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Full text of "Annual reports of the boards to the General Assembly"



^fOLOGICAL St>^^ 



BX 8951 .A3 

Presbyterian Church in the 

U.S.A. General Assembly. 
Minutes of the General 



I 



HOME MISSIONS 



THIRTEENTH AMUAL REPORT. 



In presenting to tlie (leneral Assembly its Thirteenth Annual 
Report, the Board of Home Missions desires 

First^ to thank tlie Great Head of the Church for sparing, during 
another year, the lives of His servants, its members and officers, 
and to a large extent, the lives of the missionaries and their families 
on the field ; 

Secondly, to acknowledge its obligations to tlie Presbytei'ies, and 
the Home Mission Committees for their invaluable aid in carefully 
examining tlie cases recommended for assistance, and in bi'inging 
before the churches the needs of the Board ; and 

Thirdly, to express its feelings of gratitude to the contributing 
churches and liberal friends for their prayers, sympathy and kindly 
words of encouragement, as well as for their unprecedented pecu- 
niary aid. " The Lord hath done great things for us, whereof we 
are glad." 

That the General Assembly may have a clear conception of the 
work done during the last year by our Board, its prayerful attention 
is called first, to the 

HOME MISSION DEPAETMENT. 



I. THE VASTNESS AND NEEDS OF THE FIELD. 

(a) East of the Mississippi River : 

There is an impression, more or less general, that the territor}" 
lying east of the Mississippi River is no longer missionary ground. 
It is supposed to be occupied by a settled population whose interests 



2 A N N U A L R E PORT OF T H K [1883. 

are fully cared for by the Presbyteries. This is a great mistake. 
Porfions of the coast of New Jersey are as needy as that of Oregon 
or California; sections of Pennsylvania where oil wells, coal beds 
and mines have been discovered lately, need home missionaries as 
much as do the Wood River country in Idaho, New Castle in 
Washington Territory, and South Pueblo in Colorado ; the lake 
and lumber districts of New York call as loudly for the blessings of 
the gospel as do the people around Lake Superior or Puget Sound. 

Assurances have come to us from the neighborhood of the Mus- 
kingum River, in Ohio, from Indiana, Kentucky and Southern 
Illinois, tliat there are large towns and populous rural districts in 
them, as destitute of Sabbath schools, churches and missionaries as 
are some districts along the Platte and the Niobrara Rivers in Ne- 
braska, the little towns of Dakota and the extended plains of Texas. 
How could it be otherwise ? The Eastern States are filling up almost 
as rapidly as the Western, the natives going farther west, foreign- 
ers taking their place, while new kinds of industries are starting here 
and there that attract multitudes of workmen and their families. 
For generations this process will necessarily continue. 

Northern Michigan and North-western Wisconsin may be re- 
garded as virgin soil. Vast tracts of country are being cleared 
on the banks of Lakes Huron and Michigan. Multitudes of people 
are pushing into the beautiful bays of the Lower and the hitherto 
uninhabited iron regions of the Upper Peninsula. Magnetic ore 
was discovered early last spring in Nortliern Wisconsin ; the forest 
was felled in April to lay the foundation of the first dwelling, and 
by the middle of August of the same year, there were one thousand 
people in the place, and a goodly number of Presbytei'ians were 
begging for a home missionary. This is a fair sample of scores, if 
not hundreds of localities even east of the Great Father of waters. 
If the home missionary field were confined to this I'egion, it would 
be enough to tax all the powers of the Board to supply its wants. 

(b) West of the Mississippi River : 

The territory lying West of the Mississippi River, all of which is 
now open to us, is beyond our powers to grasp. Taking the three 
trans-continental railways, viz : the Northern Pacific, running from 



1883.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 3 

the Lakes to Paget Sound ; the Union and Central Pacific connect- 
ing Council Bluffs and San Francisco ; and the Southern Pacific and 
the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe having their eastern terminus 
at New Orleans, and their western at San Diego or the Golden 
Gate, we may divide the country into ten great empires, and 
consider them one by one. On either side of the Northern Pacific, 
running along the British line from the western extremity of Lake 
Superior to Frazer River on the Pacific coast, are three great em- 
pires eclipsing, in extent of territory, and capability of supporting 
life, the thi-ee great empires of Europe, viz : Great Britain, Austria 
and Germany. 

(1.) MlNNKSOTA AND DaKOTA. 

Minnesota and Dakota form the first empire embracing a larger 
area of country than Great Britain and Ireland, and surpassing 
them in ability to support 35,000,000 of people. It is estimated 
that the valley of the Red River of the North alone is capable of 
producing all the wheat consumed yearly in the United Kingdom. 
This is a land of wheat and barley, of rich soil, salubrious climate, 
and admirable railroad facilities ; hence people from every land are 
pouring into it. The sturdy farmers of New England, Ohio, Indi- 
ana and Illinois; Canadians from the western Provinces; Scandina- 
vians, Danes and Norwegians troni Northern Europe; Germans, 
Hollanders and the well-to-do farmers and mechanics of Great 
Britain and Ireland, are pouring in by the thousand. What a field 
for Home Missions ! 



(2.) Montana and Idaho. 
Pushing our way westwai-d, we come to the second empire, com- 
posed of Montana and Idaho, with a territory equal in extent to 
the French Republic with its 40,000,000 inhabitants and immense 
power in the politics and commerce of the world. As yet this is 
a frontier region with possibilities beyond the power of the most 
sagacious to compute. There are here between twenty and thirty 
valleys that are extensive, beautiful and rich in soil. The pasture 
on the river banks and the foot hills is unsurpassed. The timber in 



4 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1883. 

the western counties and alono; the Clark's Fork of the Columbia 
is abundant and excellent in quality. The mines, so far as they 
have been devel<)j)ed, are rich and extensive. Those recently dis- 
covered in Idaho promise to cast into the shade any that have as 
yet been discovered. Villages, towns, and even cities, spring up 
as by magic. Tliis region is yet unreached by railways, except the 
north-eastern corner of Montana, by the Northern Pacific, and the 
south-western corner of Idaho, by the Utah and Northern; yet the 
number of people seeking homes in this region of the Rocky 
Mountains is very large. There is no part of the country more 
in need of the gospel than this middle empire lying on either side 
of the Northern Pacific Road. 

(3.) Oregon and Washington Territory. 
Oregon and Washington Territory form a third empire larger 
in extent than that of Italy and Portugal. This is a land of 
beauty, as well as of fertility. Its temperature is mild 'though it 
occupies an extreme northern latitude, and much of its soil is 
exceedingly rich. It can boast already of large cities like Portland 
and Salem, Seattle and Port Townsend. The tide of immigration 
has set strongly in this direction. When the Northern Pacific and 
the Oregon Short Line are completed, making two great highways 
to the East, and the California and Oregon Line, aftording railway 
facilities to the South, the tide of immigration will doubtless in- 
crease ten-fold. All this is enlarging the home mission field almost 
beyond our ability to comprehend. 

(4.) Iowa, Nebraska and Kansas. 
Taking next tlie Union and Central Pacific, as our course, we 
come to Iowa, Nebraska and Kansas, which form a fourth empire 
having the most productive agricultural lands in the world. This 
empire is about the centre of the United States, and, since agricul- 
tural interests are more permanent and sure to retain inhabitants 
than the mining or commercial interests, it is destined in time to 
teem with a thrifty population. The call for missionaries to this 
region, especially to Nebraska, is loud and emphatic. The valleys 



1883.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 5 

of the Elk Horn and the Niobrara are filling up with the great 
tides of people moving Westward in search of homes and fortunes. 

(5.) Colorado, WYf)MiNG and Utah. 

The fifth great empire is that of Colorado, Wyoming and Utah, 
whicii comprises an area of 286,859 square miles, considerably 
larger than that of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. The State of 
Colorado is the third in size in the American Union. Its area is 
nearly twice as large as that of Illinois, and nearly three times 
as large as that of Ohio. It is larger than the whole of New 
England and New York added to it. It is nearly equal to the 
combined areas of New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and 
Delaware, which was for many years the entire home mission field 
of our Church. 

Utah is one of the richest Territories in the land. Though its 
main resources are minerals, gold, silver, iron and coal, yet with 
its 2,000,000 acres of arable land lying in every degree of altitude 
from three thousand to ten thousand feet ; with its great variety 
of climate from that of Vicksburg to that of C^hicago ; with its 
vast snow deposits on the Wasatch range of mountains to supply 
water for irrigation ; with an atmosphere pure and exhilarating ; 
and with a soil of surpassing fertility, Utah must become in time 
one of the leading agricultural districts of America 

Wyoming has afforded as yet only a few minerals and rich pasture 
for sheep and cattle, but its resources are undeveloped and even 
unknown. 

(6.) Nevada and California. 

The sixth great empire is that made up of Nevada and Califor- 
nia, which embrace an area of territory equal to six States of the 
size of New York. Nevada has not as yet given promise of a 
great future, but her larger sister, California, makes up for her 
deficiencies. This State is eight hundred miles in length, and two 
hundred in breadth, with a coast line of eleven hundred miles. It 
has 40,000,000 acres of fertile and arable land ; lQ,0Oi 1,000 are 
fenced, and 25,000,000 under cultivation. The mines of Califor- 



fi ANNUAL KKPOKT OF THE [1883. 

nia are known the world over for their number and exhaustless 
wealth. With these resources, the enterprise and population of 
this State will soon be enormous. But its spiritual destitution is 
very great. 

(7.) Missouri, Arkansas and the Indian Territory. 
Taking now the Southern route across the continent, we reach 
tlie seventh empire composed of Missouri with its rolling country, 
river bottom lands and Iron Mountain ; Arkansas, with its cotton 
tields and medicinal springs ; and the Indian Territory, with its 
rich soil but malarial climate. All this region is receiving a goodly 
share of the great tide of immigration going westward. Rail- 
road facilities are increasing here every month. Arkansas is open- 
ing its vast fields and resources to the world. The Indian Territory 
is being disturbed by the shrill whistle and ponderous wheels of 
the locomotive. 

(8.) Texas. 
This is in itself'a great empire. It is one-third larger than the 
French Republic. A steady stream of substantial and intelligent 
people is flowing hither from all the States of the Union, and from 
England, Scotland, Germany and Sweden, to raise corn, feed 
cattle, pasture sheep and cultivate cotton. The lieterogeneous 
people of this State must have the gospel to fit them to become 
good citizens of this great republic. Through Texas old Mexico 
is to be reached. That country will be benefited or injured 
by the condition of Texas. 

(9.) New Mexico and Arizona. 
New Mexico and Arizona form the ninth empire. This is a vast 
and destitute field for missions. Though earlier settled and more 
interesting historically than most of the States and Territories, 
New Mexico is one of the most backward of them all. It has been 
cursed for centuries by the superstition, ignorance and idolatry 
of the Church of Rome. The people are degraded and thriftless. 
They have not as yet caught the spirit of the age, nor contributed 
their quota towards improving their temporal condition. Still, 



1883.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 7 

valuable mines have been discovered, and fresh population is pour- 
ing into the valleys of New Mexico. Railroads are penetrating the 
country, and the demand for missionaries is very urgent. 

Arizona has an area about as large as New England and New 
York combined. This region is dotted here and there with the 
miner's camp, the herder's ranche, and the pueblos of the Indians. 
The untold wealth of gold, silver and copper cropping out in 
different places is attracting labor and capital. The broad plains 
covered with rich grasses are inviting the herder and the stock 
raiser. New Mexico and Arizona will, in the near future, occupy 
important places in the great galaxy of States. The call already 
from this region for teachers and missionaries is loud and pressing. 
The destitution is heart-rending, and the wickedness of the people 
appalling ! 

(10.) Alaska. 

The tenth empire eclipses all the others in the extent of its terri- 
tory, the magnitude of its rivers, the glory of its glaciers, and the 
height of its mountains. Alaska is as large as the thirteen origi- 
nal States of the American Republic, with a territory equal to that 
of New York and New England added to them. Its great forests 
are yet unknown, its mines are undeveloped, its fisheries are hardly 
heard of, and its seal trade has only begun. What population may 
yet pour into the Islands on its coast where the climate is mild and 
the means of subsistence easily obtained, no one can tell. Already 
there are here from thirty thousand to forty thousand Indians 
wholly dependent on our Church for their education and religious 
advantages. 

What a field of missions this new West is presenting to the 
Church of to-day ! " In all the past," writes some one, " there is 
no parallel to the rapid development now going on west of the 
Mississippi. Railroads are being built in every direction, and with 
the railroad are everywhere going settlement and improvement. The 
strong tide of immigration already reaches the base of the Rocky 
Mountains where its great currents are passing on to the Pacific 
Ocean. Mexico feels the mighty influence of railroads, begun or 
assured, and is destined to undergo the most wonderful transfor- 



8 ANNUAL RIO PORT OF THE [1883. 

Illation. With all her rich resources, she will take her place as one 
ot the most important provinces in that commercial eiin)ire whose 
westernmost centre is on San Francisco Bay." 

II. THE LABORERS IN THE FIELD. 
The successful prosecution of an undertaking depends largely 
on the number and character of those engaged in it. If the 
number be inadequate, progress will be slow and success doubtful ; 
if their character be indifferent, the results of their eiforts will be 
unsatisfactory. The number of men commissioned by the Board 
during the last year was 101 larger than that of the preceding year ; 
and their character is fully up to the standard of those of former 
years. There were last year 1101 under commission against 1303 
the year before. These may be classitied as Synodical Missionaries, 
Home Missionaries, and Theological students. 

(L) Synodical Missionaries. 
It is nnnecessary to state in a report to the General Assembly 
that these are in no sense higher ecclesiastically than their brethren, 
the Home Missionaries. No Presbytery in the land guards the 
parity of the ministry and the polity of the Presbyterian Church 
with more jealons care than does the Board of Home Missions. It 
looks upon all the men whom it commissions as peers and brethren 
Ijeloved. Synodical Missionaries are only ministers on a wider 
field, and called to perform more varied duties than the Home 
Missionaries. They are nominated by the Synod, and appointed 
by the Board for special work, which the pastors cannot perform 
by reason of home duties and the extent of the territory. They 
are expected to visit every portion of the Synod, to inquire into its 
spiritual needs, to follow the rapid growth of the population within 
its bounds, and to recommend to the Presbyteries the planting of 
churches in such places as in their judgment may seem best. The 
Board regards them as invaluable agencies, in the new States and 
Territories, but not to be employed, except under special circum- 
stances in the older States, which are covered and amply cared for 
by the Presbyteries. Of the thirteen Synodical Missionaries em- 
ployed by the Board, only three are east of the Mississippi River. 



1883.] 



BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 



(2.) HoMK Missionaries. 
Of these there are scattered over our States and Territories, as 
follows, viz. : in 



ALABAMA 1 

ALASKA 3 

ARIZONA 3 

ARKANSAS 1 

CALIFORNIA 52 

COLORADO 32 

DAKOTA 60 

DELAWARE 7 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA ... 1 

FLORIDA 2 

IDAHO 4 

ILLINOIS 91 

INDIANA 45 

INDIAN TERRITORY 10 

IOWA 115 

KANSAS 113 

KENTUCKY 20 

LOUISIANA 1 

MARYLAND 20 

MICHIGAN 60 

MINNESOTA 62 



MISSOURI 64 

MONTANA 7 

NEBRASKA 96 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 2 

NEW JERSEY 55 

NEW MEXICO 18 

NEW YORK 93 

NEVADA 1 

NORTH CAROLINA 1 

OHIO 75 

OREGON 24 

PENNSYLVANIA 98 

TENNESSEE 14 

TEXAS 29 

UTAH 17 

VIRGINIA 2 

WEST VIRGINIA 11 

WASHINGTON TERRITORY. . 16 

WISCONSIN 57 

WYOMING 3 



By comparing the list given above with the number of ministers 
in our Church, it will be seen that ours is pi'e-eniinently a mission- 
ary Chui'ch. We have always claimed this honorable distinction, 
and in the face of the figures given above, no one will venture to 
deny it. This large number of missionary pastors may, on 
the other hand, lead the captious to regard our Church as weak, 
but the truth is, the spirit of missions runs so high that it keeps us 
constantly in the van of Christian progress. 

It may be of interest to the General Assembly to know where 
the Board finds most of its missionaries, what are the qualifications 
demanded of them, and the principles upon which they are located. 

{a) Where the missionaries are ohtained: 

A large number of tliem have come to their present fields in 
the ordinary way, by preaching as candidates. In such cases, 
the Board has had only to appropriate the sum of money 
recommended by the Presbytery for their support. In must 



10 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1883. 

cases, however, the Board has been relied on to select the men 
as well as to supply the means. It has, of late, drawn largely 
from the Theological Seminaries. Some of the brightest and best 
students have been induced to go out to the frontiers. Many who 
would have been called to prominent pulpits in the large cities of 
the East and the West, have received their commissions from the 
Board to preach the Gospel in barns, railway stations, and lager 
beer saloons. During the last two years the Board has also 
sought out young and successful pastors in New York, New 
Jersey, and Pennsylvania, and sent them to the prairies of Dakota, 
the silver mines of Colorado and Montana, and to the plains of 
Texas. When it has a peculiar field to supply, the Board always 
looks for a peculiar man to supply it. 

(b) The qualifiGationa demanded : 

The Board has learned by long experience that men who do 
not succeed in the older parts of the country, will not succeed 
in the West. The acuteness of the western mind, the restlessness 
of the people, the peculiar temptations arising from their state of 
society, and the difficulty of the work, call for sound sense, the 
highest mental cultm'e, great tact, the most ardent piety, and 
boundless self-denial. 

{g) The principle on which they are located : 

As far as possible the Board allows the missionaries to select 
their own field. But it has regard always to the adaptability of the 
man to the climate and the place. Those predisposed to consump- 
tion are not sent to the humid climate of Alaska or Puget Sound, but 
to that of Colorado or New Mexico ; those suffering from catarrhal 
affections are not assigned ])laces in the great altitudes of the 
Rocky Mountains, but on the plains of Nebraska or the prairies of 
Dakota; those troubled with rheumatism are not located on our 
bleak northern frontier, or on the sea coast with its raw easterly 
winds, but in districts where these troubles are scarcely known. 

(3.) Theological Students. 
During the last year fifty-seven members of the middle classes 



1883.] 



BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS, 



11 



in our Theological Seminaries were appointed by the Board to 
preach the gospel in places where summer services only were 
needed, or where it was not certain whether or not a permanent 
church was called for, or at the important outposts of rapidly 
growing congregations. Only one opinion has been expressed by 
the Presbyteries within whose bounds they have labored, and by 
the Synodical Missionaries and Home Mission Committees who 
have asked for their services, and that is most favorable to their 
zeal and efficiency. In one or two cases, a church was built by 
the student during the four months of his stay. In other cases, 
the foundation was laid for u good organization, and a demand 
created for a more permanent ministry. In a few instances it was 
shown th'at the place and the people were not ready for a Presby- 
erian church. The benelit which these students have derived from 
the exercise of their preaching powers, and the knowledge of hu- 
man nature which they have gained, are invaluable. It has given 
them facility in expressing their thoughts, and confidence in their 
ability to interest a congregation. It is hoped that many of them 
have also acquired a taste for mission work, and that they will 
devote themselves to it at tiie expiration of their seminary course. 

(4.) Deaths. 

Of the goodly army of missionaries aided by the Board, the fol- 
lowing fell during the year with their armour on, viz. : 



TOWNSEND E. TAYLOR. 
GEORGE L. LITTLE. 
ALMON G. MARTYN. 
ROBERT R. WELLS. 
GEORGE HOOD. 



WILLIAM G. HILLMAN. 
E. J. MARSHALL. 
ROBERT W. ALLEN. 
LUJMAN H. ALDRICH. 
REtJBEN BEAVER. 



All fought a good fight, kept the faith, and entered into the joy 
of their Lord. " Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord from 
henceforth; yea. saitli the Spirit, that they may rest from their 
labors, and their works do follow them." But where are those who 
will step forward to fill the broken ranks? 



111. THE WORK DONE DURING THE YEAR. 
It is impossible to estimate the amount of work done by 1387 



12 ANNUAL REPOKT OF THE [188Ji. 

pious and educated men thoroughly devoted to the temporal and 
spiritual interests of those among whom thej live. When we say 
that they have preached the gospel to thousands who would not 
have heard it but for them ; that they have administered the Sac- 
rament of the Lord's Supper for the edification of God's people ; 
that they have applied the sealing ordinance of baptism to many 
children of believers ; that they have carried the comforts and 
consolations of the gospel to aiHicted and desolate homes; that 
they have followed to the grave the remains of many loved dead ; 
and assured the surviving friends of a resurrection at the last day; 
we have mentioned only a tithe of what they have done. The in- 
direct labor performed, and the incidental good done are beyond 
all computation. They have exerted a beneficial influence over tho 
morals of the community, on the legislation of the State, and even 
on the business interests of the towns and surrounding country. 
The judgment day alone will reveal all the hallowed fruits of their 
labor. But let us be more specific. 

(1.) New Churches Organized. 

"It is obvious," says Dr. Hall, " that the results of evangelistic 
labor are intended of God to crystallize into a congregation, and so 
become powers for good. Elders are to be ordained, the machinery 
of Christian work is to be set up. Places are to be found, and 
work designated for the possessors of gifts, and the channels are 
to be opened up through which the streams of continuous bene- 
ficence may flow." During the last year the labor of our 1387 
missionaries resulted in the organization of 136 churches having a 
large number of Ruling Elders, and complete machinery for effect- 
ive work in the future. No mind can com])ute, or sagacity foresee, 
the amount of blessed influence that will proceed from these centres 
of spiritual light and power. 

(«) Strategic points only taken : 

As yet the Board has been able only to seize strategic points or 
centres of influence. The number of men available, and the 
amount of money contributed by the Church have not enabled us 
to go beyond this. No distinction is made as to the value of the 



1883.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 13 

souls to be reached, but regard is always bad to the places where 
the most wide-spread influence can be exerted. This was the 
method adopted by the Apostles of our Lord, and we are safe in 
copying their example. It is believed that if our-Church is strong 
at the commercial centres, the light will soon irradiate the sur- 
rounding country. 

(h) Mission Work in the Cities : 

There was a marked, perhaps an unprecedented advance of our 
work during the past year, in large and rapidly growing cities. 
In ]Sew York and other wealthy cities, where it can be done, it 
is unquestionably the duty of the churches themselves to support 
their missions. But, where they have not the ability, the Board 
ouglit to help them. During tlie past year, by the aid of the Board, 
one Mission Church was organized in Omaha, one in Kansas City, 
two in Denver, and three in Portland, Oregon. These are well 
located, so as to meet the wants of the growing poj)ulation, and 
the) are doing good work. They will soon become not only self- 
su])porting, but sources of supply to new and struggling congrega- 
tions throughout Nebraska, Missouri, Colorado and Oregon. 

(<•) Efforts in hehalf of the exceptional and foreign populations : 

Commendable efforts were made during the past year, to supply 

the spiritual need of the Indian, the Mexican and the Mormon. We 

have not only teachers to instruct the children, but missionaries to 

superintend the sehool work and preach the gospel. 

AV^e have taken important steps also towards reaching the Ger- 
mans who flock in such large numbers to our shores. A German 
Synodical Missionary at large is employed to ascertain and supply 
the wants of his countrymen. Scandinavians, Italians, Hungarians, 
French, Danes, Welsh and Dutcli have been helped from our 
treasury, and preached to by our missionaries. But much more 
ought to be done for them during this and the succeeding year. 

(2.) Old and Decaying Churches Strengthened.' 
The Board is of the opinion that the churches in the East which 
are depleted by emigration, should be cared foi- by the Presby- 



14 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1883. 

teries, and aided by the Board. Besides, the hope is entertained 
that the now declining churches may be again full and flourishing. 
" Wiiile the great work of Home Missions in the new portions of the 
country," says another, "should be prosecuted with vigor, these old 
States must be won and held for the Master. In them is the 
fountain-head of the work, the source of supplies ; and if the 
Church declines here, she is dying at the heart. The thorough 
evangelization of New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio and the other 
older States, means the extension of the work to the utmost bounds 
of our country, and men and means for Christ's cause throughout 
the world." 

(3.) Churches Brought to Self Support. 

Commendable progress was made by the churches during the 
past year in the direction of self-support. 37 churches bade 
us an affectionate fai'ewell, but gave us ample assurance of their 
kindly feelings towards us, and of their determination to help fill 
our treasury in the future. The joy experienced by these churches 
at finding that they could walk alone, surpassed, according to their 
own statement, all their anticipation. 

(4.) Sabbath Schools Started. 

The Board of Home Missions does not regard the Church and 
the Sabbath-school as separate institutions resting on different 
bases, and having different work to perform, but as two depart- 
ments of the same glorious work. Instead of drawing the line 
between them, instead of making it sharper and more defined, the 
Board would be glad to obliterate it altogether. The missionary 
churches are expected to look upon the Sabbath-school as a 
portion of their own field, regarding the teachers as their helpers, 
and the scholars as the children of their love over whom they 
yearn with tenderness, and for whose welfare they offer up the 
prayer of faith. 

It is expected of all the missionaries of the Board, not only to es- 
tablish Sabbath-schools wherever needed, but to see that they are 
supplied with teachers and cared for spiritually. Fom* or five 



1883,] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 15 

schools are often placed under the superintendence of one mission- 
ary, and it is seldom if ever that any of them die. 



(5.) Revivals. 
After years of coldness and desolation in the Church throughout 
the land, it is refreshing to be able to record an extensive work of 
grace in our mission churches on the frontiers. Drops of blessings 
have fallen on many iields, and even showers of grace have visited 
a number of regions. One missionary wrote to ns early in the year 
of a little cloud rising from the sea of apathy and indifference ; an- 
other, of a going in the tops of the mulberry trees ; a third, of a 
copious shower ; and a fourth, of abundant rain. Sinners were 
converted; back-sliders quickened; wanderers restored; and 
worldly professors made more spiritual. 

(6.) Schools and Colleges Founded. 

True to the past traditions of the Church, our missionaries seek 
wherever they go to found the school and the college, as well as 
the church. During the last year a college was located at Fergus 
Falls, Minnesota ; at Casselton, Dakota ; at Salt Lake City, Utah ; 
at Santa Fe, New Mexico; at Emporia, Kan. ; and at Waitsburg, 
Washington Territory. 

Whether or not these institutions will grow in strength, aid the 
church, and bless the world, remains to be seen. If the whole 
burden of their endowment and care is left to the brethren on the 
field, they will be failures. New countries need aid for their 
educational as well as their religious institutions. In the past, the 
Presbyterian Church has stood foremost as the patron of education, 
but alas ! now it is falling behind nearly all other denominations. 
Can she dispense with the aid which colleges and high schools afford 
her mission work ? Is she forgetting what Washington and Jef- 
ferson Colleges did for Pennsylvania, Western Reserve for North- 
ern Ohio, Wabash and Hanover for Indiana? No denomination 
which neglects to educate the youth of the country, can hold the 
first rank in influence and numbers. It is time, therefore, for our 
Church to organize a Committee or Board which shall locate wisely. 



16 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1883. 

and endow amply institutions for tlie higher education of our youth 
of both sexes. 

IV. THE FUNDS. 

The receipts of tlie Board fioni all sources during the past year 
amounted to $504,795.61. This sum exeeds the receipts of the pre- 
vious year by $81,400.76, and $129,550.03 of the year preceding 
that. This shows a safe and steady progress in the financial con- 
ditiou of the Board. 

The Assembly will be interested to know the sources whence 
this money has come to our treasury. 

The firH is the giving churches throughout the Land. This is 
the largest and most reliable source. The contributions from the 
churches during the year just ended amounted to $306,059.83, or 
$43,529.35 in excess of the year before. Though there must be 
more or less fluctuation even in this arising from the financial con- 
dition of the country, yet it is not like a mountain torrent, now 
overflowing its banks and anon leaving its channel dry and dusty. 
It is rather the still and steady stream flowing from perennial 
springs which lie beyond the reach of change and caprice. This 
must always be the main dependence of the Board. 

The second source is the Sahhath-school. Though small as yet, 
it is notwithstanding like the other, a living and perennial stream. 
The Sabbath-school, like the church, will continue, and the hearts 
of the children will direct their hands to help the Avork of home 
evangelization. It is gratifying to be able to say that this import- 
ant tributary is on the increase. Sessions of churches and Sabbath- 
school superintendents should see that the children have an oppor- 
tunity to contribute to this cause. 

The third, source of revenue is the sjjecial donations. This 
reached during the last year the sum of $51,263.53, or $23,046.90 
less than the preceding. It would be interesting to know the 
history of all the contributions that came to us during the year. 
Some of them were thank-ofl'erings for the restoration to health of 
a devoted husband or a beloved wife, a lovely child or a dear rela- 
tive. Some were recognitions of God's hand in protecting lives 
during a voyage at sea, or a journey through foreign lands. Some 



1883.J BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. l7 

of them were feeble returns to the Giver of all good for unexpected 
prosperity in business, or for sums of money left by a departecl 
friend. Some were the little earnings of the children, the pennies 
of the poor, or the savings of the invalid. Many of these donations 
came to the treasury bathed in tears, or radiant with the benedic- 
tions of the aged and the young. How sacred is some of the 
money expended on the evangelization of this land ! 

The fourth source is the legacies of the departed. These are 
more sacred, if possible, than the donations just named. They are 
left us by men and women on the verge of eternity as they con- 
templated their translation to a higher and better state of being. 
The money received from legacies during the past year amounted 
to $117,780.06 of this, $72,000 came to the treasury from the exec- 
utors of the late Francis P. Schoals, Esq. ; $50,000 have been 
lately left us in the will of the Hon. W. E. Dodge, and $150,000 
in that of Ex-Governor Morgan. It is hoped that the churches 
and liberal friends will not depend on these sacred trusts to carry 
on the work of Home Missions during this year. It is by no means 
certain that any portion of them will be available foi- some time. 
Even if all should be paid soon, this money ought to be devoted to 
advancing the great cause, so as to keep pace with the progress 
of the country. Some of those who have left us smaller sums 
than the above named, have done just as much for their country, 
according to their ability. 

The fifth source of the Board'' s reveniie is the interest of the jyer- 
manent funds. As the rate of interest is yearly growing less, the 
sum received from this source must decline. Notwithstanding, we 
received last year from this source $9,481.26. Larger or smaller 
sums are left from year to year to increase the permanent fund. It 
would be a matter of profound thankfulness if this were made 
sufficiently large to yield annually enough to meet all the expenses 
of the Board, so that 100 cents on every dollar contributed would 
go to the support of missionaries on the field. As it is we are 
happy to say that about 97 cents on a dollar go directly to the 
carrying on of the work. 

The last source is the missionary boxes. Though the money 
collected in this way does not go through the treasury of the 



18 ANNUAL BEPOKT OF THE [1883. 

Board, nor diminisli its ex]jendituro by rendering a smaller salary 
sufficient to its missionaries, yet these boxes do aftbrd great help to 
many, and they are acknowledged in our periodicals. They 
carry untold joy and gladness to tlie missionary. They help 
to clothe him and to make comfortable his loved household. 
They often form that important link which enables him to make 
both ends meet. The prayers and good wishes of the godly 
women who prepare these boxes are worth as much often as the 
valuable things they put in them. Still, churches ought not to be 
satistied with making boxes, money contributed is of far greater 
value. 

V. THE DEMANDS AND PROSPECTS. 

Never were the demands made on the Board greater, or the pros- 
pects brighter tlian to-day. Without saying a word about the 
wants of the iields tliis side of the Mississippi Kiver, we are asked 
for two hundred and forty-jive ministers this Spring, to fill places 
ready and anxiously waiting for them in the regions beyond. By 
a careful and moderate computation, we are satisfied that if the 
men and the money could be secured, five hundred more mission- 
aries could be profitably employed by the Board this year. Even 
this number, large as it may seem, would not be an increase out of 
proportion to the advance of the population and the progress of 
the country. Calls for men come to us from every State and Ter- 
ritory. Some of them are accompanied with appeals that cause 
our hearts to bleed. How long shall we turn a deaf ear to such 
calls ? 

The prospects before us are unspeakably encouraging. The 
number of miles of projected railroads in Texas, New Mexico, 
Arizona, Colorado, Utah, Montana, Dakota, Idaho and the Pacific 
Coast, without speaking of those in the older States is simply 
prodigious. In 1832, about fifty years ago, there were only nine 
thousand miles of railroad in all of the United States. But during 
the past year alone, eleven thousand miles were constructed. 
Every ten miles of these iron tracks means a village, a town or a 
flourishing city, needing the blessings of the gospel. These gi'eat 
highways are opening to the world the cotton fields of Texas, the 



1883.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 19 

pasture lands of New Mexico, the gold mines of Colorado, the soda 
valleys of AVyomino:, the prairies of Nebraska and Idaho, the rich 
plains of Montana, and the lumber districts of Washington Terri- 
tory. Continuous streams of population from the East and the 
West, from Canada and Mexico are now flowing into these regions, 
and they multiply the cries for help, which must be heeded, or 
this country will become intidel, or materialistic. It is hoped that 
the General Assembly will urge upon the chxirches an addition of 
20 'per cent, to the receijyts of last year to the Board of Home 
Missions, or the sum of $600,000 during the current year. It will 
be a shame for our rich missionary Church to expend less than 
that on the evangelization of our own land. 

" One grand thing about the Presbyterian Church," in the words 
of the Occident. " is that she is always equal to a great emergency. 
The emergency is now upon us. This vast field must be supplied 
with religious instruction. We need men and money, and we must 
have them. We need a million dollars, and it should be (contrib- 
uted during this coming year. The west will not always be a 
debtor, but in time will repay to the church with noble interest all 
that has been invested on her behalf. The time will soon come 
when the section west of the Mississippi River will be the greatest, 
the richest, the most powerful part of the nation. The mighty 
mountain ranges are filled with silver and gold. The great 
plains and valleys of the west are the most productive ; the climate 
is the most genial. All that they need in a worldly view is men 
and money, and they are getting both in a marvelous profusion. 

" The church must keep pace with the world. We must have 
men and money ; our brethren are already marshaled in the field ; 
with far reaching vision and courageous hearts they are pursuing 
their great work. Why move we forward with timid steps ? 
Sound the bugle call ! Exalt the standard ! Inscribe upon it the 
sentiment : ' The gospel for the west.' Proclaim the watchword : 
' America for Christ ;' bear it from church to church, and from lip 
to lip, until there shall be enkindled in the heart of every patriot, 
every friend of humanity, every lover of the Lord, a glowing en- 
thusiasm for this glorious cause." 



20 ANNUAL RKPOKT OF THE [1883. 

SUSTENTATION DEPARTMENT. 

The I)oard is very sorry to be compelled to report decline rather 
than progress in this division of its work. The fluctuations and 
changes through which the Sustentation Scheme has passed, are 
known to all the members of the Assembly. Whilst the principles 
underlying it are admirable, the application of them to the great 
variety of circumstances in this land is all but impossible. The 
experience of the past ten years has not enabled the Board or the 
General Assembly to adjust its rules so as to work smoothly and 
advantageously in all places. Earnest efforts have been made 
during the year to induce all the churches which could comply 
with the requirements, to draw their aid from the Sustentation 
Department. The success that has accompanied these efforts has 
been very satisfactory. 

More money, we are sorry to say, was drawn out of that fund 
during the year, by $7,443.36 than was put in. The receipts of 
the Sustentation Department amounted to $18,742.19, or $1,537.79 
less than the preceding year. 

The Board is of the opinion that this Scheme could be made to 
meet all the expectations of its most sanguine friends, if the east- 
ern Synods should see fit to adopt it for supplying their waning 
churches. The West is opening up so rapidly, and the demands 
made by its destitute fields on our treasury are so great, that it 
would be well for the large and wealthy Synods of New York, 
New Jersey, Pennsylvania. Ohio, and perhaps Michigan, Indiana, 
and Illinois, to undertake the support of their own weak churches, 
by special contributions, called Sustentation contributions. The 
money, as now, might be sent to the treasurer of the Board, so as 
to avoid expense and the possibility of losses, but the Synods 
should dispose of it according to their own judgment, drawing out 
all they deposit. Without indicating how the details should be 
arranged, the Board is satisfied tliat the suggestion is worthy of 
the careful consideration of the Synods. 

Even if this should fail, and the Sustentation Scheme become 
extinct, it will have accomplished good ends. It has certainly 
emphasized the necessity of permanent j^astorates, of adequate 
ministerial supj^ort, and of taking yearly steps towards becoming 



1883.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 21 

self-sustaininoj. The Home Mission as well as the Snstentation 
Department . of the Board aims at bringing about these desired 
results. It incorporates as far as possible all the good and practica- 
ble principles of Sustentation. 

THE SCHOOL DEPAETMENT. 

As there are many in the church, who have never heard of the 
origin ot this important department of onr work, it may be well 
to furnish the Assembly witli a brief sketch of its history. 

(a) Its History. 

As the railroads opened Utah, Southern Colorado, New Mex- 
ico and Arizona, they brought within the bounds of our Presby- 
teries Indian tribes, a large number of Spanish speaking Mexicans, 
and the inhabitants of far off Alaska, to whom home missionaries 
were sent. But the missionaries soon discovered that these excep- 
tional populations could not be reached by the simple preaching of 
the word. They found the Indians in many places in heathen 
darkness, needing all the ai)pliances used to reach pagan nations. 
The Mormons were under the power of the priesthood to such an 
extent as to preclude all approach to them. The Catholics of 
Colorado and New Mexico were so intensely ignorant and bigoted 
as to shun a Protestant minister, and to close the door in his face. 
In view of these difficulties, the missionaries asked either to be 
recalled or furnished with schools by which they might be able to 
"reach the children, and through them the parents. The Board 
for a time was powerless, and unable to see a way of solving the 
difficulty. 

The matter was brought to the attention of the General Assem- 
bly. That body recognizing the fact that the Board of Home 
Missions was chartered to supply destitute places with ministers 
and not with teachers, deemed it unadvisable to deviate from the 
policy of former years. They therefore called upon the women of 
the church to take up the school work and act as pioneers to our 
regular Home Missionaries. The response was generous and hearty, 
for the women saw in this something corresponding to the Zenana 



22 ANNUAL KEPORT OF THE [1883. 

work ill India. It was proposed to enlarge the sphere of the old 
Home Missionary Societies, which had been engaged for years in 
njaking up missionary boxes, by adding this more important work 
of sending teachers to train the youth of our Indian, Mexican and 
Mormon population in the principles of patriotism and Christianity. 
The addition of this department soon infused new life into the 
Home Missionary Societies throughout the land. Their success has 
been unparalleled, and beyond the expectations of their most 
sanguine friends. This work, it should be said, had been carried 
on to a commendable extent prior to this time by the Ladies' Board 
of New York and similar organizations, and their success was a 
guarantee for that of the new and enlarged organization called the 
" Woman's Executive Committee " 

(b) Its Ecclesiastical Relations. 
At the request of the ladies, the Board of Home Missions for- 
mulated the principles and rules by which their Society was to be 
guided. They were placed under the control of the Presbyteries 
and Synods : even their very existence was made to depend upon 
ecclesiastical appointments. And, from the beginning, this work 
has been carried on under the direction of and in conference with 
the Board of Home Missions. It may be regarded as an eccle- 
siastical organization. 

(c) The Progress of the Work. 
In the hands of the women, this new work has been most success- 
ful. It shows that their country, and its spiritual interests lie very 
near tlieir heart. During the six years of its existence the funds 
raised, and the teachers commissioned have been as follows, viz.: 

...20. Funds I 5,296 25 

...35. " $15,624 65 

...39. " $20,264 39 

...72. " $39,841 08 

...100. " $74,197 80 

...133. " $87,401 62 

The different Societies engaged separately in school work, in the 
past, have become happily and harmoniously consolidated, so that 
hereafter they will form only one great National Society known as 



1878. 


Teachers 


1879. 


" 


1880. 


11 


1881. 


" 


1882. 


li 


1883. 


11 



1883.] BOAKD OF HOME MISSIONS. 23 

the " Woman's Executive Committee of Home Missions," having its 
headquarters at 23 Centre Street, New York, and its auxiliaries in 
every part of the land. 

A brief . outline of the school work as it now stands, and of the 
devoted men and women on the tield, may be of value not only to 
the General Assembly, but to the whole Church. We give the 
following prepared by others who know whereof they write : 

INDIAN WORK. 
(a.) In the Indian Territory. 

The work of the Board of Home Missions in the Indian Terri- 
tory began several years ago. The Rev. John Elliott and the Rev. 
S. A. Stoddard spent a number of years of tedious labor at Fort 
Gibson and Muskogee. Tahlequah was also occupied for a time, 
and then left vacant. Until within a very short period, the work 
has been wholly that of preaching the Gospel and establishing 
churches. At the present time, there are church organizations at 
Vinita and Pheasant Hill, which are supplied by the Rev. W. P. 
Haworth. A building has been erected at Pheasant Hill, and one 
is in course of building at Yinita. Ciaremore and Tulsa, on the 
line of the San Francisco Railroad, have also been occupied more 
or less regularly by Mr. Haworth and his father, the Rev. Laban 
Haworth. 

These places are provided with schools, and the people are able 
to support their children in them. 

Muskogee, the most important railroad town in the Territory, has 
a church organization and home, a school, a pastor (the Rev. S. A. 
Stoddard), and a teacher (Miss Rose Steed). The church is alive 
and vigorous, and exercises a power for good that is felt beyond the 
limits of the town. The school is only six months old, but is grow- 
ing in favor, and is already counted a success. At Fort Gibson we 
have a church building and an organization, but it has suffered by 
long neglect, from the want of a minister. We have tried in vain, 
thus far, to secure one. 

It is desired that a school be opened here, and we only wait for 
a minister to offer to go to this field, when a teacher will be sent 
also. 



24 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1883. 

There are several out stations connected with this field, which 
promises to be hopeful, if not left vacant too long. Why is it that 
consecrated women stand ready to go to such places as this, and 
ministers, who are supposed to consecrate their lives. wholly to 
PJim whom they preach, are unwilling ? 

Tahlequah is the capital of the Cherokee Nation. For about 
two years the Kev. Willis Weaver has been preaching here and at 
Park Hill. He also preaches as occasion offers in the large board- 
ing schools for males and females, which is carried on at the nation's 
expense. At both these points we have church buildings and or- 
ganizations. Amid many discouragements a Sabbath-school has been 
established at Tahlequah, and kept in successful operation many 
years, by Mrs. Stapler, one of the members of the Presbyterian 
Church at that place. 

The Rev. A. N. Chamberlain is employed in preaching in their 
native language to the "full-blood" Cherokees at various points, 
and is scattering the seed of the Word in many places hitherto 
uncultivated. 

We have entered into contract with the Creek Nation to estab- 
lish a boarding-school among the poorest and most ignorant of them. 
The civil war and the want of buildings have hindered the com- 
mencement of this enterprise. But we hope to be able to begin 
fully equipped next September. The teachers, Mrs. Moore and 
her sister, Miss A. M. Robertson, who for many years lived and 
labored among these people, and who understand their nature and 
wants so well, have consented to undertake the management of this 
needed woi'k. 

Atoka is a town on the Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railroad, in 
the Choctaw Nation, where the Rev. Alex. Reid labored for a time. 
The Rev. John Edwards has been appointed to this place, and he has 
just entered upon his work. The Rev. Alex. Reid is now stationed 
at the old Spencer Academy and vicinity. His love for this, his 
held of labor years ago, caused him to give up Atoka, and under- 
take the reviving of these old and formerly successful missions of 
our beloved church. 

He gathers the people and preaches to them on the Sabbath, and 
is welcomed among them as a father beloved, who has been long 
absent from his children. 



1883.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 



25 



In this part of the nation our Churcli formerly had 16 churches, 
1772 members, 6 boarding-schools with 800 pupils, and 6 day 
schools. These being nearly wholly destroyed, scattered and 
broken up, the Kev. Alex. Keid now labors and prays for their 
rebuilding and gathering again. Being out of health and growing 
old, he asks for young men from the Seminaries to come and help 
him. Four are needed this spring for these fields, and the Board 
stands ready to send them. Who shall they be? 

The old Spencer Academy has been again put in order, and a 
boarding-school of 25 to 30 poor orphan children have been gathered 
into it, who are cared for bodily, mentally and spiritually by Mr. 
W. B. Kobe, his wife and daughter, and Miss A. Young. Mr. 
Kobe writes : " I think the friends helping us would feel abun- 
dantly rewarded if they could see the condition of many of these 
children when they come to us, almost destitute of clothing, 
ragged, barefooted, filthy, vermin-covered, and then see them now 
—decently clad, clean, cheerful and bright. With but few ex- 
ceptions they readily acquire our habits of living and dressing ; the 
girls especially take delight in being tidy, and in doing their work 
well. Last week one of the most pitiful-looking little girls I ever 
saw, with nothing but a filthy torn dress upon her, was brought by 
her poor old grandfather, who begged me to take her. I deter- 
mined to do so, feeling sure that some society will provide for her. 
She is six or seven years old." 

Kev. J. L. Hobbs and wife have just begun work at Lenox, the 
station where they labored many years ago. They have been most 
warmly welcomed by their old friends, and are hopeful of the work 
here. A house of worship and a home for themselves are absolutely 
needed, and must be put up soon. This is a good and worthy ob- 
ject for missionary societies and benevolent persons to aid. 

In the northern middle section of the Territory, the Kev. A. B. 
Lawyer, a native missionary, has gathered a churcli and is preach- 
ing to the remnant of his tribe, the ^ez Perces. 

Among the Pawnees, the Kev. Jas. Wilson is doing noble, ag- 
gressive work, which the Lord is blessing. Now we have described 
the whole of our work in this Territory. How little is it, com- 
pared with what it should be — shall we say must be? 



26 ANNUAL REPORT. 

During the past year more than $270 have been expended in repair- 
ing the church, the greater part of which was replaced in the mis- 
sion treasury by the gifts of the people. 

" The appearance of the church is decidedly improved and is 
much more cheerful than heretofore." 



School and Native Helpers. 

The school for girls has been under the supervision and the care 
of Mrs. Caldwell, Miss McFarren, and Miss Ramsay. It has a 
good location, good school-rooms, and many other advantages and 
attractions. There are also four Christian young ladies brought up 
and educated by the mission, who are about ready to enter upon 
full duty as teachers in the school. 

One of these gave nearly all her time to teaching during the past 
year, and the other three spent part of their time in teaching and 
part in their studies. Much is expected from them, not only in 
the school, but as active workers for Christ in the years to come. 
They have been especially useful in the past year by their singing in 
the prayer-meetings and church services, and two of them have 
been very successful Sabbath-school teachers. Miss Ramsay writes 
that there was little if any spiritual interest manifested among the 
pupils. 

Additions to the Church. — Whilst the additions to the church have 
not been very great during the past year, yet there have been some 
earnest, faithful ones gathered into the fold ; and there has been 
and is still an earnest spirit of inquiry. 

Four or five persons are looking forward to being soon received 
into the fellowship of the church, and others are seriously con- 
sidering their duty. Since the report was written there has been 
an earnest religious awakening in the church. 

Prayer-Meetings. — "These have been especially encouraging, and 
the number of those who have been willing to take part in prayer 
among the recent members as well as those who have been members 
for a longer time have given us reason to hope for still greater bless- 
ings in the future." 

Boys' School. — A school for boys is one of the first needs of the 
mission. And this will require increased funds and at least one 
good Christian lady teacher. All the schools in Bogota are conducted 
either by infidels or by the Roman Catholic Church. It is there- 
fore important that a good institution for the training of youth 
under right religious influences be established as soon as possible. 

School for Girls. — " It is also our earnest desire that the girls' 
school be reinforced with at least one good teacher, and that in 
time Mr. and Mrs. Caldwell may be permitted, by reason of reinforce- 
ments in the girls' school, to give their whole time, or at least a 
much greater part of it, to the church and city missionary work. 

"According to present arrangements no one has time to do much 
real missionary work among the people. And in our judgment we 



MISSIONS IN BRAZIL. 2/ 

thus lose one of our main chances to gain an influence over those 
who are not already interested in our work. 

"If a boys' school is undertaken, Mr. Candc^r's time and that of a 
lady teacher will be largely occupied in that work, so that we will 
still need more help or at least a reinforcement in the girls' school 
before we can have much opportunity to come in contact with the 
people as we would like to do, and as we believe from past experi- 
ence is highly necessary for any great success in our mission work." 

Statistics. 

One church ; membership, 34 ; added during the year by examina- 
tion, 5 — all males ; one absent member restored to the roll; adults 
baptized, 5 ; infants, 5 ; contributions, $270. School : enrolled, 75 ; 
boarders, i-^ girls ; day pupils, 24 boys and 38 girls. 



MISSIONS IN BRAZIL. 

Bahia : 73.5 miles N.N.E. of Rio de Janeiro ; miBsionary laborers — Rev. Mesprs. 
A. L. Blackford and J. B. Cameron and their wives ; one native assistant and one 
co'porteur. Outstation, Cachoeira, one colporteur. 

Campos : about 150 miles N. E. of Rio Janeiro — Bev. M. P. Carvalhosa. 

Rio de Janeiro : tbc capital of the country ; population variously stated up to 
400,000 ; occupied as a mi.ssiou station in 1860 ; missionan' laborers — Rev. J. F. 
Houston, Rev. John M. Kyle and his wife, and Rev. A. B. Trajano ; one colporteur 
and one teacher. ' 

Lorena: 180 miles W. by N. of Rio de Janeiro — Rev. Robert Lenin^on and his wife. 

S.\.o Paulo : 300 miles W.S. W. of Rio de Janeiro ; cliief town in the province of 
the same name ; population ^7,000 ; occupied as a mission station in 1863 ; mission- 
ai-y laborers — Rev. Messrs. Geo. W. Chamberlain and J. Beatty Howell and their 
wives ; Miss Ella Kuhl, Miss Mary P. Dascomb, Miss P. A. Thomas, and Miss 
Sophie A. Dale ; two teachers and one colporteur. 

SoROCABA : 60 miles W. of Sao Paulo. Eev. A. P. de Cerqueira Leite. 

Rio Claro : over 120 miles N.W. of Sao Paulo ; occupied as a mission station in 
1863 ; missionary laborers— Rev. J. F. Da Gama and his wife ; Miss Eva Da Gama ; 
two native teachers, and one colporteur, 

Brotas : 170 miles N.W. of Sao Pauio ; occupied as a mission station in 1868 ; 
missionary laborers — Rer. J. Zacfiarias de Miranda and two native teachers. 

Caldas : 170 miles N. of Sao Paulo — Rev. Migttel Torres. Campanha : Rev. U. 
C. Pereira. 

Botucatu : 160 miles W. by N. from Sao Paulo— Rev. George A. Landes and his 
wife. 

The Rev. J. F. Da Gama and his family, Rev. G. W. Chamberlain 
and Miss P. A. Thomas embarked for Brazil September i, on their re- 
turn. Rev. John M. Kyle and his wife sailed in December, to rein- 
force this mission. 

The reports received indicate progress. Two new churches have 
been organized, and new places for preaching opened, where it is ex- 
pected that congregations will be gathered that in time will become 
centres of rehgious interest. The following statistical table gives 
an exhibit of what has been done during the year : 



28 ANNUAL KE PORT OF THE [1883. 

state of society — a large, flourishing church, a hospital, and boys' 
school, these are all due to earnest work, and they are first fi'uits. 
To the missionaries at Wrangel is due the complete change in Indian 
life, testified to by all who are familiar with Alaska. Formerly 
Wrangel was notorious for a hai'd lot of natives — quarrelsome, 
drunken, lewd, dirty, and lazy. Now all is changed, and every 
sign indicates great advance in true civilization, 

Sitka was the old Russian capital and commercial centre, and con- 
sequently is another important point of the TeiTitory under the new 
regime. When Mrs. McFarland went to Wrangel a suitable mission- 
ary was sought for Sitka, and the Rev. John G. Brady was found. 
He was shortly afterward joined by Miss Fannie Kellogg, now Mrs. 
S. Hall Young of Wrangel, and both did efficient service during 
the time they remained. After a time both retired, and new mis- 
sionaries had to be sought. These were at last found in Mr. Alonzo 
Austin, wife and two daughters, one. Miss Olinda, is still connected 
with the Sitka mission, the other, Mrs. Styles, with .her husband, 
Mr. W. B. Styles, is now in charge of the mission among the Hoon- 
yahs. For a brief time the Rev. G. W. Lyons was also at Sitka, 
but health failing he went to California. The Sitka work has suc- 
ceeded to an encouraging degree, and while here also fire destroyed 
the first Home, the new "Boys' Home" just completed puts our 
work in better shape than it was before. The boys are taught not 
only the rudiments of an English education, but also farming and 
various mechanical arts, and the school will exert a wonderful in- 
fluence in moulding the future of the whole section tributary to 
Sitka. 

The mission to the Hoonyahs on Chichagoff Island is only two 
years old, but under the management of Mr. and Mrs. Styles, a 
good work has been done. This tribe is an important one, and 
numerically quite strong. As the mission is located at present, 
many Indians of other tribes come in contact with our missionaries, 
from which much good may be expected. 

The Chilkat Mission is one of the most important in Alaska. 
Located as it is on the Chilkoot Inlet, where the natives of the 
interior find a commercial avenue to the sea, the mission reaches 
some of the strongest tribes in the Territory, and when it is fully 



1883.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 29 

equipped, as we hope it will be soon, its influence on the natis^es will 
be second, perhaps, to none. At the Chilkat mission we have the 
Rev. E. Willard and Mrs. Willard, and also Miss Bessie Matthews. 
A few miles up the Chilkat river we have Louis and Tillie Paul, 
natives, and the first fruits of the Wrangel school, who are labor- 
ing to christianize the poor people of the Chilkat tribe. 

The last but not least of our missions is that among the Hydahs, 
the largest tribe of all, and the one peculiai'ly exposed to bad 
white influence. The Rev. J. L. Gould succeeds Mr. J. M. Chapman 
here. He has with him his wife, a sister of Mrs. McFarland, 
and his sister. Miss Clara Gould. The school is taught under 
difficulties, there being as yet no suitable building, but in spite of 
difliculties 105 Indian children attend, and the preaching services 
are crowded. 

The four principal stations are to be equipped so as to provide a 
suitable education for boys and girls, and all the others will be 
made feeders to the Wrangel, Sitka, Hydah, and Chilkat missions. 
Thus we shall soon reach the whole population of south-eastern 
Alaska, and indirectly through the natives all the people. 

The patience, fidelity, devotion, and Christian heroism shown by 
our missionaries is hardly paralleled in the annals of the church ; 
but brave hearts and consecrated lives are always ready when the 
cause of Christ demands, and Alaska will never call in vain. All 
honor to the noble band now there. 

(c). In New Mkxico and Arizona. 

At Albuquerque we have a grand work established. The church 
under the Rev. J. A. Menaul has just built a new edifice. The Pueblo 
Indian Industrial School, under Prof. R. W. D. Bryan, with his 
admiral corps of teachers, is making such rapid strides that it has 
already accomplished much good, and promises to be one of the 
most successful of all our missions. Mrs. Tibballs, the Misses Wood, 
Yerbeck, M. H. Patton, Susie Patton, and Miss Butler are the 
teachers. 

The Rev. John Menaul, at Laguna, and the Rev. J. M. Shields, 
at Jemez, have gained a good and solid footing among these two 
Pueblo tribes. Miss Stright is teaching at Jemez. 



30 ANNUAL REPORT. 



Sorocaba. 

Rev. A. P. de C. I.eite, who is a faithful worker, sends the following 
report of the field cultivated by him : 

" As the Rev. Mr. Landes had taken up his residence at Botucatu, 
near to Rio Novo, the church at the latter place, which was under my 
pastoral care, was transferred to him by the Presbytery at its last 
meeting. 

"On the 9th of April. 1882, I organized a church at Guarehy with 
four members, and baptized at the time two infants. There are sev- 
eral other persons there who are preparing to make a profession of 
their faith. 

" Of the three young men who were studying with me, one is already 
in S. Paulo studying under the direction of Mr. Howell, who, at my 
request, made arrangements for him there. The other two were un- 
able to continue their studies, on account of being obliged to support 
themselves by farming. One of them, especially, is very sorry that he 
has not the means to go on with his studies. 

" The boy who was with me, my hope for the future, was taken 
away by his father, who, being very poor, needed his services. 

"On the ist of October, 1882, we commenced worship in our new 
chapel, which is now completed inside. We need, however, regular 
seats and to finish up the outside. In the erection of our church we 
have had to contend with many difliculties, as our people are nearly all 
poor. Since we have been holding the service in the new building, 
however, the attendance has been very encouraging, and there are al- 
ready several newly interested in the cause of Christ." 

The statistics of Sorocaba and Faxina, churches to which he minis- 
ters, are found in the tabular statement. 

Rio Claro. 

On the return of Mr. Da Gama he resumed his labors at this place, 
and the school is again under his care and that of his daughter, Miss 
Eva Da Gama. Mr. Lenington has undertaken work in the Valley 
of the Parahyba, and has charge of the Lorena and Crozeiro churches. 
Besides ministering to them, he has preached in several of the larger 
towns located on the railroad between Sao Paulo and Rio Janeiro, and 
had good congregations in all of them, 

Mr. Da Gama writes of a spirit of inquiry among the people, and of 
an increased number calling for religious conversation. ^^^^ meetings 
for prayer and study of the Bible had been commenced. The attend- 
ance on preaching had steadily improved and the prospects for growth 
were encouraging. On the first Sabbath of the year ten were received 
into church tellowship on profession of their faith. Six of these were 
from the orphan school — the first-fruits of this institution. This in- 
gathering has had a happy effect on others. In this boarding-school 
are 16 boys and 15 girls, who are carefully instructed in the Bible, in 
secular knowledge, and are taught to help themselves. These recite 



MISSIONS IN BRAZIL. 3! 

with the day scholars, who number about 25. The attendance on 
Sabbath-school is from 60 to 80. 

The school at Limeira has 20 pupils, and that of Pirassinunga has 
18. At these and other outstations connected with Rio Claro the 
teacher or the Bible-reader has conducted religious services on the 
Sabbath and sometimes during the week. 

Botiicatu. 

Mr. Landes has devoted his time to proclaiming the simple truths 
of the Gospel at this and other places. The number of converts at 
Botucatu is small, but several are expecting soon to make a public 
profession of their faith. The gentleman who gave the property men- 
tioned in last report, continues a warm friend of the mission. The 
school is flourishing and numbers 41 pupils. Besides the church of 
Rio Novo, which has been placed under the care of Mr. Landes, he 
has visited the other congregations four different times in ten months — 
Lencoes, Bom Successo, and Viado. Each trip required a ride on 
horseback of nearly 200 miles, rhiee persons were received into the 
church at Lencoes on examination and 8 children were baptized. The 
believers here are very much scattered, and on this account it is very 
difficult to bring them together for religious services. One who united 
with the church has suftered in his worldly affairs by reason of his ad- 
herence to the I'rotestant faith, but he is willing to suffer if thereby he 
can glorify God. At Bom Successo there are 25 or 30 adult members. 
Two were received into this church on profession of their faith, and 
4 children were baptized. Six other persons were anxious to unite 
with the church, but they were advised to wait till the next communion, 
so as to be more thoroughly acquainted with the doctrines of the Gos- 
pel. The school has 14 pupils. At Vivado is another community of 
believers, numbering about 30 members. One was added to the 
church. These scattered communities need not only the presence of 
one who can instruct them in divine things, but the teacher and the 
colporteur are also required to educate the young and to read the Word 
to those who are unable to read it for themselves. 

There are brief notices of the churches at other points in this South- 
ern field. Senhor Zacharias has labored at Brotas and Dous Corregos 
amidst some discouragements. Sr. Torres has been happy and pros- 
perous in his work in the provinces of Minas Geraes. He is laboring 
also with his pen in combating the errors of Rome. Sr. Eduardo is 
located at Campanha, about 15 leagues from Caldas, where Mr. Torres 
has his residence. 

Rio de Janeiro. 

Mr. Houston has been encouraged by the arrival of an associate in 
Mr. Kyle, whose experience in the pastorate at home will be of great 
service in his new field. Mr. Houston reports the work growing in 
interest at this important centre. " The attendance on the services 
has improved greatly during the last few months, especially on Sabbath 
evenings, when a great many outsiders are present. Quite a number 



32 ANNUAL KEPOHT OF THE [1883. 

L. Barlow as teachei". Both clinrcli and school are doiiiir a good 
work anidiif^ these poor people. 

On the other side the raut^e are the missions at Cenecero, La Jara, 
San Rafael, Conejos, and La Costello, where, during the year, the 
Misses Ross, Miller, Tonng, Griinstead and Gilchrist have labored. 
Some of these missions were given up during the past year, because 
public schools were established, and the necessity for the missions 
has been taken away. 

At Socorro we have a church and a building awaiting a, minister. 

At Mesilla and Los Cruces we have lately reorganized our mis- 
sion, under tlie Rev. M, Mattheson. 

{fj). In Southern California. 

About a year ago we sent the Rev. Charles Bransby to Los An- 
geles, California, to labor among the two thousand Mexican and 
Spanish-speaking people there. The work has prospered and a 
much wider field been opened up than we had anticipated. After 
a time the Rev. J. M. Roberts, formerly of New Mexico, and the 
Rev. H. L. Harris, were providentially sent to this part of the 
country, where they at once engaged in evangelistic work. These 
three ministers lately made a tour tlirough some of the Mexican 
towns, and, after holding religious services, organized churches at 
Los Nietos and Anaheim. 

God in His providence has also sent Antonio Diaz to labor in 
this part of the vineyard. He was born and reared in the city of 
Mexico. After his conversion he was brought into the Presbyterian 
fold, and engaged to do evangelistic work among his countrymen. 
When the persecution against Protestants broke out in Acapulco, 
Mexico, six or eight years ago, he was compelled to get on board 
of a vessel and come to San Francisco. Afterwards he came down 
to Los Angeles to make his home. Being desirous of spreading 
among our Mexican population the gospel for which he had had to 
suffer, he saw here an open door and improved the opportunity. 
He has been working in the capacity of a lay evangelist during a 
]3eriod of about three years. He may be considered the first 
apostle of the evangelization of the Spanish-speaking people of this 
coast. His coming into our ranks gives us a double advantage — it 



1883,] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 33 

adds to our little band an efficient worker, and it leaves all the field 
in the hands of the Presbyterian Church. The latter is a fact of 
no small importance when we consider that Roman Catholic con- 
verts are greatly puzzled and perplexed by our denominationalism. 
The field now^ therefore, is ou7's, and ours is also the 7'espo7isi- 
hility. 

As the work is opening up so auspiciously, and, considering the 
circumstances, so rapidly, it is plain that two or three men cannot 
do justice to it. Besides the fields where we already have organi- 
zations, there are others, such as Santa Ana, El Monte, Pomona, 
Asuza, San Bernardino, Buenaventura, and Santa Barbara, that 
ought to be visited and worked up. Buenaventura has five hun- 
dred and Santa Barbara about one thousand Mexicans. Then there 
is San Diego and Wilmington, etc. If we had twelve men at our 
disposal for this special work we could find steady employment for 
all of them within the bounds of our Presbytery. The people of 
Los Nietos are, for various reasons, anxious to have a distinctive 
Spanish school ; so are the people at Analieini ; and I have no 
doubt that a similar request will come from other fields that may 
be developed in the future. It is a noteworthy fact that the ma- 
jority of the Mexicans that have joined our churches cannot sign 
their names, and not a few of them are unable even to read their 
Bibles ! 

MORMON WORK. 
In Utah and Idaho. 

Beginning at Malad, just over the Utah line, in Idaho, we have a 
grand work going on under the direction of the Rev. E. M. Knox. 
Amid much anxiety he is building a church with but little money 
in hand, and uncertain just when relief will come. $1000 are 
needed at once. He has large audiences on the Sabbath, and a 
school of 125 pupils, with Mrs. Knox and the two Misses Van 
Wormer as the teachers. 

Across the mountains to the east, still in Idaho, Miss Anna Noble 
and Miss Kelly have been so diligently at work that they have a 
school overflowing the small quarters in which it is gathered. At 
this point, and Richmond, four miles below, a minister is much 
needed. 



34 ANNUAL REPOKT OF THK [1883. 

Passing down Caclie Valley, to Smithiield, where Miss Bartlett 
labored for a time amid what seemed insurmountable difficulties 
and trials, we have there now Miss McCraken, with a large school 
under full headway. 

At Logan, the Rev. C. M. Parks, wife and daughter (Mrs. Shirley) 
have secured one of the most attractive homes, and church build- 
ings and successful schools in the Territory. 

The Eev. P. Bohbeck, a Swede, labors at Hyrum, Millville and 
Wellsville, among many of his countrymen, who have been be- 
guiled into the horrible system of Monnonism. He is aided in his 
good work by the Misses N utting. Hall and Best, whose " Garfield 
Memorial Chapels " have just been completed. As these are not 
fully paid for, we are still compelled to ask for more money ; $1,200 
will pay up all arrearages. 

Those of our readers who have had knowledge of the persecutions 
which nearly overwhelmed the Rev. S. L. Gillespie at the beginning 
of his work in Brigham City, will rejoice in the success that now 
attends tliat mission. It has been and is a hard field, but the harvest 
is ripening. A chapel, in which the Gospel is preached, and a good 
school have been secured. Miss Dayton is the teacher. 

At Ogden, a place of the utmost importance to our work, the 
Rev. J. F. Knowles and the two teachers, the Misses Dickey and 
Campbell, have established a church and school, that are limited in 
numbers only by the smallness of our buildings. In order to make 
our work a success new buildings must be secured at once, and 
$5,000 should be expended now ; every moment's delay is a positive 
loss. 

Kaysville is a place midway between Ogden and Salt Lake City, 
and is full of ignorance and Mormonism, which Miss McDonald is 
striving successfully to dispel. 

In Salt Lake City a good work has been done, under the 
labors of the Rev. R. G. McNiece, Prof. Coyner and the noble 
band of teachers, whose united efforts have cleansed that natu- 
rally beautiful city of much moral uncleanness, and is send- 
ing out througli the whole territory a pure religious senti- 
ment, that is making many changes for the glory of God and 
the uplifting of that people. The " Salt Lake Institute " should 



1883.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 35 

be speedily made a college, and if we are wise this will be done ; if 
not, others will establish a college there, and the Presbyterian 
Church will have lost a golden opportunity. A new mission is just 
being established, for which help is needed at once, to the amount 
of $2,500, to erect a building and fm*nish it. Miss Reed has just 
been commissioned for this work. 

At American Fork, the Rev. T. F. Day is eloquently preaching, 
and the teachers, the Misses Pierce and Simons, are instilling into 
the minds and hearts of many of the Mormon adherents, and their 
children, the pure and enlightening truths of the Gospel. A sub- 
stantial stone church has been built and paid for at a cost of much 
sacrifice and anxiety to the now happy laborers. Three miles 
further down the valley, at Pleasant Grove, Miss Work has pressed 
on successfully, amid opposition that would appal any other than a 
consecrated and brave Christian woman. 

One of our most successful missions is under the care of the 
Rev. G. W. Leonard, at Springville, where wise, diligent lal)or has 
resulted in a church organization, a substantial brick building, and 
a school of high order, with over 1 00 pupils. He is assisted in 
this good work by the Misses Munger, Wray and Hutchinson. 

Mr. Leonard has also under his care the mission at Spanisli Fort, 
where Miss Perley has for the past year and a half made headway 
against a terrible opposition, until slie has a school of twenty-five 
pupils. An assistant will soon be required. A chajDcl is very much 
needed and should be erected during the summer, and be made 
ready for the opening of the year, next September. The cost will 
be about $2500. 

The next point we reach on the journey down the valley is Pay- 
son, where a new chapel is just completed and a school established, 
taking the time of two faithful teachers, the Misses Woodruff and 
Berlin, and a parish work that keeps the Rev. J. A. L. Smith busy. 

The Huntingdon chapel, at Nej)hi, (built by kind friends in 
Cleveland, Ohio) is the center from which the gospel is proclaimed 
by the Rev. C. M. Fraser, and taught, together with the elevating 
branches of secular education, by Miss Scovel, 

Leaving this mission we pass up into the San Pete Yalley, 
between Mt. Nebo and other spurs of the Wasatch Mountains. 



36 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1883. 

Here we see the places where the Rev. D. J. McMillan so faithfully 
labored to establish the work of our church in proclaiming the 
" good news " and opening schools, by which to enlighten the poor 
ignorant people, many of whom, until he went among them, never 
heard the true Gospel. 

The Rev. G. W. Martin has now the oversight of this valley. 
The work has grown until we have flourishing schools at Moroni, 
Fairview, Spring City, Ephraim and Gunnison, with the following 
teachers, viz : the Misses Brown, Sorenson, Kyle, Rea and Campbell. 
We have also a Boarding School at Mt. Pleasant, which has its corps 
of teachers, the Misses Fishback, Crowell, Leonard and Stayers ; 
and at Manti, a school of high grade taught by the Misses Galbraith 
and Slade. At Moroni and Gunnison buildings are needed, and 
will be erected as soon as tlie money is secured. 

Passing down this valley, shut in by mountains on both sides, at 
Gunnison you come into the valley of Sevier. Two missions are 
established at Richfield and Monroe under the care of the Rev. P. 
D. Stoops, who successfully co-operates with the teachers, Misses 
Olmstead and Decker, though the accommodations are inadequate 
to their needs. 

To the west of this beautiful valley lies Fillmore, where the labors 
of the Rev. W. A. Hough and the Misses McKean and Craig have 
made permanent impressions for good upon the people of this, the 
former capital of Utah. The Scipio school, a few miles distant, is 
just begun with twenty-five pupils gathered under Miss Ramsey. 

Passing south about one hundred miles, our next workers are 
found at Parowon. Here tlie Rev. W. C. Cort has gathered around 
him a congregation and a school, which has given him an oppor- 
tunity to make impressions upon numbers of rank Mormons, who, 
despite the power of the priests, attend the services and school. 
Even the bitterest Mormon adherent admits the superior and 
purifying power of our work and workers. Miss Morton is the 
present teacher and another is needed. 

At Cedar City, twenty miles further south, after much waiting and 
watching, we have secured a building and established a school under 
the care of Miss Hartford. The determination to keep us out was 
more persistently manifested here than in any other place. Here 



1883.] BOAKD OF HOME MISSIONS. 37 

the Mountain Meadow expedition was planned, and from here the 
march began, which in a few hours carried death to one hundred 
and twenty poor helpless emigrants. 

A ride of over fifty miles through sandy wastes brings one to 
Silver Reef and Toguerville, the former, a mining town, where the 
Rev. E. N. Murphy labors, while four miles away, at Toquerville, 
Miss Burk tries what prayers, the light of the Gospel and education 
can do to purify the Mormon influence of this little town, which, 
by nature, is like an oasis in a desert land. We trust it will re- 
semble ere long, a moral one. 

On the very southern border, near the Arizona line, lies the 
beautiful little city of St. George. The Rev. A. B. Cort, with the 
teacher, Mrs. Blackburn, are laboring amidst discouragement 
caused by the deep-rooted immorality of the Mormons. Like the 
mountains that surround them, which are full of lava, hard as ada- 
mant, they resist the pure teachings of our Divine Redeemer. 

At Washington, a few miles away. Miss Stevenson teaches in the 
house where, a few years since, John D. L. Lee held his Mormon 
Court, which building was given to him for his good and faithful 
service in leading the Mormon liosts against the helpless people at 
Mountain Meadow. 

The light which these faithful workers are prayerfully and pa- 
tiently diffusing among the Mormon saints, will in due time dispel 
the delusion under which they labor. 

There have been employed within the bounds of the Presbytery 
of Utah, since the church began its work here, twenty-four minis- 
ters and eigthy-three teachers. The value of real estate bought, 
paid for, and now held, is about $97,700. This is distributed among 
thirty-three cities and towns. The number of churches organized 
is twelve ; the present number of communicants, three hundred and 
ten ; the present number of ministers, nineteen ; the number of 
schools now maintained, thirty-three ; the enrollment for the year 
exceeds two thousand ; the average enrollment for the year, one 
thousand seven hundred and sixty-one ; the average enrollment for 
the year in Sabbath schools, about one thousand eight hundred ; 
the number of teachers now under commission, fifty-three ; of these 
six were educated in the mission schools. 



38 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1883. 

If yon will examine the map of Utah, you will observe that our 
missions extend from north to soutli through the entire Territory. 
Wliile we occupy many of the most important towns, tliere are very 
many others still without a school or a church. The force of teach- 
ers and preachers could be doubled to good advantage ; but an 
empty treasury stays our liands. 

During the past year 133 Missionary Teachers have been em- 
ployed, as follows : 

Among the Indians 47 

" " Mexicans 21 

" " Mormons 65 



LITERAEY DEPARTMENT. 

(a.) The Presbyterian Home Missionary. 

Tlie paper bearing the above name is now well known through- 
out the Church. It is carrying monthly to thousands of homes 
information respecting the extent, character, resources, destitutions 
and prospects of this broad land of which they had never dreamed 
before. The Secretaries have often been asked how it was possible 
for them to conduct this work successfully without an organ of 
their own. The inconvenience was sensibly felt, but we made 
the best of it. We find the Pres7jyterian Home Missionary an 
auxiliary that we could not now dispense with. Through its pages 
we are able to lay our wants before our brethren the pastors of the 
churches, and to talk face to face with our liberal friends. Except- 
ing a deficit of 1 1702.47, less than we had once to pay for the pages 
of the Record, and much less than the cost of the copies sent free 
of charge to our ministers and teachers, the paper has paid for it- 
self during the fifteen months of its existence. As the ministers 
are entrusted by the Assembly with the important duty of raising 
money for our cause, it is no more than right that the Assembly 
should furnish them with the intelligence necessary to reach the 
hearts of their giving members. The present circulation of the 
Preshyteriaoi Home Missio7iary is 25,000, and the subscription list 
is rapidly increasing. It ought to double, and we believe that it 
will double, during the coming year. 

It is not necessary to speak of the merits of the paper, for they 



1883.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 39 

have been recognized fully by the whole Church. Some of our 
leading men have pronounced it phenomenal in quality and circu- 
lation. Its presence in the home and the church is a blessing to 
the children and a great aid to the pastor. 

(6.) Pamphlets and Leaflets. 
The Board has published but little during the years of its 
existence, except the Annual Keports, and lately three pamphlets 
entitled, ''Fresh Facts'' ''Does it Pay,'' "Home Mission Field 
for 1882 and 1883." The Woman's Executive Committee has 
issued a number of admirable leaflets on different phases of the 
school work. 

GENERAL SUMMAEY. 

Niimber of Missionaries, -------- 1,387 

" " Missionary Teachers, 133 

Years of Labor, .-..- 1,068 

Additions on Profession of Faith, .-.--- 6,281 

" Certificate, 5,305 

Total Membership, 78,669 

" in Congregations -------- 125,977 

Adult Baptisms, -1 ,^30 

Infant Baptisms, ---------- 3,677 

Sunday Schools organized, -------- 279 

Number of Sunday Schools, 1 ,777 

Membership of Sunday Schools, 120,936 

Church Edifices (value of same, $3,423,760), . - - - 1,261 

" " biiilt during the year (cost of same, $374,870) , - 132 

" " repaired and enlarged, ( " " $65,309), - 140 

Church debts canceled, -------- $97,358 

Churches self-sustaining this year, 37 

" organized, .-.----.- 136 
Numberof Parsonages (value, $287,341), 125 

APPOINTMENT OF MEMBERS. 

The term of service of the following members expires with this 

Assembly, namely : 

Ministers — Rev. Thomas S. Hastings, D. D. 
" Alfred Yeomans, D. D. 
Laymen — Jos. F. Joy. 

Jacob D. Vermilye. 
Walter M. Airman. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

By order of the Board. 



H. KENDALL, ) Se^,t^,^e.. 

WM. C. BOBERTS, ) 



40 



ANNUAL K E P O R T O F T H E 



[1883. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



0. D. EATON, Treasurer, in account with the BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS of the 
Presbyterian Church in the United States of America. 

1883— March .ilst. 
To Cash received to date for Home Missions, viz : 

From Churches, ------ 

" Sabbath Schools, . - - . . 

Women's Missionary Societies, 
'• Legacies, .-...- 

Individuals, etc., - . - - . 

" Interest on Permanent and Trust Funds, 



1882— April 1st— SUSTENTATION, 

To Balance, - - . - . 

1883— March 31st, To Cash received to date, viz: 
From Churches, .... 

" Legacies, 
" Individuals, etc, ... 



1882— April 1st— By Balance, Indebtedness to this date, 
1883— March 31st, Cash paid to date, viz: 
Acct. Home Hissions, 
" Sustentation, 

Expended as follows, viz. : 

Paid Missionaries, - - . . - 

" Acct. Teachers and Chapels, 
Taxes on Real Estate (bequeathed). 

Corresponding Secretaries, 

Treasurer, ------ 

Clerks, 

Traveling Expenses, - - - . . 

Bent, ------- 

Fuel, Care and Expense of Rooms, 

Printing Annual Report of last year, 
Printing and Stationery, - - - - 

Presbyterion Home Missionary (Free Copies), 
Monthly Record— Deficiency in Publishing, 

Postage and Revenue Stamps, 

Interest on borrowed money, ... 

Legal Expenses, - . - . - 



$208,884 42 
18,654 46 
78,520 95 
103,7-2 81 
41,783 27 
9,481 26 

f 

$20,781 59 



$461,056 17 



Home Mission indebtedness, 
Sustentation balance, 



1,601 53 
50 00 
90 66 — 18,742 19 — 39,523 78 

$500,579 95 
$15,862 54 



$490,300 38 

26,185 55 516,485 93 



400,867 65 

88,221 21 

340 35 

10,000 00 

3,000 00 

3,802 33 

810 95 

900 00 
7m 13 

1,108 65 

1,517 53 

1,702 47 

754 31 

1,211 55 

- 1,336 30 

276 50 



489,429 21 



17,613 28 



1,636 13 



5,082 96 



532,348 47 



2,724 35 
$516,485 93 



45,106 75 
13,338 23 



$31,768 52 



1883.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 41 



PERMANENT FUNDS, the income only to be used. 



United States Government Bonds, ------ $25,500 00 

New York City Bonds, - 13,000 00 

Bonds and Mortgages, - - . - - 23,500 00 

The John C. Green Fund, - 100,000 00 

Ohio State Stock 5,500 00 

IndianapoUs RoUing Mill Stock (bequeathed), . - . - 25,000 00 

Pittsburg, Cincinnati & St. Louis R. R. Bonds (donated), - 10,000 00 

Uninvested Funds, -------- 12,257 47 

Philadelphia City Stock, 500 00 

Union Pacific R. R. Bonds, Kansas Branch (donated), - - - 2,000 00 

TRUST FUNDS, the income from which is to be received by the 
donors during their lives : 
New York City Bonds, - - - - - - $1,000 

Bond and Mortgage, ...---. 1,000 

Temporarily Invested, .-.-.- 12.000 



$217,257 47 



14,000 00 



Township R. R. Bonds (bequeathed for general purposes), due Oct. 1st, 1877, pay- 
ment refused and tif uncertain value, ----.- $25,000 00 

$256,257 47 



RECAPITULATION. 



Received for Home Missions, General Work, - $461,056 17 

" " " " Sust. Dep't, - - 18,742 19 

" " " " Permanent Fund (Legacies) 1.3,997 25 

" " " Trust Fund (Donated), 11,000 00 



$504,795 61 
O. D. EATON, Treamrer. 



The undersigned having examined the accounts of O. D. Eaton, Treasurer of the Board of 
Home Missions, find the same correct, and the securities of the Permanent and Trust Funds as 
stated. 

New York, May 7th, 1883. 

J. D. VERMILYE, 



W. M. AIKMAN, X^^Sue. 
JO^. F. .TOY, 



42 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



[1883. 



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88 8 



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1883.] 



BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS, 



43 






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o oooooi-H ooooo 

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i-H rH »-, 1-H Tt CO CO 



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44 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



[1883. 



2 88888 

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1883.] 



BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS, 



45 



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88 88 18 



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coo too o 



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46 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



[1883. 



n-tOO 



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1883.] 



BOARD OP HOME MISSIONS. 



47 





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88 


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48 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



[1883. 



. 8 






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l^ O C^ IN Th M T-( .-I XI O 



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1883.] 



BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS 



49 



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19 00 


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[1883. 



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1883.] 



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51 



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52 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



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BOARD OF HOMK MISSIONS, 



53 



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[1883. 



s s 



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1883.] 



BOARD OF HUME MISSIONS. 



55 





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57 



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58 



ANNUAL REPORT OF TBE 



[i88;j. 



8S 



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oo ooco o 
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8 88 8 

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1883.] 



BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS, 



59 



88 



88 






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8?gSS 888 88 8? 



88 



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60 



ANNUAL R E P O K 'l' OF THE 



[1883. 



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1883.] 



BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 



61 





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62 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



[1883. 



88 



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538 

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1883.] 



BOAED OF HOME MISSIONS, 



63 



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64 



ANNUAL RP:P0KT OF THE 



[1883. 



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»ot~a« o>o 

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1883.] 



BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 



65 



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06 



ANNUAL KEPORT OF THE 



[1883. 



38 



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1883.] 



BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS, 



67 



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68 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



[18 83. 



B o s a 

apQWo 









bti 



^■C CCS 
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1883.] 



BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS, 



69 



88 


8 


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8 


15 


8 


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[1883. 




IS 8 



OCBOOO 



C O ■:£ O C: I- irr O 



ss 


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8S 


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CO *0 03 O iO 
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1883.] 



BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS, 



71 



88 



in 

CO 


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1 00 
9 50 
5 20 

1 03 

10 50 

4 00 
12 00 

195 00 
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3 05 
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14 00 
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4 00 
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18 62 

2 00 
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27 43 

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83 88 



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[1883. 




CO S 



82 



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BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS, 



77 





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78 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



[1883. 



Ot "-> 



83 



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79 



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6 66 
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80 



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[1883. 



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81 





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[1883. 



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28 



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93 



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4 25 
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72 48 
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4 55 
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203 50 
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191 25 
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10 75 

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83 80 
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226 65 


136 29 
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96 75 

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95 






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[1883. 



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97 



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99 



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[1883. 





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BOARD OF IT O M E MISSIONS. 



101 



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[1883. 



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1883.] 



BUAKD OE HOME MISSIONS, 



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[1883. 





TO 


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1883.] 



BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 



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ANNUAL K I<: 1' O H T O F 'V U K 



[1883. 



KEOAPITULATION BY SYNODS. 





1881-82. 


1882-83. 


Sustent'n 
i88-j-'83. 


ATL.\ NTIO 


$ 51 81 

6,935 64 

90 00 

1.845 32 

1,138 60 

19,798 43 

4.670 62 

5,185 :M 

3,455 39 

1,773 16 

9.185 30 

2,32;i 67 

3.457 27 

1,165 02 

24,777 94 

84,8.34 50 

31,933 09 

3,098 74 

53,834 32 

874 92 

383 64 

3,348 55 


$ 76 73 
8,596 09 


$ 3 65 


BALTIMt)UE 


522 64 


CHINA 




Onl^OK.VDO , 


3,093 4;^ 

1,735 81 

25,470 40 

5,911 99 

6,523 51 

2.944 55 

3,836 86 

9,1.51 64 

3,333 40 

3.251 59 

1,544 75 

38,613 96 

98,644 88 

36 322 51 

3,233 09 

59,473 99 

933 09 

659 05 


87 37 


COLUMBIA 


11 00 


ILLtNOI.S 


1,094 78 


INDIANA 


490 57 


IOWA 


483 9T 


K A N'S.VS 


239 47 


KKNTUCKY 


153 71 


MICHIGAN 


487 91 


MINNESOTA 


305 38 


.N'ISSOLTRI 


187 08 


NEHIIASKA 

NEW JEUSEY 


59 44 
1,873 69 
3.141 97 


NKW VOKK 


OHIO 


1,853 96 
85 68 


PACIFIC 


PENNSYLVANI.\ 


7,257 14 


TENNESSEE 


39 32 


TEXAS 


f.l RS 


WISCONSIN 


2.442 UO 165 43 


Legaciks 

MlSCKI,L\NEOtI8 AND SPECIAL 


351,131 67 
65,267 96 
74 395 11 


393,681 33 18,601 53 

103.732 81 50 00 

51,263 53 90 66 




13,414 13 


13,378 51 








403,108 87 


461,056 17 


18,743 19 



1883.] 



BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS, 



109 



STATISTICAL REPORTS 



(Post Office Address in Italics.) 



MISSIONARIES. 



Abels, Lucas 

ACOMB, Wm. S 

Adair, Alexander 

Adams, Eli P 

Adams, James Bailie 

Adams, John Q 

*Adams, Robert N 

*AiNSLii!;, George 

Albright, Henry F 

tALDRjcH, Luman a 

Alexander, James E . . . 
Alexander, J. Kirkwood, 
Alexander, Walter L . . 

Allen, Caleb M 

tALLBN, Robert W 

Allen, SiDNEv 

*Allin, J. H 

AxLiN, Thomas fl. 



*Allison, John 

Amlong, James L 

Anderson, Chas. T 

Anderson, James 

Anderson, John 

ANDERSON, Jos. M 

*Anderson. Matthew. . . 

Anderson, Robt. E 

Anderson, Samuel G . . 
Anderson, Thomas 0. . . . 

Annin, John A 

Anthony, Charles W . . 
*Armstrong, C. S., D. T). 
Armstrong, Thomas C. . . 

Arnold, Prank L 

AsDALE, Wilson 

*Ash, George W 

♦Athwrton, Isaac W . . . . 

Austin, Wm. L 

*AxLiNE, Andrew 

AxTELL. John S 

Ayres, Samuel B 

Baay, Jacob 

Bacon, Sam'l F 

Baesler, Wm 

Bailey, John Web.ster. . 

Bailey, Turner S 

Baird, Alex. K 

*Baker, Alvin 

Baker, Frederick P. .. 



FIELD.S OF LABOR. 



♦Baker, James R 

Baldridge, Sam'l C. 
Baldwin, Krank. M 
Baldwin, James H . . . 
Baldwin, Perry C. 



*Ballagh, Robert 

Barbor, John Park 

Barbour, Philander 

Bardill, John A 

Bardwell, David McGee. 



Platl&oille, G-er Wis. 

Goshen O. 

WaiUharq, Daytou & sta'n.Wash. Ter. 

Sandy Spring and Mt. Joy O. 

PortldtiU and Upper Mt. Bethel Pa. 

Boiihler, 1st Col. 

Fergus Falls and Western Minn. 

Humeston and Garden Grove . . .Iowa. 

Sei/inour and 3 stations Texas. 

Bond Hill O. 

liUtifij/lvduiii and Rusb Creek O . 

Jitekiion, 1st Minn. 

MdiJison Dakota. 

liroivn^ti I't/Z/c?/ and 1 station. .. Minn. 

Murrayville and Unity 111. 

Ncodesha, Fredouia and 3 sta'ns..Kau. 

Montrose and Schell City Mo. 

ChuUiuuxigd, 3d, Huutsville, King's 

Point and tJ stations Teiin. 

Jesup Iowa. 

Douglass Neb. 

Hapkensat'k , N.J. 

St. Jiie, Adora and 2 stations Texas. 

K<dainii3(io, North Mich. 

CeliiKi and Shanesville O . 

Pliilailelplihi, Berean, col'd Pa. 

Ri'dinidd F<Uls,lat Minn. 

Wheatland Minn. 

lliirinoiixburg and Evansburg Pa. 

litillii^ Cuba and Elk Prairie. Mo. 

Kewii }iee .... Ill . 

Synoilieal .Missionary 111. 

New TiiciiiiKi Wash. Ter. 

Er.iiiixtiiii and 4 stations Wyoming. 

F<i irfax and Mispah Mo . 

Dubois 111. 

Healdsburg and Fulton Cal. 

Dunkirk N. Y. 

i uka and Medicine Lodge Kan. 

Clyde and Green, t^pvimj O . 

WiUiamsrllle and 'Z stations 111. 

I'dwker C/'ti/, Glen Elder &1 sta'n. Kan. 

(Md-og/i, 1st Wis. 

Siti/reoiUe, N. J . 

( Vimliridge City Ind . 

Carroll Iowa. 

Synodical Missionary Iowa. 

Pasadena , Cal . 

Mar»hfieU(. 1st, Rural, Oak Grove, 

Hope, and 1 station Wis. 

Morris, 1st, Davis Co., 3d, & Ebeu- 

ezer Kan . 

Cohdeii 111. 

Neosho, Westminster and 3 stan's.Mo. 

Tower Citij and New Buffalo Dakota. 

Waterville, Hoskins, Kalida, Du 

pont and 3 stations O . 

Vacaville and Elmira Cal. 

Monaghan and Petersburg Pa. 

Malta and 1 station N. Y . 

Zion, Nazareth and Johannes Mo . 

Whippany N. J. 



_>. 


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3.2 






0'5 






11 


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53 


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2 


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42 


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11 


1 


1 


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s.s. 


13 


3 


3 


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11 


148 


s.s. 


7 








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s.s. 
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13 
1 














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17 





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62 


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11 


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14 


70 


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s.s. 


8 








p. 


3 


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71 


s.s. 


13 


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50 


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10 


18 


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93 


p. 


13 








s.s. 


13 






58 


s.s. 


4 


3 


o 


33 


P.E 


13 


3 


8 


123 


p. 


13 


10 


2 


91 


s.s. 


13 
13 




3 


43 


s.s. 


13 


4 


11 


48 


s.s. 


13 


;j 


1 


38 


s.s. 


11 


7 


4 


33 


s.s. 


1 
13 








P.E 


13 


3 


6 


(HI 


s.s. 


13 








s.s. 


^% 


3 


7 


60 


s.s. 


VI 


1 


3 


36 


s.s. 


13 


1 




35 


I'.E 


13 


« 


7 


109 


P.K 


\m. 


3 


1 


39 


P.E 


11 


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4 


80 


p. 


13 
12 
3 


1 




85 


P.E 


12 


4 


.5 


32 


S.S. 


6 








p. 


SK 


5 


3 


96 


s.s. 


10 


t! 


5 


57 


s.s. 


13 


~ 


■;■ 


47 


P.M 


13 
1 






300 


p. 


12 


4 




75 


P. 


13 


4 




65 


P. 


12 


1 




70 


P. 


13 


30 




108 



No Report. f Deceased. 



110 



ANNUAL KEPORT OF THE 



[1883. 



MISSIONARIES. 



Bablow, Geo. W 

Barnard, Alonzo 

Barnes, Geo. G 

*Barr, Geo. W 

*Barr, Preston 

Barr, Samuel E 

Barrett, ('has. S 

Bartholomew, Thomas D 

Bartlett, Junius A 

Baskerville, Geo. Sumner 
Baskerville, Henry C . 
Batchelder, Joseph M.. 



*Bausman, Jos. H 

*Bay. Wm. H 

*Bayne, Thomas 

Beale, David .1 

Beard, John U 

*Beattie, Lee W 

*Beaver, J. Percy 

t Beaver, Heuben 

*Becker, J. P 

*Beecher, John E 

Belden, Luther M. . . . 
Belden, Wm. W , D. D. 

*Belding, J. M 

Bell, George S 

Bell, Jas. R 

Bell, J. Vernon 

Benson, Aaron W 

*Benson, Enoch 

Benson, Homer H 

*Bentley, Samuel A.. 

*Bknton, John A 

♦Berk, John 

Berry, Franklin P 

♦Berry, James F 

Be VAN, Philip 



FIELDS OF LABOK. 



P. 
P. 

s.s. 

S.8. 
S.S. 

s.s. 
s.s. 



Bicknell, Geo. E 

Bingham, J. Shepherd. 
Birch, George W. F . . 

Bird, George R 

BlSCHOFF, .lOHN W 

BissELL, Lemuel B 

♦Black, John G 

Blackford, Robt. A.... 

Blain, Wm. J 

Blakely, David 

Blayney, Chas. P 

Blaynby, Francis S 

Blayney, Henry G 

Blis.s, James T 



Blose, Daniel Albert. 
Bloys, Wm. B. 



P. 

S.S. 
S.S. 

S.s. 

s!s. 

s.s. 
s.s. 
s.s. 

p. 
s.s. 

p. 
s.s. 

s.s. 



Detroit, Calvary Mich 

Omena and Red Wing Mich 

Bridge ville and FerlerdUhurg Md 

Albion Ind , 

Lanesboro and Henry town Minn, 

Pewee Valley Ky. 

Hampden Md. 

('(/riiiDxt, 1st Mich. 

Paulding, 1st O. 

Buxton, Norton & Reynolds. . .Dakota, 

Crookstiin Minn. 

. Osborne, Rose Valley, Covert, Kill 

Creek and 1 station Kan. 

Iowa. 

. Barlow O. 

. Montrose and Cameron. ....... Dakota. 

. Baltimore., Light St . Md . 

. Vacaville, Oal., axxA Wis.Q Nevada. 

Wis. 

. Neb. 

. Allegheny, Bethel Pa. 

Ill 

. Washington Minn . 

. Elk lidp'uU and East Bay Mich. 

. Hamilton, Union and station. N. Y. 

. Hermansville Wis. 

. WrightHville and 1 station Pa 

. Elvaston Ill, 

Pentitiehl and Winterburn Pa, 

. White Bear Lake and Pine City.. Minn. 

. Seward and 1 station Neb. 

, I'atdeerille and 2 stations Wis. 

. Zuni N. Mex. 

. Nason ville Wis . 

. Hickman Neb. 

, Salem, 1st Oregon. 

Turtle River and Forest River.Dakota. 
. Mill Town, St. Johns, Bethlehem, 

Anderson and 1 station Ind . 

Indianola, Stone Chapel and 3 sta- 
tions Kan. 

Brodhead and 1 station Wis . 

Bethany N. Y. 

Seattle Wash. Ter. 

Swedesboro and 1 station N. J . 

Oaro Mich 

Weege O 

Wliite Lake and 1 station N. Y 

Esperance N. Y 

Steamhodt Hock and Northwood Iowa 

Olive Branch and Austin Mo 

Omaha, North Neb 

RuvcHHWdod and 1 station W. va 

Leighton, Olivet, Plymouth and 1 

station Iowa 

Dresden N. Y , 

Coleman and 4 stations Texas 

BoAL, John M iLos Angeles, 2d Cal 

Board, James H \Oanaseraga, 1st and 1 station N. Y. 

BoBECK, Philip \//iram, Wellsville and Millville, .Utah. 

Boudreau Placide St. Anne, 2d 111. 

♦Booher, Marcus L Reading and Grand Rapids Mich. 

♦Booth, Geo Pacific City Mo. 

BowDER, Sam'l I Pavilion .N. Y. S.S. 

Boyd, James S ^Kirkio-ille, Millard and 2 .stations. , Mo. P. 

Boyd, Joseph N.. iXowj///;"/*/, < Viitral Col. P. 

Boyd, Robert Walla W'a/la, 1st Wash. Ter. S.S. 

♦Boyd, R. 1' De Sotc Mo 

Boyd, Thomas E \ Wymove, Odell and Diller Neb. S.S. 

Boyd, Thomas M \Lewistou Idaho. S.S. 

Bracken, Newton Glasco and 1 station Kan. S.S. 



12 

4>i 

9 

12 
4 
6X 
11 
12 
12 
4 



S.S. 



ss. 

S.S. 

p. 
p. 

s.s. 

P.E 



P. 
P. 

S.S. 

s.s. 

P.S 

P. 

s.s. 
p. 

s.s. 
s.s. 
s.s. 
s.s. 
s.s. 



4 
3 
12 
12 
4 

3 
12 
6 
3 
12 
3 
7 
8 
12 



S.S. 12 



23 



U a 

|i 

H 

]!>7' 
62 



8.50 
CO 



lor 



180 
125 
106 
10.5 
30 

180 



6 248 525 
5 36 70 



105 
100 

166 
107 
95 
120 



1.50 



84 

70 
.50 
149 
80 
64 
45 

130 

25 

52 
66 
110 

78 
72 



l(i 
121 



100 

120 

\U 
110 
.50 
95 

190 
86 

100 
80 

180 

140 

100 

78 

100 
60 

78 



130 
100 
60 

1.50 
50 
40 



• No Report. f Deceased. 



1883.] 



BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS 



111 



MISSIONARIES. 



Bracken, Theodore 
Brackett, Silas B... 



Bradbury. Henry C . 



Braden, Robert M. L. . 
Bradley, Joseph H. ... 

Branch, John 

Brandt, Gustav A 

Bransby, Charles .... 

Brent, Rolland 

Brickels, Limer F 

Bridger, Edward A. . . . 

Bridges, Wm. J 

Bright, John H 

Brinkema, Jacob 

Brouillette, Charles. 
Brouillette. Telesphore. 



*Brown, Arthur J 
Brown, Edwin. . . . 
*Brown, H. W... . 
Brown, James R 



FIELDS OF LABOR. 



Birmingliam Iowa. 

Keystone, Red River and Ellen- 
dale Dakota . 

Vesper, Blue Stone, Saltville and 4 
stations Kan. 

Irish Grove and Sweetwater Ill . 

Tuckerton N. J. 

Phim Creek and 1 station Neb . 

Melette. Northville& Warner. Dakota. 

L(>» Angeles, Spanish, and 1 sta'n. Cal. 

Bruceritle and 'Z stations Ind 

Auburndale and 1 station Wis. 

Union, Indian Prairie & Granby. . .Mo. 

lircdklyn. Green Ave N. Y. 

Chamtie and Thayer Kan . 

Kiimrar Iowa. 

Al.esea ndria Neb . 

Chehalis, Claquato, Cowlitz Prairie 
and 2 stations Wash. Ter. 

Ripon Wis. 

Green Lawn N. Y . 

. N.J. 

Emerson, lo., Emerson, Neb Neb. 

Brown, John iCanip Cooper Texas. 

*Brown, John M lAxtell and Oneida Kan. 

Brown, Wm. B Villesca Iowa. 

7><H/, Liberty Street N. Y. 

Mt. Sterling and Midway O. 



Brown, Wm. C 

♦Browne, Geo. S. J 

♦Hrownlee, H. H 

*Brownson, Marcus A. 
Bruce, Charles H 



Phi lad el ph in, Hebron, Memorial ...Pa. 

Guthrie Centre and Menlo Iowa. 

♦Bruechert. Fred. H. W .Omaha, Ger Neb. 

*Bryan, Arthur N iBarneirat and Forked River N. J. 



♦Bryant, Wm 

♦Buchanan. J. M., D. D. . . 

Buchanan, Thos. N 

Buchanan, Wm. H 

BURBANK, LYSANDER T 

Burdett, Michael 

♦BURDICK. Chas. R 

Burkhardt, John 

BuRLisoN, James H 

Burr, Henry B 

Burt. James C 

BuscH, Augustus 

*Bu.shnell, Herbert K... 
BusHNELL, Horace, Jr. . . 

Butler, James G 

Butler, Milford C 

Byers, Joseph H 

*Byram, Albert B 

Cairns, John 

♦Caldwell, Alex 

♦Caldwell, G. M 

Caldwell. John 

Caldwell, John C, D. D. 
Caldwell, John D 



Caldwell, Rob't P 

♦Caldwell, Stewart S. 
Caldwell, Wm. E 



Cambern, Henry H. . . 
Camp, Philander. . . 
♦Campbell, Arch H. . 
♦Campbell, Chas. M . 
Campbell, Donald K. 
Campbell, Elgy V. . . 

Campbell, James 

♦Campbell. James B. . 
♦Campbell, John A. . . 



Argyle N. Y. 

Linoleum ville N. Y . 

Montesiimii and Dexter Iowa. 

S(in Anion io Texas. 

Burr Oak, New H elena & 1 sta'n . . Neb . 

Ben Salem and 1 station Pa . 

Stevenson and 2 stations Wis . 

St. Edwards and 2 stations Neb. 

North Platte, 1st Neb. 

Cisco, 1st Texas. 

Mcl'herson, 1st Kan . 

Winona, Ger., and 1 station Minn. 

Beaver City and Wilsonville Neb. 

Concordia Kan. 

Grand Tower 111. 

Staunton. Raymond and 1 station. ..111. 

Perry and Clinton Kan. 

Edgar Neb, 

Emporium Pa 

Pleasant Hill and .3 stations Kan, 

Akron and Blythedale Mo, 

Centralia and 2 stations Pa 

Xorth Lii Crosse Wis 

Pleasant Grove, Hazleton & 1 sta- 
tion Iowa 

Louisville, Olivet and Plum Creek. Ky 

Lakevie w Oregon 

Jfarciis, Paullina, Liberty & 2 sta- 
tions Iowa 

Walnut Kan 

Lycoming Centre Pa 

iCasey and Guthrie Centre Iowa 

Valmont Col 

Palmyra, 1st Mo 

St. Cloud Minn 

Tehama and 1 station Cal 

May's Landing N.J 

Elwood Ind 



P. 

S.S. 

s.s. 

p. 
s.s. 
s.s. 
s.s. 
s.s. 
s.s. 

p. 
s.s. 

p. 

p. 
s.s. 
s.s. 

s.s. 

p. 

s'.s. 
s.s. 
s.s. 

H.Ei 

p. 
p. 



P.E 



P. 

S.S. 

p. 
p. 



s.s. 
s.s. 
s.s. 
s.s. 
p. 

p. 
p. 

<.s. 
s.s. 



12 

11 

12 
12 

12 
6 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 

12 
4 

12 
4 

io' 
1 

4 

12 

1 

3 
12 
12 

3 
12 

3 

6 
12 
12 
12 

2X 
12 

12 
12 
<i 
12 

12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
6 
4 



S.S. 
P. 

p. 

S.S. 

s.s. 

s.s. 
s.s. 

P.E 



11 
12 
12 

10^ 

12 

12 

1 

1 

12 

12 

12 

1 



73 385 
96 90 



.58 
29 
41 
15 
45 
27 
35 
223 
87 



35 



100 
30 
26 
70 

43 

60 
8 
99 
60 

73 
40 

;« 

115 



105 
35 



30 
113 

425 
130 
50 
50 

54 

80 



60 
115 



140 
75 
50 

100 

50 
190 

115 

72 

125 
60 
90 

125 



70 
170 

125 
15 

75 

200 

a5 

80 



150 
65 



* No Report. 



112 



ANNUAL K K P O R T OF THE 



[1883. 



MISSIONARIES. 



Campbell, Thos 

Campbell, Wm. M . . 
♦Campbell, Wm. W.. 

Cardy, John J 

Carnahan, Rob't a. 
Carpenter, John H. 

*Carr, Wm. T 

Carrington, John. . . 
Carroll, Geo. R . . . 
Carson, Harlan P . . . 



Carson, John E 

Carson, Richard M. 
Carter, Wm. S . . . . 
Caruthers, James S. 
Carver, Andrew S.. 



Caswell, Alex. K 

Cate, Charles N 

*Cathcart, J. W 

*Cecil, James W 

Cellar, Thomas J 

Chacon, Juan B 

*Chalpant, Wm. P 

Chamberlain, A. N 

Chapin, Addison M 

*Chapin, Charles B 

*Chapin, Melancthon E. 

Chapin, Wm. V 

Chapman, John C 

Chappell, George 

Cheadle, Henry C 

Cheesman, Eugene G 

Cherryholmes,Jas.Calvin 

Chestnut, Nathaniel 

Christison, Robert 



Claggett, Wm. H 

Clark, Uavid 

Clark, James H 

*Clark, Richard A. 

Clark, Seth G 

Clarke, Harrison. . . 
Clelanu, Philip S. . . 



*Cleland, Thos. H., D. D. 

Clements, Joseph 

Cleveland, Wm. N 



*Clyde, William 

Cobleigh, Wm 

♦Cochran, James. . . . 
COG.SWELL, Jos. S. . . 

CoiT, Charles P 

Cole, Osman L 

Coleman, Wm 

Colmery, David R.. 
CoMPTON, Andrew J . 



COMPTON, ORVILLE 

*CoNDiT, Elbert N 

CoNDiT, Isaac H 

Cone, Augustus 

Conrad, Jacob E 

Converse, Charles S. 

*CoNWAY, James 

Conzett, Jacob . . 

Cook, Charles H 

Cook, John J 

Cook, Milton L 

Cook, Solomon 



FIELDS OF LABOR. 



Le^iieur, 1st Minn. 

Spring Lake Mich. 

Grove Md. 

Summerville and 1 station Oregon. 

Hastings Mich. 

Paw Paio (irmie, and Wyoming 111. 

Eliz<(he.th, Siloam N.J. 

Noe Valley, lone City & Amador. . .Cal. 

Woodbine and 2 stations Iowa. 

Scotland, Tyndall, Milltown and 1 
station Dakota. 

BrimfieM Ill 

Carrollton and stations Mo. 

Mansfield and Covington Pa. 

Ellsworth Kan 

Breckenridge, Clear Pork & S sta- 
tions Texas. 

Boundary and 4 stations Dakota. 

Fairmont, Exeter and Geneva Neb. 

Fisher and 1 station Minn. 

Bourbon Ind. 

Patterson Ohio . 

San Rafael Col. 

Western and Campbell Dakota. 

Vinita Ind. Ter. 

A urora Ind . 

Norwood N. J. 

And over, Rome and vicinity. . .Dakota. 

Chetek Wis. 

Transfer -. Pa. 

Little Valley and 3 stations Pa. 

Buffalo, Rockf ord and station . . . Minn . 

Mt. Pleaxant and station Mich. 

Larimare Dakota. 

Pawnee City Neb. 

North Bend, Lewis Valley & 2 sta- 
tions Wis. 

St. Louis, Memorial Tabernacle . . . Mo. 

Austin, 1st 111. 

Santa Ana, 1st, and station Cal. 

Apalaehin and East Maine N. Y 

Rich Hill, Louo Oak and Itookville.'M.o. 

Vienna and Lewiiisville Va. 

Wakarusa, Pauline and Mission 

Centre Kan . 

Lebanon Ky . 

Harbor Springs Mich . 

Alder Creek, Forestport and 3 sta- 
tions N. Y. 

AsMand, Phoenix & 4 stations. Oregon. 

Grafton Dakota. 

Willmar and station Minn . 

Windham N. U. 

Rochester, Memorial N. Y . 

Constable N. Y . 

Garne.it Kan . 

Oittuinhus, Hoge O. 

Woodbridge, Bethel, Elk Grove and 
2 stations Cal . 

Bennett and station Neb. 

Pleasant Grove Oregon , 

Albany, 1st Oregon. 

Coudersport Pa. 

Amboy and Lake Crystal Minn , 

Rawlins Wyoming 

Odessa Drawyers Del, 

Chicago, 1st (merman .111. 

Pima /geocij Arizona, 

Mackinaw and vie — Mich, 

Missoula Montana, 

Antwerp) and Cecil O. 



>} 


/^ddedto 


^ 


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Churches. 


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cc/;, 
11 


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9 


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P.E 


12 

12 


5 


7 


87 


S.S. 


12 


7 


2 


26 


S.S. 


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74 


p. 


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75 


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17 


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s.s. 


12 


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50 


s.s. 


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47 


s.s. 


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s.s. 


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s.s. 


12 


4 


8 


70 


p. 


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s.s. 




.5 


17 


22 


s.s. 


9 


6 


3 


82 


S.rt. 


12 


4 


1 


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s.s. 


12 






62 


P.E 


.5 


() 


9 


70 


s.s. 


11 
6 


9 


12 


21 


P.E 


12 


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68 


s.s. 


12 


28 


4 


149 


p. 


12 


2 


1(i 


75 


s.s. 


12 
9 


2 


32 


34 


s.s. 


12 


27 


19 


98 


P.E 


11 
3 


2 


2 


54 


s.s. 


12 







20 


P.E 


12 


.5 


2 


68 


P. 


12 




3 


50 


S.s. 


12 
(i 


4 


18 


17 


p. 


1) 


4 


2 


121 


p. 


SK 


24 


15 


228 


s.s. 


12 






60 


p. 


12 




2 


73 


p. 


12 


3 


20 


131 


s.s. 


12 


2 




39 


s.s. 


12 


3 


6 


55 


s.s. 


12 


4 


8 


60 


s.s. 


12 


3 


1 


50 


s.s. 


12 

12 
6 






13 


p. 


12 


27 


2 


75 


s.s. 


12 
2 

1 


.... 






s.s. 




14 




80 



No Report. 



18S3.] 



BOARD OF HOMK MISSIONS, 



11! 



-MISSIONARIES. 



Cooke, Joshua 

*COOLEY, Wm. F 

Cooper, Alvin 

Cooper, Charles W. . 
CoPELAND, Jonathan. 
Cornell, Howard. . . . 
Cornet, Edward .... 



CoRT, Arthur B 



CoKT, Wm. C 

CoBV, Harlan P 

CoTTRELL, George W. . 
Coulter, Cyrenius N. . 
CouLTKB, Richard H.. . 

Coulter, Robert M 

Coulter, Wm 

♦Cousins, Edward B 

Covert, Grin D 

Cowden, John G 

*CowiiiCK, John Y 

CowLEy, Junius J 

*i 'RAiG, George 

(Jraio. James M 

Crane. Edward P 

Crane, Henry J 

Crane, Oliver, D. D... 

Cravens, Wm. A 

Crawford, Charles II. 
Crawford, Charles R. 

Crawford, J ohn W 

Crawford Levi P 

Creath, John 

Cresswell, Robt. J. . . . 

*Crissman, Geo. T 

*Crisswell, Robt. A, . 



FIELDS OF LABOR. 



Crittenden, Immer N. . . 

Ckoco, Alfred H 

Crosby, Benjamin S 

'■•Cross, Andrew B 

Crou.se, Nathaniel P 

(RuiiiSHANK, Robt., D. D. 

Cullen, Henry 

CuNDALL, Isaac N 

Cunningham, Robt. H 

Currens, Jas. B 

CuRRiE, Neil 

Curry, .Iames 

*Curtis, Chas. D 

Curtis, James F 

Curtis, Wm. W 

DAGi'ii, Thos. J 

*Danskin, Alex 

Darley, Alex. M 

Darley, Geo. M 

Dashiell, Alfred H 

*Daviks, Evan L 

Davies, Peter S 



Davis, Edwin R. . . 
*Davis, George F. 



Davis, Herbert E. , . 
Davis, James Scott. 

Davis, .John K 

Davis, Thos. D 



Davis, Wm. S. . 
Day, Edgar W. 



Storm Lake & Sulphur Springs . . Iowa 

Dakota. 

Tloimird N. Y . 

CeiHrevWe N. Y. 

'Wehxter and station . .' N. Y . 

OnceU and Rome Pa. 

Repnbli<}an Citi/, Orleans, Harmony 
and station Neb. 

Sf: (reorqe and Washington City 

(stations).... Utah. 

Piiroivini and Cedar City Utah. 

F'!iirein\: and station Wis. 

Whiting. Shamong and station ...N.J 

Taymoutb and station Mich . 

//(i}i/,-insvi/fe, 1st Ky . 

Malvern Iowa 

Gi-eeuwood and 4 stations Mich. 

A u'luhoii, Iowa. 

Appanoose and 2 stations 111. 

Deiicer, IHghland and station Col. 

Cheyenne Wyoming. 

Ihiittingiliin VaVey Pa. 

Ossian ' N. Y. 

Maniiowoc and station Wis. 

I'alit't'vnia Pa. 

.V/c7/r;/.w« and 3 stations Pa. 

Stirling N.J. 

Knob Noster and Salem Mo . 

Point Arena and 2 stations Cal. 

Good Will Dakota. 

Bethel and /"opeX-a, 3d Kan. 

/'iisadeiia Cal . 

Manuing and station Iowa. 

Pembina, Hope and station .... Dakota. 

Kearney Neb. 

Pleasant Grove, Turner and 2 sta- 
tions Oregon. 

Kr.nf, l.st Mich 

Sacv<imento, 14th St Cal. 

Stranger, Willow Springs & sta'n.Kan. 

Parkton, Whiteliall and Kirkwood.Md. 

Phdiii ixville. 1st and station Pa. 

Sariinnafu 1st, and tlackberry Mo. 

Mivnning and .J stations Iowa. 

liipon Wis. 

Mt. Sterling and New Holland O. 

I'arker, Swan Lake & 3 Stan's. Dakota. 

Lyon. Rock Lake and Balaton. . .Minn 

San Pablo and Wefft lierlceley Cal. 

New 3Iatamoras O. 

Greene and station Iowa. 

(i^age City Kan . 

Wiii/.iirort/i. Lafayette and 2 sta'ns. O. 

Saull St. Marie Mich. 

Trhiiilad, 2d, and 5 stations Col. 

Del Norle Col. 

Lakewood and station N.J. 

St. Ignace Mich . 

St. Ignace. Midland City and 3 sta- 
tions Mich. 

Homewood, Gardner, Pilot and 4 
stations ; lU . 

Grand Prairie, Mt Bethel & Belle- 
vue Mo. 

Negauiiee and 1 station Mich. 

Richland. Sumner and Union ill. 

Xen^iH-K\ Knox N.J. 

St. Thomas, Rex, Stalmait & 4 sta- 
tions Mich. 

Clai/ Centre Kan . 

Lisbon, Sheldon and 4 stations. Dakota. 



>i 






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s.s. 


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12 


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12 


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12 










p. 


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4 


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p. 


11 


s.s. 


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7 


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s.s. 


12 


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11 


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12 


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6 


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12 


s.s. 


12 


p. 


12 


s.s. 


12 


p. 


12 


s.s. 


10>i 



Added to 


^ 


Churches. 


Si 






£ a 


a 




si 










o 




2 


3 


82 


1 




71 


2 


3 


81 


1 




89 


^ 


2 


55 

1 


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C 


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IS 
48 


3 




(!4 


1 


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8 


42 
19 


19 


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47 


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57 


12 




106 


1 


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47 


4 


4 


76 


« 


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29 


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71 


8 


2 


30 
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6 


7 


129 


2 


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47 
15 


5 


29 


89 


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52 


9 


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23 


12 


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55 


21 


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!> 


67 




2 


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1 


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3 


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4 


3 


42 
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183 


5 


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45 


20 


1 


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!» 


20 


4 


1 


70 


22 


15 


107 


29 


53 


122 


2 


6 


58 


17 




170 


14 


10 


47 


35 


3 


35 


2 


9 


80 


5 


5 


33 



No Report, 



114 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



[1883. 



MISSIONARIES. 



*Day, Thkodore S 

Day, Thos. F 

Dean, Henky D 

Decker, Henry E 

Decker, I. Davison 

*D"Argent, Wm. E 

*Delamater. Isaac 

*De Garmo. Salathiel S. 

*De Long, Alfred B 

De Long, Chas. H 

Denison, Herbert G 

Denton, James N 

Devin?j, James a 

Dexter, Rescum Hart — 

*Dias, a 

Dickens, Albert W 

*DlCKBRSON, A. C, D. D. . 



Dickinson, Edward. 
Dickey, Hervey S. . . 
Dickey, James W. . . . 

Dickey, Ninian S 

Dickey, Solomon C. . 
Dickson, James 



Dillingham, John H. 

Dillon, Samuel P 

Dillon. Samuel P 

Dimond, David, D. D. . 
Dobbins, Hugh H. ... 

Dodd, Henry M 

DoDD, Reuel 

Dodson, De Costa H. 

DoENCH, Conrad 

Donaldson, Newton. 

* Donaldson, S 

DooL, Wm. I 

DouGAN, Thomas 

Dougherty, Peter . . 
Dudley, La Fayette . 



Duncan, Chas. C. B 

*DuNDAS, John R., D. D. 

Dunning, Harlan P 

*DycKMAN, Henry M 

Dye, Henry B 

Dyer, P'rancis 

Dvsart, Joseph P 

*Dysart, Milton H 

Easterday, Thos. R 

Eastman, John C 

Eastman, John H 

* Edgar, Robert 

Edwards, .Fi>hn 

Edwards, Wm. H 

Eggert, John B 

Elcock, Thos 

*ELFiELn, Edward A. . . 

Ellers, William 

Elliott, John 

Elliott, John N 

Elliott, Samuel W , 

Elliott, Wm 

Ellis, Charles D 

*Ellis, John W 

♦Emerson, Chas. H 

English, John D 

Erhardt, Fred 

Ernest, George 



FIELDS OF LABOR. 



% 



Neb 

A iiiericav Fork and 1 station Utah 

T.ilierfiirill,' HI, 

Grfeii'hush N. Y 

Petrolia and 3 stations Pa 

< 'aledonia Dakota 

Wcirfleld and Eden Ky 

Midway O 

Lenox Iowa 

Grcevfeld and 2 stal ions Iowa 

Ft. Howard & Green Bay (French). Wis 

(h'ean Uench N. J 

Pineonniiig, Calvary & 2 sta'ns..Mich 

lUtliiiii II ( '('litre N. Y 

SDalli^il Work Cal 

■ i,!nHh„ni N. Y 

Greenwood, Scott sville and Caney 

Fork K; 

Mufphi/Kbor'o and station .... 

West Weaver and 3 .stations Iowa. 

Tloirard a.nd Winstod , Minn . 

Minnedpolifs and 3 stations Kan . 

Avbvrit and '■' stations Neb . 

Pennsdale, Trout Run, Slack's Run 

and 'i .stations Pa. 

So. ,S(ii/!/i(iw and Saginaw Mich. 

UiH-kliitiil Pa. 

Honior and Arlington Ind. 

Brighton and station Ill 

Calistoga and Pope Valley Cal. 

Dexter and Brown ville N. Y . 

Trinidad and 3 .stations Col. 

Valley Creek and .station Texas. 

New York,2A, Gcr N. V. 

Moingona and Pattou Iowa. 

M'urren Ill . 

Conrad and station Iowa. 

Kilbourn City Wis. 

Pike Grove and station Wis. 

Hartford, Elmendora and sta'n, & 

Eagle Creek, Big Creek and Ot- 

tum wa Kan . 

Somerfiet^M.i. Washington Ac Jenner.Pa. 

Hanover O. 

Corvallia and Oak Ridge Oregon. 

Warren Minn . 

Sidney and 2 stations Iowa. 

Mansfield and ■\ stations N. Y . 

North Grdnri.tle and 3 stations N. Y. 

Moulton and West Grove Iowa. 

Sault St. Marie Mich. 

Las Vegas N. Mex . 

Kittmxih and 3 stations N. Y . 

Ddreujiort, 2d Iowa. 

Choctaw Nation Ind. Ter. 

lf<irrin<itoii and Felton Del. 

('nliiiiilnix^ Ceritral and Bethel. . . .Iowa. 
MJddlepoint, Centre and 3 station.s..O. 

Sack Co., Ger Iowa. 

Mine La Motte and Fredericktown.Mo. 

Omrego and station Kan . 

Miiieral Point Wis. 

Wext Fit ton O . 

Sugar Grove and station Pa . 

Morriee, Byron and Argentine. . .Mich. 

Los Angeles Cal. 

Millerboro and Willowdale .Neb. 

Barre Centre N. Y . 

M,ivc/ieK-er, 1st N. 11 . 

Mt. Vernon, Otisco, Mt. Lebanon & 

Pleasant Hill Ind. 



S.S. 

s.s. 

S.S. 

s.s. 

P.S 



s.s. 

s.s. 

p. 

p. 

s.s. 

8S. 

p.' 



p. 

s.s. 
s.s. 
s.s. 
s.s. 

P.E 

p. 



p. 

s.s. 

I'. 
s.s. 

p. 

p. 
s.s. 

s'.s. 

s.s. 



p. 

p. 

s.s. 
s.s. 

s.s. 
p. 

s.s. 

s.s. 

s.s. 

p. 

s.s. 
s.s. 

PE 

p. 

s.s. 
s.s. 

1'. 

p. 



4 
13 

9 
13 
12 

3 

5 
1« 

7 

12 
12 

13 
G 
13 

11 
H 
4 
13 
13 
6 

12 
12 
10 
13 
13 
13 
12 
3 
6 
5 
I 

10 
12 

13 



S.S, 



•% 



7 12.5 
44 



I.... 106 



No Reimrt, 



1883.] 



BOAKD OF HOME MISSIONS 



115 



MISSIONARIES. 



Ervtn, John N 

ESCHMEYER, JoHN H 

ErLNER, Louis 

Evans, David E 

Evans, Evan B 

*EvANS, Evan R 

Evans, Wm. McCldng. . . . 

Everest, Geo. T 

EwiNG, James Alex 

EzELL, Samuel 

*Fackler, John G., D. D. 

Faikbairn, Alex 

^Fanning, Newville D. .. 

*Faries, Isaiah 

Farmer, Sam'l F 



♦Farrand, Fountains R. 
Farrer, Robert B 



Faulkner, Wm. E 

FiGGE, LUDWIG 

Finks, Delos E 

Finney. Ebenezer D... 

*FisH, Edward F 

Fisher, Gkd. M 

Fisher. Geo. W 

Fisher, John 

Fisher, Sanford G 

FiSK, Ezra W., U. D — 

FiSMEK, AW 

Fitzgerald, Jas. D 

Flanagan, Jas. H 

Fleming, Jos. H 

♦Fleming, Samuel B 

Fliokinger, Robert E. 

^Flint, Joseph F 

Foland, Chester H. . . . 



FIELDS OF LABOR. 



Dai/ton Ky. 

Shelby ville, 2d, Ger Ind . 

East WilUanisburg, Ger N. Y . 

Buckeye, Oakland and station O. 

Elk City, Springdale & Mt. Hope . . Kau . 

(Council Bluffs I'resbytery) Iowa. 

Zion and 'Z stations Iowa. 

Salem and 2 stations Ill . 

Blind 11 III, Mason and station O . 

Albany and 3 stations Texas. 

Trenton Mo. 

Cdfsoii Citi/, 1st Nevada. 

Jamestown Dakota. 

Minneapolis, Franklin Ave Minu . 

Huron, Kennekuk, Lancaster and 

stations Kan . 

Mo. 



P. 
P. 
P. 

S.S. 

s.s. 



12 
Vi 

13 
11 

1~' 
1 

S.S.i 11 
S.S.'4,Hi 



S.S. 
S.S. 

p. 

S.S. rx 



FoLsoM, Arthur 

"Forbes, Samuel 

♦Forbes, W. O 

*FoRD, Jas. T 

FoRESMAN, Edwin P. 



Foster, Alex. S 

Foster, Edward P 

♦Fotheringham. Thos. F. . 

*Fox, John 

Fox, John P 

Fox, Louis R 

FoY, John 

Eraser, Charles M 

Eraser, .Iames 

Fraser, Thomas 

Eraser, Wm. J 

Frederick, Augustus 

Frbeland, Daniel N 

*Freeman, Aiios N 

B'riedgen, Francis F 

Frothingham, James 

*Pueller, Charles 

♦Fulbright, Lewis L 

♦Fullenweider, Henry P 
Fulton, James P 



Fulton, John W 

♦Fulton. Samuel D 

Gage, Iohn L 

*Galbraith, Robert C. 

♦Gamble, Daniel 

Gardiner, Abraham S. . 



Olivet, Bainbridge, Brookings and 

station Dakota. 

New Bethlehem N. Y . 

Lennox, 1st, Ger, and station .Dakota. 
Deiirer, Westniiu.ster &, Highland .Col. 

Falston and liel Air Md . 

Gilroy Cal. 

MixKOii/d Montana. 

New Hope, Greenup and Casey 111. 

Andrew and Jiellerue Iowa. 

Terrell and station Texas. 

Bowling Green Ind . 

UlmitH: City, Ger N. J. 

Weston W. Va. 

(rntftoii W. Va. 

Robert Kennedy Memorial .I'a, 

Arkansas City Kan . 

ll'<(//('(< and Slame Iowa. 

Warrensburgh N. Y. 

Beaver City, Wilsonville and sta- 
tion Neb 

Gibbon, Wood River and station. Neb. 

Potter Chapel O. 

Neb. 

Oxford Wis 

Kylertowu, Bradford, Woodland &. 
2 stations Pa. 

Miller and 3 stations Dakota . 

( 'iiltUceH and Calvary Kan . 

Colton and 8au Buenaventura . . . .Cal. 

