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Z-VA 



ADVERTISEMENTS. I 

HEATINGAmRATUS. 

E[rar\3i^*j ^^eciaiWij, pure ©y/'arnf^ «Air, 

UPWARDS OF ONE THOUSAND TESTIMONIALS RECEIVED. 

Combination of PURE WARM AIR & HOT WATER, 

AS SUPPLIED TO 

Truro Cathedral; Londonderry Cathedral ; Sherborne Abbey ; Kilmore 
Cathedral; Stanley Cathedral, Falkland Islands; Cardiff Catholic 
Cathedral; the Queen's School Chapel, Eton; Cork Asylum; Leicester 
Asylum, and to upwards of three thousand Places of Worship ; and a 
great number of Mansions, Houses, Hotels, Hospitals, Schools, Ware- 
houses, Factories, Workhouses, &c. 

" 5 Palestine Place, Cambridge Heath, London, E., Match zxrd, 1880. 

" My osar Sir,— Yoxir Heating Apparatus acts perfectly. We can warm our Targe place 
(Shoreditch Tabernacle) which seats upwards of 2,300 persons, in a very short time, and at a 
small consumption of fuel. I think the whole thmg fiist-rate.— I am, dear Sir, yours 
sincerely. "W. Cuff, Pastor.' 

" Emmanuel Baptist Chiurch, Warwick Square, Carlisle, March ^h, 18S9. 

" Dear Sir,— Your Heating Apparatus is a complete success, and how anyone can say 
anything against it I cannot tell. I believe, with good management, it could be made to warm 
our church, which is very lofty, for one-and-twopence per Sunday. There is not the slightest 
smell or faintness to the air given off when your bimple instructions are carried out. We 
never light the fires till seven o'clock Saturaay night, or early Sunday mornings, and the 
temperature is up to 60 deg. Fahr. Thtrniometers are in three different parts of the building. 
I was informed by a person the other day that ours is the best warmed church in the city, and 
1 believe it. I have personally put it to any test which has-been suggested to me, and it has 
proved all and more than you said it would. I have heated it tar above your instructions 
without the slightest ill effect from fumes. I shall be ^lad at any time to bear my testimony 
to any one requiring it, or to show them the apparatus m full work, but your system needs no 
testimony.— Yours uncerely, 

*' To Mr. J. Grundy." " A. A. Saviljub, B.A., Pastor. 



Book of TMtlmonlala gladly forwarded gratia on application to 

JOHN GRUNDY, 

CUefOffloe: 80 DUNCAN TERRACE, CITY ROAD, LONDON, 

Tyldailey ShowFOomi and Faetory : TORRBNS 8TRBBT, I8LIII0T0M. 

West End AddreBs: 57, WIQHORE STREET, LONDON, W., 

And TTLDH&LBT IRONVORKB, Bear HIHOHBBTBR^ 

Telegra mg: "JOHN ORUyPY, LO NPON*"^ 
N.B.— PSRFBCT SUCCSSS • GUARANTEED, OR NO PAY. 



\H 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



NATIONAL PROVIDENT INSTITUTION 

For MUTUAL LIFE ASSURANCE. 

FOUNDED 1886. All the Profits are divided amongst the Assured. 

^f^ ^^E ;;; ;;; : :: tl 

THE CHAIRMAN (Mr. John Scott, JR.), at the Annuai Mwting on FobnargTWi, 1896, 
Mferretltoth9 groat and increaoing popularity of IVDOWMIKT ABSORASOIt; that la, 
Aeaurancea payablo on tho attalnmont of an agrood ago foay BO, 65, or 90 i, or at doath If 
thia ahoy Id happen preoloaoly. After polntlnj out that theao Polleloa afford Life Aaaurance 
during preclaely the period when ft la moat needed, he went on to aay : — 

" The other want which Endowment Assurance meets is the need of some 
convenient and safe method of accumalating annual savings to make provision 
for the future. This becomes a more and more difficult operation as the rate 
of interest obtainable on safe investments tends to fall lower and lower. 

" The satisfdu:tory manner in which an Endowment Assurance Policy 
meets this want will be best sfeen by an illustration. Suppose a man of 30, 
recognising the responsibilities which rest upon him, decides that he will 
devote /loo a year to the two objects of makins immediate provision, in case 
he shoiild die, for those dependent on him, and also provision for his own 
later years. For this sum, or. to he exact, for 100 guineas a year, he can 
effect an Endowment Assurance for ;^3.ooo. payable on his reaching the age 
of 60. or at his death, if that should occur previously. Such a policy would 
participate in profits, and if he has these applied in the shape ot Bonus 
additions, be may reasonably expect, according to our past experience, that 
his Assurance will amount to very nearly A.ooo by the time he attains the 
a^freed age. Now the total amount he will have paid is /3,i50, and the 
difference between this and the sum he will nsceive represents compound 
interest at between 2} and 2] per cent, on the whole of the premiums he has 
paid. But these same premiums will also have insured his life during the 
30 years in which he most needed Assurance for a sum commencing at 
/3.000, and gradually increasing to nearly A.ooo ; and when allowance is 
niade for the value he has received in this form, it may be safely said that 
our young man of 30 could not probably in any other manner have secured 
the two objects he had in view so safely and advantageously. (Applause.) 

"Nor can it be objected that pur policy-holder is liable to lose the 
premitmis he has paid, if he should at any time be unable to continue his 
payments, for he can always surrender his policy in exchange for a paid-up 
policy, for a p ropor t ionate amount, on which no further premiums are 
payable, or he can, if he prefers, surrander it for its cash value ; or, to meet 
any temporary difficulty, he can, if he pleases, obtain a loan up to the 
surrender value. It should be noted, too, that the surrender values ot policies 
of this kind are very large. In the case of such a policy as we have 
instanced, the surrender viUue, after 15 years, would amount to four-fifths of 
the total sum paid in premiums, after 20 years to within a few pounds of this 
total, and in 25 years to much more than the total premiums paid. 

" This class of assurance, therefore, is one which members may safely 
recommend to their friends as not only giving excellent value for money, but 
also as certain to give full satisfection to everyone who adopts it." 



A. 5MITHBR, Actuary and Secretary, 

4», ORACBCHURCH STREBT, E.C. 
APPUCATIONS FOR AGBNCIBS INVITED. 



THE 



Baptist hand-Jook 



FOR 



1896. 



PUBLISHED UNDER THE DIRECTION OF 

THX 

COUNCIL OF THE 

Baptist Union of Kreat Britain and Ireland. 



CLARKE ft CO.. 
13 AND 14, Flbet Strbet. EC. 



x«95. 




NOTICES. 



The Spring Assembly for IS96^ of the Baptist Union 
of Great Britain and Ireland will be held in London 
on Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday, April 27th, 
29th, and 30th. Further details will be annpunced in 
the denominational papers. 

The time for, and place of holding the Autumn 
Assembly will be announced in denominational 
periodicals, as soon as the arrangements are made. 



The Editor again presents his sincere thanks to the Secretaries of Associa- 
tions, to the " Correspondents " named on page ?• and to numerous other 
friends who have assisted him in the endeavour to secure accuracy in the 
information given* and he cordially invites such assistance for the future. 
He also thanl[s those who have enriched the Hand-Book with the Memoirs 
of Deceased Ministers. 

All communications to be sent to the Secretary of the Baptist Union, 19 
Fumival-street, E.G. Corrections for the next issue of the Hand-Boox should 
be in the hands of the Secretary not later than September 14th. (See Notice 
on page 332.) 



^'bc 



ONTENTS. 



Almanack and Calendar — Riigtiing Sovereigrt^ Royal Family^ Officer 
of State — Public Business — Chronological Notes — Eclipses — Law 
Sittings and University Terms — Bank Holidays — Seasons — Legal 
Information — Census 1891 — Stamps, Duties^ &€. — Postal and 
Telegraphic Information — Passports , . (pp. xir to xxxvi), 

PART I. 

Baptist Union of Great Britain and Ireland: — Officers and 
Council — Constitution — Correspondents — Ex-Presideiits 
— Associations, Colleges and Churches in Membership — 
Honorary Members — Personal Members — Dejiartments. 

(pp. I to 49). 

PART IL 

Presidential Addresses and t^apers Read before the Assembly — 
Proceedings of the Assembly, including the President's 
Addresses (pp. 50 to 104). 

PART III. 

Baptist Societies, Colleges, Publications, &j. (pp. 105 to 130). 

PART IV. 

Institutions and General Religious Societies . (pp. 131 to 145). 

PART V. 

List of Ministers and Missionaries Deceased, with Memoirs — 
Baptist Authors and History . . . (pp. 146 to 197). 



IV. CONTENTS. 



PART VI. 

List of Associations — List of Baptist Churches, vdth Statistics, 
in England (p. 201), Wales and Monmouthshire (p. 266), 
Scotland (p. 287), Ireland (p. 292), Channel Islands (p. 293), 
and the Isle of Man (p. 293) — List of Chapels (p. 294) — 
Summary of Statistics (p. 298) . . . (pp. 198 to 300). 

PART VII. 

Architectural : — Descriptions and Illustrations — List of New 
Chapels — Chapel Improvements, New School-rooms, &c. — 
Chapel Debts paid off or diminished . . (pp. 301 to 333). 

PART VIII. 

List of Baptist Ministers in the British Isles — Missionaries — 
Ministerial Settlements — Ministerial Resignations and 
Removals (pp. 334 to 389). 

PART IX. 

List of Baptist Churches in Europe (exclusive of British Isles), 
Asia, Africa, America, and Australasia, and General Statis- 
tical Summary (pp. 390 to 463). 

APPENDIX. 

Congregational Union of England and Wales — London Congre- 
gational Ministers — General Body of Protestant Dissenting 
Ministers of the Three Denominations — London Presby- 
terian Ministers - London Congregational Board — London 
Baptist Board. (pp. 464 to 475). 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



V. 



MAGIG LANTERNS. 



THE MARVELLOUS 



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Further ImiroTemtnti. 
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It hM Ghallentfed Oempartson 
for OYer If Tean. 




SIMPLE, RELIABLE ft SAFE. 

Suitable for Missionaries. 



Mo 8m€U. No Smoke. 
No Broken QIaaaea 



PRICES OF LAMP: 

£i 2s., £[ lOs., jei Is. 



WHY IB THB PAIPHEHOOB BUPBHIOR TO ALL 0THBHB7 Baeaoaa it is carefoUy 
and scientiflcally oonstracted, and not made commercially and sold under a variety of 
noma de plume. Becauia it is a pure white light. BooauM the oonoidal glasses resist 
heat and are proof against fracture. Beeaaaa, being technical, it has no dampen or 
chimney lengtheners, which are evils to be eschewed. BeoauM it gives a good 12 to 14 feet 
disc onparalieled, therefore will largely take the place of limelight and thus save the risk and 
danger of gas explosions. 

Do not have any other Untarn or lamp than th« lAf VELLOUB PAMPHftlOOB. a 
really snperb, substantial, and efTective instrument. Waste not your money on inferior 
imitations. 

HUKDBBDB OF TBBTIMOBIALB. Supplied to Colleges, Institutions, Missionaries, 
Clergy, and the Gentry. Particulars free. 

Pbiceh : Complete PAMPHBBGOB, beautifully constructed, solid brass fronts, with high- 
class lenses, £6 6b.« £1 to., and £2 10a. 

THB DOCWBA TRIPLB Priae Medal, highest award. Supnlied to Dr. H. Orattan 
Goinneas. Capt. C. Belw^, Madame Adelina Patti, and the Royal Polytechnic. Ac., fto. 

HlfllATURB HALDBH TRIPLB. Supplied to B. J Maiden. Esq.; unparaUeled results; 
Capt. Chae. Reade, R.N. ; Rev. Canon Soott, and principal exhibitors. 

THB OBIVBRBAL LAirBRB, four wicks, four inch condensers, £1 aa. 6d. ; three wicks, 
Ita. Od.: elegant mahogany bionials, brass front, £6 10a.; blow through Jets, 8a. 6d ; 
mixed. iSa.; life models, subjects coloured la. Id each; Scripture, hymns, temperance 
tales* dM3.| Ac. 

THE CHEAPEST AND BK8T HOUSE FOR COMPLETE LANTERN OUTFITS. 

60 Slides on loan for Si., in special despatch boxes. 
BBPORB PURGHABINO be sure to get Mr. HUGHES' HIGNIFIOBNTLT 
ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE of great Inventions in the art of OPTIOAL 
PBOJECTIOH, a volume to be prized, over iCo Original Illustrations — not 
commercial. IMce 6d., postage 3d. ; ditto, including detailed list of 60.000 
slides, lod., postage 5d. The slide list 6d., pamphlets free. 

IV. C. HXJOHESS (Specialist), 

(Over as Yean* Refutation for Highest Class Results in the Art 0/ Optical Projection, &c.) 

Brewstep House, 82, Hortimer Road, Kingsland, London, N. 



VI. ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Field Laqe l^agged ^c||ool0 and ^efaQBg, 

TfflK STREE T. CLEBEEIWKLL BOAD, U., t HAMP STEAD, X.W. 

AN UB QEMT APPEAL IB MADE FOB PONDS. 

Results of Operations for the Year ending March Sist, 1896. 

936 Men and Women sheltered in the Refuses. 

968 Boys and Qirls mftiTiti»ined in Industrial Homes. 

89 Friendless Girls trained in the Servants' Homes. 

9,994 Attendances at the CrAohe. 

99,135 Attendances at the Ragsed Church. 

11,760 Attendances at the Adult Mission Services. 

76,998 Attendances at the Bihle Ragged Schools and Classes. 

7,198 Attendances at the Band of Hope. 

16,486 Attendances at the Mothers* Meeting. 

69 Bags of Linen lent from Maternal Society. 

19,916 Distributions of Broken l^ood Made. 

18,904 Loaves of Bread dlBtrihnted. 

980 Persons plaoed in, or auristed to obtain employment 

6,677 Hot Dinners given to poor ohildren. 



DOVATIOIS «UI b« thaakfUly fott¥«d, bytiw TrtMimr, Baakw, vt McMUry. 

PruidmL—TKE EARL OF ABERDEEN. 

TrwMnrmr.— WILFRID A. BEVAN, Esq., 64, Lombard Street, E.G. 

BanJk«n>.— Messrs. BARCLAY, BEVAN, RAMBOM ft CO., 64, Lombard Street, E.a 

S0or«fary.— Mr. PEREGRINE PLATT.The Institation,Vine Street, aerkenwell Road, E.G. 

British Society for the Propagation of 
the Gospel among the Jews 

ESTABLISHED 1842. 
PrtsuUnt: Rev. J. Hilss Hitchbns, D.D. Triasurir : R. Cory, E8q.,J.P- 

Somelofthe WORK DONE by the BRITISH SOCIETY: 

1. It has 27 Mlattonariei and many Voluntary Helpers, all eogaged in 

spreading the truth of the Gospel. 

2. It has MUaloii Stttioni in England^ Omnany, lastria, Bii«iU» and 

Turkic* 

3. It supports Mioola for the Toang. 

4. It has Medloal Migsioiw, and is very anxious to have one at each 

Station. 

5. New Testaments, portions of Scripture and Tracts in varioas 

languages are diatribnted. 

6. The Gospel is preached in MisaioB Halls, and by house-to-house 

visitation. 
y.^It has t Homes for Poor Aged Christian Israelites. 



present time in doinff noUe work. iNUKKAUiiiu t 
and will be gratefully received by the Secretary, 
c BEY. J. UUHLOP, at the Offices of the Booioty, 96, ONEAT RUSSELL STRBBT, 



INDEX. 



PAGE 

Aberystwyth College .. •• X24 

Africa 430 

America 434 

Americin Missionary Union 

403 406, 418, 422, ftc. 

Architectural Descriptions, Ac. . . 301 

Ar^ntina 449 

Asia 414 

Assam 424 

Associations 198 

Australasia 451 

Australasian Missions . . . . 421 

Austria-Hungary 400 

Bahamas 448 

Bangor College 124 

Bank Holidays Xx 

Baptist Authors and History . . 182 

Baptist Building Fund . . . . 106 

„ „ (Wales).. no 

Baptist Chapels 294 

Baptist Churches (With Statistics) 

„ „ in England.. 201 

„ ,1 Wales ft Mon. 266 

„ „ Scotland .. 287 

„ „ Ireland .. 292 

„ Channellsles 293 

„ „ Isle of Man 293 
Baptist Deacoxiesses* Home 

and Mission (London). . . . 1 19 
Baptist Home Missionary Society 

for Scotland Ill 

Baptist Ministers in the British 

liles 334 

Baptiflt Missionary Society 

"4. 379. 4U, Ac. 
Baptist Total Abstinence Associa- 
tion 107 

Baptist Total Abstinence for 

Wales Ill 

Baptist Total Absthience for 

Scotland 113 

Baptist Tract and Book Society 109 
Ba^ist Union of Great Britain ft 
Ifeland:— 

Officers, Couneil, ftc. . . x 

Constitiitioii and Bye-Laws 4 

Correspondents • • . • 7 

Ex-Presidents . • 8 
Constituency: — 

Associations .. .. 8 

Colleges 8 

Churches .. •• •• 9 

Honorary Members .. 21 

Personal Members . • 21 



PAGE 
Departments :— 

Corporation 29 

General Expenses Fund . • 35 

Literature Fund . . . . 35 

Home Missions Fund . . 35 

Church Extension Fuhd . • 36 

Annuity Fund . . . . 37 

Augmentation Fund.. .. 43 

Education Fund . . . . 46 

Board of Introduction . . 46 

Committee of Arbitrators .. 48 

Library 49 

The Assembly:— 

Presidential Addresses, &c. 50 

Proceedings 1895 . . .. 58 ft 79 

Baptist U nion of Germany, ftc. 394 ft 430 

„ Denmark .. 406 

„ Ireland . . . . 200 

„ Italy .. .. 392 

„ Russia .. .. 403 

,, Scotland .. 200 

„ Wales .. .. 199 

Baptist Union of Scotland Loan 

and Building Fund .. .. 112 
Baptist Union of Scotland Min- 
isters' Protrident Fdnd .. 112 
Baptist Union of Scotland Benefi- 
ciary Fund ti2 

Baptist Union of South Africa . . 430 

Baptist Western Society. . . . 109 

Bequests, Form of . . . . xxv 

Bible Translation Society . . 118 

Brazil 450 

Bristol Coflege 120 

Bulgaria 402 

Burials Act xxvitl 

Burmah 422 

Calendar xi ft xli 

Canada 434 

Cape Verde islands . . . . 433 

Cardtfif College 124 

Census xxx 

Central A'frica 431 

Central America, ftc 449 

Ceylon 425 

Chapel Debts paid ofF, ftc. . . 329 

Chapel Improvements . . . . 326 

Charitable Assurances . . . . 3^xiv 

China 426 

Chronological Notes . . . . xx 
Colleges (See separate entries). 

Colonial and Foreign Statistics. . 390 
Congregational Union of England 

and Wales, ftc 464 



Vlll. 



INDEX. 



PAGE 

County Provident Societies . . 135 

Cuba 448 

Deaths of Ministers, &c 146 

Denmark .. * 406 

Dissenting Deputies .. .. 133 

Dissenters in Church Pulpits . . xxx 

Eclipses zx 

Europe 390 

Finland 405 

Finnish Baptist Mission.. .. 405 

France ' 390 

General ^ody, Three Denomina- 
tions . . 472 

German Baptist Mission, . . . 1x8 

Germany ' 394 

Hayti 447 

Her Majesty's Chief Officers of 

State xvi 

Holland 401 

Home of Rest for Baptist 

Ministers and Missionaries . . 119 

India 414 

Institutions and GeneralReligious 

Societies 131 

Irish Baptist Home Mission . . 1x3 

I rish Baptist Training Institute . . 1 26 

Italy 392 

Jamaica 443 

Japan .. 428 

Law Sittings and University 

Terms xx 

Legal Information . . . . xx 
London Baptist Board . . 105 & 475 

London Congregational Board . . 474 

London Congregational Union.. 464 

London Nonconformist Council 134 

London Presbyterian Ministers 472 

Manchester College . . . . 123 

Marriage Laws xxvi 

Memoirs of Deceased Ministers 147 

Memorable Names . . . . 182 
Metropolitan Tabernacle Colpor- 

tage Association . . . . 108 

Mexico 442 

Midland College x2o 

Ministerial Removals, &c. . . 385 

Ministerial Settlements . . . . 383 
Missionaries in connection with 

B. M. S 379 

New Brunswick 436 

New Chapels, &c 324 

Norway 4x3 

Nova Scotia 436 

Oaths Act xxx 

Palestine 429 

Particular Baptist Fund.. .. zo6 

Passports xxxvi 

Pastors' College 123 



PAG£ 

Pastors of English Churches in 

India, &c. 382 

Patagonia 450 

Periodicals 129 

Poland 403 

Post Office Information . . . . xxxi 

Prince Edward Island . . . . 436 
Provident Society for Aged and 

Infirm Ministers, Wales & Mon. z zo 

Publications X26 

Public Business xix 

Rateability of Chapels, &c. . . xxiv 

Rawdon College Z2X 

Regent's Park College . . . . Z22 

Registration of Births & Deaths xx&xxvi 

„ Chapels . . . . xxvi 

Reigning Sovereigns .. .. xv 

Roumania 402 

Royal Family of Great Britain . . xv 

Russia 403 

San Domingo, &c. . . . . 448 

Scottish Theological College . . X25 

St. Helena 433 

Seasons xx 

Senatus Academicus . . . . Z33 
Society for Aged or Infirm Bap- 
tist Ministers (Bristol). . . . zo8 

South Africa 430 

South America 449 

Southern Baptist Convention of 
America . . . . 393, 428, 442 & 450 

Spain 406 

Spezia Mission for Italy. . . . 394 

Stamps and Duties . . . . xxxi 
Strict Baptist Mission 1x9, 418 & 425 
Summary of Statistics of Baptist 

Churches in the British Isles 298 
Summary of Statistics of Baptist 

Churches throughout the World 462 

Sweden 407 

Switzerland 400 

Telugu Missions . . . . 418 & 420 
Title and Trust Deeds, Deposi- 
tory for 107 

Trinidad .... .. .. 448 

Trustees, Appointment of . . xxiii 

United States 438 

University of London . . . . Z31 

Ward's Trust .. .... Z25 

Welsh Baptist Assurance Trust z i x 

West Africa 435 

West Indies 443 

Widows' Fund (Baptist Board). . Z05 
Young Men's Association in Aid of 

the Baptist Missionary Society 1x7 
Zenana Work (Ladies' Associa- 
tion) zx6 



ADVERTISEMENTS. ix. 



TRINITARIAN BIBLE SOCIETY 

(For the Circulation of Uncorrupted Versions ot the Word of God). 
THIS SOCIETY WAS INSTITUTED IN 1881. 

AND 18 A DISTINCTIVELY PROTESTANT BIBLE SOCIETY. 

It witnesaes for the BON OF GOD, by ezolading from governing membership Booinians 
' who deny the Deity and Atonement of Christ. iBenoe'its name.) 

It witnenes for the TRUTH OF GOD, by exclnding all oormpted Roman Oatholic 
Versions from its oiroalation. (Henoe its additional title.) 

It witnesses for the GRACE OF GOD. bv a Free Distribution of onlv the best translations 
that can be obtained. *' Whether men will hear or whether they will forbear." During the 
past year its oiroulation was 79,999 Bibles, Testaments, and portions in 91 languages. 

It made Free Grants to over 60 Missionarv Societies at home and abroad. 

The New Hebrew Testament has reached its sixth edition, and two hundred and fifty- 
jiinth thousand. It is being freely distributed amongst Jews, in all parts of the world, by 
the MIIiDM%Y MISSION TO THE JEWS. Upwards of 100,000 have gone into Russia 
alone. ThiF work is so extraordinary that it is one of the most remarkable signs of the 
iimes.--(8e6 the Society's Quarterly Beeard.) 

The Hebrew Bible (Dr. Ginsbury's Masaoretico-Crltioal Text) is now completed. 
PriceiBlli. 

The Jndeo-German Old Testament is finished in MS. It is electrotyped to the end of 
Kings ; and printed to the end of Pentateuch. The New Testament is ffnished. and 90,000 
oopieat are being printed. During its passage through the press, 890,000 copies of the 
separate portions have been printed. This is the response of the Society to a ** crying need " 

The Society is actively engaged in freely distributing the first and only Protestant Bible 
In Brittany. It is also sending large and free grants to India, Brazil, Argentina, Italy, 
Spain, etc., etc. 

Depository: 25 NEW OXFORD STREET, LONDON, W.G. 

Tteasurer: JkUE% MADB* HOLT. Bu. Chairman ofOommlttee : HARRT 0. BIBBBT,Bt4. 
Seentary: ReT. B. W. BULLIBeBB, D.D. Depoaitary : Major P. H. HBWITT. 

Who will be pleased to receive contributions for this most important work. 
The Secretary will gladly arrange for MEETINGS (Drawing-room or Public) where the 
principles and interesting work of the bociety may be explained. 



EBtabUihed 1868. % n li >T adaABefciAte:g> "DAHD8, LOHDOIT." 

DICKESON & STEWART, 

PASSAGE AGENTS, SHIPPING AGENTS, 

INDIA AND FOREIGN AGENTS, 

PACKERS AND WAREHOUSEMEN. 




Offices— n, QOEEN YICTORIA ST., LONDON, B.C. 

IFare;iou«««— FIHSBUBY MABEET, LOHDOK, E.O. 



PASSAGES, PASSENGERS MET, 

OUTFITS, BAGGAGE CLEARED, 

INSURANCES, GOODS PACKED 

STORES, FOR SHIPMENT. 

FURNITURE, Ac. WAREHOUSING. 



ADVBfiTISEMENTS. 



^ UNDAY SCHOOL as well as Day Teachers, Ministers, 
and Clergymen, and public speakers of every sort, as 
well as literary men and the *' general reader," owe 
Mr. Garrett border their sincerest thanks for tMs invaluable 
anthology. His acquaintance with poets is unique, he is 
voluminous in his reading, and catholic in his tsiste. In these 
volumes he has collected all the noblest poems illustrative of 
various portions of the New and Old Testaments, and so 
arranged them that a writer or public speaker who is in want 
of a poem to illustrate any particular text can put his hand 
upon the very thing at a moment's notice. 



NEWER AND CHEAPER EDITIONS. 

Handsomely Printed on laid paper, 8nd well bound In Buokranr), 

bevelled edges, gilt top, each 3e. 6d. only. 

I. 

THE POET^S 3I3LE. Testament Division 

630 pp. 

II. 

I HE POE I S dIdLE* Testament Division. 

520 pp. 

SELECTED AND EDITED BY 

REV. W. GARRETT HORDER, 

Author of " The Silent Voice," 

SOME OPINIONS OF THE PRESS. 

•"^neof the most beautiful anthologies of the English language. ' — Th$ 
Christian Leader. 

•• A welcome addition to the library of every cultured reader." — The 
Christian World, 

"It would be difficult to find a more interesting, and we might say 
valuable volume than the ' Poet's Bible.' It should be in all libraries.*'— 
The Spectator. 

" Nobly representative of Christian poetry.".— TAi Scotsman. 



LONDON : WARD, LOCK & BOWDeN, LTD. 

SAIilSBUBT SQUAi^B, B.a 



Calendar 1896. 



1IARCH--S1 Dayi. 



JAMUJLBT-Sl Dayi. 



MOON'S CHANGES. 



Last Ooar, 
New fiooo 



Ttbday, jh. •snu p.m. 

iooo 14th day, loh. 19m. p.ni. 
First Quar. 73rd day, »Il 4*ni. a.m. 
FoO Moon joth day. Oi. SSm- a.m. 



FBBRUART-M Dftyi. 



MOON'S CHANGES. 

Last Quar. <th day, oh. Tfbn. a-m. 
New Moon 13th day, 4h. ijm. p.m. 
First Quar. *nt day. gh. tsm. p m. 
Full Moon «eth day, jh. 51m. p.m. 



MOONS CHANGES. 

Last Quar. «th day, ixb. aom. a.m. 
New Moon lith day, toh. 4nn. a.m. 
First Quar. axid day, ixh. sjm. a.m. 
FuB Moon SQth day. sh. aom. cm. 



SUvcs (U.S.A.) freed 1863 

nishedi649 

Commonwealth cstab- 

Robt, Morrison b 1783. 

[di834 

Robert Robinson b 171$. 

[d 1790 

Proclamation against Con- 

[venticles 1661. Penny 
Post established 1840 
G. Fox d 1690. b 1634 
Dissents:. Dep. met 1736 
Brit, \luseum opd. 1759 

fed Antwerp 15*6 
(dr.) Tyndale's Bible print 
(dr.) CoT'rdale's B.p. 1535 
Baptist W. Noel d 1873 
Bd. of Bap. Min. fd. 1793 

Lord Bacon b 1560, d i6a6 

fd If o« 
C I. Fox. b 1749 [d 1716 
Dr. Williams (Libr.i 
Abraham Booth d 1806. 

fb »734 
Dr. J. Ryland b 1753. 

fd i&rs 
39 Articles sub. 156a 
C. H. Spuri;eon d 189a 





s 




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10 


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Tu 


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W 


IS 


Th 


14 


F 


U 


S 


U 
IT 


3 


18 


Tu 


19 


W 


10 


Th 


n 


F 


n 


s 




JS 


SB 


Tu 


16 


W 


rt 


Th 


» 


F 


10 


S 



Span. Inqsn. ablsd. 1813 
J. Rogers burnt 1555 

D. L. Moody b 1837 
Andrew Fuller b 1754. d '15 
Baptist Chapels. Jamaica, 
fdest. 1832 
Hooper burnt 1555 
Queen Vict- mamed 1840 
Lond. Univ. Chrtr. 1896 
C. Darwin b 1809, d 1883 
BiU or Rights 1689 

Galileo b 1564. d 164a 
MeUmcthon b 1497. d 1560 
I Henry Martyn b t78i.d 8'! 
Raikes' first S.-sch. 1781 

Negro suffrage 1869 

Bapt. Missionaries reached 
[Jamaica 1814 
F. Bampfield, M.A., sent 
fto Newgate 1689 
fLongfellow b 1807, d i88a 
Com Laws repealed 1849 
icir.» Sax. B. MS. 706-995 





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h^x 




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F 




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3 


10 


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11 


W 


11 


Th 


IS 


F 


14 


S 


IB 
16 


9t 


IT 


Tu 


111 


W 


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Th 


10 


F 


n 


S 


ts 


S 


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Tu 


IB 


W 


16 


Th 




F 




S 


80 


S 


SI 


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Nat. Covenant Scot 1638 
J. Wesley d trat, b 1703 ; 
tjo. Robinson d 1605 
(c.) WycUf ist Eng. B. 1380 
B. A F. Bible Soc. fd. 1804 
First Missny. Tahiti 1797 

Meth. Stds. ex. (r. Ox. i7«e 
Bishops exp. fr. Pari. 15^ 
fwerp. 1536; tst B. B. print 
(dr.) Tyndale's Bib. Ant- 
English Revolutioo 1688 
Ktform Bill. 183a [1671 
Decl. Indul. dharles II. 
(cir.) First Eng. Bible at 
fGenera. ISS7-60 
Eman. Russ. Serfs 1861 
(dr.) Bishop's Bible 1568 
Sir Isaac Newton d 1737 
Cranmer burnt iS4ft 
Jonathan Edwaras d 1758 



LADY DAY. 

Jo**n Bright d .889 

Test Act 1673 

Caxton's Book on Chess 
" "^ [6u. «474 



APRIL— 80 Dayi. 



MAT-31 Dayi. 



JUllE-80 Dayi. 



MOON'S CHANGES. 

Last Quar. 5th day, oh. a4m. a.m. 
New Moon 13th day. 4h. a^m. a.m. 
First Ouar. aoth day, xoh. 47m. p.m. 
FuD Moon a7th day, ih. 47m. p.m. 



MOONS CHANGES. 

Last Quar. 4th day. 3h. asm. p.m. 
New Moon tath day, 7h. 47m. p m. 
First Quar. aoth day, 6h. aim. a.m. 
Full Moon a6th day, 9h. S7m. p.m. 



MOON'S CHANGES. 

Last Quar. 3rd day, 8h. 3m. a.m. 
New Moon ixth day, 8h. 43111. a.m. 
First Quar. i9th day, xth. 41 m. a.m. 
Full Moon asth day, 6h. ssm. a.m. 



1 


w 


1 


Th 


8 


F 


4 


S 


I 


i 


T 


Tu 


8 


W 





Th 


10 


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u 


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u 


a 


M 


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W 


18 


Th 


IT 


F 


18 


S 


If 

10 


s 


n 


Tu 


11 


W 


a 


Th 


M 


F 


IB 


S 


s 


fi 


18 


Tu 


10 


W 


» 


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John Howe d 1705, b 1630 

GOOD Friday. 
Daniel Neal d 1743 
EASTRR SUNDAY 

Bank Holiday 
Quakers' Oaths abol. 1859 
Legh Richmond d i8a7 
Ub. of Consdeo. del. 1687 
Ed. Wightman mart. i6ia 
Civil W^ar (U.S.A.) i86i 
CathoUc Eman. 1839 



Conventicle Act pd. 1694. 
John Fox d 1587, b 1517: 
fLivinirstone bur. 1874 
Long Parnament dis. 1653 
David Brainerd b 1718, 
C. Bronte. fd 1747 

[b i8t6, d 18SS 
Shakespeare d i6t6, b 1564 SI 
Serampore Ch. fnd. x8oo " 



Slavery abolished 1807 
Rnbt. Hall b 1764. d 1831 

David Livingstone d. 1873 

Humboldt d 1859. b 1767 
And. Fuller d 1815. b 1754 
Cong. Union formed 183a 
Rel. Tract Soc. fd. 1799 
Test & Cor. Act rep. i8a6 
Puritaps s. for Amer. 1639 
D. G. Rossetti b i838,d 1883 



Disr. Ch. of Scotland 1843 

New Te«. R. V. pub. •8x 
Bbhop Butler bom 169a 
Act of Unifor'ty pd. 1663 
Coverdale d 1567, b 1487 

[J. S. Mill b 18:6, d 1873 

Sol. L/eag. & Cov. bt. 1661 

f Toleration 

WHIT SUNDAY. Act of 

Bank Holiday 
Bengalee N. T. pub. 1800 






M 




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W 




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F 




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10 


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Th 


IS 


F 


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14 
IB 


a 


16 


Tu 


IT 


W 


18 


Th 


10 


F 


10 


s 


SI 

n 


3 


ss 


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M 


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16 


F 


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18 
10 


^ 


80 


Tu 



(dr.) Luther's Bib. 1539- 

[«53X 

Partic. B. Fund fd. 1717 
Adam Smith b 1733. a 1790 
fReform BiB i^ 1833 
Gen. Bap. N. Con. fd. 1770; 
Seven Bishops sent to 
Dickens d 1870 fTower 1688 



Dissents. Mtg. Pluml>ers 
fHall. Anchor-la. 1567 



Battle of Nasebv 1645 

f Bisp. Butler d. 175 
Univer. Tests aboL 1871 



B. of Waterloo 181; 
Matr. Charta signed 13x3 
Acccs. Q, Victoria 1837 
Longest day 
Baptist Union fd. 1813 
Disstrs. adm. to Oxfd Un. 
Midsummer Day ri859 
First Wesleytn Conf. 1744 
[G.B. An. rsld. on Algm. 91 
G. Bap. Miss. Soc. fd i8t« 
Q. Victoria crowned 1838 



yji^mmmmm^mm^mma 



fc,> ■ • • I* • * * * * *>.• 



^AAMttm^mmmmtkmmm^ 



Calendar 1896. 



JOLT-^l Dayi. 



MOON'S CHANGES. 

Last Quar. 3rd dajr, ih. tya. a.in. 
New Moon lOth day. jh. asm. p.in. 
First Quar. 17th day. Ah. 4in. p.m. 
Full Moon a4th day, jh. 4sra. p.m. 





w 




Th 




F 




S 




J3 




Tu 




W 




Th 


10 


F 


u 


s 


IS 

u 


3 


14 


Tu 


u 


W 


16 


Th 


17 


F 


la 


S 


19 

n 


3 


n 


Tu 


n 


W 


ti 


Th 


M 


F 


» 


S 


16 


fi 


» 


Tu 


» 


W 


80 


Th 


a 


F 



W'mtnster AssmUy 1643 
DL Wilson b 1778. d 1858 
[1776. ack. Nov. 30, 1782 
American Indep. asserted. 
Star Chamber and Hi^'h* 
(Com. aboUshed 1641 
John Huss burnt 1415 



In. Calvin b 1509, d 1564 
Board of Three Denomi- 
[nations fnid. 1777 
Sun. Sch. Un. est. 1803 
BaslUle stormed 178) 
Peto's Trust Deed Act 
[passed 1850 
Dr. Watts b 1674, d 1748 
Ballot Act passed 1872 
Dr. A. Giflord d 1784 
Christmas Evans d 18)8 
Span. Arm. deltd 1388 
lm.Enfr. and Scot. 1806 
New Toleratn. Act i8ia ; 
[Jews adra. Park. 1858 

Irish Ch. disestabd. 1869 
Six Noncons. burnt at 
[Brentford 1558 
Wilberforce d 18.^3. b 1759 
Penn d 1718. b 1644 
Comp. Ch. rates ab. 1868 



AUGUST— 81 Dayi. 



MOON'S CHANCES. 

Last Quar. tst day. 6h. 34m. p.m. 
New Moon 9th day, sh. am. ».xi\. 
First Quar. 15th day, 9h. 3m. p.m. 
Full Moon 23rd di«y, 7h. 4ni. a.m. 
Last Ouar. ^lit day, loh. ssm. a.m. 





s 




j$ 




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10 


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11 


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W 


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14 


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15 


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iti 


IS 


lu 


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W 


SO 


Th 


81 


F 


SS 


S 


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M 


3 


85 


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Ih 


88 


F 


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a 



Slavy. in W. Ind. abl. 1834. 
Endd. Schs. Act 1869 
Bank Holiday 



Tennyson b 1809, d 189a 

[Goethe b 1740. d 1833 
Meth. New Con. fd. 179^ 
Elementary Educ. Act. 70 
Hurh a. Brown b 1823. 

[d 1886 

Jeremy Tavlor d 1667. b 
Richard Jefferiesd 188; 

Sir Walter Scott d i8^a 
Whitfield b 1714. d 1770 
Mar. &Reir. Act. pd. 18^; 

[W. Carey bi76i.d 1834 
I'ascal d i66a. b 1623 
Dr. Wengcr d iBS'j 

[b 1781 
G. Stephenson d 1848 
Pompeii de»t. A.D. 70 
Noncons. eje cted 1663 

Adam Clarke d 1832 



Jn. Bunyand »688. b J628 



SEPTEMBER— ao Dayt. 



MOON'S CHANGES. 

New Moon 7th day. ib. 4]m. p.m. 
First Quar. 14th day, 4h. lom a.m. 
Full Moon aist day. loh. spm. p.ni. 
Last Qiiar. 30th day, ih. sgm. a.m. 



J. Howard b 1736, d 1790 
, Mg. Gn. Ass. Bp. Del. (68^ 
j Cromwell d 1658, b 1599 

Samuel Morley. d 1886 
I Pilgrim Fathers embkd. 

[in Ma>-flowcr 1600 



Tu 
W| 
Th, Tea First Imported 1391 

S Bapt. Church formed at 
44 I [Wappiniir X633 



Jno. Foster b 1770. d 184:) 
Dr. Johnson b 1709. d 178 « 
Hansard Knollys d 1691 
ItaL Troops cnt. Rome "70 
Lnd. Miss. Soc. fnd. 1795 
Capture of Djihi 1857 



Cong. Board found. 1737 
Thomas Clarkson d IS46 
Jesuits fonnd. 1540 ; Wm. 

[of Wykeham d 1304 
MICHAELMAS I)AY. 



OCTOBER -81 Dayi. 



NOYEMBER-SODayi 



DECEMBER -81 Days. 



MOON'S CHANGES. 

New Moon 6th day, loh. j8m. p.m. 
First Quar. 13th day. 2h. 47ni. p.m. 
Full Moon 2i$t day. 4h. 17m. p.m. 
Last Quar. 29th day, 3h. 21m. p.m. 



MOONS CHANGES. 

New Moon 5th day, 7h. 27m. a.m. 
First Quar. iith day, sh. 41m. a.m. 
Full \Toon 20th day. ich. 25m. a.m. 
Last Quar. a6th day. 3h. 4(ni. a.m. 



MOON'S CHANGES. 
New Moon 4th day, sh. 51m. p.m. 
First Quar. tsth day, oh. 29m. a.m. 
Full Moon 20th d.iy, 4h. sm. a.m 
Last Quar 27th day. oh. 9m. p.m. 



1 


Th 


8 


P 


s 


S 


{ 


s 


• 


Tu 


7 


W 


8 


Th 


8 


F 


10 


S 


11 
IS 


s 


IS 


Tu 


14 


W 


16 


Th 


10 


F 


17 


S 


18 
18 


3 


SO 


Tu 


n 


W 


SS 


Th 


B 


F 


81 


s 


85 
86 


s 


87 


T.i 


88 


W 


88 


Th 


80 


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Lon. Univ. open. i8a8 
Bap. Miss. Soc. fnd. 1793 
[John Angell James d 18,9 



J. Edwards b 1703, d 1758 
Tyndale martyred is 16 
B. U. Annuity Fund 



(estd. 1875 
Arminius d 1609. b 1560 
Samuel Pearce d 1 799 
America discovered 1492 
Elizabeth Fry d 1845 
B. Kcach pilloried 1 664 
Dr. Gill d 1771, b 1697 

Ridley & Latimer bnt. at 
[Ox. 1555 ; H. Martyn 
T<1 1812. b t78i 
Henry Kirka White d 1800 
Wm. Ward b 1769. d 1823 
ColeriHgc b i7;2. d 1834 



Revoc. of Edict Nantes 
1 1685 
Doddridge d 1751 
Serretus Durnt 155? 
Vavasour Powell d in 
I Prison 1670 

Five Mile Act 1665 



(1638 
Episcopacy abol. in Scot. 

[Torbay 1688 
William in. landed at 
I'.eo. Peabody d 1^69 
Gun|>«>wd*r Plut i6<5 
Dr. Joseph Steimett b 

[1692. d 1758 

John Milton d 1674 
'rince of Walrs b 1841 
Mn. Luth«r b 1483. d 154^ 
Carey landed at Serampc^re 

B. V. incorporated. 1890 

Andrew Marvel d 1620 
John Bright b. tdii 
icir.) Foxe. mariyfolov'ist, 
[h 1517. d 1587 

John Williams martyred 
[Erromanga 1^39. b 1796 



John Knox d 1752, b 1505 

Cowper b 1711, d 1800 
Dan Taylor d 1816 



Princess of Wales b 1844 

Suttee in India ahold.. tQj^ 
[Carlyle b 1795. d 1881 

Baxter d 1691, b 1615 

iohn Miitun b 1608 
turning of Pope's Bull by 
I Luther 1530 

Council of Trent 1545 
Prince Albert d 1861 ; 

[Washington d 1799 
Oliver Cromwellmade 
[Lord Protector, 1653 

Rev. of Prayer Book 1661 

Shortest day 



CHRIS I MAS Day 
Bank Holiday 



W. E. Gladstone b 1809 
Royal Soc. Instd. 1640 
Wycliffe d 1384, b 1324 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



xin. 



^Question ... what are the objects of tue 

St. SiLEi' eiRiffiiX llSSiflX? 

Jltishrer >-. i. Thb Evangelization of St. Giles'. 

2. The Relief of the Distressed Poor. 

3. The Assistance of the Better Class of Discharged 

Prisoners. 

4. The Saving of Juvenile Offenders from a Life of Crime. 

5. The Assistance of Wives and Children of Prisoners. 

6. The Providing a Holiday and Home for Poor Children. 

7. The Training of Fallen and Destitute Women for 
Domestic Service, &c., &c. 

WHAT HAS IT DONE? 



Jlnahier 



Jlnshrer 



Through the kindness of its supporters it his been enabled 
during the past year, to — 

1. Proclaim the Gospel to many thousands. 

2. Teach on Sundays and week-days more than 1,400 

children in its Sunday Schools and Bands of Hope. 

3. Assist with food, clotning. coals. Ac, some hundreds of 

deserving poor families in St. Giles. 

4. Provide 20.960 meals to discharged prisoners, read and 

expound God's Word to them, and afterwards assist 
5,705 of them in various ways. 
5 Admit into its Boys' Homes 503 first ofifenders, and so 
save them from '* prison taint " ; to help them in every 
way to make a fresh start in life, finding them situations, 
and providing them 157.460 meals during the year. 

6. Admit 560 girls and women into its Women's Homes and 

Refuges, assisting them with clothes, work, &c., and 
by providing them with 20.390 meals during the year. 

7. Provide the benefits of a Holiday Home, and also of an 

Orphanage, for poor and neglected children. 

8. Assist in the time of their sreat need some hundreds of 

the wives and children of the prisoners. 

HOW CAN I HELPf 



FULL 



• >* I. By Sending Annual Subscriptions. 

2. By Sending Donations. 

3. By Sending Gifts of Blankets, Clothing, etc. 

4. By Distributing Literature containing Accounts of its 

Operations. 

5. By Arranging for Drawing-Room or other Meetings on 

behalf of the work. 

6. By Extending the Membership of the St. Giles' Christian 

Mission Juvenile Helpers' Band. 
PABTICULAB8 OM BB HAD FBOM THB BUPBRIBTBBOBHT. 



Contributions will be most gratofully reeefoed by^ 

P. A.^BEVAN» Esq., Treasurer, 54 Lombard St., London, E.G. 

WILLIAM WHEATLEY, Superintendent, 4 Ampton St., 

Res:ent 5q., London, W.C. 

flankers— Messrs. BARCLAY, BEVAN & CO., 54 Lombard Street, 2.0. 



XIV. ADVERTISEMENTS. 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE 

tipiatHii ai Hieii et tmiai H am Wilts. 

THB GOMeRBeiTIOHAL MIBBION HTHHAL. 

A New Hymn and Tune Book for Mission, Week-night, and P.S.A. 
Services, containing 300 Hvmns. Edited by George S. Barrett, B.A., 
D.D. Harmonies revised by Sir Joseph Barney. Prices from id. to 4s. 

THB GOKOREGATIONAL BUNDAT-80H0OL HTHHAL; 

or, Book of Praise for the Young. A New H^mn and Tune Book suitable 
for Sunday-schools, Bands of Hope, and Special Services for Children and 
Young People, containing qoo Hymns. Edited by G. S. Barrett, B.A„ 
D.D. Harmonies revisc^d by Sir Jo&eph Barney. Prices from 3d. to 4s. 

THB PILGRIM FATHERS OF NEW ENGLAND AND 

THEIR PURITAN SUCCESSORS, by John Brown, B.A., D.D. 
(Author of "John Bunyan, his Life and Times"). With illustrations 
from original sketches by Charles Whymper. Price, los. 6d. ; 8s. net. 

CHRIST FOR THB WORLD. 

Sermons in connection with the Centenary of the London Missionary 
Society. By J. Guinness Rogers, B.A., D.D. 8vo, cloth, 3s. 6d. A 
copy sent post free for 3s. 

A PRIMER OF CONORBQATIONAUSM. 

By Albert Goodrich, D.D. Price 6d. net. (postage i^d. extra). Demy 
i6mo, 140 pages. Copies for distribution, 12 for 6s.; 6 for 3s. 3d. (post 

thFI^tonement. 

By R. W. Dale, M.A., LL.D., Birmingham. Crown 8vo, 4s. net. 
17th Edition. 

THE INSPIRATION OF THE OLD TESTAMENT INDUC- 
TIVELY CONSIDERED, By Alfred Cave, B.A.. D.D., Principal of 
Hackney College. Being the Seventh Congregational Union Lecture. 
Demy Svo, los. 6d. Second Edition. Crown 8vo, 4s nett. 

JOHN THE BAPTIST: 

a Contribution to Christian Evidences. By Henry Robert Rbynolik. 
D.D., President of Cheshunt College. Third Edition, with new Preface, 
Crown Svo, 4s. nett. 

CHRISTIAN BAPTISM, 

as usually practised in Congregational Churches. An Exposition and 
Defence. By T. G. Crxppbn. With introductory note by G. S. Barrett, 
D.D. Medium i6mo, 112 pp.. cloth, 6d. net. Postage id. extra. 

MANUAL OF CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH PRINCIPLES. 

By R. W. Dale, M.A., LL.D. 7th Edition. Crown Svo, cloth, is. 6d. 

Orders and all business comrnurtications should he addressed to the 
Trade Manager^ 

Mr. HENRY THACKER, 

Memorial Hall, Farringdon Street, 
to whom all Cheques and Postal Orders, crossed ** City Bank^ Ludgat9 
Branch,** should be made payable. 



MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. XV. 



REIGNING SOVEREIGNS AND PRINCES, AND PRESIDENTS. 

Austria-Hungaiy. Emperor-King, Francis Joseph I. ; aged 65 ; accMsian, Dec. 1848. 

Bavaria, King, Otto ; aged 47 ; accession, June, 1886. {Regetuy.) 

Belgium, King, Leopold II. ; aged 60; accession, December, 1865. 

Brazil, Ptesident, Dr. Prudente Jos^ de Moraes Barras; appointed, November, 1894. 

Bulgaria, Prince, Ferdinand, aged 34 ; elected, July, 1887. 

China, Emperor, Kuang Ilstt ; aged 24 ; accession, January, 1875. 

Denmark, King, Christian IX. ; aged 77 ; accession, November, 1863. 

Egypt, Khedive, Abbas Pasha ; aged ai ; accession, January, 1892. 

France, Republic, President, Felix Faure; aged s^; elected, January 17,1895. 

Germany, Emperor, William II. ; aged 37 ; accession, June, 1888. 

Great Britain, Queen, Victoria; aged 76 ; accession, June, 1837. 

Greece, King, George ; aged 50 ; elected, March, 1864. 

Holland, Queen, Wilhelmina I. ; aged 15 ; accession, November, 1890. {Regency.) 

Italy, King, Humbert I. ; aged 51 ; accession, January, 1878. 

Japan, Mikado, Mutsuhito ; aged 43 ; accession, February, 1867. 

Madagascar, Queen, Ranavalona III. ; aged 33 ; accession, July, 1882. 

Persia, Shah, Nasir-ed-Din ; aged 66 ; accession, September, 1848. 

Portugal, King, Carlos I. ; aged 32 ; accession, October, 1889. 

Roumania, King, Charles I. ; aged 56; proclaimed, March, x88i. 

Russia, Emperor, Nicholas II. ; aged 27 ; accession, November, 1894. 

Saxony, King, Albert ; aged 67 ; accession, October, 1873. 

Servia, King, Alexander; aged 19; accession, March, 1889. 

Spain, King, Alfonso XIII. ; aged 10; accession. May, 1886. (Regency.) 

Sweden and Norway, King, Oscar II. ; aged 66 ; accession, September, 1872. 

Switzerland, President, M. Zamp ; elected December, 1894. 

Turkey, Sultan, Abdul Hamid II. ; aged 53; proclaimed, August, 1876. 

United States, President, Grover Cleveland ; aged 58 ; elected, November, 1899. 

Wurtemberg, King, William II.; aged 47; accession, October, 1891. 

THE ROYAL FAMILY OF GREAT BRITAIN. 

Queen (Alexandrina) Victoria, bom May 24, 1819; succeeded to the throne 
June ao, 1837; married February 10, 1840, to the late Francis Albert, Prince 
of Saxe Coburg and Gotha. Issue : i. Princess Victoria Adelaide (Princess of 
Prussia, January 25, 1858, German Empress. March 9, 1888), bom November 

21, 1840. 2. Albert Edward, Prince of Wales, born November 9, 1841 ; married 

March 10, 1863, to the Princess Alexandra of Denmark, bom December x, 1844, 
and has issue George Frederick Ernest Albert (Duke of York), bom June 3, 1865 1 
married July 6th, 1893, to Princess Victoria Mary of Teck : Louise Victoria 
Alexandra Dagmar (Duchess of Fife), bom Febmary 20, 1867; Victoria Alexandra 
Olga Mary, bom July 6, 1868; Maud Charlotte Mary Victoria, bom November 26, 

1869, betrothed, 1895, to Charles, second son of the Crown Prince Denmark. 

3. Princess Alice Maud Mary (Grand Duchess of Hesse, July i, 1862), bom April 25, 
1843 ; died December 14, 1878. 4. Prince Alfred Ernest Albert, Duke of Edin- 
burgh and Duke of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, born August 6th, 1644; married 

to the Grand I>uchess Marie Alexandrovna of Russia, January 23, 1874. 

5. Princess Helena Augusta Victoria, bom May 25, 1846 ; married to Prince 

Christian of Schleswig-Holstein, July 5, 1866. 6. Princess Louise Carolina 

Alberta, bom March 18, 1848; married to the Marquis of Lome, March 21, 

1871. 7. Prince Arthur William Patrick Albert, Duke of Connaught, bom 

May I, 1850; married to Princess Louise Margaret of Pmssia, March 13, 1879. 

8. Prince Leopold George Puncan Albert, Duke of Albany, born April 7, 1853 ; married 
to Princess Helen of Waldeck-Pyrmont, April 27, 1882 ; died March 28, 1884. 

9. Princess Beatrice Mary Victoria Feodore, born April 14, 1857; married to 
Prince Henry of Battenberg, July 23, 1885. 

fi) George William Frederick Charles, Duke of Cambridge, born March 26, 1819. 

(2) Ernest, Duke of Cumberland (son of the Ex- King of Hanover), bom Septem 
ber 20, 1845 : married, December 21, 1878. to Princess Thyra of Denmark. 

(3) Princess Augusta Caroline, sister of (1) (Duchess of Mecklen-burg-Strelitz), 
bom July 19, 1822 ; married June 28, 1843, Frederick, Duke of Mecklenburg-Strelitz. 

(4) Princess Mary Adelaide, sister of the Duke of Cambridge, bom Novembe 
27, 1833 ; married to H.H. the Duke of Teck June 12, 1866. 



XVI. MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. 



HER MAJESTY'S CHIEF OFFICERS OF STATE. 

Prime Minister and Secretary of State /or Foreign X/air*— Marquis of Salisbury, 

K.G. 
Lord High Chancellor — Lord Halsbury. 
Lord President of the Council — Duke of Devonshire. 
Lord Privy S«a/— Viscount Cross. G.C.B. 
First Lord of the Treasury — Arthur James Balfour, M.P. 
Chancellor of the Exchequer— Sir Michael Edward Hicks-Beach, Bart, M.P. 
Home Secretary—Sir Matthew White Ridley, Bart.. M.P. 
Secretary for the Colonies— Right Hon. Joseph Chamberlain, M.P. 
Secretary for War — Marquis of Lansdowne, K.G. 
Secretary for India— Lord George Francis Hamilton, M.P. 
First Lord of the Admiralty— George Joachim Goschen, M.P. 
President of the Board of Trade— Ch&rles Thomson Ritchie, M.P. 
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster — Lord James of Hereford. 
President of the Local Government Board — Henry Chaplin, M.P. 
Lord Lieutenant of Ireland — Earl Cadogan, K.G. 
Secretary for Scotland — Lord Balfour of Burleigh 
First Commissioner of Works — Aretas Akers-Douglas, M.P. 
President of the Board of Agriculture— V/ Alter Hume Long, M.P. 
The above form the Cabinet. 

Chief Secretary for Ireland— GerAld William Balfour, M.P. 

Postmaster-General — Duke of Norfolk. 

Vice-President of the Committee of Council on Education — Sir John Eldon Gorst, 

Q.C., M.P. 
junior Lords of the Treasury— Henry Torrens Anstruther, M.P., William Hayes 

Fisher, M.P., Lord Stanley, M.P. . 
Patronage Secretary to the Treasury — Sir William Hood Walrond, Bart., M.P. 
Financial Secretary to the Treasury — Right Hon. Robert William Hanbury, M.P. 
Civil Lord of the Admiralty — Joseph Austen Chamberlain, M.P. 
Under Secretary for Foreign i4/atVs— Right Hon. George Nathaniel Curzon, M.P. 
Under Secretary for India — Earl of Onslow, G.C.M.G. 
Under Secretary for the Colonies — Earl of Sielborne. 
Under Secretary for Home Department — Jesse Collings, M.P. 
Under Secretary for War — Hon. William St. John F. Brodrick, M.P. 
Secretary to the Admiralty— V/i\\isim Grey Ellison-Macartney, M.P. 
Secretary to the Board of Trade — Earl of Dudley. 

Secretary to the Local Government Board — Thomas Wallace Russell, M.P. 
Paymaster-General — Earl of Hopetoun, G.C.M.G. 
Comptroller of the Household— Lord Arthur Hill, M.P. 
Lord Chamberlain — Earl of Lathom. 

Attorney-General — Sir Richard Everard Webster, Q.C., M.P. 
Solicitor-General — Sir Robert Bannatjme Finlay, Q.C., M.P. 

Scotland. 
Secretary — Lord Balfour of Burleigh (See Cabinet, above). 
Lord Justice General — James P. B. Robertson (Lord Robertson). 
Lord-Advocate — Sir Charles John Pearson. Q.C., M.P. 
Keeper of the Privy Seal — Marquis of Lothian. 

Lord Justice Clerk — Lord Kingsburgh (John Hay Athol Macdonald. C.B.) 
Lord Clerk Register — Duke of Montro5;e. 
Solicitor-General — Andrew Graham Murray, Q.C., M.P. 

Ireland. 
Lord-Lieutenant — Earl Cadogan (See Cabinet, above). 
Chief Secretary — Gerald William Balfour. 
Lord Chancellor — Lord Ashbourne. 
Attorney-General— ]ohn Atkinson, Q.C., M.P. 
Solicitor-General— Wim&m Kenny, Q.C., M.P. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



XVU. 



HARTLEY & SUGDEN, ltd 



MA1.I FAX 



WELDED OR RIVETED 

Healli llppaialos Boileis 

TO ISTlLRAfll 

Churches, Schools ar\d all Public and Pri\)af^ 

lSuildit\^s, 

By the clrculaLh» of Hot Water at low pressure. 

g= ;sg^^feB;a^ga ' yi' j ^4-?. :!- ' ■- ' ■ ' ■ '' '-'■ ■^■' ^ ^^ RISK OF FIRE 
""" OR EXPLOSION. 

DURABLE, 

HEALTHY AND 

ECONOMICAL 

LITTLE ATTENTION 
REQUIRED. 

CUMAX BOILER. 

Many thousands of boilers at work throughout Great 
Britain and on the Continent, 

AND IN THE IMPERIAL GARDENS ft WINTER PALACES 
OF ENGLAND, GERMANY ft RUSSIA. 

Forty-fdnr PrlM MedaU at the Great Exhibition! -London, Parii, BnnieU, Berlin, 
Antwerp, Dresden, Lelpsle, Melbourne. 




XVni. APVBRTISBMBNTS. 



TbLBPNONB I TkLKSIIAlit 

NO. 06OSO. ** PLEADINQS, kONDON 

VE4LE, CrilFFERlEL ^ (» 

LIMITKD, 

Xeaal ant> (General printera. 



PRINTERS TO THE BAPTIST UNION OF GREAT 
BRITAIN AND IRELAND. 



Shorthand Notes of Meetings, Sermons, &c», taken, 
transcribed and printed on the shortest notice. 



PRINTERS OF 

The Baptist Hand -Book. 

The Labour Gazette. Where to Stay. 

Pinsbury Rifles Gazette. 

Insurance Gazette. Wheeling. 



ESTIMATES FREE. 

31-37 CURSITOR STREET, 



MISCELLANBOUS INFORMATION. XIX. 



PUBLIC BUSINESS, 1896. 

Jan. I.— Dog licences renewable. — Licences for Armorial bearings to be renewed 
by 31st inst— Quarter SeMiodK oommenoe this week. 

9. — Insurances renewable at Christmas expire. 

Feb. I. — Within 21 days clerks of peace of counties and town clerks of boroughs 
to forward printed copy register of voters to Secretary of State. 

April 6. — Bank Holiday. — Quarter Sessions commence this week. 

8. — Clerks of peace and town clerks to send precepts to overseers as to 

registration of voters. 

9. — Insurances renewable at Lady-day expire. 

May 25.--Bank Holiday. 

June i.— Overseers to give notice by 20th that voters who have not paid poor 
rates, due 5th January, by 20th July, will not be entitled to be inserted in list of 
voters. 

20. — Overseers to publish list of persons entitled to vote as owners, and 

notices to psrsons qualified to vote for counties to send In claims. 

22. — Quarter Sessions commence this week. 

July 9. — Insurances renewable at Midsummer expire. 

22. — See June x. — Overseers to make out lists of persons who have not paid 

poor rates, due January 5. 

51.— Came and gun licences expire. — Overseers to make out list of ownership 

claimants, occupiers' list, and old lodgers' list. 

Aug. I. — Borough and county lists to be affixed to doors of churches and chapels 
for 14 days. 
Aug. 3.— Bank Holiday. 

20. — Last day for leaving with overseers objections to county and borough 

electors ; and for service of objections on electors in counties or their tenants. 

20. — Last day to claim as borough electors.— Last day for lodger claims. 

25. — Overseers to send list of claimants and objections, and copy of register 

of county voters, to clerk of peace. 

31. — AH taxes and rates payable on March x must be paid on or before 

this day by persons claiming to be enrolled as burgesses under the Municipal 
Corporation Act. 

Sept. 2.— Town clerks in boroughs to affix in public places the list of claims and 
objections to freemen, from this day to the i6th. — Overseers to make out burgess 
lists. — Lists of objections to coimty electors and claims and objections for borough 
lists to be affixed to church doors till x6th. 

a. — Between this day and October 21, registration courts are to be held by 

the revising barrister. Claims of persons omitted in the burgess lists, and objec- 
tions to persons inserted, to be given to the town clerk in writing on or before this 
day ; notice of the objection also to be given to the person objected to. 

Oct.— An open court to revise the burgess lists under Municipal Reform Act, to 
be held some time between the ist and x^tb of October— three clear days' notice 
being given. 

12. — Quarter Sessions commence this week. 

14. — Insurances renewable at Michaelmas expire^ 

Nov. I.— Borough councillors to be elected. Nov. 9.— Election of Mayors and 
Aldermen of Boroughs. 
Dec. 26. — Bank Holiday. Dec. 31. — Various Licences expire. 



XX. 



MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. 



CHRONOLOGICAL NOTES FOR THE YEAR 1896. 

Golden Number . . 16 I Solar Cycle . . . . z I Roman Indiction . . 6 
Epact . . . . • • 15 I Dominical Letters E.D. | Julian Period . . 6.609 

The year 5657 of the Jewish Era commences on September 8th ; RAMADitN 
(Month of Abstinence observed by the Turks) commences on February 15th ; the 
year 1314 of the Mohammedan Era commences on June 12th. 



ECLIPSES IN X896. 

In the year 1896 there will be two Eclipses of the Sun and two of the Moon :~ 

fi) February 13. — An Annular Eclipse of the Sun, invisible at Greenwich. 
(2) February 28. — A Partial Eclipse of the Moon, partly visible at Greenwich. 

August 8. — A Total Eclipse of the Sun, invisible at Greenwich. 

August 22. — A Partial Eclipse of the Moon, partly visible at Greenwich. 



LAW SITTINGS AND UNIVERSITY TERMS, 1895. 









UNivHRSiTV Terms. 






Oxford. I camukiuge. 




Betfins. 


Ends. 

April I 

May 22 

Aug. 12 
Dec. 21 


Begins. 


F. nds. 1 BcRins. 


Ends. 


Hilary .. 
Lent 

Easter .. 
Trinity .. 
Michaelmas 


Jan. 11 

April 14 
June 2 
Oct. 24 


Jan. 14 
April 8 
May 23 
Oct. 10 


Mar. 28 Jan. 8 
May 22 April 18 
July 11 , 
Dec. 17 i Oct. I 


Mar. 27 
June 24 

Dec. 19 



BANK HOLIDAYS. 

The Bank Holidays in England and Ireland are Easter Monday, the Monday in 
Whitsun week, the first Monday in August, the 26th of December, if a week day, or, 
if a Sunday, the 27th.— In Scotland, New Year's Day, Christmas day (if either of 
these days fsiUs on a Sunday, the next following Monday shall be a Bank Holiday), 
Good Friday, the first Monday of May, and the first Monday of August. 



XHE SEASONF. 



Spring Quarter commences Marcu 20 
Summer Quarter commences June 21 



Autumn Quarter commences September 23 
Winter Quarter commences December 21 



USEFUL LEGAL INFORMATION. 
Registration of Births. 

An Infant should be registered within six weeks after birth. No fee is then 
payable, but after 42 days a fee of 7s. 6d. is chargeable. 

Registration of Deaths. 

Notice should be given of deaths to the district registrar. Let this be done early 
that the undertaker may have a certificate to give the mniister who performs the 
funeral service. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



xxi. 




i -.^^- 



xmi. ADVERTISEMENTS. 



NOW READY. Cloth, Gilt Top, 3/6. 



THE INSPIRATION 



AND 



AUTHORITY OF THE BIBLE 



BY 

JOHN CLIFFORD, 

M.A«, LL.B., B.SC. (LOND. Univ.), F.G.S., D.D. (Hon.) 



SECOND EDITION. 

(Rtvisid and Enlarged.) 



JAMES CLARKE & CO., 13 and 14 FLEET STREET, E.C. 



MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. Xxiil* 



Appointment of New Trustees. 

This may now be made under the Titles of Religious Congregations (Sir Morton 
Peto'8) Act, 1850, and the Acts of 1869 and 1890 extending same, now together called 
the Trustees Appointment Aces, 2850 to 1890, or by the Conveyancing and Law of 
Property Act. i88t. These Acts apply to land held in trust for the purposes of 
chapels, endowment of chapels, or ministers* residences, burial grounds, places for 
education and training of students, schools, residences for a minister, schoolmaster, 
or caretaker. When there is an existing power of appointment, the appointment 
may be effected in the manner, and by the person appointed by the mstrument, 
creating the trust; if there is no existing power, or the appointment under the 
power be not made within twelve months, then recourse should be made to the 
above Acts, under which the appointment is made, in the case of Peto's Act, by 
resolution of the church as by the Act provided, or, in the case of the Conveyancing 
Act, by I>eed executed by the persons therein mentioned, the trust property in the 
former case vesting in the new trustees by virtue of the appointment alone, and, in 
the latter case, by virtue of a declaration forming part of the Deed. The document 
should bear a stamp duty of zos. in respect of the appointment, and los. in respect 
of the vesting of the property. 

If none of these modes of appointment are feasible, resort should be had to the 
powers of the Charity Commissioners, and in the last instance to the Court of 
Chancery, though this latter course should^uot be adopted without a certificate of 
its necessity from the Commissioners. 

No form of appointment is prescribed by the Conveyancing Act, z88x, but in Sir 
Morton Peto*s Act a form is given for cases under that Act only, and is as follows : — 

Memo^ndum of the choice and appointment of new trustees of the 
chapel, situate in the parish of in the county of 

at a meeting duly convened and held for that purpose at 
on the day of 18 . Chairman. 

Names and description of all the trustees on the constitution [or last appointment 
of trustus] made the day of 

Adam Bell, of George Hurst, of Matthew Norman, of 

Charles Dixon, of John Jackson, of Octavius Parker, of 

Edward Forster, of Kenneth Lucas, of 

Names and descriptions of all the trustees in whom the said chapel and premises 
now become legally vested. 

ist. Old continuing trustees. 
John Jackson, now of Matthew Norman, now of Octavius Parker, now of 

2nd. New trustees now chosen and appointed. 

Benjamin Adams, of Jonathan Edmonds, of John Home, of 

Charles Bell, of Richard Baxter, of 

Dated this day of 18 



© 



William Hicks, 
Chairman of the said meeting. 

Signed, sealed, and delivered by the said 
William Hicks, as chairman of the said 
meeting, at and in the presence of the 
said meeting, on the day and year 
aforesaid, in the presence of 

A. B. 

C. D. 

N.B.— The Baptist Union Corporation, Limited, is prepAred to act as trustee for 
new chapel property, thus obviating with perpetual succession the recurring expense 
and trouble of re-appointment on the death or resignation of individual trustees. 
Application should be made to the Secretary of the Corporation, 19 Fumival Street, 
E.G. For Memorandum and Articles of Association see page 39. 

3* 



XXiv. M.SCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. 



Chapel Bu rial-Grounds. 

32 & 33 Vic. c. 26. — By this Act the provisions of 13 & 14 Vic. c. 28, entitled "An 
Act to render more simple and effectual the titles by which congregations and societies 
for purposes of religious worship t>r education in England and Ireland hold property 
for such purposes," are extended to burial-grounds which have been or hereafter 
shall be acquired by any congregation or society, or body of persons associated for 
religious puri>oses, and whether such burial-grounds are now in use or closed. 
Proviso that nothing in Act contained shall interfere with Burial Acts. The Acts 
render unnecessary any transfer of the property or the appointment of new trusteess 
The property is to vest by virtue of the appointment alone. 

Exemption from Rates. 

It is enacted by 3 & 4 William IV., cap. 30, that "no person or persons shall be 
rated, or shall be liable to be rated to, or to pay any church or poor rates or cesses 
for, or in respect of, any churches, district churches, chapels, meeting-houses, or 
premises, or such part thereof, as shall be exclusively appropriated to public 
religious worship, and which (other than churches, district churches, or Episcopal 
churches of the Established church), shall be" registered under 18 & 19 Vic, cap. 81. 
as a place of meeting for religious worship. (See Sec. 3.) " Provided always that 
no person or persons shaU be hereby exempted from any such rates or cesses, for or 
in respect of, any parts of such churches, district churches, chapels, meeting-houses, 
or other premises which are not so exclusively appropriated, and from which parts 
not so exclusively appropriated, such person or persons shall receive any rent or rents 
or shall derive profit or advantage." Section 2 proceeds, " Provided always that no 
person or persons shall be liable to any such rates or cesses because^ the said 
churches, district churches, chapels, meeting-houses, or other premises, or any 
vestry-rooms belonging thereto or any part thereof, may be used for Sunday or 
infant schools, or for the charitable education of the poor." It is difficult to say 
what user of part of a chapel or school premises would bring the case within the 
exception from the exemption. It is believed that no case on the point has as jret 
come before the courts. With regard to the certification of places of Worship, see 
^st ** Registration." It will be seen from the foregoing that churches of the Estab- 
lishment and chapels are on the same footing. 

Other Rates. 

By the Public Health Act the incumbent or minister of any building exempted 
by law from the poor rate is also exempt from rates for sewering, paving, and 
lighting leviable by any authority administering the Act. It maybe questioned 
whether such user (if any) of chapel or school premises as would subject tiie chapel • 
or premises to the liability to pay poor rates, might not also involve liability 
to rates levied under the Public Health Act. This Act does not apply to the 
metropolis, which is governed by the Metropolis Management Act, 1855. From that 
Act the exemption clause was omitted {qu : per iHcuriam ?) and it has been 
practically held that Dissenting places of worship are "houses," and are not exempt 
from the paving, sewering, and lighting rates leviable thereunder. In the great 
majority of cases the persons who are rateable under this Act are the Trustees of the 
property. The owners of an Established church are not liable under the Act. This 
inequality should be remedied by Parliament as soon as practicable. 

Charitable Assurances. 

The law relating to gifts and sales of lands and other property for charitable 
uses (amongst which are included the erection of chapels, schools, Sec.), has 
been recently consolidated by the Mortmain and Charitable Uses Act, 1888 (51 & 52 
Vic. cap. 42). No attempt should be made to give effect to sales of more than 
two acres of land, or to gifts for such purposes without competent legal advice. 
Land not exceeding two acres in extent may be conveyed to "trustees on 
behalf of any society or body of persons associated together for religious purposes." 
"for the erection thereon of a building for such purposes," "or whereon a building 
«sed or intended to be used for such purposes has been erected." without any special 



MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. XXV. 



formalities, provided that such conveyance be made in good faith, for full and valuable 
consideration. It is no longer necessary to enrol either the conveyance or the deed 
declaring the trusts In such cases, though the trustees may enrol such deed if they 
think fit. 

Further change has been made in the law relating to charitable assurances by an 
Act of the Session of 1891, namely, The Mortmain and Charitable Uses Act, 1891, by 
virtue of the provisions of which land may now be assured by will to or for the 
benefit of any charitable use, but such land, notwithstanding anything in the will 
contained to the contrary, must be sold within one year from the death of the testator. 

Charitable Trustees Incorporation Act. 

35 & 36 Vict. c. 24.— This Act, entitled "An Act to facilitate the Incorporation 
of Trustees of Charities for Religious, Educational, Literary, Scientific, and Public 
Charitable Purposes, and the Enrolment of certain Charitable Trust Deeds," was 
passed 27th June, 2872. 

The object of this Act is to facilitate the incori>oration of the charities indicated in 
the title, and to diminish the expense of enrolment under an Act passed in the 
thirtieth year of the reign of her present Majesty. Owing to the option of granting 
a certificate being by the Act vested in the Charity Commissioners for England and 
Wales, and to the latter having held that such certificate should be refused in cases 
where the property might be vested in the official trustee of the Commissioners 
under the Charity Commission Acts, the incorporation Act has become practically 
almost useless. 

Charitable Trusts (Recovery) Act, Z89Z. 

This Act, entitled " An Act to facilitate the recovery of rent-charges and other 
payments owing to charities," was passed on nth May, 1891. It provides for the 
institution of proceedings by the Charity Commissioners for England and Wales for 
the recovery of any property the gross annual income of which does not exceed 
/20 per annum, and which appears to belong to a charity; and regulates the 
procedure to be adopted thereon. 

Upon such proceedings it enacts that the printed report of the Charity Com- 
missioners shall be admissible as primd facU evidence of the documents and facts 
therein stated. Also that, where any yearly or other periodical payment has been 
made in respect of any land to or for the benefit of any charity or charitable pur- 
pose for twelve consecutive years, such pasrment shall be deemed subject to any 
evidence which may be given to the contrary primd facie evidence of the perpetual 
liability of such land to such yearly or other periodical payment, and no proi^f of 
the origin of such payment shall be necessary. 

BEQUEST9 TO Charities. 

(i) Bequest of an ordinary pecuniary Legacy. — In this case there is no need for 
the provision formerly inserted in wills directing the legacy to be paid exclusively 
out of such parts of the testator's estate as might lawfully be disposed of for 
charitable purposes. The bequest may be in the following form : — 

" I give to the treasurer or treasurers for the time being of the 
Society the sum of pounds,free of duty, for the general purposes 

of the said society, and his or their receipt shall be a sufficient discharge for the 
same." 

(2) Bequest of a pecuniary legacy made payable out of the proceeds of sale and con- 
version of the testator's real and personal estate, or of a share of such proceeds. — Very 
frequently a testator gives his real and personal estate, or his residuary estate, to 
trustees on trust to sell, and out of the proceeds of sale to pay the legacies previously 
bequeathed, which may include a legacy to a charitable society, and a testator may 
now bequeath a share of such proceeds to such society. In these cases, although 
perhaps not essential, it is considered prudent, at all events until the interpretation 
of the Mortmain and Charitable Uses Act, 1891, noted above, has been settled by 
Judicial decision, to add to the gift of the pecuniary legacy or share to the society 
the following direction : — 



XXVI. MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. 



" And I direct that in case all the real and leasehold estate comprised in the devise 
and bequest in trust for sale herein contained shall not be sold within one year 
from my death, then the said legacy (or share) herein bequeathed to the said 
treasurer or treasurers for the time being of the society, and the duty thereon shall 
be paid out of the proceeds of sale and conversion of my personal estate and the 
proceeds of sale of such of my real and leasehold estate as shall be sold within one 
year alter my death, in priority to all other legacies (or shares) payable thereout." 

Dissenting Registers of Births, Baptisms, and Burials. 

These registers and records, which were collected, examined and approved by 
a Royal Commission, are now deposited in the custody of the Registrar-General, 
at the Non-Parochial Register Office, Somerset House, London, which, for the 
purposes of the Act of 3 & 4 Vic, c. 92, is deemed a branch or part of the General 
Re^ster Office. Searches and extract from these registers and records will be 
granted on every day except Sundays, Christmas Day, and Good Friday, between 
the hours of ten and four, upon personal application only, and payment of legal 
fees. Applications by letUrfor search or extract cannot he complied with. Persons 
residing in the country, therefore, who may require searches of certificates, must, of 
necessity, apply to a friend in London, or employ an agent. All other communica- 
tions by letter, on the subject of the above-mentioned registers and records, must be 
addressed to the " Registrar-General, General Registrar Office, London," and it is 
requested that the words " Non-Parochial Registers " may be written on the outside 
of all such letters, the postage of which may be left unpaid. The fee for each search 
is IS., and for each certificate 2s. 6d. 

The foregoing paragraph applies only to Dissenting records. In the case of 
other registers, application for copies of certificates can be made either personally 
or by letter to the Registrar-General. 

Registration of Chapels. 

Dissenting chapels, not already registered, may be certified, in writing, to the 
Registrar-General, through the superintendent-registrar of the district, who will 
fiimish the legal form of certificate, and forward them (in duplicate) to the Registrar- 
General for record. Afterwards one of the forms will be returned, through the 
registrar, to the party certifying. At the office of the superintendent-registrar, a list 
of all chapels certified and not afterwards cancelled is open for inspection on the 
payment of is. The Registrar-General's certificate (which is legal evidence) of a 
chapel being registered may be obtained for a fee of 2S. 6d. Every place of worship 
registered under the present law in the ojffice of the Registrar-General is exempt from 
poor rates (see above), and is exempted from the operation of the Charitable Trusts 
Act, by which the Charity Commission was instituted. In order that a chapel may 
be registered for the Solemnisation of Marriages it must be " certified," and 
must have been used as a place of religious worship by the congregation requiring it 
to be registered, during one year at the least preceding such registration. If the 
building be one erected and used in lieu of some other building which had been 
previously registered and subsequently disused as a place of religious worship, the 
registry of the disused building must be cancelled, whereupon the new building may 
be immediately registered in its stead. The fee for merely certifying a place of 
worship is 2S. 6d. ; for registering the same for marriages, £3. 

Law of Marriage. 

ENGLAND. 

The law regulating Dissenting Marriages in England is contained in five Acts of 
Parliament— viz., the 6 & 7 Will. IV., c. 85 ; i Vict., c. 22 ; 3 & 4 Vict, c. 72 ; 19 & 20 
Vict, c. 119; and 49 Vict., c. 14. Particulars or explanations may always be 
obtained from the district registrars or superintendent-registrars. Marriage may be 
solemnised in any registered building, or in district register office (otherwise than 
by banns in the church, as by law established), either by certificate (without licence) 
or by licence. If by certificate (without licence) notice (accompanied with fee of is. 
for entry in " Marriage Notice Book ") must be given by one of the parties, if both 



MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. XXVU. 



live in one district, to superintendent-registrar, on form ftimished for purpose, 
containing solemn declaration of absence of impediment to intended marriage, 
certifying that oh$ of the parties has dwelt at least seven dajrs in district, and mu^t 
be signed in presence of registrar or deputy ; but if parties live in different districts, 
notices must be sent to respective superintendent-registrars. Twgnty-one clear days 
after entry of notice the certificate (for which is. must be paid) will be granted on 
application. 

The same applies if one party lives in Ireland, only notice must be given on form 
used in Ireland. If one party lives in Scotland, Sooteh certificate of proclamation 
of banns will be accepted as equal to certificate. 

If by licence, though both parties do not dwell in same district, only one need give 
notice (on a form impressed with a 2s. 6d. stamp), certifying that he or she has 
resided at least fifteen days in district, though marriage may be had in district of 
either party. Both parties, however, must be in England at time of notice, though 
only one clear day is required (unless marriage take place in Ireland with someone 
there, when seven days are required) between notice and granting of licence. Cost 
of licence, £2 4s. 6d. 

The law is substantially the same in the Channel Islands and the Isle of Man. 

If there be no registered building in the district according to the rights or 
ceremonies desired by parties, by endorsing notice with such declaration, marriage 
may be held in another district 

If usual " place of worship " at which ceremony is desired be out of district of 
either's dwelling, by inserting words : — " Such building being usual place of worship 

of said , and situate not more than two miles beyond limits of district o f ," 

certificate will be granted accordingly. 

The marriage must take place in the registered building specified in certificate, with 
open doors, between hours of eight in the morning and three in the afternoon, 
wiUiln three calendar months from day of entry of notice, in presence of registrar 
(or deputy), and two or more credible witnesses besides minister, if any. At some 
part of ceremony the words must be said : — *' I do solemnly declare that I know not 

of any lawful impediment why I may not be joined in matrimony to " ; and 

each must say to other : " I call upon these persons here present to witness that I 

do take thee to be my lawful wedded wife (or husband) " ; without which it 

is not a marriage. 

Registrar's fee for attending marriage by '.licence, los.; by certificate (without 
licence), 5s. 

In marriages in district registry office, the same conditions (only superintendeni- 
registrar must be present) and words as above must be observed. There must, 
however, be no religious service, though this does not prevent such service being 
subsequently held if desired. 

Quakers and Jews are excepted so far firom the ordinary operation of Marriage 
Acts as to be allowed their respective usages, provided due notice be given and 
certificate shall have issued. 

SCOTLAND. 

Ceremony can be performed by minister of any denomination, in any place, at any 
time, without any particular form. The law, however, recognizes as marriage 
a contract of mutual consent, though there be no minister nor ceremony of any kind, 
provided one of the parties has been twenty-one days in Scotland. 



Certificates and licences are granted Protestant Nonconformists on exactly the 
same conditions as in England, except that notice must be given on form used in 
Ireland, and immediately before licence is granted (which is on eighth day, instead of 
second as in England) an oath must be administered or solemn declaration taken. 

Marriage may also be had by special licence granted by president of that religious 
body (except Jews) to which both parties belong. 

A marriage can Uke place in Ireland when one party resides in England only by 
licence granted seven days after date of certificate of licence obtained by other 
party in England. It is the same if one party resides in Scotland, only certificate 
of proclamation of banns is accepted as equal to English certificate of licence. 



yXVlll. MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. 



THS Burials Acts. 

The following digest of the leading provisions of the Burial Laws Amendment 
Act. x88o (43 & 44 Vict., c. 41), which became law on the 7th of September of that 
year, has been prepared by the "Liberation Society" for the guidance of those 
whose duty it may be to make arrangements for interments. Further information, 
and copies of the Act, and of the requisite forms, may be obtained by addressing 
•• The Secretaries," 2, Serjeant's Inn, Fleet-street, London : — 

I.— THE NOTICE OF BURIAL. 

1. The notice of an intention to bury in accordance with the Act, in either church- 
yards or the consecrated parts of parochial cemeteries, should be given with as little 
delay as possible, and must not be later than forty-eight hours before the time 
proposed tor the burial. 

2. The notice may be given by any relative, friend, or legal representative having 
charge of, or being responsible for, Uie burial. 

3. It must be in writing; must be endorsed on the outside "Notice of burial"; 
must be signed with the name and address of the person giving it, and be in the form, 
or to the effect, following: — 

"I, of being the relative [or friend, 

or legal representative, as the case may be, describing the relation, if a relative] 
having the charge of, or being responsible for, the burial of A. B., of , 

who died at , m the parish of , on the 

pay of do hereby give you notice that it is intended by me that the body 

of the said A. B. shall be buried within the [here describe the churchyard or graveyard 
in which the body is to be buried] on the day of 

at the hour of , without the performance in the manner prescribed by 

law of the service for the burial of the dead according to the rites of the Church of 
England ; and I give this notice pursuant to the Burial Laws Amendment Act, z88o. 
"To the rector [or, as the case may be] of ." 

TN.B. — ^While it is desirable to keep to this form, the person receiving it will not be 
at liberty to object to its sufficiency because the exact words are not used, the Act 
requiring that the notice shall be in the form, *'or to the effect," of the above.] 

4. In the case of a churchyard, the notice is to be left at the house of the clergyman, 
or, in his absence, of the clergyman in charge of the parish, or of any person 
appointed to receive such notices. 

5. In the case of a parochial cemetery, if there is a chaplain for the consecrated 
ground, the notice is to be addressed to him, but is to be left at the office of the Clerk 
of the Burial Board. 

6. In the case of a pauper, notice may be given to the Incumbent, or the chaplain, 
and also to the Master of the Workhouse, or to the Clerk to the Guardians, by the 
husband, wife, or next-of-kin. The Guardians will be bound to allow the burial to be 
in accordance with the Act. 

II.— CHANGE OF TIME FOR BURIAL. 

7. The person receiving the notice may object to the time proposed for the burial 
in the following cases : — 

(a) As to burials in both churchyards and parochial cenuteries : if the burial be 
inconvenient on account of some other service having been previously to the 
receipt of the notice appointed to take place. 

(b) As to burials in parochial cemeteries only : if the time proposedinfringes 

any regulations in force limiting the times at which burials may take place 
Unless some other time be mutually arranged within twenty-four hours from the 
time of giving the notice, the person from whom the notice has been received must 
be informed in writing at what other hour on the same day the bunal is to take 
place. But if no such intimation of change of hour is sent the burial is to take 
place at the time named in the notice. There is therefore no necessity for receiving 
the consent of the clergyman ; as, in the event of his not objecting, within the time 
named, the funeral may take place in accordance with the notice, as a matter of 
course. 



MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION XXIX. 



[N.B. — Unless it be otherwise mutually arranged, burials must be between xo and 
6 o'clock from April i to October x, and between xo and 3 from October i to 
April I.] 

8. In the case of a churchyard, if the Incumbent objects to a burial on Sunday, 
Good Friday, and Christmas Day, he must name a time on the following day. He 
must also state his reason for doing so, in writing, to the person from whom he has 
received the notice. This objection cannot be taken in the case of cemeteries^ unless 
Sunday funerals are prohibited by the cemetery regulations. 

III.— CRARACTBR OF BURIAL SBRVICBS. 

9. A burial may take place either without any " religious service," or '* with such 
Christian and orderly religious service," at the grave, as the person responsible for 
the burial may think fit, and " any person or persons," whether ministers or laymen, 
who may be invited, or authorised, may conduct such service, or take part in any 
religious act thereat. The words "Christian service" include "every religious 
service used by any church, denomination, or person professing to be Christian." 

10. All burials must be decent and orderly, and any one guilty of riotous, violent, 
or indecent behaviour, or of obstructing any service, will be guilty of a misde- 
meanour. 

XI. So also will any person who shall "deliver any address, not being part of, 
or incidental to, any religious service" permitted by the Act; or who wilfully 
endeavours "to bring into contempt, or obloquy, the Christian religion, or the 
belief, or worship, of any church, or denomination of Christians, or the members, 
or any minister of any such church or denomination, or any other person." 

12. The clergyman, the cemetery authorities, and all other authorised persons, 
will have the same power to preserve order, and to prevent, or to punish, disorderly 
behaviour, or obstruction, as they now possess in the case of burials in accordance 
with the rites of the Church of England. All persons may have free access to the 
place of burial. 

[N.B. — It is most desirable that those who are responsible for the conduct of 
funerals should carefully avoid, not only the commission of any legal offence, but 
any proceedings which may aftord just ground for complaint.] 

IV.— THE RBGISTRV'CF BURIALS. 

13. The person having charge of a burial under the Act must, either on the same 
day or the day after, send to the Incumbent, or his representative — or, in the case of 
a cemetery, to the clerk — a certificate in the following form : — 

"I, , of , the person having the charge of [or, 

being responsible for] the burial of the deceased, do hereby certify that on the 
day of • 189 , of aged was buried 

in the churchyard [or graveyard] of the parish [or district] of 

" To the rector \pr, as the case may be] of 

Any person wilfully making a false statement in such certificate, or any person 
whose duty it is to make such entries, refusing or neglecting to enter the burial in 
the parish or cemetery register, will be guilty of a misdemeanour. 

v.— SBRVICBS BY THE CLBRGY OF THB CHURCH OF ENGLAND. 

14. The clergy of the Church of England are at liberty to use the burial service of 
that Church in any unconsecrated burial ground, or in the chapel therein. The 
relatives may have such service performed in unconsecrated ground by any clergy- 
man of the Church of England who may be willing to perform the same. 

15. In cases where the Church of England service cannot legally be used, and in 
any other case, at the request of the relatives, the clergy may use some other than 
the ordinary burial service ot the Church of England, provided that it has been 
approved by the Bishop, and is taken wholly from the Bible and Prayer Book. 

VI.^mSCBLLANBOUS. 

16. The Act does not entitle anyone to be buried in any place in which there 
would be no right of burial if the Act had not passed. The Act relates only to burial 
ser%nee$. 



XXX. 



MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. 



17. Neither does it affect previously existing regulations or authority in regard to 
the position of graves, inscriptions on gravestones, etc. The same fees will also 
have to be paid as though the burial were in accordance with the rites of the Church 
of England. 

18. The Act applies only to England and Wales and the Channel Islands. 



The Oaths Act, x888. 

The Act to amend the Law as to Oaths, passed on the 24th December, 1888, enacts 
that every person upon objecting to being sworn, and stating, as the ground of such 
objection, either that he has no religious belief, or that the taking of an oath is 
contrary to his religious belief, shall be permitted to make his solemn affirmation 
instead of taking an oath, in all places and for all purposes where an oath is or shall 
be required by law, which affirmation shall be of the same force and effect as if he 
had taken the oath. Every such afficmation shall be as follows: — "I, A. B., do 
solemnly, sincerely, and truly declare and affirm," and then proceed with the words 
of the oath prescribed by law, omitting any words of imprecation or calling to 
witness. 



Dissenters in Established Church PulpiTs. 

The Act by which it is considered that the clergy are restrained from inviting 
Dissenters to occupy their pulpits is the Act of Uniformity of 1662 (13 & 14 Car. II., c. 
14}. By this Act no one may act or preach as a lecturer (in which capacity it is con- 
ceived a Dissenter or layman would appear, if so invited to preach) without a licence 
from the Bishop, and it has been decided that the discretion of the Bishop to grant 
or withhold his licence cannot be questioned. Any lecturer who acts in contraven- 
tion of this enactment " shall suffer three months' imprisonment without bail or 
mainprise." No penalty, however, appears to be incurred by a parson inviting or 
permitting an unlicensed lecturer to use his pulpit ; though a Bishop who grants a 
licence to anyone who has not first subscribed to the Three Articles concerning 
" the King's supremacy, the Book of Common Prayer, and the 39 Articles," will 
have to suffer the serious inconvenience of being suspended from giving licences to 
preach for the space of twelve months. 



Recent Statutes. 

The Acts of Parliament of 55 & 56 Vict, may be usefully consulted on the following 
subjects: — Chapter xi, Mortmain and Charitable Uses Act Amendment; Chapter 15 
Charity Inquiries (Expenses) ; Chapter 23, Foreign Marriage ; Chapter 32, Clergy 
Discipline Act, 1892. 



THE CENSUS. 1891. 

The Census taken on 5th April, 1891, gives the population of the British Isles 
as 37,880,764, viz. :— 



1 

1 Persons 


Males. 


Females. 


Increase 

since 

prerious 

Census 

1881. 


Decennial 
Rate of 
Increase 
per cent. 


England and Wales. . . . 29.002,525 
Scotland 4,025,647 

Ireland 4,704,750 

Channel Islands . . . . i 92.234 
Isle of Man 1 55.608 

I 


14,052,901 
1. 942.717 

2.318.953 

43226 
26.329 


14.949,624 
2,082,930 

2.385.797 

49.008 
29,279 


3,028,086 
290,074 

Decrease. 
470,086 

Increase. 
4.53a 
2,050 


XI -65 

r> 7'77 

Decrea.se. 

908 
Increase. 

3-8 

5x6 



MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. XXXI. 

STAMPS. DUTIES, &C. 

Receipts. 

For sums of £2 or upwards (persons receiving the money are to pay the duty) . . id. 

Drafts. Bills. Ac. 

Draft or Order for the payment of any sum of money to the bearer, or to order. 

on demand, including bankers' cheques id. 

Inland Bill, Draft, or Order, payable otherwise than on demand : — 

£ £ s. d. 

Not exceeding 5 001 

^ f£ 5. and not exceeding 10 002 

» 10, „ 25 003 

I -^ 25. „ 50 o o 6 

8 50. .. 75 o o 9 

U V 75, „ 100 010 

and IS. for every additional j^ioo or fractional part thereof. 

House Duty. 

On premises of the annual value of ;^2o and under £40 — Shops, 2d. in £, 

„ ., Houses, 3d. in £. 

„ £40 and not exceeding ;^6o — Shops, 4d. in £. 
„ „ Houses, 6d. in ;^. 

exceeding ;^6o — Shops, 6d. in £. 
„ Houses, 9d. in £. 

Apprentices' Indentures 
Instrument of 2s. 6d. 

Licence for Marriage. 
Special, in England or Ireland, £5 ; not special, in England, los. 

Income Tax. 

Duty is not chargeable when the income does not exceed j^i6o a year. The rate 
of duty is 8d. per £, A deduction of ^^ 160 is allowed before charging duty in any 
case in which the total income does not exceed ;^4oo, and when the total income 
exceeds ^^400 but does not exceed ;^5oo, a deduction of ;^ioo is allowed. 



RATES OF POSTAGE, &c. 

The rate of postage on letters passing between any two places in the United 
Kingdom, including the Orkney, Shetland, Scilly, and Channel Islands, and the Isle 
of Man. is as follows : — 

If not exceeding I ounce .. id. 

Exceeding i ounce, but not exceeding 2 ounces . . . . i)d. 

,. 2 ounces „ ,. 4 ounces .. ..2d. 

„ 4 ounces „ ,. 6 ounces .. .. 2id. 

And so on at the rate of a halfpenny for every additional two ounces, or fraction of 
two ounces. 

Unpaid letters are charged double postage on delivery ; those insufficiently pre- 
paid, double the amount of such insufficiency. 

All letters should be clearly addressed in a plain hand. The stamp should stand 
above the address, to the right hand of the writer. 

No charge is made for the re-direction of letters, provided that the letters are 
re-posted not later than the day after delivery, and that they do not appear to have 
been opened. 



XXXU. MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. 



If coin be enclosed in an ordinary letter, the letter will be charged a registration 
fee of 8d. on delivery. 

No letter may be above i8 inches in length, 9 inches in vridth, or 6 inches in depth, 
unless it be sent to or from one of the Government Offices. 

Registration. 

Inland letters, book packets, parcels, and newspapers may be registered upon 
payment of a fee of 2d. over and above the postage. All letters containing coin 
should be Enclosed in a registered letter envelope, which may be obtained at any 
Post Office on pa}rment of 2id. (which includes the registration fee), or in packets 
of twelve at 2S. 2^. per packet (small sizes). 

Compensation. 

Compensation is given for loss or damage of Inland Registered Postal Packets of 
all kinds, subject to certain conditions, on payment of an Insurance Fee, which 
either consists of or includes in each case, the ordinary registration fee of 2d. ; and 
the scale of fees, and the respective limits of compensation are : — 

Two pence for £$ 

Three pence for . . . . £xo 

Four pence for £1$ 

Five pence for £20 

Six pence for £a$ 

and so on up to a maximum limit of /50. 

The following rates of postage are also in operation — 

Book Packets. 

Inland, id. for every 2 ounces or part of 2 ounces. No book packet may exceed 
5 pounds in weight, 18 inches in length, 9 in width, or 6 in depth, unless it be sent 
to or from a Government Office. 

Letter Cards. 
lid. each ; 3|d. for three ; 9d. for eight, &c. 

Newspapers. 

Newspapers (which have been registered as such at the General Post Office), 
whether posted singly or with others in a packet, |d. each between any two places in 
the United Kingdom. If more than one paper be sent under the same cover the 
packet is not chargeable with a higher rate than would be chargeable on a book 
packet ol the same weight. 

Newspaper Wrappers. 

Bearing id. stamp, sid. for six wrappers; bearing id. stamp, S^d. for eight 
wrappers, &c. 

Postcards (thin). 
i|d. for three cards, 3}d. for six cards, or in packets of ten at sid. per packet. 

Postcards (stout). 
3d. for five cards, sd. for eight, or 6d. per packet of ten cards. 

Reply Postcards (thin). 
3id. for three, 6|d. for six. iid. for ten. Ac. 

Reply Postcards (stout). 
32d. for three, 7id. for six, is. for ten, &c. 



MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. XXXUl. 



3d. 
4d. 
5d. 
6d. 



MONEY ORDERS (INLAND). 

Money Orders are granted and paid at every Head Office, and also at several 
thousands of Branch and Sub-offices and Town Receiving Houses in the United 
Kingdom, the commission on which is as follows : — 

For sums not exceeding ;^x ad. 

For sums above . • £i and not exceeding £% 
.. ;f2 .1 £a 

m .. £A m £1 

M •• £l M £lO 

An order may be crossed Uk^ a^ cheque, at the time of issue, thus : & Co. . 
and thus be payable only through a bank. Pa}rment of an Order must be obtained 
within twelve months. 

In case of the miscarriage or loss of a Money Order, a duplicate is granted without 
charge on a written application (with the necessary particulars) to the Controller 
of the Money Order Office of the Kingdom in which the original Order was issued, 
provided the loss is in the transmission to the payee, but if otherwise a charge of 
ts. or 2S. (according to the amount of the Order) is made for the issue of the 
duplicate Order. 

Money Orders are also issued on many foreign countries, the British Colonies, Ac. — 

For sums not exceeding £^ £q o t 

£S o I o 

C7 o I 6 



M 



Telegraph Money Orders 

May be sent by payment of double he commission on Money Orders, and a minimum 
chaige of Qd. in addition for the Official Telegram authorizing payment, and the 
repetition ttiereof. 

POSTAL ORDERS 

Are issued for fixed sums as follows, and paid at all Money Order Offices in the 
United Kingdom, and at Malta, Gibraltar, India, Straits Settlements, Hong Kong» 
Newfoundland, and Constantinople, within three months of issue ; and thereafter on 
payment of a second poundage. 

Amount of Order Poundage. 

IS. and IS. 6d ^d. 

ss., 2S. 6d., 3S., 3S. 6d., 4s., 4s. 6d., 5s., 7s. 6d., los., and zos. 6d. . . id. 
15s. and 20s. . . . . i}d. 

Broken amounts may be made up by the use of Postage Stamps, not exceeding 
5d. in value, affixed to the face of any one Postal Order. 



SAVINGS BANKS. 



£>eposits are received at every Postal Savings Bank Office during the hours 
appointed for the sale of stamps in amounts from is. upwards, and upon every 
complete pound yearly interest is given at the rate of £2 los. per cent. Deposits not 
to exceed £50 in one year, ending 31st December, and ;f200 in all, inclusive of 
interest. See Post OJJice Quids. 



GOVERNMENT ANNUITIES AND LIFE INSURANCES. 
Immediate or deferred annuities from £1 up to j^roo, may be purchased through 
the Post Office on the life of any person over 5 years of age. These annuities are 
payable by equal half-yearly instalments on the 5th January and the 5th July, or on 
the 5th April and the loth October, according to the date of purchase. Life insur- 
anees, from £$ to ;^ioo, can be granted to persons between 14 and 65 years of age. 
Children between 8 and 14 years of age can be insured for £%. See Post oMes 
GutiU. 



XXXIV. MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. 



EXPRESS DELIVERY OF LETTERS AND PARCELS. 

Letters and parcels are now accepted at all Express Delivery Offices in the 
United Kingdom for immediate delivery by special messenger in any part of the 
same town or rural district. Letters and parcels may also be handed in at any Post 
Office which is not an Express Delivery Office for despatch in the ordinary course of 
post to Uie nearest available Express Office for delivery by special messenger. 
Letters and parcels forwarded by mail in the regular course of post to any Express 
Delivery Office in the Kingdom are also delivered by special messenger if desired 
by the sender. 



INLAND PARCEL POST, 



Parcels not exceeding 1 1 lbs. in weight are received at any Post Office for trans- 
mission between places in the United Kingdom. 

^< In order that a packet may go by Parcel Post, it must be tendered for transmission 
as a parcel, and should bear the words " Parcel Post," which should be clearly 
written in the left-hand top comer. 

Every Post Office is open to the public for Parcel Post business on week days 
during the same hours as for general postal business. No Parcel Post business is 
transacted in the United Kingdom on Sundays, nor in England and Ireland on 
Christmas Days and Good Fridays ; nor in Scotland on Sacramental Fast Days. 

The following are the principal conditions and regulations : — 

The size allowed for an Inland Postal Parcel is — 

Greatest length .. 3 ft. 6 in. 

Greatest length and girth combined . . . . 6 ft. o in. 

For example— 

A parcel measuring 3 ft. 6 in. in its longest dimension may measure as 
much as 2 ft 6 in. in girth, i.e., round its thickest part; or 

A shorter parcel may be thicker ; thus, if it measure no more than 3 ft. in 
length, it may measure as much as 3 ft. in girth, i.e., round its thickest 
part. 

The rates of postage are, for a Parcel- 
Not exceeding i lb. in weight 
Exceeding i lb. and not exceeding 2 lbs. 

2 lbs. „ 

3 lbs. 

4 lbs. 

5 lbs. 

6 lbs. 

7 lbs. 

8 lbs. 
gibs. 

„ 10 lbs. „ , 

No parcel is accepted which weighs more than 1 1 poimds, or is not sufficiently 
paid. The postage must, in all cases, be paid in advance, and by ordinary postage 
stamps, which must be affixed by the sender before tendering a pai%el for transmis- 
sion by Parcel Post at a Post Office. 

Care must be taken that every parcel bears a clear address, and has the words 
" Parcel Post" legibly written on the left-hand comer of the address. 

Parcels must not be posted in a letter box, but must be taken into a Post Office 
and handed over the counter. If a packet, which either bears the words *' Parcel 
Post," or from its appearance seems to be intended for transmission as a parcel, is 



• • . 


3d 


g 2 lbs. 


4id 


3 lbs. 


6d. 


4 lbs. 


7W. 


5 lbs. 


9<1. 


6 lbs. 


loid. 


7 lbs. 


zs. od. 


8 lbs. 


. IS. I^. 


9 lbs. 


. IS. 3d. 


10 lbs. 


. IS. 4W. 


XI lbs. 


. IS. 6d. 



MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. XXXV. 



not'posted in accordance with this regulation, it is treated as a letter or book packet, 
if it is fally prepaid at the rate proper to either, and is otherwise in accordance with 
the letter or book post regulations. If such a packet is not fully prepaid at the 
letter or book post rate, it is treated as a parcel, and is charged on delivery a fine of 
id., together with the deficient postage, if any, at the Parcel Post rate. 

By filling up a blank form — obtainable at Post Offices — a " Certificate of Posting " 
can be had under the Stamp of the Post Office. 



INLAND PATTERN AND SAMPLE POST 

"Is intended for the transmission of bona fide trade patterns and samples of 
merchandise. ... No article sent for sale or in execution of an order, or 
otherwise than as a trade pattern or sample, will under any circumstances be 
admissible; and if any such packet be posted prepaid at the pattern rate only, 
it wiU be charged with double the deficient postage, at the letter rate^ together with 
a fine of 6d." 

Trade patterns and samples of merchandise may be sent between places in the 
United Kingdom, at the following rates of postage — 

For a packet weighing not more than 4 ounces id. 

For a packet weighing more than 4 ounces, but not more than 6 ounces i^d. 

For a packet weighing more than 6 ounces, but not more than 8 ounces 2d. 

No packet may exceed 8 ounces in weight. The limits of dimensions are 12 in 
by 8 in. by 4 in. If either of these conditions be infringed, the packet will not be 
forwarded, but will be returned to the sender. 



TELEGRAM RATES. 



The charge for any message of twelve words throughout the United Kingdom 
(including the Channel Islands. Orkney, Shetland, the Isle of Man, and the Scilly 
Isles), is 6d., and }d. for every additional word. Postage Stamps are used for pay- 
ment ; to be affixed as upon letters. Books of so forms, interleaved with a sheet of 
carbonic paper, and with embossed stamp, may be had at los. 2d. each. 



FOREIGN POSTAL ARRANGEMENTS. 

Foil details as to days of d^patch, rates of postage, &c., to Foreign Countries may 
be obtained from any Post Office, or from the Post Office Guide, which is published 
quarterly. These arrangements vary quarter by quarter, and reliable information 
cannot, therefore, be given for the whole year in this annual publication. 

The prepaid postage of 2}d. per ) ounce is now applicable to letters for all parts 
of the world outside the United Kingdom. 



COLONIAL AND FOREIGN PARCEL POST. 

Parcels can now be received at any Poet Office in the United Kingdom for trans- 
mission to many foreign countries. The system undergoes frequent revision. For 
rates, ftc., see Post Offiu Guid$t or apply at any Post Office. 



XXXVl. MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. 



PASSPORTS. 

An Englishman travelling on the Continent seldom needs a Passport, but it is 
nevertheless advisable to carry one, as it is at all times proof of identity, and 
frequently secures admission to museums and similar buildings when otherwise 
closed. A Passport is necessary for Russia, Turkey, Roumania, Bosnia and Herze- 
govina, and is desirable for Spain and Portug^. Passports are also required when 
persons are making any long stay in France, Germany, or Switzerland. 

Passports are issued to British-bom subjects by the Foreign Office or the various 
British Consuls on presentation of a recommendation from a Banker under seal, or 
upon the production of a Certificate of Identity, signed by a Magistrate, Clergyman, 
Physician, Solicitor, Notary, or M.P., and countersigned by the person on whose 
behalf the certificate is granted. Passports are issued to naturalised British subjects 
only on personal application at the Foreign Office. The charge for issue of a Pass- 
port is 2S., and for Visas — Austria-Hungary, 2S. ; Belgium, 2S. 6d. ; France, 8s. ; 
Germany, is. 6d. (visa renewable annually) ; Greece, 2S. 6d. ; Holland, 4s. 2d. ; 
Italy, 4S. ; Portugal, 8s. iid ; Roumania, 4s. 2d. (is. to British horn subjects): 
Russia, 4S. lod. (must state religion) ; Servia, 2s. 6d. ; Spain, 8s. ; Switzerland, 2s. ; 
Turkey, 4s. ; Persia, 4s. Agency fee is. extra for Passport and each Visa. 



PART I. 

BAPTIST UNION OF GREAT BRITAIN 
AND IRELAND. 



OFFICERS, COUNCIL, ETC., 1895-96. 



Presideni^Rev. JOHN GERSHOM GREENHOUGH. M.A. 

Vice-President— Rey, THOMAS VINCENT TYMMS. 

7r#as«rer— Mr. WILLIAM WILBERFORCE BAYNES, J.P. 

Secretary— Rev. SAMUEL HARRIS BOOTH, D.D., 19 Famiyal Street, E.G. 

9Mbtx% oi iy^t (KonitcU. 

(X) REPRESENTATIVES OF ASSOCIATIONS 

(In Membership with the Baptist Union). 



Bedfordshire Union.- Mr. R. Good- 
man, Flitwick. 

Berkshire.— Rev. J. Cave, Wokingham. 

BRiSTOL.«-Mr. S. lies, Bristol. 

Buckinghamshire.— Rev. H. ]. Lester, 

Aylesbury. 
Cambridgeshire. — Rev. J. Carvath, 
Willingham. 

Devon.— Mr. W. Hawkes, J. P., Devon- 
port ; Mr. H. E. Lilley, Honiton. 

East Midland. — Rev. T. Barrass, 
Peterbbroagfa ; Mr. W. B. Clark, 
Leicester ; Rev. W. F. Harris, Derby ; 
Rev. W. Woods. London. 

Essex Union.- Rev. E. Dyer, South- 
end. 

GlX)UCESTERSBIRS AND HEREFORD- 
SHIRE.— Rev. E. AshtoQ, Gorsley. 

Hertfordshire Union.— Rev. C. M. 
Hardy, B.A., St. Albans. 



Kent and Sussex.— Mr. G. Osbom, 
J.P. , St Leonards ; Rev. W. Townsend, 
Canterbury. 

Lancashire and Cheshire.- Rev. C. 

Bonner, Southampton ; Rev. R. Lewis, 

Liverpool ; Mr. G. W. Macalpine, J. P., 

Accrington. 
London.— Rev. J. Fletcher, Rev. G. P. 

McKay, Mr. H. Mambam. 

Norfolk. — Rev. J. M. Hamilton, 
Lowestoft. 

Northamptonshire. — Bfr. J. Campion. 
Courteenhall. 

Northern.— Rev. J. T. Forbes, M.A.. 
Edinburgh. 

Oxfordshire.— Rev. T. Bentley, Chip- 
ping Norton. 

Shropshire.— Rev. A. Lester, Dawley. 

Southern.— Rev. C. Joseph, Ports- 
mouth ; Rev. J. P. Williams, Ports- 
mouth. 



COUNXIL, ETC. 



SUFFOLK AND NORFOLK UNION. — Mr. 

R. Mattingly. J.P., Sudbury. 

Western.— Rev. H. Hardin, Montacute. 

West Midland.— Rev. E. W. Cantrell, 
Birmingham; Mr. H. P. Chapman, 
Birmingham. 

Wiltshire and East Somerset. — 
Mr. W. B. Wearing, Swindon. 

Worcestershire.- Mr. J. Smallwood, 
J.P., Stratford-on-Avon. 

Yorkshire.— Mr. W. Best. Bradford; 
Mr. T. R. Birkinshaw, Bradford; 
Rev. A. P. Payers, Rawdon. 

Anglesey.— Rev. T. M. Rees, Holy- 
head. 



Carmarthenshire and ' Cardigan- 
shire.— Rev. J. A. Morris, Aberyst- 
wyth; Mr. I. Phillips, Burry Port; 
Rev. E. U. Thomas, Carmarthen. 

Denbigh, Flint and Merioneth- 
shire.— Rev. E. K. Jones, Brymbo; 
Rev. T. Shankland, Rhyl; Rev. D. 
Williaros, Llangollen. 

Glamorganshire and Carmarthen- 
shire (E.)— Mr. J. Davies, Cardiff; 
Rev. W. G. Davies, Penarth. 

Monmouthshire (E.)— Rev. H. Abra- 
ham, Newport. 

North Wales English Union.— Rev. 
J. Raymond, Llandudno. 

Old Welsh.— Rev. T. E. Williams, 
Newtown. 



(2) EX-PRESIDENTS OF THE BAPTIST UNION, 



1865 Rev. 

1866 Rev.' 
1873 Mr. 

London. 

1875 Rev. A. McLaren, B.A., D.D , Man- 
chester. 

1876 Rev. 

1877 Rev. 
1882 Rev. ' 
1884 Rev. 



. J. Angus, M.A., D.D., London. 
. J. Aldis, Beckington. 

E. B. Underbill. LL.D., 



. W. Landels, D.D., Edinburgh. 
. J. T. Brown, Northampton. 
. J. J. Brown, Birmingham. 
. R. Glover, D.D., Bristol. 



1885 Rev. S. G. Green, B.A. D.D. 

London. 
x886 Rev. C. Williams, Accrington. 

1887 Rev. J. Culross, M.A., D.D., Bristol. 

1888 Rev. J. Clifford, M.A., LL.B., B.Sc.. 
F.G.S., D.D., London. 

1890 Rev. J. Owen, Swansea. 

1892 Rev. R. H. Roberts, B.A., London. 

1893 Rev. T. M. Morris, Ipswich. 

1894 Rev. G. Short, B.A., Salisbury. 



(3) PRINCIPALS OF DENOMINATIONAL COLUSES 
{In Membership ivith the Baptist Union.) 



Rev. J. Culross, M.A.. D.D., Bristol {su 

above— Ex'Presideat). 
Rev. G. Davies, D.D., Bangor. 
Rev. T. W. Davies, B.A., Nottingham. 
Rev. W. J. Henderson, B.A., Bristol. 



Rev. R. H. Roberts, B.A., London {see 

above — Ex-President). 
Rev. T. V. Tymms, Rawdon {see under 

" Officers " — Vice-President). 



(4) HONORARY MEMBERS. 



Mr. A. H. Baynes, London. 

Mr. J. Brooke, J.P., Huddersfield. 

Mr. D. Clarke, C.A., High Wycombe. 

Rev. J. H. Cooke, London. 

Mr. E. Mounsey, J. P., Liverpool. 

Rev. E. Parker, D.D., Manchester. 



Mr. W. R. Rickett, London. 
Rev. A. Tilly, Cardiff. 
Rev. J. W. Todd, D.D., London. 
Mr. W. Willis, Q.C., London. 
Rev. W. Woods, London {see 
Midland" Association). 



'East 



COUNCIL, ETC. 



(5) ELECTED MEMBERS. 
{UfUUr Sections 5 6* 6, Article VIII, 0/ Constitution.) 



Mr. F. Arnold, J.P.. Great Yarmouth. 

Rev. J. H. Atkinson, Liverpool. 

Rev. J. Bailey, B.A., Sheffield. 

Rev. J. Baillie, London. 

Rev. B. Bird, Plymouth. 

Mr. W. B. Bembridge, J.P., Ripley. 

Rev. W. E. Blomfield, B.A., B.D., 
Coventry. 

Mr. J. Bowden. Bamet. 

Rev. S. W. Bowser, B.A., Birkenhead. 

Rev. J. Bradford, Leytonstone. 

Rev. J. T. Briscoe, Bristol. 

Rev. C. Brown, London. 

Mr. S. 6. Burton, Newcastle-on-Tyne. 

Mr. G. M. Carlile, Bristol. 

Mr. J. Chown, London. 

Mr. R- Cleaver, J.P., Northampton. 

Rev. W. Cuff, London. 

Rev. J. Dann, Oxford. 

Rev. D. Davies, Brighton. 

Mr. R. O. Davies, J.P., London. 

Rev. N. Dobson, Deal. 

Rev. W. Dyson, London. 

Rev. W. Evans, Leicester. 

Rev. J. W. Ewing, M.A., London. 

Rev. E. G. Gauge, London. 

Rev. G. P. Gould, M.A., London. 

Mr. H. P. Gould, Norwich. 

Mr. R. F. Griffiths, London. 

Mr. J. J. Gumey, J.P., Newcastle-on- 
Tyne. 



Rev. R. F. Guy ton, Huntingdon. 

Rev. J. Haslam, Gildersome. 

Rev. J. Hasler, Andover. 

Rev. G. Hawker, London. 

Rev. E. Henderson, London. 

Rev. D. J. Hiley, Bristol. 

Rev. G. Hill, M.A., Nottingham. 

Mr. T. R. Hope, J.P., Redhill. 

Mr. E. Jackson, Reading. 

Rev. F. A. Jones, London. 

Mr. J. Mamham, J.P., Boxmoor. 

Rev. E. Medley, B.A., London. 

Mr. T. Penny, Taunton. 

Rev. J. Porteous, Burton-on-Trent. 

Rev. A. F. Riley, London. 

Mr. H. Rogers, J.P., Hereford. 

Rev. J. H. Shakespeare, M.A., Norwich. 

Mr. Alderman G. Shepherd, J. P., Bacup. 

Rev. C. W. Skemp, Bradford. 

Rev. W. R. Skerry. London. 

Rev. E. Spurrier, Colchester. 

Mr. P. H. Stevenson, Nottingham. 

Rev. J. Stuart, Watford. 

Rev. T. G. Tarn, Cambridge. 

Rev. J. Turner, Blaby. 

Rev. C. W. Vick, London. 

Rev. S. Vincent, Plymouth. 

Mr. W. R. Wherry, J.P., Bourne. 

Mr. T. Whitley, Southsea. 

Rev. W. E. Winks, CardiflF. 

Rev. J. R. Wood, London. 



The Comminees, as also the Council, for the Year 1896-7 will be found in the Baptist 
Union Report, which will be issued immediately after the Spring Assembly 



A 2 



CONSTITUTION (1894). 

I.— Namb. 

The Baptist Union of Great Britain and Ireland. 

II.— CONSTITUBNCY. 

The Union shall consist of the Churches, Associations of Churches, and persons 
whose names are given in the Baptist Handbook for each year as compri^ng the 
membership of the Baptist Union. 

III.— Declaration op Principle. 

In this Union it is fully recognised that every separate church has liberty to 
interpret and administer the laws of Christ, and that the immersion of believers a 
the only Christian baptism. 

IV.— Tbb Objects op this Union. 

1. To cultivate among its own members respect and love for one another, and for 
all who love the Lord Jesus Christ. 

2. To spread the Gospel of Christ by employing ministers and evangelists, by 
establishing Christian churches, by formixig Sunday-schools, by distributing the 
Scriptures and religious tracts, and by adopting and using such other methods as the 
Council shall deem advisable. 

3. To afford opportunities for conference, for the public declaration of opinion, 
and for joint action on questions affecting the welfare of the churches and the 
extension of the denomination, both at home and abroad. 

4. To promote fraternal correspondence between Baptists in this and in other 
coimtries. 

5. To obtain accurate information respecting the organizations, labours, and 
sufferings of Baptists throughout the world. 

6. To confer and co-operate with other Christian communities as occasion 
may require. 

7. To maintain the right of all men everywhere to freedom from disadvantage, 
restraint, and taxation in matters purely religious. 

v.— Operations. 
This Union shall act by its Assembly, and through its officers and.Council. 

VI.— Membership. 

The application of any Church, College, Association, or person, for admission to 
this Union shall be laid before the Council, and no application shall be complied 
with unless a majority of those present are in its favour. The constituency and 
list of members may be revised by the Council, and their decision shall be duly 
notified to the persons concerned, who shall have the right of appeal to the 
Assembly. 

VII.— The Assembly. 

I. The Assembly shall consist of representative, personal, and honorary members. 
(A) Representative members shall comprise : — 
Ministers of Churches, 
Principals and Tutors of Colleges, and 
Delegates from Churches and Associations of Churches, 
in membership with the Baptist Union. 
Churches not exceeding 150 members may appoint one delegate ; more than 150, 

two delegates ; and more than 300, three delegates. 
Associations may appoint two delegates each. 

Delegates shall be appointed annually, or for each meeting of the Assembly, and 
their appointment be duly accredited and notified to the Secretary before 
March 31st and August 3xst respectively. 



BYE-LAWS. 



(B) Personal Members shall be members of Churches, who, being Baptists, shall 
have been duly accredited in writing by at least three members of the Assembly, 
and accepted by the Council, and who are donors of ;^io, or yearly subscribers of 
not less than one pound, or, in the case of Ministers not in pastoral charge, of not 
less than five shillings, to the General Expenses Fund of the Union. 

(C) Honorary Members shall be chosen by a resolution of the Assembly, on the 
nomination of the Council, and the Officers and Ex-Presidents of the Baptist Union 
shall be tx-cffido Honorary Members. 

2. The Assembly shall meet in London in the Spring, and in the provinces if 
possible, in the Autumn, at such place as the Council may arrange. 

VIII.— The Council. 

The operations of the Union shall be conducted by a Council, consisting of: (i) 
one representative from each affiliated Association for every fifty Churches in its 
membership, or part of fifty, the names of such representatives to be certified to 
the Secretary not later than ist February ; (2) the Officers and Ex- Presidents of the 
Union; (3) the Principals of denominatiohal Colleges in membership with the.Union ; 
(4) such persons as the Assembly may think fit (having been nominated for that 
purpose by the Council^ to be Honorary Members of the Council ; (5) forty-five 
members of the Assembly, who shall be chosen in the Assembly by ballot, and who, 
together with the representatives from Associations and Colleges, the Officers and 
Hx-Presidents, and the Honorary Members of the Council, shall make it their first 
business to elect (6) fifteen other nominated members of' the Assembly. In the 
event of any vacancy occurring, the number under (5) and (6) may be made up to 
sixty by the Council electing a member of the Assembly to serve until the ensuing 
Spring Assembly. 

Eleven members shall form a quorum. 

IX.— The Officers. 

The Officers of the Union shall be the President, Vice-President, Treasurer or 
Treasurers of the Funds of the Union, and Secretary. 

X.— Alteration of Constitution. 

No proposal for change in this Constitution shall be entertained without notice 
having been given in writing at a previous meeting of the Assembly. 



BYE-LAWS. 
I.— Election of Officers. 



The Officers shall be elected at the first Session of the Spring Assembly. The 
Vice-President fwho shall be the President of the next year) shall be elected by 
ballot, wiUiout aiscussion, a majority of the total votes given being necessary to 
election. Should no person have such majority on the first ballot, the four names 
for whidi the largest number of votes has been given shall be read out with the 
number of votes given for each, and, if needful, successive ballots shall be taken. 
After every such ballot the name receiving the smallest number of votes shall be 
struck off the list until the requisite majority of votes has been given for one person. 
Should such person f^l to enter upon the office, the Council shall appoint a Vice- 
President 

II.— Election of Council. 

1. Any member of the retiring Council may be nominated for re-election. 

2. Nominations for the sixty " elected members " of the Council must be for- 
warded in writing to the Secretary on or before March 3xst, signed, if made by 
resolution of a Church or Association, by the Chairman ; or otherwise by not less 
than three members of the Assembly. 

3. Voting papers shall be printed, containing a list of the persons nominated, with 
the attendances of the Council, which shall be distributed to members on entering 
the first Session of the Spring Assembly, and no change shall be made in the list 
after its distribution. 



BYE-LAWS. 



III.— Appointment op Scrutineers. 

Scrutineers shall be appointed by the President to receive and examine all voting 
papers, and to announce the result as early as possible. 

IV.— Sessions of the Assembly. 

1. The Sessions of the Assembly shall be advertised as the Council may direct — 
the advertisements to include, as nearly as may be, a statement of the proceedings 
in their proposed order. 

2. Admission to the Sessions shall be by ticket only, to be issued by the Secretary^ 
under direction of the Council. 

3. To secure a place on the Agenda paper as arranged by the Council, notices of 
motions or of amendments, signed by the Proposer, should be in the hands of the 
Secretary seven days before the first Session of the Assembly. Other notices of 
motions received subsequently must also be in writing, and shall be considered iot 
the order determined by the Officers. 

v.— Finance. 

z. To defray the General Expenses of the Union an annual subscription shall be 
required of not less than 5s. from each Church, and not less than £1 from each 
College and each Association in membership with the Union. 

2. Subscriptions for each year shall fall due on the xst January, and, until paid» 
no cards of admission to the Assembly shall be granted. 

3. Auditors for the year shall be appointed by resolution at the first Session, 
of the Spring Assembly. 

4. The financial year shall terminate on the 31st of December. 

VI. — Meetings of Council. 

z. The Council shall meet not less than twicte a year, at fixed dates. 

2. Meetings of Council shall be summoned by the Secretary, and special meetings 
on the written request of five members of the Council, stating the objects. 

3. The expected business shall be named in all summonses of the Council. 

4. The attendance of members at meetings of the Council and Committees shall 
be registered in a book kept for the purpose. 

VII.— Committees. 

The Council shall appoint from its members separate Committees for the conduct 
of its business as necessity may arise, and each Committee shall elect its own 
Chairman at the first meeting after its appointment. 

The report of each Committee shall be given to the Council in writing by the 
Secretary. 

Separate accounts shall be kept of all funds contributed to the objects of the Union» 
and such funds shall be devoted exclusively to the objects for which they are given. 
No legacy or other fixed funds or investments bequeathed and belonging, or hereafter 
to be bequeathed and to belong, to any object or fund of the Union shall be applied 
in any odier way than has been, or may be, specified by the donors or testators of 
such fuiids respectively. 

VIII.— The Hand-Book. 

The matters to be published in the Hand-Book shall be determined by the 
Council. 

IX.— Change of Bye-Laws. 

No proposal to alter any of these Bye-laws shall be entertained until after twenty >^ 
eight days' notice has been given in writing to the Secretary, signed by the proposer. 



CORRESPONDENTS. 

The Secretaries of the Associations and of the Baptist Unions of Scotland, 

Wales and Irsland. 
France, Rer. Aim^ Cadot, Chauny. Aisne. 
Italy, Rev. W. K. Landels, 51, Corso Siccardi, Torino Rev. E. Clarke, Casa 

Alberto, Spezia. 
German Baptist Union, Mr. J. G. Lehmann, Borgfelde. Mittelweg 98, Hamburg. 
Denmark, Rev. Marius Larsen, 20, Griffensfellgade, Copenhagen. 
Holland, Rev. B. Roeles, Zutphen. 

Sweden, Rev. Prof. Drake, x8, Engelbrehtigatan, Stockholm. 
Norway, Rev. P. Helbostad, Trondhjem. 

Russian Baptist Union, Rev. A. Liebig. 4. Johannisstr., Stettin, Germany. 
Finland, Rev. E. Jansson, Potalax, Finland. 
Madeira, Rev. F. A. Jefferd, 29, Rua do Consalheiro, Funcbal. 
Cape Verdbs, Rev. G. S. C. Eveleigh, St. Vincent. 
St. Helena, Rev. J. R. Way, Jamestown. 
South Africa, Rev. H. J. Batts, King William's Town. 
Canada, Mr. B. H. Eaton, Q.C., 35. Bedford Row, Halifax, N.S. ; Rev. D. M. 

Mihell, M.A., B.Th., St. George, Ont. 
United States, Rev. Lansing Burrows, D.D., Augusta, Ga. ; (and for Free 

Baptists) Rev. G. H. Ball, D.D., Keuka College, N.Y. 
American Baptist Missionary Union, Rev. H. C. Mabie, D.D., Boston, Mass. 
Southern Baptist Convention, Foreign Mission Board, Rev. R. J. Willingham, 

D.D., Richmond, Va. 
American Free Baptist Mission, Rev. T. H. Stacy, Auburn, Mass. 
West Indies, Rev. P. Williams, Sec. Jamaica Baptist Union, Bethel Town, P.O. 

Jamaica. 
Argentine Republic, Rev. Paul Besson, Buenos Ayres. 
New South Wales and N.S.W. Missionary Society., Rev. F. Hibberd, Holden 

Street, Ashfield. 
Victoria, Mr. C. W. Walrond, Cotham Road, Kew. 

Do. Missionary Society., Rev. A. W. Webb, Aberdeen Street, Geelong. 
Queensland, Rev. W. Higlett, Albion, Brisbane. 

Do. Missionary Society., Rev. W. Poole, South Brisbane. 

South Austraua, Mr. R. W. M. Waddy, The Almonds, Magill. 

Do. Missionary Society., Rev. R. McCuUough, Parkside. 

New Zealand, Rev. A. H. Collins, Auckland. 

Do. Baptist Missionary Society, Rev. H. H. Driver, 3 George Street, 

Dunedin. 
Tasmania, Rev. E. Harris, Launceston. 



EX-PRESIDENTS OF THE BAPTIST UNION. 



X864. *MURSBLL, Rsv. J. P., Leicester. 

1865. Angus, Rbv. Joseph, M.A., D.D., London. 

1866. Aldis, Rbv. John, Beckington. 

Z867. *N0BL, Hon. and Rev. Baptist Wriothesley, M.A., London. 

1868. •GOTCH, Rev. F. W.. M.A., LL.D., Bristol. 

1869. *Brock, Rbv. William, D.D., London. 
187Q. *R0BiNS0N, Rev. William, Cambridge. 

1871. *BiRRELL, Rev. Charles M., Liverpool. 

1872. *Thomas, Rev. Thomas, D.D., Pontypool College. 

1873. Undbrhill, Mr. Edward Bean, LL.D., Hon. Sec. Baptist 

Missionary Society. 

1874. *Stovel, Rev. Charles, London. 

1875. McLaren, Rbv. Alexander, B.A., D.D., Manchester. 

1876. Landels, Rev. William, D.D., Edinburgh. 

1877. Brown, Rev. John Turland, Northampton. 

1878. 'Brown, Rev. Hugh Stowell, Liverpool. 

1879. *Gould, Rev. George, Norwich. 

1880. 'Trestrail, Rev. Frederick, D.D., Bristol. 

1881. 'DowsoN, Rev. Henry, London. 

1882. Brown, Rev. John Jenkyn, Birmingham. 

1883. "Chown, Rev. Joseph Parbery, London. 

1884. Glover, Rev. Richard, D.D., Bristol. 
Green, Rev. Samuel Gosnell, B.A., D.D., London. 
Williams, Rev. Charles, Accrington. 
CuLROSS, Rbv. James, M.A., D.D., Bristol College. 
Clifford, Rev. John. M.A., LL.B., B.Sc, D.D., London. 
Wigner, Rev. John Thomas, London. 
Owen, Rev. Jambs, Swansea. 
Griffin, Col. James Theodore, London. 
Roberts, Rev. Robert Henry, B.A., Regent's Park College. 
Morris, Rev. Thomas Mew, Ipswich. 
Short, Rev. George. B.A.. Salisbury. 

* Deceased. 



1885. 
X886. 
1887. 
1888. 
1889. 
1890. 
1891. 
1892. 
1893. 
1894. 



r ASSOCIATIONS IN MEMBERSHIP WITH THE 
BAPTIST UNION. 



ENGLAND. 
Bedfordshire Union of Christians. 
Berkshire. 
Bristol. 

Backinghamshire. 
Cambridgeshire. 
Cornwall. 
Devon. 

East Midland. 
Essex Union. 

Gloucestershire and Herefordshire. 
Hertfordshire Union. 
Kent and Sussex. 
Lancashire and Cheshire. 
London. 
Norfolk. 

Northamptonshure. 
Northern. 
Oxfordshire. 



Shropshire. 

Southern. 

Suffolk and Norfolk Union. 

Western. 

West Midland. 

Wilts, and East Somerset. 

Worcestershire. 

Yorkshire. 

WALES AND MONMOUTHSHIRE. 

Anglesey. 

Carmarthenshire and Cardiganshire. 
Denbigh, Flint and Merioneth. 
Glamorganshire and Carmarthen- 
shire (E.). 
North Wales English Union. 
Old Welsh. 
Monmouthshire English. 



COLLEGES IN MEMBERSHIP WITH THE BAPTIST 

UNION. 

Aberystwyth. Midland. 

Bangor. Rawdon. 

Bristol. Regent's Park. 



CHURCHES IN MEMBERSHIP WITH THE BAPTIST 

UNION. 

Churches (affiliated to the Baptist Onion) of not exceeding 150 Members, 
may appoint one delegate; more than 150, two delegates; and more than 300, 
thru delegates, to the Spring and Autumn Assemblies 0/ the Union. 



ENGLAND. 



BEDFORDSHIRE. 
AmptfaiU. 
Bedford— 

Bunsran Meeting. 

Mill-street 
Biggleswade, Old Meeting. 
Dunstable, West-street. 
Houghton Regis. 
Kejrsoe. 

Leighton Buzzard, Lake-street 
Luinn — 

Castle-street 

Park-street 
Maulden (U.). 
Ridgmount 
Sandy. 

Blunham, Old MuHng, 
Sheffoid (U.). 
Stotfold. 
Thnrleigh. 

BERKSHIRE. 

Abingdon, Ock-street 

Bourton (Shrivenham). 

Brimpton. 

Faringdon. 

Maidenhead, Marlow-road. 

Newbury, North Brook-street 

Reading — 

Carey. 

King's-road. 

Wycliffe. 
Snnningdale. 

Wallingford, Thames-street. 
Windsor, New, Victoria-street. 
Wokingham. 



BUCKINGHAMSHIRE. 

Amersham, Lower Meeting. 
Chesham — 

Broadway. 

Lower Chapel. 
Din ton. 

Drayton Parslow Group. 
Fenny Stratford. 
Gold-hiU (Chalfont). 
Haddenham. 
KingshiU. UtUe. 



Long Crendon. 
Missenden, Great 
Olney. 

Princes Risborough. 
Speen. 
Stantonbury. 
' Stony Stratford and I/>ughton. 
Wendover. 
Weston TurvUIe (U.). 
Winslow, Tabernacle. 

Swanboume. 
Wycombe, Union Church. 

CAMBRIDGESHIRE. 

Burwell. 
Cambridge— 

St. Andrew's-street. 

Zion. 
Cazton. 

Chatteris, West Park-street 
Cottenham, Old Meeting. 
Gamlingay. 
Harston. 
Histon. 

Isleham, High-street 
March, Centenary Church. 
Melboum. 
Prickwillow. 
Shelford, Great 
Soham. 

Swavesey, Bethel. 
Waterbeach, High-street. 
Willingham, Tabernacle. 
Wisbech— 

Ely-place. 

Upper Hill-street. 



CHESHIRE. 

Altrincham. 

Attdlem. 

Birkenhead, Grange-road. 

Jackson-street. 
Chester, Grosvenor Park. 

Northgate-street (W.). 
Crewe, Union-street. 

Victoria-street. 
Egremont, Liscard-road. 
Frodsham (U.). 
Hill Cliff. 
Hyde. 
Latchford. 
Little Leigh. 



lO CHURCHES IN MEMBERSHIP WITH THE BAPTIST UNION. 



Macclesfield, St. Greor^ge's-street 

Nantwich. 

Onston. 

Poynton. 

Sale. 

Stalybridge— 

Cross Leech-street 

Wakefield-road. 
Stockport, Greek-street. 
Tarporley. 
Wheelock Heath. 

CORNWALL. 

Calstock and Metherill. 

Falmouth. 

Helston. 

Launceston. 

Peiuance. 

Redruth. 

Saltash. 

St. Austell. 

Truro. 

CUMBERLAND. 
Carlisle. 
Maryport. 
Millom. 
Workington. 

DERBYSHIRE. 
Belper. 
Chesterfield. 
Clay Cross. 
Derby — 

Green Hill, Trinity. 

Osmaston-road. 

St. Mary's Gate. 
Heanor. 

Ilkeston. Queen-street. 
Long Eaton — 

Chapel-street. 

Station-street. 
Measham and Netherseal. 
Melbourne and Ticknall. 
Riddings and Swanwick. 
Ripley. 
Sawley. 
Smalley. 
Swadincote. 
Wirksworth. 



DEVONSHIRE. 



Appledore. 

Barnstaple. 

Bideford. 

Bovey Tracey. 

Bradninch. 

Brayford. 

Briicham. 



Bu^eigh Salterton. 

Combmartin. 

Cullompton. 

Devonport, Hope Church. 

Dolton. 

Exeter, Bartholomew-street. 

South-street 
Frithelstock Group. 
Hatherleigh. 

Hemyock and Saint Hill. 
Honiton. 
Ilfracombe. 

Kilmington and Loughwood. 
Kingsbridge. 
Lifton. 

Malborough and Salcombe. 
Modbury. 
Newton Abbot. 
Okehampton. 
Paignton. 
Plymouth— 

George-street. 

Mutley. 
Teignmouth. 
Tiverton. 

Torquay, Upton Vale. 
Torrington, Great. 
Totnes. 

Uffculme and Prescott. 
Upottery, Newhouse. 

DORSETSHIRE. 

Bridport. 

Dorchester. 

Gillingham. 

Iwerne Minster. 

Lyme Regis. 

Poole. 

Weymouth. 

DURHAM. 

Bishop Auckland. 

Witton Park. 
Consett. 
Crook. 

Darlington, Grange-road. 
Gateshead, Durham-road. 
Hamsterley. 
Hartlepool. 
Hartlepool, West. 
M iddleton-in-Teesdale. 
Rowley and Blackhill. 
South Shields— 

Tabernacle. 

Westoe-road. 
Spennymoor. 

Stockton, Northcote-street. 
Sunderland — 

Lindsay-road. 

Monkwearmouth. Barclay-street. 



CHURCHES IN MEMBERSHIP WITH THE BAPTIST UNION. 



II 



Waterhouses. 
Wolsingham. 

ESSEX. 
Ashdon. 

Barking, Linton-road. 
Burahani-on-Crouch. 
Colchester. Eld-lane. 
Earl's Colne. 
Grays, Tabernacle. 
Halstead, North-street 
Harlow. 

Potter-street 
Maldon, Crown-lane. 
Romford. 

SafCron Walden, High-street. 
Sampford, Great. 
Southend, Tabernacle. 
Thorpe-le-Soken, 



GLOUCESTERSHIRE. 

Avening. 
Blakeney. 

Bourton-on-the-Water. 
Bristol— 

Bedminster, East-street 

Broadmead. 

City-road. 

Clifton, Buckingham. 

Cotham-grove. 

Counterslip. 

Horfield. 

Hotwells, Buckingham Hall. 

Old King-street. 

Redland. Tyndale. 

Stapleton-road. 

Totterdown. 
Bristol Itinerant Society Station- 

Dundry. 
Chalford, Tabernacle. 
Cheltenham — 

Cambray. 

Salem. 
Chipping Campden« 
Chipping Sodbury. 
Cinderford. 
Cirencestert 
Coleford. 
Downend. 
Eastcombe. 
Fishponds. 
Gloucester— 

Brunswick-road. 

Corn Exchange. 
Hanham. 
Kingstanley. 
Longhope. 
Lydbrook. 
Lydney. 

Minchinhampton. 
Nailsworth, Shortwood. 



Naunton and Guiting. 

Nupend. 

Old Sodbury. 

Parkend. 

Ruardean Hill. 

Stow-on-the-Wold. 

Stroud, John-street. 

Tetbury. 

Thornbury. 

Uley. 

Wotton-under-Edge. 

Yorkley. 



HAMPSHIRE. 

Aldershot. 
Andover. 
Ashley. 
Boscombe. 
Bournemouth — 

Lansdowne. 

West Cliff Tabernacle. 
Broughton. 
Fleet and Hope. 
Isle of Wight— 

Cowes, West 

Newport. 

Niton. 

Ryde, Park-road. 

Ventnor. 

Yarmouth. 
Ljrmington. 
Lyndhurst. 
Milford. 
Odiham. 
Portsmouth — 

Lake-road. 

Landport, Commercial-road. 

Portsea, Kent-street. 

Southsea, Castle-road. 
Elm-grove. 
Romsey, Bell-street. 
Shirley (U.). 
Southampton — 

Carlton. 

East-street. 

Portland. 
Waterlooville. 
Whitchurch. 
Winchester. 



HEREFORDSHIRE. 

Ewias Harold. 

Fownhope. 

Garway and Orcop. 

Gorsley. 

Hereford. Commercial-road. 

Leominster. 

Ross, Broad-street. 

Ryeford. 



12 CHURCHES IN MEMBERSHIP WITH THE BAPTIST UNION. 



HERTFORDSHIRE. 

Berkhamsted. 

Bishop's Stortford. 

Bovingdon. 

Boxmoor. 

Chipperfield. 

Hemel Hempstead. 

Hitchin— 

Tilehouse-street 

Walsworth-road. 
King's Langley. 
Northchurch. 
Rickmansworth. 
St. Albans — 

Dagnall-street. 

Tabernacle. 
Tring, High-street. 
Watford— 

Beechen-grove. 

New Bushey. 

HUNTINGDONSHIRE. 

Bluntisham. 

Huntingdon, Trinity (U.). 
Ramsey, Great Whyte. 

KENT. 
Braboume. 
Brasted. 

Canterbury, St. George's-place. 
Chatham, Clover-street. 
Deal. 
Dover — 

Biggin-street. 
Eden Bridge. 
Eynsford. 
Eythome. 
Faversham, 
Folkestone. 

Gravesend, Windmill-street. 
Hawkhurst. 
Headcom. 
Heme Bay. 
Loose. 

Maidstone, Union-street. 
Margate, New Cross-street. 
New Brompton. 
New Romney. 
Orpington. 

Plumstead, East, Station-road. 
Ramsgate — 

Cavendish. 

Ellington (U.). 
St. Peter's. 
Sandhurst. 
Sevenoaks. 

Sheemess, Strode-crescent. 
Sittingboume. 
Smarden, Zion. 
Tenterden, High-street. 
Tunbridge, High-street. 



Tunbridge Wells, Calverley-road. 
West Mailing. 
Woolwich, Queen-street 
Yalding. 



LANCASHIRE. 

Accrington, Cannon-street 

Ashton-imder-Lyne. 

Atherton. 

Bacup— 

Acre Mill. 

Doals, Weir-terrace. 
. Ebenezer. 

Irwell-terrace. 

Zion. 
Barrow-in-Furness. 
Blackburn, Montague-street. 
Blackpool. 
Bolton— 

Astley Bridge. 

Claremont. 

Zion. 
Bootle— 

Brasenose-coad. 

Derby-road. 
Briercliffe, Hill-lane. 
Burnley — 

Colne-road, 

Rnon. 

Mount Olivet. 

Mount Pleasant. 

Yorkshire-street. 
Bury^ 

Chesham Chapel. 

Knowsley -street. 
Church. 

Clayton-le-Moors. 
Cloughfold. 
Clowbridge. 
Colne. 

Dalton-in-Fumess. 
Darwen. 
Edgeside. 
Garston. 
Goodshaw. 
Haslingden — 

Bury-road. 

Trinity. 
Heywood, Rochdale-road. 
Inskip. 
Lancaster. 
Leigh. 

Liitleborough. 
Liverpool — 

Everton-road. 

Kensington. 

Myrtle-street. 
Earlestown. 

Pembroke. 

Prince' s-gate. 

Richmond.* 



CHURCHES IN MEMBERSHIP WITH THE BAPTIST UNION. 



13 



Liverpool {continuid)-' 

Toxteth Tabernacle. 

Walton. Carisbrooke. 
Rice-lane. 
Manchester — 

Brighton-grove. 

Broughton. 

Conpland-street. 

Eccles, Peel-street. 

Gorton. Wellington-street 

Gorton, West. Birch-street 
Clowes-street (U.). 

Grosvenor-street, Cnorltoo. 

Moss-side. 

Opeashaw, Higher. 

Oxford-road (U.). 

Pendleton. 

Salford. Great Geoige-street 

Stretford, Edge-lane (U.). 

Upper Bnx>k-8treet 
Middleton. 
Millgate. 
Mills Hill. 
Nelson, Carr-road. 
Ogden. 
Oldham— 

King-street 

Manchester-street. 

Pitt-street. 
Oswaldtwistle. 
Padiham, Bumley-road. 
Preston — 

Ashton-on-Ribble. 

Fishergate. 

Pole-street 
Ramsbottom.- 
Rawtenstall. 
Rochdale — 

Drake-street 

Newbold, Milnrow-road. 

West-street. 
Royton, Oldham-road. 
Sabden. 

St. Anne's-on-the-Sea. 
St. Helen's— 

Boundary-road. 

Hall-street. 

Park-road. 
Southport, Hoghton-street. 
Sunnyside. 
Tyldesley (W.). 
Ulverston. 

Warrington, Golbome-street 
Water barn. 
Waterfoot. 
Wigan — 

King-street 

Scarisbrick-street. 

• LEICESTERSHIRE. 
Amsby. 
Barton Fabis. 
Blaby. 



Castle Donington. 

Coalville, London-road. 

Countesthorpe. 

Foxton. 

Hincklev. 

Hose, Chapel-street 

Hugglescote. 

Husband's Bosworth. 

Ibstock. 

Leicester — 

Archdeacon-lane 

Belgrave (U.). 

Belgrave-road Tabernacle. 

Belvoir-street. 
Harvey-lane. 

Carley-street 

Charles-street 

Dover-street. 

Friar-lane. 

Melbourne Hall. 

New Park-street 

Victoria-road. 
Loughborough— 

Baxter-gate. 

Wood-gate. 
Market Harborougfa. 
Melton Mowbray. 
Oadby. 
Quomdon. 

Shepshed, Chamwood-road. 
Sutton-in-the-£lms. 
Syston. 
Whitwick. 

LINCOLNSHIRE. 
Boston, Salem. 
Bourne. 
Coningsby. 
Crowle. 

Epworth and Butterwick. 
Fleet 

Grantham, Wharf-road. 
Great Grimsby — 

Victoria-street. 
Holbeach. 
Kirton-in-Lindsey. 
Lincoln — 

Mint-street 

Monk's-road. 

Thomas Cooper Memorial. 
Long Sutton. 
Louth. East-gate. 
Spalding. 

METROPOLITAN. 

(Includes Churches within the limits 
of the Metropolitan Postal District, 
and also Churches outside that District 
connected with the London Baptist 
Association). 

Acton. Church-road. 
Alperton. 



14 CHURCHES IN MEMBERSHIP WITH THE BAPTIST UNION, 



Balham. Ramsdemroad. 
Barnes. 
' Baraet, New. 
Battersea — 

Battersea Park Tabernacle. 

York-road. 
Beckenham. 
Belle Isle. 
Belvedere. 

Bermondsey, Drummond-ioad. 
Bexley Heath. 

Blackheath, Shooter's Hill-road« 
Bloomsbury. 
Bow, High-street. 
Bow Common, Blackthorn-street. 
Brixton, Wynne-road. 
Brixton Hill, New Park-road. 
Brockley-road. 
Bromley (Kent), Park-road. 
Brompton, Onslow. 
Brondesbury. 
Camberwell — 

Camberwell New-road, Clarendon. 

Cottage Green. 

Denmark-place. 
Camberwell-gate, Arthur-street. 
Camden-road. 
Catforc' HiU. 

Chelsea, Lower Sloane-street 
Child's HUl. 

Clapham, Grafton-sqnare. 
Clapton, Downs Chapel. 
Clerkenwell — 

Spencer-place, Goswell-road. 
Commercial-road East. 
Croydon, South — 

Croham Road (U.). 
Croydon, West. 
Dalston, Queen's-road. 
Deptford, Octavius-street. 
Ealing, Haven-green. 
Edmonton, Lower. 
Erith, Queen-street 
Finchley, East, High-road. 
Finchley, North. 
Forest Gate, Woodgrange. 
Forest Hill, Sydenham Church. 
Greenwich, Lewisham-road. 
Gunnersbury. 
Hackney — 

Lauriston-road. 

Mare-street. 
Hampstead, Heath-street. 
Harlesden. 
Harlington. 
Harrow-on-the-Hill, 
Highbury Hill. 
Highgate— 

Archway-road. 

Southwood-lane. 
Holbom— 

John-street. 

Kingsgate-ttreet 



Holk>way, Upper. 

Honor Oak, Mundania-road. 

Homsey, Ferme Park-road. 

Ilford. 

Islington — 

Cross-street. 

Salters' HaU. 
Kentish Town, Bassett-street. 
Kilbum, Canterbury>road. 
King's Cross — 

Handel-street. 

Vemon-square. 
Lambeth, Upton Chapel. 
Lee, High-road. 
Leytonstone, Fairlop-road. 
Loughton. 
Marylebone— 

Church-street. 
Norwood, South, Holmesdale-road. 
Norwood, Upper, Central Hill. 
Norwood, West, Gipsy -road. 
Notting Hill, Ladbroke-grove. 
Nunhead, Edith-road. 
Old Kent-road, Maze Pond. 
Paddington — 

Praed-street, Westboume Park 
and Bosworth-road. 
Peckham — 

Peckham Park-road, 

Rye-lane. 
Penge, Maple-road. 
Plumstead — 

Conduit-road. 

Park-road. 
Poplar, Cotton-street. 
Putney, Werter-road. 
Regent's Park. 
Richmond, Duke-street. 
Rotherhithe— 

Bush-road, Midway-place. 

Rotherhithe New-road. 
Shepherd's Bush-road. 
Shoreditch Tabernacle. 
Sidcup. 

Southgate, New. 
Southwark, Borough-road. 
Stockwell. 

Stoke Newington, Devonshire- 
square. 
Stratford— 

Carpenter's-road. 

The Grove. 
Streatham, Lewin-road. 
Surbiton Hill, Oaklands. 
Sutton. 

Tooting, Upper, Trinity-road (U.). 

Tottenham, High-road. 

Victoria Park, Grove-road. 

Wallington. 

Walthamstow, Boundary-road. 

Wal worth-road. 



CHURCHES IN MEMBERSHIP WITH THE BAPTIST UNION. I5 



Wandsworth — 

East HUl. 

Northcote-road. 

Wandsworth-road, Victoria. 
Westboume-grove. 
Westminster. Romney-street 
Whitechapel, Commercial-street. 
Woodberry Down. 
Wood Green. Finsbury-road. 
Woolwich, Parsons Hill. 



MIDDLESEX. 



Harefield. 

Pinner. 

Teddington. 

NORFOLK. . 

Aylsham. 

Buckenham, Old. 

Downham Market. 

Fakenbam. 

Lynn- 
Stepney Chapel. 
Union Chapel. 

Norwich — 
Gildencroft 
St. Mary's. 
Unthank's-road. 

Stalhara. 

Swafiham. 

UpweU. 

Yarmouth, The Pftrk. 

NORTHAMPTONSHIRE. 

Blisworth. 

Braunston. 

Brington. 

Backby, Long* 

Bagbrook, 

Burton Latimer. 

Clipstone. 

Desborough. 

Earl's Barton. 

Gnilsborough. 

Hackleton. 

Harpole. 

Kettering, Fuller Chapel. 

Kingsthorpe. 

Middleton Cheney. 

Moulton. 

Northampton — 

College-street 

Far Cotton. 

Grafton-street 

Mount Pleasant. 

Princes-street. 
Peterborough, Queen-street 
Ringstead. 
Roade. 



Rushden, Old Chapel. 

Sprattbn and Ravensthorpe. 

Thrapston. 

Towcester. 

West Haddon. 

Weston-by-Weedon. 



NORTHUMBERLAND. 

Alnwick. 

Berwick. 

Broomhaugh and Broomley. 

Newcastle — 

Jesmond. 

Rye-hill. 

Westgate-road. 
North Shields. 



NOTTINGHAMSHIRE. 

Beeston. 

CoUingham. 

Mansfield. 

Newark, Albert-street 

Nottingham — 

Arkwright-street 

Basford. New, Chelsea-street 
Palm -street. 

Basford, Old. 

Broad-street 

Bulwell. 

Carrington. 

Derby-road. 

George-street 

Hyson-green. 

Lenton, New, Church-street 

Mansfield-road. 

Woodborough-road. 
Retford and Gamston. 
Southwell, Park-street 
Sutton-in-Ashfield, Wood-street 



OXFORDSHIRE. 

Banbury, Bridge-street 

Caversham. Free Church. 

Chadlington and Charlbury. 

Chipping Norton. 

Coate. 

Hook Norton. 

Little Tew and Cleveley. 

Milton. 

Oxford— 

Commercial-road. 

New-road. 
Woodstock. 



RUTLANDSHIRE. 
Oakham, Melton-road. 



l6 CHURCHES IN MEMBERSHIP WITH THE BAPTIST UNION. 



SHROPSHIRE. 

Bridgnorth. 

Dawley. 

Lord's Hill, Snailbeach. 

Market Drayton. 

Oswestry — 

Castle-street (W.). 

Salop-road. 
Pontesbury. 

Shrewsbury, Claremont 
Wellington. 
Wem. 
Whitchurch. 



SOMERSETSHIRE. 

Banwell. 
Bath— 

Hay-hill. 

Manvers-street. 
Beckington. 
Borougnbridge. 
Bridgwater. 
Burnham. 
Burton (Stogursey). 
Chard. 
Cheddar. 

Crewkeme, North-street 
Fivehead and Isle Abbots. 
Frome — 

Badcox-lane. 

Sheppard's Barton. 
Hatch Beauchamp. 
Highbridge. 
Keynsham. 
Minehead. 
Moiitacute. 

North Curry and Stoke St Gregory. 
Paulton. 
PiU. 

Radstock. 
Stogumber. 
Taunton, Silver-street 
Twerton-on-Avon. 
Watchet and Williton. 
Wedmore. 
Wellington. 
Wells. 
Weston-super-Mare — 

Bristol-road. 

Wadham-street 
Wincanton. 
Yeovil, South-street. 



STAFFORDSHIRE. 

Bilston, Wood-street. 
Brierley Hill. South-street. 
Burton- on-Trent — 

New-street. 

Station-street. 



Coseley — 

Darkhouse. 

Providence. 
Cradley Heath. 
Hanley — 

Eastwood Vale and Fentoo. 

New-street 
L.ongton. 

Newcastle-under-Lyme. 
Prince's End. 
Stafford, Water-street 
Stoke-on-Trent. 
Walsall— 

Stafford-street. 

Vicarage-walk. 
West Bromwich. High-street. 
Willenhall, Lichfield-street 
Wolverhampton, Waterloo-rood. 



SUFFOLK. 

Bardwell. 

Brandon. 

Bury St. Edmunds, Garland-street. 

Eye. 

Ipswich — 

Burlington. 

Stoke-green. 

Turret-green. 
Lowestoft, London-road. 
Stoke Ash. 
Sudbury. 
Walton. 
West Row (Mildenhall). 



SURREY. 

Addlestone. 

Dorking. 

Esher. 

Guildford, Commercial-road. 

Horley, Brighton-road. 

Victoria-road. 
Kingston. 
Molesey, East. 

Redhill and Reigate, London-road. 
Woking, Goldsworth-road. 
York Town. 



SUSSEX. 

Brighton— 

Florence-road. 

Queen-square. 

Sussex-street. 
Crawley. 

Crowborough, Forestfold. 
Eastbourne, Ceylon-place. 
Hastings, Wellington-square. 



CHURCHES IN MEMBERSHIP WITH THE BAPTIST UNION. I7 



Portslade-by-Sea. 
Shoreham. 
SL Leonards. 



WARWICKSHIRE. 

Aloester. 
Attleborougii. 
Birmingham — 

Aston Park. 

Bristol-road. 

(Cannon-street), Graham-street. 

Erdington. 

Great King-street. 

Hagley-road. 

Handswortfa, Hamstead-road. 

Harbome. 

Heneage-street. 

Highgate Park. 

King's Heath. 

Moseley, Oxford-road. 

Selly Park. 

Small Heath, Coventry-road. 

Smethwick. 

Sparkbrook. Stratford-road. 

Spring Hill. 

Warwick-street. 
Coventry — 

Gosford-street. 

Queen's-road. 

St. Michael's. 
Henley-in-Arden. 
Leamington. Warwick-street. 
Longford, Salem. 
Monk's Kirby and Pailton. 
Noneaton. 
Rugbv. 

Stratiord-on-Avon. 
Stadley. 
Warwick. Castle Hill. 



WESTMORLAND. 
Kirkby Stephen Group. 



WILTSHIRE. 

Bradford-on-Avon, Zion. 

Bratton. 

Calne, Castle-street. 

Chippenham. Station-hill. 

Corsham. Priory-street. 

Damerham. 

Devizes, Sheep-street. 

Downton. Sooth-lane. 

Imber. 

Melksham, Broughton-road. 

Salisbuiy, Brown-street. 

Shrewton. 

Swindon, Tabernacle. 



Trowbridge— 

Back-street. 

Bethesda. 
Warminster. 
Westbury, Penknap. 

West End. 
Westbury Lei^. 

WORCESTERSHIRE. 

Astwood Bank. 

Atch Lench and Donnington. 

Bewdley. 

Bromsgrove, New-road. 

Cinderbank. 

Cntsdean. 

Droitwich. 

Dudley, New-street. 

Evesham, Cowl-street. 

Kidderminster, Church-street. 

Malvern, Great. 

Pershore, Broad-street. 

Redditch. 

Shipston-on-Stour. 

Stourbridge. 

Stourport. 

Upton-on-Sevem. 

Westmancote. 

Worcester. Sansome Walk. 

YORKSHIRE. 

Armley. 
Bamsley — 

Parker-street. 

Sheffield-road. 
Batley. Park-road. 
Beverley, Well-lane. 
Birchcliffe. 
Bishop Burton. 
Blackley. 
Bradford— 

Allerton, Central Ch. 

Girlington. 

Hallfield. 

Heaton. 

Leeds-road. 

Ripley-street. 

Sion Jubilee Ch. 

Tetley-street. 

Trinity. 

Westgate. 
Bramley — 

Salem. 

Zion. 
Brearley. 
Bridlington. 
Clayton. 
Cowling^ill. 
Dewsbury. 

Doncaster, Chequer-road. 
Driffield. 



1 8 CHURCHES IN MEMBERSHIP WITH THE BAPnST UNION. 



Earby-in-Craven. 
Eccleshill. 
Parsley. 
Gildersome. 
Golcar. 
Halifax- 
Lee Mount. 

North Parade. 

Pellon-lane. 

Trinity-road. 
Harrogate. 
Haworth. West-lane. 
Hebden Bridge. 
Heptonstall Slack. 
Horsfortfa, Cragg Hill* 
Huddersfield— 

Lindley. 

Lockwood. 

New North-road. 

Primrose Hill. 
Hull— 

Beverley-road. 

George-street 

South-street. 
Idle. 

Keighley. 
Leeds — 

Blenheim. 

Buriey-road. 

North-street. 

South Parade. 
Lineholme. near Todmorden. 
Lydgate. 

Malton, Castlegate. 
Middlesbrough — 

Linthorpe-road. 

Marton-road. 

Newport-roadt 
Milnsbridge. 
Miriield. 
Morley. 
Nazetx>ttom. 
Ossett. 
Polemoor. 
Pudsey. 
Queensbury. 
Rawdon. 
Rishworth. 
Rotherham. 
Salendine Nook. 
Scapegoat Hill. 
Scarborough — 

Albemarle. 

West Gate. 
Sheffield— 

Atterdiffe. 

Cemetery-road« 

Glossop-road. 

Port Mahon. 

Townhead-straet* 
Shipley — 

Bethel. 

Rosse-street 



Shore. 

Skipton. Otley-street. 

Slaithwaite, Zion. 

South Bank, Normanby-road. 

Staincliife. 

Steep-lane. 

Sutton-in-Craven. 

Thomaby-on-Tees. 

Todmorden — 

Roomfield. 

Wellington-road. 
Wainsgate. 
Wakefield. 
West Vale. 



WALES 

AND 

MONMOUTHSHIRE. 

ANGLESEY. 
Holyhead, New Park-street. 

BRECKNOCKSHIRE. 

Brecon, Kensington. 
Brynmawr, Calvary. 
Builth, Ebenezer. 
Garth. Pisgah. 
Glasbury and Penyrheol. 
Maesyberllan. 
Nantyffin. 
Talgarth, Tabernacle. 

CARDIGANSHIRE. 

Aberystwyth — 

Alfred-place. 

Baker-street. 
Cardigan, Mount Zion. 

CARMARTHENSHIRE. 

Carmarthen, Lammas-street. 
Cwmifor. 
Ferryside, Salem. 
Llanelly — 

Greenfield. 

Horeb, and Ponthenr^. 

Moriah. 
Whitland. Nazareth. 

CARNARVONSHIRE. 

Bangor (E.). 

Gilfach. 

Llandudno, Mostyn-street. 

Llanfairfechan, Libanus. 

Nevin, Sion. 



CHURCHES IN MEMBERSHIP WITH THE BAPTIST UNION. I9 



DENBIGHSHIRE. 

Abergele. 
Brymbo (W.). 
Cefamawr, Ebenezer. 
Colwyn. Old. 
Colwyn Bay (E.). 
Llangollen, Penybryn. 
Ponkey, Zion. 
Wrexham, Chester-street. 



FLINTSHIRE. 

Bagillt 

Buckley. 

Holywell. 

Nantmawr. 

Rhyl, Sassez>8treet. 



GLAMORGANSHIRE. 

Aberavon, Water-street. 
Aberdare— 
Calvaria. 
Carmel. 
Barry District— 
Holton-road, Barry Dock. 
Mount Pleasant, Cadoxton. 
Bridgend, Hope. 
Briton Ferry, Jerusalem. 
Caerphilly— 
Mount Carmel. 
Tonyfelin. 
Cardiff- 
Bethany. 

Bute Docks. Bethel. 
Canton, Hope ChapeL 
Grange Town. 
Riverside. 
Roath, Salem. 
Splott-road. 
Tabernacle. 
Tredegarville. 
Walker's-road. 
Woodville-road. 
Clydach, Calvaria. 
Cowbridge. 
Dowlais, Beulah. 

Caersalem. 
Gelligaer, Horeb. 
Hengoed. 
Hirwain, Ramoth. 
Knelstone. 
Lisvane (Cardiff). 
IJancarvan. 
Llangyfelach— 

Craigcefoparc, Elim. 
Loughor, Penuel. 
Maesteg-- 

Castle-street 
Melincrythan (Neath). 



Merthyr Tydvil^ 

Ainon. 

High-street. 

Morlais. 

Tabernacle. 
Mountain Ash, Nazareth. 
Neath— 

Christchurch. 

Orchard-place. 
Penarth — 

Stanwell-road. 

Tabernacle. 
Penclawdd, Trinity. 
Penrhiwceiber, Bethesda, 
Pontyclun. 
Pontycwmmer — 

Noddfa. 

Zion. 
Pontypridd, Carmel. 
Porth, Salem. 

Tabernacle. 
Swansea — 

Gorse Lane. 

Landore, Salem. 

Mount Pleasant. 

St. Helen's. 
Tirphil. Tabernacle. 
Tondu, Carey. 
Treharris, Bethel. 
Treherbert— 

Bethany. 
Treorky, Noddfa. 
Wauntrodau, Ararat, 
Ynyshir (Ej. 
Ystalyfera, Zoar. 



MERIONETHSHIRE. 



Barmouth, 
Corwen. 



MONTGOMERYSHIRE. 



Llanfair-Caereinion. 

Machynlleth. 

Newtown. 



PEMBROKESHIRE. 

Blaenconin Clynderwen. 

Blaenffos. 

Blaenywaen and St Dogmell's. 

Broadhaven. 

Cresswell Quay. 

Croesgoch. 

Haverfordwest, Bethesda. 

Letterston. 

Liang wm. 

B 2 



20 CHURCHES IN MEMBERSHIP WITH THE BAPTIST UNION. 



Martletwy. 

Middlemill. 

Milford, North-road. 

Moleston (Narberth). 

Narberth. 

Newport, Bethlehem. 

Newtonpants, Bethlehem. 

Pembroke. 

Pembroke Dock— 

Bush-street. 

High-street. 

Pemiar. 
Tenby. 

RADNORSHIRE. 

Bwlchysamau and Cefhpole. 
Dolau, Nantmel. 
Uandrindod Wells. 
Presteign. 
Rock. 



MONMOUTHSHIRE. 

Abercarn (E.). 
Abercam (W.). 
Abergavenny — 

Bethany. 

Frogmore-street. 
Abersychan (E.). 

Abertillery, Blaina Gwent (W. & E.). 
Bassaleg — 

Bethel (W. A E.). 

Bethesda. 
Bedwas (W.). 

Blackwood, Mount Pleasant. 
Blaenavon — 

Horeb. 

King-street. 
Blaina. Salem (W. & E.). 
Caerleon. 
Caerwent. 

Castletown (W. & E.). 
Chepstow. 
Cross Keys. 

Cwmbran. Siloam (W. & E.). 
Ebbw Vale, Briery Hill. 

Nebo (W.). 
Griffithstown. 
Llanddewi Rhydderch. 



Llanfihangel Cnioomey, Zoar. 
Llanfihangel Ystem Llewem. 
Llanvaches, Bethany. 
Uanwenarth (W. & E.). 
Machen, Siloam (W. & E.). 
Maesycwmmer. 
Magor. 

Michaelatone-y-Vedw. Tirzah. 
Newbridge (E.). 

Beulah (W.). 
Newport — 

Alma-street. 

Commercial-road. 

Commercial-street 

Duckpool-road. 

Maindee. 

St. Mary-street. 

Stow-hill. 
Norton (Skenfrith). 
Ponthir. 
Pontnewydd. 
Pontnewynydd. 
Pontrhydyryn. 
Pontypool, Bridge-street. 

Crane-street. 
Raglan, Usk-road. 
Risca, Bethany. 

Moriah (W. & E.). 
St. Melton's (W. & E.). 
Talywain, Pisgah (W. & E.). 
Tredegar, Church-street. 
Usk. 
Whitebrook and Llandogo. 



SCOTLAND. 

Aberdeen, Union-grove. 
Kirkcaldy, Whyte's Causeway. 
Paisley, Victoria-place. 



IRELAND. 



Ballvmena. 
Banbridge. 



CHANNEL ISLES. 
Jersey, St. Helier. 



HONORARY MEMBERS OF THE BAPTIST UNION. 

Date of 
Election. 

Aldis, Rev. J., Beckington 1874 

Angus. Rev. J., M.A., D.D., Londoq 1878 

Baynes, Mr. W. W., J.P., Bromley, Kent 1894 

Booth, Rev. S. H., D.D., London 1894 

Brown, Rev. J. J., Birmingham 1887 

Brown. Rev. J. T., Northampton 1887 

Clifford, Rev. J., M.A.. D.D., London 1894 

Colross, Rev. J., M.A., D.D., Bristol College 1888 

Edwards, Rev. E., Torquay 1888 

Glover, Rev. R., D.D., Bristol 1888 

Green. Rev. S. G., B. A., D.D.. London 1874 

Greenhough, Rev. J. G., M.A., Leicester • 1894 

Griffin, Col. J. T., London 1894 

Landels, Rev. W., D.D., Edinburgh 1884 

McLaren. Rev. A., B.A., D.D., Manchester . . 1874 

Morris, Rev. T. M.. Ipswich • .. 1894 

Owen, Rev. J., Swansea 1894 

Roberts, Rev. R. H., B.A., Regent's Park College 1894 

Short, Rev. G.. B. A., Salisbury 1894 

Tymms. Rev. T. V., Rawdon College 1895 

Underbill, Mr. E. B., LL.D., Hon. Secretary to Baptist Missionary Society. . 2874 

Underwood, Rdv. W., D.D., Derby 1877 

Wheeler, Rev. T. A., Hoveton St. John, Norfolk x888 

Wigner, Rev. J. T., London 1894 

Williams, Rev. C, Accrington x888 



PERSONAL MEMBERS OF THE BAPTIST UNION. 

Date ot 
Enrolment. 

Acomb, Rev. W. J., Birmingham 1890 

Acworth, Mr. J., Bradford 1878 

Aldis, Rev. J., Becldngton (See Honorary Members) 1874 

Anders, Mr. H., London .. .. k. 1892 

Anderson, Rev. J. H., Loughton ». : 2895 

Anderson, Rev. W. M., Epworth 1895 

Anderton, Mrs. A. Bury, Southport 1895 

Angus, Rev. J., M.A., D.D., London (See Honorary Members) . . . . 1874 

Angus, Mr. W., Newcastle-on-Tyne 1895 

Anstie, Mr. T. B., J.P., Devizes 1889 

Appleton, Mr. W., Sutton (5«mry) 1895 

Apthorpe, Mr. G., Cambridge 1877 

Archer, Rev. W. E., Leeds 1874 

Arnold, Mr. F., J.P., Great Yarmouth 1887 

Ashwell. Mr. H.. J.P.. Nottingham 1889 

Avery, Mr. J., St. Albans z888 

Avery, Rev. W. J., London 1895 

Bacon, Mr. A., Brentwood .. .. • 1889 

Bailey, Rev. G. T., Leyton * 1891 

Baines, Mr. L, London 1876 

Baker, Rev. T.; B.A., Lewes 1895 

Balding, Mr. E., London 1895 

Barker, Mr. A. H.. Ditchling 1893 

Barran. Mr. A., J.P., Leeds . . * » , z888 



22 PERSONAL MEMBERS. 



Date of 
Enrolment. 

Barran, Sir John, Ilkley 1878 

Barrass, Rev. T.. Peterborough 1877 

Barry, Mr. W., Scarborough 1888 

Bartlett, Mr. J. M., Newcastle-on-Tyne 1895 

Bate, Mr. R., C.C., Tarporley 1889 

Bajmes. Mr. A. H., London 1874 

Baynes, Mr. W. W., J.P., Bromley. Kent (See Honorary Members) . . . . 1874 

Beach, Mr. W. C, New Bamet 1895 

Beattie. Mr. W., Sunderland 1889 

Beecliff, Rev. R. J., London 1895 

Bell, Rev. J., Leeds 1895 

Bembridge, Mr. W. B., J.P., Ripley, Derby 1889 

Benhara, Mr. J., London 1875 

Benham, Mr. W. J., B.A., London x886 

Bcntley, Rev. T., Chipping Norton ^ .. 1874 

Bcrgin, Rev. J. M., York Town ^ . . 1893 

Best, Mr. W., Bradford x888 

Betts, Mrs., St. Albans 1895 

Bexon, Mr. A., Nottingham 1889 

Black, Mr. J., Ford, Cornhill-on-Tweed .. .. 1893 

Bompas, Mr. H. M., Q.C., London 1878 

Bond, Mr. J. T., Plymouth 1884 

Booker, Mr. W. H., Nottingham 1889 

Booth, Rev. S. H., D.D., London (See Honorary Members) 1874 

Bourne, Mr. J. P., Bristol 1874 

Bowden, Mr. J., New Bamet 1888 

Bowman, Rev. W. R., B.A., London 1894 

Bowser, Mr. H., Glasgow 1884 

Bowser, Mr. W. A., London 1888 

Bright, Mr. J., Nottingham 1896 

Brooke, Mr. J., J.P., Huddersfield 1889 

Brooks, Mr. R. H., London x88i 

Brown, Rev. J. A., London 1888 

Brown, Rev. J. J., Birmingham (See Honorary Members) 1888 

Brown, Rev. J. J., Cromer 1895 

Bruce, Rev. F. W. C, Liverpool 1895 

Bryan Rev. W. C, Hunstanton 1893 

Bult, Mr. A., London 1892 

Bums, Rev. Dawson, D.D., London 1891 

Burton, Mr. S. B., Newcastle-on-Tyne x88z 

Butlin, Rev. J., M.A., Leamington 1882 

Carlile, Mr. G. M., Bnstol X887 

Cartwright, Mr. H. S., London 1894 

Cartwright, Mrs. R., London X895 

Cayford, Mr. E., J.P., London 1884 

Chandler, Mr. B. W., F.C.A., London 1880 

Chapman, Mr. A. A., Taunton X892 

Chapman, Mr. H. P.. Birmingham x88a 

Chapman, Mr. L, Trowbridge 1895 

Chapman, Mr. W. M., Banbury X892 

Cbappell, Mr. J.. Calne 1879 

Charles, Mr. E., Bassaleg 1892 

Charlesworth, Rev. V. J., London x888 

Chedburn, Rev. VV. S., Aberdeen i88z 

Chick. Mr. S., London 1878 

Cholerton, Mr. G., Derby 1889 

Chown, Mr. J., London x886 

Clark, Mr. J., London . . 1878 

Clark, Rev, C, Bristol x888 

Clark, Rev. T., Ashford x88i 



PERSONAL MEMBERS. 23 



Date of 
Enrolment. 

Clarke, Mr. D., C. A.. Wycombe 1885 

Clay. Mr. J., Halifax ... r 1889 

Cleaver. Mr, FL, J.P., Northampton 1895 

Clifford. Rev. J., M.A., D.D., London (See Honorary Members) . . . • x888 

Cole, Rev. T. J., London 1895 

CoUier. Mr. E. P., J.P.. Reading • z888 

Collier, Rev. J. T., Salisbury 1895 

Colman. Mr. S. C. Peterborough 1889 

Cook. Mr. M., J.P.. Dunstable 1895 

Cook, Rev. G. S.. London 1888 

Cooke. Rev. J. H., London 1882 

Coombs. Rev. W., Aylesbury 1895 

Cooper. Mr. J. O.. Boscombe 1892 

Cork. Rev. D., Budleigh Sal terton 1895 

Comford. Mr. J. E.. Stourbridge 1891 

Cowdy, Rev. S.. LL.D., London 1886 

Cox, Mr. G., London 1876 

Cox. Mr. T.J Luton 1888 

Cripps, Mr. J., J.P., Liverpool • 1887 

Crossley. Mr. D. J.. J.P., Hebden Bridge . . 1874 

Culross. Rev. J., M.A., D.D., Bristol College (See Honorary Members) . . 1888 

Cumberlidge, Mr. G., J.P.. Tunstall 1886 

Curtis. Mr. E. C, Neath 1895 

David, Mr. A. J., B.A., LL.M., London .. .. 1872 

Davidson, Rev. G. W., Milton, Chipping Norton z888 

Davies. Rev. B., Pontypridd 1895 

Davies. Rev. D.. Brighton 1886 

Davies, Rev. D. M.. B.A., Colwyn Bay 1895 

Davies, Rev. E.. Monmouth 1895 

Davies. Rev. G., D.D., Bangor College 1895 

Davies. Mr. R. O., J. P., London 1889 

Davies, Rev. T. Witton, B.A., Nottingham 1895 

Davies, Mr. W.. Swansea x888 

Davies, Mr. W. J., Newbury 1895 

Davis, Rev. E. T., Sidcup 1894 

Davis, Rev. J.. Bristol x888 

Davis, Rev. J. U., B. A., London x88a 

Dawbam. Mr. R. Y., Derby 1895 

Dawson, Mr. E., J.P.. Middlesbrough X895 

Denny, Mr. C. W., London 1895 

Derrington, Mr. J. P.. Birmingham z888 

Dicks. Mr. J., Cheltenham 1895 

Dixon, Mr. B., Sheffield 1889 

Dodwell, Rev. J., Haddenham, Thame ' 1893 

Douglas, Rev. J., Teignmouth X885 

Dowen, Rev. Z. T., M.D., London x88z 

Drabble, Mr. R. C. H.. L.D.S., Sheffield X89S 

Drasrton, Mr. E., Montacute 1893 

Drew, Rev. J., St. Leonard's X89S 

Dunckley, Rev. J.. London 1895 

Dyson. Rev. W., Harrow-on-the-Hill • .. 1877 

East, Rev. D. J.. Watford 1894 

Eaton, Mr. J., Sheffield 1895 

Eccles, Rev. R. K., M.D., Salem, Ohio, U.S.A 1887 

Edwards, Rev. E., Torquay (See Honorary Members) 1885 

Edwards, Rev. P., B.A., Harlow 1878 

Edwards, Rev. H., Anstruther 1894 

Ellis. Mr. E. C. Derby 1874 

EUis. Rev. W. C, Sandy 1895 



24 PERSONAL MEMBERS. 



Date of 
Enrolment. 

Engall, Mr. T. H., London 1895 

Ennala, Rev. G. T., Upminster 1889 

Erith. Mr. H. G., London x886 

Etheridge, Rev. B. C, London 1895 

Evans, Mr. J., Brecon 1878 

Faulkner, Mr. A., London .. .*.' 1891 

Fisk, Mr. J., J.P., St. Albans 1895 

Fisk, Miss E.. St. Albans 1895 

Fisk. Miss S., St. Albans 1895 

Foster, Rev. J., London .. .V 1870 

Foulkes, Mr. A.. Abergele x888 

Ftancis, Mr. F. C, London x888 

Freeman, Mr. T. Kyfi&n, F.G.S., F.S.S., London 1893 

Freer. Mr. F. A., Bristol 1895 

Fuller, Rev. F., Bedford 1895 

Fuller, Mr. W. M., Newport, Mon. 1875 

Fuller, Rev. J. J., London . . • • . . 1895 

Gamman, Mr. F., Bedford i , , , . . '., 1895 

Garland, Mr. T., London . . . . 1 1877 

Gibson, Mr. E. A., New Barnet 1888 

Godfrey, Rev. W. S.. Croydon 1894 

Goodman, Mr. R., Flitwick 1889 

Goodman, Mr. T., Royston x888 

Goodman, Rev. W., B.A., London . . 1895 

Gordon, Mr. R., London 1883 

Gould, Mr. A. P., M.S., London • z888 

Gould. Mr. H. P.. Norwich x888 

Gould, Rev. G. P., M.A., London . . 1889 

Grace, Mr. R., London 1889 

Gray, Rev. A. C, London 1895 

Green, Mr. G., Norwich 1892 

Green, Mr. J. A., London 1888 

Green, Prof; J. R., D.Sc., London 1894 

Griffiths, Rev. P., London .. .. .. .. 1895 

Haddon, Mr. S., Weston-super-Mare X89Z 

Haines, Rev. W. W.. London X877 

Hainsworth, Mr. A. W., Farsley 1889 

Hall, Rev. S., Hindley Green . . 1895 

Hammer, Mr. G. M., Eden Bridge 1894 

Hammond, Mr. N., Seaford 1889 

Hanson, Mr. J. S., Worcester .. ., I, x888 

Hanson, Rev. J., Henshaw, Yeadon .'. .'.' .' 1876 

Harcourt, Rev. J., Leicester \ 1895 

Harper, Rev. J., Ledbury 1874 

Harris, Mr. G., London .. .. .' 1895 

Hart, Mr. S. J., Chatham '. 1890 

Harvey, Mr. J., Sandwich .. .. 2874 

Haslam, Rev. J., Gildersome. . .. • 1874 

Hawkes, Mr. w., T.P., Devonport ., 1884 

Hayman, Rev. J. f., London . . .' 1895 

Henderson, Rev. H., Plymouth z888 

Henderson, Rev. W. J., B.A., Bristol 1895 

Henderson, Rev. W. T., London • . . . .' .' z888 

Hetherington, Rev. W., Walthamstow 1889 

Hewson, Rev. J. M., London x888 

Hill, Mr. L, Derby 1892 

Hill, Rev. W., London • 1877 

Hine. Mr. A.,J.P., Maryport., ;. •'; 1889 



PERSONAL MEMBERS. 25 



Date of 
Enrolment. 

