Skip to main content

Full text of "Annual Reports. Report of the Postmaster-General. Miscellaneous Reports"

See other formats


This is a digital copy of a book that was preserved for generations on library shelves before it was carefully scanned by Google as part of a project 
to make the world's books discoverable online. 

It has survived long enough for the copyright to expire and the book to enter the public domain. A public domain book is one that was never subject 
to copyright or whose legal copyright term has expired. Whether a book is in the public domain may vary country to country. Public domain books 
are our gateways to the past, representing a wealth of history, culture and knowledge that's often difficult to discover. 

Marks, notations and other marginalia present in the original volume will appear in this file - a reminder of this book's long journey from the 
publisher to a library and finally to you. 

Usage guidelines 

Google is proud to partner with libraries to digitize public domain materials and make them widely accessible. Public domain books belong to the 
public and we are merely their custodians. Nevertheless, this work is expensive, so in order to keep providing this resource, we have taken steps to 
prevent abuse by commercial parties, including placing technical restrictions on automated querying. 

We also ask that you: 

+ Make non-commercial use of the files We designed Google Book Search for use by individuals, and we request that you use these files for 
personal, non-commercial purposes. 

+ Refrain from automated querying Do not send automated queries of any sort to Google's system: If you are conducting research on machine 
translation, optical character recognition or other areas where access to a large amount of text is helpful, please contact us. We encourage the 
use of public domain materials for these purposes and may be able to help. 

+ Maintain attribution The Google "watermark" you see on each file is essential for informing people about this project and helping them find 
additional materials through Google Book Search. Please do not remove it. 

+ Keep it legal Whatever your use, remember that you are responsible for ensuring that what you are doing is legal. Do not assume that just 
because we believe a book is in the public domain for users in the United States, that the work is also in the public domain for users in other 
countries. Whether a book is still in copyright varies from country to country, and we can't offer guidance on whether any specific use of 
any specific book is allowed. Please do not assume that a book's appearance in Google Book Search means it can be used in any manner 
anywhere in the world. Copyright infringement liability can be quite severe. 

About Google Book Search 

Google's mission is to organize the world's information and to make it universally accessible and useful. Google Book Search helps readers 
discover the world's books while helping authors and publishers reach new audiences. You can search through the full text of this book on the web 



at |http : //books . google . com/ 



REPORT 



POSTMASTER-GENERAL 



UNITED STATES; 



UmO PABT OF 



THE MESSAGE AND DOCUMENTS 



COKMUnCATID TO THS 



TWO HOUSES OF CONGRESS 



BEGOnONO O; THE SECOND SESSION OF THE FIFTT-FIRST CONGRESS. 



.'..; '« »>»■ ♦' »> • ■ ■> » • '■ 



"WASHINGTON: 

OOTBBNMENT PBINTIKO OFFICE. 
1890. 



^ 



^-'^^ 



t^ 



• * . - .-*■', 



CONTENTS, 



XSPORT OF THS POSTMASTEB-OSKERAL I 

Bills pawed, adTanoed, or placed upon the calendar, 1; adminiatrative cliangea for the 
better, 2; icrowth of the Department, 8; recommendations and needed reforms, 8| 
m quickened service, 4; qnick connections, early trains, loyal aerriee, 4; mer- ^ 

eantile bodies assisting the Department, 5; increased serrioe in the West, 5; 
time saved in many places, 6} added facilities on one-flfth of railway postofflce 
linM, 6; city distribntion on trains, Oj "Nixie" matter sent home, 6{ increased 
star snd railroad service, 7; the qnlckest service not yet attained, 7; the people 
have a right to postal telegraph aervice, 7; public sentiment strongly favors a 
postal telegraph, 8; oli^jections oatUned,8i the mail service would not have been 
extended by private corporatioDS, 9; organised c^iital and labor approve, 10; the 
EngUah system a success, 10 ; the American plan would certainly be snccessftil, 11 ; 
savings-banks at postofflices, 11 ; Department urged to establish savings banks, 11 ; 
savinga-banks abroad, 12; British savings-banks, 12; new plan in postal savingi^ 
banks, 13; lotteries and tlie mails, 14 ; lottery instructions issued, 14; othe^ schemes 
of chance, 14; decrease of postal business at New Orleans, 15; attitude of express 
companiea, 16; appUea to foreign papers, 15; "censorship" of the mailsi 10; inde- 
cent literature, 10; the statute on the suli^ject of exclusion, 17; Postmaster^^eneral 
obliged to act when applied to, 18; thesaibty of mail matter, 18; value of registered 
mall, 18; value of ordinary mail, 10; percentage of loss, 10; the foreign maii service, 
20; estimated profit fhmi foreign mails, 20; Australian malla, 20; foreign paroela- 
pcst, 20; sea poet-offlces between the United States and Oermany, 21 ; carrying the 
foreign mail, 21; United States dependent upon foreign capital for transportation 
of foreign malls, 21 1 amendment of shipping bill, 22 ; lower rates on foreign letters, 
22; foreign postage low already, 22; reduction of postage should begin with domes- 
tie rates, 23; postal-cards with paid reply, 23 ; no way to pay return foreign postage 
en letters, 28 ; parcels-post, 23 ; express companies have short hauls, Department the 
long oneo» 24 ; bne-oent postage must take precedence, 24 ; losses on * ' sampleHX>py ** 
bustueas, 24; Illustration of loss on eample copies, 25; smendment of law recom- 
mended, 25; postage on papex^covered books, 20; amendment urged making all 
books third-class matter, 28 ; curiosities of the dead-letter ofBce, 27 ; a large portion 
of fdlnrea to deliver chargeable to the public, 27; one-half of all undelivered let- 
ters not signed, 27 ; a million and a half of value in dead letters, 27 ; how to prevent 
mistakes, 28; collection of curiosities, 28; the mon^-order system, 28; increased 
number of njoney-ordexa, 28; sending their savings home^ 29 ; money-orders to Chili 
and Ecuador, 20 ; expenses of other departments heaped on the Post-0£Boe Depart- 
ment, 29; bulky matter in mails, 2d ; free matter, 30; other departments should pay 
their ahare ot service, 30; the postal service might be self-sustaining, 30; free mat- 
ter, 80| what the postage would have been on free matter at public rates, 31; ap- 
potaitments and removals, 31; Presidential removals, 31; fourth-class removals, 82; 
sll ^»pointments during the last two years, 82 ; appointments during the last year, 
33; appointmenta for last two years and for 1880, 33 ; Congressmen elected by the 
people speak for them in the Departments, 34 ; accused postmasters get a fUr hear- 
ing, 30; letter to inspectors, 35; inspectors' reports confidential, 30; civil service of 
the Post-Offlce Department) 37 ; examinations for railway mail service and inspect- 
ors should be mora difficult, 87; one-fourth or one-third of all examined fail to give 
satisfiMstlon, 87; certain plan of promotion needed, 38; many statements as to re- 
movals not true, 89; the number of po8tH>ffices, 80; large increase in number of 
efllces, 89; Ikee-deiivery experiment, 40; village free delivery, 40; to save the time 
of carriers, 40; house letter-boxes, 40; combination of three models suggested, 41 ; 
postal districts and supervisors, 41 ; better supervision needed over post-offices, 41 ; 
Ptarth Assistant Postmaster-General recommended, 42; experts and improved 

955550 . » 



n CONTENTS. 



Pag*^ 



EBFORT OF THE POSTMASTBR-GBNEBAL-^ontinned. 

book-keeping, 42; iMtter aocoantiiig needed, 42; commiMion on aooonnts at work, 
42; a postal maaeam, 43; liberal contributions, 43; Postal Goide and library, 44; 
Guide should not contain advertisements, 44 ; library shoald be improred, 44 ; pnea- 
matio tabes, 44; the pay of railroads, 45; inquiry should be made as to rates, 45; 
needed public buildings, 45; eight-story building unsuitable, 46; ground floor for 
post-offloe work, 40; change of plan recommended, 47; new buildings ten for one, 
47; greater economy in buildings, 47; a new post-office building for New York, 48; 
New Tork building inadequate, 48 ; might be close to railroad station, 49; increase 
of business at New York, 50; the count and weight of mail, 50; complete data col- 
lected, 50 ; items of mail matter, 51 ; shall letter-postage be reduced to one cent f 53 ; 
profit on 2-cent letter postage^ 63; large expenditures fixed by law and can not be 
controlled by Department^ 53 ; total revenue ftom letter postage, 54; fine work for 
Executive Departments, 54 ; loss of one million dollars on paper-covered books, 65; 
deficit could be removed by legislation, 56; increased business results from lower 
races, 66; certain conditions assumed and results shown, 57; service self -sustaining 
in 1805 under present conditions, 60; profits shown with certain assumed savings, 
61 1 profits shown with ft«e matter paid for, 62; the financial statement, 65; esti- 
mates for the fiscal years ending June 30, 1891 and 1892, 60; not practicable, 60; 
personal, 71. 
Apfbvdix: 

Appendix A.— Estimates for 1802 ^.. 73 

Afpixdix B.— Legislation and proposed legislation affecting the postal service 84 

Appkndiz C— Eeportof the house letter-box commission 90 

Appendix D.—Lottery act 96 

Appendix B.~Argument of the Postmaster-General on the Poet-Offlce Department 

and city post-office building question 101 

Appendix P.— Letter of Mr. William Potter in regard to ocean post-offices 108 

Appendix G.— Argument for a limited post and telegraph UO 

Appendix H.-<}orre8pondence on the eight-hour question 120 

Appendix L— The first century of the postal service 134 

Bepobt op the Assistant Attobkbt-Gbrxral 189 

Buildings under lease 141 

Division of correspondence 141 

General work of the office 148 

Amendments to the laws recommended 142 

Losses by fire, burglary, etc #... 145 

EXHIBIT A.-~List of claims for loss by fire, burglary, etc., for the fiscal year ended June 

30, 1890, acted upon by the Postmaster-General 146 

EXHIBIT B.—Leases 1(J2 

Bbpoet of THE Chief Post-^fvice Inbpb3tor 171 

Exhibit A.^Number and character of complaints coDceming domestic registered mail. . . 174 
Exhibit B.~Becord of registered cases referred, investigated, and closed during the year. 175 
Exhibit C— Becord of registered cases referred In previous years investigated and closed 

daringthe year ended June 30, 1800 176 

Exhibit D.—Becapitulation of registered cases 177 

Exhibit £.— Statement of complaints investigated and results of complaints investigated, 

ordinary letters 178 

Exhibit F.— States and countries between which registered mail was pasning, and number 

of cases in which investigation determined that there had been ilo loss 181 

Exhibit F1.— States and countries between which unregistered mail was passing, and num- 
ber of cases in which investigation showed that there had been no loss 182 

Exhibit F2.— States and countries between which unregistered mail was passing, and num- 
ber of cases in which losses could not be located 183 

Exhibit G.— Number and nature of original miscellaneous cases referred to inspectors. . . 185 

Exhibit G1.— Disposal by office of chief inspector of miscellaneous cases 186 

Exhibit G2.—Becapitulation 186 

Exhibit H.— Statement showing treatment of cases in which colIcctioDs or recoveries of 

amounts lost were made 186 

Exhibit L — Statement showing number, classification, and disposalof cases of arrests made 

by inspectors 186 

Brpobt of the Topogbapheb of the PobtOffice Dbpaetment 189 

Map work 191 

Miscellaneous routine work 193 

Detailed statement of maps issued • 194 



CONTENTS. Ill 

SiroKT or TBS Fibst AflazBTAirr TonuAvnoi-QtxiRAL 195 

Appointment division : 

Kmuberof iMMt^ffloM Mtftblisheduid diacon tinned, po8tmMtennpp<»inted,and increaee 

ordecraeie. aa eompered with prevlona ye^r 197 

laoreeee or deoreaae in number of offleee» ammged by States and Territories 108 

Table A.— Operations of the appointment division 200 

Tabli B.~Pn8idential po8t4>fflces, and number of offloes by oUsses SOI 

Tablb C— Operatiotts of appointment divlBion as to foarth-elass offices .' 202 

TlBLSD.~Appointments at Presidential poatK>ffloes 203 

Division ol salaries and allowances : 

Dntlea aasi<ned to salary and allowance division -. 203 

Operations of salary and allowanoe division, 201 ; aiUaetmenta of Presidential post- 
masters' salaries, 207 { classification of Presidential post-offices, 208; number of 
offices, aggiBRate sslarieo Presidential, and aggregate of gross receipts by classes. 
a08; the several adjustments of Presidential salaries. 209; summary of adjustments 
of Pxesidential salaries, 209 ; number of Presidential offices, aggregate salaries, and 
aggregate gross receipts of the four quarters ended Bf arch 81, 1890, 210 ; review of 
the salaries of poatmaaters of the third, fourth, and fifth classes, under the act of 
Hatch 8, 1883,210; bozea and box-renta, 211 ; key deposiu,211 ; aUowanees for rent, 
tml, andligfat for third-class offioea, 212 } legislation recommended, 218 ; estimates for 
compensation to postmastera, 215 ; esttmatea for clerks in post-offices, 216 ; estimates 
tn rent, fbel, and light for flr^t and second-olass offices^ 219 ; estimate for rent, fuel, 
and light for thlxd-elass offices, 820 ; estimates for miscellsneous and incidental 
items, including ftimlture for first and second-class offices, 222 ; estimates for adver- 
tising for first and seoond>c1ass offices, 232; summary of estimates, 223. 

DIvialen of bonda and commissions. 228 

Work of bond division 824 

Commisatons issued •. .825 

Penalties of bonds 226 

Divialonof post-offioe supplies. 227 

Work of supply diviiion, 827 ; number of packages sent, 237 ; qusntities of articles fur- 
nished, 227 ; items of clerical labor, 228 ; appropriations and ezpenditnree for sup- 
ply division, 229; twine, 229; wrapping paper, 229; stamps, ink, and pads, 229; 
letter balances and scales, 330 ; stationery, first and second class offices, 230 ; sta- 
tionery, Post- Office Department, 280; lacing slips, card slide labels, blanks, and 
books, 830; packing boxes, paste, sawdust, and hardware, 231 1 printing and bind- 
ing, 281; summary of estimates, 23L 

Free-delivery system 233 

New free-delivery offices, 233 ; increase in carriers' appropriation, 233; comparative re- 
sults for 1880 and 1890, 234 ; excess of local postage over the cost of service, 234 ; 
growth of system, 235 ; local postage and pieces of mail handled, 235 ; diverse re- 
sults snd explanation, 235; changes in existfng laws recommended, 236; the eight- 
hour law, 237; fkee-delivery stations, 237; equipments, 237; estimates and appro- 
priations, 23& 

Canelnding remarks 239 

Table A.^Kumber of cnrriers in the service, amount of mail delivered and collected, 

number of pieces handled, cost of service, and postage for local matter 240 

BSFOBT or THE SECOND ASSIBTAHT PoaTMASTEB-GKHBaAL 4 255 

Kail service in general, 257 ; Table 1, comparison of star and steam-boat service, 259 ; Table 
3, percentai^e of Increase or decrease in estimates for inland mail service, 1881 to 
1892, 259. Mall service in detail : Star service, 259 ; regulation wagon service, 261 ; 
special office service, 262 ; mail-messenger service, 262 ; steam-boat service, 263 ; 
railroad transportation, 264. Railway mall service: Railway post-o^ce csrs, 265; 
railroad service, including railway post-office cars, 266; railway pott-office clerks, 
266 ; transportation of sapplies, 267 ; provision for the families of railway postal 
clerks killed on duty, 267; special facilities, 268 ; mail equipments, 260; mail-bag 
repair shop, 269 ; lock repair shop, 270. Division of inspection, 271 ; miscellane- 
ous, 272. 

Table A.— Annual rate of expenditure, appropriation, and esti mates 273 

Table B.— Length of routes, annual rate of expenditure, and nambi'r of miles traveled per 

annum, in star, steam-boat, and railroad service 274 

Table C^Statement of railroad service 273 

Tablb D.— Statement of steamboat service 86d 

Table E. — ^Increase and decrease in star, steam-boat, and roil road service 874 

Table F.— Statement of dedoctions, fines, and remissions 380 



IV CONTENTS. 

BlPOBT OF THE SSOOXD AB8I8TAAT POSTMABTKB-GRNERAl^Contlnued. 

Table G.— Statement of nutll service, with increase and decrease* and percentage of in- 
crease and decrease for the fiscal year 382 

Tablb H.— Statement of the weight of malls, speed and accommodation for mails and rail- 
way post-offioe clerks, and re-adj astment of pay on railroad routes i84 

Table I.^Statement of annual rate of expenditure for railway post-office cars, showing 

increase and decrease since last annnal report 458 

Tablb K.— Expenditure for necessary and special facilities on trunk lines • 474 

Tablb L.— Statement of railroad sendee established since last annual report 475 

Tablb M.— Statement of railroad serrioe from 1830 to 1890, showing increase and decrease 

in lengtk of routes 480 

Tablb N.— Statement of all contracts for mail equipments and for the use of patents 481 

Table 0.->Statement of expenditure for mail bags, mail-bag catchers, etc 483 

Tablb P.^Statement of expenditures for mail locks and keys 483 

Table Q.— Statement of expenditures for repair shop for mail equipments • 483 

Table R.~Statement of mail bags repaired, etc 484 

Befobt of the G bnbb'al SuPEBiMTEirDBirr Bailw AT Kail Sbbvice 485 

Extent of the service, 487; equipment of railway post-offioe lines. 487; extent of railway 
mail service and force employed, 487; quantity of mail handled, 488; registered 
matter handled, 488; "Nixies, "489; case examinations, 489; comparative statement 
of mail handled, 491; comparative statement of errors, 492; printing, 492; casual- 
ties, 493; provision in case of deatb, 493; reorganisation of the clerical force of the 
railway mail service, 493; improvements, 494; fast mail system, 495; new and im- 
proved railway post-office and apartment car service, 497 ; new and improved full 
railway post-office and apartment var service, 498; interruptions, 500 ; census mail, 
500; summer resort service, 501 ; postal-card supply transportation, 601 ; assistant 
general superintendent and chief clerk, 501 ; awarding medals, 501 ; estimate for 
railway post-office clerks, 502 ; estimate for railway post-office cars. 594 ; estimate 
for special facilities, 605; commendation, 505. 

Tablb Aa.-<Rai1way post-offices in operation 509 

Tablb B&.— Bailway post office steam-boat mail service with postsl clerks 646 

TablbCc Closed pouoh lines 652 

Tablb Dd.— Comparative statement of the railway mail service fkvm 1830 to 1890 737 

Table £«.— Statement of mail distribction en route on cars by railway postal clerks 738 

Tablb F/.->Statement of errors made by postal oleiks 738 

Table 6^. — Statementof errors made by post-offices...-. 739 

Table HA.~Beoord of case examinations of permanent clerks 760 

TablbIv— Record of case examinations of probationary clerks 761 

Table KJb.— Statement of new railroad service 762 

Table LZ.— Statement of new raU way po8^offlce service 708 

Table Mm.— Statement of the annual salaries paid to railway postal clerks 777 

Exhibit l.^Statement of miles traveled by rail way postal clerks 777 

Exhibit 2.— Statement of mails separated for city delivery 810 

Exhibit 3.— Statement of leaves of absence 812 

Exhibit 4.— Detailed statement of casualties 814 

BEPOBT of the THIBD ARSISTAirr POSTHASTEB-GBinSBAL , 839 

Financial operations of the postal service, 841 ; estimates for 189]-'92, 847; amounts drawn 
from the Treasury, 847 ; transactions at Treasury depositories, 848 ; appropriations, 
expenditures, and estimates for the Third Assistant's office, 848; division of finance, 
848 ; funds received at the Department and turned over to the finance division, 849; 
dead letter fund, 849; special-delivery system, ^850; division of postage stamps, 
stamped envelopes and postal-cards, 850; requisitions, 851; parcels, 852; postage 
on second-class matter, 852; entries of second-class matter, 853; redemption of 
spoiled stsmps and stamped envelopes, 853 ; new contracts, 853; recapitulation ot 
savings by new contracts, 862; new designs of ordinary adhesive postage stamps, 
863 ; obsolete issue of 1847, 865; obsolete issue of 1851, 866; proposed new designs 
for postal-cards, 866; additional clerical force needed, 867; division of registration. 
867; losses, 868; through registered pouch, inner r^stered sack, and brass lock 
exchanges, 868; increase In registry business, 869; international registered pouoh 
exchanges, 869 ; special office system for registry divisions of the large post-offices, 
870 ; registered package envelopes of extra size, 870 ; special fbrms and system of 
registry business at small or partial stations of post-offices. 870; registration wit- 
nessing books, 870; division of files, records and malls, 871. 

Exhibit l.— Estimates of appropriations for the office of the Third Assistant Postmaster- 
General 873 



CONTENTS T 

BiroBT OF TBI Third Amutaht P08TMA8TSb-Gbiisb4I/— Conttniwd. 

Exhibit 2.— ApproprUtion and ezpendUore for 1890 870 

BzHimT 3.— IncMMe of reTenne from tbiIoiis soaroM daring 1890 orer 1889 877 

SZBiBiT i.— Beoeipts «nd ezpenditaree nnder Appropriate heads^ by qoartera 878 

SxiOBrrS.— SoeeiptaaDddlabDraemeBtoatTrMaarydepotitoriM 882 

ExmBiT 8.~Poatag»-atampa, stamped envelopaa, eto., iflsned 886 

Exhibit 7.~Iaiaea of stampe, stamped envelopes, etc., by denominations 888 

Exhibit 8.— Inerease and deoreaae in issne of stamps, stamped envelopes, eta, in 1890 as 

compared with 1889 889 

XxHiBrr 9.— Valne of stamps issued by fiscal years from July 1, 1847, to Jnne 30, 1890 890 

Exhibit 10.— Issnes of stamped envelopes by fiscal years, Jane 90, 1858, to Jane SO, 1890, with 

peroentagea of issues of speoial'ieqaesteovelopesfirom 1805 891 

Exhibit ll.~Issaes of postal-cards by fiscal years from May i, 1878, to Jane 30, 1809 892 

Exhibit 12.— Comparative statement of seoond-dass matter mailed at ilrst-dass post>offioes 

daring the past two years 808 

SXKniiT 13.— Number of registered letters and parcels transn^itted throogh the maiU from 

eaoh Sute and Territory daring the fiscisl year ended Jane 89, 1890 894 

Exhibit 14.— Operations of the registry system at thirty dttes doing largest registry basi- 

ness , 898 

Exhibit is.— Knmber and value of registered letters and panels forwarded during year 

ended June 80, 1890, for Post-Office and Treasury Departments 899 

EXHiBir 16 —Operations of the speeial-deUvery system at free-delivery offices 900 

Exhibit 17.— Copy of contract for postage-stamps 911 

EXHIBIT 18.— Copy of contract for postal-cards 923 

Exhibit 19.— Copy of contract for stamped envelopea and newspaper- wrappers 033 

Exhibit 20.— Copy of contract for registered package, tag, official, and dead letter envel- 
opes : 950 

BXPOBT of TBB SDrBBDrrXKDBRT OF THI MOKKT OBDBB STSTBM 963 

Xomber of money-order offices, 965 ; number-of postal-note offices, 966; issues and pay- 
ments of domestic money<or<1ers, 966 ; issues and payment of postal notes, 906 ; 
duplicate money-orders and postal-notes, 967 ; drafts and transfers, 967 ; remit- 
tances of surplus money-order funds, 968 ; lost remittanoeo, 968 ; erroneous pay- 
ments of money-orders, 909 ; revenues snd expenses, 909 ; international money- 
order business, 970; revenue from international money-order business, 973; post- 
office inspectors paid out of money-order proceeds, 973 ; general financial results, 
973 ; miscellaneous comment, 975. 
Arpsmix A.— Tabular statement of operations of domestic money order system, each 

year from Kovemberl, 1804, to June80, 1890 977 

APFB90IX B,— Duplicate money -orders issued 977 

ArPBHDix C— Statement of money-otders improperly paid 978 

Aypbsdix D.— Duplicate international money-ordi*rs 982 

APFKin>lXB.—Bepayment of international money-orders 963 

RDOBT of THB SUPBROTBIIDBHT OF FOBBIGH MAILS 985 

Weights of mails dispatched by sea to foreign countries, 988; net weight of United States 
mnils, and compensation received therefor by steamers appointed to transport mails 
to foreign countries, 969; net weights of closed mails of foreign origin forwarded 
and amounts paid stesmers which conveyed them from the United States, 991 ; cost 
of the service, 998 ; estimatefor flsQ^ year 1891-92, 993 ; estimate of the number of 
articles exchanged with foreign coaiitries, and amount of postage received thereon, 
905 ; number of trips and average time of trips by steamers of the transatlantlo 
service, 990; Universal Postal Union, 997 ; Parcels Post, 997 ; sea post-offloes. 997 ; 
mails for Brasil, 998 ; the Australian Colonies, 998 ; general observations, 998. 

AFPB3iDTX.—Entemational postal statistics for the year 1888 1000 

AFPK3ID1X.— Psreels post convention between United States and Costa Rica 1005 

Atfbxoix.— Parcels i>ost convention between United States aod Danish West India 

lalands 1010 

Bipovr OF THB SLPSBDmorDurr OF thb Dbad Lbttbb Offick 1027 

Mail matter treated, 1029; disposal of matter received, 1030; disposal of mall matter 
opened, 1080 ; foreign dead mail matter, 1031 ; matter returned from foreign ooan- 
tries, 1031 ; dead registered matter, 1031 ; valne of indosures restored to owners, 
1082; postage-stamps in dead letters, 1032; dead matter given to charitable insti- 
tutions, 1033; correspondence, 1033; number of pieces treated, 1038; dispossl 
of mail matter opened, 1035; unmailable hotel and fictitious matter, 1036 ; namber 
of letters returned by foreign countries, 1037 ; quantity of matter returned to aod 
received frmn certain foreign countries, 1037 ; disposal of dead registered letters, 



VI CONTENTS. 

Kkport of thr SuFXEiirTEXDBST OP TBB DEAD Lbttbb Oftics— Continued. 

1039 ; disposal of paroels. 1039 ; mail matter reoeiyed and treated, 1040 ; treatment 
and disposal of matter received and on hand, 1040 ; disposal of mail matter opened, 
1041 ; foreign dead mail matter, 1041 ; misoellaneoos comment, 1042. 

KSPORT OF TBR AUDITOR OF THK TRRASURT FOB THX POAT-OFFICR DRPAB I MEXT . . ^ 104S 

Bevenne aceonnt of the Poat-Offiee Department, 1047 1 poatmasters' qoarterly acconnta 

corrent, 1049; stamps sold, 1049; letter postages, 1049; mail transportation, 1060 { 

Pacific Railroad service, 1051; payments to and collections from late postmasters, 

1051 ; postal accoonts of late postmasters in suit, 1052. 

Table I.— Statement exhibiting quarterly the receipts of the Post-Office Department an- 

der their sereral heads 105ft 

Tablb 2.— Statement exhibiting qnarterly the expenditares of the Post-Offloe Department 

under the'r several heads 1054 

Tablb 3 — Statement of the postal receipts and expendltnres of the United States lOK^ 

Tabui 4.— Statement showing condition of the account with each item of appropriation. .. 1059 
Tablx 5.— Statement of the misceUaaeous pa^menta charged to misoeUaneous items, office 

ofPostanaster-Oeneral .' 1068 

Tabu 6.— Statement of mifcellaneoua payments charged to miscellaneoua and incidental 

items, office of the First Aflsistaat Poatmastar-Oeneral 105i^ 

Tablb 7.— Statement of the miscellaneous payments charged to miscellaneous items, offloe 

of the Second ▲sslatantPoatmaater^Oeneral 1000 

Tablb 8.->Statement of misoeUaneous payments charged to miscellaneous items, offloe of 

the Third Aasiatant Poatmaster^^enenl 1061 

Tablb 9.— Comparative statement of the receipts and expenditures of the Post-Offloe De- 
partment ftom July 1, IfiSfi, to JuneSO, 1890 1062 

Tablb 10.-~Gro8S receipts, expenses, and net revenue at Presidential post-offices 106ft 

Tablb 11.— Statement showing transactions of the money-order offices of the United States 112S 
Tablb 12.— Number and amount of international money-orders issued, paid and repaid, and 

feeseoUected 1184 

TablbIS.— Receipts and disbursements of money-order offices 1154 

Tablb 14.— Transfers to and from the money-order account 1154 

Tablb 15.— Money-order transactions with the United States assistant treasurer at Kew 

York 115R 

Tablb 16v— Revenue accrued on money-order and postal-note transactiona 1156 

Tablb 17.— Recapitulation of the net revenue 1161 

Tablb 1&— Statement of assets and liabilities 1161 

Tablb 10 —Principal international money-order transactions 1162 

Tablb 20. -Weight of letters, newspapers, etc.. sent firom the United States to Burepeaa 

countries 116ft 

Tablb 21.— Weight of letters, newspapers, eto., conveyed to foreign couptries other than 

European, by steam-ship lines 1166 

Tablb 22.— Weight of letters, newspapers, eto., sent by sea fhmi the United States to coun- 
tries other than European of the Universal Postal Union 1166 

Tabli 28.— Weight of foreign closed maila where transported by sea and amounts accru- 
ing to staam-ship companies ft»r their carriage 1167 



RE PORT 



OF 



THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 



Post-Oppioe Depabtmbnt, 
Washington^ Z>. a, November 29, 1800. 
To the Pbesibent : 

My first annual report covered less than four months of 
your administration. This, therefore, is the first statement 
of a fall year's work which I have had the privilege of sub- 
mitting. I beg to outline, in the first place, some of the 
things accomplished, or partly accomplished, and then to 
add certain recommendations for the further improvement 
of the postal service. 

Bills have been passed by Congress to provide for a new bius j^atsed, 
post-office building for the city of Washington ; to estab- pia««d^Dpon the 
lish sea post-offices for the distribution of foreign mails in 
transit and their immediate dispatch inland at New York ; 
to provide fifteen days' leave for post-office clerks ; to ex- 
periment with the free delivery in small towns to see what 
can be done towards its quicker extensiou everywhere; to 
add necessary officers and provide for leaves of absence in 
the Railway Mail Service ; and to exclude lottery literature 
fix>m the mails. A bill to establish a limited post and tele- 
graph has been unanimously reported by the Senate Commit- 
tee on the Post-Office and Post- Roads and numerous argu- 
ments in its behalf have been heard by the House committee. 
Bills hare been advanced a stage or further to permit the 
Department to forward matter on which postage has not 
been prepaid; to reduce the limit to which the free-delivery 
service may be extended down to towns of a population of 
5,000, or to offices whose revenue is $7,000; to provide super- 
visors of postal districts and additional officers to make the 
departmental service more efficient ; to fix a penalty for the 
burglary of post-offices; and to reclassify mail matter, so 
that a million doUars a year may be saved to the postal 
revenue. 



2 . EEPOBT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL, 

The snggestiou of the Department that $500,000 would 
' suffice for the inaagaration of the eight*hoar system in 
post-offices by promotions and by the employment of addi- 
> ttoiasA'M^n in preference to the payment of extra wages for 
. . mpre tjiasi eight hours of service per day met with small 
. , '. ; ''\' isvoT fBjadithe bill which proposed to appropriate $2,000^000 
or more, without, as I believe, accomplishing any more than 
the $500,000 could be made to accomplish, was allowed by 
its friends to remain upon the Calendar. A bill better to 
classify the clerks in the Eailway Mail Service is also on the 
Calendar. The postal- shipping bill occupies the same posi- 
tion of advantage. 
In the administrative methods of the Department itself 
Adminiatraiifve some chauges for the better have been made. A new series 

OQuifteB for the 

better. of smaller stamps, criticised, and justly criticised, at firsti, 

so far as the two-cent stamp was concerned (though the 
Department employed the same engravers and materials 
as formerly), are now, it is believed, quite acceptable to the 
public. Over two bundred thousand dollars has been 
saved on the contract for postal-cards, which, though they 
were properly criticised at first, were quickly brought up 
to the required standard by the contractor. Four hundred 
thousand dollars has been saved on the contract for stamped 
envelopes. Two hundred thousand dollars or more has been 
saved on certain lettings of contracts for carrying the mails, 
and at the same time the mail routes have been extended 
over almost 2,000,000 miles of railway and steam-boat and 
stage lines. The same number of inspectors have treated 
87,736 cases during the year, against 66,364 treated last 
year, or an average of 1,213 per man this year, against 938 
last year. The total number of cases on hand July 1, 1890, 
was 21,637, against 28,040 on hand July 1, 1890. This means 
an increase of 33 per cent, in cases treated, and a decrease 
of 22 per cent, in cases on hand. The anti-lottery legislation 
has entailed much extra labor upon the inspector force, but, 
on the other hand, the temptation to thieving among 
employes of the Department has been much diminished by 
the same means. The past year has been made very dis- 
agreeable to the ^^ green-goods" swindlers. 

Negotiations with the German authorities looking to 
the establishment of sea post-offices have been successful. 
A commission of expert accountants has been appointed 
thoroughly to examine the postal system and establish a 
uniform and simpler system of accounts for post-offices. 
Accurate counting and weighing of mail matter at all the 
post-offices of every grade have been made, and exact data 



GROWTH OF BUSINESS AND NEEDED REFORMS. 3 

gathered thereby toaohing the amount of free matter and 
matter of each class carried by the Department; and 
estimates indicating the effect of a redaction of letter 
postage to one cent are included. A commission of post- 
masters has examined nine handred models, designs, and 
suggestions of house letter-boxes to find something which, 
if universally adopted, would save a quarter part of the 
time of the carrier force of the Department. Several times 
postmasters, inspectors, and railway-mail superintendents 
have been called to Washington in groups to exchange ideas 
of benefit to themselves and to give the Postmaster-General 
the encouragement of their experience. 
A few figures illustrate how much the business of the ^^w^** •* *^ 

Department. 

Department has grown. The gi*oss revenue is nearly 
$5,000,000 larger than it ever was before. Almost five thou- 
sand new i)ost-offices, more than in any one year before, have 
been established upon the petitions of communities which 
have needed them. A decreasing limit for the extension 
of the free delivery has permitted the employment of letter- 
carriers in over fifty towns. Three times as many substa- 
tions and stamp agencies (which soon pay for themselves) 
were established as during the previous year. Over 5,000 
miles of B. P. O. service, so called (where traveling post- 
offices distribute the mails for instant dispatch), have been 
put on. The 58,000 transportation schedules have been 
examined, and adjusted or extended where it has been possi- 
ble. Thirty-six per cent, more of city mails have been dis- 
tributed on trains for instant dispatch than during the 
previous year. The star-route mileage has increased over 
5,000,000 miles and the railroad mileage over 11,000,000. 
The railway postal clerks have reduced the number of 
pieces usually sent to the Dead Letter Office by 2,000,000. 
By encouraging postmasters in free-delivery cities to pre- 
pare supplementary directories and by general sugges- 
tions to the public through the newspapers to take greater 
care in the direction of matter, the Dead Letter Office ex- 
pects a reduction of its labors by at least one-third. 
I shall have the honor to advocate this year, as last, with Becommendft. 

., . ., , ^ , tloDB and needed 

whatever persuasiveness it is possible for me properly to reforms, 
use, certain measures, legislative and administrative, which 
I believe to be for the benefit of the service. If some of 
them fail — as it can not be hoped that all will succeed at 
once— there will at least be the benefit of the inquiries, the 
discussions, and the collection of opinions. The postal-tel- 
egraph bill I again respectfully commend to your attention 
and to the favor of GongresSt The recommendation that the 



4 REPORT OF THE P08THASTER-GENERAL. 

postal-savings experiment be fiilly and fairly tried is again 
renewed* The discussion of the eight-hoar question can 
not be shirked; I hope the postal clerks will be certain dar- 
ing the next year who their friends are. The questions 
whether the division of the coantry into postal districts for 
the better instruction and encoaragement of postmasters, 
new and old, and whether an additional permanent ofiBcer 
of the very highest order of experience and originality 
would not be a good thing for the Department, may well 
be pressed. Within the Department itself many reforms 
can be worked out, but only slowly, partly because legis- 
lation is necessary and partly because even small revolu- 
tions are not desired by all. In the matter of simple and 
uniform accounting the coming year ought to show excellent 
results. I hope to see the civil-service examinations, es- 
I>ecially with reference to the railway mail, improved ; for 
only in proportion as these yield the most efficient civil 
servants can the benefits of the civil-service system be ex- 
tended. The whole i)OSt-offlce clerical force needs to be 
scanned thoroughly with a view to Congressional action 
looking to its better classification. 

I feel that, while the postmasters, the railway-mail people, 
the contractors, and all the officials and employes of the 
postal system are perhaps better in touch with the Depart- 
ment than they ever were before, a still better common 
spirit and purpose can be infused. I believe that the offi- 
cials and employes all agree with me that the quickest, the 
most accurate, and the most frequent service is not only de- 
sired, but is rightfully expected by the public ; and I believe 
I am not wrong in saying that the organized l>odies of busi- 
ness men, as well as the editors and the citizens generally, 
are more watchful for the shortcomings of the service than 
ever before, which is surely a very encouraging condition 
of affairs. 

A QUICKENED SERVICE. 

This one idea has dominated the Department this year: 
to make the mails go faster, more safely, and more fre- 
quently. The fifty-eight thousand six hundred and sixty- 
eight schedules of the railroads and the star and steam- 
boat routes have been studied, readjusted, and extended. 
Qniok connec- While WO are only at the beginning, with an enormous work 

tlona; early . , a, . o o7 ,,,.,, 

trainsj loyal yet to be douc, there IS satisfisKJtory progress. The railroad 
and transportation officials are in most instances ready 
helpers. Delays in connections are being removed; early 
trains to accommodate newspaper maUs are provided when- 
ever possible, and due care is takep to collect, deliver, and 



INCREASED SERVICE WITH TIME SAVED. 6 

close mails according to the particular needs of respective 

oommanities. These matters are not suffered to drift to 

their own level, but are the subjects of careful thought and 

consultation with committees and communities, and have 

the personal direction of officers of the Department. The 

new postmasters are in the main working splendidly, and 

there is a spirit of loyalty and devotion throughout the 

ranks of postal employes, notably in the Bailway Mail 

Service, which the best postal authorities declare to be in 

better shape than it has ever been before. In a number Herauttoebod* 

of cities boards of trade and local committees have ren- SSpISS^ ^^ 

dered important aid to the Department in adjusting the 

service to the better satisfaction of the public. 

I submit a few illustrations of the enlarged service in the i^S^SrwSi 
West. In fifteen months 1,149,706 miles of mail service 
were added in the State of Washington alone. Four years 
ago the service was not so large by 1,000,000 miles. In Wyo- < 
mingin fifteen months have been added about 80,000 miles 
of service, and in Idaho in fifteen months about 160,000 
miles. The last letting of contracts for star service in the 
fourth contract section, which embraces the country between 
Arkansas and California, shows the following : 

Annaal rate of expenditure : 

Jnne 30, 1890 (old servioe) 12,067.651.24 

July 1,1890 1,853,97^89 

Decrease 213,674.35 

Namber of miles traveled per annam : . 

Jane 30, 1890 (old service) 29,444,693.49 

July 1,1890 31,232,515.07 

Increase ^ ,. 1,787,821.58 

The examination of all the postal routes, whether they TinM wT«d in 
traverse railways or steam- boat or stage lines, has resulted ""^y p^*<*^ 
in many improvements, a few of which I beg to refer to. 
A morning mail from New York reaches Boston at 12 m. 
instead of 3.30 p. m., and not only benefits the latter city 
by so much, but makes earlier connections for New Hami>- 
shire and Maine. The fast mail from the west is delivered 
in Boston a business day earlier than formerly. The New 
lork and Chicago mail is delivered at 10 o'clock a. m. in- 
stead of in the afternoon or the next morning. Similar 
arrangements of schedules and similar benefits to all the 
intermediate region can be shown between Philadelphia 
Pittsburgh, Ofaicago, and St Louis. The transcontinental 
m^ referred to last year as saving a day, has been main- 



6 REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

tained successfully, and its l>eDefits have been extended to 
all the country tributary to the railroads traveled. A fast 
mail between St. Louis and Kansas City permits a delivery 
of commercial matter in Kansas City in the forenoon instead 
of in the afternoon after banking hoiirs, and early schedules 
oat of Kansas City practically advance deliveries throagh- 
out the State of Kansas by three hours. Five hours have 
been gained between Chicago and New Orleans, and it Is 
possible that the schedule may be shortened four hours 
more. Many western mails out of St. Paul have been ad- 
vanced two hours. New schedules are under consideration 
reaching from Boston to New Orleans by which all of the 
intermediate country will be benefited and business men 
at either end will gain a day. 
Added flMOi- Between September, 1889, and October 23, 1890, the full 

Of B.P. o. lines, railway post-office cars have been extended over 5,105 miles 
of additional railroad routes, and the full railwa;^ post-office 
cars already existing have been enlarged on 12,785 miles of 
railroad, while the apartment lines have been extended (new) 
on 4,434 miles and enlarged on 5,723 miles of existing rail- 
road. The efficiency and rapidity of the railway post-office 
mails have been improved on every line, and on one-fifth of 
the lines facilities that never before existed have been sup- 
plied. Bunning into and from Chicago, upon all the differ- 
ent railroads centering there, we have fifty-six daily railway 
post-office lines upon that number of trains — that is, fifty- 
six incoming and fifty-six outgoing. Thia is an increase of 
four lines during the past year. The aim of the railway-mail 
service is to make schedules that leave the large mailing 
centers after the close of business and arrive early in the 
morning so as to deliver before business begins. 

tt^wxtoSS?'*' The development of city distribution on trains so as to 
avoid delay after arrivals is indicated by the following 
enumeration of pieces of mail advanced thereby : 

1889 166,718,810 

1890 226,429.675 



Increase (say 30 per cent) 59,710,765 

b- rry 

Ut Mnt home. 



"Nixie" m»t- ffjiig improvement will be still further developed this 



year. Besides, during the past year 4,028,931 pieces of 
mail were taken from the railway post-office lines imper- 
fectly directed, of which by later treatment 2,186,933 pieces, 
or 47 per cent., were sent home. This kept out of the Dead 
Letter Office more than 2,000,000 pieces of mail matter. 
The total increased length of mail routes in 1890 was 



TH* POSTAL TELEGRAPH. 

11^831 miles. The miles traveled increased in 1890 by 
16,507^609, and were distributed in part as follows: 

Hlles. 

Texas 675,124 

Indian Territory 270,070 

Virginia* 1,588,506 

Georgia 346,176 

Florida 164,475 

Sonth Carolina 130, 520 

MiaaiHippi 258,037 

Arkanaaa 105,091 

Dakota 199,490 

The star-route mileage traveled has increased 6>388,318^^^^2iJ!2dJSSl 
miles. The railroad mileage traveled has increased 11,523,- ^^^ 
191 miles. The total number of mail routes June 30, 1890, 
was 27,105, an increase over the previous year of 1,444. The 
total number of miles traveled per annum was 327,409,493. 



Idles. 

Montana 156,916 

Wyoming 78,985 

Arizona 33,799 

Utah 68,869 

Idaho 124,413 

Oregon 179,270 

California 164,452 

Washington 323,283 



THE QUICKEST SERVICE NOT YET ATTAINED. 

The swiftest mail is not fast enough in these days for all The people 
the needs of commerce and social correspondence. The poHt«i*t«ifi{raph 
eonviction steadily grows upon me that the post-office should 
do more than employ fast mails and stage coaches, and 
that the electric wires should carry letters ; that the peo- 
ple who pay in postage rates the cost of the postal system 
have a right to the use of the postal plants as a means of 
reducing the cost of telegraphic correspondence and for the 
instant transmission of postal money-orders. We strain 
every muscle and nerve trying to gain an hour two on this 
collection or that delivery. We worry the railroads with 
importunities for new trains or faster ones that shall save 
perhaps three or four hours to the business men and the 
letter- writers. All the while its quickest service, by which 
electric letters under some of the new systems might be 
transmitted and whole days or whole nights be gained and 
saved, is kept out of the reach of these who are doing 
days' work or are just beginning to be capitalists. 

There are mail routes of thousands of miles in the new 
States and thinly settled parts of the older country where 
every mile entails a certain loss to the Department ; but the 
priceless privilege of communication by post is maintained 
though every other channel of intercourse is closed. The 
postal service, with all its longdistance and unprofitable 
service, burdened with the cost of doing without charge the 

* This large increase was oocaeioned by the addition oi 428 miles of 
raihoad lines 



8 EEPORT OP THE POSTMASTEB-GENEKAL. 

mailing basiness of all the other branches of the Govern- 
ment, loaded down with the newspaper and book mail which 
it carries at about one-sixtli of the actual cost, is neverthe- 
less nearly self-supporting. It has therefore proved itself 
V i^ble to manage successtlilly the telegraph business in con- 
nection with the postal system and as ^ part of it. 

Certain limited classes are against this consolidation, but 
the masses of the people are strongly for it. It is not possi- 
ble to take an accurate census of those favoring or oppos- 
ing it, but any disinterested person mky discover the trend 
* of feeling that has set in. That man must be willfully 

l)lind who does not see the vast and rising tide of public 
sentiment against monopoly. Here is a purpose of the peo- 
Pobiie ae nil- pie, and uo man or set of men can turn it aside. In oife 

fLVon a postal form Or another the public imperatively demands cheaper 
^^'"^^ telegraphy, and the Post-Offlce Department can supply it at 
less cost than any corporation, unless the latter has rent, 
light, and fuel free, and carriers and clerks without pay. 
It has been argued that it is not the business of the Gov- 
ernment to operate the telegraph ; but the Government of 
this and every other country controls the mail service and 
stoutly claims that the general welfare is promoted by 
managing the transmission of correspondence. In pursuing 
that object it puts on mails at great cost, cheapens postage, 
and constantly adds facilities for ready communication. The 
general welfare will be similarly promoted by going one step 
further and giving the quickest of all modes of communi- 
<^tion, namely, cheap telegraphic facilities, as it does 
mails, at points not profitable for private capital to reach, 
as well as at all other points. If mails were only run to 
self-sustaining or profit-making points the extent of the 
service would be cut off 40 x>er cent. The postal system is 
not a scheme for profit If it were, newspapers and books 
would pay their proportionate cost and either a large annual 
surplus would appear in these reports or the free delivery 
would be extended universally. The postal service is the 
Government's kind hand, protecting and promoting the 
correspondence of its people, and communication by tele- 
graph as well as by mail is essential to its best development. 

•JStoed?****"' -^ objection urged by the above-referred-to class of per- 
sons against the assumption of any telegraph business by 
the Government is that the telegraph would be in the 
hands of the party in power, and liable to corrupt use in 
times of political excitement. This is more specious than 
sound. The postal service is in the hands of the party in 
power, and liable to the same abuse. Stringent laws and 



OBJECTIONS TO POSTAL TELEGRAPH ANSWERED. 9 

I>enalties hedge aroand the postal system, jealous eyes 
watch ityand it is ever opeu to public observation and in- 
quiry. The telegraph business, in the hands of private 
individuals, is not so hedged about, and is much more likely 
to be nsed for corrupt purposes. 

Another specious objection is that the Government ought 
not to compete with existing companies. But the people 
have rights and interests as well as the telegraph compa- 
nies. In 1866 it was proposed to assume control of the 
telegraph lines; but it was then held by these companies 
that they should be permitted to realize some profit on their 
investments, and by act of Congress five years were allowed 
for that purpose, since which time the people have paid 
rates (in many cases and at many points excessive) that 
have earned over (100,000,000, which has been divided 
among stockholders or added to telegraph plants. 
The companies have been permitted to enjoy these valu- 
able franchises for a quarter of a century instead of five ' 
years. Even now it is not proposed to take these properties 
out of the hands of their owners, but to open to them and 
to the public the privilege of bidding for telegraph service 
on a modified scale, which ,will not, it is practically certain, 
interfere with the service now existing. 

It is sometimes maintained that the telegraphic service 
can be performed more cheaply by private hands. If this 
objection is good, it holds against all kinds of Government 
work. The public revenue ought to be collected by private 
hands. The laws ought to be administered by contracting 
parties. A banking firm ought to manage the Treasury, and 
the postal business should be handled by a syndicate. The 
question is, what is the best and safest for the public inter- 
est, as well as what can the general public afford to use! 
No one believes that the mail service would have been so ThemaUservtoe 
widely extended by any private corporation that had to JeSlf ^Srte^ 
pay dividends to its stockholders. One-cent postage would pJraS2S!f* ^^ 
never come if the post-office business were in the hands 
of a money-making corporation. It is for the interest of a 
private company to extend its business only so fast and 
so far as it is profitable; it is the aim of the Government 
to extend its service wherever it is actually needed. 
These further objections are made: Large outlays of 
money and an increase of Government patronage. Both 
fall to the ground, because, under the plan proposed, 
it is not intended to buy or build telegraph lines, 
bat to contract with existing companies, or such as may 
hereafter be established f and such contracts would provide 



10 EEPORT OF THE POSTMASTEB-GENEBAL. 

not only telegraphic lines, but instrnments and clerks to 
operate them, except at small offices, where the postmaster 
or one of his clerks would also be paid by the telegraph 
company to act as operator. Therefore, there could 
be no drafts on the Treasury or additions to the civil 
list, except as the general service grew— and it is grow- 
. ing every day now. The contracting telegraph com- 
pany would furnish lines, instruments, and operators, and 
transmit the messages at rates fixed by the Government, all 
of which would go to the company, except two cents per 
message, which would be retained by the Post-Office De- 
partment to cover its expense in collecting and distributing. 
In brief, this is the plan proposed. There would be 
no outlay of money, no appointments of clerks, and no 
financial liability. The persistent misstatement of the facts 
at the outset led to some misunderstandings on the part of 
a small portion of the public. The actual plan is surely en- 
titled to a just statement and a fair consideration. If there 
orxaais^dcap-is a better one, it will be quickly discovered and adopted. 

prove. '*^'Many boards of trade, chambers of commerce, and trade 
and labor organizations throughout the country have, dur- 
ing the past year, passed resolutions demanding postal 
telegraph in this or some other form. The subject was con- 
sidered by the Committee on the Po8^0ffice and Post- 
Roads of the House, but was not acted upon beyond grant- 
ing hearings to the parties interested. The Committee on 
the PostOffice and Post-Roads of the Senate reported the 
bill unanimously. 

i^kmArooocMw ^ ^^^ ^'Bcts from the last official report of the postmaster- 
general of Great Britain, dated August 11, 1890, contro- 
vert the somewhat accepted opiuion that the English sys- 
tem of postal telegraphy is a great expense to the Govern- 
ment and a failure. The increase in the number of inland 
and foreign telegrams was 8.5 and 8.1, respectively. The 
number of telegrams on the business of railway companies, 
transmitted without charge by the post-office under obliga- 
tions incurred when the use of their systems was acquired 
by the Government, increased nearly 17 per cent. Press 
telegrams are transmitted at very low rates and at considr 
erable loss to the revenue. In spite of this free and losing 
business, however, the English postal telegraph was prac- 
tically self-supporting in 1887-'88, showed a large profit in 
1888-'89, and cleared over $500,000 in 1889-'0O. This, to be 
sure, is making no charge for interest on the outlay ; but 
it may be answered that the full interest on the cost of the 
plant can not be fairly charged to the expense account, be- 



SAYINGS BANKS. 11 

caase, as is nniversally admitted, the Oovernment paid 
an excessively higjb price for the old telegraph lines. 

The relation of the receipts and expenditares of the En- 
glish system during the past three years is given in the 
following table : 



Year. 


ReoeipU. 


Bxpendi. 
tare*. 


1887-88 1 


£1.M2,940 
2,1»,965 
2,363,836 


£1, 999, 038 


1888-*89 


2,041,361 


]tf)^*90 


2,282,310 







It is to be observed that the business of the English The Ameifou 
newspapers, as well as the foreign, railway, Government, u^f^yberaooM^ 
and ordinary business, was done, and done acceptably, 
though at a loss to the revenue; and it may be repeated 
that this real Government telegraph system, in spite of its 
large free and under-cost business, pays its way, leaving a 
gradually increasing surplus to be applied to interest ac- 
count on the investment, which is unusual in Government 
works. The telegraph scheme which I advocate could 
never fail to pay its way from beginning to end, because 
the very fact that a postal-telegraph stamp had been put 
upon a telegram would imply that the expense of collecting, 
transmitting, and delivering the telegram had been paid 
in advance. The limited plan, in other words, collects as 
it goes for exactly what it does. To draw another parallel 
from the English system, which is necessarily not so free 
from the red tape of Government control as the contract 
scheme would be in this country, it may be- pointed out that 
the general telegraph business, whether commercial, social, 
or press, could be handled more expeditiously than under the 
present entirely private system, because the delay in ac- 
counting would disappear with the advent of the postal- 
telegraph stamp. 

SAYINGS-BANKS AT POST-OFFIOES. 

The Pos^Office Department is continually urged to act Department 
as the guardian of moneys for people resident in parts of MfSf^SaSS!*'* 
the country where savings-banks do not exist. It is not 
the large cities that feel this need, though even at the popu- 
lous centers banking institutions generally do not offer 
convenient hours for working people and do not; care to 
deal with small sums. It is the large mass of wage-earners 
outside of large cities that clamor for help to keep hard- 
earned gains. In some of the States no laws exist to give 



12 REPORT OF TH£ POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

State protection to savings deposited with privrate cap- 
italists. It is stated on reputable aathority that in one 
portion of the country containing twelve millions of popula- 
tion there are not as many places of deposit for the saving 
of small sums as exist in a single city of 80,000 people in 
a Few England State. 

To teach economy and thrift as leading up to better citi- 
zenship falls short if there is no adequate provision for the 
. safe-keeping of savings. Such places ought to be within 
an hour's walk of the home of every workingman. They 
can not be left to private capitalists to provide, because it 
would not pay them to deal in stnall sums or perform the 
necessary labor. The post-offices and the postmasters are 
in every respect rightly situated to do this work. It would 
be a great comfort to the people to have these banks that 
could not be affected in times of financial panic. 
SATingB baoks Of all the great powers in the world the United States 
and Germany alone are without postal savings-systems. 
The last report of the British authorities shows that on 
the average one person out of every eight in the United 
Kingdom is a depositor in the postal savings, and, while in 
England and Wales the average balance to each depositor 
is almost (70, in Ireland, where the conditions are harder, 
the average balance to each depositor is close to $94, owing 
doubtless to fewer opportunities to invest or deposit money 
for safe-keepipg. 

In Mr. Lacey's report to the Forty-seventh Congress, urg- 
ing the establishment of i)Ostal savings-banks, he quotes 
* as follows from the twenty-sixth report of the postmaster- 
general of the United Kingdom : 

Notwithstanding the dnliness of trade and the deficiency of the har- 
vest that characterized the year 1879, it is satisfactory to report a con- 
tinaed excess of deposits over withdrawals and an increase in the bal- 
ance due to depositors of np wards of a million and a half sterling. 
Mostremarkable, perhaps, is the progress shown in Ireland, considering 
the severe distress to which many parts of that country have been sub- 
ject. For the whole of Ireland there was, including interest, an in- 
crease in the balance due to depositors of $457,915, and of this amount 
the eight counties chiefly affected by the distress contributed no lem 
than $127,090. 

^Mittdi saving*. The postmastor-geueral of Great Britain states in his 
last report that the number of savings-bank depositors last 
year was 8^ 101, 120^ an increase of 560,496 persons, and tbat 
the total amount of deposits for the year was a fraction 
under $100,000,000, nearly $4,000,000 more than the previl 
ous year. In one day over 65,000 persons made deposits 
amounting to over $685,000. There were 924^010 new ac- 



NEW PLAN FOB POSTAL SAVINGS BANKS. 



13 



ooonts opened in 1889 and 637,128 closed. The total num- 
ber of open aetive accounts at the end of the year was 
4,507^809, or nearly 300,000 more than the previous year. 
The report gives interesting data of the growth of the 
savings-system in the British provinces. In Ceylon the 
system was established in 1885 and '< proved a boon to the 
poorer population." 

An interesting statement in the Bankers' Monthly for 
October says: 

Bat the greatest extension of savings-banks has been brought about 
by the introduotion of the system of post-offioe banks. In India, as 
in England, the use of the already existing maohinery of the post- 
ofSce has not only proved of the greatest advantage in point of econ- 
omy of administration, but has been of the utmost service in extending 
the opportunity of profitably exercising thrift into many parts of the 
country where otherwise it would be impossible to afford such accommo- 
dation without incurring a cost too great to be borne by the business 
of the district. * * * . In March, 1888, the totals of accounts and 
balances in the various savings-banks were as follows : 



I praaideiiey banks ... 

IS xaUway banks , 

170 mflitaiy banks... 
I»MI post-office banks. 

Total 




Balances. 



Bupeet, 

11,618,784 
2,296,501 
1,473,783 

50,488,357 



65,777,375 



The last French report at hand is that of 1885, which 
shows the amount of deposits to be over $53,000,000. 
In Belgiam the depositors at the close of 1888 had 
150,000,000 to their credit. In the ^Netherlands the depos- 
its were upwards of $5,800,000. In Sweden at the close of 
1887, the depositors, 59 per cent, of whom were minors, 
had $760,430 to their credit. Comparison of the deposits 
in 1887 with those of 1884 shows an increase of over 100 per 
cent. A report of the postmaster-general of the Hawaiian 
Kingdom dated February 11, 1890, shows that that country 
first had postal savings in 1880, and has now 2,641 depos- 
itors, with $909,613 on deposit, against $477,475 one year 
before. It would seem as though the United States should 
not be the last country to offer assistance to the masses of 
her people struggling to rise by thrift and economy. 

I recommend that the Post-OfiOice Department be author- 
ized to establish postal savings-banks under regulations 
formulated by the Postmaster-General ; that the said banks 
be located as follows : (1) In States having no laws regu- xew pUn for 
lating savings-banks; (2) in any other States upon peti-^^ki'*^^'^'*' 



14 REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENEBAL. 

tion of a considerable namber of residents of any one looal- 
iCy ; and (3) not more numerously than one post-office for 
every 10 miles of area; that the interest to be paid depos- 
itors shall be fixed by the Secretary of the Treasury at the 
beginning of each year, and be one-half of 1 ^er cent, less 
than the average rate paid to depositors by private bankers ; 
that all postal savings received within a State shall be 
placed on deposit with the national banks of that State, on 
application, in such amounts and at such interest as the 
Secretary of the Treasury shall prescribe, and that all such 
deposits be declared by special enactment preferred claims 
against the banks holding them. 

LOTTERIES AKD THE MAILS. 

Lottery in- The ucw act of Oongrcss concerning lotteries accords with 
sued? **"' ' ' the recommendations of my last annual report The intent 
of the law is to shut out all lottery business from the mails. 
Power is given the Postmaster-General, as the executive of 
the Department, within the limits of the constitution, to 
exclude all such matter. Quick action was taken the day 
after the enactment received your signature to close the 
mails against this business. Each of the 62,401 postmasters 
and the inspectors has been officially notified of the terms 
of the act, and the Department has issued regulations to 
govern their procedure in executing the law. The two 
months that it has been in operation are too short a time 
to produce results, but there is satisfactory progress. The 
lottery companies can not but see that there is to be no 
trifling or evasions in dealing with them. The press has 
aided the Department by its very generjil approval and the 
public at large have seconded its efforts to make the law 
effective. The Attorney-General has directed the prompt 
prosecution of all who violate this law. 
.f^bMcS"'*^"^ Schemes for the distribution of prizes by chance, most 
of them of a local nature, and some of them connected 
with charitable and religious organizations, and commonly 
termed innocent, have clearly come within the prohibitions 
of the new law, and consequently the newspapers and other 
publications containing advertisements of them have been 
unraailable. The Department, however, has not applied 
the law harshly in these cases, but where the notifications 
of the violations of the law have been met in a resentful 
spirit, accompanied by a refusal to omit the objectionable 
advertisements, no alternative has been left but to bar from 
the mails all such matter. 
The business of the Kew Orleans post-office has fallen 



of ebance. 



LOTTERIES. 15 

off one-third. The registered mail addressed to the Louir DeoreMeof po«tr 
siana State Lottery and money-orders drawn to its order Kew ori^if 
have been almost discontinued. While this class of cor- 
respondence seems to be disappearing from the mails it is 
noticeable that one lottery company invites correspondence 
and remittances by the several express companies, and 
announces that the agents of said companies will distribute 
circulars and receive money for tickets. The United States Atutude of ex- 
Express Company has taken the lead in declining all lot- C^* oo«np«»- 
tery business and has so instructed its agents. The Adams 
Express has followed in the same direction. Certain other 
express companies, operating mainly in the southern and 
western territory are alleged to be using their organizations 
to defeat the purpose of Congress in enacting this law. I 
have preferred to wait a reasonable time for the voluntary 
withdrawal by these corporations rather than proceed 
under the sections of the Revised Statutes that prohibit 
express companies under penalties and conditions to carry 
letters or packets over post-routes established by law or 
between places regularly supplied with mail. I am in- 
formed that the acceptance of the business of the lottery 
companies is a clear infraction of a penal statute, and at tl^e 
proper time, if occasion requires, I shall bring all this to 
the attention of the judicial department of the Government. 

The provisions of the lottery act have been held to apply ApBiiM to for. 
to droulars, i>amphlets, newspapers, and other publications ^ ^° p^p®"- 
coming into the United States from foreign countries pre- 
cisely as they do to such matter found in our domestic 
mails. There is nothing in the stipulations of the Univer- 
sal Postal Union or in the separate postal conventions 
with adjoining countries that requires the United States 
to treat foreign mails in any essential respect differently 
from domestic mails, certainly nothing that obligates the 
transmission or delivery of anything declared to be unmail- 
able by the laws of this country relating to the postal service. 
Further negotiations may be required with one or two inter- 
national neighbors with the view of suggesting correc- 
tions in their laws concerning the sending of circulars at 
transient printed rates under seal so that their contents 
can not be inspected, their present statutes having resulted 
in flooding the United States with sealed letters mailed and 
transmitted as circulars. 

It has also been held that the advertisement of the sale of 
certain premium bonds, issued by European and other gov- 
ernments, is prohibited by the provisions of the lottery act. 
The payment of these bonds is based upon two or more con- 
ditions: Ist. That drawings are to be held at stated inter- 



/ 
16 REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAIu 

vals to determine what bonds, priuoipal, and interest, of a 
given series shall be paid at a subsequent date, which draw- 
ings are repeated at such intervals until the payment of the 
entire series is provided for; and, 2d. That the holders of 
the bonds thus designated at a portion of these drawings 
shall receive a ticket which will entitle him to certain 
premiums or prizes in addition to the face value and inter- 
est of the bonds, which are to be determined by a subse- 
quent drawing for the distribution of said prizes. 

It is legitimate for a government to issue evidences of 
debt, and to provide for the payment of them at different 
times, by selecting in the manner described the, securities 
that will be first redeemed ^ and if the plan stopped at this 
point the advertisement of it would clearly not come within 
the prohibition of the act. The ruling of the Department 
s to this effect has been given in a number of cases. But 

when a scheme for the distribution of a list of premiums of 
different values, determinable by lot or chance, is ingrafted 
upon the original plan of payment and incorporated in the 
bonds as a x)art of the condition of sale, it certainly con-, 
verts the whole scheme into a lottery, which, in its broad- 
est sense, is defined to be " a distribution of anything by 
lot," and in law a scheme " for the distribution of prizes by 
chance." The Department has ruled that the sales of pre- 
mium bondsj on the terms mentioned above, could not be 
advertised in newspapers, nor could the list of premiums or 
prizes awarded at said drawings be published. 

As before stated, the lottery act has been in existence so 
short a time that its effect in suppressing the lottery evil 
can not now be fully stated. I believe that it will accom- 
plish all that was expected of it, and that each of its pro- 
visions dependent upon executive action can be made effect- 
ive. The action of the courts in test cases that must 
necessarily be begun can not be anticipated ; but it can 
be safely predicted that if the law be sustained our mails 
will be purged of what has long been conceded to be a 
most demoralizing element. 

''CENSOKSniP" OF TUE MAILS. 

lodcoent liter- The discusslon of the anti-lottery bill and the exclusion 
of certain literature from the mails have caused a good deal 
. to be said during the past few months about a censorship of 
the mails, so called; and, lest people who believe in fair play 
and a just administration of the law should find them- 
selves still misunderstanding the course of the Depart- 



INDECENT PUBLICATIONS. 17 

ment with reference to these two questions, I beg to sab- 
mit a few &ct8. It has been explained elsewhere that the 
intention is to enforce the spirit as well as the letter of the 
anti-lottery law. That i% also the purpose with reference 
to the laws regulating the circalation of indecent litera- 
ture. The whole truth is simply this: TSo line of action 
that is not reasonable will stand the test of discriminating 
criticism, and fair-minded writers and fair-minded readers 
understand this. 

An act of Congress passed March 3, 1873 (B. S., section 
3893), provided, *^ That no obscene, lewd, or lascivious book, 
pamphlet, picture, paper, print, ^ . ^ ^ shall be carried 
in the mail ; " and further, that an:ji person who should know- 
ingly mail or cause to be mailed, or who should knowingly 
receive or cause to be received, from the mails articles be- 
fore declared to be non-mailable should be deemed to be 
guilty of a misdemeanor, and liable to a fine of not less 
than $100 nor more than |5,000, or to imprisonment at hard q^i^S^^S- 
labor for not less than one year or more than ten years. It <' ' 
was soon found that it was not enough merely to provide 
for the exclusion of << obscene, lewd, and lascivious " pub- 
' lications, but that publications which were simply ^' inde- 
cent^ had also better be excluded; and accordingly Oon- 
gress, by the act of July 12, 1876 (19 Stat., p. 90), extended 
the prohibitions by adding thereto the words, '<or other 
publications of an indecent character,'' and by forbidding 
not only the carriage of such matter in the mails, but 
"the delivery of it from any post-office or by any letter- 
carrier;" so that the statute was amended to read as fol- 
lows: 

Every obflcene, lewd, or lasoivioiiB book, pamphlet, picture, paper, 
writing, print| or other publication of an indecent character * * * is 
hereby declared to be non-mailable matter, and shall not be conveyed 
in the mails, nor delivered from any post-offlooi nor by any letter- 
carrier. 

The statute was thus broadened by prohibiting the trans- 
mission of any matter offensive to modesty, or tending to 
subvert respect for decency and morality, first by consti- 
tuting the Postmaster-General the judge of the character 
of such matter to forbid its carriage in the mails (which 
could only be prevented by executive order), and second by 
leaving to judicial action the duty of imposing penalties. 

It does not matter whether or not a given publication 
presented for mailing appears, by complaint or otherwise, 
to a postmaster to be ^^ obscene, lewd, or lascivious," if it 
does appear to be <^ indecent." He is obliged, in order not 
to become a law-breaker, to refer the questionable point to 

p M G 90— r-2 



ft 
18 REPORT OP THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

the proper Department official. It does not matter, when 
the referee considers the question, whether the given pub- 
lication is merely <' obscene, lewd, or lascivious." If it is 
simply indecent, he must excluded t or break the law. A 
postmaBte^ translation of a questionable book was, as a matter of fact, 
to act when ap. presented some months since at the post-office in a Western 
^ city for transmission in the mails. It was held and referred 

to this Department. The Assistant Attorney-General, find- 
ing it indecent under any definition of the word, issued 
an order excluding it. To exclude the book was the simple 
duty of the Department. For myself I never discuss the 
policy or wisdom of breaking the law, and the officials of 
the Post- Office Department do not. 

Some have said that the exclusion of a book only draws 
attention to it and makes the damage caused by its sale the 
greater. That, as I conceive, is no affair of a sworn public 
official. Moreover, the <' advertising" which it is held the 
Department gave the objectionable publication was entirely 
due to the thrifty bluster of the publisher who, however 
much he complained of the injustice of the decision of the 
Department, never appealed to the Postmaster-General to 
have it reversed. The question is not pertinent, either, why 
the Department does not exclude certain other publications 
from the mails which are admitted to be indecent. It treats 
these cases only as they are brought to its attention; and 
one complaint is considered as carefully as another. To try 
to pursue any other policy — to try to find publications 
which on one pretext or another might be excluded — would 
be to try to establish a real censorship of the mails, which 
is entirely foreign to what I conceive to be the duty of the 
Postmaster-General. 

THE SAPETY OF "MTATT, MATTER. 

1,223,444 pieces of registered mail matter, valued at 
$1,114,491,440.07 were forwarded for the Post-Office and 
Treasury Department. It is not practicable to state ac- 
curately the value of the remaining 13,723,637 pieces of 
registered matter transmitted for the public during the 
year, but such value may be to some extent estimated by tak- 
ing as a basis of calculation the known or supposed contents 
of the 1,951 pieces reported to have been rified or lost. The 
aggregate amount of the inclosures for these 1,951 pieces 
is reported at $24,116^7, an average value per piece of 
$12.36. By computing the 13,723,637 pieces at this rate, 
toSf'S^ '****■ ^^^ ^^^^^ 18 $169,624,153.32. This is without much doubt 
an underestimate. This sum added to that of the official 



SAFETY OF MAIL MATTJBB. 19 

Talaes given above creates a total of $1,284,115,599.39. The 
net lo6S amounted in all to $14,411.86, or rcVlrv of 1 per 
cent. ' 

As to the ordinary mail matter, it is jast as difficult to 
determine its valne, because there are no declared values, vaioa of oM- 
and it is the business of the officials not to inquire what let- ""^ ™*^ 
ters contain. It is interesting to know, however, that the 
average value of the money letters opened in the Dead 
Letter Office was $1.65 ; of the letters containing postal- 
notes, $1.51; and of the letters containing negotiable paper, 
$55.OT. By taking into account all letters opened in the 
Dead Letter Office, the average value per letter is found to 
be a little more than 25 cents (25.2). It is estimated that 
there are carried in the mails 1,854,667,802 ordinary letters 
per annuu, these figures being based upon the general count 
of mail matter made for one week in May last At the 
rate of 25.2 cents per letter the value of the ordinary letter- 
mail of the United States for one year would be $467,376,- 
286.10. 

There has been no loss at all in the Department proper. 
The total supposed losses of ordinary mail throughout 
the United States, as reported by the office of the Ghief 
Post-Office Inspector, amounted to 51,745 pieces. Of these 
20,900, or 40 per cent., were packages, the remaining 60 per 
cent, being letters. The total losses ascertained to be due 
to carelessness or depredation of postal employes nuihber 
23,985, 60 per cent, of which would be 14,391. Assuming Pcnentage of 
the average value to be 25.2 cents, the total ascertained loss ^'^ 
of ordinary letters chargeable to thQ postal service would 
be $3,626.53, or k^Uq^ of 1 per cent. ; and it is a cause of 
sincere congratulation that the practical termination of the ^ 

lottery business as conducted through the mails will in 
great measure remove from postal employes the temptation 
to steal letters. 

The following is the best evidence at command of the 
character and integrity of postmasters. It is an extract 
from a letter written at my instance by the Auditor of the 
Treasury for this Department : 

NOVXMBSB 15, 1890. 

Bon. John Wakamakxr, 

Po9im4uter-General : 
Sib : I am yerbaHy reqaested by the Chief PostrOffice Inspector to 
prepare for your nae a statement of the number and amonnt of defianlta 
to the United States of postal and money order fands by postmasters 
dtuing the period from April 1, 1889, to the present date. 



20 BEPOBT OP THE POSTMASTEB-GENEEAL. 

I am of the opinion, as preyionsly stated, that, so far as the results 
of collection of deht» arising oat of the business of the past year has 
progressed, it may be safely asserted that no defalcation, resulting aa 
yet in actual loss to the Government, has occurred in ^ither postal or 
money-order transactions. 
BespectfuUy, 
(Signed) T. B. Coulter, 

Auditor. 

THE FOBBIGN MAIL SBBVIOE. 

Sstimatedpiof. The revenne from all soarces for service to foreign coan- 
tt^^MB foreign ^^..^ ^^^ ^^^j be determined by estimates based upon weights 
of mails and statistics gathered during the first seven days 
of October and April last. The aggregate snm seems to be 
$2^655408, and the actual net cost of the service is $573,882, 
showing a profit of over $2,000,000, exclusive of the cost of 
transportation from points of origin to the exchange post- 
offices. This cost can not be ascertained from any existing 
data, as it forms a part of the' general mail in transit from 
all points. For the facilities afforded by the transportation 
companies named as miscellaneous service in the table of 
the report of the Superintendent of Foreign Mails, compris- 
ing the lines of steamers to the Latin- American countries, 
the compensation allowed under the law is inadequate for 
the service performed. 
Anitraiian Mail Connections with the Australian colonies have been 
"*"** maintained with difficulty, owing to the disposition of the 

New Zealand Government to terminate the present arrange- 
ment on account of the alleged inadequacy of the compen- 
sation allowed by this Gk)vernment, viz, the entire amount 
of postage collected. The Department can only act within 
the statutes, and the subject in detail has been laid before 
the Committee on the Post-Office and Post-Roads of the 
House of Bepresentatives, whose chairman introduced a 
joint resolution which reached the House Calendar. Mean- 
While the New Zealand Government has submitted to the 
contractors (the Oceanic Steamship Company) propositions 
for the continuance of the service for one year, the accept- 
ance of which by the company probably depends largely upon 
the fate of the bill now before Congress in favor of Amm- 
can shipping and the joint resolution above referred to. 
I consider the matter of sufficient importance to the postal 
and commercial interests of the United States urgently to 
recommend that it receive prompt and favorable action. 
Fwreip pitt^ The parccls-post service continues to increase with for- 
eign nations which apply for facilities to get our products. 
During the year postal treaties have been concluded with 



FOREIGN HAILS. 21 

GoBta Eica and the Danish West India Islands. The limits 
of samples of articles have been increased for Italy ander 
the mles of the Postal Union, and the range of mailable 
articles has been extended. The Fonrth International Pos- 
tal Gongress will assemble in Vienna on the 20th of May, 
1891, to revise the existing convention and regnlations of 
the Universal Postal Union. The United States is entitled 
to two representatives. 

Negotiations instituted by this Department with the 
postal authorities of Great Britain, Germany, and France 
were conducted by William Potter, esq., of Philadelphia, as 
oor representative. A personal visit was made to the 
postal bureaus of these three countries, and while the post- 
masters-general of Great Britain and France were unable 
to enter into arrangements with the United States to es- 
tablish sea post-offices for the purpose of assorting mails 
in transit, the postmaster-general of Germany made a pre- 
liminary agreement for snch offices on ships sailing between 
IS'ew York, Bremen, Hamburg, and Southampton. The 
effect of the new service will be to save the time required 
at the New York office for assorting these foreign malls and 
for preparing them for distribution. The authority and the 
api^opriation for inaugurating this service was given by ge* pott-ofBoM 
Congress June 30, 1890. The adjustment of the details to |Ji Jf^?*^^^ 
put the service into operation has been found to be im- ™"y- 
XKMSsible by correspondence, and a representative of the 
German postal service has been ordered to this country for 
the purpose. Mr. Potter's valuable services were rendered 
at his own expense and without desire for compensation. 
His report in full is printed as an appendix to this report. 

OABBTING: THE FOBEiaN MAIL. 

The Department is wholly dependent upon steamers fly- united stetes 
ing the flags of other nations and of foreign ownership for foi^^^^oap^ 
the transportation of the mail. Exceptions are the Pacific pOTUtton of 'foil 
Mail S. S. Co., the Oceanic S. S. Co., the P. S. and Brazil **«" '"'^ 
Line, and The Bed ^^D" Line. The total amount paid to all 
the other American companies is only $10,955.97. 

Unexpected differences with steam-ship companies of for- 
eign registry relating to charges, or for other causes, might 
at any moment cut off mail intercourse with Europe under 
the present circumstances. It must be apparent that this 
country should not be subject to foreign capitalists for 
means to distribute its mail. Without considering the in- 
land charges on the foreign mail, the sea service shows a 



22 SEPOBT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

profit of not far from $2,000,000 per annum, which sum 
might^be fairly considered for disposal in the encourage- 
ment of American shipping for American mails. 

I have examined Senate bill No, 3739, now pending in 
the House, "To provide an ocean mail service," and be- 
lieve it to be for the interest of the postal service to have 
such a bill become a law. In considering the subject at 
the request of the Committee on the Post-Office and Post- 
Boads of the House of Bepresentatives I had the honor to 
si^bmit the following amendments^ which, I understand, 
were approved by the committee: 

Sec. 5. And that the total amount of oompensation to be paid for 
snoh ocean mail service over and above the net reyenne for the sea and 
United States inland postage received on the mails so conveyed shall 
Amendment of not be a charge npon the appropriation made for postal service for the 
shipping hilL post- Office Department, bnt shall be paid out of the Treasury of the 
United States npon vouchers properly issned and certified under and 
by direction of the Postmaster-General. 

Ssc. 6. The United States shall be entitled to one or more messengers, 
who shall have transportation and subsistence free of charge. 

It does not seem proper to put down to the cost of the 
. .postal service appropriations of Congress to promote com- 
mercial intercourse and build up a branch of the American 
Navy, to which the mail service is but an incident. 

LOWBB BATES ON FOREIGN LETTEES. 

The present rate of postage is 5 cents for each half ounce 
to all points throughout the world, the exception being the 
Australasian and Cape colonies, where the rates are 12, 15, 
and 19 cents on half-ounce letters. By their own acts these 
countries are not in the Postal Union. Almost all the coun- 
tries grade their postage by distances, and no country offers 
a uniform rate, or as low a rate, as the United States does. 
Considerable discussion has gone on throughout the year 
of a proposition to reduce the foreign rate to the domestic 
rate, or from 5 cents to 2 cents, the demand arising mainly 
from our friends iii Great Britain, who were represented by 
J. Henniker Heaton, esq., a member of Parliament, in a visit, 
most agreeable to the Department, for conference on this 
Foreign post- subjcct. Considering that the United States carries a for- 
**^* ^ ^ eign letter from any inland point from the southern bound- 
ary of the British Possessions to the northern boundary of 
Mexico, or from the Pacific to the Atlantic, to the ports of 
debarkation, and then without any extra charge carries it 
across the ocean, it would seem that the rate is low enough. 
I am not averse to a reduction of ocean postage, but quite 



PiJlCELS-POST. 23 

agree with the general sentiment that any redaction of rates 
of postage ought to begin with domestic rates. 

If the rate were reduced to 2 cents we should be charging p<^^g^**gb*ou?d 
the same for carrying a letter from Alaska to India as ^o^TO^oTste^ ***" 
carrying a letter from one side to the other of any street of an 
American city. If the foreign rate were reduced to the do- 
mestic rate, 2 cents per ounce, there would be no '*sea pos^ 
age,'' and consequently, as the statute (B. S., 4009) limits the 
compensation to be paid to vessels of foreign register for the 
sea conveyance of United States mails to <^ any sum not 
exceeding the sea postage on the mail so transported," there 
would be no fund available for the payment of vessels of for- 
eign register fbr transporting the mails: and if the rate were 
reduced to 2 cents per half ounce, there would be availa- 
ble for this purpose only 2 cents per ounce, and the rate of 
compensation for sea conveyance would therefore neces- 
sarily be reduced. 

POSTAL-OABBS WITH PAID BBPLY. 

The introduction of postal-cards with paid reply, each half 
of the card bearing a 2-cent ppstage-stamp, into our inter- 
national postal service would, in my judgment, prove a great 
convenience. Under existing regulations the postage-stamps 
of one country are not valid for the prepayment of postage 
on articles mailed in another country. Consequently, ar- 
ticles mailed abroad bearing United States postage-stamps 
are required to be treated as if no postage were prepaid on 
them. It is useless, therefore, for persons in this country ^^'^'^^^^^ 
to send United States postage-stamps to their correspond- postage on let- 
ents in foreign countries for the prepayment of return 
postage ; and as the transmission of coin by mail is, as a 
rule, prohibited, there is at present no convenient way by 
which provision can be made by persons in the United 
States for the prepayment of the return postage on their 
correspondence from abroad. But the regulations provide 
that the reply-half of a double postal-card issued by any 
country of the Postal Union shall, when mailed in any 
other country of the Postal Union addressed for delivery 
in the country which issued the card, be forwarded to its 
destination as a fully prepaid article ; and hence, if the 
United States issued such cards, the present difficulty 
would to a certain degree be removed. 

PARCELS POST. 

If the heavy matter put in the mails by the various De- 
partments were sent to the express offices, and if paper- 



24 BEPOET OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

cover^ books now carried in the mail ander a tilling of 
the Department at 1 cent a poaud were to be anloaded 
from the' mail upon the express companies, where sticli 
work belongs, there would be abundant compensation to 
them at their rates in this transfer of business for what they 
would lose if the Government extended the limit of weight of 
mailable packages from 4 to 8 or 11 pounds. Nearly every 
country in Europe has established a parcels post and man- 
aged it successfully to the great satisfaction of the people. 
The conditions of commerce are much the same all over the 
world, and if there are no objections from business x>eople in 
the old countries after years of experience with the parcels 
post, there would not be objections here after it was fairly 
tried. It can only be a question of time before it will be under- 
BxpfMi com. taken in some better form in this country. The system now 
abort hauls, ^m Operation allows the express companies to bid under 
bag onef '^ ^ postal rates and get the short hauls,while the long and expen- 
sive hauls are left to the Department, whose rates are fixed 
• irrespective of long or short distances. The data obtained 
by the recent weighing and count of mail matter will show 
the profit or loss of this particular part of the postal business. 
* Losing the short hauls and doing a business limited to four 

. pounds does not permit the most favorable test. While the 
post-office buildings in most of the large cities are greatly 
crowded by the postal business, there is ample room for ex- 
tension in three-fourths of the offices. The postal cars and 
express cars are coupled together on the same train, and the 
same set of men could take charge of both and use the space 

mnrttaS*FwS^^^^^*^S®*^^y*^'^^^ I am in favor of a fhll 

denoo. parcels post, but think 1 cent postage on land and sea 

should take precedence over every large postal departure. 

LOSSES ON " SAMPLE-COPY" BUSINESS. 

An act of Congress of March 3, 1885, reduced the rate 
of postage on newspapers and periodicals to a cent a pound 
when mailed by publishers and news agents, thus permit- 
ting the transmission of sample copies at the pound rate. 
This was intended to benefit only the publishers of un- 
questionably legitimate newspapers and periodicals, and 
indirectly the general public ; and, under the limitations 
expressly provided for, the resulting burden upon the postal 
service would be hardly felt. This special rate for sample 
copies has presented such a temptation, that thousands 
have resorted to the subterfuge of converting mere trade 
circulars, descriptive catalogues, illustrated price-lists, etc., 
into the semblance of newspapers and magazines, and then^ 



LOSS ON SAMPLE COPIES. 25 

after securing for them official entry into the newspaper 
class of mail matter, have circulated them promiscaonBly 
and in enormoas quantities as pretended sample copies. 

The following instance, inyolving the circulation of only 
a hundred thousand copies of one of these spurious publi- 1^^ on'J^pfJ 
cations, will show a gain to the publisher by putting his oopi«^ 
advertising matter into the form of a magazine, and having 
it admitted into the mails as such, and the consequent loss 
to the Government from the transaction : 

100,000 eopies of pnblicatioD, each weighing, say, 3 oanoes, 
postage on which, mailed separately as third-class matter, 
at the rate of 2 cents each, would be $2,000.00 

Same number of copies maUed in balk as second-class matter, 
postage on which at the rate of a cent a pound, would be . . 1 87. 50 



Saving to the publishers and loss to the postal revenue 1, 812. 50 

If the amount shown in this example, which I do not 
think is exaggerated, is multiplied by the number of pub- 
lications presenting a similar state of things, the result is 
an annual loss to the Government of about $1,100,000 ; and 
the loss to legitimate publications, whose advertising es- 
pedally is interfered with, is enormous. 

It may excite some surprise that the Department will 
carry publications of such a character. But consider the 
&cility with which a semblance of genuineness can be given 
to all this class of printed matter, the somewhat faulty con- 
ditions prescribed by law for admitting second-class mat- 
ter to the mails, and the difficulty of determining the pre- 
cise nature of such publications without delay and expen- 
sive special investigation. Hardly a day passes, indeed, 
that the Department does not refuse this privilege or 
withdraw it when granted by mistake. I suggested as a 
remedy in my last annual report some limitation of the 
number of sample copies which might be mailed at this loW|j;^«™*f®J*^f 
rate, but I am now convinced that this alone would be in- mendod. 
sufficient, and respectfully recommend the following amend- 
ment to the existing law relative to second-class matter : 

That hereafter no publisher shall be permitted to mail sample copies 
of newspapers or periodicals in excess of the number thereof sen tat the 
same time to regular subscribers, except at the rate of postage applica- 
ble t<\ transient second-class matter— that is to say, one cent for every 
Ibor ounces or fraction thereof, payable by stamps attached— every 
nmple copy to be plainly marked as such before being deposited in the 
post-office for mailing, and to be exactly the same as some regular issue 
of the publicatipn of which it purports to be a sample : Providedj That 
the light to mail sample copies, except at the rate of one cent for every 
torn ouoeea or fraction thereof, payable as aforesaid, shall be absolutely 
dffoiad toftny newspaper ob periodical the publisher of which guaran- 



26 REPOET OP THE POSTMASTER-GElSTERAIi. 

tieA to adrertisers or othera a specinc circalation thereof in excels of 
the namber actually snbsoribed for or sold, and to all nowspapers and 
periodicals the publishers of which are engaged in any bn^iness, except 
the publishiog bnsineaa, which is directly or indirectly advertised in 
ench publications. 

POSTAGE ON PAPISR-OOVERBD BOOKS. 

In my last annual report attention was invited to the fol- 
lowing abase in the postal service: Certain publishers have 
for many years issued paper-covered books in the form of 
periodicals, bearing a date and numbered in a nominal list 
or series for the purpose of sending them through the 
mails, not at the rate with which other books are legally 
chargeable, but at a cent a pound. These books differ in 
no essential respect from other paper-covered books, and 
yet are shipped in the mails in immense quantities at the 
cent-a-pound rate. The experience of another year has con- 
Amondment^^"^^^ my couviction of the great abuse involved herein; 
bS?k2S?Jd°oiwi*^^ ^ therefore urgently recommend the passage of "bill 
matter. No. 7568, introduced into the House at the last session by 

Hon. H. H. Bingham. It is intended to subject all books, 
no matter what their special characteristics may be^ to the 
rate of postage fixed by law for third-class matter, thus: 

That from and after the passage of this act all publications purport- 
ing to be issued periodically and to subscribers, but which are merely 
books or reprints of books, whether they bo issaed complete or in parts, 
whether they be bound or unbound, or whether they be sold by sub- 
scription or otherwise, when offered for transmission by mail; sball be 
subject to postage at the rate prescribed by law for third-oiass matter. 

I present again a few of the reasons in favor of this meas- 
ure that now occur to me : First. The books are not news- 
papers or periodicals in the commonly accepted sense of 
those words, or in the sense intended by Congress. They 
possess none of the characteristics of a newspaper or maga- 
zine. On the contrary, these so-calletl serials or libraries pre- 
sent only the most superficial resemblance to periodicals. 
Second. An unfair discrimination is made against other books 
published less frequently than once a month 5 and again, 
why should a paper-covered book have greater privileges 
than a bound book f Third. The loss of postal revenue is 
very great, for every pound of the books under consider- 
ation realizes to the Government just one-eighth of what 
the law intends to collect. 

The practi<ie has opened the door to other abuses. 
As postage-stamps are never affixed to periodical matter 
sent at the pound rate, it is impossible for postmasters 
at the office of destination to know whether postage bas 



THE DEAD-LETTEB OFFICE. 27, 

been paid or not, and throagh negligence or disiionesty 
matter of this kind may be smuggled into the mails without 
the pasrment of any. postage whatever. Moreover, many 
books that have really never been admitted to the second 
dass have slipped through at the low rate by being mailed 
at places away from where they were published ; and again, 
books of an obselete series, or reprinted by some other than 
the original publisher, or not really belonging to the series 
named on the cover, may get into the mails at one-eighth 
of the fair and proper rate. 

OUBIOSITIES OF THE BEAD-LETTEB OFFICE. 

Pains were taken some months-ago to ascertain why so 
much mail matter continually comes to the Dead Letter Of- 
fice. The evidences are convincing that the miscarriage tjotoffiSfni^' 
and non-receipt of such letters and parcels as reach thatabil^Jthe^'iSS^ 
office are due in the main to carelessness and omissions on ^^ 
the part of the public, and in very small measure only to 
any fault either in the system or in the work of the em- 
ployes. 

Of the more than six million and a half of pieces of mail 
matter recdved annually at that office, nearly five millions 
and a half contained nothing of value, and it is almost in^ 
conceivable, but none the less true, that about one-half of 
this number contained no signature which would enable the 
Department to -return them to the writers. They consist ^°^^<^®f ^ 
in the main of letters from one member of a family to an- ten not siKued. 
other, or letters passing between intimate friends; and the 
signature may be, for example, *' Mother," "Jack,'' "Your 
affectionate sister," or some equally indefinite appellation. 

About 5i per cent, of the whole number, or, in round num- 
bers, 319,000, of all letters opened contained valuable inclos- 
ures, either of money, negotiable paper, postage-stamps, or 
miscellaneous papers and articles. The money inclosures^^^^^J^ 
aloneamountedto over $40,000, and those representing nego- ^^^ leuxn, 
tiable paper to over $1,400,000. There were nearly 11,000 
letters which contained lotted tickets, and nearly 200,000 
contained pictures and papers of a character unfit for cir- 
culation. These were all destroyed. 

Of the more than six and a half million pieces received 
about one-half a million were of foreign origin and were 
returned to the countries whence they came. One-fifth 
of a million were restored unopened to the owners; a 
million and a half were restored to the respective owners 
after they had been opened, the information necessary to 
BOOh restoration having been ascertained from the con- 



28 REPORT OP THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

tents. J^early 300,000 Which contained inclosnres were re- 
turned to the owners, and about three and three-qaarters 
million pieces, on failure after every effort had been made 
to reach the owners, were destroyed* Parcels of merchan- 
dise unclaimed for two years are annually disposed of at 
auction. Last year there were offered nearly 39,000 such 
parcels, the proceeds amounting to $2,766.53. 
^Rowtoprevent If people who usc the mails would only be careful to 
observe a few simple requirements, trifles in themselves, 
but in the aggregate of vast account, the force of the 
Dead Letter Office could soon be reduced one-third. All 
writers of letters may not care to place their names and 
addresses upon the comer of the envelope, but if they 
would do so there could be few undelivered letters. Cul- 
tivation of the habit of scanning the address of a letter 
after it has been written would prevent nine-tenths of the 
mistakes due to deficient or erroneous addresses. It is 
purely a matter of business habit, and the remedy is the 
simplest. There is no law or regulation which can require 
an affectionate sister to place her full name and address in 
a letter to her absent brother, but if mothers and sisters 
and brothers would in some corner of the paper do this, 
there would be a million and a half more letters restored 
to their owners every year. 

That the mails are not used solely for the transmission of 
intelligence is proved by the curious collection of articles 
coiiootiou of deposited in the museum of the Dead Letter Office. Ingots 
of gold, specimens of valuable ores, kid gloves from the 
wreck of the Oregon^ imported colognes wrapped in dried 
herbs to conceal them from the customs officers, Indian 
pipes and tomahawks and a birch bark canoe, lava from the 
Modoc bed^, cocoons of the silk-worm, agate from Lake 
Superior, reading cards for the blind, birds' ^^gs? cakes, 
fruits, medicines, knives, pistols, rings and watches, live 
bees, serpents, homed frogs, and centipedes are a few of 
the articles representing the varied assortment rapidly 
accumulating here. 

THE MOinSY-ORDER SYSTEM. 

The report of the Superintendent of the Money-Order Sys- 
tem presents further evidence of the tendency shown in late 
years towards a decrease of the average amount of domestio 
iDcreasodnam- money-orders, there being an increase of nearly a half a. 
wof "oj^oy- million in the number of orders issued, but a decrease of 
over $700,000 in the amount of such orders. This is in oon- 



FREE HATTER FOB EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS. 29 

sonance with the true theory of the system, which is to pro- 
vide a meaDS of remittiDg small sums without interfering with 
Tested banking interests. The postal-notes show an increase 
of a little less thaa 2 per cent, in namber and of over a 
half of 1 per cent, in amount. In the ^gregate the amount 
of issues of money-orders amounted to nearly $140,000,000| 
the same being an increase of 3.68 per cent, over the pre- 
vioas year. 

The international money-order business exhibits an in- 
crease of over 34,000 in the number of orders issued and of 
nearly a million dollars in the amount thereof ; of nearly 
7,000 in the number of orders paid and of over $350,000 in 
the amount thereof. These figures show, in contradistinc- 
tion to the domestic business, an increase in the average 
amount of remittances from the United States to foreign 
countries, and an increase likewise in the average amount 
of the remittances from foreign couiitries to the United 
States. 

There seems to be no diminution of the steady flow toward sending th«ir 
foreign countries of the savings of new citizens who find in ** ** **"**' 
oar own land remunerative fields of labor. As shown in 
the report in question, it was necessary to liquidate bal- 
ances abroad by reason of the excess of orders drawn in 
this country over those drawn upon us to the amount of 
$8,353,501.50. 

The benefits of an interchange of money-orders with this Money -orders 
country will be extended, by means of conventions, to the nador. ^ 
Kepublic of Chili and also to the Bepublio of Ecuador. These 
conventions await only the approval and ratification of 
the home governments before the business may be began. 
Negotiations for a like purpose are in progress with the 
Bepublic of Salvador, Central America, and the British 
colonies of Trinidad and Tobago and of the Bahamas. . 

EXPENSES OP OTHER DEPARTMENTS HEAPED ON THE 
POST-OPFIOB DEPARTMENT. 

Though the express companies, which oppose the Bulky matter 
introduction of the parcels post because it would take away ^ "**^ 
from them the transportation of small packages, do not reach 
many of the interior places that most urge and need the > 
parcels post, they seem to be ignorant of the large express 
business done for the Bxecutive Departments through the 
maiL Bundles of trees 6 feet high and 6 feet around, bags 
of seeds, supplies for the Army, tons of documents packed in 
wooden cases that sometimes require three men to handle 



30 REPORT or THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

them, millions of blanks of the Gensns Office, are piled into 
the post-offices when they should be sent to the express 
Free ibatter. officer. The rcHson for it is, that the Post-Offlce Department 
is compelled to carry free anything sent ander a penalty 
frank, and penalty franks are nsed by all the Departments 
and their agents for the purpose of carrying everything they 
choose to send. It does not seem fair to be looking at a 
deficit in the Post-Office Department to see whether we can 
afford a reduction of letter postage to 1 cent when the de- 
ficit is wholly caused by conducting an express business for 
other branches of the Government. 
m2todio?Sp!J ^^ *'^® discussjon of this subject it is frequently said that 
the^.h*roof8er.i^ is ouly a matter of book-keeping j that the Government 
has finally to pay the bills. True enough ; but each De- 
partment should be able to explain its operations and not 
be burdened with expenses not legitimatriy its own. The 
only thing the Post-Office Department gets for nothing is 
the service of the Department of Justice, but the other De- 
partments bear no part of the postal expenses in return for 
all the postal service does for them free. Seventy per cent. ^ 
of the work done by the Washington post-office yelds no 
revenue. The Bureau of Engraving and Printing, connected 
with the Treasury Department, charges for every piece of 
work done for the Post-Office Department, but the Treasury 
Department places in the mails 161,000 pieces per annum of 
registered mail alone, not including a vast quantity of ordi- 
nary mail, to be carried all over the (Jnited States, for which 
the Post-Office Department gets no compensation whatever. 
The p oetai In vicw of the constantly increasing transportation of free 
aeif-caAUOniiig. matter in the mails I submit on another page a table show- 
ing its present magnitude, and ask for legislative action to 
put these charges against the Departments to which they 
belong. It will be seen that the Post-Office Department is 
self-sustaining when credited with all the work it performs. 

FREE MATTER. 

The matter mailed free of postage in a year after the ratio 
of the period above referred to may be classified as follows : 

Pounds. 

1 . Second-clMfl matter in oonnty of pablioation 30, 714, 135 

2. Franked matter^books, pamphlets, reports, seeds, etc.. 4,^79,646 

3. Matter mailed free of postage nnder penalty envelopes 

for the ExecDtiye Departments of the Government 7, 160, 2S8 

4. Supplies, packages, etc., mailed nnder penalty labels of 

the Exeontlye Departments of the Government 27, 543, 016 



PRESIDENTIAL REMOVALS. 31 

If postage bad been collected ou the foregoing the follow- wbat thepostr 
ing would be the resulting revenue: bfln'^^^OT? iKe 

mfttter at pablio 

1. On 30,714,135 ponnds of second-clasa matter, at 1 cent rates. 

per pound (per papers in coanties) $307,141^35 

2. On 4,279,646 poimds of franked matter, at 1 cent for 
each 2 oances, or 8 cents per pound, rate charged on 
third-class matter (franked matter, agricultural col- 
leges, Congressional Record) 342,371.68 

3. On 7,160,228 ponnds of first-class matter, at 2 cents for 
each i^j of an ounce, the rate paid hy the public for 

like kind of matter (letters, Department matter) 6,026,047.88 

4. On 27,543,016 pounds of supplies, at 8 cents per pound, 

the rate charged on third-class matter (other Depart- 

ment matter) 2,203,441.28 

« ' 

Total free matter •.... 8,879,002.19 

Of the foregoing the free matter carried for the Bxecu- 
tive Departments alone would amount to $8,229,489.16; and 
if postage on supplies were charged at fourth-class rates, 
as charged the public, instead of third-class rates, an addi- 
tional amount of $2,203,441.28 would be due. The total 
official matter would, therefore, yield the Department $10,- 
432,930.44 annually. In connection with this showing the 
following deficiencies in postal revenue may be recorded : 

1. Tear ending June 30, 1890 (estimated in small part) . $5, 786, 300. 40 

2. Year ending June 30, 1891 (estimated) 4,928,033.55 

3. Tear ending June ;30, 1892 (estimated) 3, 590, 862. 43 

APPOINTMENTS AND REMOVALS. 

Of the number of postmasters of the first, second, and presidentuiio- 
third classes (Presidential), whose com missions, "to have"**^**** 
and to hold the said office for and during the term of four 
years from " (date of commission), there have been removed 
in the last two years, or in the lasteight months of the term 
of jour predecessor and of the sixteen months of this ad- 
ministration (the period covered by my former annual report 

and by this report) 710 

Of these there were removed on inspectors' reports. 350 
For if competency and other causes, for the improve- 
ment of the service 360 

Of this last number 219 had served four years 
or more. 

The removals for the past year were 567 

Of these there were removed on inspectors' re- 
ports • 295 

For incompetency apd other causes, for the im- 
provement of the service 262 



32 BEPOBT OF THE POSTMABTER-GENEBAL. 

Of this last namber 174 had served four years or moie 
Three per cent, of the whole namber of Presidential post- 
masters and 15 per cent, of the namber changed daring the 
past year were removed daring the year irrespective of in-, 
spectors' reports or of foar-year terms on the jadgmentof 
the Postmaster-General and by year sanction upon evidence 
of inefficiency, miscondnct, neglect of daty, shortage of ac- 
connts, insufficient bonds, and for other causes. 
^^Dj^^usB The conditions of appointments at fourth-class offices, as 
stated in the commissions, are ^' to hold the said office of 
postmaster, with all the powers, privileges, and emoluments 
to the same belonging, during the pleasure of the Postmas- 
ter-General of the United States." 

At fonrth-olass offices the removals daring 1889 were 7. 700 

The removals during 1890 were 6,012 

The total number of removals for the two years was.... 13,712 

By comparing the two tables it is seen that the total num- 
ber of removals of all grades of postmasters during the 
last eight months * of the term of your predecessor, and of 
the sixteen months of this administration, or during the 
period covered by my two annual reports, is 14,442. 

Of course these figures do not give all changes that have 
taken place in Presidential and fourth-class offices in the 
last two years. The Department is continually making 
appointments under circumstances which have been caused 
by deaths, resignations, expirations of terms, and by the 
requirements of inspectors' reports. The full number of 
appointments during the past two years may be itemized 
and tabulated as follows : 

In instances of death 1, 226 

First appointments at new offices « 7, 197 

All appoint- In places of others resigned 16,702 

Srt tio"^**"* In places of those who had served out terms 770 

At fourth-class offices which became Presidential* 435 

At Presidential offices on inspectors' reports recommending 

removals 350 

Total 2^680 

Removals at Presidential offices for various causes, for ^ ^ 

the improvement of the service (a large part of the 
incumbents ha*! served four years) 360 

In fourth-class offices, where there are no terms (some 
of these were removed on inspectors* reports) 13, 712 

Total 14,072 

Grand total : 40,752 

* The number was 585. Almost all the appointments had been made in previons 
yeare. 



APPOINTMENTS. 



33 



The full record of appointment for the past year, item- 
ized and tabulated as above, is as follows : 

luiaaUncca of death 673 

First appointments at new offices 4,4S7 

In placee of others resigned ^'^^dnrlM 

In places of thosf) who had served ootterms 580 year. 

At fonrth-class offices which became Presidential* 134 

At Presidential offices on inspectors' reports recommending re- 
movals 295 

Total 14,448 

RemoTals at Presidential offices for various caoses, for 
the improvement of the service (of those all but eighty- 
eight had served four years and over) 262 

At foarth-class offices where there are no terms 6, 012 

Total 6,274 

Grand total 20.722 

The following table gives the number of appointments at 
all classes of offices for each particular cause, for each of 
the last two years and for the year ending June 30, 1886, 
the period in the administration of your predecessor corre- 
8poDding to the past year of this administration : 



Appolntraentfl. 



Jnne 90, 



On resii;nAtioD, Presidential 108 

Oo expiration of term ' 100 

On officM becoming Preaidentla 1* . . j 301 

On msignatton, fourth class j 8, 165 

8.654 

On n*moval«. Pre«identia], inspect- j 

or'H report ' 66 

On remoTalu, Pronidential 08 

On remcrrals, fouHb class, inspect- ' 

or'a r«TH»rt | 170 

On removala, fourth class 7,621 

(yn d«oths. Preaideniial j 45 

On death*, fourth dasa 608 

6M 

» ■ ■ — 

On efttablishment of post-offices . . . . j 2, 770 

Total 20,030 



Jane 80, 

1800. 



134 
8,086 



0.053 



105 



161 
5,861 



0,560 



31 
642 



673 



In. ; 

craase. 



55 
800 



De- 
crease. 



455 



167 
70 



246 



I 
240 |. 
164 j. 



18 
1.670 



134 



1.688 



14 



134 



Jnne 80, 
1(;86. 



658 Appointroeuta 
for last two years 
and for 1886. 

8,454 



4,427 



20,722 



1,657 I 



2,640 I 1.048 



0,112 



243 



0,823 



0,666 



20 
867 



587 



8,482 



22,747 



* The phrase "offices which became Presidential " means that when the reyennes 
of the offices increase to the amount fixed by law to oonstitnte them offices of the 
nmt. sarond, and third class, then the appointments are transferred fh>m the Post- 
rfiAAter-Oeneral to the President, who nominates candidates to tlie Senate for con* 
Urination. In nine cases out of ten the President appointA tlie incumbent who lia« 
ar-rred while the office was fourth class. 

PMaOO 3 



34 KEPORT OF THE POttTMASTEK-GBNERAL. 

In cases of appointments and removals the Department 
is obliged to depend (and is fortunate, as at present consti- 
tnted, in being able to depend) upon the advice of Congress- 
men of both political parties. The appropriation for the 
inspector force is not large enough to permit anything more 
general than an examination of misdemeanors, cases of 
shortages, violations of the postal laws, frauds on the pub- 
lic, etc. ; nor was it found possible during the past session 
to secure the authority of Congress to divide the country 
into postal districts, so that the offices might be examined 
by postal experts located in the regions with which they 
©lected'^b """the *^ ^ost familiar, and so that, in the matter of appointments 
i^opie^i^ tor and removals as well as in the re-arrangement of routes and 
partmenta. schcdulcs and the general improvement of the service, the 
Congressmen might be relieved, in part at least, of the ex- 
amination of cases which are often crowded upon them 
against their desireu The Department, being without this 
extra inspection force, is too busy to seek or to suggest 
where changes of postmasters may be made for the improve- 
ment of the service, and a large proportion of persons or com- 
munities are not interested to suggest changes. But the peo- 
ple generally expect, though they take no personal interest 
in the matter, that the postmaster will be changed with the 
change of administration. Hence the anticipated changes, 
though insignificant enough, are also numerous enough. 
Thousands of fourth-class offices do not earn $50 a year apiece. 
In thousands of cases present incumbents are eager to be 
relieved of their offices, and it is only with the greatest dif- 
ficulty that new candidates can be found to take them* 
In hundreds of cases persons of the opposite party are 
appointed or re-appointed by all administrations. In hun- 
dreds of cases changes are made simply to secure more 
convenient locations for post-offices. In hundreds of cases, 
again, it is considered politics, by members of the party 
which has lately been defeated, to discourage resignations 
until removals are made, so that the total of removals can 
appear in partisan journals as excessive. 

As the condition of affairs now is, the Postmaster-General 
or the First Assistant only happens to stumble across the 
cases which require action. The Department neither asks 
for resignations nor authorizes any person or persons to ask: 
for them ; for, when it is clear that a change ought to be 
made, the President or the Postmaster-General has the 
power to make the required removal without indirection. 
I am able to recall perhaps ten cases, however, in the si:ac- 
teen months, of my incumbency where postmasters whot^e 



FAIR HEAlilNG GIVEN ACCUSED POSTMASTERS. 35 

habits Lave become sach as to disgrace the service and 
whose frieuds interfered to prevent removals, have been 
notified in order that the publication of these disagreeable 
facts might be avoided, that they might resign if they pre- 
ferred to do so. 

It has been difficult in many cases where removals have 
been demanded to secure for the accused postmaster the 
treatment which should seem entirely fair to him. It is Aooated post- 
true that your instructions, issued to this Department inSwSiS**^*'*''^ 
March, 1889, that no postmaster should be reported upon 
by an inspector who did not also have the chance to be heard 
in bis own defense, were never to my knowledge disobeyed; 
and it is true that my additional precaution expressed in alet- 
ter* of explicit instructions, issued in January, 1890, by the 
chief post-office inspector to his various inspectors in charge, 
was never to my knowledge disobeyed ; for I would not hesi- 
tate a moment to remove an inspector, any more than I would 
any other postal official or employ^ over whom I have juris- 
diction, who disregards your instructions or mine, especially 
if, as might be the fact in this instance, he were to assume any 
attitude that might suggest the star chamber. It is hard to 

realize, however, how difficult it is, even for the exi>erieuced 

- - 
*Tbe following is a copy of the letter : 

Post-Okfice Department, 
Office of the Chief Post-Opfice Inspectoh, 
fVashington, D, C, Januarif 'M, 1890. 
Sib : In nearly^ aU cases, particalarly those involving charges against 
{KwtmastarB, it is deemed by the Department that an opportunity 
should be afforded postmasters to make answer to charges which have 
been preferred against them. The Coustitatiou of the United States 
guaranties to every citizen the right t'O be heard in his own behalf. 
This well-settled principle permeates all existing laws of this conntry, 
under which all persons are afforded opportunity to defend themselves Leitr to Ib- 
sgainst charges brought against them. Therefore, in cases where thc5."l*^^"' 
character or conduct, official or private, of any postmaster is made the 
subject of an investigation, the inspector will, after properly in vestigat- 
iDg the same, acquaint the postmaster of the character of complaints 
or cbarge«, without revealing the source of bis information, and afford 
bim an opportunity to be heard in his own behalf. In rendering ibis 
report upon the investigation, the inspector should state that the post- 
master, or accused, has had an opportunity to be heard, recording 
therein the answer or defense of the accused. This letter of instruc- 
tion is to give you in a general way the desire of the Department in 
the matt<er of treating postmasters where charges have been filed 
against them. I am aware that occasionally a case conies up where it 
woold be inexpMiient to acquaint the postmaster with the facts ascer- 
tained by an inspector. These cases, however, in my opinion, are very 
rare. You are not expected to pass on the political aspects of any oi 
the oases or candidates, unless specifically requested to do so. You 
will instruct inspectors under your direction in accordance with the 
foregoing. 

Very respectfully, 

E. CJ. Kathbone, 

Chief Inspector, 
The Imspkctobs ux Chargk. 



36 REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

inspector, to resist the temptation to find in tbe insultingdis 
loyalty of ill-natared partisans sufficient cause for removal. 
I have myself been much criticised by fair-minded persons 
because removals for these offenses against decency have not 
been made, and I realize how hard it is for an inspector not 
to make mistakes. Bnt it is a proud thing for the inspector 
force that in nearly every instance where the accuracy of 
the inspector's report has been called in question this sworn 
official of the Government has been vindicated by the sub- 
sequent investigation. 

It was once thought a delicate question, owing to the pri- 
vate nature of much of the information contained in inspoc- 
po?t»*con'flden- tors' rcports aud other confidential papers, whether these 
^^^ reports and papers should be accessible to persons more or 

less interested in special cases. I do not agree with your 
predecessor that these papers should be denied to a com- 
mittee of the Senate ; for, as I am informed, a request of 
this nature from a committee of the Senate was once denied 
by him. The Senate has a constitutional right to inquire 
about appointments. An investigating committee of tbe 
House deserves, as I beg to submit, a similar courtesy. 
The same would be true of a court of law. Perhaps it might 
be said to be the right, rather than the privilege, of the 
court of law to have the papers. Beyon d this category of 
Senators and Members, however, the confidential papers 
must not go. Rather must the Department, if necessary, 
suffer the odium of appearing to remove a person without 
cause. The confidential reasons which compel the Depart- 
ment to act must not be disclosed, first, because communities 
might in some instances be involved in strife and bitter- 
ness, and families might be subjected to disgrace and ruin. 
The removed person, either unaware of the full extent of 
the known information about himself, or else fully aware 
that no public use could in decency be made of it, often 
does not hesitate to talk or write about his so-called wrongs. 
If the truth were known, he would be the one most to suf- 
fer ; and yet, no matter how one-sided or bitter his attacks 
may be, the Department can do nothing except wait for fair 
public scrutiny and hope for honest public treatment. 

The postmaster in a small town is a candidate for re- 
appointment. The community in which he lives believes in 
civil-service reform, without quite knowing all that the 
words mean. Good citizens demand that the public service 
shall not be outraged by the appointment of any mere self- 
seeker or political "striker." The Department knows that 



CIVIL SERVICE OF THE POST-OFFICE DEPAKTMENT. 37 

the candidate for re-appointment has not accounted prompt- 
ly, possibly without fraudulent intent, for public money, or 
is a victim, say, of the opium habit. It will not re-appoint 
him. A cry is raised that the public service is prostituted 
to partisan ends. There are similar cases in large post- 
offices in which the postmaster similarly does his duty with- 
out fear. A letter-carrier in uuiform goes into a brothel, 
becomes intoxicated, and disgraces his wife and daughters. 
He i8 removed. The same cry is raised that every right of 
citizenship is outraged. 

The necessities of the secret service (which the Department 
can not do without), and the rights of good citizens who 
feel imx>elled to communicate disagreeable information, as 
well as all the dictates of charity, support me in this im- 
pregnable position. I apologize for this excursion into a 
question that is so well settled, but many of the honest, the 
thoughtful, and the friendly desire to be informed of these 
things. Your administration is to be congratulated that 
its long list of appointments will bear the closest examina- 
tion. 

CIVIL SERVICE OF THE POST-OFFICE DEPARTMENT. 

A year's experience confirms me in the judgment formed 
twelve months ago that the civil-service system, as .applied 
to the rosters of the Post Office Department, is susceptible 
of improvement. The examinations for the inspector force ErAraioittfona 
and for the Railway Mail Service ought to be made more s^^rvice^^d in- 
difficult, so that the candidates for places will better stand be^^re dimouit. 
the test of actual work. The practice of the Department 
shows that the inspector force, for example, is more efficient 
as a whole if eligibles who have seen public service are 
selected instead of those who have simply been examined. 
This means either that the examinations are not thorough 
enough or that examinations never can result in the selec- 
tion of the proper proportion of efficient inspectors — a thing 
which I do not believe. It is estimated by the railway 
mail office that the proportion of railway mail eligibles 
who fail to fill the requirements of that exacting employ- onefooHh or 
ment is a quarter or a third of all those examined. This examiD^ m\ u> 
me^ins either that the examinations are not thorough enough *'^* ""'^ *^^^*^^' 
or that it is impossible suitably to examine candidates for 
the Railway Mail Service — a thing which is certainly not 
true. The railway postal clerk can not be most efficient 
unless he has physical endurance. The inspector can not 
be most capable unless he is full of resources and alert- 
ness. Perhaps these observations seem trivial, but, if I 



38 REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

may be pernjittecl to make tlie st;itemeDt, it is just in pn>- 
portion as tbe examiuatiou sj'stem (which intends to be :i 
merit system) provides candidates wbo sacceed not only iu 
holding their places, bat in adding to the efficiency of the 
public service, that the reform can hope to gather mo- 
mentum. 
ceit^npUnof 1 ^igh that some scheme might be devised by which the 

pwinotton need- 

od. departmental force, and all parts and branches of the postal 

service, classified or to be classified, might be encouraged 
into new exertions by some just, general, and certain plan 
of promotions. This would perhaps involve the retirement 
at a certain age of Government employes who have been 
efficient in the past, and would possibly involve, too, the 
payment to them of a stated sum, or of smaller sums for 
stated periods. But scores of places in the Departments, 
and in the large post-offices, as I doubt not, are to-day filled 
with superannuated clerks who fail to do the work which 
the Department is required by Congress and the public to 
expect of them, and also prevent those from taking their 
places who would be glad to do all of the work well. It 
would seem as if we might either heartlessly remove these 
useless Government employes or else confess that we really 
have a civil pension roll. In any occupation it is the man 
who is looking for better work to do and for better pay for 
doing it that deserves the better work and the better pay ; 
and I am certain that the efficiency of the whole postal force 
would be increased beyond all calculation if there could 
exist, in it and all through it, a continual upward move- 
ment, a regular and certain retirement in some just and 
humane way, and a consequent infiax of the young, the 
strong, and the ambitious. Promotions in the service, like 
original appointments to it, ought always to be for the hon- 
esty, the capacity, and the loyalty of the service ; and while 
it is often hard, though often necessary, to decide whether 
original appointments ought to be made for these purpose8, 
it is never a question that the more frequently these de- 
served promotions occur the more these desired objects are 
obtained. 

The cause of civil-service reform has been most in dan- 
ger since the beginning of your administration, so far, at 
least, as the Post-Office Department is concerned, from its 
over zealous but short-sighted friends. It is dishonest to 
talk about violations of the civil-service law when the dis- 
trict attonieys are not appealed to to prosecute the sup- 
posed offenders. It is equally dishonest to pretend to be 



NUMBER OF POST-OFFICER. 



39 



friendly to the spirit of the reform, which, as I understand, 
is nothing more nor less than a steady effort, nuder the 
laws of reason and human natare, to improve the pub- 
lic service, and not suggest means by which the regula- 
tions, under which the instruments of the reform operate, 
may possibly be improved. 
It is not truth and will not stand the test of time, to ^y ^ 

' roenw Hfl to n»* 

declare persistently, and in the face of the known facts, m<»^»i«no*tro«. 
that forty thonsaud changes of postmasters, two-thirds of 
which are not to be avoided and all of which the present 
administration of the Post-OfQce Department does not 
shirk the responsibility for, are equivalent to forty thou- 
sand removals of postmasters ; and this is true whatever 
the ideas of particular persons may be as to the necessity, 
or the value of political parties. Nor is it truth — and it 
will not stand the test of time — to reiterate over and over 
again, that the Railway Mail Service, which had been made 
the most effective body of civil servants in the United States 
under an old established merit system of its own, wa« basely 
prostituted to partisan ends, when this administration of 
the Post Office Department was busying itself with putting 
back these trusty and tried men in the places of persons 
whose room was more valuable than their bungling assist- 
ance, and with waiting for the tardy certification of eligi- 
bles. 

I think it would be impossible to find an appointing offi= 
cer who has not been glad to take advantage of stringent 
examinations to keep away the mere political place-seekers. 
They used to be provided ; they would surely be provided 
in all the Departments if they were lacking. 

THE NUMBER OF POST-OFFICES. 

The number of post-offices of each class at the close of the 
fiscal year 30th of June, 1890, with comparisons, was : 



Clasa. 


1890. 


1889. 


1872. 


Firrt 


102 

517 

2.119 

r«9,663 


97 

497 

2.090 

66.315 




Second 


1,200 


XJiird 


Ponrth .•- 


30,663 




ToUl 


62,401 


58,999 


31,863 



The namber of new officer established in 18D0 was 4, 236 

The namber of new offices established in 1889 was 2, 770 

The^ net increase in the number of offices, after taking LanreincreMo 
into account all the offices discontinued, was 3,905, a con-SmwiT"^*'^ *"' 



40 REPORT OP THE POSTMASTER-GENPIRAL. 

Biderably larger number than ever before in the history of 
the service, the next largest being immediately after the 
close of the war (1866), when the net increase was 3,278. 

The namber of offices enlarged to free-delivery offices in 1890 was . 53 

The number of offices enlarged to free-delivery offices in 1889 was. 43 
The number of substations and stamp agencies established in 

1890, was 364 

The number of substations and «tamp agencies established in 

1889 was 84 



FREE DELIVERY EXPERIMENTS. 

viiiagefreede. GongTcss, by joint rcsolntfon late in the session, gave 
**^*^- authority to the Postmaster-General to use $10,000 of the 

annual appropriation for the free delivery for the purpose 
of ascertaining in a practical way the feasibility and cost 
of extending the free delivery to small towns and rural 
districts. Applications are now being received from va- 
rious communities for the benefits of the free delivery. The 
experiment will be made in as many places as the appropri- 
ation will warrant. In villages one plan is to allow to the 
postmaster sufficient money to pay for the service of a man 
or boy for one or two hours per day, as the case may re- 
quire. Those who prefer to go in person to the post-office 
will do so as hitherto, but those who can not get a daily 
paper because they can not go to the post-office evevy day 
for it, can have it delivered at their doors if they live, say, 
within a radius of two miles. In thinly settled rural d Istricts 
it has been proposed to ask the school teachers to distribute 
the mails to pupils authorized by parents and neighbors 
to receive them. No doubt a dozen difterent devices can he 
tried. 

TO SAVE THE TIME OP CARRIERS. 

letter. It is estimated that a quarter of the time of a letter-carrier 
is spent waiting for answers to door bells. With a view of 
providing means to save time and hasten deliveries inquiry 
has been made for a smaU, safe, and inexpensive letter- 
box to be recommended for general adoption. A com- 
mission of five of the leading postmasters of the United 
States was appointed and an advertisement issued calling 
upon inventors to submit models and devices with esti- 
mates of the cost of the same. Five hundred and sixty- 
four models and designs were submitted. Sixty-five gentle- 
men appeared before the commission at its meeting in Octo- 



bozat. 



BETTER SUPERVISION. 41 

ber to explain models ami make sa^gestions. The report of 
tbe commission appears in full in the appendix. 

It does not appear that among all the boxes presented combination or 
and examined there was one of sutticient ment to justify its soggMted. 
recommendation for general use; but three models were 
selected and the proposition made to combine in one pro- 
jected box the advantages of each, if it should be possible 
to bring about such a result ; and if it should be possible 
to find some way not only to deliver the mail quickly, but 
to collect it at each house, it would prove to be a great 
convenience and work a great change in the postal system. 
If letters can be mailed without going outside of one's house, 
the reventie would be largely increased and the safety of the 
mail greatly enhanced* 

POSTAL DISTRICTS AND SUPERVISORS. 

The recommendations in my last annual report to help the 
Department to come into closer relations with the post- 
offices met with the approval of the Committee on the Post- 
Office and Post-Boads of the House, who reported favor- 
ably a bill to establish twenty-six postal districts. The 
Committee of the Senate on the Post-Office and Post- Roads 
concluded to recommend in preference an enlargement of 
the inspecting force, and the Senate appropriated $50,000 
for this purpose. The House did not concur in this in- 
creased appropriation, and nothing has therefore been ac- 
complished. 

It seems unfortunate that 50,000 of the 62,400 post-offices Better anper. 
are without any supervision beyond the formal reports of Jver°po»t-oflicea. 
the postmasters. Important offices have not seen an in- 
spector for five years. The Inspecting Division is always 
several months behind its work for lack of men to cover the 
field. The particular work of the inspector is the investiga- 
tion of accounts, frauds^ and violations of statutes. In later 
years schemes to deflraad by the use of the mails have 
greatly multiplied, and the Department has been hard 
pressed in its efforts to protect the public. 

The special work of improving and grading the offices, 
training new men, explaining postal laws, and reorganizing 
systems of business at offices has from sheer necessity been 
wholly left undone. If it is thought best to provide for this 
important work as a branch of the Inspecting Division I 
will use my best endeavors to make it successful, but I be- 
lieve the appropriation of even $70,000 to be used in the 
discretion of the Postmaster-General in the general super- 
vision of ail the offices would enable him to select from 



42 REPORT OP THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

the center of a given district the most successful post- 
master, whose assistance to the oflBces immediately sur- 
rounding would be returned five times over in great 
improvements to the service and consequent increases of 
the revenue. By using the postmasters as supervisors no 
iiicrease of Federal appointments is required. One year's 
trial of such a system of supervision would, in my judg- 
ment, actually reduce the number of persons employed in 
some branches of the service* 

I beg to draw attention to my letter to the Committee on 
Fonrth AsBiit- ^^^® subject in the apx>endix; and in connection with this 
oenena ^'reoom' ^ Tcuew my Urgent recommendation for another Assistant 
mended. Postmastcr-G^ueral to take up several branches of the 

service needing closer attention than the present organiza- 
tion permits. 

EXPERTS AND IMPROVED BOOK-KEEPINa. 

The accounting system of the Post-OflBce Department 
needs revision. It is not uniform for the large offices, and 
it is not improbable that it might be much improved for the 
smaller ones. No well-conducted business establishment 
would allow its agent at New York to keep bis accounts 
according to one plan and his agent at Chicago, transacting 
precisely the same business, to keep them on another plan. 
It is just this state of afiEairs whicli has made much con- 
fusion in the postal system, so that it has happened that 
when It became necessary for an inspector, or for a body 
Better acconnt- of inspectors or a commissiou, to visit and examine the 
financial affairs of any of the larger olBces, its system of 
accounts had fir8t to be learned, necessitatinga considerable 
loss of time ; and if the same officers, as frequently has 
happened, were then to proceed to some other large post- 
office for the same purpose, a like task was set before them. 
The same is true of most of the great city post-offices. 

I therefore had the honor during the la«t session of Con- 
gress to request authority to expend from the appropria- 
commisnion on tion for post-officc inspcctors $6,000, or so much of that 
amount as might be necessary, m the employment of expert 
accountants to prepare and submit a plan for a uniform 
and more complete system of keeping accounts in the De- 
partment and at post-offices of the first, second, and third 
classes, so as to insure greater accuracy and to lead to 
more speedy settlements. This authority was granted in 
the annual appropriation bill, and I appointed a commission, 
consisting of Henry S. Adams, cashier of the post-office nt. 
Boston, James Warrington, consulting and expert accoi 



THE POSTAL MUSEUM. 43 

ant of Philadelphia, and James Yalden, eouHuitiog and 
expert acconutant of New York, with Mr. Adams as chair- 
man, to undertake the task ontlined. The members of this 
oommission were instructed to familiarize themselves with 
the departmental system at Washington and in the office 
of the Sixth Auditor, and then to visit a reasonable num- 
ber of post-offices in each of the three higher classes, so 
that they might be acquainted practically with the oon- 
doct of the financial affairs of such offices. 

For the sake of economizing as much as possible the 
iiind at the disposal of the Department, it was stipulated 
that unless otherwise ordered the duties of the commissioners 
should not extend beyond two months ; and postmasters and 
ail officials of the postal service were required to extend to 
them every assistance. I have great confidence in the abil- 
ity of the members of this commission to evolve something 
which will be of lasting benefit to the fiscal system of the 
postal administration. I believe that the practical ex- 
perience in postal affairs of Mr. Adams, joined with the pro- 
fessional and general business training of the other two gen- 
tlemen will bring to the service a simpler, safer, and more 
complete mode of accounts, free from unnecessary compli- 
cations. 

A POSTAL MUSEUM. 

Steps were taken in March of the current year to estab- 
lish in Washington a mnseum that should represent the 
progress of our postal system from its inception, and should 
illustrate the work of the United States postal service, as 
well as that of foreign countries. A general notice was 
given to all postmasters and postal employes to make search 
through their offices and to send to the Department what- 
ever they might find that would be desirable for exhibit in 
such a museum. They were also requested to endeavor to 
interest their patrons in the subject and transmit to the 
Department all articles which might be donated for the 
purpose in view. At the same time a letter was sent to 
each of the leading postal administrations in the world, 
inviting attention to the work undertaken, bespeaking 
their interest, and suggesting contributions such as would Libeni oontri- 
convey to visitors some idea of the postal work of foreign *"***"""• 
nations. The responses have been very liberal. There is 
at present scarcely room or force adequate to arrange and 
classify properly for exhibition the contributions received, 
but the room will be supplied before long upon the comple- 
tion of a new building rented by the Department for the 
.ixth Auditor. This will vacate some of the rooms in the 



44 REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

main building. I have felt more than warranted in asking 
firom CSongress an appropriation of $1,000 for miscellaneons 
expenditures on accoant of this masenm, and of $1,200 for 
a competent man to put in charge of it. The material on 
hand, together with that already accumulated in the mu- 
seum of the Dead-Letter Office, will' amply repay the expend- 
iture in point of interest and utility. 

POSTAL GUIDE AND LrBRARY. 

Guide should The Department ought not to obtain its official publica- 
▼ertiaem^.^'tion at Small cost by permitting publishers to recoup them- 
selves by inserting advertisements, some of which are ex- 
cluded by leading magazines and newspapers; and for this 
reason I have asked for an appropriation of $20,000, instead 
of $18,200, in order to obtain a creditable and dignified 
Postal Guide, free from all matter except such as will be use- 
ful to the public and to those who do the practical work of 
the postal service. 
Library should The Department library has been one more in name than 
be improved. ^^ reality. It has been little more than a repository for 
accumulations of public documents and reports. I have 
asked in the annual estimates for an appropriation of $1,000 
for the purchase of books, and of $1,000 for the pay of a 
librarian. The information and benefits to be derived by 
the army of postal employes, from a collection of standard 
books of reference on postal subjects, will fully justify this 
expenditure. 

PNEUMATIC TUBES. 

Between 50 and 60 miles of pneumatic tubes are buried in 
the streets of Berlin, connecting the substations with the 
main post-office. Similar use of pneumatic tubes is made 
to a lesser degree in Paris and in London. The rapidity 
with which a letter goes from one side to the other of a city 
as large as Berlin is a wonder even to an American. Two 
gentlemen, at different times, one of them an expert, at the 
request of the Department, visited the large postal centers 
of the world to study the pneumatic system. Their reports 
are not yet ready for publication; but it is hoped that the 
way may be clear to connect the Executive Departments 
and the Senate and House of Bepresentatives with the 
Washington city post-office as the first experiment in this 
direction, and that the system may then be extended to the 
substations and post-offices of large cities. I should onpe- 
cially like to see a pneumatic system working perfectly in 



THE CITY POST-OFFICE. 46 

Chicago by the time the World's Fair is in progress, so that 
the postal exhibit there woald really show this high develop- 
ment of the service. 

THE PAT OF THE BAILBOADS. 

The rate of compensation to railroads for mail transpor- 
tation was established in 1873. In July, 1876, it was re- 
duced 10 percent, and in June, 1878, it was further reduced 
5 per cent. In the matter of extra compensation for the use 
of R. P. O. cars, no reduction has taken place since March, 
1873, though concessions have been made by the companies 
in the matter of space. In the past twelve years no reduction 
of rates has taken place, though the freight rates upon all 
railroads have been steadily lowered. During this period 
the weight of the mails has largely increased. It is quite 
reasonable to say that the reduction in freight rates gen-. ^q^^jT^^^o^w 

^ o ■» be niAde aa to 

erally between 1878 and 1890 is not less than 20 per cent., ^tes. 
and in many instances it is much more.. The largest ex- 
penditure of the Department is for transportation. The 
estimates just sent to the Treasury for the next fiscal y^ar 
cover $22,010,128.31 for railroad transportation alone. A 
reference of this subject to the Committees on the Post-Office 
and Post-Eoads of the Senate and the House of Representa- 
tives for some form of inquiry and report is respectfully 
suggested. 

NEEDED PUBLIC BlTTLDINaS. 

Soon after Congress convened the Committee on Public 
Buildings took up the question of a new building for the 
city of Washington and finally passed a bill to erect a 
building at Pennsylvania avenue and Ninth street. The 
structure proposed was so palpably inadequate that I felt 
imi)elled to appear before the Senate committee and 
argue the case (as per statement in Appendix E), and suc- 
ceeded in convincing that committee that it was best to 
abandon the plan contemplated in the House bill. 

On the 25th of June, 1890, Congress authorized the ac- 
quisition of square 323, bounded by Pennsylvania avenue, 
C street, and Eleventh and Twelfth streets. The act appro- 
priated sufficient money for the purchase of the ground 
without naming any sum. It also limited the cost of the 
city post-office building to $800,000 without making any Eiffht-story 
appropriation. On the 30th of August, 1890, in the sundry Sil *^ ™"*^ 
civil bill the limit of the cost of the building was increased 
to 91,900,000, and $250,000 was appropriated to begin 
the work, it being stipulated that the structure should be 



46 REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

eight stories high. I do not hesitate to say that au eight- 
story bailding for post-office purposes will be the ruin of 
the health of the hundreds of men who must labor iu the 
darkuess and bad air of a ground floor with seven stories 
piled above their heads, and that the cost of such a build- 
ing is a great waste of the public funds. If the new edifice 
is to be an omnibus building, to be used by the various de- 
partments as tenants, the whole structure should be built 
for that purpose. The post-office building of the city of 
]New York is a fair example of the folly of such a structure. 
There the postal clerks, though there are streets on all 
sides, exist as if confined in a dark, unhealthy prison. 
Groan d floor The work of a post-office to be convenient to the people 
work. ^'must be done on the ground floor. If located in a large 

city where the mail is large and the clerks are many, it should 
not be over one high story, with portions perhaps of two 
stories for certain offices of accounts and for the sake of ar- 
chitectural appearance. Abundant light from the roof and 
good air will quicken every movement of the mails and the 
saving in top stories, elevators, boilers, etc., will doubly 
compensate for the increased cost of the ground area. 

It is not too late to amend this bad plan and adapt the 
new Washington structure to the use of the increasingly 
overcrowded Post-Office Department, massing under one 
roof the Sixth Auditor of the Treasury, the money-order of- 
flce, the mail-bag works, the supply division, and the topo- 
graphical office, all now occupying separate buildings, the 
rent of which, with the additional outlays for wagon service, 
elevators, porters, and watchmen would pay a good interest 
on theeiitirecostoftheproposednew building. Settle thecity 
post-office in alow, light, large, separate inexpensive build- 
ing, as a wing of the Post-Office Department, and by con. 
tiguity get the beneflt of the supervision of the Department 
officials, who could develop at least one nearly perfect post- 
office as an example for all others. The building of an eight- 
story block at an expense of not less than $2,500,000 for 
city post-office purposes is altogether unnecessary. Count- 
ing the rental at 10 per cent., the rate common in Washing- 
ton for large buildings, the enormous sum of tti50,000 per 
annum would be a fair rental. The rate paid for the buildin g 
now in use by the city post-office is $8,000. Proper perma- 
nent accommodations for the post-office alone could be pro- 
vided for the sum of $250,000, a single year's rental as above 
stated. Ample and well located quarters can be rented for the 
city post-office at $15,000 per annum in a new building about 
t? be erected. Our present lease expires on the first of 



GBEATER ECONOMY IN BUILDINGS. 47 

July next, and the probability of the elapse of four or five 
years before a new stone building could be completed, will 
make it necessary to move at least temporarily to some new 
place. 

I recommend the modification of the present project in 
thefie respects. Let the Post-Oflace Department take thep/;iJ°^*^,^f 
structure proposed at the corner of Pennsylvania avenue and »«>d«i. 
Eleventh street, locate the city post-office on adjoining prop- 
erty as a part of the postal enlargement, and use the pres- 
ent Post-Office Department building for the Interior and 
other Departments now using rented buildings. Or, as an 
alternative, change the plan to a much less expensive struct- 
ure especially adapted to post-office purposes. I urge that 
the Secretary of the Treasury and the Postmaster-General 
be a commission to secure the ground and erect a twin build- 
ing for the use of the Department and the city post-office at 
a cost not to exceed the sum already appropriated, exclusive 
of the cost of the ground. 

NEW BUILDINM TBN FOB ONE. 

Looking backward five years at the style and cost of the 
new buildings throughout the country completed or going 
up for post-offices, I am satisfied that nine more creditable 
and all-sufficient buildings could in many instances have 
been erected at other points equally entitled to them for the 
cost of one of the granite and iron structures that iu many 
respects are out of all correspondence with the town and 
the affiiirs to be transacted. To move out of a $GO0 
rented room, safe and ample for the postal business, into a 
$100,000 building, where the janitor alone gets more salary 
than the whole of the rent in the former place, can not be 
justified on any business principles. The postal service 
does not need any such expenditures. A one-story struct- omP^t^ tamS^ 
nre is all that is required in three cases out of four. Of ^^*' 
course due regard must be paid to the size of the town and 
the location in which the building is to be erected, as well 
as to architectural features conformable to the dignity of 
the Government; but to waste money on numerous stories, 
with towers and turrets for dignity alone, is not in accord 
with the American idea of utility and taste. 

I have favored and urged the bills now pending in Con- 
gress to regulate appropriations for post-office buildings 
according to the gross receipts of the offices, somewhat as 
follows : Taking the gross revenues for two successive years, 
with $25,000 receipts, a $25,000 building; with $20,000 



48 REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

receipts, a $20,000 bailding; with receipts of over $5,000 
and ap to $15,000, a $10,000 building. If Congress were 
to provide $1,000,000 to be spent nnder the direction 
of the Sapervising Architect and the Postmaster-General, 
between seventy and eighty proper bnildings ooald be 
erected; whereas under the present system the Ctovem- 
ment will only get from ten to fifteen. I recommend most 
earnestly the passage of the bill No. 176, House of Bepre- 
sentatives, presented by Mr. Blount of Oeorgia. 

A NEW POST-OFFICE BUILDING FOR NEW YORK CITY. 

The relation of the New York post office to the postal 
system is not unlike that of the clearing-house to the New 
York banks. Its operations affect in some degree almost 
every other office. Lack of space or working force is felt 
throughout the service. The applications of the postmaster 
at New York for clerks and carriers were necessarily very 
large during the last year, but they have been granted, 
after careful investigation, in almost every instance. Over 
$200,000 has been added to the pay-roll of the clerical force 
. ?.«^ J*^I^ in twenty months, which is a much larger amount than was 
qTiftta. ever granted before m a corresponding period. But how- 

ever much the Department tries, it can not overcome fixed 
physical conditions. It is useless to expedite trains and 
lose the gains at an overcrowded post-office. The fleet 
ocean steamers might as well be a day late, so far as the 
mails are concerned, if their immense bulk of incoming 
matter is to be piled up in the New York office until space 
can be cleared for it. The post-office building is totally 
inadequate. The men can not be managed either economi- 
cally or with the greatest speed. Of this I became con- 
vinced by personal examination over a year ago, and pub- 
licly and privately have advocated better quarters. 

New York is the metropolis. It is also the great center 
for the dispatch and distribution of outgoing and incoming 
foreign mails. Any delay or stoppage here is almost a na- 
tional inconvenience. The necessity for more room for the 
everyday work of the postal service, without reference to 
the rush and hurry of extra-busy seasons or extra emer- 
gencies when foreign steamers arrive together, is clearly 
apparent. The newspapers understand this very well. So 
do the business men and the citizens who stop to think about 
it. There is no question but that the Government ought 
to provide a proper building. A new location does not by 
any means necessitate a withdrawal of first-class postal 



NEW P08T-0FF1CK BUILDING FOR NEW YORK« 49 

oonTeniences from the present neighborhood. In fact, it 
must not. A large snbstation near the great newspaper 
offices will always be a necessity ; and it mnst be perfectly 
equipped and commodious. 

The Treasury Department and the citizens, as is well 
known, settle all questions of location. The Post-Office 
Department has no other relation to a public building than 
that of tenant. Therefore, I do not desire to offer any 
opinion except to say that the money appropriated should 
be largely spent for ground, and not for an eight or ten 
story building. K the cost of the unnecessary upper stories 
could be put into additional ground to be covered by a 
structure of one high story and gallery, with three stories 
along the front for offices, it would be the Id^^l building. 
There is also this to be said : if the new structure were close ^^oght be oIom 
to a railroad station, so that mail cars could be run upon cov- uon. 
ered sidings, much time and expense would be saved; it is a 
dear loss of money and time to haul mails from one end of ^ 

a city to the other, or from one side to another, only to carry 
them back again over the same territory. Time is always 
economized if stations are located near the railroads. The 
post-office and the stations should be connected either by 
pneumatic tubes or by means of electric underground cars. 
A special corps of carriers should make half-hourly deliv- 
eries in the iqercantile parts of cities as large as New York, 
Ohicago, or Boston. 

The gross receipts of the New York office for the year 
ended June 30, 1890, were over $6,000,000 ; the total ex- 
penditure during the same period was two millions and a 
half; and while it is true that this income and this expend- 
iture were not entirely due to local causes it is never- 
theless certain that the New York office would earn enough 
money during the time while the new building would be in 
process of constraction easi}y to pay for the structure. The 
congestion already set in at the metrox>oli8 will each year 
cripple more and more the postal service of the United 
States. That fact is clearly to be foreseen by the following 
table, which shows the increase of business at the New 
York office for five years past and the estimated increase 
for five years to come : 
P M 6 90 4 



60 



REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 



Period. 



Increase of 
baslneM at Kew 
York. 



PAflrr FIVE 

TBABS. 

Tear endiog 
Juno 30— 

1886 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

OOMUCO FIVB 
TBAB8.* 

Year ending 
June 80 — 

1881 

1892 

1893 

1884. 

1895 



OroM rerenne. 



Amoont. 



Pr.rt. 



$4, 340, 12& 20 
4,416.647.58 
4,758,515.93 
4,921«806L06 
5,430,170.84 
6^026^927.76 



6,486.758.85 
6.874,458.45 
7,342,121.62 
7. 841, 88& 
8, 374. 600. 13 



1. 

7. 

8. 

10.3 
11.0 



6.8 
6.8 
6.8 
6.8 
6. 



Hatter bandied 
by carriers 

(ooUections and 
deliveries). 



Kamber 
ofpiecea. 



324.656,828 

5836,878,429 

325,891 

•,672,049 

399,601,575 

448,651,786 



6855, a 
5355,( 



479,160,107 
511,742,994 
546.541.517 
583. 798. 340 
:, 398, 371 



8 623, 



Pt.cC 



8.8 
6.5 
0.09 
12.3 
12.3 



6.8 
6.8 
6.8 
&8 
6.8 



Expenditure for 
clerks. 



Amount. 



1833,662.05 

864,621.03 

951,564.46 

965,053.53 

1,025,26&98 

1,113,220.43 



Pr.eU 



8.7 
10.0 
1.4 
6.2 
8.6 



1,180,018.66 6.0 

1,250.814.47 6.0 

1,325, 863. :U 6.0 

1,405,415.141 6.0 

1,489,740.051 6.0 



Carrier 
foroe. 