Hampden Md. 

Carlisle and Ohio Ind . 

Detroit. Union Mich. 

Salem and Beulah Neb. 

Huntington Chapel and station. .Utah. 

Keiiiiett SipKtre and station Pa. 

Sy nodical Missionary Cal . 

Bedford Ind . 

(^Iiiiteii H'j(ty N. Y . 

Hngenot Memorial N. Y. 

Bri'okh/it, Siloara N. Y. 

( 'oniierxrille, Ger Ind. 

Manchester '.Iowa. 

Warreusburg Mo . 

Denrer, coV& Col. 

Minneapolis, 5th . . Minn. 

Harper, Danville, Kingman and 3 
stations Kan. 

Falls Citi/ Neb. 

Socorro N. Mex. 

Madeliaand St. James Minn, 

Golconda HI 

Moscow and vie Idaho 

Winslow and station iU 



S.S. 



S.S. 
P. 

P. 
P.S 



13 
4 

12 
12 
G 
12 
12 
Ih 
S.S. 5X 
S.b. I IX 
S.S 



S.S. 

S.S. 
S.S. 
S.S. 

p. 
p. 

p. 

S.S. 

S.S. 
S.S. 



p. 12 

S.S.ilO)^ 
p. El 12 



I* 

S.S. 
S.S. 
S.S. 
S.S. 

p. 

s'.s. 
p. 
p. 
p. 

S.S. 
S.S. 

p. 



S.S. 
S.S. 



S.S. 



74 
44 
80 
114 
94 

42 

40 
73 
21 



100 



30 



30 



46 

58 
55 
3S 
35 

20 
105 
58 
45 
5 
30 
31 
122 
55 

40 



115 
2ti 
69 



100 
53 

"76' 

75 
88 
34 

63 



62 



No Report. 



116 



ANNUAL EEPORT OF THE 



[1883. 



MISSIONAKIES. 



Gardner, John H 

Garrison, Abram E 

*Gakver, James C 

Gassaru, T. M 

*Gaston, Albert H. . . . . 

Gaston, Joseph 

Gates. Lorf.nzo M 

Gaus, Henry 

Gay, William 

Gaylord, Heminway J... 
Geary, Edward R., D. D . 

*6erhard, James A 

Ghormlky, David O 

*Gibson. Willard P 

GiB"FiN, George C 



KIKLOS OF LABOR. 



GiFFiN, John 



Gilchrist, Jas 

*GiLCHRisT, Jos. J 

Gelkerson, John C 

GiLbAM, Jeremiah C . . . 
Gillespie, Samuel L. . 

GiLLK.SPIE, Wm. F 

Gillette. Clark B... 

GiLMORE, John 

GiLTNER, Henry M . . . 

Glendenning, a 

Godsman, Chas. J 

GoFF, Herman A 

GOODALE, ALVIN B 

*GorLD, Calvin C 

*GOULD, J. LooMis 

*Gourlay, John L. . . . 

Gowdy, George E 

Gowdy, Wm. F 



Graham, Chas. P. 



Graham, George 

*Graham, John J 

*Graham. Samuel ... 
Grant, Martin Ellis 
Gray, Lyman C , 



Green, David Hoyl... 
Green, Nathaniel C 
Greenlee, Wm. M . . . . 
(iReycloud, David . . . 

*Grifpes, James A 

*Grifpin, Sherman W. 

Griswold, John V 

Groeneveld, Eiko J. , . 
Gruhnert, Herman C. 
*GuENTHER, John C... 

Guthrie. Hugh W 

ilACKETT, E. H 

H ageman, George 

H AGEMAN, Jambs W 

Hahn, John A 

H aun, Reuben 

* Haines, Alanson A. . . 

■Halbert, Enos M 

Hall, Henry R 

*Hall, John G., D. D.. 

]5all, Wm. Thos 

Halliday, Ebenezer. . 
Hamilton, Thomas A . . 



P. 
P. 

s.s. 
s.s. 

!^.S. 

s.s. 
s.s. 
s.s. 



LeRay N. Y. 

Big Creek, LeRoy and 2 stations . . Kan . 
Minn 

Red Oak and Huntington O . 

Marlette Mich. 

Lansing, 1st Iowa. 

Lena Ill 

Bethany, Eagle Park itS sta'ns.Orcgon. 

Dehnar and Elwood Iowa . 

(Vycle, Seapo and 3 stations Kan. 

Eugene City and 3 stations — Oregon . 

Hamburgh Iowa. 

East PofiUi ndAst Oregon . 

Conklingville and Day N. Y. 

Kenesaw, Minden, Osco, Eaton and 
1 station Neb . 

Weatberford, Lampassa.s, 1st, and 2 
stations Texas . 

Smyrna and Monroe Ind. 

Alamosa and vie Col. 

Calliope and station .Iowa. 

Marshallville and .^station O . 

Corinne, Bi'igham City and sta'u.Utah. 

Eagle Pass, ist, and station Texas. 

Beecher's Island and Farmington. .Pa. 

Hanover and Elizabeth 111. 

Thornton, Union, Verona & sta'n Neb. 

Grandin Dakota. 

Dexter, Prairie Ridge & 'i stan's . . Kan . 

Sevier County Tenn . 

Hodge and station Mo 

Burusville and Sutton W. Va. 

Hydah Mis.sion Alaska. 

Brasher Palls N. Y. 

Carrollton O . 

Mays Landing, Weymouth & 2 sta- 
tions . . . . r N. J. 

Neiv S.ilem, Walnut Valley & Stai 

Valley Kan. 

ClurksviUe Iowa. 

Mt. Vernon Ill . 

Newburgh and Kingwood AV. Va. 

C(tj)6 Vmcent N. Y . 

Bethel, Livermore. Humboldt Co , j 
Rolfe, 2d, and Rolfe, & sta'n. Iowa. S.S 

WilUiimshwiih. Monterey «fe sta'n.. .O. S.S 

Oakhind and Woodberry Minn. S.S. 

St. Paul and Strawberry Plains . Tenn . S.S 



S.S. 
S.S. 

s.s. 

P.B 
P. 

S.S. 
s.s. 

p. 

p. 

s.s. 



s.s. 

s.s. 
s.s. 
p. 

s.s. 



Mayasan Dakota. 

Irving and Leghorn Kan . 

Cherry vale and station Kan. 

Tekain ah Neb . 

Deer Lodge Montana 

Oran(/e, Ger . . N. J. 

IIoUoii and Pleasant Hill, Ger Kan. 

tWiZi/cottf, Memorial O. 

Walnut Creek Cal. 

Washington, Kan 

Superior, 1st Wis . 

(h-ainjield and 4 stations Kan . 

Sedaii. ('edarvale and 2 .stations . Kan 

North Hiinli.ston N.J. 

PioneiT. ('iijiton and Roxbury .. ..Kan. 

OoIuiiibiiK and Platcsburgh N. J . 

Northllctd O. 

I'riiicHoii and Richmond Kan . 

OraiKji', 1st Cal 

Bloomi.igton and •'} stations. Neb 

and Beekmantown, N. Y 

CeiitraK'ity Col. 

I" Hammond, W. A Portland and May ville Dakota . 



"^Hamilton, Wm. E. 



P 

S.S. 

S.S 

V. 

s.s. 
I'. 

s.s. 
s.s. 

p.' 

s.s. 

s.s. 

1*. 

s.s. 
p. 



s.s. 



3 

8 
4 

12 
12 

4>3 

<• 
12 
12 
12 

,s 



5>4- 

10 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 

8^ 
3 
12 
2 
12 
10 
12 



12 

12 
11 
10 

4 

3 

8 
12 
12 

6 
12 
12 
12 

1 
12 

13 
12 
6 
12 
12 
11 
12 
12 
VA 

i2" 
4 



* No Report. 



1883.] 



BOAKD OF HO UK MISSIONS, 



11' 




* Hampton, Cyrus A. 

Hancock, John 

Hanna, James W 

Hanna, Joseph A 

*Hanna, Lyman E 

Hanson, Hezekiah. 

Hargest, David 

Hargrave, Wm. M. . . 

Hartig, Franz 

Harris, Henry Lewis. 



Madelia and St. James Minn. 

Key port N.J. 

Armstrong, Central Kan. 

Spring Valley and 3 stations . . Oregon . 

Steel and 5 stations Dakota. 

Oq »(i III- a a.n A station 111. 

Jroudale and station O. 

Bu/ti more. Knox and station Md. 

Pleasant Vallej', Uer N.J. 

Spanish Missionary Cal. 

Harris, John K \/ie(/ c/ciii/, C'athei-ton & Riverton.Neb. 

♦Harris, Wm. E. B Barbourville, Manchester & vie ... Ky, 

Harsen, John P Xdniicok-e and st.ation Pa. 

Hart, Orlando E. . . . 

Haskell, Edwin C 

*Haviland, Benj. F.. 

*Hawk, Jacob J 

*Hawkes, John 

*HA WORTH, Laban 

Haworth, Wm. Penn. 



43if 
S.S. 6 
S.S.I t> 
S.S.; 12 
....' () 
P. i 12 



Hawthorne, Wm. C 

♦Hay, Samuel C 

♦Hays, C. C 

Hays, Frank H 

Hazen, Uervey C 

Hazlett, Dillwyn M 

♦Hazlett, Silas 

Hazlett, Wm. Jno 

Head, Simeon C 

Healy, Joseph Warren.. 

♦Heany, Ezra S 

Heaton, Austin C, D. D.. 

Heiger, Alex. M 

Helm, John S 

*Hembree, Chas. C 

♦Hemphill, Joseph 



Hemstreet, Oliver 
Henderson, John R. 
Hendren, Wm. T . . . 
Henning, John L. 



Rossville, Silver Lake and Ridge Kan 

Wolcott and station Iowa. 

Neosho Falls and Yates Centre. . .Kan. 

Hopewell Neb. 

Presbyterial Missionary Ind . 

Claremore Ind. Ter . 

Pheasant Hill, Kaw, Indian and 

Vinitia Ind. Ter. 

Ilairley, 1st Pa. 

Depere Wis. 

Poncha Springs and Salida Col. 

Omaha, Southwest Neb. 

Maulius N. Y. 

.S(>7/i«, 1st O. 

Harmony and Glasgow Minn . 

Hobokeu, Allegheivy Pa.. 

Vail Iowa. 

Oiiktand, 2d Cal 

Strasburg and Mt. Nebo Pa. 

Ltv:eH Del. 

Dexter and Earlliam Iowa. 

Lime Spriiu/fi and station Iowa 

Ash Grove, C'ave Sprmjr and Bolivar. Mo. 

San FranciKco, Hamilton Sq. & Noe 
Valley Cal. 

Johnxonvii/e, and Pitlslon N. Y. 

I.tjoriPn Farm.f, Isl N. J ■ 

Neilloville and 7 stations Wis. 

North Vernon Ind . 

Heron, Ebenezer S ISprinsr Place and 3 stations Tenn. 

Herrick, Alanson Sunny Side, W arsaw, Pleasant Prairie 

and i .■»lalii)ns. . .. .' Mo. 

Indiiinapo/ifi, ]-i\h Ind. 

Jeffemon N. Y . 

Hard.v and Superior Neb. 

Hick, John N '('lay Ridge, Pleasant View & 3 sta'ns. Neb. 

HiCKLiNG, James \ T/onesta, Tylersburg, Scotch Hill and 

1 station Pa. 

♦HiCKLiNG, Thomas lEMora, Hubbard and Gifford Iowa. 

HicROK, Francis M Jfumiiolilt, 1st Neb. 

Hill, Hiram C'ultou and San Bernardino Cal. 

Hill, Robert W jSynodical Missionary Oregon. 

Hill, Timothy, D. D Syuodieal Missionary Kan. 

HiLLMAN, James W iMineville N. Y. 

tHiLLMAN, Wm. G ^Grand Junction and Scranton .... Iowa. 

Hills, Clarence E Jfadisoniulle, lit O. 

HiNDMAN, David R I Wilson, Port llarker and station Kan . 

Hoar, Wm. John Cedar Grove and station Pa. 



P.S 

P. 

i P. 

;s.s. 

S.S. 

"pV 

P.E 

S.S. 



S.S. 

S.S. 
S.S. 

S.S. 
S.S. 

p. 
p. 



Herriott, Calvin C 

Herron, David 

♦Herron, Sam'l P 



HOBBS, S. L. 

Hodge, Sam'l, D. D.. 

Hoffman, John 

Hofford, Martin L. 
HoLLiDAY, Sam'l H . . 

Holm, Chas. A 

♦Hood, Geo 

Hood, Jacob A 

HooKE, A. Melville. 
HooKE, Robt. H 



Lenox and vie Ind. Ter 

Grundy Centre Iowa 

Baldwin Wis . 

Morrisville and station Pa . 

Bellevue Pa. 

Moherly Mo . 

Shakopee Minn . 

Schuyler, Ist, and Colfax Co., Cent. .Neb. 

Greenville Tenn. 

Flandreau, 2d, and 2 stations Dakota. 



S.S. 

P. 
P.E 

P. 

P. 
S.S. 
S.S. 



p. 
p. 
p. 

S.S. 
S.S. 

S.S. 

p. 
p. 

is'.s! 

p. 

S.S. 
S.S. 
S.S 



S.S. 

p. 
p. 

P.S 

p. 

S.S. 
S.S. 

p. 
p. 
p. 
p. 



S.S. 



13 

12 

12 

G 

6>^ 

G 

12 

4.¥ 

9 

12 

' 2 

11>^ 



3 
4 

5% 



\VA 
10^ 

12' 
G 

12 

8!<; 
12 



5kr 
11 

12 
5 
12 

12 
12 
11 
11 



5 32 30 
10 2S 130 
4 15 60 



^ Xo Report. t Deceased. 



lis 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



[1883. 



MISSIONARIKS. 



♦Hopkins, J. T 

*H<..sKiNS, R. H 

*H()UGH, Wm. a... 

Howe, Chas. M 

*HowELL, Wm. M 

*HoWKY, John D 

Hubbard, John Nilks. 

Hubbard, Wm. G 

HUOII1..5, Daniel L 

lIUGHEs, Robt. J 

Hughes, Wm. J 



Hui.BERT, Palmer S 

Hume, Jas. C 

tlUNSiCKER, Francis R. S. 

Hunt, Timothy D 

*HrNT, William H 

*HuNTER, Henry A 

Hunter, Henry T 

Hunter, Jas. H 

*Hunter, J. M 

Hunter, R. Vernon 

HuRD, Isaac N 

*HUTCHIN.SON, D. W 

Hutc^hison, Wm. A 

*HuYSER, Gerbit 

iDDiNGs, Francis W 

Idsinga, Bkrnardus H... 

Ingram, Geo. H 

loBE, La Theo 

Irondoor, Joseph 

*Irvin, Geo. a 



*Irwin, John 

Irwin, John 

Irwin, John C 

Jack. Andrew D 

Jackson, Richard H 

Jackson, Sheldon, D. D. . 

•'Jacobs, Albert 

James, David W 

Jamieson, Edward 

Jamieson, Sam'l a 

< Jeffries, C Delano 

Jelly, Alex. M., D. D 

.f EN KIN.S, David D 

Jenkins, Jenkin D 

*J ENKiNS, Louis H 

*J ennings, John O 

Jennings, Wm. H 



Jennison, Jos. F." 

.lEWELL, Joel 

Jewh.ll, Justus B 

Jimeson, a. Alex., D. D. 

Johns, Wm. Henry 

* Johnson, Arthur 

Johnson, Benj. P 

Johnson, Henry B 

Johnson, Silas 

Johnston, Adam 

.((jhnston, Chas. H 

Johnston, Fred 

joldersma, r. h 

Jones, Caleb E 

Jones, John H 

*JoNES, John L . . 

Jones, John Wynne 

Jones, Thos. Howard. . 
*JoNES, Wm 



FIELDS OF l.ABOK. 



Beaver Creek Minn. 

Perry Iowa. 

Fillmore Utah. 

JanesDi/fe and »lnlwn Iowa. 

MaryviUe,'^. Maryvillei Deer C'k.Kan. 

Altona Ill- 

Triicj/, Grayson and station Cal. 

Parma N. Y. 

Tran(}nnity an J station Iowa. 

Ac/el and Waukee Iowa . 

Packwaiikee, Weslfield, Montello and 
slalinn Wis. 

Fremont, 1st Neb. 

Lancaster, Memorial Pa . 

CarverifviUe and Plumsteadvillc Pa. 

Feiiton and Linden Mieli. 

Mich. 

Thomson and Knife Falls Minn. 

Broadalbin N. Y . 

Graham, Gettysburg and station . . . .Kan. 

Neoslio and Westminster Mo. 

Home.r and P)uli> Ill . 

IIulltHfer and )l stations Cal. 

Bloimiington Neb. 

EvitniiviUe, 1st Ave Ind. 

Weyauwej^a and Fremont Wis. 

Fisher and station Minn. 

Milwaukee, Holland Wis. 

Tuckalioe and Green Creek N.J. 

Palmyra, Vinelaud & Blue Mound ..Kan. 

Long Hollow Dakota. 

Council Grove, Parkville and Elm 

Grove Kan . 

Presbyterial Missionary Dakota. 

ihimberland and 'Z stations Wis. 

Pullerton Neb 

Mt. Pleasant and 2 stations Kan. 

Westfield an>l station O. 

Synodical Missionary N. Mex. 

San Luis Valley Col. 

Beaver Creek and 3 stations Oregon. 

Eilgerton and 2 stations O. 

Lewisville and Ebenezer Ind. 

Tecmnseh Nel). 

New Windsor, Mt. Paran & Granite.. Md. 

Frosthury Md. 

Alvin and 2 stations III. 

Mineral Point and Marshfleld Wis. 

Oskaloo.sa Kan . 

Maynard, Wilson's Grove, Dayton and 
"station Iowa' 

Paradise and station Md . 

Sylvania Pa. 

Ga ines, 1st Mich . 

Beverly and Nelsonville O. 

Jericho and station N. J. 

Shickshiniiy Pa. 

Hopewell N.J. 

Aberdeen anil station Dakota. 

Leon and 2 stations Iowa. 

Tower Hill, Prairie Bird and 3 sla'ns. .III. 

Decatur and '.i stations Texas. 

St. Paul and Turkey Creek Neb. 

Holland, 1st, Chicnjo III. 

Tuscola, Kaskaskia and station 111. 

Lowell anil .3 stalion.n O. 

Imogeitc and Essex Iowa. 

Baltimore, Tome St., Abbott & sta'n.Md. 

New Cambria and Bevier Mo . 

Somerset, New Lancaster and Louis- 
burg Kan . 



S.S. 
P. 
P. 
P. 

S.S. 
P.E 

S.S. 

P. 

S.S. 

S.S. 
S.8. 
S.S. 

p.'s 

S.S. 
S.S. 
S.S. 

S.S. 

p. 

S.S. 
S.S 

p. 

S.S. 

S.S 
S.S 
S.S. 
S.S 



Added to 
ChurcUes. 



S.S. 
S.S. 
S.S. 

p. 
p. 

S.S. 

p. 

S.S. 



S.S. 

p. 

S.S. 
S.S. 

p. 

S.S. 

p.' 

S.S. 

p. 

S.S. 
S.S. 

p. 

S.S. 

p. 

S.S. 



p. 

S.S. 



23 



No Report. 



1883.] 



BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS, 



119 



MISSIONARIKS. 



Jones, Wm. W 

JUNKIN, Benj. O 

*Kanouse, Chas. a. 
Reach, Edwin P 



Kecskemeti, Francis. 

*Kelland, .Iohn 

Kellogg, Ephraim W. 

Kelsey, Joel S 

*Kelsey, Wm. S 

Kenukick, W.M 

Kennedy, Joel 

Kennedy. Robt. W... 
*Kephart, Wm. G 



Kerr, Boyd M 

Kerr, John 

*KeRR, Sam'l Carrick 

KiER, Sam'l M 

KiLLEN, John T 

Kimball, Wm. E 

King, Obadiah J 

King, Samuel B 

King, Victor M 

Kingery, David 

KiRKWooD, James 

Knott, John W 

Knowles, James F 

Knox, Alex. L 

Knox, Edward M 

*Knox, George 

Koehler, Martin 

KoHLER, Phaon Silas 

KoLB, Jacob 

KooNS, S. Edwin 

Krees, Adolphus 

Krewso.v, Jacob B 

Kromer, Johannes 

Kyle, James H 

Lafferty, Jas 

La Grange. Sam'l W 

Lamont, Thos. J 

Landau, Gerhardt W. I . 
Langfitt, Obadiah T. .. 

*Lanman, Joseph 

*Lapsley, Jas. T., D. D. . . 

*Lattimore, Wm. () 

Laughlin, Calvin E 

♦Laugh LIN, Robt. J 

Laurie, James A 

*Laverty, L. F 

Lawrence, Alonzo W . . . . 

Lawson, Michael M 

Lawyer, Archie B 

Leason, Thos. S 

Le Clere, Geo. F 

*Lee, Jesse 

*Lee, E. Trumbull 

Leenhouse, Peter J 

Lehman, Christian K. . . 

Leierer, John 

♦Leonard, Albert S 

Leonard, Geo. W 

Leonard, Lemuel 

*Lester, Chas. H 

Lewis, Edward P 

Lewis, Elisha M 

Lewis, Henry A 

Lewis, J ames A 

Lewis, Thos. Reed 

Liesveld, Jacob 



FIELDS OF LABOR. 



Williamsburg and 3 stations Neb. 

Fainnount anri Pleasant Hill Pa. 

Decatur Ind. 

While Water, Bristol, Marble Hill and 

'2 stations Mo. 

lluii!;ariaii Mission N. Y. 

Cass City aud Columbia Mioh. 

lleiirelt'o)! N. Y. 

Humhohit, 1st Neb. 

Hittheock and Wessinglon Dakota. 

.Vshton, lloseliaiik and x," stations. . . . Kan. 
Macon, III., and Walnut & Avoca .Iowa. 
Gary. .Mtamonland Clear Lake. .Dakota, 
liock Crei.'k, Koj-estburj; and JJen- 

toii Dakota . 

DoylexliAon O . 

.Vllefflieny, Belliel and Natrona Pa. 

Decatur O. 

iJiircliard, Summit and 3 stations Neb. 

Dxit lingo, 1st Col. 

Madison, 1st Neb. 

Marion Centre and station Kan. 

Santa Maria and 4 stations Gal. 

Scranton and 'i stalioii.s Kan. 

Uurrton, Valley Townsliiii & iJsta'ns.Kan. 

Iforton aud 5 stations Kan. 

Marnhall and Clirisman 111. 

Otjilen and station Utah. 

//oojieston, 1st, and 2 stations III. 

M<il<iiJ City Idaho. 

Cherokee Iowa . 

Toledo, 1st, Oer. and station O. 

Monroelon and station ]'a. 

tjueen .Vniie and WooUatock, Ger 111. 

llannibal and station N. Y. 

Dallas, St. Paid, Ger., and sta'n. . .Texas. 

Forestville and 4 stations Pa. 

Salem, Ger., Neicark O. 

Mt. Pleasant and 3 stations Utah. 

Metropolis III. 

iMonlana Kan. 

Chicago, lie- Union Ill . 

Pati-mon, l.st., Ger N. J . 

Sanhorn. and ii stations Iowa. 

Taylor's Kails and St. Croix Falls.. Minn. 

Piesbvteiial Missionary Ky. 

('hicii(ji>. South 111. 

Randolph and Imogene Iowa. 

North Portland Oregon. 

Uice's Point Minn. 

Minn. 

Oainei on and Lathrop Mo, 

St. Mary's, New Salem and 2 stations. .0. 

Oakland and Nez Perces Ind. Ter. 

.Mill Creek, Mt. Pleasant and 4 sta'ns.Pa. 
ISatlle Creek, Mapleton &, 3 sta'n.s . .Iowa. 

Centreville N. Y . 

Poilhin<l,( 'alvary Oregon. 

Florenc Mud 4 stations Kan. 

We.sl Salem, and station O . 

Lansing aud McGregor, Ger Iowa. 

Barton Md. 

Springville and station Utah. 

liichlaiid City Wis. 

Grant and Ohio N . Y. 

Fairfield HI . 

Firth Neb. 

Carlisle N. Y 

Mira Valley, Ord City and 3 stations. Neb. 

Shelby aud Neola Iowa. 

Iowa . 



S.S. 
P.S 



S.S. 

P. 

S.S. 

S.S. 
S.S. 
S.S. 
S.S. 
S.S. 



p. 

S.S. 



S.S. 
S.S. 

p. 

S.S. 
S.S. 
S.S. 
S.S. 
S.S. 
S.S. 
S.S. 
S.S. 
S.S. 

p. 

S.S. 

p. 

P.E 
V. 

S.S. 
I', 
p. 

S.S. 
S.S. 
S.S. 

p. 
p. 

S.S. 



S.S. 



S.S. 



p. 
p. 

S.S. 

p. 

S.S. 



p. 
p. 

S.S. 



13 

13 
1 

13 
12 

3>B 

12 
6 
4 

12 

12 

8 
12 

6 

1 
12 

.5 
12 

8 
12 
12 
12 
13 

9 
13 
13 
12 
12 
12 
13 
12 
13 
13 
13 
12 
10% 
11 

4 
13 
12 
11 
9X 

10 

10 

1 

12 
4 
13 
13 

12 
12 
12 

11 
12 
12 
13 
12 
12 
12 
4 
12 
13 
12 



S.S. 
S.S. 
S.S. 
S.S. 
S.S. 

p. 

S.S. 

S.S..,. 
p. I 12 



30 



106 
1,5 



45 
.54 
74 
92 
2(5 
91 
58 
45 
51 
50 
KiS 

in.s 

15 



30 



104 
90 



' No Report. 



120 



ANNUAL R i: 1' O K T O F THE 



[188;^. 



MISSKJNARIES. 



LiNDSLEY, Darius D. 
♦Linn, E. Bennett. . . 

*LiNN, John M 

LiNNELL, Edward P. 

LiPES. Henry II 

LiPPE, Frederick. . . 

t Little, Geo. L 

*LiTTLE. Henry S 

Little, John W 

*LocH, Jacob W . . . 
LocKARD, Earl T. . . . 
Loder, Achilles L.. 

Lodge, Geo. M 

* Lombard, Chas. M.. 
Long, Abram W. .. 
Long, Frederick . . . 

LoocK, Geo 

*Lord, Claudius B.. 

*LoRD, E. L 

*LiiRD, Edwin N 

LoRiMER, Lewis L .. 

Loudon, Clarke 

lodnsbury, h. a 

Love, David R 

Lower, Jos. Laney.. 

LOWRIE, Jas. W 

LuccocK, Geo. N 



Luce, Andrew 

*LucE, Chas. P 

♦lunsford, t. b 

Luther, Ben.i. D 

Lyle, Jas. P 

Lyle, Joseph G 

Lyle, Wm. Harris 

Lynn, Francis 

*Lyon, David C 

Lyons, Geo. W 

McAfee. Sam'l L 

McAllister, John 

Mc Bride, Horatio B 

*McCahan., John M 

*M -Caslir, Uavis S 

McOauley, Hugh B 

*McClain, Josiah 

McClelland, Adam, D. D. , 
*McClelland.BrainerdT 

M cClelland, Sam'l B 

McClung, John S 

McClure. Sam'l T 

McCluskey, Jas. W 

*'McCoMB, Geo. B 

McCoMB, J. A 

McCrae, John 

*McCreery, Chas. H 

mccullum, euward a 

McCuNE, Sam'l C 

MC( JUSKEY. WM. H 

*McI)ANNOLD, Wm. G 

Mc Donald, Donald 



McDonald, Geo 

*iVicl)oNALD. Henry R. . 
McDonald, John McC . . 

^McDonald, Jos. B 

McDouGALii, Wm. H 

McElroy, James C 

McElroy, John M 

McElroy, Solomon C . . . . 

McElwee, Wm. B 

McFarland, Allan 



FIKLDS OF LABOR. 



Elmira, Franklin St N. Y. 

Oronoco Minn. 

Harvard 111. 

Miles City and 3 stations Montana. 

Mineville N. Y . 

alein, Ger Ill . 

yiKidical Missionary Net>. 

MiiMliial Missionary Texas. 

(oiumliu.s and Lost Creek Neb. 

Philndelphia^ Zion, Ger Pa. 

Kstalliiie Dakota. 

Gunnifiiin, Tabernacle .Col 

Wayne and Wakefield Neb 

Lyons Iowa 

Lower Merion and station Pa 

Colden N. Y 

Mversville, Ger. and station N.J 

Fort Keid Fla 

Pipestone Minn 

PiUsfield, Baylis and vie Ill 

NdsMnUe, Georgetuwn and station. .Ind 

Pierre Dakota 

Middle Granmlle N. T 

Fowler, P.enli>n and 2 stations Ind 

//iif'Vdrd ani\ Inland Neb 

Cri/tftii/ FiiUk iiiid stations Mich 

Emmet, 1st, Kxtliervitle and Spirit 

Lake Iowa 

La Grn, Shiloh and station Ind 

..Neb 

West Ely Mo 

Craig, Graham and .5 stations Mo 

Taylor and 1 station Texas 

Whee/ino, 3rJ W. Va 

Strawberry Plains and station Tenn 

Perrysbur-ili Ind 

Svnodicul .Missionary Minn 

Merced and slalton Cal 

Winnebafjo City Minn. 

Jenup Iowa 

UMah Cal. 



Phillips and Cadott Wis 

Pullman Hi . 

llackensack N. J. 

Uosita Col. 

Fort Greene, Brooklyn N. Y 

Rrownwood and Lipe Springs Texas. 

Pomeroy and -i stations Iowa. 

El Paso, Harmony, and 2 stations. . .Kan. 

Lyons Iowa. 

Delta and 1 station O . 

Waynesville, Wapella and Elm Grove. III. 

Sanborn andvioinity Iowa. 

Peotime, Farview and 1 station Kan. 

Chetopa Kan . 

Hansen, Uethany and station Neb 

Washburn and % stations 111. 

Cantlewood and Estelline .Dak . 

.Middletowii Pa. 

New Providence, Madisonville, and 'i 

stations Tenn, 

BeallHmlle and station O. 

Winchester Ind . 

Carleton, IJelviilere and 2 stations. ..Neb. 

CloverjMirt and Plnm Creek Ky 

Prexton and '2 stations Minn 

(JJiaM, Ellinwood and station Kan 

Batama and 2 stationa Iowa 

Bowman's C'reek and Lehman Pa 

Eureka iSprings Ark . 

Flora III. 



>. 




Added to 


s 


c & 


o • 


Churches. 


6i 


S7. 






•H'l 

3s 


E 


„; 




<, 




Z 


Uj 




U 


O 




P. 


10 


7 


3 


42 


s.s. 


4 

2 








s.s. 


9J< 


7 


14 


28 


p. 


■^ 






4H 


s.s. 


12 
10 
12 


4 




59 


P.E 


12 
12 


21 


17 


53 


S.S. 




3 


2 




S.s. 


12 


.f, 


14 


35 


s.s. 


12 
4 


2 


34 


47 


p. 


12 


2 


3 


61 


s.s. 


12 


1 




32 


p. 


12 
,5 


2 




98 


s.s. 


4 
3 








s.s. 


12 






104 


s.s. 


12 






5 


s.s. 


10 


1 




30 


p. 


12 


13 


5 


67 


s.s. 


12 


2 


1 


30 


s.s. 


4 


1 




8 


s.s. 


12 


3 


8 


47 


s.s. 


5 




3 


53 


s.s. 


4 
12 








s.s. 


12 


26 


5 


99 


s.s. 


VI 


2 


1 


11 


p. 


12 


4T 




200 


s.s. 


12 






.50 


s.s. 


S 




1 


22 


s.s. 


12 




2 


27 


p. 


6}.? 




4 


85 


P.K 


.'i 


S 


.5 


45 


p. 


12 
10 
2 


2 


2 


52 


p. 


8M 


1 


4 


63 


•p. 


6 
12 


13 


5 


149 


s.s. 


WV, 






20 


P.K 


12 


7 


\4 


.58 


s.s. 


4¥ 


4 


2 


70 


p. 


12 


2 


2 


74 


s.s. 


1 








s.s. 


12 


1 




90 


p. 


r> 








p. 


12 


10 


7 


96 


s.s. 


(i 




(i 


30 


s.s. 


3 






16 


p. 


12 








s.s. 


12 


20 


1 


200 


p. 


12 
6 


10 




109 


s.s. 


12 


5 


8 


55 


s'.s. 


W14 


4 




55 


s.s. 


.5 






43 


p. 


12 


o 




24 


s.s. 


12 






54 


s.s. 


12 

12 


1 


13 


43 



No Report. + Deceased. 



1883.] 



BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS, 



121 



MISSIONARIES. 



* McPARL AND, JAS 

McParland, Thos. C 

McFeatters, Matthew.. 

McFerrin. Jos. G 

*McGarvey, Wm. C 

McGaughey, Johnston... 

McGowAN, Jas. a 

McGregor, Jasper W. . . 

McGregor, Sam'l H 

McHarg. Wm. N 

McKay, Donald G 

McKee, John C 

McKee, Sam'l V 



McKee, Wm. B. 



*McKee, Wm. H 

*McKinlay, Geo. A 

McKiNNEY, Preston 

McKiNNON, Angus 

McLaury, Edwd. a 

♦xVEcLean, Alex 

McLean, Hector A 

McLeod, Hugh 

McMahan, Robt. T 

McMartin, Peter A 

McMaster, John 

*McMeekin, Henry 

McMioHAEL, Ethan S. .. 

♦McMillan, Duncan J 

McMillan, Hugh H 

McMillan, Jas. P 

*McMuRDY, D. B 

♦McMubray, John 

McNeal, James 

*McNiece, Robert 6 

McNiNCH, Thomas 

McQuown, Jas. R 

McRuER, Duncan. 

Macbeth, Wm. C 

Maccarthy, Chas. W. ... 
*MacFarlane, Andrew.. 

Mack, John 

Mack, Wm. Edgar 

Mackey, Wm. a 

MacQueston, Rockwood. 

Maes, Andreas A 

Mallery, Ohas P 

Mann, Alfred M 

Mann, Matthew G 

Manzanare, Josi 



FIELDS OF LABOR. 



Marcellus, Algernon. . . 

March, Wm. G., D. D 

*Marks, Jas. J., D. D 

Marquis, Rollin R 

Marsh, Theodore D 

tMARSHALL E. J 

♦Marshall, Thomas 

*Marshman, 1). M 

M artin, Albert B 

*i\1.4.RTIN, Alhon G 

Martin, Geo. W 

Martin. John 



Martyn, Ashbel G. 
Marvin, Chas. S — 
Marvin, Daniel W. 

Mason, Henry F 

Mateer, Eugene H 



Diirango Col . 

Male.nm and station Iowa. 

Queneino aiul .Maxon Kan . 

Elizabethton ami 2 stations Tenn. 

Micb. 

Santa Fe N. M. 

Owatonna .iiid station Minn. 

Independence and station Mich. 

('ale<lonia Minn. 

Blue JiapiclK Kan. 

Kengington and 4 stations Dak. 

Tracy, Saratoga and station Minn. 

Port Austin, Grindstone and 2 sta- 
tions Mich . 

Monmouth, McCune .and Osage 1st, 
Kan., .ind Arlitifftnn 111. 

Shenandoah ami Tarkio Iowa. 

Gallatin and llethel Mo. 

Giriin/ 1st Kan . 

Gallatin, Methel and Jameson Mo. 

Glidden and station Iowa 

Elwood 111. 

Lone Tree Neb. 

Duncan's Mills, Shiloh and Bi^ Valley. Cal. 

Dell liiipidfi, Coleman and 2 stations. Dak 

l'>ingham. Cumber and Verona Mieh. 

East Green Pa . 

Osceola and Stromsbiirg Neb. 

Springjielfl S<1 111. 

Presliylerlal .Missionary Utah. 

Hallock, Norlhcote anti 3 stations.. Minn. 

Burkemyille Ky . 

Neh. 

Taylor Texas. 

Piney Fallx and 3 stations Tenn. 

Salt Lake City Utah. 

Ifitchcock and Crandon Dak . 

Mill pane and Clearwater Kan. 

Martinnrilje, Mt. Zion ami station. . ..Mo. 

Forked Liver and Barnegat N. J. 

Constant ia and Cleveland N. Y. 

1 '.oise City, Idaho . 

Snohomish, Union Wash. Ter. 

Cedar FallH Iowa . 

.Mesa and station Col. 

Minneapolis ,5tli Minn . 

Ocate N. M. 

Wilmington, Olivet Del . 

Central (Mty, .Mineral Pt. rind AVelda.Kan. 

Puyallup, Nisqually, Chehalisand sta- 
tion Wash. Ter. 

an Rafael, Cenicero, La Jara, 2d, 
Saguache and La Costilla Col. 

Charleatown and Bericyn Pa. 

Cardington O . 

Presbyterial Missionary Mo. 

La Crescent and Hokah Minn . 

Synodlcal Missionary Mich. 

Greene.- Iowa 

.-^ynodical Missionary Mo. 

Howard Lake Minn. 

Washington, -Itli St.. and 2 stations. . .Mo. 

Glenene, (Jraiibiiry and Vie Texas, 

Manti and Ephraim Utah . 

St. Helena, Norris, Paragon and 3 sta- 
tions Neb . 

Mediapiiliit and station Iowa. 

Ness and ti stations .Kan. 

Oihxon Pa . 

Norristown, 2d Pa. 

Milford and station Pa . 



P.E 

S.S. 

s.s. 

S.S. 

s.s. 

s.s. 
s.s. 
s.s. 

s.s. 
s.s. 
s.s. 

s.s. 

s.s. 

s.s. 

p.' 

s.s. 
s.s. 



s.s. 
s.s. 
s.s. 
s.s. 
s.s. 



p. 

s.s' 

P.E 

s.s 



s.s, 
s.s, 
s.s, 

P.E 



s.s 
p. 

s.s. 
p. 
p. 

s.s. 

P.E 



5>r 
m 

12 
12 

4 
12 
12 
12 

4 
11 
12 
12 

12 

12 

103^ 

12 

12 

12 

9^ 

^X 

12 

12 

12 

12 

12 

3 
12 
12 

4 
12 

4 

.5 
12 
12 

5 
12 
12 

3 

2 
12 
12 

f) 
12 
11 
12 
12 



S.S. 12 
S.S. 

p. I . . . 

S.S.I 9 
12 
S.S, 



S.S. 



s.s. 

s.s. 

p. 
s.s. 
s.s. 

p. 

p. 



12 
4 

12 
4 
12 

12 

12 
12 
12 
6 
12 
12 



* No Report. t Deceased. 



122 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



[1883. 



MISSIONARIKS. 



M ATHENA, EbER Gr. 

*Mathes, a. II 

Mathes, Milton A . 



Matteson, Chas. G 

♦Matthews, John D., D.D. 
Matthieson, Matthias . . . . 

Mattice, Richard B 

Maxwell, Alex. B 

May, Montgomery 

May, Thomas J 

*Mayo, B.Edwards 

Mayo, Warren 

Mayou, Joseph 

Mazawakinyanna, Louis.. 

Meeker, Benj. C 

*Meeks, John A 

Menaul, Jas. a 

Menaul, John 

Merrill, John A 

Meyer, VVm 

♦Middleton, Edwin 

MiLPORD, Mark L 

Miller, Alfred L 

Miller, Chas. H 

Miller, E. Smith 

♦Miller, Jacob G., D.D.. . 

♦Miller, Jas. W 

Miller, John Calvin 

Miller, John H 

♦Miller. Lawrence 

Miller, Willis L 

Milligan, James V 

Millikan. Wm. F 

Milliken, Samuel J 

Mills, Eugene R 

Mills, John N 

Mills, John Payson 

MiRON, Francis X 

♦Mitchell, Jas. A 

Michell, Louis H 

Mitchell, Robt. A 

♦Mitchell, Sam'l W 

Moery, Godfrey 

Mopfatt, John P 

Mofpatt, Wm. J 

Mollenbeck, Bernard. . . . 
Mondragon, Josk D 

MONTOYA, HOMALDO 

WooDiE, Royal C 

Moore, Alex. Davis 

MooRE, Andrew D 



Moore, Daniel M. 
♦Moore, Jas. I 



♦Moore, John, D. D. . . . 

Morrison, Donald 

Morrison, Jas. M 

Morton, Wm. Walker. 



Mullan, Henry C. . . . 
♦Mundhenke, Wm. R. 

Munro, Duncan 

MuNRO, John Josiah. . 



MuRAiRE, John B 

Murdoch, Samuel 

Murgatroyd, Edwin R. 
Murphy, Edward N .. . 
Muse, Eben 



FIELDS OF LABOR. 



Mode>sta Cal . 

Villisca Iowa. 

Baker's Creek, Cloyd's Creek and sta- 
tion Tenn . 

West Troy N. Y. 

Deiii8on Texas. 

.Messilla, Las Cruces and 2 sta'ns.N. Mex. 

Oruton Fulls and statidh N. Y. 

J.eetoniu and Columbiana O. 

Gi eeiutp, llaverliill and S stationsKy 

Vancouver Wash. Ter. 

'i'able Kock, Simeon and 3 stations . .Neb. 

Mankato, Providence and Ionia. .. .Kan. 

Highland and 3 stations Kan. 

iiuffalo Lake Dakota. 

Taimiqua, 1st Pa . 

West Union O. 

Albuquerque, 1st N. Mex. 

Larjuna N. Mex . 

El 'Pmo, 1st Texas. 

Grant City and Knox Mo. 

Ked Cloud and Uiverton Neb. 

Pulmyra and Hopewell Neb. 

Madison, Grace and Preston Mo. 

Cambridge and Henrietta Texas. 

lola and 2 stations Kan. 

.M arathon N. Y . 

Georgetown, Lanipassas and vie. . .Texas. 

North Topeka and 2 stations Kas. 

Kanxds ( 'it)/. Fourth Mo . 

WilkcK Bar re. Covenant Pa. 

>aleni, SliiioU and station Mo. 

Astoria and station Oregon. 

Chili N. Y. 

Ann Carmichael and station Pa. 

Nevada Iowa. 

Idaho Springs and station C<d. 

Prairie View, Seymour and 8 sta'ns. . .111. 

Avoca, Knox and station Iowa. 

Los Alamos and Olivet Cal. 

Manchester Iowa. 

Oakland and Hebron III. 

Grantsville Laclede and Bethel Mo. 

West Friesland Iowa. 

Weatherly Pa. 

Cheever, WUIowdale and station Kan. 

Holland, 1st, and Goodwin Mo. 

Mora and 3 stations N. Mex. 

Jemez N. Mex . 

Los Gatos and station Cal. 

Bethlehem Pa. 

Pleasant Unity, Mayfleld and Ilunne- 
well Kan . 

Columlnis Kan . 

Davis Co., 2d, Morris Co. and Parker- 
villa Kan . 

Winneconne Wis. 

Suntield, Sebewa and station Mich. 

Colleye Sjtringii and 2 stations Iowa. 

Lliiieslone, Allen Grove, Wolf llun & 
2 stations W. Va . 

Brunswick Ill . 

Wheeling. Ger 111. 

Concord, Pacheco and station Cal . 

East Lake George, Bay Uoad >fe 2 sta- 
tions N. Y. 

Kobinsonviile and St. Sauveur Wis. 

Coehecton N. Y. 

Dakota City and 2 stations Neb. 

Silver Beef and station Utah. 

Mt. Vernon lU . 



S.S. 
S.S. 



S.S. 

P. 

P. 
S.S. 
S.S. 
P.S 

p. 

S.S. 
S.S. 
S.S. 

p. 
p. 
p. 



S.S. 
S.S. 
S.S. 
S.S. 



S.S. 
S.S. 

p. 
p. 
p. 

S.S. 
S.S. 
S.S. 



S.S. 
S.S. 

p. 

S.S. 
S.S. 
P.E 

S.S. 
S.S. 

p. 
p. 

S.S. 
S.S. 



S.S. 

S.S. 



S.S. 
S.S. 



S.S. 
S.S. 

p. 
p. 

S.S. 
S.S. 
S.S. 



1 

7 

9 
12 
12 

(5 
12 
12 
12 

3 
12 

4 
12 
12 
12 
12 

3 
12 

4 

4 
12 
10 
>i 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 

8 
12 
12 

r)4 

12 
10 

12 
(i 

12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 

12 
12 

4 

4 
10 
11 

12 
4 
3 

11 



125 
117 

7 
60 

145 
92 
19 
20 
76 

111 
76 
59 



29 
30 

62 
68 
40 
110 



130 
41 



70 
85 

110 
17 
18 

106 



• No Report. 



1883.] 



BOAKD OF HOME MISSIONI 



123 



MISSIONARIES. 



Myers, Benj. F. 
*Myers, K. II... 



NEERKEN, N1CHOLA.S.. 

Neild, Thomas 

Neilson, Samuel B. . . 

Nelson, Emery A 

♦Nelson, Joseph 

Newbkrry, Edwin D. 

Newton, John 

NiLES, Wm. Henry 



Norris, James 

Norton, Aua. T., D. D. . 

*Odell, Jeremiah 

*Opfer, Cyrus L 

Oggel, Edward C 

Oliver, Wm. J 

*Oller, Wm. E 

*Olmstead, Horatio P. 

Ormond, Benj. K 

*Orr, Franklin 

Ortega, Juan P 

Osler, John T 

OsiNGA, Seward 

Osmond, Jonathan 



Ould, William L 

Owens, John D 

*Paden, Robt. a 

Paige, Jame.s A 

Paisley, Moses F. . . 
Palmer, Edmund M.. 
Pangborn, David K. 

Paradls, Eucher 

Park, Thomas S 

Parker, Geo. 1) . . . . 
Parkhill, Jas. Wm . 
Parks, Adolphus H . 

Parks, Calvin M 

Patch, Jacob 

Patterson, Adam 

Patterson, John 

Patterson, Joseph . . 



Patton, Wm. D 

*Payson, Geo. H . . . . 

*Peacock, John 

Peairs, Henry R. . . 
Pearce, Thomas G. 



*Peck, Alex. S 

Peebles, Arthur B. . 

Pelan, Wm 

Penland, Alfred M.. 

Penniman, Andrew O. 

♦Peoples, S. C 

Perea, Josk Y 

Peters, C. M 

Peterson, Walter S. 

Petrie, James 

Pettigrew, Samuel.. 

Phelps, James H 

Phillips, Maxwell . . . 



♦Phillips, Samuel. 
Phillips, Wm. O . . . 



FIELDS OF LABOR. 



PiERSON, George . . . 
PiNKERTON, John A. 



Slatington, Lehighton and station. . . .Pa. 

Forest River, Inksler, Johnston and 

vie Dakota . 

Clifton and station Kan . 

Elmhd, 1st, and 2 stations Mich . 

Wate)loo Neb. 

Lock Hidge, Memorial Pa. 

Bethel, North Bend & High Point Md. 

Gethseinane Chapel, Philadelphia. . .Pa. 

Mary Esther and 2 stations Fla. 

lacksboro, Lost Valley, New Cambria 
and 3 stations Texas. 

Callicoon and 8 stations N. T. 

Sprinij Cove and station III. 

Mapleton N. Y. 

Cairo N. Y. 

Chicago, Westminster and Holland 111 . 

Aurora Neb. 

Natrona Pa. 

Rising 8un and Palmetto Ind. 

Mesa Col. 

Mechanicsburg Pa. 

El l;ito, .\gua Negra and 2 stations. N. M . 

WeM. Mil ford and '.', stations N. J. 

Peioamd 9mA station M ich . 

Ne\o Sharon, Mariixisa, Laurel and 
Russell Iowa. 

Williamnport Md. 

Orbisouia Pa. 

Armstrong's Grove and station Iowa. 

Nashville and station Ill . 

Sonumauk Ill . 

Parkville and stations Mo. 

Creston, Humphrey and station Neb. 

Mulberry French Kan. 

Centre, Unity and station O. 

Presbyterial .Missionary Ind. 

W Merrill and station Wis. 

Brownntown and Shobonier 111. 

Lo(/an, I'.rick t'tah. 

Dorchester and 3 stations Wis 

(iontibret and 2 stations Neb. 

Cambridge and Oakland Wis. 

Phillipsburg, l!ow Creek, Zion ami 
Long Island Kan . 

Cbillicothe and Wheeling Mo. 

Uosly n ". N. Y'' . 

Holmesburg Pa, 

Normal and station Ill . 

Richland Centre, Fancy Creek and sta- 
tion Wis. 

Dallas Centre, Minburn'& vicinity. Iowa. 

Mackinaw City Mich . 

Wells Minn . 

Ream's Creek, College Hill and 2 sta- 
tions N. C. 

East St. Louis Ill . 

Millwood and lUack Creek O 

Peralta and 6 stations N. M 

Terre Haute, Moffat ^it. Mission Ind. 

Presbyterial Missionary S . Dak 

Barclay Pa 

Lebanon and station Oregon 

Flushing and station Mich 

Agua Negra, El Kito, Ocate, Taos and 
Rinconnes N. M 

Philadelphia, Penn Pa 

French Creek, Clentreville, Walkers- 
ville and Lebanon. .* W. Va 

Solom.on and Poheta Kan 

Beloit, Ist, and stations Kan 



S.S. 

s.s. 

S.S. 
S.S. 

p. 
p. 

S.S. 
S.S. 

P.E 

S.S. 

S.S. 



S.S. 



11 

4 
lOX 

m 

Vi 
10 
12 
3 
12 

12 
12 
12 
12 

10 
11 

11 



p. 

S.S. 

S.S. 

p. 

S.S. 
S.S. 

p. 

S.S. 

P. 

S.S. 
S.S. 
S.S. 
S.S, 

p. 

S.S. 
S.S, 
S.S, 
S.S. 
S.S, 

p. 

S.S, 
S.S. 

p. 
p. 
p. 

S.S. 

S.S. 
S.S. 
S.S. 

p. 

S.S. 
S.S. 



S.S. 



12 
12 
12 

12 
12 
6 

12 

8 

(i 
10 
12 
\i 
12 

4 
12 
12 

i) 
12 
12 

12 
12 
(i 
10;^ 
12 

12 
12 

10 
12 

12 

8 
li 
5 



P. 

S.S. 

S.S. 

S.S. 



5>^ 
12 

12 

6 

12 
12 
12 



30 



' No Report 



124 



ANNUAL EEPORT OF THE 



[1883. 



MISSIONARIES. 



PisEK, Vincent 

PoAGE, James S 

PococK, Wm. M 

♦Pollock, John H. 
*PoLLocK, Wm, a . 
♦Pollock, Wm. G.. 

PoMEROY, John B . 



FIELDS OF LABOR. 



Bohemian, l8l N. Y. 

C'entreview Mo . 

WuTerly and Kock Creek Kan. 

Barre, Sheldon and Lisbon Dak. 

Plymouth and Ashton Iowa. 

San .Vngela, ISen Ticklin and Paint 
Ilock Texas . 

Huron, 1st. and station Dak . 

PoMEROY, Joseph S \3fmtndsviUe and station W. Va. 

Pond, Hokace N \nubhell and Endicott Neb. 

Porter, J os. W \Stanhope N. J . 

Post, Jacob, D. D i Perseverance Wis. 

Potter, Gilbert M Springdale Pa. 

Potter, Wm. Satterlee... Petoskey Mich. 

Powel, Albanus S [Helena, Sterling and Adams Neb. 

Powelson, Benj. F \ Lyons Kan. 

Pratt. Edward ^Bellevue and llarley Dakota 

Pressley, Robt. T Lee and 2 stations 111. 

♦Price. Chas. W Cherokee Kan . 

Price, Lsrael Richmond O. 

Prichard, Evan R Arthur and Portland Dakota . 

Pbideafx, Wm Bald Eagle and Buffalo Run Pa 



Provost, Joseph 
Pbyse, James M 

PCMPHRET, Wm. H 

PtruMOKT, Chas. H 

Putnam, Glen H 

*QnEEN, Stlvanus 1! . . . 

Quick, James 

Railsback, Lycurgus. 

Ralston, Jos. H 

Randolph, Allen Fitz 
♦Rankin, Isaac O .... 

Rankin, John G 

Rankin, J .Ioseph 

Rankin, John N 

Ransom, George 

Rawson, Wm. F 

Raymond, ('has. II 

Raymond, Edward N . . 

Read, Philander 

♦Reagan, John T 

Redpath, .John 



Reed, Carson 

Reed. Geo. J., D. D . . 

Reed, James 

Reed, John B 

Reed, Newton L 

Reibrrt, August 

Reichert, Francis Job. 

♦Reid, Alex 

Reid, David C 

Reid, John, Jr 

Reid, John Graham . . . 
Renville, John B . . . 

Reynard, John II 

Reynolds, Albert M.. 
Reynolds, Andrew J . . 

RiALE, Joshua 

♦Rice, Harry V 

♦Richards, Charles L. 

RiCHTER, Louis 

Rideout, Jacob B. . .• . 

Ri ED Y.Owen 

RiES, Geo. A 

RiGGS, Warner B 

♦ EiSHEB, Levi 

Rl7.EE, P 

Robe, Robert 

Roberts, James M . . . . 



French (Afoiorystown) O . 

Blue Springs Neb. 

Eureka Ill . 

Mitchell and Hope Chapel Dakota. 

Allerto'i and Lineville Iowa. 

Titusville N. J. 

I'emberville O. 

Kansas City, 3d, and 2 stations Mo. 

Burlington Kan . 

Fatrbury Neb. 

East Nassau and Nassau N. Y . 

Chili III. 

.\dair and Casey Iowa. 

Gardner and station Kan . 

3fmr Mich , 

Central Lake, East Jordan &3 sta'ns Mich. 

Indianapolis, lllh Ind . 

Le Boy and Taopi Minn 

Augusta and Kock Creek Kan . 

Eusebiii Tenn . 

Boytie Falls, Boyne City, Westwood, 

East Jordan and .stations Mich. 

Nev< London and station Iowa. 

Cohimbia and 2 stations Ky. 

Avalon, Dawn and station Mo. 

Fairmount, .Mannington and sta'n.W. Va. 

Neb. 

Jefferson Centre Pa . 

Rockport and .3 stations Mo . 

Choctaws Ind. Ter. 

Milan Mich . 

Port Toivnsend and 3 stations. Wash. Ter. 

Sy nodical Missionary Col . 

Ascension Dakota. 

Alma, " Miss Sta." and 3 stations (^ol. 

Spring Hill and 3 stations Kan . 

I )ecalur Ind . 

fa pillion and station Neb. 

Cambria Cal . 

Bozeman and Ft Benton Montana. 

Indianapolis, 9th Ind . 

Clear Lake, 1st and 2d, and 2 sta'ns. ..Gal. 

New Orleans, Immanuel La . 

Un ionville Mo . 

Brenham Texas , 

Duncansville and Martinsburg Pa. 

CoUamer N. Y. 

I'.rownville Oregon. 

Taos N. Mex . 



S.S. 



S.S. 



P.E 
P. 

S.S. 
P. 
P. 

S.S. 

p. 

S.S. 

p. 

S.S. 
S.S. 



S.S. 

p. 

P.E 
P. 

S.S. 

p. 
p. 

S.S. 
S.S. 

p. 

P.E 

S.S. 

S.S. 
S.S. 

P. 

S.S. 
P.E 
S.S. 
P.E 



S.S. 

p. 
p. 

S.S. 
P.S 

S.S. 

p. 

S.S. 
S.S. 

p. 
p. 



S.S. 
S.S. 
P.E 

S.S. 

P. 



S.S. 



<_ ' Added to 
° ^ ' Chiirchea. 



3", 



100 
113 



120 
81 
40 
80 
55 

100 

54 
66 
83 
37 

60 
72 

70 
80 
80 

88 
28 
39 



24 

62 
107 
103 
109 

21 

27 

15 
16 

75 
75 
79 
80 
49 



No Report. 



1883.] 



BOAKD OF HOME MISSIONS. 



125 



MISSIONARIES. 



Egberts, Owen J 

Robertson, Henry M., D. D 

Robertson, .John S 

*K0BES0N, Wm. D 

Robinson, Francis H 

*RoBiN80N, .J. Miller 

Robinson, Jos. C 

Robinson, Samuel N 

Robinson, Wm. M 

Rodgeks, .James 

Rogers, Edwin E 

*RoGEE8, George 

♦Rogers, Henry M 

Rogers, John A. R 

Rogers, Pearce 

*KoGKR8, Wm. H , 

Romero, Vincente F , 

ROSENKRANS, DaNIEL W 



Ross, George 

RossiTKK, Francis Z.. 
Roth, John W. F., Jb 
eowlet, rosseter c . , 

Rudolph, .John 

Rudolph. Walter S. 
RuNDALL, Herbert K 

Russell, Daniei 

Russell, Jajies R. . . . 
RusTON, Wm. Otis.... 
Rutherford, Robt. B 



FIELDS OF LABOR. 



Martin Mich 

Tombstone Arizona. 

Waterman Ill . 

Princeton, Wilherspoon St N. J . 

Anaheim and Weslniinstcr Cal. 

Dalanco and Fairview N. J. 

Worthingtiin, AVestminslt-r Minn. 

East Hamburgh N . Y . 

Frankville and Mount Zion Iowa. 

Farmington Minn. 

Hamiwmton and station N.J. 

Pencader Del. 

Mount Sterling Ky. 

Sha icano AVis. 

Mine Ilitl and I'.crkshire Valley. . . .N. J. 

C'arlisle and Ohio Ind. 

Taos and stations N. M . 

Red Hird, Hlaek Bird, Hainesville, 
iVpple t'reek and .Middle i;ranch. Neb. 

Tualetoii Plains and 3 stations. . . .Oregon. 

Omro Wis. 

Ebeneza and I'.elhel Minn . 

Brooks and Nodawav Iowa. 

Elizabeth, Ist N.J. 

Bonanza and station Col . 

Elmer and Glassboro N.J. 

Anamosa and station Iowa. 

Butte Montana . 

Bethel Iowa. 

Allendale, Fricndsville, Wabash and 2 
stations Ill . 

Nottingham and station Pa. 

Webb City and Trinity Mo. 

Bansjior and station Pa. 

Indianapolis, Sth Ind. 

ynoilical Mis.sionary Wis. 

Frederick, I'olunibia andEllendale. .Dak. 

Ricerton, Calvary N. J. 

Peru N . Y . 

Cottage Grove, Sun Prairie Wis. 

Warner, Melette and Northville Dak. 

Otsego O . 

Wamego Kan . 

.Meridian, 1st Ger., and stations Neb. 

Farley, Epworth and station Iowa. 

Independence, 1st Ger., Camp Creek 
and station Iowa. 

Eue/id, Angus and Argyle Minn. 

Arnot I'a. 

Bethel, Ger .Mo. 

Ramsay, Ger Iowa. 

Lawrence villa Pa 

Missionary among the Germans N. J 

Edinburg Ind 

Ouray Col 

S. Des Moines, Grimes and Perry. .Iowa 

Concord Pa 

Robertsdale Pa 

Lake, 1st Ill 

West Farms N . Y 

Dwight Ill 

Bennington and Culver Kan 

MirahUe and stations Mo 

Cheviot, 1st Ger O 

San Buenaventura ami station Cal 

Seward, Ist Neb 

Parma O 

York and station Neb 

Monroe and station O 

Shaver, Thos. A iLincoln Co., 1st, and Beloit Dakota 

Shaw, John F 'Trenton N. J 



P. 

S.S. 

P.E 

P. 

P.E 



Ruttbe, Lindley C 

Salmon, Clark 

S AL.MON, James M 

*Sammi8, John H 

♦Sanderson, Jos. W 

Sangree, H. II 

Sanson, John R 

Sargent, John II 

Savage, Edward 

Sawtkr, Stowb 

Scarborough, Wm. B. . . 
Scarrett, Wm. R., D. D 

ScHAEDEL, Jacob 

Schaible, Chas. E 

ScHAiBLE, John G 



Schell, .James P 

ScHBNCK, Eli AS S 

ScuLUErER, Henry C. . . 
Schmidt, Frederick... 

*ScHOLL, Henby T 

*ScnwARZ, Philip A. . . 
ScoFiBLH, Edward . . . . 

♦Scotland, Alex 

Scott, A lex 

Scott, George 

*Scott,GeorgeK 

Scott, Robt. D 

Scott, Willard 

*Scott, Wm. R 

Scott, Winfibld C 

Scott, Winfibld T . . . 
Seaman, Charles W... 
Seward. Frederick D. 

Sexton, Thos. L 

Seymour, .John A 

Sharp, Benj. F 

Sharplbss, Sam'l F 



S.S. 



S.S. 
P. 



P. 

S.S. 

s!s'. 

P.E 

S.S. 
S.S. 

P. 

S.S. 

P. 

S.S. 
S.S. 

S.S. 
S.S. 

P. 

S.S. 

p. 

S.S. 

p. 
p. 



P.E 

S.S 

S.S. 
S.S. 



P. 
P. 

S.S. 

p. 

S.S. 
P.E 

p. 

P.E 
P. 

S.S. 



S.S. 
S.S. 



P.E 
P 



12 
12 


12 
12 

5 
12 
12 

4 
12 
12 

6 

2 
12 
13 

<■)!? 

12 

12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 

wh 

12 
9 
12 
12 

6 
12 

12 
12 

9 

4 

12 

12 

9X 

4 
12 

4 
12 
12 

12 
12 
1-2 
G 
« 

12 
3 
12 
IJi 
12 
12 
12 
11 



S.S. 
S.S. 
S.S. 
P.E 
P. 
S.S. 
S.S. 

p. 

8.8. 
P. 



^ No Report. 



126 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



[1883. 



MISSIONARIES. 



Shaw, Robt. P 

Shearer, FREnERtCK A.,D.D. 

SUBKLEV, Hov.KR 

Shki-pon, Frank E 

*SnKPHi:RI>, ClIAI'.LES M 

Sherhii.l, -Ioiin S 

SniELUR, Calvin Iv 

Shields, .J AS. Milton 

Snoop, Dakius K 

*SnRivF.R, Sam'l S 

SHCTLTZ, EiMANUEL 

SiLSBY, .TOIIN 

Simpson, Anthony 

*SiMP90N, Thbo. W 

*SKiNNEr., Jas. VV 

Sloan, Isaac O 

MxjAN, John C 

Sluteb, Geo 

Smick, Wm. a 



Smith, Alex. E 

*Smith. CriAS. H. . . . 
Smith, CnRiSTOPUEE. 



Smith, Courtney 

Smith, David C 

Smith, Garrett 

Smith, James M 

Smith, John A 

Smith, J. A. Livingston. 

Smith, O. S 

♦Smith, Samuel D 

Smith, Thomas 

*Smith, Wm. C 

*Smith, Wm. D 

Smith, Wm. K 

SmO YER, ClIAS. K 

Sneath, Geo 

♦Snowdbn, Ja8 H 

Snyder, Alfred J 

Sntdek, Gkrrit 

Snyder, Wm. H 

Solomon, John P 

♦dopER, Geo. E 

Sp ANGLER, J. M 

Spencer, Julius 

♦Spilman, Jas. H 

Sproull, Robt. D 

♦Stanley, Hiram 

Stead, Alfred J 

Steen, Mosks D. a 

Stkrrktt, Alex 

*Stevbnr, Wm. C 

♦Stevenson, P. D 

Stevenson, Sam'l B 

Stevenson, Sam'l H 

Steward, Harlev J. . . . 
!>TEWART, A. Thompson. 

Stewart, David H 

Stewart, Kobt. C 

Stickel, James 

*Stimson, H. a 

St. John, Stephen N 

Stoddard, Sam'l A 

*Stone, Carlos H 

Stoops, Philip D 

Stophlet, Sam'l W 

Stout, Andrew V 

Stoutenhurg, Wm. J 

Strange, Ferdinand G. 
Straus, Julius 



FIKLDS OF LABOR. 



Sturgis, Ist Mich , 

Coffax and station Iowa. 

PlenKdnt Run O. 

Kffiiiahani and Nortonville Kan. 

La Veta Col. 

Litdijield and Spring Grove Minn. 

Un ion Idaho . 

Jemez N. Mex . 

Cass City and Brookfleld M ich . 

Mt. Alto Md. 

arton and 'X stations Wis. 

Grassy Cove and stations Tenn. 

Calvary and station Oregon . 

Hermon Md . 

Greensburg Ky. 

Mandan, Ist Dakota . 

Lyons, Craig, Silver Creek and sta'n.Neb. 

Arlington, ist. and .5 stations N. J. 

lioseburg, Wilbur, Oakland and sta- 
tions Oregon . 

Ida Grove and station Iowa. 

Portasre ville N. Y . 

Cleveland, Ash Creek, Oak Valley and 
station Neb . 

ElHcottville N. y . 

Currie and Slayton Minn . 

Omena and Ked Wing Mich. 

Cohisa and Arbuckle Cal. 

Bridgeicater, Marion and station. Dakota. 

Payson. . . .: Utah . 

Hope Mission and 2 stations Wis. 

Keynoldsbnrg and Grove City O. 

Pisffah and Bridgeport '. El. 

Galena 111. 

Elmer and Glassboro N .J. 

6^/eH?v7/e,Waveland & Spring Uanch.Neb. 

Elmore, Genoa and Gray ton O . 

Union Ridge and station Wash Ter. 

Huron O. 

Ohriatiana and Stanton Del . 

Nickerson ville Mission 111. 

Ahile.ne Kan . 

Waldenslan .Mo. 

Otego N. Y. 

Oak Harbor Wash . Ter . 

Cherry Tree and Belhesda Pa. 

Rockwood, Shiloh Hill cfc Wahiut Hill. 111. 

Providence, Ist U . I . 

Weaver lo wa . 

Oak Grove and station Minn . 

Davisnille and Westminster Cal. 

Wyandotte and 2 stations Kaii . 

Bismarck Dak . 

Buck Valley and Warfordsburgh Pa. 

Tyrone and Pine Grove N . Y 

I'erry and Kairmount 111. 

Newport, Columbia St Ky . 

Aslhland Pa. 

Seynunir and Promise City Iowa. 

7'>ipper''s Plains and Chester O. 

Sa<' City and station Iowa. 

Spencer Ind . 

Onaga, St. Clare and Leghorn Kan. 

Muskogee and 2 slationa Ind . Ter. 

Col 



Richfield and Munroe Uiah . 

Lake City and stations Iowa. 

Edgerton and Le Loup Kan. 

Aftiin and slaiions Iowa . 

liiawatlia and 2 stations Kan . 

Wilmington and station O . 



"i 'S a ^' 



S.S. 
P. 

S.S. 

S.S. 

p.' 
p. 

S.S. 

S.S. 

p. 

S.S. 
S.S. 

S.S. 



S.S. 

p. 
p. 

P.S 

p. 



S.S. 

p. 

S.S. 
S.S. 
S.S. 
S.S. 
S.S. 
S.S. 

p. 

P.S 



S.S. 
S.S. 
S.S. 

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S.S. 
S.S. 

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S.S. 



P.E 

S.S. 

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ss. 

S.S. 



S.S. 
S.S. 

P. 

S.S. 
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S.S. 



S.S. 
S.S. 
S.S. 
S.S. 
S.S. 

p. 

S.S. 

p. 
p. 



u- 


Added to 


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1- 


5 


5' 


55 




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H 





■ 







11 


6 


."i 


6.5 


12 




1 


70 









m 


12 




7 


109 


ii^ 








12 


5 


13 


90 


13 




2 


40 


12 


2 




27 




14 


7 


55, 


1 








12 


2 


1 


41 


12 






12 


12 


7 


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18 


12 








4 








12 


7 


6 


23 


12 


8 


17 


115 


12 


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8 


54 


12 


10 




49 


9 


29 




83 


2 








12 


36 


h 


63 


12 


1 




100 


9 




22 


32 


.5 


28 




I'.'O 


12 


7 


3 


45 


12 


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24 


12 

5 














7 








12 


7 


5 


210 


io;« 








''^ 








12 


4 


7 


50 


12 


4 


2 


69 


5 
10 














11 


7 


1 


07 


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12 












65 


12 






44 


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40 


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31 




126 


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3 


4 


18 


178 


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12 


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1 


80 


11=?^ 






HO 


12 


12 


7 


150 


10 




1 


30 


lOV 


3 


15 


65 


12 


1 




V4 


12 


o 


16 


55 


6 








9 




o 


59 


12 


9 


1 


30 


4 








1" 








lOV 


2 


9 


33 


12 


39 


IS 


130 i 


10 




H 


10 


12 


4 


12 


105 


12 


2 


2 


57 



• No Report. 



1883.] 



BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS, 



127 



MISSIONARIES. 



StTLZEE, N1OHOLAU8 

Swain, John L 

Swan, Ben,t. C 

SwAZKY. Arthur, D. D. 

Swift, Isaac 

SwiGGETT, Edward T. . 

Stltantjs, John 

Taggekt, Sam'l B 

*Tait, Wilson W 

Talbot, Hhward A 

Talbot, John W 



*Tasner, Austin M 

Tanner, Elias F 

Tate, Joseph (i 

Tatlor, Augustits 

*TaTLOR, (.'HARl.ES A 

Taylor, Charles H.. D. D. 
Taylor, Ohauncey P 



*Taylor, David H 

Taylor, John B 

Taylor, Samuel E 

tTAYLOB, T0WN8END E . 

Taylor, Vinet E 

Tedford, Chaklfs E. . . 



♦Teitswobth, AVm. p. . 

Templeton, Wm. R. . . 

Thomas, David 

*Thoma8, John 

Thomas, Thomas 

Thomas, Welling E. . . 
♦Thompson, Aaron. . . . 
Thompwin, Edwin J. . . 

Thompson, Ellas 

Thompson, Francis E. 

Thompson, Jamks 

Thompson, John It 



Thompson, Josi ah 

Thompson, Kobert R 

♦Thompson, Samdkl II 

Thompson, Samuel T 

Thompson, Silas H 

♦Thompson. Thomas 

Thompson, Wm. O 

Thomson, Albert E 

Thomson, Albert J 

Thomson, Willibl 

*Tuoi;ne, a. S 

♦Thornton, Norbury W. . . . 

Thyne, Joseph 

TiNDALL, Geo. P 

*ToDD, David R 

Todd, Krancis M 

*ToDi>, II. A 

TODI), i S AAC 

Todd, James D 

Todd, M. E 

*ToDD, Oliphant M 

Todd, Thomas M 

*TooF, Ebbnezer M 

Torrence, Joseph W., D. D 

TowLEK, Thomas 

*Tk acy, Wm. II 

♦Trimmer, John A 

Trussell, John H 



Tbchudi, John U. 



FIELDS OF LABOR. 



Mauston and stations Wis. 

Alleu::iny Pa. 

£'»AV/'/, McLeansboro and Sbaron 111. 

chii'iiijii. Jlsi Street 111. 

Kiiift Syi-tii'Hse N . Y . 

Morrair O . 

Ittmaii, O'Neill, Atkinson & Stewart. Neb. 

Moro 111. 

Dix Kiver Ky. 

Merrill anil station Wis. 

Fish Creek and Fulton, Mill Creek & 

Pleasant Hill Kan. 

lielle ( 'Piilre and stalinn Neb. 

^piiiijCliort and loiiipkins Mich . 

Slieltiiit. Goodman ami Berg Neb 

Presbvlerial .Missionary Ind . 

Mo<iui Indians Arizona. 

Bravkh/n. Greenpoinl N. T. 

Augusta Centre, N. Y., and Eiirekii^ 

Westniin.sterifc Salem Township. Kan. 

Dearborn and East Nankin .Mich. 

Kimball, Yorktown and 2 sta'ns. .Dakota. 
Monument, Table liock and -i sta'ns. .Col. 

Ojai and Santa Paula Cal. 

Ludlow Ky . 

Wapako>i€(<i, Turtle Creek and Ml. 

Jefferscm O. 

Dodge City, Spearville, Enterprise and 

Sterling Kan. 

i;ea<ling, \Vasliini.'t.on Street Pa. 

New Ca.-tle and .-lati.>iis Wash. Ter. 

.\sh Creek and Kllinwood 

Steveiisville, liushville and sta'ns Pa, 

Brown and Anhleij O. 

Winchester, Manchester and Merrill.. Ill 

OiMeltoii and Mai)leton Dakota 

Sciolo, Grove City O 

A'inf/ Cily and stations Mo 

Klickitat and stations Wasii. 'I'er, 

Olympia, Tumwater & sta'n.s, .Monte- 

zano Wash. Ter. 

Sharon and stations Mo 

Newfoundland N. J 

Tousontown Md . 

St. Miiri/'s, Shiloh and station Pa, 

Holhrook, Olivet, Scldon & 2 sta'ns. N. Y', 

West Las .\niinas and Junta Col 

(_)debolt and station Iowa 

Larni'il and .station Kan 

Knitfiua and staticm Ky. 

Saxtit Monica Cal, 

Akron and BIythedalc Mo, 

We^t Libert!/ Iowa 

2i^o)th<impton N . Y' 

El Dorado and 8tatii>!i Cal, 

^\ biting, Netawiikd and Corning. . .Kan 
Manassas and Prince William Co., Ist.A'a 
Dak 



HolmanviUe N.J. 

Bangor, Neshonoc and station Wis. 

Lyons, Leo and liock Lake Minn . 

Dalton and Pierson III. 

Wickex and 3 stations .Montana. 

Bad .Vxe and Frazer Mich. 

Toledo,3d O. 

Ferrvsburgh and station Mich . 

....; Ills. 



Neicark, Woodside N . J . 

Baxter Sprin(tx, Galena, Pleasanton, 

Prescolt and station Kan. 

Clarkstown, Ger., and station N. T. 



S.S. 
S.S. 
S.S. 

P. 

P. 

P. 
S.S. 
S.S. 



S.S. 
S.S. 



S.S. 
S.S. 
P.M 



S.S. 



S.S. 
S.S. 



p. 

S.S. 
S.S. 
S.S. 

p. 



S.S. 
K.S. 

S.S. 
S.S. 

p. 

S.S. 

p. 



p. 

S.S. 

P.E 
V. 

S.S. 
S.S. 

p. 

S.S. 

ss. 

S.S. 

p. 

S.S. 
.S.S. 
S.S. 
S.S. 



p. 

S.S. 
S.S. 



S.S. 12 
p. 13 



■ No Report. t Deceased. 



128 



ANNITAL REPOKT OF THE 



[1883. 



MISSIONARIES. 



*TtTCK, Nathan F 

TucKEB, IIartweli, Allkn. 



Ttack, Thomas 

UmSTKD, .luSTtTS T 

♦Unglaitb, Uknky 

♦Upham, Nath'i, L 

Vail, Solomon N 

*VaLKNTINB, lilClIARD. . . . 

Vandp;r Las, Bekknd 

Vander Lippe, Adalbert. 

Vanuohkn, Jacob D 

Van Dyke, Uavid 

♦Van Eman, George 



FIELDS OF LABOR. 



Van Eman, John W 

*Van Nuys, B. B 

Van Oostenbkugge, Cornl. 

Vaegos, Laukino 

Veddbr, Albeut F 

Veebue, Edward 

♦Viele, James P 

Vincent, Edward 

Vincent, Wm. R 

Virtue, Andrew 



Voegelin, Frsd'k E 

*V0R ThORKN, OORNELIirS G. 

Waggoner, David 

Wait, Ransom 

Wakefield, Chas. B 

Wai.kkk, Edward F 

Walker, Edwin D 

Walker, Eugene A 

♦Walker, Hf.nkv M 

Walker, John H 

Wallace, C'has. W 

Wanderer, Adolphus E. . . . 
Ward, Feud. DeWitt. D. D. 

Ward, Josiau Jerome 

Ward, Samuel 

Wai:d, Wm. A 

Warner. Joel 



Warren, Edward 

* Warren, J. B 

Waterman, Isaac N.. 

*W ATT, Robert 

Waugh, .John 

Weaver, Wm. H 

♦Weaver, Willis 

♦Webb, S. G 

Webkr, Heinrich J. . . 
Webster, Hezekiah.. 

Webster, Wm. S. C 

Weekes, Thomas J. . . 

Weih, James E 

♦Weiss, John J 

Weitzel, John 

Welcher, Manfkbd p. 

* Wbllkr, Oliver C 

Wells, Delos E 



*Wei.ls. Kdward p. . 
Wells, Elijah B.... 

♦Wells, Jos. G 

♦WELL", Lester D. . . 
+WE1.LS, Robert R. . . 

Welty, Jacob B 

Wen rick, Geo. W. S. 
Werner, Julius E. . . 



Kirklin ati'l Blizaville Ind 

lleiirietlu, Wichita Falls and 2 sta- 
tions Texas. 

Sjxtrta and 3 slalioos N . J , 

Sill i/niii and station Del. 

WiixliiiKjtoii. Zion, Ger D. C. 

AJcrcliaiitvillt' N. J. 

Mhaouri Valley Iowa , 

lliirginsport " O. 

Ilolhind Iowa. 

St. Louis, Ist Ger Mo. 

Raymond and Little Salt Neb. 

I'lainwell Mich . 

White Mound, Bethlehem and Pleas- 
ant Ilill Texas. 

Stella, Prospect and stations Neb. 

Clay, Knox and Whilely Counties Ky. 

Siemens Point Wis. 

liinconnes and .O stations N. M, 

West .Milton and x! stations N. T. 

Sail Fnnicisco, French Evanglist Cal. 

Sand Lake N. Y. 

Slielhyrille, Shelbina and Clarence. . .Mo. 

Minerva and New Cumberlaiid O. 

Spencer, Vt'alton, Amoldsburg, 

Granlsville and Elizabeth AV. Va. 

Paterson, Broadway, Ger N. J. 

Alto Wis. 

Ge'irgetown and Salem Neb. 

Porter, Catiby and stations Minn. 

Milleclgeville and station Pa. 

Glen field and station Pa. 

Peahody Kan . 

La Dora, Victor, What Cheer Iowa. 

Norlli S|irin!;lit;ld O. 

CainplMll Park r III. 

Curniiis', Dakfleld, Shawnee and sla'ns.O. 

St. Pauls L. I. 

i;ushford N.T. 

Kassan, 1st, and station Minn. 

Vergennes and 3 stations 111. 

Big Biver and llartland Wis. 

Hooper, Nickerson, Belle Centre and 
stations Neb . 

Wahoo and Marietta Neb. 

lone City Cal. 

Reddinq and stations Cal. 

Braceville and Gardner 111. 

Cvliocton N. Y . 

Baltimore, Madison Street Md. 

Park Ilill, Tahlehquah and vie. Ind. Ter. 

Qnincy and Granden Dakota. 

Pliiludctpliia, (Jarniel, Ger., &sta'n..Pa. 

l!illc V:ilky and stations Pa. 

Port .IftlfrHoii N. Y. 

Siiii Jann, l';niit!iuel Wash. Ter. 

Lil)Lity and (\iiii[i Point III. 

CiiUiiiilni^, M. .lolin's, Ger O. 

a, nihil at II Ala. 

Pkn-^iiiif rifle N . Y. 

Gr.iiiil lslan<l Neb. 

Miinieapolia, Franklin ave., and sta- 
tion Minn . 

Denver, East Col. 

Troy and Walliciui Kan. 

lli.xiiiip ami Merrill:in Wis. 

Fcutonvillc and Linden •. . . Mich. 

Bollnas and Lancellilo Cal. 

Creston Iowa. 

Hebron N. Y. 

Haddonjield N . J . 



S.S. VZ 

■I 3 

S.S.' Vi 

...I la 

p. I 8 

P. 12 

S.S. 10 

p. 11 



S.S 
S.S, 

p. 

S.S. 

p. 
p. 

S.S. 
S.S. 

S.S. 

p. 

s.s'. 

S.S. 

p. 

S.S. 

p. 

P.E 



I p. 

B.S. 

P. 

s'.s. 
Is.s. 

I S.S. 

S.S. 
S.S. 



p. 
p. 

S.S. 
S.S. 

p. 

p. 

p. 

S.S. 

S.S. 



8.8. 



S.S. 

p. 
p. 



33 



12 
12 
9 

11 i 
6 i 

12 i 
10 '. 
12 ■ 



10 



39 
1(« 
65 



10 



l.'iH 
05 



53 
23 
140 
16 



52 



30 

118 



93 
111 
90 

41 
12 
68 

26 
S6 



59 
145 



100 
69 
03 
10 
41) 



70 
80 
100 



No Report. t Deceased. 



1883.] 



BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS 



129 



MISSIONARIES. 



FIELDS OF LABOK. 



White, Charles T., D. D. 
White, Hknuv Kibke 



White, Hirajj F. 



WiLUEi.M, John C 

*VViLLAKi), Eugene S 
♦Williams, Daniel. . 

Williams, George 

Williams, John H 

+ W1LLIAMS, John N.. 



*WlLLIAM8, MOROAN 

Williams, Moses Allen . . 

♦WlI.I.IAMs, NaIIIANIEL. . . 

Williams, Robert H 



Williamson, Geo. H 

W1LUAM8ON, McKnight 

♦Williamson, Wm. E 

*WiLLOUGUBT, John W. C. 



Wilson, Haevet. 
Wilson, Hugh P.. 
Wilson, James. .. 
Wilson, James L. 



Wilson, James Lowuy.. 

Wilson, John 

♦Wilson, Peter Q 

Wilson, VVm. U 

♦Wilson, Wm. S 

Winchester, Olivke W. 

♦Winn, John 

Winter, Henry A. 



WiTTE, Frederick W 

Wittenbekger, Joseph . . . . 

WiTTENBERGER, MaTTUIAS. . 



Wolff, Julius H 

Wood, Morgan L 

♦ Woodhull, Geo. S 

♦Woodruff, Joun 

Woods, Henry W 

Woods, John 

Work, Abel M 

Workman, Abram D . . . . 
Worthington, Albert. . 
Wotring, Frederick R. 

Wright, Alfred W 

Wright, Joseph M 

Wright, Wiley K. 



Westcott, ItOB t. IJ Newton Iowa. 

Westervelt, Wm. E. ...'... . Roxborough, Philadelphia & station. Pa. 

Wethehwax, Franklin W . . j Trenton Mich. 

♦Whaling. Horace M 'Lake Cily, Poncha Springs & Salida..CoL 

Wheeler, Eobt. L Pouca Neb. 

♦Wuitcomb, Solon A Cairo Mich. 



Portland and 3 stations Ind. 

Arlington, llaynesville, Enterprise, 
Leesburg and 2 stations Kan. 

Juneau and i stations Wis. 

♦White, James. "Wilinin^jt'iii and Newport Cal. 

White, James (' Cinchnuiti, Poplar St O. 

♦Whue, Matthew T. A Salinas Cily Cal. 

Whitwoktii, George F PuyalUip, White Ulver and sta- 
tions Wash. Ter. 

Saxton, Yellow Creek and Waterside .Pa. 

Cliilcat Mission Alaska. 

Grand Kapids Dak. 

yidlirara and stations Neb. 

Schoolcraft Mich . 

iDelano, Independence and Long 

I Lake Mmn . 

Lijndon and Malvern Kan . 

Jacksonville and slation Oregon. 

Summit and Eldrld;,'e Iowa. 

Mt. Paran, Quarries, Annapolis and 
slation Md . 

Ebenezer, Ozark and station Mo. 

Uethel and station Pa . 

Vevay Ind. 

Kingsport, Uuby Creek and Wells. .Tenn. 

Wills, John T San Francisco, Olivet and Memorial .Cal. 

Wilson, Alex. C \Micood 111. 

Wilson, Calvin D Penninglonville and Christiana Pa. 

Wilson, David M Mars Hill, Pleasant Forest and sta- 
tion Tenn. 

Oakdnle and 3 stations Neb. 

Axte/l and Oneida Kan. 

Pawnee Agency Ind. Ter. 

Centre Junction, Scotch. Grove and 
Hickory Grove Iowa. 

Oxford audi stations ] nd . 

Oherlin, Clayton and 3 stations Kan. 

Masonville and Laurens N. Y. 

Weston, Pendleton and station. . .Oregon. 

Vincenues Presbytery Ind. 

Reedsburg and station Wis . 

Texas . 

Madison, St. Paul, Ger., and 2 sta- 
tions Wis. 

Beloit, 1st Ger. and station Wis. 

Plattsmouth, Ger Neb. 

Mulberry Creek, Ger., Kiley Centre, 
Ger., and station Kan. 

Xeicark, 3d Ger N. J. 

IJelle Plaine, Silver Creek <fc Oxford. Kan. 

I ron Kiver Mich . 

Nelson and Henrietta Neb. 

Frankfort, Vermillion and station. . . Kan. 

Willrnar M inn . 

Rochester, Mt. Zion and station Ind. 

Hopkins and Barnard Mo. 

Bass Kiver and 2 stations N. J. 

Wenoita and station lU. 

Ironton and stations Mo. 

Bloontfield Iowa. 

South Bend, 2d Ind. 

♦Weight, Wm. J [Morris Plains N. J. 

Wright, Williamson S 1 Westminster Pa. 

Young, John C Hamilton, N. Y. Settlement, & Breck- 

' enridge Mo. 

* No Report. t Deceased. 



>, 




Added to 


a 


t. ^ 


flS 


Churches. 


yj 






^ "S 




I 


5 


2 a 


CO 




H 







P. 


12 


2 




a3 


P. 


12 


2 


3 


111 


s.s. 


4 

8 
12 
1 


3 


2 


23 


p. 


11 


20 


3 


52 


s.s. 


10 


2() 


,5 


64 


p. 


12 
12 


2 


3 


60 


p. 


12- 

7 


ir 


3 


143 i 


s.s. 


11 


6 





! 
27 


s.s. 


12 
12 
3 


4 





125 ! 

1 


s.s. 


12 


1 


2 


20 ' 


p. 


11 


7 


2 


50 


s.s. 


12 
12 








s.s. 


12 






12 


s.s. 


7 








p. 


12 


7 


3 


82 


s.s. 


12 


11 


1 


127 


s.s. 


13 
4 
3 






40 


p. 


12 


9 


10 


82 


p. 


11 




8 


80 


p. 


12 


1 




lis 


s.s. 


12 






56 


s.s. 


12 


5 


10 


57 


s.s. 


5 


13 


(i 


62 


s.s. 
s.s. 


12 
11 










4 


86 


s.s. 


12 


5 




33 


s.s. 


12 


1 


,■) 


20 


s.s. 


115< 


2 




24 


s.s. 


12 
5 




3 


17 


s.s. 


12 
3 


1 


2 


40 


p. 


12 


3 




77 


p. 


12 


2 


1 


54 


s.s. 


12 


2 




20 


s.s. 


12 


6 




70 


p. 


12 


2.5 




110 


s.s. 


12 
2 
11 


19 


12 


75 


s.s. 


9 


.5 


7 


80 


s.s. 


5 


1 


2 


27 


P.S. 


12 


20 


4 


134 


H.S. 


11 


10 


4 


68 


s.s. 


«}<r 






17 


P.E 


12 




4 


65 


p. 


12 


« 


7 


78 


p. 


12 


5 


10 


68 


s.s. 


5H 


2 




12 


p. 


12 








p. 


12 




1 


96 


p. 


12 


18 


12 


118 



ISO 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



[1883. 



MISSIONARIES. 



Young, James T 

YouNe, Loyal, D. D 

Young, S. Hall 

Young, \Vm 

ZAHNif-ER, Geo. W. . . 

Zeioleb, Wm. M 

Zesoh, F. Otto 



FIELD.S OF LABOR. 



East Conemaugh Pa. 

WinJieM, Point Pleasant and Pleasant 

Flats W. Va, 

Fort Wrangell Alaska. 

lioyalton Minn , 

Venango Pa. 

Union City Ind 

Carlstadt, Ger., and Passaic, Ger . .N. J , 















<•-• 


Add id to 


H 


O B. 
CM 


ss 


Churches. 


<5 g 






















-1 


s 


S 


I- 


is 


Cfl 




M 


o 


H 


s.s. 


6 


11 


3 


57 


s.s. 


12 


12 


3 


76 


P.K 


12 


18 




52 


S.S. 


» 


5 




60 


p. 


12 


5 


1.5 


80 


p. 


12 


ir 


3 


160 



100 

110 
300 

75 
100 
247 



OF THE 

STANDING COMMITTEE ON HOME MISSIONS. 



The Standing Committee to whom was referred the 1.3th Annual Report of the Board of 
Home Missions, respectfully report that they have had the same iinder careful consideration, 
and while they find it full of interest in all its details, must content themselves with calling 
the attention of the Assembly to the following matters which they deem especially noteworthy : 

And 1st. Hearty thanksgiving should be rendered to Almighty God for His merciful 
preservation of the lives and health of the several Secretaries, Officers and members of the 
Board, and to an unwonted extent of the missionaries and their families. Of the 1,387 mis- 
sionaries who have been under commission and in active service, oidy ten have been called 
to " cease from their labors." These fell with their armor on in the midstof the battle, doing 
valiant service on the high places of the field. We reverently pause to pay them the tribute 
of our grateful appreciation of their earnest and self-denying services, while we glorify the 
grace which enabled them to be "faithful unto death." 

A second cause for especial gratitude to the Great Head of the Church is to be found in 
the large bestowal of the spirit of liber.dity, whereby the people have offered willingly unto 
the Lord for the carrying on and extension of the great work devolved in llis Providence 
unto them. When a year ago it was conceded that hitif a inilllon, of dolhirx was needed for 
the prosecution of the work during the ensuing twelve months, it was thought by many that 
the demand was larger than would'be met, and that perhaps it was scarcely wise to make it ; 
but the response has been such as to rebuke the little faith of those who thus thought, the 
whole amount received being $.504,795.61, of which a larger proportion than ever before was 
^ven by the churches in their regular contribiitions. Thus showing not only a continued 
interest in the great work of Home Missions, but also satisfaction with the methods under 
which the work is conducted. To Him be the praise whose is the silver and the gold, and 
who, by His holy spirit, has made those to whom He has entrusted it, measurably, faithful 
to their stewardship. 

For thus has it come to pass that our beloved Church has been able to meet the immense 
and increased demand upon her, and connnissinii one hundred and one more men during the 
past year, than were in service during the preceding. Of the 5 14:} ministers enrolled upon 
our minutes, 1,404 have the honorable distinction of being Home Missionaries, and when we 
add to this n\imber the goodly fellowship of those laboring on the foreign field, we have the 
right to thankfully claim the possession of one of the very purest marks of the apostolic 
church that we are pre-eminently a missionary body. We have spoken of the immense and 
increased demand upon the Church during the past year. This has arisen, not from the 
acquisition of new territory, but from the unprecedented increase of population in the 
territory which we have already endeavored to preempt for Christ. Never in the history of 
the country has the tide of immigration reached the rate of the past few months. The influx 
this year from other lands, will not. according to the estimate of the Board of Emigration 
of New York, fall much, if any, below 900,000. And a larger percentage than ever before are 
pushing their way to the new west. We may well ask, who are they ? and whence come they ''. 
Nobody knows, and scarcely anybody cares. Examine the passenger lists of the great in- 
coming ships and they give you no satisfaction. They only state that so many hundreds of 
men, women and children are passengers and are to be landed in New York. They come from 
Holland, from Hungary, from the mountain passes of Switzerland, from the bogs of Ireland. 
Hundreds and thousands of them are paupers and criminals sent to us by communities and 
local governments in Europe. It is a simple fact that certain town couiuals and village au- 
thorities vote money out of the town purse to enable their criminals and paupers to emigrate 
to our shores. One little Canton of Switzerland spent in h few years not less than a million 
and a half of francs in a desperate effort to dispose of its poor to other countries and so they 
come. They rest not day nor night ; steadily pouring in upon us. The gates upon our eastern 
coast stand wide open to the entrance of these millions, while those upon our western are 
closed against a few thousands, but God will open them again in spite of all the legislative 
bills and bars which may be put upon them. So they come and so they have been coming 
these years until now 11,000,000 of them, over one-fifth of our entire population, are scattered 
abroad over the States and Territories of the Union. Who are they '/ Is there any danger 
from them ? Do we incur any risk in receiving them into our bosom ? The question is sim- 
ply this and it is assuming larger and larger proportions every year, whether our Christian 
civilization, -as it has existed thus far, and as it exists to-day, thank God, whether this Chris- 
tian civilization of ours shall absorb and assimilate these multitudes that are pouring in 
upon us, in constantly increasing streams, or whether they shall absorb and assimilate us ! 
That is the question pure and simple, plain and unvarnished. That is the question before 
our Board of Home Missions in all the churches, and the increased and increasing immigra- 
tion adds largely each year to the demand for money and for men. We find that this Mace- 
donian cry to the Board for help comes — 

list. From the large and rapidly growing cities of the land. It is unnecessary to argue 
the importance, nay the absolute necessity, for heeding it. To neglect these great centres 
of influence would be fatal. They must be saved from godlessness, or it will go hard with 
the entire nation. We have apostolic example for making special and primary effort to thor= 



132 APPENDIX. 

oughly t'vangelize them. When the resident f'huroh is strong enough to attend to this matter, 
we may look to her to do it, unaided by the Board. But this Is not always the case and then 
the whole Church through her appointed agency should come to the rescue. We therefore 
note with hearty commendation that in addition to lending aid in many other cities in the 
support of mission churches already established, nfic chnrches of this character have during 
the year been established by the generous aid of the Board, one in Omaha, one in Kansas 
City, two in Denver, and three in Portland. Oregon. These churches will without question 
soon become self-supporting, and return many fold the assistance rendered them in the time 
of their necessity. The cry for help comes — 

2d. From the waning churches in thp older sections of the land. These cannot be 
abandoned and so consigned to utter extinction. Many of them may yet, through the fluctu 
ations of population, become once more self-su.staining and even helpful to others ; and even 
if they should not. they are so essential even in their crippled condition as to warrant their 
continued support. But in this connection we desire to call particular and earnest attf-ntion 
to the suggestion of the Board, that the Synods and Presbyteries, within whose hands they 
are. make strenuous exertion to apply to their support and maintenance the sustentalion 
scheme. May not this be the mission for the present of this scheme, in the working of which 
so many practical difficulties have been found, but which our Church is exceedingly loath to 
abandon. If some of the strong Eastern Synods would vigorously take this matter in hand, 
we believe that the sustentation scheme might not only be saved from threatened extinction, 
but would also gradually extend itself to other Synods as their churches become stronger 
and wealthier. 

3d. The Macedonian cry is louder than ever froni what the Board well denominates the 
great Empires of the West. It is simply impossible to grasp the figures and comparisons by 
which the endeavor is made to enable us to realize the vastness and the resources of this 
immense territory which God summons us to "go up and possess." Texas, we are told, is 
able to match, acre for acre, all the wheat lands of the other States, and then have an acre 
equal to Illinois for pasturage ; able also to take in its boundaries all the .50,000.000 of our 
population, and then be less thickly populated than Connecticut. Think of Montana, with 
its 16.n00.000 of as rich lands as the sun anywhere shines upon, and with unbounded mineral 
wealth. .S120,000,0(K) having already been sent out of it. Of >7ew Mexico and Colorado, and 
Arizona and Nevada, with salubrious climate, with immensely rich grazing lands, and with 
untold mineral wealth which has been as yet hardly touched. Of Dakota and then Alaska, 
out of which Great Britain can be four times carved, and a margin still left for another 
England, Scotland and Wales ! Mr. Seward said that he considered its purchase the most 
important act of his official life, and what with its fisheries and lumber and fur trade, and 
the fact that two little islauds off its coast, by rental and royalty upon sealskins taken there, 
have already paid the government a third more money than the whole country cost. Many 
who ridiculed the acqviisition of it are beginning to think that perhaps he was not far wrong 
after all. What all this territory means we all know. It means the home which God has 
made ready for hundreds of millions of men and women, with deathless souls to be saved or 
lost during their residence upon it. The demand upon the church is to make these new 
communities which are settling rapidly this vast territory. Christian instead of infidel in the 
very beginning, since what they are at the first, that they will continue to be for long ages 
to come. "'The law," says Dr. Hodge, "the law of fixedness and transmissibility of types 
pervades all the works of God. The wheat we now grow, grew on the banks of the Nile be- 
fore the pyramids were built. Every section of the earth is now what it is because of the 
character of its ancestors. Every State of our Union owes its present character to that of 
its original settlers. This holds good even of counties. Before the middle of the last cen- 
tury a whole church with its pastor emigrated from Massachusetts to Liberty county, Ga , 
and that county is to this day the Eden of Georgia." The Macedonian cry comes to the 
Church to occupy the strategic points in this great new West, because whoever first takes 
possession of them wiU win the fight, will settle the character and destiny of the nation, the 
permanent sceptre of which it is plain to see will be in the hands of those who dwell west of 
the Mississippi. General Eaton, our United States Commissioner of Education, says that in 
his opinion " this closing decade of the nineteenth century is the crucial hour of the Repub- 
lic." And that it is at all wise to "discern the signs of the times," who will gainsay. 

4th. The fourth special and pressing call upon the Board comes from those exceptional 
populations amongst us, viz., the Indians, the Mormons, and tl\e Spanish speaking Mexicans. 
When the railroads opened the territories in which these people are to be found, missionaries 
were immediately despatched to them. But it was speedily discovered that the ordinary 
methods employed by those sent out were not adapted to the peculiar exigencies of the case. 
While the Board and the whole church were pondering the question as to what should be 
done in the emergency, the spirit of God directed attention to the women of the church as 
perhaps having it in their power to come to the rescue. It was suggested to them that they 
might supplement the furnishing of boxes of clothing and supplies to needy missionaries, by 
rarsing money for the establishment of schools among those most ignorant people, and thus 
prex^are the way for the establishment of permanent worship among them. They responded 
with alacrity. And the page already written of the history of this movement is one of the 
very highest in the annals of our Church. From the beginning the work of these "elect 
ladies" has been carried on under the wise direction of the Board, and it has prospered 
exceedingly. We are profoundly grateful for the work done and the results achieved 
through their earnest efforts. One hundred and thirty-three teachers are supported by 
them among the peculiar people already named, and this faithful band is performing a silent 
but mighty work towards redeeming the far west from ignorance and vice, and in bringing 
glad tidings to benighted souls. Six years ago the women raised for this cause J.5.300. This 
year they raised ¥87.400, or nearly seventeen tinie.'j as much, beside large values in the form 
of supplies. We are deeply impressed with the conviction that the education of the children 
is the <mly hope of ultimately redeeming these classes from Ihe terrible bondage under which 
they are groaning ; and, therefore, that the establishment and maintenance of these schools 



APPENDIX. 133 

is of vital importance, and while speaking of work of this kind among the Spanish-speaking 
Mexicans, we cannot refrain from calling special attention to a most hopeful mission which 
han been inaugurated among 2.000 of them iu Southern California. It is a story of thrilling 
interest with which our whole Church ought to be famiUar, inasmuch as it marks the begin- 
ning of evangelistic labors among them by one who can " speak unto them in their own 
tongue the wonderful works of God." 

"your Committee note with deep satisfaction that our Home Missionaries, true to the 
tradition of our church, manifest a desire and a purpose to establish the school and the 
college along with the sanctuary, wherever it is at all practicable. Six colleges, through the 
direct agency of the missionaries of the Board, have been this year founded on missionary 
territory— in" Minnesota, Dakota, Utah, New Mexico, Kansas and Washington Territory. 
And now under the festering care of our " Board of Aid to Colleges," erected, as we believe 
in the very nick of time, we may look to see them grow into strong and useful institutions. 

A word ought, in justice, be said by your committee with reference to the organ of the 
Board, The Prexhyterian Home MiKsthmnvij. Already it has a subscription list of 25,000 names, 
and the number should be immediately and rapidly increased. If it was a househeld maga- 
zine throughout the Presbyterian church, it could not fail to largely increa.se missionary 
interest and powerfully aid the pastor when he comes before his people for the annual con- 
tribution. 

As has been already intimated, the Board, hard pressed with the multiplied and varied 
claims upon it. claims whii'h it were a deep sorrow, if not an actual sin to decline, comes up 
to this Assembly, representing the great and rich Presbyterian Church, and asks in the name 
of Jesus that it may be furnished with $600,000, wherewith to carry on its operations during 
the ensuing ye.ar. 

In view of the good account which the Board gives to-day of its stewardship, your Com- 
mittee believe that the money ought to be and will be forthcoming. They believe that the 
Church is loyal enough to her Great Head, .and sufficiently awake to the crisis which is upon 
her to respond most cheerfully to this inereaseil demand' In 1873 a friend was showing the 
Rev. Newman Hall, of London," about the city of Philadelphia, and took him into the banking 
house of Mr. Jay Cooke. It was said to Mr. "Cooke : '• Bring out that large envelope and tell 
Mr. Hall its contents." Mr. ('ooke brought out a large envelope. '" What is it y" was a.sked. 
Mr. Cooke replied : '"In the time when you people in England were saying that the great 
' American bubble ' had burst, that the American people had gone to the utmost extent in the 
expenditure of their resources, that their credit was gone, their patriotism gone, that there 
was no more of the gre.at Republic, that envelope contains the orders that were sent in one 
day for the bonds of the government. '• How much ?" "Forty-two millions !" So we are 
cotifldent that as the battle between Christ and Satan waxes hotter and hotter, and many are 
saying, '• where is now your God ?" our own beloved Church will not expose herself to the 
curse which fell upon Meroz. She " will come up to the help of the Lord, to the help of the 
Lord against the mighty ? " 

Your Committee recommends the following for adoption by the Assembly : 

I — The wise counsel, skillful planninj;, econoraical nianaj^emcnt and eneri^etie action 
of our Board of Home Missions and its officers in the execution of their high trust, merit 
our most hearty commendation and tlu)rough endorsement. Their efficient administration 
has secured to the Church a year of grand success in the woriv of evangelizing the land. 

II. — Recognizing the growing vigor and excellence of " The Presbyterian Home Mis- 
sionary," and the invahiaV)le information imparted by it, we not only cordially commend 
it to our churches, but also urge upon jiastors and sessions the duty of making a special 
effort to increase its circulation, and thus to increase the interest in the cause of Home 
Missions. 

III. — We most heartily endorse the work of the Women's Executive Committee of 
Home Missions, and earnestly recommend and strongly urge the Presbyteries and Synods 
that have not already appointed Cominitteea of Women for Home Missionary work to 
appoint such Committees at their next meeting, and we also urge upon all Christian women 
the duty of co-operating with and su.staining this groat work. 

IV. — In view of the pressing needs of Alaska, where our missions have been singu- 
larly successful, we recommend that the General Assembly appoint a Committee of five 
persons, who shall wait upon the President of the United States and the Secretary of the 
Interior, asking of the Government, through them, the establishment of civil Government 
among these people of Alaska, and pressing upon them the necessity of establishing in- 
dustrial schools in that Territory. And we further reconunend that the Secretaries of the 
Board of Home Jlissions be members of this Committee, ex-officio, in addition to tlic five 
above-mentioned. 

V. — We recommend the re-appointment for the coming term of three years of those 
members of the Board whose term of office expires with this Assembly, viz. : 
Ministers — Thomas S. Ha,stings, D. D., Alfred Yeomans, D. D. 
Laymen — Joseph F. Joy, Jacob D. Vcrmilye, Walter M. Aikman. 

VI. — The Home Mission work, as planned for the ensuing year, requires imperatively 
the expenditure of at least $600,000, and it ought to be our firm resolve, taken in faith 
in God, to place this sum in the hands of the Board. 



134 APPEND lY. 

Vir. — Rewlcvd that this Assembly oominond to the favorable consideration of the 
older Synods the sugf^cstions of the Board of Home Missions in regard to sustentation, as 
found on page 20 of its annual report. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

Saratoga Springs, May 22d, 1883. 

GEO. D. BAKER. 



I^EPO RT 

OF THE 

WOMAN'S EXECUTIVE CO.MMITTEE OF HOME MISSIONS. 



March 31«?, 1883. 

To the Board op Home Missions of the Presbyterian Church in the Urdted States 
of America : 

Gf.nti.i;mf.n : — We are able to report this year all but. four of the Synods connected with oar 
General Assemlily, as having appointeil these " Woman's Synodical Committefs of Home Missions," 
upon the exisience of which the uuiform and systematic prosecution of our work as a part of that 
of the Church itself Is based. Contributions to our treasury have come in, however, from every 
Synod t)ui tliat of Atlantic. 

A printed list of the four humlred and fourteen women now held responsible to the various Syn- 
ods for supporting the school department of Home Missions, and who are bound together in and by 
our Executive Committee, with headquarlers in New York Cily, is herewith presenled. 

"We have reason to thank Gud thiii during the past year decided advance has been made in the 
line of unification of effi)rt, especially in regard to that undertaken in the Synod of New York. 

Several of out number, as might have been expected, have been called to hisrher service than 
that of earth. We have lo record the death of Mr.s. Thomas Fraser, of Oakland, California, an early 
and efficient helper in this cause; of Mrs. D. S. Johnson, whose interest in our work, shown in every 
way in her power a year ago at her home in Sprintrfleld. Illinois, makes us realize the more the loss 
to u< in her removal hence; and again, that of Mrs. J. L. Graham, of New York, so well known as 
a leader in pioneer mission work, in our own land .as elsewhere, and who, in view of her past servi- 
ces, and as token of affectionate respect, was made sit iLs organization, December 13ih, 1882, the 
President of the Woman's Synodical Committee of Home Mis-^ions in the Synod of New York. 
"These all died in faith, and their w')rks do follow tliem." 

Our Treasurer's lieport, herewith submitted, gives the amount of money received from each 
Synod, amounting in all lo 108,231.18. 

Value of boxes of clothing, etc., reported to our Committee, $.3<),48.5.30, making in all a total of 
$9S,716.48. 

In view of the great wants to be supplied, the above seems but a beginning of what should be 
done in the future. 

The Treasurer's lieport gives an account also of how the money has been expended. 

Forty-seven teachers are employed amonir the Indians, twenty-one among the Mexicans, sixty- 
flve among the Mormons — one hundred and thirty-three in all. 

Five more are under appointment to commence work (D. V.) next September. Many promising 
applications are on hand. 

Much new work is projected. We wait the approval of your Hoard, ami the prospect of suffi- 
cient funds in haml in order to take it up as promptly as possible. Every year's delay is of more 
than double loss in sueh a work as this. 

The women and children of our church seem ready to support schools in proporti<m as the call 
for their establishment is made known to them. The above fact has convinced us thai it was true 
economy to print and circulate extensively "leaflets" in explanation of the work. 

A list of all the publicalions on hand, with specimen copies, is also herewith presented. 

We have reason to bless God for good accomplished by means of recent " Hoii'e Missionary 
Conventions" held in the Synods of New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Illinois, Ohio and New York. We 
cordially lliank the pastors and the Synodical missionaries who, by their efficient aid, have helped to 
make these Conventions a success. 

The annual meetings also of many Presbyterial Home Missionary Societies now organized have 
tended erreatly to increase interest in this cause In its every dejiartmcnt. 

Now, at the commencement of another year, we desire to " reach forth to those Ihings that are 
before." The Lord Is opening the way for an onward movemer'l. It is the universal voice of lli'>pe 
best able to judge that in the education of the young, especially in their being trained into the know- 
ledge of the Gospel, lies the best hope that Mormonism may be undermined, aud ihe Indian be ele- 
vated to a recognized place as a Christian citizen. 

All which is res|)ectfully submitted; 

F. E. H. HAINES, /Secretorj^. 



APPENDIX 



LADIES' BOARD OF MISSIONS. 



135 



In presenting the Fifteenth Annual Report of the work of this Society for missions in our own 
land, let us gratefully review all ihe way our Heavenly Father has led us, and the work which 
through this agency He has permitte<l us to do. 

NEW MEXICO. 

At Taos, the Rev. Mr. and Mr.s. Roberts have labored faithfully for ten years. A school was 
opened, and in 1874 a church wrsanized of ten members. Since that time seventy-six members have 
been received by baptism and confession of faith. Out of this church has grown the little church at 
Rincones, and the churc^hes at Ocale and Cinicero are also the results of Mr. Roberts' labors. The 
schools have increased from one to five. 

The school iit El Raiuhon hasi been re-opened under the care of Miss Brown, whose labors, how- 
ever, have l>een much impeded by the prevalence of tlie small pox. In fact, this dread disease, and 
others nearly as infectious, have seriously hindered the progress of our schools in New Mexico, aa in 
several places they have been closed by order of the authorities. Such has been the case at Santa 
Vk. the earliest station occupied by our missionaries. The mixed character of the population of the 
capital of the Territory has always been a serious hindrance in mission work. Miss Allison has 
continued her faithful services inthe Mexican Mission School. A new feature has been added to 
the Academy in the opening of a Kindergarten under the care of Mrs. Carpenter, formerly one of 
our managers. This year has witnessed the completion of the new church, which will add dignity 
and efficiency to the work of our denomination at Santa Fe. 

At Las Vegas there has been much tn discourage during the past year. Small-pox broke up the 
school in the summer and invailed the mission building. 

At El Rito, in tlie Agua Negra Valley, a very successful mission has been in operation since 
1875. A church was organized in 1S79, and the school carried on by a Mexican convert, Mrs. Juanila 
Sandoval. Last year it was taught by Mr. Maes, a native licentiate, under whose care It improved 
and flourished. 

In 1880 another school was opened in the Agua Negra Valley, at " Ilolman's Ranch," eight 
miles ilistant. This school has been taught this winter by Miss Maggie Fleming, who has met with 
kindly treatment, and reports cheerfully of good progress. !^he has enrolled twenty-two scholars, 
and says she is surprised at the rapid progress they have made this winter. 

Mrs. Tibbals, who opened a successful school at (ilorieta, was removed last summer to another 
field, but the school and Sunday-school have been kept up by Miss Wiimor, a young lady already on 
the grounil, wlio brings to her work a love and enthusiasm which ensure success. 

In Colorado the mission schools have been superseded by the public school, for which the people 
seemed prepared. Thus Miss Grimstead's Houri-nhing little school at Cockrell was given up, though 
we hear that one of the advanced pupils is teaching the little children. 

Miss Ross exchanged her toilsome position at San Luis for a new school, opened last fall, at 
Costilla, N. M. Here an interesting little church has been organized, and although it is several 
miles from her school, Miss Ross and her co-laborer ride every Sunday to conduct the Sunday-school. 
The same sad story of fatal epidemic disease, which cut down the brightest pupils, has lately come 
to us from this station. 

The most difficult branch of the New Mexican work, at least one where progress seems the slow- 
est, is that among the I'ueblo Indians. The schools at Laguna and Zuni " are moving on in a quiet 
way, sowing the good seed of the word." 

UTAH. 

In this vast Territory, in the face of overwhelming odds, our missionaries have pushed bravely 
and steadily onward. 

First in size and importance is the Salt Lake Institute, of which Prof Coyner sends an encourag- 
ing report. The school, which was opened in April, 1875, with thirty pupils, now numbers 225, with 
accommodations f)r thirty boarding scholars. Over forty of the pupds have united with the church, 
and several of the graduates are now teaching in different parts of the Territory. One of these is the 
able assistant of Miss Galbraith at Manti, where ihe school continues to flourish ; seventy-seven 
pupils have been enrolled during the year, with four boarding scholars from a distance, and she 
reports much interest in spiritual things, as well as in the daily studie*. 

At Ogden our excellent teacher. Miss Campbell, reports over fifty enrolled in her department of 
the school, all of whom attend the Sunday-school. 

With still less that is pleasant or encouraiiing in her surroundings. Miss Julia Olmstead labors 
on at Richfleld. She has enrolled thirty-ofie pu])ils this winter, with nearly as many in the Sunday- 
school, while many more attend who refuse to enroll their names. She writes of much interest man- 
ifested and ddigent study of the Bible by a number of her pupils. 

ALASKA. 

Proceeding still farther north we come to the most distant outposts of our mission — on the shores 
of Alaska. The year just past has seen much to cheer as well as to sadden our missionaries. Mr. J. 
L. Gould and his family reached Fort Wrangell early last spring, and he proceeded at once to his 
station among the Hydah Imlians, where Mr. Chapman had already opened a school. Pi caching 
and singing services largely attended, and a school of 165 pupils. 

In 1S77, Clah, or Philip, a converted Indian, first preached to large congregations of his country- 
people at Fort Wrangell, and secured several converts. In August of that year Mrs. A. R. McFarland 
was induced to open a school at Fort Wrangell with Philip as her assistant. After the death of this 
latter the following year, this remarkable woman was alone in charge of the mission and performed 



136 APPENDIX. 

iLe duties of teaclier, iiiiuisler, (fovernor aii.l jutlgo. In 1879 Kev. S. Hall YounK arrived and organ- 
ized a churcli oflweiity-Uiree members. Mrs. McFarlaml, feeling the great need of a home and pro- 
tectory for the young girls in her school, toolc several into her family and appealuil to the t'hristiaji 
public fur a building in which to shelter tlii^m lri>m lives of shame and train them to useful Chrisliaii 
womanhood, .\ugust, 1880, witnessed the fultillinent of her hopes, when a modest, but comfortable, 
wooden building was opened, with suitable exercises. 

Last summer Miss Kate llankin was sent out as her assislant, and since that time we ha\e 
received the most encouraging reports, until one sad day when the intelligence was flashed over the 
wires—" McFarland Home burned February 9tli, with all its contents. No one injured." 

We trust that ere long another and better " Hmne" will arise on the ruins of the old one, ard 
that the school will move ou with new life, endeared as it is to all our hearts by the sympathy and 
labors culled forth on its behalf 

In North Carolina the aspect of our school work is most cheering. In Concord Miss Carr and 
Miss Lurkins conduct a school of ninety pupils, most of whom i>ay a small tuition fee. 

Whitehall Seminary has cause to rejoice on the return of Miss Ufford, with renewed health, to be 
its principal. Mr. W. wrote that "the work besrun at Kocby Ridge and Concord has done more to 
remove prejudice in this seciion of the country than every thinsr else that has been done since the wai." 

This is the record of a year's work which we briuir to ttie Master's feet, beseeching Him to pur^'e 
out all that is unworthy, and to accept and crown witli His blessing what His children have sought 
to do. 

A sad minor chord mingles with our thanksgiving, and the tears fill our eyes as we rememl er 
that she in whose great heart and active brain this organization was born is no longer with us in <ur 
assembly. The Home Mission work has special cause to bless her, as it owes to her interest and faith 
its (irst impulse among the women of our cliurches. This year brings to a close the connection of 
this iJoard with the Board of Home Missions, and although we trust that the cause of Christ in our 
own land will be greatly advanced by the new arrangement and division of labor, still a feeling of 
sadness comes over us as we write "the end" on this page of our history. 

EMILY M. WHEELBli, Secretary. 



WOMAN'S HOME AND FOREIGN MISSIONARY SOCIETY 
OF THE SYNOD OF LONG ISLAND. 



We record with gratitude our progress In the past year. We have had an addition of ten 
auxiliaries, and five Mission I'.ands, ami these are exhibiting energy and zeal in their work. The 
monthly meetings of the Board have been well attended, and the earnest inquiry of many has been 
"Lord what wilt Thou have me to do?" 

Last year we reported our co-operation with the Woman's Executive Committee of Home Mis- 
sions. We have found good results working out of this union. Circulars, leaflets and appeals for 
aid have been freely dilifused, and many whose interest in missions has l)een small by reason of 
ignorance, have been stimulated to ready sympathy and helpfulness, by the information thus gained. 
We llnd in most cases of apathy, lack of information is the cause. 

In Utah, where the obstacles are so great in the way of the free course of truth, our progress is 
slow but it is sure. Truth is stronger than error and it must prevail. In that faith we labor and 
pray and take courage. We are aiding in the support of schools in Ei)hraim, Mt. Pleasant and 
Brigham City, all of which are under good and able teachers, and are making their influence felt 
on the side of truth and feared by its enemies. Wo earnestly ask for the privilege of enlarging this 
most important work. AVe have done so to some extent in assuming the support of one of the 
teachers at Albuquerque, New Mexico, and another at the Choctaw Orphan School, Indian Territoiy. 

Will some of the favored disciples of Christ who are dwelling in the sunshine of prosperity 
bestow upon us the means of increasing these nurseries of the young, that they may be trained into 
good citizenship and redeem the land lor Him. who has given us this goodly heritage V Nothing in 
the Universe is so worthy of our devoted energies. Nothings brings such a compensation. " We 
work tor Eternity." 

Mrs. WM. BKOOKS. 



THE 



^0rtxj-^l-rtTx liuuuaX §lje|r0rt 



BOARD OF FOREIGN MISSIONS 



PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 



UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. 



PRESENTED TO THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY, MAY, 1883. 



NEW YORK : 

MISSION HOUSE, 23 CENTRE STREET. 

1883. 



E. O. Jenkins, Printer and Stereotyper, ao North William Street, N. Y. 



FORTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT. 



The Board of Foreign Missions presents to the General Assembly 
the report of the work under its care for the year ending April 30, 
1883, and also the Minutes of its meetings, in the manuscript volume, 
for the same period. 

The Board also reports the death of Mr. William E. Dodge, one of 
its members. Under date of February 13, 1883, the following Minute 
was adopted in reference to this event : " The Board having learned 
the sudden death of Mr. Uodge, who had shared its counsels for twelve 
years, and was present in apparent health at its last meeting, would 
record its high appreciation of his Christian character and its deep 
sense of the loss which the cause of missions has suffered in his de- 
cease. Throughout his long and useful life he had been distinguished 
for his love and support of the cause of missions at home and abroad, 
and his benefactions had flowed forth freely toward this and every form 
of Christian beneficence ; yet the liberality of his bestowments was 
scarcely more marked than the firm and conscientious principle with 
which he contended for the cause of truth and righteousness in all the 
relations of life. 

"Resolved, that, while mourning the loss of the deceased to the 
Board and the general cause of missions, we would extend our heart- 
felt sympathy to his bereft wife and family, commending them to the 
God of all comfort in this hour of sore trial." 

JFinances. 

The accounts of the Treasurer will be found at the end of this 
report; see pages 1 21-123. I^ ^i'^ ^^ seen that the receipts of the 
Board from all sources, from April 30, 1882, to April 30, 1883, includ- 
ing the balance from last year, have been $656,237.99. Its expendi- 
tures in the same time have been $669,620.95. Balance against the 
mission treasury, April 30, 1883, $13,382.99. 

It gives the Board great pleasure to acknowledge a considerable in- 
crease in the receipts of the treasury over the amount received in any 
preceding year. And it is also encouraging that the income of this 
year represents a larger number of churches, a still greater liberality 



4 ANNUAL REPORT. 

of the Women's Boards, and an increased sum from the bequests of 
our departed friends, than was reported a year ago ; and closely con- 
nected with this was the sending out of a larger number of returning 
and new missionaries than in any former year. For all these evi- 
dences of blessing on this cause, thanksgiving should be ascribed unto 
God. 

The income of the Board reached a larger sum than was included 
in its estimates at the beginning of the year ; but the expenditures in 
some respects, for instance in the new mission to Guatemala; unex- 
pected expenses in Persia which became unavoidable ; new roofs and 
other large repairs to several buildings in difterent countries ; 
considerably increased the outlay of the year beyond what was ex- 
pected, so that a small debt remains. The Board regrets the occur- 
rence of this debt, but does not make too much of it. It can not be 
regarded as showing that too great a work has been undertaken ; at 
any rate no such conclusion would be justifiable without further light. 
On the contrary, the income of the year, flowing into the treasury 
without any request for unusual collections from the churches, and 
without special appeals to individual donors for further aid, must be 
regarded as coming from the grace of God in the hearts of His peo- 
ple, moving them to advanced action in His sacred cause. The Board, 
with deep gratitude, recognizes the marked encouragement of this 
financial report. And with such growing support as it may hope to re- 
ceive, not only will the debt be removed, but an enlarged work for 
Christ and for the unevangelized can and will be done — to the praise 
of divine grace at home and abroad, on earth and in heaven. 

The Board is glad to acknowledge gifts of the Board of Publica- 
tion, the x^merican Bible Society, the American Tract Society, and the 
American Sunday-school Union — donations of much value, in publi- 
cations printed or given directly to the missions, and, therefore, not 
included in the Treasurer's report. Neither are included the moneys 
given by the United States Government, and by three of the Indian 
Councils, towards the support of certain boarding-schools — funds 
which were expended under the supervision of the official agents of 
the donors respectively. The only expenditure for Indian and for all 
other missionary work, by the Treasurer of the Board, was made from 
the funds as acknowledged in his report. 

Publications. 

Of the Afinual Report for 1882, the number of copies printed was 
4,800. These were all distributed excepting a few copies. Of The 



ANNUAL REPORT. 5 

Foreign Missionary, 18,000 copies are now published. The circula- 
tion of T/ie Record, published for all the Boards, will be reported by 
the Board of Publication. 

MISSIONARIES SENT OUT IN 1882-1883. 

Missi07is to the Indian Tribes. 

Rev. Jeremiah N. Diament and his wife, to the Creek Mission. 

Mr. Jacob P. Whitehead and his wife, " 

Mrs. Mary Herod, " 

Mrs. Addie Mann, " 

Miss Lucy Porter, [now Mrs. J. C. Whitehead.] 

Miss Emma Snedaker, 

Miss NelHe Hall, 

Mrs. Hannah Powell, to the Seminole Mission. 

Miss Mary A. Diament, " 

Miss Susan Davis, " 

Rev. Harvey R. Schermerhorn and his wife, to the Choctaw Mission. 

Mr. Lucas Schermerhorn, " " 

Rev. Melancthon E. Chapin and his wife, to the Dakota Mission. 

Mission to Chifiese, U. S. 

Rev. Alexander J. Kerr. 

Mission in Japan. 

Rev. Arthur V. Bryan and his wife. 
Miss Kate C. Yoimgman, returning. 
Miss Mary K. Hesser. 
Miss Ann Eliza Garvin. 
Miss Margaret E. Henry. 
Miss Francina Porter. 

Mission in China. 

Rev. John L. Nevius, D.D., and his wife, returning. 

Rev. John Butler and his wife, " 

Rev. Daniel C. McCoy and his wife, " 

Rev. William S. Holt and his wife, " 

Rev. Watson E. Hayes and his wife. 

Rev. Gilbert Reid. 

Rev. Frank V. Mills and his wife. 

Rev. Oliver H. Chapin and his wife. 

Rev. John N. Hayes and his wife. 

Rev. Robert E. Abbey. 

Miss Mary E. Niles, M.D. 

Miss Fannie E. Strong. 

Miss Minnie L. Berry. 

Mission in ■ Siam and Laos. 

Rev. Daniel McGilvary and his wife, returning. 
Rev. Eugene P. Dunlap and his wife, " 
Rev. Charles D. McLaren and his wife. 



6 ANNUAL REPORT. 

Rev. John P. Hearst and his wife. 

Rev. Samuel C. Peebles. 

Miss Lilian M. Linnell. 

Miss Sadie C. Wirt. 

Miss Isabella A. Griffin. 

Miss Florence Wishard. 

Miss Antoinette Warner. 

Mission in India. 
Rev. James J. Lucas and his wife, returning. 
Rev. Alexander P. Kelso and his wife, " 
Rev. James M. McComb and his wife. 
Rev. Henry C. Velte. 
Miss Lizzie M. Pendleton. 
Miss Clara G. Williamson. 
Miss Anna S, Geisinger. 

Mission in Persia. 
Rev. James E. Rogers and his wife. 
George W. Alexander, M.D., and his wife. 
Miss Annie Montgomery. 
Miss Cora A. Bartlett. 

Missiofi in Liberia. 
Rev. P. F. Flournoy, reappointed. 

Mission in Gaboon and Corisco. 
Mr. Peter Menkel, returning. 
Miss Isabella A. Nassau, returning. 
Miss Lydia Jones, " 

Miss Lydia B. Walker. 
Miss Alary L. Harding. 
Rev. Adolphus C. Good. 

Mission in United States of Colombia. 
Rev. Thomas H. Candor. 

Mission in Brazil. 
Rev. John F. Da Gama and his wife, returning. 
Miss Eva Da Gama, " 

Miss Phebe A. Thomas, " 

Rev. John M. Kyle and his wife. 