Hodges, Mr. E. A., Redditch 1894 

Holmes, Mr. J., Rawdon 1892 

Holmes, Mr. R., Bradford 1888 

Hope. Mr. T. R., J.P., Redhill 1877 

Hors£all, Mr. J. C. J.P., C.C., Cross HiUs, Keighley 1895 

Hougham, Mr. W., Birmingham 1891 

Howard, Mr. J. B., New Bamet 1881 

Hugbes, Mr. E. W., London 1878 

Hartley, Mr. R. J., J.P.. Burnley 1878 

Hutchison, Mr. G. A., Leytonstone 1875 

lies, Mr. S., Bristol 1891 

lUingworth. Mr. W.. Bradford 1878 

Jefferson, Rev. J., Rawtenstall . . ' • . , . 1895 

Jennings, Rev. D., Stratford-on-Avon 1895 

Johnston, Rev. R., London 1874 

Jones, Mr. S., J.P., C.C, Wrexham .. 1895 

Jones, Rev. E., Maesteg 1895 

ones, Mr. W.. Orpington 1895 

Juniper, Rev. W. J., Rangoon, Burmah 1895 

Kent, Mr. W., South Croydon 1882 

Kerry, Rev. G., Calcutta 1882 

King, Mr. G., Hereford x888 

Knee, Mr. H. F., Withington, Manchester z886 

Knight, Rev. B. G., Swavesey 1892 

]S:night, Mr. W. D., Broadbridge Heath 1878 

Lees, Mr. E. A., Birmingham 1895 

Leonard, Rev. H. C, M. A., Bristol 1884 

Levinsohn, Rev. L, London 1883 

Lewam, Mr. G., Plymouth 1888 

Lewam, Mr. W., Plymouth z888 

Lewis, Mr. E. W., Wolverhampton 1895 

Lewis, Mr. G., London 1885 

Lewitt, Rev. J., Cheltenham • • • , 1890 

Lloyd, Mr. G., Bridgnorth 1895 

Lovatc, Mr. S. G., Stafford 1895 

Lowden, Rev. G. R., Hanwell 1878 

Lowe, Rev. R., Welford, Rugby 1896 

Luntley, Mr. P. H., Bromley, Kent 1874 

Lush, Mr. P. J. F., M.A., M.R.C.S., London .. .. 1895 

Macalpine, Mr. G. W., J.P., Accrington 1889 

Mace, Rev. D., Market Harborough 1895 

Mack, Mr. J., London 1892 

Mansfield, Mr. S., Trumpington 1895 

March, Rev. W., Birmingham 1895 

Mamham, Mr. H., London 2895 

Mamham, Mr. J., J.P.. Boxmoor z886 

Martin, Rev. T. H., Glasgow z888 

McKenzie, Rev. A. P., Potter Street, Harlow z888 

McMaster, Mr. J. S., London • 1877 

Mcpherson, Rev. D. P., B.D., Exeter 1894 

Mead, Mr. J. B., London . . 1877 

Meadows, Mr. W., jun., Kettering 1895 

Medley, Rev. W.. M.A.. Rawdon 1895 

Merrick, Mr. A. B., Exeter 1895 

Meyer, Rev. F. B., B.A., London 1895 



26 PERSONAL MEMBERS. 



Date of 
Enrolment. 

Miller, Rev. W., Chesham 1895 

Minns, Mr. G. C, London 1892 

Mitton, Mr. E. M., Birmingham x88x 

Moore, Rev. J. H., Oxford xSoz 

Mostyn, Rev. J., Ipswich 1809 

Moulson, Mr. Aid. W., J.P.. Bradford 1895 

Mounsey, Mr. E., J.P., Liverpool 1878. 

Myers, Rev. J.. Longwood .. ., 1884 

Myers, Rev. J. B.. London 1885 

Needham, Rev. G , Loughborough 1895 

Neubaid. Rev. J., Reading 1874. 

Newell, Rev. W., Downend 1895 

Newman. Mr. W., Louth , 1895. 

Newton, Rev. F. H., London , . . . ' 1876 

O'Dell, Rev. J., Hull 1895 

O'Neill, Rev. A. G.. Birmingham 1889 

Osbom. Mr. G., J.P., St. Leonards 1891 

Osborne, Rev. A. T., King's Lynn 1895 

Parker, Mr. H. R., London 1891 

Parker Rev. E., D.D., Manchester 1875 

Parker, Rev. J., M.A., Ilford 1891 

Parkinson, Mr. W. C, London 1877 

Parrett, Rev. C. H., Boscombe 1895 

Payne, Mr. W., London 1874 

Peak, Mr. H., Guildford 1877 

Pearce, Rev. F., Trowbridge 1874 

Pedley, Mr. G., Sutton {Surrey) x88S 

Penny, Mr. T., Taunton x88» 

Penny, Mr. T. S., Taunton i88a 

Perrin, Mr. H. S., Stony Stratford X891 

Pewtress, Mr. E., London .. .« 1885 

Pewtress, Mr. H. W., London 1895 

Pewtress, Mr. J. W.. London X895 

Phillips, Rev. G., Newtown 1895 

Philp. Rev. C, Gosport x895 

Plumb. Rev. G., Norwich . . . . X895 

Porter, Mr. W. R., Southsea iBSS 

Potter, Mr. H., London 1893 

Powell. Mr. C, Chadwell Heath X889 

Prestige, Mr. G., Exmouth 1895 

Priestley, Mr. J. G.. London 1895 

Pullar. Mr. L., Lower Weston, Bath x886 

Purchase, Rev. W. H., Birmingham 1895 

Radbum, Rev. W., Henley-in-Arden x888 

Rees, Rev. W., Blaenavon X895 

Rickett, Mr. W. R., London X875 

Rickett, Mrs. W. R., London 1895 

Ridley, Mr. A. C., Ipswich X895 

Riley, Rev. A. F., London X894 

Roberts, Mr. R. G., Swansea X895 

Robertson, Rev. F., Bath X89X 

Robinson, Mr. E., J.P., Bristol 1874 

Robinson, Mr. K., Bristol x888 

Robinson, Mr. W. L., Coventry X895 

Rogers, Mr. H., J.P., Hereford x888 

Rose, Mr. J. S., Bristol X874 

Rouse, Rev. G. H., M.A., D.D., Calcutta 1892 



PERSONAL MEMBERS. 1^ 



Date of 
Enrolment 

Rowson, Rev. H., Birmingham 1895 

Russell. Mr. J., Ardrossan 1877 

Russell. Rer. J. R.. Astwood Bank 1888 

Ryan, Mr. J., London 1895 

Salisbury, Rev. J., M.A.. Derby 1895 

Saul, Mr. T., J.P., Great Yarmouth 1888 

Saunders, Rev. J., Dinton 1877 

Saville, Rev. C, Middleton Cheney 1890 

Scholefield, Mr. J. W., J.P., BooUe 1888 

Scudamore, Rev. G., London 1893 

Seager, Rev. J., Bristol 1895 

Sharman, Mr. W. J., Bittleswell 1891 

Sharman. Rev. W.. Fleet {Jtlavdi^ 1895 

Sharp. Mr. S., Morley 1889 

Sharp, Rev. D., Bristol 1895 

Shaw, Mr. W. D.. Longwood x888 

Sheen, Mr. J., London 1893 

Shepherd, Mr. Aid. G.. J.P., Bacup 1895 

Short, Rev. G., B.A., Salisbury (See Honorary Members) 1877 

Simmons, Mr. W. R., Boscombe 1889 

Small. Mr. W., Nottingham 1896 

Small, Rev. G., M.A., Leytonstone 1879 

SmaJley, Rev. J., Blackburn 1895 

Smallwood, Mr. J., J.P., Stratford-on-Avon 1888 

Smith. Mr. A. Gumey, Bromley, Kent 1889 

Smith, Mr. F. E., Sheffield 1895 

Smith. Mr. J. F., London 1887 

Smith, Mr. J. J., J.P., Watford 1874 

Smith Mr. N., London .. 1888 

Sowerby. Rev. R. C, Stirling 1895 

Spice, Mr. W. H.. Leeds 1888 

Spurr, Rev. F. C, London 1893 

Stanford. Mr. J., J.P., Eden Bridge 1874 

Stevenson, Mr. G., J. p., Leicester 1889 

Stiff, Mr. E.. Worcester Park. Surrey 1888 

Stocker. Mr. T., St. Austell 1895 

Stocker. Miss, St. Austell 1895 

Stowe, Mr. G. S., Penarth * 1895 

Sturge, Rev. A., Dartford 1885 

Styles, Rev. W. J., London 1891 

Tarbox. Rev. E. W.. Gmldford 1893 

Tarver. Mr. G., Burton-on-Trent 1886 

Tawell. Mr. J. A., Earl's Colne 1895 

Taylor. Mr. B.. Bristol 1889 

Taylor, Mr. H., Birmingham 1895 

Taylor, Rev. W. J., London 1895 

Terry. Mr. P., London z888 

Terry, Mr. P., jun., London 1878 

Thomas, Rev. J., Exmouth 1887 

Thomas, Mrs.. Llanelly . . ~ 1895 

Thompson, Miss A., Harrogate 1895 

Thompson, Rev. J. C, Heathfield 1895 

Thompson, Mr. S., Beckenham 1877 

Thomsett, Rev. W. E., Reading 1877 

Thome, Mr. G. R., Wolverhampton 1891 

Tilly, Rev. A., Cardiff 1894 

Todd, Rev. J. W., D.D., London 1888 

Toll, Rev. J., Great Ellingham 1877 

Townsend. Mr. C, J.P., Bristol 1888 



28 PERSONAL MEMBERS. 



Date ot 
SBrolmenC. 

Tresidder, Rev. H. J., London 1890 

Trotter. Mr. M. H., Coleford 1876 

Tockett, Mr. C. H., Bristol 1895 

Tomer, Mr. J. E., J. P., Gloucester 1876 

Turner, Rev. J., Blaby 1895 

Turner, Rev. J., Eastbourne 1895 

Turtle, Mr. S. T., London 1894 

Tyrer, Mr. R. H., London 1889 

Underhill, Mr. E. B., LL.D., London (See Honorary Mimbers) . . . . 1874 

Underwood, Rev. W., D.D., Derby (See Honorary Members) x888 

Upward. Mr. E. J.. J.P.. Sandown, I.W 1874 

Varley, Rev. J. W., St. Anne's-on-the-Sea 1894 

Vasey, Rev. W. B., Sale 1895 

Vaughan. Mr. J., Dowlais 189S 

Walduck, Mr. T. H.. Bexley Heath x888 

Wales, Mr. H. C. J.P., Cheshunt 1889 

Warmington, Mr. F. W., London 1876 

Warmington, Miss H. B., London 1895 

Warren, Mr. G. A., London 1877 

Wates, Mr. J.. London z888 

Watkins. Mr. H., Swansea x888 

Watkins, Rev. S., Withington, Hereford 1895 

Watson. Mr. A., Salisbury z888 

Watson, Mr. R., Rochdale 1889 

Watson, Mr. S., London i88x 

Watts. Rev. H.. Grantham X895 

Wearing, Mr. W. B., Swindon X889 

Webb, Mr. P. C, London * X894 

Webb, Mr. W.. Chesham 1895 

Weymouth. Dr. R. F., Brentwood 1875 

Whale, Rev. W., Brisbane, Australia 1893 

Wheatley. Rev. T.. London X895 

White, Mr. Aid. G., J.P., Norwich X895 

Whiteman, Mr. W. H.. Croydon 1888 

Whitley, Mr. T., Southsea 1888 

Whitley. Rev. W. T.. M.A., LL.M., Melbourne. Australia 1888 

Whittaker, Mr. C. D., M.A., B.Sc.. Harlow X895 

Whittard, Mr. T.. Cheltenham 1895 

Wigner. Rev. J. T.. London (See Honorary Members) 1878 

Wiles, Mr. J.. St. Albans 1895 

Wilford, Mr. Aid. ].. Leicester X896 

Wilkin. Mr. M. H., London 1874 

Williams. Rev. C. Accrington (See Honorary Members) 1886 

Willis, Mr. W., Q.C, London X877 

Wilshere, Rev. D., Nassau. Bahamas 1874 

Wilshire, Mr. L. W., Derlqr 1893 

Wilson, Mr. G. D., Darlington z888 

Wilson, Rev. J. L.. Ulverston X895 

Winterton, Mr. J.. London • 1885 

Wood, Mr. H.. J.P.. London 1895 

Wood, Mr. H. E., London 1894 

Woodroffe. Mr. C. G., London 1888 

Woods, Rev. W., London X894 

WooUard, Mr. F. W.. Stony Stratford 1889 

WooUey, Mr. T. B.. London 1876 

Yeo, Mr. J.. Plymouth x888 



DEPARTMENTS OF THE BAPTIST UNION. 



I.— BAPTIST UNION CORPORATION, LIMITED. 

The Memorandam and Articles of Association of " The Baptist Union Corpora- 
tion, Limited," which are given below, were duly registered on X4th November, 1890. 
They allow the Baptist Union to hold securities and other property under a 
common seal in the name of the Corporation, thus obviating the trouble and 
expense involved in transferring such property upon the death of individual 
trustees. 

The Corporation is prepared, under certain conditions, to act as the trustee for 
chapel property in accordance with the terms of the following Memorandum and 
Articles of Association : — 

I.— MEMORANDUM OF ASSOCIATION OF THE BAPTIST UNION 
CORPORATION, LIMITED. 

I. The name of the Company is " The Baptist Union Corporation, Limited." 
3. The Registered Office of the Company will be in England. 
3. The objects for which the Company is established are : — 

(a) The promotion of the interests of the Baptist Denomination. 

(b) The acquisition by purchase, hire, or otherwise, and the acceptance by 
way of gift, subscription, donation, devise, bequest, or otherwise, and the 
holding of buildings, lands, securities, stocks, shares, and debentures, 
money, and other property in the United Kingdom or elsewhere, whether 
for the purposes of the Corporation or to be held by the Corporation as 
trustee for or on behalf of or otherwise for the use or benefit of any person, 
church, society, association, committee, or cause connected with the 
Baptist Denomination in the United Kingdom. 

(c) The selling, exchanging, mortgaging, letting, or demising of lands, buildings, 
or houses, or other property vested in or held by the Corporation. 

(d) The acceptance, taking, and holding, whether as bare trustee or otherwise, 
of any property, whether real or personal, which may from time to time 
be conveyed, transferred, assigned, or otherwise vested in the Corporation, 
upon any trust or trusts, for the benefit of or in any manner calculated to 
advance the interests of any person, church, society, association, committee^ 
or cause connected with the Baptist Denomination. 

(b) The performance of any duty, function, or act, whether ministerial or 
otherwise, in compliance with and the carrying into effect any directions 
or instructions relating to any trust i>roperty vested in the Corporation,, 
which may be given to the Corporation by any duly constituted body 
entitled to give such directions or instructions, whether the same relate to 
the corpus or to the income of such trust property. 

(f) The administration, management, and conduct as trustees, factors, or 
agents, in accordance with any trusts, express or implied, afifecting the 
same, of any trust property vested in the Corporation, otherwise than 
as bare trustees, and the exercise of any rights of ownership or any 



30 DEPARTMENTS OF THE BAPTIST UNION. 



rights or powers, discretionary or otherwise, relating to the administra- 
tion, management, and conduct of, or in any manner to, any such trust 
property. 

(g) The giving of bonds or guarantees on account of any covenants, titles, 
trusts, or agencies that may be undertaken by the Corporation. 

(h) The erection of any building, office, room, chapel, manse, or other building, 
or of any part of the same, and the repair and restoration . of the same, 
for the purpose of the Corporation, or of any church direction, or chapel 
trus 

(i) The support of agents, preachers, teachers, colporteurs, when such may be 
deemed necessary for the work of the Corporation or any church, society, 
association, committee, or cause for whom it may become trustee. 

(j) The printing and publishing of annual reports, year books, papers, circulars, 
pamphlets, books, tracts, magazines, newspapers, and other documents, 
either for the advantage and profit of the Corporation, or for that of any 
church, society, association, committee, or cause for whom it may become 
trustee. 

(k) The recovery of rents and of charges for burial or other matters con- 
nected with chapels or property vested in the Corporation or held by 
them. 

(l) The raising or borrowing of such money as the Corporation may from time 
to time determine to raise or borrow, upon banking account or otherwise 
upon such security, whether by way of mortgage or otherwise, and on such 
terms as to interest, powers of sale, and otherwise, as the Corporation may 
from time to time deem expedient. 

(m) The instituting, conducting, defending, or compromising of legal proceed- 
ings by and against the Corporation or its officers. 

(n) The investing of all or any part of the funds held by the Corporation on 
such securities and terms as may be directed, or as the Corporation may 
deem fit, and the varying of such investments. 

(o) The acquiring by purchase, amalgamation, or otherwise, the undertaking 
and business of any other society, association, or corporation having for its 
objects or some or one of them the promotion, in any form whatsoever, 
of the interests of the Baptist Denomination, or of any section or part 
thereof. 

(p) The making of bye-laws for the government of the Corporation generally, 
and the alteration or rescission of such bye-laws or any of them. 

(q) The doing of all such other lawful things as are incidental or conducive to 
the attainment of the above objects. 

4. Every Member of the Corporation undertakes to contribute to the assets of the 
Corporation in the event of the same being wound up during the time that he is a 
Member, or within one year afterwards, for the payment of the debts and liabilities 
of the Corporation contracted before the time at which he ceases to be a Member, 
and of the costs, charges, and expenses of winding up the same, and for the adjust- 
ment of the rights of the contributors among themselves, such amount as may be 
required not exceeding Five Shillings. 

5. If, upon the winding up or dissolution of the Corporation there remains 
after the satisfaction of all its debts and liabilities any property whatsoever, the 
same shall not be paid to or distributed among the Members of the Corporation, 
but shall be given or transferred to the society known as the Baptist Union of 
Great Britain and Ireland, if that shall be in existence and willing to accept it, 
and if not to some other institution ha\'ing objects similar to the objects of the 
Corporation, to be determined by the Members of the Corporation at or before the 
time of dissolution, or, in default thereof, by such j[udge of the High Court of 
Justice in England as may have or acquire jurisdiction in the matter. 



DEPARTMENTS OF THE BAPTIST UNION. 3 1 



6. The Articles of Association of this Corporation shall be subject to the 
condition that no alteration in any clause which defines the conditions of 
membership (whether with the object of increasing or diminishing the number ot 
those having a right to become Members), or in any clause relating to the qualifica- 
tion or election of Directors, shall be made without the previous assent of the 
Baptist Union. For the purpose of obtaining such assent, a notice shall be served 
upon the Secretary of the Baptist Union at least twenty-one days before the first 
day of the spring, or autumn, or other regular assembly of the Baptist Union, and 
such notice shall set forth a copy of the clause which it is proposed to alter, and a 
copy of the clause as it would stand after being altered as proposed. If the Baptist 
Union at such assembly shall pass a resolution prohibiting such alteration, or 
modifying the terms thereof, such prohibition shall take away from this Corporation 
the power of altering such clause, save in so far (if at all) as such alteration may be 
effected within the limits of the resolution of the Baptist Union ; Provided 
ihat in case no prohibition or modification be made the Corporation shall be free 
to make the notified alteration if it so deem expedient; Provided also that 
the said Baptist Union may at a future assembly vary or annul any such 
resolution as aforesaid. 

II.— ARTICLES OF ASSOCIATION OF THE BAPTIST UNION 
CORPORATION, LIMITED. 

X. For the purposes of registration the number of the Members of the Corporation 
is declared not to exceed One hundred and fifty. 

2. These Articles shall be construed with reference to the provisions of the 
Companies Acts, x86? to 1890, and terms used in these Articles shall be taken as 
having the same respective meanings as they have when used in those Acts. The 
term " Baptist Union" means the society known as the Baptist Union of Great 
Britain and Ireland. 

3. The Directors may, when they think fit, register an increase of Members. 

Membership. 

4. Every Member of the Council of the Baptist Union, and all the Ofiicers of the 
Baptist Union who shall subscribe a copy of these Articles, shall be Members of 
the Corporation. 

5. The rights and privileges of every Member shall be personal to himself; they 
shall not be transferable by his own act or by operation of law. 

6. Any Member may withdraw from the Corporation by giving one calendar 
month's notice in writing to the Secretary of his intention so to do, and upon the 
expiration of the notice he shall cease to be a Member. 

7. The Directors shall have power, by resolution duly passed and entered in 
their minute book, to determine the membership of any Member who shall by 
any means cease to be a Member of the Council of, or an Officer of the Baptist 
Union. 

Directors and Officers. 

8. The Directors of the Corporation shall be the persons who have signed the 
Memorandum of Association until the first General Meeting, and thereafter the 
Directors shall be the Members and Officers for the time being of the Council of 
the Baptist Union, who shall be the Board of Directors herein referred to as the 
Board. 

9. The President of the Baptist Union for the time being subscribing a copy of 
these Articles, shall be President of the Corporation. The Secretary of the Baptist 
Union, for the time being, shall be the Secretary of the Corporation. There shall 
be two Auditors, who shall be elected annually in General Meeting, one of whom 
shall not be a Member of the Corporation^ 



33 DEPARTMENTS OF THE BAPTIST UNION. 



Procedure of Bcard. 

xo. The Board shall meet in the spring and autumn of each year, and at such 
other times as the Directors may appoint. The Board may make such regulations 
as they think proper as to the summoning and holding of meetings, and fur the 
transaction of business thereat, and they may adjourn any meeting. 

zz. The Directors may from time to time fix the quorum necessary for the trans- 
action of business at any meeting to be held after such quorum shall hisive been fixed. 
Previous to the first General Meeting the quorum shall be three, and thereafter, 
until the Directors shall otherwise determine, the quorum shall be eleven. 

Z3. The President alone or any five Directors may at any time summon a Meeting 
of the Corporation. 

Z3. The President shall take the chair at all meetings of the Directors, and if at 
any Meeting he shall not be present within ten minutes after the time appointed for 
holding the same, the Directors present shall choose seme one of their number to 
be Chairman of the Meeting. 

Z4. Every question, matter, or thing which shall be brought up at any Meeting of 
the Directors shall be decided by a majority of votes, and in case of an equality of 
votes, the Chairman shall have a second or casting vote. 

Z5. A Director may at any time resign his Directorship by giving one month's 
notice in writing to the Secretary. 

z6. Fifteen of the Directors of the Corporation for the time being may constitute 
themselves into a special Board ^for the transaction of any business of the Company 
which in their opinion demands instant attention, provided that before transacting 
such business such Durectors enter a declaration, signed by each of them in the 
minute book, certifying that the business is urgent and that the best notice possible 
during the interval in which the knowledge of urgent business has existed has to the 
best of their knowledge been given to each of the Directors. The Directors so 
assembled shall be competent, by resolution passed unanimously, to exercise all the 
powers of the Directors in regard to such business. It shall be the duty of the 
Secretary to acquaint absent Directors as soon as practicable with the nature of the 
urgent business so transacted. 

Powers of Directors, 

17. The Directors for the time being shall have the management of all the affairs 
and business of the Corporation, and shall conduct the same in such maimer as 
they in their discretion shall think fit ; and may exercise all the powers of the 
Corporation. 

z8. Without prejudice to the generality of the last preceding Article, it shall be 
lawful for the Directors, immediately upon the incorporation of the Corporation, to 
do all or any of the following things in the name and on behalf of the Corporation : — 

(a) They may undertake, administer, and carry into execution, any trust or 
other duty, ministerial or otherwise, and accept and hold any trust or other 
property. 

(b) They may receive, act upon, and carry into effect any instructions or 
directions that may be given to the Corporation by any person or body in 
whom may be invested the management or administration of any trust 
property held by the Corporation. 

(c) They may buy, sell, exchange, mortgage, demise, or let any real or personal 

property of the Corporation. 

(d) They may exercise any power of borrowing or raising money and give 
bonds or guarantees. 

(e) They may invest and vary investments of any moneys belonging to, or under 
the control, or in the custody of the Corporation. 



DEPARTMENTS OF THE BAPTIST UNION. 33 

(f) They may affix the Seal of the Coit>oration to, or otherwise make and 
execute, any documents, deeds, powers of attorney, authorities, or other 
instruments which may be necessary, useful, or advisable for the conduct 
of the affairs of the Corporation. The Seal to be affixed in the presence of 
two Directors and the Secretary. 

(g) They may institute, prosecute, defend, compromise, or abandon any suit, 
action, or other proceeding at law. 

(r) They may appoint at any time a temporary substitute for the Secretary, 
who shall have all the powers of the Secretary for the time being. 

(i) They may enter into contracts and carry on all matters of business permitted 
by the Memorandimi of Association. 

0) The Directors may delegate any of their powers to Committees, consisting 
of such Member or Members of their body as they think fit. Any Com- 
mittee so formed shall have the same powers in relation to the matters 
delegated to them or placed under their supervision or control as the 
Directors originally had, except the power of sub-delegation. The Directors 
may withdraw such delegated power whenever they deem fit, provided 
that no prior act of the said Committee shall be invalidated by a subsequent 
regulation of the Directors if the same would have been valid except for 
such regulation. 

Provided always that any cheque or other negotiable instrument shall be signed by 
a Director, and countersigned by the Secretary. 

GBNSRAL MEETINGS! 

19. The first General Meeting shall be held at such time, not being more than 
four months after the incorporation of the Corporation, and at such place as the 
President of the Corporation may determine. 

20. Subsequent General Meetings shall be held at least once in every year, and on 
such days, at such time and place, as may be prescribed by the Corporation in 
General Meeting, and if no time or place is so prescribed, as shall be determined by 
the Secretary for the time being, or if there be no Secretary, by the President. 
Such meetings may be adjourned from time to time until the business is ended, and 
at and to such place as may be determined by the General Meeting. 

21. The above-mentioned General Meetings shall be termed Ordinary Meeting?, 
all others shall be Extraordinary Meetings. 

22. The Directors may convene an Extraordinary Meeting, and when required by 
any twelve Members, by a notice in writing left at the Registered Office, shall con- 
vene an Extraordinary General Meeting. 

Proceedings at General Meetings. 

23. Notice specifying the place, the day, and the hour of meeting, and in case 
of special business, the nature of such business, shall be served upon every Member 
of the Corporation, in manner hereinafter provided, but the non-receipt of such 
notice by any Member shall not invalidate the proceedings at any General 
Meeting. 

24. No business shall be transacted at any meeting unless a quorum of Members 
is present. 

25. Twelve Members shall be a quorum at any General Meeting of the 
Corporation. 

26. If within one hour from the time appointed for the Meeting a quorum of 
lAembers is not present, the meeting shall stand adjourned to such day, time, or 



34 DEPARTMENTS OF THE BAPTIST UNION. 

place as may be appointed in the agenda or bye-laws for the time being, and if 
at such adjourned Meeting a quorum of Members is not present, it shall be 
adjourned sine die, 

27. The President of the Corporation shall preside as a Chairman at every 
General Meeting, or in his absence such person as shall there and then be elected 
by the General Meeting. 

28. The Chairman may, with the consent of a majority of the General Meeting, 
adjourn any General Meeting from time to time and from place to place, but no 
business shall be transacted at any Adjourned Meeting other than the business 
left unfinished at the Meeting from which the adjournment took place. 

29. At any General Meeting, unless a poll is demanded by at least ten Members, 
a declaration by the Chairman that a {^solution has been carried, and an entry 
made to that effect in the minute book, shall be sufficient evidence of the fact, 
without proof of the number or proportion of the votes recorded in favour of or 
against such resolution. 

30. If a poll is demanded in manner aforesaid, the same shall be taken in such 
manner as the Chairman shall direct, and the result of such poll shall be deemed 
to be the Resolution of the Corporation in General Meeting. 

Votes of Members. 

31. Each Member shall have one vote only, and such vote must be given 
personally and not by proxy. 

Bye-laws. 

32. In addition to the powers vested in the Corporation by the Companies Acts, 
1862 to 1890, the Corporation shall have power by Resolution passed in General 
Meeting, whether Ordinary or Extraordinary, from time to time to make such 
bye-laws for the government of the Corporation, as do not under the said Acts 
require to be passed by Special Resolution as being alterations of the regulations 
of the Corporation contained in the Articles of Association. 

Accounts and Audit. 

33. Accounts shall be kept of the moneys received and expended by the Cor- 
poration, and the matters in respect of which such receipt and expenditure takes 
place, and of the property and liabilities of the Corporation. 

34. The accounts of the Corporation, and also the balance-sheet thereof, shall be 
audited every year by one or more Auditors, and such Auditor or Auditors shall 
have power to require the production of all books of account belonging to the 
Corporation, and of all vouchers which they may deem necessary to be produced. 

Miscellaneous. 

35. A notice may be served by the Corporation upon any member either 
personally or by sending it through the post in a prepaid letter addressed to 
such Member at his registered address in the United Kingdom. 

36. Any notice served by post shall be deemed to have been served at the time 
when the letter containing the same was put into the post office, and in proving 
such service it shall bo sufficient to prove that the letter containing the notice was 
properly addressedmnd put into the post office. 

37. All notices required by the Companies Acts, 1862 and 1890, and by any Acts 
amending the same, to be given by advertisement shall be advertised in such news- 
papers as the Directors may select. 

38. A certificate signed by the President and Secretary of the Baptist Union, or 
either of them, shall be sufficient proof that any person was or is a Member of the 
Council of, or an officer of, the Baptist Union, or that any minute or resolution has 
been passed by the Assembly of the Baptist Union. 



DEPARTMENTS OF THE BAPTIST UNION. 35 

II.— GENERAL EXPENSES FUND. 

For Officers, Lists of Subscriptions, &C,, see Baptist Union Annual Report, 

This Fund bears the entire cost of working the general business of the Baptist 
Union. Towards this the subscriptions from associations, churches and personal 
members contribute. Grants in aid are made from the Annuity, Home Mission, and 
Augmentation Funds towards the working expenses. The Council have resolved, 
however, that it is desirable, if possible, to raise the income of the General Expenses 
Fund to such an amount as that the whole of the contributions to each of the Funds 
under the direction of the Council shall be devoted to the objects for which they 
are given, without any deduction for office expenses. In order to do this the income 
of the General Expenses Fund must be raised to at least £2,000 a year. 

Subscriptions become due annually on zst JANUARY. It is earnestly requested 
that they be paid on that date. 

Subscribers of zos. and upwards are entitled to a copy of the Handbook, post- 
free, and other Subscribers can obtain it from the Publishers for zs. 8d. or for 2s. 
post-free. The price to non-subscribers is 2s., or post-free, 2s. 4d. 

Income for Z894, including ;^65o voted from Annuity, Home 
Mission, Church Extension and Augmentation Funds .. £im9 5 9 
. Expenditure for 1894 1.922 16 8 



III.— LITERATURE FUND. 

Chairman— Bxw , G. P. Gould, M.A. 

For Committee, ^., see Baptist Union Annual Report* 

The Council of the Baptist Union publish The Union Mission Hymnal at (words 
only) one penny, and (Music and Words), is. 6d., 2s. 6d., 3s., and 5s., according to 
style. Under the direction of the Assembly, they are publishing a series of 
Manuals for the Instruction of Young People in Baptist Principles. The first 
volume, by Mr. Richard Heath, on ** Anabaptism," and the second by Rev. J. 
Culross, D.D.. on " Hanserd Knollys," are already issued. 

Income for 1894 (including vote of ;^279 Z3S. 6d. from 

General Expenses Fund) £^28 o 6 

Expenditure for 1894 677 7 8 



IV.— HOME MISSION, 

chairman— Mr. D. Clarke. C.A. 

For Committee, Lists of Subscriptions, &c„see Baptist Union Annual Report 

The Mission was formed in Z797, under the title of the '* Baptist Home Missionary 
Society," and in Z882 was incorporated in the amended constitution of the Baptist 
Union, together with the " Baptist Irish Society," under the title of the " British and 
Irish Home Mission." The Irish department of the joint Mission was transferred 
to the Irish Baptist Association on and from zst January, Z890, and is now under the 
control of a Committee of that Association. 

The Object is defined in the Constitution of the Baptist Union as follows :— " To 
spread the Gospel of Christ by employing Ministers and Evangelists ; by establish- 
ing Christian churches ; by forming Sunday-schools ; by distributing the Scriptures 
jusd religious tracts ; and by adopting and using such other methods as the Council 
shall deem advisable." 

Income for Z894 •• /3 .084 12 5 

Expenditure for 1894 • £3.254x6 3 

C 2 



36 DEPARTMENTS OF THE BAPTIST UNION. 

v.— CHURCH EXTENSION FUND. 

Chairman — Rev. J. H. Shakespeare. M.A. 

For Committee, &€., see Baptist Union Annual Report, 

This Fund was started in 1893, for Baptist Church Extension in large towns, 
under the following scheme adopted by the Assembly of the Baptist Union : — 

z. That a fund be established, to be called the " Baptist Union Church Extension 
Fund," which shall be under the control of the Baptist Union Church Extension 
Committee, subject to the confirmation of the Council of the Baptist Union. 

3. The objects of the Fund are to undertake the formation of Baptist Churches in 
towns where local effort is inadequate, and to provide means for : — 
(a) The purchase of sites for prospective Baptist chapels ; 
{b) Grants and loans in aid of chapels built in connection with this scheme ; 
(c) A Pastor's Sustentation Fund. 

3. The sphere of the operations of the Fund shall be limited to the large towns of 
the United Kingdom. 

4. Local Church Extension Societies may be affiliated with the Fund on the 
recommendation of the Church Extension Committee, by the Council of the Baptist 
Union. 

5. The Fund shall be formed from donations, subscriptions, and legacies, church 
collections and contributions from affiliated local Church Extension Societies. 

6. The Committee may — 

(a) Purchase sites for prospective chapel building, vesting them in the Baptist 
Union Corporation, Limited, with power of sale or transfer to local bodies, 
and may (b) make grants in aid of the purchase of sites and of chapel 
building, provided that no such grant shall exceed one-half of the amount 
contributed totally to the same object, but (c) not more than one>third of 
the income, apart from sums received as the repayment of loans (and such 
sums as may be given by the donors for special purposes), shall be applied 
to the purchase of sites and to grants in aid of chapel building. 

7. The Committee may make loans in aid of the purchase of sites and chapel 
building, subject to such terras of repayment as may be agreed upon. 

8. A Local Church Extension Society making any contribution to the National 
Fund shall have a prior right to a loan of a similar amount in aid of bond fide 
Church Extension which has received the sanction of the Local Committee. 

9. An application for a grant must be signed by at least two-thirds of a Local 
Church Extension Society, who shall also, in case of a loan, furnish the names of 
four guarantors and certify their sufficiency. 

10. The Committee shall have power to guarantee an adequate salary to the pastor 
of any new church formed under the auspices of this Fund, or of any local Baptist 
Church Extension Society, for a term not exceeding four years, such guarantee in 
every case to be a gradually diminishing amount with a view to the Church becoming 
self-supporting at the end of the period. 

IX. Donors may appropriate their gifts for particular cases, or to any department 
of the Fund. 

12. That to be eligible for assistance, a church must be in membership with the 
Baptist Union, and that no grant be made in aid of purchasing a site or the cost of 
building unless the trust deed shall first have been submitted to the Committee and 
approved. 

13. That all chapels erected under the auspices of the Baptist Union shall be 
suitable in size and architectural conditions to the neighbourhood in which they are 
placed. 

14. That the first pastor of any church formed in connection with this movement, 
if aided by the Central Fund, shall be elected by the Local Church Extension 
Committee and the Church Extension Committee of the Baptist Union. 



DEPARTMENTS OF THE BAPTIST UNION 37 

15. That the Baptist Union Church Extension Committee shall endeavour to 
promote the better distribution of Baptist churches in towns' areas, having regard to 
the existence of other Evangelical Nonconformist chapels. 

x6. That the Baptist churches in large towns and in their vicinity be invited to 
form local Church Extension Societies, having for their chief objects and methods — 
(a) To secure prospective sights for churches in suitable and increasing neigh- 
bourhoods ; 
{b) To make grants to the Local Building Fund of new chapels ; 
(e) To make grants to a Pastor's Sustentation Fund for a certain term of years. 

17. That Associations and Local Unions be invited to undertake Church Extension 
in towns on a larger scale than in the past, and especially in towns where the Baptist 
cause is weak or not represented. 

18. That all contributions to affiliated societies for the purpose of this scheme, 
whether Associations or Local Unions, or Church Extension Societies, be included 
in the annual balance-sheet of the Baptist Union Church Extension Fund, such 
Societies being duly credited with them. 

19. That in order to realise the brotherhood of the Baptist churches, and to 
promote the common cause of the strong and the weak, the local Church Extension 
Societies be uriged to contribute 25 per cent, of their local funds to the National 
Fund, retaining the remaining 75 per cent, for use in their districts. 

Income for 1894 ;^3,248 12 zi 

Expenditure for 1894 2.062 zo 9 



VI.-ANNUITY FUND. 

Chairman— Rev. C. Williams. 
For Committee, Lists of Subscriptions, S^., see Baptist Union Annual Report. 



NM. — Applicants for Beneficiary membership are requested to make themselves 
thoroughly acquainted with the Rules. A II communications to be addressed to 
the Secretary, 19, Furnival-street, E.C. 



RULES 

Title. 

The Baptist Union of Great Britain and Ireland undertakes to administer a fund 

to be formed partly by voluntary donations, and partly by subscriptions of 

Beneficiary members, and to be designated '* The Baptist Union Annuity 

Fund for Retired Ministers, and Ministers' Widows and Orphans." 

Design. 
z. The object of the Fund is to provide Annuities for its Beneficiary members 
and Annuities for their widows and orphans. 

Management. 

2. The Fund shall be administered by a Committee of not less than fifteen 
members thereof, not being annuitants, and by a Treasurer, and Secretary or 
Secretaries, who shall be annually appointed by die Council of the Baptist Union. 
The Treasurer and Secretary or Secretaries of the Fund, and the Officers of the 
Baptist Union for the time being, shall be members of the Committee ex officio. 

3. The Baptist Union Corporation, Limited, shall be the Trustee of the Fund. 

4. Three Auditors shall be appointed by the Assembly of the Baptist Union. 

5. The Committee shall meet to transact business as often as may t>e required. 
Seven Members shall form a quorum All questions shall be decided by a majority of 
votes, the Chairman having a second or casting vote when the numbers are equal. 

6. An account shall be kept with a bank approved by the Committee in the 
joint names of the Treasurer and Secretary for the time being, into which all 
moneys shall be paid, and all payments shall be made by cheque, signed by both 
parties, after receiving the order of a Committee Meeting, which shall be their 
aothority for payment. 



38 DEPARTMENTS OF THE BAPTIST UNION. 



7. Proper books shall be kept by the Committee, Treasurer, and Secretary, 
contaming minutes or accounts of their respective transactions. 

8. The Council of the Baptist Union shall once in each year submit to the 
Assembly a report of the proceedings for the year ending on the 31st December 
preceding and the Treasurer shall at the same time present a statement of 
accounts for the same period duly audited. 

Mbmbbrship. 

9. Members of the Fund shall be either Honorary or Beneficiary : the former 
induding all who contribute five shillings or upwards annually, or who shall have 
paid in one sum not less than five pounds ; the latter all who subscribe for benefits 
to be received by themselves. 

zo. The persons eligible for Beneficiary membership shall be Pastors of Baptist 
Churches, Tutors of Baptist Colleges. Officers of Baptist Institutions, and Mission- 
aries of Baptist Missionary Societies. 

11. Every applicant for Beneficiary membership must be either a resident within 
the United Kingdom or a Missionary of one of the Baptist Missionary Societies of 
the United Kingdom. 

12. Every applicant who shall satisfy the Committee with respect to his character, 
health, and age, may be received by the Committee as a Beneficiary member. 

13. In the event of the Committee not being satisfied with regard to the health of 
any applicant, they shall have power to fix special terms for his reception as a 
Beneficiary member. 

14. The Committee shall determine the amount of the payments, whether by way 
of subscription or of single payment, to be made by a Missionary becoming a 
Beneficiary member. 

15. In the event of a Beneficiary member, subsequently to his reception, accepting 
the pastorate of a Baptist Church beyond the limits of the United Kingdom, or 
becoming a Missionary of one of the Baptist Missionary Societies aforesaid, he shall 
within one month of his acceptance of a pastorate, or of his having become a 
Missionary as aforesaid, give notice thereof in writing to the Secretary of the Fund. 

x6. A Beneficiary member so accepting a pastorate bejrond the limits of the 
United Kingdom, or becoming a Missionary as aforesaid, shall duly make such 
additional payments (if any) as the Committee shall determine, whether by way of 
increased subscription or further single payment. 

17. In the event of failure to give such notice and to make such additional pay- 
ments as are prescribed by Rules 15 and z6, the interest of the Beneficiary member 
in the Fund shall entirely cease. 

x8. The Committee, with the consent of the Council, shall have full power to 
assume the Liabilities and Assets of other Societies having similar objects, on such 
terms and conditions as may be agreed upon. 

* Subscriptions of Bbnbficiary Members. 

19. Every Beneficiary member shall pay an entrance fee and an amiual subscrip- 
tion, according to Table I. in the subjoined schedule, or he may commute the same 
by a single payment, according to Table II. in the same schedule. 

20. An annual subscription shall cease to be payable by a Beneficiary member 
upon his becoming an annuitant : but if an annuitant shall accept any post which 
woiild render him eligible for Beneficiary membership, his annuity shsill cease as 
from his acceptance of such post, and he shall be entitled to resume his Beneficiary 
membership upon the terms of his paying as from his acceptance of such post the 
same annual subscription as that paid by him prior to his becoming entitled to his 
annuity. 

ax. In the event of a Beneficiary member who has commuted his annual sub- 
scriptions by a single payment and has become an annuitant, accepting any post 
which would render him eligible for Beneficiary membership, his annuity shall 
cease as from his acceptance of such post, but he shall resume his Beneficiary 
membership as from that date without making any further payment. 



DEPARTMENTS OF THE BAPTIST UNION. 39 



22. If any Beneficiary member shall desire to secure the benefits of the Fund for 
his Widow and Orphans, he shall pay an entrance fee and annual subscription 
for them according to Table III. in the subjoined schedule, or he may commute the 
same by a single payment according to Table IV. The subscription for a Widow and 
Orphans shall be according to a Beneficiary member's age at the time of his wife's 
admission, and shall cease at her death or upon his becoming entitled to an 
annuity. Any Beneficiary member proposing, after his own admission, to secure 
the benefits of the Fund for his then wife and their children, shall produce a satis- 
factory medical certificate of his health. A Beneficiary member who shall 
subsequently contract another marriage, and desire to secure the benefits of the 
Fund for his widow, shall pay an entrance fee and subscription according to his 
age at the time. If a Beneficiary member's wife shall be more than five years 
younger than himself, he shall pay such additional subscription as the Committee, 
with the advice of an Actuary, shall determine. 

23. Beneficiary members, being Widowers, who may desire to secure the 
benefits of the Ftmd for their children, shall pay such subscription as the Com- 
mittee, with the advice of an Actuary, shall determine. 

24. A Beneficiary member may secure additional Annuities, not exceeding 
six (making seven in all), for himself and family respectively, upon payment 
of additional entrance fees and subscriptions; such additional subscriptions, 
however, shall give no claim to increased benefit from the free contributions to 
the Fund. 

25. Any person, otherwise eligible under Rules 10 to 17 inclusive, may become 
a Beneficiary member on payment of half-rates, and, if he shall desire to secure 
the benefits of the Fund for his Widow and Orphans, he may do so on payment 
of half-rates, subject to the provision as to increase of benefits from the free 
contributions mentioned in Rule 32. 

26. A Beneficiary member, or any Church on his behalf, may at any time 
commute the whole or any part of his annual subscriptions by one of more pay- 
ments, upon such terms as the Committee shall determine. 

37. Payments of entrance fees and single payments may, with the addition of 
five per cent, on the whole amount, be made in three equal yearly instalments. 

28. Annual subscriptions of Beneficiary memt}ers shall become due in advance 
on the first of January or the first of July in each year, bat such subscriptions 
may be paid half-yearly in advance with the addition of a charge at the rate of six- 
pence in the pound. 

29. Any Beneficiary member whose subscription, whether annual or half- 
yearly, shall be in arrear, shall pay a fine at the rate of one shilling in the pound 
for the first completed period of three months, and a further fine at the rate of 
fourpence in the pound for every subsequent month or part of a month during 
whidi his subscription shall be in arrear. 

30. (i.) Any Beneficiary member whose subscription, whether annual or hsdf^ 
yearly, shall have been in arrear for the period of twelve months shall cease to 
be a Beneficiary member as from the date when such subscription became due, 
provided there shall have been sent to him by the Secretary, at least one month 
prior to the expiration of such period of twelve months, notice that his subscription 
will, upon a date to be mentioned in such notice, be twelve months in arrear. 
(ii.) If any Beneficiary member shall, in the opinion of the Committee, be or 
become morally unfit to remain a member of the Fund, the Committee shall 
have power to determine his membership. But any Beneficiary member whose 
Beneficiary membership shall cease or be determined by either of the modes 
aforesaid, or by voluntary relinquishment, shall be entitled to be repaid two-thirds 
of the amount paid by him as subscriptions. 

31. No Beneficiary member, while receiving benefit, shall be required to pay his 
subscription. 

Benefits. 

32. A Beneficiary member shall receive ^^15 per annum in respect of each single 
subscription ; on his death his Widow, if subscribed for, shall receive ;fio per annum 
for each single subscription ; if there be no Widow, an Orphan shall receive £4 per 



40 DEPARTMENTS OF THE BAPTIST UNION. 



annum till 15 years of age, and, if there be more than one Orphan, the others shall 
receive £2 per annum each till the same age, but no Orphan family shall receive 
more than jJtxo per annum in all for any single subscription. The Annuities shall 
be increased from the funds obtained by free contributions, to such sums as the 
Committee, with the advice of an Actuary, may determine ; but if a Beneficiary 
member shall have paid for himself or for his Widow and Orphans only half-rates, 
he or they, as the case may be, shall receive only half the increased benefit given 
to other Beneficiary members and their families from the free contributions to the 
Fund. All payments shall be made in quarterly instalments on the first days of 
January, April, July, and October. 

33. An examination shall be made into the affairs of the Fund by an Actuary, to 
be appointed by the Committee, within six months after the 31st December, 1878, 
and so again within the same period after the expiration of every succeeding three 
years ; aud by the result of such examination the Committee shall be guided as to 
the benefit to be given to claimants, the proportionate scale as between Beneficiary 
members and their Widows and Orphans being maintained ; provided that until 
the third triennial valuation the addition to Annuities from the free contributions 
shall not exceed £210 for Beneficiary members, and a proportionate sum for their 
Widows and Orphans. 

34. The additions hitherto made to the Annuities shall henceforth cease to be 
payable. The Committee shall, after each Actuarial Examination, determine the 
amounts of the benefit to be given to claimants during the period ending with the 
next Actuarial Valuation, and such amounts shall be payable only until the Com- 
mittee shall have made their next subsequent determination. 

35. The wife and family of a Beneficiary member shall be entitled to the benefits 
of the Fund immediately upon his death, in accordance with Rule 32 ; but to be 
entitled to benefit for himself a subscriber must have been a Beneficiary member 
of the Fund for three years. If any applicant for membership over sixty years of 
age shall desire to secure an immediate Annuity for himself, he shall pay such 
additional subscription as the Committee, with the advice of an Actuary, may 
determine, and shall be entitled to share in the free contributions after the next 
valuation. And if any applicant for membership, whether a retired Pastor or the 
Widow of a Pastor of a Baptist Church, shall desire to secure an Immediate A nnuity, 
he or she shall pay such additional subscription as the Committee, with the advice 
of an Actuary, may determine, but shall not be entitled to share in the free 
contributions. 

36. Any Beneficiary member having subscribed for three years shall be entitled 
to claim the benefits of the Fund (i.) if he shall have relinquished office on or after 
attaining the age of sixty-five; or (ii.) if he shall have become permanently 
incapacitated for remunerative employment, and shall from time to time satisfy the 
Committee that he is so incapacitated. 

37. Every annuitant shall make application in writing for each quarterly instal- 
ment of his annuity, and shall give satisfactory information respecting the ground 
of his claim. The claim, if admitted, shall take effect and be recognised only as 
from the receipt by the Secretary of such application. 

38. If any Widow who is receiving benefit shall marry, her claims on the Fund 
shall thereupon cease, but the children of her former husband shall receive benefits 
as under Rule 32. 

Relinquishment of Office. 

39. If any Beneficiary member, at any time after his admission, but before 
he shall have become entitled to claim the benefits of the Fund, shall relinquish 
(whether permanently or otherwise) his qualifying office, he shall retain his 
Beneficiary membership ; but his right and that of his Widow and Orphans (if 
subscril>ed for) to claim a share in the dividend from free contributions shall cease 
and determine as from the date of such relinquishment of office. Provided always 
that (i.) if such Beneficiary member shall, at the time of such relinquishment, have 
the intention of obtaining with all convenient speed some other qualifying office, 
and of such relinquishment and intention shall, within three months of such relin- 
quishment, give written notice to the Committee, he and his Widow and Orphans (if 



DEPARTMENTS OP THE BAPTIST UNION*. 4I 

subscribed for) shall for the space of three years from the date of such relinquish- 
ment retain the right to claim a share in the dividend from free contributions ; and 
at the expiration of such period the Committee shall determine whether he or his 
Widow and Orphans (if subscribed for) shall retain such right, and, if so, upon what 
conditions : such arrangements to be annually reviewed and altered or confirmed as 
the Committee may see fit, so long as he may remain out of office ; ii.) if any 
Beneficiary member who has lost his right to share in the dividend from free contri- 
butions shall subsequently accept any qualifying office, the Committee may. if and 
upon such terms as they may think fit, restore the said right to him and to his 
Widow and Orphans (if subscribed for). 

Funds. 

40. The Funds not required to meet current liabilities shall be invested in the 
name of the Baptist Union Corporation, Limited, in Real or Government Securities, 
or in Debenture Stock of dividend-paying Railways in the United Kingdom, or in 
East India Government Stock, or in the Stock of Indian Railways guaranteed by 
the Indian Government, or in the Public Stocks of any of the British Colonies, until 
they shall amount, exclusive of interest, to the sum of ;^5o.ooo. When the sum of 
j^50,ooo shall have been so accumulated, any further contributions to the Fund, 
above the capitalised sum aforesaid, shall be invested in the like description of 
securities, or in such other securities, including the security of mortgage of real or 
leasehold property belonging to or held in trust for any Baptist Church or Society 
now or hereafter to be established, and upon such terms as to time or mode of re- 
payment, whether by instalments or otherwise, and with such collateral security, 
whether personal or otherwise, as the Committee may approve. The expressed 
wishes of Donors as to any particular Stocks in which their own contributions shall 
be invested, whether the same as or other than those before specified, shall at all 
times be regarded. The Committee may vary the securities from time to time, and 
make sale tibereof respectively, within the limits above mentioned. 

41. The capitalised sum aforesaid, together with such further free contributions 
as the Donors shall in writing so direct, shall form a Permanent Fund, the interest 
on which alone shall be available for the increase of Annuities. All other free con- 
tributions shall be applied by the Committee as the exigencies of the Fund shall 
from time to time seem to them to require. 

Disputes. 

42. The Council shall appoint an Arbitrator or Arbitrators, to whom shall be sub- 
mitted any dispute arising between Beneficiaries and the Committee of Management, 
and the decision of the Arbitrator shall be conclusive and binding on all parties. 

Alteration op Rules. 

43. All Alterations in or Additions to the Rules shall be made by a vote of the 
Assembly at the Annual or Autumnal Session of the Union, and notice of any pro- 
posed Alteration must be given at the previous Session of the Union, such notice 
having been first sent in writing to the Secretary. 

General. 

44. If at any time the state of the Fund should not allow the payment in full 
of all the instalments payable in respect of Annuities, exclusive of any share in 
the voluntary contributions, all such instalments shall abate in the same propor- 
tion, and the deficiency on each instalment, together with interest on such 
deficiency, shall be a charge on the Fund, and shall rank next to the current 
claims in respect of Annuities in every subsequent quarter until paid. 

45. The Treasurer and other Office-bearers, the Members, of the Committee, 
and the Trustee, shall not be individually liable for the payment of Annuities, nor 
for any loss on investments, nor for any other loss which may happen to the 
Fund, unless the same shall happen through their own wilful fault or neglect; 
and each of them shall be accountable only for his own acts. 

46. The foregoing Rules, as altered or amended from time to time in conformity 
with Rule 43, shall oe binding on each Beneficiary member, and shall be printed 
on all schedules of application for admission as a Beneficiary member, and shall be 
signed by each applicant in token of his acceptance thereof. 



42 



DEPARTMENTS OF THE BAPTIST UNION. 



SCHEDULE OF SUBSCRIPTIONS AND PAYMENTS. 

The following Tables show the payxneats required to be made in respect of one 
Annuity only of each description according to a Beneficiary member's age next 
birthday at entry. Additional Annuities (not exceeding six, making seven in all) 
may be secured upon payment of proportionate Entrance Fees and Subscriptions ; 
but such additional Annuities do not entitle to any additional benefit from the 
voluntary contributions. {See Rule 24.) 

BENEFICIARY MEMBERS. 

Table I. 

Entrance Fee and Annual Subscription for one Annuity (;f 15). 



under 


Entnnce Fee. 


Annual 
Subscription. 


under 


Entrance Fee. 


Annual 
Subscriptioo. 




i: s. d. 


£ s. d. 




£ ^ d. 


£ *. ^ 


25 


NONE 


I X 


43 


NONE 


2 17 


26 




Z 2 


44 


M 


300 


27 




I 3 


45 


„ 


330 


28 




I 4 








29 




I 5 


46 


300 


330 


30 




160 


47 


6 12 6 


330 








48 


10 10 


330 


31 




X 7 


49 


Z4 Z2 6 


330 


32 




z 8 


50 


19 


330 


33 




X 9 








34 




X II 


51 


23 12 6 


330 


35 




X 13 


52 


28 zo 


330 








53 


33 la 6 


330 


36 




z x6 


54 


39 


330 


37 




z 19 


55 


44 12 6 


330 


38 




220 








39 




250 


56 


51 


330 


40 




280 


57 


57 17 6 


330 








58 


65 5 


330 


41 




2 XX 


59 


73 2 6 


330 


42 




2 X4 


60 


8z 10 


330 



Table II. 

Single Payment, in lieu of Entrance Fee and Annual Subscription, for one 

Annuity (;f 15). 



£&lr 


Sin^lo Payment. 


under 


Single Payment. 


^Sr 


Single Payment. 




£ s. d. 




£ s. d. 




£ . d. 


^5 


20 Z5 


37 


32 


49 


48 


26 


2Z 10 


38 


33 5 


50 


50 5 


27 


22 5 


39 


34 10 






28 


23 


40 


35 15 


51 


53 


29 


24 






52 


56 p 


30 


25 


41 


37 


53 


59 5 






42 


38 5 


54 


62 Z5 


31 


26 


43 


39 10 


55 


66 Z5 


32 


27 


44 


40 15 






33 


28 


45 


42 


56 


7z 


34 


29 






57 


75 10 


35 


30 


46 


43 5 


58 


80 zo 






47 


44 15 


59 


86 


36 


31 


48 


46 5 


60 


92 



DEPARTMENTS OF THE BAPTIST UNION. 



43 



WIDOWS AND ORPHANS. 

Table III. 

Entrance Fee and Annual Subscription for one Annuity (£io). 
(Subject to the exceptions mentioned in Rule 22.) 



uJ£ 


Eatxance F«e. 


Annual 
SubKriptioo. 


under 


Entrance Fee. 


Annual 
Subscription. 




;C s. d. 


£ s. d. 




/; «. d. 


/: s. d. 


25 


NONS 


270 


43 


X 


330 


26 


«f 


280 


44 


X X7 6 


330 


27 


»t 


290 


45 


2 15 


330 


28 


II 


2 ZO 








29 




2 ZX 


46 


3 12 6 


330 


30 


If 


2 Z2 


47 


4 X2 6 


330 








48 


5 15 


330 


31 




2 13 


49 


700 


330 


32 




2 X4 


50 


8 X5 


330 


33 




2 X5 








34 




2 x6 


51 


XO 10 


330 


35 




2 X7 


52 


X2 XO 


330 








53 


X4 XO 


330 


36 




2 x8 


54 


16 X2 6 


330 


37 




2 Z9 


55 


18 X7 6 


330 


38 




300 








39 




3 X 


5b 


2X 2 6 


330 


40 




320 


57 


23 XO 


330 








58 


26 


330 


4X 


II 


330 


59 


28 10 


330 


42 


XO 


330 


60 


3X 2 6 


330 



Table IV. 

Single Payment in lieu of Entrance Fee and Annual Subscription, for one 
Annuity (;f 10). 

(Subject to the exceptions mentioned in Rule 22.) 



„i£ 


Siocle Payment. 


under 


Single Payment. 


t ui^£ 


Single Payment. 




£ s, d. 




;^ s. d. 




£ s. d. 


25 


37 XO 


37 


38 10 


49 


42 6 


26 


37 10 


38 


38 X5 


50 


42 IX 


27 


37 10 


39 


39 






28 


37 10 


40 


39 5 


51 


42 15 


29 


37 XO 






52 


42 x8 


30 


37 10 


41 


39 XO 


53 


43 






42 


39 15 


54 


43 


31 


37 10 


43 


40 I 


55 


43 


32 


37 10 


44 


40 8 






33 


37 10 


45 


40 x6 


56 


43 


34 


37 13 






57 


43 


35 


38 


46 


41 5 


58 


43 






47 


4x X3 


59 


43 


36 


38 5 


48 


42 


60 


43 



Enrolments are made on ist January and xst July in each year. Applications 
must be forwarded not later than a month previous to these dates, and the first 
payments made not later than two months after the date of enrolment. 

The rates for ages over sixty and for " Immediate Annuities " may be ascertained 
on application to the Secretary. 



44 



DEPARTMENTS OF THE BAPTIST UNION. 



SOCIETIES AMALGAMATED WITH THE BAPTIST 
UNION ANNUITY FUND. 



THE NATIONAL SOCIETY FOR AGED AND INFIRM BAPTIST 

MINISTERS AND THEIR WIDOWS AND ORPHANS. 

(Established at Birmingham, 1858.) 

Resolutions passed by the Committee of the Baptist Union Annuity Fund on the 
loth December, 1878 : — 

1. That this Committee do, as and from ist January, 1879, assume and accept the 
liabilities and toke over all the assets of the National Society for Aged and Infirm 
Baptist Ministers upon the terms and conditions following, being the terms and 
conditions agreed upon by the Committee of this Fund with the Committee of the 
said Society, and unanimously approved by a Special Meeting of Members of the 
said Society held at Walworth Road Chapel, London, on the 25th of Apnl last, and 
assented to in writing by all the Beneficiary Members of the said Society ; that is 
to say— 

(1) That in January, 1879, the Members of the National Society become 
Members of the Baptist Union Annuity Fund, entitled to share and share alike 
with the other Members of the Fund in all ite benefits. 

(2) That the Members of the National Society be entitled to retire from the 
pastorate, and claim the benefit of the Fund, at the age of sixty, on the account 
of age only, and that the present Subscription of £3 3s. coverall the advantages 
of the Baptist Union Annuity Fund. 

(3) That Messrs. Middlemore. C. T. Shaw, J. C Woodhill, and T. Adams be 
added to the Trustees of the Annuity Fund. 

2. That, in further pursuance of the said Agreement, Messrs. Middlemore, 
C. T. Shaw, T. C. Woodhill, and T. Adams be, and they are hereby, appointed 
Trustees of the Baptist Union Annuity Fund, subject to confirmation by the Union 
in accordance with Rule 3. 



THE YORKSHIRE SOCIETY FOR THE RELIEF OF AGED AND 
INFIRM BAPTIST MINISTERS AND THEIR WIDOWS. 

(Established at Bradford, 1845.) 

Resolutions passed by the Committee of the Baptist Union Annuity Fund on the 
loth December, 1878 : — 

z. That this Committee do, as and from zst January, 1879, assume and accept 
the liabilities, and take over all the assets of the Yorkshire Society for the Relief of 
Aged and Infirm Baptist Ministers and their Widows, upon the terms and conditions 
following, being the terms and conditions agreed upon by the Committee of this 
Fund with the Committee of the said Society, and unanimously approved at the 
Annual Meeting of the said Society held at Bradford on the 2nd of October last, and 
assented to in writing by all the Beneficiary Members of the said Society ; that is 
to say — 

(z) That, in order to amalgamation of the Yorkshire Aged Ministers' Society 
with the Baptist Union Annuity Fund, the capital of the Yorkshire Society be 
made up to ;^8,ooo by the Annuity Fund. 

(2) That, in the event of amalgamation, the Trustees of the Yorkshire Society 
become Trustees of the Annuity Fund, and that two of the Trustees and two of 
the Committee of the Annuity Fund be chosen from Yorkshire, so that the 
county shall be represented in perpetuity on the Trust and on the Committee 
of the Annuity Fund. 



DEPARTMENTS OF THR BAPTIST UNION. 45 

(3) That the Members of the Yorkshire Society, when amalgamation shall 
take place, shaU be subject to the Rules of the Annuity Fund, except— 

(a) That they ipay, as heretofore, three guineas each per annum as full 

payment for all benefits. 
{b) That, on their retirement from the pastorate from any other cause than 
age or infirmity, they receive back on^-third of the subscriptions paid 
by them from their admission into the Yorkshire Society, 
(c) That they be entitled to retire from the pastorate on the ground of 

age only when sixty years of age. 
{d) That in and from 1879 the payments to the claimants of the Yorkshire 
Society, on the ground of age or infirmity, shall be— 
Ministers, per annum, £4$, 
Widows, per annum, £30. 

Widows with z child under 16 years of age, £s5 per annum. 
Widows with more than i child under 16 years of age, £40 per 

annum. 
Orphans under z6 years of age— i, ;^i2 per annum *, 3, £iS per 
annum ; 3, ^^24 per annum ; more than 3, ^^30 per annum. 

(4) That the final agreement be printed in the Report of the Annuity Fund 
for Z879. 

VII.— AUGMENTATION FUND. 

Chairman— 'Rev. G. Short, B.A. 
For Committee, Lists of Subscriptions, 6^., se$ Baptist Union Annual Report. 

The following are the Rules for Administering the Pastors' 
Income Augmentation Fund: — 

X. The income of the Fund, after deducting working expenses, shall be dis- 
tributed among those Pastors of contributing churches whose salaries are not less 
than £60 nor more than ;^x5o a year. The items included in computing the stipend 
of a pastor are pew rents, weekly ofiferings, and other contributions within the 
church and congregation. 

2. The pastor must have held office in the church on zst October preceding the 
date of application, and have continued in the same pastorate until 30th June in the 
year of distribution. 

3. The form of application, duly filled in, together with a Beneficiary subscrip- 
tion of ;^io, must be in the hands of the Secretary not later than 30th June, otherwise 
the case will be ineligible. 

4. — A church or an individual contributing not less than ;^io per annum shall 
be entitled to recommend an application, or two contributors of £5 each may join 
in a recommendation ; but the recommendations shall not be in excess of the 
contributions — i.e., they shall be at the rate of one recommendation for each j^zo 
contributed. 

5. The Beneficiary subscription from a church recommended in accordance with 
Rule 4 shall, if the case be approved by the Committee, be returned to the Pastor 
with an addition of not less than ;^io from the voluntary funds. 

6. The Secretary shall be authorised to receive applications not recommended 
according to Rule 4, to make inquiries respecting them, and to report thereon 10 the 
Committee ; but no grant shall be made to such cases, except from a surplus left 
after meeting the daims of recommended cases, under Rule 4* Each application, 
whether recommended or otherwise, must be approved by the Committee before 
receiving a grant. 

7. A church which has been constituted within two years of date of application 
shall be ineligible. 



46 DEPARTMENTS OF THE BAPTIST UNION. 

8. After receiving help for three years, a church shall be required to furnish a 
detailed report of its financial condition, and assistance from the Fund shall be 
discontinueici unless the report be approved by the Committee. 

9. A declaration by the Pastor as to his income shall be made at the foot of the 
schedule as follows : — " My annual income from all sources, whether mentioned in 
the foregoing items or not, does not exceed ;^xso." 

The amount distributed in December, 1894, to iSx pastors, was £3,442* 



VIII.— EDUCATION FUND. 

Chairman— 'Mt. R. GOODMAN. 

For Committeet Lists of Subscriptions, ($<<;., see Baptist Union Annual Report. 

This Fund, under direction of the Baptist Union, aids Baptist pastors, by grants 
of money towards the cost of educating their sons and daughters. The schools are 
selected by the parents, subject to the approval of the Committee, and the grants 
are seldom renewed beyond three years. 



The following are the Rules for Administering the Education 

Fund :— 

1. That for the education of any child accepted by the Committee a sum not 
exceeding ^^15 per annum be granted by the Society in case of Boarding Schools, 
and in case of Day Schools a sum not exceeding £y zos. per annum.* 

2. That no child shall be admitted under eleven years of age, nor older than 
fourteen years, and the term of grant shall not exceed one year, unless speciaUy 
determined by the Committee. 

3. That subscribers of £10 per annum to the Fund may nominate one child for 
election in case of Boarding Schools, and subscribers of £$ per annum may nominate 
similarly in case of Day Schools. 

Income for 1894 £106 o 7 

Grants Voted for 1894 85 o o 



IX.— BOARD OF INTRODUCTION AND 
CONSULTATION. 

Chairtnanr-REV. J. Jenkyn Brown. 
Constitution and Bye-Laws. 

1. That a Board be elected by the Council of the Baptist Union for the purpose of 
introducing Pastors and Churches to each other, and for consultation in regard to 
ministerial settlements. 

2. That the Board consist of twenty members of the Council, together with the 
Officers. 

3. That the Board be appointed at the first meeting of the Council after its 
election. 

4. That the action of the Board be limited for the present to the. Churches in the 
following Associations, and that the tt embers of the Board be resident in the 

* For several years past the Committee have voted not more than £7 xos. per annum in any 
case. 



DEPARTMENTS OF THE BAPTIST UNION. 



47 



districts into which the Associations are grouped, in the proportion of two members 
to each district : — 



First District. 
Northern. Yorkshire. 

Second District. 

Shropshire. 

Lancashire and Cheshire. 

Third District. 

East Midland. West Midland. 

Worcestershire. 

Fourth District. 

Oxfordshire. Berkshire. 

Buckinghamshire. Northamptonshire. 

Huntingdonshire. 

Fifth District. 

Cambridgeshire. Norfolk. 

Suffolk and Norfolk Union. 

Essex Union. 



Sixth District. 
. London. Herts Union. 
Beds Union. (Baptist Churches only.) 

Seventh District. 

Southern. 

Wilts and East Somerset. 

Eighth District. 

Kent and Sussex. 

Home Counties. 

Ninth District. 

Monmouthshire, English. 

Gloucestershire and Herefordshire. 

Bristol. 

Tenth District. 

Western. Devonshire. 

Cornwall. 



5. That the following be the bye-laws of the Boardf: — 

(a) That the Board meet quarterly, and that in the interim the Secretary, along 
with a member of the Board residing in the district to which the vacant 
pastorate belongs, be empowered to act. 

(b) That when desirable a communication be sent to churches without pastors 
giving particulars of the nature and objects of the Board. 

(c) That ministers of churches desirous of introduction or advice with a view 

to settlement apply to the Secretary of the Board. 

(d) That brethren who are accredited by the Board be placed on the register 
of ministers desiring settlement. 

(e) That all the transactions of the Board be strictly confidential. 

(f) That until the first name introduced to a Church by the Board has been 
dealt with, no second name be mentioned. 

(g) That the Board undertake to furnish information as to character and general 
fitness for ministerial work. 

(h) That the Board undertake to furnish to applying Churches information 
respecting the character and suitability of any Ministers who may be befcure 
them as candidates for the pastorate. 

(i) That the Secretary of the Union be the Secretary of the Board. 



Reprbsbntatives for the Various Districts, 1894-95. 



First District 
Second „ 
Third „ 
Fourth „ 
Fifth 
Sixth 
Seventh „ 
Eighth „ 
Ninth „ 
Tenth ., 



Mr. J. J. Gumey, J.P., and Rev. A. P. Payers. 
Revs. C. Bonner and C. Williams. 

„ J. J. Brown and W. Woods. 
Mr. D. Clarke, C.A., and Mr. R. Cleaver, }.P. 
Revs. T. G. Tarn and T. M. Morris. 

„ F. A. Jones and J. Stuart. 

„ J. Hasler and Mr. W. B. Wearing. 

„ D. Davies and N. Dobson. 

„ R. Glover, D.D., and Mr. H. Rogers, J.P. 
Mr. T. Penny and Rev. S. Vincent. 



48 DEPARTMENTS OF THE BAPTIST UNION. 

X. -COMMITTEE OF ARBITRATORS- 

Rev. J. Angus, D.D., London, Chairman. 
Mr. W. B. Bembridge, J.P., Ripley, Derby. 
Mr. D. Clarke, C.A., High Wycombe. 
Rev. J. Clifford, D.D., London. 
Rev. E. Parker, D.D., Manchester. 

Rules adopted by the Assembly at Manchester. October iith, 1872. 

(i) The Arbitration Committee shall have all the powers, and be governed by 
all the laws, belonging or applicable to Arbitrators legally appointed. 

(2) The Arbitration Committee shall undertake the reference of any dispute 
cognisable by law, arising within or respecting any Church in the Baptist Union, 
which shall be duly submitted to it by the parties. 

(3) The Arbitration Committee may delegate to any one or more of its members 
the duty of making investigations or taking evidence ; but every award shall be 
made at a meeting of the Committee, and shall be deemed to be the act of the whole 
Committee, three members being a quorum, and every award shall be signed by at 
least three members on behalf of the whole Committee. 

(4) The award of the Arbitration Committee ^all be final. 

(5) The Arbitration Committee may, from time to time, make Bye-laws for the 
management of its business, and particularly may require of Applicants a deposit 
for payment of necessary expenses, as a preliminary condition of reference. 

(6) The Arbitration Committee shall take up any matter cognisable by law duly 
submitted to it ; it may also, in its discretion, undertake any reference respecting 
ecclesiastical matters or discipline in our Churches, duly submitted to it, though 
such matter may not be cognisable by law. 

In order to preserve intact the inalienable rights of Christian liberty, it is 
declared by this minute that reference to the Arbitration Committee shall be wholly 
voluntary. 

Bye-laws Adopted by the Committee of Arbitrators, April 30TH, 1873. 

(i) That the designation of the Committee in all documents shall be sufficient 
if named as "The Committee of Arbitrators of the Baptist Union of 
Great Britain and Ireland." 

(2) That, in order to satisfy the Committee that some difference between 
brethren exists which may properly be referred to its decision, the general nature of 
such difference shall be stated in writing, and be signed by the parties, who thereby 
shall express their consent to submit their differences to the award of the Committee, 
the statement consent in writing to be left, as a preliminary step, in the hands of 
the Secretary. 

(3) That all written statements made to the Arbitrators or to the Secretary shall 
be regarded by them respectively as " private and confidential," until the final 
decision or award be made and announced in writing to both parties. 

(4) Having regard to Rules x and 4, unanimously passed at the Autumn 
Meeting of the Baptist Union on the ixth October, 1872, it is agreed that no state- 
ment in writing or submission to the Arbitrators or any other paper shall be given 
up to either party to be used in a Court of Law or Equity, either before or subse- 
quently to the publication of an award, without the written consent of each of the 
Committee of Arbitrators. 

(5) That no fee or pecuniary reward shall be made or accepted by the Arbitra- 
tors for their services. Necessary expenses shall be provided for by deposits^ to be 
made by each of the parties with the Secretary, equal in amount, before the case 
can be heard, which deposits shall be returned wholly or in part, and in such propor- 
tions as the Committee may direct. 

(6) That for the purpose of remunerating the Secretary for his services, a smaU 
payment (the amount whereof to be determined by the Committee) shall be made to 



DEPARTMENTS OF THE BAPTIST UNION\ 49 

him by each party on presentation of the submission or statement in writing, signed 
by the parties in difference. 

(7) That, excepting cases of special business appointed for consideration by the 
Committee (and of which proposed appointment mention shall be particularly made 
in the notices of the meeting), the Committee shall meet in London. 

(8) That of all meetings of the Committee a week's notice at least shall be given, 
which may be done by the Secretary, with consent of the Chairman, or by the 
Chairman as convener of the Committee. 

(9) That suitable account books be provided in which shall be entered by the 
Secretary all deposits, receipts, and payments. 



XI.— THE LIBRARY 

In the Gallery of the Mission House, 19, Fumival-street, E.C., is designed 
mainly for the preservation of Literary Works written by Baptists or relating to 
the history of the Baptist Denomination. 



Presented during the past year : — 
By the Author- 
Memorials of Bromsgrove Church. By Rev. J. Ford. 

By the Author — 

(i) Primitive Preaching ; 

(2) The Grand Old Book. By Rev. A. McCaig, B.A., LL.B. 

By the Author — 

Life and Labours of Rev, H. W. Holmes. By Rev. T. R. Lewis. 

By the Author — 

English Nonconformity. By Rev. E. C. Pike, B.A. 

By the Author — 

Armenian Crisis. By Rev. F. D. Greene, M.A. 

By Rev. J. R. Godfrey— 

The Barton Church Magazine, 1893-4. 

By Mr. J. Hooper — 

Baptist Manuals. 4 vols. ^ 

By the late Rev. F. Perkins— 

The Baptist Reporter. 5 vols. 
The Baptist Repository. 4 vols. 
The Christian Witness. 7 vols. 
The Church. 5 .vols. 
. The Evangelical Register. 
The Gospel Herald. 
The Monthly Christian Spectator. 

By Rev. J. Saunders — 

Buckinghamshire Association Circular Letter, 1844. 



THERE ARE THREE CATALOGUES— 

L— Alphabetical. H. —Arranged according to Subjects. 

in.— Arranged according to Authors. 

An order to use the Library must be obtained of the Secretary of the Baptist 
Union. Books are not allowed to be taken away. 

Baptist Authors are requested to present to the Library a copy of each of their 
works during the year of publication. 

Works on Ecclesiastical History and Modem Criticism are specially needed to 
add to the many valuable works already in the Library. 

The Secretary will be greatly obliged if friends having copies of the Baptist 
Manual will communicate with him on the subject. 

D 



PART 11. 



BAPTIST UNION OF GREAT BRITAIN 
AND IRELAND. 



PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESSES AND PAPERS READ 
BEFORE THE ASSEMBLY. 

1863. — London. 

Progress of the Baptists in the last Sixty Years . . Rev. J. Angus, D.D. 

State of the Baptist Denomination in Wales . . Rev. T. Thomas, D.D. 

State of the Baptist Denomination in Scotland . . Rev. J. Patterson, D.D. 

State of the Baptist Denomination in Ireland . . Rev. C. J. Middleditch. 

1864.— LonAm. 

President's Address Rev. J. P. Mursell. 

The Spiritual Aspects of the Churches . . . . Hon. and Rev. B. W. Noel, 

Our Associations Rev. C. Williams. [M.A. 

Chapel Building Finance Mr. A. T. Bowser. 

Ecclesiastical Relations Rev. C. Stovel. 

Birmingham, 

President's Address Rev. J. P. Mursell. 

RomanisAi and Rationalism Rev. G. Gould. 

The General Baptist Denomination ., .. Rev. W. Underwood, D.D. 

The Influence of the Present Times on Personal 

Religion Rev. C. M. Birrell. 

Church Work in large Towns Rev. J. P. Chown. [M.A. 

Individual Effort for the Conversion of Sinners . . Hon. and Rev. B. W. Noel, 

1865. — London, 

Baptists : Their Existence a Present Necessity . . Rev. J. Angus, D.D. 
Dimculties of the Village Ministry Rev. J. T. Brown. 

Bradford, 

Christian Churches: their success proportionate 

to the presence and grace of the Holy Spirit. . Rev. J. Angus, D.D. 

Our Colleges Rev. N. Haycroft. M.A, 

Our Associations Rev. J. Mursell. 



PRESIDENTIAL AND OTHER ADDRESSES. 5I 



1866. — London. 

The Nature and Claims of Dissent Rev. J. Aldis. 

Religious Beneficence among the Baptists .. Rev. W. R. Stevenson, M.A. 

Liverpool, 

The Duty and Advantages of Domestic Worship. • Rev. J. Aldis. 

The Financial Duties of the Deacon's Office . . Mr. James Benham. 

Thoughts on Public Worship Rev. S. G. Green, B.A. 

The British and Irish Baptist Home Mission . . Rev. C. Kirtland. 

The Jamaica I Dsurrection Mr. E. B. Underhill, LL.D. 

1867.— -Lcwkicm. 

Sacerdotalism in the Church of England . . . . Hon. and Rev. B. W. Noel, 
The Ritualism of Churchmen and the Duties of [M.A. 

Dissenters Rev. C. Vince. 

Cardiff. 

A Brief View of the Churches associated in the) Hon. and Rev. B. W. Noel, 

Union . . . . j M.A. 

Baptist Principles and Religious Liberty . . . . Rev. W. Walters. 

Woman's Work in the Church Rev. J. Jenkyn Brown* 

Ministerial Education in Wales Rev. T. Davies, D.D. 

The Sacramental Theory of the Lord's Supper . . Rev. G. Gould. 

1S6S,— London. 

The Special Duties of Baptists at the present time Rev. F. W. Gotch, LL.D. 

National Education Rev. S. G. Green, B.A. 

Bristol. 

Christ the Centre Rev. F. W. Gotch, LL D. 

Ministerial Failures . . . . Rev. W. Landels, D.D. 

The Baptist College, Bristol ; its History, Students, 

and Treasures . • . • Rev. F. Bosworth, M.A. 

1869. — London, 

The Unstable and the Stable Rev. W. Brock. D.D. 

Church Membership, its Law and its Method • • Rev. C. Bailhache. 

LeicesUr, 

Our Position to-day Rev. W. Brock, D.D. 

The Policy of Nonconformists in view of Eccle- 
siastical Disest:iblishment Rev. C. Williams. 

The Best Means of Overtaking the Religious 

Destitution of our large Towns . . . . Rev. C. Short, M.A. 

The Relation of the Sunday-school to the Con- 
gregation and the Church Mr. S. R. Pattison. 

Precision in Doctrine Rev. D. Gracey. 

The Essential Spirit of Puritanism in Relation to 

the Needs of To-day Rev. W. T. Rosevear. 

1870. — London. 

The Foundation of our Faith . . Rev. W. Robinson. 

Improvement in the Mode of Public Worship . . Rev. C. Stanford, D.D. 

D 2 



52 PRESIDENTIAL AND OTHER ADDRESSES. 



Cambridge. 

A Few Lines of Baptist Histoxy and their Lessons Rev. W. Robinson. 
The Influence of Business on the Christian Life. . Rev. }• J. Goadby. 
Missing Links in our Church Life Rev. W. Brock, jun. 

187X. — London, 

The Character Demanded by the Times . . . . Rev. C. M. Birrell. 

The Best Means of Evangelizing the Masses . . Mr. H. M. Bompas, M.A. 

Northampton, 

Northampton Memories Rev. C. M. Birrell. 

Arbitration Mr. S. R. Pattison, F.G.S. 

Education for the Ministry Rev. S. G. Green, D.D. 

1872. — London. 

The Kingdom of Christ in Relation to the Aspects 

of the Present Time Rev. T. Thomas, D.D. 

The Divine Order of Christian Work . . . . Rev. J. Culross, D.D. 

Manchester. 

The Baptists and Christian Union Rev. T. Thomas, D.D. 

Our Progress : Statistical and Spiritual . . . . Rev. J. Angus, D.D. 
The Religious Aspect of National Education . . Rev. C. Stovel. 

1873. — London. 

Our Position as Baptists Mr. E. B. Underhill, LL.D. 

Nottingham. 

The History of Baptist Missions Mr. E. B. Underhill, LL.D. 

The Changes Required in Sunday-school Education Rev. R. Evans. 
The Promotion of Spiritual Life among the 

Ministers of the Churches Rev. G. Short, B. A. 

The Increase of Spiritual Life in our Churches . . Rev. T. Goadby, B.A. 

An Appeal for our Foreign Missions . . . . Rev. C. B. Lewis. 

Ritualism Rev. W. Landels. D.D. 

1874. — London. 

The Rule of our Fellowship Rev. C. Stovel. 

The Revival in the North cf England . . . . Rev. J. Mursell. 

Newcastlc-on- Tyne, 

The Privileges of our Fellowship Rev. C. Stovel. 

How may Members of Churches best help their 

Ministers ? Rev. J. Watson. 

British and Irish Home Missions Rev. J. Bigwood. 

The Desirability of a Closer Connection between 
the Baptist Union and the leading Baptist 
Societies Rev. R. Glover. 

1875. — London. 

The Gospel for the Day Rev. A. McLaren, D.D. 

Our Relation to Certain Religious Aspects of the 

Time Rev. C. Bailhache. 



PRESIDENTIAL AND OTHER ADDRESSES. 53 



Plymouth- 

The Outward Business of the House of God . . Rev. A. McLaren, D.D. 

Brethren Lately Deceased Rev. R. James. 

The Early Baptists in Devon: their History, 

Sufferings, and Character Rev. F. Bosworth, M.A. 

The Services to be Rendered by Young Men in 

the Work of the Churches Rev. T. Wilkinson. 

1S76,— London. 

Our Denominational Position Internally and 

Externally Surveyed . . * Rev. W. Landels, D.D. 

Religious Education in Board Schools . . . . Rev. E. C. Pike, B.A. 

Birmingham. 

Our Duty as Baptists Rev. W. Landels, D.D. 

Religious Life in the Rural Districts of England Rev. J.Clifford, M.A., LL.B. 

iSjy.^London. 

Christ and the Church Rev. J. T. Brown. 

Newport, Monmouthshire, 

The Ministry and Work of the Church in 

Relation to the People of Our Lord . . . . Rev. J. T. Brown. 

The Evangelization of Cities and Villages. . . . Rev. J. H. Millard, B.A. 

Welsh Churches and their Lessons . . . . Rev. J. Owen. 

1878. — London. 

Ministerial Apprenticeship Rev. H. S. Brown. 

The Best Method of Calling Forth and Cultiva- 
ting Local Evangelists in our Churches . . Rev. J. Aldis. 

The Best Means of Using Unpaid Local 
Evangelists in our Churches in Town and 
Country Rev. J. R. Wood. 

Lesds. 

An Appeal to Well-Educated Young Men to Enter 

the Christian Ministry Rev. H. S. Brown. 

Forms of Worldliness Prevalent in the Christian 

Church Rev. R. H. Marten, B.A. 

Home Mission Work Rev. J. H. Millard, B.A. 

iS7g.— London. 

Our Present Outlook Rev. G. Gould. 

The Evangelistic Work of the Baptist Union . . Rev. E. G. Gange. 

Glasgow. 

The Use and Disuse of Confessions of Faith . . Rev. G. Gould. 
Our Attitude in Relation to the Prevalent Un- 

setUement of Religious Opinion and Belief . . Rev. W. Medley, M.A. 

iSSo.— London (twice) 

The Past and the Present Rev. F. Trestrail, D.D. 

On the Moral Tendency and Influence of Infidelity Rev. F. Trestrail, D.D. 
The Claims of Mission Work on the Support of 

the Churches •. . Rev. J. B. Myers. 



54 



PRESIDENTIAL AND OTHER ADDRESSES. 



The Reality and Power of Evangelistic Work 

Dependent on the Spiritual Life of the 

Churches Rev. J. W. Lance. 

The Spirit and Method of Evangelistic Work . . Rev. H. E. Stone. 
Union Funds and Home Missions Rev. W. Sampson. 

x88i. — London, 

Our Union in Connection with the First Principles 

of Divine Truth Rev. H. Dowson. 

The Present Position and Prospects of the Annuity 

Fund Rev. W. Landels, D.D. 



Portsmouth and Southampton, 

Spiritual Life in Connection with the Assemblies 

and Operations of the Union 

The Condition and Needs of our Village Churches 
Christian Liberty in Relation to Modem Life . . 
Evangelistic Labour a Necessity of Christian Life 

1882. — London. 

The Spirit we need for our Time and Work 
The Church and the World 



Rev. H. Dowson. 
Rev.G. W. Humphreys. B.A, 
Rev. W. Brock. 
Rev. J. Stuart. 



Rev. J.J. Brown. 
Mr. W. P. Lockhart. 



Liverpool. 

Practical Aspects of Church Life 

The Duties and Responsibilities of Church Mem- 
bership 

Evangelistic Church Work in Large Towns 

iSB^.^London. 



Christ in Christian 

The Union and the Associations 



Rev. J, J. Brown. ' 

Rev. R. Lewis. 
Rev, T. V. Tymms. 



Rev. J. P. Chown. 
Rev. W. Woods. 



Leicester, 

Lessons from Leicester Rev. J. P. Chown. 

The Changes Passing over Religious Thought, 

and the Spirit in which we should meet them Rev. B. Bird. 

Christians not in Church Fellowship . . . . Rev. W. C. Upton. 

Church Life and Discipline Rev. W. R. Skerry. 

Church Finance Mr. W. Payne. 

Flunily Religion Rev. C. Stanford D.D. 

1S84.— London, 

The Gift of Prophecy Rev. R. Glover, D.D. 

Truths Essential to Church Prosperity . . . . Rev. W. Anderson. 

Glad Service Rev. J. Aldis. 

Bradford. 

The Work of the Church To-day Rev. R. Glover, D.D. 

The Economy of Spiritual Power in our Churches Rev. W. S. Davis. 

The Pastor in the Sunday School Rev. S. G. Green, D.D. 

Juvenile Discipleship, and How to Deal with it . . Rev. J. R. Wood. 
The Progress of the Baptist Denomination during 

the last Twenty Years Rev. J. Angus, D.D. 

The Progress of the Church of Christ in this 

Country during the laat Twenty Years . . Rev. C. Williams. 



PRESIDENTIAL AND OTHER ADDRESSES. 55 



Signs of Reyival Rev. S. G. Green, D.D. 

The Responsibilities of Church Members. . . • Mr. J. Templeton, F.R.G.S. 
The Quiet Hean Rev. J. Culross, D.D. 

Swanua. 

The Kingdom of Christ Rev. S. G. Green, D.D. 

The Religious Condition of Wales Rev. J. Jones (Felinfoel). 

The Public and Private Use of the Revised Version 

of the Bible Rev. H. C. Leonard, M. A. 

The Answer of the Christian Church to the Bitter 

Cry of the Poor Rev. W. Edwards, B.A. 

Elder Classes: the Link Between the Sunday 

School and the Chiirch Mr. J. E. Tresidder. 

i986.— London, 

A Plea for Union among Baptists Rev. C. Williams. 

The Attitude of the Rural Populations to Chris- 
tianity Rev. T. M. Morris. 

The Difficulties of our Village Churches . . . . Rev. G. Jarman. 

Our Duties as a Denomination to the Rural 

Districts Rev. J. J. Brown. 

The Strength and Beauty of the Sanctuary . . Rev. F. Tucker, B.A. 

Bristol, 

A Plea for Puritanism.. .. Rev. C. Williams. 

A Ministry of Power the Necessity of the Times Rev. J. Clifford, M.A., D.D 
Suggestions for the Formation of a Board of 

Reference Mr. W. M. Fuller. 

The Training of Sunday School Teachers . . Mr. A. Sindall. 

The Spiritual Harvest of the Sunday School . . Mr. G. White. 
The Best Means of Maintaining the Spirituality 

of our Church Membership Rev. J. T. Briscoe. 

The Best Methods of Using the Power of our 

Churches Rev. J. R. Wood. 

1887. — London, 

The Testimony of Life Rev. J. Culross, D.D. 

Our Prayer Meetings . . . . Rev. J. Aldis. 

Sheffield, 

Dost Thou Believe on the Son of God ? . . . . Rev. J. Culross, D.D. 

The Churches and the Coming Ministry . . . . Rev. G. P. Gould, M.A. 

The Work of the Church amongst the Young . . Rev. S. R. Aldridge, B.A., 
Fellowship Considered in some of its Ideal [LL.B. 

Aspects Rev. E. Medley, B.A. 

Church Fellowship Rev. W. Landels, D.D. 

iSS8,^London, 

The Great Forty Years; or, the Primitive 

Chiistian Faith, its real Substance and best 

Defence Rev. J. Clifford, M.A., D.D. 

The Supernatural the Essential Element in 

Church Life Rev. T. G. Tarn. 

Lay Preaching and Rural Nonconformity. . . . Rev. W. Bishop. 



56 



PRESIDENTIAL AND OTHER ADDRESSES. 



Huddersfteld. 

The New City of God ; or, the Primitive Christian 
Faith as a Social Gospel 

The Perils of a Pleasure-loving Age ; with Special 
Reference to the Young 

The Cultivation of the Devout Life 

Family Religion . . 

1889. — London. 

Our Life in Christ, that Life for Him : or, Christ 
Living in us, we Living for Him 

Young Women's Guilds 

Guilds for Young Men 

Higher Biblical Criticism 

The Relations of Employer and Employed in the 
Light of the Social Gospel 



Rev. J. Cliiford, M.A., D.D. 