Pt,9U 



703 

748 

768 

1,090 

1,103 



1,247 
1,403 
1,578 
1,775 
1,997 



10.8 
6.4 
2.7 

4L9 
1.2 



12.5 
12.5 
12.5 
12.5 
12.5 



('omplete 
collected. 



*KOTB.— The rate of increase estimated for the five years from 1801 to 1885 is the 
ayerage rate of increase on each branch of the statistios for the previous five years. 

THE OOUNT AND WEIGHT OP MAIL. 

For important statistical purposes the Department has 
been at a loss for reliable data as to the number of pieces 
and weight of matter passing through the mails and the 
amount of revenue derived from each of the several classes 
of matter. For reasons involving the quickest possible dis- 
^ patch of the mails it is impracticable to take a continuous 
account of matter mailed. But a count of mail-matter was 
ordered at all post-offices in the country for the seven con- 
secutive days beginning at 6 o'clock a. m. on the 5th of 
May, and ending at 6 o'clock a. m. on the 12th of May. The 
blank forms provided called for separate information on 33 
distinctive items. The instructions enjoined the utmost 
care upon the postmasters in making accurate reports. The 
week selected was believed to be a fairly average period 
upon which to estimate the total business for the year. The 
returns were carefully compiled by a special clerical force 
detailed from the various bureaus of the Department. The 
results of the work, which was one of no small magnitude, 
will be found in the following tabular statement. 



COUNT OF HAIL MATTEK. 



61 



SttUement of matter Bent through the maiU during the fiscal year ending 
June 30, 1890, ae estimated upon the haeie of an actual oount at all the 
poot-officee, for the seven days beginning at 6 o*clock a. m., on Monday ^ 
May 5, and ending at 6 o'clock a. m., on Monday^ May 1'2, 1890. 



1 


Ko.of 
pieces. 


Weight 


AmooDt 
of postage. 


t 
1 

-5 


It 


DOMUrnC FDWT-CLAM MATTKB. 

1. L«tt«n maQed to other poftt«iBoM 
(postage 2 cents sn onDce or 
frsctioD thereof) 


l.&61,40e,742 
256,681,155 

4,878.090 

253,889 
84,533,005 

534,828 

822,188,518 

107,878,837 


Pounds. 

87,872.584 

6.483,046 

582.371 

45,730 
820,335 

61,679 

1,711,350 

570,450 


$32,516,625.53 
6,338.650.42 

196,076.17 

16,844.43 
347,385.51 

12, 580. 38 
3,223,102.63 
1.073, 78a 37 


On. 

.88 

.33 

1.8 

2.8 
.88 

1.8 
.085 
.035 


CIS. 
2 


2. Drop -letters for local delivery 
(post«({e 2 cents an ounce or 
firaction thereof) 


2 


3. Wrapped parcels, Fcaled, mailed 
to other post-offices (postage 8 

of) 


3.0 


delivery (postage 2 cents so 
ounce or frsction thereof)'. 

5. Drop-letters at 1 cent an onnce. . . . 

«. Wrapped parcels for locsl deliv- 
ery at 1 cent sn oonce- ,,--,■,,,.. 


6.6 

1 

2.3 


7. Postal cards maUed to other post- 
offices 


1 


8. Postal cards deposited for local 
delivery 


, 






Totol flrst-class matter 


2,289,9S0,0]5 


47,147.445 


42,724,652.44 


.33 


1.9 


■looinvcijkm KATrsB (pbxpaid). 

1. Mailed by publishers and news 

agenU (postsge 1 cent a pound) 

2. Kewspapem, other than weekUes, 

and periodicals not exceeding 
two oonces in weight (postage, 
1 eent for each convi ........... 


711.915,460 

7,873.123 
1,573,832 


174,046,764 

975.200 
804.436 


1.740,467.({4 

92,638.29 
38,899.76 


3.9 

1.9 
3 


.24 
1 1 


3. Periodicals weighing over two 


2.6 


Totsl second-class matter 


721.4A1,905 


176,826.490 


1.873.005.69 


3.88 


.25 


cals prepaid with postage stamps 
aflzed (postage, 1 cent for each 


68,988,610 


11, m, 160 


889,607.39 


3.88 

1.6 
.84 


1.5 


niBD-CLAflS MATTKB. 

1. Mailed to other postHifflces 


416,187,000 
60,787,576 


40,388,611 
3,228.270 


5.792,418.05 
669,434.48 


1.4 
1.1 


TMalthixd-ohua mattar 


476,974.675 


43,611,881|6,461,85a.53| 


^•^1 


1.35 



Items of 
matter. 



52 



REPORT OF THE POSTMAST£R-GENERAL. 



Statemeui of matter sent through the niaiU during the fiacal year ending 
^ June 30, 1890, <i*o.— Continued. 



8RBD8, BCIONB, HULB8, HOOTS, KTC. 

1. Mailed t4) other post-offices 



Items of 
malter. 



2. Depooiied forjocal delivory 

Total seeda, soioDi», bulbs, 
roota,eto 

FOUUTH-CLAfiS MATTSR. 

1 1. Mailed to other postofficos 

2. Deposited for local delivery 

Total fourth-cla^s matter 

MATTKK TO FOBBIGN COUNTRIES. 

1. Letter <« and sealed parcels 

2. All otber matter to foreign conn- 

tries 




Weight. 



Amount 
of pontage. 



4,665,5:n 

117, 293 1 



Pounds, 

*i, 410, 836 $222, 310. 89 

17,964i 3,041.61 



j 
4.782,824 2,428,800 225,352.50 



35, 472. 934 
2,016,766 



Total forci;jn matter . 
Total paid matter — 



37, 489, 700 

27, 162, 216 
14,111,097 



41,273,312 

3.r'2K,899,04I 



FBBB MATTBB. 

1. Second-class matter mailed free in 
county of publication 

%. Letters inclosed in Aree-penalty en- 
velopes 

S. Supplies, blanks, twine, etc., and 
all other matter mailed under 
free-penalty labels or penalty 
envelopes nsed as labels 

4. Franked matter, books, pampfaleta, 
reports, seeds, etc., mailed free, 
under frank or other wiso, as 
provided by sections 400 to 414 
of the Postal Laws nnd Regula- 
tions of 1887 



307,141.350 
50, 188, 154 

7. 887, 821 
11,591,840 



Total free matter. 



376,509,lGri 

Total paid and free matter . . '4,005,408,20(3 






Ou. 

8.3 
L». 46 



8.13 



11, 027, 136 1, 868, 013. 80! 4. 9 
461,709 93,453.641 3.7 



«J5 
5ft 






OU. 
4.76 
2.06 



5.3 
4.63 

11.488,845 1,961,467.5:} 4.9 ! 5.23 



799,6581,484,234.48 
3,151,113 334,908.76 



3,q;>0,771 1,819.14.3.24 



205.071, 39: 5r,.954,98l.32 



I 



30, 714, 135 
7, 160, 228 

27.543.016 
4,279,64<.|. 



0.47 

3.6 
1.53 



1.6 
2.23 



5a 08 



S.9 



5.46 

2.3 
4.4 

Hi 



69,097,025 ; 2.96 , 

36o, 3GK. 4!7 :::»,9M,9fil.3*2i Tlo"! "iTm 



Total amount of prepaid postages as shown in above table $55, 954, 981. 32 

Amount of due postages collected $280,059.04 

Amount of special-delivery stamps mailed 176, 952. 80 

Amount of registry fees on paid matter 1, 216, 416. 90 

Letter postage paid in money 108,725.41 

Box rent«r " 2,257,505.70 

Fines and penalties 6.810.26 

Deadletters 12,310.73 

Miscellaneous •20,W)1.00 

Money-Older revenue 824,220.24 

4.903.802.08 

Total revenue .^ 00,858.783.40 



ONE-CENT POSTAGE. 53 

SHALL LETTER POSTAGE BE REDUCED TO ONE (JENTT. 

There can scarcely be a difference of opiuion as to the 
very general interest in the subject of one cent letter post- 
age. Conventions and associations have declared for it, 
newspapers advocate it, and great nnmbers of the people 
believe in it and want it With my short acquaintance 
with the x)Ostal business a year ago I did not feel competent 
to pass a judgment on the question beyond recording my 
conviction that the state of the postal revenues at that time 
would hardly justify the reduction. To some, who do not 
look far beneath the surface, the question may seem quite 
easy; but short inquiry will show that there are many ob- 
stacles difficult to overcome. I will try to give the result 
of my investigations. 

If the postal revenue arising from letter postage could be 
set aside for its proper uses the millions of letter writers of 
this country might quickly be permitted to enjoy a reduced 
taxation on letter writing. In point of fact there is a clear, Profit on 2-c«nt 

loiter uostniro* 

gain of nearly $30,000,000 from letter postages. This large 
profit, with the annual deficit (which last year amounted to 
$5,768,300) appropriated out of the General Treasury, is all 
swallowed up by the losses on other classes of mail matter 
carried at less than the cost of distribution and handling. 
Part of this loss is caused by the transportation of period- 
ical and newspaper mail handled at one cent a pound, of 
newspapers carried free within the county of publication, 
and of other matter franked or carried free under penalty 
envelopes. . 

The question is often asked. Why there should be any* 
deficit with a profit on letter postages and a constant increase 
in business from the natural growth of the service T The 
answer is very plain. The Postmaster-General is obliged 
to proceed under enactments of Congress which in four 
important particulars put large expenditures beyond his LArfreexpendi. 
control. These are the rates of transportation; the pay of lawlnd'^cnn doI 
postmasters which are regulated by the receipts at post- Deimrtment? ^^ 
offices; advancing salaries under classification bills, and 
the extension of the free delivery, which is proportion- 
ate to the increasing population of cities. These regula- 
tions, which have been formulated into laws by those who 
represent the people, are of course what the people want. 
If it were possible to stop all expenditures where they stand 
to-day the natural growth of the business would soon over- 
come any deficiency. But this is not possible ; increasing 
work necessitates increasing pay in salaries. The emigra- 



54 REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

tioQ into new States compels an extension of railroad and 
star routes. Without postal facilities the settlement of 
new States would be greatly retarded. People will not 
move into new countries where they can not have the news- 
papers and the letters of their kindred and friends. It is, 
however, quite within the power of Congress to determine 
whether one-cent letter postage is preferable to the usual 
annual extension of the service. 

That the subject may be properly understood, I have had 
prepared with as much care as possible a few tables of esti- 
mates to show the possible condition of the postal service 
when looked at from various stand-points. In the first place, 
there need be no conjecture as to the principal item of cost 
in trying to drop to a one-cent rate. The amount received 

Jm*totw SS?* fromletter postage last year was somethiugover $38,000,000. 

^ This sum would be cut exactly in half, and we would, there- 

fore, get but a little over $19,000,000. The deficiency for 
the current year is likely to be $4,530,000, which would 
make the total deficiency $23,500,000, and more. This large 
deficiency under a one-cent rate would be reduced, first, by 
the natural increase of business ; second, by the stimulus of 
a low rate of postage ; and, third, by the completion of the 
pending legislation to collect proper postages from sample 
copies of so-called newspapers and from paper-covered 
books. It is estimated that by the sample-copy abuse over 
$1,000,000 is annually lost to the revenue, and in the trans- 
portation of paper-covered books considerably more than 
$1,000,000 is kept out of the postal income, or postal trust 
fund, for the benefit of certain book publishers. The defi- 
ciency under a one-cent rate might be still further reduced 
by the adoption of improved devices, from time to time, 
which would save time and money. 

The most formidable item for consideration is the eight 
million dollars' worth of postal work performed annually 

Tree work for without pay for the Executive Departments. If each of 
panweou. the Departments had paid its postage, the revenues of this 
Department would have been $8,000,000 more annually 
than it is now. It is true that the census year caused an 
extra amount of work, but the natural and regular increase 
is enormous. I hold that the General Post-Office should be 
paid by the Executive Departments for labor peformed and 
be paid at the same rates as the public pay. It will at once 
be said that it makes no difference whether the work is set- 
tled for by the various Departments or by one Department 
alone; but so long as a deficiency in the Post-OfiSce Depart- 
ment stands in the way of proper appropriations for the 



LOSS ON PAPER-CO VEREt) BOOKS. 56 

needed extension of the service or the reduction of rates, it 
is but fair to direct attention to the reason why these things 
are so. The letter-writers, who contribute the largest por- 
tion of the postal tax paid into the Treasnry, may justly 
claim that this money shall be given back to them in lower 
rates or new facilities. At present a part of the letter post- 
age is applied to forwarding military supplies to the Army, 
trees and shrnbs to agricultural stations, and huge boxes 
of census blanks to the farthest end of the country. 

It will be immediatedly remarked by those who know the 
facts that a large part of the loss of the Department arises 
from carrying newspapers in the mails at 1 cent a pound } 
but it is the foundation purpose of the Post-Office Depart- 
ment to transmit intelligence, and therefore legitimate news- 
papers are entitled to practically a free use of the mail. 
There are strong practical 'as well as theoretical arguments 
for this, as the readers of newspapers are much more num- 
erous than the writers of letters and would feel an increased 
newspaper rate much more. But this argument does not 
apply to paper-covered books, which by various devices 
represent themselves to be magazines and are now allowed 
in the mails at a loss of $1,000,000 annually : and there is J^^^J^!, <^"» 

, , , million dollars on 

no necessity for this, as the newsdealer or the book pub- p»pjr«ov ©red 
lisher, and not the reader, would pay the infinitesimal dif- 
ference in the cost of each book carried by the express in- 
stead of the mail transportation. I do not think it would 
make a difference of a quarter of a cent on each book, or 
that readers would ever know the difference if the paper- 
covered literature alluded to were made third-class matter. 
It does not seem fair to letter- writers to take the profit 
made upon the transportation of letters and give it away 
for the support of the War, the Agricultural, or the Inte- 
rior Department, or to let it go to book and newspaper pub- 
lishers of a certain class. The Post-Office Department 
would be self-sustaining if it had credit for the work it does 
for nothing, and practically nothing, and if these different 
classes of mail matter were all put upon a self-supporting 
basis. 

- In the various tables that follow I show the probable 
financial condition of the Department under two-cent letter 
rate, with and without certain credits for work now done 
free for the Executive Departments, and also under changes 
and economies i>ossible to be made or practiced. I think 
it proper to give other tables showing what the probable 
movement of the revenue would be under a one-cent rate, 
and what may be expected under changes and economies. 



56 REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

There is mach more to be considered than the simple 
redaction of the revenue from $38,000,000 to $19,000,000. 
There mast be additions to the expense account for addi- 
tional clerks, carriers, railway transportation, and railway 
postal cars. It is impossible to determine with any aoca- 
racy how much this additional cost will be, but consulta- 
tion with practical postal authorities leads me to believe 
that the sum stated in the tables is a fair approximation. 

It is very clear that if a Postmaster-Oeneral could apply 
the ordinary rules of business to the affairs of the postal 
system he could make changes that would add vastly to 
the annual revenue. I said this a year ago, and my expe- 
rience during the last year confirms this opinion. It is per- 
haps wise to go slowly with new legislation, but a growing 
service nevertheless requires new adjustments. The lack 
of legislation, in many instances,. means large losses. The 
members of Congress know this, but the course of legisla- 
tion moves in certain channels. For example, a system of 
close supervision and comoact organization of the smaller 
pos^officeSy so as to make them tributary to the larger 
offices, would be the means not only of improving the serv- 
DefloitooBidbeice, but of adding largely to its revenue. But this all re- 

iTiSSwi. ^ *' quires new legislation. One-cent postage will probably be 
delayed as long as any deficit appears in the books of the 
Department. Yet this deficit might quickly be removed by 
the passage of a few measures of legislation. It is only a 
question of time, therefore, when one-cent rate will be suc- 
cessfully demanded. The money paid for postages by let- 
ter-writers is, according to my view, a trust fund, and it is 
not proper to use it for any other purpose than in paying 
the cost of the work performed, in extending the conven- 
ience of the service, and in reducing rates. 
iBorMwedbiui- Past experience shows that a large increase of business 

i^U'lrntM. "^ has resulted from the stimulus of a lower rate of postage. 
The three radical reductions in the rates of letter postage 
since the foundation of the Government occurred in 1845, 
when the letter rate was established at 5 cents; in 1851, when 
it was reduced to 3 cents, and in 1883, when the rate was fixed 
at 2 cents. For a number of years prior to 1845, under the 
exorbitant and complicated rates then prevailing, the 
revenues were almost stationary in amount, being about 
$4,300,000 annually. For the first year following the re- 
duction of 1845 the revenue was about $3,500,000„ showing 
a falling off of about $800,000. For the year ending June 
80, 1851, six years after the redqction, the revenue had 
grown to about $6,400,000, being nearly 50 per cent, more 
than the revenue prior to the reduction in 1845. 



RESULTS SHOWN ON ASSUMED CONDITIONS, 57 

For the first year under the reduction of 1851 the rev- 
enue was about $5,200,000, or about $1,200,000 less than 
the previous year under the old rate. Eight years later, in 
1860, the revenue had increased to about $8,500,000, or 
nearly 65 per cent, more than that of the revenue for the first 
year under the three-cent rate. For the year ending June 
30, 1883, the revenue was about $45,000^000. For 1884, the 
fiist year under the two-cent rate, the revenue was about 
$43,340,000, showing a flAlling off of about $1,660,000. 
The revenue for the year ending June 30, 1890, was upwards 
of $60,000,000, and this amount is about $15,000,000, or, 
say, one-third more than the revenue of 1883, the last year 
under the old rate. 

This result was accomplished in the face of the following 
important reductions in the rates of postage occurring 
during the intervening seven years : First, the reduction 
in 1884 on transient newspapers and periodicals from 1 
cent for 2 ounces to 1 cent for 4 ounces ; second, the in- 
crease in 1885 in the unit of weight of first-class matter 
from one-half ounce to a full ounce, the rate of postage re- 
maining the same ; third, the reduction in 1885 of the rate on 
second-class matter from 2 cents to 1 cent per x>ound; and, 
fourth, the reduction in 1888 of the rate of postage on seeds, 
scions, bulbs, and plants from 1 cent per ounce to 1 cent 
tor two ounces. The reduction of the letter rate in 1845 
was made in face of a small deficiency in the revenue, 
but the reductions of 1851 and 1883 were preceded by a 
small surplus of revenue over expenditures. The defi- 
ciency of the revenue for the first year under the reduction 
of 1845 was about 14.4 per cent. ; for the first year after 
the reduction of 1851 it was 27 per cent., and for the year 
after the reduction in 1883 it was 6.6 per cent. 

The following tables are printed because they show more 
clearly and forcibly the information I desire to set out than 
the same information could be conveyed by paragraphs of 
words. I would like it plainly understood that theseti^/*f"«tt'^^Il 
tables are not intended as a demonstration that one-cent J^^*^***"^'* 
postage is practicable at this or any other particular time, 
nor as a demonstration that certain conditions upon which 
the calculations are based and depending upon pending 
and new legislation will be fulfilled. They are simply 
intended to explain what the state of the Department's 
finances would be under the conditions shown in each table. 
They are estimates as accurate as the information at the 
command of the Department would warrant 

Table No. 1, the starting point, compares the revenues 



58 REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

and expenditures of the service for each of the six years 
from 1890 to 1895. 

The estimated increase of the revenao for 1892 over 1891 
is elsewhere shown to be 10 per cent. The actual increase 
of the appropriations for 1891 over the expenditures for 
1890 was 8.4 per cent. This table shows that by adding 10 
per cent, each successive year to the revenues of the preced- 
ing year, and 8.4 per cent, to the expenditures, the service 
attheclose of the fiscal year 1895 will be practically self-sus- 
taining under existing conditions, the deficit being a little 
more than half a million dollars only. 

Table No. 2 takes into account certain items of savings, 
assuming that the Department was being paid for paper- 
covered books at third-class rates; for limiting sample 
copies, by which the same rates can be collected on a large 
amount of mail matter, and that it were wise and practi- 
cable to obtain a reduction of 5 per cent, in the rate of pay 
for the transportation of the mail. In this connection it 
may be stated that within fourteen years two such reduc- 
tions have been made of 10 and 5 per cent., respectively. 
The saving on paper-covered books is estimated at $1,- 
000,000; on sample copies, at $1,100,000; and a 5 per cent, 
reduction on transportation, at $1,127,506.41. Applying 
the total saving of $3,227,506.41 to the expenditures of the 
fiscal year 1892, as shown in Table 1, and calculating as 
before for the successive years a 10 per cent, increase in 
the revenue and 8.4 per cent, increase in the expenditure, 
the result shown is that the service would be practically 
self-sustaining in 1892, with an increasing profit each sub- 
sequent ye^r, until it would amount to nearly $3,500,000 
in 1895. 

Table No. 3 is a calculation of the same kind, except it is 
based upon a reduction of 10 per cent, instead of 5 per cent, 
on the cost of transportation, and it shows a profit of three- 
quarters of a million dollars for the fiscal year 1892, increas- 
,ing to nearly $5,000,000 for the fiscal year 1895. 

Table No. 4 takes into account all the items previously 
mentioned, and in addition assumes what the extra revenue 
would be if the Department were paid at the rates charged 
to the public^ for matter now carried in the mails free, 
namely : Free newspapers within the county of publication ; 
franked matter, penalty letters of the Executive Depart- 
mentSy and packages of blanks and supplies carried for the 
same Departments under the penalty label; the total 
amounting to nearly $9,000,000. This total sum for which 
it is claimed the Post-Office Department should at least 



RESULTS SHOWN ON ASSUMED CONDITIONS. 59 

have credit is added to the revenaes for 1892^ and a 10 per 
cent, increase each successive year bein^ added to the 
revenaes and 8.4 per cent, increase added to the exx>endi- 
tnres, the results show an increasing profit from $8,500,000 
in 1892 to over $15,500,000 in 1895. This table No. 4 is 
based, it should be stated, upon a 5 per cent, reduction in 
the cost of transportation. 

Table No. 5 is a similar calculation based upon a 10 per 
cent, reduction in the cost of transportation, and shows in- 
creased profits from nearly $10,000,000 in 1892 to over 
$17,000,000 in 1895. In other words, if it were possible to 
bring about by the 30th of June, 1895, all the conditions 
assumed in these tables, the result of the whole would be 
that on the Ist of July, 1895, the postal service would be 
substantially ready for l-cent postage, which would entail 
a loss of only a little more than the profit then accruing. 

The preceding is a calculation upon the assumption that 
the Department is to wait until the let of July, 1895, before, 
commencing with Icent postage. The next, what would 
be the results under the same conditions if the Department 
were to operate under 1-cent postage from the Ist of July, 
1891. 

Table No. 6 is intended to show the results under the 
last-mentioned condition of afifairs, with a 5 per cent, re- 
daction in the cost of transportation, and it exhibits deficits 
ranging from $10,500,000 in 1892 to $9,700,000 for 1895. 

Table No. 7 is a similar calculation based upon a 10 per 
cent reduction in the cost of transportation, and exhibits 
consequently decreased deficits of from $9,350,000 in 1892 
to $8,260,000 in 1895. These two tables, Nos. 6 and 7, are 
likewise made upon the assumption that there will be no 
change in the revenues or expenditures brought about sim- 
ply by increased volume of business and increased expen- 
ditures, due to the stimulus of one-cent postage, other than 
a normal increase of 10 per cent, each year in the revenues 
and 8.4 per cent in the expenditures. 

Table No. 8 is the same kind of a calculation based upon 
a 5 per cent reduction in transportation, and a 20 per cent, 
increase for 1893 in the revenues and 5 per cent, due to 
one-cent postage, an increase of 13.4 per cent, for that 
year in the expenditures, with normal increases of 10 pei 
cent, in the revenues and 8.4 per cent, in the expenditures 
for the sncceding years. 

Table No. 9 contains no variation from Table No. 8, ex- 
cept that it is founded upon a 10 per cent, reduction in 
transportation. In other words, these tables assume that 



60 



REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-OENERAL. 



if one-cent postage should be in operation duriog the fiscal 
year 1892*, the following year there woald be an abnormal in- 
crease of 10 per cent, in the revenaes and of 5 per cent, in 
the expenditures, due to the stimnlns of one-cent postage. 

GDables Nos. 10 and 11 are precisely similar calculations, 
except that they are based upon an abnormal additional 
increase of 23^ per cent, in the revenues (3^, or one-third 
in all) and an additional increase of 10 per cent, in the ex- 
I>enditures (18.4 per cent, in all) during the year following 
the introduction of one-cent postage, with normal increases 
thereafter. ' 

Table No. 12 is the same as Table No. 2, except that it 
omits entirely the item of reduction in the cost of transpor- 
tation. ^ 

Table No. 13 is the same as Table No. 4, except that it 
omits from the calculation any reduction whatever in the 
cost of transportation. 

Tables Nos. 14, 15, and 16 are similar in character to 
Tables Nos. 6, 8, and 10, except that they omit the item of 
reductioD in the cost of transportation. 

Tablb No. \, 





1890. 


1891. 


1892. 


SattIaa ««lf. Total revenne 


$60,868,783.40 


MT SftR. fifiS. 44, 


$73, 955, 031. 88 


•nstaiDlngin]896_ , 

und Ar nrAMint Total eroendittires 






66, 645, 083. 80 






ocnditioiM. Total appropriationt 


72, 226, 69a 99 




Totid estimated expenditares 




77, 545, 884. 41 








Defloits 


5,786,300.40 


5, 5((1, 615. 19 


3, 500, 862. 43 








1883. 


1894. 


1885. 


Total rovenne .....^... 


$81, 266, 036. 17 
84,058,749.54 


$89,808,138.68 1 $88, 154, 4.52. 54 


Total estimated expenditnree 


91, 120, 768. 50 88, 774. 913. OS 

i 


Defldte 


2,793.714.87 


1,812.628.82 


*020, 460. 51 







* Practically self-suauininic. 



TABLK6 OF RESULTS ON ASSUMED CONDITIONS. 
Tabus No. 2. 



61 





1800. 1 188L 

! 


1802. 


Tote] roTomi© 


$00,858,783.40 


167,298,665.44 


$73,»55,031.88 




8«viB0B as foUowB: 






1,000,000.00 

i,ioo,ooaoo 

1,127,566.41 








rddaotiion .................... 














Totel .-..- 


3,227,506.41 




. 68, M5, 063.80 


72,226,608.00 


f Ot^ f)Xp6iCII6B r 


74,818,388.00 




Deflcito 


6,780,a0a40| 5,581,619.10 


^863,356.02 



with certain fui- 
SQraodiWTiugii. 



TMalreTeDue .. 
Totml ezpeoMs . 

Profit*... 



1883. 



681,266,035.17 
80,561,132.50 



704,902.58 



1894. 



$80. 308, 138. 68 
87,328,267.72 



1885. 



$88,154,462.64 
94,663,842.20 



1.070,870.96 8,490,610.84 



Tablk No. 3. 





1890. 


1881. ' 


1882. 


Total revflntio .....Tr-,--T.......-r-r, 


160, 858, 783. 40 


$67,296,666,44 1 


$73, 966, 031. 98 




8*vi&ga as foUows : 

On iwDAr-<MrYArad booka. . . -, r ^ - 




, 


1,000,000.00 
1,100,000.00 

2, 255, 012. 83 


On aamole coiii<n 




1 


On traosportadon, 10 per ceoi 
reduction 






Total 




1 


4,355,012.83 




66,645,083.80 


I_ 

72,226,608.99 


Totel expennen 


73,190,881.68 




Defldte 


6.786,300.40 


5,581,615.10 1 


1 764, 150. 40 





1893. 



1894. 



1895. 



Totalreveone | $81,266,035.17 $89,308,138.68 $08,154,452.54 



Total expenses 79,338.015.63 

Profit 



1,927,119.64 3,304,754.14 



86, 003, .384. 54 93, 227, 66& 84 



4,926,783.70 



* Praotioally self-Rnstaining. 



62 



BEPOKT OF THK POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 
Tablk No. 4. 



ter paid for. Kevenuo from free mfttter if paid 
for: 

VreecouDfcy 

Franked 

Penalty letters 

Penalty mipplles 

Total revenue then 

Total expenses «... 

Deficit 



1880. 



$80,858,783.40 



66,645^083.80 



5,786,800.40 



1801. 



•67,208.665.44 



72.226,608.99 



5, 581, 615. 19 



1892. 



$73,955,031.96 



307, 141. 35 

842, 371. 68 

6^026,047.88 

2, 203, 441. 28 



82,(34.034.17 
74,318,888.00 



*8, 615, 646. 17 





1893. 


1894. 


1»5. 


Total revenue then 


$91, 117, 487. 58 $100. 229, 181. 33 
80,561,132.50 87,328,267.72 


$110,262,099.46 


Total expenses 


94,663,842.20 




Profit 


10,656.304.99 


12,900,913.61 


15, 588, 267. 26 







TXblb No. 5. 



Totalrevenne $60,858,783.40 I $67,298,665.44 



1890. 



1891. 



Kevenuo from froe matter if paid I 
for : 

Freecounty j 

Franked | 

Penalty letters 

Penalt y supplies 

Total ravenue then 

Total expenses 06,645,083.80 | 72,226.698.90 

Deficits I 5,788.300.40 5,581,615.19 



I- 



1892. 



$73,956,031.98 



307, 141. 35 

342,371.68 

6, 026, 047. 88 

2.203,441.28 



I 



82,834,034.17 
73, 190. 881. 5« 



♦0. 643. 152. 59 



Total revenne then . 
Total exponftes 

Profit 



1893. 

$91,117,437.58 
79,338,915.63 



11,778,521.95 



1894. I 

$100,229,181.33 I 
80, 003, 384. 54 ' 



1895. 

$110,232,099.46 
93,227,668.84 



14,225,796.70 ' 17.024,430.62 



•Profit. 



TABLES OF RESULTS ON ASSUMED CONDITIONS. 
Tabuc No. 6. 





1392. 


1883. 


ISM. 


1805. 


ing expected ur- 
inffs 


183,834.034.17 
74.318,388.00 


170.217,437.68 
80,061. 132. 50 


tn. 239, 181. 33 
87,328,267.72 


$84 063.09(>.46 


Total expenses 


94.663,842.20 


DeBcite 


10,484,353.83 


10.343,685.01 


10,089,086.39 


9,700,742.74 



Table No. 7. 





1892. 


1893. 1 1894. 


1895. 


ToUl revennee, add- 
ing expeoted bet- 
inss ...._- 


163,834.034.17 
73,190,881.58 


170, 217, 437. 58 $77, 239, 181. 33 :f84, 963, 090. 46 
79,838,915.63 86,003,384.54 93. 227, 66tL 8t 


Total expenses 


Deficits 


9,356,847.41 


9.121,47&05 


8,764.203.21 { 8,284,569.38 



Table No. 8. 



Bevennee 

Bxpenaee 

Deficits 



1892. 



$63,834,034.17 
74,818,888.00 



10,484,353.83 



1803. 



$76,600,841.00 
84,277,0aL90 



7,676,210.90 



1894. 



1805. 



$84, 260, 925. 10 
91,356,324.35 



$92,687,017.61 
99, 030, 255. SO 



7,005,399.25 6,343,237.96 



Table No, 9. 





1892. ; 1803. 


1894. 


1895. 


ReTOnuee 


$63,834,034.17 ' $76,600,841.00 
73, 100 881. 58 82 MA 4fiO. 71 


$84,260,925.10 
89. 970. 330. 32 


$02, 687, 017. 61 


Kxpensea ....... 


07 R97 ft9» nil 






' ' 




Dcficita 


0,3.'S6,847.41 


6, 397, 618. 71 


5, 700, 405, 22 4. 840. 820. 45 

1 



Table No. 10. 





1892. 


1893. 


1894. 


1895. 


BeTennes 


063,834,034.17 
74,318.888.00 


$85,112,015.66 
87,992,971.39 


$93,623,250.11 
95.384,380.98 


$102,985,575.12 
103,396,668.98 


Xxoenses -- 




DeflciU 


10.484,353.83 


2,880,925.83 


1,761,130.87 


411,093.86 



Table No. 11. 





1882. 


1893. 


1804. 


1895. 


ReTennea 


$63,834,034.17 
73,190,881.68 


$86,112,046.66 
86^658.008.79 


$03,623,250.11 
93, 937, 276. 10 


$102,985,675.12 
101,828,007.29 


■SxpMiseff . . . - -r 




Deflcita 


9,356,847.41 


1.645.056.23 


314,025.99 


*1, 157, 667. 88 



63 



•Profit. 



64 



REPORT OF THE POSTMASTEK-GENERAL. 
Table No. 12. 





1800. 


m. 


1892. 


Total Tf>T«nni> 


$00,858,783.40 


$67.298,e«.'i.44 , 


$73,955,031.98 






Savings m foUnwa : 




1 


1,000,000.00 


On RAinnlft ooniM 




: 


1, 100. 000. 00 










Total 


2,100,000.00 




86, 645, 083. 80 


72,226,098.99 ' 


Total expensM 


75, 446, 894. 41 






Deficits 


5,786,300.40 


6,581,616.10 


1,490,862.43 







1893. 


1894. 


Total rttTMinfM 


$81,266,035.17 
81,783,849.54 


$89,308,138.68 
88, 653, 150. 90 


Total oxponsMt 






Deilcita 


517,814.87 


*664, 087. 78 







1895. 



$98,154,452.54 
96,100,015.57 



*2, 054, 436. 07 



•Profit. 



Table No. 13. 





1890. 1891. 


1802. 


TotalmTimnA 


$60,858,783.40 | $67,298,666.44 


$73,065,031.98 




Kerenue from ft^ee matter if paid 
for: 
]Prp6 county , r 






307,14L35 

342,871.68 

6,026 047.88 


Franked 






Penalty letters 






Penaltv snDolies 






2.203 441.28 










Total revenne then 


82,834,034.17 
75, 445, 894. 41 


TVttA <*lTM^n«W, . T r r . T . , . . T , - . . r . 


66,645,083.80 


72. 226, 69a 99 






Defloits 


6.786,300.40 


6, 581, 615. 10 


*7, 388, 139. 76 





1883. 



1804. 



1895. 



Total revenue ^ , 

Total revenue then I 901, 117, 437. 58 $100, 229, 181. 83 j $110, 252, 099. 46 

Total expenses I 81.783,849.54, 88, 653, 150. 90 | 06.100,015.57 

Pioflt ..I 0,334.08&04 I 11.576,030.48 I 14,152,083.80 



THE FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 
Tablk No. 14. 



65 





1892. 


1803. 


1894. 


1805. 


BevoDUM 


$03,834,03417 
76^445.894.41 


$70,217,437.58 
81.783,349.54 


$77. 239, 181. 33 
88, 653, 160. 90 


$84,963,099.46 
96.100,016.57 


Xxponses 




Deikdto 


11.611. 860.24 


11,565.911.96 
iBLK No. 15. 


11,413.969.57 


11,136,916.11 




Ti 






' 


1892. 

$63,834,034.17 
75.445,894.41 

11,611,860.24 


1893. 

$76,600,841.00 
85,565. 644. 26 


1804. 


1895. 


BaTenaea 

BxpeiwM 


$84, 260, 925. 10 
92.742.31&37 


$92,687 017.61 
10$,582»673.11 


Beflcite 


8,951.803.26 


8,481,393.27 


7,845,655.60 


Table No. 16. 




1882. 


1893. 


1894. 

$03,623,250.11 
06.831,485.85 


■ 
1896. 


BaTenaes 

IXpODM** 


$63,834,034.17 
75,445,884.41 


$85,112,045.56 
80. 327,93a 96 


$102, 985,6761 12 
104, 965, 33a 66 




DeficiU 


11,611,880.24 


4.215,893.42 


3,208,235.74 


1,979.765.54 



THE FINANCIAL HTATEMENT. 

Below are statenieuts of the revenae^ expenditures, and 
actual cost of the postal service for the three fiscal years 
ending respectively June 30, 1888, June 30, 1889, and June 
30, 1890, it being customary to restate the accounts of the 
two years preceding that for which each report is made, 
becaase appropriations are available for two years, and cer- 
tain items which, when the accounts are first stated, can 
only be estimated, after the lapse of that time are defi- 
nitely ascertainable. The variations between expenditures 
andactual cost of the service are due to taking into account 
the amounts earned by the Pacific railroad companies for 
mail transportation and certified to the Secretary of the 
Treasury in pursuance of the law. 

, p M G 90 5 



66 REPORT OF T5E POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

Fiscal year ending June 30, 1888. 

RBVBNUB. 

1. Ordinary postal revenue $51, 896, 8&8. 96 

2. Receipts from money -order business „ 798, 317. 83 

Qroas revenue 52,695,176.79 

EXPEKDITURES AND LIABIUTIES. 

Expenditures : 

From July 1, 1887, ^ Sept. 30, 1888. «55, 795, 357. 84 

From Oct. 1, 1888, to Sept. 30, 1889. 490, 073. 70 

From Oct. 1, 1889, to Sept. 30, 1890. 38, 823. 47 

56,324,255.01 
Liabilities : 

Outstanding indebted- 
ness for various ob- > 
Jects, estimated $1, 603. 66 

For transportation of 
mails on Central Pa- 
cific Railroad, not in- 
cluded in amount cer- 
tified to Secretary of 
the Treasury 308,504.55 

Due Sioux City and Pa- 
cific Railroad Com- 
pany for similar serr- 
ice during the year. 12, 199. 17 

322,307.38 

Total expenditures and liabilities for the service 
oftheyear 56,646,562.39 

Deficiency in revenue 3,951,385.60 

COST OF POSTAL SBRVICB. 

Expenditures and liabilities as above |66, 646, 562. 39 

Amount certified for credit to Pacific 
railroads from July 1, 1887, to Sep- 
tember 30, 1888 11,240,600.83 

From Oct. 1, 1888, to Sept. 30, 1889 .... 1, 507. 20 

T'»fc»l 1,242,108.03 

Total cost of service 57,888,670.48 

Excess of total cost of postal service over revenues . 5, 193, 493. 63 
Th3 receipts were $3,951,385.60, or 6.9 per cent., less than 
the expenditures, and $5,193,493.63, or 9.8 per cent, less 
than the total cost of the service. 

Oo-npared with the previous fiscal year there was an in- 
crease of $3,778,585.02, or 7.8 per cent., in the gross revenue 5 
an increase of $3,529,888.72, or 6.6 per cent., in the ex- 
penditures and liabilities; and an increase of $3,673,476.92, 
or 6.5 per cent., in the estimated total cost of the service. 



THE FINANCIAL STATEMENT.' 67 

Fiscal year ending June 30, 1889. 

BBVKNUE. 

1. Ordinary postal revenue $55,387,806.37 

2. Beceipts Irom money-order basinese 787, 804. 81 

GnMBieTenne 56,175,611.18 

Deduct amount charged to bad debts, opmpromise and 
suspense cases 27,596.26 

Bemaining revenue 56,148,014.92 

EXPENDITURES Ain> LIABILITIES. 

Expenditures: 

From July 1, 1888, to September 30, 

18^ $61,376,847.24 

From October 1,1889, to September 30, 

1890 288,485.16 

Liiabilities : 

Actual indebtedness not reported to 

Auditor on account of transportation 

of mails by railroads 17.61 

Outstanding indebtedness for various 

obJects,e8timated 576.646.43 

For transportation of the mails on the 

Central Pacific Bailroad, not in- 
cluded in the amount certified to 

the Secietary of the Treasury 321, 146. 11 

Due 8ioux City apd Pacific Railroad 

Company for similar service during 

the year 12,305.24 

Total expenditures and liabilities for the service 
oftheyear 62,555,447.78 

Deficiency in revenue 6.407,432.86 

COST OF POSTAL SERVICE. 

Expenditures and liabilities as above $62, 555, 447. 78 

Amount certified for credit to Pacific rail- 
roads from July 1, 1888, to September 30, 
1889 $1,253,673.33 

From October 1, 1889, to September 30, 1890 578. 13 

Total 1,254,251.46 

Total cost of service 63,809,699.24 

Excess of total cost of the postal service over 
revenue 7,661,684.32 

The receipts were $6,407,432.86, or 10.2 per cent., loss than 
the expenditures, and $7,061,684.32, or 13.6 per cent, less 
than the total cost of the service. 

Compared with the previous fiscal year there was an in- 
crease of $3,452,838.13, or 6.G per cent., in the revenue; 
an increase of $5,908,885.39, or 10.4 per cent., in the ex- 
penditures and liabilities ; and an increase of $5,921,028.82, 
or 10.2 per cent., in the estimated total cost of the service. 



68 BEPOET OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

Fiscal year ending June 30, 1890. 

RBV£NUE. 

1. Ordinary postal revenae ^,057,877.66 

2. Receipts from money- order busiuess , ^,220.24 

Gross revenue 60,882,097.92 

Less amount charged to bad debts, compromise and 
suspense cases 23,314.52 

Remaining revenue 60,858,783.40 

EXPENDITURES AND LIABILITIES. 

Expenditures : 

From July 1, 1889, to September 30, 

1890 $65,930,717.11 

Liabilities : 

Indebtedness for various 
objects $305,096.39 

Outstanding indebted- 
ness for various objects, 
estimated 76,512.40 

For transportation of the 
mails on the Central 
Pacific Railroad not in- 
cluded in the amount , 
certified to the Secre- 
tary of the Treasury . . 320, 529. 07 

Due Sioux City and Pa- 
cific Railroad Company 
for similar service dur- 
ing the year 12, 228. 83 

714,366.69 



Total expenditures and liabilities for the service 
of the year 66,645,083.80 

Deficiency in revenue 5,786,300.40 

COST OF POSTAL SERVICE. , 

Expenditures and liabilities as above $66, 645, 083. 80 

Amount certified for credit to Pacific railroads 1, 207, 401. 80 



Total cost of service 67,852,4^5.60 



Excess of total cost of the postal service over revenue . 6, 993, 702. 20 

The receipts were $5,786,300.40, or 8.6 per cent., less than 
the expenditures, and $6,993,702.20, or 11.4 per cent., less 
than the total cost of the service. 

Compared with the previous fiscal year there was an in- 
crease of $4,710,768.48, or 8.37 per cent., in the revenue; 
an increase of $4,089,636.02, or 6.5 per cent., in the ex- 
penditures and liabilities ; and an increase of $4,042,786.36, 
or 6.3 per cent., in the estimated total cost of the service. 



ESTIMATES FOR 1891 AND 1893. 69 

ESTIMATES FOB THE FISCAL YEARS ENDING JUNE 30, 
1891 AND 1892. 

With an average annual increase at the rate of 7.2 per 
cent, in the revenue for the fonr years ending June 30, 1889; 
an increase of 6.7 per cent, for the latter year alone; an in- 
crease of 8.37 per cent, for the year just closed, and every 
reason to snppose that the current year will be an excep- 
tionally prosperous one, it seems proper to count upon an 
increase of 10 per cent, in the revenues of the present and 
the next fiscal years. The estimates may therefore be stated 
thus: 

Fiteal year ending June 30, 1891. 

Amonnt of ordinary postal revenae for year ending June 

30,1890 §60,057,877.68 

Inoreoseof lOper cent 6,005,787.76 

Estimated amount of ordinary postal revenae 6G, 463, 665. 44 

Add leyenne from money-order business, upon revised 
estimates of the superintendent of the money-order 
system, by letter of October 27, 1890 835, 000. 00 

Gives gross revenue 67, 298,665. 44 

The appropriations for the year amount to $72,226,698.99, 
which will not be supplemented by deficiency appropria- 
tions, so that upon this basis the deficiency will not exceed 
$5,581,616.19. 

lUeal year ending June 30, 1892. 

Estimated amount of ordinary postal revenue for the 

year ending June 30, 1891, as before $66,463,665.44 

Increase of 10 per cent 6,646,366.54 

Gives estimated amount of ordinary ' postal reve- 
nue for the year 73,110,031.98 

Amount of estimated revenae from money «order busi- 
ness 845,000.00 

Gross revenue for the year 73,955,031.98 

Amount of estimated expenditures shown in table of esti- 
mates submitted by the Postmaster-General through 
the Secretary of the Treasury 77,545,894.41 

Leaves estimated deficiency of revenue to be sup- 
plied oat of general Treasury 3,590,862.43 

NOT PBACTICABLt;. 

Daily suggestions in letters, newspaj)er8, and personal 
calls are made that the PostOffice De[>artment should do a 
variety of things of which the following are examples, and 
for which the law does not provide :• To try the experiment 



70 fiBPORT OF THE POStM ASTER-GENERAL. 

of a general parcels-post with packages weighing over four 
pounds; to stop the Sunday mails; to make free delivery 
universal ; to provide a fractional currency for transmission 
by mail ; to make every post-office a money-order office ; 
to require the use of none but stamped envelopes in order 
to avoid non-payment of postage ; to provide receptacles 
in street cars for the collection of mail matter ; to put let- 
ter-boxes at all railroad stations. 

In another part of this report will be found some observa- 
tions in regard to the parcels-post. As to the Sunday 
mails, the best thoughts of the representative postmasters 
have been obtained, and the gist of all the opinions is that 
so long as the mails are carried on railroads so as to arrive 
at the post-office on Sunday, it is impracticable to discon- 
tinue the treatment of mail matter so transported and de- 
livered inside of post-offices without serious embarrassment 
to general business interests. Then vast accumulations of 
mail matter would have to be handled on the first busi- 
ness day of the week. Every citizen can stop the Sunday 
delivery of his own mail if he chooses, and a petition from 
any community signed by a considerable majority of the 
patrons of the post-office requesting the closing of an office 
on Sundays would be regarded with fevor by the Depart- 
ment as a means of ascertaining by practical experiment 
just what the effect of Sunday closing would be. 

As to making free delivery universal the Department has 
already taken the first step to ascertain what is practicable 
in this direction by obtaining authority of law to test rural 
free delivery. To make universal free delivery would add 
millions to the cost of the Department. As to fractional 
currency for mailing purposes, its provision would be the 
business of the Treasury Department It is not the func- 
tion of the Post-Office Department to issue currency. The 
postal note is now issued at money-order offices. 

It is out of the question to make every post-office a 
money-order office ; for, aside from the fact that it is doubt- 
ful whether there is a demand for the system at a large 
majority of the fourth-class post-offices, there is the fuiither 
consideration that it would be impossible to obtain frofiS the 
postmasters of such offices bonds adequate to protect the 
Government for the valuable supplies intrusted to them. 
Such widespread extension of the money-order system 
would furthermore, in virtue of the valuable, blanka and 
funds which would then be stored in every post-office, make 
such offices the objects of the cupidity of burglars to a far 
greater extent than they are at present, on account of the 



PERSONAL. 71 

inconsiderable quantities of postage-stamps which they con- 
tain. 

In regard to the universal nse of stamped envelopes it 
may be said that the Qovernment has no power to coerce 
the public into the use of a special sort of envelope, what- 
ever advantages might be gained from the adoption of the 
suggestion. The plan of placing collection boxes on street 
cars is not a new one, and from what is known of the experi- 
ments made in past years seems to be far from practical or 
advantageous. It did not develop rapid collections. Further- 
more, it would involve declaring the lines of every street 
railway company pos^roads, and in times of strikes would 
subject the mails to the danger of delay or depredation. 

It is not practicable to place a letter box at every railroad 
station for the reasons : First, that the mail trains do not 
stop at every station and frequently do not s^top at many 
stations; second, that when they do stop it is not possible 
or proper for the postal clerk to leave his car for the pur- 
pose of making collections from the box; third, that it 
would not be feasible to require the postmaster, whose 
office in many instances is at a distance from the station, to 
visit the latter at train time for the purpose of depositing 
the contents of the boxes in the cars ; and fourth, if the 
railway postal clerk should be charged with the duty of 
emptying the boxes, he might carry the mail in the direc- 
tion opposite to that intended. 

PEBSONAL. 

I regret extremely the retirement of Mr. Clarkson, whose 
deserved popularity, and efficiency as an executive in the 
difficult position of Firiit Assistant, have been equaled 
only by the loyalty and warmth of his personal friendship 
to me. But the Department, as I also desire to record, is 
fortunate in having the experience and endeavor of Colonel 
Whitfield, Mr. Lowrie Bell, Captain White, Captain Brooks, 
and the others, who have been promoted to the more im- 
portant posts to which their successes have entitled them. 
I am grateful to all the officials and employes of the De- 
partment, in and out of Washington. What I accomplish 
is with their assistance. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

John Wanamakbe, 

Postmaster- General . 



Appendix A. 



£BHmaiea of appropriations required for (ke aervioe of ike fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, 
by the Post' Office Department, 



Detailed objects of expeoditnre, and explanatioos. 



Estimatod 

amoaut which 

wiUbe 

required for 

eacn detailed 

object of 
expenditure. 



TJKOSK THE POST-OFFICE DEPABTMENT, OUT OF THE 
POSTAL REVENUE. 

F06TAL 8IAVICB. 

OJIe« q^ Uu Postnuuter-General. 

Mail dapredationfl and post-ofllce inspectors ; and not exceeding $6,000 of 
thia amount may be expended for fees to United States attorneys, 
manhals, clerks of ooart» and speciid counsel necessarily employed in 
prosecnting civil suits instituted by the (Sixth) Auditor of the Treas- 
nry for the Poat-Offioe Department, through the Solicitor of the Treas- 
my, against the snreti^ on the official bonds of late postmasters, as 
prorided for by section 282, BeTised Statutes of the United States ; and 
the act of Congress approved June 17, 1878, is hereby amended so as 
to authorize the Postmaster-General to appoint twelve, instead of ten, 
poaVoffiee inspeotors, to be assigned to duty at such important points 
as he may designate, who shall each receive a salary of 92,600 per an- 
nonn, and no more (June 30, 1800) 

S«WBzds for the apprehension and conviction of highway, stage, and 
train lobbsn, and post-office burglars (submitted) 

AdvertUng (June 30, 1800) 

Hisoenaaeons items in the office of the Postmaster^General (same act) . . 

Total , 

OJiee of the Firgt Asnttant Postmatter-O^neral. 

Compeo8ationu» postmasters (June 30, 1880) 

Compensaiion to clerks in post-offices (same act) 

Bcnt^ light, and fuel for first and second class offices, including rent of 
dty pos^offlce at Washington, D. C; and of thia sum not exceeding 
$100 may be paid for the rent of a branch post-office on Capitol Hill, 
in the city of Washington (same act) 

Bant, light, and fuel for offices of the third class : Provided, That there 
ahall not be allowed for the use of any third-class post-office for rent a 
som in ezeeas of $400, nor more than $60 for fuel and lights In any one 
year (same act) 

MfaoeUaiieoas and incidental items for first and second class post-offices, 
inclnding ftimitnre (same act) 



Amount 
appropriated 

for the 

current fiscal 

year ending 

June 30. 1891. 



$295,000.00 

20. 000. 00 

18, 000. 00 

1, 500. 00 



334,500.00 



14,000,000.00 
8,849,000.00 



731,500.00 

592,800.00 
172, 0(>0. 00 



$250,000.00 



18, 000. 00 
1.600.00 



14,000,000.00 
7.300,000.00 



6(*>5,000.00 



571,500.00 

120, 000. 00 
73 



74 



REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 



S$timates ofapgropriationB required for the sereioe ofthefleoal year ending June 30, 1892, 
by tke Poei'Offloe Departnufni—Continned, 



Detailed ol^eota of ezpenditore, Mid explanatioiM. 



Eatimeted 
aaneuBt which 

will he 
leaaired for 
eacn detailed 

ol^ect of 
ezpenditare. 



AmoQiil 
appropriated 

for the 
cnrreDt fiscal 
year endioK 
June 80, 1881. 



TTHDER THB POSTOFFICB DBPABTHXNT, OUT OF THE 
POSTAL BEVSNUS—Continaed. 

POSTAL BSRYlCB—continiied. 

OJUe qf the Pint Attietant Potfrnottor-GeiMfoi— Continiied. 

Free-deliTery service, of which a sam not exoeeding $10,000 may he 
expended for experimental free deliyery at small offices not having 
thereqoirements of popnlatien or revenae under existing law(8ame act) 

Stationery in post-offices (Aame act) 

Wrapping-twine (same act) ■ 

Wrapping-paper (same act) 

Letter-halances, scales, and test- weights, and repairs to same (same act). 

Postmarking and rating stamps and repairs to same, and ink and pads 
for stamping and canceling purposes (same act) 

Packing hoxes, sawdust, paste, and hardware (J une 30, 1800) 

Printing fscing slips, card-slide lahels, hhinks, and hooks of an urgent 
nature for post-offices of the first and second classes (June SO, 1880) . . . , 



Total. 



Q0e€ <if the Second Aetietant Poetmasler-Oeneral. 

Inland mail transportation, vis, inland transport<ation hy star routes 
(June JO. 1800) 

Inland transportation hy steam-boat roates (June 80, 1880) 

Kail messenger service (June 80, 1880) 

HaU-hags and mail-hag catchers (June 80, 1880) 

Man locks and keys (June 80,1880) , 

Rent of hnilding for mail-hag repair shop and lock repair shop, and for 
fhel, gas, watchmen, and charwomen, oil, and repair of machinery 
for same (June 30, 1880) 

Inland transportation hy railroad routes, of which a sum not exoeeding 
180,000 may he employed to pay freight on postal-cards, stamped en- 
velopes, and stamped paper from the manuf^tories to the post-offices 
and depots of distribution 

Railway post^ffice car service (June 30, 1880) 

Railway post-office clerks, of which a sum not exceeding $25,000 may 
he applied to the payment of the actual and necessary expenses in- 
curred in traveling hy chief clerks of two or more railway post-office 
lines and hy railway postal clerks who act as examiners (June 30, 



1880). 



Necessary and special facilities on trunk Hues: Pnmded, That the 
Postmaster-Oeneral may, in his discretion, withdraw this ftind, or any 
portion thereof, from any railroad company when, in his judgment, 
the public interests require it (June 30, 1880) , 

HisceUaneons items (June 30, 1880) 



810,082,642.00 
57, 000. 00 
85,000.00 
00,000.00 
18,000.00 

40,000.00 
2,000.00 

8,000.00 



18,084,485.00 
57,000.08 
85,000.00 
58,000.00 
18,000.08 

40,000.00 
3,000.00 

7,000.00 



35,007,842.00 



5,882,730.51 
525,000.00 

1,210,000.00 
280,000.00 
45.000.00 



6,600.00 



22,550,128.31 
2,731,000.00 



6,363,000.00 



187, 103, 58 
1.000.00 



Total 38,771,462.41 



Ojke ef the Third Aetietant Postmaeter-QeTural. 

HanuCioture of adhesive postage and special delivery stamps (June 30, 
1880) 



Pay of agent and assistants to distribute stamps, and expenses of 
agency (June 80b 1880) 



5,812,216.65 
525,000.00 

1,100,000.00 
^7^000.00 
50,000.00 



6^500.00 



21,106,275.65 
2,510,000.00 



5,810,000.00 



285,421.78 
1,000.00 



203,000.00 

8,ooaoo 



173,000.00 
8.0081 00 



ESTIMATES FOR 1892. 



75 



Qf appropriations required for ike aervidt of ihefineal ytar mding JiMie 30, 1892, 
(jf ike PoBt'Office D^^rtment^Coniinned. 





Estimated 
amount which 

wUlbe 
reqnired for 
each detailed 

object of 
expenditnre. 


Amonnt 
appropruted 

for the 
current fiscal 
year ending 
Joiie30,1881« 


bHDZR THE POSTOFFICB DEPARTMENT. OUT OF THE 
POSTAL BBVEHOTE-^^oiitiinied. 

Mamifafltnre of stamped envelopes, newspaper-wrappers, and letter- 
theeU (Jane 39; 1890) 


9988,000.00 

17,800.00 
214,000.00 

7,800.00 
127.000.00 
2.500.00 
4,000.00 
1,000.00 


9875,000.99 


Psy ef azeot and assistants to distribnte stamped envelopes, news- 
pa^cr-WTi^peni, and letter-sheets, and expenses of ageney (June 30, 
IttD) 


16,000.09 


Xamifiwtore of postal-cards (June 30, 1800) 


180,000.00 


aceney (Jane 30. 1800) 


7,800.09 




116,000.00 
2,500.00 


Sagtsvin)!, printing, and binding drafts and warrants (Jane 80, 1890) .... 


3,600.00 
1,000.00 






Total 


1,510.100.00 










762.990.00 
160, 000. 00 


712, 000. 00 


BaluM <hM foH^ emmtrf m 


161, 000. 00 






Total 


912,000.00 






' 


Total Postal Service 


77,545,894.41 
73,955,031.98 


72,226,698.00 


FOBCAL BBvunn: 
Otdinarr xervennes i78L 110. 031. 08 




















DKFICOEIICT Dl POSTAL BCVSHUB. 

Leaving a defldenoy in the revenne of the Post-Offlce Department to be 
provided for oat of the general Treasory 


3,590,862.43 


Indefinite. 








3,690.862.43 


Indefinite. 






POsT-OPFICE DEPABTHEKT, OFFICE OF THE POSTMASTER- 
GENERAL. 


18,000.00 
2,500 00 

8.000.00 




CiiiefCasik Post-Offlce Department (Jaly 11. 1890 ; R. S., page 65. sec 383) 
CWef PostOffioe Inspector (Jnly 31. 1880, Jnly 11. 1800, voL 24, page 205, 
•W.1) 







76 



REPORT OF THE PORTMASTER^GENERAL. 



BsUmafes of appropriationB required for the seiticeof the fiscal year ending Juihe 30, 1892, 
hy the Poet-Office Department— Oontivm^, i 



Detailed objects of ezpenditare, aud ezplanationa. 



Estimated 
amount which 

wHlbe 
required for 
each detailed 

object of 
expenditure. 



Amount 
appropriated 

for the 
current fiscal 
year ending 
J'une30,1891. 



POBT-OFFICB DEPAETMBNT, OFMCB OF THB POSTMASTBB- 
6ENEBAL~-Continued. 

SALAJilBS POST-OFFICB DKPASTMJ«T>-OOntinued. 

stenographer CJuIy 11,1890; B.S., page 661, sec 393) ■ 

Stenographer (July 11,1890) 

Appointment clerk (July 11, 1890 ; B. S., page 27, mob. 107-100) 

One clerk of claw 4 (July 11, 1800) 

Two clerks of class 4 (July 11, 1800; R. S., page 27, sec. 167) 

One clerk of class 2 (same acts) 

One curator of postal museum; additional (submitted) 

One clerk at f 1.000 (March 3, 1881, July 11,1890; RS., page 27, sees. 

167-189; vol.21, page 411, aecl) 

One librarian, additional (submitted) 

One messenger (same acts) 

One assistant messenger (July 11, 1890 ; R. S., page 27, sec. 167) 

One page (July 11, 1890) 



Ojfict 0/ the Auiitant AUomty-Ottitrat for the Pott-OJtce Department. 

Law clerk (June 19, 1878, July 11, 1690 ; yoL 20. page 201, sec. I) ■ 

Two-clerks of class 4 (July 11, 1890 ; R. S., page 27, sec. 167) 

One clerk of class 3 (same acts) 

Increaso one clerk at $1,600 to $1,800 (submitted) 

One clerk of class 2 (Jnlyl 1,1890) 

Two clerks of class 1 (July 11, 1890) 

Increase one olerk at $1,200 to $1,600 (submitted) 

One ascistant messenger (submitted) 

*' Total 



OJlce(^f the Firtt Auittant Potttnaiter- General 

First Assistant Postmaster-(^neral (July 11, 1800 ; R. S . page 65, sec 
889) 



Chief clerk (July 11, 1890; R. a, page 66, sec 393) 

Additional (submitted) 

Chief of salary and allowance division (Harch 8, 1883 ; July 11, 1890 ; 

▼01.22, page 600, sec. 1) 

Chief of appofaitment division (Mar. 3, 1883; July 11, 1890 ; vol. 22, page 

660, seel) 

Chief of bond division (July 7,1884; July 11, 1800; vol. 23, page 190, 



i.l). 



Superintendent of post-office supplies (July 11, 1890 ; R. S., page 66, sec. 

893) 

Superintendent of ft«e delivery (July 11, 1890 ; R. S., page 66, sec. 394) . . 

Four clerks of class 4 (July 11, 1890 ; R. S., page 27, sec. 167) 

One clerk of class 4, additional (submitted) 

Twenty-two clerks of class 3 (July 11, 1890 ; R. S., page 27, sec. 167) 

Three clerks of class 3, additional (rabmitted) 

One olerk of class 3 to act as stenographer and Department telegraph 

operator (Jnly 11, 1880; R. S., page 27, sec. 167) .^ 

^ht clerks of class 2 (same aotii) 



$1,800.00 
1,600.00 
1,800.00 
1,800.00 
3,200.00 
1,400.00 
1,200.00 

1,000.00 

1, 000. 00 

840.00 

720.00 

360.00 



30, 220. 00 



2,500.00 

3, 600. 00 

1,600.00 

200.00 

1,400.00 

2,400.00 

400.00 

720.00 



12,820.00 



4,000.00 

2,000.00 

500.00 

2,200.00 

2»000.00 

2,000.00 

2,000.00 
3,000.00 
7,200.00 
1, 800. 00 
35, 200. 00 
4,800.00 

1,600.00 
11,200.00 



$28, 020. 00 



11, 600. 00 



ESTIHATES FOB 1892. 



77 



E*tmaie$ofappropriaiums required for the service of the fiscal year ending June M, 1892, 
by the PoeU Office Departmeni^Conimwe'SL. 



Btttalled olrfeetB of exp«ndltiire, rad expluiationii. 



POST-OFFICB DSPASTHENT, OFFICE OF THE POSTMASTER- 
GEKSR A L-Cootinaed. 

SALAJUIS FOflT-OFFICB DRFABTMIHT-^OIItiliaed. 

OgM 0/ tht Fwtt AuitUnU Po«<iiMMler-Gf«fMral— Continued. 

Twcaty-foorolerksof clMsl (Mmeaote) 

I^c]flrkiofclM«l,additionj«l (snbniitted) 

InenMe two derks at $1,200 each to $1,600 (submitted) 

Ifi«f«Me three clerks at $1,200 each to $1,400 each (submitted) 

Ten eiMts at $1,000 each (July 11, 1880: B. 8.. page 27, sec. 100) 

Oaeelerk at $1,600: additional (snbmitted) 

Iccnase fire clerks at $1,000 oMsh to $1,200 each (snbmitted) 

IvoderfcMat$900each(Jn]yl1,1890; R.S.. page 27, sec. 167) 

:5x anistaBt meeeengen at $720 each (same acta) 

XiBelalMrenat$660each (same acts) 

TvopafMat$300eaeh<Jn]7ll,1800) 

Onepage: additional (anbmitted) 

Total : 



Ofe€ of Uu Second AuittatU PoittnasUr-eeneroL 
i>«coiid Assistant Postmaster-Geneial (July 11, 1890; B. S., page 65, 



:.»0).. 



aftfderk(JnlyU.1800; R.S., page 66. sec 383) 

AiMitional (snbmitted) 

<:i«f of diriflion of inspection (June 18, 1878; Jaly 11, 1880; voL 20, 

psfea02, see. 1)* 

Niperioteadent of raUway aiJUnstment ( Jnne 15, 1881 ; July 11, 1800 ; vol. 

21,page334, aeo.l) •.. 

Tea derks of elaaa 4 (Jnly 11. 1880; R. S.. page 27, sec 167) 

Thirty-fottr clerks of olaas 3 (July 11, 1880 ; K. S., page 27, sec. 167) 

KiKhtpen clerks of class 2 (same acts) 

0«» ttenograpber (Jnly 31, 1886 ; Jnly 11, 1890 ; vol. 24, page 205. sec. 1) . 

E«htesn derks of class 1 (Jnly 11, 1880 ; R. S., page 27, sec 167) 

Sine derks at $1,000 each (Jnne 19, 1878; Jnly 11,1880; vol 20, page 202. 

•et.1) : 



rtre derks at $80t each (Jnly 11, 1880 ;R.S., page 27, sec. 167) , 

^>ne assistant mesaengen at $720 each (same aots) 

Tvo laborers at $000 each (same acts) 

Total 

Ofice of the Third Astistant Pottmatter-Genoral. 

TluH Aadstant Postmaster-General (Jnly 11, 1880; R. S., page 65, sec. 

»> 

'"Tiiefderk (Jnly 11,1880; R8., page 06. sec303) , 

Additional (iiobmitted) 

Ofif of division of postage stamps (Jnne 20. 1874, July 11, 1890, vol. 18, 

pse^-lW, seel) 

^3hst of finance dhrision, who shall give bond in sach amount as the 

Potunaster-General may determine for the faithful discharge of his 

<l«tiet{M«fch 3, 1883, July 11,1880; vol 22, page 660, aec.l) 



Estimate 
amount which 

will be 
reouirod for 
each detailed 

object of 
expenditure. 



\ 



$28,800.00 

2. 400. 00 

800.00 

600.00 

10,000.00 

1,000.00 

1.000.00 

1,800.00 

4.320.00 

5,940.00 

720.00 

360.00 



Amount 
appropriated 

for the 
onrrentflsoal 
year ending 
June 80, lOoL 



137,240.00 



$123,960.00 



4,000.00 

2,000.00 

500.00 

2,000.00 

2,000.00 
18,000.00 
54.400,00 
25, 200. 00 

1,600.00 
21. 600. 00 

9, 000. 00 
4, 500. 00 
2, 160. 00 
1,320.00 



14>*,280.00 I 147, 780. ( 



4, 000. (K) 
2,000.00 



2,000.00 



78 

Ettimaies of appropriaiUniB required far the eerviee of tkefisoal year ending June 30, 1892. 



REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

mired for the service of tkefisoal year 
Fost-Qffloe Department — Continued. 



BetAiled oldeots of ezpendiUire, and explaiiAtiont. 



Betimated 

amouDt which 

wmbe 

required for 

eacn detailed 

ot(Jeot of 
expenditure. 



Amoimt 
appropriated 

for the 

current flsoal 

rear ending 

nne 30, im. 



P08T-0FFICB DEPASTMBNT, OFFICE OF THE POSTHASTEBr 
GBNEBAIr-Continned. 

SALASXKS POn-OFFicB DEPABnoDfT— continued. 

Ofiestiftht Third Attistant Poftmattir-tiiMMral— Contlnaed. 

Chief of diTiaion of registration, additional (submitted) 

Foar clerks of class 4 (Joly 11, 1890; B. S., page 27, sec 107) 

Oneolerltof classi, additional (snbmitted) 

Sixteen clerks of class 8 (Jnly 11, 1800; R S., page 27. sec. 167) 

Two derks of class 3, additional (submitted) 

Twenty^two clerks of class 2 (July 11, 1890 ; "R. S., page 27, sec 107) 

Two clerks of class 2, additional (submitted) 

Twenty-six clerks of class 1 (July 11, 1890; B. S., page 27, sec 167) 

Four derks of class 1, additional (submitted) 

Seven clerks at f 1,000 each (June 19, 1876, July U, 1890 ; vol. 20, page 203, 

seel) ^ 

One cleric at f 1,000, additional (submitted) 

Two female clerks at $900 each (July U. 1890; B. S., page 27. see. 167) 

Three assistant messengers at $720 each (same acts) 

Six laborers at $660 each (same acts) 

Total 

Dsad-Lstter OffiM, 

Superintendent (July 11, 1890 ; B. S., page 66, sec 308) 

One clerk of class 4, who shall be chief derk (July 11, 1890 ; B. 8. , page 

27, sec. 167) 

One chiefderk at $2,000 instead (vibmitted) 

One clerk of class 4 (July 11, 1800; BS., page 27, aecl67) 

Three clerks of class 3 (same acts) 

Eleven clerks of class 2 (same acts) 

Twenty-four clerks of class 1 (same acts) 

Four clerks at $1,000 each (same acts) 

One derk at $1,000, additional (submitted) 

Fifty flTC derks at $900 each (July 11, 1800 ; B. S., page 27, sec 167) ... . 

Six derks at $900 each, additional (submitted) 

Six female derks at $720 each (July 11, 1890 ; B. S. , page 27. sec. 167) .. . 

One assistant mesHonger (same acts) 

Two laborers at $660 each (same acts) 

Two laborers at $660 each, additional (submitted) 

Four femalelaborersat $480each (July 11, 1890; B S., pagfc 27, sees. 167-169) 

Total 

0£U€ of SupenntenderU cf Forngn MaUs. 

Superintendent (July 11, 1880; B.S..page 66, sec 393) 

Chief derk (same acts) 

One clerk of class 4 (July 11, 1890; B.S.,page27, sec 167) 

Three derks of class 3 (same acts) 

One derk of class 2 (same acts) 

Onederkofdassl (July 11, 1890; B.S.,page 27, secl67) 



$2.ooaoo 

7.200.00 

1,800.00 
26,600.00 

8,200.00 
30,800.00 

2,800.00 
81,200.00 

4,800.00 

7,ooaoo 

1,000.00 
1,800.00 
2,160.00 
3,960.00 



186,070.00 



$110, 970. UO 



2,500.00 

1,800.00 

200.00 

1,800.00 

4,800.00 

15,400.00 

28,800.00 

4,000.00 

1,000.00 

49,500.00 

5.400.00 

4, 320. 00 

720.00 

1.320.00 

1,320.00 

1,920.00 



124. 800. 00 



116,880.00 



3,000.00 
2,000.00 
1,800.00 
4,800.00 
1,400.00 
1,200.00 



ESTIMATES FOR 1892. 



79 



JSgtimattB of apprcpriaHona rmiredfor ihe $ervioe of thcfiaoal year ending June 30, 1892, 
by the PoaUC^/iee Department^ContiuueA, 



I>etalled ol^ecta of expenditure, and ezpUuiations. 



Estimated 

amount which 

will be 

requirod for 

eaoh diftiailed 

ol^eetof 
expenditare. 



▲monnt 
appropriated 

for the 
cnrrent finoal 
year endine 
Jnne80,l»L 



POST^FFICE BEPABTHBNT, OFFICB OF THE POSTMASTEB- 
GENERAL— Continued. 

BALAsm POflT-ovFXCB DBPABTMSNT— <3ontinaed. 

OJUe 9f SuperinUndent nfFortign ifatZ*— Gontinned. 

Two elerka at $1,000 each (Jane 15,1880; Jaly 11, 1890, vol. 21, pa^e 235, 

eeal) 

iBcreae e two elerka. at $1,000 eaoh, to $1,200 each (submitted) 

One a—irtant meaaenger (July 11, 1890 ; R.S.,page37, eeo.167) 

Total 

OJtu ^ Money-Order Syttem. 

Svperintendttt (Joly U, 1890; RS.,page8({, 8eo.893) 

Chief cleric (same aeta) 

Bizelerkaof obMa4(Jalyll,1890; B.S.,page27. sec. 107) 

One clerk of olaea 4, additional (mibmitted) 

Bight elerka of claes 3 (Jnl^ 11, 1800; R.S.,page27. aeo.ie7) 

Fire elerka of olaes 2 (same acta) 

Twelve dsrks of elaia 1 (same acta) 

Six elerka at $1,000 each (Jnne 10, 1878 ; Jnly 11, 1890 ; vol. 20. page 202. 

M6.1) 

One derk at $1,000, additional (aabmitted) 

Ftire elerka at $90$ eaoh (Jaly 11,1890; B.S., page 27. sees. 167-100)..... 

One aaaiataot meeaenger (same acta) , 

Oneenginefkr(eameaeta) 

One aaaiaftant engineer for additional hailding for money-order division. 

Sixth Anditor'a Office (same aots) 

One flireman (same acts) 

Fear watchmen at $720 eaoh (sameaeta) 

One oondoctor of elerator (same acts) 

Foot charwomen at $240 eaoh (same acts) 

One female laborer (Jnly 11. 1890; B.S., page .27, sees. 167-180) 

Ten laborers at $060 eaoh (same acts) 

One page^ additional (sobmitted) \ 

Total 

Qfifce (if Mail Deptedatione. 

Cliief elerfc(Ang.S.1882, July 11,1890; voL22. page252, sec. 1) 

Oaeolerkofelaes3(Jalyll,l890f R. S., page 87, sec. 167) 

One steoographer to chief post office inspector, additional (submitted) . . 

Two clerks ofclass 2 (July 11,1890; R.S., page27, Beo.167) 

One clerk of das* 2, additional (sabmitted) 

TlTe elerka of oUuial (July 11, 1890 ; R. 8., page 27, see. 167) 

Cue derk of olaasl, additional (sabmitted) 

Tbiee elerka at $1,000 each (Ang. 5, 1882,*Jnly 11, 1890 ; vol. 22, page 252, 

seal) 

Om derk at $000, additional (sabmitted) 

OMsasistant messenger (Jnly 11, 1890; R.8., page27, sec 167) 

QiMi aartsf nt messenger, additional (snbmltted) 

Total 



$2,000.00 
400.00 
720.00 



17,320.00 



3,500.00 

2,000.00 
10,800.00 

1,800.00 
12,800.00 

7,000.00 
14,400.00 

6,000.00 
1,000.00 
4,600.00 
720.00 
1,000.00 

1,000.00 
720.00 

2,880.00 
720.00 
960.00 
480.00 

6.600.00 
360.00 



79,240.00 I 



2, 100. 00 
1,600.00 
1,600.00 
2,800.00 
1,400.00 
6.300.00 
1.200.00 

3.000.00 
900.00 
720.00 
720.00 



ai, 9401 00 



$16, 92a 00 



76.080.00 



li^UO,M 



80 



REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER -6ENERAL. 



EBtimates of appropriations r« 
by the . 



mired for ike service of the fiscal year ending June 80, 1892, 
^oet'Office Department — CoDtinued, 



Betoiled olJeotB of expenditnre, and expIanBtions. 



Satimated 
amount which 

will be 
required for 
eacn detailed 

object of 
expenditure. 



Amonnt 
appropriated 

for the . 
cnrrent flsoai 
year ending 
June 30, 1801. 



POSTOPFICE DEPARTMENT, OFFICE OF THE POSTMASTER- 
GENERAL— Continned. 

BALAEIES P08T-0FF1CB DXPABTMSKT— continued 

Office qf tli0 Topographer, 

Topographer (July 11,1890; R. S., page 66, sec. 393) 

Three skilled draughtemen at $1,800 each (Aug. 6, 1882, July 11. 1890 ; R. S. 

page 27, aeca. 187-169; ▼oL22, page 252, seo.l) 

OneeklUed draughtaman, additional (submitted) 

Three skilled draughtemen at $1,600 each (Aug. 6, 1882, July 11, 1890 ; R. S. 

page 27, sees. 167-169, vol.22, page 252, seo.l) 

One skilled draughteman. additional (submitted) 

Thxee8kiUeddraughtemenaU1.400eaoh(AuK. 5. 1882; July 11, 1890 ; R. S. 

page 27, sees. 167-169, vol. 22, page 262, seOil) 

Three skillea draughtemen at $1,200 each (Aug. 5, 1882. July 11, 18t)0: R. S., 

page 27, sees. 167-169; yoL 22, page 252, sec. 1) 

One examiner (sameaote) 

One clerk of class 2 (same acte). 

One map mounter (sameaote) 

One assistant map mounter (same aote) 

One assistant messenger (same acte) , 

Two watchmen at $720 each (sameaote) 

Four female olerka at $900 eaoh (sameaote) • 

Oneoharwoman (sameaote) 



Total. 



Office (^ Diebursing OUrh and SuperintendwU. 

Disbnrsingclerkand8uperintendent'(July 11, 1890; R.S., pageOS, sec. 

393) 



One clerk of class 2, accountant (July 11, 1890 ; R. 8., page 27, sees. 167-169) 

One elerk of class 1, store-keeper (sameaote) 

One clerk of class 1, additional (submitted) 

One engineer (July 11, 1890; R. S., page 27, sees. 167-169 ; R. S., page 66, 

sec 303) 1 

One assistant engineer (same acts) 

One fireman, who shall be a blacksmith (same acte) 

One fireman, who shall be a steam-fitter (same acte) 

One conductor of elevator (same acte) 

Two firemen at $720 each (same aote) 

One carpenter (July 11, 1800; R.S.. page 27, sees. 167-160; R.S.,page66, 

800.393) 

One assistant carpenter (same aote) 

Captein of watch (sameaote) 

Nineteen watchmen at $720 each (July 11, 1800 ; R. S., pages 27,66, sncf*. 

167-169,898) 

Twenty-two laborers at $660 each (same acts) 

One laborer, additional (submitted) 

One plumber (July 11, 1890, R. S., pages 27*, 66, sees. 167-169, 393) 

One awning-maker (July 31, 1886, July 11, 1890 ; R. S., pageit 27, 66, sees. 

167-169.393: vol. 24, page 286, seel) j 

Fifteen charwomen at $240 each (same acte) ,..1 



$2,500.00 

5,400.00 
1,800.00 

4,800.00 
1,600.00 

4, 200. 00 

8,600.00 

1.200.60 

1,400.00 

1,200.00 

720.00 

720.00 

1, 440. 00 

3,600.00 

240.00 



34,420.00 



2, 100. 00 
1,400.00 
1. 200. 00 
1,200.00 

1.400.00 

1,000.00 

900.00 

900.00 

720.00 

1,4 to. 00 

1,200.00 
1,000.00 
1, 000. 00 

13.680.00 

14.520.00 

660.00 

900.00 

900.00 I 
3.600.00 I 



$31, 020. 00 



ESTIMATES FOB 1892. 



81 



Itiimmtm of appropriatUms reqttiredfor the service of tkefiical year ending June 30, 189S2, 
hjf ike Poet'Offiee Department — Continned. 



DeUiled objects of expenditure, and explaiitttions. 



PUST-OFnCB DEPAKTMKNT. OFFICE OF THE POSTMASTER- 
GENERAL-Continiied. 

BAKAEIHI PO0T-OF7ICE DIPABTMBHT— continued. 

OJIce of DUbwMung OUrk and J^v^Mrintendifit— Gontinued. 

7««r vafiduBea »t |720 each, for additional building (July 31, 18M, Jnly 
11,1890; B.S^fMif(e 27. Mos. 167-160; vol. 24, paf;e 206; sec 1) 

Tvo ftreBMn at f726 eaeb, for additional bnilding, additional (aabmitted) . . 

Oaa elevator condaetor for additional bnilding, adilitional (anbrnitted) . . . 

nreelaboren *t |660 each for additional building (July 81, 1866, July 
11,1890: K.S.,page27,0«ca.lC7-16O; vol. 24, page 206. see 1) 

Oae laborer Hdt additional bnilding, additional (submitted) 

Tkne elianromen at $'340 each, for additional building (July 31, 1880, July 
aiBBO; R.S., page 27. aeca. 167-160; vol. 24, page 206, see. 1) 

Tbree charwomen at 9940 each for additional building, additional (sub- 



Estimated 
amount which 

will be 
reouired for 
each detailed 

object of 
expenditure. 



Ji] 



Amount 
appropriated 

for the 

current flseal 

ear ending 

une 30, 1801. 



And the foUewfng additional force for the additional bnilding used for 
the storage of postoffiee supplies : 
Two watchmen at $720 each (July 11, 1800 ; B. S, page 27, sees. 167-160) . 

Two flxemen at |7S0 each, additional (submitted) 

One hOiocttr (Jnly U, 1800; B.&, page 27, sees. 167-160) 

Oae dmnroman (same sots) 



♦2, 
1, 



440.00 I 
720.00 ' 



1,080.00 . 
660.00 



I 



720.00 
720.00 



440.00 
440.00 
660.00 
240.00 



62. 620. 00 



$55,780.00 



ToUl salaries Post-Offioe Department. . 



804,070.00 I 744,050.00 



cosraeaan sxpneie, posT-onaci okpabtmext. 

CuBtingCDt expenses of the Post>OiBoe Department, vi z : 

Statioaery and Uank-books, including the amount necessary for the 

pCErohsae of free penalty envelopea (July 11,1890) | 

Additioaal (submitted) 



12.000.00 I. 



1, 000. 00 



13,00a00 I 12,000.00 



Fod and repairs to heating apparatus (July 11, 1800). 

(3as and eleccrio lights (same act) 

Additioaal (submitted) 



1 9, 000. 00 


9,000.00 


5, 250. 00 


'^ 


750.00 








6,000.00 


6,260.t» 



Flunbing and gas and eleotrle Ught fixtures (Jnly 11, 1800). 
Additioaal (submitted) 



Teicfrrsphlng (same set) 

Paia^ (same aet) ^. 

Carpets and matting (same aet) 

Fnnitne (same act) 

Pntehase of and keeping hnrsee, and repairs to wagons and harness 

(MBieset) 

Hndwan (saae act) 

Hawniweons items (same act) 

A^fiUeaal (Bubmitted) 



2,000.00 
1,600.00 








3,600.00 


2,000,00 


2,500.00 
3.600.00 
3, 000. 00 
3,000.00 

1,500.00 
1, 000. 00 


2,000.00 
3,500.00 
3.000.00 
3,000.00 

1,500.00 
1,000.00 



P M G 90 6 



12, 000. 00 
500.00 

12,600r00 



12,000.00 



82 



BEPORT OP THE P0STMA8TEB-GENBBAL, 



EsUfMttes of appropriations required for the aerviee of thefieoal year ending June 30, 189SS, 
by the Post' Office Department — Contiimed. 



]>et«iled objects of expend itnre, and explanations. 


Estimated 
amount which 

will be 
required for 
each detailed 

object of 
expenditure. 


Amount 
appropriated 

for the 
current fiscal 
year ending 
J^uneao,lh91. 


POST^FFICE DBPARTMBNT, OFFICB OF THE POSTMASTER. 

GENERAL— Continued. 
ContlnKont expenses, Post-Oflaoe Department— Continued. 

Citv direoioriefl. additional (submitted) .'.-.. 


♦1.000.00 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 
1.000.00 




Type-writing machines and type-vriter suppliea. additional (sub- 
mitted) • - 




mant. additional (Hubmitted) 




tional (submltttd) i 






' '"* 


BXKT OP BUILDinOS, P08T-OFFICB DIPARTHKKT. 

TonosraDher'soflOcerJulv 11. 1890) 


1,600.00 

8,000.00 

0.084.00 
i, 910. 00 

4,000.00 




Rent of a suitable building or buildings for the use of the money-order 
avatom of the Post-Offloe Denartment (July 11. 1890) 




Rent of building for use of the money-order division of the Auditor of 
tiie Treasurv for the Post>Office Denartment (same act) 




A^iltMnnal #«ihtnittA<)) _. 




Rent of a suitable building for the storage of post-offloe supplies (July 
IL 18001 '. 








Total 


24,500.00 


019.584.00 




Hon.— For list of buildings rented by the PoAt-Of&ce Department in 
Washington, D. C, see next page. 

OFFiaAL POSTAL GUmB. 

Publication of copies of the Official Postal Guide, including not exceed- 
ing 1,600 copies for the use of the Executive Departments (July 11, 1800) . 
Additional (submitted) 


18,200.00 
10,800.00 










Total 


29.000.00 


18,200 00 






P09T-B0UTE HAPS. 

Miscellaneous expenses in the Topographer's office in the preparation 
and publication of the post-route maps (July 1 1, 1890) ...., 


16,000.00 
750.00 


18, 000. 00 


And the Postmaster-General may authorize the sale of poAMt>ute 
maps to the publio at cost and 10 per centum thereof added, the pro- 
oeeds of such sales to be used aa a farther appropriation for the prepara- 
tion and publication of post-rout« maps. 

P08TAOB, POST-OFFICE DEPABTHEHT. 

Postage-stamps for oorrespondence, addressed abroad, which is not ex- 
empt from postage under article 8 of the Paris conyentlon of the 
UniTcrsal Postal Union (July 11, 1890) 


750.00 


KOTB.^The estimates for "printing and binding," submitted by the 
Postmaster-C^neral under section 2, act of May 8, 1872 (Revised 
Statutes. 720, aeotion 3661), will be found under the tiUe of " Misoel- 
laneona,'* post. 




Total, Post-Offlce Df^partrapnt x 


939,720.00 


*850,134.00 






PrintlBg and binding for Post-Office Department, exclusive of money- 
Ardnr office to be executed under the direction of the Publio Printer. . 




385.000.00 









♦ Includes 0800 appropriated for moving Sixth Auditor's money-order division to new building, not 
asked for fiscal year 1892. 



ESTIMATES FOR 1892. 
BMdinga rmUed by the Poti-Offiee Department. 



83 



LooAtdOD of buildings. 



S e a t o n Hoqm building, Louisiana avenue, part of 
building. 

Fourth and East Capitol streets, northeast cor- 
ner (eeUar and flrst floor). 

No. 1«]3 T street, northwest, first fioor 

Kortbweat corner of Blghth and £ streets, north- 



Kob tli B straeft, northwest. . 



Ke«b 41S and 4tD TSintb street, northwest, part of 

saeond and third floors. 
JToa. m and 613 S street, northwest 



Nos. 47»and 481 C stKet,northwest.. 



TMal. 



For what purpose used. 



CitypostK>ffioe.. 



Branch city post-office . 



Branch ctty post-office 

Honey-ortler office, Poet-Office De- 
partment. 

Money-order division of the Sixth 
Auditor's office. 

Topographer's office, Fost-Office De- 
partment 

Division of post-office supplies, Post- 
Office Department. 

Mail-bag repair shop 



Annual 
reutal. 



$8,ooe.oo 
fwaoo 

1,000.00 
8,000.00 

N, 000. 00 

n.6O0LOo 

4,000.00 
3,000.00 



30,400.00 



* At the rate of $4,000 until February 1, 1891 ; after that date an appropriation at the rate of 99,000 
will be availnble for another building during the remainder of the fiscal year. 
f H«atiiig included. 



Appendix B, 

LEaiSLATION AND PROPOSED LEQISLATION AFFECTING THE POSTAL 

SERVICE. 

SENATE BILLS AND RESOLUTIONS. 



No. 



Title, and by whom Introduced. 



Remarks. 



Bee. 12 

96 

Bill 13 

350 

351 
853 
457 



508 

630 

eo8 

926 

955 
966 



957 



1567 
1567 



1650 



2004 



2424 



84 



To re-appropriate and apply the amoant appropriated 
by the act of Congress approved March 3, 1877, to pay 
certain Southern mail contractors. (Mr. Bntler.) 

Proposing an amendment to the Constitution providing 
for the election of postmasters by the people. (Mr. 
Hoar.) 

To require preference to be given to citizens of the 
States ana localities where the mails are to be carried 
in all mail lettings. (Mr. Call.) 

To provide for the erection of public bnildiugs for post* 
onioes in towusand cities where thei>ostoflice receipts 
for three years preceding have exceeded $3,000 an* 
nually. (Mr. Paddock.) 

In relation to the officers and employes of the Kailway 
Mail Service. (Mr. Paddock.) 

Selating to postmasters at Presidential offices. (Mr. 
Paddock ) 

To reduce letter postage to one cent per ounce. (Mr. 
MltchelU) . 

To provide for the erection of public buildings for post* 
offices in towns and oitieis where the post-office re- 
ceipts for three yearn preceding have exceeded three 
thoasand dollars annually. (Mr. Vest.) 

To prohibit the mailing of newspapers and other pub- 
lications containing lottery advertisements, and pre- 
scfibing apenalty for the violation of the same. (Mr. 
Wilson, of Iowa.) 

To punish dealers and pretended dealers in counterfeit 
money and other fiiaudulont devices for using the 
United States mails. (Mr. Mitchell.) 

Extending the privilege of the mail free of postage to 
historical societies. (Mr. Morrill.) 

Sxtending the privileges of the free delivery of mails. . 



Concerning post-offloea of the third class. (Mr. Wilson. 
of Iowa.) 

To amend section 25 of the act of March 3, 1879, en- 
titled "An act making appropriations for the service 
of the Post-Office Department for the fiscal year end- 
ing June 30, 1880, " and for other purposes. (Mr. Wil- 
son, of Iowa.) 

Postage on second-class matter at firee-delivery post- 
offices. 

To authotiae the Postmaster-General to lease premises 
JBor the use of post-offices of the first, second, and 
third classes. (Mr. Wilson, of Iowa.) 

Toprovide for limited postal-telegraph service. (Mr. 
CJullom.) 

To provide for the purchase of a site on which to erect 
a Doilding for the use of the Post-Office Department 
and the United States post-office at Washington, D. 
C. (Mr. Sawyer.) 

To repeal so much of section 3915 of the Revised 
Statutes or the United States as permits the Post- 
maater-Oeneml to have retum requests printed oq 
envelopes. (Mr. CuUom.) 

To amend an act entitled " An act to extend the ft'ee- 
delivery system of the Post-Office Departmnnt, and 
for other purposes, " approved January 3, 1887. (Mr. 
Harrl.-*.) 

Providing for the appointment of an nssistant general 
superintendent and a chief clerk, Railway Mail Serv. 
ice, (Mr. Sawyer.) 



On Senate Calendar 



On Senate Calendar. 

Passed Senate. In Committee on 
the Post-Office and Post-Boads, 
House of Representatives. 



On Senate Calendar. 



On Senate Calendar. 
On Senate Calendar. 
On Senate Calendar. 



1>0STAL LEGISLATION. 
BENATE BILLS AND RESOLUTIONS— Continned. | 



85 



Kou 



Title, and by whom introduced. 



Remarks. 



Bai2S€6 
2614 
774« 



2747 
2708 



2817 



2920 
2922 



3611 
8830 

3739 
3904 

3805 
3941 
3042 

3M3 

3906 

4007 

4099 

4010 

4041 

4066 
41&e 



4234 
4283 



4365 



To reolaaAify and fix the salaries of persons in the Rail- 
way Hail Service known as railway postal clerks. 

To appropriate money for the erection of post-office 
baildines. (Hr. Moody.) 

To amend an act approved May 9, 1888, entitled "An 
act to amend an act entitled 'An act authorlzin}£ the 
Postmaater-General to a^Jnet certain claims of post- 
masters for loss by barelary, fire, or other unavoida- 
ble oasaalty,**' approved March 17, 1^2. (Mr. Saw- 
yer.) 

To fix the rate of postai^e on periodica] pablications con- 
taining the print or reprint of books. (Mr. Sawyer.) 

To amend certain sections of the Revised Statutes re- 
lating to lotteries, and for other purposes. (Mr. 
Sawyer.) 

To simplify and economise the collection and manage- 
ment of the postal revenues. (Mr. Davis.) 

To improve the mail service. (Mr. Sawyer.) 

To pay employes of the Post-Offlce Department addi- 
tional compensation for extra hours of duty required 
of them in the year )885. (Mr. Sawyer.) 

To amend an act making appropriations for the service 
of the Post-Office Department for the fiscal year end- 
ing June ^, 1880, approved March 2, 1880. (Mr. 
Washburn.) 

Classifying employfts in first and second class post- 
offices. 

To amend an act entitled "An act to adjust the salaries 
of postmasters.** approved March 3, 1883. 

To reclassify and fix the salaries of persons in the K»il- 
way Mail Service known as postal clerks. (Mr. Wil- 
son of Iowa). 

To provide for ocean mail service between the United 
States and foreign ports, and to promote commerce. 

To fix the rate of postage on perlofliciilpublicAtioDs con- 
taining the printer repriutof bookn. (Mr. Colquitt.) 

Regulating ratea of jpostage on second-class mail matt-cr 
at letter-carrier offices. (Mr. Ciilqnitt.) 

Granting leaves of absence to clerks and employds in 
first snd second class post-offices. (Mr. Sawyer. ) 

To amend section 5478 of the Revised Stntutcs of the 
United States fixing penalty for burglary of a post- 
office. 

To pay employ4sof the Post*Offlce Department additional 
compensation for extra hours of duty required of 
them in the year 1885. (Mr. Sawyer.) 

To repeal sections 3062 and 3053 of Re\ised Statutes of 
theUnited States. (Mr. Sawyer.) 

Relating to contracts for carr>ing mails. 

To amend ^tectiun 3829 of the Revised Statutes. (Mr. 
Saw>er.) 

Prescribing penalty for maintaining an nnanthorized 
post-office. 

To amend sections 3834, 3836, and 3837 of the Revised 
Statutes, and for other purposes. 

Suretyship on postmasters bonds. 

To limit the hoars of work of clerks and employ 6s in 
first and second class posVofficca. (Mr. Hiscock.) 

Granting leaves of absence to clerks and employes in 
first and second class post-offices. (Mr. Hiscock.) 

To increase the pay of letter-carriers. (Mr. Evarts.) 

Amendatory of and supplemental to sections 3952 and 
3953 of the Revised Statutes of the United States and 
of the act of Congress approved June 23, 1874, entitled 
"An act making appropristions for the sei-vicM of the 
Post-Office Department for the year ending June 30, 
1876, and for other purposes." (Mr. Sawyer.) 

Release of bidders on acceptance of a bid. 

To establish a limited post and telegraph service, and 
for other pnrposes. (Mr. Sawver.) 

To provide for granting leaves of abaenco to employfis of 
the Post-Office Department emploved in the mail-bag 
repair shops connected with said t)opartment. (Mr. 
Sawyer.) 

To amend certain sections of the Revised Statut<»s re- 
lating to lotteries, and for other purposes. (Mr. Saw- 
yer.) 

To enable the Postraaster-Genernl to test the practica- 
bility of extending the free-delivery Hyfitora to offices 
of foarth class apd other offices. (Mr. Sawyer.) 



Passed Senate. In H. R. Com. on 
Post-Offices and Post-Roads. 



On Senate Calendar. 



Passed Senate. In H. R. Commit- 
tee on Exi)enditnres P. O. DepiL 
On Senate Calendar. 



On Senate Calendar. 

Passe<l Senate. In House of Rep> 
I'eBentatives Committee on the 
, Judicial^. 



Pa<ii.<te<l Senate. In House of Rep* 
rcHontatives Committee on Ppst- 
Ofiiccd and Post-Roads. 



On Senate Calendar. 



Has become a law. 



Bt'came law in another form. (So 
IlonsoRes. 21S.) 



86 



REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL, 
HOUSE BILLS AND RESOLUTIONS. 



No. 
Rm. 10. 

128 
179 

218 

2B1 

Bill 26 

178 
' 108 
213 
228 
233 



241 



242 



841 

353 
350 

871 



471 
483 



643 



648 



657 



Title, and by whom intro<lati«cl. 



PropoeiDfl: an amendmefnt to the Constitation makiuj; 
it poasiDle to provide for the election ot iHMtmftsters 
by tho people. (Mr. Sbively.) 

Proposing an amendment to tbe Conntitutlon of the 
United States proTiding fur the election of postmasters 
by the people m the several t^tates. (Mr. Flower.) 

Constmin.e part of act of March 2. 1880, makings appro* 
prlationsfor the office of Second Assistant Postmaater- 
General. (Mr. Binsham.) 

Continning in effect cnapter 1065 of the acts passed at 
the first session of the Fiftieth Consrees. (Mr. Stock- 
bridge.) 

To obtain new look for registered mail matter. 

To allow tbe Postmaster-General to expend $10,000 to 
tost at small towns and villages the system of the 
free-delivery service, and for other pnrposef. (Mr. 
Bingham.) 

To authorise the Postmaster-General to transport the 
Anstraliau closed mail from San FnuQcisoo to New 
York for Great Britain at reduced rates or fi«e of 
cost. (Mr. Bingham.) 

To reduce the postage on certain letters. (Mr. Wheeler.) 

One cent per half ounce within State in which letters 
are mailed. 

To provide for post-office buUdlngs. (Mr. Blount) 



Remarks. 



To reduce letter postage to 1 c^nt per ounce. (Mr. 
Post.) 

For the relief of the letter carriers. (Mr. Lawler.) 

Pension for disability or twenty years' service. 

To creato the postal telegraph of the United States. 
(Mr. Anderson.) 

Amending section 10 of an act approved March 3, 1878, 
making appropriations fur tbe service of the Post- 
Office Department for the fincal year ending June 30. 
1880, and for other purposes. (Mr. Owen.) 

Catalogues of iustitntions of leaming, and reports of 
religious associations, to be entitled to certain privi- 
leges in the mails. 

To probibit the mailing of newspapers and other publi- 
cations containing lottery advertisements, ana pre- 
scribing a penalty for the violation of the same. 
(Mr. T. M. Browne.) 

To amend sections 3029 and 4041 of the Revised Statutes 
authorising the Postmaster General to prohibit the 
d^ivery of registered letters apd the payment of 
money-orders, and providing for the return of tho 
same. (Mr. T. M. Browne.) 
I To provide for tbe erection of post-office buildings in 
I cities, towns, and villages of 3,000 inhabitants yr 
more, and for other purposes. (Mr. Perkins.) 

To provide for the erection of public buildings in oer- 
tam towns and cities in tbe United States. (Mr. Peters.) 

To pay dependent relatives of persons killed by acci- 
dent engaged in the Itoil way Mail Service, and to com- 
pensate for injuries received. (Mr. Peters.) 

To amend seotion 3904. chapter 4, title 46. of tbe Re- 
vised Statutes of tbe United States. (Mr. Carnth.) 

To provide for erection of post-office buildings in cities, 
towns, and villages of 3,(M>0 inhabitants or more. 

To authorize the Post-Office Department to forward 
mail matter upon wbich postage is not prepaid. 
(Mr. Morse.) 

Providing for 1 cent per ounce postage on first-class 
matter. (Mr. Brewer.) 

To create the board of public buildings and to provide 
for tho erection of public buildings in cities of less 
than 100,000 inhabitants. (Mr. Cutcheon.) 

Providing for letter postage on drop letters at 1 cent 
eaohatpMt-offlces where free delivery is established. 
(Mr. ODonnell.) 

Relating to the postmasters at Presidential offices. (Mr. 
Conneu.) 

To allow postmasters 10 per cent, interest for use of fix- 
tures. 

To provide for the erection of public buildines for post- 
offices in towns and cities where the post-office receipts 
for three years preceding have exceeded three thou- 
sand dollars annually. (Mr. Conncll.) 

Authorizing reports of societies of an agricultural char- 
acter to DO oarried at newspaper rates of i>ostage. 
(Mr. BachanaD, of Kew Jersey.) 



Has become a law. 



Has become a law. 



On House Calendar. 



On CalendarofCommittee of Whole 
House on state of Union. 



POSTAL LEGISLATION. 
HOUSE BILLS AND RESOLUTiONS-Continaed. 



87 



BUI 574 
C22 
648 
780 

«n 

867 

671 

874 

969 

1600 

3273 

8290 

3818 
3321 



Title, and by irbom mtTodoced. 



3722 



3633 

3863 
8875 



4661 

4973 
4974 

4675 

4977 
5389 

5463 



£effiilfttiDe the r»te of postage on finit*c]am matter. 

Redacing the rate to 1 cent per oonce. 

Provkling for the payment of mail service in the Stotea 
of Alabama, Atkanaaa, North Carolina, and other 
Southern States. (Mr. Ewart.) 

To rednce letter postage fVom 2 oenta to 1 cent, and the 
prio^ of postal cards Arom 1 cent to one-half cent each. 
{Ur. Henderson, of K. C.) 

To amend section 4004 of the Revised Statutes relating 
to the Railway Mail Service. (Mr. Dibble.) 

Pay to railroads for postal-car service. 

To pay emploj68 of the Pos^Offlce Department addi- 
tional compensation for extra hours of duty required 
of them In the year 188& (Mr. Honk.) 

To rednce the postage on fourth*class matter. (Mr. 
Oront.) 

PosUseon seeds, etc., to be 1 cent for 4, ounces. 

Relatmg to the postal money -order system. (Mr. 
GroQt) 

Fees for money -orders. 

To enable the people to name their postmasters. (Mr. 
Grout) 

To establish post-office savings-banlcB as a branch of 
the Post-Office De]»artment. (Mr. McComas.) 

To establish a postal -telegraph system in the United 
States. (Mr. McComas.) 

To increase the compensation of fourth-class post- 
masters. (Mr. Wheeler.) 

To designate, classify, fix the salaries, and regulate 
the appointment ana emplovment of officers, clerks, 
and employ6s at Presidential post-offices. (Mr. Fun- 
ston.) 

To rednce the postage on fonrth-class matter. (Mr. 
Bingham.) 

To amend certain sections of the Revised Statates rotat- 
ing to lotteries, and for other purposes. (Mr. Bing- 
hrai.) 

To extend the free-delivery system of the PostOffice 
Department, and for other purposes. (Mr. Bingham . ) 

To amend section 388, Revised Statates, to provide for 
the appointment of additional officers sua employes 
in the Post-Office Department, and forother purposes. 
(Mr. Bingham.) 

In relation to the officers and employ6s of the Railway 
Mail Service. (Mr. ConnelL) 

To provide for post-office buildings in all places where 
the gross receipts of any post-office for two years or 
more shall have exceeaed 63,000 per annum. (Mr. 
Lane) 

Concerning official correspondence with the Depart- 
ments of the Government. ( Mr. Springer. ) 

To increase the par of letter carriers. (Mr. Chipman.) 

To amend, section 7 of the act entitled "An act estab- 
lishing post-r ads, and for other purposes," approved 
March 3, 1877. (Mr. Cutcbeon.) 

To provide for the appointment, organization, and 
compensation of the inspective force of the Post- 
Office Department. (Mr. Dockery . ) 

To provide for the erection of public buildings for 
post-offices in towns and cities where the post-office 
receipts for three years preceding have exceeded 
63.000 annually, (tf r. McCord.) 

To provide for ooean mail service between the United 
States and foreign ports. (Mr. Bingham.) 

To reclassify and fix the salary of persons in the Rail- 
way Mail Service, known as railway postal clerks. 
(Mr. Bingham.) 

Providing for the appointment of an assistant general 
superintendent ana a chief clerk, Railway Mall Serv- 
ice. (Mr. ) 

To prtwide a postage>stamp redemption card. (Mr. 
Bingham.) 

To amend act of May 7, 1878. section 2, volume 20, Stat- 
utes at Large, and so forth. (Mr. McClamray.) 

To reqnlre mail contractors to reside on or contignoos 
to mail routes on which they perform service. 

To provide for the better compensation of postmasters 
of fonrth-olasspost-offloes of the United SUtes. (Mr. 
Siiookdale.) 



Has become a law. 



88 



REPORT OP THE P08TMASTER-GBNERAL. 
HOUSE BILLS AND RESOLUTIONS— CoDtinued. 



No. 



BiU597t 



6478 
7019 



7021 

7022 
7023 
7024 
7053 
7847 
7427 

7428 

74S9 

7556 
7567 



7558 

7566 
7707 
7846 
8054 



8976 

8087 

9177 
9219 

9264 

9794 

9806 



Title, aod by whom iAtrodaoed. 



To provide for the ereotion of po8t>office baildinge in 
citiea where the cross receipta of the post-offlce for 
threeyears preoediiiff have exoeedod $3,000 annnall y. 
(Mr. Post) "^ ^ 

Graatinfc leaves of absence to clerks and employes 
in first, second, and third class post-oflSces. (Mr. 
Ketcham.) 

To limit the hoars of work of clerks and employes 
in first, second, and third class post-oiBoes. (Mr. 
Ketcham.) 

To provide for poet-office bnildiniTB. (Mr. Tnrpin. ) 

To panish dealers and pretended dealers in coanterfeit 
money and other fraadolent devices for ueinic the 
United States mall. (Mr. Clunie.) 

To amend section 389 of the ReviHcd Statutes, to pro- 
vide for the appointment of additional officers in the 
Post-Office Department. (Mr. Binjj^bam.) 

To provide for the employment of tweuty-six supervis- 
ors of post-offices. (Mr. Bingham.) 

To provide for a general manager of the post-offloe. 
(Mr. Bingham ) 

Regnlating rates of postage on seoond*olass mail matter 
ai letter-carrier offices. (Mr. Bingham.) 

To fix the salsries of oertain subordinate officers of the 
Post-Office Department. (Mr. Hopkins.) 

To authorize the payment of salary to letter carriers 
who are not alio wed leave of absence. (Mr. Hayes. ) 

To amend the act of June 27, 1884. to fix the pay of 
substitute letter carriers, and for other purposes. 
(Mr. Taylor.) 

To amend section 3 of the act of August 2, 1882, to fix 
the pay of letter carriers, and for other purposes, 
(Mr. Taylor.) 

To amend the act entitled "An act to extend the free- 
delivery system of the Post-Offlce Department, and 
for other purposes. (Mr. Taylor.) 

To fix the pay of letter carriers at certain offices. 

To improve toe mail service. (Mr. Bingham.) 

To contract for foreign steam-snip service. 

To amend an act approved May 9, 1888, entitled "An 
act to amend an act entitled * An act authorizing the 
Postmaster-Oeaeral to a^ost certain claimH of post- 
masters for loss by burglary, fire, or other unavoid- 
able casualty ,'" approved March 17, 1882. (Mr. Bing- 
ham.) 

To fix the rate of postage on periodical publicatioDs con- 
taining the print or reprint of books. (Mr. Bingham.) 

To fix the salaries of certain subordinate officers of the 
Post-Offioe Department. (Mr. Hopkins.) 

To regulate the appointment of fourth-class post- 
masters. (Mr. Lodge ) 

To provide for the establishment of Grovemment tele- 
graphs. (Mt. Taylor.) 

To provide for granting leaves of absence to employes 
or the Post-OSlee Department employed in the mail- 
bag and mail-lock shops connected with said Depart- 
ment. (Mr. Caldwell ) 

To simplify the classification of mail matter. (Mr. 
Lodge.) 

To reoIasHify and fix the salary of persons in the Kall- 
wav Mail Service known as postal clerks. (Mr. CaXd- 
weU.) 

Amending section 3893 of the Revised Statutes relating 
to excluding obscene and immoral literature from the 
mails. (Mr. Swoney ) 

To amend certain sections of the Revised Statutes re- 
lating to lotteries, and for other purposes. (Mr. 
Hansbrongh.) 

To provide for the return of second-class mail matter. 
(Mr. Bingham.) 

To reolassifv and fix the salaries of pernuns In the 
Railwav Mail Service known as postal dorks. (Mr. 
Cheadle.) 

To amend section 39.'i7 of the Revised StatntM of the 
United States relating to the transportation of mails, 
and for other putposes. (Mr. L» FoUett'C.) 

To repeal sections 3952 and 30.53 of Revise<l Statutes of 
the United States. (Mr. Wilson, of Kentucky.) 

Relating to oontmctA for carrving the mails. 

Making appropriations for the service of the Pont- 
Offioe Department for the fiscal year ending June 30, 
1891. 



Remarks. 



On Calendar of Committee of the 

Whole U«>U8e on the state of the 

Union. 
On Calendar of Committee of the 

Whole House on the state of the 

Union. 



On House Calendar. 

On Calendar of Committee of the 
Whole llotiso on the stat« of the 
^ Union. 



On Calendiir of Committee of the 
Whole Huuse on tho state uf the 
Union. 



I On llonse Calsudar. 



Laid on table. 
Has become a law. 



POSTAL LEGISLATION. 
HOUSE BILLS AND RHLSOLUTIONS.-Contiaued. 



89 



STo. 



Title, and by whom introdaoed. 



BemMTlu. 



I 



Hm become a law. 



BdI9961 To amend aeotion 3d93 of the Beviaed Stotutea of the 

United Statea, and for other pnrpoaea. (Mr. Hender- 

aon.) 
Prohibiting mafllne of obaoene pahlicationa. 
Granting leavea of abaence to olerka and employ^ in 

firat and aeoond olaaa poat-offioea. 
To amend chi4>ter 82, lawa of 1883, approved Maroh 8, i 

and farther amended by chapter ZK of the lawa of 

1885. approved Maroh 8, 1885, in relation to fixing the 

rate of letter poatage in oitiea with a popolntion of '• 

10.000 or over. (Mr. Qoinn.) 
To inereaae the pay of letter oarrlera. (Mr. Wade.) 
To amend aectlon 5478 of the Jteviaed Statutea. (Mr. , On House Calendar. 

Bingham.) I 

To aathorize poetmaatera to adminiater oatha and take 

acknowledgmenta In penaion oaaee. (Mr. HalL) ; 

To amend Motion 8828 of the Revised Statntea. (Mr. 

Bingham.) 
Problbita onanthoriaed poat-offlcea. 
To amend an act entitled *'An act to adjust the salaries 

of poetmaatera." approved Maroh 3, 1883. (Mr. Mil- 

I ukST) 

J Fixes the salary of poatanaster at Angoata, Me. 
\ A hill to re-adtnat theaalary and allowanoea of the poat- 
maatersat Gnthrie, OU^oma, and Kingfiaher, in the 
Territory of Oklahoma. 
Granting aathcority to poetmaaters to adminiater oaths 
in certain pension oaaea, and for other purposes. (Mr. 
Smith, oflllinola.) 
To limit the honra of work of olerka and employ6s in 
first and second daaa poatK>ffioea. (Mr. Ketcham. ) 



1MB8 

10481 
10017 

10723 

10702 

11000 

11044 
U082 
U236 
11527 
U508 
11020 

11053 

11738 
11744 
11927 

11863 



To amend chapter 1085 of the acta of the first session of 
the Fiftieth Congreaa. 

To amend certain aectlons of the Beviaed Statutes relat- 
ing to lotteriea, and for <»ther purposes. (Mr. Caid> 

To aUiofw poetmaatera in first and aeoond claas post- 
ofiloea to anapend clerks and employOa therein with- 
out P*7» n<»t exceeding thirty days, for neglect of duty , 
and for other porpoeea. (Mr. Bingham). 

For the eatablishment of a first-class mail and steam- 
ahip service between Tampa. Fla., and Aspinwall, 
Central Ameiloa» for a term of five years. (Mr. Tay- 
lor.) 

To amend sections 8834, 3836, and 3837 of the Revised 
Statutes, and for other porposes. (Mr. Bingham.) 

Soreties on postmasters^ bonds. 

To amend section 3868 of the Revised Statutes of the 
United Statee. (Mr. Caruth.) 

Letter-boxes in railroad stations. 

For the establiahment of a first-class mall and steam- 
ship service between New Orleans, La., and Aspin- 
waii. Central America, for a term of five years. (Mr. 
Coleman.) 

To prohibit transmission through the mails of obscene, 
lewd, lascivious, or indecent publications, pictures, 
models, casts, or instruments, and for other purposes. 
(Mr. Wickham.) 



SnbstHnte for 3847, 4767. and 5623. 
On Calendar of Committee ot the 
Wiiole House on atateof Union. 



Substitute for 6UB. On Calendar 
of Committee of the Whole House 
on state of Union. 

Passed Hou^ of Representatives. 
Pending, in Senate Committee 
on Post-Offices aud Post-Roads. 

Substitute for 177, 241, 242, 3321. 
8067. Has become a law. 



Appendix 0. 
eepoet of house letter-box coxmissiok. 

Hon. John Wanamakbr, 

Postmaster- Gen jBral, Wcishington, D, C, : 

Sir : The commission appointed by yon in Jane, 1890, for the pnrpose of recom- 
mending a device for letter-boxes for the doors of dwellings, beg leave to submit the 
following report : ' 

The commission met at the Post-Office Department in this city, October 1, 1890, and 
held daily meetings until October 11, 1890. Of the members of the commission orig- 
inally appointed there were present General John M. Corse, postoj aster at Boston, 
Massi ; Mr. C. Van Cott, postmaster at New York, N. Y., and Mr. J. B. Harlow, post- 
master at St. Lonis, Mo. The other two members appointed by yon. Postmaster 
John W.Ross, of Washington, D. C, and Postmaster G. W. Nott, of New Orleans^ 
La., had left the service since their appointment, and before the convening of the 
commission and necessarily ceased to be members of the commission. Capt. Henry 
Sherwood, postmaster at Washington, D. C, was snbstitated by yon for Mr. Ross» 

The commission voted to request the appointment of two new members, and at 
their request you appointed Mr. James E. Bell, superintendent of the delivery divis- 
ion of the post-office at Washington, D. C, and Mr. W. B. Smith, acting inspector, 
in charge of the Washington division, and W« £. Corbin was ordered to report to 
the commission as secretary. 

Prior to the meeting of the commission the members received large nnmbers of 
models and devices for boxes under the terms of the notice by the chairman, as fol- 
lows: 

*^ The Postmaster-General, in order to increase the efficiency of the free-delivery 
service, desires to secure a device for a letter-box for the doors of dwellings that will 
be simple in construction, low priced, and capable of a^ustment to the exterior of 
doors without injuring or defacing them. A letter-box that will fill these require- 
ments will save much of the carrier's time, while increasing the securtty of the mail 
to the householder. To this end he has appointed the committee mentioned below, 
who invite the public to send to either of the members designs, samples, models, or 
suggestions for a box that will fill the necessary requirements. 

'* Designs will be received until October 1, 1890, after which date the committee will 
meet at some point hereafter to be designated to examine the designs, models, and 
samples submitted by the public, and, af&r careful consideration, will report to the 
Postmaster-General the box, in their Judgment, beet adapted to the purpose. 

'^The Postmaster-General will probably officially adopt the box or recommend the 
same to the public for general use. Manufacturers and inventors are respectfully 
solicited to carefully prepare their designs, models, and samples and forward them 
within the time above mentioned. It is also desirable that the designs, models, 
and samples should be accompanied by manuscript description, which will furnish 
all information necessary for the commission to determine the value of the same.'' 

Subsequently the following notice was issned, and widely circulated through the 
press: 

**Po8T-Office, Boston, Mass., 
"Division I, Executive Office of the Postmastkb, 

'' September fiO, 1890. 
" The commission appointed by the Postmaster-General to secure a suitable house 
letter-box will convene in Washington, D. C, at the Post-Office Department, Room 
42, Floor D, October 1, proximo. All models, plans, etc., must be before the commis- 
sion by that date, and parties in interest can appear before commission to explain 
their plans or they can furnish written descriptions, as they prefer. 

"Jno. M. Corse, ChmrmanJ' 
90 



REPORT OP HOUSE LETTER-BOX COMMISSION. 91 

MODELS AND DESIGNS SUBMITTED. 

It WAS the effort of the commission to give every one who replied to the circalar 
the opportunity to appear and set forth the features of his device. Stenographic re- 
porta were made of these statements aod were carefully gone over hy the commission 
with a view to give every one a full and fair hearing. 

The numher of models and designs submitted appears in the following tables : 

Number of Boston models 63 

Number of New York models 50 

Number of St. Louis models 59 

Number of Washington models 215 

Total 387 

Number of Boston designs ..« 46 

Number of New York designs 27 

Number of St. Louis designs 23 

Number of iVashington designs 81 

Total 177 

To which may be added about two hundred communications containing sugges- 
tions of more or l^s value. Some sixty-five gentlemen appeared personally before 
the commission, or committee of its members, and explained their models. 

THE INEXPERIENCE OF THE COMMISSION. 

The commission, on assembling, discovered that owing to their previous limited 
experience in connection with house letter-boxes they were unable to determine ej^ 
actly what they wanted, or what the public service required in the shape of a box; 
and it was not until after a careful examination of many of the models that they 
could approximate towards anything like the necessary requirements for a box to 
recommend to the Postmaster-General. 

The first process of the commission was one of elimination. Out of about eight 
hundred, models, designs, and suggestions submitted, there were many which were 
obviously unfit for the use proposed. The consideration of combination boxes for the 
interiors of large public buildings and tenement houses was deemed subsidiary, if not 
beyond the scope of the inquiry committed to us. Three times the commission went 
over the models and designs submitted, each time reducing the number by rejecting 
those obviously unsuitable. 

ESSENTIAL REQUIREMENTS OF A SATISFACTORY BOX. 

The commission, afte;r mature deliberation, outlined the essential requiremenui of 
a satisfactory box as follows : 

(1) It should be of small cost. 

(2) It should be neat in appearance. 

(3) It should protect the contents against rain, sleet, snow, and dust. 

(4) It should furnish reasonable security against removal of the letters by thieves, 
and against the removal of exterior boxes from doors or walls. 

(5) It should be as simple as possible in its manner of operation. 

(6) The lid or cover of the box should be so hung as not to require the carrier to 
open it or to use more than one hand in depositing the mail. 

(7) The box should mar the door as little as possible. 

(8) The box should have an attachment of some character for the reception of 
papers. 

(9) It should disclose the presence of mail matter without being opened. 
These are the affirmative requirements of a suitable box. 



92 REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

Among the -designs rejected are all those which provide for opening the box by 
the opening of the hoase door. With these boxes the contents are always exposed 
when the honse door is open, and they are unsaitable for general use. Boxes provid- 
ing for the collection of mail were also ejected as not entirely within the scope of 
onr inquiry. The commission discusses their possible use later on in the report. The 
element of cost is obviously important if the box is to be adopted for general use at 
private expense, or at the expense of the Government. I^eatness in appearance is 
also so obviously a requirement as notto need discussion. 

Many of the boxes submitted are not as secure as they should be against dirt and 
wet, and many more disregard the essenti|il requirements of security against thieves. 
A simple opening is not an adequate safeguard against thieves. The expert letter 
thief uses wires, waxed sticks and many other ingenious devices to extract letters 
from open boxes, and the form adopted should be one which throws the letter into 
such a position that it can not be withdrawn by these devices. The box should also 
be strong enough to resist easy breaking, or removal of the fastenings, so that it can 
not be taken away without being opened. For this purpose, the box which is fas- 
tened onto the wall from the inside, so that the fastenings can only be reached by 
unlocking the box, is preferable to one which is secured or fastened to the wall from 
the outside of the box. Simplicity of mechanism is as import-ant as low cost, or 
security against theft. Indeed, there should be no mechanism at all. Springs and 
similar devices are liable to get out of order and to be costly for repairs. A device 
for common use should be dependent upon nothing more complicated than hinges 
and the force of gravity. 

The requirement that the carrier shall be able to place mail in a box without touch- 
ing it is disregarded in many of the models. This requirement is of special importance 
for the convenience of the carrier and promptness of delivery. A lid which has to 
be lifted, or a door which has to be opened, obliges the carrier to use both his hands, 
one of which is usually loaded with his mjiil-bag, while the other holds the mail 
which he desires to slip into the box. The arrangements should be such that he 
should be obliged to use only the hand which holds the packet of mail to be delivered, 
and that the covering should yield readily to the pressure of the mail and close auto- 
matically after it has fallen into the box. The reasons why the box should not mar 
the door are sufficiently obvious. 

The importance of providing for newspapers and packages is second only to that of 
providing for letters. If the carrier is obliged to summon the occupant of the honse 
every time he delivers a paper he will be obliged to do it on almost every trip, and 
the saving of time by the adoption of the box system will be very small. The com- 
mission can not recommend any system which' leaves papers or packages which can 
be delivered by carriers to the mercy of passers-by. It is essential, therefore, that 
some provision should be made for papers of the ordinary size which are taken out by 
carriers. 

The provision for disclosing the presence of mail matter without opening the box 
is for the convenience of those using it on the interior, and requires no special discus- 
sion. This requirement has been disregarded in many of the models, while others have 
made satisfactory pruvision for disclosing the presence of mail matter without show- 
ing it fully to curious and unauthorized eyes. 

Your commission, after mature deliberation and comparison of the different boxes, 
were led to the conclusion that no one of them had sufficient merit to justify recom- 
mending it for general adoption. In addition, they think that no one pattern of box 
will serve every purpose. The models and designs logically separate themselves 
into outside boxes and inside boxes, and boxes for tenement houses. 

The commission decided that, so far as they are able to make a recommendation at 
the present time for an inside box, it should be simply for the adoption of a door- 
plate or letter-slot which should meet the requirements of small cost and simplicity, 
secnrity fh>m theft, and protection against the weather* The decision to recommend 



BEPOBT OF HOUSE LETTEB-BOX COMMISSION. 93 

a door-plate niAkes the problem eimpler, and exolades the neoeaaity for oonddering 
■everal of the reqairemoDto in the caae of an exterior box. 

A door-plate presents a simple enough appearance on the outside, and the chief 
question regarding it is the arrangement of the lid. This invoives more considera- 
tion than might at flrst appear. It involves protection against the weather, and if 
there is an interior box behind the lid it involves also protection against the removal 
of the letters by wires, waxed sticks, etc. Protection against the weather is not al- 
ways afforded by the simple device of a lip hanging on a hinge upon a flat opening. 
A better device is one which provides for an incline on the outside of the lip and a ]\d 
hinged at the bottom, so that the letters a)re pushed upward, instead of one hinged at 
the top. It is important that the lid should be so arranged that the force of gravity 
should always oarry it back tight against the opening instead of leaving it open, or 
hanging loosely. 

SUQOESTIOKS. 

The commission decided to bring to your attention three models providing for the 
closing of the lid by force of gravity, one preHcnted by A (see Appendix), one pre- 
sented by B (see Appendix), and one presented by C (see Appendix), which 
has been designated as No. 215 W. The device of A seems to come nearest to the 
requirements which we have set forth. The opening is sunk into the door, giving a 
beveled edge below so as to protect the inside against the weather and dnst. There 
is no mechanism, but a slight pressure opens the lid at the upper edge, and a skillful 
construction of the lid carries it back promptly aud closely into position. The adop- 
tion of such a door-plate leaves it optional with the occupants of the dwelling to 
choose such a box upon the interior of the house as suits their convenience. They 
need have no box at all, and the letters can be allowed to fall upon the floor, as is 
done in many offices and dwellings, or they can have a box of wire or basket work 
open to everybody. If security against interior occupants is desired the boj^-holder 
can choose a box with a key, which completely covers the mail, or one which leaves 
it partly visible. 

INTERIOR BOXKS. 

While not able to recommend any particular box, we invite attention to a few 
which suggest possible forms for interior use. One of them is marked No. 105, and 
the model is furnished by D (see Appendix). The feature of this box is a swell at 
the top which enables the n^ail to be inserted through a slot iipwards. The mail 
then drops to the bottom of the box. The cliaracter of the slot affords a measure of 
protection against outside thieves. Another of the boxes to which we invite your 
attention is No. 11, presented by £ (see Appendix). This is simply a basket or cage 
of wire with a padlock. Another box is No. 80a, presented by F (see Appendix). It 
is a rectangular wooden box, of the simplest pattern, opening on the inside of the 
house by a door. Another box is that of Q (see Appendix), and illustrates a form of 
box which collapses and falls against the wall when the mail is removed. This is 
made of a chain netting, and seems to be of the simplest of that class of boxes pre- 
sented. It collapses simply by the force of gravity. These boxes are presented to 
* your attention to illustrate the extreme variety of forms brought before the commis- 
sion. None of them meet all of the requirements, aud we do not recommend any one 
of them for adoption ; they illustrate ideas only. 

EXTERIOR BOXES. 

The exterior boxes to which we invite your attention are nearly complete in them- 
selves, and exclude rhe use of the door slot. One of them. No. 54<f, is presented by 
H (see Appendix). We recommend this, with a modification, by the adoption of the 
paper attachment as shown in No. 54s. This box, as presented to the coxumission^ is 



94 RfiPOBT OP THE POSTMASTEE-GENERAL. 

fed from the bottom by the simple insertion of the mail, and has more of the elements 
of security and conyenienoe than any of the other boxes prosented. The box No. 
54« has merits, bat woald be improved by the sabstitation of teeth like those in 
No. b4d for the blade where the mail is inserted at the bottom. The box No. 54a has 
a bell attachment which rings as the back of the box drops under the pressure of the 
mail matter. This is a box which is open when the mail is in it. All three of these 
boxes aro presented by the agent of H. Additional to these, we invite your atten- 
tion to box No. 209, patented by K (see Appendix). Mail can be inserted under the 
lid without lifting it, by a separate movement, and there is a wire attachment for 
holding papers. An illustration of the simplicity with which a mechanical device 
can be arranged is famished by a design (No. 45 B) submitted by L (see Appendix). 
The adoption of these exterior boxes necessarily excludes the use of the door slot, 
and would interfere with a perfectly uniform system if the slot were adopted. Some 
of these boxes could be used with advantage in large office buildings where the mail 
is comparatively secure from the weather and from theft, and others might be used 
on the outside of buildings if the occupants saw fit to take the risk. In adopting a 
design for geueral use, uniformity is desirable to assist the carrier, and save time, 
where.the conditions permit uniformity. 

^ ANNUNCIATORS. 

The commission nas thought proper to invite your attention, without recommenda*^ 
tion, to the merits of two systems of electrical auuunciators. In one of these, that 
of *' M.'' (see Appendix), the presence of mail is indicated by the ringing of a bell 
and the falling of a card, which remains in position nntil replaced. The card bears 
the word " Mail,'' and indicates when one re tarns to his office that some mail has 
been left in the box tor him. The other system, that of *< N." (see Appendix), enables 
one to tell by pressure of a button whether mail is in the box at the entrance of the 
doOr. If there is no mail the bell fails to ring ; if there is mail the pressure on the 
knob produces a ring, caused by the weight of the mail closing the electric circuit. 

OBNERAL OON8IDEBATION8. 

The consideration of the subject snbmitted to as has elicited from the commission 
a desire to call your attention to some suggestions of a broader scope which have 
been made in the course of oar investigations and may merit your attention. 

Several of these are made by ''O." (see Appendix), who seems to have given much 
intelligent and fruitfal study to the subject of the postal service. In design No. 70, 
submitted by him, he urges the general adoption of a house box for collection as well 
as delivery. This suggestion is not altogether new, and involves consideration of the 
extension of the collecting force and new methods of both collection and delivery. 
^'O." suggests that a house-to-house collection would enable people to mail their own 
letters who now have to intrust them to messengers, and would prevent many losses 
in this way which now go unexplained. The ability to mail letters without going 
outside of one's doors, it is also suggested, would greatly increase the use of the mails 
and perhaps pay for the probable increase in the expense by the increase of business. 
Many more letters would certainly be written if thoy were collected at each house 
and promptly taken to the post-office for deli very. A house-to-house collection wohld 
involve a reorganization of the carrier and collecting service, but might prove quite 
as practicable as the existing system. The carrier might with little loss of time, if 
proper boxes were provided, collect at each house at the same time that he delivered, 
and in order to avoid becoming overloaded might deposit his collections in recepta- 
cles like the street letter-boxes which could be frequently visited by collection 
wagons. It might be found more advantageous to have tbe collecting done by a differ- 
ent corps of men, but the advantages and disadvantages of both methods could readily 
be determined by a few experiments. It would seem that the increased cost of such 
a system ought not to bb great, for the letters have to be collected from some point 
nndei; the existing system and the multiplication of collection places would be conv- 



BEPORT OF HOUBB L£TTEB-b6x COMMISSION, t 95 

pensated by the Amallneas of the collections at each place and the increased oonven- 

ienee of the pablic. 

The designs of *' O." include a system of scales in each box, depending upon a simple 

system of gravity, by which the proper postage upon the mall matter can be readily 

determined. Snch snggestions involve changes in the postal service 80 radical that 

it is beyond the scope of oor powers to do more than bring them to your attention ; 

but they look in the direction of making the postal service the faithful servant of the 

publioy which supports ifc, and keeping its development abreast with the tmprove- 

ments in the other appliances of modern life. While it may not be possible to adopt 

such plans at once, they embody ideas which may some time be of use in the improve- 

ment of the service, which has been so rapid under your intelligent direction. 

* 

COKCLUBIKO RBCOlfitMSNDATlON. 

We are not prepared to recommend the adoption by the Post-Office Department of 
soy of the devices submitted to us. It would seem that an intelligent consideration 
of the subject by post-office officials and inventors ought to discover improvements 
upon anything iihtoh has been presented. We would respectfully recommend that 
no official action be taken at present, but that the subject be left open and fliat the 
requirements for a bos similar to those suggested by the commission ^n this report 
be laid before inventors and others interested, as far as possible, and models solicited 
based upon these requirements, or that such steps be taken as may occur to the Post- 
master-General to complete the consideration of the subject. 

We beg to call your attention to the faithful co-operation in our labors of the Chief 
Clerk of the Department, Mr. W. B. Cooley, and also the diligence and fidelity of 
Mr. W. £. CorbiU| secretary of the oommia^ion ; and Mr.. Zane, stenographer. 

C. Van Cott, 

PofitTnasterf New Tark, K. F. 
J. B. Haklow, 

Postmaater, St. LauUf Mo, 
Henry Sherwood, 
PostmasieTf Washitigton, D, C 
James £. Bell, 
Superintendent Delivery y Washington, D. C. 
W. B. Smith, 
Acting Inspector in Charge, WMhingUm, P. C. 
Jno. M. Corse {Chairman). 
Poatmaeter, Boston, Maee. 
VfASBBXQTOVt, Ootoler 13, 1890. 



APPENDIX. 

A.~A. S. Johnson, Waterford, Saratoga County, N. Y. 

B.—A. B. Miller, Herbst, Grant County. Ind. 

C. — ^Without name or address. 

D.— H. C. Kromer, 917 Linden avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

£.— Yale and To^gfne Lock Company, Hartford, Conn. 

F.^A. Dalstrom, Asbton, Mich. 

G.— W. D. Doremus, Washington, D. C. 

H.— James S. Mason & Co., 101 Portland street, Boston, Mass. 

K.-*Hart Manufacturing Company, Detroit, Mich. 

L.— Mrs. George £. Bender, Chicago, 111. 

M.^A. F. Carmen, Washington, D. C. 

N.— American Klectrlo Letter Box Company, Boston, Mass. 

0.~£dward S. May, 1815 Linden street, Washington, D. C. 



Appendix D. 

LOTTERY ACT WHICH WENT INTO EFFECT SEPTEMBER 19, 1890. 

AK ACT to amend certain seotiona of the Keyiaed Statutes relating to lotteries, and for other pur- 
poses. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of RepreeeniaUvee of the United States of AmeHoa 
in Conffress aaeembled, That section thirty-eight handled and ninety-four of the Re- 
vised Statutes be, and the same is hereby, amended to read as follows : 

'* Sec. 3894. No letter, postal-card, or circular concerning any lottery, so-called 
gift concert, or similar enterprise offering prizes dependent upon lot or chance, or 
concerning schemes devised for the purpose of obtaining money or property under 
false pretenses, and no list of the drawings at any lottery or similar scheme, and no 
lottery ticket or part thereof, and no check, draft, bill, money, postal-note, or money- 
order for the purchase of any ticket, tickets, or part thereof, or of any share or any 
chance in any such lottery or gift enterprise, shall be carried in the mail or delivered 
at or through any post-office or branch thereof, or by any letter-carrier; nor shall 
any newspaper,, circular, pamphlet, or publication of any kind containing any adver- 
tisement of any lottery or gift enterprise of any kind offering prizes dependent upon 
lot or chance, or containing any list of prizes awarded at the drawings of any such 
lottery or gift enterprise, whether said Ijist is of any part or of all of the drawing, be 
carried in the mail or delivered by any postmaster or letter-carrier. Any person who 
shall knowingly deposit or cause to be deposited, or who shall knowingly send or 
cause to be sent, anything to be conveyed or delivered by mail in violation of this 
section, or who shall knowingly cause to be delivered by mail anything herein for- 
bidden to be carried by mail, shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and on con- 
viction shall be punished by a fine of not more than five hundred dollars or by im. 
prisonment for not more than one year, or by both such fine and imprisonment, for 
each offense. Any person violating any of the provisions of this section may be pro- 
ceeded against by information or indictment, and tried and punished either in the 
district at which the unlawful publication was mailed or to which it is carried by 
mail for delivery according to the direction thereon, or at which it is caused to be 
deliyered by mail to the person to whom it is addressed." 

Sec. 2. That section thirty-nine hundred and twenty-nine of the Be vised Statutes 
be, and the same is hereby, amended to read as follows : 

'^Ssc. 3929. The Postmaster-Qeneral may, upon evidence satisfactory to him that 
any person or company is engaged in conducting any lottery, gift enterprise, or 
scheme for the distribution of money or of any leal or personal property by lot, chance, 
or drawing of any kind, or that any person or company is conducting any other 
scheme or device for obtaining money or property of any kind through the mails by 
means of false or fraudulent pretenses, representations, or promises, instruct post- 
masters at any post-office at which registered letters' arrive directed to any such 
person or company, or to the agent or representative of any such person or company, 
whether such agent or representative is acting as an individual or as a firm, bank, 
corporation, or association of any kind, to return all such registered letters to the 
postmaster at the office at which they were originally mailed,'with the word ' Fraudu- 
96 



LOTTERY ACT AND INSTRUCTIONS. 97 

kst* plainly 'fatten or stamped apon the on taide thereof ; and all such letiera bo 
nturned to sach postmasters shall be by them returned to the writers thereof, under 
*ach regnlatioxis as the Postmaster-Gtoueral may prescribe. But nothing contained 
ifi this section shall be so construed as to authorize any postmaster or other person to 
open any letter not addressed to himself. The public advertisement by such person 
or company so oondncting such lottery, gift enterprise, scheme, or device, that remit- 
taDces for the same may be made by registered letters to any other person, firm, 
link, corporation, or association named therein shall be held to be prima facie evi- 
deofe of the existence of said agency by all the parties named ther»*Jn ; but the 
Pustmaster-Greneral shall not be precluded from ascertaining the existence of such 
agency in any other legal way satisfactory to himself.'' 

Sec. 3. That section four tliousand and forty-one of the Revised Statutes be, and 
tbe same is hereby, amended to read as follows : 

'* Sec. 4041. The Postmaster-General may, upon evidence satisfactory to him that 
anT person or company is engaged in conducting any lottery, gift enterprise, or 
i.-beme for the distribution of money; or of any real or personal property by lot, 
chance, or drawing of any kind, or that any person or company is conducting any 
other scheme for obtaining money or property of any kind through the mails by 
T.iean8 of false or fraudulent pretenses, representations, or promises, forbid the pay- 
m*>Qt by any postmaster to said persoft or company of any postal money-orders drawn 
:o his or its order, or in his or its favor, or to the agent of any such person or com- 
pAQT, whether such agent is acting as an individual or as a firm, bank, corporation 
(iT association of any kind, and may provide by regulation for the return to the 
remitters of the sums named in such money-orders. But this shall not authorize an}^ 
perm>n to open any letter not addressed to himself. The public advert iseme at by 
frceh person or company so conducting any such lottery, gift enterprise, scheme, or 
<icrice, that remittances for the same may be made by means of postal money -orders 
rn any other person, firm, bank, corporation, or association named therein shall be 
beld to be prima facie evidence of the existence of said agency by all the parties 
Lamed therein ; but the Postmaster-General shall not be precluded from ascertaining 
the existence of such agency in any other legal way." 
Approved, Sepf«mber 19, 1890. 

INSTRUCTIONS TO P0STMASTXR8. 

1. Section :)894, above quoted, applies to any letter, ordinary or registered, if it con- 
reras any lottery, gift concert, or scheme described in tho section, and to lottery 
tirketa, checks, drafts, bills, money, postal-notes, or money-orders for the purchase 
•^f lottery tickets, or any share or chance in a lottery or gift enterprise, and to the list 
of the drawings at any lottery or similar scheme, and forbids the carrying of them in 
ibe mails or the delivery of them from post-offices. 

1 The seal of a letter, or of any sealed packet prepaid at letter rates, must not be 
distarbed for the purpose ot ascertaining if its transmission in the mail or its delivery 
at s post-oifice is forbidden by the provisions of this act. Nor will the mere suspicion 
that such a letter or packet relates to a lottery, or the fact that it is addressed to any 
peisoQ known to be engaged in the business of conducting a lottery, justify its deten- 
tion or non-deU very, except that the delivery of registered letters at the office of des- 
tination shall be withheld when the Postmaster- General has issued specific orders, 
onder the provisions of section 39129, to that effect. 

3. Postal-cards and circulars unsealed, and all other unsealed matter, may, when 
nspected of having been deposited or mailed in violation of the provisions of this 
Mt, be examined for the purpose of ascertaining their character. 

4. The mailing of matter interdicted by this act by citizens to lottery companies and 
tlKir representatives is as dear a violation of the law as the mailing of such matter by 
lottery companies to their cnstomers or other persons. 

P M G 90 7 



98 REPORT OP THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

5. When it is known at the time of depositing them for mailing that postal-cards 
or circulars are nnmailable under the provisions of section 3894, above quoted, the 
postmaster should decline to receive them. If they be found in a post-office and the 
sender is unknown to the postmaster, or if they be discovered in the mail in transit, 
they should be withdrawn and marked or stamped "fraudulent" and sent to the 
Postmaster-General, accompanied by a special report from the postmaster explaining 
the reasons for their detention. 

6. The provisions of this act apply to letters, postal-cards, and circulars concern- 
ing lotteries, or similar schemes, that come in the mails from foreign countries, and 
such matter so received should be treated as if it originated in the United States. 

7. Matter sent in violation of the provisions of section 3894, discovered by post- 
masters at intermediate offices, should be withdrawn from' the mail and disposed of 
iu the same manner as if it had been discovered by the postmaster at the office of 
mailing or the office of delivery. But postmasters at intermediate offices should not 
delay the transmission of other mail in making special search for anything declared 
by this act to be unmailable. 

8. Newspapers, pamphlets, and publications of all kinds, bearing date before or 
since the nineteenth day of September, 1890 (at which date the act took effect), 
which contain the advertisement of any lottery, gift enterprise, or similar scheme, 
or the whole or part of the list of prizes awarded at the drawings of lotteries or simi- 
lar schemes, are by the provisions of this act denied carriage in the mails,* or delivery 
to subscribers, addresses, or to any other person, or as '' sample copies." Postmasters 
should refuse to receive them from publishers or to deliver them if by inadvertence 
they reach the office of destin ation. When found by postmasters in the mail in tranH^ 
they should be held until a report concerning them can be made to the Postmaster- 
General, and instructions received from him as to the disposing of them. 

9. Foreign newspapers, pamphlets, and publications of all kinds containing printed 
matter forbidden by the provisions of this act should be treated as if they were pub- 
lished in the United States. 

10. Clerks in the Railway Mail Service discovering matter the carriage of which is 
forbidden by the provisions of this act should withdraw and forward it to t'.eir re- 
spective division superintendents. Division superintendents should treat such 
matter in the same n^anner as postmasters are herein instructed to treat it. 

11. 'The term ** lottery," as used in this act, embraces all kinds of schemes, general 
or local, for the distribution of prizes by lot or chance, such as gift exhibitions, enter- 
prises, concerts, raffles, or the drawing of prizes in money or property at fairs. Hence, 
letters, postal cards, and circulars concerning them, and newspapers, pamphlets, and 
other publications containing advertisements of them, are nnmailable. 

12. The provisions of section 3929, relating to registered letters, and of section 4041 
relating to money-orders (both of which sections are set out in full in the preceding 
copy of the act), apply to such matter at offices of delivery only, and are to be en- 
forced upon the direct orders of the Postmaster-General. 

13. Postmasters and other postal officials and employ^ are expected to be diligent 
in carrying out the foregoing instructions for the enforcement of the provisions of 
this act. 

Jno. Wanamakbr, 
Foatmaster- G ^eraZ. 
Post-Office Department, 

WaMngtaUf D. C, October 3, 1890. 



THE attorney-general's LETTER ON GUESSING CONTENTS. 99 



THE ATTOBNEY'GENERAL'8 LETTER WITH REFERENCE TO QUESSINa 

CONTESTS. 

* Department op Justice, 

Washington, October 31, 1890. 

Sir: In response to the inqniries made nnder date of the 6th instant as to whether 
advertisements in newspapers of the "gaessing contest,'' in its various phases, are in 
Tiolation of section 3894 of the Revised Statutes, as amended by the act of Septetn-, 
ber 19, 1390, I snbmit this answer : 

With other inclosures yon transmit the advertisement of the Cincinnati Enquirer 
setting forth one of these projects in detail, and as this exhibit presents the material 
question quite distinctly, I will make use of it for the purposes of this answer. 

The scheme or " enterprise '' advertised by the Enquirer is, that it will give to the 
sender of the first ** guess '' giving the correct, or nearest corrsct, num ber of votes of 
the Democratic and of the Republican candidates respectively, for the office of ^sec- 
retary of state for the State of Ohio at the next election, $100 each, and to the sender 
of the second correct or nearest correct guess (if no correct guesses are received) of 
the vote of either candidate, $50 each, and to the sender of the third correct guess 
or nearest correct guess (if no correct guesses are received), $25 for each candidate, 
and $5 each to the senders of the next fifteen correct or nearest guesses (if no correct 
guesses are received) on each candidate — thus offering to give the amount of $500 to 
thirty-six persons. 