Mission in Chili. 
Rev. William H. Lester and his wife. 
Rev. William E. Dodge. 

Mission in Gtmtemala. 
Rev. John C. Hill and his wife. 

Mission in Mexico. 
Rev. Harvey Shaw. 
Rev. Samuel T. Wilson. 



MISSIONS AMONG THE INDIANS. 7 

MISSIONS AAIONG THE INDIANS. 

Seneca Mission. 

Upper Cattaraugus : Cattaraugus Reservation, Western New York ; mission 
begun, 1811 ; transferred to the Board, 1870 ; missionary laborers— Mrs. Asher 
Wright, Rev. Morton F. Trippe and his wife ; one native assistant. Lower Cat- 
taraugus : on the same Reservation ; missionary laborers — Rev. Henry Silvcrheels :* 
one native helper. Sub-Stations : on Tonawanda and Tuscarora Reserves, West- 
ern New York ; missionary laborers 

Alleghany : Alleghany Reservation, Western New York and Pennsylvania; mis- 
sionary laborers — Rev. William Hall; Rev. Benjamin A. Minkey; two native licen- 
tiate preachers. 

Lake Superior Chippewa Mission. 

Odanah : on Bad Kiver Reservation, iu the north-western part of Wisconsin, the 
Reservation fronting on Lake Superior ; traucferred to the Board, 1870 ; missionary 
work resumed, 1871 ; missionary laborers — Rev. Isaac Baird and his wife ; Rev. 
Henry BlaUhford ; Miss Susie Doughei'ty. Oulntation : at Ashland, Miss Marion 
MacLarry on Lac Court d'Orielles Reservation; Rei'. Louis hanypenny; one native 
licentiate preacher ; one native teacher. 

Dakota Mission. 

Yankton Agenct, Dakota Territory : on the Missouri River, 60 miles above 
Yankton ; station occupied, 186H ; missionary laborers — Rev. John P. Williamson 
and his wile ; Miss Nancy Hunter, teacher ; Rev. Henry T. tklwyn. Outstuti&ns, 
four ; native helpers, three, of whom one is a licentiate. At Yankton Agency, for 
the present, Rev. Melaucthon E. Chapin and his wife. 

Flandreau, Dakota Territory : on Big Sioux River, 40 miles above Sioux Falls ; 
station occupied, 1869 ; missionary laborer — Rev. John Eastman. 

Poplar Creek, Montana Territory : on the Missouri River, 70 miles above Fort 
Buford ; station occupied, 1880 ; missionary laborers — Rev. George Wood, Jr., and 
his wife ; Miss Jennie B. Dickson, Miss Charlotte C. McCreight ; outstations, two ; 
nati\c teachers two. 

Omaha Mission. 

Blackbird Hills, Nebraska : on the Missouri River, about 70 miles above Omaha 
City ; mission begun, 1846 ; missionary laborers — Rev. William Hamilton and Mr. 
Homer W. Paitcli and their wives; Mrs. Margaret C. Wade, Miss Margaret C. 
Fetter, Miss Mary L. Barnes, and Miss Susan La Flesclie. 

Winnebago Mission. 

Winnebago, near Omaha ; mission work resumed, 1881 ; missionary laborers — 
Rev. Samuel N. D. Martin and his wife. 

Iowa and Sac Mission. 

Station near Highland, Kansas ; mission work resumed, 1881 ; missionary labor- 
ers—Rev. bamuel M. Irvin and his wife. 

Creek Mission. 

At TuLLAHASSEE, Indian Territory : Mrs. William S. Robertson. 

EuFAULA : Rev. Robert C. McGee. North Fork, near Eufaula ; one native licen- 
tiate preacher. 

Wealaka : Kev. Robert M. Loughridge, Rev. Jeremiah N. Diament, Mr. Jacob 
P. Whitehead, and their wives ; Mrs^ Mary Herod, Miss Emma Snedaker, and Miss 
Nellie Hall; Rev. Thomas V/. Ferryman; native licentiate preachers, three. 

Seminole Mission. 

Wbwoka, Indian Territory ; mission begun, 1849 ; suspended, 1861 ; resumed, 
1867 ; missionary laborers — Uev. J. Ross Ramsay and his wile ; Miss Adaline Ram- 
say, Mrs. Hannah Powel, Miss Mary A. Diament, and Miss Susan Davis ; Rev. Cowe 
Hacho ; thiee native licentiate preachers, and seven other native helpers. 

Choctaw Mission. 

Spencer Academy, Indian Territory : Rev. Oliver P. Stark and his wife ; Rev. 
Harvey Schermerhorn and his wile ; Mr. Lucas Schermerhorn. 

* Names iu italics denote natives of the tribes. 



ANNUAL REPORT. 



Nez Perces Mission. 

Lapwai, Idaho Territory ; Rev. George L. Deffcnbaugh and hie wife ; three native 
licentiate preachers. 

Kamia, Idaho Territory ; Miss Sue L. McBeth, Miss Kate C. McBeth ; Bev. Bohert 
Williams ; three native licentiate preachers. 

OuTSTATiONs : OH the Umatilla Reserve, Oregon, and at Wellpinit, Washington 
Territory, supplied by licentiate preachers. 

One of the newly-appointed ladies to the Creeks, Mrs. Addie Mann, 
was removed by death not long after she had entered on her work, 
greatly to the sorrow of her fellow-laborers. Three others resigned, 
Miss McCay, of the Seminole ; Mrs. Craig, of the Creek, and Miss 
Copley, of the Omaha mission — for sufficient reasons. Mr. Wil- 
liam Fish, a Creek licentiate preacher, died in January. He could 
not preach in English, but in his own language he was an earnest and 
eloquent speaker, and his being called from his work is a serious loss 
to his people. His departure was full of peace. The new laborers 
appointed are Rev. H. Schermerhorn and his wife, and Mr. L. Scher- 
merhorn, Choctaw mission ; Rev. J. N. Diament and his wife, Mr. J. 
P. Whitehead and his wife, Mrs. Herod, Miss Snedaker, and Miss 
Hall, Creek mission ; Miss Diament, Mrs. Powel and Miss Davis, Semi- 
nole ; Miss Barnes, Omaha; Rev. M. E. Chapin and his wife, Dakota, 
See names in connection with their stations. 

The usual statistics of the churches and schools are here given. They 
do not report large accessions, except in a few instances, but they show 
signs of spiritual life in most cases. 



Clmrcbes. 


Received 
on profession. 


Whole Numher. 


Seneca Mission: 


17 

7 
1 

1 

6 

11 
2 
5 

3 

1 

1 

8 

1 

1 

49 


110 
65 
24 
24 

79 

73 

44 

112 

61 

72 
89* 

60 

200 

208 

67 

53 








Chippewa : 
Dakota : 


IfUl Church 

Ilandrecm 

Omaha : 

Creek : 




Seminole : 
Nez Perce : 


Kamia 

Wellpinit W T 







* Last year's report. 



MISSIONS AMONG THE INDIANS. 9 

A few persons were received by letters, but the table only enumerates 
those who were received on profession of their faith — one hundred 
and fourteen. The Deep Creek church was amicably transferred to 
the charge of a Congregational missionary, but a part of its members 
living near the outstation of Wellpinit, united in the organization of a 
church there. The members of this church are mostly, if not all, 
Spokans. The other new church in connection with the Nez Perce 
mission is composed of Umatilla Indians. Both are favored with the 
services of native licentiate preachers from the Nez Perce reserve. 
Their self-denial in going to these outposts, leaving their own people 
and their homes to live and labor among strangers, secured the warm 
approval of their missionary friends, and doubtless the blessing of Him 
in whose service they are engaged. 



Schools. 




Boarding. 


Day. 


Seneca 


Upper Cattaraugus . . 


— 




Chippewa . . 


Odanah & outstation 


9 


50 


Dakota 


At Yankton Agency 








and three places in 
its vicinity 

At Santee Agency. . 

At Poplar Creek and 
two places near 


10 


183 
192 


Omaha 


Near Omaha Agency 


54 


- 


Creek 

Seminole. . . 
Choctaw. . . 
Nez Perce. 


Wealaka 


100 

60 
60 


25* 
4 

21* 


Euf aula 


Wewoka 


Spencer 


Kamia 





* Last year's report. 



In the boarding-schools, 100 are girls ; in the day-schools, not sepa- 
rately classified, probably one-half are girls. 



Various Notes. 

Of the Seneca Mission the report speaks with great thankfulness of 
new interest at the chief station on the Cattaraugus reserve. After a 
long time of declension, the year ended with revived earnestness in the 
church, and a cheering addition to its members. This was closely con- 
nected with a persistent effort by the missionaries and the members of 
the committee of missions of the presbytery to enlist the church in self- 
support. This effort was successful ; the first step was taken after many 
years of neglect, and now all are grateful for this good beginning, and 
for the spiritual blessings which have followed it. On the Alleghany 



10 ANNUAL REPORT. 

reserve, seven members were received, and the same number died, 
leaving the whole number unchanged. The practical supervision of 
the presbytery, through its committee, already referred to in one re- 
spect, is recognized as of general service. 

The Chippewa Mission has occupied a sub-station at Ashland, a few 
miles from Odanah, where Miss MacLarry is now stationed, and where 
a small dwelling-house and chapel have been erected for the Woman's 
Board of the Northwest. The native minister at Odanah, through age 
and infirmity has withdrawn from most of his active labors. The board- 
ing-school had but a few scholars, and it is not likely to have more, even 
if it be kept up, unless children from other Reserves shall be brought 
to it. This could be done at a moderate cost, by the efforts of Gov- 
ernment ; but these seem not likely to be available. The day-school 
at Odanah is well attended, owing in part to a lunch given to the schol- 
ars at the expense of the Government. Much disappointment was felt 
in the turning aside to secular work of a native, whose services had been 
engaged as a missionary laborer. The outstation work on Lac Court 
d'Oreilles is continued, but not with marked success. The training of 
native laborers, and visits to some of the seven Lake Superior Reserves! 
will probably occupy much of Mr. Baird's time hereafter ; a work much 
needed, but of much difficulty among these 5,000 Indians, living in 
widely separated bands. 

In the Omaha Mission the boarding-school suffered loss from the 
removal of so many of the scholars to one of the Government schools 
in the east, but others less advanced have taken their places. This 
school is supported in part by the Government grant of $100 per scholar. 
The church, after passing through some discouragements, seems to be 
now in a hopeful condition. The number of Omahas is about 1,200, 
in a semi-civilized state, mainly through the work of the mission. 

The Wifinehago Mission is still without large visible result, except 
a better attendance on public worship, and the growing intiuence of 
the missionary. A dwelling-house will be completed in a few months, 
at an expense of Si, 000 to the Board, which will not only give an in- 
dispensable home to the mission family, but will lead the Indians — 
1,500 in number — to regard the church as taking a permanent interest 
in their welfare. The ministers in both the Omaha and Winnebago 
tribes are no longer young men. Mr. Martin, in his report, urges the 
importance of soon securing such men, especially in the hope of their 
learning the vernacular in each case, as of great moment to their use- 
fulness. 

The Dakota Mission makes an encouraging report. The old work 
at Yankton Agency and vicinity is going forward with increased inter- 
est. The new work at Ft. Peck, on the upper Missouri, is steadily 
gaining influence. The Rev. M. E. Chapin and his wife expect to be 
settled in a short time in the same district. The Sioux, of various 
names, but all of one family, are sujjposed to be the largest body of un- 
evangelized Indians on our North American Continent. Probably no 
better door of access to them can be found than at Ft. Peck and its 
vicinity. The mission there ought to receive energetic support, in- 
creased rather than lessened by the self-denial and discouragements 



MISSIONS AMONG THE INDIANS. II 

which will mark its earlier stages. But alieady signs of promise begin 
to appear. Too much sympathy and conunendation can hardly be 
given to the two single ladies, for their part of the work that seems to 
be so well begun. Mr. Wood is laying the foundations of future use- 
fulness, by acquiring a knowledge of the Indian tongue, besides holding 
services now through an interpreter. 

The Iowa and Sac Mission affords little material for report. The 
missionary was absent from his post of labor, at his own charges, for 
several months, on account of his wife's feeble health. When at home 
he was well received by the Indians. They are few in number, and a 
good deal unsettled by the question of their removal to the Indian Ter- 
ritory. 

In the Creek Mission the boarding-school has been removed from 
Tullahassee to VVealaka. Thereby a larger and better building is occu- 
pied, in a place more within reach of the influential part of the tribe. 
In both places the property belongs not to the Board, but to the Creeks, 
who have shown great liberality toward their favorite school. Its be- 
ing settled in a new building involved a large amount of labor. It is 
noteworthy that its superintendence has returned, unsought, to the ex- 
cellent and able missionary who began the school at Tullahassee. In 
later years it was greatly indebted to the faithful labors of the late 
Rev. VV. S. Robertson, whose memory will long be precious among the 
Creeks. The number of scholars is increased to loo at VVealaka, and 
nearly as many more applied for admission when the school was re- 
opened, but could not be received. Soon after the reopening of the 
school, serious sickness prevailed for a while, adding greatly to the cares 
of the missionaries ; but this passed away and the regular duties of the 
classes were steadily fulfilled until in March, when a case of scarlet fever 
led the teachers to send the scholars to their homes for a week or two. 
It is hoped that the spiritual results of this school will be manifest in 
the future as they have been heretofore. 

At Tullahassee, in the early part of the mission 3'ear, the school of 
twenty-five boys was kept up with the consent, and in part at the expense, 
of the Indian school authorities. Mrs. Robertson, aided by Mrs, Craig 
and Miss Green, continued in the successful charge of this school until 
the end of the school year. The religious instruction imparted by the 
ladies was evidently attended with the divine blessing, aud they had the 
happiness of seeing nine converts received as members of the church of 
Muscogee, seven miles distant, whose minister and elders had taken 
much interest in the meetings held at Tullahassee. The school prop- 
erty at this station, so long occupied by the Board, will hereafter be in 
the use of a school for colored scholars, by the direction of the Creek 
trustees. May its future course be as useful as its past ! 

Preaching services have been maintained at various places, particu- 
larly by Mr. Ferryman, the native minister. He has also rendered some 
aid to Mrs. W. S. Robertson, in her work of translating the New Testa- 
ment into the Muscogee or Creek language. In this she is now spend- 
ing the evening of a life long and earnestly devoted to the welfare of 
these Indians. Mr. Loughridge is also engaged in translating the book 
of Psalms into the same language. The later months of the year among 



12 . ANNUAL REPORT. 

the Creeks witnessed serious trouble between hostile parties. These 
difficulties can not be described here, and may soon be ended. If kept 
free from internal feuds, and unmolested by unprincipled white persons 
from the adjoining States, the Creeks and other tribes in the Indian 
Territory may hope, before many years, to enjoy the blessings of Chris- 
tian citizenship in our country, taking rank among our best people. 
And, if so, they will surely bless the God of Christian missions for these 
agencies of their prosperity and the hope of eternal life, which a 
goodly number of them already possess. 

In the Seminole Mission^ rumors of trouble from lawless persons in 
the western parts of the adjoining district were, for a time, not a little 
alarming, but the year ended without disturbance. The boarding- 
school is doing a noble work here, and the Indians have the faithful 
services of some of their own sons as preachers of the Gospel, them- 
selves signal proofs of the blessing of God on this mission. The con- 
trast in this tribe is great, since the Rev. R. M. Loughridge, now of the 
Creek mission, found them on his visit, hastening to wreck and ruin, 
after having been defeated in a war with the white people, and gained 
their reluctant consent to his preaching to such as might choose to hear 
him, provided he remained only in a certain small place ! They owe 
much to his labors and those of the brethren who took up the work 
and carried it on with the divine blessing, until now the Seminoles are 
becoming a Christian and civilized people. Among these successful 
laborers for many years has stood the faithful missionary still in charge 
of the mission. 

The Choctcnv Mission^ now as formerly, is chiefly represented in 
the principal boarding-school of the tribe for boys, known as Spencer 
Academy. A new building has been erected by the Council, for its 
use, in a much better place, and affording improved quarters for teach- 
ers and scholars. The arrangements for fitting up and furnishing the 
new building here, as for the Creek school at Wealaka, cost a great 
deal of labor and inconvenience to the missionaries, so far removed 
from towns and stores ; but in both cases the Indian Councils showed 
a praiseworthy liberahty in defraying the expense. Spencer Academy 
was reopened in November, with a full attendance of scholars. Some 
of them had little previous training, and it was no easy matter to clas- 
sify so many large boys according to their knowledge, and secure their 
study of the lessons ; but the missionaries are well qualified for the 
work, and able to make a good report of its progress. Here also, as 
at Wealaka, sickness invaded the school, causing great trouble for a 
time. In this school, as in all the Indian schools under the care of the 
Board, careful and earnest attention is given to the religious instruc- 
tion of the scholars. The brethren have not been able to enter on 
preaching services at places yet within reach ; the pressing work at 
Spencer did not permit them to be absent; but after the school is 
fully under weigh it may be found practicable to enter on wider labors. 

The Nez Perce Mission, under the efficient labors of the missionaries, 
has enlarged its borders without lessening its work at home. A new 
church was organized over the line in Washington Territory at Wellpinit, 
on the Spokan River, embracing some members of the Deep Creek 



MISSIONS AMONG THE INDIANS. 



13 



church, and another church was formed on the Umatilla Reserve, Ore- 
gon. The returns of both churches are given in the table of statistics. 
In both the labors of the Nez Perce minister and licentiate preachers, 
encouraged by Mr. Deftenbaugh, were of the greatest value ; and they 
were hardly less useful to the two Nez Perce churches on their own 
Reserve, leading them to prize more highly the blessings of the Gospel, 
and to enlarge their views of Christian duty toward the Spokans and the 
Umatillas. Besides his visits to more distant places, Mr. Deftenbaugh 
has kept up his work for the Nez Perces ; and the two ladies, Miss 
Sue McBeth and Miss Kate McBeth, still conduct their very useful 
schools for the education and training for usefulness of men and women. 
The interest of the churches at Lapwai and Kamia has been weMf 
maintained. Few missions of the Church have enjoyed greater proofs 
of the blessing of God than have been granted of late years to the work 
for the Nez Perce, Spokan, and Umatilla Indians. 

In general, the work of the Board for the Indians must be regarded 
as healthful and hopeful. The preceding pages show that these mis- 
sions are going on as well as in former years ; and they are conducted at 
a moderate expense for such a large and varied work, among twelve 
tribes amounting last year to but $31,359.60 from the funds of the Board. 
More men are needed in several fields, two or three at an early day to 
prepare for keeping up the work now conducted by aged men, and 
several to enter upon new stations, particularly in the region of the 
Upper Missouri River. Both men and pecuniary means are required 
for this enlarged work. 

The statistics of the Indian work of the Board from 1867 to 1883 
are here given They will be regarded as decidedly encouraging. In 
order to see their force, it is needful to remember two things, that several 
extensive missions which had been broken up by the war in 1861, have 
been but partially resumed ; and that the three missions received by 
transfer from the American Board in 1871 and 1872, included only five 
ministers, one native minister, five ladies, 379 communicants, and 151 
scholars. 

















m 






1 


-2 


ii 
> d 


<i> 

« s 


a . 
« a 
3 

1| 


r p. 


1 

a - 
a 







g 




^i 


5 


^aa 


a 
a 


02 





















1867. 


4 


3 








9 





14- 


108 


18S3. 


10 


16 


9 


17 


35 


15 


1240 


710 



As to the transfer proposed by one of the Presbyteries of a part of 
the Indian missions from the charge of the Board, several of the mis- 
sionaries have expressed earnest adverse convictions, regarding it as 
injurious to their work. None of them favor this measure, so far as 
is known ; but no inquiry has been made as to their views of the sub- 
ject. 



14 ANNUAL REPORT. 

In the nomination of persons for appointment as Indian agents, 
no report here seems to be called for. It is understood that the 
Government, through its Secretary of the Interior, no longer looks 
to the Missionary Boards for these nominations, though no formal no- 
tice of this change has been given to our Board. The recent removal 
of an upright and efficient agent, appointed some years ago on its 
nomination, and the alleged character of his successor, seem to show 
that the old policy of making these appointments is again in force. 
But the influence of the manner of making appointments, in use from 
1870 to 1877, and less completely in use from 1877 to i88t, can not 
but remain in the public mind. The Missionary Boards are relieved 
■from a difficult and a delicate duty ; and while mistakes have sometimes 
been made by them, particularly as to the efficiency of some of their 
nominees, it is yet true that there was a great improvement over the 
plans previously followed ; and the attention of the country was turned 
to the im])ortance of having good and able men in these agencies. 
The great abuses so common in former times are not likely to be 
generally tolerated hereafter. 



MISSIONS IN MEXICO. 

Southern Mexican Mission. 

Begun in 1872 in the City of Mexico ; laborers— Rev. J. M. Greene and his wife, 
Rev. S. T. Wilson, Miss Laura M. Latimer, and Miss Fannie C. Snow ; Rev. Messrs. 
Arcadio Morales, Hipolito Que&afia, Daniel Rodriguez, Manuel Zavaleta, Procopio 
Diaz, Heziquio Foreada, Enrique Bianchi ; eight unordained preachers, about fifteen 
native teachers. 

The mission has sustained a great loss during the year in the resig- 
nation of Mr. and Mrs. Ogden, on account of continued ill health on 
the part of Mrs. Ogden. 

Rev. S. T. Wilson has been added to the missionary force and has 
made such progress in the language as to promise full service at an 
early day. With the exception of some temporary illness on the part 
of the teachers in the girls' school, the missionaries now in the field 
have been blessed with health. The attitude of the General Govern- 
ment has continued to be favorable to the mission work, and the prog- 
ress of the country in all material development has only rendered it 
more important to redouble all the means of evangelization in order 
to subsidize the rapid transitions of the people to the furtherance of 
the Gospel. Otherwise the growth of scepticism and all corrupting 
influences may hereafter prove more difficult to overcome than the 
blind superstitions of the past and the present. Great changes are 
inevitable in Mexico, and this all statesmen and intelligent citizens 
now feel. And while the most influential of these openly favor the 
introduction of Protestantism, it is the grand opportunity, the crucial 
period, in the history of the Republic. In no other mission of the 
Presbyterian Board has the response given to missionary eftbrt been so 



l6 ANNUAL REPORT. 

prompt and so generous. Nowhere else have richer harvests been 
gathered. No Christian nation ever had a fairer field, or one more 
open and accessible and fruitful than that which now presents itself just 
across our southwestern border. The mission report, after giving the 
total membership of the princii)al portion of the field at 5,067, says : 

'•We prefer to drop out, in block, the work in Guerrero, instead of 
retaining a part of it — 573 members — as did the report of last year, 
as, in fact, the returns are uncertain, all we can learn from our two 
Bible-readers who work among the 32 scattered congregations in that 
State, being that the brethren, in general, are true to their Christian 
belief and are anxiously awaiting the day when the mission can send 
them ministers — a thing which can not be done under the present 
fanatical Governor." It is a significant fact in relation to the charac- 
ter of the persecuted Christians of the 32 congregations of Guerrero 
that two of them who fled to Southern California have there so faith- 
fully preached the Gospel to the Spanish-speaking residents that a 
flourishing religious community is the result. Thus the refluent tide 
of missionary influence returns to bless our own land. During the 
year the mission has suffered the loss by death of one of its ministers, 
the Rev. Benjamin Pascal. 

During the year the following new congregations have been opened : 

Liraapan, minister, E. C. Salavar, attendance 70 

"El Barrio," " H. Forcada, " 60 

Poxtla, " O.Vega, " 18 

San Andres, " Del Areo, " 30 

Ecacingo and Tejomachusco, minister, L. Alitarre, attendance 55 

Agustadero, under the Zitacuaro ministers 126 

The past year has seen steady growth in the girls' boarding and day- 
school in the City of Mexico. The school had at the end of the year 
a force of five instructors, 100 enrolled day-scholars, and 13 boarders. 
The mission has also supported, in whole or in part, in the City of Mexi- 
co and elsewhere, 9 other schools, under 10 teachers, showing a total 
enrollment of 340. 

The Theological Seminary in the City of Mexico has been well .sus- 
tained during the year, the missionaries giving instruction three hours 
a day on the following subjects : Theology, Church History, Homilet- 
ics, Evidences, Introduction of Greek Grammar, Exegesis, and Com- 
parative Creeds. The number of students in the seminary, or in prep- 
aration for a theological course, is 13. To these should be added 8 
others in Zitacuaro, who pursue theological studies under the care of 
Mr. Rodriguez, as he and they are able. 

The Press has done the following work, nearly all the labor of type- 
setting and printing being the gratuitous offering of the theological 
students : 

An edition of 4,000 Shorter Catechisms. 
" " " 3,000 Provisional Hymn-books. 

Sunday-school lesson leaves, 500 a month for the past four months, 
a dozen tracts and leaflets, 50,000 copies, 300,000 pages. 

A detailed account of some of the churches will exhibit the thrift 
and promise of the work. 



MISSIONS IN MEXICO. I7 

In the City of Mexico two congregations are included in one mem- 
bership, and are presided over by Messrs. Morales and Diaz. The 
total membership is 573, additions 26, Sabbath-school 155, contribu- 
tions $187.09. At Vera Cruz, Mr. Quesada is doing an humble but 
faithful work, having added 23 to the church membership, which now 
numbers 400 ; Sabbath-school, 22; contributions, $56.37. 

At Toluca Mr. Zavaleta has a church of 89 members, and a Sab- 
bath-school of 50. Fifteen members have been added during the 
year. 

In the State of Michoacan Mr. Rodriguez has charge of five churches, 
with a total membership of 1,165 ; Sabbath-school pupils, 130 ; chuich 
members added, 102 ; estimated contributions, $230. . 

Mr. Bianchi has charge of four congregations m the same State, 
with 746 communicants and 66 Sunday-school pupils; members of 
church received, 92 ; estimated contributions, $270. 

The licentiate, Juan Alvarez, has also in Michoacan seven congre- 
gations with 753 communicants and 80 Sunday-school pupils ; ad(L'd 
during the year, 155; contributions (including some gifts for a new 
church previously given, but not reported), $1,320. The totals for ihe 
work in Michaocan are these : communicants, 2,064 ; additions during 
the year, 439. The promise of the work in this Western State of tlie 
Republic is so great that the missionaries have seriously considered 
the question of making it the chief centre of the mission. 

As encouraging facts bearing upon the development of self-help 
among the native population of Michoacan, the following extracts are 
made from the correspondence of the Rev. Mr. Greene, relating to 
the building of the church in Zitacuaro : 

" The land on which it stands was donated by Mr. Rodriguez, who 
has also supervised with great care the whole process of building, so 
that we have a most solid, durable structure of stone with shingle roof, 
which would not dishonor even an American village. It is a plain ob- 
long structure, sixty feet by twenty-seven, finished with hard walls, 
ceiling of painted muslin and floor of brick. The pulpit, tables, 
benches, and some very pretty carved ornaments over the doors and 
windows mostly represent the work of four young men in the Zitacua- 
ro church who are supporting themselves by the labor of their hands, 
and at the same time studying in preparation for the ministry. The 
structure has cost ^2,600. Of this the people themselves have given 
^1,090, the list of contributors representing no less than ninety per- 
sons and the sums ranging from twelve and a half cents to $674.51. 
The rest has been furnished by the mission, the last $300 being given 
by the Woman's Missionary Society of the Synod of Long Island." 

The following facts are much of the same character, and are not 
less encouraging. They relate to a cabinet organ : 

"On receiving it here with three others, the gift of a son of Mr. 
Cyrus W. Field, at my house in Mexico, I notified the brethren in 
Zitacuaro, 150 miles away to the west, and they sent me three mules. 
Two of the instruments were ' Baby Organs,' and were packed in one 
box. With great care these huge boxes were lifted upon the backs of 
the mules and skillfully fastened by means of ropes to a kind of stout 



l8 ANNUAL REPORT. 

j)ack-sacldle, on which they rested. Thus they were borne in five suc- 
cessive clays to Zitacuaro City. But Jungapeo is 3,000 feet lower and 
it was not possible to convey them down the ?teep declivity on mule- 
back. Accordingly eight brethren from Jungapeo started one morning 
early, walked fifteen miles to Zitacuaro, and returned in the afternoon 
over the same road, bringing the organ on a sort of bier with four 
handles, relieving each other, of course, at intervals. These brethren 
were very poor, but they volunteered this service and performed it 
with great heartiness. Let me give you another instance of the self- 
hel))fiilness of this Zitacuaro people. When the walls of the church 
were complete it became necessary to secure sixty stout beams thirty- 
six feet long. • To have bought them in Jungapeo would have cost 
$90. A good brother in Ahuacate, eighteen miles away, hearing of 
their net-d, sent them word that they were at perfect liberty to enter 
his pine forest and cut all the beams they needed, free of cost. The 
offer was promptly accepted. All the oxen in the neighborhood be- 
longing to the brethren or their friends, were brought together, num- 
bering thirty yoke, with two men to each yoke. On a Monday morning 
they started. Brethren along the road gave men and oxen their meals 
and cared for them at night. Three days were necessary for the round 
trip, so that by Saturday night the thirty-six miles had been twice 
traversed and sixty fine beams were ready to be placed on the walls. 
The oxen were furnished without charge. The sixty brethren each 
gave a week of their time without cost, and the work was all done as 
a voluntary offering to the Lord." 

In the State of Hidalgo a newer but interesting work is being car- 
ried forward by Mr. Forcada, assisted by Mr. Evaristo Hurtado. 
Communicants reported are 486 in number, 60 having been added 
during the year. In the Jalapa district are three congregations, under 
the care of Mr. Pompeyo Morales, having 120 communicants and 25 
Sabbath-school pupils ; added, 20; estimated contributions, $15.00. 

Other small congregations are reported as follows : 

Culhuacan, Mr. Vega, communicants, 46 ; contributed $29 

San Lorenzo, Mr. Espinola, " 115 ; add., 10; S. S. 68. 

Capulhuac, " Gomez, " 39 ; S. S. 25 ; con 1,95^ 

Halpaw, " Delarco, " 65 ; add. ii ; " 51 

Ozumba, " V. Hurtado " 300 ; " 25 ; " 48 

Chimal, " " " 100 ; S. S. 25 ; " 18 

Tizapan, in charge of students, com. 100; " 25; " 18 

If the 573 heretofore reported in the State of Guerrero be added, 
the total membership in our Southern Mexican mission is 5,640. 

If men and means were at hand it would be desirable to establish 
new full stations in Michoacan and Hidalgo, with two resident mis- 
sionaries in each. It is confidently believed, also, that with the acces- 
sion of a less fanatical Governor Guerrero may become one of the 
most fruitful fields. 



MISSIONS IN MEXICO. I9 



Siaiisiics of Southern Mexico. 

Ordained missionaries 2 

Unmarried female missionaries 2 

Native pastors 7 

Unordained preachers 8 

Native teachers 15 

Theological students 21 

Total pupils of all grades 340 

Communicants 51640 

Added during the j'ear 546 

Sunday-school pupils 643 

Adult baptisms 458 

Infant " 360 

Contributions known $1,589.52 

" estimated 710.05 

Northern Mexican Mission. 

MoNTEBET : occupied 1877 ; laborers — Rev. McL^srs. Hei.ry C. Thomsor, for the 
present at Saltillo, and Harvey Shaw, Mrs. Thomson, and Mi»s Mary E. (Jochran ; 
Rev. Bria^idioStpulveda, and fonr otlier native preachers aiid three teachers. 

Zacatecas : occupied 1873 ; laborers — Rev. Mes^srs. T. F. Wallace and Luigi M. 
de Jesi, M.D., and their wives ; three native helpers. 

San Luis Potosi : occupied 1873 ; laboier — one native preacher. 

Jerez : occupied 1880; laborers — Rev. D. J. Stewart and his wife. 

In this country : Mrs. Wallace, 

Monterey and Saltillo. 

During the year Rev. Harvey Shaw was added to the missionary 
force, and Mrs. H. C. Thomson returned to the field after a leave of 
absence. 

Miss Abbey Cochrane was removed from the mission by marriage. 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomson found it necessary on account of ill health to 
change their post of labor from Monterey to the higher altitude of Sal- 
tillo, where a new station has been formed which is well chosen in 
many respects, and especially as a central point for the training of 
young men for the ministry. It is seventy miles south of Monterey, 
and on the line of the projected railroad to San Luis Potosi. Owing 
to the illness of Mr. Thomson and the chief native preacher, the num- 
ber added to the church is smaller than that of last year. The total 
membership is 540. 

The number added during the year is forty-eight. Twelve pupils in 
boarding-school are reported, and twenty-one in day-school. 

The report of the mission speaks of various difficulties connected 
with the work of education. Compulsory and free education on the 
part of the Government diminishes the demand for missionary schools, 
except so far as they are required for training up helpers, and for the 
children of Protestants. The compulsion does not prescribe the kind 
of school patronized, and the law is satisfied if children are reported as 
actually attending a Protestant school. 

The girls' boarding-school is now located on the premises beloniging 
to the mission. 



20 ANNUAL REPORT. 

Should a change of location become a necessity, it is believed that 
this i^roperty could be sold or exchanged to advantage. 

The labors of Mr. Thomson have been given to a variety of work. 
Itinerating among the churches, teaching a theological class, publish- 
ing hymns and tunes, preparing text-books lor theological students, and 
general supervision. 

Miss Thonison, though ill for one month, and greatly interrupted 
by changes and improvements made in the school building, has made a 
successful year, assisted a part of the time by her sister, and for a time 
also by Miss McKnight. A woman's society and prayer-meeting have 
been started. An additional teacher is greatly needed in the school. 

Mr. Shaw has assisted in the repairs of the building and in general 
supervision, while giving chief attention to the language. 

Zacatecas» 

Although the Zacatecas field is one of the most interesting and 
fruitful in Mexico, the Board has failed for the past two years to re- 
ceive formal reports of its various departments of work. The statis- 
tics of the field, therefore, can only be approximately given, being 
made up partly from letters received during the year and partly from 
the reports of the year previous. The Rev. I.. M. de Jesi, M.D., has 
been laboring in Zacatecas and the surrounding outstations during the 
entire year, devoting himself in part to the practice of medicine, and 
partly to pastoral and itinerary work. His labors have been most 
abundant and successful in both departments. In the early part of 
the year, upon a tour in which he visited 7 or 8 principal outstations in 
the northern part of the field, he baptized 61 persons, 40 of whom 
were organized into a church at San Bartolo, a place of great fanati- 
cism. The following extract is from his letter of September 5th : 

" Three weeks before I arrived there a large crowd of over 2,000 
persons gathered for an attack on our congregation, who were at wor- 
ship at the time, and who were only saved by a force of soldiers who 
arrived acc'dentally in their pursuit of a band of robbers. The chief 
of this force established order promptly, after which, with his men he 
attended the services during that day and the next. The last night's 
services were prolonged until 12 o'clock, and 40 adults were baptized, 
in connection with the administration of the Lord's Supper. Forty- 
eight others declared their love of Christ ; but it was thought best to 
give them a period of probation before being received." 

The same letter states that at Sombrereta there are about 40 well- 
tried Christians, but it was found impossible to administer the sacra- 
ment of baptism on account of the great fanaticism of the city and 
the want of an efficient guard. Fifteen or twenty earnest Christians 
were found at Durango, where it seems very important to organize a 
church. In the building up of these country congregations it is very 
essential to secure permanent places of worship. For example, in 
Fresnillo, which has a population of 6,000 people, with a Protestant 
congregation of 200, there is no place in which that number can as- 
semble. A grant or aid of $1,200 would enable the people to secure 



MISSIONS IN MEXICO. 21 

a church, the necessary balance being raised by themselves. In San 
Juan, Guadalupe, the brethren ask for a lot which will cost about 
$ioo, upon which they promise to erect a chapel themselves. In 
Santa Clara the people will build a chapel if they can secure a grant 
of $85 for lumber. It seems highly important that the Board should 
be able to assist congregations like these which, in their poverty, are 
so ready to help themselves. The work in Zacatecas owes much to 
Dr. G. M. Prevost and his family, who, though not connected with, or 
supported by, the Board, have rendered very efficient help. About 
the beginning of the year a chapel was secured, largely through the in- 
fluence of Dr. Prevost, and fitted up for Protestant worship. This 
property, which was obtained on a long lease, belonged to a former 
monastery, and had been for a long time used as a hotel, instead of a 
church. It is capacious and attractive since the changes and renova- 
tions have been made by the mission. One wing of this structure 
will, it is thought, serve admirably for school accommodations, and it 
is to be hoped that during the coming year a flourishing school may 
there be established. On the 3x51 of July, the mission suffered a great 
loss in the death of Signor Mota, who had been the principal native 
preacher of the station, and a man of great power and eloquence. 
The new church, though at the time not completed, was opened for 
his funeral, which was attended by about 400 persons, 300 of whom 
joined in the procession to the cemetery. Dr. Prevost {^reached an 
impressive sermon in the church, and the native preacher, C. Sandoval, 
made an address at the grave. The occasion was one of great im- 
portance, as it served to arouse the attention of the peoi)le to a sense 
of the magnitude of the Protestant movement. The event caused 
great alarm to the bishop and the priests, who, from that time, pub- 
lished in two different papers the most violent charges against the mis- 
sion, and particularly against Dr, Prevost. On the i6th of June the 
new church edifice was dedicated, a building second only to the cathe- 
dral in that city. Large numbers attended the services not only from 
Zacatecas, but from the surrounding outstations. The mayor of the 
city and many liberal citizens were also present. It is estimated that 
800 persons were assembled, many of whom could not gain an en- 
trance within the doors. A choir of 20 voices, led by Severo M. Pre- 
vost, gave great interest to the occasion. Three short discourses were 
preached, after which 68 persons, 57 of whom were then and there 
baptized, were admitted to the church, and partook of the I>ord's Sup- 
per. A large crowd of the fanatical Catholic population assembled in 
front of the church, but the presence of the mayor and leading citi- 
zens, with the guards furnished by the Governor, deterred them from 
violence. With the accessions made then, the church in Zacatecas 
reached a membership of 625, of whom 150 had been received within 
two or three months. Since that time other accessions have been 
made. A large Sabbath-school of 250 is in active operation, and 
it is believed that with the opening of the day-school at least 100 
pupils could immediately be enrolled. Steps have already been taken 
to secure an efficient teacher to superintend such an institution.. In 
the medical work, while Dr. De Jesi, our missionary, has accomplished 



22 ANNUAL REPORT. 

much, a great deal has also been done by Dr. Prevost, entirely at his 
own charges, among the poor. His work is the more to be appre- 
ciated because in doing this gratuitous service he has suffered greatly 
in his general professional practice by the prejudice created by his 
active sympathy with the Protestant cause. At one time his life seemed 
imperilled. At the same time that violent charges were published 
against him, under the authority of the bishop, the Catholics had 
well-nigh succeeded in sujiplanting the present Liberal Governor. 
Through timely information, however, the plot was discovered, and the 
mob which had expected to attack the congregation was thwarted by 
the substitution of a new police force for that which had been bought 
over to the service of the bishop. All the letters received during the 
past year, both from Dr. Prevost and members of his family and from 
our missionaries, have urged with the greatest emphasis the need of re- 
inforcements, as the work is evidently too great for those now on the 
field. Some points, particularly San Luis Potosi and Durango, are in 
danger of passing into other hands for want of an efficient husbandry 
of the work already begun. A gentleman visiting Zacatecas wrote to 
the Board in December as follows : " Having just returned from a three 
weeks' visit to Zacatecas, I am constrained to say that it seems to me 
that the best work for the money and time expended that I have yet 
seen in Mexico, and I have seen all the work of the Southern field, is 
that of Zacatecas. The local congregation is the largest that I have 
had the ple.^sure of addressing anywhere, and yet, for all the Mexican 
families residing there, there are no schools, nor orphanges, nor print- 
ing presses, all of which are found so important in the City of Mexico. 
They have no native preachers, and as they are without a training- 
school, this want does not seem likely to be met, without the inaugura- 
tion of some more efficient means. The want of a primary school is 
also very great. The children of Protestants in Zacatecas are sent 
during the week to Catholic schools, in which both the teachers and 
pupils vent upon them their fanatical prejudice and hate. One boy 
was recently almost killed by a Catholic companion. Teachers could 
be secured if a school was organized and funds were at hand. There 
are young men connected with the church also who might soon be- 
come good preachers if trained for the purpose." The present is a 
critical time for the mission in Zacatecas, There has been a great 
awakening followed by a cruel persecution. There is great curiosity on 
the part of the people. The Protestants, for the time, are under the 
protection of the State Governor, but all this is liable to change. 1 1 
is now a time of golden opportunity, and the work should be vigorous 
and well sustained, but the lack of funds, teachers, schools, and tracts 
operates as a great discouragement to the missionaries. Fifteen con- 
gregations are without preachers, and all are without tracts or any ad- 
vantage of a press, with which to answer the insults and misrepresen- 
tations of their bitterest foes. " In the large cities of Mexico there 
are crises in which the people are stirred and their attention is fixed on 
Protestantism, and at such times more can be done in one year than 
can be accomplished in ten, after the opposition is turned into indiffer- 
ence. Such a crisis is upon Zacatecas. It is the time to strike." 



MISSIONS IN SOUTH AMERICA. 23 

In the autumn the Rev. T. F. Wallace returned to Zacatecas, afier 
a leave of absence of some months, and, although no report has yet 
been received from him, his various letters show that he has been 
busily employed most of the time in itinerations southward to San 
Luis Potosi, and also in the northern stations as far as Durango. 

Statistics of the Northern Mission. 

Ordained missionaries, 5, of whom one is a physician ; unmarried fe- 
male teacher, i ; ordained native preacher, i ; four other helpers and 
three teachers; added during the year (at least), 263 ; total member- 
ship (based on last year's statistics), 1,580 ; Sabbath-school scholars 
about 350. 



MISSIONS IN SOUTH AMERICA. 

Mission in the United States of Colombia. 

Bogota : the capital of tbe country ; -situatecl on an elevated plain ; latitvifle four 
decrees north ; climate temperate ; population estimated at 80,000; occupied as a 
mission station 1856; missionary laborers— Rev. M. E. Caldwell and liis wife ; Rev. 
T. H. Cundor ; Miss Kate McFanen and Miss Margaret Ramsay ; two native teach- 
ers. 

The Staff of laborers has been strengthened during the year by 
the arrival of Rev. T. H. Candor, June 22. 

The mission station at Bogota is situated in the center of a large 
mission field of growing importance. Foreign capital and foreign 
improvements are making the country more and more attractive, at 
least so far as they affect material progress and liberty of thought. 
Signs of progress are constantly visible ; wire fences, better im- 
proved farms, more commodious houses, the introduction of sewing- 
machines, iron bridges and telegraphs, building of rolling-mills and 
railroads, all betoken change and improvement. The telegraph now 
connects Bogota with the rest of the world. The gold, silver, and 
emerald mines of the country, once so alluring to foreigners, are now 
giving place to furnaces, rolling-mills, and railroad enterprises. One 
of the railroads in process of construction will soon connect Bogota 
with the large steamers on the Magdalena River, thus giving easy 
access to the coast and to all the various climates and fruits between 
the torrid and temperate zones. 

It will also give quicker access to cities of considerable size on 
the plain of Bogota and elsewhere, as well as afford a speedier 
change of climate for the sake of rest and health. 

These improvements will undoubtedly bring with them much more 
enterprise, energy, and competition into the country, and thus serve 
to break up the barriers of superstition and prejudice which stand 
in the way of moral progress. 

The people are bound to move away from the old ruts of igno- 
rance and superstition. But where and to what their faith will 



24 ANNUAL REPORT. 

drift, is nn important question. Rolling-mills and railroads, and im- 
proved machinery, material enterprises, can not convert the soul. 
They may prepare the way in some measure for the truth, but un- 
less Christ and the Gospel are presented and pressed upon the 
people with earnestness and love, they will be worse off, as the change 
would be from a blind and superstitious faith to no faith at all. 

Bogota being the capital of the Union has gathered about it much 
reiinement and wealth and is adopting from year to year more and 
more of the advantages which belong to the cities of the North. 

"The English, Germans, and Americans have brought with them 
strange stories of the wealth and grandeur, as well as of the stability 
and superiority of their governments. These things have awakened 
an ever-increasing desire on the part of these people to go to visit 
these lands. 

'' The highest ambition of many seems to be to gather money 
enough to visit New York or London. Many of the young physi- 
cians and dentists go to Philadelphia, New York, London, or Paris 
to complete their education. Thus the superior advantages of 
Protestant institutions and Protestant civilization are universally 
conceded, and this fact goes a great way toward softening down 
harsh prejudice against Protestantism and is more and more pre- 
paring the way for the Gospel." 

Liberal Ideas.— ''''YjVQ.xv many devout Catholics have caught much 
of the spirit of progress and love so as to be considered liberal in 
their ideas toward Protestants. While the majority of the ruling 
and intelligent class of people in the country (at least so far as our 
observation has extended) believe in the free exercise of private opin- 
ion ; it is also true that those who rule the political affairs of the coun- 
try have but little faith in religion of any kind, while their families, so 
far as the female portion is concerned, are generally bigoted Catho- 
lics, and even they themselves who profess to be liberal in their 
ideas acquiesce and give external reverence to the superstition of 
Romanism. Then, the liberty which many of the free thinkers de- 
sire, is not the liberty of the Gospel, but the license to free them- 
selves from all holy restraints. And since it is easier to drift with 
the current than to oppose it, and as very few even of the most 
liberal have much knowledge or faith in anything better than Rom- 
anism, it is not difficult to understand why a Protestant church in 
such a community must labor long and patiently under many diffi- 
culties before much fruit can be expected." 

Encouragements. — Heretofore this mission has labored under great 
discouragements, such as only those intimately connected with it 
could possibly understand. 

For many years there was no church building in which to wor- 
ship and no certain house in which to dwell. Then the laborers 
have always been few at any one time, and the greater part of these 
have from one or more reasons left the field when they were only 
about ready to use the language to good advantage. 

" Now," says the report, "we have both a church and a mission 
house free from debt, and both are in a very good state of repair. 



26 ANNUAL REPORT. 

During the past year more than $270 have been expended in repair- 
ing the church, the greater part of which was replaced in the mis- 
sion treasury by the gifts of the people. 

" The appearance of the church is decidedly improved and is 
much more cheerful than heretofore." 



School and Native Helpers. 

The school for girls has been under the supervision and the care 
of Mrs. Caldwell, Miss McFarren, and Miss Ramsay. It has a 
good location, good school-rooms, and many other advantages and 
attractions. There are also four Christian young ladies brought up 
and educated by the mission, who are about ready to enter upon 
full duty as teachers in the school. 

One of these gave nearly all her time to teaching during the past 
year, and the other three spent part of their time in teaching and 
part in their studies. Much is expected from them, not only in 
the school, but as active workers for Christ in the years to come. 
They have been especially useful in the past year by their singing in 
the prayer-meetings and church services, and two of them have 
been very successful Sabbath-school teachers. Miss Ramsay writes 
that there was little if any spiritual interest manifested among the 
pupils. 

Additions to the Church. — Whilst the additions to the church have 
not been very great during the past year, yet there have been some 
earnest, faithful ones gathered into the fold ; and there has been 
and is still an earnest spirit of inquiry. 

Four or five persons are looking forward to being soon received 
into the fellowship of the church, and others are seriously con- 
sidering their duty. Since the report was written there has been 
an earnest religious awakening in the church. 

Prayer-Meetings. — " These have been especially encouraging, and 
the number of those who have been willing to take part in prayer 
among the recent members as well as those who have been members 
for a longer time have given us reason to hope for still greater bless- 
ings in the future." 

Boys' School. — A school for boys is one of the first needs of the 
mission. And this will require increased funds and at least one 
good Christian lady teacher. All the schools in Bogota are conducted 
either by infidels or by the Roman Catholic Church. It is there- 
fore important that a good institution for the training of youth 
under right religious influences be established as soon as possible. 

School for Girls. — " It is also our earnest desire that the girls' 
school be reinforced with at least one good teacher, and that in 
time Mr. and Mrs. Caldwell may be permitted, by reason of reinforce- 
ments in the girls' school, to give their whole time, or at least a 
much greater part of it, to the church and city missionary work. 

"According to present arrangements no one has time to do much 
real missionary work among the people. And in our judgment we 



MISSIONS IN BRAZIL. 2/ 

thus lose one of our main chances to gain an influence over those 
who are not already interested in our work. 

" If a boys' school is undertaken, Mr. Candor's time and that of a 
lady teacher will be largely occupied in that work, so that we will 
still need more help or at least a reinforcement in the girls' school 
before we can have much opportunity to come in contact with the 
people as we would like to do, and as we believe from past experi- 
ence is highly necessary for any great success in our mission work." 

Statistics. 

One church ; membership, 34 ; added during the year by examina- 
tion, 5 — all males ; one absent member restored to the roll; adults 
baptized, 5 ; infants, 5 ; contributions, S270. School : enrolled, 75 ; 
boarders, i^i g'^'^ '■> *^3y pupils, 24 boys and 38 girls. 



MISSIONS IN BRAZIL. 

Baiiia: 735 miles N.N.E. of Rio de Janeiro; missionary laborers — Rev. Messrs. 
A. L. Blackford and J. B. Cameron and their wives ; one native assistant and one 
colporteur. Outstation, Caelioeira, one colporteur. 

Campos : about 150 miles N. E. of Rio Janeiro — Rev. 31. P. Carvalhosa. 

Rio de Janeiro : the capital of tlie country ; population variously stated up to 
400,000 ; occupied as a mission station in 1860 ; mi^slonan' laborers — Rev. J. F. 
Houston, Rev. John M. Kyle and his wife, and Rev. A. B. Trajaiio ; one colporteur 
and one teacher. ' 

LoRENA: 180 miles W. byN. of Rio de Janeiro — Rev. Robert Lerinj^on and his wife. 

Sao Paulo : 300 miles W.S.W. of Rio de Janeiro ; chief town in the province of 
the same name ; population 27,000 ; occupied as a mission station in 1863 ; mission- 
ary laborers— Rev. Messrs. Geo. W. Chamberlain and J. Beatty Howell and their 
wives ; Miss Ella Kuhl, Miss Mary P. Dascomb, Miss P. A. Thomas, and Miss 
Sophie A. Dale ; two teachers and one colporteur. 

SoROCABA : 60 miles W. of Sao Paulo. Rev. A. P. de Cerqueira Leite. 

Rio Claro : over 120 miles N.W. of Sao Paulo ; occupied as a mission station in 
1863 ; missionary laborers— Rev. J. F. Da Gama and his wife ; Miss Eva Da Gama ; 
two native teachers, and one colporteur, 

Brotas : 170 miles N.W. of Sao Pauio ; occupied as a mission station in 1868 ; 
missionary laborers — Rev. J. Zacharias de Miraiida and two native teachers. 

Caldas : 170 miles N. of Sao Paulo— .Bev. Miguel Torres. Campanha : Rev. E. 
C. Pereira. 

BoTUCATU : 160 miles W. by N. from Sao Paulo— Rev. George A. Landes and his 
wife. 

The Rev. J. F. Da Gama and his family, Rev. G. W. Chamberlain 
and Miss P. A. Thomas embarked for Brazil September r, on their re- 
turn. Rev. John M, Kyle and his wife sailed in December, to rein- 
force this mission. 

The reports received indicate progress. Two new churches have 
been organized, and new places for preaching opened, where it is ex- 
pected that congregations will be gathered that in time will become 
centres of religious interest. The following statistical table gives 
an exhibit of what has been done during the year : 



28 



ANNUAL REPORT. 



Received 

ON 

Profes- 
sion. 


•^ J. 

°5« 
J t f 

^a3 

o o " 
HO 

41 
33 
11 
35 
188 
93 
67 
33 
34 
53 
35 
138 
66 
42 
12 
11 

6 
61 
38 
36 
40 

6 
68 

4 


BAPTISMS. 


Contributions 

FOR 

DIFFt;BENT P''R- 

POSES. 


Adnlts 


Infants. 


Araqaara 


3 
9 

'6 
13 
13 

8 
2 
1 

7 

20 
5 

i 

3 
11 

7 
22 

38 
4 


2 

8 

5 

10 
10 

8 

'7 

"8 
3 

i 

'3 
11 

7 
22 

38 
4 


3 

7 

3 

5 

16 

6 

6 

3 

3 

8 

3 

15 

15 

5 

's 

9 

14 

5 

"38 

2 


124 
44 

512 

901 
2,225 

227 
49 
13 
71 

j- mi 
22 

30 
18 

*5 


Babia 

Cachoeira 


Campos 

Rio de Janeiro 

Sao Paulo 


Sorocaba 


Caldas 


Macliado 

Rio Oaro 

S. Carlos do Pinhal 


Brotas 


Dous Corregos 

Borda da Matta 


Lorena 


Cruzeiro 


Rio Novo 


Faxina 

Len9oes 




Arcado 


Cabo Verde 


Guarehy 


Total 


173 


1,110 


147 


170 


$4,698 





Whilst 172 were received on profession of their faith, the net gain to 
the membership is only 16. This discrepancy is owing to the great 
decrease in the membership of the Brotas church. For some years, 
owing to removals and to new organizations springing up and covering 
part of the field, the roll of communicants was gradually reduced, but 
it seems that care had not been taken always to remove from the roll 
the names thus dismissed. This has been done during the year. Some 
of the churches have not reported their membership. 



Sao Paulo. 

During the absence of Mr. Chamberlain much of the work of this 
station came upon Mr. Howell. Rev. Mr. Morton preached regularly 
once a week when in the city. Here as in Bahia, Rio Janeiro, and 
other i)laces Rev. Maxwell Wright, an evangelist, held a series of re- 
ligious services, preaching a ])ure Gospel with great earnestness, direct- 
ness, and power of illustration, much to the profit of many. Mr. 
Howell speaks of his own method of preaching during the year, as 
" Avoiding as far as possible all controversy, but seeking to convince 
my hearers of their need of an inward spiritual life and to lead them to 
Christ as the only one who could supply their soul's need and give 
them life and peace and holiness." As a result of this course he 
mentions a notable increase upon the services, and apparent deepen- 



MISSIONS IN BRAZIL. 29 

ing of spiritual life, and quickening zeal among the church members, 
together with numerous conversions. Another encouraging sign has 
been the large attendance upon the weekly lecture and the presence of 
the three married daughters of a wealthy and influential Baron residing 
near the school, together with their children. 

The young men of this church organized at the beginning of the 
year a Society for Christian Work, 'i'heir efforts have been prmcipally 
directed to missionary labor among the _,Itahans. Regular services 
have been held among them every Sabbath by two Itahaii members 
of the church. A weekly service, conducted by an elder and other 
members, has been maintained at a village six miles north of Sao Paulo. 
One person, the head of a large family of this village, recently made 
a public profession of his faith. Some other members kept up a 
weekly prayer meeting in one of the suburbs, and others gave their 
services to a mission Sabbath-school, which is distinct from the church 
Sabbath-school. 

Mr. Chamberlain writes " that a spirit of liberality has accompanied 
the movement for the building of a new house of worship. Yxom. the 
Ladies' Auxihary Society, Sabbath offerings, Juvenile Missionary Soci- 
ety, and special subscriptions the sum of $2,225 '^^s been contributed. 
Larger subscriptions payable during this year will swell this amount. 
On December 2d we laid the first brick of the new edifice and the 
foundations up to floor level followed speedily." The completion of this 
much-needed building and the aid received from friends in the United 
States and in Brazil will be reported in due time. 

The day-school has been thoroughly graded upon the basis of a seven 
years' course — three years in the Primary School and four years in the 
High School. The attendance at the close of the year was 100 — 53 
boys and 47 girls. Of these, 51 were children of believers and 49 
were from Roman Catholic fauulies. There was an increase of the 
number at the beginning of this year. 

The Girls' Boarding School has been under the direction of Miss 
Kuhl and Miss Dascomb, who report a successful year. There were 
15 boarders. Some of these are supported by funds sent from home 
societies. " Their advancement, not only in study, but also in the de- 
velopment of their character, has been very satisfactory. We rejoice 
to say that God's Spirit has been with us and that several of our family 
give evidence of conversion, showing by their lives that they are fol- 
lowing Christ." Those who are aided from mission funils are expected 
to become teachers or Christian workers, and are taken at an age when 
they show ability to study and give promise of future usefulness. 

The Imprensa Evangelica, which is regularly published at Sao Paulo, 
is reported as " doing a good pioneer work, and brings us into commu- 
nication by letter with persons interested in the Gospel in sections of 
the country where no preacher or missionaries have ever gone, and we 
often see extracts in our many exchanges in widely separated parts of 
the country. It has 755 subscribers in twelve of the twenty provinces 
in the empire." 



30 ANNUAL REPORT. 



Sorocaba. 



Rev. A. P. de C. Leite, who is a faithful worker, sends the following 
report of the field cultivated by him : 

" As the Rev, Mr. Landes had taken up his residence at Botucatu, 
near to Rio Novo, the church at the latter place, which was under my 
pastoral care, was transferred to him by the Presbytery at its last 
meeting. 

"On the 9th of April, 1882, I organized a church at Guarehy with 
four members, and baptized at the time two infants. There are sev- 
eral other persons there who are preparing to make a profession of 
their faith. 

" Of the three young men who were studying with me, one is already 
in S. Paulo studying under the direction of Mr. Howell, who, at my 
request, made arrangements for him there. The other two were un- 
able to continue their studies, on account of being obliged to support 
themselves by farming. One of them, especially, is very sorry that he 
has not the means to go on with his studies. 

" The boy who was with me, my hope for the future, was taken 
away by his father, who, being very poor, needed his services. 

"On the ist of October, 1882, we commenced worship in our new 
chapel, which is now completed inside. We need, however, regular 
seats and to finish up the outside. In the erection of our church we 
have had to contend with many difiiculties, as our people are nearly all 
poor. Since we have been holding the service in the new building, 
however, the attendance has been very encouraging, and there are al- 
ready several newly interested in the cause of Christ." 

The statistics of Sorocaba and Faxina, churches to which he minis- 
ters, are found in the tabular statement. 

Rio Claro. 

On the return of Mr. Da Gama he resumed his labors at this place, 
and the school is again under his care and that of his daughter. Miss 
Eva Da Gama. Mr. Lenington has undertaken work in the Valley 
of the Parahyba, and has charge of the Lorena and Crozeiro churches. 
Besides ministering to them, he has preached in several of the larger 
towns located on the railroad between Sao Paulo and Rio Janeiro, and 
had good congregations m all of them. 

Mr. Da Gama writes of a spirit of inquiry among the people, and of 
an increased number calling for religious conversation^ New meetings 
for prayer and study of the Bible had been commenced. The attend- 
ance on preaching had steadily unproved and the prospects for growth 
were encouraging. On the first Sabbath of the year ten were received 
into church tellowship on profession of their faith. Six of these were 
from the orphan school — tne first-fruits of this institution. This in- 
gathering has had a happy eftect on others. In this boarding-school 
are 16 boys and 15 girls, who are carefully instructed in the Bible, in 
secular knowledge, and are taught to help themselves. These recite 



MISSIONS IN BRAZIL. 3 1 

with the day scholars, who number about 25. The attendance on 
Sabbath-school is from 60 to 80. 

The school at Limeira has 20 pupils, and that of Pirassinunga has 
i8. At these and other outstations connected with Rio Claro the 
teacher or the Bible-reader has conducted religious services on the 
Sabbath and sometimes during the week, 

Botucaiu. 

Mr. Landes has devoted his time to proclaiming the simple truths 
of the Gospel at this and other places. The number of converts at 
Botucatu is small, but several are expecting soon to make a public 
profession of their faith. The gentleman who gave the property men- 
tioned in last report, continues a warm friend of the mission. The 
school is flourishing and numbers 41 pupils. Besides the church of 
Rio Novo, which has been placed under the care of Mr. Landes, he 
has visited the other congregations four different times in ten months — 
Lencoes, Bom Successo, and Viado. Each trip required a ride on 
horseback of nearly 200 miles. Three persons were received into the 
church at Lencoes on examination and 8 children were baptized. The 
believers here are very much scattered, and on this account it is very 
difficult to bring them together for religious services. One who united 
with the church has suffered in his worldly affairs by reason of his ad- 
herence to the I'rotestant faith, but he is willing to suffer if thereby he 
can glorify God. At Bom Successo there are 25 or 30 adult members. 
Two were received into this church on profession of their faith, and 
4 children were baptized. Six other persons were anxious to unite 
with the church, but they were advised to wait till the next communion, 
so as to be more thoroughly acquainted with the doctrines of the Gos- 
pel. The school has 14 pupils. At Vivado is another community of 
believers, numbering about 30 members. One was added to the 
church. These scattered communities need not only the presence of 
one who can instruct them in divine things, but the teacher and the 
colporteur are also required to educate the young and to read the Word 
to those who are unable to read it for themselves. 

There are brief notices of the churches at other points in this South- 
ern field. Senhor Zacharias has labored at Brotas and Dous Corregos 
amidst some discouragements. Sr. Torres has been happy and pros- 
perous in his work in the provinces of Minas Geraes. He is laboring 
also with his pen in combating the errors of Rome. Sr. Eduardo is 
located at Campanha, about 15 leagues from Caldas, where Mr. Torres 
has his residence. 

Rio de Janeiro. 

Mr. Houston has been encouraged by the arrival of an associate in 
Mr. Kyle, whose experience in the pastorate at home will be of great 
service in his new field. Mr. Houston reports the work growing in 
interest at this important centre. " The attendance on the services 
has improved greatly during the last few months, especially on Sabbath 
evenings, when a great many outsiders are present. Quite a number 



32 ANNUAL REPORT. 

are thinking of making a profession, but for some reason are not yet 
prei)arecl. One obstacle to an increase of the Sabbath-school is, that 
the members are so scattered and at such a distance from the church 
that they can not send their children." One or two new places for 
preaching will be opened during the year. The colporteur has sold a 
number of Bibles and Testaments, and a great many religious books 
and tracts. Two visits were made to the church at Ubatuba — one by 
Senhor Trajano, who remained nearly a month, preaching to the peo- 
ple. Twelve made a public profession of their faith in Christ. Mr. 
Houston remained with them 12 days, when ten new members were 
received. Visits were also made to Petropolis, but no immediate fruits 
have as yet appeared. 

Bahia. 

The regular Sabbath and weekly services were maintained during the 
year. Nme persons were received into the church by profession and 
8 adults and 7 children were baptized. Nearly $60 were contributed 
for various purposes. The catechetical class was kept up with an 
average attendance of about 30. In the women's department the in- 
struction was given orally for the most part, and the interest was well 
maintained. There was also another service held in a different part of 
the city under the care of the native laborer. Colportage was em- 
ployed as a means of reaching the people with the truth, both in Bahia 
and Cachoeira, and 66 Bibles, 127 New Testaments, 645 volumes of re- 
ligious works, and 7,000 tracts, to the value in all of $480, were put 
into circulation. There were also 90 copies of the Lnprensa Evan- 
gelica taken. 

Cachoeira was visited once a month by one of the missionaries. The 
QDlporteur residing' in that place maintained services the intervening 
Sabbaths. A few persons gave some signs of interest in the truth, and 
the circulation of books and tracts was larger than the previous year. 
The work, on the whole, does not wear an encouraging aspect. Visits 
were made to other places and the Gospel preached in them. The 
people were ready to listen, but no spiritual results were seen. 



MISSIONS IN CHILI 

Valparaiso, the chief seaport of Chili, latitude 33 de^. south : Population 100,- 
000; laborers — Rev. Messrs. David Trumbull, D. D., aud A. M. Merwin and their 
wives ; Rev. Wm. E. Dodge ; three assistants. 

Santiago, the capital city of Chili, 120 miles inland from Valparaiso, vfith which 
it has railroad connection : Population, 125,000 ; laborers— Rev. Messrs. S. J. Chris- 
ten and W. H. Lester and their wives. 

Talca, 120 miles south of Santiago, connected with the same hy railway : Popu- 
lation, 20,000 ; occupied by a native helper. 

CoNCEPciON, near the coast, about 300 miles south of Valparaiso : Population, 
15,000 ; laborers — Rev. S. W. Curtis aud his wife. 

The Chili mission has undergone important changes during the year. 
The Revs. P'.neas and Robert McLean, of the Concepcion station, 
have both been compelled to resign on account of ill health, and are 



MISSIONS IN CHILI. 33 

now in this country. During the year the Rev. William E. Dodge wa^ 
sent out by the Board, but was subsequently called to becouie associate 
pastor of the Union Church in Valparaiso, by which his support as well 
as the expense of his passage was assunied. The Rev. W. H. Lester, 
about the same time, was sent to the mission and was assigned to San- 
tiago, where he has already entered with much vigor upon his work. 
The Rev. A. M. Mervvin has continued his successful work at Valpa- 
raiso. The Rev. S. J. Christen has continued to act as pastor of the 
church at Santiago, at the same time conducting a boys' school. The 
Rev. S. W. Curtis is still at Concepcion, where at present he is com- 
pelled to assume the care of the entire work of the station. The need 
of at least one more man for that station is immediate and pressing. 

The Spanish church in Valparaiso, under the care of the Rev. Mr. 
Merwin, has had a prosperous year. The number of adherents, young 
and old, connected with his congregation is given at 255. The regidar 
attendance is 150 ; communicants, 82 ; additions during the year, 26. 
The Sabbath-schools, two in number, aggregate 125 pupils and teachers. 
After stating that the past year has been the most prosperous of any 
in the history of the mission, Mr. Merwin adds: "We note with spe- 
cial gratitude that 26 persons, after due probation and examination, 
have come forward to make public profession of their faith in Christ, 
and to enter into covenant relations with His church. A gain of near- 
ly 40 per cent, on the previous membership is certainly a most cheer- 
ing result." 

The Union church of Valparaiso (which, though self-supporting, 
gladly identifies itself with the work of our mission, and Dr. Trumbull 
counts himself as really a part of our mission force), reports an average 
attendance of 350 in its morning congregation, and has two Sabbath- 
schools of about 80 pupils each. During the last year 45 persons 
were received into the church, about one-half of them on profession. 
The present membership is 200. Two weekly prayer-meetings and a 
Young Men's Bible-class in the pastor's study are among the agencies 
employed. This church has almost from the first borne an important 
part in the mission work proper in Chili, giving large attention to the 
work of Bible distribution and the dissemination of religious papers, 
and also to the work among seamen in the port. 

In the city of Valparaiso, a man is needed to take charge of the Es- 
quela Populare, an institution mainly self-supporting, but holding con- 
nection with the mission. Effort has been and is still being made to 
find a principal for this school, and also an experienced female teacher 
for the female department. 

This institution has been liberally supported by merchants of Val- 
paraiso, who hope to make it the foundation of a large and flourishing 
institution, for higher Protestant education in Chili. Messrs. Balfour 
& Co. have placed at the disposal of the school suitable buildings with 
accommodations for over 200 pupils. The day department has iSc 
pupils ; the boarding department has 12. The increase in attendance 
has been 40 per cent, over that of last year. " The current expenses," 
says Mr. Merwin in his report, " have been almost entirely met by 
donations here and by the sewing class, many of the pupils attending 

3 



34 ANNUAL REPORT. 

church and Sabbath-school. A good matron and a building erected 
for the purpose have been secured for the boarding department (' Shel- 
tering Arms'). Contributions are made toward the current expenses 
by friends in this country. A bazaar was held in March to raise 
funds for the purchase of the buildings now occupied." A semi- 
monthly paper has been issued, 14,400 copies of Spanish tracts, and 
various articles have been contributed to the daily papers. 

I'ne church in Concepcion, organized four )ears since by the Revs. 
lineas and Robert McLean, has had, on the whole, a history of 
niarked success, but has suffered during the past year from the illness 
and final removal of two of its missionaries. It reports three additions 
on examination, and the baptism of ten infants. Two members have 
died. 1'he total membership is not reported for this year. An efficient 
work, has been carried on at this station by the publication of a Prot- 
estant paper, which, while exciting more or less animosity on the part 
of the i)ai)al extremists, has greatly won the confidence of the liberal 
portion of the community by its strong leavening influence in the ele- 
vation of Southern Chili. 

The church in Santiago, under the care of the Rev. S. J. Christen, 
reports an attendance at the Sabbath services of from 30 to 70. The 
average attendance at Sabbath school is 23, the number of communi- 
cants '26, and the number of baptisms during the year, 6. Services 
have been maintained at the Canadilla station by Signor Angeli. A 
great obstacle to progress in Santiago is pointed out in the dependence 
of the poor (and most of the Protestants are poor) upon the wealthy 
for employment, the latter class being for the most part bigoted Cath- 
olics, or skeptics. " The artisan class are, moreover, mostly connected 
with associations which are essentially infidel, and the largest number 
of the educated and liberal party in the country belong to the positivist 
school of Compte, and are passive or indifferent. Still, important and 
interesting things are occurring, and never was there a time better 
suited to missionary and reformatory work. The leading journals of the 
country are advocatmg a separation of Church and State : the ma- 
jority in Congress is in favor of this, as are also the President and his 
Cabinet. There is no doubt that within a year or two this separation 
will come, and an enlarged sphere of usefulness will be opened." An 
interesting point in the report of the mission, as well as in the recent 
missionary correspondence, is the fact that a special Legate, or Nuncio, 
who had been sent out to Chili by the Pope of Rome, was sent back 
by die Government, the proposed papal interference being rejected. 
All the letters received indicate a great change as now taking place in 
all parts of the Republic. 

• An important sign of the times is seen in the following extract from 
a letter of the Rev. A. M. Merwin, written at Valparaiso, March 4th : 
•' Yesterday an editorial appeared in the oldest and most conservative 
daily of this city, that is really cheering. It calls attention to the 
threats of the clerical party, who menace the Government with revo- 
lution and a war in case their demands are not met, and shows that 
the people are too far advanced to follow ultramontane leaders. 
' The Catholic religion,' it says, ' which is based on the Gospel, and 



MISSIONS IN CHILI. 35 

which springs from the divine teaching of the God-Man, will always 
be our religion ; but that which has for its interpreters those who 
amalgamate the basest passions with the preaching of political and 
anti-liberal dogmas, which the Curia Romana has wished to convert 
into religious dogmas, that will be the religion only of the ignorant, of 
that inconsistent group who obey the priest only because they see him 
with a gown, and believe that beneath that black rag there is hidden 
the Spirit of Jesus Christ.' " 

The following is equally significant and is taken from the same 
letter : " Last night at our prayer-meeting an ex-Congressman, a law- 
yer, quite advanced in years, made a few eloquent remarks to thos'* 
present. He urged them as they loved their country and valued the 
salvation of their souls to give heed to the Gospel, and to open their 
souls to Christ, who is the incarnation of the truth. The hearers, 
nearly fifty in all, were much moved by this address from a country- 
man of his position, who was a perfect stranger to them. He resides 
in Santiago and has maintained cordial relations with one missionary 
there for several years ; has also written excellent articles for the 
press signed ' Un Prctestante Chileno.' " 

At the same time evidences of the greatly increased confidence 
toward our missionaries by the Government are shown, the venerable 
Dr. Trumbull having been repeatedly consulted in regard to matters 
of public interest by those high in authority. The trustworthiness and 
self-denying toil which have characterized his mission work through 
these years have been most thoroughly appreciated, and if the Presby- 
terian Board, through its representatives, shall be able to maintain the 
prestige and influence which its work has already gained, great and 
blessed results may be expected to follow. A most earnest call has 
been made in nearly every letter received, for men to engage in a 
similar work at various points northward along the coast, Callao, Iqui- 
que, etc., where are already many American and British residents, 
whose sympathy and aid might be counted upon in maintaining re- 
ligious services. Thus far, however, the Board has been unable to fur- 
nish either men or means for this work. At the mission meeting 
held January gth, 1883, the following resolutions were unanimously 
adopted : 

" That the mission again calls the attention of the Board to Callao 
and Iquique, beseeching that men may be sent to preach to the En- 
glish residents in each of these places, in the hope of ultimately reach- 
ing the native people of Peru with the Gospel of Christ. 

" That as Christian men and missionaries our hearts ache at the 
thought of the dreadful immorality and spiritual destitution prevailing 
on this coast, as well as the indifference of the Lord's people in other 
lands to the deplorable state of things. 

" That after Valparaiso these are the largest and most influential 
ports south of Panama. Prominent individuals in both places have 
signified a wish that our men should be sent, and are ready at once to 
aid in the support of qualified laborers." 

The total number of missionaries, including Dr. Trumbull, is 5 ; of 
communicants, 272 ; number added during the year, ^^^ pupils in the 
school, 180 J Sabbath-school pupils, 125 ; church attendance, about 200. 



36 ANNUAL REPORT. 



MISSIONS IN WESTERN AFRICA. 

Liberia Mission 

Monrovia : Rev. Robert A. M. Deputie. 

Clay Ashland : Rev. P. J. Flouruoy ; Mr. Albert King; Mrs. Rachel A. Eth- 
rlge. 

Marshall : 

Near Marshall : Mr. Henry D. Brown. 
SiNOE : Rev. James Priest; Rev. Z. R. Kennedy, sospended. 
GiBEAH, on the Farmini^ton River : Mrs. Sophie E. Nurse. 
Samsonville : Mrs. Martha Jones. 

Near Cartsburgh : 

schieffelin : 

Partial reports have been received from the churches and schools in 
Liberia. The number of communicants in the church of Monrovia is 
57, of whom two were received last year. The church of Clay Ash- 
land reports 43, of whom 10 are new members. The church of Sinoe 
reports 82, of whom 10 are new members. No reports have been re- 
ceived from other churches ; the report of the year before last gave 
20 for the church of Marshall, 25 for Schieffelin, 19 for Grassdale, 8 for 
Carysburgh, and 6 for Brewerville. The church at Sciiieffelin has 
been greatly favored in the building and complete arrangements of a 
handsome stone church, through the liberality of Mr. H. M. Schieffelin, 
of New York, one of Liberia's best friends. 

The report of the Clay Ashland school enumerates 6t, scholars, 
mostly in the primary department, in which Mrs. Wordsworth, now 
Mrs. Ethrige, assisted Mr. King. The others are in the academical 
classes, from which some will soon pass to the college. In New Tom's 
station 21 scholars are reported; at Sinoe 17, until the school was 
discontinued on the return of Mrs. J. R. Priest to this country; at 
Pleasantville 8, until the removal of Mrs. Waters, now Mrs. Nurse, to 
Gibeah, farther inland, where she expected to teach a native school ; at 
Brewerville 39, taught by Mrs. Jones as an assistant in the primary 
department of Mrs. Barboza's school. These returns are not large, 
but they are of some importance in view of the imperfect provision 
for the support of public or common schools. 

The laborers connected with the Board are but few in number : 
three ministers, not including one suspended, two teachers, and three 
female teachers. One of the ministers is now aged, and no longer 
equal to the good service which he has been doing for forty years at 
Sinoe. More ministers are evidently needed, especially if the Gospel 
is to be preached in the interior. One new minister is under appoint- 
ment, a graduate of Howard University, and a member of the presby- 
tery of Fairfield, who is expected to embark for Liberia in May or 
June. Others have the question of their duty as to going to Africa 
under earnest consideration. And three young men of good promise 
are under the care of the presbytery of West Africa as candidates for 
the ministry ; they are, however, only in the earlier stages of the 



38 ANNUAL REPORT. 

course of studies. It is hoped that the College of Liberia will now be 
conducted with greater vigor. Two new professors will soon arrive in 
Monrovia, and the president of the college is also on his return from 
a visit to this country. The schools are doing good, especially those 
at Clay Ashland and at New Tom's station. Six of the scholars in 
the Clay Ashland school were lately received as communicants. 

Three things seem very needful to the success of the mis- 
sionary cause in Liberia. First, a greater number of well- 
qualified and earnest laborers ; second, a much greater spirit 
of self-support, in both churches and schools, by the Americo- 
Liberian people; this is deeply felt by all the friends of Liberia 
in this country, and particularly by the missionary boards of the 
five denominations having at heart the establishment and spread 
of Christian work. And third, a more vigorous effort to give religious 
instruction to the aboriginal people living in Liberia, in large number, 
and in "the regions beyond." The last two of these essential matters 
should be urged on the attention of our friends in Liberia. It must 
be readily conceded that these things, self-support and evangelizing 
work for the natives, have not been altogether neglected by the Americo- 
Liberians, whose temporal circumstances are in most cases very 
limited, but there seems to be great need of a deeper interest in them ; 
and for all three, prayers should be made without ceasing that God would 
give large measures of His grace to all connected with the extension 
of the Gospel in Liberia and the^regions of the interior. The field of 
Christian labor in Western Africa, accessible from the Liberian coast, 
ought to be one vigorously cultivated. The day of small things must 
not be despised ; but the Church should look for progress far greater 
than has yet been made. 

How far the colored churches of our country will supply ministers 
for Africa is not yet settled. The names of three were recommended 
for this service by the Synod of Atlantic at its last meeting, but no 
application for their appointment has reached the Board. A former 
graduate of Lincoln College, under appointment as a missionary, was 
led to remain in this country, as also a medical graduate, who had 
been appointed to Liberia. But great as is the home field and deep 
as is its need of educated ministers, the work in Africa is greater ; and 
great would be the influence on the churches here of active and ear- 
nest missionary work abroad ; indeed, it may well be doubted whether 
these home churches will rise to full prosperity, unless they endeavor 
to extend the Gospel to the dark countries from which their fathers 
came. 

Gaboon and Corisco Mission- 

Benita : on the mainland, fifty-three miles north of Corisco ; occupied as a mis- 
Bion station, 1864 ; missionary laborers— Rev. Cornelius De Heer and his wife ; Rev. 
William C. Gault and his wife ; Mrs. Louise Reutliuger. Outstations — Hanje, 
Batanga, Evune, etc. ; eight native assistants. 

Corisco : fifty-five miles north of the equator, and from fifteen to twenty miles 
from the mainland. Alongo: occupied as a station, 1850 ; missionary laborers — 
Bev. IhiaJ'' Iketije ; one native licentiate preacher. Outstation at Mbiko, on the 
mainland, opposite Corisco ; one native assistant. 




MISSIONS IN WESTERN AFRICA. 39 

Gaboon : at Baraka, on the Gaboon River, near the equator, ten miles from the 
sea ; occupied as a mission station, 1842 ; transferred to the Board, 1S70 ; mission- 
arv laljorers— Rev. William Walker, Rev. Graham C. Campbell and his wife. Rev. 
Adolphus C. Good; Mrs. Albert Bushnoll, Mrs. Thomas E. Garden, Miss Lydia 
Jones, and Miss Lydia B. Walker ; Mr. Peter Menkel ; four native assistants. 
OutstatioH—At Bembwe, on the Gaboon River ; Bev. Ntaka Truman. 

Neae NenCtEKEnge : seventy miles up the Gaboon River ; at Angam : occupied 
as a station, 1881 ; missionary laborers— Rev. Arthur W. Marlinsr and his wife. 
At A'e»(76»e«(7e, outstation : one native teacher. K\,Munda: one native assistant. 

Kangwe : on the Ogove River, 165 miles from the sea by the river, or 90 miles 
direct; occupied as a mission station, 1876; missionary laborers — Rev. William H. 
Robinson ; Mr. Joseph H. Readins; and his wife ; Miss Isabella A. Nassau ; Miss 
Mary L. Harding ; one native licentiate preacher ; three other native helpers. 
Outstations on the river, at Belambila, etc. ; three native helpers. 

Tallaguga : on the Ogove River, 70 miles above Kangwe ; occupied as a mission 
station, 1882; missionary laborers— Rev. Robert H. Nassau, M.D., andliis wife. 

The Rev. A. C. Good and Miss Mary L. Harding, new missionaries, 
and Misses Nassau, Jones, and Wali<er. returning, have all arrived in 
this field. Mr. Peter Menkel came to this country on a visit for his 
health, and after some months returned. In his absence Mrs. Menkel 
was called to her rest. She was held in much esteem as a faithful and 
excellent missionary, and deep sympathy is felt for the four children 
deprived of her care, and also for their father. Everything was done 
for them that could be done. Henry M. Bacheler, M.D., and his wife 
have lately returned to this country. In reporting the health of the 
mission, the Rev. R. H. Nassau, M.D., gives a most favorable ac- 
count of the families at Benita and on the Ogove ; at Gaboon and its 
vicinity also a favorable report in general is given, though not of com- 
l)lete exemption from sickness. A temporary leave of absence may 
be expedient in two or three cases. The return of Mr. Walker, after 
about forty years, all, excepting the time of his visit to this country, 
spent at Gaboon, is soon expected. This is partly owing to his infirm 
health, and partly to his desire to superintend the printing of the 
Scriptures as translated into Mpongwe. Dr. and Mrs. Bachelers re- 
turn is owing in part to considerations of health. In his medical re])ort, 
above mentioned. Dr. Nassau refers to a subject of interest when he 
specifies the fine health and promise of the four infant children, bringing 
with happy cares great enjoyment into as many homes. In these 
homes, with their new attractions, new examples of priceless value are 
set before many heathen families. 

In reporting the progress of this mission, returns of the churches 
and schools may first be enumerated, and afterwards accounts given of 
the ditferent phases of the work. 

C/iur^rhes. 

Benita, received on profession 21 ; whole number 278 

Corisco, " " " 9 ; " " 62 

Gaboon, — " " 41 

Kangwe, " " " 3; " " 30 

Sc/ioois. 

Benita, boarding scholars 33 ; day scholars 6 

Corisco, " " 10; " " 10 

Gaboon, " " 59; " " 14 

Kangwe, " " 24; " " 18 

Of the boarding scholars sixty-two are girls ; and of the day scholars seven. 



40 ANNUAL REPORT. 

Religious Progress. — In the villages on the sea-coast north and 
south of Benita, there has been much encouragement in mission- 
ary work. The! regular visits to the outstations h.ave been well re- 
ceived, while at Benita the attendance on public worship often exceeded 
the liuiits of the chapel. The native helpers were usually welcomed 
on their journeys, and in some places were able to sell not a few 
copies of Christian books ; on his last visit to Banaka and Evune, 
outstations north of Benita, Mr. De Heer sold a good share of these 
books. The sales during the year amounted to $50 in native currency. 
To the church twenty-one new members were added, including some 
from the outstations, making the whole number 278. The catechism 
class was increased in number. 

In Corisco the native minister and the native licentiate preacher 
make a better report than was given last year, though it was necessary 
to separate several persons from the church, completing, it was hoped, 
this painful duty.' The number of communicants was thus reduced to 
62. But a larger attendance at public worship and in some cases 
apparent earnestness of attention lead to the hope of better days near 
at hand. 

At Baraka and other places in the Gaboon part of the field no 
special encouragement was manifested. A somewhat serious trouble 
resulted from the conduct of the French authorities on the Gaboon 
River. In seeking to arrest and punish one of the natives they fired 
on the town of Nengenenge and destroyed it. This involved the loss 
of a house belonging to the mission, and personal i)roperty of one of 
the missionaries ; in all, the loss was about ^700 in value, which the 
authorities refused to make good when a respectful application was 
made to them for that purpose. This matter has been referred by the 
mission to our Government, but as yet without redress. 

The usual services were held at Baraka, the church being under Mr. 
Walker's charge, until the end of the year, and at Rembwe the native 
minister reported efforts to make the Gospel known ; but no increase 
is mentioned in the number of native members of the church. The 
seed sown will yet bear fruit. 

Mr. Marling, whose station above Nengenenge brings him in con- 
tact with the Pangwes, refers to his satisfactory intercourse with them, 
their willingness to listen to the Gospel message, and their disposition 
to give up cannibal practices, at least so far as those who live nearest 
the station are concerned. 

At Kangwe a few converts were added to the church, and some are 
regarded as showing interest in Christian instruction. Here and at 
other places on the Ogove the Pangwe people are gaining the control 
of towns belonging to feebler tribes, and they are likely to become 
possessors of the coast country between the Ogove and the Gaboon 
Rivers, and even north of the latter. As yet no converts have been 
made from this large and energetic tribe. For them especially, and 
even for some other tribes, missionary labor is only at its beginning. 

The Schools of the Mission, as a means of the conversion of the 
youth, and their training for usefulness, have continued to occupy a 
large place in missionary Tabor. At Benita, the girls' boarding-school, un- 



MISSIONS IN WESTERN AFRICA. 4I 

der Mrs. Reutlinger's and Mrs. De Heer's earnest work, has borne good 
fruit. And the school for boys, at first under the charge of Mr. De Heer 
and afterwards of Mr. Gault, was also well kept up. The customs of 
the people as to early marriage, and the power of a father to sell his 
daughter as an additional wife to a polygamist, are sometimes sad 
hindrances ; but, on the whole, there has been encouragement. A 
similar report, though in less degree, is made of the small school for 
boys at Corisco, where the native licentiate ])reacher aids the native 
minister in these and other duties. At Baraka, the schools were great- 
ly injured, for a time, by the serious misconduct of several of the 
older scholars ; the necessary discipline led to a number of dis- 
missals, and in some cases still worse results soon followed. 
It would seem sometimes almost impossible to prevent deplorable 
evils, growing out of heathen depravity and corrupt foreign influences. 
But it was hoped this trouble would be a useful part of needed disci- 
pline. The average attendance and improvement in the schools for 
the year were as usual, under the care of Mrs. Bushnell, Mrs. Ogden, 
and Mr. and Mrs. Campbell. At Kangwe, the boys were under Mr. 
Robinson's care, and "the small but very satisfactory girls' school" 
was in the charge of Mrs. Reading and Mrs. Nassau. One of the girls 
was received as a member of the church. At the end of the year 
under review several changes were made in the work of the teachers, 
which will be more fully reported next year. 

The most important step, probably, was the decision of the mission 
in January, to form a theological training-school at Baraka, at the out- 
set, to be under the instruction of the Rev. A. C. Good. Perhaps 
some young men from other parts of the coast may attend this class, 
thereby avoiding the injurious influences of their education abroad, 
and keeping them in close connection with the native work to be done 
in Africa. It is instructive also to note that the brethren see clearly 
the evil results which too commonly follow education in English. 
Their rule, as stated by Mr. Walker, is to begin with the vernacular, 
and not to teach English until good progress has been made in the 
native language ; afterwards instruction in English is given to a few of 
the scholars. At Baraka about one in five among the boys, and one 
in six among the girls, have added some knowledge of English and 
lessons therein to their vernacular studies. The want of text-books 
in the native languages seems to render acquaintance with English in- 
dispensable for the present. 

To Translating the Scriptures, Mr, Walker has given a large part of 
his time. "The books of Samuel, Kings, Ezra, and Nehemiah have 
been translated. Part of all the translations of other books have been 
revised and corrected, with the assistance of Komanande, the inter- 
preter, and Rev. Ntaka Truman. Genesis and the first twenty chap- 
ters of Exodus, all of Proverbs, and the Acts of the Apostles are to 
be revised for the press ; the first edition of Mpongwe Scriptures is 
nearly or quite out of print. Probably other portions that were printed 
are nearly exhausted." Mr. Walker was translating the book of Esther, 
and he greatly regretted that he could not take up and complete the 
translation of the Pentateuch, but hoped that two of the other fnis- 



42 ANNUAL REPORT. 

sionaries, keeping up their knowledge of Hebrew and mastering the 
Mpongwe, would be able to complete it. He expresses deep gratitude 
for having been enabled to do so much of this sacred work, and refers 
to the kind consideration of all the members of the mission for his com- 
fort and success in it. Though he can not safely remain longer in 
Africa, he hopes to aid in superintending the Mpongwe Scriptures as 
they pass through the press in this country. 

071 the Ogove, both Dr. Nassau and Mr. Reading have given a great 
deal of time and labor to procure required buildings, the former es- 
pecially meeting with great difficulties. In such work on this river 
materials of some kinds could not be obtained ; regular laborers were 
not to be found, much less mechanics of any kind ; the missionaries 
themselves had to do much of the work, enduring hardships and some- 
times perils from the lawless Pangwes. They do not dwell on these 
things, but such severe conditions of beginning missionary work may 
well be remembered with admiration of the missionaries, and gratitude 
to God for hearing prayers on their behalf. Probably the worst is 
over, but it is evident the Pangwes, whose numbers and energy seem 
almost certain to control the country on the Ogove, overshadowing 
and perhaps driving off smaller and more pacific tribes, will prove a 
hard people to be won for Christianity. Yet, once converted, as they 
surely will be by divine grace, they will become efficient agents in the 
spread of the Gospel. Before the year ended Dr. Nassau and his 
wife had the happiness of removing to their new home — the furthest 
inland yet occupied. That it will prove to be a safe, healthful, and 
useful post of labor for Christ among a savage people will be the prayer 
of many. 

The question of travelling and freightage on this river, and indeed 
on the sea-coast of the mission which extends north to Batanga, is one 
of no small moment. The schooner^ bought at Gaboon some years 
ago by the mission, only suits the coast — not the river, and is a very 
slow vessel. It is probably near its end. For the river there are two 
small steamers, owned by European houses, which have been obliging 
as to carrying passengers and freight, but will not accept any remu- 
neration, and can not be depended on often when service is needed. 
It was hoped that such steamers, if increased in number, might be 
available for public use in the ordinary way ; but this does not seem 
likely to be the case at any early time. Canoes or small boats have 
to be used commonly, notwithstanding their delay and inadequate 
room, much exposure in the hot tropical climate, and at times no lit- 
tle danger from lawless natives. It seems almost indispensable to pro- 
vide a small steamer that could be used both on the coast and the 
river ; one that would be of light draught, for during part of the year 
the river at some distance from the sea is very low, and yet one that 
would be safe on the ocean, which is usually exempt from rough 
weather. The risk of attacks by natives will probably become less as 
the missionaries become better known. Mr. Reading has had to refer 
to his boat being fired on, when in charge of his employes, who saved 
themselves by lying down while the tide carried the boat out of reach. 
Similar cases might too easily occur, but the lawless men would not 



MISSION IN SYRIA. 43 

be so likely to attack a steam vessel. The missionaries and the Board 
have had liiuch coiresi)ondence on this subject. Both parties had to 
act with care to avoid any but needful expense. All the brethren were 
not in favor of a ste uner at first ; but the conviction has become general 
that one should be obtained. The expense would be considerable — 
probably not less than $10,000 for purchase and equipment, and then 
a considerable outlay for captain, engineer, crew, fuel, repairs, etc. 
Probably many persons would be ready to respond liberally to an ap- 
peal for this object. 

On a general view, it is evident that the field of this mission is one 
that is great and full of hope, but yet one that involves difficulties of 
no light degree, particularly such as grow out of the great heathenism, 
the ignorant and deeply depraved condition, of the people to be evan- 
gelized. Access to interior regions is almost certain to be gained be- 
fore long, so as to reach healthier stations, places less pervaded by 
malaria ; and the native helpers trained at existing stations may be ex- 
pected to be very useful in this inland progress. The staff of labor- 
ers from this country is now in better supply than before, and is well 
worthy of the confidence of the Church at home. All that can be 
done will be done by the men and women in the field. They will 
surely receive the sympathy, and be sustained by every good means 
and by the prpyers, of our churches at home. 



MISSION IN SYRIA. 

• Beirut : Rev. Messrs. C. V. A. Van Dyck, D.D., M.D., Wm. W. Eddy, D.D., and 
James S. Dennis, D.D., and their wives ; Miss Eliza D. Everett, Miss Ellen Jackson, 
iind Miss Emilia Thomson. 

Abeih: Rev. Messrs. Wm. Bird and Theodore S. Pond and their wives; Mrs. 
Emily S. Calhoun, Miss Emily G. Bird, and Miss Susie H. Calhoun. 

SiDON : Rev. Messrs. Wm. K. Eddy and George A. Ford, Mrs. Mary E. Ford, 
Miss Bessie M. Nelson, and Miss Sai-ah A. Ford. 

Tripoli : Rev. Samuel Jessup and wife ; Rev. C. W. Calhoun, M.D. ; Miss Harriet 
LaGrange. 

Zahleh : Rev. Messrs. Gerald F. Dale and Frederick W. March and their wives. 

In this country : Rev. Messrs. Wm. M.Thomson D.D., H. H. Jessup, D.D., and 
O. J. Hardin and wife, Miss Hattie M. Eddy and Miss Fannie Cundall. 

Faculty of the Syrian Protestant College: Rev. Daniel Bliss, D.D., President; Rev. 
George E. Post, M.D., Rev. John Wortabet, M.D., Rev. Harvey Porter, Frederick 
J. Bliss, B.A., Frank E. Packard, B.A., with a corps of native tutors. 

The year has been marked by sorrows and difficulties, which have 
sorely tried the faith and courage of the mission. In June, Rev. Dr. 
Jessup, then recently bereft of his wife, left for the United States, to 
provide for the education of his children. Rev. O. J. Hardin and 
family arrived, on leave of absence, about midsummer, having been in 
constant service nearly eleven years. Miss Hattie M. Eddy was also 
obliged to ask leave of absence, on account of ill health. Dr. Van 
Dyck, after a temporary absence, returned invigorated. Miss Fanny 
Cundall has been obliged to resign her connection with the mission 



44 ANNUAL REPORT. 

and return home. Miss Sarah A. Ford has been appointed a missionary 
of the Board and assigned to the Sidon field. 

The exciting political and warlike events transpiring in the East have 
rendered the year unfavorable for religious effort and spiritual growth. 
The mission report says : " The war in Egypt, being really a war of 
religions, in which Moslem bigotry and hatred of Christianity were 
tempted for a moment to seize their old weapons, made the earth to 
tremble under the feet of the Christians in Syria. Thousands of the 
people of Beirut left their homes in the months of agitation and fled 
to the mountains. Refugees from Egypt spread the panic. The war 
was the sole topic of conversation ; the one subject read about and 
thought about. Religion was crowded out of notice. Among the 
thousands who fled from Alexandria to Beirut were many gamblers and 
scoffers. It has been hard to make the plants of righteousness grow 
amid the inflowing tide of such influences." 

Still the ^'ear has not been devoid of good results. In some direc- 
tions marked progress has been made. The interest in the Sidon 
field has continued, and a large number have been added to the 
church. In the whole mission field log have made profession of their 
faith, being 22 less than were reported last year. In many of the out- 
stations a good state of feeling is reported and encouraging results are 
anticipated. There are not a few indications that a most radical 
change'is gradually coming over Syrian society. The various agencies 
at work, prominent among which may be mentioned the Bible, the 
preaching of the Word, the press, the wide-extended system of education, 
are slowly but surely sapping the foundations of ancient systems of 
error and superstition. 

An assembly of the preachers and teachers, held in Beirut in April, 
1882, is specially worthy of notice. The report says: " Over a hun- 
dred were present in the conference. They came from various parts 
of Syria, and nearly a week was spent by them in discussing subjects 
of practical religion. It was an enthusiastic meeting. The opportu- 
nities in Syria for such Christian communion and exchange of thought 
have been exceedingly rare, and all those present were raised to a 
higher plane of intellectual and spiritual life than they had heretofore 
reached." 

At the annual meeting of the mission, held in December, the follow- 
ing action was unanimously taken and referred to the Board : 

(i) "That Presbyteries be formed at Beirut, Abeih, Sido?i, Tripoli, 
and Zahleh. 

(2) "That each Presbytery consist of such ordained missionaries of 
the Presbyterian Board of Foreign Missions of the United States and 
such ordained Professors of the Syrian Protestant College as may de- 
sire to enter it, of all native pastors, and of one elder from each church 
within the bounds of the Presbytery. 

(3) " That these Presbyteries, together with any others which may 
be formed by neighboring Presbyterian missions, constitute the Synod 
of Syria. 

(4) " That these Presbyteries and Synod have no organic ecclesias- 
tical connection with churches in Great Britain or the United States. 



I.Oiuji.l-uele lEast 36 jErcrm. Crgemrigh. 



febeh 



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w -*-ij f / ft 



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IRirOTJ (f^ 























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SCALE or IWItES. 

Til f ^'7 -T 



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46 ANNUAL REPORT. 

(5) " That members of these Presbyteries may retain their connec- 
tion with ecclesiastical bodies in Great Britain and the United States." 
With reference to this the Board has taken no action. 

Beirut Station. 

The central church enjoyed the pastoral care of Dr. Jessup till his 
departure for the United States. Upon his departure the mission de- 
cided to inaugurate a native pastorate. This plan, however, has not 
been successful, owing to the aversion of the congregation to being 
placed under the care of a native pastor. After a prolonged but un- 
successful experiment, during which the interests of the church began 
to suffer, the project was abandoned and Dr. W. VV. Eddy has been 
chosen pastor. 

The Sabbath-school of the church and the weekly teachers' meeting 
are conducted by the mission, and are well attended. Eight persons 
were admitted to the church on profession of their faith. 

Work in the several departments of the church and school in the 
Eastern quarter has been faithfully kept up. About 60 persons at- 
tended the preaching ; 80 were in the Sunday-school and 70 in the 
day-school. One effect of the Sunday-school has been to stir up the 
zeal of the Greek church, which has taken a new departure in carrying 
on an opposition Sunday-school, in which the methods of Protestants 
are closely followed. 

The theological class, numbering seven students, under the special 
charge of Dr. Dennis, completed their course of study, passed a credit- 
able examination, and have entered the work in the several stations. A 
building for the use of the seminary, for which contributions to the 
amount of $15,000 have been made by friends of the institution in 
America, and $5,000 by the Board, is being built on ground donated 
by the Trustees of the Syrian Protestant College. 

The record of the Beirut Female Seminary, both numerically and 
financially, has been very encouraging. The number of boarders has 
crowded the accommodations, being 46 against 41 last year. The num- 
ber of day-scholars in the higher department has increased from 5 last 
year to 1 1 this, and what is more satisfactory is, that quite a number 
of the pupils are grown-up girls. The receipts from patrons of the 
school, for the year ending July, 1882, were nearly $400 in excess of 
those of any previous year, while the full-pay pupils were nearly three 
times as many as those for 1881. Of the 57 pupils, 20 were Greek 
CathoUcs, 17 Greeks, 13 Protestants, 4 Maronites, 2 Jews, and i 
Moslem. The Moslem is the daughter of an Egyptian Bey, who vis- 
ited the various girls' schools of Beirut and satisfied himself as to the 
superior merits of this seminary. 

A class of 19 pupils is in course of training, to become teachers in 
various parts of Syria and Egypt. 

The primary department has averaged 70 in daily attendance, and it 
is mentioned as a special cause for gratitude, that the building so long 
rented for this department has now become the property of the semi- 
nary by purchase. Had it passed out of the control of the school it 



MISSION IN SYRIA. 47 

would have been highly detrimental to the best interests of the insti- 
tution. 

One of the former pupils of the school united with the church the 
past summer, and several of those in attendance give good evidence 
of a change of heart. 

The women's class for sewing and religious instruction has been car- 
ried on at Ras Beirut with good results by Miss Jackson and Mrs. 
Porter. 

A weekly Arabic paper of 8 pages, and a monthly child's paper of 
4 pages, have been issued. An illustrated volume of rhymes for chil- 
dren, two atlases of 12 maps each, on Biblical and general geography, 
engraved and printed in Edinburgh, are among the recent publications. 
A translation of the Presbyterian confession of faith and form of church 
government has been prepared. A revision of the five editions of the 
Arabic Scriptures has been begun, and a text-book in Systematic The- 
ology is now going through the press. A " Universal History," pre- 
pared by Prof. Porter, is nearly ready for the press. 

Egypt has, ordinarily, taken half the issues of the mission press; but 
in consequence of the war all orders were cut off for some months, 
while, owing to the feverish state of feeling in Syria, fewer books were 
sold, and, as a result, the stock of books on hand has largely increased, 
and the lesources of the press been somewhat crippled. Sales have 
increased largely toward the end of the year, the demand from Egypt 
having begun again. 

Abeih Station. 

A good degree of health has been enjoyed by the missionaries of the 
station, and the results of the year's work have been fairly successful. 
Twenty-one were admitted to the church on profession of faith, mak- 
ing the total number of members in the station 231. 

A fifth church was organized at Suk el Ghurb consisting of 64 mem- 
bers. Most of these were set off from the Abeih church. The other 
churches and membership are as follows : Abeih, 87 ; Ain Zehalta, 
36; Kefr Shima, 32, and B'hamdun, 12. In the whole field there are 
20 preaching places, with average congregations, aggregating about 
850. Depletmg influences are still at work, and the report says of 
the 87 members on the list of Abeih church: "They are scattered 
from Egypt to Hums and from Beirut to Damascus in 26 different 
places. In general no other part of the Syria mission field suffers 
so much from the emigration of Protestants as this station. The re- 
sult is disheartening to those who remain, for it is the young, the vigor- 
ous, the enterprising, and the better educated who leave." 

The extensive educational work of this station, mainly of a primary 
character, has been highly successful. There have been 38 of these 
schools with 1,680 pupils, and 6 schools of higher grade with 150 pupils. 
The work at Shweifat has passed through a crisis not uncommon in the 
history of mission work. After two years of much promise, good at- 
tendance, and excellent progress, the boys' school has been broken up 
by a rival Greek school. Except the 8 students who have entered the 
college at Beirut, not a pupil remained. To meet a felt need the 



48 ANNUAL REPORT. 

teachers were at once transferred to Suk el Ghurb, where good build- 
ings and furniture belonging to a Scotch society were obtained for a 
nominal rent. A boarding-school was opened with 34 pupils, chiefly 
from the advanced classes of neighboring schools. All but one of 
these pupils pay at least for board and books and enjoy the instruction 
and guidance of two excellent teachers and the daily oversight of the 
missionary. 

The work of Mrs. Calhoun and her daughter, Miss Susie Calhoun, 
for the women and girls of Shweifat has been encouraging. The girls 
remain in the school to a more mature age than formerly and good 
progress is shown in study and deportment. 

The Maronite bishop recently visited his native village, Dibbeyeh, 
after a long absence. Many of his people expected that he would stir 
up persecution against the Protestants. The Protestants treated the 
prelate with all due respect, and their course was reciprocated. "Our 
teacher, a near relative of the bishop, went with him from house to house. 
Religious conversation was not avoided, and the Maronite dignitary 
showed himself much enlightened and disclaimed several errors of the 
Romish Church." While still there a Protestant lad of the village died 
at Ain Zehalta school, expressing a firm hope in his Saviour and a desire 
to be with Him. When the news reached Dibbeyeh, the bell of the Mar- 
onite church was tolled in token of sorrow, and the bishop visited the 
afflicted family at once, saying to the assembled company " that the 
relatives of the deceased had great occasion for comfort, inasnuich as 
a youth of such a character and strong faith had undoubtedly been 
taken to heaven." This shows a remarkable change of feehng in a 
direction least expected. 

The prospects of the Kefr Shima church are better than for some years 
past. The school at Wady Shehroor has grown despite the assaults of 
the bishop and clergy. In Abeih 3 have united with the church. A 
woman's class, sometimes numbering 80, was conducted with profit by 
the ladies of the mission during the summer. 

At Deir el Komr, notwithstanding the mflux of French infideUty, 
the schools and the general work have prospered and religious instruc- 
tion has been prominent. In Ain Zehalta 3 were added to the church, 
and Protestantism is intluential. Mrs. Watson's school is very success- 
ful. At least a dozen villages in this district are very desirous to have 
schools established in them. 

In the village of Abeih 4 young women united with the church. All 
of them were taught in mission schools. A Sunday-school, averaging 
over 100, has been conducted every Sabbath, and the work among 
women has been earnestly pursued. Forty dollars were contributed 
for benevolent purposes. 

Aramun, called the "Sleepy Hollow" of the Lebanon, is gradually 
coming forward with overflowmg congregations and a declared Protest- 
ant community of 60 souls. 

In respect to contributions for general benevolence and educational 
purposes, commendable progress has been made. These aggregate 
$1,130, of which sum over $500 is subscribed to general benevolence. 
In El Haddeth the Protestant community contribute regularly toward 



MISSION IN SYRIA. 



49 



a building fund for a chapel. They have contributed at the rate of 
$2 per member, and hope to do better in the future. In many parts 
of the field the people are showing a spirit of self-help in the matter 
of educating their children, which is highly gratifying. 

Sidon Station. ' 

The year has been one of gratifying progress. Twenty-three out- 
stations have been occupied, of which three are new. One of these, 
Jezzin, is of special importance, being one of the largest towns of 
Southern Lebanon, and a government centre as well as a Maronite 
stronghold. All sorts of violent threats were uttered by its fanatical in- 
habitants, and prodigious efforts made to crush out the mission schools 
for boys and girls. 

On the side of Mt. Hermon, 4,000 feet above the sea, is the village 
Shibaa, proverbial for its rude people. Here new work was begun, the 
people furnishing the school-room, a room for the teacher, and paying 
about $17 in money. 

A reorganization has been effected, by which 4 churches have been 
increased to 9, as follows: Sidon, 43 members; Alma, 21; Kanah, 
16; Hasbeiya, 57; Ibl, 29; Jedeideh, 19; Kheyam, 54 ; Mejdel, 14; 
and Mejdeluna, 40. Church sessions are being ordained in the new 
organizations. 

Divisions have been healed and a good state of feeling exists among 
the churches. Fifty-four have united with the church on profession 
of their faith, of which number about one- third are the children of 
Protestants. Among those admitted was a Metawali Moslem, who ex- 
hibits the strongest evidence of saving faith in Christ. 

The Sidon Seminary continues its good work, though with a reduced 
number of pupils. At the close of last school year Miss Eddy left for 
America, to gam much-needed rest and strength.* Miss Bessie M. Nelson 
has been in charge, efficiently assisted by Miss Sarah A. Ford. Mrs. 
F'ord has also taught a class in the Harmony of the Gospels, and given 
religious instruction on Sabbath evenings. An excellent spirit per- 
vades the school, and since last report 4 pupils have made profession 
of their faith in Christ. There is an average attendance of 75 in the 
day department. 

The boys' training-school has been carried on with 27 boarders pay- 
ing about $400, which sum covers all expenses, except teacher's salary. 
Seven boys, trained in this school, have entered the Beirut Protestant 
College. 

A Bedouin boarding-school, supported and managed by the native 
churches, has been opened at Jedeideh. It is an experiment from 
which good results are anticipated. Board and lodging are furnished 
free to any boy who comes from the'desert tribes. A sum sufficient to 
meet these expenses has been subscribed among the churches, and an 
excellent man, Abu Asaph, who has traveled extensively among the 
Bedouin tribes, and has an intimate knowledge of their habits, has 
been selected to take charge of these " sons of the desert." 

Special prominence has been given to the preaching of God's Word. 



50 ANNUAL REPORT. 

Stated services have been maintained in 25 places, being an increase 
of 6 since last report. 

A colporteur has been regularly employed, visiting the fairs held in 
the Merj Ayun district, and canvassing the villages. He has sold many 
Bibles and books to the pupils of Greek as well as Protestant schools. 
The Sidcm church made a contribution for Bible distribution, and sent 
two persons to leave cojjies of the New Testament in villages entirely 
destitute of the Word of God. Each book was left, as a loan, witl» 
some responsible person who could read. 

Thirty-one schools were in operation during the year, attended by 
1,679 pupils, and an average of 1,338. Of these 209 are in the higher 
departments; 325 were Protestants, and 340 Moslems, Jews, and 
Druzes. Some of the older schools have grown, especially in numbers 
and efficiency. Among them are Hasbeiya and Jedeideh, where more 
than 100 boys are attending each school. One result of these schools 
is, that It is no longer regarded as a scandalous sin to attend Protestant 
schools ; while at the same time the Greeks have been compelled to 
open schools of their own, in which Protestant methods and text-books 
are used. 

Progress is shown in the financial results of the year. The fees in 
the day-schools have amounted to $136, and in church support and 
general benevolence, $451 have been raised, while over $900 have 
been paid by students attending the Sidon Training-School and the 
college at Beirut. In various parts of the field buildings have been 
enlarged and improved, and in Sidon arrangements are making for 
building a new church. 

A Roman Catholic monk has renounced his errors, and, having 
withstood the false accusations of his former co-religionists, is now a 
faithful Christian teacher. 

A Metawali boy, taught in mission schools, has applied for baptism. 
He attended regularly upon the services while in Sidon. Some of his 
former friends followed him from his native village, and, on leaving 
church, he was set upon by a mob, beaten, given to the soldiers, and 
put in prison. After his release the doctors of the Metawali faith la- 
bored with him in vain. His friends finally cast him out, renouncing 
all claim upon him and all relationship with him. It costs something 
for a man to change his religion in the East. 

Tripoli Station. 

During most of the year Rev. S. Jessup has been alone at the cen- 
tral station of this large field. In A lay last Dr. Calhoun performed a 
simple surgical operation on a Moslem child, but, owing to the lack of 
efficient nursing in her home, erysipelas set in and caused the child's 
death. The city health officer, a bigoted Maronite, moved by the 
basest motives, endeavored to have Dr. Calhoun arrested and tried be- 
fore a native commission. In consecjuence of threats of violence Dr. 
Calhoun went to Beirut in June to see what could be done to restore 
peace; the case was carried by him to Constantinople, where after 
much tlelay his diploma was approved according to Turkish law. The 



MISSION IN SYRIA. 51 

authorities, however, have done nothing to restore his sign which was 
torn down by the TripoH poHce. Dr. Calhoun has, meanwhile, been 
laboring with success within the bounds of the Lebanon government. 
He treated, during the year, 1,922 patients, of which number 802 
were surgical cases. 

The Greeks, by far the largest of the Christian sects in Tripoli city 
and port, have been stirred to a remarkable zeal during the year. 
They seem to fear extinction, and to have formed a determination to 
overcome Protestant influence and teaching, if they can. They have 
succeeded in breaking up the boys' high-school in Tripoli, at least 
temporarily, and propose to destroy the girls' school. The boarding 
department in this school has increased to 13, against 9 last year. 
These girls are gathered from the confines of Tripoli station, two from 
Gherzooz, and two from Mahardeh. In spite of the hostility of the 
Greek church, there is every reason to believe that a great future is be- 
fore this school in raising up teachers and doing for the women of 
Northern Syria a greatly needed work. Although the loss of Miss 
Cundall is greatly felt, yet there is no falling off in the number of day 
pupils, 84 being in attendance. Very commendable progress has been 
made in all departments of study. 

The various services on Sunday and through the week in the city of 
Tripoli have been well attended. The Sunday-school has grown in 
interest. The services at the port, together with the Sunday and day- 
schools, have not been so well attended as last year. A permanent 
place of worship, owned by the Board, is a necessity, the supply of 
which, it is hoped, may soon be realized. 

"The Tripoli, Hums, and Hamath carriage road," the second great 
thoroughfare in Syria, is about to be opened. It has 75 miles of com- ' 
pleted road, and must be the beginning of great changes in Northern 
Syria. 

Great interest in spiritual things has characterized the year in Ma- 
hardeh. The brethren meet almost nightly, and read the Bible and sing 
hymns, often till midnight. When a preacher recently visited them the 
meetings continued almost uninterruptedly from Saturday evening till 
Monday, the room being crowded till midnight, scarcely giving time to 
eat. 

The Hamath schools grow in popular esteem, and in Hums the 
Gospel is taking deep root ; 200 children are in the day-schools and 
half that number in the Sunday-school. The brethren were instru- 
mental in reforming a drunkard, who brought his wife with him to 
church. She said "the reHgion that gave her back her husband and 
made a man of him and led him to care for her soul as well as her 
body, was the religion that Hums women wanted, and that no priest 
ever helped her or her husband." 

" The apostle to the Nusaireyeh," says the mission report, " has not 
yet appeared, and little has been done in this great field." In the 
Husn and Safita districts the schools have been well attended. Great 
interest is shown at Amar, where 4 have united with the church. These 
being the first church members in that part of Husn district, strong 
opposition at once sprang up. The old priest made a false charge 



52 ANNUAL REPORT. 

against these Protestants before the governor of the district, but 
was turned out of court. Then a bkistering monk from the famous 
convent of St. (ieorge came to the village to collect the tithes. He 
sent word to the sturdy teacher that he was coming, first to overcome 
him in discussion and then to administer a sound thrashing, for " per- 
verting the children of the orthodox church." The teacher quietly 
laid out his Bible on the table and a heavy oaken cudgel close at hand 
and sent word to the noisy monk that he was ready to try conclusions 
with him in both sorts of contest. The monk avoided Protestant 
polemics, and on his return was severely rebuked by the abbot for 
bringing disgrace upon the convent. 

In Akkar region new ground has been occupied, while in the Leb- 
anon districts old schools have been closed and new ones opened. 
The boys' school at Amyun has 90 pupils. A good girls' school has 
been begun there and another at Bishmezzin. 

Three were admitted to the church in Kusba. A new school for 
boys has been opened at Batrun (ancient Botrys), a seaport of Leba- 
non, a centre of the sponge fisheries and a Maronite stronghold. 
Maronites, Greeks, and Moslems united in the petition for this school. 

During the year 48 employes were at work ; 22 persons were added 
to the church, 19 on profession of their faith ; 32 schools were carried 
on, while about 1,200 children were under instruction. This field con- 
tains over 1,000 cities, towns, and villages, and more than one-half of 
the population within the bounds of the Syria mission, while the mis- 
sion of the Board is the only evangelical agency in this field. 

Zahleh Station. 

The members of this station were called to mourn the early death 
of Anna L. March, the infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. March. 

Much work has been done and gratifying progress has been made 
in nearly all parts of the field. Seven persons united with the church 
on profession of their faith. Some of these were the direct fruits of 
faithful personal effort and earnest prayer. The opposition of the 
papal sects continues in Zahleh and has resulted in a great multiplica- 
tion of schools, there now being 37 teachers and 1,000 scholars, of all 
sects. \x\ Zahleh or Maallaka, services are held every day of the week. 
The preaching services and the Sunday-school have been well attended 
and with increased interest. 

The boys' high school numbered nearly 50. The standard of 
scholarship has been raised to meet the demands of the work. 

In Maallaka boys' and girls' schools have been well sustained. The 
peace of the church has been disturbed by the defection of one of the 
most influential members. He has not gone back to his old sect, and 
hope is entertained that prayers in his behalf will be answered. Sys- 
tematic giving has occupied much attention and is awakening greater 
interest in the church. 

Twenty-two common schools have been maintained in as many dif- 
ferent places. There have been in attendance 717 pupils. The 
school at Talabayeh, which was largely Moslem, has been given up 



MISSION IN SYRIA. 53 

for the present from lack of a suitable teacher. It was in this village 
that the Moslem Khoteeb (preacher) asked the son of the Sheikh 
"Who was Jesus Christ?" and received as answer, ^'■The Son of 
God, the Saviour of the world.'" 

At Khurbeh the girl teacher from the Sidon school, and only church 
member in the village, has carried on her school despite the determined 
opposition of priests and the most influential men of the place. 

The prospects in Cob Elias are very cheering. The people take an 
intelligent interest in their school and the religious services, contrib- 
uting regularly toward their support. " A young man of this village 
who left home without even a bed, because he was a Protestant, re- 
cently came into possession of a little property, and was enabled to 
enter the preparatory department of the college, with a view of be- 
coming a mission teacher." 

In the villages of Meshghara, Koraun, and Furzul the schools are 
well attended and interest in religion is increasing. Forty persons in 
the first of these villages recently declared themselves Protestants. 

In Al Hadesh the way was prepared by the colporteur. A Meta- 
wali Moslem has learned to read and bought a large copy of the Tes- 
tament and Psalms, which he reads aloud upon the housetop and in 
the vineyards. Another man has read his Bible so diligently that he 
has become famous and has been compared with M. Ibrahim, " the 
walking concordance." 

The priest of Shelifa has forbidden his people to kiss the pictures 
of the saints. The older people attend Sabbath-school. 

At Baalbec, the first outstation in importance and the centre of a 
large number of villages, the work is being pushed with much vigor. 
Great opposition has been aroused by the bishop, Jesuits, nuns, and 
certain influential men. It is proposed to build a church at this point. 

A good beginning has been made at Ras Baalbec. These rude and 
lawless people are already appreciating the advantages of a school 
among them. Eight or ten have recently declared themselves Prot- 
estants. 

Systematic giving has been productive of good results in this field. 
In the village of Zahleh $127 have been raised, and the contributions 
from other outstations aggregate #93. A large number of promising 
lads and young men from this part of Syria are pursuing their studies 
in the departments of the college at Beirut, paying largely for their 
privileges. 

Statistics of Syria Mission. 

Ordained missionaries 14 

Female missionaries 20 

Native pastors 4 

Licensed preachers 31 

Teacliers ,. 160 

Total force 202 

Number of churches 19 

Communicants 1,036* 

* Owing to an error in the Abeih report of i8Si, the whole number of communicants was given 
as 1,008. The number added in 1882 was 109. 



54 ANNUAL REPORT. 

Added during the year lOQ 

Preaching places 89 

Sabbath-schools 80 

Pupils in same 2,915 

Contributions $2,122 

Girls' boarding-schools 3 

Boarding pupils in same I03 

Common schools HQ 

Pupils in same 4.974 

Total pupils in all schools 5. 815 

The Press. 

Pages of Scripture 8,245,600 

Total pages books, tracts, and periodicals printed 20,190,600 

Books bound 25,266 

Pamphlets bound 57.3i6 

Types cast 520,000 

Miscellaneous printing, pages 239,952 



MISSIONS IN PERSIA. 

Western Mission. 

Oroomiah (near Lake Oroomiah) : occupied as a mission station of the Americau 
Board, 1834 ; transferred to this Board, 1871 ; missionary laborers— Rev. Messrs. B. 
Labaiee, Jr., John H. Shedd, D.D., James E. Rogers; Joseph P. Cochran, M.D., 
and their wives ; Mrs. D. P. Cochran, Miss N. Jennie Dean, Miss Mary K. Van 
Dozee, Miss Agnes Cary. 

Tabriz : Rev. S. L. Ward and his wife ; Rev. John N. Wright ; Rev. Samuel G. 
Wilson ; George W. Holmes, M.D., and his wife ; Miss Mary Jewett, and Miss 
Mary A. Clark. 

Eastern Mission. 

Teheran : Rev. Messrs. James Bassett, Joseph L. Potter, and W. W. Torrence, 
M.D., and their wives ; Miss Anna Schenck, Miss Cora A. Bartlett. 

Hamadan ; Rev. James Hawkes ; Edgar W. Alexander, M.D., and his wife ; 
Miss Annie Montgomery. 

In this country : Rev. J. M. Oldfather and wife ; Mrs. L. C. Van Hook and Miss 
Sarah J. Bassett. 

Rev. James E. Rogers and his wife, Edgar W. Alexander, M.D., 
and his wife, Miss Annie Montgomery and Miss Cora A. I3artlett 
sailed from New York August loth to reinforce this mission field. 
Rev. J. M. Oldfather and his family returned in the summer for the 
benefit of their health. Mr. Labaree has remained during the year, 
prosecuting the work which took him to Constantinople. 

Owing to the great distance between some of the stations, the 
lack of railroads, and even roads for travel, the diversity of lan- 
guage and other causes, it was deemed wise to divide the mission 
into Eastern and Western — .he two stations Oroomiah and Tabriz 
falling naturally into the one and Teheran and Hamadan constitut- 
ing the other. 



MISSIONS IN PERSIA. 55 

Western Persia Mission. 

Oroomiah. 

The work embraced in this division is the oldest, and from the 
state of things in the nation it has been confined mainly to the Nes- 
torians. Evangelistic labor is gradually extending, as the following 
summary of operations shows ; it is gathered from full reports of the 
mission. 

The Evangelistic Work continues und^r the joint care of the native 
board and the mission station. The aims are : 

(i) To see that every church and congregation is supplied with 
preaching and pastoral care ; that every place where a congregation 
can be gathered is occupied as fast as men and means are provided, 
and that as far as possible the Gospel message is proclaimed to every 
soul. 

(2) To see that the congregations grow into churches and are 
grouped together when necessary for self-support and efficiency of 
labor. (A church can be organized when there is a body of faithful 
Christians sufficiently strong to furnish ruling elders and one-fourth 
of the preacher's salary.) 

(3) That the churches advance to be self-supporting and aggres- 
sive—that obstacles to their growth be removed and every means 
used to save souls. 

(4) That the preachers employed have sufficient support and 
show faithful and efficient labor and that the congregations give ac- 
cording to their ability to the support of these preachers and to 
other Gospel work. 

(5) That places of worship be provided in all congregations as 
fast as practicable. (The rule is for all such buildings : One-third 
from the people and two-thirds from the mission.) 

The foUowmg summary of statistics shows in part the encourage- 
ment and success of the year : 

Laborers in evangelistic work. Total number 70 

Of these, who acted also as teachers 31 

" " " are fully ordained pastors of churches 16 

" " " " " " ministers 28 

" " " " licentiates and winter helpers 30 

" " " " theological students, working in vacation 12 

Aggregate of work done 49 jts. and 6 mos. 

Of this, the part paid for by the people 11" " % " 

" " " " " " " " mission 37 " " 8J " 

Organized churches 20 

Congregations, many of them with communicants 60 

Other preaching places 42 

Total of preaching places 122 

(All of these are in S^'riac but five, which are in Tui'kish.) 

Added on examination 200 

Total of communicants 1,576 

Average of Sabbath attendance 4,581 

Total of contributions by the people near $2298 

The Educational JVork is also under the joint care of a native 
board, and of the mission station. The results of the year are 
summed up as follows : 



56 ANNUAL REPORT. 

Total under iustruction 2,286 

Of these, in the college W 

" Female sonilnary 48 

" high schools 82 

" villaee schools 2,102 

" Jewish boys 12 

" Syriac-speaking boys 1,605 

" " " ^irls 529 

" Armenian boys 97 

" Moslem boys 40 

" " ffirls 2 

" Kurdish boy 1 

The Nestorians. — These figures show that the Nestorians are the 
people to whom the Gospel is preached more fully than to any other 
on the field. To bring them as a people under the influence of the 
Gospel and to build up among them a true and living church is the 
object specially kept in view. They are limited in numbers and the 
papal monks are at work disputing the ground at every point. But 
as the only one of the Semitic races where evangelical truth has 
found a lodgment, and as the remnant of a missionary church, this 
work should be maintained. Though few in numbers as are the 
Waldenses or Moravians, yet as a witnessing church they are the 
chosen means of God to show His power and glory to many times 
their number of unbelievers. 

Education. — The college and female seminary for the higher edu- 
cation and for intermediate and village schools for the masses, with 
'the orphanage of Miss Good for girls and of Shamasha Khnaneshoo 
for boys, both of whom are supported from England, furnish ample 
educational facilities for the Nestorians. The competition raised 
by the papal monks and nuns is the only special drawback in work- 
ing this plan. 

"Mission work now embraces nearly all the Nestorian villages and 
hamlets of Oroomiah. But in very many of these the papists have 
also opened schools, and in some are building places of'worship, and 
are trying to induce the people to follow them. By means of a 
home for poor orphan girls the nuns have in the last few years 
trained up and married off over two hundred young women. They 
make it to the advantage of young Nestorians to marry these girls, 
as they give with each one a nice outfit instead of exacting heavy 
expenditure, as is the old custom. The only condition is, that the 
young man will join the papal communion. In this way more than 
any other real additions have been made to the papal community, 
as these girls, trained from childhood, continue firm and sincere ad- 
herents. But they not .only offer free schools, but add shoes, 
clothing, and a variety of flattering inducements that poor people 
without enlightened consciences can not resist. This seriously affects 
every effort to develop among the people an intelligent instinct in 
education and secure from themselves support. On the one hand, to 
allow the papists to gather the children and leaven their minds with 
fatal errors is a risk to immortal souls. On the other hand, to open 
entirely free schools so as to induce the parents who are indifferent 
or who prefer our instruction, but not enough to pay a cent for it, is 
to thwart our effort to help the people to help themselves. This 



58 ANNUAL REPORT. 

question is a perplexing one and we would be glad to have an ex- 
pression of the opinion of the Board upon the subject." 