Rev. T. V. Tymms. 
Rev. F. B. Meyer, B.A. 
Rev. W. Cuff. 



Rev. J. T. Wigner. 
Mrs. Edward Medley. 
Mr. D. F. Gotch. 
Rev. J. W. Todd, D.D. 

Mr. T. W. Bushill. 



Birmingham. 

Christian Citizenship 

Woman's Work in the Church 

Child Life in England : its Perils and our Duties 
Some Phases of Ministerial Life and Work 
The Development and Perfecting of the Work of 
Local Preaching 



Rev. J. T. Wigner. 
Mrs. Dawson Bums. 
Rev. B. Waugh. 
Rev. J. Culross, M.A., D.D. 

Mr. Alderman W. R. Wherry. 



X890. — London, 

L^.i" An Effective Ministry of the Word Rev. J. Owen. 

Sunday Morning Classes for Adults . . . . Mr. Alderman W. White. 

Centre and Suburb : a Plea for Christian Work in 

Large Towns Rev. J. J. Brown. 

The Growth of Clericalism Rev. C. W. Vick. 

Cardiff. 

The Free Churches and the People • . . . Rev. J. Owen. 

The Cplture of the Devout Life Revs. J. P. Clark, M. A., and 

J. R. Russell. 

The Organisation of Local Preachers . . . . Mr. G. M. Carlile. 

The Instruction of our Young People in Noncon- 
formist Principles Mr. C. A. Vince, M.A. 

The Claim which our Churches have on the Best 

Services of their Best Men Rev. W. Brock. 

Charm in Church Life Rev. G. Hawker. 

iSgi.— London. 

A Voice from the Pew Col. J. T. Griffin. 

Evangelistic and Philanthropic Work outside our 

own Churches Rev. J. P. Tetley. 

The Right Use of Wealth Mr. A. Briggs, J. P. 

The Sense of Responsibility for Personal Sin . . Rev. G. Hill, M.A. 

Individualism and Socialism Rev. J. G.Greenhough,M.A. 

Manchester. 

The Greater Forty Years ; or, The Progress of 
Christ's Kingdom during the last Four 

Decades . . Col. J, T. Griffin. 

Our Colleges Rev. J. Cnlross, D.D. 

The Work of the Church for Elder Scholars . . Mr. A. White. 

Women's Work among the Sick Poor . . , . Miss Farrer, M.B., B.S. 

Women's Work in Connection with the Social 

Condition of the Poor Miss Edith A. Angus. 

The Christian Conception of Society . . . . Rev. J. Clifford, M.A., D.D. 



PRESIDENTIAL AND OTHER ADDRESSES. S7 



1892. — London (twice). 

The Witness of the Bible to itself Rev. R. H, Roberts, B.A. 

Baptist Church Extension in Large Towns , . Rev. J. H. Shakespeare, M.A. 
The Witness of the Bible to the Kingdom of ) « « tt Roberts B A 

Heaven upon earth j t • • 

Divine Power, the Need and the Heritage of 

Christian Workers Rev. W. J. Henderson, B.A. 

1893. — London. 

Our Greatest Need . . . . Rev. T. M. Morris. 

Church Worship — 

Prayer Rev. J. Bailey, B.A. 

Praise Rev. H. Bonner. 

Labour Problems in the Light of the Gospel . . Rev. J. C. Carlile, M.L.S.B. 

Reading. 

Our Proper Work Rev. T. M. Morris. 

The Better Equipment of Sunday School 

Teachers in View of the Demands of our Age Rev. C. Brown. 

1S94. — London. 

Baptists in Relation to other Christians and to 

some of the Special Questions of fhe Day . . Rev. G. Short, B.A. 
Ministerial Life and Work — 
The Aim and Results of an Evangelical Ministry Rev. W. E. Winks. 
The Distinctively Pastoral Relation of the 

Minister to his People Rev. L. G. Carter. 

The Spirit in which we should regard the Present 

Phases of Biblical Criticism Rev. S. Vincent. 

NewcastU-on-Tyne, 

The Religious Instruction of the Young . . . . Rev. G. Short, B.A. 

Young People's Societies of Christian Endeavour Rev. J. Stuart. 

Indifference to Religion: its Roots and Remedies Rev. J. R. Wood, 

Broken Ideals . . Rev. J. Thew. 

1895. — London. 

A Puritan Message to the Democracy . . . . Rev. J. G. Greenhough, M.A. 

The Betting Fever Rev. J. Baillie. 

Our Church Polity in relation to the Churches . . Rev. R. Glover, D.D. 

Our Church Polity in relation to the Pastors . . Rev. J. Thew. 

Consecration to Christ Rev. B. Bird. 

Portsmouth. 

A Free Churchman's Thoughts about the Church Rev. J. G. Greenhough, M.A. 

Hymnody in our Churches Rev. S. G. Green, D.D. 

Hymnody in Mission Services Rev. F. C. Spurr. 

•• Help Clement also " Rev. W. J. Styles. 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE SPRING ASSEMBLY, 



HELD IN 



LONDON, 

April 22«i, 2yd^ 24th and 25/A, i8'95. 



MONDAY, APRIL 23RD. 
BLOOMSBURY CHAPEL. 

HOME MISSION SERMON. 

At noon, Rev. H. Arnold Thomas, M.A., of Bristol, preache<l 
tlu^ Annual Sermon on behalf of the Home Mission, from 
Romans x., i. 

FIRST SESSION. 



DEVOTIONAL SERVICE. 

At three o'clock a Devotional Service was held, conducted by 
the retiring President, Rev. G. Short, B.A. Prayer was offered 
by Rev. D. P. McPherson, B.D., of Exeter, and Mr. H. Dibben^ 
ot London, 



SPRING ASSEMBLY. 59 



NEW PRESIDENT. 

At the close of this service, Mr. Short introduced, as his 
successor to the Chair, Rev. J. G. Greenhough, M.A., whose 
first business was to appoint the following gentlemen as 

SCRUTINEERS 

For the election of the Council and the Vice-President: — 
Rev. A. B. Middleditch (Convener), Mr. J. Carter, Mr. J. A. 
Curtis, Rev. R. A. Elvey, Rev. F. James, Mr. H. W. Pewtress, 
Mr. J. Ryan, Mr. J. Sheen, and Mr. H. W. Smith. 

ANNUAL REPORT. 

The Annual Report of the Council, copies of which had been 
circulated in the Assembly, was adopted on the motion of the 
Secretary, seconded by Mr. J. A. Compston, of Leeds. 

HOME MISSION CENTENARY. 

The following resolution was moved by Rev. C. Brown, of 
London, seconded by Mr. Alderman D. Clarke, of High 
Wycombe, Chairman of the Home Mission Committee, and 
carried unanimously : — 

" That this Assembly having heard the Report cf the Couocil with 
regard to the urgent need for a larger income on behalf of the Home Mission » 
in order to continue the work already undertaken, and meet the pressing 
and increasing call for further help, and in view of the interesting fact 
that the Mission will attain its Centenary in 1897, hereby resolves that 
the Churches and Associations be requested to arrange for the making of 
collections and the gathering of subscriptions to further the work of the 
Mission, and worthily commemorate the Centenary by securing an 
adequate permanent increase of the Fund, and authorizes the Council to 
make an appeal accordingly." 

ELECTION OF VICE-PRESIDENT. 

Rev. A. B. Middleditch, on behalf of the Scrutineers, 
announced, in accordance with Bye-law I., as the result of a 
second ballot, the election of Rev. Thomas Vincent Tymms, of 
Rawdon College, as Vice-President of the Union for the ensuing 
year, and Mr. Tymms briefly responded, accepting the office. 

ELECTION OF OFFICERS AND AUDITORS. 

The election of the Officers of the Union and of Auditors for 
its Funds was moved from the Chair, seconded by Mr. R. 



6o SPRING ASSEMBLY. 



Cleaver, J. P., of Northampton, and unanimously carried as 
follows : — 

(i) Officers :—{a) Treasurer— Mr. W. W. Baynes, J. P. 

{b) Secretary— Rev. S. H Booth, D.D. 

{2) Auditors : 

(a) General Expenses Fund — Mr. W. E. Cove and Mr. 
B. W. Chandler, F.C.A. 

{b) Home Mission Fund — Mr. H. R. Parker, Mr. H. 
Potter and Mr. B. W. Chandler, F.C.A. 

(r) Church Extension Fund — Mr. A. T. Chew, Mr. R. 
Gordon and Mr. B. W. Chandler, F.C.A. 

(i) Annuity Fund — Mr. A. Faulkner, Mr. A. Gurney 
Smith and Mr. B. W. Chandler, F.C.A. 

{e) Augmentation Fund— Mr. J. Winterton and Mr. 
B. W. Chandler, F.C.A, 

(/) Literature and Education Funds — Mr. Percy C. 
Webb and Mr. B. W. Chandler, F.C.A. 

On the motion of the Secretary, the Session was adjourned at 
5 p.m. 

PUBLIC WORSHIP. 

At seven o'clock, worship was conducted by the Vice-Picesident, 
who read Psalm cxlv. and Acts iii., 24 to iv., 12. 

PRESIDENT'S ADDRESS. 
The President then delivered the following address : — 

A PURITAN MESSAGE TO THE DEMOCRACY. 

Among the various centenary celebrations of recent years there 
has been perhaps none more remarkable than the latest — the 
tercentenary of Archbishop Laud. It is not surprising that it 
awakened little interest — that most Churchmen ignored it, and 
not a few wished it had been let alone. The surprising thing is 
that it should have been thought of at all. To set up an image 
of Laud, and summon all men by sound of clerical sackbut and 
psaltery to come and bow down to it, is one of those anachronisms 
at which patience grows angry and charity smiles. The Bishop 
of Peterborough half apologized for the attempt by confessing 
that the search for heroes in those times was fruitless. We can 



prestdrnt's address. 6i 



understand his difficulty, though we do not share it. The 
exigencies of his position limited the field of his research ; yet 
surely the annals of the Episcopal Church are not so barren of 
great names and memories worth reviving, that it must needs 
give this man a foremost place in its martyr roll, and invest him 
with the saint's aureola. The man who represented and em- 
bodied in his small person and unexpansive mind all those 
distorted views and stifling principles which our English nation 
has grown out of, and is almost ashamed to remember: the 
sworn foe of political and religious liberty, the champion of a 
close and cruel intolerance, the fussy inquisitor, the ubiquitous 
spy, the man who lost the patriot in the priest, the Christian in 
the ecclesiastic, the man in the machinery, the idolator of form 
and uniform, slave of etiquette and master of postures, who 
substituted gewgaws for grace, candles for conscience, rubrics 
for righteousness, and dead works for a living God. Surely it 
were better that this man should be allowed to slumber on in 
the oblivion to which kindly time has consigned him. There 
are some graves which it is well not to disturb. Even after the 
lapse of centuries the ashes do not smell sweet. Requiescat I 
we can easily forgive if we are only permitted to forget. 

But this attempt to glorify Laud deserves our commendation 
in one respect. In these days it is refreshing to find people who 
are not ashamed of their, forefathers — who believe that great 
men lived before the giants of the nineteenth century arose, and' 
that the past is not a museum of forsaken idols and fossilised 
stupidities, but a pantheon of hallowed figures and a storehouse of 
inspiring memories. To mistake the objects of our reverence is an 
intellectual or moral blunder, but to have no reverence at all is the 
sin against the Holy Ghost. To glorify those who were unworthy 
of it is to follow marsh lights instead of heavenly stars, but to- 
recognise no light save that which flashes from modern mirrors- 
is to see our own faces in a glass and call them the faces of the 
Almighty. This age is too much disposed to fling scorn upon 
the dead : to fancy that their heroisms were crazes, their ideals- 
delusions, and their thoughts childish gropings in the dark. We 
are afraid of not being up to date. The charge of being old- 
fashioned frightens a great many people out of their convictions, 
and some few out of their wits. We must have new altars, new 
prophets, and, alas, a ''new woman." Our systems have issued 
from the Patent Office marked absolutely original. Our **isms" 
are of yesterday if they are not of to-day. Some of our theologies 
are like spring birds recently fledged — vain enough to think that 
their untried wings can carry them higher than St. Paul's 
soarings. We have even new Churches of which our fathers 
were ignorant — a Labour Church, a Church of Humanity, a- 



62 SPRING ASSEMBLY. 



Church of Our Father, and a Church bom in an Editor's room 
begotten by a Reviewer of Reviews, and happily stillborn. 
'< Mons parturit et nascitur ridiculus mus.*' There is a popular 
idea that this modern age sprang fully formed like Athena from 
some Zeus's wise head : there was no groaning and travailing in 
pain to produce it. It was not the fruit of other men's labour. 
It was self-created. Its own wisdom laid the egg from which it 
was hatched. 

But this self-conceit is the child of ignorance. If we 
despise our fathers it is because we do not understand them. 
We are so engrossed with the novel and the newspaper 
that we have not time to look back, and we think the clatter of 
modem tongues perfect music because they are the only voices 
we have heard. 

And not to know the past is to misread the present. The 
problems of to-day are tne outcome of many yesterdavs. He 
who knows not what his fathers thought cannot think wisely 
himself. There is historical continuity in all things. We cannot 
build lasting fabrics with absolutely new material ; there must 
be at least the old rock underneath if the bricks and mortar are 
modern. Our secularisms, socialisms, materialisms, agnos- 
ticisms, some of our very humanitarianisms have no solidity 
because they have no underground. We have seen them 
" spreading like a green bay tree," and we shall see the other 
thing which the Psalmist saw. They are the seed on stony 
ground which springs up forthwith, because it has no root and 
presently withers away. Men do not live on fashions but on 
faiths. We get our opinions, fads and fashions from floating 
things in the circumambient air ; convictions are rooted in the 
deep soil of the past. Our thoughts are shaped, coloured and 
directed by the movements and exigencies of the time, but if 
they have any substance it is supplied by the best thoughts and 
doings of the great ones whom we have left behind. 

•• Those dead but sceptred sovereigns who still rule our spirits 
from their urns." 

Forgive this somewhat stale philosophy, and bear with me 
as I try to point the application. I wish to speak about 
the men whom Laud vainly tried to squeeze into his eccle- 
siastical moulds, and shape into an unlovely and diminutive 
uniformity : the men with whom he carried on that battle of the 
dead letter against the living spirit, which always ends in one 
way, and which ended for him in a way that was not con- 
venient. I wish to ask if those old Puritans have any message 
for the new age — for the democracy in particular, and if 
possible to look at certain questions of the day through Puritan 
eyes. 



president's address. 63 

Perhaps to the general world whose fashion is to sneer at 
these men that it may be saved the trouble of understanding 
them, the proposal to learn anything from this quarter may 
seem as absurd as to animate fossils, or push back the wheels of 
time. But not to you : " Ye are the children of the prophets," 
not yet wholly ashamed of your ancestry, possessing, I trust, 
some of their spirit, and at least patient enough to bear with 
one who thinks that they were far above our scorning, and that 
some of the light which they had was not only clearer than 
Laud's candles, but more heavenly than the electric brilliance 
in which we walk. 

I am not going to do them injustice by unmeasured and 
unqualified praise. Walking in their company one should at 
least learn to be honest and truthful, for they were nothing if 
they were not that ; and either to extenuate their faults or laud 
extravagantlv their virtues would be to offend their memories 
and prove that we are wanting in their best qualities. We 
understand many things better than they did. We*take wider 
views because we stand upon their shoulders, and illumination 
from various sources has fallen upon human problems, and upon 
God's own revelation, which they were not privileged to see. 
The heavens have not been shut up through these centuries, 
nor has the praying heart found the vision always sealed and 
waited in vain for the fuller light to break through the clouds. 
To accept the Puritan theology as a complete and authoritative 
statement of God's thought is to credit men with omniscience, 
and to place a human limitation on the outflow of the Divine 
Spirit. To moor ourselves to that old anchorage is indeed to be 
safe from "every changeful wind of doctrine," but it is also to 
feel no more the mighty current of living spiritual force which 
bore them on to greatness. 

The soul of Puritanism lives for ever, but some of the forms 
in which it appeared fall away. The body decays, it is even 
buried, the spirit survives. Every earnest age is animated by 
it afresh. Whenever Christ's power is unusually felt Puritanism 
comes from its grave again like Lazarus, but not to walk among 
living men in the grave clothes in which it was buried. It is 
arrayed in new garments of beauty and praise. 

We have learned things which they knew not, or only saw 
" through a glass darkly," and which we would not willingly 
let go. We would not exchange the throbbing, tender, pitiful 
heart of this age for the sterner thoughts which gave them 
heroic strength, but often froze up the fountain of their tears. 
The sweet humanities of our times, the gentler sentiments, the 
broader charities, the larger hopes, we would not lose, even to 
get back their more virile faith, and rock-like righteousness. 



64 SPRING ASSEMBLY. 



They saw the majesty and sovereignty of God, His holiness and 
power, with eyes of awe and reverence to which we are 
strangers. They stooped lower at His feet in self-abasement 
than we do, and therefore were lifted up higher. But in veiling 
their faces from the splendour they lost sight of that rainbow 
which is around the throne, and of which the rain-drops are 
surely Divine tears. They believed that the throne of the 
universe was established in righteous and irresistible power, 
and the touch of Almightiness upon them made them mighty, 
but they sometimes forgot that in the midst of the throne there 
is a gentle and suffering Lamb, and that the central and deepest 
force of all is love, pity, and self-sacrifice. We know these 
things better than they did, not because we are wiser, more 
thoughtful, more logical, better theologians, we are not ; but 
because we have done what the Master advised, we have carried 
into the study of these things more of the child's heart, and 
" the things which were hidden from the wise and prudent have 
been revealed unto babes.** 

I am more anxious, however, to emphasise the points in which 
they were, and still are, our masters. It is far easier to criticise 
their limitations than to take a just measure of their moral 
magnitude. The nineteenth century cannot get a proper 
perspective of the seventeenth. We are too luxurious to 
appreciate the Puritan's simplicities, too much the servants of 
forms and conventions to understand his rigorous sincerities, 
too pleasure-loving to give him credit for an honest disdain of 
the world's frivolities. Above all, we are not sufficiently imbued 
with religious thought to enter into the feelings of men who 
lived in the presence of Gcd continually, who felt His hand 
upon them in their daily thoughts and work, who talked about 
Him as naturally as we talk about the weather or politics or 
business, and who carried a spirit of prayer into every resolve 
and act of their lives. Think how far we have left that religious 
atmosphere behind in which five hundred English gentlemen, 
members of Parliament, could kneel down together on the 
floor of the House of Commons, crying to God on behalf 
of their poor country, and shedding tears copiously as they 
prayed. Imagine the present House of Commons doing this, 
with Mr. Labouchere •leading the supplications ; think what a 
power of imagination is needed to reproduce that scene, and 
then judge how remote that world is from ours. It is so much 
the fashion now, indeed, to keep what religious convictions we 
have discreetly hidden in our own breasts, save on the stated 
occasions of worship, that we find it hard to believe in the 
absolute sincerity of men who spoke without reserve, in all 
scenes and companies, in letters and business transactions and 



president's address. 65 

political speeches, about their faith in God, and the solemnities 
of the world to come ; and alas ! there are comparatively few men 
now who could do it without some measure of affectation and un- 
reality, because there are few who walk close enough to God to 
give the clear and honest ring to such language. We would 
gladly forego some of our modern accomplishments and crafts 
to get back the temper and spirit of men who did all their work 
under the great Taskmaster's eyes ; who needed no press 
criticism to keep them up to their public duties ; no paid over- 
seers to watch them at their humbler labours, who believed that 
every word, action, and thought was weighed and scanned by 
Him, who walked always in the searching light of Divine 
omniscience, and in view of the judgment throne. It would 
save us from some fears and forebodings concerning the 
immediate future ; it might even be better for our commercial 
interests, and it would certainly contribute greatly to the puri- 
fying of national morals if that searching light were felt a 
little more on the Stock Exchange, in the rooms where limited 
liability companies are floated and directed, and in the factories 
where the operative thinks that it is to the interest of his class 
to do as little work as possible. In these days when the law is 
so imposingly elaborate, and yet so impotent ; the press so lynx- 
eyed, and yet so blind ; and Trades* Unions so solicitous about 
increase of wages and shortening of hours, and often so 
indifferent about the conscientious discharge of duty, it would 
be an advantage, indeed, if we could add to the resources of 
civilization a little more of what those less polished fathers of 
ours called the fear of God. 

And, truly, if the new democracy were not so intolerant of 
everything that is old, it might improve its temper and learn 
some lessons of moderation, and even of wisdom in the Puritan 
school. That school was the Bethlehem of the new age. The 
open Bible gave it birth, and it was cradled in Puritan homes. 
Then and there man discovered his own worth. He swept aside 
priestly veils and laid himself open to the direct light of God, and 
in that hght he stood self-revealed. It showed him the infinite 
value of the individual soul, the preciousness of each single life 
in the eyes of the Redeemer, and the unconquerable energy 
of each single soul when allied by faith with the Almighty. 
There he foimd himself exalted to be a king and priest by divine 
right, ennobled by the imposition of a mightier hand than that of 
princes, raised immeasurably in the scale of being, and energized 
with a wonderful consciousness of human dignity. Puritanism 
was the upspringing of a new and larger manhood, in the presence 
of which titles and degrees, social distinctions, intellectual 
superiorities, and even royal pretensions became of slight and 



66 SPRING ASSEMBLY. 



almost contemptible importance. From that fountain issued 
the ever broadening current of modem democracy which is 
carrying us all along to unknown and doubtful issues, issues 
however, which are only to be dreaded if the religious spirit 
which originated the movement is trampled out by gross 
material and secular forces. The Puritans believed that man 
was great not by virtue of his humanity, but by virtue of his 
kinship with God. He was nothing unless he was a temple of 
the Divine. It was the fatherhood of God that ennobled him. It 
was faith and spiritual receptivity that made him strong. It 
was moral qualities that gave him all his worth. They knew 
nothing of the modern rant which claims for all men a natural 
equality, which professes a sort of sublime indifference to moral 
distinctions, which demands for the indolent and thriftless the 
rewards of the sober and dutiful, and which in its insane 
endeavours to force a general levelling up would bring about a 
universal levelling down. The Puritans were not so blind to 
facts. The common talk about human equality is mere bubble 
blowing. Start from a religious foundation and there is some ground 
for it. Set it in the light of God and it may bear examination ; 
acknowledge that we are the children of God, and alike dear to 
Him, and it may be thought of, but apart from that it is a 
theory which explodes in laughter. It is absurd to suppose 
that all inequalities are produced by social conditions. They 
are aggravated and intensified, undoubtedly, but with the most 
favourable social conditions most of them would remain. We 
are not born equal or gifted equally. We are born with an 
amazing and sometimes awful diversity of mental and bodily 
powers, clever and dull, feeble as cripples or abounding in 
energy, capable of only the lowest work, or fit for works of 
genius. And no contrivances can make men equal. Though 
you were to proclaim equality by a thousand Acts of Parliament 
you would not render it a fact or induce the world to believe it. 
And in every society, no matter how constituted, and though 
you employed all the machinery which collectivism could devise 
to chain men down to the same level, the inequality would assert 
itself, and there would be leaders and led, and the morally 
strong would get to the front, and the weak would be left in the 
rear, and in spite of all you could do to prevent it there would 
be diversity of rewards. 

It is only in the sight of God and in our relationship to God 
that there can be anything approximating to human equality. 
Some puny crippled child says to his big strong brother, " I am 
in all things equal to you," and the brother good-hum ouredly 
laughs. " Yes,*' the feeble one says, ** for my father thinks as much 
of me as he does of you. I am as dear in my mother's eyes as you 



president's address. 67 



are." Then the big brother takes the little one up in his arms and 
says, " Yes, that is true, we are equal, and for father's sake 
and for your sake because you are so weak, I will help to carry 
you until we reach the journey's end." I can understand that. 
That is Christian equality. Whatever we are, strong or feeble, 
brilliant or commonplace, capable of the highest work or only 
fit for drudgery, we have the same place at God's feet, the same 
share in His love. He does not think less of us because we can 
only limp along in the rear. " It is not His will that the least 
of His little ones should perish," and it is only as men feel that 
and recognise the obligation of brotherhood, and not by any 
forcing socialistic process, that we can attain to any real sense 
of human equality. 

The doctrine of human brotherhood has no meaning save that 

which the Puritans gave to it. They found it in the Divine 

fatherhood. If they put limits upon the Divine fatherhood 

which to some of us are unwarranted, that is not the question. 

At least they were not guilty of the modern absurdity of thinking 

that there can be a family without a parentage. To-day some of 

the men who are most urgent in pressing the claims of human 

brotherhood are the men who want us to throw down our altars 

and put God out of our thoughts. We are to worship humanity, 

•without knowing whence it came or whither it goes. They do 

xiot believe that we ever had a father, but they are clamorous 

in asserting that we are brothers. It is possible that we 

came not from Adam but from apes — nay, the latest 

scientific theory is that the origin of all things was a cell — 

the word is spelt with a " c " — and yet we are all brothers. 

What stuff is this ? What is it but stealing the clothes of 

Christianity and rejecting the living body of it ? It is playing 

vrith fine words that once had a meaning and have lost it. 

W^hat makes brotherhood but fatherhood ? How can there be a 

family if there has never been a parent ? All this is juggling 

with names, and not even clever jugglery, for a child can see 

through the trick. Fraternity on a basis of materialism and 

agnosticism is an inverted pyramid, or like a spinning-top kept 

going by incessant lashing. There is no reason apart from God 

why the man of refinement and elevated thought should admit 

to brotherhood the man of soddened intellect and coarse 

nature ; no reason why the strong should bear the burdens of 

the weak ; no reason why the dismal science of political economy 

should not have free course, and self-interest be made supreme. 

It is only as we walk in the light Divine that we have fellowship 

one with another. We are united in family bonds by that same 

•* golden chain of prayer " which binds us to the feet of the 

Father, and without that all the grand humanitarian sentiments 

E 2 



68 SPRING ASSEMBLY. 



which are so much boasted of would perish as lighted faggots 
go out when they are flung off from the parent fire. 

The aim and ideal of modern democracy points to the 
equal elevation of all, and to that end it ^ks the sweeping 
away of law-made distinctions, and of ' all fictitious and 
artincial superiorities. It is an ambition with which in all 
its nobler aspects we are in profound sympathy. Our 
ears are open to the bitter cries of city life, to the complaints of 
the unprivileged classes, and our hearts are with them in their 
aspirations after a better lot. If it were otherwise we should 
have no part with the Master. We want to see men every- 
where rise to a proper conception of manhood, and endowed 
with power to become sons of God. " It shall come to pass in 
that day that the feeblest shall be as David and David as 
an angel of God." But the way to accomplish that is not to 
bring David down to the stature of the feeblest. The Puritan 
doctrine of election finds little favour now either among the 
proletariat or in Christian circles. It is often treated with a 
grimace, and to venture a word in its defence would be to place 
oneself among antiquarian curiosities. Yet the derision which 
it provokes is the derision of superficial minds — minds which 
have not discernment enough to distinguish between the husk 
and the grain. There is an imperishable body of truth beneath 
the changing form. "The outward man perisheth, but the 
inward man is renewed from day to day." There is always an 
election of grace. God carries the world forward by the 
instrumentality of leading spirits. He lifts the mass of men up 
through the few who are specially endowed with gifts and 
goodness ; the sunlight shines upon the hilltop before it reaches 
the valleys below ; the earth is saved by the salt of the earth. 
If we have no excellence in the front ranks we shall have less 
than mediocrity in the host behind. One may discern in the demo- 
cracy a growing impatience of every kind of superiority. Its cry is 
'* Make no more giants, God, but elevate the race "; and that 
cry recalls an older saying, " Whom the Gods wish to destroy 
they first make mad." If God makes no more giants we shaU 
all be dwarfs. Let us beware lest in our crusade against 
individualism we crush individuality, and in our impatience of 
social differences abolish moral excellence. Pictures of a 
socialistic paradise, where all shall be equally strong and 
happy, are charming in the distance ; seen close at hand they 
are made up of men and women as dull and imiform as waxwork, 
and all small. We look for the kingdom of God, and lo, we 
find a kingdom of Liliputians. If there be no free play for the 
individual forces there will be a speedy decay of manhood. We 
grieve over the evils wrought by excessive competition. They 



president's address. 69 



are manifest and deplorable, but the dead level and torpor that 
would ensue from the absence of competition would be hideous 
to contemplate. The schemes, organizations and trades' unions 
which would provide compulsorily for the indolent and improvi- 
dent, secure a minimum wage for the worthy and the worthless, 
remove all incentives^ to superior industry, and chain the 
aspiring men down to the heels of the sluggish, would arrest all 
growth, clip the wings of energy and genius, and corrupt the 
very springs of honesty. In like manner, to propose that 
Government shall do everything for us is to propose that we 
abdicate and lose the power of doing anything for ourselves. 
To make the Government our nursing mother is not far removed 
from a return to babyhood. My Puritan blood revolts against 
Government drill. People who believe that religion needs no 
State support cannot consistently draw the line there. The 
State is no wiser than the average contents of the ballot-box, 
and its hands are bandaged in red tape. It is sufficiently clever 
to fashion imitative functionaries and automata ; but manhood 
develops on surer lines when the State secures it room to work 
in, and then for the most part leaves it alone. If we have to 
submit to the rule of majority, there should be surely some limit 
to its power. The rights of man are more sacred than the whims 
of the greater number. The majority may be as unreasonably 
despotic as those Stuarts against whom our Puritan fathers 
fought, and collectivism may crush personal liberty as cruelly 
as Laud's forcing presses tried to do. We shall not raise the 
stature of the masses by cutting off all the tall men's heads ; we 
shall not accelerate the forward movement of humanity by tying 
up the feet of the foremost. Give us more giants, God, for we 
want to see the race elevated. Give us more elect men. There 
never was a time when leaders were more needed ; leaders who 
lead and are not content to follow ; ^ living and original voices, 
not mere echoes ; men who believe in principles more than in 
policy, in conscience more than in votes, in the approval of God 
more than in the applause of the crowd ; above all, men ** pre- 
destinated to be conformed to the image of Christ,'' that the world 
in following them may come nearer to Him whose face they 
shew. Without them the march of the democracy will be but 
" the blind leading the blind until they both fall into the ditch." 
The secular temper of the new age needs leavening with the 
spirit of the Puritans. Those men believed that righteousness 
exalted a nation, and that if we would have other things added 
we must seek first the kingdom of God. They verily thought 
that life was more than meat, and the body more than raiment, 
and that a man's well-being did not consist exclusively in " the 
abundance of the things" which he possessed. They kept 



JO SPRING ASSEMBLY. 



moral and spiritual ideals ever before them. The Millennium for 
which they looked was not earth-born but heaven descended. 
It was not a paradise of material comforts but a sphere in which 
God's will would be supreme, and the blessings of obedience 
would fall upon a regenerate humanity. No lower ideal than 
that can ever be entertained by those who call themselves the 
children of the Puritans. We are confronted now by a very 
different spirit. There is a widespread conviction or sentiment 
that nothing more is needed for the redemption of society but a 
rearrangement of social conditions; salvation will be wrought 
by science and sanitation; the heart will be cleansed by an 
external application ; lusts, envies, and hatreds will cease when 
the body's cravings are satisfied. Take care of the animal 
in man, and the spiritual will take care of itself. Brighten the 
material surroundings and you will bring in the golden age, and 
men will love as brothers, and peace will flow **as a river, and 
righteousness as the waves of the sea." 

On the top of these vain dreams there comes the clamour for a 
social gospel, though what that phrase means it is not always 
easy to define. The preacher is to put into the back-ground 
the eternal truths that he may cater for temporal wants. 
He is ** to forsake the word of God and serve tables ; " he is to 
forget the soul's hunger in appealing for the necessities of the 
body. He is to resign the prophet's functions for the more 
popular arts of the demagogue. We are told even that if Christ 
were to come again He would come as a social reformer, as the 
champion of the labour party ; to multiply loaves, and double 
wages, and satisfy the physical cravings of man. And our 
answer to all this is that if Christ were to come again He would 
come as He came before, to deliver men from the bondage of the 
devil and to save* people from their sins, whether poor people or 
rich people. He would compassionate now as He did then, the 
sufferings, hunger, ignorance and wants of the toiling, groaning 
multitude. He would appeal to those who love Him to busy 
themselves in relieving every kind of human need. But His 
great work would still be to convince the world of sin, righteous- 
ness, and a judgment to come, to prove to men that the main 
cause of their misery is not in things external, but in their 
enmity to God, and the evil of their own hearts, and to lift them 
up by faith, repentance, and regeneration to a new and happier 
Ufe. 

And we cannot and dare not preach any other Gospel. Our 
work is moral and not political. Our weapons are spiritual, 
not carnal. It would be a happy thing indeed if we could 
raise all political and secular things to the high religious level 
as the Puritans did, but the tendency against which we have 



PRESIDENT S ADDRESS. Jl 

to guard is the reverse process, the letting down of religion 
to the secular plane, the surrender of the Divine ideal to 
the pressure of the lower nature. It is ours to declare with 
unwavering voice that " The Kingdom of God cometh not with 
observation," not from the outside, but grows up within. Each 
man must be made sober, pure, unselfish and loving by having 
a new nature given from above before the Millennium can come. 
Each member of society must have the heavenly mind before 
the whole of society can be coloured with heavenly hues, and 
the only way to happiness, whether for the individual or the 
race, leads through the straight gate which the Incarnation 
opened — the way of forgiveness, cleansing and renewal by the 
Holy Ghost. 

I have said comparatively little about the Puritan theology, 
and about the Puritan anthropology nothing at all, nor will I 
speak of it save one word : We have all reacted more or less 
from their severe and uncompromising doctrine of total human 
depravity. Have not some in their revolt from that extreme 
position swung to a far more perilous extreme ? The Puritans 
believed without qualification in what a greater Puritan called 
** The exceeding sinfulness of sin." Scoffers tell us that they 
exaggerated the disease in order to magnify the remedy. And 
it is true that the grace was very wonderful in their eyes, because 
the abyss from which it had saved them was so profound and 
dark. ** Deep called untp deep"; redeeming love opened itself 
out to them in all its grandeur and pathos, because the guilt 
had been so great and the mercy so undeserved. Verily, sin 
was to them a terrible fact, the one grim reality compared 
with which physical pain, blood drops, tears, and even death, 
might be thought of as small evils. How much of this moral 
sensitiveness have we retained ? The temper and spirit of the 
new age have very little of it. We are all shocked by the sight 
of bodily pain ; we quiver like sensitive plants at the very 
thought of blood, and there is a weak sentimentality which 
would spare the most brutal offender the touch of the lash ; but 
sin : what do we feel about that ? The sense of sin in the 
democracy is conspicuously wanting. There is a keen sense of 
injustice and of wrong done by man to man, especially of wrong 
done to the unprivileged classes ; but of sin, in the true meaning 
of that word, there is little or none. Nor is this defect confined 
to one class. We hear common talk about sin and moral 
responsibiUty, and we meet with it in a certain class of light 
literature, which threatens to remove and destroy all sense of 
wrong-doing, to strike at the very roots of conscience, and to 
obliterate the eternal distinction between right and wrong. Sin, 
nay even crime, have come to be regarded in some quarters not 



72 SPRING ASSEMBLY. 



as things to be reprehended, but rather to be pitied. They are 
the result of inheritance, or a mental defect, or a disease, or a 
fault of training, or the inevitable effect of environment ; some- 
thing to be deplored and sympathised with, and treated with 
lavender water and tears, and it is supposed that God will so 
regard them, and make things all smooth and well with the 
worst offender at the end. Ah, well ! I have something of the 
Puritans, and prefer as they did the old Bible ways, which have 
no respect for all this effeminate and hysterical sympathy, which 
waste no pity on confirmed wrong-doers, which uphold the sanctity 
of conscience, which are compassionate with the erring, and merci- 
ful to the penitent, but ever indignant and wrathful with those 
who harden themselves in their iniquity. If our theologies are 
defective, the defects generally have their origin here. They 
have no sufficient conception of the righteousness of God 
because they do not recognise the guilt of man, and they make 
even the Divine love a flaccid and almost immoral benevolence 
because they do not see anything to provoke its indignation. It 
Is through the consciousness of sin that we reach up to the 
unsearchable riches of His grace, to the fact and mystery 
of Atonement, and to that very holiness without which no man 
can see God. And if we do not believe in the sin of the human 
heart, if we do not believe that sin is the one great evil of 
humanity, the one and only thing which God hates with an 
eternal hatred, we might as well tear up our creeds, burn our 
Bibles, and beg one another's pardon for wasting our lives 
in preaching a useless Gospel. 

And now I come to the finish. I have not said these things to 
you because I think you need to be reminded of them, and because 
I fear you have become unfaithful to your best traditions. I 
have ventured to speak in this way because, though in some points 
you may differ from me, I am persuaded that on the main lines 
your thoughts run with mine. I would fain believe, and do believe, 
that whatever changes have affected our denominational faith and 
life, they have left unimpaired the richest and noblest elements 
of our Puritan inheritance. If we have lost a little we have surely 
gained more. Were one of these fathers to re-visit us I think he 
would bring less of the spirit of criticism than the spirit of congratu- 
lation. I can fancy him saying, " You are not so distinctly separate 
from the world as we were. You do not look upon its lighter 
diversions with our stern and scornful eyes. Perhaps we were 
somewhat too rigid, but may not you be getting a little too lax ? 
We read nothing but grave and devout books, and our children's 
lives were a little too dull because we did not give them a touch 
of romance. Perhaps you are wiser in letting imagination have 
fuller play, but your popular literature is now so mixed, so 



PRESIDENT'S ADDRESS. 73 

sensuously realistic, some of it so defiled, that the young heart, 
and the old heart, too, can hardly escape contamination if it be 
allowed the free run of the field. You have made your public 
worship far less sombre than that which we knew. There is 
more beauty in your sanctuaries, and that is well if there be also 
as much strength. Your sermons have been cut shorter and 
shorter, chiefly in compliance with the dictates of the least 
religious. Take care that they do not dwindle to the vanishing 
point. You have pleasant Sunday afternoons, and sometimes 
pleasant Sunday evenings. I can forgive you, though that was 
not our way. I understand your difficulty ; you belong to a 
pleasure-loving generation, which will hardly enter the Lord's 
house unless pleasure is written over the portals, and is reluctant 
to take its heavenly bread without a thick coating of earthly 
sugar — only remember that the religious life cannot be nourished 
wholly on sweets. You love music in your services better than 
we did, though we did not hate it so fiercely as is commonly 
reported. We swept the organs and choirs from the churches 
only because they had first driven out everything else, and it 
seems as if history were repeating itself, and you would by-and- 
bye have to borrow our broom again.'* These things the 
Puritan might say, but I think he would also say, ** You have 
kept the Faith ; you have jealously preserved the truths for 
which we fought and suffered ; you have not cut away the Bible 
with German scissors. All that was deepest in us is as deep in 
you. You have the same sense of human unworthiness ; the 
same trembling, yet mighty clinging to the Cross ; the same 
impassioned love for Him who died thereon. He is to you as 
He was to us. Deity Incarnate, and the fairest of the sons of 
men. On His human side you understand Him better than we 
did, and have caught more of the spirit of His earthly ministry. 
Your sympathies are wider, if not stronger, than ours. You 
think less of the elect, but you have more solicitude for the 
world at large. The enthusiasm of humanity burns in you with 
a purer flame, and you have more hope than we had of bringing 
the whole guilty world to the Redeemer's feet." 

In some such language would a truth- loving Puritan speak 
now if he could address us ; and that at least is the voice in 
which I would speak. We cannot go. back, and we would not 
if we could. My whole point has been not that the former days 
were better than these, but that there were some things in the 
former days which we should do well to recover if we have lost 
them, and to hold fast if we still retain. But if the Church of 
to-day could learn some things from the Puritans it could teach 
them more. It works in broader fields. It is more in touch 
with universal needs. It feels more the throbbings and heavings 



74 SRPING ASSEMBLY. 



of the great human sea. Its heart is expanded with nobler 
charities, and its eyes shine with the light of a fuller promise. 
There has seldom been a time when the Church had a more 
forward look, when its veins and arteries were pulsing with 
more varied activities, when it had more assurance of the Master's 
living presence, and more confidence in His final and complete 
victory. And rarely has there been a time when its tendency 
and urgent and pathetic desire were more towards unity, towards, 
the solid front which is needed by those who are fighting the 
Lord's battle. 

Thank God, we as a denomination are one and in harmony, 
and yet not quite. There is a little rift in the lute ; would to- 
God it were healed. Would that those who went out from our 
Union could understand that their God-appointed place is with 
us. There passed away from us not long ago, it still seems but 
yesterday, one who was called, half in playfulness and half in 
reverence, " the last of the Puritans." He was not the last — 
there are many left, but none that could measure themselves 
against him, or wield with such power the sword of the Spirit. 
His memory will be forever sweet, and men can still conjure 
with his name. It were cruel to use the name for any office save 
that of love and healing. That grave which is still to all, a regret, 
which is to many a shrine of inspiration, should also be our 
place of re-union. If Jacob and Esau, who had so little in 
common, could join hands and mingle tears beside Isaac's 
grave, should not we who are one in all dear things 
let that grave bring us together again ? There is 
nothing to forgive — there are only some things to forget^ 
and, indeed, they are almost forgotten — let it be altogether. 
I know that if he could speak to us now from the clearer light in 
which he walks it would be to say, " Children, love one another.*" 
And if by these trembling words I could make all our brethren 
feel this as I feel it myself, I should be indeed thankful to God 
for this alone that you have called me to occupy this privileged 
position. 

The Session closed at 8.48 p.m. with the Benediction. 



BUSINESS PROCEEDINGS. 75 

TUESDAY, APRIL 23RD. 

BLOOMSBURY CHAPEL. 

SECOND SESSION. 



The President took the Chair at three o'clock. Prayer was 
offered by Revs. E. Carrington, of Sheffield, and T. W» 
Medhurst, of Cardiff. 

THE BETTING FEVER. 

Rev. J. BaiUie, of London, read a paper on " The Betting 
Fever." Revs. W. Evans, of Leicester, followed with some 
remarks upon the subject, and also seconded the following 
resolution, which had been moved by Mr. S. Watson, of 
London : — 

" That this representative meeting views with the greatest distress, the 
growth of gambling amongst all classes of the community, and would 
earnestly call upon the Legislature to turn their serious attention to this 
unspeakable evil, and, with a view to its abatement and ultimate 
suppression, to enforce the laws already existing, and enact such other 
measures as will bring about this desirable object." 

ATROCITIES IN ARMENIA. 

Mr. T. H. Bennett, of Derby, moved, and Rev. F. E. 
Robinson, B.A., B.D., of Leighton Buzzard, seconded, the 
following resolution, which was carried unanimously : — 

" This Assembly emphasizes the action of the Council of the Baptist 
Union in protesting against the atrocities which, on evidence wnich 
cannot be ignored, have been perpetrated on Armenian Christians, and 
implores Her Majesty's Government, in accordance with treaty obliga- 
tions, to take immediate steps to prevent the continuance of such 
barbarous persecution." 

It was also resolved, on the motion of Rev. J. Clifford, D.D., 
of London, that the Officers of the Baptist Union be deputed to 
attend the Conference of the Anglo- Armenian Association on 

Sh May. Rev. G. Short, B.A., of Salisbury, seconded, and at 
s suggestion, it was agreed that Dr. Clifford be also asked to 
represent the Union on that occasion. 



76 SPRING ASSEMBLY. 



BOARD OF CONCILIATION. 

The following resolution was moved by Mr. Alderman G. 
White, J. P., of Norwich, seconded by Rev, W. J. Tomkins, of 
Rushden, and carried unanimously : — 

** In view of the derangement to trade, of the widespread misery to 
feimilies, and of many and often aggravated social evils consequent upon 
strikes and lock-outs, this Assembly of the Baptist Union appeals to 
Parliament, without distinction of party interests, on principles of fair 
dealing, to appdint a National Board of Conciliation to which disputes 
between employers and employed may be referred, with a view to settle- 
ment with promptitude ana justice." 

DISESTABLISHMENT IN WALES. 

Rev. W. Thomas, of London, moved, and Rev. E. C. 
Pike, B.A., of Exeter, seconded, the following resolution, which 
was carried unanimously : — 

" The Assembly of the Baptist Union records its satisfaction at the 
second reading by a substantial majority, of the Bill for the Disestablish- 
ment and Disendowment of the Episcopal Church in Wales, and hopes 
that with all proper dispatch such Bill in its main provisions will become 
law. believing— as this Assembly has always affirmed— that all State 
Establishment of Religion is opposed to the progress of Christ's Kingdom 
on earth, and consequently to the best interests of the nation." 

TEMPERANCE REFORM. 
The following was unanimously adopted, upon the motion of 
Rev. R. Richard, of Bristol, seconded by Rev. S. Vincent, of 
Plymouth : — 

•• This Assembly expresses its approval of the provisions of the Bill 
which has just been introduced to the House of Commons by the 
Chancellor of the Exchequer to establish local control over the trad£c in 
intoxicating liquor, and urges that the Bill be pressed forward with the 
utmost energy, so that it may speedily become law." 

The President pronounced the Benediction, and the Session 
closed at 5.10 p.m. 



wednesday, april 24th- 

memorial halt ^ ''ingp' 
stree: 

HOME MISSION AND "EN 

MEET 

At half-past five o'clock refres sd, 

quarter to seven o'clock the Cha r, , 

E. Wood, J. P., of Leicester. 



\ 



BUSINESS PROCEEDINGS. 



77 



Prayer was oflFered by Rev. G. Hider, Mission Pastor, Great 

Sampford, Essex. 

After the Secretary had made a statement regarding the 
Home Mission and Church Extension Fmids, addresses were 
given by (i) Rev. A. C. Batts, of Upwell, on ** The Position 
and Prospects of Village Nonconformity ; (2) Rev. C. Joseph, of 
Portsmouth, on " Christ and Civic Life ; " and (3), Rev. W. J. 
Woods, B.A., Secretary of the Congregational Union of 
England and Wales, on ** The Free Churches in English 
Cities." 

The Vice-President pronounced the Benediction. 



THURSDAY, APRIL 25TH. 

BLOOMSBURY CHAPEL. 

THIRD SESSION. 



The President took the chair at ten o'clock. ' 
Prayer was oflfered by Rev. G. E. Ausden, of Smarden, and 
Mr. T. Whittard, of Cheltenham. 

DEPUTATION FROM SCOTLAND. 

The President cordially introduced Rev. D. W. Jenkins, of 
Glasgow, President of the Baptist Union of Scotlandf, who was 
present to represent that body, and he conveyed its fraternal 
greeting to the Assembly in a short address. 

THE MINISTRY AND THE CHURCHES. 

Rev. R. Glover, D.D., of Bristol, gave an address on ** Our 
Church Polity in relation to the Churches," and after prayer by 
Rev. W. Townsend, of Canterbury, Rev. J. Thew, of Leicester, 
read a paper on " Our Church Polity in relation to the Pastors." 
Mr, W* Payne, of London, then led in prayer, and discussion 
.ensijej^ -.'hlch Rev, J. E, Bennett, B.A., of London; Mr. 
of Sheffield ; Rev. G. Jarman, of Bristol, and 
. B*A., of Exeter, took part. It was unanimously 
e motion of Re%\ J. T< Brown, of Northampton, 
S. P. Carey, M,A., of Loughborough : — 
ficil be recjuested ta take into their serious considera- 
Q of how to secure a closer fellowship between our 
deal with those sources of weakness affecting our 
■i been p^mted out by Dr. Glover and Mr. Thew; and 
re^dp ^sembly at the earliest possible 



78 SPRING ASSEMBLY. 



THE POPE'S LETTER, 

The following resolution was moved by Rev. R. Glover, D.D., 
of Bristol, seconded by Rev. E. Medley, B.A., of London, and 
carried : — 

" That the Officers of the Union be requested to prepare and submit to 
the Autumn Assembly a letter to the Pope in reply to his recent invitation to 
English Christians to return to the Church of Rome." 

CLOSING ADDRESS. 

Rev. B. Bird, of Plymouth, gave the closing Address to the 
Assembly on " Consecration to Christ." 

CONCLUSION OF SESSIONS. 

The Vice-President offered prayer, and this terminated the 
third and last Session of the Spring Assembly. 

At the kind invitation of the London Baptist Association, the 
members of the Assembly partook of luncheon in the King's 
Hall, Holbom Restaurant, at two o'clock. 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE AUTUMN ASSEMBLY, 

HELD IN 

PORTSMOUTH, 

October yth, 8/A, gth and lo/A, 1895. 



MONDAY, OCTOBER 7TH. 

HOME MISSION AND CHURCH EXTENSION 
MEETING, 

TOWN HALL. 



At 5 p.ni. refreshments were kindly provided by the Local 
Committee, and 

At 7 p.m. the Chair was taken by Rev. C. Joseph, Chairman 
of the Local Committee, who gave a cordial welcome to the 
Union on behalf of the Churches in Portsmouth. 

Prayer was offered by Rev. F. W, Reynolds, Mission Pastor, 
Redruth. 

After the Secretary had made a statement regarding the Home 
Mission and Church Extension work of the Union, addresses 
were given by (i) Mrs. Bonwick, of London, on ** The 
Evangelization of the Villages " ; (2) Rev. J. H. Shakespeare, 
M.A., of Norwich, on " Some Conditions of Social Progress " ; 
and (3) Rev. W. Cuff, of London, on ** Men, Money and 
Movement.*' 



8o AUTUMN ASSEMBLY. 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8th. 

At 7.30 P.M. A 

SPECIAL SERVICE 

was held in Fareham (Wesleyan) Chapel by Rev. A. F. Riley, 
of London. 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER qth. 

At 7.30 a.m. Sermons were preached at (i) Kent-street Chapel, 
Portsea, by Rev. J. Wilson, M.L.S.B., of Woolwich, from 
Luke XV., 3 to 10 ; and (2) Elm-grove Chapel, Southsea, by Rev. 

tW. Ewing, M.A., of London (to Christian workers), from 
aniel xi., 32. 

FIRST SESSION. 

LAKE ROAD CHAPEL. 

At 10.6 a.m. the President, Rev. John Gershom Greenhough, 
M.A., took the Chair. After prayer, oflfered by Rev. F. Pugh, 
of Swindon, and Mr. Councillor T. Baker, of Othery, the 
President delivered his address as follows : — 

In the first address which I was privileged to give from the 
Presidential chair, I ventured to lead your thoughts on some- 
what secular lines, and to examine, though I trust with Christian 
eyes, some of the problems and ideals which are agitating the 
popular mind. I had in view the mass of people whom, in 
religious phraseology, we roughly call the world, and though I 
did not overlook the welcome feet that in the great multitude 
which makes up the democracy there are not a few to whom 
Christ and Christian thoughts are dear, my glances were 
directed chiefly to those who would hardly regard themselves as 
belonging to the household of Faith, and whose main interests 
are not centred in what we call the Kingdom of God. And that 
has suggested the subject of my present address. For when we 
talk about the " World " we think of its co-relative the Church, 
and I have a notion that the imaginary Puritan whom 1 brought 
into your Assembly to discourse on the spirit and temper of the 
modern age, would hardly have been willing to retire until you 
had patiently endured his utterances on this dearer, if not greater, 
theme. I will not, however, introduce him to you again, but 
simply give you in my own poor words 



president's address. 8i 



"A FREE CHURCHMAN'S THOUGHTS ABOUT THE CHURCH." 
And here the track on which I have to lead you has been 
well trodden. Your eyes must be content to rest on familiar 
objects, and your ears to suffer that which has become almost 
stale by repetition. The theme is one which hardly admits of 
novelty. My main purpose will be to re-state the things which 
are commonly believed among us, and ** to stir up your pure 
minds by way of remembrance.'* 

You will neither expect nor desire a discussion of the various 
questions of ecclesiastical poHty which are suggested by the 
word Church, nor would it be profitable, even if it were within 
my capacity, to defend by force of argument those principles of 
Church life and government which we deem sacred and true. 
This Presidential chair is not the place for elaborate apologetics, 
nor would this Assembly, with all its intellectual keenness and 
long-suffering patience, be willing to follow any one less than a 
Doctor of Divinity through the dusty archaeological chambers into 
which such a discussion would draw it. My task is both simpler 
and more practical. It is not to establish principles, but merely 
to emphasize and apply them. 

Our idea of the Church needs no cumbrous and circum- 
locutory definition. When I address you first as representatives 
of Baptist churches, and then, lifting the survey over a wider 
ground, forget the sect in the community, and think of you as 
members of the one great family of faith, as living stones in that 
living temple which Christ doth fill, I have given you implicitly 
our conception of the Church, and expressed the only two 
meanings of that word which the Scriptures sanction by usage, 
and to which we attach any importance. We believe that 
wherever there is a company of men and women, be they few or 
many, united for the worship and obedience of Jesus, and 
seeking to do His will as the only will which they regard as 
authoritative and Divine, there is a Church. His own words 
carry us behind all ecclesiastical tradition and debate, and 
enable us to dispense with them : " Where two or three are 
gathered together in My Name there am I in the midst." All 
the essentials of a Church are briefly expressed in that. It is 
the charter of our ecclesiastical freedom. There is no question 
about the consecration of the building when He condescends to 
enter ; no doubt about the validity of sacraments where the 
real presence is enjoyed ; no need of bishops when the one Arch- 
bishop presides ; no want of the Holy Ghost where He breathes 
upon the faces of His disciples ; and no longing for communion 
unrealized, where souls are joined in mystical fellowship with 
Him. Where these conditions are satisfied a Church is found. 
And we have but to group together mentally these small com- 



82 AUTUMN ASSEMBLY. 



munities in one great aggregate, to gather in one comprehensive 
and illumined vision aU the assemblies in earth and heaven and 
all the individual hearts which are conscious of the same beloved 
Presence and inspired by the same sentiments, and there grows 
up before us that one vast eternal house which He has built, 
and is still building, for His praise, and which we call the Holy 
Catholic Church. 

We do not talk about Catholicity in the confession of a creed 
and then empty the word of its meaning in practice. " God has 
brought us forth into a large place." We spurn with mingled 
charity and disdain the limitations which human pride or short- 
sighted zeal have put upon Christ's grand conception of His 
own household. We quietly ignore, if we do not despise, the 
narrowness of vision or vulgarity of sentiment which claims for 
a party what belongs to a commonwealth and regards as the 
monopoly of a sect that which is the universal privilege of 
believers. When we speak of tke Church it is not with the 
insolent e.xclusiveness which violates brotherhood to exalt a 
class, but with the humbler glorying which loses self in the 
contemplation of a vast and innumerable fraternity. 

To tell us that the Church is only found in conjunction with a 
certain rigid and unexpansive form of ecclesiastical discipline and 
polity, that there is no Church without a graduated hierarchy, 
a stereotyped creed, a certain confined channel of grace, and a 
real or fictitious line of apostolical successors, is to tell us that 
there can be no li\dng body and throbbing heart without a 
particular fashion of dress : or that there can be no Divine force 
without one unvarying kind of machinery. It is to cramp the 
Holy Ghost within the confines of a system, and to reduce the 
manifold wisdom of God to the uniformity of a pattern. 

The Church in all its essentials existed before ecclesiasticism 
was bom, and it would remain in all essentials were every known 
form of ecclesiasticism dead and forgotten. If it does not date 
back to the twelve who formed the first company of disciples, it 
certainly dates back to that somewhat larger company on whom 
the affusion of Pentecost came. That Divine outpouring made 
the Church if it did not fall on one. There in substance and all 
fundamental things, there in its typical and prophetic beginnings, 
was the Church which was to fill the world with the witness of 
Christ's grace. A band of men and women, fired with the love 
of their crucified and risen Lord, and mighty through the power 
of the Holy Ghost, without organization, without machinery, 
without bishop, priest, liturgy, or ecclesiastical building, yet 
with all the equipment needed for their holy work and- 
warfare ; whatever came afterwards was but development, 
adaptation, organization, and expansion. And the Church 



president's address. 83 

of to-day, with all its manifold machinery, methods, and forms, is 
in all indispensable things just that little company indefinitely 
multiplied, with the same unseen Presence lending its forces, and 
the same unction from above conferring upon it superhuman gifts. 
It comprises, just as it did when the Apostle described it, all ** the 
faithful in Christ Jesus called to be saints," all to whom the Name 
is inestimably dear. His Person their worship. His Word their 
unquestioned law, who love Him with a love that is more than 
human, who trust Him with a trust stronger than life, whose 
eager and fervent desire is to get His truth made known, His 
redeeming power proved, and His Name lifted above every name 
" until at the Name of Jesus every knee shall bow.** In that 
Church we humbly and reverently trust that we have part, and 
if there be any other we know it not, nor should we aspire to a 
place in it, though it were the very highest. 

There are certain words such as heresy and schism, which 
ecclesiastics have always employed as bogies to frighten children. 
We are too familiar with them to be scared. There has recently 
come from the pen of one whom we revere, that venerable 
statesman who has retired from the political arena to think 
and write thoughts dearer to him than any which he found 
there, a generous plea for modern heresy and schism. We do 
not lightly challenge the utterances of such a man, and we 
should be wanting in spiritual sensitiveness if we did not 
appreciate the pathetic tenderness of his tone, but when we find 
ourselves classed under one or both of those heads, and the 
Church defined as a visible organization whose corporate unity 
Christ designed and provided for by an unbroken line of apostolical 
succession, we feel that the hand which was intended to soothe 
has barely escaped inflicting a wound. We quietly repudiate 
those two words. They are offensive, however gently adminis- 
tered. If the writer had known how offensive I think he 
would not have used them. We know no heresy and schism 
except that which denies saving truth, or severs itself from 
the body of Christ, and we are more than innocent of both 
offences. It is strange how the most gifted minds may fail to 
see beyond the boundaries of the system in which they 
have been trained, may mistake the shibboleths of a regiment 
for the watchwords of the Christian army, and while burning with 
the desire to be both just and generous, may misunderstand the 
very alphabet of those who belong to another school. We have 
never dissented or separated ourselves in any degree from 
the company, visible and invisible, of the faithful, or &om Him 
who is its living Head ; we have only parted from a politico- 
ecclesiastical organization. We do not violate the unity of 
the Spirit, because we claim for the Spirit a diversity of 

F 2 



84 AUTUMN ASSEMBLY. 



operations, and if it seems to devout minds like that whose 
words I have quoted, that the witness of the Church for Christ 
is seriously weakened by its want of uniform order and 
centralized authority, our answer is that the real witness power 
of the Church is not in the imposing grandeur of an artificial 
solidarity, but in the measure of its service and moral elevation. 
Christ does not extend and perpetuate belief in Himself through 
hierarchies and sacramental machinery and cunningly carved 
channels of grace, but by reproducing Himself in the lives 
of disciples, by multiplying fair images of Himself in the faces 
and hearts of those who love Him. And any Christian community 
which can show this proof of His presence and inworking power 
may fairly answer every question about its catholicity in the 
proud words of an Apostle, ** Henceforth let no man trouble me, 
I bear in my body the marks of the Lord Jesus.*' 

Now these principles, clearly understood and firmly held, will 
determine our attitude towards some of those questions which 
are everywhere exciting, and perhaps suggesting larger hopes, 
to the Christian mind. One of the most important of these is 
the problem of Christian union, though that is not one question, 
but many, according to the more or less ambitious views which 
suggest it. With some it takes the form of a practical proposal 
to draw into closer bonds the Protestant Evangelical bodies ; 
with others it is a scheme of vast dimensions but Utopian cha- 
racter that aims at nothing less than the re-union of Christendom ; 
while a third party with more vague charity than vital con- 
viction would construct a Universal Church on the creedless 
basis of good fellowship. Whatever form the question takes 
there is no doubt that it is arousing the widest possible interest. 
There is not a Christian conference or Church gathering held 
without some earnest utterance of a desire to discover what is 
practicable in this direction. A hundred gifted pens have 
expressed the longing of devout hearts for its attainment. The 
secular press, which does not readily lend its columns to religious 
topics, has devoted large space to its discussion. It has con- 
verted a Swiss mountain valley, erewhile the secluded haunt of 
tourists, into the happy meeting ground of world scattered 
divines, and perhaps made some sanguine dreamers think that ** In 
this mountain the House of the Lord shall be established, and all 
nations flow unto it." It has elicited from the Archbishop of 
Canterbury a manifesto which follows an apostolic precedent in 
•* becoming all things to all men,** and " giving no oflfence in 
anything,'* which is for the most part sweetly vague, innocently 
unmeaning, and onl^ strong at the point, if there be a point* 
where it claims for his own communion unrivalled authority and 
unique importance; and it has drawn from the amiable tenant of 



president's address. 85 

the Vatican a curious perversion of history, an emphatic re- 
assertion of errors which are revolting to every Protestant mind, 
and an exhortation to charity and meekness which contrasts 
strangely with the spirit that has usually ruled in that quarter. 
Now I need not say that we follow these movements of 
thought not only with profound interest, but with prayerful 
sympathies. We rejoice in that deep undercurrent of unity 
which is beginning to be felt by the lovers of Jesus beneath the 
surface volume of denominational life, and we are anxious to 
take our full part in emphasizing essential oneness, and bringing 
into heartier co-operation those who are already closely akin in 
spirit, purpose and truth. But it is well that we should try to 
understand first, what is possible? and secondly, what is 
desirable ? Many of the contributors to this discussion have 
but reminded us of the proverb that "In all labour there 
is profit, but the talk of the lips tendeth to penury," and 
some of them, instead of encouraging our hopes, have rather 
suggested despair. Between men who glory in the principles 
and doctrines of the Reformation and men whose eyes 
are towards Rome, who are avowedly much more wishful to 
fraternize with foreign herarchies than to join hands with their 
Christian fellow-countrymen, a closer approach is hardly within 
the range of present possibility. When men are willing to go 
with almost obsequious steps and cap in hand to beg for papal 
recognition of their orders, and their Primate can hardly conceal 
his disappointment that the Pope, like the deities on Carmel, 
" answers them not at all,*' they not only furnish what to a 
Protestant nation is an unedifying and humiliating spectacle, 
but they make us feel that there must be an entire change of 
spirit, and pehaps a new baptism of the Holy Ghost, before union 
between them and ourselves can be even thought of. And, 
further, when an assembly of bishops proposes as a basis of 
re-union the recognition of the historical Episcopate, we should 
regard it as an insult if we did not more charitably assign it to 
ignorance of our position. They seem incapable of under- 
standing that we attach no value whatever to those orders 
which are with them of supreme importance, that we regard 
their solicitude in this matter, however conscientious it may be 
now, as the outgrowth of an anxiety to exalt the privileges of a 
priestly caste. We honour all the good and devout men who 
fill the Episcopal seats, and thank God for the gifts of mind and 
spirit which they have brought into the service of the Church. 
We are all richer when any of the real ** Kings of the Earth do 
bring their %lory and honour" into any part of the Holy City. 
All things are ours, whether Paul, or Apollos, or Cephas, or a 
golden-tongued Chrysostom, or modern bishops like those of 



86 AUTUMN ASSEMBLY. 



Worcester and Ripon, but our honour is given to the bishop 
who has proved his calling of God, and not to the bishop who 
has received his call from the first minister of the Crown. Our 
honour is given to the sanctified culture and energies, and not 
to any imaginary grace which the office confers, and to admit for 
the sake ofunion that our ministry needs their ordination would 
be to put in doubt our calling of God to submit to fallible 
human judgment the Divine gift of prophesying, and, in fact, to 
confess that our whole history has been a mistake, and some 
of our dearest convictions a folly and delusion. 

Let it be clearly understood that union on any of these lines 
is not only unattainable, but to us well-nigh unthinkable. 

Moreover, it is well that we should have a clear definition of 
aims. Do we all mean the same thing when we use the same 
language ? Are some of us wrestling with substantial things 
and others only beating the air ? Pope, Cardinal and Primate 
seem to be engaged in fondly nursing a dream, while we are 
praying for the realization of something both possible and sub- 
stantial. When we talk about union, we mean a brotherhood of 
hearts amid a diversity of forms and administrations ; when they 
talk about it they are thinking of a centralized human authority 
which shall either make different things one by giving them the 
same name, or secure the obedience of uniformity. The first 
would be valueless, even if it were not dishonest ; the second is 
not within human power unless it should please God to re-create 
men all in one mould. It belongs to the region of fantastic 
imaginations. Some of us are too busy to pursue the rainbow, 
or start off again in search of the philosopher's stone, and we are 
all too old to cry for the moon, if we are not too wise. To have 
" the single eye" in the Saviour's sense is to be " full of light," 
but to have *' the single eye" in the priest's sense is to dispense 
with the faculty of vision. We cannot, and we would not if we 
could, crush individuality, and force all minds through the same 
plaster of Paris cast. That is only man's narrowness and 
poverty challenging and defying God's rich diversity. It is not 
possible, and if it were possible we should oppose it with all our 
energy and prayer. It would produce sameness at the expense 
of force, originality, and life, and make peace through mental 
and spiritual torpor. 

When the Archbishop of Canterbury writes, " We know that 
our divisions are a chief obstacle to the progress of the Gospel," 
we both assent to the proposition and we dissent from it. The 
obstacle is not in our divisions, but in the spirit that divfdes. 
In no other department would a proper division of labour be 
regarded as a hindrance to progress and production. The 
hindrance lies not in the multiplicity of operations, but in the 



president's address. 87 



want of sympathy and mutual recognition among the workers. 
It is not our divisions that retard the Gospel, but the envies, 
jealousies, prides, and uncharities which we bring into them, 
the poverty of love and imagination which claims for a small arc 
of the circle all the grace which God makes to flow through the 
whole circimiference ; the imgenerous competition which cares 
not how it weakens its neighbour's part of the wall if it may but 
strengthen its own ; the personal vanities and disputes about the 
infinitely little, which needlessly multiply congregations ; the 
haughtiness which monopolises a parish and insolently ignores 
all Christian fellow-labourers; the occasional malignity which 
puts the dissenting sanctuary and the beer-house into the same 
class, and the general waste of energy which compasses sea and 
land to make a proselyte when it might be moving heaven and 
earth to make a Christian. These are the things which grieve 
the hearts of all good men, and cause the enemies of the Lord 
to blaspheme, and these, alas ! spring from unsanctified human 
nature to whatever system it belongs. 

We ought not to allow ourselves to be befooled by any incon- 
siderate outcry against divisions, or be tempted to overlook the 
strength of denominationalism while lamenting and confessing 
its weaknesses and abuses. Let us not in our zeal for union 
give the world the impression that we are apolo^zing for our 
existence. I for one must decline to take part in that act of 
humiliation. The forces making for Religion in this land have 
been immeasurably augmented by the different channels and 
agencies through which they have operated. Let CoUectivists 
argue if they will, that one centralized and unified Christian 
community would have done Christ's work better than separate 
organizations directed by the same free spirit ; the facts of 
history are on the side of the Individualist in this as in other 
things. Even in the kingdom of God it is not monopolies that 
produce the grandest results. The witty Frenchman sneers at 
this little island of ours with its hundred religious sects, but 
these sects prove not less the intensity and earnestness of the 
religious element than its impatience of authority, and though 
we should be well content with a smaller number, we would 
rather have ten thousand sects than a land like the Frenchman's 
neighbour, Spain, where one sect dominates and cultivates ihe 
whole field and brings forth chiefly tares and corruption. The 
Pope, in that address which I have referred to, heaves a profound 
sigh of regret for the days when the Church was one. We 
cannot conjure up the ghost of a sigh. It never was quite one 
in the sens^ which he implies ; there was always just enough 
independence of thought and just enough of dissent to prevent 
its sluggish waters from stagnating into death. But when it 



88 AUTUMN ASSEMBLY. 



was nearest one, in the Romish sense, then was it most fit to be 
"spued out of" the mouth of Christ, and most a bye-word 
among the nations. Let us not forget the immense service 
which has been rendered to the Saviour's cause by the generous 
rivalry of the denominations, by their unconscious provoking 
one another to good works, and the saving agencies, countless in 
number and variety, which they have initiated. Especially let 
not that community which almost begrudges the denominations 
a place be unmindful of the immeasurable stimulus which it has 
received from their presence and labours. Let us remember, 
too, what is true now and always has been, that they are not 
the mere offspring of human caprice and error, but part of God's 
deliberate design for the ampler manifestation of His truth. 
His many-coloured wisdom shines forth more freely and beauti- 
fully through many windows. The full harmonies of His voice 
are better heard through many instruments. His saving grace 
reaches more hearts through many channels. The inspired seer 
tells us that he saw in the City of God twelve gates, and he 
probably knew the Divine mind better than those who would 
make one gate wide enough to admit all, and close the rest. 

No, it is not by the effacement of denominational lines that 
we shall attain the end we all desire. A far nobler unity is 
within our reach, and, indeed, to all evangelical bodies is fast 
coming. It will have come when these various communities 
have equally grasped the central truth that ** Christ is all and in 
all," Christ exalted above all, Christ loved better than all ! That 
is the watchword of union ; that is the grand Catholic note. If 
we love our creeds and forms and dignities and orders and 
ecclesiastical idols and sects and parties better than we love 
Him, unity is impossible, but if we truly lift His Name above all 
these names, unity is in our hands already. Details will slowly 
settle themselves if devotion to Him and adoration of His divine 
Person be the predominant sentiment. If there are thousands — 
as there undoubtedly are in every branch of Christ's Church 
— to whom He is the source of all spiritual life, aspiration and 
hope, the name loved best, the joy of all joys, the end of all 
desire, then the prayer for unity has been already answered for 
them, and in no other way but by the deepening in the whole 
Church of this spirit of concentrated love, can the prayer be 
answered for the rest. 

There is one thing more to be kept in mind in our endeavours 
aft er a wider and richer fellowship. It is possible even in this 
to lose the substance in clutching at the shadow and to secure 
peace by the semi-denial of our deepest convictions. If faith 
profit nothing without charity, even charity is not worth winning 
by tbe sacrifice of faith. There must be great beliefs in common, 



president's address. 89 

or unity is a mere pretence. It is of no use joining hands 
around an empty shrine or marching together under a flag 
which means nothing in particular. It is easy to mistake pulpy 
sentiment for charity and to prostitute that angelic grace to the 
service of a loose indifFerentism. In fact, the charity which 
believes that there is an equal amount of good in everything is 
not far removed from the cynical indifference which thinks there 
is no particular good in anything. The Church has been defined 
by one who ought to know, and who, moreover, sang an immortal 
song in praise of charity, as the *' pillar and ground of the 
truth," and we at least are not likely to ignore that part of 
her function. A pillar and basement are intended to support 
something positive and substantial, and not a structure of 
airy negations and cloudy sentiments. We have never put 
our trust in creeds drawn up by human hands, nor are we 
likely to begm. We have no particular reverence for those 
ancient documents in which mysteries are set forth in bad 
metaphysics, more unintelligible than the mysteries them- 
selves. We have no thirty-nine articles to stand as sentinels 
over the faith ; nor do we believe that any number of such 
sentinels would keep dishonest men out of the fold. Elastic 
consciences will wriggle through any net, no matter how 
closely the meshes are drawn. But we cling — and always have 
clung — to those great and vital truths which have been 
substantially the heritage and jealously preserved treasure of 
the Universal Church, and only on the basis of these are we 
prepared to recognise communion. If men think they have part 
in the Church who have given up nearly every one of her 
distinctive doctrines, who call in question the incarnation, the 
divinity of our Lord, and it may be the supernatural and 
miraculous, it is not for us to deny their claim. We leave 
that to our Master's wiser judgment ; but we should be guilty of 
disloyalty to Him if, for the sake of charity, we were to put the 
same light estimate upon these things which they do. And if 
we are told, as we shall be, that some of these men are great, 
tender, and reverent souls, we cheerfully admit it, we even 
confess that we are far behind them in graces of spirit ; but we 
cannot on that account consent to forego our witness, nor can we 
understand how those to whom Christ is only human should 
wish to have fellowship in worship with those who pray to Him 
as Divine. One would rather have supposed they would say : 
" Ephraim is joined to idols, let him alone." No, there must be 
something like oneness in vital truths, or there will only be the 
semblance of unity and communion, and there is no attraction 
to us in a feast of brotherhood from which all the choicest viands 
are gone ; the table covered with little more than empty dishes, 



90 AUTUMN ASSEMBLY. 



and the guests only able to talk about surface things because, in 
their deepest beliefs, they are far apart. We are ready to work 
with all good men in furthering moral and righteous ends. In 
warring against iniquity we need not arrest the march to test the 
orthodoxy of the soldier by our side, and, indeed, men who have 
any sort of sincere Christian or religious convictions, are incom- 
parably nearer to us than those who have none. " I am a 
companion of all them that fear Thee, and of them that keep 
Thy precepts.'* But we must part company at those hallowed 
places where our Master meets with us, unless their lips and 
ours can say together, " My Lord and my God,** foreven brother- 
hood must not be bought at the price of truth, and there is 
nothing in the world worth gaining by the sacrifice of honesty. 

But while we will have no part in building up a comprehensive 
Church on the ruins of precious belief we should be careful to 
give a place in it to all the faif hful, irrespective of condition and 
party. The Church is the Household of God. It is the 
place where a Father's welcome awaits all the children who 
seek His face, and where every one, no matter to what rank or 
section he belongs, should feel at home. It is the region of grand 
equalities, where the world's poor distinctions are forgotten in 
the profound needs felt by all, and in the condescendmg 'grace 
which stoops as much to save the greatest as the lowliest. The 
Church knows nothing about either the classes or the masses. 
These are terms which Society recognizes, but which have, or 
ought to have, no meaning in the fraternity of faith. The 
Church degrades itself when it takes sides. It is neither the 
paid retainer of the rich, nor the one-sided champion of the 
poor. It is the impartial servant of all alike. It cannot play 
the part of flatterer and cover with smooth words the weak- 
nesses and vices of any class without forgetting its high calling, 
and losing its strength and purity ; and if it is ever guilty of 
stirring up hatred and exasperating division when it should be 
healing breaches and kindling love it forfeits all right to its 
Master's name. Its part is to warn, rebuke, exhort and render 
equal justice fearlessly to every one, and to represent, as far as 
it can, that great Judge with whom there is no respect of 
persons. A Church which includes only one class is but a maimed 
and half-developed member of the body of Christ. It violates 
one of the primary conditions of its existence. A Church of 
millionaires would be a laughing stock. A Church of capitalists 
would die of its own surfeit if it survived the sneers of the world, 
and a labour Church is no less a travesty and a contradiction of the 
Divine idea. A Church must be Catholic in the social sense as 
well as the theological. If rich and poor cannot meet together 
there we shall look in vain for the Master's presence. If the 



PRESIDENT S ADDRESS. Ql 



labourer says, *• I will have no dealings in worship with the 
employer," God will ** cover Himself with a cloud which prayers 
cannot pass through," and if there is any sanctuary in which the 
labourer finds no welcome, God will remain outside with him, and 
the worshippers will be left to their respectabilities and idols. 
The Church is not a society, club, or a workman's federation, but 
the place of the Father's feet, where love makes all men equal. 
And, further, if it would retain and fill its God-appointed place 
it will be the servant of the people and not of a party. The Church 
wears no political badge, and uses no political shibboleths. It has 
done this in times past, and always to its own loss and shame. It 
has too often, alas I made itself the obsequious servitor of parties 
that opposed human progress, and defrauded justice, and the 
penalty has been the sacrifice of its influence and the dwindling 
of its light. The Church has never gained anything but dis- 
honour and enfeeblement from its political alliances, and never 
will. It can only be free to serve Christ, and become the 
minister of all by holding itself loose from these entanglements. 
The members of our Churches will be, individually, as they 
always have been, eager politicians, and their sympathies will 
always be given to that which makes for advance, righteousness, 
and equality of human opportunity, but, as Churches, we are 
unpledged and unattached. There is no section of Christ's one 
household which can afford to write over its doors, "We are all 
of one political colour here." If men are one with us in the 
great things of faith, we ask no questions about the other things. 
Our pulpits should give no voice to party cries — they should be 
lifted above the arena of political debate. They abuse their 
privilege when they become the mouthpieces of a section. They 
only use it nobly when they speak as God's messengers to aJl. 
Whether our ministers should take a leading part in politics 
outside is a matter which I am not presumptuous enough to 
discuss, and were I to express an opinion it would clash with 
the views of men far better and wiser than myself. If they can 
do it without imperilling their higher functions, without suffering 
a lowering of tone in their higher work, it is well. But some of 
us have lost all desire to take that part since we struck what 
seemed to us a deeper vein. It may be that we are nervously 
afraid of losing the line spiritual touch which our weapons need 
if we engage too much in the rougher work. Perhaps we can 
never quite forget that the minister is hardly a free agent, that 
he cannot divest himself of his representative character, that he 
is supposed to be speaking for his people, and not simply for 
himself. Possibly we are ambitious to be true successors of 
those Apostles who gave themselves up wholly to the ministry, 
and certainly we need all the strength we have for the special 



92 AUTUMN ASSEMBLY. 



work which the grace of God has made our own. On that point, 
however, I speak with modest hesitation, but with none what- 
ever on the duty of keeping the sanctuary clear from the dust 
and contentions of the political world. There no word should 
be uttered which betrays political bias — ^there the words of mercy 
and judgment should be heard, wcwrds of warning and words 
of promise, great truths and great principles, burning utterances 
of indignation against manifest wrong, appeals steeped in love and 
hope to all the weary and the sinful. There the strife of tongues 
should be allayed, and the worshipper forget, in blessed moments 
of elevation, by what party name he is called. A Church is the 
peculiar possession of Christ, and can never lend itself to a party. 

I do not think we can form too high an estimate of the work 
of a Church, nor can we demand from it a greater service than 
that which its Master asks, but we may easily mistake its 
functions, and by requiring from it that which is no part of its 
calling may cripple its true ministry, and even degrade it. The 
Church is to shed its influence everywhere, but it is not to 
meddle everywhere. It is to teach politicians righteousness, 
but not to be a politician ; it is to help in making good and 
honest business men, but it is not to do their business for them ; 
it is to furnish the principles by which all social problems must 
be solved, but it is not to undertake the solution of the problems ; 
it is to give its sanction to pure recreation, and to utter its 
warning against all that defiles, but it is no part of its function 
to provide entertainment ; it is to prescribe the diet, but not to 
be a purveyor of the food; it is to salt every department of 
human activities, if it can, but chiefly by attending to its own 
special calling. That calling is, above all things, to bear per- 
sistent witness for Christ, to keep His changeless image before 
the changeful minds and fashions of men, to teach them to do 
and observe all things which He commanded, to preach His 
Gospel and to exemplify it, to bring men under His saving 
power, and to raise their tbouj^hts above the secular and material, 
to the spiritual, eternal and divme. A Church which is not 
doing that, whatever else it may be doing, is as salt that has 
lost its savour. Though it gain the whole world by ministering 
to men's lower desires it will but have lost its own soul and 
perhaps theirs. ^ 

Let our own Churches at least be on their guard against 
every temptation to substitute pleasurable devices for exercises 
of devotion, and sacred concerts for prayer and praise and the 
preaching of God's word. We thank God for the ministry of 
song. It will lift us up like angePs wings if we use it soberly, 
but nothing needs more to be kept in its own place and due 
proportion — to have too much of it can only gratify a religious 



president's address. 93 



self-indulgence. A Church may be inspired by heavenly 
melodies, and it may fall asleep and die to that sound if it hears 
no other. The modem tendency to disparage the teaching func- 
tion will, if yielded to, be fatal to the Nonconformist Churches. 
They at least cannot live by music and aesthetics ; they can 
only live by strong convictions, by intelligent apprehension of 
the truth, by prayerful study of God's word, and by that 
preaching which has always been God's instrument for soul- 
saving and the building up of holy lives. The Churches which 
still believe in the foolishness of preaching will need patience 
and grace enough to resist the attractive fashions of the day, 
but they will prove in the long run by their stability and growth 
that <' the foolishness of God is still wiser than men." 

And now I have but one word to add, and it may seem 
superfluous and even absurd. If we are to claim our part in 
the one great Church of Christ we must be alive, with ears open 
to His calls, with eyes that survey the wider fields before us, 
with hearts and minds that have understanding of the times. 
This is not a happy time for a slumberous and backward Church 
to live in, for the age, whatever its defects, is in grim earnest, 
and has nothing but scorn for the laggards. But this is a magni- 
ficent time for a Church which feels the Master's power within it 
and is burning to be in front of His battle. We are in the 
midst of a wide-spread religious revival which is not shewn by 
multitudes of conversions, but less ostentatiously in the deepening 
of the religious sentiment in nearly all classes' of men. No 
observant eye can have failed to mark the reaction from 
materialism, agnosticism and negativism which is everywhere at 
work and constantly increasing. The witness of it comes from 
most unexpected quarters. Frederick Harrison, the Positivist, 
speaks almost the language of a Christian as he interprets 
the returning sigh of the human heart for something which 
Science and Nature cannot give. A statesman who was half 
regarded as an Agnostic, surprises the world by a positive 
treatise on the bases of belief. The scientific world has changed 
its tone from an almost aggressive hostility to Christianity to 
one of respectful and even reverent sympathy. The School of 
Huxley, with its coarse and well-nigh brutal antagonism to 
revealed truth, passed away with him who was its chief prophet. 
The stream of fictional literature, in which there is no God 
and no hope, is beginning to sicken those who have been long 
drinking of it, and in the great mass of the people there is a 
distinct turning towards the thoughts and ideals of Jesus if there 
is no direct movement towards the Churches. In tne Church of 
Christ itself there is a growing impatience of mere negativism, 
of criticism which only whittles down and destroys, and an 



94 AUTUMN ASSEMBLY. 



urgent demand for something that the feet can stand on and 
the heart hold fast. And truly the army of the Lord is feeling 
the impulse of this great spiritual movement. Its thoughts are 
all in the direction of advance, it is full of the energy of hope. 

It is not the time for any denomination to stand still, " to let I 
dare not, wait upon I would,** and to acknowledge before the 
world that its faith is too small to do more than hold its own. 
If a Church does not attempt larger things it loses what it has 
already gained. If it does not move forward with the moving 
host it not only loses the inspiration which comes to the host, 
but it severs itself from the Master who always marches in 
front, and it is slowly deserted by all the eager and ardent 
spirits. If our foreign missions are to sound the retreat for want 
of men and means— if our home missions are to languish crippled 
on the bed of annual deficits — if Church extension is to fail 
because the enthusiasm which God has kindled in a few souls 
provokes no answering fire in the rest — I shall then begin to 
believe that we are^ what the oracles of the hierarchy tell us, 
schismatics, for these things can only be where a Church is no 
longer in living union with its Lord, and no longer feels the 
vitalizing, energizing current of His blood. 

But I name the thing only to reject and spurn it. " I am 
persuaded better things of you though I thus speak.** Our 
denomination has often had its moments of apathy or its moods 
of weariness, but it has soon recovered front them, and sprung 
up again to new and nobler enterprise. So it will be now. I 
will not finish with a despondent word or in accents of rebuke. 
I will rather beseech you by the mercies of God, by the passion 
of Jesus Christ, by the memories of all the grace you have 
received, and all the great things which the Lord has enabled 
you to do, by your illustrious traditions, and the names of your 
sainted dead, by all your martyrs and heroes, by all your past 
glories and all your hopes of future reward, to answer the calls 
which God makes upon you, and to command His blessing by 
expecting and attempting greater things. 

THANKS TO PORTSMOUTH FRIENDS. 

On the motion of Miss Hearn, of Northampton, seconded by 
Mr. W. Goode Davies, of Newcastle-on-Tyne, it was unani- 
mously and cordially resolved :-^ 

*' That the Assembly' hereby expresses its most cordial thanks to the 
friends of all denominations in Portsmouth and the district, and esjpecially 
to the pastors, deacons, and members of the Baptist Chmrcbes, for their 
abounding hospitality to the members of the Baptist Union during its 
Sessions, and for the Christian courtesy they have shown to their guests ; 
also to the Local Committee for the admirable arrangements they have 



BUSINESS PROCEEDINGS. 95 



made, and to the Mayor and Corporation for the generous way in which 
they have granted the use of the Town Hall. for the public meetings of the 
Union." 

Rev. J. P. Williams and Mr. T. Whitley responded on behalf of 
the Local Committee, as did also Rev. J. Oates (Congregational) 
on behalf of friends of other denominations. 

LOCAL DELEGATIONS. 

On behalf of a delegation of Ministers of the Portsmouth and 
Gosport Nonconformist Association, Rev. J. Kemp, Honorary 
Secretary, read the following address : — 

To the Members of the Baptist Union of Great Britain and Ireland, met in 

Annual Assembly at Portsmouth, October 9th, 1895. 
Honoured fathers and brethren, 

The members and friends of the Portsmouth and Gosport Noncon- 
formist Association, representing the Congregational, Wesleyan, Bible 
Christian, Presbyterian. Primitive Methodist, and Baptist Churches of 
this town and district, desire to offer you their most respectful and cordial 
greeting on this your second visit to our ancient borough. 

We gratefully recognize that in the Providence of God the Baptists 
have been able for centuries to bear faithful testimony to the great central 
truths of our holy religion ; and that, through good report and ill, you 
have upheld the banner of civil and religious freedom ; and that for more 
than a hundred years you have been distinguished leaders in the noble 
enterprise of evangeliziog the heathen world. 

We rejoice also that amid the dangers which now threaten the principles 
of religious liberty, your Churches remain faithful to their noblest 
traditions. The rising tide of Sacerdotalism imposes upon all Protestant 
Christians a fresh responsibility in safe-guarding the ramparts of truth. 

We believe that the vital doctrines of our Evangelical Nonconformity 
can alone counteract the subtle forces which are seeking to destroy the 
work accomplished by our Puritan fathers. The imm^iate access of 
the soul to God, the conscious sense of sins forgiven, the sanctifying 
presence of the Holy Spirit in the believer's life, the atoning virtue of the 
sacrifice of Christ availing to the uttermost of man's need — these and 
other vital truths of Christianity alone can repel the insidious advances 
of sacerdotal assumption. 

In the defence and propagation of these, and all leading principles of 
of our common Evangelical faith, we are devoutly thankful to know that 
we stand in unbroken phalanx, with firm front to all the adversaries of 
the truth as it is in Chnst. 

We trust that this unity will be greatly strengthened by your visit to 
our town ; and that your sojourn with us may be to you a season of 
refreshing from the presence of the Lord, as well as an occasion of spiritual 
quickening to all the Churches in this neighbourhood. 

We Dray that the benedictions of heaven, promised to those who dwell 
in brotnerly unity, may rest like the dew of Hermon upon all the Churches 
—both yours and ours— and that the universal Church of Christ may be 
filled with the fruits of righteousness which are by Jesus Christ, unto the 
glory and praise of God. 

Signea on behalf and by order of the Association. 

A. E. Sharplby. B.A., President. 
John Kbmp, Honorary Secretary, 



9^ AUTUMN ASSEMBLY, 



Rev. Walter C. Talbot (Congregational), and Rev. C. H. 
Floyd (Chairman of the Portsmouth District of the Wesleyan 
Methodists), spoke in the name of the delegation, and the 
President replied. 

On behalf of the Hampshire and Isle of Wight Band of Hope 
Union, Mr. W. Miller, Honorary Secretary, read the following 
address : — 



To the Baptist Union of Great Britain and Ireland in Conference at 
Portsmouth. 

gth October, 1895. 

Amongst the many addresses which will be presented to you on the 
occasion of your visit to our ancient Borough, we on behalf of the Hamp- 
shire and Isle of Wight Band of Hope Union, embracing nearly 2og Bands 
of Hope and Juvenile Temperance Societies, with a membership of 23.000, 
inclucfing Portsmouth Union, with 66 Societies and 12,000 members, unite 
in giving you a hearty welcome, and in offering you our sincere con- 
gratulations, expressing an earnest desire that the deliberations of this 
Conference will tend to waken and deepen the interest of all those who 
are engaged in the extension of Christ's Kingdom. 

The organization which we represent stands foremost in the ranks of 
social reform, having a twofold aim : that of inculcating in young people 
the principles of total abstinence from the use of intoxicating drinks, and 
that ot promoting habits of truth, self-control, and thrift, thereby 
conducing to good citizenship. 

We rejoice to know that during the past ten years a more active 
interest has been taken in our movement throughout the United Kingdom, 
and in the spread of our principles. Physiological lectures have been 
given in Elementary Schools — in which Portsmouth and other parts of 
this county have taken a prominent position — Workhouse Bands of Hope 
have been established, visits paid to industrial homes, and last, but not 
least, a growing interest is being taken in our Christian Churches and 
Sunday Schools. 