A blank form set forth provides for the writing in of the number of votes that the 
person competing shall see fit to designate, and for entering his name and residence. 
The designating period is to end with the day upon which the election is held. The 
caption of the advertisement is "Thousands in it," and it is announced that 'Mf no 
correct guesses are received the nearest correct guess will be entitled to the prize.'' 

The scheme of this newspaper requires that all "guesses" shall be upon blanks out 
from copies of its issues, and the guess must be sent in within a limited time. 

It is provided that any person may guess, and that each may guess every day and 
as many times each day as the person shall see fit to do so. 

If this offer were not made in good faith it would be a scheme devised for obtain- 
ing money nnder false pretenses. . Being made in good faith, the gifts are doubtless 
offered with the purpose of increasing directly as well as indirectly the sale of the 
issues of the newspaper, and of rendering its business of increased value to those 
who offer the prizes. 

The statute reads as follows : 

**No letter, postal-card, or circular concerning any lottery, so-caHed gift concert, 
or other similar enterprise offering prizes dependent upon lot or chance, or concern- 
ing schemes devised for the purpose of obtaining money or prop'erty under falHe pre- 
tenses, and no list of the drawings at any lottery or similar scheme, and no lottery 
ticket or part thereof, and no check, draft, bill, money, postal-note, or nionej'-order 
for the purchase of any ticket, tickets, or part thereof, or of any Hhare or any chance 
in any such lottery or gift enterprise shall be carried in the mail or delivered at or 
through any post-oflice or branch thereof, or by any letter carrier ; nor shall any 
newspaper, circular, pamphlet, or publication of auy kind containing any adver- 
tisement of any lottery or gift enterprise of any kind offering prizes dependent upon 
lot or chance, or containing any list of prizes awarded at the drawings of any such 
lottery or gift enterprise, whether said list is of any part or of all of the drawings, be 
carried in the mail or delivered by any postmaster or letter-carrier." 

The prohibition directly material to this inquiry, is : 

"Nor shall any newspaper • • * or publication • ♦ • containing any 
advertisement of any lottery or gift enterprise of any kind offering prizes dependent 
upon lot or chance * * *^ be carried in the mail or delivered by any postmaster or 
letter carrier." 

In construing this law it is not to be forgotten that it is not only penal, but that 
it it in derogation of the right or privilege usually accorded to citizens in the use of 



100 REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

the maiia. It is, therefore, to be strictly constraed as against the Goyernment. It 
is clear that the statate is directed against only saoh enterprises as are " dependent 
upon lot or chance." 

It will hardly be contended that the enterprise under consideration was dependent 
npon lot. Was it dependent upon chance, within the meaning of the statute t It 
seems to me this question must be answered in the negative. In a certain sense and 
in a certain degree, perhaps, any prediction as to human action may be said to be 
dependent upon' chance ; that is to say, that it is in some measure dependent upon cir- 
cumstances the happening of which can not be anticipated or foretold with any de- 
gree of certainty. But, at the same time, it can not be said that a prediction that a 
man who has lired a life of uprightness for fifty years will, during the remainder of 
his life, continue so to live, or that a man who has been a successful business man 
/or fifty years will so continue, or that a man who has maintained certain opinions, 
religious, political, or economical, will continue in the same line, is dependent upon 
chance. It is, of course, quite possible that such man may utterly change his habits 
of life, business, or opinions, but such change will not be purely matter of chance. 

So with regard to the case in hand. A student of statistics might know approxi- 
mately the number of Republican votes and the number of Democratic votes in the 
State of Ohio; he might approximate the ratio in which one and the other might in- 
crease or decrease in a given year. It is quite likely that his estimates would o^ten 
be wide of the mark, but it would not be by reason of chance, but by reason of 
causes In regard to -vrhich he had formed erroneous estimates. It would hardly do to 
say that a child, or a school boy, could form as correct an estimate in the matter as 
an experienced politician who had been giving weeks and months Of steady Atten- 
tion to the consideration of the question. But, without further elaboration, I am 
quite clear that estimates made upon the probable political action of the people in 
a given State in a pending election can not be said to be dependent upon chance, 
within the meaning of this statute; and that, therefore, this enterprise was no in- 
fraction of the lottery law in question. 

In conclusion it may not be improper to say that this law was framed with a view to 
the suppression of certain well-known and wide-spread agencies for evil ; and it is 
certainly not wise to embarrass its execution by a strained or unnatural construction, 
in reaching after practices not thought of as a motive for its enactment. 
Very respectfully, 

W. H. H. Miller, 

Attornejf- General. 

The Postmasteb-Genebal. 



Appendix E, 



ARGUMENT OF THE POSTMASTER GENERAL BEFORE TBE JTOUSE AND 
SENATE COMMITTEES ON PUBLIC BUILDINGS, APRIL 11 AND 1*2, RE- 
GARDING THE POST-OFFICE DEPARTMENT BUILDING AND Jf ASHING- 
TON CITY POST-OFFICE BUILDING. 

In diflcnssing the qaestion of aooommodatlons for the machinery of the postal sys- 
tem, the Departmental hailding and city post-office seem to me to have a natural 
relationship, and I shall therefore consider them together in what I have to say. At 
the oatset it is proper to recall the following facts : 

The hoilding now occupied by the Post-Offioe Department, inclnding the Sixth 
Auditor's Office, was completed abont 1866, when the number of post-offic<$s in the 
United States was 23,828 and the gross revenue of the postal service $14,336^986. 
To-day there are over 61,000 post-offices and the revenues of the Department in 1889 
amounted to $56,175,611.18, or four times as much as in 1866, notwithstanding reduc- 
tions of letter-postage from 3 cents for one-hldf ounce to 2 cents for an ounce, and still 
greater reductions on newspapers. 

The length of the post-routes in 1866 was 180,921 miles ; in 1B89 it was increased to 
416,159 miles, or nearly two and one- third times the distance. Postmasters were paid 
in 1866 salaries amounting to $3,454,677. Last year their salaries aggregated 
$13,171,382, or four times as much. The money-order system, started in the latter 
part of 1864, was in its infancy in 1866, there being then but 766 money-order offices, 
transacting a business in oirders issued of less than $4,000,000. No arrangements had 
at that time been made for an international money-order business, and the p«stal-note 
had not been devised. To-day there are 8,727 money-order offices, whose combined 
business amounts to nearly $140,000,000 annually. The registry business in 1866 was 
■mall, the total number of registered pieces being only 275,103, while last year they 
numbered over 14,000,000. The Railway Mail Service was established in 1865 and 
was just beginning when the present Department building was finished. The Bureau 
of Foreign Mails had not been, established. Substantially, therefore, most of the 
great features of the postal service are the creations of the last twenty-five years. 

So much has been said of the overcrowded condition of the building now used 
that it would be needless to repeat it. The broad and undeniable fact is that the 
present stroctnre is filled to its utmost with people and with material ; that a part of 
the force is working in unfit quarters, and that much of the storage space is dark and 
not easily accessible. Clerks are working in basement rooms crowded together 
everywhere, and ralnable pai>ers are frequently exposed in hallways. The growing 
neceasities of the service have compelled, from time to time, the taking of outside quar- 
ten, and to-day the Department is paying $20,000 annual rental for Marini's Hall, 
the E-etnet Bink, the Money-Order building, the Topographer's Office, and the mail- 

101 



102 REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

l»ag repair shop, Wliiio there are more people quartered in the Department itself than 
ey^ tefor^.- • — - - ' '. 

.' : i^c iitddn ^liUdUi^; ,^iixh oonsists of three stories, with a basement half noder 
groandy contaias about 68,000 sqaare feet of floor space available for clerks and 15,000 
square feet for storage, mostly in the basement. There is an attic which is dark, and, 
filled as it now is, with a mass of books and papers, serves only to invite a disastrous 
fire. The Department is using on the outside five rented buildings of 75,80^ square 
feet of floor space, or only 7,200 square feet less than iu the whole of the main build- 
ing. The owners of the Rink building on E street have notified the Department that 
the rental will be increased $2,000 beginning on July 1, next, and the Sixth Auditor 
must have additional room for about seventy-five clerks, which will probably cost 
|3,000. The total outlay for rent for this year will thus be not far from |:^,000, which 
sum is equivalent to the interest of $625,000 at 4 per cent., or $833,000 at 3 per cent. 

To this should be added the extra cost by the quadrupling of watchmen, messen* 
gers, laborers, charwomen, elevators, heating and lights, almost all of which would 
be saved in a single well arranged and adapted structure, if no other move for build- 
ings is to be made. With $275,000 the Post-Office Department could buy and pay for . 
the ground and build a substantial, five-story stone and brick building within three 
bloclcs of the present Post-Office Department, to contain 100,0d0 sqnare feet, which 
would accommodate all the offices and work-shops now in leased quarters. 

It should be borne in mind that this is the present status of postal affairs, and that 
it will require at least five years or more to complete a new building of the regula- 
tion class for the Department ; and, at the rate of growth of the Department during 
the last five years, the next five will probably bring the number of post-offices to 
75,000, and the gross revenue to $75,000,000, and it is not unlikely that in ten years 
from this date there will be 100,000 post-offices and $100,000,000 of gross revenue, 
with a service rapidly expanding in all its branches. 

Then we ought to anticipate new features of the postal service, some of which 
will probably be embraced within the scope of its operations before long. The 
postal telegraph is exciting much interest among the people, and is under consid- 
eration by one of your committees; the telephone is its natural accompaniment; 
postal saving-banks are demanded by many; there will be universal free delivery in 
some form ; possibly a postal civil-service school for education in postal business. 
The certain reduction of letter-postage to one penny in the near future will greatly 
swell the volume of business and require larger clerical forces and places to work 
in. For these reasons and because of the natural growth of the business of this en- 
tire Department our needs will increase from 158,800 square feet of area now in use 
to 300,000 square feet or more. 

The ideal building for this purpose is not a hotel building of numerous rooms 20 by 
20 feet, such as are now in use, but a structure arranged with "pecial reference to its uses 
by the various branches of the Department, where the chiefs of bureaus can conven- 
iently superintend the clerks of the respective divisions, and the records can be kept 
fh>m the public eye and touch. Spacious, light, well ventilated rooms would pre- 
serve the health of the clerks, save gas bills, greatly expedite work and economize the 
time of Senators, Congressmen^ and the public. Convenience and economy would 
be gained by placing all the postal business located in this city under two roofs, locat- 
ing the city post-office in a low building, where the people require easy accommo- 
dations, and placing the Executive Department offices, workshops, and supply and 
storage rooms in a high building where they would be better accommodated. 

In the year 1887 it was proposed to take the block bounded by Eighth and Ninth and 
E and F streets, adjoining the present Department building, and enlarge the present 
structure by an edifice covering the street intervening and the entire square. The 
area thus added would be about equal to the available floor space on all floors in the 



THE P. O. DEPARTMENT AND CITY P. O. BUILDINGS. 103 

present bailding, 83,000 aquare feet, and including the iuterveuiog street, abont 
25,000 square feet additional, makings, with the 83,000 square feet now in use, the 
gmnd total of nearly 200,000 square feet, in a four-story building similar to the pres- 
ent strnotore. The data of the cost of the real estate, as estimated in lb87, was abont 
1750,000. It is estimated that the value has increased 20 per centum, so that the 
ground would now cost about |900,000. The probable cost of the building would be 
12,500,000, making a total of |3,400,000. This plan has met with much favor in the 
past and is thoroughly practicable. 

If the city post-office is to be located at Ninth and Pennsylvania avenue, as con- 
templated by the House bill now in the Senate committee, I would favor the removal 
of the Department building to its close proximity, and the present PostOffioe Depart- 
ment building could be connected by bridges or tunnels with the Interior Depart- 
ment, which is seeking more room and paying at the present time large sums for the 
rental of outside buildings. To construct a new building for the Interior Department 
means a large outlay. Yet the gathering or its outlying branches into one building 
means a large saving. To annex the contiguous Post-office Department building to 
the Interior Department would be true economy, and the application of further ap- 
propriations to a new postal building would only be an exchange of buildings. 

It is only a question of time when the Post-Office Department and the city post- 
office will be connected with the Capitol and the Executive Mansion and various 
Departments by pneumatic tubes, so that it is not so important where the new struct- 
ure or structures are located. To save time and expense it is more important that 
the city post-office be near the railroad stations than in the center of the city, as 
the carrier service delivers the mails at the people's doors, and inexpensive sub- 
stations in various parts of the city afford tlie best convenience for the purchase of 
stamps and money-orders and for registering letters and packages. If it is detinitely . 
settled that the city XK>st-offlce is to be moved to Pennsylvania avenue, I respectfully 
submit for consideration that the proposed post-office structures be made the first 
step in a plan ultimately to occupy the south side of Pennsylvania avenue from 
Ninth street to the Treasury with Government buildings. New buildings are con* 
templated for the city post-office and Post-Office Department, the Patent Office, the 
Department of Justice, the Hall of Records, State Department halls, Census Bureau, 
District Commissioners, Supreme Court and reception halls and business offices of 
the President, and a broad, comprehensive, general plan might be sketched out of 
which each new building to be erected might be a part. None of the present struct- 
ures in the locality referred to are costly, and a great saving could be made by secur- 
ing the property before further improvements are made. Such a movement would 
give a new start to the improvement of Washington, and the massing of the build- 
ings at one point, instead of isolating them at various points in the city, would not 
only greatly beautify tbe city, but add to the value of the contiguous real estate and 
the tax income therefrom. 

The Qovemment owns the block bounded by B, Tenth, Twelfth street and the south- 
ern sides of squares 324 and 350, containing about 87,500 square feet. Koughly cal- 
culated tbe areas of the squares 323, 324, 349, and 350, not including the street space, 
aggregate about 184,000 square feet, and including the streets, about 270,000 square 
feet. 

The following are the areas of the respective squares : 

Square feet. 

Square 323 61,400 

Square :«4 :{9,200 

Square 349 45,865 

SquAceSSO 37,800 

Total -,.-.. 184,265 



104 



BEPORT OF THE POSTMASTEB-GENERAL. 



Rbskrtatioh. 




B street. 






C Btieet. 




349 



I 




LOCATION OF THE PKOPOSEO CITY POSTOPFICE. 



The folio wiDg are the respective assessed valuations of these squares as taken from 
the books In the office of the District assessor: 



Gronnd. 



Improre* 
meats. 



Square 323.. 
Square 324.. 
8qaHre349.. 
SqaareSfiO.. 

Totia. 



1117, 633 
49. 377 
113,206 
63,4r2 



H6,000 
43,106 
64.000 
22,800 



343,688 



175^900 



Total eroaod 

Total Improvemeota. 



343,688 
176,900 



Grand total. . 



519,588 



The present market value of this property is somewhat a matter of conjecture, but 
I am informed it can not be more than double the assessment, or $1,000,000. I sub- 
mit that it would be better to purchase all this property at this time than to pay 
|275,000 for the lot contemplated in the House bill for the purchase of a city post- 
office site. The lot in question is irregular in shape, as follows : 



City post-offioe. 



Square 380. 



THE P. O. DEPARTMENT AND CITY P. O. BUILDINGS. 105 

laminfbrmedbytheoitypoBtmasterthat the whole 8qnare contains 36,417 sqnare 
feet, while the part allotted to the new post^-office consists of 10,198 square feet, which is 
not more than that now in use in the cramped quarters of the 8eaton House. The actual 
needs of the proper post-office for Washington City are 60,000 square feet and this 
Bhonld be in one floor. To put $800,000, as proposed, into a small building and be 
obliged to use upper stories, reached by elevators, would be a vast and unnecessary 
expense. The present rental of the Beaton House property in use for the post-office 
is $8,000. The rent at 5 per cent, for the proposed new building and fixtures would 
be $o5,000, and the increase of expenditure in such an inconvenient and ill-adapted 
building for watchmen, elevators, and other expenses, would practically bring the 
rent up to $75,000 per annum. This rental could nearly all be saved by combining 
the post-office and Department buildings on the property adjoining the site selected, 
or at Eighth and F streets ; bnt if the committee considers it impracticable to unite the 
two buildings, I respectfully submit that it would be at least worth while to con- 
sider abandoning the building of any structure of several stories for a city post- 
office that does not need npper rooms, and put the amount required in constructing 
npper stories in ground area, covering the same with a structure of one story, which, 
in height, for the sake of appearance, could be equal to two ordinary stories, with 
over-head lighting and abundant ventilation, and a model of architecture and util- 
ity in American post-office building. Snob a building could be erected for from one- 
third to two-fifths of the usual class Government building, and the ground, bought 
with what would be saved from the cost of a many-storied building, would enable 
the post office to work without double handling of mails, or, if the space were not 
needed now, it could be reserved for future enlargement. To squeeze the Washing- 
ton city post-office into a structure of the shape and size of the proposed plan is not 
bettering the postal service, and before the building could be completed the subject 
would be up again from the pressure of actual needs and compel the consideration 

that could be more wisely given to-day. 

Square teet 

The Washington City post-office now occupies on the first floor about 10, 000 

The new site offers on the first floor (estimated) ' 10,198 

The new site offers on four floors (estimated) 40,800 

The actnal needs to-day are 60,000 

The actual needs in five ;ears will probably be 100,000 

It is already admitted by niany that the proposed new building is too small, and 
that '* it is only a ^ginning,'' and that the remainder of the block can or ** ought to 
be secured." If this is actually done the entire area would be 36,417 square feet, and 
calculating at the same ratio of cost for the proposed building under the House bill, 
the total cost of the lot would be about $900,000, and of building, $2,500,000, or a 
total of $3,400,000. The rental, calculated at 5 per cent., would be $170,000. 

The following table shows the sizes and annual gross receipts of various post- 
offices: 



Square feet. 



Gross receipts. 



PbiUd6lpli]A.Pa.. 

CliieaKQ,lll 

Cfaichuisti.Oblo. 
8l Louis. Mo 



LoaisTille. Ky . 
WsshingtoB ... 



68,663 
54,533 
51.900 
38,250 
35,160 
33,686 
20,000 



$2,122,667 

2, 053, 001 

794, 286 

1, 058, 497 

1, 064, 352 

307, 268 

390.209 



The free matter handled at the Washington city post-office would nearly double 
the amount stated if postage were paid, so that office space at least equal to the 
building at Cincinnati wonld be required. 



106 REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

Valuable and suggestive infonnafion is contaiaed in the following reply to inquir- 
ies addressed to the Supervising Architect : 

' Treasury Departbcbnt, 

Office of the Supbrvisino Architect, 

WaahingUm, D. C, ApHl 10, 1890. 
Hon. John Wanamaker, PoatmoBter-Qmierah WoBhingUm, D. C: 

Sib : Please Hud ttcoompanying estimates requested. 
First. To erect adjoining the preseut Post-Omce building an additional 
bnilding covering lot bounded by Eighth, Ninth, E, and F streets, con- 
nected with present building, as one structure $2,500,000 

Second. To erect a city post-offloe building on squares numbers 323 and 349, 
bounded by Pennsylvania avenue, C, Tenth^ and Twelfth streets, with 
85,000 square feet first floor area, main portion of building a one-story 
structure, with two and three story sections only on principal street fronts, 

constructed of freestone or brick, with stone trimmings 1, 500, 000 

Third. To erect on blocks numbers 323 and 349 a building to accommodate 
city post-office on first floor, and five floors above, each of 90,000 square 

feet area 3,600,000 

Fourth. For buildings on squares 323, 324, 349, and 350, Department bnild- 
ing facing Pennsylvania avenue, basement and four stories, with 90,000 
square feet floor area, and a one-story city post-office building in rear 

with 90,000 square feet floor area 3,000,()00 

The above estimates are exclusive of cost of site. * 
Respectfully yours, 

Ja8. H. Wixdrim, 
Supervising Architect, 

It is apparent that the outlay for extending the Department building on the block 

adjoining the present building would be as per estimated |3, 400, 000 

The new city post-office in its proposed form would cost 1, 075, 000 

When extended over the full block 3,400,000 

The city post-office and Department building could be combined at Ninth and F 
streets, or upon anew location, for but little more than the outlay for the post-office 
alone that will ultimately be necessary at Pennsylvania avenue, if the House bill 
becomes a law. 

The question has arisen as to the actual size of the lot referred to in the House bill 
before the Senate Committee, and the following letter (A) from the Supervising Archi- 
tect has been called out, to which is added a copy of a letter (B) to the Hon. 8. L. 
Milliken,Chairman of the House Committee, written by the Supervising Architect on 
January 27, 1890, giving the sizes of certain drawings that do r^t seem to have been 
designed for the area of the lot named in the House bill : 

(A) 

Treasury Department, 
Office of the Supervising Architkct, 

Waahingt^, D, C, April 12, 1890. 
The honorable the Postmabter-General: 

Sir: Please find herewith the areas of the lot of the proposed site for the Washing- 
ton City post-office: 

First. Lot bounded by Pennsylvania avenue, Ninth street, and C street, by the 
Washington Safe-Deposit Company's building on the west ; number of square feet, 
10,198. (Total area to bnilding line.) 

Second. Area of entire block bounded by Ninth street, Tenth street, Pennsylvania 
avenue and C street ; number of square feet, 33,882. (Total area to building line.) 
BespectfuUy, yourS| 

Jas. H. Windrim, 
Supervieing Architeoi, 



THE P. O. DEPARTMENT AND CITY P. O. BUILDINGS. 107 

(B) 

Trkasury Department, 
Ofpics of the Supervising Architect, 

WaahingUm, D. C, January 27, 1890. 
Hon. 8KTR L. MiLiJKVX, 

HouM of Bepresentatives, Waahingtan, D. C: 
Sir: Referring to yoor oonversatiop at this office on Saturday, and in complianoe 
with your verbal re<^uest, I have the honor to state that the piano for the proposed ' 
poet-office building m this city, which yoa handed me, show 14,116 sqaare feet of 
floor area for the post-office working room on the first floor, with 5,26d sqnare feet of 
floor area for pnblio lobbies, halls, etc. ; a basement to be used for heating apparatus; 
the second story for the carriers' division ; the third story for the mailing division ; 
and the fourth story for mail-bag repair shop ; giving the aggregate qf abont 78,000 

2:nare feet of floor area for the four floors; with closets and lavatories on each floor; 
so two passenger and two freight elevators ; and from computations made in this 
office it is found that such a building can be erected for about $800,000. . 
The drawings above referred to are herewith returned. 

In this connection I may state that from the information received there are three 
hundred and eighteen persons employed io the post-office, and the post-office build- 
ing now occnpied has a total floor area of about 20,000 square feet. 
Respectfully yours, 

Jas. H. Windrim, 
Supervising Architect, 

Inasmuch as I have been requested to give my opinion fully on this subject I 
would say that I believe, in view of the facts submitted, that it would be best to ap- 
point a commission, consisting of the chairman of the Committee on Publi&Buildings 
and Qronnda of the Senate, the chairman of the Committee on Public Buildings and 
Grounds of the House of Representatives, and the Postmaster-General, which commis- 
sion, or a majority of its members, shall be authorized to select and purchase a site 
for the building or buildings necessary to the city post-office and the Post-Office De- 
I»artment, and that said commission be instructed to report their action to Congress 
within three months from the passage of the bill 



Appendix F. 



LETTER OF MB. WILLIAM POTTER RELATING TO THE ESTABLISHMENT 
OF OCEAN POST-OFFICES. 

Washington, D. C, June 18, 1890. 

Sir : As per yoar letter of instmctions, dated Janaary 2, 1890, aiitliorizing me to 
enter into negotiations with the antborities of the English^ FrencU, and German 
Governments, with a view of establishing marine or sea post-offices on transatlantic 
mail steam-ships, I proceeded to London, leaving New York January 4, by Cnnard 
steam-ship Jfftruria. Upon my arrival in London I forwarded my crediting letter 
from the Secretary of State to Hon. Robert Lincoln, American minister, asking him 
to deliver my credentials from you to the postmaster-general of Great Britain, to ar- 
range for an appointment. The favor of an immediate interview was granted, and 
the entire qaestion of sea post-offices between New York, Qaeenstown, and Liverpool 
was laid before the English post-office department. 

After many interviews, lengthy correspondence, and careful research into the sub- 
ject, the English postmaster-general reported that, owing to the mail from New York 
being discharged at Queenstown,and assorted in transit on train and boat to London, 
ther^ appeared to be no appreciable advantage to be gained in establishing sea post 
service. They presented me the estimate of the Cunard and White Star Steam-ship 
Companies for the cost of a semi-weekly service amounting annually to £26,442, or 
$128,772.54 (see Exhibit A), and stated that while they could appreciate the saving 
of such a service to our Department, we having no port of entry corresponding to 
Qneenstown, it was however no advantage to them ; but as an earnest of their desire 
to see established between the United States and Great Britain a parcel-post system, 
they submitted a proposition (see lettersof Sir Arthur Blackwood, dated March 21, 1890, 
marked Exhibits B and C) offering to contribute £5,935 10«., or $28,905.88 annually 
to the cost of the sea post-offices, it being a condition, however, that we adopt the 
parcel-post. While I bad no power or desire to discuss this new question, which 
brought in tariff complications, I have submitted the papers concerning the subject, 
marking them Exhibit D. 

I proceeded thence to Paris, and through Hon. Whitelaw Reid, American minister, 
presented my credentials and arranged for an interview with the minister of com- 
merce and industry and the director-general of posts and telegraphs in France. The 
question of the advantage to be obtained by both countries in the establishment of 
the sea post-offices between New York and Havre was carefully, and I think forcibly, 
placed before the French department. After investigating the matter thoroughly 
and receiving an estimate of the cost of a' weekly service on the General Trans- 
atlantic Company amounting to 166,100 ftancs, |32,057.30 annually (see Exhibit £), 
the French director-general reported that while there would be a considerable time 
saved to them in the adopting of this service, it would require legislative authority 
for the necessary appropriation, and that their tenure of office being at all times un- 
certain, they did not care in the beginning of their administration to incur the risk 
of unpopularity in asking for an additional appropriation for this service. They 
would therefore postpone the subject for the present, hoping later to take it np and 
oondnot the same to a favorable termination. 
108 



OCEAN POST-OFFICES — LETTER OF MR. POTTER. 109 

Proceeding to Berlin and arranging for InteryiewB tbrongh Hon. William Walter 
Phelps, American minister, I was gratified to find that the (German Government was 
not only favorably inclined bnt most anxious to establish the marine post-offices be- 
tween New York, Bremen, and Hamburg. In their communication to your Depart- 
ment, dated Berlin, September 13, 1889, they stated that they had entered into pre- 
liminary arrangements with the North German Lloyd and the Hamburg- American 
Steam-ship Company, according to which these companies will place at the disposal 
of the postal adminintration on each steamer a space of 10 square meters, 107.58 
square feet, which should be arranged in such a manner as to provide office-room for 
the distribution of the mall and a place for the officials to 4leep. For furnishing 
these spaces and for the conveyance and board of the officials the company to receive 
for each round trip 225 marks, $535.50. If the steamer carries a sea post-office only 
in one direction, however, half that amount will be paid to the company. 

I stated to the imperial secretary of state of Germany that these figures, though, 
satisfactory to the Geru^n post-office, would not for a momeot be entertained by you, 
and that (see your letter of November 8, 1889) you had stated that while you fully 
appreciated the advantage of the sea post-offices as to expediting the delivery of 
articles in the two countries, you were of the opinion that the rate named ^as en- 
tirely too high, and that yon felt satisfied that the transatlantic companies will be 
disposed to furnish facilities for sea post-offices at more reasonable and equitable rates 
of compensation, and to that end had commissioned me to seethe German post-office 
department and to endeavor through them to accomplish the desired result. The 
German officials, while not hopeful of being able to obtain any satisfactory results, 
named the Messrs. Fritsch and Kratke as their commissioners to accompany myself 
as the representative of your Department, and visit the directors of the North Ger- 
man Lloyd at Bremen and the Hamburg- American Steam-ship Company at Hamburg, 
and to endeavor to obtain from them a more favorable estimate of the cost for this 
new ^rvice. I have great satisfaction in saying that the result of our interview was 
to obtain in writing (see Exhibits F and G) from the directors of both steam-ship 
companies an agreement to make the cost of furnishing space and conveyance and 
board of two International officials 1,500 marks a round trip, this amount being 33} 
per cent, less than the oflfer of 2,250 marks which had been accepted as perfectly 
satisfactory on the part of the German post-office. (See their letter to you dated 
September 13, 1890.) 

According to the memorandum made by the Gkrman secretary of state and 
marked Exhibit H, the total cost of a semi-weekly service on the German steamers 
will be 242,288 marks, $57,008.94 per annum, or 121,144 marks or $28,504.47 for 
each country ; and for a tri-weekly service, which is much preferred by the Grerman 
Government, 363,432 marks, $85,513.41, or to each country 181,716 marks, $42,756.70. 
These figures are supposed to include every expense, and should be about the total 
cost of the service. In the appointment of officials, in order to avoid any future 
complications, it is suggested that international sea post-offices be established; 
the officials, one-half American and one-half German, to be appointed as interna- 
tional officers, and the total expense of the service to be divided equally between the 
two Departments* 

The imperial secretary of state of the German Empire, Dr. Yon Stephan, supple- 
ments the negotiations with a final letter to you, dated 17th of May, 1890 (see Ex- 
hibit I), in which he expresses the hope that the sea post-office service may speedily be 
inaugurated, as he is positive that it will not only save time and money to both de- 
partments, bnt that it will be a mutual advantage, '' and greatly facilitating and 
improving communication between the United States and Germany,'' and therefore 
be the means of bringing the countries nearer together in peace and unity. 
I have the honor to be, with great respect, your obedient servant, 

William Pottkil 

Hon. John Wanamaksr, 

FoMtmaaier-Qeuaralf WoMngUm^ Z>. C. 



Appendix G. 



ABOUMEVT FOB THE LIMITED POST AH D TELEGRAPH. 

Office of the Postmaster-Oexerai., 

Washington, D.<f,, September 25, 1890. 
Hod. Henry H. Bixqham, ChairmaHf 

AKD GeNTLEMBX OF THE COMltflTTEE: 

Dbab Sirs : Yonr suboommittee on postal telegraph informs me that all the parties 
that have signified a desire to be heard on the postal-telegraph bills have submitted 
their testimony, and that it is in order for me to add anything apon the subject. 

After standing for a year past in the midst of the controTersy over postal telegraph 
that for over forty years has gone on with sharper tone and widening range, I am 
more than evet convinoed of the wisdom and practicability of restoring the tele- 
graph to the postal service and make it what it was originally intended to be, a part 
of the postal system. I say this after closely studying the arguments against the 
bill, made so vigorously, by the great telegraph company which is now its only visible 
opponent. I do not believe it possible to argue this question down. There is a 
deep and far- reaching conviction among the people that the telegraph service is by 
right a part of the postal service. To carry the postal system from pony-riders to 
stage-coach, and on to railroad service, and to stop'all further progress because three 
thousand owners of telegraph stock oppose, is not in accord with the genius of oar 
people pr the spirit of the times. 

The will of the people in this respect has manifested itself unmistakably before 
Congress in public speech and statement during the last twenty years. Resistance 
to that great popular demand may not be the wisest thing, noi' is it fair to count 
those who urge the adoption in some form or other of the postal telegrapluas hostile 
to existing corporations. We stand confronting a public measure of no mean impor- 
tance or magnitude. It is to give the country a vast enlargement of its postal system 
and to bring home to the people the cheap use of one of the most powerful agencies of 
modem commerce and civilization. 

Though the literature of this subject is already large 1 desire to touch upon a few 
points that I have in mind, and leave with you for publication, if you deem it ad- 
visable, certain appendices which I hope will be of value both to the advocates and 
opponents of the limjted postal telegraph. This discussion, 1 honestly believe^must go 
on until the whole scheme is fully understood, and then wiU come the adoption of the 
people's postal telegraph. I feel certain that the people will not be turned back from 
their purpose to qaicken and cheapen their methods of communication, and I mean to 
help them by every means at my command. 

AS TO THE CONSTITUTIONALITY OF POSTAL TELEGRAPHY. 

It has been argued by learned lawyers for a score of years that a Government tele- 
graph is unconstitutional. The motives of these gentlemen have been one of two 
in all cases. They have been the paid attorneys of those corporations whose special 
interests have demanded that their monopolies should in no way be interfered with. 
110 



LIMITED POSTAL TELEGRAPH. Ill 

They hare known their business and hare done it' well. The other opponents were 
those who imagined that the Constitution wonld be exposed to every sort of outrage 
if they were to fall sick for a day. The conrts of highest appeal have settled this 
question. Congress settled it, in advance of jadicial action, by making the United 
States the owner, and the Post-Office Department the manager, of the first line of wire 
constracted for commercial and public uses. The old Grovernment telegraph schemes 
were oonstitutionaL What shall be said, then, of the limited postal telegraph plan, 
which I have been somewhat criticised for bringing forward f There is no doubt that 
it is constitutional. The Constitution permits the Qeneral Gk>vemment to transmit 
intelligence for the people. The Post-Office Department has been doing this, with the 
money and the improvements at its disposal, for one hundred years. It is preposter- 
ous to argue that the telegraph ought not to be utilized for the cheaper, speedier, 
and more aconrate transmission of messages. I have had prepared, and submit for 
your reference. Appendix F, which touches upon this consideration. The Assistant 
Attorney-General fbr the Department assures me that the conclusion that the limited 
postal telegraph plan is constitutional can not be resisted. 

THB DEMAND FOB POSTAL TELEGRAPHT. 

It will be said that the discussion of this question during the present session and 
for the past thirty-five years is all to no purpose because there-is no demand for 
postal telegraphy. It has been said over and over again that the service furnished 
by the telegraph Companies in this country is cheap enough and efficient enough. It 
has been said that only a million of people in this'Country use^ihe telegraph anyway, 
and that the number would not be greater, even if the rates were only one-half as 
high. All of these things are simply not true. The telegraph service is not fully ef- 
ficient. It is too high priced ; and it can easily be shown, moreover, and shown by 
figures which have been gathered from the telegraph business, as well as from other 
innovations of a similar nature, that the number of persons using the telegraph wonld 
double and treble very speedily. 

One of the most effective early advocates of postal telegraphy was Postmaster-Gren- 
eral CrosweU. He said in 1872 : 

'*I did not take my position until after repeated solicitation from people of all 
grades of society : some rich, some poor; some men in business, and some in social 
life ; some from t ne East, and some from the West ; nor until Congress itself had in- 
augurated and carried on two or three able and laborious investigations." 

In 1879 Hon. Benjamin F. Butler, then a member of the House of Representatives, 
represented that petitions from twenty -eight States and three Territories, containing 
many thousands of names, had been referred in 1875 to the Judiciary Committee of the 
House, of which Ckneral Butler was then chairman. These urged that the Govern- 
ment should then build a telegraph. It is to be noticed, indeed, that both these move- 
ments for postal telegraphy were intended to secure the larger scheme, which either 
built or bought lines. The limited plan, the modest, harmless experiment, I think I 
am right in saying, might have been ten times more widely supported. 

In February of this year I was much gratified to receive a letter upon the postal 
telegraph question from Messrp. Ralph Beaumont and J. J. Holland, members of the 
national legislative committee of the Knights of Labor. These gentlemen, after 
describing the introduction of postal telegraph bills into the last Congress by Rep- 
resentatives Smith, of Wisconsin, and Glover, of Missouri, and reciting further that 
the Glover bill was re-introdnced into the present Congress by Representative Wade« 
of Missouri, said that their organization "at the last session presented Congress with 
petitions containing upwards of 500«000 signatures in favor of this measure. " They 
went on to say with reference to the present postal telegraph discussion : 



112 REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

'^It is thA intention of oar orj^anization and the Farmers' Alliance and Indnn- 
trial Union to send ont petitions to the people for their signatni'es in favor of the 
measure, and we feel that we shall within the next ninety days be able through the 
two organizations to present to Congress petitions containing upwards of two million 
signatures." 

Mr. Beaumont, who represented the legislative committee of the Knights of Labor 
at the hearings given by your committee, gave, on March 7, 1890, a brief history of 
the efforts of his order in behalf of postal telegraphy. He said that Representative 
Smith, of Wisconsin, had prepared a bill which had been supported by the signatures 
of 530, 000. Knights of Labor, as the records of the centrid office of the order would 
show. The smallest number of names from any Congressional district was 34, from 
the Third Mississippi ; the largest number was 7,174, from the Thirteenth Pennsyl- 
vania, which embraces the Schnylkill County mining district, and was represented by 
Mr. Brumm. This bill, according to Mr. Beaumont, was lost in the committee. A. 
compromise measure, prepared after conferences with Representative Raynor, of 
Maryland, was lost in the calendar, '< which,'' Mr. Beaumont adds with pathetic good 
nature, " under the rules that governed the House during the past two Congresses 
seems to have been a sort of potter's field for legislation." Mr. Beaumont added later, 
in the hearing of March 7, that since the collection of the 530,000 signatures the 
organization of the Knights of Labor had spent f31,000 in public lectures through- 
out the country. Postal telegraphy was the question discnssed ; and he went on : 
'* This fall we have- formed an alliance with another large body of the industrial 
people, the National Farmers' Alliance and Indnstrial Union. For the past ten days 
that organization has been sending blank petitions to over one thousand of their 
branches daily, and expect to keep it up for ten more days." Mr. Beaumont con- 
cluded by saying that he thought when these returns came in the question whether 
the public mind was awakened to the demand for postal telegraphy would be effect- 
ually answered. 

The members of your honorable committee will recall the testimony of an un- 
doubted expert in telegraph matters, Mr. D. H. Bates, lately president of the Balti- 
more diid Ohio Telegraph Company, upon this same query, whether better telegraph 
facilities are demanded. Mr. Bates described, in his testimony of March 4, 1H90, 
how the Baltimore and Ohio Com'pany had adopted a partial mail service, by which 
a considerable telegraph business w^ created among 10,000 telephone subscribers 
within a reasonable radius of Boston. A lower rate for night messages was charged, 
and a lower rate where the messages could be delivered through the free delivery 
post-offices. Here was positive proof that extra facilities meant extra business. Mr. 
Bates declared, indeed, that these customers con Id always be counted upon; those 
disgnsted with the delays and mistakes of the Western Union, those who desired a 
quick service when the monopolist lines are full, and those who believed in competi- 
tion as a proper means of resentment. Mr. Bates, who has followed the postal tele- 
graph discussions of the past twenty-five years, added that there was no doubt that 
the people demanded a cheaper telegraph service ; the effective objection had always 
been that the plans most numerously brought forward involved either the purchase 
or the building of the lines and the employment by the Government of a great force 
of civil servants. These objections, as I shall beg the liberty of pointing out later on, 
are obviated by the present proposition. 

I have mentioned evidences that the agricultural and industrial masses of the peo- 
ple want the telegraph service within their reach. The measureless body of pro- 
ducers, in order not to be manipulated and robbed by the speculators, need to be 
nearer to the consumers ; and the measureless body of consumers, in order not to be 
manipulated and robbed by the same speculators, need to be nearer to the producers. 
I have referred to the fact that an acknowledged telegraph expert has proved that 
cheaper telegraph service has been demanded. I beg to give yon a further illustration 
of the demand for a cheaper and a better service in the statements and memorials 
of the business men. It is weU known that boards of trade and chambers of com- 



UMITEO POSTAL TELEGRAPH. 



113 



meroe of the oonntry have penistently tricld to push forward postal telegraphy. The 
leader in this movement hns been the National Board of Trade, which embraces the 
following commercial organisations: 



Baltimore Board of Trade. 
Baltimore Com and Flonr Exchange. 
Boston Merchants' Association. 
Bridgeport Board of Trade. 
Chicago Board of Trade. 
Cincinnati Chamber of Commeroe. 
Detroit Board of Trade. 
Indianapolis Board of Trade. 
Milwankee Chamber of Commerce. 
Milwaukee Merchants' Association. 
Minneapolis Board of Trade. 



New Haven Chamber of Commerce. 
New York Board of Trade and Transpor- 
tation. 
New York Chamber of Commeroe. 
Philadelphia Board of Trade. 
Portland (Oregon) Board of Trade. 
Providence Board of Trade. 
8au Francisco Chamber of ComYuerce. 
Scrauton Board of Trade. 
St. Paal Chamber of Commerce. 
Trenton Board of Trade. 



I received during the spring and sammer, without any effort on my own part, the 
memorials of some twenty-five or thirty boards of trade and chambers of commeroe 
from various parts of the country, supporting the limited plan which I had the honor 
to submit to you early in the session. I have added these in the Appendix (B), which 
the incredulous may peruse. These demands of the business men show beyond dis- 
pute, it seems to me, that the much-vaunted infinitesimal portion of the community 
which uses the telegraph wants a better and cheaper service. Another evidence, and 
one quite an conclusive, appears In the record of bills, resolutions, and memorials pre- 
sented to Congress during the past twenty-five years. A record of these appears in 
Appendix G. The measures therein enumerated would not have been brought for- 
ward except in obedience to a popular desire for reform. The array of facts and the 
association of names set forth in this plain, unvarnished list are,. as it seems to me, 
of striking significance. 

I beg to call your attention to another thing, perhaps the most encouraging of all 
to the friends of postal telegraphy. It is the strong indorsement of the press of the 
country. Of two hundred and eighty-nine newspaper articles which have come to 
my notice during this discussion two hundred and nine are for postal telegraphy and 
eighty against it. I have had equal pleasure in offering the unfavorable and the 
fkvorabld. The objections raised to the adverse criticisms show how little the writers 
are acquainted with the plan. The objections, in other words, are mostly smartly- 
turned sentences about the utter business inexperience of persons engaged in trade. 
In a second appendix (K) occur press opinions collected during the time of the great 
telegraph strike in 1883. I ask you to look these over. They show, as it seems to me, 
not only how quickly the popular pulse betrays the fever of business and industrial 
excitement, but also how powerful the press is when it is united, earnest, and honest. 
Nine-tenths of the favorable clippings support the general or Government scheme. 
How much more strongly wonld they nrge the limited! 



WHY TBB SERYICB 18 HIOH-PRICED AND INDIFFERENT. 

It was well said by one of the earliest and ablest advocates of postal telegraphy 
that cheapened intelligence was wanted and that competition only could cheapen 
intelligence; that there were men who were ready under permission to attempt to 
cheapen it ; and that the authority was wanted simply to prevent interference by 
means of or throngh instrumentalities that were against it. The telegraph service 
is high-priced and indifferent becanse it is a monopoly. *' It is no secret," said a circu- 
lar recently issued by certain prominent members of New York Chamber of Commerce, 
** that the excessive charges for telegraph servjce (excessive as compare<l with its actual 
cost) are necessary to pay dividends upon capital stock watered several hundred per 
cent, over aotnal investments.'' '* All attempts at competition,'' the circular added, 
"have failed, only resulting in the absorption of a rival and a new watering of stock." 

Mr. Gardiner G. Hubbard, whom oar friend Mr. Marat Halstead, lately nominated 
F M a 90: 8 



il4 REPORT OF THE POSTMASTEE-GENERAJ4. 

for miDiBter to Germany^ calls ''an amasing old gentlemani*' quoted as early as 1874 
the following extract from an annual report of the Western Union Telegraph Com- 
pany: 

''The extension of competing lines has ceased, and it is not believed that the cap- 
ital can be found for any now enterprises. The time is not distant, therefore, when 
the Western Union Telegraph Company will be substantially without a competitor in 
the conduct of this business.'' 

Mr. Hubbard, by the way, is not exactly " an amusing old gentleman !" He niay 
not be young; but he is not to blame for that. There is nothing improper in his 
advocacy of postal telegraphy. He did it ten years before he was rich in telephone 
dividends. ^ He has always urged a reduction of telephone prices. He is an authority 
on postal telegraphy in this country, and he will soon see it a realized fact. 

In 1B84 Senator Edmunds, of Vermont, discussing the Dawes and the Edmunds 
postal telegraph bills, said among other things : 

'* The only difference (between a Government telegraph and a private telegraph com- 
pany) would be that whereas the private company may be squeezed by cutting 
rates; may be frozen out, or bought up, or pooled with, so as to create an actuiQ 
monopoly by which not only the prices of intelligence, but what kind of intelligence 
shall go, and when it shall go, and under whose control, is made the subject of one 
doiiiinatioii — the only difference will be that whereas they can treat and deal with 
rival companies, they can not treat and £K>o1 with and cut rates and run Congress out, 
and that is just where the rub really is, I suppose." 

About the same time another unquestioned authority said : 

**The Western Union Company is a little corporation controlled by an executive 
committee of three or four gentlemen sitting in their offices in New York. Its wires 
run all over the country, extending by their cc^nections into each port of the globe. 
Tliis company controls the market price of each article that is dealt in in every mart 
in this country. It controls, to a greater or less ext'Ont, all the news— social, political, 
and general— that is sent over its wires, and every important personal telegraphic 
communication. This corporation is uncontrolled by any law save the interests of 
it<s directors, for there is no law on our statute-books to regulate this vast business. 
The laws of the several States have no powei^to regulate it, for its lines and business 
run from one State and one continent to another, and the instant its lines pass from 
one State into another they are beyond the reach of the laws of the iirst State, which 
are powerless beyond its boundaries, and can not regulate any message going into 
another State." 

In the present discussion Mr. F. B. Thurber, of New York, has given a list of the 
directors of the Western Union Telegraph Company. I beg to append their names: 

Norvin Green. George J. Gould. John Hay. 

Thomas T. Eckert. Edwin Gould. William D. Bishop. 

John T. Terry. John G. Moore. Collis P. Huntington. 

John Vanhorne. Cyrus W. Field. George B. Roberts. 

Jay Gould. Henry Weaver. Sidney Shepard. 

Russell Sage. Percy R. Pyne. Erastus Wiman. 

Alonzo B. Cornell. Charles Lanier. William W. Aator. 

Sidney Dillon. Austin Corbin. Chauncey M. Depew. 

Samuel Sloan. J. Pierpont Morgan. James W. Cleudenin. 

Robert C. Clowry. Frederick L, Ames. Henry M. Flagler. 

Mr. Thurber used this list of names to answer the question why the public can not 
have the great boon of a postal telegraph. "No such list of names," he added, "can 
be found in the directory of any other corporation in this country. Every name rep- 
resents some great interest. They are the richest and the best in the financial world. 
They deservedly rank as our best citizens ; their names are found scattered through- 
out the religious and charitable world, but in the matter of transmitting intelligence 
their interest diverges from that of tlie general public and it remains to be seen 
whether sixty-five millions of people, pr the comparatively few stockholders which 
these men represent, will be able to control the great force of electricity as applied 
to the transmission of intelligence." 

According to uncontroverted statements made before yonr honorable committee 
the capital stock of the Western Union Telegraph Company in 1858 was $358,700. 



LIMITED POSTAL TELEGRAPH, 115 

The ntook dividends decUred between 1858 and 1^ amoant^ to $17,810,146, and the 
stock issued for new lines was $1,937,950 ; so^ that the capital stock on July 1, 1866^ 
was 1^, 133,800. In 1866 new stock was created to the amount of $20,450,500 ; so that 
the total capital of the Western Union on the Ist of July, 1867, was $40,568,300. The 
largest dividend declared by the company up to 1874 was 414 per cent. The largest 
amount of stock ever divided at one time was $10,000,000, and for a period of seven 
years the dividends were about 100 per cent, a year on its average capital. It was 
by adding dividends to dividends, and by piling the one up on top of the other that 
this tremendous amount of $46,000,000 of capital and debt was created. The history 
of the company shows no change of policy. In 1874 the company bought up its own 
stock and the stock of other telegraph companies and accumulated a fqnd of over 
$15,000,000, which was held in one shape or another in the treasury of the company. 
An investment of $1,000 in 1858 in Western Union stock would have received up to 
the present time stock dividends of more than $50,000 and cash dividends equal to 
$100,000, or 300 per. cent, of dividends a year. These have been some of the dividends 
declared : In 1862, 27 per cent.; in 1863, 100 per cent.; in 1H64, 100 per cent.; in 1878, 
$6,000,000; in 1881, one of $15,000,000 and another of $4,300,000 ; in 1886, 25 per cent. 
The Western Union plant, exclusive of its contracts with railroads, could be dupli- 
cated for $35,006,000. Its present capital is $85,960,000. It has realized $100,000,000 
of net profits in twenty-five years by its high charges. 

Dr. Norvin Green, president of the Western Union Telegraph Company, has made 
some significant admissiene. He says that in 1868 the average profit to the company 
upon each message was 41 cents; in 1878 the average profit was 13 cents; between 
1878 and 1883 the business increased from 24,000,000 to over 41,000,000 of messages; 
the largest yearly profit of the company was realized in 18d3, unless the present year 
should hhow a larger. The average profit per message since 1878 has been about 7^ 
cents. This is pretty fair. The annnal number of messages increased iirom 6,400,000 
in 1H68 to 54,100,000 in 1889. This is a pretty fair business, too. 

"The great question,'-' said Congressman Raynor, discussing the Glover telegraph 
bill at the last Congress, " that underlies the discussion of this measure, is whether 
we are not in the hands of a monopoly that not only has the right to fix Its charges 
arbitrarily, bnt can crush opposition whenever it encounters it. Of all these monop- 
olies, I submit that the telegraph system of this country, substantially owned and 
controlled by one man, is the worst and most dangerous of them all." '^ It is no 
longer safe or expedient," Mr. Raynor went on, ''to intrust into the hands of one 
overpowering monopoly the telegraph business of this country. It is a power that 
not only can be used, but has been perverted, for purposes hostile to the best interests 
of the people; the markets of the country, its finances, and its commercial interests 
to so large an extent depend upon the honest and honorable administration of the 
business of this company that the people are not in a mood to repose a trust of thia 
character any longer without competition in the hands of a stock-jobbing corpora- 
tion.'' 

WHAT THE LIMITED PLAN 18. 

I have tried to show that the telegraph service of this country ought to be cheaper 
and not inaccessible to the people. Business men genefally, and the industrial and 
farming classes, too, demand that the service shall be more efl^cient as well as cheaper. 
The ordinary opposition, which under the direction of competent men would bring 
prices down and make the service quicker and more accurate, has been tried a score 
of times and it has always failed. There is practically bnt one telegraph company in 
this country to-day. , I say this because the Postal Telegraph Company has an ar- 
rangement with the Western Union by which prices are to be kept up. What, then, 
is to be done abont itT The Government, which has not hesitated to use the stage 
ooach and the railroad train for its mail service, must come to the rescue. The ex' 
periment most not tax a large number for the benefit of a few. It must not, there- 



116 REPORT OP THE POSTM ISTER-GENERAL. 

fore, involve any addition to oar immenae standing army of civil employes ; it mu«t 
not involve any large appropriations. It mast be a carefal, inexpensive experiment ; 
then it will be a most beneficent established institation. I say this with entire con- 
fidence, because progress does not go backwards, whatever the obstructionists may 
say. I shall ask you now to consider for a moment a detailed description of the limite<l 
postal telegraph plan which I brought to yonr notice early in the session, and which, 
with such modifications as the experience and judgment of experts have brought 
about, I now urge with more earnestness and confidence than ever. 

The bill is '' to establish a limited post and telegraph service " ** for the purpose of 
facilitating the transmission of correspondence among the people of and promoting 
commerce between the several States and Territories of the United States," to be 
a bureau of the Post-Otflce Department for the deposit, transmission, and delivery 
of postal telegrams through the postal service. All post-offices where the free- 
delivery service now exists, and the offices of the telegraph companies with which 
contracts would be made, would be postal telegraph stations. In addition, the Post- 
master-General would be empowered to designate from time to time other post-offices 
as postal telegraph offices. He is directed by the bill, after inviting proposals by 
public advertisement, to contract with one or more telegraph companies now in 
existence or that may become incorporated, for a period of t«n years, for the trans- 
mission of postal telegrams on conditions and at rates of tolls set forth in the bill. 
Rates may be reduced by the consent of both parties to the contracts at any time 
during the continuance of the contracts. Postal telegrams are to be sent in the 
order of filing, except that Government telegrams take precedence. As with the 
mails no liability is to attach to the Post-Offioe Department on account of delays or 
errors. The charges for the collection, transmission, and delivery of postal telegrams 
other than postal money-order and special-delivery telegrams and Government tele- 
grams I give briefly as follows : 

For twenty words between stations within a State or Territory, or between sta- 
tions 300 miles apart or less, 15 cents; for twenty words between stations in the States 
of Wisconsin, Illinois, Connecticut, Tennessee, and Mississippi, and the States east 
of them, 25 cents; for twenty words between stations in the States of Minnesota, 
Iowa, Missouri, Arkansas, and Louisiana, and points west of them, 25 cents; for 
twenty words between stations in States forming, generally speaking, zones up and 
down on both sides of the Mississippi, 25 cents; for twenty words between any two 
stations not above provided for, 50 cents ; for all words in excess of the first twenty, 
1 cent per word ; prepayment of replies to be made at the office from which the orig- 
inal telegVam is transmitted. 

It is provided in the bill that the money-order service of the Post-Office Depart- 
ment shall be extended to designate postal telegraph money-order offices under the 
usual method and under the usual fees now charged by postmasters. The contract- 
ing telegraph companies are to have aU the revenue from this postal telegraph serv- 
ice except the usual rate of letter-postage for each telegram, which is to be reserved 
to the Department. All the accounts for the telegraph service are to be kep^ as the 
postal accounts are kept by the Auditor of the Treasury for the Post-Office Depart- 
ment. Tho Postmaster- General may provide suitable space in post-offices for the use 
of the telegraph companies, though nothing in the act prevents the telegraph com- 
panies from maintaining offices of their own, or permits the telegraph companies to 
compel the Postmaster-General to furnish space in post-offices. The companies em- 
ploy at their own expense all officers, operators, and employ^ for the transmission of 
the telegrams. If any postmasters act as operators, they are to be compensated by a 
uniform percentage on the tolls of all telegrams handled by them, or by some other 
share of these tolls to be paid by the company as the contracting parties may agree. 
Any contracting telegraph company, it is distinctly provided, may do its regular busi- 
ness for the public as at present. Postmasters are to be compensated for the postage 
portion of stamps and telegram forms as they are now compensated for postage on reg- 



LIMITED POSTAL TELEGRAPH. 117 

nlar mail matter. The Postmaster-General sliall provide telegram etamps and tele- 
gram forme. A severe penalty (imprisonment at hard labor for from one to three 
years) is provided for the pmiishment of persohs either in the employ of the telegraph 
companies or of the Post-Office Department who shall secrete or destroy postal tele- 
grams or make known the contents of postal telegrams. All employ^ of the com- 
panies or of the Department are obliged to make oath in the usual way for the faith- 
ful x»erformanoe of their duties. Even without all these safeguards there would be 
no trace of power in the hill for an administration to use for Improper purposes. In 
the intensity of the English elections there has been no trouble from the complete 
Goveisment telegraph ; there could be none at all from the limited undertaking. 
Congress is too watchful and the people too jealous of their rights and too well able 
to resent a wrong. 

But I beg to refer you to Appendix A, which is the bill itself, and respectfully to 
challenge the most critical to find wherein the measure fails to pay due heed to the 
interests of any persons involved in the experiment or in any way affected by it. 

THX OPERATION OF THE PLAN. 

The working of the plan can easily be seen to be most economical as well as most 
convenient. All post-offices and letter-boxes, no matter where they might be located, 
would be utilized by the public as receptacles for postal telegrams, and, as the de- 
mand arose, special boxes might be established for postal telegrams only, from which 
collections might be made more frequently than from .the regular letter-boxes. In 
all or most of the post-offices the wires of the contracting telegraph company would 
be placed, and its operators would transmit the postal telegrams to their destination 
by wire, Just as telegraph companies how transmit their business. With postal tele^ 
grams filed by the senders in person or through the medium of messengers or serv- 
ants, there would be no more delay involved np to the point of reception at the end 
of the line than now occurs in the general telegraph business ; and in case of postal 
telegrams collected from letter-boxes at short intervals, the delay would generally 
be not greater than is now required to go to a Western Union branch office to send 
the telegram. As fast as telegrams were received at the telegraph office of destina- 
tion, they would be ** enveloped " and addressed and a postage-stamp of proper value 
affixed, and they would then be handed over to the post-office by the telegraph com« 
pany for delivery by the regular carrier service. As the business developed and itt 
demands were understood, the intervals between deliveries might easily be shortened. 
In large cities there are regular deliveries leaving the post-office almost every hour. 
In any case the payment otlO cents extra would provide for an immediate special 
delivery in the same manner as a letter is now handled when a special-delivery 
stamp is affixed in addition to the regular postage. No matter how remote post* 
offices might be from postal-telegraph stations, they could always have the advantage 
of the telegraph service forward and backward ; for postal telegrams could always 
bo sent by mail to the nearest telegraph station for transmission thence by wiie to 
their destination, or they could be received by mail from the telegraph stations simi- 
larly. 

It will be observed that postal telegrams would be collected and delivered by 
means of the post-office service and transmitted by wire from point of origin to des- 
tination through the medium of the contracting telegraph company. This company 
would stand in exactly the same relation to the Post-Office Department that a rail- 
road, or steam-ship company, or a stage line or local express company holds which has 
a contract for transporting mail-matter from one city or town to another, or between 
branch post-offices in large cities. In many cases a postal telegram would be col- 
lected, transmitted, and delivered with no more delay than now occurs in the business 
of existing telegraph companies; and in most cases the time consumed in the collection 
and the delivery, especially in respect to postal telegrams passing between distant 
eities or towns, would not affect the value of the communication. Indeed, it is be- 



118 REPORT OP THE POSTMASTEB-GENEBAL. 

lieved a rast amonnt of oorrespoudence now committed to the mails would seek the 
more speedy postal telegraph chaniiol. In each case the Post-Office Department 
wonld earn its postage, while the people would be the better served. The telegraph 
company would be able to do the business at the greatly reduced rates, because it 
could be relieved not only of all the accounting, but of two other important items of 
expense to it, namely, the collection and the delivery of telegrams, which would be 
removed from them entirely, and that, too, without any appreciable additional ex- 
pense to the Department. 

In cases where the amount of business to be done would not justify the telegraph 
company in the maintenance of a separate telegraph staff, the postmaster, if not an 
operator himself, wonld employ an operator, his extra compensation from the tele- 
graph service enabling him to procure such help. In many cases the postmaster's 
assistant, or one of his clerks, would be selected with a view to his ability to tele- 
graph. The result would be that in such cases the telegraph work could be per- 
formed by the postmaster or his assistant, and their compensation thereby be in- 
creased; and where the regular post office duties are so heavy as to preclude 
such joint labors without their undue Interference with each other, the telegraph 
company wonld employ an operat>or to give all of his time to the telegraph. There 
would be no overcharges by thrifty operators. The charges for postal telegrams 
would be easily understood. There are but three separate tariffs named; 15, 25, 
and 50 cents for the first twenty words. One cent per word is charged in all cases 
-for additional words. If an insufficient value of stamps should be affixed, the deficit 
would be collected from addressees, provided at least 15 cents should be prepaid. If 
stamps of a value less than the minimum amonnt (15 cents) were affixed, the com- 
munication could be forwarded by mail. The bill would protect both the Post-Office 
Department and the public, and would provide for a class of correspondence that, 
generally speaking, would not be put upon the wires at the high rates now prevailing. 

I can not be made to believe that this union of the telegraph and the postal serv- 
ice, whereby each would so distinctly lessen the burden of work of the other, will not 
appeal to the ingenuity, the enterprise, and the good sense of the American people the 
moment they understand it. I am sure that it is easily susceptible of proof that this 
convenient, safe, and quick service would be very generally used. We use a postal 
card for brief communications and run the inappreciable risk of having its contents 
become known to persons other than the addressee; by paying twice the price of a 
postal card we can convey a whole ounce of written matter under seal, and by pay- 
ing 10 cents more, we secure an immediate delivery. In the case of the telegraph, it 
is true, there is already a deferred service at night, for which about two-thirds or 
three-fourths of the full rate is charged, depending upon the number of words trans- 
mitted, the delivery being made on the next succeeding business morning; and it has 
beenargned with some show of reason that the small number of night messages com- 
pared with those sent at day rates is evidence that the public demands a quick 
rather than a cheap telegraphic service, and that any effort largely to increase the 
volume of telegraph business by means of much cheaper rates for a deferred service 
would only result In loss, for the reason that the expense of performing that service 
would increase in substantially the same ratio with the volume of business. It is to 
be answered, however, that the small difference between the day rate and the night 
rate is a reason why the latter rate is not used more largely ; and it can not be denied 
that, as between the mail and the telegraph, there is a wide margin of time, particu- 
larly between places or regions, say, 500 miles or more apart, and that an enormous 
amount of correspondence — commercial, social, and political — now sent by mail would 
be put upon the wires if there were suitable conveniences and ample facilities and if 
the cost were not prohibitory or excessive. 

As to the conveniences for collection and delivery, what could be more complete 
than the post-office machinery, already within quick reach of all the people f Noth- 
ing remains but to bring the cost of the service down to a point which will permit 



LIMITED POSTAL TELEGRAPH. 119 

some of this vast volame of basiness to be sent by telegraph. Can this be done f It 
certainly can. Begin in the large cities and commercial centers, where the great bulk 
of the present hnsiness, mail and telegraph, originates. We find that to collect and 
distribnte messages local wires and branch offices are maintained at greatcoat, which, 
added to the cost of messenger service, is estimated to amount to one-fourth or even 
one-third of the whole cost of the servioe ; which average cost is stated in the West- 
ern Union reports to be about 23 cents per message. The Baltimore and Ohio Tele- 
graph Company during the last twelve months of its existence handled seven and a 
half millioDS of telegrams at an average cost of less than 20 cents. The territory 
covered by the lines of that company was limited, however, extending from Portland 
to Chicago, St. Louis, Galveston, and intermediate points, not including certain 
Southern States. If now, therefore, we can cot off the local expenses referred to, we 
have gone a long way towards the desired result. Consider, also, that the general 
expenses of the organization need not be increased (except in an inappreciable 
ratio) in order to provide for the handling of a largely increased volume of busi- 
ness; and also consider the other established fact that the actual cost (for labor; of 
performing a given class of service does not increase in the same proportion as the 
increased business does. A further item of saving is disco.vered in the fact that in 
capital and maintenance account in a large majority of cases this contemplated in- 
crease of business could be handled upon wires which would otherwise be idle at 
times ; bearing- in mind; of course, the fact that in any given direction the time 
would always come when additional facilities would need to be provided. As a rule, 
however, a large increase in the volume of business would serve to utilize many or 
most of the wires when otherwise they would stand idle. We are thus able easily to 
eliminate from the problem before us a considerable percentage of the cost of hand- 
ling telegrams. 

The question arises, would the public be satisfied with a telegraphic service which 
woold not provide, first, immediate delivery ; second, writteu receipt from ad- 
dressee; third, responsibility for damages. As to the first point, it may be remarked 
that the character of the contemplated service is such that a half hour or so at each 
end of the line for 'the post-office service would not be objectionable, while for instance 
twenty-four hours or more, if the mail were used, would be so. The fact would re- 
main, however, that the usnal telegraph service would still be available for business 
demanding more rapid collection and delivery. The plan is intended to take care of 
that class of communications which will stand a delay of an hour or two, but not of 
a whole day or more. 

In regard to the question of a written receipt from addressee, the answer is, that, 
taking the whole volume of post-office matter as now delivered by carriers, the per- 
centage of delivery by responsible carriers is greater than in the case of telegraphic 
messages delivered by irresponsible messenger boys. Suppose a case of a telegram 
arriving at its destined address f The addressee, if present, either receives it in per- 
son or through the medium of a servant, employ^, or agent. Now, whether a receipt 
is given or not, the addressee gets the communication. If, however, the addressee is 
absent or occupied, his servant, employ^, or agent receives the communication, and, 
whether it is receipted for or not, the addressee gets it promptly if his agent performs 
bis duty. The same is also troe of a letter or other communication sent by mail. 
One cause of the present high rates charged for the delivery of telegrams, is the labor 
and time required to obtain written receipts, which, by the way, are now very fre- 
quently supplied by the more or less deft hand of the messenger boy himself for it is 
a isLct that the public considers the giving of a written receipt for a telegram as an 
unnecessary burden and nuisance; and after all, why should one sign such a receipt f 
A telegraph company is bound to deliver a 1 elegram whether a receipt is given or 
not. The public has to pay the extra cost involved, and that, too, with the cer- 
tainty that in the case of a claim for damages the telegraph company would, to that 
extent at least, be protected against the payment of such a claim. Tiie other ^point, 



120 REPORT OP THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

responsibility for damages, is perhaps the most important ; bat yon can not bny 
something for nothing, anO for the class of cbmmunioations under considerution, and 
in view of the gre^t advantages to the public in cheapness and in added convenience, 
it is to be submitted that the telegraph company and the Department may fairly be 
relieved of liability for damages in cases of loss, error, or delay, Just as the Depart- 
ment is now relieved of it in-the transmission of letters. 

IT WOULD PAY THE TELBGBAFH GOMPANDES. 

The strenuous opposition of the telegraph monopoly to the limited post and tele- 
graph plan would seem to indicate that the existing companies, or company, either 
want to sell out to the Government at a watered valuation or else they are not yet 
convinced that the plan would result favorably to them in a financittl way if it were 
tried. For myself I believe that they would make money by the contract; and 
experts who have had experience for twenty-five or thirty years in the telegraph 
business in all its branches— Government, railroad, news, and commercial — ^think that 
if the proposed plan were tried it would immediately become so popular with the 
public that it would very soon, if not from the start, be a remunerative venture to 
those telegraph companies which chose to hold out inducements for this new kind of 
business. It is a universal experience that, in transportation by whatever method, 
lower prices and better facilities bring additional business and increased revenues. 
I find this proposition so evident that it is surprising that any one should seriously 
argue against it. As early as 1872 Mr. William Orton, then the president of the 
Western Union Telegraph Company, gave it as his opinion that the telegraph con- 
tributed far more to the development of the postal service than it drew from it as a 
result of its competition ; which was to say that between any two cities of the 
United States the increase in the correspondence by mail would be in a larger ratio 
than the increase in the correspondence by telegraph, whatever that increase might 
be. Mr. Orton felt sure that the telegraph, so far from detracting from the revenues 
of the Post-Offlce Department, was a constant stimulant to increase the correspond 
ence by mail. 

Can it be seriously stated that the reverse is not true ; that it is not true that an 
increase of the postal business under the plan which I have urged with much per- 
sistence would not inevitably cause an increase in the business of the telegraph com- 
panies? A book full of figures could be produced to show that the successive reduc- 
tions of telegraph rates during the past twenty-five years under the spur of postal 
telegraph discussions have caused unprecedented increases ih the number of messages 
handled from year to year. Dr. Green has said' that the average tolls charged to the 
public in 1887 by the Western Union Telegraph Company were less than half of what 
it cost the company in 1868 to handle the messages. An examination of the business 
of the Western Union Telegraph Company between two periods, 1872 to 1880, and 1881 
to 1889, shows irresistibly that the Western Union has managed to exist under suc- 
cessive reductions of rates and the consequent successive increase of business. From 
1872 to 1880 rates were reduced by the Western Union from 62 to 38 cents, or 42 per 
cent. 

Daring that time the number of messages handled increased from over 12,000,000 
to over 29,000,000, or 140 per cent. In those eight years the profits of the company 
increased from $2,790,000 to $5,833,000, or 105 per cent. This was under the direction 
of Mr. Vanderbilt and Mr. Orton. During the second period, under Mr. Gould and 
Dr. Green, from 1881 to 1889, the Western Union rates were reduced from 38 to 31 
cents, and the number of messages increased from over 32,000,000 to over 58,000,000, 
or 67 per cent. It may be suggested as an objection to this reasoning that in the 
growth of the country is to be fouud the reason for this increased use of the telegraph. 
But the increase of the country in the last decade has been, perhaps, 30 per cent., 
while the increase of the Western Union's business has been almost 100 per cent.; 
and to the whole proposition it is simply to be replied that we have Dr. Green's re- 



LIMITED POSTAL TELEGBAPH. 121 

peated word for it that the class in this ooantry which uses the telegraph is not over 
a xnillion and is not capable of being enlarged. A conservative financial jonrnal in 
New York recently*; commenting upon the latest annoal report of the Western Union 
T«^legraph Company and representing that Western Union stock was a good invest- 
ment at market rates, said : 

" It now carries messages, five a year (on an average) to the eleven million business 
houses and families of this land. Make it also the Tetter post and the increase will 
be thirty-fold, with the income foarfold greater than at present, even with the rate 
five-sixths less. The Western Union Telegraph is bound to move on, for lightning is 
now the steed that progress loves most." 

A few officials of the Western Union will deny to your committee or to members 
of Congress whom they fancy they will be able to influence against this proposed 
legislation that the above statement is true. The proposition is simply one to make 
them earn their dividends on a large business, legitimately, and not on fictitious 
values. They will admit that a limited post and telegraph service means an increase 
to their revenues. If this is the fact with reference to the principal telegraph com- 
pany (the only one, in fact), it is true of those which exist, or think they are existing, in- 
dependently of it. It would be true for such telegraph companies as might be organ- 
ized and operated in good faith on the not unreasonable prospect that they might bid 
saccessfally for a part of the Qovemment work. The telegraph service can not be 
cheapened and quickened under the existing monopoly. There is no way for the 
people to get relief except by some proper intervention by the Government, such as 
1 am endeavoring to outline ; and though it may be said that the coffers of these com- 
panies might be filled more quickly under the stimulus of new business, it can be said 
with equal truth that the companies would have to work for their extra revenue. 
The new profit would be due, not to a monopoly of all the- telegraph service of the 
country, but to an obliging and business-like foresight which had finally consented 
to obey the law of demand and supply. The extra profits would be earned, not upon 
the watered capitalization of a partly worn-oat plant, but upon the iair and free fa- 
cilities which you, and I, and all of us must offer, if we hope to find a market for our 
labor. I am not snro that the people, freed from this oppressive monopoly, would 
not of their own accord send their messages for the reason that they had, as it were, 
an interest in the service. At any rate they would be permitted to send their letters 
in the quickest way, if they had the means to pay the tolls ; and they would have 
the means, because prices would not be twice too high. 

I have tried to show that telegraph companies operating their lines under the pro- 
visions of the limited post and telegraph scheme would make large profits, not so 
much by monopolizing all the business and charging a fictitious value for the service, 
but rather by honestly meeting the popular demand for a lower-priced service. I ask 
your indulgence for a moment to show by still another illustration, one taken from 
the recent history of the Post-Offlce Department, that this idea is true. The general 
business of the country was depreciated in 1883, when letter-i>o8tage was reduced from 
3 cents to 2. The ordinary postal revenue for the year ended Juue 30, 1^83, was 
almost $45,000,000. The usual increase in the revenue, if the 3-cent rate had continued 
to prevail, was expected from past experience to be about 5 per cent. On this basis 
the postal revenue for the year ended July 30, 1884, would have been something over 
$47,000,000. The actual revenue for that year, under the reduction to 2 cents for let- 
ters, please bear in mind, was almost $43,000,000. This was only 10 per cent, or less 
than the revenue would have been on a 3-cent basis. In the face of this reduction of 
the principal item of postal revenue by one-third, there was a complete recovery of 
revenue within four years from the time of the change, and that, too, in spite of the 
depression in business Just mentioned, and in spite of these other two thingH : Tbe in- 
crease in the unit of weight of letters from one-half ounce to an ounce, and the reduc 
tioD from 2 cents per pound to 1 cent per pound on second-class matter. The intro- 
dneiion of the postal-oard in 1873 was followed by an increase of over 7 per cent, in 



122 REPORT OP THE POSTif ASTER-GENERAL. 

the revenae, and that in spite of the panic of that year. It in well known to railroad 
people that the estahlishmeut of fast mails invariahly results in large additions to the 
amoaat of matter carried. In Great Britain the namber of letters carried doubled 
in two years atter the inangnration of penny postage. In the year following the be- 
ginning of the postal telegraph in England the number of messages transmitted was 
over 8,500,000 ; in 1884 the annual number was over 32,800,000. When the Belgians 
reduced their prices for the transmission of postal telegrams to 10 cents (half a iranc) 
the number of business messages sent promptly increased over 200 per cent., and the 
number of, social messages increased 1,000 per cent. 

MORE EFFICtSKT A8 WELL AS LOWEB PRICED. 

The telegraph service of this country must be cheaper. I have tried to show why 
by the method Just set forth, it may be cheapened now. I believe the service could 
also be made more efiScient nnder the postal telegraph. Thousands of Western Union 
operators are what are called railroad operators ; that is, if I understand it, they are 
employed at railroad stations, principally by railroad companies, to bulletin and re- 
cord the movements of trains. They are not skilled operators. Operators in the free- 
delivery cities, being required to do work of a large variety and to do more of it, 
would command higher prices and would be better men. The effect npon the whole 
body of telegraph operators would be beneficial for this reason : The operators in the 
smaller places, to which the plan would almost inevitably and properly extend, would 
even more be required to be expert and faithful. There would be a general upward 
movement among all the 15,000 of the craft. If in some offices clerks who know the 
art of telegraphy were to be required, the present clerks could learn to handle the 
keys ; or new men, nnder the increase ot business, revenue, and salary allowance, 
could be selected by proper examinations. I know it has been said that men and 
women can not learn telegraphy with ease. Dr. Green has said that it takes months 
to learn the telegraph 'Hick.'' This is, no doubt, true; but this same astute Dr. 
Green had no trouble in filliug the places of the striking telegraph operators in 1883. 

Mr. Beaumont, Vhom I have already quoted, has said that when operators belong, 
ing to District Assembly 45 of the Knights of Labor, noticing that the Western Union 
Company was paying great dividends on watered stock, and thinking that some of the 
workmen ought to share in this prosperity, struck for a raise in wages. Dr. Green did 
not hesitate to put boys and girls into positions of responsibility on a day's notice. 
We know that this was done in thousands of cases; we know that the service recov- 
ered from its ailment in a short time. The strike showed that while the telegraph 
company might monopolize the handling of messages, the organized body of opera- . 
tors could not monopolize the furnishing of workmen. With some incentive besides 
the prospect of the poor wage scale of the Western Union, the art of telegraphy would 
receive a most perceptible encouragement in this country. It has been said that one- 
third of all the telegraph operators are continually preparing themselves for other pro- 
' fessions, and that the other two-thirds are continually thinking of doing so. Accord- 
ing to the Electric World, of the 100 men working on the regular night force in the 
Western Union main office in New York City, 36 are either studying or working at 
something else during the day. In these occupations are, doctors, 8; lawyers, 6; 
ministers, 3 ; brokers, 3 ; actors, 2 ; theatrical managers, 2 ; real estate dealers, 2 ; 
inventors, 2 ; book agent, 1 ; manufacturer, 1 ; civil engineer, 1 ; author, 1 ; commer- 
cial business, 1; electrical special agent, 1; composer of music, 1. Now, either these 
men are bad ministers and bad actors, or else they are bad operators. In either case 
they are not making the most of themselves. I suppose they would not venture into 
fields outside of telegraphy if they were not poorly paid and poorly encouraged to 
excel. The questiou whether employment with a corporation which might lock out 
its employes upon the slightest provocation, to the peril of the business interests of 
the whole country, would be desirable, would not be the only^ question with the 



LIMITED POSTAL TELEGRAPH. 123 

young men and women demrons of learning the art. This monopoly would be ouly a 
part employer of all the telegraphic skill in the country. 

Sinee the iutrodaetion of the quadrnplex twenty years ago, the Western Uhion 
Company has, I am told, made but one change or improvement in its method of telo- 
graphic transmission having for their object the greater speed or the transmission of 
A larger volume of traffic of a given wire. I refer to the Wheatstone Automatic, an 
English invention, which has been in sncoessfnl nse on the Government lines in that 
country for eight or ten years. On the other hand, England has not only adopted 
our quadruples, but also the Delaney Multiplex, another American invention. And 
this brings me to another thought which is very forcibly discussed in Appendix £. 
Besides furnishing a stimulant to the study and use of efficient telegraphy, the postal- 
telegraph plan, dividing as it would the entire nse of the telegraph in this country 
with the sole telegraph monopoly, would also furnish an impetus to the inventive 
genius of the Americans who study electrical matters. I have had enumerated, per- 
haps, a seore of devices, already patented for the purpose of cheapening and qnicken- 
ing the telegraph ser\'ice, which finds no nse and no profit under the present condition. 
I am not an expert in electrical matters, bnt I know that all of these inventions can 
not be wholly bad. I am sure that many of them are good, but they can not be got 
into operation with the field monopolized. The public can not have the benefit of 
this rare class of American brains, nor can the inventors -find a deserved remunera- 
tion for their work. The Western Union Company, having the control of the tele- 
graph business, has no use for devices which cheapen and quicken the telegraph serv- 
ice and warrant a claim for reduction of rates. The public, not knowing what it 
misses, can not become aroused to the defects in methods now in vogue. If once a 
break is made in this rampart of telegraph monopoly, not only will the men and 
women who build and use the telegraph wires find a better market for their fidelity 
and skill, but inventors, knowing that their cases are to be tried before an impartial 
eourt, will also find a spur to better efforts. I can not enumerate the devices intended 
to cheapen telegraphy and distinctly not made use of by the Western Union at thisi 
time ; bnt I ask yon to examine the appendix, or better still, see by personal exami- 
nation, if some of the inventors are not prepared to show the efficacy of their efforts 
as well as the futility of them nnder the Western Union domination. 

BY WAY OF KXPLANATION. 

I desire in conclusion to explain, as politely as may be, one or two things that are 
not understood. I have challenged the Aiost rigid scrutiny of the limited postal tele- 
graph bill. I ask to have printed all of the printed criticisms of it which have come 
to my notice, as an argument in its favor. The limited postal telegraph bill is not a 
proposition to take money from the Treasury or to employ additional civil servants ; 
it is not a proposition to put any power whatever in the hands of the Government, 
which is not at present greater and more dangerous where it is. It is a proposition 
simply to dovetail together two great machines so that one shall do business equi- 
tably and by that means make more money (which shall be willingly accorded to 
it by the people); the other to utilize its present skilled and faithful energy to help 
supply the people with still better means of communication famished still more 
cheaply. It is a proposition incidentally to quicken the telegraph service by en- 
couraging all the members of the operators* craft to realize that they are the 
better off the more they are able to devote themselves to one thing and are permitted 
to see some result from their inventive genius. It is not a proposition to buy the 
railroads, or the ooal mines, or the saw-mills or the bake-shops of the country. It 
Is not a confession that Americans ingenuity is incapable of keeping up with the 
march of mercantile and industrial progress. 

I am prond to imitate so good a patriot as Postmaster-General Creswell, who did 
not shirk the responsibility of appearing before the committees of Congress, when he 
was invited, to explain why he believed in the reforms that he advocated. In 1872 



124 BEPORT OP THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

Mr. CreMwell remarked upon the fact that Mr. Ortoo, then the president of the West- 
ern Union, had taken it upon himself to deal somewhat facetiously with the report 
of the Postmaster-General, and to express himself in terms of commiseration for the 
weakness therein displayed. Mr. Creswell frankly admitted that he had heen labor- 
ing nnd^ a disadvantaf^e. He had had, he said, not one dollar of public money at 
his disposal except what had been used by the assignment of a single department 
clerk to the duty of gathering information. Mr. Orton had thought it proper, he 
said, to designate the statements of the Postmaster-General as the mere vaporings of 
an ignoramus. He should not hesitate to find the facts in the discussion, if he could, 
no matter if it did displease Mr. Orton. *' I wish it to be understood," he concluded, 
** that a display of mere temper by anybody will not control or aifect my action.'' 

History repeats itself. March 1, 1890, Dr. Green, the present president of the West- 
ern Union, said of the present Postmaster-General that he might congratulate him- 
self that he can '* smile and smile, and murder while he smiles.'' '' We propose," Dr. 
Green continued, '* to controvert that order [the order fixing Government rates] in 
the courts, and demonstrate that that is not one-half of the cost of the service." '* I 
never before heard of a Cabinet oflScer," the astute doctor said, continuing his rhap- 
sody, "going to all the meeting^ of a committee, urging the adoption of his pet 
schemes, which have not been recommended by the President." After thus according 
to the President the privilege of '' lobbying " your honorable committee and barring 
the Postmaster-General out of this privilege, Dr. Green concluded to put the mem- 
bers of yonr committee on their guard against him. "The Postmaster-General," he 
said, ** has got a great many appointments, and every member of Congress has several 
of them in his district." Here is the old story repeated. The special interest may 
spend no end of money and never question means to gain its point; but there must 
be no one to speak for the public. There is no dollar to be spent for a real reform. 

But I have another good illustration of the trite saying that history repeats itself. 
In the printed report of one of the hearings of 1872 occurs a foot-note signed ** W. O." 
It says that an apology is due to the public for having provoked a Cabinet minister 
to forget the proprieties. Mr. Orton adds that respect for the committee and for the 
office of Postmaster-General restrained him from making answer on the spot, to the 
reflection upon his veracity implied in the Postmaster-General's request that Mr. 
Orton give his information ** under oath." On March 3, of this year, Dr. Green sent a 
letter to the chairman of your honorable committee, to say that in the hurry of the 
moment he had forgotten to express his profound appreciation of the kind and court- 
eous treatment which the committee had extended to him, and he had also forgotten 
to express his entire confidence in the fairnesi and impartiality with which it was in- 
vestigating the subject under consideration. He farther said that he wanted to take 
back the expression "coaching" the committee, which the chairman had spiritedly 
objected to, and substit^ite for it the word " urging." It is the same fight now that 
it always has been. The special interest must be sacrificed to the general. 

If others speak out for the telegraph stockholders some one must stand for the i>eo- 
ple in the interest of the cheaper telegraphy that they want. I believe it belongs to 
this Department to take this stand, and I propose intelligently and persistently to 
keep this subject before you in strong confidence that it will not be long before your 
committee will take steps to give the people the relief prayed for. 
Very respectfully, your obedient Bervant« 

John Wakamaksr, 

PoBhna9ter-Gmeral, 



POSTAL TELEGRAPH BILL. 125 

riXAL DRAFT OF THK POSTAL TELEGRAPH BILL SUBMITTED BY THE POSTMASTER-GEN- 
ERAL FOR THE CONSIDERATION OF THE HOUSE COMMITTEE OX THE POST-OFFICE AKD 
POST-ROADS OF THE FIFTY-FIRST CONGRESS. 

A BILL to establish a limited post and telegraph serrioe, and for other purposes. 

Sec. 1. Be ii enaoted hy the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of 
America in Congress assembledf That for the purpose of facilitating the traDsmission of 
oorrespoQdence among the people of, and promoting commerce between, the several 
States and Territories of the United States, a limited post and telegraph service is 
hereby established as a bureaa or part of the Post-Office Department, for the deposit, 
transmission, and delivery of postal telegrams through the medium of the post-offioe 
service as herein provided. All post-ofBbes at incorporated cities, villages and 
boToaghs, where the free-delivery service now exists, and the offices of the telegraph 
companies referred to in section two of this act, shall be postal-telegraph stations, 
and in addition thereto the Postmaster-General may, from time to time, designate 
other post offices and telegraph offices thereat as postal-telegraph stations. 

Sec. 2. For the purpose of patting this act into effect the Postmaster-General, 
after inviting proposals by public advertisement, shall contract with one or more 
telegraph companies, now in existence, or that may hereafter be incorporated, for a 
period of ten years, under such conditions as he may deem best, consistent, however, 
with all the provisions of this act, for the transmission of postal telegrams, on the 
terms and at the rates of tolls hereinafter specified: Providedf That said rates may 
be reduced by the consent of the parties to said contract, at any time during its con- 
tinuance. 

Sec. 3. All telegrams received by the contracting company or companies for trans- 
mission, whether postal telegrams or otherwise, shall be sent in the order of filing, 
except that priority shall be given to telegrams relating to the business of the Gov- 
ernment. No liability shall attach to the Post-Offlce Department on account of de- 
lays or errors in the transmission or delivery of postal telegrams. 

Sec. 4. The charges for the transmission and delivery of postal telegrams, other 
than postal money-order and special- delivery telegrams, and telegrams relating to 
the business of the Government, shall not exceed the rates stated in this section: 
Pfovidedf That in no case shall the rates on postal telegrams exceed those of the con- 
tracting company or companies on any other class of business which they may do, the 
rates on press reports excepted. 

For the first twenty words or less, counting address and signature, between postal- 
telegraph stations within «ny one State or Territory, and between such stations, not 
in the same State or Territory, and less than three hundred miles distant from each 
other, fifteen cents. 

Between postal-telegraph stations not less than three hundred miles apart and not 
in the same State, east of and including the States of Wisconsin, Illinois, Kentucky, 
Tennessee, and Mississippi, twenty-five cents for the first twenty words or less. 

Between postal- telegraph stations not less than three hundred miles apart and not 
in the same State or Territory, west of and including the States of Minnesota, Iowa, 
Missouri, Arkansas, and Louisiana, twenty-five cents for the first twenty words or less. 

Between postal-telegraph stations within the following-named States, and not less 
than three hnndred miles apart, and not in the same State, twenty-five cents for the 
first twenty words or less, viz: Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, 
Louisiana, Michigan* Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Tennessee, and Wisconsin. 

Between all other postal-tblegraph stations not provided for above, fifty cents for 
the first twenty words or less. 

The chargAe for all words in excess of the first twenty words shall be at the rate of 
one cent per word. 

Tlie charges for ^he transmission of all telegrams relating to the business of the 
Govemmenty and passing between its Departments, their officers, agents, and em- 



126 REPORT OF THE POSTMASTKR-jaENERAL. 

ploy^, and persoDS whom they may address, shall be those annoally fixed by the 
Postmaster-General, in accordance with the provisions of section 5266 of the Revised 
Statntes. 

Prepayment of replies to postal telegrams not exceeding twenty words, oonnting 
address and signature, may be made at the office from which the original telegram Idj 
transmitted. 

Sec. 5. That the money-order service of the Post-Office Department shall, as soon 
as practicable, be adapted, under such rules and regulations as the Postmaster- Gen- 
eral shall prescribe, to the limited post and telegraph service between snch poBt- 
offices as may, from time to time, be designated by him as postal-telegraph money- 
order offices ; and the fees for postal- telegraph money-orders shall be donble the rates 
now charged for domestic money- orders in addition to double the charge for poBtal| 
telegrams of twenty words; but no postal-telegraph money-order shall exceed in 
amount one hundred dollars ; and the provisions of section 4 of the act of March 3, 
18^3, and of section 2 of the act of June 29, 1886, In regard to compensation of post- 
masters for the transaction of money-order business and allowances for money-ordcr< 
clerks shall apply to telegraph money-order bnsiness : Provided, That the Post- 
master-General may allow to postmasters at first-class offices, whom he may desig- 
nate to perform special money-order duties under this act not required of other post- 
masters, such amount in each case as he may deem expedient for the clerical service 
required for such duties, and the cost of stationery and snch other incidental ex- 
penses as are necessary for the transaction of that business may be paid out of the 
proceeds thereof. 

The provisions of section 5463, Revised Statntes of the United States, as amended 
by the act of Congress approved January 3, 1887, concerning the falsely forging, coun- 
terfeiting, engraving, or printing of money-orders, and the altering of the same, and 
the passing, uttering, or publishing of any false, forged, connterfeited, or altered 
money-order be, and they are hereby, extended so as to include postal money-ordera 
issued under the provisions of this act. 
' Sec. 6. Payment by the Post-Office Department to the telegraph company or com- 
panies for the transmisfiion of postal telegrams shall be made quarterly, or, if prac- 
ticable, at shorter intervals, on the basis of allowing to said companies all the charges 
therefor, less the charge for the postage at the rates fixed by law on mail-matter of 
the first class; and for the transmission of postal money-order telegrams all the 
charges, less the postal charge and fees due the Post-Offlce Department. The tele- 
graph company or companies shall, upon forms prescribed and approved by the Post- 
master-General, reader accounts to the Auditor of the Treasury for the Post-Office 
Department for their services aforesaid for each quarter of the fiscal year as fixed by 
law, or more frequently if practicable, and the Auditor shall without delay a-.dit and 
report the same to the Postmaster-General for settlement and payment, as in thecsae 
of other accounts audited by him. The original postal telegrams transmitted by the 
. telegraph company or companies shall be filed with the Auditor as vonchers with 
said account. After the lapse of thirty days from the complete settlement of the 
accounts for each quarter, and the payments thereunder, the telegrams aforesaid 
shall be destroyed under such rules as the Postmaster-General shall prescribe, and 
all copies thereof shall also be destroyed under such regulations and at snch times 
as he may designate, not exceeding thirty days after the date of the settlement of the 
accounts to which they apply. 

Sec. 7. The Postmaster-General may in his discretion provide for the use of the 
telegraph companies suitable space or room at postal -te^graph stations in buildings 
leased or rented by the Post- Office Department, and in snch portions of bnildingu 
owned by the Government as are set apart for the uses of post-offices, and the corri- 
dors and passages appnrteuaut thereto. Nothing, however, herein contained shall 
be construed to prevent the telegraph company from occupying offices at postal-tele- 
graph stations separate and apart from buildings occupied by post-offices, nor as con- 



POSTAL TELEGRAPH BILL. 127 

Btitatiiig tbe right in the telegraph company to require the Postmaster-Ueneral to 
famish space or room for the telegraph company whenever in his jadgmeut it can 
lot he done without injury to the postal senrice* 

8sc. 8« The telegraph company or companies^ patties to the contract provided for 
kerelD, shall eonstmct, leiise or acquire, equip, maintain, and operate all telegraph 
lines necessary to comply with the provisions of this act and the conditions of the 
COD tract to be executed hereunder, and shall employ at their own expense all officers, 
operators, and employ^, for the transmission of postal telegrams, except those who 
are employed in the collection and delivery thereof. If, with the consent of the Post- 
master-General, the postmasters at postal- telegraph stations shall act as operators for 
the telegraph company or companies, they shall be compensated for their services by 
a QDiform x>ercentage on the tolls of each telegram handled by them, or by some other 
»hare thereof, to be agreed upon by the company and the Postmaster-General, and to 
be paid for by the company. 

Sec 9. That within two years from the approval of this act at least one-half of the 
postal-telegraph stations contemplated by it shall be connected by the wires of the 
t«legraph company or companies; within the next succeeding year after said con- 
nection shall be completed at least one-half of the remainder shall be connected ; and 
eoanections to all said postal-telegraph stations shall be made within one year after 
the time last mentioned : Provided, That the contracting telegraph company or oom- 
panies shall not be reqnired to build or furnish a line to connect with any free-deliv- 
enr office more than one hundred miles distant by land line from the nearest other 
fin&e^ delivery office. 

Sec. 10. Before or at the time the contract contemplated by this act shall be exe- 
cuted by any telegraph company, such company shall file with the Postmaster-Gen- 
enlan agreement in writing of its acceptance of the restrictions, obligations, and 
conditions, so far as they are not superseded by the provisions of this act, of sections 
5'i63 to 5269 inclusive, of the Revised Statutes of the United States, and thereupon 
the privileges and benefits of said sections shall inure to said company. 

s^c. 11. Nothing in this act contained shall operate to prevent any telegraph com- 
pany from performing business for the public as the same is now done : Provided^ 
h^vectr, That it shall not be lawfnl for the contracting telegraph company or com- 
paaies, doling the term of any contract provided for therein, to engage directly or 
indirectly in the sale of press reports, election reports, market quotation 8, or general 
new«, or be interested in the sale of any such reports, quotations, or news, by reason 
of the ownership, as a company, of stock, bonds, or securities, or by or through any 
eoDtraet or arrangement with ai\y individual, firm, company, or association engaged 
in such sale, beyond the service of transmitting such reports, quotations, or news, in 
the form of telegrams, at rates which shall be uniform to all who may send such tel- 
egrams over the lines of the said company or companies. 

Sec. 12. Postmasters shall be compensated for the postage portion of stamps and 
telegram forms used in the transmission of telegrams as they are now compensated 
for postage on other matter, and they shall report sales and cancellations of such 
stamps and forms separately with their quarterly returns. To simplify such returns 
and the settlement thereof, the Postmaster-General may, in his discretion, provide 
telegram stamps, as well as telegram forms ; and, in case he does so. the words *' post- 
aj;e-stamp9,'^ as they appear in this act, shall be construed to also include postal- 
telegram stamps. 

Skc. 13. The. provisions of section 5464 of the Revised Statutes of the United 
States relating to the forging or counterfeiting of postage-stamps, stamps printed 
lipon stamped envelopes, or postal cards, or any die, plate, or engraving therefor ; 
Aod to the using, or having in possession with intent to use or sell, any forged or 
eoQuterfeited postage-stamp, stamped envelopes, postal-card, die, plate, and engrav- 
^^ l>e, and they are hereby, extended and applied, including the punishment for 
▼iolations of said statutes, to the forging and counterfeiting of postal-telegram forms. 



128 REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

aad the dies, plates, or engravings therefor, and to the anlawfal selling and using of 
the same. 

Sbc. 14. Any person employed in any department of the postal service, or in any 
department of the telegraph company or eompantes under contract with the Post- 
Office Department, agreeably to the provisions of this act, who shall, except as pro- 
vided herein, secrete or destroy any postal telegram intrusted to him, or which shall 
oon^e into his possession, and which was intended to he transmitted by telegraph, or 
to be carried or delivered by any mail carrier, mail messenger, route agent, letter 
carrier, or other person employed in the postal service, or by said telegraph company 
or companies, or who shall expose or make known the contents of such telegram, un- 
less so authorized by the sender or addressee thereof, shall be imprisoned at hard 
laboj: for not less than one year nor more than three years. 

Sbc. 15. Before entering upon their duties as such all persons employed by the tel- 
egraph company or companies referred to herein, as officers, operators, messengers, 
clerks, book-keepers, or in any other capacity, or to whom postal telegrams shall be 
in anywise intrusted, shall take and subscribe, before some magistrate or other officer 
authorized to administer oaths by the laws of the United States, or of any State or 
Territory, an oath or affirmation in such form as the Postmaster-General may pre- 
scribe, and conformably to the laws relating to oaths and affirmations.^ 

Sec. 16. The Postmaster-General, by and with the advice and consent of the Presi- 
dent, may conclude treaties or conventions with foreign countries for the extension 
and oonnectiou of the postal-telegraph service, including the interchange of postal- 
telegraph money -orders, between them and the United States. 

Sbc. 17. The Postmaster-General is hereby authorized to prescribe rules and regu* 
lations, not inconsistent with law, for carrying out the purposes of this aot and for 
the conduct of the service for which it provides. 



Appendix H. 



COBBESPOHDEHCE OH THE EIOHTHOTTE aUESTIOH. 

COMMITTKK ON THE PoST^OFnCE AND POST-ROADfi, 

HOU8K OF KKPKB8KNTAT1VK8, 

JVashinglon, 2>. C, May 3, 1890. 

My Dbar Sir : I have your favor of April 4, in reply to my letter of February 21, 
conoemiDf^ H. R. 6449, *'A bill to limit the hoars of work of clerics and employ^ in 
first, second, and third class post-offices." While I am not familiar with the details v 
embracing the hoars of labor in the several classes of offices where clerks are em- 
ployed, 1 am of the opinion your statement that they are engaged ''on an aver^ 
age of twelve hoars per day'' to be greater in hoars than the facts warrant ; bat, 
of coarse, you have the data and should be able to reach an accurate conclusion. 
During my administration of the Philadelphia post-office, from 1867 to 1872, the 
clerks were divided into three toars of daty, each (our consisting of eight hours. 
This system, or division of labor, worked admirably, and fair eompensation was al- 
lowed by the Department. If the statement is correct that the average hoars of 
work are twelve in first, second, and third class post-offices, there should be some 
romedy and early relief. The labor is both mental and physical, and in many of the 
divisions of the office exacting and severe. 

Whether the proposed legislation contained in the bill will best reach the require- 
ments of the service is certainly a subject deserving the most critical examination. 
As this question is now before the Committee on the Post-Office and Post-Roads, I 
wonld be pleased to receive from you such suggestions or recommendations as you 
may deem proper to submit for our consideration. 
Verv truly, yours, 

Hknry H. Bingham. 
Chuirman Committee on the PoBt-Offioe and PoH-Soads, 

Hon. John Wanamaker, 

Fo$tfiiaeter'General. 



Post-Opficb Department, 
Office of the Postmastek-Genrrai., 

Washington, D. C, June 7, 1890. 
81R : Referring to House Bill 6449, to limit the work of clerks and employ^ in 
post-offices, yoa addressed me a letter on the 21st of February asking for specific 
Information as to the additional cost of operating the postal service under an eight- 
hour law for all poet-office clerks and employ^. I endeavored in my reply of April 
4 to place before yoa, withoat argument or expression of official opinion, the prob- 
able coat. The estimate had to be made without extra data and upon the judgment 
and experience of various postal offidals, as there had been no reason t<i obtain and 
record the hoars of duty of postrodftoe clerks throughout the Uoit*^ StiteH 



130 REIfOET OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

The estimate made by the chief of the salary and allowance division was based 
npon a probable average service of twelve hoars per diem. By reason of yoar letter 
of May 3, in the farther, discussion of this sabjeoc, in which yon very properly say, 
*< Whether the proposed le^lation contained in the bill will best reach the reqaire- 
ments of the service is certainly a subject deserving the most critical examination/' 
I was led to issue the following circular letters to postmasters to obtain- absolutely 
ooriect data for the use of your committee : 

IFOB FIBST-CLABS OFFICES.] 

PoST-OFFICB DBPARTMBNTy 

WMhingUm, D. C, May 16, 1890. 
Sir : I have to request that you will inform me as soon as possible as to what is 
the average number of hours per day the clerks of your off ce are required to work. 
Please use the inclosed blank form for your reply, and give the desired information 
for each dlyision of your office separateljr, and also for each quarter of the year sep- 
arately. It is requested that you reply within five days after the receipt of this letter. 
Very truly, 

John Wanamaksr, 

FoBtmMter-GmetaU 
Postmaster, 

In response to the above I have at this writing reeeWed replies from 91 out of 102 
first-class post-offloes and 498 out of 517 second-class post-ofBoes, showing the hours 
of duty of clerks and employes in first-class post-offices to be 10 hours and 12 min- 
utes and in second-class post-offices to be 11 hours and 49 minutes. 

The records of the Department show, June 1, 1890, that in first-class post-offioes 
we have 6,221 clerks and in second-class post-offices we have 1,903 clerks, a total of 
8,124 clerks. 

The aggregate salaries of each class divided by the number of clerks gives the 
annual salary of each clerk in the first-class post-offices $834 and in second-class 
post-offices $591, and a daily pay of clerks in flrst*class post-offices to be $2.28 and 
in second-class post-offices to be $1.62. 

Dividing these amounts by 8, the proposed time of the labor of each clerk, the 
hourly compensation of clerks of the first class would be 28 cents and of the second 
class 20 cents. To put the service on a basis of eight hours, it would be required to 
pay each clerk of the first class for two hours and twelve minutes extra service per 
day, and the agji^regate outlay for this for 6,221 clerks for one year would be $1,398,730. 
To pay the 1,903 clerks of the second class for the excess over eight hours (being 
three hours and forty-nine minutes) for one year would require $530,208. The 
total amount required for clerks of both classes for payment for excess of time over 
eight hours would be $1,928,938. This estimate excludes the third-class offices, which 
were included in the bill as it was first presented, and does not contemplate consec- 
utive hours as was first proposed. 

The present salaries are not too high even for a fair day's work and are too low for 
a day of indefinite andever-iocreasiug hours. The fact adverted to by a member of 
the committee, that these places are much sought after and that a great pressure is 
upon every Congressman, should not be the only indication of the proper value of a 
fair day's work. The condition of discontent among the post-office clerks arises 
from a lack of adequate appropriations in past years to allow the post-offices the 
proper number of clerks necessary to perform a day's work within a reasonable num- 
ber of hours. A larger business has grown year by year, and the Department has 
been obliged to pinch almost every office, and in many instances compel twenty men 
to do twenty-five men's work. Deserved promotions and increases of pay have not 
been made, while the burdens of clerks have steadily grown heavier. Now, the clerks, 
seeing no recognition on the part of the Department or Congress to relieve them of 
this excessive labor and these long hours, have tried the plan of commanding atten- 
tion by organization and petition. This has resulted in the bill for eight hours. 



THE EIGHT-HOUR QUESTION. 131 

I do not believe the intelUgent men upon the postroffioe rosters are eatUfied with 
work for ei^bt hoars if it will only produce at the utmost an average of |834 per year* 
They are not crushed by the hard work, but want to be paid the money they earn for 
their families. They want recognition in the wayof promotion or increased salaries. 
If the bill were drawn to forbid any man to woiiL over eight honrs and give him no 
chance for extra pay for over eight hours, I am of opinion that the clerks would not 
want it. The post-office clerks do not want what other clerks are not getting. They 
know that tbe banking, commeroial, and business office clerks have no iron-clad rule 
of overtime pay or stop work after a given number of hours. They understand that 
the exigencies of business require business to be done as it comes — some days «ix 
honrs or seven, some days twelve hours. 

Tbe post-office clerks are not small men, to haggle over ten minutes or an hour or 
two of occasional extra service, nor have they rendered a grudging service with' all 
the overtime that they have given under compulsion ; but the fact that each day 
the labor is longer and heavier, without recognition of any practical kind, naturally 
impels them to seek rolief in one form or another* They natn rally, take advantage 
of the popular but, adapted to all businesses, not always practical sentiment in favor 
of eight hours, and would thus get their salaries increased by allowances for over- 
time. If it was proposed to make a uniform regulation fixing eight hours for a day's 
work for clerks of all grades in trades, professions, and employments, the case would 
b^ differont. I do not believe that thero is any such peculiar hardship about postal 
work to warrant the post-office clerks demanding that they be legislated into a privi- 
leged class. They only desiro a fair day's pay for a fair day's work, and protection 
from an imposition of labor. 

Post-office clerks understand that the postal service is not easily regulated within 
stipulated hours. Tbero aro delayed railroad trains or a number of ocean steamers 
arriving concurrently, extra heavy mails, produced by a variety of causes, that over- 
load post-offices at certain periods. There are light days and heavy days and days 
that require almost two days* work in one, that most have prompt and rapid service 
to save loss and disappointment to thousands of people. It will not be practicable 
for any post-office to carry a permanent force equal to the work of a donble day. 
The qnestiou may be asked why this condition will not affect carriers who are on an 
eight-hour basis. The answer is that they make their deliveries on a schedule, and 
go out when tbe gong strikes, with whatever mail is ready at the time. 

Of conrse it is not impossible to organize the post-office work on a basis of eight 
hours or six hours if needed. It can be adjusted to any stipulated number of hours, 
.but an arbitrary adjustment of this kipd occasions a heavy and partly unnecessary 
cost to the Department, shifts the responsibilities of the clerks, provokes mistakes by 
introducing emergency men to take up unfinished tasks, and would make extraordi- 
nary embarrassments in times of heavy mails. I do not believe that any well-organ- 
ixed business in this or any other country would be at the trouble of having time 
clerks and keeping books for ten minutes overtime one day, seventy- two minutes 
another, and twenty minutes another when all this expense could be obviated by 
properly averaging the time given and fixing the pay accordingly; when the work 
increased supply additional men to do it, and pay out the same amount monthly in 
salaries as would be allowed for claims for overtime. At the present time there are 
fifteen hundred claims of letter-carriers for overtime, which the Department ac- 
countants, inspectors, and postmasters are straggling to verify before ordering pay- 
ment. 

The remedy in my Judgment is very plain. Give the clerks encouragement by 
passing the bill for the fifteen days' holiday. Reclassify the service as proposed. 
Begrade the railway mail as favorably reported. Add to the estimates submitted by 
the Postmaster-General for the next year the sum of |500,000 for additional post-office 
elerks to enable the Department to make such promotions as are earned and to allow 
iaorease of olerka al many points. Instruct the Postmaster-General to so adjust the 



132 



R£PORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 



work at all post-offioes that the honftof service will be redaoed to an average of fifty 
hours a week. In offices where this can not be done allow holidays for overtime. 

1 call yoor attention to the fact that the proposed bill, as I am informed by the 
Assistant Attorney •General, embraces all clerks and employ^, the chief clerks, heads 
of registry divisions, heads of mailing divisions, and saperintendents of mails, deliv- 
ery, re^ristry, and money-order, down to the stampers and porters. I have oansed to 
be prepared the following tables ta show yon how the eight-hour bill wonld affeot 
the salaries of the higher grades of clerks : 

Statement ghowing ten representative first-olasa offices (salaries of postmasters ranging from 
$3,000 to 16,000), showing present salaries of assistant postmasters and superintendents 
ofmails^ delivery f registry ^ and money-order, and the estimated increase of salaries for 
service for itoo hours and twelve minuteSf the same being the average time, as shown by 
returns recently made by said vJerks^ in excess of eight hours per day. The total cost of 
the ten clerks in each line of duly is also shown. 





Offiee. 


Salary 

of 
post- 
mas- 
ter. 


Salary of 

assistant 

postmaster. 






Mails. 


Delivery. 


Eegistry. 


Money*onler. 


Vo. 


8 
hoars. 


2 

honrs 

and 

12 

min- 

ntes. 


8 
boars. 


2 
bonrs 

and 

12 
min- 
utes. 


8 
hours. 


2 
hours 

and 

12 
min- 
utes. 


8 
hours. 


2 

hours 

12 
min- 
utes. 


8 
hours. 


2 

hours 
and 
12 
min- 
utes. 




Barlinirtoii. Iowa . . . ^^ ooo 


11,500 
1,600 
i;700 
1.700 
1.000 
1,700 
1,900 
1,800 
3,000 
3,000 


$418 
418 
468 
468 

440 
468 
623 
405 
8-i5 
825 


1800 


0247 


$1,300^ 


275 
880 
885 
830 
803 
468 
385 
060 
743 












8«attlo,Wash 

New aaven. Conn.. 

Memphis, Tenn 

Providence. K I 

Omaba,Nebr 

Baflfalo.N.Y 

Pittsburgh. Pa 

CinoinoRti,Ohio.... 
BostoD, Maaa 

Total 


3,000 
8,400 
8,400 
3, too 
3.600 
3.8()0 
8.000 
6,000 
6.000 




tl,000 






$i,ooo 

800 
1.80O 
1,000 
1.400 
1,400 
1,600 
2.100 
2,400 


$275 


10 


1.200 
1,400 
1.800 
1,300 
1.700 
1.700 
2,600 
2,700 


880 
885 
868 
413 
468 
408 
687 
743 


1,200 
1,400 
1,200 
1.100 
1,700 
1,400 
2.400 
2.700 


$800 
1,000 
1.100 
1.100 
i;200 
1,200 
2.000 
2.100 


$220 
276 
803 
803 
330 
830 
560 
578 


368 
275 
885 
385 
413 
578 
060 








5.338 




4.009 




4,237 


2.»» 




8.640 

















KOTK.— At present there are 102 ^rst-olass offices. 



* And registry. 



t And mooey-order. 



Statement showing ten representative second-class offices (salaries of postmasters ranging 
from $2,000 to $2,800). shouring present salaries of chief clerk and head registry, mailing^ 
and money-order clerkSj and the estimated inoreanefor services for three hours andforty- 
nine minutes, the same being the average time, a« shown by returns recently marfe by said 
clerks, in excess of eight hours per day. The total cost for the ten clerks in each line of 
duty is also shown. 





Office. 


Salary 

of 
post- 
mas- 
ter. 


Salary chief 
clerk. 


Salary head 
mailing 
clerk. 


Salary head 
registry clerk. 


Salary head 

money-order 

clerk. 


So. 


8 
boora. 


8 

hoars 
48 

min- 
utes. 


8 
hours. 


3 
hours 

40 
mm- 
utes. 


8 
hours. 


S 
bonrs 

40 

min- 
utes. 


8 hoars. 


3 

hours 

40 ' 

niin- 

ntus. 


1 


Orlando. Fla 


$3,000 
2.000 
2,200 
2,200 
2.400 
2.400 

*2,eoo 

t2, 600 
J.800 
2.800 


♦700 

*900 

*800 

•700 

*900 

•000 

•1,000 

tl,000 

1.000 

•1.200 


834 

438 
881 
334 
488 
438 
477 
477 
477 
571 


600 
600 
600 

fUM 
600 
700 
700 
600 
600 
800 


280 

2R6 
286 
2X11 
:?86 
3.34 
334 
286 
286 
381 








? 


Athen»,Ga 












Jackson, Mm 












Nebraska City, Nebr... 
Adrian, Mich 






















BaUvia,M. Y 












Aurora^ 111 












Bradford, Pa 












Salem, Mass 


600 

600 


286 

286 


600 
600 


286 


10 


Atchison. K«iit ....... 

ToUl«.,., «..,.. .*• 


286 




.. 




8,051 




672 




ft7$ 

















VPTif «*4I pmtAl ibort m UT Hoo«a*olMi v^Mt&^t * A«4 moAo/'or4onh t A«4 rogifl7i 



THE EIGHT-HODK QUESTION. 



133 



From the above tables it appears that it will require for the payment of the prin- 
cipal clerks as follows. 

The first table shows the additional cost for extra service in excess of eight hours 
per day, at average time, as shown by recent retams, namely, for — 



No. 



Cost. 



AMistmt pwtouwterB 

SaperintendenU of raailB 

Sapcriot«nd«iito delixery 

Supttrintendento registry 

Siipefiniend«nU money-order. . 



Totel. 



IS.8S8 

4,287 



20,112 



Taking this sum, |20,112, the total cost of 10 clerks for each principal line of duty 
for 102 first-class offices would amount to |205,142. ' 

From the second table (second-class offices) we have the total additional cost for 
time in excess of eight hours per day, namely, 3 hours and 49 minutes, as shown 
by recent returns^ for 10 chief clerks, |4,365; 10 first mailing clerks, $3,051 ; making 
a total of $7,416 as the average total cost for the group of ten offices. At this rate 
for the 517 second-class offices, ihe total cost would be $383,407. 

This estimate is made on the basis of the 10 chief clerks and 10 first mailing clerks 
for the total of 517 second-class offices. The aggregate of the salaries of clerks at 
seeond-class offices, however, including stampers and employ^ is shown to be an 
average of $591 per annum per clerk. Taking this average as the basis for the addi- 
tional time, nearly 3 hours and 49 minutes in excess of eight hours, the total estimated 
cost for all clerks and employ^ at second-class offices would be $530,208. 

The results show the total cost for services in excess of eight hours per day for the 
principal clerks for first-class offices is estimated at $205,142|; for second-class offices 
the estimate is $556,827; the total estimate for first and second-class offices $761,969, 
and the bakance, $1,166,969, is required for all other postal clerks and employ^ in 
the first and second-class offices, making a grand total of $1,928,938. the outlay 
necessary for the eight hoars' service. 

It is well to remember that these places are filled by persons of such character and 
training that it will be exceedingly difficult to delegate their duties and responsi- 
bilities to others after eight hours' duty. If this bill is favorably considered, I would 
recommend that this class of clerks, if included, have an extra compensation in lieu 
of eight honrs, and that the bill be amended to limit it to clerks receiving $1,400 per 
annum and less ; and, further, that a clause be inserted to authorize deductions in 
eases of less service than eight hours per day, or forty-eight hours per week. 
Yours truly, 

JOHK Wanamaker, 

PoBtmaaier- General, 

The Chairman Committse ox the Post-Ovficr and Poht-Roads, 

House of BepreseniaUvee, 



Appendix I. 



THE FIRST CEHTUBT OF THE POSTAL SEBVICE. 

This year's operations be^n tbe history of the seooDd century of the American 
postal system. When the Post-Offlce Department began its career in 1789, Congress 
seemed hardly willing to give it an organized existence. The act which authorized 
its orestion— or, rather, which continued in operation the old establishment of the 
confederation— expressly provided that it should last ''until the end of the next ses- 
sion of Congress, and no longer ;" and this temporary measure was renewed year after 
year for several sessions, until in 1794 a permanent establishment was provided for. 

One of the first aims of Alexander Hamilton, the Secretary of the Treasury, after 
the Government of the Constitution had been fairly inaugurated, was to devise some 
means by which the postal establishment could be made to serve the public with the 
greatest attainable efflcieocy. In some parts of the country a regular system of ar- 
rivals and departures of the mails had never been established , stage-drivers and 
post- riders were permitted to carry and deliver letters, without any hinderance, for 
their own private emolument ; almost all money transactions were in the currency 
not of the National Government, but of the several States, and this currency was of 
fluctuating value according to circumstances and localities; the rates of postage 
were very high and complex. They were, for example : 

For every single letter not exceeding 30 miles, 6 cents. 

For every single letter over 30 miles, and not exceeding 60 miles, 8 cents. 

For every single letter over 60 miles, and not exceeding 100 miles, 10 cents. 

For every single letter over 100 miles, and not exceeding 150 miles, 12^ cents. 

For every single letter over 150 miles, and not exceeding 200 miles, 15 cents. 

For every single letter over 200 miles, and not exceeding 250 miles, 17 cents. 

For every single letter over 250 miles, and not exceeding 350 miles, 20 cents. 

For every single letter over 350 miles, and not exceeding 450 miles, 22 cents. 

For every single letter over 450 miles, 25 cents. 

For every double letter, double the said rates. 

For every triple letter^ triple the said rates. 

For every package weighing 1 ounce avoirdupois, to pay at the rate of four single 
letters for each ounce, and in that proportion for any greater weight. 

Not a daily mail existed anywhere ; the number of post-offices in the whole country 
did not exo^sd a hundred ; the length of all mail-routes was abont 2,000 miles ; and 
the entire annual revenue of the service was considerably less than $50,000. Such 
was the condition of the postal establishment under Samuel Osgood, the first Post- 
master-General under the Constitution. 

HALF A CENTURY I«ATBR. 

Nearly half a century later, however— in 1835~when the locomotive began to re- 
place the pony in the conveyance of the mails, the number of post-offices in the United 
States had increased to more than 10,000, the gross amount of postal receipts to nearly 
93,000,000 in one year, and the leui^th of post-routes to 113,000 miles. The postal 
establishment ^as no longer insignificaut, but the rates of postage were still excess- 
ive ; the transmission of the mails was slow and infrequent ; there probably were * 
not more than twenty offices in all the land supplied by a daily mail. There had 
been little done to indicate that spirit of liberality and progress which should always 
134 



FIRST CENTURY OP THE P08TAI/ SERVICE. 135 

be the animating principle of the postal serTice. The ooantry daring this period was' 
in many plaoM a wildemeM, and the difflonlties nnder which the mails had to be 
transported aro almost Indicroos when we think of them now. In 1806, for illnstra- 
lion, Gideon Granger, then Postmaster-General, in a communication to the House of 
BepresentatlTeSi makes the following queer recommendations concerning the trans- 
portation of the mails between Athens, Ga., and New Orleans, La. : 

<*This part of the route ought to be surreyed and marked out, and cleared of nnder- 
bmah and trees 4 feet wide, it would be rather an iignry than an advantage to clear 
wider than is necessary for a single horse, as it has been found to encourage a thick 
growth of brush. 

"Dog River is 40 feet wide, and is too deep to ride whenever there is considerable 
rain. Two logs may be laid across it, so as to enable the rider to cross with the mails 
oD his back, and swim his horse alongside. 

"Pasoagoula River is 250 yards wide. A family lives here and keeps a canoe, in 
whioh the rider with the mail should be crossed, the horse swimming alongside of 
the canoe." 

This same Postmaster-Gtoneral, in 1810, congratulates the House of Representatives 
npon the tremendous strides in the pathway of jj^rogress made by his Department. 
He says that at the beginning of the century — 

'<It required to write from Portland to Savannah and receive an answer forty 
days ; now it requires twenty-seven. Then it re<)^uired thirty-two days between Phtf- 
adelphia and Lexington, Ky. ; now it requires sixteen. Then it required forty-four 
days between Philadelphia and Nashville ; now it requires thirty. Then it required 
between New York and Canandaigua twenty days ; now twelve." 

The illiberal spirit actuating the postal officers of that period is exemplified by 
the following extract from a letter addressed by R. J. Meigs, the Postmaster-General 
in 182;{, to the chairman of the Committee on the Post-Offlce and Post-Roads of the 
House of Representatives : 

" It appears to me that no book ought ever to be sent by mail, even if letter or 
packet postage was paid on it. It is an article which is not, like letters and news- 
papers, valuable only for its quick conveyance, and may well be sent by the usual 
routes of many articles of merchandise. 

• •••••« 

''Some years ago the postmasters at many of the places where books were printed 
ooDstmed them as subject only to pamphlet postage. The consequence was that the 
mails were soon overloaded with novels and the lighter kinds of books of amusement ; 
and I was under the necessity not only of correcting this misconstruction of the rate 
of postage, but to prohibit postmasters from sending books in any case through the 



"It would be useful to prohibit by law the transmission of books by mail. The 
Secretary of State has during the last summer sent a number of cart-loads of books 
In this manner. The consequence has been the mails have been overloaded, and it 
has occasioned demands probably of twice as much as it would have cost to send 
them by means of the booksellers through the ordinary channels, and many news- 
papers have been rubl>ed to pieces and lost, and letters damaged.'' 

Twenty-five years later, in 1860, the nun^ber of post-offices had increased to over 
88,000, the gross postal revenue had more than doubled, and the entire length of post- 
routes had grown to 240,000 miles. This period (from 1835 to 1860), one would sup- 
pose, should have been the most prosperous in the history of the postal service; for 
during that time steam as a motive power bad come to a wonderful degree of develop- 
ment, the country had increased greatly in population, wealth, and enlightenment, 
aad the quick transmission of intelligence by means of the post had become one of 
the greatest public necessities. But there is nothing very brilliant in this page of 
postal history. 

One instance alone of its mismanagement, the magnetic telegraph, which, though 
atone time actually under the control of the Post-Office Department, brought into 
existence by means of public appropriations, with its inventor and all his collabo- 
rators employed as postal officers, was abandoned by the Government and suffered to 
be monopolized and enjoyed by private corporations. 



136 REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER- GENERAL. 

THESE LAST THIRTY YEARS. 

From 1860 to the olose of the fisbal ye«r lately ended— Jane 30, 1890— the progrew 
of the postal establishment has been most manrelons. The number of post-offioes 
has more than donbled, the aggregate now being 62,401 ; the total length of all the 
mail-routes in the country, not including letter-carrier roates in the cities, has increased 
to about 428,000 miles, and tbe gross postal revenue has grown to a little less than 
$61,000,000, representing an increase oyer the reyenne of 1860 of more than 600 per 
cent. Thefree-deliyery service, which now, in 454 cities of the country and by means 
of more than 9,000 carriers, makes deliveries and collections of the mails, without 
extra tax, to the doors of the citizens, has been added. The great money-order system 
has been established, a system under, which, at any one of 9,389 post-offices, remit- 
tances, in sums from one cent to a hundred dollars, may. be made to every part of 
the world with absolute safety, and which is used so largely by the people to-day 
that the amount of its annual business in the issue and payment of orders is nearly 
1256,000,000. 

Another great step in the progress of the postal service — the evolution, from an 
immature state, of the railway-mail or traveling post-office system, by which, owing to 
minute distribution en route on railroads and steam-boats, and by means of immediate 
transfers to connecting lines, the mails are now carried witb the utmost expedition 
from the places of mailing to those of delivery — was effected during the period under 
consideration. 

Still another great stride in the march of the postal service was the passage 
of laws that created two great railways across the continent — the forerunners of 
several others — reducing the time of mail communication between New York and San 
Francisco or Portland from three weeks to 8ix days, and through the naturally re- 
sulting establishment of mail service with China and Japan, opening up direct inter- 
course with all of Asia and the islands of the Pacific. The direct effect was rapidly 
to develop all the region west of the Mississippi River, forming populous and pros- 
perous communities where before only the Indian and the buffalo had roamed. 
Their indirect effect has been, by linking America with Asia, and thus completing the 
chain of mail service around the earth, to show the practicability, if not to suggest 
the inauguration, of that splendid scheme of postal intercourse known now as the 
Universal Postal Union, whose purpose it is to unite in a sort of brotherhood all the 
nations of the world, making their countries a single territory, and subjecting them, 
so far as postal matters are concerned, to the operation of equal and exact laws* 

The period we are considering, too, has been signalized by numerous reduc- 
tions in the rates of postage on all classes of mail matter, so that instead of the vary- 
ing and oppressive rates of former times, we have now, taking everything into con- 
sideration, perhaps a lower and simpler tariff of postage than any other country in the 
world : and by a great extension in the scope of the mails, which now take in books, 
all kinds of printed matter, and almost every variety of small merchandise. The 
registry system has been extended to furnish more than ordinary security. 

Of minor importance, but still indicating enlightened advancement during the 
period in question, have been the introduction of the i>06tal-note system, giving the 
people to some extent the benefits of a fractional paper currency; the adoption of 
stamped newspaper wrappers and special request envelopes, the latter securing the 
direct return of a letter to its writer, if undelivered, without the delay of its passage 
through the Dead Letter Office; the universal use of stamps for the payment of pofit- 
age on mail matter, both that which is due at the time of mailing and that doe at 
the place of destination ; and the special-delivery system, by which for u moderate 
fee immediate delivery of mail matter is secured upon its arrival at any post-office. 

The postal establishment of the United States has arisen from a condition of in- 
significance tv> be the largest of all the nations of the world. Instead of one little 
room, which in 1789 was sufficient to accommodate the entire central force of tbe 



FIRST CENTURY OP THE POSTAL SERVICE. l37 

Poet-Offloe Department, a building four stories high^ and covering an entile block in 
Washington, is now inadequate, to say nothing of the great post-office structures 
all OTer the land. Instead of the post-boy on his lazy horse, coming and going at 
will between straggling villages along a single line of post-rontes, with h^ and 
there a diversion to a cross-road, as was the way in Osgood's time, the mails are now 
transported almost with the speed of thought, according to fixed schedules .of 
arriyal and departure, over such innumerable routes as to make their aggregate 
journeys every working day equivalent to forty-one times the circuit of the earth. 
From a total business of perhaps a thousand letters a day, which is but a trifle less 
than the estimate of the Postmaster-General in 1789, letters and other pieces of mail 
matter are steadily dropping into the numberless receptacles of the postal system at 
the rate of nearly 8,000 a minute. This marvelous system employs more than 150,000 
agents. 



• REPORT 

OF THR 

ASSISTANT ATTORNEY-GENERAL 

FOR THE 

POST-OFFICE DEPARTMENT. 



FISCAL YEAR ENnED JUNE 30, 1890. 



139 



REPORT 

OF THE 

ASSISTANT AITORNEY-GENERAL FOR THE POST-OFFlCE 
DEPARTMENT. 



Opficb of the Assistant Attorney General 

FOB THE PoST-OFFICB DEPARTMENT, 

Washingtony D. C, November J81, 1890. 
Sib : I bave the honor to Babmit herewith a report of the operatioim 
of this office for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1890, together with cer- 
tain recommendations which in my judgment should receive the atten- 
tion of Congress. 

BUILDINGS UNDER LEASE. 

Exhibit B, accompanying this report, shows the places at which leases 
were held by the Department on June 30, 1890, on buildings occupied 
by postroffioes, the term of each lease, the amount of rental, and other 
items of information. 

Tbis table shows that, at the close of the last fiscal year, such leases 
w^re held at 367 post offices and 74 postal stations, being an increase 
over the preoeding year of 40 post-offices and 14 postal stations, the 
^ggregsite cost being $425,074.50. All these leases except five were 
beld on post-offices of the first and second classes, the five being on 
offices of the third class, there being no change in the number of 
third-class offices under lease during the past year. 

DIVISION OF OOBBESPONDENOE. 

To this division is referred the miscellaneous correspondence of the 
Post-Office Department, requiring a construction of the postal laws and 
regulations. 

Each letter received in this division requires an examination to ascer- 
tain the exact bearing of the laws or regulations upon the particular 
question submitted, and the preparation of an answer that shall be in 
entire conformity with all previous rulings that may have been made 
upon the same subject. 

Correspondence concerning the delivery of mail, the ownership of 
which is in dispute, is also conducted from this office. 

It may also be stilted that the correspondence arising in the execu* 
tion of what is known as the ^' Green goods " act, and the act forbidding 
libelous, scurrilous, <lefamatory, or threatening matter to be printed or 

ynfiiteu upon post^l-cftrds, or qr the outaide wrapper or envelopes of 



142 BEPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENEBAL. 

mail matter, has brought a score of letters per day for consideration 
and reply. 

Daring the year ended June 30, 1890, 14,995 letters were consid- 
ered and answered, or referred for investigation ; a much greater num- 
ber than was ever before received in any fiscal year. 

This vast correspondence was handled by two persons, one clerk of 
class four, who acts as the chief of the division, and one other clerk, a 
stenographer and type- writer, of the $900 class. 

To impose such labor on two x)ersons is to so burden them as to make 
it impossible to insure accuracy, promptness, and careful thought in the 
conduct of this important business. 

Th^ force in this division should comprise a chief at a salary of $2,000 
per year,* one clerk of class three, so that the services of a person com- 
petent to pass upon law questions can be secured, and a clerk of class 
one. 

GENERAL WORK OF THE OFFICE. 

I think that it is safe to state that the work of this office has been 
doubled, and possibly quadrupled within the last three years, by reason of 
devolving upon it the work of examining the claims of postmasters under 
recent acts of Congress for losses by burglary, fire, casualties, or the 
purloining of money letters in transit, and by the addition of a volume 
of correspondence growing out of the recent enactment of the amended 
lottery act An average of about 100 letters per day, asking for inter- 
pretations of this act and for instructions concerning the applications 
of it to matter deposited in post-offices, has been received since the date 
at which the act was approved. The number o^* this class of letters 
seems to be increasing instead of decreasing, and it may be predicted 
that many questions in connection with this law will pour into this office 
for months and even years to come. Many of these questions are intri- 
cate and important, and the answers to them can not be given without 
close thought and careful research. 

It would not be an exaggeration to state that the additional work im- 
posed upon this office in attending to this correspondence will make it 
necessary to employ at least two or three additional clerks of more than 
average intelligence and qualifications. 

AMENDMENTS TO THE LAWS REOOMMENDED. 

In my annual report of date November 21, 1889, your attention was 
called to several proposed changes in the laws that I deemed necessary, 
to wit : To secure the Grovernment against losses by reason of insuffi- 
cient bonds; to make clear some ambiguous statutes in connection with 
re-imbursements to postmasters for losses, and to enlarge and more 
clearly define the provisions of the law concerning obscene matter and 
indecent publications. 

Bills were drafted and sent to you, and through you to the post office 
committees of the two Houses of Congress at its last session, in which 
were embodied all the proposed amendments to the several laws, b^t 
no action seems to have been taken on any one of the bills; at least so 
far as I have been able to discover no favorable reports of the commit- 
tees were made thereon. 

Attention is now called to the fact that the laws referred to in that 
report remain unchanged, and I desire to emphasize the recommenda- 
tions then made by reproducing a part of what was suggested. 

Concerning the liability of sureties on postmasters' bonds, theneces-* 
sity of enlarging the authority of the Postmaster-Greneral in certain 



ASS'T ATT'y GEN'l — ^PBOPOSED AMfiNDMENTB TO LAWS. 143 

eaaeSy and the proposition to make assistant postmasters more directly 
responsible to the Department I stated that—' 

Some ohaoge in the law concerning the liability of sureties on the bonds of post- 
mastera, and so as to more clearly define their daties and responsibilities when a va- 
GADcy in the offioe of postmaster ooonrs, should be made. Section 3S36, Kevisecf 
Statutes, provides that their responsibility shall continue until a successor shall be 
appointeid, and that it shall extend to ** the safe-keepincr of the public property of 
the post-office and the due performance of the duties tnereof ;^' but it is silent as to 
what authority the sureties may exercise over the office until the vacancy be filled. 
To «Dforce the provision cited, the Department regulation provides that upon the 
death of the postmaster the sureties may take possession of the ofilee, etc., ** and may 
depute one of themselves or another person as acting postmaster/' who shall continue 
to serve in that capacity until the office shall be filled by a regular appointment. 

Ordinarily this regulation proves to be sufficient in case of the postmaster's death ; 
but occasionally the Department finds itself seriolisly embarrassed by the disagree- 
ment among the sureties, who meet, discuss the matter, and " agree to disagree," or 
who divide, one portion suggesting one person and another portion a different per- 
son, or, in case of the absence of a part of the sureties when such vacancy occurs, 
when those present make a choice, which is afterward disapproved of by the absent 
sureties. Not only does embarrassment ensue to the Department proper, but the 
accounts of the vacant postmastershin on the record of the Sixth Auditor become 
entangled in such a way as to retard tneir final settlement. 

The difficulty complained of is not confined to vacancies occasioned by death, but it 
arises in case of removal where the conduct of the outgoing postmaster requires the 
immediate severance of his connection with the office, as well as in instances where 
the postmaster absconds ; and it is more apt to occur when it is known that the poli- 
tics of the successor will differ from those of the postmaster whose office has Just 
become vacant. I have advised the Auditor in recent cases to recognize the person 
as acting postmaster who was desl^ated by the sureties representing the largest 
amoont on the postmaster's bond, and in cases where the sureties faUea to name any 
person^ to recognize whoever was serving as assistant postmaster prior to the va- 
cancy. This advice, however, was simply the best I could give under the circum- 
stances. It was not a ruling upon the law, but only a proposed common-sense 
arrangement made necessary bv tne emergency. 

I submit that the section of the Revised Statutes above cited should be so amended 
as to give the Postmaster-General full power to deal with all such cases in his own 
way, if the sureties fail to perform their duty, and so as not to disturb their bonded 
liability. He is of ten compelled to assume the risk of so acting, but it is by no means 
certain that he does not also take the risk of releasing the sureties ; and it is quite 
certain that he should not attempt to define the responsibility of sureties in the ab- 
sence of legal authority to do so. 

I would further suggest that the matter of the responsibility of assistant postmas- 
ters is one that at this time should be given due consideration by the Department. 

This officer is appointed by the postmaster, and in the majority of cases is the most 
active person connected with the office, and the ostensible business manager thereof. 
He possesses practically all the authority of the postmaster, and a greater insight 
into the general business and minuties of the office. With all the license and power 
granted such assistant, he is, however, neither by statute or regulation under any 
obligation or bond to the Department. His responsibility can only be determined by 
a judicial consideration of each particular case submitted. In my Judgment the De- 
partment should be secured by ample bond, executed to and approved by it, in all 
cases before he enters upon the duties of his office. 

I see no reason, also, why this rule should not be extended to include money-order 
and registry clerks in offices where the same are employed under a designated title 
as such. 

I called attention a year ago to the propriety of amending the law so 
as to very clearly define what constituted a " burglary," and stated that 
the only definition that the Department could safely adopt was that of 
the common law, that it was *^ the forcible entry of premises in the 
night time." 

In the absence of a statutory definition, it was unwise to apply the 
law as it now exists to any other crime than the one thus defined in the 
settlement of claims of postmasters growing out of ^^ burglary." Hence 
I suggested that section 5478, Bevised Statutes, should be amended to 
read as follows : 

Any person who shall forcibly break into, or attempt to break into, any post-office, 
or any buUding used in whole or in part as a post-office, with intent to commit 



144 REPOKT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

therein larceny or other depredation, shall be deemed gnilty of burglary, and on 
conviction thereof shall b^ pimished by a fine of not more than one thousand dol- 
lars and by punishment at hard labor for not more than twenty years. 

The deficiencies of the act of May 9, 1888, were also pointed oat in 
my last report by its unintentional discrimination in favor of a class of 
claims arising from losses which accrued between March 17, 1882, and 
May 9, 1888. The amendments to the act of March 17, 1882, relating to 
such claims, were detailed, and in a word I suggested an amendment 
to the act of May 9, 1888, which if it were embodied in a law would be 
of great service to us in settling these claims and would be just to the 
claimants. The amendment was to insert after the word '^ provided'' 
in said act the following, to wit : 

That no claim exceeding the sum of two thousand dollars shall be paid or credifed 
nntil after the facts shall have been ascertained by the Postmaster-General and by 
him reported to Congress, together with his recommendation thereon, and ai) appro- 
priation made therefor : And nrmnded fitrtheTf That this act shall not embrace an v 
claim for losses as aforesaid which occurred more than fifteen years prior to March 
seTenteenthy eighteen hundred and eighty-two, or any claim for losses which occurred 
prior to the date last mentioned, which was not made within six months after said 
date except claims for postal fnnds, which may be allowed if made within six months 
from May ninth, eighteen hundred and eighty-eight, in eases where the postmaster 
had, at or about the time of the loss, made report thereof to the Post-Office Depart- 
ment or to a special agent or inspector of the Dei)artment, or any claim for losses 
which occurred subsequent to March seventeenth, eighteen hundred and eighty*two, 
unless such claim was made within six months fh>m the time such loss occurred ; and 
no claim for losses which may hereafter occur shall be allowed unless made within 
six months from the date of the loss. 

I also renew my recommendation concerning the erasing from the act 
of May 9, 1888, the words *< unavoidable casualties" and substituting 
therein the words *' cause notarising from or contributed to by fault or 
negligence on the part of such postmaster." 

^^ Unavoidable casualties" has nothing but an imaginary definition in 
the law ; or, to state it in another way, its meaning is so indefinite that 
we are seriously annoyed by the attempt to apply the definition to any 
case upon which a claim is based not specifically provided for in the 
statutes. 

Exi^erience in this office hsu demonstrated the importance of more 
clearly defining by statute the authority of the Postmaster-General in 
what does or does not constitute contributory negligence upon the part 
of postmasters who claim credit for postal or money-order funds that 
are lost in transit. 

The rule at present adopted for determining whether or not the post- 
master ^ould be relieved from the consequences of his supposed care- 
lessness, 80 as to justify an allowance for losses of this character, is that 
he shall have at least one witness to the counting, the enveloping, and 
dex>ositing in the mail-pouch of any letters or packets containing such 
remittances, and this rule is founded upon the regulation which the 
Postmaster-General can not safely change, lest it encourage postmasters 
in habits of negligence in connection with such remittances, and yet 
there are many cases in which the strict application of this rule would 
absolutely prevent them from making the remittance (especially of 
money-order funds) at the time required by the Departmental regula- 
tions, and that would, in the event of the burglarizing of an office or 
the destruction of money -order funds by fire, impose upon them the 
burden of the lossr 

It does not seem fair to require a postmaster to hold money-order 
funds in his office beyond the time that he is directed by the regulation 
to remit them simply because be may not be able to secure a disii)« 

tereHtoil yyiium iu (be midaio o( tb^ nigbt to iH>me lutg lii» office to 



ass't att'y gbn^l— proposed amendments to laws. 145 

Terify the counting and enveloping of the money, and stay there until 
he sees it deposited in the mail pouch to be carried fi*om the office to 
the mailing-coach or mail-car ; and it *)s equally unjust to make him 
pay the loss that might occur by fire or burglary that same night when 
the funds thus exposed to such casualty would have b^n in transit but 
for the strictness of the regulations. Nor is it wise for the Postmaster- 
General to make a new' regulation on this subject without the full 
authority of law ; hence, I recommend that the act now under dis- 
cussion shall be further amended so as to permit the Postmaster-Gen- 
eral to use his discretion in allowing credits or reimbursements in cases 
of losses, if he is satisfied that a failure to comply with the regulations 
of the Department did not arise from indifference or willful neglect, and 
that the failure did not contribute to the loss. 

LOSSES BY FIBB, BUBGLABY, ETC* 

The accompanying exhibit (A) shows the amounts allowed under the 
act of Congress approved May 9, 1888, for losses resulting from fire, 
burglary or other <^ unavoidable casualty," and for postal and money* 
order funds remitted for deposit and lost in transit. 

The total number of claims acted upon is 656, of which 507 were 
allowed in whole or in part, 117 were disallowed, and 32 were with- 
drawn or dismissed. 

The total amount allowed is $41,093.75, viz: For postal funds, 
$8,198.51; for money-order funds, $5,277.19; for postage stamps and other 
stamped paper, $27,618.05. The allowances are classified as follows : 

For postal fuDda : 

Lost by lire $880.73 

Lo«t by burglary 7,i:}6.«9 

I.KMit in transit to depository offices 166. 72 

Lost by misoellaneons casnalties 14. 17 

d, 19b. 51 
For naoney-order funds : ===== 

Lost by tire 67.70 

Lost by burglary 2,584.49 

Lost in transit to depository offices 2,635.00 

5,277.19 
For postage stamps, etc. : = 

Lost by fire ti,lft4.:}6 

Lost by burglary 19,245.67 

Lost by miscellaneous casnalties 218.02 

""277618. 05 

Aggregate 41,093.75 

Classified according to the causes of loss, the allowances were as 
follows, viz : 

Losses: 

By fire 19,092.79 

By burglary 28,967.05 

In transit.. 2,801.72 

By roiscellaneous casualties > 2.'J2. 19 

Total $41,093.75 

Very respectfully, 

Jas. N. Tyner, 
Assistant Attorney- Oe7ieraU 
The POSTM ASTKU Geneeal, 
p H G 90 10 



16 



SEPOBT OF THE POSTMASTEK-OENEBAL. 



as 



llll§i|i§iiii|||il |i||||i|§|||§i|i|i|i 






1 



:„• :•? 



."2 :•§ 



% 't 






J, 



555 :5-<3S5 i : :S ;5 :55S5 



9 o5 i'a i O O^ i 

::::::: :5553 : :^5 



o 

1 



li 



>il 



II 






a* 



6S 
5^2 



?a 






3SSS 



s 






«5 ; 



?:ss 



I 



epOOCPOOdDOPWOOwCOODOPQDOOQOoqCPOOCOOpgpoOd^flOOOOOCOflpflOWOftOO 



I 
? 

« 






a 



jl&^i h i ■ : JS'-iii -^ iil J i j: : It I iijiil •Is' 










1 

i 










ASS't ATT'y GEN'l — LOSSES BY FIRE, BURGLARY, ETC. 147 



ill ililii liiliiiil iillliiii liiiiilii 

^"^'^ ^n^^^g^ ^^^g'^'n^^^^ ^'i^:^*''^^^'^^'^'^ ^^f^^^'^'f^^^^ 

ao5«^s5:«2 ssj'o-aog'w* aosos^oSo 

^jzjS-^nP^s;; •^s^a-<j5;z;c2as S*?*?^?^^-^'?^???; 






•e ^-3 •.It'? : : ifo 

&^ 9 . O V • -Of* 

IsS ^ o^ Ip o oS ^ o o o 



ii- 



5-i = ?1 



•3^ 5© 



5<^S5 : i : : : : : :555 ^ : i : : : • : :? 




B 

1 



o *»5 



131 



I It -siH 



S"** S *^ o 

I iiliiil 



e o o'S o 






S^ • :J 3 : .2 "ta : * '.a :S '4^ '^ : .3 • :^ '2 6^3 :S : • • •• 




C^^ 



^ a a e. — ^ . 



^^a^.^ 



- "~ o 
a 3, © o 



148 



0.2 

"So 

q5 



REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

lii|i|i|i|i|ii|iii|||§||||||i|i|||||i||i 

>»S > ? = >»>§ »-* i^ti^ >>>*a *^ »^ a S a i ►»*-• i ►i a a »-"^>^ ^J^'^'S »■* d »^ a § S 



^»?^»?^?^ 



s 
a 

S 
o 
O 

I 



I 

s 









•s 






I 



85 



5 

i 

a 






^ 






S> t« 99 eS rH O O to 






«i!9 



111 



sss 



wSe^&^9) too 



S :S 






ssss 



s 

X 
X 



o 3 o 5 S^ v»2 ^.2 ®J a «^o fi$ 5'« J V ^v^ «J! a so© g'a » » ©^ S^ « 



|::|;&n|i;:|M:|;|ii|Mi:|M::!||:i&|:!: 

^-S'§ £^^4 S s^-S ^S e-SBsl £-§?£■§■§■§ ^S.S'S.S'Sl S'^S^S I £••§ £'§ 






is 




ass't Arr'Y oen'l — losses ijy fir^ burglary, etc. 