Several of the nineteen organized churches have been refreshed 
by revivals. All but two have received new members, and to the 
nineteen, no have been added by examination. The congrega- 
tions not yet organized into churches have also been blessed and 
sixty-one have been added on profession. Some of them can soon 
become fully organized churches. Two new places have been oc- 
cupied by preachers. One is in the papal quarter of the city. A 
good man who died a few years ago left his property to the mission- 
ary work. This property, next door to the monks' establishment, 
has now come into use by the death of his widow. At the same 
time several prominent Catholics left the monastery and formed with 
others a good congregation, who enjoy the services of a preacher. 
The other place is in Suldooz, 50 miles to the south. Two churches 
and several congregations are vacant or supplied temporarily. 
Future growth must be within the parishes already occupied ; and 
for this there is great need of faithful laborers and the mighty 
working of the Spirit. 

" The Field in Kurdistan is beset with many difficulties. The 
lack of government and the insecurity of life and property are the 
great outward obstacles. But within also are difficulties. The 
mountain clans are much divided among themselves and have 
awakened very slowly to the value of the true Gospel and to the de- 
sire of education. But there is progress and the way is open to in- 
crease our work in several places. The Kurdish power is broken, 
and since the capture of Sheikh Obeidullah in November the pros- 
pect is good for a season of peace. Mr. Wahl, the agent of the Pri- 
mate of all England, is opening a few schools and endeavoring to 
revive the Old Nestorian Church. We have opened two new places 
by stationing preachers, and six new places by schools. The one 
church in Hassan Bootan is suffering from the oppressions of Kurds. 
Coming upon the great poverty, caused by famine, these oppres- 
sions bear very heavily upon the poor people and threaten to scatter 
them unless relieved. Four have been added to this church and 
twenty-five to the other congregations in the mountains. Malek 
Petros, one of the most influential chiefs in Tiary, is a firm friend 
of the truth. We have begun to build a good school building in 
his village near the site which Dr. Grant selected forty years ago. 
This will be a high-school for young men in the very heart of the 
mountains. We have also adopted the plan of sending college stu- 
dents and one of their teachers into the mountains for the long 
vacation. Thus we can provide schools for places when there is a 
desire for light. The difficulty of superintendence in that Alpine 
region will still remain." 

At the meeting of the Native Synod, the first week of November, 
the committee on the mountain work brought in the following rec- 
ommendations, which were discussed and adopted. They had no 
faith in Mr. Wahl's mission, as they said, and so recommended : 



MISSIONS IN PERSIA. 59 

" I. That we request the missionaries to ask of the Board in 
America two missionaries to form a station in the mountains. 
2. That if possible some of our best men from Oroomiah enter the 
mountain work for five years. 3. That by all means a high school 
be provided and well manned for the mountaineers." " The third 
recommendation we are fulfilling. As to the second, the difficulty 
is to spare good men from posts where they are already indis- 
pensable. The first is the old problem, no nearer solution than it 
was twenty-five years ago. It would be practicable if we had a de- 
voted unmarried man, for him to do great good by spending a part 
of each year at the new school in Tiary, and from there aiding the 
work. As it is, with a missionary tour every year, with a yearly 
conference and institute such as we had last summer for the workers, 
and with an increase of young ministers of consecration and 
ability there is hope of a rapid increase of results." 

TAe Native Workers. — " There are eighty places now calling for 
trained and devoted workers such as should graduate from our 
theological course. Of these, seventeen posts are vacant and sixty- 
three are occupied. Two have been removed from the roll during 
the year : one by death and one by failure of health, and four young 
men completed their course and joined the ranks. If we class the 
sixty-three laborers as good, fair, poor, and very poor, there are 
19 classed as good, 22 as fair, 17 as poor, and 4 as very poor. 
These very poor ones will have to fall out. Others have labored 
over 30 and some over 40 years, and in the course of nature must 
soon rest from their labors. We are often perplexed by this ques- 
tion : Is it better to leave a field vacant or to supply it by a poor 
laborer .? Another question is : What shall be done to support 
those who are superannuated in the work and are without means of 
their own .'' Another very pressing question is : How to keep our 
preachers from going into debt or involving themselves in worldly en- 
tanglements while, at the same time, they provide something for their 
families and for old age ? In an old country where the avenues of 
enterprise are few and the battle of life is a hard struggle, the prob- 
lem of a minister's family is very different from that in America. 
And so of old age. Yet the conditions of a successful ministry are 
the same : a good educational training, faith in God and consecra- 
tion to His service, and with these relief from undue worldly anxi- 
eties and temptations. I have thought that possibly some kind of 
savings bank would obviate the trouble." 

The Armenians are an important part of the population in Salmas 
and some other places. The mission have sent an earnest and 
strong appeal for a station at this point to be occupied by a foreign 
laborer. There have been schools in two of their villages the past 
year, and some of them, in Nestorian villages, are members of the 
church. 

The Jeivs, whose ancestors were brought to these cities of the 
Medes more than twenty-five centuries ago, are here in considerable 
force, near 500 houses in Oroomiah city and many smaller commu- 
nities in other places. They are despised and oppressed and are 



6o ANNUAL REPORT. 

still looking for a Messiah to come. One of the college teachers 
visits them very often, reasoning with them out of the Scriptures. 
Last winter there was an opening and one of the students started a 
school, and for a time a company of young men seemed much in- 
terested, but without any positive results. 

The Persian Mussulmafis. — Many of them are open to religious 
conversation and itinerant efforts as in former years. A private 
Sabbath service and Bible class have been held for the converts 
from Islam and others who often attend with them. Miss Van 
Duzee has held a similar service for women. Kasha Yacob, who is 
supported by his friends in England, has similar meetings, attended 
often by twenty or more. In a few minds in the city there is a 
genuine interest. In the villages our evangelist reports opportuni- 
ties to preach often to large numbers of attentive hearers. He 
finds nearly always an open door and some inquiry and conviction. 
The Bible is also read by some, and thus in many ways Christ is 
lifted up. With all these opportunities to sow the seed, there is 
little hope at present of opening schools, gathering congregations, 
or planting churches among the Mussulmans. Last spring the gov- 
ernor closed the school for boys and ordered the girls to leave the 
female seminary. As soon as an organized and continued effort is 
apparent, some one makes complaint and the law is enforced and 
the work broken up. One by one thej Mussulmans may privately 
join the Christian assemblies, and thus some be saved. 

Medical Work. — This department has occupied much of the 
time of Dr. Cochran, who has visited the hospital, the dispensary 
in Oroomiah and large numbers in the village and in the town. 
The Westminster Hospital was completed during the year. " It is," 
says the doctor, " a commodious and pleasant refuge for many who 
from the nature of their troubles or from want of proper treatment 
and nursing are suffering and dying from the lack of just what we 
trust they can find in this institution. It is our object, as it is our 
determinatioa, to make this, the first fully-equipped and regular hos- 
pital in Persia, a blessing to many sufferers and a help in other ways 
to the work as a whole." About loo patients, most of them surgi- 
cal cases, had been treated in it. He greatly needs help in sustaining 
many of those who enter it for treatment. Some can pay for their 
board, others can not. A single bed for the year will cost about 
$25. The number of patients in all treated by Dr. Cochran was 
nearly 6,000. 

Printing. — This branch has suffered greatly during the year from 
the want of a superintendent and the absence of several who are 
connected with the press at Constantinople. An experienced super- 
intendent has been appointed, who will soon sail for Oroomiah ; 
2,000 primers in Syriac were published the last year ; also 500 vols, 
of Simple Science, 300 pp. There were 20 issues of the Rays of 
Light, 400 copies of each issue, and some smaller publications. 

Tabriz. 
Missionary Work. — The authorities have never been in sympathy 
with the work at this station and the missionaries find an increasing 



MISSIONS IN PERSIA. 6l 

disposition on their part to annoy. On several occasions persons 
have been arrested for attending religious meetings, and fines im- 
posed, and on one occasion three members of the medical class 
were arrested by the chief of the Ferashes and threatened and then 
let go. These occurrences have been irregular and spasnwdic, but 
they have diminished the attendance at the meetings. 

Since the removal of the girls' school to the new building erected 
for it, services in Armenian or Turkish have been held every Sab- 
bath afternoon in Lalawa in charge of Mr. Wilson. The preaching 
in Armenian has been by Stefan, whose success is doubly gratify- 
ing, inasmuch as he represents the first-fruits of the training-class, 
of which he is still a member. The average attendance has been 
about forty. Regular services have been held in the church, usually in 
Turkish. The missionaries have been able to preach more frequently 
this year than last, owing to the improved health of Mr. Ward, and 
the greater familiarity with the language on the part of Mr. Wilson. 
Mr. Wright has devoted himself to other parts of work with con- 
siderable success. The attendance on the meetings has averaged 
about 60, but has varied considerably, owing to causes mentioned. 

Mr. Whipple has recently commenced a service in Syriac, in the 
reception-room of the dispensary, which is attended by nearly all 
the Nestorians residing in the city. 

The continued threatenings of danger have had a very depress- 
ing influence on the spiritual condition of the church, more, prob- 
ably, than a real persecution would induce. " Danger recognized 
and understood loses much of its terror, and many who are timid 
and irresolute when the evil is impending, are found among the 
most courageous when it proves a reality." There has been an in- 
crease in the benevolence of the church. 

Education. — The boys' school has been very prosperous during 
the year. The training-class has not only supplied an Armenian 
preacher in the person of Haritoon, but has also furnished an effi- 
cient superintendent for the school, whose earnest, consecrated 
efforts to promote its efficiency have had much to do with its suc- 
cess. Soon after the commencement of the winter session the 
school, at that hour not in session, was visited by the Ferashes of the 
Valiyat. A number of the Mussulman pupils, however, were inter- 
cepted on their way to school, and severely threatened. When as- 
sembled the pupils were informed of what had taken place, and 
given their option to continue coming at their own risk or to with- 
draw, but nearly all stood firm and have been regular in their attend- 
ance. Another difficulty in the way has been the competition of 
the Armenian schools, which are well equipped and whose teachers 
receive very large salaries. But in these schools there is little 
taught, either by precept or example, of Gospel truth. 

" The need of a Boarding- School for boys has long been apparent, 
but heretofore it has not been found practicable. This year, how- 
ever, a commencement has been made and the results so far have 
been quite gratifying. It is our desire to make self-support one of 
the prominent lea Lures ot the school, and as lar as practicable this 



62 ANNUAL REPORT. 

principle is carried out. Nine boys have been admitted, of whom 
five remain at present." 

The total attendance at day and boarding school during the year 
was 52, average 30, including 13 Mussulmans, 38 Armenians, and i 
Nestorian. Lessons Avere given in Turkish, Persian, Armenian, and 
English. 

One of the members of the training-class was transferred to the 
medical class, under Ur. Holmes, and subsequently two others were 
transferred. It is hoped that they may thus find an enlarged sphere 
of usefulness as witnesses for Christ. 

The girls' school was removed to the new building in October, 
and with the greatly increased accommodations its prospects are 
very much improved. Miss Clark has been enabled to resume 
charge of the school, which permits Miss Jewett to give her at- 
tention to evangelical work with the women. The total attendance 
during the year was 25, the average for the latter part of the year 
being 19. The languages taught are, Persian, Armenian, Turkish, 
and English, with the various elementary branches, singing, house- 
work, embroidery, etc. Regular religious services have been held 
with the women by Miss Jewett, and the attendance has been good, 
but the interest manifested has not been as great as could be de- 
sired, many coming out of curiosity rather than for religious in- 
struction. Miss J. has also made many calls, for religious conversa- 
tion, upon the women in their homes. " The year has been an 
eventful one, in the fact that it marks the erection of the new school 
building, now nearly completed, and having accommodation for 40 
boarders, a commodious room for women's meetings, besides the 
school and class rooms, and apartments for three missionary ladies. 
Also the erection, on the same grounds, of a residence for Mr. 
Ward. Both these buildings are very substantially constructed and 
present a very pleasing contrast in appearance to the majority of 
the Persian houses about them. The people regard the erection of 
these buildings as an indication that we have come to stay, and we 
trust that long before time has rendered them unfit for occupancy 
there shall be no need for missionaries in Persia, because of the 
perfect accomplishment of the work of which we are now but laying 
the foundation-stones."' 

The Medical Department. — Dr. Holmes gives the following ac- 
count of this new work : " It is now fairly established, and the 
beginning is made of a work which is destined, with God's blessing, 
to have important results. One of my former pupils in Oroomiah, 
Mirza Shimoil, who afterwards pursued his studies with Dr. Coch- 
ran, makes a very efficient dispensary assistant. He, with the two 
remaining members of the original class, graduate in medicine the 
coming summer. The three other young men previously mentioned, 
all of whom are very promising, and all members of our church, 
converts from Islam, are also pursuing medical studies with me. 

" The attendance at the dispensary, which was very large during 
the summer, was interrupted by my absence at Maragha and 
Oroomiah, but has again become so great as to make it difficult to 



MISSIONS IN PERSIA. 63 

see all who come. The reading and exposition of Scripture and 
prayer is a part of the regular order in the dispensary, and thus 
many hear the Word who would not otherwise come within sound 
of the Gospel. 

" The need of a hospital in this great and destitute city of 
200,000 souls is very great, and I trust the way may soon be opened 
for the erection of a suitable building for that purpose. 

" A not unimportant feature of my medical work relates to con- 
sultations with native physicians, who frequently call upon me for 
advice, or to decide between their conflicting opinions. Some of these 
are crude enough, yet I have been surprised to find here several 
physicians and surgeons who are really very well informed. These 
have, however, in every instance been instructed by European pre- 
ceptors. I may mention that one of my former pupils, who studied 
with me for a time in Oroomiah, has now the post of regimental 
surgeon in the Persian army, and has recently received a decoration 
from the Shah for his services in the Koordish war. Whether 
worthily bestowed or not I can not say." 

Translation. — The abridgment of Mosheim's "Church History " 
has been translated by Mr. Wilson as far as to the sixth century, 
and the translation of Ray's " Practical Arithmetic " carried forward. 
A mental arithmetic has been transferred from the Osmanli Turkish 
to this dialect. Miss Clark has completed the translation of the 
"Child's Gospel History." Mr. Ward has translated from the Os- 
manli, a commentary on the Sermon on the Mount and on Mat- 
thew. The work of translating Guyot's Geography has been 
carried on by Mr. Wright. 

Outstations. — The church at Maragha has had to endure severe 
persecution during the year by the Armenians. The utmost power 
of the Armenian hierarchy was put forth to crush the little band of 
believers, and for a time they were fearful and dispirited. But 
God overruled all the designs of their enemies, and as a last resort 
the khalifa, or archbishop, visited the scene in person. But he also 
failed, and the work has gained in strength from the efforts of its 
enemies to overthrow it. One person was received on profession 
and three on probation. The average attendance at church was 37, 
Sunday-school 22. The day-school has suffered most from the per- 
secution, but a few have been kept together. The pastor and wife 
reach many by personal visitation and receive many calls for re- 
ligious conversation. He reports open doors at Shashavan, Benab, 
and other places visited during the year. A preacher was stationed 
at Meandaiib during a portion of the year, and was warmly received. 
A school was also conducted for a time at Berabad. At Ilkachee the 
teacher, who is son of the chief of the village, reports the average 
attendance at 11. At Khoi the work, which had been suspended 
by the death of Kasha Shimoon, has been reopened by Shamasha 
Werder. The khalifa wished all his people there to give a pledge 
not to furnish a house for our services or school, but he has been 
found fighting against God, and his purposes have come to naught, 
while he himself has been called to give account of his deeds to the 



64 



ANNUAL REPORT. 



Judge of the quick and dead. Kazar, an Armenian educated at the 
college, has charge of the school. Attendance at preaching is good. 
Social religious meetings are held every evening, attendance 15 to 20. 
Attendance at school 15. Some work is also done in the surround- 
ing villages. The two helpers' wives engage in evangelistic work 
with the women. 

The work in Ardabil has been suspended owing to the impossi- 
bility of finding a suitable helper to station there. 

Tours have been made during the year to Khoi by Mr. Wilson 
and Dr. Holmes, and to Maragha and Syinkala by Mr. Wright. 
" In every place visited there is an apparent anxiety to hear the 
truth, but too often it is as seed sown by the wayside, which Satan 
soon steals away, and yet doubtless in many cases that we know not 
of, the fruits of these distributions of the Word are silently matur- 
ing, to be made manifest in God's own time. In Maragha we re- 
ceived frequent calls from a Hajji of noted probity and influence, 
whose familiarity with the Scriptures was surprising, and who made 
no secret of his belief in Christ. But the saving faith which is 
ready to endure ostracism and persecution for Christ's sake is too 
seldom found. 

" Deacon Baba has made several tours during the year, and now 
for several months he and Shimoon have been touring in the Cau- 
casus. They report the people everywhere eager to hear the Word, 
and were religious freedom permitted, a great work might be done 
beyond the Aras." 

Summary. 







Missionaries & Helpers 


1 








-73 






Schol. in Schools 




Am 'r'n 


Native. 


Bdg. 


Day. 






Names 
















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u 




































































of 


















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a 


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tc 


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0) 























Station 


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00 
















2 -J^ 

2.2 


Ph 








Q 

73 




CO 












i 


aud 


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.2 


T3 


p 




•6 




to 


be 

s 


.fel 


■o 


■o 


■s 




§ 


a 

n 


"S 












f, 


Outstations. 


N 
u 

OS 



1873 
1875 
1879 
1880 




a 

V 


3 


'G 
"7. 

1 


CO 

•'3 

a, 

r-l 

4 


1 



1 


2 
1 


-§« 

4 2 
3 

1 
1 


OS t3 

3 


< 

9 

1 


£ 

< 

5 


-S 

« 

4 


■1 


£ 



y, 
6 


o 
H 

49 
5 


c 


$76 


<i5 
9 


.2 

'a 

B 

23 


43 

20 
15 
11 


-a 
a 

2 


3 

a 

IS 


1 


Tabriz 


4 83 


Maragha 

Khoi 




2U 
15 


Ilkachee 


11 


Perobad 


188^ 






4 


1 


3 


1 
10 2 




_ 


5 


4 


1 


~6 


54 


$76 


9 


_ 


b 


2 


_ 


6 


Total 


3 1 


310 


23 95 


4185 










Eastern Persia Mission. 
















Tc 


he 


ra7t 


, 



























The responsibility of missionaries for allowing Mohamme- 
dans to be present at religious services was removed by the Per- 
sian authorities, as stated in the last Annual Report. When 



MISSIONS IN PERSIA. 6$ 

this was done the chapel in the district of the Shimron gate 
which had been closed was then opened, and services in Persian 
have been regularly held in it on every Sabbath since that event. 
The pupils of the girls' and boys' schools have been attendants of 
this congregation, together with a few Jews, Mussulmans, and Ar- 
menians. The usual attendance has been about eighty souls. 

Services in English were begun by Mr. Bassett, on Christmas-day, 
in his house, and were continued until the time of the annual dis- 
persion of the Europeans for the summer months. During the 
winter a subscription, amounting to ^1,200, for the construction of 
a cemetery and chapel for Protestant Europeans, was raised by 
Mr. Bassett. In November last the services in English were re- 
opened ; the two clerical missionaries of the station preaching in 
alternation. 

Two religious services, in Persian, on every Sabbath were held in 
the chapel near the Casveen gate while Mr. Potter resided in that 
quarter. Since his removal to the north side of town, the services 
on the mission premises have been conducted alternately by the 
missionaries. 

Schools. — Three day-schools for boys have been maintained most 
part of the year. The school for the children of Jewish parents 
was opened early in the year at the request of the elders of the 
Jewish community, and has numbered from forty to sixty boys. 
The teachers have been two Jews, one of whom is a member of the 
church. No opposition has been started to the work, and the num- 
ber of pupils might be greatly increased. The studies are prose- 
cuted in the Hebrew, Persian, and English tongues. Instruction 
in English has been introduced within the last three months. 

There is a great need of a high-school or seminary for the boys 
and young men, in which the pupils can be separated from the evil 
influences of their homes. The beginning of such an enterprise 
was made last spring by the transfer of the Armenian pupils from 
the eastern quarter of the city to the mission premises. For the 
lack of suitable buildings it has thus far been a day-school, with 
from twenty-five to thirty-five boys as pupils. Many applications 
for admission have been received from Mussulmans. They have 
invariably been referred to the Persian authorities for permission, 
which has never been reported as granted. 

The school in the chapel near the Casveen gate has been very 
small. Since last spring all the schools for boys have been under 
the supervision of Mr. Bassett. The number of male pupils in daily 
attendance on all the schools has been about one hundred. 

The demand in the way of education in Teheran is for that which 
is European. There is need of a first-class Protestant school in this 
city. If the present opportunity is not improved for this purpose, 
it will be great injury to the work. The sum of $4,000 is needed 
with which to erect suitable buildings. 

The girls' school shows that during the year forty-five pupils 
have been enrolled, and the average attendance has been twenty- 

5 



66 ANNUAL REPORT. 

one. The religious services held in the school have been frequent. 
The report mentions the religious interest of this year as more 
'* thorough, deep, and lasting than at any previous time." Several 
important points are sought to be attained in carrying on the school, 
viz. : I. To take pupils while yet very young. 2. To keep the 
school open during the entire year. 3. To make the English lan- 
guage the medium of instruction. 

Books and Colportage. — This department, in charge of Mr. Potter, 
shows that 1,220 volumes of Scriptures have been sold, valued at 
$272 ; 433 volumes have been granted, with a value of $74; 617 
volumes of text-books have been sold, worth $132 ; and 349 vol- 
umes granted, worth ^62. 

Book-rooms have been kept in the cities of Teheran, Resht, 
Kome, Yezd, and Mashhad. The amount of sales in religious and 
text-books shows an increase of seventy-five per cent, over those of 
the preceding year. It is worthy of note that the work of Scripture 
distribution was not interfered with by the Government during the 
year. Mr. Whipple, agent of the Bible Society, furnished consider- 
able grants for this department of the work. 

Medical Department. — This is the first year of the medical depart- 
ment of the work. Up to January i, 1883, Dr. Torrence has given 
more than 4,539 prescriptions. He has seen, in ten months, 3,352 
persons, and has received the sum of $412. The doctor has rendered 
much service to Europeans as well as to native Persians. A hospital 
for Persians and Europeans is one of the proposed objects to be at- 
tained as soon as possible, and one, of which, there is great need. 

Native Church. — The additions to the church in Teheran have been 
four, one of whom is a Jew. Three young Armenians have recently 
been examined by the session preparatory to admission to the church. 
There have been several removals and one death. The total mem- 
bership is now twenty-nine. The contributions for the year have 
amounted to the sum of $85. The church has suffered a felt loss in 
the death of Ustod Ibraheem, one of the organizers of the church, and 
an elder. He was a person held in esteem by those without, for pru- 
dence, honesty, and industry. He was one of the few who received 
no aid from the mission, having never been employed in any capacity. 

The Work in Resht. — Since the occupation of Hamadan, the city of 
Resht has been the only outstation. Near the beginning of the year 
an Armenian, Lazar, who was the first teacher employed by the mis- 
sion in Teheran, was sent to Resht in response to an earnest request 
from Armenians in that place, to open evangelical work there. 
This request was made to Mr. Bassett, as he passed through Resht on 
his return from America, in the fall of 1881. Help was promised by the 
Armenians making the call. The native assistant opened a book-room 
and a school. In time. Sabbath services were held in a room rented 
for the purpose. About thirty tomans, or sixty dollars, have been con- 
tributed in Resht, A congregation represented by ten families has been 
gathered. They desire to organize a church, and want an ordained 
preacher. Some work has been done by I^azar in Anzile, the port of 
Resht. The number of Armenians there is, however, small, but many 



MISSIONS IN PERSIA. ^J 

pass through the place to Resht, and lo other places in Persia. The 
work done in Resht is deemed to be important, and it gives good 
promise of permanent results. The importance of the place in its com- 
mercial relations with the interior of Persia, gives promise of results 
from labor there, much greater than the comparatively small Christian 
population of the town would seem to warrant. 

G^'Oiuth of Teheran, — " There is a marked contrast," says Mr. Hassett. 
" between the condition of Teheran now, and when 1 tirst saw the place 
in J 872. At that time the population was not certainly known, but 
was thought to be about 100,000 souls. The population is now be- 
lieved to be near 200,000. The area inclosed between the old and 
the new walls is rapidly filling up with buildings thioughout the circuit 
of the city. At the rate of progress made in the last five years, the 
vacant land within the twelve gates will soon be occupied. The im- 
portation of F.uropean ways and inventions has been considerable. 
The imitation appears in the buildings, in width of streets, policemen, 
uniforms, carriages, and gas-light and post-oHices. Tiie country at 
large remains in the former condition of poverty and wretchedness. 
There is no attempt at improvement in agriculture nor in the arts. 
The resources of the country remain undevelo|)ed. Something is at- 
tempted in the way of mining, but, as yet, it has been productive of no» 
great results. The taste, so far as developed, ajjpears to be chiefly for 
what is ornamental, and for the lu.xuries of P^aro[)eans. Intellectual 
and moral reformations have not to human judgment begun. Tele- 
graphs and western ornaments and trinkets let in a little light, but 
nothing has come or been accepted which might not easily be lost 
without leaving a trace of good." 

Hamadan. 

Religious Services. — Preaching has been maintained during the year 
in the Armenian quarters, and the attendance has ranged from 70 to 
100 persons. The spiritual interests of the church have steadily im- 
proved, and in the accomplishment of this, there has been a weekly 
meeting of the pastor and elders of the church, together with the Jew- 
ish evangelist and school teachers, where each has told what he has 
done for Christ, and with whom he has held religious conversation. In 
this way they have talked with almost every unbeliever in the com- 
munity in regard to his soul's salvation, and in some cases with excel- 
lent results. The women have also, to some extent, engaged in this 
work, with the result of filling the benches on their side of the church 
to overflowing. 

"Three weekly prayer-meetings have been held, one especially for 
women, which have been reasonably well attended. At the beginning 
of this present year, an afternoon Sabbath-school was started, which 
promises to be one of our most interesting services. On the first day 
there were, in all, about seventy scholars, besides officers and teachers. 
This number has grown since. 

" Saturday and Sunday afternoon meetings have been held in the Jew- 
ish quarter, with an average attendance at the first of the year of about 



68 ANNUAL REPORT. 

twenty-five, but since the persecutions commenced the number has been 
very much diminished. The people are willing to listen to the truth 
at their homes, but the fear of oppression keeps them back from openly 
confessing Christ. 

''Some eight members of the church have been engaged in the traffic 
of wine, etc., but during the year more than half have been induced to 
give it up, and the rest will do so as soon as they can find other means 
of subsistence. We hope eventually to root it out of the community. 
We no longer receive those engaged in this business into the church." 
There have been eighteen additions, one of these by letter, to the 
church duiing the year. The number of communicants is fifty-eight. 

Schools. — During the year the more advanced of the Armenian boys 
were removed to the Jewish school, and this forms the basis of a high 
school. There are about fifty boys in this united school, and thirty 
boys and girls in the Armenian infant-school, which has lately been 
transferred to the charge of Miss Montgomery, to be the beginning of 
the school for girls. "The power of these schools is seen in two direc- 
tions : first, in influencing many grown-up men and women to com- 
mence to learn to read, and some have made commendable progress; 
second, in the oft-repeated request made by Mussulman parents to 
allow their boys to attend these schools. There is now a strong effort 
being made by the authorities to close these schools, which has not yet 
proved effectual, because not based on proper authority. But since 
we are informed that the Minister of Foreign Affairs is not favorably 
disposed to us, we know not when they may be closed, with serious 
injury to our work." 

Bible Work. — The demand for Scriptures in Hamadan is small, but 
the men who lately started through the surrounding villages send favor- 
able reports. 

I Ontstations. — " The first in importance," says Mr. Hawks, " is Sen- 
nah, some twenty-four farsacks, or three days' march, from here. Some 
time ago the Nestorians of Oroomiah interested themselves in their 
nation, as represented in that city by i6o families or more, and sent a 
man there, who made a good impression and some converts. The 
Nestorians there are Roman Catholics, but Protestantism has a num- 
ber of friends among them. I visited the city last spring with two 
helpers, and was able to do little because of the opposition of the 
Catholic priests. This was also the case among the Jews, who are 
said to number 500 houses, but the number is probably exaggerated. 

" Shamasha Pera arrived there from Oroomiah a short time after my 
departure, but because of the opposition to us, he met with a cold re- 
ception at first, expressed in the refusal of a house in which he might 
live. The opposition finally became so strong that the Vice-Governor 
(elt obliged to insist on his leaving the city as a matter of personal 
safety. We have been entirely unsuccessful in our efforts to obtain an 
order allowing him to return." 

'■'■Kermanshah is about four days off, on the road to Baghdad. Since 
Deacon Pera was not able to return to Sennah, he has spent a few 
weeks in Kermanshah, and reports a very interesting work among the 
Jews and Ali-Alahus. There are other places where we shall wish to 



MISSIONS IN INDIA. 69 

open schools and services in the future. Now we are just beginning 
to explore the region off to the east and south." 

Statistics of both Missions. 

Missionaries (ordained) 10 

Physicians 3 

Female Missionaries 22 

Stations 4 

Outstations 90 

Communicants 1,717 

Received on profession of their faith 233 



MISSIONS IN INDIA. 

Lodiana Mission- 

Rawal PiNDi : 170 miles north-west of Lahore ; mission station commenced, 
1855 ; missionary laborers — Miss C.irrie Downs and Miss Margaret Given ; native 
Christian assistants — one catechist, seven teachers, two Bible-womea. Uutstation, 
Murree. 

Lahore : the political capital of the Punjab, 1,225 miles north-west of Calcutta ; 
mission station commenced, 1849 ; miesiouary laborers — Rev. John Newton and his 
wife. Rev. C. W. Forman and his wife. Miss Thiede ; native Chrir^tian assistants — three 
catechists, six teachers, one colporteur. Employed by the mission — Mrs. Ander- 
son and the Misses Harris. 

FiROZEPORE : 50 miles south-west of Lodiana; occupied as a station, 1882; Rev. 
Francis J. Newton and his wife. 

HosHYARPORE : 45 miles north of Lodiana ; mission station commenced, 1867 ; 
Rev. K. 0. Vhattcrjee and Bev. If. Abdullah ; one colporteur, six Scripture-readers, 
and one Bible-woman. 

Jalandhar : 120 miles east of Lahore, 30 miles west of Lodiana; mission .station 
commenced, 1846 ; missionary laborers — Rev. Charles B. Newton and his wife, Jietj. 
Golak Nath, Rev. J. C. Rose ; other native Christian assistants — one catechist, four 
teachers, and one colporteur. 

Lodiana : near the river Sutlej, 1,100 miles north-west of Calcutta ; mission sta- 
tion commenced, 1834 ; missionary laborers — Rev. Messrs. El wood M. Wheriy, Ed- 
ward P. Newton, and James M. McComb, and their wives ; Miss Sarah M. Wherry, 
Miss Annie S. Geisinger, and Miss Lewis ; Rei>. John R. Dales. Native Christian 
assistants — four teachers, six female teachers, and two helpers. Ouistation at 
Jagraon, C. W. Forman, M.D., Rev. Ahmad-S/iah, and one other native helper. At 
Ropar, Rev. Matthias., and Morinda, Rev. Ashraf All ; one teacher. 

Ambala: 55 miles south-east of Lodiana; mission station commenced, 1848 ; 
missionary laborers — Rev. George S. Bergen and his wife, Miss Mary Pratt ; Rev. 
W. Basien, Rev. Sandar Lai ; native Christian assistants — one catechist, four teach- 
ers, one Bible-woman, one colporteur. Outstation at Shahabad — two native assist- 
ants. Jagadri outstation — one licentiate, one helper. Engaged in itinerant work — 
Rev. Marcus C. Carleton and Marcus B. Carleton, M. D. ; one catechist. 

Sabathu : in the lower Himalaya Mountains, 110 miles east of Lodiana ; mission 
station commenced, 1836 ; missionary laborers — Rev. Adolph Rudolph and his wife ; 
native Christian assistant— one helper. 

Saharanpub: 130 miles south-east of Lodiana; mission station commenced, 
1836 ; missionary laborers— Rev. J. F. UUmann and Rev. Henry C. Velte ; employed 
by the mission, Mrs. Mulvany; Rev. Kanwar Sain; native Christian assistiints — four 
teachers, one Scripture-reader, and two female teachers. Outstation at Muzaflaruu- 
gur. Rev , Theodore W. J. Wylie. 

Dehra : 47 miles east of Saharanpur; mission station commenced, 1853 ; mission- 
ary laborers — Rev. David Herron, Miss Margaret A. Craig, Miss Annie Uerron, Miss 
Lizzie M. Pendleton, and Miss R. Evans ; employed by the mission. Miss A. .Wood, 
Rev. O. McMaster ; native Christian assistants — six male and six female teachers. 



70 ANNUAL REPORT. 

and one Bible-woman. Outstation at Rajpore, six miles from Debra — one native 
eatocliist. Woodstock — Mrs. James L. Scott, Miss Annie E. Scott, Miss Mary 
Fullerto!;, and Miss Irene Griffiths, Miss Clara G. VV'illiamson. 

RooRKHEE : 20 miles south-east of Saharanpur ; mission station commenced, 1856 ; 
native Christian assistants — two helpers. 

In thin country ; Rev. Reese Tliackwell and his wife, Mrs. E. A. Morrison, Rev. 
W. J. P. Morrison and his wife. In England: Mrs. J. F. UUmann. In Germany: 
Rev. W. Calderwood and his wife. 

Furrukhabad Mission- 

FuTTEHGUKH : on the Ganges, 723 miles north-west of Calcutta ; mission station 
commenced, 1838; missionary' laborers — Rev. John S. Woodside and his wife; 
Miss Jennie Woodside ; native Christian assistants — one cateehist, four Scripture 
readers, and six teachers. Outstation, Chabramow — one cateehist, one Scripture- 
reader, one colporteur, and one Bible-woman, Qaim-gunj, one cateehist, one 
helper, and one Bible-woman. 

FuEKUKHABAD : uoar to Futtehgurh ; mission station commenced, 1844 ; mission- 
ary laborers —Re v. Messrs. George A. Seeley and George W. Pollock, and their wives ; 
Mis? Elizabeth J. Seeley ; native Christian assistants— two catechists, seven Bible- 
women and zenana visitors, live Scripture-readers and colportem's, and five teach- 
ers. Employed by ti:e mission— Mrs. Brown and Miss Blunt. 

Mtnpurie : 40 miles west of Futtehgurh; mission station commenced, 1843; 
missionary laborers — Rev. James J. Lucas and his wife ; Miss Sarah S. Hutchinson ; 
native Cbrii^tian assistants — live teachers, five catechists and Scripture-readers, 
three zenana visitors and Bible-women, and two colporteurs. Etah, outstation. 

Etawah : on the Jumna, 50 miles south-west of Mynpurie ; mission station com- 
menced, 18(J3 ; missionary laborers — Rev. Thomas Tracy and his wife; Miss C. 
Belz, teacher and zenana visitor; Hen. Nabibaksh; native Christian assistants — five 
Scripture-readers, two colporteurs, one candidate, one Bible-woman, and one female 
teacher. Two sub-stations. 

Allahabad : at the jmiction of the Ganges and the Jumna, 506 miles north-west 
of CUeutta ; mission station commenced, 1836; missionarj' laborers — Rev. Messrs. 
William F. Johnson, D.D., James M. Alexander, James F. Holeomb, and J. C. R. 
Ewins: and their wives ; Miss S. C. Seward, M.D. ; BeiK I. J. Caleb ; native Christian 
assistants — five teachers, four catechists, five Scripture-readers, one colporteur, and 
luur Bible- women. Outstation, Fultehpore — one cateehist, one Scripture-reader. 

GwALioR : mission station commenced, 1873 ; Mrs. Joseph Warren, and Mev. 
Mohan Lai ; two native assistants. 

In this country : Rev. F. Hej'l. 

Kohlapur Mission- 

Kohlapur : 200 miles south-east of Bombay ; mission station commenced, 1853 ; 
taken under care of the Board, 1870 ; missionarj' laborers— Rev. Messrs. Joseph M. 
Goheen and L. B. Tedford and their wives ; Mrs. J. J. Hull ; native Christian as- 
sistants — two licentiate preachers and nine teachers and helpers. 

Ratnagiri : 70 miles north-west of Kolapoor ; mission station commenced in 
1873 ; missionary laborers — Rev. Galen W. Seller and his wife, and two native 
teachers. 

Panhala : 14 miles north of Kohlapur; mission station commenced, 1877 ; mis- 
sion uy laborers — Rev. George H. Ferris and his wife ; Miss Esther E. Patton ; four 
i)at;ve helpers. 

Li thh country : Rev. Joseph P. Graham and his wife. 

Rev. J. J, Lucas and his wife sailed for India in July, on their re- 
turn. 'I'hey were followed in October by Rev. A. P. Kelso and his 
wife, who had been detained at home for some time by the sickness 
and death of one of their children. Rev. James M. McComb and his 
wife, Miss Lizzie M. Pendleton, Miss Clara G. Williamson, and Miss 
Anna S. Geisinger sailed in Seinember, and Rev. Henry C. Velte in 
November. These are new laborers. 



MISSIONS IN INDIA. 7 1 

During the summer, Miss Julia M. Bacon, Mrs. Newton, widow 
of John Newton, M.D., Mrs. Morrison, widow of Rev. John H. Mor- 
rison, D.D., Rev. W. J. P. Morrison and his wife arrived in this 
country. Rev. VV. Calderwood and his family are in Germany on 
leave of absence, expecting soon to return to India. 

Evangelistic operations are confined to the three missions — Lodi- 
ana,Furrukhabad, and Kohlapur. Whatever advance has been made 
has been within the limits of these divisions. The work, as prosecuted 
in India, will be grouped around these. 



LODIANA MISSION. 

This is territorially the largest of the three missions, and there are 
in it ten stations and a number of outstations. At each of the main cen- 
ters all the appliances of a thoroughly organized religious establishment 
are enjoyed. Preaching has been maintained and divine ordinances 
observed. The present continues to be a seed time. No great religious 
awakening has taken place at any point. There are, however, increas- 
ing signs of unrest among the people, and a growing dislike of some 
of their own religious tenets. The Lodiana report gives the following 
account of the religious movement at Ram|)ur : " The peoj:)le who 
are the followers of Hakim Singh continue to grow in numbers ; 
about one hundred adherents, it is said, join tliis band aimually. In 
reply to an inquiry as to what they called themselves, one of them 
said that ' they had no name in particular, but that they believed in 
one God and in Jesus as the true incarnation of God ; that they believed 
they would be saved on account of His having borne the load of sin,' 
etc. — showing that he understood the Gospel way of salvation. When 
asked what the people in the village called them, he said : ' We are 
called Christian,' and acknowledged that this name was appropriate in 
the sense that they believed on Christ, When asked if he prayed to 
Jesus, he replied: 'I do, morning and evening'; and referring to his 
troubles, he said : 'Were it not for this faith I could not bear up 
under them.' 'On the whole,' says the rejjort, 'there is growth, and 
we may still hope, that in due time a harvest will be reaped. They 
always receive us most cordially, and recognize us as the teachers of 
the .true religion.' " 

Rev. Goloknath, of Jalandhar, speaks of the visit of a Mohamme- 
dan of superior intellect, who sought to convince him that the Mo- 
hammedan society is undergoing a change, and that he was working 
out a reformation by reconciling the doctrines of the Koran with the 
maxims of the Gospel. His followers observe no outward religious 
rites, and have taken the name of Taraizis, from the Arabic word 
which signifies duty. The number is constantly increasing. If one 
of them is in distress, or meets with any sudden misfortune, the whole 
fraternity comes forward to help him in his trouble. Others mention 
similar readiness to forsake or improve their old faiths by adopting 
some or all of the teachings of the Gospel. Rev. K. C. Chaterjee 
speaks of a Mohammedan gentleman purchasing a New Testament 



72 ANNUAL REPORT. 

and other religious books for his servant, reading them to him, and 
thus leading him to Christ. He refers to many inquirers in certain 
villages, men who love the Saviour and bow to His name, but who 
have not yet asked for baptism. 

Rev. C. B. Newton, of Rawal Pindi, speaks of the magical effect 
of music in subduing the most turbulent of the natives, and its influ- 
ence at times of leading hearts to receive the truth. An interesting 
weekly meeting is held in that place, and is composed of poor people 
in a poor man's house, which exhibits one phase of missionary work. 
" We go about dusk, and the room soon fills up with the company ; 
most of them are Christians of not very long standing, but a few are 
Hindoos, and one or two are Mohammedans. The occupation of the 
evening is chiefly singing, with instrumental music. The hymns sung 
are mostly of the kind known as bhajans, set to native airs, many of 
which are plaintive and sweet, while some are spirited and lively. 
During the service of song, which lasts a couple of hours, all hearts 
are softened, and the half hour at the close, in which a portion of 
Scripture is read and expounded, is solemn and impressive. After the 
service is concluded with prayer, tea is brought in by the wife and 
daughter of our host, and this terminates the evening, which is both 
pleasant and profitable. Within the year, now closing, three Hin- 
doos have professed faith in Christ, and received baptism at these 
meetings. The last time we met, the old Mohanmiedan baker was 
much affected, and begged us at parting to pray for him." 

It is difficult to tell the numerical force of the churches, as the sta- 
tistical tables, with one exception, have not been received. The 
church at Rawal Pindi received six on profession of their faith, and 
dismissed eleven — present number, thirty-nine. The collection for 
eleven months amounted to about $160. Three were adnutted on 
examination to the church at Hoshyarpore ; communicants, forty- 
nine ; four to the church of Ambala, and three to that of Jallandar. 
Ten were received by the church at Dehra on profession of their 
faith, and seven by that of Saharanpur. The roll of this latter church 
was reduced by removals from the station. 

In most places the missionary is listened to with respect by the 
people ; still not a few are afraid of his influence, and various attempts 
are made to neutralize it. The following plan was adopted in Am- 
bala : " The Word has been preached five times a week in the bazar 
to large and attentive audiences. A few weeks ago the Mohamme- 
dans began to preach in opposition to us on one side of the shop 
rented by us in the city as a preaching-place, and the Hindoos at the 
same time began to preach on the other side ; as there was danger of 
an outbreak on account of the abusive language used by the two par- 
ties in speaking of each other, they were required by the police to 
stop preaching altogether. The Mohammedans are determined to be 
allowed to speak, or to have the preaching of the Christians stopped. 
They will, most likely, be allowed to commence again on condition 
that they refrain from language calculated to otfend and excite those 
of other religions." 

Sabbath-schools are increasing, and many children of heathen 










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Calclitta Sk 







Madras 

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INDIA 



85 iQngitudE last 



74 ANNUAL REPORT. 

parents attend. The I.odiana report says : " In April a Sunday-school 
was started for Hindu and Mohammedan boys, and about the same 
time one was begun for girls in one of the zenana schools. The suc- 
cess of both, so far as attendance is concerned, has been far beyond 
our expectation. Over 700 children have been reached in this way." 

Schools. 

There has been no change in the character of these institutions. 
They are conducted in the same manner as formerly, and embrace 
pupils of various ages and of different religions and classes. In them 
divine truth is taught, seeds of heavenly wisdom are deposited in the 
mind and heart of the scholars, and the moral influences of these are 
gradually enlarging. This is presented in the Rawal Pindi report : 
"The extent to which public sentiment in religious matters is moulded 
by mission schools is not of a nature to be expressed in statistical 
tables, but it is visible in the awakening of independent thought among 
the educated and the comparative laxity of superstitious observances 
among the masses. The strong point of Indian heathenism to-day 
lies in the fact that the women are still its devoted adherents, and in a 
system of religion so essentially interwoven with social customs as 
Hindooism, it is a hopeful sign of the times that female education is 
Ijeginning to excite general interest." In the Saharanpur report Mr. 
Ullmann says : " To show that the religious instruction given to the 
pupils is producing good effects, I will mention two facts : One of the 
pupils was going to be married and all the arrangements for the wed- 
ding were made. On the wedding-day the priest brought in an idol of 
the god Ganesh, telling the youth to worship it. He refused, saying 
that he would rather not be married than worship that idol. As he re- 
mained decided in spite of the priest's remonstrances, the latter had 
to carry away his god and perform the ceremony without it. Again, a 
boy, the son of a Kabirpanthi, saw his father performing his worship 
outside his house in a public place. He found fault with it, saying to 
his father, that in the Bible it was written : ' When thou prayest, enter 
into thy closet, and when thou hast shut thy door pray to thy Father, 
which is in secret,' etc., adding, ' Why do you perform your worship to 
be seen of the people ? ' The father saw that his son was about right, 
and, though he is still continuing his worship, he does it now inside of 
the house." 

The boys' boarding-school building in Lodiana is nearly ready for 
pupils. It will be under the care of Rev. J. M. McComb. The or- 
phanage at Saharanpur has 36 boys. 

Girls' schools are increasing, and there is a growing interest in fe- 
male education. The schools are partly zenana schools and partly 
under the direct control of the missionary. The girls' boarding-school 
at Dehra has had, on the whole, a prosperous year. The number in 
attendance has been 140. Of these, 8 made a profession of their 
faith in Christ. The report speaks of "an unusual interest in the 
nightly prayer-meetings, every girl who is a member of the church 
down to the fourth class taking her turn with the teachers in leading 



MISSIONS IN INDIA. 75 

the meetings. The influence of these meetings upon daily life and 
conduct seems to be greater this year than usual." An encouraging 
work has been started in Anibala. " A man asked to have his wife 
and daughter taught, and a Christian woman was sent to teach them. 
Another man hearing of this, asked to have his daughter taught. 
From this the work has gone on and spread, till now there are 13 
women and girls in twelve different houses being taught by two Chris- 
tian women, all of whom pay monthly fees, graduated according to the 
salary or income of the father or husband. Others are instructed who 
do not pay fees, and many more are eager to be taught who are ready 
to pay ; but there is no other Christian woman in Cantonments fitted 
to undertake such a work. The Christian Vernacular Education So- 
ciety's works are used as text-books." The girls' schools in Saharan- 
pur number 13. Of these, 8 are for Mohammedans and 5 for Hindoos. 
The superintendent of these schools is assisted by 3 Bible- women. 
There are 397 girls enrolled. 

In regard to zenana work, there is in certain places a steady'growth 
of public sentiment in its favor. Mrs. Malvary, of Saharanpur, writes: 
" My happiest work is in the zenana, of which I have 35. Some of 
them belong to very rich men, who have themselves come, asking me 
to visit their women. There seems to be among these poor natives a 
spirit of seeking for a more certain tangible hope in the hereafter than 
their own religions can afford. One woman told me that some time 
ago she and some others, overwhelmed with a sense of sin and misery, 
resolved to steal away from their homes and go to the river Ganges to 
bathe. They were aware that their husbands would prevent it, so they 
stole off during their business hours. I asked whether they did not 
feel quite lightened of their sins and rid of their evil propensities when 
they returned ? They said, ' Oh, no ; on the contrary, we felt much 
worse, and the habit we wished cured grew stronger than ever.' " She 
speaks of the prospect of soon reaching village zenanas. 

Miss Herron writes of a new opening for zenana work in Dehra, 
and of one who had been giving much of her time to it. She spends 
the first hour in every house in imparting Bible instruction. She has 
established a school among the Brahmo Somaj women, all meeting in 
one house. Many of them seem affected by the story of a Saviour's 
love, and one gave evidence that she had accepted Christ as her Lord 
and Saviour. 

This department of work has made great advances in Lodiana. The 
number of pupils under instruction has greatly increased. "There 
is a silent work of conciliating the women and leading them to a 
deeper respect for the Gospel and its messengers. A blind woman 
visited by one of the ladies, has been very much interested in the way 
of salvation by faith in Jesus." Similar statements are found in other 
reports, showing the gradual leavening influence of the truth upon the 
secluded inmates of Hindoo homes. 

Leper Asylums. 

These are found at Lahore, Ambala, and Sabathu. To that of Sa- 
bathu 20 were added during the year. Including three cases of out- 



y^ ANNUAL REPORT. 

door relief, the total who have received the benefits of the institution 
is 105, of whom 79 are males, 25 females, and one is a little child. 
The report refers to the loss the asylum sustained in the departure 
of Mrs. Newton, who had, with her husband, devoted so much 
time and care to it. None of the inmates had united with the church 
during the year. Two applied for baptism, but, needing further in- 
struction, it was thought best that they should wait a little longer. 
''Among the besetting sins," says Mr. Rudolph, "of these poor creat- 
ures, avarice stands out prominent. The leper clings as much to his 
possessions, few though they be, as those that are rich in this world's 
goods. He hoards up from his scanty subsistence allowance some- 
thing for the future, though he knows that he is taken care of while he 
stays in the asylum. He is ready to steal from his fellow-sufferer what 
little savings he may have laid by, and may watch his dying moments 
to gain possession of his little treasures before measures can be taken 
to prevent it." 

"It is curious to notice how carefully the leper nurses his caste prej- 
udices. The disease has made him an outcast as far as he is con- 
cerned. He is turned out of house and home, and is not permitted 
to associate with his nearest relative, and yet, when he comes to the 
asylum, he will not lodge in the same room with people of a lower 
caste." " Often when we watch them making painful efforts to get 
into the prayer-room in the morning, we ask ourselves : Is this a de- 
scendant of that being that was created in the image of God, and has 
sin left him a wreck like this — a mutilated body with the power of lo- 
comotion much impeded, the sense of smell and taste dulled, the eye- 
sight greatly weakened, hearing affected, the faculty of speaking in 
some cases almost gone, and even feeling so far lost that the hottest 
vessels are handled and the hand is burned and the injury incurred not 
noticed till it becomes apparent to the eye ? How true a type this of 
the leprosy of the heart that has no perception of divine things — sees 
no beauty in Christ, is past feeling, etc." The number of cases treated 
medically in the asylum through the year amounted to 2,469, and of 
the outdoor patients who suffered from various diseases, 525. There 
were 38 in the leper asylum at Ambala. 

Medical. — Drs. Carleton and Forman, medical missionaries, have 
been visited by many patients in different parts of the country, and 
whilst giving relief to bodily ailments, they have directed the minds of 
many to the Great Physician and have urged them to turn to Him, 
who alone can heal their sin-sick souls. 

The Press. 

"The work done this year has been greater than for several years past. 
In all, about 180,000 volumes of books and tracts were carried 
through the press during the first ten months of this year. Besides this, 
about two-thirds of the ITrdu Reference Bible has been printed, 
though not reported. In like manner, about one-half of the New 
Testament portion of the ' Bible Stories in Bible Language,' printed 
for the American Tract Society, is not reported in the table of works 
printed this year. 



MISSIONS IN INDIA. 77 

"Among the works published this year are (i) 'The Adam-Zrurati 
Quran,' by Rev. G. L. Thakur Dass, in which Qunin is weighed in 
the balance with the Bible and found wanting. This was first pub- 
Hshed in the ' Nurafshan,' in 1880. It was published entirely by sub- 
scription. (2) 'The f'our Gospels in Kashmiri.' These will bring 
the glad tidings to the multitudes dwelling in the Happy Valley in their 
mother tongue. The remainder of the translation of the New Testa- 
ment, made by the Rev. T. R, Wade [MS. is about to be printed for 
the Punjab Bible Society]. 

" (3) The monthly Handbills in Urdu, published by the Punjab Book 
Society, have reached a monthly issue of 10,000 copies. The whole 
number issued during thirteen months ending December 31, 1882, was 
123,000. 

" (4) ' The Dawn of Light,' in Punjabi, makes a useful addition to 
the vernacular literature of the Punjab. 

" (5) 'The Sermon on the Mount,' printed in Thakrue type, forms 
the first installment of the Holy Scriptures in the peculiar dialect of the 
people of Chamba and the KuUu Valley. The Gospel of Matthew is 
also going through the press. 

" (6) A new Zenana Reader, prepared by A. L. O. E., has been pub- 
lished in Persian Urdu, by the C. V. E. Society. This will be of great 
use to all zenana workers. 

"(7) 30,000 tracts have been reprinted and published in behalf of 
the American Tract Society. 

"We have printed for the same society, 'The Roman Urdu First 
Book,' prepared by Mr. H. F. Bentel, of the C. M. S. mission, at 
Clarkabad. It is compiled in the place of the best primers used in the 
Western countries, the principle being to proceed from combinations 
of the simplest forms to the formation of the more difficult. The pupil 
begins to spell words from the very start, and is able to read easy sen- 
tences before he knows the alphabet. Finally, we have published at 
this press, editions of the ' Westminster Shorter Catechism,' in both 
Persian and Roman Urdu." 

Bible and Tract Distribution. 

" We are glad to report a larger issue of Scriptures this year than 
usual, though there is still abundant room for improvement. The num- 
ber issued last year was only 1,841 Scriptures and portions. This year 
our books show an- aggregate issue of 6,379, most of which were sold. 
The whole number of books and tracts, including Scriptures, issued 
from our Depository this year, was 43,230." 



FURRUKHABAD MISSION. 

In this mission are six stations, eight churches, and several outsta- 
tions. Though the territory is not as large as that of the Upper mis- 
sion, it embraces a thickly settled country, and with the exception of 
Allahabad, no other society is at work within its bounds. No reports 
have been received of the two churches in Allahabad. Regular serv- 



78 ANNUAL REPORT. 

ices were maintained at Futtehgurh, which has on the roll 133 com- 
municants. Three converted Hindoos and one Roman Catholic were 
admitted to this church on profession of their faith. Here, as in some 
other places, the Mohammedans have employed a man to oppose the 
missionaries when preaching in the bazar. He first sought to break up 
the congregations, but the police interfered ; he next attempted preach- 
ing so near to the missionaries as to draw away, if possible, the audiences; 
but his efforts have failed of their object. Nine new members were added 
to the church at Furrukhabad, which numbers fifty-six members. Its 
contributions for benevolent objects were about §50. There are 100 in 
Bible-classes and the Sabbath-school. A Mohammedan and a Hindu 
were admitted to the communion of the church at Mainpuri by bap- 
tism. Total membership fifty-two. The report speaks of several in 
attendance on preaching, who show a deep interest in spiritual things. 
One of these, a young Brahmin, said to Mr. Alexander, not long ago : 
"While I am in church Ustening to the singing of hymns, the prayers 
and the preaching of the Word, I feel strong and ready to profess 
Christ ; but when I go outside and begin to mix with the world I be- 
come weak again." The Sunday-school is largely attended, the aver- 
age being 130. The Etawah church has twenty-nine on its roll, but 
no statistical report of this church and that of Gvvalior has been received. 
The missionaries and native laborers have been busy during the year 
preaching in various places to the unconverted. Mr. Holcomb since 
his return has devoted a portion of his time to visiting the villages 
around Allahabad. This work had been neglected for many years. 
He writes : " During the past year we have tried evening work with 
the help of the sciopticon and singing, and the success is most encour- 
aging. We have sometimes gone to a village after dark and found the 
prospect for attracting hearers most unpromising, but after throwing a 
picture on the wall of a house and commencing the singing, a large 
company has gathered around us. One great advantage of the night 
meetings is that the women come out to see and hear as well as the 
men." He had visited twenty-four distinct villages, some of them very 
large, and was planning to go to others, as there are over forty that are 
accessible to him for an evening visit. He has also made a tour into 
the district, and had visited forty-eight villages, preaching the Word in 
some of them many times. He also spent twenty days, at the mela 
preaching and distributing books and tracts. Mr. Ewing has not only 
held evening services durmg the week in the city, but he has also, as 
opportunity allowed, visited and preached with the catechists in the 
several places selected by them. Fifteen different localities have been 
fixed upon, and four of these are frequented each day by the native 
preachers. Rev. G. A. Seeley spent some time in preaching in the 
Furrukhabad district. He says : " In a large village we found fruit of 
seed sown years ago, special mention being made of a visit from Mr. 
Kellogg and his esteemed wif^, some so far testifying to the power of 
the trutn as to say that they had not worshipped idols since the Sahib's 
visit. At another village we met a most interesting case — a young 
Kayath, who seemed to be a sincere inquirer. He took a copy of the 
New Testament, which I hear he is earnestly studying. The ladies 



MISSIONS IN INDIA. 79 

with the Bible-woman found good openings everywhere, and gained a 
hearing in many zenanas." He reports several interesting cases of 
men who had come to a knowledge of the truth or were groping 
after it, but who lacked the moral courage to come out openly on the 
Lord's side, and to face the trials to which such a step would subject 
them. Among these is a Mohammedan fifty years of age, educated 
when a boy at the Furrukhabad school, who confesses that there he was 
deeply impressed by divine truth. He calls himself a Christian. He 
told the missionary that he read his Bible, prayed and fought hard to 
remember the Sabbath day. This is only a type of many scattered all 
over India, who know the truth and yet fail to make a public profes- 
sion of Christianity. Mr. Alexander, of Mynpurie, mentions several in- 
teresting cases, among others that of a fakir who had visited all the 
places of pilgrimage in the country, and who was sent for by him when 
atone of the outstations. He found him surrounded by many disciples, 
but when alone he told the missionary that for more than twenty years 
he had sought for peace, supposing it could be found only by those who 
performed pilgrimages and other acts of merit ; but since he had been 
reading Christian books which he had purchased, he had come to see him- 
self a great sinner, that all his past efforts were in vain, and that Christ 
only could save. He promised soon to seek baptism. Mr. Alexander 
spent some time preaching in the district and visiting the outstations. 
He reports the completion of the mission chapel in the city, which is 
admirably situated for evening bazar preaching. Nearly $500 were 
contributed by friends of Mr. Alexander in this country, and a similar 
amount in India. 

Education. 

Mr. Ewing mentions the increase in the boys' high-school at Alla- 
habad, having 359 on the roll ; of these, 297 study English, together 
with Sanscrit or Persian, and 62 who are taught entirely in Hindi — all 
study the Bible and recite lessons from it ; a Sabbath-school was 
opened for these scholars : attendance optional. This service has 
been successful and appreciated from the beginning. There has been 
a steady increase until the attendance now ranges from 160 to 200, 
several of the boys walking three or four miles every Sabbath. The 
promise for good is cheering. The number enrolled in the Kuttra 
school is 132. The Maharaja's schools at Furrukhabad are ten in 
number ; they have been carried on as in former years. The number 
enrolled in them and in the Anglo- Vernacular schools is 745. The 
Futtehgurh boys' school is attended by 42 pupils, who are chiefly the 
children of native Christian parents. The girls' school has been 
under Miss VVoodside's care, who has devoted much time to it. It 
has 6t, on the roll, of whom 39 are orphans. In the Anglo- Vernacu- 
lar schools in Mynpurie are 210 boys and 91 in the Vernacular schools 
and ^T,i girls; of this number 30 are the children of native Christians. 

Zenana work has been carried on at all the stations. Mrs. Hol- 
comb, of Allahabad, has spent several days each week visiting the 
zenanas, while the Bible-woman went every day. Between 40 and ^o 
women have learned to read, most of whom are studying the Bible, 



8o ANNUM. REPORT. 

and many of them committing portions to memory. x\t Furrukhabad 
Mr. Seeley reports 21 houses open, with 54 women and girls under 
daily instruction. No account of the work under Mrs. Brown and 
Miss Blunt has been sent. Miss Belz reports that the zenana schools 
at Etawah number 130 pupils, who with few exceptions belong to the 
higher castes. They are all reading religious books. She mentions 
several encouraging circumstances connected with this work. A 
woman who had been ill and nigh unto death said to Miss Belz on her 
recovery : " Since I have been reading in your Christian books 1 
have given up the worship of Hindoo gods and goddesses. I do no 
longer believe in them, for they are all false." Her husband is learning 
to read, his wife being his teacher. When asked what he thought 
of the Christian religion she replied : " Oh, he thinks as I do, and 
that the whole Hindoo religion is false." When several of her pupils 
left school, Miss Belz writes "that she presented them with a copy of 
the New Testament for their diligence. One of them began at once to 
teach her mother and three sisters to read. Another one of high caste 
is teaching her sister-in-law and her niece. It is a fact that girls having 
been in the habit of reading certain books at school love these books and 
prize them highly when they leave it, and as these are all Christian 
books they may by teaching their own relatives to read them become 
the means of spreading the Gospel truth in the dark zenanas." In 
summing up her work for the year, Miss Belz says: "I have been 
with the Gospel message 71 times to the city of Etawah and have 
spent 17 days at Melas near Etawah. Besides this I have proclaimed 
the Gospel 417 times in from 250 to 260 different villages and have 
visited for the same purpose 168 zenanas. My work, monotonous 
though it is, consisting in repeating from day to day the old, old story, 
is a sweet work to me, though my hearers are for the most part very 
stupid. People at home have no idea of the awful stupidity of the 
women here living in villages. But it is cheering to see how the light 
of the truth is gradually dawning upon them, and how by giving Ime 
upon line, here a little and there a little, they are beginning to take in 
the Gospel plan of salvation. Some of them say that they have given 
up the worshipping of idols altogether and that they believe in the Lord 
Jesus." 

Miss Seward, M.D., reports both zenana and medical work at 
Allahabad. The number of zenana pupils varied from 30 to 35, 
who had regular lessons. The number of dispensary patients was 
3,472. "A large proportion of those who have come to the dispen- 
sary have been of the higher castes, and quite often those who come 
for treatment ask us afterwards to their houses." She refers to an un- 
expected opening for work among Mohammedans and their desire to 
be taught divine truth, consenting to study the Bible in the Persian 
character. A new dispensary and other appliances are greatly needed 
to give more efficiency to her work. 

KOHLAPUR MISSION. 

This mission occupies the western coast of India, lying to the south 
of Bombay and is entirely distinct in language from the two al- 



MISSIONS IN IN£)IA. 8 1 

ready mentioned which are situated in the north-western portion 
of the coinitry. It has three stations and four outstations. The 
number of communicants reported is; Kohlapur 73, Panhala 16, and 
Ratnagiri 5. A new chapel has been completed at Panhala. " The 
limits of this field," says the report, " are being gradually extended and 
one of our licentiates has gone to live in a large and important town 
where he has established a school. Moreover, we are asked for 
teachers in other towns ; the force of Christian truth is being felt, and 
the spirit of religious inquiry is spreading." 

The same methods of work are pursued in this as in the other mis- 
sions. The most prominent agency is that of preaching in the lan- 
guage of the people. This is kept up in various forms at each of the 
stations. 

Mr. Goheen reports that at Kohlapur the daily service for prayer 
and exposition of the Scriptures in the home chapel has been regularly 
observed and that the Wednesday evening prayer-meeting and the 
Sunday afternoon service in the city chapel have been well attended. 

There was an average attendance of about forty at the daily morn- 
ing i:)rayers at Panhala; two church meetings during the week — one 
on Tuesday for catechizing, and the other on Friday for prayer, and 
for giving an opportunity to each one to tell of his work done during 
the week. 

On each Lord's day there was a Sunday-school in the morning and 
preaching in the evening. 

In Ratnagiri, divine service was held regularly in the chapel on 
Sunday morning, the average attendance be\ng about fifty-five. On 
Sabbath afternoons Mr. and Mrs. Seller, Miss Patton, and native 
helpers have addressed, or read to, quiet audiences of from forty to 
eighty prisoners in the jail, and the women have been taught hymns,which 
they like to sing. Mr. Seller also reports a preaching service on Sun- 
day and Wednesday evenings in a rented house in the densest part of 
the town, attended chiefly by Brahnians, who are sometimes disputa- 
tious. 

The Sunday school is a great feature of the work in Kohlapur. 
During the year there was an average attendance of 300 in the two 
schools. The children seemed interested in coming, and were 
promptly in their places when the bell rang. Similar schools were 
held at the other stations, though not with the same success. 

Schools. 

Mrs. Hull taught in Kohlapur for a few months in the Christian 
school in the compound, and then opened a school for girls in the 
city chapel in which there are now about twenty girls, mostly Mara- 
this and Mussulmans. As no rewards are given, and parents can not 
see the need of educating their daughters unless they are paid for 
being taught, this attendance is very encouraging. 

Mrs. Tedford also has a girls' school in her bungalow, composed of 
girls of low caste. Some of these scholars have learned to read and sew 
nicely in the few months she has had them ; they can also sing some 
Christian hymns well. 

6 



82 ANNUAL REPORT. 

The two boys' schools in Kohlapur have been very prosperous. 
The average daily attendance in these two schools is 125. 

The Christian school in the compound under Mrs. Goheen's care 
has been making good progress. Towards the end of the year Mr. 
Tedford took charge of a few classes. 

The attendance in the boys' school at Ratnagiri was thirty-five, and 
in the girls' school sixteen. Mr. Seller has assisted several classes of 
young men in their English studies, and with whom he had many con- 
versations on religious subjects. 

The girls' school at Panhala has on the roll fifteen, including four 
boys. This work at some of the outstations is full of encouragement. 
"In April, Khundoo, a licentiate, was sent to Sangli — a town about 
thirty miles from Kohlapur — to open a school. It is composed of 
poor boys, but they are eager to learn. Two of them live in a small 
village two miles from Sangli, and have to swim a large river (the 
Krishna) every morning and evening ; in the cool weather they come 
into school shivering in their wet clothing. Khundoo also preaches to 
crowds in the streets, and has gained access to the houses of a few 
influential natives in Sangli, who wish to know something of Chris- 
tianity." 

The Kodoli school for boys had an average attendance of twenty- 
five, whose steady progress in their studies, evinced faithful work on 
Santu's part, who is their teacher. A few years ago he was a poor, 
ignorant Mahar, but now he ranks high as an instructor. "Twice 
during the year Brahman teachers from the Government school at 
Kodoli have visited Santu's school and expressed surprise at his work. 
This is remarkable, as Brahmans do not, as a rule, take any interest 
in the education of the lower castes. 

"The fathers of some of these pupils are malakaris — necklace wear- 
ers — a species of 'holy' men. These men sent their children to the 
school, hoping that they would learn to read, and then, when grown 
up, would also become malakaris j but now the boys see the foolish- 
ness of such religious actions, and urge their parents to throw away 
their necklaces. 

One little boy, when told by his mother to pour water on the family 
idol, asked, " Why should I give water to the God who created the 
oceans and holds them in His hand ? Why should I give water to 
this stone ? " " True," said his mother. Probably this was the first 
time such an idea had entered her head. 

"Many other children wish to enter the school, but at present there 
is not sufficient accommodation for them. 

" Several of the boys are asking for baptism, and strange to say, their 
parents are willing that they should become Christians." 

But little has been done in the way of zenana work, as there is lit- 
tle or no access as yet to the homes of high-caste women. 

Tours into some of the larger towns and villages were made by the 
missionaries. In one place they had an audience of nearly 300. 



MISSION IN SIAM. 83 



MISSION IN SIAM. 

Bangkok : on the River Meinam, 25 miles from its mouth ; occupied as a mission 

station in 1840 to 1844, and from 1847 to the present time ; missionary laborers — 
Rev. Afessrs. Noah A. McDonald, D.D., and his wife ; Rev. James W. Van Dyke ; 
Miss Mary E. Hartwell, Miss Mary McDonald, MiL-s Laura A. Olmstead, and Mrs. 
C. D. McLaren, teachers ; two native licentiate preachers ; two native Christian 
teachers. Outstation, Ayuthia — two native teachers. 

Petchaburi : on the western side of the Gulf of Siam, 85 miles south-west from 
Banfrkok ; occupied as a mission station in 1861 ; missionary laborers— Rev. 
Eugene P. Dunlap and his wife ; Cliarles S. Sturge, M.D., and his wife ; Miss Mary 
L. Cort and Miss Lilian M. Linnell, teachers; three native helpers. Outstations, 
Bangkaboon and Paktalay, and other places— three native helpers. 

In this country : Mrs. Van Dyke, Miss Coffman, and Miss Hattie H. McDonald. 

Much to their regret and that of the mission, the Rev. C. S. Mc- 
Clelland and his wife were obliged to return home on account of his 
health. It is not expected that he can resume work in Siam, though 
he is anxious, if his health should be restored, to continue his 
labors in some other field. Miss Sarah Coffman and Miss Hattie 
McDonald were also compelled to leave the field on account of im- 
paired health. They are improving by the rest enjoyed at home. 

Rev. James W. Van Dyke sailed in July on his return to his 
work. Mrs. Van Dyke reiriained in this country with their children. 
He was followed in October by Rev. Eugene P. Dunlap and his wife, 
who were glad to resume the labors that sickness had forced them to 
leave. They were accompanied by Rev. C. D. McLaren and his wife 
and Miss Lilian M. Linnell. [While this Report is passing through 
the press, the sad news has been received of Mr. McLaren's death, 
from cholera. He was a devoted missionary, and one of marked 
promise of usefulness]. 

The mission, greatly reduced in numbers, had much trouble in 
maintaining the work at different points — soiTie of it had to be sus- 
pended — and as a result former difficulties that had disturbed the 
mission continued to prevent apparent or real advance. Since 
the arrival of the reinforcement things are wearing a brighter 
hue and times of refreshing from the Lord are not only desired, 
but expected. The testing process has been severe, but it was 
needed and much good will result from the discipline that has been 
exercised. Out of the 81 members in the church at Petchaburi 12 
have been indefinitely suspended. It is hoped that in time .most of 
these will return to their allegiance to Christ and to the fellowship 
of the church. Since the report was sent several of these have 
been restored. 

Services were kept up during the year at the Somray station^ 
Bangkok, by Rev. Dr. McDonald. The attendance was good and 
was composed of the members of the church, scholars of the day- 
schools, persons residing in the mission premises, and outsiders. 
Three persons were received into the fellowship of the church on 
profession of their faith, five members were excommunicated or 
suspended, six infants were baptized. The present membership of 
this church is 46. The church at Petchaburi was for a good part of 



84 ANNUAL REPORT. 

the year without an ordained minister and regular preaching — and 
that when it greatly needed both ; but it was impossible to supply it 
and the other stations with this single ordained foreign laborer. The 
delay in reinforcing this mission is one of the causes of the unsettled 
state of things. No report has been received of the other two 
churches in connection with the Presbytery. 

Educatio7i. — The boys' school at Bangkok has had on its roll 60 
pupils ; average attendance 42. Two-thirds of this number are 
boarders. This school has been taught by Miss Mary McDonald. 
Besides their regular course of studies the children have committed 
to memory the shorter catechism, " Faith and Practice," and portions 
of the Gospels in Siamese. An effort has been made by the superin- 
tendent to secure a larger proportion of paying scholars, but not with 
much success. The sum of $124 has been received from the parents 
of some of the pupils for their board. The girls' boarding-school at 
Bangkok has continued under the care of the Misses Olmstead and 
Hartwell, who have not only enjoyed their work, but have had some 
encouragement in it. The girls have made commendable pro- 
gress in their studies. "Whilst the spiritual condition has not 
been what we should have rejoiced to see, yet many encouraging 
incidents have transpired to prove that the majority of the pupils 
has at last begun to develop a conscience." After giving evidence 
of this the report says : " The Sabbath service conducted by the 
native licentiate, the Sabbath-school conducted by the two mission- 
ary ladies, and the Sunda> night prayer-meeting, together with daily 
devotions and the Friday afternoon prayer-meeting, have been blessed 
to this consummation." One of the scholars has asked for baptism 
and it is hoped that others will also come out decidedly as the 
friends of Christ. The school was invited to place at the Centen- 
nial Exhibition at Bangkok fancy and other articles made by the 
girls, in some cases prepared in the grand hall of the Queen. 
" These were the admiration of the King, who expressed the same in 
emphatic terms to the teachers personally, and afterward proved 
the sincerity of his words by purchasing the entire collection. His 
majesty further attested his approval of the cause of female educa- 
tion in Siam by forwarding to each of the associate principals a 
silver medal, a souvenir of the first exposition in Bangkok." The 
number enrolled during the year was 37 ; of these, 10 were day 
scholars. 

The removal of Miss CofTman and Miss McDonald from Petcha- 
buri threw the whole educational work upon Miss Cort, who was 
able to devote her whole time to it, not missing a single day during 
the year, and spending in the school-room a large part of each day. 
She had charge of five schools and a boarding department. There 
were 2,^ connected with the Howard Industrial School, who spend 
part of each day in learning to sew, and another part in study. The 
garments made by the older ones are sold, for which they receive 
pay — extending from two to eight cents a day. All in this institution 
are required to attend religious services. There were 38 girls and 
8 boys in attendance upon the Glendale school, which is held in 




1AM 



nS Lang. WtMt 



E.C.DRIDGMAN «wARiai.sr,BLwvoBK NWP PUBLISHER. 



86 ANNUAL REPORT. 

the mission compound ; two of this number expect soon to make a 
public profession of their faith in Christ. The Colorado school 
was attended by i 2 girls and 2 boys ; the Market Street school by 
II girls and 2 boys, and the Bethany school by 18 girls and 5 boys. 
There were only 11 in the boarding department, 4 of whom paid 
for their board. The Sabbath-school was kept up after the morn- 
ing sermon. Miss Cort prepared a Life of Christ in Siamese, 
which is now ready for the press. It is a partial translation of 
Yonge's " Bible History." 

Medical. — For a good part of the year Dr. Sturge was the only 
male missionary at Petchaburi. Besides attending to his medical 
practice he taught for a time a school in the Laos village, about 
two miles from the town. This was sometimes attended by 30 
scholars. A religious service was held in the school-house every 
Tuesday afternoon during the dry season. He reports prescribing 
for 4,552 cases, about double the number of the previous year. 
More than half of these were females. "Among the patients," 
he says, " were many Chinese and not a few Buddhist priests and 
native physicians. The surgical operations were about 200. Many 
serious cases, the result of violence purposely inflicted, have come 
under my care during the past year ; among them compound frac- 
tures of the skull, fractures of the lower jaw, arms, ribs and fingers, 
gunshot wounds, etc. All these were intentionally perpetrated, and 
are mentioned to show the moral condition of the Siamese. Pet- 
chaburi has only about 10,000 inhabitants and there have been 
other cases from the same cause which did not come under my 
care." A small hospital built of brick has been completed. In 
the upper story are two wards separated by a central room used as 
a dispensary. " The object of the hospital is to gather in the 
afflicted from the surrounding country that they may be healed of 
their bodily infirmities, and at the same time pointed to the Great 
Physician who alone can heal the soul. We believe that it will 
prove a great aid to mission work in this place." Most of the 
money for this building has been raised by Dr. Sturge. 

The Pi-ess. — Dr. McDonald revised during the year the Epistles 
from Romans to Philemon, inclusive, and printed 2,000 copies. 
There were also issued in Siamese 1,000 copies of" Man the Judge," 
" Religious Balance," 1,500 copies, "Creator and Redeemer," 1,500 
copies, and 1,000 copies of the Shorter Catechism. 

Statistics: 4 churches, 148 members. Boarding-schools: boys 
40, girls 38. Day-schools : boys 37, girls 113. 



MISSION AMONG THE LAOS. ' 8/ 



MISSION AMONG THE LAOS. 

Chieng-Mai: on the River Quee-Pinff, 500 miles north of Bans;li;ok; occupied as 
a mission station, 1867 ; missionary laborers— Rev. Jonatlian Wilson ; Rev. Nfessra. 
Daniel McGilvar}', D.D., and Rev. J. P. Hearst, and their wives ; Rev. S. C. Peoples, 
M.D., M. Cheek, M.D. ; Miss Edna S. Cole, Miss Isabella A. Griffin, Miss Sadie C. 
Wirt, Miss Florence Wishard, and Miss Antoinette Warner. One native assistant ; 
four outstations. 

In this country : Mrs. J. Wilson. 

This mission was reduced during the year to a minimum force — 
having only one ordained missionary who was able to attend to 
the central station and the different outposts. He did what he could 
to maintain services at most of these, and his labors were not in vain. 
When the report of the year was completed, a strong reinforcement 
was on its way — consisting of Rev. Dr. McGilvary and his wife on 
their return, Rev. J. P. Hearst and his wife, Rev. S. C Peoples, and 
the Misses Griffin, Wirt, Wishard, and Warner. These probably 
reached Chiengmai in March. 

Dr. Cheek and his wife greatly feel the need of rest after their 
arduous labors, and are contemplating a visit to this country. 

Through the inability of Mr. Wilson to visit Lakown, no com- 
munion service was held in that church during the year. One of the 
elders was put in irons and imprisoned on the plea of debt, but the 
real reason was hostility to the new religion and to all who favored 
it. This act was therefore intended to intimidate the members of 
the church and all who sympathized with them, and it had its effect 
upon two of its number. Similar attempts to suppress the spread 
of the "new doctrine" among the Karen villages were made by 
the Lakown authorities, and this determination to arrest all aggres- 
sive movements upon their religion, shows that they dread the dif- 
fusion of Christianity among the people. 

" One of the elders of the Chiengmai Church," says the report, 
" was dismissed to that of Moa Dawk Doong. One man who had 
long been careless of church privileges has gone back to spirit- 
worship. Early in the year he was taken with fever, when he was 
persuaded to employ the services of a 'medicine man.' He re- 
covered, and from that time considered himself wedded to the 
spirits of the family clan. When cited to appear before the church 
for this, he replied that he wished his name stricken from the roll — 
adding, that if in the future he fell heir to incurable disease, he 
would come back to the church for help. From what we gather of 
his life since his baptism, we are convinced that he has not known 
what real faith in Christ is, and that his one idea is, Christianity is 
nothing more than matter of mere worldly advantage. There may 
be others in the church like him. Still we judge not. Time will 
try eveiy man's work, and the Lord knoweth them that are His." 

Two of this church were removed by death — one a man of .sixty 
years, and the other a little girl, the youngest of the number. 
They left behind them expression of their hope in Christ. Two 



88 ANNUAL REPORT. 

young children and two adults in Bethlehem church have died. It 
was no unmeaning ceremony for the Christian friends to gather, in 
worship of the blessed Saviour, around the coffins of these little 
ones, and then, in the comfort of faith, to bear them to their graves. 
The religious superstition of this land would have denied them 
coffins, and given them hastier and less seemly burial. The parents 
in their sorrow understood something of the Saviour's meaning 
when He said : "Suffer little children to come unto me, and forbid 
them not, for of such is the kingdom of heaven." 

Death of Loong Nan Inta. — This man was the first convert among 
the Laos of Chiengmai — the first elder in the Chiengmai church, and 
then in the church of Bethlehem. From the day of his conversion 
to that of his death, he was firm in his faith, decided in his convic- 
tions, earnest in his work, and faithful to his obligations. He sought 
to win others to Christ, and the cause is greatly indebted to his 
Christian life and labors. He was taken under the care of Presby- 
tery of Siam, as a candidate for the ministry in 1873, but he was 
unable to go to Bangkok till 1879 fo'' licensure, when he concluded 
that his health was too uncertain for such a step, but, said he, "I 
will do what I can for the Master in the position I already fill," and 
he did it faithfully and loyally, until the Master came for him. 

" When told that he could not live through the day he turned to 
his eldest child and committed the mother to his care. He gave 
his hand to each of us first, then to his dear faithful wife and chil- 
dren and grandchildren, and last to the church members, saying 
to them, 'Be patient! be patient! trust in Jesus, all of you.' To 
his youngest son he said, ' I am walking on the way you all must go ; 
only be ready for our Lord. Oh, my son, do not fall from the right 
path. Trust in the Lord now and do His work as I have tried to 
do. You will suffer many trials, but they will be forgotten when the 
day of reward comes. You plant the rice fields in the water and in 
the rain, but three months from now you will gather the harvest. 
Learn from your yearly work the lesson of life, and strengthen 
yourself in Jesus.' He suffered greatly, but toward the last he lay 
quietly as if sleeping, then suddenly opened his eyes and looked at 
me as if he would speak, but he was not looking at me, for his eyes 
were full of light and joy. A smile passed over his face, and at the 
same instant he breathed his last." 

Religious services were kept up every Sabbath in three of the 
churches and at an outstation some eight miles distant from Chieng- 
mai. Sabbath-school was continued with its wonted interest, under 
the superintendence of Dr. Cheek. Each of the missionaries had 
classes, Mrs. Cheek the women who could not read, she giving them 
oral instruction. The number enrolled was over a hundred, but 
the average attendance was considerably less. 

Medical. — Dr. Cheek reports that there has been a considerable 
increase in the medical work over that of any previous year. The 
number who received medicines in one way or another was about 
13,000, and "the applicants in many cases came from districts from 
which we had not previously had patients, while many of the 



MISSION AMONG THE LAOS. 89 

princes and others from the city who had kept aloof from any con- 
tamination from the hated foreigners, have been compelled to seek 
for themselves or their slaves the remedies which had proved to be 
life-saving to so many others ; so that the foreign medicines have been 
more generally and more thoroughly tested than ever, and their 
effects contrasted with the native methods of combating disease — 
incantation, spirit-worship, sacred water, with or without some rude 
empiricism with native herbs, the bones, teeth, and gall of various 
reptiles and mammals — have given them a wide recommendation." 
This interesting report of Dr. Cheek's may be printed in the Foreign 
Missionary. He pleads earnestly for means to build a hospital, so 
that this branch of the mission work in Chiengmai can be usefully 
extended. 

The Boarding-school\\z.^ to be discontinued. To maintain it would 
have involved an amount of care and physical exertion, on the part 
of Miss Cole, that would have soon broken her down. Its super- 
vision, with that of the whole work at the station with no one to 
help, was simply impossible. It was therefore wise to utilize her 
time and abilities in carrying forward other departments of labor, 
which she has done with considerable success. The school will be 
resumed after the arrival of those who are on their way to assist in it. 
Some eight of the former pupils have been, however, under her 
daily training. Five boys, one of them the son of Princess Ooboon, 
and nephew of the Queen, came to her for daily lessons in English; 
arithmetic and geography are two branches of their studies. She 
has also had a Bible-class, to which she has given an hour or more 
of her time each day. This class has about twenty-five names on 
its roll — twelve of them former pupils. 

During the year, one of her girls, at her suggestion, began 
a school for the little children of the mission compounds. She 
has taught them their letters, and to read for an hour in the morn- 
ing and also to sing the hymns used in worship. Miss Cole has also 
visited at the houses of the villagers as she has had strength. 
All this, with the study of the language, which she continues, makes 
a work that would fill the hands of one in the vigor of health. 
The work of building for the school has progressed but slowly. It 
has been one mainly of preparation. 

" As the North Laos Mission grows in the number of its mission- 
aries — the number of its agencies for the evangelization of the peo- 
ple — the number of its baptized converts, and the number of its 
stations, it calls for the prayers of the whole Church to multiply 
themselves many fold. We are sure these will be offered for us. 
Leaving the old year with God for His mercy, we enter the coming 
one with desire and hope of His rich blessing upon us and our 
work." 



90 



ANNUAL REPORT. 



Church Statistics of the North Laos Mission, for Year ending 
September 30, 1882. 



o 



Added on examination 13 

Dismissed by letter | 1 

Received by letter 1 . . 

Excommunicated 1 

Adults died during the year I 2 



Whole number of communicauts. 

Adults baptized 

Children baptized 

Deaths of children 

Whole number of children. 
Scholars in Sabbath-school. 

Church collection 

Outstation 



83 
11 



39 

102 

$9.51 

1 



2 
27 
3 
3 
2 
23 

$4.'43 



o 



9 

15 

$2.32 



33 



5 

144 
23 
20 

78 

102 

$16.26 



MISSIONS IN CHINA. 



Canton Mission. 

Canton : on the Canton River, 70 miles from the sea ; occupied as a mission sta- 
tion in 1845; missionary laborers — Rev. Messrs. Andrew P. Happer, D.D., Henry 
V. Noyes, B. C. Henry, Wellintjton White, and Joseph Thomson, M.D., and their 
•wives; John G. Kerr, M.D., and his wife; Rev. A. A. Fulton, Mii^s Hatlie Noycs, 
Miss Mary M. Happer, Miss Alverda Happer, and Miss Electa M. Butler ; 21 native 
preachers, 28 teachers, and 13 Biljle-women. 

Ningpo Mission. 

Shanghai : on the Woosung: River, 14 miles from the sea ; occupied as a mission 
station, 1850; mips'onary laborers — Rev. Messrs. W. S. Holt, J. N. B. Smith, and O. 
H.Chapin, Mrs. Holt, and Mrs. Chapin, Mrs. J. M. W. Faniham and Miss Lizzie D. 
Farnham, Bev. Bao-Su-Saiig and Tawj-Toh-Uoonq ; 3 native licentiates, 6 teachers and 
Bible-women. In t/iis cow dry : Rev. J. M. W. Farnham, D.D. 

Ningpo : on the Ningpo River, 12 miles from the sea ; occupied as a mission sta- 
tion, 1845; missionary laborers— Rev. Messrs. John Butler and Wm. J. McKce and 
their wives ; J. E. Stubbert, M.D., and Miss Sarah 0. Warner ; Eei>. Messrx. Zia Tiny- 
iong, Bao-kwong-hyi^ Voh-Confi-eng, Zi-Kyno-jing, Lu (Jing-veng, Yiaiig-Ling-tsiao ; 8 
native evangelists, 8 teachers and assistants. 

Hangchow, the provincial capital of Chekians: province, 1.^6 miles northwest of 
Ningpo : occupied as a mii^sion station, 18.59 ; missionary lubr^rers — Rev. Messrs. J. 
H. Judson anr! Frank V. Mills and thi-ir wives ; Rev. Messrs. Tsang Nyingkwo 2iU(i Tii 
Zang Fofi, 2 evangelists, 5 teachers and helpers. 

SUCHOW, 70 miles from Shanghai : occupied as a mission station in 1871 ; mi.^sion- 
ary laborers — Rev. Messrs. Geo. S. Fitch and J. N. Hayes, and their wives ; 1 licenti- 
ate and 7 assistants. 



MISSIONS IN CHINA. 9I 

Nanking : on the Tanff-tse Kiang, 90 miles from its mouth ; occupied as a mission 
station, 1876 ; laborers— Rev. R. E. Abbey and wife, and Miss Mary W. Niles, M.D., 
and 3 native helpers and teachers. In this cou7itry: Rev. Charles Leaman and wife. 

Shantung and Peking Mission. 

TtTNGCHOW : on the coast, 55 miles from Chpfoo ; occupied as a mission station, 
1861 ; missionary laborers— Rev. Messrs. C. W. Mateer, D.D., and W. M. Hnyes 
and their wives; Mrs. J. M. Shaw and Miss Lillian Mateer, Hcv. Yue Ke Yin; 
3 evangelists and 8 helpers. In this country : Rev. C. R. Mills. 

Chefoo, the chief foreign port of Shantung : occupied as a mission station, 1862 ; 
mis3ionary laborers— Rev. Messrs. J. L. Nevius, D. D., Hunter Corbett and J. A. 
Leyenberger and their wives, and Rev. Gilbert Reid ; Miss Jennie Anderson, Jiev. 
Yuen Kihyin, 2 evangelists and 3 helpers. 

Peking, the capital of the country : occupied as a mission station, 1863 ; mission- 
ary laborers— Kcv. Messrs. J. L. Whiting, John Wherry, and Daniel McCoy and 
their wives ; B C. Atterbury, M.D., Miss Mary E. Barr, and Miss Fannie M. Strong ; 
1 licentiate and 4 helpers. 

Che-nan-Fou, capital of the Shantung province, 300 miles south of Peking : occu- 
pied as a mission station, 1872 ; missionary laborers — Rev. Messrs. John Murray and 
S. H. Hunter, M.D., and their wives and 3 helpers. 

Wei HiEN, 1.50 miles southwest from Tungchow : occupied as a station in 1882 ; 
missionarj' laboreis — Rev. Mt-ssrs. R. M. Mateer and J. H. Laughlin and their 
wives, and Horace B. Smith, M.D., and his wife. 

Canton Mission* 

The mission report speaks witli gratitude of the preservation of the 
health of the missionaries during the year, though death has somewhat 
reduced the force of native helpers. The three churches in Canton 
have all been prosperous, though no unusual ingatherings are recorded. 
To the five churches of the mission the additions have been as follows : 
First church, 42 ; Second church, 52 ; Third church, 7 ; San Ui church. 
10 ; Chik Horn church, since September, when it was organized, 3. 
Total accessions 115 — a gain of over 23 per cent. The successes of 
the year, liowever, are but very inadequately set forth by the mere 
statistics of membership. The general leaven of Christian influence 
is effecting changes which can not be accurately measured. The in- 
fluence of the mission is felt in many ways, and operates through a 
great variety of channels. Preaching the Gospel not only in the 
churches, but also in the street chapels, of which there are 8 in the 
city ; schools, itinerating, medical practice, Bible-reading from house to 
house — all these are co-oi)erating for the one result. In a peculiar 
degree the work of the dispensary helps that of the adjoining chapel. 
The daily preacliing heard in Canton sows the seed of the Word in 
distant towns, while the work done in the outstations strengthens in 
turn that of the congregations in the city. One new church has 
been organized during the year. It is situated in a country town and 
is known as the Chik Horn church. The history of the organization 
illustrates so well the vigorous and self-reliant character of some of 
these outlying churches that we quote the account given in the mis- 
sion report : 

"It was organized on the 30th of September with 21 members; 18 
were from the San Ui church, i from P'irst church, and i from Second 
church at Canton, and i from California. The church is mainly the 
result of the work which centres at the mission chapel, established 



92 ANNUAL REPORT. 

here five years ago. Six of the members are from one village, fifteer> 
miles from the chai)el. Early in the year they commenced, entirely 
of their own accord, holding meetings in one of their own houses reg- 
ularly on the Sabbath and sometimes on week days. These meetings 
have been kei)t up throughout the year with much interest, and their 
effect is evident in the earnest character of the members who live in 
that locality. One of the colporteurs of the mission meets with them 
whenever he can. Another interesting feature of this church is that 
it has undertaken to be self-supporting. On the evening of the or- 
ganization, after the usual Bible-lesson, three months' salary for the 
native preacher was laid down, in good silver, upon the table and then 
placed in the teacher's hands. Those in mission employ, connected 
with the church, all give one-tenth of their salaries, and some of the 
members do the same. One colporteur, whose salary is $5.00 per 
month, gives one dollar a month. This man, the day after one of the 
communion Sabbaths, proposed walking back to his station, 30 miles. 
It was said to him : ' It will be a long walk ; had you not better take a 
boat ? ' His reply was : ' No. I had rather walk and save the money 
for the church.' Not a cent has been drawn from the mission treasury 
since the organization, September 30th. The members have already 
paid the salary of their preacher up to March ist, and the rent of the 
building up to the middle of next June, besides spending some twenty 
dollars for repairs. It is but right to add that they have received gen- 
erous aid from Mr. Jones, of the American Bible Society, who has 
been laboring in that region. Another hopeful feature of the work 
here is that it is reaching the women. Mrs. Noyes and a Bible-woman 
spent a month last year, and a shorter time this year, in visiting the 
women at their homes, and with very encouraging results. Those of 
them who have joined the church are earnest and faithful. Of the 23 
members 7 are women. Statistics : Added on examination since Sep- 
tember 30th, 2 ; received by letter to organize the church, 21 ; adults 
baptized, 2 ; infants baptized, 2 ; whole number of members, 23 ; con- 
tributions, $75.08." 

Regular services have been maintained in the First church by Dr. 
Happer on the Sabbath and during the week ; at the same time much 
attention has been given to the men's training-school. Mr. Henry has 
had charge of the Second church, the preaching in the Treasury 
Street chapel, and the chapel work connected with the hospital, be- 
sides an itinerating work in which 143 villages were visited in the 
interior. He also visited the island of Hainan, whose population 
of one million embraces aboriginal tribes who, it is thought, are more 
teachable than the Chinese, and among whom harvests might be 
gathered, like those of the Karens of Burmah or the original mount- 
ain tribes of Formosa. Mr. Noyes has had pastoral oversight of the 
Third church, together with preaching in the city chapels. He has 
also spent live months in itinerating, penetrating new fields to the 
north and west of Canton, which invite missionary effort on a large 
icale. On every hand the demand for more laborers in the vineyard 
ss so great as to be well-nigh disheartening, in view of our scanty means 
to supply it. Messrs. White, Fulton, and Thompson, though mainly 



MISSIONS IN CHINA. 93 

occupied with the acquisition of the language, have joined in the itiner- 
ating work, and are contemplating the establishment of a new station at 
Linchow. Thus far their efforts to secure mission pro|)erty, except a 
place for a dispensary, have not been successful. The people are 
friendly, but the ruling Mandarin is strongly opposed. 

The men's training-school, under the care of Dr. Happer, has had 
20 students during the year. Four men have been examined with a 
view to employment as helpers. One former graduate has been called 
to the pastoral care of a Chinese church in Honolulu. It is a signifi- 
cant fact that four men from California are now employed as helpers 
by the Canton mission. While the reflex influence of the California 
mission upon the mother country has, perhaps, been exaggerated, such 
acknowledgments of indebtedness as this will show how intiuiately the 
one work of two hemispheres is related. 

The training-school for women, under the care of Miss Hattie Noyes, 
has numbered 42 pupils, while the girls' boarding-school has had 68. 
Eight women and five girls have been received into the church. Three 
women from the school have commenced Christian work and one has 
entered upon the study of medicine. 

During the ten years' history of this school 86 pupils have been re- 
ceived into the church, and 42 have become active helpers. Miss 
Noyes has also had the supervision of two or three day-schools and 
an equal number of Bible-women. So interesting has this latter 
branch of her work become, that, in some instances, large numbers of 
women have come into Canton from distant towns. On one occasion 
over 100 came thus to receive instruction. 

Altogether there are 11 Bible-readers in the employment of the 
mission. The supervision of these with 28 day-schools is divided be- 
tween the ladies of the mission — Mrs. and the Misses Hai)per, Mrs. 
Noyes, Miss Noyes, and Miss Butler. Miss Henry has continued her 
very successful work among the orphans, and Mrs. Kerr has given in- 
struction to native women in her house. 

The boys' boarding-school has been mainly under Miss Butler's 
care, and has numbered 8 boarders and 30 day-scholars. 

The 28 day-schools are exerting a wide-spread influence. The 
total number of pupils under instruction has been 996. Wiio can es- 
timate the influence of this quiet but life-giving instruction of a thou- 
sand youth of both sexes ? 

The hospital work, under the care of Dr. J. G. Kerr, has been great- 
ly prospered. He has had 19,199 out-patients, 1,182 in-patients, and 
has performed 963 surgical operations. During a part of the year 
Miss Mary E. Niles, M.D., now of the Ningpo mission, was under his 
special instruction. Miss Butler is studying medicine ; and several 
natives also have formed a class. 

Dr. Joseph Thompson has secured for his medical work a footing in 
Linchow. A small dispensary has already been opened, and there is 
reason to believe that his medical work will be the means of opening 
the way for spiritual seed-sowing in that important inland city. 

During the year work has been commenced in Macao, where, early 
in the year, a few native Christians, at their own instance, rented 



94 ANNUAL REPORT. 

rooms and began to hold services. Many such evidences of a self- 
reliant and earnest Christian spirit are beginning to appear. 

Statistics of the Canto fi Mission. 

Ordained missionaries, 6, of whom one is a practicing physician, 
one lay physician ; unmarried women, 4 ; native preachers and teach- 
ers, 20; Bible-women, 11; churches, 5; communicants, 571; added 
during the year, 115; contributions, I898 ; training-schools, 2; stu- 
dents, no, 20 male and 90 female; day-schools, 28; total number 
of pupils, 996, viz., boys 557, girls 439; patients in hospital — out- 
patients, 19,199; in-patients, 1,182; surgical cases, 963. 

Ningpo Mission. 

Marked changes have occurred in the Ningpo or Central China 
mission during the past year. The Rev. Messrs. W. S. Holt and John 
Butler and their families have returned after a leave of absence. Rev. 
J. N. Hayes and wife, appointed during the year, have been stationed at 
Soochow, and Rev. R. E. Abbey, who has been married to Mrs. Albert 
Whiting, is assigned to Nanking. Rev. O. H. Chapin and wife and 
Miss Lizzie D. Farnham, newly appointed, have been stationed at 
Shanghai, and the Rev. F. V. Mills and wife at Hangchow. The Rev. 
Charles Leaman and family have returned to this country on leave of 
absence, on account of the health of Mrs. Leaman. Dr. J. E. Stub- 
bert has been removed by the direction of the mission from Nankin to 
Ningpo, where he expects to open a dispensary. 

Shanghai Station. 

Immediately on the arrival of Mr. Holt to resume the charge of 
the press, Mr. Fitch and family proceeded to Soochow. On December 
2d Dr. Farnham was obliged to return to America on account of his 
health, leaving Mrs. and Miss Farnham to pursue their work in his 
absence. 

The boys' and girls' boarding-schools at the South Gate, to which 
their attention is given in part, have been carried on with their usual 
success. During the year there have been in attendance forty-two 
boys and thirty-one girls, the present number being thirty boys and 
twenty-seven girls. In addition to the boarding-schools there have 
been nineteen day-schools, distributed as follows : In Shanghai, 9 ; 
Soongkong, 4 ; at Tsu-poo, 4 ; at An So, 2. These schools report an 
attendance of 358 scholars, 266 boys and 92 girls. Some of these 
day-schools are under Mrs. Farnham's care. 

During the year Rev. Tang-Tah-tsoong was installed pastor of the 
First church at the South Gate. There have been added to it on pro- 
fession of iaith, 17 persons; by letter, 2. The number at present is 
127, of whom 66 are males and 6x females. 

In addition to the supi)ort of the pastor, the church maintains three 
Sunday-schools in Shanghai, Soongkong, and Tsu-poo, with an aver- 
age aggregate attendance of about 500. The church also supports one 
of the day-schools and a Bible-woman. 



MISSIONS IN CHINA. 95 

One of the assistants, Tsu-Tsok-San, a licentiate of Shanghai Pres- 
bytery, was ordained on October 2 2d, and has gone to Nanking as an 
assistant. 

A dispensary which has been opened at the South Gate was under 
the charge of a native assistant, a student of the London mission hos- 
pital, for a part of the year. 

General approval has been expressed not only by the central, but by 
the northern mission, of the manner in which the Press has been con- 
ducted during the absence of Mr. Holt by the Rev. G. F. Fitch. The 
amount of work has been very large, the men having been called to 
work during a part of the night. Most of the work done has been 
strictly connected with missionary enterprise. The work of the Ameri- 
can Bible Society has been kept up and a larger amount of printing for 
the use of the mission has been done than for several years past. 
$2,000 were allowed by the Board in 1882, and $2,500 in 1883 for 
printing in the interests of the various missions. These amounts have 
been taken from the surplus earnings of the press. The press has for 
some years yielded an income to the mission, and the superintendent 
has paid over $5,000 into the treasury of the mission from the earn- 
ings of the past year. The rksnme oi the press work in 1882 is a fol- 
lows : 

VOLS. PAGES. 

For Bible Societies 372,1.50 30,127,100 

Tracts for our Board 263,700 8,04«,400 

Suudries 135,867 6,022,527 

Total 

771,717 44,196,027 

The organization during the year of the Second Presbyterian church 
in connection with the press building was a very important step in ad- 
vance. The Rev. Pow Tsitsai has been called to its jjastoral care. This 
church numbers seventeen members. Mr. Pow has also charge of a 
street chapel in the Peking Road, in which strangers have an oppor- 
tunity every day to listen to the Word. The day-school is also con- 
nected with the press building, and is under the management of Mrs. 
Holt. The nuuiber of pupils is twenty-one. During the year a new 
printing-press was sent out to Shanghai by the Board, and is reported 
as doing most etftcient work. 

Ningpo Station. 

The return of the Rev. John Butler and his family has greatly en- 
couraged the missionaries of this station who during the previous year 
had been overburdened with work and responsibility. The local 
church has received during the year 6 persons on examination, 5 of 
whom were from the girls' boarding-school. Some very interesting 
cases are reported among the converts gained during the year. An 
interesting feature of the work at the Ningpo station is the presby- 
terial boys'-school. This is under the care of a committee of the 
presbytery and is wholly or almost wholly supported by the native 
churches. Its formation marks an important era in the history of this 



^6 ANNUAL REPORT. 

mission, and it looks more like a self-supporting, self- developing Chris- 
tianity than almost any other thing connected with the mission. It is 
at present in a vigorous condition, having an average of about 30 
pupils selected from the different native churches of the presbytery. 
It should be a matter of prayer on the part of the Church that these 
young men thus gathered and trained by the native churches them- 
selves may become bright and shining lights in the diffusion of the 
Gospel. The girls' boarding-school of thirty-one pupils under the care 
of Mrs. McKee, has been prosperous. So far as the limited number 
of missionaries at the station would admit, the work of visiting the out- 
stations has been carried on. Important work has been done by Miss 
Warner in visiting fiom house to house in Ningpo as well as in super- 
intending the numerous day-schools. A new outstation has been estab- 
lished at Song-o, and a suitable house has been secured for holding 
services. At another recently formed station six believers have been 
won to the truth. One of these was converted by a careful perusal of 
the gospel of Luke which he had purchased from a missionary. A class 
for young men has been formed for the purpose of more thorough train- 
ino- for the ministerial work. A good report is given of the native as- 
sistants, who go forth in apostolic style as itinerant preachers of the Gos- 
pel in the widespread Ningpo district. The report urges the purchase of 
a much-needed sanitarium in the mountains near Ningpo. This fortu- 
nately has been assumed through the munificence of a friend, and has 
been authorized by the Board. 

Hangchow. 

With the accession of Mr. and Mrs. Mills this station has only re- 
ceived the same amount of missionary force that it had enjoyed for 
several years past. Although the time of Mr. Mills has been given 
chiefly to the acquisition of the language, and Mr. Judson has been 
virtually unaided, the interests of the mission have been promoted by 
at least a moderate growth. The church in Hangchow has received 9 
members, though but 3 of these were received on profession of their faith. 
The total membership is 58. The Sabbath-school numbers 100. The 
contributions of the church amounted to $130.53. A second church in 
the Hangchow district has received 5 members on profession and num- 
bers 37. This church contributed $84.81. At an outstation is another 
small church of 10 mea)bers. 

The boys' boarding-school, under the care of Mr. Judson, has 
numbered 29 pupils. There are more applicants for aduiission than 
can be received. In the main the school is considered prosperous. 

There are four day-schools, having a total attendance of 70 pupils. 
Three of these are in charge of Mrs. Judson, 

Suchow. 

Owing to the absence of Mr. Fitch for a year, during which he has 
had charge of the press in Shanghai, Suchow has been without a niis- 
sionary and the work has suffered accordingly. We are obliged to give 
the report of membership which we gave last year. The labors of 



MISSIONS IN CHINA. 97 

both Mr. and Mrs. Fitch have been abundant and fruitful in Shanghai 
in connection with the newly organized church at the press buildings, 
and it is to be hoped that with the aid of Mr. and Mrs. Hayes, who 
have been assigned to Suchow, they will be able to raise that station 
to a new measure of prosperity. 

Nanking. 

This station has been more seriously affected by changes in its 
missionary force than any other, not accepting Chinanfou. The ab- 
sence of Mr. and Mrs. Leaman and the removal of Dr. Stubbert to 
Ningpo have for a part of the year left Mrs. Whiting, now Mrs. 
Abbey, alone. Necessary building operations have also consumed 
much time and diverted attention from direct missionary work. Still 
something has been done by native helpers, and in day-schools and 
work among native women. 

The addition of Mr. Abbey to the station and the transfer of Miss 
Mary E. Niles, M.D., from Canton to Nanking near the end of the 
year have given a more hopeful aspect to the work. 

Statistics of the Ningpo Mission. 

Ordained Missionaiics 13 

Male Plij'sician 1 

Unmarried Ladies (of whom one is a physician) 3 

Native Pastors 10 

Licensed Preachers 14 

Other Helpers 29 

Communicants 801 

Added During the Year 49 

Sunday-school Scholars 574 

Pupils in Boardiiiij-Schools 116 

" Day -Schools 557 

Amount of Contributions S911 

Peking Mission. 

The missionaries of the Peking station record with gratitude the de- 
gree of health which has been accorded to its members throughout the 
year. Mr. and Mrs. J^IcCoy have returned to the field after a leave of 
absence, and the mission has been reinforced by Miss Fannie M. Strong, 
who will assist Miss Barr in the girls' school. There has been an in- 
creased attendance at the church and Sabbath-school. Seventeen have 
been added to the church on profession in Peking, and thirteen in the 
outstations, some of whom give unusual promise of usefulness. Work 
has been continued in the street chapel, the services being, for the most 
part, well attended. Many are represented as expressing their belief 
in the Gospel, yet from prudential reasons refraining from union 
with the church. Considerable work has been done in the selling of 
books and tracts in the streets. The native laborers have spent a fair 
portion of their time in the outstations, and Mr. and Mrs. AVhiting have 
also made an extended tour. The boys' school, under the care of the 
Rev. Mr. Wherry, has employed two native teachers, one a graduate 
of Dr. Mateer's school in Tungchow. He is a man of excellent 
scholarship, both classical and scientific. He has been many years a 

7 



98 an:>:ual report. 

Christian, and as such has exerted a good influence in the school dur- 
ing this, his first year. The course of instruction has inchided the 
Chinese classics and the ordinary branches of study, besides daily 
Scriptural studies. One of the more advanced pupils is under the care 
of the Peking Presbytery, and is preparing for the ministry. The num- 
ber of pupils is twenty-six, eight of whom are members of the church, 
most of them having joined recently. The station report adds : " In 
one sense we hope all may be said to be Christians." This school might 
be almost indefinitely enlarged, and its work is exceedingly promising. 

The girls' school has been carried on successfully, though both this 
and tlie boys' school are in need of better accommodations. The num- 
ber of pupils reported in the girls' school is twenty-five. An industrial 
class of various ages has been conducted by Mrs. Whiting, and one of 
the pupils has joined the church. Considerable work has been done 
by members of the mission, particularly Rev. John Wherry, in the 
preparation of books and other much-needed literary work. The medi- 
cal department, under Dr. B. C. Atterbury, has received a great im- 
pulse during the year, in connection with the new building which he had 
purchased at his own expense for the prosecution of his work. The 
number treated at the dispensary in the northern part of the city has 
been 1,560, and at the dispensary in connection with the hospital, 450. 
Since the opening of the hospital in the latter part of 188 1, forty-six 
surgical cases of various kinds have been treated. Most of the jjatients 
have paid something for the food and medicine, thus observing the very 
important principle of self-help according to ability. Attention has 
been given in connection with this medical work to spiritual teaching, 
in order that, coupled with bodily healing, there may be the entrance 
of the Word of Life. 

In relation to the hopefulness of the outstation work. Rev. J. L. 
Whiting reports as follows : " I have been particularly interested in an 
outstation in the northern part of Shantung. We have quite a num- 
ber of men fron) the villages which I have visited in the Pingzuan and 
Zuching districts engaged in business in this city. Several years since 
three of them became interested in Christianity, and finally joined the 
church here. Since that, others have been received. Some have re- 
turned home, and others have come in their places. Those going home 
have carried the Gospel with them. Their families and some of. their 
neighbors have become interested. They have asked us to visit them. 

" During the last year we have twice sent a helper to labor in that 
section. During the early winter he had a daily class of inquirers num- 
bering eight or ten, for about a month. On his return he reported 
that during the Week of Prayer they had felt a special outpouring of the 
Holy Spirit, that nearly all who had met for prayer had been broken 
down with a sense of sin ; that church members and inquirers had con- 
fessed their sins with much weeping, and that several inquirers were 
anxiously looking forward *.o being received into the church. 

"Many people little acquainted with the Chinese think them a stolid 
people, devoid of feeling, but those who have carefully observed them 
become more and more convinced that such is not the case. Some 
missionaries have expressed surprise that we have hitherto seen so lit- 



MISSIONS IN CHINA. 99 

tie apparently deep conviction for sin in connection with the conver- 
sion of individuals, and still less of that general awakening often mani- 
fested in times of revival at home. The facts stated by this helper show 
conclusively that the Chinese are susceptible of religious feeling, and 
that when the knowledge of the truth shall have been generally dis- 
seminated, we may confidently expect powerful awakenings, and multi- 
tudes together turning from heathenism to Christianity. For my part, 
I rather fear that when that time shall come, they will be carried into 
extravagances, than that they will be too little influenced by feeling. 

"As the helper brought an earnest invitation both for Mrs. Whiting 
and myself to visit the villages mentioned this fall, we determined to 
acce|)t. We had a taste of riding on carts and wheel-barrows and 
on donkeys, besides walking for a change. We found more appli- 
cants for baptism than we had been led to expect. Thirteen adults 
were received, and three children were baptized. These persons were 
from three villages, the farthest of which were twenty miles apart." 

The missionaries of the Peking station have never been so greatly 
cheered as now by the hopeful aspects of their work at all i)oints. 
They urge strongly, however, their great need of additional accommo- 
dations, and these nuist speedily be provided. 

Chefou. 

The Chefou station has been reinforced by the return of Dr. and 
Mrs. Nevius, and the arrival in October of the Rev. Gilbert Reid. 
Miss Tiffany has, during the year, been disconnected from the station 
by marriage into another mission. The church and congregation in 
Chefou has been attended with a gratifying success, the growth of the 
congregation having been greatly promoted by the enlargement of the 
church edifice. The number added to the local church is 107. The 
Sabbath-school has been kept up vigorously, and preaching services 
have been maintained in the chapel in the business portion of the city. 

The girls' school, which had been suspended for some time, has 
been reorganized under the care of Mrs. Lyenberger, and an urgent 
request has been sent to the Board for a new missionary to assist in 
instruction. The school formerly in charge of Mrs. Nevius has again 
passed into her hands, having, during her absence, been under the care 
of Mrs. Lyenberger ; and Miss Minnie Berry, of California, has, toward 
the close of the year, been appointed to assist her. 

The boys' boarding-school at Chefou has been successfully taught 
by one of the former pupils. He graduated at the college at Tung- 
chow a year ago. During the early part of the year there was niucn 
sickness in the school. At one time fourteen of the boys were down 
with fever. This caused a serious break in study. The last half of 
the year has been marked by diligent study and cheering success. The 
objects and aims of this school have frequently been referred to in the 
past. Two from this school are soon to enter the theological class, 
and two others will begin the study of foreign medicine. Three of the 
boys have taken prizes for scholarship in the Tungchow college. 

A good work has been accomplished, as in former years, in the in- 



100 ANNUAL REPORT. 

striiction of inquirers and those who are in course of preparation for 
nsefuhiess as native teachers and preachers. These are generally drawn 
from tiie country districts to spend a few months in Chefou, under the 
direction of Mr. Corbett and Dr. Nevius. Mr. Corbett says: "The 
great majority of those who have studied in former years are now liv- 
ing Christian lives, and some of them are very zealous and efficient in 
making known the truth." 

During the summer Mr. Lyenberger had a class of upwards of thirty 
men from different parts of the interior ; now thirty-five men are study- 
ing with Mr. Corbett. They seem to be sincere seekers after truth, 
and are intelligent and thoughtful men. They are much interested in 
study, and may be expected to prove faithful and efficient leaders at 
their homes, which are mostly in new regions from loo to 300 miles 
distant from Chefou, and where, as yet, there are no churches and no 
regular preaching. 

The faithful work of Miss Anderson among the women of the vil- 
lages around Chefou has been pursued with its usual success. It is a 
work whose only attraction is that — the very highest indeed — of win- 
ning souls to Christ. 

Of the country churches, Mr. Corbett says : " My faith has been 
strengthened and my heart cheered by the many evidences which I 
saw of God's power in the hearts of the people while on my late journey. 
The outlook has never been so promising as at present. Seventy-two 
have been received into the church during my autumn journey, mak- 
ing 123 additions in the outstations during the past eight months. One 
of these is a man eighty-one years of age, blind and feeble, but clear 
of mind and of intelligent spiritual understanding. Two others, both 
seventy-five years of age, were received, and still another eighty-seven 
years of age. His case is an interesting one. Having casually heard 
one of the native preachers he requested all his neighbors to certainly 
inform him if the preacher came that way again. An opportunity was 
soon given him to listen again to the truth, which he received gladly. 
Receiving Christ at last, he pressed the missionary's hand and said, 
with tears, ' I am sure God must have jjut it into your hearts to come 
so far to tell me this joyful news. What would have become of me if 
1 had not lived until now'; and he added, ' When I first heard that it 
was 1,882 years since Christ came to save the world and that He had 
commanded His disciples to preach the Gospel to all creatures, I could 
not believe it possible ; for why, then, the delay ? WHiy have I been 
permitted to live to an extreme old age and never, until now, been 
permitted to hear even an intimation of the truth which equally con- 
cerns every human being?' This man had been a skeptic concern- 
ing heathen worship from his childhood, and had refused to worship 
at the graves of his ancestors, at the same time feeling an insatiable 
longing in his heart which nothing could satisfy until he received the 
Saviour." 

Nothing can exceed the interest of some of the incidents given in 
Mr. Corbett's correspondence concerning his field. The following is 
an exan)ple : A Christian man had resolved to remove to a distant 
locality to escape from persecution. Finding a favorable community 



MISSIONS IN CHINA. lOI 

he rented a place of residence and returned for his wife, who, however, 
refused to accompany him. As she threatened to commit suicide if he 
left his home, his plan was abandoned ; but during his visit to the place 
of his intended residence he had preached the truth, and a young man 
who had listened soon followed him to his home. There he became 
more fully acquainted with the Gospel of Life. Returning at last to 
communicate the good news to his friends, he and his father, an older 
brother, nephew, and a son, were baptized. 

Twelve day-schools are reported at the outstations, each of which 
becomes as a city set upon a hill, spreading its influence far and near. 
In every case also the school becomes a church or worshipping assem- 
bly. The report shows great encouragement in regard to native labor- 
ers, who " are trained for their work in such a way as to retain their sim- 
ple habits of life, living cheaply and never losing sympathy with their peo- 
ple." A striking instance is given of Christian devotion on the part of 
a converted Tauist priest, who received baptism about two years since. 
He has set apart his own house as a place of worship, and rented a 
small room near by, in which he lives with his family. " During the 
year," says Mr. Corbett, "it was my privilege to baptize twenty-eight 
persons in his house. The people acknowledge this priest as their 
leader in bringing them to the knowledge of the truth. He now con- 
ducts their worship of God as he formerly led them in the worship of 
idols. His wife's father and brother were of the number thus baptized." 

Tungchow. 

This station has been reinforced during the year by the arrival of 
Mr. and Mrs. VV. M. Hayes, though at the same time it has been de- 
prived of the service of the Rev. Charles Mills, who is in this country 
on leave of absence. The high-school or college, under the care of 
the Rev. Dr. Mateer, has advanced steadily in its course of prosperity. 

There has been a larger number in attendance than in any previous 
year. The average has been sixty-five. The large increase was owing 
mainly to the higher reputation of the school among the Chinese, to- 
gether with the increased number of native Christians in the interior, 
among whom are many who are anxious to secure an education for 
their sons. A goodly number of the new pupils admitted are already 
well advanced in their Chinese studies, several being full-grown men. 
Ownig to this increase in numbers an additional house has been 
secured and fitted up at a moderate expense. More branches have 
been taught than in any previous year. In doing this the chief de- 
pendence has been placed on the former graduates as teachers, and 
they have done most efficient and faithful service. The school has 
suffered from the fact that in the absence of Mr. Mills, Dr. and Mrs. 
Mateer have had their attention called in part to general mission work. 
The school report says : " We have great reason for thankfulness that the 
religious tone of the institution still continues excellent; nearly every 
one of the pupils who is of a sufficiently mature age is a professed 
Christian," Nine were baptized during the year. Three young nien, 
all of good talents, were graduated. One of these has gone to Hang- 



102 ANNUAL REPORT. 

chow to take charge of the boys' school, another has been called to 
Chefoo to superintend the Scotch Presbyterian mission school, and the 
third will assist Dr. Neviiis in his extensive country work. 

In its standard of studies, this institution has all the elements of a col- 
lege. Its graduates are found in various parts of usefulness throughout 
North China ; and there is in contemplation in the immediate future, 
a medical department in which promising young men will be trained 
as Christian physicians. 

The ladies of the station who have wholly or in part acquired the 
language, kept up all their usual departments of labor in schools and in 
labor among women from house to house. 

The opening of the year was saddened by the death of Mrs. Capp. 
All hearts were filled with grief by the loss of one so useful and so well 
beloved. Mrs. Shaw has given most of her time to the school which 
Mrs. Capp left without a head. Mrs. Mateer, although suffering from 
impaired health, has assisted her husband, not merely in the college, 
but in the itinerating work. In the early part of the year she made a 
trip extending fifty miles beyond Wei Hein. A part of the time she 
had no other protector than one of the native helpers. The trip was 
a very profitable one, as very goodly numbers of inquirers were ready 
to hear the truth. Dr. Mateer made two trips dursig the year. Dur- 
ing the second one he was permitted to baptize forty- six persons, most 
of whom were converted by faithful labor on the part of a native helper. 

The attention of the younger missionaries has been given mainly to 
study of the language, though in school work and itineration, they have 
made beginnings, and Dr. Horace Smith has not lacked for opportuni- 
ties of medical practice. 

Wei Hien. 

An important step in advance has been taken in the establishment 
of the new station, Wei Hien, from the missionary force at Tungchow. 
The Revs. Robert Mateer and J. H. Laughlin and their wives, together 
with Horace Smith, M.D., and his wife, have been sent by the mission 
for the occupation of this new and most promising post, which lies about 
150 miles south-west from Tungchow. Land has been purchased and 
arrangements have been made for buildings for the use of the mission. 
A providential gift of $5,000 by Miss S. B. Hill, as almoner of her 
brother, the late James Hill, Esq., has furnished the means for the 
erection of these buildings. The prayers of the Church doubtless will 
attend these young families in their efforts to raise the standard of the 
Gospel and lay the foundations of a Christian church in this promising 
field. 

Chinan Fou. 

This station has been beset for two or three years past with pecul- 
iar difficulties. The loss of its pioneer missionary, Rev. J. S. Mcll- 
vaine, the prestige of whose apostolic labor had apparently given the 
mission a most favorable outstart, and whose private funds had pur- 
chased a church building for the use of the mission, seemed but the 
beginning of calamities. Du-ect obstacles have also been interposed 



MISSION IN JAPAN. IO3 

by the hostility of the people, who even mobbed the chapel, broke up 
the services, and involved the missionaries in questions with the au- 
thorities which have not yet been settled. But it is the firm purpose 
of the Shantung and Peking mis'sion not only to hold on to its work at 
this, the capital of the province, but with the Board's help to reinforce 
the station. An earnest call for two men has been voted by the mis- 
sion. Surely it is not the first instance in which great discouragements 
have fallen upon most promising fields, and it is believed that these re- 
verses at Chinan Fou will, as in niany similar instances, be followed 
by great and rich blessings. 

Rev. Mr. Murray and Dr. Hunter have each, in his sphere, labored 
on in preaching the Word and in ministering to the sick, hoping th it 
brighter days may soon come, as they assuredly will. 

It is the hope of the Board that two young men already under ap- 
pointment may be sent to this remote but promising station. 

Statistics of S/ia/itung and Peking Missions. 

Ordained missionaries, of whom one is a phj'sician 13 

Lay ijliysicians. 3 

Unmarried female missionaries 5 

Native paslors 2 

Other evanirelists 9 

Total number of A)mmunicants 1,476 

Received during year 38'3 

Sunday-school pupils 720 

Pupils in boys' and girls' boarding-schools 102 

Day-schools, boys 2(5 

" girls 30 

Contributions $300 



MISSION IN JAPAN 

Yokohama : on the bay, a few miles below Yedo, or Tokio ; mission begun, 1859 ; 
missionary laborers — James C. Hepburn, M.D., and his wife ; Miss Carrie T. Alex- 
ander. 

Yedo, or Tokio : the capital of Japan ; station occupied, 1869 ; missionar}' labor- 
ers— Rev. Messrs. David Thompson, William Imbrie, George W. Knox, James M. 
McCauley, and Arthur V. Bryan and their wives ; Mrs. Maria C. True ; Miss Kate 
C. Youngman, Miss Sarah C. Smith, Miss Anna K. Davis, Miss Isabella A. Leete, 
Miss Lena Leete and Miss Marj' L. Reede ; six native ministers, names not reported ; 
seven licentiate helpers ; eight helpers not licensed ; twelve students not licensed ; 
eight Bible-women. 

Kanazawa : on the Japan Sea, about 180 miles north-west of Yedo ; station oc- 
cupied, 1879; missionary laborers -Rev. Thomas C. Winn, and his wife; Rev. 
James B. Porter; native assistants. 

Osaka : a seaport in the Island of Niphon, 33 miles from Miako ; station occupied, 
1881 ; missionary laborers — Rev. Thomas T. Alexander and his wife ; Miss Mary K. 
Hesser, Miss Ann Eliza Garvin, Miss Margaret E. Henry, Miss Francina Porter. 

Returning to tlds country: Mr. John C. Ballagh and his wife. 

The death of the Rev. Oliver M. Green, November 17, 1882, was a 
severe loss to this mission. He had returned to this country for his 
health, but his work for Christ and the Japanese was done. He went 
to Japan in 1873, His lovely character, fine talents and scholarship, 
and devotedness to missionary service, secured for him the great regard 
and affection of his fellow-laborers ; and his death in the prime of life, 
being in the thirty-eighth year of his age, is one of the events to beun- 
<ierstood hereafter. Mr. John C. Ballagh and his wife were constrained 



I04 



ANNUAL REPORT. 



by tiie state of their health to withdraw for a season from their efficient 
work ill Tokio. They may soon be exi)ected in tliis country. The 
Rev. Arthur V. Bryan and his wife, Misses Hesser, Garvin, Porter, and 
Henry joined the mission during the year ; and Miss Youngman, with 
improved health, returned to her work in Tokio. The serious illness 
of the Rev. T. C. Winn, following soon the death of their young son, 
was a great drawback to the work at his station, requiring the absence 
of himself and his family for a considerable time after he was able to 
leave his post ; but it is expected that he will soon return to Kanazawa. 
The Rev. J. B. Porter remained on duty there with no associate, meet- 
ing with good encouragement. 

The transfer of the Rev. T. T. Alexander and his wife from Tokio 
to Osaka was mentioned in the Report of last year. And four single 
ladies were appointed to Osaka. This new station thus occupied will 
be regarded as an advanced post in our Japanese field, and one marked 
by favorable conditions. This city is the second in the Empire in its 
population and influence, and it is supposed that it will give access to 
other important places on the eastern side of the country. It will aid 
this eastern side work, wliich was commenced previously at Kanazawa. 
There is still some uncertainty as to the permanent residence of 
foreign laborers, not being one of the ports open by treaty. Osaka, 
one of the treaty cities, is free from this danger of insecurity. The 
three brethren, Messrs. Winn, Alexander, and Porter, and the ladies, 
may all be considered as connected in general with Osaka, even though 
some of them may occupy other places, including Kanazawa, where 
residence is permitted to foreigners. 















'J 






0-S5 


ai'6 


o . 

P5oo 


o . 




Name of Church. 


gi 


MS 


S.2 

c3 t2 


5^ «.2 


.2^ 




o 


3 " 






SCO 












TS 


SJ 








<5 




< 


CO 

















230 


Shinsakae, Tokio 


1873 


13 





108 45 


Sbiba, or Ros^etsucho 


1874 


58 


8 


164 89 


189 


Sumioshicho, Yokohama ... 


1874 


2 




51 70 


177 


Shinagawa, Tokio 


1877 


IP 


(i 


47 Kl 


1517 


Hoden 


187.5 


1 





35 


1Q 


25 


Omori 


1877 
1877 

1877 
1878 



50 

7 

7 




11 

3 


12 

185 

90 

5S 


8 
66 
22 
25 


14 

265 
104 

78 


Asakusa, Tokio 


Ushi Gome " 


Hogo " 


Kiiiii 


1878 


8 


3 


71 


30 


187 


Sakura 


1878 
1879 
1880 


8 
7 


1 
3 


33 

48 


18 
60 


11 

78 


Nihon Bashi, Tokio 


Tanagawa 


Shimonoseki 


1880 
1881 

1S8:J 


20 

15 
7 


2 
4 


28 
37 
''3 


32 
3 


19 

89 
12 


Kanazawa 


Samayamaguchi 


Oue church* 


1882 
1882 . 






20 
15 






One church* 


Totals 




222 


41 


1025 53S 


2995 



* Organized after the statistical table was made ia Tokio, names not stated. 



