shut-in 
individual in touch with the world without. Blind people — 
especially men — who happen to live in the country in the 
winter season, when they are likely to be more or less house- 

42 



bound, may get into a bad way unless able to resort at will 
to pastimes like visiting by telephone, reading, writing let- 
ters, listening to the phonograph, playing the piano or the 
fiddle, playing at table games, and trying day after day to 
make all the house clocks strike together. Let such a man 
add a simple telephone and telegraph wireless receiving out- 
fit, and he has but to "rub his Aladdin's lamp" and behold, 
he is back in the great world again. 



43 



WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY, 1922. 

Demonstration of Pupils' Activities, attended by 400 Guests. 

Boys' Department. 
In the museum alcoves: 

Classes in Arithmetic; Geometry; Geography; Pencil Writing; 

Typewriting; Reading; French, with use of graphophone records; 

Weaving; Modeling in plasticene; Stereotyping and printing. 
Experiments in Physics. 
Manual training, showing chair-caning, putting in web and flag 

seats, and making sloyd models; piano tuning. 
First aid activities by boy scouts. 
Games of checkers, dominoes, chess, and cards. 

In the hall: 

Physical exercises. 
Competitive games. 

Girls' Department. 
In the museum alcoves: 

Classes in Arithmetic; Algebra; Ancient history; Business cor- 
respondence, with use of tj^iewriter; Geography; Physiology, 
with use of models; Nature study, examining stuffed animals; 
Reading; Writing. 

Manual training, showing knitting; crocheting; sewing by hand 
and with machine; basketry; caning; rug- weaving; drafting. 

Domestic science, showing ironing; polishing metals; preparation 
of balanced meals. 

Girl scout work in telegraphic code; in tying knots. 

In the hall: 

Social and folk dancing. 
Competitive games. 
Shepherdess gavotte. 

44 



EXHIBITION OF ACTIVITIES OF PUPILS OF 
THE PERKINS INSTITUTION AND MASSA- 
CHUSETTS SCHOOL FOR THE BLIND. 

Jordan Hall, Boston, Wednesday, May 17, 1922, at 3 o'clock p.m. 

The Hon. Francis Henry Appleton, presiding. 

Part I. 

Organ — Finale from Sixth Symphony Widor. 

Malcolm L. Cobb. 

Opening remarks. 

The Hon. Francis Henry Appleton. 

Games and exercises. 

Eandergarten and Primary Children. 

Classroom work. 

Pupils of the Upper School. 

Part II. 
Address. 

Prof. Francis G. Peabody of Cambridge, Mass. 

Folk dances. 

Boys of the Primary School. 

Gymnastic exercises. 

Boys of the Upper School. 

Shepherdess gavotte. 

Girls of the Upper School. 

45 



DEMONSTRATION 

Given (by Akrangement) at the Perkins Institution, Water- 
town, IN Connection with a Conference op American Red 
Cross Workers, held in Boston in May, 1922, and attended 
BY over 200 Members and Friends. 

PROGRAM. 

Afternoon. 
Inspection of the different departments of the Institution. 
Exhibition of pupils' activities in the museum alcoves. 



Organ solo. 



Piano solo. 



Evening. 
Student of Perkins Institution. 

Student of Perkins Institution. 



Work for the Blind, with special reference to Braille transcribing. 
Mr. E. E. Allen, Director, Perkins Institution for the Blind. 

Selections. 

Girls' Glee Club of Perkins Institution. 

Popular methods of promoting health ideas. 

Demonstrated by Astra, the Health Fairy. 

"Your Mouth," oral hygiene film. 

Radio Health Talk. 

Water, first aid — life-saving. 

Demonstration in swimming pool. 

46 



GRADUATING EXERCISES OF THE PERKINS 

INSTITUTION AND MASSACHUSETTS SCHOOL 

FOR THE BLIND. 

Tuesday, June 20, 1922, 10.30 a.m. 

PROGRAM. 

Chorus — "The Lost Chord" Sullivan 

Essays : 
The Importance of Agriculture. 

George James Gaffney. 

History and Development of the Poultry Industry. 
John Stewart Inglis. 

Protecting the United States from Plant Pests. 

Lloyd Haskell McLaughlin. 



Organ — Grand chorus Dubois 

Edward Walker Jenkins. 

Essays: 
The Opening Door of the Working World. 
Emil Schoner. 

Different Methods of Conmiunication. 

Albert Joseph Gagnon. 

Recitative and aria — "Clad in Verdure Green" . . . Handel 

Mary Lynn Rollins. 
Essay : 

Shakespeare and the Music of his Time. 

Edward Walker Jenkins. 

Presentation of diplomas and certificates. 

The Hon. Francis Henry Appleton, 
President of the Corporation. 

Chorus — "The Twenty-third Psalm" .... Neidlinger 

47 



Graduates of the Class of 1922. 

George James Gaffney. Edward Walker Jenkins. 

Albert Joseph Gagnon. Lloyd Haskell McLaughlin. 

John Stewart Inglis. Emil Schoner. 

Certificates from the Pianoforte Normal Department, 

Marie Eleanor Flynn. Ethel Elaine Montgomery. 

Mary Lynn RoUins. 

Certificates from the Pianoforte Tuning Department. 

Malcolm Langdon Cobb. Kong Youk Kim. 

Edward Joseph Craig. Roger True Walker. 



48 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS. 



I. — Acknowledgments for Concerts, Recitals and 
Lectures. 

To Mr. W. H. Brennan, for thirty tickets for the course 
of symphony concerts in Sanders Theatre, Cambridge. 

To Miss Mary D. Davenport, through Miss AHce F. 
Poor, for the use of two tickets, and to Mrs. B. H. Dick- 
son, for the use of one ticket, for a concert by the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra. 

To Mr. Wendell H. Luce, for twelve tickets for a piano- 
forte recital by Mme. Germaine Schnitzer, and for eight 
tickets for a pianoforte recital by Miss Naomi Bevard, both 
in Jordan Hall, Boston. 

To Miss Eleanor Brigham, for twenty tickets for a 
pianoforte recital by Miss Bertha Wesselhoeft Swift in 
Jordan Hall, Boston. 

To Mrs. C. M. Hutchinson, for an invitation to twenty- 
two to attend Mr. Thornton W. Burgess's stereopticon lec- 
ture on birds in Brattle Hall, Cambridge. 

To Mrs. A. M. Peabody, for a general invitation to at- 
tend Mr. Arthur Edward Wilson's illustrated bird lecture in 
Bulfinch Place Church, Boston. 

To the Committee for the Blind, Temple Israel, Boston, 
for an invitation to twelve to attend a pianoforte recital by 
Mr. Silvio Scionti in Jordan Hall, Boston. 

To Miss Edith Seamans Chase, for six tickets for a lec- 

49 



ture by Prof. Marshall Perrin on "What the high school will 
do for your child," in Watertown High School Hall. 

To the Children's Museum, Jamaica Plain, for an invi- 
tation to ten to attend an outdoor carnival. 

II. — Acknowledgments for Recitals, Lectures and 

Dramatics in Our Hall. 

To Mr. Havrah Hubbard, speaker, and Mr. Bowman, 
accompanist, for an illustrated description of the operas 
"Pagliacci" and "Hansel und Gretel." 

To Mr. William Strong, for a pianoforte recital. 

To Mrs. George H. Pendergast, for a talk on her travels 
through the Mediterranean Sea. 

To Prof. Albert H. Gilmer and pupils from Tufts and 
Jackson colleges, for a presentation of three one-act plays, 
"Food", "Aria da Capo" and "Suppressed Desires." 

To Mrs. Lucia Ames Mead, for a talk on the Peace Con- 
ference and kindred topics. 

To Mr. Abraham Haitowitsch, for a viohn recital. 

To Mr. Roderick Fraser, for a pianoforte recital. 

To Miss Claudia Potter and friends, for readings. 

To Colonel Knight and members of the Fifth Infantry 
Regiment Band, for a concert on the lawn. 

III. — Acknowledgments for Periodicals and News- 

papers. 

California News, Christian Record (embossed), Colorado 
Index, Florida School Herald, Illuminator (embossed), In- 
dustrial Enterprise, Matilda Ziegler Magazine (embossed). 
The Mentor, Michigan Mirror, Ohio Chronicle, Our Dumb 
Animals, Rocky Mountain Leader, The Theosophical Path, 
The Utah Eagle, Virginia Guide, West Virginia Tablet. 

50 



IV. — Acknowledgments for Gifts and Services. 

To Dr. Henry Hawkins and Dr. Harold B. Chandler, 
for professional services. 

To the Massachusetts Charitable Eye and Ear In- 
firmary, the Massachusetts Hom(eopathic Hospital and 
the Boston City Hospital, for care and treatment of pupils. 

To Mrs. Walter C. Baylies, Miss Carrie E. Silloway, 
in memory of her mother, Mrs. Roger Merriman, Mrs. E. 
Preble Motley, Mrs. Sprague, in memory of Miss Eliza- 
beth Ward, Mrs. Atwood, and children of Phillips School, 
Wellesley Hills, through Miss Leonida Hennick, for gifts of 
money. 

To the Belmont Unitarian Girls' Club, through Mrs. 
Emma Abbott Allen, for fruit; and to this club and to Mrs. 
David Evans, for parties for the children. 

To the Committee for the Blind, Temple Israel, Boston, 
for clothing, for parties given in our cottages, for transporta- 
tion of pupils, for two Victrolas, and for two season tickets 
for the Cambridge course of symphony concerts. 

To Mrs. John Chipman Gray, Lady Campbell, Mrs. 
Vincent Maschio, Mrs. F. W. Colburn, Mrs. J. Verner 
Critchley, Mrs. Frank Walker, Miss Dorothy How- 
land through Miss Adams, Miss Emilie Poulsson, Mrs. 
Robert Everett, Mrs. Reinhold Ruelberg, Miss Alice 
F. Poor and Mrs. Arthur W. Tobey, for clothing, ice 
cream and cake, fruit and toys at Christmas. 

To Miss Florence W. Birchard, Miss Harriett Dex- 
ter, Mrs. C. A. Burke, Mrs. Alexander Caldwell, Mrs. 
Sydney Sheinwald, Mrs. Richard Pinkson, Mr. Richard 
Levi and Mrs. Lena Binner, for clothing; and to Mrs. 
BiNNER, for articles of furniture. 

51 



To Mr. Jerome C. Smith, for two cases of cocoa; and to 
the Watertown Woman's Relief Corps, for cake. 

To Mr. F. H. Pratt, for an automobile ride for the 
younger pupils; and to Mr. Parker B. Field and other 
friends through Mrs. A. M. Peabody, for transportation of 
pupils on outings. 

To Mrs. A. B. Gould, for a writing frame; and to Mrs. 
Grace L. Hilton, for a Hall Braillewriter and tuning tools. 

To Miss Harriet E. Freeman, for an interesting and 
valuable piece of marble statuary. 

To Mr. H. W. Tyler, for a piano player and music rolls; 
and to Mrs. F. H. Ripley, for an Angelus and music rolls. 

To Mr. Ingram I. Margeson, for fruit trees. 

To Mrs. James Ogilvie, for a stuffed and mounted crane. 

To Mrs. H. G. Chamberlain, for a handwritten Braille 
copy of "The Golden Legend." 

To Mrs. George H. Monks and Mr. S. J. Kafelas, for 
plants. 

To Miss Emilie Poulsson, for a copy of her book, 
"What Happened to Inger Johanne." 



52 



LIST OF PUPILS 

October 1, 1922. 



Upper School. 



Adomaitis, Elsie. 
Baker, Elsie. 
Bessette, Vedora. 
Blake, Clarissa H. 
Bolton, Gladys M. 
Boone, Florence M. 
Bosma, Gelske. 
Bradbury, Thelma M. 
Brooks, Madeline D. 
Brown, Dorothy M. 
Brustuen, Sonora I. 
Buckley, Alice. 
Cambridge, Mollie. 
Cherlin, Mary. 
Clancy, Elizabeth. 
Coakley, Alice L. 
Cohen, Ruth. 
Colaizzi, Josephine. 
Comtois, Eva. 
Connors, Margaret. 
Costa, Marianna. 
Critchley, Rosamond M. 
Curran, Catherine E. 
Doyle, Mary E. 
Drake, Helena M. 
Dufresne, Irene. 
Dunn, Mary C. 
Duquette, Irene. 
Eastman, M. Albertina. 
Elliott, Ethel S. 
Elliott, Mary. 
Ennis, Ethel F. 



Farnsworth, Esther M. 
Fiske, Dorothy T. 
Flanagan, M. Ursula. 
Frazier, Kathleen. 
Gagnon, Eva. 
Gilbert, Eva V. 
Goff, Eva. 
Haigh, Laura A. 
Hall, Jane A. 
Hamel, Irene. 
Hanley, Mary. 
Hilton, Charlotte. 
Hinckley, Dorothy M. 
Jefferson, Annie. 
Keefe, Mildred. 
Kelley, Beulah C. 
Lagerstrom, Ellen M. 
Lanoue, Edna. 
Lanoue, Helen. 
Leppanen, Mary. 
L'Heureux, Juliette. 
Linscott, Jennie M. 
Matthews, Edith M. 
McMeekin, Jennie. 
Minutti, Desaleina. 
Murphy, Ellen. 
Nadeau, Olivina M. 
Najarian, Nevart. 
Person, Erine A. 
Poirier, Delina M. 
Pond, Flora E. 
Rose, Sadie. 



53 



Rowe, Margaret C. 
Saladino, Rose M. 
Severance, Georgia M. 
Shea, Mary Ellen. 
Skipp, Doris M. 
Smith, Dorothy L. 
Stutwoota, Mary. 
Terry, Annie B. 
Thebeau, Marie. 
Trudel, Olive C. 
Turner, Mildred H. 
Wall, Agnes M. 
Weathers, Dorothy. 
Wilcox, Bertha M. 
Wolf, Hedwig. 
Adams, Lyman H. 
Amiro, Gilbert. 
Antonucci, Alberto. 
Barrett, Robert C. 
Belinsky, Samuel. 
Bergeron, Albert. 
Blair, Herman A. 
Carlos, Antone F. 
Chandler, James L. 
Combs, Raymond L. 
Conley, Edward. 
Craig, Edward J. 
Curtiss, Miles B. 
Dame, Leo. 
DiMartino, Matthew. 
Donovan, Kenneth J. 
Eaton, Charles P. 
Egan, John P. 
Epaminonda, John. 
Evans, Walter C. 
Frende, John. 
Gaffney, George J. 
Gagnon, Albert. 
Gagnon, Lionel. 
Gallant, M. John. 
Gearrey, Raymond E. 
Goguen, Raoul. 
Gould, Francis E. 
Gray, Wales H. 



Hanley, Thomas A. 
Hannon, James E. 
Hartselle, Cecil H. 
Hendrick, Horatio W. 
Jablonski, Joseph. 
Jenkins, Edward W. 
ICatwick, Arthur D. 
Kealey, Francis J. 
Keefe, Clarence G. 
Kelleher, Thomas A. 
Kim, Kong Y. 
Krafve, Karl H. 
Laminan, Oiva. 
Laminan, Toivo. 
Leone, Amadeo. 
Le Roi, Francis H. 
Liberacki, Edward. 
Lillie, Karl C. 
Lippitt, Raymond A. 
MacGinnis, Raymond H. 
Maloney, Everett S. 
McCarthy, Eugene C. 
McLaughlin, Lloyd H. 
Medeiros, John. 
Mennassian, Souran. 
Michaud, J. Armand. 
Munn, Daniel J. 
Munro, George H. 
Navarra, Gaspere. 
Nelson, Ralph R. 
Oldham, Milner. 
O'Nem, Ralph L. 
Paquette, Armel. 
Peavey, Francis P. 
Pedersen, Edward M. 
Perry, Emerson C. 
Piccolo, R. Albert. 
Rainville, Ernest C. 
Reynolds, Waldo F. 
Rosenbloom, Robert. 
Rubin, Manual. 
St. George, William. 
Silva, Arthur P. 
Slaby, Peter J. 



54 



stone, Walter C. 
Vaillancourt, Maurice A. 
Vance, Alvin L. 
Vetal, Herbert M. 
Waterall, Walter. 



Weston, Gordon W. 
Winton, Henry W. 
Withers, Harold. 
Young, Vinal R. 



Lower School. 



Allen, Elizabeth M. 
Almeda, Maria R. 
Barnard, Eliza B. 
Bazarian, Mary. 
Beliveau, Leontine_T. 
Braley, Ruth I. 
Buckley, Frances A. 
Busbyschell, Barbara M. 
Casella, Frances. 
Corsi, Angelina. 
Coughlin, Ethel. 
Grossman, Evelyn M. 
Daniels, Dorothy D. 
Dardioli, Luigina. 
De Dominicis, Edith. 
Doherty, Kathleen E. 
Duverger, Loretta V. 
Edwards, Eleanor B. 
Fanning, Gladys L. 
Farnham, Barbara E. 
Ferrarini, Yolande. 
Glynn, Helen, 
Goodwin, Helen J. 
Harasimowicz, Alice. 
Has well, Thelma R. 
Hinckley, Geraldine. 
Holland, Doris A. 
IngersoU, Dorothy. 
Kazanjian, Zaroohie. 
Landry, Edwina. 
Laudate, E. Lena. 
Laurenzo, Carolina, 
Lenville, Eva Hilda. 
Lyons, Mary L. 
MacDonald, Katherine. 
Macdougall, Mildred D. 



McGovern, Velma, 
McMullin, Beatrice M. 
Mierzewski, Stephanie. 
Mitchell, Ethel G. 
Nowicki, Janina. 
Ogilvie, Hilda M. 
Pepe, Carmella, 
Pepe, Philomena. 
Pimental, Mary V. 
Poirier, Emma, 
Rankin, Margaret D. 
Reese, Helen. 
Saladino, Beatrice L. 
Samon, Stacey. 
Santos, Emily. 
Saverino, Maimie. 
Scott, Arline R. 
Silvia, Emma. 
Simmons, Bertha. 
Stanievicz, Mary. 
Tirrella, Helen, 
Wheeler, Theresa, 
Widger, Evelyn L. 
Berube, Walter, 
Bowden, Robert F, 
Cammarano, Angelo. 
Campbell, Peter F. 
CaroseUi, Andrea. 
Case, William A. 
Casella, Charles. 
Chombeau, Bertrand. 
Cormier, Alfred. 
Costa, Anthony. 
Cowick, Orville H. 
Cullen, George F. 
Damon, George M. 



55 



Davy, Horace, 
Despres, John P. 
Di Cicco, Emilio. 
Donovan, Thomas J. 
Dore, Charles W. 
Dow, Ralph E. F. 
Dunbar, Kenneth A. 
Egan, Robert J. 
Ferguson, George A. 
Gagnon, R4ne. 
GiuHano, Paolo. 
Gould, Basil. 
Grime, G. Edward. 
Hatch, Arthur F. 
Henry, Paul W. 
Holmes, Rutherford B. 
Hurley, Arnold E. 
Jackman, Richard F. 
Kubilunas, John. 
Lamarine, William L. 
Lavoie, J. H. Alphonse. 



Libby, Arthur C. 
Maschio, Angelo N. B. 
McCluskey, Harry L. 
Meuse, Lawrence A. 
Meuse, Paul R. 
Morse, Kenneth. 
Paquette, Armand. 
Pike, Norman N. 
Pratt, Marston T. 
Rainville, Harvey L. 
Remington, Joseph H. 
Santos, Tony, 
Shaw, Harris E. 
Shulman, George. 
Simoneau, Henry J. 
Stott, Lester W. 
Summerhayes, Paul R. 
Thompson, R. Lawrence. 
Tobey, Arthur W. 
Wesson, Kermit 0. 
Yates, Merle F. 



The places from which these pupils come and the number 
from each place follows: — 



Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Maine 

New Hampshire 

Vermont 

Connecticut . 



189 
32 
19 
14 
10 
5 



Hawaii . 
Alabama 
New Jersey . 
Virginia . 
South Dakota 
Canada . 



56 



SUBSCRIPTIONS FOR THOMAS STRINGER. 



Permanent Fund for Thomas Stringer. 

[This fund is being raised with the distinct understanding that 
it is to be placed under the control and care of the trustees of the 
Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind, and that 
only the net income is to be given to Tom so long as he is not provided 
for in any other way, and is unable to earn his living, the principal re- 
maining intact forever. It is further understood, that, at his death, 
or when he ceases to be in need of this assistance, the income of this 
fimd is to be applied to the support and education of some child who is 
both blind and deaf and for whom there is no provision made either 
by the state or by private individuals.] 

Fay, Miss Sarah M., bequest $1,000 00 

Marrs, Mrs. Kingsmill ........ 10 00 



57 



STATEMENT OF ACCOUNTS. 



Boston, October 4, 1922. 

Messrs, Wabren Motley, F. H. Appleton, Jr., Auditors, Perkins 
Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind, Watertown, 
Massachusetts. 

Gentlemen: — I have audited the accounts of Albert Thorndike, 
Treasurer of the Institution, for the fiscal year ending August 31, 
1922, and have found that all income from investments and proceeds 
from sales of securities have been accounted for, and that the dona- 
tions, subscriptions, and miscellaneous receipts, as shown by the books, 
have been deposited in bank to the credit of the Treasurer of the In- 
stitution. 

I have vouched all disbursements and verified the bank balances as 
at the close of the fiscal year. 

The stocks and bonds in the custody of the Treasurer on August 
31, 1922, were counted by the Auditing Committee and the schedules 
of the securities, examined by them, were then submitted to me and 
found to agree with those called for by the books. 

I hereby certify that the following statements covering the Insti- 
tution, Howe Memorial Press Fund, and Kindergarten, correctly set 
forth the income and expenditures for the fiscal year ending August 

31, 1922. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN MONTGOMERY, 

Certified Public Accountant. 



58 



INSTITUTION. 

Balance Sheet, August 31, 1922. 

Assets. 
Plant : — 

Real estate, Watertown $580,394 99 

Real estate, South Boston 8,647 74 

$589,042 73 

Equipment: — 

Furniture and household $11,566 77 

Tools, etc 1,156 53 

Music department 19,750 00 

Library department 67,677 19 

Works department 12,907 68 

113,058 17 

Investments: — 

Real estate . . . . . . . . $208,078 74 

Stocks and bonds 536,090 32 

Stocks and bonds — Varnum Fund . . . 82,272 42 
Stocks and bonds — Baker Fxmd , . . 9,982 25 

836,423 73 

Inventory of provisions and supplies 2,870 45 

Accounts receivable 4,571 06 

E. E. Allen, Trustee 733 90 

Cash on hand 8,172 36 

Total $1,554,872 39 



Liabilities. 

General account $345,233 51 

Funds: — 

Special $56,377 00 

Permanent 304,813 84 

General 837,015 79 

1,198,206 63 

Unexpended income, special funds 9,586 00 

Gifts for clock and organ 39 00 

Vouchers payable 1,705 12 

Accoimts payable 101 53 

Total $1,554,872 39 



59 



Condensed Treasttreb's Income Account, Year ending August 31, 1922. 

Rent net income $12,439 28 

Interest and dividends, general purposes 28,305 37 

Interest and dividends, special funds 2,614 37 

Annuities 1,200 00 

Donations 4,589 00 

Tuition and board, Massachusetts .... $40,680 00 
Tuition and board, others 30,281 66 

70,961 66 

Total $120,109 68 

Less special fund income to special fund accounts . $2,614 37 
Less Treasurer's miscellaneous expenses . . . 497 76 

3,112 13 

Net income $116,997 55 

Net charge to Director $116,222 43 

Repairs, faulty construction 1,157 82 

117,380 25 

Deficit $382 70 

Income Special Funds. 

On hand September 1, 1921 $8,823 73 

Income 1921-1922 2,614 37 

Total $11,436 10 

Distributed 1,851 50 

Unexpended income August 31, 1922 $9,586 60 



Condensed Director's Expense Account, Year ending August 31, 1922. 

Administration : — 

Salaries and wages $6,883 17 

Other expenses 513 33 

$7,396 50 

Maintenance and operation of plant: — 

Salaries and wages $24,178 49 

Other expenses: — 

Provisions $13,858 16 

Light, heat and power . . 11,288 49 

Household furnishings and sup- 
plies 3,380 27 

Insurance and water . . . 1,672 36 

Repairs 4,142 61 

Publicity 673 25 

Depreciation on furniture, 
household equipment, tools, 

etc 2,427 26 

Depreciation on buildings. Water- 
town 13,047 83 

Miscellaneous .... 1,957 34 

52,347 57 

76,526 06 

Amaunt carried forward $83,922 56 

60 



Amount brought forward $83,922 56 

Instruction and school supplies: — 

Salaries and wages J30,611 65 

Other expenses 1,456 48 

32.068 13 

Total $115,990 69 

Add net loss, Tuning department .... $314 54 

Less net income, Works department ... 82 80 

231 74 

Net charge to Director $116,222 43 



WORKS DEPARTMENT. 

Pbofit and Loss Account, August 31, 1922. 

Revenue. 
Sales $47,336 39 



Expenditures. 

Materials used $13,623 06 

Salaries and wages 26,943 51 

General expense 4,675 15 

Auto expense 842 47 

Total expenditures 46.084 19 



Profit $1,252 20 

Deduct : — 

Difference in inventory of tools and equipment $1,046 90 
Loss on bad accounts 148 15 

Total $1,195 05 



Less: — 

Recovered from bad debts 25 65 



1,169 40 



Total profit for year ending August 31, 1922 . . . $82 80 



61 



INSTITUTION FUNDS AND LEGACIES. 



Special funds: — 

Robert C. Billings (for deaf, dumb and blind), 
John D. Fisher (Scholarship) 
Joseph B. Glover (for blind and deaf) 
Harris fund (Outdoor Relief) 
Maria Kemble Oliver (Music) . 
Elizabeth P. Putnam (Higher Education) 
Richard M. Saltonstall (Use Trustees) 
A. Shuman (Clothing Fund) 



Permanent funds : — 

Charles Tidd Baker . 

Charlotte Billings 

Stoddard Capen . 

Jenny M. Colby, in memory of 

Ella Newman Curtis Fimd . 

Stephen Fairbanks 

Harris Fimd (General Purposes) 

Benjamin Humphrey 

Prentiss M. Kent . 

Jonathan E. Pecker 

Richard Perkins . 

Mrs. MarLlla L. Pitts, in memory of 

Frank Davison Rust Memorial 

Samuel E. Sawyer 

Charles Frederick Smith 

Timothy Smith . 

Mary Lowell Stone 

George W. Thym . 

Alfred T. Turner . 

Anne White Vose . 

Charles L. Young 

William Vamum Fund 



General funds : — 

Elizabeth B. Bailey 
Eleanor J. W. Baker 
Calvin W. Barker . 
Lucy B. Barker 
Francis Bartlett . 
Mary Bartol . 
Thompson Baxter 
Robert C. Billings 
Susan A. Blaisdell 
WiUiam T. Bolton 
George W. Boyd . 