There is room in our ranks for all willing and earnest workers, for we 
are fighting no imaginary foe ; we, therefore, realizing the supreme 
importance of our work amongst the young, invite your hearty co- 
operation in the various districts represented here. 

We wish you God-speed in the noble work in which you are engaged, 
and pray that the blessing of the Almighty may rest upon your labours. 
Signed on behalf of the Union, 

B. M. Portsmouth, President, 
R. Oldpield, Treasurer, 
W. Williams, Chairman, 
W. Miller, Hon. Sec., 
W. Corner, President, Portsmouth Band 
of Hope Union, 

Miss Emily Weston spoke in the name of the delegation. 



BUSINESS PROCEEDINGS. 97 



On behalf of the Portsmouth Temperance League (adult 
societies), Mr. W. Miller read the following address : — 

To the Baptist Union of Great Britain and Ireland in Conference assembled 
at Portsmouth. 

g/A October, 1895. 

The Adult Temperance Societies of the town, as represented in the 
" Portsmouth Temperance L^gue," give a most cordial welcome to your 
Assembly on this your visit to our ancient Borough, and we most 
earnestly pray Almighty God that your deliberations may be crowned 
with success, and may be a means of blessing to many, not only in this 
town, but throughout the area covered by your Union. Our League has 
brought temperance workers of all classes more closely together, having 
afi&liated societies from the B.W.T. Associations, C.ET.S., Good Temp- 
lars, Rechabites. Sons of Temperance, Sons of Phoenix, and Bands of 
Hope and Temperance Societies from various Nonconformist Churches ; 
and, although tne various branches have different modes of working, we 
recognise in the "drink traffic" one common enemy to all that is best 
and noblest in mankind, and all the societies are working in their own 
way for its removal from our midst. We are proud to know in the 
Baptist Union there are many stalwart workers for the Temperance cause, 
who fully understand our work and its difficulties. We are able to 
welcome you to a town represented by two Members of Parliament 
pledged to the hilt to support Temperance Legislation. We earnestly 
trust that among the many momentous questions that will be brought 
before your Conference during its sittings time will be found for the 
consideration and advancement of the Temperance movement. We 
thank you for affording us this opportunity of welcoming you among us, 
and pray that the blessing of Almighty God may crown your deliberations. 

Signed on behalf of the League, 

William Ward, President. 
John Cull, Hon. Secretary, 

Rev. E. C. Chorley (Wesleyan) spoke in the name of the 
delegation. 

On behalf of the Portsmouth Sunday School Union, Mr. 
W. C. Ransom read the following address : — 

To the Baptist Union of Great Britain and Ireland assembled at Portsmouth, 

October, 1895. 
Gentlemen, 

We, the undersigned, as representing the Portsmouth Sunday School 
Union, comprising 45 schools, 1,240 teachers, and 13,757 scholars, beg to 
extend to you our most hearty welcome and greeting. 

It is our desire and prayer that you may experience, from the Sessions 
and meetings at which you gather for deliberation in the interests of 
Christ's Kingdom, great blessing and stimulus, both in your own spiritual 
life and, on your return, in the various churches of which you are the 
honoured representatives. 

Looking upon Sunday School work as " the Church's mission to the 
young," we feel that the interests of both are inseparably bound together, 



98 AUTUMN ASSEMBLY. 



and, therefore, that the benefits and privileges which accrue to yourselves 
must in turn tell for the good of this branch of Christian work. 
Trusting that much good may be the outcome of these great meetingB, 

We are, 
On behalf of the Portsmouth Sunday School Union, 

Henry Martin, Prisideni, 

W. LoNGYBAR, Chairman •/ CommUUi^ 

W. C. Ransom, General Secretary. 

In a few appreciative words the President responded to the 
messages of the Temperance and Sunday School delegations, 
and the Session was closed with the Benediction at i p.m. 



SECOND SESSION. 

LAKE ROAD CHAPEL. 

The President took the Chair at 3.5 p.m., and prayer was 
offered by Rev. E. W. Tarbox, of Guildford. 

THE POPE'S LETTER. 

In place of a letter to the Pope as directed by the Assembly 
on 25th April, 1895, ^^® Vice-President submitted an ** Address 
to the English People^" respecting " The Pope's Letter " on 
Christian Reunion, the adoption of which was seconded from 
the Chair. After discussion in which Rev. J. Lewitt, of 
Cheltenham ; Rev. S. J. Jones, of Liverpool ; Mr. R. Cleaver, 
J.P., of Northampton ; Rev. T. M. Morris, of Ipswich ; Rev. S. 
Vincent, of Plymouth ; Rev. E. B. Woods, B.A., of Manchester ; 
Mr. F. A. Freer, of Bristol ; Rev. J. E. Jasper, of London ; 
Rev. G. Short, B.A., of Salisbury ; Rev. £. C. Pike, B.A., of 
Exeter ; Rev. J. Collins, of Lymington ; Rev. H. Hardin, of 
Montacute, and A. H. Lee, of Walsall, took part, it was 
eventually resolved upon the motion of Rev. G. P. McKay, of 
London, seconded by Rev. T. W. Medhurst, of Cardiff: — 

** That the Address be referred back to the Officers, in order that it may 
be turned into an * Open Letter ' to the Pope, and forwarded to him 
accordingly." 

The following is therefore the final form of the document : — 

An open Letter to Pope Leo XIIL, respecting his Letter to the 
English People, dated April 14^^, 1895. 

In common with all *' Englishmen who glory in the Christian name," we 
have carefully read the Letter addressed to us on Easter Sunday, 1895, 
and cordially reciprocate the good wishes therein expressed. We earnestly 



BUSINESS PROCEEDINGS. 99 

join in prayer to the Great Head of the Church that all who are united 
to Him by Faith, and are thus united to each other as members of His 
twice-born fiamily, may speedily be united in visible bonds of mutual love, 
common service, harmonious worship, and undivided testimonv to the world. 
We share the conviction that our Lord's prayer for His disciples reveals the 
eternal and invincible purpose of the Father's grace, and. therefore, undismayed 
by the disorders and strife which have weakened the Church and now hinder 
the triumphs of the Gospel, we believe that disciples are being '* perfected 
into one" through the duscipline of ages, and that all things— «ven those 
which now distress us— are working together for the ultimate consummation 
of our Lord's desire. 

But inasmuch as the Unity which Christ praved for can only come to pass 
by our ceasing to be *' children tossed to and fro and carried about with 
every wind of doctrine, by the sleight of men, in craftiness after the wiles of 
error" (Ep. iv., 14), and by our universal attainment to *'the unity of the 
^th, and of the knowledge of the Son of God : unto a full grown man, unto 
the measure of the stature of the fulness of Christ " (Ep. iv. 4), we deem 
it our duty to contribute towards this end by speaking in love what we believe 
to be the truth concerning those historicsJ causes of ecclesiastical division, 
which compel us to maintain the Protest of our fathers against certain 
doctrines and practices of the Roman Church. 

It would be untimely for us to traverse in detail the account given in 
the Letter, of Au^stme's mission to the Anglo-Saxons, but we cannot 
admit its accuracy m many important particulars. We honour the desire of 
Pope Gregory to evangelize the pagan races which had driven out the 
already Christianized British people from the Eastern portions of this 
island, but we deplore the claim made by Augustine, as Gregory's represen- 
tative, iq, be received as the ecclesiastical superior of the British Bishops. 
In that claim, with its disastrous consequences, we see a prominent 
illustration of the divisive mfluence which the assertion of supremacy by 
Roman Pontiffs has incessantly wrought in this fatherland, and we applaud 
the repudiation of it by the ancient British Church. 

Descending to the Sixteenth Century, we observe that the Letter before us 
speaks of the efforts made by former Popes to oppose the Reformation and 
to minimize its results. The nature of these efforts is not referred to. but 
they are written in characters of blood upon our annals ; and we lament that 
no confession of sin has ever been made on account of them by the official 
beirs of persecuting Popes and Bishops. We rejoice to hear, not threatenings, 
but kindly invitations to-day; yet, while hailing this new tone, we find no 
indication of changed principles or abated demands for absolute submission. 
We look back with devout thankfulness to God for those events of the Six- 
teenth Century which the Pope r^rets. We mourn over the violence of the 
struggle, and the civil and military complications which obscured the religious 
issue and injured the spiritual life of that age ; but the religious freedom then 
partially obtained, and since increased, is a heritage in which we exult, and 
It is impossible for us to regard with seriousness any proposals for unity which 
involve a surrender of that privilege for which so many of our forefathers 
suffered bonds, impoverishment, and death. 

We cannot adopt the position that complete unity of opinion is an 
indispensable condition of Christian fellowship or inter-communion, but reunion 
with the Roman Church is rendered impossible by the maintenance of beliefs 
and practices which we deem subversive of the first principles of Christ ; 
4.g., at the present hour we, in common with a vast majority of English 
Christians, he under the solemnly pronounced " Anathema " of the Roman 
Chnrch, because we deny the following propositions : — 

I. *' That it is a dogma divinely revealed that the Roman Pontiff when he 
speaks 0X cathedra, . . • is possessed of . . . infallibility . • . and 

* .— • • 1 G 2 



lOO AUTUMN ASSEMBLY. 



tliat tbetefore such definitions of the Roman Pontiflf are irre/ormable,*'— Decrees 
of the Vatican Council. 

2. That the Apostle Peter was ''appointed the Prince of all the Apostles 
and the visible Head of the whole Church Militant," and " that the Roman 
Pontiff is the successor of blessed Peter in this primacjr." — Ibid, 

3. That the Virgin Mary and other saints are our intercessors in heaven, 
and that '^' it is good and useful suppliantly to invoke them." — Decrees of the 
Council of Trent. 

4. That "honour and veneration " are to be given to " images of Christ, of 
the Virgin . . . and of the other saints," also to " the relics of saints.*' 
—Ibid. 

5. That '* there' is a Purgatory, and that the souls there detained are helped 
by the suffrages of the fciithful." — Ibid. 

6. That Christ instituted an order of sacrificing Priests to " offer His own 
body and blood." — Ibid. 

7. That the Lord's Supper is a propitiatory sacrifice in which bread and 
wine become the very body of Christ, and as such are offered to God. — Ibid. 

8. That|sacramental confession and penance were instituted by Christ. — Ibid. 

9. That in "absolution " sentence is pronounced by the priest as a judge. — 
Ibid. 

10. That " the power of granting Indulgences was granted to the Church." 
—Ibid. 

11. That Baptism is necessary to salvation, and that by it we are made 
entirely a new creature. — Ibid. 

Without discussing these doctrines, we reaffirm our conviction that they 
are anti-Christian ; and that the Papal assertion of authority to define the 
doctrine of the Universal Church, and to anathematize all who think other- 
wise is an attempted usurpation, which only fails to excite indignation because 
so manifestly futile and absurd that it rather commands our compassion. 
Until such pretensions have been abandoned, overtures from Rome can only 
betray a pitiable failure to understand the minds of most Englishmen to-day. 

While thus refusing to subject ourselves to spiritual and intellecti^ 
bondage for the sake of unity, we invite Pope Leo XHI. to seek unity with us 
in " the Liberty wherewith Christ hath made us free ; " and we beseech all 
who now acknowledge his Primacy, to re-examine their position in the light 
which shines firom the mind of Christ through those Scriptures which they 
and we revere. 

We gladly note the Catholic sentiments expressed by the Archbishop 
of Canterbury in his Pastoral Letter of August 30th, 1895. With 
him we deplore *' the recent appearance within the Established 
Church of certain foreign usages and forms of devotion ; " and earnestly 
hope that his wise counsel will help to preserve the blessings of the 
Reformation, in so far as they are possessed by the Church over which he 
presides. We join with him in deprecating the narrow and schismatic 
spirit of the Pope's Letter, which ignores the existence of any Church outside 
the Roman communion, and hail with satisfaction his opinion that an intelli- 
gent a^[Mration after unity "must take account of Eastern churches, of 
non-Episcopal churches and bodies on the continent, at home, and among 
tjie multiplying populations of the new world." 

- We respectfully call the attention of Pope Leo XIII. to the large measure 
of brotherly love and fellowship already subsisting between ourselves and many 
Reformed Chiirches in English-speaking lands. Differing as we do, on various 
points of Church Polity. Biblical Interpretation, and the Administration of 
Ordioanoes, We are becoming increasingly conscious of our essential oneness 
in loyalty to Christ as the sole Head of the Church. We respect each other's 
fidelity to conviction, and are more truly one in this, even when it keeps 
ts somewhat apart, than* we should be if loyalty to the Master were 



BUSINESS PROCEEDINGS. lOI 



saxaificed for the sake of a premature abolition of denominational distinctions. 
In this spirit we can work and worship side by side ; and shall continue to prav 
without ceasing for the visible fulfilment of the Saviour's desire. Such 
prayer may be answered in part by judgments which will make the House 
of God to tremble, and consume whatever is perishable in ecclesiastical 
systems : but the trials and changes of the commg age can have no terror 
for those who love truth more than their own opinions, and are more 
solicitous for the Kingdom of God than for their own institutions. 

We grieve to know that there are many Englishmen who do not glory in 
the Christian name ; and we fear that thev are encouraged in their unbelief 
by the £anlts and divisions of the Church. We are not surprised that the 
spectacle of what is called Christendom should seem to throw doubt on the 
Divine origin of the Church and on her future glory and triumph. We 
submit, however, that the troubled history of Churdies confirms our faith 
that the Ideal Church after which all are striving is no vain dream, but a 
Divine thought given to the world by our Founder, and so imperishable 
that after eighteen centuries of comparative failure it is sought more ardently 
and with more definite conceptions of its worth and world-wide significance 
than at any former time. We invite men to judge and condemn our defects ; 
but we entreat them not to spurn the Ideal because too sublime for present 
attainment, or because it has been travestied by unworthy institutions in the 
past. In many of the greatest matters of belief all Cburistians are agreed. 
We differ in things supplementary, and in our modes of presenting God's 
message to man, and man's worship to God ; but we all believe that every 
good thing comes down from the Father, and that all human aspirations, 
prayer, praise, and service ascend to the Father through the Son of Man. 
Finally, we desire to unite with all our fellow Christians in praying earnestly 
for that Visible Unity which will be the crowning evidence of Christianitv ; 
and will usher in the ultimate desire of Christ for mankind : — *' that tne 
world may know that Thou didst send Me and lovedst them, even as Thou 
lovedst Me." 

(Signed) On behalf of the Baptist Union, assembled in 
Portsmouth, October gth, 1895. 

J. G. GREENHOUGH, President. 

T. VINCENT TYMMS. Vice-President. 

SAMUEL HARRIS BOOTH, Secretary. 



"THE CHILDREN IN THE SANCTUARY," 

With the concurrence of Mr. G. A. Hutchison, of Leytonstone, 
and Rev. F. A. Jones, of London, who had been announced to 
open a Conference on this subject, it was agreed, in consideration 
of the lateness of the hour, to defer the discussion until the 
Spring Assembly. 

The Benediction was pronounced by Rev. G. Short, B.A., 
of Salisbury, and the Session closed at 4.25 p.m. 

SERMONS TO CHILDREN. 

At 6 p.m. Sermons to children were preached at (i) Victoria- 
road Chapel, Forton, by Rev. G. Hay Morgan, B.Sc, of London, 
from Cant. ii.,*i5 ; (2) Lake-road Chapel, by Rev. C. Bonner, 
of Southampton, on •* Christ, the Magnet of Souls " ; and (3) 
Elm-grove Chapel, Southsea, by Rev. E. Medley, B.A., of 
London, from 2 Kings, v. 1-3. 



I02 AUTUMN ASSEMBLY. 



PUBLIC MEETING, 

TOWN HALL. 

At 7 p.m. the Chair was taken by Sir John Baker, M.P. 
Prayer was offered by R^v. B. Brigg, of Margate. Addresses 
were given as follows: — (i) Rev. W. E. Blomneld, B.A., B.D., 
of Coventry, on " The Present Crisis in the Education Question ** ; 

!2) Rev. E. G. Gange, of London, on ** Spiritual Power "; and 
3) Mr. Alderman G. White, J. P., of Norwich, on "The Relation 
of Total Abstinence Associations to Social Reform." 



SPECIAL SERVICES 

were held as follows : — 7.30 p.m. : (i) Emsworth, Rev. F. 
Thompson, of Luton ; (2) Avenue-road, Gosport, Rev. R. G. 
Fairbairn, B.A., of Cheltenham ; (3) Newport, LW., Rev. T. 
Phillips, B.A., of Kettering ; ^4) Bell-street, Rom.sey, Rev. 
A. B. Middleditch, of London ; (5) George-street, Ryde, LW., 
Rev. F. C. Spurr, of London ; ^6) Sandown, LW., Rev. T. 
Hancocks, of Ramsgate ; (7) Shirley, Rev. W. H. M*Mechan, 
of London; (8) Waterlooville, Rev. F. C. Player, B.A., of 
Wolverhampton ; (9) West Cowes, LW., Rev. C. Williams, 
of Accrington ; and (10) City-road, Winchester, Rev. P. H. 
Smith, of Northampton (at 8 p.m.). 



THURSDAY, OCTOBER ioth. 

At 7.30 a.m. a Sermon was preached in Elm-grove Chapel, 
Southsea, by Rev. F. B. Meyer, B.A., of London, from 
Acts, xi., 15. 

THIRD SESSION. 

LAKE ROAD CHAPEL. 

The President took the Chair at 10.5 a.m. Prayer was ofiered 
by Rev. W. Evans, of Downton, and Rev. C. E. P. Antram, 
of Stocksfield. 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION. 

The following resolution was moved by Rev. C. Williams, of 
Accrington, seconded by the Secretary, and after remarks by 
Rev. L A. Ward, of Sheffield, Mr. T. H. Engall, of London, 



BUSINESS PROCEEDINGS. IO3 

Rev. W. Woods, of London, and the Vice-President, was carried 
unanimously : — 

" That this Assembly rejoices in the spread of education in our land* 
especially in the good work accomplished by School Boards since 1870* 
and demands that the School Beard system shall be extended to evety 
part of the country, and a Board School be placed within easy and 
reasonable distance of every family. That the Assembly renews its 
protest against the support nrom public funds of sectarian schools, and 
claims that no denominational formulary shall be taught in any State- 
aided school, that all scholars and teachers, whatever their religious 
opinions, shall be equally treated in all public elementary schools, and 
that all such schools shall be under the management of boards elected bv 
the public. The Assembly also instructs the Council to co-operate with 
other representative Unions and Conferences in the formation of a 
National Vigilance Committee for the maintenance of tl^e rights Of 
Nonconformists. ' ' 

DISESTABLISHMENT. 

It was resolved, on the motion of Mr. J. R. Smith, J. P., of 
Southampton, seconded by the Secretary : — 

"That this Assembly emphatically renews its solemn protest against all 
Establishments of religion by the State as unjust in principle, mischievous 
in operation, and totally at variance with the spirit of the religion of 
Jesus Christ. That the Assembly recognises and deplores the long 
catalogue of persecutions, wrongs, and sufferings which have been 
' inflicted upon the noblest men by Established Churches, in the name of 
our Lord and Master ; that the same spirit is inherent in all established 
churches, however the form may be modified ; and that such establish- 
ments of religion have in every age injured the spirituality, the purity, 
and the usefulness of the Church of Christ. That the Assembly, there- 
fore, calls upon the Free Churches of the United Kingdom, by the 
memory of the sufferings and sacrifices of their fathers, by their love of 
a pure and free Gospel, and by their loyalty to the Lord Jesus Christ, 
the Founder and sole Ruler of the Church, to realize their responsibility 
and bounden duty to promote, by all lawful means, the disestablishment 
and disendowment ot the Churches * by law established ' in England, 
Scotland, and Wales." 

TEMPERANCE REFORM. 

The following resolution was moved by Mr. T. Kyffin Free- 
man, F.G.S., F.S.S., of London, seconded from the Chair, and 
carried unanimously : — 

"That this Assembly regards with shame and sorrow the vice and 
misery which spring from the liquor traffic ; and in view of the universal 
testimony of philanthropists, magistrates, and Her Majesty's judges, that 
drink is the fruitful source of the poverty and crime which crowd our work- 
houses and prisons, the Assembly expresses its conviction that experience 
has shown that irresponsible magistrates are unfit to be a licensing body 
and hereby calls upon the Government to prepare some scheme Iw which 
the people may control the issue of licenses to houses intended lor their 
use. That the Assembly is alio of opinion that all clubs in which 
intoxicating liquors are sold should be licensed, and be subject to police 
supervision, as in the case of houses now licensed.'* 



I04 AUTUMN ASSEMBLY. 



** HYMNODY IN OUR CHURCHES/' 

JJJfA paper on this subject was read by Rev. S. G. Green, D.D., 
of London, which was further discussed in relation to Mission 
Services by Rev. F. C. Spurr, of London. 

Then followed a 

DEVOTIONAL ADDRESS 

by Rev. W. T, Styles, of London, on Phil, iv., 3, •* Help... 
Clement also.' 

Rev. T. M. Morris pronounced the Benediction, and so 
terminated at i .4 p.m. the third and last Session of the Autumn 
Assembly. 



PUBLIC WORSHIP. 

TOWN HALL. 

At 3 p.m. a Sermon was preached by Rev. Charles New, of 
Hastings, from Mark ix., 29. 

CLOSING PUBLIC MEETING. 

TOWN HALL. 

At 7 p.m. the Chair was taken by Mr. E. Robinson, J. P., 
of Bristol. 

Prayer was offered by Rev. D. Davies, of Brighton. 

Addresses were given as follows : — (i) Rev. J. Owen, of 
Swansea, on "An Evangelical Revival"; (2) Rev. J. Thomas, 
M.A., of Liverpool, on " The Sacerdotal Revival "; and (3) Rev. 
W. L. Watkinson, of London, on *« The Influence of Sacer- 
dotalism on National Prosperity." 



At the meetings in the Town Hall on Monday, Wednesday 
and Thursday evenings organ recitals and choral selections were 
given under the direction of Mr. W. E. Green, and at the last 
meeting his efficient services, together with those of the organist 
and the choir, were suitably acknowledged on behalf of the 
Council of the Baptist Union, by the Secretary. 



PART III. 



BAPTIST SOCIETIES, COLLEGES, 
PUBLICATIONS, &c. 



I.— SOCIETIES. 

THE BAPTIST BOARD. 

Originated Jan. ao, 1723. President, Rev. A. B. Middleditch ; Vice-President, Rev. 
W. Hamilton ; Secretaries, Rev. J. H. Cooke, Ramleh. Coolhorst-road, Crouch 
End, N.. and Rev. E. T. Davis, Sidcup R.S.O. ; Committee, Revs. J. W. Boud, 
G. T. Ennals, W. H. King, R. E. Sears, G. Simmons, and W. J. Styles. 

(For List of Memt>ers, see last page.) 

RULES. 
z. That the design of this Society is to afford an opportunity of mutual consulta- 
tion and advice on subjects of a religious nature, particularly as connected with the 
interests of the Baptist Denomination. 

2. That this Society do consist of approved Ministers of the Baptist Denomina- 
tion, being, or having been, Pastors, residing in or about the Cities of London and 
Westminster. 

3. That any Candidate for admission into this Society shall express his desire to 
the Secretary in writing, or through some Member of the Board ; and that his 
application having been laid before one meeting shall be decided at another, 
a majority of at least two-thirds of the Members present being necessary for his 
admission. 

4. That this Society transact its ordinary business at meetings to be holden on the 
last Tuesday in each month, beginning with October, and ending with the following 
May, and that the meeting in March be the annual meeting of the Board. 

5. That at the Annual Meeting of the Board, the Rules shall be read, the 
proceedings of the year reported, the expenses defrayed, a report for the 
general body of the three Denominations prepared, a Secretary chosen for the year 
ensuing, and any other business transacted that may be deemed necessary. 

6. That Special meetings of the Board be summoned whenever necessary in the 
judgment ot the Secretary, or upon a requisition signed by six Members. 

7. That the expenses of the Board be met by a levy on the Members, to be agreed 
npon at the Annual Meeting ; and that any individual not having paid, for a period 
of two years, his proportion of the sum called for, and not paying on a final 
application within three months after the expiration of this period, be no longer 
considered a Member. 

8. That the Rules of the Board shall not be altered except at an annual meeting, 
or at a meeting specially called for the purpose. 

9. That when any of the brethren are removed by death the Secretary be 
requested to ascertain the time and arrangements of the funeral, and communicate 
the same to the Members of the Board, in order that each of the brethren may have 
the opportunity of testifying his respect by attending. 

The Widows' Fund of Members of the Baptist Board. 

Instituted 1872. 

Treasurer—Mr, H. Wood, J.P. 

Honorary Secretary — Rev. W. J. Styles, i, College-street, Is|lington, N. 

Object. — To provide a sum (at present about £u$) available for the widow ; or if 
there be no widow, for the young children, if any, immediately on the death of a 
Beneficiary Member. 



106 SOCIETIES. 



* All accredited Baptist Miaisters within the Metropolitan area (whether belonging 
to the Baptist Board or not) can be Bene/tciary Members. The subscriptions of 
Honorary Members are gratefally received. 

Beneficiary Subscriptions.— ios. 6d. if not more than 45 years of age ; 158. Qd. 
if above 45 ; £1 is. if above 50, on joining, and similar amounts on the death of 
a member. A donation of five pounds or an annual subscription of One Guinea^ 
entitles to Honorary Membership. 



PARTICULAR BAPTIST FUND. 

Formed 1717. Objects. — For the relief of ministers and churches of the 
Particular Baptist denomination in England and Wales ; the education of young 
persons of the same persuasion for the ministry ; donations of books to young 
ministers ; and for any other charitable purpose (consistent with the general design) 
which the managers shall approve. 

Income, year ending Feb., 1895 ;^3>o86 511 

Expenditure, ditto 2.984 5 3 

Treasurers— VLv, J. J. Smith, J.P., Rev. S. H. Booth, D.D., and Mr. C. Price. 

Secretary— Mr, R. Grace, 160, The Grove, Camberwell, S.E. 
*^* This Fund is- managed by the Pastors and Messengers annually appointed 
by those churches which have subscribed towards the capital and make annual 
collections. Applications to be made in writing, addressed to the Secretary, the 
last week in August. 

BAPTIST BUILDING FUND. 

Formed 1824. i- The object of this Fund is to assist, by loan without 
interest, in the building, enlargement, or repair of, or in the removal of building 
debts on, places of worship, including therein buildings for Sunday schools, class 
rooms, lecture rooms, and Home Mission halls in connection therewith, belonging 
to the EvangeUcal Churches of the Baptist Denomination throughout the United 
Kingdom ; and also to undertake the custody of title deeds and other documents 
relating to any place of worship, school, college, or other property held in trust for 
any purpose of the Denomination. 2. Forms for the preparation of trust deeds 
for chapMel property, and directions for the appointment of new trustees from 
time to time, are supplied gratis on application to the Honorary Secretary. 

N.B. — In 189X the funds of the General Baptist Building Fund, amounting to 
;^6,400, were joined to the previous capital, which amounted to £43,000, in pursuance 
of a request intimated in a Resolution unanimously passed at a Session of the 
Baptist Union in 18S9, and in accordance with Resolutions passed by the General 
Baptist Association, at Burnley, in June, 1891, and by Subscribers to the Baptist 
Building Fund at a Special General Meeting in October, 1891 — the Amalgamated 
Fund continuing under the title of '* The Baptist Building Fund." 

1894-5— 

Income — Balance brought forward - ;^?94 2 9 

Subscriptions and Donations .. .. 210 13 2 

Congregational Collections .. .'. .. 51 4 8 

Liverpool Auxiliary 53 9 9 

Rent of Peniel Chapel 58 z 8 

Donation subject to Interest . . • • 60 o o 

Loans repaid • • . • 10,637 o o 

ZI1364 12 o 

Expenditure— 

Loans to 41 Churches ;f 10,915 o o 

Annuities in respect of Donations . . . . 64 18 4 

Working Expenses 251 7 i 

Balance at Bankers' 133 6 7 

IX.364 12 o 

The Capital of the Fund is ;f 5 1,442 17s. id. 



SOCIETIES. 



107 



rrws<Ms~W. B. Bbmbriogb, J. P., E. Mounsey, J.P., E. Rawlings, and 

W. R. RlCKETT. 

Committee, 

Fletcher, Rev. J. 
Gordon, Mr. R. 
Griffiths, Mr. R. F. 
Hill, Mr. H. 
Mote, Mr. J. 
Ohiey. Mr. T. H. 
Payne, Mr. W. 



Aveiy, Rev. W. J. 
Benham, Mr. W. J., B.A. 
Benson, Mr. J. 
Bentley, Rev. W. 
Bowser, Mr. W. A. 
Chapman, Mr. J. W. 
Cowdy, Mr. J. 



Pewtress, Mr. S. 
Stoneman, Mr. J. 
Underhill, Mr.E.B., LL.D, 
Wilkin, Mr. M. H. 
Wood, Mr. H.. J.P. 
Woollacott, Mr. J. C. 



Treasurer—Mr. J. B. Mead, Endsleigh, Wickham-road, Brockleyi S.E. 

Auditors— Mr. J. Wates and Mr. G. Robertson. 

Honorary Secretary— Mr. J. Howard, 42, Old Broad-street, E.G. 

SoUcitor—Mr. S. Watson, 12, Bouverie-street, Fleet-street, E.G. 

Secretary for Deeds—Rey. W. Bentley, 227A, Brooke-road, Upper Clapton, N.E. 

Travelling Secretary and Collector— Ridv. F. H. Newton, x8, Ribblesdale-road, 

Homsey, N. 

BanAtfrs— London and County Bank, Lombard-street, E.G. 



Depository for Title and Trust Deeds. 

A Strong Room, fire-proof, has been provided in the basement of the Baptist 
Mission House, Furnival Street, where the Deeds of Chapel and other property con- 
nected with the Baptist denomination will be securely kept, under the guardianship 
of the Baptist Building Fund. Officers of Churches are strongly advised to avail 
themselves of the security for their Chapel Deeds thus offered to them. For Forms 
of Application apply to Rev. W. Bentley, 227A, Brooke-road, Upper Clapton, N.E. 



BAPTIST TOTAL ABSTINENCE ASSOCIATION. 

President— Mt. Alderman G. White, J.P., Norwich, 
Treeisurer — Mr. J. B. Meredith, Hawthomdene, Sydenhara-road, Croydon. 

Committee. 



Rev. D. Bums, D.D. 
„ J. H. Cooke. 
„ R. A. Elvey. 
„ A. C. Gray. 
„ F. C. Hughes. 
„ W.J.Mills. 



Rev. G. H. Morgan, B.Sc, 
„ J. Parker, M.A. 
„ J. E. Shephard. 
„ W. Stott. 

Mr. S. B. Burton. 
„ J. T. Dunn. 



Mr. T. K. Freeman. 

„ R. F. Griffiths. 

G. Pedley. 



J. Wates. 



Wood, J.P. 



Hon. Secretary— Mr. J. T, Sears, J.P., 11, Crane-court, Fleet-st., E.G. 

General Secretary — Rev. H. Trotman, 133, Spring Vale-road, Sheffield. 

Travelling Secretary — Rev. J. M. Hewson, 4, The Avenue, Acre-lane, Brixton, S.W. 

This Association was formed to utilize to the greatest advantage the Total 
Abstinence power existing in the churches of the Baptist denomination. The 
Travelling Secretary devotes the whole of his time to visiting the churches and 
assisting m the formation of Temperance Societies and Bands of Hope. Its monthly 
organ is The Bond of Union. ^ . .• ... 



I08 SOCIETIES. 



All abstaining Baptist ministers, deacons, elders, professors and students of 
Baptist colleges, and abstaining delegates to the Baptist Union, and other Baptists 
who abstain, and contribute to the funds of the Association a donation of £$, or a 
subscription of at least 2S. 6d. per axuium, are eligible for membership. The Bond 
of Union is sent, post free, to all subscribers of 5s. and upwards. The present 
ministerial membership is 1,424, and 266 students. 

. Pledge. — I hereby agree, by Divine assistance, to abstam from all intoxicating 
drinks as a beverage, and to promote the practice of abstinence throughout the 
community. 



METROPOLITAN TABERNACLE COLPORTAGE 
ASSOCIATION. 

Founded 1S66 by the late Rev. C. H. Spurgeon. 

President— Rev. T. Spurgeon. 

Vice-President— Rev. J. A. Spurgeon, D.D., LL.D, 

Honorary Secretary— Mr. C. P. Carpenter. 

Secretory— Mr. A* E. ALDER. 

Object. — ^The increased circulation of religious and healthy literature, blended 
with personal evangelistic effort by means of Christian Colporteurs, who devote all 
their time and visit every accessible house with Bibles and good books and periodi- 
cals for sale, and perform other missionary services, such as visitation of the sick 
and dying, and conducting meetings and open-air services as opportunities occur. 
The Association is unsectarian in its operations, " doing work for the friends of a 
full and free Gospel anywhere and everywhere," and a strict supervision is exercised 
over the books and periodicals issued for sale. 

Last year seventy-three Colporteurs were employed in twenty-four counties. 
Expenditure, £5,663 os. jd. Sales, £8,125 ^s* ^o^* 

The average cost of a Colporteur is £80, but the Committee will appoint a man 
to any district for which £45 a year is subscribed. For further information, appli- 
cation should be made to the "Secretary," Metropolitan Tabernacle Colportage 
Association, Pastor's College, Temple-street, Southwark, S.£. 



SOCIETY FOR AGED OR INFIRM BAPTIST 
. MINISTERS. 

Formed 1816. Object.—" The relief of Baptist ministers, being Beneficiary 
members, when they appear to be permanently incapacitated for pastoral duties l^ 
reason of age or infirmity." 

Capital invested ;^i3i204 o o 

Income, year ending June, 1895 6211211 

Receipts on account of Capital 4yi 11 11 

19 Shares to Claimants at ;^32 xos. each. 617 10 o 

Number of Beneficiary Members, 1x5. 

Treasurer— Rev. J. Culross, M.A., D.D., Bristol. 

Secretary— Mr. W. Sherring, Bristol 

Trustees— Mr. W. Sherring, Mr. G. H. Leonard, J.P., 

Mr. C. TOWNSBND, J.P. 



SOCIETIES. 



109 



Committee, 



Brown, Rev. C, London. 
Brown, Rev. J. J., Birmingham^ 
Burton, Rev. W., Minehead. 
Evans, Rev. G. D., Totnes. 
Glover, Rev. R., D.D., Bristol. 
Gower, Rev. H. F., Bath. 
Hawkes, Mr. W., J.P., Devonport. 
Henderson, Rev. W. J., B.A., Bristol. 
Hepburn, Mr. T. H., Hele. 
Humphreys, Rev. G. W., B. A.. Wellington. 



Jarman, Rev. G.. Bristol. 
Knee, Rev. H., Bristol. 
Medway, Mr. H. A., Bristol. 
Moore, Rev. H., Bristol. 
Penny, Mr. T., Taunton. 
Skerry, Rev. W. R., London. 
Tratman, Mr. A. R., Bristol. 
Vincent, Rev. S., Plymouth. 
Wood, Rev. J. R., London. 



BAPTIST WESTERN SOCIETY 

FOR WIDOWS AND ORPHANS. 

Formed 1807. Object. — The relief of necessitous Widows and Orphans of 
ministers of the Baptist denomination, in the counties of Cornwall, Devon, Dorset, 
Hants, Wilts, Gloucester, and Somerset, including the city of Bristol. 

Capital Invested £8,227 ^3 o 

Income, year ending June, 1895 407 o 5 

Receipts on account of Capital ; . . . . 330 8 8 

7 Widow Claimants, ;^34 i8s. 6d. each 244 9 6 

4 Widows and Children 159 15 6 

Number of Beneficiary Members, 62. 

treasurer— ^ev. J. Culross, M.A., D.D. 

Secretary— Mr. W. Sherring, Bristol. 

Trustees^Mr. G. H. Leonard, J.P., Mr. W. Sherring, Mr. C.Townsend, J.P., 

Mr. T. H. Hepburn. 



BAPTIST TRACT AND BOOK SOCIETY. 

Farmed 1841. Object. — " To disseminate by means of tracts, books and other 
publications, the truths of the Gospel of the Lord Jesus Christ, and the teaching 
of the New Testament Scriptures respecting Christian Baptism." 

Income, year ending December 31, 1894 j^ii035 6 2 C 

Expenditure 1,039 '3 2 J 

Officers and Committee for 1895. 

Treasurer—Mr, M. H. Wilkin, Hampstead, N.W. 

Editor— Rev, E. Parker, D.D., Baptist College, Brighton-grove, Manchester. 

Committee, 
LIFE MEMBERS. 



Bell, Mr. J. A., London. 
Bland, Rev. S. K., Ipswich. 
Box, Rev. J., London. 
Cattell, Rev. J., Bessels Green. 
Davies, Rev. Prof. G., D.D., Bangor. 
Lynn. Rev. J. H., London. ' 

. ORQINARX 
Archer, Rev. G., Huddersfield. 
Baxllie, Rev. J., London. 
Briggs, Rev. H., Todmorden. 
Brown, Rev. H. D., M.A., Dublin« 
Cuff, Rev. W., London. 
Davies, Rev. D., Brighton. 
Davies, Rev. Prof. T. W., B.A., Not. 

tingham. 
HugheSrRev. J. S., Warrington. 
Jenkins, Rev. D. W., Salendine Nook. 



Morris, Rev. J. A., Aberystwyth. 
Parker, Rev. E., D.D., Manchester. 
Reynolds, Rev. P., London. 
Shaw, Mr. W. D., J.P., Longwood, 
Huddersfield. 

MEMBERS. 
Marshall, Rev. J. T., M.A., Manchester. 
Moore, Rev. S. H., New Maiden. 
Parry, Rev. A. J., Cefn Mawr, Ruabon. 
Tarn, Rev. T. G., Cambridge. 
Thomas, Mr. A., M.P., Cardiff. 
Thomas, Rev. J., M.A., Liverpool. 
Towler, Rev. R. E., Manchester. 
Williams, Rev. C, Accrington. 
Williams, Rev. R. E., London. 
Wood, Mr. H., J.P., London. 



no SOCIETIES. 

Hon. Secretary— yiT, J. C. Woollacott, Tintem Cottage. New Maiden. 

Trade Manager— Ux, Luke W. Bickbl. 

CcUecior^—llLt. A. Whitehead, Wood-villa, New Hey, near Rochdale, 
and Mr. W. K. Bloom, 331, West Green Road, Tottenham, N. 

Depository and Book Room-^16, Gray*8 Inn Road. W.C. 



THE BAPTIST UNION OF WALES. 

See " Associations." Part VI. 



THE PROVIDENT SOCIETY FOR AGED AND INFIRM 

BAPTIST MINISTERS IN WALES AND 

MONMOUTHSHIRE. 

Established 1872. Objects. — " To enable Ministers of the Baptist denomination 
in Wales and Monmouthshire to meet the exigeDcies of old age, sickness and death." 

Income for 1894 ;f35o 5 3 

Capital invested 2,739 17 3 

Number of aged ministers relieved during the year, by ;fii xis. 7d. each, x6. 

Number of Members, 149. Annual Subscription, £1, 

Chairman— Rev. W. Harris, Aberdare. 

Secretary — Rev. W. Morris, Treorky, Pontypridd. 

Treasurer— Mr. D. Davibs, Merthyr. 

Trustees— Rev. C. Griffiths, Bristol; Rev. J. G. Lewis, D.D., Swansea; 

Mr. D. Davies, Merthyr; Rev. W. Edwards, B.A., D.D., Cardiff; and 

Rev. H. C. Williams, Corwen. 



BAPTIST BUILDING FUND FOR WALES. 

Formed 1862. Object.—" To assist, by loan without interest, in the building, 
enlargement, or repair of places of worship belonging to the Particular or Calvinistic 
Baptist denomination in Wales and Monmouthshire." 

Capital Account. 

To Loans in hands of the Churches ;^7>748 15 o 

Swansea Harboui Trust 500 o o 

Balances 27 o 6 

£8,275 15 6 

Chairman for 1895-96 — Rev. D. DaVIES, Llandudno. 

Hon. Treasurer— Ur. D. Davies, 3, Glebeland, Merthyr Tydvil. 

Hon. Solicitor— Ut. J. Jones Pughe, Pontypridd. 

Hon, Secretary— Mr, 1. Phillips, Burry Port R.S.O., Carmarthenshire. 



SOCIETIES. Ill 



WELSH BAPTIST ASSURANCE TRUST, LIMITED. 

CAatrman— Mr. O. Lewis, St. Briavel's, Coleford, Glos. 

Treasurers—MT. W. R. Edwards, T. P., Carmarthen; Mr. R. D. Evans. M.D., 

F«stiniog. 

Solicitor— fAr. J. Jones Pughe, Pontypridd. 

Secretary— Mr, I. Phillips, Brynteg, Burry Port R.S.O., Carm. 

Capital, ;^xo,ooo in 2,000 Shares of ^^5 each. 

Object. — " To carry on the business of insurance of chapels, schools, class-rooms, 
Testries, &c., with their fittings; houses, colleges, libraries, and other property 
belonging to the Baptist denomination in Wales and Monmouthshire, or its Associa- 
tions in the same." 



WELSH BAPTIST TOTAL ABSTINENCE SOCIETY. 

Established 1879. 

President— Rev. J. W. Maurice, Dinas Cross. 

Vice-President — Mr. R. Williams, Gam, Dolbenmaen. 

Secretary— Rev. J. Griffiths, Llanfairfechan, N. Wales. 

Treasurer— Mr. S. Ellis, Llanfair, Welshpool. 

Auditor— Mr. H. Abraham, Porth, 

The Society was formed for the purpose of combining the temperance power of 
the churches to check the great evil of intemperance. By its means the Colleges 
are visited annually by members of the Committee, who address the students ; the 
conferences of the Associations are addressed ; a paper is read at a meeting held in 
connection with the annual meetings of the Welsh Baptist Union ; and various 
other agencies are employed. Almost all the students, and a majority of the 
ministers, enrol themselves as members of the Society. 



BAPTIST UNION OF SCOTLAND. 

See " Associations," Part VI. 



BAPTIST HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY 
FOR SCOTLAND. 

Chiefly for the Highlands and Islands. 
Formed 18x6. Object. — '* The dissemination of the Gospel of Christ in Scotland.' 

Income for 1894-5, from Subscriptions, Donations, and 

Legacies ;f 2.250 l^ to 

Expenditure for 1894-5 — Salaries and Missionaries' 

Travelling Expenses, &c 2^02 9 iz 

Legacy Fund 715 17 xi 

Obioi Fund 44 13 3 

Hon, Treasurer — Mr. W. O. Gibb, 21, Royal Terrace, Edinburgh* 

Secretary — Mr. P. Waugh, 69, Momingside Drive, Edinburgh. 

The Committee consists of members of Baptist Churches in Scotland, 



112 SOCIETIES. 



Twenty-three missionaries are supported, in whole or in part, by this Society. 
They are distributed as follows : — In the Shetland Isles, 3 ; in the Orkney Islands, 3 ; 
Caithness, 2 ; Forfarshire, x ; Perthshire, x ; Hebrides, 6 ; Argyllshire, 3 ; A]rr- 
shire 3 ; Lanarkshire, x ; Roxburghshire, i ; Fifeshire, 2. 



BAPTIST UNION OF SCOTLAND LOAN AND 
BUILDING FUND. 

Established 1878. 

Object. — " To assist in the liquidation of Chapel debts by loans of money, with- 
out interest, and in the building, enlargement, or repair of places of worship 
connected with the Baptist denomination in Scotland." 

Capital ;^3.943 3 i 

Subscriptions, 1894-95 . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 13 o 

Balance in Bank x2o 4 i 

Advanced to Churches during the year 800 o o 

Trustees—Mr. J. Wilson, Falkirk ; Mr. H. Bowser, and Mr. J. Nimmo, 

Glasgow; Mr. T. G. Coats, Paisley; and Mr. J. Walcot, 

Edinburgh. 

Convener—Mr, J. Walcot, Edinburgh. 

Law Agent— Mr. T. White, S.S.C, Edinburgh. 



BAPTIST UNION OF SCOTLAND MINISTERS^ 
PROVIDENT FUND. 

Established 1874. 

Income, 1894-95 £277 4 4 

Expenditure 195 5 o 

Capital , e.xoo i3 10 



BAPTIST UNION OF SCOTLAND BENEFICIARY 

FUND. 

Established 1869. 

Object. — " The relief of aged and infirm ministers in Scotland." 

Income, 1894-95 £36 11 o 

Expenditure 7050 

Balance at Credit op Fund 25a 9 5 



SOCIETIES. 



113 



SCOTTISH BAPTIST TOTAL ABSTINENCE SOCIETY. 

Object: — "To promote the practice of Total Abstinence among the ministers, 
students, members, and adherents of the Baptist Churches in Scotland, and to 
further the interests of the Temperance cause in General. 

PrexitUn^—tAr, R. Lockhart Edinburgh. 

Vice-Presidents. 



Rev. W. Grant, Edinburgh. 
Rev. R. Macnair, M.A., M.D., Edin- 
burgh. 
Rev. W. TULLOCH, Edinburgh. 



Rev. A. Wyue. M.A., Edinburgh. 
Rev. F. H. ROBARTS, Glasgow. 
Mr. A. Coats, Paisley. 
Rev. John Crouch „ 



Hon. Treasurer— Mr. J. S. Bone, i, Park-terrace, Langside, Glasgow. 
Han. Secretary—yit. F. Spite, 6, The Crescent, Dalmuir, Dumbartonshire. 



Committu, 



Black, Mr. W.. Edinburgh. 

Johnston, Mr. J. W. „ 

McKenzie, Mr. „ 

Macdonald, Rev. G. „ 

Tait. Rev. D. 

Thomson, Mr. A. B., M.A., Edinburgh. 

Urquhart, Mr. A., S.S.C. „ 

Watson, Mr. J. 

Way, Rev. T. W. 

Brown, Mr. A. K., Glasgow. 

Elder, Rev. J. 

Graham, Mr. J. C. 

Last, Rev. E. 

Lockhart. Mr. D. 

Millar. Rev. W. J. 

Parker. Mr. A. 

Sharp. Mr. G. 

Young, Mr. A. 

Bisset. Rev. A., M.A., Aberdeen. 

Dingwall. Mr. A. „ 

Gibb, Mr. A. „ 

Scott. Mr. F. J. 

Seivwright, Mr. J. „ 

Watt, Mr. W. 

Macintosh, Rev. W., Airdrie. 

Edwards, Rev. H., Anstruther. 

Fortune, Mr. R. „ 

Thomson. Mr. P. „ 



Carter, Mr. J., Dundee. 

Clark. Rev. D. „ 

Ireland, Mr. D. .. 

Lawson. Mr J. „ 

Lister, Rev. T. W. ,. 

Hagen, Rev. J. T.. Dunfermline. 

Johnston, Rev. J. B., M.A.. Galashiels. 

Thomson, Rev. A., Galashiels. 

Chrystal, Rev. J. R. B.D., Hamilton. 

Seaman. Rev. W., Hawick. 

Farquhar, Rev. J.. M.A., Paisley. 

M'Alpine, Mr. A., Paisley. 

McCallum, Mr. J. M. „ 

Robinson, Rev. J. A. G.. M.A., Perth. 

McKinlay. Mr. A., Rothesay. 

Swan, Mr. A., Stirling. 

Yuille. Rev. G. „ 

Brown, Mr. G., Greenock. 

Corbet, Rev. A. „ 

Glendening, Rev. R. E., Elgin. 

Richards, Rev. W., Leith. 

Brown, Rev. H. D., A)rr. 

Hourston, Mr. D. „ 

Nicolson,Rev. W.B., M.A., Kirkintilloch. 

Payne, Rev. A. J., Peterhead. 

Hirst, Rev. S., St. Andrews. 

Connor, Rev. J., Motherwell. 



BAPTIST UNION OF IRELAND. 

See " Associations," Part VI. 



IRISH BAPTIST HOME MISSION. 

Founded i%i^ as the Baptist Irish Society. 

Chairman— Rsv. H. D. Brown, M.A., Glengyle, Rathgar, Dublin. 

Treasurer— Mr. H. A. Gribbon. Holme Lea, Coleraine. 

Secretary— Mr. T. R. Warner, Rockefeller House, Harcourt Street, Dublin. 

H 



t 



114 



SOCIETIES. 



General CommUtu, 



Atkinson, Mr. E. D., Tandragee. 

Banks, Rev. S. J.. Banbridge. 
*Bennett, Mr. B., Waterford. 
•Brown. Rev. H. D., M.A., Dublin. 

Bury. Mr. A. U. G., M.A.. Dublin. 

Carson, Rev. K. H., Tubbermore. 
•Clark, Rev. R.. Belfast. 
•Crosthwaite, Dr. Davenport, Dublin. 

Dixon, Mr. J. L., Dublin. 

Donald, Rev. C. S., Belfut. 
•Drummond, Mr. W. H., Dublin. 

Froste, Mr. R. P., B.A., Dublin. 
•Glendinning, Mr. R. G., Belfast. 
•Graham, Mr. H. H., Belfast. 
•Gribbon, Mr. H. A., Coleraine. 

Haughton, Mr. R. S., Dublin. 

• These consdtute 



D.L., 



•Irwin, Mr. W., Donaghmore. 

Kirker, Mr. H., Banbridge. 

La Touche, Mr. J., J.P., 
Brannoxtown. 
•M'Kelvey, Mr. D., Belfast.. 

Mcintosh, Mr. H., Belfast. 

Nixon, Surgeon F. A., Dublin. 
•Pearson. Mr. J. D., Dublin. 

Prendreigh, Mr. A.. Cork. 

Wallace, Mr. J. R.. Limerick. 
•Warner. Mr. T. R., Dublin. 

Warner, Mr. W. C, sen., Dublin. 
•Waters, Surgeon -Major, C.B., J.P. 
Tubbermore. 

Weatherup, Mr. J., Carrickfe^rgus. 



the Executive Committee. 



Income for the year X894 £2,154x5 5 

Expenditure 2,4x0 15 3 

Eighteen agents employed. 



BAPTIST MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

(Mission House, 19, Fumival-street, E.C.) 

Formed 1792. 

Gross Receipts, }rear ending March 31st, 1895 . . . • */62,999 x8 3 

Gross Expenditure do 71.700 3 6 

Cash Receipts, during same period, for Centenary Fund 4.825 X3 xx 
Expenditure, during same period, on account of 

Centenary Fund 22,821 X3 8 

• These totals do not include amounts raised and expended at mission stations. 

Committee and Officers, 1895-96. 

Treasurer— Mr. W. R. Rickett. 

Hon, Secretary — Mr. E. B. Underhill, LL.D. 

General Secretary, — Mr. A. H. Baynes. 

Assoeiatum Secretary— Rrv, J. B. Myers. 

Secretary of Bilfle Translation Society Auxiliary— Rev. W. HilX. 



Committee. 



Atkinson, Rev. J. H., Liverpool. 
Bailey, Rev. J., B.A., Sheffield. 
Baillie, Rev. T., London. 
Barran, Mr. A., Leeds. 
Bird. Rev. B., Plymouth. 
Briscoe, Rev. J. T., Bristol. 
Brown, Rev. C, London. 
Chown, Mr. J., London. 
Clarke. Mr. D.. C. A., High Wycombe. 
Collier, Mr. E. P., J.P., Reading. 
Davies. Rev. D., Brighton. 
Dobson, Rev. N. Deal. 



Evans, Rev. B., Aberdare. 
Forbes. Rev. J. T., M.A., Edinbtirgh. 
Gauge. Rev. £. G., London. 
Glover. Rev. R.. D.D., Bristol. 
Gould, Rev. G. P.. M.A., London. 
Gray, Rev. R.. Birmingham. 
Greenhough, Rev. J. G., M.A., Leicester 
Griffiths. Mr. R. F., London. 
Hawker, Rev. G., London. 
Henderson, Rev. E., London. 
Hill, Rev. G., M.A.. Nottingham. 
Lush, Mr. Percy J. F., M.R.C.S., London. 



SOCIETIES. 



"5 



Mamham, Mr. F. J., Addlestone. 
Mamham, Mr. J., J-P-i Boxmoor. 
Martin, Rev. T. H., Glasgow. 
Mead, Mr. J. B., London. 
Medhurst, Rev. T. W., Caidiff. 
Medley, Rev. E., B.A., London. 
Morris, Rev. J. A., Aberystwyth. 
Morris, Rev. T. M., Ipswich. 
Morris, Rev. W., Treorky. 
Olney, Mr. T. H., London. 
Owen, Rev. J., Swansea. 
Parkinson. Mr. W. C , L.C.C.. London. 
Payne, Mr. W., London. 
Penny, Mr. T. S., Taunton. 
Phillips, Rev. T., B.A., KeUering. 
Price, Mr. C, Hampstead. 



Roberts, Rev. J. E., M.A., Manchester. 

Shakespeare, Rev. J. H., M.A., Norwich* 

Short, Rev. G., B.A., Salisbury. 

Skemp, Rev. C. W., Bradford. 

Skerry, Rev. W. R., London. 

Smith, Mr. J. J., J.P., Watford. 

Spurrier, Rev. E., Colchester. 

Tarn, Rev. T. G., Cambridge. 

Thew, Rev. J., Leicester. 

Vincent, Rev. S., Plymouth. 

Wherry, Mr. Alderman W. R.. J.P., 

Bourne. 
Whitley, Mr. T., Southsea. 
Williams, Rev. H. C, Corwen. 
Wood, Rev. J. R., London. 



And the Officers of the Zenana Mission. 

Auditors— Messrs. J. Jennings, H. Keen, and W. W. Parkinson. 

Bankers— Messrs. Barclay, Bevan, Tritton ft Co., 54 Lombard Street, E.G. 

Honorary Members of Committee, 
Having rendered important Services to the Society. 



Aldis, Rev. J., Beckington. 
AUsop, Rev. S. S., Ripley, Derby. 
Angus, Rev. J., D.D., London. 
Barrass, Rev. T., Peterborough. 
Baynes. Mr. W. W., J.P., D.L., Bromley. 
Bembridge, Mr.W. B., J.P., Ripley, Derby. 
Bompas, Mr. H. M., Q.C., London. 
Booth, Rev. S. H., D.D., London. 
Bowser, Mr. H., Glasgow. 
Brown, Rev. J. J., Birmingham. 
Brown, Rev. J.T., Northampton. 
Burton, Mr. S. B., Newcastle-on-Tyne. 
Clifford, Rev. J., M.A., D.D., London. 
Culross, Rev. J., D.D., Bristol. 



Edwards, Rev. E., Torquay. 
Green, Rev. S. G., D.D., London. 
Gumey, Mr. J. J., J. P., Newcastle. 
Landels, Rev. W., D.D., Edinburgh. 
McLaren, Rev. A., D.D., Manchester. 
McMaster, Mr. J. S., Toronto. 
Muller, Professor, Amsterdam. 
Orton, Rev. W., Leicester. 
Rawlings, Mr. E., London. 
Robinson. Mr. E., T.P., Bristol. 
Spurgeon, Rev. J. A., D.D., London. 
Underwood, Rev. W., D.D., Derby. 
Wheeler, Rev. T. A., Norwich. 
Williams, Rev. C, Accrington. 



Honorary Members of Committee {ex-officio), being Presidents or Principals of 
Denominational Colleges, in accordance with Regulation, p. 116. 



Parker, Rev. E., D.D., Manchester. 
Roberts, Rev. R. H., B.A., London. 
Tymms, Rev. T. V., Rawdon. 



Davies, Rev. Gethin, D.D., Bangor. 
Davies, Rev. T. W., B.A., Nottingham. 
Edwards, Rev. W., D.D., Cardiff. 
Henderson, Rev. W. J., B.A., Bristol. 

Plan and Regulations of the Society. 

Name. — ^The name by which the Society has been, and is, designated, is " Thk 
Baptist Missionary Society," including "The Particular Baptist Missionary 
Society for Propagating the Gospel among the Heathen," which was formed in 1792, 
and *' The General Baptist Missionary Society," which was formed in 1816. 

Object. — ^The great object of this Society is the diffusion of the knowledge of the 
religion of Jesus Christ throughout the whole world, beyond the British Isles, by the 
preaching of the Gospel, the translation and publication of the Holy Scriptures, and 
the establishment of schools. 

Members. — ^The following persons shall be considered members — viz., pastors of 
churches making an annual contribution ; ministers who collect annually ; and all 
Christian persons concurring in the objects of the Society, who are donors of ten 
pounds or upwards, or subscribers of ten shillings and sixpence annually to its funds. 

General Meeting of Members. — A General Meeting of Members only shall be held 
annually, at which the Committee and Officers shall be chosen for the year ensuing, 
the Auditors of accounts appointed, and any other business pertaining to the Society 
transacted. 

H 2 



Xl6 SOCIETIES. 



In choosing the Committee and Officers, the Chaiiman of the Meeting shall 
receive all names which it may be intended to propose. Out of the list so obtained, 
forty members of the Committee shall be .chosen by ballot, those who have the 
greater number of votes being the parties elected, and the members so elected shall 
be empowered to fill up the number to fifty-'our members, as required by the 
xollowing rule, from the list of nominations presented at the Annual Meeting. 

Committee. — That the affairs of the Society shall be conducted by a Committee of 
fifty-four persons, two-thirds of whom shall be residents beyond twelve miles of 
St. Paul's ; the Committee to meet monthly, or oftener, in London, on a fixed day, 
for the despatch of business ; seven members to be deemed a quorum ; the Com- 
mittee to 1>B empowered to fill up vacancies 

Public Meetings. — A Public Meeting of the Society shall be held annually, when 
the list of the Committee shall be read, the accounts presented, and the proceedings 
of the previous year reported. The Committee shall also be empowered to summon 
Public Meetings in London or elsewhere, whenever the interests of the Society may 
seem to require. 

Corresponding Members. — All Treasurers and Secretaries of Missionary Auxili- 
aries shall be Corresponding Members of the Committee, together with such 
persons as it may be found necessary to add to their number. 

Honorary Members. — The General Meeting of Members shall also be empowered 
to appoint as Honorary Members of the Committee any who have rendered 
important services to the Society; provided the nomination of such Honorary 
Members of Committee shall proceed only firom a resolution of the General 
Committee of the Society, or from six members of the Society who are combined 
therein. 

Honorary Members (^jr-oj^icio).— Presidents or Principals of Denominational 
Colleges shall be ex officio Members of the Committee of the Society. 

Members of the Society entitled to Vote at Committee Meetings. — All Honorary 
and Corresponding Members of the Committee, and all Ministers, who are Members 
of the Society, who may occasionally be in London ; and also Ministers residing 
in London, similarly qualified, together with the Treasurers and Secretaries of 
London Auxiliaries, shall be entitled to attend and vote at the Meetings of the 
Committee. 

Funds. — All moneys received on behalf of the Society shall be lodged in the 
hands of the Treasurer, or of Trustees to be chosen by the Society. When the 
amount received shall exceed the sum needed for the current expenses of the month, 
it shall be invested in the Public Funds, until required for the use of the Mission. 

Alteration of Constitution. — No alteration in the constitution of the Society 
shall be made without twelve months' notice having been given at a previous 
Annual General Meeting. 

For further Particulars see Report published by the Baptist 
Missionary Society. 

THE LADIES' ASSOCIATION FOR THE SUPPORT 

OF ZENANA WORK IN INDIA AND CHINA. 

(In connection with the Baptist Missionary Society.) 

President— lILxs. Rickett. 

Treasurer— lArs. Underhill. 

Hon. SecrOarUsiuS. E. A. xlZlh' EUerdale-road. Hampstead. N.W. 

iMiss H. C. Bowser, Sunnyside, Richmond Road, Ealing, W. 

The object of this Society is to send the Gospel to the women of India and 
China, and it is carried on by lady missionaries and native Bible-women and school 
teachers. Zenanas are visited, schools established, and evangelistic, medical and 



SOCIETIES. 



117 



vilUge work maintained in 26 different stations, with a staff of 58 lady visitors and 
200 native agents. Boarding, normal, and day schools contain 3,300 pupils, and 
2,000 pupils are in Zenanas under regular instruction. 



Baillie. Mrs. 
Barnard, Mrs. 
Barran, Miss. 
Baynes, Mrs. A. H. 
Bycrley, Miss. 
Caine, Mrs. 
Campagnac, Mrs. 
Cowdy, Miss. 
Fletcher, Mrs. 
George, Mrs. 
Gould. Mrs. A. P. 
Gould, Mrs. H. P. 
Green, Mrs. 



Committee. 
Hawker, Mrs. 
Henderson, Mrs. E. 
Hill, Mrs. W. 
Japp, Miss 
Johnson, Mrs. G. L. 
Kemp, Miss E. G. 
Lewis, Mrs. P. 
Medley, Mrs. E. 
Murrell, Mrs. 
Olney, Miss A. 
Parkinson, Mrs. 
Roberts, Mrs. R. H. 
Robinson, Mrs. E. 
Williamson, Mrs. R. 



Rooko, Mrs. A. B. . 
Rose, Mrs. H. 
Salter, Miss 
Skerry, Mrs. 
Smith, Mrs. J. J. 
Southwell, Miss. 
Spurgeon, Mrs. J. A. 
Sturt, Mrs. 
Trafford, Mrs. 
Tritton, Miss. 
Warmington, Miss. 
Watson, Mrs. S. 
Whitley, Mrs. 



And the Treasurer and Secretaries of the Baptist Missionary Society. 
Honorary Members : Mrs. J. F. Smith and Mrs. Sale. 
Income, year ending March 3zst, 1895 . . . . ;^9,oo5 
Expenditure 9,255 



YOUNG MEN'S ASSOCIATION IN AID OF THE 
BAPTIST MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

Founded 1848. OBJECTS : — '' To diffuse a missionary spirit, especially among 
the young, by the dissemination of missionary information, the establishment of 
missionary libraries, and the delivery of lectures ; to form and encourage Sunday 
School and other juvenile missionary auxiliaries ; and to promote systematic efforts 
on behalf of missions." 

All moneys received by the Association for the Baptist Missionary Society are 
paid over direct, the working expenses being met by separate subscriptions. 

President— Mr. H. M. Bompa.s, M.A., Q.C. 
Vice-Presidents. 



Rev. J. Angus, D.D. 
Mr. A. H. Baynes. 
Mr. W. J. Benuam, B.A, 



Mr. T. H. Olney. 

Mr. W. R. RiCKETT. 

Mr. E. B. Underhill, LL.D. 



Treasurer— Mr, F. J. Marnham. 

Acting Hon. Secretaries—Messrs. J. Everett, F. W. Ford, and H. E. Wood, 
19, Fumival-street, E.G. 

Committee. 



Bell, Mr. D. S. 
Bond, Mr. A. 
Dyer, Mr. W. G. 
Evans, Mr. H. W. 
Field, Mr. F. E. 
Ford, Mr. F. W. 



Judd, Mr. G. H. 

Lovejoy, Mr. T. 

Maynard, Mr. J. 

Myers, Rev. J. B. 

Page, Mr. J. B. 

Parkinson, Mr. W.W., L.C.C. 

Wood, Mr. H. E. 



Shepherd. Mr. A. J. 
Taylor, Mr. W. 
Thomson, Mr. H. O. 
Tucker, Mr. F. E. 
Tyrer, Mr. R. H. 
Westwood, Mr. W. J. 



One representative from Regent's Park College ; one from Metropolitan Tabernacle 
College ; and two representatives from each School. 

School Visitor— Mr, J. Everett. 
Auditors— Mr. C. E. SMiTH'and Mr. W, W. Parkinson, L.C.C. 



1X8 SOCIETIES. 



BIBLE TRANSLATION SOCIETY. 

Formed 1S40. Object. — " It shall be the object of this Society to aid in printing 
and circulating those translations of the Holy Scriptures from which the British and 
Foreign Bible Society has withdrawn its assistance, on the ground that the words 
relating to the ordinance of Baptism have been translated by terms signifying 
immersion ; and further to aid in producing and circulating other versions of the 
Word of God similarly faithful and complete." 

Income, year ending March 3xst, 1895 £^^^7^ 2 8 

Expenditure 1,239 9 3 

Treasurer^Mr. £. B. Underhiix, LL.D., Derwent Lodge, Thurlow-road, 
Hampstead, N.W. 
Secretary—^eiv, W. Hill. 9. St. JuUan's-road, Kilburn, N.W. 
Committee, 
Angus, Rev. J., D.D. London. Davies, Rev. G., D.D„ Bangor. 

Baynes, Mr. A. H. „ ! Davies, Rev. T. W., B.A., Nottingham. 

Booth, Rev. S. H., D.D. „ Edwards, Rev. W., D.D., Cardiff. 

Clifford. Rev. J.. M.A., D.D. ., Henderson, Rev. W. J., B.A., Bristol. 

Gould, Rev. G. P., M.A. ,. | Landels. Rev. W.. D.D., Edinburgh. 

Green, Rev. S. G., D.D. ., Mamham, Mr. J., J.P., Boxmoor. 



Griffiths, Mr. R. F. 
Myers. Rev. J. B. 
Rickett. Mr. W. R. 
Roberts. Rev. R. H., B.A. 



Morris. Rev. J. A., Aberystwyth. 
Morris. Rev. T. M., Ipswich. 
Owen, Rev. J., Swansea. 
Parker, Rev. E., D.D.. Manchester. 



Scorey, Rev. P. G. „ , Shaw, Mr. T., Huddersfield. 

Willis, Mr. W., Q.C. ., ' Short. Rev. G., B.A., Salisbury. 



Wood, Rev. J. R. 
Barrass, Rev. T., 'Peterborough. 
Brown, Rev. J. J., Birmingham. 
Brown, Rev. J. T., Northampton. 
Culross, Rev. J., D.D.. Bristol. 



Tilly, Rev. A., Cardiff. 
Tymms, Rev. T. V., Rawdon. 
Wheeler, Rev. T. A., Norwich. 
Williams, Rev. C, Accrington. 
Williams, Rev. H. C, Corwen. 



Wherry, Mr. Aid. W. R., J.P., Bourne. 



GERMAN BAPTIST MISSION. 

Committee for Distribution of Funds sent out from Great Britain. 

Treasurer— Rev. P. W. Bickel. D.D.. Hamburg. 

Secretory— Pastor K. Mascher, Dresden. 

Pastor WiEHLER, Bremen. I Pastor R. Kromm, Breslau. 

., E. Millard, Wiesbaden. „ Weerts, Frankfurt-on-Main. 

„ L. Horn, Elbing. | Herr Pielstick, Hamburg. 

Rev. F. B. Meyer, B.A., London. 

Treasuret for Great Britain—Mr. M. H. Wilkin. Hampstead, N.W. 

Hon, Secretary for Great Britain— Mr, W. S. Oncken, Sunny Bank, Lincoln. 

Amount received during 1894-95 in Great Britain, ;^499 6s. 3d. 

Summary for January ist, 1895, comprising the Churches in Germany, 
Switzerland, Austria-Hungary, Holland, Roumania, Bulgaria and South Africa. 

Number of Churches . . . . 163 I Number of Sunday Schools . . ^ 
„ Members .. .. 31.399 1 » Sunday Scholars .. 21,466^ 

Amount contributed by the German Churches to the work of this Mission, about 

;f25.540. 

N.B. — Five German Churches in South Africa, with 928 members, are included 
in the above summaiy. The Russian Churches, of which there are 48, have formed 
a separate Union, with a membership of over 15,000. The proceedings are in the 
Lettish, Esthonian and German languages. The 25 Danish Churches have also 
formed a separate Union, numbering 3,000 members. 



SOCIETIES. 



119 



STRICT BAPTIST MISSION. 

Pomud z86o. Object.—" The diffusion of the Gospel in heathen lands, and the 
formation of churches in accordance with the principles of Strict Communion 
Baptists." 

Income, 1894, including balance from 1893 of j^45S 168. 8d. • . ;f 1,949 6 xo 

Expenditure 1,362 la 8 

* Balance in hand 586 14 2 

PrtsidetU—yit. J Box. 

Vice-President— lAr, R. £. Sears. 

Treasurer— ^x, W. Abbott. 

Hon, Secretaries— Mr. J. Briscoe, 58, Grosvenor-road, Highbury New Park, N. ; Mr. 

I. R. Wakelin, 33, Robert-street, Hampstead-road, N.W. ; and Mr. F. J. 

Catchpole, zx, Jemingham-road, New Cross. S.E. 

This Mission has two centres of evangelical work — in India and Ceylon. In 
India there are eighteen stations and fifty-three sub-stations, with sixty-eight 
workers; in Ceylon there are four stations, and five workers. 



BAPTIST DEACONESSES' HOME AND MISSION. 

59, Doughty Street, London, W.C. 

Superintendent— Rev. W. Brock. 16, EUerdale-road, Hampstead, N.W. 

Acting Treasurer— Mr. S. Thompson, ix, Wood-street, E.C. 

Secretary — Rev. E. Henderson, 21, Victoria-road, Clapham. S.W. 

Committee. 

Lush, Mr. Percy J. F., M.R.C.S. 



Baillie, Rev. J. 
Chown, Mrs. 
David. Mr. A. J., LL.M. 
Denny, Mrs. 
Gordon. Mrs. 
Gould. Mr. A. P. 
Grigg. Mr. F. R. 
Hudson, Mrs. 

The Central Mission 
neighbourhood around. 



, M.S. 



McKay, Rev. G. P. 
Micklem, Mr. N., LL.B. 
Page, Rev. W., B.A. 
Skerry. Rev. W. R. 
Stiff, Mr. E. 
Thompson, Mrs. S. 
Vick, Rev. C. W. 

is in Dozrington-street, Leather-lane, E.C., and the 
Seven sisters are engaged there, in visiting, nursing, and 
conductizig meetings. A medical dispensary is open every Friday afternoon for 
the poor, and is conducted by Dr. Lush. There are also five sisters at work in 
various parts of London, in connection with Baptist Churches, and under the 
superintendence of their ministers. 

Income, X894 ;^9o6 X9 4 



HOME OF REST FOR BAPTIST MINISTERS 
AND MISSIONARIES. 

Cefn-y-Coed, Llanfairfechan, North Wales. 

President— Rey. A. McLaren, D.D., Manchester. 

Vice-Presidents. 



Baynes, Mr. A. H., London. 
Booth, Rev. S. H., D.D., London. 
Brown, Rev. J. T.. Northampton. 
Clifford, Rev. J., D.D., London. 
Culross, Rev. J., D.D., Bristol. 
Glover, Rev. R., D.D., Bristol. 
Greezihough, Rev. J. G., M.A., Leicester. 
Medley, Rev. W., M.A.. Rawdon. 



Parker. Rev. E.. D.D.. Manchester. 
Rickett, Mr. W. R.. London. 
Roberts, Rev. R. H.. B.A.. London. 
Shakespeare, Rev. J. H., M.A., Norwich. 
Short. Rev. G.. B.A.. Salisbury. 
Tymms, Rev. T. V.. Rawdon. 
Williams. Rev. Chas., Accrington. 



I20 COLLEGES. 



CommUtee of Management, 

McLaren, Rev. A.* D.D. 



Macalpine, Mr. G. W.. T.P. 
Roberts. Rev. J. E., M.A. 
Streuli, Rev. A. W. H. 



Atkinson, Rev. J. H. 
Bonner, Rev. C. 
Bowser, Rev. S. W., B.A. 
Lewis, Rev. R. 

House Committee. 

Rev. J. E. Roberts, M.A., Rev. A. W. H. Streuli, and the Warden. 

Warden and Treasurer (pro. tern.) — Rev. C. Bonner, Southampton. 

The Home of Rest is open throughout the year, and is under the care of a Lady 
Superintendent. Baptist Ministers or Missionaries, alone or with their wives, can, 
when in need of change, find a home there. All provision is made for comfort and 
recreation, at a much smaller cost than that incurred in the usual way of taking a 
holiday. Particulars may be had of the Warden. 



II.— COLLEGES. 

BRISTOL. 

Instituted 1770. 

Income, year ending June, 1895 j^x.goo 16 10 

Expenditure 1,878 19 5 

Present number of Students, 22. 

Trustees— Mr. T. H. Hepburn, Mr. E. Robinson, J.P., Mr. W. Shbrring. 

Mr. C. TOWNSEND, J.P. 

«/W«# P«'«cM^«/« J K®^- J- CULROSs, M.A., D.D. 
Joint Presidents | Rev. W. J. Henderson, B.A. 

The Study of Classical and General Subjects is pursued in the classes of Bristol 
University College. 

During 1895. in the University of London, Mr. H. G. Hore passed the Inter- 
mediate Arts Examination, and Mr. A. Moore and Mr. J. Thomas matriculated, the 
former in the First Division and the latter in the Honours Division. 

Treasurer— Ut. E. Robinson. J.P., BristoL 

Secretary— Rev. R. Glover, D.D., 15, Westfield Park, Bristol. 

Financial Secretary— Rev. H. Knee, Wellington House, Ashley-road, Bristol. 



MIDLAND. 

Nottingham. 

Instituted 1797 in London. Removed to Wisbech 18 14. to Loughborough in 1825, 
to London in 1841, to Leicester in 1843, ^ Nottingham in 1857, to ChUweU in x86i, 
and to Nottingham in 1883. 

Income, year ending June, 1895 £9^^ o o 

Expenditure 960 o o 

Present number of Students, 14. 
Principal and Tutor in Biblical Languages and Biblical Theology — 
Rev. T. W. Davies, B.A. 
Warden— Rev. W. Evans. 
Warden Elect— Rev. T. Barrass. 
Hon. Medical Officer— Mr. J. Watson, M.B., CM., M.R.C.S. 
The Study of Classical, Mathematical, and Literary Subjects is pursued in he 
classes of Nottingham University College. 

During 1895, in the University of London, Mr. J. H. Rushbrooke matriculated in 
the First Division and Mr. P. G. R. Monk in the Second Division. 



COLLEGES. 



I2X 



Treasurer^Mr, J. S. Smith, Mountsorrel, Loughborough. 

Han, Secrgtaries—Rev. W. Evans, Leicester, Rev. R. SiLBY, Nottingham, and 

(Finance) Mr. W. Hunt, Nottingham. 



Li/$ Governors. 
Mr. W. B. Bembridge, J.P. | Mr. R. F. Griffiths. 

fMr. A. Bradley. 



*Aked. Rev. C F. 

Atkinson, Rev. T. H. 
^Barrass, Rev. T. 

Bennett. Rev. J. E., B.A. 
•Bishop, Rev. W. 
•Carey, Rev. S. P., M.A. 

Carrington, Rev. £. 

Clark, Rev. J. 
•Clifford. Rev. J., M.A.. D.D. 
•Coleman, Rev. E. E. 
♦Douglas. Rev. J., B.A. 

Ford, Rev. R. C, M.A. 

Godfrey, Rev. J. R. 

Handford, Rev. R. F. 

Harris, Rev. W. F. 

Jenkins, Rev. R. 

Jones. Rev. W. R. 
•McElwee, Rev. G. M.. M.A., B.Sc. 

Payne, Rev. C. 
•Vick, Rev. C. W. 

Ashby, Mr. W. 
f Barwick, Mr. E. 

Bennett, Mr. T. H. 
fBexon, Mr. A. 
1 Bishop, Mr. C. T. 
fBooker, Mr. F. W. 
{Bright. Mr. J. 

* Academic Committee. 



I Mr. J. S. Smith. 

Mr. Alderman W. R. Wherry, J.P. 
Elected Members of Council, 

f Bright, Mr. L. 



iBrownsword, Mr. A. 



Cholerton, Mr. G. 
Clark, Mr. W. B. 



Finance and Reference Committee. 



I . 

flCullen, Mr. A. H. 
♦IForth, Mr. C. 
*Granger, Prof. F. S., D. Lit., M.A. 
+Hall, Mr. S. 

{Harrison, Mr. Alderman T. H., J.P. 
Hoffman, Mr. G. 
tMallet, Mr. J. T. 
Pochin, Mr. J. 
♦Stevenson, Mr. P. H. 

Representatives of Baptist Union, 
Booth, Rev. S. H., D.D. 
Williams, Rev. C. 

Representatives of East Midland 
Association. 
♦Ashwell, Mr. H., J.P. 
Woods, Rev. W. 

Representatives of West Midland 
Association, 
Brown, Rev. J. J. 
Lee, Rev. A. H. 

t House Committee, 



RAWDON, NEAR LEEDS. 

The "Northern Baptist Education Society,*' formed at Norton, Bradford, 1804. 

College removed to Rawdon, 1859. 

Present number of Students, 25. 

Income, for year ending June 30, 1895 £1431 i5 xi 

Expenditure 2,057 14 2 

Special Contributions to Arrears Fund, 1895 .. 625 o o 

Committee for 1895-96. 

President and Tutor in Theology— Rev. T. V. Tymms. 

Tutor in Greek and Philosophy— Rev. W. Medley, M.A, 

Tutor in Hebrew, Greek Testament, and English— Rev, D. Glass, M.A. 

During Z895, at Edinburgh, Mr. W. H. Holdsworth took the degree of M.A. ; and 
in the University of London, Mr. C. A. Charter took the degree of B.A. 

Treasurers—Sir John Barran, Bart., Leeds; Mr. W. Town, Keighley. 

Secretary— Rev. C. W. Skemp, Bradford, 

Finance Secretary— Mr. W. R. Bilbrough, Leeds. 



122 



COLLEGES. 



Members of 
Arthur, Rev. D., Haworth. 
Bailey, Rev. J., B.A., Sheffield. 
Barran, Mr. A., Leeds. 
Benskin, Rev. F. J., Huddersfield. 
Best, Mr. W., Bradford. 
Bilbrough. Mr. A., Leeds. 
Birkinshaw, Mr. J. R., Bradford. 
Bonner, Rev. C, Southampton. 
Bonner, Rev. H., Birmingham. 
Bowser. Rev. S. W.. B.A., Birkenhead. 
Bright, Mr. J.. Nottingham. 
Brooke. Mr. Aid. J., T. P., Huddersfield. 
Chown, Mr. J., London. 
Davies, Mr. W. G.. Newcastle-on-Tjme. 
Payers, Rev. A. P., Rawdon. 
Feamside, Mr. E., Leeds. 
Forbes, Rev. J. T., M.A., Edinburgh. 
Fyfe. Mr. J. R., Shipley. 
Gray, Rev. R., Birmingham. 
Green, Rev. S. W., M.A., London. 
Greenhough, Rev. J. G., M.A., Leicester. 
Greenwood, Mr. J. F., Oxenhope. 
Haslam, Rev. J., Gildersome. 
Hill. Rev. G., M.A., Nottingham. 
Horsfall. Mr. J. C, Sutton-in-Craven. 



the Committee, 

Hunter. Rev. W. J., Kirkcaldy. 

lUingworth, Mr. W. K., Leeds. 

Jones, Rev. W., Hebden Bridge. 

Lewis, Rev. R., Liverpool. 

Macalpine. Mr. G. W., J. P., Accrington. 

Martin, Rev. T. H., Glasgow. 

Medley, Rev. E., B.A., London. 

Mursell, Rev. J., Derby. 

Paget, Mr. S.. Keighley. 

Porteous, Rev. J., Burton-on-Trent. 

Pratt, Mr. J. H.. Rawdon. 

Riley, Rev. A. F., London. 

Roberts, Rev J. E., M.A.. Manchester. 

Scholefield. Mr. J. W.. J.P.. Bootie. 

Skerry, Rev. W. R., London. 

Smith, Mr. F. E., Sheffield. 

Spencer, Mr. T., Manchester. 

Stuart, Rev. J., Watford. 

Taylor, Mr. R., Southport 

Thew, Rev. J., Leicester. 

Town, Mr. J., Leeds. . 

Walker, Mr. A., Lindley. 

Watson, Mr. R., Rochdale. 

Watts, Mr. H., Liverpool. 

Whitewood, Mr. J. E., Ben Rhydding. 



Ac worth, Mr. J., Bradford. 

Aid is, Rev. J., Beckington. 

Crossley. Mr. D., J.P., Hebden Bridge. 

Eaton. Mr. J.. Sheffield. 

Green, Rev. S. G., D.D., London. 



Honorary Members of the Committee. 



Henderson, Rev. W. J., B.A., BristoL 
McLaren, Rev. A.. D.O., Manchester. 
Morris. Rev. T. M., Ipswich. 
Mounsey, Mr. E., J.P., Liverpool. 
Williams, Rev. C, Accrington. 



REGENTS PARK. 

Instituted at Stepney, 1810. Removed to Regent's Park, 1857. 

INCOME, 1894-95 £4.382 

Present number of Ministerial Students, 39; Ministers educated from 
commencement, 400. 

Emeritus Principal— "Rev. J. Angus, M.A., D.D. 

Principal and Theological Tutor— Rev. R. H. Roberts, B.A. 

Tutor in Philosophy and in New Testament Exegesis— Rev. S. W. Green, M.A. 

Tutor in Church History and in Hebrew— Rev. G. P. Gould, M.A. 

Tutor in Classics, 6^. — Mr. C. McEvoy, B.A., and Browne Medallist 

Treasurer— Mr. E. B. Underbill, LL.D. 

Secretary — Rev. W. W. Sidey. 54, Lansdowne-road, Tottenham. 

Committee, 



Angus, Mr. C. J. 
Baillie, Rev. J. 
Balding, Mr. E. 
Baynes, Mr. A. H. 
Benham, Mr. W. J., B.A. 
Bergin, Rev. J. M. 
Booth, Rev. S. H., D.D. 
Chown, Mr. J. 



Cooke, Rev. J. H. 
East, Rev. D. J. 
Freeman, Mr. T. 
Gauge, Rev. E. G. 
Green, Rev. S. G., D.D. 
Lush,Mr.P.J.F.,M.R.C.S. 
Mamham, Mr. H. 
Medley, Rev. E., B.A. 
Wood. Rev. J. R. 



Page, Rev. W., B.A. 
Price, Mr. C. 
Rawlings, Mr. E. 
Rickett, Mr. W. R. 
Skerry, Rev. W. R. 
Thomas, Rev, E. 
Todd, Rev. J. W., D.D. 
Weymouth, Dr. 



COLLEGES. 123 



The following Managers of the Baptist Fund have been elected by the Fundees 
to serve on the Committee during the ensuing year, viz. : — 

Mr. J. Eastty I Mr. P. Cadby I Rev. W. T. Henderson 

Mr. R. Grace | Mr. J. J. Smith, J.P. | 

The Session begins early in September. All applications to be sent in by the 
15th of the preceding May^ 

During 1895, in the University of London, Mr. F. J. Shipway and Mr. W. A. 
Benton matriculated in the First Division, and Mr. D. J. Evans passed the Inter- 
mediate Arts Examination in the Second Division. At St. Andrews, Mr. J. E. 
Ennals. B.A., passed the second and final examination for the degree of B.D. 



PASTORS'. 

Instituted at Camberwell, 1856. Removed to Metropolitan TabemacUt x86i. 

Income, year ending December 31st, X894 ;^4i068 2 9 

Expenditure 5,188 19 2 

Present number of Students, 55. 

President— Rev. J. A. Spurgeon, D.D., LL.D. 

Tutors— Rev, F. G. Marchant, Rev. A. M'Caig, B.A., LL.D., and Rev. W. 
Usher, M.D. 

Tutors 0/ Evening Classes— Messrs. S. Johnson, and T. F. Bowers, B.A. 

Secretary—Mr. E. H. Bartlett. 

During 1895. in the University of London, Mr. S. S. Sarson, Mr. E. P. Wright 
and £. M. Yeomans matriculated in the Second Division. 



MANCHESTER. 

Brighton Grove, Manchester. 

Established as the " Baptist Theological Institution" at Bury, October, 1866. 

Present number of Students, 19. 

President and Theological Tutor— Rev. E. Parker, D.D. 

Tutor in Classics, Hebrew, and Philosophy— Rev. J. T. Marshall, M.A., Lond. 

Treasurer— Mr. W. D. Shaw, J.P., Huddersfield. 

Secretary — Rev, H. Ellis, M.A., Farsley, near Leeds. 

Collector— Rev. R. E. Towler, Eltham Terrace, Levenshulme, Manchester. 

Committee. 

Meilor. Mr. D., Bradford. 
Mitchell, Mr. J., Bradford. 



Bayley, Mr. C. H., Oswestry. 
Crabtree, Mr. S., Bradford. 
Delday. Mr. J. H., Scarborough. 



Elias, Mr. J., Liverpool. 
- ■ Ic, Mr, - " * 



Fairbank, Mr, C, Ogden. 
Fisher, Mr. H., Marsden. 
Hanson. Mr. G. H.. Huddersfield. 
Harvey, Mr. W., Nantwich. 
Hirst. Mr. W., Golcar. 
Hurst. Mr. John, Rochdale. 
Illingworth, Mr. W., Bradford. 
Lewis, Mr. B., Cardiff. 
Maden, Mr. J. H., Ramsbottom. 
McMaster, Mr. J. S., Toronto. 
Marshall, Mr. J. D., Farsley. 

Together vrith (a) Ministers educated in the College, (b) Pastors of churches giving 
to the College an annual collection, and (c) Ministers accepted as Associates of the 
College. 



Moulson, Mr. W., J.P., Bradford. 
Pearce, Mr. Joseph, Leeds. 
Shaw, Mr. Geo., Huddersfield. 
Smith, Mr. J., Lindley, Huddersfield. 
Sykes, Mr. T. E., Huddersfield. 
Taylor, Mr. E., Milnsbridge. 
Watson, Mr. P., Bradford. 
White, Mr. J., Bradford. 
Whitehead, Mr. W. A., Bradford. 
Whiteley, Mr. J. W., Rishworth. 
Wilkin, Mr. M. H., London. 
Wilson, Mr. George, Bramley. 



124 COLLEGES. 



CARDIFF. 

Originally tfu Welsh and English Baptist Education Society. Instituted at 
Abergavenny, 1807. Removed to Pontypool, 1836, and to Cardiff ^ 1893. 

Income, year ending June, 1895 £^*^^9 2 9 

Expenditure 1,482 7 8 

Present number of Students, 24* 

President— Ue^, W. Edwards, B.A., D.D. 

r«/or— Rev. J. M. Davies, M.A. 

During 1895, in the University of London, two students matriculated in the First 
Division, and in the University of Wales, one student matriculated in the First 
Division. 

Chairman— l&T, H. Phillips, J.P., Newport. 

Treasurers— VLt. Councillor W. Edwards, J.P., Maindee, Newport, and Mr. 
Alderman R. Cory, J.P., Cardiff. 

Secretaries— ISievs. D. B. Jones, Caerleon, Mon., and W. Morris, F.R.G.S., 
Treorky, Pontypridd. 

Auditors— ULt, D. Jones, Pontnewynydd, and Mr. T. James, Blaenavon. 



ABERYSTWYTH. 

Instituted at Haverfordwest, 1839. Removed to Aberystwyth, 1894. 

Income, year ending August ist, 1895 £^2 Z2 6 

Expenditure 920 7 6 

Present number of Students, 16. Educated from commencement, 295. 

Tutors— Revs. J. A. Morris, and T. Williams, B.A. 

Treasurers — Mr. J. Rowlands, Haverfordwest, and Mr. J. Morgan, J. P.; Aberystwyth. 

Secretaries — Revs. J. Jenkins, Newport, Pembrokeshire; B. Thomas, Letterston, 
Pembrokeshire, and D. F. Ellis, Aberystwyth. 

The College Term begins the Fourth Wednesday in October and ends the Second 
Wednesday in August. 



BANGOR. 

Instituted at Llangollen, 1862. Removed to Bangor, 1892. 

Income, year ending Dec. 31st, 1894 ' ;^z.290 19 ix 

Expenditure 1,248 9 6 

Present number of Students 24. Ministers educated from commencement, x68. 

Principal and Tutor in Theology, Apologetics and Hebrew — 
Rev. G. Davies, D.D. 

Tutor in Greek Testament, Philosophy and Church History — 
Rev. S. Morris, M.A., (Lond.). 

(Arts Students attend the classes and lectures at the University College.) 

During 1895, in the University of Wales, Mr. E. C. Jones and Mr. D. O. Griffiths 
matriculated. 

Treasurer— Mr. R. Beck, Bangor. 

Secretaries — {Minutes) Rev. J. Griffiths, Llanfairfechan ; and {Honorary) 
Rev. O. Davies, D.D., Carnarvon. 

The Session begins in October and ends the last week in June. 



COLLEGES. 125 

DR. WARD*S TRUST. 

Trustus-'Rev. J. Angus, D.D., Rev. S. G. Green, D.D., 
Mr. E. Rawlings. 

Treasurer— Mr. J. J. Smith, J.P. 

Hon. Secretary— Rbv. S. H. Booth, D.D., 19, Fumival-street, E.G. 