I ililililiiiiii illtli 1111111111111111111 



tz « 2 a «> 



£ ft *- 
2 a 



t : : 



1*^ 



^•3 



_^ .|| ;| -ill ill's 









s ^ 



»5 o o ^ o o o*a ^ o 0*3 ^ooooooooo ©"a ^ ©"S 5 ® s ©*s ^'a © z's f^ © © o ©*S 
2'0'§ ©'§'§•§ a o.C'c i J2'§'§'§'§'§'0'§'«'§'§ a^St? J;2'a^'o |al'*s S^S'^'Stj'c § 

S : :5 i i :p5 : ip5 ::::::::: :p5 :p5 :^ :p5p :^i35 i : : :S 



S 



S!3 



3:$ 
Si 



3^ 



^ss 






• « fd 12* 



S8 



ss 






ss 



•a 

11 



C « 2 « 

5 till 
o >3 



s§s§i§§ii iisgiiiiiiiiiiSiiiiiiSiiiiiiiii 



S • ^2 g'a'SSf S^Sf SX^'S"^''-"" S g :^2'if ^S'* 8*S a'S 2 S 2'2'S S " ^^^ 



: : : S i 



il 



' i|! = =|: • ; ; : i ! i :|| i|; ; :||i : ! ill =|; Ml; in 

"> M© e'Sco © o © © o © © '^2 * bD© o ^ E t«© © © © m© S © m© © ^Tc_ © S TcS 
I gtj g-S iSo'C'CKi'C'oyra g ?i! g g^-o g^ g'tj-otj'© ^'o^rt §•«•«:£ trg-aiS |^i3 
















lilt 



c ©5.®, 



150 



REPORT OF THB POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 



SI 
58 



i||ii|if|l|i|l||ill|l|l||l||§i||||||||lii 
i||i i|i||i||g| N5II i| 3 1 i g i| I i s i|i|||i|| i| 



a 
o 

I 



I 



I 



r 



7t 

I 
I 



s 



I 



s 

& 



i 



•8 



■8 - . 



5 is? ^ 



i! ;;;; lit ;| i : :i| ::;;•! !| J-s ;; it's ::: ! 

:::::: :S5 :5 : : «< : i : : i : IS i^ i i :fi5 • j M 







III mil 



li 










ASs't ATT't GEN'l — FLOSSES BY PIRE, BURGr.ARY, ETC. 151 



mil I i|||||||§§|||||||i|||||i|||||i|i||||§i 
i 8 1 ir I'^lllli s|s Nil i 1 8||^||||i i|N g>|8 J liUM 



4 


V 


c 


e 


e c 


c 


i 


s 


iii^ 


^-§^^4 


1 

5 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


'■■i 


i-2 

111 

555 


4 


iU 




: : : : : 


1.60 
7.48 
45.64 
68.84 
18.61 
10.00 
56.65 


s 

s 




«*^ig^e is 




ca 
sg 


























s 






















S 




s 

:9' 


















P 

•d 






















s 

si 








s 
















50.88 
0.21 
1&85 
30.00 
105.77 
1.75 




.*cl-5g«o*jg 


8S 








8 






OS 


3 










SS : 



lllll§i|||i|ss||||ii||||i||||i|§ii|||||§||ii|| 



s,-^ 






*■ w'** .^ t .^ 

lii.^=l 



^PQ^BQ !SpQ I mPQ ip^PQ 'PQ iSpQ 



tSpPM^Sn 



5?J5 5 2 'J! 



I 

U 

2.5 d 

I'll 

tip 

s a • a 



8 & 
E ^ 

^ I 

€ I 




OO ^OOOOOOdd 



152 



BEPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-OENEEAU 






o 

O 

I 

42 



i 



Si 



I 



I 



a 









^ 

^ 



«. 

^ 



P 



<5^ 

. a 






8S 



iiii|§|i| 



1^ 



oc coooaoobabS 8S6 S oQ V 00 oc 00 00 OD 35 S oo 

S kP ^ b M S •: ►.§ > gQPa S^ S a Q ^ *: q2 ^in^ •8 ^o i*s S S» ^^ > 



}f9 



:^ 



p<j ::::::: :ft • 









i"? : I'S : : : : : i i-S .. 

is -Isl S$ ' ' ■•oS • • -St ' ', 

:^S :^S5 : : : : : :55 i : :^5 : : :q^ : i 






5ri 












^s 



iiiliiiiiiiliiiiiiiiiiiiliiiiliiiiiiiiii 



I 

I 



I 
H 

s 
s 



a.- ; : • -.5 ; a : - s • • 



1. 







ASS't ATt'y GEN'l — LOSSES BY KlBK, BURGLAUY, ETC. 153 



iiiiiiiii iiiiiiiii § iiiisiiiiiiis 11111111 i iiii 



i 

s 



e^ o 00 o 00 o so 000 



=1 



:i55 : ■ 



^4 *^0 



S8S 






:S 






!! ©"s Is o^ ^00 00 000000000 

«— «• «— «i -^^^ .-fO'O'O'O'O'O'O'O'C'3 



s 



S :S 



as 



SS?J82 



9S& 



ig 









S :^ 

e4 U 



^9 



s? 

*• 






11 

^ -I 

22 O 

I' 
II 

^5 






« • « • • OS 



o'm£'3 o ' 2 o ' o'S'Sco o o o o J J*^o 'SJ-2'mo ''m'2'mO J'w © o o o "5o ''Sc 




J«= M±?2S9 3o 



HW»^haHP^HJ54 










154 



EEPOKT OF THE POSTMA8TEK-GENERAL. 



u 



ill iiiiiliiiiiiiiiilili iiliiiiii i Hi 



°fss^«f'^as"«^"'«*sfsf»'s«^s5f''"'*''''^sfs\.°*'*'ga"s"22"aa\.s" 



sTof^r 



4a^ »Ss3«5^.?aSI4.;p!s35l3^al5 a4all55l4 J? Ill 



1 

.2 

a 
o 
O 

I 



I 
I 



S 
s 



3? 



s 




I 



2g2S3£S'-"rf:?s''a'""frftfR'*5'^5«^8"jf5iSs"a9S^^^ 



tiummfmfmuimu^uumi^t 



u S O O. 



I 



a 



IJIIJIUI 



^ : : :^S :&(q \^^ 



o uo e e o 



fit . 






;x4ȣiOOA 



:Cn 




ass't att*y 



GEN'L — LOSSES BY FIRE, BUBOLARY, ETC. 



|i§l|ii|iiiiiii| mil iiii |iiii§|i|i|ii|i| 
ii&ialM|iiS|-?ii'^MNi'^llll'^is||g|||iil|lls 






In 






Si! 



si 



"2 
SI 



s'C'S'S 2 1^ cJS'O'^ S.S'O'O g'Sjg'5 S^'C'C'O'e'c < ©•§ | o-o-o-c | o-c-o g-S cts J^ ^ | 



.1 

sr 









:5q^p5 


i :p 


?;^e 




<^l 


: 


•.S3 -^S • • 


:S^ 


:p 


:^ ij 


< 


52gS i :§ :g? 

^das i Is is 








S5J :J£3 




si 


is iaig^s i^g : 




83 


s 












r:8 : 
SS i 




i : is :S i 
: i :g ;§S i 


\ I 




i is 
: i§ 






8^ 










S : :3 i : 
" i :^ i i 




Sc588 




i : :r i 
: : .lo : 


§SS : :§ i :es : 


: ;si 










llllllliiiilllllilililllllilillililllli 



O-fc 

li 

'sa ss 






ill 







• • "3 'T S * 









2 2 »-*'= 



\ 

a 

*;5'^.* S a ► c ^-5 






i-1 




Hl':POR'r\ OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 






i.iil'if'il' 



I 



•3 



•g :% 



114 
55 






•s 



•"SI'S 



ooooo^o'sff5isoooO'-:o^cooo_o 
'O'O'C'O'O ot3 5^ S^TS'O'O'a 2 "^ ,£ "O ~ rs 's "c 

fi^ : : ip^p-^ :::::. ;<i :p5S5 : : : p i^ : : : : : 



I 



p. 

CO 






s 






ss 



2gSS5 



aoQC« 









ss 



sss 



|4 

II 



SSJU 






ass 

c4cooo* 



I 



S*^'§''"'28*"S*"Sf«*-"2f2fS«*^"«§S'S£55:2fr;2SS 



sifgCasg 



• A Md O t- CO 



M© < 



.5'i'S'C g'O'O ?•« £ u £ Ef'S-O'e £ Sf-o 
fiQ . . .N • •PQ •PmACmPQ I . .pEiPQ 







. ASS'T ATT'y GEN'l— LOSSES BY FIBE, BURG^.ABY, ETC. 157 



^„^ ^ ^ ^ 



^SSsM'^^^S^^"^^^^ 



S2S*2f«S'S'Sf^«f5JS2'2fS5**" 



SoofloQcSSoES 



5 * 



i<^iJilliliiiiini«lililf<'iiJliliilii4jriii 



ftf o » 



:S1 



•■8 i-S : . 

•Si I :i 



it 
►t 

>^ |5 © ® © ®^ 






:2^ 


55 i i ; i 


i : 


\ 15 


:3 iftS 


1 : : \Q<p 


< 


1 


i : 


55 




•is ■ 






20.03 
1.48 

12.68 
2.00 
2.60 


61.32 

20.00 

6.95 

22.27 


iSSg :5 


i is i :§ 
! i5; 1 i- 


; 




S is 


. . 




: '8 


s 

CO 










is i : 


i i :& : 

ii i- i 




& i 














• 
• 


3 is 


. . . .1 


t : 


g : i 
e4 : : 


is : : 
it W 


:i8 :8 : 






8.02 

40.29 

7.00 

218.48 


is 




SSI i 

^i i 


is; i 



ill 

S 11 



^ : :^ : a 



^^1 







;i;&^^^fi^&&^p;pi&(iif4&&&S&&&&& 



158 



REPORT OP THE POSTBiASTER-GENERAL, 



2^ 






a 
.5 



g 
I 

OD 

i 

I 



I 



& 



I 



2 

I 

£ 



5 S ! o*© 









:o<l :o««j : • : : p^ : 



: :q 



-iit 



h 



|p'S|5©o5^®o©o©3eoo 

555 : :§^ i i i i : : : : : 



CO 



tin :S5 i 



53^ 



a 



-34 



^ : 



S8 



:S 



9^ 



S3 



^8 



-5i 









•a* 



5 



illiliiilllillillliiilililiililiiiiiillii 




ass't att't aEN'L— losses by fiee, bubolaby, etc. 159 



ililiiililliilliliiilliifiiillilllllllliil 11 : 



Jll 








:i«^ 


' 


3 
< 


5555 






:2 


55 




S5 








35 






i^^i 


< 


i 


1 


i5" 


I 


: i^'*' 


S2S 






S 




si 


iSS 
\6 


S i 


is 
is 








S i 




26.15 
63.16 
33.47 
69.30 
52.26 


Si 










8 




















































g : 






^2 














S 










is 
is* 




7.56 

5.28 

2.44 




S 






s 




:S 





t: 



V. ML' 

«2 



Mi- 

111 






* a 

a 

SI 



|||§i|ii|||il|i§l&iii§i|i|iili|i||||||l|iiiil 



i< 



►sex 



I 



ti : :|g^5^ : lb: it: if : : :&|£'|': it: it: it" i 



II 




160 



REPOET OF THE POSTMASTEB-GENERAL. 



li 



>i a a a d a a.d fl t aPP i; <^' Si ^ (! q ^^ d.d d ^ £; S > ^' ^ a ^ ^ ^^ Si ^ e^ ^ »^ 



O 

I 



;5 







o 
2 



<8 « 



S? 



s 

s 

I : 



2^ 
1 



a 



6i 



p;^ 






ec4 



sss 



c«« . .^ 



2§ 



i 



^ c o © o 

5 : : : i 



oSc 






iliiliilliliiiiiliiiliiiliiiiiiiliiilii 



^ ^glF fits Nll?2l'^^'§ £ ^^^M £ ^^.^. £lt SI'S £ ?2 ^ 



y- . aJS-a qJ: a-S S.5 aj3 3.5: d "• • ;42 9 



^. - fc. i. fc, . M - »- "^ '' 






't^ 



H 



X 




ASs't ATT'y GEN'i, — LOSSES BY FIRE, QURULARY, ETC. 161 

lliil 1111111111111 II 

^c»*:SaSe»9 ef aSoicCeS t^ Setts' ^co<>n^ o"*" 

^« 



8"2 



St ill ="8 i-S 



■8 :■? 

liS| 



S 



gtDtp 



S^S 



00^ 



5:38 



as : 



i|iil||i|g|ii|iii|i|i| 

" ® • S 2^5 if ^= » ^j^ ? « o S"o § o.>« s 








PUG 90 ^11 



-•3 

<u a 


'^ ^ 


S 


^ ^ 


•3 


fta 


s-g 


Ip a 


^ © 


8° 


eS « 


b§ 


JO-S 


b » 


« 9 




d • 


BB 




S^ 


O'.tJ 


2^ 


•ss 


11 


^H. 


^?^ 


a c3 


® o < 


^^ 




6 




a. S 




X 2 


is Q 




9 


a 8. 


a «M 


o 


5 « 


% ^ 


S a 


•= a ' 


1 i) 


s el 


* £»-• 


^ :s2 


^ 3 


■2 -3^ 


e • '^ 


auatai 
any, re 


?5^-3 


"|?2 


o 2 o o 


Jz5-J>?J 



s 



a 

.3 



I If 



162 



REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER- GENERAL. 



LEASES. 

Exhibit B. — Statement of post-offices and postal stations where premises hat^ been leaecd 
by the Oovemment, shomng namber leasedf salary of postmaster y term of lease, rental 
per annum f etc,, June 30, 1890. 

POST-OFFICES. 





' 






Term of lease. 








Na 


Offices. ^ 


Class. 


Post, 
master's 




No. 
of 


Bent per 


Heat fuel, or 
liglft in- 










• 




salary. 


From— 


To- 


years. 


annum. 


eluded ib lease. 


1 


AQiii8ion,Ala .... 


2 


12,300 


Nor. 1,1889 


Nov. 1.1894 


5 


$300.00 




2 


BirminghaiD. AIa . 


1 


8,100 


Oct. 22,1887 


Oct. 22,1892 


5 


1. 800. 00 




3 


Hot Springs, Ark. 
Fresno, Citl 


2 


2,400 


Jan. 1.1887 


Jan. 1, 1892 


5 


1,020.00 




4 


2 


2,500 


Oct. 8. 1888 


Oct. 8, 1893 


5 


1.00 


Heat and light. 


5 


MsrTSv111e,Cal... 
Oakland. Cal 


2 


2.000 


July 1,1887 


Jaly 1,1892 


5 


300.00 




6 


1 


3,200 


Deo. 1,1886 


Dec. 1,1891 


5 


1.200.00 




7 


Pomona, Cal 


S 


2,000 


Jan. 1, 1889 


Jan. 1,1894 


5 


300.00 




8 


BedBlaff.Cal.... 


2 


2.100 


July 1.1887 


July 1,1892 


6 


360.00 




9 


Riverside. Cal.... 


2 


2,200 


Apr. 1.1889 


Apr. 1,1894 


5 


1.00 




10 


San Bernardino, 

CaL 
San Diego, Cal.... 


2 


2,400 


June 30, 1888 


June 30, 1883 


5 


1.00 


Heat 


11 


1 


8.000 


....do 


....do 


5 


1,200.00 


Heat and light 


12 


Santa Ana, Cal... 


2 


2,000 


Jan. 1,1889 


Jan. 1,1894 


6 


300.00 




18 


SanU Barbanh Cal 


2 


2,400 


July 1,1889 


July 1,1894 


6 


1.00 


Do. 


14 


Stockton, Cal 


2 


2,600 


Aug. 13, 1889 


Aag. 13, 1894 


5 


780.00 




15 


Aspen, CoI6 :. 

Colorado Springs, 

Colo. 
DenTer,Colo 


2 


2.400 


May 15, 1890 


May 16, 1895 


5 


1,000.00 


Do. 


16 


2 


2.700 


Feb. 1,1886 


Feb. 1,1891 


5 


1.00 


Do. 


17 


1 


3.600 


KoT. 28.1889 


Nov. 28,1892 


3 


10, 500. 00 




18 


Greeley, Colo 

Leadyllle.Colo.... 


2 


2.000 


Apr. 1,1889 


Apr. 1,1894 


5 


600.00 


Do. 


19 


2 


2,000 


July 1.1889 


July 1,1894 


5 


1.00 




20 


Pueblo, Colo 


2 


2,800 


May 1,1887 


May 1,1892 


5 


1.00 




21 


Trinidad, Colo.... 


2 


2.300 


Mar. 16. 1889 


Mar. 16, 1894 


5 


600.00 


Do. 


22 


Birmingham, Conn 


2 


2.400 


July 1,1886 


July 1,1891 


5 


1,000.00 




23 


Bridgeport. Conn 
DaaDnry,Conn ... 


1 


3.200 


Mar. 81, 1888 


Mar. 31, 1893 


5 


3,087.50 


Heat 


34 


2 


2,600 


Jan. 1, 1889 


Jan. 1.1894 


5 


700.00 


HeHt and light 


25 


Meriden.Conn.... 


2 


2,900 


Apr. 19, 1889 


Apr. 19, 1894 


5 


1. 800.00 


Do. 


28 


New Britain. Conn 


2 


2,600 


Jane 30, 1888 


June 30, 1893 


5 


1,045.00 ; Heat. 


27 


Kew London. Conn 


2 


2,800 


Oct. 1,1888 


Oct. 1. 1893 


5 


2.500.00 


Heat and light 


28 


Korwich.Conn — 
Stamford, Conn . . . 


2 


2,700 


Apr. 1.18K9 


Apr. 1,1894 


5 


1,800.00 




29 


2 


2.500 


Apr. 1,1890 


Apr. 1,1895 


5 


1.400.00 




30 


WalUngford, Conn 
Waterbnry, Conn. 


2 


2,000 


Dec. 12,1887 


Dec. 12,1892 


5 


650.00 


Do. 


81 


1 


2,900 


Apr. 1,1890 


Apr. 1,1895 


5 


2,400.00 




32 


Washington, D.C. 


1 


6,000 


July 1,1889 


July 1,1891 


2 


8,000.00 




88 


Orlando. Fla 


2 


2,000 


Apr. 18, 1888 


Apr. 18, 1893 


5 


4M).0O 




34 


Colnmbus,Ga 


2 


2,500 


Jan. 1, 1889 


Jan. 1,1894 


5 


1,200.00 




85 


Borne, Oa 


2 


2 400 


June 30, 1888 
Dec 1,1885 


June 30. 1893 
Dec. 1,1890 


5 


600.00 




36 


Sarannah.&a 


1 


3,200 


5 


1,850.00 




87 


Belleville, III 


2 


?900 


Oct. 1, 1888 


Oct. 1, 1893 


5 


450.00 


Da 


38 


Bloomington. III.. 
Charleston. 111.... 


2 


2,600 


Oct. 1, 1886 


Oct. 1, 1891 


6 


1,250.00 




89 


3 


1,700 


Jan. 1,1890 


Jan. 1,1891 


1 


400.00 


Do. 


40 


DanviUclU 


2 


2,400 


Jan. 1,1888 


Jan. 1,1894 


5 


600.00 




41 


Decatur, 111 

Dixon, 111 


2 


2.700 


June30,l888 


Junc30,1893 


5 


900.00 




42 


2 


2,200 


Sept.15,1887 
Feb. 23, 1888 


Sept. 15, 1(^92 
Feb. 23,1893 


5 


175. 00 




43 


Blgin^IU 


2 


2,800 


5 


1,500.00 




44 


Bnglewood. HI 


2 


2,500 


Oct 1,1887 


Oct 1,1892 


5 


500.00 


Do. 


45 


Evanston,Ill 


2 


2,400 


Oct. 1,1889 


Oct 1,1894 


5 


1. 000. 00 




46 


Freeport,Ill 


2 


2,600 


Nov. 1,1887 


Nov. 1, 1892 


5 


600.00 




47 


Galesburg. Ill 

Jackson^lle,I11.. 


2 


2.700 


Nov. 1,1889 


Nov. 1, 1894 


5 


1, 000. 00 




48 


2 


2.500 


Feb. 1,1889 


tV)b. 1,1894 


5 


600.00 




49 


Jo1iet,Ill 


2 


2,700 


Sept.15,1887 
July 1,1886 


Sept 15, 1892 
July 1,1891 


5 


850.00 


Do. 


50 


Kankakee, HI 

Lincoln. lU 


2 


2.200 


5 


180. 00 




61 


2 


2.200 


July 2,1888 


July 2,1893 


5 


600.00 




52 


MattooiLiU 

MolincHi 


2 


2.100 


Mar. 1, 1889 


Mar. 1. 1894 


5 


600.00 




58 


2 


2,500 


July 1,1890 


July 1,1895 


5 


1,325.00 


^ 


54 


Monmouth, HI.... 
PakParkriU 

PekJn,*Hl. .'.*.".'.*.'.'.' 


2 


2.200 


Jan. 1,1883 


Jan. 1,1891 


8 


400.00 




55 


2 


2.300 


July 1,1889 


July 1. 1894 


5 


750.00 




56 


2 


2,400 


Jan. 15, 1887 


Jan. 15, 1892 


5 


1.00 




57 


2 


2,300 


Oct 1,1887 


Oct. 1,1892 


5 


200.00 




58 

60 


Qninqy.Hl 

Rockibrd,Hl 


1 
1 


3,100 
8,000 


Apr. 1,1873 
Jan. 1,1890 


Apr. 1, 1893 
Jan. 1.1895 


20 
5 


1.800.00 
1, 200. 00 




60 


Book Island, HI... 


2 


2,600 


Mar.l5, 1888 


Mar.15, 1893 


5 


1, 000. 00 




61 


South Chicsgo. HI. 


2 


2,300 


Jan. 1.1P87 


Jan. 1,1892 


5 


1.00 




62 


Sterling, HI 


2 


2,300 


Nov. 1.1887 


Nov. 1.1892 


5 


600.00 




63 


Streator,Ill 


2 


2,800 


Jan. 1,1888 


Jan. 1,1893 


5 


900.00 




64 


Crawfordville, Ind 


2 


2.200 


May 27.1889 


May27,lfl94 


6 


450.00 




65 


Elkhart, Ind 


2 


2,600 


July 1,1886 


July 1,1891 


5 


1.00 




66 


Goshen, Ind 


2 


2.300 


Jan. 1,1890 


Jan. 1,1895 


5 


300.00 




67 


GreenoastIe.Ind.. 
Greensbnrgn, Ind. 


2 


2,000 


Sept. 2, 1889 ; Sept. 2. 1890 


1 


120.00 




68 


3 


1,700 


May 20,1890 


May 20,1801 


1 


850.00 


Da 



ASSIStANT ATTORNEY-GENERAL — LEASES. 
LEASES— Contlnaed. 



163 



Exhibit B. — StaUment of post-offices and postal stations ^whers premises have heen leased 
by the Governmentf etc. — Continued. 

POST-OFFICES-Continued. 



Offices. 



I Poet- 
Clas8.'aiaAt«r*8 
ftalary. 



Term of lease. 



From* 



To— 



No. 

of 

yeara 



Rent per 
annam. 



Heat.fbel,or 

' light in- 

cladeu in lease. 



Kokomo, Ind 

La Fayette, Ind .. 

La Porte. Ind 

Logaosport. Ind . . 

Madison, Ind 

Harion, ind 

Mu]icie,lnd 

Peru, Ind 

Kiebmond, Ind ... 
Sonth Band. Ind.. 
Valparaiso, Ind... 
Yincennes, Ind ... 
Atlantic, Iowa — 
Burlington, Iowa. 
Cedar Kapids, 

Iowa. 

Creaton,Iowa 

Davenportt Iowa . . 
OcMSorah, Iowa — 
Fort Dodee, Iowa. 
Fort Madis^on, 

Iowa. 
Iowa City, Iowa... 
Keokuk, Iowa — 

Le Mars, Iowa 

Marshalltown, 

Iowa. 
tfluscatine, Iowa.. 
New Hampton, 

Iowa. 
Oskalooaa, Iowa . . 
Ottamwa,Iovra... 
Siotuc City, Iowa.. 

Vinton, Iowa 

Wat«rloOj^Iowa. . . 
Abilene, Kana .... 
Arkansas City, 

Kans. 
Atchison, Kans... 
Cbanate.Kans.... 
Bodge City, Kana. 
Oarden City, 

Kans. ^ 

Hutchison. Kans. . 
KansasCity.Kans. 
Larned, Kans . ... 
Lawrence, Kans .. 
Mcpherson. Kans. 
Parsons, Kans .... 
Wellington, Kans. 
Wichita, Kans.... 
Winfield,Kans... 
Bowling Green, 

N«wi»oit,Ky 

Auburn, Me 

Aninista,Me 

Lewfston, Me 

Waterrille, Me ... 
Cumberland. Md. . 
Frederick, Md . . 
Ha^erBtown, Md. 
Attleborongh, 

Mass. 
Beverly. Mass . . . 
Brockton. Mass . . 
Fitch burg, Mass. 
Greenfield, Mass. 
Haverhill, Mass . 
Hulyokc, Mfti^s . . 
Uydc !'ark. Mass 
Lawrence, M San . 



$2,000 
. 2,700 
2,200 
2.400 
2,200 
2,200 
2.300 
• 2.000 
2,700 
2,800 
2,200 
2,200 
2.100 
3,000 
2,900 

2,200 
3,100 
2,100 
2,000 
2.100 

2.400 
2.700 
2.100 
2.500 

2,400 
1,000 

2.300 
2,700 
3,100 
1,800 
2,400 
2, 200 
2,200 

2,300 
1,600 
1,700 
2,000 

2.400 
2.600 
1,700 
2.700 
2,100 
2, COO 
2.100 
3,000 
2,300 
2.000 

2,500 
2,300 
3,000 
2.600 
2,100 
2,400 
2,300 
2,400 
2,100 

2,300 
2,500 
2,700 
2.400 
2,.')00 
2,K0O 
2,600 
2,800 



Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Feb. 



Jan. 20, 1890 
July 1.1888 
Jan. 1.1887 
Deo. 5.1887 
Jan. 1.1 8h8 
Feb. 1,1890 
Feb. 15. 1888 
Jan. 1,1889 
1.18>« 
1,1885 
1,1889 
1.1888 
Jan. 13, 1890 
Jan. 12, 1884 
Jan. 1,1885 

Feb. 1,1889 

July 1,1889 

July 1, 1889 

Apr. 1,1890 

Feb. 1.1880 

Jan. 1,1885 
Oct 1, 1886 
Aug. 15, 1886 
Jan. 1,1889 

July 1,1887 
Apr. 1,1890 



Jan. 
May 
Feb. 
Jan. 
Jan. 



1.1889 
1,1886 
4, 1889 
1.1886 
6, 1H90 



Sept. 1,1887 
Mar. 1,1889 

Sept. 15. 1888 
Apr. 1,1890 
Jan. 1. 1888 
Mar. 31. 1888 

July 1,1889 
Nov. 1.1889 
Nov. 4,1888 
Apr. 1.1890 
Sep:;. 24, 1888 
Jan. 1. 1890 
July 1,1886 
Oct. 1. 1886 
Mar. 1,1888 
Sept 12, 1887 

Dec. 16,1889 
Apr. 1.1887 
July 1,1886 
Feb. 1,1890 
June 15, 1887 
Apr. 1,1887 
July 1,1887 
June 30, 1888 
Oct. 1. 1889 

Jan. 1. 1887 
Oct. 16,1887 
Au«:. 15, 1887 



Julv 
Fell. 
Nov. 
Feb. 
Jan. 



1, 

1,1890 
1,1888 
1,1888 
1,1888 



Jan. 20, 1896 
July 1,1891 
Jan. 1.1892 
Dea 5,1892 
Jan. 1,1893 
Feb. 1,1895 
Feb. 15, 1893 
Jan. 1,1894 

— do 

Jan. 1.1891 
Jan. 1.189<l 
Feb. 1,1888 
Jan. 13, 1805 
Jan. 12, 1894 
Jan. 1,1895 

Feb. 1,1894 

July 1,1894 

July 1.1894 

Apr. 1.1895 

Feb. 1,1895 

Jan. 1,1895 
Oct 1. 1891 
Aug. 15. 1891 
Jan. 1.1894 

July 1,1892 
Apr. 1,1881 

Jan. 1,1894 

May 1.1891 

Feb. 4,1894 

Jan. 1. 1891 

Jan. 6, 1895 

Sept 1,1892 

Mar. 1,1894 

Sept 15, 1893 
Apr. 1,1891 
Jan. 1. 1893 
Mar. 31. 1893 

July 1,1894 
Nov. 1.1894 
Nov. 4,1893 
Apr. 1,1895 
Sept 24, 1893 
Jan. 1,1895 
July 1.1890 
Oct 1, 1891 
Mar. 1,1893 
Sept 12, 1892 

Dec. 16, 1894 
Apr. 1,1895 
July 1,1891 
Feb. 1,1895 
June 15, 1892 
Apr. 1,1892 
July 1,1892 
June 30. 1893 
Oct 1, 1894 

Jan. 1,1882 
Oct 15,1882 
Aug. 15, 1892 
July 1,1891 



Feb. 
Nov. 
Feb. 
Jao, 



1,1895 
1.1893 
1. 1893 
1,1893 



5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
6 
5 
5 
5 
6 
5 
6 
5 

10 
10 

6 
6 
5 
5 
5 

10 
5 
5 
5 

5 
1 

5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 

6 
1 
6 
5 

5 
5 
5 

5 

a 

5 

4 
5 
5 
5 

4 
5 
5 
6 
5 
5 
5 
6 
6 

5 
5 
5 
5 

5 
5 



$700.00 

Lioaoo 

700.00 

1,200.00 

400.00 

700.00 

800.00 

500.00 

1.400.00 

1. 200. 00 

400.00 

1.00 

375.00 

2,6oaoo 

1,200.00 

640.00 

1,200.00 

300.00 

600.00 

1800.00 

1,200.00 

1,000.00 

125.00 

800.00 

1, 000. 00 

3od:oo 
4oaoo 

.500.00 

2,800.00 

1.00 

250.00 

LOO 

500.00 

1.360.00 

400.00 

460.00 

1.00 

225.00 

1. 200. 00 

200. 00 

1,800.00 

300.00 

450.00 

180.00 

1.00 

900.00 

500.00 

1, 400. 00 
700.00 

1. 300. 00 

1, 100. 00 
600.00 
600.00 

1. 000. 00 
800.00 
600.00 

000.00 
1,400.00 
1, 700. 00 

560.00 
2,500.00 
1, 200. 00 

8<X).00 
1,550.00 



Heat and light 

Da 

Do. 
Do. 

Fuel and light 
Heat, 



Heat and light 



Do. 



Do, 

Do. 
Do. 

Do. 

Light 
Heat 

Heat and light. 
Do. 
Do. 



Heat 
HcAtand light. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Heat 
Heat and light 



Do. 
Heat 



164 



REPORT OF THE POSTMASTfiR-GENEKAL. 



LEASES— Continued. 

Exhibit B. —'Statement 0/ post-bffifes andpostal ataiione where premises have been leaeed 
by the Oovernmenlf etc. — Continued. 

f. POST-OFFICES-Contlnued. 









Poat- 


Term of lease. 


No. 


Rent per 


Heat, fii**], or 


Na 


OffioOB. 


Claaa. 


roaster's 




of 


light in- 
cluded in 1. ase. 






salary. 


From— 


To- 


years. 


annum. 


133 


Lvnn.Miw» 

Maiden, ^Bs 


1 


13,100 


Dec. 15,1889 


Dec. 15, 1804 


5 


$2,800.00 


Heat 


184 


2 


2,400 


Oct. 1, 18H« 


Oct 1, 1891 


5 


800.00 


Do. 


135 


Melrose. MftM.... 


2 


2.000 


Oct 1, 1887 


Ocu 1, 189i: 


5 


350.00 


Heat and light 


136 


Milfbrd.Mastf.... 


2 


2,000 


Jan. 1, 1890 


Jan. 1,1805 


5 


500.00 


Do. 


137 


ITewburyport, 

MaiiR. 
Newton, Mam.... 


2 


2,500 


Mar. 13. 1886 


Mar. 13, 1891 


5 


90U.00 




188 


2 


2,300 


Oct 1, 1888 


Oct 1,1893 


5 


1,050.00 


Do. 


139 


Newtonvilie,MaM 


2 


2,100 


Jan. 1.1889 


Jan. 1, 1^94 


6 


575.00 


Do. 


140 


North A.d»me, 

Maea. 
Northampton, 

PittX'ld.Mass... 


2 


2.700 


Oct 15,1887 


Oct 15,1892 


5 


1,000.00 


Do. 


141 


2 


2,500 


July 1,1887 


July 1,1892 


5 


675.00 


Heat 


142 


2 


2,600 


Jan. 1, 18P0 


Jan. 1, 1900 


10 


1,400.00 


Do. 


143 


Plymouth, Maes.. 
Salem, Maea 


2 


2,100 


May 1,1890 


May 1,1895 


5 


700. 00 


Heat and light. 


144 


2 


2,800 


Jan. 21,1887 


Jan. 21, 1892 


5 


2, 100. 00 


Do. 


145 


Soath Framing- 
ham, Maea. 


2 


2,000 


Oct 1, la87 


Oct 1.1892 


5 


626.00 


Dp. 


146 


Sprin^eld. Mass . 
Tanntoo.Maiw 


1 


8,300 


...do 


....do 


6 


2,500.00 


Heat 


147 


2 


2,700 


July 1.1886 


July 1,1890 


4 


1, 250. OO 




148 


Waltham. Mass... 


2 


2,500 


Feb. 1.1886 


Feb. 1,1891 


5 


1,200.00 




149 


Westflehl.Maes... 


2 


2,600 


Apr. 1,1690 


Apr. 1.1895 


6 


1,150.00 




150 


Woburn. Maae... 


2 


2,300 


Jan. 1. 1889 


Jan. 1,1894 


5 


1, 250. 00 


Hpat and light 


151 


Woroeater. Maaa.. 


1 


8,700 


June 30, 1888 


June 30. 1893 


6 


3,260.00 


Heat 


152 


Adrian, MIoh 


2 


2,400 


Apr. 9.1890 


Apr. 9,1895 


5 


500.00 




153 


Alpena, Mich 


2 


2,000 


Mar. 1.1889 


Mar. 1,1894 


5 


400.00 




157 


Ann Arbor, Mich 


2 


2.600 


....do 


. do. 


5 


1, 200. 00 




158 


BattleCreek. Mich 
Bay City, Mich... 


2 


2,700 


Jan. 1,1889 


Jan. 1. 1894 


5 


1, 300. 00 


Heat. 


159 


2 


2,600 


Apr. 21, 1886 


Apr. 21. 1891 


5 


700.00 




160 


Big RapidH, Mioh. 


2 


2, 100 


July 15, lji-8 


July 15,1893 


5 


650.00 


Heat and light 


161 


Charlotte, Mich... 


2 


2.000 


June 9, jT»K) 


June 9, 1894 


4 


550.00 




162 


Baat Saginaw, 

Mioh. 
Flint, MIoh 


1 


3,000 


June 1.1890 


June 1,1895 


5 


2, 200. 00 




163 


2 


2,400 


Apr. 1,1889 


Apr. l,18f»4 


5 


800.00 




164 


HilLidale,Mieh... 


2 


2,200 


Jan. 20,1887 


Jan. 20, 1892 


6 


375.00 




165 


Ionia, Mich 


2 


2,200 


Jan. 1.1880 


Jan. 1, 1894 


5 


750.00 




166 


Jackaon.Mlch.... 


2 


2,800 


Dec 21,1887 


Dec. 21, 1892 


5 


1, 40J. 00 




167 


Kalamaxoo, Mioh . 


1 


3,000 


Jan. 1,1889 


Jan. 1. 1894 


5 


950.00 




168 


Lanaing,Mich.:.. 


2 


2,800 


Oct 1, 1887 


Oct 1.1892 


5 


1. 5(K). 00 


Heat 


169 


Manistee, Mich... 


2 


2,200 


Mar. 15, 1888 


Mar. 15, 1893 


5 


700.00 




170 


Ponti»o,Mich .... 


2 


2,000 


Jan. 1,1888 


Jan. 1,1893 


5 


400.00 




171 


Ypailauti.Miob... 


2 


2,200 


May 1,1889 


May 1. 1894 


5 


300.00 




172 


Dulath,Minn 


1 


8,000 


June 16, 1887 


June 15, 1892 


5 


1, 450. 00 


Heatand light 


173 


Faribaalt,Minn... 


2 


2,200 


Oct 1, 1888 


Oct 1, 1893 


5 


600.00 




174 


Mankau>,Minn... 


2 


2,400 


May 16, 1890 


May 16,1895 


5 


1, 200. 00 




175 


Red Wing. Minn.. 


2 


2.100 


Jan. 1,1X89 


Jan. 1,1894 


5 


1, 000. 00 




176 


Rochester. Minn.. 


2 


2.200 


Jan. 1. 1890 


Jan. 1,1895 


5 


1, 050. 00 




177 


Winona, Minn 


2 


2,600 


Jan. 1.1887 


Jan. 1,1892 


5 


1, 800. 00 




178 


Meridian. Miaa.... 


2 


2,300 


Feb. 15, 1887 


Feb. 15,1892 


5 


480.00 




179 


Natchez, Miss .... 


2 


2.300 


Apr. 1,1887 


Apr. 1,1890 


3 


480.00 




180 


Vioksburg,Misa.. 


2 


2,500 


Sept. 1, 1886 
Feb. 1,1889 


Sept 1,1891 
FeU 1,1894 


5 


1, 000. 00 




181 


St. Joseph, Mo ... 
Sedalia,ko 


1 


3.300 


5 


900.00 




182 


2 


2,500 


Oct 1. 1886 


Oct. 1, 1891 


5 


400.00 




183 


Springfield, Mo . . . 


2 


2.700 


May 1,1887 


Mav 1.1892 


5 


1. 050. 00 


Do. 


184 


Batte City, Mont . 


2 


2,600 


Nov. 24. 1886 i Nov. 24, 1801 


5 


1.00 


Do. 


185 


Helena, Mont 


2 


2,700 


Mar. 8, 1880 M»r. 8, 1891 


5 


1, 260. 00 




186 


Beatrice, Nebr.... 


2 


2,400 


Mar. 7, 1887 Mar. 7, 1892 


5 


700.00 




187 


Fremont, Nebr 

Grand IaUuid.Nebr 
Hastings. Nebr . . . 
D0Ter,N.H 


2 


2,400 


Junel5,1890l June 15. 1895 


5 


1, 130. 00 


Heatandlight. 


188 


2 


2.300 


June 30, 188S ! June 30, 1893 


5 


600.00 




189 


2 


2.500 


May 1,1887 


May 1,1892 


5 


6(X).00 




190 


2 


2.400 


May 1,1886 


May 1 1891 


5 


800.00 


Heat 


191 


Keene,N.H 


2 


2.4(K) 


July 1,1890 


July 1,1895 


5 


950.00 


Heatandlight. 


192 


Nashau,N.fl.... 


2 


2.600 


J^n. 1. 1890 


Jan. 1, 1895 


5 


1, 400. 00 


Heat 


193 


Asbury Park, N. J 


2 


2,400 


Jan. 10.1887 


Jan. 18,1892 


5 


600.00 


Heatandlight. 


194 


Atlantic City, N. J 


2 


2.600 


Mar. 30, 1888 


Mar. 30, 1893 


5 


1, 100. 00 


Do. 


195 


EastOrauge. N. J. 
Elizabeth.^. J ... 


2 


2, 900 


June 30, 1888 


June 30, 1893 


5 


900. 00 


Heat 


196 


2 


2.700 


Apr. 1. 1H88 


Apr. 1,1893 


5 


800. 00 




197 


Hobokeu, N. J 


2 


2.600 I Miiy 15, ISUO 


May 15.189.-) 


5 


l.l'OO.OO 




198 


Morristown.N.J . 


2 


2.500 April 1, 18K7 


Apr. 1.1892 


5 


600. 00 




199 


New Brunswick, 

N.J. 
Orange, N.J 


2 


2,600 


June 30, 1888 


June 30, 1893 


5 


900. 00 


Heatandlight, 


200 


2 


2.700 


Mar. 31, 1888 


Mar. 31, 1893 


5 


1, 600. 00 


Heat 


301 


Pater8on.N.J.... 


1 


8,000 


May 1.1886 


May 1.1891 


5 


1,500.00 


Do. 



ASSISTANT ATTORNEY-GENERAL — ^LEASES. 
LEASES— Continued. 



165 



Exhibit B.—SlaUment of post-offices andpoaial eiaiions where premisea have heen leased hy 
the Government, eto, — Contioaed. 

POST-OFFXCES-Contioaed. 



Offices. 





Post- 


Claas. 


mast^r'a 




salary. 


2 


$2,600 


2 


• 2.30O 


2 


2.000 


2 


2,100 


2 


2,500 


2 


2.400 


2 


2,000 


1 


8,100 


3 


2,100 


1 


6,000 


2 


2,300 


2 


2,200 


2 


2,500 


2 


2.000 


2 


2.30O 


1 


8,100 


2 


2,700 


2 


2.300 


2 


2,400 


2 


2,000 


2 


2,400 


2 


a. 700 


2 


2,700 


2 


2.200 


2 


2, 300 


8 


1,900 


2 


2,400 


2 


2,600 


2 


2.000 


2 


2.500 


2 


2,500 


2 


2.800 


2 


2,100 


2 


2,200 


2 


2.300 


2 


2,300 


2 


2,200 


2 


2,200 


2 


2,200 


1 


8,800 


2 


2.800 


8 


l.SOO 


2 


2,700 


2 


2,500 


2 


2.300 


2 


2,000 


1 


3,300 


2 


2,700 


2 


2,000 


2 


2,200 


2 


2,700 


1 


2,400 


2 


2,500 


2 


2.700 


2 


2,600 


2 


2,300 


1 


3,100 


2 


2,000 


, 2 


2,0110 


2 


2,100 


2 


2.000 


2 


2.900 


2 


2,400 


1 


3,200 



X.erm of lease. 



Plalnfield,X.J.. 
PrincetoD, N. J .. 
Rutherford, N.J. 
Vin6land.K.J... 
Amsterdam, N. T 
Bat»vla,N.Y.... 

Bath,JI.Y , 

Binfchamton. N . T 
BrookporL N. Y . 
Brooklyn. N. Y . . 

Cofaf>ee,K.Y 

ConiinK.K.Y 

Coi]rUaiid.N.Y.. 
DansvUl«,N.Y.. 
Daiikirk,N.Y... 

Klmlra,N.Y 

Genevii, N. Y 

Glens Falls, N.Y 
GlorersTlUe.K. Y 
HoosickPalKN.Y 
Hornellsville, 

N.Y. 

Ithaca, N.Y 2 2.700 July 1. 

Jamestown. K. Y . 2 2. 700 May 1, 
Johnstown. N.Y.. -2 2.200 July 14, 
Kingston. N.Y ... 2 2,300 June 1. 

LeRoy.N.Y 8 J,900 July 1, 

Little Falls, K. Y . 2 2,400 Jan. 1, 
LockporkN.Y... 2 2,600 Apr. 1, 

MsJone.N.Y 2 2.000 Apr. 1, 

Middletown,N.Y. 2 2,500 Mar. 31, 
Mount Vernon, 2 2,500 Feb. 1, 

N.Y. 
Newburgh.N.Y.. 2 2.800 Apr. 1, 
KiaKara Falls, 2 2,100 Apr. 1, 

KoTwiib.N.Y..-. 2 2,200 Mar. 26, 

Oneida.N.Y 2 2.300 Mar. 31, 

Oneonta,N.Y 2 2,300 July 1, 

Owego.N.Y 2 2,200 Oct 1. 

Penn Yan.N.Y... 2 2,200 July 2, 

Port Jervis, K . Y . 2 2, 200 J une 30, 

Rocbesl«r,N.Y... 1 8,800 Apr. 1, 

Borne, N.Y 2 2.800 Oct. 1, 

Sag Harbor. N.Y. 8 1.500 May 1, 

Saratoga Springs, 2 2,700 Jan. 1, 

Schineotody.N.Y. 2 2,500 July 1, 

Sing Sing, N.Y... 2 2,300 Mar. 1, 

Touftwanda,N.Y. 2 2,000 July 1. 

Troy.N.Y 1 3,300 May 1. 

WatertowiKN.Y- 2 2,700 Jan. 15. 

Waverly.N.Y.... 2 2,000 JiUy 1, 

West Now Brigh- 2 2,200 Nov. 1, 

ton. N.Y. 

Yonkers. N.Y 2 2,700 Juno 1, 

AsheriUe,N.C ... 1 2,400 Oct. 26, 

Charlotte, N. C . . . 2 2, 500 Nov. 10, 

Wilmington, N.C. 2 2.700 Sept. 1, 

Far^o, N. Dak .... 2 2, 600 Jan. 1, 

Grand Forks, K. 2 2,300 Jan. 1 

Dak. 

Akron, Ohio 1 3,100 July I 

Alliance, Ohio .... 2 2,000 May 1 

AabUbala.Obio.. , 2 2,000 Apr. 1, 

BellainsOhio 2 2,100 July 1. 

Bnnyrus, Ohio 2 2, ()00 Fob. 15, 

Canton. Ohio 2 2.900 May 16, 

ChUlicotbe,Obio.. 2 2,400 Apr. 1, 

D»ylon,Ohio 1 3,200 Oct. 15, 

* 93.000 per annam additional allowed for rent at 
tOr nntn completion of Goveinmentboilding. 




May 
Jan. 
May 
Jan. 
Aug. 
Jan. 
July 
Ocu 
Apr. 
July 
Oct. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
July 
Mar. 
Feb. 
Apr. 
Jan. 
Apr. 
May 
July 



1888 May 1, 
1H90 Jan. 1, 
18CK) May 1, 



1890 
li!89 
1889 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1889 
1887 
18 7 
1800 
1887 
18«8 
1889 
1890 
1889 
1890 
1889 
1887 

188*i 
1886 
1888 
1882 
1887 
1884 
1882 
18h9 
1888 
1889 

1890 



1888 
1888 
1887 
1888 
1888 
1888 
18^6 
1888 
1890 
1883 

1887 
1886 
1887 
1890 
1887 
1887 
1889 

1887 
1889 
1888 
1888 
IHOO 
1890 

1889 
1890 
1890 
1889 
1880 
18>^9 
1880 
1883 



Jan. 1. 

Aug. 1, 

Jan. 1, 

July 

Oct. 

Apr. 

July 

Oct. 

Mar. 



Mar. 1, 



July 
Mar. 
Feb. 
Apr. 
Jan. 
Apr. 

May i; 

July 1, 

July 1, 

May 1. 
July 14. 

Jane 1, 

July 1, 

Jan. 1. 

Apr. 1, 

Apr. 1. 
Mar. 31, 

Feb. 1, 



1891 
189.') 
1895 
1895 
1894 
1^94 
1802 
1893 
1894 
1893 
1892 
1892 
1895 
1892 
1893 
1894 
180.5 
1894 
1895 
1890 
1892 
2 
18vi 
1 89 J 
1890 
180 
1892 
1894 
1892 
1894 
1893 
1894 



Apr. 1,1895 
Apr. 1,1894 



Mar. 

Mar. 

July 

Oct, 

July 

Jane 

Apr. 

Oct. 

May 

Jan. 



26, 1893 
31. 1»*93 
1, 18f>2 
1, 18t>3 
2, ]8:)3 
30. 1893 
1, 1891 
1, 1891 
1, 1891 
1, 1893 



Jnly 1,1892 

Mar. 1.1891 

July 1,1892 

May 1,1893 
Jan. 15.1892 

July 1,1892 

Nor. I,le04 

June 1,1892 
Oct. 26.1894 
Nov. 10, 18U3 
Sept. 1.1893t 
Jan. 1, 1895 
Jun. 1, 1895 

July 1,1891 
May 1.1895 
Apr. 1, 18U5 
July 1.18S»4 
Feb. 15.1894 
May 6,1894 
Apr. 1.1891 
Oct. 15,1803 



Sent per 
aunum. 



Heat, fnel, or 

light in- 
cluded in lease. 



91, 050. 00 : 

700. 00 ' 
36U. 00 ' 
300 00 
1.200.00 I 

1, 100. 00 ! 

.wo. 00 ! 
1,600.00 

350.00 
•6, 700. 00 

850.00 

975.00 
1, 260. 00 

850.00 

450.00 
2,400.00 

600.00 
1,000.00 
1,200.00 

400.00 
1,200.00 

1, 500. 00 

1,200.00 
550.00 
550. 00 
200. 00 
650. 00 

1. (>00. 00 
55U. 00 

1, 400. 00 
600.00 

1, 700. 00 
700.00 

600.00 

600.00 

600. 00 

700.00 

450.00 

1. 000. 00 

5, 000. 00 

4i5.00 

350.00 

1,500.00 

1,000.00 
400.00 
400.00 
3,250.00 
1, 000. 00 
500.00 
840.00 

1,500.00 
400.00 
600.00 

1, 600. m 

l.l.'iO.OO 
1.200.00 

1, 380. 00 
9(K).00 
200. 00 
600.00 
450.00 

1, 300. 00 
1, 000. 00 

2, 950. 00 



Heat and lighL 



Da 

Da 

Heat. 



Fuel and light. 
HeatandUght. 



Da 

Da 

Do. 

Heat 

HeatandUght. 

Fuel. 
Heat. 



Heat 
HeatandUght 

Heat 



Heat and light 

Do. 
Heat 

Do. 
HeatandUght 



Da 
Da 



Heat and light 
Do, 

Do. 

1)0. 

Do. 

Do. 

Da 
Heat 



Brooklyn for addition to main office, not under leasee 



166 



REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 
LEASES— Continaed. 



Exhibit B. — Statement of post-cfficee and postal UationB where premUes have been leased 
, iy the Govei'nmentt etc, — Continned. 

POST-OFFICBS-Conttnoed. 



Vo. 



266 

267 



270 
271 
272 
273 
274 
276 
276 
277 
278 
279 
280 
281 
282 
283 
284 
285 
286 
2^ 
288 
280 
290 
291 
202 
203 
294 
20S 
296 
207 
298 
299 
800 
801 
802 
8U3 
804 
805 
806 
807 
808 
809 
810 
811 
812 
813 
814 
815 
816 
817 
818 
819 
820 
821 
822 
823 
824 
825 
826 
827 
828 
829 
830 
881 
832 
833 
884 



OAo»H> 



Delaware, Ohio . . 
East Liverpool, 
Ohio. 

BIyria,Ohio 

Findlay.Ohio 

Fremont, Ohio .... 
6»Uipoli0,Ohio.. 
Hamilton, Ohio .., 

Iron ton, Ohio 

Kenton. Ohio 

Lima, Ohio , 

Manafi*ad, Ohio... 
Marietta, Ohio... 

Marlon, Ohio 

Massillon, Ohio... 
Mt. Vernon, Ohio.. 
Norwald. Ohio... 

Oberlin,Ohio 

PaineavUle,Ohlo. 

Piqa%Obio 

Salem, Ohio 

Springfield, Ohio.. 
Stenheoville, Qhio. 

Tiflan,Ohio 

Troy, Ohio. ... 
nrbana,Obio .. 
Warren, Ohio.. 
Wooater, Ohio . 

Xenia,Ohio 

Yonngetown, Ohio. 
ZaneavUle, Ohio 
AUentown, Pa.. 
Salem, Oregon .... 

Altoona,PA....... 

Bellefont.et Fa ,... 
Bethlehem, Pa,... 
Bra>ltord, pa ,„., 

CarliBle,Pa 

Chambenibarg, Pa 

Cheater, Pa 

Co1an^ia,Pa 

Corry. Pa 

DanTllle,Pa 

Downingtovro.Pa. 

Easton, Pa 

Franklin. Pa...... 

Greensbargh, Pa. 

Hacleton.Pa 

Huntingdon, Pa . 
Johnstown, Pa .. 
Lancaster, Pa.... 

Lebanon, Pa 

Look Haven, Pa . 
McKeesport, Pa . 
MeadvilkPa... 
New OaaUe, Pa. . 
Norrlstown, Pa.. 

Pittston,Pa 

Pottatown.Pa... 

Boranton,Pa 

Shamokin, Pa.... 

TitnsTiUe, Pa 

TowandiLPa 

Warren^a 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 
wmiamsportt Pa 

York, Pa 

Westerly, R. I ... 
Aberdeen, a Dak . 
Huron. & Dak . 
Sioux FaUa.&Dak. 



CI HAS. 



master'fl. 



12.800 
2,800 

2,200 
2,600 
2.800 
1,900 
2,500 
2,000 
2.000 
2,500 
2,800 
2,200 
2,200 
2,200 
2,100 
2.200 
2,200 
2,400 
2,400 
2.300 
8,200 
2,400 
2,300 
2,100 
2,200 
2,800 
2,300 
2,200 
2,700 
2,800 
2,700 
2.200 
2,700 
2,100 
2,300 
2,600 
2,200 
2,300 
2,500 
1.900 
^200 
2,000 
1,400 
3,600 
2,200 
2,100 
2,800 
2,400 
2.500 
2,900 
2,500 
2,300 
2,800 
2,600 
2,400 
2,400 
2,300 
2,800 
8,100 
2,100 
2.400 
2,000 
2,600 
2,900 
2,900 
2,700 
2,200 
2,400 
2.300 

i;soo 



TtTmuflf-afi^, 



Fron 



To- 



Apr. 15, 188S? Apr. 15, 1803 
Jan. 1,1889 Jan. 1, 18U4 



Oct. 1,1889 


Oct 1,1894 


Nov. 9,1689 


Nov. 9,1894 


Jaly 1,1887 


July 1,1892 


Mar. 1,1890 


Mar. 1,1890 


Oct. 1, 1886 
July 5,1887 


Oct 1. 1891 


July 1,1892 


Sept 7,1889 


Sept 7,1894 


Mar. 15, 1888 


Mar. 15, 1893 


Apr. 1,1889 


Apr. 1,1894 


June 1,1890 


June 1,1895 


July 1,1887 


July 1,1892 


Sept 20. 1886 


Sept 20, 1891 


Apr. 1,1887 


Apr. 1.1892 


July 1,1886 


July 1.1891 


Mar. 1,1890 


Mar. 1,1805 


Oct 22,1887 


Oct 22.1892 


Sept 2,1889 


Sept 2,1893 


Nov. 1,1889 


Nov. 1.1894 


Mar. 15, 1887 


Mar. 15, 1892 


Feb. 1,1887 


Feb. 1,1892 


July 1,1886 


July 1,1391 


July 1,1887 


July 1,1892 


Jan. 8.18M7 


Jan. 8.1892 


Aug.15. 1887 


Aug.15,1892 


Deo. 11, 1886 


Dec. 11, 1891 


Jan. 1, 1887 


Jan. 1,1892 


July 1,1H87 


July 1,1892 


Sept 1,1886 


Sept 1, 1891 


Oct 1, 1889 


Oct 1, 1894 


Mnr. 1,1889 


Mar. 1,1894 


Oct 1,18P8 


Oat 1,1893 


July 2,1888 


July 2,1893 


May 1,1886 


May 1,1891 


Nov. 16, 1887 


Nov. 16. 1892 


Mar. 1,1890 


Mar. 1,1895 


Jan. 1,1890 


Jan. 1,1895 


Oct 1,1888 


Oct 1.1892 


Feb 15.1890 


Feb. 15, 1894 


June 1,1887 


June 1.1892 


Oct 1,1887 


Oct 1,1892 


Aug.15,1886 


AuK.15, 1891 


Apr. 1,1887 


Apr. 1,1892 


Apr. 1,1880 


Apr. 1.1804 


Apr. 80. 1889 


Apr. 1,1890 


July 1,1889 


July 1,1894 


Apr. 1,1888 


Apr. 1,1893 


July 1,1886 


July 1,1891 


Oct 1,1887 


Oct 1,1892 


Mar. 81,1888 


Mar. 81, 1893 


Mar. 1, 1888 


Mar. 1, 1893 


Jan. 1,1888 


Jan. 1.1893 


J un 30,1888 


June 30, 1893 


Oct 1, 1886 


Oct 1, 1891 


Feb. 1.1889 


Feb. l,18f)4 


July 1,1886 


July 1,1891 


Mar. 31, 1888 


Mar. 31, 1893 


Apr. 1,1889 


Apr. 1,1894 


Jan. 1, 1889 


Jan. 1,1894 


Nov. 1,1889 


Nov. 1,1894 


....do 


....do 


....do 


....do 


Apr. 1,1888 


Apr. 1,1891 


June 80.1888 


June 80, 1892 


Apr. 1,1889 


Apr. 1,1894 


Oct 1,1888 


Oct 1,1893 


Deo. 6,1887 


Dec 6,1893 


Jan. 1,1890 


Jan. 1,1805 


Feb. 1,1888 


Feb. 1,1883 



Ho. 
of 


Rent per 


^eani» 


aoDuui. 


5 


9500.00 


6 


700.00 


6 


650.00 


6 


1,200.00 


5 


400.00 


1 


300.00 


5 


600.00 


5 


380.00 


5 


600.00 


5 


1,600.00 


5 


1, 150. 00 


5 


650.00 


6 


400.00 


5 


1.00 


5 


600.00 


5 


560.00 


5 


350.00 


5 


275.00 


4 


1,000.00 


5 


600.00 


5 


2,200.00 


5 


900.00 


5 


500.00 


5 


600.00 


5 


800.00 


5 


650.00 


5 


600.00 


5 


400.00 


5 


1,200.00 


6 


800.00 


5 


2, 000. 00 


6 


1.00 


5 


900.00 


6 


380.00 


6 


700. 00 


5 


600.00 


5 


450.00 


5 


440.00 


4 


676. 00 


5 


300.00 


6 


350.00 


5 


500.00 


5 


1.00 


5 


1, 100. 00 


5 


600.00 


4H 


750.00 


5 


1, 200. 00 


5 


300.00 


6 


750,00 


5 


2,000.00 


5 


850.00 


5 


600.00 


6 


500.00 


6 


1,000.00 


6 


700.00 


5 


1, 000. 00 


5 


5(10.00 


5 


800.00 


5 


2, 790. 00 


6 


400.00 


5 


750.00 


5 


500.00 


6 


1,000.00 


5 


1, 100. 00 


4 


80().00 


5 


1, 000. 00 


5 


800.00 


6 


600.00 


6 


700.00 


6 


1,200.00 



dudiHl 111 lea«e. 



Heat and light. 

Do. 
Do. 



Do. 



Do. 
Do. 



Heat 
Do. 

Heat and light. 

Do. 

Do. 
Do. 



Do. 

Heat 

Do. 
Heat and light 



Heat 



Heat and light 



Do. 



Do. 
Heat 



Heat and light. 

Do. 
Heat 



Hoat and light 



ASSISTANT ATTORNEY-GENERAL — LEASES. 
LEA8ES--Cootinued« 



167 



Exhibit B. — Statement of post-offices and postal stations where premises have heen leased 
by the Government^ eto.— Contmaed. 

POST-OFFICES— Continned. 



No. 



336 

337 
33^ 
339 
340 
341 
342 
343 
344 
345 

346 
347 
348 
349 
3i30 
351 
352 
353 

354 

355 
356 
357 
358 

359 
360 
3(il 
362 
363 
864 
366 
366 
367 



Offices. 



Chattanooga^ 

Bonham, Tex 

Cormcana.Tex 

Fort Worth, Tex . 
Oaineeville, Tex . . 

Bonston, Tex 

Paris, Tex 

Sherman. Tex 

Ogden, Uuh 

Salt Lake City, 

Utah. 
Benninf^n,Vt... 
Bractlehoroiigh,yt. 

Montpelier, Yv 

St. Johnsbary, Vt. 
Lynchborgh, Va . . 

Staonton. va 

Seattle, Wash 

Spokane Falls, 

Walla Walla, 

Wash. 

Appleton, Wis 

Ashland. Wis 

Beloit,Wis 

Chippewa Falls, 

Wis. 
Eau Claire, Wis .. 
Fond dn Lac. Wis. 
Green Bay, Wis .. 
Janesville.WU... 
Marinette, Wis . . . 

Racine, Wis 

Sheboygan, Wis... 
Watertown, Wis.. 
Cheyenne, Wyo . . . 

Total rental at 
367 offices.... 



, Post- 
Class. 'ma««ter'8 . 
salary, i 



Term of lease. 



No. 
of 



$3,100 

1,600 
2,000 
2,800 
2,100 
2,900 
2.200 
2,400 
2.500 
3,100 

2,200 
2.500 
2.400 
2,200 
2,800 
2,400 
3,000 
2.600 

2,300 

2,300 
2,400 
2,300 
2,100 

2,500 
2,400 
2,300 
2,500 
2,100 
2,800 
2,^00 
2.000 
2,400 



From— 



Jan. 2,1888 

Jan. 2,1886 
Apr. 1,1890 
Jan. 1.1890 

...do 

Ang. 1,1886 
Sept 1, 1887 
Nov. 1.1887 
Ang. 1,18«8 
Jnly l,18d6 



Jan. 
OcL 
Jan. 
July 
July 
July 
Oct. 
Dec 



1,1889 
1, 1>'86 
1,1889 
],1&<0 
1,1886 
1.1887 
14,1889 
1,1889 



Jnne 30, 1888 

Jan. ]. 1890 
Nov. 12,1887 
Mar. 1,1890 
Jnne 1,1889 



Oct. 

Jan. 

June 

Jan. 

July 

July 

Mar. 

Jan. 



1,1886 
1,1889 
7,1890 
1, 18K7 
2,18^8 
1,1889 
1,1889 
1.1888 



Nor. 10, 1888 



Jan. 2, 1893 

Jan. 2,1891 

Apr. 1,1805 

Jan. 1,1895 

..-.do 

Ang. 1,1890 

Sept 1,1892 

Nov. 1.1892 

Aug. 1,1896 

July 1,1891 

Jan. 1,1894 

Oct 1, 1801 

Jan. 1,1891 

July 1,1894 

Jnly 1,1891 

Jnly 1,1892 
Oct 14,1894 

Dec 1,1804 

Juno 80, 1803 

Jan. 1, 1895 
Nov. 12, 1892 

Mar. 1,1895 

June 1,1804 

Oct 1, 1801 

Jan. 1.1804 

Jnne 7,1895 

Jab. 1. 1892 



July 
July 
Mar. 
Jan. 



2,1803 
1,1893 
1,1894 
1,1893 



Nov. 10, 1803 



Rent per 
annum. 



Heat, fuel, or 

light in. 
eluded in lease. 



$5.00 

LOO 
400.00 

1, 600. 00 
360.00 
000.00 
240.00 
360.00 
600.00 

1,200.00 

800.00 
650.00 
850.00 
600.00 
700.00 
400.00 
2,700.00 
780.00 

620. CO 

000.00 
600.00 
800.00 
800.00 

1.500 00 
600.00 

1,200.00 

1. 100. 00 
350.00 

1,160.00 
800. OU 
600.00 

1,600.00 



324,042.60 



Do. 
Dv. 



Do. 



Do. 



Do. 

Do. 

Doi 
Do. 
Do. 



Do. 



POSTAL STATIONS. 



Baltimore. Md . 
West Baltimore 



li 

6 ' 

^ i 

10 I 

11 . 

12 ] 

13 ! 

14 ' 

t 
15 

16 : 

17 I 

18 i 
19 
20 i 



Boston, Mass 

Back Bay 

Brighton 

Brookline 

Cambridge .... 
Cambridgeport 
Charlestown . . . 

Chelsea 

Doreheeter — 
£sst Boston ... 
East Cambridge 
Jamaica Plain . 

Mattapan 

North Cam 
bridge. 

Revere 

Roxbury 

SomervUle.... 

Station A 

South Boston , 
Winthrop 



$5,000 



6,000 



Jan. 15,1887 



Oct. 1. 1888 
July 1,1887 
Mar. 31. 1888 
Sopt 16, 1887 
Jan 1, 1889 
Nov. 1,1886 
Jnne 1,1890 
Aug. 1,1889 
July 1,1889 
Mar. 31, 1888 
Jan. 1, 1890 
Mar. 1,1890 
Apr. 1,1887 

Nov. 10. 1887 
Feb. 1,1889 
Jan. 6, 1889 
Deo. 1, 1885 
Jan. 1, 1889 
Sept 1,1887 



Jan. 16.1892 



Oct 1, 
July 1, 
Mar. 31. 
Sept. 15, 
Jan. 1. 
Nov. 1. 
June 1. 
Aug. 1, 
July 1, 
Mar. 31, 
Jnn. 1, 
Mar. 1. 
Apr. 1. 



1892 
1893 
1892 
1804 
1891 
1895 
1894 
1894 
1893 
1895 
1805 
1802 



Nov. 10. 1892 
Feb. 1,1894 
Jan. 6, 1894 
Dec 1, 1889 
Jan. 1, 1894 
Sept 1.1802 



$650,00 



1.500.00 

575.00 

8UO.00 

750.00 

1, 000. 00 

800.00 

2, 000. 00 

1. 000. 00 

1, 450. 00 

560.00 

550.00 

400.00 

600.00 

150.00 
1,600.00 
1, 000. 00 
1,050.00 
1,000.00 

144.00 



Heatand light 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Heat. 

Heat and tight 

Do. 

Do. 

Da 

Dc 

Do. 
Heat 
Heat and light 



168 



KEPOET OF THE POSTMASTER-GENKRAL. 
LEASES—Continned. 



Exhibit B. — Statement of post-offices and postal stations tohertf premises have been leased 
^ by the Oovernment, etc. — Contiuued. 



POSTAL STATIONS-Continued. 





Officea. 


Class. 


Post- 
master's 
salary. 


Term of lease. 


No. 

of 

years. 


Kent per 
annum. 


Heat f'lel, or 

light ia- 
eluded in lease. 


Ko. 


From— 


To- 




Brooklyn, N.T... 
Hrevoort ...» 


1 


$5,000 












71 


Deo. 1,1887 
May 1.1886 
Nov. 1,1888 
Dec 1,1885 
Jan. 21,1888 


Dea 1.1897 
May 1.1891 
Nov. 1,1891 
Dec. 1,1889 
Jan. 21. 1893 


10 
5 
5 
4 
5 


61, 700. 00 

720.00 

625.00 

600. CO 

2,000.00 


Heat 


22 


Green point .... 






Heatandllght. 
Do. 


?^ 


Station £ 






24 


Station S 






Heat 


?5 


Station W 










qhlcago,ri 

MadiMOiiStreet. 
North Diyieion. 
Ogden Avenue 

Station. 
South Divialon 
Stock Tarda . . . 


1 


6,000 




20 


Dec. 1.1888 
May 1.1886 
May 1,1887 
Jan. 16.1890 

Oct. 1, 1886 
Feb. 15, 1889 
Feh. 1.1890 


May 1,1803 
May 1,1891 
May 1,1892 
Jan. 15,1895 

Oct 1, 1891 
Feb. 15, 1894 
Feb. 1.1894 


5 

5 

5 
5 
5 


1, 020. 00 

1.116.00 

2.100.00 

750.00 

1.800.00 

1, 300. 00 

780.00 


Heat and light. 


T! 






7% 






Fuel and light. 


20 






Heat and light 
Heat 


90 






ni 






Heatandllght. 


82 


Twenty-second 
Street Sta- 
tlon. 

Cincinnati. Ohio.. 
Station C 






Do. 




1 


G,000 




Vt 


Oct 1,1887 
June 1,1888 


Oct 1.1892 
June 1.1893 


5 
5 


180.00 
450.00 




M 


Station E 






Do. 




Tndianapolis, Ind. 
Union Depot... 


1 


8,500 




B5 


Oct 1,1888 


Oct 1,1893 


5 


900.00 


Do. 




Kansas 01^. Mo.. 
West Kansas 
City. 

Loa Angeles, Cal.. 
Station B 


1 


8,800 




fan 


Jun^ 1, 1886 


June 1,1891 


5 


312.00 


Heat 




1 


8,800 




87 


June 1.1888 
....do ....... 


June 1,1883 
....do 


5 
5 


600.00 
500.00 


Heatand light. 


38 


East Los An- 
geles. 

Milwaukee, Wis.. 
South Side .... 






Do. 




1 


8,700 








30 


Apr. 1,1880 


Apr. 1,1894 


6 


600.00 






New York, N.Y.. 
Station A 


1 


8^000 




40 


Feb. 1,1890 
May 1.11-88 
Sept 16, 1889 
May 1,1889 
May 1,1890 
Jan. 1,18X9 
May 1,1887 
May 1,188X 
Jan. 1,1887 
Ang. 1,1889 
Apr. 1,1790 
Mar. 1,1890 
May 1, 1890 


Feb. 1,1895 
May 1. 1893 
Sept. 16, 1894 
May 1,1804 
May 1,1895 
Jan. 1,1894 
May l,189i 
May 1.1893 
Jan. 1.1892 
Aug. 1.1894 
Apr. 1,1895 
Mar. 1,1895 
Mav 1. 180.5 


5 
5 
5 
6 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 

I 

5 
5 


6, 200. 00 

8. 000. 00 

8.500.00 

5.000.00 

4.200.00 

2. 700. 00 

2,900.00 

2, 200. 00 

2,000.00 

2,600.00 

9t»0.00 

9,001). 00 

5.0OC.00 

750.00 

850. 00 

460.00 

2,100.00 

500.00 


Heat 


41 


Station B 








4? 


Station C 






Do. 


4H 


Station D 








44 


Stations 






Do. 


45 


Station F 








4<t 


Station O 






Do. 


47 


Station H 








48 


Station I 








40 


Station L ...... 








no 


Station M 








51 


Station 






Do. 


52 


Station P 








58 


Station B 






Oct. 1, 1888 ' OctC l! 1893 




54 


Stations 






May 1.1889 
Jan. 1,1887 
Nov. 20, 1889 
Feb. 1,1880 


May 1,1894 
Jan. 1.1892 
Nov. 29, 1894 
Feb. 1,1894 




55 


Station T 








50 


Station W 






Do. 


57 


Bigh Bridge... 










Philadelphia. Pa.. 
Station P 


1 


6,000 




58 


July 1,1886 
Mar. 1.1890 

....do 


July 1,1891 
Mar. 1.1895 

...do 


5 
5 

5 

6 

5 

5 

6 


420.00 
1,600.00 

610.00 

600.00 

600.00 

800,00 

2, 150. 00 




50 


Columbia Ave- 
nue Station. 

Kensington 
Sution. 

West Park Sta- 
tion. 

Southwest Sta- 
tion. 

Pansyunk Sta- 
tion. 

Bast Chestnut 
Street Sta- 
tion. 






Heatandllght. 


fH) 






01 






...do 


....do 




0? 






May 6,1890 
Apr. 7,1890 
Mar. 1,1860 


May 6,1805 
Apr. 7.1805 
Mar. 1,1896 




08 






Do. 


04 






Do. 











ASSISTANT ATTORNEY-GENERAL — LEASES. 
LEASES— Continned. 



169 



Exhibit B. — Statement of posi-ojficea and postal statUms where premises hare heen leased 
by the Government, etc. — Contiuuod. 

POSTAL STATIOlfS-ConUoiied. 



Na 


0£Bce6. 


Claaa. 


Post- 
tnaater's 
salary. 


Term of loane. 


No. 

of 

years. 


Rent per 
annum. 


Heat, fuel, or 

light in- 
cluded iu leaae. 


From— 


To— 


ff5 


Philadelphia, Pa-- 
Continued. 
PaaohaUrUIe 
Station. 

Pittaburgh, Pa... 
Station B 






Apr. 21,1800 


Apr. 


21. 1895 


6 


$600.00 


Heat and liKht 




1 


$3,000 


fiA 


June 1,1880 
Oct. 1, 1887 


Jnne 
Oct. 


1.1801 
1,1892 
1. 1892 


5 
6 

4 


250.00 
400. 00 
400.00 


I)o 


fl7 


Ba<»t Liberty . . . 






Do. 


f» 


South Side.t.... 






Sept. 1,1888 


Sept 


Do 


70 
71 


StLoui«,Mo 

Station B 


1 


0,000 




Jan. 1 1887 


Jan. 


1.1892 
1, 18»3 
1,1890 


5 
5 
4 


180. 00 
420. 00 
420. 00 




Station E 






June 1,1888 


June 


Do. 


2«orth St. Louia. 






Jnl> 1,:886 


July 






SanFranoiaco.Cal. 
Station B 


1 


6,000 




7? 


Jan. 1,1800 


Jan. 


1, 1896 


5 


1, 500. 00 






Springfield, Mo... 
Station A 


2 


2,600 




73 


Jan. 1,1888 


Jan. 


1.1803 


6 


LOO 


Do. 




Waabinirton.D.C. 
Baat Capitol 
Station. 

Total rental at 
74 Rtationa . . 


1 


5^000 






Oct 1.1889 


Oct 


1,18M 


6 


900.00 




74 










101,032.00 


















1 



KECAPITULATION. 



Total of poAt-officea , 

Total of pontal sUtions. 



No. 



3fi7 

74 



Amount. 



9324. 042. 50 
101,032.00 



Grand total, offices and stations 4«1 425.074.60 



REPORT 



OF TUK 



CHIEF POST-OFFICE INSPECTOR 



FOR 



1 8 9 O. 



171 



REPORT 



OF THE 



CHIEF POST-OFFICE INSPECTOR. 



Post-office Depaetment, 
Office of Chief Post-office Inspectoe, 

Washington, D. 6\, October 21, 1890. 

SiE : I bave the honor to sabmit herewith for yoar information a 
namber of statistical tables showiui? the workings of the force of post- 
office inspectors during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1890. I have ap- 
pended to each table explanatory comments of my own which, taken 
with the tables, form a report of the work of the office and its agents 
for the year. 

The dnties of inspectors may be generally classed as of two distinct 
kinds — the work growing out of depredations upon the mails and mis- 
cellaneous work which does not relate to nor have its origin in the 
former. These two kinds of duties the statistics exhibited in the fol- 
lowing tables explain. With the former the general public is more di- 
rectly concerned, and with the latter the postal service, in all its 
branches, which has come to be termed ** the Department." How much, 
then, depends on faithful performance of these two kinds of duty. The 
public feels losses keenly and cries out loudly when it suffers from the 
dishonest pilferer of letters, and the inspector must respond quickly 
and successfully to meet the demands put upon him in this direction. 
So much depends upon the safe and speedy delivery of letters that the 
public becomes the best critic in many cases. 

With the watchful eyes of fraternal branches of the Department over 
his movements, the inspector must exercise great care and delicacy in 
the performance of tasks committed -to him by those branches, for on 
his judgment and on his reports depend, in a large measure, the action 
and policy of the Department. I think I may be pardoned for the feel- 
ing of satisfaction that impels me to report that the officers of this 
branch of the service have had an eye single to their duties both 
toward the public and the Department. They have been ever zealous 
and faithful in their efforts to correct wrong, to make the crooked 
straight, to cast light upon dim questions, and to lend assistance in 
clearing the way to a good postal service. The first class of duties 
mentioned has its origin largely in the complaints of the public in the 
treatment of its mail-matter. This is of two kinds — registered and 
ordinary. Experience long ago separated these two classes of com- 
plaints and in the office gave them separate designations with appro- 
priate subdivisions. 

173 



174 



REPORT OF TUE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 



The first of these is class A. This relates to complaints of all kinds 
received concerning the domestic registered mail ; complaints of losses, 
delays, rifling, tampering, and wrong delivery, etc. The number and 
cause of these complaints will appear from the subjoined table, marked 
Exhibit A. 

Exhibit A,— Number and character of complaints (by Slates) upon which '*A " ca^es tcere 
made up and re/eired to post-office inspectors for investigation duHng the fiscal year 
ended June 30, 1890. 





Leit^rs. 


Pack- 
ages. 


3 

185 
« 

67 
178 
128 
187 

64 

ID 

3 

348 

07 
266 

80 
266 
208 

35 
110 
168 
213 
190 

44 

64 
114 
101 

80 
248 
285 
215 
558 
7 

16 

64 
263 

27:j 

232 

80 
217 

91 

257 

7 

183 

26 
230 
261 

69 

20 
226 

93 
138 
100 

37 


Alleged cause of complaint 




Stftten and 
Territories. 


IK 

pi 


1 

1 

a 

i 


"tS 

2 

a 

s 

1 


1 

! 

2 
.... 

1 
4 
4 

10 

1 


.5 

1 




X 

1 

s 
S 

15 


i 

a 

1 

3 


> 


be 

K 

s 


2 
"Si 

ii 
2 


-a 

a. 
« 

i 
2 

s 


i 

i 




t 




102 


70 

2 

35 

80 

83 

104 

31 

6 


2 
6 

2 
6 
4 
11 


70 

-« 

69 
50 
55 

w 

2 
12 
35 

122 
16 
03 

117 
12 
50 
82 

117 

102 
15 
80 
19 
54 
41 

113 

129 
21 
56 
3 
7 
26 
9 
82 

153 
7 

99 
42 
84 
3 
92 
13 

109 

133 

28 

5 

106 

2r. 

92 
43 
10 


01 
8 
19 
80 
66 
113 
37, 



8 


2 






2 


185 


Alaska 






8 




81 
86 
35 
75 
12 
12 
3 

101 
41 

123 
19 

103 

143 
16 
56 

100 

125 

118 
17 
32 
27 
63 
48 

121 

171 
25 

123 
3 
10 
39 
24 
03 

157 
11 

123 
42 

108 
4 
93 
16 

134 

150 
25 
6 

133 
40 

101 
51 
20 


3 
14 

6 
12 

4 
1 














67 


Arkansas ............ 


1 
1 
2 

1 


8 
3 

4 


2 


'/.'.'. 


1 

1 


3 

I 
1 
2 

1 


178 


California 


12« 


Colorado ..... ...... 


187 


Connooticat 

Dakota* - . - - 


3 

I 






19 










1 
1 
1 
2 


• 




3 


IMstrict of Colambia . 


220 
50 

140 
11 

109 
60 
10 
45 
58 
81 
67 
22 
26 
72 
35 
29 

124 
96 

188 

428 
4 

21 

237 

121 
70 
69 
88 
44 

130 

2 

88 

10 

02 

100 
43 
10 
84 
45 
34 
47 
16 


1 
1 
2 


17 
5 

1 


327 

53 

125 

10 

139 

63 

21 

41 

66 

81 

72 

23 

23 

80 

34 

30 

121 

113 

185 

485 

3 

9 

31 

243 

154 

39 

72 

00 

29 

134 

3 

84 

6 

105 

99 

35 

13 

89 

62 

37 

53 

26 


3 
5 
9 

io 
11 
2 
9 

7 

7 

8 
3 
6 
5 

5 
3 

7 
15 
7 
6 

1 


3 
8 
3 


1 
1 
5 






4 
2 
3 
1 
9 
5 


348 


Florida 






97 


Georffia 






266 


Idaho 






30 


Illinois 


16 


38 
5 


7 
6 


1 

3 


1 


3 


266 


Indiana ...... . . r . . . 


208 


Indian Territory 

Iowa 






35 


2 
3 
2 
2 

2 
2 

4 
1 

"4 

1 
2 


7 
7 
5 
3 
3 
4 

11 
2 
3 
3 

14 
1 
5 


"l 

"1 

. 1 

3 
2 
2 

4 
8 

1 


7 
3 
5 
4 


2 






I 
8 
1 
1 
2 
2 


110 


Kansas 




1 
... 


168 


Kentucky 


1 
1 


1 


213 


Louisiana 


190 


Maine 


44 


Maryland 


2 

7 
3 

1 

"s 


1 






64 


\f<u||in/)li n fiA its 






114 


Michigan 

Minnesota 


1 
1 
1 
4 






2 
2 
2 
6 


lOL 






80 


MissiasiDDi 






248 


M'"<»onTi .- 


.... 


2 


289 


Montana ............. 


.... 1 

6 : 1 


215 


Nebra8ka 




4 


.... 


538 


Kevada 


7 


New Uampshire 


















16 


1 
1 
31 
3. 


3 

I 

28 

2 


5 

2 

11 

25 

"s 

9 
13 


.... 

6 
.... 

2 

"2 


1 

7 








1 
1 
5 
3 


64 










263 


New Yotk 


10 


4 


1 
1 


.... 


273 


North Carolina 

North Dakota 


3 I 7 


232 
80 


Ohio 


2 
6 


4 
5 
14 
1 
2 


8 
5 
10 
1 
1 
1 
3 
5 
.... 

5 

1 


3 




2 


5 
6 
6 


217 


Oregon 


91 


Pennsvlvania 

Rhode Island 


4 


.... 


4 


267 

7 


Sonth Carolina 


6 
4 


19 
4 


"2 
3 
4 

1 


.... 


— 






ia3 


Sonth Dakota 

Tennessee ............ 






26 


1 
3 
1 
1 
6 
3 

'2 


3 

8 

'3' 

4 
5 
3 

"i' 


"i" 

1 


... 


.... 


1 


230 


Texas 


261 


Utah 








69 






1 


'4' 


20 


Virginia 


14 
3 

7 
3 

1 


5 

1 


3 

I 




226 


Washinrton ...... 






03 


•West Virginia 

WificonAin . ... 




1 


1 


138 


1 








lou 














37 






U4 












Grand totil 


3,311 


3,679 


135 


244 


7,369 


2, 725 


3, 927 


^ 


68 


57 


4 . 22 


91 


7,3UO 



•Before division. 



Exhibit B. 



Btfttes and Territories. 



AlAbuna 

AlaakA 

AriionA 

ArkftDMM 

Califomi* 

C<ilorsdo 

CoDoeoticat 

Dakota 

Delaware 

District of Colombia.. 

Florida 

Georgi* 

Idaho 

niinois 

Indiana 

Indian Territory. . . 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentacky 

Loaisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Jdassacbnsetts 

Miohixan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Miasoan 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Kerada 

Kew Hampsbire... 

New Jersey 

Kew Mexico 

Kew York 

Kortb Carolina .... 

Kortb Dakota 

Ohio 

Oreffon 

JPennsylTsnia 

Rhode Island 

Sonlb Carolina..... 

SonthDrtkoia 

TenneMee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Vir^nia 

WasbiuKton 

West Virginia 

Wisoonsin 

Wyoming 



Total. 



210 
29 
27 
6 

105 
28 

r 7 

28 
45 

SO 
81 

7 
27 
45 
28 
24 
28 
68 
14 
42 

1 

2 

8 
16 
114 
87 

4 
61 
21 
86 

2 
23 

4 
26 
47 
12 
11 
84 
25 
22 
19 

4 



Koloss. Cause 
complaint^ 



of 



O I© • 



U 



10 



1, 663 28 <87 236 116 202 143 



h 

a^ s 

r 

1 



328 68 



44 18 



8 41 



.'Tear 

:•> [hi 
'.1 we 

•Use 

- uS c 

<tof 



I 



4: 



619 



661 



p M a 90— face page 175 



98 

'28 
97 

108 

87 

40 

18 

8 

249 
70 

143 
11 

208 

351 
14 
81 

117 

185 
79 
37 
58 
88 
63 

116 
144 
27 
]480 
6 


^'♦« 
£53 
245 
86 
^ 8 
'JLBI 
"88 
177 
_ 6 
flB 
_11 
• i78 
109 
18 
-15 
til 
a^ 

Lie 

78 
10 

fl4 



CHIEf* INSPECTOR — REGISTERED CASES. 175 

From the foregoing^able it appears that there were received during 
the year 7,369 complaints of all kinds, and of these 6,990 were complaints 
of depredations upon registered letters and 379 upon registered pack- 
ages (third and fourth class matter) ; 2,725 complaints were of rifling; 
3,927 were of loss of the entire letter or packet ; 327 loss of the letter ob 
package from the accompanying registered package envelope; 68 com- 
plaints of detentipn were received ; 144 of wrong delivery ; 57 of tam- 
pering ; and 120 others of various wrongs. Of these 7,369 complaints 
4,714 have been investigated and reported upon dnring the year. The 
result of these investigations is shown in the following table, Exhibit B : 



176 REPORT OP THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

luvestigation sbowed that no loss bad occurred, either to sender or 
addressee, in 2,763 cases, the letter or packet having been safely de- 
livered or the cause of complaint groundless. Of the» reported cases of 
rifling, investigation showed that in 143 cases no inclosure was made by 
the sender ; iii 328 no rifling had occurred (all that was inclosed had 
been received); 66 cases of rifling occurred either before mailing or 
after delivery, thus relieving the Post-Office Department of blame ; and 
44 cases of reported lost registered matter were ibund not to have been 
registered at all, either having been bent in the ordinary mail or not 
mailed. Loss was foand to have occurred in 1,951 cases. A careful 
scrutiny of Exhibit B will show to what causes the loss was attributa- 
ble. It is gratifying to state that of these losses only 666 cases are 
chargeable to the dishonesty or carelessness of postal employes. But by 
application of the disciplinary rules of the service reimbursement was 
required and recovery of stolen amounts was made in 489 cases ; the 
lost articles or valuables were traced into the Dead Letter Office and 
restored to the owners in 183 cases, and in 67 cases voluntary reim- 
bursement was made by the party at fault before the loss was reported 
to the Department, This leaves 1,117 cases in which the cause of the 
los6 wa« ascertained, but in which no one was at fault or in which 
under the circumstances no recovery could be made. There wer6 also 
105 cases in which no trace of the reported lost matter could be found, 
making in all 1,222 cases in which actual loss was ascertained to have 
occurred. 

There were on hand July 1, 1889, 2,667 cases, and of these 2,083 were 
investigated and loss was found to have occurred in 568 cases, or a little 
more than 27 per cent. Now, taking this percentage as a basis and 
assuming that as great a percentage of loss will be found to have 
occurred in the 2,655 cases of the fiscal year uninvestigated, we have 
616, which added to the 1,222 cases in which loss was by investiga- 
tion found to have occurred, we have a total ascertained and estimated 
loss of 1,838. This compared with the total number of domestic regis- 
tered pieces handled during the year, viz, 14,148,564, shows a loss of 1 
piece for every 7,697 handled. 

At first thought, this number seems alarmingly large, but the tables 
given in this report, Exhibits B and E, must be considered in connec- 
tion therewith. The year has been one marked by casualties which 
the Post-Offlce Department could neither avoid nor prevent. By ex- 
amining Exhibit B it will be observed that of the 1,951 cases of loss 
1,180 were due to accidents, or more than 60 per cent., while only 686 
were ascertained to be due to dishonesty or delinquency of postal 
employes. La>st year the losses due to casualties were 586 only, out of 
a total of 1,283, or 45 per cent., while 591 were chargeable to the em- 
ployes of the service. The number of complaints investigated during 
the year of those referred was 4,714, as against 3,998 last year, while 
the losses unaccounted for is one less this year than last. This, I am 
satisfied, indicates careful work on the part of this office, and relieves 
the Department of blame for increase of loss, which by another year 
may be greatly reduced, as there may be no great casualties to swell 
the totals of our annual reports. 

Exhibit (3 shows the treatment of the 2,667 cases on hand July 1, 
1889, and Exhibit D a resume of the work done during the year in the 
treatment of cases of class A, and it is, in fact, a recapitulation of Ex* 
hibits A, B, and O. 



ne 30, 1890 





9 resultinft from— 


% . 
$i 

it 

u 


i 

h 




a 

•f 
I* 

1 


i 
1 


f 
1 


1 






o 


i 


1 

i 
i 

1 
1 

s 


1 
1 

i 
5 


H 


AJBBkm ..< 


-. 


u 


$759. 75 


$750.75 


84 


.... 


3 


$112.00 


4 


9 


60 
2 


AriaoD* .. 


5 


. ... 


165.10 
7.00 
10.00 


88.25 

7.00 




12 
11 
6 
6 

18 

7 








7 
88 
2 




26 


jLrkaoBMi. 
CiUifomi* 
C^rado . 


.... 


1 


10.00 


77 
88 








12 


Conneotio) 


-- 


"*2* 


&00 
4.90 


8.00 
4.90 










18 


I>»kot*... 










29 


I>eUiw»re 




1 


10.00 




1 


IHatriot od 










3 
20 
80 




71 




166 


Florida..! 


** 


"2* 


10.00 
191.00 


10.00 
19L60 


.... 


8 
2 
1 
2 
2 


118.72 

102.75 

28.64 

18.36 

116.12 


32 


OeorKi*..' 
Idaho * 


"127* 
6 
2 


10 

'■■"2' 
2 

4 
5 


48 

4 


Tllinois . .. 
Indian Xfll 


-. 


124 


«7«.80 
. &55 


10.00 


16 

9 

65 

4 

20 

27 

10 

2 

6 

6 

24 

9 

17 

20 

4 

7 


5 

19 


216 
67 
64 


Iowa * 

KaDsaa ..1 


4* 

1 


.... 

6 
2 


'60.66' 

227.66 

222.00 

5.55 

20.00 

4.00 

109.75 

26.10 

613.10 

98.00 


'"eo.oo* 

213.81 
81.00 
6.55 
20 00 
4.00 
169.75 
23.00 
121. 10 
30.00 


1 


1 


30.66 


33 

83 


KentnokT 
IxmisianAi 
Maine --. 


9 
"2 


*'i' 

1 


13.87 
L26 
5.00 
1.60 


7 

1 


80 
46 

^ 16 
15 


Maryland, 
Masaacbol 


- 


.... 


Michigan 
MinneaoU 
MissisaipH 
Miaaonri.^ 
Montana. « 


-• 

i* 


1 
1 


1 


1 


'2 
.... 


50 
45.00 

"*i.66 


4 
11 
16 

7 

1 


68 
39 
63 
6- 
16 


Kebraelca^ 
Ke^ada.. 


•• 




56.83 


66.83 


.... 


1 


6 00 


20 
1 


Kew Ham 
























Kew Jeraj 
Kew MexJ 
Kew Yorl 
KorthCatf 
Ohio — -< 
Oregon -J 
Pennaylvj 
Bhode lall 


,.. 


.... 


62.00 




2 

4 
24 
12 
29 

7 
25 

8 
14 
43 
38 
14 








2 


6 


12 











:; 


4 
8 
2 

"i* 


96.68 
210.87 
35.50 
32.75 
16.68 


19.68 

210.87 
12.50 
32.75 
7.00 


1 






12 

1 
3 


3 
3 
6 

1 
6 


80 


1 
9 


20.00 
17.74 


34 
66 

17 


.... 


2 


20.00 


7 


59 
3 


South Can 










4' 


4 

3 

1 


65 20 

21.42 

1,495.00 






21 


Tenneaae« 
Texaa ----« 
Utah ..--^ 
Vermont- 4 


3 

1 


.... 


16.85 
120. 47 


6.60 
23.50 


4 
61 


'"4 


62 
133 
19 


I 


4 


16.00 
37.31 
186 63 










i 

33 
20 

1 
1 

1 


*i2' 

1 

*'*'i' 


3 


Virginia.. 
WaAbiEi2t4 
Weet Viri 
Wiaoonsin 


4.26 
44.50 


19 
15 
6 

4 


8 

1 
3 


"2 


3.95 
3.00 
4.50 

30. 00 


78 
48 
20 


" 


2 


7i66 


60.00 


22 
1 






















1 


su 


183 


4,366.33 


2,211.09 


634 


68 


85 


2,281.37 


454 1 U4 


2,083 



CHIEF INSPECTOR — REGISTERED CASES. 177 

An examination of Exhibit D shows an increase of 12 percent, in the 
whole number of complaints received during the fiscal year ended Judc 
30, 1890, over the number of complaints reported in the previous fiscal 
year, while the number of complaints during the year 1889 was 36 per 
cent, greater than the whole number of complaints reported in the fiscal 
year ended June 30, 1888. This is a reduction of two-thirds in the rate 
per cent, oi increase iu favor of the fiscal year just ended, a most grat* 
ifying evidence of the increased ** celerity, certainty, and security" 
with which the mails carrying valuables of all kinds have been handled 
throughout the postal service daring the period just closed. This 
showing undoubtedly indicates a marked improvement in the conduct 
of this important branch of the service, an improvement to the promo- 
tion of which, I am convinced, the corps of inspectors has contributed 
its full share. 

Exhibit B.—JSeoapitulation of **A" oases, 

(BaMd Dpon tabaUted statements for the fiscal year ended Jane 30, 1800, to|;ether with aotnal oouxtt 
of "A" caai-s in the Post-Office Department on Jx\y 1, 1890 ] 

Casee made ap : 

Caaea oatatanding July 1,1889 , 2,787 

Caaea referred for investigation during the fiscal year 1880-'90 7,360 

Total ^ 10,138 

Biaposed of as follows : 
Cases cloned durinf; the dscal year 1880-'90 : 

Pn^vions'vear cases 2,083 

Canent-yearcaaea... 4,7.4 

6.797 

Bslanee still outstanding 3^33)1 

As follows: 
Cases returned by inspectors still nnddr consideration by office: 

Previoiis^year oases 62 

Ca^^en^year cases 320 

Caaes still in the hands of other bnreana of the Department: 

Prerious- year cases 64 

Current-^ ear cases 02 

Casea still in the hands of poat-office Inspectors for investigation Jaly 1, 1800 2, 792 

3,3*0 

RESUME. 

MThoIe nnmber of "A " cases made ap in the fiscal year^ 

1887-'88 4,820 

188a.'89 6,S60 

1880-*00 7,3b0 

Increase in two years of over 52 per cent 

The next class of case^ grows out of complaints received of depreda- 
tions upon the ordinary mail. To this has been given the designation 
Glass B. 

Exhibit E fully sets forth the work done in this class of cases. There 
were received, made into canes, and referred for investigation 51«745. 
Of these, 38,099 were investigated, leaving 13,646 awaiting investiga- 
tion June 30, 1890. Twenty-nine thousand and fifty-three of these 
complaints related to lost letters, and 20,900 to lost packages, third and 
fourth-class matter. Eight hundred and seventy-two post-offices were 
burglarized and 358 were destroyed by fire. Sixty-three postal cars 
were wrecked or burned. There were 51 highway robberies of mail 
stages, 3 mail-messenger wagons were robbed, 153 mail-pouches were 
reported lost, and 202 were cut by accident or intention, or stolen. 
P M G 90 12 



178 



REPORT OP THE POSTMASTER GENERAL. 



Exhibit £. — Statement of complaints received and result of complaints investigated. Class 

B^ ordinary letters, 

COMPLAINTS RBCBIVED. 



Where mailed. 



Arkansas .... 
California .\.. 

Colorado 

Coimectlcat. . 
DeUwaxe — 
Florida . 



Georgia. 
flliiioU.. 



Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentncky 

Louisiana 

ICsine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan ..: 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missonrl 

Kebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New York 

New JerMy 

North Carolina. ...... 

North DakoU 

Ohio 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

Sonth Carolina. 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Termont 

Virginia 

Washington 

WestViiginla ^ 

Wisconsin , 

AlMka 

Arizona 

District of Columbia . 

Idaho :... 

Indian Ter 

Montana 

New Mexico 

Utah 

Wyoming 



Total 29,053 



I 



246 

123 

508 

271 

711 

128 

177 

37ft 

2,187 

548 

433 

344 

489 

248 

:J76 

792 

1,896 

605 

320 

123 

1.070 

239 

9 

235 

6,666 

1,113 

241 

102 

1,444 

61 

8,866 

184 

187 

63 

261 

385 

126 

682 

104 

188 

453 

3 

19 

549 

12 

23 

43 

83 

21 

23 



I 

a 



196 

100 

388 

224 

566 

107 

148 

296 

1,889 

462 

85 1 

276 

343 

191 

320 

656 

1.468 

500 

276 

99 

858 

191 

6 

202 

4.618 

845 

181 

92 

1.211 

50 

3,447 

143 

151 

60 

182 

286 

106 

551 

89 

148 

375 

3 

15 

438 

10 

21 

30 

26 

16 

13 



5 
^ 



50 
23 

120 
47 

146 
21 
84 
88 

802 
86 
79 
68 
96 
57 

• 56 

136 

228 

105 
44 
24 

212 

48 

8 

83 

2,148 

268 
60 
10 

233 
11 

419 
41 
S6 
3 
79 
99 
20 

131 
15 
35 
78 



4 

111 
2 
2 

12 
7 
6 

10 



I 



72 

34 

440 

133 

367 

46 

79 

246 

2,985 

294 



434 

157 

121 

4->6 

884 

433 

170 

81 

987 

170 

12 

65 

6,472 

375 

65 

21 

1,140 

42 

2,019 

271 

56 

32 

127 

141 

30 

331 

30 

63 

271 

1 

6 

352 

4 

7 

18 

22 

27 

14 



h 



14 



El 



=r 



23, 114 5, 939 20. 900 1872 358 • 63 51 



.a- 



2t 



367 

101 

1,008 

424 

1.094 

177 

277 

681 

5^218 

912 

753 

581 

941 

428 

529 

1,247 

2,607 

1,080 

515 

180 

2,183 

439 

24 

815 

13,242 

1,506 

332 

134 

2,717 

127 

5.975 

461 

264 

99 

434 

579 

168 

1,078 

159 

299 

755 

5 

32 

906 

22 

38 

71 

67 

56 

45 



3 ,153 292 i 61, 745 



CHIEF INSPECTOR — OBDIKABY CASES, 



179 



Exhibit £. — Statement of eampluints received and reeuU of complaintB Inveetigatedj Close 
B, ordinary letters— Continued, 

RESULT OP COMPLAIITTS INVESTIGATED. • 



.Where miulod. 



AUbama .... 
Arkuieas.... 
Califoniia ... 

Colorado 

Connacticat . 
Delaware.... 

Florida 

Georida 

nUsoit 

Indiana 

Iowa 



Kentoeky 

Louieiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

MaaBacbnsetta 

Mlelii^an 

Minufflota 

MiMlMippi 

Miaeonri 

Kebraaka 

NoTarta 

If ew Hampehire 

Kew York 

Ifew Jersey , 

North Carolina 

North DakoU 

Ohio 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Bhode Island 

Sontfa Carolina 

Soalh Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Yermont 

Vlrjrinia 

Washi ne ton 

West Virginia , 

Wisconsin 

Alaska 

Arizona 

District of Colnmbia.. 

Idaho 

Indian Territory , 

Montana , 

N«w Mexico 

Utah 

Wyoming 

Total 



NodiscoT> 
ery. 



27 
2 

190 

161 

386 
25 
63 
40 

038 
86 

271 
26 
77 
26 

107 
60 

687 

873 

177 

5 

76 

150 
10 

121 
1,200 

221 
40 
41 

173 
81 

872 

122 
11 
42 
53 
' 26 
65 

107 
81 
53 

255 
2 
1 

143 
3 

'""ii 

20 
17 
17 

7,160 



No loss. 



Losses 
chargeable 

tooare. 

lessnessor 

depredation 

of postal 

employes. 



67 

30 

168 

100 

148 

23 

61 

158 

310 

54 

143 

121 

61 

81 

62 

165 

305 

• 87 

44 

31 

380 

110 

2 

40 

1,437 

102 

63 

8 

172 

28 

300 

42 

41 

15 

106 

110 

22 

164 

80 

67 

53 

9 

11 

165 

5 

4 

11 
17 
15 
12 

5,830 



116 

43 
265 

86 
331 

84 
100 
172 
2,701 
341 
127 
164 
618 

65 
143 
846 
004 
200 
130 

48 
404 

51 
2 

86 

8,084 

804 

118 

17 
1,104 

18 
4,145 



02 

17 

155 

103 

54 

462 

27 

61 



3 
324 
2 
7 
15 
12 
2 
3 

23,985 



chargea- 
ble to 
accidenl 



cbargea> 
bleto 

persons 

not in the 

postal 

service. 



2 
tf 

7 
48 

' "i 

12 
4 

11 
15 
227 
30 
3 
2 




7 

19 

7 

1 

1 

181 

7 

241 

146 

2 

1 

3 

2 

8 

7 

1 

7 



1,020 



Cases 

•till in 
hands of 
inspectors 

for in- 
vestiga- 

tion. 



154 
115 
365 

00 

106 

45 

40 

803 

1,245 

383 

206 

268 

168 

246 

114 

154 

404 

389 

16p 

103 

1,852 

105 

10 

52 

2,408 

372 

101 

67 

1,133 

40 

822 

151 

116 

24 

114 

339 

24 

330 

66 

106 

207 

1 

J7 

250 

11 

27 

30 

17 

17 

12 

13,646 



180 BEPOET OF THE POSTMASTER-GENEBAL. 

A. still farther sabdivisioD of the first braDch of the vrork of the 
office has been given the designation of Class F and is set forth in 
Exhibit«F, F,^R» 

Class F Cases. 

The nnmber of this class of complaints received from postmasters, 
foreign postal administrations, and all other sources for the fiscal year 
ended Jane 30, 1890, were 10,644. Of these, 6,064 related to regis- 
tered mail, 4,125 to nnregistered mail, and 455 cases related to miscel- 
laneoas complaints, as to treatment of mail matter passing between 
the United States aud foreign countries. 

The number of cases of this class brought to a close duriDg the year 
was 10,436, of which 6,899 related to registered mail, 3,791 to unregis- 
tered mail, and 746 to miscellaneous complaints. Of the inquiries made 
regarding registered matter 5,385 cases were finally closed without loss, 
or if loss was sustained it was made good to the sender or addressee 
as a result of investigation. In this number are included 15 cases of 
alleged abstraction of contents in which it was ascertained that no loss 
had been sustained, also 12 cases of alleged rifling and 29 cases of loss, 
in which, as a result of investigation, the losses were required to be 
made good. Of this last number collections were made and repayment 
effected through the office of chief inspector in 34 cases ; 209 cases 
closed without loss related to registered mail matter passing through 
the United States in transit from one foreign country to another, which 
became the subject of inquiry by this office. The registered cases in- 
cluded in the accompanying table (Exhibit F) represent those which 
could be conveniently grouped, as between certain States and foreign 
countries, in which 5,086 complaints were closed without loss. 

Of the whole number of cases treated relating to registered mail pass- 
ing between the United States aud foreign countries, the losses, thefts, 
and casualties amonnted to 514 cases, as follows: 

Number of ca96« of alleged rifling .....'. U2 

Namber lost in transit not received by addressees 68 

Number destroyed by onming of post-offioes ]2'J 

Number destroyed by burning of postal cars 152 

Lost by wreck 2 

Losses by robbery of poBt*officeB or of mail 27 

514 

Total represented by oasnalUes 277 

Charged to United states employ6s 41 

Losses located outside the United States 44 

362 

Namber not acconnted for, and in which the loss or responsibility may be said to rest equally 
between the United States and foreign coautries 152 



CHIEF INSPECTOR — FOREIGN CASfifl. 



181 



ExBiBiT F. — StnieB and countries between which ike regislered mail, teas passing, and 
number of cases in which investigation determined that no losses had been sustained; or in 
which! the losses sustained were made good, as a result of investigation. 



StAtes and Tanitories. 


< 

8 

1 


i 

u 

it 


j 

1 
1 


i 

c 


i 

a 


6 





5 

1 




3 


i 
2 


1 
1 

.a 

1 


m 


1 

a 


I 
CO 


s 

It 

00 


z 
s 

a 


1 

1 

> 

CO 




D 


2 
1 

i 


• 
1 


^ 
^ 


Alabama 












1 


3 








3 

1 








25 


Alaska. . . . 






1 
1 

"io 
1 

11 
7 
























3 




"i 
2 


1 

is 
4 

4 


2 2 
A 2 

68 60 
20; 13 
16 17 
10 ft 


5 
2 

41 
11 
6 


2 










1 










14 




3 
37 
11 
5 
8 




'2 










2 
2 

1 










13 


California 


11 

"i 




4 
1 


7 

1 
4 
2 


9 


10 
3 


5 


7 




15 


301 


Colorado 


66 






1 




... 


69 


Dakota 


... 


4 






88 


Delawars . 






5 
12 

1 
6 


"'5 
i 


3 
3 
1 

43 








1 
1 










s 


Difltriot of Colnmbia 


1 






8 


... 


7 
2 


3 








2 


1 


2 


3 




4 


48 


Florida 








15 


Georjrfa . . 


1 
















3 




18 


Idaho 






1 

12 
1 
1 
1 
4 
1 
7 
7 


'2 

"i 

1 


"'7 
1 
2 

i 

1 
10 


2 a 


"8 

1 




1 
4 


7 


Illinois 


49 1 




131 
21 
2 
2d 

20 
12 
5 


70 
6 


23 
3 


... 


21 


4 


4 

1 


1 




5 


386 


Indiana 


1 




36 


Indian Territorv 










1 
2 
2 
2 





Iowa .......... 


8 

I 


"3 


"i 
"i 


14 
4 
4 
11 
2 
8 
81 
20 
10 
2 


8 

'26 
2 
3 

39 
5 

' i 


1 




^ 


1 
9 
3 
3 

5 

27 

6 

7 


1 

"i 


5 

6 


58 












66 


Kentncky 


"*6 












29 


I^nifdaaa ................ 


a|... 


4, 5' 2 


79 


Maine ... 




2 


** 


14 


Maryland 


s 
s 










24 

19 
34 
28 

2 
73 

8 
28 








2 

1 
1 


1 
9 
3 
9 








46 


MaMachasettfl 




1 


lU 
15 
8 


4 

I 
1 


9 

1 

! 

2 

1 
1 


6 
2 

1 


1 
2 


... 
5 


10 

... 


8 
1 
5 

1 
2 

1 
4 
1 


1 


5 

1 


12 

1 


351 


Michipan 

Minnimota . . 


]l ? 


113 
95 


MiMdaitippl * 


2 
17 






1 
2 


•3 


10 


MiMonri: 


1 


3 


11 

i 
1 
1 

11 
4 
1 

18 


2 


20| 16 
8 1 

19, 3 
3' 3 
2 1 

^1 ? 


6 




1 


10 
2 
4 

1 


::: 


1 
2 
7 




172 


M<Tntana 


27 


Nebraaka 

Nevada 


1.5 
1 






1 




... 






"\ 


8.'> 
11 


New HamiMbire ... 


...L. 


"2 


1 
3 
1 
65 


1 
49 

376 

205 

14 
44 

1 

2 

5 
15 

3 
66 

2 


16 


NewJeraey.. 

Kew Mexico 


lol.. 

11... 


1 

is 


1 
3 
21 

i 
"i 


"2 


'2 


4 

49 
] 


19 




•? 


1 


2 


1 
'33 


2 


112 
11 


New York 


156 


5 


225 

3 

22 

11 

m 
11 
3 
5 
12 

6 
3 
6 
24 
3 
7 
3 


301 

is 

85 
6 


( : ' 22: 12 


isi 9fi«i 


North Carolina 








9nA 


Ohio 


37 

2 

139 




... 


11 


1 


9 


10 




n 


4 

1 
8 


1 
2 


1 

li 
1 


2 




1 
44 

I 


1 


.1 27 


PonnaylTania 


2 

1 


1 


17 




12 


12; 683 


Rhode Island 


1 


_^ 


2 26 


$^nth Carolina 


















1 6 


Tennessee................ 


3 
22 

1 














9 




... 


3 

1 








4 
2 

1 


... 


1 36 


Texas 


1 


... 


4 

4 
2 
8 






2 


71 11 


2 


... 




1 ino 


Utah 




2 




15 


Vermont 


10 


Virtrinia 








"2 


1 














1 

i 


i 
1 




1 


18 


Wash in^on 


« 

1 
20 




... 


1 




2 


1 


... 






63 


West Virginia 

Wisconsin 


12 


... 


... 


« 
2 

326 


1 
22 


1 
164 


1 




9 


4 

... 


... 


2 


1 


B 2 


132 


Wyoming 


9 




^ 


18 


24 


' 




Total 


1.458 


R89 


66&I n)< 


13 


29 


245 ^9 


94'inA 


85! 3A 


67 


82 


5,080 








1 












" 



Of the ordinary mail passing between the United States and foreign 
conntries made the subject of investigation, Exhibit P 1, represents 
1,246 cases in which no loss was sustained or the missing mail-matter 
was reclaimed by means of the inquiries instituted. Exhibit F 2, shows 
2,545 cases in which the losses could not be located. 

It should be remembered that there is no certain means of tracing 
ordinary mail-matter, as it is not recorded in transit, either in the 
United States or foreign countries ; but by diligent inquiry at offices of 
origin and destination, at foreign and domestic exchange offices, and 
the dead-letter branches of the United States and other countries, many 
of these losses have been located, and the letters or parcels, or their 
missing contentS| have been restored to senders or addressees. 



182 



REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 



The iniscellaDeoas cases treated under Class F, aifecting mail matter 
received from or in transit to foreign countries which became the sub* 
ject of investigation, are summarize as follows: 

CftMS relaUng to datiable mail-mfttter 358 

Cases affeoUng iDternational money-orders , , 46 

Complaints as to lottery oiroiUars, eto., mailed in foreign oonntries to persons residing in this 

oonntry * ' 27 

Misoellaneons complaints on other sabjeots jt 816 

746 
8XnniART-.GLA.SS F GASSa 

Number of F eases on hand Jane 80, 1889, as nnflnished i 2,072 

Number of new oases reported for fiscal year 1890 10,644 

12, 716 

Nnmber of snch cases closed for the year, the necessary inquiries baling been concluded 10, 436 

Number remaining ufifinished JTuIy 1, 1890 2,280 

12,716 

Exhibit F 1. — States and countries between which the unregistered maV-inaiter was pass- 
ing, and number of cases in which investigation showed that no losses had been sustained 
or was the n^ans of reclaiming the missing articles. 



States and Territories. 


1 


6 



§ 


1 

1 

1 


J 


1 


i 

1 




d 

3 

1 


t 


M 


1 

1 


1 


i 


1 


1 


i 

•c 

s 
< 

1 


1 


1 


s 

1 


1 


Alabama 














1 


8 

2^ 

16 

1 

1 
6 
1 
6 
1 
46 
2 
1 
8 

I 

1 

1 
5 
40 
14 
3 
1 
7 
2 
6 
























4 


A rkannas .........'..-.. ^ 








4 

2 

1 
5 




























5 


California - 






2 




3 


6 
8 
8 


2 1 






2 


1 


1 


1 1 






51 


Colorado , 




1 


















21 


Connectiout 








1 


1 




















23 


Dakota 






























2 


Delaware 


1 
1 












1 
6 
























3 


District of Columbia . . 


1 




1 




1 


2 


1 
















1 


2 


22 


Florida 
















1 


Georgia.... - 








8 
































Idaho 






































Illinois 


2 






.... 
32 




2 

1 


9 

1 


.,. 






2 
















85 


Tndfi^na 














4 


Indian Territory. ..... r 


































1 


Iowa.. 












1 

1 
2 

1 
1 
2 
1 
1 


.... 

""i 

7 
3 

1 


























Kansas 








2 
2 














1 












11 


Kentucky 






























l/ouisiana...... 




1 


2 
























6 


Maine 




I 

14 
10 
























■ 


8 


llaryland. ......... .... 




























1 


11 


Massaohusetts 


























63 


Michigan 








.... 


1 




1 
1 




"i 


2 

1 










87 


Minnesota 














14 


Mississippi 






















1 


Missouri...:..::.;::.;. 








2 




1 


2 


.... 


1 








1 


1 










15 


Montana 






















2 


Nebraska 








1 
2 
2 




... 


3 
























10 


New Hampshire 








6 
32 

1 
210 

1 
14 

1 
83 

6 

1 

2 
1? 
























7 












1 


4 


1 












2 










42 


New Mexico 


1 
14 
























2 


New York 


2 


8 


148 




26 


51 


8 


1 




3 




8 


12 


5 


C 




3 


535 




1 


Ohio 




1 




7 
1 
11 






8 


13 


1 


1 




2 
















43 












... 






2 


Pennsylvania 


2 


... 


1 




4 


14 

1 


2 


1 








1 


8 


1 

I 


*".* 




4 


132 


Rhode Island 


8 


South Carolina . 








1 
1 




.... 






















2 


Tennessee ., 






























8 


Texas 












2 
1 






















1 


15 


Utah 














4 

1 
8 
5 

4 
8 






















6 


Vermont 








? 




























8 


Virginia 












2 


.... 


■ 1 




... 








1 


' 






8 


Wssbington 




























6 


Wisoondn 








1 












2 










2 








9 


Wyoming , 
























■' 








3 










































TbtiJ 


21 


6 


8 


254 


2 


52 


136 


615 


12 


• 


12 


10 


8 


13! 95 


12 


7 


36 


11 1 9AS 













CHIEF INSPECTOR — FOREIGN CASES. 



183 



Exhibit F 2.-r'^'a/-^« and covniries between which ihe unregistA^'ed mail matter waspassinj^ 
and ihe number of ca$e8 in whichy after diligent ivquiry^ the losses could not be locaitd 
either in ihe United States or in foreign countries. 



States and Territories. 





B 

1 


1 

i 


6 


B 

s 


i 


a 



s 
1 



2 

1 

77 
26 
20 
6 
6 
18 




1 

M 


1 

1 

1. 


1 


1 


1 


B 

1 


S 
■ft 

CO 


1 


1 


• 

1 

1 


1 


H 










2 
1 
6 
2 
4 

17 
2 




















■ 11 






































8 










"3 


"16 


1 
10 


























8 


CaJifornia 




i 


1 




5 




















3 


112 






















S3 








1 


4 














44 


Dakota 




























9 


TVIitwflTe . . .... 


































8 


District of Colambia 


2 -- 


1 


6 

1 




3 


4 


i 














1 










87 


Florida 




















7 


G^orsia ...... 










1 


1 


9 

1 
52 
7 

1 
10 






















11 


Idaho 








■'••]-'- 


























1 


Illinois 


2 






68 ... 


6 


20 
2 




... 






3 












2 


1 


157 


TDfl^ttna 


2 










12 


Indian Territoiy 


































1 


Iowa 








4 

2 
















'1 
















17 


Kansas 










" 2 
5 

"2 

6 

"1 

1 


1 

"1 

1 
8 
7 
2 

4 


15 1 








20 


Kentacky 








4... 

1 ... 
16... 

2... 
73; 1 

1::; 


4 
3 
4 
9 






















1 

*i 


11 


T^rfiniwifmrn .,,.,.,...., 










... 






... 






... 






4 


14 


Haine 








2? 


Mit^rylf^nd . 










1 














1 
1 






23 


Miusacbasetts 

Michigan 


1 


4 
1 


1 


701 2 
23 -- 




"2 


"2 

1 






1 






8 


174 
98 


Minnesota 


1 


8 
1 
16 
















1 


22 


MiMiissippi 




















2 


MifMtouri 


1 
1 


... 




6 ... 


4 


4 




1 
"1 


... 




2 










1 


44 


Montana. ........... 


fi 




ill..: 


i 








18 


Kebraaka 


' 






I 
2 


8 
1 
2 
22 




12 


Kevada 
































3 


Hfeif Hampshire 




, 




13 






























15 

55 


17ew Jersey 


1 


1 




5 


1 


6 


12 
i04 


1 


1 












2 










New Mexico 


1 
292 




1 
879 

3I 

5 
110 
10 

I 

9 
2 

1 

12 
10 
I 
7 
3 


1 

17 














3 


New York 


52 


24 


1 


12 


4 


2 


6 


1 




4 


11 






10 


1,060 
3 


North Carolina 


Ohio 


6 

1 
18 


1 




27 




9 

1 


14 

23 
4 










3 






2 






2 


... 


96 


Oregon 


"(iV.'. 










9 


Pennsylrania 

Khode Island 


5 


1 




4 


2 




2 


5 


4 




12 


2 

1 


233 
29 


South Carolina ...... 








... 


"i 






... 








2 


Tennessee 






1 


"2 

3 

a 




2 
3 


1 
8 


8 


Texas 






19 


Utah 








1 










7 


Vermont 
































1 


5 


Virginia 


1 
1 










3 










1 
1 














15 


Washington 


1 


1 


6 












1 
















22 


West Virjrinla 






1 

7 
2 

249 


















2 


Wisconsin 


2 


1 


... 


1 
1 

692 


1 
1 

10 


147 




1 


1 


1 


















23 


Wyoming 












7 




90 


ii 


"e 






12 


12 


18 


1 


"29 


17 


~20 


'"' 


^ 






ToUl 


1,043 


33 


27 


Is 


2,545 



184 REPORT OP THte P0STMA8TER-GENERA.L. 

The second part of the inspector's duties heretofore indicated, and 
which are more nearly allied to the Department than to the public, is 
set forth in Exhibits G, G 1, and G 2. 

This has been designated Class O. Of this class 10,721 cases were 
referred for investigation. These are not properly mail depredations, 
nor do they grow out of the latter. They spring from the needs of 
the Department in seeking information for improving or extending the 
service in any of its branches, and from the violation of postal laws and 
regulations by postal officials and others. As may be inferred their 
performance is oftentimes a delicate task, requiring tact and judgment, 
else the results obtained are of little value. 

I regret that more attention could not have been given to the inspec- 
tion of the smaller post-offices, but with the force at my command, this 
has not been practicable, with due regard for the proper performance of 
other work. Great benefit may be derived by postmasters and post office 
employes, and much good may result to the service from personal visits 
and instruction of the authorized representatives of the Post-Office 
Department. Much can be learned in a few minutes' conversation that 
faithful study of the regulations will not show. The moral effect upon 
post office officials in remote communities of a personal visit of one of 
your representatives can not be too highly estimated. Many of these 
officials have never seen such a representative, and the fact that the 
Department has enough interest in the office to send some one to look 
into it is an indication that the holding of it is not a mere perfunctory 
act, nor a position to be lightly esteemed. It reassures the posytmaster 
and gives him fresh confidence in himself and increases the dignity of his 
position in his own opinion and in that of his neighbors, and thus indi- 
rectly augments the moral6 of the service. I most respectfully ask, 
then, for this reason that the appropriation for the inspection service 
be restored to $300,000. It is hoped that, during the year upon which 
we have now entered, something may be done in this direction with the 
increase of $50,000 granted by Oonsrress, but, at best, we can not hope 
to reach all the post-offices and inspect them even once during the 
time. If the money -order offices alone are critically inspected it will 
be as much as can be faithfully done with the available force. There 
were of these (July 7, 1890) 10,344; January 1, 1890, there were 60,140 
post offices of all kinds, and if only the money -order offices are inspected 
49,796 offices will remain unvisited. 



CHIEF INSPECTOR— MISCELLANEOUS CASES. 



185 



Exhibit G. — Number ^ nature of case, and office of original reference of misceUaneoua 
cases (Class C) referred to post-office inspectors for investigation during the fiscal year 
ended June 30, 1890. 





Offices Arom whi^h references were made for InveBtigntion. 


ClAMof casea. 


1 


11 


rs S 
1^ 


11 


9 

ri 
II 


II 


ii 
III 

C O V 

• UP 
< 


'4 
II 


1 

a 


Hi 

P P. 


1 

n 






4,307 

15 

594 

1 

23 

16 

118 

227 
81 


















4,307 
492 


Irflp«ctioii of po8t otiicea 

Com plaint t and chargea aj^iinst 
pofltmaoters and emplo3'6s of 
i>09t-offic6a ...... ...... .......... 


15 
131 

2 
12 




84 

47 

60 










426 
C95 

3 

12 

22 

49 

.10 

17 

.. .^. 

1 

50 

86 
14 

7 

5 

5 

11 

12 

408 

21 

1 

3 

3 

91 

122 

10 

315 

78 

759 


2 

7 

1 



69 

1 

33 


60 


15 


51 




1,621 


Tfolation of aiKJtion 259, postal 

laws and regulations. 
EnUblishment of post-offioes and 

stations 


o6 










86 
















Discontinuance of post-offioes and 
stations ..... 


88 
















Allowances for po6^offioe8 

Location, change of site, etc., of 


269 




























48 
















29 


29 








3 










11 














155 




• 156 


Routes: Establisliment, discon- 
tinnanCA. or chanire of service. 






10 

21 
27 








60 


Routes: Charges against con- 
tractors carriers, etc 
















57 


Mail-kevs- Losa etc 










1 
11 






42 


Charges against railway post-office 












18 


Collection of balance due the 
United States ... 
















74 


Inspection of money-ordar busi* 
ness. collection of funds, for- 
warding sutements, and in- 
struction of postmasters 










222 
113 
42 








227 


Wrong payment of money-orders 
and noatal -notes . ... 
















125 


Estai>li.4hing and discontinuance 
of money-order seirvice 
















64 


Section 880, and act of June 18. 
1888, as amended 


2 


5 




10 

1 

13 


6 


49 




480 


Section 879 


8 ' 


30 


Section 615 




1 


"i* 










15 


Section 706 








4 




g 


Section 1442 












3 


Section 1447 




14 
5 


4 
1 


1 




"l 


10 
12 
1 

38 

1 

234 


1 
8 


121 


Section 1448 




141 


Section 1449 








11 


Section 1400 




3 




4 

e 

117 


2 
81 


6 

1 

54 


368 


Section 1499 




86 


Hiscellaneons inrostigations and 
complaints...................... 


33 


184 


90 


1,673 




Total 


195 


5,522 


178 


283 


520 


95 


663 


38 


3,214 


113 


10,721 





186 REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

JCxMhit G 1. — Diapositionf by office of Chief Poet- Office' Ivspectoff of misceUaneoM cases 
{Class C) referred to and reported upon by post-offi^ imipectors during the fiscal year 
ended June 30, 1S90. 

ZTambot referred to and reUtiog to office of— 

PoBtmaater-General 215 

First AsMittant Postmaater-Oeneral 6,057 

Second AssiBtant Pontmaster-General 207 

Third AsafBtant Poetmaater-General t 242 

Buperiotendent Money-Order System 416 

General Superintendent Railway Mail Service 63 

Assistant A ttorney-General 424 

Superintendent Free Delivery System » 01 

Aaditor of the Treasnry for the Post-Office Department 80 

Belating to office of the chief post-office inspector and filed 1,242 

Beporta of the inspection of poat-offieea reterred to the several bureana of the Department 414 

Total 8.421 

Exhibit G 2.'-'Iiccapi1ulaiion. 

Caaea (Claas C) referred to Inapectora for in veati nation diirin;; the fiscal year 1800 10, 721 

Caaea on hand July 1, 1889, referred for investigation during previous yeara 7, 524 

Total to be accounted for 18.245 

Caaea referred to inspectors, reported upon, and finally closed during fiscal vear 1890 8, 421 

Caaea referred to inspectors during previous years, reported upon, and finally closed during the 
flacalyearlSW 7,214 

Total number caaea oloaed 15,635 

Caaea remaining in the handa of inapector JToly i, 1880 (un Investigat ed) 2. 610 

Exhibit H is a statement showing the treatment of cases by the 
office in which collection or recoveries of amounts lost was made on 
account of mail depredations. 

Exhibit H. — Statement of the receipt and disbursement of moneys collected and recovered 
on account of losses in the nMils during the fiscal year ld90. 

' KECEIPTS. 

Balance remalninfj^ over unexpended from the fiscal year 1889. (Being moneys recovered 
during the previous fiscal years) $2, 582. 90 

Total amount collected and recovered (and received at the Department) from July 1, 1889, 
to and including June 30, 1890 17,619.81 

Total amount to be accounted for 20,202.71 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Total amount restored to proper owners on account of reported lossea: 

In 1,018 Olaas A caaea $13,849.26 

In 116 ClaaaB caaea 651.82 

In4 ClaaaC caaea 11.90 • 

In33 ClaaaF caaea 404.05 

In4Claaa special cases 14.14 

Total amount (no proper owners found) covered into the United States Treanury : 

Inl2Chia8 A casea 73.97 

In 4 Claaa B caaea 7.35 

InlClaaaFoaae .3.00 

In 3 Claaa fnoeoial caaea „ 53.68 

Total number of caaea treated, 1,190. 14, 909. 17 

Balance remaining unexpended at the ending of the fiscal year 1890 6, 233 64 

There were treated by inspectors during the year: 

Cases of Claas A, inclading those referred in previous years 7, MA 

Cases of Class B, including those referred in previous years 54,3:21 

Cases of Class C, including those referred in previous years 15, 6:^5 

Cases of Class F, including those referred in previous years 10, 436 

Total 87,736 

The Statement concerninpf cases of Class F includes those treated 
directly by office of chief inspector and not referred to inspectors for 
investigation. There remained on hand, awaiting treatment, June 30, 
1890, of all classes of cases, 21,637. 

Exhibit I is a statement showing the criminal statistics of the office 
for the year. 



Exhibit I.— 


Isoal 


year 


ended June 30, 1890. 










VTATB COUBTB. 


■^ 




Offenders. 


Disposition of cases. 


1 


StetdvheraarTMted. 












-^ 




a 
1^ 




1 


1 

S3 


^ 


^ 


1 

"3 


3 

-a 


pj 


OM 




pq 


< 


H 


5 


< 


< 


H 


O 


AlftlMuna •— -.--. 
















20 


ArUon* 






...... 












ArkftDMs 
















12 


CaUfornia 
















29 


Colorado 
















70 


nAnnAfltifiii^ .......■•««•-•• 


2 




2 


I 




1 


2 


48 


Dfilawan -,--- ..... 
















1 


Dirtriot of Columbia 
















6 


Florida 
















20 


Q^orgilh , 


2 


\ 


3 






3 


3 


85 


Idaho. .1 


















Ulinoifl 




1 


1 


1 






1 


71 


Indiana ..r»»-..-r^T------< 








20 


Indian Tarritorv ---f --« 


.... 














g 


Iowa ' 


8 




8 


3 






3 


10 


Kanaaa • 


2 




2 


2 






2 


36 


Kfintnoky ........i 


1 




I 


X 






1 


13 


Loniffiana ,,...,,,^.-.-- .. 
















23 


Maine 


. 















7 


Marjluad 
















U 


MaMftohnsetta ....i 


1 

4 


2 
2 


8 






8 
8 


8 



42 


Michigan ^.--r- -- 






16 


Minn«aota' 


2 




2 






2 


2 


22 


MiMiMippi 

Missoon « 




1 


1 






1 


1 


19 


8 


8 


6 









6 


67 


Montana ...«........•* -- 








Kebraaka 
















14 


Nevada - 


















New Hampshire. ..•••. ••>••-• 


9 




2 






2 


2 


4 


















15 


Kaw Mexico ..--• 


.... 














3 


Mew York 


R 


6 


"'ia' 


2 




11 


13 


86 


North Carolina - 
















20 


North Dakota - 
















8 


Ohio .- --« 


S 


...... 


6 
8 






5 
8 


5 

3 


50 


Oref^on « 






8 


Pennsylvania. ...•••.....•• •-' 


1 


1 


2 






2 


2 


68 


Rhode Island 
















2 


South Carolina ......< 


.... 














7 


Soath Dakota 
















2 


















35 


Texas •...■■..■... ■•■■«.•*---' 


4 


2 


C 




2 


4 





26 


Utah 


1 


Vermont.. ...... ......,..•> •-< 


4 
2 




4 
2 






4 
1 


4 
2 


8 


VlTj^nia 


I 




38 


Washinerton .................. 


1 




1 




I 




1 


4 


West Virginia ■ 
















4 


Wisconsin •....•..■•....••■.•« 


1 




1 


1 






1 


16 


WvominflT. .................... 










... 
















Total - — 


48 


21 


69 


12 


3 


M 


60 


1,014 




?«ftWH 



















CHIlJF INSPECTOR — LOTTERIES — REWARDS. l87 

I need hardly call attention to the great labor of inspectors in seek- 
ing information and preparing data concerning the workings of the lot- 
tery companies and in demonstrating the defects in the law existing 
concerning them. 

It is a well known fact that the use of the mails by these nefarious 
enterprises has been the principal means of reaching the ignorant and 
gullible and in reaping from their victims a rich harvest of ill-gotten 
gains. 

The subject-matter submitted to you in this connection has been 
gathered from every part of the land and practically verified by obser- 
vation here in Washington, almost in the shadow of the Department 
building. 

I feel that we can be proud of the success achieved. 

I recommend that the act of June 17, 1878 (20 Statutes, 140), be so* 
amended as to provide for the appointment by the Postmaster-General 
of twelve post-office inspectors at a salary of two thousand five hundr^ 
dollars per annum, instead of ten now provided for. This becomes nec- 
essary because of the recent creation of two new divisions with head- 
quarters at Helena, Mont., and Austin, Tex. 

In conclusion, I beg to call attention to the increase in the number 
of burglaries of post offices, which this year is 872 as against 849 
last year, and beg to renew my recommendation of last year for a 
special appropriation of $25,000 for the payment of rewards for the 
apprehension and conviction of burglars; also to include in the same 
appropriation provision for the payment of rewards for the apprehen- 
sion and conviction of highway stage and train robbers, which are, 
under your order No. 237, dated June 27, 1890, now paid out of the ap- 
propriation for the salaries and expenses of inspectors of this service, 
and it is desired that the said appropriation be relieved to that extent. 

The necessity for this appropriation is the same now as last year, as 
these robberies arc increasing. 
Very respectftilly, 

E. G. Rathbone, 
Chief Post- Office Inspector. 

The Postmaster-General. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

TOPOGKAPHER 

OF THE 

POST-OFFICE DEPARTMENT 

FOR 

1890. 



180 



REPORT 



or Tus 



TOPOGRAPHER OF THE POST-OFFICE DEPARTMENT. 



Post-Offioe Department, 

Topographer's Office, 
Washington^ D. 0., October 25, 1890. 

Sir: I have the honor to snbmit herewith the annual report of this 
office for the tiscal year ended June 30, 1890. 

The Topographer's Office has been occupied in the preparation and 
publication of the bimonthly editions of post-route maps; in the con- 
struction of new maps to replace those requiring new compilations, and 
also those which, from the continuous changes and additions necessi- 
tated by the extension of the postal service, have become unserviceable; 
in noting upon the pofit-rouLe maps, for the use of the Post-Office De- 
partment, every month, the daily establishments and changes in post- 
offices and changes in service; and in correcting by hand, whenever 
feasible, such maps of former editions remaining on hand, for the use 
of the postal service. 

These maps, by the present method of reproduction, being issued 
every two months and corrected up to date, form a continuous history 
of the progress and changes of post routes, and are of great use in the 
various branches of the postal service. 

MAP WORK. 

1. Construction of new maps. — During the past fiscal year we have 
been enabled to complete and publish all tbe maps which had been 
allowed to remain in an unfinished state, or were in course of prepara* 
tion, and also to construct and complete new sheets to replace fofmer 
copies requiring new compilations. 

The maps completed and published are as follows : New England 
(except Maine), in two-sheet form ; New York, in four-sheet form ; Ohio 
and Indiana, in two-sheet form; Texas, in two-sheet-form; and Oregon 
and Washington, in two-sheet form; twelve sheets in all. 

There are now in course of preparation : North and South Dakota, in 
two-sheet form; Colorado, in two- sheet tbrm; Montana, Idaho, and Wy- 
oming, in two-sheet form; and Utah, in one-sheet form ; seven sheets in 
all. 

Owing to the worn condition of the working surfaces of some of the 
lithographic base stones, in consequence of the long use and repeated 
corrections they have been subjected to since 1883, there remain a num- 
ber of maps which should be replaced by either new lithographic or 
photolithographic copies. Also, those maps, hitherto regarded as pre- 

191 



192 REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

( ' • 

liminary, should be replaced by new coustractions, as they were com- 
piled at a time when reliable and systematic tsarveys were wanting to 
constitute a basis for correct compilation. 

In order to provide for the renewal of these maps in time, the serv- 
ices of two additional draughtsmen will be required. 

The process employed in the reproduction of these maps is that of 
photolithography. All corrections and additions by this process, con- 
sisting of establishments and changes in post-offices, changes in their 
intermediate distances, frequency of star routes in colors, the railway- 
mail service, county and State boundaries in colors, the whole mode 
of supply, are shown upon the regular bi-monthly editions of the post 
route maps. 

2. Stib maps, — ^Two drawings, showing the environs of Des Moines, 
Iowa,''and St. Paul and Minneapolis, Minn., the territory embraced in 
these special drawings being overcrowded on the general edition of 
post-route maps, have been prepared and transferred to their respect- 
ive base-stones of the general edition. 

3. Special diagrams. — Sample diagrams of the States of New Jersey, 
Alabama, Georgia, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, North and South 
Dakota, .Colorado, Indiana, Ohio, Kentucky, Tennessee, Louisiana, 
Kansas, Missouri, Washington, Oregon, Arkansas and Indian Terri- 
tory, have been prepared for the Railway Majl Service, for the use of 
the employes of that service, exhibiting the railway postal lines and 
their connecting side mail-routes. 

Twelve thousand and seven hundred sheets of these diagrams, com- 
prising nineteen States and Territories, have been printed and furnished 
to the General Superintendent of the Hallway Mail Service. It being 
found too expensive to supply the numerous employes (postal-car clerks 
and others) of that service with the elaborate maps of the general edi- 
tion, these cheap special diagrams are made up from transfers from the 
base stones of the post-route maps, and designed to show only the 
black work of the latter maps. 

4. The preparation of the bimonthly editions of the post-route maps of 
the United States. — In the preparation and publication of the bi-monthly 
revised editions of the post-route maps, by means of prints from litho- 
graphic stones, the draughting force of this office has prepared for the 
contractors 720 correction sheets for the black work and 360 color-cor- 
rection sheets for the color work. The work on these lithographic 
stones, during the interval between each edition, is brought up to the 
latest possible exhibit of the existing postal service, by means of these 
corrected sheets furnished the contractors. 

Also three hundred and sixty sample sheets, showing the monthly 
changes in the postal service, have been kept up by the draughtsmen. 
These sample sheets are used by the lady correctors in bringing up 
the postal service on the published maps that may be on hand in the 
intervening months. 

5. Diagrams — For the daily use of the officers and clerks of the 
several bureaus of the Post-Office Department, twelve complete sets 
of postiil diagrams, comprising in all three hundred and three maps, 
have been brought up monthly. These diagrams graphically exhibit 
the mail service throughout the extent of the United States as actually 
in operation at the beginning of each month. 

In addition to this series of diagrams there have been furnished at 
longer intervals than a month two hundred and seventy-five maps for 
the use of the Postmaster-General, Finance and Inspection Divisions, 
Money-Order OfficCi and other officers of the Department. 



TOPOGEAPHEK — WORK PERFORMED. 193 

HISOELLANEOUS ROUTINE WOfeK. 

(1) Thirteen thoofiand hIz hnndred and twenty-six corrections and 
additions have been made on the post-route maps, consisting of estab- 
lishments and changes in post-offices and changes in service. All of 
these items have been transferrlMl tx> working maps, sample and cor- 
rection sheets, and entered in books, classified by States, etc., for the 
use of the dranghtsmen. 

(2) Sixteen thonsand one hundred and thiiw sheets of post-route 
maps« consisting of five thousand seven hundred and eighty-nine maps 
of States and Territories, mostly in combined form, have been distrib- 
uted during the past fiscal year. The greater part of this distribution 
was to postmasters, post-office inspectors, officers and clerks of the Kail- 
way Mail Service, diagrams for the use of the officers and clerks of the 
Post-Office Department in Washington, and other agents of the Depart- 
ment, the remainder being furnished on request to Senators and Members 
of the House of Jtepresentatives, committees of Congress, and when 
available to other Departments of the Government, purchasers, educa- 
tional and scientific institutions. 

In order that these maps may be of greatest .use in the various 
branches of the postal service it is important that tliey should be 
mounted in suitable form. Forty-five percent of the maps issued have 
therefore been backed on muslin and mounted on rollers or bound in 
folio or octavo for portable use. 

All requests for post-route maps received by this office, for the use 
of the general postal service or other applicants, have received prompt 
attention, and since the mounting facilities have been enlarged there 
has been no unnecessary delay in furnishing mounted maps. 

A detailed statement of this distribution of maps duri ng the past fiscal 
year is appended, with a side comparison with numbers issued for,the 
year preceding. 

The sales of post-route maps, as authorized by law, amounted, dur- 
ing the past fiscal year, to $2,806. 

(3) The miscellaneous correspondence comprised five thousand and 
seven hundred letters, written upon the various subjects pertaining to 
thedetail of the office. The number of letters received was five thousand 
three hundred and ninety. v 

In order to locate correctly the lines of railroads one hundred and 
thirty-one letters of request have been addressed to engineers and other 
officers of the railroads, inclosing a tracing or a map of the section 
of country through which the road passes, to have marked thereupon, 
or upon a map oJT their own, the correct line, with intermediate dis- 
tances, for transference to the maps of this Department. 

Seventeen hundred and eighty -six circular queries have been sent to 
postmasters to obtain the precise location of their post-offices, such 
being necessary when the description in the papers furnished through 
the Appointment Office is found inadequate. 

In addition to the general duties of this office, it is called upon to 
furnish, lor other departments of the Government, certificate of dis- 
tances by post-routes, required in the settlement of mileage accounts 
by officers of the public service. This work has, as usual, received 
prompt attention. During the past fiscal year one thousand two hun- 
dred and five letters have been answered, covering one thousand seven 
hnndred and twenty-four queries. These calls, in many cases, involve 
references to postal records of twenty and thirty years ago. Lists of 
counties in the (Jnited States and lists of distances of the shortest post 
PUG 90 13 



194 



REPORT OF THE POSTM.VSTER-OENERAL. 



routes between the lJirg:er and more important places, have been fur- 
nished for the United States Official Postal Guide. 

1 respectfully submit that in the appropriation bill the usual pro- 
viso be inserted that the Postmaster-General may authorize the sah^ of 
post-route maps to the public at cost, the proceeds to be used a^ a fur- 
ther appropriation for the preparation and publication of post-route 
maps. 

I take pleasure in testifying to the general faithful and efficient 
work of the employes of this office. 

A condensed statement of the work performed in the Topographer's 
Office for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1890, is herewith added. 
Very respectfully, 

0. RoESER, Jr., 
^ TopograplieVj Post-Office DepartmcnU 

Hon. John Wanamaker, 

Postmaster- Oeneralj Post- Office Department. 



Detailed statement of post-route maps issued duHng the fiscal year ending June 30, 1890. 



To whom ftimished. 



Postmaiitera 

PoHt-oflico iDBpectoni 

The railway mailftervice (beaiden dia^ranis) 

Pont-Office Department (offioors aud cTerkH) 

MiaoellaueoaR (inclading Senators and Members of the Houm of Rcpretenta- 
tive«, commltteenof ConjsreBs, officers of other Government Departments, edu- 
oational and scientific Institutions, and maps sold to private parties) 



Total. 



No. of maps issned 

durins the fiscal 

year eadinx— 



*Mapa issued daring 1890=16,130 sheets. 



tMaps issued during 18S9=12,25G sheets. 




Condensed statement of work performed in the Topographer^ s Office during the fieoal year . 

ending June 30, 1690. 

Constrnotion of new maps in sheots 12 

Snb-maps 2 

Special nample diafrramn for Railway Mail Service 19 

Correction, color correction, and sample sheets , 1,440 

Diagrams " kept up " monthly for Post-Oftice Department 303 

Diagrams famished at longer intervals thnn a month 275 

Corrections and additions to post-roate maps 13, 6?ft 

Letters received 5, .300 

Letters written 5,70() 

Railroad letters and tracings sent ont i:U 

Certificate of distances famished 1,206 

Circular qaerioa to postmaaten ......•• 1,786 



REPORT 



OF THE 



FIRST ASSISTANT POSTMASTER-GENERAL 



FOH THE 



FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1890. 



196 



REPORT 



OF THX 



FIRST ASSISTANT POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 



Post-Offtcb Department, 
Office Fihst Assistant Postmaster-General, 

Washington^ D. C, November 22, 1890. 
Sir : I Lave the honor to sabmit the following report of ^tUe work of 
this Bateau for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1890: 

APPOINTMENT DIYISION. 