MISSION IN JAPAI^. ^ 105 

The work of the mission consists in preaching, by foreign and native 
ministers ; teaching in day, boarding, and training-schools ; colporlage 
by native Bible-readers and visitors, both men and women ; and trans- 
lating the sacred Scriptures. The above statement of church sta- 
tistics shows the progress made in the first of these lines of work. They 
are taken from the report of the mission of February 29, 1883, but the 
returns are mostly dated in the preceding December. Besides the num- 
bers given in the table, the report mentions the death of forty church 
members during the year, and the exclusion of fifty more. 

The list of native laborers connected with the mission shows 
a considerable increase, the whole number being forty-one. Forty- 
nine preaching places are occupied in connection with sixteen organ- 
ized churches ; ten are not so connected. Mr. Thompson refers to the 
preaching work at some jjlaces in these terms : " Mr. Knox reports 
the following as the principal items of interest in the churches con- 
nected with our mission in the Eastern Chiu Kwai or Presbytery. 

" I. The organization of a new church in Daillachi, in this city, and 
a church building erected at a cost of 1,600 yen, of which 1,400 was 
paid by the Japanese, .... one man paying over 1,000 yens of this 
sum. 

" 2. The formation of a Home Missionary Society in connection 
with three churches. 

"3. A good increase in the membership of the churches in Asakusa 
and Roget-sucho, 

" 4. An increased liberality in these churches and larger contribu- 
tions for church expense and evangelistic work. 

"5. An interesting work in the country fifty miles from the city on 
the eastern sea-coast of Japan, where twelve men, most of them men 
of education and position, have been baptized by native ministers." 

Mr. Thompson adds : " As to my own work in the Northern 
Chiukwai, I will only say that it has prospered during the year. 
Nearly all our churches there show additions by baptism and some 
liberality. My work among these churches consists of general super- 
intendence and preaching nearly every Sabbath in different churches. 
Also I made an evangelistic tour of one month in the region north of 
this city, as before reported by me." 

Mr. Porter says of Kanazawa in February : " This winter we have 
purchased and repaired a very neat church building for the Kanazawa 
believers. They have borne half of all the expenses, the other half be- 
ing met by private individuals, so that it cost the mission nothing. It 
will seat a little more than 100 persons. Instead of seats we have mats, 
and the audience all sit in simple Japanese fashion. The Christians 
have all shown a very commendable enthusiasm in getting and fitting 
up their church, men and women working industriously to make it neat 

and comfortable We have just opened another preaching place 

in the city, with the special view of holding meetings for such as we 
can not attract to the church." Four adults were baptized in De- 
cember, one of them an officer in the army, formerly a Buddhist priest. 
The work at this station has had marked success almost from its com- 
mencement. 



I06 ANNUAL REPORT. 

The schools of the mission are making satisfactory progress. The 
boarding-school for boys in Tokio reports loi scholars. It was under 
the charge of Mr. Ballagh until his health required him to withdraw 
from Japan for a time. He was assisted by Mr. Alexander until his 
removal to Osaka and by Mr. and Mrs. McCauley all the year. The 
services of Mr. O. R. Benton were engaged part of the year by the 
mission. The studies of this school have been so well conducted as 
to have secured for it a large degree of influence ; perhaps it may be- 
come a school of still higher grade. The proposal to make it a col- 
lege, in which three missions shall be represented, each contributing 
a part of its support, has been favorably received in Tokio, but it is 
not yet settled. " During the year," the report of the mission adds, 
"twelve of the students have united with the church. The first class 
graduated last year, and two of its members are now assisting in the 
school ; one is teaching, and the other, while pursuing his studies in 
the theological school, holds the place of monitor." 

The report of the boarding-school for girls in Tsukiji, Tokio, has 
not been received, but it is understood that this school, under the 
charge of Misses Smith, I. A. Leete, L. Leete, and Reede, has been 
in successful progress. Of the interesting educational and other work 
in Bancho, Tokio, under the charge of Mrs. True and Miss Davis, a 
very favorable account is given by xVIrs. True : 

"We have had under our care during the year an average of 120 
children and young women ; many of these are quite small children 
and are in the day-schools only. The attendance has been quite uni- 
form, and we have been able to rejoice in evident improvement in 
lessons and general deportment. In each department of the school 
Bible instruction is given daily. During the year two of the native 
teachers and four of the pupils have been received into the visible 
church. We have strong confidence that they are truly members of 
Christ's body. All but two of our nine teachers are now professing 
Christians, and we have much comfort in working with them. This 
number includes our private teachers, also one who is studying English 
half of each day. Our Sabbath-school has had an average attendance 
of 6^ pupils and 8 teachers. Beside the school here, one of our 
teachers has taught a class of women in the church Sabbath-school, 
and another has a class of adults in one of our day-school buildings. 
This class is designed especially for the parents of the day pupils ; as 
yet the attendance is small, from six to twelve, but we hope for much 
good from it. 

" We have under our care four Bible-women. To their instruction 
and assistance we have given much thought and time, and have felt a 
measure of encouragement in the work ; but. for want of more time 
and strength for that department, we have feared that less was being 
done than might reasonably be hoped for. No women of experience 
can be found, and to direct inexperienced women requires more time 
than we, with so much school work, can well command. This has 
been a source of much anxiety. Miss Davis has been able to assist, 
throughout the year, in conducting the music in two churches. My 
own work, outside of our own school, has been largely in connection 



MAP OF THE 

JAPAN ISLES. 




I08 ANNUAL REPORT. 

with the Kiyobashi church. It has been a source of joy to me that 
in that church has grown up a sympathy and confidence in my abiding 
interest and love for them. The lack of this was my continual trial 
during my first few years in Japan. The work that we can report is but 
little. May it be ours to know that our few and feeble efforts have not 
been in vain." 

The day-school for girls in Yokohama, under Miss Alexander's 
charge, and Mrs. Hepburn's Japanese and foreign Bible-classes for 
girls have given encouragement ; but no special reports of them have 
been received. 

The theological school, supported by the Scotch United Presbyte- 
rian, Reformed Dutch, and Presbyterian missions, each represented by 
one of its missionaries as a teacher, is considered an important part 
of the missionary work in Tokio. Its report of last year enumerates 
four students in the preparatory class, two in the first year's class, two 
in the second, three in the third, two in the fourth, and six in special 
studies — in all nineteen. The forming of the preparatory class ; the 
question whether the studies should be conducted in English or as here- 
tofore in the vernacular, which was answered by forming two courses 
of studies, one in each language ; and the requirement of a certain 
proficiency in secular studies, and for those in the English course a 
certificate of graduation from an English school of recognized stand- 
ing ; — subjects of no small moment, which were practically adopted 
during the last year, will have a favorable effect on the usefulness of this 
school, as it is expected by the three missions. A Japanese instructor 
was employed in the regular school, and another temporarily in the 
preparatory class. " During the year three students have completed 
the course, and one has received ordination. One had to be dis- 
missed .... and three had their names removed from the roll for 
irregular attendance and failure to reach the minimum required in 
recitati-ons and in class examinations." Besides Mr. Imbrie, who is con- 
nected with this school as one of its three permanent instructors, Mr. 
Knox, of our mission, gave valuable assistance in its duties. 

In translating the Scriptures, Dr. Hepburn was occupied most of 
his time, as he has been for several years ; this year his work was 
chiefly on the Old Testament. " He has finished the book of Prov- 
erbs," Mr. Thompson reports, " which has not been published yet. 
He has also revised Mr. F.'s translation of First Samuel, and he is 
now engaged on the book of Jeremiah, which he hopes to finish in 
two or three months. Besides the above mentioned work he has 
preached frequently and prescribed for the sick at his own house." 
Mr. Thompson speaks of his own work of translating the Scriptures, 
besides his work among the churches, preaching nearly every Sabbath, 
and evangelizing tours ; he has " finished a translation of the book of 
Genesis, and given it into the hands of the Revision Committee. This 
translation was begun several years ago by a committee in Tokio, but 
one after another withdrew until I was left alone to finish it." 

No report has been received from Osaka, but no doubt good efforts 
have been made in missionary labors at that station. 

The general outlook in Japan is favorable to the spread of Chris- 



MISSIONS TO THE CHINESE IN THIS COUNTRY. I09 

tianity. While foreigners are not yet permitted to reside at any but 
cities specified in certain treaties, no such restriction is imposed on 
native Christian missionaries. They can live in the interior, after be- 
ing trained at missionary stations in Tokio, Osaka, and elsewhere. It 
is hoped that in the revision of treaties with foreign powers the prohi- 
bition of foreign residence will be removed. In the meantime the 
Government is steadily conducting its system of common-school and 
normal-school education, and fostering professional learning, so that 
the Japanese are already in a very diti'erent condition as to Western 
knowledge from that of former years. Unhappily, skepticism, as a 
reaction from the old beliefs, and the influence of irreligious persons 
from Western countries, are serious obstacles in the way of the Gos- 
pel. These the Gospel itself will overthrow. As a means to this 
great end, our missionary agencies and the lives and examples of our 
Christian men and women are invaluable. And to these will soon be 
added large numbers of native missionaries and pastors. Before long 
the truths of Holy Scripture, accompanied by the divine power of the 
Holy Spirit, will, without doubt, lead the Japanese to become a Chris- 
tian people. At present the Board should stand ready to enter any 
and every new door that may be open for the work of missionaries. 
It may even be expedient to send out more laborers to be getting 
ready for the coming harvest. It may also be found that from these 
Japanese islands, the country of Corea, for centuries in deep spiritual 
darkness, but now apparently opening slowly to the influences of West- 
ern nations, may best receive the messengers of the Gospel. 



MISSIONS TO THE CHINESE IN THIS COUNTRY. 

San Francisco : mission begun 1853 ; missionary laborers — Rev. Augrustas W. 
Loomis, D.D., and his wife, and Kev. A, J. Kerr ; Miss Majjgie Culbertsou ; em- 
ployed by the Oecideutul Ladies' Society Mission, Miss Culile and .Miss Baskin ; 
three teachers in English ; two Chinese evangelists ; two other native helpers. 

Oakland : mission begun 1877 ; missionary laborers — *Rev. Ira M. Condit and his 
wife ; two teachers ; one native helper. 

Sackamento and San Jose : two teachers ; two native assistants. 

Portland, Oregon : one native assistant. 

The Chinese mission in California has been subjected to various 
changes during the past year, and yet is able to report the greatest 
degree of prosperity that it has ever known. Rev. A. W. Loomis, 
D.D., was obliged during the year to seek a temporary release from 
his duties on account of ill-health. The Rev. I. M. Condit also after 
several years of interrupted labor was granted a leave of absence 
for the year. The fact that these absences were not contemporaneous, 
and the arrival of the Rev. A. J. Kerr to reinforce the mission in 
September prevented serious interruption of the work. Religious ser- 
vices and the various schools have been maintained regularly and 
with success. 



* Now on leave of absence. 



no ANNUAL REPORT. 



San Francisco. 



The entrance of the San Francisco congregation into its new church 
edifice (formerly the First Presbyterian Church), which had been pur- 
chased by the Board for its accommodation, dated a new era in the 
enlargement and encouraging aspects of the work in that city. The 
Board was subjected to the heavy expense of % 1,038. 7 7 for the reno- 
vation and adaptation of the church to its wants, it having been occu- 
pied by the congregation of the First Church until October 13th. 
The building will seat 640 people, " and the Chinese congrega- 
tion," says Dr. Loomis, " has on every Sabbath since the occupation 
been far better than our most sanguine expectations. Generally on 
Sabbath morning we have a respectable, and you may say a large con- 
gregation even for so large an audience room." The local church in 
San Francisco now numbers about 160. The number added during the 
year is 17, of whom 13 were received upon examination. A marked 
feature of the religious life of this flourishing little church is its liberal- 
ity. The contributions during the year have been as follows : For the 
fitting up of the new church $777.45, of which $138.70 was sent in by 
absent members. This last ir, an important fact as showing the genu- 
ineness and permanency of the interest which these people cherish 
toward the church. The contributions for the poor and sick were 
$22.50; for current expenses $40; for a theological student at Canton 
$ro ; monthly concert collections $144.95 ; total $987.90. In addition 
to this various gifts have been sent to assist the congregation at Los 
Angelos. The church has also pledged $8 per month or $96 per year 
toward the support of one of its members now studying medicine 
under Dr. Kerr in Canton, with a view of practicing in the various 
communities in which the Chinese in California formerly resided. 
This work of a church of 160 members, all of whom are men of 
limited means, is perhaps without a parallel among all the churches of 
our country ; and no better evidence could be given of the moral 
earnestness which is inculcated in these people. 

Two Sabbath-schools have been conducted in connection with the 
church : one at midday and the other at 6 p.m. The night-schools 
held during the week are invariably followed by religious services, and 
throughout the exercises of the school, scriptural lessons, hymns, etc., 
are interspersed. In all respects the character of this and all the 
other schools connected with the mission in California is thoroughly 
religious. The Rev. Mr. Kerr, to whom reference has already been 
made, is represented as having commenced his work most vigorously, 
devoting special attention necessarily to the acquisition of the language. 
He speaks with great enthusiasm of the work which opens up before 
him, particularly in the direction of higher education for the sons of 
Chinese merchants, and others of the better class. Of the new church 
building, he says : " I consider the purchase of that property the best 
thing that has yet been done for the Chinese here. It seats 640 per- 
sons. On the 19th of November, when it was opened, scores of China- 
men were unable to gain an entrance. Since that time the morning 
congregations have averaged about 400 and the evening 200. In the 



MISSIONS TO THE CHINESE IN THIS COUNTRY. Ill 

old chapel, the two together did not number 200. Our Sabbath- 
schools have more than doubled in number. Chinatown is proud of 
this church. It is one of the sights. It is always shown to the coun- 
try (Chinese) cousins when they come to the city. Little knots of 
men may be seen every day standing on the sidewalk reading the 
tasteful Chinese sign that invites all to come." 

Oakland. 

The removal of Mr. Condit on leave of absence necessarily left this 
station in a somewhat crippled condition, though Mr. Hyde for a time 
occupied the mission house with his family, and had oversight of the 
school. Upon his removal from Oakland after some weeks Mrs. E. T. 
Stanley, secretary of the California Branch of the Women's Foreign 
Missionary Society, occupied the house with her son, giving more or 
less attention to the school. Until March ist four teachers were em- 
ployed in the evening school, Miss Sarah Hayes, Miss Hill, and the 
Misses Alger. Occasionally one of the missionaries from San Fran- 
cisco has conducted Sabbath services in Oakland ; at other times 
native teachers liave conducted worship. There has been an average 
of 25 present in the morning and 50 in the evening. The evening- 
school has averaged 50, and the Sabbath-school held in the First Pres- 
byterian Church of Oakland about the same number. The present 
membership of the church is 68. The baptisms during the year have 
been eight. One of the teachers connected with the school has been 
supported by a contribution of $18 per month from the First Presby- 
terian Church. A part of the incidental expenses are paid by the 
pupils. The Young Men's Christian Association of San Francisco 
has a vigorous branch in Oakland. Two young men from this church 
are studying theology at Cincinnati and Beaver Falls. The total 
membership of this church as well as that of San Francisco is con- 
stantly affected by the removal of young men to other localities, some 
of whom had been the most active workers, though as a rule their 
record subsequent to their removal is very favorable. During the 
year the Board purchased a house for the mission at Oakland at an 
expense of $2,700, one-half of the payment being deferred until an- 
other year. 

Sacratnento. 

The work at Sacramento has been prosperous during the year. 
Mrs. A. Johns and daughter are the teachers of the evening-school 
and Mrs. Wilder superintendent of the Sabbath-school, She also visits 
among the Chinese women, reporting this portion of her work to the 
Women's Foreign Missionary Society at Philadelphia. The building 
long occupied by the evening-school and the Young Men's Christian 
Association was burned in September, but the school, finding other 
quarters, has been maintained with little interruption. The average 
attendance of the night-school on 5 evenings of the week is 30. The 
young men connected with this station are said to be unusually intelli- 
gent and reliable, and the services at present depend mostly upon 



112 ANNUAL REPORT. 

their direction and support. No native helpers are at present there 
employed, though one or two men giving their whole time seem to be 
necessary to the permanent growth of the work. Our missionaries 
express their satisfaction at the untlagging interest taken by the Rev. 
H. H. Rice, as well as by his congregation in this Chinese work and 
particularly in the Chinese Sabbath-school conducted in his church. 
Thirty-five Chinese have been received into his church membership, 
1 6 of whom are reported as absent, having returned to China, or are 
scattered through various parts of our own country. 



San Jose. 

At this center the mission work still lives, though not as vigorously 
as could be desired, owing to the removal two years ago of some valu- 
able men who returned to China or to the Sandwich Islands. The 
mission has also suffered by the action of one or two contumacious 
Chinamen. Mrs. Cary, who has so long been interested in this work, 
has continued her efforts. In the evening-school on five evenings of 
the week the average attendance is 20, the number enrolled each 
month being 51. The baptisms during the year have been 4, total 
number baptized during the last 11 years 29. One member of this 
little church died during the summer in the triumphs of the Christian 
faith. His brethren tenderly cared for him in his sickness and defrayed 
all the expenses of his burial. A part of the expenses of the school 
is defrayed by the pupils. Two or three friends in the community 
have given important aid in the school. 



Santa Clara. 

Miss Hattie Lewis has given another year of self-denying and 
gratuitous labor not without gratifying success. One of her pupils 
was recently baptized and became connected with the church in San 
Francisco. The Rev. James Newell, the pastor of the church in 
Santa Clara, has ably seconded her work. Her school roll now num- 
bers 49 names, the largest number at any one session being 15. 



Napa. 

Several visits have been made to this place by our native colporteur 
Nam Art. The Rev. V. A. Lewis, who has temporarily supplied the 
church, has. taken a very deep interest in this Chinese work, and 
through his efforts, with those of his people, a permanent building, 
costing $575, has been secured and deeded to the Board of Foreign 
Missions. Of this amount the Chinese in that community subscribed 
$100. The average attendance of the evening-school is 22, and the 
Sabbath-school 30. Thirteen new members have been added, i j of 
whom were received upon examination. 



MISSIONS TO THE CHINESE IN THIS COUNTRY. II3 



San/a Rosa. 

The work at this station has been greatly advanced by the efficient 
co-operation of the Rev. F. M. Dimmick. The little congregation 
being left without a home by the sale of the property which they had 
rented, it was provided with a new building at a cost of $1,026.55 
from his own resources. The evening-school ranges from 14 to 23, 
with a vigorous little Sabbath-school and a Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation. Mrs. E. P. Wilson being obliged to leave her work as teacher 
for a time, her place was filled by Mrs. McNab, assisted by Mrs. Dim- 
mick and others. During the last year the whole number of scholars 
increased from 20 to 40. The 6 Chinese who have been baptized at 
this station since it was organized have all removed from the place ex- 
cept one ; but favorable reports of them are received in their new 
places of residence. Two faithful teachers in this school have recently 
been called to their reward : Mr. Hubbell, who died in San Diego, and 
Mr. Chamberlain, who died in Springfield, Mo. They are cherished in 
the memory of their Chinese pupils. 

San Rafael. 

Work at this station has been fluctuating on account of frequent re- 
movals, but this year, through the efforts of the native colporteur, Nam 
Art, the work has been revived. Comfortable rooms have been se- 
cured and furnished. Through the sympathy and effort of the Rev. 
James S. McDonald the Sabbath-school has been opened in his 
church, teachers volunteering for its maintenance. The largest 
number in attendance is 22. The work is substantially aided by the 
members of the Chinese Church in San Francisco and Oakland. 

From San Diego and other places in Southern California calls are 
made for the means of commencing a vigorous work among the 
Chinese. 

Los Angeles. 

The mission property in this place was transferred by the Board 
to the United Presbyterian Church, and a missionary of that Church 
is now working there under its Home Board. There are, however, 
a large number of Chinese who prefer to identify themselves with the 
Presbyterian Church under the care of Rev. J. W. Ellis. They have 
maintained services for their countrymen in the rooms of the Young 
Men's Association and are now earnestly seeking for the means of 
securing permanent quarters, while they persevere in looking to this 
Board for assistance. 

P'our native assistants were employed in San Francisco and Oakland 
at the beginning of the year. Now there are but two, one having 
gone into secular business for reasons which he deemed sufficient, and 
another having returned to China. 

In Portland, Oregon, the Board has employed a teacher of the 
Chinese in connection with the church of Rev. Dr. Lindsley. 
8 



114 ANNUAL REPORT. 

Work among Women. 

The Women's Home is still the center of vigorous influence. It 
has employed during the year various visitors who teach in the families, 
and the Clay Street day-school, under their care, has been in full 
operation. The Home and its inmates have been under the excellent 
supervision of Mrs. Culbertson. One of the most attractive features 
of the Sabbath services is the presence of a large and interesting 
Chinese family, and the help they render in singing and preaching is 
most valuable. (A piinted report of their work will soon be pub- 
lished by the ladies.) The work among women has been kept up by 
Mrs. Loomis in connection with her husband. 

In closing the report upon the Chinese work in California the Board 
can but express its great satisfaction at the fact that with only two 
male missionaries yet acquainted with the language, and both of them 
obliged to be absent more or less during the year on account of health, 
so great a result has been accomplished. This is owing largely to the 
volunteer services of many friends of the mission. It should be borne 
in mind that in addition to direct spiritual work very heavy cares and 
labors are laid upon our missionaries in California. The supervision 
of so many outstations with their schools is onerous, and as the reports- 
express it, " The agency department," which relates to the care of mis- 
sionaries coming and going between this country and China, their 
tickets, baggage, freight, etc., the purchase of supplies for those in the 
field, together with a large correspondence with the Chinese in both 
hemispheres, all this involves much care and consumes much time. 
As to their direct work, the preaching services, the schools held every 
evening and the apostolic visitation from house to house, together 
with an occasional sermon in English to assist the brethren in need, 
allow no leisure. Our conscientious missionaries find themselves 
well-nigh overburdened with the greatness of their work. Of the new 
church edifice formerly of the P'irst Presbyterian Church, now devoted 
to the service of the Chinese, the mission report speaks enthusiastically. 



SiaiisHcs. 

These are imperfectly reported. So far as stated the total member- 
ship of Chinese churches is 228. Many others won to Christ by the 
native helpers are connected with the local American churches. There 
are eight night-schools, and about tiie same number of Sabbath-schools. 
Seventeen members have been added to the church in San Francisco ; 
Oakland not reported. The San Francisco church has contributed 
an aggregate of $987.90. The church in Napa gave $100 toward a 
place of worship. 



GUATEMALA MISSION. II5 



GUATEMALA MISSION. 

Gautemala, capital of the Republic of the same name ; mission begun in 1882 ; 
laborers — Rev. John C. Hill and wife. 

About the beginning of the present fiscal year the attention of the 
Board was, for the second time, called to the great promise of the small 
but vigorous Republic of Guatemala as a field for Protestant missions, 
and assurances were given from reliable sources of the most cordial 
sympathy with such a movement on the part of the President, General 
Rufino Barrios. It was ascertained that as early as the year 1872 he 
had issued a decree of entire religious liberty in the Republic, that the 
Jesuits had been expelled for their intrigues, and that although not a 
Protestant in any proper sense, the President would welcome the en- 
lightenment of Protestant teaching. 

It was ascertained, moreover, that in the total population of 
1,500,000, while general advancement had begun in almost all other 
directions, there was not a single Protestant service to be found. Evi- 
dences were also given that in the capital city of 60,000 inhabitants, 
there was a large element of Americans and Europeans, and that an 
English service might soon be expected to become self-supporting. 
Under the circumstances the Board resolved to enter the field, and ap- 
pointed the Rev. John C. Hill and wife, late of Fayetteville, N. Y., as 
its missionaries. During the summer President Barrios visited New 
York, and in the interviews held with him by the officers of the Board, 
all the previous statements as to his favorable disposition toward the 
missionary operations were verified. It so happened that Mr. Hill, in 
his journey from San Francisco to Guatemala, was a fellow-passenger 
with the President and his staft", thus having an opportunity to learn 
more fully the favorable attitude of the Government toward his work. 
He has already established an English service in a building rented from 
the President at a nominal price, and reports gratifying prospects in re- 
gard to the sympathy and co-operation of the citizens. Many facts have 
been learned in regard to the general character of the country, all of 
which seem favorable to our mission. Mr. Hill describes the country 
and climate as follows : " The country being very broken in its general 
aspect, and the greater part of it being at an elevation of about 5,000 
feet above the level of the sea, it may be said to be free from the usual 
tropical diseases, so that the best insurance companies do not charge 
any extra premium for residence here. Even on the coast the climate 
is not so deadly as is generally supposed in the North. If foreigners 
sicken and die on these coasts, it is not so much the climate as their want 
of care of their health. The clin)ate here, in the capital of Guatetnala, 
is practically the same all the year round, few people ever making any 
change in their clothing. The weather at the beginning of January, in 
the capital, is like a warm June in central New York, and in conse- 
quence we can enjoy fresh vegetables at all seasons." 

With respect to the religious condition of the country Mr. Rill 
writes as follows : 



Il6 ANNUAL REPORT. 

"The power of the church is entirely broken, and the children are 
being educated in Government schools, from which everything of a re- 
ligious nature is rigidly excluded. Formerly all the educational inter- 
ests of the country were in the hands of the priests, and ' education ' 
consisted largely in teaching the lives of the 'saints.' The result of 
this system of education is seen in the fact that only about ten per cent. 
of the entire population can read. In the capital the proportion is 
fully twenty per cent.., which reduces somewhat the proportion for the 
rest of the country. 

" We have one daily paper, also five or six weeklies, and several 
monthlies ; one of the latter is devoted to educational interests. The 
press is continually opposing the pretensions of the Catholic Church, 
and loses no chance to expose the vile character of the priests who are 
occasionally discovered in some scandalous proceeding. Nothing, how- 
ever, is done to supply the spiritual void which they make by destroy- 
ing faith in the Catholic system. It is assumed that a purely secular 
education is the only need of the country. ' The Gospel of culture ' 
is proclaimed as their salvation. Nothing is said against religion in 
general. The fight is made with Catholicism as opposed to intellect- 
ual progress. But in the minds of the people it is either Catholicism 
or nothing. Most of them regard the Protestant denominations in the 
same light as heathenism. The press not reaching the common peo- 
ple on account of their illiteracy, the educated classes are drifting into 
all forms of infidelity. 

" The reforms already secured by the judicious administration are, I 
believe, permanent ; it is impossible now for any reactionary movement 
to succeed. It has v/ell-nigh silenced all oi)position. 

"The inmiediate need of Guatemala is evangelization. The native 
press will help on the preaching and reading of the Word. A desire is 
expressed by many of the leading citizens to have a school established 
in which English only will be used. The opportunities that would be 
afforded by such a school with devoted Christian teachers for the 
Christian training of children would be very great, by bringing the 
Gospel into immediate contact with the upper classes. The President 
has repeatedly urged the necessity of such a school as an adjunct to 
the preaching. 

" In addition to the schools for children of the school age, night 
schools for adults are provided at many places in which instruction is 
given in the ordinary branches. The advantages offered by these are 
secured by as many as can be accommodated, indicating a desire for 
an education. One generation more will produce a great change in 
the intellectual condition of these people." 

As to the present status and assuring prospects of the mission, Mr. 
Hill states that services have been held for a time in private houses 
with an increase from week to week until about forty were present. 
By the last accounts, however, a committee of gentlemen was circu- 
lating a subscription to provide for the furnishing of a chapel. Of the 
building to be used as a chapel, Mr. Hill says: "I have rented a 
house from the President within two squares of the center of the city 
at a merely nominal price considering the size, style, and convenience. 



PAPAL EUROPE. II7 

It is the nev .st house in the city, and was built by President Barrios 
for one of his sons. For the present we shall only occupy the upper 
story, which will give us ample room for a chapel and a residence. 
Owing to the peculiar way of constructing houses in Guatemala, it 
would be impossible to rent a hall or room for a chapel without rent- 
ing the whole house. The arrangements made are the most economi- 
cal possible." With reference to the opening of a girls' school, Mr. 
Hill says that the promised patronage from leading citizens, both En- 
glish and natives, is such as to warrant the belief that within a year 
and a half the school may be self-supporting. It is to be hoped that 
the way will speedily be opened for the establishment of such an in- 
stitution. 

A general desire has been expressed by those high in influence for 
the establishment of a high-school for both sexes, with the belief that 
at no distant day it will become entirely self-supporting. It is need- 
less to say that the chief work contemplated by the Board is one which 
concerns the Spanish-speaking population, but it has been thought 
wise first to secure, as far as possible, whatever elements of Protestant 
strength or support may be found among the English-speaking popula- 
tion. 



PAPAL EUROPE. 



Much sorrow is expressed in letters received from the Rev. Matteo 
Prochet, of the Waldensian Church, at the great loss suffered by the 
cause of missions in Europe and throughout the world in the death of 
the most liberal supporters of evangelical work in this country, refer- 
ence being had particularly to the decease of Messrs. R. L. Stuart and 
William E. Dodge, recently added to that of James Lenox, John Aitken, 
and other well-known friends of the Waldensian cause. " I send you 
a printed report," says Mr. Prochet, "and wish that you would glance 
at it, if only to satisfy you that your efforts of last year have been blest 
of the Lord, and have resulted in glory to His holy name. Our financial 
position may be said to be bad, yet not from reckless expenditure or 
from diminution in the contributions of our churches. It comes sim- 
ply from the enlargement of our work in answer to the manifest calls 
of Providence. At the same time there has been a remarkable modi- 
fication in exchange, which will raise the value of Italian paper money 
to a par with gold. The loss to the mission practically by this means 
is about ten per cent., as the remittances received have but ninety per 
cent, of their former purchasmg power. The result is a deficit of about 
$5,000 in the treasury, and at the same time there must be an increase 
of $3,000 in order to realize the same practical values that were for- 
merly received." The following table of statistics is presented in Mr. 
Prochet' s report as showing the relative growth of the Protestant cause 
in Italy. 



Membern 


2,530 


3,431 


do 


not known 


not known 


do 


1,649 


1,666 


do 


1,276 


1,451 


do 


437 


707 


do 


155 


250 


do 


195 


343 


do 


not known 


20 


do 


do 


100 


do 


do 


134 



Il8 ANNUAL REPORT. 

1878. 1882. 

Wuldensian Ctnirch (out of the Wald Valleys). 
Free '^hrisliau Church (Plym. Brethren). 
Free Church. 
Wesloyuns. 

Methodist Episcopals. 
Baptists (close communion). 
Baptists (open communion). 
Baptists (general). 
Baptists (Independent). 
Baptists (class of special). 
The Plym. Brethren object to statistics and never say their number. 

It is scarcely invidious to say that the growth of the Waldensian 
Church has exceeded that of all other Protestant churches in Italy, so 
far as reported, the total increase in the five years being 891. But per- 
haps the most significant of all, as showing growth and vigor, is the 
fact that while the Waldensian congregations in 187 1 contributed only 
$2,020, they gave in 1883 $10,130, or more than five-fold. 

Pastor Lorriaux, of the Central Protestant Evangelization Society of 
France, closes a report in which he gives many interesting details of 
work at the various French stations, as follows : 

" It is a most striking feature of the present situation — in the pro- 
portion as we need workers for the ancient work as well as for the new 
stations, the number of vocations for the ministry increase — and at the 
present hour, our preparatory school as well as owx facitlt'es de theologie 
have a larger number of students than they have had for the last 
twenty-five years. 

"What we want is to show you the facts as if you witnessed them. 
We do reckon on our American brethren's help and sympathy. 
Several new stations have come to life through your Christian assist- 
ance. Do remember your young children on this side of the Atlantic. 
Believe me, dear and reverend brother." 

No reports have been received from the Evangelical Society of Bel- 
gium or the Evangelical Society of Geneva. 

Appropriations of the year. 

Remittances to the Evangelical Society of rrcneva f 485.25 

" " '' " " Belsriura 485.25 

Evnugeliciil and Central Protestant Societies of France 970.50 

Bohemia Speciul -. . . 1,019.00 



Waldensian Synod $1,939.52 



3,265.52 



Interest on Endowment Fund 1,326,00 

Total $6,225.52 



PROPOSED TRANSFER OF INDIAN MISSIONS. 

SPECIAL REPORT TO THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 

The Board of Foreign Missions would respectfully make the follow- 
ing report to the General Assembly concerning the reference on page 
105 of the Minutes, 1882, in regard to the transfer of missions in the 
Indian Territory : 

No joint action on the subject has been taken by the two Boards. As 
ihey are but committees appointed by the Assembly, each for its own 
work, it would seem that any great change in this work should be 
ordered by the Assembly itself; and to its decision both Boards would, 
of course, cheerfully submit. 

In rejiorting the case to the Assembly, the Board would state, that 
three missions are under its care in the Indian Territory — among the 
Creeks, Seminoles, and Choctaws. They were begun in 1842, 1846, 
and 1848, respectively ; broken up in the war ; resumed in 1866 ; ex- 
cepting the last, which was under the care of the Southern Presbyte- 
rian Church for some years, but in 1881 its principal school was again 
placed in the charge of the Board. In each mission a boarding school 
is maintained, which is supjjorted in jjart by the Council of the tribe, 
and is the principal school in each nation. For all of these schools 
written or oral contracts exist between the Councils respectively and 
the Board. It would seem to be inexpedient to make any change in 
the charge of these schools. They are highly prized by the Indians, are 
doing well, and are full of promise. Other kinds of missionary work, 
moreover, are closely connected with them, which would also receive 
injury, as it is believed, from the transfer — especially the training of 
native licentiate preachers and others preparing for the ministry. So 
far as the Board is aware its work in the Indian Territory has the 
approval of the missionaries and the confidence of the Indians ; the 
latter is of slow growth among them, and is of no little moment. So 
far as the Board is informed, neither the missionaries nor the Indians 
themselves desire this transfer. Many of our Christian people, also, 
have for many years felt themselves identified with the Board in this 
work, by their sympathies, gifts, and prayers. The transfer would lead 
to their withdrawing from their connection with the Board in tlie sup- 
port of these missions, and thereby, in all i)robability, would lesson 
their interest in its general work — a result to be contemplated only 
with solicitude. 

The Board would further respectfully recall to the recollection of 
the Assembly, the fact that its work for these Indians, as well as for 
other tribes of Indians, is founded on the same principles that have 
been recognized and approved by our Christian people ever since our 
Church entered on the work of foreign missions. As heathens, the 
Indians were, and are still to a considerable extent in these tribes and 
to a large extent in other tribes, foreign in language, manner of .life, 
and religious or rather superstitious belief; and they are to be evan- 



120 APPENDIX. 

gelized like the heathens of other countries. Hence the methods and 
means of their conversion must be those usual among heathen people. 
It is doubtful whether recent changes in their circumstances should 
lead to any change in missionary plans for their benefit. They are 
now brought out from their seclusion in some measure by the railroads 
and tl)eir closer contact with white people on the frontiers, but the 
Church may well fear that this will not hasten the day of their conver- 
sion. The old way is still the best way, as the experience of the sev- 
eral churches seems to prove. Certain it is that the old line of mis- 
sionary policy and procedure has achieved noble results heretofore; 
and it may be expected, if not interrupted, to complete the transforma- 
tion of the Indians from heathenisu) to Christianity and civilization. 

The Board would close this report by referring to its Annual Report 
to the General Asseinbl)', for information in detail concerning the 
missions to be affected by the i)roposed transfer. 



Jfinitiuial ^leport. 



Payments by tlie Board of Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian Church from 
May 1, 1882, to May 1, 1883. 

MISSIONS. 

MISSIONS IN INDIA. 

Expenditures on account of 

Lodiaua Mission, :?G4,853 08 

Furrukliabad Mission, 38,046 70 

Kolapoor " 10.966 19 $113,865 97 

MISSIONS IN SIAM AND LAOS. 

Expenditures on account of 28,702 57 

MISSIONS IN CHINA. 

Expenditures on account of 

Canton Mission, 17,265 03 

Ningpo and Shantung Missions, 75.373 99 92,539 03 

MISSIONS TO TUE CHINESE IN THE UNITED STATES. 

Expenditures on account of 15,339 01 

Balance for Church in .San Francisco 10,500 00 25,839 01 

MISSIONS IN JAPAN. 

Expenditures on account of 37,534 97 

MISSION IN SYRIA. 

Expenditures on account of 54.064 21 

MISSIONS IN PERSIA. 

Expenditures on account of 70,965 25 

MISSIONS IN AFRICA. 

Expenditures on account of 

Liberia Mission. 4,400 56 

Gaboon and Corisco Mission, 29,039 57 33,440 13 

MISSIONS IN SOUTH AMERICA. 

Expenditures on account of 

Bogota Mission, 4,.')92 53 

Brazil " 51.918 09 

Chm " 22,646 19 79,156 81 

MISSIONS IN MEXICO. 
Expenditures on account of 

Northern Mission, 20,368 95 

Southern " 47.149 40 ^ 67,518 35 



122 



FINANCIAL REPORT. 



MISSION TO GUATEMALA. 

Expenditures on account of 



3,085 00 



MISSIONS TO AMEKICAN INDIANS. 



Expenditures on account of 
Cliippowa Mission, 
Creek " 

Choctaw " 

Seminole " 
Seneca " 

Dakota " 

Kez Perces " 
Omaha " 

Winnebago " 
Iowa " 



4.237 65 
^^,239 52 
1,240 00 
3,296 29 
2,861 43 
5,848 61 
3,058 50 
5,252 77 
1,366 33 
470 50 



31.359 60 



MISSIONS IN PAPAL COUNTBIES. 

Remittances to 

France, 970 50 

Belgium, 485 25 

Geneva, 485 25 

Bohemia, Special 1,019 00 

Waldenses, $1,939 52 \ 

" Int. on Endowment Fund, 1 ,326 00 ) 



3,265 52 
Total expenditures of Missions, $644,346 41 



PRINTING. 

The Forty-fifth Annual Report — expense of 

publishing 5,000 copies, and postage $1,134 50 

The Home and Foreign Record — proportion of 

deficiency, 1,088 07 

Printing circulars and blanks, 283 30 

The Foreign Missionary, expense of publish- 
ing 18,000 copies, including those sent 
free to Ministers and Donors, less receipts 1,244 65 



6,225 52 



3,750 52 



SECRETARIES' AND TREASURER'S DEPARTMENT. 



Rev. John C. Lowrie, Secretary, 
Rev. David Irving, " 

Rev. F. F. EUiuwood, " 
William Rankin, Treasurer, 
Clerk hire. 
Travelling expenses 



$3,U00 00 
3,500 00 
4,8(J0 00 
3 100 00 
4,537 42 
644 23 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

Postages, $626 45 

Library, binding and stationery, 294 03 

Taxes, insurance repairs, and care of Mission 

House, $2,536 39, less rents, $1,414 50 1,121 89 



19,481 65 



2,042 37 
$669,620 95 



treasurer's report. 



123 



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1 



%\\mi\\ |lcprt of llctcipts 
BY THE BOARD OF FOREIGN MISSIONS 

DURING THE YEAR ENDING MAY 1, 1883. 



5^^ The contributions under the heading of " Sabbath Schools" are included In the 
first column, which represent the donations of churches. 



SAB. 8. w. b'ds. 



SAB. 8. W. B D3. 



BTNOD OP ATLANTIC. 

Pby of Atlantic. 

Aimwell 

Beaufort, Salem 

Bethel 

Calvary 

Congruity 

Deems 

Ehenezer 2 60 

Edisio 

Good-Will 4 40 

Grace 

Harmony Chapel 

Htbron 

Hopewell 

Immauuel 

Jauios I-iland 

Macedonia 

Maliua 

Mt. Lisbon 

Mt. Pleasant 

Mt. Sinai 

Olivet 

Salem 

bummcrville 

St. Andrew's 

St. Michael's 

St. Paul 

Walliugl'ord 

Zion 

7 00 

Pby of Catawba. 

Bellpfonte 
Ben Salem 
Bethel 

Betlii):i£re 

Bidd'eville 

Black's Chapel 

Caldwell 

Chailotte 

Chcraw 

Concord 7 00 

Davidson College 1 00 

Dutchman's Creek 

Ebenezer 

Emanuel 

Fair Forest' 

Good Hope 

Hamilton 

Hopewell 

Huntersville 



Lloyd's Chapel 

Love's 

Mills River 

Macedonia 

Mattoon 1 00 

Miranda 

Monroe 

Murkland 

McClintoclr 

Mt. Olives 

Mt. Zion 

New Hope 

Philadelphia 

Pleasant View 

Poplar Tent 

Salem Hill 

St. Paul 

Walker's Chapel 

Woodland 

9 00 

Pby of East Florida. 

Jacksonville Ist 10 00 

3d Col 
Lake Eustis 

Mary Esther 5 00 

New Smyrna 
St. AuguatiDe 

15 00 
Ptry of Fairfield- 
Abbeyville 
Bethlehem 
Blue Branch 
Calvary 

" Chapel 
Carmel 
Hebron 
Hermon 
Howell, Salem 
Ladsou 1 00 

Lebanon 
Little River 
Macedonia 
Mt. Hsgah 
Nazareth 
Olivet 
Pitts 

Pleasant Grove 
Shiloh 

Sloan's Chapel 
Tabor 4 00 

500 



15 00 

15 00 



ANNUAL REPORT OF RECEIPTS, 



127 



SAB S. W.B'DS. 



Phy of Knox. 
Antioch 1 00 

Gracp, Memorial 
Macon, Washburne 

ave 
Medway 
New Hope 
Oglethoipe Chapel 
Plea;iar.t Grove 
Riceboro 

1 00 
Phy of Yadkin. 
Anoerson Creek 
Bethany 
Blandonia 
IJlue's Crossing 
Booneville 
Cameron 

Cartims;e , 

Catawba River 
Chapel Hill 
Cool Spring 
Danville 
Kbenezer 
li'ayetteville 
Freedom 
Ki'cedom, East 
Friendship 70 

Gold Hill 
Greensboro 
Hillaboro 
Lngiin 

L-xi'i^ron 1 02 

Lillington 
Mebaiiesville 
Memorial 

Mocksville 50 

M'. Airy 
Mt. Olive 
Mt. Pleasant 
Mt. Tabor 
Mt. Veraon 
Mt. Zion 
Nazarelh 
New Centre 
Oakland 
Panthersford 
Pittsburgh 
Raleigh 
Salisbury 
Statesville 
St. Paul 
Thoraasville 
Whitehall 

Williams Chapel 1 CO 
Wilmington 
Wilson 
Winston 

3 a 

SYNOD OP BAI.TIMORR. 

Pby of Baltin'ore. 



Annapolis 


22 00 


18 00 




Arlington 








Ashland 


12 00 






Baltimore 1st, 


3,00n 00 




180 00 


2d 


397 60 


125 00 




" 12th 


41 90 




181 00 


" Aisqui 


h St 30 no 


29 00 


100 00 


" Bound 


yAviei 50 




199 00 


" Broadway 7 00 




22 00 


" BrownMem416 84 




870 98 


" Contra 


19 50 




350 00 



Faith Chapel 



SAB. 8. W. b'DS. 



Baltimore 








'■ Grace 








" Knox 


2 00 






"■ Lafayette 


sql6 07 




134 33 


" Light St 








" Madi:'on st 5 00 






'• Tome st 








" West- 








minster 


134 .50 


28 71 


T5 00 


B rton 


10 73 


10 73 




Bol Air 


7 00 




10 CO 


Bethel 


10 00 






Chesinnt Grove 






40 00 


Churchville 


36 00 


5 on 


49 00 


Cunilit'iland 


58 95 


35 95 




DeerCreek,Harm 


y 40 00 




101 00 


Ellicott City | 
Patupsa f 


60 00 


60 00 


125 00 


EiiiL> ettsburjr 1 


117 15 


35 97 


42 00 


Piney Creek" t' 




25 00 


Fallston 


3 00 




25 00 


Franklinvillc 








Frederick City 


43 78 


89 20 




Frostburgh 


3 CD 






Gi>vanr Cliapcl 








Granite 


21 13 






Hagerstown 






69 70 


Hampden 


10 00 




10 00 


Havre de Grace 


30 00 






Lonaiiiuing 


00 






Mt. Alto 


11 00 






Mt. Paran 








New Vv'indsor 


8 00 






Paradise 


8 00 






Taneytown 


50 00 




66 00 


The Grove 








Williamsport 


15 00 




5 00 


Miscellaneous 


41 00 




1,000 00 



4,826 71 387 50 8,686 06 



Pby of New Castle, 

Barren Cr'k Springs 
IJlackwater 
nndfreville 
Buckingham 

Ches.T|» ake City 16 00 
Christiana 3 00 

Cool Spring 

Delaware City 11 07 

Dover 44 00 

Drawyers 6 18 

Lden 

Elkton 30 00 

Federalsburgh 
Felton 8 00 

Forest 1st, 58 00 

" 2d 1 00 

Georgetown 
•ir^en Hi.l & Rock- 
land 19 00 
Harrington 15 00 
Head of Christiana 14 00 
Kennedyville Grace 



111 00 



30 25 

5 65 



28 .50 103 64 



Lewes 
Lincoln 

Lowe- Brandywine 
L'r West Notting- 
ham 
Manokin 
Milford 
Mispillion 
Newark 
New fastle 
J'encader 
Pitts' Creek 
Fort Deposit 



10 35 

24 64 

45 21 

45 00 

32 37 
198 11 
7 33 
26 60 
50 57 



12 00 



20 47 



40 00 



9 00 
50 52 



26 00 



87 00 
48 21 
10 00 

30 00 

12 00 

50 00 



128 



ANNUAL REPORT OF RECKIPT8. 



Port Ponn 


26 on 


Red Clay Creek 


37 00 


Rehoboth, Del. 




Md. 




Rock 


20 00 


Rockawalking 




Smyrna 


13 00 


Snow Hill 


15 00 


Stan [ on 


2 00 


St. Gecrsre 


8 00 


Westminster 




White t lay Creek 


49 50 


Wicomico 


45 00 


Wilmington, iRt 


I'JS bi 


Cen- 




tral 




" Hano- 




ver st 


55 00 


" Olivet 




West 


30 00 


Zion 


2.5 00 



8AB. S. W.B'DS. 

37 18 
13 00 

30 75 



13 00 



29 50 



9 00 



40 00 

41 25 
43 41 
25 I'O 



280 OO 

78 72 

ID 00 

116 00 

30 00 



1,184 8G 215 99 1,211 06 



Fby of Rio de Janeiro. 
Pby of Washington City. 



Alexandria, let 


5 75 


Bi(j Oak 


2 00 


Boyd 




Clifton 




Darnestown 


21 33 


Falls Chiucli 


50 00 


Fieedmen 




Georgetown,W'tSt. 


100 00 


Hermon 


6 00 


Hynttsville 


9 00 


Lewinsville 


2 25 


Manassas 




Neelsville 


26 33 


Prince William, Ist 


2 00 


Unity 


4 55 


Vienna 


4 25 


Washington 1st 


43 53 


4th 


236 72 


(ith 




Wash'gton, 15th st 


45 00 


Washington As- 




sembly 


89 on 


Wash'ton Eastern 


6 00 


Wash'ton, Metro- 




politan 


60 25 


\Vash'ton,N.Y. av 


311 70 


Wash'gton, North 


21 47 


Wash'ton, W'st'rn 


Vil 21 


Wash" ton, West- 




minster 


40 00 


Wash'ton. Zion Ev 




Miscellaneous 





2 00 



21 33 



6 6T 



170 88 
10 00 



17 28 
48 21 



1,181 31 301 37 



BYNOD OP COLORADO. 

Phy of Denver. 

Black Hawk 

Boulder 34 50 

Central 5 50 

Cheyenne 

Denver Central 250 00 
Highland 1 00 

" St. Paul 

" Westminster 1 00 
17th St 36 22 

" Capitol Ave 
Erie 
Evans 



4 00 



27 20 
60 00 
39 87 
55 00 



20 25 

178 78 



16 00 



BAB. 9. W. b'DB. 



Fair Play 

Fcrt Collins 

Georgetown 

Goliten 

Greeley 

Idaho Springs 

Lawson 

Laramie 

Leadville 

Lonumont 

Monument 

Kawlins 

Table Rock 

Valmont 



7 40 
19 00 



3 40 



76 00 
40 00 

16 no 

6 00 

6 00 

55 97 



557 99 
Pby of Montana. 



Bozeman 

Butte 

Deer Lodge 

Hamilton 

Helena 

Miles City 

Mis.^oula 

Skalkaho 

Steveiisville 

Wickes 

Miscellaneous 



12 00 

5 80 



2 40 



24 95 
Pby of Pueblo. 
Alamosa 
Animas City 
Canon 40 00 

Cinecero 

Colorado Springs 133 06 
Del Norte 
De Herrera 
Durango 
Granda 
Gunnison 
Irwin 
Lake City 
La Jara, 1st 
" " 2d 
La Junta 
La Veta 
Mesa 
Ouray 

Poucha Springs 
Pnel-lo 
Rock Creek 
Rosita 
Saiida 
San Rafael 
Silver Chtl" 
Trinidad 
Walsenburgh 
West Las Animas 



10 00 



16 50 



5 00 
16 00 



10 00 
1 00 



231 56 

Pby of Santa Fe. 
Albuquerque 5 00 

Agua Negra, El Rito 2 00 
" "2d 



Jemez 

Laguna 

Las Vepas 

Me^silla 

Ocate 

Prcscott 

Kincones 

Santa F6 

Shakespeare 

Soc rro 

Tombstone 



2 00 
10 00 



4 00 



12 00 



27 00 



60 00 
SO 00 
10 00 



4 00 703 12 



801 00 



16 00 



84 2S 



16 00 395 26 



ANNUAL REPORT OF RECEIPTS. 



129 



SAB. S. W. B'DS. 



Taos 
Tuscon 

35 00 
Phy of Utah. 
American Fork 
Corinne 

Ephraim 4 00 

Evanston 

Logan Brick 5 00 

Manti 4 00 

Mt. Pleasant 
Naphi 

Ogden, 1st 10 00 

Salt Lake City, 1st 25 00 
Silver Reef 
Spriugville, Ist 

48 00 

SYNOD or THE COLUMBIA, 

Phy Of Idaho. 
Boise City 
Dayton 
Deep Creek 
Kamia 

Lapwai 10 00 

Lewiston 10 50 

Moscow 
Summerville 
Union 
Waitsburgh 
Walla Walla 
Weston 1 00 

21 50 



11 60 



11 60 



Pby of Oregon. 



Albany 
Asbland 
Astoria 
Beaver Creek 
Bethany 
Bethlehem 
Brownsville 
Clatsop 
Corvallis 
Eagle Park 
Eugene City 
Fort Wrangle 
Hopewell 

ludependence Cal- 
vary 
Jacksonville 
Knappa 
Lebanon 
Oak Kidge 
Phoenix 
Pleasant Grove 
Portland 

" Calvary 
Roseburgh 
Salem 

Spring Valley 
Tualitin Plains 
Wilbur 
Yaquima Bay 



20 00 
20 00 



5 00 
10 00 



20 00 



11 00 

5 00 

7 08 
10 00 
40 35 



9 50 
10 00 
2 00 



Chehalis 

Kittitas 

Klikitat 

Lowell 

New Castle 

Nisqually 

Olympia 



177 93 
Pby of Pv get Sound. 



8AB. 9. W. B DS. 



4 00 



3 61) 


20 00 


45 60 


149 50 


5 00 


8 45 


232 15 


11 70 



Port Townsend 






Puyallup 


— -- 




San Juan 






Seattle 


10 00 


10 00 


Srohomish City 






South Union 






Stiolacoom 






Tacoma 


" 


9 00 


Qumwater 
Vancouver 






2 00 




White River 


2 00 






18 00 


"~ 30 70 


8r»0D or ILLINOIS 120 74 




Pby of Alton. 






Alton 


no CO 3 m 109 03 


Baldwin 






Belleview 


12 55 




Bt-llevilie 






Bethel 


4 50 


19 T5 


Blair 






Brighton 


4 00 


15 CO 


r.uller 


6 00 




Cavo Spring 






Carlinville 


23 00 


44 00 


Carlyle 


6 60 


44 95 


Carrollton 


IGl 11 


51 00 


Chosler 




28 00 


Oollinsville 


31 00 


4 90 


Ebenezer 




15 86 


East St. Louis 






Kdwardsville 




16 00 


Elm Point 


2 30 




Greeiifiold 




10 00 


Greenville 




30 00 


Hardin 






Hlllsboro 


12 00 


15 05 


Jersey vile 


42 00 


81 85 


Lebanon 






Gor 






Litchfield 


7 00 


30 30 


Marina 






Moro 






Nokomis 


7 00 




Old Ripley 






Plainview 


4 00 


16 00 


Pleasant Ridge 






Plum Creek 


7 00 




Raymond 


3 60 




Rockbridge 


4 00 




Rockwtod 




30 00 


Salem, Geiman 


12 00 




Shiloh Hill 






fjbipman 




6 70 


Sparta 


76 00 


54 00 


S^pring Cove 


10 00 




Staunton 






Steele's Mills 






Sugar Creek 


4 10 


2 4.1 


Trenton 




30 00 


Troy 




31 00 


0pper Alton 






Virden 


39 40 


65 50 


Walnut Grove 


5 00 


10 00 


Wave land 


2 85 


6 00 


Whitehall 






Woodbiirn Ger. 


10 75 


14 00 


Yankeetown 






Zion, German 


16 90 






564 66 3 00 770 68 


Phy of Bloomingion. 




Alvin 






Atlanta 






Boment 


26 0(1 


128' 46 


Bloomiugton, let 


42 00 20 00 



i^,o 



A^TNUAL KEPORT OF RECEIPTS. 



Bloomingtoii 2(1 

B ickl.y 

Ciiyuaii 

Cen-o G'>r<lo 

Ch^impaign 

Cht-n a 

Cliiitsworth 

Clinton 

C.welle 

Danville 

Dwi<:l)i 

Elm Grove 

tl Pa>o 

Fairbnry 

Farm r City 

Gibson 

Oilman 

Grand View 

Ilouirr 

Hoopestown 

He , worth 

Jersey 

Lexington 

Mtckinaw 

Mansfield 

Miiiotik 

Monlicello 

N>rmal 

OnarEra 

Pax ton 

Pellsville 

Philo 

Piper City 

Pontiac 

Prairie View 

Keading 

Rossvill" 

Kidgeville 

Salem 

Tolono 

Towa-.da 

Union 

Urbana 

Wapella 

Watseka 

Waynesville 

Wenona 

Miscellaneous 



145 00 



108 T5 
8 00 

13 81 

210 13 

90 
22 00 

4 00 

14 55 

8 00 

9 60 

600 
21 00 

17 30 

11 25 

12 53 
9 45 

6 00 
35 OK 
2 00 

38 24 
30 IK) 
33 00 



2 00 
50 00 



1 20 
15 00 
26 00 

948 02 



Pby of Cairo. 



Anna 

Bridgeport 

Caledonia 

Cairo 

Carmi 

Carbondale 

Cartersville 

Centralis. 

Cobden 

Denmark 

Dongola 

Du Bois 

Du Quoin 

Eagle Creek 

Entield 

Equality 

Fairfield 

Flora 

Friendsville 

Galum 

Gilead 

Golconda 

Grand Tower 

Harrisbiirgh 

Kinmundy 

Metropolis 



17 18 



87 06 



00 



10 00 

16 00 
18 35 
■M 00 
39 30 

14 00 



22 03 
3 00 
61 80 

12 22 



36 00 

2 50 

3 75 



4 63 



3 00 



4 75 



10 00 



23 95 



r. b'ds. 


McLeansboro 


4 80 


SAB. 9. 


w. b"ds. 


343 52 


4 60 


17 00 


61 00 


Mt. ("armel 
Mt. Vernon 
Murphyeboro 


8 00 






210 91 


Nashville 


12 96 




25 00 


60 00 1 


Oak Grove 
Odin 








81 00 


Old Da Quoin 










Olney 


16 00 


6 00 


44 95 


100 00 


Pispah 


10 00 






20 00 


Richland 


5 25 








Richview 


18 50 


7 10 




12 50 


Siline Mines 
Sa em 
Sharon 


2 00 

3 67 




19 00 


32 57 


Shawneetown 


18 80 






60 70 


Sumner 


1 05 








Taniaroa 


5 no 




24 90 


1 


Union 


3 00 








Vergennes 


3 50 








Wabash 






600 




Walnut Hill 






14 00 


65 95 











19 00 




871 48 


56 60 


403 20 


10 00 
19 10 


Pby of Chicago. 






8 00 


Austin, 1st 


2 00 




34 66 


81 36 


Bloom 
Braidwood 


20 25 
12 00 








Chicago, 1st 


1.557 85 




1,729 64 




2(1 


855 51 




908 21 


28 00 


8d 


9^1 89 




1,187 04 


25 00 


Chicago, 4th 


3,276 78 




1,.S63 7T 




5th 


42 00 




214 68 




6th 


172 81 




394 45 


80 00 


3th 






219 07 


60 00 


" 1st Ger. 

" 41st St 


23 00 


10 00 


60 00 


32 00 


" Campbell Park 




6 IS 


18 00 


" Full rtoii ave 77 23 




91 00 




" Glover ave 










" Howe St 






15 00 




" Holland 










" Jeft'son Pai 


k 108 01 




181 25 


4 00 


" Ke-Union 
" Scotch 






25 00 


131 00 


" Westminster 71 30 




50 00 




Deerfleld 


1 00 






2,612 07 


Dunton, 1st 






45 06 




Du Page, let 


30 00 




50 00 




Ehvood 






10 CO 




E iglewood 


30 00 




154 13 


82 00 


Evaiston, 1st 
Gardner 


275 00 




479 77 


12 00 


Half Day 


2 00 




1 00 


75 90 


Highland Park 






145 00 


31 00 


Homewood 






17 00 




Hyde Park, 1st 


976 94 




766 39 


43 45 


J(jliet, 1st 


13 71 




77 68 


7 00 


" Central 


82 37 




85 25 




Kankakee, 1st 


70 92 


16 75 


36 00 




2d 










Lake P'orest 


379 55 




1,550 22 


18 00 


Lake 1st 
Libertyville 


2 20 








Manteno 


60 66 


4 50 


22 50 




May wood 


9 27 








Mt. Forest 






9 00 




Peotone, Ist 


40 00 




66 15 


6 00 


Pilot, let 










Riverside 


64 80 


30 00 


68 80 




River Park 










S'e Anne, 2d 








23 00 


Waukegan 
Wheeling, 1st 


89 68 


15 00 


131 00 




Whe,eling,Zion,Ger 




89 86 


5 00 


Will 


10 00 




3S18 



ANNUAL EErORT OF KKCEIPTS. 



131 



SAB. S. W. B D8. 



SAB. ?. W. B DS. 



Wilmington 


15 20 




39 25 


Pana 


42 72 


84 99 


Miscellaneous 


135 67 




104 00 


Paris 

Pleasant Prairie 

Prairie Bird 


7 00 
10 00 


35 65 




9,488 59 


66 25 


10391 66 


25 00 










Kedmau 






Pby of Fi 


eeport 






Robinson 






Apple River 

Belvidere 

Cedarvillo 

Diirand 

Elizabeth 

Foreston GVe, Ge 

Frsepoit, 1st 

2d 

8d, Ger 
Galena, 1st 
" Ger 
South 


55 00 
4 00 

3 00 

r 240 oa 

89 12 

23 14 

18 35 
21 00 
85 63 
27 00 

35 72 


16 90 
2 00 


106 00 

10 00 

200 00 
15 10 

45 00 

46 00 
27 00 


Slielbyville 
Shohrmier 
St. Elmo 
Sullivan 
Taylcrvillc 
Tower Hill 
Tuscola 
Vandalia 
Walnut Prairie 
Wat8(m 
West Okaw 
York 


3 00 

5 00 
10 00 

9 00 
39 00 

8 00 


30 00 

21 00 

13 25 
26 00 


Hanover 
Harvard 


298 35 21 


•21 417 92 


Lawrence 
Lena 


30 00 




36 47 


Pby of 


Ottawa. 




Linn & Hebron 


95 60 






Aurora 1st 


17 60 


47 36 


Marenso 


281 10 


31 10 


102 50 


Au Salile Grove 


11 00 


30 03 


MuIdlH Creek 


85 98 


18 58 


251 39 


Brookli.-ld 






Monlicello 








Earlville 


8 00 




O.liville 








ElL'in 




8 00 


Oregon, Ist 


46 50 




68 00 


Farm liidge 


9 00 


3 40 


Prairie Dell 








Granville 






Queen Anne 


8 00 






Mendota 


91 93 


117 10 


Rid;:efiild 


35 96 




30 19 


Morris 


21 00 




Ridott 








Oswego 


3 50 


23 00 


Kockford, 1st 


141 00 




75 00 


Ottawa 






" Wcstm'ter ao 14 


3 41 


141 00 


Ottawa, South 






Rock Run 


6 00 






Paw Paw Grove 


16 on 7 10 10 00 


Scales Mound 


13 00 






rialo, 1st 


2 00 


20 00 


Slianiion 








'• 2d 






Warren 


13 00 


13 00 


21 00 


Polo 




81 80 


Willow Creek 


75 25 


17 25 


104 JO 


Rochelle 


10 00 




Wiuiiebago 


24 00 




130 21 


t^aiidwieh 


11 00 


29 55 


Winslow 








Somonauk 




18 00 


Woodstock 


42 05 


6 80 


20 00 


Streator 




35 00 


Ziou 


82 15 


17 15 




Sycamore, Ger 






Miscellaneous 






7 00 


Troy Grove 














TTni(»n Grove 


6 25 


47 00 




1,439 09 


126 19 


1,435 26 


Vienna 














Walthara 


20 00 20 00 9 85 


Pby of JUattoon. 






Waterman 






Areola 


11 47 




12 50 


While Rock 






Ashmore 
Assumption 


5 00 






Wyoming 


1 00 
















Berkwith Prairie 


8 00 








228 28 27 


10 422 59 


Bethany 














Brovvnstowa 


5 00 






Pby of Peoriti. 




Casey 


5 on 




6 00 


Alta 




10 00 


Charleston 


19 00 


3 40 


48 38 


Altona 


5 00 


4 00' 


Chrisman 


2 00 






Astoria 




11 50 


Pal ton 








Brimfield 




12 70 


Dudley 


6 00 




20 00 


Brunswick 


2 00 


147 80 


Etlingliam 






25 00 


Canton 


9 21 




Grandvievir 


4 00 






Crow Meadow 


13 no 


19 80 


Greenup 








Deer Creek 


15 00 


41 00 


Hebron 








Delavan 


16 73 




Hickory Grove 








Elba 




15 05 


Kansas 


35 00 




22 45 


Limira 


14 00 


26 00 


Kaekaskia 








Elm wood 


8 00 


50 95 


Marshall 


1 40 






Eureka 


25 CO 


48 66 


Mattoon 


25 00 






FarminfTton 


20 00 


27 57 


Milton 








French Grove 


10 00 


126 00 


Mt. Olivet 








Galesburg 


108 95 


35 00 


Morrisonville 


9 00 




13 70 


Green Valley 






Moweaqua 








Henry 




185 00 


Neoga 


28 76 


17 84 


84 00 


Ipava 


10 00 


10 00 


New Hope 








John Knox 


17 00 


101 30 


New Providence 








Knosville 


28 20 


1 (»0 


Newton 








Ijicon 




307" 32 


Oakland 








Il^ Wigtown 


51 50 




Palestine 








Limestone 


2 50 





13^ 



ANNUAL KKI'OKT OF KECEIPTS. 



Low P'int 

Mansfit Id 

Oneida 

Peoria, 1st 
'• 2i\ 
•' Calvary 
" Grace 

Princeville 

Prospect 

Sparlund 
Vermont 
Washbniu 
■Wa^lMii,' on 
West Jersey 
Yates City 
Mi'-cellaneous 



17 35 

9 25 
•ilO -il 
44 89 

7 80 
40 CO 
178 5:5 
■ii 00 



13 CO 



50 00 



48 00 
334 14 
•22-i 85 
■>8 00 
52 00 
9tj 00 
89 00 
25 15 



7 10 
18 tiO 



50 75 
1 00 



899 12 50 00 2,105 74 



P/>y of Rock River. 

Albany 

Aleiio 

Arlington 

Aehton 

Beiil'h 

bufl'alo Prairie 

Calvary 

Centre 

al Valley 

Dixon 

Eiigington 

Edwards 

Franklin Grove 

Pulton 

Givrden Plains 

Geneseo 

Hamlet 10 00 

Keithsburg 4 00 

Kewanee H 00 

Maiden 

Miian 

Millersburgh 

Morrison 

Miinson 

New Boston 

Newton 
Norwood 

Peiiiel 

Perryton 

Pleasant Ridge 

Pre-Einption 

Princeton 

Rock Island B'dw'y 12 90 
" Central 7 00 

Sharon 

Spring Valley 

Sterling 

Viola 

Woodhnll 

Ceut'l Prairie 



4 95 



9 25 
10 21 
5 00 

60 80 
15 00 



29 54 



10 CO 
12 00 



() 00 
121 00 

16 85 
3 00 
1 50 
7 00 

89 88 



50 CO 
4 65 
11 00 



512 53 



5 00 



5 00 
53 00 



Phy of Schuyler. 
Adrian 

Appanoose 6 00 

Aui^iista 15 00 

Biirdolph 18 88 
Birmingham 3 00 

Brooklyn 1 00 

r.nrton Memorial 

Buahnell 17 00 13 00 

Camp Creek 30 00 

Camp Point 20 00 5 00 

CitrtLge 53 28 18 29 

Chili 



30 00 



48 86 



20 00 

20 77 



4 00 

5 00 



25 00 



Clayton 

Doildsville 

Kl>enezer 

Ellin<?ton Mem'l 

Elvaston 

Fairmou'it 

Foun'ain Green 

Good Hope 

Hiimilton 

Hersman 

Horeb 

Huntsville 

Kirkwood 

Lee 

Liberty 

Macomb 

McLean 

Monmouth 

Montebollo 

Mt. Sterling 

•' Gcr. 
New Salera 
Oak Valley 
Olive 
Oquavvka 

" Junction 

Perry 

Plymouth 

Pitt!^ field 

PontooMic 

Prairie City 

Quincy, 1st 

Rushville 

Salem, Ger. 

Shiloh 

Walnut Grove 

Warsaw 

Wythe 

Miscellaneous 



6 00 
10 00 


28 no 

21 64 

8 83 


7 DO 
20 00 


103 30 
41 77 
51 62 
14 00 




111 00 




51 00 



8 00 

3 75 

21 00 

30 00 
7 00 



20 00 

6 00 

66 50 

67 n7 
2 00 

196 49 

8 00 



l(t m 
3 00 



16 00 



60 15 
4 00 



13 00 



584 81 



29 00 

25 00 
50 00 



29 50 



Pby of Spri'igfldd. 
Auburn 
Bates 

Bruih Creek 
Chatham 
Dawson 
Decatur 
Farmitigton 

Irish Grove 40 00 

Jacksonville. 1st 149 49 

" 1st Port'se 

5 25 
" Central 
" Wes!m'r 
Lincoln 
Miicon 
Manchester 
Maroa 
Mason City 
Murrayvilie 
Nn|.!es 

North Sangamon 
Pennsylvania 
Petersburgh 
Pissrah 

Pleasant Plains 
Providence 
Spriiigticid, 1st 
2d 
3d 
" l»t Port'se 
2d " 
Sweetwater 
Unity 
Virginia 13 00 



40 00 



54 20 
14 27 



100 00 
125 57 



14 20 
5 CO 



. B DB 

19 00 

20 00 
34 00 

13 00 

25 00 



58 00 
2 00 
47 00 



85 80 125 00 



24 00 



3 00 
22 15 



11 50 

101 00 



16 47 
12 40 

:,667 00 



714 62 148 24 3,301 87 



9 (X) 
227 85 160 CH1 



25 00 

100 50 

16 00 

4 00 

13 00 

7 00 



15 39 



5 00 



50 00 



76 00 



40 23 
60 00 
1(6 57 



62 07 

69 97 
21 75 
20 00 

259 32 
155 00 
68 11 



26 70 
35 00 



ANNUAL REPORT OF RECEIPTS. 



T 1 '> 

1 r % 



S^AB. 8. W. B DS. 



Williamsville 
Wiiicht'tttT 



SYNOD OP 

Pby of Cra 
Alamo 
Aitioa 
Benton 
Bethany 
Bethel 
Beulah 
Clinton 
C>.lfax 

Covington, 1st 
2d 
Crawfordsville, 1st 

" Centre 
Darlington 
Davton 
Delphi 
Dover 
Elizaville 
IC age lie 
Fowler 
Fiankfo t 
Hlcl<ory Grove 
Hopewell 
Judson 
Kimberlin 
Kirklin 
Ladoga 
La Fayette, 1st 
2d 
Lebanon 
Lex'nston 
Marshtield 
Mont'Zniua 
Newtown 
Newport 
Nesv Bethel 
Oxford 
Parkersburg 
Perrvsville 
Prairie Centre 
Rockville 
Romney 
Rossville 
Rock Creek 

R(.cl<lield 

Sedalia 
Spring Grove 
State Line 
Sugar Creek 
Thorn town 
Toronto 
Union 

Veedersburgh 
Wa?elind 
Wea-Romney 
West Lebanon 
West Point 
Williamsport 
Zionsville 



8 30 
971 33 1S2 39 1,053 01 

INDIANA. 

ufvrdnvUle. 



9 00 
68 00 
6 50 
9 00 



1 00 

35 00 

3 10 

30 00 

25 16 



7 00 
184 00 



3 25 

15 83 

10 00 
1 95 

16 00 

3 00 



8 45 
30 00 



6 00 



9 00 
2 30 
S 00 
7 50 



1 00 
8 00 
7 38 



3 25 



91 00 



86 00 

13 22 

5 00 

55 42 



45 25 

38 80 
104 86 

45 00 
114 19 

00 

8 00 

5 on 

117 97 



2 00 

117 59 
yii 53 
10 CO 



35 00 



14 SO 



465 42 100 25 



Albion 

Aaburn 

Bluffton 

Bristol 

Decatur 

Elbaiian 

Elkhart 



Pby of Fori Wayne. 



4 00 
8 70 

5 00 

5 00 

2;d 00 



20 00 
25 dO 


15 50 

16 50 


25 00 


I 60 50 


6 CO 


1,026 13 


9 69 
16 00 
12 00 


148 25 



Fort Wayne, Ist 
2d 
8d 

Goshen 

Highland 

Hopewell 

Huntington 

Kendullville 

Larwill 

La Grange 

L:ina 

A' iller.-burgh 

Murray 

(.•rland 

Oss;aU 

Pierceton 

Pleasant Grove 

Salem Centre 

Swan 

Troy 

Warsaw 

Waterloo 

Misccllaneoue 



Pby of Ind 
Acton 
Bainliiidgo 
n th:inr 
BliioniingtoD, 
Widnut St 
B iggsiown 
Rrownsburph 
Ciirpentersville 
Clerni"nt 

Ci.lUMlbus 

Danville 

Dotraldsnn 
Kdinbiirgh 

Franklin, Ist 

Georgetown 

Greenca-lle 

Greenfield 

Greenwood 

Hebron 

Hopewell 

IndianapoliB, Ist 
2d 
3d 
" 4th 

5th 
" 6th 

7th 
8th 
9th 
llih 
12th 

Indianapolis Me- 
morial 

Nashville 

New Hope 
" PIsgah 

Piitnamville 

Shil.di 

Southport 

Union 

White Lick 

Miscellaneous 



218 50 100 00 

54 77 30 00 
2 00 
13 00 

8 35 

9 iO 



14 40 



00 



47 44 
8 50 



11 45 
24 35 



97 17 



18 00 
9 40 



80 92 
66 60 
293 17 
24 00 
60 0(.) 
3 00 
8 CO 

14 17 

1 00 
18 46 

58 30 



3 00 

2 00 

13 00 



10 22 



5 00 



368 00 
89 51 
57 00 

126 00 



25 00 
55 00 



31 00 
66 00 



12 75 




6 50 

4 85 23 25 



200 00 

64 00 

11 00 

64 PO 
461 27 
4-0 00 
2^2 27 
159 30 
5 &) 
5 00 

10 ro 

14 00 



70 00 
46 55 



40 37 



862 44 31 57 1,963 76 



Pby of Logansport. 
Bethel 6 00 

Bethlehem 
Bnurbon 

Centie 3 25 

Concord 6 00 

Crown Point 



134 



ANNUAL KEPORT OF EECEIPT8. 



Franclsville 
Goodland 
Harris Prairie 
Ilebron 
K(?hlland 
Lake Pniirle 
La Porte 
Logan sporf. Ist 

" Broadway 6 25 
Meaciow Lake 
Michigan City 
Mishawaka 
MoDon 
Monticello 
Mt. Zion 

PiSglih 

Plymouth 
Reminfrton 
R.-'DSSelacr 
Rochester 
Rolling Prairie 
Salom 

South Bend, Ist 
2d 
Sumptions Prairie 
Tassinong 
Union 
Valparaiso 
Walkerton 
Weat Union 



5 00 



270 11 

214 88 



154 24 

14 70 



25 40 
3 00 



10 00 
5 70 



9 (X) 



44 S9 



15 75 
2 00 



69 36 



21 03 
3 85 



6 00 



794 17 100 24 



Pby of Muncie. 
Anderson 
Centre Grove 
Elwood 
Hartford City 
Hopewell 
Jonesboro 
Kokomo 
La Gro 
Liberty 
Marion 
Muncie 

New Burlington 
" Cumberlaud 
Hope 



9 00 
10 GO 



00 



5 00 
4 20 



Noblebville 

Perry bbtirgh 

Pern 

Portland 

Shiloh 

Tipton 

Union City 

W;ibash 

Winchester 

Xeuia 



30 00 



5 00 
2 50 



126 25 



189 75 



6 00 



15 20 



Pby of A'tfjc Albany. 
Anderson 



Bethel 

Bedford 

Bethlehem 

Bridgeport 

Brownfetown 

Charlestown 

Oxydou 

Graham 

Greenville 

Hanover 

Jackson Co 

Jefferson 

Jeffersonville 

Laconia 

Leavenworth 



4 36 
1 50 



5 65 



28 50 



10 00 



W. B'D8 


7 00 


6 00 


40 65 
90 2H 
1U5 00 
51 34 
29 SO 
48 40 
39 37 


48 30 


13 75 
20 30 
29 00 


39 50 


40 18 


40 90 
130 37 


680 15 


30 00 


7 10 


6 25 


45 00 


15 00 
11 04 
39 bli 
32 54 


17 00 
10 00 

130 10 


343 69 


14 80 


21 50 


2 00 
70 50 


61 00 



Lexinston 


6 25 


12 55 


Livonia 






Madison, Ist 


85 63 


16 75 90 00 


2a 




20 00 


Mauckpnrt 






Mill own 1 


1 50 




Mitchell 




8 85 


Monroe 






Mt. Lebanon 






Mt. Vernon 






New Albany, 1st 


69 00 


50 CO 


" 2d 


71 82 


50 00 


" 3d 




51 86 


New Philadelphia 






" Washington 


10 00 


13 00 


North VernXin 






Oak Grove 


1 70 




Orleans 




j 


Otisco 






Owen Creek 




22 00 


Pioli 






Pleasant Hill 






" Township 






Rihoboth 


6 60 




Salem 




10 80 


Seymour 




27 33 


Sharon 


2 30 




'• Hill 


5 00 




Smyrna 






St. .John 


2 00 




Unity 






Uticit 






Valley City 
Vernon 


3 10 


57 95 


Vevay 






Walnut Ridge 


5 00 


858 46 


Miscellaueoua 










334 27 


V75 1,427 65 


Pby of Vinoennea. 




Bethany 






Bowling Green 






Brazil 


83 02 


&J 00 


Bruc ville 






Carlisle 


3 15 




Claiborne 


4 00 




Evansville. Ist ave 


8 00 


55 .50 


" Grace 


41 90 


75 00 


" Walnut 8t 102 00 


131 00 


Grayville 


3 00 




Howesville 






Indiana 






Koli en 


2 GO 




Mt. Vernon 






Oak Grove 






Oakland City 






Ohio 






Olive Hill 






Petersburgh 


4 00 


6 00 


Poland 






Princeton 


5 00 


43 46 


lloyal Oak 






Saline 






Smyrna 






Spencer 




15 23 


Sullivan 


18 23 


5 23 


Terre Haute, Cent'l 35 00 


41 00 


Union 






Upper Indiana 


13 75 


10 15 


Vandiilia 


1 00 




Vincennes 


33 78 


71 80 


Wiishiniiton 


10 74 


2 72 7 60 


West Salem 






Wovthington 






Miscellaneous 


20 00 





383 57 



7 95 516 75 



ANNUAL REPORT OF RECEIPTS. 



135 





s 


AB. 9. 


W. B'D3. 




SAB. s 


w. b'ds. 










"Wyoming; 


50 00 


81 55 


Pby of White Water. 






Hope Missions 


42 46 25 00 




Arlington 
















Aurora 


16 00 


1 15 






1,091 27 57 79 


1,224 53 


Bath 

Brookville 


21 45 


10 00 


10 00 


Pby of Council Blufs. 




Cambridge 


2 80 




10 50 


Adair 


4 50 




Centrcville 








Aftonr 




13 65 


Clarksbu gh 








Atlantic 




3 00 


" Memorial 






Audubon 






College Comer 






22 00 


Avoca 


12 00 


25 00 


Connersville 


13 00 




10 00 


Bedford 


10 00 


400 


Ger 


2 00 






Brooks 






Dunlapsville 


3 00 






Caledonia j 






Ebenezer 


7 00 




18 85 


Casey 


11 01 




Greensburgh 


93 95 




377 56 


Clarinda 


5S 80 


25 00 


Hagerstown 








Carson 






Homer 








Conway 






Hopewell 


2 00 






College Springs 






Kingston 






61 30 


Corning 
Council Bluffs 


14 06 


50 62 


Knightstown 






17 76 




26 00 


Lawronceburgh 








Creston 






LewisvlUe 


6 00 




1 00 


Emerson 


15 00 6 00 


24 70 


Liberty 






8 00 


Essex 


3 00 


3 10 


Metamora 








Fairvicw 




6 00 


Mt. Carmel 








Goshen 






New Castle 








Greenfield 


4 30 


98 


Palmetto 


116 31 






Griswold 






Richmond 






300 48 


Guthrie Centre 






Rising Sun 


7 00 






Hamburgh 






Rushville 






85 55 


Hazel Dell 






Sardinia 


14 63 




25 00 


Henderson 






Shelbyville 


29 !t3 


5 58 


67 00 


Imogene 






" Ger 


5 00 






Knox 


1 35 




Sparta 








Lenox 


9 70 




Union 








Lo"an 
Malvern 


2S 27 19 00 


7 05 


Versailles 








36 00 


58 88 


Zoar 








Marne 


5 00 




Miscellaneous 






60 00 


Menlo 

Misr-ouri Valley 
Mount Ayr 


6 00 
5 00 
5 60 






m. 57 


16 73 


1,074 44 












Nodaway 




600 


SYNOD OF IOWA. 






Neola 






Pby of Cedar Rapids. 






Orient 
Pilot Grove 






Andrew 


2 85 






Platte Centre 






Anamosa 


4 67 




9 72 


Red Oak, 1st 


20 22 


79 29 


Bellevue 


9 18 






Randolph 






Bethel 
Big Grove 


3 00 


2 00 




Shelby 
Shenandoah 




36 85 


Blairstown 


9 30 




24 09 


Sidney 


27 00 


14 75 


Cedar Rapids, Ist 


685 33 




261 00 


Union 






2d 


83 05 




99 00 


Villisca 


8 00 


400 


Central 


6 30 






Walnut 


8 00 


16 50 


Centre Junction 


6 50 






Westminster 






Clarence 


7 00 




10 00 


Woodbine 


12 07 




Clinton 


34 00 


10 00 


110 40 


Miscellaneous 




2 00 


Delmar 






5 00 








Dysart 
Elwood 


D 00 




25 07 




304 88 25 00 


405 82 


Ely 
Fairfax 








Pby of Des Moines. 




Fulton 








Adel 


8 00 


60 00 


Garrison 






23 30 


Albia 


10 55 


25 00 


Hickory Grove 








Allerton 






Linn Grove 


38 32 


9 42 


83 00 


Centreville 


62 00 




Lyons 






9 00 


Chariton 




15 36 


Marion 


24 71 


11 37 


57 00 


Cincinnati 






Mechanicsville 






64 55 


Colfax 


4 60 




Mt. Vernon 


13 90 




38 09 


Columbia 






Onslow 


8 50 




10 00 


Corydon 


1 00 




Pleasant Hill 








Ddllas Centre 


400 




Richland Centre 


10 00 






Derby 






Scotch Grove 


12 20 




10 00 


Dcs Moines 




171 00 


Shellsburgh 








Dexter 


13 56 


11 55 


Vinton, 


33 00 




292 00 


Earlham 






Watkins 


2 00 




11 75 


East Des Moines 


5 00 


^0 00 


Wheatland 








English 


4 50 





^3^ 



A2TNUAL REPORT OF RECEIPTS. 



8AB. S. W. b'DS. 



Gnle.^bnrgh 

G^iidt II Grove 

Grand River 

Hartf.ini 

Hopeville 

HumestOD 

Iiiiliiin<'la 

Kii'>xville 

Leighton 

LP"n 

Lineville 

Lifas 

Medora 

Mariposa 

Miritinr.i 

Moiilton 

Mt Vernon 

Newbern, Knglish 

Newton 

New Sharon 

Olivet 

Osce.iia 

Oskaloosa 

Pelli 

" Holland 
Perry 
Plymouth 
Prom se 
Bus-^cll 
Seymour 

South Des Moines 
St. Charles 
TJnionville 
Waukee 
White Oak 
Winterset 
"Wood burn 



SO 15 
20 69 



6 00 



28 (16 
3 00 



15 00 



.3 00 
3 00 



7 00 
193 00 



Fby of Dubuque. 



Bethel 
Camp Creek 
Centre town 
Clermont 
Dyersville 
Dubuque Ist 
2d 
" German 
Epworth 
Fairbanks 
Farley 
Frankville 
Hazleton 
Hopkiiiion 
Independence, Ist 
Ger 
Jesup 

Lin sing, let 
" Ger 
Lime Spring 
Manchester 
Maynard 
McGregor 
Mt. Hope 
Peosta 
Pine Creek 
Pleasant Grove 
Prairie 
Rossville 
Rowley 

Sherrill's Mound 
Waukon 
Zlun 



15 00 
8 00 

2 00 
41 87 

125 00 
13 00 
8 00 
1 00 

3 00 

1 00 

6 90 

20 00 

7 50 

7 00 
3 54 



7 00 



4 00 
2 00 



8 60 
185 00 
12 00 



18 85 
5 69 



2 95 



6 00 



25 00 

26 00 



25 00 
10 00 



5 00 

6 10 



27 50 
25 00 



22 00 
9 00 



118 00 75 00 



423 01 145 49 564 40 



12 00 



2 00 
2 00 



10 00 



102 30 



23 27 
111 00 



3 65 
16 00 



7 00 
30 00 



426 41 16 00 363 22 



bAB. 8. W. B'DP. 



Pby of tort Dodge. 
Arcadia 3 00 

Battle Creek 6 35 

Beloit 
Bethel 

Boone 14 no 

Calliope 10 00 

Carroll 8 00 

Cherokee 12 00 

Denison 
East Orange 
Eden 

Emmet Co., 1st 
Estberville 

Fort Dodge 143 18 

Glidden 
Grand Junction 
Hospeifl 2 00 

Humboldt Co 
Ida 25 (10 

Jefferson 

Lake City 10 00 

Liberty 5 00 

Mapleton 2 00 

Marcus 3 00 

Meriden J 00 

Moingona 8 00 

O'Brien Co Scotch 3 00 
Odebolt 8 00 

Baton 10 00 

Pleasant Valley 
Plymouth Co 
Pomeroy 
Providence 
Ramsey 
Rippey 
Rolfe 

Rolfe 2d 5 07 

Sac City 
Sanborn 
Scranton 

Sioux City 16 65 

Spirit Lake 
Storm Lake 

Vail 9 56 

West Weaver 
Wheatland, Ist Ger 5 00 
Miscellaneous 

310 41 
Pby of loiva. 
4 00 



Batavia 
Bentonsport 
Biriuinjjham 
Bloomfiild 
Bonaparte 
Buriinfiton, Ist 
Chequest 
Groton 

Ebeuezer, German 
Eddyville 
Fairtield 
Grandview 
Home Prairie 
Keokuk, Westm'r 
Kirkville 
Kossuth, Ist 
Lebanon 
Libertyville 
Mediapolis 
MiddletowQ 
Montrose 
Morning Sun 
Mt. Pleusant, 1st 
Ger 
New London 



8 00 
5 00 



111 38 
2 00 



91 89 



336 53 



5 00 
3 00 
5 00 

14 80 
2 00 

37 50 
155 90 

20 00 
7 00 



3 00 



20 70 



57 00 

10 00 

121 89 

6 60 



26 00 



2 50 
14 00 



4 60 



21 00 

19 00 

9 00 
23 10 290 49 

88 70 
51 89 124 90 

70 34 178 61 

105 75 

112 00 

13 80 
102 60 
49 41 



60 00 



31 00 
126 46 



57 90 



ANNUAL REPORT OF RECEIPTS. 



137 



Oakland 
Ottiimwa 
Perlee 

Pleasant Plain 
Primrose 
Salina 
Shavrtn 
Miil-d 
Shunam 
Spring Creek 
St. Peter's Evan'l 
Su'iimit 
To'ilsboro 
Trenlon 
Troy 
Union 
WapeltD 
West Orove 
" Point 
Wiofield 



Pby f>f low 
Atalisst 
B thel 
Blue I4ras8 
Bro)kl.vn 
Cfdar Valley 
C lumbus Central 
Crawford sville 
Davenport, 

" College Av 
Deep River 
Eldridfre 
Elm Grove 
Fuirview 
Hermon 
Iowa City 
Keota 
La Dora 
La Fayette 
Le Claire 
Malcolm 
Marengo 
Martiusburgh 
Montezuma 
Mt. Uni(jn 

Muscatine, Ist 
Ger. 

New Centre 

Oxford 

Princeton 

Red Oak Grove 

Scott 

Sigourney 

Solon 

Sugar Creek 

Summit 

Tipton 

Unity 

Victor 

Walcott 

Washington 

West Branch 
" Liberty 

What Cheer 

Wilton Junction 

Williamsburg 



22 75 
24 00 



3 00 



3 00 

14 50 

1 85 



20 00 

6 00 

2 00 

5 00 

911 10 
a City. 

11 CO 

6 10 
40 00 

5 45 

4 45 
11 00 
11 00 
15 81 

5 00 



8 50 

10 75 

7 00 

8 50 

13 15 

11 00 

10 00 

12 00 

9 00 

50 
10 00 

30 17 
4 00 

2 00 
79 55 

4 00 

14 75 

15 00 

3 12 

362 80 



50 00 



25 61 



9 00 
11 00 



18 45 
182 23 1,105 19 

2 00 
5 05 



10 nn 

25 00 



2 34 



SAB. S. W. B'DS. 



5 no 

3 00 



10 75 



6 00 



8 46 



29 57 



18 45 
31 00 



13 90 
18 50 



3 00 



38 87 
33 50 



18 00 



Pby of Waterloo. 
Ackley 

Albion 5 00 

Applington 
Butler Centre 



35 65 241 84 



48 18 
23 19 



Caldwell 
Cedar Falls 

'• Valley 
Clarksville 
Conrad 
Corinth 
Dayton 
East Friesland 
Eldora 
Giflford 
Greene 

Grundy Centre 
Holland 
Iowa Centre 
Janesville 
La I'orte City 
Marshalltown 
Morrison 
Nevada 
Northwood 
Pistrah 

Point Pleasant 
Polens Grove 
Kock Creek 
Salem 

State Centre 
Steamboat Rock 
Toledo 
Tranquility 
Union 
Unity 
Waterloo 
Waverly 
West Friesland 
Whitton 
■Williams 
Wilson's Grove 
Wright Co., 1st 



800 



10 00 
10 00 



17 50 

12 50 

8 00 
25 00 

13 39 

6 CO 



11 50 



10 25 
15 00 



11 25 
3 83 

10 00 

8 00 

2 00 

192 72 



STNOD OF KANSAS. 

Phy of Emporia. 
26 00 



Arkansas City 
Augusta 
Belle Plain 
Big Creek 
Burliugame 
Burlington 
Caldwell 
Calvary 
Cedarville 
Clear Water 
Council Grove 
Davis Co., 2d 
Dexter 
Ebeuezer 
El Dorado 
Elm Creek 
Eimendora 
El Paso 
Emporia, Ist 
2d 
Fai^^^ew 
Florence 
Harmony 
Hartford 
Homer Creek 
Hunnewell 
Indiauola 
LeRoy 
Lyndon 
Malvern 
Marion Centre 
Mayfield 
Morris Co. 



5 00 

2 dO 

28 25 

15 00 

25 00 

9 00 
2 00 



17 00 



5 00 
12 00 



5 00 
5 50 



2 GO 



2 50 

8 00 
2 00 
14 00 



2 00 



3 00 



15 00 
5 00 



4 00 



5 00 


19 90 


18 25 


7 00 


18 85 


8 80 


26 00 


5 00 



27 03 

5 00 



26 15 
3 00 



7 00 



5 00 272 35 



17 50 

5 50 

11 47 



10 00 
10 85 



10 00 



2 00 13 00 
7 50 



5 00 



138 



ANNUAL REPORT OF KKCEIPTS. 



SAB. 8. W. B'DS. 



■AB. S. W. B'DS 



Mt. Zion 

Mulvane 

New Salem 

Newton 

Oaklnud 

Osasf City 

Oxford 

Peabody 

Peotone 

Parkcrville 

Pleasant Unity 

Plymouth 

Prairie Ridge 

Quenemo 

Rock 

" Creek 
Salem Towrship 

Welsh 
Scranton 
Sedan 

Silver Creek 
Star Valley 
Stone Chapel 
Walnut Valley 
Walton 
Waverly 
Wellin^on 
Westminster 
Wichita 
Winfleld 



2 00 
35 00 



10 00 



6 00 
5 00 



2 00 
5 GO 

3 00 



32 40 



81 40 
30 00 



347 05 

Pby of HiqMand. 

Arrington, Ger. 

Atchison 4 00 

Axtee 5 00 

Blue Rapids 6 86 

Corning 

Deer Creek 

Doniphan 

Effingham 

Frankfort 

Greeuleaf 

Hiawatha 

Highhmd 

Hoi ton 

Ger. 
Huron 
Irving 
Keunekuk 
Lancaster 
Leghorn 
Marysville 

North 
Netawaka 
Neuchatel 
Nortoiiville 
Oneida 

Pleasant Hill, Ger 
Ross 
St. Clare 
Troy 

Vermillion 
Washington 
W;ithena 
Whiting 

99 06 
Pby of Lamed. 
Alexandria 

Arlington 1 00 

Ash Creek 
Bellefontainc 
Bethel 

" Ger. 
Brown's Grove 



4 no 
2 00 



12 00 
41 20 



2 00 
5 00 



3 00 



9 00 



5 00 



63 00 



33 35 



8 25 



42 63 



2 00 238 05 



5 20 



20 00 

9 00 
12 50 



5 20 



41 50 



Burrton 


5 00 


C'aiiiou 




Chase 


25 00 


Coleville 




Dodge City 


3 10 


Ellinwood 


2 00 


Enterprise 




Harper 




Kiiynesville 




Uutchiuson 


19 00 


luka 




Kingman 




Iviiisley 
Lamed 




7 43 


Lyons 


8 HO 


Marquette 




Medicine Lodge 




McPherson 


2 70 


Mt. Pleasant 




Ness 




Pioneer 




Pleasant Valley 




R ymond 




Roxliury 




Sharp's Creek 




Spearviile 


2 00 


Sterling 




Valley Township 


3 00 


Zion 






78 23 


Pby of Neosho. 


Altamont 




Baxter Springs 


10 03 


Curlvle 


17 50 


Cata'lpa 


23 75 


Cedar Creek 




Central City 


4 00 


Chauute 


2 15 


Cherry Township 




Cherryvale 




Che to pa 




C!aramore 




Colu'.r'.tjus 




Elk. City 




Empire City 




Fish Creek and 1 
Fulton 1 


4 00 


Fort Gibson 




Foi't Scott 


18 00 


Fredonia 




Galena 




G.iniett 


9 00 


Geneva 


4 10 


Girard 


21) 00 


Humboldt 


16 60 


Independence 

Ger 
lola 


3 00 


4 50 


Kaw, Indian 




La t^ygne 




Ue Loup 




Liberty 


1 70 


Lone Elm 




Lciuisburgh 




Mapleton 




Maple Grove 


4 35 


.Mill Creek 


1 00 


Mineral Point 


3 75 


Munmc ulh 


76 


Montana 




Mound Valley 




Mount Hope 




Muskofjee 


17 40 


McCune 


1 90 


New Lancister 




" Pittsburgh 





1 00 



31 80 



44 50 



11 00 



1 00 



4 50 



89 80 



4 50 



17 50 



300 



8 00 
38 00 



ANNUAL EEPORT OF EECEIPTg. 



139 



New Scotland 
N.odi-sha 
Ni'dsho Valley 
North Fork 
Osii^e, 1st 

'■ Mission 
Ot'wego 
Ottawa 
Piiola 
Parsons 
Pleas ill t Hill 
PlensRnton 
Proscott 
Princeton 
Reeder 
Riclimond 
Ripen 

Round Prairie 
Rutland Centre 
Salem 
Somerset 
Spiinsdale 
Sugar Valley 
Tahlequali 
Thayer 
Union town 
Vinita 
Walnut 
Wealaka 
Weir City 
WeWdka 
Wire Crossing 
Williamsburgh 
Yates Centre 



10 55 
3 15 
6 00 



40 00 
1 00 



6 05 
4 50 



60 



LOO 



ail 74 



GO 



73 25 



Pby of Osborne. 
Bethel 
Bow Creek 
Clayton 
Covert 
Cresson 
Gettvsburgh 
Graham 6 00 

G aiiitield 
Hayes City 
Kill Creek 
>'ortou 
Oberlin 
Osborn 
Phillipsburgh 
Prairie View 
Rose Valley 
Russell 
Shilob 

Smith Centre 
Victoria 
Wakeeney 
Zion 



6 00 



Pby of Solomon. 



Abilene 

Ashtnn 

Belleville 

Beloit 

Bennington 

Cawker City 

Cheever 

Clyde 

Concordia 

Culver 

Delphos 1 

Ellsworth 

Fort Barker 



S 00 



40 00 

2 00 

9 00 
5 00 

117 51 
1 00 
5 00 

3 00 



5 00 



80 62 



9 61 
5 00 



SAB. S. W. B D3 



Fountain 








Glasco 








Glen Elder 








Ionia 








Lincoln Centre 








Mankato 






8 75 


Minneapolis 


15 .34 


5 78 


6 72 


Mt. Pleasant 


6 UO 






Mulberry 








New Tabor 








Plum Creek 








Pobeta 


s 00 






Prii.-pect 








Providence 






7 67 


Rose Bank 








Rubens 








Salina 






21 43 


Scandia 








Seapo 


1 00 






Solomon 


14 00 






Summerville 








Vesper 


2 00 






White Creek 








White Rock City 








Willow Dale 


3 00 






Wilson 


5 00 






Wolf Creek 








MiscellaDeous 


2 00 








143 85 


10 78 


89 82 


Pby of Topeka. 






Armstrong 








Auburn 


17 .30 




30 00 


Bethel 


5 00 






Black Jack 


10 00 




^00 


Blue Mound 


5 00 






Clay Coutre 






8 75 


Clinton 


9 03 




S7 00 


Curtiss Creek, Ger. 






Di> t^oto 








Edgerton 


16 00 






Exeter 








Fa rinonnt 








Gardner 


5 00 




5 46 


Hebron 








Junction City 


10 00 






Lawrence 


]'J8 46 


25 00 


IIT 95 


Leavenworth, 1st 


SO to 




175 00 


West- 








minster 








Manhattan 


15 00 






Mission Centre 








Mulb; rry Cr'k, Ger. 5 00 






()latht,lst 








Oskaloo.-a 






15 00 


1 almyra 


4 00 






Pauline 


2 75 




5 00 


Perry 


3 77 


1 02 


25 00 


Riley Centre 


4 00 






Eossville 








Sharon 






6«) 


Silver Lake & Ridge 






Spring Hill 


4 00 






Stranger 








Summit 








T.ipeka, 1st 


219 17 


106 76 


120 00 


Topeka Third 


3 00 






" North 


7 00 




10 00 


Vineland 


7 67 




3 36 


Wakarnsa 








Wanieg" 


2 00 




600 


Willow Springs 








Winchester 








Wyandotte 


5 00 


1 00 





588 20 133 78 600 50 



140 



ANNUAL REPORT OF RECEIPTS. 



8AB. 8. W.B'DS. 



BTNOD OP KESTUCKY. 

Pby of Eiienezer. 



Asliland 

Augusta 

B I'lineton 

Canton 

Concord 

Covington, 1st 

Crittonden 

Dayton 

KbeiiezcT 

Faluioilth 

FK-miniisburgh 

FraDkfo'r'. 

Greenup 

Lexington, 2(1 

Ludlow 

Maysville, 

Moorell' Id 

Mt. S'.orlins 

Murphysville 

New Hope 

Newport, Col'bia st 

Paris, let 

Sbarpsburg 

Valley 



68 65 



218 72 

9 00 
1 00 

43 70 
3S GO 

3 00 
26!) 40 

5 00 

5 00 



1 00 



5 00 



1 25 



10 00 



34 40 



117 19 



8 61 
105 25 



115 00 
30 00 



60 00 



658 07 
Pby <]f Louisville. 

Bowling r,r'n 2d 12 00 

Caney Fork 

Cloverport 

Dycusliurgh 

Elizabethtown 

Fredonia 

Greenwood 

Hodgensviile 10 00 

Hopkinsville Ist 

Kuttawa 

Louisville, 4th 

'■ Central 204 80 

" College 8t 55 25 

" K-.ox 

" Olivet Ch'l 30 00 

" Warren 

" IMemorial 89 67 

" Walnut St 21 62 

" 22d et 4 00 

Marion 

Nevsf Castle 1 70 

Olivet 15 00 

Owensboro, 1st 140 00 

Penna Run 

Pewee Valley 7 50 

Pisgah 

Pleasant Hill 

Plum Creek 5 00 

Princeton, Ist 4 85 

2d 

Salem 

Scottsville 

Shelbyville, 1st 22 95 

South Carrollton 

630 34 
Pby of Transylvania. 
Barhourville 



162 84 318 86 



00 



27 00 

5 00 

20 00 

165 00 

80 00 



Bethel, Union 
Burkesville 
Columbia 
Concord 
Crab Orchard 
Danville, 2d 
Dix River 
Ebenezer 
Edmondton 



2 50 
17 50 
19 25 



100 00 



200 CO 



20 00 



9 50 
10 00 



570 50 



70 00 



Green sburgh 

Harmony 

Harrodsburgh 

Uustouville 

Kirk wood 

Lancaster 

Lebanon, let 

Livingston 

Lowell 

Meaux Chapel 

Murafordsville 

New Providence 

Paint Lick 

Perrysville 

Pine Hill 

Richmond 

Stanford 



10 00 

5 00 
5 00 
8 00 
1 00 



8 50 



176 75 



6TN0D OP MIOniCAN. 



Pby Qf Detroit. 


Ann Arbor 


34 26 


Birmingham 


20 00 


Brighton 


5 00 


Canton 




Dearborn 


10 00 


Detroit, 1st 


442 79 


" Calvary 


8 00 


" Central 




" Fort St 


1,255 56 


" Jefferson 




ave 


459 00 


" Memorial 




" Trumbull 




ave 




" Union 


80 00 


" Westmin- 




ster 


817 38 


East Nankin 


8 25 


Erin 


6 00 


Farmington 




Holly 


16 00 


Howell 


179 51 


Independence 




Milan 




Milford 


219 CO 


Mt. Clemens 




Oakland 




Plaintteld 


8 25 


Plymouth, let 


43 8S 


2d 


4 00 


Pontiac 


41 38 


Saline 




^^outhfleld 




South Lyon 


41 21 


Springfield 


8 00 


Stony Creek 


24 00 


UnacUUa 


10 50 


White Lake 


21 50 


Wing Lake 




Wyandotte 


15 50 


Ypsilanti 


50 00 



45 51 



40 00 



18 45 



5 40 



00 



70 00 



496 00 
104 24 
43 23 


3 05 

623 86 

37 Oil 

85 00 

1,813 75 


5 30 
30 00 



147 00 
20 00 



13 00 

92 81 



183 00 
34 25 



45 OO 
52 96 



18 00 
10 00 



30 00 



35 00 

5 00 

851 00 

15 00 



3,773 97 118 36 4,243 34 
Pby of Grand Rapids. 
Advance 
Big Rapids 

West- 
minster 
Boyrie Falls ] 00 

Cadillac ' ji 49 

Central Lake 
Crooked Lake 
Crofton 
East Bay 



ANNUAL REPORT OF RECEIPTS. 



141 



9AB. 9. W. B'DS. 



Elk Kapids 


11 BO 


Evart 


2 00 


Perrysburg 


3 00 


Greenwood 


5 00 


Graud Haven 




Grand Rapids, 1st 




" VVestm'ter 


86 11 


Harbor Springs 




Ionia 


21 00 


Lu lington 


11 00 


Montague 


35 83 


Muir 


26 00 


Old Wing 




Omena 




Peto^key 


23 77 


Pewamo 


5 00 


Sebewa 




Spring Lake 


21 00 


Westwood 





2 30 



201 31 

Pbij of Kalamazoo. 
Alamo 

Allegan 18 00 

Berrien Springs 
Biicliauan 
Burr Oak 
Cassopolis 
Cousiantine 
Decatur 
Edwardsburgh 
Kalamazoo 1st 

North 



Kendall 
Law ton 
Marl in 
Niles 
Parkville 
Paw Paw 
Plain well 
Richland 
Schoolcraft 
Sturgis 
Three Rivers 
White Pigeon 



6 00 
20 00 

9 00 

335 01) 

13 00 

5 00 



3 00 
45 24 



2 00 
10 00 
13 91 
30 45 

15 00 

525 60 



Pby of Lansing. 



Albion 

Battle Creek 

Brooklyn 

Concord 

Dausville 

Delhi 

Ecklbrd 

Grand Lodge 

Hastings 

Homer 

Lansing, Ist 

" Franklin st 
Marshall 
Mason 
Oneida 
Okemos 
Parma 
Springport 
Stockbridge 
Sunlield 
Tekonsha 
Windsor 
Miscellaneous 



10 00 



49 T6 



10 00 
3 00 



67 00 
70 64 
10 00 
52 42 
10 00 



6 80 

7 00 
7 55 

25 CO 

5 00 

391 17 



10 00 



200 00 
36 08 
72 08 



25 00 



3 00 



2 30 352 65 



34 00 

25 00 
3 67 
12 40 
81 20 
40 (0 

459 05 



2; 00 
70 00 

25 00 

30 00 

27 28 
40 05 
10 00 

878 65 



14 00 
51 00 
20 00 



2 00 

3 00 
21 00 

48 73 
17 00 
21 00 
10 00 



6 00 



12 00 



10 00 225 73 



Erie 

Uaisin 

Petersburgh 

Jonesville 

Adrian 

Coldwater 

Monroe 

Klissfleld 

Palmyra 

Quincy 

Reading 

Hillsdale 

California 

Manchester 

La Salle 

Clayton 

Deerfield 

Dover 

Hudson 

Tecumseh 

Ida 



Pby of Mont oe. 
8 63 



11 50 
53 72 

67 50 
57 15 

68 00 



20 55 



1 CO 



162 80 



450 85 



Pby of Saginaw. 
Alcona 

Argentine 6 00 

Au Gres 

Au Sable & Osceola 5 00 
Bad Axe 

Bay City 140 00 

Bingham 

Blaclcman Station 
Bro.'kfield 
Byron 

Caro 10 12 

Cass City 4 00 

Calkinsville 
Calvary 
Caseville 
Columbia 

Corunna 33 00 

Cuinber 
East Saginaw 
Emerson 27 00 

Fenton 

Flint 131 30 

Flashing 
Frazer 

Gaines Station 
Grindstone City 1 00 
Harrisville 

Ithaca 4 90 

Lafayette, 2d 2 00 

Lapeer 24 00 

Linden 
Marietta 

Midland City 5 00 

Morrice 

Mt. Pleasant 9 00 

Mundy 9 00 

Omer 
Paris 

Pinconning 
Pine River, Ist 

2d 
Port Austin 10 00 

Port Hope 3 (JO 

Saginaw 5 00 

City 383 89 

" South 5 00 

Sand Beach 

Taymouth 14 14 

Vassar 
Verona 19 06 

Westminster 

851 41 



13 72 



W. B DS. 


21 60 


5 50 


5 00 


37 00 


114 16 


43 00 


97 30 


46 68 


7 00 


ICO 00 


6 00 


3 26 




117 00 



4 00 



9 00 

160 00 



29 00 



30 00 



10 00 
39 00 

240 00 



142 



ANNUAL REPORT OF RECEIPTS. 



BYNOD OF MINNKSOTA. 

Pby Of Dakota. 
Ascension 
Brown Earth 
Buffalo Lakes 
Flandrcau, 1st 
Goodwill 
Hill 

Long Hollow 
Mayasan 
Pilgrim 
Yankton Agency 24 00 

24 00 

Pby of Mankato 
Amboy iPt 10 OO 

Beaver Creek 
Blue Earth 1st 
Carrie let 
Garden City 
Grand View 
Home 

Jackson. let 5 00 

Kasota 
Lake Crystal 
Le Sueur iBt 8 00 

Luverne let 
Lyons 
Madelia l?t 

Mankato l^t 59 56 

Pipest-ne ist 
Redwood Falls 17 10 
RocU Lake 

Saratoga ist 1 00 

St. James 1st 3 OlJ 

St. Peter Union 34 35 
Tracy ist 1 00 

■Weils Ist 13 00 

Westminster 64 6i 

Windom 
Winnebago let 





216 63 


Pby of Red River. 


Angus 




Bariic 




Bismarck 


4 00 


Boundary 




Casseiton 




Elm Grove 




Euclid 




Fargo 


24 no 


Fergus Falls 


40 00 


Fighers 




Forest River 


1 00 


Grand Forks 




(Jrand Rapids 




Greeurtood 




Hope 


1 00 


Jamestown 




Kensington 


5 00 


Lisl)on 


2 60 


Mandeu 




Mapleton 




Mekinok 


6 68 


Moorhetid 




New Buffalo 




Pembina 


5 00 


Quincy 




Shildon 


3 70 


St. Vincent 




Suttou Memorial 


2 00 


Tower City 


5 CO 


Turtle River 




■Warien 





BAB. 8. W. B'DB . 



1 03 





WePtern 










VVlnatland 










Miscellaneous 


27 75 










127 73 


1 03 


173 62 




Phy of St. Paxil. 








Belle Plaine 


5 00 








Browns Valley 


2 CO 








Buffalo 


24 42 








Delano 


3 00 








Diamond Lake 










Dnluth, 1st 


32 00 




21 50 




Dundas 
Empire 
Farmiugton 
Florence 


2 00 
1 00 
5 00 






4 00 


Forest 
Goodhue 


1 00 






16 00 


Green leaf 










Hastings 


18 00 




88 72 




Howard 


5 00 








Independence 


3 00 








Jordan 


5 00 








Litchfleld 


30 00 




20 31 


8 50 


Long Lake 


3 00 






35 00 


Minneapolis, 1st 
5th 


351 20 




246 00 




" Andrew 


1.38 00 




173 86 




" Franklin av. 


44 .30 


34 30 


15 00 


2 40 


" Westminster 


319 99 




358 40 


60 CO 


Murdock 
Oak Grove 
Olivet 


5 35 
3 00 








Pine City 


5 00 




13 00 




Red Wing, 


14 04 




70 00 




Bice's Point 


28 00 


2ro 


16 81 


62 38 


Rockford 
Royalton 
St. Croix Falls 


4 00 
4 00 




15 00 


10 75 


Shakopee 
Spring Grove 








37 00 


Stillwater, 1st 


14 28 




36 62 




2d 








230 03 


St. Cloud 






82 00 




St. Paul, Ist 


41 00 


15 00 


209 10 




" Central 


216 52 




113 00 




" Dayton Ave. 


74 36 




87 86 




" House of Hope 400 56 


25 00 


141 53 


7 00 


Taylor's Falls 
Vermillion 
White Bear Lake 
Wilraar 
Winsted 


2 00 
1 00 




20 00 


70 00 


Miscellaneous 






87 90 


27 30 




, . — . 










1,806 02 


76 30 


1,766 61 




Pby of Southern Dakota. 






Aberdeen 










Bainbridge 










Bridge water 










Brookings 










Cameroii 










Coleman 










Dell Kapids 








40 00 


Deiitor 








29 32 


Flaiidreau,2d 
Forestburgh 
Harmony 
Holland, Ist 
Hope Chapel 










Huron 


25 00 




32 20 




Kimball 


4 29 








Lenox, Ist Ger 










Lincoln Co., Ist 










Maiion 









ANNUAL REPORT OF RECEIPTS. 



143 



PAB. S. W. E'DS. 



Millto-mi 


2 00 


Mit'-hell 


4 00 


Montrose 




New Madison 




Olivet 


4 24 


Parker 




Pierre 




Rock Creek 




Salem 




Scotland 


8 00 


Tyudall 


2 (K) 


Turner 


3 00 


White Lake 


1 92 




54 45 


Piyof 


Winona. 


Albert Lea 


50 00 25 00 


Bethel 




Caledonia 


17 43 13 63 


Chatfield 


4H 07 2-> lO 


Chester 


15 CO 


Claremont 


40 00 


Ebenezer 




Frank Hill 




Fremont 


6 10 


Glasgow 


7 00 


Harm ny 




Ilenrvtown 




Hokah 




Houston 




Ka-son 


3 20 


Lanes boro 




Lake City 


21 05 5 00 


La Crescent 


3 00 


Le Roy 


2 10 


Manchester 


4 00 


Oakland 


3 00 


Oronoco 
Owatonna 


10 30 


Preston 


10 00 


Richland 




Kiphy 


3 00 


Rochester 




Stewanville 




Taopi 




Washington 




Winona, lat 


41 28 


" German 


8 00 


Woodbury 




Wyckofif 





291 13 

SYNOD OF MISSOURI. 90 00 



Pby of Osage. 


Appleton City 


2 00 


Austin 


3 00 


Bethel 




Browningtowu 




Butler 


9 70 


Centre View 


10 00 


Clinton 




Greenwood 




Hish Puint 




Holden 




Hume 




Jefferson City 




Kansas City, 1st 




2d 


200 00 


3d 


2 00 


4th 


3 00 


Knob Noster 


3 00 


Laynes\-ille 




Lone Oak 




Malta Bend 


2 00 


Montrose 


1 00 



32 m 



79 31 



12 35 



35 00 



60 39 



26 95 



65 03 241 70 



23 15 



69 74 



11 00 
6 00 



New Berlin 


2 00 


Nevada 




Olive Branch 


4 00 


Osceola 




Pleasant Hill 




Prairie 




Prosperity 




Ra>more 




Rich Hill 




Rockville 




S.ilem 




Salt Springs 


4 00 


Schell City 


1 00 


Scdalia, Ist 




Sharon 


3 00 


(Sunny Side 




Tipton 




Warrensburgh 


5 00 


Warsaw 




Westfi.-ld 


8 65 


Miscellaneous 






263 35 


Pby of Ozark. 


Afeh Grove 




Bellevue 




Bethel 




Buffalo 




Cartnage 


65 30 


Centre 




Con«'ay 




Ebenezer 


5 00 


Eureka Springs 


3 51 


Grace 




Granby 




Urand Prairie 




Joplin 




Linn Creek 




.Madi>on 


3 30 


Mountain Grove 




Mt. Bethel 




Mount Zion 




Neosho 




North Prairie 




Ozark Prairie 


3 00 


Pleasant Valley 




Preston 


4 50 


Salem 




Shiloh 




Springfield Calvary 


47 00 


Stockton 




Trhiity 




Waldensian 


2 00 


Webb City 




Westminster 




West Plains 




White Oak 




White Rock 






133 61 


Pby (f Pa'myra. 


Bethel 




Bevier 
Birdseye Ridge 


8 03 


Brooktield 


20 03 


Canton 




Clarence 




Edina 


8 00 


Gleuwood 




Glasgow 




Glasstown 




Grants^ille 




Hannibal 


150 00 


Kirksville 


10 00 


Knox City 


2 00 



8AB. a. w. b'ds. 



10 60 



23 00 



110 00 
252 49 



20 00 



GO 



75 00 



1 65 



98 00 



1000 



60 00 



144 



ANNUAL REPORT OF RECEIPTS. 



Laclede 




La Grange 




Louisiana 


5 87 


Macon 




Millard 


5 00 


Jlilan 




Mobcrly 


3 50 


Monticello 




Newark 




New Cambria 




New Providence 




Palmyra 


.35 00 


Pleasant Prairie 




Saliebury 




Sodgwick 


2 00 


Shelbina 




Shelbyville 




St. John 




Sullivan. Ist 


1 60 


Unionville 




West Ely 


3 00 


Wilson 






253 97 


Pby of Platte. 


Akron 




Albany 




Avalon 


3 00 


Barnard 


2 00 


Bethel 




Brecken ridge 


4 81 


Cameron 




Carrollton 


4 00 


Chillicothe 


1 00 


Coloma 




Craig 


5 00 


Dawn 




Easton 




Fairfax 




Fillmore 




Forest City 




Gallatin 


10 20 


Goshen 




Graham 


2 00 


Grant City 


5 00 


Hackberry 


2 50 


Hamilton 


16 19 


Highland 




Hodge 


9 00 


Hopkins 


2 00 


Jameson 


4 00 


King City 


3 00 


Knox 




Lathrop 




Lincoln 




Long Kranch 




Maryville 


43 43 


Martinsville 


10 00 


Mirabile 


1 00 


Mizpah 




Mound City 




Mount Zion 


5 00 


New Point 


3 20 


N. Y. Settlements 


7 40 


Oak Grove 




Oregon 




O shorn 




Parkville 


10 00 


Platte City 




Ravtnna 




Rockport 


5 00 


Rosendiile 


14 00 


Savannah 


6 00 


Stauberry 




St. Joseph, North 


3 00 



Tarkio 



Westmin'r 40 00 



SAB. S. W 


b'ds. 


Union 


10 00 


9AB. S. 1 


V. b'ds. 












Weslon 










19 00 


Wheeling 
Willow Brook 














231 73 




100 88 






Pby of St. Louis. 










Bethel 


70 00 










Bethlehem 












Bristol 


1 00 










Carondelet, 1st 












Carrollton 


10 85 








6 00 


Cuba 

Be Soto 

Elk Prairie 

Emanuel 

Ferguson 

Fredericktown 

Hillsboro 

Hot Springs, 2d 

Indian Prairie 


4 00 
8 00 











Irouton 


19 90 






1 65 


95 00 


Johannes 












Kirkwood 


77 37 




6 00 






Laketon 












Marble Hill 


3 45 










Mine La Motte 


3 95 










Moselle 












Nazareth 


5 00 










Ozark 












Pacific 












Pleasant Hill 










7 50 


Point Prairie 










6 00 


Poplar Bluflf 
Rolla. 1st 
Rock Hill 
Salem 

•' German 
Smithville 
St. Charles, 1st 


8 00 

12 50 

1 00 




25 00 






St. Louis, 1st 


154 93 




265 GO 






2d 


1,067 00 


367 00 








" IstGer. 


15 00 










" 2d " 












" Glasgow A\ 


e. 00 




8 15 






" Lafayette P'k 40 00 




20 00 






" Mcm'l Tab. 












" North 


48 25 




84 00 






" South 












" Wash"n Ave. 




206 63 






" Westminster 10 00 










" Union 












Washington 












Webster Groves 


15 00 




26 00 






White Water 


3 00 










Windsor Harbor 












Zion 


1 65 










Zoar 


20 00 










Miscellaueous 


25 00 








8 00 




1,633 35 


367 00 


590 77 






SYNOD OF 


NEBRASKA. 








Pby of Hastings. 










Aurora 










6 00 


Avon 
Beaver City 






30 00 




25 OO 


Bethany 
Blue Hill 












Edgar 


18 00 


3 00 


14 80 






Elkton 












Glenville 












Hansen 






1 25 






Hardy 










5 88 


Harmony 








^- 


42 50 


Harvard 












Hastings 


7 32 




23 60 



ANNUAL KEPOET OF RECEIPTS. 



145 



Henrietta 

Indianola 

Inland 

Ketiesaw 

Mindeu 

Negunda 

Nelson > 

Olivet 

Orleans 

Osco 

Red Cloud 

Republican City 

Riverton 

South Adams 

Spring Ranch 

Superior 

Thornton 

Union 

Unity 

Verona 

Waveland 

Williamsbnrgh 

Wilsonville 

Miscellaneous 

25 3-2 
Pby of Kearney. 
Apple Creek 
As'h Creek 
Berg 

Black Bird 
Burr Oak 
Cleveland 
Elk Dale 
Gibbon 
Goodman 
Grand Island 
Hainesville 
Inmau 

Kearney 6 50 

Lone Tree 8 00 

Myra Valley 
New Ueleiia 
North Platte 
Ord City 
Overton 

Plum Creek 4 00 

Red Bird 
Shelion 

St. Paul 13 00 

Turkey Creek 

31 50 
Pby of Nebraska City. 



3 00 



Adams 

Alexandria 

Auburn 

Beatrice 

Belvidere 

Bennet 

Bethel 

Beulah 

Blue Springs 

Brownville 

Burchard 

Calvert 

Creston 

Diller 

DouEjlass 

Endicott 

Exeter 

Fairbury 

Fairmount 

Falls City 

Firth 

Garrison 



1 00 

2 00 



14 00 



4 00 
6 00 



7 23 
4 00 



6 00 



3 00 

29 00 



■w. b'ds. 


Geneva 








60 00 


Goshen 






Helena 


2 60 




Hickman, Ger. 


6 .50 




Highland 






Hopewell 




11 40 


Hubbcll 


3 00 




Humboldt 


22 40 




Knox 






Lincoln 




2 50 


Little Salt 






Marietta 


6 00 




Marysville 






Meridian 


10 00 




Nebraska City 


23 00 




Nehama 






Odell 






Osceola 






Palmyra 






Pawnee City 


16 46 




Plattsmouth 


38 75 




Ger. 






Prospect 


2 00 


2 00 


Raymond 




1 


Rosefleld 




145 55 


Salem 


10 55 




Seward 


22 00 




Shelby 






Scicily, Ger. 






Simeon 






Stella 


1 00 




Sterling 


800 




Summit 


8 00 




Table Rock 


2 00 




Tamora 


8 (X) 




Tecumseh 


3 00 




Wahoo 


6 00 


5 00 


White Cloud 
Wood Lawn 






York 


9 60 


19 50 




275 09 




Pby of Omaha. 


82 95 


Bellevue 
Belle Centre 






Blackbird Hills 


24 00 




Bone Valley Mills 


4 00 




Clontibret 


3 00 




Colfax Co. Central 




9 50 


Columbus 

Craig 

Creston 


12 00 


66 95 


Dai ley Branch 
Dakota City 
Decatur 
Elk Valley 




9 00 


Freemont 


24 35 


1 75 


Honper 




33 00 


Humphrey 
Lyons 






Madison 


4 00 




Millerboro 






Nickerson 






Niobrara 


5 00 


73 43 


Norris 


5 00 




Oakdale 


3 50 




Omaha 






'• 2d 


60 04 




" German 


4 00 




" North 






Papillion 






Pleasant View 


3 20 


12 50 


Ponca 




8 00 


Schus'ler 


10 n 


6 00 


Silver Creek 
Silver Ridge 






St. Edwards 


200 



S. 9AB. W. B'DS. 



8 50 

184 50 



1 50 



2 00 
36 6(K 



107 15 



778 



8 00 
23 OQ 



600 



88 00 



SO 00 

6 00 
238 10 



700 



13 00 
6.00 
6 00 



14*) 



ANNUAL RKl'ORT OF KP:CEIPT8. 





?AB. 8. 


w. bd's. 






SAB. 8. 


w. b'ds. 


South We?t 


8 no 






PatersoD, 1st 


135 50 




183 94 


Tekamab 


7 00 




8 50 


2d 


115 2;b 


50 00 


60 00 


Wakefield 


3 Oit 






3d 


100 00 






Waterloo 


3 00 






" 1st Ger 


8 75 






Wayne 








" B'wav Ger 






West I'nion 








East Side 






Willowdile 








" Westmi 


n- 






St. Helena 


4 10 






eter 


10 OC 
















Rnlhprford Park 


163 77 


50 00 


175 16 




1S4 36 


1 50 


345 60 


'I'euiifly 
Union 


52 26 




153 00 


8TN0D OF NEW JERSEY 






Wcnhnwken 
West Milford 






23 00 


Pbyof 


Corisi'o. 



















B3uita 


60 00 








2,222 m 


207 87 


2,225 07 


Galxjoa 


80 00 














Ogove 


22 no 

162 00 






Pby of Monmouth. 
Allentiwn 80 00 










115 00 










Asbury Park 


7 87 




16 25 


rhy nf Elizabeth. 






Earnegat 
B:iss River 






18 60 


Ba-^ldTig Ri'^lge 


172 00 


40 00 


112 50 


Beverly 


65 35 




SO 00 


Betlileiiein 


85 11 


43 44 


26 00 


Borrlentown 


24 70 






Clarkpsville 






12 00 


B'irlingtDn 


45a S7 


253 23 


114 05 


Clinton 


97 44 


20 00 


20 75 


Calvary 






33 66 


Coke^burLrh l^liss'n 






Colli lufius 


6 35 


3 00 




Conu'ct Farms 


30 00 






Cianberry, Ist 


127 20 




50 00 


Cranford 


29 50 




80 44 


2d 


151 67 




175 00 


Dunellcu 


18 35 


2 00 




Cream Ridge 


11 00 




18 26 


Elizabeth, 1st 


958 S2 




155 no 


Delanco 


2 00 


2 00 




" 2d 


2S 59 




30 00 


Englishtoivn 


5 10 






" 3d 


M 95 


51 96 


45 00 


Fairview 








" 1st Cer. 


16 25 






l<"iirniingdale 


435 00 






" Madison av 






Forked River 








'• Siloam 








Freehold, l;t 


44 78 




202 00 


" We#tm"8t 


=r803 85 


126 85 


230 00 


Hiirhtstown 


200 00 




80 CO 


Elizubethport 


34 00 




60 60 


Iliihnansville 


4 00 




16 OJ 


Lamingtoii 


58 00 




41 20 


Jacksonville 


8 83 






Liberty Corners 


5 (0 






Jatiiebburgh 


90 00 




160 00 


Lovvei- Valley 


21 00 






Keyport 
Lakewood 


2 00 






Metuchen 


71 11 


37 63 


30 on 


47 41 




44 00 


New Providence 


18 00 




li4 00 


Miinalipan 
Mani^hcster 


34 50 






Perth Amb<y 


36 44 




100 00 


18 00 




15 00 


Pluiuflel.l, l8t 


79 .",7 




|-801 10 


Matawan 


95 24 


40 00 


35 00 


" 2d 


535 85 


50 00 


Mount Holly 
Oceanic 


60 37 


2S 00 


77 50 


Pluckamin 


50 2(i 


13 01 


66 83 


18 46 






Rahway, ls=t 


111 70 




65 80 


Ocean Beach 


3 00 


2 00 




2d 


130 00 




90 00 


Perrin^ville 


6 25 






Roselle 


324 S6 


174 94 


13n 00 


PlattsburKh 


5 00 




7 75 


Springfield 


20 00 




89 00 


Phimstead 


6 00 






Weatticld 


40 25 




233 23 


Piov'd(.'nce 


14 95 


12 07 




Woodbridge 


20 00 




90 00 


Itf d Bank 


10 00 






Elizabeth, 4 








Shrewslxiry 


60 00 




41 00 


churches 






709 27 


South Aniboy 


6 15 














Squan Village 


29 00 




51 46 




3,150 70 


565 82 


3,272 72 


Tennent 


42 00 






Pby of Jersey City. 