Amounts carried forward $62,822 91 $361,190 84 



$4,000 GO 


710 00 


5,000 00 


26,667 00 


15,000 00 


1,000 00 


3,000 00 


1,000 00 


• «;c 077 nn 


. $10,000 00 


40,507 00 


13,770 00 


100 00 


2,000 00 


10,000 00 


53,333 00 


25,000 00 


2,500 00 


950 00 


20,000 00 


6,000 00 


4,000 00 


2,174 77 


8,663 00 


2,000 00 


3.000 00 


529 89 


1.000 00 


12,994 00 


5,000 00 


82,292 18 


?ni *?!? 94 


$3,000 00 


2,500 00 


1,859 32 


6,953 21 


2,500 00 


300 00 


322 50 


25,000 00 


5,832 66 


555 22 


5,000 00 



62 



Amounta broxight forward $52,822 91 $361,190 84 

General funds — Continued. 

Caroline E. Boyden 1,930 39 

J. Putnam Bradlee 268,391 24 

Charlotte A. Bradatreet 10,508 70 

Lucy S. Brewer 6.000 00 

J. Edward Brown 100,000 00 

T. O. H. P. Burnham 5,000 00 

Emma C. Campbell 1,000 00 

Edward F. Cate 5,000 00 

Fanny Channing 2,000 00 

Ann Eliza Colburn 5,000 00 

Susan J. Conant 500 00 

William A. Copeland 1,000 00 

Louise F. Crane 5,000 00 

W. Murray Crane 10,000 00 

Harriet Otis Cruft 6,000 00 

David Cummings 7,723 07 

Chastine L. Cushing 500 00 

I. W. Danforth 2,500 00 

Charles L. Davis 1,000 00 

Susan L. Davis 1,500 00 

Joseph Descalzo 1,000 00 

John H. Dix 10,000 00 

Alice J. H. Dwinell 200 00 

Mary E. Eaton 5,000 00 

Mortimer C. Ferris Memorial .... 1,000 00 

Mary Helen Freeman 1,000 00 

Cornelia Anne French 10,000 00 

Martha A. French 164 40 

Ephraim L. Frothingham 1,825 97 

Jessie P. Fuller 200 00 

Thomas Gaffield 6,685 38 

Albert Glover 1,000 00 

Joseph B. Glover 5,000 00 

Charlotte L. Goodnow 6,471 23 

Ellen Hammond 1,000 00 

Hattie S. Hathaway 500 00 

Charles H. Hayden 23,111 53 

John C. Haynes 1,000 00 

Joseph H. Hey wood 500 00 

Margaret A. Holden 3,708 32 

Charles Sylvester Hutchison .... 2,156 00 

Ernestine M. Kettle 10,000 00 

Lydia F. Knowles 50 00 

Catherine M. Lamson 6,000 00 

WUUam Litchfield 7,951 48 

Hannah W. Loring 9,500 00 

Susan B. Lyman 4,809 78 

Stephen W. Marston 5,000 00 

AmounU carried forward $618.210 40 $361.190 84 

63 



Amounts brought forward 



$618,210 40 $361,190 84 



General funds — Concluded. 

Charles Merriam 1,000 00 

Joseph F. Noera . 2,000 00 

Sarah Irene Parker 699 41 

George Francis Parkman 50,000 00 

Grace Parkman 500 00 

Philip G. Peabody 1,200 00 

Edward D. Peters 600 00 

Henry L. Pierce 20,000 00 

Sarah E. Pratt 1,000 00 

Grace E. Reed 4,500 00 

Matilda B. Richardson 300 00 

Mary L. Ruggles 3,000 00 

Marian Russell 5,000 00 

Nancy E. Rust 2,640 00 

Joseph Scholfield 2,500 00 

Richard Black Sewell 25,000 00 

Margaret A. Simpson 968 57 

Esther W. Smith 5,000 00 

The Maria Spear Bequest for the Blind . . 15,000 00 

Henry F. Spencer 1,000 00 

Joseph C. Storey 5,000 00 

Sophronia S. Sunbury 365 19 

Mary F. Swift 1,391 00 

WiUiam Taylor 893 36 

Joanna C. Thompson 1,000 00 

William Timlin 3,000 00 

Mary Willson Tucker 465 32 

George B. Upton 10,000 00 

Abbie T. Vose 1,000 00 

Horace W. Wadleigh 2,000 00 

Joseph K. Wait 3,000 00 

Harriet Ware 1.952 02 

Charles F. Webber (by sale of part of vested 

remainder interest under his will) . . . 11,500 00 

Mary Ann P. Weld 2,000 00 

Cordelia H. Wheeler 800 00 

Opha J. Wheeler 3,086 77 

Samuel Brenton Whitney 1,000 00 

Mehitable C. C. Wilson 543 75 

Thomas T. Wyman 20,000 00 

Fanny Young 8,000 00 



837,015 79 
$1,198,206 63 



64 



DONATIONS, INSTITUTION ACCOUNT. 

Clapp, Mrs. Robert P. , . . $10 00 
Committee of the Permanent Charity 

Fund, Incorporated .... 875 00 

Traiser, Charles H 10 00 



$895 00 
Through the Ladies' Auxiliary Society . . . 3,694 00 



$4,589 00 



Organ Fund : — 

Helen R. Pulsifer 12 00 

For Founding a Scholarship in "Memory of John D. Fisher" 

Anonymous $15 00 

Carlton, Miss Mary L 100 00 

De Witt, Alexander 5 00 

Emerson, Miss Frances W. .... 25 00 

Emmons, Mrs. R. W., 2d 50 00 

Frary, Mrs. Mary C 5 00 

In Memory of L. A. C. (Miss Matilda G. 

CooUdge) 5 00 

Lothrop, Mrs. T. K 300 00 

Plumer, Charles A 5 00 

Webster, Mrs. F. G. . . . . . • 200 00 

710 00 

$5,311 00 



65 



HOWE MEMORIAL PRESS FUND. 

Balance Sheet, August 31, 1922. 

Assets. 
Equipment and supplies: — 

Printing plant $874 59 

Machinery . . 4,378 30 

Printing inventory 13,021 71 

Appliances manufactured 7,364 32 

Appliances purchased 352 29 

Embossing inventory . . . . . . 689 10 

Stationery, etc 958 30 

$27,638 61 

Investments: — 

Stocks and bonds 161,464 89 

Notes and accounts receivable . . . . . . . . 4,727 62 

Cash on hand 3,714 91 

Total $197,546 03 

Liabilities. 
General account $181,029 80 

Funds: — 

Permanent $5,000 00 

General 11,390 00 

16,390 00 

Vouchers payable 126 23 

Total $197,546 03 



Condensed Treasurer's Income Account, Year ending August 31, 1922. 

Interest and dividends $10,840 25 

Other income 134 69 

Total $10,974 94 

Less Treasurer's expenses 52 50 

Net income $10,922 44 

Net charge to Director 11,739 67 



Deficit $817 23 



66 



Condensed Director's Expense Account, Year ending August 31, 1922. 

Maintenance and operation of plant: — 

Embossing $2,917135 

Printing 4,398^40 

Appliances manufactured 8,128 42 

Appliances purchased 18 09 

Stationery 663 39 

Library 2,196 72 

Depreciation on machinery and equipment . 486 48 

Publicity 16 68 

Miscellaneous appropriations .... 100 00 

Miscellaneous salaries and expenses . . . 2,031 48 

$20,957 01 

Less: — 

Discounts $9 81 

Income from sale of appliances, $6,794 02 

Income from sale of books, music, 

etc 2,413 51 

9,207 53 

9,217 34 

Net charge to Director $11,739 67 



HOWE MEMORIAL PRESS FUNDS AND LEGACIES. 

Permanent fund : — 

Deacon Stephen Stickney Fimd $5,000 00 

General fimds: — 

Beggs Fund $100 00 

Joseph H. Center 1.000 00 

Augusta WeUs 10.290 00 

11,390 00 

$16,390 00 



67 



KINDERGARTEN. 

Balance Sheet, August 31, 1922. 

Assets. 



Plant: — 

Real estate, Watertown 

Eqmpment : — 

Furnitvire and household 
Tools, etc. 
Music department 



$12,571 72 

951 39 

2,400 00 



Investments: — 

Real estate $419,946 43 

Stocks and bonds 1,011,683 02 



Inventory of provisions and supplies 
Accounts receivable . . . . 
E. E. Allen, Trustee . . . , 
Cash on hand . . . . 



$463,014 97 



15,923 11 



1,431,629 45 

2,870 46 

994 36 

175 83 

5,307 88 



Total $1,919,916 06 



Liabilities. 
General account $327,872 48 

Funds: — 

Special $7,140 00 

Permanent 203,554 17 

General 1,377,937 51 



Unexpended income special funds 
Vouchers payable .... 
Account payable .... 



Total 



1,588,631 68 

1,362 12 

831 71 

1,218 07 

$1,919,916 06 



Condensed Tbeasureb's Income Account, Year ending August 31, 1922. 



Rent net income 

Interest and dividends, general purposes 
Interest and dividends, special funds 

Donations 

Tuition and board, Massachusetts . 
Tuition and board, others 



$32,060 00 
13,420 00 



$22,794 63 

52,172 55 

280 14 

15 00 



45,480 00 



Total . . . . 
Amount carried forward 



$120,742 32 



$120,742 32 



68 



Amount brought forward 



$120,742 32 



Less special fund income to special fund accounts . 
Less Treasurer's miscellaneous expenses . 



$280 14 
568 66 



848 80 



Net income $119.893 52 

Net charge to Director $109,212 42 

Repairs, faulty construction . . . . . 281 24 



Balance of income 



109,493 66 
$10,399 86 



Income, Special Frmds. 

On hand September 1, 1921 81.260 31 

Income 1921-1922 



280 14 



Total 
Distributed 



Unexpended balance August 31, 1922 



$1,540 45 
178 33 

$1,362 12 



Condensed Director's Expense Account, Year ending August 31, 1922. 



Administration : — 

Salaries and wages 
Other expenses 



Maintenance and operation of plant 

Salaries and wages 
Other expenses : — 
Provisions 

Light, heat and power 
Tuition and board 
Household furnishings and sup 

plies 

Depreciation on furniture 
household equipment, tools 

etc 

Depreciation on buildings 

Water town 
Insurance and water 
Repairs .... 
Printing appropriation 
Publicity 
Miscellaneous 



$6,882 50 
1,483 42 



$26,708 41 



$13,304 98 

10,633 72 

9,821 66 

3,926 08 



1,662 83 

10,135 68 
1.451 77 
3,689 95 
1,091 60 
750 04 
3,890 46 



60.364 77 



Instruction and school supplies : — 

Salaries and wages • $13,000 00 



Other expenses 



773 32 



3,365 92 



87,073 18 



13,773 32 



Net charge to Director ..... . • • $109,212 42 



69 



KINDERGARTEN FUNDS AND LEGACIES. 

Special funds: — 

Charles Wells Cook (Scholarship) . . . $300 00 

Glover Fund (Albert Glover, Blind deaf mutes) 1,840 00 

Emeline Morse Lane (Books) .... 1,000 00 

Leonard and Jerusha Hyde Room . . . 4,000 00 

$7,140 00 

Permanent funds: — 

Charles Tidd Baker $15,000 00 

William Leonard Benedict, Jr., Memorial . 1,000 00 

Samuel A. Borden 4,675 00 

A. A. C, In Memoriam 500 00 

Helen G. Coburn 9,980 10 

M. Jane WeUington Danforth Fund . . 10,000 00 

CaroUne T. Downes 12,950 00 

Charles H. Draper 23,934 13 

Eliza J. Bell Draper Fund 1,500 00 

Helen Atkins Edmands Memorial . . . 5,000 00 

George R. Emerson 5,000 00 

Mary Eveleth 1,000 00 

Eugenia F. Farnham 1,015 00 

Susan W. Farwell 500 00 

John Foster 5,000 00 

The Luther and Mary Gilbert Fund . . . 8,234 47 

Albert Glover 1,000 00 

Mrs. Jerome Jones Fimd 9,935 95 

Charles Larned 5,000 00 

George F. Parkman 3,500 00 

Catherine P. Perkins 10,000 00 

Frank Davison Rust Memorial .... 15,600 00 

Carohne O. Seabury 1,000 00 

EUza Sturgis Fund 21,729 52 

Abby K. Sweetser 25,000 00 

Hannah R. Sweetser 5,000 00 

Mary Rosevear White 500 00 

203,554 17 

General ftinds: — 

Emilie Albee $150 00 

Lydia A. Allen 748 38 

Michael Anagnos 3,000 00 

Harriet T. Andrew 5,000 00 

Martha B. Angell 16,172 61 

Mrs. WiUiam Appleton 18,000 00 

Elizabeth H. Bailey 500 00 

Eleanor J. W. Baker 2,500 00 

Ellen M. Baker 13,053 48 

Mary D. Balfour 100 00 

Nancy Bartlett Fund 500 00 



Amounts carried forward $59,724 47 i $210,694 17 

70 



Amounts brought forward $59,724 47 $210,694 17 

General funds — Continued. 

Sidney Bartlett 10,000 00 

Emma M.Bass 1,000 00 

Thompson Baxter 322 50 

Robert C. Billings 10,000 00 

Sarah Bradford 100 00 

Helen C. Bradlee 140,000 00 

J. Putnam Bradlee 168,391 24 

Charlotte A. Bradstreet 6,130 07 

Sarah Crocker Brewster 500 00 

Ellen Sophia Brown 1,000 00 

Rebecca W. Brown 3,073 76 

Harriet Tilden Browne 2,000 00 

Katherine E. BuUard 2,500 00 

John W. Carter 500 00 

Adeline M. Chapin 400 00 

Benjamin P. Cheney 5,000 00 

Charles H. Colburn 1,000 00 

Helen CoUamore 5,000 00 

Anna T. Coolidge 45,138 16 

Mrs. Edward Cordis 300 00 

Sarah Silver Cox 5,000 00 

Susan T. Crosby 100 00 

James H. Danforth 1,000 00 

Catherine L. Donnison Memorial . . . 1,000 00 

George E. Downes 3,000 00 

Lucy A. Dwight 4,000 00 

Mary B. Emmons 1,000 00 

Mary E. Emerson 1.000 00 

Annie Louisa Fay Memorial .... 1,000 00 

Sarah M. Fay 15,000 00 

Charlotte M. Fiske 5,000 00 

Elizabeth W. Gay 7,931 00 

Ellen M. Gifford 5,000 00 

Joseph B. Glover 5,000 00 

Matilda Goddard 300 00 

Maria L. Gray 200 00 

Caroline H. Greene 1,000 00 

Mary L. Greenleaf 5,157 75 

Josephine S. Hall 3,000 00 

Olive E. Hayden 4,622 45 

Allen Haskell 500 00 

Jane H. Hodges 300 00 

Margaret A. Holden 2,360 67 

Marion D. Hollingsworth 1.000 00 

Frances H. Hood 100 00 

Abigal W.Howe 1,000 00 

Martha R. Hunt 10,000 00 

Ellen M. Jones 500 00 



Amounts carried forward $547.152 07 $210.694 17 

71 



Amounts brought forward 



$547,162 07 $210,694 17 



General funds — Continued. 
Clara B. Kimball . 
Moses Eamball 
Ann E. Lambert . 
Jean Munroe Le Brun 
William Litchfield 
Mary Ann Locke 
Robert W. Lord 
Elisha T. Loring 
Sophia N. Low 
Thomas Mack 
Augustus D. Manson 
Calanthe E. Marsh 
Sarah L. Marsh 
Waldo Marsh 
Annie B. Matthews 
Rebecca S. Melvin 
Georgina Merrill . 
Louise Chandler Moulton 
Maria Murdock 
Mary Abbie Newell 
Margaret S. Otif . 
Jeannie Warren Paine 
Anna R. Palfrey . 
Sarah Irene Parker 
Helen M. Parsons 
Edward D. Peters 
Henry M. Peyser , 
Mary J. Phipps 
Caroline S. Pickman 
Katherine C. Pierce 
Helen A. Porter . 
Sarah E. Potter Endowment 
Francis L. Pratt . 
Mary S. C. Reed . 
Jane Roberts 
John M. Rodocanachi 
Dorothy Roffe 
Rhoda Rogers 
Mrs. Benjamin S. Rotch 
Edith Rotch . 
Rebecca Salisbury 
Joseph Scholfield . 
Eliza B. Seymour . 
Esther W. Smith . 
Annie E. Snow 
Adelaide Standish 
Elizabeth G. Stuart 
Benjamin Sweetzer 

Amounts carried forward 



10,000 00 

1,000 00 

700 00 

1,000 00 

6,800 00 

5,874 00 

1,000 00 

5,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

8,134 00 

20,111 20 

1,000 00 

500 00 

15,000 00 

23.545 55 

4,773 80 

10,000 00 

1,000 00 

500 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

50 00 

699 41 

500 00 

500 00 

3,900 00 

2,000 00 

1,000 00 

5,000 00 

50 00 

425,014 44 

100 00 

5,000 00 

93,025 55 

2,250 00 

500 00 

500 00 

8,500 00 

10,000 00 

200 00 

3,000 00 

5,000 00 

5,000 00 

9,903 27 

5,000 00 

2,000 00 

2,000 00 



$1,257,783 29 $210,694 17 



72 



Amounta brought forward .... $1,257,783 29 $210,694 17 

General funds — Concluded. 

Harriet Taber Fund 622 81 

Sarah W. Taber 1,000 00 

Mary L. Talbot 630 00 

Cornelia V. R. Thayer 10,000 00 

Delia D. Thorndike 5,000 00 

Elizabeth L. Tilton 300 00 

Betsey B. Tolman 500 00 

Transcript, ten dollar fund .... 5,666 95 

Mary Willson Tucker 465 32 

Mary B. Turner ....... 7,582 90 

Royal W. Turner .... , . .■ 24,082 00 

Minnie H. Underbill . . . . . . 1,000 00 

Rebecca P. Wain Wright .... .' 1,00000 

George W. Wales , .... . . 5,00000 

Maria W. Wales .... . , . 20,000 00 

Mrs. Charles E. Ware 4,000 00 

Rebecca B. Warren 5,000 00 

Jennie A. (Shaw) Waterhouse .... 565 84 

Mary H. Watson 100 00 

Ralph Watson Memorial 237 92 

Isabella M. Weld 14,795 06 

Mary Whitehead 666 00 

Julia A. Whitney 100 00 

Sarah W. Whitney 150 62 

Betsy S. Wilder 500 00 

Hannah Catherine Wiley 200 00 

Mary W. Wiley 150 00 

Mary Williams 5,000 00 

Almira F. Winslow 306 80 

Harriet F. Wolcott 5,532 00 



1,377,937 51 



$1,588,631 68 



DONATIONS, KINDERGARTEN ACCOUNT. 

Brett, Miss Anna K $10 00 

"Children of the Kng," Church of the Disciples, 

Boston . 5 00 

$15 00 



73 



CONTRIBUTIONS FOR THE PERKINS 
INSTITUTION. 



Through the Ladies' Auxiliary Society, Mrs. Sarah A. Stover, Treasurer: — 

Annual subscriptions $1,680 50 

Donations 1,736 50 

Cambridge Branch 140 00 

Dorchester Branch 53 00 

Lynn Branch 38 00 

Milton Branch 46 00 

$3,694 00 



ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTIONS FOR THE 
PERKINS INSTITUTION. 

Through the Ladies' Auxiliary Society, Mrs. S. A. Stovrr, Treasurer. 



Abbott, Miss Georgianna E 
Adams, Mrs. Waldo 
Alford, Mrs. O. H. 
Allen, Mrs. F. R. . 
Alley, Mrs. George R. 
Amory, Mrs. Charles W 
Amory, Mrs. Wm., 2d 
Bacon, Miss Mary P. 
Badger, Mrs. Wallis B 
Baer, Mrs. Louis . 
Balch, Mrs. F. G. . 
Baldwin, Mrs. J. C. T. 
Bangs, Mrs. F. R. . 
Barnet, Mrs. Solomon J. 
Bartol, Miss Elizabeth H. 
Batcheller, Mr. Robert 
Beal, Mrs. Boylston A. 
Beale, Mrs. Wilbur F. . 
Betton, Mrs. C. G. 
Bigelow, Mrs. Henry M. 
Bigelow, Mrs. J. S. 
Boardman, Mrs. W. D. 
Boutwell, Mrs. L. B. . 

Amount carried forward 



. $1 


00 


5 


00 


. 20 


00 


3 


00 


1 


00 


. 25 


00 


. 25 


00 


3 


00 


5 


00 


. 10 


00 


6 


00 


5 00 1 


. 10 


00 


5 


00 


. 20 


00 


. 10 


00 


. 10 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 


3 


00 


. 10 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


. $189 00 



Amount brought forward $189 00 

Bruerton, Mr. Coiirtney, in 
memory of his mother 
Mrs. James Bruerton, for 

1921-22 . . . . 10 00 

Brush, Mrs. C. N. . . 10 00 
Burr, Mrs. Charles C. . .10 00 

Carr, Mrs. Samuel . . 10 00 
Gary, Miss Ellen G. . .50 00 

Chamberlain, Mrs. M. L. . 5 00 

Chandler, Mrs. Frank W. . 5 00 

Chapin, Mrs. Henry B. . 10 00 

Chapman, Miss E. D. . . 1 00 

Chapman, Miss J. E. C. . 1 00 

Chase, Mrs. Susan R. . . 1 00 

Clapp, Dr. H. C. . . . 2 00 

Clark, Mrs. Frederic S. . 10 00 

Clement, Mrs. Hazen . . 5 00 

Clerk, Mrs. W. F. . . . 3 00 

Cobb, Mrs. Charles K. . 10 00 
Codman, Miss Catherine 

Armory . . . . 10 00 



Amount carried forward $342 00 



74 



Amount brought forward . $342 00 Amoun,t brought forward . $642 00 



Coolidge, Mr. J. Randolph 
Corey, Mrs. H. D. 
Cowie, Miss Jessie 
Cox, Mrs. William E. . 
Craig, Mrs. Helen M. . 
Craigin, Dr. G. A. 
Cummings, Mrs. Charles A 
Curtis, Mr. George W. . 
Curtis, Mrs. Horatio G. 
Curtis, Miss Mary G. . 
Cushing, Mrs. H. W. 
Gushing, Mrs. J. W. 
Cushing, Miss Sarah P. 
Cutter, Mrs. E. G. 
Cutter, Mrs. Ellen M. . 
Cutts, Mrs. H. M, 
Dale, Mrs. Eben . 
Damon, Mrs. J. L. 
Daniels, Mrs. Edwin A. 
Davis, Mrs. Joseph E. . 
Davis, Mrs. Simon 
Denny, Mrs. Arthur B. 
Denny, Mrs. W. C. 
Derby, Mrs. Hasket 
Drost, Mr. C. A. . 
Dwight, Mrs. Thomas . 
Edmands, Mrs. M. Grant 
EUot, Mrs. Amory 
Elms, Miss Florence G. 
Emmons, Mrs. R. W., 2d 
Endicott, Mrs. Wm. C. 
Ernst, Mrs. C. W. 
Ernst, Mrs. H. C. . 
Estabrook, Mrs. Geo. W. 
Eustis, Mrs. F. A. . 
Faulkner, Miss Fannie M. 
Field, Mrs. D. W. . 
Fitz, Mrs. W. Scott 
Foss, Mrs. Eugene N. . 
Freeman, Mrs. Louisa A. 
Friedman, Mrs. Max 
Gay, Mrs. Albert . 
GiU, Mr. Abbott D. 
Goldberg, Mrs. Simon . 
Goldschmidt, Mrs. Meyer H 
Grandgent, Prof. Chas. H 
Gray, Mrs. Reginald 
Hall, Mrs. Anthony D. 
Harrington, Mrs. Francis B. 

Amount carried forward 



$342 00 


25 00 


2 00 


1 00 


10 00 


5 00 


5 00 


10 00 


5 00 


5 00 


10 00 


5 00 


2 00 


6 00 


2 00 


2 00 


1 00 


5 00 


2 00 


1 00 


5 00 


3 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


10 00 


1 00 


10 00 


3 00 


2 00 


35 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


1 00 


10 00 


10 00 


5 00 


25 00 


10 00 


3 00 


5 00 


1 00 


2 00 


2 00 


1 00 


3 00 


15 00 


2 00 


3 00 


$642 00 



Hatch, Mrs. Fred W. . 
Haven, Mrs. Edward B. 
Hayward, Mrs. G. G. . 
Herman, Mrs. Joseph M. 
Higginson, Mrs. Henry L 
Hills, Mrs. Edwin A. . 
Homans, Mrs. John 
Hooper, Miss Adeline D. 
Hooper, Mrs. James R. 
Howe, Mrs. Arabella 
Howe, Mrs. George D. . 
Rowland, Mrs. M. M. . 
Hunnewell, Mrs. Arthur 
Hyde, Mrs. H. D. . 
In memory of Mrs. David 

P. KimbaU . 
Johnson, Mrs. Wolcutt H 
Jones, Mrs. B. M. . 
Josselyn, Mrs. A. S. 
Joy, Mrs. Charles H. 
Kettle, Mrs. Claude L. 
Kimball, Mr. Edward P. 
King, Mrs. S. G. . 
Kingsley, Mrs. Robert C. 
Klous, Mrs. Isaac, in memory 

of Mr. Isaac Klous . 
Kornfeld, Mrs. Felix 
Lamb, Miss Augusta T. 
Lamson, Mrs. J. A. 
Leland, Mrs. Lewis A. . 
Levi, Mrs. Harry . 
Lincoln, Mr. A. L. 
Little, Mrs. D. M. 
Locke, Mrs. C. A. . 
Lockwood, Mrs. T. S. . 
Loring, Judge W. C. 
Loring, Mrs. W. C. 
Lothrop, Miss Mary B. 
Lovering, Mrs. Charles T 
Lowell, Mrs. John . 
Macurdy, Mr. Wm. F. . 
Mansfield, Mrs. George S 
Mansfield, Mrs. S. M. . 
Mansur, Mrs. Martha P. 
Mason, Miss Fanny P. 
Merrill, Mrs. L. M. 
Merriman, Mrs. Daniel 
Mixter, Miss Mary A. . 
Morison, Mrs. John H. 



Amount carried forward . $969 50 



5 00 


3 00 


. 10 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


. 10 00 


5 00 


. 20 00 


1 00 


. 10 00 


2 00 


. 25 00 


1 00 


. 25 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


. 10 00 


1 00 


5 00 


3 00 


5 00 


3 00 


1 00 


1 00 


2 00 


1 00 


2 50 


6 00 


5 00 


. 10 00 


. 10 00 


. 25 00 


. 25 00 


5 00 


. 10 00 


5 00 


. 10 00 


2 00 


1 00 


3 00 


. 10 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 



75 



Amount brought forward . $969 50 



Morrison, Mrs. W. A. . 


1 00 


Morse, Dr. Henry Lee . 


5 00 


Morse, Mrs. Joseph 


1 00 


Morse, Miss Margaret F. 


5 00 


Morss, Mrs. Everett 


5 00 


Moseley, Miss Ellen F. 