PosUofficei established and discontinued, postmasters appointedf and the increase or decrease 
as compared with the previous year. 



Fosi-officM. 



JnDo ao, 



Jane 30, 
1880. 



Inoreate 



Docreaso 



Poftt-oflBoes established dnriofc the year.., 
PoAtrofflces disoontinned during the yew. 

Net iocrease orer previous year 

Whole nomber of post-offices 

Kiiiii iter of presidential •, 

Kaniber of foarth-class < 



2,770 
1,147 
1,023 

58,099 
2,684 

56,315 



4,427 
1,025 
3,402 

62.401 
2.738 

50,063 



1,657 



1,779 

3.402 

54 

8,348 



122 



Appointments during the year. 



Appointments. 



Jnne 30, 
1889. 



Jnne 30, 
1890. 



Increase. 



Decrease. 



On resignations and expirations of term. 

On removals 

On offices liecoming presidential , 

On deathn of postmasters 

On establishment of post-offices 



8,553 

7,853 

301 

553 

2,770 



8,019 

6,560 

134 

673 

4,427 



Total. 



20,722 



866 



120 
1.657 



2.143 



1 284 
167 



Total appointments during the year 20.722 

Total offices discontinued *. 1,025 

If vmber of names and sites changed 1.581 

Total eases acted upon 23,828 



198 



EBPORT OF THE P08TMASTER-GT5NKRAL. 



The number of new offices established and the increase in tlie nam- 
ber of post-offices, arranged by sections. States and Territories, were 
as follows : 



states and Territories. 


SsUb- 
lished. 


Increase. 


Maine 


Nwf MngUmd StaUa. 


83 
U 
28 
27 
10 
20 


28 


New HttDpahira 


. 7 


Vermont .' • - 


11 


Mf"M(n<7hnnettii 


16 


Khode iBland 


9 


Goonecticiit ...... --- 


11 








Total 


157 


88 








New York....... 


133 
39 
13 
68 

316 
3 


89 


lifew Jersey. ...................................................................... 


24 


Delaware 


8 


Miu-yl^ni^ _, , _ .,.,.. , . 


40 


Penneylvania •. 


215 


District of Colum 


bU _ 








Total 


671 


376 




BtaUM and TerrUorie» on Paeifio Slops, 

.^ ^ - 1 




Oreson ..•••....• 


114 
162 

24 
167 

17 
3 


60 


Califomla I..I I .'..II 1.11... .' 


72 


Neva<la 


11 


Wanbiiif^n — - 


125 


Arizona.. ....... 


--.------.-.--.----- ----- - 


10 


Alaska ' 


2 




> 




Total 


487 


280 




Southern SUUet and Indian Territory, 




Virginia 


241 

180 
252 

no 

264 
117 
246 
153 
97 
2£6 
182 
202 
224 
238 
148 


166 


West Virginia...... 


128 


Norih Caroliiia... 


159 


South Carolina 


50 


Georgia................................. .. ... 


133 


Florida 


54 


Alabama....... 


175 


Mississippi 


94 




58 


Texas ..•• 


142 


Arkansas 


84 


Missouri 


134 


Tennessee 


155 


Kentucky '. 


173 


Indian Territory. 


102 








Total 


2,909 


1,815 






8 
OMo 


160 
96 

no 

98 

112 

102 

103 

88 

79 

120 

117 

36 

79 

55 

46 

23 


117 


Indiana. ........................... . .................................. ....!..... 


63 


Michigan 


68 


Illinois 


49 


Wisconsin , 


83 


Iowa .. 


45 


Minnesota • 


52 


Kaosna ... . 


23 


NebrAHica 


37 


Colorado , 


67 


Dakota (North an<1 i^nt.b inrtliifiA^) . . . . . 


87 


New Mexico 


' 


28 




46 


Wyoming ............... .. .... . .. 


42 


Idaho 


33 


TTtah * 







' 




Total 


1,436 


849 







' PIB8T ASSISTANT — APPOINTMENTS. 199 

The g^reatest increase m the number of povSt oflSees in any of the 
States for the year was 215 in Pennsylvania. In Alabama the increase 
in number was* 175 : Kentucky, 173; Virginia, 183; North Carolina, 159 ; 
Tennessee, 155, ana Texas, 142. The largest increase for the previous 
year was 121 in Pennsylvania. There was no decrease in any of the 
States or Territories in the number of offices. 

In each of eleven of the States there were upwards of two thousand 
offices in operation on June SO. The following are the States and the 
whole number of offices : 

Pennsylvanift 4,570 

New York 3,40(5 

Ohio 3,073 

Virginia -2,706 

North CftToIinft 2,511 

IlltDois 2,401 

MinBonri 2,3-9 

TeDoessee - ^ 2,273 

Texas 2,248 

Kentaoky 2,214 

Indiana ...J 2,05(5 

Tn only nine of the States are there one hundred or more Presidential 
offices. Those are as follows : 

New York 240 

Pennsylvania 200 

lUiuoiB lyo 

Ohio....: : 154 

Mas^Hchnsetts 144 

Michigan * i:i7 

Iowa* 13(5 

Kansas 12i) 

Indiana 100 



200 



REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 



The following tables. A, 6, 0, and D, are given for general informa- 
tion : 

Tablb a. — Operations of the Appointment Division for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1890. 





Poat-offloea. 


Fourth-class pod^ 
masters. 


Presidential caaea. 




SUtM and Territories. 


1 

S 


1 

1 

.a 

Q 


1 

1 

1 


1 


1 


1 


1 

P 


1 

1 


1 

I 


1 


S 


1 


j 

1 

8 

§ 

e 



H 


Alabama /.. 

AIa«ka 


197 

3 

17 

141 

115 

95 

13 

22 

10 

1 

92 

196 

40 

67 

79 

122 

76 

70 

190 

73 

39 

62 

20 

99 

75 

124 

170 

65 

71 

13 

9 

80 

33 

101 

203 

137 

83 

250 

9 

91 

178 

208 

13 

U 

202 

132 

160 

100 

45 

30 

47 


22 

1 

7 

57 

43 

28 

2 

2 
2 

1 
38 
63 
7 
18 
16 
20 
81 
47 
26 
15 
11 
12 
4 
21 
23 
30 
36 
19 
34 
2 
2 
6 
6 
12 
44 
20 
23 
85 

*82' 
23 
66 

4 

3 
87 

7 
32 
17 

3 

7 
9 


61 

2 
4 

85 

20 
26 

4 

7 


20 

8 

60 

11 

^ 12 

1 

3 


206 
4 

29 
214 
101 
157 

37 

47 

9 

1 

149 

243 

47 

269 

261 

61 

226 

354 

370 

99 

103 

91 

45 

264 

151 

168 

413 

81 

203 

11 

84 

58 

56 

241 

224 

340 

130 

417 

13 

113 

328 

461 

25 

45 

366 

125 

230 

172 

50 

76 

79 


90 
1 

15 
131 
116 

49 

54 

21 

18 

1 

60 

91 

10 

209 

276 

14 

222 

165 

192 

39 

123 

101 

49 

224 

106 

87 

250 

16 

110 

8 

80 

90 

17 

873 

164 

581 

18 

447 

18 

80 

168 

167 

6 

80 

472 

31 

131 

181 

9 

32 

61 


20 


1 


8 


4 





2 


601 
11 




26 
12 
11 
5 

< 

1 


2 
2 

8 
7 

1 


1 
2 

20 
7 

21 


1 
9 
10 
6 

1 

3 
1 


77 


A|>)f;||f|imif _ . 


. . .V. 


1 
7 

4 


668 


California 


551 




390 


CoDDecticut 


138 


DakoU (to NoTeDiber2, 
1889) 


106 


Delaware 


.... 


3 






44 


DiHtrict of Columbia . . . 


1 

17 
63 
11 
26 
11 
22 
18 
85 
64 

5 

9 
15 

3 
00 
48 
80 
70 
15 
57 


i' 

23 

5 
8 
3 
11 
10 
42 
17 

2* 

4 
1 

19 
24 
14 
20 
13 
25 






6 


Florida 


15 

25 

2 

18 

15 

8 

15 

14 

25 

14 

11 

23 

8 

9 

8 

17 

24 

1 

6 

1 

7 

18 

24 
28 

81 


1 

1 

2 

12 

15 


1 
10 

"'39' 
16 


9 
4 

1 
49 
31 


1 


1 
1 

1 

8 
8 
3 
2 
5 
2 
2 
3 
2 
4 
6 
1 
3 
6 
2 
2 
1 
8 
1 


393 


6eor8;ia 


697 


Idaho 


121 


Illinois 


717 


rndiana ...„., ,,,...- -r^ 


» 723 


Indian Territory 

Iowa 


245 


22 

32 

2 

.... 

) 

8 
16 

6 

1 
IS 

8 
22 

"i* 

2 
2 

14 
1 

12 
6 



19 

19 

16 

5 

8 

7 

43 

21 

11 

6 

20 

2 

11 

1 

8 

21 

2 

42 

""42' 

4 
62 


21 

84 

8 

5 

8 

3 

11 

31 

11 

9 

21 

2 

13 

5 

10 

7 

2 

48 

14 

23 

1 

85 

1 

8 

11 

26 

2 

2 

14 

2 

4 

18 

1 

8 

10 


1 

2 

.... 

8 

"2' 

2 

.... 

1 

"i 


653 


Kansas 


827 




804 


LouiMitona 


257 


Maine 


321 


Maryland 


307 


Massachusetts 


191 


Micbiiran 


7'M 


M-iuocHotn ••.•• •••••.• 


435 


Misaisnippl v.. 

Missouri 


477 

1, 034 

206 


Montana .......... .... 


Nebraska 


530 


Nevada 


38 


New Hampshire 

New Jersey 


7 
15 

9 
80 
92 
29 
19 
44 

1 

15 
92 
62 

7 

2 
141 
43 
53 
43 
12 

80 

81 


i' 

6 
. 5 
26 
8 
8 
5 

5* 

84 

40 

5 

"**'09 

25 

9 

14 

10 

25 

23 


16:) 

246 


New Mexico 


125 


New York 


8 

.... 

1 

"i* 


9 

1 
7 
3 
8 
1 
1 
8 
6 


913 


North Carolina......... 


767 


Ohio 


1,109 


Oregon 


296 


Pennsylvania .......... 


1,328 


Rhode Island . ... ...... 


43 


South Carolina 


12 
28 
28 

8 

8 
43 

2 
13 
11 

2 

2 

4 


5 

"i* 

1 

5 

"s 

1 
1 
6 


6 

18 

1 
6 
8 
1 
6 
27 
2 

6 

5 


352 


Tennessee.............. 


842 


Texas 


1,050 


XlUh 


61 


Vermont ............... 


1 
'3 


2 
3 

8 
2 

4 


166 


Virginia 


1,287 


Washini^n 


356 


West Virginia 


6:u 


Wisconsin 


5H4 


Wyoming 


125 


North Dakota, fh>m 
November 3, 188» 

South Dakota, tnm 
November 3, 1889 






192 






241 








Total ,...,., 


*.437 


1,025 


1,581 


(OOti) 


8.086 


1^012 


642 


m 


£80 


m 


31 


134 


23;, 828 







PIB8T ASSISTANT — ^APPOINTMENTS. 



201 



Tabus B. — Pruideniial poMt-officet in each State and Territory an June 30, 1889, and June 
30, 1800, with the increase and decrease ; also the number of offices of each ciaee and 
the total number ofofficee in the United States on that date. 



tories. 


June 30, 
1889. 


JnneaO, 
1890. 


In- 
crease. 


De- 
crease. 


First 
class. 


Second 
class. 


Third 
class. 


Fonrth 
class. 

1,966 
17 

165 
1,452 
1,270 

636 

437 
* 1,117 

149 
12 

817 
1,846 

253 
2,205 
1,956 

344 
1,645 
1, 700 
2,169 

831 
1,0(9 
1,029 

711 
1,720 

1,028 

141 

496 

767 

246 

3,168 

2,483 

2,919 

635 

4,370 

125 

1,074 

2,238 

2,167 

248 

505 

2,065 

581 

1.558 

1,550 

219 


Total. 

June 30. 

1890. 


AUbam* 

Alaska 


26 


27 


1 


..... .^. 


2 


4 


21 


1,893 
17 


Aii Yon^ -^,,,_^,-,^. 


6 

M 
83 
39 
62 
51 

8 

1 
19 
82 

6 
191 
98 

1 
13« 
137 
43 
14 
44 
22 
142 
137 
69 
27 
85 
18 
80 

8 

80 
74 

9 

236 

28 

154 

15 

192 

12 

21 

82 

78 

6 
28 
42 
13 
17 
87 

7 


6 

26 

85 

40 

58 

50 

8 

1 

18 

32 

7 

196 

100 

3 

136 

129 

45 

15 

45 

22 

144 

137 

58 

30 

92 

18 

81 

7 

87 

74 

10 

240 

28 

154 

18 

200 

18 

22 

35 

81 

5 

20 

41 

21 

10 

90 

7 








1 

8 
15 

6 
15 

8 


4 
21 
65 
33 
40 
42 

7 


170 


ArltaonaA ......••.. 


1 
2 
1 


i' 

1 


1 
5 
1 
3 

i' 

1 

s' 


1.477 


California 


1,355 


Colorado 


676 


Connecticut.. 

Dakota 


495 

1,167 

157 


0<daware 


Difltiict of Columbia 






13 


Florida 




1 


5 
5 


13 

34 

7 

158 

75 

3 

112 

110 
35 
12 
35 
18 
99 

107 
47 
25 
79 
16 
72 
5 
31 
SO 
8 

168 
21 

102 
15 

152 

7 

19 

29 

67 

3 

21 

32 

17 

16 

71 

5 


835 


Georgia.... 


1,878 
2l>0 


Idabo 


1 
5 
2 
2 




Illinola 




4 
4 


34 
21 


2, 401 


Indiana 

Indian Territory . . . 
Iowa. .- 


2. 0.Vi 
»47 




6 
2 

I 
1 
3 
1 
6 
4 
3 


18 
17 
9 

a 

7 
8 

39 

26 
8 
5 

10 
2 
7 
2 
6 

20 
2 

61 
7 

45 
2 

41 
5 
2 
2 

11 
1 
8 
7 
3 
2 

18 
2 


1, 7bl 


Knnaaa ^.. 

K<!>ntucky .......... 


2 

1 
1 


8 


1.S38 
2,214 


Ix>oiaiana 


846 


Haine 


1,094 


Maryland 


1, OJl 


Haa«acbu«ett8 

UicblfEan 


2 




i«55 
1,857 


Minnesota 


i' 

7 
1 

i 


1 


1.272 


MiseiMtppi 


1,278 


MiiMottri 




8 


2,389 
348 


Montana 


Kobraska 


i 


2 


1, 107 


Nevada 


148 


New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 


533 




4 


831 


1 

4 




256 


New York 




11 


3.406 


North Carolina 


2, 51 1 


Ohio 






7 

1 
7 
1 
1 
4 
3 
1 


3,0TJ 
653 


Orefzon .' 


3 
8 

1 
1 
3 
3 




Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

T*;unessoe 


4, 570 

i:{8 

1.000 
2,273 


Texas 


2, 248 


Utah 


253 


Vermont 


1 

8" 

2 
8 




534 


Viririnia 


1 


2 

1 
1 
1 


2,700 


Wiwhin^ton...- 

WeatVirjcinia 

^Viiiconsitt ......... 


602 
1.577 
1 010 


Wyoming; 


2-J6 












ToUl 


2.684 


2,738 


71 


17 


102 


517 


2,119 


50,663 


62.401 





NOTB.— In the above table. Korth and South Dakota are counted as Dakota. North Dakota had on 
June 30. 1800. 18 Presidential and 476 fourtholaM offices, and South Dakota 32 Presidential and 642 
foorth-class offices. 



202 



REPORT OP THE POSTMASTER-aENERAL. 



TA^LB C-- Operations of the appointment divieion of ike office of the First AssiBtant Poet- 
nuuter-Generalf as to fourth class offices j for the year ended June 30, 1890, also post- 
offices in each State and Territory on June 30, with the increase over the corresponding 
number on June 30, 1889. 





Fost.offioeB. 


Fourth-class post- 
masters. 


3 

686 
11 
73 
654 
497 
306 
115 
103 
40 
5 
380 
681 
117 
607 
65H 
242 
588 
735 
866 
245 
301 
204 
129 
657 
406 
456 
972 
197 
481 
30 
139 
212 
119 
797 
751 

183* 
1,085 




i 

o 

M 


States •DdTenltoriM. 




1 

a 
.3 


1 

r 


si! 

< 


1 


1 
■ 

131 
116 
49 
54 
21 
18 
1 

69 

91 

10 

209 

276 

14 

222 

165 

192 

3U 

128 

101 

49 

224 

106 

87 

269 

16 

no 

3 

80 

90 

17 

373 

164 

32 
531 


20 
...... 

26 

12 

11 

5 

4 

1 

"'V$ 

25 
2 

18 
15 
3 

15 

14 

25 

14 

11 

23 

8 

9 

8 

17 

24 

1 

6 

1 

7 

13 

"40* 
24 

2 
28 


Alabama ..........' 


197 
3 

17 

141 

115 

95 

13 

22 

10 

1 

92 
196 
40 
67 
79 
122 
76 
70 
190 

39 

52 

20 

89 

75 

124 

170 

65 

71 

13 

9 

30 

33 

101 

203 

36 

187 


22 

1 

7 

67 

43 

28 

2 

2 

2 

1 

38 

63 

7 

18 

16 

20 

31 

47 

26 

15 

11 

12 

4 

21 

23 

30 

36 

19 

34 

2 

2 

6 

5 

12 

44 

7 
20 


61 
2 
4 

85 

20 

26 

4 

7 


20 


206 

4 

29 

214 

191 

157 

37 

47 

9 

1 

149 

243 

47 

269 

261 

61 

226 

354 

370 

00 

103 

91 

46 

264 

151 

168 

413 

81 

203 

U 

34 

58 

55 

241 

224 

76 
340 


170 

1,477 

1, 355 

676 

495 


175 


Alaaka 


2 


Arixona 


3 

60 
11 
12 

1 
3 


10 


Arkanoaa 


84 


California 


72 


Colorado 


67 


Cocnocticut -. 


11 


Dakota (to Not. 2, 1889).. 
Delaware 




167 
13 

8:^5 
1,878 

260 
2.401 
2,056 

347 
1,781 
1,838 
2.214 

846 
l.OiH 
1,051 

855 
1.857 
1.272 
1,278 
2,389 

348 
1,107 

148 

533 

831 

256 
3.406 
2,511 

403 
3,073 


8 


Di«triot of Colombia 


1 

17 
63 
11 
26 
11 
22 
18 
85 
54 

5 

9 
15 

3 
50 
43 
30 
70 
15 
67 






I*'lorida 


8 

23 

5 

3 
3 
11 
10 
42 
17 

2 

4 
1 

19 
24 
14 
20 
13 
25 


54 


Georgia.......... 


133 


Idaho 


33 


Illinots 


49 


Indiana........ .......... 


63 


Indian Territory 


102 


Iowa ,...'... 


45 


Kansas 


23 


Kentucky ......•••...... 


173 


I/O 111 ntana 


58 


Maine 


28 


Maryland 


40 


MaMaoboaetts 


16 


Michigan 


68 


Minnesota ..•. 


52 


MissiBsippi 


94 


MiMaonri.. 


134 


Mnutana 


46 


Nebraska 


37 


Nevada 


11 


New Hampshire ......... 


7 
15 

9 
30 
92 

30 
29 




7 


New Jersey ............. 


1 
6 

5 

20 

25 
8 


24 


New Mexico 


28 


New York 


89 


North Carolina 

North Dakota (fh>m No. 
vember 3. 1889) 


159 


Ohio 


117 


Oklahoma (Included in 
Indian Terrltorv) ...... 




Oregon .................. 


83 

250 

9 

91 

47 
178 
208 

13 

14 
202 
132 
160 
100 

45 


23 
35 

"82* 

9 

23 
66 

4 

3 
37 

7 
32 
17 

3 


19 
44 

1 
15 

31 

92 

62 

7 

2 

141 

43 

53 

43 

12 


8 
6 


130 

417 

13 

113 

79 
328 
461 

25 

45 
366 
125 
230 
172 

50 




is 

447 
18 
80 

51 

168 

167 

6 

80 
472 

31 

131 

IHl 

9 


9 

31 

"ii* 

4 

28 
28 

I 

43 
2 
13 
11 
2 


282 

1.224 

41 

843 

221 
817 
992 
58 
152 
1,261 
340 
610 
524 
121 


653 
4,570 

138 
1,096 

674 
2,273 
2, 248 

2:>:j 

534 
2,70« 

602 
1.577 
1,640 

226 
(1.107) 


60 


Pf^nnsvlyania. ........... 


215 


Rhode Island 


9 


South Carolina 


5 

23 

84 

40 

5 

69* 

2.") 
9 
14 
10 


59 


South DakoU (from No- 
vember 8, 1889) 






155 


Texaa .......•■•«. 


142 


Utah 


9 


Vermont. ................ 


11 


Virginia 


165 


Washington 


125 


West Virginia 


128 


Wiitoonsin 


83 


Wyoming 


42 


[Dakota] 


87 






1 j ' "■ 






«2 


2\,m 




Total 


4,427 


1,025 


1.581 


666 


8,08U 


M.. 


62,401 


3,402 



f 1B8T ASSISTANT — SALARIES AND ALLOWANCES. 



203 



Table D. — Appoinlments made upon reaignationa, commissions expired^ removals, deaths, 
e/c, ai Presidential post-offices during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1890. 



StatM and Territories. 


Resigned. 


Comrois- 

nlODS 

expired. 


Removal 


Deceased. 


Offices 
become 
Presiden- 
tial. 


Total 

numlK'rof 

cases. 


AUbAma 


1 


8 


4 




2 


15 


AlMka 






A rizona. 


2 
2 

8 

7 

1 


1 

20 

7 

21 


1 
9 
19 
6 
1 
3 
1 






4 


ArkaiuuiB 




1 
7 

4 


14 


Califoniia 




54 


Colorado 




24 


Conoecticat 




28 


I>akota (to Novf>mbflr 2, 1889) 






J 


]>elAware 




3 


•T 




4 


District of Colambia 










Florida 


1 
1 
2 
12 
15 


1 
10 




4 

1 

40 

81 


1 


1 

1 
1 
8 
3 
3 
2 
5 
3 
2 
8 
2 
4 
6 
1 
3 
6 
2 
2 
1 
3 
1 


13 


Georgia - 


16 


Idaho 




4 


llliaois i 


39 
16 


2 


110 


Indiana. r ........ 


65 


Indian Territory 




3 


lowit... ..,,.. ...,...., 


22 
32 
2 


10 

19 

16 

5 

8 

7 

43 

21 

11 

6 

20 

2 

11 

1 

8 

21 

2 

42 


21 

34 

8 

6 

8 

8 

11 

31 

11 

9 

21 

2 

13 

6 

10 

7 

2 

48 

14 

3 

23 


1 
2 


65 


KaoMM 


92 


Keatncky ......1 


28 


I/onisiana 




12 


Maine 


1 
1 
3 

16 
6 
1 

13 
8 

22 




20 


Maryland - 




13 


Mamachanetta 


1 
3 

i 


62 


Michigan 


77 


Minneeota 


29 


JllSSir?!;:::::::::::::::::::::::-:::: 


21 
02 


Montana 





Nebraaka 


I 
1 


49 


Nevada 


g 


Kew Bampehire 


3 
2 
2 
14 

I 
1 
12 


24 


Kew Jersey ^ 

New Mezioo «.. 


i' 


34 
6 


New York 


8 




1 


116 


North Carolina 


16 


North Dakota (from Noyember 3, 1880) . . 


5 
42 




g 


Ohio 




7 


84 


Oklahoma 






Oregon .................................. 


6 
8 


4 

52 


1 

35 
1 
3 
10 
11 
26 
2 
2 
14 
2 
4 
18 
1 


1 
1 


3 
8 

1 
1 


14 


Pf*nnflylvanla 


104 


Rhode Island 


2< 


South Carolina 




5 

5 


18 
1 
5 
8 
1 
6 

27 
2 







Sooth DakoU (from November 3, 1889) . . 
Tennessee...... ....... ............ ... 


5 
2 
5 




20 




3 
6 


25 


Texas 


3 


58 


Utah . 


3 


Vermont 


4 
1 
6 


I 


2 
3 

8 
2 

4 


14 


Virginia 


26 


Washinfrton 




16 


West Virginia 




12 


Wiaeonaln 


8 

1 


3 


60 


WT0«n<D2T- r.- 


4 








Total... 


253 


560 


657 


31 


13. 


1,565 





DIVISION OF SALARIES AND ALLOWANCES. 

DUniBS ASSIGNBD TO THE SALARY AND ALLOWANCE DIVISION. 

The most important duties are the adjustment of salaries of Presi- 
dential postmasters, or postmasters of the first, second, and third 
classes; consideration of applications for clerk-hire, rent, fuel, light, 
famiture, miscellaneous and incidental expenses for first and second 
class post-offijces, and rent, fuel, and light for third-class offices ; exami- 
nation of the quarterly returns, or accounts of postmsisters at offices of 
the first and second classes, before finally passed by the Auditor of the 
Treasury for the Post-Office Department; the regulation of the salaries 
and duties of employes necessary for the proper transaction of the postal 



204 



REPORT OP THE POSTMASTER- GENERAL. 



business in the first and second class post-offices ; the saperviHion and 
regulation of the box-rent rates and deposit for keys for lock-boxes, 
and the large and constantly increasing correspondence relative to the 
subject-matters stated. 

Additional duties have beep imposed upon the salary and allowance 
division by the act of Oongress which provides that clerks doing 
money-order business at offices of the first and second classes shall be 
compensated from the allowance for clerk-hire. The apportionment for 
salaries of money-order clerks at first and second class offices is now 
made through the salary and allowance division, and the commissions 
accruing on money-order accounts are returned under existing law as 
a part of the revenue of the Department. 

The act of Congress approved March 3, 1883, which requires an an- 
nual adjustment of the salaries of Presidential postmasters, to take ef- 
fect at the beginning of each fiscal year (July 1;, instead of the bien- 
nial adjustment a^ heretofore authorized, also largely increases the 
work of this division. The seventh annual adjustment of the salaries of 
Presidential postmasters was made upon the basis of the gross receipts 
which accrued at the respective offices for the four quarters ended 
March 31, 1890. The recent law providing for allowances for rent, 
fuel, and light for third-class post-offices, or offices whereat the sal- 
aries of postmasters are fixed from $1,000 to $1,900 per annum, has also 
greatly increased the work of the division. By the adjustment of the 
salaries of Presidential postmasters, which took effect July 1, 1890^ 
2,147 offices were assigned to the third class, being an increase of 114 
offices as compared with the number of third-cla^s offices July 1, 1889. 

Additional duties of an important character have been assigned to 
this division on account of the act of Congress approved March 2, 1889, 
relative to the classification and the fixing of the salaries of clerks at- 
tached to first and second class post-offices \ and, also, by the act of 
Oongress approved October 1, 1890, relative to leaves of absence of not 
exceeding fifteen days in any one fiscal year, with full pay, for clerks 
and employ^ attached to first and second cla^s post-offices. 

The various operations of the Salary and Allowance Division during 
the past fiscal year are concisely stated in the following tabulated 
statement : 

OperatiouM of ike Salary and Allowance DiviHonfor ihefieeal year ended June 30, 1890. 



Itomi. 



Lettera received 

Letters writteD 

CirciiUu* letters aent out 

Allowanoes for clerk'hire made 

Total allowed for clerks in poat-oflSce 

Allowances for clerk-hire declined 

Allowancee for rent, fael, and lifrht made 

Total amoant allowed for rent, fnel. and light 

Allowances for rent, ftiei, and light declined 

Allowances for miscellaneous Items made 

Total allowed for misoellaneons items 

Allowances for misooUaneoas items declined 

Allowances for famitnre made 

ToUl allowed for ftimitare. (See amoant misoeUaneous.) 

Allowances for Aimitare declined 

Allowances for advertising made 

Total allowed for advertising , 

▲llowuioet for adTartiaiag aeoUned 



Fiscal year 188&-'90. 



ToUl 
number. 



34.268 

44, 210 

20,314 

7,68-2 



2,895 
12, 5D1 



1,503 
13.045 



8,022 
1, 027 

1,074 
325 



$6,5r>0,000.00 



474 



Aggregate 

of 
allowaucoA. 



1. 034, 590 

"iio.ooo.oo 



13,371.71 



FIRST ASSISTANT — SALARIES AND ALLOWANCES, 205 

OperaHan9 of the Salary and AUowanee Division far the fUeal year, etc.— Continned. 



Cases sent to Chi(>f Posi^fBoe Iniipeotor for iDforinatido 

IfoartJi-oUws post-offices reported by the Auditor when the annual oomxMiiaa- 
tion of the postmaster amoouts to $1,000, exclaslTe of mouey -order oommis- 



SiODS . 



Fourtb-elass offices assigned to th e Presidon t i al class ■ 

Affj^regate required to pay the salaries of postmasters at the above Presideutial 

offices (118) tor one year 

Special adjustment s of postmasters' sslaries. 



Xs^gregtkto snm re<^uiTed to pay the above increased salaries for one year. 
Postmasters* salaries reduocM and dibcontinned. 



Agirreicate amount saved by salaries reduced and discontinued, as above 

Total salaries of postmaster^ adiusted during the year 

Argresate salaries involved in tueailjustraentM (2,8S8). as above 

First-cuass post-offices (salary of postmai^t^r $3. 000 to $0,000 a year) , 

Second-dass post-offices (salnry of poatmaHter $2,000 to $2,900 a year) 

Thinl-elass post-offices (salary of postmaster $1,000 to $1,900 a year) 

TotalPreddentialpostoffices July 1,1890 

Total required for salaries of Presidential postmasters, as above (2,732), for 

one year 

Ailowaace for clerk hire reduced and discontinued 

Amount saved by clerk hire reduced and dlsocmtinned 

Allowances for rent, fuel, and lisht reduced and discontinued 

Amount saved by rent, fuel, and light reduced and discontinued ^ 

Einploy6s (average) ,.. 

Employes, roTiew of postmasters* salaries (average) , 



Fiscal year 1889-'00. 



Total 
number. 



498 



118 
U8 



118 
..... 



2.888 



116 

554) 
2, (M!fi 
2, 732 



47 
"185 



10.9 
1.5 



Aggregate 

of 
allowances. 



$131,700 
"'l3i.'70O 



1,500 
'i,' 785* 800 



4,613.500 
2i,'850 
31,952 



The letters received during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1890, num- 
bered 34,268, being an increase of 942, as compared with 1889. In ad- 
dition to the letters received, copies of the quarterly returns of the 
Presidential offices for the four quarters ended March 31, 1890, »um- 
bering 11,080, were received and considered, as well as the rosters of 
clerks and employes attached to the 102 first-class and 519 second- 
class offices and the stations connected therewith. Forty-four thou- 
sand two hundred and ten letters were written, being an increase of 
3,709, or 9.2 per cent., as compared with 1889. Twenty thousand three 
hundred and fourteen circular letters were sent out, being an increase 
of 2,329, as compared with 1889. Seven thousand six hundred and 
eighty-two allowances for clerk-hire were made, being an increase of 
1,023, or 15.4 per cent., as compared with 1889. Two thousand eight 
hundred and ninety-five applications for clerk-hire were declined. 
Twelve thousand five hundred and ninety-one allowances for rent, fuel, 
and light for first, second, and third-class post-offices were made, being 
an increase of 6,189, or 70.1 per cent, as compared with 1889. This 
increase was occasioned by the general revision of the allowances for 
these items for the offices stated. One thousand five hundred and 
three allowances for rent, fuel, and light were declined, being an in- 
crease of 311, as compared with 1889. Quite a number of these appli- 
cations were declined, for the reason that, under existing law, the 
maximum amount which could be approved for rent for an office of the 
third-class was $400, and the maximum sum which could be approved 
for fuel and light was $60. 

The requests for allowances in excess of the amounts stated could 
not be approved under the law. Thirteen thousand and forty-five allow- 
ances for miscellaneous and incidental items were made, being an in- 
crease of 2,977, or 29.6 per cent., as compared with 1889. Three thou- 
sand and twenty-two allowances for miscellaneous items were declined, 
being an increase of 376, as compared with 1889. One thousand and 
twenty-seven allowances for furniture were made, being an increase of 



206 



REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 



247, or 31.7 pier cent, as compared with 1880. Three huudred and 
twenty-five allowances for advertising were made, being an increase of 
75 as compared with 1889. Fonr hundred and seventy -four allowances 
for advertising were declined, being an increase of 142 as compared 
with 1889. One hundred and eighteen postofiQces of the fourth class, 
were reported by the Auditor whereat the annual compensation of the 
postmaster amounted to $1^000 for the four quarters, exclusive of money- 
order commission. Of this number 118 offices were assigned to the 
third class ; the aggregate of salaries of postmasters thereat making a 
total of $131,700» The total number of salaries of Presidential post- 
masters adjusted during the year amounted to 2,888, and the aggregate 
amount involved for salaries in all adjustments amounted to $4,785,800. 
Forty-seven allowances for clerk-hire were reduced or discontinued, 
making a saving of 21,850 ; and 185 allowances for rent, fuel, and light 
were reduced or discontinued, involving a saving of (31,952. 

A tabulated statement is herewith respectfully submitted, showing 
the operation of the salary and allowance division for the fiscal years 
1880 to and including 1890, with an increase of the work since 1880. 

Operations of the Salary and Allowance Division. 



IteniB. 



1880. 1881. 1882. 1883. 1884. 1885. 1886. 1887. 1888. 1889. 1890. » 



Letters received 

Let>t«r» ftDswercd 

Circular letters sent ont . . . 

Allowances for clcrk-hlre 
made 

Allowances for clerk-hire 
declined 

Allowances for rent, fael, 
nnd light made 

Allowances for rent, fuel, 
and li^ht declined 

Allowances for niiscella- 
ueons items made 

Allowances for niiscella> 
neons items declined 

Allowances for furniture 
made 

Allowances for fhmitnre 
declined 

Allowances for stationery 
made 

Allowances for stationery 
declined 

Allowances for advertising 
made 

Allowances for advertising 
dpcliniMl 

CaseH referre«l to the Chief 
Po!»t-Oftice InHpector 

Si>ecia] adJustnittntH post- 
masters' salaries 

Biennial adju>*tments post- 
masters' salaries 

Fonrtb class post-offices re- 
ported by the Auditor, 
where the annual com- 
pensation of the post" 
roaster amounts toff, 000, 
exclosiveof money-order 
commissions 

Presidential offices role* 
^t«d to fourth class 

Fouth class offices assigned 
to third class 

Lease castas prepared 

Leases iu upuration 



siioo 



1,8361.694 



Fiscal year ended June 30— 



4.2S5 
4,751 



302 
223 
484 

96 
166 
596 
615 

lOl 



1.003 
879 
144 
703 
534 
117 
337 
635 
19 



48 



1,764 



117 



8,806 
7, — 
13,503 

2,280 

1.684 

499 

171 



I 



84 
251 



152 



99, 113 



10, 620 17, 837 
10, OO2I2I, 393 
" —-21,228 



14,483 
2,758 
2,604 
2.461 
622 
3, 177| 4, 970 



856 

258 

244 

2,628 



2,501 
543 
915 
3,239 
918i 1. 128 
21 



I 



39 120 

I 
189 368 



2,012 



192 

9 

145 

33 

313 



349 



298 

15 

174 
176 

228 



21, 873 24, 031 29, 834 31, 456 33, 326 34. 268 29, 370 
28, 3:12 30, 105,35. 5CH 37, 441 40. 501,44, 210 39, 050 



24,94415,080 



3.917 

1.319 

2,518 

967 

4.551 

1,613 

647 

779 

(») 

207 

218 

116 



4,875 



97 



»8^ 



25,314 28,019 



3,352 

IJ 

1.690 
507 

4.709 

1,356 
578 
595 



3,412 

1,727 

1,353 

668 

4,983 

2.130 

523 

720 



50 

I 

232 

130 

89 



248 4 
2H8 (2) 



«28 
240 
214 
278 



4,737 

2,455 

1,359 

683 

6,726 

3,131 

654 

907 



207 
243 
426 



118 
22 

118 



5,477 

2.148 

2,142 

787 

8.125 

2,788 

748 

919 



17,98520.314 
6.659 
2,316 



7,40? 
1,192 
10,068 
2,646 
780 
1,002 



226 
34: 
459 
201 



210 

28 
197 



250 
332 
516 
190 



281 
46 
198 



20,3)4 
7,682 6.346 
2,895 966 



12, 591 
1,>503 

13,045 
3,022 
1,027 
1,074 



12,190 
1.280 
12,561 
2, 926 
8Cl 
478 



I 



325 

H 

493 

118 



118 

37 
118 



325 
474 
445 
118 



1 

37 
19 



■ Transferred to 4lvi*ioAa of poft^ffioes up- 
pliM» 



» Relates to stationery, fiscal year ended June 
30, 1883. 
* TriWBferred to law acd le«9e clerk. 



FIRST ASS't ADJUSTMENT OF POSTMASTERS* SALARIES. 207 

Operations of the Salary and Allowance Di«i«toji— Continued. 



Itemfl. 


Fiscal year ended Jnne 30>- 


Ih 


1880. 


1881. 


1882. 


1883. 


1884. 


1885. 


1886. 


1887. 


188& 


1889. 


1890. 


kj 


Cmm of all kinds marie 
special 




117 


787 

17 
2,003 


378 
22 


194 

917 


181 














IMncrmtmaed rent, fuel, and 
light ^. 


110 


Iflv 


76 
1,107 
2.336 

11,189 


107 

552 
2,502 


104 

109 

2,662 


185 

47 
2,732 


185 


Di8continnod cl^rk-hira. .. . -- - 




217 92 


7-.>ft. 19-» 


47 


Preflidendal post-ofticea — 
Claimn for Te>ad|jui«tment of 

der act of March 3, 18S3. . 


1,764 


1,863 


2, 176 2, 3231 2. 233 2. 244 

' 1 

.6 53726lRD'>1«. fi^l 11 fi»7 


968 


RailwBj mall allowancea 
made 




*74 
3 






1 1 












3 


4 


5 


7| MS, »13 

1 1 


•17.6 


'15.5 


•10.5 


MO. 9 






* Tranaferred to office of Second Assistant Post- 
master-General . 

'84- employes on review of postmasters* aal- 
ariee (1885 and 1886). 

* 11-4- employ6s on review of postmasters' sala- 
ries (1887). 



'0-f employes on review of postmasters* sala- 
rie-H (18JW). 

*1+ employes on review of postmasters* sala* 
ries (18^9). 

'1.5 cm ploy 6s on review of postmasters* sala- 
ries (1890). 



▲DJUATMENT OF PRESIDENTIAL POSTMASTERS' SALARIES. 

Under the act of. Congress approved March 3, 1883, antiual ac^nst- 
meDts of salaries of Presidential postmasters are now made instead of 
biennial adjustments, as heretofore authorized. In compliance with 
this law, the seventh annual adjustment of the salaries of Presidential 
postmasters, or postmasters at first, second, and third class post offices, 
was made upon the basis of the gross receipts which accrued at the re- 
spective offices for the four quarters ended March 31, 1890, to take eflFect 
July 1, 1890. This adjustment was made upon the basis of tbe adjust- 
ment for one year, or four quarters, at the two-cent, or reduced rate of 
letter postage. The salaries of 2,770 postmasters were reviewed. The 
result of the adjustment was an assignment of 116 offices to the first 
class, 550 to the second class, and 2,0t)6 to the third class. This was a 
net increase of 14 fir8^cla8S offices, 33 second-class offices, and 33 third 
class offices, from July 1, 1890, as contrasted with the same items for 
the previous year. Under the operation of the act of March 3, 1883, 10 
offices were assigned from the fourth to the third class, October 1,1889; 
43 offices January 1, 1890 ; 33 offices xVpril 1, 1800, and 32 offices July 1, 
1890, making a total of 118 additional third-chiss offices. 

Thirty-seven offices (all third-class) were relegated to the fourth class 
July 1, 1890, making the total number of Presidential offices July 1, 
1890, 2J32, an increase of 80 offices, as compared with the same item 
July 1, 1889. 

The aggregate amount required to pay the salaries of Presidential 
postmasters from July 1, 1890, is $4,613,500, an increase of 8184,400, or 
4.2 per cent, as compared with the same item July 1, 1889. The grand 
total of gross receipts which accrued at Presidential offic^es for the four 
quarters ended March 31, 1890, amounted to (45,429,361.74, being an 
increase of $3,675,283, or 8.8 per cent, as contrasted with the receipts 
as shown by the adjustment which took effect July 1, 1889. The aggre- 
gate of salfluries of Presidential postmasters will absorb 10.16 per cent, 
of the revenue of Presidential offices, being 0.45 per cent less than the 
percentage shown by the review of 1889. The grand total of gross re- 
ceipts wUch accrued at these offices for tbe four quarters ended March 



208 



REPORT OP. THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 



ol, 1890, is 76.32 per cent, of the revenue of the Department for the 
Kame period. 

The classification of Presidential post-offices, made in accordance 
with the requirements of the act of Congress, approved March 3, 1883, 
ill effect July 1, 1890, is concisely stated as follows : 



k 

FirHt oImh ; 

Total Jane 30 1800 






102 




HftlAffiittfMl to AM^OEld oloAft rTiilv 1 1890 .•.•••••.•.••...••...••*•.•••. 


2 
1« 






Sncoiid clafw advanceil tio fimt clasa. Julv 1. 1890 








Net increase, July 1, 1890 


14 


14 










Total flrat-claaa. Jalv 1 1890 






116 


116 










Socon<lclam: 

Total JnneSO 1890 






517 




SAcond ndvauciMl to first clafui Julv 1.1800. .......................... 


16 
8 
2 

53 
2 






Second relefrated to third cla«n, Jnly 1, 1800 








First relt'jjated t<) necond oIbhs, Jnlv 1, 1800 








Third advanced to B(>cond clt&BM Julv 1 1890 ........................ 








Fourth ad vancMl to Becoud class July 1, 1890 








}fet increase acoond clasH Julv 1 1890 .......a..... ............. 


33 


33 










Total BfH*nndcltff», Jnly 1,1 800...... ,..t, .... 






550 


550 










Third olasa: 

Total June 30, 1800 






2,110 




Third ad van cod to second claM. Jnlv 1. 1800 


63 

o 

37 

1 

. 8 

30 






Fourth advHiic<Ml to second class July 1 f 1800 








Third releirated to fourth claMH Julv'l 1800 








Third discontinned Julv 1 1890 








Second rolepated to thira class. July 1, 1800 -,...-. 








Fourth advanced to third class. July 1 1890 ......................... 








Net decrease third class. Julv 1.1800 


53 


53 










Total third-class, July 1, 1800 






2,066 1 2,066 










Grand total Presidential post-offices (first, second, and third 
classes). July 1. 1800 








2,732 











The number of offices, aggregate of salaries of Presidential post- 
masters' salaries, and aggregate gross recei[>ts, arranged by classes, in 
effect July 1, 1890, is shovrn as follows: 



Class. 


Number 

of 
omces. 


Apgregate 

s.ilarifH ot 

postmastorH. 


-AKj^regate 

liTi>HA rt'ci'iptJ*, 

tour niiarrm-H 

onde<i March 

31. 1800. 


First 


116 

550 

2.066 


$109, 100 
1, 286, 700 
2. 017, 700 


$20, 609, 037. 46 


Second - 


8, 285. 100. 45 
7.634,328.83 


Xhird 




Total 


2,732 


4.613,600 


45.429,a6L74 





FIRST ASS't — ADJUSTMENT OP POSTMASTEKS^ SALARIES, 209 

The several adjustments of salaries of Presidential postmasters, made 
in accordance with the requirements of the act of March 3, 1883, which 
took effect October 1, 1883; July 1, 1884; July 1, 1885; July 1, 188(5; 
July 1, 1887; July 1, 1888; July 1, 1889; July 1, 1890, are shown in 
the following tabulated statement : 



Date. 


Number of 

Preeiden- 

tialpoflt- 

offloee. 


Aifirregate 
MilaneA of 
PrentdenUal 


AyeTHice 
ealaryof 
Preeiden- 
tial poet- 
masters. 


Aggrefrate 

receipte which 

aocraed at 

Prenideniial 

offices. 


Per cent of 

apgrejrate 

receipts 

absorbed for 

postmasters* 

salaries. 


Per cent of 
entire rev- 
euae of De- 
partment 
whioli ao- 
craed at 
Presidential 
offices. 


fictober 1.1883.... 

July 1,1884 

Jal5-l,i885 

Jalyl,18fe6 

Jaly 1.1887 

July 1,1888 

Jmiy 1,1889 

July 1,1890 


2,195 
2,323 
2,233 
2,244 
2.336 
2«502 
2,652 
2,732 


$3,707,500 
3,828,700 
3, 630, 600 
3,68\500 
3, 880, 300 
4, 202, 800 
4,429.100 
4,613.500 


$1,689 
1,648 
1,625 
1,642 
• 1,661 
1.680 
1.670 
1,689 


$33,53.5,253.95 
33, 0:a, ti9T. 33 
31, 792, 220. 56 
32,491,561.58 
35. 176, 161. 67 
38.498,987.86 
41, 764, 07a 41 
45,429.361.74 


1L06 
11.59 
11. 4i 
11.34 
11.03 
10.02 
10.61 
10.16 


74.28 
74.80 
75. d6 
74.07 
74.84 
74.00 
75.42 
76.32 



A summary of the adjustments of salaries of Presidential postmas- 
ters, July 1, 1889, and July 1, 1890, showing in detail the net increase 
of salaries of said postmasters^ is shown in the following tabulated 
statement : 





Namber 
of offices. 


Salaries of postmasters. 


Date. 


Aggregate. 


Net 
increase. 


Jaly 1,1889 


2,652 
2,732 


$4, 429, 100 
4.613.600 




Jaly 1,1880 








Tat^\ increAse toT ffaln) ................................. 


80 


184,400 


$184,400 




This increase is sbown in detail as follows : 
Total nniober of first second and third class post-offices, whereat 


993 


128.500 








Kew offices durloir fiscal year : 

Octolierl 1880 


10 
48 
88 
82 


11.800 
47,000 
85,600 
37,800 




Jannarv L 1890 




April 1 1890 




Jolv 1.1880 








Total 




131,700 










Graiid total of increase, ......... ........r-r-rTT.x.. .......... 




255,200 










RBDUCnOMB. 

B^Iemted to fonrth class. Jnlv 1.1890 


37 


39,100 
30.200 




By redoctions at 241 Presidential offices 




Bv Presidential offices discontinued 






nnlTeraitT of Virirlnia. Jolv 1. 1890 




1,500 










Total 




70.800 
184.400 








184.400 






Total 




255.200 











A tabulated statement, showing the number of Presidential offices, 
the aggregate of the salaries of Presidential postmasters, and the ag- 
gregate gross receipts which accrued at the respective offices for th^ 
y jj o 90 H 



210 



REPORT OP THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL- 



four qaarters ended March 31, 1890, arranged by States and Territories, 
in alphabetical order, is respectfully submitted, as follows: 



StAfba and Territorioa. 



Alabama 

Alaska 

Arizona 

ArkaDsaA 

(JalifoTDia 

Colorado 

Connecticat 

Delaware 

Diatrtot of Columbia. 

Florida 

Oeor};ia 

Idaho 

niinols 

Indiana. 

Indian Territory 

Iowa 

Kaunas 

Kentucky 

Loniaiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Maaaachnsetta 

Michigan 

Minneaota 

Miaaiaaippi 

Montana 

Miaaoorl 

Nebraaka 

Nevarta 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

Kew Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 



Ohio. 

Oklahoma 

Oropon 

Peouaylvania .. 
Khudelaland... 
South Carolina . 
South Dakota.. 

Tenneaaee 

Texaa 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Waahingtott.... 
West Virginia.. 

Wiaoonain 

Wyoming 



Total. 



Prewdpniial 
post-ottlcea, 
adjuatment 
Juiyl,l«W. 



5 
25 

81 
41 
CO 
8 
1 

18 

S'J 

6 

198 

100 

3, 

13G 

116 

45 

16 

45 

22 

143 

137 

57 

30 

17 

93 

78 

« 

37 

73 

9 

246 

28 

17 

157 

3 

17 

202 

14" 

22 

32 

35 

80 

5 

28 

40 

22 

19 

93 

7 



2,732 



Aggregate 

aalariea of 

poatmaatei-H. 



$48,200 



8,300 
' 39,300 

138,100 
66.900 

100, 000 
12,800 
5,000 
32, 400 
67, 200 
8,600 

321, WO 

171, 100 
3,800 

220,600 

183,300 
74,400 
23.900 
73,500 
38.500 

261.600 

224, 300 
92, 300 
45, 700 
29,000 

146,200 

118,900 
9.000 
58,900 

140, 000 
14,100 

441.300 
46.500 
25,600 

281.600 

5.700 

29,300 

350,200 
27, 100 
34.500 
47, 200 
68, 700 

183, 100 
10,300 
47,400 
68,600 
37,300 
80,800 

151, 000 
10.900 



4,613.600 



<^l(gi^S»te re- 
ceipts, four 
qnartera end- 
ing March 31, 
1890. 



$275, 183. 13 



27.482.57 

162, 891. (iO 

1.366, 644. no 

500, 892. 91 

851,289.14 

88,539.11 

411,198.21 

156,811.64 

479,028.71 

22.896.93 

4,378,781.47 

969,742.49 

8,531.05 

1,062.484.81 

753. 818. 64 

588, 452. 62 

453, 750. 99 

415, 8R6. 89 

739. 841. 20 

3,691,011.71 

1,401.258.84 

924,115.42 

161.750.79 

141, 787. 17 

2,054,376.75 

655,064.04 

28,888.83 

262,017.65 

1, 083. 040. 91 

44,672.48 

9, 640. 129. 91 

193.069.37 

88,564.16 

2,856,211.85 

21,038,08 

210,T21.26 

4,313.486.12 

360. 516. 23 

109. 446. .'^2 

157,296.27 

525, 919. 45 

696, 656. 59 

94. 458. 22 

200.241.75 

500. 666. 43 

247. 067. 83 

143,413.43 

929, 872. 30 

36, 742. 42 



46,429,361.74 



Grand total gross receipts $45,429,361.74 

Grand total postmasters' salaries 4,613,500.00 

Percentage of grona receipta ahaorbed by aalariea 10.16 



REVIEW OF THE SALARIES OF POSTMASTERS OF THE THIRD, FOURTH, 
CLASSES UNDER THE ACT OF MARCH 3, 1683. 



AND FIFTH 



The review of the salaries of postmasters, and ex-postin asters of the 
third, fourth, and fifth classes under the act of March 3, 1883, as con- 
strued by the Attorney-General of the United States, under date of 
February 13, 1884, and re-afiii^med June 14, 1884, has been completed. 
The act of Congress approved August 4, 1886, limited the presentation 
of claims to January 1, 1887 ; and all applications filed prior to January 
1^ 1887, have been reviewed. The aggregate amount allowed as addi- 



PIK8T ASSISTANT — BOXES AND BOX-RENTS. 211 

tional compensation under this act was $1,221,009.69. Appropriations 
to pay these claims have been made by the Congress under dates of July 
1, 1884, March 3, 1885, August 4, 1886, February 1, 1888, March 30, 1888, 
and October 19, 1888 ; the appropriation aggregating $1,221,350.40. 

A summary of the work of reviewing the salaries of these postmasters, 
as required by the act of March 3, 1883, as above stated, is shown in the 
annual rei)ort8 of the Postmasters- General /or the fiscal years ended 
June 30, 1885, pages 217, 218, and 219 ; June 30, 1886, pages 155, 156, 
and 157 ; June 30, 1887, pages 364, 365, and 366 ; June 30, 1888, pages 
82 and 83. 

The subject-matter of the review of these salaries involved consider- 
able additional work and correspondence during the fiscal year just 
closed, as a large number of claimants made application for review of 
salary not knowing that a])plications were barred from January 1, 1887, 
by the act of Congress approved August 4, 1886. 

BOXES AND BOX-RENTS. 

Boxes are classed as call-boxes, lock-boxes, and lock-drawers. They 
are provided as follows: 

(1) Where post-oflices are located in Government buildings by the 
Treasury Department. 

(2) At first and second class post-offices, the lessor, by agreement in 
the lease, frequently furnishes the box outfit. 

(3) Under existing law (R. S., sec. 4052, and sec. 490, P. L. and R., 
edition of 1887), patrons of post-offices may provide lock-boxes or lock- 
drawers for their own use under conditions stated. 

(4) In all other cases boxes mudt be furnished and kept in repair by 
the postmaster. 

Boxes are provided to accommodate patrons of the post-office, as a 
convenience to the postmaster, and as a source of revenue. At all 
Presidential post-offices, or offices of the first, second, and third classes, 
box-rents are included in the gross receipts accruing at the said offices 
in making the annual adjustment of salaries of Presidential postmasters ; 
and these postmasters, therefore, indirectly receive a part of the box- 
rents in the sum allowed as compensation. At the fourth class offices 
the box-rents, under existing law, are practically allowed as a part of 
the compensation of the postmaster. (Bee section 2, act of March 3,' 
1883.) The supervision of box-rent rates by the Department has re- 
sulted in uniformity of prices, better accommodations to box-renters, 
and an increase of revenue from box-rents. 

KEY DEPOSITS. 

The key deposit is exacted as a security against the loss of keys. 
The money so collected is held by the postmaster as a trust fund. The 
deposit for keys lost or withheld over thirty days after the box to which 
it belongs has been vacated is forfeited, and is then transferred to the 
fund called "key deposit forfeiture fund." This forfeiture fund is used 
(1) for the purchase of new keys to replace those lost, broken, or with- 
held; (2) for necessary repairs to locks; and (3) for keeping the boxes 
in goo<l condition. 

Renters who provide their own boxes are not required to make de- 
posits for keys furnished by themselves; and at offices where post- 
masters provide their own boxes under present regulations they are per- 
mitted to exi'rcise their discretion in collecting a deposit for keys. The 
key deposit collected is at the rate of 50 cents for each key. The pres- 



212 



REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER- GENERAL. 



ent regulations of the Treasury Department require adeposit of only 25 
cents for each key. Custodians of Government buildings have also 
been instructed to make return of the fund heretofore known as tli^e 
forfeiture fund ; and repairs to boxes and locks, and the purchase of 
new keys are now allowed from the appropriation for repairs, etc. 

I am of opinion that the key-deposit rate should be reduced from 50 
to 25 cents. The reduction to 25 cents will enable postmasters to rent 
more boxes and thereby increase the revenue from box-rents. 

ALLOW AXCBS FOR RENT, FUEL, AND LIGHT FOR THIRD-CLASS OFFICES. 

The act of Congress approved June 30, 1890, provides for allowances 
for rent, ftiel, and light for post-oflSces of the third class, or offices 
whereat the gross receipts range from $1,900 to $8,000, and the salaries 
of the postmasters from $1,000 to $1,900 a year. An appropriation of 
$571,500 is made for this purpose for the current fiscal year. The lim- 
itation relative to the allowance tor rent, and also for fuel and light is 
continued for the present fiscal year, the same as the maximum amounts 
fixed by law for the past fiscal year, the maximum rent for a third-class 
oftice being $400, and the maximum amount for fuel and light $60 a 
year. As stated in the text relative to estimates for this purpose for 
the ensuing fiscal year, a limitation of these allowances is not in the 
interest of good service. 

By the adjustment of the salaries of Presidential postmasters, as re- 
quired by the act of Congress approved March 3, 1883, to take effect 
July 1, 1890, 2,066 officers were assigned to the third class from the date 
named. 

A tabulated statement of these offices, arranged to exhibit the offices 
and grades (salary of postmaster $i,000 to $1,900, inclusive), in the 
several States and Territories, in effect July 1, 1890, is herewith sub- 
mitted. » 

Third-ola$$ po8t-offloes in each State and Territory, arranged to eachihit the number of each 
grade {ealary, $1,000 to $1,900, inoluaive), from October 1, 1890. 



States and Territo- 
ries. 



$1,000 $1,100 $1,200 $1,800 $1,400 $1,500 $1,600 $1,700 $1,800 $1,900 



Postmasters* salaries. 



Total. 



Alabama 

Alanka ■ 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

CHlifornia , 

Colorado 

(Connecticut 

Delaware 

Dhtrict of Colarabia. 

Florida 

Georgia , 

Idalio 

Illinois... 

Indiana 

Indian Territory .... 

jowa....'. ■ 

Kanium 

Kentucky 

I.oninikna 

Maine 

Maryland 

M annacbasetts 

Michitsan 

M iunenota 

MiHAisHippi 

Jklissoon ...p .., 



13 





2 


2 


6 


1 




26 


12 


8 


4 


1 





22 


13 


13 


14 


5 
















16 


12 


12 


10 












i 



4 
2.1 
65 
33 
45 

7 



13 

26 

5 

161 

74 

3 

115 

101 
37 
13 
87 
17 
98 

109 
49 
25 



FIRST ASSISTANT — ALLOWANCES RECOMMENDED. 
Third'Clabs poit'OjUicta in each State and Tirrit^ryf etc. — Coutinued, 



213 



States and Territo- 








PuKtitiaateftf' anlaried. 






$1,900 


Total. 


riea. 


$1,000 


$1,100 


$1,200 


$1,300 


$1,400 


$1,500 


$1, 600 


$1,700 


$1,800 


Montana ............ 




2 

12 

8 

4 

I 

16 

4 

4 
12 


1 

12 
1 
8 

e 

1 

22 

4 

.....J. 


1 


1 
10 




2 

8 


i* 


8 
3 
1 

1 
7 


2* 
2 


13 


WUn^itka ......■•.T . 


4 
2 
2 
2 


70 


Xf«vada ............. 


4 


New Hanipahire 


2 

5 

1 
18 

1 
4 
9 


20 
18 


2S 

12 
18 

11 
11 


5 
8 

1 

23 

2 

1 

16 


8 
6 

1 

20 

8 

1 

11 


32 

47 


NfW Mexico 


7 


New York 


16 

1 


10 

1 
1 
8 


8 

i' 


175 


North Caro«nft 

North Dakota 


23 
15 


Ohio 





107 


Oklahoma 




v)r«KOD 


1 

U 

1 


8 
26 

8 

7 
8 
10 


""ii 
1 

4 
2 
3 
« 


1 
13 
1 
3 
3 
3 
6 


23 


1 
1 
1 
3 

13 

1 
3 
4 
2 
2 
5 


2 

14 
2 

1 

1 

8* 


2 
13 


2 

7 


16 


PonMTlvanla 

Rhode Island 


154 
8 


Sonth Carolma ...... 


1 
1 
1 
1 


i' 

1 

2 


20 


Suath Dakota 

TennesDee 


1 

e 

....... 


28 
28 


Texas , 

UUh 


68 

4 


VflTDODl ^ . 


8 
2 
2 
2 
10 
1 


2 

4 
6 
2 

1 


3 

e 

a' 

e 


2 

1 
1 
3 









* 


Virginia 


2 

i* 

8 


3 
1 
t 
4 


1 
1 

4 


31 


Waahinf^toxi 


16 


Weftt Virjfinia 

Wjaoonatn .......... 


17 
75 


Wyominjr 


5 




















Total 


IBl 


298 


232 


210 


287 


293 


247 


183 


139 


77 


2,147 





LSQISLATION KECOMMENDKD. 

Cldnsificatian and salariei of clerics in the larger offices.^The recom- 
mendation heretofore made, relative to the cUissificatiou and salaries of 
clerks and employes attached to first and second class ofiices, was fa- 
vorably considered by the Congress ; and by the act approved March 2, 
1889, provision was made for the classification and for fixing the sala- 
ries of the said derks and employes, to take effect from July 1, 1889. 
The Congress, however, failed to appropriate a sum sufficient to meet 
the requirements of the service under the said act by $350,000. The 
limited appropriation greatly embarrassed the Department in the admin- 
istration of the service under this act. The appropriation as made by 
the Congress for clerks in i>ostoffice8 for the current fiscal year is 
$200,000 less than the sum estimated by the Department as required 
for this service, including the operation of the classification act. The 
maximum salaries for certain lines of clerical service are not large 
enough at present to command the highest order of clerical ability, and 
the law should be amended in this respect. 

Alkncances for rent^ fuel^ and light for third-class offices. — Authority 
for allowances for rent, fuel, and light for third-class offices was granted 
by the Congress for the first time in th« history of the Department by 
the act approved July 24, 1888. This act, however, limited the maximum 
annual sum for rent to $300, and the maximum annual amount for fuel 
and light to $60 ; and the act approved March 2, 1889, increased the 
maximum annual sum for rent to $400, and continued the maximum 
annual amount for inel and light at $^0 a year. The act approved June 
30, 1890, for the current fiscal year, re-affirms the maximum amounts to 
$400 for rent and $60 for fuel and light per annum. This limitation of 
the allowances for rent, fuel, and light for third-dasa offices is not in 
the interest of good service. The Department shoold have full discre- 



214 REPORT OP THE POSTMASTEfe-GENERAL. 

tionary anthoritj to fix these allowaoces for third-clasa offices in ac- 
cordance with the best interests of the postal service, having in view 
the local conditions and surroundings of the respective offices. I tbere- 
fore recommed that the limitation of these allowances be repealed. 

Allowances for boxes, fixtures^ furniture^ miscellaneoiM^ and incidental 
items^ and stationery for Presidential post-offices. — I beg to again state 
that the present unjust class distinctions recognized by existing law 
relative to allowances for boxes, fixtures, furniture, miscellaneous, and 
incidental items, and stationery for Presidential offices should be ex- 
punged from the statutes. No good reason can be stated why the nec- 
essary boxes, fixtures, furniture, etc., should not be provided for all 
Presidential offices ; and every reason in the interest of good service why 
they should be provided. At present boxes and fixtures are provided 
by the Treasury Department where post-offices are located in Govern- 
ment buildings ; and at first and second-class offices where, under lease, 
the owner of the premises agrees to furnish them. At all other offices 
the postmaster or patrons must provide the boxes and fixtures ; and, 
under section 4052, Revised Statutes ^section 490, P. L. and B., edition 
of 1877), all boxes erected and used in any post-office, no matter how 
famished, become the absolute property of the United States. This 
condition of the service under existing law is a source of frequent dis- 
putes, scandals, and trouble between the outgoing and newly appointed 
postmasters, often involving the friends of the disputants, to the great 
injury of the postal service. 

I therefore recommend that existing law be amended so that the 
Post-Office Department shall provide the boxes, fixtures, furniture, and 
miscellaneous and incidental items and stationery for Presidential post- 
offices. The stationery should be furnished from the Pos^Office De- 
partment through the Division of Supplies, just as now furnished to the 
first and second class offices. 

The adjustment made in accordance with the requirements of the act 
of March* 3, 1883, which took efiect July 1, 1890, resulted in 2,732 offices 
of the Presidential grade, classed as follows : 

First class 116 

Second class. 550 

Third class 2,0«6 

Total 2,732 

Compensation to postmasters of the fourfh cUiss. — I again invite at- 
tention to the need of legislation relative to the compensation of the 
fourth-class postmasters. The rates of compensation (act of Congress 
approved March 3, 1883) are not sufficient to enable the Department 
to secure the best service at these offices. I again recommend that the 
subject-matter of compensation of fourth-class postmasters be consid- 
ered, with a view of providing proper rates of compensation to be fixed 
in even hundreds of dollars for a specified period, on the basis of the 
business of the respective offices for, say, the preceding year. An 
amendment of existing law, as suggei^ted, will be in the interest of good 
service. At the close of the fiscal year ended June 30^ 1890, the fourth- 
class offices numbered 59|663. 



tlRST ASSISTANT — ESTIMATED APPROPRIATIONS. 



215 



ESTIMATES FOB COMPENSATION OF POSTMASTERS, CLERKS IN POST- 
OFFICES ; RENT, LIGHT, AND FUIEL FOR FIRST AND SECOND CLASS 
OFFICES; RENT, LIGHT, AND FUEL FOR THIRD-CLASS OFFICES; 
MISOELLANEOtJS AND INCIDENTAL ITE^iS, INCLUDING FURNITURE, 
FOR FIRST AND SECOND CLASS OFFICES, ADVERTISING FOR FIRST 
AND SECOND CLASS OFFICES, FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 
30, 1892. 

COMPBK8ATION TO POSTMAJSTSR8. 

The following were the estimates, appropriations, and ezpendi tares 
for this purpose during the past two fiscal years : 



Estimates 

A ppropriationa 
Sxpeudltues.., 



188&-*89. 



$13,200,000.00 
12, 800. 000. 00 
13,^75,555.41 



1889-'W. 



$13, 600. 000. 00 
13. 600, 000. 00 
13,753,0ft5.69 



IncroaM. 



Amoant. Per cent. 



$400, 000. 00 
800, 000. OO 
677, 540. 28 



3.03 
6.25 
4.38 



The appropriation made by the Congress for compensation to post- 
masters for the present fiscal year is $14,000,000, being an increase of 
$400,000, or 2.9 per cent., as compared with the appropriation for this 
purpose for the past fiscal year. The expenditures for compensation 
to postmasters for the past fiscal year amounted to $13,753,095.69, be- 
ing an excess of $153,095.69, as compared with the appropriation as 
made by the Congress. The expenditures for compensation to post- 
masters "by quarters for each of the fiscal years ended June 30, 1888, 
June 30, 1889, June 30, 1890, were as follows: 



« QoArter ended^ 


Flacal year 
1888. 


Fiscal year 
lb89. 


Fiiical year 
1890. 


S^DtAmber 30 , 


$3,012,459.26 
3, 130. 275. 60 
3, 266, 035. 76 
3.192,988.55 


$3, 157, 468. .T3 
8,301,20fl.78 
,3,419.572.99 
3. 297, 304. 31 


$3 285 535. 26 


U^tf ^Mn'ber 31 •.•.••••••••••••••«.••••«••••«••-••.».«•• 


3, 447, 089. 23 


March 31 


3, 546. 061. 59 


JtfDeSO 


3,474.409.61 




Total -. : 


12,601,734.17 


13, 175, 555. 41 


13,753, 095. 69 





This statement shows that the increase of condensation to postmas- 
ters for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1889, amounted to $573,821.24, or 
4.6 per cent., and that the increase for the same purpose for the fiscal 
year ended June 30, 1890, amounted to $577,640.28, or 4.4 per ceut., 
the average increase being $576,876.28, or 4.5 per cent. 

At this ratio of increase the total compensation to postmasters for the 
fiscal year 1890-'91 will amount to $14,329,971.97, and for the fiscal 
year 1891-^92 to $14,974,821. 

The aggregate of salaries of Presidential postmasters in efi'ect July 
1, 1889, amounted to $4,429,100, being an increase of $226,300, or 5.4 per 
<^iit., as compared with the same item July 1, 1888. The grand total 
of Presidential postmasters^ salaries in efi'ect July 1,-1890, amounteil to 
$4,613,500, an increase of $184,400, or 4.2 per cent. The ajrgregate 
sum of the salaries of Presidential postmasters at ottices of the first, 
second and third classes for the llscal yejir ende<l June 30, 1890, 
amounted to $4,469,075, being an iiicieiiso of §151,175, or 3.5 per cent., 



216 



BEPOET OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAX. 



as compared with the same item for 18S7. Subtracting the total of sal- 
aries of Presidential postmasters from the aggregate amoant allowed 
for compensation of postmasters gives the sum of $9,283,121, or the 
a^£[regate of compensation of fourth-class postmasters. This amouut 
divided by the average number of fourth-class offices gives the sum of 
$161.65 as the average compensation of a fourth-class postmaster. 

The total revenue of the Department for the past fiscal year is stated 
to be $60,882,097.92, being an increase of $4,706,486.74, or 8.4 percent., 
as compared with the previous year. The increase of revenue during 
the fiscal year 1888-^89 was $3,480,434, or 6.6 per cent. The increase of 
revenue during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1890, as compared with 
the previous year, shows an advance of 1.8 per cent. 

Having these facts in yiew, I am of opinion that an appropriation of 
$14,900,000 will be required to compensate postmasters for the fiscal 
year ending June 30, 1892. I thereforerecommeud an appropriation of 
$14,900,000, or an increase of $900,000, or 6.4 per cent., be requested 
for the compensation of postmasters for the fiscal 3'ear ending June 30, 
1892. 

CLERKS IK POST-OFFICES. 

The following were the estimates, appropriations, and expenditures 
for this purpose for the past two fiscal years: 



Item. 



Estimates 

ApproprUtiona 
Bxpenditares.. 



188a-m 



$5^ 650, 000. 00 

I 5,050,000.00 

I 25. 000. 00 

5,924,5r2.37 



1889-'00. 



; $6, 600, 000. 00 
• 300. 000. 00 

[ 6,550,000.00 

6,516.943.2a 



Increase. 



AmouDt. Per cent. 



I $1,250. 000. 00 

575.000.00 
591,430.86 



22.12 

9.62 
9.08 



The appropriation for clerks for the present fiscal year is $7,390,000, 
being an increase of $840,000, as compared with the appropriation for 
the past fiscal year. 

The appropriation, as made by the Congress for the present fiscal 
year, is $200,000 less than the amount estimated by the Department 
for clerks in post-offices for the current fiscal year. This estimate, it 
should be observed, was made after careful consideration, having in 
view the results of the postal service to June 30, 1889, the requirements 
of the clerks' classification act, and the probable growth and increase 
of the service to the present time. It was then stated that it would 
require not less than $350,000 to put the classification act into efi'ect 
and authorize salaries for clerks as contemplated by the said act. The 
adjustment of salaries of clerks made in accordance with the require- 
ments of the classification act, in effect July 1, 1890, has verified the 
statement heretofore made as to the amount needed for salaries, and 
the growth and increase of the service as estimated has been exceeded, 
as will be hereafter shown. While the increase of this appropriation 
as authorized by the Congress has enabledthe Department to greatly 
improve the efficiency of the clerical force, the reduction of $200,000 
has prevented the improvements which should have been made. 

The authorized allowances for clerk hire for the past fiscal year ex- 
actly absorbed the appropriation for clerks in post-offices as fixed by 
the Congress. In fact, the clerks' classification act, which was approved 



PIHST ASSISTANT — ESTIMATED APPROl>RIATlONS. 



217 



by the Congress March 2, 1889, to take effect July 1, 1889, could not be 
put into operation properly bei^aase the appropriation as made by the 
(Congress was $350,000 short of the amount required to compensate the 
clerks as contemplated by the .«aid act. The aggregate of all allow- 
ances for clerk hire on postal account at present is $6,800,963, and on 
money-order clerk-hire account $555,295, making a grand total of 
$7,356,258. 

The allowances for clerks in post-offices assigned to the first and sec- 
ond classes, and stations connected therewith, are made in accordance 
with sections 3860 and 3863, Bevised Statutes, and sections 460 and 
403, Postal Laws and Eegulations, edition of 1887 ; and at thir.l and 
fourth-class offices for clerical labor in separating mails in compliance 
with section 11, 19 Stats., 82 (July 12, 1876), and section 461, Postal 
Laws and Regulations, edition of 1887. 

By the adjustment of the salaries of Presidential postmasters in ac- 
cordance with the requirements of the act of March 3, 1883, in effect 
July 1, 1890, a total of 116 offices were assigned to the first class, and 
550 to the second class, making a grand total of 666 first and second 
class offices, or a net increase of 47 offices, or 13.2 per cent., as com- 
pared with the number in effect July 1, 1889. 

GRie total receipts which accrued at first and second class offices, as 
shown by the adjustment which took effect July 1, 1890, amounted to 
$37,795,038, being an increase of $3,513,701, or 10.3 per cent. The in- 
crease of gross receipts which accrued at first and second class offices 
in 1889 amounted to $2,984,924, or 9.5 per cent, of the revenue of the 
Department for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1890. The revepue of 
the Department for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1890, is stated at 
$60,882,097.92, being an increase of $4,706,486.74, or 8.4 per cent., as 
compared with the same item for the previous year. 

With a view of showing the present increase of business and postal 
receipts more in detail, a tabulated statement is herewith submitted 
showing the gross receipts, and the increase thereof, in amount and 
per cent, at ten first-class offices for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1890. 





Stote. 


• Gross receipts. 




OiBoe.. 


Year ended 
June JO, 1890. 


Increase in 
anioant. 


Increase 

in 
per ceDt. 


New York 


New York 

Illinois 


$6, 026. D28 

8, 126, 840 

2, 218, 830 

2. 070, 236 

1, ;38,1.'04 

810, 006 

696, 155 

718. 250 

642.048 

524, 047 


rM, 757 
342, 535 
187.290 
212, 735 
133, 232 
62. 325 
30,690 
59,907 
49. 130 
62,460 


11.0 


Chiemgo 


12.3 


Ph tlii4f«lnhift ,. 


FennriylvanlA 

MaHsachiiAetts 

Mianouri 


9 2 


BoAtOtl..'. 


n.fi 


SuLoois 


13.3 


Cincinnati ................................... 


Ohio 


8 3 


Kan Franciaoo 


California 


4.6 


BitMklyn 


New York 

Marvlana ..:...... 


9 1 


B.'kltimore 


8 3 


JPtttaborgh 


Pennsylvania 


13 5 






ToUUa 


l), 970, 153 
1, 797, 015 


1,737.067 
173,707 


101.1 


jBLV9Tmfjfi9 ........ . ■■ ...*....••......... 




10.1 



These offices (ten) show receipts amounting to 29.5 per cent, of the 
revenue of the Department for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1890, the 
average increase of receipts per office being $173,707, or 10.1 per cent. 

A table is also submitted of twenty representntive offices to exhibit 
the gross receipts and the Increase thereof, in amount and x)er cent., 



218 



REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENEEAL. 



for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1890, contrasted with the same items 
for the previous year. • 



Offlee. 



BoAton 

New York 

Brooklyn 

JvnejCity 

Utlca 

Kichmonl 

Atlanta 

Knoxville 

Memphia 

New Orleans... 

DaOm 

Toledo 

Peori? 

Davenport 

Omaha 

Denver 

Salt Lake City. 

Portland 

SeatUe 



Total 

Averagea . 



State. 



Maanachaaetta. 

New York 

...do , 

New Jersey 

New York 

Virginia 

Georgia 

Tenneaaee 

...do 

Loaiaiana 

Texas 

Ohio 

Illlnola 

...do 

Iowa 

Nebraaka 

Colorado 

TTtoh 

Oregon 

Waahington.... 



Groaa reoeipta 

year ended 
June 30, 1880. 



$2,070,236 

6, 02tJ, 928 

716. 250 

134. U0(5 

83.605 
188.425 
159. 263 

62.941 
148.185 
416, 333 
100. 068 
173, 91(i 
3, 126. 884 

99, 147 

51,474 
246, 352 
269, 510 

65, 720 
133,604 

77,493 



14, 340, 34a 
717, 017 



Increase. 



Amount. 



1212.735 

596.757 

59.907 

16,696 

6.986 

15,704 

12, 752 

10, 002 

14, 552 

60,943 

20.664 

23,885 

342.458 

9, 721 

4,567 

24,186 

45,450 

16, 087 

26.334 

30,575 



1,550,961 
77,548 



Per cent.. 



11.5 

11.0 

9.1 

14.2 

9.1 

9.1 

8.7 

18.9 

10.9 

17.1 

26.0 

16.9 

12.3 

10.9 

9.7 

10.9 

21.2 

32.4 

24.5 

65.2 



348.6 
17.4 



This table shows a total increase of receipts in the sum of $1,550,961, 
or an average per office of $77,548, or 17.4 per cent. 

It has been shown that the increase of reeaipts at both first and 
second class post-offices for 1889 amounted to $2,984,024, or 9.5 per 
cent., and for 1890 to $3,513,701, or 10.3 per cent., as contrasted with 
the same items for the previous years. Considering the first-class 
offices separately, a clearer idea of the rapid increase of receipts is 
brought out, as the folllowing statistics show : 

Increase of receipia at first-claas offices. 



Year ended March 31— 



1888. 
1889. 
1890 



Amount. 



12,217,386 
2, 559. 216 
3,134,384 



Per cent 



10.3 

10.7 
11.9 



This statement shows an increase of $3,134,384, or 11.9 per cent, of 
receipts at first-class offices for the year ended March 31, 1890; and an 
average increase of $2,636,995, or 10.97 per cent, for the past three 
years. The tir8^class offices numbered 97 in 1888, 102 in 1889, and 116 
in 1890. 

The present number of first and second class offices is 666, a net in- 
crease of 47, or 13.2 per cent., as compared with the same item for the 
past year. To realize that these offices are the arteries of the service, 
(consider that the receipts which accrue<l thereat for the four quarters 
ended March 31, 1890, amounted to $37,796,037, or 62.1 per cent, of the 
revenue of the Department for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1890, while 
in number (666) they represent only 1.1 per cent, of the total number of 
post-offices in effect June 30, 1890.. No other item of expense of this 
bureau is as important as that for clerks in post-offices. The increase of 



FIRST ASSISTANT — ESTIMATED APPROPRIATIONS. 



219 



the appropriation for this purpose is promptly responded to throughout 
the country by an improved clerical service. 

The increase and ^wth of the postal service^ as shown by the state- 
ments herein made, wonderful as it is, will be exceeded by June 30, 1892, 
if present conditions continue. 

Haying these facts in view, I am of opinion that $8,349,000 will be 
needed to compensate clerks in post-ofBces for the fiscal year ending 
June 30, 1892. This amount is an increase, as compared with the 
appropriation made by the Congress for the present fiscal year ot $959,- 
000, or 13 per cent. Omitting the sum of $200,000 which was not 
appropriated, though estimated and requested for the present fiscal 
year, the estimated increase is only 10 per cent. 

I therefore recommend that an appropriation of $8,349,000 be requested 
for clerks in i>OBt-office8 for the fiscal year end ing June 30, 1892. 

BSKT, U6HT, AND FUKL FOR FIRST AND SECONp CLASS P08T-OFFICB8. 

The following were the estimates, appropriations, and expenditures 
for tills purpose during the past two fiscal years : 



Eatimstoa 

Approprifttloiw 
£xpeiidltiuw.. 



1888-m 



$553,000.00 

660,000.00 

6,000.00 

639,004.31 



l880-'90. 



•000,000.00 
*10. 000. 00 
600.000.00 

no, 000. 00 

679, 009. 62 



^ Increase. 



Amoant. Per cent 



$68,000.00 

55,000.00 
40.005.31 



10.0 

09.0 
07.4 



* BflfOt for Waabinffton, D. C. post-oflElce, net of March 2, 1889. 

t Additional for rent, Washington, D. C, post-ofhce, act of March 2, 1889 



The appropriation for rent, light, and fuel for first and second class 
offices and stations connected therewith for the present fiscal year is 
$<i65,000, being an increase of $55,000, or 9 per cent., as compared with 
the appropriation for the past year. The total amount expended for 
these items during the past fiscal year for which proper vouchers have 
been submitted to the Auditor to date is stated at $579,069.62. The 
difference between the amount stated by the Auditor and the aggre- 
gate amount authorized by this office will be approved when proper 
vouchers are submitted. 

During the past year nine first and second class offices were moved 
into Government buildings, making a total saving of $17,979 for items 
of rent, fuel, and light. Three additional first and second class oOices 
were moved from old to new Government buildings. A number of 
additional first and second class offices will be moved into Government 
buildings during the present year. 

On July 1, 1800, by the adjustment made in accordaucje with the re- 
quirements of the act of March 3, 1883, 116 offices were assigned to 
the first class, and 550 to the second class, making a total of 666 first 
and second class offices, being a net increase of 47 offices, as compared 
with the number for the previous year. 

The records show that the gross receipts which accrued at first and 
second class offices for the year ended March 31, 1HS9, amounted to 
$:U,281,337, being an increase of $2,984,924, or 9.5 per <!ent. For the 
four quarters ended March 31, 1890, the gross receipts amounted to 



220 . 



REPOltT OP THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 



$37,795,038, or an increase of $3,513,701, or 10.25 per cent., as com- 
pared with, the previous year. 

It should be not^d that iu addition to the first and second class 
offices, a large number of stations or branch offices have been estab- 
lished in connection with the larger post-offices, and that allowances 
for rent, light, and fuel have been authorized for many of these stations. 

Having these facts in view, and the probable increase of thiB postal 
service, 1 am of opinion that an approi)riation of $731,500, or an increase 
of 10 per cent., as compared with tlic* appropriation for the current 
fiscal year, will be needed for rent, li^ht, and fuel for first and second 
class offices and stations connecteil theiewith for the fiscal year ended 
June 30, 1802; and I so recommend. * 

KBNT, LIGHT, AND FUEL FOR TlIinD-CLASS OFFICES. 

The following were the estimates, appropriations, and expenditures 
for this purpose during the past two fiscal years : 





• 
Itemi. 


1888-'89. 


US»-'W. 


Per cent. 




Increaae. 


Decrease. 




itoo.ooo.oo 

450, 000. OU 
314, 528. 95 


$505. 080. 00 
505.080.00 
422, 164. 05 




22.3 




12.2 
34.2 




IitXi>eiiait<irtffi ............^.... 









The first appropriation in the history of the postal service for rent, 
light, and fuel for third-class post-offices, or Presidential offices, whereat 
the salary of the postmaster, under existing law, ranges from $1,000 to 
$1,900, and the gross receipts ftom $1,900 to not exceeding $8,000 a 
year, was made by the Congress on the recommendation of this office 
July 24, 1888. The appropriation for this purpose for the present fiscal 
year is $571,500. This appropriation is made with the proviso that the 
allowance for rent in no case shall exceed $400 and the allowance for 
fuel and light $60 in any one year. This limitation of the allowances 
for rent, light, and fuel for third-class post-offices should be repealed, 
as the Postmaster-General should have full discretionary power to fix 
allowances for these items for third-class post-offices in accordance with 
the merits of the respective offices and the local surroundings. There 
is no restriction for allowances for rent, light, and fuel for first and 
second class offices, and there should be none for third-class offices. 

By the adjustment of salaries of third-class postmasters, which took 
effect July 1, 1890, in accordance with the requirements of the act of 
March 3, 1883, 2,066 offices were assip:ned to the third-class. Eighty- 
two additional offices were added to this class from October 1, 1890, and 
one office discontinued, making a net increase of 81 offices, or a total of 
2,147 from October 1, 1890. 

These offices were graded as follows : 



Salary of postmaater. 



11,000 
1,100. 
1,200 
1,300 
1.400 




Salary of posttuaster. 



$1,500 
1,600 
1,700 
1,800 
1,9U0 



No of 
offioeji. 



293 

247 
183 
139 

77 



FIRST ASSISTANT — ESTIMATED APPROPRIATIONS. 



221 



The namber of these offices and the grade, by States^ and Territories, 
is shown in the following statement: 

Tkird-claaB post-offices in each State and Territorif arranged to ejchibit the number of each 
grad4) {salary f 1,000 to f 1,900, inclusive), from October 1, 1890. 



States Mid Tern. 


Postmasters* salaries. 


Total. 


tones. 


$1,000. 


$1,100. 


$ 200. 


$1,300. 


$1.400. '$1,500. 

! . 


$1,600. 


$1,700. 


$1,800. 


$1,000. 


AUbsm* 


1 


6 


1 


8 


2 


8 


4 


1 


3 




22 


Aljuka 




AnsonA ............ 






1 
2 
7 
6 
2 
8 






1 
2 
4 
4 
7 


i' 

13 
5 
8 


1 
1 
5 
2 
6 


i* 

6 
4 
1 
1 


1 
1 
2 

4* 


4 


ArkanaoA 


2 
10 
8 

1 


6 

4 
4 
6 


3 

8 
1 
8 
2 


5 
8 
5 
5 
2 


23 


California — ... 


6a 


Colorado 


33 


Connecticut ......... 


45 


Dclawnre ... ...... 


7 


Dixtriet of Columbia. 














Florida 


2 

1 


2 

1 

28 
8 
1 

15 

13 

6 

2 

7 

4 

14 

15 

6 

8 

11 

2 

12 

8* 

4 
1 

16 
4 
4 

12 


8 

8 

....... 

4 

****io' 

12 
3 
8 

8 
2 
7 

18 

6 

12 
1 

12 
1 
3 
6 
1 

22 
4 

""'ii* 


2 
2 
2 

16 
10 
1 

14 

8 
1 
4 
1 
4 

6 
4 

1 
6 


1 
3 
1 

80 
6 
1 

11 

12 
4 
2 
7 
4 

13 

16 
5 
6 

12 
1 

10 


2 
6 
1 
22 
9 


8* 


1 


2 
2 


1 
2 


13 


(.leortria ............. 


26 


Idaho 


5 


lllinoiit 


13 
8 


16 
14 


14 
7 


8 
7 


4 
1 


161 


Imiiuna ........... 


74 


Indian Territory .... 


3 


Iowa -- 


8 
11 

4 
2 
4 


22 

13 

3* 

8 

16 
12 
6 
4 
7 
3 



13 
14 
5 
3 
8 
1 

12 
10 
6 

5* 

2 
8 


13 
7 
3 


4 
7 
8 


5 
8 

1 


115 


RansHA . ......... 


101 


Kentacky ........... 


37 


Loaisiana ........... 


13 


Maine 


2 
2 
14 
8 

i' 

6 



6 


8 


1 


37 


Maryland 


17 


M ASAachasetts ...... 

Michigan 


5 
18 
6 


ii 

8 

5* 

8 
3 

1 
1 
7 


2 
6 
1 
1 
5 

2' 

2 


08 
109 


MinneeotA -. 


49 


MieaiMippi 


25 


MiaeouTi 


8 


80 


Montana .........*.. 


13 


Nebraska .......... 


4 
2 
2 
2 


70 


Xerada 


4 


N'ew Hampshire 

N«w Jersey. ........ 


2 
6 

1 
16 
1 
4 



4 
5 
1 

20 
2 
1 

18 


2 
6 
1 

25 
5 
8 

12 
1 
1 

18 
1 
6 
8 
7 

11 
8 
6 
3 
8 
1 

11 
8 


5 
6 
1 

83 
2 
1 

16 


3 
6 

1 
20 
3 

1 
U 


32 
47 


Xew Mexico 


7 


New York 


15 

1 


10 

1 
1 
8 


8 
5* 


175 


North Carolina 

North DiUcota 


23 
15 


Ohio 





107 


Oklahoma 


1 


Orej(on .............. 


1 

11 

1 




8 

28 

3* 

7 
8 
10 


""ia* 

1 

4 
2 
8 
6 


1 

13 
1 
8 
8 
8 
6 


4 
23 
1 
1 
3 
6 
6 


....... 

1 
1 
1 
8 
13 
1 
8 
4 
2 
2 
6 


2 

1 
1 

8* 


8 

18 


8 

7 


16 


Penniylrania 

Rhode Island 


154 
8 


Sontb Carolina 


1 
1 
1 

1 


i' 

1 
2 


20 


Soath Dakota 


6 

^ 1 
6 


28 
28 

68 


ivxas 


f'tah 


a 


V*f»rmont • 


3 
2 
2 

2 
10 

1 


2 
4 
5 

2 


1 


8 
8 

2* 

6 


2 

1 
1 
3 



8 
5 
1 
8 
8 








22 


Viruinla 

WHAhinet-on 


2 

i 

8 


8 

1 
1 

4 


1 
1 

4' 


31 
16 


\Ve»t Virginia 

WUconsin 


17 
76 


Wvomine 


5 




















Total 


181 


208 


232 


210 


287 


283 


247 


183 


130 


77 


2.147 





A carefnl examination of special adjustments of the salaries of third- 
class postmasters, made in accordance with the requirements of sections 
1 and 2 of the act of March 3, 1883, for the past four years, has re- 
sulted in an estimated increase of 150 additional third-class officer as 
the probable number for the current fiscal year, making the total esti- 
mated number of third-class offices July 1 next, 2,216. 

Taking the average allowance for rent, fuel, and light as made under 
the appropriation for the current fiscal year, and the estimated num- 
ber of offices as stated, it will require an appropriation of $592,800 for 
this purpose for the next fiscal year ; and i therefore recommend that 



222 



REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 



the Congress b^ requested to make an appropriation of $592,800 for 
rent, light, and fuel for third-class post-oflices for the fiscal year end- 
ing June 30, 1892. • 

MISCELLANEOUS AND INCIDENTAL ITEMS, INCLUDING FURNITURE, FOR FIRST AND 
SIfiCOND CIJVSS POST-OFFICES. 

The following were the estimates, appropriations, and expenditures, 
for this purpose during the past two fiscal years. 



Items. 


1888-'«). 


1880-'90. 


Intt«Me. 


Estimaten «. 


$100,000.00 
100, 000. 00 
87,269.74 


$110. 000. 00 
110. 000. 00 
103,139.61 


F9r tent. 
10.00 


A D nronriatioiiB 


10.00 


Expena ituros 


1&18 







The' appropriation for this ])urpose for the current fiscal year is 
$120,000, being an increase of $10,000 as compared with the past year. 
Formerly two appropriations were made by the Congress for these 
items, but by the act of March 2, 1889, a single appropriation was made 
for miscellaneous and incidental items, including furniture, for first and 
second class offices. The aggregate amount allowed for these items 
for the past year exactly absorbed the appropriation. The items 
chargeable to this appropriation include all articles required for the 
postal service at first and second class ofilces which are not provided 
for by other appropriations 

By the adjustment made in accordance with the requirements of the 
act of March 3, 1883, 116 offices were assigned to the first class, being 
a net increase of 14 first class ofilces, and 650 to the second class, a net 
increase of ^3 second-class offices, making a total of 660 tirst and second 
class post-offices in efi'ect July 1, 1890. This shows a net increase of 
47 first and second class offices as compared with the number for the 
previous year. 

In addition to the regular offices, all stations connected with the 
larger offices are provided with miscellaneous and incidental items and 
furniture as needed from this appropriation. 

The adjustment in efiect July 1, 1890, shows that the total gross re- 
ceipts which accrued at the first and second class offices for the four 
quarters ended March 31, 1890, amounted to $37,795,038, being an in- 
crease of $3,513,701, or 10.25 per cent. The increase of receipts which 
accrued at first and second class offices for the year ended March 31, 
1889, amounted to $2,984,924, or 9.5 per cent. 

Taking these facts into consi<leration, and the growth of the postal 
service, 1 am of opinion that $132,0(M), or an increase of 10 per cent., 
will be required for miscellaneous and incidental items, including fur- 
niture, for first and second class post-offices for the fiscal year ending 
June 30, 1892. 



ADVERTISING FOR FIRST AND SECOND CLASS POST-OFFICES. 

In compliance with Department Order Ko. 82, of March 7, 1882, 
allowances for advertising for offices of the first and second classes are 
made from and charged to the ap])roi)riation for advertising for the office 
of the Postmaster General. The appropriation for this purpose for the 
present fiscal year is $18,000, being the same amount as that appropri- 
ated for this purpose for the past fiscal year. 



FIRST ASSISTANT — BONDS AND COMMISSIONS. 



223 



Some years ago the appropriation for this purpose was $40,000, but 
was reduced by the Congress to $20,000. On this account, most of the 
lists of UDclaimed letters were published free as a matter of local in- 
terest or news. Under date of December 1, 1887, however, the Supcr- 
intendent of the Dead-Letter Ofhce, iu accordance with the opinion of 
the Assistant Attorney-General for the Post-Office Department, in- 
structed postmasters to collect one cent for each advertised letter, 
whether published in a newspaper or posted in a written list in the 
post-office. Under these instructions, postmasters found it difQcnlt to 
have the advertised letter-list published free as a matter of local news, 
as was done in a majority of the offices prior to the date named. This 
action caused a large number of postmasters to make application for 
allowances to pay the cost of advertising letter lists, but the limited 
appropriation will not warrant favorable action. 

I am of opinion that the cost of publishing these letter lists should be 
provided for by the Congress. 

The amount allowed by this office for advertising for the fiscal year 
ended June 30, 1890, is $13,371.73, leaving a balance of only $4,628.27 
for advertising for the office of Postmaster-General, for which the ap- 
propriation of $18,000 was made. 

It is my opinion that a better administration of this branch of the 
•service conld be made if a separate appropriation for advertising for 
offices of the first and second classes was made for the office of the First 
Assistant Postmaster-General. 

Having these facts in view, I therefore recommend that the Congress 
be requested to appropriate $15,000 for the officie of the First Assistant 
Postmaster-General for advertising for first and second class post-offices 
for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892. 

SUMMAKT OF ESTIMATES. 



Item. 



CoRipensAtion to pMtmMtera 

Clerktt in po«t-offlce« 

Bent, fuel, and liicht, first and second class offices . . 

Rent, fuel, and light, Ibinl-class ofiices 

Hfscellaneoas. incidental, and furniture, first and 

second clam offices 

Advertijfting, first and second-class offices 



Present ap- 
propriation. 



Estimates, 
1891 -'92. 



Increase. 



A mono t. ' Per cent. 



I 



f U. 000, 000 

7, 390. 000 

665. 000 

571, 600 

120, 000 
* 18, 000 



$14, nOO, 000 

8, 349. 0«)0 

731,500 

592, 800 

132. 000 
1 15, 000 



$900,000 

959, 000 

66,500 

21, 300 

12.000 



6.4 
18.i) 
10.0 

3.7 

10.0 



* This appropriation is made for the office of the Postmaster-General. 

t ISo appropriation has been authorized for advertiHing, office of the First Assistant Postmaster- 
GeaeraL 

DIVISION OF BONDS AND COMMISSIONS. 



To this division is assigned the duty of prepHring and transmitting 
all letters of appointment of newly appointed postmasters, together 
with blank bonds and oaths for execution ; recording the names of post- 
masters, the dates of their appointment, the names of their sureties, 
and the establishment, discontinuance, and changes of names and sites 
of post-offices; also to examine all bonds, and see that the same are 
properly executed and filed away alphabetically by States, and to pre- 
pare all postmasters' commissions for the signature of the President or 
the Postmaster-General (as the case may be), and see that such commis- 
sions are properly and promptly mailed when so signed. 



224 REPORT OF THE TOSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

The preparation of the varions reports required under the hiws and 
regulations of the Department is assigned to this division, as follows: 
daily, to the Division of Post-Office Supplies, office of the First Assistant 
Pbstmaster-Creneral ; to the Contract and Equipment Divisions, office 
of the Second Assistant Postmaster-GcDeral ; to the Stamp Division, 
office of the Third Assistant Postmaster-General; and to the General 
Superintendent of the Railway Mail Service for publication in the 
Daily Bulletin ; weekly, ^to the Saperinteudent of the Money-Order 
System and to the Auditor of the Treasury for the Post-Office Depart- 
ment; and quarterly, to the last-named office, together with a list of the 
officer transferred from the fourth class to the Presidential list. ' 

The correspondenceincident to the work of the division is prepared 
therein for the signature of the First Assistant Postmaster-General. 

The record work of the division may be briefly described as follows : 
The names of all Presidential offices and postmasters q.re recorded ir\ 
two books, in one of which the names of the offices are entered by 
States and Territories in alphabetical order. In the other the names 
of the postmasters are kept In alphabetical arrangement according to 
dates of appointment. The names of the postmasters appointed at 
money-order offices which do not belong to the Presidential list are 
entered alphabetically in a separate record, according to dates of ap- 
pointment. The names of postmasters appointed at all fourth-class 
offices which do not belong to the money-order list, are likewise entered 
in a separate record, in alphabetical order according to dates of appoint- 
ment, the same being divided into two sections in consequence of the 
large number of entries required. There are also 39 record- books in 
which the names of post-offices of all classes are recorded by States and 
coanties, together with the names of the postmasters and the dates of 
their appointment. • 

Herewith is presented, in tabular form, a complete statement of the 
amount of penalties of all bonds filed for the protection of the Depart- 
ment and as a guaranty for the faithful performance of official duties. 
This statement is arranged by States and Territories, as follows: Presi- 
<lential offices, $34,160,000; money-order offices not on Presidential list, 
$34,972,000; fourth -class offices other than nM>ney-order, $34,607,000; 
making a total of $103,839,000 in penalties secured by property valued 
at twice that amount, and showing an increase in the amount of pen- 
alties of $6,953,000 during the last fiscal year. 

The aggregate amount of work done by the division is herewith pre- 
sented in tabular form, together with a comparative table of the most 
important items of business transacted during the two previous years. 

There is also presenied a table showing the number and class of com- 
missions issued during the year ended June 30, 1890. 

Work of the Bond DiviHon for ikefUeal year ended June 30, 1890. 

Presidential cases recorded and npon which appointment papers, bonds, etc., 

were mailed and commissions issaed 2, 496 

Appointment bonds examined, indorsed, and submitted to the Postmaster- 
General and approved 21,313 

Bonds retnmed for correction 2,567 

Appointment bonds filed *. 21, 3l:{ 

New bonds required upon request of surety to be released &ZS 

New bonds required at the instance of the Third Assistant Postmaster-Gen- 

ei;al 80 

New bonds required upon recommendation of post-office inspectors 114 

New bonds required in consequence of the extension of th# «uoney-order busi- 

JivoB ••••••••••«•••••.«•••••«*• ••** « r* *••«! L^^v^ » ^vtn V4i * •*.. *••• •*•• ««^. f *^* 

i 



FreST ASSISTANT — BONDS AND COMMISSIONS. 



225 



New bonds required iu conseqnenoe of the establishment of the postal^note 

business ^ 174 

New bonds sent npon request of postmasteiv 824 

Total new bonds required !.. 2,811 

New. bonds received, examined, indorsed, and submitted to the Postmaster- 
General for acceptance 2,105 

New bonds reported to the Third Assistant Postmaster-Qeneral 81 

New bonds reported to the Auditor 2, 105 

New bonds tiled :,.. 2,105 

Jackets prepare<l in sending new bonds 2,105 

Commissions prepared and mailed to postmasters 21,:i94 

Commissioned [lostmasters reported to tbeAnditor 21,313 

Commissioned posmasters reported to the Third Assintunt Po<<tmaAtt>r-Geiiorn1 . 21, 313 

Commissioned postmasters reported for publication in the P«»s(ai Bulletin.. . 21,313 

Commissioned postmasters reported to the money-order o&ce 4, 538 

New bonds reported to the money-order office 957 

Blank designation and oaths mailed to acting postmasters 624 

Designations and oaths of acting postmasters received, examined, indorsed, 

recoided, and filed 490 

Circular letters sent on appointments, changes of names and sites, and dis- 
continuances of post-offices 97, 632 

Circulars sent to appointees delinquent in the execution of their bonds 939 

Circulars accompanying commissions sent to postmasters 167,930 

Surety circulars sent to chief post-office inspector 3,936 

Circulars sent to postmasters delinquent in furnishing new bonds 2, 531 

Circular letters sent notifying sureties of death of postmaster 624 

Poet-office inspectors' reports on responsibility of sureties received, examined, 

and filed 4,231 

Blank oaths for assistant postmasters, clerks, and employes mailed 26, 698 

Oaths of assistant postmasters, clerks, and euipIoy<<)H received, examined, in- 
dorsed, and filed 1 35,031 

Entries made on the books of the division 118,595 

Current record books in use in the division 39 

Blank forms in use in the division 75 



Increase of businete in the Bond IHviaion, Po8i- Office Department f for the year 1890 ae com- 

pared \viih I'^dU. 



Tear endine June 
30 - 



1890. 



Frenidential appointments upon which bonds were msiled 

Fonrthclass cases coDsidf>rea 

Appointment bonds received, approved, and filed 

CommissiODs issued to poHtma»ters 

Monev-order postniast^^rs cx^m missioned dnrinf: t)io year 

Circular letters mailed on appointments, establishments, and chan;;os 
Entries made in books of the division , 



829 
20, 7«r» 
17,519 
17,fil9 
», 035 
92,^01 
93,408 



2,496 
18. 917 
21.:U3 
'.'1.394 

4,ft3K 
97. a 12 
118,595 



Commisfdone Utued, monthly j during (he fiscal year ending June 30, 1A90. 



Months. 



July 

An^nst « 

September 

October 

No veiiil*er 

Deoeiuber 

Jan nary 

Fcbrnary 

March 

April 

Y^y r 

June , 

Total 



Presi- 
dential. 



148 
82 
116 
111 
79 
1 
622 
004 
333 
159 
130 
111 



2,496 



Fourth 
class. 



2,765 
2,091 
1.607 
1, 36:^ 
1.375 
l,5fi« 
1,425 
l,23fi 
1,487 
1.409 
1,349 
1.144 



18,817 



Total. 



2,913 
2,173 
1,723 
1. 474 
1,454 
1,567 
2,047 
l.MO 
1,820 
1,568 
1,479 
1,255 



21, 813 



Presi- 
finntial 
(dupli- 
cate). 



Fourth 
class 

(dupli- 
cate). 



2 


20 








11 


















1 




1 




1 




3 


H 




7 



73 



Total 
(dupli- 
cate). 



81 



Monthly 
totals. 



2,935 
2,174 
1, TH 
l,4Pft 
1. 4 58 
1.571 
2, 052 
1.843 
1.H24 
1,573 
1.488 
1,262 



21,894 



226 



BBPOHT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 



C<mmi$$ion§ i$$ued, tnontktjf, during 1h9 Hmsal year emding June 30, 1890.— Continued. 

BBCAFITULATIOSr. 

Pre«M«itiAl 2,4Pe 

Fourth-oUM 18,817 

21, 313 

PrMldentiia (dnplloiite) i 

Fonrth-dAM (dupUuste) 78 

81 
Total 21. 3M 

P0udlH€$ qfall honde onJUeiutke B<md DMtUm, June 30, 1890, and the incr&ue or de- 

»M80 a$'oampared with 1889. 



8ta(M and TenitoriM. 



AUlbMDA 

AlamkM 

ArfMMi* 

ArkMiuM 

ClUifonii* 

CMondo 

CoBoeotioat 

Dftkoto 

Dels wMtft. ...... ...... 

Diatriok of ColambU. 

Florid* 

Goofjpcift 

Id*bo 

miiioU - 

IndlMia 

Indian Territory 

Iowa 

Kaaaaa 

Kontaoky 

Loaiaiana 

Maine 

MMTlaod 

MaMMMhaaetto 

Miehixan 



laippi 

Miasonii 

Montana 

Nebraaka 

KeTada 

New Hampiihire., 

New Jpraey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina ... 
Okie . 

CnfOKOB . ....*•...• 

PennaylTania..... 
Rhode lalaad..... 
Booth Carolina.... 

Tenneaaee 

Tezaa 

Utah 

V ennont. • .. • . ■ • . . 

Tfncinia , 

WaiiblD|(t4m 

West Virginia.... 

Wiaconain 

WyominI; 



Total. 



Penaltiea. 



Preeiden. 
tial bonds. 



Money' 
order bonds. 



$380,000 



71.000 
811,000 

1,200,000 
534,000 
801.000 
461,000 
181,000 
100.000 
287,000 
452,000 
75l000 

2,389.000 

1.170^000 
62,000 

1,441,000 

1,257,0U0 
562.000 
322,000 
563,000 
381.000 

1.812,000 

1,624,000 
658,000 
206,000 

1,221.000 
184.000 
770,000 
82,000 
885,000 
886.000 
110,000 

8,565.000 
811,000 

a; 160. 000 
253.000 

2,860.000 
199,000 
263.000 
660,000 

1,16.\000 
118,000 
262,000 
520,000 
245.000 
189.000 

1,105.000 
89,000 



34,260,000 



$439,000 

11,000 

140,000 

1,027! 000 
601,000 
241,000 
706,000 
69^000 



491,000 
648.000 
223.000 

2,469,000 

1,896,000 
180.000 

2^878,000 

2,102,000 
544,000 
898.000 
610,000 
280,000 
609.000 

1,440.000 
033,000 
619.000 

1,745,000 
161,000 

1, 160. 000 
119,000 
321,000 
238.000 
174,000 

1,854,000 
617.000 

2,288.000 
417.000 

1,678.000 

66,000 

841,000 

523,000 

1,613.000 
185.000 
409.000 
632,000 
386,000 
800.000 

1,162,000 
65.000 



Foarth' 

clans bonds 

other than 

money- 

order. 



1939,000 

7,600 

111,500 

• 750,600 

861.600 

416,000 

482,606 

773,500 

94,600 

8.000 

420,000 

968,500 

164,600 

1,227,500 

1,081,000 

209.000 

778,000 

760,000 

1,161,000 

467,000 

736,500 

607,000 

641,500 

984,000 

682,000 

647,600 

1,163,000 

230.000 

477,000 

102,500 

884.506 

611,000 

163,000 

2, 177, 600 

1,213.600 

1,646.000 

420,000 

2,740.000 

112,000 

662,600 

1,179,600 

1,188,600 

192,000 

378,500 

1, 605, 000 

355,500 

818,000 

1,022,500 

130,500 



Total amoaiit of pen- 
alties. 



1880. 



61,694,600 
12,600 

805,600 
1,572,500 
2,723.000 
1,407,000 
1,874,600 
1,808,000 

236,500 

109.500 
1,062,600 
1,004,600 

372,000 
6,012,000 
8,422,000 

264,000 
4^522.500 
4,011,000 
2,103,500 
1, 145, 000 
1,745,600 
1,230,000 
2.804,500 
8.707,500 
8.219,000 
1,880.500 
8.903,500 

642,000 
1,939,000 

284,000 
1,027.000 
1,642.500 

399.500 
7,587,500 
2,008.000 
^737,600 

997,000 
6.487,500 

864.000 
1, 107, 500 
2,081.000 
3,648,500 

428.500 
1,028,000 
2,354,000 

775,000 
1, 213. 000 
8,066.000 

255.000 



84,972.000 34,607,000 103,839,000 107.886,000 



61,768,600 
18,600 

822,600 
1,661,600 
8,148.500 
1,460,000 
1,464,500 
1,940,600 

284,500 

108L0OO 
1,148,000 
2,063,500 

462.500 
6,025,500 
8^662,000 

391.000 
4,662,000 
4.119,000 
2,257,000 
1,187.000 
1,800,600 
1.268,000 
^962,600 
4,048.000 
2.273,000 
1,461,500 
1, 119, 000 

676,000 
2,407,000 

803,500 
1,000.500 
1,734,000 

437,000 
7,696,500 
2, 141, 500 
6,084,060 
1,090,000 
6.783,006 

867,000 
1,166,500 
2.262,500 
8.901,500 

480,000 
1,049,600 
2,567,000 

936.506 
1.807,000 
8, 289, 500 



1889. 



Inorease 
of 1890. 



688.600 

6.000 

17.000 

89.006 

425,500 

43,000 

90,000 

132,500 

48.000 

•1,500 

86,500 

159,000 

80.500 

113.500 

230,000 

127.000 

60,500 

108.000 

163,500 

42.000 

64.000 

38,000 

168.000 

340,500 

64,000 

72.000 

215,500 

33.000 

488,000 

19,500 

63,500 

91,506 

37,500 

59,000 

133,600 

346,600 

93,000 

295,600 

3,000 

59,000 

181,500 

253.000 

61,600 

21,500 

203,000 

101,500 

94.000 

221.2M)0 

29,500 



5, 954, 500 



Tbtal increase of 1890 as oompand With 1869 16^963.000 



FIRST ASSISTANT — POSt-OPFICE SUPPLIES. 227 

DIVISION OF POST-OFFIOB SUPPLIES. 

This division fiimishes each post-offioe thronghoat the oountry with 
supplies, divided into classes as follows: 

Offices of the fourth class are furnished with 8-oance letter-balances, 
faein^c slips, canceling-ink, stamping-pads, postmarking, rating, and 
canceling stamps, thirty-eight forms of blanks, and, if the receipts of 
the office be $100 or more per annnm, with twine and wrapping-paper. 

Offices of the third class are furnished, in addition to the above, with 
thirty-two forms of blanks, 4-ponnd scales, and, when necessary to 
weigh second-class matter, 62 and 240 ponnd scales. 

Offices of the first and second classes are furnished, in addition to the 
above, with test weights, 600-ponnd scales, or of a greater capacity 
when necessary, thirty forms of blanks pertaining to the free-delivery 
system, and with ninety items of stationery. 

The Department proper is furnished with one hundred and thirteen 
items of stationery, blanks, blank-books, labels, records, registers, etc. 

WOBK DONB BT THE DIVISIOX. 

The number of requisitions briefed, filled, and filed for the various 
classes of articles furnished for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1890, is 
shown by the following: 

Tablb I. 

Twine and wrappiDg-pftper 29,018 

Stamps 18.070 

Scales 7,708 

Blanks and books 132,346 

Canceling-ink and stampiDg-paUs 16,385 

SUtionery 4,341 

Total 197,868 

The number of packages, registered packages, sacks, and cases of 
goods sent out during the same period is shown by the followiug : 

Table II. 

Packages, ordinary 252,160 

Packages, registered 2,642 

Sacks and cases 31,727 

Total 286,529 

The following table shows the quantity of the principal articles fur- 
nished for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1890. 

Table in. 

Blanks 90,031,105 

Books 180,130 

Facing-slips 432.692,640 

Marking, ratine^>nd canceling stamps 26,948 

Jnte twine. --J?r. ponrnla.. 916,131 

Cotton twine do... 52,210 

Flax twine do... 2,120 

Letter-lMlances and scales 8,085 

Wrapping-jfMkper ri'ifms.. 35,180 

Canceling-ink pounds.. 18,498 

Inkingpads 18,429 

Letter-neads and folio w-BbeetM 3, 355, 530 

Knvelopes 1,965,637 

Card-blotter sheets.. 121,548 

Card-board do... 210,921 



228 REPORT OP THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

Scratob'-blooks 29,206 

Slide labels . 912,600 

Examinntion cards .- - •- 805,000 

Rabber bands « groHs.. 4,033 

Robber bands puuiuls.. 8,275 

Rabber erasers 6,358 

Peas gross— 9,837 

Pen-holders 70,706 

Lead-pencils 173,499 

Writinginks bottles.. 11.191 

Mncilage do 5,399 

Mncilage and ink-stands 9, 273 

Sponge-cups andpap«r-wei«»-l>tH • 3,782 

Steel erasers and envelope knives , 4,654 

Shears 1,950 

Rulers and folders 2,032 

Carbon and semi-carbnn paper slieots.. 73, 308 

Rabber stamps 3,692 

Press copy-books .-.. 1,433 

Copying and blottiug-p^uls .,.- .• 1, 814 

Thumbtacks 11,364 

Paper-fasteners 127,100 

Pen-racks, clips, and loitor-tiles 2,889 

Sealing-wax pounds.. 4,513 

Pins ^ papers.- 3,463 

Pins boxes.. 1,559 

Sponge pounds.- 332 

Shipping tags 103,100 

Besides the above, there have been received and disposed of daring 
the same period — 

Packages from the Government Printing Office 61,882 

Letters not requisitions 6,697 

^ The amount of the more iraportjint portions of clerical labor per- 
formed is shown by the following table : 

Tablk IV. 

Entries of record : 

Wrapping paper and twine 28,018 

Stamps 18,070 

Scales 7,708 

Ink and pads : 16,385 

Order books 2,527 

Journals 4,341 

Ledgers 4,341 

Itemized accounts 30, 015 

Government Printing-office accounts 27,723 

Accoants kept : 

Itemized 167 

Dollars and cent« 645 

Inspectors' reports 902 

Orders on con tractors 1,212 

Labels and tugs writti'n 2T5,0:t2 

Circular letters sent out 25, 180 

Letters written 6,54^^ 

Receipts written 13,467 

Memorandum bills iilod 3,444 

Duplicate bills passed 1, 107 

Advance exigency allowance to postmasters 1,098 

Books of record and iness oopy-l>ouka 06 



FIRST ASSISTANT I>08T-OFFICE SUPPLIES. 



229 



The appropriations and expenditures for the fiscal year ended June 
30, 1890, are shown by the following table, omitting cents for conven- 
ience. 

Tablk V. 



Wrapping pap«r 

Twiij** 

lialaiiot'H anil scales 

St.»nii>», ink. atul pa«1 a 

Sjatioutrry, I'ost-Oilice DepHrtment 

Siatioutry, flrat and ^ecoml cliiaa offices ... 

l*:ifkiiij;-iMixe8, »aw(lu8t. Iifltdwure. t-tv 

I riiirni>; faciug fllipHaiid curd alidu labelH . 
rriulini; , 



Appropria- 
tions. 



^50,000 
85,000 
15,000 
35.000 
11.000 
57.500 
3,000 
7,000 
200.000 



Total. 



463,500 



Sxpendi* 
tnres. 



$49,898 

78,032 

U.MNI 

'33.3U8 

10,991 

51,743 

1.413 

0.171 

203, 311 



449,857 



The sum of the appropriation for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1890, 
amounted to $463,500 and the expenditures were $449,857, about 97 
per cent, of the appropriations. This left at the end of the fiscal year 
$13,643, in addition to which there was on hand stock as per inventory 
amounting to $60,685.21. 

'nviNB. 

There was expended from the appropriation of $85,000 for wrapping 
twine the sum of $78,032 (see Table 5), leaving a balance of $6,968. 
There was on hand, as per inventory of July 1, 1890, twine amounting 
in value to $15,493.08. The amount of twine issued for the year ende<l 
June 30, 1889, was 917,024 pounds, while the amount ivssued for the 
present year. was 970,461 pounds, showing an increase of 53,437 pounds 
in the amount used. The natural growth of the service for the past 
few years shows that the increased amount of twine issued for each 
fiscal year has averaged over 50,000 pounds. 

It is estimated that the sum of $85,000 will be required to meet the 
demands of the service for wrai>piug twine for the fiscal year ending 
June 30, 1892. 

WRAPPING PAPER. 

From the total appropriation of $50,000 there have been expended 
$49,898 (see Table 5), leaving to the credit of the appropriation $102. 
There was on hand, as per inventory of July 1, 1890, paper amounting 
in value to $4,405.44. There were 7,284 reams of paper furnished in 
excess over the previous year. The greatest increase was for the Eail- 
way Mail Service and facing slips. By reference to Table 3, it shows 
that 432,692,640 facing slips were furnished against 327,659,840 for the 
year ended June 30, 1889, an increase of 105,032,800 facing slips, equal 
to 6,079 reams of paper. This shows the large and steady growth of 
the postal service and the demand for these papers. 

It is estimated that an increase of this appropriation to $60,000 will 
be required to meet the demands of the service for the fiscal year end- 
ing June 30, 1892. 

STAMPS, INK, AND PADS. 

The appropriation for stamps, ink, and pads for the fiscal year ended 
June 30, 1890, was $35,000; the expenditures were $33,308 (see Table 



280 REPORT OP THE P08TMASTER-GENERAL. 

fl), leaving a balance to tbe credit of the appropriation of $1,692. This 
service is constantly increasing by the continual establishment of new 
offices, together with the natural growth of the service, and the de- 
mand for these* articles increases year by year. 

It is estimated that $40,000 will be required for the service for the 
fiscal year ending June 30, 1892. 

LETTBR BALANCKS AXD SCAIJE8. 

Table 6 shows, from the appropriation of $15,000 for letter-balances 
and scales, an expenditure of $14,990, leaving to the credit of the appro- 
priation $10. Letter-balances of 8 ounces capacity are furnished to 
every post-office; 4- pound balances in cases where the receipts of the 
office reach $400 per annum; and 62, 240, or 600 pound scales to offices 
where second-class matter is received. Taking into consideration the 
natural wear and tear upon scales which have l^n in service for a year 
or more, the constant growth of the service, and the continued estab- 
lishment of new offices, it is deemed prudent to ask that the sum of 
$18,000 be appropriated to meet the demands of the service for the year 
ending June 30, 1892. 

BTATIONKRT^ FIK^T AND SBCONB CLASS OFFICES. 

The appropriation for stationery for offices of the first and second 
classes for the year ended June 30, 1890, was $57,500 ; from this amount 
there have been expended $51,743, leaving a balance to the credit of 
the appropriation of $5,757. The demands on this service are con* 
stantly increasing by the establishment of new second-class offices. 
Since July 1, 1890, 56 new offices requiring stationery have been estab- 
lished, making a total of 675 offices to be supplied, as against 619 fur- 
nished during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1890. 

I therefore ask that $57,000 be appropriated to meet the demands of 
this service for the year ending June 30, 1892. 

8TATI0NSBT, POST-OFFICH DEPARTMENT. 

From the appropriation of $11,000 for the purchase of stationery and 
free penalty-envelopes there were expended $10,991 (see Table 5), leav- 
ing a balance of $9. The increased expenditures for this service over 
the previous fiscal year were $1,486. The continued growth of the 
other services necessarily makes an increased demand on this appro- 
priation in the issuance of stationery ; especially is this the case in the 
items of papers and envelopes. As will be seen Table 3 shows 173,120 
letter-heads and 78,137 envelopes more were used than during the pre- 
vious fiscal year. In consideration of the fact that this appropriation 
was exhausted before June 30, 1890, it is deemed essential that there 
should be an appropriation of $13,000 to meet the demands of the serv- 
ice for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892. 

FACINO SLIPS, GARD-8UDB LABELS, BLAKK8, AND BOOKS. 

From the appropriation of $7,000 for the purchase of the above- 
lamed articles, $6,171 have been expended, leaving a balance of $829. 
rhis was the first appropriation for the above-named articles, and good 
'esults, both to the service and the labor attached in the pertbrmance of 
the same, have been apparent. I regard it as a very important one, 



FIRST. ASSISTANT — ^POST-OPPIOB SUPPLIES. 231 

and deem it essential to the service. The creating of each new first 
and secoud class office makes an additional drain npon this appropria- 
tion; over 60 new offices were established Jaly 1, 189^^, and taking that 
as a basis for the next year's increase, I ask that $8,000 be appropriated 
for the printing of facing slips, card-slide labels, blanks, and books of 
an argent nature for first and second-class offices for the fiscal year end- 
ing Jane 30, 1892. 

PACKING-BOXXS, SAWDUST, PASTE, AND HARDWABS. 

From the appropriation of $3,000 for the parohase of the above-named 
articles, there has been expended the sum of $1,413, leaving a balance 
to the credit of the appropriation of $1,587. The past fiscal year being 
the first to apply this appropriation (the reqairemeots under the same 
now being more definitely known), it is believed that a smaller amount 
will answer the purpose. 

I therefore ask that $2,000 be appropriated for the purpose of pur- 
chasing packing-boxes, sawdust, paste, and hardware. 

pRnrnMo akd Biin>iNa. 

The regular appropriation for printing and binding for the fiscal 
year end^ June 30, 1890, was $200,000, to which the Public Printer 
was obliged to make a farther allotment of $14,903.12. 

From this appropriation there have been furnished by the Public 
Printer, 90,209,316 blanks, books, etc (see Table 5), at a cost of $203,- 
311.90, the amount of memorandum biUs as furnished by the Public 
Printer. 

Three hundred and twenty-five requisitions, amounting to $10,247.27, 
in addition to the amount shown as furnished, were made upon the 
Public Printer before the expiration of the fiscal year, but were held 
up by that officer as unfinished and carried over to the appropriation 
for the fiscal year ending 1891. For the fiscal year 5,230 requisitions 
were made on the Public Printer, against 4,58 1 requisitions during the 
previous year and 5,048 for the second previous year. 

It is estimated that an appropriation of $285,000 will be required to 
meet the demands of the service for the fiscal year ending June 30, 
1892, in view of the increasing demands likely to be made upon the 
appropriation for printing and binding from the natural growth of the 
service, and from the further fact that the Public Printer requires a 
large percentage of the appropriation for his current expenses. 

£$UmaU of appropriations for ikefi$eal year ending June 30, 1692. 

Wiappiog and facing-slip paper $60,000 

Wrapping twine 85,000 

Letter balanceeand scales 18,000 

Postmarking, rating and canceling stamps, ink and pads 40, 000 

Stationery, first and second classes 57,000 

Stationery and free penalty envelopes, Post<Office Department 13, 000 

Printing &oing slips, card-slide labels, etc 8,000 

Packing-boxes, sawdust, and hardware 2, 000 

Printing aod binding 285,000 

Total 568.000 

The present clerical force of this division consists of 21 clerks, mes- 
sengers, and laborers. Table 5 shows that articles to the value of 



232 BEPOBT OF THK POSTMASTER-OENEKAL. 

$449,857 wore received for tbe year ended June 30, 1890. To handle and 
account for the articles representing this amount, consisting of thou- 
sands of tons and millions of articles, in a prompt and accurate manner 
requires an amount of manual and clerical work that the present force 
is scarcely able to perform. Year by year this labor is constantly 
increasing, and by referring to the amounts expended for the last 
few years it will be seen that for the fiscal vear ended June 30, 1887, 
•331,738 ; June 30, 1888, $454,450 ; June 30, 1880, $412,444, and June 
30, 1890, $449,857 were expended, respectively. Upon this showing for 
the past four years it will be seen that the money consideration for the 
fiscal year ended June 30, 1890, is $118,119 in excess of that of the year 
ended June 30, 1887. 

To receive and disburse the articles representing this amount, in this 
business as in any other, must necessarily require a sufiicieut force to 
properly and accurately perform the duties. Every precaution and 
• care is taken in conducting this business; separate records of each 
appropriation are kept in detail, and transcripts furnished to the book- 
keeper of the division, who keeps an official itemized account, showing 
item nnmbets, description of goods, postoftice and State, date of requi- 
sition, date filled, and quantity sent; also a dollaraud-cent account, 
both in journal and ledger form, with each post-ottice of the first and 
second classes, and with each bureau of the Post-Office Department 
proper, detailed records of appropriations and expenditures are kept, 
showing date of passing the bill, number of voucher, number of order, 
and to whom paid. Inventory books show the precise quantity of 
each item and value thereof on hand each June 30. 

The division of post-office supplies differs materially from the other 
divisions of the Department. It supplies the Post-Office Department, 
the railway-mail service, the inspectors-in-charge, 675 post-offices of 
the first and second class, and the 60,000 thir<l and fourth class post- 
offices throughout the country with the articles necessary to properly 
conduct the business of the postal service. It represents in each and 
every respect a mercantile house doing a business annually equal to 
the amount expended from the several appropriations granted by Con- 
gress for this purpose, aggregating for the past fiscal year $463,500. 
It necessitates keeping in stock at all times sufficient supplies to meet 
the demands made by the various branches of the service that are sup- 
plied from this source. 

Not only does this division conduct the business covered by appro- 
priations made to the First Assistant Postmaster-General, but also 
that made to the Postmaster-General, for stationery and free penalty en- 
velopes, and for printing and binding, thus virtually being under the 
direction of two officials. Since the establishment of a ** blank agency," 
as it was formerly termed, the appropriations have rapidly increased, 
and for the past fiscal year the total amount of the appropriations for 
which the superintendent of the division was held accountable was 
$463,500, an increase of 250 per cent. 

To illustrate the increase in the volume of business done by this 
division, I will present the increase per cent, of requisitions received 
and some of the principal articles furnished for the year ended June 30, 
1888, over that of June 30, 1887, and that of June 30, 1890, over that 
of June 30, 1889. 

For the year ended June 30, 1888, the increase over the previous year 
was 24 per cefit. in requisitions for wrapping paper and twine; 32 per 
cent, for blanks and books ; 40 x)er cent, in the number of all requisitions 



FIKST ASSISTANT — ^FREE DELIVERY SYSTEM, 



233 



received; 18 per cent, in the number of packages sent ont; and tbe 
average increase for packages, cases, sacks, and registered packages 
was 23 percent.; for blanks furnished, 7^ per cent.; for wrapping paper, 
11 per cent, and the increase of eleven principal articles was 44 per cent. 
For the 3'ear ended June 30, 1890, the increase over the year ended 
June 30, 1889, was 15 per cent, in requisitions for wrapping paper and 
twine; 14 per cent, for blanks and books, and 7 per cent., in the number 
of all requisitions received; 3 per cent, in the number of packages sent 
out ; and the average increase for packages, cases, sacks, and registered 
packages was 3 per cent. ; for blanks furnished, 3 per cent. ; wrapping 
pa{)er, 26 per cent.; and the increase of eleven principal articles was 31 
per cent. This clearly indicates the rapid growth of the service and 
tbe increased demands made upon the division. 

THE PEEE-DELIVERY SYSTEM. 



NKW FREE-DKLIVRRY OFFICES. 



The number of free-delivery offices at tbe close of the fiscal year was 
454, an increase over the preceding year, ended June 30, 1889, of 53. 
The following were the new offices established : 



Arkansas City, Kans. 
Albiou, Mich. 
AfipuD, Colo. 
Amesbnry, Mass. 
AsbeYille, N. C. 
Anniston, Ala. 
Butt© Citv, Mont. 
Biddeford, Me. 
Benoin|(t(in, Vt. 
Brunswick, Ga. 
Corry, Pa. 
Creston, Iowa. 
Clinton, Mnss. 
East Liverpool, Ohio. 
Fresno, Cal, 
nnshiug, N. Y. 
Fodtoria, Ohio. 
Fort Madison, Iowa. 



Geneva, N. Y. 
Green Bay, Wis. 
Hazel ton, Pa. 
Ionia, Mich. 
Johnstown, X. Y. 
Jefferson Citj, Mo. 
Kearney. N(ibr. 
Kankakee, 111. 
Lock Haven, Pa. 
Madison, lud. 
Med ford, Mass. 
Menominee, Mich. 
Mount Vernon, N. Y. 
Mont Clair, N. J. 
Marion, Ind. 
Niajrara Falls, N. Y. 
Norwich, N. Y. 
Oak Park, 111. 



Oberlin, Ohio, 
Pasadena, Cal. 
Peekskill, N. Y. 
Quincy, Maes. 
Sing Sing, N. Y. 
South Omaha, Nebr. 
South Norwalk, Conn. 
St. Cloud, Minn. 
St. Johnsl)nry, Vt. 
Santa Kosa, Cal. 
Shenandoah, Pa. 
Trinidad, Colo. 
Urbana, Ohio. 
Wansau, Wis, 
Westfield, Mass. 
Washington, Pa. 
Ypsilanti, Mich. 



INCREASE IN CARRIERS' APPROPRIATION, ETC. 

The number of additional carriers appointed during tbe year was 
SOU, thus increasinii: the number in the service June 30, 1889, of 8,257 
•to 9,i>00 June 30, 1890. 

Tbe appropriation for the service was $8,000,000, and the total cost 
$7,976^202.72, leaving an unexpended balance of $23,707.28. 



234 



REPOBT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

COMPARATIVB KB8ULT8 FOR 1889 ANP 1890. 



The aggregate resalts of the operations of the free-delivery system 
for the fiscal year ended Jane 30, 1890, and a comparison with the 
preceding year, ended Jnne 30, 1889, are given in the following table: 

Aggregate reiulU of the free-delivery service far the fiscal year ended June 30, 1890. 



1889. 



18M. 



Increase. Per cent. 



Kumber of offices 401 

Number of carriers 8,257 

Registered letters deUyered 4,623,564 

Letters deUrered 1,063.»20,5» 

Postal-cards deUvered 253,223,124 

Newspapers, etc, delivered 491,595,219 

Letters collected 884,604.564 

Postal-cards collected 260,267,041 

Newspapers, etc., collected 187,611,500 

Whole number of pieces bandied 3,085^805,540 

Pieces handled per carrier 373,720 

Total cost of service^ including post-office in- 
spectors $«,967,94L00 

Aversge cost per carrier 839.45 

ATeocaga cost per piece mills.. 2.2 

Amount of postage on looal matter 90,686,921.82 

Excess of postage on looal matter over total cost 
of service 1,878,978.92 



454 

9,066 
4.734.588 
1,145,486,531 
252,404,982 
530, 479. 752 
952, 068, 411 
253,784.823 
158,210.659 
3,207,259,606 
863,695 

97,976,202.72 

^ me. 88 

2.4 
$10,184,764.42 

2,208,561.70 



58 

800 

210, 074 

91, 566, OO'i 

*728, 142 

88.884,538 

67,403,857 

•6,482.218 

20,609,150 

211,454,156 

10,025 

01,018,260.82 

87.48 

0.2 

$647,842.60 

*370, 418. 22 



13.21 
9.79 
4.66 
8.68 

*0.28 
7.91 
7.62 

•2.40 

14. P9 
6.85 

•2.68 

14.63 
4.45 
9.09 
6.79 

•14.36 



EZ0BS8 OF LOCAL POSTAGE OVER COST OF SERVICE. 

The local x>ostage exceeded the cost of service in 35 of the 454 offices 
(being 1 less than the preceding year), as shown by the following 
table: 

FoeUoffieee at which the local postage exceeded the cost of the service. 



Name of office. 



State. 



Receipts 
from local 
postage. 



Cost of car- 
rier service. 



Net gain. 



Aspen ;.... 

Atlanta 

Baltimore 

Birmingham 

Boston 

Brooklyn 

Chicago 

Cincinnati 

Cleveland 

Colorado Springs . 

Denver 

Hartford 

Leavenworth 

Little Rock 

LoweU 

Minneapolis 

Montgomery 

Newwk 

New Haven 

New Orleans 

New York 

Omaha 

Philadelphia 

Pittsburgh 

Providence 

St. Louis 

St Paul 

Salt liSke City.... 

SanFranciaco 

Scranton 

Seattle 

Tacoma 

Troy 

Wilkes Barre 

Tonkers 



Colorado 

Oeorgia , 

Ma^land 

Alabama 

Massachusetts. 

New York , 

nUnois 

Ohio 

...do 

Colorado 

.. do 

Connecticut .... 

Kansas 

Arkansas 

Massachusetts. . 
Minnesota 



New Jersey .., 
Connecticut ... 

Louisiana 

New York...., 

Nebraska 

Pennsylvania. 

...do.. 

Rhode Island . 

Missouri 

Minnesota...., 
Utah ...-:..... 

California 

Pennsylvania. 
Waahmgton.., 

.. do 

New York 

Penn8ylvania.. 
New York 



fit 
26, 

818, 

13, 

[,119, 

540. 

720. 

185, 

91, 

5, 

70, 

44, 

9, 

10, 

21, 

88, 

8. 

71, 

41. 

98, 

5.721, 

69, 

1,192, 

120, 
53, 

407. 

75, 

8, 

179. 
19, 
11, 
10, 
27, 
18, 
13, 



612.28 
494.49 
940.08 
068.34 
10&36 
67^56 
811.83 
056.35 
755.62 
722.18 
284.67 
386.61 
270.58 
515.72 
920.39 
414.74 
012.58 
901.50 
185.85 
342.56 
266.57 
186.45 
;00.40 
860.50 
009.74 
762.36 
583.26 
200.42 
741.53 
221.75 
060.03 
800.07 
757. 65 
847.35 
397.85 



$1,353.62 

22,349.98 

316, 66L 01 

6, 709. 12 

428,876.82 

342,782.28 

639.906.34 

149,778.81 

91, 59a 98 

3, 711. 60 

36,836.54 

25, 199. 19 

7, 314. 18 

7.465.52 

21,900.82 

70,480.22 

5,210.27 

67, 141. 13 

83, 473. 88 

82. 442. 8 J 

1, 032, 123. 72 

38.988 84 

689,235.05 

94,300.01 

49,191.60 

226.775.29 

70, 705. 46 

7,750.48 

155,801.55 

17, 966. 82 

9, 502. 88 

8. 331. 90 

27,422.15 

13,491.39 

10,329.01 



$258.61 

4, 144. 51 

102,270.07 

6.359.22 

690,238.54 

»7,W6.27 

180, 814. 99 

35,277.54 

156.64 

2,010.58 

33. 44& 13 

19.187.42 

1,956.40 

3,050.20 

11.67 

9,935.52 

802.26 

4,760.37 

7, 661. 97 

15, 899. 67 

1,689,142.85 

30, lOa 11 

603,465.35 

35,461.49 

4,808.14 

180,987.07 

4,877.80 

449. 94 

23, 939! 08 

1, 254. 93 

2, 167. 15 

2,468.17 

385.50 

355.96 

3,068.84 



FIKST ASSISTANT GROWTH OF FREK DELIVERY SYSTEM. 235 

GROWTH OF THE SYSTEM. 

The details of the growth of the free-delivery system from its inaugu- 
ration Jaly ly 1863, to June 30, 1890, inclusive, are given in the follow- 
ing table : 

Graw^ of ike free-deUvery service fir<>m it$ inauguration, July 1, 1863. 



Ymt. 


Num. 
berof 
offloe*. 


Nnmber 
of car- 
rien. 


Coatofaervice. 


Postaeeonlo-i 

c«I matter. 


BxceM of 
cost. 


Excess of 
postage on lo- 
cal matter. 


1868-*64 ... 


66 

45 
46 
47 
48 
48 
61 
52 
52 
62 
87 
87 
87 
87 
87 
88 
104 
100 
112 
154 
150 
178 
181 
180 
356 
401 
454 


685 
757 
863 
943 
1,108 
1,246 
1,362 
1,410 
1,443 
1,408 
2.040 
2.106 
2,269 
2.265 
2,275 
2,360 
2,688 
2,861 
8,115 
8,680 
3,890 
4,358 
4,841 
5,310 
6,346 
8,267 
0,066 


1317,063.20 
448,664.51 
580.236.41 
600. 034. 34 
005. 034. 50 
1,183.015.81 
1, 230, 070. 85 
1.353,023.23 
1,385,065.76 
1,422,495l48 
1,802.606.41 
1,880,041.09 
1,981,186.61 
1,803,619.85 
1,824,166.96 
1.947,706.61 
2.363.603.14 
2; 499, 911. 64 
2,623.262.74 
8,173,886,51 
8, 504, 206. 52 
8,085,052.55 
4,312,306.70 
4, 618. 692. 07 
5,422.356.86 
6,1^7.041.00 
7,970,202.72 








]864-*6S 








1865-*66 








1868>'97 








in7-*68 








1868-'60 








1869^*70 ^ax ... . 


$681,864.70 
768, 120. 78 
907.351.03 
1, 112. 251. 21 
1,611,481.66 
1,947,509.54 
2.065,561.73 
2,254,597.83 
2.452,261.51 
2. n2, 523. 86 
8,068,797.14 
3, 273. 630. 30 
8,816,576.00 
4,105,230.52 
4, 778, 484. 87 
6,281.721.10 
5,&30.242.97 
6,691,253.60 
7.721.689.16 
9,536,921.82 
10,184,764.42 


f548,21.'>.l5 
505.802.45 
478,Gi;{.H3 
310,244.27 
101, 214. 75 




1870-'71 




liWl-'72 




1872-'73 




1S73-74 




1874-'76 


$67. 517. 56 


1875-*76 




84,376.22 


Ig7«-'T7 




360,977.98 


lg77-*78 




628,084.66 


1878-'79 




864,771.14 
706,104.00 
778, 718. 85 


IST^'SO 




1880-*81 « 




1881-'82 




1,193,313.36 


lWffi-*88 




1,021,894.01 
1, 274, 27a 85 


1883-'84 




18B4-'85 




1,295.768.66 
1,526,936.27 
2,072.561.62 
2, 209, 332. 80 


1885-'86 




M8B-'a7 




18l7-*88 




1868-'89 


2,578,079.92 
2.208.561.70 


188»-*90 









LOCAL POSTAGE AXD PiStsS OF MAIL HANDLED. 

The free-delivery system was inaugurated July 1, 1863, and during 
eleven years the receipts from local postage were less than the cost of 
the service, and it did not become self-sustaining until June 30, 1875, 
when a credit balance was shown of (67,517,55, and on June 30, 1890, 
it had increased to $2,208,561.70. 

The local postage for the year ending June 30, 1870, amounted to 
•681,864.70; June 30, 1880, $3,068,797.14; and June 30, 1890, $10,184,- 
764.42. 

In 1870 the number of pieces of mail handled was 245,267,549 ; in 
1880, 932,121.843 ; in 1890, 3,297,259,696. 

The rate or increase, as shown by these figures, will give some idea 
of the possibilities at the end of the next decade and the enormous 
results w^ch will then be exhibited in every feature of this service. 

DIVERSE RESULTS AND EXPLANATION. 

The tables in this report exhibit diverse results at different offices in 
regard to number of pieces handled, cost per piece in mills, cost of the 
service, disproportionate number of carriers to the population and 
business done, and other irregular features of the service, which are 
due to a variety of causes, among which the following may be stated : 

The physical and geographical conditions of the territory to be served, 
such as strieams to cross and hilly an.d broken ground to traverse ; the 
amount of sparsely-settled country and the number of large estates on 



236 BEPOBT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

the carriers' routes; the large area of territory served ; the climate; the 
time of arrival and departure of mails and the quantity to be-bandled ; 
the number of individual letters and pieces, and of packages of mail 
containing numerous letters and* other matter to one address and deliv- 
ered in bulk to business houses and manufacturing establishments ; the 
lailure in many cases to obtain a correct count rather than a very lib- 
eral estimate of pieces handled ; the time required to make the serv- 
ice efficient at offices recently established ; the number and capacity of 
tenement houses ; the compactness of some cities where a large business 
is done, and the number of dwellings In other cities more particularly 
occupied for residences, where a small amount of business mail is 
handled. Every effort is being made by the inspectors and the super- 
intendent to correct all inequalities, and examinations of free-delivery 
offices are constantly being made with a view to secure a correct count 
of local postage and number of pieces of mail handled, and also provide 
a satisfactory service to the patrons of every office. 

CHANGES IN SXISTINQ LAWS RECOMMENDED. 

The present law provides for the establishment of the free-delivery 
system, in the discretion of the Postmaster-General, at *' every place 
containing a population of not less than 10,000 within its corporate 
limits according to the last general census taken by authority of State 
or United States law, or at any post-office which produced a gross 
revenue for the preceding fiscal year of not less than $10,000.'' There 
is a demand for the extension of the service to places having a smaller 
population and revenue, and an amendment of the law is recommended 
so as to include, in the discretion of the Postmaster-General, all places 
which have a population as shown by the last State or United States 
census of 5,000, or the post-offices of which ])rodnced a gross revenue 
for the preceding fiscal year of at least $7,000. The law at present 
does not provide sufficient allowances for third-class offices to warrant 
a satisfactory free-delivery service, and in case the amendment above 
referred to should be approved and authorized by Congress, some pro- 
vision for clerk-hipe allowance to this class of offices, to take effect 
when the free-delivery service shall be established, is respectfully 
recommended. 

The law now in force makes no distinction in salaries between letter 
carriers and collectors of mail-matter, while in case of' the former a 
higher intelligence is necessary in the performance of the duties re- 
quired. The collection service, however, requires only men of good 
character and of the requisite physical ability, for which $600 per an- 
num would be an adequate compensation. Now all are treated alike, 
and promotions of collectors are made from $600 to $800, $850, and 
$1,000 per annum, the same as of delivery carriers. The carriers be- 
come more efficient and are able to handle and deliver their mail with 
greater facility from year to year, while the collectors can perform, as 
a rule, as satisfactory' service the first year as afterwards. The crea- 
tion by law of a class of collectors with a salary of $600 per annum, 
and not subject to promotion, would enable the Departraeut to separate 
the deliveries and collections at all the large offices and thus insure 
better results in both branches at a decreased cost. It is not intended 
to recommend a reduction of the salaries of old carriers who may be 
performing collection service at the time the law shall take effect, or 
prevent) their promotion under existing: law. Provision should be made 
for new men who shall be required for collection service only, at a 
salary of $600 per annum, from and after a given date. 



FIRSl ASSISTANT — FREE DELIVERY STATIONS, 237 

The law now provides for a leave of absenOd with pay, of fifteen 
daye^in each year, for letter carriers. If absent for any cause in excess 
of that time their routes are served by substitutes, who receive the pay 
of the carriers. Carriers occasionally become disabled by accident of 
severe illness and are unable to resume their duties for several days or 
weeks, which, in case of poor men, may result in much hardship. I 
think the law should be so amended as to provide for payment in such 
cases out of the* regular appropriation for this service of the salary 
now fixed by law, for a limited time, to those whose disabilities have 
been incurred in the line of duty. 