Tom's River 
Tmkerton 


800 






Arlington 


29 78 






Whiting and 








Carlstadt 


6 00 


6 00 




bhaoio. g 


3 00 






Englewood 
llackcnfack 


1,092 27 
19 00 




585 00 














2,130 45 


340 30 


1,320 52 


Boboken, 


17 76 




227 80 










West 


53 75 


20 00 


100 00 


Pby of Morris and Oranae. 




Jersey City, 1st 


126 06 


55 00 


225 00 










2d 


13 18 




90 00 


Berkshire Valley 








" 8d 








Boon ton 


188 00 




83 46 


" Bergen, 






Chatham 


141 00 




50 00 


1st 


177 11 




332 17 


Ches'er 


80 00 


15 00 




" Clare- 








Dover 


94 00 




41 30 


mont 


30 21 






" Welsh 








" Westm'ster 21 83 






Fairmount 


4 00 






Lakeview 








Flanders 


25 00 






Nowfoundland 


17 00 






German Valley 


50 00 






Norwood 








Hanover 


65 00 




lf50 00 


Passaic 


26 87 


26 87 


130 00 


Madison 


209 89 




80 00 


" German Ev. 






Mendbam, Ist 


246 57 




65 40 



ANNUAL EEPCET OF RECEIPTS. 



147 



Mendharo2d 

Mine Hill 

Morrist'iwn, 1st 
" South St 

Morris Plains 

Mt. Frf'edom 

Mt,. Olive 

Myersville 

New Vernon 

Orange, Ist 
2d 
" Bethel 
" Certral 
" East 
" Gi'iman 
" South 




37 00 
6 00 
64 00 
700 00 
Sai 11 
55 50 
1J80 97 
5t0 69 
10 00 
250 12 
St. Cloud 1-20 00 
50 26 



Parsippany 

Pleasant Giove 

Pleasant Valley 

Enckavvav 

Schooley's Mount 

Stirling 

Summit 

Succasiinna 

Whippany 

Wyoming 



40 00 

118 60 

12 00 

148 26 

88 49 

6 GO 



Pby of JVewark. 



Bloomfleld 



5:95 68 



Caldwell 
L'. ona Farms 
Montclair 
Newark, 1st 
2d 



German 
Westm'r 101 00 
40 30 



8d 

6th 
" Bethany 
" Ciilvary 
" Central 
" Ger l«t 
" 2d 
" '• 8d 

" High St 
" Knox 
" Memorial 25 00 
" Park 82 54 

" Pane St 2 00 
" Rosevilte 546 48 

SuthP'k484 83 
" Wi' kliffe 
" Wooilside 
Miscellaneous 



29 63 
679 27 
176 05 
218 00 
45.3 58 
47 50 
25 00 
20 00 
137 00 
42 50 
10 00 
8 00 
483 00 



25 00 
69 34 
50 00 



50 00 



15 00 



200 00 
457 50 



475 00 
140 00 



190 00 



33 00 
94 57 



70 00 



7,397 82 616 04 2,637 



360 00 

205 55 

182 50 

400 00 
200 50 

455 00 
30 00 
30 00 

200 00 



250 00 



200 GO 

524 99 

440 05 

51 UO 

12 00 



3,907 34 15 00 8,541 39 



Pby of New Brunsicick. 



Alexandiia, 1st 


14 00 


Amwell, 1st 


14 00 


2d 


13 50 


" United, 


1st 28 25 


Bound Brook 


11 10 


Copper Hill 




Dayton 


2 00 


Duteli Neck 


92 49 


Ewing 


44 50 


Flemington 


188 47 


Frenchtown 


57 00 


Hamilton Square 


19 00 


Hopewell 


2 13 


Holland 


17 38 


Kingston 


15 00 


Klngwood 


3 00 



4 00 



24 70 



44 00 
41 83 
36 00 

45 00 
63 00 



140 00 
179 00 
43 10 



12 38 15 00 



8AB. 8. W. b'dS. 



Kirkpatrick Mem. 
LanibertTille 
Lawrence 
Miltbrd 

New Brunswick, 1st 
2d 
Pfmington 
Princeton, Ist 
2d 

" Withtrsp'n si 
Stockton 
Titnsville 
TrentOD, 1st 

" 2.1 

" 3d 

" 4th 
5th 

" Prospect 8t 
Miscellaneous 



7 00 

275 P3 

221 17 

25 C5 

217 90 

50 00 

49 80 

221 3;^ 

I'S 25 

1 00 

7 00 

15 00 

9&5 00 

20 50 

257 79 

160 00 

3 (10 

455 (5 



46 30 



10 00 



42 00 



3.C69 05 97 38 3,261 79 



Pby of Newton. 



Andover 


3 40 






Asbnry 


39 00 




38 52 


Belvidere, Ist 


VXy 00 




2-:i7 00 


2d 


100 00 




125 50 


niairttown 


108 87 


28 87 


23S 00 


Blootiislmry 


19 8:3 


9 63 


30 00 


Bi'aichville 


lU (10 






Danville 


411 00 




11 00 


Deckertow-n 


27 00 






Delaware 


10 00 


5 00 


12 00 


Gr.enwich 


88 08 


38 50 


39 50 


Ilackeltstown 


202 00 




89 60 


Harniony 


40 00 


15 CO 


68 00 


Hope 








Knowlton 


7 00 


3 00 


8 00 


Laluvette 








M'-nsfield, 2d 








Markfboro 






23 00 


Montana 


1 40 






Musconetcong Val 


y 29 00 


8 00 




Newton 


2:10 00 




98 73 


North Hardiston 


47 00 


7 00 




Oxford, 1st 


63 00 






2d 


64 00 


28 50 


104 10 


Phillipsburgh, 2d 


5 00 


7 00 


150 00 


Sparta 


5 00 




5 40 


t>tanhope 


7 00 






Slewa'-tsville 


108 50 


12 50 


70 00 


Stillwater 


29 50 


8 00 


.38 00 


Swarthwood 


2 00 






Wantage, 1st 






100 00 


2d 


25 00 






Washington 


175 00 


100 00 




Yellow F.-ame 


42 92 


3 57 




Miscellaneous 


20 00 




SCO 



1,705 50 274 77 1,480 35 



Pby of West Jersey. 



Absecon 

Atco 

Atlantic City 

Berlin 

Blaekwoodtown 

Brainerd 

Bridgeton, 1st 
" 2d 

" West 

Banker Hill 

Camden, Ist 
2d 

Cedarville, 1st 
2d 

Clayton 



5 00 

56 74 

240 00 
90 00 
60 52 
3 00 
33 75 
18 25 
75 61 
10 00 
97 00 



6 74 



24 04 



5 00 
22 00 



84 00 

46 00 

132 00 
92 81 
112 40 



48 20 

[ 31 00 

42 74 



MS 



ANNUAL REPORT OF RECEIPTS. 



Cape I'land 

Cold Spring 

D.-erfieUl 

Elmer 

Fiirlleld 

Glassbi r ujh 

Gl uceet r City 

Green -vich 

Greeu Creek 

Haddonfield 

Hanmouton 

Jericho 

Lee(l"8 Point 

May's Laridins 

Mnrchan!sville 

Millville 

Pitts Grove 

S:ilem 

Somer's Point 

Swedesboro 

Tuckahoe 

Vineland 

Waterford 

Wenonah 

Williamstown 

Woodsbury 

" Ger 
Wodstown 
Miecellaueous 



31 20 
36 00 
57 31 

12 ()8 

10 00 
35 f)T 

fi7 33 
25 00 



13 00 

10 00 

5 00 

90 00 

107 24 



50 00 

46 00 
40 00 
98 97 

85 75 



SAB. 8. W. B'dS. I 

31 20 44 42 
6 00 
12 12 80 00 



18 00 



116 00 



15 00 
35 86 



20 43 

7 00 

135 00 



20 33 
62 10 
89 57 
101 00 

10 00 



80 00 

118 50 



17 25 
30 00 



12 00 
1,571 02 303 96 1,354 75 



SYNOD OF ALBANY. 

-P5y of Albany, 

Albany, 1st 226 44 

2d 398 40 

" 3d 14 12 

" 4th l,05-( 00 



" 6tli 

" State St. 

" West End 
Amsterdam 1st 
2.1 
Ballston Centre 

" Spa 
Batchellerville 
Bethlehem 
Broadalbin 
Carlisle 
Charlton 
Conklingville 
Corinth 
Day 

.East Nassau 
Esperance 
Gal way 
GloTersville 
Greeobueh 
Hamilton, Union 
Jefferson 
Johnstown 
Kingsboro 
Mariaville 
Mayfield Centre 
Nassau 
New Scotland 
Northampton 
Northville 
• Pine Grove 
Princetown 
Rockweirs Falls 8 68 
Sand Lake 

8aratoga8pring8,l8t 74 81 

" 2d 35 16 

Schenectady,! St, 581 50 

" East 

Ave. 116 06 



7 00 
937 87 
5 00 

65 56 
9 00 
51 00 



3 00 
12 CO 

2 00 

3 63 
16 14 

5 00 
263 65 

22 00 

8 00 

100 00 

32 00 



10 00 



1 00 



30 34 



316 35 
340 75 
285 00 
532 00 
170 00 
608 19 
7 25 

250 00 

48 01 

150 00 



4 14 



7 05 


30 70 


15 12 


6 00 


30 00 


40 48 


79 62 


12 00 


15 50 


50 00 


26 00 


37 00 



41 89 



65 05 
8 00 



55 25 
29 12 
8 00 
83 90 
50 85 
571 45 

118 00 



Stephen town 
Trilie's Hill 
West Gal way 
West Milton 
West Troy 
Miscellaneous 



15 00 
11 50 



18 98 



SAB. S. W. B D9. 



15 56 
e 74 
20 00 
11 32 
41 07 
93 20 



9 48 



4,112 50 318 :i5 226 53 



Pby of Binghamton. 
Afton 
Apalachin 

Bainbridge 35 00 

Binghamton. 1st 487 29 
North 249 95 
" Ross 
Memorial 
Binghamton, West 
Cannonsville 



10 00 



450 00 



Conklin 

Cortland 

Coventry 2d 

Deposit 

East Maine 

Freetown 

Marathon 

Masonville 

McGrawville 

Nichols 

Nineveh 

Owego 

Prebl=) 

Smithville Flats 

Truxton 

Union 

Virgil 

Waverly 

Whitney's Point 

Willet 

Windsor 



7 00 

314 44 

19 05 

6 74 



5 00 



63 00 

70 23 

3 53 

8 10 

15 00 

lOS 00 
5 25 

12 00 



70 00 160 25 



22 50 



100 00 
19 00 



19 00 



80 00 
10 00 



31 80 



1,409 58 70 00 902 55 



Pby of Boston. 
Antrim 

Bedford 29 81 

Boston, 1st 227 29 

Springfield st 



East Boston 
Lawrence Ger 
Litchfield 
Lond"nderry 
Lowell 

Manchester Ger 
Newburyport, Ist 
2d 
New Boston 
Providence 
Reading 
South 13o8ton 
South Ryegate 
Windham 



28 00 

12 98 

8 75 

5 00 

5 00 

175 76 

36 10 

13 58 



15 00 

52 08 



609 35 



50 00 



50 00 



Pby of Brooklyn. 
Brooklyn, 1st 1,751 52 



1,400 00 



2d 

Ainslie st 
City Park 

Chapel 
Classon Ave 
Clinton st 
E. D., Ist, 
Fort Green 
Franklin Ave 
German, 1st 



103 40 



20 00 
81 57 
190 37 
18 37 
22 00 
66 00 
20 00 



50 00 
10 00 



ANNUAL EEPOET OF RECEIPTS. 



149 



sAs. a. w bd's. 



SAB. S. W. B'DB. 



Brooklyn 








Sennett 


5 25 




" Green Ave 


18 13 






Springport 


12 94 


1 00 


" Greenpoint 








Victory 






" Hopkins St. 


12 00 






Weedsport 


89 18 


85 18 


" La Payette 















ave 


J,400 17 


250 00 


188 50 




1,614 84 210 90 


749 42 


" Memorial 


158 T9 












" Ross st 








Phy of Champlam. 




" Siloam 


6 00 












" South 3d St. 








An Sable Forks and 




E. D. 


492 84 






Black Brook 




20 00 


" Tabernacle 


112 20 






Beckmantown 




6 00 


" Throop Ave 


368 43 


125 00 


100 00 


Belmont 


20 00 




" Westminster 4(i6 75 


50 on 




Burke 


20 00 




S.L.Edgewater 1st 282 20 






Chazy 


29 77 




' Cavalry 


(47 40 


47 40 




Chateaugay 


n 00 


30 00 


" W.N.BrightOD 






Champlam 

Constable 

Ellenburg 




30 00 




6,638 14 


532 40 


1,688 50 














Esse.x 




40 00 


Pby of Buffalo. 






Fort Covington 


23 18 


15 40 


Akron 








Ke.isevilie 


41 75 


18 53 


Alden 


7 48 




13 00 


Malone 


174 49 


314 77 


Buflalo, 1st 


3C0 00 




191 00 


Mineville 






'• Brecken- 


[ 20 61 


10 61 




Mooers 


3 34 


7 00 


ridge St. 




Peru 


9 12 1 87 


5 00 


" Calvary 
" Central 


116 40 






Plattsburgh 




131 00 


300 00 




125 00 


Port Henry 


115 77 


60 00 


" East 


10 00 




18 37 


Miscellaneous 




10 00 


" I;?/;'ye"ej.3^^49 




360 00 








448 42 1 87 


687 70 


" North 


621 74 


194 82 


300 02 








" Wells St. 


8 00 






Pby of vtiemung. 




" Westmin' 


r 335 44 




50 00 


Big Flats 


48 00 


25 00 


" West Side 


16 00 






Breeeport 






Clarence 


10 00 




9 00 


Burdutte 


25 00 


28 50 


Connewango 


5 00 






Dundee 


8 00 


14 54 


Dunkirk 


20 00 






Eddytown 


50 00 


20 00 


East Aurora 


50 00 


12 00 


14 00 


Elmira, Ist 


2J,9 00 


322 53 


East Hamburgh 


7 00 




20 16 


" 2d 




65 00 


Fredonia 


691 91 


100 39 


78 50 


" Franklin 


St 




Glen wood 








" Lake St. 




120 50 


Gowanda 








Havana 


3 77 


15 00 


Jamestown 


27 00 




22 50 


Hector 


9 00 


20 00 


Lancaster 


50 00 




24 00 


Horse Heads 


14 00 


86 50 


Panama 








Mecklf-nburgh 


7 00 


11 00 


Ripley 


50 00 




75 00 


Monterey 


1 80 


10 00 


Sherman 


41 50 




3:S 50 


Morela'id 




5 73 


Silver Creek 


15 00 




39 25 


Newfleld 


5 84 


20 00 


Springvi le 


10 00 






Pine Grove 




3 78 


South Wales 


2 00 






Rock Stream 


7 00 




Tonavvanda 








Southport 


23 01 


20 00 


Tonawanda Mission 






Spencer 




12 32 


United Mission 








Sugar Hill 




5 00 


Westflrld 


148 22 






Sullivanville 






Miscellaneous 


10 00 






Tyrone 
Watkina 


2 00 














50 67 


29 18 








3,227 79 


31T 82 


1 373 30 














513 09 


834 57 


Piy of Cayuga. 












Auburn, 1st 


415 09 




200 00 


Pby of Columbia. 




2d 


124 56 




203 04 


Ancram Lead Mines 




" Bethany 








Ashland 






" Calvary 


68 62 


41 25 


11 23 


Cairo 




13 27 


" Central 


79 72 


8 10 


too 00 


Canaan Centre 




80 00 


Aurora 


244 10 




67 32 


O.tskill 


146 80 51 64 


204 00 


Cayuga 


44 00 




32 60 


Centreville 


15 72 


8 00 


Dryden 


24 75 






Durham 1st 


16 00 


40 00 


Genoa, Ist 


54 50 


17 00 


14 00 


2d 


12 85 




" 2d 


5 00 






Greenville 


19 85 


26 75 


" 8d 


5 17 




10 00 


Hillsdale 






Ithaca 


279 55 


49 55 




Hudson 


212 50 


280 22 


Ludlowville 


25 00 






Hunter 


13 14 




Meridian 


99 00 


70 00 




Jewett 


60 00 


24 00 


Owasco 


5 50 




25 00 


Livingstonville 


15 38 




Port Byron 


32 91 


25 00 




New Lebanon 


800 


32 21 


Scipio 








Eeosst-lat-rville 






Scipioville 








^ Spencertown 







150 



ANNUAL BEPORT OF RECEIPTS. 



8AB. 9. V?. BDV. 



Valatie 
Windham 



East 



61 72 
36 30 
11 34 



629 60 
Pdij of Genesee. 
Alexander 
Attica 
Batavia 
Bergen 

Beiliany Centre 
Byron 
Castile 
Corfu 

East Bethany 
Klba 
Leroy 

Leroy and Bergen 
North Kergen 
Oakfiekl 
Orangeville 
Pavillion 
Pembroke & 

Batavia 
Perry 
Pike 

P'Ttaijeville 
Tonawanda Valley 
War!<aw 
Wyoming 
Miscellaneous 

1,028 62 
Pby of Genesee Valley. 
Allegany 



51 64 769 45 



136 76 

115 58 

56 33 

7 50 
20 00 
25 30 
15 00 

8 55 

115 27 

9 00 

13 00 

14 25 

5 00 

34 78 
£5 00 



376 00 
21 80 



11 15 



68 72 



100 00 
5 26 



Almond 

Andover 

Angelica 

Belmont 

Bradford 

Centreville 

Cuba 

Duke Centre 

Ellicottville 

Prankllnville 

Kendall 

Limestone 

Olean 

Portville 

Ru-shford 



Ply of 
Bellona 
Brancliport 
Canandaigua 
Canoga 
Dresden 
Geneva, 1st 

" North 
Gorham 
Hopewell 
Manchester 
Oak's Corners 
Ovid 

Penn Tan 
Pholps 
Romulus 
Seneca 

" Cistle 

" Falls 
Trumansburgh 
Waterloo 
West Fayette 
Uigcellaneous 



11 00 
40 00 



80 00 
5 00 



10 00 
10 (0 



117 75 
78 88 



352 63 

Geneva. 

20 00 

85 00 

17 65 

194 74 
250 12 
20 CO 

11 00 

7 00 
67 56 
108 06 
131 45 
98 68 
78 45 
22 00 
118 00 

18 00 
85 00 
10 17 



3 30 



20 00 



5 65 



25 00 
60 00 
30 00 
15 95 



36 75 
329 42 
19 25 
11 14 
26 DO 
77 46 
14 00 

28 50 
91 00 

58 37 
25 00 



12 00 

10 00 
125 00 
26 00 

7 00 

896 89 



18 15 
150 68 



8 30 168 83 



23 00 
95 00 



75 00 
65 00 
13 00 

45 00 
82 00 

90 00 
5 00 

805 22 
5(J 00 

100 00 
8 00 
65 00 



1,342 88 156 60 880 25 



Amity 
Callicoon 
Centreville 
Chester 
Circleville 
Clftrkstown, Ger 
C'Checton 
D«miiscus 
Denton 
Florida, Ist 
2d 
Goodwill 
Goshen 
Greeiibush 
Haverstraw, 1st 



Ply of Hudson. 
17 00 



5 69 

45 00 
7 OO 
1 00 

16 00 



60 50 

99 90 

164 25 

14 10 

18 75 



Central 120 00 



FTamptonburgh 
Hempstead 
Hopewell 

Jetfersocivllle , Ger 
Lit)erty 
Milford 

Middletown, 1st 
2d 
Monroe 
Mount Hope 
Montgomery 
Montioello 
Nyack 
Oiisville 
Palisades 
Port Jervia 
Purvis 
Rimnpo 
Ridge bury 
Rockland, 1st 
2d 
Scotchtowu 
Stony Point 

Unionville . _ 

Washing'nville, Ist 70 00 
2d 21 01 
West Town 66 00 

White Lake 8 00 



57 90 
5 00 

4] 00 
3 00 

13 99 

11 10 
94 77 

240 07 

12 50 

90 00 
25 00 

47 47 
15 00 
40 18 
65 00 

305 00 
9 80 



53 45 
31 75 
2S 00 



13 75 

120 00 

10 00 



4 00 



125 00 



26 18 
25 00 



28 00 



10 00 



14 00 
80 00 



6e 00 

55 00 
130 00 

150 00 

30 00 

26 50 

60 98 

54 00 
83 00 

25 00 
40 00 



65 00 
29 00 



32 00 
67 26 



1,914 18 361 93 896 74 



Phy of Long Island. 
17 33 
10 18 
187 00 



Amagansett 

Bellport 

Bridgehampton 

Brookfleld 

Cutchogue 

East Hampton 

Franklinville 

Greenport 

Holbiook 

Mattituck 

Middletovcn 

Moriches 

Port JefTerson 

Sag Harbor 

Selden 

Setauket 

Shelter Island 

Southampton 

Southold 

South Haven 

West Hampton 

Yaphank 

Miscellaneous 



4 00 

25 00 
171 30 

72 m 
117 95 

5 00 

26 SB 
51 81 
23 60 
90 00 

37 00 
35 00 

103 82 

12 68 
20 00 
12 00 
20 00 



1,042 53 

Pby of Lyons. 
East Palmyra 
Fairville 



84 95 



6 81 
10 12 



15 00 



116 88 



90 85 



90 85 
61 65 



ANNUAL REPORT OF RECEIPTS. 



151 



SAB. S. W. b'DS. 



Galen 


30 80 




76 10 


Haron 








Junius 


13 93 






Lyous 


87 33 




75 25 


Marion 








Newark 


8fi 04 


24 37 


96 43 


Ontario 


17 00 




15 00 


Palmyra 


100 00 




95 00 


Rote 






25 00 


S ivannah 








Sodiis 






11 50 


Sodus Centre 








Way lie 








Williamson 


18 70 






Wolc..tt.l«t 


87 00 


3 CO 


29 00 


" 2d 






25 00 




390 80 


27 37 


509 93 


Pbxj of JJTdSKWJ. 






Astoria 


40 00 


15 00 




Babylon 


8 00 


8 00 




Bellmore 








Christian Hook 


3 03 






East Williamsburgh 3 00 






Freeport 


20 00 






Greeu Lawn 


4 50 






Glen Cove 








Hempstead 








Huntiuijton, 1st 


303 20 






2d 


3:^ 00 






Islip 


22 (9 






Jamaica 


91 47 




100 00 


Melville 








Newtown, let 


60 05 


30 00 




Northport 


41 41 






Oyster Bay 


VI no 






Roslyn 


5 00 






Smithtown 








Springlield 


16 33 






St. Paul's 








Whitestone 


5 00 


5 GO 




Woodliaven 








M.i8cellaneou8 


25 00 







693 08 58 00 ^^O 00 



Phy of New York. 



Am., Montreal 
New York, let 

1st Union 

4th 

7th 

4ih ava 

5th ave 

13th St 

14th St 

84ih 8t 

Wf8t23d8t 

Allen St 

Bohemian 

Brick 
" ch Ch'l 

Canal st 

Ceniral 

Covenant 

" Chapel 

East 30th St 

Emmanuel " 

Faith " 

French, Evang'l 

German 
" 2d 

Grace Chapel 

Harlem 

Hope Chapel 

MaUiaon square 2,458 50 



600 00 

3,369 48 

.58 04 

167 86 

5 22 

691 33 

9,741 95 

324 00 

83 S4 

3 82 

134 00 



10 00 

1,635 48 

34 00 

30 00 

249 24 

1,977 23 

10 64 

2 00 

10 00 
20 00 

2 31 
25 00 
171 10 



224 71 
10 00 
10 00 



80 00 



2 31 

25 00 

100 00 



150 00 
50 00 



38 00 



825 00 



967 00 



220 00 
325 00 



Madison sq. Ger. 5 00 
Mndi>OD square 

Mem'I Chapel 4 00 
Madison st Ger. 
Mf.WashiiiKton 1,408 14 



50 60 



Murrav Hill 54 02 


30 38 




New York 3-i 88 






N.Tth 90 00 






Olivet Chapel 75 00 


50 00 




Preir. Memorial 432 76 






Phillips 63 55 


25 00 




Puritans 242 84 






Romeyn Chapel 6 ijO 






Eutsers 




300 00 


tSc.tch 1,475 no 


114 00 


500 00 


Sea and Land 20 00 






Shiloh 






Spring 8t 






University pi 1,911 19 




522 20 


Washiuy'ii fl'ta 64 29 






West 3,57ti 93 






Westminster 60 95 




30 00 


Phelps Meai'l 112 92 


10 00 


80 DO 


Miscellaneous 




S 00 



31,450 51 681 40 3,415 20 



Pby of Niagara. 



Albion 


5^ 6i 


Barre Centre 




Carlton 


8 00 


Ilolley 




Kuowiesville 




Lewiston 


20 00 


Lockport, 1st 


279 21 


'• Calvary 




2d Ward 




Lyndonville 


12 71 


Mapleton 




Medina 


30 CO 


Millville 




\iagara Falls 


136 73 


Porter 


70 00 


Ridgeway 


7 50 


Somerset 


16 63 


Tuscarora 




\V ilson 


23 GO 


Wright's Corners 





13 00 



SO 00 



100 10 



100 00 



75 00 



10 00 



659 42 

Piy of North Hirer. 

Amenia 30 00 

South 76 56 

Bethlehem 20 00 

Canterbury 51 50 
Cold Spring 

Cornwall 70 97 
Fishkill 

Freedom Plains 13 26 

Hughsonville 4 00 
Highland Falls 

Kingston 29 00 
Little Britain 

Lloyd 48 00 

Marlborough 41 05 

Maiden 5 00 

Matteawan 48 20 
Middle Hope 
Millerton 
Milton 

New Hamburgh 

Newburgh, 1st 180 00 

Calv'y 137 30 

Union fc2 00 
New Windsor 

Pine Plains 38 00 



13 00 835 10 



12 00 



30 00 



13 26 



48 00 



13 64 



50 00 100 00 



3 J 00 



152 



ANNUAJL REPORT OF RECEIPTS. 



SAB. S. W. b'D8. 



Pleasant Valley 44 81 
Pleat^aiit Plains 
Poii^hkeepsie 134 59 

Rondout 137 50 

Smithfleld 20 00 

Wapi'iuj^er's Falls 
Westmiii8ter 
Mibcellaueous 10 00 



Pby of Otsego. 
14 00 



Buel 
Cherry Valley 
Colchester 
Cooperstown 
Deli.i, l9t 
" '2d 
E:i6t Guilford 
Exeti-r Centre 
Fly Creek 
Gilbertsville 
Guilford Centre 
Guilford and Nor- 
wich 
Hamden 
H..bart 
Laur.na 

Middlefield Centre 
Milf.ird 
New iierlin 
Oneonta 
Otego 

Riclifield Springs 
Shuvertowu 
Sprin^eld 
Stamford 
Unaililla 
Wo center 
MigcellaueouB 



117 00 



18 49 
47 25 



14 00 
55 00 

15 78 



5 00 
15 00 



Avon 
" Central 

Brighton 

Brockport 

Caledonia 

Charlotte 

Chili 

Clark?on 

Dansville 

Fowlcrville 

Gates 

Geneseo, 1st 

Gencseo Village 

Groveland 

Lima 

Livonia 

Mendon 

Mt. Morris 

Moccow 

Nanda 

Ogden 

Osaian 

Parma Centre 

Psnnficld 

Pittsfcrd 

Rochester, 1st 

3d 

" Brick 

" Cahary 

" Cent'l 

Mem'l 



656 52 

Pby of Rochester. 
17 00 



16 00 
26 00 
92 53 
70 30 

37 00 

63 84 
8 18 

16 56 

300 00 

14 35 

73 53 

129 00 

6 00 

55 58 

10 00 

10 00 

81 let 

5 00 



19 00 



ino 79 
800 00 
80 00 
765 48 
29 00 
St. Peters 144 93 
Wm'ster 46 00 



27 71 



63 50 



10 00 



16 50 



16 50 



25 00 



68 200 00 



615 08 
30 00 



1,215 74 270 11 775 08 



20 00 



7 00 
50 00 



10 00 

166 0(1 

3 50 

146 no 

160 31 
81 41 



35 00 
15 22 



41 30 



34 00 


28 15 

5 00 

37 44 

43 75 


27 00 




120 00 

25 00 

9 GO 

15 OO 

125 00 


47 00 

;io 00 

27 20 
18 00 



SS5 31 



32 00 
10 00 
50 00 
60 00 
41 81 

19 42 

220 00 

20 00 
15 00 

10 00 280 00 

40 00 
55 00 
55 00 



34 14 
24 25 



61 50 



78 25 
182 (JO 

1,200 00 
60 10 
490 22 
27 75 
50 00 
10 00 



Sparta, 1st 


4 CO 


'■ 2d 


7 00 


Ppringwater 




Sweden 


33 00 


Tuscarora 


17 87 


Union Corners 


8 00 


Victor 


17 00 


Webster 


17 00 


West Mendon 


42 00 


Wheatland 




Miscellaneous 





SAB. 8. W. B'SS . 



25 00 
95 00 



25 00 



5 00 



6 00 
81 00 



3,741 84 317 00 3,303 34 



Phy of St. Lawrence. 



Adams 
Brasher Falls 
Brownville 
Canton 
Cape Vincent 
Carthage 
Chaumont 
De Kalb 

■' Junction 
Dexter 
ElKworth 
Gouverneur 
Hammond 
Helena 
Heuveiton 
Huntington 
Le Roy 
Millerville 
Morri^town 
Orleans 

Oswegatchie, 1st 
2d 
Ox Bow 
Piessi3 
Potsdam 
Eossie 

Sackett's Harbor 
Tht-risa 
Waddngton 
Watertown, 1st 



29 60 
6 17 
5 36 

18 00 

17 00 

20 00 

3 f.2 

1 75 

10 27 

139 48 
100 00 



6 65 

10 00 

792 00 

20 00 

! 00 

160 30 

3 42 

10 00 

18 95 

379 21 



Stone St 45 00 



Pl/y of Steuben. 



A''di3on 

Arkport 

B:iih 

Cimpbfll 

Canaseraga 

Cmisteo 

Cohocton 

Corning 

Elk Creek 

Htmmoiidsport 

Hornby 

Horneilsville 

Howard 

•lasper 

Niples 

Painted Post 

Prattsburgh 

Pulteney 

Wheeler 

W'odlmll 

Miscellaneous 



41 07 

4 44 

45 97 

100 (JO 

38 UO 

7 00 

107 30 



90 33 
30 00 
11 60 

11 50 

2S 38 

8 00 

3 23 



526 82 



Pby of Syracuse. 
Ambny 28 00 

Baldwinsville 31 50 



58 33 
25 00 
3OOO 



48 M 
100 OO 



80 00 
11 85 

20 00 

100 00 
11 46 
43 00 

35 00 



68 00 
197 00 



1,013 70 10 00 827 64 



5 80 



5 SO 



15 00 
20 24 
55 no 
CO 00 
5 00 
10 00 
22 16 
50 00 

14 00 
30 00 

100 00 

15 65 
84 00 
36 30 
17 00 
42 41 
33 11 



80 00 



ANTSTFAL REPORT OF RECEIPTS. 



153 



SAB. 8. W. b'DS. 



BAB. 9. W. B'DS. 



Camillus 








Warrenf burgh 








Cazenovia 


165 00 


40 00 


25 00 


Wiiterford 


321 42 




395 92 


Cleveland 


2 62 






Wlniel.nll 


20 66 




127 32 


Ciillamer 








Miscellaneous 


10 00 






Coii.">taDtia 


13 00 














East Syracuse 

Elbridge 

Fayetteville 


30 00 


11 00 




3,352 29 


148 64 


2,237 24 


54 53 




50 00 


Pby of 


Utica. 






Fulton 


175 00 


75 00 


24 00 


Augusta 


7 00 






Hannibal 


15 00 






Booneville 


?,0 00 




10 00 


Jamesville 








Camden 


16 00 




6 00 


Jordan 


32 00 






Claysville 


12 00 




12 00 


La Payette 


20 00 






Clinton 


151 28 




161 68 


Lenox 








Deerfleld 








Liverpool 


26 36 




78 00 


P. re>tport & Al- 
der Creek 








Manlius 


17 34 










1 00 


Marcellus 


34 .'•S 




SO 00 


Grant 








Mexico 


58 30 




69 88 


Hamilton College 








Oueida L .ke 








Holland Patent 


40 09 






" Valley 


12 60 






Ilion 








Onondaga Valley 








'Knoxboro 






70 00 


Oswego, 1st 


61 02 




60 00 


Little Falls 


33 82 






" Grace 


125 53 




50 00 


Litcbfield 








Otisco 








Lowville 


40 00 






Pompey 








Lyons' Falls 


8 00 






'• Centre 








Martin^burgh 


7 67 


2 05 




Ridgeville 


3 00 






New Hait lord 


42 00 






Syracuse, Ist 


321 SI 


40 00 


105 00 


Ne«- York Mills 


35 00 




60 00 


" 4th 


174 16 


20 15 


350 00 


North Gage 








" latWard 


4 87 






Norwich Corners 








" Park Cen- 








Ohio 








tral 


245 76 




300 00 


Oneida 


1.50 00 




26 00 


Skanea teles 


100 00 




124 92 


Oneida Castle 


15 00 






Wainpsville 








Oriskany 


















Rome 


137 41 




140 00 


1,754 4? 


186 15 


1,326 80 


Sauquoit 
Soutli Trenton 


19 73 




















Pby of Troy. 






Turin 


15 95 






Argyle 








Utica, let 


847 96 




475 00 


Bay Road 


8 50 






" Bethany 


60 00 




250 00 


Bolton 








" Elizabeth st 






Brunswick 


20 00 






" West 








Caldwell 


20 00 


15 00 




" Westm'stcr 244 52 




80 00 


Cambridge 


30 26 




29 00 


•' Memorial 


90 55 


Ifi 00 


80 00 


Oliester 


7 00 






Vernon 


42 95 


12 95 


25 CO 


Ciihoes 


160 00 




89 00 


*• Centre 








East Lake George 


1 57 






Verona 


8 75 






Port Edward 


17 00 






Waterville 


21 20 






Glen's Falls 


186 41 






West Camden 


15 75 






Green Island 


20 00 






Westernvile 


44 00 




6 00 


Hebron 








Whitosboro 


18 61 






Hoodie Falls 


124 23 


31 73 


63 65 


Williamstown 


8 18 






Johnsoriville 


41 50 
lUl 48 

37 SI 


14 50 


55 00 
185 72 

30 75 


] 
Pby of We 








LansingbMr^h, 1st 
Lansingburgh, 01 
vet 


,6C3 42 
stchester. 


31 00 


1,400 68 


Malta 


10 00 






Bedford 


84 00 






Mecbanicsville 








Bethany 


41 00 






Midde Granville 








Bridgeport, 1st 


56 50 




135 00 


Nonh Granville 








Croton Falls 


11 89 






Piltstown 


5 00 






Darien 


10 00 






Salem 


56 00 




85 00 


Gilead 


52 00 


80 00 




Sandy Hill 


67 53 






Greeuburgh 


132 05 


25 00 




Schaghticoke 


18 00 


8 00 


11 00 


Greenwich 


8 86 






Stillwater, 1st 


17 50 




47 90 


Hartford 


33 00 






2d 








Huguenot Mem. 


10 00 






3d 








Irvmgton 


589 63 






Troy, Ist 


826 62 




215 00 


Katonah 






25 00 


" 2d 


215 96 




880 00 


Mahopac Falls 


42 59 


25 00 


25 00 


" 3d 








Mt. Kisco 


14 00 






" 9th 


46 76 




51 25 


New Rochelle 


400 00 






" Liberty st 








North Salem 


2 00 






" Mt. Ida Me 


- 






Patterson 


62 10 


25 00 


28 08 


morial 


26 37 




15 00 


Peekskill, Ist 


355 58 


165 00 


28 81 


" Oakwood ave 13 2:i 




3 00 


2d 


12 00 






" Park 


48 85 




83 00 


Pleasantville 


2 00 






" Second st 


602 00 




298 03 


Port Chester 


44 06 




40 40 


" Westminstei 


, 15 00 




41 70 


Port's Memorial 


10 40 






Woodside, 


262 13 


74 41 


80 00 


Poundridgo 


40 00 


9 00 





154 



AI^NUAL REPORT OF RECEIPTS. 



8AB. S. W. b'DS. 



Riverdale 

Eye 650 75 

Siii2 Sin? 300 00 
South Ea-t Centre 60 70 

" Kast 39 00 

" Salem 74 00 

Stamford, l?t 320 43 
Thri)t:t;'s Neck 

Thompsonville 16S 94 

Tremont 13 00 

West Farms 5 00 

White Plains 125 00 

Youkers, Ist 17S 31 

" Day Spring 

" Westmiuster 225 00 

Yorktown 80 00 



240 00 



50 00 
30 00 



8 79 



25 00 



50 00 
26 00 



75 00 
87 25 



250 00 
77 50 



55 00 
200 00 



100 00 



4,2*1 69 648 79 1,127 04 



PaE. 8. W. BD'S. 



STNOD OF OHIO. 

Tby of Athens. 
Amesville 

Athens 

B:irl()w 

Bash an 

Bfcch Grove 

B.-r.'a 3 00 

Beverly 3 20 

Bristol 

Carthage 

Chester 2 50 

Cross Road8 

Decatur 

Deerfleld 5 72 

Gallipolis 50 00 

Logan 20 00 

Marietta 15 35 

Matamoras 

Middleport 46 58 

McConnellsville 4 05 

Nelsoiiville 

New England 

New Plymouth 10 00 

Ponieroy 17 00 

Rutland 

Stockport 

Syracuse 1 14 

Tupper's Plains 1 00 

Warren 8 00 

Walertown 7 60 



195 04 
Pby of Belief oiitaine. 

Bellefontaine 130 28 

Belle Centre 13 00 

Buck Creek 82 00 

Bucyrus 57 22 

Crestline 5 00 
De Gralf 

Forest 4 75 

Gallon 35 00 

Huntsville 7 00 

Kenton 23 27 

Marseilles 7 00 
Mount Blanchard 

Nevada 5 00 

Patterson 16 00 

Rushylvania 22 00 
Rush Creek 
Sandusky 

Spring Hills 23 53 

Uliper Sandusky 10 00 

TJrbana 34 91 

West Liberty 18 79 
Wyandotte 
Zanesfleld , 

443 75 



11 00 
25 00 



10 91 
20 00 
5 00 



129 00 

55 71 



20 00 



38 00 



314 62 



122 65 
25 00 

85 00 
34 76 
5 00 
39 00 
62 50 
22 00 
15 00 
54 50 

13 00 

44 00 



26 32 
83 10 
122 55 
18 50 



722 88 



PInj of CUUlicothe. 




Bainbridge 


5 45 




Belfast 


5 00 




Bethel 


1 00 




Bloomingburgh 


as 50 


34 50 


Bourneville 


30 (»0 




Chillicothe, lat 


250 86 


100 00 


3d 


10 00 


32 (50 


Concord 


2 00 


21 50 


Ovtitlilana 






Fall'>eek 






Frankfort 


6 00 


15 00 


French 


5 00 




Greenfield 1st 


174 00 


100 00 


Greenland 


6 50 




Hamdcn 


17 50 


16 10 


Hillsborough 


219 00 50 00 


112 50 


Marshall 


5 00 


8 02 


Memorial 


2 66 




Moua 






McArthur 






Mt. Pleasant 


6 00 


22 75 


New Market 


4 39 




New Petersburgh 




North Fork 


16 71 


48 10 


Omega 
Piketon 










Psgah 


100 00 


32 50 


S: 1 rn 


195 45 32 25 


123 83 


Sinking Spring 






Union 


5 53 




WasbinRton 


33 00 


62 45 


Waver ly 


5 00 




Wilkesville 


21 08 


15 00 


Wilmington 


10 00 






1,170 63 82 25 


744 85 



Piy of Cincinnati. 
Avondale 73 31 

Bantam 
Batavia 

Btihel 15 85 

Bond Hill 8 15 

Cheivot, Ger. 

Cincinnati, 1st 61 00 

2d 385 21 

8d 415 00 

4th 10 00 

5th 

6th 10 00 

7th 89 89 

let Ger. 30 00 

" 2d " 25 00 

Central 291 80 

" Ciimmins- 

ville 13 03 
" Mt Au- 
burn 200 00 
" Poplar 

St 88 20 
" Sabbath- 
Day 
" Walnut 

Hill 471 61 
Cleves and Berea 13 57 
Clifton 70 00 

C.Uege Hill 81 21 

Delhi 11 02 

Elizabeth & Berea 23 50 
Blc-ndale 64 00 

Goshen 6 16 

Harrison 4 00 

Lebanon 27 00 

Lovclaud 80 41 

Maderia S 70 

MadiBonville 6 00 



6 82 



38 44 

10 00 
15 00 
50 00 



125 60 



25 00 
7 56 



225 00 

300 00 

185 00 236 00 



200 09 
58 15 
265 50 



250 00 
120 00 
465 24 

105 00 



125 00 


3f)4 50 




27 00 


20 00 


46 00 




135 70 




41 60 



200 60 



54 50 
40 00 



ANNUAL EEPOKT OF RECEIPTS. 



155 



SAB. S. "W. B'DS. 



Mason and Pisgah 
Monroe 
Moulerey 
Montgomery 
Morrow 
Moscow 
Mt. Carmel 
NfW Richmond 
Pleasant Ridge 
Pleasint liun 
Reading and Lock- 
land 
Sharonville 
Somerset 
Springda'e 
Sterling 
Venice 
Westwood 
William sburgh 
Wyoming 
Miscellaneous 



3 03 
8 00 



52 00 
80 00 



31 04 

5 00 

10 00 

6 00 

7 50 
22 50 

31 00 



290 00 
365 00 



6 00 



9 39 



4 00 

5 00 



4 80 



38 00 
61 50 



20 80 



18 00 



3 00 
20 00 



50 00 



114 !i0 

183 10 



3,338 68 473 65 3,815 95 



Pby of Cleveland. 

Akron, Ist 

Ashtaliiili, Ist 80 80 26 87 

Brecksville 16 00 

Chester, let 

Cleveland, 1st 1,635 50 100 00 

•' 2d 1,200 00 318 00 

" Case av 195 00 25 00 

" East, let 61 00 

" Euclid av 463 93 

" North 12 00 

" South 85 00 

" Wilson ave 10 00 

Woodland av 398 00 60 00 



Elyria 

Grafton 

Guilford 

Hudson 

Independence 

Kingsville 

Lafayette 

Milton 

Northfield 

North Springfield 

Orwell 

Parma 

Painesville 

Rome 

tolon 

Streetsborough 

Wer.t. Kea've Col. 

Willoughby 

Miscellaneous 



10 00 
22 50 



10 00 
10 00 

20 00 
3 04 

26 50 
6 43 

33 50 
22 00 
10 00 



4,331 20 
Pby of Columbus. 
Amanda 

Bethel 1 51 

Blendon 41 12 

Bremen 1 00 

Central College 30 39 
Circleville, Ist 

" Central 

Columbus, Ist 470 29 
" 2d 425 00 

" Hoge 5 66 

" St. John's 
" Ger 

" West- 

minster 30 00 



6 12 



50 00 



36 31 


19 50 


33 00 


432 09 


567 20 


205 80 


59 94 


384 32 


38 67 


15 70 


50 00 


360 15 


20 00 


7 04 



17 12 

U 40 
8 00 


93 33 

16 65 

17 00 


5 00 
55 60 
5 UO 



529 87 2,491 72 



Darby 
Dublin 
Green Caetle 



7 50 



53 00 

25 00 

7S 38 

243 07 

265 06 

29 00 



134 91 
S3 00 



Greenfield 

Grove City 

Groveport 

Lancaster 

Lithopolis 

London 

Lower Liberty 

Midway 

Mifflin 

Mt. Sterling ' 

New Holland 

Reynoklsburgh 

Rush Creek 

Sciota 

Worthington 

Miscellaneous 



4 00 

2 OH 

31 67 

10 00 

11 00 
7 60 
1 05 

13 25 



12 75 

7 00 

7 50 

100 00 



SAB. S. W. B'DS. 



15 00 
47 10 
30 00 
112 50 
94 20 



Bath 
Bellbrook 
Bethel 
Blue Ball 
Camden 
Carrollton 
Cedarville 
Clifton 
Colliusville 
Covington 
Dayton 1st 
4th 



Pby of Dayton. 
5 00 



20 00 

10 00 

3 40 

13 00 

100 00 



314 07 

33 00 

Memorial 30 61 

12 17 

903 72 

7 00 



Park 
Third st 

Eaton 

Ebenezer 

Fletcher 

Franklin 

Gettysburgh 

Greenville 

Hamilton 

Harm on V 

Jacksonburgh 

Middletown 

Monroe 

New Carlisle 

New Jersey 

New Paris 

Osborn 

O.^ford 

Plqua 

Pleasant Valley 

Riley 

Seven Mile 

Somerville 

South Charleston 

Springfield, 1st 
'° 2d 

Troy 

Washington 

Xenia 

Yellow Springs 

W. F. Sem'y, 
Oxford 



2 37 
15 00 

5 00 
23 00 
89 35 



50 50 
3 30 
13 00 
12 00 

1 00 
66 00 
63 53 



15 00 
4 50 

17 32 
123 00 
240 00 

120 19 
6 30 

121 25 
65 00 



2,508 58 
Pby of Huron. 
Bloomville 
Clyde 
Elmore 
Fostoria 
Fremont 
Genoa 
Graytown 
Green Spring 
I Huron 



18 37 

2 00 

3 50 
21 00 
95 00 



3 00 

1;^ 00 



3 CO 



3 00 
2 00 



47 20 

14 00 

10 50 
17 00 

15 50 
15 05 
14 50 



1,220 35 64 12 1,283 97 



2 50 
75 00 



60 00 
17 00 



11 48 
18 00 



209 75 

5 00 

180 50 

6 00 
75 00 
41 50 

448 00 
34 10 

15 50 
67 90 

31 07 

100 53 

2 60 

22 67 



29 11 



80 00 
144 73 



22 25 
15 50 

430 00 
260 73 
175 00 

66 05 



154 50 2,846 20 



11 60 61 95 

1 00 

34 19 

99 05 

13 00 105 26 



S5 00 



156 



ANNUAL EEPORT 



Mel in ore 

McCutchenville 

Milan 

Monrocville 

Norwalk 

Olena 

Pern 

Republic 

Sandusky 

Titlii) 

Miscellaneous 



Fbyof 
Ada 
Arcadia 
Blanchard 
Bluffton 
Celina 
Centre 

Columbus Grove 
Delpbos 
Dupout 
Enon Valley 
Fiudlay 
Harrison 
Kalida 
Leip>ic 
Lima 

*' Mission 
McComb 
Middlepoint 
Mt. Jeflerson 
New Salem 
New Stark 
Nortb Bethel 
Ottawa 
Eockport 
Shanesville 
Sidne}-, 
St. Mary's 
Turtle Creek 
Van Wert 
Wapakoneta 
West Newton 
West Union 



5 00 



6 00 
95 80 
12 00 
15 00 

75 85 



364 52 

Lima. 

75 00 

10 CO 



20 00 



38 00 
1 50 



66 00 

15 00 
1 50 

3 00 
1 00 

10 06 

80 00 

4 00 
87 00 

1 00 

3 00 

24 50 

3 00 

5 00 
3f8 56 



Pby of Mahoning. 



Alliance 
Beloit 
Brookfield 
Canfield 
Canton 
Champion 
Clarksou 
Coiis\ille 
Columbiana 
Concord 
East Palestine 
Ellsworth 
Hanover 
Hubbard 
Kinsman 
LfeJonia 
Liberty 
Lowell 
Uassillon 
Middle Sandy 
Mineral Kidge 
New Lisbon 
Newton 
Niles 

North Benton 
" Jackson 
Petersbur<;ti 
Pleasant Valley 



129 26 
14 (0 
10 00 

150 00 



4 00 
12 80 
8 60 
4 00 
80 00 



21 25 



90 80 

33 80 
11 00 

106 91 
10 00 
4 00 

34 53 
28 00 

3 00 



12 50 

5 00 
15 00 
38 50 

10 00 

55 16 
64 47 
7 00 

24 60 534 08 



51 00 



16 54 
42 21 



46 00 

162 28 
6 00 
3 00 



74 80 
2S 25 
10 00 
17 00 23 10 
12 50 



17 CO 475 68 



00 



5 CO 



42 91 



1 52 



19 00 



18 3T 



32 50 
40 00 



14 66 



32 76 
26 50 
47 00 
216 60 

30 00 
135 86 
55 (10 
11 00 



OF RECE 


[PTS. 

25 no 

42 00 

5 00 

35 53 

1st 1,271 12 

2d 11 00 


SAB. S. W. b'DS. 


Poland 

Salem 
Vienna 
Warren 
Youngstown 


100 24 

113 10 

6 <0 

1.02 SO 

50 00 395 53 



2,139 59 108 43 1.390 42 



Ply of Mai- ion. 

Ashley 5 66 

Birliu 

Br<.wn 10 34 

Caledonia 

Cai-diii^'ion 5 CO 

Chfstoi-ville 41 HO 

Delaware 161 00 

Delhi 
Genoa 

Iberia 15 00 

Jerome 

Kingston 5 70 

La Rue 2 25 

Lil.eity 11 00 

Marion 20 00 

Marvsville 26 f9 

MillVird Centre 
Mt. Gilead 55 65 

Ostrander 30 UO 

Pisgah 

Porter 7 30 

Providence 
Radnor and Thomp- 
son 10 00 
Richwood 5 00 
Saiem 
Sunbury 

Trenton 5 00 

West Berlin 8 58 

York 12 66 



Pby of Maumee. 



Antwerp 

Bowling Green 

Bryan 

t ecil 

Defiance 

Delta 

Eagle Creek 

Edgenon 

Fayette 

Grand Uapids 

Haskius 

Hicksville 

Highland 

Hull Prairie 

Lost Creek 

Madison 

Maumee 

Milo 

Milton Centre 

Mt. Salem 

Napoleon 

North Baltimore 

Paulding 

Pemberville 

Perry sburgh 

Walnut 
St. 

Ridgeville 

Spring Lake 

Stryker, French 

Toledo, 1st 

" Ist Cong'l 
" 1st Ger. 
" 3d 



15 00 
10 50 



31 25 
5 00 



4 17 

4 50 



6 00 



4 00 



37 95 
5 00 



2+ 23 

41 00 



5 00 



15 CO 



13 00 



18 25 
50 27 
17 00 

24 26 

261 15 
16 50 

36 00 



50 no 

120 51 
70 00 
39 70 
47 00 
44 00 
23 00 

4 55 

400 



60 00 
53 00 
10 40 



98 28 ' 93S 59 



63 00 
48 62 



16 65 
10 00 



500 
IS 00 

8 00 
30 00 

4 00 

9 16 
15 00 
27 83 

S7 78 

12 00 

185 63 

11 00 



ANNUAL REPOET OF RKCEIPTS. 



157 





SAB. s. 


w.b'ds. 

115 00 


Powhattan 


7 00 


SAB. S. 

2 20 


(V. b'de. 


Toledo, Westm'r 


85 22 




Tontogany 


12 00 


45 00 


Kock HUl 


26 67 






Waterville 






Scotch Ridge 






22 00 


Weston 


11 oa 


6 00 


Se ecaville 


13 50 




17 75 


West Bethesda 


65 00 




8hor' Greek 


9 00 




40 00 


West Unity 




50 00 


Stillwater 






5 50 










St. Clairsville 


110 00 


54 00 


SCO 00 




320 60 13 00 


653 61 


Washington 


13 96 




26 07 


Phy of Portsmouth. 




Weegee 

West Brooklyn 


3 10 
3 00 






Buckeye 






WeM Chester 


30 00 






Buena Vista 


2 00 




Wheeling Valley 


5 51 




26 75 


CedroD 






Woodsfield 








Di'oatiir 


5 00 




York 








Eckmanseilte 


28 30 2 90 


7 50 


1 




114 55 




FeHsl.uri.'h 

Felicity 

Georgetown 


032 97 


2,060 60 


25 00 




Pby of Steubenville. 






Green Brier 


1 00 




Amsterdam 


15 00 


8 00 




Hanging Rock 


9 no 




Annapolis 


2:1 00 


6 00 




Higginsport 






Bac )n Ridge 


7 00 




40 00 


Huntington 






Beech Spring 


30 no 




31 30 


I ronton 


100 00 




Bethel 


20 41) 




25 00 


Jacks 'D 


22 91 


20 00 


Be hesda 


110 00 


70 00 


50 00 


Johnston 


5 00 




Bethlehem 


20 00 






Madison 






Bloi.nifiekl 


2 00 






Mancliester 


43 00 


9 75 


Buchanan Chapel 


23 CO 




16 00 


IMineral Springs 






Carrollton 


48 19 


25 00 


16 00 


Mt. Joy 






(.'enire 








Mt. Loigh 
Oakland 


13 00 




Centre Unity 


9 00 










C'urinth 


65 00 


40 00 


65 00 


Portsmouth, 1st 


329 35 50 00 


21 83 


Ooss Creek 


28 01 






2d 


\Ti 90 


185 00 


Deersville 


10 00 






" Ist Gei 


. 5 Oit 5 00 




Del Roy 


9 00 




7 00 


Red Oak 


50 00 




Dennison 


15 00 




62 50 


Ripl-y 


86 50 


25 00 


East Liverpool 


19 00 




95 00 


Rome 






East Sprinefield 


16 80 






Russellville 
Sandy Springs 


23 87 
2 00 2 00 




Feed Spring 
Ilarleni 


9 50 

39 00 


6 00 




Sardinia 


13 15 




Ilopediile 
Irondale 


16 50 


1 50 


14 00 


West Union 


6 30 




3 00 






Winchester 


10 00 




Island Creek 


17 00 






Miscellaneous 


200 00 




Kilgore 

Lima 

Linton 


44 CO 

17 62 




6 00 




1,154 28 59 90 


272 08 


21 45 








Long's Run 


30 00 


12 00 


36 50 


Pby of St. 


Clairsville. 




Madison 
Minerva 


5 00 
4 00 




82 50 


Antrim 




55 00 


Monroeville 


40 70 






Barnesville 


7 00 7 00 


75 00 


Newcomerstowu 








Bealsville 


8 40 


8 00 


New Cuiiiberlarid 








Bellaire 1st 


47 00 


117 75 


New llaaerstown 


86 25 


25 00 


15 00 


" 2d 


18 15 


81 30 


NewHarrisburgh 








Bethel 


6 61 


12 64 


New Philadelphia 






36 00 


Beulah 




6 78 


Oak Ridge 


11 50 




12 00 


Birmingham 


37 00 


8 16 


Pleasant Hill 


25 00 


20 00 




Buchanan 






Potter Chapel 


4 00 






Buffalo 


% 15 11 15 


62 96 


Richmond 


40 03 


23 70 


30 54 


Cadiz 


51 80 


316 00 


Ridge 


5 00 




5 00 


Caldwell 






Saiiiieville 


56 12 




35 00 


Cambridge 


60 00 


102 00 


Scio 








Coal Brook 


4 60 


6 50 


Sloan 






16 00 


Concord 


74 20 40 20 


97 00 


Still Fork 


.32 52 




14 96 


Crab Apple 


47 50 


86 56 


Steubenville, 1st 


22 79 


10 CO 


46 00 


Farmington 


11 00 


12 50 


2d 


212 00 




244 00 


Freeport 




83 00 


Old 


ion 00 




76 25 


Kimbolton 






Two Ridges 


68 00 


25 00 


41 68 


Kirkwood 


26 42 


136 54 


Uhrichsville 






30 00 


Lore City 




22 00 


Uniiinport 


15 00 


7 00 




Martinsville 




134 97 


Waynerburgh 






20 00 


Martin's Ferry 


62 25 




Wellsville 


12 00 


19 00 


107 14 


Morristown 


2 00 


80 06 


Yellow Creek 


219 69 


76 15 




Mount Pleasant 


58 S9 


97 87 


Miscellaneous 






38 00 


New Athens 




65 00 














New Castle 


3 26 


6 65 




1,662 18 


374 35 


1,285 82 


Nottingham 


185 00 


34 30 










Olive 




20 00 


Pby of wooster. 






Portland 






Apple Creek 


66 35 




41 00 



158 



ANNUAL REPOET OF RECEIPTS. 



Ashland "" 


105 40 




Belleville 


00 




Berlin 


3 00 




Bethel 


n 00 




Black Creek 






Blooming Grove 






Canal i ulton 


18 00 




Cheater 


14 50 


8 00 


Clear Fork 


9 00 




Congress 


19 39 




Dalton 


22 00 




Doyle^^to\vn 


28 00 




Fredi-ricUsljurgh 


143 16 


35 16 


Hayebville 






Holmesville 


16 54 




Hopewell 


104 00 


20 OO 


Jackson 


19 50 




Jeromeville 






Lexington 


50 13 


20 00 


Loudonville 


10 CO 




Mansfli'l.l, 1st 


133 77 


110 00 


Marshallville 






Millersburgh 


32 00 




McKay 


8 97 




Mf. Eaton 






Nashville 


10 00 




Oliveijburgh 


20 00 




Ontario 


3 43 




Orange 


30 00 




Orrville 


7 09 




Perryeville 


11 24 




Plymouth 


16 00 




Svannah 


69 60 


25 60 


Siielhy 


10 00 




Sbiloh 






8hri;ve 


27 00 


3 00 


Wayne 


16 94 


5 45 


West Salem 


29 98 




Wooster, let 


116 18 


18 SB 


West- 






minster 


73 05 






l,2i2 22 


252 09 


Phy of Zanesville. 




Bladensburg 






Brownsville 


54 40 




Chandlersville 


7 10 




Clarke 


42 00 


5 50 


Coming 






Coshocton 


43 no 




Dresden 


5-i 81 




Duncan's Falls 


8 30 




Evans Creek 






Fairmount 


4 00 




Frazynburgh 






Frederickstown 


25 00 




Granville 


58 94 




Hanover 






High Hill 


33 00 




Homer 


2 20 




Jeflferson 


35 00 




Jersey 


65 00 




Johnstown 






Keene 


10 00 




Kirkersville 


5 00 




Linton 


10 lO 




Mad'son 


43 86 




Martinsberg 


7 00 




Milwood 






Mt. Pleasant 






Mt. Vernon 


48 00 


8 1^0 


Mt. Zion 


10 00 




Muskingum 


138 94 


11 44 


Newark, Ist 


70 00 




2d 




^ 


" Salem, Qer. 




New Concord 


18 00 


-Jl.- 



55 00 
22 16 



57 30 
11 80 

30 00 

14 25 
32 00 
112 64 

17 62 
22 OU 

20 00 
10 00 
4 00 

30 40 



00 



10 00 

26 78 
16 00 
3U 00 
44 00 



15 00 

6 00 

15 00 

134 00 

114 85 

797 80 



23 00 
30 00 
17 50 

110 00 

25 00 



61 00 
86 86 

20 00 

8 91 

13 00 

44 20 

40 05 



87 84 



61 75 
24 00 
35 92 
33 li 
313 13 

64 86 



New Lexington; 
Norwich 
Oakneldj 
Oti-ego 
l*ata>ka!a 
Roscoe 
Rofteville 
Kural Dale 
Hulcni, German 
Shawnee 
Uuiiy 

t^niontown 
LTtica 

Waterford 
West Carlisle 
Zuntsvilie, Ist 
2d 
" Putnam 



43 00 
4 110 
H 00 

10 00 



00 



28 20 

11 00 
91 69 
10 00 
67 00 



SAB. 8. W. B D.S. 



47 45 



68 00 

E 20 00 



• 11 00 
45 25 


49 06 
179 00 
111 45 



1,065 44 24 94 1,611 35 



BTNOD OF PACIFIC. 

Piy of Benicia. 



Areata 


10 00 




Benicia 






m-i Valley 


6 00 




Lloomfieid 


6 00 




Kolinas 






Calistoga 


12 00 




Clear Lake, Ist 






2d. 


6 00 


1 00 


Davisville 






Dixon 


6 00 




Duncan's Mills 


5 00 




Fulton 






Ilealdsburgh 




5 35 


Mendocino 


15 00 




Napa 


220 75 


115 05 


Plainfleld 






Point Arena 






Santa Kosa 


21 00 


6 00 


San Rafael 


44 .50 


72 00 


Shiloh 


5 00 




St. Helena 


20 00 


39 00 


Tomales 


8 00 




Two Rocks 


13 00 




Ukiah 


18 00 


4 25 


Vacaville 




15 00 


Vallejo 


20 00 




Westminster 








435 25 


5 25 252 80 


PbyofLos 


Angelea. 




Arlington 


28 00 


80 00 


Anaheim 


7 55 




Buenaventura 


36 00 




Carpeuteria 






Coiton 


600 




Lo8 Alamos 






Los Angelea 






Newport 






Ojai 


5 00 




Orange 






Pasadena 






San Bernardino 


6 00 




Santa Anna 






SaniaBarljara 


14 20 




Santa Maria 






Santa Monico 


4 00 




San Diego 


20 00 




Westminster 


14 36 




W ilminglon 







141 11 



30 00 



ANTSTUAL REPORT OF RECEIPTS. 



159 



SAB. B. W. B'D?. 



Pby of Sacramento 


Amador 




Arbuckle 




Carson City 




Chico 




Columbia 




Colusa 


5 80 


Elko 




Elk Grove 




Eldorado 
Eurtka 




Grayson 




loue City 


5 30 


Marysviile 




Merced 


6 CO 


Modepto 




Nord 




Oleta 




Placerville 




Plymouth 




Red Bluff 




Reddiii? 


3 00 


Sacramento 


50 00 


14th St 




Shcridin 




Stockton 


2: 00 


Tehama 




TiacT 




Virsrfiiia City 


7 75 


Woodbridge 





104 85 
Pby of San Francisco. 



Alameda 

Berk ley, 1st 

Brooklyn 

Danville 

Noe Valley 

Oakland, Ist 
2d 
" Chinese 
" East 

Pacheco 

San Francisco, Ist 
" Calvary 
" Central 
" Chinese 
" French 
" Howard 

St. 
" Larkin St. 
" Memorial 
" Olivet 
" Sr. Johns 
" Welsh 
" Westmin- 
ster 
" Wood- 
bridge 

San Pablo 

Walnut Creek 

West Berkeley 



50 GO 

50 00 
7 50 
4 00 



40 00 
384 90 



27 65 
3 00 
2 00 
2 00 
168 00 



100 00 



12 05 
11 10 



170 20 



75 00 
5C OJ 



125 00 



58 40 

38 00 
60 00 



297 00 



23 60 
34 75 



11 50 
281 25 



154 00 
116 00 

7 50 



70 00 



862 20 170 20 1 152 00 



Pby of San Jose. 
Alvarado 
Arrovo Grande 
Bakersfleld 



Cambria 




Cayucas 




Contreville 


13 15 


Gilroy 




Hollinter 


6 00 


Livermore 


6 10 


Los Gatos 


10 00 


Mayfleld 





SAB. 8. W. b'DS. 



Mcnlo Park 
Milpitas 
Piano 
Plea^anton 
Portersville 
Salinas City 
Santa Clara 
San I.eandro 
San Luis Obispo 
San Jose 
Visilia 
Watsonville 



9 00 
5 00 



9 00 



46 00 



180 05 



9 00 226 05 



8TNOD OP PENNSYLVANIA. 

Pby of Allegheny. 



Alleffhenv, 1st 


192 00 




610 00 


'' 2d 


£2 23 


8 15 


65 23 


" let Ger 


32 10 


14 15 




" Bethel 


10 00 






" Central 


94 77 


20 00 


201 30 


" Nnrth 


866 55 




4.31) HO 


" Providence 37 10 




28 00 


" School St 30 00 






" Valley 


100 72 




191 20 


Bikerstown 


64 0) 


10 00 


52 50 


Beaver 


54 44 


42 44 


88 74 


Bellevne 


2 60 




81 00 


Briilffewoter 


10 01) 




48 00 


Bull Creek 


2 00 






Concord 


9 00 






Cro68 Uoads 


20 00 






Kiiisworth 


27 85 




96 08 


Fiiirinount 


10 40 






Freedom 


5 00 






Glasjrow 


4 00 






Glenfleld 






82 50 


Hiiiinds 


17 23 




100 00 


rioboken 


8 08 




6 00 


I ml 1181 ry 


8 CO 






L' etsdale 


238 60 


37 62 


43 67 


Millvale 


8 32 




77 00 


Natrona 


2 00 






New iinlem 


10 00 






Pine Creek, let 


7 46 






2d 


8 00 






Plains 


10 00 




23 00 


Pleasant Hill 


4 00 


1 00 




Rochester 








Sewicklcy 


853 07 


3.34 35 


131 07 


Sbarpsburgh 


119 24 


40 00 


215 43 


Springdale 


8 00 




25 00 


Tarentnm 






19 00 


Miscellaneous 




502 71 


75 00 




2,891 76 


2,625 72 


Pby of 


Blairsville. 






Armagh 








Beulah 


1.55 no 


.35 00 


211 00 


Blacklick 


3 00 






Blairsville 


405 97 


100 00 


108 81 


Braddock 


39 50 


8 00 


69 00 


Centreville 








Chest Springs 








Congruity 


75 00 




47 75 


Connemaugh 


5 00 




31 00 


Colesville 




25 50 




Cross-Roads 


23 00 


15 00 


4 00 


Perry 


110 00 


10 00 


122 81 


Ebeneburgh 






50 00 


Fairfield 


100 00 


10 17 


25 00 


Greeiisburgh 


74 14 


6 65 


165 00 


HaTison City 


5 75 




13,00 


Irwin 


19 55 




50 57 


Johnstown 


36 80 


13 02 


155 00 



i6o 



ANNUAL BEPORT OF KECEIPTS. 



SAB. S. W. BD 8. 



Laird 

Latiobe 

Lisronier 

Livermore 

Manor 

liurrysviUe 

New Alexandria 

New Saltm 

Parnassuft 

Pine Kun 

Pleasant Grove 

Pluiu Creek 

Polce Run 

Salem 

Union 

Unity 

Verona 

Miscellaneous 



6 no 

80 00 

48 GO 

80 00 
77 76 
32 31 
18-2 04 

19 00 
10 f;0 
46 00 
98 75 

20 50 
28 04 
50 60 



Pby of Butler. 

Allegheny 

Atnily 28 70 

Buffalo 10 20 

Butler 201 26 

Centre 54 83 

CentreviUe 63 39 

Glintonville 

Concord 75 57 

Fairview 

Harlansburg 

Harriaville 

Jefferson Centre 

Karus City 

Maitinsburgll 

Middlesex 

Mt. Nebo 

Muddy Creek 

New Uope 

New Salem 

Nortli Butler 

" Liberty 

" Wasliington 26 00 
Petrolia 
Pine Grove 
Plain Grove 
Pleasant Valley 
Portersville 
Scrub Grass 
Summit 
Sunbury 
Unionville 
Westminster 
Zelienople 



5 00 

12 81 

4 00 
3 00 

43 00 

5 45 

7 00 
22 90 

8 00 

6 39 
20 00 



177 40 

61 83 

5 00 

18 lO 

106 00 

7 00 
20 00 

9 00 
11 CO 

3 00 



Bis Spring 
Bloomfleld 
Buck Valley 
Buffalo 
Burnt Cabins 
Carlisle, Ist 
3d 

Centre 

Cliaiiibersb'gh, C 
" (Full'g Sp'i 

Dauphin 

Derry 

DlcUinson 

Dancannon 

Fayetteville 

Gettysburs;h 

Greencastle 

Green Hill j 



1,015 73 

Pby of Carlisle. 

165 00 
60 00 



20 00 
12 00 



25 00 
33 75 



5 00 
9 10 



53 00 
25 00 



1,832 SO 338 76 



9 00 

5 00 

60 86 

169 20 



10 no 

37 00 



5 00 
62 02 



47 39 
37 63 



18 40 



10 00 



17 00 
11 11 



37 43 
31 22 



50 00 



Ilarrisburgh, Elder 

st 
" M'k'tsq 
" Pine St 1 
" West'r 
" 7th St 

Landishurgh 

Lower Pain Val'ey 

Lr. Marsh Creek 
Gt. Conewago 

Mechanicsbiirgh 

Mercertburgh 

Middletowu 

Middle Spring 

Millcrstown 

McConnelleburgh 

Newport 

Paxton 

Petersbursh 

R. Kennedy Mem'l 

Shermandale 

Shippenbburgh 

Silver Spring 

St. Thomas & (. 

Hocky Spring ) 

Upper Path Valley 

Uiiuer 

Warfordsburgli 

Wayuisl'oro 

Weil's Valley 

York Spring 



60 00 
13 00 



28 00 



8 74 
257 60 



10 00 



1,465 03 



253 76 



2 50 

333 59 

,026 59 

16 00 



170 29 

21 75 

60 00 
116 00 

22 75 

144 03 

61 50 

12 95 
20 00 
18 50 

5 00 

6 00 
5 00 

100 43 
28 00 
3 30 

13 00 
112 44 

3 SO 

87 39 

7 59 



BAB. 8. W. b'DS. 



630 24 

579 00 

100 00 

64 CO 



3,622 46 

Pby of Chester. 

Ashmun 12 00 

Avondale 14 44 

Bryn Mawr 88 85 

Charlestown 10 00 

Chester, 1st 

" 3d 

" t ity 

Christiana 

Coatesville 

Darby, Ist 

" Borough 
Dilworthtown 
Doe Run 

Dowuingtown, Cen- 
tral 12 10 
East Whiteland 32 50 
Fagg's Manor 106 05 
Fairview 12 00 
Forks of Brandy- 



95 22 



48 00 



11 53 
9 00 



wine 
Glen Kiddle 
Great Valley 
Honey Brook 
Kenuelt Square 
Marple 
Media 
Middlctown 
New London 
Nottingham 
Oxford, 1st 
2d 
Penningtonville 
Phcciiixville 
Ridley 

" Park 
Trinity 
Unionville 
Upper Octorara 
w iiyne 

West Chester Ist 
West Grove 
Miscellaneous 



40 29 



50 00 
110 00 



60 60 
31 50 



100 00 

18 00 

8 00 

157 12 

4 00 
18 50 
14 00 

8 00 
106 40 

5 00 
166 56 

30 00 

9 00 

43 72 
3 00 

50 00 

10 00 
89 12 



25 00 

81 25 
112 00 

63 00 

64 50 
10 00 
62 00 

45 25 



20 00 ira 00 

12 00 

77 44 27 85 

68 00 

20 CO 

767 17 3,324 44 



90 00 
112 65 

60 00 
38 80 
65 00 
20 00 
115 20 



11 06 



23 00 
50 00 



3 75 



43 72 



53 05 
10 81 



211 48 
7 00 
50 00 
17 00 

60 SO 

82 00 
170 00 
25 GO 
66 00 



82 00 

5 00 
194 00 

8 00 
20 67 

9 00 



152 00 
92 73 

425 00 
25 10 
14 00 



1,235 11 131 53 2,220 99 



ANNTTAL EEPOET OF KECEIPTS. 



l6l 



SAB. S. W.BDS. 



SAB. W. B'B8. 



Pby of Clarion. 






Harmon ebnrgh 


10 00 






Academia 


4 00 






Irvineton 


2 00 






Beech Woods 


16 00 




100 00 


Jamestown 


2 06 




12 00 


Bethesd.i 


9 64 




20 CO 


Kerr'8 Hill 


6 75 






Brookville 


67 63 


20 00 


100 00 


Meadville, Ist 


32 00 




20 00 


Callensburgh 


12 00 




30 00 


2d 


25 00 




50 00 


Clarion 


60 82 


8 00 


130 85 


Mercer, 1st 


75 78 


13 24 




Concord 






15 00 


2d 


25 00 


3 75 




East Brady 






60 00 


MilledKeville 








Kdenburgh 


14 00 




10 00 


Mill Village 


2 07 






Elkton 








Mt. Pleasant 


12 25 






Eiiilenton 






21 02 


North East 


65 50 


43 00 


274 50 


Foxburgh 








Oil City, Ist 


37 15 




100 00 


Grcnvllle 


27 85 




83 70 


Pittsfleld 


2 00 






Greenwood 








Pleasantville 


8 65 




38 20 


Leatherwood 


2.3 46 


12 37 


73 35 


Salem 


2 40 






Licking 


5 25 




25 00 


Sandy Lake 


40 00 




42 00 


Maysville 








Springfield 


4 87 




35 35 


Mill Creek 


3 13 




6 13 


Stoncboro 








Mt. Pleasant 


1 75 






Sugar Creek 


7 00 






Mt. Tiibor 


S 30 






Mm'l 


9 00 






New Bethlehem 


25 00 




61 32 


Sugar Grove 


2 00 






Nrw Kehoboth 


4 00 




23 61 


Sunville 


9 00 




22 00 


Oak Grove 


2 30 




39 44 


Tideoute 


13 00 




81 41 


Oil City, Second 






162 97 


Titusvillo 


375 29 




875 00 


Perry 


8 00 






Union 








Perrysville 






20 00 


Ulica 


25 00 




21 00 


Pisgah 


7 00 




65 00 


Venango 


6 31 


1 00 




Reynoldsvllle 


1 00 






Warren 


64 95 


24 95 


125 00 


liichardsville 


2 00 






Waterf<.rd 


20 00 


20 00 


38 50 


Richland 


12 10 






Waterloo 








Ridgewav 


4 66 






Wattsbnrgh 


26 00 






Scotch Hill 


2 40 




19 00 


Westminster 


9 50 


4 00 




Sholoh 






21 25 


Miscellaneous 






989 02 


Sligo 


6 00 














St. Petersburgh 








1,865 11 


259 17 


3^0 29 


Tioncfita 
Troy 


1 70 
3 00 




13 00 


Pby oj Huntingdon. 12 50 






Tylersburgh 


2 30 






Alexandria 


113 26 


16 00 


11 00 


Unity 








Altooua, 1st 


116 20 




188 00 


West Millville 


5 00 




10 80 


2d 


46 85 




81 05 


Wilcox 


4 00 






Bald Engle 






18 00 


Worthville 


3 00 






Bedford 


.33 96 


5 42 












Bellefonte 


230 00 


20 00 


212 20 




347 29 


40 37 


1,051 44 


Bethany 

Bethel 

Beulah 








Ply of Erie. 






52 00 


13 00 


13 00 


Atlantic 


5 00 






Birmingham 


697 16 


23 50 


164 CO 


Beaver Dam 








Bradford 


1 56 






Belle Valley 


18 50 


6 00 


15 00 


Buffalo Run 


4 00 






Cambridge 






57 25 


Clearfield 


125 78 


12 57 


89 85 


Cherry Tree 








Curwensville 


70 75 


37 86 


15 26 


Cochranton 


8 75 


• 3 75 




Duncan sville 


15 00 




50 00 


Concord 


1 80 






E. Kishacoqui'.'.as 


70 00 


9 00 


33 85 


Conneiiutville 


28 74 


28 74 




Everett 


2 00 






Cool Spring 


63 70 


727 




Fruit Hill 


57 00 


30 00 


16 00 


Cooperstown 






46 00 


Hollidaysburgh 


93 35 


16 73 


252 25 


Corry 


15 00 




45 00 


Houtzdale 


34 15 




37 85 


Dempseytown 


2 00 






Hublersburgh 








East Greene 


7 15 






Huntingdon 


201 15 


50 00 


185 12 


Edinboro 


35 00 




56 00 


Kylertown 


3 00 






Erie, Ist 


65 25 




150 00 


Lewistown 


.303 69 


105 00 


109 00 


" Central 


200 00 




75 00 


Lick llun 








" Chestnut st 


20 50 




25 15 


Little Valley 


13 00 






" Park 


300 00 


100 00 


200 00 


Lo^ns " 


28 50 


13 50 


21 18 


Evansburgh 


10 00 






Lost Creek 








Fairfield 


14 00 






Lower Spruce Creek 25 00 




38 50 


Fairview 


10 00 




30 00 


Lower Tuscarora 


56 25 




55 00 


Franklin 






127 20 


Mann's Choice 








Fredonia 


15 00 




30 30 


Mapleton 


2 00 






Garland 


2 00 






Martinsburgh 


10 00 




23 21 


Georgetown 


5 20 




9 00 


Middle Tuscarora 


29 00 






Girard 


41 49 


8 47 


48 44 


MiflBintown 


69 00 




77 02 


Gravel Run 






18 45 


Milesburgh 


09 






Greenfield 








Milroy 


37 35 


10 25 


19 00 


Greenville 


59 00 




128 52 


Morrisdale Mines 








Hadley 


12 60 






Moshannon and / 


2 33 






Harbor Creek 


5 40 




30 00 


SnjwShoe ^ 







II 



1 62 



ANNUAL REPORT OF RECEIPTS. 



8AB. 8. W. B DS. 



SAB. S. W. B'DS. 



McVeytown 


30 00 






Tnnnclton 






12 00 


Mt. Union 


14 00 




22 57 


Union 


15 00 




16 78 


Kewton Hamilton 


3 50 






W:i8hington 




20 00 


42 00 


Orbisonia 


1 85 






West Glude Run 


31 00 


6 00 


,50 00 


Osceola 


12 00 






West Lebanon 


32 65 




86 00 


Penfleld 


13 55 


5 20 




Worthington 


!)8 50 


8 00 


50 0) 


Perrysvllle 


54 37 




59 51 


— 












Peru 


3 00 






1,106 19 


152 62 


2,371 78 


Petershnrgh 


8 75 














Pliillipsburgh 


37 94 


13 20 




Pby of Lackawanna. 






Pine OrovH 


20 63 




62 86 


Abington 








Robertsdale 








Archibald 


4 00 ■ 






Saxlon 


5 26 






Arrarat 








Shade Gi.p 


86 00 






Athens 


9 11 




6U00 


Shaver's Creek 


3 00 






Barclay 


5 00 




80 00 


Shcllabarsh 








Bennett 






25 00 


Shirleyshurgh 


5 GO 




4 63 


Bethany 








Sinking Creek 


8 20 




40 00 


Bowman's Creek 


2 00 






" Valley 


30 00 




137 00 


Brooklyn 
Camptown 


6 42 






Spring Creek 


119 75 


7 75 


123 26 


13 00 






" Mills 


4 00 






Canton 


30 00 




25 00 


Spru'e Creek 


842 70 


36 00 


881 24 


Carbondale 


194 07 


39 85 


45 35 


Tyrone 


18 40 




46 59 


Coalville 


42 00 




8 55 


Upper Tuscarora 


18 89 


5 29 




Columbia Cross 








Waterside 


1 80 






Roads 








W. Kishacoquillas 


150 00 


70 00 




Covenant 


2 00 






■Williamsburgh 


68 00 




50 00 


Dimock 








Woodland 


1 00 






Diindaff 








Yellow Creek 


1 51 






Dunmore 


16 00 






Migcellaneous 






75 32 


Dushore 






38 00 










East Canton 








3,573 98 


500 27 


3.213 31 


Franklin 1st 


16 57 




28 70 


Pby of Kittanning. 






Gibson 
Great Bend 


7 31 




20 00 


Apollo 


60 00 




150 00 


Hawley 






20 00 


Appleby Manor 


10 63 




30 00 


Harford 


10 00 






Atwood 


1 75 






Harmony 


90 00 


25 00 


44 00 


Bethel 


40 CO 


21 00 


30 00 


Herrick 








Bethesda 








Honesdale 


282 50 




264 67 


Boiling Spring 






23 68 


Kingston 






69 35 


Brady's B. nd 








Laporte 


e 00 






Centre 








Lebanon 








Cherry Tree 


8 00 






Lehman 








" Run 


3 74 






Liberty 


2 81 




10 00 


Clarksburgh 


57 00 




23 00 


Littl* Meadow 


1 00 






Clinton 


10 00 






Langclyffe 


9 00 




93 22 


Concord 


10 00 


10 00 




Mehoopany 








Crooked Creek 


7 00 






Meshoppen 








Carrie's Kiin 


44 00 


8 00 


80 00 


Mouroeton 


1 00 




27 50 


East Union 


5 00 






Montrose 


251 52 


51 52 


105 04 


Ebenezer 


43 00 


10 00 




Nanticoke 


62 45 






Elder's Ridge 


47 00 




55 00 


New Milford 


15 00 




24 00 


Elderton 


15 85 




45 00 


Newton 








Freeport 


83 70 




140 00 


Nicholson 


10 00 




5 65 


Gilgal 






19 50 


Northmoreland 








Glade Run 


60 00 




34 17 


North Wells 








Harmony 


4 00 




116 00 


Orwell 


4 57 




16 86 


Homer 


15 00 




28 00 


Petertibnrgh, Ger. 








Indiana 


10 00 




338 00 


Pittston 


150 00 




28 00 


Jacksonville 






100 00 


Plains 








Kittarninf; 


120 00 




450 00 


Pleasant Mount 


20 00 






Leechburgh 


23 00 


15 00 


100 00 


Plymouth 


47 44 


30 38 


100 00 


Mahoning 


4 00 




5 40 


Prompton 








Marion 


67 00 


25 00 


60 00 


Providence 








Mechanicsburgh 


15 00 




30 00 


Kome 


5 00 






Middle Creek 


5 50 






Rushville 


8 00 






Midway 


5 00 




25 00 


Salem 








Mt. Pleasant 






9 55 


Scott 








Parker City, let 


5 00 




30 00 


Scrauton 1st 


301 f.5 


C 00 


815 00 


Pluraville 


5 00 




13 00 


2d 


282 97 


100 00 


119 00 


Rayne 


6 75 


4 12 




" German 


2 00 






Rural Valiey 


20 00 


1 00 


30 00 


" Green Ridge 








Rockbridge 


1 00 




12 70 


avenue 


6S 06 




95 00 


Saltsbureh 


83 62 




80 00 


" Washburn s 


. 50 00 






Slate Lick 


60 35 


18 50 


68 00 


Sbickshinny 






61 45 


Smicksburgh 


3 40 






Silver Lake 








Brader's Grove 


18 75 


6 00 


39 00 


Snowden Mem'l 









ANNUAL REPORT OF RECEIPTS. 



163 



SAB. 8. W. B DS. 



Springville 

Sterling 

Stevensville 4 00 

Susq'hanna Depot 16 00 

Sylvania 

Terrytown 

Towauda 318 31 

Troy 50 fi6 

Tunkhannock 54 14 

Uniondale 

Ulster 5 00 

Warren 2 00 

Waymart 

Welle & Columbia 

West Pittston 150 no 

Wilkesbarre 4i)T 73 

" Coven't 
Grant St. 
Chapel 8 00 

" Mem'l 26 63 

" Sonth 

Chapel 29 50 
Wyalaeing, Ist 15 UO 

" 2d 
Wyoming 

Wysox 10 00 

Miscellaneous 94 00 

3.368 42 
Pby of Lehigh. 



Allentown 
Allen Township 
Ashland 
Audeureid 
Bangor 

Beaver Meadow 
Bethlehem 
Catasauqua, Ist 
Catasauqua, Bridge 

8t 

Conyngham Valley 
Easton, 1st 

" Brainerd 

" South 
Eckley 
Ferndale 
Hazleton 
Hokendauqua 
Jeanaville 
Lehighton 
Lockridge 
Lower .Mt. Bethel 
Mahanoy City 
Mauch Chunk 
Middle Smithfield 
Mountain 
Portland 
Port Carbon 
Pottsville, 1st 
2d 
Reading, 1st 

" Wash'ton St. 
Shawnee 
Shenandoah 
Slatington 
South Bethlehem 
Stroudsburgh 

East 
Summit Hill 
Tamaqua 
Upper Lehigh 
Upper Mt. Bethel 
Weatherly 
White Haven 
Wormelsdorf 
MisceWaneous 



64 43 
10 00 



23 00 
8 00 



7 00 
6U 00 



11 87 



1^3 00 
495 15 



6 00 
31 94 
12 21 



8 50 
26 24 
KiO 45 

7 92 

15 00 

40 0( 

250 50 

362 37 
6 25 

14 00 



25 25 
S 75 
95 63 
13 00 
38 45 
22 50 
10 00 
8 50 

1 71 



9 00 
148 38 



5 00 



466 22 



8 00 
1 71 



30 00 
24 20 



6 00 
6 00 



8 50 
5 81 



7 50 
30 32 
100 00 

5 35 



12 50 

2 00 
26 98 

3 00 

13 80 



25 00 
50 00 
10 00 

300 00 
151 41 



19 00 
125 00 
495 00 



175 10 

10 00 
37 50 
33 00 

45 66 

3,644 51 

192 00 



10 00 
10 00 



SAB S. W. b'DS. 



Pby of NorthximMrland. 
Bald Eagle & INit- 

20 04 



tany 
Beech Creek 
Ht-rwick 
Blooinsburgh 
Brier Cieek 
Buflfiilo 
Centralia 
Chillisquaque 
Derry 
Elysburgh 
Kmpoi-iurn 
Great Island 
Grove 
Hartlt-ton 
Holland Run 
Jersey Shore 
Lewisburgh 
Linden 
Lycoming 

" Centre 
Mahoning 
MifflUiturgh 
Milton 
Montgomery 
Montoursviile 
Mooresburgh 
McEwensville 
Mt. Zion 
Money 
New Berlin 
N. w Columhta 
Northumberland 1st 14 25 



17 05 

442 46 

■i 00 

60 85 

58 92 
28 00 



fin 00 

104 00 

2 00 

80 00 
111 00 

113 59 

12 00 

104 77 

6 18 
.36 CO 

7 09 

15 00 

7 00 
19 00 

16 66 



28 02 



28 70 



00 



300 00 

57 00 i 



178 73 
19 00 



5 00 



284 60 
29 46 
45 00 



64 45 
102 65 



Oranyeville 

Ponnsdale 

Raven p Creek 

Renovo 

R'jhrsburgh 

Sbamokin 

1st 
Shiloh 
Suiibury 
Warrior Run 
Washington 
Washingtonvllle 
Watsontown 
Williamspyrt, 1st 
2d 

3a 

Miscellaneous 



18 00 
5 00 



14 65 

1 00 



10 00 

58 87 



89 31 



14 25 



8 37 



30 00 
126 70 



22 43 

265 30 
22 50 



43 00 
13 00 

106 00 

116 00 

65 00 

112 00 
56 35 

117 43 



45 55 



25 00 
25 00 



136 05 
20 00 

112 50 
243 .50 
125 00 



2,134 09 2:^6 04 1,001 CO 



31 90 

5 00 

20 00 

11 29 



10 00 



1,967 62 291 67 1,379 08 



Phy of Philailelphia. 
PhUadelphia, 1st 1,379 10 
2d 1,480 04 
3d 2i-)9 37 
4th 32 00 
" 9th .57 86 

10th 1,569% 
l.-ith 30 00 
Phila., African 
" Atonement 
" Bethany 35 05 
" Calvary 1,186 45 
" Chambers 26 70 
•' Clinton St 1 ,=0 <-« 
" Immauuel r^ ''^ 
" Faith Chapel 
" Grace 22 00 

" Greenwich 

St. 10 00 

'• Holland I 

Memorial ( 

" Hope Chapel 

" Lomb'd St., / 

Central f 



67 36 
20 00 



35 05 
57 76 



732 25 
6.50 00 
648 37 

50 00 
612 72 



140 00 
516 90 
250 00 

158 00 



100 00 
5 00 



164 



ANNUAL Ri;POKT OF KECEIPTS. 



Phila., Mariner's 
Scots 
South 

South w'k'st 
South-west- 

era 6 00 

Tabernacle 139 67 
Tabor 30 00 

Union 45 00 

Walnut St 1,323 12 
Wasirton 

Sq,, iBt 54 43 
Westmin- 
ster 90 90 
W. Spruce 

St. 935 82 

Wharton St 10 t'O 
Woodland 30 00 
Miscellaneous 



SAB. s. w. b'ds. 



176 70 



30 CO 



25 00 
73 12 



10 00 



162 81 
35 10 



83 70 




8,903 97 389 83 7,914 68 



Pby of PhUadeliyhia Central. 
Phila., Alexander 123 00 123 00 
" Arch St 327 31 

" Berean 
" Bethesda 

" Bethlehem 88 80 
'■ Carmel, Ger. 3 00 
*' Central 1,000 00 

" Cohocksink 33ii 92 156 75 
" Columbia av 45 16 
" Corinthian av 3 00 
" Cumberland St 
•' Gaston 38 48 27 50 

" Green Hill 

" Kensington 251 .31 178 43 
•' " let 127 60 

" Kenderton 6 50 

" Lehigh Ave. 
" Logan Sq. 
" Mantua, 2d 
" Memorial 20 00 

" Norihern Lib- 
erties, Ist 418 33 
" North 46 36 

" N. Broad St 
" N. lOrh St 11 00 

" Northmiuster 
" Northwestern 55 03 
" Olivet 55 32 

" Oxford 156 63 

" Princeton 270 00 
" lUchmond 
" Sixty-third St. 32 19 
Spring Garden 



100 00 



" Temple 


100 00 


" Trinity 




" West Arch st. 


128 36 


" West Park 


25 00 


" York 8t 


102 30 


" Zion 


3 00 


Miscellaneous 


20 10 



1.55 20 
1,959 50 

400 00 
57 50 

224 58 

498 00 

98 00 



280 00 
171 00 



40 00 



68 00 
121 00 

135 00 

250 00 

1,006 64 

244 15 

190 00 
497 60 
606 18 

40 00 
83 95 
196 80 

153 00 



3,7S8 60 585 68 '<'i475 45 



Pby of Philadelphia North. 

Abington 50 00 

Ann Carmichael 33 68 10 43 
Ashbourne 8 00 

Ben Salem and New- 
port 



Bridesburgh 
Bristol 
C&rversville 
Chestnut Hill 
Conshohocken 



31 50 
117 40 

2 no 

200 00 
10 00 



13 40 



SAB. S. W .b'ds. 



Doylest'wn & Deep 

Itun 60 00 

Edge Hill Carmel 
Falls of Schuylkill 45 00 
Forestville 3 00 

Frankford 135 27 

Germ'town, Ist 1,127 00 
2d 322 S5 
" Market Sq 140 50 
Hermon 
Holmesbnrgh 
Huntingdon Valley 13 00 
Jeffersonville Cen 1 
Jenkinstown, 

Grace 
Leverington 9 09 

Lower Merion 6 00 

Manayunk 90 00 

Merion Square 
Morrisville 2 00 

Mount Airy 
Neshaminy of 

Warminster 31 75 

Neshaminy of 

Warwick 97 CO 

Newtown 107 54 

Norristown, 1st 222 58 
2d 2 00 

" Central 106 00 
Norriton & Provi- 
dence 105 56 
Plumsteadville 2 00 
Port Kennedy 5 48 
Pottstown 184 44 
Roxborough 9 38 
Springfield 

T/ioinpson Mem'l 20 00 
Wakefield 45 20 



258 00 
59 65 



44 00 
20 00 
106 25 

303 00 



40 GO 



00 



45 00 



22 31 



180 00 



142 00 
1,C99 55 

242 00 
50 00 
25 00 
13 25 

75 00 



65 00 
18 00 

45 00 



02 00 

135 60 

146 83 327 43 



57 37 



3 88 



86 00 
59 00 



80 00 
17 HO 



50 00 
18 20 



3,350 82 316 72 8,536 81 



Pby of Pittsburgh. 



Amity 

Bclhuny 

Bethel 

Bloomfield 

Bridgeville 

Calilomla 

Canonsburgh 

" Centre 

Chartiers 

Fairview 

Forest Grove 

Hazlewood 

Hebron 

Homestead 

Hopewell 

Knoxville 

Lebanon 

Long Island 

Manslifld 

Middlet'>wn 

Miller's Run 

Mingo 

M!)ntour8 

MouoDgahela City 

Mt. Carmel 

Mt. Olive 

Mt. Pisgah 

Mt. Washington 

North Brancti 

Oakdale 

Pittsburgh, Ist 

" 2d 

8d 

61 h 

7th 



5 00 
42 75 
44 55 

2 75 
42 00 
17 17 
72 24 
58 63 
55 01 
21 00 
15 00 
13 80 

40 00 

2 84 
13 62 

41 00 
50 00 
24 52 

5 00 
17 17 
87 30 
15 76 
15 00 

6 no 

9 00 

13 00 

9 00 

2 00 

63 .57 

800 00 

760 10 

1,363 52 

128 00 

13 25 



13 00 
13 47 



25 00 



130 60 
151 50 

2C1 00 

69 52 

71 00 

150 00 
33 90 



64 00 



15 00 101 50 
55 55 



11 00 
16 00 



6 00 



42 45 

968 38 
725 73 
620 CO 
200 00 



AI^NUAL EEPOET OF KECEIPTS. 



165 







SAB. S. 


w. b'ds. 


Rich Hill 


61 GO 


SAB. 8. 


W. B D8. 


Pittsburgh 8lh 




11 00 


59 85 


" Bellefleld 


167 66 


25 00 


a31 80 


Sharon Ist 






26 27 


" Cntral 


6 57 






" 2d 








" East Lib- 








Sharpsville 


6 10 






erty, 


606 11 




200 10 


Slippery Rock 


29 50 


16 50 


35 CO 


" Grace Mem'l 1 00 






Transfer 


2 00 






" Lawreiice- 








Unity 


131 67 


79 00 




ville 


ana 63 




145 74 


Westfield 


362 00 


25 00 


96 14 


" Shadv Side 


574 64 


100 00 


440 00 


West Middlesex 


32 92 


19 50 


30 00 


" South Side 
" Park Ave. 






50 00 
90 44 










125 00 




1,541 73 


291 01 


1,352 28 


R!\ccoon 


242 00 


60 00 


162 55 










Riverdale 








Pby of Wasmngton. 






Sharon 


47 68 




23 05 


Allen Grove 


8 02 






Swiss vale 


33 00 


17 00 


140 00 


Bethlehem 


11 75 






Valley 


1 77 




191 20 


Burgetti-town 


62 80 


50 00 


136 68 


VeroTia 


3 56 






Cameron 


5 00 






West Elizabeth 


21 85 


12 00 




Cl.iysville 


133 36 


62 56 


195 44 


Wilkiubburgh 


127 25 




133 73 


Cove 

Cross Creek 
Cross Ro'.u'.s 


m 80 
75 00 
32 00 


20 80 


139 84 
154 00 
27 00 


5.979 77 


313 47 


5,483 74 


32 00 










East Buffalo 


50 00 


10 00 


50 00 


Pby of Reasione. 






Fairview 


62 00 




11 50 


Belle Vernon 






96 40 


Forks of Wheeling 


171 00 


23 00 


152 00 


Brownsville 






45 50 


Frankfort 


36 (K) 






Coniu'llsville 


78 76 


14 26 


123 65 


Hook^town 


8 00 




35 00 


Dunbar 


18 00 




125 00 


Limestone 


14 00 






Dunlap'8 Creek 


39 00 




39 00 


Lower Buffido 


34 66 






Fairchauce 


7 00 






Lower Ten Mile 


33 00 




75 00 


Fayette City 








Mill Creek 


20 00 




66 12 


George's Creek 








Moundsvillo 


12 00 




54 00 


Greensboro 








Mt. Olivet 


10 00 




55 00 


Jefferson 








Mt. Pleasant 


31 00 




25 00 


Jeuner 


1 00 






Mt. Prospect 


60 40 


4 15 


51 00 


Lauiel Hill 


92 81 


8 00 




New Cumberland 


166 40 


75 40 


95 00 


Litllu Redstone 






15 00 


Pigeon Creek 


41 60 




132 79 


Long Kun 


27 30 




155 00 


Pine Grove 








McCleiliindtown 


2 00 






Three Springs 


12 00 




40 00 


McKeesport, 1st 


55 61 




333 92 


Unity 






18 27 


Mt. I'leasant 


27 00 




60 00 


Upper Buffalo 


58 14 


15 39 


137 12 


" Re-Union 20 00 




90 40 


Upper Ten Mile 
Washington, Ist 


40 00 


85 00 


97 80 


Mt. Vernon 


19 65 




14 50 


182 18 


24 68 


688 44 


Mt. Washington 


2 00 






•16. 


240 51 


200 00 


174 83 


New Providence 


40 00 


10 00 


50 00 


Waynesburgh 


12 86 




54 00 


New Salem 






7 87 


West Alexaniier 


244 50 




322 00 


Pleasant Unity 


15 36 




52 37 


" Liberty 






57 00 


Rehoboth 


129 26 




137 90 


" Union 


8 00 




34 00 


Rmnd Hill 


40 00 


25 00 


50 00 


Wellsburgh 


19 17 




53 80 


Scottdale 


15 00 




30 50 


Wheeling, let 


278 09 


6 25 


5(J6 02 


Sewickley 


7 00 






2d 


76 99 




74 53 


Someri-et 


8 00 






8d 


7 00 




25 00 


Spring Hill Furnace 






Wolf Run 


3 00 






Tent 






25 00 


Miscellaneous 






28 60 


Tyrone 
Uiiiontown 


16 00 

77 00 




.57 00 
80 00 












Lt 


2,326 23 


549 23 


8,816 66 


West Newton 


43 84 




74 55 










Miscellaneous 


781 59 


57 26 


7 90 


Pby of Wellsboro. 
Allegheny 1 00 
Ariiot 10 00 








1,671 36 




Pby of Shenango. 






Beecher's Island 
Couilersport 


8 00 

7 00 




1«00 
17 10 


Beaver Falls 


50 00 




148 93 


Covington 


3 21 






Clarksville 


95 79 




100 00 


Elk land | 


33 00 




12 54 


Enon 


8 £0 




42 00 


Osceola f 




10 32 


Hermon 


10 .37 




57 00 


Fall Brook 








Hopewell 


80 00 






Pa'-inington 


7 00 




9 72 


Lecf^burgh 


49 45 


15 00 


52 00 


Kane 


10 99 


5 00 


5 00 


Little Beaver 


12 96 


8 50 


32 00 


LawrencevlUe 


59 92 






Mahoning 


47 00 


23 00 


40 00 


Mansfield 


4 08 




14 16 


Mt. Pleasant 


191 01 


60 00 


66 00 


Tioga 


8 00 




13 20 


New Brighton 


221 08 




217 00 


Wellsboro 


116 72 


34 17 


19 02 


New Castle, Ist 


94 93 


33 51 


115 50 










2d 


40 00 




41 64 




268 92 


39 17 


116 96 


Neshannock 


39 00 




139 25 










Newport 


13 00 




17 00 


Pby Of West Africa 






North Sewickley 


2 00 








*^ 




» 


Petersburgh 


2 00 






Beadle Memorial 


88 






Pulaski 


9 45 




36 70 


Brewersville 









i66 



ANNUAL REPORT OF RECEIPTS. 



SAB. 8. W. BIj'h. 



CJay Ashla- d 

Careysburgh 

Greenville 

Marshall 

Monrovia 

Schieffelinville 



6 26 



Pbyof West Virginia. 
Arnoldsburgh 



Bethel 
Buckhannon 
Buru.oville 
Centreville 
Clarksbur^h 
Cranberry 
Elizabeth 
Fairmont 
French Creek 
Gleuville 
Gnatty Creek 
Graftou 
Grantsville 
Hughes River 
Hughesville 
Kanawha 
Kingwood 
Lebanon 
Long Reach 
Mariniiigton 
Morgantown 
Newburgh 
Parkersburgh. 1st 28 00 
" Calvary 12 50 

Pennsboro 
Pleasant Flats 
Point Pleasant 
Ravenswood 
Sistersville 
Spencer 
Sngar Grove 
Sutton 
Walkeraville 
Walton 
Weston 
Winfield 



6 63 



7 84 



13 60 



10 00 



22 00 



5 00 
34 63 



5 00 

2 00 

11 70 



8 25 



5 16 
7 00 



Bellevtie 


25 00 


Chanceford 


46 51 


Chestnut Level 


41 16 


Cedar Grove 


25 00 


Centre 


14 56 


Christ Chapel 




Columbia 


26 61 


Donegal 


22 00 


Hopewell 

J. Coleman Mem'l 


10 83 




Lancaster 


52 00 


Leacock 


35 03 


Little Britain 


10 66 


Marietta 


68 20 


Middle Octorora 


18 70 


Mount Nobo 


2 00 


" Joy 


10 00 


Moneghan 


35 00 


New Harmony 




Pequea 


20 00 


Pine Grove 


5 00 


Slateville 


82 00 


Slate Ridge 


85 50 


Stewartstown 


15 00 


Strasburgh 


34 00 


Union 




Wrighlsville 


16 00 



2;^ 00 



179 31 

Pby of Westminster. 



8 37 



22 20 



7 00 



31 00 
10 00 



2 11 


17 25 


6 00 


24 00 


3 00 



30 80 



37 26 
54 62 



2 50 
19 00 



20 20 
11 78 



23 00 228 52 



74 25 
85 00 

80 10 



113 50 

16 68 

150 00 
80 01 » 

65 00 
16 00 
20 00 

6 50 
68 44 
25 31 
72 00 

126 00 
20 25 
43 00 

66 00 
30 00 



9AB. 8. W. b'D3. 



York 
Miscellaneous 



1,357 52 
5 73 

1,964 01 



405 00 
141 54 



SYNOD OF TENNESSEE. 

Pby of ITolston. 



Amity 
CollcM Hill 
Davidson's River 
Elizabethton 
Greenville 
Jonesboro 
ICingsport 
MouQt Bethel 
Mount Lebanon 
New Hope 
New Salem 
Oakland 
Reedy Creek 
Reems Creek 
Kogersville 
Salem 
St, Marks 
Tabernacle 
Timber Ridge 
Wells 



1 00 



3 00 
1 00 



1 00 



13 80 
2 35 



3 00 



1 40 



26 55 



Pby of Kingston. 



Baker's Creek 
Bethel 
Centennial 
Chattanooga, 2d 
Clover Hill 
Cloyd's Creek 
Eusebia 
Forest Hill 
Grassy Cove 
Mars Hill 
Madisonville 
Maryville, 2d 
Mt. Tabor 
Mr. Zion 
New Providence 
Piiiey Falls 
Pleasant Forest 
Rockiord 
Unitia 
Wariburg 



4 00 
30 15 

6 25 
2 00 

5 00 

5 00 

6 45 
8 00 

13 70 
1 00 
1 00 

12 50 

1 00 

2 00 

1 00 
99 05 



Pby of Unimi. 
Bethel 
Caledonia 
Coal Creek 
Calvary 
Erin 
Hebron 

Hopewell 10 00 

Knosville, 2d 
New Market 4 40 

New Prospect 
Shiloh 

Spring Place 10 00 

St Luke's 
St. Paul's 

Strawbi^rry Plains 5 00 
Washinstton 1 70 

Westminster 7 20 



38 30 

SYNOD OF TEXAS. 

Pby of Austin. 
Austin, Ist 200 30 



78 57 1.776 56 



S5 86 

10 00 

400 



6 25 



6 25 



11 40 



7 00 



S2 00 



68 35 

25 00 
17 75 
7 00 
3 00 



10 00 
31 50 



22 00 



2 58 



11 10 118 83 



18 79 
1 00 



34 41 

3 50 

75 63 



S5 15 



30 00 



195 43 



ANNUAL BEPORT OF RECEIPTS, 



167 



Brenham 
Brownwood 
Coleman City 
EasrJe Pass 
El Paso 
Galvefton. St. 
Paul's Ger. 
Georgetown 
Lampasas 
Muke water 
New Orleans, Ger 
Point Rock 
San Antonio 
Taylor 



83 3t 
6 91 



3 00 
2 00 



10 00 



5 00 
2 00 



lij tJO 



812 58 
Pby of North Texas. 



Adora 

Bethlehem 

Cactus Hill 

Cambridge 

Camp Cooper 

Pecatur 

Denison, Ist 

Frankfort 

Gainesville 

Gertrude 

Jacksboro 

Lost Valley 

New Cambria 

Shiloh 

St. Jo 

Valley Creek 

Zion 

Miecellaneous 



1 00 



5 00 



2 00 



6 no 

13 00 



Pby of Trinity. 
Albany, 1st 
Belle Plain 
Bot^que 

Breckcnridge 1 00 

Cedar Valley 
Clear Fork 
Cisco 

Dallas. Ger. 10 00 

Glen Fork 
Glen Rose 
Granbury 
Mt. Pleasant 
Stephensville 
Terrill 5 OO 

Thorp r„- Spiinga 
Willow Springs 
Wills Point 
Weatherford, 1st 

16 00 

BTNOD OF •WISCONSIN. 

Pby of Chippewa. 
Baldwin 
Bangor 

Black River Falls 
Big River 5 00 

Blair 
Cadotte 

Chippewa Fall 8 
Cumberland 

Eau Claire 15 00 

Galesville 8 85 

Hartlaud 

Hixton 7 00 

Hudson 9 50 

Independence 



1 06 



W. B'DS. 


( 


SAB. 9. 


w.b'ds. 




La Crosse. 1st 


26 80 


12 30 


31 35 




North 


6 UO 


1 50 






Lewis Vailev 










Maiden Rocii 










Manston 


5 no 


5 00 






Neillsville 


28 00 


3 00 






Nesh.iioc 


9 00 








New Lisbon 










North e;:d 










Prescott 


120 15 


22 86 






127 10 




Pby of Lake Superior. 
Escanaba 












Florence 


13 00 








Ford River 






24 00 




Ishperming 


9 00 




105 00 




Marinetta 






42 4S 




Marquette 


128 28 




50 50 




Menominee 


26 0) 




C4 65 




Negauni'B 


17 29 








Oconto 


13 00 




45 00 




Ontonagon 








2 (0 


Sault Sto Marie 


9 50 






Sipplicuson 
Still 




















216 07 




331 fii 




Pby of Milwatikee. 








Barton 


7 00 








Beloit, 1st 


69 ."iO 


3 00 


61 31 




'• German 


5 50 








Brodhead 










Cambridge & Oak 


» 








land 


l' 






2 00 


Cato 

Cedar Grove 
Delavan 
Delaflcld 
Geneva Lake 


23 25 
40 00 
5 l.S 
10 00 








Janesville 


32 00 




14 62 




Kenosha 






1 00 




Lima 


4 00 




31 60 




Manitowoc 






T50 




Milwaukee, 










" Calvary 


35 82 




. 230 00 




Holland 


10 30 


1 50 






" Imman'l 


413 80 




544 50 




" Perse- 










verance 






5 00 




Oostbnrgh 


5 00 








Ottawa 


4 07 




11 05 


13 00 


Pike Grove 
Racine 
Richfield 
Stone Bank 


25 00 

43 51 

3 00 

2 00 




£8 10 




Waukesha 


52 77 


22 77 


34 96 


13 00 


West Granville 
Wheatland 


10 00 


10 00 






Windsor 








69 00 




801 65 


37 27 


968 93 




Pby of Winnebago. 








Alto, Holland 










Amherst 










Appleton Mem'l 






16 00 




Ashland 










Auburndale 


3 00 








Beaver Dam, As- 


>. 






9 10 


sembly 
Colby 








9 65 


De Pere 








8 00 


Dorchester 
Fort Howard 


10 00 
13 00 







i68 



A^fNUAL REPORT OF RECEIPTS. 





SAB. s. 


w.bd's. 




E 


AB. 8. 


w.nn'?. 


Fond dn Lac 


112 45 




69 00 


Cottage Grove 


5 85 






Ficmoiit 








Dayton 


2 00 






Green Bay 








Fancy Creek 
Hazel Green 


4 00 






Hope 


3 00 












Horicon 








Highland 


6 00 






Jenny 








Hurricane 


3 00 






Juneau 








Kilbourne City 


11 10 


2 10 


32 00 


Keshena 








Liberty 








Marshfield 








Lodi 


34 37 


5 29 


14 53 


Merrill 








Lowville 






11 50 


Dlosinee 








Madison 


70 05 




141 00 


Nasonville 








St.P.Ger 


2 00 






Neenah 


8 00 




112 00 


Marion 


3 Oi) 


3 00 




Oak Grove 








Mcrrimac 






1 00 


Odanah 








Middletown 


3 70 






Omro 


18 00 




21 95 


Ger. 








Oshkosh 


21 00 


9 00 


21 50 


Mineral Point 






8 02 


Phillip 








Monroe 








Plover 








Montello 








Kipon 


7 07 




5 00 


Oregon 


13 50 




700 


Robinsonville 








Oxford 








Rural 


17 00 


5 50 




Packwankee 








Shawano 


5 00 






Pardeeville 


3 00 




1 00 


Spencer 








Platteville 


5 60 






Stevens Point 






27 00 


Portasje 


10 95 




14 00 


St. Saveur 








Poynette 


23 93 


3 93 


11 50 


Superior 








Prairie du Sac 






41 00 


Wausau 








Pulaski 


12 00 






Weyauwega 


2 25 






Reedsburgh 


4 35 




6 50 


Winneconne 








Richland City 

" Centre 
Rockville 


2 00 
11 00 
4 00 


49 






219 77 


14 50 


272 45 














Sun Prairie 








Pby of Wisconsin Miver. 




Verona 


6 00 






Baraboo 


11 00 




15 12 


Wauiiakee 








Beaver Dam, let 






3 00 


Westfield 








Belleville 






21 00 


Wyalusing 


1 00 






Cambria 


7 73 

















Columbus 










261 13 


14 SI 


328 17 



A COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS FROM PRESBY- 
TERIES AND SYNODS (NOT INCLUDING RECEIPTS FROM 
WOMAN'S BOARDS) FOR THE YEAR ENDING MAI 1st, 
1882, AND 1883. 



Il 


ii 


, 1881, 
1882. 




>> " 


(H '^ 


^ rH 


(H tH 


<1 !- 


<1 H 


5 !- 


d H 






I« 


^3 


O O 


o o 


£ o 


O O 










Stnod of Atlantic. 




Synod or Iowa. 




Pby of Atlantic $2 00 


$7 00 


Pby of Cedar Rapids $1,2.=)5 69 


|!l,091 2T 


C.tawba .5 00 


9 00 


Council Bluffs 221 84 


304 88 


East Florida 42 85 


15 00 


Des Moines 466 81 


423 01 


Fairneld 4 00 


5 00 


Duhnquo 6(K1 45 


426 41 


Knox 1 00 


1 00 


Fort Dodge 185 74 


810 41 


Yadkin 4 30 


3 22 


Iowa 724 48 
Iowa City 440 18 


911 10 
362 80 






59 15 


40 22 


Waterloo 193 89 
4,C89 03 


192*73 


Synod op Baltimore. 


4,022 60 


Pby of Baltimore 4,T64 19 


4,826 71 


,- 




New Castle 1,042 11 


1,184,86 


Synod op Kansas. 




Rio de Janeiro 
Washington City 1,027 08 


1,184 34 


Pby of Emporia 179 74 
Highland 95 73 


347 05 
99 06 


6,»33 38 


7.195 91 


Larned 63 74 
Neosho 159 79 


78 23 
241 74 


Stnod op Colorado. 




Osborne 

Solomon 1.30 16 


6 00 
143 85 


Pby of Denver 311 74 


5.57 99 


Topeka 364 72 


588 20 


Montana 68 90 


24 95 








Pueblo 188 25 


231 56 


993 88 


1,504 13 


Santa F6 23 03 


85 00 






XJiah 14 00 


43 00 


Synod of Kentucky. 




605 92 


897 50 


Pby of Ebenezer 782 74 
Louisville 586 32 


658 07 
6.30 34 


Stnod op the Columbia. 




Transylvania 172 90 


176 75 


Pby of Idaho 55 00 


21 .50 


1,.541 9 6 


1,465 16 


Oregon 253 88 


177 93 






Puget Sound 20 00 


18 00 


Synod op Michigan. 




328 88 


217 43 


Pby of Detroit 8,182 .34 


3,773 97 






Grand Eaplds 155 92 


201 31 


Synod op Illinois. 


120 74 


Kalamazoo 427 08 


525 00 


Pby of Alton 561 05 


564 66 


Lansing 847 96 


894 17 


Bloomington 518 61 


918 02 


Monroe 306 98 


450 85 


Cairo 307 43 
Chicago 8,387 44 


371 48 
9,433 59 


Saginaw 727 69 


851 41 






Freeport 1,845 91 


1,439 69 


5,147 97 


6,197 31 


Mattoon 359 30 


298 35 






Ottawa 218 48 


228 28 


Synod op Minnesota. 




Peoria 7ii7 19 


899 12 


Pby of Dakota 55 00 


24 00 


Eock River 377 48 


512 -,i 


Mankato 204 92 


216 00 


ScQuyler 5S0 48 


714 62 


Red River 59 10 


127 73 


Springfield 1,394 20 


971 33 


St. Paul 1,419 75 


1,806 02 
54 45 






Souihcrn Dakota 


14,777 57 


16,507 35 
465 42 


Winona 228 35 
1,967 12 


291 18 


Synod op Indiana. 
Pby of Crawfordsville 457 26 


2,519 96 


Fort Wayne 476 18 
Indianapolis 481 35 


419 86 
862 44 


Synod of Missouei. 


90 00 


Lo?ansport 647 67 


794 17 


Pby of Osage 233 10 


26^3 35 


Muncie 210 08 


189 75 


Ozark 103 00 


133 61 


• New Albany 502 05 


SU 27 


Palmyra 279 40 


253 97 


Vincennes 235 20 


383 57 


Platte 153 82 


2;31.73 


White Water 360 10 


341 57 


St. Louis 1,416 31 


1,633 35 


3,369 89 


8,791 05 


2,185 63 


2,606 01 



I/O 



A COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS. 



Sg 



2 f< 



Synod op Nebraska. 

Pby of Has'tiugs 

Kearney 33 C2 

Nebraska City 177 f>4 

Omaha 112 57 



323 83 



Synod of New Jersey. 



Pby of Corisco 

Elizabeth 

Jersey City 

M'inmouth 

Morris & Orange 

Newark 

New Bninswicli 

Newton 

West Jersey 



118 00 
2,726 51 
1,095 99 
1,966 95 
6,680 59 
3,666 72 
3,717 27 
1,643 84 
1,202 88 

23,718 75 



Synod of New York. 

Pby of Albany 3,1 

Binghamton 1, 

Bostun ■; 

Brooklyn 4,1 

Buffalo 2,i 

Cayuga 2,1 
Champlain 

Chemung I 
Columhia 

Geuesee 1,' 
Genesee Valley 

Geneva 1,: 

Hudson 1,' 
Long Island • l,i 
Lyons 
Nassau 

New York 28, 
Niagara | 

North Kiver 1, 
Otsego 

K<>(;h.-ster 3, 

St. Lawrence 1, 

Steuben 

Syracuse 1, 

Troy 3, 

Utica 1, 

Westchester 3, 



M H 



516 27 



69,888 58 



25,916 81 



76,284 46 



Synod of Ohio. 
Pby of Athens 

Bellefontalne 

Chillicothe 

Cincinnati 

Cleveland 

Columbus 

Bayton 

Huron 

Lima 

Mahoning 

Marion 

Maumee 

Portsmouth 

St. Clairsville 

Steubenville 

Wooster 

Zanesville 



218 16 

370 19 

924 42 

3,326 22 

3,694 58 

729 53 

2,112 73 

426 81 

364 13 

2,218 73 

449 09 

328 08 

783 32 

688 80 

1,422 42 

1,227 10 

S36 29 



20,120 60 

Synod of Pacific. 

Pby of Benicia 376 80 

Los Angeles 133 90 

Sacramento 68 25 

San Francisco 855 20 

San Jose 186 25 

1,620 40 



Synod of Pennsylvania. 

Pby of Allegheny 

Blairsville 

Butler 

Carlisle 

Chester 

Clarion 

Erie 

Huntingdon 

Kittanning 

Lackawanna 

Lehigh 

Northumberland 

Philadelphia 

do Cen'l 
do North 
I Pittsburgh 

Redstone 

Shenango 

Washington 

WcUsboro 

W. Africa 

West Virginia 

Westminster 



£^ 



195 04 

413 75 

1,170 63 

3,338 68 

4,831 20 

1,220 35 

2,508 53 

364 52 

38S 56 

2,1^9 59 

438 83 

320 60 

1,154 28 

1,0.32 97 

1,662 18 

1,252 22 

1,065 44 

23,027 42 



435 25 
141 11 
104 85 
862 20 
49 25 

1,592 66 




50,490 31 54,051 7T 



A COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF KECEIPT8. 



171 





00 ai 


3B§g 


00 00 


* z6 




.1 CO 




















^ "^ 


tH 7" 


>• '- 


^ ^' 




< X 


-«l (H 




.2 < 




?i 




^2 


1? 







p 





i" 




" r^ 
fe ^ 


K Eh 


fc ' 








Stnod or 'WisocNSiN. 




SiNOD OP Tbnnbsseb 






Pby of Chippewa 131 89 
; L:il<e Superior 24t 4.5 


120 15 
216 07 


Pby of Holston 


24 36 
87 53 
98 21 


26 55 
99 05 


Milw:tnk-e 636 98 
Winnebago 230 11 


SOl 65 
219 77 


Uuion 


88 30 
163 90 


Wisconsin Kiver 273 02 
1,513 43 


261 13 




210 10 


1,618 77 








From Churches 210,066 35 


230,450 27 








From Churches through 




Synod or Texas. 






, Woman's Boards 178,180 27 


192,729 33 
















Total feom CinxRcnES, 38S.246 62 


423,209 60 








Lbgacies 113,152 59 


126,93:5 59 


Pby of Austin 


244 82 


312 58 


Miscellaneous 75,399 17 


98,160 00 


North Texas 


28 10 


13 00 


' 





Trinity 


7 00 


16 00 


Total 576,798 38 
Number of contributing 


648,303 19 










279 92 


34158 


churches 8,341 


3795 



A Comparative Statement of Receijpts from Woman's 
Societies. 



From 
May I, i88i, 

to 
May I, 1882. 



From 
May I, 1882, 

to 
May I, 1883. 



Woman's Foreign Missionary Society, Phila, $103,713 19 $112,696 63 

Woman's Board of Missions of the North west.. . 43,35503 50,40004 

Ladies' Board of Missions, New York 22,056 34 21,396 86 

Woman's Board of For. Missions, Albany Branch 3,703 15' 4,001 45 

Woman's Board of For. Missions, Troy Branch. 2,233 88 2,692 94 

Woman's Board of Missions of the South-west. .. 1,432 68| i,54i 4i 

Woman's Home and For. Miss. Soc, Brooklyn. . 1,686 00 



$178,180 27! $192,729 33 



^ttm 0t the General gtisiscmljlif. 

The report of the Board of Foreign Missions was presented to the 
General Assembly, Saratoga, New York, on Friday, May i8, and re- 
ferred to the Standing Committee consisting of — Ministers : Rev. Mar- 
vin R. Vincent, D.D., Joseph F. Dripps, Dunlop Moore, D.D., William 
Bannard, D.D., William J. Harsha, Charles R. Mills, Joseph P. Gra- 
ham, Ennals J. Adams. Elders : Messrs. George H. Shields, Edward 
W^ells, John C. Gallup, M.D., Albert S. Hall, J. Guy McCandlass, 
Theodore S. Hubbard, John R. Entrekin. 

This Committee reported on Wednesday, May 23d. After an 
encouraging survey of the whole field, with a notice of the press- 
ing and immediate wants of the same, it recommended the approval of 
the Minutes of the Board, and the adoption of the following resolu- 
tions, which were done : 

Resolved, i. That the work of Foreign Missions heis rightful claim upon the affection, 
the conscience, the means, and the energy of our Church — a claim based upon the com- 
mand of our Saviour Christ, and upon the love which is the fruit of His Spirit. 

2. That the appeal of the Board for the sum of $700,000 for the work of the next year 
should receive the cheerful response of the Church to the measure of the full amount. 

3. That pastors be urged to present this cause statedly to their congregations, to f ress 
its sacred claims, and to employ all means by which the people may be informed of the 
character, methods, and needs of the Foreign Missionary work. 

4. That the Assembly commend this cause with special emphasis to the parents and 
Sabbath-school teachers of our Church with a view to engendering early in the Church's 
children a sense of its claims, and an interest in its results, as well as a habit of system- 
atic giving. 

5. That we commend the Foreign Missionary anew to the attention of pastors, and 
urge that special efforts be made to increase its circulation in the churches. 

6. That we recognize the strong and tender claim which this cause has upon the sympa- 
thy and co-operation of our Christian women ; that we are grateful to God for the in- 
spiration which has led to their organized effort on its behalf, and has crowned that effort 
with such signal success. That we commend the work of the Woman's Board to the 
attention and sympathy of our pastors, and approve the formation of Woman's Mission- 
ary Societies in the several congregations. 

7. That Rev. Wm. M. Paxton, D.D., and John D. Wells, D.D., and elders Robert 
Carter, Wm. A. Booth, and Ezra M. Kingsley, whose term of office expires, be re-elected 
members of the Board, and that Rev. M. R. Vincent, D.D., be elected to fill the vacancy 
caused by the death of Wm. E. Dodge. 



Missionaries of the Board of Foreign Missions 
1871-1883. 



The following list supplements the list given in the Annual Report of 1870, 
but does not contain the names of native missionaries. 

Note. — ♦Died. + Transferred from American Board, w., Married. Figures, Term of Service 

in the Field. 



Uissionaries among: the Indians. 

Seneca Mission. 

Barker, Rev. W. P., i877-'8o.* 

Barker, Mrs. W. P.. i877-'8o. 

tFord, Rev. G., m., 1868-75. 

tHall, Rev. \V., 1834- 

tHall, Mrs. W., 1834-82.* 

Trippe, Rev. M. F., m., 1881- 

tWright, Rev. A., 1831-75.* 

fW right, Mrs. A., 1833- 

Chippewa Mission. 

Baird, Rev. I., m., 1873- 

Dougherty, Miss N., 187 3-7 5. 

Dougherty, Miss S. A., 1873- 

Dougherty, Rev. P., m., 1 838-7 1. 

MacClarry, Miss M., 1879- 

Mills, Rev. S. J., m., 1871-72. 

Phillips, Miss H. N., 1871-75. 

Porter, Mr. A., w., 1 847-7 1. 
Tarbell, Miss M. L. (Mrs. 

Baird), 1872- 

Verbeck, Miss S., 1871-78. 

Walker, Miss L. B., 1873-75. 

Williamson, Mr. A. W., 1872. 

Omaha Mission, 

Bryant, Miss M., 1881. 

Copley, Miss J., i88i-'82. 

Estill, Miss M. S., 1880- '81. 

Fetter, Miss M. C, 1881- 

Hamilton, Rev. W., .»«., 1867- 

Irvin, Rev. S. M., m., i88c)-'8i. 

Jennings, Miss M., i88c>-'8i. 

Partch, Mr. H. W., m., 18S1- 

Wade, Mrs. M. C, 1881- 



Winnebago Mission. 

Martin, Rev. S. N. D., ;;/., 1881- 
Wilson, Rev. T. M., i868-'69. 

loiua and Sac Missiofi. 
Irvin, Rev. S. M., m., 1881- 

Dakota Mission. 

Aungie, Miss H., 
Calhoun, Miss E., 
Chapin, Rev. M. E 
Dickson, Miss J. B., 
Hunter, Miss N., 
McCreight, Miss C. 
tVVilliam.son, Rev. T 
Williamson, Miss N 
tWilliamson, Rev. J. 
Wood, Rev. G., Jr., 

Choctaw Mission. 

Schermerhorn, Rev. H. R., 

tn., 
Schermerhorn, Mr. L., 
Stark, Rev. O. P., m., 

Creek Mission. 