5 00 


Moses, Mrs. Louis 


1 00 


Nathan, Mrs. Jacob 


5 00 


Nathan, Mrs. John 


5 00 


Nazro, Mrs. Fred H. 


2 00 


Niebuhr, Miss Mary M. 


1 00 


Norcross, Mrs. Otis 


5 00 


Olmsted, Mrs. J. C. 


5 00 


Orcutt, Mrs. W. D. 


1 00 


Page, Mrs. Calvin Gates 


2 00 


Paine, Mrs. W. D. 


2 00 


Pecker, Miss Annie J. . 


10 00 


Peckerman, Mrs. E. R. 


2 00 


Pickert, Mrs. Lehman . 


2 00 


Pickman, Mrs. D. L. 


25 00 


Pitman, Mrs. B. F. 


10 00 


Prince, Mrs. Morton 


5 00 


Putnam, Mrs. James J. 


10 00 


Ratchesky, Mrs. I. A. . 


5 00 


Reed, Mrs. Arthur 


2 00 


Reed, Mrs. John H. 


2 00 


Rice, Estate of Mrs. Nan- 




nie R 


75 00 


Richards, Mrs. E. L. 


2 00 


Robbins, Mrs. Royal . 


10 00 


Roeth, Mrs. A. G. . . 


1 00 


Rogers, Mrs. R. K. 


5 00 


Rogers, Miss Susan S. . 


5 00 


Rosenbaum, Mrs. Henry 


1 00 


Rosenbaum, Miss Loraine 


1 00 


Rosenbaum, Mrs. Louis 


5 00 


Rowlett, Mrs. Thomas S. 


1 00 


Saltonstall, Mr. Richard M. 




in memory of his mother 




Mrs. Leverett Saltonstall 


10 00 


Sargent, Mrs. F. W. 


10 00 


Saunders, Mrs. D. E. , 


5 00 


Scudder, Mrs. J. D., in 




memory of her mother 




Mrs. N. M. Downer . 


5 00 


Scull, Mrs. Gideon 


10 00 


Sears, Mr. Herbert M. . 


25 00 


Sears, Mrs. Knyvet W. 


30 00 



Amount carried forward $1,294 50 



Amount brought forward $1,294 50 



Shepard, Mr. Thomas H. 
Sherwin, Mrs. Thomas . 
Sias, Mrs. Charles D. . 
Simpldns, Mrs. Mary W. 
Sprague, Mrs. Charles . 
Sprague, Mrs. H. B. 
Stackpole, Miss Roxana 
Stearns, Mr. and Mrs. C. H 
Stearns, Mrs. Wm. Brackett 
Stearns, Mr. W. B. 
Steinert, Mrs. Alex. 
Stevens, Miss Alice B 
Stevenson, Mrs. R. H 
Stone, Mrs. Edwin P. 
Storer, Miss A. M. 
Storer, Miss M. G. 
Strauss, Mrs. Ferdinand 
Taylor, Mrs. Wm. O. 
Thompson, Mrs. A. C 
Thorndike, Mrs. Alden A. 
TUeston, Mrs, John B. . 
Tuckerman, Mrs. Charles S 
Wadsworth, Mrs. A. F. 
Ward, The Misses . 
Ward, Miss Julia A. 
Ware, Miss Mary Lee . 
Warren, Mrs. Bayard . 
Warshauer, Mrs. Isador 
Wason, Mrs. Elbridge . 
Weeks, Mrs. W. B. P. . 
Weld, Mrs. A. Winsor . 
Weld, Mrs. Samuel M. 
West, Mrs. Charles A. . 
White, Miss Eliza Orne 
White, Mrs. Joseph H. 
White, Mrs. Norman H. 
WhitweU, Mrs. F. A. . 
Williams, The Misses . 
Williams, Miss Adelia C. 
Williams, Mrs. Arthur . 
Williams, Mrs. Jeremiah 
Willson, Miss Lucy B. . 
Wingersky, Mrs. Harris 
Winsor, Mrs. Ernest 
Withington, Miss Anna S 
Wolcott, Mrs. Roger 
Young, Mrs. Benjamin L, 



10 00 
3 00 
2 00 
5 00 
5 00 

20 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 

10 00 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



10 00 

5 00 

25 00 

25 00 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



1 

5 

2 

5 

5 

2 
25 00 

2 00 

2 00 

5 00 

15 00 

100 00 

2 00 

2 00 
00 
00 
00 



10 00 



$1,680 50 



76 



DONATIONS. 



Abbott, Miss Georgianna E 
Adams, Mrs. Charles H. 
Adams, Mr. George 
Alden, Mrs. Charles H. 
Allen, Mrs. Thomas 
Bacon, Miss Ellen S. 
Bailey, Mrs. Hollis R. . 
Barr, Mrs. A. W. . 
Bartol, Mrs. John W. . 
Bateheller, Mr. Robert 
Batt, Mrs. C. R. . 
Baylies, Mrs. Walter Cabot 
Bicknell, Mrs. Wm. J. . 
Blake, Mrs. Arthur W. 
Blake, Mrs. Francis 
Bolster, Mrs. F. R. 
Bond, Mrs. Charles H. 
Bowditch, Dr. Vincent Y. 
Bradt, Mrs. Julia B. 
Brett, Miss Anna K. 
Brewer, Mr. Edward M. 
Browning, Mrs. Charles A. 
Bullard, Mr. Alfred M. 
BuUens, Miss Charlotte L. 
Bunker, Mr. Alfred 

C 

Carpenter, Mrs. George A. 
Carter, Mrs. John W. . 
Cary, Miss Ellen G. 
Cary, Miss Georgina S. 
Clark, Mrs. Robert Farley 
Codman, Miss Martha C. 
Conant, Mr. Edward D. 
Coolidge, Mrs. Francis L. 
Coolidge, Miss Penelope F. 
Cotting, Mrs. Charles E. 
Cotton, Miss Elizabeth A. 
Crocker, Mrs. George G. 
Cummings, Mrs. Charles A 
Cutler, Mrs. C. F. 
Daland, Mrs. Tucker . 
Edgar, Mrs. Charles L. 
Edwards, Miss Hannah M 
Estabrook, Mrs. Arthur F. 
Eustis, Mrs. Herbert H. 
Evans, Mrs. Charles 
Evans, Mrs. Glendower 
F 



$1 00 
5 00 
2 00 
5 00 
5 00 

25 00 
5 00 
2 00 

10 00 

10 00 
5 00 

2 00 

3 00 
5 00 

20 00 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



1 
5 
5 
5 
1 

10 00 
5 00 
5 00 

2 00 

1 00 
10 00 

5 00 

5 00 

100 00 

10 00 

5 00 

5 00 

10 00 

3 00 

2 00 
5 00 

200 00 
10 00 

5 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
25 00 

5 00 
25 00 

1 00 

5 00 
25 00 



Amount brought forward . $636 00 



Amount carried forward . $636 00 



Ferrin, Mrs. F. M. 
Fitch, Miss Carrie T. . 
Frothingham, Mrs. Louis A 
Frothingham, Mrs. Ran 

dolph . 
Green, Mr. Charles G. 
Greenough, Mrs. C. P. 
Guild, Mrs. S. Eliot 
Harris, Miss Frances K 
Hooper, Miss Gertrude 
Houghton, Miss Elizabeth G 
Houston, Mr. James A 
Hoyt, Mrs. C. C. . 
Hubbard, Mrs. Eliot 
Hutchins, Mrs. C. F. 
Hyneman, Mrs. Louis 
lasigi, Mrs. Oscar . 
In memory of Mrs. Harriet 

L. Thayer, through Mrs 

Hannah T. Brown 
Johnson, Mr. Arthur S. 
Johnson, Mr. Edward C. 
Johnson, Mrs. Herbert S. 
JolUfTe, Mrs. Thomas H. 
Kimball, The Misses 
Kimball, Mrs. Marcus M. 
Koshland, Mrs. Joseph 
Lawrence, Mrs. John . 
Linder, Mrs. George, ii 

memory of Miss Jennie M 

Colby .... 
Loring, Mrs. Augustus P. 
Lovett, Mr. A. S. . 
Lowell, Mrs. Charles 
Lowell, Miss Lucy 
Lyman, Mrs. George H. 
Manning, Miss Abbie F. 
Marrs, Mrs. Kingsmill . 
Mason, Mrs. Charles E. 
McKee, Mrs. Wm. L. . 
Merriam, Mrs. Frank . 
MHls, Mrs. D. T. . 
Morrison, Miss Jean E. 
Morse, Mrs. Leopold 
Moseley, Miss Ellen F. 
Nichols, Mr. Seth . 



10 00 
10 00 
25 00 

2 00 
50 00 

5 00 
10 00 

5 00 

2 00 
10 00 

5 00 
10 00 
10 00 

5 00 

2 00 
10 00 



5 00 
10 00 
25 00 
10 00 

5 00 
25 00 
50 00 
10 00 
10 00 



50 00 

10 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 

10 00 
5 00 

10 00 

50 00 
7 50 

10 00 

5 00 

2 00 

100 00 

10 00 
5 00 



Amount carried forward $1,246 50 



77 



Amount brought forward $1,246 50 



Peabody, Mr. Harold 


5 00 


Peirce, Mrs. Silas . 


2 00 


Perry, Mrs. C. F. . 


3 00 


Pfaelzer, Mrs. F. T. 


. 10 00 


Philbrick, Mrs. E. S. 


3 00 


Powell, Mrs. Wm. B. 


5 00 


Pratt, Mrs. Elliott W. 


. 10 00 


Punchard, Miss A. L. 


5 00 


Quincy, Mrs. G. H. 


. 10 00 


Rice, Mrs. N. W. . 


. 25 00 


Richards, Miss Alice A. 


. 10 00 


Richardson, The Mjsse 


s, in 


memory of M. A. E. 


and 


C. P. P. 


2 00 


Richardson, Mrs. Fredei 


■ick . 5 00 


Richardson, Mrs. John 


3 00 


Riley, Mr. Charles E. 


. 25 00 


Ripley, Mr. Frederick E 


[. . 2 00 


Rodman, Miss Emma 


5 00 


Ross, Mrs. Waldo 0. 


5 00 


Rust, Mrs. Wm. A. 


5 00 


Sanger, Mr. Sabin P, 


. 10 00 


Sargent, Mrs. L. M. 


. 25 00 


Sears, Mrs. Richard D. 


. 20 00 


Sever, Miss Emily 


5 00 


Shaw, Mrs. G. Howlanc 


. 15 00 


Sherman, Mrs. Wm. H. 


5 00 


Sias, Miss Martha G. 


5 00 


Slattery, Mrs. Wm. 


2 00 


Spalding, Miss Dora N. 


. 10 00 



Amount carried forward $1,483 50 



Amount brought forward $1,483 50 



Spring, Mr. and Mrs. Romney 3 00 


St. John, Mrs. C. Henry, in 




memory of her mother 




Mrs. Isaac H. Russell 


5 00 


Stone, Mrs. Philip S. . 


2 00 


Strauss, Mrs. Louis 


2 00 


Talbot, Mrs. Thomas Palmei 


1 00 


Thayer, Mrs. Ezra Ripley 


10 00 


Thayer, Mrs. Wm. G. . 


10 00 


Thing, Mrs. Annie B. . 


10 00 


Traiser, Mrs. R. E. 


5 00 


Tucker, Mrs. J. Alfred . 


1 00 


Tudor, Mrs. Henry D. . 


5 00 


Vaille, Mr. Charles A. . 


10 00 


Vickery, Mrs. Herman F. 


50 00 


Vorenberg, Mrs. S. 


2 00 


Vose, Mrs. Charles 


2 00 


Wadsworth, Mrs. W. Austin 


20 00 


Walker, Mrs. W. H. 


10 00 


Warner, Mrs. F. H. 


10 00 


Watson, Mrs. Thomas A. 


10 00 


Wheeler, Mrs. A. S. 


5 00 


Wheelwright, Miss Mary 


5 00 


Whitney, Mr. Edward F. 


10 00 


Willcomb, Mrs. George 


10 00 


Williams, Mrs. C. A. 


5 00 


Williams, Mr. Ralph B. 


25 00 


Williams, Mrs. T. B. . 


5 00 


Willson, Miss Lucy B. . 


5 00 


Wyman, Mrs. Alfred E. 


15 00 


< 


51,736 50 



78 



CAMBRIDGE BRANCH. 



Ames, Mrs. James B. . 
Bogg, Mrs. Edwin P. 
Chandler, Mrs. Seth C 

(donation) . 
Emery, Miss Octavia B 

(donation) . 
Farlow, Mrs. Wm. G. (dona' 

tion) .... 
Francke, Mrs. Kuno 
Frothingham, Miss Sarah E 
Goodale, Mrs. George L. 
Greenough, Mrs. J. B. . 
Hayward, Mrs. James W. 
Hedge, Miss Charlotte A 

(donation) . 
Horsford, Miss Katharine M 

(donation) . 
Houghton, Miss Albert M. 

Amount carried forward 



$10 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


1 


00 


3 


00 


10 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


10 


00 


$65 00 1 



Amount brought forward 

Howard, Mrs. Albert A. 
Kennedy, Mrs. F. L. 
Kettell, Mrs. Charles W. 
Longfellow, Miss Alice M 

(donation) . 
Neal, Mrs. W. H. . 
Richards, Miss L. B. 
Thorp, Mrs. J. G. . 
Toppan, Mrs. Robert N 

(donation) . 
Wesselhoeft, Mrs. Walter 
Whittemore, Mrs. F. W. 
Willson, Mrs. Robert W. 
Woodman, Miss Mary (do 

nation) 
Woodman, Mrs. Walter 



$65 00 



5 


00 


3 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 


10 


00 


. 10 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


. 20 


00 


2 


00 



$140 00 



DORCHESTER BRANCH. 



Bartlett, Mrs. Susan E. 


$1 00 


Bennett, Miss M. M. . 


1 00 


Callender, Miss Caroline S. 


2 00 


Churchill, Judge J. R. . 


1 00 


Churchill, Mrs. J. R. . 


1 00 


Gushing, Miss Susan T. 


2 00 


Donation 


1 00 


Eliot, Mrs. C. R. . 


2 00 


Faunce, Miss Eliza H., in 




memory of her mother 




Mrs. Sewall A. Faunce 


2 00 


Hall, Mrs. Henry . 


1 00 


Haven, Mrs. Katharine 




Stearns 


1 00 


Hawkes, Mrs. S. L. 


2 00 


Humphreys, Mrs. Richard C 


2 00 


Jordan, Miss Ruth A. . 


2 00 


Nash, Mrs. Edward W. 


1 00 


Nash, Mrs. Frank K. . 


5 00 



Amount carried forward 



$27 00 



Amount brought forward 

Preston, Miss Myra C. 
Reed, Mrs. George M. . 
Sayward, Mrs. W. H. . 
Stearns, Mrs. Albert H. 
Stearns, Mr. A. Maynard 
Stearns, Mr. A. T., 2d . 
Stearns, Henry D., in mem 

ory of . 
Whitcher, Mr. Frank W 

(donation) . 
Whiton, Mrs. Royal 
Wilder, Miss Grace S. . 
WiUard, Mrs. L. P. 
Woodberry, Miss Mary (do 

nation) 
Wright, Mr. C. P. . 



$27 00 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



1 00 



5 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


5 


00 



$53 00 



79 



LYNN BRANCH. 



Caldwell, Mrs. Ellen F. 

Chase, Mrs. Philip A. (dona- 
tion) .... 

Earp, Miss Emily A. 

Elmer, Mr. and Mrs. V. J. 

Sheldon, Mrs. Chauncey C 

Smith, Mrs. Joseph N 
(donation) . 

Amount carried forward 



$1 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


10 


00 


$28 00 1 



Amount brought forward 



$28 00 



Sprague, Mr. Henry B. 




(donation) .... 


5 00 


Tapley, Mr. Henry F. (do- 




nation) 


5 00 



$38 00 



MILTON BRANCH. 



Brewer, Miss Eliza (dona^ 

tion) .... 
Forbes, Mrs. J. Murray 
Jaques, Miss Helen L. . 
Klous, Mrs. Henry D. . 
Pierce, Mr. Vassar 

Amount carried forward 



$5 00 
10 00 
10 00 
1 00 
10 00 

$36 00 



Amount brought forward . 

Rivers, Mrs. George R. R. . 
Ware, Mrs. Arthiir L. (dona- 
tion) 



$36 00 
5 00 
5 00 

$46 00 



All contributors to the fund are respectfully requested to peruke the 
above list, and to report either to Albert Thorndike, Treasurer, No. 
19 Congress Street, Boston, or to the Director, Edward E. Allen, Water- 
town, any omissions or inaccuracies which they may find in it. 

ALBERT THORNDIKE, 

Treasurer, 

No. 19 CoNGBESs Street, Boston. 



80 



FORM OF BEQUEST. 

I hereby give, devise and bequeath to the Perkins Institution 
AND Massachusetts School for the Blind, a corporation duly 
organized and existing under the laws of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, the sum of dollars ($ ), 

the same to be applied to the general uses and purposes of said 
corporation under the direction of its Board of Trustees; and I 
do hereby direct that the receipt of the Treasurer for the time being 
of said corporation shall be a sufficient discharge to my executors 
for the same. 



FOBM OF DEVISE OF REAL ESTATE. 

I give, devise and bequeath to the Perkins Institution and Mas- 
sachusetts School for the Blind, a corporation duly organized 
and existing under the laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
that certain tract of real estate bounded and described as follows: — 

(Here describe the real estate accurately) 
with full power to sell, mortgage and convey the same free of all 
trusts. 



NOTICE. 



The address of the treasurer of the corporation is as 

follows: 

ALBERT THORNDIKE, 

No. 19 Congress Street, 

Boston. 



81 



Perkins Institution 

And Massachusetts vSchool 
For the Blind 




NINETY-SECOND ANNUAL REPORT 
OF THE TRUSTEES 



1923 



BOST ON ^ ^ Jt ^ ^ 1924 
WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO 



C^e Commontoealti) of ^m^att^mtm 



Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School fob the Blind, 
Watertown, November 12, 1923. 

To the Hon. Frederic W. Cook, Secretary of State, Boston. 

Dear Sir: — I have the honor to transmit to you, for the use of the Legislature, 
a copy of the ninety-second annual report of the trustees of this institution to the 
corporation thereof, together with that of the treasurer and the usual accompany- 
ing documents. 

Respectfully, 

EDWARD E. ALLEN, 

Secretary. 







OFFICERS OF THE CORPORATION. 



1923-1924. 



FRANCIS HENRY APPLETON, President. 
WILLIAM L. RICHARDSON, Vice-President. 
ALBERT THORNDIKE. Treasurer, 
EDWARD E. ALLEN, Secretary. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



FRANCIS HENRY APPLETON. 

WILLIAM ENDICOTT. 

PAUL E. FITZPATRICK. 

Rev. PAUL REVERE FROTHINGHAM. 

G. PEABODY GARDNER, Jr. 

ROBERT H. HALLOWELL. 



JAMES ARNOLD LOWELL. 
CHARLES E. OSGOOD. 
Miss MARIA PURDON. 
Mrs. GEORGE T. PUTNAM. 
WILLIAM L. RICHARDSON, M.D. 
LEVERETT SALTONSTALL. 



STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Monthly Visiting Committee, 

whose duty it is to visit and inspect the Institution at least once in each month. 



January 
February 
March 
April 
May . 
June . 



1924. 

Francis Henry Appleton. 
Miss Maria Purdon. 
Robert H. Hallowell. 
Paul R. Frothingham. 
James A. Lowell. 
Charles E. Osgood. 



July . 

August 

September 

October . 

November 

December 



1924. 

Paul E. Fitzpatrick. 
Mrs. George T. Putnam. 
G. Peabody Gardner, Jr. 
William L. Richardson. 
Leverett Saltonstall. 
William Endicott. 



Executive Committee. 
Francis Henry Appleton, President, ex 

officio. 
Albert Thorndike, Treasurer, ex officio. 
Edward E. Allen, Secretary, ex officio. 
P.*.UL E. Fitzpatrick. 
Robert H. Hallowell. 
James A. Lowell. 
Miss Maria Purdon. 



Finance Committee. 

Albert Thorndike, Treasurer, ex officio. 
William Endicott. 
Robert H. Hallowell, 
G. Peabody Gardner, Jr. 



Auditors of Expenses. 

G. Peabody Gardner, Jr. 
Robert H. Hallowell. 
John Montgomery, Certified Public Accountant. 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION AND TEACHERS. 



EDWARD E. ALLEN, Director. 



TEACHERS AND OFFICERS OF THE UPPER SCHOOL. 
LITERARY DEPARTMENT. 



Boys' Section. 

Miss JESSICA L. LANGWORTHY. 
Miss CAROLINE E. McMASTER. 
CHESTER A. GIBSON. 
FRANCIS W. DANA. 
Miss LIZZIE R. KINSMAN. 
Miss CLARA L. PRATT. 
Miss FLEDA CHAMBERLAIN. 
Miss CLAUDIA POTTER. 



Girls' Section. 

Miss ELSIE H. SIMONDS. 
Miss ANNIE L. BRADFORD. 
Miss GENEVIEVE M. HAVEN. 
Miss MARY H. FERGUSON. 
Miss MARION A. WOODWORTH. 
Miss JULIA E. BURNHAM. 
Miss GERTRUDE S. HARLOW. 
Miss GRACE M. HILL. 



Teacher of Home Economics. 

Miss MARY C. MELDRUM. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL TRAINING. 



C. BENJAMIN MINNER. 



Miss MARY H. FERGUSON. 



Miss LENNA D. SWINERTON. 



DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC. 
EDWIN L. GARDINER. 



Miss HELEN M. ABBOTT. 
Miss MARY E. BURBECK. 
JOHN F. HARTWELL. 
Miss GRACE E. EVANS. 



Miss BLANCHE A. fBARDIN. 

Miss SHIRLEY W. KEENE. 

Miss MABEL A. STARBIRD, Voice. 



DEPARTMENT OF MANUAL TRAINING. 



Boys' Section. 
JULIAN H. MABEY. 
HAROLD W. STANTON. 
Miss MARY B. KNOWLTON, Sloyd. 



Girls' Section. 

Miss FRANCES' M. LANGWORTHY. 
Miss M. ELIZABETH BOBBINS. 
Miss MARIAN E. CHAMBERLAIN. 
Miss ALTA M. LUX. 



DEPARTMENT OF TUNING PIANOFORTES. 

ELWYN H. FOWLER, Manager and Instructor. 



LIBRARIANS, CLERKS AND BOOKKEEPERS. 

Miss LAURA M. SAWYER, Librarian. I Mias MAI L. LELAND, Bookkeeper. 
Miss FLORENCE J. WORTH, Assistant. Miss WINIFRED F. LELAND, Assistant. 
Miss ANNA GARDNER FISH, Cl^k. ' Miss LUCY E. YEGANIAN, Assistant. 

Mbs. SARAH A. STOVER, Treasurer for the Ladies' Auxiliary Society. 



DEPARTMENT OF BUILDINGS. 

FREDERICK A. FLANDERS, Superintendent. 



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 

OSCAR S. CREELEY, M.D., Attending Physician. 

HENRY HAWKINS, M.D., Ophthalmologist. 

HAROLD B. CHANDLER, M.D., Assistant Ophthalmologist. 

ARTHUR WILLARD FAIRBANKS, M.D., Pediatrician. 

Dr. FRANK R. OBER, Orthopedic Surgeon. 

HOWARD ARTHUR LANE, DM.!)., Attending Dentist for the Institution. 

REINHOLD RUELBERG, D.M.D., Attending Dentist for the Kindergarten. 

Miss ELLA L. LOOMER, R.N., Attending Nurse. 



DOMESTIC DEPARTMENT. 

WALTER S. GOSS, Steward. 



Matrons in the Cottagres. 



Boys' Section. 
Mrs. LOUISE M. SAURMAN. 
Mrs. CHESTER A. GIBSON. 
Mrs. AGNES C. LUMMUS. 
Mrs. FLORENCE T. MINNER. 



Girls' Section. 

Miss JENNIE L. KINSMAN. 
Miss KATHERINE M. LOWE. 
Miss VINA C. BADGER. 
Mrs. HATTIE S. ADAMS. 



PRINTING DEPARTMENT. 
FRANK C. BRYAN, Manager. 
Mrs. MARTHA A. TITUS, Printer. | Miss MARY L. TULLY, Printer. 



WORKSHOP FOR ADULTS. 

FRANK C. BRYAN, Manager. 
Miss EVA C. ROBBINS, Clerk. 



TEACHERS AND OFFICERS OF THE LOWER SCHOOL. 
KINDERGARTEN. 



Girls' Section. 

Miss Cornelia M. Loring, Matron. 
Miss Ethel M. Goodwin, Assistant. 
Miss W. R. Humbert, Kinder gar tner. 
Miss Alicb M. Lane, Teacher. 



Boys' Section. 

Miss Nettie B. Vose, Matron. 
Mrs. Emma H. McCraith, Assistant. 
Miss Carolyn M. Burrell, Kindergartner 
Miss L. Henrietta Stratton, Teacher. 
Miss Sadie Turner, Teacher. 

Miss Shirley W. Keene, Music Teacher. 

Miss Margaret McKenzie, Teacher of Manual Training. 

Miss Lenna D. Swinerton, Assistant in Corrective Gymnastics. 

Samuel P. Hayes, Ph.D., Psychologist. 

Miss Kathryn E. Maxfield, Assistant in Psychology and Personnel, 

Miss Ruth E. Wilcox, Assistant Psychologist. 



PRIMARY DEPARTMENT. 
Boys' Section. 



Miss Clossie E. Clark, Matron. 
Miss Flora C. Fountain, Assistant. 
Miss Ethel D. Evans, Teacher. 



Miss Beth A. Easter, Teacher. 

Miss Minnie C. Tucker, Music Teacher. 

Miss Rosalind L. Houghton, Sloyd. 



Mies Ada S. Bartlett, Matron. 
Miss Eleanor Foster, Assistant. 
Miss Bertha M. Buck, Teacher. 



Girls' Section. 



Miss Margaret Miller, Teacher. 
Miss Naomi K. Gring, Music Teacher. 
Miss Sharlie M. Chandler, Sloyd. 



LADIES' VISITING COMMITTEE TO THE KINDERGARTEN. 

Mrs. John Chipman Gray, President. 
Miss Annie C. Warren, Vice-President. 
Miss Eleanor S. Parker, Secretary. 



Mrs. Algernon Coolidge 
Miss Eleanor S. Parker 
Mrs. Harold J. Coolidge 
Miss Maria Purdon 
Mrs. Ronald T. Lyman . 
Miss Ellen Bullard 
Miss Annie C. Warren . 
Mrs. Roger B. Merriman 



> January. 

February. 

March. 

April. 

} May. 



Miss Alice Sargent 
Mrs. John Chipman Gray 
Mrs. George T. Putnam 
Mrs. George H. Monks 
Mrs. E. Preble Motley 



June. 

September. 