THIS BIGHT-HOUR LAW. 

By the act of May 24, 1888, limiting the time of service of letter car- 
riers to eight hours per day and providing for payment for time em- 
ployed in excess thereof, the annual expenses of the free-delivery serv- 
ice have been largely increased. Although the whole service has 
been reorganized in compliance with its provisions, on account of the 
increasing business additional carriers are constantly being applied for 
by postmasters, to enable them to keep within the law. Frequent 
changes in the schedules are necessary and inspectors are obliged to 
devote a considerable portion of their time to this work. 

The claims upon the Department for overtime will be made every 
year, as long as the law remains in force with its present legal con- 
struction. It does not provide an average service of eight hours for 
any period, and while full payment of the fixed salary is required where 
the service is performed within a less number of hours, as is often the 
case when the mail to be handled is light, or fails to arrive on account 
of storms or blockades, an excess of time over eight hours on any day, 
however short the period, entitles the carrier to payment pro rata. 

Congress having failed to provide additional clerks to enable this 
office to promptly settle these claims for overtime, and the necessity for 
a careful examination of them requiring, in many cases, much corre- 
spondence with postmasters and claimants, will necessarily delay their 
adjustment. The business connected with the free-delivery division is 
now so large as to require the entire time of the present force of clerks 
in the current work of the office, which is accumulating and increasing 
beyond their ability to perform satisfactorily. 

FREE-DBLIVEBY STATIONS. 

The number of free-delivery stations in operation at the close of the 
fiscal year was 288, and the number established during the fiscal year 
was 90. These stations are for the accommodation of the people remote 
from the post-office, and generally have money order and registration 
facilities and for the sale of postal supplies, and many have, in addition, a 
direct service to the people by letter carriers. These stations relieve 
the main office and increase the postal revenues and should be judici* 
ously increased in number as the necessity for them becomes apparent. 

EQUIPM1BMT. 

The equipment for this service at the close of the fiscal year, June 30, 
1890, consisted of 9,066 regular letter carriers, about 3,000 uniformed 
substitutes and 706 horses. The annual running expense at that date 
was $101,586.68 for car-fare for use of carriers, and $188,529.30 for horse- 
hire for mounted men and for wagon service. 



238 REPORT OF THE POSTBfASTER-GENERAL. 

JBSTXHATEfi AND APPROPBIATIONS. 

The estimates, appropriations, and expenditures for the free-delivery 
service for the past two years were as follows : 



1888-'89. 



1689.'90. 



Increase. 



BaUmatoa 

Approprifttions . 
Expenditures.... 



$7,000,000.00 
7,000,000.00 
6,957,941.90 



18, 005,050.00 
8. 000. 000. 00 
7, 976, 202. 72 



fl,O0S.050.0O 
1,000.000.00 
1,018,260.83 



The appropriation for the current fiscal year is $9,094,485. 

E8TIMATB FOB THE FISCAL TEAR COMMKKCIKO JULY 1,1891,AKD ENDING JUNE 30, 

1892. 

The annual pay of carriers in the service June 30, 1891, subject to 
the usual changes, will be as follows: 

l,400camerB,»t$600each $840,000 

613 carriers, at $800 each 490,000 

3, 450 carriers, at IfSoO each 2,932,500 

4, 603 carriers, at $1,000 each : 4,603,000 

10.066 8,865,500 

To which is to be added: 

For promotion of 2,013 carriers tinder act of Angnst 2, 1882 $311, 74S 

Additional carriers (equal to 450 for full year) ^ 270,000 

Pay of dobstitntee for carriers on vacation (10,066) 251,650 

Pay of snbstitates for additional carriers on vacation (450) 11, 250 

Pay of temporary carriers 2,500 

Pay of substitutes for holidays and emergencies 2, 500 

Incidental expenses 375,000 

To classify carriers at additional first-class free-delivery offices under act 

of Januarys, 1887 50,000 

Post-office inspectors 27,000 

10,167,542 
Credit by change in grade of carriers 75,000 

Total 10,092,542 

The pay of carriers on June 30, 1891, as above gn^ven, is ascertained 
by adding to the salaries at this date (October 29, 1890,) the increased 
pay of those who will be entitled to promotion under act of August 2, 
1882, and by adding to the number of $600 men the additional carriers 
that will be needed for new ofQces and the present service prior to June 
30, 1891. 

The carriers in the service June 30 next, whose salaries will then be 
$600 and $800 (2,013 in number) will be entitled to promotion during the 
fiscal year commencing July 1, 1891, under the act of August 2, 1882. 
The amount required for this purpose, viz, $311,742, has been ascer- 
tained from the promotion register. 

The sum of $270,000 for additional carriers is to provide for the ex- 
tension of the service and the increase of business at present offices (500 
in number) and also at additional offices to be established during the 
fiscal year under act of January 3, 1887. 

The amount required to pay for substitutes for carriers on vaca- 
tion ($262,900) is in accordance with act of June 27, 1884, which grants 
a leave of absence of fifteen days during the fiscal year to each letter 
carrier, without loss of pay. 



PIEST ASSISTANT — FREE DELIVERY SYSTEM. 239 

The item of $2,500 for pay of substitutes is to cover emergencieety such 
as large accamalatious of mail duiiug the election and holiday seasons. 

The item of $2,500 for^ temporary carriers is for the employment of an 
additional force at watering places and summer resorts. 

The estimate for incidental expenses ($375,000) is for horse-hire, car- 
fare, wagon service, letter-boxes, satchels, furniture, and aU other ex- 
penses in connection with the service not enumerated above. 

The item of $27,000 for pay of post-office inspectors covers the amount 
to be paid out of the free-delivery appropriation by direction of the 
Postmaster- General. Th<* amount paid last year was $26,440. 

The amount estimated ($50,000) is to pay for classification of carriers 
at additional first class £ree-deliveiy offices under act of January 3, 
1887, which provides that cities having a population of 75,000 or more 
may have three classes of letter carriers with salaries named thereiiL 
Thus far the official census shows that twelve cities come within the 
law, and the classification of these will cost $44,900. 

Of the amount of estimate ($10,092,542) the sum of $9,786,292 will 
be required by operation of law, the increase being $306,250, viz : For 
additional carriers, $270,000; additional substitutes, $11,250; addi- 
laonal amount for incidental expenses, $25,000. 

Additional Information showiufi: the operations in detail at every 
free-delivery office will be found in the tabulated statement marked 
Table A, appended to this report. 

OONOLUDINO REMARKS. 

The foregoing is a r6sum^ of the work of the various divisions of 
this office for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1890, with such recom- 
mendations as my brief connection therewith enables me to make. 
The duties of the office have been too recently assumed to permit me 
to discuss intelligently any questions vitally affecting the policy of the 
branch of the service assigned to the office of the First Assistant. 
Longer experience and more thorough familiarity with the work of the 
several divisions will enable me to lay before you in a subsequent 
report, or from time to time as may be most advisable, suggestions 
tending to promote the efficiency of this branch of the Post-Office De- 
partment. 

Very respectfully, 

8. A. Whitfield, 
First Assistant Postmaster-OeMtaL 

Hon. John Wanamaker, 

. Fostmnster-OeneroL 



240 



REPORT QT THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 



Table A. — Statement showing the number of carriers in service June 30, 1890, the amount 

ainount of postage on local matter dar 



1 
2 
8 
4 
6 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
16 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
S3 
24 
25 
20 
27 
28 
20 
30 
31 
32 
38 
34 
35 
36 
37 
88 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
15 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 
S3 
54 
56 
56 
57 
58 
69 
60 
61 
62 
63 
64 
65 
66 
67 
68 
69 
70 
71 
Ti 
73 



Pott-office. 



Abilene, Xanii 

Ad]iiui.Mich 

Akron, Ohio 

Albany, N.Y 

Albion. Mioh.*.... 
Alexandria, Va. . . . 

Allngheny, Pa 

AUentown, Pa 

Alton, 111 

Altoona.Pa 

Auenlinry, Maaa. t 
Amalerdam, If. Y . 
Annapolia, Md .... 
Ann Arbor. Mioh . 
Anniaton, Ala.M... 

Anaonia, Conn 

Appleton, Wia . . 1 . 
Arkanaae City, Kans-t 
Aabary Park, N. J . . 
A»heville,N.C.f.... 

Aahland.Wia 

Aapen, Colo.; 

Atchison, Kana 

Atlanta, Oa 

Atlantic City, K. J.. 

Anbam, Me 

Aabiim,N. Y 

Aagnsta,Ga 

Augnata. Me 

Aarora, HI 

Aaatln,Tex 

Baltimore, Md 

BanKor, He 

BaUTia,N.y 

Bath. Me , 

Battle Creek. Mich.. 

Bay City, Mich 

Bayonne,N.J 

Beatrice. Nebr , 

Beaver Falla, Pa 

Belle¥iUe,IU 

Bennington, Vt. * ... 

Bethlehem. Pa 

Beverly, Maaa 

Biddef'ord, Me. t 

Binghamton, K. Y 

Birmingham, Ala 

BirmiD);ham, Conn .. 

Bloomineton. Ill 

Sosion, Mane 

Brailford.Pa 

Brattleboro, Vt 

Bridgeport. Conn .... 

Brd$;etoii.N..T 

Brockton, Mam 

Brooklyn. N.Y 

Bmnawiok. 6a. h ..., 

Buffiilo,N.Y 

Burlington, Iowa .... 

Bnrlington, Vt 

Butte City, Mont:... 

Cairo, ni 

Camden, N. J 

Canton, Ohio 

Carlisle, Pa 

Carthage, Mo 

Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 
Chambersburith, Pa 

Champaign. Ill 

Charleston, S. C .... 
Charlf^ston, W. Va. 
Charlotte, N. C ... 
Cbaitaoooga, Tenn 



Car. 
riera. 



8 
6 

12 
44 
3 

4 

27 

11 
5 

10 
5 
7 
8 
7 
4 
5 
5 
4 
4 
5 
6 
3 
9 

30 
6 
5 

15 

17 
7 

8 
226 
9 
6 
4 
8 

11 
7 
4 
5 
7 
3 
4 
5 
5 

15 

11 
6 

11 

451 

6 

5 

1« 
6 

11 

361 

5 

104 

12 
9 
6 
6 

26 

11 
4 
2 
9 
4 
4 

22 
3 
5 

14 



Delivered. 



Eegia- 
^red 
letters. 



Letters. 



687 
1,210 
4,174 
12,837 

389 
2.040 
20.744 
3,16H 
1,091 
1,847 
• 189 
1,163 

818 
1,527 

186 

598 
1,009 

708 

777 

434 
1,247 

659 

2,143 

31,629 

2,»98 

1.144 

4,436 

11,081 

24,146 

2,067 

1,913 

96,893 

3,184 

639 

75 

2,660 

5,431 

1,443 

4H4 

809 
1, 9.33 

304 
1,419 
1. 713 

247 
5. 3.% 
3,704 
1,075 
6.141 
165, 341 
2, 428 
2.829 
5,174 
1,086 
1.865 
106,188 
23 
86.817 
4,596 
4,301 
1,281 
4,52« 
5,486 
3,702 
1,290 

170 
2,344 

648 

5501 
17.1!U( 
2,'J77 
1, 272 
11. 723 



258,549 
375,691 

1. 360. 799 
4, 952, 398 

120, 105 
368,810 

3. 949. 800 
1, 132, 014 

497. 776 

1, 013. 393 

142,311 

482.536 

220,040 

780, 132 

82.026 

245.171 

318,735 

297. 786 

334,052 

123, 130 

463,284 

181, 534 

1, 156, 241 

4,023,264 

824.589 

237,585 

1,368,60-2 

3, 304. 141 

990,540 

809,795 

1, 060. 181 

16, 822, 871 

647, 598 

245.863 

246.360 

804.798 

1,581,369 

349,061 

300.314 

296,441 

351. 527 

115, 706 

337, 624 

404, 771 

74.274 

1, 513, 434 

1, 186, 776 

400. 606 

1, 065, 672| 

62,669,485 

722. 241 

382, 470 
1,617.306 

3.'»1, 640 

891, .')24 

38, 504, 405 

r>4, 386 

15, S29, 664 

1, 062, 50H 

1, 123, 481 

257, 029 

478, 714 

1, 868, 622 

1,329,395 

398,496 

84,871 

651, 554 

232. 887 

288, 568 

2, 341, 830 

223. 534 

383, 111 
1. 840. 422 



Postal, 
cards. 



47,085 

84,643 

277,094 

877, 614 

28,001 

96,171 

804,817 

241, 051 

00,970 

170,608 

24,396 

71,592 

40,194 

128,629 

14,257 

43.041 

59,506 

37.318 

46,689 

17, 070 

67, 473 

14,789 

277,648 

902,050 

134, 118 

64,577 

254,570 

1, 139, 095 

161, 160 

168, 635 

180, 906 

4, 827, 932 

105, 164 

44,356 

32,360 

161, 834 

266, 635 

62.052 

57, 117 

68, 226 

78. 441 

13, 727 

70, 161 

71, 429 

11, 671 

274, 7K7 

192, 885 

83. 077 

22:4, 932 

14, 096, 6 U 

150. H23 

76, 205 

304, 801 

«1. 223 

212, i»75 

11, 175. 194 

6. .'^01 

3, 048, 781 

231.285 

175, 390 

19,58 

105, 505 

504. 008 

230. 470 

72. 0.'>3 

16,239 

111.980 

50.464 

6.3. 767 

538. 973 

33,3151 

86, 6K4 

331,4751 



Newspa- 
pers, etc 



Collected. 



Local let- 
ters. 



246,973 
298.125 
070, 282 

2, 403, 318 
121.117 
216, 666 

2, 173, 5.58 
526, 288 
296.979 
653, 879 
91,867 
264. 817 
166,248 
622. .TO2 
27, 948 
181.691 
284,489 
168, 434 
195. 449 
77, 236 
304.043 
147, 346 
749,708 

2,951,560 
506,100 
168, 454 
865,373 

2, 233, 902 
250,820 
681. 375 
801, 855 

7, 948. 501 
467, 038 
186. 395 
152. 032 
491, 38G 

1, 164. 449 
180, 320 
262, 690 
196,127 
434, 580 
83, 705 
266, 132 
249, 171 
66,459 
901, 088 
490, 609 
213,783 

1,141,310 
25,576,675 
472.521 
297,643 
888. 6fH) 
]9.'..5.->8 
67<i, 3H9 



20,636 

19,152 

08,207 

610, 437 

1,953 

13,028 

561, 335 

73, 816 

18,727 

47, 077 

9,077 

22,508 

8.707 

25,614 

6,374 

7,86i» 

7,282 

4.772 

2,899 

6,145 

24,488 

31,261 

89, 762 

280, 722 

16.760 

2. 455 
104.412 
136. 439 

21. 780 
47,504 
44,453 

7,513,497 

44,371 
8, 912 
7,066 

IP, 305 
118, 346 

20, 020 
7,475 
8,012 

12, 163; 

3, 863 
16. OI2I 
17, 3461 

2,08l' 
109, 839i 
118,4.52 
29, 582 
42,994 
27,840,271 
38, 3M« 

22, 998 
190. 024 

11.448 
57.007 



MaU let- 
ters. 



* Bstabliabed October 1. 1889. 



23, 945 

7, 970, 330 

807, 100 

747, 23 

165, 758 

203. 002 

1, 156, 119 

94,3, 543 

379, 757 

76, 4.50 

464, :ifi^l 

225, 461 

280, 8:»5 

774, 070 

95, 953 

269, 1S3 

1, 141,942i 



2, 



15, 



17,591,05.' 11,077,327 

5. 752' 

2,822,718 

73, 0441 

102, 085 

25,889 

47,991 

197,869 

00,457 

15,084 

7.234 

15,013 

7,586 

4. 094 

198, 69.< 

13,08-. 

7. 163 

1.51, 94 •» I 



16 



f Kxtablished January 1, 1890. 



: Kstabliehed July 1 



117. 036 
187.926 
093. 748 
628, 504 

72, 205 
275. 879 
908, 035 
720,41-: 
195.085 
393, 25.3 

51. 823 
237, 860 
111,916 
428, 983 

T2, 628 

78, 698 
183,060 
100, 684' 
271.019 
101,8711 
256, 88C; 
198, 53.'>' 
524. 448 
23.5, 880 
557,069 

98, 043 
880,286 
061,178 
478, 839 
52.5, 176 
551, 942' 
238, 142. 
528. 249 

87, 667i 
160.211. 
267, ZM\ 
866, 110' 
173.890 
144. 205 
136, 608 
178,371 

40. 623 
135.001 
101,529. 

44,901, 
904. 644 
015,601 
181,405 
536. 469 
214. 88.«> 
321.056 
293 946 
931.6^;^ 
168, 722 
418,604 
,461,0.12; 

:i7, 32:f 
,013.678, 
085, 70a! 
891, 495! 
180,7.'"»oi 
538, 927t 
879. U89' 
855, 928 
184. 66y 

90,515 
273. 77o' 
153. 5.55 

83, 224 
, 775, Tis 
131.2.33 
li'6.124 
220, 87^ 
.1889. 



PHtST ASSISTANT — OPEBATIONS OF FREE DELIVERT. 241 



of mail delivered and eollecUdt the number of pieaea handled^ ike cost of eervieef and tk4 
ing tlmfitaal year ended June 30, 1890. 



ColkMftad. 




Coet of serrioe. 


Poetage 


















o 


















8.2 


on lo<>aI 




Local poR. 
ta-lcards. 


Mail piMi. 
taloarda. 


Newspa- 
pen,6t4i. 


Aggregate. 


Per 

carrier. 


Aggregate. 


Per 

carrier. 


matter. 




14.703 


20.474 


2^015 


751,057 


250,352 


$2,894.51 


6798.17 


$690.03 


1 


10.359 


40.045 


15.104 


1,032.255 


172,042 


5. 392. 27 808. 71 


6.2 


802.26 


2 


47.368 


337,309 


370,487 


4.464,548 


372.045 


10. 523. 15 876. 85 


2.3 


4,143.05 


3 


261.483 


398.590 


300.518 


12,851,678 


280.720 


37,958.54 882.65 


3.0 


21.272.98 


4 


1,758 


14,160 


45,141 


404,838 


134,946 


1. 570. 30 523. 45 


3.8 


233,76 


5 


3,329 


80.505 


20.178 


1.070,*94 


269,123 


3.433.171 8J8.29 


3.1 


424.30 


6 


274.426 


542.474 


290. 917 


11, 5.0, 114 


436,883 


24.885.92, 921.70 


2.1 


28.821.70 


7 


23,088 


204.057 


58,141 


2,983,935 


271,267 


8. 610. 32 


800.04 


3.0 


2,103.98 


8 


12.867 


39.887 


14. 320 


1, 187. 802 


286,538 


3.348.59 


609.72 


3.0 


1.717.20 


9 


'2'^ 


64,870 


20,23: 


2,384,740 


238.474 


8,573.14 


887.31 


3.5 


2.679.92 


10 


2,288 


0,739 


3.022 


382,317 


68.483 


1.838.79 


367.76 


5.5 


730.78 


11 


UU500 


32.007 


22,110 


1,148. 798 


163.828 


5.245.87 


748.41 


4.5 


2.025.51 


12 


1.825 


21.905 


8,975 


580.488 


193,496 


2,824.38 


874.79 


4.5 


435.36 


18 


10,358 


02.300 


30,804 


2,000,530 


296.648 


6.037.90 


862.57 


2.0 


1,568.81 


14 


2,7»2 


11.858 


7,. -.70 


225,645 


56.411 


989.94 


247.48 


4.3 


372 98 


15 


6,300 


12, 401 


12,501 


588,501 


117,700 


4,113.80 


822.78 


7.0 


1.233.59 


16 


5.202 


21.763 


0, 181' 


881. 248 


178.250 


4,119.03 


823.81 


4.6 


1,176.75 


17 


a,i33 


13,879 


5,450 


831,134 


157, 783 


2,803.34 


700.83 


4.4 


1.399.87 


18 


2,290 


31,845 


20,830 


004,865 


226,316 


8,486.24 


867.06 


ao 


906.21 


19 


2,954 


10.534 


8.33il 


346,722 


69,144 


1,772.48 


354.40 


5.1 


620.58 


20 


6.810 


20,088 


11.245 


1,153,607 


192,261 


5,19L42 


865.24 


4.5 


1,443.40 


21 


15,323 


13.948 


817.280 


305,760 


1,353.62 


461.21 


2.2 


1.812.23 


22 


114.000 


38.819 


3,000.500 


834,400 


7. 551. 51 


830.00 


2.5 


5,616.19 


23 


380.400 


828. no 


320.404 


12,949,079 


431.038 


22,349.98 


744.09 


1.7 


28.494,49 24 


0.827 


97,753 


18.777 


2,107.391 


361,232 


5.71&22 


952.64 


2.8 


1.439.'j9; 25 


3.777 


10,328 


11,088 


806.431 


121,286 


4,202.93 


858.50 


7.0 


760.25 26 


35,058 


122.022 


132,192 


3.772,061 


251.530 


11.922.45 


794.83 


3.1 


' 3, 616. 43 


27 


109.012 


262.040 


101,848 


i, 360, 426 


491.711 


14,378.35 


845.79 


1.7 


5,613.70 


28 


13.704 


82,708 


43.797 


2, 067, 500 


295,357 


8. 710. 90 


9.^8. 70 


3.2 


1, 540. 44 


29 


25,017 


78.760 


70,332 


2,408.070 


367.630 


0, 147. 02 


683.00 


2.5 


2, 210. 41 


30 


28.020 


78.364 


46^570 


2,803,109 


360,388 


6.810.27 


851.28 


2.4 


2.530.41 


31 


4,378.781 


3,553.601 


3,930,253 


64.310.471 


284.500 


218, 861. 01 


958.68 


3.3 


318.910.08 32 


27.850 


83.319 


f3.787 


1.960,580 


217,841 


8, 417. 15 


935.24 


4.3 


2 067.34' 33 


4.218 


13, 178 


5,296 


506,510 


119,304 


3.524.31 


704.86 


5.9 


8H1.31I 84 




24 250 


18.51H 
. 55. 779 


638 872 


169.718 
239,388 


3.419.80 
7, 120 67 


854 95 


5.3 


601 69- 35 


7,'667 


48,561 


1,015.117 


891.21 


3.7 


1.391.821 86 


72.702 


85,488 


583.437 


4. 523. 065 


411.278 


8,5ri6.0fl 


778.73 


1.1 


4. 001. 01 ; 37 


8.647 


23,894 


14,504 


834.443 


119,206 


5. 215. 51 


745.07 


6.2 


1.148.321 38 


3.673 


25,105 


10.094 


812,057 


203,014 


3,463.66 


865.91 


4.2 


1,600.45; 39 


4,606 


28,547 


.S988 


745,434 


149,087 


3. 2(12. 6-2 


640.52 


4.3 


1. 494. 77 40 


12,810 


33,450 


24.840 


1,128.580 


161.227 


8, 209. 33 887. 05 


6.5 


810.00 


41 


1,210 


2.032 


3,828 


260,048 


88.883 


1, 147. 78 


382. :i9 


4.3 


22T21 


42 


5.305 


2:1.948 


7.807 


853.409 


213. 375 


3, 057. 45 


764.36 


3.5 


1,326.45 


43 


0.2T7 


30,8H2 


228.808 


1.205,014 


241,003 


4, 823. 88 


924.77 


3.8 


1,150.74, 44 


800 


4,501 


2.090 


207.114 


41,428 


1, 702. 62 


340.52 


8.2 


247.00 45 


46,230 


223.023 


90.239 


4.098,534 


273,230 


10, 551. 87 


703.48 


2.5 


6,510.1?' 46 


73.356 


137.751 


72,268 


3, 291. 462 


290,224 


8.709.12 


809.92 


3.0 


13,088.84 


47 


13.363 


28.000 


22.805 


971, 502 


194, 318 


4, 766. 51 


963.30 


4.9 


1,484.81 


48 


34.185 


162.431 


199, 425 


3,415.559 


310, 505 


7.207.87 


656.26 


2.1 


2,972.72 


49 


9,640.030 


11,387,046 


11. 471, 496 


210, 081, 472 


486.855 


428,876.82 


950.95 


2.0 


1,119,105.36 


50 


24.073 


47.495 


41,528 


1. 820, 053 


303,442 


4,864.84 


810. 81 


2.6 


1,841.58 


.•51 


11.680 


62.623 


108,5:i2 


1, 337, 035 


265,587 


4,689.77 


917.95 


3.4 


951.94 


62 


78,038 


127,344 


72,082 


4, 215. 212 


234, 176 


14.372.17 


798.34 


3.4 


11,060.93 


53 


4.705 


34.813 


10,418 


836,603 


167, 301 


4,226.02, 845.20 


5.0 


958.00 


54 


33.284 


85.147 


110,523 


2,492,508 


228,502 


0, 357. 08 860. 64 


3.7 


4.474.50 


55 


5,822.630 


4, 268, 192 


3,179.282 


108, 183, 321 


290,677 


342, 782. 28 949. 54 


3.1 


540.678.55 


66 


1,559 


4,000 


1,655 


135.144 


27.029 


98:1.41 198.68 


7.2 


854.23 


57 


1,462,655 


1,662,604 


1,001.518 


40. 528, 683 


389.899 


102,659.11 987.11 


2.5 


97,821.85 


58 


S^.!S 


250,538 


84,882 


3,556.374 


296,364 


10,087.71 840.64 


2.8 


8.178.00 


59 


115,972 


140, 753 


8.384,315 


370,491 


7,850.51 850.06 


4.7 


3.195.28 


60 


11,060 


8,288 


U,384 


8ti0. 955 


138,191 


3,220.39* 6U.08 


4.7 


2,226.76 


61 


20.206 


140.312 


35,302 


1,574,489 


262, 415 


8.804.78 834.13 


2.4 


1,453.71 


62 


132.400 


261.439 


100.296 


5.102,227 


198,230 


17,446.88 671.03 


3.4 


9,835.12 


63 


73,624 


183,180 


122,145 


8. 818. 433 


347, 130 


8, 907. 03 809. 73 


2.3 


3.153.89 


64 


7.390 


42,418 


29.457 


1,130.521 


282,830 


3,162.16, 790.54 


2.8 


751.82 


66 


3,296 


17,400 


3,811 


305.494 


152,747 


1,755.921 877.98 


5.7 


347.61 


66 


7.074 


47.660 


24.718 


1,699.184 


177,687 


7,894.04' 877.12 


4.9 


4,903.03 


67 


4.040 


30.042 


78,100 


777,683 


193.421 


3, 478. 50 860. 62 


4.5 


1,458.41 


68 


1,951 


18.248 


18,252 


762.453 


188, 113 


2,580.081 645.26 


8.4 


633.58 


89 


186, f!0 


419.624 


281,815 


6,534,8:4 


297. 039 


19, 344. 24 879. 28 


2.9 


8,072.43 


70 


11.102 


18,377 


4,288 


534. 152 


17>*, 051 


2,629.45' 879.82 


' 4.9 


1, 386. 78 


71 


4.354 


26.320 


5^751 


887.932 


177.586 


3,432.40' em.Ar* 


3.8 


403.85 


72 


112,507 


189,427 


148,009 


5^152,416 


368,030 


12,769.27 nv.MJO 


2.4 


11,196.31 


78 


}£«to1 


)1t«b«d ApH 


1 I, 1860. 






IIEBUblUh 


^Hfl 


kroh 1,1890. 


F 


B( & 90*- 


Hi 

















242 REPORT OF THE POSTKASTER^SNERAJU 

Tablb A,-^Statemmt thounngi ike number of carrier$ in Mfvioe June 80, 1890, the 



Post-offloe. 



Car- 
rien. 



Delivered. 



Kegla- 

tered 

letten. 



Letter*. 



PoetaL. 
oarda. 



New8i>*> 
per^eto. 



CoUeeted. 



Looallet. 
ten. 



Kelllet- 



74 
75 
76 
77 
78 
79 
80 

ai 

82 
83 
84 
88 

M. 
87 



80 
91 
9S 
83 
94 
86 
96 
97 
98 
99 
100 
101 
102 
103 
104 
105 
106 
107 
108 
109 
110 
HI 
112 
113 
114 
115 
116 
117 
118 
119 
120 
121 
122 
123 
124 
126 
126 
127 
128 
120 
180 
131 
132 
188 
184 
135 
186 

m 

188 
189 
140 
141 
142 
148 
144 
145 
146 
U7 



Cbeiter, Pa 

Cheyenne, Wyo 

CIllCAtfO, lU 

Gbillioothe.Ohio. . 
Chipi>ewa Fella, Wia 

CinolnDati, Ohio 

CleTeland, Ohio 

Clin too. Iowa 

CUuton. Mass* 

Cobo«a.N.Y %. 

Colorado Springs, Colo 

Columbia, h. C 

Colainbus. Ga ; 

Coliimlmii. Ind , 

Colnrnliaa, Ohio .... 

C.DCOrd, M.U 

CoroinR. N.Y 

Corry, Pa.t 

Comicana, Tex 

C«irtland, N.Y 

Coanoll Bluffs, Iowa. 

CuviDirton, K\ 

CrawfordsvillA, Ind . 

Creston. lowat , 

Ciinib'-rlaiiil, Md 

DxllaA, Tex 

D'Uluirr. Conn 

Danville, III 

DHUville. Va 

D.irt*iip<M't, Iowa. .. 

DaMoii. Ohio 

Ihc;4tiir. Ill 

Df Uwan*, Ohio 

DeuifMin. T(<x , 

I)«iiT»'r, Colo , 

D A MoiiioM, Iowa 

Di-tndl, Mich 

Dover, N. H 

Dobiiqats Iowa 

Ualuth. Minn 



Diinltirk.N.Y 

EiMton, Pa 

Eant Liverpo«»l. Ohiot 
BiMt Oninfr«s N. J .... 
Ea-tt SaiciDiiw. &fich.. 

E^nCMre, WU 

Elgin 111 

BtizAbeth, K.J 

Elkhart. Ind 

Elmira, NY 

El Pa8o.Tex 

Bl.vria,Ohio 

£iiip«iria. Kaoa 

£uj{l«*wood, 111 

Erie, Pa 

Evauaton, HI 

ETHOHTille, Ind 

Fal1IUy«T. Maae 

Fargo, N.Dak 

Findltiy.Ohio 

Fitohbnrg. Maae 

Flint, Mtoh , 

Flushing. N.YJ 

Fonddn Lao, Wta.... 
Fort Madison, Iowa*. 

Fort Scott, Kana 

Fort Smith. Ark 

Fort Wayne, Ind 

Fort. Worth. Tex 

Fostona.Ohio; 

Frankfort, Ey 

" ■ • Md. 



Frederick, 
Fn.'«port, 111 
Fremont, Xebr 

'Satabliahed Hank 1« 1880l 



7 

8 

618 

5 

6 

158 

98 

6 

4 

10 

5 

7 

7 

4 

86 

9 

4 

4 

8 

6 

12 

12 

4 

4 

4 

17 

6 

5 

4 

18 

21 

9 

4 

5 

49 

80 

86 

6 

18 

15 

4 

12 

5 

8 

13 

8 

8 

16 

5 

16 

3 

4 

6 

19 

18 

5 

18 

21 

4 

8 

8 

6 

4 

6 

5 

7 

4 

17 

10 

4 

4 

8 

5 

4 



1,207 

1,029 

516.863 

716 

T2& 
96,538 
93,386 
1,504 

152 
1,524 

761 
2,984 
2,331 

638 
16,657 
3. 9*>1 

478 

671 

810 
2.225 
8,716 
8,566 
1,446 

200 
1,411 
12,272 
l,a'S0 
1,485 
1,004 
4,9f«9 
12,433 
2,476 

617 
1, TA 
17,050 
12.090 
64.112 
1,565 
5,671 
7.364 
1,157 
3,714 

255 
1,363 
5,914 
1.719 
2,182 
8,941 

817 
8.859 
1,457 

693 
1,792 
2,(i9L 
2.911 

778 
15,400 
1,774 
1,559 
1,860 
9,827 
2^862 

419 

1,603 

85 

%Tn 

2,867 
6,820 
5,517 

433 
1,918 

654 
1,807 

578 



608.528 

237,985 

182,540.416 

252,577 

262,212 

17.093,146 

14,854.296 

559,004 

70,430 

678.154 

64^559 

432,536 

414,374 

813.169 

4, 709, 1U6 

987,924 

245.812 

203.675 

106,755 

1,463! 408 

1,028.107 

821. 851 

138 m 

210.899 

9,056.428 

872,847 

489, 610 

219,379 

1, 837. tf48 

8. 19'i, 537 

881,618 

411. 523 

402,347 

Q, 104. 575 

2, 805, 850 

14, 859, 035 

39>l,09l 

1. 877, 884 

% 578. 720 

878,190 

1,139,034 

165, 212 

935.979 

1,465,694 

643,018 

823.117 

1,872.318 

1,871.509 

288.117 

261.607 

887.547 

1 171. 962 

2,296,136 

007,565 

1,010.135 

1,680.951 

318,565 

544.861 

820,218 

606,675 

164,190 

491,215 

61.750 

653.680 

575, 02G 

2, 315, 297 

1,048,680 

200,832 

850,033 

172, 419 

482,275 

228,424 



175.990 

37,123 

80,875,208 

56,772 

40.291 

3.850.244 

9,875,697 

85,397 

16,844 

94,046 

32.078 

79,275 

104, 161 

72,364 

834,925 

175,204 

86,434 

42,215 

15,958 

167,287 

183,926 

280,815 

85. €63 

27,702 

40.480 

, 944,122 

63.849 

106,915 

43.992 

838.870 

OiO, 139 

185,321 

65,1M6 

76.900 

1,020,159 

470.894 

2, 647, 218 

79. 874 

243.849 

409,610 

72,008 

941.124 

86,786 

128.051 

254, 917 

98,744 

121,677 

279.280 

84,819] 

800,685 

42.207 

00,649 

73.534 

103,030 

400,168 

84.887 

664,987 

160,606 

86.319 

121,035 

140. 8H7 

124,109 

24,076 

90,148 

11,447 

81.906 

87,953 

446,257 

184, 6U 

45,402 

104.848 

84,549 

03,499 

34,769 



805,894 
170.612 
46,690,785 
286.0- 
239,1^ 

6,892,141 

7,044,236 
453,836 
61, 710 
825,801 
845.096 
178, 440 
977, 381 
187. 504 

2, 552. 562 
511.805 
108.699 
138, 022 
68.477 
459.892 

1,482,392 
662.568 
227,956 
128.256 
175,949 
M6,667 
872,628 
881.871 
133.254 
922,526 

2, 306. 867 
63>.743 
312. 135 
221. 121 

6,288.892 

1.442,867 

6,505.517 
829, 223 

1,054,645 

1,506.842 
253,980 
709,169 
127, ^00 
860,630 

1, 807. 611 
611,971 
650,462 

1,018.883 
887.799 
810,535 
228.785 
236,858 
284,308 
677,005 

1,964.735 
381, 025 

1,801,510 

1,182.444 
209.859 
373, 716 
558,146 
898.336 
81,672 
296,328 
89,489 
864.114 
487.935 

1,318,119 
438,670 
147, 199 
175.948 
74,762 
327,452 
180,037 



81,676 

88,168 

29,808.967 

9,391 

96.096 

8,883,786 

9^468.221 

24,244 

2,526 

87.911 

40,284 

20,974 

28.171 

7,203 

892,750 

109.441 

6,619 

11,071 

1,864 

16.824 

915,987 

61,830 

8,281 

8.165 

8.051 

77.619 

14.679 

19,568 

4.936 

96.042 

989.958 

42,949 

8,149 

19.788 

1.417,275, 

144.019 

1,869,645 

15.528 

•4.081 

415. 161 

95.967 

77. 517 

10.842 

82.864 

164.678 

84.251 

69.067 

14.1 

60^979 

42,891 

11,965 
16.796 
61.018 

181,906 
17,907 

914.938 
78.045 
82.659 
30.421 

100,682 
16,538 
89.701 
12.017 
634 
27.012 
29,446 

106,881 

88,080 

8^167 

81,264 

• 1,683 
13,008 
7.533 



879.614 
128.229 
80.208,180 
105,319 
290.398 

7.550.756 

7.896.319 
928,397 
30.874 
805.185 
462.066 
827,082 
358.284 
96.040 

2,658.248 

703,683 

100.150 

07.421 

62,180 

996.032 

1,598.185 

710, 104 

14A 905 

88 643 

60,324 

1,458.491 
185^480 
178.045 
178.422 
99't.667 

1,432.598 
401,216 
171.652 
256.236 

7.504,549 

1,215,747 

6,085.847 
178.464 

1,261,656 

1,856,831 

225,649 

676.747 

78,865 

461,650 

1,062,179 
679,488 
808,609 
796.702 
191,796 
602,698 
931.100 
117. 182 
168,445 
468.919 
821,556 
182,541 

1,928.963 
708.848 
631.383 
336,754 
494.081 
293.992 
81,196 
198,267 
33,916 
856^118 
808,264 
964,601 
496,542 
82.880 
819,734 
180.672 
205. 5dl 
10S,867i 



FIB8T ASSISTABTT OPERATIONS OF PEEE DELIVERY. 243 

am9 mmi of maU delwered and collected, the nwmbor of pieces handled, f tc.— Coutinaed. 





CoUeotod. 




Cost of eervice. 
























Po^tege 




















|5 


«B local 






Loofllpoa. 
uJoards. 


ICldl pot. 
tei^oara*. 


Kewap*- 
pen, etc 


Aggregate. 


Per 
carrier. 


Aggregate 


carrier. 


maOtar. 






64,837 


84.521 


124.258 


1.700,924 


242,989 


♦5,402.99' 1771.86 


8.1 


03.80a60 


74 




11.783 


20,630 


45,009 


OKTi. 4M 


228. 495 


2,614.78 


871.59 


8.8 


1.838.69 


75 




•,275.846 


14,248,778 


30, 264. 826 


382.254,168 


618, 534 


539.906.34 


878.78 


1.4 


720, 811. 3:i 


76 




8»775 


17.000 


11.874 


693.585 


138,717 


4,384.26 


876.85 


6.3 


1.195.44 


77 




7.054 


20.850 


21,875 


917. (r?3 


183, 535 


3.786.71 


757. 34 


4.1 


640.96 78 




l,7».12l 


1,844,806 


1,716.963 


45. 123, 060 


285, 590 


149, 778. 81 


947.97 


3.3 


185.056.35: 79 




1,019.200 


1,847.150 


1,036,649 


89.132,155 


399, 308 


91, 598. 98 


934.68 


2.3 


91.755.621 80 




0.280 


85,747 


16,578 


1.405,4f.6 


2^4,243 


5, 248. 70 


874.78 


3.7 


1,365.711 81 




^7ia 


0,060 


2,696 


193, 936 


48,484 


1, 068. 48 


267. 12 


5.5 


255.521 82 




12, 71* 


88^739 


28^455 


1,517,537 


151,754 


8,181.77 


818.18 


5.4 


1,856.22 83 




15,472 
12.400 


21,072 


8lv072 


1, 587, 009 


817, 402 


8, 711. 60 


742. 32 


2.8 


6,728.13 


84 




0^140 


23,794 


1, 142, 694 


163. 242 


4,374.05 


624. 86 


3.8 


1.421.50 


85 




84.0-29 


79.354 
i0.3Q2 


81,253 


1,329,948 


189,993 


6, 106. 41 


872.34 


4.6 


1,990.05 


86 




3,982 
230.179 


13.584 


665.686 


166, 421 


2, 39a 39 


599.59 


3.6 


66a 14 


87 




580,871 


296,347 


12,283,635 


341, 212 


31,251.83 


868.11 


2.5 


21,300.79 


88 




58.868 


127,738 


70.676 


2.748,691 


305,410 


7, 507. 03 


834.11 


2.8 


8.987.48 


89 




2,921 


16,980 


7,947 


587,106 


146,776 


8. 307. 13 


826. 78 


6.0 


1.58^69 


90 




i.387 


28,182 


12.860 


527,984 


131,996 


1.941.06 


485.26 


8.6 


400.78 


91 




015 


7,819 


1,689 


264,917 


88,306 


9,146.80 


715.60 


ai 


55a 001 02 




0,on 


68^846 


18^444 


1,727,459 


287. 910 


4.742.91 


790.48 


2.7 


1.117.32! M 




140.010 


210.817 


246,289 


5,550,086 


462,557 


10.487.68 


873.97 


L9 


9,580.69! 94 




51.242 


168,467 


136,579 


2,937,778 


247,231 


0.393.68 


782.81 


3.2 


1.973.191 95 




4.531 


86,864 


9,617 


889,064 


209,766 


2,552.89 


038.22 


ao 


67^95 96 




1,525 


4,788 


1,438 


344.080 


86,022 


1.355.66 


338.80 


a9 


321.471 97 




1,»6 


8; 690 


3.686 


495, 7^5 


123.946 


8,497.84 


874.40 


7.0 


l,m.78 08 




60.074 


176^709 


96,841 


5, 133. 218 


801,954 


14,75L44 


867.73 


2.8 


6,890.92 90 




0,010 


17,825 


14,434 


997,817 


166,303 


4.861.31 


810.22 


4.8 


2,667.10 100 




1,765 


47,539 


19,029 


1.142,327 


228,465 


3,540.78 


708. 16 


ai 


2.334.00' 101 




10.155 


28,825 


11,097 


625,563 


156,891 


3,277.66 


819.41 


6.2 


753.03 102 




83,8»3 


185,875 


922,171 


5,318,921 


409.148 


8,697.99 


669.85 


1.6 


4,842.091 103 




187. U9 


358,809 


1.077,838 


9,490,378 


451,923 


15. 952. 36 


759.63 


L6 


0.902.52) 104 




18,308 


108,190 


56,725 


2^324,036 


258,2«)3 


7, 052. 11 


783.57 


ao 


2,01a 88 


105 




4,090 


31,148 


12,290 


1.017,296 


254.324 


3,456.97 


864.24 


a4 


656.65 


106 




U.840 


81,27D 


17,535 


1, 039, 205 


207,859 


4.346.59 


869.32 


4.1 


822. 87 


107 




913,836 


818,644 


697,477 


27,926,956 


569,938 


36,836.54 


751.77 


1 3 


76,284.67 


108 




88.170 


214,323 


148.558 


6.507.533 


216,918 


24.462.09 


815.40 


a 7 


a 112. 52 


100 




8VO,080 


1.044,150 


677,709 


81, 517, 428 


360,472 


81,308.71 


945.45 


2.6 


77.617.86 


UO 




14.801 


20,128 


44,871 


1, 086. 645 


181, 107 


5.093.25 


848.87 


4.7 


1,016.46 


111 




5I8.404 


244,026 


256,126 


4,596,89-J 


858,607 


9L637.60 


741.85 


2.2 


4, 120. 26 


112 




204.079 


264,838 


93,415 


6,836,960 


455,797 


12,658.17 


843.88 


1.8 


11. 162. 59 


U3 




8^750 


81, 179 


67,957 


1,052,846 


263,211 


8.548.26 


887.06 


as 


862.22 


114 




^824 


160.880 


63,607 


8,094,966 


257, 914 


10.032.70 


833.64 


a2 


3,866.25 


115 




3.038 


18.761 


14.741 


451,298 


90.259 


2,214.33 


U2.87 


4.8 


842.83 


116 




21,204 


08.234 


112.133 


2,167,198 


270.899 


0,480.22 


810. 03 


ao 


8,656.86 


117 




01.778 


186,562 


186,069 


4, 714, 597 


862.661 


8,97L07 


690.08 


1.0 


7, 167. 29 


118 




29.151 


77.619 


289.937 


2,415,793 


301,974 


0,054.37 


831.78 


2.7 


3,023.75 


U9 




-A 870 


69,011 


30,833 


1,987,254 


248,407 


6, 6U. 85 


826.48 


a 3 


2.750.94 


120 




118.908 


122,801 


175,152 


4. 150, 640 


259,415 


12,-515.50 


782. 22 


ao 


6, 789. 36 


121 




8^2M 


81,187 


9.396 


1. 144, 478 


228,896 


8,978.30 


795.66 


a4 


803.18 


122 




87,109 


102,461 


07,298 


8,870,423 


241,901 


11,657.72 


72a 61 


ao 


6,650.75 


128 




12,728 


17.819 


81,843 


890.672 


296,891 


2,414,08 


804.69 


2.7 


1, 804. 59 


124 




6^147 


K.818 


18,961 


737,810 


184,452 


2.583.66 


645.01 


a5 


561.74 


126 




5b M4 


24,628 


9,757 
6^988 


957,750 


159,625 


4. 782. 19 


797.03 


ao 


1,457.66 


126 




a^MO 


70,618 


2^715,065 


226,255 


10, 020. 94 


835.08 


a7 


2, 383. 95 


127 




104,067 


148.854 


106.835 


6,974.556 


331. 920 


14, 449. 28 


802.74 


2.4 


8, 837. 52 


128 




01704 


• 17,814 


JJ^ 


1,163.119 


232,624 


3, 903. 67 


780.78 


as 


2, 555. 56 


129 




908LOO0 


407,080 


388,864 


7.445,493 


413,639 


12, 444. 66 


691.36 


1.6 


8, 587. 93 


136 




56^018 


184,086 


76.878 


4,088,940 


194,711 


15, 848. 92 


754.71 


as 


7, 947. 35 


131 




11,445 


65,588 


102,950 


1,490,340 


372,585 


3, 330. 36 


834.84 


2.2 


1,344.03 


132 




16^707 


48.891 


24,792 


1,408.607 


186.699 


6,482.77 


685.35 


a 7 


1.706.50 


183 




0S1O8 


108,989 


127.909 


2,415,412 


801,926 


6,817.14 


852. 14 


a8 


3, 849. 72 


134 




O^M 


00.126 


01,870 


1.578,633 


263,105 


6.215.32 


869. 22 


as 


1, 150. 36 


135 




aS08 


12.004 


8,807 


413.967 


103,492 


1,434.22 


356.06 


a4 


740. 25 


136 




Zsss 


82,802 


11,400 


1,186,884 


189, 3H9 


5,126.96 


854.49 


4.6 


1,258.40 


137 




aso 


6^704 


4.U8 


208,523 


41,705 


1, 130. 37 


228.07 


5.4 


79.46 


138 




10,886 


80,876 


22,716 


1,660,530 


222,933 


5,077.08 


725. 29 


a 2 


1, 797. 49 


130 




iZsM 


40,803 


28.824 


1,579,620 


894,905 


2, 870. 77 


717. 69 


1.8 


1, 303. .30 


140 




66,720 


201,015 


96,005 


^ 519, 015 


324,701 


12, 058. 15 


709. 30 


2.2 


4,284.83 


141 




30,503 


62.989 


40.687 


2, 291, 402 


229, 140 


K, 088. 06 


80X.iil 


as 


2, 317. 47 


143 




4,000 


22.236 


11,427 


522. 725 


130,681 


1, 799. 23 


449.81 


8.4 


43.S. 17 


143 




14,420 


73.452 


36,486 


1, 108. 049 


277. 012 


2, 909. 55 


727. 39 


2.6 


1,310.90 


144 




oiol 


• 33.505 


7,634 


4.V5. 497 


152, 1«8 


2, 270. K9 


7:.o. 9« 


4.9 


737. 61 


145 


4,782 


39,Iol 


17, »K) 


1, 1S5. 461 


237. 05»2 


3, ;t4i>. 7-1 


7.SS. 15 


3.3 


1.274.21 


146 


4,4861 


12,007 


7,070 


578,770 


144, 692 


2, 737. 3h 


, »)h4.34 


4.7 


1 1,2.>6.36| 147 






:X«tobUbh4 


»d Jannary 


1.1890. 


53 


£ftUbUHhe<l ] 


S'oveuib* 


rl, U 


i89. 





244 BEPOBT OF THE POSTHAST£R*G£NERAL. 

Tablb A.—StatetMnt showing tk$ wimber of oarrien in service June 20, 1880, ike 



Post-office. 



Car- 
riers. 



DeUTsred. 



Regis- 
tered 
letters. 



Letters. 



Postal- 
oards. 



Kewspa- 
pen, etc 



CoUeoted. 



Matt let- 
ten. 



148 
a48 
160 
151 
152 
153 
154 
155 
156 
157 
168 
168 
180 
181 
182 
188 
184 
186 
168 
187 
188 
160 
170 
171 
172 
173 
174 
175 
178 
177 

ns 

170 
180 
181 
182 
183 
184 
186 
188 
187 
188 
188 
100 
101 
102 
103 
104 
105 
106 
107 
108 
100 
200 
201 
202 
203 
204 
205 
208 
207 
208 
208 
210 
211 
212 
218 
814 
215 
216 
217 
218 
210 



FreBioDt,Ohio. 
FnsiK>,Cal.*.. 
Galesbnrgh. Ill 
GalTOSton^ Tex 

Oeneva, 14. Y. t 

Glens Palls. N.T.... 

Gloucester, Mass 

GloTe»TlUe.N. Y... 

Goshen, Ind 

Grand Island, Nebr . 
Giand Rapifls, Mich 
Green Bay. WU.:.-. 

Greenvl]le»8.C 

Hagentown. Md 

Haosllton, Ohio , 

Hannibal, Mo 

fiarrisbarff. Pa 

Hartford, Conn 

Hastlnp, Kebr , 

Harerblll, ¥ms 

HAselton, Pa.* 

Helena, Mont 

Hoboken, N.J , 

Holyoire, Mass 

Hornells^me,N.Y.. 

Hot SprinffH, Ark 

Hooston, Tex 

Hudson. N.Y 

Huntingdon, Pa , 

Huron, &I>ak 

Hutchinson Kans . . . 
Hyde Park. MaM.... 
Indianapolis, Ind . . 

Ionia. Mich. t. 

low* City, Iowa 

Ithaca, N.Y 

Jackson, Mich 

Jackson, Miss 

Jacksonville, Fla... 
JacksonTiUcHl.... 
Jamestown, N. Y . . . 

JanesTille. Wis 

Jefferson City, Mo. t 
Jeney City, N.J... 
Johnstown, N. Y. If . 

Johnstown, Pa , 

Joli(*,Ill 

Kalamasoo, Mich 



Kankakee, Iiy 

Kansas City, KJans .. 

Kansas City, Mo 

Kearney. Iff ebr.17 — 

Keene,K.H 

Keokuk. Iowa 

KnoxrUle, Tenn , 

La Crosse, Wis 

La Fayette, Ind 

Lancaster, Pa 

Lansing, Mich 

Lawrence, Kans 

Lawrence, Mass 

LeadTille,Colo.«.... 
Leavenworth, Kans . 

Lebanon, Pa 

LewistoD,Me 

Lexington, Ky , 

Lima, Ohio 

Lincoln, Nebr 

LitUe Falls. N.Y.... 
Little Rock, Ark.... 
Lock Haven, Pa. IT... 

Lockport,N.Y 

Logansport, Ind 

*8stobliohe4 July 1,1880. 



658 
0,867 
0,700 

676 
1,204 
1,105 
1,454 

M8 

502 
18,202 

058 
2,031 
1,077 
2,020 
2.130 
4,450 
16,884 

210 
2,174 
5 
3.132 
5,287 
2,666 

712 

660 
8,306 
1. 

081 
1,637 
1,473 

430 
40,560 

802 
1.050 
1,728 
4,144 
2,711 
8,064 
2,164 
1,088 
1.208 

887 
24.015 

153 
8,165 
1,728 
4,748 

171 
2,200 
54,653 

638 

746 
4,760 
13.480 
12,614 
8,112 
8,106 
2,236 
3,667 
l,806i 

2741 
8, 743| 

06l{ 
2.0001 
8,460' 
1.007 
2,471 

018 
8,444 

763 
3,555 
1.468 



264,808 
244,287 
816.400 

2.558,803 
154,005 
261,58.1 
513. 310 
521, 128 
413, 241 
225,785 

4,080,808 
116^878 
288.078 
273,024 
800,062 
823,488 

1.213,010 

2.102,701 
316,461 

1,578,077 
185,062 
460.078 

1,200.800 
807, 570 
428,828 
448.400 

1,527,607 
346,788 
274,880 
170.878 
816,874 
200,006 

8,009,270 
171,830 
450,766 
677,028 

1,005,802 
280,500 

1, 168, 485 

576, 615 

704,447 

466.388 

71.806 

4,602.840 
56,701 

1,004,208 
807.847 

1,210,826 
78,868 

1,081,044 

18,053,427 

804,068 

215.674 

067,775 

1,188,307 
077,441 

1,823,1136 

1,051,088 
645,870 
006^400 

1. 790, 007 
383,734 

2,107,027 
411,888 
557, 706 

1,038,315 
563,450 

1,757,440 
380,630 

1, 177, 765 
178,084 
761, 804 
540,764 



t Established January 1, 



58,614 

32,566 

120,637 

240,216 

26,726 

44,830 

110,028 

108,846 

86,828 

40.875 

023,046 

10.881 

47,872 

66,871 

117,587 

240,400 

206,588 

438,880 

47,065 

205,108 

80,873 

38,030 

313,200 

141,083 

77,664 

46,470 

281,238 

80,468 

46,888 

24,706 

124.868 

60.0fl?7 

1,344,035 

28,180 

88,828 

110,286 

402,287 

48,408 

180,080 

105,023 

148,855 

88,606 

15,186 

1,182,816 

0,134 

206.398 

162,541 

232,221 

17,8S8| 

104,722 

2.183,903 

88,785 

48,582 

175,288 

170,158 

180,868 

868,068 

108,818 

135.888 

200.048 

240,781 

45,574 

478,406 

08,118 

110, 876 

243.810 

126.510 

274.827 

66,704 

241,003 

30.527 

130,647 

113,220 

1880, I 



285.071 
108,354 
536,001 

1,017,< — 
128,000 
104.381 
328,1' 
400,704 
278,1 
188,210 

2,181,401 
80,078 
137,380 
188,250 
388,807 
732,831 

1,066,860 

1,415,333 
214,'^ 
871, 
143,102 
384,890 
301.288 
660,460 
206. Otf 
282.486 
055,578 
168.858 
172.087 
146,780 
422,117 
160,062 

8,100,401 

00.387 

822,048 

401,317 

1,635.000 
296,332 
366,160 
502,104 
520,284 

* 300,327 
74,052 

1,803,414 
42,050 
601,245 
577.221 
502.013 
66,053 
608,644 

6,258,672 
221,365 
225,001 
585,485 
580,200 
740,838 

1,289,811 
619,600 
508,051 
626, 711 

1, 411, 103 
257.032 

1.507.886 
258,803 
386,260 
611, 771 
350,067 

1,387,576 
246,246 
807, 810 
150,70 
478, 875( 
308. 203; 
Estftbliflhed 



8,826 

14.181 

34,026 

95,270 

6,378 

18,306 

88,781 

15,088 

8,380 

6,010 

514,656 

0,736 

5,053 

10,210 

20.846 

111,435 

71,803 

282.060 

0.848 

02,024 

6,843 

48.884 

975.153 

114, 813 

28,680 

9.768 

101,489 

20.813 

17,848 

4,068 

74,800 

6,3U 

576, 148 

13,883 

7,403 

37,882 

180,207 

0,252 

84,419 

31, 110 

34,004 

11,066 

6,477 

710,080 

780 

86,522 

77,288 

30.238 

2,648 

41,647 

1,820.074 

24.448 

7,711 

26.040 

64,783 

46,150 

58.548 

24.204 

85,252 

05,302 

120.426 

12.661 

171, 538 

37.836 

18,208 

72,725 

10.408 

168,016 

18,686 

121,050 

4.786 

66.354 

35,865 



February I 



130,501 
187,627 
673,210 
1, 526, 033 
140,502 
240.032 
226,203 
17K.403 
151,; 

83,878 
2,078,030 

88,140 
121,415 
162,248 
365.607 
781,500 
625,896 
046,31] 
130,637 
827,096 
.70,2U 
JITO, 816 
504,202 
530,046 
238.466 
206.360 
887,208 
210.377 
172.810 
121,360 
607,432 

50,711 
3.077.405 

66,027 
120,058 
301,741 
882.452 
220.420 
1. 127. 803 
366(^421 
320,507 
188,788 

71,081 
3,606.835 

20,877 
656.886 
303,582 
401.203 

20.743 

701,033 

13,862,484 

101, 764 

86,000 
860,830 
680.800 
622,310 
680,624 
276,189 
428,745 
688.066 
1,244,888 
175,287 
2,043,256 
886,852 
288.585 
638.843 
162,800 
1,808,180 
161,545 
008,621 

81,566 
523.503 
.128,275> 
IbOO. 



FIB8T ASSISTANT — OPERATIONS OP FREE DELIVERY, 245 
mmaumt ofmml delivered and coIJeeM, ike nutkber of pieces handled, 0to.— Continued. ^ 



Xocalpos* 



XaillKW- 



HewBpa- 
peca, eta 



PtoMt handled. 



Ajynregato. 



Per 

carrier. 



Coat of aervloa. 



AfUP'ejtate. 



carrier. 






Poataga 
on lo<Mil 



4.067 

10«374 

90.153 

«,782 

1.283 

8.160 

85,457 

10, 856 

5,308 

3,618 

248,670 

1,779 

2,317 

6^745 

12.068 

60.879 

30.464 

86,940 

5,633 

70,685 

2,888 

17.707 

179,682 

33,289 

6,171 

2.670 

55,975 

5.021 

2.143 

1,630 

28.884 

5,407 

2S0,9&8 

5.413 

3.714 

14,733 

01,335 

4,226 

50,196 

19^757 

14,410 

8^163 

1,846 

006,049 

1.125 

32,678 

32,274 

16,810 

1,002 

86.206 

731,495 

6.880 

5,230 

18^991 

24,346 

25,856 

46.697 

21,415 

2Sy326 

38,645 

97,693 

11,602 

281,006 

11.971 

16,038 

40,J66 

11,272 

96^655 

6,064 

88^614 

1,351 

22,911 

18»738 

^Eatabliahad 



30,646 
11,578 
268,790 
364.607 
19, 170 
41,065 
46,157 
00,577 
39,429 
14, 



19, ( 

20,048 

34,038 

59,905 

877.888 

146.152 

144,308 

17,397 

130,513 

21, 081 

21,222 

223,214 

62,495 

36.689 

15, 227 

187,567 

81,836 

26.216 

13,733 

82,005 

12,753 

714, 396 

12,92rt 

21,465 

47.840 

230,647 

41.365 

160,051 

71,350) 

70.772 

41.595 

10,061 

774.622 

2.842 

77.241 

58.675 

88.436 

4.718 

157.281 

2.100.786 

0.405 

17.415 

84,489 

81,704 

134,600 

171.000 

68.700 

103.040 

162,253 

148. 138 

12.679 

446,560 

58.531 

91,589 

147,029 

24,273 

222,829 

38,788 

166,314 

11,908 

89,817 

68,030 

April 1, 



00.854 

7,880 

30,106 

297,827 

22. 016 

45,027 

225,628 

10,243 

38,662 

2,965 

808,004 

32,813 

15,784 

17.061 

72,053 

280,301 

83,372 

88.082 

6,147 

71,281 

2,700 

23,941 

42,363 

79,819 

19,807 

9.066 

75,073 

11,350 

58,987 

10,520 

32,557 

5,340 

324,042 

2,588 

6,419 

169,834 

179,466 

16,000 

180,400 

42,660 

31,025 

31,001 

3,634 

1,006,858 

1,177 

43,077 

48,164 

141,488 

3.776 

201,981 

1,384,575 

13,949 

12,436 

31,586 

59,183 

426,600 

118,728 

87,848 

241,720 

56,650 

118,122 

12,241 

876,625 

24,030 

45,8261 

64,815 

0,179 

120,531 

13,666 

66,355 

13,296 

427,046 

29,261 

1890. 



706,766 

597,404 
2,418,565 
6, 173, 111 

500,254 

843,346 
1,626,438 
1,286,488 
1,032,650 

566,342 
11. 807, 146 

378,232 

588,876 

758,327 
1,578,806 
3,260,982 
8,547.607 
5,584,417 

747.876 
3,908.991 

481, 177 
1, 232, 569 
3,224,768 
2,532,440 
1,130,756 

958,350 
4,080,263 

880,886 

772,759 

495^100 
2, 191. 259 

610,792 
U; 557, 210 

392,336 
1,032,049 
1,792,384 
5,511,240 

858,232 
8,835,557 
1,717,013 
1,858,830 
1,137,810 

266,480 
14^524,028 

135,757 
2,802,399 
2,149.258 
2,808,977 

202,717 
3,166,667 
42, 149, 300 

722,200 

618,704 
2,218,027 
2, 881, 975, 
3,175,682 
8. 912, 174 
2,801,061 
2, 216, 478 
2,877,637 
5.191,054 

911, 174 
7,596,645 
1, 153, 690 
1, 520, 776 
2,861,943 
1. 250, 160 
5.420,525 

928, 145 
3, 585. 476 

472,987 
2,504,602 
1,523,824 



160,363 
140,361 
302,323 
501,460 
101, 851 
168,669 
190,805 
214. 415 
265,662 
141,585 
421,684 

94,558 
117,775 
189,582 
197,351 
467,133 
236,507 
199,443 
186,969 
800,693 
120,294 
154,071 
248,050 
253,244 
188,459 
159,726 
340,022 
176,177 
257,586 
165,033 
365, 210 
152, 
356,860 

98,084 
268,012 
100,154 
501,022 
214,558 
803,232 
345,403 
232,354 
189,568 

63,870 
850,430 

33,039 
311,378 
214,926 
312, 109 

50,679 
263,047 
669,585 
180.550 
154,676 
221, — 
205,855 
288,698 
355,652 
209,187 
277,060 
359.705 
288,392 
227, 7W 
949,581 
230,718 
190,007 
357, 743 
251,832 
387,845 
185,620 
358,648 
118,24" 
278. 289 
190, 478 



18,538.80 
2,620.61 
6, 675. 23 

10,072.26 
1. 632. 53 
8,774.56 
7,351.21 
5,206.73 
2, 303. 81 
3, 49a 90 

25,210.46 
1,208.86 
3,125.08 
3,460.16 
6.866.67 
5,782.52 

13,242.73 

25,199,10 
3,555.21 

10, 157. 16 
2, 579. 25 
5,712.59 
9,389.23 
8,706.02 
6,070.86 
4,671.86 
8,058.62 
4,285.03 
2,309.45 
2,515.43 
5,110.59 
3,197.28 

48, 735. 22 
1,382.30 
8,465.16 
6,878.11 
8,414.66 
3,104.00 
0, 663. 15 
4, 141. 02 
6,412.44 
3,809.01 
1,344.62 

66,606.00 
746.38 
7,866.16 
0,042.48 
8,145.56 
675.73 
0,000.11 

65,033.48 
2,024.90 
3,481.68 
6,676.10 
0,979.44 
9.843.88 
8. 685. U6 
7.980.80 
6. 592. 87 
5,426.40 

14, 994. 11 
3, 292. 47 
7, 314. 18 
4,332.73 
6,761.70 
6,432.35 
4,373.01 

11. 746. 04 
4,201.92 
7,465.52 
1,931.43 
6.3R3.46 
5, 273. 66 



1707.78 
657.40 
6B6.90 
914.35 
326.51 
754.91 
918.90 
867.79 
576.95 
874.72 
900,37 
302.22 
625.02 
865.04 
858.33 
826.07 
882.85 
899.45 
88&80 
781.32 
644.81 
714.07 
722.25 
870.60 
845.14 
778.64 
746.56 
867.19 
799.82 
838.48 
851.76 
799.82 
937.22 
845.57 
866.29 
764.23 
764.97 
776.00 
87a 47 
82a 38 
801.55 
049.99 
336.15 
977.52 
186.69 
885.13 
904.25 
905.06 
16a 93 
750.76 
87a 83 
506.22 
870.42 
667.51 
712.82 
894.89 
790.40 
725. 53 
824.11 
67a 17 
833.01 
8*!3. 12 
014.27 
866.55 
843.96 
804.04 
874 60 
838.93 
840.38 
748.66 
482. 86 
7()9. 27 
659. 21 



V4 
4.4 
2.3 
1.7 
8.2 
4.41 
4.8 
4.0 
2.2 
6.2 
2.1 

a2 

5.3 
4.5 
4.3 
1.7 
8.7 
4.5 
4.2 
2.6 
5.3 
4.6 
2.9 
3.4 
4.5 
4.8 
2.8 
4.8 
3.1 
5.0 
2.3 
5.2 
2.6 
3.5 
3.3 
3.8 
1.5 
3.6 
2.9 
2.4 
3.4 
3.4 
5.2 
3.9 
5l5 
2.8 
4.1 
2.9 
3.3 
2.8 
1.5 
2.8 
5.6 
3.0 
3.5 
3.1 
2.2 
3.4 
2.0 
1.9 
2.9 
3.6 
1.0 
3.8 
4.4 
2.2 
3.4 
2.1 
4.5 
2.0 
4.0 
2.5 
3.4 



0626.08 148 



842.56 
1,612.07 



140 
150 



4,824.60 151 



1.84 

742.88 

2,700.13 

1,566.24 

935.86 

1,260.65 



152 
158 
154 
156 
166 
157 



15,645.58 156 



260.56 

800.08 

761. 74 

763.61 

3,304.48 

11, 085. 80 

44.836.61 



150 
160 
161 
161 
168 
164 
165 



1,842.62 166 



4,021.14 

771.96 

4,965.73 

8,829.42 

5,188.20 

1,888.95 

523.59 

8,827.44 

1,096.58 

586.30 

1,080.60 

3^407.36 

1,060.52 

42,015.54 

403.12 

705.86 

2,001.62 

6,027.37 

353.26 

3,099.11 

1,890.92 

2, 05a 33 

1, 184. " 



107 
168 
160 
170 
171 
172 
178 
174 
175 
176 
177 
178 
170 
180 
181 
182 
183 
184 
185 
186 
187 
188 
180 



351.05 100 



25,452.17 

180.71 

2, 470. 92 



191 
192 
193 



3.045.69 194 



2,527.03 



195 



192.70 196 



2,371.14 
63,922.87 

1,314.86 

1,069.69 

2, 436. 18 

4, 349. 39 

2, 930. 05 

2,467.14 

3,341.90 

2, 510. 12 

.% 653. 49 

5, 738. a'. 
851.35 

9, 270. 58 

2, 196. 39 

1,229.67, 212 

4,878.48 213 

1,079.741 214 

8,679.08 215 

1,411.24 

10,515.72 

,475.09 

2,630.97 

1, 323. 55 



197 
198 
199 
200 
201 
202 
203 
204 
205 
206 
207 
208 
200 
210 
211 



N Satabliahed March 1, 1800. H Kstabliabed October 1, 1889. 



216 
217 
218 
210 
220 



246 REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

Tasvr A.'^Staiemefii shmoing the number of carriers in service June 30, 1890, lite 



221 
Y ^ 
223 
224 
225 
226 
227 
228 



236 
237 
288 
239 
240 
241 
242 
243 
244 
246 
246 
247 
248 
249 
260 
251 
252 
253 
254 
255 
266 
257 
256 
259 
200 
261 
262 
263 
LIM 
265 
266 
297 



270 
271 
272 
273 
274 
275 
276 
277 
278 
279 
280 
Z81 
282 
283 
284 
285 
286 
287 
288 
289 
290 
291 
202 
203 
294 



Post-office. 



Long IslADd Citv, N. Y 

Loa Augeles, Cal 

Louisville, Ky 

Lowellf Mass 

Lynchbnrjrh, Ya .... 

Lvnii,Mass 

MoKeesport, Pa 

MacoDfGa 

Madi«oii,Ind.* 

MadisosuWis 

Maiden, Mass 

Vanobeater. N. H ... 

Manistee, Mich 

MaDkato, Minn 

Mansfield. Ohio 

Marietta. Ohio 

Marion, Ind.t 

MarlboroniEb, Mass . 

Marquette, Mich 

Marshalltown, Iowa . 

Maesmon^Ohio 

MeadvUle,Pa 

Medf0Td.Maes.* 

Memphis, Tenn 

Menominee, Mich.*.. 

Meriden,Conn 

Meridian, Miss 

Middletown, Conn 

Middletown.N. Y.... 
Middletown, Ohio.... 

Milwanken, Wis 

Minneapolis, Minn . . . 

Mobile. Ala 

Moline.Ill 

Monmoatb.Ill 

Mont Clair, N.J. J 

Montgomery, Ala 

Montoelier,Vt 

Morrfstown. N. J 

Moont Vernon, N. Y. • 

Mnnoie, Ind 

Mnscatine, Iowa 

Muskecon, Mich 

Nafthna,N.H 

Nashville, Tenn 

Natohez,Miss 

Nebraska Citv.Nebr. 
New Albany, Ind . 

Newark, N.J 

Newark, Ohio 

Now Uedfoid, Mass .. 
New Britain, Conn . . 
Now Bmnswick, N. J 

NewbarRh,N.Y 

Newburyport, Mass . 

Newcastle, Pa , 

New Baven, Conn. . . 
New London, Conn. . 
New Orleans, La ... . 

Newport, Ky 

Newport, K.I 

Newton, Kans 

Newton, Mass , 

Newyork,N.Y 

Niagara Falls, N. Y.* 

Norfolk, Ya , 

Norristown, Pa 

North AdauiH. Mans . , 
Northampton, Mass .. 

Norwalk. Conn 

Norwalk.Obio 

Norwich, Conn 

Norwich, N.Y.t 

Oakland, Cal 



Car- 

riers. 



14 

34 

60 

25 
9 

24 
5 

11 
4 
7 
9 

16 
5 
4 
8 
3 
4 
5 
4 
6 
4 
5 
5 

28 
4 
8 
4 
5 
6 
3 

74 

74 

11 
5 
3 
6 
7 
3 
6 
5 
4 
5 
9 
8 

26 
4 
4 

10 

76 
6 

20 
6 
7 

12 
6 
6 

40 
6 

89 
7 

12 
4 
5 
1,103 
8 

20 
6 
6 
6 
4 
4 

10 
4 

27 



Delivered. 



Regis- 
tered 
letters. 



2,372 

13,771 

63,045 

5,023 

3,761 

4, 526 

1,496 

14,333 

859 

3,675 

1,857 

5,580 

943 

610 

2,041 

654 

293 

876 

2,336 

1,588 

447 

1,136 

127 

46,208 

537 

1,612 

1,200 

718 

1,517 

348 

41,029 

46, 371 

7,686 

943 

288 

198 

907 

917 

1," 

573 

824 

447 

1,955 

1. 782 

39,768 

1,346 

394 

1,45.] 

29,618 

2.426 

3,396 

501 

1, 290 

2.576 

771 

1.566 

ii:,34« 

1. 127 

57. 6r>3 

1,*»^3 

2, m» 

969| 

608; 

945,923' 

363; 

9,6691 

1,1201 

1, 276i 

747, 

465 

732 

1,724' 

1701 

6,329 



Letters. 



Postal- 
cai-ds. 



805,890 

3, 036, 509 

8, 892, 565 

2, 032, 046 
541. 730 

2, 204, 765 
477, 914 

1. 480, 588 
198, 819 
794,193 

1, 169, 770 

1,287,212 
340, 747 
432,534 
988,209 
143,054 
116,461 
562,965 
409,056 
575, 816 
281,686 
449,119 
221,765 

4,067,703 
133, 301 
679,382 
183, 141 
264,782 
614,790 
333,765 
13.779,666 
12,469.967 
000,661 
297, 177 
270, 112 
219, 452 
612. 165 
235, 641 
647,775 
300,321 
319,213 
191, 415 
625, 901 
617, 215 

3, 841, 857 
158,102 
375, 070 
522,970 

7,488,636 
555,506 

2,200.177 
341, 480 
830, 878 
983. 039 
384,590 
599. 597 

3,925,612 

405, 682 

10, 677, 600 

400,829 

1, 908, 591 

370,728 

370, 782 

155, 355, 521 

177, 170 

1, 540, 359 
361.869 
399. 609 
315,400 
202, 652 
304, 221 
698,964 
78,767 

2, 458, 740 



213,875 

844,592 

1, 945, 324 

473. 426 
102, 627 
452, 591 

64,784 

434,995 

35, 575 

128,796 

164,227 

234,382 

82,818 

111,600 

180,283 

24,880 

33,214 

111,141 

67,560 

93,710 

58,292 

78,980 

47,084 

625,483 

19,980 

108, 719 

16,401 

45,856 

128,729 

54,517 

2, 390, 102 

1, 622, 132 

150, 528 

50,067 

66.915 

23, 102 

144,186 

41,104 

82.888 

56,420 

69. 740 

40,558 

113, 926 

125,066 

713, 202 

10.636 

69, 153 

188,071 

1, 982, 484 

125,240 

438, 019 

57, 608 

95, 905 

168.203 

60, 970 

146,220 

808,341 

57, 770 

3.589.262 

92, 431 

821,199 

41, 9531 

62,799 

33, 581, 939 

24,146 

342,435 

68, 101 

100. ."ilO 

47, 391 

81, 925 

75,275 

91,136 

15, 323 

459. 427 



Newtpa- 
pers, etc. 



389,355 

2, 203, 843 

3,470,278 

1, 825, 643 
257, 221 

l,2.'i3,716 
291,642 
571, 930 
146.696 
574. 148 
641, .556 
888,901 
436, 420 
378,551 
534,042 
118. 725 
82,0t« 
539, 974 
281,272 
364,863 
886,414 
329,209 
125,187 

1, 529. 180 
118,540 
456,028 
185. 87« 
183, 317 
533,860 
119,312 

6, 100, 057 

5, 724. 004 
888,163 
267,684 
254,201 
91,634 
413,155 
146, Me 
274,966 
174, 676 
225.106 
24.5,430 
486.503 
417,038 

1, 735, 392 

99,005 

392.189 

370,054 

2,618,644 
272,901 

1, 510, 868 
333,099 
283, 521 
742,235 
246,199 
303,441 

2.908.605 
199, 337 

6,774,354 
298, 445 
708,656 
319. 579 
242, 014 
38,091,803 
121,319 
784,884 
244,223 
273,258 
214, 389 
131, 485 
274,713 
496,526 
60.145 

1,601,769 



CoUeeted. 



Loeid tot- 
ters. 



Msillut- 
ters. 



62,847 

869,490 

778,060 

144,564 

17.850 

161,844 

10,704 

88,432 

4,221 

66.801 

28,1681 

82,274J 

4.081 

87,690 

44,882 

3,036 

4.081 

47.091 

82,336 

21,738 

48,698 

8,802 

181,072 

6,703 

14,080 

3,004 

13,627 

80,580 

6,858 

2,087,083 

1,769.930 

66,841 

14,432 

7,800 

15, 6M' 

172, 645 

8,896 

66,004 

10,475 

7,043 

7,812 

66,283 

27,704 

267,862 

2,705 

20,207 

20, 635 

1,191,133 

13,867 

122, .'>38 

11.555 

66,620 

87,836 

13,736 

27,072 

557, fATI 

14,590 

2, 990, 277 

24,746 

08,359 

17, 875 

81,306 

67,421,447 

5,219. 

04,774 

24,410 

13,549 

12,677 

3,518 

8,471 

71,699 

2,999 

345,275 



813.687 

2,625,614 

4,888,69» 

1, 350, 319 
810, 12.> 

1,081,848 
165,853 

1,065,509 

136,823 

427.825 

998,302 

478,352 

166.708 

220.138: 

714,6881 

79, 791) 

60, 83h\ 

386, 990' 

241, 09:»: 

222,002! 

78,4:(il 

306, IX 

70,922 

1,887,2M 
114 4V2 
123, 3U 'i 
98,963 
181,831 
490, 1041 
224,048! 

7.039,0181 

6.888,0041 
684,863 
186, 579 
120.297 
56,479 
986,338 
101,548 
223,078 
81,122 
110, 173 
150.581 
424,539 
292,962 

2, 555, 505 
97,030 
254,180 
464,555 

3,387,1.'»4 
195, 843 

1, 243, 373 
94 170 
251. .531 
721, 935 
160. 214 
180. 240 

1, 563, 737 
131, 3971 

7, 476, 406 
107. 048j 
411, 257 
157. 003 
124, 020, 
04, 502. 373 
79,685 

1,073,199 
216.444 
131. 146 
147, 033 
52.128 
122,000 
353,311 
42,003 

1,308,174 



• BstAblished October 1 , 1889. t Established March 1, 1890. tEstabUahed Janaary 1, 1890. 



FIRST ASSISTANT OPERATIOKS OP FREE DELIVERY. 247 

amammt ofwunl delivered and eolleoted, ihe nmmber ofpieeee handled, 0io.— Continued. 



GoQeeted. 


PlMMhMiai«d. 


Cost of MTvioe. 


PoetAfce 


















|5 






ICaillKW- 
tal-cMdi. 




▲ggi«cirt«. 


Per 

oarrier. 




Per 

OBrrier. 


on local 
matter. 




46,883 


00.828 


*61,663 


2,108,180 


150.441 


810,063.60' 0718.83 


4.8 


01,082.03 


221 


228,184 


272,127 


288,888 


0,376,018 


275,766 


81. 660. 50 


931. 20 


8.8 


22.446.6h 222 


a2»,aK» 


082,138 


487.869 


21,463,674 


367,728 


68.627.78 


077.13 


2.7 


47,030.85 223 


112, 819 


158,888 


188.273 


6,207,089 


248,284 


21, MO. 32 


07&33 


8.5 


21.920 39 224 


7,771 


68.387 


17,245 


1, 322, 726 


146,960 


7.575.36 


841.71 


6.7 


2, 6;i4. 73 -225 


107, Olt 


181.004 


126.307 


6. 524. 510 


230,188 


20,086.54 


87V 04 


8.7 


0.663.65. 226 


5.3M 


2^.847 


0.168 


1,050,714 


211,942 


4,460.00 


801.98 


4.2 


1.506.01 227 


81,809 


208,042 


40,543 


8.90.'>.265 


868,206 


8,«i06.30 


790.48 


2.2 


4, 118 14 228 


2^231 


28.808 


28,080 


578.056 


144,514 


2,000.46 


600.11 


a3 


,148,t'.5.2J9 


ao.8«7 


110.720 


81,006 


2, 178. (•21 


311, 145 


6,040.15 


862.88 


• 2.8 


2. 30{< 06 ZV) 


18,581 


80,007 


81,180 


2,422,662 


200.183 


7,087.51 


887. fJO 


33 


2.5 9.51 2.31 


88,88^ 


84.458 


87,880 


8.062,865 


101, 420 


18,977.63 


87:i.60 


4.5 


4,(»80.0:t 2f2 


7,258 


18,708 


8,176 


1, 062, 751 


212,550 


8,865.02 


778.00 


3.6 


507.71 238 


22,787 


48,148 


10.271 


1,262,334 


815.568 


8,610.34 


002.58 


2.8 


2,64>l.87 234 


88,688 


183,210 


U4,721 


2, 605. 824 


836,978 


6,618.03 


701.63 


2.1 


1,631.78 235 


1,088 


18.751 


4,322 


385,103 


131,701 


2,41.5.22 


806.07 


6.1 


49t.3.V 236 


2.401 


8,508 


4,353 


302,326 


75.581 


682.97 


170. 74 


2.2 


3mi. 11 237 


84,110 


64.218 


42,008 


1, 729, 275 


845.855 


4. 'ATI 40 


874. 4K 


2.5 


1,748 44 238 


12,788 


87,0J8 


18,305 


1,191,752 


297.938 


8,274.42 


818.60 


2.7 


1,239.61 239 


4,881 


68,238 


40.330 


1, 876. 901 


229.407 


4, 283. 30 


713. hS 


3.1 


1,474.H4 240 


3,613 


18,767 


0.462 


702,775 


108,104 


8, TOM. 30 


827.07 


4.6 


r3M9 241 


18.178 


78,843 


16,363 


1,322.464 


264.493 


4,3:11.61 


8(16 32 


3.3 


1,788.60 242 


8,847 


14,018 


16,164 


610. 914 


102. 183 


15-5.72 


517.14 


6.0 


71 •'.48 248 


l«1.063 


271,380 


147,003 


8,867,202 


316.688 


22,401.41 


803.26 


£6 


11,215. (t9 244 


2,068 


0,874 


112.368 


518. 702 


120,608 


1, 720. 41 


432. 3.5 
875 14 


a3 


409 4-' 245 


8.655 


18,688 


18.703 


1,428.161 


178.520 


7,001.11 


4.9 


4,185.49 246 


6.808 


8,716 


4,677 


458.677 


114,668 


3,187.81 


700 Ort 


7.0 


740.53 247 


7; 157 


18,601 


10.846 


675. 724 


135, U6 


4.3)9.52 


««3.90 


6.4 


2.17M.h7 248 


26.600 


68,140 


41.087 


1, 045. 137 


324.189 


6. 027. h3 


8:1:. 97 


2.6 


2,4fll.0M 249 


2,778 


43,180 


24,tr73 


800.670 


260.560 


2.394 99 


708 XI 


2.9 


4P9 18 -54) 


1,142.138 


1,806,684 


727, 421 


84, 66:1 0^9 


4^1. 792 


73, MU. .57 


002.56 


2.1 


62.4(5.12 261 


704,043 


072,222 


1,468.357 


81.1 5,030 


42». 140 


70, 4^9. 22 


952. .5*1 


2.2 


88 4U 74 252 


44,091 


117,463 


02,897 


2,102, ltf3 


263. 836 


0. 725. .55 


881. 14 


3.4 


2,«U.^7 ;i53 


8^130 


10,718 


27,5^2 


87 J. 310 


174 477 


4,4:i7 W 


8k7.,5:i 


5.0 


0K5 2ti 254 


8,880 


18,306 


^991 


737. 789 


2f)8 894 


2,410.58 


8«a53 


3.2 


47 . 01 '255 


2,758 


8.400 


4.773 


419, 450 


69.908 


2. 842 i>0 


30(1. 43 


5.5 


1.35:i.08 256 


186.164 


880.000 


102,785 


2. 028. 135 


418. 305 


6.210.2: 


744. .<2 


1.7 


6,(»12.5;i -57 


4.863 


2^^40 


48 182 


702.637 


23*. 14o 


2,64U.86 


880.29 


3.7 


6 4 7u 258 


18.070 


20.334 


18L8.'iO 


1,861.051 


22.-», 175 


4,251.411 


70^. r>8 


3.1 


8.8»:l.26 250 


0,820 


14,014 


8.540 


666.670 


133.356 


2, 3 0. 57 


465, 1 


3.5 


2. l(i.5.7ii 200 


4,255 


20.025 


7.058 


764. 337 


191.0-4 


2,906.31 


726 8 


3.8 


1.0.17.8.'. jr.! 


Im 


47,607 


14,032 


716, -.'88 


UH. 0.57 


8, 829 44 


765 ^9 


.5.3 


^»^. 7:( 262 


16.856 


61,708 


67.000 


l,St5.4r.9 


205.052 


7,250 81 


80,5.14 


3.9 


2 fr.';i 82 Wi 


17,318 


84.828 


110,804 


1,67.".. 097 


209,:»87 


6, 17.*. 56 


771.. 57 


3.6 


l,y-4. •.. 264 


184, 40H 


877,306 


811.304 


0,995.fi«'4 


384 446 


22. 548, 0:1 


H57. -3 


2.2 


14. OH. 00 205 


1,184 


12.664 


7,571 


89«, 2:r2 


9U. K)8 


8,189.14 


797. 18 


ao 


34".. wm 


6^227 


40,015 


886.360 


1,491.810 


372. 052 


2,910.41 


727 »iO 


1.9 


649 14 •J67 


16,321 


105. 107 


104, 0H6 


1, 798. 341 


179,834 


5,9U2.U0 


.5W». 29 


3.3 


I,l.*{5. :s;i 208 


890.461 


722.067 


413,051 


18,68.->.0:i8 


245.85.5 


67,141. Vii 


S^Xii 


3.5 


71,001.50 269 


0.303 


64.826 


0.720 


1,239.112 


206, 519 


4. 592. 20 


765. 37 


3.7 


LOW jO 270 


107,4!I7 


141. 831 


108,082 


5, 875. 721 


2:50, 788 


15. 6»5. 00 


784. 75 


2.6 


5,076. 4n 271 


6,184 


16.800 


6,T72 


867.158 


144. 526 


5,046 H7 


841. 16 


6.8 


2,ff)".46 272 


28,262 


68, 2r^ 


14,H2.i 


l,6:n,157 


233.022 


6.7M0.42 


814.35 


3 4 


3. .5»i() t.7 273 


88,m 


01,731 


180. S&8 


2,066.334 


247.196 


10.^94 67 


rtll.22 


.^6 


8.977 22 274 


10,007 


21.845 


15,450 


014.781 


1,52. 46:i 


.5, 001. 22 


84 {. .54 


5.5 


l.MJM 275 


18,172 


40.882 


11.848 


1,333.038 


222,173 


3, 5h6. 30 


5»7. 72 


2.6 


1.4.>4 14 276 


284.141 


272,551 


284,886 


10, 577. 788 


264 444 


33,4ti.88 


8:tt5 h5 


3.1 


41, i:r..h5 277 


8.838 


15.372 


7.010 


835. 9fK) 


i:i9. 326 


3, 766. 34 


6 -» 00 


4.4 


2, 64(i 14 278 


2^215.807 


1.066,203 


1,761.805 


87,499.457 


421. 342 


82, 442. 80 


92«. -.12 


2.1 


98.a42.56 279 


23.068 


41.104 


06,426 


1, 176, 280 


168,040 


5. 447. 86 


778. 27 


4.5 


1,0.>:< 17 280 


41.817 


28,430 


44,332 


8,560.458 


206. 705 


11, 235. 04 


030. 25 


3.1 


5,.3:n.01 2X1 


11.482 


16.181 


6,300 


040,759 


235. 189 


3, 408 68 


h74. 67 


3.7 


1, 9^» 24 282 


a 651 


24,837 


20,717 


886.634 


1T7, 107 


4, 0-23. 06 


804. 61 


4.5 


1,711 TO 2/<3 


]8k8«7,837 


17,807,320 


20,008,123 


448,661,786 


406, 575 


1,032. 12*. 72 


93ri. 74 


2.3 


2. 721, 266. .57 2rt4 


2,577 


11,208 


5.520 


427,207 


142. 432 


1, 548. 00 


516.30 


3.6 


4^7.00 285 


78, U8 


280.772 


88,607 


4,208,818 


214.940 


15,128.92 


756.45 


8.5 


7,4:m.T)4 2^6 


18,010 


42,008 


16,442 


085,115 


164,186 


6. 050. 71 


843.28 


5.1 


1, 010 .54> 2K7 


7:805 


10,668 


12,466 


058. -.36 


1.59. 756 


4,990.98 


ail. 83 


5.0 


1,9(11. -.5 VS8 


5^718 


10.500 


16,463 


770, 317 


129, 719 


6, 122. 13 


853. 69 


6.4 


2,0iHj.f»l 289 


1,837 


7,660 


8,638 


434,708 


lOK. 677 


2, 733. 86 


683.47 


6.3 


1,014.94 290 


81 061 


26^300 


21,816 


840,688 


210. 172 


8.457.17 


864.29 


4.1 


426. 15 291 


18,263 


50,744 


30,679 


1, 824. 04« 


182.404 


7. 839. 39 


78:^.94 


4.2 


4, 78H. 74; 202 


1.200 


0^888 


2,898 


2i:<, 193 


5.3, 298 


96f}. 58 


241.64 


4.5 


180.44, 293 


181,1081 


186^2261 


201,851 


8,757,807 


350,292 


24,476.71 


906.64 


8.6 


13,216.14 204 



248 BEPORT OP THE POSTMASTEB-OENERAL. 

Tablk A.^Siatemeni $homng the number of oarriera in aerviee June 30, 1890, the 



296 

!!96 
207 
296 
299 
300 
301 
302 
903 
304 
305 
306 
, 907 
308 
309 
310 
311 
912 
318 
314 

3l9 

316 

317 
316 
319 
320 
321 
332 
823 
3-J4 
325 
826 
327 
328 
329 
330 
331 
332 
333 
334 
335 
896 
337 
388 
339 
340 
341 
342 
343 
344 
346 
346 
347 
348 
349 
350 
351 
352 
353 
364 
355 
356 
867 
358 
350 
860 
361 
362 
363 
364 
365 
360 
367 
368 



Poflt-oi&ce. 



Oak Park, in.*... . 
Ohcrliu.OUloK... 
Offdensbiiitfb.N. Y 

OUfan.N. Y 

Oiuaba, Xebr 

Oooida^N.Y 

OneoDia. N.Y 

Orange, N.J 

Oahkotth.Wia 

Onkalooem Iowa . . . 

Oswego. N.Y 

OtrAwa.ni 

OtUwa.Kans 

Ottiiiuwa. Iowa 

OweircN. Y 

Padaonfa. Ky 

ParU,Tex 

Parkertiburch, W.Va. 

Paeadeua, Gal. * 

PaseaicN.J 

Patereon, N. J 

Pawtaoket, R. I 

PaekftkULN.Y.t 

Pekin.ni 

Penaaoolai Fla 

Peoria. Ill 

Pet**niburfth,Ya 

PhibulHpbia. Pa 

Pine Bliitt; Ark 

Piqua,Obio 

Pliuibnrtfb, Pa 

PiU^fleHMasM 

PiUrttoii. P» 

PlainaoW.N.J 

Pl*U«bnrgb. N.Y.... 
Port Huron. Mich.... 

Port Jervm. N. Y 

Portland, Me 

Portland, Oregon 

Porteiuoutb. N. H.... 

Portamoath, Obio 

Porrnnioatb, Va 

PutUviile, Pa 

Poiigbkeepslr, N. Y .. 

Provide uce, R. 1 

Pueblo, t Jolo 

Qninoy.IU 

Quincy, Maaa. t 

Kaclni-, Wis 

RaleiKb,N.C 

Reading;. Pa 

Red Wlnjr. Minn 

Ricbmond, Ind 

Kicbniond. Va 

Roanoke, Va 

Rochester, N. Y 

Rockfor^l, 111 

Rock Islflnd. Ill 

Rockland, Me 

Rome,Ga 

Rome,N.Y 

Rutland, Vt 

Sacramento, Cal 

Saginaw, Mich 

StAlbaua.Vt 

St. CInud. MinnjJ 

St.Jo1in»biiry. Vt.t... 

StJoMpb.Mo 

St. Louie, Mo 

St. Paul. Minn 

Sslem. MiiAtt 

Salem. Ohio 

Salem, Oregon 

SaJlna.Kana 



Car- 
riera. 



45 



10 



5 

4 

22 

8 

6 

3 

6 

17 

9 

715 

4 

5 

104 

6 

6 

8 

8 

6 

4 

23 

16 

6 

5 

5 

8 

10 

49 

10 

16, 

5 

10 

6 

21 

3 

9 

87 

4 

66 



Dellverod. 



Regia- 

tered 

letters. 



7 
6 
4 
7 
6 

15 
8 
4 
3 
4 

18 
226 

74 

13 
3 
3 
4 



Letters. 



10,' 



Postal- 
cards. 



Newspa- 
pers, etc. 



Collected. 



Local letr 
ters. 



32,080.280 34,536,270 42,150,000 



13, S 



337, 477 
206, 813 
660.153< 
948,680| 
►,612,707 



49,331 

63.396 

2, 427, 447 

126,138 

49.637 

139, 087 

26.538 

!44,644 

45.670 

564.932 

171.041 

67.926 

78.674 

67,938 

129,013 

172. 501 

1. 074, 037 

98,424 

364,608 

17, 401 

195, 4.'^ 

46,663 

622.585 

55.814 

207. 722 

800.843 

40, 391 

1. 802, 027 

308,756 

77,316 

28,751 

50,874 

102,088 

12H,890i 

130, 0051 

119,7901 

60,872 

13, 437 

83, 7291 

4«0.787 



161. 357 
172,062 

4, 976. 050 
300,167 
202, 535 
298, 803 
111.362 
464,571 
155. 018 

1.427,771 

1, 227, 143 
225,437 
285.805 
167,318 
609,054 
473, 219 

3, 163, 951 
645, 140 

1,342,960 

60.009 

608,708 

179, 507 

1,178,942 
226,651 
827, 205 

1, 761, 8M 
189. 374 

3.844.253 

1,280.517 
388,467 
136.021 
144.470 
332, 437 
376,994 
600. 065< 

1. 040. 466 
174, 251, 
90.75& 
164.3821 

1. 650. 598' 



6,080 

7,131 

8,225,770 

35, 170 

14,2471 

46,U06< 

14.800 

31.190 

16, 185 

217,380 

2U.899 

12.523 

10. 135 

20. 521 

40,411 

69,041 

1, 103, 116 

91,828 

56,348 

4,080 
33,810 

7, 512 
155, 176 

3,725 

73,103 

479. 413 

0,206 
1,001.681 
32,307 
26,734 
14, 933 
47, 710 
30,080 
99,838 
46, I23«| 
50,079| 

9,917 

2.404 
14,845 
234.843 



11, 18]! 204 20|212i970 ]l,S05io28| 

m nnj ooo n iTa ooA a cut a/wti 



1, 024, 883 
211,653' 
60, 373 
18.15^ 
37, 



7. 178, 220 
601,466 
226,859 
118,726 
191.489 



2,601.890 
56,827 
11. 513 
4,R82' 

7.708. 



' SaUblisheil Jnly 1, 1889. 



tEsUbllahed January 1, 1890. 



MaU let. 
ters. 



78,113 
105.089 
486. 376 
111.715 

5,244,670 
116.534 
65,418 
314.685 
356,271 
237. 638 
409. 158 
214. 930' 
14:1, 655 
503, 843 
2rt5. 18J 
282,00 J 
79, 493 
144.693 
148, 066 
135. 133 
721, 197 
528,604 
197,551 
224, ZH 
•115.561 

1. 553, 086 

653. 768 

49,301,580 

107. 80i) 

20i.414 

6. 461. 292 
193, 480 
109. 518 
207, 741 
143, 161 
475,997 
204,586 

1,919.449 

2. 048. 458 
187. 299 
231.702 
877.807 
440.401 
4?0, 067 

3.238,117 
637,872 
7U6.945 
45,115 
499,884 
127.242 
930,500 
84,4T7 
53.'. 606 

1. 994. 322 
158.700 

4. 024, 952 
972.008 
243.747 
195,707 
328.899 
269 936 
703.596 
640.007 
404.420 
167.994 
81,008 
159.565 

1. 483. 267 
38,022.604 

5,902,202 
875,722 
101,940 
107. 518 
110,81lJ 



FIBST ASSISTANT — OPERATIONS OP FREE DELIVERY. 249 



awumni of mail delivered and collected, ihe number of piece* handled, e^o.— Continued. 



CoUeoted.. 


Pieoea handled. 


-r 

CoatofaerTioe. 


Poataga 


















U 


















on local 




Local po»- 
tal-CMda. 


Mailpos. 
Ul-c«rd8. 


pepa.etc. 


AggTogata. 


Par 
carrier. 


Aggregate. 


Per 
carrier. 




matter. 




n,m 


10,286 


0.753 


695,626 


183,105 


$8,667.57 


1711.61 


6.1 


$1,094.60 


205 


3,000 


14,033 


7,626 


60*2,073 


200,691 


1,656.82 


518.94 


2.5 


422.36 


296 


8,194 


98,707 


382.104 


1,929,647 


321. 591 


6.235.94 


872.66 


2.7 


979.96 


297 


S.850 


20.631 


0^325 


700,808 


141,961 


4, 059. 03 


811.81 


6.7 


1, 269. 02 


298 


1, 146, 777 


1,465,078 


674. 076 


31,638,610 


700.858 


88.988.34 


866.41 


1.2 


69,186.45 


299 


8,202 


24,066 


10,338 


733.228 


183.307 


3, 154. 96 


788.74 


4.3 


660.13 


300 


1,337 


9,360 


5,783 


693. 3MI 


148,345 


2,597.59 


649.39 


4.3 


583.77 


301 


23.027 


43,064 


16,847 


1,680,810 


240,114 


6,690.30 


798.61 


3.3 


4.986.10 


302 


14,6«0 


68,707 


63.812 


2, 343, 932 


260,487 


7,777.72 


864.19 


3.3 


2,502,48 


303 


10.856 


41, 974 


28,922 


1,146.406 


. 229,281 


3,887.16 


677.43 


2.8 


1.294.89 


304 


53,256 


06,366 


96,284 


2,664,111 


266,411 


8,107.40 


810. 75 


ai 


2,776.47 


308 


8.504 


33,009 


17,070 


1,223,660 


203,926 


4,508.44 


781.41 


3.6 


1,400.76 


306 


6,581 


24,702 


7,197 


1,046.485 


a 261,621 


2,889.56 


709.89 


2,7 


1.092.51 


307 


47.090 


160,602 


40,678 


2.271,553 


324,607 


6, 707. 13 


815.30 


2.6 


2,634.33 308 


ft. 515 


39,174 


32,970 


943, 776 


236,944 


2, 83a 58 


700.64 


3.0 


647.34 309 


9.637 


53.719 


13,704 


1, 084, 442 


216,888 


4,040.92 


808.18 


3.6 


871.96 


310 


2,962 


9,149 


3.180 


345,502 


86,375 


3,236.77 


809.19 


9.6 


894.27 


341 


2,623 


38,245 


7,582 


705.406 


176,374 


8,275.77 


81&94 


4.3 


2,098.94 


312 


7.481 


13.666 


17,456 


799.862 


159,972 


4, 263. 52 


862. 70 


6.2 


9ia71 


313 


8,6:30 


19,261 


60,154 


1,039,563 


260.890 


2.889.81 


722.45 


2.7 


1. 561.061 314 


170, 462 


142.336 


105. 510 


6,434.688 


292,486 


18, 041. ("3 


820.08 


2.8 


9,506.43 


315 


73,241 


126.966 


44,06L 


3, 657, 827 


467, 228 


7,189.31 


892.41 


1.9 


4,322.44 


316 


7.238 


28,100 


43.786 


739,443 


147,888 


1, 812. 36 


360.47 


2.4 


622.86 817 


8,841 


84.450 


44,470 


811,960 


270,653 


2,04&07 


682.69 


2.5 


488.78, 818 


2,822 


• 7,889 


8,671 


. 462, 275 


00,465 


3.368.36 


673.67 


7.4 


1.167.37 319 


181.703 


1,104,309 


331,634 


7,484,723 


493.218 


12.028.05 


707.24 


1.6 


11,408.121 320 


51,944 


230.143 


47,600 


2,832,986 


314.776 


6,840.81 


760.09 


2.4 


1.926.121 321 


10,832,160 


15,061,500 


20,298,680 


306. 908, 147 


429.368 


680.235.06 


963.96 


2.2 


1,192,700,40; 322 
760.821 323 


11,331 


14,606 


5,950 


610,994 


165,248 


2.400.00 


600.00 


3.8 


6,140 


102,000 


62,305 


1, 029, 210 


206.842 


2,823.37 


564.67 


2.7 


893.69 324 


t088,337 


1.689,672 


896,973 


34,378,171 


330,658 


94,399.01 


907.68 


3.3 


129, 860. 50 


325 


14,942 


28.968 


18.788 


1,244,760 


207,490 


6,460.50 


910.08 


4.3 


. 3,719.38 


326 


2,633 


16,237 


6,730 


685,124 


114,187 


4,228.95 


704.82 


6.1 


1.169.62 


327 


20.172 


32,446 


13,739 


1,601.383 


200,173 


6.128.01 


766.00 


3.8 


3,496.27 


328 


2,879 


17,469 


7,916 


506,386 


168,795 


2,000.47 


666.16 


3.9 


924.23 


320 


7,397 


109.347 


91,660 


2,001,620 


337,204 


6,201.83 


866.97 


2.5 


l,8d0.13 


330 


7,486 


83,238 


63,219 


793,099 


198,274 


2.626.82 


656.63 


3:3 


644.05 


331 


133,019 


339.643 


. 232,138 


8, 041. 102 


349,613 


19. 217. 85 


835.66 


2.3 


12.080.36 


332 


97,496 


207.809 


99,578 


6, 108, 319 


387, 394 


13,726.26 


857. 89 


2.2 


11.012.66 


333 


7,232 


23,223 


13,623 


867.350 


146, 225 


3, 778. 20 


629.70 


4.3 


1,084.56 


334 


6.658 


67,439 


16,360 


1.019,667 


203,955 


3, 799. 46 


769.89 


3.7 


939.35 


386 


21,905 


67,082 


30.874 


1, 051, 065 


310. 393 


4, 070. 32 


814.06 


4.6 


716.83 


330 


28,841 


91,301 


110,737 


2,110,511 


264.564 


6, 778. 70 


847.34 


3.2 


1,T23.27 


337 


36.960 


73.488 


42,662 


2,238,409 


228.840 


8,474.26 


847.43 


3.7 


' 6.024.67 


338 


418,879 


448.869 


277.610 


15.345,103 


318, 309 


49, 191. 60 


1, 003. 91 


3.2 


63,999.741 339 


66.995 


66.906 


77,683 


2,607.780 


250,778 


8,364.93 


836.49 


8.3 


6,854.451 340 


43,459 


161,264 


90.566 


4,465,478 


279, 002 


11,748.84 


734.30 


2.6 


3,843.961 341 


2.664 


6,000 


3,562 


265,693 


51, 138 


1. 663. 13 


332.63 


6.5 


530.71! 342 


13,751 


99,471 


84,268 


2,490,940 


249,004 


8,966.66 


895.66 


3.5 


1. 977. 36 343 


3'^® 


26,341 


20,594 


657,338 


100,566 


3,951.96 


658.66 


6.0 


1, 291. 79 344 


100,068 


247.607 


128.900 


6,758,693 


274, 222 


17, 764. 57 


845.93 


8.0 


10,066.94 345 


2,498 


21,923 


26,305 


663,351 


221.117 


2, 243. 47 


747. 82 


3.3 


344 441 346 


26.633 


108,060 


130, 721 


3, 016, 793 


335,199 


8. 008. 07 


889.78 


2.6 


3.147.64! 347 


419,891 


396,362 


162,874 


9, 730, 327 


262,982 


30,426.24 


822.30 


3.1 


14, 570. 23, 348 


3.504 


20,601 


4,387 


808. 929 


202, 232 


2,933.81 


733.45 


3.6 


2,334.36 349 


866,714 


873^743 


676,173 


20, 628. 339 


317, 820 


61, 222. 69 


941.88 


2.9 


49.770.74 350 


16,350 


240,476 


606,803 


4,988,066 


329,920 


10, 909. 64 


839.20 


2.1 


4,889.29 351 


9,222 


43.676 


87,582 


1,340,401 


191, 213 


6,246.43 


749.49 


3.9 


1, 495. 53 


352 


9.849 


32,852 


14,278 


617,395 


123, 479 


3, 586. 70 


717.34 


8.8 


1. 159. 52 


353 


22,882 


67,272 


11,001 


923,623 


230,906 


3, 22& 28 


807.07 


3.6 


1.469.51 


3.'»4 


14,670 


60,672 


29,813 


1,419,391 


202, 770 


6.869.42 


837.06 


4.1 


1.418.13 


355 


49,882 


111.315 


'^.^ 


2,444,757 


407, 469 


4, 691. 40 


781.90 


1.9 


2,591.50 


356 


39,988 


44.866 


3,020.063 


201,938 


12, 917. 77 


861.18 


4.2 


3,366.48; 3a7 


U,297 


44.470 


98,093 


2,693.180 


324, 147 


6,682.39 


710. 29 


2.1 


2, 309. 13 3 8 


3.593 


19,930 


37,826 


763.378 


190,844 


2,824.39 


706.09 


3.7 


436i32! 359 


1.640 


3.800 


2,784 


239,397 


73, 132 


1,804.41 


601.44 


5.3 


1,085.77 :m 


4,098 


23,952 


21,431 


588,230 


147, 057 


1,950.91 


487.73 


8.3 


671.45 361 


160.773 


426,062 


211.980 


7, 704. 502 


428,033 


14, 629. 32 


812.74 


1.9 


14.627.28 362 


6,6»,S9B 


13, 244, 812 


15,531,183 


161, 500, 031 


715,004 


226, 775 29 


1,003.4:< 


1.4 


407. 762. 36, 363 


988.861 


948^288 


1,038,353 


34, 637. 724 


467.942 


70. 705. 46 


96r> 48 


2.0 


75,583.26 364 


40,925 


72.826 


43,053 


2,221,183 


170.860 


11,2-28.98 


863.77 


5.0 


3, 942. 26 


305 


8,377 


24.419 


10.508 


(!07, 069 


232. dM 


2. .570. 09 


^58. 89 


8.7 


856.04 


366 


2,474 


7,135 


18,096 


428,367 


142, 786 


2 581. 25 


800.42 


6.0 


678.61 


3C7 


26,487 


10.951 


614,015 


153.604 


3, 402. 68 


865.64 


5.6 


1,061.65 


868 



$£Btabliahed October 1, 1889. 



250 REPORT OP THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

Tablr a, — Statemeni ahatoing iks number of carriers i» service June 30, 1890, the 



PMt4>ffloe. 



Car- 

rlera. 



DeliTored. 



Kogto- 

terad 

letters. 



Letters. 



Postal- 
eards. 



Newspa- 
pers, etc. 



Colleoted. 



Local let- 
ters. 



Hail let- 
ters. 



369 
370 
371 
372 
373 
374 
375 
376 
377 
378 
379 
380 
3dl 



384 

38B 



387 



390 
391 



894 
395 
896 
3«7 
398 
399 
400 
401 
402 
403 
404 
405 
406 
407 
408 
409 
410 
411 
412 
418 
414 
416 
416 
417 
418 
419 
420 
421 
422 
423 
434 
426 
436 
427 
428 
429 
430 
431 
432 
433 
434 
435 
436 
437 
438 
439 
440 
441 
442 



Salt Lake City. Utah 

San Antonio, Tex 

iSan Diego, Cal 

Sandusky, Ohio 

San Fraocifloo, Cal. . . . 

Sao Joii6,Cal , 

Santa Rosa, Cal.** 

SaratogaSprings.lf.'y 

Sarannah,Ga 

Schenectady. N. Y. . . . 

Scranton. Pa 

SeatUe, Wash 

Sedalia,Mo 

Selma,Ala 

Seneca Falls, K.Y.... 
Sheboysan. Wis ... 
Shenanaoab, Pa.t. . 

Sherman, Tex 

Shreveport La 

Sing Sing. N.Y.t... 
Sionx City, Iowa . . 
Sioux Fafts, S. Dak 
Sonth Bend, lud ... 
Soath NoTwaik Conn.t 
South Omaha. Nebr.t. 
Spokane Palls. Wash 

Springfield, in , 

Springfield, Mass ... 

Springfield, Mo , 

Springfield, Oliio.... 

Staramrd, Conn , 

Stannton. Va 

Sterling, ni 

SteiibenTille.Ohio... 

Stillwater, Minn 

Stockton, Cal 

Streator.IU 

Syracuse. N.y 

Tftcoma, Wash 

Taunton, Mai«s , 

Tcrrw Haute, Ind. 

Tiflin.Ohlo 

TitusTille, Pa , 

Toledo. Ohio 

Topekn, Kans , 

Trentoo,N J 

Trinidad. Coio.$ 

Troy.N.Y...... 

Urbana. Ohio 6 

Utlca,K.Y 

Vicksburg. Miss 

Vinceunes, Ind 

Waco, Tex 

Walla Walla, Wash... 

Waltbam,Mass 

Warren, Ohio , 

Warren, Pa 

Washington, D. C .... 
Washington, Pa.* .... 
Water bury. Conn. .... 

Waterloo, Iowa 

Watertown, N. Y 

Wausaa.WisJI , 

Wellington, Kans .... 

West Chester, Pa 

Westerly. R. I 

Westfleld,Kass.|| 

West Troy. N.Y 

Wheeling. W. Va 

Wichita, Kans 

Wilkes Barre, Pa 

Williamsport., Pa 

Wilmington, Del 

Wilmington, N. C 



12 

11 

9 

8 

160 

12 
4 
7 

18 
7 

24 

12 
9 
4 
4 
6 
6 
4 
4 
4 

14 
4 

11 
4 
4 

12 

22 

9 

16 

5 

4 

4 

7 

6 

7 

6 

40 

18 

9 

18 

5 

6 

37 

18 

26 

4 

37 

3 

23 

6 

5 

6 

3 

7 

3 

3 

125 

4 

10 

4 

9 

4 

3 

8 

6 

6 

4 

16 

14 

15 

13 

19 

8 



> SsUblished Jannary 



S.993 

7,273 
3,077 
1.181 
126.806 
8,254 

262 
8,601 
10,622 
1,167 
6,156 
11,455 
4,036 

874 

402 
1,116 

246 
U146 
4,601 

652 
8.014 
1.384 
6,417 

786 

817 
3,035 
6,095 
6,728 
1,245 

23. 358 
926 
9821 
631 

1.892 

1,501 

1,384 

1,215 

16. 649 

10,231 

1,813 

8,709 

878 

1,205 

19,690 

12,082 

4,635 

1,272 

11, 461 

201 

14. 359 
4,f02 
2,486 
1,150 
1,107 

901 

1,062 

779 

53,778 

421 

1,4G2 

1,071 

3,447 

410 

906 

522 

774 

618 

680 

12,210 

4,909 

3,617 

6,366 

5,995 

8,169 

1,1800. 



1, 157, 613 

1,064.068 

049,280 

662,170 

25^.956.124 

1,188,480 

71,962 

1,183,847 

2,288,799 

080,628 

2,769.006 

1,7U,828 

1,0 A, 959 

239.231 

197,489 

290,660 

66,353 

255,109 

207.146 

860,962 

1,093,782 

427,036 

1,226,395 

212,829 

411,888 

606,642 

1,717.892 

2,293,156 

496, 178 

1.952,1051 

885. 4331 

196,8671 

314, 182' 

493. 4651 

069,7611 

448,085' 

871. 218 

6» 627, 978 

1, 180, 208, 

066,9941 

2,085 639 

842.767 

863,176 

4,747,683 

8.269,(144 

1,661,700 

265,100 

4, 161, 958 

160.882 

2, 874, 940 

284.960 

546,133 

863,990 

145, 104 

1, 038. 774 

313, 494 

294,621 

12, 687, 127 

150,966 

643,837 

254,065 

932.860 

139, 182 

214,688 

246, 14r» 

150. 597 

277,948 

242,390 

1, 532, 025 

1, 269. 102 

1,013,857 

1, 367, 311 

2, 180, 678 

846,843 



180,962 

84,463 

65,425 

147.607 

7, 178, 707 

100,065 

12,717 

162,482 

616,704 

117,623 

427,036 

125,389 

251,981 

84,689 

88,698 

52,748 

14^490 

48,710 

23.634 

64,721 

185.090 

71,791 

144. 510 

86,423 

46.909 

50,679 

868,217 

445,845 

72.382 

408,622 

69.563 

37,384 

04.624 

94,196 

112,730 

61,609 

77.220 

970, 183 

282,725 

152,000 

650.956 

77,990 

05,401 

027,808 

443, 270 

825.8.i5 

42,084 

761,841 

87,529 

629, 378 

43.670 

96. 4»0 

47. •^95 

9,;i79 

167,507 

69,612 

69. 133 

2,353.354 

25,844 

»9,2«8 

62,404 

132,864 

23, 958 

76.240 

48.308 

24,677 

46,853 

86,665 

828,132 

167,543 

400,652 

259, 814 

489,008 

187,205 



1,053,134 

766. 503 

403, 420 

413,400 

11,233.177 

1,036,322 

62,862 

472,039 

828, 070 

636,328 

1,908^256 
963,082 
071,301 
217,732 
203,135 
295,488 
42,504 
100,883 
129,558 
201, 187 
799,297 
261,726 
797, 611 
107, 782 
233,108 
356,043 

1,137,006 

1,272,443 
334. 7K4 
052,860 
220.002 
187, 196 
211.154 
312,640 
434,500 
350,755 
200,642 

2, 280, 012 
050, 159 
653.455 

1, 560. 753 
804, 352 
195, 467 

1,943.566 

1,869.664 
945, 790 
161,445 

1,628,810 
92.066 

1, 227, 171 
126. 458 
230, 356 
189, 726 
118, 656 
439,006 
233,9itl 
191, 036 

7,162,419 
92.535 
435, 606 
240. 505 
500,800 
141, 040 
194. 072 
130. 378 
134,267 
146, 753 
133, 689 
849,676 
654,710 

1, 367, 268 
612,707 

1,048,266 
866.403 



t Established April 



182, 121 
43. 209' 
30,169' 
17. 779 
0,576,690' 
60, 724 
3,350 
62,589; 

307, 816, 
18,032 

889.924| 

94,261i 

44,863 

1-2,866 

2,759, 

4,843 

1,870 

7,180 

6,855 

69,895 

105,009 
19, 9 - 
79, 975 
7,095 
17,100 
40,881 
90.043 

241.795 
22,207 
00.816 
19, 951 
12,771 
10,552 
12.782 
74.443 
39.240 
15,4'{9 

499.399 

170, 129 
99,478 

14.5, 198 
10,227 
10,987 

825.919 

398,061 

186,866 
12,643 

992.794 
8,696 

248,124 

0.724 

18,612 

10,780 

7.r22 

50,005 

10,634 

11.686 

2, 186, 874 

7,079 

37.384 

11,760 

43,817 

7,240 

12,836 

12,935 

8,933 

9,266 

3.183 

132,143 
64,847 

301,572 

108. 082 

172,080 
64,436 
1,1880. 



604,120 
000,480 
366,007 
260,672 
14, 687, 086 
678.259 
45,964 
796,802 

1,826,364 
176.534 

1,016,777 

900.510 

505,780 

100,400 

88,150 

86.764 

56,840 

188.288 

140,673 

262,102 

1,073,673 
100.404 

1,216.312 

81,868 

426.072 

402.037 

1,215,030 

1,287,406 
402,285 
857,047 
110, 761 
178, 018 
164,181 
183,065 
268,280 
888.210 
180.534 

2, 910, 894 

1,116,169 
430. 614 

1,738,787 
173. 601 
174, 276 

2,040.831 

1,576,373 
800.323 
229.900 

2,126,^365 
60,912 

1, 565, 374 
172, 055 
413, 874 
177, 814 
102, 749 
438.541 
195, 102 
109. 149 

8, 666, 337 

75,620 

261,340 

213,102 

614,464 

60.653 

104, 712 

178, 149 

66.041 

167,360 

93,070 

1,408,134 
819.058 

1, 178, 120 
747,884 
886.240 
504,231 



FIRST ASSISTANT — OPERATIONS OF FREE DELIVERY. 251 
amount ofvuiU delivered and colUctedf the number of jpirccs hamlhul, oic. — Continnrxd. 



Collected. 


Pieces haodled. 


Costoi 


■ service 




PoBU^e 


















9 . 


















g^ 


OD local 




LoealpM- 


Maflpofl. 
tal-iianU. 


Newspa- 
pers, et«. 


Aggregate. 


Per 
carrier. 


Aggregate. 


Per 
carrlfer. 


<£5 


matt«r. 




77,«>4 


124,187 


92,867 


8,488,601 


290.716 


$7,750.48 


$645.87 


.. 


$8,200.42 


368 


W.834 


60,000 


39.907 


2,701,833 


245, 621 


10, 060. 34 


914.58 


3.7 


.5, 068. 86! 370 


13,505 


84.264 


39,925 


1,683,162 


177, 018 


7. 758. 41 


862.05 


4.9 


2,4]9.4l| 371 


13,402 


66,170 


18.384 


1, 489, 765 


186, 221 


6, a5a 39 


867.29 


4.6 


2,503.69 


872 


8.080,708 


2, 139, 878 


2,931.713 


73, 859, 689 


461. 6J3 


155. 801. 55 


974. 25 


2.1 


179. 741. 53 


3r3 


41,194 


62,879 


66.399 


3, 200, 506 


266, 625 


10, 800. 94 


907.58 


. 3.4 


5,815.60 


374 


1.651 


4,998 


1,929 


205, 675 


51,419 


1,423.19 


355. 79 


6.9 


176.43 


375 


S5,840 


98,313 


64,802 


2, 810, 215 


401,459 


6, 652. 48 


950. 35 


2.3 


2,191.28 


376 


217,300 


883.688 


164,010 


6,493.419 


360, 745 


15. 833. 21 


879.62 


2.4 


10,316.71 


377 


15,773 


30,675 


29,203 


1, 706, 858 


243, 694 


6, 728. 98 


818.43 


3.8 


1. 658. 94 


378 


113,790 


185,804 


127,410 


6, 894. 559 


287,273 


17.966.82 


748.62 


2.6 


19, 221. 75 


379 


54.851 


69,248 


110, 381 


4,089,614 


340, 801 


9, 502. 88 


791.91 


2.3 


11.660.03 


380 


37.607 


141,278 


66,810 


8, 153, 472 


350, 386 


7, 859. 70 


873. 30 


2.4 


1, 802. 31 


381 


4,280 


16,933 


9,014 


636, 015 


159, 004 


3,157.87 


789. 47 


4.9 


1,891.61 


382 


1.075 


5.800 


4,475 


486, 883 


121, 721 


3, 259. 32 


814.83 


6.6 


580.93 


383 


3,318 


12,650 


4,781 


751. 287 


125, 215 


4,340.07 


723. 34 


6.8 


727.86 


384 


939 


10,222 


3,407 


195. 876 


39,175 


1, 017. 73 


205. .55 


6.2 


49.50 


385 


4.288 


22.036 


18,030 


640, 612 


160. 153 


3, 888. 25 


972.06 


6.0 


778.80 


386 


^176 


U049 


8,978 


550. 570 


137. 042 


3, 477. 76 


869.44 


6.3 


1. 060. 17 


387 


14,790 


86.389 


63,515 


1, 064, 309 


266,077 


2, 502. 32 


625. 58 


2.3 


2.499.93 


388 


54.008 


167,271 


67,086 


8, 490. 825 


249. 345 


10, 772. 71 


769. 48 


8.0 


10, 201. 94 


389 


11,953 


87.656 


14,792 


1, 036, 703 


269,176 


3. 709. 69 


927. 42 


8.6 


1,047.86 


380 


50,317 


258,847 


66.255 


3, 845. 139 


349, 558 


7, 259. 06 


659.09 


1.9 


2,248.21 


891 


8,697 


18,567 


3.197 


467. 144 


116,786 


2. 660. 63 


666.66 


6.7 


1,052.83 


392 


14,272 


92,225 


699.714 


1. 940, H90 


485. 172 


2, 685. 98 


671. 49 


L3 


829.66 


392 


32,871 


83.043 


87, 174 


1, 748. oo:> 


249,715 


4,546.57 


649.51 


2.6 


2,514.34 


394 


81,058 


282,022 


301,250 


5, 201, 820 


433, 443 


10, 407. 79 


867.32 


2.0 


8,662.56 


395 


95,620 


226,222^ 


137. 075 


6, 004, 693 


272. 941 


18. «84. 81 


849.31 


8.1 


13. 58a 96 


396 


10,532 


66,257 


18.875 


1,413.745 


157, 08:i 


6, 502. 07 


722.45 


4.6 


2.709.23 


397 


39,017 


169,359 


208,673 


4, 672, 4«i3 


292, 029 


13, 515. 20 


844.70 


2.9 


4. 719. 79 


398 


8^838 


17,742 


9.498 


838,804 


167, 761 


3. 412. 24 


680.26 


4.0 


2,878.74 


399 


8,272 


38,685 
31,188 


20.311 


626,380 


156. 595 


3, 5U9. 59 


877.39 


6.6 


918.75 


400 


4775 


11, 033 


802, 320 


200, 580 


3,458.85 


864.71 


4.3 


746 70 


401 


7,153 


54.328 


15, 513 


1,175,9:« 


167.990 


6, 747. 07 


821.01 


4.9 


1,319.11 


40-^ 


21,850 


41.450 


83,506 


1. 658, 210 


276. 368 


5, 269. 21 


87a 20 


3.1 


2.073.84 


403 


»>,]80 


23.52g 


67,108 


1,380,114 


197, 159 


6. 084. 26 


869. 18 


4.4 


1. 777. Dl 


404 


9.042 


36.684 


30.930 


1,020,924 


170.154 


4, 438. 62 


739.77 


4.3 


994.70 


405 


268,291 


417. 582 


229,396 


12, 529. 334 


313, 233 


34, 909. 53 


872. 74 


2.7 


33.275.14 


406 


142,325 


109.207 


88.650 


4,057.803 


312. 139 


8.331.90 


640.92 


2.0 


10, 800. 07 


407 


54.100 


81.589 


43,505 


2.482.214 


27.-., H02 


7,511.40 


834.60 


3.0 


4.961.871 408 


129,072 


582.651 


394.109 


7,186.964 


552, 843 


8. 908. 84 


6a-> 30 


l.l 


4. 704. 39; 409 


7,159 


35.885 


10, 914 


963. 27:< 


192, 655 


4, (!6H. 15 


81.3. 0:i 


4.2 


772.03; 410 


5,733 


27.832 


16.611 


866,687 


173, 337 


4. 358. 99 


871. 80 


5.0 


1.205 151 411 


177,929 


502,298 


187, 212 


10. 881, 920 


294,106 


30, 475. 30 


823. 66 


2.8 


17, .51 9. 70 412 


225.184 


227,628 


82. 415 


8. 103. 710 


450. 206 


15.016.76 


834. 26 


1.8 


10,645.61' 413 


84,619 


186.825 


73, 157 


4, 089, 640 


157, 294 


17. o;w). 25 


655. 01 


4.1 


9,560.11 414 


«^101 


16,107 


6,165 


740, 817 


185, 2'H 


2,848.71 


712. 18 


3.8 


1.04.V82 415 


453,786 


485.747 


441, 5:^2 


11.054,274 


298. 764 


27, 422. 15 


741. 14 


2.4 


27, 7.57. 6.) 


416 


965 


13.838 


4,113 


354. 291 


118,097 


1,96:). 29 


6.5.5. 10 


&6 


526. 94 


417 


104,427 


290,788 


203,958 


7,058,519 


30«, 81)2 


20, 537. 62 


892.94 


2.8 


11, 492. 80 


418 


2,978 


18.265 


12,581 


672, 403 


112, 0.^2 


4. 839. 79 


806.63 


7.2 


979.76 419 


20,049 


66.521 


23,372 


1, 408, 733 


281, 747 


3,31.^.11 


(563. 02 


2.3 


1,045.02' 420 


6,500 


18.285 


11,055 


825. 695 


137,616 


4, 439. 52 


739.92 


5.3 


2.379.52 421 


5.320 


6,172 


4,691 


395.909 


131,9f59 


2,133.30 


711.10 


5.3 


755. ;V2 422 


34.970 


65, 08?V 


38,999 


2, jm, 848 


324, 603 


.'i, 900. .56 


842.94 


2.5 


3.75.'i.56 423 


6.604 


53,167 


61, 416 


944,052 


314, 684 


2. 210. S8 


736. 96 


2.3 


573.80- 424 


3,663 


1»S412 


5,506 


693, 985 


2:n.3l'8 


2. 638. 62 


879.54 


3.8 


1.231.77 425 


1,071.880 


1.122,092 


1,759,269 


37, 063, 230 


296, 506 


119, 828. 90 


958.63 


3.2 


76,374.1.5; 4i'6 


1.970 


8.658 


2,908 


365, 901 


91.475 


1, 424. 87 


356. 22 


3.8 


206. 16; 427 


14.102 


28,707 


16,660 


1, 556. 296 


15.5,630 


7,944.05 


794. 40 


5.1 


4,849.2l| 428 


8,993 


60.509 


82,001 


878, 399 


219,599 


3, 19a 30 


799. 57 


3.6 


835.73' 42!) 


17.291 


75.727 


126,864 


2,346.149 


260, 683 


6. 83^]. 19 


759. 24 


2.9 


2, 467. 74 


430 


2.052 


9.966 


6,427 


389,928 


97,482 


1. 996. 39 


499.10 


5.1 


771.52 


431 


9.7«2 


37,659 


23,263 


793, 6«8 


264,556 


2, 623. 84 


874. 61 


3.3 


581. 37 


432 


8,683 


37.218 


17. 122 


677, 510 


225. 837 


2, 393. 06 


797. 68 


3.5 


1, 2r,9. 44 


43:; 


3.495 


7.829 


8,655 


404.168 


80, a'{4 


4, 243. 66 


848.73 


10.4 


9fi9. 45 


4.34 


3,563 


16.215 


6.759 


673, Ki-A 


134, 767 


2, 306. 30 


461.26 


3.4 


1, 066. 20 


435 


2,527 


13,408 


29,367 


554,935 


138,734 


2, 773. 73 


693. 43 


4.9 


234. 51 


4,3t; 


81,879 


261.945 


148, 790 


4, 754, 929 


297. 183 


11.103.07 


693. 94 


2.3 


5,278.38 437 


31,581 


119,253 


66,819 


3, 198. .^72 


22><. 45.> 


12. 704. 27 


907. 45 


3.9 


4,475.93 


438 


89.361 


226,773 


137,751 


5, 628, 980 


375. '2(\'t 


13,491.39 


899. 42 


2.3 


13. 847. 35 


439 


28,953 


158^283 


89,597 


3. 379. 747 


259, 1»81 


10, 897. 23 


asa 25 

h:>G. or, 

608. 53 


3.2 


3.913.95 


440 


88.061 


170. 577 


68,002 


5. 103. 916 


268, 627 


16. 276. 46 


3.1 


9, 690. .38 


441 


36.802 


123,126 


31,302 


2, 713, 606 


339. 201 


4, 868. 16 


1.7 


3,351.75 


442 



iSiteUlaliedJiay 1, 1889. 



% Bstablished July 1, 1889. 



H Established October 1, 1889. 



252 REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

Tablk a.— Statement ahoioing the number ofeanriera in service June 30, 18W, the 





Post-ofBce. 


Car- 

Tlera. 

5 
8 
5 
7 
4 

29 
4 

13 
8 
9 

>4 

11 


XMiTi»red. 


Oolleetod. 




Reria. 
t4»re<l 
letters. 


Lettoitu 


Postal- 
cards. 


fiowflpa- 
pera. etc. 


Local let. 

tora. 


Hail let- 
ters. 


443 

Ui 
445 
446 
447 
448 
440 


Wintield.Kans 

Witiona, Minn 

Wobnrn, MiMn 

WooniHMjki't, R. I . . . . 

Wooster. Ohio 

Worc«»«t«r, Mftdt 

Xonia. Ohio 


703 

1.755 

232 

088 

1,814 


400,495 
487,130 
245.032 
378. 213 
337,003 
2,612,432 
•>13. «70 


75 866 
95.327 
64.723 
69. 919 
75,203 
562.709 
m,078 
^,030 
140,773 
188,994 
40, 514 
218.555 


388,556 
616,777 
167,228 
336.937 
807.815 
1,758,056 
152,050 
601,327 
427,280 
567.516 
175, 061 
683,886 


18,661 
12,282 
18,105 
24,297 

9,466 
257,248 

7,191 
213,603 
211; 603 
68,646 

8.886 
62,886 


249,375 
209,099 

89.866 
178,464 
180,985 
963,656 

72,929 
637,300 
279,831 
486.601 
134,823 
674, 762 


450 

4rii 


VonkerH.N. Y 

Yotk.Pa 


2.2531 1.684.207 
2. r>04 633. 512 
3. 284 937, 703 
607 276,280 
4, 004 1, 071. 855 


452 
453 
454 


Yoiiniriitown. Ohio . . . 
Ypsilanil.Mich.*.... 
Zanos villi', Ohio 

Total 




5), 086 


4,734,5381.146.486.531 


252.404,982 


530. 470. 752 266, 256, 612 686, 812, 799 




Amount paid poat- 
offiro inspectora. 

Total 
















































J 





* EaUbliahed July 1, 1889. 



FIBST ASSISTANT OPERATIONS OF FREE DELIVERY. 253 

€moutU ofwutil d$Uv€red and colUotedf the number of piec€9 handled, ^^o.—Continaed. 



CoU«eted. 

• 


Pieces handled. 


Coetol 


' sernce 




PoRtogn 














' 


f^ 


















OD local 




LoodLpoa- 
talcuST 


HAUpo*. 


Kewgpa* 
pen, etc 


Aggregate. 


Per 

carrier. 


Aggregate. 


Por 
carrier. 


3.0 


matter. 




10, 2M 


90.430 


25.964 


1,211,313 


242,263 


$3,646.09 


$720. ."W 


0794.52 


443 


9.bM 


34.804 


30,382 


1,390,203 


174,525 


6, 005. 43 


863.18 


4.8 


2,195.74 


444 


•.711 


15,271 


9,342 


001, 513 


120.30.3 


S.OOP.-W 


799.88 


6.6 


600.26 


445 


9,703 


24,215 


11.905 


1,033,631 


147, 661 


6. U55. 79 


885.11 


5.8 


1,6U.50 


446 


».1M 


83, lis 


27,026 


981, 740 


245,437 


2,960.23 


742.31 


3.0 


060.84 


447 


124,450 


106,097 


05,206 


0,545,042 


226,601 


24,817.80 


856.70 


3.7 


18,442.50 


448 


2,487 


lS,fl02 


8,033 


540,770 


186.192 


2,9«2.57 


745.04 


5,5 


895.00 


449 


96,140 


145.iM8 


140.002 


3,806.011 


202,770 


10.320.01 


794.50 


2.7 


R .'{07. 85 


450 


12,948 


02.767 


21,012 


1.602,205 


200.276 


6,873.46 


860. 1H 


4.2 


2. 138. .W 


451 


25^006 


81,058 


40.430 


2,343,742 


260.416 


6,732.80 


748.10; 2.4 


3, 428. 51 


452 


4.520 


10,874 


8.422 


667,577 


166.804 


2,774.35 


693. 59 4. 1 


^fi02.08 46,1 


28,315 


156,149 


51,506 


^ 850, 918 


259, 174 


8.851.99 


804.73 


3<1 


2.786.66 454 


110,280,985 


148.503,888 


158,210.050 


3,297,260.606 


863,0957,949,782.04 


870.88 


2.4 


10.184,764.42 














26, 440. G8 
































7.976,202.72 

















REPORT 



OF THK 



SECOND ASSISTANT POSTMASTER-GENERAL 



FOR 



1 8 9 O. 



255 



REPORT 



OF THK 



SECOND ASSISTANT POSTMASTER-GENERAL 



Post-Offioe Department, 
Office of Second Assistant Postmastbr-Geneeal,, 

Washington^ November 7, 1890. 
Sib : I have the honor to sabmit the following report of the office of 
the Second Assistant Postmaster-General for the year ended Jane 30, 
1890: 

MAIL service in GENERAL. 

The annual rate of expenditure for inland mail transportation on June 
30, 1890, was— 

For 15,887 star roatea, aggregating 237,456.81 miles in length I-"), 411, 666. 06| 

For 6,714 mail messenger routes, aggregating 5,245.33 miles in length. 1, 019, 2h7. 56 

For 129 steam-boat routes, aggregating 10,456.42 miles in length 462, 819. 72 

For 2, 176 special-office routes, aggregating 20,052.81 miles in length . . 42, 840. 13 

For 2,199 railroad routes, aggregating 154,779.35 miles in length 20, h69, 231. 55 

For 172 railway post-office car routes, aggregating 29,665.14 miles in 

length 2,526,000.11 

For 5,836 railway post-office clerks 5, H18, &5r.. 00 

For mail equipments 247, 51,5. 15| 

For necessary and special facilities on trunk lines 295, 421. 78 

Total 36.693,437.07 

Comparison with the report for June 30, 1889, shows : 
Star sermce, — For the star service an increase of 810 routes, an in- 
crease of 4,125 miles in lenjjth of routes, and an increase of $183,278.90J 
in the annual rate of expenditure. The number of miles traveled per 
annum was 95,160,918.70, at a cost of 5.68 cents per mile; the average 
number of trips per week was 3.85; an increase of 5,383,318.06 in the 
number of miles traveled per annum, a decrease of 0.14 cent in the 
rate of cost per mile, and an increase of 0.16 in the average number of 
trips per week. 

Begnlation wagon service. — In regulation wagon service (included in 
the star service) there were 30 routes, aggregating 507.04 miles in 
length; the annual rate ot expenditure was $451,048.14; the number 
of miles traveled per annum, 1,045,290.37 ; the rate of cost per mile, 
23.18 cents ; the average number of trips per week, 36.89 ; an incriNise 
of 6 routes, of 106.34 miles in length of routes, of $47,318.40 in annual 
rate of expenditure, and of 428,945.72 in the number of miles traveled 
per annum ; a decrease of 3.44 cents* in the rate of cost per mile, and 
m increase of 0.51 in the average number of trips per week. 

P M a 90- 17 257 



258 BEPOET OP THE P08TMA8TEE-GENEEAL. 

Special office service, — For the special-office service, au increase of 177 
routes, of 3,228.15 miles in leugth of roates, and a decrease of $8,769.03 
iu auuual expenditure. The number of miles traveled per anunm (esti- 
mated on a basis of 1.79 average trips per week) was 3,733,071.04, at a 
cost of 1,14 cents per milej the average number of trips per week, as 
estimated, was 1.79; an increase over the estimate for 1889 of 753,304,68 
in the number of miles traveled per annum, a decrease of 0.59 cents in 
the rate of cost per mile, and an increase of 0.09 in t&e average number 
of trips per week. 

Mail-messenger servicc-^'FoT mail-messenger service, an increase of 
370 routes, of 222.06 miles in length of routes, o (70,098.71 in annual 
rate of expenditure. The number of miles traveled per annum was 
9,563,017.40, at a cost of 10.65 cents per mile ; the average number of 
trips per week was 17.63 ; a decrease of 1,218,736.49 in the number of 
miles traveled per annum, au increase of 1.85 cents in the rate of cost 
per mile, and a decrease of 3.10 in the average number of trips per 
week. 

Steamboat service. — For the steamboat service an increase of one 
route, a decrease of 141.45 miles in length of routes, and an increase of 
$16,787.24 in annual rate of expenditure. The number of miles trav- 
eled per annum was 3,236,806.05, at a cost of 14.29 cents per mile; the 
average number of trips per week was 2.97 ; an increase of 66,531.79 in 
the number of miles traveled per annum, an increase of 0.23 cent in 
the rate of cost per mile, and of 0.10 in the average number of trips 
per week. 

Railroad service. — For the railroad service, an increase of 86 routes, of 
4,397.82 miles in length of routes, and of $1,428,135.77 in the annual 
rate of expenditure for transportation. The number of miles traveled 
per annum was 215,715,680.17, at a cost of 9.67 cents per mile for trans- 
portation ; the average number of trips per week was 13.40 ; an increase 
of 11,523,191.09 in the number of miles traveled per annum, of 0.15 cent 
in the rate of cost per mile for transportation, and of 0.35 in the aver- 
age number of trips per week. 

Railway post-office car service. — For the railway post-office car service 
an increase of 16 routes, of 3,005.29 miles in length of routes, and of 
$327,482.56 in the annual rate of expenditure. 

Railroad service {inchiding railway post-offi^ce car service), — For the 
railroad service (including the railway post-office car service) the annual 
rate of expenditure was $23,395.231.66 ; the rate of cost per mile traveled 
was 10.84 cents ; an increase of $1,755,618.33 in the annual rate of ex- 
penditure and of 0.25 cent in the rate of cost per mile. 

Railway post-office clerks, — For railway post-office clerks, an increase of 
388 in the number of clerks, and of $550,055.00 iu annual rate of ex- 
penditure. 

Mail equipments. — For mail equipments, an increase of $50,884.32^ in 
annual rate of expenditure. 

Necessary and special facilities on trunk lines, — For necessary and spe- 
cial facilities on trunk lines, a decrease of $233.60 in annual rate of ex- 
penditure. 

The sums actually disbursed appear in the Auditor's report. 

The number of contracts drawn in duplicate during the year was 
5,989, a decrease of 704 from the number for the preceding year. 

RBCAPITCLA.TIOK. 

Summary of all classes of mail service in operation June 30, 1890 : 
Number of routes, 27,105 ; length of routes, 427,990.72 miles; annual 
n>te of expea4itare, $36,693,437,07; number of milga, tr^vel^ per «ia^ 



SECOND ASSISTANT — STAR SERVICE. 



259 



umn, 327,409,4d3.02 ; rate of cost per mile traveled, 11.20 cents ; rate 
of cost per mile of length, $85.73^ average number of trips per week, 
7.35 ; an increase of 1,444, or 5.62 per cent., in the number of routes ; of 
11,831.58 miles, or 2.84 per cent, in length of routes ; of $2,617,719.96^<r) 
or 7.68 per cent, in the annual rate of expenditure ^ of 16,507,608.73, or 
5.30 per cent in the number of miles traveled per annum; of 0.24 
cent, or 2.18 per cent., in the rate of cost f)er mile traveled ; of $3.85, 
or 4.70 per cent., in the rate of cost per mile of length ; and of 0.17, or 
2.36 per cent, in the average number of trips per week. 

Table I. — Campari^fm of star and aieam-boat servioe, 

Compariwn of the ttar and Bteam-hoat $enioe far (he year ended June 30, 1890, with the 
annual average of eaid eervieefor the ten yeare next preceding, develops the following re-- 
suUs: 





Star service. 


6team-bo«t service. 




Miles trav. 
eledper 
aonnm. 


Annnsl r»te 
of expebdl- 

tare. 


Cost 
per 

mUe. 


HUes trsT. 
eledper 
aonnm. 


Annual rate 

ofezpendi. 

tnre. 


Cost 

per 
mile. 


ArvnRe for year* 1889-'89. In- 
clusive. 
For year ended June 36, 1890. . . 


MUet. 
81,563,691.79 

95,169,918.76 


DoUart, 
5^ 971, 621. 95 

5,411,666.961 


Oent$. 
6.83 

&68 


JfOet. 
8.879,862.45 

8,236,806.05 


VoUar$. 
574.618.58 

463.819.72 


Csncr. 
14.81 

14.29 


Increaeo (per eeni) 

DtjcfvuMe (per cent) 


16l67 












2.87 


L68 


16.57 


19.45 


8.61 









Table U. — Statement showing the percentage of increase or decrease in the estimate of cost 
of inland mail service for each year from 1881 to 1802 tnolawioe, as compared with the 
amount appropriated for said service for the year next prtceding in each case. 



Year, 




Estimate. 


Perrentafce of increase 
or decrease. 




Amount. 


IToar. 

1881 
1882 
1888 
1881 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 


Amount. 


Increase. 


Decreaee. 


ISflO 


$20, 845. 000. 00 
23.326,000.00 
24.376,082.00 
26.067,000.00 
24.387.120.00 
26,401,000.00 
28, 510, 000. 00 
30, 100, 432. 00 
80.137,750.15 
31,653.777.74 
84,612,213.28 
37,601,413.90 


924,125,000.00 
25,715,032.00 
25,738,000.00 
25.494.120.00 
27.441,50,'>.60 
30,294.269.50 
80, 363, 7 T). 64 
30,187,750.15 
31,816,682.74 
34,878,942.02 
38, 581, 413. Wh 
39,771.462.411 


15.73 
10.24 
5.59 




]|)81 , 




1882 




1083 


2,20 


1884 


12.52 

14.74 

.12 
558 
10.18 
11.47 
5.70 




1885 




igwe 




1887 




1888 




1889 




1880 




1801 









MAIL SEBYIOE IN DETAIL. 

8TAH SERVICE. 

The annual rate of expenditure for this clnstf of service ou June 
30, 1890, waA $5,411,666.06 J; the number of routes was 15,887, the 
ARSrregate leni^th of routes, 237,456.81 miles, and the annual travel 
95,160,918.76 miles. 

The rate of cost per mile traveled was 5.68 cents. 

The average number of trips per week was 3.85. 

Tbe appropriation for the last flocal yet^r wae $5|650,000, 



260 EEPOKT OF THE POSTMA8TKK-GENERAL. 

The sum expended was $5,320^732^7, leaving an unexpended balance 
of $329,267.63. 