Baldwin, Miss E. J., 

Brown, Miss S. G., 

Cole, Miss P. A., 

Diament, Rev. J. N., m., 

Edwards, Miss K-, 

Green, Miss Lillian, 

Hall, Miss N., 

Herod, Mrs. M., 

Irwin, Miss M., 

Loughridge, Rev. R. M., tn., i88i- 





i88o-'8i. 


, ;«., 


i873-'75- 
1883- 
1878- 
1880- 


c, 


1880- 


.S.,w., 
p., rn 


1834-79.* 

1873-77-* 
, i86a- 


m.. 


i88a- 



1882. 

1882- 

I88I- 



i876-'8o. 

1876-77. 

1880. 

1882- 

1871-72, 

i88o-'82. 

i88i- 

1882- 

1878-79. 



1/4 



APPENDIX. 



Mann, Mrs. A., 1882.* 

McCay, Miss H. J., 1877-80. 

McGee, Rev. R. C, m., 1878- 
Porter, Miss L. (Mrs. 

Whitehead), 1882- 

Richards, Miss M. E., 1880. 

Robertson, Rev. W. S., 1850-81.* 

Robertson, Mrs. W. S., 1850- 
Robertson, Miss A. (Mrs. 

Craig), l87i-'82. 

Russell, Aliss N. C. 1873-74. 

Shepherd, Miss S. O., i869-'72. 

Siiedaker, Miss E., 1882- 

Whitehead, Mr. J. P., m., 1882- 

Wilson, Miss M., 1871. 

Worcester, Mr. L., ;«., 1871. 

Seminole Mission. 

Davis, Miss S., 1882- 

Diament, Miss M. A., 1882- 

Gillis, Rev. J., m., 1873. 

McCay, Miss H. J., 1881-82. 

Powell, Mrs. H., 1882. 

Ramsay, Rev. J. R., m., 1856- 

Ramsay, Miss M., i879-'8o. 

Ramsay, Miss A., 1880- 

Nez Perce Mission. 

Ainshe, Rev. G., m., 1811-7^^. 

Coyner, Mr. J., m., 187-},- 7 \. 

Cowley, Rev. H. T., m., 1871-73. 
Deffenbaugh, Rev. G.L.,»z., 1878- 
McBeth, Miss K. C, 1879- 

McBeth, Miss S. L., 1877- 

Martin, Rev. S. N. D., m., 1873-75. 
Spalding, Rev. H. H., m., 1 871 -'74.* 

Spokan Mission. 
Cowley, Rev. H. T., w., 1875. 

New Mexico Mission. 

Annin, Rev. J. A., m., i87i-'73. 

Annin, Miss L. A., i87i-'73. 

Crane, Mr. W. F., 1873-74. 

Crothers, Miss M. L., 1871. 

McElroy, Mr. P., m., 1871-72. 

Menaul, Rev. J., m., i87o-'73. 

Raymond, Mr. C. C, ;«., 1872-73. 

Roberts, Rev. J. M., m., i868-'73. 

Truax, Rev. W. B., m., 1872-7^. 

Missionaries in Mexico. 

Allen, Miss E. P., 1872-76. 



Cochran, Miss A. D., 
Cochran, Miss M. E., 



i879-'82. 
1879- 



De Jesi, Rev. L. M., tn., 1882- 
Forbes, Miss M. G., i877-'8o. 

Greene, Rev. J. Milton, m., 1881- 
Hennequin, Miss L. A. H., i877-'8i. 
Hutchinson, Rev. M. N.,;«., 1872-80. 
Keil, Rev. A. P., w., i879-'82. 

Latimer, Miss L. M., 1881- 

Leason, Miss M. E., i876-'77.* 

Ogden, Rev. R., ;;?., 1881-83, 

Phillips, Rev. M., in., 1872-82. 

Pitkin, Rev. P. H., in., 1872-73. 

Polhemus, Rev. I. H., 111., i879-'8i. 
Shaw, Rev. H., 1882- 

Snow, Miss F. C, 1881- 

Stevvart, Rev. D. J., m., 1875- 
Thomson, Rev. H. C, m., 1872- 
Wallace, Rev. T. F., m., 1878- 
Wilson, Rev. S. T., 1882- 

Missionaries in T7. S. Colombia. 

Caldwell, Rev. M. E., m., 1880- 

Candor, Rev. T. H., 1882- 

McFarren, Miss K., 1869- 

Pitkin, Rev. P. H., m., 1866-72. 

Ramsay, Miss M., 1880- 

Wallace, Rev. T. F., m., i862-'73. 

Weaver, Rev. W., m., i874-'8o. 

Missionaries in Brazil. 

Blackford, Rev. A. L., m., i86o-'76 ; 

1880- 
Blackford, Mrs. A. L. (Miss 

Simonton), i86o-'76.* 

Chamberlain, Rev.G.W.,;«., 1865- 
Chamberlain, Miss M., i876-'79. 

Cameron, Rev. J. B., m., 188 1- 
Da Gama, Rev. J. F., m., 1870- 
Da Gama, Miss E., 1876- 

Dale, Miss A. (Mrs. Hous- 



ton, '83), 
Dascomb, Miss M. P., 



Hazlett, Rev. D. M., m., 

Houston, Rev. J. T., in., 

Houston, Mrs. J. T., 

Howell, Rev. J. B., in., 

Kuhl, Miss E., 

Kyle, Rev. J. M., m., 

Landes, Rev. G. A., in., 

Lenington, Rev, R., in., 

Schneider, Rev. F. J. C.,;«., i86i-'77, 

Thomas, Miss P..R., 1877- 

Van Ordcn, Rev. E., in., 1872-76. 



1882- 
i869-'76; 
1881- 
1875-80. 
1875- 
1875-81.=* 

1874- 
1882- 
1880- 
186S- 



Missionaries in Chili, 



Christen, Rev. S. J., in., 
Curtiss, Rev, S, W., in., 



1873- 
1875- 



APPENDIX. 



175 



Dodge, Rev. W. E., 1882- 

Guzman, Rev. J. M. I., 1871-75.* 

Ibanez, Rev. J. M., j 872-76.* 

Lester. Rev. W. H., m., 1882- 

McLean, Rev. R., m., 1877-83. 

McLean, Rev. E., m., i878-'o2. 

Mervvin, Rev. A. M., m., 1866- 

Sayre, Rev. S., i866-'77. 

Trumbull, Rev, D., w., 1846- 

Missiouaries in West Africa. 

Liberia Mission. 



Blyden, Rev. E. W., 


i873-'78. 


Brown, Mr. H. D., 


1882- 


Deputie, Rev. J. M., 


1869-77.* 


Deputie, Mrs. J. M., 


i869-'8i. 


Deputie, Rev. R. A. M., 


1870- 


Diggs, Mrs. E. A., 


1878-81. 


Dillon, Rev. T. E., 


1865-79.* 


Donnell, Rev. D. L., 


1 878-79.* 


Donnell, Mrs. D. L. (Mrs 




David), 


1880. 


Erskine, Rev. H. W., 


1848-76.* 


Flournoy, Rev. P. F., 


1871-76; 




1883- 


Ferguson, D. C, 


1863-73.* 


Harrison, Rev. S., 


1854-72.* 


Herring, Rev. A., 


1854-73.* 


Jones, Mrs. M., 


1880- 


Kennedy, Rev. Z., 


1878- 


King, Mr. A. B., 


1870- 


McDonough, Mr. W., 


1842-71.* 


Priest, Rev. J. M., 


1843- 


Priest, Mr. J. R., 


1879-80.* 


Priest, Mrs. J. R., 


1880-82. 


Wardsworth, Mrs. R. A., 


1881- 


Waters, Mrs. S. E., 


1876- 



Marling, Rev. A. W., ;;/., 1880- 
Menkel, Mr. P., i^73- 

Murphy, Rev. S. H., m., i87i-'8o. 
Nassau, Rev, R. H. (M.D.) m., 

1861- 
Nassau, Mrs. R. H. (Miss Latta), 

i86o-'7o.* 
Nassau, Mrs. R. H. (Miss Foster), 

1881- 
Nassau, Miss I. A., 1868- 



Reutlinger, Mrs. L. 
Reading, Mr. J. H.; 



1866- 



Gaboon and Corisco. 

tBushnell, Rev, A., m., 1 844-79.* 
tBushnell, Mrs. A., 1852- 

Boughton, Miss S. J,, i87i-'73.* 

Bacheler, H. M. (M.D.),ot.. i879-'83. 
Cameron, Miss J. (Mrs. Marling), 

1879- 
Campbell, Rev. G, C, tn., 1880- 
Devvsnap, Miss S., i875-'8i.* 

De Heer, Rev. C„ ni., 1855- 

Gault, Rev. W. C, ;//., 1881- 

Giilespie, Rev. S. L., m., 1 871-74. 
Good, Rev. A. C, 1882- 

Harding, Miss M. L., 1882- 

Hendricks, Mrs. S. E., 1873 -'74. 

Jones, Miss L., 1872- 

Kops, Rev. J. C. de B., m., 187 1-73. 
Lush, Miss J. M. (Mrs. Smith), 

1873-76 ; 1878-81, 



Robinson, Rev. W. H 
Schorsch, Rev. W., 
Taylor, G. W. (M.D.), 
Walker, Rev. W., 
Walker, Miss L. B., 
White, Miss M. B. (Mrs. Gillespie), 
i873-'74- 



1875-77; i88o- 
1881- 
1873-76, 
1873-74.* 
1879- 
1877- 



Missionaries in Asia. 
Syria. 

tBird, Rev. W„ m., 1853- 

Bird, Miss E., 1879- 

tCalhoun, Rev. S. H., m., 1843-76.* 

tCalhoun, Mrs. S. H., 1843- 

Calhoun, C. W. (M.D.), 1879- 

Calhoun, Miss S, H., 1879- 

Cundall, Miss F., 1879- 

Dale, Rev. G. F., ?Az., 1872- 

Danforth, G. B. (M.D.), 1871-75,* 

Danforth, Mrs. G, B., 1871-81,* 

tDennis, Rev. J. S., ;;/., 1867- 

tEddy, Rev. W, W., vi., 1852- 

Eddy, Rev. W. K., 1878- 

Eddy, Miss H. M., 1875- 

tEverett, Miss E. D., 1868- 

Fisher, Miss H. M., 1873-75. 

Ford, Rev, G. A., 1880- 

Ford, Mrs. M. E., 1881- 

Hardin, Rev. O. J., m., 1871- 

Jackson, Miss E., 1870- 

tjessup. Rev. H, H., 1856- 

tjessup, Mrs. H. H., i868-'82.* 

tjessup, Rev. S,, m., 1863- 

Johnston, Rev. W. L., m., i879-'8o, 

Kipp, Miss M., 1872-75. 

Loring, Miss S. B., 1870-73. 

Lyons, Miss M. M., 1877-80. 

La Grange, Miss H., 1876- 

March, Rev. F. W., m., 1873- 

Nelson, Miss B. M., i88r- 

Pond, Rev. T. S., m., 1873- 
tThomson, Rev. W. M., ;«., 1833-77. 

Thomson, Miss A., 1876. 
tVan Dyck, Rev. C. V. A., m., 

1840- 



1/6 



APPENDIX. 



Van Dyck, Miss L., iSy^-'jg. 

Wood, Rev. F. A., m., 1871-78.* 
Wood, Mrs. F. A., 1871-78. 

Persz'a. 

Alexander, G. W. (M.D.), m., 

1882- 
Bartlett, Miss C. A., 1882- 

Bassett, Rev. J., m., 1871- 

Bassett, Miss S. J., 1875- 

Carey, Miss A., 1880- 

Clark, Miss M. A., 1880- 

tCoan, Rev. G. W., m., 1849-79.* 
Cocliran, Rev. J. G., ;«., i847-'7i.* 
tCochran, Mrs. J. G., 1847- 

Cochran, J. P. (M.D.), ;«., 1878- 
Cochran, Miss K., 1871-75. 

tDean, Miss N. J., 1868- 

Easton, Rev. P. Z., ?;?., i873-'79. 
Hawkes, Rev. J. W., 1880- 

Holmes, G. W. (M.D.), 1874-77 ; 

1881- 
Jewett, Miss M., 1871- 

tLabaree, Rev. B., m., 1S60- 

Montgomery, Miss A., 1882- 
Oldfather, Rev. J. M., m., 1872- 
Poage, Miss A. E., i875-'8o. 

Potter, Rev. J. L., m., 1874- 

Rogers, Rev. J. E., m., 1882- 

Sciienck, Miss A., 1877- 

Scott, Rev. D., 7/z., 1 877-79.* 

Scott, Mrs. D., i877-'79. 

tShedd, Rev. J. H., ;«., 1859- 
Stocking, Rev. VV. R., m., i87i-'8o. 
Torrence, W.W.(M.D.), w., 1881- 
Van Duzee, Miss M. K., 1875- 
Van Hook, Mrs. L. C., 1876- 

tVan Norden, Rev.T.L., m., 1866-73, 
Ward, Rev. S. L., m., 1876- 

Wtiipple, Rev. W. L., ;;/., i872-'79. 
Wilson, Rev. S. G., 1880- 

Wright, Rev. J. N., 1878- 

Wriglit, Mrs. J. N., 1878.* 

Ifidia. 

Alexander, Rev. J. M., ;«., 1866- 
Bacon, Miss J. M., 1872- 

Barker, Rev. W. P., 1872-76.* 

Beatty, Miss C. L., 1862-70.* 

Belz, Miss C, 1872- 

Bergen, Rev. G. S., tn., 1865- 
Brink, Miss P. A. (M.D.), 1872-74. 
Brodhead, Rev. A., ;«., i859-'78. 
Bunnell, Miss M. (Mrs. Graham), 
1872- 
Butler, Miss J. M., 1880-81. 

Calderwood, Rev. W., in., 1855- 



Caldwell, Rev. J., m., i838-'77.* 
Carleton, Rev. M. C., 1855- 

Carleton, Mrs. M. M., i855-'8i.* 
Carlton, M. B. (M.D.), 1882- 

Campbell, Mrs. J. R., i836-'73.* 

Campbell, Miss A., i874-'78. 

Campbell, Miss L. M., 1875-78. 

Craig, Miss M. A., 1870- 
i Dickey, Miss N. (Mrs. Tracy), 1870- 

I Downs, Miss C, 1881- 

Ewing, Rev. J. C. R., ;«., 1879- 

Ferris, Rev. G. H., m., 1878- 

Forman, Rev. C. W., 1848- 

Forman, Mrs. C. W., i855-'78.* 

Fullerton, Miss M., 1877- 

Geisinger, Miss A, S., 1882- 

Given, Miss M., i88i- 

Goheen, Rev. J. M., m., 1875- 

Goheen, Mrs. J. M., 1875-78.* 

Graham, Rev. J. P., ;«., 1872- 

Griffiths, Miss I., 1879- 

Hardie, Miss M. H., 1874-76. 

Herron, Rev. D., 1855- 

Herron, Mrs. A., i868-'74.* 

Herron, Miss A., 1879- 

Heyl, Rev. F., 1867- 

Holcomb, Rev. J. F., m., 1870- 

Hull, Rev. J. J., >n., 1872-81.* 

Hull, Mrs, J. J., 1872- 

Hutchinson, Miss S. S., 1879- 

Janvier, Mrs. M. L., i856-'75. 

Johnson, Rev. W. F., m., 1860- 

Kellogg, Rev. S. H., m., i2>6^--]6. 

Kellogg, Mrs. S. H., i865-'76.* 

Kelso, Rev. A. P., in., 1869- 

Lucas, Rev. J. J., in., 1870- 

McComb, Rev. J. M., in., 1882- 
McGmnis, Miss A, B., 1876- 

(Mrs. Goheen, 1880-) 

Millar, Mrs. S. J., i873-'77. 

Morrison, Rev, J, H,, m., i838-'8i.* 

Morrison, Mrs. J. H., 1871- 
Morrison, Rev. W.J. P., in., 1865 



Morrison, Miss H.,' i865-'75. 
Morrison, Miss S. (Mrs. 

Thackwell), 1869- 

Myers, Mrs. H. B., i865-'75. 

Nelson, Miss J. A., i87i-'78. 

Newton, Rev. J., m., 1835- 

Nevvton, Rev. J. Jr.(M.D.), i86o-'8o.* 

Newton, Mrs. J., i86i-'82, 

Newton, Rev. C. B., in., 1867- 

Newton, Rev. F. J., in., 1870- 

Newton, Rev. E. P., in., 1873- 

Owen, Rev. J., in., 1 840-70.* 

Patton, Miss E. E., 1880- 

Pendleton, Miss L. M., 1882- 

Perley, Miss F., i879-'8o. 



APPENDIX. 



1/7 



Pollock, Rev. G. W., m., 1881- 
Pratt, Miss M., 1873- 

Rudolph, Rev. A., m., 1846- 

Sayre, Rev. E. H., m., 1863-70. 

Sailer, Rev. G. W., m., 1870- 
Seeley, Miss E. J., ' 1879- 

Seeley, Rev. G. A., m., 1870- 
Seward, Miss S. C. (M.D.), 1873- 
Scott, Rev. J. L., i839-'67 ; 

i877-'8o.* 
Scott, Mrs. J. L., i86o-'67 ; 1877- 
Scott, Miss A. E., 1874- 

Sly, Miss E. M. (Mrs. Lucas), 

1871- 
Tedford, Rev. L. B., m., 1880- 
Thiede, Miss C, 1873- 

Thompson, Miss M. B. (Mrs. 

C. B. Newton), 1869- 

Thackwell, Rev. R., m., 1859- 
Tracy, Rev. T., ;«., 1869- 

Ullmann, Rev. J. F., m., 1848- 
Velte, Rev. H. C., 1882- 

Walsh, Rev. J. J., m., i843-'73. 

Walsh, Miss L., i87o-'82. 

Warren, Rev. J. m., 1 839-' 54 ; 

i873-'77-* 

Warren, Mrs. J. 1873- 

Wherry, Rev. E. M., m., 1867- 

Wherry, Miss S. M., 1879- 

Wikofif, Rev. B. D., m., i86o-'75. 

Wilder, Rev. R. G., m., 1871-76. 

Williamson, Miss C. G., 1882- 

Wilson, Miss M. N., 1873-79.* 

Woodside, Rev. J. S. m., 1848- 

Woodside, Miss ]., 1868- 

Wynkoop, Rev. T. S., i868-'77. 

Siam. 

Arthur, Rev. R., m., 1871-7 2- 

Anderson, Miss A. (Mrs. Noyes, 

China), 1872-76. 

Caldwell, Miss B. (Mrs. Cul- 

bertson), 1878-81. 

Carrington, Rev. J., m., i86g-'7^. 
Coflfman, Miss S., 1874- 

Cort, Miss M, L., 1874- 

Culbertson, Rev. J. N., m., iSyi-'Si, 
Dickey, Miss E. S., i87i-'73. 

Dunlap, Rev. E. P., »?., 1875- 
George, Rev. S. C, ;«., i862-'73. 
Grimstead, Miss S. D., 1874-77 

Hartwell, Miss M. E., 1879- 

House, Rev. S. R., M., 1 847-76. 
Kooser, Miss J. (Mrs. McCau- 

ley), 1878- 

Linnell, Miss L. M., 1882- 

McCauley, Rev. J. M., m., i878-'8o. 
McClelland, Rev. C. S., m., i88o-'83. 
McDonald, Rev. N. A., fn., 1860- 

12 



McDonald, Miss H. H., 1879- 
McFarland, Rev. S. G., ;«., i86o-'78. 

McLaren, Rev. C. D., ;«., i882-'83.* 
McLaren, Mrs. C. D., 1882- 

Olmstead, Miss L. A., 1880- 

Sturge, E. A. (M.D.), m., i88o- 
Van Dyke, Rev. J. W., ;«., 1869- 

Laos. 

Campbell, Miss M. M., i879-'8i.* 
Cheek, M. A. (M.D.), m., 1875- 
Cole, Miss E. S., 1879- 

Griffin, Miss L A., 1882- 

Hearst, Rev. J. P., m., 1882- 

McGilvary, Rev. D., m., 1858- 
Peebles, Rev. S. C, m., 1882- 

Vrooman, C. W. (M.D.), i87i-'73.* 
Wilson, Rev. J., m., 1858- 

Warner, Miss A., 1882- 

Wirt, Miss S. C, 1882- 

Wishard, Miss F., 1882- 

China. 

Abbey, Rev. R. E., m., 1882- 
Anderson, MissS.J.(M.D.), i877-'8o. 
Anderson, Miss J., 1878- 

Atterbury, B. C. (M.D.), 1879- 
Berry, Miss M. L., 1883- 

Bliss, S. C. (M.D.), i873-'74. 

Brown, Miss M. J. (Mrs. Capp), 

1867- '82.* 
Barr, Miss M. E., 1877- 

Butler, Rev. J., m., 1868- 

Butler, Miss E. M., 1881- 

Capp, Rev. E. P., m., i869-'73.* 

Capp, Mrs, E. P., i867-'i;2.* 
Carrow, F. (M.D.), ;«., i876-'78. 
Chapin, Rev. O. H., m., 1882- 
Cooley, Miss A. S„ 1878. 

Corbett, Rev. H., ?«., 1863- 

Corbett, Mrs. H., 1863-73.* 
tCrossette, Rev. J. F., ;«., 1870-78. 

Crouch, Miss L. A. (Mrs. Lea- 
man), 1873- 
Davenport, Rev. S. A., 1874. 
Dickey, Miss E. S., 1873-75, 
Dodd, Rev. S., m., 1861-78. 

Doolittle, Rev. J., m., 1872-73.* 
Doolittle, Mrs. J., 1872-73. 

Downing, Miss C. B., i866-'8o. 

Eckard, Rev. L. W., in., 1869-74. 
Fulton, Rev. A. A., 1881- 

Farnham, Rev. J. M.W., m., i86o- 
Farnham, Miss L. D., 1882- 

tFitch, Rev. G. F., w., 1870- 

Green, Rev. D. D., vi., 1859-72.* 
Green, Mrs. D. D., i«59-72. 

Happer, Rev, A. P., m., 1844- 



178 



APPENDIX. 



Happer, Mrs. A. P., 1869-73.* 

Happen, Miss A., 1880- 

Happer, Miss L., i87i-'8o. 

Happer, Miss Lucy, i869-'7i. 

Happer, Miss M. M., 1879- 

Harshberger, Miss F. E. (Mrs. 

Butler), 1875- 

Hayes, Rev. J. N., m., 1882- 

Hayes, Rev. D. E., 7n., 1882- 

Henry, Rev. B. C, m., 1873- 

Holt, Rev. W. S., m., 1873- 

Houston, Miss B., 1878-79. 

Hunter, Rev.S.A.(M.D.),;«.,i879- 
Judson, Rev. J. H., m., 1880- 
Kerr, J. G. (M.D.), ;«., 1854- 
Kelsey.Miss A.D.H.(M.D.), 1878- 
Ketchum, Miss A. P. (Mrs. 

McKee), 1876- 

Leaman, Rev. C, m., 1874- 

Leyenberger, Rev. J. A., m., 1866- 
Laughlin, Rev. J. H., ;«., 1881- 
Lyon, Rev. D. N., m., i86o-'8i. 

Marcellus, Rev. A., ?«., i869-'7o. 
Mateer, Rev. C. W., ;«., 1863- 
Mateer, Mr. J. L., 1872-75. 

Mateer, Rev. R. M., ?«., 1881- 
Mateer, Miss L., 1881- 

McCartee, D. B.(M. D.), ;;/„ 1844-72. 
McChesney.Rev.W. E., w.,i869-'72.* 
McChesney, Mrs. W. E., 1869-72. 
tMcCoy, Rev. D. C, m., 1869- 
McKee, Rev. W. J., m., 1878- 
Mills, Rev. C. R., 1857- 

Mills, Mrs. C. R., 1857-74.* 

Mills, Rev. F. V., w., 1882- 

Mcllvaine, Rev. J. S., i868-'8i.* 
Morrison, Mrs. W. T., r86o-'76. 

Murray, Rev. J., m., 1876- 

Nevius, Rev. J. L., m., 1854- 

Niles, Miss M. E. (M.D.), 1882- 
Noyes, Rev. H. V., ;;/„ 1866- 
Noyes, Miss H., 1868- 

Noyes, Miss M. E., 1873- 

Patrick, Miss Mary D., 1871.* 
Patterson, J. P. (M.D.), ;«., 1871. 
Preston, Rev. C. F., ;«., 1854-77.* 
Reid, Rev. G., 1882- 

Roberts, Rev. J. L., m., \Z^\-^Z. 
Schmucker, Miss A. J., 1878. 

Shaw, Rev. J. M.. w., 1874-76.* 

Shaw, Mrs. J. M., 1874- 

Shaw, Miss H. J. (Mrs. A. P. 

Happer, 1876-), 1870- 

Sellers, Miss M. R., 1874-76. 

Smith, Rev. J. N. B., 1881- 

Smith, H. B. (M.D.), m., 1881- 
Strong, Miss F. C, 1882- 

Stubbert, J. E. (M.D.), 1881- 



Thomson, J. C. (M.D.), m., 1881- 

Tiffany, Miss I., 1881- 

Warner, Miss S. A., 1878- 

Wherry, Rev, J., m., 1864- 

White, Rev. W., m., i88i~ 

tWhiting, Rev. J. L., m., 1869- 

Whiting, Rev. A. M., i873-'78.* 
Whiting, Mrs. A. M., (Mrs. 

Abbey, 1883) 1873- 

White, Rev. W., m., 1881- 

yapan, 

Alexander, Rev. T. T., m., 1877- 
Alexander, Miss C. T., 1880- 
Ballagh, Mr. J. C, ;«., 1875- 
Bryan, Rev. A. V., m., 1882- 
Carrothers, Rev. C, in., i869-'75. 
Cornes, Rev. E., m., i868-'70.* 
Davis, Miss A. K., 1880- 
Eldred, Miss C. E., i877-'8o. 
Gamble, Miss A. M., i873-'75. 
Garvin, Miss A., 1882- 
Green, Rev. O. M., j873-'82,* 
Gulick, Miss F., i876-'79. 
Henry, Miss M. E., 1882- 
Hepburn, J. C. (M.D.), ;«., 1859- 
Hesser, Miss M. K., 1882- 
Imbrie, Rev. W., m., 1875- 
Knox, Rev. G. W., w., 1877- 
Leete, Miss I. L., 1881- 
Leete, Miss L., 1881- 
Loomis, Rev. H., m., 1 872-76. 
Marsh, Miss B., i876-'79. 
McCaiiley, Rev. J. M., m., 1880- 
Miller, Rev. J. R., i873-'75. 
Parke, Miss M. C. (Mrs. Thomp- 
son), 1873- 
Porter, Rev. J. B., 1881- 
Porter, Miss F., 1882- 
Smith, Miss S. C, 1880- 
True, Mrs. M. C, 1876- 
Thompson, Rev. D., m,, 1863- 
Winn, Rev. T. C, m., 1878- 
Youngman, Miss K. M., 1873- 

Chinese in California. 

Condit, Rev. I. M., m., 1860- 

Culbertson, Miss M., 1878- 

Cummings, Miss S. M., i874-'77. 

Kerr, Rev. A. J., 1882- 

Kerr, J. G. (M.D.), m., 1877-78. 

Loomis, Rev. A. W., m., 1859- 

PhiUips, Miss H, N., 1875-77. 

Chinese in New York. 

Goodrich, Miss S. U., 1878-82.* 

Jews. 
Neander, Rev. J., 



i848-'76. 



APPENDIX. 179 



Woman's Boards. 

The following abstracts of the various Woman's Societies reveal the 
hold they are taking upon a large portion of the membership of our 
Church and the steady progress they are making in interesting others 
in the missionary work. The summary of receipts tells the steady prog- 
ress that has been made year by year, while that for the past twelve 
months shows a continued and steady advance. The removal by death 
of Mrs. Julia M. Graham, of New York, takes away from the Ladies' 
Board not only an indefatigable laborer and devoted friend, but also 
one of the pioneers and most earnest promoters of the woman's foreign 
missionary work. " Though resting from her labors she will continue 
to live in their fruits." 

No report of its operations has been received from the Board of the 
Southwest. 



Abstract of the Thirteenth Annual Report of the Woman's Foreign Mission- 
ary Society of the Presbyterian Church, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Our thirteenth year has been signalized by growth at both ends of 
the line. 

The Society has been incorporated. Sixty-three new societies have 
been added to the roll, making 1,229 in all. 'I'his addition represents 
much earnest effort, because most of the larger, stronger churches were 
organized in previous years. The number of Rands is 873. of which 115 
have been formed during the year. A number of Sabbatli-schools are 
included, affording opportunity to educate the young men and boys in 
the work. 

While the fifty Presbyterial Societies, of which two are of the past 
year's growth, rei)ort most favorably, we realize that their strength de- 
pends upon the auxiliaries standing, like ancient Gideon's band, each 
one in its own place. 

The circulation of the magazine, Woman's Work for Woman, has 
reached 10,000; ihdii oi Children' s Work, 12,500. A subscription list 
of 20,000 for the latter must be obtained, to make it self-supporting. 

Eight new Leaflets have been issued, and 45,000 sold. The Foreign 
Missionary Catechism and the Book of Exercises for Mission Bands 
have proved to be real helps. The mite-boxes have been "Treasure 
houses" indeed. During the meetings of the Pan-Presbyterian Coun- 
cil in Philadelphia, a Standing Committee on Correspondence was ap- 
pointed. This Committee is now in communication with twenty-four 
Woman's Missionary Societies in foreign countries, and twenty-three 
in the United States. 

The receipts of the year were $12 [,186.40, making, with a balance 
of $4,000 (medical fund), at the beginning of the year, $125,186.40. 
Of this amount, $112,696.93 was paid in to the Treasurer of the Board 
of Foreign Missions. Of the remainder, $3,060 was sent directly to 
the mission fields for buildings and other specific objects. The balance 
met the expenses of the medical students, traveling expenses and serv- 
ices of returned missionaries, printing, and other current expenses of 



l80 APPENDIX. 

the Societ)'. l5,6oo, a fund for medical missions, is held by the 
Treasurer. 

Twelve missionaries have been added to our list ; our support and 
loving sympathy are pledged to 117 of these faithful workers. We 
have lost five; one by death, Mrs. Charity Menkle, of Benita, Africa. 
Three have returned home, and one married out of our mission. 

Eight missionary teachers continue, as heretofore, to aid the mission, 
sent from this country, in Africa and India. 

T31 Bible-readers and native teachers render efficient assistance. 
We have under our care 127 day-schools, and 466 scholarships. We 
have now three students in the Woman's Medical College of Pennsyl- 
vania, and hope sincerely that we may this year secure three times 
that number of educated, strong, consecrated young women ready to 
enter the doors wide open for their healing ministrations. 

While there have been few new auxiliaries reported to us, our re- 
ceipts show an increase of nearly $9,000 on those of the preceding 
year ; but in the language of the Jedaideh women, in pleading for a 
school building, " We long for more and more names to be written in 
God's book of loans," realizing that this is God's way of working, it is 
"God's work in human hands." 



Woman's Presbyterian Board of Missions of the Northwest. 

The twelfth annual meeting was held in Detroit, Mich., and the 
review of work seemed full of encouragement, as regarded from last 
year's stand-point. But the crying needs of the world, and the ample 
means of our Church for all demands, compared with reports of work 
done, caused us to mention progress with trembling. 

The changes made in the limits of the Synods have not interfered 
with our work, as most of the States in this section have never em- 
braced more than one. In the 57 Presbyterial Societies, included in 
9 Synods, we have 1,284 Societies. The serious question arises, how 
shall we ever enlist the 900 uninterested churches on the frontier, if 
the pastors become absorbed in " too much home work " ? We must 
interest the Seminary teachers, so that out of every 60 graduates there 
may be more than one volunteer for Foreign Missionary work. 

We are supporting 45 missionaries, including 3 now in this country. 
We have equipped and sent out 10 new teachers, all of whom are now 
in their stations ; and one going to Africa learned the new language 
on shipboard, so as to speak well on landing. 

Although the circulation of the magazines has increased, it is not 
yet as general as it should be, if our ladies expect to ever become ac- 
quainted with the work and proceed intelligently. Duty must be 
learned and done cheerfully. 

The work among the Indians has undergone some changes and 
more are under consider? tion ; but we shall hold on to all the teach- 
ers, in some location. 

We are publishing in the Benga tongue, which is the language of 
millions in Africa, three books: "The Second Reader," "Peep of 
Day," and "Come to Jesus." 



APPENDIX. l8l 

In India we have 9 missionaries, who have in charge 19 schools, 15 
teachers and Bible women, and we are to have scholarships in the 
schools to be opened for boys in Lodiana. 

At five different stations in China we have 10 missionaries. The 
work here is exceedingly promising, and a perusal of the Annual Re- 
port will repay the reader. 

A new feature has developed in our Society, and we have under 
appointment a young lady as Medical Missionary for Japan. 

What is the outlook for the coming year ? 

Three ladies whose support has just been assumed ; one teacher for 
Japan, three for China, four for India, two for Mexico, and two for 
Syria. This would place 62 missionaries on our list for our support. 

We also need funds for a building in Osaka, Jaj^an, and to com- 
plete the school building in Tabriz, Persia, besides for schools and other 
objects. 

This means more giving into the treasury of the Lord, more con 
secration, more of the vitalizing power of prayer from the women en- 
gaged in this cause. 

The contributions of the Board amounted to $55,858.37, including 
a balance of last year of $809. 17, making an increase of nearly $6,000 
for the year. 

Shall we allow the work to grow beyond our means, or shall we 
give liberally, and make the Bible aggressive ? . 



Abstract of Thirteenth Annual Report of the Ladies' Board of Missions, 

New York. 

Our foreign work during the year has been signally prosperous. We 
have added five new workers to our list, and now support thirty-two 
missionaries, besides twenty-two native teachers and Bible-readers, who 
are laboring in seven different countries. 

We are interested in twenty-one schools, most of which we support 
entire, in others we have scholarships. The seminary at Beirut, Syria, 
and the school at Tripoli have increased in numbers, and have gained 
in receipts for board and tuition. Our new station at Hamadun, Per- 
sia, shows signs of vigor and growth which are surprising. One of our 
new recruits is laboring there, and we hope to send a second one this 
summer to the same field. 

Mrs. Cochran's appeal for the endowment of hospital beds, has met 
with a hearty response, and we can report the desired number as nearly 
complete. 

In India, at Mynpurie and Lodiana, several new schools have been 
added to our roll, and the plea comes from our missionaries, " Send 
us two more teachers, we must have themy 

The addition to Graham Seminary, Tokio, Japan, has been built 
within the year, and is a material improvement. This seminary is 
destined to be a power for good in the land, and its influence is already 
far-reaching. 

Many letters have come to us from our friends in China and Siam, 



l82 APPENDIX. 

bringing good cheer and hopeful tidings. Converts are multiplying, 
and the Gospel is gaining upon the idolatry and superstition of the 
people. 

Africa is not behind in the glad story, and a light above the bright- 
ness of the sun is breaking through the heavy clouds which have hither- 
to enveloped that land. 

In Mexico, at Ozuniba and Toluca, we have assumed the care of 
two schools, both prosperous and influential. 

Our receipts for the year have been $24,273. 

For full details of our work, list of nussionaiies, helpers, etc., we re- 
fer our friends to the published Annual Report of our Society. 



The Woman's Foreign Missionary Societies of Albany and Troy 

have in the field seven missionaries, eighteen teachers and Bible-read- 
ers, fifty-one scholarships ; at home the number of auxiliary Societies 
and Bands is 141. 

Miscellaneous work of the Society was carried on in schools at 
Teheran, Chefoo, Gaboon, and in Syria. The general work in Syria 
has been under the care of Miss Bird; in Africa, under Miss Nassau, 
Mrs. Bushnell, and Rev. Mr. DeHeer. Boxes and packages have been 
sent to Siam, Africa, India, Persia, Syria, Smyrna, and Mt. Lebanon 
Home. 

Total receii^ts for the year : Troy Branch, $2,731.07 ; Albany 
Branch $5,068.75, and collection at Hudson, $82,20 — $7,882.02. 



An Abstract of Eeport of W. M. S. of Brooklyn. 

The amount of money raised is $4,280.77; disbursements for For- 
eign Missions, $2,088.50. We have assumed the support of Mrs. Mc- 
Laren in Bangkok ; Miss Reade in Tokio, Japan ; while we continue 
the support of two native teachers in girls' school in Tripoli ; aid in 
support of school in the Gaboon Mission, Africa; in San Paulo, Brazil, 
and in Mexico City. We number eighteen auxiliaries and eight Mis- 
sion Bands. We note with gratitude a deepening interest on the 
island in missionary work, and the parent Society is receiving fresh 
accessions of strength and influence — we hope to the g/orj of God. 



APPENDIX. 



183 



STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS FROM 1833 TO 1883. 



To May i, 1833 (18 months] $6,431 90 

1834 16,296 46 

1835 17,677 52 

1836 19.123 36 

1837 22,832 54 

1838 44,748 62 

1839 55,566 43 

1840 53,244 65 

1841 65,681 58 

1842 56,508 29 

1843 53,763 66 

1844 66,674 07 

1845 72,117 33 

1846 76,394 53 

1847 82,739 34' 

1848 89,165 09 

1849 96,294 40 

1850 104,665 40 

1851 108,544 33 

1852 117,822 90 

1853 122,028 83 

1854 140,719 05 

1855 128,547 90 

1856 143,234 04 

1857 142,268 93 

1858 173,848 50 

1859 160,254 75 



To May i, i860 $187,106 96 

1861 184,472 21 

1862 150,191 93 

1863 161,661 47 

1864 188,335 15 

1865 250,174 85 

1866 183,183 00 

1867 218,835 16 

1868 264,126 42 

1869 319,188 78 

1870 249,764 98 

1871 311.548 14 

1872 451,276 35 

1873 446,115 88 

1874 617,510 98 

1875 450,468 01 

1876 509,728 69 

1877 473,371 78 

1878 463,084 30 

1879 426,882 54 

1880 585,501 82 

iS8r 584,582 31 

1882 583,124 38 

1883 655,588 19 

$11,153,018 68 



The above Statement of Receipts includes the gifts of the living member- 
ship of the churches, and the legacies received by the Board. 



1 84 



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BOARD OF FOREIGN MISSIONS. 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD. 

1881-1884. Charles K. Imbrie, D.D., Robert R. Booth, D.D., James P. 

Wilson, D.D., David Olyphant, Henry Ide. 
1881-1885. Charles H. Parkhurst, D.D., Rev. M. R. Vincent, D.D., 

Hooper C. Van Vorst, LL.D., George S. Coe, Robert 

Lennox Kennedy. 
iS33-i386. William M. Paxton, D.D., John D. Wells, D.D., Robert 

Carter, William A. Booth, Ezra M. Kingsley. 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD. 
Rev. William M. Paxton, D.D., President. 

" John D. Wells, D.D., FzV^-Z're-j. 

" John C. Lowrie, \ 

" David Irving, [■ Secretaries. 

" Frank F. Ellinwood, ) 
William Rankin, Esq., Treasurer. 



Letters relating to the Missions, or other operations of the Board, may be 
addressed to the Rev. John C. Lowrie, Rev. David Irving, or the Rev. 
Frank F. Ellinwood, Secretaries, Mission House, 23 Centre St., N. Y. 

Letters relating to the pecuniary affairs of the Board, or containing remit- 
tances of money, may be sent to William Rankin, Treasurer, same address. 



The Foreign Missionary is published monthly for the Board of Foreign 
Missions, at one dollar a year for each copy ; or ten copies to one address 
for $6.00. It is sent free, when desired, to donors of ten dollars and upward, 
and to ministers of our churches. 

Address, " Foreign Missionary," 23 Centre Street, New York. 



The Home and Foreign Record is published monthly for the Boards of 
Domestic and Foreign Missions, Education, Publication, Church Extension, 
Freedmen, and Relief, at fifty cents a year, or at twenty-five cents a year each 
copy, if a certain number of copies to one address are taken. Address, 
^^ Home and Foreign Hecord" 1334 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 



Form of Bequest. — The Board is incorporated by an Act of the Legislature 
of the State of New York. The corporate name to be used is — The Board of 
Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America. 



Certificates of Honorary Membership, on the payment of thirty dollars ; 
of Honorary Directorship, one hundred dollars. 



An Act to incorporate the Board of Foreign Missions 
of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of 
America : 



Passed April 12, 1862. — Chapter 187. 



The People of the State of New York, represented in Senate 
and Assembly, do enact as follows : 

Section i. — Walter Lowrie, Gardiner Spring, William W. Phil- 
lips, George Potts, William Bannard, John D. Wells, Nathan L. 
Rice, Robert L. Stuart, Lebbeus B. Ward, Robert Carter, John C. 
Lowrie, citizens of the State of New York, and such others as they 
may associate with themselves, are hereby constituted a body cor- 
porate and politic forever, by the name of the Board of Foreign 
Missions of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of Amer- 
ica, for the purpose of establishing and conducting Christian Mis- 
sions among the unevangelized or Pagan nations, and the general 
diffusion of Christianity ; and by that name they and their success- 
ors and associates shall be capable of taking by purchase, grant, 
devise, or otherwise, holding, conveying, or otherwise disposing of 
any real or personal estate for the purposes of the said corporation, 
but which estate within this State shall not at any time exceed the 
annual income of twenty thousand dollars. 

Section 2. — The said corporation shall possess the general pow- 
ers, rights, and privileges, and be subject to liabilities and provisions 
contained in the eighteenth chapter of the first part of the Revised 
Statutes, so far as the same is applicable, and also subject to the 
provisions of chapter three hundred and sixty of the laws of eighteen 
hundred and sixty. 

Section 3. — This act shall take effect immediately. 



SIXTY-rOURTH 



ANNUAL REPORT 



iooard of iEidMeation 



PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 



United States of America. 



Presented to the General A.^sembhi, at Saratoga, N. Y., May, 1883. 



PHILADELPHIA: 

Published by the Board, 1334 Chestnut Street, 
1SS3. 



BOAED or EDUCATION. 



MEMBERS. 



THOMAS J- SHEPHERD. D. D., 
N. S. McFETRIDGE, D. D., 
JAMES M CROWELL, D. D. 



SAMUEL A. MLTCHMORE, D. D., 
J. H. MUNRO, 
E. B. HODGE. 



J. FREDERICK DRIPPS, 
R. M. PATTERSON, D. D., 
G. H. DUFFIELD. 



1881-84. 



52 85. 



1883-86. 



FULTON W. HASTINGS, 
H. W. PITKIN, 
FRANKLIN G. BAKER. 



TAMES F. GAYLEY, M. D., 
CHARLES M. MATHEWS, Esq., 
JOSEPH HARVEY. 



\VM. FEW SMITH, A.M., 
SAMUEL FIELD, 
ROBERT N. WILLSON, Esq. 



OFFICERS. 



J. FREDERICK DRIPPS, 
R. M. PATTERSON, D. D., 

D. AV. POOR, D. D , 

E. G. WOODWARD, 



President. 

- Vice-President. 

Corresponding Secret.^ry. 

Treasurer. 



OOISTTIEHSTTS- 

Candid.vtes Aided — Pkei-ar-vtorv Department — Colleges 4 

Theolo<;ical Seminaries — Takle of Pkesiivtkries Represented 5, 6 

contrihutions 7 

Important St-vtistics 8-1 1 

Annual Report of Treasurer 12 

Legacies — Per.manent Fund 13 

Statement of Receii'T.s 14-28 

Tabular Statement ky Synods and Presbyteries 29-31 

Appendix and Rules 32-40 



SIXTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT. 



The Board of Education lierewith respectfully presents to the Gene- 
ral Assembly its sixty-fourth Annual Report, and it does so in cir- 
cumstances that move to special thank^^givinjjc and praise. The year 
has been a prosperous one in every re.-pect, and attendance at meetings 
has been generally full. All pecuniary obligations have been prompt- 
ly met ^yithout the borrowing of a dolhir, and an ample surplus remains 
in the Treasury. The Permanent Fund also has been increased by the 
addition of $10,000 derived from a single legacy. Early in the year, 
indeed, the Board lost, with much regret, a valued member of its 
body, who also was its honored President, by the removal of Rev. B. 
L. Agnew, D.D,, to Pittsburgh ; but his office was filled by the elec- 
tion of Rev. J. F. Dripps, while the Rev. R. M. Patterson, D.D., 
was chosen Vice-President. To complete the membership, the Rev\ 
N. S. McFetridge, D.D., was elected for the remainder of the term 
1881-4, subject to the approval of the Assembly. 

Governed by a proper caution, the Board, at its first meeting in Sep- 
tember, voted to keep the scholarships at the amount fixed upon last 
year ; but, in January, such was the appearance of the Treasury that 
it ventured upon an increase — putting those for students in College and 
Seminary at $120 each, and those for tiie Preparatory Department at 
f 100 each. And this is what all have received, save the few who 
asked for less amounts, or who were taken under care in the latter 
part of the year. The advance thus made was much needed, and M-as 
gratefully accepted. Yet all evidence goes to show that it should be 
the aim of the Church to enable the Board to i:)ut its scholarships at 
the maximum allowed by the rules. This is none too large w'hen the 
steadily increasing expense of the education is considered ; and it is 
earnestly hoped that the Board will have the means to grant it next 
year. 



CANDIDATES AIDED. 

The candidates aided under care of the Board numbered in all 486, 
an advance nt' l(j upon the nuinl)er last reported. They are distributed 
alonu three courses of study as follows : In the Preparatory Department, 
81 ; in College, 221 ; in the Theological Seminary, 184. Of these, 35 
are Germans; 3 Bulgarians; 68 Colored; 11 Indians; 1 a Spaniard; 
1 ^^'elsh ; and 1 a Hindoo. The institutions where they are study- 
ing are given below. 

PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 



Biddle Univ., Charlotte, N. C 26 

Wooster, Univ., 9 

Howard Univ., Washington, D. C 5 

Lincoln Univ., O.xford, Pa 5 

Park College, Parkville, Mo 4 

Few Smith Academy, Philad'a, Pa... 3 

Hanover College, Ind 3 

Newark Ger. Sem., Bloomfield, N. J.. 3 

Brainerd Inst., Chester, S. C 2 

Clinton Academy, N. Y 2 

Freehold Inst., N. J 2 

Statesville High School, N. C 2 

Ada College, O i 

Carleton College, Minn i 



Coe College, Iowa 

Highland Univ., Kansas 

Lawrence Univ., Wis 

Lawrenceville High School, N. J 

Marietta College, O 

Maryville College, Tenn 

Monson Academy, Mass 

Tualitin Academy, Oregon 

Union Kimball Academy, N. H 

^^incennes Univ., Ind 

Wabash College, Crawfordsville, Ind. 

West Philadelphia Academy, Pa 

Whitestown Academy, N. Y 



COLLEGES. 



Wooster Univ., Wooster, 27 

Princeton College, N. J 21 

Wabash College, Crawfordsville, Ind. 19 

Hamilton College, Clinton, N. Y 18 

Lafayette College, Eiston, Pa 18 

Park College, Parkville, Mo 11 

Biddle Univ., Charlotte, N. C 9 

Lincoln Univ., O.vford, Pa 9 

Dubuque German Seminary, la 8 

Washington and Jefferson College, 

Washington, Pa 8 

Blackburn Univ., Carlinville, 111 7 

Lake Forest Univ., Ill 7 

Parson's College, Fairfield, la 6 

Newark Ger. Sem., Bloomfield, N. J. 4 

P>anklin College, New Athens, 3 

Galesville Univ., Wis 3 

Hanover College, Ind 3 

Howard Univ., Washington, D. C 3 

Marietta College, 3 

Mar)'sville, College, Tenn 3 

Williams' Col., Williamstown, Mass.. 3 



Centre College, Danville, Ky 2 

Drury College, Springfield, Mo 2 

Eldersridge Academy, Pa 2 

Highland Univ., Kansas 2 

Indiana State Univ., Bloomington 2 

University of Penna., Philad'a 2 

Union College, Schenectady, N. Y.... 2 

Western Univ., Pittsburgh, Pa.. 2 

Coe College, Cedar Rapids, la 

Columbia College, N. Y. City 

Kansas State Univ., Lawrence, Kan.. 

Knox College, Galesburgh, 111 

Monmouth College, 111 

New Windsor College, Md 

Princeton Collegiate Institute, Ky 

Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis 

University of New York, N. Y. City.. 

Waynesburg College, Pa 

Westminster College, New Wilming- 
ton, Pa 

•^Brooklyn, N. Y 



Under private tuition, by especial permission of Presbytery. 



THEOLOGICAL SEMINARIES. 

Princeton Theo. Sem., N. J 48 1 Lincoln Univ., Oxford, Pa 6 

Western Theo. Sem., Allegheny, Pa. 40 fHartfoid Theo. Sem., Conn 4 

Lane Theo. Sem., Cincinnati, 21 ' Piddle L'niv., Charlotte, N. C 4 

Union Theo. Sem., X. Y. Jity 18 j Howard Univ., Washington, D. C 4 

Auburn Theo. Sem., N. \ 17 | Newark Ger. Sem., RIoumfield, N. j. 4 

Northwestern Theo. Sem., Chicago.. 10 fAndover Theo. Sem.. Mass '... i 

Danville Theo. Sem., Ky 6 San Francisco Theo. Sem., Cal i 

t By especial permission of Presbytery. 

lu the course of the year two candidates were dropped for marry- 
ing; one for misrepresentations of himself, discovered after one quar- 
ter's payment ; one for turning aside to secular pursuits ; one for 
lack of means to go on Mith his studies ; and one because dropped 
from his class by the Biddle University for incompetency — six in 
all. But of these only four can be regarded as foilures, and this may 
be considered a small number in comparison with tliose who bid fair 
to fulfill their promise. 

TABLE OF PRESBYTERIES REPRESENTED. 

Synod of Atl.\ntic. Presbytery of Atlantic, 2; Catawba, 23; Fairfield, 15; 

Knox, I; Yadkin, S 40 

Synod, of B-\ltimore. Pres. of Baltimore, 5 ; Newcastle, 3 ; Washington 

City, 8 16 

Synod of the Colu.mbi.a.. Pres. of Puget Sound, i i 

Synod of Illinois. Pres. of Alton, 10; Cairo, 2; Chicago, 8; Freeport, 2 ; 

Peoria, 2; Schuyler, 4 28 

Synod of Indian.\. Pres. of Crawfordsville, 10; Fort Wayne, 2; Indianapo- 
lis, 2 ; Muncie, I ; New Albany, 7 ; Yincennes, 3 25 

Synod of Iowa. Pres. of Council Blufts, 4; Des Moines, 2; Dubuque, 4; 

Fort Dodge, 3 ; Iowa, 7 ; lona City, i ; Waterloo, 2 23 

Synod of Kansas. Pres. of Highland, 2; Solomon, 2; Topeka, 2 6 

Synod of Kentucky. Pres.oi Ehenezer, 4; Louisville, 3; Transylvania, i... 8 

Synod OF Michigan. Pres. of Detroit, i; Lansing, i 2 

Synod of Minnesota. Pres. of Mankato, i; St. Paul, 3 4 

Synod of Missouri. Pres. of Ozark, 6; Platte, 20; St. Louis, i 27 

Synod of Nebraska. Pres. of Nebraska City, 2; Omaha, i 3 

Synod of New Jersey. Pres. of Elizabeth, i ; Jersey City, 2 ; Morris and 

Orange, i; Monmouth, 2; Newark, 7; Newton, 2; New Brunswick, 34; 

West Jersey, 2 ri 

Synod of New York. Pres. of Albany, 4; Binghamton, 2; Boston, 4; 

Brooklyn, 4 ; Buffalo, I ; Cayuga, 5 ; Chemung, 3 ; Geneva, i ; Hudson, 2 ; 

Long Island, i ; Lyons, 3 ; New York, 2 ; Niagara, i ; North River, i ; 

Rochester, 3 ; St. Lawrence, i ; Steuben, i ; Syracuse, 2 ; Troy, i ; Utica, 

15 ; Westchester, 5 62 



6 

Synod oi Ohio. Pies, of Athens, i; Bellefontaine, 4; Cincinnali, 4; Lima, 
I ; Mahoning, i ; Marion, 2 ; Maumee, 2 ; Portsmouth, 3 ; St. Clairsville, 7 ; 

Steubenville, 7 ; Wooster, 21 ; Zanesville, 2 55 

SvNoi> OK THE Pacific. Pres. o[ 'ia.w Francisco, i I 

Synod of Pennsylv.\nia. Pres. of Allegheny, i; Blairsville, i; Butler, 4; 
Carlisle, 3; Clarion, 5 ; Chester, iS ; Huntingdon, 6; Kittanning. 8 ; Lacka- 
wanna, 3 ; Lehigh, 5 ; Northumberland, i ; Philadelphia, 6 ; Philadelphia 
Central, 5; Philadelphia North, 2; Pittsburgh, 10; Redstone, 2; Shenango, 4; 

Washington, 10; West Virginia, 4; Westminster, 2 100 

Synod of Tennessee. Pres. of Holston, 3; Kingston, 7; Union, 4 14 

Synod of Texas. Pres. of Austin, i i 

Synod of Wisconsin Pres. of Chippewa, 3 ; Winnebago, 3 ; Wisconsin 

River, 4; 10 

486 
Candidates in connection with the Board complete their studies at 
various Theological Seminaries as folloM's: — Western, 12; Princeton, 
11; Union, 7; Auburn, 5; Lane, 5; Danville, 4; Northwestern, 4; 
Howard University, 3; Newark, German, 2; Biddle University, 1 ; 
Hartford Seminary, 1 ; Lincoln, 1. 

From the above account it will be seen that the number of candidates 
in the Preparatory Department is unusually large, and this increase has 
come mostly from those of our own race and country.. But it has 
not been made without much care and inquiry into the worth and 
needs of the persons aided. Many who applied for scholarships were 
refused, not showing any special reason for being treated as excep- 
tional cases ; and those who were received have, in every instance, 
been strongly recommended. Several of these were sons of minis- 
ters or missionaries, who had been early consecrated to the service 
of the Gospel, and vv^ere entering upon their studies while yet too 
young for self-support. An additional reason for these exceptions was 
this: — The schools and Academics where students can be iitted for 
College are few, and ofteii far tiway from the residences of the candi- 
dates. At the West they are frecjuently attached to the Colleges as 
Preparatoiy Departments, and arc attended at an expense no less 
costly than that of the advanced course. . Hence, aid is as much 
needed ordinarily by a student when fitting for College as when at 
College. And where the promise of usefulness is briglit, and the 
circumstances are such as to guarantee continuance and success in the 
line of study, it seems the part of .sound policy to .secure the best 
results by a little aid at the lieginuing, when it is really needed. Lack 



of thorough trainiug in the first stages of education is apt to be felt 
all through the course, and is seldom effectually remedied by any 
after efforts. Xo good economy, therefore, is it to withhold assist- 
ance at the critical period, and run the risk of spoiling promised ex- 
cellence. Besides, it is well known that in getting a load under way 
the hardest pull is at the start. Only let a momentum be once gained 
and the after-progress is easy. Indeed, the momentum gained will 
often ensure a reaching of the goal by its own force. Hence, one 
would say that it was common sense to grant assistance when the 
pressure was the heaviest, jyovided the load to be moved promised to 
pay for the expense. So the Board has acted, being at the same time 
particularly careful about the proviso. This fact it will be well for 
Presbyterial Committees on Education to bear in mind, and to accom- 
pany all recommendations of students in the Preparatory Course with 
A full detail of circumstances, which shall justify their acceptance as 
•exceptional cases. 

CONTRIBUTIONS. 

The sum total of the Board's receipts for the present year exceeds 
that of the previous one by §9,474 25. This does not include a 
legacy of $10,000, which, according to the suggestion of the Assem- 
bly of 1882, has been added to the Permanent Fund. Such an advance 
is exceedingly gratifying. Among the sums contributed, it should be 
specially noted, were several that were the refunding of scholarships 
by those in service \vho had enjoyed the benefit of them, amounting 
in all to §2,058 46 ; and in one instance, to her great honor be it told, 
the widow of a minister who had just closed a life of faithful labor, 
after sending to ascertain how much her husband had received in the 
•course of his education, forwarded us the whole amount, $300, as a 
grateful testimonial of the benefit which had been conferred on him. 
Several contributions have teen made also by friends known and un- 
known, in response to appeals published in the Record for students of 
special worth, who needed more than the Board could give. These 
are pleasant facts, which indicate that the Record is read, and that 
the Board is rising in popular favor, and is believed to be performing 
a work most important for the advancement of the Church. 

But notwithstanding these encouraging indications there is evident 
room for improvement. The Board has not yet been able to put the 



scholarships at the maximum allowed Ijy its rules. Aiul it will not 
be satisfied, uor ought the Church to be content, until this is done. 
And this could be easily done if only all our churches would lay to 
heart their obligations to this cause and see how their own best inter- 
ests are involved in it, and contribute accordingly. But many fail us. 
Out of 5,744 churches on our list, more than half (3,299) have sent 
us nothing. Of these, it must be said a large proportion are marked 
vacant, and not a few of these are in a feeble, torpid state. Besides, 
there are some who may be excused on the ground that they are sustain- 
ing candidates of their own. Yet there are too many which ought to 
contribute to this cause that do not, owing, it is to be feared, to the 
fault of pastors mIio neglect to press its claims, or entirely pass them 
by. And of these churches the Board would respectfully and ear- 
nestly ask, what ground they have to expect good pastors for them- 
selves when their pulpits shall become vacant, if they take no part in 
the work of providing a ministry, either by contribution of funds or 
the consecration of sons. Such neglect is not only a wrong to the 
■whole Church, but it is also bad policy in view of the personal inter- 
ests involved. The M^ork of furnishing a suitable and efficient min- 
istry is no light task. It costs something, and there is no propriety 
in a church's accepting a benefit wholly at others' expense w'hen it is 
able to help towards its supply. 

IMPORTANT STATISTICS. 

An examination of the catalogues of our Theological Seminaries 
reveals the following facts. The Seminaries referred to are those of 
Princeton, Union, Western, Auburn, Lane, Northwest, and Danville. 
We take these Seminaries because these are the only ones that have sent 
us catalogues covering the period selected, and they furnish a fair 
basis for the purpose proposed, which is to show the rate at which 
our Church has been supi^lying ministers annually for the last seven 
years. We give the sum total of the students that have been attend- 
ing in the three classes of these Seminaries year by year: — 187G-7, 
483; 1877-8, 452; 1878-9, 443; 1879-80, 432; 1880-1, 425; 
1881-2, 429 ; 1882-3, 411. 

In this series it will be observed that with the exception of a slight 
reaction in 1881-2 the decline has been steady, making a difference 
from first to last of 72. This is somewhat alarming. The average 



9 

of supplies thus offered us from these, our niaiu sources, is only 127 
per year. Let this be set over against the 98 who are reported as de- 
ceased the last year, and the 28 dismissed to other denominations — 
116 in all — and it does little more than fill the vacancies thus created. 
The number that can be counted on from other sources in addition is 
very small. Our main reliance for a surplus must be from other 
denominations, and of these, 58 were reported last year — 2 less than 
double the number we dismissed. Meanwhile, the net increase of our 
churches for the last seven years has been 667 — that is an average of 
95 per year. According to all fair calculations, these Seminaries ought 
to graduate every year not less than 225 candidates. If fit to preach, 
they could all find employment at once. 

Furthermore, M'hen we consider the outlook for the future the indi- 
cations are by no means cheering. The number of students in our 
various Colleges who are contemplating the ministry is reported to be 
ominously small. At the Annual Meeting, held in Union Theologi- 
cal Seminary on the Day of Prayer for Literary Institutions, it was 
stated, as the result of information carefully collected from all parts 
of the field, that "no inprovement n})on the falling record of recent 
years could be perceived. The probability was that the next four 
years at least would show an increasing scarcity of ministers." At a 
similar meeting held on the same day at Princeton, a like conclusion 
w^as reached. A letter from that place says : — " From the general 
reports obtained from the Colleges as to the number of candidates for 
the ministry in them, it is evident that those who control our Colleges 
should see to it that the claims of the Gospel ministry be urged upon 
those who profess a willingness to do the Lord's work, and yet are 
drifting away from duty." These testimonies accord perfectly with 
the facts and conclusions which present themselves to the Board. It 
becomes the Church to look them fairly in the face. They are too 
serious to be blinked. There is no subject which calls for more 
earnest discussion, and which ought more to occupy the time and 
attention of the General Assembly at its impending session, than that 
which they present. The steadily increasing number of our vacant 
churches, amounting to over a thousand, according to the Minutes of 
the last Assembly, and the unanswered calls for more men by our 
Mission Boards, urge upon our ecclesiastical bodies the duty of adopt- 
ing vigorous measures for inquiring into, and if possible, removing 



10 

the obstacles whicli hiiuler tlie ])njpei' supplies for the ministry and 
for facilitating their increase. That obstacles exist is but too evident. 
AVhat they are it is hardly the province of the Board to state. It is 
rather for the Assembly to search them out, and to call the attention 
of the churches to them, and if possible, also to prescribe the means 
for their abatement. Unless this is done, and done speedily, there is 
danger that the normal development of our Church will be impeded, 
and that the best interests of the country and the cause of the Gospel 
will suffer detriment. An obligation is put on us to commit the 
things which we have heard and received of Christ to faithful men 
■who shall be able to teach others also. This obligation it devolves on 
the Church to fulfill, according to the measure of its ability. The 
men cannot be had unless they are prayed for, and sought for, and 
properly trained. And to this business must the Church address 
itself with an earnestness and zeal proportioned to the demand. 

In view of the many communications made to the Board from 
various quarters of the Church, it would respectfully suggest the 
question whether the use of tobacco in any and every form by the stu- 
dents under its care ought not to be explicitly prohibited as an un- 
warrantable extravagance. 

The Board has given careful consideration to the recommendation 
of the last General Assembly, ''That the Board of Education invest 
the Permanent Funds in its charge, amounting to §43,950, in schol- 
arships, yielding each $200 a year, with the design of increasing them 
to S250 as soon as practicable; these scholarships to be given to 
students whose grade of scholarship is high, and who do not receive 
aid from any other source." 

The Board is always desirous of carrying into execution the recom- 
mendations of the General Asseml^ly, but, in this instance, it has 
found serious difficulties and objections in the way. Indeed, it is, as 
a matter of legal bearing, a very serious question, whether it is com- 
petent for the Board to make any such use of the funds which have 
been placed in its charge for its general work as is contemplated in 
the recommendation. Aside from this view of the matter, however, 
it seems to the Board doubtful whether it would not injuriously affect 
its position and claims in the estimation of many of its friends. At 
present, and until the contributions from the Church shall justify a 
considerable increase in the amounts which can be paid to students 



11 

under the care of the Board, the income accruhig from invested funds 
■will be needed to supplement the annual contributions. It is the de- 
sire and aim of the Board to enlarge the appropriations to meritorious 
and needy candidates for the ministry as soon as possible to such an 
amount as will confer all the assistance requisite without encouraging 
extravagance, or removing a healthy stimulus to self help. This 
point has not been reached as yet, nor does it seem to be close at 
hand. 

In the judgment of the Board, tlierefore, it would, in any view of 
the case, be premature to tie up its Permanent Funds at the present 
time in the manner recommended. Whether it would even be advis- 
able to put these funds into such a fixed and unalterable form would 
seem to be a question of grave importance. 

In view of the foregoing considerations, and with all deference to 
the wisdom of the General Assembly, the Board does not see its way 
clear to adopt the recommendations referred to. 

The members whose term expires by limitation this year are : — 

3Iinister.s—J . F. Dripps, R. M. Patterson, D.D., and G. H. Duf- 
field. 

Laymen — AVilliani Few Smith, Robert X. Willson, Esq., and 
Samuel Field. 

The sanction of the Assembly is also asked for the election of Rev. 
X. S. McFetridge, D.D., to supplv the place of Rev. B. L. Agnew, 
D.D. 

All which is Respectfully Submitted in Behalf of the Board of Edu- 
cation. D. W. Poor. 

Corresponding Secretary. 



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13 
LEGACIES RECEIVED IN 1882-83. 



John Gordon, late of Cranbury, N. J $1,934 53 

Peter Van Tuyl, late of Warren Co., 559 38 

William Wilson, late of Maryville, Tenu 1,708 40 

John Alexander, late of Mifflin Co., Pa 800 00 

Ann E. Dill, late of Hamptonburg, N. Y 52 35 

Thomas Kiddo, late of Allegheny Co., Pa 475 00 

Mrs. Margaret S. Purviance, late of Baltimore, Md 900 00 

Charles Wright, late of East Cantou, Pa 19 00 

Miss Jane Scott, late of Delaware, -5 00 

Miss Margaret Scott, late of Adams Mills, 60 00 

Jane H. Paries, late of Philadelphia, Pa 190 00 

Chauucey Dewey, late of Cadiz, SO 00 

Mrs. Eveline P. Hood, late of Antrim, X. H 500 00 

Mrs. Jane H. Carver, late of Hartsville, Bucks Co., Pa 500 00 

Agnes C. Young, late of Logansport, Ind '-5 00 

John S. Kenyon, late of New York City 1,000 00 

F. D. Beebe, Brockport, N, Y. (in part). A conditional gift 598 75 

F. P. Schoals, late of New York City 10,000 00 

$19,397 41 



PERMANENT FUND. 



Investments. Income. 

Philadelphia City 6 per cent, bonds •.. 827,950 00 $1,677 00 

Bonds and mortgages on Philad'a City property. 16,000 00 700 00 

$43,950 00 
On hand not invested 10,000 00 

Total $53,950 00 $2,377 00 

We, the undersigned, have examined the securities held by the Per- 
manent Fund of the Board of Education of the Presbyterian Church, 
and find them to correspond with the above statement. 



STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS 



-OF THE— 



BOARD OF EDUCATION", 



By SYNODS, PRESBYTERIES, and CHURCHES. 



FOR THE YEAR EXDIXG APRIL 15th, 188: 



RECEIPTS. 

1882-83. 

iSYNOD OF ATLANTIC. 

Atlantic Presbytery. 

Congruity S2 00 

Goodwill 5 00 

r> 00 

Catawba Presbytery. 

Concord So 00 

Ebenezer 1 00 

Mattoon 1 00 

Woodhmd 1 00 

Rev. M. Ijams 1 28 

S9 28 

Fairfield Presbytery. 

Hermon $1 00 

Tabor G 00 

$7 00 

Knox Presbytery. 
Antioch SI 00 

§1 00 
Yadkin Presbytery. 

Boonville SI 31 

Fayetteville 1 25 

Friendship 80 

Le.xinjiton 2 00 

Lewisburg 1 46 

Mocksville 50 

Mt. Olive Go 

Mt. Zion 1 00 

Salisbury 75 

Statesville 2 00 

Thomasville 1 02 

Kev.C. B.Ward 1 09 



SU 43 J 



RECEIPTS. 

1882-83. 

SYNOD OF BALTIMORE. 

Baltimore Presbytery. 

Annapolis S3 00 

Ashland G 00 

Baltimore, First 600 00 

Second 25 00 

Twelfth 5 00 

Abbott Chapel 2 00 

" Boundary Ave 68 00 

" Broadway 5 00 

Brown Mem'l.. 110 00 

" Central 35 00 

" Lafayette Sq... 8 00 

Kiiox 2 00 

Madison St.... 5 00 

" 'Westminster... 13 00 

Bethel 5 00 

Bel Air 5 00 

Chestnut Grove 10 UO 

Churchville 29 00 

Cumberland 15 00 

Deer Creek, Harmony.. 30 00 

Emmittsburgh 30 00 

'Fallston 4 00 

Frederick City 6 44 

Iliigerstown 16 00 

Ham]i(kai 5 00 

Havre (kMirace 10 00 

Lonaconing 2 00 

New Wind.sor 2 00 

Piney Creek 15 00 

Taney Creek 20 Oo 

Williamsport 8 43 

SI, 099 87 

yeiv Castle Presbytery. 

Chesapeake City S20 00 

Drawyer's ." G GS 

Elkton 30 oil 

Forest, First 10 (in 

" Second 1 00 



RECEIPTS. 

1882-83. 

Green Hill & Rockland S7 00 

Harrington 1 00 

Lower Brandy wine 12 30 

Lower W. Nottingham. 34 20 

Manakin 10 00 

Newark 5 00 

Pencader 1 68 

Pitt's Creek 6 00 

Port Pen n 12 00 

Rock..- 10 00 

Snow Hill 5 OD 

St. George's 12 OO 

White Clay Creek 14 00 

Wicomico 10 00 

Wilmington, Central.... 124 79 

Hanover St.. 15 00 

Olivet 2 00 

West 15 00 

Zion 20 00 

S390 ft". 



Washington City Presbytery. 

Albright S2 00 

Big Oak 2 00 

Falls 13 46 

llyattsville 2 00 

Lewinsville 2 42 

Neelsville 11 33 

Vienna 2 08 

Washington, First 17 40 

'• Fourth 42 06 

" Eastern 2 GO 

" Assembly 30 00 

" Metrojiolitan.. 50 00 

" N. Y. Avenue.. 13 00 

" Western 43 08 

" Westminster... 10 00 

15th Street 29 00 

" West 50 00 

Lui:v 5 08 



S327 51 



15 



RECEIPTS. 

1882-83. 

SYNOD OF COLORADO. 

Denver Prcgbytery. 

Boulder Sll 00 

Denver, 17th Street 11 tio 

Central 120 60 

Idaho Springs 5 10 

Leadville 43 50 

Monument 8 00 

Rawlins 7 00 

Table Rock 4 00 

Vahnont 30 01 

Rev. D. E. Finke 3 00 

$244 46 

Montana Presbytery. 

Bozeman SIO 00 

Rev. S. B. Crittenden 

and wife 2 40 



S12 40 

Pueblo Presbytery. 

,Xlanu)?a B7 85 

CiUKin 15 00 

Coliirudo Spring.s 32 41 

Pueblo 5 00 

Trinidad 4 50 



S74 76 
Santa Fe Presbytery. 

Albuquerque J5 00 

.Jemez 1 00 

Laguna 5 00 



Sll 00 



Utah Presbytery. 
Salt Lake City $4 00 



S4 00 
SYNOD OF COLUMBIA. 

Presbytery of Idaho. 

Boise City ?1 00 

Union 5 00 

We.stou 75 

S6 75 

Presbytery of Oregon. 

Albany S) 00 

Astoria 5 00 

Eugene City 4 00 

Jaiksonville 3 00 

Munix 1 31 

Pleasant Grove 5 00 

Salem 2 25 

Tualilin Plains 2 00 



$27 56 
Presbytery of Puget Sound. 

Seattle S3 15 

White River 1 00 



RECEIPTS. 
1882-83. 

SYNOD OF ILLINOIS. 

Alton Presbytery. 

Alton, First 814 00 

Bethel 3 00 

Brighton 1 00 

Carlinville 8 40 

Carlyle 4 50 

Carrolton 30 67 

Chester 11 00 

Collinsville :. 6 60 

EdwardsviDe 1 00 

Greenville 4 00 

Hillsboro 5 00 

.Tersevville 02 00 

Litcirtield U 00 

Xokomis (KJ 

Plainview 2 (K) 

Plum Creek 2 55 

Salem, German 4 00 

Si>arta 15 00 

Stroudsburgh, German. 5 40 

Troy 2 (X) 

Virden '.* 77 

Yankeetown 5 00 

Zion, German 5 60 



S217 4'J 

Bloo mington Presbytery. 

Bement $10 52 

Bloomington, First 15 00 

Champaign 23 83 

Chenoa 6 00 

Danville 42 32 

Farmer City 6 50 

Gilman .". 6 00 

Lexington 8 00 

Mackinaw 8 60 

Minonk 1 70 

Monticello 2 50 

Oak Grove 4 14 

I'axton 2 00 

Piper City 6 OO 

Pontiac 4 67 

Rossville 6 00 

Salem 2 00 



fl55 78 



RECEIPTS. 

1882-83. 

Sumner $1 95 

Tamaroa 5 00 

Union 4 20 



Cairo Presbytery. 

Bridgeport 15 00 

Carbondale 20 00 

Carmi 4 16 

Ceutralia, First 5 00 

Cobden 10 00 

Du Quoin 6 75 

Enfield 11 00 

Fairfield 3 00 

Flora 5 00 

Gilead 1 55 

Golconda 2 00 

Grand Tower 13 05 ; 

Harrisburgh 2 00 

McLeansboro 3 00 ; 

Metropolis t\ 00 

Nashville 6 85 

Murphevsboro 5 00 

Pisgah 8 00 

Richland 3 80 

Sharon 1 08 

Shawneetown 15 20 



$158 59 



Chicago Presbyter y. 

Austin $3 51 

Chicago, First 100 00 

" First German.. 2 00 

Second 558 35 

Third <il 51 

Fourth 525 90 

Eighth 14 00 

" Fullerton Ave 38 05 

" Re-Union 5 00 

Du Page 10 OO 

Elwood 4 00 

Englewood 19 50 

Evanston ^.. .50 37 

Homewood s 43 

Hvde Park 185 00 

Joliet, First 14 00 

Central 5 OO 

Kankakee, First 19 00 

Lake Forest, First 75 46 

Maywood 5 00 

Riverside 14 27 



SI ,748 35 
Freeport Piesbytcry. 

Freeport, First Sll 08 

Elizabeth 1 00 

Galena, South 20 00 

" German 5 (X) 

Hanover 5 (K) 

Liini and Hebron 4 OO 

Low Point 5 00 

Marengo s 00 

Middle Creek 15 63 

Oregon 19 25 

Prairie Dell 4 00 

Rock Run 6 00 

Rockford, First 50 00 

Westminster... 9 80 

Willow Creek 23 19 

Winnebago 4 70 

Woodstock 16 00 

Zion 7 60 



S215 15 

Matioon Presbytery. 

Areola $ 69 

Brownstown 2 00 

Chrisman 6 00 

Kansas 12 00 

Mattoon 10 00 

Morrisonville 6 OQ 

Moweaqua 2 00 

Neoga 3 40 

Pana 2 76 

Paris, First 9 00 

Pleasant Prairie 5 00 

Prairie Bird 9 00 

Shobonier 1 00 

Tower Hill 6 00 

Vandalia -3 75 

West Okaw 50 



185 10 



16 



RECEIPT*. 

1882-83. 
Ottawa Presbytery. 

All Sable Grove.-. SO 00 

Aurora 6 ih) 

Earlville 4 50 

Farm Ridge 1(3 oo 

Osweso 3 ol 

Paw Paw Grove 5 00 

Plato. First 2 00 

Rochelle 20 00 

.Soinoiiauk 3 00 

AValtham 11 35 

Wyoming 1 00 

S7S It) 

Peoria Presbi/tcry. 

Altona S2 00 

Brimfield 3 00 

Brunswick 2 00 

Canton 5 79 

Crow Meadow 11 25 

Deer Creek 4 00 

Delavan 5 00 

Flmwood 3 00 

Eureka 5 50 

Farminston 10 00 

French Grove 3 00 

Galesburgh 25 04 

Ipava 13 00 

John Knox S 00 

Knoxville 5 00 

Lewii^ton 51 50 

Oneida 4 30 

Peoria, First 53 19 

" Second 5 75 

" Grace • 3 00 

Princeville 15 00 

Prospect 25 G5 

Salem S oO 

"i'ates City 6 no 



Pock River Presbi/tcr;/. 

Aledo S2 05 

Ashton 7 00 

Centre 5 90 

Dixon 12 OS 

Edgington 7 00 

Elmira 10 48 

Franklin Grove 8 00 

Hamlet 4 00 

Kewanee 3 00 

Morrison 5 00 

Kewton 5 00 

Norwood 15 00 

Peniel 2 50 

Pleasant Ridge 1 70 

Princeton 8 38 

Rock Island, Central.... 4 21 

" Broadway 8 15 

"Sterling 20 00 

Woodhull 9 00 

$139 05 

Schuyler Presbytery. 

Appanoose SC 00 

Augusta 5 00 

Bardolph 4 75 

Brooklyn 3 00 

Bushnell 4 00 



EEf EIPTS. 

l»82-s:3. 

Camp Creek $15 00 

Carthage 3 00 

Clayton 2 00 

Ebenezer ^ 50 

Elvaston 15 00 

Fairmount 2 50 

Hamilton 5 00 

Hersman 5 oo 

Kirkwood 5 00 

Liberty 2 fJO 

Macomb 11 5i) 

Monmouth 35 45 

Oquavvka 1 oO 

Perrv 3 5o 

Prairie City 4 00 

Rushville 46 Oo 

Salem, German 2 40 

Warsaw 10 00 

Walnut Grove 2 00 

$211 GO 

Springfield Presbytery. 

Decatur $26 35 

Irish Grove 6 00 

Jacksonville, First 133 92 

" Westminster 21 20 

Lincoln 22 52 

Macon 3 00 

Ladoga 2 05 

Maroa 3 00 

North Sangamon 16 00 

Parkersburgh 1 04 

Springfield, First 53 80 

" Third 49 10 

" Second Portg'se.. 5 55 

Calvary 22 00 

Virginia 5 on 

Williamsville 2 50 

$373 09 

SYNOD OF IXDI.\.NA. 

CrawfordsvUle Presbytery. 

Benton $3 00 

Bethany 14 25 

., Beulah 5 00 

Darlington 4 20 

Davton 10 00 

Fowler 3 00 

Frankfort 19 00 

Lebanon 3 00 

Newtown 9 00 

Oxford 2 00 

I Prairie Centre 2 75 

Rockfield 2 25 

Rockville IG 50 

Romney 5 75 

Sugar Creek 3 82 

Waveland 3 25 

$112 83 

, Foi-t Wayne Pn.shytcry. 

Albion $3 00 

Blufi'ton 3 00 

Decatur 4 00 

Elkhart 14 10 

Fort Wayne, First 52 48 

" Second 2 oo 

Goshen 10 Oo 

Huntington 12 Oo 



RECEIPTS. 

1882-83. 

Kendallville $14 OG 

La Grange 8 50 

Lima G 00 

Ossian 3 10 

Piercetoii 1 50 

S133 74 

III <Ua n apolis Presbytery. 

Columbus $2 50 

Hopewell.. 17 20, 

Indianapolis, Third 26 00 

Fourth 33 00 

Fifth 2 00 

Sixth 4 00 

Eleventh.. 1 00 

Twelfth.... 8 3:5 

Memorial.. 11 53 

.Southport 5 40 

$110 96 

Logansport Presbytery. 

Bethel $3 00 

Goodland ¥> Oo 

La Porte 19 71 

Logansport, First 14 00 

Michigan City 22 30 

Mishawaka, First 7 00 

Monticello 8 57 

Mount Zion 2 00 

Plymouth 5 Oo 

Rochester 3 15 

South Bend, First 9 69 

Union...; 5 00 

Valparaiso 11 55 

$115 97 

Muacie Presbytery. 

Hartford City $2 00 

Hopewell 3 00 

' Libertv 2 00 

Muncie H 00 

i Peru 2 72 

Portland 2 00 

Tipton 3 00 

Union Citv 3 00 

Waba.sh 20 63 

Xenia 1 00 

Tontogony 5 00 

$55 35 

^'cw Albany Presbytery. 

Bedford $3 52 

Hanover 6 50 

Jacksonville 13 10 

Lexington 3 00 

Madison, First 9 05 

" Second 7 60 

Mitchell 2 00 

New Albany, First 45 75 

Second.... 12 48 

Third 19 85 

New Washington 6 00 

Oak Grove 2 .50 

Paoli 5 90 

Rehoboth 3 00 

Sharon Hill 3 2.^ 

Walnut Ridge 2 .50 

I $145 10 



17 



RErEIPTS 

1882-!^3. 

Vincennes Presbytcnj. 

Brazil 831 00 

Cliuborne 7 00 

Evansville, Grace 15 75 

Walnut St... 10 00 

Graysville 5 00 

Princeton 5 00 

Sullivan 4 00 

Upper Indiana 7 00 

Vincennes 22 45 



8113 20 



White Water Presbi/ter;/. 

Aurora $.'■> 00 

Brookville 10 00 

Cambridge City 5 56 

College Corner 3 10 

Connersville, First 7 00 

" German... 1 00 

Ebenezer 5 00 

Greensburgli 33 00 

Homer 2 00 

Lewisville 4 (0 

Richmond 13 17 

Ri.-^ingSun 2 00 

Shell)yville, Fir.-,t 13 00 

SlOo .S3 



SVXOD OF IOWA. 

Cedar Hapids Presbytery. 

BigGrove 82 21 

Bliiirstown v> 00 

Cedar Rapids, Fin-t 74 4(' 

" Second... 21 48 

Centre Junction 4 00 

Clinton H oo 

Dysart 3 oo 

Linn Grove 13 04 

Marion 14 79 

Mount Vernon 11 00 

Onslow 5 I'D 

Ricliland Centre 10 00 

Scotch Grove 4 oO 

Vinton 23 70 

Wyoming 15 n 



8288 99 



Council. Bluffs Presbytery 

Bedford 810 00 

Clarinda 11 60 

College Springs 3 00 

Corning 3 91 

Emerson 2 00 

Essex 3 00 

Greenfield 2 50 

Logan 1 30 

Malvern 15 00 

Menlo 4 00 

Pilot Grove 2 00 

Sidney 10 00 

Villisca 2 00 



RECEIPTS. 

1882-83. 
Dcs Moines Presbytery. 

Adel 86 40 

Allerton 4 00 

Ccntreville 9 50 

Chariton 4 40 

Colfax 4 00 

Des Moines 19 91 

Ea.st Des Moines 3 (X) 

Hartford 1 00 

Indianola 2 00 

Knoxville. 9 06 

Leighton 3 00 

Leon 3 00 

Lineville 3 00 

New Sharon 3 00 

Newton, First 7 95 

Olivet 3 00 

Plymouth 3 00 

Promise 1 00 

Seymour 1 50 

Waukee 1 25 

S92 97 

Dubuque I^esbytery. 

Bethel 82 00 

Dubuque, First 20 00 

German 14 (X) 

Dyersville 3 00 

Fairl)anks 2 00 

Independence, First 5 (lO 

German 4 50 

Lime Spring 2 2S 

Pine Creek 5 (X) 

Waukon 25 00 ■ 

Zion 3 50 



RECEIPTS. 

15*2-53. 

Mount Plea.«ant, Ger 89 00 

New London 6 00 

Oakland 2 00' 

Otlumwa 2 00 

Primrose 2 00 

Spring Creek 2 00 

St. Peter's, Evangelical. 8 45 

West Point 1 15 

Winfield 5 00 



8164 84 

loiva City Presbytery. 

Crawfordsville 81 00 

Deep River 2 38 

Fairview 1 10 

Hermon 5 00 

Iowa City IS 50 

Keota 1 00 

I^dora 5 00 

Martinsburgh 2 30 

Montc/unia 5 00 

Muscatine, German 3 00 

Oxford 5 00 

Scott 3 55 

Solon 50 

Sugar Creek 2 00 

Inity 2 00 

Walcott 1 00 

Washington IS 77 

West Branch 3 10 

West Libert V 10 00 

Wilton 5 00 



895 20 



870 31 



Fort Dodge Presbytery. 

Arcadia 81 00 

Battle Creek 1 (Kt 

Bethel 1 (lO 

Boone 7 75 

Carroll 3 00 

Cherokee 5 00 

Fort Dodge 14 15 

Humboldt 1 00 

Ida 3 00 ; 

Logan 1 00 

Marcus 55 ' 

Odebolt 2 W 

Paton 6 00 

Rolfe, Second 2 00 

Sac City 15 84 

Vail 9 50 : 

Wheatland, First Ger.... 5 00 ' 



Iowa Presbytery. 

Birmingham 86 00 

Bloomfield 2 00 

Burlington. First 6110 

Chequest...! 2 75 

Fairfield 3 41 

Keokuk, Westminster.. 34 65 

Libertyville 2 00 

Mediapol s 92 

Middleto.v 2 76 

Montrose 1 Ch) 

Morning Sun 10 65 



Waterloo P-csbytery. 

Albion 85 00 

880 28 Cedar Falls 7 00 

Conrad 4 00 

Janesville 4 00 

La Porte City 10 60 

Nevada 6 00 

State Centre 8 50 

Tranquility 10 00 

I'nion 62 

West Friesland 7 00 



862 7Li 



SYNOD OF KANS.\S. 

F.mporia Presbytery. 

Belle Plain 82 00 

Burlingame 1 00 

Burlington 3 00 

Caldwell 4 2I 

Clear Water 2 01 

El Dorado 2 00 

El Paso 6 uu 

Florence 1 OJ 

Malvern 2 oo 

Marion Centre 3 00 

New Salem 2 00 

Osage City 3 00 

Peabody 5 50 

Sedan 3 00 

Star Valley 1 00 

Stone Chapel 2" 00 

Walnut Valley 3 00 

Wichita 24 15 

Rev. Geo. E. Bicknell... 5 00 



874 86 



18 



RECEIPTS. ' 

l.S8'2-83. 
Highland Preshi/tery. 

Clifton 85 (XI 

f:flSngham 2 00 

Frankfort 3 00 

Hiawatha 7 00 

Highland 9 00 

Kennekuk o oo 

Nortonville 1 00 



S9) 00 
Lamed Pi-esbyieri/. 

Arlington $1 00 

Hutchinson 7 W 

Lyons 6 00 

Mount Pleasant 1 W 

815 00 

Neosho Presbyla-y. 

Clianute S6 80 

Chetopa 5 00 

Fish Creek and Fulton.. 1 50 

Fort Scott 30 00 

'.iarnet 4 25 

Girard 9 00 

Humboldt 3 21 

loia 8 65 

McCune 3t) 

Mill Creek 1 Oo 

Monmouth 15 

Muskogee 15 00 

Osage 59 

Pai-sons 7 00 

Pheasant Creek 1 ijO 

Princeton 3 Ou 

Richmond 2 -55 

Walnut 1 .iO 

Wawaka 2 50 

"Cash" 5 00 



3^88 06 

Solomon Presbytery. 

Abilene $10 00 

Beloit 12 00 

Bennington 10 30 

Blue Stone 3 Oo 

Cheever 3 00 

Clyde 2 Oo 

Culver 7 00 

FortHarker 2 00 

Mount Pleasant 2 W 

Plum Greek 8 10 

Salens 16 50 

Solomon 2 00 

Willow Dale 1 00 

Wilson 3 00 



S81 90 

Topcka Presbytery. 

Bethel S2 50 

Black Jack 5 00 

Clinton 4 30 

Edgerton 2 50 

Leavenworth, First 20 DO 

Mulberry Creek, Ger 1 00 

North Tupeka 7 00 

Spring Hill 5 00 

Topeka, Tl'ird 3 00 

$.00 30 



RECEIPTS. 

1882-83. 

SYNOD OF KENTUCKY. 

Ebenezer Preslyytery. 

Ashland 8*58 88 

Augusta, First 9 00 

Covington. First 121 64 

Dayton'. 4 .50 

Ebenezer 1 00 

Flemingsburgh :J6 05 

Frankfort 11 85 

Lexington, Second 50 00 

Ludlow 6 05 

New Hope 1 Of» 

Paris 8 (X) 

Sharpsburgh 3 00 

S312 97 
Louisville Presbytery. 

Hopkinsville SI 75 

Louisville, College St... 24 05 

Knox 3 75 

Walnut St... 10 35 

22d Street.... 1 00 

Owen.sboro. First 38 50 

Pewee Valley 10 05 

Plum Creek 3 00 

Princeton, First 3 20 

Shelbvville, First 14 00 

Olivet 3 00 



3112 65 
Transylvania Presbytery. 

Columbia $3 00 

Danville, Second 50 (W 

Harrodsburgh 10 00 

Lancaster 9 00 

Lebanon 7 00 

€79 00 

SYNOD OF .MICHIGAN. 

Detroit Presbytery. 

Ann Arbor S30 89 

Brighton 2 65 

Detroit, First 117 75 

Calvarv 5 00 

Fort Street 1*5 38 

.Jefferson Ave... 137 72 

" Union 15 00 

" Westminster.... 158 65 

Plymouth, First 12 87 

" Second, 6 65 

Pontiac 11 25 

Saline 6 12 

Wyandotte 6 00 

Ypsilanti 25 (M) 

S670 93 
Grand Papids Presbytery. 

Greenwood $2 00 

Muir 2 00 



$4 00 
Kalamazoo Presbytery. 

Constantlne SI 00 

Edwardsburgh 3 00 

Kalamazoo, First EO 00 

Kalamazoo, North 2 00 

Kendall 3 00 

Martin 6 00 



RECEIPTS. 

1882-83. 

Richland ?8 00 

.Schoolcraft 2 29 

Three Rivers 6 90 

White Pigeon 9 OiJ 



874 19 
Lansing Presbytery. 

Albion 810 00 

Concord 9 22 

Homer 24 00 

Lansing, Firet 20 80 

Parma 3 00 



867 02 
Monroe Presbytery. 

Adrian 817 00 

Coldwater 13 45 

Erie 6 00 

Hillsdale, Firet 10 75 

La Salle 2 00 

Monroe 17 00 

Petersburg 3 00 

Reading 1 75 

Tecumseh....: 30 00 



8100 95 
Saginaw Presbytery. 

Au Sable and Csceola... 82 00 

Bav Citv.: 25 00 

Ithaca 4 40 

Midland City 3 00 

Mount Plea.s'ant 5 00 

Port Hope 1 00 

Saginaw 4 00 

.Saginaw City 44 30 

South Saginaw 4 00 

Va.ssar 8 04 

8106 74 

SYNOD OF MINNESOT.Y. 

Dakota Presbytery. 
Yankton Agency Si 00 

84 00 
Mankato Presbyta-y. 

Amboy .• 83 00 

Kasota 1 00 

Le Seuer 5 00 

Mankato 11 09 

Redwood Falls 3 00 

St. James 1 00 

St. Peter's Union 11 95 

Trac-s- 1 00 

Wells 2 00 

Winnebago City 1 00 

Worthington 5 67 



845 71 
lied Piver Presbytery. 

Bismarck $:? 00 

Forest River 1 00 

Kensii)«-i()n 2 00 

.Mackinock 4 10 

Moorhead 13 00 

Tower City 5 00 

■• Friend of Missions"... 5 16 



J9 



RECEIPTS. 
1882 S3. 

Southern Dakota Pi-esbytery . 

Huron SIO 00 

Olivet i 00 

Milltowii 1 00 

Mitchell .5 00 

Scotland M 00 

Tyndall 1 00 

Kev. W. J. Hughe.s .'> (X) 

Turner 3 00 

331 00 

St. Paul Presbytery. 

Brown Valley 32 00 

Duluth 20 00 

Empire 2 00 

Farmington 1 00 

Forest 1 00 

Hastings 5 00 

Howard 2 50 

Minneapolis, First 5(j 50 

•• Andrew 30 .50 

" Franklin Av.. 14 00 

" Westminster . 178 76 

Olivet 1 00 

Red Wing 2 (51 

Rice's Poini 2 00 

at. Paul. Central 68 92 

Dayton Ave ... 26 75 

House of Hope lfX> 52 

."^tillwafer, First 13 iW 

Vermilion 2 00 

«531 !I6 

WiiM)ia Pre.shi/tery. 
Chattield $18 il 



KECEIPT.o. 

I • 1882-83. 

Palmyra Prenbytery. 

Brooktiild $9 00 

Edinfl 3 oo 

Hannibal, First 15 00 

Kirksville 12 00 

Knox City i oo 



S 00 






Fremont. 

Manchester 

<Jwatonna 

Winona. First 

(jerman . 



6 00 
2 (M) 

6 00 

7 00 I 
2 00 



PlaHe Prcshylery. 

Avalon $5 60 

Bethel 1 00 

Breckenridge 89 

Carrollton 9 00 

Craig 2 00 

Dawn 1 50 

Gallatin i 00 

Graham 2 00 

Hamilton 

Hodge 76 

Hopkins 2 00 

Martinsville 2 00 

Maryville 45 00 

Mt. Zion 50 

New York Settlement... 1 £8 

Oak Grove 3 00 

Parkville 20 00 

Platte City 2 00 

Rockport .') 00 

Rosenilale 1 00 

ijt. Joseph, North 3 0<) 



i RECEIPT.S. 

1882-83. 
Kebraika City Preabytery. 

Alexandria J2 25 

Adams •> 75 

P««fice s 00 

Bennett 2 00 

Burchard 1 (X) 

Fairview 1 (jo 

Falls City 3 00 

Helena i 45 

Hubbell '. I QQ 

Humboldt .5 so 

Li'i^oln ■ 13 70 

Meridian 4 oo 

Pawnee City 4 o,r> 

Plattsmouth, German... 5 00 

Prospect o 00 

Salem 3 «._, 

Seward g oO 

3 00 Sterling i §(, 

"" Summit ' 1 00 

Stella : i(X) 

Table Rock 2 00 

Tecumseh 1 00 

York 8 2.') 



ii84 07 



Union 
West Point 



Westminster 160 00 Clay Ridge 



Omaha Presbytery. 

Blackbird Hill 

Cloutibret. 



2 00 
3 



7- 13 



SI. Louis Presbytery. 



Columbus 10 ."io 

Crt'ston 1 50 

Iremont 9 n 

Hooper 2 Go 

Oakdale 4 .50 

Omaha, Second 44 31) 



Bethel....: 317 00 Schuyler « jji 



341 11 

SYNOD OF MIS.SOIKI. 

Oaage P-e-ibytery. 

Appk'ton Citv $.5 75 

Kansa.-i City, Third... 
Fourth. 

Knob Noster 

Malta Bend 

Mlive Brand) 

Pleasant Hill 

Raymore 

Salt Springs 

W'arreii.sburgh 

Wesiticld 



1 00 

2 00 
5 00 
2 00 

1 00 

2 00 
8 55 
1 00 
5 10 
1 85 

35 15 



Ozar!: Presbytery. 

Ash Grove 32 20 

Cartilage 8 15 

Ebenezer 2 00 

Mount Zion 2 15 

<^zark 2 (JO 

WaldeiLsian 1 00 



Cuba 3 00 

Ironton 2 50 

Kirkwood 23 00 

Marble Hill 1 (H) 

Mine La Motte 1 30 

Nazareth, German 11 96 

RoUa 6 00 

St. Louis, 1st 100 00 

■■ 2d 100 00 

" First German 6 00 

Glasgow Av 14 25 

Lafayette Park... Sii iO 

North 21 00 



St. Edwards., 

Wayne 

Wakefield 

Pka.sant View. 



3 6.5 
3 00 
3 (30 



398 87 



SYNOD OF NEW JEP.SEY. 

Corisco Presbytery. 
Benita % oO 



Westminster. 

Emanuel. 

Washington 

White Water 

Zion, German. 



4 00 

5 00 

6 ,50 
2 00 
5 .50 

Zoar 10 00 

3372 51 
SYNOD OF NEBRASK.\. 

Hastings Presbytery. 

Edgar So 00 

Hastings 1 .36 



36 36 



Kearney Presbytery. 

Kearney 311 00 

Lone Tree 10 00 

North Platte 3 O'J 



317 50 



324 00 



86 (}0 

Elizabeth I^rsbytery. 

Backing Ridge $6S 00 

Betlik'hera 6 87 

Clarksviile 2 On 

Clinton g ;q 

Connecticut Farms s 0(j 

Cranford ]() 00 

Elizabeth, First 95 Sfj 

Second 24 92 

Third "6 od 

AVestminster 163 Oo 

Elizabethport I6 00 

Lamington 2I 00 

Liberty Corner "5 ou 

Lower Valley 5 00 

Metuchen, First 4 50 

Plainfield, First 14 73 

Second 276 Tt 

Pluckamin ig 31 

Rahway, First 33 90 

Second 54 47 



20 



KECEIPTS. 

1882-83. 

Roselle. First «24 13 

Springfield 5 00 

Woodbridge 10 00 

1873 88 

Jerbry City Presbytery. 

Arlington ?7 67 

Hackensack 8 00 1 

Hoboken, Firs; 9 37 : 

Jersey City, First 23 00 ■ 

" Second 9 32 

" Bergen, First 70 00 ! 

" Westmn'r 5 00 , 

Newfoundland 3 00 i 

Ptissaic 5 t)4 

Paterson, First 52 00 j 

Third 5 50 

" First German. 5 00 

" Westminster.. 5 00 

Rutherford Park, First. 50 60 

Tenafly 18 59 

West Hoboken 5 00 

WestMilford 5 00 , 

$287 79 j 

Monmouth Preshytcry . 

Allentown SM 00 

Beverly 31 67 

Bordeutown 8 40 

Burlington 37 99 

Calvary 10 00 

Columbus 4 00 

Cranburv, First 30 00 

" Second 5 00 

Cream Ridge 5 00 

Farmingdale 15 00 

Freehold, First 89 14 

Hightstown 37 00 

Holmanville 2 00 

Jacksonville 3 46 

Jamesburgh 20 00 

Manalnpau 10 00 

Matawan 14 13 

Mount Holly 13 07 

Ocean Beacli 2 00 

Oceanic 44 45 

Plattsburgh 3 00 

Plumstead 4 41 

Providence 3 00 

Shrewsbury W 00 

Squan Village 21 34 

Tennent H "0 

Tuckerton 2 00 

$167 06 
MorrU and Orange Presbytery. 

Boonton $13 00 

Chatliam 57 00 

Chester 10 00 

Dover 29 23 

East Oraiigi •'■'< 1' 

Fairmount 2 00 

Flanders 5 00 

Madi>on 43 Id 

Mindhj;!.!, First 46 18 

fcecond 5 00 

Mine Uiil 5 00 

Mjiri- Plains 3 00 



RECEIPT?. 1 
1882-83. 

Morristown, First 850 45 

" South btieet.. 70 53 

Myersville 5 00 

New Vernon , 10 00 

Orange, First 45 00 

Second 24 11 

Bethel 8 65 

Central 50 00 

" German 2 00 

Pleasant Grove 6 00 

Rockaway 35 00 

Schooley's Mountain ... 3 00 

South Orange 44 IS 

Succasunna 14 00 

Summit, Centre 55 30 



$085 94 
Newark Presbytery. 

Bloomfield, First $43 92 

Caldwell 14 46 

Lyon's Farms 12 46 

Newark, P'irst 48 50 

Second, 55 57 

Third 74 09 

Sixth 12 00 

Bethany 2 00 

" Calvary 2 00 

Central 33 00 

Ger., First 30 00 

" " Second.. 5 00 

" Third 4 00 

High Street ... 81 05 

Memorial 10 00 

South Park.... 169 15 

" Woodside 3 00 



8(i(iO 20 



Kew Bnmswick Presbytery. 

Alexandria, First $13 00 

Amwell, Fiist 4 00 

'• Second 7 00 

" United, First.. 4 25 

Bound Brook 10 84 

Dutch Neck 10 00 

Flemington 45 01 

Frenchtowu 20 00 

Hamilton Square 4 00 

Holland 5 00 

Hopewell 6 00 

Kingston H 00 

Kingwood 2 50 

Kiiivpatritk, Memorial. 5 50 

Lambertville 70 00 

J.,awrcnccville 17 50 

Milford 17 05 

New Brunswick, First .. 36 89 

Second 10 00 

Pennington 27 00 

Princeton, Fir.'-t 63 28 

Second 14 10 

Stockton 1 00 

TijusviUe 6 00 

Trenton, First 131 00 

Second 5 00 

Third 95 21 

Fourth 42 00 

Fifth 2 (R) 

Prospect St 108 51 

$791 64 



RECEIPTS 

ie8.'-8S 

Nervton Presbytery. 

Andover $3 66 

Belvideic, First 18 62 

Second 23 00 

Blairstown 40 20 

Bloomsburv 3 00 

Danville...." 15 00 

Delaware 4 00 

Greensburg 14 91 

Greenwicli 14 63 

Hackettstown 50 OO 

Harmony 15 00 

Hope 2 00 

Knowlton .. 2 00 

ISIanstield, Second 1 00' 

Marksboro 4 00 

Musconetcong Valley... 9 OO 

Newton 40 00 

North Hardiston 15 OO 

Oxford, Second 10 OO 

Phillipsburg 7 OO 

Sparta 2 OO 

Stanhope 3 00 

Stewartsville 20 00 

Stillwater 9 00 

Wantage, Second 6 OO 

Yellow Frame 7 35 



$339 37 



West Jersey Presbytery. 

AsburyPark 85 OO 

Blackvvoodtown 20 00 

Bridgeton, Fiist 50 OO 

West 42 OO 

Bunker Hill 3 00 

Camden, First 30 51 

Second 15 00 

Cape Island 10 OO 

Cedarville, First 33 41 

Second 3 00 

Cold .Spring 23 OO 

Deerfield 9 50 

Glas-borongl) 2 00 

Gloucester City 5 00 

Mays Landing 2 00 

Millvillc 6 00 

Pittsgrove 30 OO 

Salem 44 80 

Vineland 12 7J 

Wenonah 30 OO 

Williamstown 10 00 

Woodburv 25 29 

Woodstown 22 00 

$434 24 
SYNOD OF NEW YORK. 

Albany Pesbytery. 

Albany, Second $86 50 

Fourth 200 00 

Sixth 3 00 

State Street 140 19 

Clinton Square 18 00 

Amsterdam, Second 96 00 

Ballsion Centre 4 81 

Ballston Spa 10 43 

Bethlehem 17 00 

Charlton 7 OO 

Corinth 4 00 



21 



RECEIPTS 

1882-8S. 

-Gloversville S46 3;> 

Jefferson 3 00 

Johnstown 20 00 

Saratoga Springrs, First. 13 65 

Schenectady, First 50 95 

East Ave. 31 42 

Tribe's Hill 4 00 

West Troy 5 27 

$71)1 55 

Binghamton Pi-esbylery. 

Bainbridge 85 00 

Binghamton, First 123 27 

North.... 9 28 

West 8 00 

Cortland 49 83 

Coventry, Second 7 25 

Deposit 8 54 

Marathon 2 00 

Nineveh 5 48 

Owego, First 9 44 

Preble 4 13 

Sniithville Flats 5 73 

Union, First 4 00 

Waverly 39 34 

Whitney's Point 3 42 

Windsor 4 .50 



KErEIPTS. 

188 .'-83. 

Riplev $ 5 00 

Sherman 18 00 

Silver Creek H 00 

Springville 5 00 

Westfield 56 21 



S362 53 



3289 11 



Bii<ton Presbijlery. 

Antrim 811 00 

Boston, Springfield St... 5 00 

East Boston 45 46 

Lawrence, German 9 86 

Lowell 2 00 

Newburyport, First 25 00 

Windham 1 00 



899 32 



Brooklyn Presbytery. 

Brooklyn, First, Henry 

Street 8127 27 

Brooklyn, Second 49 52 

" Classon Ave 58 75 

" Franklin Ave... 24 00 

" Hopkins St. Ger 6 00 

" Lafayette Ave.. 148 40 

" South Third St. 38 54 

" Thnjop Ave 31 83 

" Westminster 147 56 

Edgewater, First 'A O" 

8085 94 
B uffalo Presbyte ry . 

Alden 83 00 

Buffalo, First 10 00 

BreekenridgeSt 3 00 

Calvary 38 80 

" East 10 00 

Lafavette St 57 23 

North 30 00 

West Side 1 00 

" Westminster 67 29 

Wells St 2 00 

•Clarence 5 00 

East Aurora 10 00 

Jamestown 20 00 

Lancaster 10 00 



Cayuga Presbytery. 

Auburn, First 8144 58 

I " Second 33 85 

Central 14 35 

Aurora 27 29 

Dryden 4 00 

Genoa, First 7 00 

Ithaca 1 fX) 

Meridian 7 00 

Owaseo 8 00 

Port Bvron 4 00 

Sennett 4 20 

Springport 3 17 

Weedsport 10 00 

8268 34 

■ Champlain Presbytery. 

Chazy 86 15 

Fort Covington 13 83 

Keeseville 7 65 

Mooers 3 :i5 

Flattsburg 27 82 

Port Henry 87 97 

8146 77 

Cliemung Presbytery. 

Big Flats $75 00 

Burdett 7 00 

Elmira. First 58 40 

Horse Heads 5 00 

Monterey 25 

Mecklenburgh 5 00 

Pine Grove 1 00 

Southport 1 00 

Tyrone 2 00 

Watkins, First 15 00 

8109 65 

Columbia Presbytery. 

Durham, Fir^;t 827 00 

Greenville 5 75 

Hudson 10 00 

New Lebanon 5 00 

Valatie 24 94 

Windham 8 00 



880 69 

Genesee Presbytery. 

Attica 812 15 

Batavia 31 82 

Bergen 14 60 

Bethany Centre 3 00 

Byron 6 00 

Corfu 5 00 

Leroy 23 30 

North Bergen 4 00 

Warsaw 93 00 

Wyoming, First 8 65 



RECEIPTS. 

1882-83. 

Genesee Valley Presbytery. 

Ellicottville 8 2 00 

Franklinville 5 00 

Clean 42 28 

Portville 50 25 



899 53 



Geneva Presbytery. 

Canoga 87 00 

Geneva, First 35 .54 

Gorham 11 00 

Manchester 4 00 

Oaks Corner 3 50 

Phelps 18 53 

Romulus 8 38 

Seneca 26 51 

•' Castle 5 00 

" Falls 57 00 

Trumausliurgh 18 00 

West Fovette 3 86 



8198 32 



Hudson Presbytery. 

Amitv 89 00 

Centfeville 5 00 

Chester 38 39 

Circleville 5 00 

Clarkstown, German... 1 00 

Cochecton 12 00 

Florida. First 14 00 

Goodwill 18 .58 

Goshen l6 61 

Greenbush 4 78 

Hamptonburgh 26 00 

Hempstead 3 00 

Hopewell 22 00 

Jefiersonville 5 00 

Liberty 1 87 

Middletown, Second 21 40 

Milford 2 06 

Monticello 4 00 

Monroe 3 00 

Nyack 2 54 

Otisville 3 00 

Palisades 10 00 

Port Jervis 25 00 

Ramapo 10 (JO 

Ridgebury 1 90 

Scotchtown 9 95 

Stony Point 11 40 

Washingtonville, First. 15 00 

■' Second... 3 58 

West Town 10 00 



8201 52 



8315 06 

Long Island Preslrytery. 

Bellport 86 00 

Cutchogue.. 10 00 

East Hampton 19 85 

Mattituck 6 60 

Middletown 11 65 

Moriches 10 00 

Port Jefferson 6 00 

Sag Harbor 61 00 

Setauket 7 00 

Shelter Island 17- 00 

South Haven 8 12 

Southampton 37 62 

Westhampton 7 00 

8207 84 



22 



RECEIPTS. 

1882-83. 
Lyons rrcshj/tery 

Galen S-'^ f»0 

Lyons 22 87 

Newark ^~ •'•> 

Palmyra 1" 13 

Sodus 2 00 

Wolcott, First <". oo 

Second 7 00 



4G 



yassau Pnt^hytcry. 

East Williamsburg S2 00 

Huntington, First 24 75 

Islip 38 00 

Jamaica 41 73 

Rev. A. G. Russell 5 00 

•• Thank Oflering" 10 00 

»121 48 

Nav York Pnshytery. 

New York, Allen St S2 00 

" Brick 114 37 

" Brick Ch. Chap. 16 83 

" Canal St 10 00 

" Central 74 01 

" Ch.oftheCov't. 243 00 
" Ch. of Sea and 

Land 4 00 

" Faith Chapel... 1 00 

" Fifth Ave 2144 68 

" First 2422 67 

■' First Union 12 00 

•' Fourth 67 20 

" Fourth Ave 37 24 

" Fourteenth St... 19 39 

" French Evan... 5 00 

" Harlem 38 58 

" MadLson Sq 269 &4 

" M Sq. Memor- 
ial Church 12 00 

" Memorial 174 42 

•• Murray Hill 26 96 

" Phillips 55 08 

" Puritans 44 19 

" Rutgers 107 83 

" Scotch 397 00 

" Thirteenth St... 54 00 

" University PI... 404 52 

•' Wash. Heights.. 59 00 

" West 4:16 62 

" Westminster 20 70 

" West 23d St 31 00 



$7305 53 



Niagara Presbytery. 

Lewiston $5 00 

Lockport, First 110 23 

Medina 8 40 

Niagara Falls, First 16 75 

Porter 6 50 

Wilson 5 00 



$151 88 
North River Presbytery. 

Amenia $7 00 

Bethlehem 25 00 

Cold Springs 2 00 



RF.CEITTS. 

[ 1882-83. 

Cornwall ^ 11 

Hughsouville 2 16 

Newburgh, First 28 00 

Calvary 8 49 

Poughkeepsie 25 01 

Pine Plains 8 00 

Pleasant Plains 8 61 

Pleasant Valley 10 15 

Rondout 13 74 

.South Amenia 26 09 

Wajipinger's Falls 5 86 

S178 22 

Otsego Presbytery. 

Cherry Valley S35 00 

Delhi, First 43 00 

Gilbertsville 30 00 

Guilford Centre 5 44 i 

Hamden 2 50 

Hobart 27 00 [ 

New Berlin 3 10 | 

(Ineonta 17 71 

Richfield Springs 10 00 i 

Springfield 2 00 , 

Stamford, First 12 00 

Unadilla 4 00 

Worcester 4 00 I 



RECEIPTS. 

1882-8:1 



$195 75 



Kocheder Presbytery. 

Avon 15 00 

Brighton 16 Oi 

Brockport 22 71 

Caledonia 12 50 

Dansville 14 73 

Genesseo, First.... 32 45 

Groveland 9 78 

Lima :i>5 07 

Moscow 3 00 

Mount Morris 5 36 

Nunda 1 00 

Ogden 15 09 

Perry 18 00 

Rochester, First 67 69 

Third :» 20 

Brick 150 00 

Calvary 2 00 

Central 108 71 

'■ Memorial 3 0) 

St. Peter's 30 00 

" Westminster 3 00 

Sparta, First 3 00 

•' Second 5 Wl 

Tuscarora 4 12 

Union Corners 1 20 

Victor. First 8 00 

WfstMi.'ii(ion 7 00 

Rev. D. R. Kddv 25 00 



Sf>o8 55 
St. Lawrence Presbytery. 

Adams $.5 50 

Brasner Falls 3 78 

Brownville 2 25 

Canton 7 55 

Cape Vincent 3 00 

Carthage 9 74 

Dexter 1 47 

Gouverneur 23 40 

Hammond 16 00 



Heuveltou $4 

Morristown 5 

Oswegatchie, First 10 

Pot<;dam 11 

Sackett's Harbor 5 

There.sa 4 

Waddington 13 

Watertown, First 116 

'■ Stone St 15 



S258 



S^'.caben Presbytery 

Addison $;% IB 

Arkport 94 

Bith 21 05 

Campbell 30 0f> 

Canisteo 18 75 

Canaseraga 4 00 

Corning 8 47 

Hornellsville 20 65 

Howard 14 00 

Jasper 8 (Kt 

Painted Post 10 a5 

Prattsburgh 18 83 

Pultnev 6 00 



f 197 20 



Syracuse Prrsbylerij. 

Amboy $6 00 

Baldwinsville 2 W) 

Cazenovia 40 00 

East Syracuse 2 00 

Elbridge 17 00 

Favetteville 20 0f» 

Fulton 30 W 

Hannibal 5 00 

Jordan 10 00 

Liverpool 10 29 

Manlius 2 54 

Mexico 24 20 

Onondaga Valley 4 00 

Oswego, First 7 45 

Grace 25 00 

Ridgeville 2 00 

Svracusc, First 32 00 

First Ward... 82 

Park Central. 30 (Ki 



8270 ;;o 



Troy Presbytery. 

Bay Road fl 00 

Caldwell 2 00 

Chester 2 00 

East Lake George 1 00 

Johnsonville 22 00 

Lansingburgh, Olivet... 21 69 

Pittstown 6 00 

Salem 20 00 

Sandv Hill 75 

Stillwater, First 8 50 

Troy, First 277 73 

•' Second 218 94 

" Third 63 42 

" Nnith 31 69 

" Oakwood Ave 4 82 

" Westminster 4 00 

" Memorial 5 33 

Waterford 78 83 

Whitehall 13 OO 

»782 70 



23 



KECETPTS. 
1882-83. 

Utica Presbytery. 

Augusta S-2 00 

Cdmden 10 00 

Clayville 8 00 

Holland Patent 11 00 

Lowville in 00 

Lyons Falls 3 00 • 

Martinsburgh .i 00 

New York Mills 9 0(i 

Oneida 51 86 

Rome 17 42 

Turin 6 00 

Utica, First 02 95 

" Bethany of. 14 

" Memorial 26 <Ki 

" Westminster 40 Ofi 

Vernon Centre 15 00 

Verona 4 0(i 

Waterville 10 00 

Walcott Memorial 9 00 



$386 37 



Westchester Presbytery. 

Bedford 820 00 

Bethany ^.. 10 00 

Bridgeport. First 36 26 

Croton Fulls 2 00 

Darien 5 00 

Hartford 26 00 

Huguenot Memorial 5 00 

Irvington 114 76 

Katonah 3 00 

Mahopac Falls 10 00 

Mt. Kisco 10 70 

NewRochelle 45 00 

Patterson 5 00 

Peekskill, First 48 10 

Second 7 00 

Plea.santville 2 00 

Port Chester 58 

Poundridge 10 00 

Rye 50 00 

Sing Sing 50 00 

South East 7 00 

South East Centre 4 00 

South Salem 15 00 

Thompsonville 13 tW 

AVestFarm«; 2 00 

Yonkers, First 105 48 

" Westminster.. 10 00 

Yorktown 6 O'J 



622 88 



SYNOD OF OHIO. 

Athens Presbytery. 

Barlow..., $.5 00 

Gallipolis 25 Oi 

Logan 21 00 

Marietta, Fourth 9 35 

New Plymouth 5 00 

?65 35 

Belief I intainc Presbytery. 

Bellefontaine $27 01 

Belle Centre 3 00 

Buck Creek 4 00 

Bucyrus 3 86 

Crestline 7 26 



RECEIPTS. 

1882-83. 

Huntsville 82 00 

Kenton 15 80 \ 

Marseilles 7 00 

Patterson 2 00 

Rush Creek 1 00 

Rushsvlvania 12 00 

SpringHills 5 28 

Urbana 14 54 

WestLiberty 2 86 

Wyandotte.". 78 

1108 39 

ChiUicuthi Presliytery. 

Bethel $1 00 

Bloomingliurgh 16 74 

Chillicothe, Third 5 00 

Frankfort 7 00 

French 2 00 

Greenfield 115 00 

Hillsborough 19 05 

Marshall 5 00 

New Market 3 50 

New Petersburgh 15 (Ki 

North Fork 15 50 

Pisgah 11 00 

South Salem 13 23 

Wilmington 5 00 



$234 02 



Ciiuiitnalt Pies'jytery. 

.\vondale $63 21 

Bethel...- 5 00 

Bond Hill 1 00 

Cincinnati, First 22 00 

" Third 32 00 

" Fitth 5 00 

" Seventh 34 00 

" Central 64 65 

" Cumminsville 16 19 

'• Mount Auburn... CO 00 

" Walnut Hills 105 49 

" First German 5 00 

" Second (ierman... 5 00 

Cleves 2 00 

College Hill... 14 00 

Elizabeth and Berea 2 00 

Glendale 32 05 

Goshen 2 15 

Harrison 7 00 , 

Lebanon 3 00 

Loveland 23 99 

Madisonville 8 Oil 

Montgomery 13 00 

Morrow 10 00 

Pleasant Ridge 10 63 

Pleasant Run 3 00 

Sharonville 7 69 

Spriugdale 16 05 

Wyoming 25 00 

S598 10 

Cleveland Presbytery. 

Ashtabula, First $2 56 

Brecksville 12 00 

Chester, First 5 00 

Cleveland, First 212 78 

" Second 350 00 

" Euclid Avenue.. 86 21 

•' South 20 00 

" Woodland Ave.. 100 00 



RECEIPTS. 

1882-83. 

Guilford, Fir;t $7 00 

Lafayette 2 29 

Milton 7 00 

Northfield, Fi st R 00 

Orwell 10 00 

Parma 5 5i 

Rome 4 14 

Western Reserve Col- 
lege 10 00 

Wiloughby 10 OO 

Rev. H. Farwell 10 00 

$849 48 

Co'umbm Presbytery. 

Amanda $3 46 

Blendou 14 92 

Central College 11 3) 

Columbus, First 106 83 

Second 7-5 00 

Hoge 4 92 

" Westminster 16 00 

Greencastle 1 41 

Grove City 4 00 

Lancaster. K 70 

London 11 00 

Lower Liberty 16 60 

Midwav 1 50 

Mt, Sterling 7 20 

Revnoldsburgh 2 00 

Scioto 1 00 



$285 W 
• I><iyl<in Presbritery. 

Bath $2 (K) 

Blue Ball 10 00 

Camden 6 00 

Clifton 29 46 

Davton. First 46 99 

Third Street... 240 46 

" Memorial 10 00 

Park 10 09 

Eaton. First 4 00 

Franklin 10 0.) 

Greenville 9 10 

Hamilton 26 55 

Middletown 18 00 

Monroe 2 25 

New Carlisle 8 00 

New Jersey 5 W 

Osborn 1 00 

Oxford 24 60 

Piqua 13 30 

Seven Mile 3 32 

Somerville 3 00 

South Charleston 6 CO 

Springfield, First 05 00 

Second 20 00 

Trov 31 61 

West < arrolton 2 00 

Xenia 30 0(J 

$637 73 

Jluron Preshytcry. 

Bloomville $6 00 

Clyde 2 00 

Elmore -5 00 

Fostoria H 31 

Green Springs 100 

Huron 2 OJ 



24 



RECEIPTS. 

1882-83. 

Nonvalk $20 ST) 

Republic 3 00 

Sandusky 7 10 

857 26 

Lima Prei^hytenj. 

Blanchard $3 00 

Celina 4 50 

Delphos 1 86 

Findlay, First 11 dO \ 

Lima 3 00 i 

McComb 5 00 

Middlepoint 3 00 I 

Rockport 5 00 

St. Marv's 2 00 

Van Wert 6 00 



RECEIPTS. 
1882-83. 



RECEIPTS. 

1882-83. 



142 36 



Mahoning Pirsbi/tenj 

Alliance $16 95 

Beloit 3 00 

Brookfield 5 50 

Canton 32 00 

Clarkson 2 00 

Columbiana 4 00 

EastPalestine 3 00 

Ellsworth 13 00 

Kinsman 6 00 

Leetonia 23 15 

Massillon 51 71 

Middle Sandy 5 00 

Newton ,5 00 

New Lisbon 18 00 

North Benton 13 00 

Pleasant Valley 2 00 

Poland 10 00 

Salem 15 00 

Vienna 3 00 

Warren 13 75 

Youngstown, First 10-1 67 

Second.... 3 00 



»352 73 
Maumee Presbytery. 

Bowling Green $9 00 

Defiance 8 25 

Delta 3 00 

Eagle Creek 4 00 

Edgerton 4 00 

Mount Salem 1 00 

New Bethesda 10 00 

Perrysburgh, Walnut 

Street 3 00 

Toledo. First German... 2 00 

West Unity 2 00 

$46 25 

Marion Presbi/trrij. 

Ashley 83 30 

Berlin 3 35 

Brown 6 00 

Chesterville 10.00 

Debiware 15 00 

Delhi 4 63 

ll)eria 7 00 

Jerome 2 00 

Kingston 2 25 

Liberty 8 00 



Marvsville 8 S 20 Smithfield $ 3 00 

Mount Gilead 17 60 i Steubenville, Second.... 35 00 



Pisgah. 

Porter 

Sunbury 

Trenton 

West Berlin. 
York 



4 74 

1 60 

2 00 
8 00 
fi 29 

3 00 



Portsmouth Presbytery. 

Cedron 83 50 

Decatur 4 00 

Eckmansville 5 00 

Felicity 4 50 

Ironton 27 25 

Manchester 8 00 

Mount Leigh 9 88 

Portsmouth, Second 62 00 

Red Oak 7 00 

Ku'^sellville 7 97 



$149 10 



St. Clairsville Presbytery. 

Bealsville $4 00 

Bellaire, First 15 00 

Cadiz 17 50 

Cambridge 60 00 

Concord 4 60 

Crab Apple 7 00 

Kirkwood 1 72 

Martinsville 7 00 

Morristown 7 70 

Mount Pleasant 10 67 

Olive 2 00 

Rock Hill 12 45 

Short Creek 7 00 

St. Clairsville 30 00 

Stillwater 2 25 

Weegee... 5 00 

Martin's Ferry 20 07 

$213 96 

Steubenville Presbytery. 

Amsterdam $5 00 

Annapolis 6 01 

Beech Spring 29 00 

Bethesda ,30 00 

Bethlehem 10 00 

Buchanan Chapel 2 00 

Carrolllon 10 19 

Centre Unity 3 00 

Corinth 10 00 

Cross Creek 4 75 

Dell Roy 5 00 

East Liverpool 9 26 j 

East Springfield 9 25 

Hopedale 5 00 

Irondale 2 00 ; 

Island Creek 4 00 I 

Long'.s Run 8 09 I 

Madison 6 .52 ' 

Minerva 3 50 

New Hagerstown 2 46 

Oak Ridge 2 00 

Pleasant Hill 2 00 

Linton 5 00 ' 

Ridge 3 00 

Scio 2 00 



Still Fork 3 20 

Two Ridges 10 00 



Uni'inport . 

Wellsville 

Yellow Creek. 
Toronto 



8102 96 



2 00 
29 00 
40 00 

3 00 

$304 22 



Wooster Presbytery. 

Apple Creek 85 12 

Ashhuid 23 14 

Belleville 5 00 

Bethel 5 00 

Canal Fulton 16 00 

Clear Fork 3 25 

Doylestown 11 00 

Fredericksburgh 7 50 

Holmesville 13 00 

Hopewell 17 00 

Jackson 3 86 

Jeromeville 1 .50 

Lexington 22 50 

Loudonville 4 00 

Marshallville 2 00 

Mt. Eaton 2 00 

Nashville 5 00 

Orange 6 00 

Plymouth 6 00 

Savannah 6 92 

Shelby 4 00 

Shreve 5 00 

West Salem 3 00 

Wooster, First 61 74 

" Westminster... 21 78 



$261 31 
Zanesville P-esbytery. 

Brownsville $10 00 

Clark 12 00 

Concord 5 00 

Coshocton 35 00 

Dresden 18 16 

Duncan's Falls 3 35 

Evan's Creek 3 00 

Fairniount 5 00 

Granville 35 27 

High Hill 5 00 

Jetlerson 10 00 

Jersey 8 00 

Keene 13 00 

Kirkersville 9 00 

Madison 10 25 

Mt Vernon 17 00 

Mt. Zion 4 72 

Muskingum 21 00 

New Concord 4 00 

Newark, Second 20 00 

Norwich 8 25 

Otsego 2 00 

Pataskala 3 00 

Salem, German 2 27 

Salt Creek 4 90 

Utica 19 .52 

West Carlisle 11 00 

Zanesville, First 6 25 

Second 16 20 

Rev. J. A. Baldridge 

and Wile 3 00 



{325 14 



RECEIPTS. 
1H82-83. 

SYNOD OF PACIFIC. 

Benicia Presbytery. 

Bloomfield S4 00 

Mendocino 3 25 

Napa 63 00 

Lakeport Sab. School... 1 00 

San Rafael 22 20 

St. Helena 9 00 

Tomale.s 7 00 

Two Rocks 6 00 

Ukiah 11 00 

Vallejo 10 00 

?130 15 

Los Angeles Presbytery. 

Anaheim Jl 41 

Arlington 14 10 

Orange 4 20 

San Buenaventura 7 10 

Santa Barbara 13 25 

Westminster 7 48 



S47 54 



Sacramento Presby'ery. 

Chico $4 00 

Marvsville 10 00 

Merced 2 00 

Redding 5 00 

Sacramento, Westmn'r. 35 00 



$56 00 
San Francisco Presbytery. 