October. 

November. 

December. 



General Visitor. 

MisB Elizabeth G. Norton. 



Honorary Members. 

Mrs. Maud Howe Elliott. 
Mrs. Larz Anderson. 
Mrs. Kingsmill Marks. 



MEMBERS OF THE CORPORATION. 



Abbot, Mrs. Edwin H., Cambridge. 
Adams, Karl, Boston. 
Allen, Edward E., Watertown. 
Allen, Mrs. Edward E., Watertown. 
Amory, Robert, Boston. 
Amory, Roger, Boston. 
Anderson, Mrs. Larz, Brookline. 
Angier, Mrs. George, Newton. 
Appleton, Hon. Francis Henry, Peabody. 
Appleton, Francis Henry, Jr., Boston. 
Appleton, Mrs. Francis Henry, Jr., Boston. 
Appleton, Dr. William, Boston. 
Atherton, Mrs. Caroline S., Jamaica Plain. 
Bacon, Caspar C, Jamaica Plain. 
Baldwin, S. E., New Haven, Conn. 
Ballantine, Arthur A., Boston. 
Bancroft, Miss Eleanor C, Beverly. 
Barbour, Edmund D., Boston. 
Bartlett, Miss Mary F., Boston. 
Baylies, Walter C, Boston. 
Baylies, Mrs. Walter C, Boston. 
Beach, Rev. David N., Guilford, Conn. 
Beebe, E. Pierson, Boston. 
Benedict, Wm. Leonard, New York. 
Bennett, Miss Gazella, Worcester. 
Black, George N., Boston. 
Blake, George F., Worcester. 
Blunt, Col. S. E., Springfield. 
Boardman, Mrs. E. A., Boston. 
Bourn, Hon. A. O., Providence, R. I. 
Bowditch, IngersoU, Boston. 
Bremer, S. Parker, Boston. 
Brigham, Charles, Watertown. 
Brooke, Rev. S. W., London. 
Brooks, Gorham, Boston. 
Bryant, Mrs. A. B. M., Boston. 
Bullard, Miss Ellen, Boston. 
Bullock, Col. A. G., Worcester. 
Burditt, Miss Alice A., Boston. 
Bumham, Miss Julia E., Lowell. 
Burr, L Tucker, Jr., Boston. 
Cabot, Mrs. Thomas H., Boston. 
Callender, Walter, P*rovidence, R. I. 
Camp, Rev. Edward C, Watertown. 
Carter, Mrs. J. W., West Newton. 
Cary, Miss Ellen G., Boston. 
Chapin, Edward P., Andover. 
Choate, Charles F., Jr., Southborough. 
Cook, Charles T., Detroit, Mich. 
Cook, Mrs. C. T., Detroit, Mich. 
Coolidge, Mrs. Algernon, Boston. 
Coohdge, Francis L., Boston. 
Coohdge, Mrs. Harold J., Boston. 
CooUdge, J. Randolph, Boston. 
Cotting, Charles E., Jr., Boston. 
Crane, Zenas M., Pittsfield. 
Crosby, Sumner, Cambridge. 
Crowninshield, Francis B., Boston. 
Cunningham, Mrs. Henry V., Boston. 
Curtis, Charles P., Jr., Boston. 



Curtis, Mrs. Horatio G., Boston. 

Curtis, James F., Boston. 

Cutler, George C, Jr., Boston. 

Dabney, George B., Boston. 

Damon, Willard A., Springfield. 

Davies, Rt. Rev. Thomas F., Springfield. 

Davis, Livingston, Milton. 

Day, Mrs. Frank A., Newton. 

Dewey, Francis H., Worcester. 

Dexter, Mrs. F. G., Boston. 

Dexter, Miss Harriett, Boston. 

Dexter, Miss Rose L., Boston. 

Dillaway, W. E. L., Boston. 

Dolan, WiUiam G., Boston. 

Draper, Eben S., Hopedale. 

Drew, Edward B., Cambridge. 

Duryea, Mrs. Herman, New York. 

Eliot, Rev. C. R., Boston. 

Elhott, Mrs. Maud Howe, Boston. 

EUis, George H., Boston. 

Ely, Adolph C, Watertown. 

Endicott, Henry, Boston. 

Endicott, William, Boston. 

Endicott, William C, Boston. 

Evans, Mrs. Glendower, Boston. 

Everett, Dr. Oliver H., Worcester. 

Fanning, David H., Worcester. 

Faulkner, Miss F. M., Boston. 

Fay, Mrs. Dudley B., Boston. 

Fay, Mrs. Henry H., Boston. 

Fay, Miss Sarah B., Boston. 

Fay, Thomas J., Boston. 

Fay, Wm. Rodman, Dover, Mass. 

Fenno, Mrs. L. C, Boston. 

Fitz, Mrs. W. Scott, Boston. 

Fitzpatrick, Paul Edward, Brookline. 

Ford, Lawrence A., Boston. 

Freeman, Miss H. E., Boston. 

Frothingham, Rev. P. R., Boston. 

Fuller, George F., Worcester. 

Fuller, Mrs. Samuel R., Boston. 

Gage, Mrs. Homer, Shrewsbury. 

Gale, Lyman W., Boston. 

Gammans, Hon. G. H., Boston. 

Gardiner, Robert H., Boston. 

Gardiner, Robert H., Jr., Needham. 

Gardner, George P., Boston. 

Gardner, G. Peabody, Jr., Brookline. 

Gardner, Mrs. John L., Boston. 

Gaskill, George A., Worcester. 

Gaskins, Frederick A., Milton. 

Gaylord, Emerson G., Chicopee. 

Geer, Mrs. Danforth, Jr., Shorthills, N. J. 

George, Charles H., Providence, R. L 

GUbert, Wm. E., Springfield. 

Gleason, Mrs. Cora L., Boston. 

Gleason, Sidney, Medford. 

GUdden, W. T., Brookhne. 

Goddard, Harry W., Worcester. 

Goff, Darius L., Pawtucket, R. I. 



Goff, Lyman B., Pawtucket, R. I. 
Goldthwaite, Mrs. John, Boston. 
Gooding, Rev. A., Portsmouth, N. H. 
Gordon, Rev. G. A., D.D., Boston. 
Gray, Mrs. John Chipman, Boston. 
Gray, Roland, Boston. 
Grew, Edward W., Boston. 
Griffin, S. B., Springfield. 
Griswold, Merrill, Cambridge. 
Hall, Miss Minna B., Longwood. 
Hallowell, John W., Boston. 
Hallowell, Robert H., Boston. 
Hammond, Mrs. G. G., Boston. 
Haskell, Mrs. E. B., Auburndale. 
Hemenway, Mrs. Augustus, Boston. 
Higginson, F. L., Jr., Boston. 
Higginson, Mrs. Henry L., Boston. 
Hill, Arthur D., Boston. 
HiU, Dr. A. S., SomerviUe. 
Holmes, Charles W., Toronto, Ont. 
Homans, Robert, Boston. 
Howe, Henry S., Brookline. 
Howe, James G., Milton. 
Howes, Miss Edith M., Brookline. 
Howland, Mrs. O. O., Boston. 
Hunnewell, Mrs. H. S., Boston. 
Hunnewell, Walter, Jr., Boston. 
Hutchins, Mrs. C. F., Boston, 
lasigi, Miss Mary V., Boston. 
Ingraham, Mrs. E. T., Wellesley. 
Isdahl, Mrs. C. B., California. 
Jackson, Charles C., Boston. 
Jenks, Miss C. E., Bedford. 
Johnson, Edward C, Boston. 
Johnson, Rev. H. S., Boston. 
Joy, Mrs. Charles H., Boston. 
Kasson, Rev. F. H., Boston. 
Kellogg, Mrs. Eva D., Boston. 
Kendall, Miss H. W., Boston. 
Kidder, Mrs. Heniy P., Boston. 
Kilham, Miss Annie M., Beverly. 
Kilmer, Frederick M., Watertown. 
Kimball, Edward P., North Andover. 
King, Mrs. Tarrant Putnam, Milton. 
Knowlton, Daniel S., Boston. 
Kramer, Henry C., Boston. 
Lamb, Mrs. Annie L., Boston. 
Lang, Mrs. B. J., Boston. 
Latimer, Mrs. Grace G., Boston. 
Lawrence, Mrs. A. A., Boston. 
Lawrence, John Silsbee, Boston. 
Lawrence, Rt. Rev. Wm., Boston. 
Ley, Harold A., Springfield. 
Lincoln, L. J. B., Hingham. 
Lincoln, Waldo, Worcester. 
Livermore, Mrs. Wm. R., New York. 
Lodge, Hon. Henry C, Nahant. 
Logan, Hon. James, Worcester. 
Longfellow, Miss Alice M., Cambridge. 
Lord, Rev. A. M., Providence, R. I. 
Loring, Mis» Katharine P., Prides Cross- 
ing. 
Loring, Miss Louisa P., Prides Crossing. 
Lothrop, Mrs. T. K., Boston. 
Lovering, Mrs. C. T., Boston. 
Lovering, Richard S., Boston. 
Lowell, Abbott Lawrence, Cambridge. 



Lowell, Miss Amy, Brookline. 
Lowell, James Arnold, Boston. 
Lowell, Miss Lucy, Boston. 
Luce, Hon. Robert, Waltham. 
Lyman, Mrs. Ronald T., Boston. 
Marrett, Miss H. M., Standish, Me. 
Marrs, Mrs. KingsmUl, Boston. 
Mason, Charles F., Watertown. 
Mason, Miss Ellen F., Boston. 
Mason, Miss Ida M., Boston. 
McElwain, R. Franklin, Holyoke. 
Merriman, Mrs. D., Boston. 
Merriman, Mrs. Roger B., Cambridge. 
Merritt, Edward P., Boston. 
Meyer, Mrs. G. von L., Boston. 
Minot, the Misses, Boston. 
Minot, J. Grafton, Boston. 
Minot, James J., Jr., Boston. 
Minot, WiUiam, Boston. 
Monks, Mrs. George H., Boston. 
Montagu, Mrs. H. B., Kelton, England. 
Morgan, Eustis P., Saco, Me. 
Morgan, Mrs. Eustis P., Saco, Me. 
Morison, Mrs. John H., Boston. 
Morse, Mrs. Leopold, Boston. 
Morse, Miss Margaret F., Jamaica Plain. 
Moseley, Charles H., Boston. 
Motley, Mrs. E. Preble, Boston. 
Motley, Warren, Boston. 
Norcross, Grenville H., Boston. 
Norcross, Mrs. Otis, Boston. 
Norton, Miss Elizabeth G., Boston. 
Osgood, Charles E., Jamaica Plain. 
Osgood, Mrs. E. L., Hopedale. 
Osgood, Miss Fanny D., Hopedale. 
Parker, Miss Eleanor S., Boston. 
Parker, W. Stanley, Boston. 
Partridge, Fred F., Holyoke. 
Peabody, Rev. Endicott, Groton. 
Peabody, Frederick W., Boston. 
Peabody, Harold, Boston. 
Peabody, Phihp G., Boston. 
Peabody, W. Rodman, Boston. 
Perkins, Charles Bruen, Boston. 
Perkins, Mrs. C. E., Boston. 
Phillips, Mrs. John C, Boston. 
Pickering, Henry G., Boston. 
Pickman, D. L., Boston. 
Pickman, Mrs. D. L., Boston. 
Pierce, Mrs. M. V., Milton. 
Plunkett, W. P., Adams. 
Pope, Mrs. A. A., Boston. 
Poulsson, Miss Emilie, Boston. 
Powers, Mrs. H. H., Newton. 
Pratt, George Dwight, Springfield. 
Proctor, James H., Boston. 
Pm-don, Miss Maria, Boston. 
Putnam, F. Delano, Boston. 
Putnam, Mrs. George T., Dedham. 
Putnam, Mrs. James J., Boston. 
Rantoul, Neal, Boston. 
Read, Mrs. Robert M., Medford. 
Remick, Frank W., West Newton. 
Rice, John C, Boston. 
Richards, Miss Elise, Boston. 
Richards, Mrs. H., Gardiner, Me. 
Richards, Henry H., Groton. 



Richardson, John, Jr., Readville. 
Richardson, Mrs. Johii, Jr., Readville. 
Richardson, Mrs. M. G., New York. 
Richardson, W. L., M.D., Boston. 
Roberts, Mrs. A. W., Allston. 
Robinson, George F., Watertown. 
Rogers, Miss Flora E., New York. 
Rogers, Henry M., Boston. 
Russell, Otis T., Boston. 
Russell, Mrs. Robert S., Boston. 
Russell, Mrs. W. A., Boston. 
Russell, Wm. Eustis, Boston. 
SaltonstaU, Leverett, Chestnut Hill. 
SaltonstaU, Mrs. Leverett, Chestnut Hill. 
Sargent, Miss Alice, Brookline. 
Schaff, Capt. Morris, Cambridge. 
Sears, Mrs. Knyvet W., Boston. 
Shattuck, Henry Lee, Boston. 
Shaw, Bartlett M., Watertown. 
Shepard, Harvey N., Boston. 
Slater, Mrs. H. N., Boston. 
Smith, Joel West, East Hampton, Conn. 
Snow, Walter B., Watertown. 
Sohier, Miss Emily L., Boston. 
Stearns, Charles H., Brookline. 
Steams, Mrs. Charles H., Brookline. 
Stearns, Wm. B., Boston. 
Sturgis, R. Clipston, Boston. 
Thayer, Charles M., Worcester. 
Thayer, Rev. G. A., Cincinnati, O. 
Thayer, John E., South Lancaster. 
Thayer, Mrs. Nathaniel, Boston. 
Thomas, Mrs. John B., Boston. 



Thorndike, Albert, Boston. 
Thorndike, Miss Rosanna D., Boston. 
Tifft, Eliphalet T., Springfield. 
Tilden, Miss Ahce Foster, Milton. 
Tilden, Miss Edith S., Milton. 
Tuckerman, Mrs. C. S., Boston. 
Tufts, John F., Watertown. 
Underwood, Herbert S., Boston. 
Underwood, Wm. Lyman, Belmont. 
Villard, Mrs. Henry, New York. 
Wallace, Andrew B., Springfield. 
Ware, Miss Mary L., Boston. 
Warren, Miss Annie C, Boston. 
Warren, Bayard, Boston. 
Washburn, Hon. Charles G., Worcester. 
Washburn, Mrs. Frederick A., Boston. 
Waters, H. Goodman, Springfield. 
Watson, Thomas A., Boston. 
Watson, Mrs. Thomas A., Boston. 
WendeU, William G., Boston. 
Wesson, James L., Boston. 
West, George S., Boston. 
Wheelock, Miss Lucy, Boston. 
White, George A., Boston. 
Wiggins, Charles, 2d, Boston. 
Winsor, Mrs. E., Chestnut Hill. 
Winsor, Robert, Jr., Boston. 
Winthrop, Mrs. Thomas L., Boston. 
Wolcott, Roger, Boston. 
Wright, Burton H., Worcester. 
Wright, George S., Watertown. 
Young, Mrs. Benjamin L., Boston. 
Young, B. Loring, Weston. 



SYNOPSIS OF THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE ANNUAL 
MEETING OF THE CORPORATION. 



Watertown, November 7, 1923. 

The annual meeting of the corporation, duly summoned, was held to-day at the 
institution, and was called to order by the president, Hon. Francis Henry Apple- 
ton, at 3 P.M. 

The proceedings of the last meeting were read and approved. 

The annual report of the trustees was accepted and ordered to be printed, to- 
gether with the usual accompanying documents. 

The report of the treasurer was accepted and ordered on file. 

Voted, That acts and expenditures, made and authorized by the Board of Trustees, 
or by any committee appointed by said Board of Trustees, during the corporate year 
closed this day, be and are hereby ratified and confirmed. 

The corporation then proceeded to ballot for officers for the ensuing year, and 
the following persons were unanimously elected : — 

President. — Hon. Francis Henry Appleton. 

Vice-President. — William L. Richardson. 

Treasurer. — Albert Thorndike. 

Secretary. — Edward E. Allen. 

Trustees. — Francis Henry Appleton, William Endicott, Paul E. Fitzpatrick, G. 
Peabody Gardner, Jr., Robert H. Hallowell, James A. Lowell, Mrs. George T. 
Putnam, and Leverett Saltonstall. 

The following persons were unanimously elected members of the corporation : — 
Roger Amory, Charles F. Choate, Jr., Charles P. Curtis, Jr., Eben S. Draper, John 
E. Thayer, Jr., and Bayard Warren. 

The meeting then adjourned. 

EDWARD E. ALLEN, 

Secretary. 



10 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES. 



Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind, 
Watertown, November 7, 1923. 

Ladies and Gentlemen : — The Perkins Institution is 
sometimes called an instrumentality for the sociaUzation of 
its pupils. It has other duties and problems, but perhaps 
this one best describes its basic purpose; and in the present 
report we shall dwell especially upon it. 

A bhnd child kept at home is so sure to be different and 
to remain different from the rest of the family that some 
observers would have him removed and placed out together 
with a few others like himself where he would suffer neither 
coddHng nor neglect. Others, feeUng that such a child who 
is bound by his bUndness to miss a multitude of life's pleas- 
ures and can ill afford to be deprived of the mothering that 
most of us recall together with all that home ties mean, would 
much rather see him kept at home, if he has one. But, since 
they reahze the responsibihty of so doing, they would put 
this home in the care of a trained visitor, — some tactful, 
sympathetic woman who knows how to bring to bear upon 
famihes the influences which we read about in books on the 
Pre-School Child. We once sent such a one about with great 
satisfaction but, having lost her, have only been waiting to 
discover in behalf of our kindergarten just such another. 

We have long been maiUng printed Suggestions to the 
Parents of BUnd Children, and the Massachusetts Division 
of the Bhnd has been sending an agent into such homes. 
Even so, when the bhnd child of six first enters our kinder- 
garten we find him by measured test from nine to eighteen 
months mentally retarded. Since the mind is approached 

11 



and informed through the senses and since in his case the 
main gateway has been closed, the wonder is that he is not 
still more retarded. And he would be, were it not that he 
usually has brothers and sisters who have had to "tend" 
him and so have spurred him on through play. There once 
came to our kindergarten an orphan girl of eight, the "only 
child" of her grandparents who had brought her up. When 
asked what she played with at home she repUed: "I can't 
play; I'm blind." 

While the normal kindergarten age should be under six, 
with us it is generally over six, and promotion to reading and 
writing may not follow until the child is eight. Undeveloped 
and untrained as the entering child is, then, his inabihty to 
fit at once into family hfe which is carefully ordered is pro- 
nounced. Why should he not be self-centered, selfish and 
uncontrolled? But even though he speaks Httle or no Eng- 
Hsh, as occasionally happens, he cannot remain anti-social or 
unsocial or clannish in such a community. Undemocratic 
ways soon yield to guidance and camaraderie where the 
whole child is put to school. A kindergarten has been de- 
fined as a group of Httle children brought together for the 
purpose of happy mutual adjustment. Such adjustment is 
exactly what we strive for in all kindergartens for the bhnd: 
and this purposive education is the real beginning of social- 
ization. 

While much of this follows along with the hygienic regimen 
of the household, most of it probably comes from the new 
and natural association of children of nearly equal handi- 
cap; — directive association in the gathering room and free 
association on the playground. Visitors are often held by the 
charm of it all and are reluctant to move on. 

Only a few — at most ten — new children ever enter one 
of our two kindergarten families together; the rest, who 
have been there a year or more, have been advanced perhaps 

12 



to first or second or third primary grades. These older ones 
of the same household help wonderfully in the living adjust- 
ment. They vie with one another in being chosen to show 
the entering child about and get his bearings. Occasionally 
the little mentor overdoes things, in which case the new 
child objects; but as a rule the big brother and big sister 
attitude is appreciated, and this always makes for mutual 
benefit. In the house the newcomers are taught self-care in 
all ways by house-mothers who have been with us many 
years, also helpfulness in bedroom, dining-room and pantry, 
and the children respond because they love to be useful and 
active; they certainly save many steps for others. Their 
hitherto shut-in lives have begun to grow through manifold 
expression — through doing rather than receiving. In the 
kindergarten room they learn togetherness and many de- 
lightful songs, games and occupations, of which last the kinder- 
gartners have gradually gathered a vast assortment. On 
the playground — and there are both covered and open play- 
grounds — the girls play ring-around games, skip rope or 
swing or romp or slide, or roll old automobile tires about, 
while the boys climb and swing, play horse and tumble about 
on the grass or snow or two or three together roll a huge log 
to a new position; but above aU they play with light logs or 
fence posts with which they build huts and cabins, and some- 
times a ship to sail away to distant cities in; sometimes a 
pen or stall, containing leaves or hay and having a few of 
their number inside as squeahng pigs or mooing cows. 

Besides having conducted walks for nature study, we ar- 
range to have groups of these young people out of doors 
together a great deal — even a part of every school hour, 
alternating as we do the free abandon of the playground 
with almost every indoor class exercise; it matters not how 
often the children have to change wraps and rubbers. For 
like all children they come to love the playground because, 

13 



as each family has its own lot and play cloister, it never 
ceases to offer some inviting pastime which for the moment 
is the one thing in all the world they want to do; and they 
go do it without let or interference from the presence of 
older children or of rougher and faster children with full 
sight who, if there, would naturally and thoughtlessly monop- 
olize the place and force the bUnd children to the wall. When 
the town boys have come to skate on the institution pond 
they have brought hockey sticks and unless restrained have 
rendered skating simply impossible for bUnd boys of any 
age. 

The teachers have made to the Director written reports 
of these diversified activities and of the abiding lessons they 
impart, which form interesting reading.^ They tell not only 
of the school work, the way the children progress through 
this or that new method of teaching reading, for example, 
or respond to the project instruction begun in class and con- 
tinued on the grounds, and of all the many useful presents 
they make in their sloyd rooms; but also of the influence of 
keeping pets, which practice we began in the boys' primary 
two years ago, — the raising of a dog from puppyhood, of 
families of rabbits, and of the failure to raise and retain a 
couple of squirrels; how the boy who became "head animal 
keeper" grew alike in responsibihty and character; how the 
boys buried the pets that died, conducted their Uttle funerals 
and on Memorial Day decorated the graves. The reports 
tell too of the almost continuous building and rebuilding of 
log cabins by these primary boys, one saying, for example: 
''It is exceedingly necessary that the huts be taken down and 
rebuilt in a different location several times a week. They 
work at them as instinctively as beavers." Undoubtedly 
this particular activity tends to satisfy a boy's destructive 
instincts as well as his constructive ones. Anyway these 

I See pages 29-40. 

14 



teachers have acquired a respect for a pile of old fence posts 
which they do not give to fixed play apparatus. 

There may be too much play apparatus — one each of two 
kinds of swing, especially a fenced-in plank swing, one incUned 
gangway plane for sliding summer and winter, one ''trolley 
coaster," a homemade seesaw, a bar to perform on and some- 
thing like the Junglegym to climb, is ample for one group of 
thirty boys. When they had more pieces of the same thing 
they not only tired of them but abused and broke them. 
Now that they cannot always play with them whenever 
they Uke but must often await their turn, the institution 
carpenter is no longer in demand. They are acquiring re- 
sourcefulness with a few things and learning some lessons in 
the care of property. However, as boy nature seems to crave 
change and variety to work off exuberance of spirit and 
vitality, the proper playground for so large a group as thirty 
pre-adolescent blind and partly blind boys must be spacious 
and can contain to advantage also running track, skating 
rink and sundry other attractions; but above all the fence 
rails a-plenty, to which may be added a few but not too 
many old automobile tires. 

Young girls do not seem to need so much play paraphernaUa 
as this ; dolls and the care of dolls' wardrobes, seesaws, swings, 
jumping ropes, stilts and pogo sticks and a rocking boat 
answer for much of the time, as do snow shovelUng and coast- 
ing in winter. Nevertheless, without constant leadership in 
play the adolescent girls tend more and more to walk up and 
down by twos and threes, chatting unceasingly. Especially 
true is this of the totally bUnd. And since the habit — and 
the boys get it too, though later — is cUquish and unsocial in 
the broadest sense their teachers must either provide new and 
attractive diversions or more leadership; and too much leader- 
ship marches with dependence. Therefore, when last term a 
primary teacher discovered at a school supply store great 

15 



boxes of sizable wooden building materials, one was straight- 
way bought, though it cost $80; for we reaUzed that its didactic 
influence year after year promised to be greater than that of 
an additional teacher whose salary might be as much as $80 
for a single month. With these blocks the Uttle girls have 
built a cabin big enough for a whole class of nine of them to 
get into at once; and since they may do this inside their 
playroom they have a new acquisition indeed, one which ought 
to fill a void their caretakers have been unable quite to fill 
before. And so, what with playing school, playing with their 
dishes and all that goes with dolls and fancy work, it is far 
easier to provide on a rainy day for girls than it is for boys. 

With all this provision for spontaneous play, with their in- 
dividual toys and possessions, their conducted games of com- 
petition, their dressing up and rehearsing for special occa- 
sions, their entertaining company, their gymnasium work 
which they like and their dancing steps which they tolerate; 
the freedom of the playground, the constraint and propriety 
of house action and table manners, the heeding of the program 
bells, the respect and obedience paid to their elders, — in a 
word, the whole regimen of a well-conducted boarding-school 
life with which our sympathetic and understanding women 
surround the youngsters, are we not justified in claiming that 
the term socialization, or preparation for Uving among others 
in social competence, describes the real end and purpose of 
the Perkins Institution? The formal education of the blind 
is also an end and a tremendous one, but it would be more or 
less useless without the knowledge and abiUty to apply it in 
the world at large. 

Doubtless all boys and girls would benefit from a few years 
under the regimen and fife of a boarding school, just as they 
would also benefit from attendance at pubhc school. English 
people who can do so usually send their sons ofif to boarding 
school at the age of eight; and they do this to make them 

16 




Children Building an Indoor Playhouse big enough to get into. 1923. 



manly and self-reliant; in other words, to socialize them 
early. 

From observation and from a definite study made at a 
sister schooP Mr. Allen beUeves that most bUnd children of 
school age are better off for the most part away from home. 
He would have them taught in and adjusted early to a diver- 
sified environment where they perceive themselves to be not 
the exception but the rule, and so acquire no early class con- 
sciousness. This is what he understands by affording them 
equality of opportunity. He would also give every capable 
one of them experience in the pubhc school, there to measure 
himself with his unhandicapped fellow and estimate his own 
powers and condition; but he would prefer to provide this 
fiercer competition when the student has grown strong enough 
to meet it. And so he sends to the local high school every 
year such of the abler ones as want to try it; and these few 
invariably find it a first-class bridge over into the competi- 
tion of the outside world. 