The annual rate of expenditure on Jaly 1, 1890, under contracts made 
during the last fiscal year, for the performance of star service from 
July 1, 1890, to Jane 30, 1894, in the fourth contract section, embrac- 
ing Arlsiansas, Louisiana, Texas, Indian Territory, Olxlahoma, Kansas, 
Nebraska, South Dakota, North Dakota, Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, 
New Mexico, Arizona, Utah, Idaho, Washington, Oregon, Nevada, 
Galifornia, and Alaska, was $1,853,976.89, a decrease from the annual 
rate of expenditure for service in the same section on June 30, 1890, of 
$213,674.35, representing a saving of $854,697.40 for the ensuing contract 
term of four years from July 1, 1890. 

The total namber of star routes in operation on July 1, 1890, was 
16,643, an increase of 756 over the number in operation on June 30, 1890. 

The total annual rate of expenditure was, 

July 1,1890 $5,250,704.27* 

Aagoiit 31, 1890 5,305.371. 21* 

September 30, 1890 5.334.548.31* 

The appropriation for the current fiscal year is $5,812,216.55. ' 

The amount estimated as necessary for the fiscal year ending June 
30, 1892, js $5,892,730.51^, being $80,513.96^, or 1 .38 per cent., more than 
the appropriation for the current fiscal year. 

During the past year efforts have been made to correct the abuse of 
this service resulting from the abandonment of unprofitable routes by 
accepted bidders and contractors. 

Section 3952 Bevised Statutes (until recently in force) provided that 
no bidder for carrying the mails should be released from his obligatioDs 
under his proposal, notwithstanding an award made to a lower bidder, 
until a contract was executed and the service actually begun. 

Under this statute, if an accepted bidder or contractor failed to be- 
gin the service, the Department was compelled to award the route to 
the next lowest bidder. 

Competition for mail service is very close, and the difference between 
the lowest two bids is usually small. Under such circumstances, the 
actual pecnniary damage suffered by the Department by reason of the 
failure of an accepted bidder or contractor to begin service, and the re- 
letting of the route, would be the difference between the rate of his 
bid and that of the next lowest bid for the contract term of four years, 
which is frequently but a very small sum. 

Taking advantage of this fact, certain professional bidders who had 
submitt^ proposals for routes with little, if any, knowledge of the cost 
of operating them, and who found after the acceptance of their bids by 
the Department that the routes could be sublet only at a great loss, 
deliberately refused to begin the service, trusting to effect a compromise 
with the Department on the basis of the small pecuniary damage suf- 
fered by the Department from reletting the routes rather than to com- 
ply with the obligations of their proposals and operate the service at a 
much greater loss to themselves. To check this evil, the Department 
refused in such cases to make any further compromises on the basis of 
the pecuniary damage resulting from reletting the service, taking the 
ground that the pecuniary damage was no compensation for the annoy- 
ance and injury to the people interested, caused by the disarrangement 
of their mail service : that when a bidder failed to comply with the ob- 
ligations of his bond, he forfeited the full amount of that bond ; and 
that what the Department wanted was not damages, but specific per- 
formance of all contracts. 



SECOND ASSISTANT — REGULATION WAGON SERVICE. 261 

To farther emphasize this position, steps were taken for the first time 
to prosecute failing bidders ander the criminal statnte, and the only 
case that has yet been reached by the courts resnlted in a conviction of 
the failing bidder. 

Moreover^ parsaant to the recommendation of the Department, Con- 
gress recently repealed section 3952, B. S., so that when routes are aban- 
doned hereafter they Vrill be relet in open competition, increasing the 
damage account stated against the failing bidder. Such action has 
undoubtedly resulted in a very great improvement in the star service. 

Ck>ngress has also, upon the recommendation of the Department, re- 
pealed section 3953, B. S., which required bids to be accompanied by cer- 
tified checks or drafts in cases where the amount of the bond required 
with the bid exceeded $5,000. The repeal of that statute, it is thought, 
will result in the receipt of bids from persons who are amply at^e to 
furnish the required bond and to perform the service, but who are not 
willing or able to deposit a check to be held by the Department from 
five to eight months, which has been necessary under the statutes here- 
tofore in force. At the same time the interest of the Department will 
be sufficiently protected by the bonds which are required to accompany 
all bids. 

kkoulahon wagon servics. 

This service is performed in cities, in wagons of uniform character 
prescribed by the Department. It is included in the estimate for star 
service, and is paid for out of the appropriation for that service. 

The following statement shows the cities in which regulation wagon 
service was in operation on June 30, 1890, with the annual rate of ex- 
penditure in each city. 

Annual rate of expenditure for regulation wagon mail-meaaenger, mail station, and tranefer 
aervicCf in operation on June 30, 1^0. 



Kame of city. 


Annaal 
rate. 


Name of city. 


Annaal 
rate. 


Boston Masii - . 


$39, 973. 00 

8,250.00 

16, 62& 00 

4, 487. 00 

182.500.00 

20,994.94 

10, 000. 00 

10.875.20 

31,973.00 

8,300.00 

840.00 

2,400.00 

1,040.00 

2,487.00 

1,737.00 

1,385.00 

1,393.00 

800.00 

3, 70a 00 


Naahville Tenn 


2 675. 00 


ProTidenee, R.I 


Loaisvilte, Ky 


5,793.00 
14«749.00 
6.290.00 
1,987.00 
4,880.00 


BrooUTii.N.T 


Cincinnati Ohio 


T^nflkl^ K. Y , , r 


Cleveland. Ohio 


Now York, N.T 


Oolninbiu, Ohio 


Philadelplua, Pa ; 


Toledo, Ohio 


Pittabanrh, ^a 


Chicafto,Ill 


84,000.00 
5^880.00 


Baltlmore,Md 


Detroit, Mich 


Waahioj^n, D. C 


Milwaukee, Wis 


4,926.00 


Itichmond, Va -. 


MinneApolid, Minn 


8,88&00 


WilmiiiKtoD,N.C 


StPanl,Minn 


8,950.00 
1,286.00 
4,985.00 


CharlcH^toD A.C ., .. - 


Borlinirton, Iowa ....... .... .... 


Iff^c^xn. Ct^ X 


KansaA City, Mo 


S«vaonah,Oa 


StLonia,Mo 


14,945.00 


Atlanta, ft% . 


New Orleans La 


4,09&00 


Jaokaonville Fla 


0?nab^Nf»h^ 


2,995.00 


Ohattanoof^a, Ti^nn 


ijftp Vrancivco, Cal 


8,000.00 


'R'novVtiiA.'TAnn - 


Total 




ICemnhia. Tenn 


451, 048. l4 









The annual rate of expenditure on July 1, 1890, was $452,56^.14 an 
increase of $1,520 over the annual rate of expenditure on June 30, 1890. 

Consideration will be given, and my conclusions submitted to you 
during this fiscal year, respecting the advisability of hereafter modify- 
ing the advertisements and contracts for regulation wagon service, so 
as to define more specifically the character and extent of the additional 
service that may be ordered by the Department^ or that shall fix upon 
some limit to the same. 



262 REPORT OP THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

Under the preseut practice the advertisements and contracts pro- 
vide that the contractor shall perform, without additional compensa- 
tion, any and all additional service that may be ordered by the De- 
partment, within the city to which they refer at any time during the 
contract term of four years. The bidder is presumed to have taken 
into account the probable increase in service during the contract 
term, and to have made his bid a sum that would represent the average 
value per annum of the service for the entire term ; and, as this is 
an unknown quantity, the bidder, for his own protection under natural 
circumstances, fixes his bid at a very high rate, in which case the De- 
partment may pay more than a fair price for the service; or if^ 
through competition or misjudgment, the bidder does not make suffi- 
cient allowance for the item of probable increase, the additional 
service required of him may result in his financial loss. 
' The point to be determini*d is really how far a modified form of con- 
tract, 60 as to remove from it some of the elements of great uncertainty 
respecting the limitation of additional service, will encourage reliable 
bidders to compete for this class of mail service. 

SPBCIAL OFFICE 8BRVIGX. 

The amount expended for service of this class during the year ended 
June 30, 1889, was $51,609.16 ; during the year ended June 30, 1890, 
$42,840.13. 

The number of special offices on June 30, 1890, was 2,176, the aggre- 
gate length of routes 20,052.81 miles, and the annual travel (estimated 
on a basis of 1.79 average trips per week) was 3,733,070.64 miles. 

The rate of cost per mile traveled (based on the above estimate) was 
1.14 cents, 

The compensation for this class of service is limited by law (B. S., 
sec. 3971) to an amount not exceeding two-thirds of the salaries paid to 
the postmasters at the several offices supplied. 

The expenditures for this service are chargeable to and included in 
the estimate for star service. 

MAIL-MES6BN0ER 8RRVICB. 

The annual rate of expenditure for this class of service on June 30, 
J890, was $1,019,287.56; the number of routes was 6,714; the aggregate 
length of routes, 5,245.33 miles; the annual travel, 9,563,017.40 miles; 
the rate of cost per mile traveled, 10.65 cents ; and the average number 
of trips per week, 17.53. 

The appropriation for the last fiscal year was $1,000,000 ; the sum 
expended was $974,660.76, leaving an unexpended balance of $25,339.24. 

The number of routes in operation on June 30, 1890, was 6,714; July 
1, 1890, 6,715 ; an increase of one route. 

The annual rate of expenditure was : 

Jnly 1,1890 $1,020,538.93 

August 31, 1890 1,036,447.08 

September 30, 1890 1,038,590.39 

The appropnation for the current fiscal year is $1,100,000. 

The amount estimated as necessary, for the fiscal year ending June 
30, 1892, is $1,210,000, being $110,000, or 10 per cent, more than the 
appropriation for the current year. 

The mail-messenger service, which is in operation between railroad 
stations and post-offices over 80 rods distant, and which must uecessa- 



SECOND ASSIStANT — STEAMBOAT SERVICE. 



263 



rily increase as the railroad lines are extended, is in a very satisfactory 
condition. 

The experiment of requiring wagons protected on front, sides, and 
rear by high wire screens to be used in this service iu' some of the larger 
towns (where regalation-wagon service is not deemed necessary) hav- 
ing proved snccessfal, snch service has been established in 13 additional 
plaees dnring the past year. 

The following is a list of the places in which screen-wagon service is 
now in operation : 



Ko.or 

loato. 



309082 
2M192 

2140B1 
220010 
221021 



233100 
235028 
235074 
23708A 



Nameofoity. 



Siitlflnd,Vt , 

WoroMter, Ham 

BoehMter.K.T . . 
Fredericksbnrgh, Va 

6re0nviUe,&C 

Aiigiiata»Ga , 

SvantTill«, Ind 

BlchmoiMi, lad 

Bloomington, HI 

I>eoatar,m 

6TaiidSapi4a,Hich. 



Coat per 
anntnn. 



$449 

1,488 

1,500 

478 

550 

895 

1,700 

MO 

2,400 

480 

1,200 



No. of 
roate. 



237104 
241088 
243064 
243068 
243071 
250030 
260063 
260068 
265148 
260026 
276026 



Name of oitj. 



Kalamaaoo, Mich .... 

St. Clotid, Hina 

Couocil BlttfEs, Iowa 
Des Moines, Iowa . . . 

I>almqa«}, Iowa 

Fort Worth, Tex.... 
8an Antonio, Tex ... 

Sherman. Tez 

Kaasaa Citv, Kane .. 
Salt lAke City. Utah 
Loa Angelee, Cal 



Cost per 
annom. 



1489 
339 

2.100 
475 

1,760 
720 
860 
650 
600 

1.217 

6,769 



STEAM-BOAT SERVICE. 

The annnal rate of expenditure for this class of service on June 30, 
1890, was $462,819.72. 

The nnmber of rentes was 129 ) the aggregate length of routes, 
10,456.42 miles, and the annual travel, 3,236,806.05 miles. 

The rate of cost per mUe traveled was 14.29 cents.. 

The average number of trips per week was 2.97. 

The appropriation for the last fiscal year was $450,000 ; the sum ex- 
pended was $444,343.64, leaving an unexpended balance of $5,656.36. 

The annual rate of expenditure on July 1, 1890, under /M>n tracts made 
during the fiscal year for the performance of steam-boat service from 
July 1, 1890, to June 30, 1894, in the fourth contract section, was 
$178,469.54, a decrease from the annual rate of expenditure for service 
in the same section on June 30, 1890, of $14,705.83, representing a 
saving of $58,823.32 for the ensuing contract term of four years from 
July 1, 1890. 

The total number of steam-boat routes in operation on July 1, 1890, 
was 132. 

The total annual rate of expenditure for steamboat service was : 

Joly 1,1890 1450,060.19 

Aiigiwt31,1890 459.108,36 

September 30, 1890 4 459,091.11 

The appropriation for the current fiscal year is $525,000. 

The amount estimated as necessary for the fiscal year ending June 
30, 1892, is $525,000. 

There appears to be no postal necessity for any great extension of 
this branch of the service at the present time. The contract for service 
between Port Townsend, Wash., and Sitka, Alaska, has been renewed 
for another period of four years, upon satisfactory terms. 

Special attention by personal* investigation has been given to many 
steam-boat routes, resulting in the cutting off of some useless service, 
and the establishment of additional facilities where needed, in sections 



264 



KEPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 



of country which, by reason of their topography, could not be as well 
8applied by any other means. 

RAILROAD TRANSPORTATION. 

The annual rate of expenditure for railroad transportation, on all 
routes on which pay was adjusted on June 30, 1890, was$20,8tJ9,231.55. 

The nnmberof routes wa82,199; the aggregate length of routes was 
154,779.3.*> miles; the annual travel, 215,715,080.17 miles. 

The rate of cost per mile traveled was 9.67 cents. 

The average number of trips per week was 13.40. 

The length of routes on which pay. was unadjusted on June 30, 1890, 
was 2,515.97 miles. 

The decrease in the number of miles on which pay was unadjusted 
was 843. 

The appropriation for the last fiscal year was $19,105,557.90; the 
amount expended as shownby the Auditor's accounts was $li),087,274.57. 

It is estimated that the payment for service during the fiscal year 
ended June 30, 1890, on routes on which the pay was unadjusted on 
June 30, 1890, will amount to $201,277.60. 

The annual rate of expenditure for railroad transportation on routes 
on which the pay was adjusted in the fourth contract section on Juue 
30, 1890, was $4,810,245.15. 

The result of the regular quadrennial readjustment of pay for service 
in said section by oilers to September 30, 1890, was an increase of 
$1,137,104.68, or 23.63 per cent., making the annual rate of expenditure 
in said section, on September 30, 1890, $5,947,349.83. 

The total number of railroad routes in operation July 1, 1890, was 
2,211, an increase of 12 over the number iu operation on June 30, 1890. 

The total annual rate of expenditure for railroad transportation was : 

Joly 1,1890 $20,868,803.55 

AngUBt 31, 1890 '21,939,994.16 

September 30, 1890 '. 22,043,588,28 

The appropriation for the current fiscal year is $21406,275.65. 

The amount estimated as necessary for the fiscal year ending June 
30, 1892, is $22,550,128.31, being $1,443,852.66, or 6.84 per cent., more 
than the appropriation for the current year. 

Increase in length of railroads over which the mails were carried during each of ih^ years 
from 1882 to 1890 inolasivef also showing the number of miles of railroad servtoe on 
which the pay was not adjmied on June 30 of each of said years. 



Year. 


Increiute 
iu leiijjth 
of routes. 


tJnad- 
JiiAted 
service 

June 30. 


rear. 


iDcrewe 
in length 
of routes. 


rTDacl* 
Justed 
serrioe 

Jane 30. 


1882 


MUu. 
8,994 
9.645 
6,952 
3. K72 
2,901 


8,449 
7. 2U 
9.026 
2,945 
1,693 


1887 


MUet. 
7. 015. 81 
12. 764. 51 
6.668.21 
4,397.82 


MOu, 
4. 196. .59 
e,T.'3.2l 
8, 35& 97 
2,515.97 


1883 


1888 


1884 


1880 


1885 


1890 


1886 









SECOND ASSISTANT — RAILBOAD SERVICE. 



265 



StaUment showing in what States the largest part of the increase in length of routes of rail- 
road service, during the year ended June 30, 1890, took place, with au estimate of the in- 
crease in the annual rate of expenditure for transportation for said service. 



StetoB. 



Increase 
in num- 
ber of 
routes. 



Increase 
in lenetli 
of routes. 



Efltimated 
increase 
in anonal 
rute of ex- 
penditure 
for this new 
service. 



Vindnia 

Washington., 

Georgia 

Texas 



Minnesota 

Mich1|can 

North Carolina . 

Kaw York 

Mississippi 

Pennsylvania ... 
Nebrask* , 



JTOm. 
40&24 
366.06 
353.01 
200.18 
200.77 
275.45 
242.08 
230.65 
31&86 
197.61 
J76.86 
154.83 



Total. 



48 



8,218.60 



DoUars. 
82,650.20 
29.284.80 
28.340.80 
23,034.40 
23, 261.. 60 
22,036L00 
19,306.40 
18, 452. 00 
17, 508 80 
16. 808. 80 
14,14&80 
12,386.40 



257, fl 



LUO 



Length of railroad routes^ annual rate of expenditure for transportation, and average an- 
nual rate of cost per mile of length for transportation for each of the years from 1880 Iq 
1890y inclusive. 



Year. 


Length of 
routes. 


Annual 
rate of ex- 
penditure 
for trans- 
portation. 


Average 

annual rate 

of cost per 

mile of 

length. 


Year. 


Length of 
routes. 


Annual 
rate of ex- 
penditure 
for trans- 
portation. 


Average 

annual rate 

of cost per 

mile of 

length. 


1880 


IfOM. 

85,320 
91,560 
100.663 
110,208 
117. 160 
121.032 


DoUart. 

9,237.945 
10,240.261 
11,207.3.13 
12,288.700 
13,273,606 
14,758,405 


DoUars. 

ioa27 

111. 92 
112.34 
111.60 
113.20 
121.93 


18R6 

1887 


Miles. 

123,938 

130,948 

143, 713 

150,381 

154.779 


DoUars. 
15,520.191 
16^ 174. 601 
17,528,600 
19,441,006 
20,860.232 


DoUars. 
126 23 


1881 


123.52 


1882 


1888 


121.06 


1888 


1880 


129.27 


1884 


1890.....^ 


134.63 


1885 









THE RAILWAY MAIL SERVICE. 

RAILWAY POST-OFFICE CARS. 

The annual rate of expenditure for full railway post-office cars in 
service on June 30, 1S90, was $2,526,000.11. 

The number of routes on which railway post-office cars were used was 
172 ; the length of routes, 29,665.14 miles. 

The appropriation for the last fiscal year was $2,260,000 ; the sum 
expended, as shown by the Auditor's account, was $2,203,1^1-01. 

The annual rate of expenditure for railway post-office cars in the 
fourth contract section on June 30, 1890, was $369,729.90. 

The result of the regular quadrennial readjustment of the pay for 
service in said section, by orders to September 30, 1890, was a decrease 
of $120.15, making the annual rate of expenditure in said section on 
September 30, 1890, $369,609.75. 

The total annual rate of expenditure was: 

Jaly 1,1890 $2,526,000.11 

Angostai, 1890 •<>, 5:%), 567. 51 

September 30, 1890 2,561,086.51 

The appropriation for the current fiscal year is $2,510,000. 



266 



REPORT OP THE POSTMASTER- GENERAL. 



The amoant estimated as necessary for the fiscal year ending June 
30, 1892, is $2,731^000, being $221,000, or 8.80 per cent., more than the 
appropriation for the current year. 

Annual rate of expenditure far railway poat-offioe cara^ with increase or decrease and per- 
centage of increase or decrease from 1880 to 1890, inclusive. 



Year. 


Annn*! rate of 
expenditare. 


iDOreaBe or decrease in an- 
nual rate of expenditure. 


Percentase of inoreaae 
or decrease. 




Inorease. 


Decrease. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


1880 


$1,261,041.00 
1,864,107.00 
1,455,851.00 
1,590,001.00 
1.738,997.00 
1,860,488.00 
1,816.321.00 
1,881,680.00 
1, 006, 350. 00 
2,108,517.55 
2,526,000.11 










1881 


$103,066.00 
01,744.00 
143, 150. 00 
189,996.00 
180,491.00 




a 17 
6.78 
0.88 
8.76 
7.50 




1882 






1883 






1884 






1885 


'"'$53,'i67.'o6 




1886 


2.84 


1887 


65.259.00 
114.779.00 
202,158.20 
327,482.56 


8.59 
6.10 
10.12 
14.80 




1888 .•.: 






1889 






1890 













BAILROAD 8BRVICB, INCLUDING RAILWAY POST-OFFICE CARS. 

Length of routes and annual rate of- expenditure for tran^orlation and railway post* 
office oars combined, showing increase and percentage of increase for the years 1880 to 
1890, inclusive. 



Year. 


Length 
of routes. 


Increase 
in lenfi^th 
of routes. 


Percent- 
age of 
increase. 


Annusl rate of 
expenditure. 


Increase in 

annual rate of 

expenditure. 


Percent- 
age of 
increase. 


1880 - 1.. 


JTOm. 
85,820 
91,669 
100,563 
110,208 
117, 160 
121,032 
123.983 
130,049 
148,713 
160,881 
164,779 


MiUt. 
6,829 
6,249 
8,994 
0.645 
. 6,952 
8,872 
2,001 
7,016 
12.764 
6,668 
4,898 


6.66 
7.32 
9.82 
9.59 
6.30 
8.80 
2.30 
5.66 
9.74 
4.68 
2.92 


DoUart. 
10, 408, 986. 00 
11,618,868.00 
12.758,184.00 
18.887,800.00 
15.012.603.00 
16,627.983.00 
17.836.512.00 
18.056,272.00 
19.524,959.00 
21,639,613.88 
28.896,23L66 


DoUart. 

031,306.00 

1, 114, 382. 00 

1,189,816.00 

1,184,616.00 

1,124.803.00 

1,615,380.00 

708.529.00 

719,760.00 

1.468,687.00 

2.114.664.18 

1,755^618.83 


0.73 


1881 


10.61 


1882. 


9.81 


1883 


8.89 


1884 


a 09 


1885 

1886 


10.76 
4.20 


1887 


4.15 


1888 


8.13 


1889 


10.83 


1800 


8.11 







RAILWAY P08T-0FFICB CLERKS. 

The annual rate of expenditure for railway post-office clerks on Jane 
30, 1890, was $5,818,655. 

The number of clerks was ^,836. 

The appropriation for the last fiscal year was $5,600,000; the snm ex- 
pended was $5,562,844.35, leaving an nnexpended balance of $37,155.65. 

The appropriation for the corrent fiscal year is $5,910,000. 

The amoant estimated as necessary for the fiscal year ending June 
30, 1892, is $6,353,000, being $443,000, or 7.49 per cent., more than the 
the appropriation for the current year. 

In this connection, I desire to call attention to the report addressed to 
me by the General Superintendent of the Railway Mail Service, and, as 
it is expected this office will hereafter direct the management of this 
most important branch of the postal service, it will be proper for me to 
g^ve special consideration, in this report, to some of its characteristics 
and the need that exists for making provision for its development so as 



SECOND ASSISTANT — ^RAILKOAD SERVICE. 267 

to enable its efficiency to be always in line with the expansion of the 
country's mail service. 

The burden of accomplisbing a rapid and reliable mail service must 
necessarily devolve upon the railway post-offices, if for no other reason 
than that the facilities of all the large local post-offices of the country 
are likely always to be coniracted, and throughout the entire country out- 
side of the large cities it will at no time be possible to create facilities 
and provide sufficient expert clerical force to expand materially, the sys- 
tem of closed pouches; so that the avenue through which the mails 
should be distributed and advanced is by the enlargement of the sys- 
tem of railway post-offices and the constant re-enforcement of the num- 
ber of its railway postal clerks, to which must be added some provision 
fbr the enlargement of the organization with additional grades tor 
clerks, which, under the law as it now exists, is incomplete. The ex- 
tent of the Bailway Mail Service and the character of its duties have 
far outgrown the present organization. It is reasonable to estimate 
that in the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, provision should be made 
for the distribution in railway post-offices of one thousand million more 
pieces of mail matter than in the fiscal year of 1889, and the ratio of in- 
crease I estimate at 10 per cent, each year over the next preceding year. 

It is hoped, therefore, that Congress will take favorable action upon 
the bill which has already received the approval of the Oommittee on 
Post-Offices and Post-Boads, and which will provide, it is believed, for 
the developments in the railway mail service for at least ten vears to 
come. 

TRANSPORTATION OF SUPPLIES. ' 

The recommendation looking to the removal jfrom the mails of a still 
larger proportion of the supplies of this Department, and the exclusion 
therefrom of a vast amount of matter furnished from the other Depart- 
ments of the Oovemment, is worthy of careful consideration. The rail- 
way post-office is not equipped to care for and handle economically cases 
and packages that are ordinarily adapted to fast freight transportation, 
and which could, at greatly decreased cost, be expeditiously provided, 
for as is customary with high-class merchandise shipments. 

PROVISION FOR FAMILIES OF RAILWAY POSTAL CLERKS KILLED ON DUTY. 

I desire to renew the recommendation of one year ago with regard to 
suitable provision being made for the families of clerks who are killed 
while on duty. The plan suggested in the report of the General Super- 
intendent of the Eailway Mail Service is very simple, and should com- 
mend itself to the favorable action of Congress. 



268 



REPORT OJ* TIfE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 



SPECIAL FAC1LITIK8. 



l?he annual rate of expenditurjB for this class of service on June 30, 
1890, was $295,421.78. This sum was expended as shown in the follow- 
ing statement: 



Number of route. 


Termini. 


Railroad company. 


Miles. 

136.00 

144.00 

86.10 
01.80 

70.80 

81.50 

23.07 
63.54 
16X07 
110.00 

05.00 

108.00 

171.50 
126.18 

116.30 


Pay per 
annum. 


S006 


New York. N. Y., to Spring- 

fleld. M.188. 
4.35 a. m. train, New York to 

Albany. 

BeltlmoTO to Haeeratown 

PhUadelphia, Pa.,to Bay Viow 

(n.o.), Md. 
Bay View (n.o.), Hd., to 

Waahington, D. C. 
WaAbinKton,D.C., to Qnan- 

tico (o. 0.), Va. 
Quantioo (n. o.) to Bichniond. . 

Ricbmond to Pet<*rBbargb 

Petorsburgh to Weldon 

Weldon to Wilmington 

Wilmington to Florence 

Florence to Charleston Junc- 
tion (n. 0.). 

Charleaion Junction (n. o.)to 
Savannah. 

Savannah to JaokaouTllle 

Jackeonville to San ford 

Sanfbrd to Tarapa 


New York, New Haven and 

Hartford. 
New York Central and Hud- 

non Birnr. 
Wej^tArn M Arylund - - r r t 


$17, 647. 06 


6011 (part) ...... . 

10006 (part) 

10001..;.... 


25,000.00 
15, 718. 25 


Philadelphia, Wilmington and 
Baltimore. 

Baltimore and Potomac 

Richmond. Frederickaburgh 
and Potomac ............... 


20,000.00 


lOOlS 




UOOl (part) 

11001 (part) 


21,900.00 
17,419.26 


11008 


Richmond and Petereburgh. . . 
Petersburgh 


4,210.27 
11, 596. 05 


11009 


18002 


Wilmington and Weldon 

Wilmington. Columbia and 
Augusta. 

XnrtfiAaatnm ................ . 


29 541.27 


14002 (^art) 

14005 (part) 

14004 (part) 

15000 


20,075.00 
17,337.50 
10,710.00 
31, 309. 70 


Charleaton and Savannah .... 

Savannah, Florida and Western 
Jacksonville, Tampa and Key 

West. 
South Florida .....^«..^ir...-T- 


16018 


22,867.26 


16007...... 


21, 095. 17 


• 








Total 




296,421.78 











The appropriation for the last fiscal year was (295,655.38. The sum 
estimated as necessary for the current fiscal year is $295,421.78. 

The amount estimated as necessary for the fiscal year ending June 
30, 1892, is $197,103.59, being $98,318.20, or 33.28 per cent, less than 
•the appropriation for the current year. 

The extent and character of the ordinary mail service throughout the 
entire country within the past few years has been greatly advanced, 
and the growth of the mails has adcled largely to the compensation of 
the railroads, more especially the trunk-]ine systems, justifying the 
commencement of curtailment of the appropriation, which for a number 
of years has been made to certain railroads for special facilities, ai!kd 
with a view to the gradual accomplishment of this end, the amount esti- 
mated as necessary for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, has been 
fixed at $197,103.59, which ia $98,318.20 less than the amount appro- 
priated for the current year. 

In my judgment the ordinary compensation now allowed by law 
should secure from railroads hearty co-operation with the Department 
in the establishment of such schedules as will accomplish a maximum 
amount of good mail service, and whenever this is done the compensa- 
tion is sure to be advanced, occasioned by the natural increase in the 
quantity of mails transported. 

The railroads associated with all large cities and trade centers of the 
country have an interest, independent of the compensation allowed di- 
rectly by the Government, in cooperating with the Post- Office Depart- 
ment in its efforts to expedite the distribution of newspapers to the 
outlying districts earl}' in the morning, and in the quickening of com- 
mercial mails after the close of each day's business, and it ought to be 



SECOND ASSISTANT — MAIL EQUIPMENTS. 269 

possible, i;vithhi a very few years, to dispense altogether with preferential 
allowances for special facilities, and still be within the power of the 
Department to maintain and further advance the hi^ii standard that 
has been reached by the Railway Mail Service train schedules that now 
prevail. 

In dwelling so fully upon the subject of allowances for special facili- 
ties I do not wish to be understood as criticising the occasion which 
first led to the granting of them. 

I believe at the oats tart such payments were a necessity, especially' 
in connection with the establishment, via the Atlantic coast line and 
Tampa, of a reliable and quick mail service between New York (as the 
base) and Havana, but I do not see the justilication for continuing in- 
definitely to this line, any more than to others, an allowance for a special 
train schedule, and at the same time, owing to the constant increase of 
the quantity of the mails, keep adding to the compensation at each 
quadrennial weighing of the route. 

If at the end of two years all of the special allowance is withdrawn, 
each of the roads will still be receiving for mail transportation more . 
than was allowed by the combining of the regular with the special com- 
pensation at the inception of the special service. 

MAIL EQUIP]MENTS. 

Appended hereto is a tabular statement (O) of the number, descrip- 
tion, and cost of all mail-bags and mail-bug catchers purchased and put 
into service during the year ended June 30, 1S90 ; a tabular statement 
(P) of all mail locks and keys purchsised for the service during the same 
period ; a tabular statement (N) of all contracts for mail equipments in 
force on June 30, 1890; also a tabular statement (Q) of the expendi- 
tures under the appropriation for the establishment of a repair shop for 
mail equipments, and (B) a statement of bags repaired, etc. 

The total expenditure for mail bags and mail-bag catchers, with their 
appurtenances and repairs, during the year ended June 30, 1890, was 
$222,857.47J. 

The total expenditure for mail locks and keys, including repairs of 
same, was (14,768.63. 

Comparison with the last annual report shows, for the fiscal year ended 
June 30, 1890, an increase in the expenditure for mail-ba^'S, mail bag 
catchers, etc., of $41,9r>ai7-i^tf ; a decrease in the expenditure for mail 
locks and keys of $960.90. 

The appropriation for the last fiscal year for mail-bags, mail-bag 
catchers, etc., was (225,000 ; the sum expended was $222,857.47^, leav- 
ing an unexpended balance of $2,142.52^. 

The appropriation for mail locks, keys, etc., was $15,000; the sum 
expended was $14,768.63, leaving an unexpended balance of $231.37. 

The appropriation for the mail-bag repair-shop was $10,000 ; the sum 
expended was $9,889.05, leaving an unexpended balance of $110.95. 

The appropriation for the current fiscal year for mail-bags, mail-bag 
catchers, etc., is $275,000 ; for mail locks and keys, $50,000 ; for repair- 
shop for mail equipments, $6,500. 

The amount estimated as necessary for the fiscal year ending June 
30, 1892, for mail-bags, mail-bag catchers, etc., is $260,000 ; for mail 
locks, keys, etc., $45,000; for repairshop, $0,500. 

MAIL-BAO BBPAIR SHOP. 

Owing to the increase in facilities it was made possible during the 
laat ye«w tQ improve very much the condition of the mail-bag equip- 



270 



REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 



inent of the Department, and it is believed its condition will be still 
further advanced during the present and the next fiscal year. 

The increase in the quantity of mails renders it very necessary that 
there be a large addition eaieh year to the amount of the new equip- 
ment, and to the extent that the Department is capable of properly 
maintaining that already in use, the necessity for adding new equip- 
ment is being reduced. 

The increase in the mails and the call for additional pouches and sacks 
will be made apparent when it is shown that in the two months of De- 
cember, 1889, and January, 1890, the New York City post-office re- 
quired 60,867 more number one jute sacks than during the same months 
one year previous, and in September, 1890, the same post-office nsed 
48,901 more bags than during September, 1889. This increase is pro- 
portionately great at other of the important post-offices throughout the 
country. 

It will be the policy hereafter of the Department to guard against 
delays occasioned by storms, washouts, and other interruptions on lines 
of transportation, by holding some equipment in reserve in the large 
cities, to be nsed only in case of great emergency. While this precau- 
tion may render it necessary to carry a somewhat larger extent of 
equipment, it is a proper precaution justified by the importance of the 
service. 

The following will show the extent to which repairs were made in the 
mail-bag repair shop at Washington during the year ending June 30, 
1890 : 



Jute sacks 91)2,435 

Leather poaches 74,64S 

Catcher pouches 17,159 

Horse mail-bags 1,864 



Inner registered sacks 
Foreign sacks 

Kegisti^red poaches ..., 



2,028 
3,366 



Total l,032,( 



LOCK-REPAIR SHOP. 

Last year's statement in regard to the repair shop renewing and put- 
ting into nse many obsolete and seemingly worthless locks has been 
well substantiated by the shop during this fiscal year, thereby efiecting 
a large saving to the Department. 

Because of the increase in the appropriation one year ago it has been 
made possible to dispense with the sellings for a mere trifle, of old locks 
and material, and by the substitution of repairs restore them to the 
service in about as good condition as when new. 

The appropriation for next year will be needed because of the large 
number of free-delivery offices being established, and as well to meet the 
increase in the demand for iron locks. 

It is Sblso in contemplation to replace the round key series of more 
than 5,000 through registered locks, by altering them into the flat-key 
pattern, which can be done by changing the hasp of the lock at an ex- 
pense of less than $1 each, really rendering the lock much better than 
when new. The contract price of this lock has been $2.50 each, and 
for the key 25 cents each, and the saving that will be effected by 
changing will not be less than (8,000. It is believed that, with the 
changes referred to, the stock of this character of locks will be suffi- 
cient to supply the increased calls of the service for some years to 
come. All of the important changes that will be necessary thereafter 
to protect an efficient combination, it is proposed to make in the De- 
partment's repair shop, and it is the judgment of experts, that the 
ftlter^U register looks, ^tter being pverbnuied under the direction of the 



SECOND ASSISTANT — ^DIVISION OP INSPECTION. 271 

Department, will be better adapted to the needs of the service than any 
new design that has been snbmitted. 

It is also proposed to shortly commenoe the work of altering the 
Bagle lock that was nsed jnst before the introduction of the iron lock 
now in nse. The Eagle can be altered by nsing dies for makin|: new 
tnmblers for the interior, which effects a change requiring an entirely 
different key from the one heretofore used in them. It will require 
about one year to accomplish the change in this lock, when they will be 
in readiness to take the place of the present lock, the contract for the 
supply of which expires in two years. 

With the substitution of the changed Eagle lock it is contemplated to 
call in the present iron lock and, by changing and repairing at a trifling 
cost, have it in readiness so that, after tbe new Eagle has been in use 
for not more than five years, it will be again possible to substitute an en- 
tirely different lock and key. This system carefully followed out will 
accomplish much greater security to the mails and at a very small ex- 
pense in the aggregate to the Department. 

DIVISION OF INSPECTION. 

The groea amount of fines and dednctions from postal contractors and 
others dnrine the year ended June 30, 1890, was .|330, 978. 04 

The amount of remissions on deductions on acconnt of sat- 
isfactory explanation was $86,287.07 

The amount of remissionH of fines was 7, 666. 04 

Making total remissions of fines and dednctions 93, 953. 11 

LeaTing the net amount of fines and dednctions for the fiscal year ended 
June 30, 1890 237,024.93 

The above amounts are classified as follows : 

Fines and deductions, railroad service |264, 713. 26 

Fines and deductions, star service 39,907.66 

Fines and deductions, steam-boat service 18, 895. 73 

Fines and deductions, mail messengers 3, 433. 60 

Fines and dednctions, postal clerks 4, 027. 79 

Total fines and deductions 330,978. 04 

Remissions, railroad service $91, 482. 35 

Remissions, star service 1, 411. 44 

Remissions, steam-boat service 873. 88 

Remissions, mail messengern 90.42 

Remissions, postal clerks -. 95. 02 

Total remissions 93,953.11 

Leaving the net amount of fines and deductions for the fis- 
cal year ended June 30, 1890 237,024.93 

The amount of fines imposed upon, and deductions made from the 
pay of contractors, shows conclusively the value of the system of in- 
spection of mail service now in force. 

It will be observed that the net amount of fines and deductions is 
many times the entire cost of maintaining the Division of Inspection. 
But while the saving to the Department, in a money point of view, is 
large, the real value of this division lies in the constant and close su- 
pervision maintained by it over the performance of the service. There 
is but little legislation bearing upon the matters of which it has 
charge; and the work being largely done under rulings made to 
govern ^M^ clas* of cases, or iudividual cases, mak^g tb§ divi^iQtt 



272 REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

practically a court of eqnity as between the Department and the con- 
tractor. 

That there is a marked improvement in the mall service throughout 
the country is clearly indicated by the fact that complaints of the same 
are becoming less frequent. 

There also appears to be developing abetter understanding between 
mail-carriers and the Department: the latter, while being strict in the 
enforcement of its rules and regulations pertaining to performance of 
the service, takes pains to assure the former that they will be fairly 
dealt with, and any supposed grievance they may have will receive 
prompt and careful consideration. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Appropriation for year ended June 30, 1890 |1,000.00 

Amoont expended 519.99 

Balance onexpended 480.01 

Appropriationfor current fiscal year.. 1,000.00 

Amount estimated as necessary for fiscal year endiog June 30, 1892 1, 000. 00 

Throughout the past year the discipline and ef&ciency of the clerical 
force attached to this ofQce have been fully maintained, and it is be- 
lieved the results of their labors have been altogether satisfactory, botI;i 
to the Department and the public. 
Very respectfully, 

J. LowRiB Bell, 
Second Assistant Postmaster- General. 

Hon. John Wanamaker, 

Postmaster- General. 



ADDENDUM. 



Table A.— Shows annual rate of exx>enditure, appropriation! ^Q^ estimates. 

Table B. — Shows length of routes, annual rate of expenditare, and number of miles 
traveled per annum. 

Table C.—Statement of railroad servioe. 

Table D. — Statement of steam-boat service. 

Table E.— Statement of increase and decrease in mail service. 

Table F. — Statement of deductions, fines, and remissions. 

Table G.~ Statement of mail service, with increase and decrease, and percentage of 
increase and decrease for fiscal year. 

Table H.— Statement of weight of mails, speed, accommodations for mails aud rail- 
way post<office clerks, and re-adjustment of pay on railroad routes, 
with an index. 

Table L — Statement of the annual rate of expenditure for R. P. O. cars, showing in- 
crease and decrease. 

Table K.— Statement of expenditures for necessary and special facilities on trunk 
lines. 

Table L. — Statement of railroad service established during last fiscal year. 

Table M.— ^Statement of increase and decrease in length of railroad routes from 1836 
to 1890. 

Table N. — Statement of all contracts for mail equipments and for use of patents. 

Table O. — Statement of expenditures for mail-bags, mail-bag catchers, etc. 

Table P. — Statement of expenditures for mail-locks and keys. 

Table Q.— Statement of expenditures for repair shop for mail equipments, 

Table K.-«Statement ofmail-bags repairet^, etc, 



SECOND A8SISTAIIT — ESTIMATES. 



273 



I 



1 



S 







sss 



lis I 



39 



^o6 



SS^S 3SSSSS S 

gi^i liii'ii i 



$9S 



SSkSSs 










I 



S88S SiSSSSS S 






3S 






&$S8 S8SSS 



ill is 



fill 

IP^IIHtii 



P M G 90 18 






:30 



284 



Rl^PORT OP THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 



I 







8 SS 



1 



nil 



iQ n ^:^ S Sl^SS :?S ;3 2$S ;3^ SS &S3 IS S2 ^ 
Ss' S ^S g ^eS ^S §' sSg ti tig gs 3 ^' SS 






Is 



3 

s 



it 



^& s S9 s SS SS %'ss e^ S9 s2 9 s a 

kiiU i a u t i^ u it Ui i i 

^ieS" oT ci" »J fH of^ w'oT lo'cf oo" r^" »^ 






s a 

i §' 



Fli 



jg S SS S SS SS ti 9S &S 9ii SX 9 t n 

\ii%i ^ ii U i iU U it iiiti 

sirf «" irf ^ i-T orf''* efoT irfef oo t-T t-T 



^ S5 s$;< t ^t sss ^ si^ 4^ s^ ^:: "^ ss ^ 



I 



iS 8 SS e 



Ii 



S3 SS 3 S 



98 SS !SS s e s 
g as! isi j*2- s^ -* :« 



I 



!1 



9 



I 



1^ 
1 *3 






9 

I 






«l 1 



s 

I 







I 
1 



1 ^ 
ll 



^3 



8 <3i| 



8*1 t 

•=1 ^ 









M 9 

iHll ll 



^1 Ilia ^d s| 



ll ll 1 

•S'2" . •'2 S 



^^1 



s SS5 s;: SS 52 s 8 s 

S SS Sr SS SS S S 8 



SECOND ASSISTANT RAILROAD SERVICE. 



285 





lit 




ei o m 


1 




« 


oH'. 


I 




& 


.a«S'S 



P3 -i 







r80.00 
]40.00 


i : :g : 

i ; ;5 j 


I 890. 00 


















47.03 
42.76 
44.46 


289.86 

42.75 
128.12 

92.84 
143.64 

94.05 

42.75 
204.35 

68.40 
42.75 

1,681.79 

84.65 
188.10 
62.16 
88.07 

246.24 
61.56 

165.87 
82.94 

162.45 

42.76 

117. 14 
42.76 
87.21 

46.17 


C S S : 

ttt\ 


t 
t 


164,997.01 

650.19 
8, 33a 01 
1.764.46 
13.683.14' 
6,1J«.00 
280.01 
22,709.88 

717.61 
50a29 

922,221.94 

1.807.27 

19,679.32 

4,655.66 

1,067.72 

7,320.71 
. 8,368.66 

12, 85a 24 

7.569.93 

051.95 

402.27 

14,883.80 

811.22 

6.486.60 

703.63 






s 

C3 


31,689.20 


: : is i 
: : :« i 


: ^ : 
: S : 

i t \ 


















272.77 
184.68 
212.61 


i 
t 


138,807.81 

650.19 
3,339.01 
1, 754. 46 


6,133.00 

280.01 

18,992.28 

717.51 


789,180.84 

1,807.27 
19. 67a 82 
4,666.66 

1,057.72 

7.320.71 
8, 86a 66 

12.868.24 

7,669,93 

951.95 

402.27 

14,883.80 

811.82 

6,485.60 

703.63 



s; 2S 



3 So^S S % ^ % % % 

t dSSSJSSsI S3 S jjS«3 S3 §S ;d §5 



» 5 • 









S So3SSc:S3 






SSSS 3 



»Sp4 

Hid 

o u 

1^ 



^9 
U 

lie 



s 

w • 
9 

Is 



• ,2 

;:S 1 



3 I 5 



1 






1- 

^ P JZ5 • •- • 










SI 



I 



o a sr © o 

ir 



II 

O 

11 

II 









I 



! I 



«0 






:« ;a 

•1 2 

If I 

li ^ 

acH ^ © o 

<- P © -M O 



11 






II 






iiis8 II § 



c» 2 2 ''"^ CO r- 00 o» 
V 9 $ <9 S9 9 S 



C4 ^§33 

35 <5 $8 



286 



BEPOET OF THE P0STMA8TEB-GENEEAL. 









a 

I 

a 

O 
Q 



I 






8 

I 



I 



h 



Is i^iii yiy i^sg^g m iU^ i it iiu 

^ CO W W iH ^i d ^< 



l§5 






Is am Hi tmu m up s u mt 



S s r; 



3 9 



e« *^c!i •-« eliHci i-i ,^ -« i-< i-< ^ SS ^^ ^e4rii-« i-t t^A ..^ «hih 



s 

I 






is 



•a 

S 

o 

I 



9.:. 



9 

I- 

la 



(4 

_ o ^S o o o o o 58 e 






^,3^.3 



008 



(4 



ip 

•oS-c 

ti 
III 




-a 

i 
s 






- 5 E^lt^ 



cos 










lull 



^ ^ IS * 



-OCT? e'* 
«| D Z ^ d « 

'J 



* ill :S 






ail .. 






I'sf 



S ^ 



888§88 $1^ isii 



li liii 



SECOND ASSISTANT — BAILROAD SERVICE. 



287 






S S 5 S SS :3 S9 ^S 

s i § § §§ 2 i§ i§ 



^- okf ^■ 






ssssesssgs 

§ i ^ 

^ r^ ^' tf efef ^' 



i ? §8 ^ 



S 3 e S SS 9 S« &8 S 3S9 TiS^ 8 



s s 

5 ^ 
S r» 



S S S^8 S 





s 


s 








8 




8 


5 S 


8 




^ 


8 


8 




8S 


s; 


s s 


o 


^ 


23 


8 


ss 


^S 


8 


ssd 


•sa 


s 


9 • 


•• 


o6 


S 


S 


s':^ 


ed 


s s 


s 


s 


S3 


8 


3S 


?8 


9 


882 


S88 


s 


S» 8 




ss 


8 


a 


89 


t* 


^ ^ 


s 


3 


«^ 


Ok 


«sl 


s- 


m5 


5;-i 


si^d 


s 


S a 


s: 


s' 


^ 


A 


8g 


^ 



I 



I 

I 

o 

I 



§ I 



•I 






ipU til ^ 









1 ^'^Lia SI 

CD ncCCQ MM^ 







I 



III 

in 

III 



£ 



I 






r 



:l 



B 5 5 fl 

pq >>ncq 



< «£ 



si 8. 

ns it 
111 II 

Ill if 



21 
e 
H 

I =&. 

• »&^ 



tcll-s 



i 



s I • ^ s 



1 g 

I ^ 
I s 



n -g 



I 

III 

« s 

8 5 



^ 3-S 



lli^l IFI 



.a 'o 

^ s 



S3 

II 



1^ 



a< u h 1^ 



In 



8 8 sii 



3«o «<dS (ev8 S 8co S 



§ 8 S 



is 



288 



BEPOET OF THE P08TMA8TER-OENEEAL. 



I 



si**" 



-^1 






6a|« 



^ " " •" " " . 



•8 



a 
'43 

S 






fi 



I 

••• 

3 

S 

t 

I 
1 



I 
c5 



H g 



<S^ €f k-'c9»^'tt ef <♦" r^' cf of ^ ft^^ *tS 







l§ t utt tiiU^ it Hi tt iitit 



8S« sss; 



^ 53 3 9S 

n coo i> Mto «^^ 










'ft 



nS 



•til S I «i { "I 



i 1 1 1 

■a H I w 







fill mm I 



S3 S S3 SS S ^ S 
SS ;p 9$ So S S S 



SECON^D ASSISTANT — RAILROAD SERVICE. 



289 



(J 






& @9 s s; ? s 
ft tt t i ^ ^ 



i i n i i u a t ^i U i i 



f 00 CI 



^ ^{: eS 






i 21 s' i g i § g s d s 5 g Si 8 § gg g i 

rf ^ CO • f^ t^ oc cf 






2 a« 



« 04 lO 



00 64 d t^ CiC 

r-^ f^ ^H y0 






S 9S 2 



9 9SSSS1S9SSSSS^SgSS?SoSS 

w> e4^*o^ etf ^ id itf •# W t<^ o «^ ^ o>^ W » k5c4 in oo 



w I- t- p 






5 
1 






» « - 



^ I 

r^ 3 

= i i 2 

-^ M CO 



•pi 

1*3 

CO 



111 









. a 



5 



* : ^ 



-5 9 .ES-o H T^ 
« -< ^ »352i o p; 



J- s 

- ^L®02 «--a. ft 



• a 



•.as • 

IB t 




- J O «B 5,fl as 



g 



S 



f ^ s 

® £^5 te fl « ^ d 




- I 
I ^ 









:5 6 
s^? II ? 



lilll 




o -a 

5? 1 'S-3 i'o 
d ? — — ■' ^"^ 



o—««-*»5wr»ooopr-ic«ir3fO«?t'.ocoo — (^^c^>^•Qo^- 
P M a 90 X9 



290 



EEPOET OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 



USPS 



s 

i 



I 

a 



4 



fill 



III 






jS 8 ssse e 



of 

r^ of Ud' ^c£ oiT Sf ^ 



11^ J 



s 






^S 3 SSSSS S 



g §S§ 



g^i s mi M i t^ U 

-£ 05* ^ tScf CO . M cT 






& s a 9SSS s s 



I 



I 



<§ 



I 



^^ S SSS SB 






:i 

CM 



^ s 

u 

O o 



I OS 









PS 

I 



P4 



■a 

1 

I 
I 



p ^ 
8 ? 

H 

K 



I 



g 









il<3 £ I- 



-Jo r xrSgg 



509 ?« 












.=^1 










SECOND ASSISTANT JBAILROAD SERVICE. 



291 









CI »-( -^csaocii 



S; g S2^S S5 S 2 ^S ?I«S5 •SSIS S^IS ^ S;2»g§«g 2?;S«2 22S:i :5 
3 ^ S$r:2 So ^ 9 gSS ^S^ ^SSl; »S S :$;;S^$^ g^S^Sg 2gSS!g 9 



I 
















I 



1^ 



§ 

el 









pi, 



^J .1 «« epic's 






:§ I 



2 3««5 

^ -r *> . ^ - 






:« 



• >_, « 
: t * > 




O O iH'v* « •* 



^ •. — ^- 'Q «ot- QDO»o .-hmw^ »o» t- oco»p — rjco -firseot^oo OO — W M 

— ^ — C-i-MO CI CJ <ri C^C» CIMO CO « :-3 <t n r-. evs C0«^^^-^ '5r^"*?3''* -riomo « 

o o oooo o o e po ooo oooo oo o oooooo ooooo pooo o 



292 

I 



BfcPOKT Of THE POSTMASTE&-GENEBAL. 






aB3 



.1 






1 






I 









^<^ CO* 






a<s|§ 



^$1 3 3 3S 3 3 3 SS&IS S 6S S 






c« 4D toao <D ei M e4e«*<o<D 



04 c« c^e>*<o<D 64 



f!3 S 



8S S 



I 

S 
Q 



.3 S S S^ S g S 



odmioesl ad r^<-« ^ 



ss 



<§ 



I 

8| 

1^ 



I 



I lit l^"i 
i ill 111- 












a 

CO 






.5 

a © 



a o 



11 



H B A & 



•4 I 



g s 



a S<^t9 . 



'5 I 



^1 



II ^ 

ll.l 

g|3i|a||gis 

tQM PL) 



•I lis 



^l?5fi 



111 
sg^ 



3 

I 

3 
S SoJ 



^: 



03 

Is §1 



I 



^ 



:S -si - 

§ Si S 

I iS 9 

l-l I 

, <85 es 

,d.a ^ 



=•8 5 



i i § §1 I § § §§i§i i 11 



r»t»fc*f c- 



I 






VN- v->. '(» 



SECOND ASSISTANT RAILROAD SERVICE. 



293 



s 11^ $ ^ gs $ S i'£U g §^ ^ 8 it^^ i ^ s^ ^^ 4^ % i 



^ 9SSS §^ S SS 



r4 r-*e40t 



Mc^cq o c> ^ 



s es us SS3 g .t 



^ g§M 3 ii i § Ui i B>; ^ § m it a m §i i n 



8 SS? 8 

^ rig i 






efcJ" 



ciT e^to" 



S o2 • 
3 S^S 









fit s 



Scii 









II 






Usi 



5 * 






P4 



1, 

§ Si W ^ 
^ -a'^ -fl§ .0-2 p^ 






Pw 



o^^z^^m o i«css III SI, 11 s 



V o o 



d 

6 



» 2 .2 if »« 
— Sj3 o a 
d-|3 «^ 



p) 

1« « 



II 



3« 

d 



-o d 
cB a 
« « 



ilii 

e tSd 
^ III 



P- 5 fi-i 






Ii 



i % 



nS S 



c^ tr] 






3^ ='-3 !! 

? ^ .-I'd '• 
^ = c^dS 



|i^ I 
ill i 

25 b If 



■■■i I 

©I? > 

I - w 

1§ >' 
a B^^ 



I 



B* 



^ §;!.- B 

t- 6'd/2 O 
o o d^ Z- 

». cues . »« 
« e t- ^ d 

«>i.2d^>ig 



§2^3 JS S3 222 E: 22 S 55 



5?; f, 



Ii 

•s d 
2* 

*- b 

« d 

11 






-2-2 

1^ 



5^ cLS 






d'« 
2 d 
^ ee 






s^'O 



^ A ^ 
0-1 -= Q 



o ^ 









pa B 

i I 



294 



REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 






^ h ». 












odd QC'ji.':'!?* 00 • -^ «^ ci «d d od* 






«: 

•? 



Ills 



I 

Si 



S 

8 
X 
i; 



I 

6 



f^-"*!-? •"♦•ow* oTi-Tcf os'o" i-Tt-T ^ t-T r-Tcd" cT ff« cf 









|5j^:iS§g ^ssg ?J38 missis:! 



S; 9 8; S8 S S 

S S 2^ ^? ?S SS 



09 e«<2 






: :S 



a M ; 



a'^'C'C'e^ ji q pfe p^ ;t^ a^s 



Pi* ^ ^ r* *■*• r/% »^ O ^^ ^^ 



5 

eft 



I p 



i1 

L. ^ a & u c»c I 



a r 



X c - S t' Sl> ' 



pi 



' «8 

;<1 



1^ 



S" 



K: 






C w^ 

WO PQCSPS. 







lO«Dr>XOO •"•NCO ^».1 



aoa» 9 •^ 



S3 



SScnoDobix Socao SS ccooooS S w X dooo S S S 



SECOND ASSISTANT RAILROAD SERVICE. 



.295 






•-T jj cC CO Ks coi-T of eo" od"^ »-? leT »-r af« of »-r cT 



§ 3 ig i li ii m s § ii^'l ti i^i it t U ^ tit iU 

.-T f" est CO lO rf.^ C<f •» OOt-T r^^" irf »4" orr.r cf t-i* cC 





[^ 


i» 




a 




s 




S 


^ S 










s 




9 




« 


Ok 


s?; 


"^ 


sss 


0410 


«Me9 


e« 


s 


^o^e^ 


25J 


2SS 


ss 


1H 


^s 


^ 


• Mod 


e««« 


s 


Q 


S5? 


S 


iSi; 


n^ 


s$s 


1H 


r^ 


S^^S 


SS3 


SSSS 


s^s^ 


s 


^s 


s 


;3$5 


85S 


:< 


a» 


•og 


li 


^s 


s^ 


e;!Js5 


« 


i 


-^|S 


SJS 


•^;jj- 


sfs 


s 


i^ 




;j-^s 


§S8 




M S Sol S SS .S8 SSS S S SSSS 8S SSS S« S ^s S .^S« ^a6w 



296 



KEPOKT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 









^ (« b . 



!l 



ce s esssss s ssss? ss ssiss a a s ess 

5 



4^ 9 SSS8SS $ 9msa c^ rises ess ss? 

ig s m^sU i uui u Hit m ii^ 



-ago 






< p. 






a' 



<a « m ei <«• -^ •« 



C^iei €409040 «-* 



C4C4C1 






I 

d 






il 






£ ft* ►? 
|§|&l||g-| 




•a -g 



5 •SgS'SS 






■o -f^^ 3 <i 




SECOND ASSISTANT — ^RAILROAD SERVICE. 



297 












w ^- lo^- 



» og 



? ^ 3 SS ? 







.2 ;$Q Sm £ p. 



- :5 



1^ 






Pi 






CA 



11 



.2 g^ ^5 






& "2 

'J 



^ lit" 

a * o S 
,5 «a g a 



-Bel 

fills 



£3 .'r ss 







§ i 

^S DO .« 

IHhl 

ilflsl 

^^ h P^ 



^ gg g §s § §§ I gg §^g§ g§ 3 § S3S3 S S9S SS S § S 



o£l So 



COOO OOOOCCOO 00 do 



298 



UEPORT OP THK POSTMASTER-OENERAL. 



I 
a 

s 



I 



« 
S 



.1 






4 
I 









"1|S 



Hi 















r^ «5 « lO-^ 



s 



g^SS^I^ 3 SSSSS 



^' s^^ ^' ^ sisS Si ^ «j»i s'^^qi^ ^* s^ej 



.•or* in 

«(o<« Ok 

III g 
5 - 












8 e: 



^ «e^ 04 to <o« ^ 















31* 
||3 

51 1- 



•* -a I 



3^ 



I. il 1 1 ill 



■ a I fc 












51s ? -11^ 



?5> JS 






PhO 



55m 



IP? 
:P^ 



11 

it 



I 






3 S 






3 !? 

M 6 s 

CO a '-' 

^1 Is 









A O 4, 






w5 



ti I 

. sea *^ 
••a S 



iiillfi 



,5 

sis' 
"111 



^i 



00 00 oo 00 SoDoo 00 00 oooo 



SJ S3 8 S 



ggggP 5 egg 

OOODOOOOOO 00 SoOQO 



SECOND ASSISTANT — BAILSOAD SERVICE. 



299 



tt 

1 1 



14 

1*11. 













M 








i 












: : ' ' 




175.00 

40.00 
1 150. 00 

] 50.00 


42.75 

188.96 

42.75 

42.76 

42.75 

47.03 
42.76 

46.17 

42.75 

67.29 
17.18 

29.25 




164.16 

104.83 

69.26 

42. T5 
42.75 

59.00 

42.75 

1,153.40 
817.81 

4S0. 00 


S ^ £ s ? ss s s ss s 

5 5 g g 5 ii i a ii i 




16,197.66 

4,777.24 

3,803.06 

650.22 
865.68 

4,622.06 

545.40 


i 

e<9 


122,212.80 
40, 369. 99 

230. 851. ZS 


























s 

i 

1 












J 


8 5 S 


129.68 

1,766.47 

473.67 

232.13 

614.74 

688.90 
860.36 

260.86 

115.85 

1,604.69 
500.00 

1, COO. 00 




1 


16,107.66 

4, 777. 24 

3,803.06 

650.22 
865.68 

4,622.06 

545.49 


i 

53 


106,112.80 
43. 841. 59 

100,894 78 



s s 



C« ifi <D 



•alO lO flO OOO 4D 



^3 H 



S 8 S 9 

CQ m ^ id 



r4atf 



e4 sffft !i e4 



s ^ s c«s ;s ss 
i ^ i ^^'f^ ti 






5 



ft o 



I 

i 

I 



S »2 (S ££ 



(4 f^^ 



- el i»vt2 

? 2 Ǥ 









2c % 
Is J 

!IJ 







tt ^ o 



ff t f4 
111 I 



.2 « 



08 iJ ^ 



s s 




. B 




^ <e 


d 


o 




^^1 


■^ 
^ 


.III 


t 


^^ 


^ 


PQ « 


PP 



(~ f* S 00 00 OBoS 00 oB QoSo w dS o 
00 00 or oc oo 0000 oc <o <3Coo <d oo oo 



292 



RtPOBT Ob" THE POSTMASTE&-GENEBAL. 






!!■§ 



MP 



S^ 4 $' 44 4 4 4 44i4 4 4^ 4 






a 
a 



I 



s 

o 

I 

It 



^ a 









11° J 

IS' 



■1 b ^ . 

lip 



^^ 3 3 SS 8 S 3 SSSSS 8 BS S 

4- 






3 



CM o lOaD «D e^i C'l 



C;! NCMtDO M CD « O 



ii g 

5 s -- 






I 

s 
p 






>r. t> edeoooi od i>»-J -J 



83 



^ 



I 

si 



it 

r 



H 



MS, 



1^ 5«« pSff^ 

0. ^ ft, ^^ : ^ 



P4 
p4 






|5 PS 
s >^ 



IS I 

9-< -S. 









5 

a 

2i 

a 
cs 

S 

CO 



=1 1 

T.- si I 

5 o CO ^ w a 

=S2 ., ^ 



S 9 



:» 



=" W 



% m^ 1 1 1 



M .2 ;• 



■S?5a|?^9 



ill 



•-i 










^- 



"i 



§ i §i'§ 



d' 






l> r* b- r- 1* t- 1-- 



1 l|l!f 



II i 



Ml 

I 



3 
at li 



I Si 



S 
o 






89 OQ 



Vfci.' .-f^'f? 



SECOND ASSISTANT RAILROAD SERVICE. 



293 






>.^i=. CO 



So t--9 









ii I !; s^i g' g§ ^ I m i t ii m ii i i 



CD l>C«fi^ 



cf «io" 



3 ssis e: 









cj«o da -^0(5 w o« 







s |i a 

a :j a "c 

'^iS ties Ills 






I III w 



I 
s 

.«^^"j1s Pis' 






td 1^;!^ 



Ice ^- 






■sa 1^ 

con S 



5 iSS § i 23 S 2 352 S 22 ?J c^; Ut^V. f, 8 gS 8g S 




294 



REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 




^ 



J'^co'^i— cot- cio^ loao psifCDt- I- a» r^ ?3-h u3 c- Jo t-oo 



^^1-^ -ro'«o' cf^'cf «"«cr — 'i-T 



2 S S8 ' £ « S 08S 

-f<0 Wl'T — Ift S 1MOO 

,-» ^ M-^ «o o 25 —.0 



^ 



s 



23 

Si 



05 
I 






6>A = 






Jjcjcit-'-iJcs'-*! a»o« ceo 0(5^0 CM 00 o — o-'*' c« to o 
ac5ir:in.-e»« rti-"«* ooo -*»«oooo -^ -h ^ csi^ w ^ 2 
(§'*.-r •<♦•««' aTr-rci" «o" t-r»-" ^ ,-r r-Teo cf cf 



20 "0 S ^rS ® 



sg ss ss 



co<-I C9a6c9C4 



1-1 fH t-t of 






p. 

© © 



A5 : 

K : 
« * 

1 : 



pa 

^ti2 . ,^ q o =.- a o o 



iB 



^1 

S =5 



^1 






piS g>^ 



c4[ 



PL, ^ (^ &4^ P^ Cs 



-i^ 



•52p5 



5 

IX 



.?^i 









:5 :|:2 3 






S - t» 






H<'-)r-pacH oipaa wo 



'"Sis 

5 b S 2 



:= «8 



M 2 

.5 a 



* - a .2 



5 









Ch O i^ 



'^5 

if 



'^ a ^ « S 
±-3 5 S O 
<?: « o « ii 



^ 2 

— 9 

a a 

IS 



P^ &4 »^l. 



»o © r- x o o ^ M ro ■«* »; 

ccwooocoux Saoco So 



|525 S S ^ 11 I S S S| 
ccSS« S S s dbx 00 S S Sx 



SECOND ASSISTANT RAILROAD SERVICE. 



.295 









s^ 



= c4^ 






cC ^ cf 



t i t^ t ti U m i § ^i^'^ 1^ 6'»i ii i §M tit in 

»-r ^f e« » icT wTr-T cf •» 00.1* f-T « .-T oT^ cf r^" of 



!• d m 

e» ■« el 

3:20 ^ esc* 

CM n >-i 1-1 »-i 



^ 3 9 g S 9 






•Pi 

J o 

il 




:§ : : i : 



:o3 
ip$ 



s If 






si « 



tw 













•8 



III 
1 >;! 



^s 



^5 -^ •S 






Is. |C^^|S 









CO So 

"a* 



P- S-s 

O eS X 



m S SS S SS .SS SSS S S -wSSS SS SwS oooo S WW S . ooSw u,3odi 



296 



EEHOKT OF THE P08TMA8TER-GKNEEAL. 



■8:20.6 



s 



^ 



^ »« b . 

3iS^ 






it 
I? 









&o •'I *-^ «5 



<S $ SSSSSS $ $33SS3 (:« S38S @ 3 S 2S? 






.S 9 



3 



■§ 



I 
d 







.2 &; 









•2 :rf 

5 .jS ® as S 
6^£ 5£2 



S:- d^ Ca 






: go 

|i I 






i=|J1sOi|l«ls 



-^ - 9 



^1 
i.| 

c « * 
* es es 

fell 



c ■ . fl 

-S^ so 




\ss 



!'i 



§§1222 






2 •: 22S 

00 00 oooooo 



SECOND ASSISTANT RAILROAD SERVICE. 



297 



58 ^g 5.al5? 9 S5 58 ^5 853*5? S5J e sil 5i^5JS S 5^5^ 5;is sj 5; s^ 






« i-C itfr-T ,-r »-f -T N »o 



S3S ^ 



«ocD «i94«d40 eo«D C4 e>4 toawM 



t^ •-« c« 



<0;^e» frlt- 



e^t- jn w 









CO '•I 
<DQb 



I 

I. 

si 



:<4 
:35 



. li 

^ ss 



i : e > 






PS 

III 









pal 



:5 



Pd 



p4 .S o 

la rtf © « ■ 

p4 rt&<<lo o 



^ 



Pi 



U PS 






PiPUl? U5m p* 



& 1 



S?H3 



1^ 
55 




Ph Ph 



g i 

► 2 5 5 

0§ CO ^ 

«J ft® u-fl 
_ • ^ P O Q 
B fl fl i^ toe's 



f 



flD flDCO OO 0000 4D OOtV 00 00 00 ODOOOCOO 00 00 00 00 QDQOOOOO 00 00 00 00 00 00 CO 00 00 



298 



RKPORT OF THK POSTMAKTER-OENERAL. 



I 

§ 



I 



« 
S 



t 
I 



»« 

« 



5 
I 









4 " 







"*'t K? "^ •''"' 



5j Sis S ^ 58* 










I 





S^e 


;2p 


5S 




yo 


^ 


CU 






's 


-o 




:•& 


a 


ii 


li 


: g 


^ 


^ 





"« 


Q 




"a 


St 


o. 


£ 


s 


J.1J 


S 


s 



II 



fe Z' 



Is 



:3 

'A & > 



eB a ^5 

11^ is 






to s^:> JS 



11 



I 5a 







ii 



00 00 00 w OOOOOO 00 00 0000 00 00 90 00 



<-«<-} SJ f-4 r4 1-4 *4«^wM 
0000000000 00 OOOOQV 



SECOND ASSISTANT — ^BAILBOAD SERVICE. 



299 






12=1 

Sea's 











M 








< 






175.00 

40.00 
r 150. 00 

j 50.00 


42.75 

135.96 

42.76 

42.75 

42.75 

47.03 
42.76 

46.17 

42.76 

67.29 
17.18 

29.25 


--i 




12».53 

1,766.47 

473.07 

232.13 

614. 74 

539.90 
366.36 

260.86 

115. 85 

1,604.69 
500.00 

1,600.00 


S 

i 


16,197.66 

4,777.24 

3, 803. 06 

650.22 
865.68 

4,622.06 

545.49 




S 3 ?i 
£j 8 .•=i 

M CO 00 

^9" §" 
























186,235.16 




16.100.00 
5.628.40 

48, 956. 50 


120.53 

1,766.47 

478.67 

23^13 

614.74 

689.90 
366.36 

260.86 

115.86 

1.604.69 
500.00 

1. COO. 00 




1 


16,197.66 

4,777.24 

3,803.06 

650.22 
865.68 

4,622,06 

545.49 


ea 


106,112.80 
43,841.59 

100,894 78 



8 8 



ca lo « « 



<5 «• 



8333 9&8F^g8S^8 

e4 ^ id ^ ^od M) e4 ado s* d t<: 



« ^ Ok «M CO t« 

ai 3 2 S'8' {S ^ 



8 Si 



s i 




111 ill 



II 



3 1 



3 

S . _ 



B 

I 






.S ^ 

o 



I -s S 

9 S 3 • 

'S 
P 



: 3 : 

iJ I ^ 

• •^ b, .tJ 



p ^ « 



tc 

a 

1 



•S -" :S 



IP 



XI Co 
^S a 






S »« 



III 

eS - e9 

PQ n 



3 S3 8 S 

00 eooc oc CO 



«S 8 S S 

90 OO 00 OC 00 



30«) 



REPORT OP THE POSTMASTER-OENERAli. 



I 



e 
J - 

H 

ik 
7"' 



III 

sis. 

|S| 






s 



'aS* 






1 



i 



SI 



I ^-uf ^- ^- ^- eC H" e«f a" e^t*~ o" ^" ef 



•as® . 



STfii 



IS« 



J 



IE I 






P^ r^ r^ Ci cT Cf 






I 



I 



S 

SSe! 



S 






CQsJCJ « 














^ p^ s 






•Spi5 I 



hi 



S S 
S -a 

1-§ 



^oc .2 & >. 



1^1 









'3 S 



o ^., 






£S^ 



Sails » 



5 £ 






\i 



gl5 I 1:^6 












a i; 



.C ? H 



3 «^ '2 



a p-^*^ ■ 2 o o 

O.C o — " 



ItJKJUiiliyit 

■-^ Sin's M rt 3"S^'5'* « S^ c«jj-«- 



3 



l~ 00 



T-i CJ rt 



i i i I is 8 s ssl § 



SECOND ASSISTANT BAILROAQ SERVICE. 



301 



•1 



I 









n S 



'rf -T 



$ ft s 



S 8 



s s 









9 S 
2 S 



• : : is ii : 


: :g : 


is: : : : : :::::: 


i i i ;i g ; 


• 'a : 


\ i\ \ W \ iiiiii 


: : : i-^ "^ : 


i is : 


i tf ; ; 1 : ; • ; • • • • 






So ss ss s 



fH CO tH M ri pH»-4»-« 



^ s 



a? ^ 






PS* 




ajat ji. 



< ^ » 



S Pi 

It's 
111 

m 



II 



p; 

P5 









:p| 



■ eS 

i-H 

• n 



^§ 3 ®| P5 ««o 
?1s 2 ^"o^fii =3ons 



•ii 



g ?£§> 

.2 ^ o-g es 

ip^«^ii 



•§§1 

N O « 

ill 






--I 

.CO 



d 

s ij 

m in 
I2l| III 

c 3 o m 



2s 



I §11 



^ 4 



'. a 

1-'^ III 







- II 



i s 



^- ■&§§•& If f" I,:-: 

DSP a P.2 prt "^.5' 



s-a 



<9 S 

t>-2 



« j^lill 






ski 



;i< a^p^p^Hi Oo* i-)P) ^ xP^ t1 p^P^;:)0^o 

O ppOO op OO O 03 O POOOOO 
rmt^ ^ ^r^ r^ iH »N »^ '^ «5 H 



»1 <-»'Hr-«^ 



302 



.BEPORT OP THE P08TMA8TEB-SENEBAL. 



1 






3 ^ 




ES|g 
3aF 






§2 g S2 
S S 5J 



'8 



a 






a 



I 



8- 
S 

1 



I 
I 



9fr 












8 
I 






8 






^ 



? s s 






^ ^ 9 




S 15 

^ si S3 



S 3 



.«a 

o o 

a 
©•- 

S3 



M : : : 

fall 

POeoU 



:« : : 



liit^. !l nil I 






5- 



•o fi 



i-i: .1 is 







c a « 



p5a. « i 

If Srf 

•A S S*^ 



I 'la 



II 1 



■<oo 
.cat) 

{^ ® 

1^ 



»J'^ 






d 



03 

o 

i 



1^ 



IS 



§ 



m 

d 
•g- -2 

I 5 

I « 

•? 1 



lllsl 

afeiC 4 a 

SB? 2 o 



ills § 3i Is 



SECOND ASSISTANT — BAILKOAD SERVICE. 



303 



/:8 



■♦ eo S> ^• 55 B « ■^•oi'-co r- eooo o t» t-t- t* ^• t-3 
lO 9 ^ ci >4 S '^ ^iaicie-i c! -^r^ q» « c4ci c< d cloJ 



ss^'s ^ § 



s 


g 


^ 


s 


s 


s s 


esss s 


ss s 


^ 


S^S 


S 


s 


^5 


iS 


Ksa 


S S 


S5 




g 


2 


i 


5 


w5 

2 


i i 


imt 1 


it i 


5 


'U 


5 


i 


5« 


1 


Sg§ 


i % 


i 


e<^ 


Cff 






3«r 


CO 


cfgf 


^^ ^ 










•^ 


§' 


SS3 


2- '^ 2" 












J 1 














: : 


s 




s 


















J 














: : 


i 




i 










g 


s 


S 


S 


s s 


P«Sg s 












: : 


o' 




S 








s 


SiS s 


^ 


S58 


S 


s 


S:S 


s 


KSS 


2 § 


s 


g 


^ 


g 


S 


S 


i g 


tm 1 


Pi i 


f 


i^ 


5 


i 


ig 


? 


Si'iS i 


1 


©f 


e«r 






of 


« 


~-gf 


^-^- ^• 










^ 


Itf 


g-^;i 


S" « 


■ «- 



9 s 



S 8 



^ 3 S; 2 S S S 2SS3S ^ ;:? S 
5S 2^ S ^ 5 35 :g 5^5-** ^ ^^ ^ 



2^ S;;: 9 « SS 

1^ ad«0 09 t<^ c»^ 



otto So ca Ok. 00 




i 



P5PS -3 






S S 
^ I 



;| 



^fc- 






22 i« 5^12 , 

II It sill i nm 

•3 5 ^A4 ofao-a 



--^ *< Cm 5 Oil 




'2 "o 

§ 9 






s "^ 

- i S 



1 :1 



-^=2 9 S i^. > 






cc 



» £3 • 



I 
I 



n^^ 






« 2 " 5 S 
on o n 



2w 

1.5 






3 5S£23S S SS S as 



* fl fl 



I 






®5 
©CO 



III- 



fl =2 o 



S 



is tJ 

-a . 



llllfl lg 



o oS o o o 

cc r^ eo e-: <o n 



304 



KBPOUT OK THK POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 



& 



*- u •= . 






1 



§ 

I 






^ 



I 

ft 



I 

I 

I 
d 



;s 



l^iSi i Is iSi 







ills s i§ ill I I ssis II illsl ii s 



SECOND ASSISTANT — BAILROAD 8EBVICE. 



305 





1^ 


is* 


1 


a 

11 




a 
>. 

m 

04 


$ 















: :8 is S : : : : 
j jS is 3 : : ; i 








j {{ 








4« 


9S S3 E: 8 SPS 


• o 

1 i 


11.722.48 
47, 039. :U 

17.141.34 
34.513.80 

32.671.18 
2.545.07 


4.631.80 

606.58 

6.440.29 

4,796.34 

1, 857. 74 
1,335.28 
1. 394. 16 

2,504.87 
2.577.34 
7.T78.23 

2,409.42 
412.10 












: S 

! i 


' 7,170.'oi* 

7,' 475." 00 
6. 658. CO 










: y. 




1.516.48 
448.87 

895.01 
460.84 

490.77 

1.96L96 

189.88 

791 78 

1,797.68 


: 2 

: i 





SS 9 



o « e«e«« 



3 



CO -^409 C4<V^t 



9S 25SS 9 S 93SS 
as ^^ 3 5 ^S55{g 










:i' 


it 


■rid 


«.s 


• a c 


p 


>kS 


Sf 


l1 


^1 


^11 



i-9 5 



SI 111 
|l ill 




(QSS (Su « 



s -III 



• o 

-a 

It 
i r^ 



|1 il« 



u6 

If 



^ . « o u 
2.2 .4J ^'S 
:3 H es *« £ <B 



111 



§i 



iiii 






p M O 90 ^20 



306 



REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENKRAL. 



9 

a 
a 






i 






I 



1^ 

HP 









h 






i^-k 






I 









ss s 






^ 






ss s 




: :S i : 


H i 




! .'5 * • 


SSif * 




i P : : 






s s 



4 e« M ,H 04 i-i M rHiH 






1 







ss gsss^ss s$ 






1.1 



9 



5^§ ■ 



I 






w : 
S .1 :| 



SI ^ ia 



iillll- 



« a 






U f^ :o CO "J j^s;pM 












tJOO 



§ 

i ^ 






fl 
11 

ss* 



I 
•E 



Ijl -; 

^li t 






a 

1 
111 

2 ©«« 

3 = S 

i-sS 



^1 
1^ P 






if 



i< 



5^ ss^UsS * 






fills 



SECOND ASSISTANT RAILROAD SERVICE. 



307 



IF 
Pi 

P4 



s 






S 














i i 






































m5 






Iff 




















































w 


























































ScS 


^ 


58S5 


gs 88 55;;:pg ese 


S ft't- 


r2 S S 12 38^2 


ss ^ 




S^ 


s! 


SS^I 


, Ui ixi M^SS^S 5J5S*5i 


S ^^^ 


$' ff 2 ^ gS^S 


is 5 






8S 






- a s 



>• xf •tfrf ttfafcfef 



eorf^H 



gJS 



''^•^S S« S« c3«S 



9<D« 00 ««t<^ 






»H »^ rH i-i • fH r-J 1M 



St 1 







<l e^ c^ M cj 



CI ^52 CO e*5«S « « CO 






308 



KEPORT OF THE POSTMASTEE-GENEBAL. 



I 

a 



s 




3 




•H 




s 




"S 


*§ 


a 


^ 


** at 


«• 


s| 


s 


1^ 


.* 



t ^1 

5 















ll 






i it 



1^1 



^ 



4123 



■sss s s 9 !;« s 8SS a S8!;s 

|is§ s i' I i^ i Hi i tiii 







III g -a^F-- 



7 

d 



P5 c5 « 






^1^11 ^llSI *l«s^ 
?!Fi §;!§l l"il| 






a 

-. ^ [/: ;j 






30 -3 a 

S2S = 



•* .S 



8 



ca s « iS s g a • 

•TO*; •^ 'r »o — 

ii 






-«J U 



o> a «e 

> I yi|i 



^1 






ill s 



g ss 



tfi o 8 S S 



(3 



a 

I 

a 



t2 gS 



51 

•i* a^ 

»3£ 



SECOND ASSISTANT RAILROAD SERVICE. 



309 



I 



agS. |g| 












SSg S S S S SS :;S2 S^ !SSS^ S 



^i §§i § 



5o So eoo?8 S o 



r 



3 SS 8S3 as 

^'- V <d'^*^' off 








9 






ss 


8 












s 




^ 








« 


49 1^ 


S2«S 


e<o 


»^«» 


•^SS 


<D 


s 


«o 


s 


22 


«>«>e| 


•55 


ot^oo 


09 


« 


o 


s 


SS3 


sss 


ss 


28 


nns 


s 


^ 


s 


o 


gs 


5g§§ 


$S 


^ssss 


s 


s 


35 


si 


S^ 


g^JJ 


^as 


SU 


i0 


CO 


§ 


@ 


■♦ 


ss 


S5SS 


^^ 


ggJii 


S3 


28 


^ 






i 1^6 

>^ o t> ^ 

^ IS 



1 ufdnut 



a c o a 

e^ o o 

^H as ao 
4 



- 2 «> BB 



111 i^ 



•a 



15 

OS 



1^ 









I' 

^ 1 



^1 



3?l .1 IS SU^ 



S • 



im 




21^ 



7 1 5 



^ 3 £ 



1 i 

S So 

S o * 

^"4 



I 



5. ^o 

"^ CO 

.2 o»i2 

Z «£ 



^ ^' a f^ -ki* 






^i 



5 .S-^^l 






! tiS 

* ^<^ eS 

2« rt a 

'O'C^'3 

a a=: = 
es eS >> se 



3 § 



S 

o 
H 

c 

o 

«5 



§ §1 li§ S8 i§ §§| § § s s p sii §8 iisi i i i 



810 



REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 



I 



1 



a* 

^ 00:3 






all:? 
gS6£ 



IP 



7 



^ 
^ 



e 
.2 

I. 






l^lg 



II 

OS 




li 



s s 



s 



ss 






g ssSs t 









5 



^ 

^ 

s 



1^ 









ss 

il 



s s 



SI 









s 



I 



.2 

1^ 



SSSi 



MOW CO 9 2cct« O 



CO P 









I 

d 















^ *^»'^ f^ - i,: 



.si J! 



ST 



t s 



« 12 II 



.a (4^ 



jHg 



3 

CO 




I 



E«S 



^ 






11 HI 



a OS d 
(< M (ii t« 

« o « o 

s sae 
p 000 

bC bCbCU 



IS 



res 2 
<1 «f ^ 



li 



e -loe g 

e^ OOot qq 

i 1 ill i 



r 
il 



« a 






if 

I 



^ 

^ 



o 



SECOND ASSISTANT — BAILROAD SERVJOE. 



311 



sill 









an-2 a 

8 <)Ci 









0400 O O 






S9 


&9S 


8 83 


S 9S3 » SS ;SS5 S: 


g 


ssgss 


ss 


gS5 S 


?§S5 


ii 


il^ 


i U 


s ^^i i ii M ^ 


§ 


§§ii 


g 


gi e 


§§ 


-"* 


>.'ef 


»r 




iH ef efiH .H ef t^ 


.-T— w" 


S" 




o-«r 


is 
















s 


S i i 




;i 














' : : : 


i 


i\ \ 




•t- 












! 




s 


^ i i 




2$ 


&9S 


s ss 


? 5 


.S3 S 9S SS E 


. g 


sss 


s 


^^ ^ 


n'ci 


a 


§is 


i ii 


i i 


S-g g §g i^ § 


g 


III 


i 


ii g 


ii 


-^"s" 


i--cf 


of 




^* « ef^- 'i-T ©^ 


r t-* 


^-^-cf 


i 


g*" «5 








(«•"* g 'gwc 



S«S 



sss 


g^s 


s 


ss 


8 


£3S 


8 


ss 


&s 


? 


8 


SS3 


9 

i 


;:fe 


s 


!;8 


gg 


SSS- 


«tf 


s'^ 


^ 


•'•-S 


M 


^^ 


••s 


8 


g 


siiz 


|8 


d 


iH 

































4 



§1 



:?• 



88 

III 



e flw 

SI'S 
&2^ 






S ^9 



! Ill 



•a^ 
•>^^ 






!dS;a 



l«i 






SS-3 

aSS. 



I 
S s 






■1 ill 
i III 



: s? 

SSI 
III 

»^C 5 i* fee* 



I 



1 I 
^ § 



1 









i .§1 



6^ 

jam w 

§« "g I 

Is <4 1 

II i o 



P4 : 

II 

II 

Ii 

§•5 



■ §2 

50cq 

O (SCU 

§11 






22 

Si 



4i 
1^. 



•3 



lial 



0$ 






L^' 




® 


3 
7< 


« 


ii 


oQ 


> 




•O'C 


*« 


£3 


s 


es 


QIC 


«9 


S a 


a 
5 




1 



r||rt 

So 



32 



252 SSS 









312 



REPORT OP THE PqSTMASTfeR-GENERAL. 



I 

a 



e4 



•8 









a 

o 
o 



•5 ** •« 

IIP 









S SS S& S 9(;9 tSS 8 S S SS S S 

ef woT g «rg r4" jrf" »-r -4" f^ 



9 go 



s 3S as 8 sss ss 8 a S S3 2 



§ 

I 

I 



1 



ft5 






t- ^fc- t-od 









S3 «8 82 S SSS 98 3 8 ;: SS S 




|8 II 
1 "3 - "g? 



1 bI 

111* 



lit. 






ji'S^ 



dS SSSSSS SwS 8 S S SS 



SECOND ASSISTANT — BAILSOAD SEBVICE. 



313 








8 i 
2 : 






























i 


S 3 S 3 &SS 3 'S^ S ^ SSS SS;^ &S 8 S S ^ S ?£ : : 




? 3 3 s tiss s 98 ;: s 893 xsa ;3S s s $ s s cs i i 

^ g § i s§l i §§ 1 g' i^i g|i i§ 3 i ^ § i^ ; ; 






S : 

s : 


is 
ii 

jeo* 






'• 






















i 
5 


2,182.76 

43,502.94 

801.03 

28, 403. 10 

2,211.23 
21,647.31 
22,966.76 

6,666.78 

3,607.45 
856.28 

680.74 

1,627.06 

4,839.63 

790.44 

2,080.19 

2,012.24 
5,494.99 
1,461.62 

680.11 
485.97 

2,862.86 
488.03 

2.450.40 
242.82 

1,686.06 

6,608.77 
200.92 




2S S SS 


i 


S ? ^ S :i^a s; ss 2 S S9So SSS 6S & 8 S 3 So 9g?S 


i 



TJ ^ TS "O 

9 s ; 1 



I 






3 > >■ 



9 

y^ ^ ;4 11^ : 




a ® s 111 
3 I I 

-;S § S I III S 



i 

.a 

s 






is if 



II I Fl i lai 



i i ill I II i i ill. Ill 11 ii I I i i llil 



314 



REPORT OP THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 



eu-SP 






s s 



'^ig 




: S 5^ S3 S g 



11 



.iSS Sis S 3 8 C 8 SSt^SS ss s; Sg SS 3 

(§ cj r--^ g- _- jf j^ 5 «-frf ,5«J -r cf g- 






^ 






S 9 



s 

g* 






• SS $S S S S ^ S SS^^S SS S^ S:'S SJ s s 

iii §§ s' s § § § mu ii § ig ^ g § 






5 

MOO e»^ 



^ 



7^ ^ SS S 

«D ^ eaeoooeS mod 






I 



:: ? 41 .^ s f^s^iss ^s? s 
§ 8 S g g '^dsssig 82 - 



SS ^ S 41 

s:^ I " ^ 



5 
§ 







I 



;s (o ^ Mo-<i^5 



l"^ 1 « •« 









I'sf 






SECOND ABSIflTANT — EAILEOAD SERVICE. 



315 



6 

c4 






•8 



^ 









^TZ ^*<« -«' W^fr-" -<' tf of r4- r^ ^ 



dig ii§ i§ ^§§1 ^i § I I i i ^ y 

i^H ^ef ^ wt-Ti^ i-T ttT of r-T ifT p-T 



8 8 



CO 


89S 3 SS 


8S 


§ 


413. 
180. 
100. 

175. 
273. 


iH 


s 


gS 


3S {: :SSs 


S!S 


g 


§§§ i ^g 


1^ 


84. 


g"as' tf asf 


eft-- 


S 


s 






S 






^ 


^ 






g' 






irf" 


s 






«f 













? S w, S 8 S g 



iO «o o 



S SS$ S 



cJ8 2S 



:2ils ss^s ss sg^g •-^ ^ ri Js 5 ;j s* Si 










mm 



Q 3w So 



III 



ii ii I 



11 



I III I Ii II 



e>4 CiCicii 



316 



KEPOET OF THE P08TMA8TER-OENRRAL. 



|SiSt!iSJ 



fl 
(4 






r 







N 



s s .s 

s ^ ^ 



tfS {o S 3 S S So 
1^ ^ S g I g g 



s 






fl 

g 

o 

I 



•? 






<S 9S3S&SSSC: 

li M s i g i S gg 
5jf •* jf * sf f If -• •*# 






1«° 



Mi 



s s s 

i i g 

^- f* itf 



g g i I g i § gi 

«^ tf *" 5? S S -"* '^'Sf 



S 



;^ s 
9 i A 



S ^ 3 

5 S5 53 S2' 



?8 Saa 2 5 



n SigS 



8 



3 



S 

I 






& ^ 9 % 
S 8 S 2* 









Pfi 
I 



a 



I 
I 

I 



1 I 



:s § ^ s 



3 t 






J? H .^ 

u u «. 



T W I 



1 1 



- o 5 ^ 



5 'S 
2* • 









s 1 



I " 

o ? 



OS 



w W- 



o o o o a 



E 



— S c 



6-A 



c^ ^ ^ 



s s; s 



2S 



1^ 



9 



•C r^ « - e8 e,x- - « ? 

►JO mPo o o 



5 



^a ll 



^'S ^ I 



so 
(J50 



"3*0 o" 

fl fl a' 

e 3<* 



5 o 



53 r 



§§ §§i 



SECOND ASSISTANT HAILKOAD SEBVICE. 



317 




hi 

^5l 



%^i 



: 8 :: :8 ::::::::: 8 


lis: 


8 : : : : : 


; - N ji M M N M i * 


M i \ 


si i : j i 


S9fS3SSSS^S2:5§SS^3S3S 


SIS s; s 


8112 ^ ^ s as 


^ ^4 f.4 v^ rH rH CO 


SS g 55 


1^ as ^ g sj 


r^ 




, 



^ § i g i§ g 4 ^ g i §1 M s 

v-T c» e^* lif w ££■ "O g CO rH c«V «r «■ • 






SSS S :? ^ 5^2 

i^ i i ^ i 



: 8 : 


• is : i i : 


: : i : : 8 


lis: 


S ; : i : i 


\ § ! 


: ii : : : : 


; i i : i sS 


W t i 


t\ \ \ w 


! * i 


: i* i i : 1 


i i • i i - 


H ^ i 


-• i i ; i 



^ ^ c4^ M> ce'o" «- ^ od- PK-^ cf^ OCT P9 of 



£:S 


S 


J5 


29^ 


s 


9 


s 


?1 


^i 


i 




n 


-4 




g 


i 


<tf^ 


f: 


cT 


lO 


^ 




t- 


X 



2 


S 8 
St 2 


8 


ss 


8 . 

5 « « 55 «• 


M 




? 
t 


8 
53 «* 


8 
Si 


S3 


8* 


S3 


8 S 


2 


8 


8 £ 

^ 2 


8 S8 


!$ 


S S S S S9 

1 - S s 5Si 


8 
1 


5 
i 


% 

S 




& 
§ 


S 




8 

;5 


8 8 






3 n M 



i 1 1 ;S 



I I " I 







I 

SI a 
Is -g 

III® 



1 s 






5 6 





►-S* "5 2 ► 
:z;p ^ *2 5 



liiiiiiiiiipsii 

C« ^ ^ C4 CI94 «M oS C^ M CI ClS S« C4 e* 



il ^ I 

jS H g 
S-fl o J o 



PS 

li 1 



. 1 1 

6- 2 ^ 

g 8 £ 



0-? -2" E •§ ■§ 

O^ ?^ Q D O 



I 



ii i i 



t-'o a» o i-i cj 

Hi-<|« '^ A lO lO 

oo o o e o 

McS M M M C4 



318 



BEPORT OF THE POSTMASTEB-OENBBAL. 



agsfs 



5s« 



lip 



s;r;? sss ^ S 3 ::!: SS 3 ^8 s§§ 
Ut^ S^ '^ ^ S S 9' S ^'^ 3!S 



5 3 5:S 



1 



Si 



ss:;;: s:( s s s 9 :; s ss ss 

§ii ^i g S g i ^ ^ U it 






9 S SS 






^ 



3 

J 



<§ 






• 4 



^S ? 8S:% C2S & S S ;> % S S3 SS $ S SS 

|i g ill s§ g ^ ^ i i ^ ii §1 . i t a 






g S 



So 









^ ;: ^ 9 s 2S 9S ^s 

^ S SS 5:! •■ g S8 ^t 



s 

55 S2!S 






I. 
11 



5 o 5 :2 



► 1 •a«'^>.^8 




O Q HMO oo 



M I ^ ! HI 

S3 1 1 1 a el 
«3 « J » s is 
«s| afljj -I 



>. : 

|| 
o| 



oo 



I 3 








is 

CO B 

llll I I I 

^5 3 H ^ * 






i S. §§s is I § § § i i 11 §1 



i 



I 



■S5 
i:9 



q 

ea o '^ 9 

>» 5 "Sl 

§ ^ «1 

I Is J I 

H > wo 



CI CICICI CIC4 CI d C* C* C4 



ci c« e«9« 



SECOND ASSISTANT — RAILROAD SERVICE. 



317 




St 

it 



8 
S 



s 
s 



S 9 



s ss 



s ss ^ ^s si ;s ^ 



^5 SS 3^ 3 SS S 
^ s; ^$ S^ SS g 



s; s 



.^-^s g 



s^ 
s^ 



t^ § s 

^ e^ 4b 



I 8 i g Ss s s ^ g s gi g i a 

f-T gT c« Kf e6rt£ •« g 00 ^ w"-* od' « «f 



SSS 


8 


t2 


2«l& 


S 


;$ 


§5 


CI 


n 


i 




it 


C4 


i 




i 


«fV 


S> 


cT 


5? 


'^ 




jf 


00 



: 8 : 


: is i : : • 


: : : i : S 


lis: 


S : : 




i i i 


: ii i : : : 




ii i i 


i\ \ 




: Sf : 


i i* i ; ; i 


i i i i i - 


i i sf i 







r^ 1^ Cf lO efC> lO ^ Otf rH pf^ otf pf otf 

do rH •-4 lO i-l I* 



s;:S 


s 


J2 


2^^ 


S 


9 ?:• 


?• 




i 


m 

5 


m 




S E 


s 


rf-^ 


& 


cT 


S 


*- 


t- 


«' 



10.50 

2112 

12.60 

19 

6 
65.40 

22 

81.05 

6. 

18 

12 

12 
6 

12 

10.47 

2«.70 


21 
9.89 

29.50 

12 


8« a 8 2 s 



^' § 3 ^ ^'S ^' i ^ ^ ^ ^'^ ^ i s Si^ g 5 



§s? s s §s ^; 

fJt^ "J eJ t-J »>^ 

K*^ "^ '- 5 S 



11 I 

i 4 I 

3-1 G 5 



S S I s 



1 



II 



^1^'3'^. 



3 t 



H os: 



1 I 

•2 ^^ 
S g« 

p a « 

laslg 
5 5 



- ^ 3 o C 2 a §3. 



£^ii 



-J ^ H ;^ >5 «p o 



1 e 
" I 

ill 

■3 «u 



s 



1^^'.- 



I i 

,_ • a 



i|-S|5|««S 





•i III t III! 

>< o ^ Q tqd« o 



HI 






§ s 






air^ 



6 o 



5 



§§i§siii§ll§iill 



c« CI C4 e<« 



ii 1 1 i 

cici c« c* 



r- (C a» o ^ cj 

^S S I 8 § 

c3 C« e« 04 C4 



320 



BEPOBT OF THE POSTMASTEB-OUNEBAJL. 



I 






8 S 



8 



8 
8 



Ji 



^>^ aoioio 

1^ ;)!$4 



as 8 9? SS ? S 2 92 2 8 S ti 
^i ^ §i ^S I § ^ ^g & 8 !i ^ 



1 

.9 

O 

o 



•^ 

^ 



§ 

I 

I 

m 
••• 

Oft 

s 

i 
I 
I 



li 




9S S %S 83 K S $ S<! S: S !S S 
^g §' ^§ ^g S I § i^ g S S I 

"8" 8f tfa" •*»■ a" a" f -':? sf «" -*"'* 



■5w 



is S is : 


i S 


: 8 i : i : : : 


:^ ^ It i 


; i 


: ^ : : : : : ; 

I 00 • • • • I • 


isT tf !'-■ ! 


: ^ 


i ^ i: : i i : 




SS ^ ^S) SS :; S $ S2£ ^ S » 8 

gg § s^ gg 3 § g i^ g ^ £ I 

**tf :f s§f '^"u s g f ^':£J tf *«' •"" -•* 




8 SS. 8 3' 

as ^ ^'a 2s s :;' gi »s s 



Is •*^a« 



S3 $ c:ss 8S $ 9 :s esf: S ^1 S; 3 
$;? ^ dj •jid y g g 88 S d $ SS 



ii 



5fc 



I pi' 



03 4 : © 



a 5 •'Sab 

> S 3 Wg S B 

ii'^'o.sa^S 



:| 2 03:a 






1 2 = 

•J o ^ 






I ^ I 

I £ I 

I 




16 I 1 S--^ 

ftiM H O O 



■^ : : 




tt 


III 


i 


1 


©a 


A 


iJ 


and 

ndC 
erro 


1 


1 


S " H 


"9 






s 


6 

i 


.sli^ 


t; 


Hi 


13 i 2 


fc 


^ 


o ow 


H 


09 



1 1 

J - 

! 3 



r i 



12 



«ff* » 



§§§§!§ 



SECOND ASSISTANT RAILROAD SERVICE. 



319 









S !2 ^ S ^ g::i^S S 

s :§ ^ ^ 9' i^Uu ^ 



t*t-t-e»< 






S 5i 






si 



SS 8 



r! s 9 S 

Mil 






s 






^ 



g ^ 



gg 2 g 

— d o w 

j:5 J;? s 



00 09 ^ ^1 






;s ff s 




is 


« 


•s 




^ 


1 


•«w 


na 


oZ 


a 


•o 


««^ 


es 


a 


•SI 


1 


5 


is 


s 


3 


-<^ 


bS 


Q 



I i i i i I %$i^ i iilfi I i ii i 



i i i i§ I 



322 



REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 






OS 



s s 



g 

a 
o 
O 
I 



I 



I 



I 



lip 



S S5 S PS 



s s 






r 



i si s 



S So ^ SoSSS^ :X^ 



s s 



00 f^*^" 



§ t 






s s 



CO -^ 



lip 



I 



^s s ss 2 s So » sssr^i: ss 

IM ii ^ § s i ^§§ii ^d 

<§ o o ^- «r ^-^- 



S S 



S 8" 




S 






^ s ^ s 

eif«0d<Dt>. Qd99 



S 3 



I 






s s 




llllll- 






e 
I 






9 

s 

s 

09 



? I 

P CO 

^ S c o 

»3 p^ 



If I 
ee ^ . £ 

ir2»5£ 






o 2 fir's §•« 

I g nm 



i 



to 

er. > 

p ao 

3» 



s 
s 



II 









SECOND ASSISTANT RAILfeOAD SERVICE. 



323 



*• « fl rir —^ 







LNI IM 






!l. 






SSS 






gS3 iS s 8ss;:ssss 



ss 



Orai-HS TO 






s ess ss^ s i2ss 



*S'^ s- ^ 



s 

5 



S9 SS S SSSS^gSSS&S SiS^£3 






T-5'oo'af ift'cj »rf lOirf 



8 


i S 


• is • : 


: is :S : : 


S 


s 


^o • ' '• t ; : : 


1 


1 It 


iigi; 


i:g ;^ii 


i 


g 


;g: :i ; iii 


^ 


i i * 


;;►-;; 


M- i^ii 




cf 


• o" • • 1 t • • i 






9»Qq 



--!f -- i 



s nmm ills 









CIr 



C4 



^«* 






^ 

^ 



J2 S** 












lit*'' 


Mi 
HI 


« : ; 
pS : : 

Iii 

5 i : 




(4 

1 






I ^ 









p$ 






?&«?; 



I* 

i— - .a, - -^•J^ 



3 I*^ 

1 a 

- ®^ 



5 



2 s:« 



h5;:;pi K 



P^S S 9:5 

'C g OS '-' -^ -.. 



"^ is '^ e 



11 






S4 






324 



BEPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 



9 



a 



fc «- "^ . 

Sets 









^Sl ^ S S^ :j ^^ SS Si S S^' Si 



9 C!l 



li 



5 ^ 






SSS 3 & SS SJ SS ' S S S S3 8 

V irf" cf Qo»-r t^ f-Tcf e<f e-* of e'ef* tj 









4 



s 
§ 

I 

A1 



is : 

;i i 


is : 

\i ! 





























i4i 

r4^ 




SSS $ Sq S^ Q S^ ^ S S SS S3 3 S SS 

§§ i s iS i iB B S s i^ § i S s 












a 
5 



-iSe- oSS SS N rS So 






s 8^ s s as 2 

SS £58 g S ^" g 






<§ 



o 



id 



a 
•5 







c^5 






SECOND ASSISTANT — RAILROAD SERVICE. 



325 



s 






8 S 



S SSgS {5 giSg ^Sg SSS gS?? eg?2 ^^ S J2 S^S S Jg S2 

:^ ^^^9 ^ 9S^ ^sg;;' $'^'&' ^ss*s;i^^* s^' ^ ^ s^^ s s^ ^ 



S S S SS^S S ?;::& S$S S3^t; SrSr: ^?:S:i §1:2 SB ^ ^SS S S S 
S S5 g g§i§ ^ S?i| S&*S SS^ SSJ?: S?SS 23J S ? SS^JS S S - 

•O ««i lO f-fC4«-194 fH (OlOQO lOr^dO caooo «AOO 'ofCOaO «t> CO to (-f-(0 71 oo ^ 



s 



S ^ S SScSS S ??:& S9S Sa^ ^Sl: ^?:s:; ^:2 S ^ ^^S S S S3 

§ § § §isi g igi i§g Mi m m i^ § i ri^i » i ^ 






e ««eceirf c« t^«e« 












S ?3SS ^ SS^ SS9 SS;S SS;^ SS2 S§3 S ? SSS^ 
S SiSSJ^ ^ S**^ S'g8 at fiin S'^S S:? S S3 52S 



S S ?i 

o gj oi 







P S 8 - 






« eS to O S c 






:| 



.^ 



6*7 






1 

I 

S n 



a ^ 

c^4 



9 o 

§ s 

II 

« a o 



ill 

I 9 §2 



I s 

i § PS 
= g "^ 

grfe 

o £ 3 



2 '§ 

1 1 



1^ 

2 P 



1 Ills 

I gJsS 



C c B 5 S s^.i > 




-(MM '<<• wra o 

(s.|-(^ (« !■. IN. 

"SCO oo o 



SS^^ 






^ ss 



__ op 2000 



W 00 S 



324 



BEPOBT OF THE POSTKASTES-OENEBAL. 



^ b (li 



C :S 

5: 



;S)58S S2 8 9 g 
SSS ^^ S S 8 



=: 8 g;? 8 :? 8 5S s s s 





a 

§ 









Ho 



.ns 



r:S2 SS 3 £; SS 8 Sg S S S S3 S iS S S 

^Hi s§ g s si i §'^ g 8 S III § i a i 






w :S 


: :g i i : : 


lii 


: :^ II 1 1 

'. ',o '» ' I ' 


Q I** 


: jsT i i : i 



I 

6 






8 SS S i3 S 

SS o ^- OD to a 




SECOND ASSISTANT — RAILROAD SERVICE. 



327 



tfis 



ii 



1 

i 






i 



l«o If 



&3 Is 

1||S 



'^-tll 



" 








. i : : is 


i i s 


V^^V^/ ^^V^ 




S— V 




>^/ 










— 










iiiiS 


; 


^ 




. 












• 




















!*»^^ 






^^.^^ <«^VrfK 












S : 




% 


sssss&s^ssa^ 


^ ss s&ss 


. S g 


S S3 9 S S 


^S £3 S S 


s i 




^ 

r* 


S3g;si§s&§§§^ 


^ sS sj^s 


' it 


g siis S g Sg2^ S f: s 








w,^ 


W«/ V^V*' 






S : 


S5 


3 


sssasss So ss 


S So $ g s 


* 8 S 


8 s: So SS3 s s ss 


g : 


i 


i 


^I'i^i^i i s'l 


618. 

126. 

900. 
064. 


2 g 


g § ^ § 


846. 
312. 

071. 

834. 

745. 




1 


O 


■ rfv^«g-^*aa- 


§f - a -• 8J 5 


'•^55 5? -^-^^ •* «* af 




• 


S 




: i : Is 




s 






























i 




iiiiy 




^ 




























: 


2" 




1 : : i^"' 




of 
























e i 


8 


a 


:;!SSSS33 So ^% 


S IS 9 s s 


s s 


s^ s Is ssss s s a 


g : 


i 


ae 


iiiiiU t i§ 


51& 

126. 

900. 
004. 


3 S 


615. 
688. 
222. 

(MR 


it Hi 




t 


c 


cf^2«g«-of cf.^ 


S -"5- 


' U 5 


■ «* s- a "f""* ■* ■* 8" 




^ 















8 sass'^Sa* «* §• • ?J 2; j; a •-' 



s ^ e 8 ss 

s '^ "^ ;i «^a« a 



S 3 









II 



I 



'I 
o 5 o- 



(4 

I 

S 

S 

1- 

S : 



o *» 2 « ® 




& s 

II 



II 



a 1 



^9 ^ '2« 
" "»3 A< o p 



s 

s S 






§ :S5^I^3I 



•S,| « Q 

wis ^ I 

•a 'C o r ^ 

llfll 1 



I • I 

1 1 glli 



I -g a 



.9' 1 

S I S 2 

O H flB 9 

■r- sa -5 ft 






.Sill 



p b, 



3 1 

S S 

I S 

9 9 

o o 

« •! 

•© "c^ 



1^ 



.2 S-^^ 



.a 



e8 



O P5<l^ NOP 






s s 

A 8 



gssgfcS g 2:: a 2 
OOOQO O OO O O 



«<i lO (O i« op 

§ § S I 3 

e^ 04 CM ei C4 



3 SS3 S U 



328 



EBPOET OV THK POSTMASTER-GENBaiAL; 



-3 

a 






•s 



s 
o 









8 






ft; 

I 

ci 



>« fc, M 



•9 IS 






ii 



o 29c4a»u3o5 on •-• d o o t^csee r-i oco-i m 







ss o o d 



?».i.is|^ 



Sr^'c 












2 

to 

S 



i1 



•;3 a 



^d o o o 09«i>e«> r4e<j '^ ^ "^ ^ oiood H i3<^*^ S^ 
tSf-i ^ n S MCMOoS om ^ ua o o t^cora i-« ocoS n 



e CO ■<«<«$«oco«o ec* 



^e> 9 S 3 f:*^»ra&l oi^ 2 t: S o oo^ 

it S '4 S feSSigfc ^S S S 5? 5 S*s|S5 






^ai9 .5 e 



?t 



6 '3 
■2 I 
8 H 



c3 >^ O 5"= * 55 « ^ 






S 






! ^ 



«-3 P^ fa ^ 



. - § 

>.,ifi 2 2 
^X^ o a 

n o ® ^ 

'^ > -* r 



!l 



§ ^- I 









o o ooooo oo O 

O Cl CI e9MC4:-4C« CIC^ M 




i^^^sis ? i S g 



S 5So 3 3d 



e; s 



SECOND ASSISTANT — iIaILROAD SERVICE. 



329 




^^'^^tit^^^ 4^ 



t^ ^ ci »6 
I- e* ^ ^ 






? i i i § i ^. ii § IS iiti 

•^pf cow ,-i4'»4"i-J' tS dt 



ii^i^X ig' i §; i 






mm M a i 






j4 5 «J n^ o cd g ss ^ 00^ ^ g i rf 







I Mil 

^ IJI 

Fill I . 



vl 1 1 1 E 



I 



•9 



1 



III § I g I 

Pi pL^ tq P4 O p4 



!• ^ II 

S SSiJ 

a llil 



I II 









a 



i 



! 3 



: . d 

K * 
111 

I'll! 



!fc©l-9a 



9 3 




1^1 



s 



1 



);§;§ (^pj 






•II 



s^ s^ 



!:s ^^ s s 



330 



REPORT OP THE 'POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 



I 



I 



I 



^ 






s -s 



M L4 M 

IIP 









3 goSe»c«^ao 



S 

§ 



•? 



i 
§ 

I 

ft 



I 









9 So^ S 



e> 53 lO eo e^ S o t- 



i^Ci. 



■<e<jj' 



I § 



lip 



pi Id is 



9 So^ s 









3 s s 

cdtt V«D ^o 



01 09C9 C<1C( 



3 S $ s; 



S 









S 
^ 






Sw> 







?q4 i 





I lis 3^ 1 II 
12 •a-S d ?► 



S n 



.5 "" o _•« ""2 






s§ ii 



i§ I ii 



I iiiilil 



SECOND ASSISTANT RAILROAD SERVICE. 



331 







02 



ss 









f4 ^<g^, ^ 



s s 



S 53 2S 
^ SS t: 



CO 






da 



^53 ► 



S S S SI^SSS 

g' s sS ^Vii^ 






I 



IS 






I 



4 ■§ ^1 



li 



H 

I 

e 

I 



a I 



t:.&5 



9 

M 

I 



Ssl^>»S^ • • • • 
S u 6 





s 


8 3 9 4S 3 S 


S & $;SS? 


s «« 


g 


1 


i s i § 


l§ i 


:■ s 


i t im 


i i 


J- 


s 


«r ;f « ^ 


'vi g 


r 


-rf rf «^ 


« «f 


3 


s 


S S S 






: : : : is 






t 


s 


i ^ § 






: ! iiil 






<£ 


s 


Cf 9f 












g 


s 


S 8 S ^ 


s s; 


s 


•s & stisae: 


S Si 


S 


i 


i § § ^ 


i i 


§ 


i i tm 


^ i 


tf 


S5 


r^ ~" •" •« 


'a a 


ri 


r rf ,f .jjf 


«- « 


S 


2 


s s 


P s 


3 


S 8 


s 


Si 




ri S 5' " 


ri S 


S 


«* a ss"»^ 


od tt 


^ 


8 


^ n t z 


8 a 


s 


n t SISSS 


s s 


i 


!( 


t^ ti ^ i 


'i 1 


^ 


^ si SsSg 


^ s^ 



> 

s 



9 



I 



11 



I 



II 



•3 »2 

I a 

s I 
I 



-1 

IS 



g^ 



M ia>-^ £» 



I 



H 

s 

M 

i 

a 
94 



I 1 i-S iS 
8 I ?|«'8 

f ^ PI! 



e«ieo^ io<o 



§ I III ii I 



00 at 

i I 



332 



eep6et op the postmaster-general. 



o 
.2 

I 



s 



I 



5 

? 

I 

1 



<§ 



^^1 









II 






I4l 












i 

1 



"si 



I 



i & 



OtO iA lOM 






^25838 



1^ ^ i § § ^ i g ^dg' § ^ gg s §i § li 



{;!:;3:@ss:s9S ssss s s ss 9 sis; s s^ 
IS ^ § g § S' ^ y ^gg 3 g gg i gg § §1 



SS S 8* 



« S 









CO p, GQ Si CO 

9 S .S S .9 
•S S<9 B«S ^ 

^ fill fi^l s-a 
- &1 g5 a? gS gg 

c o 5 c" '^ '^ 






s 

h H 



!1 




SECOND ASSISTANT — BAILBOAB SERVICE. 



333 



J 



^ 

dt 



s 



S ? 8 2 g 






S S C9 S S S 

^ ^ o" V 



ef =f o" aS vS ^ 






s 
§ 









e4e 



;s 


e 


S e 








s 






S 






s 














t- 


5; 


;Ss;S 


« 


s 


« 


»<: 


a 


s 


«5 


« 


a 


oi 


e- 


a 


e 


we^co « cococo 


CO 


« 


3 


« 


98 8 


s 


ss 


S3 


So 


s 


e 


&; 


s; 


s 


5 




g 


3 


£SSS 8 SoS 


s 


ss 


S 


a 




s 


etf 


«H 


si 


SJ 


2^ 


1 


CO 


s 


^ 


^ 


i 


;^ 


«jHr^ ^ «e^« 


t 


s 



8 I 



^ I » 

S J 8 

Ss'^ a 

O Q O O t> 



6 « P» ^ 
5 * « d 

'^ 3 9 I- 



S 9 






£ •= 



I S 






-.2 3 



,9,3953^-0= 

? a 



Pi 

If 

5z; 






3 ® s ^ 









o S t) ^ 






e 
i 

p:5 



a ^ 



I 



s I 



oS « fe ^ 

a 5 5P f5 



>5 iji 




o 



s 
^ s 

6 ^ 
11 

i-i 



« o 

<s q a 

5^ S 

•s« I 



a 



If 
I I I 

2f|| 

^2 £ SS 

p$ H n 



1| 

5 a 



-3 

a 



;^ ^ "g 
•a "O 2 

1 a I 



s aa 



a o d rf 

SSI 3 









r^ 



a"^ 



1 

:2 g 



3 



o » ^ »? S 



8 :? ^ S S 

i § § § g 



§1 






334 



EEPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 






VAHm 






?!ll If '* «* 









nil 
11^ 



1 



93 ;3 S S SS 9 9 ss ss ^s s 
g's: ^ g ss ^ s' 2! ;;s gg* sg s^ 



•s 

a 
.2 

s 






g; 
a 



3 



a 

1 

6 



ll 



3S» 88 ?6 3 38 



IIS 



s 



^ 
§ 

Kf 



s 



9 S S 

g g g 
-f V 5 



§^ 8 ? 



9 S S 



«* a" s" - !f 4 d 



8 or * fe.S a 



T' 



P 

od 






1^ »H ri 



9 SI! 



I 



I" 



3 S8SS8 88{3!!S 







4^1 



I Hi 11 11 i 11 



SECOND [ASSISTANT — EAILBOAD SERVICE. 



335 







f 



15 












i § 


'*''**^ I ; I ! .' 








i is 
















s 

si 




SS3 








9 
s 


< ioa.28 

i 128.11 

46.17 
164.68 


g 

^ 


41.72 

42.75 
64.98 
42.75 
132.63 


S2 
Si 


S5 

i4 




e 


1^ 


s 
si 


8? 



9 S: 9 SSSSS S 9 S 8 S3S S r: $SS3 S SS 2 S 3 S S« 

^ ^ mm Hi iui t iut t u a nt n 



CO 

1 

I 

IJ5 



$ r: S SSS^SS S S S S SS SS S: 9S;33 S S3 S S 3 S 83 





le 


Z 9 


s 


iH 


s 


A 


S 




Ud 


« 
















ee « 


od 


S2SSS 


^ 


d 


fH 


ad 


««* 


CO 


Si 


cooicoe 


<0 


c«co 


CO 


CO 


e 


e 


eee 


































3 t 


s; 


s&;;^s 


& 


s 


s 


a 


sg 


s 


3 


SSS8 


s 


2SS 


^ 


s 


8 


» 


gs 


'^ 


i 


S^^ss- 


© 


^ 


8 


m 


H 


? 


05 


igiSiig 


&; 


s^ 


<d 


^ 


1 


5 


^i 



1^ 

a 



11 

I 



, ^If §1 . 

it i : i i : ess i 




If 

a s 



1 



3 



ili 






S 5 


r 0.^^ 


ri a 


1.^19 


a af 


» sj§ 


S 1 




S3;S^ 


"ol= i i 


^ S 


S ?x« 



II 



s 

s^5 



St a 



-s d 
at! 



d2 



I I 






ia 






®^ -cow .»5„ 



•2 ga a 
p . ">^ fl . 

^S f*M ^ OS a 



9* v» ^m K>^r>acQB ^ 

I i I lilli I 



336 



BEPOBT OF THE POSTMASTEK-OENESAL. 



04 tk 






p 
e 

a 
o 



s 
4 



fl 



I 



m 

bP 



I 



it 






Id i ^ i$ig s g iM ^ ^i I § ^ ^ ^ ^ § 

^irf -? -^-eo"-;" itf « r^- ^' 00 lot^ « or -^' ef -f 






III 



p i ^ ^ig ^ y §'^ ^ i ^i i s ^ ^ ^ i 

glCT ^^ •^'ofrH •o' «f .M- ^ aS wf«^ c^ oT r4^ 9r o' 









I 

Q 






s 



S ^ ^^ S Si £^9 ;:$ S$ S S Si g * 



^1 



ll 



•s 



1 



I.- 

I? 



2' 






a >» 
53« 



I" 






(J 73 ^'^ CO 




'9 

a • -^ • • 



II 



I 

•9 



\^ 3 

fa ft 

^ I 

1 



g 3 






•9 

s 



il 



CO .2 



I .9 '^ 1 



111 I llllo'l 




— n t*^ _« 3 2 gflt . 



d ^ 1^ ~>H Sa"^ a 
" £ •* d 3 "-* P^ • w 

?3 H n ^ ^ 



^^1 



S4 CO <•• toe 



So o "2 »2>2 5 



S i 



^ ?S Z 2 '* S 3C 3? « «.o o f^ »^ i-^ to lO SJ « 

III lip iiiiiiiiilil 



SECOND ASSISTANT — EAILKOAU SERVICE. 



337 



So C .o 



8 88585 














s 




*w\*s 


g i 






: 8 






42.76 

48.74 

06.67 
42.76 
100.80 
94.05 




140.63 

68.40 

5 15l39 
\ W.07 

64.08 

C 580.60 
{ 737.01 

84.65 
133.38 
70.52 

65.84 

112.86 
159.89 

5 141.93 
\ lia54 

42.75 

146.37 

70.11 
72.68 
141.03 


1,800.63 
1,266.26 

2,001.03 
086.24 

1, 048. 24 
077.17 


^ 


1 


87.811.50 
8,350.16 

83.520.00 

4.07&76 

240,481.03 

7,040.48 
6,004.73 
17,539.72 

2. 471. 63 

19,203.14 
6,916.84 

27,917.90 

382.18 

63,248.31 

1.580.27 

6.725.73 

48,081.62 




X 






i 


s 










S i 
§ i 






: g 
: ^ 






1,300.63 
1,266.26 

2,001.03 
08a 24 

1.048 24 
077.17 






37.811.50 
8, 359. 16 

33,520.90 

4, 97a 76 

175,081.03 

7, 940. 48 
5,004.73 
17,539.72 

2,471.63 

19.203.14 
6.016.84 

25, 405. 40 

382.18 

46.541.26 

1,580.27 

5,725.73 

48,081.62 



s s s 



e^foteo 



»m«D « ee 



eera in 









S i^ i ^ a ^5>: 5S ^5 

CI <-( CO ?i w »H 






9 I 

I ^ .i 

g. TS P5 

^ fl « 

09 Q ^ 



3. t 



o ^ o 



3 






9 3 

a to 



2f3 









p5 ^ 







1 



55 



i I III! I 




I y 19SS 9 



- 3 



5 i 1 s 

1 ^ ri 
^ 1 "3 ^ 

I * |S§ 
fa's fes 

sal •ss| 

SB O O S 



a 2.9S ^ 

o g'g.O M 



.4 







c8 

a 



3 

Pi 



5 

09 



« 
PU 



1^ 



j^M 



O P P«^ 






l> H G 90 ^22 



s; l; 



5 Soo p 00 



d 00 



338 



REPORT OP THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 









s 



So OMlS 



,a5 e^ - 






4li 

IIP 



•rf -^Mw t-^oJ ode^ ^rf»-« 



ss 



3 



ss ^2S 3 a ^ 

si ^S* 2^ ^ ^ 



a 

§ 



s 
4 



s 



a. 



S 



HO 



^8 S S SS^ 






S5 S S3S 



9 S ScS s s s 

tf$ id e-^r^ 1^ «> tA 

S S i?? 2S S E: 

Otf l> of irf" CO 






i 






a.: 

"I 



eg 



Is 3 ^ ^§3 g i ill 



SS S SF2 S 3 S 
2* »^ 55g fi ^ e 

o «o ?e= A o c- 



Average 
No. of 
trips 

per week 
over 
whole 
roatel 


•S 




g 


9 




ss 


2S 


s 


gs 


e 


s 


s 


ss 


^ 


c» 


s 


ei 


o4e«ico 


<D 


d 




Jlj 


91 


s 


n" 


t- 


t". 


fci 


8 


.& 


3 


So 


gag 


^ 


s 


SSSo 


S5 


§ 


s 


9U 


s 


s 


s 


1 


1- 


g 


IS 


gSJS 


g5 


g 


^Sg 


^ 


i 


^ 


^t 


^ 


sj 


» 



1 



I 



I • 

I i 



I 
I 






''I 

lililiiiiilili 

o o R :o o o 



I 



? 1 ^ I 2»l 

2 I 1 ^ §-| 

2 o * 9 ®S? 

I J5 ® g^^ 

i S Si -d^g 

p W S p^« 







I 
1 



£ 
^ 



ll 



3 » 



« 8 

|«esa 






i^l*^ 



5z; •• 



II 



it', 



!i 






i 

CO 

9 
I 

•c 





a 

I- 

^•3 



II 






9 £ 



§ 

.2055 ? 

8 -Si r-SI I 
Q e-< H pq ?5 









S8S 






I 11 I I 



SECOND ASSISTANT — BAILEOAD SERVICE. 



337 



t 










ss 






8 9 ss S So SSS ai S3' S2 ^ 

3 S Ids ^ SS; 3^;;^ 4 sin ^si ^ 



{o 

^ 



8 !S SSSSS^ 

^ ^ cf ^- 



s s s ? s ^^^ 6 ;^2 
S S § i 9 iii S is 

gg otf rf -^ oT t-««^j5 «* or«r 



s 






s 
§ 



8 

of 






^- „- »r ^ 



g s 8 22 s 5P?2 8 ;:s ? 

t-4 ^ o 0(5 g A^cS f^ ejcd t^ 

gj- «r fj ^ g? «-'«'«: ••' s«^ sJ 



s s 
















2! 




S 


s 


CI 


S 






^ 




o 


S!SS 


«D 


« 


S**2S 


« 


CO 


^ 


« 


oi 


d 


^ 


cig. 


« 


SS 


tf$ 


s 


S 


rfsis 


s 


s 


sg^^ 


s 


5lg 


g: 


M 


s 


8 


8 


S^!S 


.3 


2S 


s 


3 


g 


SSS: 


t 


i^' 


^sSss 


g 


1^" 


§ 


d 


i 


^ 


g 


^'■§ 


S^ 


gg 


s 


06 


c3 


Sl^g 



t i «. 



el I 

J|«5|ii:|!l|i| 
^ Q ^ : :q » 5 



1 1 






p 



1^. 

9 5 

P U 

3 fl 



t5 




If III If 






Cfi 

1 

t 

t 

» 

i- 

o 



I 



1 

I 



i« 



II ll 






I 5 |iss I I 






2 •§ ^ ^ 

p iS rf rt 

a « t .a 

rf I .3 ^ 

a o u S 



^ »S • p 

o g^O 



i 

I 






P4 



0^ 



:- 1 II 



I 



a^ 



§«»3g 

- • ^ o 
* S ^ k 



^ s s s 

l> H G 90 22 



ill I li 






340 



REPOET OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 









9 



•2 

a 



Q 

o 
o 






1 






^ 









^O frS ID 

18 !j !« 






.3 2 Se S ISS S S S S $ SSiS S S3 8 S 

Is si ^i 3 ii ^ i I & ^ i§^ ^ ^i M 









^S 2 Sis cS S3S S n S S S3 ZSSS S SS S S 

|i Mi I i§ i i g g ^ §i^ ^ ^i ^ i 



11^1 HI 






3 e:^ S ^ 5 
•«* 3 s; S5 a 






1^ 



1 



t3 



I 



* 1 ^1 



§1 



3'S 



I 1 



>. -S 






P o 00 



I t-1 



a 



I 



^ll 






1 

o 

I 



^i 



a aO 



I 



It 



2 «^ 
•a ^ d a 9 s ° 

? ^ |i sS%s 



5 ^' 

s i 

" I 

d "A 

o c 

•-I . OB 

rfcaf 

P4 P< 



6C £ 

2 ® 

•s ^ 



II 



1 |2| 

. sig 




ill 



S 9!i 



I i 11 Mi i 



i 11 I 



SECOND ASSISTANT — ^KAILROAD SERVICE. 



341 



Is 

13 



8 8 S 



e !j 3 s 9';^ ^ ^ s^ ^ « ^ s^st ^^ ^ ^ ^^^ ^ 



eor-i P 3 



3,806.16 

1,129.45 

4,822.32 

719.48 

1.436.40 
965.00 

1.048.65 

256.60 

14.822.07 

940.07 

3,497.63 

10,646.60 

2,667.44 
6,727.13 

2,075.34 
121.80 


10, 070. 84 

639.96 

1,317.03 
474.84 
271.46 

403.13 


CM 


251,034.10 
28.534.25 
70,448.40 




9 

i 

4 


S !3 S 

t t t ' 
9 ^ S- 


«• ^ V ^ ^ ^ tS o rfirf. cf 


10,070.84 

639.96 

1,317.03 
474.84 
271.48 

403.13 


«0 

i 

i 


201,448.10 
23.637.80 
66^343.40 



.►^ ;i a 



•5 • a •• 35 



« ^•t•<o 00 



ess 
!l ^ d 



:S ^ ^ S si;i ^ ^ !^ 5i rf Si s^ sj-^ b i Ss** "^ 



Mi 




1 § 

g N 

2«1 






I 



a 



5^ 



§ § si i s i I I § i^ ^- ^ 






REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 





^ 


«^-|i 


ifbS 








a. 


















1 


a 


Is a. 1^5 


2« 

a§ 
^1 


















? 




^ -- 
_-*^" 


"■^ 


a 
*^^^ 




' 












^^,* 


•• 


ss 


s 


§g 






s s 


s 
















Sad" 


1 




§ 


g^g 






3S 


s 
















II |d 


r 


§3 


s 


9 sssssa!:s s 


as 


^ 


Sc 


? 


9 


Si 


g 


lip 




^ 

e^ 


s 


S t 


^sggs g^s 


i 


s^ 


d 


^ 


g 


»3 


it 


,{ 


s 


8 


n s 


s:8£ s ^ 


;s5 


9 


s 


s 


s 


s 


• a 


c 


g 


S 


§ Ssg^ i ^ii 


i 


s 


« 


S 


g 


CI 


n 


•^ 


:f 


5 


5 5: 


"^'-'Sg «25 


oc 




3 


a- 


a 


■ t 


-JrO 


•• 


s 


S 


S 






s s 


s 








: 










w 


§ 


^ 


i 






§i 


^ 








: 








^ 


V 




€f 






"5 


of 








; 








•;5 1- b • 




£5 


8 


^ s 


S@3 s s 


i::5 


s 


s 


fS 


S 


s 


s 


1-2 i-l 


s 


S 


CI 


i i 


giSS s 


3^2 


§ 




^ 


$ 


i 


i 


^2|* . 


1^ 


S 


sf 


i" 5; 


■c4 


r^ 


■^ § « 


SS 


■ Qd 




CO 


^ 


09 


sf 






J2 



2 a 

a. ?! 



s 2 



9 S (d 



iM o ^ «D 



iSSSS S $S3 ss S $ K 8 S 

5^5?!:^ M ^^-^ ^ 2« ^ s ?; 2 






p. 

I 

QQ 

3 
3 









:p4 
:f4 



SSSKo 






1 1 ^ 



3 2:1 



5 t^"S 



3 



I 



p4 



M t4 w O- « 



^^ 



1 § 

g 3 

^ J 

o s 

i I 



.a 

I 



s 

i 



i 






a o 




ilii i iii i i i i i 



SECOND ASSISTANT: — KAILROAD SEEVICE. 



343 




3 
8 . 

1 



!;; ii ^ i i •;: i ; i :■;:•;: i ; i : i i i ;; • 

• ! : : ; ^^^^ : ! t ! ! I ' ' '. ' > ■ '.'.*. ! * ' '. ' '. *. ' '. '. 


56.43 
183.88 

42.75 

119.78 
42.75 

5 217.51 
i 271.80 

48.66 

129.96 

67.65 
120.66 

4 J. 75 

71.82 

79.52 
98.33 

42.75 
137.66 

89.78 

. 46.17 

103.46 
123.98 
42.75 

47.88 

57.29 

5&14 

49.59 

46.17 
42.75 

42.75 
54.72 
T7.81 


S 

9 



SS S SS S 3 S Sa S 3 t:'SS t:S S S SSS S ;3 S3 € SS S8S S 

11 ^ i^i i i ^ ii i ^ ii a ii m ii 'i i m m i 

efcf -^ itf ^" « tJ lo'cl" cf t-'-f 22 '* •** eotfr^ ^f f-i" V ^^ cf <^ 



8 

i 



SS S Sto S S 8 Sa S S ^S i=% S S SSS S S SS 3 3S S3S 2( 

i^ S' §1 I S ^ 1^& i I ii i'i ^ i i§i I i ^ ^ ^H Ss's S 

def 1-i <rf" «r CO *^ irf"e* cS t-"^ "^ V »^" eo"o"»-r cf i-i V ^ of ef 

«<( CI i-i 1^ ^^f^ CO 






2 8 



^'^ <o otf ^ 



s «s s 



Sc 

»-"♦«) 



52S^ 



ss 


^ 


5:S 


S 


So 


s 


5S 


8 


eS 


§^;s 


ss 


3 


5 


z^2 


CO 


?2 


S 


? 


PS 


5§§ 


S 


*S 


s 


iS 




J^ 


^ 


^s 


w5 


S* 


a's 


ss 


5 


o 


ggc5 


5 


u 


s 


s; 


is 




«' 






S g I'd 



M 



e- .-^1 



-0 :;! : 






3 IfdS^ 



S eo s<J 353 



.i 



I 

9 

OQ O 



§ 



13 




is PI 



111 

a ^ S 

a I ■" 



a ^ ^ 

5 3 O • qj g-=^ ^ o s 2 ** 2 2 o o ^ 1 a S5 5 « ^5 ^-S o 




■^^AiiA^Uff.'lL''' .^ » 



KEPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 



1 



i 
I 






Il|3 






1^ 












s 






^3 s;: s eissi! sssssssssess 






6 S: 



;?*- • «>s s s a ;? 



s 



.3 ZB S SSSS S 

1^ s'g g i^rfosig ^ 



$S S SS $ 3 S S & 
«:i •' Ssi S J< *•* s 53 






if 

I 



I 
i 



1 



i| a ; i ;<i • 
1 § ^'^^l I' 




;§ 



beg< 



H o-ftS ' 



- fa-Si 

llil^l 



"3 s 






s 

.=3 



-5! 



11 1 
1 ^ 

.. = .„ . f1 i 



CO .N M DQ^SO 



CO 




I 




•■3 go I 






^'1 



SECOND ASSISTANT ^RAILEOAD SEBVICE. 



345 



It 

I I 
5 I 



i 
i 



:l 



8 ^SS 5: SSSS SSS ? 8 ::$ :S S 



S3 ss s^ s ^ s 8 



i 



8 S8 So g^8 8S;S SSS8Sg§ S9S8 98SS> 

I IS' g iig §i^ i § § § i i gs i i i i i 



•cT ef^ flC cCeC«r efi-Ti-r 



rf ^- cf 



8 
§ 



8 38 So e^S SSSS SS.S 8 S 



§ IS g ^ig §i§ s s I i ^ § §§ § i I i 



tS^ •f'f ef e^efaff cf^'^' 



irf -T ef 



S $S S S 8 8 g 

MS 



cf ^- ^- 



«c« « ^« 



•s« ss 



8 ^8 ^ 88SS 88^ 8 ? S 



8 



3 8S 9 

:2 ^S S 



S 9 
S 3 



I 

1 



:5 
ii 

•"S 

II 



I i«l 



c5 



M - '^ 'b w . 
•S M fs ^ J - g 



If 

ill! 



a b 'S 



SI 

CO W 



I II 



3 



CO OQ 




3«3 

•2fr 

Ui 



I I6 I I 1 I 

ta ^ a to P a 



1^ 



2 .^ i ' 



.W^^fq^^.W-S^jJ 



^QO i-3 



% P OQ CD 



p? 



6a 
HZ 

Ip 

•pSw 






H 

i 

2 If ^ 

if S^« § 
« g o o .s 



1 « ** 

S I 1 2 

^ 5 ! I 
^ I 5 s 

3 2 -§ I 

I f 3ii 

1 1 ri 



«C« OOOk 



Ii ^ i i i i §i ii 



i i 



346 



REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 



1 

3 



i 



.5 
3 

8 

s 
b 

£ 

I 




^tn <Dt«QO 



CO CQ W WW W CO w 



SECOND ASSISTANT — RAIL.ROAD SERVICK. 



347 




liiiiiiiiii 



8 



9^ s 



3 S € S3SS ^^2 

& 6 ^ s^9 sJ^si 



s s 






S 88 8 




6,855.78 
26.841.89 
54,473.74 

9,854.44 

17.670.72 
33, 183. 55 

53.326.35 

8,180.25 

129,493.37 

17,579.23 

16.905.10 

28,112.96 
8,906w30 

1,404.93 

766.26 

8,961.72 
7,499.84 






g 








1.741.00 


S2 

i 

of 








2,609.46 

2,223.00 
10,106.93 

429.63 


S 


6,86&73 
26,841.39 

54,473.74 

9.35444 

17,570.72 
88,133.55 

53,326.86 

2,180.23 

125,012.87 

15.838.23 

16, 006. 19 

20.454.70 
8,906.30 

1.4P4.93 

756.26 

8,981.72 
7,499.84 



S SS3 S 



1^ oil 

■Sd 'egg 



$ S 8 SS$ SSE! 



d <^ 



s e ss 







348 



KEPOET OF THE POSTMA8TEB-GENEKAL. 



Si 







*« u M 






I 

.9 

5 



I 
I 

It 
••• 

8 



ll 



^38 SS38S3SSSS&S8S9S&S 

III i M § g § i ^ ^i ^i I § i i S 

OT CT ^ d^ rf ^ ^ g MMf MCO OCT '* ^ ^ 







8 

I 



j8S 3S33SS8S3 3E:8«3SS&S 

11^ ^ M i i § ^ i s §i =i ^ i i i ^ 



s 



ss t 






^ 



85 




5 



i 1» 

Is 

Ji s 

S! 

e 



t 5 

Cj I'd} 

5 >. o -c 



•g s 



pH W ? P 



1f 

I 

I 



1 •- 

1 1 

"S i 



£ § 



s 



1 It si 



I • 



S^5 



_ — 4> ~ 4; 

W S^ H O 



8 I 



H 
B 2 a* 5 



i 



» ft s 



^ S 



I 

3 

- 1 

I I 






|§|i|i§§|§i si. i i § i I 

60 CQ CO CO M CO CO 00 00 00 M 09O 



•-4 fH «>« «4 ^ 

00 00 00 00 8 



SECOND ASSISTANT BAILBOAD SERVICE. 



349 



9 i 


ik 


s g 




1 "8 


^ 5, 


lilJ 


S'SS'S 


«1H^ 


& & 


^ 



s:: ^ ^^ fi^ ^ ^^ s s* s; ^'9' !j ^ ^ ^ ss ^3 s 3 ^' t^ ^' ^ 

S S. SS Sr^ S §SS 3 ;S 5 SS § S^ :S S ?.^ SI9 ^ S; 3 Sd ? s 

i i ii S^ s ii ^ g s ^S i § § § ^B is B i ^ g i i 

^ 1^ «ii-r 00 ^cf ^ ^ of r-r ^ eo « ef -^t-" V^ •* «* oi" ©f oo 

S3SSSr^S8!SS:$;SSS8!S9S^§^g5S99^S;3So?SS 

^ s ig §'s i Si ^ § ^ ^§ i § i ^ ^g §§ B i § g i § 



s 



S3 S SS SS 8 SSS C^ S S SS S8 t^ 8 S 
S g ^"^ ^S ^ ^S 8 ^ g ^"^ 4 ^ n i 



S S3 3 S § S 
S S 8 ^' ^ ^ 



111- 
ills 



:1 Ji 









a >» 



1-3^3 § III 



S 

a 

3 

I 



1 

i 

a 



its 

S 



M ^ 



•25" 5^,3 



5 H 







a ^ 
oc a * 

f i' J 5c O o 



J20 
11 






^t 



eg, •?» 

0«a ^ 



g6 ^ 
•ts g 

!■? I 

2^ I 

AH n 



u 
1 

3 5 



OS 

** a B 

ill? 






fc 



O to O H»4 IRI-) 



I ^ 

S 9 



H CO 



iili II I 11 III li III! 11 11 iliii 

S 09 MM MM M m3 M M M MM M M M M MM MM M M M M M 



350 



EEPOBT OF THE P08TMA8TEE-QENEBAL. 



1^ 



& 









s 
1^ 






?•> 



3 ;$ «i;i ^ ^ 



9 ;i ^ 



8 



1 



4 



.5 



1^ 






S 3 SS S o 



S 9 S S9 

Hi a 






•as© . 



s 



l4§ 



^«a.. 



S8 



8 « ScQ S o 



^ cf 






- • 



8 S 

i ui 






3 






etf ^ 



S S& 



S 



3 



I 
I 

6 



I 



§3 




1 I =3 



2 I 



65 qS M» 



5^ -►§© 






M S 

•Ef S 

^ to 






il 



3b 

O « ^ 









•8 




a 

1 






1 



i 1 S'3 ^ 



H 



^-1 



i I I II § I i^ 

M CO S «•» S M Co3 



SECOND ASSISTANT — ^BAILROAD SERVICE. 



351 



i 

•ra 

s 






III 



s 



?S S&S 8S S S SS ScS 3 9 2 ess 5!: S S3S S SS {3^3 ^ 



sss 


sss 


?! S 


o 


3 


ss 




SIS 


i § 


i 


§ 


^§ 


cf^- 


s:?*- 


S 25" 


eC 


8S 


"•g" 



i s' i gi 1^ i t4 i it m § 

a "* R- "■ 



&f^ cT icTc^ V ^V ^-^•'^- tf 



s 



^ 



00 n m^n^^ fr* o o 

5^ ^%i i i i 

efV uj'irror ctT V Oft 



3 






r^ irf 55 m ©f-f ©r itfeo V VV ^'.^'-H- «r 





ss 


g 




s 


;;s 




s 






« 


ss 












t-r- 


^r^w 


s s 


t- 


s 


oiJaiS 


CD 


a 


S 


•s 


00 t- 


od 


•-3 


fc- 


«.. 


t*e-r- 


« 


sss 


SS3 


SS& ^ 


•A 


:;S 


S$ 


00 


?: 


s 


ss 


sn 


s 


28 


s 


Sg 


S!!S 


o 


^i 




S^5 


g 


u 

Wv^ 


H 


s 


^ 


« 


!^5 


5;s 


^ 


gi: 


e2 


Bg 


S'ilS 


^ 







^>^ 



P I ill H 

OC5 ^ 0« O *0 



III I 



Si 
9S 



cQ-^m « t<-ao 






s§ 



352 



EEPORT OP THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 



I 

a 



U 1^. 






a 



^ t* ^ 






U 
•? 









.■.:S ^S tiff i S SS 4S3^ S SS SSS S 39 S9 

ki it it ii u m i i§ Mi t u u 

t 



ficrN" r-i"tH"«f ^ ef'^T eC«r 



: 



if II 



^F!3 ?S &?: 3 i( &« «8E: n SiS SSS S S9 S9 






ft» t»» »»e- 



t-t»t- fc* f^« e-^ 



s 



J^ W »H iH 






I 



o « 



«5 

S8 



Sri 
Is, 



■S3'' 
9 3 2 



St*? 



«i3yji|<^ili| 






•So 



PJ3 



1 



5H 



II 







SECOND ASSISTANT ^RAILROAD SERVICE. 



353 



si 



SI 



ss 

t 



M 






^ sj s ^ ^ ^ ^ ^s ^ 9' Sis ^ ^'d^^ aS @ 



S3 9 S :s ^S; gj 

r^s ;s s ^' ^s ^ 



i § § s g § i s^ s s gg i i'ls§ ^ s i ii § i § is' i 

o oT K orf* ktT cf trTio »^ 'rf«» »-r i-Tf-i rJ rf jg" ciotf cf • oT •« 



i I ^ i g s i s^ i ^ §g I siH^ ^ i i is' g a i §i i 

o oT t<^ 04* td* 04" lo'io ^ -"iT^ ^ r^j^* "^ *^ S" Sf*^ cT flrf" of irf" 





s 


8 








9 












-* 


s 








69 


f 


o> 


t- 


t- 


t- t> 


noo 


« 


« 


fc-t- f 


<D««D«D ^ 


S 


;£ 


c-«$ 


t* t- 


• t*** 


I- 


s 


s 


9 


& 


S 


ft JS 


g28 


s 


lO 


ss s 


SSS& 9 


2 


>♦ 


sa 


s ^ 


S S3 


s 


^ 


2 


^ 

^ 


^ 


.4 
2 


g i 


r»oo 


otf 


^' 


Igp « 


^§28 g- 


^ 

•<•> 


Vi 

^ 




2 g 


11. 