John Ward, LL.D., a Professor in Gresham College, who died in 1758, had, in 
1754, put in trust ;f 1,200 Bank Stock, to be applied after his decease to the education 
for the Ministry of two young men or more, whose parents shall be Protestant 
Dissenters, living in England, or who shall have resided in England at the time of 
their decease (preference being given to those of Baptist parentage), and who 
when appljring snail declare their intention to give themselves to the work of the 
ministry in South Britain. Such young men shall have made a good proficiency in 
the Latin and Greek languages, and the Exhibition shall be for their improvement 
in these languages, and for the acquisition of Hebrew. A Scheme by the Charity 
Commissioners (July, 1863) comprises these particulars, and also directs that an 
Exhibitioner shall not be more than twenty-one years at the time of his appoint- 
ment, and shall not retain his appointment after the age of twenty-five years. 
The Scheme also directs that each Exhibitioner shall, during the tenure of his 
appointment, attend some established University or other Educational Institution 
in the United Kingdom, where provision is made for their preparing for a Degree, 
as determined by the Trustees. The number of Students at present aided by the 
Trust is five. 



SCOTLAND. 

Theological College. Glasgow. 

Instituted 1894, in place of the Theological Hall of the Baptist Union of Scotland, 
which was instituted in 1869. The new College is in no way connected with the 
Baptist Union of Scotland. It is intended to provide for a complete course of 
ministerial education, which will comprise: — (i) A course in Arts in a Scottish 
University, qualifying for the M.A. Degree; and (2) a course in Theology, 
embracing (a) Biblical and Systematic Theology; (6) Biblical Criticism and 
Exegesis ; (c) Church History and Apologetics, including the Historical position and 
Principles ot the Baptists ; {d) Homiletics and General Pastoral Work. 

President— Frot J. Coats, M.D. 

Vice-Presidents. 

Bowser, Mr. H. I Walcot, Mr. J. 

NiMUO, Mr. J. I Wilson, Mr. J. 

Treasurer— Ur. G. W. Elmslie. 

Joint Secretaries— Ut, A. Nimmo, M.A., and Mr. C. H. Bowser. 

Trustees, 
Bowser, Mr. H. 



Nimmo, Mr. J. 
Somerville, Mr. R., M.D. 



White, Mr. T., S.S.C. 
Wilson, Mr. J. 



Tutors — 



Biblical and Systematic Theology— Rev. A. Wylie, M.A. 

Biblical Criticism and Exegesis — Rev, ]. Coats, M.A. 

Church History and Apologetics — Rev. T. McLellan. 

Homiletics and General Pastoral Work, including the Historical Position and 

Principles of the Baptists— Rev. T. H. Martin. 



126 PUBLICATIONS. 



IRELAND. 

ROCKEFELLBR HOUSE, HARCOURT-STRBBT, DU BUN— TRAINING INSTITUTE. 

Instituted 1892. 

Present Number of Students, 8. 

President— Rev. H. D. Brown, M.A. 

Vice-Presidents, 
Mr. D. Crostrwaite. LL.D. | Mr. J. La Toucre, D.L., J.P. 

Secretary— Mr. T. R. Warner. 

Treasurer— Mr, F. A. NixON, F.R.C.S.I. 

Committee, 



Adam, Mr. J. 

Beater. Mr. O. P., M.D., LL.B. 
Beater, Mr. H. W. 
Bennett, Mr. B. 
Clark, Rev. R. 
Drummond, Mr. W. H. 
Froste, Mr. R. P., B.A. 
Gibb, Rev. A. G., M.A. 



Glendinning, Mr. R. G. 

Gribbon, Mr. H. A. 

Haughton, Mr. R. S. 

Uoyd. Mr. T. E. 

O'Hara, Mr. E. 

Pearson. Mr. J. D. 

Warner, Mr. W. C. 

Waters, Brigade-Surgeon, C.B., J.P. 



PHncipal^MT, A. Bury. M.A.. T.C.D. 

Mathematical Tutor— Mr. S. Willis (Siz., First Honorman T.C.D.). 

English— Mr. E. RONBY. 



III.— PUBLICATIONS- 

THE UNION MISSION HYMNAL. 
(See under " Literature Fund" of the Baptist Union, page 33.) 



(i) PSALMS AND HYMNS. 

First published in 1855. 



(2) PSALMS AND HYMNS, WITH SUPPLEMENT. 

First published in t88t. 



(3) " THE TREASURY " CONGREGATIONAL TUNE 

BOOK. 
Published 1886. 



PUBLICATIONS. 



127 



(4) PSALMS AND HYMNS FOR SCHOOL AND HOME. 

Published 1882. — Enlarged 1892. 



(5) "THE TREASURY" SCHOOL AND HOME TUNE 

BOOK. 

Published j 883.— Enlarged 1892. 



(6) YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 
HYMNS. 



Also Hymn Sheets — Special for Various Occasions. Seventeen different sorts. 
Published 1887—1894. 

• 

The entire profits of these six publications and hymn sheets are yearly distributed 
amongst the widows and orphans of Baptist ministers and missionaries. The 
amount distributed in 1895 was j^9So; and the total amount thus distributed 

The next distribution will take place in April, 1896. 



Trustees. 



Angus, Rev. J., D.D., London. 
Baynes, Mr. A. H., London. 
Booth, Rev. S. H.. O.D., London. 
Bowser, Mr. H., Glasgow. 
Brown, Rev. J. J., Birmingham. 
Brown, Rev. J. T., Northampton. 
Chown, Mr. J., London. 
Cnlross, Rev. J., D.D., Bristol. 
Edwards, Rev. W.. D.D.. Cardiff. 
Glover, Rev. R., D.D., Bristol. 
Green, Rev. S. G., D.D., London. 
Landels, Rev. W., O.D., Edinburgh. 



Maclaren, Rev. A., D.D., Manchester. 
Mead, Mr. J. B., London. 
Medley, Rev. E., B.A., London. 
Roberts, Rev. R. H., B.A., London. 
Shaw. Mr. W. D., J.P., Huddersfield. 
Todd, Rev. J. W., D.D., London. 
Tymms, Rev. T. V., Rawdon. 
Underbill, Mr. E. B., LL.D., London. 
Wheeler, Rev. T. A., Norwich. 
Williams, Rev. C, Accrington. 
Wood, Rev. J. R., London. 



Treasurers— Mr, J. B. Mead, Endsleigh, Wickham-road, Brockley, S.E., 
and Mr. J. Chown, Springfield, Brondesbury Park, N.W., 

Honorary Editor of Tune Book — Mr. J. B. Mead. 

Bankers— Messrs. Barclay, Bevan & Co., 54, Lombard-street, E.C. 

Secretary and Manager— Mr. H. W. Pewtress, 22A, Purnival-street, E.G., 

to whom application for Grants to Widows should be made before 25th March. 

Published by the Psalms and Hymns Trusty 22A, Fumival-street, E.C. 

Remittances to be made payable to the Secretary, as above. ] 



128 PUBLICATIONS. 



(i) THE BAPTIST HYMNAL. 

First published in 1879. Profits devoted to Denominational objects, «^., the 
Annuity and the Home Mission Funds of the Baptist Union, the Midland College, 
And the Baptist Building Fund. 



(2) THE UNION HYMNAL. 

Same book as the Baptist Hymnal, with undenominational title for the use of 
Union Churches. 



(3) THE SCHOOL HYMNAL. 

Published in December, x88o. A Collection of 343 hymns for the young, for use in 
Sunday Schools and families. 



(4) THE INFANT-CLASS HYMNAL. 

A Selection of Hymns from the preceding, for use in InlSBuit Classes and Religious 
Services for Young Children. 



(5) THE SCHOOL HYMNAL TUNE BOOK. 

Published in May, 1882. Containing tunes for all the hymns in the School and 
f nfant Class Hymnals, as well as for the hymns of peculiar metre in the Baptist 
Hymnal. 

Editor 0/ Tutu BooA— Mr, J. Adcock, Nottingham. 



The Baptist Hymnal and four following publications, which were formerly the 
property of the General Baptist Association, are now issued solely under the 
direction of the undermentioned Trustees : — 



Bembridge, Mr. W. B., J.P., Ripley. 
Chapman, Mr. J. W.. London. 
Clifford, Rev. J., D.D., London. 
Fletcher, Rev. J., London. 
Harrison, Mr. Alderman T. H., J.P.. 

Derby. 
Hill, Mr. H., Nottingham. 



Jones, Rev. J. C, M.A., Spalding. 
Mallet, Mr. J. T., Brighton. 
Pike, Rev. E. C, B.A., Exeter. 
Roberts, Mr. C, London. 
Underwood, Rev. W., D.D., Derby. 
Wherry, Mr. Alderman W. R., J.P., 
Bourne. 



Treasurtr—Mr, J. T. Mallet, Brighton. 
50ere/afy~Mr. P. H. Stevenson, 2, Vickers-street, Nottingham. 
Publishers—^, Marlborough & Co., 51, Old Bailey, London. 



PUBLICATIONS. 129 



SELECTION OF HYMNS. 

First published in 1829, by Trustees, for the benefit of the widows of Baptist 
ministers and missionaries. 

Grants from the commencement till 1892 ;^i 3*625 o o 

Trustees— Mr. A. H. Baynes, London ; Mr. F. W. Cartwright, London. 
Mr. J. Eastty, London ; and Mr. C. Price, London. 

Treasurer and Secretary—MT, A. H. Baynes, 19, Fumival-street, E.C. 

Applications should be addressed to the Secretary in the month of September. 

Publishers— Messrs. Pewtress & Co., 51, Old Bailey. 

•^* An edition is now published, under the title of " The Selection Enlarged," 
containing a large proportion of the Psalms and Hymns by Dr. Watts which are 
generally used in Public Worship. 



OUR OWN HYMN-BOOK. 

Compiled by the Aaie Rev. C. H. Spurgeon. 

T^ be had of the Publishers, Messrs. Passmore & Alabaster, 4, Paternoster- 
buildings, Paternoster-row, London, E.C. 



IV.— PERIODICALS. 

Yearly. 

Baptist Hand-Book. Two Shillings. Clarke & Co., 13, Fleet-street. E.C, and 
Veale, Chifferiel & Co., Limited, Cursitor-street, Fumival-street, E.C. 

Baptist Almanack. Twopence. R. Banks, Racquet-court, Fleet-street, E.C. 

Spurgeon 's Illustrated Almanack. One Penny. Passmore & Alabaster. 

Monthly. 

Baptist Magazine. Sixpence. Alexander & Shepheard. 

Baptist Messenger. One Penny. Elliot Stock. 

Baptist Visitor. One Halfpenny. Baptist Tract Society, 

Bond of Union. One Penny, Sears & Sons, u. Crane-court, Fleet-street. 

Church and Household. One Penny, Marlborough & Co. 

Earthen Vessel and Gospel Herald. Twopence. R. Banks, Racquet-court, 
Fleet-street, E.C. 

Missionary Herald. One Penny. Alexander & Shepheard. 

Juvenile Missionary Herald. One Halfpenny, Alexander & Shepheard. 

Sword and Trowel. Threepence. Passmore & Alabaster. 

Weekly, 

The Freeman. One Penny ; per annum, post free, Six and Sixpence. Alexander 

& Shepheard. 
The Baptist. One Penny ; per annum, post free, Six and Sixpence. Elliot Stock. 

I 



130 PERIODICALS. 



WELSH. 

Trb Wblsr Baptist Hand-Book. One and Sixpence, One Shilling, and Six- 
pence. Yearly. Lleweljm Griffiths, Cwmavon, Glam. 

Yr Adroddiad. Yearly. Sixpence. Jenkin Howell, Aberdare. 

Serbn Cymru {Star of WaUs), Weekly. One Penny. W. M. Evans, Carmarthen. 

Seren Gomer. Bi-monthly. Sixpence. Jenkin Howell, Aberdare. 

Y Grbal \JKe MagaJtine). Monthly. Threepence. W. Williams, Llangollen. 

Yr Athraw {The Teacher), Monthly. One Penny. W. Williams, Llangollen. 

Yr Herald Cenadol {Welsh Missionary Herald). Monthly. One Penny. Lewis 
Evans, Cadoxton, Barry, Cardiff. 

Yr Hauwr {The Sower). Monthly. One Penny. Baptist Union of Wales Sunday 
School Committee. 

The Baptist Record. Monthly. One Penny. Date & Buston, Cardiff. 



SCOTCH. 



The Scottish Baptist Magazine. Monthly. One Penny. Morrison & Gibb, 
.A2JB£ Edinburgh. 



IRISH. 
The Irish Baptist Magazine. Monthly. One Penny. W. W. Cleland, Belfast. 



PART IV. 



INSTITUTIONS & GENERAL RELIGIOUS 
SOCIETIES 

IN WHICH BAPTISTS ARB MORE OR LESS INTERESTED. 



UNIVERSITY OF LONDON: 

BURLINGTON GARDENS, LONDON. W. 
VISITOR— THE gUEEN. 

Chancellor— The Rt. Hon. Lord Herschell, D.C.L., F.R.S. 

Vice-Chancellor—SiT Julian Goldsmid, Bart., M.A., M.P. 

Registrar— Mr. A. Milman, M.A. 

This important corporation was created by Royal Charter, in the seventh year of 
the reign of William IV., and the first year of the reign of Queen Victoria, 1837, 
" To hold forth to all classes and denominations of Our faithful subjects, without 
any distinction whatsoever, an encouragement for pursuing a regular and liberal 
coarse of education : and considering that many persons do prosecute and complete 
their studies both in the United Kingdom and elsewhere, to whom it is expedient 
that there should be offered such facilities, and on whom it is just that there should 
be conferred such distinctions and rewards, as may incline them to persevere in 
these their laudible pursuits ; We do, by virtue of our prerogative royal, and of our 
special grace, certain knowledge, and mere motion, by these presents, for Us, our 
heirs and successors," constitute William, Duke of Devonshire, &c., &c., one body 
politic and corporate, by the name of " The University 0/ London " ** for the purx>ose 
of ascertaining, by means of examination, the persons who have acquired proficiency 
in literature, science, and art, by the pursuit of such course of education, and of re- 
warding them by academical Degrees and certificates of proficiency, as evidence of 
their respective attainments, and marks of honour proportioned thereunto." 

The original charter provides, that not only University College, and King's College, 
London, shall issue certificates to candidates for degrees in arts or laws, but also all 
other institutions, '* corporated or unincorporated, established for the purpose of 
education, whether in the metropolis or elsewhere, which the Sovereign, under her 
sign-manual, shall authorise to issue such certificates." But the present charter, 
obtained in 1863, allows Degrees in Arts, Science, and Law to be conferred on any 
candidate who may have evinced sufficient merit at the specified examinations, 
whether he has studied at any college or not. 

By a Resolution of the Senate passed July 27tht 1881, the Titles of the Examina- 
tions until then known as the First B.A.. First B. Sc, First LL.B., First M.B., and 
First B.Mus.. were changed to those of Intermediate Examinations in Arts, Science, 
Laws, Medicine, and Music, respectively. 

Examinations for Matriculation. 

One commences on the second Monday in January, and the other on the second 
Monday in June. The pass list contains three divisions — Honours, First and Second 
Division. 

I 2 



132 INSTITUTIONS AND 



Examinations for Dbgrbb of Bachelor of Arts (B.A.). 

Ths Intermediaie Examination in Arts commences on the third Monday in July. 
The Examinations /or Honours take place in the same week and the following week. 

The Degree Examination commences on the fourth Monday in October. The 
Examinations /or Honours take place in the fourth, fifth and sixth weeks after the 
Pass Examination. 

Mastbr of Arts (M.A.). 

The Examinations for the Degree of Master of Arts commence — Branch I. 
(Classics), on the first Monday in June ; Branch II. (Mathematics), the second 
Monday in June; Branch III. (Mental and Moral Science), the third Monday in 
June; Branch IV. (any two of the following subjects: English Language and 
Literature, including Anglo-Saxon Language and Literature ; French Language and 
Literature ; German Language and Literature ; Italian Language and Literature ; 
the Celtic Languages and Literature ; Hebrew Language and Literature, including 
Syriac Language and Literature; Sanskrit Language and Literature; Arabic 
Language and Literature), on the fourth Monday in June. 

Doctor of Literature (D.Lit.). 

The Examination for the Degree of Doctor 0/ Literature takes place on the first 
Tuesday in December. 

Examinations in the Hebrew Text of the Old Testament, in the Grbbk 
Text of the New Testament, in the Evidences op the Christian 
Religion, and in Scripture History (a first and a further Examination. 
WITH AN Interval of One Ybar at least between them), 

Take place on Tuesday and Wednesday in the week following the conclusion of 
the B.A. Examinations for honours. 

Bachelor of Science (B.Sc). 

The Intermediate Examination in Science commences on the third Monday in 
July. The Examinations /or Honours take place in the same week, and the first 
week and the second week after the Pass Examination. 

The Degree Examination commences on the third Monday in October. The 
Examinations /or Honours take place in the third, fourth and fifth weeks after the 
Pass Examination. 

Doctor of Science (D.Sc). 

The Examination for the Degree of Doctor 0/ Science takes place within the first 
twenty-one days of June, and is mainly based on a Thesis upon some branch of 
Science written and published by the candidate. The Examiners are at liberty to 
test the candidate's knowledge to any extent they may deem desirable ; or they 
may, when the Thesis is of a high order of merit, pass him without further 
examination. 

Bachelor of Laws (LL.B.) 

The Intermediate and Degree Examinations for the Degree of Bachelor 0/ Laws 
take place within the first fourteen days of January. Examinations for Honours 
take place in the second week after the Pass Examinations. 

Doctor of Laws (LL.D.). 

The Examination for the Degree of Doctor 0/ Laws takes place in January, in the 
week next but one following the LL.B. Examination. 

Provincial Examinations 

For Matriculation, for the Examination in Arts, for the Intermediate Examination 
in Science, and the Preliminaiy Examination in Medicine, are also held in various 
towns and colleges upon application being made to the Senate of the University. 



GENERAL RELIGIOUS SOCIETIES. I33 



For full particulars respecting fees, subjects, honours, exhibitions, see the Calendar 
of the University of London for the current year, or " The Regulations," which may 
be obtained on application to "The Registrar of the University of London, 
Burlmgton-gardens, London, W." 

N.B. — All the foregoing Examinations, and likewise those in Medicine and in 
Music, together with all the Scholarships, Prizes, &>€., attached thereto, are now open 
to Women upon precisely the same conditions as to men. 



SENATUS ACADEMICUS OF THE ASSOCIATED 

THEOLOGICAL COLLEGES, BRITISH 

AND COLONIAL. 

Constitution. 
The Senatus consists of the Professors of the Associated Colleges, together with 
a delegation of three other gentlemen from each college, and such ministers as hold 
the diploma of Fellow. It is empowered to institute examinations in Theological 
and Biblical subjects, including Ethical Philosophy and Church History ; and to 
grant certificates to those candidates who pass such examinations. 

Examination for the Diploma of Associate (A.T.S.). 
Candidates are required to show a competent knowledge of Apologetical and 
Doctrinal Theology, Exegesis of the Old and New Testaments, Homiletics, Church 
History, and Philosophy. If in one of the associated colleges, they must produce 
certificates of character and standing from the tutors; if ministers, from the 
Secretary of the Baptist Union or of the Cofinty Association. Prizes are awarded 
to present students who distinguish themselves in the examination. 

Examination for the Diploma of Fellow (F.T.S.). 

Associates may gain this by satisfying the Examiners in two separate years as to 
two or more of these branches :— Hebrew and Chaldee, Greek Testament, Septuagint 
and Vulgate, Theology, History of Christianity, &c., Apologetics. 

Sixteen colleges are now members, including Rawdon, Manchester, Bangor, 
Aberystwyth, Cardiff, Regent's Park, and Midland; and more than fifty Baptist 
mmisters hold its diplomas. 

It is under consideration to apply for power to grant degrees. 

The Examinations are held in June ; particulars can be obtained of Rev. W. 
Farrer, LL.B. (one of the Registrars). New College, South Hampstead, N.W. 

The following Students passed in 1895 : — 

Honours Division. — (i) with ;f20 Prize, Arthur Herbert West, B.A., Regent's 
Park; (6) David Jerman, Manchester. 

First Division.-^i) John Bell, Regent's Park; (4) Ralph Holme, Midland, and 
Wm. A. Livingstone, Manchester, equal ; (16) Robert William Davies, Bangor ; (20, 
with another) Arthur Spelman Culley, Regent's Park ; (23) George William Bloom- 
field, Manchester. 

Second Division. — (2) John Richard Phillips, Bangor. 

Rev. William Ernest Blomfield, B.A., B.D., of Coventry, passed with credit the 
first half of the further (or Fellowship) Examination. 

[Mem, — The Senatus does not give honours in single subjects, but only in the 
E»unination as a whole. The marks obtained by a candidate are furnished to the 
authorities of his College /or their private information, not for publication]. 



DISSENTING DEPUTIES. 

This important Association has now existed for upwards of a century and a half. 
It originated in a general meeting of the Protestant Dissenters of London, held in 
November, 1732, to consider an applicalion to Parliament for the repeal of the 
Corporation and Test Acts. The want of a permanent body to superintend the civi 
concerns of Dissenters being strongly felt, it was resolved at a subsequent meetin 
held in January, 1735-36, that deputies from the several congregations in Londoj, 



134 INSTITUTIONS AND 



should be chosen for that purpose. The first meeting of the deputies was held at 
Sahers' Hall Meeting, January Z2th, 1736-37. Dr. Benjamin Avery in the chair. 
The succession of gentlemen who have occupied the chair is as follows :— 

X737 Benj. Avery. LL.D.,deceased. 
1764 Usper Manduit, deceased. 
X77Z Thomas Lucas, deceased. 



1777 William Bowden, deceased. 
Z779 Nathaniel Polhill, deceased. 
1782 George Brough, deceased. 
1785 Edward Jeiferies. deceased. 
1802 EbenezerMaitland. deceased. 
Z805 William Smith, M.P., deceased. 
X83X Henry Way mouth, deceased. 



Z844 John Remington Mills, deceased. 
Z853 Sir Samuel Morton Peto, Bart.» 

M.P., deceased. 
Z855 Apsley Pellatt, M.P., deceased. 
Z864 Sir Samuel Morton Peto, Bart. 

M.P., deceased. 
Z869 Sir Charles Reed, M.P., LL.D., 

F.S.A., deceased. 
Z875 Henry Richard, M.P., deceased. 
X889 Mr. WiUiam Woodall. M.P. 



Committee of Deputies of the Three Denominations, Presbyterian, 
Independent, and Baptist, in and within Twelve Miles of London, 
Appointed to Protect their Civil Rights for the Year 1895. 

Chairman — Mr. W. Woodall, M.P., Queen Anne's Mansions, S.W. 

Depufy-Chairman— Mr. Alderman Evan Spicer, Belair, Dulwich. S.W. 

Treasurer — Mr..W. Holborn, Fern Lodge, Campden-hiU, Kensington, W. 

Mr. A. H. Baynes, 19, Fumival Street. E.C. 

„ W. W. Baynes, J.P.. Pickhurst Wood. Bromley, Kent. 

„ W. T. Bolton, 4, Cumberland-park, Acton, W. 

„ W. S. Caine, M.P., 33, North Side, Clapham, S.W. 

M J. Clapham, Queen's Head-street Board School, Essex-road, N. 

II J' J* Corbin, 85, Gresham-street, E.C. 

„ J. Eastty, 86, Grange-road. Bermondsey, S.E. 

„ W. S. Gard, Trewithen, Roslyn-hill. Hampstead, N.W. 

„ W. G. Snowden Gard, 20, Upper Park-road, N.W. 

„ W. Hazell, M.P., 15, Russell-square, W.C. 

„ J. Laughland, 17, Highbury New-park, N. 

„ H. Lee, T.P., 25, Highbury Quadrant, N. 

„ B. S. Olding, Lissant House, St. Mary's-road, Long Ditton, Surrey 

„ S. Robjohns. Marchmont, Hatherley-road. Sidcup R.S.O. 

„ E. Unwin, Woodcote. Burnt Ash Hill. S.E. 

„ G. S. Warmington, Stonycroft. 146, Burnt Ash-hill, Lee, S.E. 

„ S. Watson, Z79, New Park-road, Brixton-hill, S.W. 

„ J. Carvell Williams, M.P., 21, Homsey Rise-gardens, N. 

Sir W. H. Wills, Bart., M.P., 25, Hyde Park-gardens, W. 

5«cr#tery— Mr. A. J. Shepheard, 31 and 32, Finsbury-circus, E.C. 



LONDON NONCONFORMIST COUNCIL OF 

EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCHES. 

President— Rev, J. Clifford, D.D. 

Treasurer— Mr. R. W. Perks, M.P. 

Honorary Secretaries— Revs. J. Matthews, W. J. Avery, A. Jeffrey, and 
J. Jackson (Memorial Hall, E.C). 

Objects : — ^To furnish opportunities to Evangelical Nonconformists for taking 
concerted action upon questions affecting their common interests, or bearing upon 
the social, educational, moral, and religious welfare of the people. The Council 
will, as occasion requires, endeavour to influence public opinion upon such subjects 
as the following: — i. The moral state of London, and the best methods of sup> 
pressing intemperance, gambling, sweating, overcrowding, and social vice. 2. The 
social condition of the people, and the causes that hinder the acceptance of the 
Gospel of Christ. 3. The rescue and restoration of the lapsed and lost, and the 



GENERAL RELIGIOUS SOCIETIES. 135 

removal of the causes of their degradation. 4. The liquor traffic and public house 
licences, the opium monopoly, the prohibition of the liquor traffic in heathen 
countries, the importance of moral character in our legislators, the adoption of 
arbitration in industrial and international disputes, religious persecution m rural 
districts. 5. The religious visitation of hospitals, workhouses, lodging houses, 
prisons, &c.; and the question of hospital nursing. 6. The representation of 
Nonconformists on Boards of Guardians, School Boards, Coimty Councils, Ac. 

Membership.— The Council shall consist of the Minister and two representative 
members of each congregation vrithin the Metropolitan area. 



COUNTY PROVIDENT SOCIETIES. 

FOR THE BENEFIT OF CONGREGATIONAL AND BAPTIST MINISTERS AND THEIR 

FAMILIES. 

1. Bedfordshire and Himtingdonshire Provident and Benevolent Society. Formed 
1812. For Nonconformist ministers who. through age or infirmity, retire from the 
pastorate, their widows and orphans. Secretaries, Rev. J. Brown, B.A., D.D., 
Bedford ; Rev. P. Griffiths, 2, Heyworth-road, Clapton, N.E. Treasurer, Mr. 
C. P. Tebbutt, Bluntisham, Hunts. Funds, ;^6,ioo invested. Distributed at last 
annual meeting, ;^244. 

2. Cambridgeshire Benevolent Socie^, for the relief of necessitous Dissenting 
Ministers' widows and orphans. Capital. ;f4*38S 3S. id., 2} per cent. Consols. 
Established 1807. Secretary, Mr. G. E. Foster, Cambridge. 

3. Essex and Herts Benevolent Society for the relief of necessitous widows, and 
the children of Protestant Dissenting Ministers; and also of such ministers as 
through age or^ infirmity may be incapacitated for public service. Established 
1789. Trustees, Mr. Ernest Ridley, Chelmsford, Mr. J. G. Smith, Watford, 
Heru, Mr. F. A. Wells, Chelmsford. Treasurer, Mr. F. A. Wells, London 
Road, Chelmsford. Secretary. Rev. E. T. Egg, Woodford Green, Essex. 
Amount of Funded Property, ;^9,300. Terms of Membership — (i) All Protestant 
Dissenting Ministers who have accepted an invitation to the stated discharge of the 
pastoral office in any congregation, in either of the two counties, are eligible for 
admission to beneficiary memt>ership, provided that they make application to the 
Society within four years from the date of such acceptance, and provided also that 
at the time of his application he is not more than 48 years of age. (2) Every 
minister who wishes to become a Beneficiary member must be nominated by two 
members to whom he is personally known, at one general meeting, and be proposed 
and seconded (by proxy) by two other members, to whom also he is personally 
known, at the next general meeting. The pa3rment of personal and congregational 
subscriptions is due from the (ime of nomination. (3) Personal Subscription, 
£1 IS. ; Congregational Subscription, not less than £2 ; Beneficiary Life Member- 
ship, ;^io Tos. ; Gentleman's Life Membership, ;^zo los. ; Lady's Life Membership, 
£5 Ss- (4) In removing to some other county of the United Kingdom, or to the 
Continent, or to the Colonies, a minister is at liberty to continue his membership, 
or he may have his personal contributions returned to him on application to the 
Treasurer. The Committee are very desirous that both ministers and churches 
of the two denominations in the counties of Essex and Herts should take a 
greater interest in this Society, and they urge that further particulars should be 
obtained from the Secretary. An effort is being made to raise the capital of the 
Society to ;^io,ooo. 

4. Watkinson's Trust. Secretary, Mr. W. Theobald, Crossing, near Braintree. 
The interest of jfz.518 2} per cent. Consols. The trust deed declares — "That 
the income of the charity prdperty shall be from time to time applied for and 
towards the relief, support and maintenance of poor Protestant Dissenters, 
ministers of the Gospel, commonly called Baptists and Independents, within the 
county of Essex. Or for and towards the relief and support of poor widows of such 
poor ministers aforesaid, as such of the major part of the trustees see fit." The 
proceeds of the charity are appropriated yearly in the month of July. 



136 INSTITUTIONS AND 



5. Kent Union Society, for the benefit of aged and infirm ministers of the Gospel 
in the county of Kent and the widows and orphans of ministers. Instituted i&>2. 
The ministers assisted are only such as, being members of the Society, are, through 
age and infirmities, incapable of exercising the pastoral office. This Society partakes 
both of an equitable and benevolent character. Application for membership to be 
made within three years after the commencement of ministerial work in the county. 
Secretary, Rev. G. W. Cowper-Smith, Tunbridge Wells. 

6. Norfolk. The Norfolk Protestant Dissenters Benevolent Society. Instituted 
x8oo. Income, x894-5, ;^444 los. ixd. Beneficiaries 1894-5, z8. The Beneficiary 
members of this Socie^ are ministers who through age or infirmity are rendered 
incapable of public service ; also the necessitous widows and orphans of such 
ministers. Secretary, S. Cozens Hardy, Norwich. 

7. Northamptonshire Baptist Provident Society. Instituted at Kettering in 18x3. 
Capital, ;^7,392 xos. xod. Beneficiary members — ^widows and orphans of ministers, 
and disabled or retiring ministers. Treasurer, Mr. D. F. Gotch, Chesham House, 
Kettering. 

8. The Suffolk Benevolent Society for the Relief of Necessitous Widows and 
Orphans of Protestant Dissenting Ministers, and also of such Ministers as, through 
age or infirmity, may be incapacitated for public service in the county of SuffoUc. 
The annual meeting is held on the third Friday in June. Hon. Secretary, Mr. H. 
F. Harwood, Tuddendam Hall. Ipswich. Hon. Treasurer, Mr. J. V. Webb, 
Combs, Stowmarket. 



Agbd Pilgrims' Fribnd Society. Treasurers, Mr. F. A. Bevan, 54, Lombard- 
street, E.C., Mr. W. J. Parks, 32, The Chase, Clapham Common, S.W. 
Secretary, Mr. J. E. Hazelton ; Office, 83, Finsbury Pavement, E.C. Instituted 
1807. For giving life pensions of 5, 7, and xo guineas per annum to the aged 
Christian poor of both sexes, and of every Protestant denomination, who are 
not under 60 years of age, and give Scriptural evidence that they are of " The 
Household of Faith." During the last 89 years it has been the Lord's almoner 
in relieving the temporal necessities of upwards of 6,000 of His aged disciples. 
At the present time there are ao6 pensioners on the 10, 338 on the 7, and 792 on 
the 5 guinea list. Upwards of /8.700 per annum is distributed in pensions 
alone. In the Asylum at Camberwell. 42 of the pensioners are provided with a 
comfortable home, coals, medical attendance, etc. The Asylum at Homsey 
Rise accommodates x2o pensioners, the Home at Brighton 7 pensioners, and 
the Stamford Hill Home 9 pensioners. All the inmates of the Asylums and 
Homes enjoy the same privileges. 

Apprenticeship Society. President, Mr. J. Wates. Vice-President, Mr. M. 
Holmes. Treasurer^©, tern., Mr. J. Snow. Secretary, Mr. J. R. V. Marchant, 
X, Gray's Inn-square, W.C. Object— To assist by grants of money Congrega- 
tional or Baptist ministers or their widows in apprenticing their children or 
otherwise preparing them for business. 

Army Scripture Readers and Soldiers' Friend Society. President, General 
Right Hon. Viscount Wolseley, K.P. Secretary, Col. Philips, late 4th Hussars. 
Office. 1X2, St. Martin' s-lane, W.C, 

Bible Lands (or Turkish) Missions Aid Society, 7, Adam Street, Strand, W.C. 
Honorary Secretary, Rev. W. A. Essery. Bankers, Messrs. Barclay, Bevan, 
Ransom, Bouverie & Co., i. Pall Mall East, S.W. President, Earl of Aberdeen. 
Treasurer, Lord Kinnaird. 

Book Society, for Promoting Religious Knowledge among the Poor. 
28, Paternoster-row, E.C. Instituted X750. Treasurer, Mr. W. Payne. Secretary. 
Mr. W. S. Payne. 

British and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, 55, New Broad-street, E.C. 
Patron, H.R.H. The Prince of Wales. President, Mr. A. Pease. M.P. 
Treasurer, Mr. J. Allen Secretary, C. H. Allen, F.R.G.S. Assistant Secretary, 
J. E. Teall. Organ of the Society, The Anti-Slavery Reporter, bi-monthly. 
Price xd. Free to subscribers of xos. and upwards. 



GENBRAL RELIGIOUS SOCIETIES. 137 



British and Forsign Bible Society, 146, Queen Victoria-street, London, E.G. 
Formed 1804. Secretaries, Rev. J. Sharp, M.A., and Rev. W. M. Paull. 

British and Foreign Sailors' Society, Sailors' Institute, Mercers'-street. 
ShadweU. E. Established 1818. Treasurer, Sir J. C. Dimsdale. Secretary, 
Rev. £. W. Matthews. Association Secretary, Mr. G. Clarke, R.N. Sustains 
and assists 150 agents in 97 home and foreign ports. Income last year, 
;^24.9" 5S- 3d. 

British and Foreign School Society, Temple Chambers, Temple Avenue, 
London, E.G. Formed 1808. President for 1895-96, Right Hon. A. J. 
Mundella, M.P. Treasurer, Mr. J. G. Barclay. Secretary, Mr. A. Bourne, 
B.A. Normal Colleges and Practising Schools — Male: Borough-road 
(Isleworth), and Bangor; Female: Stockwell, Darlington, Swansea, and Saffron 
Walden. 

British Society for the Propagation of the Gospel among the Jews. 
Formed 1842. Secretary, Rev. J. Dunlop. Accountant, Mr. H. J. Wesson. 
Offices, 96, Great Russell-street, Bloomsbury, W.C. 

Central Association for Stopping the Sale of Intoxicating Liquors on 
Sunday. President, Mr. A. Pease, M.P. Vice-Presidents, the Archbishop 
of Canterbury ; Duke of Westminster, K.G. ; Mr. W. S. Caine. M.P. ; 
Rev. C. Garrett ; Rev. A. McLaren, D.D., &c., &c. Treasurer. Mr. G. C. 
Haworth, J.P. Hon. Sees., Mr. R. Whitworth, Rev. Canon Stowell, M.A., 
Rev. W. Young, B.A. Travelling Sees., Mr. E. Thomas, 14, Brown-street, 
Manchester (Northern District); Rev. J. Seager, 12, Coburg-road, Montpelier, 
Bristol (South- Western District); Mr. J. Roles, 34a, Corporation-street, 
Birmingham ^Midland District); Mr. W. Copleston, 4, Burton-road, Thornton 
Heath, S.E. (London and South-Eastern District). General Secretary, Mr. 
J. W. Causer. Offices, 14, Brown-street, Manchester. Organ, Sunday Closing 
Reporter. 

Ckntral Young Men's Christian Association, Exeter Hall, Strand, W.C, 
186, Aldersgate-street, E.G., and 59 and 60 Cornhill, E.G. Formed 1844. 
General Secretary, Mr. J. H. Putterill. Financial Secretary, Mr. C. Hooper. 

Children's Aid Society. Established 1856 (in connection with the Reformatory 
and Refuge Union). To rescue and to assist to maintain destitute and 
neglected children. Secretary, Mr. A. J. S. Maddison. Office, 32, Charing 
Cross, S.W. 

Children's Special Service Mission. Instituted 1868. President, Rev. E. A. 
Stuart, M.A. Treasurer, Mr. J. E. Mathieson. Hon. Children's Evangelists, 
E. Arrowsmith and J. Spiers, 13A, Warwick-lane, Paternoster-row, E.G., and 
others. Hon. Sec, T. B. Bishop. Secretary, Mr. H. Hankinson. Office 
of Our Own Magazine, The Children's Scripture Union, and Golden Sells 
Hymn Book, 13a, Warwick- lane. Paternoster-row, B.C. 

China Inland Mission. (Non-denominational.) Directors of the Mission, 
Rev. J. Hudson Taylor, M.R.C.S., F.R.G.S., Newington Green, N. ; Mr. 
T. Howard, Westleigh, Bickley, Kent. Treasurer, Mr. R. Scott, 12. 
Paternoster-buildings, E.C. Council: T. Howard, Westleigh, Bickley, Kent. 
Chairman. W. Hall, 17, St. Faith's-road, West Norwood, S.E. ; R. H. Hill, 
3, Lombard-court, E.G.; W. Sharp, 13, Walbrook, E.G.; P. S. Badenoch, 
108, Newington Green-road, N. ; R. Scott, 12, Paternoster-buildings, E.C. ; W. B. 
Sloan. Secretary, W. B. Sloan. Offices of Mission, Newington Green, N. 
Present Staff of the Mission, 630 missionaries and associates and wives of 
missionaries, 309 native helpers as pastors, evangelistsr colporteurs, Bible- 
women, Ac, and zo8 unpaid native helpers. Stations and Out- Stations occupied 
(in fourteen provinces) : Cheh-Kiang Province, 66 ; Kiang-su Province, 7 ; Gan- 
hwuy Province, 20; Hu-peh Province, 3; Kwei-chau, Province, 6; Si-chuen 
Province, 18; Shan-si Province, 50; Shan-tung Province, 6; Shen-si Province. 18 ; 
Ho-nan Province, 6 ; Yun-nan Province, 6 ; Kan-suh, 6 ; Kiang-si, 27 ; Chih-li 
Province, 5. Income for 1894, ;^33,i58 is. Monthly record of information, 
China's Millions. Published by Morgan & Scott, 12, Paternoster Buildings. 



138 INSTITUTIONS AND 



Christian Evidence Society. President, The Archbishop of Canterbury. 
Vice-President, Sir G. G. Stokes, Bart, F.R.S. Secretaries, Rev. C. L. 
EngstrOm, M.A.; Rev. T. T. Waterman, B.A. Office, 13, Buckingham-street^ 
Strand, W.C. Objects: — ^To declare and defend Christianity as a Divine 
Revelation. To controvert the errors of Atheists, Agnostics, Secularists, and 
other opponents of Christianity. To counteract the energetic propag^dism 
of Infidelity, especially among the uneducated. To meet the difficulties and 
strengthen the faith of the doubting and perplexed. To instruct the young in 
the Evidences of Christianity. Methods of Operation: — Sermons, lectures^ 
popular controversial addresses, classes, publications, tracts, conversations, and 
correspondence. It removes serious obstructions which lie in the way of tiiose 
who preach the Gospel of Christ ; and; being catholic in its character, it claims 
support from all who are interested in the defence of our common Christianity. 
There is a speciality in the work which is necessitated by the religious imrest 
and questionings of the times ; and the sphere of operation is not occupied by 
any other organisation whatever. 

Christian Instruction Society. Instituted 1825. President, Sir G. Williams. 
Treasurer, Mr. T. Dence. Secretary, Rev. R. Mackay. Office, Memorial 
Hall, Farringdon-strut, E.C. Object : — ^To advance evangelical religion 
by promoting the preaching of the Gospel, the establishment of prayer 
meetings and Sunday-schools, the circulation of the Scriptures and religious 
tracts and books, systematic visitation from house to house, by specially 
qualified Deaconesses, who are affiliated to Churches in different parts of 
London and the suburbs, and by such other means as the Committee may from 
time to time approve. 

Christian Literature Society for India, 7, Adam-street, Strand, W.C. 
Formed 1858. Secretary, Rev. G. Patterson. Assistant Secretary, W. J, 
Wintersgill. 

Church Missionary Society, Salisbury-square, Fleet-street. Secretaries, Rev. 
H. E. Fox, M.A. (Honorary) ; Rev. B. Baring-Gould, M.A., Rev. F. Baylis, M. A., 
Rev. G. F. Smith, M.A., Rev. P. I. Jones, M.A., Rev. W. E. Burroughs, B.D.. 
Mr. E. Stock (Editorial), and Mr. D. M. Lang (Lay). 

Colonial Missionary Society. (Congregational.) Address, Memorial Hall, 
Farringdon-street, E.C. Secretary, Rev. D. B. Hooke. 

Congregational Church-Aid and Home Missionary Society, Memorial 
Hall, Farringdon-street, London, E.C. Treasurer, Mr. G. N. Ford, Manchester, 
Secretary, Rev. W. F. Clarkson, B.A. Income (1894), ;f 28,428. The objects 
of the Society are:— i. To call forth the resources of the Churches for 
wise and systematic use in Home Mission work. 2. To assist Churches which 
are unable to meet their financial requirements. 3. To provide for a more 
adequate remuneration of ministers who are doing good work in necessitous 
districts. 4. To enlist lay agency for the preaching of the Gospel in villages 
and remote places, and the establishment and maintenance of Sunday-schools. 
5. To form district auxiliaries for gathering information and raising funds for 
the County Unions. 6. To increase the influence of Free Church principles. 

Congregational Pastors' Insurance Aid Society, Memorial Hall, Farringdon- 
street, E.C. Treasurer, Mr. E. Unwin. Secretary, Rev. F. Sweet. Capital, 
;f5,7i7. Grants made in 1894-5, £mt. 

Congregational School, Caterham Valley, Surrey. Founded 1811. President 
and Treasurer, Rev. J. Viney. Secretary, Rev. H. Grainger. 

Country Towns' Mission, 18, New Bridge-street, London, E.C. Treasurer, 

Mr. H. C. Nisbet. Secretary, Mr. G. H. Mawer. 
Discharged Prisoners' (Metropolitan) Aid Society. Established 1864. 
Aids "short-term" male prisoners from H.M.'s Prison, Pentonville ; also from 
other prisons in town or country on communication from the authorities or 
friends. Mr. T. R. Price, 10 Freegrove-road, HoUoway, N., Secretary. 
Has a •• Home " at 10, Freegrove-road, Holloway, N. Cases assisted in 1894, 
1 ,320 ; cases assisted since formation, 19,591 . Income, 1894, £698 19s. 5d. Agent» 
Mr. W. Langmaid. Office, 15, Buckingham-street, W, 




OmSKMJLL, ESUGIOvTS SOCIETIES. I^ 

Dk. Baeludo's Ocass worn Ovphax axd Pe:<tiiv ik Cull^ksx. F^wtadtr 
Dr. T. J. BuBixvfaw F.JcLC.S^E^ i$ to «k SnotP^tr C&tt»»wv> 

E. Turn J. Mr. W. Fowi«r. Secrafeur. Ur. J. vXUta^^ 

Ea^ki^-fiam v^mntm hones;. oaDapnsed ta dfbr-oa* dtSsraot iDSbtuucoi^ 

this Kitie. ia «hich SMrtr yoo^ MSCvnNi 
ov in KSMieacvL "Hm Hooms ukIuvW 

B9X. 159. Bvdec-ffwd, E-: Swritry Hv.'twr /.-r r#nf La};w F.^$. Te^jLhax^iW^ 

■OL Siepaey-i iii iwij. Loodoa. E. ; I,a^cttr H.*«s# ,/cr i^«$mw# )\^w>4«, o>^ ^ K^ 
6a6^ riMiiii'iiiii'-road, E.; Fu:.^* H«^«m /\v OrfJUn ^»J i^tstitnU Cuis. IUH(- 
ioSBdcEaani. Essex; fia^Ms' Ca^Xr, HAwkharst« Kent: Htr Mjtysrts H^^s^iUi 
far W^CkOdrtm, 13 to 19. Stepoey-causeway. E.: S^rca^ts* Ft^ Kt^^sS^ *mJi 
Hmk, Starge Hoose. 3a, Bov-road. E.: Sht::tr f^>r OirU^ Alrrad Stnwt. K , 
Fmetory Gtris Cimb mnd Imstitmit, C<^perneId-road. F.: Tk4 ^* B4*kiv4 ' 
Warkmg Homg -for Older Giris\ 273. M^re-stn&et. Hjtckiiey. N.K,; .V**vik 
Home Jar Tomng Girts m Das^tr vPrivate Address^; Ciiv M^ssfn^tr £ru'a«f<r. 
Head Ofioes, iS to 16, S^ney-causeway. E,; TrnVn y<*.k Sk^^fS^ck 
Bngmd£ and Homg, Three Colt-street, Lunebouse. E,: U'lxxi cA(\^M^i; 
Bfigmde mmd AermUd Water Factory, 622. CommercUl-n>ad« K. ; F^rm 
Sckoal cMr. IL Phipps. J. P.), Brom\-ard» Worcester: BurJttt /\v«i/o»Y. 
Bordett-raad, E. ; Ccttvalasctnt SeasuU Homu, Felixstowe. SutK^lk: .7iVi#<s 
Memorial Home jar IncmrabUs, 16, Ttafal^ar-road. Birkdale. S«.^uthiH>ri . 
Haam for Girl Orphans, 3, Bradninch-pUce, Exeter: CkiUrtn'i Fr*t 
Lodging Houses, 81, Commercial-street, Spitaltields, and 12, IXvk-strtvt, 
Ijeman-street, E.: Emigration Depot and Dtstrtfmting Homts : " HiU^UMTAe. ' 
Peterborough, Ontario (for Girls); 2x4, Farley-avenue, Toronto, Canada vt^vr 
Younger Boys); Industrial Farm, near Russell, Manitoba \ior Young Mon^; 
Boarding-Out ScMeme, Head Offices; Blind and Dtaf Mut* Brans h, MeAd 
Offices ; Branch for Crippled and Deformed ChiUrtn, Head omces ; " The Chil- 
dren's Fold" 18a, Grove-road, E.; Shipping Agency, Head c^thces. with hrancht** 
at Yarmouth and Cardiff; Frte Meal Branch, Head Otiices. and Kdinbur>;h 
Castle, etc.; Copperfield-road Schools, Coppertield-road. K.; The iVi>/'/«'j 
Mission Church, "Edinburgh Castle," Limehouse, E.; 5^ Ann's OosM Hall, 
Limehouse, E.; Cabmen*s Shelter, Burdett-road, K.; Edinburgh Castle Coffee 
Palace, Rhodeswell-road, E.; Dublin Castle Coffee Palace, 31) and 41, Mil« 
End-road, F.; The Ecut London Tract and Pure Literature Depot, Rhodes- 
well-road. E.; Evangelical Deaconess House, 403 and 405, Mile Knd-rotul, K.; 
Dorcas House, Carr-street, Limehouse, E.; Earl Cairns Mission Hall, Salmon's* 
lane, Limehouse. E.; Gloucester Place Mission Hall, Salmon's-lane, K.; " The 
Institute," 212 Burdett-road, E. ; East London Medical Mission, 234. High- 
street, Shadwell. E. ; "i4n Ever Open Door," Eight Rescue Branches in liaih. 
Birmingham, Bristol, Cardiff, Leeds, Liverpool, Newcastleon-Tyno and 
Plymouth. 
Elmsue Scholarship Fund.— The death of the Rev. W. G. Elmslie, M.A., D.D., 
Professor of Old Testament Literature in the Presbyterian CoUegu, London, which 
occurred in November, 1889, gave rise to the formation of a " Memorial Fund," 
which amounted to about £2,000, contributed chiefly by friends in connection with 
the Baptist, Congregationalist, and Presbyterian communions. Of this the sum of 
;^i,ooowas placed in trust for thebenefttof Dr. Klmslie's son, while the remaining 
£1,000 was placed in trust for the purpose of founding " one or more KlmHlie 
Scholarships for the promotion of Old Testament and Semitic learning among the 
denominations in England and Wales known as Independents, Baptists, and 
Presbyterians." The trustees acting under the directions of the Trust Deed 
have appointed a committee selected from the three denominations named, who 
have the conduct of the examinations. &c. The committee consists of the 
Revs. J. Clifford. D.D., J. O. Dykes. D.D., A. M. Fairbairn. D.D.. R. H. 
Roberts, B.A.. O. C. Whitehouse, M.A., and John Watson, M.A. ; Messrs. A. H. 
Baynes. F.R.G.S.. A. N. Macnicoll, and P. H. Pye-Smith, M.D., tORether with 
the trustees Messrs. G. W. Knox, B.Sc, H. M. Matheson. and H. M. Murray, 
M.D. The scholarships are to be open for competition "to all theological 
students who shall then be in their last year of study or preparation for the 



J 



140 INSTITUTIONS AND 



Holy Ministry at any of the colleges in England or Wales connected with, or 
from time to time generally understood as connected with, any of the 
denominations known as ' Independent or Congregational,' ' Baptist,' and ' The 
Presbyterian Church of England,' to be awarded and held upon such terms and 
conditions as shall from time to time be directed by the committee. All 
detailed informations as to the examinations can be obtained from the principals 
of the various colleges. 

Evangelical Alliance, 7, Adam-street, Adelphi, W.C, Formed 1846. General 
Secretary, Mr. A. J. Arnold ; Deputation Secretary, Rev. C. B. Nash. 

Evangelical Continental Society, Memorial Hall, Farringdon-strect, E.G. 
Secretary, Rev. G. H. Giddins. 

Evangelization Society, for employing men of all sections of the Church and 
of all ranks in life in preaching the Gospel throughout England, Scotland and 
Wales. Hon. Secretary, Capt. W. E. Smith, 21, Surrey-street, Strand, W.C, 
and (Scottish Branch) The Secretary, Grove-street Institute, Glasgow. 

Female Aid Society and Female Mission to the Fallen, or Woman's 
Mission to Women (in connection with Reformatory and Refuge Union). 
Established 1858. Upwards of 25,000 have had a fresh start in life. Hon. Sec, 
Mr. W. T. Paton. Secretary, Mr. A. J. S. Maddison. Office, 32, Charing 
Cross, S,W, 

Female Servants' Home Society. Formed 1836. Secretary, Mr. C. S. Thorpe, 
Offices, 79, Finsbury-pavement, B.C. 

Grotto Home for Destitute Lads, 55, Paddington-street, W. (in connection 
with the Reformatory and Refuge Union). Office, 32, Charing Cross, S,W, 

Home and School for the Sons and Orphans of Missionaries, Black- 
heath, Kent. Established 1842. Head Master, Mr. W. B. Hay ward, M.A., 
late Scholar of Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge. The school is first 
grade, with alternative classical, modem or commercial courses for boys above 
fourteen years of age. Pupils must be above six and under twelve years of age 
on admission. £ai per annum for each boy over ten years of age, and ;f 18 for 
each boy under that age, are the payments by the parents or guardians, the 
difference in the cost of maintenance and education being met by subscriptions 
and donations. There are at present two leaving scholarships, viz., "The 
Haworth " and " The Basil Memorial," each of the value of /50 per annum for 
two years, open to sons of missionaries only. Pupils, other than sons of 
missionaries, are admitted to the school on terms to be obtained direct from the 
Head Master. Present number 73. of whom 67 are sons of missionaries. Hon. 
Treasurer, Mr. E. Unwin, Woodcote, Burnt Ash Hill, Lee, S.E. Hon. Secre- 
taries, Rev. R. W. Thompson, London Mission House, 14, Blomfield-street, E.C. ; 
and Mr. A. H. Basmes, Baptist Mission House, 19, Fumival-street, E.C. 

Homes for Little Boys, Famingham and Swanley, Kent. Secretaries, Messrs. 
A. E. Charles & W. Robson. Offices, 25, Holborn-viaduct, E.C. 

Homes for Working Boys in London. Founded 1870. x. Pelham House, 30, 
Spital-square, Bishopsgate, E. 2. Hanbury House, 22, Dorchester-place, 
Blandford-square, N.W. 3. Haddo House, 88, Blackfriars-road, S.E. 4, 
Rossie House, 35, Lamb's Conduit-street, W.C. 5. Howard House, 14, Foumier- 
street, Spitalfields, E. 6. Tyndale House, 29, Whitehead 's-grove, Chelsea, 
S.W. 7. Macgregor House, 9, Wine Office-court, E.C. Treasurer, The Hon. 
T. H. W. Pelham, Deene House. Putney-hill, S.W. Secretary, W. Denham, x8, 
Buckingham-street, Strand, W.C. 

Irish Evangelical Society and Congregational Home Mission, Memorial 
Hall, Farringdon-street, E.C. Secretary, Rev. R. H. Noble. 

Lady Hewley Charity. For assisting poor Congregational, Presbyterian, and 
Baptist Ministers in the five Northern counties of England, or widows and 
daughters of such ministers, or ministers disabled from duty who have been 
located in these northern counties. There are almshouses at York connected with 
the charity. Clerk to the Trustees, A. Armour, Cereal Court, Brunswick-street, 
Liverpool. 



GENERAL RELIGIOUS SOCIETIES. I4I 



London Aged Christian Societv^, 32, Sackville-street, W. President. Mr. 
J. T. Morton. Hon. Secretary, The Rev. Prebendary Webb Peploe, M.A., 
Secretary, Colonel Hamilton Northcote, R. M. Artillery. Collector, Mr. S. 
Vaughan. Bankers, Messrs. Drummonds & Co. This Society grants monthly 
pensions of Ten Shillirigs to poor members of " The Household of Faith " over 
65 years of age, residing within five miles of St. Paul's Cathedral, nominated by 
Subscribers. Annual Sut)scribers of £4 4s., or four Annual Subscribers of 
£1 IS. each, may recommend Candidates. 

London City Mission, 3, Bridewell-place, New Bridge-street, E.C. Formed 1835. 
Treasurer, F. A. Bevan, Esq. Secretaries, Revs. R. Dawson, B.A., and T. 
S. Hutchinson, M.A. Number of Missionaries, 477. 

London Congregational Union, Memorial Hall, Farringdon-street. E.C. 
Treasurers, Mr. W. Holborn, and Mr. Edward Spicer, J.P. Secretary, Rev. A. 
Meams. Superintendent of Philanthropic Work, Mr. E. W. Gates. Nett Income, 
Church Aid, Chapel Building and Philanthropic Funds for 1894, ;f6,258. 
Objects: — i. To promote the spiritual intercommunion of the Congregational 
Churches of the Metropolis ; to aid such of them as may be weak ; to facilitate 
the expression of their opinions upon religious and social questions, and in 
general to advance their common interests. 2. To promote the erection or 
enlargement of Congregational Chapels and Mission Halls, and to secure sites 
for Chapels and Halls. 3. To raise and distribute a Fund for carrying on 
philantluopic work, and in other ways to help the sick and destitute poor. 

London Female Guardian Society. — Probational Home, 21, Old Ford-road, 
Bethnal Green, E. ; Training Home, 191, High-street, Stoke Newington, N. 
Secretary, Mr. W. E. Page. 

London Female Preventive and Reformatory Institution (known also as 
"Friendless and Fallen"). Established 1857. Objects: — i. To afford protec- 
tion to friendless virtuous young women in circumstances of moral danger. 2. 
To train friendless young girls for domestic service. 3. To seek to reclaim the 
fallen. Training Home for friendless young girls, 7, Parson's-green, Fulham, 
S.W. ; Homes for respectable young women and friendless girls in moral 
peril, 459 and 461, Hollo way-road, N. ; Rescue Homes, 200, Euston-road, N.W. ; 
Milton House, Femshaw-road, Brompton, S.W. ; 35, Eden-grove, HoUoway- 
road, N. ; 5, Parson's-green, Fulham, S.W. ; Open-all-Night Refuge, for the 
immediate reception of both classes, 37, Manchester-street, King's Cross, W.C. 
The inmates are fed, clothed, housed, instructed and placed out in service or 
otherwise suitably provided for. The benefits conferred are absolutely free. 
There is no barrier to admission on the ground of creed, class or country. 
Secretary, Mr. W. J. Taylor, 200 Euston-road, near Gower-street, N.W. 

London Missionary Society, 14, Blomfield-street, London Wall, E.C. Secretaries, 
Rev. R. W. Thompson (Foreign); Rev. A. N. Johnson, M.A. (Home); and Rev. 
G. Cousins (Editorial). Treasurer, Mr. A. Spicer, M.P. 

Lord's Day Observance Society. Established 1831. Secretary, Rev. F. Peake, 
M.A., LL.D. Office, 20, Bedford-strut, Strand, W.C. 

Midnight Meeting Movement. Begun in 1859. Secretary, Mr. C. W. McCree. 
Office, 8a, Red Lion-square, W.C. 

Mill Hill School, London, ^f.W. This is a public school, not a proprietary 
. school. Founded in the year 1807, it was re-organised under the authority of 
the Court of Chancery, in 1869, on the model of the great Public Schools ; and 
is conducted on thoroughly unsectarian principles. The inclusive fees for 
yearly boarders are — under twelve years of age, 22 guineas a Term ; under 
fourteen, 23 guineas; above fourteen, 28 guineas. The sons of Christian 
ministers are eligible for election by the Governors to " Ministerial Exhibi- 
tions," whereby the fees are reduced to forty guineas a year. There are 
valuable Entrance Scholarships, £30 to ;^9o a year, tenable so long as the 
holders remain at the school. The Bousfield Scholarship, founded by the late 
Mr. Robert Bousfield, of the annual value of £50, is tenable for three years 
at University College, or, for a ministerial candidate, at New College, London. 



142 INSTITUTIONS AND 



Court of Goveraors^Rev. J. Angus, D.D.» Mr. R. W. B. Buckland. Mr. E. S. 
Curwen, Rev. J. O. Dykes, D.D. Mr. G. Elliott, Mr. E. H. Mayo Gunn, Mr. T. A. 
Herbert, B.A., LL.B., Mr. J. Howard, Mr. G. W. Knox, B.Sc., Mr. H. 
Mamham, Mr. N. Micklem. M.A.. Mr. S. S. Pawling, Mr. J. Powell, 
Mr. P. H. Pye-Smith, M.D., F.R.S., Mr. T. S<Jrutton (Treasurer), Mr. A. 
Spicen M.P., and Mr. Percy C. Webb. Head Master, Mr. J. D. McClure. 
M.A., LL.M., Trinity College, Cambridge. Boarding-House Master, Mr. E. W. 
H ALLIFAX, M. A. Secretary. Mr. £. Hampden-Cook, M.A., Mill Hill School, N.W. 

Ministers' Seaside Home, Morthoe. North Devon. This Home has been 
established, and is open all through the year, to meet the needs of Minifrters of 
all denominations and their wives, with only limited incomes, who may require 
seaside change. The scale of payment is graduated according to ministerial 
stipend. The property is invested in nineteen Trustees. The annual expenses 
are met by donations and subscriptions. All enquiries and applications for 
entrance may be addressed to the Warden, the Rev. U. R. Thomas, Redland» 
Bristol. 

National Education Association. President, Right Hon. A. J. Mundella, M.P. ; 
Chairman and Treasurer, Hon. E. L. Stanley ; Secretaries, Mr. T. E. Minshall 
and Mr. B. Whishaw, B.A. Offices, 35 and 36, Outer TempU, London, W.C, 
Objects : — i. To promote a system of national education which shall be 
efficient, progressive and unsectarian, and shall be under popular control; 
and also to oppose all legislative and administrative proposals having a 
contrary tendency. 2. To secure the universal establishment of School Boards 
in districts of suitable area, and having under their control unsectarian schools 
within reasonable reach of the population requiring them. 3. To secure Free 
Schools, on the condition that every school receiving a grant in lieu of fees 
shall be under public representative management during the ordinary school 
hours. 4. To obtain facilities for the better training of elementary teachers 
in unsectarian institutions, under public management, in addition to the existing 
means of training. 

National Refuges for Homeless and Destitute Children. Founded in 
1843 by the late William Williams. There are eight Homes on shore, in or 
near London, for Boys and Girls, and the training ships A rethasa and Chichester, 
moored off Greenhithe, Kent. Boys trained from the commencement, 11,285; 
girls, 2,253. No votes required. Urgent cases admitted at once. President, 
the Rt. Hon. the Earl of Jersey, G.C.M.G. ; Chairman and Treasurer, Mr. W. 
E. Hubbard ; Deputy-Chairman, Mr. C. T. Ware; Secretary, Mr. H. B. Wallen; 
Finance and Deputation Secretary, Mr. H. G. Copeland. Bankers, London and 
Westminster Bank, 214, High Holbom, W.C. Londonoffice, 164, Shaftesbury- 
avenue, W.C. 

National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children 
(Incorporated by Royal Charter), 7, 8, 9 & 10, Harpur-street, London, W.C. 
Director and Secretary, Rev. B. Waugh. 

Naval and Military Bible Society (1780), 32, Sackville-street. W. Hen. 
Secretaries, Admiral Sir F. L. McClintock, Colonel F. White. Secretary, Mr. 
S. Rayson. Bankers, Messrs. Herries, Farquhar & Co. 

Nonconformist Grammar School, Bishop's Stortford (an hour's ride trom 
London). Head Master, the Rev. R. Alliott, M.A., with seven Assistant Masters. 
Fees — 14 to 18 guineas per term, inclusive. Seven scholarships tenable in the 
School. Two Exhibitions tenable at the Universities. Certified Laboratory. 
Carpentry. New Swimming Bath. Healthy situation. The School is a Centre 
for Science and Art Examinations. Full Prospectus of the Head Master. 

North Africa Mission. This Mission seeks to evangelize the Moslems, Jews, 
and Europeans in North Africa. Its present sphere embraces five large countries, 
viz., Morocco, Algeria, Tunis, Tripoli, and Egypt. The Mission Staff consists of 
eighty-six workers, including five qualified doctors, and several trained nurses. 
Communications should be sent to the Hon. Sec., E. H. Glenny, 21, Linton-road, 
Barking. 



GENERAL RELIGIOUS SOCIETIES. I43 



Open Air Mission, ii, Adam-street, Strand, W.C. Formed 1853. Hon. Secretary, 
Major G. Mackinlay. Secretary, Mr. F. Cockrem. 

Orphan Homes of Scotland and Destitute Children's Emigration Homes, 
Bridge of Weir, Renfrewshire. City Orphan Home^ Working Boys' Home^ 
Children's Night Refuge, Young Women's Shelter, and Mission Hall, 13, James 
Morrison-street, Glasgow. Canadian Distributing Home : Fairknowe, Brockville, 
Ont, Canada. National Consumptive Hospitals for Scotland, Bridge of Weir. 
Communications to be addressed to Mr. W. Quarrier, Orphan Homes of 
Scotland, Bridge of Weir. 

Orphan Working School, Senior Branch, Haverstock-hill, N.W. Junior 
Branch, Alexandra Orphanage, Homsey Rise, N. Convalescbi^t Home, 
Harold Road, Margate. Instituted 1758. Secretary. Mr. A. C. P. Coote, M.A, 
Offices, 73, Cheapside, London, B.C. 

Palestine Exploration Fund. To obtain Materials for the elucidation of the 
Scriptures by means of Archaeology, Manners and Customs, Topography, 
Geology, Botany, &c., of the Holy Land. The work proposed for 1895-6 is the 
continuation of the researches in Jerusalem, Eastern Palestine, &c., and the 
publication of the work already done. Office, 24, Hanover-squaret W. 
Secretary, Mr. G. Armstrong. 

Peace Society. Secretary, W. E. Darby, LL.D. Office, 47, New Broad-street, 
Finsbury, E.C, 

Protestant Alliance. Object : " The Maintenance and Defence of the Scriptural 
Doctrines of the Reformation against all encroachments of Popery," and for this 
purpose " to unite Protestants of all Denominations in demanding that the 
national support and encouragement given to Popery should be discontinued." 
Secretary, Mr. A. H. Guinness, M.A. Office, 430, Strand, W.C. 

Protestant Union. Trustees, Rev. Dr. Angus, Rev. Dr. Kennedy, Mr. J. Spicer, 
Mr. E. Pye-Smith Reed, Secretary, Rev. F. Sweet. Office. Memorial Hall, 
Farringdon-street, E.C. This Union, which is a ministerial Mutual Assurance 
Society, was formed in 1798, for the benefit of Protestant ministers of all 
denominations. Capital, ;f 73,379. Payments to widows, £2,021 ; to children, 
;f972- 

Ragged School Union, 37 Norfolk-street, Strand. Formed 1844. Holiday 
Homes Fund. Poor Children's Aid Society. Ragged Church and Chapel 
Union. President, Right Hon. Earl Compton, M.P. Treasurer, Mr. F. A. 
Bevan. Secretary, Mr. J. Kirk. 

Rebecca Hussey's Book Charity. For making grants of religious and useful 
books to Parish Libraries, Schools, and other Institutions. Mr. J. M. Clabon, 
21, Great George-street, Westminster. 

Reedham Orphanage, Purley, Surrey. Instituted 1844. Treasurer, Mr. H. C. O, 
Bonsor, M.P. Secretary, Mr. J. R. Edwards. Office, 35, Finsbury Circus, E.C. 

Reformatory and Refuge Union. Established 1856. Secretary, Mr. A. J. S. 
Maddison. Office, 32, Charing Cross, S.W, Chairman of Committee, Rev. T. 
Turner. 

Reformatory and Refuge Union Provident and Benevolent Fund. Estab- 
lished 1876. To provide assistance to Widows and Orphans of Officers who have 
served in Institutions in connection with the Reformatory and Refuge Union ; 
and to the Officers themselves, if through accident or ill-health they become 
incapacitated. Secretary, Mr. A. J. S. Maddison. Office, 32, Charing Cross, S. W. 

Religious Tract Society, 56, Paternoster-row, E.C. Founded in 1799. Treas- 
urer, Mr. E. Rawlings. Hon. Secretaries, The Rev. Canon Fleming, B.D., and 
Rev. J. Stoughton, D.D. Secretaries, Rev. L. B. White, D.D., and Rev. S. G. 
Green, D.D. Association Secretaries— England, Rev. C. Williams, Rev. W. J. 
Wilkins, and Rev. A. Mercer, B.A. ; Wales, Hon. Sec., Rev. T. Levi ; Scotland, 
Rev. T. Boyd, M.A.; Ireland, Rev. W. Irwin, D.D. ; Continent, Rev. J. Craig, 
D.D. ; Corresponding, Mr. D. J. Legg. 



144 INSTITUTIONS AND 



Royal Naval Scripture Readers* Society, 112, St. Martin's-Iane. Secretary, 
Admiral H. Campion, C.B. 

School of Handicrafts for Destitute Boys, Chertsey, founded by Dr. 
Hawksley (in connection with the Reformatory and Refuge Union). Office, 
32, Charing Cross, S.W. 

Seamen's Christian Friend Society. Head-quarters, 5/. George' s-street, London 
Docks, E. Office, 255, Burdett-road, Limehouse, E, Secretary, Rev. G. J. Hill. 

Society for the Liberation of Religion from State-Patronage and 
Control. Treasurers, Mr. A. Illingworth and Mr. B. S. Olding. Parliamentary 
Chairman, Mr. J. Carvell Williams, M.P. Secretaries, Messrs. J. Fisher and 
S. Robjohns. Office, 2, Serjeants' -inn. Fleet-street, E.C. 

Society for Promoting Female Education in the East. Formed 1834. 
Secretary, Miss Webb, 267, Vauxhall Bridge-road, S.W. 

Society for the Relief of Aged and Infirm Protestant Dissenting 
Ministers. Treasurer, Mr. P. Cadby. Secretary, Rev. P. G. Scorey, Ellesmere, 
Venner-road, Sydenham, S.E. Instituted 1818. The persons relieved by 
this Society are Protestant Dissenting Ministers of the Presbyterian, Inde- 
pendent, and Baptist denominations in England and Wales, accepted and 
approved by their respective denominations, who have resigned their pastoral 
office in consequence of incapacity, by age, or other infirmities. Number of 
cases relieved during the year, 63. The grants amounted to £753. The Society 
confers on every contributor of £105 the right to nominate one minister to be 
placed on the list of Annual Recipients. 

Society for the Rescue of Young Women and Children. Instituted 1853. 
Secretary, Mr. C. S. Thorpe. Offices, 79, Finsbury -pavement, E.C. 

Stockwell Orphanage for Fatherless Children, Clapham-road, London, 
S.W. Income £11,129 14s. 3d. Expenditure, ;^i3,oo6 9s. 6d. Trustees 
and Committee of Management, Rev. J. A. Spurgeon, D.D., (President), 
Rev. C. Spurgeon, Rev. T. Spurgeon, Mr. T. H. Olney, Mr. C. F. 
Allison, Mr. W. Higgs, Mr. J. Stiff, Mr. J. Hall, Mr. J. Buswell, Mr. J. E. 
Passmore, Mr. W. Mills, Mr. F. Thompson, Mr. S. R. Pearce. Master, Rev. 
V. J. Charlesworth. Secretary, Mr. F. G. Ladds. Fatherless children, boys 
between the ages of six and ten. girls from seven to ten, are received, when 
there are vacancies, irrespective of creed and locality, but those of Baptist 
Ministers are considered specially by the Trustees. Applications, giving full 
particulars, should be addressed in writing to the Secretaiy, at the Orphanage. 

Sunday School Union, 56, Old Bailey, and 57, Ludgate-hill, E.C. Formed 1803. 
Hon. Secretaries, Messrs. E. Towers, C. Waters, J. Edmunds, and W. H. 
Groser, B.Sc. 

Surrey Mission Society. Formed at Tooting, a.d. 1797, for preaching the 
Gospel in the villages of the County. It embraces Christians of all Evangelical 
denominations. It has only a small income and a few village chapels. Hon. 
Secretary, Rev. I. Doxsey, F.S.S., 186, The Grove, Camberwell, S.E. 

Trinitarian Bible Society (for the circulation of Uncorrupted Versions of the 
Word of God), 25, New Oxford-street, W.C. Instituted 1831. Clerical Secretary, 
Rev. E. W. BuUinger, D.D. Hon. Lay Secretary, Mr. H. C. Nisbet, 35, Lincoln's 
Inn Fields, W.C. 

Walthamstow Hall, Sevenoaks (Institution for the Education of Daughters 
of Missionaries). Treasurer, Mr. S. Scott, 66, Widmore-road, Bromley, 
Kent. Honorary Secretary, Mrs. Pye>Smith, St. Katherine's, Sevenoaks, 
Cash Secretary, Miss Mary Towne, 28, Walford-road, Stoke Newington, N. 
Lady Principal, Miss Unwin. Depends for support on payment from pupils, 
and on private and congregational offerings. The fees are £15 155. per annum 
under twelve, and ;^2i over twelve. A charge of £6 per annum for those under 
twelve, and £g for those over twelve, if clothing is provided. 



GENERAL RELIGIOUS SOCIETIES. Z45 

Wesley AN Missionary Society. 17, Bishopogate-streec Witfain. Traasttrars, Mr. 
T. M. Harvey, and the Rev. J. H. Rigg, D.D. Secretaries. Revs. G. W. 
Olver. B.A.. F. W. Macdonald. and M. Hartley. Honorary Secretary, Rev. 
E. E. Jenkins, M.A.. LL.D. 

Widows' Fund. The Society for the Relief of Widows and Orphans of 
Protestant Dissenting Ministers of the Three Denominations. Founded 
in 1733. During the past year 232 widows were helped by grants amounting to 
£2.772. Treasurer, Mr. W. Edwards. Secretary, Mr. R. Grace, 160, The 
Grove. Camberwell, S.E. 

Working Men's Educational Union. Supplies Pictures and Diagrams suitable 
for popular lectures. Now transferred to the Religious Tract Society, 56, Pater- 
noster-row. where lists may be obtained free. 

Young Women's Christian Association. London Office, i6a, Old Cavtn ish- 
street, W. Honorary Secretaries, The Hon. Emily Kinnaird and Miss ^iorleyt 
Secretary, Mr. H. Kidner. 

Zenana iAedical College. 58, St George's-road, S.W. To train ladies to be 
Missionaries. Lady President, H.R.H. the Duchess of ConnaughL Hon. 
Treasurer, Mr. G. J. Green. Hon. Secretary, Dr. G. de G. Griffith. 



PART V. 



DEATHS OF MINISTERS AND MISSIONARIES 



TO NOVEMBER, 1895. 



banks. R.Y 

BIooRifield, J... •• 

Charles, F. A 

Cook. J 

Davies, T. (D.D.) . . 

Davis.} 

Davis, W. S 

Dean, W 

Dearie. G. B 

EUis. W. C 

Evans. H. R 

Evans, T. R 

Evans. W 

Fishboume, G. W. . . 

Foskett, L. R 

Howell, J 

Johnson, B 

Johnston, R 

Tones, D 

Jones, J 

Jones, R 

Jones, W 

Jones, W. M. (D.D.) 

Kitching. H 

MacKenna, A 

Macmaster, R. P. . . 
M'Mechan. W. H. .. 

Mathias, J. G 

Maynard, G. B. 
Morris, J. S. . • . • 

Nicholas, J 

Owen, J. T 

Owen,W 

Parkinson, J 

Passey, T 

Platten, H 

Reynolds, G 

Roberts, £. (D.D.) . . 

Roberts, G. H 

Roberts, J 

Sear, G 

Speed, R 

Stephens, J. M. (B.A.) 

Taylor, B 

Taylor, J 

Thomas, S 

Webb, S. R.(M.D.).. 

Wilkins, H 

Wilks.E. D 

Williams, J. P. (LL.D.).. 
Williams, W. T. .. 

Wood, J. H 

Wyard,G 



FORMERLY AT 



Egerton Postal 

Gloucester 

Weston-super- Mare,Bristol-rd 

Sutton (Suffolk) 

Haverfordwest, Bethesda . . 

Dover, Tabernacle 

Nottingham, Carrington 

Yarmouth, I.W 

Pulham St. Mary 

Cutsdean 

New Wells 

Shepshed 

Cefncymeraa 

Stratford, The Grove . . . . 

Tring, New Mill 

Mountain Ash 

Raglan 

Hanley .. • 

Liverpool, Walton 

Speen 

Mochdre 

Fishguard 

Finsbury, Seventh Day Baptist 
Portsmouth, Landport . . . . 

India (B.M.S.) 

Darlington 

Barnes 

Pontlottyn 

Hatherleigh 

Bow, Empson-street . . . . 

Caersws 

Woking 

Narberth 

Nuneaton 

Ruardean Hill 

Birmingham, Hagley-road . . 

Kidwelly 

Pontypridd 

Carmarthen, Priory-street . . 

Cefiibychan 

Wem 

Bishop Burton 

Hereford 

Pulham St. Mary 

Denholme 

Howey 

Congo (B.M.S.) 

Cheltenham, Salem . . . . 

Kingsbridge 

Pontlottyn ., .. .. .. 

Gelligaer, Horeb 

Monk's Kirby and Pailton . . 
Stevenage 



DATE OF DEATH. 



March 

May 

Jan. 

March 

March 

March 

Dec. 

Jan, 

March 

Nov. 

May 

June 

^'. 

Dec. 

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April 

June 

Aug. 

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24 

13 

9 

29 

9 
II 
30 
22 
M 

7 
13 
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20 
22 

15 
29 

13 
19 
26 
16 
13 
24 
22 
21 
II 
26 
18 
18 
5 

26 
19 
19 
12 
23 
II 
29 
30 
7 
8 

17 
17 
6 

29 
8 
36 
13 
3 
25 
20 
20 
19 
30 



X895 
1895 
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1895 



MEMOIRS OF DECEASED MINISTERS, 
TO NOVEMBER 14TH, 1895. 

*,* Memoirs which were not received by November 14/A will appear in the 
Hand- Booh for 1897. 



1. Banks, Robert Young, the third of four brothers in the ministry, entered 
into rest 24th March, 1895, at the advanced age of eighty-five. His parents were 
Baptists, and he was born at Ashford, Kent. When very young he manifested love 
to the Saviour. Under the preaching of his eldest brother, C. W. Banks, he was 
brought into the liberty of the Gospel. He then became an earnest student of the 
Bible, and exercised his gifts in the preaching of salvation by Christ. At the hearty 
invitation of the Baptist Church at Egerton, Kent, he gave up business in which he 
had been successful, accepted the pastorate there, and remained for more 
than thirty years. The truths he preached to his flock he followed in his life. In 
trouble and joy, in prayer and praise, in private and public, he was the true 
Christian soldier. His whole life was spent in his native county, and there, where 
he had lived and laboured, he laid down his armour, and patiently waited 
the summons calling him away. Grace enabled him to do this, and he often 
expressed his resignation to the Divine will in Job's words : ** All the days of my 
appointed time will I wait till my change come." It came, and found him ready. 
His tabernacle dissolved slowly; but strength was given equal to the day of 
trial, and his spirit returned unto God who gave it. It was on the Lord's Day 
morning while in prayer that his speech failed him, so that he could not proceed 
but regaining it he went to the usual service. In reading, it again feuled, and he 
was taken from the pulpit to his home. Though somewhat restored he was not 
again permitted to preach. 

•' For ever with the Lord ! 
Amen, so let it be; 

Life from the dead is in that word, 

•Tis immortality." — S. ]. B. 

'2. Bloomfield, John, who died on 13th May, 1895, at the age of seventy-six 
years, was born at Stowmarket, Suffolk, on 13th August, 181 8. His long and 
honourable connection with Gloucestershire commenced when he was quite a young 
man and held his first pastorate at Bethel Chapel, Cheltenham. He afterwards 
received and accepted a call to Salem Chapel. Meards Court, London, and subse- 
quently left there for Westgate Chapel, Bradford. Mr. Bloomfield remained in 
Yorkshire until 1870, when he responded to the invitation of the Gloucester 
Ba)>tists to become the minister of Brunswick-road Church. His high Christian 
character, mature experience, and genial kindness eminently qualified him for the 
large sphere of usefulness which the Church then offered, and from the commence- 
ment his ministry proved highly successful. There were crowded congregations 
and numerous additions to the Church, and it soon became evident that a scheme of 
extension must be carried out. The schoolroom was taken down and the site 
used for enlarging the chapel, which became, in the main, a new building. The 
sitting accommodation was increased from 550 to 1,050, and the work was completed 
at a cost of about ;f 3,000. The church and congregation threw themselves heartily 
into the effort made to obtain the requisite funds, aod they were led by Mr. Bloom- 
field, who was personally most successful in obtaining outside assistance towards 
the object. The Church secured the temporary use of the British Schools for the 
purposes of the Sunday school until 1884, when the Raikes' Memorial Schools were 
erected on the site adjoining the chapel, at a total cost, including the land, of ^^3.500. 
Mr. Bloomfield commenced his pastorate on 3rd July, 1870. He remained at 

K 2 



14^ MEMOIRS OF MINISTERS. 

Brunswick-road until December, 1886, when he determined to retire from the 
stated ministry; and he carried with him into his well-earned retirement the 
respect of all who had the pleasure of his acquaintance. But his retirement did 
not mean the severance of his connection with Gloucester, for until the last year of 
his life he continued to evince a lively interest in educational and other matters. He 
assisted the Brunswick-road Church as far as his strength allowed, both on anni- 
versary and other occasions. He was first Vice-Chairman and then Chairman of the 
Gloucester School Board, and a member of the Infirmary Committee, and he won the 
confidence and esteem of his fellow-citizens in other capacities. He attended the 
meetings of the School Board for the Last time on 19th November, 1894. When Mr. 
Bloomneld's contemplated retirement became known it was proposed by his friends 
to raise a testimonial in the shape of a fund sufiScient to purchase him an annuity, 
and upwards of ;f46o was contributed by friends of all denominations from far and 
near. In politics he was an ardent Liberal, and he was ever ready to assist the 
cause of progress whenever opportunity offered. At a meeting held at the Com 
Exchange in July, 1892, Mr. Bloomfield said : " A man who becomes a religious 
teacher does not cease to be a citizen, but the responsibilities of citizenship are 
rendered all the more solemn by the very fact that such a man is a minister of 
religion. A minister of religion should be concerned for the consolidation of every- 
thing that is good, and he should try to get rid of everything that is evil and against 
the interests of the people." Mr. Bloomfield in due course occupied the presidential 
chair of the Gloucestershire and Herefordshire Association, and for some years he 
was on the Committee of the Baptist Missionary Society. The following from the 
Bishop of Gloucester and Bristol was read at the funeral service : — " I am really 
greatly grieved that dear, good and kind Mr. Bloomfield has been called from us ; 
yet of no one could it be more truly said that he has verily been called Home. I had 
a great regard for him, not only for the genial kindness which he ever showed 
towards me, but from the deep conviction I had of his love and devotion to our dear 
Lord and Master, and of his faithfulness in all his ministerial work. I greatly grieve 
that I did not call on him before I left Gloucester, but I knew not that he was in a 
precarious state. Pray convey to all his friends my sincere condolence and my 
warm appreciation of his high Christian character and true Christian sympathies. 
To-day he has been often in my thoughts, and alwrays with the feeling Requiescat in 
pace.'* — A bridged from the "Gloucesier Journal." 

3. Charles, Frederick Aldis, the youngest son of Mr. John Charles, of 
Broomhall Park, was born in Sheffield, and educated at Chesterfield Grammar 
School, where he distinguished himself as a scholar. In early life Mr. Charles 
became a member of Townhead Baptist Church, and there in various ways he sought 
to further the interests of Christ's Kingdom among men. After leaving school it 
was intended that he should follow a commercial life, and so he entered his father's 
business at Kelliam Rolling Mills, Sheffield, in 18^2, and there remained until 1858. 
He thus acquired that keen, practical ability which ever marked his after life as a 
Christian minister. The desire to help men by preaching the Gospel of the Saviour 
grew until he determined to obey the Apostle's mandate : '* Let no man seek his 
own, but each his neighbour's good," and, although a promising future opened 
before him in business, he disregarded pecuniary allurements and rewards, and as 
one who could honestly have said, " What things were gain to me these have I 
cotmted loss for Christ," he steadfastly set his heart upon the work of the ministry. 
He entered Rawdon College as a lay student under the care of the Rev. S. G. 
Green, D.D., and there he studied for a year before becoming a ministerial student 
in X859. After six years of conscientious preparation, he accepted his first charge 
at WaiFehaven. Thence, in order to be near his father, he removed to Nottingham, 
iind became pastor of a church at Basford. When he resigned that charge, he served 
the churches in the district for a time by his occasional ministrations. In 1876 Mr. 
Qiarles became pastor of the Church at Grange-road, Darlington, and finally he 
accepted the pastorate at Bristol-road, Weston-super-Mare. His ministry b^an 
there on the first Sunday in February, 1885, and was diligently continued until the 
end of 1894, when in December of that year he resigned owing to ill-health. He 
survived only a few days, for he died on January 9th, 1895. A local authority says 
that during his residence in Weston he was for many years secretary to the British 
Schools, and showed his deep interest in the hospital, not only by frequent visits to 
that institution, but also by the special lecture which he prepared every year on 



MEMOIRS OF MINISTERS. I49 



behalf of its funds. Mr. Charles had for years contributed many articles to several 
magazines and newspapers. Within a short time before his death he published 
three booklets which will have more than a transitory interest—" The Preaching for 
To-day," " The Relationships of Life in the Light of Christianity," and " Charles 
Kingsley." The last of these has been most favourably reviewed by the Press, and 
has had a wide circulation. His kindly visitation of the sick and poor, his generosity, 
his ever-ready help to those in embarrassment, will not soon be forgotten. In 
writing to a friend a little time before his death, he says, " We disappear one by one— 
into the dark— but each may throw his comrades a token — before he goes. . . . 
Take my poor witness. There is one clue— one only — goodness— the surrendered 
will— everything is there— all faith— all religion— all hope for rich or poor." " Thy 
will be done."— J. W. 

4. Cook, Jonathan, who died on 29th March, 1895, at the age of fif^-one years, 
was a member of the church at Waldringfield, and preached in neighbouring churches 
until he accepted an invitation to the pastorate at Sutton, near Woodbridge, in 
1863, where be continued until his death. He was an earnest, devoted, peace- 
loving, and truthful Christian. All he did was with a whole-hearted desire to glorify 
God, and he was too unselfish to study his own interests. During his last illness he 
was happy in the Lord, and peacefully waited the call home. Resting upon the 
Rock of Ages, he was perfectly ready. — J. A. 

5. Da VIES, Thomas, was bom November 12th, 1812, at the Wem Fawr 
Farm, St. Mellons, three miles from Cardiff, on the way to Newport, Mon. 
His parents occupied a good position in the world, and were held in great 
respect in the neighbourhood. All the children became useful, and, in many 
cases, prominent members of the Baptist Churches after the good example 
set them by their parents. Thomas received what was, for those times, a good 
day school education. At the age of sixteen he took a situation at Dowlais. 
It was during his stay there that he was baptized by Rev. David Saunders, 
aiyl received into the Church at Zion, Merthyr Tydvil. Soon after, he and some 
otners, united to form the Caersalem Church, Dowlais, now one of the largest 
in the Principality. In his eighteenth year he returned to his home and joined 
the Church at Castletown, the pastor of which was the well-knovm Welsh bard 
Evan Jones, " Gwrwst" lie was one of the founders of the Sunday school 
at St. Mellons, and soon afterwards he started preaching services in the same 
place. When, eight years ago, the foundation stone of the present handsome chapel 
at St. Mellons was laid, Dr. Davies told the large audiences that as a young man — 
a farmer's son — he had carted most of the stones of the old chapel. In 1831 he 
removed to Cardiff to study under the direction of the late Rev. William Jones, of 
Bethany. Among those who signed his application for college training was 
Christmas Evans, then pastor of the Tabernacle, Cardiff. At the close of the trial 
sermon the great preacher put his hand on young Thomas Davies' shoulder and 
said in Welsh, " Well done, my boy : you will make a preacher : I will gladly sign 
your application." In 1 832 he was admitted into Bristol College, under the presidency 
of the Rev. T. S. Crisp. Among his fellow-students were the Rev. J. T. Brown, 
Northampton, and the late Doctors Benjamin Davies and F. W. Gotch;*the late Dr. 
F. Trestrail had just left the college. For four years Mr. Davies worked with 
commendable diligence and success, at the end of which time he accepted an 
invitation from the English Church, Merthyr Tydvil. He found a small congre- 
gation, a small church, and a small and altogether miserable chapel in an out- 
of-the-way part of the town. There he remained for twenty years accomplishing a 
really wonderful work. The attendance and the membership grew, well-tondo 
families were first drawn to the chapel, and then joined the church. The place was 
soon found to be too small, and in 1843 what was then one of the finest (lapels in 
Wales was erected in the main thoroughfare of the town. This was soon filled and 
the organizations of the church prospered greatly. " High Street Chapel." Merthyr, 
and its popular pastor were much talked of throughout the Principality. Mr. 
Davies tnrew himself heart and soul into the public movements of the town. 
During the Chartist riots he used to go fearlessly into the most boisterous meetinn, 
and he never failed to get a hearing. His influence in the town was unique. The 
present writer was for two years pastor of the same Church, and it is his deliberate 
conviction that no public man in Merthyr TV^^^l over sO completely gained the ear 



150 MEMOIRS OF MINISTERS. 

and the heart of the population as did Thomas Davies. In 1856 Haverfordwest lost 
David Davies — a man who was equally weighty in character and brilliant as a 
preacher. Thomas Davies, of Merthyr, was unanimously and cordially invited 
to succeed him as president of the college and pastor of the Church. To the 
great joy of all concerned the invitation was accepted, and, in 1857, he entered 
upon his new duties. The result to the college was a large increase in the income, 
with a corresponding growth in the number of students. Annual written examina- 
tions were introduced, the standard of admission was raised, and many other 
improvements were effected. In many respects he was an ideal President. His 
judgment and presence of mind were quite remarkable. He was extremely bright 
and cheerful in his temperament, and no one could more easily or more pleasantly 
overcome a difficulty than he could. He was the youngest old man I ever knew, 
to the last he was as playful as a boy, and as willing to take in new ideas, if they 
were well-supported, as an ardent youth with his career before him. His shrewd- 
ness and common-sense amounted almost to genius, and it was these qualities, 
rather than large stores of learning, that constituted his strength as teacher and as 
president. In the sermon class, he would be sure to hit off the principal defects 
of the sermons, and by mimicry, sarcasm, and wit, make them ridiculous. Like 
his predecessor, David Davies, though not to the same extraordinary degree, 
the late Dr. Davies had also much ability in reconstructing a new sermon after 
he had torn the old one into shreds. His younger days belonged to a period 
when opportunities for drinking deep of the well of knowledge were few ; but his 
knowledge was wide, and it bore directly upon the work he had to do, and I was 
always struck with the aptitude and force with which in classroom, in pulpit, and 
on platform, he could use the knowledge he had. For eleven years it was my 
pleasure to be classical tutor during his presidency. From 1857 ^^ ^^^5* the 
late Hev. T. Burditt, M.A., was Dr. Davies's assistant at the Bethesda Church 
as well as at the college. F*rom 1865 to 1886, Dr. Davies was sole pastor of the 
Church. From 1886 to 1894, the Rev. R. O. Johns was co-pastor. Dr. Davies 
resigned the presidency of the college in 1894, having held the position for thirty- 
six years. From the time he entered the ministry up to the day of his death he was 
never out of a pastorate, so that he was in the ministry of the Baptist denomina- 
tion fifty-nine years. For many years he was Vice-President of the Haverfordwest 
School Board. In 1874, he occupied the position of President of the Welsh Baptist 
Union. In 1886, he received a testimonial of ;f 430 in appreciation of his services. 
In 1889, a beautifully executed oil portrait was presented to him. He was for 
several years before his death one of the Vice-Presidents of the Bible Society. Of 
literary work he did practically nothing, though the few articles he wrote and the 
college reports he issued, show he had great power for concise and pointed writing. 
He died rather suddenly on 9th March, 1895, leaving behind him a good name and 
an abiding influence for good. — T. W. D, 

6. Davis, James, who died nth March 1893, at the age of sixty-six years, was bom 
in Liverpool, and baptized when only twelve years old in Soho-street Chapel by 
Rev. R. Lancaster, pastor of the Church. His father had been a deacon, as well as 
the superintendent of the Sunday school. The immediate occasion of his religious 
decision was the last sermon preached by the Rev. Moses Fisher (Mr. Lancaster's 
predecessor), who died shortly afterwards. Starting on a business career in the 
office of a cotton broker, he did not enter Rawdon (then Bradford) College until he 
was twenty-one years of age. He was the first alumnus of that institution who 
matriculated at London University, but he was prevented from taking his degree by 
his early settlement, in 1885, as co-pastor with Mr. Winter, at Counterslip Chapel, 
Bristol. He subsequently held pastoral charges in Teignmouth, at Banbury for 
twelve years, and at I>over. He had considerable classical scholarship and 
acquaintance with modem languages, and his conversational powers were great. 
As a preacher he found delight in his work. In the sick-room his cheery manner 
and childlike faith were specially welcome. It is impossible to estimate how much 
good he did by his custom of quietly and earnestly speaking to people, whenever 
he had an opportunity, words of spiritual appeal and counsel, and they were 
generally received with courtesy and gratitude by rich and poor alike. When, a few 
months before his death, he retired to Weston-super-Mare, into the midst of his 
happy family circle, and with the longing still to do some work, those who loved him 
thought they saw the brightness of sunset in his life. The Master has called him 




THOMAS DAVIES, D.D. 