So much for sociaUzation in the lower school. In the upper 
school much the same process continues though in ways more 
adapted to boys and girls between the ages of sixteen and 
twenty. The just promoted ones, who in the primary school 
were leaders, because Uke the lion in the fable they were 
strongest, find themselves no longer such but subdued fol- 
lowers in a freer, less considerate, if not rougher, community 
of the grammar and high schools; and they are jostled into 
conformity with much promptitude. Real hfe seems to have 
begun for them. The routine of school is now checkered less 
by individual play and more by teamwork, — frequent club 
and society meetings, by debates, by an occasional initiation 
and a banquet at their own expense, by receptions, calls, cele- 
brations, by dances to which they may sometimes invite in 

> New Opportunities for Blind Children before Entering School, by O. H. Burritt, Principal of the Penn- 
sylvania School for the Blind, Overbrook, Pa. 

17 



partners from outside, and, when the object is to raise funds 
for club use, by holding a school progressive whist party or 
cottage dramatics. Then, there are the occasional activities 
such as the boy scout meetings and hikes into the country, 
once a year camping out there, also the unbeUevable gambols 
of Hallowe'en and the giving of gifts around the several trees 
at Christmas. The Glee Club sings frequently at outside 
parties and churches, where the singers are almost always 
socially entertained. The older and more musical pupils 
attend a great many concerts in Cambridge or Boston, both 
they and their guides paying their own carfares. When the 
school is to give a Shakespeare play, an older pupil is chosen 
business manager; and each manager labors to do better 
than his predecessor. 

One must not suppose that blind boys and girls do not 
have spending money. They either bring it from home or 
earn it. Individuals of them may earn it during free time at 
Perkins in various ways, — sometimes by helping in Ubrary, 
printery, or service department, by carrying and fetching the 
mails, or by delivering the morning and evening papers 
throughout the institution; and most of them always by re- 
seating chairs, of which the neighbors bring in a continual 
supply. Of course the institution provides no money for 
clothing or personal expenses. There are, besides, divers good 
causes enough for which a little money is needed; and the 
having of it in pocket is of value morally. 

Those coming up from the lower school, perhaps twenty at 
a time, no longer live together but are distributed among eight 
families, where each one shares a room with some new ac- 
quaintance. These families are of the same size and of sim- 
ilar personnel. Their routine is the same, but in other re- 
spects, — even in menus, — they are individual. 

The cottage hfe is varied in many ways, — music, singing, 
dancing; competitive checkers, dominoes, chess and cards. 

18 



There is story-telling, often by the Hghted fire, with plenty of 
wood in the cellar, puzzles to work out, charades to guess, 
callers to entertain, and rooms to help decorate. There are 
the seasonal sports, — in the fall, intercottage football matches 
by the boys, played according to rules of their own making, 
and intercottage competitive games by the girls, with the 
award of prize banners to adorn walls of the cottage Uving 
rooms. When the boy champions from the Permsylvania 
school come to Watertown, which is every other year, there 
is excitement and a great to-do, — competing, feasting, and 
sending off, after three days' entertaining, their guests. And 
the boys manage all this also: for they have an athletic fund 
of their own raising. It is worthwhile experience. But the 
one continuous thing making for sociaUzation we beUeve to 
be our plan of contributory housework; also our arrange- 
ment, almost unique in institutions, for bringing both the 
teachers and the pupils of a family together at table to par- 
take of the same family menu. This practice makes for good 
manners and mixing and fresh conversation three times a day, 
and is wholesome in its effect upon teacher and taught ahke. 

We have a thirteenth family in a model cottage, the small 
group majoring in domestic science. It has no servant; so 
its teacher is able to impose upon the girls in turn various 
household responsibiUties, — being hostess, cook, second girl, or 
having care of the house temperature. In the course of the 
year most of the faculty will have been invited in to a meal or to 
a reception, all of which mil have been done in proper form. 

Blind pupils can stop too long at the same boarding school: 
the Pennsylvania school and ours exchange one or two pupils 
yearly; the Connecticut school sends several here at once. 
There comes a time when perhaps every one of our students 
would profit by being subjected to the complete change and 
the more strenuous environment of a school for the seeing. 
Still, while they are at our family school they are learning 

19 



about community life amid rather superior conditions. They 
develop generosity, loyalty and the spirit of mutual service. 
They discover their real aims and desires and try out their 
abiUties. They learn how to study effectively, usually acquire 
an accomplishment or two and know how to fill in happily 
their hours of leisure; in short, boarding school is the labora- 
tory in which they may learn to mix the re-agents of success. 
The visiting alumni and alumnae tell them so, the former bid- 
ding them to buckle to and the latter to ''spread wide their 
skirts while the heavens are raining gold." 

So much for the intramural Ufe of the upper school, and 
the days are very full. These older pupils go out into the 
world much more than the younger do and have much more 
freedom. The sister school in New York City sends all 
pupils home week-ends, a sociaUzing custom no other Ameri- 
can school for the blind enjoys. Only about twenty-five of ours 
live near enough for this. The rest busy themselves Saturday 
afternoons walking, making radio sets, working about their 
poultry plant, kicking football, swimming, reading, doing fancy 
work, etc. Sundays they attend Sunday school and church in 
Watertown, but otherwise spend their programless day as they 
please. From time to time many frequent the local stores 
to buy the eatables that children love. Home ties are rarely 
severed, for very few pupils remain over the Christmas and 
Easter recesses, and none stay in the summer vacation. Fortu- 
nately almost all have homes to go to, and those who have 
none must at least go away somewhere and make new asso- 
ciations. A few of these go to summer camps, — eighteen 
went last year. A growing number wish to work and earn, and 
of these an agent of the Massachusetts Division of the Bhnd 
has been placing more and more each season. The past sum- 
mer she placed eight as mothers' helpers. Obviously those 
who have made good at short jobs will be the more Ukely to 
do so at longer ones after leaving school. 

20 



Now, more than one successful blind man asserts that 
"blindness is a greater social than industrial barrier." In 
view of this generaUzation it is pertinent to ask ourselves, Do 
we succeed after all in really sociaUzing our pupils, so that 
they not only will hold their own under varying circumstances 
but also will become and remain acceptable citizens of the 
world? The minority, yes; the majority, no. The plain 
reasons for the many failures are two: first, society as it is 
does not understand the bUnd man, has Httle faith in his 
capacity, and is reluctant to give him, however well fitted and 
however good his personality, the chance and trial he needs; 
second, the majority of the bhnd themselves, even when helped 
and followed up, are for one reason or other not strong enough 
to win their way against the attitude and competition of the 
seeing. For these, though trained at great expense in school, 
there is the consciousness of being useful at home or of having 
aftercare employment among relatives and friends or recourse 
to special subsidized workshops elsewhere. Even so their 
lives have been greatly enriched during school days, which 
fact has made for a fuller and happier existence. As to the 
efficient minority, — and it is a relatively large minority, — 
a few go to college and afterwards enter the professions or 
business or teaching to compete on practical equaUty wdth 
other people; others do hand assembUng in factories and ware- 
rooms, ticketing, wrapping, inspecting, seUing, office type- 
writing, making household articles, serving as mothers' help- 
ers, poultry keeping, lecturing, entertaining, investigating 
social conditions, home teaching among the adult bUnd, 
operating telephone exchanges, piano tuning, practising mas- 
sage, and so on. The enlarged field open to the bUnd here 
indicated has resulted partly from conditions created by the 
war, and partly from increased efforts and care at vocational 
adjustment, a matter which in our own community has grown 
slowly though steadily, following the labors of the Massachu- 



21 



setts Division of the Blind over a period of years, particularly 
those of its head placement agent, a persistent, wise and 
tactful woman, who serves also as vocational guide to our own 
pupils. Naturally they look upon her as their most practical 
friend. 

The year under review was as successful as any has been 
in this problem of sociaUzation which, we repeat, is an excep- 
tionally difficult one to solve with people who are constrained 
by blindness. Very Httle illness interfered with the usual 
routine. The investigations of the resident psychologists and 
the lectures of Professor Hayes, under whom they labor, have 
abundantly interested the teachers and have led more and 
more to a finer classification of the pupils and to improved 
ways of instruction. The Director, beUeving as he does very 
strongly that that education is wofuUy incomplete which 
does not provide for one's leisure, continues to stress the cul- 
tivation of diversions, — the solitary pastimes, of course, but 
more particularly the social diversions of seeing people. He 
not only keeps talking about this, calling it a duty to oneself, 
but encourages — almost enjoins it — both as a sweetening 
effect upon the cottage family Hfe now and as a habit to be 
carried over into life later on, — one which can turn into 
minutes, hours that then too often drag themselves out into 
seeming days. 

Reading is the chief pastime of a growing group of our blind 
people. Our library, which is the regional one for all New 
England, circulated by mail last year an average of 725 
volumes a month to some 635 outside readers. This is its 
extension service. Present pupils drew out for their own 
pleasure 4,535, about 23^2 times as many as were required 
for class uses alone. While books embossed in Moon's type, 
— the easiest of all tangible systems and therefore especially 
adapted to the newly blinded among the adult, — still hold 
the lead in the outside circulation, it is interesting to note 

22 



that even here in its home field American braille has already 
yielded in number of books circulated to the European uni- 
form system. However, it is only fair to the disappearing 
type to explain that its gradual submergence is in no sense 
due to inferiority but rather to the simple fact that the only 
novels being embossed nowadays are in the new type. In due 
process of time the same supplanting of the old by the new 
will take place within the school also; for last year we intro- 
duced it in the lowest grades. Then, too, since all the recent 
issue of braille music employs the new alphabet in its titles, 
words and expressions and since our chorus learns all its music 
from the tangible score it follows that nearly all pupils can 
already read the new braille. The press of the Illinois school 
has issued most of this music, though our own Howe Memorial 
Press put out last year alone 10,416 pages of it, 3,060 being 
for young beginners. Its fiction output was Drowned Gold, 
Jeremy, St. Abigail of the Pines, Audacious Ann, and an edition 
of The Deer slayer, condensed for the use of schools. It em- 
bossed for general distribution 75 packs of playing cards and 
manufactured some thousands of slates on which to wiite 
in the braille system. It has also brought out a second century 
of the Perkins braillewriters. 

In April we gave our annual demonstration at Jordan Hall, 
Boston, before about five hundred invited guests. His Ex- 
cellency Governor Cox did us the honor to speak. 

Visitors continue to pour in upon the institution, and they 
are all welcome. We invite the public in for special occasions, 
and it comes. The Harvard and RadclifTe professors of 
Social Ethics bring their classes for a whole afternoon each 
fall, a practice our Director encourages by giving them personal 
conduct and explaining things in detail as they go about. 
He is bent on getting across to these selected students the 
meaning of it all both to them and to the bhnd; to them the 
fortifying realization of the capacity of the human spirit 

23 



under the spur of necessity, and to the bhnd the satisfaction 
of knowing that a better understanding of the correct status 
of bUnd people is being disseminated where it can be expected 
to find fertile soil. 

To be able to tell Harvard students that their own university 
has so far recognized The Education of the Blind as a subject 
fit for treatment in an extension half-course offered by its 
graduate school of education, is a matter of some pride. 
Naturally the Perkins Institution fosters this study in every 
reasonable way, throwing open its ample collection of blindiana, 
— Hterature, pictures and casts, — for the theory and its 
school plant for the practice. Last season was the fourth 
consecutive one of the course. Thirteen students took it, 
several coming from distant states, one of them from Japan. 
This gentleman is a graduate of the Imperial University of 
Tokyo, speciahzing in education of the bUnd and the deaf. 
The daily mingling of all these selected people with our regular 
pupils and teachers is mutually stimulating. 

We regard this so-called Harvard course also as an extension 
of the influence of Perkins Institution. The subject, though 
treated generally, speciaUzes most in the direction of teaching; 
and it is hoped, if we can manage to keep the enterprise going 
for a few years more, that that which now is but a locally 
recognized need will become a widely justified demand. A 
sister school, that in Philadelphia, is sending one of its teachers 
to take the course. Three of our own teachers have taken it, 
and five more have registered for the coming season. Mr. Allen 
has already announced to his faculty that he expects soon to 
make special certification from this or a similar course the 
ladder of promotion at Perkins. 

Another extension service we expect to establish is the 
creation of scholarships at Perkins Institution for the voca- 
tional training of such exceptional bhnd people, handicapped 
in means, as need to study in a large educational center like 

24 



Boston. We have spoken in recent reports of this need. We 
now gratefully announce that, while for this purpose more 
money is wanted, the Fisher Fund, helped by several generous 
donations, has been built up so that with its aid we have 
been enabled this year to invite to Perkins a promising stu- 
dent from Porto Rico, who is herself bUnd and who is pre- 
paring to teach others who are bUnd at home in Ponce. There 
the pioneer school for such children of Porto Rico has been 
founded by Miss Cordero whom we trained a few years ago, 
before the time of the Harvard class. This is an example of 
what such a fund may accompHsh. We are very grateful 
that we can extend our exceptional faciUties, and those which 
exist around us here, to one from a far-away region where 
nothing similar exists. We beUeve that this money is most 
usefully spent in so broadening the field of our work and that 
it will later help many others. Also, as only the more promis- 
ing appHcants will be taken, money to be spent from this fund 
will probably have more result on the individual helped than 
a like amount spent on the unexceptional student. Both 
from the standpoint of the cause and the standpoint of the 
individual it will be well appUed. We earnestly hope that 
much more money for the Fisher Fund, or for similar funds, 
will be given us, coming either in large or small contributions. 
Once it becomes well-known that such a chance for education 
is being offered here, there will be no lack of deserving appU- 
cants. 

We sent back last summer to his home in Hawaii a young 
Corean, who had been bUnded by accident in the sugar-cane 
fields. Friends had sent him to Watertown for readjustment 
and training; and this is the equipment he carried away: a 
working knowledge of EngHsh spoken, written and read, a 
grammar-school education wdth abihty to use a typewTiter, 
to sing and to play the piano, to do all sorts of chair- and 
rush-seating, to make reed baskets, rugs and brooms, to 

25 



renovate mattresses and to tune pianos. He also carried a 
full kit of tuning tools. Furthermore, he took back with 
him habits of study and of thrift, a fine physique, a cheerful, 
inviting personality, a determination to make good, and 
other qualities which we think of as successful socialization. 
His presence among our people at school was as inspiring to 
them as association with them was to him. 

Still another instance of Perkins institution extension is 
our Works Department at South Boston. Since its office 
and salesroom has been located at No. 383 Boylston Street, 
Boston, this department has been of little expense to the 
institution and the pubhc, — for the past decade none at all. 
This is a very unusual condition of affairs in workshops for 
the blind the world over. There are two main reasons for 
this success: first, the shop is a small private enterprise, 
paying reduced rent and no taxes, whose managers have 
built up a good business chiefly in mattress work, which is a 
selective handicraft; second, it hmits its number of employees 
to its amount of business in mattresses, pillows and chairs. 
The shop is not conducted to see how many bhnd people it 
can give some sort of employment to, but to see how many 
competent workers it can keep busy and satisfied. This 
number is about twenty. It has paid them over $16,000 the 
past fiscal year, which is 10% more than the best previous 
year and means an average wage of $75 a month to the eight- 
een men and women in constant attendance. The spirit of 
these employees is co-operative. To be associated in success 
is ever gratifying. They are therefore interested to help 
improve the business; they realize that to do good work not 
only helps them but at the same time helps other bhnd people 
to get employment. Since they are paid by the piece, most 
of them are only too willing to work overtime in emergencies. 
A public workshop could not well do this. We are proud 
of this department and congratulate both its participating 

26 



workers and its efficient, sympathetic manager. All Greater 
Boston knows of this shop and its salesroom. Given famiUes 
have patronized it into the second generation. They realize 
that the service is mutual. Such an agency in their midst 
stands as a tangible evidence of practical training in ''helping 
the bhnd to help themselves." And not a few have been led 
by it to make bequests to the institution. Like the Water- 
town tower, one of its purposes is publicity. 

On June 7 the alumnse, forty strong, met at the school. 
This yearly gathering acts always as a spur to the under- 
graduates. The six graduating girls held on June 18 the 
most delightful Class Day exercises imaginable. No school 
girls could have carried out a brighter program. On the last 
evening of the term the graduating boys held their reception 
and dance, to which they invited in their parents and their 
girl friends from home and from the neighborhood. It was a 
very pretty affair. 

On October 1 of the current year, 1923, the number of 
bUnd persons registered at the Perkins Institution was 305, or 
four fewer than on the same date of the previous year. This 
number includes 76 boys and 82 girls in the upper school, 54 
boys and 58 girls in the lower school, 12 teachers and officers 
and 23 adults in the workshop at South Boston. There have 
been 46 admitted and 50 discharged during the year. 

Causes of Blindness of Pupils admitted during the School 
Year 1922-1923. — Ophthalmia neonatorum, 6; Ulcerative 
keratitis, 1; Accident, 3; Optic atrophy, 14; Congenital 
defects, 8; Congenital nystagmus, 3; Albinism and nystag- 
mus, 4; Retinitis pigmentosa and congenital cataract, 1; 
Buphthalmos, 1; Brain Tumor, 3; Tuberculosis of the eye, 
1; Neuro-retinitis, 1; Rheumatic iritis, 1; Acute cyclitis, 1; 
Corneal opacities, 1; Leucoma, 1. 



27 



Death of Membeks of the Corporation. 

William Appleton Burnham; Mrs. Harriet, widow of 
Greely S. Curtis; Horatio Greenough Curtis; George 
A. Draper; Mrs. Mary Duncan Thorndike, wife of 
Charles Henry Fiske; Charles G. Green; Miss Har- 
riet A. Littell; Mrs. Susan Mason, wife of Justice Wil- 
liam Caleb Loring; John Lowell; Mrs. Lucia Clapp, 
widow of Dr. William No yes; W. Prentiss Parker; Mrs. 
Cora Lyman, widow of Gardiner Howland Shaw; Henry 
Southworth Shaw; Francis Shaw Sturgis; Henry M. 
Whitney. 

All which is respectfully submitted by 

FRANCIS HENRY APPLETON, 
WILLIAM ENDICOTT, 
PAUL E. FITZPATRICK, 
PAUL REVERE FROTHINGHAM, 
G. PEABODY GARDNER, Jr., 
ROBERT H. HALLOWELL, 
JAMES ARNOLD LOWELL, 
CHARLES E. OSGOOD, 
MARIA PURDON, 
OLIVE W. PUTNAM, 
WILLIAM L. RICHARDSON, 
LEVERETT SALTONSTALL, 

Trustees. 



28 



FROM REPORTS MADE BY TEACHERS, SCHOOL 

YEAR 1922-1924. 



My visit to Perkins as a grown-up, seeing pupil preparing to become 
tutor to a blind child in Italy, which has lasted from the first week in 
May until the closing of school, has been a most delightful experience 
for me and I have realized more than ever before the value of the 
opportunities offered to the students. I studied the following sub- 
jects: — Braille, Music Braille, the use of the Braille writer, square- 
hand writing, knitting, basketry, handweaving, mat-making, and plas- 
ticine and clay modelling, trying to work, as far as possible, with the 
pupils. 

This working together with the pupils has proved of greatest value 
to me; in fact, I consider it the most important feature of my prepa- 
ration for teaching, because I have been enabled thereby to observe 
the work and progress of the pupils — the daily routine work of the 
entire class, not on exhibition, but "at home" in the classroom. The 
casual observer who spends only one day perhaps in the classroom 
often sees the brightest child at his worst and the dullest at his best 
and cannot understand the difficulties and accomplishments of each. 
But I was able to study the various children and their problems and 
the methods used by the experienced teachers to help them solve these 
problems. I compared my own work with theirs, and observed also 
the difficulties caused by the double handicap of blindness and dull 
mentality, or clumsy fingers, other physical defects, laziness or lack of 
interest. In the knitting class I was permitted to help in correcting 
mistakes and, on one occasion, was able to assist the teacher by 
taking over all of her classwork when she was obliged to be absent 
for a day. 

The spirit of co-operation on the part of the teachers has been most 
marked, for they have helped me in every way possible. It seems to me 
that the effect on the pupils of having an "outsider" in class is rather 

29 



good than otherwise, for it helps to arouse their interest — partly be- 
cause they find they are doing something which another grown-up 
besides the teacher considers sufficiently worth while to learn. The 
spirit of competition too is stirred; I found the children continually 
trying to keep up to me, — "the new pupil." In knitting class, one 
little girl, who ordinarily accomplished not more than four or five rows 
during the hour, by "racing" with me, found, at the end of the hour, 
that she had finished twelve rows, — almost as many as I had done, — 
and was quite proud of the fact. 

I was so completely accepted by the children as one of them that a 
little girl, in all seriousness, offered, one rainy day, to lend me some of 
her playthings, because I could not go w^alking as I had planned. 

Once in weaving, when I had made a bad mistake, one of the boys 
said to me in great surprise, "Why, can't you see it?" and I was 
obliged to confess to carelessness. Perhaps the idea that all mistakes 
made by pupils are not due to lack of vision was not a new one to him, 
but, at least, it was a wholesome example ! 

On several occasions I was asked to act as guide to a symphony 
concert, to concerts given by the Glee Club, and to the bird lectures, — 
always a pleasure to me, because of the contact with small groups. 
On another occasion I accompanied a group of the younger girls to 
Cambridge to hear the step-singing at Harvard. The girls thoroughly 
enjoyed the music, but for them there was so much more than the 
singing to be enjoyed! There was the library, with its many steps 
which must be climbed and counted, the pillars around which each 
must climb to ascertain their size, the lawns and the numerous other 
buildings. The raised map of the grounds was also a source of pro- 
longed study and interest. But a very important and pleasurable 
feature of the trip was the fact that we arrived home very late — 
thereby postponing bedtime! 

These seven weeks of study here have given me not only the funda- 
mentals of the technical knowledge I needed, but also renewed in- 
spiration and desire for service. Eleanor E. Kelly. 



30 



The Dog. 

A seven weeks old puppy came to our schoolroom one afternoon; 
she cried because she was in a new place among strangers. She had 
been expected by us all, but she was a bigger baby than we had looked 
for. After long discussion we named her Nancy. 

All the boys had to touch her. Although she cried much we some- 
how did our schoolwork. 

Kermit brought her milk, but she still cried; the milk was cold, 
she would not touch it. After school I took her to my room, gave her 
warm milk; it was so good she stood on three legs and almost fell 
into the dish. Then after it was eaten she howled. She howled all 
the time someone was not holding her. To let the household sleep I 
held her nearly all night; she had the colic. Next day in the sloyd 
classroom we fed her boiled milk and crackers. She grew better, she 
began to play, she stilled her howling and slept awhile. 

Then we worked at our tasks. When she was awake she wanted to 
be under our feet, and howled when closed in the basket. Our work- 
ing powers were distracted between nursing the puppy, watching her 
try to play, and cleaning up after her. So we did not make good 
headway with our work and found ourselves still working inside, when 
in other years we were through and outside in the garden. However, 
we wanted the dog, and if she did take up some of our time she repaid 
us with her play. 

The boys said Nancy was just the same as their babies at home. She 
made us stop work to attend to her, even when in her pen. 

Later the puppy learned how to go about, and, like their small 
brothers and sisters, began to bother them with taking their things. 
If they dropped anything, she got it. To enable us to get our work 
done she had to be chained; then she howled. However, we tried 
not to hear her; presently she would give a sigh and go to sleep. 

The process of worming the puppy was of great interest to some of 
the boys, especially the fact that she also had had a dose of castor oil. 
This brought a great deal of sympathy from some. Then came, 
boylike, the question of how many worms. The fact of some of their 
small sisters or brothers having had worms made the dog seem more 
human. 

31 



With spring and the grass Nancy was allowed out on the playground. 
She was not liked then, as they found she did not allow them to play 
football. However, by keeping her in part of the playtime, this trouble 
was overcome. It was also found that for the dog's own health, since 
she played too hard, a program for the playground had to be arranged. 

The boys often have said that the dog minded better than they; 
also that she was wise, and soon became far more cleanly in her habits 
than some of the boys were who were many times her age. What all 
learned from her was cleanliness of body and of housing quarters, and 
from her actions obedience and loyalty to her owner; that they must 
have clean hands so as to keep her white fur clean; that, if they wanted 
her to keep well, they must not let her overdo in play; that very 
plain food is best — for dogs. 

I kept Nancy at home with me all summer. The boys wondered 
if she would know them again this fall. She did. But she studied all 
newcomers with eyes and nose. 

She has divided us all into two classes, those w^ho can watch her 
wiggly ways and those who cannot. She does not often parade before 
any one of the latter, but in order to get his attention will put her 
forepaws up on him as far as she can reach. 

When we play with a football in the gymnasium Nancy has to be 
tied. But when we play running games she will lie still. 

I am very sure that all the boys have been greatly benefited from 
association with this dog. She has made them tenderer, more chari- 
table towards one another and more obedient to me. They seem to 
understand themselves better. A boy who grows up without a dog 
misses a lot of what some people may call socializing experience. 

The Rabbits. 
The rabbits had a prosperous year, — the final count being three 
mothers and seventeen young. Several had died, which always brought 
sadness upon Joseph, the head animal keeper. The last of these he 
and a few boys as mourners had buried with services, repeating them 
on Memorial Day, very seriously, with music, flowers and prayer, as 
Mr. Allen who was present, can testify. Later its little body was 
exhumed and reburied in the "animal cemetery." 

32 



At the close of school in June I gave Joseph his pet rabbit, "May," 
as reward for faithfulness. He said he hardly deserved to have her 
because he had forgotten once in a while to feed the animals and had 
not kept the barn clean enough. 

Well, after he and most others had gone home and all the rabbits 
had been boarded out for the summer and I had had a chance to put 
my own classroom in order, I started, broom in hand, for the barn. 
The three remaining boys had been asking me if I had seen the barn. 
Such a question had always meant before that it was untidy and 
needed my help. Now these boys rather eagerly accompanied me and 
when I opened the door exulted in the surprise I got. The floor had 
been scrubbed white, and everything was in its place. They said they 
had done this to square themselves with Joseph to whom they con- 
fessed to having been mean, often bothering him while at his chores. 
It had taken them a whole afternoon to do this work. 

If this is the way boys respond to the lesson of responsibility as 
taught through the needs of the pets, I feel repaid for my additional 
care and early rising during the first weeks of the baby rabbits' lives, 
when I dared not let more than one understanding boy help about the 
pens. Rosalind L. Houghton. 



Memorial Day in the Boys' Department, May 30, 1923. 

Memorial Day being in weather all that a holiday should be, every 
one proceeded to enjoy himself in the way that most appealed to him. 
The boys were rather individual in their tastes, and showed consider- 
able independence in carrying out their ideas. Those who generally 
go home for the week-ends, went away as usual; a number of them had 
friends who came to see them, and they took great pleasure in showing 
these friends about their school home, which at this season of the 
year is especially beautiful; others were invited out to spend the whole 
or a part of the day with friends or relatives. 