20. 
232. 


i 




s a 



^ $ ^' I? 



> o - f = 
<J h4 M < Wo 









« 4 



.A a I" s 
" I 11 I 



§^9 CO C9 c ) 
CQ CO CO ud 



p :tt G 90 



354 



REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 



a> 

P 

.5 

a 
o 






§ 






mi. 



^ a 



.^1 



ga g^ g s 



2S 55 



^ s 



^ ^8 9 8 5 ^!^ ^ ^^ 8 9' ^ z: ^ 



.S 88 !S S SS 3S S SS 2 t^ S S S 
|g ili § ^ 8 Si g S§ § S g g § 



'^ "^ 



rHt^ *4" ^^ « ©f i-r ^tf 












^S 8S & S S «3 S SS 3 S « 3 S 

Is ^^ g M si ^ d§ g g g ^ § 

go" V "rf" o* r4'e^ ^ ^'V «^ cf ^•' «tf 



ad 









I 

I 

I 



4SSS83t!88SSSa86S38S 




a'^«5 fc 



li 



ii i 



s s 

S 8 



SECOND ASSISTANT KAILKOAD SKRVICK. 



355 



o *> 

llg 

ill 



Ho M <« 

04 d 



,^5 



ssss 









;: So 3;s3 S2 ss^ sss 





























g 

rJ 
? 
















s 


t^s 


s;5? 


.n 

^ 


§s 


sii 


^•■ 


^* 


tff^'v 



s s ? 



S 9 



S 



M<0 ««0<O 



SS3S s s ^£;^ ^ ^ 3 SS s s;;^ 



«sis 5 - B^- s S 






5 pJ 



(4 



•E 

ll 

as 

^^ 1-11 









Sr.ou O P3 



^ 'I 9 



:p4 



^ 



JO 
O O 3 



I s 



:4S 
:1 






-cj -g P^ : a 



is 

2: -2== 



^«? 
gas « 

• « S .as 

B B « « 
. » « J a 



d 
d 

a*H A 






|-S 



I I «^ 



^ g 0-.0 



lllsjll 






o a 






•2 ® ®ji 

t!3 C^ 



SS"^ 5 - — 









•5 2 2 



A O »H ri M ■^ »r. » 

O O Q© O OOO 

CO rr> ^ CO n w CO w 



1 - 

s ««^ 

g S « O 



5 ^. J?;^w 



I 
I §5 

1 en's 

3 rd^ 

<b a ^ ee 

Jag ^ gc O 
•3 «^ 4; a 







356 



REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 









a 



^o3 



& 


0*0 


3( 


m 


S 




V3 


* E-sa 


S*9 


.P.O. 
PlatU 
Oreopi 
4.47 m 


£ 


« 






ss 





a 
o 



^ t4 b 



-■ 

Ha 



1^ :^ ^^' 



So g ;: s: S ^:S 



II 



5 SS 



^ e^ S 3 CO Se^ 

s g g i ^ §3 

ef ^ ao' ^ cT t-*»c 









•5 So 









SS 
sis' 




t m % i u i ^ it 

f-T ,HKf eC f-T otT V cr itfio 






I 
S 

I 



s 
I 

3 

a 



8^ 



15 f2S2 
2S' ^^ 



s !S ?§ s s; s^^ 

s s ^ ^ ^ ^:s 






2 



ft; 

I 

o 






!^ 









■^Z > ^ 



g 5^ a 



d 






■§ Si . 



' isim 



1 §=: .J'-^Z -^^5fl 



^ «5 

itUn 

a © * o t*s 
2-252.5^ 

'A MM ;^ 




m8 S S3 Mm M 



SECOND ASSISTANT RAILROAD SERVICE. 



357 



S8 S 8 S3 !25 S: ;r ?2!2 {2S g^ 






SS 3 8 9 SS S: S SS S$ 8 


1 


10,751.78 

14,415.13 
7, 016. 13 

16,654.57 
10, 748. 98 
2,252.06- 

8,022.46 
' 737.86 
7,235.17 

7, 697. 36 

2,514.00 

2.184.87 
6,395.40 
5,797.53 




























8 

5 




























2,035.87 
8.827.83 

50,128.04 

8,237.95 

7, 685. 42 

3,75.1.02 
2,250.56 

3,203.27 

7,454.58 

2,167.85 
416.38 

2,498.73 

b90.48 

790.86 


i 


10, 751. 78 

14, 415. 13 
7,016.13 

15, 654. 57, 
10, 748. 98 
2,252.06 

8,022.46 

737.86 

7,235.17 

7, 697. 36 

2, 514. 00 

2,184.87 
6, 395. 40 
L, 797. 53 



"*o '^ eo 






Sg ^ 3 S 
^'^ ^ ^ ^ 



^^ i n i^ S^ ^ 



IT 

1 5 

.a a . 

5jll 






• > s 

121 1 



i 



poi 



a 2 « S "M ^ 

11^. Si Hi 



.2 01^ 



:Sl«|«|i 



^BQ 



ll Mil 

S'3«1p^£8as« 

Mqq A Cx OO 



I 



JlSipS 



9 

I 




1:1 
•e-3 

5z5c5 



o 

t^ D CU fePtt 



2 |l ••§. fl 



S5 « 

!1l 



CO --^ 

S i| 2-g 
I si fi S 



^ 1 



o 



.a 



1 -Si- 



nil Elifl li. 



11! 
Ill 

fS 



S9 



00 S 



s 

o 

s 



Is SS s 



i-» e«55 



9 CO CO 09 CO CO CQ 00 CO 



358 



REPORT OF THE P0STMA8TKR-GENEEAL, 






lloS' 



3lp 






•2 

a 



aS? 



H5 

•aoo . 



3 






Id i § ii § i gi i i i§ i §2 §id s § i 



e^'ri ef M* V 



of ^ c«f»-r oVi-r f-T ^ CO* 



<9 S S SS 8 S SS S S SS C SSi SSS S 3 s 






I 



a »H O fH f-* 



dg "^ •»* 

CO fl CO 

eS 






:.^ I 



I ml I ! 

lllsllisiTlllg^^gSSo 

O 05 O fiO O '^ >J CO : 



11 

I. 






:qo 









=«l I 3 ^ 






-J -s •*+ :^ 'fii ^% 



I 







t« 00 a oj- 

I I I ii 



SECOND. ASSISTANT — RAILROAD SERVICE. 



359 



III 



S3 

z 



n 



I I 



a 



I 
if 



HI 

Ill 

lli 

P4 



8 



8g 
$9 



^25 



733 S ^ SS S9 
^!#' S ^ ^ ^ 



S ft ^ 

^ ss ^ 






s 









9S P! 8 S S 
is g 8 i S 



an 



S2S ^ 8 



S 

g 






§3 



8SSS 



98 S 8 S 3 

i3 S i 8 s 



8 
§ 



gi ? s 

g i i 

8 C-" oT 



S? ? 8 

is I s 

a" •-' s 









S 5 



8 
8 



;s!8 






S;8 8 S 8 8 
sis «^ S 5 g 



8 ?} 8 

s s ^ 



_ I 



SS r: S 



1 

I 



5|? 

1^ 



a I 



|l 



as c 

III 

§|§ 




PS 

I 



1 -a 



p^3 



:S 



II I § 



s& ^ s 

•Si l^-s 



o o — - 



► > 






5« 



I 

I 



u 



ox 



5 
1 



s 



^1 



^si 



^3 1-3. 1-3 I 



S 

, o 

3 






^= f 



copi:>r,-^ 



II 

1 ^ 

1 - ^ 

•2 J -c 

• O C8 

^ S a 



"S •§ §. 

^ " 1 



i 



If 

si 



II 



I 1 



pS (S 



3 



6 p5 CO CO PS n CO 



S 5 S 
~ 8 S 



§11 
SJ 55 J^ 



360 



EEPOKT OP THE POSTMA8TEB-GENERAL. 



i 



■5 "9* 

§1? 



^ »4 • 



1^ 



51 §3 



s S3 ;; sss ssc ss s s is s s ss 
^ ^s ^ iU^ sS^if z^ 1^ 4 ^ si St ;i^ 



1 

a 
a 



i 






it 






S 8 S SS 

^ s ^ i§' 



1^=! 






43' 



3 3 SS S :tSS SSS 78 S e S 3 8 ss 



.^e4 



1 



ft; 

I 

d 



S 
S 



1^ 



^ S S9 8 S8S 8SSS tSS 9 & S S ^ SS 




S i 



•I i Is ^ its; 






> ea fl J 

So*? 



9 

I 



3.^ 



I 






§ Pi ^ 11 

O P4 P O Q:S 



ss 



s^l 






SECOND ASSISTANT — RAILROAD SERVICE. 



361 



I 

O 

I 

.is 






si :: ^ K g ^ ^ ^ ^^^ a 



3 s cess SSS S S 8 


s 


1,182.81 
16^146.84 
61.784.21 

6^031.01 
11,375.77 

2,537.05 
875.78 
566.43 

1,182.08 
1.826.57 
3,057.06 


9 


74,449.88 




8 


:::-•:: j j j \\\ 




J 


3 S cess S3S S 9 8 


1 


1.182.21 
16,146.34 
61,734.21 

6.831.01 

11,375.77 

&,537.05 
275.73 
566.48 

1,182.03 
1,026.67 
3,057.06 




3 
1 



% S 99S$ SSS9 S S S 



S 8 S S ^ 
Si g ^ r: S 



S 9 3 
5? •* S 






i 



pi 









I 

I 



1^1 



6P« 

o 

Mill 



2 rt 

I -^ 



*< ^ 




sis 
-ill 



!I5 



3 "3 



111 
§=.sf 

^" s ? • 



.3 



llJ ^ 
111 

11 



- Mi 



l3 

6 ^ 



^3 a 

V o 

S ^ 

^ i 



I. 






rw 







8 

>5 



a 





|2S£2 



362 



REPORT OK THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 



1 

a 



4 



^5 






S1|2 










m i i 












S 3 ^ S So S ^3SS S 

i s s i g im ^ 



5f rf:? 



So 






t» *• t* 



»e«« « 



3S S & 



8 ssss s s « asss s 



1 



^ 



e o 



5p 



|l p^ i 



1^ 




1 1 i 

l-» -5 h-» 



^11^ 



^il 



QQ 2 O SO 2 

OHO 




■ill 



HH(KO 



1 



"5 >» 



J 
1 




1 



OQ 



5 -- o 



;o 6 



III I nn I 
ill liiflP 11 

n S n i>hu!e<i3 i^ 



IS 



.^^ 



S S S S S S SoSoo o 



SECOND ASSISTANT- 



I 

I 



II 



-BAILROAD SEBVICE. 



363 


























! 


f>^^^ 


















42.75 
59.00 

62.41 


2 9'S$S§g8S^?'g^^^g^S^gJS^^ 


593.37 
5,850.44 

1,291.26 




g g 2 § i^ S i § § ^ g i $ g 5 g i g ^ 

frf" cf « «r ^ S ^' Sf "*' ^ C-- -f ef eT ef 


















































e;^ S : 




16,752.97 

822.98 

858.80 

2. 93a 16 

8,849.24 
6,819.82 

908.02 

2,966.66 

64,562.56 
1.859.45 

27 Ifli. 17 






7,937.99 
5,171.03 
2,852.05 
2,604.05 
2,250.65 





SS 8 ^ 
28 S "^ 



8 S 26 S S?8 S 2 



ft*'.* * 

.eg •« 

^3 g « 



•of S ."^ 






^ ai tfS 

9 fH rH 



8SSSSS8;SS^ 



•^s a 



So 8 3 

s ^ :i 



-8 






I J 



.SB 

00 s 






O O 



III 

•= I ^ 

« a 1 8 « 

K • a © ff 



I Wfl 




■§ IS "§ 

s s s 

3 fid ST 

^-« g5 tf« 




I 






2 2 £2 55 CT w eo CO ^ 



364 



REPORT OP THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 



I 

a 



I 



I' 



s 


S 


p 


& 


•s 





1 


i!. 




^S" 



14 S 

Pi 







.9 

? 






4 



1 



I 



I 

6 



11 

H a 






5:1 






s^ 






S :s 

iii 

vS '•<iS 



S 






i 

I 



i 






8)S 



J.9SS S^jiS 






t: S3 
3 ^S 



9 



ill Jit 



5 

& 



5 I 5 

* i 5 p«je 



g^ 



„ _ 5 . * a e, 

^ e"^ §5; s"^ as d 



« -2 ^ 

•3 1 & 

a " g 

g « 8 



•d 

s 






I 

1 




0-1 



11 11 I I I II 



SECOND ASSISTANT RAILROAD SERVICE. 



365 



as 






I 



sss 



8 



^a 



Sfig 



s 88 s :: s ss^:: sss s s s 
§ ^s g ^ i^ 44^ ii^s ^ ^ § 






8.082.16 
17,035.02 

4.887.41 

458.40 


Id 


s 


s 

1 

^ 


9 S 
5f 


4,623.07 

502.78 

424.08 

3.076.42 


1,316.70 
28,602.44 
13.752.87 

1,775.81 

1,077.72 

66,040.88 


2,833.08 

4,084.23 
2,820.34 


S9 




9 
i 




s 

§ 

s 








''3,*660.'76 
6,060.50 




\ \ 






8.082.16 
17, 035. 02 

4.887.41 

453.40 


r-l 

i 


8 




^ 8 

i § 

8 


4,623.07 

502.78 

424.08 

3,076.42 


1,316.70 
25,032.60 
13,752.87 

1.775.81 

1.077.72 

60,870.88 


2,333.08 

4,084.28 
2,820.84 


S9 


^ 

s 


5 



cold « t« 



ai eofw tr>cor» a t» t^ 



e» CO 



:S8 8 8 
8g g ^ 



^S:! 98 8 8 ^ S3S 889 8 ?! ^ 8 S3 
gj«S 2S g ^ 8 2*3 S5^S 8 ?S 5 g S5S 



8^ 8 & 







S 



Q 

I 

E 




j 
J 


ill 


t 

s 

^ 

m 


it i 


^ 


p<«^5 


A 


l^ i 




lis! 




['3 '. 






► «w >s?< 4 3 




S 



^1 

r 



? 

o 
■rf 
S 









I 









& & $ 













•s 



1; 

11 



I III 



IS' 



4 I i 

••3 « ^ 



^Il I I I I II II 



3Gfi 



REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 



t 



S 



i' 



5105" 






B 

a 



o 












^ 

.s 









I 



itii 






£9 3S 




o» e>t<- i-Scoo com 



t*t*t- «o<DC»r<- t*o« 



I 



41:: s"* 



SS S'^3 






©2 



S3 



'»i 



o © 5 o « .« 



Sisg 









£* " ^ 



:^ 




• OCA 









itl II |fg|£ 



^I1 






if 

•go 

SS 

52 



S<^ 




SECOND ASSISTANT — RAILROAD SERVICE. 



867 






8 

1 






sss 3 s 3 &{: atn aacs s sses s 9s 



^ t-- 



V etif 






^ t-' 



eief 



t«cot« •«* 



■s g*-" 



s s 



3Sf5 S 8 So SS Sr:8 SSS3 S SSSS 8 SS 







SSI s s ^ i^ S^S S|si i ISIS i i'"^ 
ill § § § is 8S§ sill i iii| i is 



368 



REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 



m 

4 



« 



I 

i 



I 

g 

I 



I 

B 
& 






I 



I 



.9 



CO 



«5 



I ill 

■8t8«* 



a 



P. 

S 



0< 

I 
I 
I 









Ml 



lllllll 



8 »"*'<'flS • 



p hf^P^^^•<^-h Est fept<fcfa P^ 




?cs 



I 

1 ^ 



J I 



^1 



•■§1 
^ .1 



Joi SS5««^. IS 11 
n i-» pE4 n t^ftita ^ nnpQ 




Si td 

Ills 8 



8S 



Si 

O • 



^?sT 



Ilk 



Itill 
lull 

issis 

^saBB 



M 


Is*- 2^8 6 - 52" 8 a*" 


8 




8 


1 ,.= 


1^ 


S 8 8 8 8 8 888 8 888 


8 


100.00 

1.36&00 

1,000.00 
725.00 
70tf.00 


§ 


1 7,875.00 

800.00 

1,500.00 



I ill 



in 

II* 

«« i. « 




S 8 8 3 8 S 8SS3 S SSS 



i I §11 



III 



SECOND ASSISTANT — ^STEAMBOAT SERVICE. 



369 



i 

II 

;-i 

II 

ll 

u 

1* 

•I 



i^i^ 



till la 

SBSf Za 

lll| II 

§§§§ i§ 

III* 

8§§f 

saa' __ 



ii 

a t 



in I 

III 4 



.>4 



. Iltt 



a 






Islsfsf 






8 
§ 



Deo (Qoe 



»a« 



ss 



s s s 

§ i i 



-g g 



sssssss s 



oo««9e«e4eeoe •xmoocacdv^ 



S8SSS8 8 8 S 8 









a 

I 



I -^ ii 






S3 I 



5" 

mnkil 



5 1 



y> SCOOT -a 

•3-<fe^23 a a S I 



.a 



3 

2 
•H 

^ 



^ 






ill 

mi . 

>k^ s « s 



Si i^ 
*-» 2 

^ " I 
Is s 



Ilifll ! 

3S|||il 

|§35S3 a 

a c o o o o o 

2:i E a s,s a 






II 

CO H 
2 2 
|i 

a a 



III 
P M G 90- 



•A lA iO to m lA tr> 
t» e- 1~ t» t- i> r^ 






8 8 
8 o 



-24 



370 



REPOBT - OF ' TSS POSTMASTEB-GBIfEBAL. 



•s 

p 
a 



a 

6 






a a 
oo 



m 



«Dee<ieo«0«e<) 









S3SSSSS S 



2 « 



S!38SSS<; 



sssssss 



cat«ao ' fc 



8SS 



§1 



I 






fl 






ilil 



5 ►»"► 






°tl ^ 3 & ' 



llilitt 

a a «B fl s S ° 



-251 



HOO 



o « 



^ I 



SSSSnoS o 
coooooo ^ 



liiiiil 

o CO ci n n CO n 






bo 
SB 

55 



as 

fiQPQ 



SECOND • ASSISTANT — STEAMBOAT SERVICE. 



371 



ii 

si 



I 



Me«^t«M 






3 






^s 



SSS ? 33$ ^ SS 



sss s 



8 SS 



i it 



^ 

Is*® 

ill* I 
2SfS 



I 
^1 



II if 111 111 



f^O^ 



wM 



►9 »^e^ 



is 



«!3 



3 V 



^<5gs 

m 



S,sg 



'Hi 

Us 



|h^I h III 



111 




I 



I g ho 
Sill 



i §1 

r ►.a 

i -s 



ill I ill 1 ii ill I 



372 



REPORT OE THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 



1 

P 

a 

o 






a 
S 



a. . . 

£ o 9 2 

aa$a 

O O u O 

£233 



mi 



5 






aa| 
ooS 



o o 

aa 



1 



s 
I 






x^l 



1^1 



5' 



I 



ceeo«D«Dt« 



eMiHC<9ee«eoeQMr-ie« 



15385: f2 



S8SSS 






8SSS 



81 2 «2S^:;SSS( S 



S 888888 8 



n s 



2 
3 







M > 









6 3 



I 



III! 



SECOND ASSISTANT — STEAMBOAT SERVICE. 



373 






aa 











II 




^ 




«eco 


•«C3^« 




ds s s s s s 


i' 


8 


8 

2 




1 


• 

i 


SS9SS S 3 StSSSS H 8;:S£{! 




Z 8 


3 


i, 328. 77 

M4.00 
6.000.00 
6.000.00 




s 
1 



I 

«e 



■5 

i-i 












II 



3 -Is 

I ill 



3 

p. 



I 

o 

I 




fii 



|§|ejli 



11 



374 



REPOHT OP THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 



I 



^ 
« 



s 



f 



S 



I 



I 

I 



I! 

IS 



'H 



.1 



If 

8*3 

d 



I 



88 

131 









I" 



si 



ss 



8S 









3S 
is 



S3 

r 







SECOND ASSISTANT — ^INCHBASK AND DECREASE. 



375 



g 



8$3SS$SSSS 






i 






ssss 




m 



I 



iJ 



a ^^ 



M^c 



JHIIIIIIlll I, 



te 



REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 



11 






: :g 


:3 ;SS : : 


;;•! 


:2 !^^ ; i 


: : :« 


't-- ''-f : : 


. . .(« 








.3 

I! 



3SS 






ii 






e 
I 






fi CO esT •r^eCef 04 ih 






Sf:s 



ss 



So 















9SSS 



?:$ 



1-8 



ffi 



n 






i| 






ztiitun mat 



S SS9S 






ss 






g 









1^ l^gssig^^ ^^^^si 







SECOND ASSISTANT — INCREASE AND DECBEASE. 377 



Hi 

s s'sf 



:85S 



:38S 
:v let ^ 



;SSSSS 









ssss 



ssss 












378 



REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 



I 

3 



a 
o 



I 



I 

i 



• »i 



1 



I 



.8 






I 



I. 

11 

^ P« 

s 



a 

I 



3 

H 



« 9 
11 



s 






I 












jg^sssisisiii^ mtmt Mima uu 



r 






13^ 



S8!i^SSSS SSS8§S5;g 8^S?S5:?:!?S SS 

gsss'ggs isi^iis^ s*s^|g|gg g§ 



S8 






§s 


S;; 


SSS : 




is 


m 


i3i; 




5g? 


s»s 


«^S5-| 





S§ : 


5 i 






:S ig 


SSSSS 






:S : 






n\ 






i '4 


834. 
824. 
152. 
242. 
370. 






•i i 




la**: 


tf : 






:S is* 


s"3sa's 






is i 





2t 83SS 

«D« eOCMOOO 





SS 


ssa^s 


s 


g i 


s 




li 


gri 


rfgoo<tfo 


s 


2i 


a 




^ : 















si S : is : i^SS gds'^^^ 



S^ 



:5i 



• Sr- 



issji 



:^g" s*ii 




SECOND ASSISTANT — INCREASE AND DECREASE. 



379 



s -.s 

^^ • 

S : 









ss 









:2S 



ssssss 



sssss 



ss 



SS8SSS 



iiilit^i 



sssss 



V »- 



A 



I 



■^llll 



380 



EEPOBT OP THE POSTMASTER-QENBRAL. 



i 



S :8S 

1-5 'tr-H 



ssss, 



S :SSSSSSS 






2lWi¥fS8iTgM8^S^"l88ll8S28lSlSWSg8SHa8f 



■a 



i 



X " " 



:^^^^g^^!^g^iligs^gi^^s«^a«§l§S'^=g 



rj" ^ 












I 

B 

2 



a 

I 

So 



jl 

4i< 



i 

a 



ii 



it 



% 



T§S 



•4 •« 






II 



f2S 
83 



8S 



I 
I 

i 

1 



*« 



mo 



I 



Ssstsi 












sss 






88 



88 



5 ooo «o 
cT r^* irT 






I i 






•Hnf-ScIS *io93ek 



^ss^-^a 



Pss 



8 * 









gg 






iss : : 


I : isss : : 


i is iss is iss : : : 


: i : iss is : 


i^-" i I 


: : is"^*^ : i 


i ;^ igg i- \^^\\\ 


i : i i-5«J i^ j 



CO 



II 



t 

"^"sSsllssl'Tgist fiss^gssss^'ssssssssssss'ss's 



i 






:9S8SSS 






00 'vd^^odokop^ 



?SoS$3S$S 



p3 



5: 



94 ef 






1 



1^.1 



s=« I 







^:<^^aaS(SSneoSS^3JMM3iiaaa»ail!S£»S£!SllSS£S. 



-81 






SECOND ASSISTANT — ^DEDUCTIOIJS, FINES, ETCl 



381^ 



SS :SS 



S3SSS88S6 

am 



^ «r 



Si 






S3 



^5 



ss 






sssse 

^ of 






IFffWIaH' 



!2S 



SE^ 






IV 



1 



,,.oi5P|| S 



M 

H 

p 

H 



I 



I 



II 

§1 



S!3SS 






I 



SS3SSS 



I 






^ ^ 



382 



BEPOBT OP l-HJB POSTMASTEB-GBNEEAL. 



G,—Mail service as in operation June 30, 1869, and June 30, 1890, shotHtig increase and 
decrease, and j}ercenta!ge of increase and decrease^ from June 30, 1889, to June 30, 1890. 



June 30, 1880. 



June 80, 1880. 






A 



€S 



|S 

IS- 



STAK URVICK. 

Number of routes 

LeoKtb of routes (mUes) 

Annual rate of expenditure 

Number of miles trareled ptit 

annum 

Rate of cost per mile traveled . . . 
Kate of cost per mile of length . . 
Average number of trips per 

week 



BBOULATIOX-WAGOK SERVICE (io 

eluded in star service.) 

Number of routes 

Length of routes (miles) 

Annual rate uf expenditure 

Number of miles traveled per 

annum 

llate of ooot per mile traveled . . . . 
Kate of coBt per mile of length . . . 
Average number of trips per 

veolc 



BTAB ssuvicE (ouittioE rogulft- 
tion-wagon service). 

Number of routes 

Length of routes (miles) 

Annual rate of expenditure 

Number of miles traveled p«r 

annum 

Kate of cost per milu traveled . . . 
Kate of cost per mile of length. . 
Aveiago number of trips per 

week .« 



STKAM-BOAT ftBKVICB. 

Number of routes 

Length of routes (miles) 

Annual rate of expenditure 

Number of miles traveled per 

annum s 

Rate of cost per mile traveled . . . 
Kate of cost per mile of Inngth.. 
Average number of trips per 

week 



MAIL-MK88KNGEB 8BBVICB. 

Number of routes 

Length of routes (miles) 

Annual rate of expenditure 

Number of miles traveled per 

annum 

lute of cost per mile traveled . .. 
Kate of cost per mile of length. . 
Average number of trips per 

week 



15,077 
233, 331. 81 
$5,228,887.07^ 

88. 777. 000. 70 

S.62 cents. 

$22.40 



80 

400.70 

$403,720.74 

1,516,344.65 

26. 62 cents. 

$1, 007. 06 



36.38 



15,047 
282,031.11 
$4,824,657,334 

88,261.266.05 

5. 46 cents. 

$20.71 

a64 



128 

10,507.67 

$446,032.48 

3,170,274.26 

14. 06 cents. 

$12. 08 

2.87 



6.344 

5, 023. 27 

$040,188.85 

10,781.753.80 

& 80 cents. 

$188.05 

20.63 



15,887 
237,4'M.81 
$5,411,666,061 

05,160,018.76 

6.68 cents. 

$22.70 

&85 



36 

507.04 

$451.04&14 

1,045.200.37 

23. 18 cents. 

$880.57 

86.80 



15.851 

236.040.77 

$4,000,617.02^ 

03,215,628.30 

5. 32 cents. 

$20.03 

3.78 



120 

10,456.42 

$462,810.72 

8, 236, 806. 05 

14. 20 cenU. 

$44.26 

2.07 I 



6.714 

5,245.33 

$1,010,287.66 

0.563,017.40 

10. 65 cents. 

$104.32 

17. M 



810 

4.125 

$183, 278. 00^ 

6, 383, 3ia 06 



$0.80 
0.16 



6 

106.34 

$47,318.40 

428,045.72 



0. 14 cent 



0.51 



804 

4, 018. 66 

$135, 060. 50i 

4.054,372.34 



$o.ae 

0.14 



$16, 787. 24 

66.531.70 
0. 23 cwnt. 



370 

222.00 

$70, 008. 71 



3. 44 cents. 
$117.00 



5.87 
L76 
3.50 

5.00 

'L74 

4.33 



120.00 
26.53 
1L72 

28.28 



2.40; 



0. 14 cent. 



141.45 



12.02 
U.71 



1.40 



5.34 
1.72 
2.81 

5.61 

i.Ol 

3.84 



0.78 
3.'76 



2.56I 



L33 



h 85 cents. 
$5.37 



2.00 

; 1.03 

5.18 

. 3.48 



6.83 

4 42 
7. 



1.218,736.40 



8.10 



21.02 
2.84 



n.30 



15.02 



SECOND ASSISTANT — TOTALS OF MAIL SEBYICE. 



383 



G.^Mail »ervice a$ in operaHan June 30, 1899, and June 30, 1890, etc. — Con tinned. 



lt<&ILBOAI> 8BSV1CS. 

Number of routes 

Lenirth of routes (miles) 

Annual rate of C'xpenditure: 

For traaspffftation 

For railvay poBt^>iBce cars.. 

For transportotion and rail- 
way p. o. cars combined . . . 
Number of miJes traveled per 

annum 

Bate of cost per mile traveled: 

For transportation 

For transportation and rail- 
way p. u. cars combined . . . 
Bate of coat per roile of length : 

For transportation 

For transportation and rail- 
way p. o. oars combined . . . 
Averse number of trips per 
week 

SPECIAL ovticB anviCB. 

Number of routes 

Length of routes (miles) 

Annual rate ot expenditure 

Number of miles traveled per 

annum 

Bate of cost per mile traveled . . . 
Bate of cost per mile of length . . . 
Average number of trips per 

week 

UAlhWAY POflT-OmCB CLBRKS. 

Number of clerks 

Annual rate of expenditure 

MAIL BQUIPMBim. 

Msil-bafTS, mail-bag catchers, etc. 

liail-locks and keys, etc 

Bepair-sbop for mail equipments. 
Total annual rate of ex- 
penditure 

NKCS88AET AXD SPKCIAL BACIU- 
1118 OX TBUKK UXfiS. 

Annual rate of expenditure 

RBCAPITULATlOir. 

Total number of routes 

Total length of routes (miles) ... 
Tutai annual rate of expenditure. 
Total number of miles traveled 

per annum 

Bate of cost per mile traveled . . . 
Bate of cost per mile of length. .. 
Average number of trips per 

week 



June 80, 1880. 



2.113 
150,381.53 

$10,441,005.78 
02, 198. 617. 56 



|21,630,613.'83 

204,102,480.08 

0. 62 cents. 

10. 59 cents. 

$129.27 

$143.80 

13.05 



1.000 

16,824.66 

$51,600.16 

2.070,766.36 

1. 73 cents. 

$3.06 



1.70 



5.448 
$5^268,600.00 



$180, 001. 80 A 
$15^ 729. 53 



$196^ 630. 83i^ 



$295.666. 88 



25,661 
416. 159. 14 
$34,075,717.10/, 

310,901.884.29 
10. 96 cents. 
$81.88 

7. IS 



June 30, 1880. 



2.199 
154.779.35 



H 

II 



86 

4»397.83 



$20, 869. 231. 55 !$!, 428, 181 77 
$2,526,000.11 $327. 48;:. 66 



$23. 895, 231. 66 

215,716,680.17 

9. 67 cents. 

10. 84 cents. 

$134.83 

$151 15 

18.40 



2,176 

20,052.81 

$42,840.13 

3,733,070.61 

1. 14 cents. 

$2.13 

1.79 



$1,755,618.33 

U,523,19L09 

a 15 cent. 

0. 25 cent. 

$5.56 

$7.28 

0.35 



177 
3, 228. 15 



753.80^28 



0.00 



$5, 818. 655. 00 $550. 055. 00 



$222,857.47) 
$14. 768. 03 
$9,889.05 

$247. 515. 15) 



$295,421.78 



27,105 

427. 991). 72 
$36, 693, 437. 07 

327.400.493.02 

11. 20 oenla. 

$85.78 

7.85 



$41, 056. 17 A 



$8,889.05 
$50,884.32/, 



1.444 
11, 831. 58 
$2,617,719.96A 

16,507.608.78 
0. 24 cent. 
$3.85 

0.17 






S3 



19' 



s^ 



4.1 O 
eg 



4.07 
2.02 



7.84 
14.89 



&11 
5.64 
1.57 
2.36 
4.80 
5.04 
2.68 



' 8.85 

.119.18 

$8^769.03 



0. 50 cent. 
0. 03 cent. 



25.28 



5.29 



7.12 
10.44 



060.90 



. 23. 19 



25.87 



$233.60 



5.62 
2.84 



I 5.30 
2. 18 
4.70 

2.36 



58 



16.99 



34.10 
30.39 



&10 



0.07 



384 



EEPOBT OF THE P0STMA8TEB-GENEBAL. 



H. — Table $howing the re-fMutment of the rates of pay per mile on railroadroutes in States 
routee in other States ana Territories ; the re-adjustn^ent of the rates based upon returns 
mails and raihcofy post-^ffioe olerkSf and the nunAer of trips per w^, in acoordancetoith 

[Abbreviations: r. p. o., railway poet-offloe ; apt., 



I 

I 



State aod termini. 



MAins. 
2| Kewporti Foxcroft. . . , 



1004 



1007 



1017 



nW HAMF8H1BB. 

Hookeet, Centre 
Barnstead. 



Fabyaii House, N^. H., 
South Lnnenborgb, 

....do 



1019} Belmont, Tilton. 

VEIUfOHT. 



2017 



3034 



104035 



Montpelier Junction 
(D. o.>,WilliamBtown 



MA88ACHU8KTTB. 

North Grafton Sta. (n. 
o.), West Upton. 



Bofcton, Kaos., ProTi- 
denoe, R.I. 



104036, Boston. Dedham 

104037 Canton Junction 
(n.o.), Stoughton. 
3074| Beaton, Rivertide 
I Junction (n. o.) 



Corporate title of 

company carrying 

the mail. 



3077 Mount Tom, • E»Bt- 
hamptonStation(o. o.) 
I 
3081 Chatham Station (n. 
o.), Harwich Junc- 
tion (n.o.) 



3082 



Lowell Janction (n. 
o.), Lowell SUtion 
<n.o.) 



Maine Central &.B... 



The Conoord and Mon- 
treal RR. 



Boston and Lowell B. 
B. 

Maine Central B. B. . . 



The Conoord andMon- 
trealRB. 



Central Vermont R. R. 



Grafton and Upton B. 
R. 



Old Colony R.R 

...do 

...do 

Boston and Albany R. 
E. 

Connectiout River R. 
R. 

Old Colony R.R 

Boston ami Maine R.R. 



! 

! 






MUe». 
28.04 



Pound*,, 

500 25| 



24.08 



28.42 
20.72 



6.82 



1&08 



7.87 



48.88 



0.74 
8.94 



12.10 



32 l*^ 

5P52 .IS" 



458 



iM821 



85820 



10820 



31811 



240 



24,160 



547 
001 



1.023 



3.50 131 

7.04 192 

8.50| 40 



19 



18 



16 



18 



Size, etc.. of mall'Car 
or apartment. 



Feet and inehet, 
no apt 



apt.8by7,ll. 



apt. 12 by 6.4 (ar.) 1 1 



apt. 14.8 by 7.5 (av.). 



no apt . 
...do.. 



....do. 



r.p.a 55.2bvaiO(aT.) 
2L, 11. 40 ft. author- 
ised. Apt. 18.6 by 
8.10(av.)ll. toMans. 
field. 24.53 m.; 2 1. 
residue, 19.45 m. 

nomt 



apteby2.8.2l 41.96 



s.. 

1^ 



12 



10.96 



9.6 
6 



12 



26.31 



11&57 



45.61 
30 



no apt . 
...do.. 
....do.. 



SECOND ASSISTANT — RAILWAT ADJUSTMENTS. 



885 



and Terrifarien in which the c<mtraot term expired June ^, 1890, and aho on certain new 
of the iv fight of the iNai/«, the speed tvith which they are conveyedfihe accoinmodaiione for 
the oofs of March 3, 187.i, Jaly 1*^ 1876, and June 17, 1878. 

apartm«nt ; L, line or liaet { m., miles.) 









£g5 



Si 

• d 



S.'^ 
^s 






M.13 



eo.7i 



82. M 
7&6e 



42.75 
50.45 

45.32 

375.35 

65.84 
M.13 

124.83. 

42.75. 
42.75. 
42.75<,. 



75.00 






Dolb. DolU. 
5«.43 



64.13 



7a 11 



59.00 



42.75 



245.89 



69.26 

45.32 



91.49 



75.00 



ii. 



I £3 



DoUar§. 
1,836.68 



1,488.32 

1«942.45 
1,619.88 

291.56 
760.78 

856.66 

16,507.89 



641.28 
25'i. 67 

1,521.67 



149.62 
300.06 
363.37 



^ Pi 



DoUare. 



8,29&50 



5U.2 
i = 



i 



1. 721. 64 



1,568.15 



1,700.86 



450.17 



848.57 



10,792.26 



674.59 
178.56 

1,218.27 






5 K J 



DoOarf. 



8,298.50 



flt^ 



1800. 
Apr. 1 



Apr. 1 



1889. 
July 1 

Oct 7 



Nov. 11 



Oct 8 



1890. 
Apr. 1 



Jnly 15 



July 15 
July 15 

Apr. 1 



1889. 
Bee 2 



Apr. 1 



July 10 



BciDftrki. 



Wefftbed 30 days fVt>m 
Apr. I. 1H90 Kniin 
Feb 15. 1890. on 13.7 
m. eztennlon rrom 
Dexter to Foxcrolt. 

Weifched 80 d»ye from 
Apr. 1, 1890. Prom 
Jan. 27. 1890. oc 4.26 
m. ezt««naioa from 
Pitttiflfld to Centre 
Banutead. 

Weifched 80 days ftom 
Sept 24, 1888. 0.84 
m. deeroaM). 

Weighed 30 days from 
Apr. 1, 1890. From 
Oct 7. 18r«, on 17.78 
m.; and from Kar. 
20.1i-90,on2.94m.ex- 
t<>nsion fh>ra Seott, 
K.H..to SontbLnneo- 
bnreb, Vt. 

Wf iKbed 30 days from 
Apr. 1, 1890. From 
Not. 11,1889. New. 

Weigbed 30 days fht>m 
Oct 8, 1889. From 
Deo. 17. 18«L exten- 
sion from Barre to 
WiUIamstown,7.45 m. 

Weigbed 80 days from 
Apr. 1, 1896.' From 
Jnly 1, 1890. on 4.72 
m. extension lh>m 
Grafton to Weat Up- 
ton. 

WeiL'bed 80 days from 
July 15, 1890. 



Do. 
Do. 

Weighed 80 days ftrom 
Apr. 1, 1890. From 
Dec2, 1889. on 3.09 m. 
extension fh>iu Cook 
street station to (n.a) 
Ki verside Jnno. (n.o.) 

Weighed 80 days from 
Apr. 1. 1890. From 
Dec. 2. 1889. New. 

New. Weighed SO days 
from Oct. 8, 1889. 

New. Weighed 30 daya 
from Oct 8, 1889. 



P M G 90 25 



386 



BEPORT OF THE P0STMA3TER-GENEBAL. 



K.'-TdbU shotoing the re^adju^nent of th^ raiet of ptijf per mile on railroad routee in 



6 



104038 



104080 South Braintree, 
KMS.,Newport,R.L 



104040 
104041 
104043 
104044 
104040 



104047 
104048 
104049 
104060 
104061 



104054 
104061 
104064 



104066 
104078 
104076 

104081 



i 



6021 



6044 



107074 



6101 



State and tennini. 



KAaaAOHUSVTTB— cont'd 
Boston, South Brain- 



South AMngton Sta- 
tion, Brid|(ewater. 

MiddlebOTongh. Ptot- 
inoetown« 

Attleboronsh, .Hid- 
dleborongn. 

South Bmntroe, Pall 
River. 

Buzxard*s Bay, Wood's 
HoU. 

South Braintree, Ply- 
mouth. 

Sterling Junction, 

Pratt's Junction. 
Yarmouth Junction 

(n. o.). Hyannis. 
South Framingharo, 

LowelL 
Fairhaven, Tremont 

Junction (n. o.). 
New Bedford, Pitch- 

hnrg. 



New Bedford, Fall 
Kiver. 

Attleborough. North 
AtUeborougfa. 

Braintree Junction 
(n. o.), Kingston Sta- 
tion (n.o.). 

Atlantic, West Qnincy . 

Bead vUle, Dedharo . . . . 

North Abington, Han- 
over. 

Chatham Station(u.o.), 
Harwich June (n. o.) 

NEW TORK. 

Bocheeter, Charlotte .. 



Mineola, OyaterBay. 



Tail's Gate Junction 
Oi.a), Newburgh 
Junction (no.). 

Sidney, Edmeston 



Corporate title of 

company carrying 

the mail. . 



Old Colony B.B 
....do 

.do 

do 

.do 

.do 

.do 

.do 

.do 

.do 

do 

do 

•do 

.do 

do 

do 

.do 

•do 

....do 

do 



NewTork Central and 
Hudson Biver R. K. 

Long Island B. B. Co. . 



New York, Lake Brie 
and Western R. B. 

New York,Oiitario and 
Western Bwy. 



i 

8 

! 




3.72 
2.28 

7.81 

7.04 



0.41 
14.61 



12.60 
88.20 



4. aw 

2, 

1, 

1. 



26 



28696 

82890 

1,60028 



61.86 



7.43 
86.38 
22.06 
30.70 
17. 
96.62 

4.88 
3.64 
28.44 
16.26 
09.16 



14.00 

4.02 678 

82.20 1,611 



140 
183 
206 



Sise, etc., of mail-car 
or apartment. 



MUm. Pottfub. JTssC and inchet, 
U.86 17. 707 24 r. p. a 40 by 8.6, 1 I. 
Apt. 90 by 8.11 (av.) 
4L to Brabtiee, 0.05 
bl; 8 L residue, 
1.41m. 
8,eB085^r.p.a40b7 8.6,lLto 87.11 
M i ddleoorough, 
28.20 m. : apt. 20.8 by 
0(av.) iLtoHiddle- 
borough, 88.20 ra.: 1 1. 
between Fall River 
and Newport, 18.87 m. 
No apt. zesidne. 
156(29 no apt 22.41 

r. P.O. 40 bv&6»l L; 14.70 

apt. 20.6 by 0.2, IL 
no apt 10.80 

apt!20by&10,ll 38 

BO apt 22 

apt. 90 by &10, 1 L to 37.86] 
XingstoB, 21.80 m.; 
2L residue, 4.78 m. 

■oapt 18 

971961.. ..do 24 

1,64928 apt 10.4 by 8.10 (ar.) 12 

48824 no apt 12 

1, 688l26| apt 18.10 by 7.10 (av.) 34. 83 
1 1. between Taun- 
ton and Mansfield, 
10.88 m.; 2L thence 
to South Framing, 
ham. 21.20 m. ; 1 1. 
rsddua, 88.08 m. 
7023 no apt 18 

...do 36 

apt 90 by 8.10. 11. 21.63! 

no apt IS 

....do 18.60 

....do 16.65 

23J....do 12 

70{28 no apt 12 

422|27|....do 16 

960 261. ...do 26.11 

477201 apt 16 by 6.10, 11 10. 67 



I 



SECOND ASSISTANT — ^RAILWAY ADJUSTMENTS. 



387 



Staim and Territori€a in whiek ike wntraet term expired June 30, 1890, etc, — Continued. 






P4 



111 



BE' 






^3 
01 



mn 



P 
1^ 



4, 3 O 



« a 

la 



!t 



BflBiArka. 



Z>oair. 
908.091 



DoBt. 



DoZZ*. 



2& 00 288. 47 



Doltonr. 

25.00 8,477.181 • 284.001 



Dolls. 



Doltort. 



lAlO 26.001 



146.21 



26u00 0188^86 582.86 



42.75 
161.00 

49iS0 
180.88 
114.57 
112.86 

66. 8« 

47.08 
118. 

50.00 
110.80 



42175 

W.97 

108L88 



2&00 



42.75 
42.75 
42.75 

48.61 



42.75 



68.14 



47.08 
tts.42 



42.75 
168.00 
42L75 
70.58 
65.84 
77.81 

5L80 
42.78 

m.ez 

56.58 

11L15 



26.001 



42.75 
64.18 
65^84 



42.76 
48.75 
42.75 

42L76 



4flL74 



145w86 
56w48 



817. 
18,860.00 
1,008.06 

6.18a.56|. 
2,042.78'. 
8,001.88. 

818.00. 

188.48. 

8,882.58. 

800. 84j. 

10,16Bl24 



2,158.50 



686.07 

285.20 

8,441.58 

158.08 

07.47 

883.87 

807.01 

482.27 
848.42 



598.57 
2,077.06 



DoOmrt, 
8,040.81 



8,988.97 



817. 
18,283.88 

843.06 
8,166.94 
1,178.92 
2,071.80 

247.77 

15L38 

8,876.38 

84a 15 

10,248.58 



DoOmv. 
284.80 



1800. 
Jiily 15 



688.26 Joly 15 



2,160.50 



688.07 

257.80 

2,120.04 



150.03 
07.47 
383.87 

800.08 



741.88 

1,83L41 
1,488.22 



July 15 
July 15 
July 16 
July 15 
July 16 
Jnly 15 

Jnly 15 
July 15 
July 15 
July 15 
July 15 



July 15 
Joly 15 
July 15 



July 15 
Jnly 15 
July 15 

July 15 



1880. 
Not. 15 

1800. 
li^ 15 



188a 
Sept 9 

Oct 8 



Weigbed 30 days from 
Jul> 15^ 1810. 



Do. 



Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Da 
Do. 



Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



Da 
Do. 
Da 

Da 



Weigbed 80 days from 
Apr. 1, 1890. From 
Nov. 15,18«9. New. 

Weighed 80 daya from 
Hay 15, 1890. From 
Oct. 1,1888. on 3.17 m. 
extension firom Locnnt 
Vallev to Oyster Bay. 

Weighed 30 days from 
Sept 9. 1880. 

^Vighed 30 days from 
Oct. 8. 1H89. From 
Joly 1. 1880. on T-.^W 
m. ext. fr »m New 
Berlin to Edmestoo, 
and 7.08 m. from May 
22 to Jane 80, 1888. 



388 REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

H. — Tiible Bhotving the re-aifjiutrMni of ihs raU$ of pay per mile on railroad rontee im 



I 



8tAt6 and teimini. 



Corponte title of 

company OMxylng 

themiOL 



I 

S 

I 



si 

Sf%£ 



►88-3 



P 

'Hi 



GUm, etc.. of uudl-oar 
or apwtBtieiit. 






C106 

6U0 
6141 
6142 
6143 
61U 

7047 

7067 

7068 
7060 
7070 

8018 
8062 

8004 

UOllO 
8156 



mw YORK— cont'd. 
Binghamton, BniEalo . 



Saaunitrille, Hague- 
not Janotion (n. o.). 



Aabnn, Oeno* .... 
PrattBbnrgb. Kftnon*. 
Wftyland, Boliyar. . 



Delaware, Laokit. 
wanna and Weatem 
B.S. 



PortJerrifl^onticeUo 
and New York S. B. 

Lehigh VaUeyKR... 



Kanona and Pratta- 
barghB.B. 

The Lackawanna and 
Sonthweeteni &.B. 



pQundt. 



Angelica, BolfMt Junc- 
tion (n. o.). 



.do . 



Sea lale City, ATalon 



Potterayflle, White 
Hooae Station. 



Atlantio City, Long, 
port. 

Hatawan Junction, (n. 
o.), Atlantic High- 
lAnds. 

Brown's Mills, 
Brown's Mills Jano- 
tion (n. o.>. 

PKOb'BTLVAinA. 

Scranton, Carbondale . 



Carlisle, Pine Grore 
Fnraaoe. 



West Jersey B.B 

Bookaway Yalley R.It. 



Camden and Atlantio 
R.&. 

Central B. B. Co. of 
New Jersey. 

PennsylTania B. B . . . . 



Delaware and Hndson 
CanaL 

Sonth Moantain Bwy. 
and Mining Co. 



Oxford, Peter's Creek ' Peach Bottom B. B. 



Hartley Hall, Kord* William sport and 

mont. Korth Branch B. B. 

Hunter's Bun, Oettys- Oettysbnrgh and Har- 



8172 



burgh. 

Jameson City, 
Bloomsburgh. 



8177 
8182 



8188 



risburg B. B. 

Bloomsbursh and Sul- 
UTanB.B. 



Bloomsbttigh, Bupert. Bupertand Blooms- 

I burgh B. B. 
La Joa6 Station (n. o.), PennsylTanla B. B. . . . 

Hastingii. ! 

Duncan n on, K e w ; Perty County B. B — 

Bloomfleld. I 



17.661 
81. 
1168 
68.88 

6.87 

4.01 

8.67 

7.08 

U.08 

L08 

17.87 
18.07 

80.23 

27.16 
22.64 

80.42 



2.18 
14.38 

11.481 



80330 



4820( 



144ilS 



13616 



IVee atid tndUt. 
no apt 



8620 

84 

87 

6613 
840 
41 

1,84620 
458 



.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 

.do. 
.do. 



23.85 

6 

6 
12 
0.81 
6 

12 

12 



....do. 
....do. 



....12 

....10.781 

....12 



10220 no apt.. 



46820 
718 



17822 



apt 10.1 by 6.2 (av.). 80 
3 1. 



aptl2.6by 7.5(aT.). 1 
L to Hunter's Bun, 
10.85 m. ; no apt resi- 
due. 



aptOby8,ll 

apt 14.8 by 7.5, 11. 



apt 8.4 by 6.6, 11. 



no apt. 



5415 

68101. 



266 12. ...do. 



1Si.n 



12 
18.88 



12 



SECOND ASSISTANT — RAILWAY ADJUSTMENTS- 389 

Statm tmd Terriiories in wkUk th^ contract term expired June 30. 1890, «te.~Coiitinaed. 



ii 



9*^ 



Si 

5*3 






fe.S5iH.a 



S 






5^ 






2>(»«9. 

24.56 


DoUt. 


DoUt. 
24.56 


DeOt, 


42.75 








42.75 








42.75 








42^75 








4175 








4175 








4175 


■••••• 


4176 




4175 








a. 16 








4175 








160.04 




80.87 




60.71 




57.29 




4175 




4175 




61.56 




47.88 




7168 




6126 




4175 





43.61 




4175 








4175 








47.03 

















DoOan, 
5,000.00 



756.68 

82187 

641.21 

2,52L82 



17L85 



86167 
67182 
8168 

1,787.68 
1,151. 

86188 

1,67L96 
1,645.47 

1,800.45 



8162J 
614. 74 
539.90 



IS 

^^ 
Si; 

%% 



Milan. 



m 
i 



Dottmn. 
5^6(10.00 



86186 



1,402.45 
l,0iB6.78 

817.88 

1,300.42 
1,578.43 

80L85 



S = «! 



Dottan, 



11 
'I 



Deo. 2 



Oct 10 



1880. 
Feb. 8 



Febi 10 
FeK 24 
Feb. 24 



1888. 
July 28 

18B0. 
Apr. 1 



1888. 
July 24 



Ooi. 24 

1890. 
Kar. 3 



1889. 

Jnly 1 



July 1 



July 1 
1880. 

%.• 

July 1 



Oct 28 



Nov. 1 
Mar. 1 
Deo. 18 



Benurka. 



Weighed 80 days from 
Apr. 1.1890. Servloe 
estnbliabed Deo. 2, 
1889, at $5,000 per an- 
nmn for two yean. 

Weighed 80 days from 
Apr. 1, 1890. From 
Oct. 10. 1880. New. 

Weighed 80 days from 
Apr. 1, 1880. From 
Feb. 3, 1890. New. 

Weighed 80 days from 
Apr. 1, 1890. From 
Feb. 10, 1890. New. 

Weighed 30 days from 
Apr. 1, 1890. From 
Feb.24,1890. New. 
Da 



Weighed 30 days from 
Apr. 1, 1890. From 
JiUy29.1889. New. 

Weighed 30 days from 
Apr. 1. 1890. From 
Deo. 23. 1889. on 8.85 
m. exi. from New Qer^ 
maotown to Potters- 
vUle, 

Weighed 90 days from 
Apr. 1, 1890. From 
JiOy2i.l889. New. 

Weighed 80 days from 
Hay 12, 1890. From 
Oct. 24, 1889. Now. 

Weighed 80 days from 
Apr. 1, 1889. From 
llar.8,188a New. 



Weighed 80 days fhim 
Oct. 8, 1889. 0.08 m. 
decrease. 

Weighed 30 days from 
Fto£l9.18S9. 



Weighed 80 days from 

Feb. 19. 1889. l.U m. 

increase. 
Weighed 30 days £tom 

Sept. 9, 1890. 
Weighed 30 days from 

Feb. 19, 1889. 0.10 m. 

decrease. 
Weighed 80 days flrom 

Oct. 23, 1889. 9.74 m. 

est. from Benton to 

Jameson City fh>m 

Apr. 1, 1889, to Jnne 

80,1889, and from Joly 

1,1889. 
Weighed 80 days £rom 

Apr. 1. 1890. New. 
Weighed 30 days from 

Oct. 8, 1889. New 
Weighed 80 dayd from 

Apr. 1,1880. ^ew. 



390 



EEPOET OF THE P08TBIASTEE- GENERAL. 



H. — Table tihotoing ihe re'O^i^Mi'iMnt of the rate$ of pay per mils on railroad routes iw 



a 

p 



State Mid tormini. 



Corporate title of 

comiMny carrying 

the mail. 



I 



'i 



•aS. 



Siie, etc., of maU-oar 
or apartment. 



r 



8184 
6186 
8186 
8167 

10026 
116030 

114040 
114042 



FKHNBTLVAXIA— eonVd. 

McGee'sStation (o. o.), 

Glen CampbelL 
Mount Pleasant, Soott- 

dale Junction (n.o.)* 
Pond Creek Jonottoni 

(n. o.), Sandy Bon. 
KoKeeeport, Belle 

Yemon. 

XABYLAMD. 

Orangerille Jonotlon 
(a. o.), Sparrow's 
Point. 

Eaaton, St Michael's.. 



Bristol,Tenn., Clinch- 
port, Va. 



Portsmoaih, DanTfUe 



Pennsylraiiia B.B. 



lllOtt 



114044 



114046 

114046 

114047 
114048 

U4046 



U016 



Graham, Honaker . 



Lynehhiirsh, 



Centnd B. B. Co. of 

New Jersey. 
Pittshnr^ and Lake 

BrieB.% 



Korthem Central Bwy . 



Baltimore and Bastem 
Shore B. B. 



South Atlantic and 
OhioB.B. 



Atlantic and Danville 
Bwy. 



Norfolk and Wectem 
B.B. 



Lynchburg and Dur- 



MUu. 
8.S7 

6.69 

in 

88.01 



Poundt. 
20 

267 

68 

408 



&14 
U.61 



L87 



66.16 



Uynchburg i 
namB.B. 



Scotland, Wakafleld 
Statimi. 

Skinqnarter, Farm* 

PortsmontKTa., Tar* 

borough, N. C. 
BuflUo Junction (n. 

o.), Boilhlo Lithia 

Springs. 
OoshcnBridi 

bridge 

Springe. 

wxsT ynoiMLL 

Blue Stone Junction 
(n. o.). Hipping. 



lge.Bock. 
Alum 



Sony, Snasex and 
Southampton Bw>. 

Fannyille and Pow* 
hatsnB. B. 

Norfolk and Carolina 

B. B. 
Atlanttcand Danville 

Bwy. 

Bookbridge Alum 
and Oo^hen B. B. 



Norfolk and Western 
B.B. 



96.08 

60.02 

104.03 
8.78 

10.05 



•.42) 



12220 no 



20520 



225 



20 



281 



F§it and inehta, 
no apt 

...do 

....do 

apt 8.10 by 8.10, 11.... 

apt 

....do 

apt 7. 6 by A4, 11.. 



apt 18.2by&7, 11.. 



18 



106, 9 no apt . 



6 
16 
18 
18 

12.6 
12 



apt 11 by 6.0, 11 

83822 aptl0.6by8.9, 11... 



146;U apt. 7.4 b? 5.4, 1 l.be- 
I I tween M^oseley Junc> 
I lion and P'armvllle. 

41626 apt. 20 by 0,11 , 



llS'lli no apt . 
186 10' no apt . 



84 14 no apt. 



7.63 



SECOND ASSISTANT — RAILWAT ADJUSTMENTS. 



391 



StaUt and Terrilcries in which the oontritci term expired June 30, 181K>, efo.— Continued. 



P4 






P4 fl 



t^.T, 



Mi 



33 



p< 



is. 



11 

IS 



^5 

a 



11 

as 



BMDftrks. 



42.75 
4«.17 
42.75 
57.20 



42.75 



42.75 



U.46 



56.48 



D0U9. 



DoJU. 



DoUt, 



41.46 



52.16 



4175 



52.16. 



47.08 



42.75 



42.75 

42.75 

56.14 
42.75 

42.75 
42.76 



42.75 



866.86 



260.86 
115. 



347.08 



402.05 



1.830.45 



11,680.80 



HoOart. 



Dottart. 



DoOart. 



2,452.41 



8,257.01 



858.42 

2,565.85 

6,048.30 
161.50 

420.63 



402.70 



2.248.15 



3,332.86 



015.20 



8,141.60 



834.73 



1600. 
Feb. 5 

Feb. 10 

Feb. 12 

Mar. 17 



1888. 
Oct. 28 



1800. 
Apr. 7 



1880. 
Oct 1 



1880. 
May 1 



Sept. 16 
Apr. 1 



1880. 
July 8 

1880. 
May 12 



May 21 

July 21 

1800. 
Aug. 4 



1880. 
Feb. 10 



Weigbed 30 days fnmi 
Apr. 1,1880. New. 

Bo. 
Dow 



Weigbed 30 days from 
Apr. 1, 1800. From 
Oct. 28, 1888. New. 

Weigbed 90 days from 
July 8, 1880. From 
Apr. 7, 1880. New. 



Weigbed 80 days from 
Oct 1, 1880. 2.16 m. 
ext., Spears Ferry to 
Clinobport from May 
27,1880. 

Weigbed 80 days from 
Sept. 2, 1880. 75.73 m.. 
Fortemontb to Bel- 
field from July 1,1880; 
10.85 m.ext., Belfleld 
to Lawreocevillefrom 
Oct. 1.1888; 110.60 m. 
ext., LawrenceTille to 
Dsnrille from May 1, 
1800. 

Wt)igbed 80 days fron: 
Sept. 16.1800. 35.70 m. 
ext., Kelly to Honaker 
from March 17, 1890. 

^'^eigbed 30 days from 
Apr. 1, 1800. 20.16 m. 
ext.. Rnstburgh to 
Brook NesI from Aug. 
12, 1888: 20.94 m. ext.. 
Brook Neal to South 
Boston from Feb. 8, 
1880. 

Weigbed 30 days from 
Oct 1, 1880. l^ew. 

Weigbed 80 days from 
Sept. 10, 1890. New. 

Do. 

Do. 



W^eigbed 30 days from 
Aug. 7, 1890. New. 



Weigbed 30 days from 
Oct 1, 1888. 1.59 m. 
ext., Dubring to Flip- 
ping ftom Febi Vi, 
1800. 



S&2 



EEPOET OF THE P08TMASTEB-GENERAL. 



H. — Table ahnDing the re-adjustment of Ike rates of pay per mile on railroad routes in 



i 
1 



nt*Ut ftad tenninl. 



wasT TinQi:?fiA— coat'd. 

1S018 MartlBBboTfTh.W.Ya., 
Winohenter, Va. 

12M5 HarriAon (n. o.), Elk 
Qarden. 

12026 SeweU Depot, Cliff 
Top. 

12027] Thoouui, Slkina 



18012 

18010 

18080 

18051 
18087 
!8088 
18089 
18040 

VBHl 

118081 

118042 



14036 



14027 



KORTR CAKOtlNA. 

GivensboroQgh, Bnral 
HalL 



Hal{fkx« OrecnTiUo . 



Tarborongli, Plym- 
oath. 



High Point, Ashbor- 
ouch. 
SiokMdale. ICadiaon.. 

Ifonroo. X. C, Che*, 
tor. 8. C. 
liackey** Ferry, Ro- 

Wbiston, Walnut 
G«Te. 

Hendenon, Durham . . 



Factory Junction (n. 
o.), Bamaenr. 



TTilarfngton. Fayette- 
▼file. 

Candor 



U8043 Alwrdeen, 



•OUTB CABOUIIA. 

Blackrille, Sierem . . 



Camden. & C. Ruth- 
erlbrdUin,N.a 



Corporate tta* of 



Cumberland Valley 

R R 
West Virfrinia Central 

and Pittttburgh Bwy. 
Longdale iron Co 



West Virginia Central 
and Pittsborgh Bwy. 



Richmond and Dan- 
ville B.B. 



Wilmington and Wel- 
donR.B. 



Albemarle and Ral- 
eigh R.R. 



Richmond and Dan* 
TiUeRR. 

Cape Fear and Tad- 
kin Valley Rwy. 

Georgia, Carolina aod 
Northern Rwy. 

Albemarle and Pan* 
tego K R. 

Roiinoke and Southern 
Rwy. 

Durham and Northern 
Rwy. 

Cape Fear and Tadldn 
VaUey Rwy. 



.do. 



Aberdeen and West 
SndB.R. 



Blackrille. Alston and 
Newberry R. R. 

Charleaton, Cincinnati 
and Chicago R.B. 



^ 
^ 



5® 



22.79 

7.16 

10.10 

85.06 



41.80 

6&23 

0S.9i 

28.21 
11.48 
16.06 
4.43 
18.52 

42.05 

10.81 

82.04 
25.36 

29.09 

149.90 



P<mnd»' 

834 

64 

27 
803 



740 

872 

337 

202 
94 
81 
26 
75 

139 



19 



Size, etc., of mail-car 
or apartment. 



Feet and inches. 
apt.l4.5bya7xav.),21 

no apt 

no apt 

apt. 8.6 by 7, 1 1 



apt 8 by 6.0, 2 1. to 
Win«t*»n.28.60 m. ; no 
' clerk residue. 



apt 8.6 by 6.6,11. 



apt 8.6 by 6.6, 11. 



14 no apt.. 
11 no apt.. 

14 no apt.. 

I 
17| no apt.. 

15 no apt. . 
12' no apt.. 
10 no apt. . 



662 23 



apt 20 by 8.10, 1 I. 



47 



88 



810 



10 



no apt , 

no apt , 

apt 22.2 by 8.3, 1 1. 



^ . 
-Cm 

S 



;o.78 



0.54 



SECOND ASSISTANT — ^RAlL>«rAY ADJUSTMENTS. ^93 

Stales and Territories in which the contract term expired June 30, 1690, «to.-^ODtina6d. 



si 

si . 



DoUs. 

77.81 

42.75 
42,75 
40.60 



JMU. 



74. 8» 

54.72 

S8.18 

12.75 
42.75 
42 75 
42.75 
42.75 

42.75 

42.70 



TO.VJ .... 
42 75 .... 



42L75! 



50.45, 









r§ i^^ 



£' 






£0. 

Is 



IJ 



DoU§. 



91.48 



42.75 



54 72 



42.75 



42.75 



DoUs, 



lH 



IMlan. 
1.778. 28 

305.M 

421.77 

1 707.87 



8,100160 

3,188.84 
2,017.88 

1,205.07 
480.77 

1,951.90 
180.38 
79L78 

1,707.63 

821 50 

5,804.06 
1,084.14 

1.243.58 

7,562.44 






7>9Uar». 



DoOon, 



8,600l64 



2,051.25 



8,008.66 



408.28 



868.41 



feirf 

O • »4 



DoOari. 



1880. 
Nov. 18 

Mar. 4 

3CMr. 18 

Aug. 6 



Oct. 1 



1800. 
Apr. 1 



Apr. 1 

1880. 
Sept. 

Fab. 25 

Mar. 26 

May 1 

June 10 

Oct. 1 

1890. 
July 1 

Mar. 3 
July 7 

1889. 
April 8 

Feb. 25 



Wetched 80 days from 
April 1,1800. New. 

WeJffhed 30 days from 
Oct. 1,1880. New. 
Do. 

Weighed 80 days from 
Oct. 1,1880. 18.67 m., 
Tlunnaa to Parsooa 
from Julyl.lOOO; 21.08 
m. ext., PUBOiis to 
Elldna,ftom Aug. 5, 
1880. New. 



Weighed 80 days from 
OotL1880. 1S.71 m. 
ext., winaUm to Su- 
ral Hall from Aug. 12, 
1880. 

Weighed 80 days from 
Apr. 1,1800. 88.80 m. 
ext., Seotlaad Neok 
to Greenville from 
Oct 7, 1880. 



Weighed 80 days from 
Apr.lJ800. fe.41m. 
ext., wUliamsUn to 



Plymouth from Dea 
0,1880. 
Weighed 80 days from 
Got. 1,1880. New. 
Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Da. 



Weighed 80 days from 
Apr. 1,1800. New. 

Weighed 30 days from 
Sept. 16. 1800. 0.76 m. 
ext., MiUboro to Bam- 
neur ttom July 1,1800. 

Weighed 30 days from 
Sept. 16, 1800; New. 



Weighed 80 days from 
Oct. 1, 1880. 0.01 m. 
ext., Ferry to Sievern 
from April 8. 1880. 

Weighed 30 days from 
Oct. 1,1880. 41.60 m. 
Camden to Lancas- 
tor, from June 4, 1888; 
23.00 m. ext.. Lancas 
tor to Rock Hill from 
Nov.5,1888:84.60 m. 
ext.. Rook Hill, S.C., 
to Rutherfordton, N. 
C. from Feb. 26, 1880. 
New. 



394 REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

H.'-Table ahowing the re-ckdjuatment of the rates of pay per mile <m railroad routes in 



I 



State and (ermini. 



Corporate title of 

company carrying 

the mail. 



i 



hi 



m^e^ et«., of toall^^oar 
or ApBTlment. 






14030 

14081 
14032 

14033 
14034 

15040 
15047 

15062 

15064 

15056 

I 

15056 



eoutHOABOLiHA— oon'd. 

Pe Dee Junction (n. o.), 
8. C, Rowland, N.G. 



Florence R. R. 



JfOef. 

27.50 



Pnvncfff. 



Aiken, Sdgefleld 

Wilaon's, Snmmerton 



Floyd's (n. o.), Harts- 
▼ilh 



Carolina, Cnmberland 
Gap andChioagoBwy. 

Wilson and Sommer^ 
ton R.R. 



lie. 
Sumter, Vance's 



Albany, 6a.. Colnm- 
bia^Ala. 



Amerlcus, Columbus. 



BartBvilleK.R 

Cbarieeton, 8umter 
and Northern R.B. 



Southeastern RR.. 



Maoon, Athens. 



ITnion Psint, White 

Plains. 
Rogers, Stillmors 



15060 Crawford, Lexington. 



15000 
15001 
15002 

10087 
17027 



Macon, Yaldosta. 



Wadley.BlaokTille.... 

Stalesborongh, Derer. 

Dunlap (n. o.), Smitho- 
nia. 

FLOBIDA. 

Kissimee, Noroosee . . . 



Montgomery, Luveme 



Savannah and West- 
ern R.R. 



Covington and Macon 

R. Mf 



UnionPointand Whit« 

Plains RR. 
Rogers and Summit 

r:r 



Georgia Southern and 
Florida RR. 



Lexington Terminal 
RR. 

Donovan. Perkins and 

CO.RR 
Dover and Staiesboro 

RR 
Smithoniaand Dunlap 

RR 



St Cloud Sugar Belt 
Rwy. 



Northwest and Florida 
RR. 



34.jf7 
Ifi.OO 

10. Ml 
SOlOO 

03.01 
65.3a 

100lV7 

13.70 
tl.241 



4. 05 

^.86 
10. 2i 

10.60 



12 no apt ...^. 



10410 



7g 
348 



4ai 



24' 



no apt.. 

,...dfl.. 



13 



.-.do ..... 

^t 12 by 0.0,11., 



12 




12 



apt. IfibjB.l, 11...... 7 



apt.ia,llbyB,K,ll„_, 



apt.SObyaHtl. 



10013 



159.401 ^34 



no apt., 



apt 12 by 7,11. 



0.30 



mis 



3» 

11 

13 

10 

230(11 



no apt., 

...do.. 
...do. 
....do. 



no apt. ...^ 

apt, 15.fi by 7.O.. 11... 




12 
12 

12 



8EC0ND ASSISTANT — BAILWAT ADJUSTMENTS. 



395 



SUUe8 and Territoriet in which the contract term expired June 30, 1890, etc. — Continued. 



II 



Ml 



JMb. 1Mb, 
42. 7S 






Si: '^ iL 



42.75 
42.75 

43.75 
53. •! 

59.85 
45.82 

47. fl 

42.75 
42.75 

44.46 



42.75 

42.75 
42.75 
42.75 

42.75 
44.46 



DoOs, 



DoOt, 



49.59 



42.75 



43.09 



I 42.75 



42.75 



DoUarB. 
1,176.92 



1,093.10 
989.56 

427.59 
1,098.36 

3,808.25 
2»597.65 

4,098.47 

590L62 
1.83&&1 

9^829.15 



108.78 

1.318.83 
430.47 
270.58 

797.04 
2,298.13 



IS 



It 



DoOan. 



^5. 

Iff 



JhOam. 



8,291.35 



2,489.09 



4,741.81 



856.99 



2,210.47 






DoUart, 






1880. 
Feb. 4 



Feb. 25 

▲ag. 12 

1800. 
Jan. 20 

Mar. 3 



April 1 



April 1 



1880. 
Sept. 4 



Nov. 4 
July 1 

April 1 



Deo. 



1880. 
Feb. 3 



Jan. 27 
Mar. 6 



1880. 
Aag. 10 



Oot 1 



Remarka. 



Weiff bed 89 days troux 
Ocl. 1. 1889. 17.56 m. 
Pe Dee Jnnotion (u. 
o.) to Dillon, from 
Ang.6,1888; 0.04 ni. 
ext., Dillon to Bow- 
land from Feb. 4, 
1880. New. 

Weighed 39 days ttom 
Oct 1,1880. New. 
Do. 



Weiipbed 80 days from 
Apra 1,1800. New. 

Weighed 19 days Arom 
June 2,1800. l^ew. 



Weighed 39 days flrom 
April 1, 1890. 13.25 
m.ext., Blakely.Ga., 
to Columbia, Ala., 
from Oct. 1, 1880. 

Weighed 30 days from 
April 1, 1880. 26.64 
m. ezL, Boena Vista 
to Columbus from 
Dec. 2, 1880. 

Weighed for 80 days 
from Sept. 4, 18^. 
84.19 m. ext.. Madison 
to Athens from Jan. 
21,1889. 

Weighed 30 days from 
April L 1899. New. 

Weighed 39 days from 
Oot 1, 1880. 11.24 m. 
ext, Summit to Still- 
more from July 1, 
1880. 

Weighed 30 clays from 
Sept 4, 1880. 86.19 m. 
Maoon to Cordele, 
from Nov. 6, 1888; 
30.85 m. ext, Cordele 
to Tifton from Feb. 
4,1880; 47.45 m. ext., 
Tifton to Valdosta 
from April 1, 1880. 
New. 

Weighed 39 days ttom 
April 1,1899. New. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 



Weiriied 30 days from 
Oct 1,1889. ^ew. 



Weighed 80 days from 
Oct 1, 1880. 5.09 m. 
ext, Patsburgh to 
LuTerne from Mar. 
4,1839. 



■ ■■'I ■ 



396 REPORT OF THE POSTMASTEB-OENERAL. 

H.^Tahle showing the re-adjustment of the rates of pay per mile on railroad routes im 



I 



17036 



17087 



IfOia 



10027 



90018 



20041 



State And termini. 



ALABAMA— eoatlnned. 
BInninghMn, Oneenta. 



Binnt»gh—i, Blocton. 

MiafliamPFi. 
LemontiBoMdale — 



TnllahoiDA, Bob Air 
CMaidne. 



HempbJsi Perryrille . . 



nXTUCKT. 

Webbrllle, Oreemip. . 



20020 Georgetown, Yar. 



20008 Dodge, Hidl's Store... 



EtadsvIII^ Ind., 
Princetop, Ky. 



LoolfiTllle, Lexington 



LooieTiUet Henderson. 



Frankfort, 0-eorge- 
town. 

OwcBsboroogh, Fords- 
▼llle. 



Corporate title of 

company carrying 

themaiL 



Birmingham Mineral 

A. Bto 



,.de.^. 



LonisTille, New Or- 
leans and Texas Rwy . 

NashTllle, Chat\a. 
nooga and St. Loois 
Rwy. 



Tennessee lOdland 
Rwy. 



Bastem Kentucky 
^ Rwy. 



Versailles and Mid- 
way Bwy. 



Ksntncky XTnion Bwy. 



Ohio Yalley Rwy . 



LooisTille, Kew Al- 
bany apd Chieago 
Rwy. 



Louisville, St Louis 
and Texas Rwy. 



Kentucky Midland 
Rwy. 

Owensboro, FUls of 
Rough and 0-reen 
BiverRR 



t^ (L 



a <j 3 c 4 
H < 



MUes. 



51.44 



26.ea 237 



07.00 5U8 



13&4& 384 



87.00 



10.80 131 



28.08 



100.07 



97.40 



142.51 



24.57 
28.78 



8b«, etc., of maU-car 
or ApkrrjueDt. 



t^Qttnd*. Feet andimdua. 



26 iipt.iaebyT.4.11. 



V'O 



184 



744 



on 



107 
101 



u 



iSjnoapt 

nol^)t 

lil apt. 12 by », n_, 



20 



20 



17 



27 



apiUbyO, I J 



no apt . 



no apt . 



apt 18 by 8. 11. 



apt 14.0 by 8.8. 1 1. to 
Lawrenoeburgh,0180 
m. ; no clerk res. 



26 apt 10 by 8.10, 11. 



no apt . 
no apt . 



t 



14 



10 ja 



9.U 



8.10 



ILSO 



18 



SECOND A86ISTAKT — RAILWAY ADJUSTMENTS. 397 

8imU$ and TerrUwim mi wkiek ike oamtract («m expired June 30, 18U0, eio.— ContiiuMd. 



^ 




1^ 



k 









r 



if 



DoOe. 
42.75 



j>oa«. 



DoOt, 



DolU. 



42.75 



4&32 



6113 



8141 



4flL7« 



DoOorf. 
I,6ea07 



2,U0.M 



1.1CL55 



4,889.08 



«;60S.T7 



DMmn. 



IkXktn, 



DoOun, 



4.888.99 



42.75 



42.75. 



42.76 



74.38 



77.81 



71.82 



42.75 
4175 



42.75 



50.44 



42.75| 



03.27 



70.11 



1.007.39 



820.07 



1,012.74 



7. 48184 



0,887.69 



9,04168 



1,40175 



L55 



0,489.30 



0,324.02 



1889. 
Apr. 15 



July 22 



Apr. 8 



Aug. 1 



May 27 



Jnly 1 



Oct. 1 



Dec. 28| 



Oot 1 



1880. 
Apr. 1 



1888. 
Feb. 18 



1,050.30 
1,144.84 



Aug. 5 

1881 
Jen. 1 



Weighed 80 deye 
Oct 1.1889. ^A 

Dow 
Dow 



Weighed 80 dejs from 
Aug. 1,1881 158 n. 
ext., SperU to Ben 
Air CoiJ Mine from 
ICev 11888. 

Weighed 80 days fsom. 
Oct 1, 1889. New. 
80.89 m. Hempbieto 
JAokaon from July 
28, 1888: 19.10 m. 
ext., Jeckaoii to Per- 
lyriUefroni Mfty27, 

Weighed 80 dftyefrom 

Oct. 1,1888. 129 m. 

est, Wiiletd to 

WebbriUe from July 

1,1889. 
Weighed 80d»y« from 

Oct. 1,1888. 10.96 m. 

ext., Midwfty to 

Georgetown from 

Feb. 11. 1889. 
Welgbed 80 d»ys from 

Apr. 1,1890. 187 m. 

ext.. Glny Oily to 

Hau's Store from 

Deo. 23. 1889. 
Weighed 80 days from 

Oct. 1, 1881 10.79 m. 

ext., Hendenon^y., 
. to EvaneTilli^ Ind., 

£rom#raly 15^ 1889. 

Weighed 80 days from 
Apr. 1,1890. 24.09m. 
ext., Lawremeeborgh 
to Lexington from 
Fob. 10,1880. 



Weighed 80 daye from 
Oct. 1,1889. 20.80 m. 
LonisTille to Weet 
Point, hkp eerviee on 
ronto No. 129009, at 
$14.54 per m.i 92.01 
ni. Weet Point to 
Owensboroagh from 
Jan. 7. 1889; 2170 m. 
ext., Owensborottgh 
to Henderson from 
Feb. 18, 1889. Kew. 

Weighed 30 days from 
Oct. 1,1889. >rew. 



Weighed 99 
Apr. 1,1891 "New. 



398 REPbBT OF THE POSTMA)ST£K-G£N£BAIi. 

H.^Table thowing the r^adjuatment of the nUet of pay per mile on railroad routes in 



20043 



nom 



21105 



2S105 
28108 

18107 
24MS 

240e6 

24070 
24077 



State and tenninL 



UBSiTUCKT— oontinaed. 

Lftwxenoebnrgh, Har- 
rocUbargh. 



OineimiAti, Ports* 
moath. 



Corporate title of 

compaay carrying 

the mall. 



CbidBaatl,Cbetiot.. 
FiadUy, Ottawa 



Logsnsport, Clyaen 

BTaiMTille,K«wtarish. 

nxjxoiB. 

Oarbondale, Bast Cape 
Giraideao. 



ICaiion and Harriaoa 

Station (D.O.) 
Mnip h 7 sb o r o n gh, 

Pinekneyrille. 

CldeagOb JFiee poit . 

Sparta, CovltenTlUe.. 



Kewbem,AltoB 

XICHXOAir. 

Lamon, South Haren. 



itiCope- 



Mount Pli 
nialL 



Lowell, Freeport 

Xalamaaoo and Wood* 
bory. 



LonisTille, New Al- 
bany and Chioago 
Kwy. 



Ohio and Korthweet- 
em xL IL 



Cineinnati and Weet- 

wood R* R« 
Ameiloan Midland 

K.E. 



Wabaah Western Bwy. 



. Suburban 

and KewonrghBwy. 



Grand Tower and Car- 
bondaleK.B. 



StLooJa. Alton and 
Terre Haute B. R. 



Illinois Central R.B.. 

Centralia and Chester 
S.B. 

St. Louis. Alton and 
Springfield B.B. 



Toledo and South 
Haren B.B. 



ToledOL Ann Arbor 
and Korth Miohigan 
Bwy, 



Lowell and Hastings 
B.B. 

Kalamasoo and Hast- 
i n g s Construction 
Co. ( Limited), operat- 
ing the Chioago^Kala- 



Bwy. 



I 



s 

1-1 



m 



8 



MUei, 
22.80 



107.82 



7.50 
21.80 



Pounds- 



&80 
lail 

66w78 



27.21 
28.88 

U4.44 
8.20 



8&08 



104.30 



12.85 
44.00 



77822 



181 
45 



25710 

10618 

8I2I17 



88021 
85121 

6^81027 
171 



18.55 41621 



28415 



1,058 



132 



10518 



17 



Sise, etc., of mail-oar 
or apartment. ^ 



Put and in«he$. 
apt. 14.6 by 8.8, 1 1 . 



066251 apt 20.1 by 8.1 1 

no apt 

no apt 

no apt 

no apt 

no. apt 

aptl&6bytJ,ll 

apt. 18.6 by 0.8,1 1 

r.n. 0.44.4 by 8., 11 (40 

feet authorised), 
no. apt 

aptll by 6.10. 11 

no.H»t 

apt.26 by 8,11 

noiqpt 

no apt 



i ; 






10 



10.58 



1&60 
12 

8.88 



8.21 
9.5 I 

12 
15 

18 
12.00 



12 

11.44] 



SkOmmHd 



SECOND AtelSTANT — ^RAILWAY ADJUSTMENTS. 399 

TnrUorim in whUih the contract terni aspired J»fM 30, 1890, ato.— Continued. 



^1 

Hi 



DoOt 
76.24 



ff2L94 



41.76 
4X76 



11. U 
42.76 

50.45 

81 €6 

78.06 

179. M 
42.76 

S8.14 

48.74 

87.21 



42.76 
41.76 



NIf 



II 



||i|d 



1? 



Z>dat.lZ>olIt.tI>olb. 



if 

III 

lis 



iii 



IE 



26.00 



78.61 



42.76 



42.76 
42.75 



42.75 



82.84 



42.76 



26.00 



1,877- 86. 



8,80L18 



820182 
810.07 



7&64 
432.20 

2,811.67 

2,283.88 
1,836.13 

20,647.70 
360.56 

787.79 
1,758.10 

9.008.00 



548.83 
1,800.86 



2,881.00 



JMkwt. 



8,684.91 



1,146.70 



1,188.22 
887.86 



863.55 



6,365.43 



1,328.07 






DoUart, 



2,861.00 



H 



1890. 
I^b. 10 



Apr. 1 



1888. 
K»7 8 

Sapt 9 



J'Tme21 
July 1 

Apr. 1 



1890. 
Jan. 2 

Jan. 2 

1880. 
June 10 

Oct. 1 

1890. 
Jan. 1 



July 23 



Apr. 1 



1889. 
Dec. 16 



!Oot. 16 



Bemarka. 



Weighed 80 days ftom 
Apr. 1, 1890. For- 
mal^ part of route 



Weighed 88 days ftom 
Apr. 1,1880. 0^80 m. 
ext., Batavia June* 
tion (n.o.) to Cincin- 
nati from Ang. 15, 
1889. 

Weighed 80 days flrom 
Oct. 1,1888. I^ew. 

Weighed 80 days from 
Oct. 1, 1888. New. 
28.10 m. Findlay to 
Ghmdorf from May 
18, 1689. Route oar- 
tailed to end .at Otta- 
wa, from Sept 9, 1889. 



Weighed 80 days from 
Oct. 1,1889. libMrr. 
loe over roate 22018. 

Weighed 80 days from 
0<£ 1,1888. New. 



Weighed 80 days from 
Apr. 1, 1890, 28.93 
m. ext., from Gnmd 
Tower to East Cape 
Girardeau from Apr. 
1.1890. 

Weighed 80 days from 
Jan. 2, 1890. 
Do. 



Weighed 80 days from 
Srat.24, 1889. New. 

Weighed 80 days from 
Dec 5, 1889. New. 

Weighed 80 days from 
Apr. 1,1890.. New. 



Weighed 30 days from 
July 23, 1890. From 
May 13, 1889 on 16.83 
m. extMfrom Hartford 
to Soath Haren. 

Weighed 80 days trom 
April 1, 1890. 39.73 
ext., from Cadillac to 
Copemish from Deo. 
2.1889. 

Weighed 30 days from 
Apr. 1. 1890. New. 

Weighed 80 days fh>m 
Apr. 1, 1890. 18.52 
m. ext.,from Hastings 
to Woodhnry from 
Oct. 16, 1889. 



400 BEPOET OF T^E POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

H. — Table showing the re^adjusiment of the ratee of pay per mile on railroad routee in 



State ukd termini. 



Corporate title of 

oompany carrying 

themaiL 






'SS8 / 

► a • 



Size, ete., of mail-car 
or apartment. 






I 

.12 



24082 



94084 



34(085 

94086 
24087 



26068 

28060 

25070 

25071 
25072 

25078 



uiCBXo AN— continued. 
Storffia, Battle Creek . 
DorandfSast Saginaw. 

Maniatee, NeaaenCity. 



. Berrien 
G^pringa. 

Ftankfort, Copemiah . , 

Tale, Port Huron 

WIBCONBDI. 

Daxterrille, Lynn 



Pratt Junction, Bar- 



Parrtab Junction (n. 
cKParriBh. 
Hurley, Pence 



90011 



Paokwanlcee, Montello 
▲bbotaltord. Athena. 

Pairchild,MondoTi.. 

MXMXttOTJL 
Dnltttlk, Preato 



20064 



26067 



27100 



Mlnneapolia, 
City. Ljwa. 



Bed Wing, Zombrota. . 

little Falla, Braineid 

FMtUe^Croolcston. ... 
8t Paul, Minneapolis. . 
StPaul^MinneapoUa.. 

lOWJL 

Ottumwat Evaiia 



StLouia, Sturgieand 
Batae<;reekK.R. 

Toledo, Ann Arbor 
and North Michigan 
Bwy. Co.. leeaee of 
the Toledo. Saginaw 
and Mackinaw Rwy. 

Manistee and North- 
eastern B.B. 



St. Joseph Valley Rwy. 



Frankfort and South< 
eastern R. R. i 

Flint and Pere Mar- 
quette R.R. 



Wisconsin, PittaTllle 
and Superior Rwy. 
Co., lessee of the Mil- 
waukee, Dexterriile 
and Northern Rwy. 

Milwaukee, Lake 
Shore and western 
Rwy. 

do 



.do. 



Korthem Pacific R.R. 

Abboteford and North- 
eastern R.R. 

Sault Sto. Marie and 
Sonthweatem Rwy. 



K«nheni Padflo R. B. 



Chicago, St. Panl and 
City Bwy. 



Onlutb, Bed Wing and 
Southern B.B. 

Northern PacifleB.B. 



.do. 
.do. 



Chicago, Borlington 
and Northern R B. 



Wabash RB. 



MUu. 

41.00 

80.86 



30.30 



1L88 

I 

25.00 

24.68 
25.80* 

17.08 

4.68 

5.00 

7.01 
15w08 

86.00 
144.01 

148.68 



25.08 



30.05 

23.07 
10.39 
10.30 



28.01 



Poundi. 
301 



451 



Fe€t and inehe». 
apt. 15.4 by 7.2, 11. 



apt. 14.8 by 9, 11 10. «» 



221 



20 no apt . 



12 



184 13 no apt . 



i 
I ' I 

20017 no apt 12 



59128 



41 



35 



2415 



25 



12 



124 

48 



214 



81824 



1,58027 



1,271 



6021 



1,875 
1,213 



1,60021 



25 



apt 22 by 8.11, 1 I. 



.12 



no apt ! 9 



.do. 

..do. 

.do. 

.do. 
.do. 

.do. 



apt 24.6 by 0.1, 11... 



apt 10.0 by 7.5, 1 1. 



noapt 

apt 22 by 7.2, IJl jl2 



14.24 



18.20 



noapt 

apt 30.4 by 0.5. 11. 
apt 25.4 by 0. II.. 



apt 10 by 8.2, 11. 



SECOND ASSISTANT — RAILWAY ADJUSTMENTS. 



401 



8tate$ and Territoriea in whidt the ctmtrad tprm expired June 30, 1890, ete.— CoDtinaed. 






DoUi. 



50.85 



43.61 



42.76 

42.76 
87.56 

4S.75 

42.75 

42.76 

42.75 

42.76 
42l;5 

43.61 
«L5« 

n%.30 






S ft 

at 



DolU. 



48.74 
77.29 



42.79 
100.89 
91.06 



47.02 



•BSifta 

•ag. fts. 



M 



ft*S. ^Sio 
® a ii ' n 



DoUt. Z>pUf. 
I-.. 



47.88 



42.75 



49.03 



100.44 



1, 317. 03 

P M G 90 — ^26 



1 12 



2,328.M) 
2,3OL0O 



1,716.48 



507.87 

1.068L75 
1,067.1& 

i.ia2.» 

768L61 

200.49 

252.22 

290.67 
644.67 

l,600.2u 
8,885.25 

16,609.70 



1.266.26 
2,392.12 



986.24 

1,04^24 

977.1 



a . 

« o 



1MMar$, 



§sl 

sS,it 

Sis 
lis 



2>o«ar«. 



658.82 



672.08 



5.70&49 



11,088.05 



hi 



a °ft 



DoUor*. 



^1 



e 

3» 



BemarlEs. 



1880. 
Mar. 4 



Mar. 25 



1800. 
Apr. 1 



1880. 
Oct. 1 

1800. 
Jan. 1 

Mar. 10 



1880. 
Deo. 2 



Apr. 1 



Sept 26 

Sept. 26 

IhOO. 
Jan. 1 
Feb. 1 

Pel*. 17 



Apr. 1 



Mch. 7 



1R89. 
Jnly l.'i 

Nov. 24 

1890. 
Feb. 3 
Feb. 24 
Mar. 10 



1880. 
June 21 



Weighed 30 daya from 
Sept 24, 1800. Kew. 



Weighed 80 daya fron 
Apr. 1, 1800. 21.80 
m, est., from One- 
k a ma to Copemiab 
from Dec. 2. 1880. 8.71 
m.ext.,from Copemiah 
to Keaa^n City from 
March 24, 1800. 

Weighed 30 daya from 
Apr. 1,1890. Kew. 

Do. 

Do. 



Weighed 80 daj'a from 
Apr. 1. 1800 10.08 m. 
ext.from LIndney to 
Lynn from Deo. 8, 
18^0. 

Weighed 30 daya from 
8ept.24.U88. Keir. 

Weighed 80 daya from 
ApT.1, J&O. Neir. » 

Do. 
Do. 

Do. 



Weighed 30 days from 
Apr. 1. 1890. 20.72 m. 
ext , from l)rmin<'rd to 
PrpAto from Nov. 24, 
1889. 

Weighed 30 daya from 
Mar. 7. 1800. tO.:^0 m. 
ext.. St Paol to Min* 
neapoliM fitiiD Dec. 
2,1880; 20.75 m. ext., 
Lyle to M»(HtD City 
from M r. 8, IbOO. 

Weiehed 30 dava from 
Sept.24,lW«. Kew. 

Weijfhrd 80 da\B from 
Apr. 1,1890. New. 

Do. 
Da 
Do. 



Weighed 30 daya from 
St-pt 24, 18^. Lap 
aerrioe. New. 



402 BEPOBT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENEBAL. 

^.— Table akowing the re^adjiMtment of the ratee of pay per mile on railrond roii^t€§ in 



State and tennioi. 



Corporate title of 

company oarrying 

the mail. 



I 



t 
J 



III 



i^U 

^ 



Size, etc., of mail-car 
or apartment. 



s. 



27106 
27107 
27108 

28045 



iowA>-eontinaed. 
Evans, Harvey 



Wabash B.B. 



JTOm. 
10.48 



1,097 



Tara» Fort Dodge . 



Malrem, Tabor 

1I1860USL 

CapeOirardean, Hnnt- 
or. 



Joplin, Splitlog. 



28070 

28071 
28072 



147001 

147002 
147003 

147004 
147005 
147008 
147007 
147008 
147000 
147010 
147011 



Tower Grove Station 

\n. o.)/Oak HillJanc- 

tion (n. o.). 
Biverside Station (n. 

o.). Bonne Terre. 
Delta (n. o.), Maiden. 

Mo. 



Memphis, Tenn.,Little 
Book, Ark. 



Helena, Clarendon 

Little Bock. Fort Smith 



Trlppa, Warren 

Malvern, Hot Springs, 
BrlnUey, Jaoksonport- 



LittleBock, Arkansas 
City. 



GhiGago,Bock Isknd 
and Pacific Bwy. 

Tabor and Korthem 
Bwy. 



Cape Girardeau Sontb- 
westem Bwy. 



Kansbs City, Fort 
Smith and Sonthem 
Bwy. 

St. Lonis, Oak Hill and 
Carondelet Bwy. v 

Mississippi Biver and 
Bonne Terre Bwy. 

St. Louis, Arkansas 
and Texas Bwy. Co. 
in Arkansas ana Mis- 
souri. 



Little Bock and Mem- 
phis B. B. 



Arkansas Midland B.B 

Little Bock and Fort 
Smith Bwy. 



St. Louis, Iron Mount- 
ain and Southern 
Bwy. 

Hot Springs BB 



6.85 
0.43 

93. SO 
34.64 

7.08 

31.89 
51.67 

136.00 

48.77 
160.42 

40.26 
22.70 
60.91 



F€et amd indut. 
apt. 19 by 9.2, 11 



41 
1431.'^ 



no apt. 
...do. 



188 



16 



apt.l5by7, 11. 



12817 



23,36025 

17014 
16018 



8.80521 



no apt.. 



r. p. 0.49.4 by 9.4,2 1; 

noneanthoiixed ; apt 

18.8 by 9.8, 11 
noapt 



.do. 



7 
6 
18 

7.65 
ILU 

31.60 

14 

7 



221 



1,66821 



81810 



Foreet City, Helena. . . 

Nashville, Hope 

Gurdon, Camden , 

Searcy, West Point . . . 



Whiteand Black Biver 
Valley Bwy. 



St Louis, Iron Monnt- ' 114. 95 
ain and Southern I 
Bwy. 

....do ' 43.63 



Arkansas and Louisi- 
ana Bwy. 

St Louis, Iron Mount- 
ain and Southern 
Bwy. 

Searcy and West Point 
B. B« 



25.97 



34.69 



8.54 



1.541 
135 

1, 
777 
730 
237 



apt 22. 8 by 8. 21. 



12 



apt 14.6 by 7, 1 1 

apt 18.2 by 9.2, 11.... 

apt 17.10 by 9.5, 11.... 

noapt., 

apt 9.4 by^6.2, 1 1 

apt 17.10 by 9.5. 11... 
apt 24.10 by 8.10, 11 . 

apt 9 by 6, 21 

apt 9.7 by 9.4, 1 1 

noapt 



6 
7 

6 
21 

6 
9.34 

7 
14 

6 

6 



SECOND AiSSIstANT — RAU^WAY ADJUSTMENTS. 



403 



States and Territorie9 inwkkh the eontraot term expired June 30, 1890, ete. — Continued. 



is. 

04 



DoOt, 
45.31 



Doa». 



42.75 
42.75 

42.75 
42.75 

388.80 

42.75 
42.75 

123.12 

4a.81 
90.28 

SOL 00 
106.59 
42.75 
10L75 
75.24 
7S.53 
4S.32 
..4S.81 



w ■ 
piO 

SO' 






m 
t0 



Si 



u 



m 






JDottf. 



5&14 



42.75 



115.00 

42.75 
89L76 

48.17 
82.04 
42.75 
78.95 
6108 
99.00 
44.48 
48.74 



DoOt. 



11 
s§ 

(M is 

o 

-•J 



Z>oacBrf. 

474.84 



271.48 

408.13 

I 

4,013.7o' 



It 



CA 



§•2 



1,480.85 



2,800.61 

1,38a 
2,904.81 



18,806.88 

2,12&85 
15,296.23 

2,485.18. 
2,464.99 
2,803.90 
11, 898. 16 
3,282.72 
1,900.57 
1,572.15 
372.42 



DoOan. 



I 



^5, 

if 

« 5 S 

Ml 



DoUarg. 



4,212^82 



870.81 



si 

Si 



DoUart, 



15,606.00 

2,084.91 
11, 71ft 68 

2,273.87 
2.106.67 
2,603.47 
8,763.06 
2.901.85 
1,624.27 
1.648.13 
388.32 



I 

II 

1^ 



1889. 
Jnne 21 



▲ag. 12 

1890. 
Feb. 17 



iLUg. 6 



1889. 
S«pt.98 



Oct 1 

1890. 
Mar. 10 

Apr. 1 



July 1 

July 1 

July 1 

July 1 

Jtxly 1 

July 1 

JiUy 1 

July 1 

July 1 

July 1 

July 1 



RemttkB. 



Weighed 30 days from 
Sept. 24, 1889. Lap 
service. New. 

Weighed 30 days tntn 
Apr. 1.1890. New. 

Do. 



Weighed 90 days from 
Aug. 6. 1890. 21.43 m. 
ext., from WUlianis- 
▼ille to Hunter firom 
June 24, 1889. 

Weighed 80 days from 
KoT.6,1889. 14.27 m. 
ext., from Neosho to 
Splitlog fh»m Sept. 

Weighed 30 days fhmi 
Hay 1,1890. New. 



Weighed 80 days ft«m 
Apr. 1,1800. ^ew. 

Weighed 80 days from 
May 1« 1890. New. 



Weighed 30 days firom 

May 21, 1890. Land 

grant 184 m., 2 m. not 

Umd grant, at $153.00 

per m. 1 m. increase. 
Weighed for 30 days 

from Feb. 18, 1880. 
Weighed for 30 days 

from Feb. 18. 1880. 

Land grant. 1.42 m. 

increase. 
Weighed for 30 dars 

from Jane 25. 1890. 

0.01 m. Increase. 
Weighed 80 days from 

Feb. 18,1890. 2.70 m. 

decrease. 
Weighed 30 days from 

Feb. 18, 1890. 0.01 m. 

increase. 
Weighed 30 days from 

Sept. 9. 1890. 1.20 m. 

increase. 
Weighed 30 days from 

Feb. 18,1890. 1.02 m. 

decrease. 
Weighed for 30 days 

from Feb. 18, 1890. 

1.56 m. decrease. 
Weighed 30 davs from 

Feb. 18, 1880. 2.38 m. 

decrease. 
Weighed 30 days from 

Feb. 18, 1890. 8.47 m. 

extension Kensett to 

West Point from Oct. 

28, 1889. 0.81 m. in- 



404 REPORT OF THE P0STMA8TER-GEKERAL. 

B..— Table showing the re-adjustment of the rates of pay per mile on raitroad routes in 



I 



Stale and terminL 



abkahaab— «ontlnaed. 
Knobel, Forest Citiy • . . 



SeligmftQ, Mo., Bv- 
rekft Springs, Ark. 

Newport, CnsbniAii . . . 



McKeil, HagnollA. 



U7012 
147013 
147014 
147016 

147016 

147017 Bnlthton, Okolons.. 

147018 Bo(;era,BeBtonTille... 

147019; Fort Smith, ' Ark., 
Paris, Tex. 

147020 Pine Blair, Snglish.... 
I 

147021 FsyetteTlUe, St. Fsnl. 



Yaracir, Canunins.. 



147022 

147023 

147024 
147025 

147020 



140001 
140002 



149008 



149004 

140005 
140000 



Arkadelphia, Dslark. 



Bald Knob, Ark.,Mein- 
phis, Teno. 



Jenson, Mansfleld. . 
Fort Smith.Greeuwood 

Argents, Altheimer... 

LOUISZAITA. 

Vaoant. 

Xew Orleans, Cheney- 
▼llle. 

New Orleans, La Fay- 
ette. 



SchrieTer, Honma. 



Tidalia, JonesTllle . 
Clinton, Ethel 



Corporate title of 

oompany carrying 

the mail. 



St. Loois, Iron Mount- 
ain and Sonthem 
Kwy. 

Bareka Springs Bwy. 



St. Lonis, Iron Honnt- 
ain and Sonthem 

St. Lonls, Arkansss 
and Texas Bwy. in 
Ark. and Mo. 

Vsnier Branch Bwy.. 



Sonth western Arlcan* 
saa and Indian Terri- 
tory I^ B. 

BentonvlUe B. B 



St. Lonis and San Fran- 
cisco Bwy. 

Pine Bluff, Monroe and 
New Orleans Bwy. 

St. Lonis snd Sao Fran- 
Cisco Bwy. 

mUma Thole, Arka- 
delphia and Missis- 
sippi Bwy. 

St. Louis, Iron Moaut- 
ain and Sonthem 
Bwy. 

St. Louis and San 
Fruioisoo Bw v. 

St. Loois, Iron Mount- 
tain and Sonthem 
Bwy. 



St. Loois, Arkansas 
and Texss Bwy. in 
Ark. and Mo. 



Texas and Pacific Bwy 



Morgans, Louisiana, 
and Texas B. B., and 
steam-ship Co. 



.do. 



Natchez, Bed Blrer, 
and Texss B. K. 

LonisTille. New Or- 
Ieans,aDa Texas Bwy 



! 



JfOM. 

97.48 



19.54 
42.19 
6.58 

6.76 

14.56 

7.05 
109.48 

29.62 

35.52 

1L43 

03.78 

laao 

19.29 
43.10 

170.40 
145.45 



15.29 

25.00 
a79 



go 

l?5 






Pounds. 
1,174 



754 
498 
194 



68 
63 

403 

1,297 

147 



13 

10 

4816 

79024 

550 24 
182 

7510 



2.677 
9,898 



195 

166 
109 



....do . 



Sise, etc., of mall-car 
or apartment 






FeitemdinehM. 
apt. 24.10 by 8.10, 1 1 . 



no apt. 

apt. 14.6 by 7.6, 1 1 . 
no apt. 



....do 

apt. 21 by 7, 1 1 



no apt... 

aptl2by7, 11 

no apt 

apt. 24.10 by 8.10, 1 1 . 



apt 9.6 by 7, 21. 
no apt , 



..do . 



apt 20.4 by 7, 1 1 . 

o.,40by 9.1.11 
,9 by 9.2; iL 



r.p.o.,40by 9.1^1 1.; apt. 



no apt. . 

....do.. 
do . 



14 
6 

14 

16 
6 

18 

7 

6 

7 

6 . 

2L24 

14 
6 



10.801 
14 



SECOND ASSISTANT RAILWAY ADJUSTMENTS. 405 

Siaies and Territories in whieh the contract term expired June30y 1890, eto.~Cou tinned. 



XhBt. 
02.34 



74.39 
03.27 
42.76 



DcUt. 



f' 



IsS '-Se. 

a d at! 




Dottt. l>olU. 
66.69 



42.75 

56.43 
»7.47 

42.75 

4B.32. 

42.75 

76L10 

66.84 
42.76 

42.76 



187.66 
117.17 



42.76 

43.75 
42.78 



I 






70.11 
60.44 

42.75 



42.75 

43161 
71.82 

42.75 

47.03 

48.76 

61.18 

50.00 



108.46 



25.00306.80 



42.75 

42.75 
42.76 



DoUart. 

' 0,001.30 



1,458.58 

2,680.86 

281.28 



28^00 



622.01 

307.83 
16^518.21 

l,206w25 

1, 600. 76 

488.63 

7,136.65 

1,204.87 
824.64 

1,842.62 



23.457.26 
28^077. 85 



663.64 

1,004.40 
875l77 



I! 






DeUart. 



3,626.25 



li 



DoOari. 
6^510.61 

1,450.60 

2,046.35 

287.28 



307.45 
U; 133. 64 

1,566.05 

1,686.40 

488.63 

6.000.62 

1, 075. 57 



17,747.52 
27,886.02 



652.36 

1,004.40 
388.60 



Pp. 
5 « ^ 



IMBar*. 



1- 



I* 



1800. 
Jaly* 1 



July I 
iJuly 1 
Jalv 1 



8, 74a 00 



July 1 

July 1 

July 1 

July 1 

July 1 

July 1 

July 1 

July 1 

July 1 

July 1 



July 1 
July 1 



B«ai«rks. 



July 1 

July 1 
July 1 



Weighed 30 days from 

Feb. 18, 1800. 0.28 m. 

decreaee. 
Weighed 80 daye from 

M»r. 18, 1600. 1.28 

m. deoreMe. 
Weighed for 80 days 

tnm Feb. 18, 1800. 

1.62 m. incraaae. 
Welched 30 days from 

Feb. 18, 1800. 0.14 m. 

decrease. 

Serrioe ditcontiDued 
from March 31, 1800. 

Weighed for 30 days 

from Feb. 18, 1800. 

0.03 m. decreaee. 
Weighed for 30 days 

from Feb. 18. 1800. 
Weighed for 30 davH 

fh>m Feb. 18, 1800. 

0.55 m. iDcreaae. 
Weighed for 80 davH 

from Feb. 18, 1890. 

6.80 m. decrease. 
Weighed for 30 days 

from Feb. 18, 1890. 

0.34 m. decrease. 
Weighed for 30 days 

from Feb. 18, 1800. 

Weighed for 30 days 
from Feb. 18. 1880. 
0.07 m. increase. 
Do. 

Weighed for 30 days 
from Feb. 18, 1800. 
0.27 m. increase. From 
Apr. 16, 1888, on 19.02 
m. New. 

Weighed for 30 days 
fh>m Feb. 18, 1800. 
U.15m. increase. From 
May 6, 18ri0, on 42.05 
m. New. 



Weighed 30 days from 
Feb. 18, 1890. 1.14 m. 
decrease. 

Weighed 30 days from 
Feb. 18, 1800. 83.52 m. 
New Orleans to Mor- 
gan City, land grant, 
formerly $164.16 per 
mile. From July 1. 
1890, 80.82 m.. land 
grant, at $173.74 per* 
mile. 4.47 m. de- 
crease. 

WiMghed 30 days from 
Feb. 18, 1800. 0.03 ni. 
increase. 

Weighed 30 days from 
Feb. 18, 1890. 

Weighed 30 days from 
Feb. 18, 1880. 0.30 m. 
decrease. 



406 REPORT OP THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

}\. — Table nhowin^ the re-adjwitment of the rates of pay per mile on railroad routes in 



£ 

I 



149007 

140008 

148000 

140010 

149011 

149012 

149013 

149014 

14901S 

149016 
14901 

149018 

149019 

149020 

149021 



149022 



149020 



150001 



150002 



StAto and termini. 



LonmAHA— oontlnned. 

Slanghter, La., W«ibd- 
TillS,Mi8a. 



Vloksbnrg, Hits., 
ShreTeport, La. 



8cfarieTer,ThibodMnix 



Lafayette,!*., Orange 
Tex. 

Shreyepofrt, Cheney* 
Tille. 

Cadea, 6t ICartinsTille 



Baton Rouge Jnnction 
(n. o.), Baton Bonge. 

New Orleana, CoTing- 
ton. 

Baldwin SUtion (n.o.), 
Ttonina. 



ShrevepoTt, Logana- 

POPt. 

Cypreas, Katchltoohea 



Gibeland, Homer . . 



Galveaton, Ark., 
Shreveport, La. 

Kew Orleana, Point 
a la Hacfae. 

La Fayette, Alexandria 



New Iberia, ATeiy. 



New Orleana, Point a 
la Hache. 

TEXAS. 

Honaton, GalToaton. . . 
Hooston, San Antonio 
Honitton, Deniaon.. 



Corporate title of 

company carrying 

tlie mail. 



LonisTiUe. Kew Or- 
leans,ana Tezaa Rwy, 



yickabore, Shieve* 
port andPadilo B. B. 



and Texas R. B. and 
Steam-sbip Co. 
Lonisiana, Western 
B.B. 

Texaa aad Paciilo Rwy 



Moigans, Loniaiana, 
and Texas R. R.and 
Steam^ship Co 

Texas and Faciilc Rwy 



East Lonisiana R. R . 



Morgans, Louisiana, 
and Texas R. R. and 
Steam-sbip Co, 

Shreveport and Hens' 
ton Rwy. 

NatobltocbeaR.R.... 



Louisiana and North- 
west R.R. 

St. Loais, Arkanaas, 
and Texas Rwy. Co. 
in Ark. and Mo. 

New Orleans and Gulf 
R.R. 

Morgans, Loulsianau 
and Texas R. K. and 
Steam-sbip Co. 



New Orleans and Gulf 
R.R. 



International and 
Great Northern R.R. 

Galreston, Harrisbnrg 
and San Antonio Rwy. 

Houston and Texas 
Centra} Rwy. 



I 



JfOM. 

41.73 



Poundt. 



178.07 

5.26 

113.66 

167.67 

7.30 

10.96 

50.80 

15.46 

4L72 
12.70 

19.70 

61.54 

43.62 

86.40 



10.45 
46.62 



6L81 



215.65 



^3 85^ 



2,681 



19 



Size, eto., of maU-car 
or apartment. 



Feet and inohst. 
9 no apt 



r. p. o., 42.2 by 9.3, 1 1 
(not authorised). 



336 
8,303 

l,93l|24 

i 

uir 

I 

157 12 

20924 

61 



no ti^t.. 



650 
284 

216 

120 

299 



93 



no apt.. 

....do., 

.do., 

....do. 



15 



8,07328 

I 
4, 019'24 

6, 193:25 



r. p.o.,40 by 9.1,1 !•; spt., 
&.9bytf.2,ll. 

apt 20.4 by 7,11 



apt. 14 by 7, 1 1 . 
no apt 



... do 

^t24.6by9.11. 
apt 7 by 6, 11 ... 
aptl8by*9,l 1... 



no apt 

apt 7 by 6, 11. 



apt. 20.6 by 9.2. 2 1. . 
apt 22.9 by 9.2, 21.. 
apt. 22 by 9.21.... 



h 

r 



14 
14 

7 
14 

7 
7 

7 

7 I 
14 

14 

6 

6 

7 



10 
7 

28 
14 
1S.C 



SECOND ASSISTANT — ^RAILWAY ADJUSTMENTS. 407 

SialM and Tenritoriea in whtch the contract term expired June 30, IfSOO, 0IO. ^Continued. 



I 



is . 



DoUi. 
44.46 



op. 

1:: 






DoUt. 



D6a$, 

42.75 



110. 13 

88.10 
208.06 
134.83 
42.75 
42.75 
42.75 
42.75 

70.11 

4a 74 

4X01 
42.75 
40.«» 
48.74 



04.29 



42.75 
25.00194.08 
92.34 



42.75 

42.75 

42.75 

42.75 

4i75 
45.31 

42.75 

42.75 

44.46 

I 

139.37 



42.75 
42.75 

142.n 

lfiOL47 
182.97 



S4 



U 



n 



m 



TkOB. DoOart. 
1.85&31 



I 10,000.19 



I . 



t 274.86 

I 

25.001 23» 430. 77 9,84L50 

19,081.94 

312.07 

40&54 

2,566.45 

660.91 



V, 

v.* 

It 



DoUan. 



42.75 
49.59 

13^38 

[123.12 

t 

I16I.6O 



t 



2,924.98 
61&99 

859.11 

2,030.83 

2,282.20 

3,11&01 



440.73 
1,960.25 

7,820L56 
83,742.75 
01,913.88 




DoOarg. \ DoUart. 



1,839.25 



11,100.31 



248.86 

21,079.661 2,831.25 

I 
14,497.67| 

301. 81 1 

406.121 



"r 



If 

tali 

ft 



1890. 
July 



July 1 

July I 
July 1 
July 1 
July 1 
July 1 



2.543.62 July 

I i 

661.931 JiUy 



Rein*rks. 



Weighed 30 days from 
Fe6.18,]890. 16.09 m. 



1,783.53!. 
626. 5oL 

839.18;. 

2,609.40' 

9,223.00. 

i 

10,106i9e* 



429.63 
2,208.29 

0^865.73 
26,841.39 
54, 473. 74 



July 
July 

July 

July 

July 

July 



July 
Aug. 



ext. Bayou Sat* to 
SlAOicbter from Dea9, 
1889. 0.06m. deoreMe. 

Welebed 80 days from 
Fe5. 18, 1890. Land 
graot. 0.41 m. In- 
crease. 

Welebed 80 daya trcm 
Feb. 181 1890. 0.51m. 
decrease. 

Weighed 30 days from 
Feb. 18, 1890. 0.41 m. 
increase. 

Weighed 80 days from 
Febri8,1890. 1.10 m. 
increase. 

Weighed 80 days from 
Fob. 18, 1890. 0.24 m. 
increase. 

Weighed 30 days from 
Feb. 18, 1890. 1.40 m. 
increase. 

Weighed 30 days from 
Feb. 18, 1800. 0.30 m. 
increase. 

Weighed 30 days from 
i Feb. 18, 1890. 0.21 m. 
I increase. 
1 1 Weighed 30 days from 
< Feb. 18. 1890. 

Weighed 80 days from 
Feb. 18. 1890. 1.08 m. 
increase. 

Weighed 30 days from 
Feb. 18, 1890. 0.07 m. 
increase. 

Weighed 30 days from 
F.^b.]S,]890. 0.50 m. 
increase. 

Weighed 30 days from 
Mar. 3, 1890. 4.38 m. 
decrease. 

Weighed 30 days from 
Feb.18.1890. 24.30 m. 
Lap service. Cheney- 
vilie to Alexandria, 
over route No. 140011, 
lormerly at 463.27 per 
milo. From Jaly 1, 
1890, 25.57 m. lap serv- 
ice, at $5.99 per mile. 
0.58 m. decrease. 

Weighed 30 days fh>m 
Feb. 18, 1890. 0.40 m. 
increase. 

Weighed 30 days tram 
Aug, 1. 1890. 



July 1 Weighed 30 days from 
; Feb. 18. 1890. 0.09m. 
! decrease. 
July I Weigbed 30 days fh>m 
' Feb.18.1890. 2.36 m. 
decrease. 
Jnly 1 Weiehed 30 days from 
Febll8,1890. 1.99 m. 
increase. 



408 



REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 



H.'^TdbU ihowing the re-^Justmeni of ike rates of pay per mile on railroad routes in 



i 

I 

I 



Stete ftnd termini. 



Corporate title of 

company carrying 

the mail. 



t 



§1 






Sixe, etc., of mail-car 
or apartment. 



r 



150004 



150005 



180006 



100007 



150008 



IBOOOO 



TBL4B— continued. 
Hempatead, Aoaiin.. 



Bremond, Soaa. 



HoQston and Tezaa 
Central Bwy. 

....do , 



115. 10 



1,209 



LoBgriew, Honaton. . 
Palestine, Laredo.... 
Hooaion, ColnmUa... 



Sbrereport, La., Bl 
Paao, Tex. 



International and 
Great Northern K.K. 



....do. 

— do 

Texaa and Paoiflo Rwy. 



64.49 

238.32 
415.78 
51.05 

833.43 



842 

3.020 

6,280 

149 

3,420 



Feet and ineheM. 
aptl4by8.10,ll... 



iSOOlO 
150011 
150012 
150018 
160014 
150015 
150016 
150017 
150018 
160010 
150020 



Xexarkana, Ark.,lCar- 
aliall, Tex. 

Whiteeborongh, Tex., 
Tex&rkana, Ark. 



Honaton, Orange 

Jelbraon, MoKinney. , 
Colamboa, La Grange 
Henderson, Overton. 
Corpoa Chrietl, Laredo 
I>eniaon, Minneola. 
Brownsville, Isabel... 



..do.. 



Port Lavaca, Cnero... 
Hooaton, Sealy 



Texaa and Kew Or- 
leans R B. 

Hissonri, Bjinsas and 
Texas Rwy. 

Galveston, HarriRbnrg 
and San Antonio Rwy. 

International and 
Great Northern R.R. 

M e X i c an National 
R.R. 

Minaoori. Kansas and 
Texas Rwy. 

Rio Grande R.R 



Golil Western Texaa 
and Pacific Rwy. 

Texaa Western Rwy . 



74.61 

173.26 

106.89 

154.56 

31.64 

16.44 

161.50 

103.02 

23.20 

56.11 

62.25 



14,010 
1,343 
8,264 



30713 



184 

275 

278 

1.153 

24 
221 

40 



apt. 17.8 by 9.4, 11. 



opt. 21.8 by 8.10. 1 1. . 



apt 22 2 by 9 2, 1 1 to 
Taylor, 2 1 ■la\Ior to 
San Antonio, 116.50 m. 

no apt 



r.p.o., 60 by 9.1, 1 1, 
(40 feet an>b.) be. 
tween Ma*nball and 
Fort Worth, 170.70 
m.; apt. 21.6 by 9.1, 
11. and 2 addl.l.be- 
tween Harshall and 
Lougview. 



r.p.o., 50 by 9.1. 11. 

(40 feet ant h.); apt. 

21 6 by 9.1, 2 1. 
opt. 20.4 by 7, IL 

r.p.o., 40 by 9,1 l.;apt, 
22. 9 by 9.2, 11. 

apt 11.10 by 6.10, 11 .. 

no apt 

no apt 

aptl2by0,l 1 

apt.20.6by7.6. 11.... 
no apt 

apt 14.6 by 0, 1 1. be- 
tween Victoria and 
Cuero, 28.89 m. 

no apt 



14 
8.32 

14 

11.40 
3 



21 

14 
14 

7 

6 

7 

7 
10.57 

7 

6.60 

3 



SECOND ASSISTANT — RAILWAY ADJUSTMENTS. 



409 



States and TerritorUs in which the contract term expired Juve 30, 1890, etc. — Continned. 



i% 


it 

u S 


p. 




ii 


11 






h 








n 




So 


a P 

ifl 


h 


a A 


Bemwks. 




11 


III 


tie 


Its 


Is 

1^ 


DoUart. 


DoUar: 


1 

S' 




Dca». 


DoU*. 


l>olU. 


DotU. 


Dollars. 


DoUart. 


1 
1890. 1 


97.47 




81.23 




11,21&79 




9,354.44 




Jaly 1 


Weighea 30 days fyoni 
Feb. 18. 1890. 0.06 m. 





































flecreasto 


79.66 




76.10 





4.286.18 




17, 570. 72 




July 1 


Weifflied 90 days from 
Feb. 18. 1890. 0.67 m. 






































decreane. The part 
of this route between 
Ross and Albany is 
V restated under No. 
150076. 


151. M 




U1.93 




35, 310. 64 




33, 133. 65 




July 1 


W«igb<*d ao days from 
Febi 18, 1899. 0.13 m. 




























deorease. 


173 57 




128. L'S 


72,166.93 




53, 326. 85 


July 1 


Weiebed 80 days horn 
Feb. 18, 1890. 0.02 m. 






j 




1 






1 










deoroase. 


42.75 




42. 75' 


2, 182. 38 




2, 180. 25| ., 


July 1 


Weigbed 80 days firom 
Feb. 18, 1890. 0.05 m. 
































increase. Based on 
















• 




a service of not less 




















than 6 round trips 


147.92 


25.00 


1.'!). 0{ 


25. 00 


11.-3,834.85 


4,492 50 


125,012.87 


4,482.50 


July 1 


_pcr week. 

WeiKhe«l 30 days from 
Feb. 18.1890. 129 m. 






































decrease. 19.30 *ni., 




















Shrereport to State 




















line(n.o.) land grant. 




















formerly at $127.22 




















per m.. now $118.34 




















per m. 91.60 m., Si< 




















erra Blanca to £1 




















Paso, lap service ovt-r 
route No. 31039, for- 






































merly at $81.23 per 




















m., now 9L61m. at 




















$72.68 perm. 


266.76 


25u 00 227.43 


25.00 


19,902.96 


1.865.25 


15, 838. 23 


1. 741. 00 


July 1 


Weighed 80 days from 




















Feb. 18,1890. 4.97 ra. 


















increase. 


100.04 




07.47 




17,332.93 


16,905.19 


July 1 


Weighed 30 days from 
















Feb. 18, 1890. (U8m. 








2^.00 










decrease. 


205.20 


29.00 


192.37 


21,933.82 2,672.25 


20, 454. 70 


2,658.25 


July 1 


Weigbe<l 30 days ftom 
Feb. 18, 1800. 0.56 m. 


































increase. 


49.59 




57.29 




7, 664. 63 


8, 90C. 30 


July 1 


Weighed 30 days from 
Feb. 18, 1890. 0.90 m. 






























Incroase. 


42.76 




44.46 




1,352.61 


1.404.93 




July I 


Weighed 30 days from 
Feb. 18. 1890. 0.04 m. 




V 


































increase. 


47.88 




44.46 




787. 14 




756. 26 




July 1 


Weighed 80 days fVom 
Feb. 18. 1890. 0.57 m. 





































decrease. 


47.88 




55.68 




7, 732. 62 




8, 981. 72 




July 1 


Weighed 80 days firom 
Feb. 18,1890. 6.10 m. 
































decrease. 


91.49 




72.68 




9.425.29 




7,499.84 




July I 


Weighed 80 days fh)m 
Feb. 18,1890. 0.17 m. 












- 




















decrease. 


42.75 




42.7ft 




99L80 




990.09 




July 1 


Weighed 30 days from 
Feb. 18, 1890. 04 m. 






































increase. 


43.61 




43.01 




2,446.95 




2, 419. 92 




July 1 


Weighed 30 days from 
Feb, 18, 1890. 0.62 ra. 




































increase. 


42.76 




49L75 




2,233.68 




2,260.19 




July 1 


Weighed 30 days from 
Feb. 18, 1890. 0.62 m. 
































increase. Based on a 




















service of not less 




















than round trips per 




















week. 



410 REPOBT OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERiiL. 

s 

H. — Table showing the re-adjustnumt of the rates of pay per mile on railroad routes in 



State and termini. 



Corporate title of 

company carrying 

tlie mail. 



I 

e 
IS, 

J 






Sise, etc, of mail'oar 
or apartment. 






150021 

150022 

150023 
U002i 

160085 

1S0026 

150027 

150028 

150029 

150080 

150081 

150062 

150033 

150034 

150036 

150036 
160087 



TBXAB — continued. 

Wazahacbie, Garrett 
(n.o). 

Deniaon, Henrietta 

Hoaston, Tex., Logans- 
port, La. 
Navaaota, Conroe 

Toxarkana, Ark., 
GateeTlUe, Tex 

G^rgetown, Bound 
Book. 

Galveaton, Fort Worth 

Whiteeborougli, Tay- 
lor. 

Beaumont, Bockland . . 

Dallas, Denton .., 

Dallas, JSemp 

Mineola, Troup 

San Antonio, Corpus 
ChrifltL 

Phelps, HuntsTille ... 
Dallas, Weaiherford . . 

Bosenberg, Victoria. . . 
Fort Worth, Texline.. 



Central Texas and 
Northwestern Bwy. 

Missouri, Kansas and 
Texas Bwy. 

Houston. East and 
West Texas Bwy. 

Gulf, Colorado and 
SanU F6 Bwy. 

St. Louis, Arkansas 
and Texas Bwy Co. 
in Texas. 

International and 
Great Northern B. B. 

Gulf, Colorado and 
Santa F6 Bwy. 

Missouri, Kansas and 
Texas Bwy. 

Sabine andSast Texas 
Bwy. 

Misaonrf, Kansas and 
Texas Bwy. 

Texas Trunk B.B. 



International and 
Great Northern B. B. 

San Antonio and Aran* 
sas Pass Bwy. 

International and 
Great Northern B. B 

, Gulf, Colorado and 
I Santa F6 Bwy. 



Now York, Texas and 
Mexican Bwy. 

Fort Worth and 
Denver City Bwy. 



UiU9. 
12.10 



FoundM. 
0.92 



160038 
150039 



Austin, Burnet 

San Antonio, £1 Paso 



1U.48 

192.70 
46.24 

306.60 
10.28 

347.66 

234.21 
74.07 
3a46 
49.28 
44.50 

160.47 

8.33 

04.40 

92.04 
452.65 



2,211 

667 
207 



1,155|19 

367 
1,287 
6^173 

362 

364 

161 



60024 



22 



819 



12 



64916 



841 



26 



2,21625 



FMt and inehei. 
apt 17.6 by 8.10. II.... 

apt. 19.2 by 7.11 (av.), 

apt 14 by 7, 11 

aptll.8 by 6.10,11.... 

apt 24.6 by 9,11 

no apt 

apt 20.9 by 9.2, 11 

apt 21.9 by 9.8,1 1 

apt 16 by 6.8, 11 

apt 16.7by 6.7.11..... 

apt 18 by 9,11 

apt 21 by 9,11 

aptl7by9,ll 

no apt 

apt 18 by 9, 11 between 
i)aUas and Clebum, 
54.05 m. No derk 
residue. 

apt 14.6 by 9, 1 1 

apt 21.4 by 7.2, 11 



14 

14 

7 
7 

9.80 
14 

8.48 
14 

7 
14 

6 
14 

8.02 
14 
11 

7 
&51 



Austin and North- 
western B. B. 

Galveston, Harrisbnrg 
and San Antonio 
Bwy. 



6L16 



710 
1,172 



aptl4by7.4»l.l 

I4;>t22.9by9.2,ll.... 



SECOm) ASSISTANT — RAILWAY ADJUSTMENTS. 



411 



Stat^and Terriioriea in which the eontraet term expired June 20^ 1890, etc.— Continued. 



n 

S.9-S 

'3a 



Dolts 
84.05 



IMii. 



iao.g2 

70. »7 
42.75 

91.40 

53.87 

97.47 

182.97 

53.87 

53.87 

42.75 

6&40 

71.8*;. 



Iln^, 



JS ^ 

S:s 



m 

o ft** 



*- s s 

2 * S 



59.85 



I 



129. 96J . 

48. sol. 
42.75 

I 67.55 

4&74 

I 
102. 

156147 
43^75 

157.32 
42.75 
7&66| 
52. 16 



50.45 43.61 . 

70.11; 49.591. 

I I 

I 
7a 66 ; 73,53 

130.82 82.94 

I 



72.68 
98.84 



72.68 
94.06 



II 



fl<Sg 

lis 



DoUart. 
1,024.26 



14.583.81 

13,675.01 
1,984.01 

27,999.34 
554.88 

33,888.42 

42.853.40 
3,900.15 
2,07L84 
2,105.86 
3,049.95 

10, 806. 75 

420.24 

6,61&38 



So 

H 

i| 



DoUan, 



00 i 

hi ; 

ti ■ 
III; 



^1 

O CB rf 

PC4 



I 



DcUart, 
736.15 



14.467.14 

\ 

9,555.99 

1, 878. 86 

20. 629. 10 

502.99 

35^688.86 

36,621.80 

3,242.58 

5,989.17 

2,110.99 

3,503.51 

8,140.08 

865.45 

4,650.55 




JktUan. 






S^ 



1880. 
July 1 



July I 

July 1 

July I 

July 1 

July 1 

July 1 

July 1 

July 1 

July 1 

July 1 

July 1 

July 1 

July 1 

July 1 

July 1 



RemarkB. 



Weished 80 days from 
Feb. 18,1890. 0.20 m. 
deoreaae. 

Weighed 30 days from 

Seh. 18, 1890. 0.16 m. 
icreaae. 
Weiffbed 30 daya from 

Feb. 18. 1890. 
Weif^bea 30 daya from 

Feb. 18, 1800. 1.29 m. 

inoreaae. 
Weighed 30 daya from 

Feb. 18, 1890. 0.21 m. 

looreafie. 
Weighed SO daya from 

Feb. 18, 1880. O.OB m. 

decrease. 
Welffhed SOdaysfivm 

Feb. 18. 1880. 0.70 m. 

inorease. 
Weighed 80 days from 

Feb. 18, 1890. 0.16 m. 

increase. ^ 

Weighed 30 daya from 

Feb. 18, 1890. 1.78 m. 

decreaae. 
Weighed 30 days from 

Feb. 18, 1890. 0.39 m. 

increase. 
Weighed 80 days from 

Feb. 18, 1800. 0.12 m. 

decrease. 
Weighed 30 days from 

Feb. 18, 1890. 0.05 m. 

increase. 
Weighed 30 days from 

Feb. 18, 1800. 5.59 m. 

decrease. 
Weighed 30 days from 

Feb. la 1880. 0.05 m. 

decrease. 
Weighed 30 days from 

Feb. 18.1890. 0.62 m. 

increase. 



Weighed 30 days from 
Feb. 18, 1890. 0.66 m. 
decrease. 
' July 1 Weighed 30 days from 
^ April 1, 1890. 0.47 m. 
decrease. 16.23 m. ex- 
tension Harrold to 
I Vernon, from Nov. 1, 
i 1886; 27.85 m. oxten- 
I sion Vernon to Quau- 
; nab, from March 21, 
' 1887; 86.88 m. exten- 
' sion Qnannah to 
. Clarendon from Oct. 
I 10, 1887; 174.20 m. 
extension Clarendon 
> to Texline, from June 
4,1888. 
July 1 Weighed 30 days from 
: Feb. 18, 1890. 0.44 m. 
. iucroase. 
July I Weighed 30 days from 
I Feb. 18, 1890. 1.12 m. 
I' inoreaae. 



412 



REPOBT OF THE POSTMAE^S-OENEBAL. 



U. — Table showing the r«-adju»tmeitt of ffu ratet of pay p«r mile on rttUroad routes in 



i 

£ 

Q 

M 

I 



1«CMM 
150041 
150042 
150043 
U0M4 
1G404; 

150040 
160047 
160048 
150049 
150050 
150051 
150052 
150053 

160064 

160055 
150056 
150067 
150058 
160060 
150060 
160001 



Ktibtft fttid t«iiiiiuL 



TKZAtHM»iitliined. 



Echo,B0ltoo ,^. 

Guide, Hubftftft 

Spcjfford, E&if Lu PoiH . 
Tjlcir, Lufldn ,.-. 



Qennmont, Sabine 



TrkLlty, Colmefmell.. 

Honston, Alvin 

Longview, Carthage . 
Temple, San Angelo . 



Somerville (ii.o.),Na- 
vaaota. 

Coleman Junction (n. 
o.), Coleman. 

Fort Worth, Waxaha- 
chie. 

DallaH, Honey Grove.. 



Fort Worth, Tex., 
Pnrcell, Tnd. T. 

Greenville, Dallas 



Taylor, Fayetteville . 



Kennedy, Wallia Sta- 
tion. 

San Antonio, Kerrville 

Ladonia, Paris 

If onnt Pleasant, Sher- 
man. 

FortWorth.Graobnry 



Corporate tHle of 

Dompanj carryinff 

the mall. 



Galvflelx>i], BaniJiburg 
and Ban Antonui 

Mlbsaart Kansas and 
T^iaii ILwy. 

Teias Cuitral Hwy. .. 



GaLvefltDD, narriabiirg 
and »u Antonio 

B%. Louis, Arkansas 
■nd Texas K«ry Co. 
Jo T^tm- 

84iblne and East Teias 
Jiwy. 



Missouri, Kaniiaii and 

Gnlf, Colorado and 
Santa F6 Bwy. 

Texas, Sabine Valley 
and Northwestern 
Rwy. 

Gnlf, Colorado and 
Santa F6 Bwy. 

....do 



....do.. 



Fort Worth and New 
Orleans Rwy. 

Gnlf, Colorado and 
SanU F6 Rwy. 



Si 






.do. 



Missouri. Kansas and 
Texas Bwy. 



.do. 



San Antonio and Aran- 
sas Pass Bwy. 

....do 



Gulf, Colorado and 
Santa F6 Bwy. 

St. Louis, Arkansas 
and Texas Rwy. Co. 
in Texas. 

Fort Worth and Bio 
Grande Bwy. 



61TB 
6X21 
$6.06 
B0i07 
30.60 

67.17 
24.54 
39.35 
228.00 
28.60 
6.18 
41.51 
81.53 

I 

173.04 

! 

56.15 
83.26 

180.99 
71.26 
80.07 

110. 57 
41.04 






Pt>untljt. 



0013 
40^ 



457 



IT 



3210 



:!4ft 
831 
100 
995 
69 
239 
596 
624 



068: 
287 
363 
507 



24820 



ax aparttQt^iit. 



Feet and isteksi. 
no apt , 



no apt. 

no apt 

apLO.fiby T,l L.... 
apt.le.Oby 6.4, 11. 
no apt ....„,.. 



»I»t 13 J by 7.1, 11.. 

no apt 

no apt 

apt 9.10 by 7.4, 11.. 

no apt 

apt 9.10 by 7.4, 11.. 
apt 17.0 by 8.10, 11. 



apt 18.6 by 9, 1 I be- 
tween Dallas and La- 
donia, 69.44 m. No 
clerk residue. 

apt 20.2 by 9, 1 1 



2i apt 13.1 by 7.1, 11 



20 apt 10 by 6,11.. . 

loj apt 15 by 9. 11.. 
635 15' apt 10 by 7, 1 1 .. 
71120 apt. 13.6 by 9. 11. 
347 8 apt 24.6 by 9.1 1. 



no apt. . 



I I 



7 
U 
6 
7 
7 
3 

7 
21 
6 
7 
7 
7 
7 
8.03 

14 
7 
7 
6 
6 
7 
7 
6 



SECOND ASSISTANT — RAILWAY ADJUSTMENTS. 413 

8iate9 and Territories in which the oontraci term eaepireA June 30, 1890, eio, — Continaed. 



n 



s.§s 









MM 






If 







^5 

-4a 

11? 



if 



Su 



BeiDArks. 



44.46! 



DcfU. 



DoOm. 
4X79 






JDoOort. 
671.75 



DoUan. 



&S.S8 
42.75 
5&43 
M.71 
42.75 

4&32 
5L30 
4^75 
84.85 
42.76 
46.32 
67.55 
60.26 

83.70 

48.74 

53.87 

66.69 

60.26 

73.68, 

58.0} 

4ft 17 



45.32 
4175 
42.75 
43,61 
42.75 

42.75 
60.85 
42.75 
87.21 
42.76 
42.75 
45.32 
42.76 

70. 

45.32 

53.01 

58.14 

64.18 

66.88 

6L56 

43.61 



374.06 
2,231.07 
2.011.72 
6^468.14 
1,311.90 

3,044.14 
1,258.00 
1.682.21 
10,307.81 
1,218.37 
280.07 
2,804.00 
5^646.76 

H400.02 
2,688.01 
4»48&21 
8,78&72 
ii036.46 
2,185.48 
5,861.31 
1,804.81 



X>oUar*. 
530.50 



810.06 
2,228.55 
1.481.71 
3.007.80 
1,334 22 

2, 85ft 12 
1,410.04 
1,701.44 
10,804.61 
1,162.80 
267.18 
1,808.00 
3,450.85 

13,668.48 
2, 47ft 28 
4.415.20 
7,738.78 
4,60L33 
1.986.43 
6,777.75 
1,803.27 



DottarM, 



1880. 

Jaly 1 

July 1 

July 1 

July 1 

July 1 

July 1 

July 1 

July 1 

July 1 

July 1 

July 1 

July 1 

July 1 

July 1 

July 1 

July 1 

July 1 

July 1 

July 1 

July 1 

July 1 

July 1 



Welched 80 deye from 

Feb. 18, 1800. 0.24 m. 

increase. 
Weighed 30 daye fhm 

Feb. 18, 1300. 0.33 m. 

decreaae. 
Welshed 30 days from 

Feb. .18, 1800. 0.08 m. 

inereaae. 
Weished 30 days from 

FebTlO, 1800. 

Weighed 80 days from 

Feb. 18, 1880. 0.46 m. 

iucrease, 
Weicbed 80 daya from 

Feb. 18, 1800. 0.52 m. 

deoreaae. Baaed on a 

service ot not leaa 

than 6 round tripe per 

week. 
Weighed 30 daya from 

Feb. 18, 1890. OJMm. 

increase. 
Weighed 30 days from 

Fob. 18. 1800. 0.83 m. 

inereaae. 
Weighed 30 days from 

Feb. IS, 1800. 0.45 m. 

deoreaae. 
Weighed 30 days from 

Feb. 18, 1890. 1.00 m. 

increase. 
Weighed 30 daya from 

Feb. 18. 1800. 1.30 m. 

increase. 
Weighed 30 daya from 

Feb. 18,1800. 0.07 m. 

decrease. 
Weighed aO days frtim 

Feb. 18. 1800. 0.37 ni. 

decrease. 
,Weighed 30 daya from 

Feb. 18, 1880. 0.82 m. 

inereaae. 

Weighed 30 daya from 

Feb. 18, 1890. 2.41m. 

increase. 
Weighed 30 days from 

Feb. la 1880. 0.51 m. 

increase. 
Weighed 30 days from 

Feb. 18, 1890. 0.03 m. 

decrease. 
Weighed 80 days from 

Feb. 18. 1880. 2.03 m. 

decrease- 
Weighed 30 days from 

Feb. 18, 1800. 0.40 m. 

decrease! 
Weighed 30 days from 

Feb. 18. 1890. 0.00 m. 

decrease. 
Weighed 30 days from 

Feb. 18, 1890. 0.47 m. 

increase. 
Weighed 30 daya from 

Feb. 18, 1800. 0.31m. 

decrease. 



414 EEPOET OF THE POSTMASTEE-GENEBAL. 

H. — Table, showing the re- adjustment of the rates of pay per mile on railroad routes in 



I 
I 



160002 
150063 
160064 
160006 



150066 



160667 



150068 



150I69 



150070 



150071 



160072 

160076 



isaooi 



State and terminL 



TBXAB— continued. 
YoakniD, West Point. 

San Marcos, Lockhart. 



Corsloana, Hilla- 
boroagb. 

Texllne, Tex., Faeblo, 
Colo. 



Pan Handle, Waab- 
bam. 



Commerce, Fort 
Worth. 

Bockport^ Gregory 

Kildare, Linden 



Dallas, Waxahachie.. 



Victoria, Beeville . 



Bumei. Marble Falls. 
Sosa, Albany 



nnuAN TKRRrroBT. 
Atoka, Lehigh 



169002 Vinita, Sapalpa . 



Corporate title of 

compsny carrying 

the mail. 



San Antonio and Aran- 
sad Pass Rwy. 

Mlaaonri, Kansas and 
Texas Bwy. 

St. Lonia, Arkanaas 
and Texas By. Co. In 
Texas. 

Union Paciflo, Denver 
and Gulf Bwy. 



Pan Handle Bwy . 



St. Louis, Arkansas 
and Texas Bwy. Co. 
in Texas. 

San Antonio and Aran- 
sas Pass Bwy. 

Kildare and Linden 
Bwy. 



Missouri. Kansas and 
Texas Kwy. 



Golf: Western Texas 
and Pacific Bwy. 



Austin and Korth- 

westem B. B. 
Texas Central Bwy . . . 



Missouri. Kansas and 
Texas Bwy. 

St Louis and San 
Francisco Bwy. 



1 

t 


Arerage weight of 
mails carried over 
entire route per 
day. 


iroM. 

48.87 


PotMu2». 

177 


17.27 


266 


42,05 


298 


227.74 


1,806 


16.28 


110 


06.32 


161 


21.28 


107 


13.36 


77 


82.28 


154 



10 



20 



Size^ etc., of mail-car 
or apartment. 



Feet and iMeksa. 
ajpt. 10 by 7, 1 1 



no apt 

9 apt. 23.6 by 8, 11.. 
apt.21.4by7.2,lJ. 



no apt., 



apt. 23.6 by 8,11. 

18j no apt 

15' no apt 



16 no apt . 



56.00' 



224:24 



no apt . 



16. 03'» 364 20 apt. 14 by 7.4, 1 1 . 



175.73 



0.25 
7&33 



842 20 apt. 17.8 by 0.4, 11 8.88 



I 
165 8 no apt 12 

I 

44312 apt. 18.6 by 7.3, 11 ' 7 

I 



SECOND ASSISTANT — EAIliWAT ADJUSTBIENTS. 



415 



8tat» tmS Taritoriet in wkieik th« eontraol term expired June 30, 1890, «(o.— Continned. 



Hi 



IMU. 
42.75 



47.03 



4SL50 



119170 



12.75 

a.75 
42.75 

42.75 

44.46 



59.87 
7a 66 



42.75 
47.88 



so, 

h A 



Op 



DoO*. 



« a 



is 

it! 



S.?-! 



DoOt. 
42.75 



45.32 
40.50 
119.70 



42.75 

44.46 
42.75 
42.75 

42.75 
44.46 



li 
Si 



1Mb. 



S6 



76.10. 



42.75 
84.20 



DoUart. 
2,131.94 



812.20 
2.08&25 
18,284.76 



Xteliort. 



603.83 

4^203.18 
907.58 
57L14 

1,379.97 
2.475.97 



912.01 
13,822.92 



395.43 
3,750.44 




601.00 

4, 370. 86 
917.84 
566.86 

1,389.36 
2,463.96 



346.70 
2,804.74 



as 

1^ 



BemArks. 



1800. 
Jaly 

July 

July 

Jnlr 



lehed 
; Feb. 18, 1880. 0.33 1» 
I decrease. 
1 < Weisbetl 30 days ttom 
; Feb. 18, 1800. 0.15 m. 
InoreAAO. . 

Welshed 30 days from * 
Fe&18,1880. 0.05 m. 
increase. 

Welshed 80 days from 

April 1,1800. 0.77 m. 

decrease. Un 228.51 

m. from June 4, 1888. 

toJiine30,1800. New 

01.79 m. lap aerrlca 

between Trinidad and 

Paeblo,oTerTOute No. 

165001, at 821.37 per 

mile. To June 30, 

1800, lap aerrioe on 

01.21 miles. 

July 1 W