152 MEMOIRS OF MINISTERS. 

to the highest service, where, to use his own words concerning a brother minister 
whose sermons he edited for the Press, " No faculty will be left unexercised, no ^ift 
will be wasted, and the endowments of the soul will find a scope of action surpassing 
our grandest conceptions." One of his remarks during his last illness was this : '* I 
am in God's hands, whether it be His will to heal me or to take me to heaven." 
In this spirit of calm trust and hope he lived and preached, and bore the burden of 
life (which at times pressed sorely), and died, leaving behind him in the memory of 
those who knew him the image of a true friend as well as of a happy, earnest, 
ever-ready servant of the Lord. — M. M. D. 

7. Davis, William Steadman, who died at St. Leonards on 30th December, 
1894, was bom in 1839. He was the third son of the Rev. Joseph Davis, then 
minister of Blackfriars, London. His boyhood was spent in the village of Amsby 
and at Southsea, and he was taught in various schools. He learned the business of 
cabinet-making in London, durmg which time he joined his father's old church, 
under the Rev. William Barker, to whose ministry and kindness he always felt 
indebted. With other yoimg men he began to write and talk. Encouraged to enter 
the ministry, he read with his eldest brotiier before entering college. While at Sab- 
den he was most welcome in the colleges and the school ; his picturesque, 
pathetic, grave, and trenchant style made him acceptable as a preacher, and his 
industry won him a good place in the entrance examination at Rawdon, which he 
never lost He was from childhood a great reader— « devourer of history, 
biography, and poetry. He was very select in his choice of books, and did not leave 
a mean one on his shelves. He was never the technical scholar ; it was the living 
nature and human character that attracted him. His preaching was, perhaps, 
strongest in dealing with ethical and personal topics. He was once fond of John 
the Baptist; the severity, directness, and picturesqueness of the martyr-prophet 
touched his sjrmpathies. Before leaving college he was called to the Church at 
Queen's Park, Manchester, where his ministry was happy and useful, and he was 
respected and beloved. Thence he moved to Huntingdon. His stay there was cut 
short by Mrs. Davis' illness, and he removed to Ryde. He afterwards ministered 
for short periods at Carrington, Nottingham ; and at Haslingden. Illness closed his 
work at both places, but in each of them he is still loved. While at Ryde his most 
fEuniliar and best-loved brother, Benoni, died at Ventnor. This was a great blow to 
him, and some think he never quite recovered the shock. Behind his reserved and 
silent manner there was a well of sincerity and affection for those who tapped it ; 
and, curiously, he was much drawn to those whose personal qualities contrasted 
most with his own. His intimate friends were not many ; it would be hard to find 
his enemy ; he was a man to rely on. His later was not like his earlier preaching ; 
it was weaker in attnu:tive qualities, and stronger in reflection and argument and 
doctrine and spirituality. This was the result of maturity and of labour. His 
sermons never cost him nothing, they had to be prepared, and though his tempera- 
ment was even, their effect was delicately dependent on his surroundings. His life 
may be best summed up in one phrase ; it was a " patient continuance in well- 
doing." He has the honour and eternal life that follow it. — J. U. D. 

8. Dean, William, was bom at Chard, Somerset, February 17th, 1814. In early 
life he was engaged in the boot and shoe trade, and carried on business at Newport, 
I.W., as a leather cutter for many years, during which he was connected with the 
Churdi at Castlehold. He began preaching at Broughton, Hants, where he was 
very useful, and where bis labours are still remembered with thankfulness. Many 
of the villages around Broughton shared in his earnest and affectionate ministrations. 
A firiend who knew him well during his residence at Newport thus writes of himapd 
his work at that period : " I remember his coming to Newport many years ago. 
His services as a local preacher were in great demand. The various Nonconformist 
churches of the island gave him a hearty welcome, and profited greatly by his 
ministry. One of the foremost in promoting unity, he was ready to serve 
Independents, Wesleyans, Primitive Methodists, Bible Christians, FVee Wesleyans, 
or Baptists, and as he preached the Gospel in its breadth and fulness, his ministry 
was equally acceptable to all. I had the privilege of often travelling with him to 
the west end of the island, where in turn we preached at Freshwater, Colwell, 
Yarmouth, Wellow, &c. With all his quiet, unassuming manner, he had great 
resources of spiritual knowledge, and his faith was based on principle and intense 




WILLIAM STBADMAN DAVIS. 
{From Photograph by A.Dcbenham, Ryde I.W,) 



154 MEMOIRS OF MINISTERS. 



conviction. He had the ' faith working through love.' As a preacher, he was a 
* workman that needeth not to be ashamed.' . . . His spiritual fervour and 
intense earnestness were highly valued by the village communities. At times his 
voice would tremble with emotion . . . and his great concern was for the 
spiritual good of the people. His name is fragrant in all the churches at Roud, 
Chilleston, VVootton Bridge, Swanmore, St. Helens, Sea View, and Porchfield, as 
well as in other parts of the island. Always on the side of freedom in politics and 
in religion, he never failed to promote good feeling and to secur^ a recognition of the 
rights of others." The writer's acquaintance with Mr. Dean dates n-om the year 
1879 only, about a year after his settlement at Yarmouth, I.W. This step he took 
on the recommendation of Dr. Trestrail. There he toiled faithfully, and won the 
respect of all. He was permitted to serve this Church for fourteen years, when, in 
1892, increasing years and infirmities compelled him to resign. He continued, 
however, to be at least nominally pastor, and took the services one Sunday in the 
month, when he presided at the Lord's Supper. Even this limited service had 
eventually to be relinquished, but he preached occasionally as long as his strength 
permitted. After a protracted and painful illness, bom with great patience, he passed 
away to the presence of the Lx>rd he had so long and conscientiously served, on 
the 22nd January, 1895. — J- C- 

9. Dearle George Bird, was a native of London. His father was a man 
esteemed for his strict integrity, though he was an avowed Deist. When his son 
was quite a lad he became deeply impressed, and at the age of sixteen was baptized 
by Rev. James Nunn at Beulah Strict Baptist Church. From that time he was 
a most ardent worker in the Sunday school and in other religious institutions 
connected with the Church. When twenty-six years of age, he left London for 
Norwich, where for many years he practised as a dentist, and for nearly forty years 
devoted all his spare time and religious enthusiasm to the service of the Strict 
Baptist Churches, especially in the Norfolk villages. During this time he was 
pastor of the Churches at Felthorpe. Shelfanger, and at Pulham St. Mary in which 
he continued until his death. His home and social life were characterized by deep 
affection and devotion and a perennial cheerfulness, and his religious and public 
life was marked by an unswerving fidelity to chose truths he held to be in accord 
with God's Word. He was a bold defender of Strict Baptist principles, fearlessly 
denouncing the errors he thought other Churches were teaching. As a Non- 
conformist of a pronounced type, and a Radical in politics, he took great interest 
in all national questions, believing that the religion of Jesus should have complete 
sway over the entire life of man. During his residence in Diss, where he spent the 
last thirteen years of his life, he took an active part in public affairs as a member 
of the School and Local Boards. His life was in perfect harmony with the truths 
he loved and taught ; and his death, though tragic, was simply the fulfilment of his 
own desire, for more than once he had been heard to say that if he had any choice 
about dying, he would prefer to die preaching. On Sunday afternoon, 24th March, 
Z895, his earthly ministry was abruptly concluded while he was preaching 
from the text " Lovest thou Me more than these? " Qohn xxi., 15.) For at 3.15., 
when the gale, which devastated the Eastern counties, was at its height, without a 
moment's warning a portion of the roof was blown off, and a chimney and gable 
end wall were precipitated into the chapel. Tons of brick and mortar came 
crushing through, striking the pastor violently on the head. Although everything 
was done that could be done, he never recovered consciousness until the following 
day, when he was translated to perfect service in the more immediate presence of 
the King he had so long loved and faithfully served. He was sixty-seven years of 
a^e.^R.D. 

10. Evans, Hugh Rees, was born at Llanllugan, in the county of Montgomery, 
about 1837. His parents were in straitened circumstances, and his health, when a 
child, was very feeble, and never became very strong at any time of his life. His 
educational advantages were very small, only just enough to enable him to read 
and write. He spent some years as a farm ser\'ant, and when, by an accident, he 
lost one of his legs, he was apprenticed to a tailor who was a deacon and the leader 
of ihe singing at Llanllugan Chapel. Mr. Evans was ardently fond of reading, and 
out of his scanty means he bought candles, so that he might sit up all night to read 
some favourite book. He was baptized at an early age at Lllanllugan or Llan£eiir> 



MEMOIRS OF MINISTERS. I55 

CaereinioD, and soon after commenced to preach. In 1869 he was invited to take 
charge of the church at New Wells, and he accepted the invitation, and continued 
to minister there with much acceptance and success for twenty- five years. His 
health tailed and he resigned in 1894, but he continued to preach occasionally until 
within a few weeks of his death, which took place in May, 1895. ^^ ^ ^^^ ^^' 
Evans was quiet, peaceful, and unassuming, and was held in high esteem by all who 
knew him. As a preacher he was above the average, for his sermons were well 
thought out, his outlines were clear, and his delivery was marked with great 
earnestness, pathos, and vigour. — D. £. H. 

IX. Evans, Thomas Rhys, was born at Sirhowy, Monmouthshire, in 1832. 
His parents were distinguished for their godliness and sterling worth, and very 
early in life he was received as a member of the Siloh Baptist Church, Tredegar, 
then under the pastoral care of the Rev. W. Roberts. According to the custom of 
the Welsh churches he was soon invited to give expression to bis religious feelings 
at the weekly service, which he did in so promising a manner that the church 
urged him to consecrate his life to the work of the ministry. , After he had spent a 
year at Merthyr Tydfil, under the tuition of Rev. T. Davies, he applied in 1854 
for admission to Pontypool College, and was accepted. At the close of an honour- 
able college course, he accepted an invitation to become the pastor of the church at 
Usk. which he filled successfully for two or three years. About 1861 he removed to 
Countesthorpe, to assist the venerable Rev. Shem Evans, of Arnsby, who had the 
oversight of the united churches of Arnsby and Countesthorpe. His relations with 
ihe venerable pastor were of the happiest kind, for as a son with a father " he served 
in the Gospel." But when the new chapel was built at Countesthorpe the two 
churches became independent of each other, and Mr. T. R. Evans was invited to 
assume the sole pastorate. For ten years he carried on a vigorous and faithful 
ministry, and on leaving, in 1872, for Shepshed, he was presented with several 
valuable presents, and his name is still lovingly remembered in Countesthorpe. 
At Shepshed, in the maturity of his powers and in the prime of his strength, he 
unreservedly threw himself into all manner of work. He ungrudgingly gave much 
strength and time to educational matters, and not deeming political questions as 
something " common or unclean," he earnestly and boldly advocated the principles 
of Progressive Liberalism. But his greatest solicitude was for the spiritual welfare 
of the church. For this he toiled " in season and out of season," and his labours 
were richly blessed. Towards the end of 1890 his health failed, and he tendered 
his resignation of the pastorate and removed to Leicester. For a time he rendered 
valuable service to many churches in the county, until one day he was suddenly 
smitten with a deadly disease. He died nth June, 1895. — W. E. 

12. Evans, William, of Cefncymerau, passed away on 20th June, 1895, after a 
brief illness, which lasted for a few hours only. He was the son of Evan Evans, who 
was for many years pastor of the Church at Gam, Dolbenmaen, Carnarvonshire. 
William was one of a family of seven children. He was baptized in March, 1840, 
and about twelve months after he began to preach the Gospel. He was ordained to 
the ministry at Gam in 1848. About 1850 he settled in Llanbedr, Merionethshire, 
and took the oversight of the little Church at Cefncymerau. Though he was not a 
popular preacher, in his quiet way he made his message tell with his hearers all 
through his long stay. He saw many additions to the Church, so that his ministry 
showed steady, though slow, growth. Soon after his settlement at Cefncymerau the 
chapel was rebuilt, and he worked very hard to pay off the debt. A new Church 
was also started at Harlech, and a neat little chapel was built there, which is now 
filled. Some years before his death Mr. Evans gave up the charge of the two 
Churches. He had his share of sorrow, for he buried his only daughter when she 
was four years old, and his wife was an invalid for many years before her death in 
January, 1893. Mr. Evans was a man of sterling character, and a thorough Christian. 
His successor at Cefncymerau testifies to the exceedingly kind, respectful and 
harmonious spirit in which Mr. Evans worked with him after his resignation of the 
pastorate. — G. W. 

13. FiSHBOURNB, George William, who died on 22nd December, 1894, at the 
age of seventy-eight years, was a resident in London before his admission to Stepney 
College, and his ministry commenced in 1838. On the 19th January, 1840, he 
settled as pastor of the Church in Guernsey, and removed to Bow in September, 



136 MEMOIRS OF MINISTERS. 



1846. His ministry at The Grove Chapel. Stratford. E., began in 1853 and terminated 
in 1866, when he removed to Bognor, and for a time took the oversight of the Con- 
gregational church in that tovrh, without, however, ceasing to be a Baptist. West 
Brighton became his place of residence in 1884. and there he died. He was Financial 
Secretary of Regent's Park College from 1 851 to 1893. His son and all the friends 
who could have given fuller details of his life have pre-deceased him. — J. A. 

14. FosXETT, Louis Robert, after a lingering and painful illness, heroically 
borne, went home early in the morning of 15th December, ^89!, at the age of thirty- 
seven years. He was always bright and hopeful even in the darkest day. Chelsea 
was his birthplace, and there he was trained in a godly home. When school days 
were over he commenced work as an electrical engineer. Very soon after his con- 
version, which took place in September,! 874, he was baptized by the late Rev. John 
Teall, and became a member of the Strict Baptist Church, worshipping in Queen- 
street Chapel, Woolwich, where he was a very useful worker, both as a Sunday school 
teacher and a village preacher. In 1877 he was admitted to the Pastors' College, and 
continued there three years. His first settlement as pastor was at Shepton Mallet 
and Croscombe in the Bristol Association, where he remained for seven years. His 
other pastorate was at New Mill, Tring, in the Hertfordshire Union, also of seven 
years' duration. There is a coincidence in the fact that the call to his second charge 
came at the same time of the year and almost on the same date as the first ; both 
were held for the same period. His last duty in the first Church was to receive two 
new members, and there were also two to be received on the last Sunday of his 
second pastorate. The work of the ministry was an intense delight to him. Preach- 
ing was his chief pleasure, and the wonder is that he did not die in the pulpit, for 
he told a friend after preaching his last sermon that he had to hold on to the sides 
of the pulpit as for very life. The thought of being able to leave the membership of 
the Church at New Mill as large as it was when he undertook the charge was a 
source of great comfort and joy to him. All that medical skill and affectionate 
nursing could do for him was most cheerfully done, though with much self-denial 
on the parts of others. The immediate cause of death was haemorrhage of the 
lungs, but for years, inflammation, congestion, pleurisy and influenza had undermined 
his strength. During the last few hours he had a terrible fight for breath, but the 
end was calmness and peace. In full possession of all his mental faculties, he 
turned his face to his beloved wife, and, in a clear voice, he said, " The battle's won." 
The next moment he had gone to his reward. He was a man of deep conviction, 
of fearlessness in speech, and one of the most devoted of all the followers of the 
late President of the Pastors' College. — C. P. 

15. Howell, John, was a native of Carmarthenshire. His early education was 
scanty. At Aberdare he worked underground whilst quite a boy. He thirsted for know- 
ledge, and began preaching when very young. In 1870 he entered Pontypool College, 
and at the close of bis course he settled as pastor of the Welsh Church at Cwmpark. 
He was there for two years, when he was invited to the pastorate of the English 
Church at Tonypandy . Eighteen months later he was invited to the English Church, 
Nazareth, Mountain Ash, and there he spent eighteen years in active work. He 
was a thoughtful and earnest preacher, a painstaking pastor, and an excellent public 
man. He was foremost in every good movement. The late Lord Aberdare esteemed 
him very highly, and all regarded him as a leading citizen. He was a member of 
the Local Board for years, worked hard in connection with the Reading Room and 
the Hospital ; he was one of the most prominent members of the Glamorganshire 
English Association, and a journalist of much ability. For some years he had not 
been strong, on account of overwork, but his energy and enthusiasm were unbounded. 
He died at the early age of forty-seven years, deeply regretted by a large circle of 
friends, and mourned by a united and loving Church. Three branches in connection 
with his- Church were established by his instrumentality at Miskin, Cefiipenar, and 
Newtown. He served for years on the Llanwonno School Board, and his work was 
as effective as it was varied. His lectures on Palestine, Brittany, Ac., in which 
countries he had travelled much, were greatly appreciated. He felt a deep interest 
in the welfare of Brittany. He was held in the highest esteem for all his work. 
— W. E. 

z6. Johnson, Benjamin, was the son of Edward Johnson, paper mannfacturer, 
Hoarwithy, near Ross, Herefordshire. He was bom 17th October, 1822, and was the 
youngest of thirteen children. When he was quite young his parents removed to 



MEMOIRS OF MINISTERS. 157 

■Whitebrook, near Monmouth, and it was there he was brought to Christ under the 
ministry of the Rev. W. Lloyd. He commenced preaching at Llandogo when he 
was seventeen years of age, and during the pastorate of the Rev. M. Philpin. He 
served his apprenticeship as a painter and plumber, and worked at that trade for a 
few years, but feeling that he was called to the work of the Christian ministiy he 
placed himself under the private tuition of the Rev. J. Wright, of Layshill, Hereford- 
shire. In 1845 he was invited to become the pastor of the Church at Garway, near 
Ross, and in addition to his pastoral work he discharged the duties of schoolmaster in 
connection with *' Cough's Charity." Thirteen years of earnest and feithftil toil were 
spent there, during which he had also under his pastoral supervision the Churches 
at Norton and Orcop. He preached thrice every Sunday, and his name is still very 
lovingly remembered by the old members. In 1858 Mr. Johnson removed to Raglan, 
Monmouthshire, where he toiled diligently and successfully for the long period 
of thirty-seven years. There also he was schoolmaster as well as pastor, and 
preached three times regularly every Lord's Day. During his ministry at Raglan, a 
new chapel was erected (in 1861-2), and through his indefatigible efforts the build- 
ing was soon free from debt. On the completion of the twenty-fifth year of his 
pastorate there, he was presented with a handsome testimonial (a purse of money) 
from his Church and congregation, and about the same time he was elected president 
of the Monmouthshire English Association. Mr. Johnson was a splendid type of a 
country pastor, and most loyally, but unostentatiously, did he work for his Master 
m a Church and Tory-ridden village. He was in reality one of Christ's ** good 
and faithful " servants, and he entered into the " joy of his Lord " on 13th April, 
1895. The day after his death Mrs. Johnson died, and, amid many tokens of 
respect, both were buried the same afternoon at Kingcoed, a preaching station 
connected with the Church at Raglan. Verily, in " death they were not divided," 
and their end was peace, accompanied with an abundant *' entrance into the ever- 
lasting Kingdom of Our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ" — D. B. J. 

17. Johnston, Robbrt, died at his residence, 70, The Avenue, Castle Hill, Ealing, 
W., on 19th June, 1895. He v^ras bom in London in August, 1826, and received his 
education at the Blue Coat School. A boy of quiet disposition and bookish 
tastes, he took less than the average schoolboy's interest in sport, and very 
early in life he was, to use his own familiar phrase, " converted to God." His 
parents — ^members of the Church of England -destined him for a commercial 
me, and he was in the employ of Messrs. Unite, of Edgware Road, W., when, 
in 1865, he was asked to accept the pastorate of the Baptist Church at Hanley. 
That position he filled with marked success for two or three years, but, as con- 
tinued residence in that part of the country was injurious to his health, he returned 
to London, and resumeo his connection with Messrs. Unite, under whom he held a 
responsible post, until his death. On his retirement from the pastorate at Hanley 
the church presented him with a handsome clock as a token of its appreciation of 
his loving and faithful service. For a short time he resided at Shephenl's Bush, and 
then removed to Ealing. There — ^in Ktrchen Road— he commenced what proved to 
be his life work. For some time before he left London for Staffordshire he and 
Mrs. Johnston were in charge of a boys' home in Paddington, and out of that grew 
a Youths' Christian Association. Soon after he settled in Ealing he founded such 
an Association there. It be^pm in a very small way — with the gathering of a few 
youths on Sunday afternoon m one of his rooms. But Mr. Johnston's earnestness 
and unassumed love for lads soon attracted others, and he found, although he had 
once or twice enlarged his house for ihe purposes of the Mission, as it came to be 
called, that it afforded insufficient accommodation for the Sunday afternoon class, 
and be therefore built in The Avenue a house with a large comfortable room 
attached, in which the class met. At one time the Mission numbered nearly 150 
members. When Mr. Johnston found that it was competing with the Sunday 
Schools, he raised the age of admission &t>m twelve to fifteen years. His success 
must be attributed to his personal character, to the frict that his strong religious 
convictions were wedded to perfect human sjrmpathy. In other directions he found 
scope for bis burning zeal for the regeneration of mankind. An earnest teetotaller, 
he often appeared on temperance platforms, and he was an acceptable preacher at 
the Ealing Dean Primitive Methodist Chapel and elsewhere. He rendered valuable 
help to the Ealing Branch of the Sunday School Orchestral Band. Mr. Johnston, who 
was a member of the Ealing Dean Church, lost no opportunity of protesting against 



158 MEMOIRS OF MINISTERS. 



attempts to substitute the dogmas of any Church for personal faith. He wished his 
" boys," as he lovingly called them, to be connected with some religious organiza- 
tion, but he never attempted to dictate in regard to their choice. By his death 
Ealing loses one of its notable figures, a man who could ill be spared. — Abridged 
from The Middlesex County Times. 

z8. Jones, Daniel, was one of the most brotherly, large-hearted, and helpful of 
our ministers, and one whose loss must long be felt. Bom at Bassaleg 14th 
November, 1839, he entered Haverfordwest College in i860. He had been some 
time in business, and had saved money to pay his college expenses. He was 
pastor at Shrewsbury from 1864 to 1868, and at Stourbridge from 1869 to 1873. He 
then removed to Liverpool, and was for some time actively connected with the 
National Education League. This work secured for him the acquaintance and 
warm personal esteem of many leading men of different public bodies. He was 
at that time and until 1879 the pastor of Old Swan Church, for which a chapel was 
built mainly through his untiring efforts. From there he went to Fabius Chapel, 
Everton-road , and he continued in that pastorate until x888. Mr. Jones toiled against 
great discouragement among a very poor population, but with unfailing energy and 
hopefulness, and there are many at that place who remember with life-long grati- 
tude his devoted ministry. From 1888 to 1892 he was Deputation for the British 
Society for the Propagation of the Gospel among the Jews. During the latter part 
of that time he rendered valuable service to the Walton Church, then without a 
pastor, and on resigning his post with the Society he became in 1892 pastor of that 
Church. In 1894 failing health compelled Mr. Jones to resign, and he then left for 
Sydney in search of health, which seemed at first to be returning to him. He 
undertook a very hopeful pastorate at Ashfield, N.S.W., when suddenly graver 
symptoms developed, and he was taken to his rest on 26th August, 1895. In addition 
to all that has been recounted, he was for some years secretary of the Liverpool 
Baptist Union, of which he was also chairman ; and in all the work of the County 
Association he took a deep interest, and gave to it valuable help. On his departure 
from Liverpool many friends of various denominations contributed to raise a fund to 
defray the expenses of the voyage, and the warm expressions of esteem which 
accompanied the gifts testified to the worth of Mr. Jones and of his work. " Jesus 
Christ and Him crucified," was the inspiration of his truly devoted and beautiful life. 
—J. W. S. 

19. Jones, John, was bom 10th April, 1810, in the county of Radnor. In his 
early days he was proficient in athletics, in which he often joined his companions 
on the Sabbath. Sometimes he felt the stings of conscience, and then he would 
loiter behind and fall upon his knees under some hedge and cry for pardon. At 
length God. by His gracious Spirit, wrought the work of saving grace in the young 
man's heart, whereupon he felt a strong desire to lead his comrades from their 
follies into the light and joy of salvation. Soon he began to preach and showed 
much aptitude and zeal in the work. He received, and accepted, a call to settle 
over the Church at Madley in 1830. Mr. Jones removed to Rajglan, thence to 
Layshill, and, later on, successively to Kidderminster, Oundle, Knighton, Llang- 
wam and Usk. His last charge was at Speen, Buckinghamshfre, where he 
remained ten years and reached his ministerial jubilee. He continued to reside 
in the place until his death, which occurred z6th March, 1895. After he resigned 
the pastorate he occasionally conducted services for some of the neighbouring 
Churches. He was devoted to preaching, and had a fine commanding presence 
and a good voice. To some he doubtless appeared harsh, but he had a kind heart, 
and, tme to his Divine Master, and severe upon looseness in life or laxity of 
doctrine, "Christ and his Cross" was all his theme. — C. S. 

20. Jones, Robert, was bom at a farmhouse called Tyn>y-Coed, in the parish of 
Llaoystumdwy, Carnarvonshire, 28th November, 1825. He commenced his religious 
life with the Independents, by whom he was invited to exercise his gifts as a 
preacher of the Gospel, and, having done so for some time with much acceptance, 
he entered Bala College, where he studied for two or three years. After leaving 
college he was for some time pastor of the Independent Church at Rowen, Car- 
narvonshire, but having changed his views in regard to Baptism he was baptized 
at Carnarvon, and in 1866 became the pastor of the Baptist Churches at Newchapel 



MEMOIRS OF MINISTERS. I59 



and Cwmbellan, Montgomeryshire. After he had been there about seven years he 
resigned. He was then without a pastorate for some time; but the Church at 
Cwmbellan again invited him to become their pastor in 1875. He did so, and 
continued until 1878, when he took charge of the Church at Mochdre, in the same 
county. Advancing age and feeble health compelled him to resign in 1894. * He 
preached occasionally at Mochdre and the churches in the neighbourhood up to the 
time of his death, which took place on 13th July, 1895. Mr. Jones was a man of 
unblemished character, an able preacher, and a careful pastor ; but of a quiet and 
retiring disposition. He was not a man to take the lead, but to work quietly out of 
sight. He was for some years the agent of the Bible Translation Society in his part 
of the country; and in many other ways he did much unostentatious work for the 
Master.— J. G. 

21. Jones, William, was born at Brymbo. Denbighshire, August, 1835. His 
father, J. R. Jones, was a poet of considerable reputation, and the author of some 
well-known Welsh hymns. The son was baptized in his eighteenth year by the 
Rev. R. A. Jones, of Llanfair, and on 25th November, 1855, he commenced to 
preach. Though his first attempts at preaching did not give any indication of his 
future eminence, it was evident that he was endowed with talents of no mean order. 
After the usual course of training at Haverfordwest College, he settled as minister 
at Penyfron, Flintshire. The Church at Penyfron was small, and not likely 
confer much distinction on its pastor. The situation was trying, and many a man 
might have been so influenced by the unfavourable environment as to sink in 
despair ; but he mastered the circumstances, turned his disadvantages to advantage, 
and made the best possible use of his time in studying the Holy Scriptures and 
various philosophical writers, and so cultivated the acquaintance of the best society 
in the form of authors ancient and modern. He would lose himself entirely in the 
society of Hamilton, Kant, Hegel, and others, whose productions he would read 
with sympathetic interest, but also with careful discrimination. The Church at 
Conway enjoyed his ministration for a short period after his removal from Flint- 
shire, and then he removed to Bargoed in Monmouthshire. The Church there was 
comparatively large, and a wide sphere of usefulness opened before him. Having 
accepted an mvitation from the Church at Fishguard in Pembrokeshire he removed 
thither in 1870, and there, with the exception of some two years he spent in London 
as the pastor of the Welsh Church in Castle Street, Oxford Street, he remained 
until .his death, which took place on 24th March, 1895. Mr. Jones was a man 
of remarkable powers, a profound thinker, and a very eloquent preacher. He 
read and he thought, and one could wish that he had written as well — but he care- 
Cully avoided printers' ink. Even when he filled the chair of the Welsh Baptist Union 
which he did last year at Morriston — he had not written his carefully prepared address, 
so that only a fragmentary report of what was acknowledged on all hands to be a very 
masterly production is ever likely to see the light. M r. Jones preached a very powerful 
sermon at Carnarvon, during the sitting of the Welsh Baptist Union, in 1892, on 
" Eternal Life." Amongst jnany eloquent passages was one describing the infant 
waking to consciousness of life. On a certain day the candle is taken from one room 
to another, the eye of the little one follows it. That is the first time for it to consciously 
observe any object, but the last time will never come. In addition to the profound 
thoughts, the apposite illustrations, the rich poetic fancy, and the chaste diction of 
the preacher, there was an irresistible charm in his manner. He was very con- 
servative in his theological views. He had no interest in conferences or committees, 
and if by some accident he found himself present at one, he would be most careful 
to observe the golden rule of silence. He rose to the highest rank of Welsh 
preachers. His illness was brief, and his transition to the world of fuller knowledge 
was very sudden. — H. C. W. 

22. Jones, William Mead, the son of a physician, was bom at Fort Ann, Washing- 
ton Co., New York, on 2nd May, 1818. In his early years he worked as a former, 
but finding himself called to preach, in 1838 entered Madison University, Hamilton, 
New York. lU-health, however, sent him away early in the course. He was 
ordained pastor in the Mill Creek Church, Huntingdon Co., Pennsylvania, 5th January, 
1 84 1. He continued as a pastor and evangelist in Central Pennsylvania until 
1844. During this time he travelled 12,000 miles (mostly on horseback) in keeping 
his appointments. He organized several churches in that State. He entered 



l6o MEMOIRS OF MINISTERS. 



enthusiastically into the cause of Emancipation, and encountered the most violent 
opposition from many of his Baptist brethren on account of his views, some even 
refusing to have him in their houses. In January, 1845, he was sent by the 
American Baptist Free Mission Society as a missionary to the freed negroes of the 
island of Hayti, where he remained for six and a-half years and organizeid a church 
at Port au Prince. During a temporary return to the States he became a convert to 
the observance of the seventh day as &e Sabbath. After a few months he severed 
his connection with the Mission and returned to the States. He entered the 
Seventh-day Baptist Denomination and became pastor of one of their churches at 
Shiloh, N.J., which charge he held for two and a-half years. He was then sent by 
the Seventh-day Baptist Missionary Society to Palestine, and resided for two years 
at Jaffa, and for five years in Jerusalem. In May, 1859, he baptized in the Pool of 
Siloam, Youhannah el Karey, a Syrian, of the Greek Church, a native of Nablous, 
subsequently a student of Regent's Park College, London, and now a missionary at 
Nablous. On account of ill-health he returned to America in i860, passing through 
London. In the States he lectured on Bible lands, and was successively pastor of 
the Seventh-day Baptist Churches at Walworth, Wis., Scott, N.Y., and Rosenhaym, 
N.J. In 1872. on the death of the Rev. W. H. Black, F.S.A., he was called to the 
Seventh-day Baptist Church at Mill-yard, Leman-street, London. Here, buried in 
a slum, he toiled hard to make known his views of the Sabbath, printed many 
tracts, and in 1875 started a quarterly journal called " The Sabbath Memorial." 
This was devoted to the theological, archaeological and philological aspects 6f the 
question. About 1886 the honorary degree of Doctor of Divinity was conferred upon 
him by the University of Alfred, N.Y., a Seventh-day Baptist institution. For over 
ten years Dr. Jones was engaged at the British Museum upon a work which he 
published under the title of " A Chart of the Week." This consisted of a table 
comprising the names of the days of the week in z6o languages. In every one of 
these languages the days of the week appear m the same order, and in xo8 of them 
the Saturday was called " Seventh Day,** ** Sabbath," or " Rest Day." Dr. Tones 
was himself responsible for the terms collected from all the Asiatic and Anican 
languages, his lengthy residence in the East having made him a master of Hebrew 
and Arabic, and he was well acquainted with Syriac, Greek, Latin, Ftench and 
Dutch. He was assisted in his work by H.I.H. the late Prince Louis Lucien 
Bonaparte, who prepared for him the days of the week in all the European 
languages. — W.B. 

23. KiTCHiNG, Henry, who passed away on 21st October, 1895, was bom at 
Sheffield on 13th December, 1826, and was in his youth a tool-maker. His pastor, 
the Rev. J. E. Giles, encouraged him in a desire to devote his life to- the ministry. 
In 1850 he entered Bradford College, where he was known as a singularly diligent 
student. His first pastorate (at Eye, Suffolk) commenced in 1854, and lasted two 
years. Thence he removed to Sabden, and in 1859 he accepted an invitation to 
the church at Lake-road, Portsmouth. At that time the church was in a low 
estate, but his earnest, thoughtful preaching soon brought about a revival, and 
the chapel was crowded. A difference arose and a number of the members 
left with him, who, after worshipping for a short time in a public hall, built a 
chapel in Herbert-street, Landport. But the church formed there never flourished 
greatly, and after a while Mr. Kitching accepted the post of chaplain to the 
Landport Cemetery. Heftook an active interest in public af&irs and showed 
considerable business ability. He was elected a member of the School Board, 
and a governor of the Portsmouth Grammar School. Then he removed to the 
neighbouring village of Waterlooville, where he kept a boarding school, and was 
pastor of the Baptist church. Eventually he removed to London and took an active 
part in journalistic work and electioneering. In 1892 he retired to Selsey, 
Chichester, where his active career came to a peaceful close. He was a man 
known to but few, though greatly honoured and oeloved by such as enjoyed the 
privilege of his friendship. He was very studious, a good classical scholar, and of 
refined taste in literature. His sermons were marked by great insight into 
Scripture, and by elevation of thought, whilst they always had a clear evangelical 
ring. His preaching failed to be popular through the weakness of his voice. He 
was characterized by a singular tenderness of disposition, though he was sternly 
uncompromising in matters of principle. His was a remarkably devout spirit, of 
the old Puritan type.— J. H. C. 



MEMOIRS OF MINISTERS. l6l 



24. MacKenna, Angus, was accepted for foreign mission service in 1856. He 
found his way before that time to India, and he did Christian work in Calcutta 
previously to joining the mission. In 1857 he was at Serampore. Subsequently he 
went to Dinajpore and after that to Chittagong, Barisal, Dacca, and Soory. He 
was an earnest and affectionate Christian brother and a £uthful missionary. He 
knew and understood the failings and the excellencies of Bengali Christians as 
perhaps few missionaries did. He was tender, patient, firm and loving in dealing 
with them as a father among his children. In 1894 his health failed greatly, and 
the Home Committee would have allowed him to return to England then, but he 
was unwilling to do so, and he went for a few months to Daxjeeling instead. He 
rallied there somewhat, and returned to Soory before the end of the year, too feeble 
to do much work himself. There was a slight improvement of health as the cold 
weather came on, but soon he began to fail again and, as a last hope, he went to 
Calcutta, where through the kindness of Dr. Crombie he obtained a private room in 
the Genera] Hospital, and where, attended by Mrs. MacKenna, he received the best 
medical treatment available. The opinion of the doctor was that the only hope of 
improvement lay in a speedy departure for a temperate climate, and arrangements 
were being made for this, when he became so much worse that the doctor said he 
could not be moved unless he had an accession of strexigth. He calmly realised 
the fact that the end was drawing near, and after making the few preparations 
necessary for his wife and children, quietly trusting the Saviour whom he had so 
long preached to others, he passed away to the everlasting rest of the saints of 
God.— -G. K. 

25..MACMASTER, Robert Paton, passed away on a6th March, 1895. He 
was a Scotchman, the son of an Ayrshire &rmer, and was bom- on i6th October, 
1830. His student days were spent in Edinburgh, where he formed the resolution 
to follow the profession of medicine. Religious convictions, however, turned his 
thoughts in another direction, and, becoming a Baptist, he soon evinced a desire to 
enter the ministry of our denomination. His first charge was at Walsall, thence he 
removed to Coventry (Cow Lane) in 1854. Thereafter, he held successively pas- 
torates at Bristol (Counterslip), Bradford (Hallfield), and Darlington. The last- 
named post he was compelled to resign in 1883 owing to failure of health. He took 
a voyage to Australia with his wife, in order to visit a son living there, and with the 
hope of recovering health and spirits. The loss of his wife, however, on the voyage 
out was so great a shock to a system already shattered, that he returned to this country 
scarcely better than when he set out. His physical condition compelled his retire- 
ment from the ministry, and he went to Bradford to live with his second son. 
Throughout his long years of active service Robert Macmaster was a conscientious, 
earnest toiler in the Master's vineyard. His brethren on two occasions showed 
their appeciation of his worth by electing him to the Presidency of the Bristol 
Association, and of the Yorkshire Association (z88i). He was also Secretary of 
Rawdon College from 1874 to 1880. A scholarly, well-read man, his preaching was 
eminently thoughtful, and always pervaded by a serene spirit. He was one who 
believed that 

" Religion dwells in the depth and not the tumult of the soul/* 

In his character there was much shrewdness, combined with a kindliness of dis- 
position that made one feel how human he was, and withal, a genial, quiet humour 
that was refreshing. Common-sense views of things were always characteristic of 
him. He was also a man of intense sympathy, not of the fussy, boisterous order, 
but deep and sincere, unobtrusive in manner, yet practically helpful in word and 
deed. Above all, he was an earnest follower of the Master, with a lofty ideal ot 
Christian possibilities, ever " pressing on." This man, so capable, kindly, vigorous^ 
was laid aside from life's duty in his very prime by a strange, inscrutable Providence, 
whose ways we cannot understand here. For the last twelve years he was physically 
disabled by nervous disorders, and unfit for work of any kind, but patient and 
humble in spirit, never murmuring or complaining, nay, even cheerful and brightly 
resigned. At first the enforced idleness was irksome, but when he realized what 
life was thenceforth to be for him, he accepted the Divine will with serenity of spirit. 
He once said to the writer that his " chief anxiety was to learn the meaning of it for 
himself, to get the good of it for his own soul." The one bright element in his 



X62 MEMOIRS OP MINISTERS. 



painful lot was that his mind was always awake, and his interest in the theological 
and political questions of the day was always keen. He was pre-eminently hopeful, 
even confident about the issues of human history, as became one who had so closely 
assimilated the mind and spirit of the Redeemer of mankind. — T. H. M. 

26. Maynard, George Blatchford, was bom at Northlew, North Devon, zath 
August, 18x5. He was converted among the Bible Christians when he was about 
fourteen years of age, and a year later he began to exhort and preach in the open 
air and in cottages. After some years he was baptized at Inwardleigh, and he then 
became a local preacher among the Baptists. In i860 he was appointed pastur at 
Frithelstock, Buckland, Newton St. Petrock, Shebbear, HalwiU, Germansweek, 
and Muckworthy. After about ten years' fkithful service there, he settled at 
Watchet and Williton as co-pastor with Rev. T. E. Rawlings in 1873. He remained 
there about three years, and his ministry proved very useful ; but his health failed, 
and, under medical advice, he had to return to his native place. In 1879 he was 
invited to the church at Hatherleigh, where he ministered for about seven years, 
and then he retired. He was ill for about four months, and then the end came— 
very calmly and peacefully — on 5th May, 1894. He was greatly beloved by his 
friends and neighbours. — C. H. P. 

27. Morris, Joseph Stephen, was bom at Hackney, 22nd June, 1840. He 
attended the Sunday School at Mare-street Chapel, and was converted in his 
sixteenth year. Soon after he was baptized by the Rev. D. Katterns, whose 
ministry was mainly instrumental in giving him the clear, comprehensive view of 
Evangelical doctrine which distinguished him in after years. At seventeen he 
commenced preaching in the streets, and continued active in Christian work until 
entering the Pastors' College in 1863. He proved a diligent student, and was often 
asked to preach in different parts of the kingdom. At the close of 2864 the Church 
at Romney-street, Westminster, appealed to Mr. Spurgeon for help. Mr. Morris 
was selected to preach, and some elders of the Tabernacle were appointed to 
00K>perate with him. He was elected pastor in 1865, and soon the Church 
flourished again. In 1875 Mr. Morris was invited to the pastorate of the 
new chapel erected at Leyton by the London Baptist Association, and in 
1876 he left a loving and united people at Romney-street with great regret for 
that purpose. Soon his thoughtful, vigorous preaching drew around him 
&ithful helpers, who responded readily to his leadership. His wise counsels 
and administrative ability produced excellent results — a strong Church was 
gathered, the debt on the building was removed, and a fund was raisod for 
additional schoolrooms. About 1883 the theological lectureship of Harley House 
Training Institute for Missionaries was vacant, and attention was directed 
to Mr. Morris, to whom eventually the position was offered. With characteristic 
modesty he hesitated to accept it; but intimate friends urged him to 
make the attempt He soon proved himself equal to the work, and 
it became increasingly evident that the years of previous training had 
peculiarly qualified him for the post. He had been a diligent student of 
the word, and an eager reader of all the critical works to which he could 
gain access. His lectures were a great success. They attracted and com- 
p^ed the attention of the students, whose minds they informed and whose 
views of Divine tmth they moulded. For seven years he continued this work in 
conjunction with his pastorate, but the strain was too severe. Early in 1890 he 
reluctantly severed his connection with the Church at Leyton, and gave himself 
entirely to the College. He was installed as principal, and the entire control of the 
work was committed to him. He discharged the duties of the office faithfully and 
fearlessly. He was honoured for his quick perception of real worth, and feared f(M: 
his swift detection of unreality and hypocrisy. He was loved by a wide circle, and 
his presence was felt to be a tower of strength throughout the College. He was 
unexpectedly laid aside by a painful illness, and after four months of agonizing 
pain, borne with Christian fortitude, he entered into rest on ist October, 1895. 
It could be said of him, " He was a good man, and feared the Lord above many." 
In preaching, his exposition of the word would often have a wonderful charm for 
the attentive hearer because of the bright side-light he was able to throw upon fbe 
text. Few present will ever forget the illustration they had of this in the address 
he gave at the last Conference of the Pastors' College Evangelical Association. He 



MEMOIRS OF MINISTERS. 163 



had not the art of appealing to the popular ear and gratifying the popular taste, he 
could not dazzle by mere rhetorical display ; but he was " apt to teach," and the 
truths he taught will live in those who had the privilege of sitting at his feet. 
His worth was best appreciated by those who knew him best, and such most feel 
his loss.— D. R. 

28. Nicholas, Jacob, was bom 23rd April, 1812, at Little Newcastle, in Pembroke- 
shire. He left that county early in life for " The Hills," as the iron and coal districts of 
Glamorgan and Monmouth were commonly called, and settled at Rhymney. Prom 
the church at Zoar in that town he entered Haverfordwest College, where he was 
one ot the earliest students. In 1844 be was ordained as pastor of the churches of 
Caersws and Rhydfelen. Montgomeryshire. These churches were then very small 
an^ weak, but by his untiring efforts and God's blessing they soon flourished and 
became comparatively strong for such thinly-populated districts. Mr. Nicholas 
threw himself heartily into the educational movement, which was beginning to be 
felt in Wales just at that time. He was the chief promoter of the Caersws British 
School, and one of its first managers. As a deputation for the Baptist Missionary 
Society, in the counties of Montgomery and Radnor, for many years, he travelled 
hundreds of miles over bleak mountains in all kinds of weather. Often he was wet 
through before reaching his destination for the night, and in order to go to the 
meeting would be " rigged out " in the clothes of some kind farmer in the neighbour- 
hood. He became a well-known man in all the thurches of the Association, and to 
know him was to love and respect him. His power and influence in the conferences 
of the Association were soon felt, for his unblemished character, gentle demeanour, 
and strong common sense combined to give him authority whenever he rose to 
speak. As he advanced in life, and his health, which was never very robust, became 
more feeble, he resigned his charge of the churches in 1880, after thirty-six years 
of faithful and successful service, in recognition of which a testimonial of nearly 
£100 was presented to him in June, 1881. His health did not permit him to preach 
often duriag the remainder of his life. He was seized with an attack of influenza 
and bronchitis, and he peacefully passed away on 26th April, 1895. — ^J. G. 

29. Owen. John Tomlinson, was born at Whitby on oth of February, i860. At 
the age of ten he went to Shields, and after attending school underwent a a training for 
the teaching profession. He taught for five years in a school at Shields, and finished 
his training by two years* study at Borough-road College, London. On returning 
to Shields he became a master in a school at Jarrow, and remained there until he 
received his " parchment," which would entitle him to accept a position as head- 
master. He next turned his attention to journalism, and joined the staff of the 
Northern Weekly Ltader, Subsequently he occupied the sub-editorial chair of the 
Shields Daily Gazette. After six years of most exacting service, during which 
period he was also actively engaged in political work as a Liberal of the advanced 
school, he entered the Ministry, and accepted the pastorate of the Church at Barclay- 
street, Sunderland. His health broke down, and he went south to recuperate. 
Whilst staying at Woking in the spring of 1891, he preached at the Baptist Congrega- 
tional Chapel on one or two occasions, and then, in May of that year, received a 
hearty call from the Church, which he accepted. His fidelity to his principles and 
convictions never wavered, and he struggled on against difficulties until he succeeded 
in making the Church a centre of life and activity. Various organizations sprang 
up; as, for example, the Pleasant Sunday Afternoon movement, the Mutual 
Improvement Society, and the Mother's Meeting, and it was his intention to have 
started a library and reading-room. Always willing to help the poor and suffering, 
he did much last winter by free breakfasts for children to alleviate distress. One 
of Mr. Owen's special gifts was his ability to clothe in the most simple, yet beautiful 
language, the commonest things in nature, and it was this which gave his 
addresses to children every Sunday a peculiar charm. He entered very heartily 
into all that concerned the well-being of Woking. The School Board controversy 
he followed with keen interest, and his sympathies were on the side of the 
majority of the Board. In the movement for a Local Board he took a prominent 
part, and his advice was listened to with great attention. He became the first 
Chairman of the Technical Education Committee, and held that office to the end. 
In the spring of 2894 he found scope in the Guildford Parliamentary Division for 
his political energies, for he became the agent of the Liberal party, and 
carried through the registration work. His health again failed, and on xoth 

L 2 



164 MEMOIRS OP MINISTERS. 



November, under medical advice, he sailed for the Cape. The previous evening he 
met the members of his congregation in the school-room, and cheered them with 
words that showed the sincerity of his affection for them. He was presented with a 
purse of over Ao, and the gift was the more precious to him as it had been made 
at some sacrifice to the donors, who embraced all classes, and whose subscriptions 
ranged from 6d. to ;^xo. It was hoped that the parting would only be temporary, 
and that in May he would again take up his charge, strengthened by the chsinge of 
climate and rest. Those hopes were not fulfilled. After his arrival at Cape Town 
he remained there until the 9th January, and, according to his letters, his health 
seemed to have been benefited by the change. He then left Cape Town for Pretoria. 
On the way he contracted malarial fever, and, although very ill on his arrival, he 
preached on Sunday in the Church, and on Monday he paid a visit to a dymg 
person. After that he was confined to his bed, and he died on 19th February, 1895. 
-^Abridged from the *' Survey Times," 

30. Owen, William, died 19th February, 1895, at the ripe age of eighty-two. 
He was bom in the neighbourhood of Newport, Pembrokeshire. When he was 
young, he left his home and journeyed as far as Cardiff, which was considered a 
feat in those days, and there he apprenticed himself as a printer. He soon won 
the respect and confidence of his master by the rapid progress he made and by his 
noble and trustworthy character. He acquired a considerable amoimt of know- 
ledge, and in after years he edited and published "Y Bedyddiwr," a Welsh 
periodical, which rendered valuable service to the denomination. A volume of 
sermons by the late Rev. James Rowe, of Fishguard, which is widely read and 
considered of rare value, was also published by Mr. Owen. He was brought up in 
a family and in a neighbourhood where religion occupied the most prominent and 
honoured position, and his character was influenced accordingly from his youth. 
At Cardiff he joined the Church at the Tabernacle, and made himself very useful in 
the Simday school and in the prayer meeting. He was soon asked to preach and 
consecrate himself to the ministry. He did so, and succeeded in forming a Church at 
Canton. Receiving an invitation from Felinganol, one of the oldest Churches in 
his native county, he accepted it with joy and trembling. He laboured there with 
great acceptance and success for many years. From there he went to Hill Park, 
Haverfordwest, where his stay was short, but the work he did was great and lasting. 
After that he settled at Narberth, and there spent the best years of his life, and did 
the noblest part of his work. Having acquired knowledge and great experience in 
the ministry, he was able to exercise a considerable influence over the Churches of 
Pembrokeshire. When he retired from the ministry, he spent the last years of his 
life preaching as he had opportunity. He was a man of rare qualities, a good 
organizer, a strict disciplinarian, an enthusiastic supporter of the Missionary 
Society ,^and a friend of widows and orphans. In politics he was a staunch, active, 
and influential Liberal.— J. J. 

31. Parkinson, James, originally of Great Eccleston, was a genuine man, and a 
most faithful minister of the Gospel of Christ. In youth he was apprenticed by his 
father in Lancaster with a view to commercial life ; but the cherished wish of his 
mother, whom he greatly revered for her distinctive piety^ was that he should enter 
the Christian ministry, and afterwards this became his own free and deliberate 
choice. Accordingly, when of age, he relinquished a promising business career, and 
offered himself as a student to the committee of the college at Bradford, at that time 
under the presidency of Dr. Acworth. Though he never set himself to achieve 
academic distinction in his college days, he was a careful and devoted student, and 
won for himself the admiring ^endship of his tutors and fellow students. His 
ministerial life extended over a period of thirty-six years, during which time he 
settled over Churches as follows : — In 1858 at Hinckley, in 1866 at Brightside, in 1870 
again at Hinckley, in 1874 at New Lenton, Nottingham, in 1879 at Queensbury, 
and in 1885 at Nuneaton. In each of his pastorates he exerted a gracious 
influence, and enjoyed the profound respect and warm affection of his people. 
While an ardent lover of all men, young people had the warmest place in his 
heart. Among them he found the most congenial department of his ministry, 
and accomplished the best work of his life. By individual attention and 
frank dealing, more than by preaching, he induced very many of them to 
yield to the Saviour and to enter the fellowship of His Church. It was no doubt 
his practical interest in the young which suggested to his mind the thought of 



MEMOIRS OF MINISTERS. 1 65 

leaving his library to the studenta of Rawdon College, an example, by the way, 
which other ministers might wisely follow. Mr. Parkinson was a lifslong abstainer, 
and a ready helper of every movement which pertains to the uplifting of the people. 
As a preacher he was not only careful and sedulous in his preparation for the pulpit, 
but also conspicuously loyal to evangelical truth, and conscientiously insistent on 
the necessity of the Holy Spirit's agency to make it viul and saving. His 
friendship was a sacred thing, and close association with him as a Cnristian 
comrade was both an honour and a joy. At Nuneaton, after a protracted 
illness. Mr. Parkinson devoted himself to re-establish the Baptist cause, which had 
sadly languished. It was here he finished, through the grace of God, a blameless 
and truly consecrated life. The number of ministers and crowds of people who 
attended his interment in Nuneaton Cemetery afforded convincing evidence of the 
general esteem and affection in which he was held by the public, and showed how 
his departure had moved the whole town witii sorrow and sympathy. Among other 
words spoken at his funeral in honour and love of his memory were the following 
by his brother-in-law, the Rev. F. G. Marchant, ofthe Pastors' College :—" I have 
loiown him for more than thirty years, and having regard to all that I remember of 
him during that period, and judging it from the highest Christian standpoint. I do 
not think that I ever knew a more consistent and faithful life. His quiet and earnest, 
yet cheerful and unpretentious goodness has often rebuked me, but I never onoe 
felt that he pained me by anything that seemed out of harmony with his position as 
a minister of Christ. Looking back on all that I have known of him as a man, as 
my relative by marriage, as a Christian, and as a minister of the Gospel, I do not 
remember ever to have heard from him any word that I wished he had not spoken, 
or to have seen him do a thing that I wished he had not done. He was a kindly and 
IKitient man, a most considerate and beloved friend and brother, a devout and 
sincere Christian before us all, an earnest and loving minister ofthe truth as it is in 
Jesus, and he was faithful unto death."—]. C. 

32. Passey. Tom, was bom at Ross on 5th December, 1870, and died at Ruardean 
on 23rd March, 1895. It was his lot to live in the busy little town on the banks of 
the silvery Wye from birth till early manhood. During this period he certainly 
enjoyed blessings and advantages, for both his parents were true Christians. His 
education was not neglected and his Sunday school was most helpful. When he was 
fifteen years of age, his teacher, a devoted Christain worker, was the means of lead- 
ing him to the Lord. Soon after, he was baptized and received into the Church. 
At the age of seventeen he began to preach in the villages, and became so acceptable 
a '* supply *' that Baptists and Wesleyans alike constantly sought his assistance. 
He was full of love for the Lord, and a desire to "rescue the perishing," and many 
were the fruits of his ministry. By the time he had reached his twentieth year he 
felt firmly convinced the great Head of the Church was calling him to pastoral 
work. It was impossible to persuade him to seek a college training. Taking his 
own course, he resigned his situation and wandered through Herefordshire preach- 
ing the Gospel. Concerning these evangelistic tours it may be said he never 
lacked a home or funds, and his message was blessed to very many. In May, 1891, 
he accepted an invitation to preach at Woodchester. His services were appreciated, 
and resulted in a request that he would supply the pulpit for six months. This was 
followed by a call to the pastorate. Feeling Divinely guided, he accepted the 
invitation, and for the next two and a-half years he served the Church with much 
success. The membership and congregation increased considerably. On Easter 
Sunday, 1894, he undertook the Mission Past6rate at Ruardean Hill, and for twelve 
months toiled there faithfully. During this brief time he greatly endeared himself 
to his people, and was used of God in leading a number of people out of darkness 
into light. The young soldier was, however, soon called to exchange the sword and 
shield for the crown and palm. He left the battle with startling abruptness. A 
severe cold, increased by exposure, brought on pneumonia. After a few days of 
intense suffering, borne with marvellous patience and submission, he " fell asleep " 
full of confidence and peace. Just before passing away he raised his eyes and 
appeared to gaze on the glory of Heaven, whilst from his lips there leapt the words : 
" O that with yonder sacred throng, 

I, at his feet may fall, 
Join in the everlasting song. 

And crown Him Lord of all." 



l66 MEMOIRS OF MINISTERS. 



Not only in Ross. Woodchester, and Ruardean Hill — but also throughout the 
Forest of Dean, and in many parts of Gloucestershire and Herefordshire, Mr. 
Passey's memory will remain green. His attractive presence and effective singing, 
his love and zeal for Christ, his consuming desire and effort to win souls, will not 
soon be forgotten.— W.A.W. 

33. Flatten, Henry, was bom at Runton, near Cromer, on 20th May, 1838. 
His parents were Wesleyans, but on their removal to Yarmouth they joined the 
Baptist denomination. In 1858 Mr. Flatten entered Rawdon College, and while 
there, showed many signs of the great originality in both methods and thought that 
characterized his after Uiia. While not a student in the sense of being highly 
proficient in classics and mathematics, he was a greiit reader and displayed 
remarkable powers of sermonizing. It has been told of him that when special 
seasons of inspiration were upon him, he would remain in his study for days 
together, admitting only the choice friends who understood his moods and spirit. 
His^ absorption in his sermons was complete, and, as we should expect, the 
criticisms of such a remarkable man in the sermon class were of an uncommon 
order and highly suggestive. On leaving college in 1862 he accepted the pastorate 
of the church at Stradbroke, near Ipswich, where he spent, what he often referred 
to, as the happiest years of his life. Towards the end of 1867 he was invited to the 
church at Maze Fond, London, and those who enjoyed the privilege of his ministry 
there speak of it as not simply eloquent, but useful too, in the highest degree. For 
earnest, thoughtful young men he cleared and widened the ways of truth, and by 
means of a large and successful Bible class, as well as through his preaching, 
became a helper of the most valued kind. After a ministry of five years in London, 
he removed to Derby Road, Nottingham, which pastorate he held for something 
over three years, until, in 1875, he accepted an invitation from Graham Street, 
Birmingham, to succeed the late Rev. Charles Vince. Mr. Flatten laboured in 
Graham Street until 1882, when he removed, with part of the congregation, to new 
and commodious premises in Hagley Road; whilst another portion removed to 
Handsworth, under the pastoral care of Rev. H. Bonner. For ten years more he 
occupied the pulpit at the " Church of the Redeemer," closing his ministry in the 
summer of 1892. Later in the year he declined an invitation to Bournemouth, 
preferring (chiefly for family reasons) to remain in Birmingham : and shortly after- 
wards he began to conduct services as an unattached minister. This latter resolve 
was a source of considerable regret to most of his friends — especially in the 
ministry— and it is in no spirit of unkindness that they say it was a great mistake* 
and did not a little to shadow some of the later days of a singularly striking and 
really beautiful life. Mr. Flatten did not take a prominent part in the public af&iirs 
of Birmingham, consequently he was not so widely known as his pxiedecessor and 
some of his contemporaries ; but he was a man of fine culture, and of exceptional 
power as a preacher. It is not easy to describe the charm of Mr. Flatten to those 
who loved him, and less easy, perhaps, to tabulate the results of his ministry. So 
fascinating was he, and so attractive his preaching, that he was everything to them. 
To doubters he was a " restorer of paths to dwell in," to the thoughtful and devout 
a high priest who stood in the very " Holy of Holies," a true voice of God speaking 
to their souls. The writer of this notice has heard him preach such sermons as he 
never listened to from any other lips, while his addresses at the Communion of the 
Lord's Supper have brought him and others face to face with their Lord and Saviour 
Christ. His preaching was very often mystical in the best sense, and had in it a large 
measure of the prophetic element. He was a preacher who soared ; he dealt with lofty 
ideas, and he spake like a seer. Some who heard him probably neither saw nor 
understood this side of him; unsympathetic, hard, mechanical, money-grasping 
people would perhaps call his preaching unpracticail, but it was so only because 
absorption in material things blinded them to his ideals. Doubtless he saw 
" visions " and dreamed " dreams," but his visions and dreams were true. It is 
not to be denied that the duties of a regular pastorate were irksome to him, they 
fretted him, and, in a way, he was not well fitted for them. Our congregational 
system does not provide many suitable spheres in which to develop to greatest 
advantage the peculiar gifts that Mr. Flatten possessed ; his personality and 
ministry might have been an incalculable blessing to the churches if he could have 
preached in much the same way as do the canons of the Episcopal Church, or could 
have spent a few days together in different districts giving them the results of his 




HENRY PLATTBN, 

(Reproduced from " Bdgbastonia " by permission,) 



l68 MEMOIRS OF MINISTERS. 



richest thought and highest inspiration. The personal charm ot Mr. Flatten to his 
intimatefiriends was* very great. In fraternal and kindred meetings his presence 
was eagerly welcomed, and he seldom failed to warm others with the love of his big 
heart. After association with him, his brethren always felt themselves richer in 
ideas, their conceptions of the ministry were enlarged, and they came away more 
anxious to become good ministers of Jesus Christ. Perhaps it is largely true that 
he was a man of moods, and the faults of moody men, like their virtues, sometimes 
lie very near the surface. If Mr. Flatten was sometimes impetuous to a fault he 
was also generous to a fault, if impatient sometimes, loveable as a little child at 
others, and when sorry and repentant sorry and repentant secretly, with a bitterness 
that colder and more calculating natures never know. There are men to be found 
who cannot understand the fine abandonment of some noble natures. At the 
bottom Mr. Flatten had the docile heart of the little child, and a simplicity that was 
deeply touching and beautiful — the apparent roughness was the outside of him ; 
he was gentle and refined within, and with all his affectation of mdifference to it, 
he was dependent upon sympathy to the last degree. Towards the end he became 
much broken and worn, largely, perhaps, as the result of his detachments and the 
lack of some former fellowships. It was not surprising, iberetore, that when 
pneumonia assailed an already debilitated constitution it should terminate fatally, 
and he entered into rest on nth January, 1895. He was borne to his last resting 
place by his six sons, to whom the memory of their father's affection is a rich 
possession. Henry Flatten was a child of the Light, and into it he has entered, and 
he who latterly was often so tired and troubled abides " where beyond these voices 
there is peace." — R. G. 

34. Reynolds, George, was the third son of the late Rev. John Reynolds, the first 
pastor of the Church at Siloam. Kidwelly. He was bom 7th June, 1823. His father 
baptized him on Whit-Sunday, 1840. He commenced to preach in 1854. After 
being educated at Derlwyn College, by Dr. Da vies, late of Ffrwdvale, he was chosen 
co-pastor with his father at Salem, Ferryside, and was ordained in i860. He took 
charge of the Church at Bethany, Llanstephan, in 1865, and successfully ministered 
to the two churches for many years. Upon the death of his father in 1 878 he removed 
to Siloam, Kidwelly, and became co-pastor with his brother John, and soon after he 
gave up the charge of the Churches at Salem, Ferryside, and Bethany, Llanstephan. 
But at the same time he became pastor of the Churches at Ebensier, Llandefeilog, 
and Noddfa, Trimsaran, because they were nearer to Kidwelly. After a few years 
he restricted his work to Kidwelly on the ground of increasing years.'and there he 
remained until his death. He was not a man of great learning, but of correct judg- 
ment and solid piety, and he was an eloquent and evangelical preacher. / In 1894 
he was the President of the Carmart lenshire and Cardiganshire Association. He 
lived as he taught others to live, and was very much respected by all classes. After 
nineteen months' illness he died in peace on 29th of March, 1895. — J. R. 

35. Roberts, Edward, was twm at Carrog, in the parish of Corwen, on nth 
January, 1820, close to the former residence of Owen Glendower, the renowned Welsh 
chieftain. His parents were adherents of the Established Church, but owing 
probably to the influence of some of his early companions, the son was induced 
when quite a youth to attend a service at the Glyndyfrdwy Baptist Chapel, where 
he was baptized by Dr. Pritchard, of Llangollen. Soon after, he commenced preach- 
ing, and entered Fontypool College. No one made more use of his oppor- 
tunities than did Mr. Roberts. On leaving the institution, he settled at Pontes- 

-bury, Salop. He did a good work in this quiet country town, and left a deep 
impression on the people. After a few years' work there he returned to his 
native land, to preach in his native tongue, and was pastor successively of 
the Churches at Cefnbychan and Rhyl, until he removed in 1869 to Ponty- 
pridd, Glamorganshire, and there he remained until his death. He was a man 
of very varied gifts and accomplishments, but he made all his acquirements 
subservient to his position as minister of the Gospel. He took a deep interest in 
political and social questions, and worked hard in the interests of education and 
temperance, but he allowed nothing to interfere with his study of the Bible. He was 
successful as an architect of several chai>els, was well versed in poetry, and in music. 
He always paid much attention to Biblical criticism, and went to the fountain head by 
reading the Old Testament in Hebrew, and the New Testament in Greek. He 



MEMOIRS OF MINISTBRS. 1 69 



possessed a well-balanced mind, strong in judgment and in reasoning, with a 
retentive memory. Dr. Roberts* sermons gave evidence of hard study, and were 
often models of Biblical exposition, capable of enlightening the mind and 
moving the will. He produced more strong meat for men than milk for babes. 
The diploma of a Doctor of Divinity, which was conferred upon him by the 
Senate of William Jewell College, Missouri, in i88x, was felt to be an honour 
fully deserved and worthily worn. His literary productions were extensive and 
constant. Besides contributing regularly to several periodicals, and acting as 
editor of Seren Gomer for some years, he published a " Grammar of the Welsh 
Language," completing the work ot the late Rev. John Williams, and a " Commentary 
on the Epistle to the Galatians,'* in a volume of 464 pages, and, in addition, several 
pamphlets on various subjects. He was like a little child in humility, and at the 
same time he was manly and courageous. His attachment to his own denomination 
was strong and sincere, but he had thorough friends in all denominations. His 
character was Christ-like. He preached occasionally to the end. He was truly a 
great man, and those nearest to him were most aware of his greatness. — H. C. W. 

36. Roberts, Griffith Humphrey, was one of the best known ministers in 
Wales. He was bom at Llangybi, Carnarvonshire, 24th April, 1831, and lost both 
his lather and his mother in his childhood. His father was a farmer, but the son 
when a youth was attracted to a seafaring life, and he was deprived of early 
educational advantages. Whilst a sailor he was brought to the knowledge of Christ, 
and was baptized at Penuel, Bangor, in 185 1. His heart glowed with love to the 
Saviour. As he meditated, the fire burned, and the unquenchable longing to save 
men showed itself two years after his admission to Church membership in his 
commencing to preach at Tyddynshon. He soon commanded the ear of the people, 
and the Churches at Capel Gwyn and Bodedeym, Anglesey, invited him to the 
pastorate, which he accepted towards the end of 1853. In this secluded agricultural 
district he spent three years, faithfully discharging his pastoral duties and studying 
the theology of the Puritans. In 1858 he removed to Tabor, Dinas, Pembrokeshire. 
The peace of this church had unfortunately been disturbed, but the advent of Mr. 
Roberts inaugurated a period of peace and progress. His deep spirituality and sound 
common sense, under the Divine blessing, restored order, whilst his good preaching 
and indefatigable efforts outside the pulpit combined to build up a strong church. 
His health becoming seriously impaired he was advised to seek a change, and he 
entered upon the pastorate at Penuel, Carmarthen, 8th October, 1874. Although 
suffering from physical weakness for twenty-one years, he discharged his duties 
there with marvellous diligence, and received nearly a thousand persons into member- 
ship. In addition to his acceptable preaching and proverbially faithful attention to 
his pastoral work, he took a deep interest in educational matters. While at Tabor he 
was mainly instrumental in establishing an elementary school in the present school- 
room. This school he successfully piloted through many difficulties. At 
Carmarthen he was for the last few years a member of the School Board and of the 
Intermediate Board of Management. He was also invited to occupy positions of 
honour in the Welsh Baptist Denomination. On one occasion he preached the 
annual sermon to the students at Haverfordwest, and in June, 1894, he preached to 
the students at Bangor. He had filled the chair of the Carmarthen and Cardigan 
Baptist Association, and in the year of his death he was Vice-President of the Welsh 
Baptist Union. He was also a strenuous advocate of total abstinence from 
intoxicants. Mr. Roberts was a man of peace, and his end was characterized by a 
beautiful calmness of spirit. He passed away at noon on 7th June, 1895. For 
Christ he lived, and he now rests " with Christ, which is far better." — E. U.T. 

37. Roberts, John, was born at Cefnmawr, Denbighshire, on 21st June, 1841. 
He never went to school, but was engaged in a coal mine when young. At the age 
-of eighteen years, having keenly felt the need of a Saviour, he was baptized by the 
Rev. Llewelyn Rees, and a year later, at the urgent request of the Church at 
Cefabychan, he commenced preaching. Some years after, his ordination took 
place at the same church. On 2ist December, 1871, he received an invitation to the 
pastorate of the Churches at Mold and Penyfron, where he became the successor 
of such eminent men as Rev. H. W. Hughes, Dinas. and the late Rev. W. Jones, 
Fishguard. Mr. Roberts worked in the mine on Saturday and entered upon his 
pastorate on Sunday. At Mold he won the affections of all. He toiled hard and 



J70 MEMOIRS OF MINISTERS. 



developed considerable power as a preacher of Christ's Gospel. On 19th May. 
1874, he received a call to undertake the charge of the newly-formed Church at 
Brynamman. This became his life work, and it was as " Roberts, Brynamman," 
that he was known far and wide. During his eighteen years' ministry at Brynamman 
he baptized upwards of five hundred believers, and was the means of establishing a 
thriving Church at Cwmgors. Mr. Roberts was popular among the Churches, and 
was beloved of all. He received several pressing invitations to other spheres, bt.t 
he declined them all, until he was invited to the pastorate of his mother Church ct 
Cefnbychan, whither he removed in September, 1892, and where he remained until 
his death on 8th July. 1895. ^i^ disposition was genial and sunny. He spent but 
little time in ordinary public duties, but concentrated his energies on Church and 
pulpit work. He made up for the loss of early training by greater acquaintance witli 
the Bible, and was never content to advance an argument for Christ without placing 
it beyond dispute by a verse or passage of Scripture. Mr. Roberts was beautiful in 
character, kind and loving as a husband and father, firm as a friend, industrious and 
sympathetic as pastor, and withal an effective preacher of Jesus Christ. He died 
peacefully at the age of fifty-four years. — E. K. J. 

38. Sear, George, who died at Wem. Shropshire, on 17th September, 1895. 
was born at Wobum, Bedfordshire, in February, 1822. His parents attended the 
Independent Church in that town, and the influence of Mr. Castleton, the pastor, 
was of the most helpful kind, so that at a very early age Mr. Sear became a preacher 
of the Gospel, and scarcely remembered the time when he was not anxious to lead 
others to the knowledge of Christ, which had been blessed to his own salvation. 
After passing through a course of training at the Borough Road Training College, 
he became a schoolmaster, and followed that profession until 1862, when, having 
been baptized by the Rev. T. A. Williams at Haddenham, he became pastor of the 
Church at Histon, Cambridgeshire. In 1866 he removed to Soham. and in the 
following year to East Dereham, in Norfolk. In 1870 he became pastor of the 
Church at Halstead, and during his ministry there took a good deal of interest in 
the work of the denomination, and also had the privilege of superintending the 
erection of new schoolrooms, which greatly aided the Church in their work amongst 
the children. His pastorate at Halstead was a happy one. and during its con- 
tinuance he secured the esteem of his own people and of the neighbouring churche«. 
In 1876 he undertook the work at Umberslade. There a Church was formed, 
and in a somewhat limited sphere, good service was rendered to the cause 0/ Christ. 
During his residence at Umberslade Mr. Sear took great interest in the work of the 
Midland Association, and for some years acted as one of the District secretaries. 
The closing years of his life were spent at Wem, where, so long as his strength 
permitted him, he served the Church as its pastor. The tie which bound him to 
that Church was broken only by his decease. He served the Shropshire Association 
for a time as its president and secretary. The last two years of his life were years 
of intense bodily pain, but his faith failed not. During this period of suffering the 
members of the Church displayed a large amount of Christian sympathy and love 
towards him. He had been to them a true Christian pastor and friend, and so won 
their love that with true gladness of heart they ministered to him in every way 
possible to them. All through his long life he sought to be true to his Divine 
calling, and those who knew him best have the pleasure of remembering him as a 
true Christian friend. — S. H. 

39. Speed, Robert, was a native of Bradford, and his early religious life was con- 
nected with that stronghold of Baptists, Westgate Chapel, then under the pastorate 
of the Rev. H. Dowson, of whose ministry Mr. Speed spoke with the utmost venera- 
tion and affection. His parents were in humble circumstances, and early in I ife 
young Robert entered the employ of Mr. William Peel, a stuff merchant, of Bradford. 
He was then an earnest and thoughtful youth, attending regularly the classes of the 
Mechanics' Institute for the study of mathematics, German, &c. He, along with his 
life-long friend, Mr. Alderman Moulson, and many others, was baptized in 1855. In 
1857 Mr. Speed and Mr. Moulson were among those who were dismissed to form the 
new church at Trinity Chapel, which had been built by Westgate friends as a thank- 
offering to God for a century of blessing that they, as a church, had enjoyed. Mr. 
Speed was appointed teacher of the Young Men's Bible Class, a post in which he 
was privileged to be eminently successful. The Rev. H. J. Betts, the minister oC 



MEMOIRS OF MINISTERS. I7I 



the new chapel, became much interested in him, and encouraged him to take 
opportunities of preaching and to give addresses. Mr. Speed entered the Pastors' 
College in 1863. There his grave, gentle, and earnest character was fully ap- 
preciated by his fellow students. He always seemed to live in fear of the sin of 
presumption, and it appeared to some who valued him highly that that fear was a 
great restraint to him. Yet no man in the ministry valued the spirit of enterprise 
and progress more than he did. In due course he began his ministry at Mill Street, 
Bedford, where he remained many years. He saw the erection of the present chapel, 
and thence he removed to Milnsbridge ; then to Lindsay Road, Sunderland ; and 
finally he settled at Bishop Burton in 1887, where, subjected to clerical opposition and 
social ostracism, he was enabled to maintain for eight years an earnest evangelical 
ministry, adorned by a blameless life. About six weeks before his death, on the 
the Lord's Day morning, he was taken suddenly ill, and was kept from his pulpit 
engagements for three weeks. The doctor suggested that he should give up 
preaching and consider that his active work was finished, but he became much 
better, and a few days before his death remarked to Mr. Alderman Sample at Beverley 
that he thought he should soon be able to resume his full duties with comfort. On 
17th May, 189s, he left home to pay a visit at Walkington, about two miles off. 
Returning home he had to face a storm of cold north-west wind, and he was found 
by a labourer, about mid-day, leaning against a hedge, but quite dead. Thus the 
gentle spirit of Robert Speed was called away to enter into the joy of the Lord he 
had so quietly and faithmlly served.— J. M. M. 

40. Stephens. John Mortimer, was bom at Bath 15th November, 1843. At 
nine years of age he was sent to Mill Hill School, where he manifested considerable 
mental energy and moral courage. He was by nature disposed to argument and 
intellectual strife, and, perhaps more than most of us, was compelled to fight his 
way into the citadel of FaKh. In this conflict he received great assistance from his 
mother, a singularly gracious woman, who reasoned and prayed with him so effec- 
tively that, in very early days, he was led into a child-like Christian confidence 
which he steadfastly maintained unto the end. He was baptized at the age of 
sixteen and joined the Church at Cirencester, of which his father was at that time 
pastor. On leaving school he became an articled pupil In the laboratory of the late Dr. 
Voelcker, Professor of Chemistry at the Royal Agricultural College, Cirencester, and so 
successfully did he make his way that at eighteen years of age he was able to earn his 
livelihood. At this time he was encouraged to preach at cottage meetings, and his 
heart was gradually drawn towards the work of the Christian ministry. Much to 
the regret of his friend, Dr. Voelcker. he left Cirencester for Regent's Park College, 
and obtained the B.A. degree (London). Before the completion of his college 
course, he accepted a unanimous call to the pastorate of the united Churches 
at Naunton and Guiting. in Gloucestershire. After five happy and useful 
years spent on the Cotswolds he removed to the busy town of Sheffield, and 
became the first pastor of the Church which was formed at Glossop-road. His 
position there afforded ample scope for the exercise of his restless ener^fs, 
and he became deeply attached to the people, but in the year 1877 he received 
an invitation from the Church at Bewick-street, Newcastle-on-Tyne. He was 
very happy in his work at Sheffield, and it was a severe trial to leave the 
town, but the work at Newcastle presented great difficulties, and the difficulties 
which repel most men always possessed great attractions for him, so he accepted 
the call. But when Uie time for parting came the pain of it was so great that tfiose 
who knew him best said it had added twenty years to his age in less than that 
number of months. At Newcastle his work soon outgrew his strength. During 
his ministry there the chapel in Bewick-street was sold, and after amalgamation 
with the sister Church at Marlborough-crescent it was arranged to build two new 
churches; one in Westgate-road, the other in Osbome-road, Jesmond. In this 
work he took a very active and self-denying share. As a pastor he was a capital 
visitor, and was always welcome in the homes of the people. He has been known 
to go out before breakfast to seek an enquirer in whom he had been interested the 
previous evening. Many friends became anxious about htm. and early in 1887 he 
resigned his charge, considerably run down in health and broken in spirit. The 
following year he felt sufficiently recovered to accept the pastorate of the Church at 
Hereford, but his strength soon proved unequal to the work. He toiled in that 
city four years, and then went to Germany for the use of the baths. He remained 




JOH14 MOiiTtliSR STEPHENS, B.A, 




MBMOXRS OF MINISTERS. 173 

in that countiv for a year and a-half. Too ill to do much there, he yet displayed 
a very ssrmpathetic interest in the work of the German Baptists. Feeling a little 
stronger he retamed to England and settled down in Bristol. Occasionally he was 
able to preach, but his work was almost done. He and his &mily became 
associated with the Church at Tyndale Chapel, and much enjoyed the ministry 
of Dr. Glover. During the last months of his life he was glad to be able to render 
some service to the Liberation Society in the West of England. It was very 
affecting to see him with his broken, shattered strength bravely contending for 
the flag which he had set up in the Lord's name during the days of his youth. 
He was faithful unto death. Not until within a few weeks of his death did his 
friends know the real nature of the disease from which he suffered. He received 
the physician's report with calm fortitude and resignation, his only care being for 
the wife and fiamily so soon to be left behind. His sufferings at times were intense, 
but he endured them with Christian heroism. He entered int» rest 6th October, 
1895. Mr. Stephens was a warm supporter of Foreign Missions. In each of his 
pastorates the number of subscribers to the Baptist Missionary Society largely 
increased daring his ministry. With almost his last breath he commended the 
work to those around him. His death, at the comparatively early age of fifty-one, 
is a great loss to the Churches. His life was one of noble self-denial, and, as 
one of his deacons described him, he was " a grand man." — C. H. 

41. Taylor, Benjamin, who was pastor at Pulham Mary forty-six years, fell 
asleep on the very day his successor, Rev. G. B. Dearie was buried, 29th March, 1895. 
He commenced preaching in a bam at Pulham, and in 1842 the Church was formed 
of which he continued to be pastor until, in x886, increasing infirmities compelled 
bim to resign, and from that time he was laid aside from active service. He was 
an intelligent, earnest preacher, and much beloved. A number of small works 
which he published had an extensive circulation, and were valued and useful 
amongst the country folk of Suffolk and Noriolk. He was seventy-eight years of age. 
— S. K. B. 

42. Taylor, John, was bom in May, 18x9, at Longford, near Coventry, where 
he spent his youth and early manhood. He was baptized, and joined the Church at 
Longford, under the ministry of the Rev. J. Tunnicliff, of Band of Hope fame. 
He was soon engaged in Christian work, as Sunday school teacher, local preacher, 
and ** clerk " in the public services of the sanctuary. He was much respected for 
his amiability of disposition, consistency of character, and willingness to co-operate 
in Christian and other useful activities. When in his thirtieth year, he was 
admitted into the college at Leicester, then under the Presidency of the Rev. J. 
Wallis. Mr. Taylor was a diligent student, affable in his manners, fluent in 
speech, and a great reader of John Howe, and other seventeenth century 
theologians. At the close of his college course he entered on his first pastorate 
at Sandy-lane Chapel, AUerton, where he' spent ten happy years, and did useful 
work. At Wolvey, in Warwickshire, and Sutterton, m Lincolnshire, he also 
laboured a few years, and then returned to Yorkshire and spent the greater part 
of his ministerial life at Denholme, near Bradford, first in full pastored work, and 
afterwards in retirement. Up to the last he preached occasionally. He was a 
man of unswerving and uncompromising fidelity, a Christian sincere in his pro- 
fession, and thoroughly honest in all his activities, and a minister faithful to the 
trust committed unto him. Though not much of a leader among men, and not of 
the first order in the pulpit, he still did good work for the Master. His " record is 
on high," and in the great day of reckoning he will not be without stars in his 
crown of rejoicing. — ^W. G. 

43. Thomas, Samubl, was bom in the parish of Gladestry, Radnorshire. His 
parents were godly people, and he was baptized by the late Rev. Tames Jones, of 
Rock, at Cwmgwillim, Newchurch, in May, 1829. Mr. Thomas soon began to preach 
the Gospel. A Baptist Church was about that time established at Gladestry, and 
the young preacher was for a little while under the instruction of the Rev. George 
Thomas, of Newtown, who was afterwards classical tutor at Pontypool College. His 
first pastorate was New Wells, near Newtown, his second was at Builth, Breck- 
nockshire, and his third and last pastorate (which comifienced in 1854) was at Howey, 
near Llandrindod Wells, where he was greatly respected. He was a farmer during his 



174 MEMOIRS OF MINISTERS. «• 

pastorate at Builth, and for many yean had a £arm near Howey. Mr. Thomas had 
to devote much time to farming, but he was a diligent and successful pastor. Many 
were added to the Church under his faithful ministry, and many whom he baptized 
removed to other places, so that the Church continued small. Mr. Thomas was an 
energetic preacher. Towards the close of his life Mr. Thomas retired from farming 
and built a cottage near the chapel. There he lived until the death of his wife. 
As the infirmities of age came upon him he resigned the pastorate of the Church. 
Having removed to a farmhouse in Brecknockshire, near Newbridge-on-Wye, he 
preached occasionally in the houses near him. He was frequently visited by the 
vicar of the parish. Mr. Thomas died 26th June, 1894, at the age of eighty-two 
years.— J. J. 

44. Webb, Sidney Roberts, was bom in London on xgth February, 1867. His 
early boyhood wa% spent under his father's roof, in that picturesque comer of 
Hampstead Heath known since the days of Domesday Book as " Wildwood." He 
was one of a bright and affectionate group of brothers and sisters. Under the 
Christian influences which surrounded him, and a parental care alike wise, 
generous, and devout, his character rapidly developed ; and at the age of fourteen 
he was baptized, and became a member of the church at Heath Street. He 
remained a member there till his death, and if he found help and comfort in its 
warm and active sympathy with his high purposes, he repaid the debt by the 
unbroken consistency of his conduct and the inspiration of his example. Sidney 
Webb was a missionary from the beginning. Almost immediately after his baptism 
his father received a little note from him, still fondly preserved, in which he says 
that for six years past he had wished to become a missionary, and asks that he may 
be educated with that view. The letter led to a conversation, and the conversation 
to an understanding that his wish was to be recognized, and, if possible, carried out. 
Sidney himself had never any doubt of the Divine call. Years afterwards he writes 
from the Congo: "It was Christ's command that prevented me from being at 
Penmaenmawr this summer. He said, ' Go ye into all the world and preach the 
Gospel.' He said it to me in such a way that I gladly obeyed Him, and came out 
to Africa." In 1881 he was sent to Mill Hill School, and at the end of his course 
there, he matriculated in the University of London. A little later he entered on 
his medical studies at Edinburgh ; he passed his examinations there with credit, 
and gained his degree of Bachelor of Medicine. The diploma of Doctor was 
conferred upon him in 1892. After leaving Edinburgh he was for some time 
resident medical officer at the Mildmay Mission Hospital in Bethnal Green. 
Through all these stages he showed the same readiness to take up whatever came 
to his hand to do for Christ, and the same simplicity, directness, and determination 
in discharging it. But perhaps it was the seaside services for children, into which 
he was induced to throw himself in 1887, which most excited his ardour, and drew 
out his peculiar gifts. His letters on this subject, addressed to his friend and 
comrade, Mr. Howard Staines, show a heart on fire for the personal salvation of 
the boys and girls with whoift he met at these services. Here also the athletic 
element enters ; there are anxious inquiries after " a good pitch for cricket and a 
good field for sports." He hopes to bring his knowledge of botany into service in 
the excursions to be made. " But all towards the great end," he adds. One by one 
he sought to get hold of the boys. He corresponded with numbers of them 
afterwards. He prayed for them continually. " What a crowd of boys," he writes 
from Wathen in 1893, "whom one has loved and tried to influence, can be recalled 
in procession by the memory ! I should not be so fond of the boys here if it had 
not been for the practice I had at Worthing and Penmaenmawr." On ist January, 
1893, with his newly-married wife. Dr. Webb was commended to God's care in the 
midst of the Church at Hampstead, and a few days later sailed from Antwerp for 
the Congo. Afirica had been early laid upon his heart by his intercourse with 
the Combers, and especially with Mr. Bentley, who had throughout been his 
adviser. But he was prepared to accept any field to which the Committee 
might prefer to send him. " I used to say Africa," he writes, " and I had a 
low idea of all other work; now, thank God. I say anywhere that my Lord 
and King appoints." Africa, however, was to be the scene of bis short two 
years of missionary service ; and Wathen was his allotted post. Dr. and Mrs. 
Webb were met upon their way by a party of boys from the station with banners 
and drums and hospitable attentions, and his heart opened to them at once. As 




SIDNEY ROBERTS WEBB, M.D. 



176 MEMOIRS OF MINISTERS. 



in England, so upon the Congo — it was the boys with whom he was to find his 
special opportunities. Medical work was not neglected. Patients multiplied as 
the skill and kindness of the young doctor became known. He had sometimes as 
many as 120 in a day ; and five of the boys would be assisting him through the 
long hours of the morning dressing ulcers, while he himself examined into 
all the cases, dispensed the medicine, and attended to the more serious wounds. 
He began simple lessons in physiology with the highest classes in the 
school, and was translating a small hand-book on the same subject for the use of 
the native evangelists. His medical skill was also in frequent requisition for State 
officials and other Europeans. But from April, 1893, to March, 1894, he had the 
entire school at Wathen under his care, comprising from 70 to no boys, and it was 
among Uiem that his directly missionary work was done. There were, first, the 
regular school lessons to be superintended, and ioto them the young Englishman 
plunged with scarcely any knowledge of the native language, but bravely using 
what he had to *' criticise the copies, and explain the mysteries of multiplication 
and division." There were the games of the boys to be entered into, and all their 
curious questions to be met. ** We are inundated in the evening with boys," he 
writes soon after his arrival ; " they play about the room, look over our shoulders, 
and watch our writing ; and we allow them as much liberty as is good for them." 
Then, as the language became more familiar, he followed his old plan of indi- 
vidual religious conversation, and gave the address, when his turn came, at the 
service where all assembled. The first he gave in native speech without assis- 
tance was on the last Sunday of 1893. It touched the hearts of many 
of the boys, and of one in particular, baptized the following year, who traced 
his decision to its earnest appeals. " We are having good times," he writes home 
in April, 1894, " and better are coming. There is a spirit of inquiry abroad, and I 
have begun to try my hand at personal talk with a limited vocabulary. I like the 
boys," he adds, ** as much as I do English boys, and I hardly expected to do this. 
My twist in the direction of boys holds good for black as well as white." Mrs. 
Webb's observation is to the same effect " The boys were fond of him," she says. 
" and he was passionately fond of them. His longing desire was that they might 
become Christ's servants and follow Him." It is delightful to know how that 
desire was gratified before he died. He had himself the joy, on 4th of February, 
1895, of baptizing Ntinani and Mabika, and of seeing them engaged in telling out 
the Gospel to their countrymen. Dr. and Mrs. Webb left Wathen on their home- 
ward journey at the end of March 1895 in good health and spirits. The fatigue and 
exposure of the long march down the river brought an attack of fever on both of them, 
and when they reached Underbill they were in a condition that caused intense 
anxiety. They were tenderly cared for by Mr. and Mrs. Forfeitt and Mr. Pinnock. 
An English steamer was about to sail for home, and it was thought wisest that they 
should at once proceed in her. Mrs. Webb gradually rallied, but her husband grew 
worse, and notwithstanding every effort on the part of the ship's doctor, aided by 
missionary friends on board, he sank to rest in the early morning of Good Friday, 
and was buried the same day, according to his own desire, off Ambrigette, in the 
bosom of " the grjmd old sea." — W. B. 