Of those who stayed here, some of the older ones seized upon the 
time to get ready their written accounts of a visit they had recently 
made to George Hagopian's poultry farm, but this was wholly vol- 
untary and applied to a few for only a part of the day. Some enter- 

33 



prising boys I heard of proceeded to clean house! They cleaned their 
rooms and cleared out their possessions, looking towards the end of the 
term not far away. In one instance a hose was commandeered to 
water some plants and seed beds. Playing with the water is always 
good fun, and probably it did not hurt the plants greatly. The foot- 
ball field attracted groups of boys during the day, as it always does. 
Small groups also collected on the grass at different times to play with 
jackknives. A good many, with seeing boys in the lead, went for walks 
in the morning or afternoon. The Boy Scouts in uniform went with 
Mr. Stanton, their Scout Master, to march with the Watertown Scouts 
to the cemetery and attend the Memorial exercises. They made a 
good appearance, Mr. Stanton said, and did well. One of them, 
rather leg weary on his return, said he thought he walked for "miles". 

A group of boys of the poultry classes spent a good part of the morn- 
ing in dressing chickens and, I judge from the reports, had a good 
deal of fun over it. They went on hikes in the afternoon. Some of 
them said they followed the procession to the cemetery and attended 
the exercises of the day. Mr. Allen says that one or two small boys 
were happy in going about with him digging borer grubs out of trees. 
Mr. Minner with a few of the smaller boys spent a large part of the 
morning rigging up a seat for their little boat; then finding that the 
oarlocks they had did not fit, went to the power house to get them 
ground down. After dinner, they launched their craft and rowed with 
Mr. Minner down to a small island, on which they landed and took 
possession, deciding it would be a fine place to build Indian huts 
"some day." 

At supper time the households met and related their day's adven- 
tures, and some of the tales occasioned a good deal of glee. 

On the whole I think the day was very profitably spent, and the 
fact that there was help on the part of the officers, but very little 
dictation as to the manner of the activities, not only gave more pleasure 
to the boys, but helped them learn self-dependence in taking care of 
free and unassigned time. Jessica L. Langworthy. 



34 



The Scout Camping Trip. 

At twelve o'clock, Tuesday, June 12, fourteen boys and their Scout 
Master from the school, arrived at the Dover Scout Camp owned by 
the Boston Council of Boy Scouts. The majority were totally blind, 
yet were just as cheerful and courageous as the other Boy Scouts. 
Like them, they enjoy hearing the birds sing, and many recognize 
them by their song. One of our troop remarked that while on the 
camping trip he had learned to know the songs of a large number of 
new birds. 

Near the cabin where we slept, stood an observatory, about twenty- 
five feet high, which our boys, like all boys, wanted to climb to the 
top of. I was interested to find when we returned to Watertown that 
one of them undertook to make a model of the tower on this observa- 
tory, to take home with him. 

By climbing and by being obliged to walk quite a distance over 
rough ground for their drinking water, the boys became very self- 
reliant and independent, even going back and forth alone. While on 
their hikes, some of those who cannot see at all asked to walk along 
by themselves. 

Although being kept awake the first night by the "cool breezes" 
and inexperience in sleeping on bare springs, the boys made no com- 
plaint but only laughed and joked as they made preparations for the 
following nights. Very seldom did a boy confess to being fatigued at 
night, even after taking a ten mile hike and doing his regular chores, 
which consisted of chopping wood, washing dishes, getting water for 
the camp, cooking, etc. 

All were anxious to know the different trees that grew near the cabin, 
and the semi-sighted ones wished also to learn the poisonous plants 
that grew in the woods. Besides learning about the trees, the boys 
had instruction in first aid, in the building of fires, and in signalling, 
all which they followed up with actual practice. 

We emphasize neatness with our scouts as they do with the seeing 
scouts. They were orderly about their bunks, clean about the camp 
and very anxious to keep the whole cabin neat. When we left on 
Friday morning, June 15, they took special pains to leave everything 
in spick and span order. 

35 



The boys took pride in standing at "Assembly" and "Retreat" 
while the flag was raised and lowered. "Taps" was sounded by one 
when all the troop had gone to bed. 

In the three years that I have been at Perkins, I have never seen 
our boys appear so thoroughly normal as they did on our camping 
trip. Harold W. Stanton. 

The Perkins-Overbrook Track Meet. 

Between the successive track teams of Perkins and Overbrook there 
exists what may be regarded as a standing challenge, according to the 
unwritten terms of which, teams from these schools stage a track 
meet each year held alternately at Perkins and Overbrook. The meet 
occurs, of course, in the regular track season — near the close of the 
academic year — and in spite of the mutual understanding between 
the two schools that the meet shall take place, it is each year ofiicially 
established through a challenge duly rendered by the proper team. 
The expenses of these meets are met by athletic organizations in each 
of the schools, and these organizations are entirely student affairs — 
they are not handled by the management of the respective institutions. 
The funds which these associations have are raised through member- 
ship dues, proceeds from sales, parties of various kinds, dances, plays, 
etc. 

In 1923, Perkins challenged Overbrook, the challenge was accepted, 
and the meet set for June 2nd on Perkins field. 

The Overbrook team — four boys — accompanied by the principal in- 
structor of their school, arrived at Watertown Friday morning, June 1st. 
They spent Friday getting acquainted with our boys and becoming 
familiar with our athletic field. Friday evening a little entertainment 
was given in Eliot Cottage for the visitors. Miss Potter and some 
boys from her public speaking classes presented a one-act play called 
"Swimmin' Pools", Miss Potter herself gave two or three readings, 
and her friend. Miss Andrew, of Boston, who has been very generous 
toward us with her time and talent, gave other very enjoyable readings. 
The boys' glee club sang several numbers, and the entertainment was 
closed by the serving of cake and fruit punch by the house matron, 
Mrs. Lummus. 

36 



The meet began Saturday afternoon at two o'clock, and lasted 
until about six o'clock. Mr. Crowell and Mr. Waugh of Watertown, 
and our Mr. Goss, acted as officials. We had a good crowd, and the 
excitement was high, but no new records were made. The Overbrook 
boys were the victors, their score being 42 against Perkins 21. The 
individual records may be had at the office of the Perkins gymnasium. 

A banquet was given in Bridgman cottage at seven o'clock, Saturday 
evening. It was planned by Mrs. Minner, matron of the cottage, 
assisted by several teachers and officers of the institution. Miss 
Meldrum of the Domestic Science Department gave her expert advice 
in planning the menu, and assisted in making the decorations. Our 
Mr. and Mrs. Gibson lettered and decorated the place cards. Mrs. 
Mansur, Miss Woodworth, and Miss Lux also assisted in making the 
decorations and carrying out the plans of the banquet. The matrons 
of Tompkins and Moulton cottages lent chairs, tables and silver. 
Cobb, Bates and Yerxa Company gave the Perkins Athletic Associa- 
tion the benefit of wholesale prices on supplies. The Mitchell, Wood- 
bury Company was kind enough to lend a dozen glass candlesticks and 
five dozen sherbet glasses. At the tables places were laid for fifty 
persons. Eight of the younger boys from the upper school acted as 
waiters. The honors for winners in the meet were gold, silver and 
bronze medals, and these were presented at the banquet by Mr. 
Cowgill, principal instructor of the Overbrook school, Mr. Allen 
having had to leave early. Speeches were made by Mr. Allen, Mr. 
Cowgill, Mr. Minner, and the Captains of the track teams, — Charles 
Piscowski of Overbrook, and Arthur Katwick of Perkins. After the 
banquet the boys gathered in the cottage living room to sing and chat. 

Sunday morning we took the Overbrook boys for a row on the 
Charles River. In the afternoon the Perkins Athletic Association 
conducted the visitors to Nantasket Beach, where they treated them 
to the various concessions. 

Monday morning Mr. Cowgill took his boys to visit historic Boston 
and the workshops for the blind in Cambridge and South Boston. 
The Overbrook team left for home Monday afternoon. They were 
escorted to the car by the entire boys' school. C. B. Minner. 



37 



An Experiment in Dramatics. 

In a recent number of "The Youth's Companion" there appeared 
on "The Children's Page" a three-scene dramatization of "The Little 
Brown Hen." It appealed to me at once as something adaptable to 
one of my classes in expression, composed of ninth grade and first- 
year high pupils. Though the writer intended the little play for child 
actors and an audience of children, I immediately wanted to experi- 
ment with it in a class of big girls — blind girls. 

There was no time in which to put the scenes into Braille; the girls 
would have to desire very much to act in this play, in order to find 
the time for memorizing parts; for Perkins girls in their 'teens, learning 
a great variety of things every day both in school and out, can truth- 
fully plead "no time" if extras are requested for which they are not 
decidedly enthusiastic. And I, for my part, am not always satisfied 
with memorized lines presented by pupils in the expression class. The 
inflection does not please, the words too often are uttered without 
thought. Therefore, for good reasons, I made no attempt to put the 
scenes into Braille. 

A quicker way to present to my pupils the subject matter was to 
read over to myself, thoughtfully and several times, the first scenes; 
then to go into class and introduce the characters. Next I set the 
stage, talked of the stage properties, and proceeded to talk for the 
characters. I gave their lines as well as I could without having 
memorized them. I sat down for this one, and stood up for another 
one; I walked, talked, and made my exit. 

Then I called for volunteers: who would come forward to take the 
parts, remembering the speeches as well as they could, making up 
their own, if necessary? Seven hands (there were seventeen girls in 
the class) rose at once. The hands expressed eagerness. 

Who would be the selfish brother? Three girls were ready to show 
what he was like. Who, the unselfish brother? More hands — five or 
six. He was a popular youth. "Who will be the little brown hen?" 
Only one hand was raised. The teacher waited a moment. She 
realized that the necessary "cluck, cluck, clucking" was the draw- 
back here. Should she say, "All right. Bertha, you may be the little 
brown hen?" Bertha's hand was high in air. Evidently she wanted 

38 



to be chosen. So the teacher chose her. And only two or three 
smiles were seen, not a sound of a laugh was heard as Bertha, the 
only negro in the class, arose to impersonate the little brown hen. 

The scene proved worth while. The audience of pupils listened with 
interest to well-inflected speeches and to a most excellent clucking. 
There was an occasional laugh at lines improvised at a moment's need 
— and a general enthusiasm for play-acting. 

At the second lesson, the first scene was completed with the appear- 
ance of another character, Gretchen. Just as this little maiden was 
pleading with the selfish brother for more time in which to get the 
rent, an unexpected audience appeared in the form of Miss Cross 
escorting a teacher from Brighton with twelve or fifteen of her eighth 
grade pupils. These visitors were invited to take seats in the rear of 
the assembly room and listen to the scene repeated from the beginning. 
Both teacher and pupils showed pleasure in this dramatic work (perhaps 
play is the better name) and expressed regret when they had to leave. 

At the present time, my class is in the midst of the second scene of 
the little sketch printed in "The Youth's Companion". Enthusiasm 
still prevails, and inflection is natural because spontaneous. I feel 
that for classroom work this method of studying dramatics is more 
successful than that of learning the parts word for word. Pupils really 
think, anyway. If their language is crude, it at least improves week 
by week; and sometimes, so far as wit is concerned, a pupil improves 
upon the original text. Genevieve M. Haven. 

An Evening with Barrie. 

On Monday, November 6, the open meeting of the Howe Reading 
Club took place in Dwight Hall. The entertainment was in the hands 
of the executive committee, which carried out the decision, made by 
the club at the last annual meeting in December 1921, to consider 
Barrie and his writings. 

First, Miss Swinerton refreshed our memories as to the facts of 
Barrie's life. Next, Miss Haven read some beautiful selections from 
"Margaret Ogilvy," thus pointing out the lovely influence of Barrie's 
mother. Within a few days several of the grammar-school girls 

39 



started of their own accord to carry out a resolve to read this book — 
Scotch and all! 

The remainder of the program was given over to the second act of 
"Quality Street," in which the members of the executive committee — 
teachers and pupils alike — took part. Esther Farnsworth was quite 
a "star" as Miss Phoebe. She became enthusiastic enough to rent a 
wig for the occasion. Dorothy Brown made a capital Miss Susan. 
The school-room scene — dunce, naughty boy and all — created quite 
a bit of merriment. In fact the audience was very responsive through- 
out the act and had no fault to find with a somewhat crude stage- 
setting. Surely the costumes made up for that! Lady Campbell said 
that Miss Lowe's poke-bonnet was startlingly like one her mother 
used to have. When music was needed the drum and bugles were 
heard in the distance. Altogether the effect was very pleasing. 

Elsie H. Simonds. 



40 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS. 



I. — Acknowledgments for Concerts, Recitals and Lectures. 

To Mr. W. H. Brennan, for thirty tickets for the course of symphony concerts 
in Sanders Theatre, Cambridge. 

To Mr. Joseph C. Walker, secretary, for fifty tickets for a concert by the 
Cecilia Society in Symphony Hall, Boston. 

To Mr. William Strong, for five tickets for a program of music for two piano- 
fortes, given by himself and Mr. Herbert R. Boardman. 

To Mrs. Anita Davis-Chase, for an average of ten tickets for each of three 
recitals in Jordan Hall, Boston. 

To Miss Alice Hutchinson, secretary, for three season tickets for a series of 
eight concerts by the Chromatic Club. 

To Mrs. Leo Ecker, for three tickets for concerts by the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra. 

To Mr. Arthur Hadley and Miss Helen Hadley, for twenty tickets for a 
song recital by Mr. CoUn O'More, assisted by Emilie Rose Knox, vioUnist, in 
SjTn phony Hall. 

To Mrs. A. Lincoln Filene, for fifteen tickets for a concert by pupils of the 
Boston Music School Settlement in the Copley-Plaza Hotel. 

To Mrs. A. M. Peabody, for a general invitation to attend Mr. Edward Avis's 
illustrated bird lecture in Bulfinch Place Church, Boston. 

To Miss Edith Torrey, for ten tickets for a pupils' recital in the Torrey Studio, 
Boston. 

To Miss Helen W. Seavey, for an invitation to attend Miss Grace Cornell's 
lecture on "Art as an Economic Factor" in the Boston Public Library. 

IL — Acknowledgments for Recitals, Lectures and Dramatics in Our 

Hall. 

To Prof. Edward Abner Thompson, for a reading of "Disraeli." 

To Mr. Donald McMillan, for a lecture on his trips to the Arctic. 

To Miss Ethel Potter, for a reading of "A Kiss for Cinderella." 

To Dr. Bricker of the Mayo Sanatorium, for a talk on "The Care of the 
Teeth." 

To Mr. WiNTHROP Packard, for a talk on birds. 

To Mrs. Lucia Ames Mead, for a lecture on "Some Phases of International 
Affairs." 

To Conmiissioner John P. Johnson, for a talk on "Immigration." 

To Prof. Albert H. Gilmer and pupUs from Tufts and Jackson colleges, for a 
presentation of "The Servant in the House." 

To Mr. Z. W. Hauk of the Hill Bros. Co., for a motion picture of the date in- 
dustry, with accompanying description. 

To Miss Marion Chapin, for an organ recital. 

To the Rev. Edward Dwt:ght Eaton, D.D., for a lecture on "Hawaii." 

To Mr. William Strong, for a pianoforte recital. 

To Mr. Arthur E. Wilson, for a talk on birds. 

To Mr. Herman de Anguera, for a talk on "South America." 

To Dr. S.\muel P. Hayes, for a talk on "Judging Human Character." 

III. — Acknowledgments for Periodicals and Newspapers. 

CaUfornia News, Christian Record (embossed), Colorado Index, Florida School 
Herald, Illuminator (embossed). Industrial Enterprise, Juvenile Braille Monthly, 
Matilda Ziegler Magazine (embossed). The Mentor, Ohio Chronicle, Our Dumb 
Animals, Red, White and Blue, Rocky Mountain Leader, Students Rev-iew, The 
Theosophical Path, The Utah Eagle, Virginia Guide, West Virginia Tablet. 

41 



IV. — Acknowledgments for Gifts and Services. 

To Dr. Henry Hawkins and Dr. Harold B. Chandler, for professional services. 

To the Massachusetts Charitable Eye and Ear Infirmary, the Massa- 
chusetts HoMCEOPATHic HosPiTAL and St. Elizabeth's Hospital, for care and 
treatment of pupils. 

To Mrs. Walter C. Baylies, Mrs. John Chipman Gray, Mrs. Henry H. 
Sprague, in memory of Miss Elizabeth Ward, the Primary Department of the 
Sunday School of the Union Church of Weymouth and East Braintree, and Miss 
Susan Avery's class in that Sunday School, the Kindergarten Departments of the 
Eliot Bible School of Roxbury, the Junior High School of Wellesley Hills, Mrs. 
Hyslop, Mrs. E. Preble Motley, Miss Ella L. Loomer, Mrs. J. T. Atwood 
and daughter, and Miss Harriet Littell, for gifts of money. 

To Miss Esther Pratt, Miss Ruth Colburn, Miss Emma Kingsland, Mr. V. 
Maschio, Mr. M. Ferguson, Mrs. A. W. Tobey, Mr. P. F. Leland, Miss Ella 
L. LooMER, Miss Harriet Littell, Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Goodwin, Mrs. White, 
Mrs. Reinhold Ruelberg, Mrs. Alexander Cochrane, Lady Campbell, Mrs. 
Joseph Hardy, the Liberty Orchards Co., and the Hill Bros. Co., through Mr. 
Z. W. Hauk, for confectionery, fruit, preserves and ice cream. 

To Miss Mary Adams, Miss White, Mrs. Henry H. Sprague, Mrs. Frank 
Walker and Miss Teague, for dolls, toys and other gifts. 

To Mrs. E. L. MacMahon, for a pianoforte. 

To Mrs. A. C. Cousins, for a pianola with records; and to Mr. Joshua Loen- 
BAUM and Miss Emma Kingsland, for records. 

To the Committee for the Blind, Temple Israel, for a Victrola with records, 
and for clothing; also to that Committee, to Mrs. David Evans, to a Girls' Club 
at Behnont Unitarian Church, and to Mrs. Malcolm Taylor, for parties for the 
children; and to Mrs. Stewart Burchard, for transportation in the last-named 
instance. 

To Mr. and Mrs. William H. Claflin, for a sleigh ride for the children "in 
memory of Mrs. Thomas Mack." 

To Mrs. Galen Flanders, Mrs. Pike, Mrs. Homer Rogers' Sunday School 
class at Trinity Church, Boston, The Ladies' Guild of St. John's M. E. Church, 
Watertown, Mrs. I. M. Slocum, Mrs. J. Adler and Mrs. Sigmund Adler, Mrs. 
M. J. Alland and Mrs. W. H. Lamarine, for clothing. 

To Mrs. de Anguera, for a mounted fishhawk. 

To Mr. Harrie E. Waite, Dr. Reinhold Ruelberg, Miss Belle N. Clarke, 
Miss Georgia Trader, Mr. Unosuke Kawamoto, the Lend a Hand Mission, 
Boston, and the American Brotherhood for the Blind, for paper and books. 

To Mr. H. W. Tyler, for raffia. 



42 



LIST OF PUPILS. 

October 1, 1923. 



Upper School. 



Baker, Elsie. 
Bazarian, Mary. 
Bessette, Vedora. 
Blake, Clarissa H. 
Boone, Florence M. 
Bosma, Gelske. 
Bradbury, Thelma M. 
Brooks, Madeline D. 
Brown, Dorothy M. 
Buckley, Alice. 
Cambridge, Mollie. 
Clancy, Elizabeth. 
Coakley, Alice L. 
Cohen, Ruth. 
Colaizzi, Josephine. 
Comtois, Eva. 
Costa, Marianna. 
Demers, Germaine M. 
Doyle, Mary E. 
Drake, Helena M. 
Dufresne, Irene. 
Dunn, Mabel C. 
Dunn, Mary C. 
Duquette, Irene. 
Eastman, M. Albertina. 
EUiott, Ethel S. 
Elliott, Mary. 
Ennis, Ethel F. 
Farnham, Barbara E. 
Fiske, Dorothy T. 
Flanagan, M. Ursula. 
Foster, Mabel G. 
Gagnon, Eva. 
Gilbert, Eva V. 
Goff, Eva. 
Hamel, Irene. 
Hanley, Mary. 
Haswell, Thelma R. 
Hilton, Charlotte. 
Hinckley, Dorothy M. 
IngersoU, Dorothy. 
Jefferson, Annie. 
Kazanjian, Zaroohie. 
Keefe, Mildred. 
KeUey, Beulah C. 
Lagerstrom, Ellen M. 
Lanoue, Edna. 
Lanoue, Helen. 
Laurenzo, Carolina. 
Leavitt, Ella C. 
Leppanen, Mary. 
L'Heureux, Juliette. 
Matthews, Edith M. 
McGovern, Velma. 
McMeekin, Jennie. 
Murphy, Ellen. 



Nadeau, Olivina M. 
Noon, Rita A. 
Ogilvie, Hilda M. 
Parker, Ethel I. 
Person, Erine A. 
Poirier, Delina M. 
Pond, Flora E. 
Rankin, M. Dorothy. 
Rose, Sadie. 
Saladino, Rose M. 
Santos, Emily. 
Severance, Georgia M, 
Shaw, Helena. 
Shea, Mary Ellen. 
Sim, Ruby E. 
Simmons, Bertha. 
Skipp, Doris M. 
Smith, Dorothy L. 
Stutwoota, Mary. 
Thebeau, Marie. 
Trudel, Olive C. 
Turner, Mildred H. 
Wall, Agnes M. 
Weathers, Dorothy. 
Wilcox, Bertha M. 
Wolf, Hedwig. 
Amiro, Gilbert. 
Antonucci, Alberto. 
Barrett, Robert C. 
Behnsky, Samuel. 
Bergeron, Albert. 
Blair, Herman A. 
Carlos, Antone F. 
Chandler, James L. 
Combs, Raymond L. 
Conley, Edward. 
Cormier, Alfred. 
CuUen, George F. 
Curtiss, Miles B. 
Dame, Leo. 
DiMartino, Matthew. 
Dougherty, Alexander W. 
Dow, Ralph E. F. 
Eaton, Charles P. 
Egan, John P. 
Epaminonda, John. 
Evans, Walter C. 
Frcnde, John. 
Gaffney, George J. 
Gagnon, Lionel. 
Gagnon, R6n6. 
Gearrey, Raymond E. 
Goguen, Raoul. 
Gould, Francis E. 
Grime, G. Edward. 
Hanley, Thomas A. 



43 



Hannon, James E. 
Hartselle, Cecil H. 
Hendrick, Horatio W. 
Jablonski, Joseph. 
Jenkins, Edward W. 
Katwick, Arthur D. 
Keefe, Clarence G. 
Laminan, Oiva. 
Laminan, Toivo. 
Lavoie, J. H. Alphonse. 
Leone, Amadeo. 
Le Roi, Francis H. 
Libby, A. Cleveland. 
Lippitt, Raymond A. 
MacGinnis, Raymond H. 
Maloney, Everett S. 
Marchesio, Aldo. 
McCarthy, Eugene C. 
Medeiros, John. 
Mennassian, Souran. 
Meuse, Lawrence A. 
Michaud, J. Armand. 
Morse, Kenneth. 



Munro, George H. 
Navarra, Gaspere. 
Paquette, Armand. 
Piccolo, R. Albert. 
Rego, Peter. 
Reinert, Alfred E. 
Reinert, Gustav. 
Reynolds, Waldo F. 
Rosenbloom, Robert. 
Rubin, Manual. 
St. George, Wilham. 
Shulman, George. 
Silva, Arthur P. 
Slaby, Peter J. 
Stone, Walter C. 
Traub, H. Spencer. 
Vaillancourt, Maurice A. 
Vance, Alvin L. 
Wesson, Kermit O. 
Weston, Gordon W. 
Winton, Henry W. 
Withers, Harold. 
Young, Vinal R. 



Lower School. 



Ahneda, Maria R. 
Badrosian, Mary. 
Barnard, Ehza B. 
BeUveau, Leontine T. 
Braley, Ruth I. 
Buckley, Frances A. 
Casella, Frances. 
Corsi, AngeUna. 
Coughhn, Ethel. 
Grossman, Evelyn M. 
Daniels, Dorothy D. 
Dardioh, Luigina. 
Davis, Mary. 
De Dominicis, Edith. 
Delia Morte, Maria. 
Dien, Sarah M. 
Doherty, Kathleen E. 
Duverger, Loretta V. 
Edwards, Eleanor B. 
Fanning, Gladys L. 
Ferrarini, Yolande. 
Glynn, Helen. 
Goodwin, Helen J. 
Harasimowicz, Ahce. 
Hinckley, Geraldine. 
Holland, Doris A. 
Landry, Edwina. 
Laudate, E. Lena. 
Lenville, Eva Hilda. 
Lyons, Mary L. 
Macdougall, Mildred D. 
McEvoy, Evelyn M. 
McMullin, Beatrice M. 
McNamara, Eileen. 
McNamara, Lorraine. 
Mierzewski, Stephanie. 
Mitchell, Ethel G. 
Nowicki, Janina. 
Pepe, Carmella. 
Pepe, Philomena. 
Perry, May B. 



Pimental, Mary V. 
Poirier, Emma. 
Reese, Helen. 
Robinson, M. Viola. 
Roy, Catherine M. 
Saladino, Beatrice L. 
Samon, Stacey. 
Saverino, Maimie. 
Scott, ArUne R. 
Silvia, Emma. 
Stanievicz, Mary. 
Szezerba, Mary. 
Tirrella, Helen. 
Wheeler, Theresa. 
Widger, Evelyn L. 
Withrow, Cora. 
Wonderly, Christine E. 
Beauheu, Ernest. 
Berube, Walter. 
Bowden, Robert F. 
CambardeUi, Arthur J. 
Cammarano, Angelo. 
Campbell, Peter F. 
CaroseUi, Andrea. 
Case, Wilham A. 
Casella, Charles. 
Chombeau, Bertrand. 
Clemens, John. 
Cook, Wilham L. 
Cookson, Robert. 
Costa, Anthony. 
Cowick, Orville H. 
Damon, George M. 
Davy, Horace. 
Despres, John P. 
Di Cicco, Emiho. 
Donovan, Thomas J. 
Dore, Charles W. 
Dunbar, Kenneth A. 
Egan, Robert J. 
Ferguson, George A. 



44 



Giuliano, Paolo. 
Gluckstein, Archie. 
Gould, Basil. 
Hatch, Arthur F. 
Henry, Paul W. 
Holmes, Rutherford B. 
Hurley, Arnold E. 
Jackman, Richard F. 
Kubilunas, John. 
Lamarine, WiUiam L. 
Lankowicz, Stanley. 
Lubin, Johxi. 
Marchesio, Guido. 
Maschio, Angelo N. B. 
McCluskey, Harry L. 



Meuse, Paul R. 
Paice, Gerald J. 
Pike, Norman N. 
Pratt, Marston T. 
Rainville, Harvey L. 
Remington, Joseph H. 
Santos, Tony. 
Shaw, Harris E. 
Simoneau, Henry J. 
Spelman, Kenneth E. 
Stott, Lester W. 
Summerhayes, Paul R. 
Thompson, R. Lawrence. 
Tobey, Arthur W. 
Yates, Merle F. 



The places from which these pupils come and the number from each place 
follows : — 



Massachusetts 
Rhode Island 
Maine . 
New Hampshire 



185 I Vermont 

39 I Connecticut 

17 I Alabama 

14 I Virginia 



45 



EXHIBITION OF ACTIVITIES OF PUPILS OF THE 

PERKINS INSTITUTION AND MASSACHUSETTS 

SCHOOL FOR THE BLIND, 1832-1923. 