Alameda 831 43 

San Francisco, Calvary 45 00 

'' I.arkin St 3 '0 

Memorial 2 00 

Olivet 2 0(1 

St. John 20 00 

8103 93 

SYNOD OF PENNSYLVANI.\. 

Allegheny Presbytery. 

AUeghenv. First $33 36 

First Ger 8 .54 

" Second 11 15 

" Bethel 5 00 

'■ North 00 16 

'• Providence.. 15 00 

Valley 21 71 

Bakerstown 18 00 

Beaver 9 00 

Bellevue 4 21 

Bull Creek 5 00 

Cross Roads 10 52 

Emsworth 14 10 

Fairmount 5 00 

Glasgow 3 00 

Hiland 5 21 

Industrv 3 00 

Leetsdale 84 43 

Millvale 5 00 ' 

New Salem 3 00 

Pine Creek, First 7 .50 

Plains 4 00 

Pleasant Hill 1 00 '' 



RECEIPTS. 

1882-83. 

Sewickly ^0 00 

Sharpsburgh 14 34 

Springdale 4 00 

S445 23 

Blairsville Presbytery. 

Beulah S25 85 

Blairsville 76 00 

Braddock 20 00 

Congruity 22 00 

Cros.s Roads 8 00 

Derry 25 00 

Ebensburgh 11 00 

Fairfield. 9 15 i 

Harrison City 7 02 

Irwin 5 88 

Johnstown 11 OO 

Laird 2 00 

Latrobe 12 00 

Ligonier 8 00 

Livermore 5 OO 

Manor 2 Of) 

Murraysville 10 00 

New Alexandria 46 S.') 

New .Salem 9 30 

Pine Run 14 0() 

Pleasant Grove 5 60 

Plum Creek 10 (H) 

Poke Run 2-5 00 

I'nion 4 98 

Unity 20 75 

Verona 3 90 



S400 28 



Butler Presbytery. 

Amity S3 00 

Butler 32 62 

Centre 10 17 

Centreville 26 .58 

Clintonville 8 00 

Concord 11 00 

Fairview 5 00 

Harlan.'<burg 4 (X) 

Jefferson Centre, Gur.... 3 00 

Karns City 2 00 

Martinburg 6 00 

Middlesex 26 00 

Muddy Creek 7 00 

New Hope 5 00 

New Salem 4 00 

North Butler 4 00 

North IJbcrtv 15 50 

North Washington 3 00 

Pine Grove 25 99 

Plain Grove 20 00 

Pleasant Valley 4 00 

Portersville 5 00 

Scrub Gra-ss 10 00 

Summit 9 00 

I'nionville 4 00 

We^t Sunbury 7 00 



Carlisle P-esbyiery. 

Big Spring $25 00 

Bloomfield 5 00 

Burnt Cabins 4 00 

Carli.sle. First 47 91 

Chambersburgh, Fall- 
ing Spring 30 00 



KECEIPTS. 

1882-83. 

Dauphin $11 OO 

Duncannon 8 00 

Favetteville 4 25 

Gettvsburgh 7 85 

Green Hill 2 00 

Greencastle 27 00 

Harrisburgh, Market 

Square 22 25 

Harrisburg. Pine St 62 56 

" Westminster. 3 27 

Lower Marsh Creek 2 50 

Lower Path Valley 24 00 

McConnellsburgh 2 34 

Mechanicsburg 12 25 

Mercetsburgh 20 00 

Middle Spring 50 00 

Millerstown 16 25 

Revnoldsville 1 00 

Shippensburgh 28 38 

Silvers' Spring 4 00 

Cpper Path Valley 10 00 

Waynesboro' 9 07 

Well's Vallev 1 85 

J. C. Barrett," Truas 16 00 

Strasburg 6 50 

Waynesburg 4 36 

$152 59 

Chester Presbytery. 

Brvn Mawr S25 78 

Charlestown 3 00 

Chester, First 20 00 

Third 46 00 

" City 6 00 

Coatesville 25 00 

Dilworthtown 12 00 

Downingtown, Central. 12 58 

East Whiteland 6 00 

Fagg's Manor 11 00 

Fairview 7 00 

Forks of Brandy wine... 35 00 

Glen Kiddle 1 00 

Great Vallev 18 50 

Honey Brook 16 31 

Keiinett Square 2 00 

Marple 12 00 

Media 7 00 

Middletown 3 00 

New London 15 88 

Nottingham 2 00 

Oxford 38 65 

Pho^nixville 4 00 

Reeseville, Trinitv 3 00 

Ridley Park '. 5 00 

Upper Octorara 16 00 

Wayne 10 00 

West Chester, First 28 95 



S492 65 



Clarion Presbytery. 

Academia $7 00 

Beech Woods 9 00 

Brookville 49 60 

Callensburg 4 00 

Clarion 9 67 

Emlenton 3 00 

Greenville 3 65 

Leatherwood 4 74 

Licking 2 66 

Mill Creek 1 87 

Mount Pleasant 100 

Mount Tabor 2 13 



26 



RECEIPTS. 

1882-83. 

New Bethlehem $11 00 

Oak Grove 3 00 

Perryville it 00 

Pisgah C 00 

Ridgwav 2 07 

Scotch Hill 3 15 

Sligo 3 00 

Tionesta 1 10 

Troy .r, 00 

Tylersburgh 1 75 

Wileox..... 2 W 



J144 39 



Erie Presbytery. 

Atlantic f3 30 

Belle Valley 5 50 

Cambriflge." 8 00 

Cochrantoii 5 00 

Concord 2 00 

Conneautville 5 00 

Cool Spring 4 55 

Cjrry 7 00 

Dempscytown 1 00 

Edinboro 31 00 

Erie, First 43 61 

" Central 25 00 

" Chestnut Street.... 9 00 

" Park 30 00 

Fairfield 10 00 

Fairview 2 00 

Fredonia 5 00 

Garland 2 00 

Georgetown 2 14 

Girard 13 OO 

Gravel Run 7 00 

Greenville 48 50 

Hadley 5 23 

Harbor Creek 6 78 

Irvineton 2 00 

Jamestown 3 09 

Kerr's Hill 5 00 

Meadville, First.. 11 48 

Second 8 50 

Mercer, First 17 30 

Mt. Pleasant 7 22 

North East 14 00 

Oil City, First 15 45 

Pittsfield 2 00 

Pleasantville 2 65 

Polk 50 

Salem 2 86 

Sandy Lake. 8 13 

Springfield 51 07 

Sugar Creek 3 00 

" Memorial... 4 00 

Sugar Grove 2 00 

Sunville 5 00 

Transfer 2 00 

Venango 2 55 

Warren 25 00 

Waterford 5 00 

Westminster..... 2 00 

S483 41 

Huntint/don Prei<bytery. 

Alexandria 122 50 

Altoona, First 28 59 

" Second 26 31 

Bedford 1 00 

Bellefonte 101 00 

Bethany 2 00 



RECEIPTS. 

1882-83. 

Beulah $12 00 

Clearfield 46 51 

Ciirweiisville 10 (Ki 

Duncansville 7 00 

East Kishacoquillas 47 00 

Fruit Hill 11 00 

Glen Hope 3 00 

Hollidavsburgh 24 20 

Houtzdale 11 15 

Huntingdon 83 39 

Kylertown 2 00 

Lewistown 36 91 

Little Valley 3 30 

Logan's Valley 00 

Lower Spruce"Creek 10 00 

Lower T\iscarora 16 00 

Martiusburg 7 00 

McVeytown 18 00 

Middle Tusearora 7 00 

Mittlintown 60 25 

Milesburgh 12 11 

Milroy 12 00 

Moshannon and Snow 

Shoe 3 42 

Mount Union 3 00 

Orbisonia 2 09 

Osceola 10 00 

Penfleld' 5 00 

Perrysville 15 SO 

Petersburg 7 64 

Phillipsburgh 5 54 

Pine Grove 3 50 

Saxton 2 80 

Shade Gap 5 00 

Shaver's Creek 2 00 

Sinking Vallev 17 00 

Spring Creek 20 00 

Spruce Creek 22 52 

I 'pper Tusearora 8 35 

Waterside 33 

West Kishacoquillas.... 25 00 

Williamsburgh 10 00 

Wiiiterburn 7 00 

Woodland 1 00 

Yellow Creek 88 



RECEir-TS. 

1882-83. 

Mount Pleasant $ 2 00 

Parker Citv 15 00 

Plumville 1 00 

Rockbridge 4 00 

Rural Vallev 10 00 

Saltsburgh 27 50 

Slate Lick 7 60 

Smicksbu rgh 3 70 

Union 6 65 

Washington 10 00 

West Lebanon 16 00 

Worthington 7 50 



72 15 



$8(14 77 
Kilianning Presbytery. 

Apollo $33 00 

Appleby Manor 4 66 

Atwood 9 51 

Bethel 10 00 

Belhesda 2 00 

Cherry Run 5 46 

Cherry Tree 2 00 

Clinton 3 00 

Concord 2 00 

Crooked Creek 11 51 

Currie's Run 37 00 

East Union 5 50 

Ehler's Ridge 22 00 

Elderton 11 71 

Freeport 8 (to 

Glade Run 27 00 

HarUiOny 3 00 

Homer 4 00 

Indiana 55 00 

Kittanning 45 00 

Leechburgh 26 85 

Mahoning 3 00 

Marion 20 00 

Middle Creek 4 00 

Midway. 6 00 



Lackawanna I'rcsbytery. 

Archbald $2 00 

Athens 5 37 

Barclay 4 50 

Bennet 1 00 

Carbondale 18 47 

Coalville 5 00 

Franklin, First 1 95 

Harmony 16 00 

Honesdale 30 00 

Langclifli". 5 00 

Laporte 4 00 

Liberty 52 

Little Meadows 100 

iVionroeton 2 00 

Montrose 40 00 

Nantlcoke 5 00 

Nicholson 3 78 

Orwell 4 25 

Pittston. First 70 00 

Plymouth 22 75 

Rushville 3 00 

Scranton, First 155 69 

" Second 10 00 

" WashburneSt.... 10 00 

Shickshinny 3 39 

Stevensville 3 00 

Susquehanna Depot 5 00 

Svlvania 1 00 

Terrytown 1 00 

Towanda, First 74 30 

Troy, First 12 40 

Tunkhannock 16 84 

Warren 1 00 

West Pittston, First 90 00 

Wilkesbarre, First 129 45 

" Memorial 18 97 



S777 r,;; 

Lehigh Presbytery. 

Allen Township $10 (Ki 

Allentown 14 20 

Audenreid 8 00 

Bangor 5 00 

Bethlehem, Firsts.... 4 00 

Catasauijua, First 10 OO 

Easton, First 25 00 

Brainerd 35 53 

Hrtzleton 28 10 

Jamestown, S. S 39 

Mahanov Citv 24 22 

Mountain 6 00 

Port Carbon 25 00 

Portland 3 50 

Reading, Washington 

Street 6 00 

Shenandoah C 3r\ 



27 



KECEIPTS. 

18S2-83. 

South Bethlehem $ 47 

Summit Hill 12 % 

Tamaqua 5 00 

Upper Mount Bethel.... 5 00 

Weatherly 5 00 

SJ.Si" 72 

Northumberland Presbyterij. 

Bald Eagle and Nittany Sii 3.5 

Berwick 7 00 

Bloomsburgh 46 28 

Brier Creek 3 00 

Buttalo 1' 35 

CJiillisquaque 7 00 

(freat Island 10 00 

Jersey Shore 50 00 

Lewisburgh 30 00 

Lvcoming 20 00 

Centre 6 UO 

Mahoning GO 3s 

Milton 15 00 

Mount Zion 3 00 

Muncy 18 20 

New iJerlin 4 .50 

Orangeville 7 00 

Rohrsburgh 1 00 

Shamokin 11 28 

Shiloh 5 00 

Washington 2-t 85 

Williamsport, First 31 3("i 

Second.... 53 27 



RE< EIPTS. 

1882 83. 

Philadelphia, North 3 44 88 

'• North Broad St 58 fi9 

" Nort'n Liberties, 

First 100 00 

Philadelphia, North- 

rnin.ster 04 00 

Philadelphia, Olivet 39 01 

•' Oxford .55 74 

" Princeton 197 20 

•' West Arch Street... 41 46 

" West Park 10 00 



RECKIPTS. 

_18ff2-83. 

Pittsburgh. Bellefield... $147 00 

East Liberty... 240 00 

"Jracc Mem 2 00 

■' Lawrcnceville 33 75 

Shadv Side 184 4"> 

Park "Ave 62 50 

Raccoon 60 00 

Swissvale 29 16 

Vallev 3 43 

West Elizabeth 13 39 

Wilkin-burgh 03 30 



S1157 79 



$433 82 



Philadelphia Presbytery. 



Philadelphia, First 

" Second 

•• Third 

" Fourth 

" Ninth 

•' Tenth 

•' Fifteenth 

" Calvary 

" Chambers 

'■ Clinton St. Im 

" Grace 

" Greenwich Street. 

" South 

" South Western 

" Tabernacle 

" Tabor 

'■ Walnut Street 

" W. Spruce Street.. 

" Wharton Street.... 

" Woodland 



8172 26 

296 93 
40 06 
10 00 I 
?8 62 

211 32 
5 00 

128 *-. 

100 11 
29 fK) 

7 00 
10 00 
3S 11 

5 6 J 
113 25 

8 00 
814 .33 
323 42 

5 00 
,. 27 75 

$2401 26 



Philadelphia North Presbytery. 

Bridesburg 810 00 

Bristol 25 00 

Carversville 2 00 

Che-stnut Hill 105 OO 

Dovlestown 27 00 

Frankford 52 22 

Germantown, First 327 71 

Second 66 1.5 

Waketield. 29 32 

Huntingdon Valley 4 00 

Jeffersonville, Centen- 
nial 5 00 

Leverintrton 6 00 

Maiiavunk 20 00 

Morrisvillc 1 00 

Ncsliaiaiiiy. Warmin- 

ister 32 25 

Neshaminy, Warwick... 25 50 

Newtown 55 7-5 

Norristown, First 35 76 

Second 2 00 

Central 8 00 

Norriton ct Providence 3? % 

Plumsteadville 2 00 

Port Kennedy 5 00 

Pottstown 49 80 

Roxborough 5 00 



81469 76 
H< dstone Presbytery. 

Brownsville S5 00 

ConncUsville 25 00 

Dunbar 35 85 

Dunlap's Creek 25 25 

Fayette Cjty 1 38 

George's Creek 5 90 

Greensboro 1 00 

.Tenner 1 00 

Laurel Hill 10 50 

McKecsport. First 20 88 

Mount Pleasant 18 00 

'• Reunion... 9 38 

New Providence 15 00 

Pleasant Unitv 5 00 

I Rehoboth 8 70 

"Friends" 5 00 

Round Hill 14 00 

Scottdale 4 00 

Somerset 3 00 

Tyrone 14 92 

Uniontown 20 75 



8249 51 



S910 42 



Philadelphia Central Presbytery. 

Kendertm 83 50 

Philadelphia. Alexan- 
der 32 12 

Philadelphia, Arch St... 80 75 

" Bethesda 26 75 

'• Bethlehem 28 01 

" Central 57 84 

" Cohocksink 243 43 

" Columbia Ave 31 95 

" Corinthian Ave... 2 00 

" Kensington 50 00 

First.... 31 20 

" Memorial 15 00 



Pitti<bur<ih Presbytery. 

Amity 83 00 

Bethany 26 25 

Bethel 33 00 

Bloomtield 1 »» 

Bridgeville 21 00 

California 3 32 

Canonsburgh 20 42 

Centre 12 86 

Chartiers 9 85 

Hazlewood 7 09 

Hebron 5 (Xi 

Homestead 5 00 

Hopewell 1 65 

Lebanon 22 00 

Long Island 10 00 

Mansfield 12 86 

Mingo 31 00 

Monongahela Citv 24 50 

Mount Olive 3 00 

Mount Pisgah 9 00 

Mount Washington 12 00 

North Branch 2 00 

Oakdale 45 45 

Pittsburgh, First 175 09 

Second 95 50 

Sixth 33 74 

Seventh 4 40 



Shenango Presbytery. 

_Beav£r Falls f20 00 

X'larksville • 14 60 

Enon 7 00 

Hopewell 10 00 

Leesburgh 31 00 

Little Beaver 7 06 

Mahoning 9 00 

Mount Pleasant 13 00 

Neshannock 24 22 

New Brighton .32 25 

New Castle. First 35 71 

Second 20 83 

Petersburgh 2 00 

Pulaski 5 83 

Rich Hill 10 60 

Sharon, First 9 72 

Sharpsville 4 40 

Unity 9 48 

West Middlesex 6 18 

Westfield 20 00 



8292 78 

Washington Presbytery. 

Allen Grove 81 60 

Bethlehem 2 75 

Burgettstown 14 68 

Cameron 1 86 

Cove 8 00 

East Buffalt 18 00 

Forks of Wheeling 70 00 

Hookstown 4 50 

Limestone 2 00 

Lower But^'alo 5 oo 



28 



RECEIPTS. 

1882-83. 

Lower Ten Mile S9 00 

Mill Creek 5 42 

MonudsvilU' 5 17 

Mount olivet 4 .58 

Mount Pleasant 3 00 

Mount Wa.shington 4 40 

Pigeon Creek 15 86 

Upper Buttalo 13 30 

Upper Ten Mile 22 57 

Wasliington, First 74 If* 

Second 13 52 

Wayne.sburgh 9 2i) 

West Alexander 36 Ot 

M'est Union 6 00 

"Wheeling, First 43 11 

Second 16 70 

Wolf Run 1 00 

Sill 46 

Wellsboro Presbytery. 

Allegheny $2 00 

Beecher Island 2 00 

Coudersport 4 00 

Covington 2 00 

Elkland and Osceola.... 4 00 

Farmington 2 00 

Kane 3 59 

Uawrenceville 6 00 

Mansfield 2 00 

Wellsboro is 23 

$45 82 
M'esteni Africa Presbytery. 

Schiettelinville W 37 

Beadle Memorial 88 

$1 25 
Westmiyister Presbytery. 

Bellevue 812 00 

Cedar Grove 4 00 

Centre 13 00 

Chancetbrd 20 00 

Christ Chapel, Lebanon 27 45 

Columbia 9 33 

Donegal 4 00 

Lancaster ?1 00 

Marietta 10 00 

Middle Octorara 13 00 

Monaghan 7 00 

Mount Nebo 1 00 

Pequea 7 05 

Pine Grove 3 00 

Slate Ridge 18 26 

Strasburgh 2 00 

Union 6 50 

Wrightsville 5 00 

York 170 33 

8353 92 
West Virginia Presbytery. 

Clarksburgh S3 00 

Grafton 5 00 

Kanawha 19 oo 

Parkerslnirgh. First 9 00 

Calvary.. 13 00 

Pleasant Flats 5 00 

Point Pleasant 2 00 

Weston 3 00 

Wintield 6 00 

865 0) 



RECEIPTS. 

1882-83. 

SYNOD OF TEN.VES.SEE. 

Hnlston Presbytery. 

.Jonesboro $7 00 

Mount Bethel 1 00 

Oakland 1 75 

Salem 3 00 

Tusculum 1 00 

$13 75 

Kinyston Presbytery. 

Baker'.s Creek $3 00 

Bethel 13 0) 

Clover Hill 1 00 

Cloyd's Creek 4 00 

Easebia 2 00 

Forest Hill 6 00 

Grassy Cove 3 75 

Madisonvil e 3 00 

Mars Hill 3 00 

Mount Tabor 1 00 

New Providence 18 19 

Piney Falls 3 13 

Pleasant Forest 1 00 

Readv Creek 1 00 

Rockford 2 00 



RECEIPTS. 

1882-83. 

SYNOD OF WISCONSIN. 

Chippewa Presbytery. 

Bangor $2 00 

Big River 3 00 

Galesville 3 00 

Hixton 5 00 

Hudson 9 00 

La Crosse, First 10 40 

North 2 00 

Mauston 1 50 

Neilsville 7 00 

Neshannoc 3 80 

North Bend 3 00 

849 40 

Lake Superior Presbytery. 

Florence 811 00 

Ishpeming 6 00 

Marinette 6 ?6 

Marquette 38 08 

Menomonee 11 00 

Negaunee 15 00 

Oconto 10 00 

Sault Ste. Marie 7 50 



865 07 
Union Presbytery. 

Hopewell 88 30 

Knoxviile, Second IS 59 

New Market 3 55 

Shiloh 1 00 

Spring Place 2 75 

Strawberry Plains 2 00 

Westminster 1 65 



37 84 



SYNOD OF TEXAS. 



Au.'<tin Presbytery. 

Austin 821 25 

Brenham 2 90 

Brownwood 41 

Galveston, St. Paul's 

German 4 00 

Georgetown 1 00 

New Orleans, German... 5 00 
San .\ntonio, Madison 

Square 5 00 

839 56 
North Texas Presbytery. 

Adora 81 00 

Jacksboro 1 00 

Saint Joe 1 00 

Valley Creek 5 00 

88 00 

Trinity Presbytery. 

Breckenridge 81 00 

Camp Cooper 5 00 

Dallas, St Paul, Ger 5 00 

811 00 



, i 



8104 84 
Milwaukee Presbytery. 

Beloit, First 820 50 

Dclafield 98 

Janesville 13 00 

Milwaukee, Calvary. ... 36 65 

•' Holland 3 00 

" Immanuel 6152 

" Perseverance... 5 00 

Oostburgh 5 00 

Ottawa 98 

Pike Grove 9 00 

Waukesha 12 00 

8167 63 

Winnebago Presbytery. 

Auburndale 83 00 

Dorchester 1 00 

Fond du Lac It 75 

Fort Howard 6 00 

Neenah 22 43 

Oshkosh 4 00 

Shawano 3 00 



851 18 

Wisconsin River Presbytery. 

Baraboo 89 00 

Highland 3 50 

Hurricane 3 W 

Kilbourne City 4 74 

Libertv 2 04 

Lodi 16 00 

Madison 39 32 

Middleton 69 

Portage City 10 00 

Praire du Sac 25 14 

Pulaski 5 40 

Reedsburgh 4 00 

Rockville 5 00 

Wyalusing 2 00 

8129 83 



29 



Tabular Statement by Synods and Presbyteries. 



Synods ! h 

AND 2 

Presbyteries, z 



> o 



ZM 
2 H 

s « 



Synods 

AND 

Presbyteries. 



2 g2 



SYNOD OF AT- 
LANTIC. I 

Atlantic ,2 4100.00 

Catawba 123 2,500.00 

East Florida 

Fairfield |15 1,473.00 

Knox I 11 120.00 

Yadkin... ' s\ 840.00 



$7.00 1 

y.28: 



7.001 

1.00 

14.43! 



SYNOD OF INDI- 
ANA. 

2,8M, Cravvfordsville.... I0l$l,200.00 

2,580 Flirt Wiiync 2! 200.00 

■jm IiKlianapolis 2| 240.00 

1,047 Logunsport 




« S 



5 H 



$112.83! 
133.74 
110.96 
115.97' 
55.35 
145.10, 
113.20 
103.83 



16 41 
13 19 



4,191 
2,934 
5,815 
3,156 
1,686 
4,390 
2,965 
3,108 



Baltimore, 

New Castle 3 

Wasliington Citj'.j 8 



$600.00 81,099.87 31 
240.00 3y0.(i.5 24 
740.00: 327.51 18 



SYNOD OF COLO- 
RADO. 



1 16 $1,580.00,81,818.03 73, 



„„,„ , SYNOD OF IOWA. 
6,04 / . 

18' 5,415 Cedar Rapids 

3 4,117 Council Blufts 4 

I'Des Moine.s 2 

•&. 15,579 I Dub uq lie I 4. 

Fort Dodge 3| 

Iowa I 7 

Iowa City t 1 

Waterloo 2 



$400 00 1 
145.00; 
320.(i0' 
250 .00 1 
840.' K)i 
120 00! 
220.00 



8288.99 15 19 

70.31 13 40 

92.97 20 33 

86.28 11 22 

78.79 17 28 

164.84 20 25j 

95.20! 20 24' 

62.72 i 10 321 



2,879 



3,129 
2,192 
1,831 
3,312 
2,769 
2,013 



Denver i $244.46 9 14i 

Montana 1 12.40l 1 9' 

Pueblo ' , 74.76 5 221 

Santa Fe ' 11 OOl 3 141 

Utah 4.001 1 lli 



1,770 
295 
832 
388 
293 



|23 $2,295,001 $940.10 1 126' 223 j 20,931 



$346,621 181 701 3.578 



$100.00 > 



SYNOD OF THE 
COLUMBIA. 




S6.75! 3 9 730 




...' •27.;".6! 8! 20 1.091 


Puget Sound 


1 
1 


4.15 2 18 612 




i $38.46 13 47l 2,433 



SYNOD OF ILLI- 
NOIS. 

Alton '10 81,080.00 $217.49 

Bloomington '...I | 155.78 



Cairo t 2 240.00| 

Chicago I 8 940.00' 

Freeport 2l 200.00 

Mattoon '...I 

Ottawa |... 

Peoria 2 240.00 

Rock River ... 

Schuyler I 4| 480.00 

Springfield ...: 



1.')8..59 
1,748.35 
215.151 
8=1.10' 
78.161 
277.97! 
139.45 
211.60 
373.49 



23 32 ; 
17' 33 

24: 28 
21! 28, 
181 19! 
16 30 



3,630 
4,032 
2,636 
9,880 
3.700 
3,018 
1,744 
3,739 
2,939 
3,831 
3,814 



i28 $3,180.00 $3,661.13 213 2671 42,963 



SYNOD OF K.\NSAS. 

Emporia 

Highland 

Larned '....' i 

Xeosho '... j 

Osborne 

Solomon , 2: 240.00i 

Topeka 2, 240.00| 



3,050 

1,364 

907 



$74.86! 19 42 

30.001 7 27 

15.00! 41 321 

88.06 1 20| 58 2,793 
I I 22' 466 

81.901 14 26 1,498 

50.30! 9 33 




Ebenezer 

Louisville ' 3 

Transylvania i 1 



$840.00 1 



SYNOD OF MICHI- 
GAN. 



Detroit 

Grand Rapids. 
Kalamazoo .... 

Lansing 

Monroe 

Saginaw 



$120.00 



120.00 



$670.93 
4.00 
74.19 
67.42 
100.95 
106.74 



21 $240.00 $1,022.23 50 132 16,598 



24 5,822 

25 1,693 
13 2,023 
17, 1.927 
12 2,2.55 

'41 2,878 



30 



Tabular Statement by Synods and Presbyteries. 



Synods 

AND 

Presbyteries. 





m 






oe 


S 


>5 




O 


'^ 


? 


3 ! 






C9 








X 


a 








« 


c 


b- 












' 



Si 

Z CO 



Synods 

AND 

Presbyteries. 










« 








» 


Z 




















u 


B 


ffi > 


o 


e; 


o 


^ 05 


r; 


D 


CO 


f.'t 












• 


H 


r-^r 



- 5^ ' E i 



SVNOD OF MINNE-' . ' 

SOT A. I 

Dakota S-I.OO 

Mankato H SIOJ.OO 4.5.71 

Red River 33.26 

Saint Paul 3, 360.00 531.96 

Southern Dakota .31.00 

Wiuona 41.11 



1 9 804 

11 l.'j 1,213 

6 2.T 991 

19 : 26 3,5:i4 

-: 22 463 

6 2S 1,390, 



4 $460.00 $687.04 50125 8,395 



>VNOD OF MI.S- 
SOURI. 

Osage S35.15 

Ozark 6 S680.00 17..50 

Palmyra 40.00 

Platte 21 2,100.00' 277.13 

Saint Louis 1 100.00 372.51 



11 29: 2,587; 
6 28' 1.189 



31 

24 31| 



1,566 
2,1421 



20, 30 4,183 



SYNOD OF NE- 
BRASKA. 

Hastings 

Kearney 

Nebraska City 

Omaha 



|28 $2,880.00, $742.29 66|149| 11,667 



$6.36 

24.00 

$240.00 84.07 

120.00 98.87 



SYNOD OF NEW i 

Iyork, Cmilinued 

;Chemung 3 

|Columbia 

Genessee 

Genessee Valley 

Geneva i 

Hudson 2 

Long Island 1 

Lyons 2 

Nassau ', 

New York 2 

Niagara 1 

Nonh River 1 

Otsego 

Roche.ster 3 

St. Lawrence 1 

Steuben 1 

Syracuse 2 

Troy 1 

Utica. :15 

Westchester 5 



$360.00 



120.00 
240.00 
120.00 
24'J.OO 



L'40.00 
120.00 
120.00 



360.00 
120.00 
120.00 
195.0U 
J 20.00 
l,7.^w.00 
44t.0l) 



$169.65, 


10 


13 


2,213 


80.69 


6 


14 


1,%7 


201 52 


10, 


13 


2,629 


99.53 


4: 


11 


1,512 


198.32 


12 


9 


4.171 


315.06 


30 i 


14 


5,770 


2-7.84, 


13: 


9 


3.224 


77.46 


7, 


11 


2,.520 


121.48 


4 


19 


2,465 


7,305.53 


30 


9 


19,535 


151.88 


6 


12 


2,719 


178.22 


1-1 


18 


4,639 


195 75 


13t 


13 


2,570 


038.55 


271 


17 


8.099 


258.86 


18! 


12 


3,832 


197.20 


13' 


7 


2,330 


270.30' 


19; 


16 


5,038 


782.90 1 


19! 


23 


6,826 


386.371 


19 


■It 


5,655 


622.88! 


28 


11 


6,016 



|61 $6,920.00|15,073.35!402 369;i31202 



$360.00 $213.30 



2 33 

3 21 
23 36 
14 23 

42; 113 


8.59 

(i23 

2.364 

1,422 


5.268 



.SYNOD OF NEW 
JERSEY. 

Cori.sco S6.00 

Klizabeth 1 $120.00 873.88 

Jersey City 2 22(i.O0 287.79 

Monmouth 2 220.00! 467.06 

Morris & Orange.. 1 120.00 685.94 

Newark 7 7.50.00 600.20 

New Brunswick.. 34 3,810.00 791.64 

Newton 2 240.00 339.37 

West Jersey 2 120.OO1 431.24 

5l'$5,600.00!$4,486.12l 9li 90,46,201 



SYNOD OF OHIO. | \ 

JAthens ' 2! $195.00 

Bellefontaine ! 4 360.00! 

iChillieothie 

Cincinnati | 4i 30.1.03 

[Cleveland 

jColumbus ' 

Dayton 

Huron ' 



1 5 

23 7 

17 12 

27 15 

27 12 

17 8 

.30 3 

26 8 

23 20 



401 
6,272 
4,163! 
4,691' 
6,692 
6.8.58 
6,886, 
5.086 
5,1-52 



Lima 

Mahoning 

Marion 

Maumee 

Portsmouth 

St. Clairsville... 
Steuhenville. ... 

Woo.-^ter 

Zanesville 



11 120.00 

1' l-O.Oo 

2j 1.58.00 

2 240.00 

3 90.0) 
7. 720.00 
7 960.0 1 

iO 1,910.00 

2! 240,00 



$65.35 
108.39' 
234.02 
.598.101 
849.48 i 
285.841 
637.73 
57.26 
42.36 
352.73 
102.96 
46.25 
149.10 
213.96 
304.22 
2(il.31 
325.14 



5, 24 

15l 8 

14 20' 

30 20. 

17 11, 

16 14 

27I 15 

9i 10' 

10! 22' 



22! 12, 
18' 19 
10 19 
10' 22 

27: 15 
33 21 
25 16' 

29 21 j 



2,270 
2,693 
3,427 
7,682 
5.000 
3,2:il 
6,084 
1,890 
2,.540 
4,706 
2.376 
2,887 
3,231 
5,347 
5,999 
4,350 
5,305 



55 $5,412.00, $4,634.20 317 2891 69 022 



SYNOD OF NEW 
YORK. 

Albany... 4 $480.00 

Biiighamton ' 2 240.00 

Boston 4 370.00 

Brooklyn ! 4 480.00 

Buttalo I 1, 120.00 

Cayuga 5 560.(X) 

Champlain 



SYNOD OF THE 
PACIFIC. 




$761.-55 19 26 8,108 Benicia .!...' ; $130.45 10! 16 

289.11 161 13 3,792! Los Angelos '...' 47 54 6' 13 

99.3i 7 10: 2,721' Sacramento |...l 56.00, 5 24 

6.8-5.94 10, 14 11,984! San Francisco li $120.00, 103.93 6 21 

362.53 19' 13 5,309|ISan Jose '...' 1 23 

268.34' 13' 8 3.465] j- - '— | 1 — 

146.77 6 12 2 087i ' l' $120.0oi fj;i7.92l 27l 97' 8,653 



1,187 

688 

1,269 

4,.529 

980 



31 



Tabular Statement by Synods and Presbyteries. 



Synods ^ 

AND 5 

Presbyteries, z 



Synods -^ ^ 
AND = a : 

Presbyteries, z 2 ■ 











a 


« 




:j 


u 


25 


;s 


U 


iJ 




£ 


P3 


^ 


X 


aa 


Z 






c r< y 



SYNOD OF PENN- 
SYLVANIA. 

Allegheny 1 

Blairsville 1 

Butler 4 

Carlisle 3 

Chester 18 

Clarion d\ 

Erie ' 

Huntingdon 6 

Kittanniug 8' 

Lackawanna 3' 

Lehigh 51 

Northumberland 1, 

Philadelphia e' 

rhilad'a. Central. 5| 

Philad'a North... 2 

Pittsburgh 10 

Kedstone 2 

rjhenango 4 

Washington 10 

Wellsboro 

West Virginia 4 

Western Africa 

Westmin.ster 2 



8120.1)0 
120.00 
480.00 
360.00 

1,620.00 
580.00 



720.00 
820.00 
360 00 
600.00 
120.00 
660.00 
560.00 
240.00 
987.00 
240.00 
480.00 
1,200.00 



480.00 

'moij 



544-1.23 
400.28 
275.86 
4.52.-59 
492.65 
144.39 
483.41 
804.74 
472.15 
777.63 
239.72 
4:«.82 

2.401.26 

1,157.79 
910.42 

1,469.76 
249.51 
292.78 
411.46 
45.82 
65.00 
1.25 
353.92 



26 11 

26 8 

26 7[ 

29 16 

28 10 

23 20 

48 15 

50 18, 

37 12 1 
36 471 
21 23 
23 25 

20 10| 
21, 17 
25 17 

38 12 

21 11 
20 5 
27; 12 
10 4 

9 25 



19! 



5.634 
5,238 
3,6.56 
6,390 
5,430 
3,188 
7,947 
9,39.> 
6,2:55 
7,637 
4.967 
5,267 
11,219 
12,46.5 
6,7;?5 
9,107 
3,878 
4.413 
6,45*') 
Si 17 
1,786 
276 
4,57;- 



, SY'NOD OF TEN- 
i NESSEE. j 

Holston ' 3 8360.01) 813.75 5 14 770 

Kingston : 7 820.00 65.07 13 5 1,043 

Union ,4 480.00 37.84 7 9 1,573 

I ll4Sl ,660.00 1 ^1 1 6.66 1 27i 28 3,3 86 

SYNOD OF TEX.\S. 

Austin 1 8120.00 839.56 7 7 623 

North Texas 8.00 4 13 462 

.Trinity 11.00. 3 12 192 

1 8120.00 858.56 i U 32 1,277 



100810,987 .00 812,781.44 565 ^m 132701: 



SYNOD OF WIS- I 

! CONSIN. 

Chippewa 3 8280.00 S49.40 11 13 

Lake Superior 104.84 8 5, 

Milwaukee 16763 11 13 

Winnebago 3 340.00 51.18 7 32 

Wi-sconsin River.. 4 480.00, 129.83 14; 27j 

10 81,100,00 8502.88 51i 9ol 8,731 



1,033 

781 
2,655 
2,098 
2,164 



FORM OF A DEVISE OR BEQUEST. 



All that the Board deems it important to furnish is its cori>or.\.te na.me, viz. : T!ie Board qf' 
Educationof the Pi-egf»jterian Church in the United States of America. 

The State laws differ so much that no one form will answer in all the States. 

The following form may be used in some of the States : 

" I give and devise to The Board of Education of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of 

America, the sum of dollars to and for the uses of the said Board of Education, and, 

under its direction, to be applied to assist candidates for the ministry." (If real estate or other 
property be given, let it be particularly described.,) 



Letters atid conununications for the Board of Educ.x^tion. relating to the general concerns of the 
Board, to candidates for the ministry, reports, appropriations, etc., are to be addressed to the 
Corresponding Secretary, ^Rev. D. W. Poor, D. D.>, No. 1334 Chestnut Street. Philadelphia. 

Remittances of rioney should be sent to the Treasurer, Mr. E. G. Woodward, same addreiss. 



APPENDIX. 

ACTION OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 



The Standint; Committee of the Assembly on Education consisted of 
the following persons : — 

Miniiters. Elders. 

Hervfa' D. Ganse, Homer N. Hibbard, 

Ben.i. F. Bittinger, James Cruikshaxk, 

Thomas Murphy, Stanton Cady, 

James Y. Mitchelj., Walter L. Rankin, 

Edward G. Thurber, Horace B. Silliman, 

\Vm. W. Williams, David H. Huntting, 

William Bishop, Archibald S. Voris. 

Solomon C. McElroy. 
The Committee presented on Friday, May 25th, through its Chair- 
man, Rev. Dr. Hervey D. Ganse, of St. Louis, the following report, 
which was accepted, and after discussion was adopted : — 

The Standing Committe on Education respectfully report: — 
Our Church has good reason to be encouraged and thankful over the 
present aspect of her work of " Education." 

First ot all the Board has met all the demands of the past year and 
has a small balance in the treasury. This proves that the gifts of the 
Church to this cause have materially increased, the fact being that they 
are by more than nine thousand dollars — nearly fifteen per cent. — larger 
than they were the year before. At the same time the permanent fund 
has, by a single legacy made an increase of $10,000. 

The larger income of the year has been distributed among the candi- 
dates in addition to the scholarships; which, however, are still too low. 
The Church will sympathize with the Board's desire to raise them to a 
maximum of $150 a year. A result which can easily be reached. If 
the growing interest in this cause shall only extend to all the congrega- 
tions that are well able to aid it our Board of Education will be lifted 
out of its long struggle into the c >mplete efficiency which its work de- 
serves. Your Committee recommend the following: — 

Resolved, That the General Assembly earnestly wishes for further in- 
crease of the income of the Board of Education, and asks some contri- 
bution from every Church. 

Another matter of joy is the increase, however small, of the number 
of candidates availing themselves of the Board's assistance; for we 
assume that that increase has been made only under prudent and con- 
scientious recommendations by the Presbytery. 



33 

It is to be noticed, however, that arguments which claim to rest on 
principle continue to be urged, in speech and print, against the whole 
policy of furnishing to students for the ministry, a kind of help not 
ottered to students iu law and medicine. Such assistance is said to de- 
moralize its recipient and to degrade the office to which it brings him. 
And if the ministry were a mere profession, this would be true. But if 
it be a work of Christian love which resigns the remuneration of a pro- 
fession for the opportunities of Christian service, the objection is empty. 
The love for Christ, in a thousand different hearts, acts under one obli- 
gation, and with one aim — the glory of C'hrist and the triumph of His 
cause. If one man has talent to aim with and no money, and other men 
have the money which the talent needs, these two things are obliged to 
come together and help each other. It is the case of the head needing 
the feet and the feet are criminal if they refuse the service. Kxactiy 
this has been the principle on which Christian gifts have for so many 
centuries been flowing together in endowment of Christian schools. 
When John Howard set the American example of such giving he as- 
sumed one thing, and this Assembly in its great movement for educa- 
tional endowments assumes the very same ; that disposition toward the 
learning, especially toward the learning requisite for preaching, is to be 
developed and helped. Otherwise the young minds would be left to 
seek knowledge wherever they could find it. But the knowledge is con- 
creted into colleges and seminaries so that the student can find it in 
bulk. And money does that. Gifts of money support the professor 
while he teaches and the president while he administers ; and not at all 
that the one or the other may be supported, or that abstract learning 
may be secure of a venerable seat; but just for this: that learning and 
the young soul which is to use it may come together. And whenever 
any young soul is doing its very best to effect that meeting, and for Christ's 
sake, the Christian money that helps him up the hill no more stigmatizes 
him than does Christian endowment money stigmatize the temple toward 
which he climbs, or the college officer, who iu cap and gown beckons 
him up. It ought to be understood that nothing but a worldly or natur- 
alistic misreading of the motive and function of the Christian ministry 
can obscure the wisdom and beauty of that sympathy which brightens a 
young man's way into the ministry as the angels brightened Christ's 
when they saw Him lonely and hungry and "came and ministered unto 
Him." 

This fundamental principle more than vindicates the Board in increas- 
ing the proportion of what they call " exceptional cases ;" that is, of 
cases aided from the beginning of preparatory study. After a young 
man has gained some learning and some skill in studying, he may per- 
haps do something toward self-support. But his first untrained grapple 
with learning requires all his powers; and the Committee commend the 
judgment of the Board, that, if he is worth helping, it is good to help 
him then. 

It is an important question whether the amount of aid ought to be 
varied by grades of scholarship. It is plain that the candidate whose 
standing proves him to be indolent or incompetent is to get no aid. But 



34 

among thoroughly worthy men some will be better scholars than others. 
Ought the Church, through the Board of Education, to put a premium 
in money upon superiority thus shown ? There s«'em to be good i-easons 
for answering, no. Fair grading among students in difterent institutions 
is impossible, as the Board have said. But even presenting fair grad- 
ing in scholarship would by no means be fair grading in the aggregate 
of (pKilities which the Church and her Master most demand in the Chris- 
tian ministry. The most precious elements in that aggregate can not be 
graded in advance of work, except by God only. Besides, such dis- 
tinction between picked men and the average men, if recognized and 
proclaimed by the Church herself, and afterward carried by the two 
classes before the Presbyteries and the Churches, could not but have un- 
wholesome effect upon both parties. Comparisons between men are sure 
to be made by the public, and soon enough ; and the men of the brightest 
parts will get all the advantages that is due to them. The Church's duty 
through this Board seems to be to look for true men, fit for their work ; 
id, having found them, to esteem and treat them all alike. The Com- 
littee recommend the following: — 

Resolved, That the General Assembly approve the reasons of the Board 
for omitting to divide the Permanent Fund into distinct scholarships 
yielding large amounts to be given to students whose grade of scholar- 
ship is high. 

The Board by some striking statements concerning the lessening num- 
ber of candidates and the increasing number of vacant Churches urges 
the Assembly to an earnest effort to discover and remove the causes 
which divert our young men from the sacred office. It thus becomes 
your Committee's duty to touch this large subject. Upon any nice de- 
tails of those causes opinions would be apt to differ. But concerning 
one main cause, in which many of the rest are rooted, there seems to be 
little room for difference. 

If the ministry be in essence an unworldly effort to serve Christ by 
serving his Church, such effort assumes the honest and hearty sympathy 
of the Church so served. With that sympathy engaged, and with God's 
favor upon it, there results a relation full enough, indeed, of care and 
work, but of ideal tenderness and delight. Where the Church makes 
herself one with her ministry, that office mounts up bright and strong 
like the peak of a hill, stable, on broad foundations. As much as the 
ministry needs in a worldly way is made sure to it out of the Church's 
worldly means. Worldly successes of its own, therefore, it can well 
afford to forego for the sake of the spiritual successes and delights to 
which a sympathizing spiritual Church helps it on. It is a Gospel axiom 
that such a Church would never lack such a ministry till the end of 
time. 

But let some influence persuade the Church to thrust in between her- 
self and her ministry, the common relations of business ; and the minis- 
ter finds himself where Christ never meant him to be — between two 
closed doors. He has shut himself off from all worldly successes, and 
the Church has shut him out of her heart. It is not in human nature, 
however gracious, to accept those impossible conditions. The Church 



35 

which imposes them must correct its mistakes or it will have no ministry 
by and by. The vital essence of partnership is sympathetic identity be- 
tween the Church and her leader in Christ's work. That makes long 
pastorates. Something else makes short ones. Multiplied and colliding 
denominations and Churches creating among themselves a worldly strife 
come to estimate ministers by their value in the popular market. Min- 
isters, being human and often sore pressed, are tempted to make such 
estimate of themselves and of each other. " Ministerial Success" gradu- 
ally becomes an old name for a new thing — namely success in the min- 
istry as a business — a thing to be compensated by employers at its busi- 
ness value. Pastor and people cease to be one party, and become two. 
They meet and part on commercial principles. The man who sur- 
rendered business in the hope of being the leader of a spiritual host 
discovers that he is in business after all as the servant of a corporation. 

Of cdurse this is the extreme statement of the evil. The discrimi- 
nating truth concerning American congregations of all denominatio' 
would grade them up from this low level to a large class that retai 
X'ery much the old-time Gospel idea of the Christian minister and esteei 
him very highly in love, for his work's sake. But it is a blind man why. 
does not see that this class diminishes and the other classes grow. 

Now Christian consecration is not folly. It is wisdom. It is not con- 
secration to something that cannot be done; but to something that can. 
If it have Christ's enemies to meet, it may be consecration to martyrdom 
and be very wise at that ; for the martyrdom is its achievement. But if 
consecration has a work to do with the Church, then the Church is to 
work with the consecration. Martyrdom sudden at the hands of the 
world, and martyrdom slow at the hands of the Church, as many a good 
man knows it, is martyrdom in excess, consecration itself being judge. 

It is no wonder that a young man who has grown up seeing how the 
minister of his father and mother is in their hearts, and how all his 
reasonable worldly interests are in their faithful hands, catches by con- 
tact the flame of that pastor's zeal and delight, his parents praying be- 
forehand that the flame may be kindled. But it is not conceivable that 
a thoughtful youth who lias known Ave pastors, or three, or even two, and 
has heard far more al)out the marketable merit, on the score of which 
they come and go, than of their place in Christ's heart or their people's 
should under that process kindle naturally to any theory but a purpose 
not to be a minister. And it is not conceivable that his mother should 
much oppose his purpose with her prayers. 

In one word, when Christ's ministers forego worldly profit and suc- 
cesses, Christ's Church must give them the compensating sympathy and co- 
operation which Christ ordains, or ministerial motive dies out and the 
ministry with it. Make the ministry a trade, and it is too precarious a 
trade to invite wise ventures. But let the Church esteem the work and 
exalt it according to New Testament meaning, and until Pentecost shall 
be reversed and the Holy Ghost shall forsake the earth, the work shall 
never want workers. 

All this is no argument for a ministry to be pampered or flattered or 
indulged in idleness or imperiousness or any other wrong. It demands, 



36 

on the other hand, a style of ministerial living and labor that shall com- 
pel the Church to foster it with respect and love. When the Holy 
Ghost enjoined, " Let no man despise thee," He taught what experience 
proves, that the ministry cannot come to dishonor in the Church except 
by its own sufferance. The Church could not, under any temptation, 
have so widely lost the New Testament ideal of this office if ministers 
themselves had kept it within their own hands and had set it forth. 

There is room and need for a great reformation. Let the Assembly 
warn the people of the intrinsic conditions of an office which seeks not 
theirs but them ; let the Church give her heart, and then, of course, what 
is needful of her means, both to pastors at home and to all those noble 
men who are representing the Church piety in new and needy fields; let 
every minister magnify in practice the supreme spiritual substance of his 
work. Let him suffer for the sake of his ministry and of Christ sooner 
than make merchandize of himself, even in the Church's market; let 
him exalt the pure delight which he gets from Christ and his service, 
and which no wrongs can lessen. So shall mistakes be rebuked and cor- 
rected, and our youth shall get from such holy heroism an inspiration 
like that which came with the mantle of Elijah when he found Elisha, 
the son of Shaphat, plowing with the oxen, and cast it upon him. 

It is not true, then, as is often said, that there is no need of prayer upon 
this subject, but not only or chiefly for prayer for the increase of the 
number of candidates, but prayer for the condition of Church life that 
shall, under grace, develop candidates as the spring develops buds. More 
faith in the things that never change, more zeal, more boldness, would 
make the ministry more real. A real ministry would, by the Holy 
Ghost, make a real Church, and would command a real succession. 

The Committee recommend the adoption of the following resolution : 

Resolved, That all pastors and stated supplies be requested to study 
very carefully the fact and the cause of the diminishing supply of min- 
isters, and to make the same the subject of special preaching and prayer 
on the last Sabbath of January next. 

In regard to this same question of the increase of candidates the Com- 
mittee attach very great importance to the means adopted by this 
Assembly for the wide distribution of preparatory schools and colleges. 

The Board have intimated to the Assembly that there is a direction in 
which manifest waste of money is made by some of the candidates whom 
the Board assists, and upon this subject the Assembly is requested to 
speak. The Committee recommend such answer as follows: — 

Proper reflection and feeling, it would seem, would forbid any waste 
of means thus derived. What comes into a candidate's hands as mere 
money re})resents the faith and prayers and, to a large degree, the self- 
denial of pious souls who intend their gifts to the pure glory of Christ. 
Not a farthing of such gifts should be squandered, nor any other farth- 
ing from whatever source received, the waste of which can require to be 
supplemented from these consecrated ofl'erings. The man who does not 
strictly need that help is a criminal if he takes it. It belongs to some 
one else whose need is real. And if he takes it on the footing of need 
he is bound to apply it to the need, and to nothing else, Jf he perverts 



37 

it to any empty indulgence, however irreproachable, he does a triple 
injury ; to the giver whose intention he thwarts ; to himself by the loose 
lesson which he teaches his conscience, and to his fellow candidates' pre- 
sent and future. For nothing else so much hinders this tide of benevo- 
lence as the belief that the gifts in not a few instances and in part at least 
are spent in needless things. The solution of this difficulty cannot be 
reached by the assertion of the candidate's separate and manly respon- 
sibility. That, indeed, precludes all human question concerning his use 
of his own means. It does not oblige other men to trust their means to 
his notions of responsibility, unless they are satisfied with them. In so 
far as the Board, which stands between the givers and the candidates, 
knows that any unnecessary use of the Church's gifts is made, whether 
by one candidate or by many, in degree and form, adapted to give rea- 
sonable check to the income of the Board, it is not only the right but the 
duty of the Board to use all the means necessary for bringing that mis- 
chievous inconsistency to an end. And from the operation of this rule 
the most innocent thing conceivable should not be shielded if its use be 
so needless on the one hand and so expensive as to threaten the injury 
described. 

With this clear statement of the principle the Committee think it 
well to commit detail of applicatioji to the Board. 

Overtures have been put into the Committee's hands as follows: — 

From the Presbytery of Neosho, in regard to the establishment of a 
"Young Women's College." 

From the Synod of Texas : from the Presbytery of North Texas ; 
from the Presbytery of Trinity in the Synod of Texas, enclosing liberal 
offers made citizens of Breckeuridge and Stephens County ; and from the 
First Presbyterian Church of Breckeuridge ; all of which seek aid in 
establishing a college in Texas. 

The Committee recommend that all these overtures be placed in the 
hands of the new Board of Aid for Colleges and Academies. 

The term of the following members of the Board of Education ex- 
pires by limitation this year : — 

Minisirrs—.l . F. Dripps, R. M. Patterson, and G. II. Dufheld. 

Laymen — William Few Smith, Robert N. Willsou, and Samuel Field. 

The Committee recommend their re-election. 

The Boaril has asked the Assembly's sanction for tlic election of Rev. 
N. S. McFetridge to supply the place of Rev .B. L. Agnew. 

The Committee recommend that the sanction be given. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

H. D, Ganse, Chairman. 

Saratoga, May 23, 1883. 



RULES OF THE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

— REI.ATINO TO — 

CANDIDATES FOR THE MINISTRY. 



I. — Dependence oe the Board of Education upon the Presbyteries of the 

Church. 

1. The Board of Education shall receive and aid candidates for the ministry of the 
Gospel only upon the recommendation of a Presbytery of the Church; and the Presby- 
tery is responsible for their examination, subsequent care, and the designation of the 
annual amount of aid to be granted to them, within the limits set by the General 
Assembly. 

2. The Board will in each case look especially to the Education Committee of the 
Presbytery for filling out and forwarding the form of recommendation required for the 
reception of a candidate, and also for the pastoral care of the same until his entrance 
upon his official duties. 

3. As a general rule, the Board will receive any young man of whose examination and 
recommendation in conformity with its requirements proper notification has been given ; 
but it shall be at liberty to refuse new candidates beyond its ability to support them. 

IL — Reception of Candidate. 

1. The encouragement of a young man to enter the Gospel ministry is a matter of 
serious concern both to himself and to the Church ; and it should be given only by those 
who have proper knowledge of his mental and moral character, accompanied with much 
counsel and prayer, and directed by a single desire for the glory of God. Every candi- 
date should join that Presbytery to which he would most naturally belong ; and he should 
be introduced to it either by his pastor or by some member of the Education Committee 
after such acquaintance as will warrant his taking the responsibility of so doing. 

2. The Presbytery, in examining students with a view to their recommendation for 
aid, must embrace such points as are indicated by the following questions, to which defi- 
nite answers, by the direction of the Assembly, will invariably be re(|uired by the 
Board : What is the candidate's name ? Age ? Residence ? Is the Presbytery satisfied 
as to his experimental piety? As to his motives for seeking the ministry? As to his 
talents? As to his health? As to his promise of practical efficiency? Is he free from 
expensive and injurious habits? What is the lowest amount of pecuniary aid required 
to supplement his really necessary expenses till the end of the jiresent collegiate year ? 
Of what congregation is he a member? How long has he been in the communion of 
the Church? >A'hat is his stage of study? Where studying? Has he been recom- 
mended to Presbytery by his Church Session? If in a Theological Seminary, has he 
pursued a collegiate course or itsefpiivalent ? Can he lecitethe Westminster Assembly's 
Shorter Catechism ? Give the name of a responsible ])erson (usually a member of the 
faculty of the institution, or his j)astor) through whom the scholarship can be sent. 

3. No candidate shall be received by the Board who has not been a member of the 
Presbyterian Church, or of some closely related body, for at least one year; who has 
not been recommended to the Presbytery by the Session of the Church of which he is a 
member; and who is not sufficiently advanced in study to enter college, except in extra- 
ordinary cases. 

HI. — Scholarships. 
I. The annual scholarships to candidates shall be the same in amount for theological 
and collegiate students, and not exceed ^150; for those in the preparatory course, the 
amount shall not exceed $160. 



39 

2. These scholarships shall be paid to a student only on the reception of particulaf 
and satisfactory reports from his professors, embracing the following points : Christian 
Character? Scholarship? Rhetorical Ability? Punctuality? Economy? 

3. The Board may increase or diminish, in a general ratio, the scholarship in case of 
unusual surplus or deficiency in funds. 

4. No payment shall be made in advance. Each payment shall be acknowledged by 
a receipt signed by the candidate, or by the person authorized by him to receive it. 
And this receipt shall contain a ])ledge to return the amount given, with interest, in case 
he of his own accord turn aside from his ministerial calling. 

5. In order to suit the period when the students most need assistance, and when the 
reports from professors can be most satisfactorily made, the reports shall ordinarily be 
made on the tirst days of October, January, and April. The payments of a student 
whose recommendation is made at any time between those days may be e.\pected to 
commence at the date of it. 

6. The Board will in no case be responsible for the debts of students; hut it is ex- 
pected of them that the scholarship shall be first applied to the payment of tuition and 
boarding. 

7. The payments to candidates shall cease regularly at the close of the collegiate year, 
or earlier when the time for which they were recommended l)y the Presbytery has ex 
pired, and these shall not be made in cases of prolonged ill-health which may unfit them 
for the work of the ministiy ; or when they are manifestly improvident, or contract debts 
without reasonable prospects «f jiayment; or when they marry ; or when they receive 
assistance from any other educational board or society; or when, from private circum- 
stances, they cease to need aid. 

8. The sums of money appropriated by the Board shall be refunded to it, with interest, 
in case a student fail to enter on or continue in the work of the ministry (unle.^s it ap- 
pears that he is providentially prevented), or if he ceases to adhere to the standards of 
the Presbyterian Church; or if he changes his place of study contrary to the directions 
of the Presbytery, or continue to jirosecute his studies at an institution not approved by 
it or by the Board, or if he withdraws his connection from the Church of which this 
Board is the organ, without furnishing a satisfactory reason. 

9. A scholarship aftbrded by the Presbyterian Church, through the Board of Educa- 
tion, is not to be given or regarded as a loan, to be refunded by those who comply with 
these rules and regularly enter the ministry, but as her cheerful contribution to facilitate 
and expedite their preparation for it; and they are only obligated by it to a warmer in- 
terest in her efforts for the advancement of the Redeemer's kingdom, and especially to 
the use of the means necessary to instruct and stimulate her members in the duly of 
multiplying and sending forth preachers of the Gospel of salvation to all the world. 

IV. — Care of Candidates. 

I. Candidates are required, except in extraordinary cases, and then only with the ex- 
plicit permission of their Presbyteries, to pursue a thorough course of study, preparatory 
to that of theology, in institutions that sympathize with the doctrinal teaching of the 
Presbyterian Church; and, when prepared, to pursue a three years' course of theologi- 
cal studies in some seminary connected with the same Church , and no work of preach- 
ing is to be allowed to interfere with the diligent and faithful prosecution of their pre- 
scribed .studies until their close. 

* 2. The Board can rely only upon the Education Committee of each Presbytery for the 
regular care of its own Candidates, which should include the constant exercise of a 
parental oversight over them in spiritual things, and the bestowment of the counsel they 
need as to their mode of preparation, their places of study, their trials, and the occupa- 
tion of their time, while not engaged in study, in employments which will tend to 
qualify them for effective usefulness as pastors or evangelists. 

3. The Board shall assist the Presbytery, in its care of candidates, by furnishing 
annually to the Education Committee a summary of information from the professors' re- 
ports as to the standing of each student ; and the Corresponding Secretary shall exercise 
a general supervisory care over them, also visit and address them, when practicable, at 
the institutions where they are, in regard to their duties and the claims of the office 
which they have in view. 



40 

4- The recommenflation of each candidate must be annually renewed by his Presby- 
tery, if possible at the sprin<j meeting, in connection with one from the Session of the 
Church of which he is a member, and a specification must be made of the amount needed 
by him ; and until the notification of these points has been received, a student will not 
be considered as upon the roll for the year. 

t;. Recommendations, or renewals of them, made by an Education Committee in the 
interim of the Sessions of a Presbytery, shall be received as sufficient, provided its action 
is reported to the Presbytery at its next session, and not countermanded to the Board. 

6. If, at any time, there he discovered in a student such defect in capacity, diligence, 
and especially in piety, as would render his introduction into the ministry a doubtful 
measure, it shall be the sacred duty of the Board to communicate without delay the in- 
formation received to the Education Committee of his Presbytery ; and if, on careful 
inquiry on the part of the Presbytery, no satisfactory explanation of the defect can be 
obtained, or if no response be received by the Board from the Presbytery or trom its 
Committee on Education, within the current quarter, it shall be the duly of the Board to 
withdraw its aid altogether. 

7. Special care should be exercised by the Presbytery in the examination of students 
who are about to enter upon the theological course, according to the instructions of the 
Form of Government (Chap. XIV. Sec. III.); and this examination should be con- 
ducted by the Presbytery, and be entirely satisfactory as to the " real piety" of the 
students, and "the motives which have influenced them to desire the sacred office," be- 
fore they are allowed to take this final step towards assuming its great responsibilities. 

8. The annual reports and occasional publications of this Board, with the Alonthly 
Jiecord 2in(\ a copy of the Confession of Faith, shall be sent gratis to all students under 
its care who request them. 

V. — Particular Duties of Candid.\tes. 

1. Inasmuch as the great aim of the Church, in the establishment of the Board of Edu- 
cation, is the increase of holy and faithful preachers of the Gospel> the young brethren 
who look to this work are earnestly and affectionately reminded that all intellectual ac- 
quisitions are of little value without the cultivation of piety, and that they are expected 
and required to pay special attention to the practical duties of religion, such as reading 
the Scriptures ; secret prayer and meditation ; occasional acts of special consecration of 
themselves to Christ and to His service, as their Redeemer and as the Lord of all; at- 
tendance at regular meetings on the Sabbath and during the week ; endeavors to pro- 
mote the salvation of others; and the exhibition at all times of a pious and consistent 
example. 

2. Inasmuch as the scholarships granted by the Board will necessarily fall short of a 
full support of the students, it will be expected that they and their friends will make all 
proper exertions to supply whatever may be wanting. 

3. When a student shall find it necessary to relinquish study for a time, in order to 
increase his means for support, by teaching or otherwise, he shall first obtain the consent 
of the Education Committee of the Presbytery, or of the Board; and if, when given, 
he shall not be al sent from study more than three months, his scholarship will be con- 
tinued; but if longer, it will be discontinued, or continued in part, according to circum- 
stances. 

4. It shall be the duty of each candidate connected with the Board to report himself, 
soon after the meeting of the General Assembly, to the Education Committee of his 
Presbytery, as to his progress, wants, and prospects; and when any of the requisitions 
of the Board which affect him may not be carried out by teachers or others, it becomes 
his duty to see that they are attended to, that delays and losses to himself may be pre- 
vented, 

5. The reception of a scholarship by a student shall be considered as expressing a 
promise to comply with all the rules and regulations of the Board. 



1883. 
FORTY- FIFTH 



ANNUAL REPORT 



BOARD OF PUBLICATION 



PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 



^^nitetr States of America. 



PRESENTED TO THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY AT ITS MEETING IN 
SARATOGA, N. Y., MAY, 1883. 



PHILADELPHIA: 

PKESBYTERIAN BOARD OF PUBLICATION, 

No. 1334 CHESTNUT STREET. 
1883. 



DIRECTIONS FOR CORRESPONDENCE. 

Letters relating to the general interests of the Board, to donations of the Board's 
publications, to the appointment of colporteurs, and all reports, orders, remittances 
of money from colporteurs, and all other communications relating to the colportage 
work of the Board, to be addressed to the Rev. William E. Schenck, D.D., Cor- 
responding Secretary . 

Manuscripts and communications concerning matter offered for publication, to 
the Rev. John W. Dulles, D.D., Editorial Secretary. 

Reports of Sabbath-schools and letters relating to Sabbath-school work, to Rev. 
.Tames A. Worden, D.D., Secretary of Sahhalh- School Work. 

Remittances of money and contributions, to Mr. S. D. Powel, Treasurer, 

Orders for books and business correspondence, except from colporteurs, and all 
orders and payments for periodicals, to Mr. John A. Black, Business Siqierin- 
tendenl. 

All to 1334 CHESTNUT STREET, PHILADELPHIA. 



FORM OF BEQUEST. 

The Board of Publication is incorporated under the laws of Pennsylvania, under 
the style of " The Trustees of the Presbyterian Board of Publication." Bequests 
are respectfully solicited, and should be made to the Board as above designated. 

All bequests are applied to the uses of the Missionary Fund, unless otherwise 
directed by testators. 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF PUBLICATION. 



Term to expire in May, 1884. 

MINISTERS. LAYMEN. 

Rev. George F. Wiswell, D.D., E. A. Rollins, 

Rev. John W. Dulles, D.D., Joseph Allison, LL.D. 

Rev. William E. Jones, D.D., Henry N. Paul, 

Rev. Willard M. Rice, D.D., John H. Watt, 

Rev. J. Addison Henry, D.D., William L. Mactibr, 

Rev. Matthew Newkirk, D.D., John D. McCord, 

Rev. William D. Roberts, Edward P. Borden, 

Rev. Samuel J. Niccolls, D.D., Jos. M. Collingwood. 

Term to expire in May, 1885. 

Rev. William P. Breed, D.D., Charles H. Biles, 

Rev. William E. Schenck, D.D., Henry C. Blair, 

Rev. Roger Owen, D.D., Archibald McIntyre, 

Rev. Charles A. Dickey, D.D., George F. Wiggan, 

Rev. John Henry Sharpe, Samuel C. Perkins, 

Rev. Thomas J. Shepherd, D.D., William Brockib, 

Rev. S. a. Mutchmore, D.D., Robert N. Willson, 

Rev. Loyal Young Graham, Robert C. Ogden. 

Term to expire in May, 1886. 



Rev. Robert M. Patterson, D.D., 
Rev. Thomas Murphy, D.D., 
Rev. William T. Eva, D.D., 
Rev. James A. Worden, D.D., 
Rev. William Greenough, 
Rev. Herrick Johnson, D.D., 
Rev. John S. MacIntosh, D.D., 
Rev. John S. Sands, 



Theodore W. Baker, 
Gen. William F. Raynolds, 
George W. Mears, 
William Wood, 
William L. Dubois, 
Robert H. Hinckley, 
George Sharswood,* 
John Scott. 



TRUSTEES OF THE BOARD OF PUBLICATION. 

For the term ending June, 1884. 
William L. Mactier, Henry N. Paul, 

Gen. W. F. Raynolds. 

For the term ending June, 1885. 
William L. Dubois, E. A. Rollins, 

Robert N. Willson, Secretary. 

For the term ending June, 1886. 
.John D. McCord, Samuel C. Perkins, 

Archibald McIntyre, Vice-President. President. 



* Deceased. 



OFFICERS OF THE PRESBYTERIAN BOARD OF PUBLICATION. 



President.— Rbv. W. P. Breed, D.D. 
Vice-Presidents. — Hon. Joseph Allison, LL.D. 

Rev. Thomas J. Shepherd, D.D. 

Kev. J. A. Henry, D.D. 
Corresponding Secretary. — Rev. William E. Schenck, D.D. 
Editorial Secretary. — Rev. John W. Dclles, D.D. 
Secretary of Sabbath- School Work.— Rev. James A. Worden, D.D. 
Business Superintendent. — John A. Black. 
Recording Clerk. — Rev. Willard M. Rice, D.D. 
Treasurer. — S. D. Powel. 

BUSINESS COMMITTEE. 

Samuel C. Perkins, John H. Watt, 

E. A. Rollins, William Wood, 

John D. McCord, William L. Dubois, 

Rev. S. a. Mutchmore, D.D., Edward P. Borden. 
John Scott, 

PUBLISHING COMMITTEE. 

Rev. T. J. Shepherd, D.D., Rev. R. M. Patterson, D.D., 

Rev. W. p. Breed, D.D., George AV. Mears, 

Rev. George P. Wiswell, D.D., Robert N. Willson, 

Rev. Charles A. Dickey, D.D., Rev. John Henry Sharpe. 

Rev. W. M. Rice, D.D., 

COMMITTEE ON PERIODICALS. 

Rev. William T. Eva, D.D., Henry N. Paul, 

Rev. J. Addison Henry, D.D., Archibald McIntyre, 

Rev. Matthew Newkirk, D.D., William L. Mactier. 
Gen. W. F. Raynolds, 

MISSIONARY COMMITTEE. 

Rev. Thomas Murphy, D.D., Theodore W. Baker, 

Rev. Roger Owen, D.D., Gen. William F. Raynolds, 

Rev. William D. Roberts, George F. Wiggan, 

Rev. John S. Sands, Joseph M, Collingwood. 
Rev. J. S. Macintosh, D.D., 

SABBATH-SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

Rev. R. M. Patterson, D.D., Robert C. Ogden, 

Rev. W. E. Jones, D.D., Henry C. Blair, 

Rev. L. Y. Graham, Robert H. Hinckley 
Rev. William Greenough, 

AUDITING COMMITTEE. 
WiLL'AM Brockie, Charles H. Biles, Henry M. Paul. 



ACTION OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY, 

OF MAY, 1883, 

ON THE BOARD OF PUBLICATION. 



The General Assembly, at its sessions in Saratoga, N. Y., appointed 
the following Standing Committee on the Board of Publication, viz. : 

Mrnisters. — J. Glentworth Butler, D.I)., Samuel Hodge, D.D., Am- 
brose Y. Moore, William S. Taylor, Henry A. Harlow, Thomas K. 
Davis, D.D., Edwin Hall, Adelbert Van der Lippe. 

Elders. — Edwin S. Wells, Joseph Milligan, Henry C. Jenkins, 
Henry H. West, John Stewart, John Sutherland, Manly Rogers. 

On Wednesday, May 24, this Committee presented its report to the 
General Assembly, which, after discussion, was adopted without 
amendment, and is as follows ; 

The Standing Committee on Publication have carefully considered 
the action of the Board as presented in its Forty-fifth Annual Report, 
together with the special instructions of the last General Assembly to 
the Board, and also certain overtures referred by this Assembly, and 
respectfully report : 

DIRECTIONS OF THE LAST ASSEMBLY. 

First. — That the directions of the last Assembly have all been loy- 
ally and heartily fulfilled. " A separation as complete as practicable" 
has been established " between the Publishing and the Colportage De- 
partments." To " give greater unity to the work of colportage," and 
to decrease the cost of administering that work, the ofiice of superin- 
tendent has been abolished and its duties transferred to the Corre- 
sponding Secretary of the Board; and, further, the four District 
Superintendents have been retired from that position. " The work of 
colportage, including the selection and appointment of colporteurs, 
has been placed under the exclusive supervision of the Corresponding 
Secretary and the Missionary Committee of the Board." " No col- 
porteur has been sent to labor within the bounds of any Presbytery, 
unless first recommended by the Presbytery or its appropriate com- 
mittee," and no one has been appointed without careful examination 
as to fitness for the work, and without a previous pledge of faithful 
obedience to the printed instructions of the Board. Furthermore, 



6 

careful and laborious attention has been given to the reconstruction of 
the colportage work. In the counsels and injunctions impressed upuu 
the workmen, the central and vital matters of helpful religious minis- 
try, of Sabbath-school planting and strengthening, and of judicious' 
and gratuitous distribution of printed truth among the spiritually des- 
titute, have been freshly and urgently emphasized. And the Mission- 
ary Department has sought, as far as possible, to secure the aid of 
pastors, home missionaries and other voluntary helpers in securing the 
wider dififusion of our Presbyterian literature. 

As instructed by the last Assembly, depositories of the Board's 
publications have been established at Chicago and St. Louis, and 
arrangements for the sale of its books, tracts and periodicals have been 
made with bookselling houses in New York city, Syracuse, Cleveland. 
Detroit, Indianapolis, Pittsbui'gh and Cincinnati. 

These statements cover all the special directions of the last Assem- 
bly, save that touching the expenses and profits of the Publishing 
Department. This matter we treat definitely hereafter in its place. 

THE WORK OP THE YEAR. 

Second. — Your committee gladly report a year of effective work per- 
formed by the Assembly's Board of Publication, in all respects a year 
of unusual prosperity. 

The work, as reorganized by the action of the last Assembly, in- 
definitely two-fold. It includes a business work of publishing and 
sale of books, tracts and periodicals, and a missionary work of col- 
portage and of Sabbath-school improvement and expansion. 

THE BUSINESS OR PUBLISHING DEPARTMENT. 

Twenty-five new books and twelve new tracts, of which there have 
been printed 119,500 copies and reprints of previous publications to the 
number of 324,250 copies, making in all 443,750 copies, together with 
a total issue of ten periodicals, amounting to 11,940,819 copies, com- 
prise the production of the year. The fact to be noted in this connec- 
tion is that the net increase of subscriptions to our periodicals amounts 
to 108,000, which means an addition of one and a half million copies 
to the product of the previous year. 

As to the quality of the subject-matter contained in this vast issue 
of periodicals, tracts and volumes, in the estimate of intelligent readers 
it is unsurpassed by any similar products of the press. Every min- 
ister and member of the Presbyterian household, as well as the super- 



intendents and Sunday-schools that give it welcome, bears testimony to 
its worth, its suitableness and its increasing usefulness. 

The committee call attention, also, to the material, the style of dress 
and the substantial make-up of the volumes, and to their price, in 
comparison with issues of other publishers. In paper, press-work and 
binding the books of the Board have no superiors. And in the mat- 
ter of price, since the great reductions made during the last few years, 
there are scarcely any publishing houses that vie in cheapness with 
our own admirably-managed " Book Concern " in Philadelphia. A 
personal examination by your committee of six books, the last pub- 
lished by as many different leading houses (each book priced at $1.25), 
in comparison with the Board's last book (at the same price), shows 
that the latter volume contains from 36 to 172 pages more reading 
matter, and that the volume is equal if not superior to all others in 
quality of paper and press-work, and in solidity and strength of binding. 

THE treasurer's ACCOUNT (pages 46 and 47 of annual" report). 
With a balance on hand at the outset of $31,288 belonging to the 
Publishing Department and of $7297 to the Missionary fund, the 
whole amount received from various sources on account of publication 
was $199,852, and that received for missionary work (including profit 
on books sold) was $42,685, making the total of receipts $281,124. 
Of this sum $210,648 was disbursed for the Publishing or Business De- 
partment, and $41,793 was expended upon the Missionary Department; 
leaving a balance of $28,681 with the Treasurer. Besides this clear 
discrimination between the receipts and expenditures of the two depart- 
ments, which appears in these financial statements, it is a grateful fact, 
and one of prime interest to pastors in the appeal for greater breadth 
and more abundant service in behalf of colportage, that the year's con- 
tributions from church offerings, legacies and individual donors were 
all actually expended upon the colporteurs and the donated publications 
at their net value ; and further, that two-thirds of the cost of donated 
publications were returned in the form of profit upon books sold by 
the colporteurs. An analysis of the Treasurer's several statements 
will make all these points manifest, so that the announcement may 
henceforth be boldly made by every minister who asks a generous 
offering for this cause, that all moneys gathered for colportage and 
missionary work are expended exclusively upon such work as directed 
by the General Assembly; not one dollar goes into the Publishing 
Department. And it may be added that any intelligent investigator, 
by careful comparison of the Treasurer's statements, can ascertain 



8 

every needful and desirable fact touching the financial adjustment of 
the two departments. 

As indicating the Board's response to the instructions of the last 
Assembly bearing upon a larger use of its profits in the reduction of 
prices and increase of missionary donations, its present report affirms, 
and all the facts disclosed confirm the statement, that to the best of 
its judgment it has utilized and will continue to utilize its small bal- 
ance of profit by reducing still yet further the prices of its publica- 
tions and enlarging its appropriations to the work of colportage. This 
response of the Board, confirmed as it is by its action, seems squarely 
to meet and remove the last of the objections or difficulties suggested 
in past years. 

THE MISSIONARY DEPARTMENT OP THE BOARD. 

As previously intimated, this includes the Colportage and Sabbath- 
school work. During the whole or considerable portions of the year 
49 colporteurs have fulfilled their simple but needed and helpful ser- 
vice in 33 Synods and 64 Presbyteries. They have organized 72 
Sabbath -schools in destitute localities, and infused fresh life into 1172 
previously existing schools. They have visited 56,651 families, and 
distributed by sale and donation many thousands of volumes and hun- 
dreds of thousands of tracts and periodicals. In the work of gratui- 
tous distribution, the Missionary Committee have also been aided by 
large numbers of voluntary and unpaid visitors. 

In view of the vastness of the legitimate field for colportage service, 
and of the instant demand for this temporary pioneer work of sim- 
plest seed-planting at hundreds of points in our limitless territory, 
among an already stupendous population with its swiftly-multiply- 
ing millions, it surely becomes a Church possessing so mighty and 
wide a heritage of spiritual power and material resources to ask if such 
meagre results in this pioneer department of its high missionary call- 
ing can suffice to meet its central obligation to its divine Head ! 

Your committee recommend that the General Assembly press with 
an intense emphasis upon the hearts of the entire ministry and the 
people of the Presbyterian Church the imperative call for greatly-en- 
larged offerings to this colporteur service, that a broader, more ade- 
quate and efiective work may be wrought in behalf of the spiritual 
condition and needs of our everywhere massing western population. 

The Sabbath-school Work. — As closely allied to the Mission- 
ary Department, it finds its natural place in this connection. 



Through the judicious plans and energetic efforts of the Secretary, 
together with the warm and growing sympathies and the quick and 
earnest responses of the churches in connection with this work, that 
work is now fully inaugurated. The year's report discloses results that 
already vindicate the wisdom of past Assemblies in the creation and 
care of this new agency. 

The Secretary has either directed or largely participated in more 
than a score of Sabbath-school institutes, covering almost the entire 
(church and reaching its prominent centres. He has given a course of 
lectures in the Princeton Seminary, and addressed the students of the 
seminary at Chicago. Furthermore, by specific communications with 
Synods, Presbyteries, and by wide private correspondence with pastors 
and superintendents, conveying information and suggestions concern- 
ing Sabbath-school work, by frequent communications in our lesson 
helps and suggestions for teaching in the Westminster Teacher, and 
by pressing everywhere the organization of normal classes, he has 
sought to use his office in the interest of the work committed to his 
care. As the result partly of his labor and of a larger and more in- 
telligent apprehension of the Sunday-school work, there appears a 
deepening interest, with more of wise oversight and effort to improve 
methods and appliances on the part of church sessions, while our 
Presbyteries are helping to increase the enthusiasm and efficiency of 
the schools by appointing and sustaining institutes for instruction and 
stimulus. 

In accordance with suggestions made to your committee, they rec- 
ommend the adoption of the following resolutions : 

1. Pastors and sessions are urged to put forth practical and persist- 
ent efforts to enlist their entire congregations in systematic Bible 
study and teaching in connection with the Sabbath-school. 

2. The General Assembly again emphasizes the duty of church 
sessions to exercise supervision over their Sabbath-schools, especially 
in the choice of officers and teachers. 

3. In the judgment of the General Assembly greater prominence 
should be given in Sabbath-school contributions to the causes repre- 
sented by our Boards, that the scholars may be educated intelligently 
to contribute to each, always and especially remembering the Sabbath- 
school Missionary Work of the Board of Publication. 

4. The General Assembly approves the proposed organization of the 
Board, through its Secretary, of the Bible Correspondence School in • 
the interest of the better trainin"; of teachers. 



10 

5. The General Assembly hereby designates the second Sabbath of 
June as the Children's Day, on which special services for the children 
shall be held, and the vital topics of the Christian nurture and the 
conversion of the young shall be pressed upon the thought of the 
entire congregation. 

Conclusion. — In concluding this summary review the committee add 
this brief comment : that the extent and excellence of the work 
achieved aflPords the most fitting commendation of the wisdom of the 
Board's administration and the efficiency of all its official helpers, and 
it is but just that the word of warm and generous approval should 
have renewed expression by this Assembly. 

Special overtures or memorials respecting an increase of publications 
in German have been received from seven Presbyteries, viz. : Alton, 
Trinity, Platte, St. Louis, Chippewa, Missouri and Rock River. The 
phraseology of the papers runs thus, " To take immediate steps to 
supply the great want of German literature ;" " to increase and im- 
prove ;" " to provide more and more suitable German books and tracts;" 
" to secure promptly a liberal supply of such as can be used." 

In response to this wide and earnest request, your committee rec- 
ommend the adoption of the following : 

Resolved^ That the General Assembly recommend that the Board 
of Publication give especial consideration to the wants of our German 
Presbyterian congregations, and publish for their use as soon as prac- 
ticable a series of readable, earnest tracts in the German language, 
explaining and enforcing the doctrines and polity of the Presbyterian 
Church. 

In place of the members of the Board whose term of office expires 
in May, 1883, the committee recommend the election of the following: 

Ministers. — Robert M. Patterson, Thomas Murphy, James A. Wor- 
den, William T. Eva, William Greenough, Herrick Johnson, John S. 
Macintosh, John S. Sands. 

£lders. — Theodore W. Baker, George Sharswood, W. F. Raynolds, 
John Scott, George W. Mears, William Wood, William L. Dubois, 
Robert H. Hinckley. 

In place of Rev. George W. Musgrave, the Rev. H. Augustus 
Smith, and of Mr. G. S. Benson, who have died during the past year, 
and Mr. Samuel A. Coyle, who has resigned, they recommend Revs. 
Samuel J. Niccolls and William D. Roberts, and Messrs. Edward P. 
Borden and Joseph M. Collingwood. 



FORTY-FIFTH ANiNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Presbyterian Board of Publication. 

1883. 



The Board of Publication takes pleasure in presenting to the 
General Assembly this its Forty-fifth Annual Report, grate- 
fully acknowledging the goodness of God in bringing it to the 
end of another year of its work in circumstances of increased 
prosperity and promise. 

During the year now closed the Board has added to its cata- 
logue a large number of valuable and interesting volumes, 
adapted to attract and benefit various classes of readers. The 
issues of its periodicals are steadily enlarging and are taking a 
wider and stronger hold upon the church, especially upon the 
young. The colporteurs of the Board, bearing its publications 
to the homes and hands of the people, are more widely than 
ever before traversing the newer, more sparsely-settled and 
more destitute portions of the land, and have been manifestly 
attended by the divine blessing. The Sabbath-school work of 
the Board has gained in popularity, in power, and in extended 
usefulness. New channels have been opened for the steady sale 
of the Board's publications in many large cities of the United 
States and Canada. The receipts of the Board are in ad- 
vance of nearly all the years preceding. And in every depart- 
ment of its work the Board rejoices to perceive that it is making 
a steady onward progress towards wider fields and larger meas- 
ures of usefulness and power in advancing the kingdom of our 
divine Redeemer. For this greatly-enlarged, on-coming work, 



12 FORTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT [May, 

it is our prayer that the hearts and hands both of the members 
of this Board and the church at large may be fully prepared by 
the power of the Holy Spirit. 

VACANCIES TO BE FILLED. 

The term of office of the following members expires in May, 
1883, viz. : 

MINISTERS. LAYMEN. 

Rev. Robert M. Patterson, D.D., Theodore W. Baker, 

Rev. Thomas Murphy, D.D., John Sibley, 

Rev. James M. Crowell, D.D., William F. Raynolds, 

Rev. Stephen W. Dana, D.D., William Montelius, 

Rev. James A. Worden, CD., George W. Mears, 

Rev. William T. Eva, D.D., William Wood, 

Rev. William Greenough, William L. Dubois, 

Rev. Herrick Johnson, D.D. Robert H. Hinckley. 

The Board has also lost by death during the past year three 
faithful and valuable members, viz., the Rev. George W. Mus- 
grave, D.D., LL.D., the Rev. H. Augustus Smith, D.D., and 
Gustavus S. Benson, Esq., the term of office of all of whom 
would have expired in May, 1884. Mr. Samuel A. Coyle, 
whose term would also have expired in May, 1884, has re- 
signed, owing to failing health. 

THE FISCAL YEAR. 

The year now reported extends from April 1, 1882, to 
March 31, 1883, inclusive. 

THE WORK OF PRODUCTION. 

The Board has published during the past year — 

Copiea. 

25 Books 88,500 

1 Catechism 3,000 

4 16mo Tracts 12,000 

4 18mo " 10,000 

3 32mo " 6,000 

Total of new publications .... 119,500 
Reprints of former publications . . 324,250 

Total number 443,750 



1883.] 



OF THE BOARD OF PUBLICATION. 



13 



Brought forward, .... 

Of periodicals there have been printed — 
Westminster Teacher . 
Westminster Quarterly 
Westminster Lesson Leaf 
Westminster Primary Lesson Leaf 
German Lesson Leaf 
Forward .... 
Sabbath-school Visitor . 
Sunbeam .... 
Presbyterian Monthly Record 
Morning Star 

Total of periodicals . 
Annual Report of the Board 

Aggregated publications of the year 



NEW PUBLICATIONS. 

BOUND VOLUMES. 



443,750 



459,761 

479,517 

3,119,935 

629,447 

75,216 

161,385 

2,723,806 

3,866,956 

116,151 

308,645 



11,940,819 
6,500 

12,391,069 



Catalogue 
Number. 

No. 1240. Calvinism in History. By the Rev. N. S. 
McFetridge, D.D. 16mo, pp. 157. Price, 75 cts. 

This book contains four parts, and inquires as to the workings of the 
system of doctrines called Calvinistic, and by their effects tests the doc- 
trines themselves. It considers Calvinism as a political force, as a moral 
force, as an evangelizing foi'ce, and shows what its influences have been 
in all these regards. 

No. 1241. In the Enemy's Country. By Mrs. A. K. Dun- 
ning. Letting Down the Bars Series, No. 3. 16mo, 
pp. 256. Price, $1. 

In it the fortunes of the Hosmer family are followed, and we find 
some straying away from right paths, and " In the Enemy's Country," 
amid perils. 

The previous volumes of this series are "Letting Down the Bars,'' 
and " Scattered," Nos. 1225 and 1227. 

No. 1242. The Children's Sermon, with a selection of 
" Five-Minute Sermons " to children. By the Rev. 
John C. Hill. 16mo, pp. 91. Price, 50 cts. 

The first part of this book sketches the history of recent methods of 
preaching to the children. It gives reasons for preaching short sermons 
to the children as a portion of every regular morning service, and then 



14 FORTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT [May, 

suggests how this may most eflFectively be done. The second part con- 
tains a number of such sermons. 

No. 1243. Brighter Days ; or, The Story of Catherine 
Jans. A sequel to " Those Dark Days." By Helen 
C. Chapman. 16mo, pp. 288. Price, $1. 

This book continues the story told in " Those Dark Days " (No. 1220), 
and shows how the persecuted people of the Netherlands withstood their 
Spanish oppressors and secured religious as well as civil liberty. 

No. 1244. The Christian Sabbath ; Its Nature, Design and 
proper Observance. By the Rev. R. L. Dabney, D.D., 
LL.D. 16mo, pp. 93. Price, 50 cts. 

An intelligent and pungent discussion of the Sabbath question. It 
presents a train of thought, not in the beaten track, that will prove of 
great value. 

No. 1245. Tangles and Corners in the life of Kezzie 
Driscoll. By Kate W. Hamilton, author of " Vagabond 
and Victor," etc. 16mo, pp. 335. Price, $1 25. 
Kezzie Driscoll is the Christian daughter of a Christian man, but 
there is little of the light and strength of godliness in her home. She 
desires to do right, but she finds moral " tangles " which she cannot un- 
ravel. In the progress of her life God leads her to a clear resting in him 
for wisdom and guidance, and her path grows clear and her footsteps 
iirm. 

No. 1246. Love and Friendship. By the Rev. J. F. Dripps. 
32mo, pp. 96. Price, 50 cts. 

The author of this volume argues that enduring love and true friend- 
ship, in the fullest significance of the terms, are identical, and that they 
are to be found in the union of the parties in the love of Christ. 

No. 1247. Dorothy Dorchester. By Helen B. Williams. 
16mo, pp. 396. Price, $1 25. 

This volume follows the fortunes of two girls, first at home and then at 
boarding-school. Dorothy's conscience will not permit her to be at ease 
until she rests in losing personal ambition in a trustful rest in Christ. 

No. 1248. Harry Moore's Choice. By Julia A. Matthews. 
With other Missionary Stories. 16mo, pp. 379. Price, 
$1 25. 

A volume of missionary stories which takes its name from the first 



1883.] OF THE BOARD OF PUBLICATION. 15 

of them. The book is addressed especially to boys, and seeks to awaken 
them to an earnest purpose to live for the kingdom of Christ. In it the 
" Story of Mohammed" is admirably told. 

No. 1249. The Mode of Christian Baptism. By the Rev. 
Samuel Hatchings. 16mo, pp. 34:4. Price, $1. 

The first edition of this book received the warm commendation of 
men of eminent ability for the freshness, clearness, candor and force 
with which it discusses, in conversational form, the subject of the mode 
of Christian baptism. Even a Baptist paper said, " The author has 
written in an excellent spii'it, and the arguments used are of a sensible 
kind." The new and revised edition can be commended to those seeking 
light on the questions discussed. 

No. 1250. Home Making. By the Rev. J. R. Miller, D.D., 
author of " Week-Day Religion." 16mo, pp. 310. 
Price, ^1. 

In it Dr. Miller addresses the makers of the home, husband, wife, 
father, mother, brother, sister, son and daughter, in words of wisdom 
clothed in grace. The entrance of this book into the homes of our peo- 
ple cannot fail to be of service in purifying their atmosphere and ele- 
vating their tone whilst contributing to their enjoyment, for it is as 
pleasant as it is profitable. 

No. 1251. Through the Desert. By Mrs. A. K. Dun- 
ning. Letting Doivn the Bars Series, No. 4. 16mo, 
pp. 272. Price, $1. 

In this fourth volume of the " Letting Down the Bars Series," we find 
some of the members of the Hosmer family reaping the fruits of wan- 
dering in the deserts of trial and disappointment. 

See Nos. 1225, 1227, 1241, 1252, for other volumes of this series. 

No. 1252. Gathered In. By Mrs. A. K. Dunning. Letting 

Down the Bars Series, No. 5. 16mo, pp. 300. Price, 

$1. 
This fifth book completes the Letting Down the Bars Series. In it 
the clouds that hung over some of the children of godly parents are dis- 
pelled, and we see them safely " Gathered In " to the kingdom. 
The series is composed of— 

No. 1225. Letting Down the Bars. 
1227. Scattered. 
1249. In the Enemy's Country. 

1251. Through the Desert. 

1252. Gathered In. 



16 FORTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT [May, 

No. 1253. The Church in Scotland : a History of its An- 
tecedents, its Conflicts and its Advocates, from the 
earliest times to the first Assembly of the Reformed 
Church. By the Rev. James C. Moffat, D.D., Pro- 
fessor of Church History, Princeton Theological Semi- 
nary. With four maps. 12mo, pp. 447. Price, $1 75. 

Recent research has done much to clear up the obscurity which rested 
upon the early periods of Scotch Church History. Ancient books upon 
the subject have been subjected to careful comparison and criticism. 
Fact has been separated from fiction, and true historic record from 
legendary lore. The results of this research have been here brought 
together in a consecutive narrative, every statement of vrhich is sup- 
ported by critically defined evidence. It consists of four books : — Book 
First, Ancient Period ; Book Second, Period of Papal Rule ; Book 
Third, Causes which led to the Reformation ; Book Fourth, The Ref- 
ormation Conflict. Four maps, prepared expressly for it, illustrate the 
volume. 

No. 1254. Martyrs of the Reformation. Merle D'Au- 
bignd's Martyrs of the Reformation, with an Introduc- 
tion by the Rev. C. H. A. Bulkley, D.D., Professor of 
Rhetoric and Literature in Howard University, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 12mo, pp. 510. Price, $1 75. 

The personal sketches contained in this volume have been carefully 
culled by Dr. Bulkley from Merle D'Aubign6's History of the Reforma- 
tion : they constitute a notable gallery of religious portraits, which for 
vivid coloring and personal verisimilitude are unsurpassed. Their read- 
ing should and will give nerve and fire to our too cool religious emotions. 

No. 1255. China and the Chinese. A general Descrip- 
tion of the Country and its Inhabitants ; its Civiliza- 
tion and Form of Government; its Religious and Social 
Institutions ; its Intercourse with other Nations, and 
its Present Condition and Prospects. Revised edition. 
By the Rev. John L. Nevius, D.D., twenty-eight years 
a Missionary to China. With a map and numerous illus- 
trations. 12mo, pp. 452. Price, $1 50. 

Now that China is our next neighbor on the west, it is important that 
we become acquainted with the country and its inhabitants. This book, 
which is fully described in the title page, will help us to such an ac- 
quaintance. It gives the result of the personal observations and expe- 



1883.] OF THE BOARD OF PUBLICATION. 17 

riences of the author, a man of high intelligence and abundant oppor- 
tunity, during more than twenty-five years of familiar intercourse with 
all classes of the people, and in difi"erent parts of the empire. 

No. 1256. The Elder and his Work. By David Dickson, 
Master of the Merchant Company of Edinburgh. Re- 
printed from the thirteenth thousand of the Edinburgh 
Edition. 16mo, pp. 92. Price, 50 cents. 

This tractate is from the pen of one of the best-known and most use- 
ful elders of the Free Church of Scotland. It is practical in its scope, 
and abounds in the most admirable suggestions. It treats in successive 
chapters of the importance of the eldership, the elder's qualifications, 
duties of elders, the elder in his district, etc., etc. It is eminently 
adapted for circulation among elders in our American churches. 

No. 1257. Tom Bard, and other Nortonville Boys. By the 
Rev. J. A. Davis. Illustrated. 16mo, pp. 408. Price, 
$1 25. 

The boys, girls, men, women and places told of in this book are real, 
though bearing fictitious names. It shows that boys can live Christian 
lives and yet be real boys, and that in boy-life simple acts of kindness 
and Christian charity may bring results far beyond our highest expecta- 
tions. The one great object of the book is to lead boys to become better 
acquainted with the Saviour. 

No. 1258. Dr. Grantley's Neighbors. By Ella Beck- 
with Keeney and Annette Lucille Noble. 16mo, pp. 
320. Price, $1 15. 

This book has the peculiarity of being the work of two authors. Mrs. 
Ella Beckwith Keeney, whose previous book, " Following the Master," 
gave high promise of excellence as an author, began this volume, 
but, dying in early womanhood, left it only half written. Her friend, 
Miss Annette Lucille Noble, took up the unfinished work and carried 
it to completion with so full a sympathy that it is impossible to tell 
where one writer ended and the other began. In a tale of more than 
oi'dinary power, the influence of consistent Christian bearing on the 
part of his " neighbors" to break down the bitter prejudices of the in- 
fidel, " Dr. Grantley," is skillfully portrayed. 

No. 1259. The Greys. By Abby Eldridge. 16mo, pp. 
216. Price, 85 cts. 

A temperance tale directed rather against those insidious efi'ects of 
moderate drinking which often escape notice outside of the home, than 



18 FORTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT [^lay, 

against drunkenness in its grosser forms. It is told with effective quiet- 
ness. 

No. 1260. Graham's Lectures on Ephesians. Lectures 
on the Epistle to the Ephesians. By the Rev. William 
Graham, D.D., of Bonn, Prussia, formerly of Damascus. 
8vo, pp. 453. Price, $1 25. 

This is a book of no ordinary merit. The characteristics by which it 
is especially marked are broad learning, shown in results rather than by 
processes ; a remarkable knowledge of the Scriptures, by which light is 
made to concentrate upon the text under consideration from a multitude 
of related passages, and an intense fervor, enlightened by a rare spirit- 
ual insight. It is a book to be read, not hastily, but section by section, 
with attention and meditation, that its deep thoughts of things divine 
and spiritual may be grasped and made our own. A brief sketch of the 
author's useful and eventful life, now (1883) in its seventy-third year, is 
prefixed to the volume. 

Half Hours avith the Lessons for 1883. 12mo, pp. 475. 
Price, $1 50. 

This volume contains forty-eight short sermons on the Sabbath-school 
Bible lessons of the International Series for 1883, by twenty-four prom- 
inent pastors and preachers. They are specially prepared to throw light 
upon the lessons and to aid superintendents and teachers in their studies. 
While the explanatory and practical notes of the oi'dinary lesson helps 
take up the passage verse by verse, most of these sermons aim to gather 
the text into a unity by taking its central thought and developing it. It 
is good to look at a passage from as many points of view as possible, and 
these sermons show us the lessons from the preacher's standpoint. They 
are short and practical, and will be admirable for reading aloud in the 
home circle week by week when the lesson is being talked over. As a 
book of sermons merely, this volume is well worth purchasing. It has 
been so warmly welcomed that a similar volume will be published on 
the Bible lessons for 1884. 

Missionary Exercises. For the use of Sabbath-schools and 
Mission Circles and Mission Bands. 12mo, pp. 192. 
Price, 30 cents. 

This collection of responsive readings, dialogues, selections, prose and 
poetry, arranged by the " Woman's Foreign Missionary Society of the 
Presbyterian Church," fills a place and meets a want in connection with 
the work of missions in the churches. It is sold at the low price of 
thirty cents, to facilitate its purchase and enlarge its usefulness. 



1883.] OF THE BOARD OF PUBLICATION. 19 

Manual of Forms. 16mo, 124 pp. Limp morocco. Price, 
75 cents. 

The rewritten and much enlarged edition of this manual, prepared by 
the Rev. Archibald Alexander Hodge, D.D., will prove helpful to pastors. 
Its title in full expresses its intent: it is "A Manual of Forms for bap- 
tism, admission to the communion, administration of the Lord's Supper, 
marriage, funerals, ordination of elders and deacons, etc., conformed to 
the doctrine of the Presbyterian Church." 

The Westminster Question Book for 1883. 18mo, pp. 
192. Price, 15 cents. 

In all respects this little book is believed to be in advance of its pred- 
ecessors. It is intended for teachers, parents and scholars. It contains- 
the lesson text in full, daily home readings, golden text, topic and lesson 
plan, notes on the text, questions, practical teachings and Catechism 
question for each lesson. There is really matter enough packed into it 
for a dollar book, but it is sold iovjifteen cents. It has had a very cor- 
dial reception, as has been shown by its large circulation in the face of 
increased competition. Besides giving a question of the Shorter Cate- 
chism in order in each lesson, other questions are woven into the exposi- 
tion of every lesson. This is a feature that should commend it to all 
our Presbyterian schools, in which the distinctive doctrines of our Church 
should be clearly inculcated. An edition of sixty thousand copies has 
been published and almost entirely disposed of. 

IN PRESS. 

The Westminster Sabbath-School Hymnal. 

In response to a pressing demand, as well as to the recommendations 
of the last General Assembly, the Board has in a good state of forward- 
ness a book for the service of song in our Sabbath-schools, to be called 
the Westminster Sabbath-School Hymnal. 

The book aims to give — both as to hymns and tunes — 

1. What our young people can sing. 

2. What they will sing, 

3. What they ought to sing. 

A carefully-made selection from the standard hymns of the Church 
forms the backbone of the book. Among these greatly-loved hymnt; 
preference has been given to those best in themselves and most worthy 
of being stored in the memory, and those most readily grasped by the 
young and most adapted to hearty singing. With these indispensable 
hymns of the Church there has been mingled a liberal selection from 
the many books published for use in "gospel meetings" and in the 
Sabbath-school, of hymns and tunes that are deservedly favorites. 



20 FORTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT [May, 

Original pieces of merit, with others from the modern ecclesiastical 
music of England and the Continent, complete the book, on which 
neither expense nor labor has been spared. It is believed that it will 
prove sound in its composition, whilst attractive and available for the 
service of song in the Sabbath-school, and also fitted to use in the chapel 
and prayer-meeting. To pack as much as possible into the book, with- 
out unduly increasing its size and cost, hymns will be given without the 
music where the tunes to which they are ordinarily sung are familiar 
and pretty sure to be within reach. 

The long experience, the good taste and skill, with the Christian sym- 
pathy in the work, of the musical editor, Mr. T, F, Seward, assure us of 
excellence in that department. It is confidently believed that the book 
will be found truly serviceable, and will be used with pleasure as well as 
with profit. It will contain 192 pages, and more than two hundred 
hymns ; and will be sold at 35 cents, or $30 per hundred. 

An edition with the hymns only, without the tunes, will also be pub- 
lished and sold at a lower rate. 

Index of Presbyterian Ministers. 

The Board will publish at an early day a work on which great labor 
has been put and a very heavy cost incurred, an " Index of Presbyterian 
Ministers." In an overture to the General Assembly of 1880, the atten- 
tion of the Assembly was called to the fact that no alphabetical index 
to the lists of ministei's given in our Assembly Minutes was published 
previous to the New School Minutes of 1851 and the Old School Minutes 
of 1854, Hence the information contained in the early Minutes of the 
Assembly is practically unavailable to those desiring such information, 
whilst to secure needed information with regard to ministers whose 
names occur in later years involves a great expenditure of time. The 
overture was referred by the Assembly to the Board of Publication, 
and it was determined by the Board that a volume should be published 
to meet this want. Prof. Willis J, Beecher, D.D., of Auburn Theological 
Seminary, has, at immense labor, prepared an alphabetical index, giving 
every year and page on which the name of every minister of the Presby- 
terian Church of the United States of America, from the beginning of 
its recorded existence, occurs. The stereotyping of the book is nearly 
completed. It will make a volume of about 600 octavo pages. 

TRACTS, 

16mo Series. 

No. 321. The Sociable, the Entertainment and the 
Bazaar, By the Rev. Alfred E. Myers. 16mo, pp. 
61, Price, 10 cents. 



1883.] OF THE BOARD OP PUBLICATION. 21 

A pointed, practical and pungent discussion of the sociable and its 
fellows as elements of church life and influence. 

No. 322. Believe ! Only Believe ! By the Rev. E. P. 
Humphrey, D.D., LL.D. IGmo, pp. 16. 

A call to the impenitent to rest in Christ as their Saviour. 

No. 323. Person and Power of the Holy Spirit. By 
the Rev. S. W. Dana, D.D. 16mo, pp. 24. 

A vital doctrine practically applied to the life of the believer. 

No. 324. The Preaching for the Times. A timely dis- 
cussion of an important topic. By the Rev. Charles 

A. Dickey, D.D. 16mo, pp. 16. 

ISmo Series. 

No. 209. Easter Counsels and Cautions. By the Rev. 
Henry A. Nelson, D.D. Pp. 24. Price, 3 cents. 

Thoughts for Christians on the resurrection of our Lord. 

No. 210. The Divine Origin of the Bible. By the Rev. 

B. B. Warfield, D.D. Pp. 47. Price, 5 cents. 

It is shown that nothing can account for the Bible but its divine 
inspiration. A tract for the people as well as for the times. 

No. 211. Old Uncle Ben. By Philip Barrett. Pp. 8. 

In which the simplicity of faith is illustrated by the story of an aged 
negro. 

No. 212. How Shall I Know that I am Saved ? By the 
Rev. Arthur T. Pierson, D.D. Pp. 4. 
A narrative of child piety containing a telling lesson for old or young. 

32mo Series. 

No. 49. The High Mountain Apart. By Mary C. Miller. 
Pp. 32. Price, 5 cents. 
Words for the anxious, the sorrowful and the suflfering. 

No. 50. The Desert a Delight. By Mary C. Miller. Pp. 
64. Price, 8 cents. 

Tender and helpful words for the sick and weary. 



22 FORTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT [May, 

No. 51. Sources of Strength. By Rev. James A. Worden, 
D.D. Pp. 8. 

Counsels for workers in the Sabbath-school. 

Progress of Christian Missions. By the Rev. Francis A. 
Horton. Pp. 40. Price, 5 cents. 

A hand-book of questions and answers on the history of missions, for 
use in the family, Sabbath-school and mission band. 

PERIODICALS. 

This important department of the work of the Board continues 
to increase in its extent and in its influence. The churches 
and the Sabbath-schools have come more and more to the be- 
lief that they can do better every way by using the papers and 
Bible-helps of their own Board than by going elsewhere. This 
conviction has swelled the subscription lists of the various 
periodicals to an extent truly remarkable, and this increase of 
circulation goes constantly on, promising a still greater circu- 
lation in the future. 

With January, 1883, the prices of several of the periodicals 
were largely reduced, as will be noted below. The helps to 
Bible study and the illustrated papers published by the Board 
ai'e — 

the WESTMINSTER TEACHER. 

The Westminster Teacher is a monthly magazine of forty 
pages, octavo. It aims to meet the wants of our Sabbath- 
school teachers and officers by a full exposition and illustration 
of the International Bible Lessons, and by articles bearing upon 
the various departments of this branch of church work. It is 
also designed to aid parents in the home instruction of their 
children in connection with the studies of the Sabbath-school. 
The large increase in the circulation of the Teacher during the 
past year, as well as direct communications, give gratifying 
evidence of its measurably fulfilling its aims and meeting the 
wishes of its subscribers. 

It is furnished at 60 cents a year to single subscribers, and 
oO cents where six or more copies are addressed to one person. 



1883.] OF THE BOARD OF PUBLICATION. 23 

WESTMINSTER QUESTION BOOK. 

The Westminster Question Book is mentioned under the head 
of " Bound Volumes," but is a part of the series of publications 
for use in Bible study by Sabbath-schools. It has been popular 
in the past, but has been made still more worthy of approval. 
Though called a " Question Book," it is a complete manual for 
the study of the International Bible Lessons of the year. The 
Shorter Catechism is given in it systematically, one question 
for each Sabbath, as in the other periodicals of the Board. It 
is intended for use in Bible-classes and the senior classes of the 
school. Price, $15 per hundred, net. 

AVESTMINSTER QUARTERLY FOR SCHOLARS. 

The Westminster Quarterly is a help to the study of the 
Bible lessons, adapted to use by the more intelligent classes of 
our Sabbath-schools. It is published in the form of an octavo 
of thirty-two pages. One appropriate hymn accompanies each 
lesson, so that each quarterly number contains eleven or twelve 
hymns adapted to use in the school. The increase in its cir- 
culation is the best evidence of its approval by our churches. 
Single subscription, 20 cents ; school subscriptions, to one ad- 
dress, 15 cents each per annum. 

THE WESTMINSTER LESSON LEAF. 

This "Leaf" fills the place of an "intermediate leaf." It 
is issued monthly, but is so arranged that the lesson for each 
Sabbath occupies the two sides of one leaf. Thus those who 
prefer a monthly distribution of the leaf are satisfied, and those 
desiring to have a weekly leaf have only to tear the leaves 
apart. As in the other papers, the Shorter Catechism forms a 
regular part of each week's lesson. 

PRICES REDUCED. 

In accordance Avith the fixed plan of the Board to furnish 
aids to Bible study, as well as all other publications, at the 
lowest sum consistent with business safety, the price of the 
" Lesson Leaf" was reduced with January, 1883, from the rate 
of $7 50 to $6 for one hundred copies for one year. This 



24 FORTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT [May, 

Step will undoubtedly meet the wishes of our feebler congrega- 
tions, and enable them to take the help prepared specifically 
for them by their own Board. 

WESTMINSTER PRIMARY LEAF. 

The Westminster Primary Leaf, for the youngest classes 
studying the International Bible Lessons, is still prepared by 
Mrs. G. R. Alden ("Pansy "), and has largely increased in its 
circulation. The same reduction in price has been made in it 
as in the "Westminster Lesson Leaf," mentioned above. 

GERMAN LESSON LEAF. 

The German Lesson Leaf is doing a good work in meeting 
the wants of our German congregations, to whom it proves a 
valuable help in the study of the Bible in the Sabbath-school. 
Although, owing to the limitation of its circulation by the 
limited number of German congregations in our connection, it 
was published at a loss at $7.50 per hundred copies a year, the 
price has been reduced to $6, that our German brethren 
may not pay more than do the more numerous English-speaking 
Presbyterians. 

THE SABBATH-SCHOOL VISITOR. 

This oldest periodical of the Board holds its own against the 
numerous papers that have come into existence since it began 
to instruct and gratify young readers with its bright articles 
and attractive illustrations. In 1882 it was published every 
week, but a change has been made in 1883 that will meet the 
demand of many churches of small means for a paper with all 
the excellencies of- the Visitor, but at a smaller cost than 
even its low price. The Visitor is now published twice a 
month, that is, on the first and third weeks of each month. It 
may be taken once a month or twice a month, as may. be pre- 
ferred, at the following terms per year : 

SINGLE SUBSCRIPTION. 



Once a month .... 25 cents. 
Twice a month .... 40 cents. 



SCHOOL SUBSCRIPTIONS. 

To one address, at the rate of 
^12 per 100 copies, once a month. 
24 " " twice a month. 



Or, at the rate of one cent for each copy. 



1883.] 



OF THE BOARD OF PUBLICATION. 



25 



Then, on the second and fourth weeks of each month, the 
Board publishes 

THE MORNING STAR, 

which will be found equal to the Sahhath- School Visitor in 
every respect, but of one-half its size, yet with more than one- 
half the amount of reading, at the following rates per year : 



SINGLE SUBSCRIPTIONS. 



Once a month 
Twice a month 



10 cents. 
'20 cents. 



SCHOOL SUBSCRIPTIONS. 

To one address. 
$ 6 per 100 copies, once a month. 
12 " •' twice a month. 

Or, at the rate of half a cent for each copy. Surely that is 
cheap enough ! 

THE SUNBEAM. 

The Sunbeam continues to smile on its constantly-increasing 
army of young admirers. It is a weekly illustrated paper, 
with easy reading, in short words and big type, with attractive 
engravings, adapted to the very little ones of the home and 
school. It also carries help on the International Lessons for 
the primary classes and the little ones at home. Single sub- 
scriptions, 30 cents; school subscriptions at the rate of $25 per 
hundred, a year. 

FORWARD. 

With January, 1882, the Board commenced the publication 
of Forward, an illustrated monthly paper, sixteen pages quarto, 
to meet the wants of that class of our young people who have 
outgrown the " children's papers," and who demand something 
more mature. Some of them are in our older classes, some in 
Bible-classes, some are teachers, and some entirely out of the 
Sabbath-school. Forward is made attractive by pictorial illus- 
trations, whilst its articles constantly keep in view the tastes 
and wants of those for whom it is prepared. It seeks to be 
helpful, to be elevating, to lead heavenward, whilst aiming also 
to be sprightly and wide awake to topics of present interest to 
young men and women. Its price was 50 cents a year ; and 
40 cents where five or more copies were sent to one address. 
But, with a determination to put its periodicals at the lowest 
possible rates, the Board has 



26 FORTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT [May, 

REDUCED THESE PRICES, 

SO that now one copy to one address is 40 cents ; five or 
more copies to one address, 25 cents each, per year. With 
this change the circulation of Forward is already nearly 
three times what it was in 1882. There can be no question 
that this circulation will still more largely increase as the 
churches become acquainted with the paper. It meets with 
universal applause. 

THE PRESBYTERIAN MONTHLY RECORD. 

This organ of the Assembly's Boards and Committees con- 
tinues to be published, in octavo pamphlet form, by the Board 
of Publication, but only as publisher for the Assembly's Boards 
and Committees, the control of its pages resting entirely with 
the several organizations represented. The monthly circula- 
tion of the mao-azine has been between nine and ten thou- 
sand, including the copies sent gratuitously to each of the min- 
isters of the Church. The loss incurred by its publication and 
distribution is shared by the Assembly's Boards in the ratio of 
the space occupied by each. 

DISTRIBUTION. 

THE BOOKSTORE OF THE BOARD. 

The handsome bookstore of the Board, at No. 1334 Chest- 
nut Street, Philadelphia, is an attraction to Presbyterians 
visiting that city. They find there a full display of all the 
publications of the Board, which all are invited leisurely to 
examine. Its catalogue now contains over 2500 publications, of 
which about 1500 are volumes, the remainder being tracts and 
pamphlets. They are of wide variety and scope, and are 
adapted to interest and benefit all kinds of people. They com- 
prehend numerous and valuable works on the doctrines and 
polity of the church, on religious experience and Christian 
duty, on church history, missions and nearly every Christian 
topic. They are suited to help the unconverted soul, the 
Christian believer, the ruling elder, and the minister of the 



1883.] OF THE BOARD OF PUBLICATION. 27 

gospel. Choice selections may be made for the Sabbath-school 
or the church library, or for family use. Few persons who 
have not given special attention to the matter are aware how 
wide and comprehensive is their variety. 

In addition to these, the Board offers in its bookstore a large 
stock of the publications of other publishing houses — the chief 
ones in all our large cities. Orders for other books, if not on 
hand, will be filled, if possible, by promptly procuring them 
elsewhere. 

Any number of the very best books for Sabbath-school 
libraries may here be selected with every reasonable assurance 
that they will be found unobjectionable. If any book is pur- 
chased which is deemed by the purchaser, on careful examina- 
tion, objectionable, he is invited to return it with a written 
statement of his objections, and either its price or another 
volume of the same price, as he may direct, will be sent to 
him. 

A wide variety of maps, charts, blackboards, sessional and 
Sabbath-school records, minutes, class-books, blank forms, 
librarians' books, and all other f;\cilities needed for the proper 
and convenient working of the church or the Sabbath-school, 
may here be found. 

Bibles and New Testaments, commentaries and theological 
works, of both handsome and plain styles, are always kept on 
hand, and if any particular kind is wanted that is not in the 
store, it will be promptly obtained from its publisher or else- 
where, and furnished at the lowest practicable price. 

Although the contrary is often asserted by rival dealers, and 
the statement is occasionally reiterated even by Presbyterians, 
careful and fair comparisons made between its prices and those 
of numerous other houses in various cities enable the Board 
to assure all parties interested that its books are sold as low 
as those of most publishing houses, and cheaper than those of 
many of them. Within the last few years the prices of a 
large proportion of the books on its catalogue have been greatly 
reduced. The entire list of ISmo and 32mo publications, 
covering about 450 volumes, have been reduced in price fully 



28 FORTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT [May, 

30 per cent., no book of this class now costing more than 60 
cents, retail price ; or to Sabbath-schools 45 cents. Many of 
these publications have as much reading matter in them as 
the ordinary $1 and $1 25 volumes, and if made in the other 
size would readily sell at those prices. 

In view of all that it is doing to diffuse by every right 
means a Calvinistic, Presbyterian and evangelical literature 
throughout our land and the world, may not the Board of Pub- 
lication properly appeal both to the Christian zeal and denom- 
inational sympathies of all true Presbyterians, whether they 
be ministers, ruling elders or private church members, for 
their active co-operation in enlarging the circulation of its 
publications in their several vicinities ? Who can tell the great 
amount of good they might thus do, in this day when so vast 
an amount of pernicious literature is scattered broadcast, by 
helping to diffuse the pure and blessed truths of the gospel as 
an antidote thereto ? 

OUR NEW DEPOSITORIES. 

In accordance with the action of the last General Assembly, 
a depository of the Board's publications has been established 
at Chicago, under the care of Mr. C. H. Whiting, at No. 137 
Wabash Avenue, one of the best locations of the. city. It is 
now fairly under way, and all the issues of the Board can be 
obtained there, as well as other publishers' books. 

Another was established at St. Louis, in charge of Rev. J. 
W. Allen, D.D., at No. 1107 Olive Street, which was already 
a headquarters for Presbyterians. Both of these, it is hoped, 
will meet the wants of their respective regions. 

OTHER BOOKSTORE ARRANGEMENTS. 

During the year new arrangements for the sale of our publi- 
cations have been made with Messrs. Ward & Drummond, 116 
Nassau Street, New York, who keep a full stock, with largely 
increased business ; with Mr. George A. Mosher, Syracuse, 
N. Y., which also looks favorable ; with Mr. John Willyoung, 



1883.] OF THE BOARD OF PUBLICATION. 29 

of Detroit, Michigan ; with Messrs. Ingham, Clark & Co., 
Cleveland, Ohio ; with the Board of Colportage, Pittsburgh, 
Pa. ; Rev. W. A. Patton, Indianapolis, Indiana ; and the 
Western Tract Society, Cincinnati, Ohio, to all of whom greater 
facilities have been offered. 

RECEIPTS AND SALES. 

The receipts into the treasury during the year from all 
sources, including the balance of $38,586 55 from last year, 
were $281,124 16, and exclusive of that balance, $242,537 61. 

The entire expenditures of the year have been $252,442 23. 

The balance in the treasury at the end of the year, March 
31, 1883, is $28,681 93. 

The aggregate of sales has been $195,420 02. This aggre- 
gate does not agree with the Treasurer's account, because it 
includes credit sales, while that account exhibits only cash re- 
ceived. Particulars of receipts and expenditures may be found 
in the Treasurer's report and statements, further on in this 
report. 



30 FORTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT [May, 

THE 

MISSIONARY DEPARTMENT 

OF THE 

BOARD OF PUBLICATION. 



The Board has faithfully carried out the directions given to 
it by the last General Assembly. A separation as complete as 
practicable has been maintained between the publishing and the 
benevolent departments. The office of Superintendent of Mis- 
sionary Work has been abolished and its duties transferred to 
the Corresponding Secretary. The four gentlemen who had 
served the Board as District Superintendents retired from that 
position on the first day of October last, with the thanks of 
the Board for the faithful and efficient services they had ren- 
dered during the years in which they had severally held to it 
that relation. The work of colportage, including the selection 
and appointment of colporteurs, has been placed under the ex- 
clusive supervision of the Corresponding Secretary and the 
Missionary Committee of the Board. The Missionary Depart- 
ment, in its instructions to the colporteurs, has laid fresh and 
urgent emphasis upon their work of religious visitation, gra- 
tuitous distribution and Sabbath-school work among the spirit- 
ually destitute. It has also sought to make a larger use than 
ever of pastors, missionaries and other voluntary helpers in 
securing the wider diffusion of the Board's literature, wherever 
it could judiciously be done. 

THE WORK OF THE YEAR. 

For the first time in several years the missionary work of the 
Board has passed through the year without any indebtedness 
on the part of its Missionary Fund. Very near the close of 



1883.] OF THE BOARD OF PUBLICATION. 31 

the preceding year, the Board itself, by a large appropriation 
to the Fund from the profits of its business, placed this depart- 
ment in a position which has enabled it to perform its work 
with more freedom and earnestness than it could otherwise 
have done. And this position, its steady income from the con- 
tributions of the churches, with constant care and economy in 
its expenditures, has enabled it to maintain until now. 

Demands for missionary work, both in the employment of 
colporteurs and through grants of the Board's publications, 
have been constant and importunate. These demands have 
been met so far as possible. Some of our former colporteurs 
have retired from service, and have been replaced by new ones. 
But no new colporteur has been commissioned without earnest 
efforts to obtain, previously, ample and positive testimony in 
regard to his qualificatiojis, physical, intellectual and spiritual, 
for the work. No one has been appointed without a previous 
personal correspondence between himself and the Correspond- 
ing Secretary, or without his having read the Board's printed 
" Instructions " to its colporteurs, and having promised to give 
faithful obedience to all the requirements contained therein. 
Nor has any one been sent to labor in the bounds of any Pres- 
bytery without first obtaining the recommendation of that 
Presbytery or of its Standing Committee on Publication, that 
he should be so sent. The gifts required for this work are 
peculiar and rare. It is not an easy thing to secure a first-rate 
colporteur. But the gracious Lord of the harvest has sent to 
us some laborers through whom we hope that many sheaves 
shall be gathered into his garners. 

Many of these colporteurs have fields of vast extent, so vast 
that only approximately can they be properly cultivated. Had 
the Board the men and the money to sustain so many, it would be 
a source of unspeakable and incalculable blessing to our Church 
to have one colporteur actively at work in every Presbytery 
connected with our General Assembly. But, alas I the Board 
has neither the men nor the money. We trust the time is 
coming when the Lord will put it into the hearts of his people 
to furnish enough of both. Meanwhile, many of our colpor- 



32 FORTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT [May, 

teurs extend their labors over two or even more continuous 
Presbyteries, doing what they can to sow the good seed in 
alternate quarters or half-years in each Presbytery. 

The entire number of colporteurs in the field during the 
whole or portions of the year has been 49, who have labored 
in 33 Synods and 64 Presbyteries. These have distributed 
during the year 32,139 volumes by sale, while 33,326 volumes 
and 3,822,800 pages of tracts and periodicals have been gratu- 
itously distributed by them and by the Missionary Committee 
acting through large numbers of voluntary, unpaid and uncom- 
missioned distributors. The commissioned colporteurs have 
also visited 56,651 families, with a large majority of which they 
have held religious conversation and prayer, accompanied also 
usually by the reading of the Holy Scriptures. They also 
report having held 1840 prayer-meetings and other religious 
services as opportunities occurred. Details of this work are 
given in the colportage tables printed further on in this Report. 

This is an important quantity of pure religious truth to 
disseminate mainly among the destitute and needy. And if 
accompanied by the blessed and almighty influences of the 
Holy Spirit, what measure of blessing is too large to expect 
from it ? And we have precious evidences that the Holy Spirit 
does attend and bless the truth distributed by these humble 
laborers. The correspondence of the Board, coming not only 
from these colporteurs themselves, but from pastors and others 
who are close observers of their labors and thoroughly cog- 
nizant of the facts, affords abundant and delightful testimony 
to the enlightening, convincing, converting and sanctifying 
power which accompanies the truth thus scattered. 

OUR COLPORTEURS AND SABBATH-SCHOOLS. 

It is a part of the duty of every colporteur of the Board to 
organize new Sabbath-schools in destitute places on his field 
wherever he finds it practicable, and to supply them with 
the library books, catechisms, lesson helps, papers and other 
facilities published by the Board. It is also his duty to visit 



1883.] OF THE BOARD OF PUBLICATION. 33 

and encourage, so far as he can, all Sabbath-schools, especially 
such as are feeble, on his field. This part of his work grows 
in importance and value every year. It has been found in 
very many cases to prepare the way for a demand for the home 
missionary, and in not a few instances has been a first step 
towards the organization of flourishing Presbyterian churches. 

The colporteurs report that during the past year they have 
organized 72 new schools in such destitute localities. They 
have also visited and encouraged 1172 schools during the year, 
into many of which they have infused new life, and in not a 
few instances have prevented their extinction. Large numbers 
of children have thus begun to receive regular Sabbath in- 
struction in the blessed truths of the Bible and to feel the 
benign influence of the Christian religion. 

This branch of our colportage work was begun eight years 
ago, since which time the Board's colporteurs have organized 
and nurtured 712 Sabbath-schools, and have visited and aided 
10,760 schools. Over twenty thousand children have thus 
begun to receive instruction in the Holy Scriptures and to be 
led in the path towards happiness in this life and the eternal 
happiness of heaven, instead of being left to ignorance of God, 
to Sabbath-breaking and all their fearful consequences. 

WILL OUR SABBATH-SCHOOLS HELP? 

Thousands of Sabbath-schools connected with our Presby-^ 
terian churches are enjoying without stint the regular use of 
library books, papers and all the recently- devised facilities for 
Sabbath instruction. They are receiving regular, affectionate 
and wise instructions from teachers every Sabbath. Will they 
not gladly help this Board to furnish similar supplies and in- 
structions to poor and needy children who cannot supply them- 
selves, and whose parents cannot or will not do so for them ? 
Surely no other cause can have a more appropriate place in the 
prayers and the gifts of our favored Sabbath-schools. Yet it is 
a sad fact that while our Presbyterian Sabbath-schools raise 
every year in the aggregate a very large amount of money, 
comparatively few of them send contributions to the Missionary 
3 



34 FORTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT [May, 

Fund of this Board to help it gather the neglected and untaught 
children in destitute places, and to place in their hands such 
books and helps as they themselves enjoy abundantly. We 
earnestly appeal to all our Sabbath-schools for their help in the 
prosecution of this important branch of the Board's work. 

We do also respectfully urge our pastors and Sabbath-school 
superintendents to press this matter upon the attention of their 
schools, and to secure and send us contributions. The General 
Assembly has repeatedly recommended that this should be done. 
The last General Assembly unanimously adopted the following 
resolution : 

That pastors and sessions be urgently requested to maintain a careful 
supervision of the objects for which collections are made in the Sabbath- 
schools, and to secure their contributions to our own benevolent causes, 
giving due prominence to the Sabbath-school toork of this Board. 
[Minutes of 1882, pp. 48, 49.) 

SABBATH-SCHOOL WORK. 

The Rev. James A. Worden, D.D., Secretary of Sabbath- 
school Work, submits the following as his report of that work 
during the past year : 

To God I render thanks for constant evidences of divine guidance and 
blessing upon this work during another year. That there has been sub- 
stantial progress in this agency of the Church the past year is certain. 

I. From the greater thoroughness in Bible teaching in our Sabbath- 
schools. 

From all quarters comes the intelligence that teachers are more careful 
in their preparation and scholars more studious of the Scripture lessons 
at home. More than ever before, time and labor are devoted to faithful 
instruction, judicious exposition of Scripture and to its practical appli- 
cation. 

The study last year of the entire Gospel according to Mark in regular 
order proved unusually interesting and profitable. Perhaps never before 
in the history of the Church has the life of Christ been so widely and 
carefully studied as by our Sabbath-schools in 1882. Out of the sixty 
thousand teachers in our Church there are many thousands who are 
studying to approve themselves unto God, workmen that need not to be 
ashamed. This improvement in Bible teaching is partly due to the 
general interest in Bible work which is one of the signs of the times. 



1883.] OF THE BOARD OF PUBLICATION. 35 

It is still more due to the infusion into the Sabbath-school of the life, 
authority and sanctified learning of the Presbyterian Church. 

1. It is more than ever manifest that our Sessions are aflfectionately 
caring for and overseeing the Bible teaching of their schools. 

2. Our Presbyteries are almost without exception supervising and 
elevating the Sabbath-school work of their churches, systematizing 
and extending it. Almost a