Jordan Hall, Boston, Monday, April 30, 1923, at Three o'clock p.m. 
The Hon. Francis Henry Appleton, presiding. 



Opening Remarks. 



Games and Exercises. 



Classroom Work. 



PROGRAM. 



Part I. 



By the Hon. Francis Henry Appleton. 
By the Kindergarten and Primary Children. 
By Pupils of the Upper School. 



Example of Work in Expression. 

By Boys of the Upper School. 



Address. 

Folk Dances. 
Gymnastic Exercises. 
Reed Dance. 



Part II. 

By His Excellency, Channing H. Cox, 
Governor of Massachusetts. 

By Girls of the Primary School. 

By Boys of the Upper School. 

By Girls of the Upper School. 



46 



CONCERT BY THE CHOIR OF THE PERKINS 

INSTITUTION AND MASSACHUSETTS 

SCHOOL FOR THE BLIND. 



Sunday Afternoon, May 20, 1923, at 3.30 o'clock. 

PROGRAM. 

The Peace Pipe Frederick Converse 

Mixed chorus with baritone solo. 

Daybreak Eaton Farting 

March of the Cameron Men Granville Bantock 

Three Pictures from "The Tower of Babel" Rubinstein 

(a) Chorus of the Sons of Shem. 

(b) Chorus of the Sons of Ham. 

(c) Chorus of the Sons of Japhet. 

A. D. 1919 — A Commemorative Poem by Brian Hooker, 

Set to music for mixed chorus with soprano solo by . . . Horatio Parker 

Harrying Chorus, from the Plymouth Tercentenary Pageant . Edgar StiUman Kelley 



47 



GRADUATING EXERCISES OF THE PERKINS 

INSTITUTION AND MASSACHUSETTS 

SCHOOL FOR THE BLIND. 



Tuesday, June 19, 1923, 10.30 a.m. 



PROGRAM. 

Part Song— "A Psalm of Life" Pinsuti 

Girls' Glee Club. 

Essays: 

Popular Opinions Regarding Reading and Writing. 

Nevart Najarian. 

The New Outlook for the District Schools. 

Esther May Farnsworth. 

Perkins Girls at Louise Andrews Camp. 

Jane Augusta Hall. 

Harriet Hosmer. 

Helena Mary Drake. 

American Women in Politics. 

Jennie May Linscott. 

On Making Calls 

Gladys May Bolton. 

Pianoforte Solo — Etude in G-flat, Op. 10 Chopin 

SoNORA Irene Brustuen. 

Essays: 

The Development of the Newspaper. 

Walter Cameron Stone. 

National Parks. 

Thomas Augustine Hanley. 

Our National Capital. 

Edward Joseph Liberacki. 

The Shadow of the Turk. 

Daniel James Munn. 

Presentation of Diplomas and Certificates. 

By the Hon. Francis Henry Appleton , 
President of the Corporation. 

Chorus — "The Twenty-Third Psalm" Neidlinger 



48 



STATEMENT OF ACCOUNTS. 



Boston, October Twenty-fourth, 1923. 

Messrs. Warren Motley, F. H. Appleton, Jr., Auditors, Perkins InstiMion and 
Massachusetts School for the Blind, Watertown, Massachusetts. 

Gentlemen : — I have audited the accounts of Albert Thorndike, Treasurer of 
the Institution, for the fiscal year ending August 31, 1923, and have found that all 
income from investments and proceeds from sales of securities have been accounted 
for, and that the donations, subscriptions, and miscellaneous receipts, as shown 
by the books, have been deposited in bank to the credit of the Treasurer of the 
Institution. 

I have vouched all disbursements and verified the bank balances as at the close 
of the fiscal year. 

The stocks and bonds in the custody of the Treasurer were counted by the 
Auditing Committee and the schedules of the securities, examined by them, were 
then submitted to me and found to agree with those called for by the books. 

I hereby certify that the following statements covering the institution, Howe 
Memorial Press Fund, and Kindergarten, correctly set forth the income and ex- 
penditures for the fiscal year ending August 31, 1923. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN MONTGOMERY, 
Certified Public Accountant. 



INSTITUTION. 

Balance Sheet, August 31, 1923. 

Assets. 
Plant: — 

Real estate, Watertown $573,372 66 

Real estate. South Boston 8^647 74 

„ . , '■ $582,020 40 

Equipment: — 

Furniture and household $11,042 99 

Tools, etc i;236 60 

Music department 18,850 00 

Library department 70,695 61 

Works department 12,674 05 

, , , '■ 114,499 25 

Investments: — 

Real estate $208,078 74 

Stocks and bonds 580,558 46 

Stocks and bonds — Varnum Fund 127^373 61 

Stocks and bonds — Baker Fund 9,831 25 

T . , . . J ,. '- 925,842 06 

Inventory of provisions and supplies 3 358 27 

Accounts receivable . . 5*413 91 

E. E. Allen, Trustee . . '733 90 

Cash on hand . . . 9 581 44 

Tota' $1,641,459 23 

Liabilities. 

General account $346,455 57 

runds: — 

Special $59,277 00 

Permanent 355,280 96 

General 867,382 39 

1,281,940 35 

Amount carried forward $1,628 395 92 

49 



Amount brought forward $1,628,395 92 

Unexpended income, special funds 10,166 77 

Gifts for clock and organ 39 00 

Vouchers payable 2,857 54 

Total $1,641,459 23 

Treasurer's Condensed Income Account, Year ending August 31, 1923. 

Rent net income $13,484 30 

Interest and dividends, general purposes 30,724 05 

Interest and dividends, special fimds 2,851 81 

Annuities 1,200 00 

Donations 3,387 50 

Tuition and board, Massachusetts $40,300 00 

Tuition and board, others 33,595 42 

73,895 42 

Total $125,543 08 

Less special fund income to special fund accounts .... $2,851 81 
Less Treasurer's miscellaneous expenses 741 95 

3,593 76 

Net income $121,949 32 

Net charge to Director $122,915 30 

Repairs, faulty construction 2,152 96 

125,068 26 

Deficit $3,118 94 

Income Special Funds. 

On hand September 1, 1922 $9,586 60 

Income 1922-1923 2,851 81 

Total $12,438 41 

Distributed 2,271 64 

Unexpended income August 31, 1923 $10,166 77 

Director's Condensed Expense Account, Year ending August 31, 1923. 

Administration : — 

Salaries and wages $7,556 18 

Other expenses 428 94 

$7,985 12 

Maintenance and operation of plant: — 

Salaries and wages $25,204 80 

Other expenses : — 

Provisions $13,598 65 

Light, heat and power 14,729 06 

Household furnishings and supplies . . . 2,976 53 

Insurance and water 3,448 08 

Repairs 4,443 63 

Publicity 898 09 

Extraordinary expense 1,405 21 

Loss on bad debts 786 26 

Depreciation on furniture, household equip- 
ment, tools, etc 2,287 97 

Depreciation on buildings, Watertown . . 13,260 30 

Miscellaneous 1,061 31 

58,895 09 

84,099 89 

Instruction and school supplies: — 

Salaries and wages $31,186 00 

Other expenses 850 97 

32,036 97 

Net loss. Tuning department 191 84 

Total $124,313 82 

Less net income. Works department 1,398 52 

Net charge to Director $122,915 30 

50 



WORKS DEPARTMENT. 
Pkofit and Loss Statement, August 31, 1923. 

Revenue. 
Sales $51,689 60 

Expenditures. 

Materials used $13,863 65 

Salaries and wages 28,812 71 

General expense 5,211 12 

Auto expense 744 66 

Total expenditures 48,632 14 

Profit $3,057 46 

Deduct : — 

Difference in inventory of tools and equipmen G . . . $1,542 24 
Loss on bad accounts 121 05 

Total $1,663 29 

Less bad debt recoveries 4 35 

1,658 94 

Total profit for year ending August 31, 1923 $1,398 52 



INSTITUTION FUNDS AND LEGACIES. 
Special funds : — 

Robert C. Billings (for deaf, dumb and blind) . , . $4,000 00 

John D. Fisher (Scholarship) 3,610 00 

Joseph B. Glover (for blind and deaf) 5,000 00 

Harris Fund (Outdoor RelieQ 26,667 00 

Maria Kemble Oliver (Concert Tickets) 15,000 00 

Elizabeth P. Putnam (Higher Education) .... 1,000 00 

Richard M. Saltonstall (Use Trustees) 3,000 00 

A. Shuman (Clothing Fund) 1000 00 



Permanent funds : — 

Charles Tidd Baker $10 



Charlotte Billings 

Stoddard Capen .... 

Jennie M. Colby, in memory of . 

Ella Newman Curtis Fund . 

Stephen Fairbanks 

Harris Fund (General Purposes) 

Harriet S. Hazeltine Fund . 

Benjamin Humphrey . 

Prentiss M. Kent .... 

Jonathan E. Pecker 

Richard Perkins .... 

Mrs. Marilla L. Pitts, in memory of 

Frank Davison Rust Memorial . 

Samuel E. Sawyer 

Charles Frederick Smith 

Timothy Smith .... 

Mary Lowell Stone 

George W. Thvm .... 

Alfred T. Turner .... 

Anne White Vose .... 

Charles L. Young .... 

William Varnum Fund 



1 

12 

5 

127 



125 79 
,507 00 
,770 00 
100 00 
.000 00 
,000 00 
,333 00 
,000 00 
,000 00 
,500 00 
950 00 
.000 00 
.000 00 
,000 00 
,174 77 
,663 00 
,000 00 
,000 00 
529 89 
000 00 
994 00 
000 00 
633 51 



General funds: — 

Elizabeth B. Bailey 
Eleanor J. W. Baker 
Calvin W. Barker . 
Lucy B. Barker 
Francis Bartlett . 



,000 00 
,500 00 
,859 32 
.953 21 
,500 00 



$59,277 00 



355,280 96 



Amounts carried forward $15,812 53 $414,557 96 

51 



Amounts brought forward $15,812 63 $414,557 96 

General funds — Continued. 

Mary Bartol 300 00 

Thompson Baxter 322 50 

Robert C. Billings 25,000 00 

Susan A. Blaisdell 5,832 66 

William T. Bolton 555 22 

George W. Boyd 5,000 00 

Caroline E. Boyden 1,930 39 

J. Putnam Bradlee 268,391 24 

Charlotte A. Bradstreet 10,508 70 

Lucy S. Brewer 10,215 36 

J. Edward Brown 100,000 00 

T. O. H. P. Burnham 5,000 00 

Annie E. Caldwell 3,000 00 

Emma C. Campbell 1,000 00 

Edward F. Gate 5,000 00 

Fanny Channing 2,000 00 

Ann Eliza Colburn 5,000 00 

Susan J. Conant 500 00 

William A. Copeland 1,000 00 

Louise F. Crane 5,000 00 

W. Murray Crane 10,000 00 

Harriet Otis Cruft 6,000 00 

David Cummings 7,723 07 

Chastine L. Gushing 500 00 

I. W. Danforth 2,500 00 

Charles L. Davis 1,000 00 

Susan L. Davis 1,500 00 

Joseph Descalzo 1,000 00 

John H. Dix 10,000 00 

Alice J. H. Dwinell 200 00 

Mary E. Eaton 5,000 00 

Mortimer G. Ferris Memorial 1,000 00 

Nancy H. Fosdick 3,750 00 

Mary Helen Freeman 1,000 00 

Cornelia Anne French 10,000 00 

Martha A. French 164 40 

Ephraim L. Frothingham 1,825 97 

Jessie P. Fuller 200 00 

Thomas Gaffield 6,685 38 

Albert Glover 1,000 00 

Joseph B. Glover 5,000 00 

Charlotte L. Goodnow . 6,471 23 

Ellen Hammond 1,000 00 

Hattie S. Hathaway 500 00 

Charles H. Hayden 27,461 01 

John C. Haynes 1,000 00 

Joseph H. Heywood 500 00 

George A. Hill 100 00 

Margaret A. Holden 3,708 32 

Charles Sylvester Hutchison 2,156 00 

Ernestine M. Kettle 10,000 00 

Lydia F. Knowles 50 00 

Catherine M. Lamson 6,000 00 

William Litchfield 7,951 48 

Mary I. Locke 7,500 00 

Hannah W. Loring 9,500 00 

Adolph S. Lundin 100 00 

Susan B. Lyman 4,809 78 

Stephen W. Marston 5,000 00 

Charles Merriam 1,000 00 

Joseph F. Noera 2,000 00 

Sarah Irene Parker 699 41 

George Francis Parkman 50,000 00 

Grace Parkman 500 00 

Philip G. Peabody 1,200 00 

Edward D. Peters 500 00 

Henry L. Pierce 20,000 00 

Sarah E. Pratt 2,928 59 

Grace E. Reed 4,850 00 

Matilda B. Richardson 300 00 

Mary L. Ruggles 3,000 00 

Marian Russell 5,000 00 

Amounts carried forward $733,203 24 $414,557 96 

52 



Amounts brought forward $733,203 24 $414,557 96 

General funds — Concluded. „ „ ,„ «„ 

Nancy E. Rust 2.640 00 

Joseph Scholfield 2,500 00 

Richard Black Sewell 25,000 00 

Margaret A. Simpson 968 57 

Esther W. Smith f.OOO 00 

The Maria Spear Bequest for the Blind 15,000 00 

Henry F. Spencer 1.000 00 

Joseph C. Storey 5,000 00 

Sophronia S. Sunbury ^^^ ix 

Mary F. Swift 1.391 00 

William Taylor A^r^l% 

Joanna C. Thompson 1.000 00 

William Timlin 3,000 00 

Mary Wlllson Tucker 465 32 

George B. Upton 10,000 00 

Abbie T. Vose 1.000 00 

Horace W. Wadlcigh 2,000 00 

Joseph K. Wait 3,000 00 

Harriet Ware 1.952 02 

Charles F. Webber (by sale of part of vested remainder in- 
terest under his will) 11,500 00 

William H. Warren 4,073 17 

Mary Ann P. Weld 2,000 00 

Cordelia H. Wheeler 800 00 

Opha J. Wheeler 3,086 77 

Samuel Brenton Whitney 1.000 00 

Mehitable C. C. Wilson 543 75 

Thomas T. Wyman 20,000 00 

Fanny Young 8,000 00 

William D.Young 1^000_00 ^^^^^^^ ^^ 



$1,281,940 35 



DONATIONS. INSTITUTION ACCOUNT. 

Safford, Mr. & Mrs. F. R $10 00 

Through the Ladies' Auxiliary Society 3,377 50 

Additions to Scholarship Fund in "Memory of John D. Fisher": 

Adams, Mrs. Karl $5 00 

Allen, Rev. Frederick B 10 00 

Agoos Family 75 00 

Bartlett, Miss Mary F 10 00 

Bixby, Dr. James F., in memory of 25 00 

Blake, Mrs. Frances 20 00 

Blake, George F 10 00 

Brooks, Gorham 25 00 

Burditt, Miss Alice A 2 00 

Chandler, Mrs. Seth C 5 00 

Clapp. Mrs. Mary L 20 00 

Cotting, Charles E 10 00 

Crabtree, Miss Lotta M 2,000 00 

Gushing, Miss Sarah P 10 00 

Damon. A. W 10 00 

Day, Mrs. Frank A 5 00 

DeWitt, Alexander 10 00 

Emerson. Mrs. William 25 00 

Everett. Dr. Oliver H 5 00 

Farlow. Mrs. William G 5 00 

Frary, Mrs. Mary C 5 00 

Gage, Mrs. Homer 40 00 

Geer, Mrs. Danforth. Jr 10 00 

Gray, Mrs. John C 100 00 

Hale, Mrs. Louis G 10 00 

Haskell, Mrs. Edwin B 5 00 

Hearsay, Mrs. Mary E 5 00 



$3,387 50 



Amounts carried forward *2,462 00 $3,387 50 

53 



Amounts brought forward 



Additions to Scholarship Fund in " Memory of John D. Fisher' 
— Concluded. 
Hemenway, Mrs. Augustus 
Hoyt, Mrs. William E. 
Hubbard, Miss Helen 
Keene, Mrs. Jarvis B. 
Leland, Leslie F. . 
Leland, Mrs. Lester 
Loring, Miss Louisa P. 
Mason, Charles F. 
Morrison, Mrs. John H. 
Nathan, Mrs. Jacob 
Perkins, Edward N. 
Potter, Mrs. William H. 
Powers, Mrs. H. H. 
Pulsifer, Mrs. G. R. 
Rogers, Miss Winifred 
Saltonstall, Leverett 
Snow, Walter B. . 
Sohier, Miss Emily L. 
Stoddard, Charles F. 
Taff, Mrs. William W. 
Taylor, Mrs. Anna M. 
Tifift, Eliphalet T. 
Tower, Miss Ellen M. . 
Wales, Mr. & Mrs. William Q. 
Whitman, Mr. & Mrs. Edmund A. 
W'inters, Mrs. Mary Ray 
Winthrop, Mrs. Thomas Lindall 



H. 



$2,462 00 $3,387 60 



100 00 

5 00 
25 00 

5 00 

5 00 
25 00 

5 00 

10 00 

100 00 

3 00 

5 

1 

5 

1 

2 



00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

15 00 

3 00 

5 00 

10 00 

5 00 

1 00 
25 00 
20 00 

5 00 
25 GO 

2 00 
25 00 



2,900 00 



3,287 60 



HOWE MEMORIAL PRESS FUND. 
Balance Sheet, August 31, 1923. 

Assets. 
Equipment and supplies : — 

Printing plant $874 59 

Machinery 4,305 47 

Printing inventory 12,881 09 

Appliances 8,443 75 

Embossing inventory 581 80 

Stationery, etc 718 78 

$27,805 48 

Investments : — 

Stocks and bonds 169,915 20 

Notes and accounts receivable 3,760 10 

Cash on hand 4,095 62 

Total $206,576 40 

Liabilities. 
General account $181,936 17 

Funds: — 

Special $7,000 00 

Permanent 5,000 00 

General 11,490 00 

23,490 00 

Vouchers payable 150 23 

Total $205,576 40 



54 



Treasurer's Condensed Income Account, Year ending August 31, 1923. 

Interest and dividends, general purposes *^^'q«« ^l 

Interest and dividends, special funds Vaa or 

Other income ^^ ^" 

Total $11,211 10 

■loiai • SO 4Q 

Less Treasurer s expenses "'^ 

Net income ^]\'l^\ ol 

Net charge to Director lu.^io ^i 

Balance of income *^06 37 

Director's Condensed Expense Account, Year ending August 31, 1923. 
Maintenance and operation of plant: — 

Embossing a'^zL o = 

Printing 4,1^6 85 

Appliances ^'^-^ ^^ 

Stationery o^H a^ 

Library 2,067 43 

Depreciation on machinery and equipment .... 448 08 

Publicity 1 Q,t So 

Salaries 1-»15 00 

Loss on bad accounts i4? va. 

Miscellaneous ^^^ ^^^^.3 ^3 

Discounts c cIt ol 

Income from sale of appliances o'l v ^i 

Income from sale of books, music, etc 2,187 51 

7,707 79 

Net charge to Director $10,215 24 



HOWE MEMORIAL PRESS FUNDS AND LEGACIES. 

Special funds: — 

Harriet S. Hazeltine (printing raised characters) $2,000 00 

Deacon Stephen Stickney Fund (books, maps & charts) . 5,000 00 



$7,000 00 



Permanent fund: — 

J. Pauline Schenkl 5,000 00 

General funds : — ^„„„ ^^ 

Beggs Fund $200 00 

Joseph H. Center 1.000 00 

AugGsta Wells 10.290 00 ^^ ^qq qq 



$23,490 00 



KINDERGARTEN. 

Balance Sheet, August 31, 1923. 

Assets. 

Plant: — e/tcocoo 01 

Real estate, Watertown $45o,83^ ^1 

Equipment: — 



FiUTiiture and household $11,664 23 

Tools, etc 1.098 12 

Music department 2,200 00 



14,962 35 



Investments : — 

Real estate $563,841 89 

Stocks and bonds 969,294 38 .„„ ,„^ „, 

1,533,136 27 

Inventory of provisions and supplies ^'04? ko 

Accounts receivable "Iv 52 

E. E. Allen, Trustee . ^I^ °X 

Cash on hand 5.419 89 

Total $2,016,741 34 

55 



Liabilities. 
General account $343,108 54 

Funds: — 

Special $7,340 00 

Permanent 204,013 44 

General 1,407,879 18 

1,619,232 62 

Unexpended income, special funds 1,552 36 

Mortgage note payable 48,000 00 

Vouchers payable 1,398 03 

Accounts payable 3,449 79 

Total $2,016,741 34 



Treasuber's Condensed Income Account, Year endinq August 31, 1923. 

Rent net income $24,440 67 

Interest and dividends, general piu-poaes 52,939 06 

Interest and dividends, special funds 296 17 

Donations 15 50 

Tuition and board, Massachusetts $33,580 00 

Tuition and board, others 12,936 00 

46,516 00 



Total $124,207 40 

Less special fund income to special fund accounts .... $296 17 

Less Treasurer's miscellaneous expenses 815 70 

1,111 87 

Net income $123,095 53 

Net charge to Director $115,492 13 

Repairs, faulty construction 3,179 11 

118,671 24 



Balance of income $4,424 29 

Income, Special Funds. 

On hand September 1, 1922 $1,362 12 

Income 1922-1923 296 17 

Total $1,658 29 

Distributed 105 93 

Unexpended income August 31, 1923 $1,552 36 

Directob's Condensed Expense Account, Year ending August 31, 1923. 
Administration : — 

Salaries and wages $7,013 98 

Other expenses 640 88 

$7,654 86 

Maintenance and operation of plant : — 

Salaries and wages $26,446 58 

Other expenses : — 

Provisions $13,419 57 

Light, heat and power 14,240 46 

Tuition and board 12,655 42 

Household furnishings and supplies . . . 3,519 56 
Depreciation on furniture, household equip- 
ment, tools, etc. 1,647 45 

Depreciation on buildings, Watertown . . 10,371 46 

Insurance and water 2,304 88 

Repairs 2,896 72 

Publicity 875 82 

Loss on bad accounts 117 38 

Extraordinary expense 755 86 

Miscellaneous 2,786 88 

65,591 46 

92,038 04 

Instruction and school supplies : — 

Salaries and wages $15,000 00 

Other expenses 799 23 

15,799 23 

Net charge to Director $115,492 13 

56 



KINDERGARTEN FUNDS AND LEGACIES. 

Special funds : — , . , - 1. „ „ „„ 

Charles Wells Cook (Scholarship) . . . • . $500 00 

Glover Fund (Albert Glover, Blind deaf mutes) . . . ^'^X "1^ 

Emeline Morse Lane (Books) 1.000 00 

Leonard and Jerusha Hyde Room 4,000 00 



Permanent funds: — sti c m;^ as 

Charles Tidd Baker * i 'nnn nn 

William Leonard Benedict, Jr., Memorial .... l.UUU uu 

Samuel A. Borden 4,675 00 

A. A. C, In Memoriam n nin Vn 

Helen G. Coburn . . . . , 9.9«0 10 

M. Jane Wellington Danforth Fund 10,000 00 

Caroline T. Downes 12.950 00 

Charles H. Draper 23,934 13 

Eliza J. Bell Draper Fund l.;^00 00 

Helen Atkins Edmands Memorial 5,UUU W) 

George R. Emerson 5,000 00 

Mary Eveleth 1.000 00 

Eugenia F. Farnham 1-015 00 

Susan W. Farwell r nnn nn 

John Foster , 5,000 00 

The Luther & Mary Gilbert Fund 8.508 Ob 

Albert Glover 1.000 00 

Mrs. Jerome Jones Fund r'^^n nn 

Charles Larned ^-000 00 

George F. Parkman 3.500 00 

Catherine P. Perkins 10.000 00 

Frank Davison Rust Memorial , 'nnn nn 

Caroline O. Seabury o,'von ^o 

Eliza Sturgis Fund 21,729 52 

Abby K. Sweetser 25,000 00 

Hannah R. Sweetser 5,000 00 

May Rosevear White Fund 600 00 



$7,340 00 



204,013 44 



General funds: — «, r;n no 

Emilie Albee $150 00 

Lydia A. Allen o nnn on 

Michael Anagnos in^in ?!n. 

Harriet T. Andrew ,5'9x, ?V 

Martha B. Angell 16.172 61 

Mrs. William Appleton 18,000 00 

Elizabeth H. Bailey „ ^^X X» 

Eleanor J. W. Baker ,^'^92 9^ 

Ellen M. Baker 13,053 48 

Mary D. Balfour JHR Rn 

Nancy Bartlett Fund ,«^x2 2x 

Sidney Bartlett 10.000 00 

Emma M.Bass 'ooo cR 

Thompson Baxter mnnnnn 

Robort C. Billings 10,000 00 

Sarah Bradford „ 3;22 2!^ 

Helen C. Bradlee 140,000 00 

J. Putnam Bradlee 168,391 24 

Charlotte A. Bradstreet 6,130 07 

Sarah Crocker Brewster ^9P 9.9. 

Ellen Sophia Brown 1.000 00 

Rebecca W. Brown 3,0/3 76 

Harriet Tilden Browne 2,000 00 

Katherine E. BuUard 2,500 00 

Annie E. Caldwell 4,000 00 

John W. Carter ^^9^9 

Adeline M. Chapin ^^99 99 

Benjamin P. Cheney 5,000 00 

Charles H. Colburn 1.000 00 

Helen Callamore 5,000 00 

Anna T. Coolidge 45,138 16 

Mrs. Edward Cordis ^22 ^9 

Sarah Silver Cox 5,000 00 

Susan T. Crosby 100 00 

Margaret K. Cummings 5,000 00 

Amounts carried forward $476.180 20 $211.353 44 

57 



Amounts brought forward $476,180 20 S21 1,353 44 

General funds — Continued. 

James H. Danforth 1,000 00 

Catherine L. Donnison Memorial 1,000 00 

George E. Downes 3,000 00 

Lucy A. Dwight 4,000 00 

Mary B. Emmons 1,000 00 

Mary E. Emerson 1,000 00 

Arthur F. Estabrook 2,000 00 

Annie Louisa Fay Memorial 1,000 00 

Sarah M. Fay 15,000 00 

Charlotte M. Fiske 5,000 00 

Nancy H. Fosdick 3,750 00 

Elizabeth W. Gay 7,931 00 

Ellen M. Gifford 5,000 00 

Joseph B. Glover 5,000 00 

Matilda Goddard 300 00 

Maria L. Gray 200 00 

Caroline H. Greene 1,000 00 

Mary L. Greenleaf 5,157 75 

Josephine S. Hall 3,000 00 

Olive E. Hayden 4,622 45 

Allen Haskell 500 00 

Jane H. Hodges 300 00 

Margaret A. Holden 2,360 67 

Marion D. Hollingsworth 1,000 00 

Frances H. Hood 100 00 

Abigal W.Howe 1,000 00 

Martha R. Hunt 10,000 00 

Ellen M. Jones 500 00 

Clara B. Kimball 10,000 00 

Moses Kimball 1,000 00 

Ann E. Lambert 700 00 

Jean Munroe Le Brun 1,000 00 

William Litchfield 6,800 00 

Mary Ann Locke 5,874 00 

Robert W. Lord 1,000 00 

Elisha T. Loring 5,000 00 

Sophia N. Low 1,000 00 

Thomas Mack 1,000 00 

Augustus D. Manson 8,134 00 

Calanthe E. Marsh 20,111 20 

Sarah L. Marsh 1,000 00 

Waldo Marsh 500 00 

Annie B. Matthews 15,000 00 

Rebecca S. Melvin 23,545 55 

Georgina Merrill 4,773 80 

Louise Chandler Moulton 10,000 00 

Maria Murdock 1,000 00 

Mary Abbie Newell 500 00 

Margaret S. Otis 1,000 00 

Jeannie Warren Paine 1,000 00 

Anna R. Palfrey 50 00 

Sarah Irene Parker 699 41 

Helen M. Parsons 500 00 

Edward D. Peters 500 00 

Henry M. Peyser 4,650 00 

Mary J. Phipps 2,000 00 

Caroline S. Pickman 1,000 00 

Katherine C. Pierce 5,000 00 

Helen A. Porter 50 00 

Sarah E. Potter Endowment 425,014 44 

Francis L. Pratt 100 00 

Mary S. C. Reed 5,000 00 

Jane Roberts 93,025 55 

John M. Rodocanachi 2,250 00 

Dorothy Roffe 500 00 

Rhoda Rogers 500 00 

Mrs. Benjamin S. Rotch 8,500 00 

Edith Rotch 10,000 00 

Rebecca Salisbury 200 00 

J. Pauline Schenkl 5,000 00 

Joseph Scholfield 3,000 00 

Eliza B. Seymour 5,000 00 



Amounts carried forward $1,254,380 02 $211,353 44 

58 



Amounts brought forward $1,254,380 02 $211,353 44 

General funds — Concluded. 

Esther W. Smith 5,000 00 

Annie E. Snow 9,903 27 

Adelaide Standish 5,000 00 

Elizabeth G. Stuart 2,000 00 

Benjamin Sweetzer 2,000 00 

Harriet Taber Fund 622 81 

Sarah W.Taber 1,000 00 

Mary L. Talbot 630 00 

Cornelia V. R. Thayer 10,000 00 

Delia D. Thorndike 5,000 00 

Elizabeth L. Tilton 300 00 

Betsey B. Tolman 500 00 

Transcript, ten dollar fund 5,666 95 

Mary Willson Tucker 465 32 

Mary B. Turner 7,582 90 

Royal W. Turner 24,082 00 

Minnie H. Underbill 1,000 00 

Rebecca P. Wain Wright 1,000 00 

George W. Wales 5,000 00 

Maria W. Wales 20,000 00 

Mrs. Charles E. Ware 4,000 00 

Rebecca B. Warren 5,000 00 

Jennie A. (Shaw) Waterhouse 565 84 

Marv H. Watson 100 00 

Ralph Watson Memorial 237 92 

Isabella M. Weld 14,795 06 . 

Mary Whitehead 666 00 

Evelyn A. Whitney Fund 4,400 00 

Julia A. Whitney 100 00 

Sarah W. Whitney 150 62 

Betsy S. Wilder 500 00 

Hannah Catherine Wiley 200 00 

Mary W. Wiley 150 00 

Mary Williams 5.000 00 

Almira F. Winslow 306 80 

Eliza C. Winthrop 5,041 67 

Harriet F. Wolcott 5,532 00 



1,407,879 18 
$1,619,232 62 



DONATIONS, KINDERGARTEN ACCOUNT. 

Brett, Miss Anna K $10 00 

"Children of the King," Church of the Disciples, Boston . . 2 50 

Sabin, Caroline R., in memory of 3 00 



$15 50 



59 



CONTRIBUTIONS FOR THE PERKINS INSTITUTION. 



Through the Ladies' Auxiliary Society, Mrs. Sarah A. Stover, Treasurer: — 

Annual subscriptions $1,617 50 

Donations 1,464 00 

Cambridge Branch 165 00 

Dorchester Branch 43 00 

Lynn Branch 40 00 

Milton Branch 48 00 



$3,377 50 



ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTIONS FOR THE PERKINS 
INSTITUTION. 

Through the Ladies' Auxiliary Society, Mrs. S. A. Stover, Treasurer. 



Adams, Mrs. Waldo 

Alford, Mrs. O. H. . 

Allen, Mrs. F. R. . 

Amory, Mrs. Wm., 2d 

Bacon, Miss Mary P. 

Badger, Mrs. Wallis B. . 

Baer, Mrs. Louis 

Balch, Mrs. F. G. . 

Baldwin, Mrs. J. C. T. . 

Bangs, Mrs. F. R. . 

Barnet, Mrs. S. J. . 

Bartol, Miss Elizabeth H 

Batcheller, Mr. Robert . 

Beal, Mrs. Boylston A. . 

Beale, Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur F. 

Bigelow, Mrs. J. S. . 

Boutwell, Mrs. L. B. 

Brown, Mrs. Atherton T. 

Bruerton, Mr. Courtney, in mem- 
ory of his mother, Mrs. James 
Bruerton 

Burnham, Mrs. John A. 

Burr, Mrs. Charles C. 

Carr, Mrs. Samuel . 

Chamberlain, Mrs. M. L 

Chandler, Mrs. Frank W 

Chapin, Mrs. Henry B. 

Chapin, Mrs. H. W. 

Chapman, Miss E. D. 

Chase, Mrs. Susan R. 

Clapp, Dr. H. C. . 

Clark, Mrs. Frederic S. 

Clement, Mrs. Hazen 

Clerk, Mrs. W. F. . 

Cobb, Mrs. Charles K. 

Codman, Miss Catherine Amory 

Coolidge, Mr. J. Randolph 

Corey, Mrs. H. D. . 

Cox, Mrs. William E. 

Amount carried forward 



$5 00 
25 00 

3 00 
25 00 

3 00 

5 00 
10 00 

5 00 

5 00 
10 00 

5 00 
20 00 
10 00 
10 00 

2 00 
10 00 

5 00 
10 00 



5 00 

5 00 

10 00 

10 00 

5 00 

5 00 

10 00 

1 00 

1 00 

1 00 

2 00 
10 00 

5 00 

3 00 
5 00 

10 00 

25 00 

2 00 

10 00 



$293 00 



Amount brought forward 

Craig, Mrs. Helen M. 
Craigin, Dr. Geo. A. 
Crocker, Mrs. U. H. 
Curtis, Mrs. Horatio G. 
Curtis, Miss Mary G. 
Gushing, Mrs. H. W. 
Gushing, Mrs. J. W. 
Gushing, Miss Sarah P. 
Cutler, Mrs. E. G. . 
Gutter, Mrs. Ellen M. 
Gutter, Mrs. Frank W. 
Dale, Mrs. Eben 
Damon, Mrs. J. L. . 
Daniels, Mrs. Edwin A. 
Davis, Mrs. Joseph E. 
Davis, Mrs. Simon . 
Denny, Mrs. Arthur B. 
Denny, Mrs. W. C. . 
Derby, Mrs. Hasket 
Drost, Mr. C. A. 
Dwight, Mrs. Thomas 
Edmands, Mrs. M. Grant 
Eliot, Mrs. Amory . 
Elms, Miss Florence G. 
Emmons, Mrs. R. W., 2d 
Endicott, Mrs. Wm. C. 
Ernst, Mrs. C. W. . 
Ernst, Mrs. H. C. . 
Eustis, Mrs. F. A. . 
Faulkner, Miss Fannie M. 
Fearing, Mrs. Marion C. 
Field, Mrs. D. W. . 
Fitz, Mrs. W. Scott 
Friedman, Mrs. Max 
Frothingham, Mrs. Langdon 
Gage, Mrs. Homer . 
Gill, Mr. Abbott D. 

Amount carried forward 



$293 00 

5 00 

10 00 

5 00 

5 00 

10 00 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



10 00 

1 00 
10 00 

2 00 
2 00 

50 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 

10 00 

10 00 
2 00 
5 00 

25 00 
5 00 
5 00 

10 00 
2 00 



$539 00 



60 



Amount brought forward 



$539 00 



Goldberg, Mrs. Simon 


2 00 


Goldschmidt, Mrs. Meyer H. 


2 00 


Gooding, Mrs. T. P. 


2 00 


Grandgent, Prof. Chas. H. . 


3 00 


Grant, Mr. and Mrs. Robert 


5 00 


Gray, Mrs. Reginald 


15 00 


Grosberg, Mrs. O. . . . 


3 00 


Hall, Mrs. Anthony D. . 


2 00 


Haven, Mrs. Edward B. 


3 00 


Hayward, Mrs. G. G. . 


10 00 


Herman, Mrs. Joseph M. 


5 00 


Hight, Mrs. Clarence A. 


10 00 


Hills, Mrs. Edwin A. 


5 00 


Holbrook, Mrs. Walter H. . 


3 00 


Homans, Mrs. John 


10 00 


Hooper, Miss Adeline D. 


5 00 


Hooper, Mrs. James R. . 


20 00 


Howard, Mrs. P. B., for 1922-23 


3 00 


Howe, Mrs. Arabella 


1 00 


Howe, Mrs. George D. . 


10 00 


In memory of Mrs. David P 




Kimball .... 


25 00 


Ireson, Mrs. S. E. . 


5 00 


Johnson, Mrs. Wolcott H. 


5 00 


Jones, Mrs. B. M. . 


10 00 


Josselyn, Mrs. A. S. 


5 00 


Kettle, Mrs. Claude L. . 


1 00 


Kimball, Mr. Edward P. 


5 00 


Kingsley, Mrs. Robert C. 


5 00 


Klous, Mrs. Isaac, in memory of 




Mr. Isaac Klous . 


3 00 


Kornfeld, Mrs. Felix 


1 00 


Lamb, Miss Augusta T. . 


1 00 


Lamson, Mrs. J. A. 


2 00 


Lane, Mrs. D. H., for 1922-23 


2 00 


Larkin, The Misses . 


1 00 


Ledyard, Mrs. Lewis Cass 


5 00 


Leland, Mrs. Lewis A. . 


1 00 


Levi, Mrs. Harry 


2 50 


Lincoln, Mr. A. L. . 


5 00 


Locke, Mrs. C. A. . 


10 00 


Loring, Judge W. C. 


25 00 


Loring, Mrs. W. C. . 


25 00 


Lothrop, Miss Mary B. . 


5 00 


Lothrop, Mrs. W. S. H., for 1922-2 


3 10 00 


Lovering, Mrs. Charles T. 


10 00 


Lowell, Mrs. John 


5 00 


Macurdy, Mr. Wm. F. . 


10 00 


Mansfield, Mrs. George S. 


2 00 


Mansfield, Mrs. S. M. 


1 00 


Mansur, Mrs. Martha P. 


3 00 


Mason, Mrs. Charles E. . 


50 00 


Mason, Miss Fanny P. . 


10 00 


Merrill, Mrs. L. M. 


5 00 


Merriman, Mrs. Daniel . 


5 00 


Monks, Mrs. George H., for 1922 


20 00 


Morison, Mrs. John H. . 


5 00 


Morrison, Mrs. W. A. 


1 00 


Morse, Miss Margaret F. 


5 00 


Morss, Mrs. Everett 


5 00 


Moseley, Miss Ellen F. . 


15 00 


Moses, Mrs. George 


2 00 


Moses, Mrs. Joseph 


5 00 


Moses, Mrs. Louis . 


1 00 


Nathan, Mrs. John . 


5 00 


Nazro, Mrs. Fred H. 


2 00 


Niebuhr, Miss Mary M. 


1 00 


Norcross, Mrs. Otis 


5 00 



Amount carried forward 



$990 50 



A mount brought forward 

Olmsted, Mrs. J. C. 
Orcutt, Mrs. W. D. 
Page, Mrs. Calvin Gates 
Paine, Mrs. W. D. . 
Parker, Miss Eleanor S. 
Pecker, Miss Annie J. 
Peckerman, Mrs. E. R. 
Pickert, Mrs. Lehman 
Pickman, Mrs. D. L. 
Pitman, Mrs. B. F. . 
Putnam, Mrs. James J. 
Ratchesky, Mrs. I. A. 
Reed, Mrs. Arthur . 
Reed, Mrs. John H. 
Rice, Estate of Mrs. Nannie R. 
Robbins, Mrs. Royal 
Roeth, Mrs. A. G. . 
Rogers, Mrs. R. K. . 
Rogers, Miss Susan S. 
Rosenbaum, Mrs. Henry 
Rosenberg, Mrs. Alexis 
Rowlett, Mrs. Thomas S 
Russell, Miss Catherine E. 
Sargent, Mrs. F. W. 
Saunders, Mrs. D. E. 
Scudder, Mrs. J. D., in memory of 
her mother, Mrs. N. M. Downer 
Sears, Mr. Herbert M. . 
Sears, Mrs. Knyvet W. . 
Shepard, Mr. Thomas H. 
Sherwin, Mrs. Thomas . 
Simpkins, Miss Mary W. 
Sprague, Mrs. Charles 
Stackpole, Mrs. F. D. 
Stackpole, Miss Roxana . 
Stearns, Mr. and Mrs. C. H. 
Stearns, Mrs. Wm. Brackett 
Steinert, Mrs. Alex. 
Stevens, Miss Alice B. 
Thomson, Mrs. A. C. 
Thorndike, Mrs. Alden A. 
Thorndike, Mrs. Augustus 
Tilcston, Mrs. John B. . 
Tuckerman, Mrs. Charles S. 
Wadsworth, Mrs. A. F. . 
Ward, The Misses . 
Ward, Miss Julia A. 
Ware, Miss Mary Lee 
Warren, Mrs. Bayard 
Warshauer, Mrs. Isador . 
Wason, Mrs. Elbridge 
Weeks, Mr. Andrew Gray 
Weeks, Mrs. W. B. P. . 
Weld, Mrs. A. Winsor 
Weld, Mrs. Samuel M. . 
Wheelwright, Miss Mary 
White, Miss Eliza Orne . 
White, Mrs. Joseph H. . 
White, Mrs. Norman H. 
Whitman, Mrs. Wm., for 1922-23 
Williams, The Misses 
Williams, Miss Adelia C. 
Williams, Mrs. Arthur 
Williams, Mrs. Jeremiah 
Willson, Miss Lucy B. 
Wingersky, Mrs. Harris . 
Withington, Miss Anna S. 
Young, Mrs. Benjamin L. 



$990 50 



5 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


10 


00 


10 00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


25 


00 


10 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


50 00 


10 


00 


1 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 


10 


00 


5 00 


5 GO 


25 


00 


30 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


10 


00 


3 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


10 


00 


5 


00 


25 


00 


25 


00 


1 


00 


5 


00 


10 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


25 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


50 


00 


15 


00 


100 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


10 


00 


$1,617 


50 



61 



DONATIONS. 



Abbott, Miss Georgianna E. 
Adams, Mr. George 
Alden, Mrs. Charles H. . 
Allen, Mrs. Thomas 
Amadon, Mrs. Arthur F. 
Bacon, Miss Ellen S. 
Bailey, Mrs. HoUis R. 
Bartol, Mrs. John W. 
Batcheller, Mr. Robert . 
Batt, Mrs. C. R. 
Baylies, Mrs. Walter Cabot 
Betton, Mrs. C. G. . 
Bigelow, Mrs. Henry M. 
Boardman, Mrs. W. D. . 
Bond, Mrs. Charles H. . 
Bowditch, Dr. Vincent Y. 
Bradt, Mrs. Julia B. 
Brewer, Mr. Edward M. 
Browning, Mrs. Charles A. 
Bullard, Mr. Alfred M. . 
Bullens, Miss Charlotte L. 
Bunker, Mr. Alfred . 

C 

Carpenter, Mrs. George A. 
Carter, Mrs. John W. 
Cary, Miss Ellen G. 
Cary, Miss Georgina S. . 
Clark, Mrs. Robert Farley 
Codman, Miss Martha C. 
Conant, Mr. Edward D. 
Coolidge, Mrs. Francis L. 
Coolidge, Mrs. Penelope F. 
Cotting, Mrs. Charles E. 
Cotton, Miss Elizabeth A. 
Edgar, Mrs. Charles L. . 
Edwards, Miss Hannah M. 
Evans, Mrs. Charles 
Evans, Mrs. Glendower . 

F 

Ferrin, Mrs. F. M. . 
Frothingham, Mrs. Louis A. 
Frothingham, Mrs. Randolph 
Grandin, Mrs. J. L. 
Gray, Mrs. John Chipman 
Greenough, Mrs. C. P. . 
Guild, Mrs. S. Eliot 
Hatch, Mrs. Fred W. 
Hersey, Mrs. A. H. . 
Houghton, Miss Elizabeth G 
Hoyt, Mrs. C. C. . 
Hubbard, Mrs. Eliot 
Hutchins, Mrs. C. F. 
Hyneman, Mrs. Louis 
lasigi, Mrs. Oscar 
In memory of Mrs. Harriet L 

Thayer, through Mrs. Hannah 

T. Brown 
Johnson, Mr. Arthur S. . 
Johnson, Mr. Edward C. 
Johnson, Mrs. Herbert S. 
Jolliffe, Mrs. Thomas H. 
Joy, Mrs. Charles H. 
Kelly, Miss Elizabeth F. 
Kimball, The Misses 
Kimball, Mrs. Marcus M. 
Koshland, Mrs. Joseph . 
Lawrence, Mrs. John 
"E. L." .... 
Lovett, Mr. A. S. . 
Lowell, Mrs. Charles 

Amount carried forward 



$2 00 
2 00 
5 00 

10 00 
2 00 

25 00 
5 00 

10 00 

10 00 
2 00 

10 00 

2 00 

3 00 
5 00 

10 00 
5 00 
5 00 

10 00 
5 00 
5 00 

2 00 
1 00 

10 00 

5 00 

5 00 

100 00 

10 00 
5 00 
5 00 

10 00 

3 00 
3 00 

10 00 

200 00 

5 00 

25 00 

1 00 
5 00 

25 00 
10 00 
25 00 

5 00 
15 00 
25 00 

5 00 
10 00 

5 00 

5 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 

5 00 

2 00 
10 00 



5 00 
10 00 
25 00 
10 00 

5 00 
10 00 

5 00 
25 00 
50 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 

5 00 

5 00 

$900 00 



Amount brought forward . . $900 00 



Lyman, Mrs. George H. 

Manning, Miss Abbie F. 

Mason, Miss Mabel M. 

Masten, Miss Helen 

McKee, Mrs. Wm. L. 

Merriam, Mrs. Frank 

Mills, Mrs. D. T. . 

Morrison, Miss Jean E. 

Morse, Dr. Henry Lee 

Nathan, Mrs. Jacob 

Neill, Mrs. Albert B. 

Nichols, Mr. Seth . 

Perry, Mrs. C. F. . 

Pfaelzer, Mrs. F. T. 

Potter, Mrs. Wm. H. 

Pratt, Mrs. Elliott W. 

Prince, Mrs. Morton 

Punchard, Miss A. L. 

Quincy, Mrs. G. H. 

Ranney, Mr. Fletcher 

Rice, Mrs. N. W. . 

Richards, Miss Alice A. 

Richardson, The Misses, in mem 
ory of M. A. E. and C. P. P. 

Richardson, Mrs. Frederick 

Richardson, Mrs. John 

Riley, Mr. Charles E. 

Ripley, Mr. Frederick H 

Rodman, Miss Emma 

Rosenbaum, Mrs. Louis 

Ross, Mrs. Waldo O. 

Rust, Mrs. Wm. A. 

Sanger, Mr. Sabin P. 

Sears, Mrs. Richard D. 

Sever, Miss Emily 

Sias, Miss Martha G. 

Slattery, Mrs. Wm. 

Snow, Miss Marion 

Spalding, Miss Dora N. 

Spring, Mr. and Mrs. Romney 

St. John, Mrs. C. Henry, in mem- 
ory of her mother, Mrs. Isaac H 
Russell . 

Stearns, Mr. Wm. B. 

Stone, Mrs. Edwin P. 

Stone, Mrs. Philip S. 

Storer, Miss Mary G. 

Storrow, Mrs. J. J., for 1922 

Strauss, Mrs. Ferdinand 

Strauss, Mrs. Louis 

Talbot, Mrs. Thomas Palmer 

Thayer, Mrs. Ezra Ripley 

Thayer, Mrs. Wm. G. . 

Thing, Mrs. Annie B. 

Tucker, Mrs. J. Alfred . 

Tudor, Mrs. Henry D. . 

Vaille, Mr. Charles A. 

Vickery, Mrs. Herman F. 

Vose, Mrs. Charles . 

Wadsworth, Mrs. W. Austin 

Waite, Miss Louise L. 

Walker, Mrs. W. H. 

Warner, Mrs. F. H. 

Watson, Mrs. Thomas A. 

Wheelwright, Miss Mary C. 

Whitney, Mr. Edward F. 

Willcomb, Mrs. George . 

Williams, Mrs. C. A. 



Amount carried forward . . $1,402 00 



62 



Amount brought forward . .$1,402 00 

Williams, Mrs. T. B. . . . 10 00 
Willson, Miss Lucy B. . . . 5 00 

Winsor, Mrs. Ernest ... 2 00 

Amount carried forward . .$1,419 00 



Amount brought forward 

Wyman, Mrs. Alfred E. . 
Zerrahn, Mrs. Franz E. . 
Ziegel, Mr. Louis 



. $1,419 GO 

15 00 

5 00 

25 00 

$1,464 00 



CAMBRIDGE BRANCH. 



Agassiz, Mr. Max 

Ames, Mrs. James B. (donation) 

Boggs, Mrs. Edwin P. 

Chandler, Mrs. Seth C. . 

Emery, Miss Octavia B. 

Emery, Miss Octavia B. (dona 
tion) 

Farlow, Mrs. Wm. G. . 

Foster, Mrs. Francis C. (donation) 

Francke, Mrs. Kuno 

Frothingham, Miss Sarah E. 

Goodale, Mrs. George L. 

Greenough, Mrs. J. B. . 

Hedge, Miss Charlotte A. (dona 
tion) 

Horsford, Miss Katharine M. (do- 
nation) 



Amount carried forward 



$10 00 

10 00 

2 00 

2 00 
5 00 

3 00 
5 00 

30 00 
5 00 
2 00 

1 00 

2 00 

5 00 

5 00 



$87 00 



Amoiint brought forward 

Howard, Mrs. Albert A. . 
Kennedy, Mrs. F. L. 
Kettell, Mrs. Charles W. 
Longfellow, Miss Alice M. (dona 

tion) .... 
Neal, Mrs. W. H. . 
Richards, Miss L. B. 
Sargent, Dr. D. A. . 
Thorp, Mrs. J. G. . 
Toppan, Mrs. Robert N. (dona 

tion) .... 
Whittemore, Mrs. F. W. 
Woodman, Miss Mary (donation) 
Woodman, Mrs. Walter . 



$87 00 



5 00 


3 


00 


10 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


5 


00 


20 


00 


2 


00 


$165 00 



DORCHESTER BRANCH. 



Bennett, Miss M. M. 
Callender, Miss Caroline S. . 
Churchill, Judge J. R. . 

(Donation) .... 
Churchill, Mrs. J. R. 

(Donation) .... 
Cushing, Miss Susan T. . 
Eliot, Mrs. C. R. . 
Hall, Mrs. Henry 
Haven, Mrs. Katharine Stearns 
Hawkes, Mrs. S. L. 

Donation 

Humphreys, Mrs. Richard C. 
Jordan, Miss Ruth A. 
Nash, Mrs. Edward W^ . 

Amount carried forward 



$1 


00 


2 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


1 


00 



$20 00 



Amount brought forward 

Nash, Mrs. Frank K. 
Preston, Miss MjTa C. 
Reed, Mrs. George M. 
Sayward, Mrs. W. H. 
Stearns, Mrs. Albert H 
Stearns, Mr. A. Maynard 
Stearns, Mr. A. T., 2d . 
Stearns, Henry D., in memory of 
Whitcher, Mr. Frank W. (dona 

tion) 

Whiten, Mrs. Royal 
WiUard, Mrs. L. P. . 
Woodberry, Miss Mary . 



$20 00 



5 


00 


•7 


00 


1 


00 


3 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 



$43 00 



LYNN BRANCH. 



Caldwell, Mrs. Ellen F. . 
Chase, Mrs. Philip A. (donation) 
Earp, Miss Emily A. 
Elmer, Mr. and Mrs. V. J. 
Page, Miss Elizabeth D. 

Amount carried forward 



$1 00 

10 00 

2 00 

5 00 

2 00 



$20 00 



Amount brought forward 

Sheldon, Mrs. Chauncey C. . 
Smith, Mrs. Joseph N. (donation) 
Tapley, Mr. Henry F. (donation) . 



$20 00 

5 00 

10 00 

5 00 

$40 00 



63 



MILTON BRANCH. 



Brewer, Miss Eliza (donation) 
Cunningham, Mrs. C. L. 
Forbes, Mrs. J. Murray . 
Jaques, Miss Helen L. 
Klons, Mrs. Henry D. (donation) 

Amount carried forward 



$5 00 

2 00 

10 00 

10 00 

1 00 



$28 00 



Amount brought forward 

Pierce, Mr. Vassar (donation) 
Rivers, Mrs. George R. R. 
Ware, Mrs. Arthur L. (donation) 



$28 00 

10 00 
5 00 
5 00 

$48 00 



All contribviors to the fund are respectfully requested to peruse the above list, atxd to 
report either to Albert Thorndike, Treasurer, No. 19 Congress Street, Boston, or 
to the Director, Edward E. Allen, Watertown, any omissions or inaccuracies ivhich 
they may find in it. 

ALBERT THORNDIKE, 

Treasurer. 

No. 19 Congress Street, Boston. 



64 



FORM or BEQUEST. 

I hereby give, devise and bequeath to the Perkins Institution 
AND Massachusetts School for the Blind, a corporation duly 
organized and existing under the laws of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, the sum of dollars ($ ), 

the same to be applied to the general uses and purposes of said 
corporation under the direction of its Board of Trustees; and I 
do hereby direct that the receipt of the Treasurer for the time being 
of said corporation shall be a sufficient discharge to my executors 
for the same. 



FORM OF DEVISE OF REAL ESTATE. 

I give, devise and bequeath to the Perkins Institution and Mas- 
sachusetts School for the Blind, a corporation duly organized 
and existing under the laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
that certain tract of real estate bounded and described as follows: — 

(Here describe the real estate accurately) 
with full power to sell, mortgage and convey the same free of all 
trusts. 



NOTICE. 



The address of the treasurer of the corporation is as 
follows: 

ALBERT THORNDIKE, 

No. 19 Congress Street, 

Boston. 



05 



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