45. WiLKiNS, Horatio, was bom 15th January, 1847, in Musbury, South Devon, 
where he spent his early days. As a child he was very intelligent, and showed a 
thoughtful interest in sacred things far beyond his years. His parents were 
members of the Church of England, out when quite young he left home to live with 
his uncle, who was a Baptist, and under his influence the lad was led to adopt 
Baptist views, and at the a^e of fifteen confessed his Saviour by baptism. For some 
time prior to his conversion he had revealed a strong bent for preaching, and he 
now found scope for the exercise of his gifts in connection with the village churches. 
His growing popularity and usefulness fiimished unmistakeable proof that God had 
called him to the work of the ministry, and at the age of twenty he entered the 
Pastors' College, where by his marked ability, conscientious application and fervent 
devotion, he won the affection and esteem of the President, the tutors, and all his 
brethren. While he assiduously cultivated his mental powers, the culture of the 
devout life was not neglected. His devotion was never obtrusive and demonstrative, 
but all who knew him knew how genuine it was, and could not fail to be impressed 
by it. During his college days he preached every Sabbath at a small chapel in 
Clerkenwell, and in June, 1869, he was ordained to the pastorate of the Church at 




HORATIO WILKINS. 



778 MEMOIRS OF MINISTERS. 



Hockliffe-road. Leighton Buzzard, where he gpent four useful and happy years. In 
January. 1873. he received and accepted a call from the Church worshipping in Salem 
Chapel, Cheltenham, the town which was destined to be the scene of his life's work. 
There amongst an affectionate and appreciative people he laboured with increasing 
■and multiplying evidences of success for a period of seventeen years. Under his 
■able and devoted ministry the Church grew in spiritual power and usefulness. His 
amiable disposition, his great tenderness of heart, and his transparent honesty, 
combined with a deep, fervent, and humble piety, which influenced all he did, 
•endeared him to the hearts of his people and made them feel that he was indeed ** a 
good man and full of the Holy Ghost," while his deep insight into truth and his 
exceptional power to express his thoughts with ease, fielicity, and beauty, are 
sufficient to account for the attractiveness, efficiency, and helpfulness of his public 
ministry. Those who had the pleasure of listening to him regularly knew they were 
listening to a man who had the open vision and who verified the truth of what he 
taught. His sermons were not only beautiful in conception and diction, but they 
were also lucid and instructive expositions of Divine truth, showing a strong fiutfa 
in the infinite goodness of God and a tender sympathy with men in all the sorrows 
and struggles of their life. He was most at home in enforcing the devotional and 
practical aspects of religion. His public prayers were remarkable for the qualities 
of reality, devoutness and helpfulness, and revealed his own close communion with 
God. in which lay the secret of his power. As a pastor, he was keenly alive to the 
joys and the sorrows of his people, literally weeping with those who wept and 
rejoicing with those who rejoiced; and such sympathy as he gave could only 
be given at great cost to a nature so finely sensitive. He was a true " Son of 
Consolation." Coming home one day from visiting a family in sorrow, he exclaimed, 
" Oh, my heart is breaking for my people." It is no wonder that his relations with 
his Church and Congregation were so cordial and happy. Though quiet and 
unobtrusive in his habits and disposition he was, nevertheless, a man of public 
spirit, well qualified to form and express an opinion on the great questions of the 
•day, and his power as a platform speaker secured for him considerable popularity 
where he was known. He was a leader of Nonconformity in the town, and took an 
active part in local politics and in all good works. The County Association, the 
Committee of the Baptist Foreign Missionary Society and the Council of the Baptist 
Union, received his valued help, and had his life been spared he would doubtless have 
•occupied a prominent position in the denomination. In 1879 ^^ labours were 
interrupted by a severe affliction which threatened to end his days. He was greatly 
cheered by the prayerful and practical sympathy of his people, and his restoration 
to health and work was welcomed by them with deep gratitude and abotmding joy. 
The years following were years of happiness, of deep consecration, of hard and sue* 
cessful work. He ever had a lofty ideal of his pulpit work and pastoral relations, 
and to the fulfilling of that ideal he offered himself a living sacrifice. In the winter 
of 1887-8, it became apparent to his intimate friends that his health was slowly 
giving way under the pressure of his exacting labours, but he struggled on until the 
first Sunday in April. 1888, when he preached what proved to be his last sermons. 
On the advice of his deacons, he went away for rest and change, but instead of 
improving, he broke down completely with nervous exhaustion and bronchial 
asthma, and for seven years he was a prostrate but patient sufferer. For a time his 
affliction, working on a mind fond of brooding thought and a temperament keenly 
susceptible, produced a mental depression which robbed him of the comforts of the 
Gospel, but the cloud ultimately passed away, and in sweet tranquility and radiant 
hope he spent the remainder of his days, and entered into his rest on 3rd Marbh, 
1895. Those who knew him most intimately loved him dearly, and they ^ank God 
for every remembrance of such a good man and faithful servant of Jesus Christ.'— 
F. J. B. 

46. WiLKS, Edward Davibs : earnest student ; instructive and helpful preacher; 
sympathizing pastor ; friend of education at school or college ; lover of Missions, 
Home or Foreign; devout and joyful Christian — all this was the good brother 
in the Lord whose death occurred on Christmas Day, 1894. He had been staying 
in Cardiff for a few weeks, at the house of his brother-in-law, making that town 
the centre of useful work in the interests of the Baptist Missionary Society. The 
illness of which he died was contracted by overwork and exposure to very trying 
conditions of labour as a delegate and visitor on behalf of that Society. But he 



MEMOIRS OF MINISTERS. 179 

bad no complaint to make. He was far too good a soldier of Jesus Christ to 
complain of death m the field of battle. He was much more inclined to thank 
God for eiving him " an expected end.'* Mention is made of this because it was 
typical of the man in his entire life and character. He was always meek, modest, 
patient and strong, with a feeling for duty, public or private, which made his path 
dear from funst to last. Born in Swansea in 1833, Mr. Wilks was in his sixty-first 
year at the time of his death. He was baptized and received into membership at 
York-place, Swansea, when only twelve years of age. In his boyhood he had the 
advantage of instruction under Mr. John Jenkins, M.A., head master of an excellent 
boys' school in the town. At the age of eighteen he was admitted to a three years* 
course at Pontypool College, whence he proceeded to Bristol, and there he remained 
four years. His first and longest pastorate was at Oswestry. It began in 1858, and 
continued twenty-three years. During this time his work as a pastor was solid and 
lasting in its results, and his reputation for business capacity and scholarship 
secured him the position of Secretary to the Shropshire Association and to ihe 
neighbouring college at Llaneollen. The committees of this college and of Ponty- 
pool were often indebted to him as Examiner in Classics and Theology. On his 
removal to Kingsbridge, Devonshire, in z88i, he was again made Association 
Secretary, and won the esteem of his ministerial associates and lay brethren for 
his business qualities, but failing health reduced his pastorate in the south to three 
years. The latter part of his life was spent at Oystermouth (commonly called The 
Mumbles), near Swansea, where his enforced retirement from pastoral responsibility 
was turned to account for study and occasional preaching. It was a great joy to 
him when the Missionary Society asked him to visit the churches of South Wales 
as their a^^t and representative. Any kind of Christian work was congenial to 
him after his long and laborious inactivity. If he had been allowed to make choice 
of the conditions under which he had to meet and face death, nothing could have 
been more to his mind than a deatih-summons which found him with his hands full 
of work. He was a good preacher, pastor, scholar, friend ; one of the men whose 
very merits stand in the way of their popularity, but who never fail to awaken the 
esteem and love of those who know them best and are best able to estimate their 
worth. To men of this sort the Christian Church can never adequately discharge 
her debt of gratitude.— W. E. W. (v. d. m.) 

47. Williams, John Penry, was the son of the late Rev. Thomas Williams, of 
Ebenezer, Llangunnog. He was born on 23rd April, 1828, at Llangunnog, Carmarthen- 
shire, was baptized by his father in 1846, and was soon after encouraged to commence 
preaching. At the Normal College, Carmarthen, he was a diligent student from 
1850 to 1852. On 3rd May, 1853, he was ordained at Ebenezer, Llanelian, Denbigh- 
shire. In 185s Mr. Williams removed to Maesteg, and fouryears after to Cwmtwrch 
and Pontaidawe. He accepted the pastorate at Zoar, Pontlottyn, in 1861, which he 
held until 'the day of his death, a period of thirty-four years. The first nine 
years of his ministry were only preparatory to the great work of his life. At 
Pontlottyn he distinguished himself in the cause of public elementary education. 
He wrote much for the press in English and in Welsh, and he lectured on 
political and religious topics more than most of his brethren. Mr. Williams 
was more than once elected chairman of the East Glamorganshire Associa- 
tion. He was secretary of the Committee of the first British school established 
at Rh]rmney in 1863, and of another school opened at Pontlottyn in 1865. 
At that time the Rev. W. Roberts (Nefydd) was an agent of the British 
and Foreign School Society, and rendered subsUntial help to Mr. Williams 
in his efforts to establish and maintain these schools. One of these 
schools was afterwards transferred to the Bedwellty Board, and the other to the 
Gelligaer Board. Dr. Williams was a member of the latter from its formation, and 
was for twelve years its vice-chairman. In 1874 he was elected one of the directors 
of the Lewis Pengam Endowed School, and three years ago was the chairman of 
that body. For a considerable time he was a guardian of the poor, a county and a 
district councillor, &c. Dr. Williams was a strong man all round, and the history of 
Gelligaer parish could not be written without giving a most prominent place to the 
noble work which he accomplished on behalf of religion and education. As a 
minister he was held in the highest respect by his Church and Congregation. His 
sermons were evangelical and they bore obvious marks of diligent study, but he 
iras not considered one of the most eloquent and effective speakers. He was a man 

M 2 



)8o 



MEMOIRS OF MINISTERS. 



of strong convictions, and those who could not agree with him never questioned his 
sincerity and conscientiousness. Many years ago he received the degree of LL.D. 
from one of the Universities in the United States. After a long and painful illness 
he gently fell asleep on 20th ]ime, 1895. — T.D. 

48. Wood, John Henry, was born in 1808 at Lydd, on the Kentish coast, not far 
from the lighthouse at Dungeness. He received his early education partly at Lydd 
and partly in a French school across the Channel. Having the misfortune to be 
" impotent in his feet — a cripple from his mother's womb," he was incapable of 
physical effort and of any commercial pursuit. He had to support himself by 
teaching in private boarding schools. He followed the vocation of an usher until he 
was nearly thirty years old. He then became master of a day school at Melbourne. 
Derbyshire. With his weekly teaching he combined the work of Sunday preaching, 
and his services were sought in many of the Midland towns and villages. He also 




JOHN HENRY WOOD. 

published several small pamphlets on controversial subjects, and in 1847 h© com- 
pleted a volume of nearly four hundred pa^es, entitled, " The History of the General 
Baptists." Adam Taylor published his history of the same denomination in 1818, 
but it was too costly to be reprinted. Mr. Wood ventured on the production of quite 
a new work, and brought down the history to a much later date, and the entire 
edition was soon sold. It has not been reprinted, but is of much value as a work 
of reference. In subsequent years he published treatises on "The Great 
Propitiatory," and on Popery, as well as such booklets as " The Heavenly Mansions 
and Joyous Anticipations." His later work was a history of the Martyrs of Kent. 
Being well known as a preacher and author, he was advised to give up his schoor 
and enter the regular p[vinistry. His first sphere was . Sutterton, Lincolnshire, and 
his next was Smarden, Kent. Afterwards he removed to Wolvey, Warwickshire, 
and. lastly, to Monk's Kirby and Pailton. There he met with a painful accident. On 
'etting out of his pony carriage his crutches became entanglea in the reins and he* 



MEMOIRS OF MINISTERS. l8l 



fell to the ground. Both his frail legs were fractured, and a long confinement to his 
bed ensued. This event, together with approaching old age, compelled him to 
retire. The means of support in his time of need, and to the end of his days, were 
providentially offered by the generosity of Colonel Croll, of Reigate, who engaged to 
make quarterly allowances to twelve aged and disabled ministers. Mr. Wood was 
Ihus enabled to return to his birthplace, and spent his closing years in Ebenezer 
Cottage. Long before the end, his eyesight bc«an to fail, and at length he became 
totally blind. But as he had ever been one of the best, so was he to the last, one 
of the happiest of men. In his days of health he was never heard to murmur at his 
malformation, and when his vision as well as his vigour failed, he did not repine. 
His fiaith and hope never failed, and his joy in the Lord was unspeakable and 
full of glory. He peacefully expired at the age of eighty-six. on 19th May, 1895.— 

49- Wyard, George, was the eldest son of the Rev. George Wyard, who. for 
many years, was the honoured and beloved pastor of the church meeting in Soho 
Cjf^pel, Oxford Street. London. He was bom at Richmond, Surrey, in January, 
f 832, and after receiving a good education, entered upon a business career at the 
age of fifteen. When fourteen years of age he was brought to the knowledge of the 
Lord Jesus Chnst, was baptized by his father, and admitted to the fellowship of 
the church. From the time of his conversion he was a diligent reader of the Bible ; 
be took great delight in the means of grace, both public and private, and became 
not only well grounded in the tenets held by that section of the denomination 
to which he was attached, but was a devout, earnest and consistent follower 
of his Lord and Master. When in the prime of his young manhood many of his 
fellow members, much impressed with his knowledge of the Scriptures, his gift 
in prayer, and his ability to communicate his knowledge to others, thought they 
discovered in him gifts for the ministry of the GosimI, and they desired him to 
exercise those gifts as opportunity arose. This he did with much acceptance, and being 
solemnly set apart to the work of the ministry, he became the pastor of the church 
meeting in Providence Chapel, Reading. Leaving Reading, he settled at Irthling- 
borough, then at Shrewsbury, and subsequently at Brighton, Harlow, and Stevenage. 
In each place his work was blessed of God, and there are many persons who will 
be '* his joy and crown of rejoicing in the day of Jesus Christ." His life was a 
chequered one. His trials, sorrows and disappointments were very numerous and 
heavy, but he endured them with a £aith and courage peculiarly his own. As the 
time of his departure, unexpected by those whom he loved, drew on, his walk with 
^God became close and manifest. His last illness was brief. He preached at 
Borough Green, in Kent, on the Sunday, returned to his home at Forest Gate on 
Monday, became exceedingly ill, in two days sank into a state of unconsciousness, 
and on the morning of 30th August, 1895, be quietly and peacefully breathed his- 
Jast. " Absent from the body, present with the Lord."— J. S. W. 



MEMORABLE NAMES AMONG BAPTISTS. 

I For listof Memorable Names among Baptists » see Baptist Hand^Book, 1689.] 



BAPTIST AUTHORS AND HISTORY, 1527-1800. 

By JOSEPH ANGUS. D.D. 

I.— Baptist Authors from i527-z6oo. 

Books and public doouments pnblished against Baptists throw more light on the 
early history of the body in England than any extant Church reoerds. 

SARLY NOTICBS OF BAPTISTS. 

The earliest General Baptist churches of which any history is known were 
founded about 1611-14 by Thomas Helwisse. in London. Tiverton, Coventry, ftc. ; 
and the earliest Particular Baptist church byjohn Spilsbury, at Wapping, in 1633. 
There are traditions of earlier churches. The Baptist Society at Shrewsbury is 
said to have been formed in 1627 ; that at BIckenhall (now at Hatch), near Taunton, 
in 1630 (Thompson, quoted by Toulmin. Neal. iii., p. 352). Even in 1457 there is 
said to have been a congregation of this kind at Chesterton (Robinson's Claude, ii., 
p. 54). The earliest books in defence of their views were vrritten by John Smyth in 
1608-9. More than seventy years earlier, however, literature supplies us with 
evidence of the existence and activity of Baptists in England. In 1548 John Vernon 
translated and published BuUinger's ** Holesome Antidote against the Pestilent Sect 
of the Anabaptists." Three years later William Tumer.Doctor of Physick. dewsed 
" a Trtacle against the poyson — lately stirred up agayn by the furious Secte of the 
Anabaptists," London. 1551. These are the earliest English Antibaptist books I 
know. At Bocking and at Faversham ministers and whole congregations were 
seized by the officers of the law ; and Strype notes that these were the first bodies 
that made separation from the Reformed Church in England. This occurred at 
least as early as 1548. Within ten years inquiries were made for Anabaptists, as 
we find from " Articles of Visitation.** issued by Bonner in Kent, by Gardiner at 
Cambridge, and by Dr. Chedsey in Essex. In 1589 Dr. R. Some issued ** A Godly 
Treatise," chiefly against Henry Barrow and John Greenwood, and other Puritans, 
whom he charges with Anabaptistical errors. Earlier still we have evidence of their 
activity and numbers in the fires of martyrdom that burnt so fiercely at the begin* 
ning of that century. Latimer speaks of 500 of them in one town. In 1538 a 
commission was issued to the Bishops of the Southern Province to inquire aifter 
Anabaptists and to punish them. Froude tells us. with noble indi^^nation, how 
fourteen were done to death because they ** were faithful to their oonsaenoe." The 
members of the '* Pilgrimage of Grace" appealed to Henry VIII. that " the heresies 
of Luther and of the Anabaptists, diouid be annihilated and destroyed." For a 
hundred ^ears, therefore, before we hear of Baptist Churches, we read of proclama- 
tions against Anabaptists, and of the persecution, banishment, and death, of many in 
the Southern counties of England, and during the reigns of all the Tudors. These 
proclamations, it is true, were issued in part against Baptists who came from 
Holland and Germany, and were thought to hold erroneous doctrines on other 
points ; but, in the Instructions to the Commissioners, they are directed also how 
to deal with those who denied only infant baptism, and held on other points the- 
common fiuth. 

The following are some of the works which show the wide spread of Baptist senti- 
ment, both in England and on the Continent, before the seventeenth century. Up to 
the last date no English Baptist is known to have written any defence, nor is there 
any authentic history during the sixteenth century of the existence of English 
3i^tist Churches. 



BAPTIST AUTHORS AND HISTORY, I527 — 180O. 



i»3 



In this list : A. mMns thmt I have the book ; B., that it is in the Bodleian ; B.L., 
in the Baptist Library ; B.M., that it is in the British Museum ; S, in Sion College ; 
U.C, in the University Library* Cambridge ; W., in Dr. Williams' Library ; and 
y.lf ., in York Minster. 



1537— ZwiNGLE, H.: Contra CaUbap- 
tistas. Tigttri. B.M. 

1535— BULLINGBR, H.: Adv. omnia 
Catabaptistamm Prava Dogmata.. 
Tig. B.; U.C. 

I536-'Articles devysed by the Kynge's 
Hi^ness..to establyshe Christen 
quietnesse. K.Henry's Creede — agt. 
Anab. A. ; B.M. 

1536— The Pilgrimage of Grace 
'* To have the heresies of Luther, 
Wickli£fe, the works of Tyndale. . 
and such other heresies of Anabap- 
tists annulled." Fronde ii. 566. A. ; 
B.M. 

I546-l640~lNIVNCtlONS AND ARTICLES : 

Contain several cautions and orders 
for inquiring into Anab. doctrines 
and practices. See Sparrow's CoUns. 
and separate Articles. A. ; B. ; 
B.M. 

154S— HORTENSius, L. : Tvmvltvvm 
Anabaptistarum Liber unus. Basil. 
[The origin of many unfounded 
charges agt. E. Baptists.] A. ; 
B.M. ; B. 

1549-1553.— Common Prayer of Ed. 
Vlth. (First and Sec. Edns.) de 



nounces Anab. byname. A. ; B.M., 
Ac. 
1550-1551 — Notes of Interrogatories and 
Answers before the Inquisition 
St Venice, Bologna, Rome, &c., 
with details of the Beliefs and Prac- 
tices of Anabaptists in those cities 
and m other parts of Italy. Pub- 
lished by Emilio Comba, Florence, 
and tr. by J. T. Betts, Esq. (MS.) A. 

1551— Bollinger. H. : A most sure 
dcrfence of the baptisme of Chil- 
dren agt. the pestiferous secte 
of the Anab., tr. by Jno. Veron. 
A.; B. 

1551— Turner, Wm., M.D. : A Preserva- 
tive or triacle agt. the Poyson of 
Pelagius lately styrred up agayn by 
the lurious secte of the Anab. de- 
vysed by W. Turner, Powles Ch. 
yard. B.M. : S. ; U.C 

Fratres POLONI :— Socinus. F. (1539- '604) ; Crallius ( 1 590-1 633) ; Slichtingius 
(1592-1661); Wolzogenius (1596-1658). The Polish Brethren, as they were 
CflkUed, were Unitarians and Baptists, having defended Believers' Baptism in 
their works. See indexes in their collected works, 7 vols., fol. 1656. Some have 
ascribed the existence of the English Baptists to their teaching, but a refr^rence 
to the above dates shows that there is no ground for this statement. A. 



155a— The Duke of Northumberland 
to W. Cecill "..wishes the King 
would appoint Mr. ^nox (John 
Knox) to the See of Rochester. .& 
whe stone to the Archbp. of Canter- 
bury and a Confounder to the 
Anabts. lately sprung up in Kent" 
State Paper Kalendar (Domestic)^ 
Rolls Court. 

i56c~A Proclamation ag. Anabap* 
tisies, given in Arber's Stationers' 
Co. Register, i., 570. 

1560 — Knox, John : An Answer to & 
great number of Cavillations, by an 
Anabaptist (it contains ihe Pam- 
phlet). A. ; B.M. ; S. 

1560— Veron, Jno: An Apology or 
Defence of Predestination [agt. 
Anabts. and troublert of the 
Church]. A. 

1562— Simon Menno : (First ed. of his 
treatise on Saving Truth, &c.) A. 

1565— De Bres. G. : La Racine des 
Anabapcistes avec tres ample refuta* 
tion, &c, [again in Dutch in 1570, 
and pub. in America (at Cambridge) 
in 1688]. W. 

1569 — A Proclamation agt.dispearsing, 
buying, and allowing of seditious 
books ; another (1570) ; another 
(1573) ! others (in 1583 and 1588). 
See Arber's Register, vol. i. 

1571— Whitgift. John: Answer to a 
Certain Libell. an admonition to 
Parlt with Certayne Notes of 
Anabts. out of Zwingli. W. 

1575— De PiCDOBAPTiSTARUM errorum 
origine per Mart. Czechium (a Polish 
Author). A. 

1588 — Some, R. : A Defence. . and a 
Refutation of many Anabaptis^ical 
absurdities on Magistracie, Bap> 
tisme, &c. B.M. ; B. ; W. 

1588— [Udall, J. &c.]: Martin Mar- 
prelate. The Epistle, Ac. The be- 
ginning of a large Literature. A. ; 
B.M..&C. 

1589— Some. R. : A Godly treatise where- 
in are examined many execrable 
Fancies given out by H. Barrow 
and J. Greenwood ; and by other of 
the Anabt. order. A. ; B.L. ; Y.M. 



184 BAPTIST AUTHORS AND HISTORY, 1 527 — 180O. 



II.— Baptist Authors from 1600-1700. 

With the seventeenth century the history of our churches begins. But even during 
this century, Baptists are known quite as much through the works and persecution 
of Uieir opponents as from their own writings. Thomas Edwards, in his *' Gangrzna " 
(1646), and Daniel Featley, in " The Dippers Dipt ; or the Anabaptists ducked and 
plunged over head and ears at a Disputation in Southwark " (1648), tell us of many 
laithful workers of whom else we should have known nothing. Edwards speaks of 
various counties where Baptists abounded, and Featley tells how there had been 
hundreds of Baptists in Southwark for twenty years or more. In 1589 Dr. Some also 
reports that there were several congregations of Baptists in London. In 1640 a violent 
attack in Latin on " Anabaptistes and other Heretics " was translated into English 
by J. D. ; and in 1642 two pamphlets were published in London — one giving " The 
History of the Anabaptistes in High and Low Germany," and the other warning the 
English against the entire sect. These publications show how the early Baptists 
were dreaded and misunderstood. 

ANCIENT CONFESSIONS 

In the year a. d. 1644 the first English Baptist Confession was published. It was 
expressly intended to correct mistaken impressions of their faith ; and this was 
followed by other editions, with slight changes or additions, in 1646, 1651, 1652, and 
1653 (Leith). In 1656 a Creed of a similar kind was prepared by Thomas Collier, and 
published in the name of seventeen churches in Somerset and neighbouring counties. 
Another Creed, based, like the Savoy Confession of the Independents, upon the 
Westminster Confession of Faith, was published in 1677, 1688, and 1692. Meantime, 
other Confessions, signed by some of the General Baptists, were published in 1651 by 
thirty churches in the Midland counties, in 1660, and another in 1678, and in 1691. 
Fifty years earlier (161 1), John Helwisse published a "Declaration of English 
People " at Amsterdam ; and, about the same time, John Smyth, at Amsterdam, 
drew up a Confession of Faith in Dutch, which has been published in a complete 
form in English in Evans' History. As an evidence of the spread of Baptist views, 
and of the hope that they would be counteracted, the French Reformed Church 
published a *' Formulary of Baptisme for those Anabaptists not Baptised " ; and 
this was translated and published in London in 1646. In addition to the usual 
Articles of Faith, the candidate was required, before he was baptised, to confess his 
error, and avow his belief in infant baptism. Two of those who signed the Confes- 
sion of 1646 were French pastors in London. 

SEVERITY OF PERSECUTION. 

These are indirect proofis of the prevalence of Baptist views ; the severity of the 
persecution of Baptists in the century is another. The men named in the following 
list held no so-called Mennonite views. They were not prosecuted for civil crime. 
They were nearly all known as holy, earnest men ; and yet nearly all of them 
suffered for their principles. Three, at least, died in prison — Bampfield, De Laune, 
and Vavasor Powell. Bunyan and Jennings were each in gaol for a dozen years. 
John James was executed on a charge of speaking seditious words, but on the 
scantiest evidence. Samuel Oates was tried for murder, on the ground that he had 
baptised a convert who died three months after baptism. Keach was put in the 
pillory for his Catechism : and nearly all were fined or imprisoned, or made to 
suffer for their faith— a testimony at once to their fidelity, and to the spread of 
their principles. 

PUBLIC DISCUSSIONS. 

Two peculiarities distinguish the Baptist history of the seventeenth century. It 
was the age of public disputation ; and ministers devoted a large amount of time to 
evangelistic work. The former, it is generally admitted, was useless except as 
calling attention to truth ; the latter largely blessed. One dispute was held in 
Southwark, in 1642, between Dr. Daniel Featley, Mr. William Kimn, and others ; 
then in London in 1643, where Knollys, Kifiin, and Jessey, took an active part ; 
another at Tirling, in Essex, in 1643. between T. Lamb and others ; another at 
Newport Pagnell, in 1647, between J. Gibbs and R. Carpenter ; another at Ashford, 
in 1649, between S. Fisher and several clergymen ; another at Bewdley, in 1649, 
between Baxter and Tombes ; another in London, in 1650, between Dr. Chamber- 
lain and Mr. Bakewell : another at Cork, in 1652 ; another at Abergavenny, in 1653 



BAPTIST AUTHORS AND HISTORY, I527 — 180O. I85 



between H. Vaughan, Tombes, and J. Craig ; the last at Portsmouth, in 1698. 
**with his Majesty's licence," between W. Russell, M.D., ftc., against Samuel Chan- 
dler, ftc. I have the reports of most of these discussions, and can confirm the 
Judgment that they most have been profitless for conviction. On the other hand, 
ministers who visited various counties for preaching purposes found many an open 
'door with many adversaries, and formed churches which long prospered, some down 
-to our own day. 

LIST OF AUTHORS. 

The following list of about one hundred and sixty contains not more than half 
of those whose names have come down to us as belonging to the seventeenth 

^%ntury. They are the names of men who are best known in our literature. 
Against most of the names a letter or letters will be found, referring readers 
who wish to know more of the men to histories which give an account of their 
life-work and sufferings. These biographical notices are often very touching 

^nd instructive. 

The references are to the following : — 

[B.] Brook's (B.) Lives of the Puritans from the Reformation under Elizabeth to 
the Act of Uniformity, 1662. 3 vols. 18x3. 

[Ca.] Calamy's (E., D.D.) Nonconformists' Memorial: An account of the Lives 
.and Sufferings of 2,000 Mmisters ejected in i66a. With S. Palmer's additions. 
3 vols. 1802. 

[C] Crosby's (T.) History of the English Baptists from the Reformation to the 
Banning of the Reign of George I. 4 vols. 1738-1740. 

rE.I Evans' (B.. D.D.) Early English Baptists. 2 vols. i86a. 

[N.J Neal's (D., M.A.) History of the Puritans, or Protestant Nonconformists, 
from the Reformation in 15x7 to the Revolution in x688. Dr. Toulmin's edition. 3 
-vols. 1837. Dr. Toulmin himself held Baptist views, and has written a very useful 
.account of the Baptists and Quakers, which is appended to this edition. 

[L] IviMEY's (Jos.) History of the English Baptists from the Earliest Times to 
the Death of George III. 4 vols. X81X-X830. 

[T.] Taylor's (A.) History of the English General Baptists from the Beginning 
.of the Seventeenth Century. 2 vols. 18 18. 

[U.] Underhill's (Dr. E. B.) Introductory Notices, in the Hansard Knollys' 
Society's volumes. 1846. 

[W.J Wilson's (Walter) History and Antiquities of Dissenting Churches and 
Meetixig Houses in London, Westminster, and Southwark. including Lives of their 
Ministers from the Rise of Nonconformity to the Present Times. 4 vols. 1808-X814. 

Brief notices of the more eminent of the names may be found in — 

Cramp's (J. M., D.D.) Baptist History from the Foundation of the Christian 
•^hurch to the present time, 187 1, and in 

Wood's (J. H.) History of the General Baptists of the New Connexion. 1847. ^^^ 
in Dr. Cathcart's Baptist Encyclopaedia, Philadelphia. 1881. 

For the history of ministers in particular districts special notice is due to such 
works as Joshua Thomas's History of the Welsh Associations, published in 
Rippon's Register; Douglas's History of the Northern Churches ; Hargreave's 
life of Hirst, 1816; Fuller's (J. G.) History of Dissent in Bristol, 1840 
'GOADBY's Bye-Paths of Baptist History; and Baptists and Quakers in North- 
.amptonshire, 1650-1700, &c. ; Cathcart's Baptist Encyclopaedia, Philadelphia. 
x88i. 

Names. Notice of in 

* Adams, R., Leicestershire, Devonshire-square, London, d. 17x6 Ca, C. W 

* Adis, H., 1661. '* A Fanatick's Alarm, by one of the Sonsof Zion " 

* Allen, R., White's AUey, d. 1717 C. T, W 

* * Allen, Will., 1686, author of several works C 

Life of, by Bishop Williams, 1707. 



l86 BAPTIST AUTHORS AND HISTORY, I527 — 180O, 

Names. Notice of in 

Bampfield, F., M.A., b. 16x4, d. 1683. Loodoii, Wtttshtre . . Ca, C, W 
Died in Newgate 

* Bartier, E.. BiAopsgate-street, 1641 B. C, I, T, W 

^ Barebones, P., 1640 (see lessey's Life, 7, ix, 83, and Dexter). 

* Barrow, R., ** Answer to B. P. in favour of I. B." 1643. 

* Bishop. G., " Election and Reprobation," 1663. 

* Blackett, H., Durham (see Douglas's History). 

^ Blackwood, Chr., 1644-1460, Staplehurst, Northumberland. 

Ireland B.d.T.W 

* Bonham. Josiah, Byefield, '* The Churches' Glory," 1674 • • Goadby 
Britten, Willm., b. 1608, **The Moderate Baptist." 1654- 

^ Brown, T., Scripture Reader, 1673 .. C 

* Brown, R., London, Worcester, 1678, d. Plym Ca, C 

* Bunyan, J., b. i6a8 ; imprisoned from 1660-1672 ; Biographies. . C, I 

* Busher, L., 1614 ; Plea tor Liberty of Consdenoe. the first book 

on that subject and On False Translations of N. T U 

* Caffin. M., Horsham, ftc, 1633 T 

Camelford, Gab., Fumess Fells, d. 1676 Ca, E 

* Canne, J., Amsterdam, Bristol, 1640. . • . B, I, W 

* Gary, P., Dartmouth. 1685, d. 17x0 I 

Chamberlain, Dr. P.. London. 1650 U 

* Cheare. Abr., Plymouth, 1648 B.C.I 

Clayton. J., Shad Thames. 1660, d. 1689 T 

* Coe. C. Bedford (see Bunyan's works). 

* Collet. B., Bourton, z66o .. .. I 

* Collier, Thos., Hampshire. Ac., 1645 B. C. I 

* Collins. H.. Wapping (afterwards Presoot-street), 1677, d. 1702 C. I 

* Collins. W.. Petty France, 1675-1702 W 

* Comwell. P.. M.A.. Marden, Cranbrook. 1643. First used 

laymg on of hands, T. i.. 120 B. I, T 

* Cox. B., M.A., 1639, Devon, Coventry. Lon B. I, T 

* Coxe. N., D.D.,Petty France. 1675-1688 C. W 

* Danvers, H., near Aldgate. d. 1687 C. I. W 

* De Laune, T., Schoolmaster, London. *' A Plea for Noncon- 

formity." Died in Prison I 

* Dell. W., M.A., Master of Caius College. Cambridge . . . . Ca, T 

* Denne, H., 1643. Fenstanton, ftc., Canterbury, London, d. 1660 B, C, E, I, T W^ 

* Denne. J., Lincolnshire T 

* Doe, C, London I 

Donne, I., Keysoe (K. Coll.), imprisoned with Bunyan • . . . Ca. I 

* Drapes. E., London. " Gospel Glory," 1649 I 

Du Veil, CM.. D.D.. Gracechurch-street C, I. T, W 

* Dyke. D., M.A., b. 16x7, Devonshire-square, d. x688 . . . . B, C, W 

* Ewer. S., on Baptism W 

Ewins. T., d. X670, Broadmead Ca, I 

* Everard. R.. recommended by Marsom T 

* Field, H., Bumham, * Last Legacy " of T 

* Fisher, S., Ashford, 1649 Ca, C 

Forty, H., London, Abingdon, d. X692 C, I 

Frewen, Paul, Warwick Ca. C 

Gibbs, J., Newport Pagnell, Olney Ca, C, I 

Gitford, A.. Bristol, b. 1649, d. 1721 C, I 

* Gitford. J., Bedford, 1650, Bunyan's " Evangelist" .. .. B, I 

* Gosnold, Jno., Pembroke Hall, London, d. X678 Ca, C, E, I 



BAPTIST AUTHORS AND HISTORY, I527 — 180O. 187 

Names. Notice of in 

* Qrantham. T.. b. 1634. Line., Norf.. d. 1692 *. B. C. I. T 

* Griffiths, I., Bisbopsgata-street, d. 1703 C, W 

* Haggsr, H., Stafford, baptised Danvers C 

* Hammaod, G., Biddenden, 1648 I, T 

Hardcastle, Thomas. Shadwell ; Broadmead, Bristol . . . . Ca, C 

* Harrison, Major-General. " Head of the Baptists in England " E, U 

* Harrison, T., Petty France, i689'Z699 W 

Head, Josh., Bourton-on-W Ca 

* Helwisse, Thos., London, 1615, d. 1620. Poonder of the first 

General Baptist Church B, E,T, W 

* Hobson, Pttol, Cnitched Friars, Northamberland. Ac. . . . . Ca, C, W 

* Hooke, Jos., Bourn, *' Apology for Believers' Baptism," 1701 .. T 
Horrockes, T., Essex, see Davids' History of Nonconformity in 

^ E«M Ca,E 

* How, S., "Cobbler," Deadman Place, 1639, warmly praised by 

R<Mer Williams W 

^ Hatc&nson, E., " On the Covenants and Bsmtism,'* 1676 . . C. I 

* Hutchinson, Col., and MrB.(see Memoirs, and Toulmin'sNeaUiii.) 

* Ives. Jer.. Old Jewry, 1655-1674 C, T, W 

* James, Jno., Whitechapel, x66i, executed B, C, E, T 

* Jeffiry, W., b. i6z6. Bessels Green B,C.I,T 

Jennings. Jno., Bishopsgate, 1675, was imprisoned twelve years C, I, T 

* Jeasey, H., b. 1601, bap. 1645, d. 1663, Founder of an open 

Communion Church, urged a revision of the authorised version Ca, C, I, W 

* Keach, B.. b. 1640, Horselydown, 166B-1704 C, I, W 

* Keach, Elias, Hymns, 1696, in the Huth Library C, I 

* Kiffin, W., b. z6i6, Devonshire-square, 1644-92, d. 170Z, im- 

prisoned. See Orme's Life. . C, I, W 

KiUcop,Th. 
^ King, D., near Coventry, 1650, Southwark I 

* Kin^nrorth, R., Staplehurst 

* Knollys, Hans., b. 1598, London, d. 1691. See Kiffin's Life, 1692 B, C, E. W 

* Knutton, Immanuel. 

* Lamb, Tho6..Colchester, Colman-street, b. 1640, d. 1672 .. B, C, E. 1, T, W 
Lamb, Is. (son of above), Ratcliffe Highway, often preached before 

Blake and Penn, d. 1691. T. Oates became one of his members C, I 

* Laurence, H., Sec. of Council of State, Milton's friend . • . . C, E 

* Lilbume, las., Col., Devonshire-square, &c. 

* Loveday, S.. East Smithfield. x66o. d. 1685 T 

* Lndlow, E., " Head of Baptists in Ireland " E 

Maisters, Jos., b. 2640, London, d. 1717 Ca, I 

* Marlow, Is., Maze Pond. Wrote against singing, answered by 

Keach, 1692. One of the Treasurers of the Fund. 

Marsden, Jer. (called Ralphson from his father's name). Im- 
prisoned with Bampfteld . . B, Ca, E 

Marsom, J., Luton, 1675. Imprisoned with Bunyan, d. 1726. . . I. 

* Milton, John, b. x6o8, d. 1674. See Masson's Life ; he held 

Baptist Views. 

* Minge. Thomas, " Gospel Baptist," 1700. 

* Monk, T., Buckingham, author of Creed of 1678 T 

* Morton, J., Lon., i6zo, Colchester. A Colleague of John Smyth's B. C. E, T 



1 88 BAPTIST AUTHORS AND HISTORY, 1 527 — 180O. 



Names. Notice of in 

MuUiner. Abr., Bishopsgate-street, b. 1671 . d. 1739. Mentioned 

by D'Assigny, 1709. . . . C, T 

Myles, I., Ilston, Founded iit Welsh Church at Swansea. 1649 Thomas 

* Nicholas, J. St., Lutterworth, d. 1698 C, I 

* Norcott, J., the successor of Spilsbury, at Wapping, d. 1675 . . I 

* Oates, Sam., Co-pastor with Lamb, Coleman St., Essex, 1646, d. 

1666. Tried on charge of murder for baptizing a convert . . B, C, I, W 

* Oates, Titus, He was a Baptist, was excluded, then became a 

clergyman, and afterwards a Roman Catholic C, I 

Page, Edw., Bristol 
^ Palmer, Ant., Bourton and London, 1678. Leominster, Worcester Ca, I 
'* Pardee, W., " Ancient Christiani^ Reviewed," written in Lei- 
cester and Worcester Prisons I, T 

* Patients (or Patience), Thos., assistant of Kiffin, Devonshire 

Square. Dublin, 1644. d. 1666 B. C, I. U, W 

* Pendarves, J., B.A., b. 1623, Abingdon, 1652, d. 1657 . . . . C. I 
^ Piggott. John, London I. T 

* Piggott, Thomas, Amsterdam (see Barclay). 

* Plant, Thomas, London I, T 

Plimpton, J., Dublin, 1696-1698. 

* Porter, J., Dispute at Ellesmere, 1656. 

* Powell, Vavasor, the Apostle of Wales, died in prison, 1671 . . Ca, C, E. I 

* Prince, Thos., against Kiffin, 1649. 
Prudhom, C, Bndlington, X698. 

* Pumell, R., Bristol, 1652-1659. 

Quarrel, T., Uangwm. (See J. Thomas's History of Associations 
in Wales) Ca 

* Richardson, S., Colleague of Spilsbury, 1647 I 

* Rider, W., first Pastor of Keach's Church, 1653 C, I 

* Robotham, J., Upminster. 

* Russell, W., M.D., d. 1701, Northamptonshire, Portsmouth, &c. C 

* Sharpe, I., Frome, d. 1740. A Convert of Bunyan*s. 

Sickelmore, Jno., 1640, Portsmouth and Chicester . . . . B. C. T 

* Simpson, Jno., London, 1650, d. 1662 B 

Sims, John, Southampton, 1646 (Edwards' Gangraena) . . . . B, C, I 

* Smith, F., Bookseller, imprisoned by Judge Jeffries, d. 1691. . . T 
Smith, W., Welton T 

* Smyth, Jno., Amsterdam. Lincolnshire, d. z6io B, C, E, I, W 

* Spilsbury, Jno., Wapping, 1633. Founder of the xst Particular 

Baptist Church (?) B, C. W 

* Spittlehouse, J. 

* Stanley, F., East Haddon, Northamptonshire, d. 1696 . . . . C T 

* Steed, Robt., Dartmouth, 1640, and co-pastor of Hansard KnoUys C, I 

* Stennett, Ed., Wallingford C, I 

* Stennett, Joseph, b. 1663. Pinners' Hall, 1690 to 17x3. Sue. 

Bampfield C, I 

* Stennett, Joseph. D.D., Little Wild-street C, I 

"* Sturgion, John, i66x. Plea for Toleration C, U 

Terrill, Ed., Schoolmaster and Minister, Bristol, b. 1635. d. x686 

Laid foundation for Bristol Academy I 

Thomas, W., d. 1693, Bristol, trained ministers I 

Tillam, T., Hexham, &c. 



BAPTIST AUTHORS AND HISTORY, 1527 — 180O. iSq^ 



• Tombes, J., b. 1603, d. 1676. Temple, Bewdley, &c Ca, C, I 

• Tredwell. J.. Suliblk. 169a I 

TuthUl H. 

• Vane, Sir Henry. 

Vaughan, H., Olchon. Radnorshire. 1633-1653, Pastor of first 
Baptist Church in Wales (see Myles) B, C 

• Walwyn, R., Herts. 

• Walwyn, W., London 

Whinnell, T., Taunton • I 

• Wilcox. T., b. 1622. d. 1687. Often imprisoned. Cannon-street 

and Sonthwark. " A Choice drop of Honey," &c C. I 

Wilkinson, Jno., 1619 B 

• Williams, Roger, b. 1599. d. 1683. Founder of first Baptist 

Church in America (See Biography of) B, W 

Wise, Laurence, Chatham, Goodman's Yard Ca, E, I 

Woodward, W., Harlow, 1662-1712 and Davids' Esiex . . . . Ca, C, I 

Woolwich, Hez. 

Wright, Jos., b. X623, Maidstone. Twenty years in prison . .1, T, W 

•Wyke, A. (see Edward's Gangnena). 

•WylcB, N., Colchester. 



REMARKS ON THIS LIST. 



Of the whole number, more than fifty, and these among the most eminent, had 
received a University education. Biographical notices of seven-and-twenty of them 
are given in Brook's " Puritans," and of three-and-twenty more who were ejected at 
the Restofation, in Calamy. Several others, whose names are not found in Brook or' 
Calamy, were also members of one of the universities, like Dr. N. Coxe and Dr. 
Chamberlain. Some, like Samuel How and John Bunyan, were, as Baxter says of 
himself, "of no University" ; but more than are generally supposed were trained- 
men ; and proved by their history the extent of their learning and the strength of 
their principles. 

II. 

In consequence of the amalgamation of General and Particular Baptists in 1891,^ 
the distinctive designations are omitted ; but it may be well to remark that both 
sections of the body as they formerly existed are included in this list. In the early 
part of the seventeenth century, the Particular and the General Baptists were- 
more closely agreed than in the eighteenth, and were nearly equal in numbers 
and influence. The earliest Creeds (1644, 1646, &c.), and the first Creed of 1677, 
which is based on the Westminster Confession, are Calvinistic. The Creed of 1660* 
is Arminian ; and the Creed of 1670 is claimed by both, though perfectly acceptable 
to neither. Both were earnest and evangelical, nor is it always easy to distinguish 
between them ; " however, the seeds of decay had taken deep root," towards the* 
dose of the century, in the General Baptist churches (Taylor's History, i. 355), nor' 
did they regain their old vigour and faith till after the formation of the New 
Connexion in 1770. 

III. 

I have not included Welsh Baptists in the above list, except the names of 
Vavasor Powell and two others. About twelve Welsh clergymen are said to have- 
been ejected at the Restoration who became Baptist ministers, and others had left 
the Established Church before. In a touching narrative of the condition of Wales- 
given by Vavasor Powell and prefixed to " The Bird in the Cage " (London, 1662), 
fie tells us that at the beginning of the Civil War there were but one or twa 
gathered congregations in all Wales, and in some counties scarce any that 
made profession of godliness ; but that when he wrote ** there were above twenty 
gathered churches with, in some two, in some three, in some four or five hundrec^ 



IQO 



BAPTIST AUTHORS AND HISTORY, 15^7 — 180O. 



members." These were the beginmngs ol dark days. The noble and sainted 
man died, in 1670, in the fifty-third year of hia age, and in the eleventh year of bis 
imprisonment. 

IV. 

Of this list of 156 authors I have one or more works of 1x7 of them, marked (*)• 
This is an increase of 30 Baptist ministers, and of one or more of the works of 40, as 
compared with the list as issued some years ago. 

V. 

I shall be specially glad to hear of copies of works by Allen (R.), Blackwood (C.) 
Britten, Chamberlain (Dr. W.), Doe (C). Edwards (Dublin), Gifford (Dr. A.). Gosnold 
0.)* Hammon (G.), Haggar (H.), Helwisse (T.). Ives (Jet.), Keach (B.) (I have 30 
<works of his out of 45), Knollys (H.). Lamb (Thoe.), Monk (Thos.), Pendarves (J.), 
fUchardson (S.). Russell (Dr. W.), and Smith (Jobn and William), of Welton, and any 
Works of authors in the preceeding list which have no asterisks prefixed. 



III.— Baptist Authors from 1700-1800. 

In the following list each author has the name of the place appended, whereby he 
may be most easily identified. The number after the name indicates how many 
works of his I possess ; and the dates indicate when or between what times the 
works were published. 

No. of Date of 

Name and Field of Labour. Works. Publications. 



Acton, S., Nantwich 
Allen, John, Petticoat-lane. . 
Anderson, W., Graf ton-street 
Applegarth, Mr. R., Kent .. 
Ash, John, LL.D.. Pershore 
Ashdowne, W., MSB. and books 
Austin, A., S. Colefield 
Anther, J., Waltham Abbey 



Backus, Is.. Boston, U.S.A. 4 

Bailey, N., LL.D., London 10 

- - .. .'. (w) 

6 

X 

2 

•• 3 

2 

3 

I 



Beatson, T., Hull, &c. 

Beddome, B., Bourton 

Beddome, B., Jun. . . 

Belbin, B., Reading . . 

Bicheno, Jas., Newbury 

Biggs, Jas., Devizes . . 

Birt, W., London 

Bligh, Michael, Sevenoaks . 

Booth, Ab.,Prescott-street.. .. 40 

I 
I 
6 
6 
3 



Booth, P.. Lincolnshire 
Boyce, Gilbert, Coningsby . . 

Bradford, John 

Braidwood, W., Edinburgh 
Braithwaite, G., Devonshire-square 

Brine, Jno., Curriers Hall 50 

Bristol College, Rep. and Ser * 14 

Brittain, T., Luton, London— MSS (wanted) 

Brown, J., Kettering 3 

Bulkley, C, Old Jewry 8 

Burnham, R., Grafton-street 9 

burroughs, Jas., Paul's-alley « i 



1710-1741 
1752- 

1757 
X789 
1763-1778 
1763-1791 
1790-1808 
1731-1762 

1754-1792 

1726-1 76S 
1779 

1734- 

1777 
1732 

1798-1806 

1795 

1746 

1764 

1769-1796 

1718 

1787 

1787-1800 

1796-1799 

1733-1737 

1743-1765 

1 770-1784 

1758-1777 

1735-1771 
1787- 1807 

1733 



BAPTIST AUTHORS AND HISTORY, I527 — 180O. 



191 



Name and Field of Labour. 

BniTOughs. Jos., Joiners* Hall 
Bnrt, Job 



Bntterworth, J., Birmingham 

Butterworth, L 

Buttfield, W., Dunstable . . 
Button, W., Dean-street . . 



C. J., Sevenoaks 
Cameron. H. (Scots Bt.) 
Carey. Wm. (D.D.) .. 



Clark. Jas.. Lincoln 
Clark. J.. Trowbridge 
Clarke, Aug.. Redcross-atreet 
Clarke, W. N. (M.A.), Unicorn-yard 
Cole. C, Whitchurch 

CoUett, J.. Bourton 

Collins, W.. Petticoat-lane . . 
Comthwaite. R.. Boston, &c. 
Crabti«e. W.. Bradford 
Craven, J.. Redcross-street. . 
Crossley, D., London. Tottlebank 



Dafibme, M. J., MSS. 
Davison. J.. Trowbridge . 
Davye. T.. Leicester 
Day, R. (M.A.), Wellington. 
Deacon. S., Barton . . 
Dobel, D.. Cranbrook 
Dobel, Jos., Kent . . 
Dore, Jas., Maze-pond 
Dore, W., Cirencester 
Dowars. W., Spitalfields . 
Dankin. J., London . . 
Dunscombe, T., Aston 

Dutton. Anne 

De Foe, D 

Dimton. John, London 
Dyer, Geo., Cambridge 



No. of 


Date of 


Works. 1 


Pul>lications. 


19 


. 17x3-1761 


I 


1737 


I 


. 1774-1781 


I 


X77X 


I 


1778 


3 


. 1785-1787 


I 

2 


! 1806-1808 


2 


1792 


I 


X804 


10 


. 1784-1804 


5 


. 178X-1789 


6 


. 1768-X784 




X782 




• '734-1744 




1748 




1740 




. 1780-1789 




. 1744-177X 




1744 


•j 


. 1788-1803 




1704 




1719 




1799 


15 


. 1786-1803 




1755 




1807 


35 


. 1784-1814 




1779 


10 


. 1757-1795 




1783 




1792 




. 1735-1748 



With details about Baptists. 



Edwards, M., Rye 

Edwards. Morgan 

Edwards. Peter. Portsea . • 
Elwall, Edw., Mill-yard . . 
Evans, Caleb (D.D.), Bristol 

Evans, Hugh 

Evans, John Abingdon 

Evans, J. (LL.D.), Worship-street 



Fall, Jas.. Watford 

Fanch, Jos., Ramsey 

Fawcctt, Jno., (D.D.), Hebdcn Bridge . . 

Feist, P., Beverley 

Fellows. J., Bromsgrove 

Filkes, J. D.; Wilts 

Fisher, S., Norfolk 

Flower, B., Harlow 

Foot, W.. Bristol .. ... '-,-' 
Foskett. B., and H. Evans, Bnstol, MSS. 



X 

7 

7 

30 

2 

7 

35 

3 

4 
14 

X 

13 

2 

8 

3 

6 



1761 
1792- 
1779-1805 
X723-1736 
1766-1790 

1773 
1778-&C. 
1793-X811 

1746-1756 
1763-1768 
1774-18x0 

1795 
1771-1779 
1718-1737 
1767-1802 
1796-1804 
1739-1766 
1755-1756 



192 



BAPTIST AUTHORS AND HISTORY, 1527 — 180O. 



Name and Field of Labour. 



No. of 
Works. 



Foster. Jas. (D.D.). London 12 

Francis, Benj.. Shortwood zo 

Fuller. A., Kettering, various editions 40 

Fund, Baptist— Rules, Orders, and Reports from beginning 



Date of 
Publications. 

.. X720-1735 

.. 1771-X799 

. . 1784-18x5 

. . 1791-Ac. 



Gale. Jno. (M.A., D.D.). Barbican 8 

Gamer, J.. MSS., Oulton, Cumberland 2 

Garratt. J. Northampton i 

General Baptist New Connexion formed 

General Baptist Magazine — ^3 vols 

General Baptist Repository 6 

Gibbs, p., Plymouth x 

Giftord, A. (D.D.). Eagle-street 5 

Giles, W., Kent 6 

Gill, Jno. (D.D.), Works 45 

Gillard, D., Folkestone and Hammersmith 2 

Gould, Js., Harlow i 

Graham, W., Carlisle 3 

Grosvenor, B., (D.D.), baptised by Keach 11 

Gumey, Mr. J., London ■, t 

Gumey, Mr. T., London 4 



17x3-1724 

X723 

1770 

1798-1800 

X802 

1786 

I733-I746 
X77I-X799 
X732- 
X784-X787 

X776 
X74I-I784 
17x0-1735 

1795 
1755-1770 



H. J., London 

Hague. W.. Scarborough 

Hall, Chr.. Leicester and London 

Hall, E., Boston 

Hall, R.. Sen., Amsby 

Harrison, Amos, Croydon 

Harrison, R 

Harrison, T., Loriner's Hall 

Harrison, Thos., Jun., Little Wild-street 
Hartley, jno., Haworth 

Hassell, Thos., Newcastle 

Hatch, Thos., London 

Haydon, J., Sen 

Haydon, J., Jun., Shortwood 

Hewley, Lady : Her " Charity " and its History 

Hews, Fr., Dunstable 

Hinton, Jas., M.A.. Oxford 

Hodges, N., Paul's-alley 

Holden, Jas 

HoUis, Thos., Mr., London 

Howard, John, Mr.. Cardington and London . . 

Hughes, John, London 

Hill. T.. Carleton 

Hupton, Job 

Hutchinson, R.. Rotherhithe 

Hutton, J., Broughton •• 



Hymns, Collection of— 

Ash and Evans 

Bumham, R. . . . . . 

Clark, J.p Trowbridge .. 
Clarke, W. A.. Bunhill-row • 
Cole. C. Whitchurch .. 

Deacon. S 

Fawcett. J 

Fellowes. J 

Franklin, Jonathan. Croydon. 



1729 
1792. &c. 

1769 
X817-1719 
X771-1776 
X724-i^43 
1759-1761 

X700 
X715-1729 

1755-X774 
X779 
1804 
X724 

1745-1780 

X7XO-1840 
X798 

1792-X820 
1713 
1775 

1730-1736 
1780 
1768 
1771 
1800 

1773 
1781 



1769- 

X783 
X799 
1788-1801 
1789-1792 
X785-X797 
1782- 



x8ot 



BAPTIST AUTHORS AND HISTORY, I527 — 180O. 



193 



Name and Field of Labour. 



No. of Date of 

Works. Publications. 



Gifford. Dr. A 1766 

Hupton, John 

Keacb, Benjamin 1700 

Keach, Elias xyoo 

Medley. Sam 1789 

Middleton, Jos ». ,, 1793 

Needham.f. • 1768 

Rippon, John, D.D 1782 

Ryland, John. D.D I773i &c. 

Steele. Anne 1760, fto. 

Stennett, Joseph 1705-1712 

Swaine, Jos., Walworth 1796 

Taylor, Dan 1772 

Turner, D., Abingdon 1745 

Wallin, Benjamin, Maze Pond 1750 

Westlake,T 1789 

Wyles, N., Colchester ' 1700 



Inglis, K, D., Edinburgh 



1791*1800 



[ackson, Alvery. Yorkshire 2 .. 1752 

fames, Sam 2 . . 1766-1768 

Jenkins. Jos.. Duke-street S . . 1706 

\ [enkins, Jos.. D.D., Walworth 15 . . X78x-i8i5 

] lohnson. John, Liverpool. . 12 . . t7s8-X796 

' fob, David z • . 1803 



Keeble, J., Blandford-street 
Killingworth, Grant, Norwich 
• Kimber. Is.. Nantwich 
Kingsfbrd, 1., Deal. Portsmouth . . 
Kingsford. Mr. W. M., Canterbury 
Knott, J., Eythome 



1805 
173^1757 

1756 
1795- 
1789-Z812 

X794- 



Lacey, J„ Portsea 3 . . 174X-X761 

Ladson, J., Needingworth x . . 1802- 

Langdon, J., Hebden Bridge 4 .. i8o2-x8o4 

Liddon, J., Hampstead 8 . . X781-X8X6 

Liele, Geo., Jamaica x .. X796- 

Littlewood, T., Rochdale . . . * . . 6 • • X79o-x8o6 

Llewellyn, Thos.. LL.D., Prescott-street i .. X747- 

Lloyd, J., Tenterden, Colnbrook 6 • . I768-X799 

Lovegrove, R. S., Wallingford z • • X794- 

Lyon, W., Dundee x • . X794- 



Macgowan, J., Devon square 20 . . X768-X7i3 

Macgregor, R., London 7 . . X758-X773 

McLean, A., Works 20 . . X791-1822 

Maisters, Jos., Joiners' Hall ix .. X7X7- 

Marsom, John F., London x . . X795- 

Blartin, John, Keppel-street, MSS 35 •• i77x-i82o 

Matthews, N., London z • • 1742- 

[Maurice, M.] x . * X726- 

Medley. S., Watford and Liverpool. MSS 5 • • X779-X800 

Medley, Sarah x • • x8o7- 

Messer, B., Grafton-street c . • X769-x>73 

N 



194 



BAPTIST AUTHORS AND HISTORY, I527 180O. 



No. of 
Works. 



Name and Field of Labour. 

Middleton, Jos., Lewes . , , 

Miller, John. Pulbam Market '* t 

Moore, J., Northampton " , 

Moore. W., Redcross-street * * ' , 

Morgan.Abel ' ** i 

Morris, Jos., Weston " " « 

Morris. J. W.. Clipstone ' * ^ 



Neale. Miss . 

Needham, J., Hitchin .' \\ .'* J 

Newton, Jas., Bristol * , 

Noble. D., Mill-yard .*.' ^ 

Northamptonshire History of Churches • • 



Price, H., Uverpool , 

Palmer, T., HuU •• •• 3 

Parsons, R., Bath '/. *.; ;; , 

Parsons, T., Wilts ;; I 

Pearce, S., Birmingham « 

Pendered, W., Hull " " ? 

Piggott, J., Wild-street .*.' " ** g 



Randall, W., Chichester and London 

Reed, B., Exeter 

Rees. D., Limehouse 
Reynolds. J., Curriers* Hall 



[2W] 

2 

a 



Rhudd, J., Devonshire-square .. ., \\ " " « 
Rhudd, S., M.D., Turners' Hall ' " T 



Richards, W., Lynn , 
Richardson, S., Chester 
Richardson, T., Pinners' Hall 
Rippon. John. D.D., London 
Rippon. Mr. Thos., London 
Robinson, R.. Cambridge . . 

Rogers. J.. Ejmsford 

Rowles. S.. Canterbury. Colnbrook 
Rutherford, J.. Dublin 

Ryland, J. C, Warwick 

Ryland. J., D.D., Works, Bristol . . 



32 

50 



Sharp, John, Frome 

Sheraton. J., Jun., Stockton 

Shoveller. J., Portsea 

Sing. J., Bridgnorth 

Skepp. T., Cripplegate 

Slee, J., Haworth 

Smith, Jas., Islington \\ 

Stanford, J., Hammersmith 

Stanger, J., Kent ,* 

Stanford, Jno., D.D., firom Maze Pond . . . . \' 

Staughton, S., Coventry, Washington \ [' 

Steele, Anne, Broughton _^ j - 

Stennett. T06., Pinners' Hall .. .. ** ** tn 

Stennett,Dr.J., Exeter, Little Wild-street .! " " J? 
Stennett, Dr. S., Little Wild-street .. .. ' "It 

Stevens, J., Horsleydown " "2 

Stewart, T., Windmill-street .. .. '* ** ° 
Stinton, B., MSS. and works .. .. ' 



Date of 
Publications 

Z786- 

1720- 

Z722- 

1793-179^ 

1747- 

»743-i737 

1792- 

1796- 

1742-1753 

Z766-Z782 

Z76Z-Z78Z 

Z70C-Z800 

Z796-Z8ZS 
Z750 
1774 
Z79Z 

Z796-Z806 

«797 
Z702-Z7Z3 

1747 
Z7Z4-Z7Z5 
Z726-Z748 

Z782 
1733-Z734 
Z732-Z74a 
178Z-Z806 

1796 

Z7a9 
Z784-Z836 

«79z 
1777-1799 

z8oa 
Z78Z-Z809 

X758 
1757-1792 
Z769.Z825 



Z782 

z8o3 

1738 

Z722-Z75Z 

1779 
Z804 

^ '784 
Z785-Z789 



J780. 

1695-^7^3 - 

1738-Z754 

Z760-Z797 

1755-1767 
Z803 
Z7Z4 



BAPTIST AUTHORS AND HISTORY, I527 — 180O. 



195 



Name and Field Of Labour. N-^. PuSf^^L 

Sutcliflfe, John, Olney 6 .. 1783-1808 

Swaine, J., Walworth 10 .. 1792-18x4 

Swanston, A. (Scotch Bt.) .. ., •• 1 .. 1800 

Symonds, Joshua, Bedford i .. 1767 

Taylor, Dan 50 . . 1809 

Taylor, Is., Cahie 3 .. 1778-1807 

Thomas, John (Missionary) i • . 1793-1800 

Thomas, Joshua, Leominster 5 • • 1786-1794 

Tommas, John, Bristol 2 .. 1774-1790 

Toms, J., Chard, M.S i 

Tomlinson, J., D.D., Taunton, &c 9 . . 1741-1802 

Trivett, Edward, Norwich 1 . • 1770 

Tucker, William, Chard . . . . 1798-1814 

Turner, D., M.A., Abingdon 34 .. 1747-1803 

Twining, J., Trowbridge 3 .. 1775-1790 

Upton, James, London S .. 1795-1802 

Wallin, B., Maze Pond 20 . . 1748-1782 

Wallin, G., Colne 3 .. 1723-1733 

Walton, T., Cohie 1 .. 1803 

Ward; J., LL.D., Gresham Professor 6 . . 1744-1762 

Ward, Thomas. Melksham 1 . . 1799 

Watt, Dr. James, Glasgow 2 

Weatherley, W., Pinners' Hall 2 . . 1750-1801 

Whiston, W. (member of Foster's and Stennett's Church) . . 50 , . 1702-1745 

Whitfield, C, Hamsterley 7 • • 1778-^801 

Wilks, M., Norwich 3 .. 1791-1818 

Williams, B., Salisbury i . . 1780 

Williams, T., Ryeford x . . 1787 

Wilson, S, Prescott-street *. .. 20 ,. 1732-1750 

Wiiilerbothajn^ VV'., Plymouth 7 .. 1793-1796 

t li^t of the last century conta^ins 270 authors, and I have about 1,500 of their 

I shall be glad to hear of other authors, and of additional works by authors 
lies I have already. There are volomes, and especially single sermons, 
^Id prove very welcome. 




CREEDS. 

FESsioNS and Catechisms generally accepted 
;tice. I have copies of them alL 

^ ^Minder of Smyth's Company (Evans) 161 1 
L \ T the English people at Amsterdam 

\V ''" 

\ %N Churches in London falsely 

1644 

^ 
\ ^ - 1646 

V by Thos. Collier), . . . 1646-1656 

^ 1646 

I N 2 



196 BAPTIST AUTHORS AND HISTORY, I527 — l8oO, 



The Faith and Practice 01 thirty Congregations in Beds., Northampton- 
shire, Ac. (G. B.) 1651 

ard Edition of London Confession, with Heart Bleedings 165 1 

4th Edition 165a 

5th Edition, Leith 1653 

A Brief Declaration of Faith by Anabaptists met in London. (G. B.) . • 1660 

An Orthodox Creed, or A Protestant Confession of Faith (partly G. 

and partly P. Baptist) 1679 

A Confession of Faith based on the Westminster Assembly's Confession. 

xst Edition . . 1677 

A Confession of Faith of many Congregations in General Assembly, with 

Appendix on Baptism and Communion 1688 

Part of the Edition recommended by the Messengers . . • 1689 

General Assembly of 1689, Proceedings of, with a General Epistle to the 

Churches 1669 

Confession ordered to be translated into Latin. [Was this done ?] •• »• 1693 

A Third Edition was published in 1699; 4th and 5th in 1719-20; and a 
Philadelphia Edition in 1742. There are many later Editions as at Man- 
chester, 1851. Many Associations described themselves, up to compara- 
tively recent times, as accepting this Confession. 

Articles of Faith owned as Orthodox by the Baptist Congregations, and 

subscribed by their Ministers at Quarter Sessions 1704 

(This is based largely on the doctrinal articles of the English Church, and was 
required under the Toleration Act, and to the exclusion of Popeiy and 
Unitarianism.) 

Besides these General Confessions some Ministers and some Churches 
framed Creeds for themselves. 

BUNYAN's Reasons for his Faith and Practice may be found in his Works. 

Vavasor Powell's Creed in his Life and Death, p. 20; and Benj. Keach 
framed a Confession for the Church over which Dr. Gill afterwards 
presided. 



CATECHISMS. 

A Soul-oearcfahig Catechism, by Chr. Blackwood, 2nd Edition . . . . 1653 

Do., do., for Lancashire 1652 

B. Keach's Primer, Child's Instructors, &c. (for which he was pilloried) • . 1664 

V. Powell's Catechism and Concordance. 5th Edition 1673 

H. Jessie's Catechism for Children 1673 

J. S, The .Christian Doqtrine. A Short Catechism approved by Elders of 

Baptist Churches 1680 



BAPTIST AUTHORS AND HISTORY, I527 — 180O. I97 

The Baptist Catechism, on the basis of the Shorter Catechism prepared by 

William Collins, and ordered by the Assembly to be printed . . . . 1693-4 

The Baptist Catechism, with Keach's portrait, and often called by this 

name. x6th Edition 1764 

Do., edited by Dr. Rippon, and corrected 1794 

Other Editions are:— The zyth, Horeelydown; Bristol, 1775; American 
Edition, Philadelphia, 1751 ; the Sun<!by School Union, &c. ; in all which 
Scripture proofs are addeid. 

"The Baptist Catechism" was also published by B. Beddome, with 
Scripture expositions, at London, pp. z88, in 1752 ; and in Bristol, pp. 
192, in 1776 ; and elsewhere. It is based in part on Henry's. . 
Though " The Baptist Catechism " is a common title, the contents differ. 

Keach's and Beddome's were best known in the last century. 

All these Creeds were prepared in the first instance for explanatory and defensive 
purposes, and to show in a general way the sentiments of the Body. When adopted 
by any Church all Sister Churches were left free ; and in the Churches adopting 
them as much freedom was allowed as was consistent with a substantial agreement 
in the same general truth. (See quotations from Baptist authors in Sehajps History 
of ike Creeds of Christendom^ Lond., p. 853-4). J. A. 



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LIST OF CHURCHES. 



20 1 



II.— CHURCHES. 



N.B. — (x) A List of Churches in Membership with the Baptist Union 

WILL be found at PAGE 9. 

(2) (U.) denotes a Union Church, composed of Baptists and Pado- 

BAPTISTS with EQUAL RIGHTS UNDER THE TRUST DEED. 

(3) (Sc.) "Scotch Baptist." 

(4) (C.) AFTER A Minister's Name indicates that he is a Congre- 

GATIONALIST. 
(5 PLACES IN Italics ARE SUBORDINATE STATIONS. PLACES VfHEttB 

Cottage Meetings only are held are not given. 

(6) In England and Wales the population of MUNICIPAL 

BOROUGHS, ACCORDING TO the census of 189I, IS INSERTED 
WHERE SUCH POPULATION IS NOT LESS THAN IO,000. 

(7) The STATISTICS which follow WILL IN ALMOST ALL CASES BE FOUND 

TO AGREE WITH THOSE GIVEN IN THE LATEST ANNUAL REPORTS OF 
THE VARIOUS ASSOCIATIONS. IN THE VERY FEW CASES, HOWEVER, 
WHERE THE ASSOCIATIONS HAVE NOT YET FOUND IT TO BE PR*ACTI- 
CABLE TO ADOPT THE BAPTIST UNION FORM FOR STATISTICS, THE 

Editor HAS, WHENEVER possible, obtained Returns direct from 
THE Churches. Churches not in any Association have also 

BEEN COMMUNICATED WITH DIRECT. 



(8) A List of CHAPELS not connected with Associations, and from which 
returns cannot be obtained, will be found at page 294, In some 
of these cases It Is known that the Churches have ceased to exist 



(Bngfanb. 

(Aggregate Population, exclusive of Monmouthshire, 27.931,074.) 
(Monmouthshire will be found at page 264.) 



BEDFORDSHIRE {Pop., 160,704). 
(B., Beds Union.) 



Onrchca. 


1 


1 




II 






P«ston. 


ari 


■ 


AmpthiU (U.) .. .. 
Bedford (28.023):— 
Bunyan Meeting (U.) 
Stagsden . . . . 


1882 
1650 


350 

zioo 
200 
200 
150 
300 

600 

120 
350 
600 


98 

222 

108 

40 
70 


18 

34 

26 

3 
10 
8 


160 

300 
130 

295 
60 
100 

65 


3 

7 
6 

4 

I 


J.H.Kelly.. .. 
J.Brown,D.D. (C.) 

W. Turner.. .. 
J.W.Wren.. .. 

H. G. Stembridge 

G.Goodwin.. .. 
D. FTavel . . . . 


1890 
1864 

1889 
X877 

z888 
1891 


B. 

B. 


GoUington . . 






Ebtow 






Kempsion . . 






Mill-street .. .. 

Rothsay-road .. .. 

Biggleswade:— 

Old Meeting .. .. 

Dunton 


1830 
1771 


B. 
B. 


Blunham, Old Meeting. 
Carlton 


1724 
1688 


B. 
B. 



202 



LIST OF CHURCHES. 



BEDFORDSHIRE— continued. 



Churches. 



Cotton End 

Cardington • • 
Cranfield : — 

East End .. .. 
Dunstable: — 

West-street 

Heath & Reach . . 

Hinwick {see Northamp 
Houghton Regis . . ,, 

Sundon , 

StreatUy , 

Keysoe, Brookend 
Leighton Buzzard: — 
Hockliffe-street 

Lake-street . . . 

Ledbum 

Luton (30,006) : — 
Castle-street (U.) . 

Caddington . . . 

Perry Green . . . 
Park-street . • . 

Pepperstoch .. . 

Limbury 

StopsUy 

Wellington-street . 

Woodside • • . 
Maulden(U.) .. . 

Renhold 

Ridgmount 

Riseley 

Sandy 

Sheflford(U.) 

Stondon 

Staughton, Little. . . 

Stevington 

Stotfold 

Thurleigh 

Keysoe-Row .. . 

Toddington 

Wootton, High-street . 



1776 

z66o 

1836 

1842 

tons 
1760 



1652 

1835 
1775 



1836 

1837 
1841 
1689 



[846 
1862 
1768 
X873 
1701 
1839 
1858 
1829 
Z865 
1766 

1655 
1832 

1837 



1816 
1826 



500 



650 

x8o 

hire) 

500 

xoo 

70 

500 

850 

400 
80 

1050 
225 
300 

1000 
300 
130 
140 
900 
no 

400 

150 
500 

270 

550 
350 

300 

450 
400 
250 
250 
100 
200 
200 



70 



50 



80 ao 
20 zo 



139 



154 
52 

460 

640 



498 
26 
84 
25 

132 
9 

134 
54 
9 
50 
36 
33 
62 



53 



II 



95 

57 
109 
50 

253 

130 

224 
zoi 



468 

82 

Z70 

759 

Xi2 

65 

100 
691 

60 

1X8 
42 

1x4 
36 

234 
90 

75 
50 
Z04 
68 
48 



70 



x6 



II 

^5 



W. H. Smith . . 

S. McAlister 

E. A. Smith 

( G. Durrell ) 

( of Leighton) 

J.T.Frost .. .. 

T. Varley . . . . 

G. Durrell . . . . 
( F. £. Robinson, ) 
t B.A., B.D. ) 

H. Collings . . . . 
Frank Thompson 

G. D. Hooper 
J. R. Andrews 



J. Palmer 



G. H. Jones. • 
L. Humby . . 

C. B. Warren 
S. Williams.. 
J. Hart . . . . 
G. Chandler 



H. C. Field . . 
J. H. Readman 



Z890 B. 



X87Z 

X895 
X878 

1886 

X887 

1875 
1894 

z866 

X892 

1893 
1894 
189X 



1891 
X895 

X872 
1894 
X889 
x866 

X89X 
X870 



B. 
B. 
B. 

B. 
B. 



BERKSHIRE. 

BERKSHIRE (Pop., 338,709). 
(B.. Berks.) 



203 



Abingdon, Ock-street. . 

CothiU 

Drayton 

FyJMd 

Marchant . . . . 
Aacot 

London Road 

Beech Hill 

Bourton (Shrivenham) 
Bracknell .. . 



1652 



1886 



X796 
1851 
x886 



Brimpton 1843 

Farixiigdon 1576 

1880 
1790 
1880 



Buscot . . . . 

Kingston LisU 

LUtU CoxweU 

Maidenhead (10,607): — 

Marlow-road . . . . 

BqynHUl .. .. 

Moreton, South . . . . 

Newbury (11,002) : — 

North Brook-street. . 

HeadUy 

Long'iane . . . . 
Berries Bank,, .. 
Ashmore-green 
Ramsdale . . . . 
Re&ding (60,054) : — 
King's-road . . . . 
'Silver-street .. .. 

Hurst 

Sherfteld 

EastllsUy .. .. 
Ashampstead. . 

Compton 

StreatUy .. .. 

WestllsUy .. .. 

Oxford-road . . . . 

KnowlHUl .. .. 

Carey 

Calcot 

Wycliffe 

Grovelands . . . . 

Sandhurst 

Sunningdale 

Wallingford :— 
Thames-street . • . . 

Roke 

Cholsey 

Wantage 

Garston-lane . . . . 
Windsor, New (12,327) : 

Victoria-street . . 

Wokingham .. .. 

Sindlesham .. 

Finchampstead 

New Mill .. 



Il'i 



650 



120 



1873 
X834 



X64O 
1836 
I813 
1822 
1869 



640 

x86o 
1849 
1831 
1864 
1840 
X851 
1858 
1866 
1859 

x866 

x88i 
1887 
1884 
1828 

1794 
1798 
1825 
1648 



1838 
X774 



140 
250 

200 
140 
250 
100 
80 

xoo 
340 



70 
500 

120 

X20 
100 
XOO 



920 
200 
120 

150 

too 
xoo 

X20 
XOO 
500 

700 

600 

130 
130 

350 
XOO 

150 
300 



350 
550 

x8o 
X50 

X20 



113 



31 



X20 

"8 
316 



395 
'26 

18 
x8 



13 

18 

77 
166 



253 
112 



61 



85 



55 



154 
167 



17 



128 



45 
45 
29 
44 
60 
41 
"3 
30 
X2 



x86 

51 
20 

419 



418 

266 

82 

42 
20 



24 
too 

230 

425 

284 

40 

38 
60 

45 
20 

IXO 



200 

135 

33 



27 


W. H. Doggett .. 


1894 


I 


Alfred Ward .. 
R. W.Mansfield.. 


x88o 
1867 


3 
9 

6 

x6 

20 

3 
6 

9 


J.G. Skelly.. .. 
H.Smith .. .. 

H.J. Preece .. 
G.Russell ,, ,. 
G. J. Knight 

F. Jackson, M.A... 

W.H.Rose.. .. 

W.A. Findlay .. 

W.G. Hailstone.. 
R. M. Hunter . . 


1891 
X889 

1888 
1895 
1889 

1896 

x886 

1888 

1887 
1895 


2 






3 

2 

8 
3 


H. R. Salt .. .. 

G. A. Ambrose . . 

J. Aubrey . . . . 
J. Cave 


X883 
1892 

1893 
1885 



B. 



B. 



B. 

H.C. 
B. 
B. 



B. 



B. 



B. 



B. 
B. 



204 



LIST OF CHURCHES. 



BUCKINGHAMSHIRE {Pop,, 185,284). 
(B., Backs. H., Herts Union. H.C., Home Counties. N., Northamptonshire.) 



Amersham: — 

Lower Meeting . . 1782 
Aylesbury : — 

Walton-street . . . . 1801 
Bierton (Aylesbury) . . 1851 
Buckland Common 

(Tring) . . i860 

Chenies 1789 

Chesham :— 
Broadway 1706 

Ashl^ Grun. 

CharUredge . 

VaU 

Lower 17x4 

Hyde Heath .. 

Ley Hm.. .. 

WhelpUy HiU 
London-road, Zion 
Cuddington .. •• 

Dinton 

Drayton Parslow 
Mursley . • . . 
Newton Longville 
Famham Common 
Fenny Stratford . . 
Ford (Aylesbury). • 
Gold-hill (Cbalfont) 

Seer Green . . 
Haddenham .. .. 

ChearsUy 
Hanslope, Long-street (s 
Ickford (Thame) . 
Kingshill, Little . 
Lee Common 
Long Crendon . 
LoosleyRow.. . 
Marlow, Gt.. Glade-rd. 
Marsworth (See 

Hertfordshire) 
Missenden, Great 
Olney 

Lavendon 

Ravenstone . • 

Weston Underwood 
Princes Risborough ..1707 

Longwich 



1868 
X831 
1847 
1805 
X838 

X8X3 

X874 

x8oo 
X7X6 
1774 
X843 
1810 
X854 
eeN 
1825 
1814 
1854 
1799 
X862 

1855 



1778 
1694 



450 

320 
200 

150 
200 

850 
80 

xoo 

60 
500 

I20 
80 
50 

140 
X20 
150 

x6o 

60 

750 

250 

450 
X40 
500 

100 
ortha 

X20 

300 

XOO 

480 
230 

250 



370 
500 
140 
80 
80 
600 

xoo 



X20 

6x 

30 

12 
40 

335 
183 

• • 

178 

24 
15 

34 
73 
23 

160 


20 
xo 

12 

9 
5 

56 

42 

H 

31 
5 
6 
8 

14 
6 
2 

24 


127 

1^ 

60 
33 

520 

195 

70 

221 
38 
55 
53 

IS 

25 
^5 


a 

2 
3 

3 


J.W.CoUey .. 
D. Witton .• •• 


X894 
1893 


23 
xo 
xo 


W.B. Taylor .. 
L. G.Carter 
H. Trueman 


X883 
1890 
1890 


I 

X 
X 
2 

4 






• J. A. Andrews . . 

H.Stone.. 
H.S. Smith.. .. 


1893 

1874 
x88o 


76 
41 
151 

mpt 


X2 

9 

2X 
0« 


85 
70 
182 

hire 


4 
3 
8 

.) 






J. Edwards . . • • 


1891 


60 

17 
66 

57 
46 

85 
89 

• • 

X25 


13 

8 

xo 

10 
16 

7 
3 

17 


85 

74 

258 

x6o 
90 
30 

• • 


4 

X 

2 

3 

xo 


J.Robinson.. .. 
J. L. Cooper 


x886 
1894 


. • •• .. .. . . 

J. E. Joynes 

W. Dorey . . . . 
M.JosUn .. .. 


1895 

1888 
1893 







a 



a 
a 

B. 



a 
a 
a 



a 

B. 
B. 

a 



B. 
N. 



BUCKINGHAMSHIRE — CAMBRIDGESHIRE. 



205 



BVCKmOUAMSHIRE-^ontinued 



^.i 



Quainton 

Slough .. 

Speen (P. Risborough) 

Stantonbnry 

Stony Stratford and) 

Loughton .. .. ) 

Cosgrove 

Towersey (Tbame) . . 

Wendover 

Weston Turville (U.) . . 
Winslow, Tabernacle. . 

Swanboume . . . . 
Woobum Green . . . . 
Wraysbury (Staines) . . 
Wycombe (i3.435)-"" 

Bridge-street, Zion . . 

Union Church . . . . 
Holmer Green 
Wycombe Marsh .. 



1817 200 
1894 150 
18x3 400 
X856J 200 
400 
xoo 



1656' I 



1837 130 

X683 200 

1855 170 

1864 450 

1809 250 

1833 130 

1868 180 

1680' 400 

1845' 550 
1877 150 

.. I X20 



47 
32 
88 
37 
163 
15 



78 
37 
47 
x8 

10 

35 

65 
210 

39 



100 

26 

1x0 

120 

230 



53 
60 
32 
30 
76 

200 

240 

57 

99 



,:} 



H. J. Lester 



W. 



PhilUps 
Harrison 



S. Cheshire. 



J. Wilkins ., 
G. Barnes . , 

H. K. Byard 

F. Tilbury . , 



J. Morling 
C. Hobbs . . 



. x88o 
.11894 
.'X892 



,1893 



I1893 
. 1 891 

. 1892 

,;i889 



B. 

H.C. 

B. 

N. 

N. 



B. 
B. 
B. 

B. 



H.C. 



1 891 
X895 



B. 



CAMBRIDGESHIRE {Pop., i88,9Cx). 
(C, Cambridgeshire. E.M., East Midland.) 



Aldreth 

Burwell :— 

North-street . . . 

Cambridge (36,983) :— 

Eden . . ..«•..' . 

St. Andrew's-street. 

Cambridge-place . 

MiU-raad . • • 

Nelson-street . . • 

Zion 

Newmarket-road . 

Cazton 

Longstcwi . . . 

Chatteris >— 

West Park-street . 

Forfy Foot Bank . 

Park-street, Zion . 



1 


1 


^1 


1' 


•1 

^1 


¥ 
H 



200 

185 1 500 



1823 
1721 

i88x 



1837 
X889 
1842 



1783 
i860 
18x9 



700 
750 
200 
450 
200 
900 
150 
300 



500 
xoo 

900 



46 

75 

124 
638 

398 
54 



50 
120 

X89 
394 

530 

592 

180 

71 



200 

50 

190 



C.W.Dunn.. 
H. A. Fletcher 



J.Jull 

T. Graham Tarn 



H. Frank Griffin 
W. Kelsey .. •• 

W, K. Bryce 
H. M. Winch 



x866 

X893 

1879 
1879 

X884 
1891 

1894 
1895 



C. 
C. 

c. 



2o6 



LIST OF CHURCHES. 
CAMBRIDGESHIRE— «Ott/mMe<l. 



I 



Chesterton • • . . 
Chittering . . . . 
Cottenham:^ — 

Old Meeting • . 
Ely, Zion • . . . 
Gamlingay, Old Mtng. 
Haddenham . . . . 
Harston . . . • 

Histon 

MUtan .. .. 

Isleham : — High-street 

IsUham Fen . . 

Pound-lane (U.) 
Landbeach • • • • 
March: — 

Centenary Church 
WhittUsea-road 
Chain Bridg$ 

Providence . • 
Melboum .. .. 

Over 

Prickwillow .. .. 
Shelford, Great .. 

Soham 

Swavesey : — 

Main Road 

Bethel . . . . 

Thetford (Ely) .. 



Tydd St. Giles . . 
Waterbeach, High-st, 
Willingham.Tabemacle 

High Street . . 
Wisbech:— 

Ely Place .. •• 
West Walton.. 

Upper Hill-street 

North Brinlt.. 

Norwich-road, 

Walsoken .. 

Victoria-road 

Witchford (Ely) 



1844 
1858 



300 
xao 



1780 750 



Z820 
1710 
1814 
X786 
1858 
X865 
18x2 
1875 

1693 
x8a8 

1700 
1845 



250 
500 
500 
337 
325 
150 
450 
150 
450 
320 

750 
80 



1859 120 



X835 
1675 

1737 
X815 
X825 
175a 

1789 
X840 



750 
600 
350 
400 
4x0 
500 

400 
400 

150 

X792 Z20 
1660 600 



X873 
1662 

X665 



1792 



1857 
X87X 



600 

800 

850 
150 

600 



60 
135 



90 
17 

174 

J3 
92 

159 
89 
89 

X53 

72 
36 

156 



155 
77 
40 
98 

X08 

X27 

45 
57 

26 



IXX 

165 



12 1 

2XZ 



140 
60 

176 I 



215 
X82 

x6o 
191 

215 

95 
60 

320 



3x0 
60 
90 
80 

135 
170 

50 
92 

60 



143 
165 
70 

x6o 
40 



T.T. Ball .. 
Mark WyaU 

C. T. Allen . . 

H. J. MUledge 
W. Higgins . . 
F. Potter . . 
R. Smith . • 

S. B. NewUng 

J. A. Wilson 



I. L. Near 



B. J. Northfield . 
R. A. Belsham , 
F. S. Reynolds . 



D. Bruce . . 
F. W. Dunster 



B. G. Knight . 
( F. W. Dunster, 
1 of Soham 



, X889 
1879 

,1894 

1885 
, X892 
, X890 
,1895 

1892 

X872 



1892 
1889 



C. 
C. 

c. 

c. 
c. 

C. 
C. 



C. 
C. 



1894 



X889 
1894 
Z89I 



X890 
1889 



C. 
C. 

c. 



C. 

C. 

E.M. 



H. Jenner 
J. Carvath 
W. Gill.. 



A. G. Everett 
. CockeU . . 



11:^ 



Campbell. 



1894 
X89X 
1893 

1892 

1862 
x886 



C. 
C. 



C. 



CHESHIRE. 



207 



CHESHIRE {Pop,, 730.058). 



L.C., Lancashire and Cheshire. D.F.M., Denbigh, Flint, 
and Merioneth.) 



Alderley Edge, Brook- 

lanefu.) 

Altrincham, Tabernacle 

Audlem 

Birkenhead (99,857):— 

Grange-road . . . 
Cathcart'Street • , 

Jackson-street .. , 

Woodlands (W.) . 
Chester (37,105) :— 

Grosvenor-park 

Milton-st., Ebenezer 
HooU 

Northgate-st. (W.) . 
Crewe (28.761) :— 

Victoria-street . . . 
Underwood-lane . 

Union-street . . . 
I>i8ley,WycliffeHall.. 
Egremont, Liscard- 

road(U.) 

Frodsham 



Haslington (Crewe) 
HUl Clifif (Warnngton) 
Hyde (30,^) 
Latchford (Warrington) 
Little Leigh (Wrringtn) 
Macclesfield (36,009): — 

St. George's-street 
Nantwich . . . . 
WiUaston .. 
New Brighton 

Onston 

Poynton . . . . 
Sale (Manchester) 
Seacombe, Brighton-st 

(W.) 

Stalybridge (26,783):— 

Cross Leech-street.. 

Wakefield-road 

DakenJUld . . 

Stockport (70,263) :- 

Greek-street . . 

Thomson-street 

Grove-lane Cheadle 

Hulme, . . . 

Brook-lane Alderley 

Tarporley . . • . 

Warfordand.. •• 

Bramhall .. .. 

Wheelock Heath.. 



} 



1890 
1887 
1814 

1858 
1878 
1868 
1839 

1871 
1877 

i860 

1849 
1878 
1883 
1893 

1864 
1889 
1884 
1522 
1869 
1852 
1820 

1822 
1862 
1878 
1894 
1849 
Z862 

1875 
1877 

1838 
x8o8 



1838 



X840 

1717 
1600 
1856 
X823 



160 

450 
120 

620 
270 
550 
300 

400 
800 

200 

350 
300 
640 
200 

500 
300 
200 
300 

325 
300 
200 

550 
350 
150 
364 
200 
x8o 
350 

Hall 

500 
750 



920 



200 

Z20 
180 
250 



17 

104 

28 

212 
92 
62 

146 

146 

95 

46 

126 

'89 
25 

215 
25 
46 

47 
52 
83 
35 

137 
62 



34 

31 

106 

19 

62 
233 



284 
15 




10 


60 


12 

3 


130 
22 


49 
23 
x6 

X2 


600 
326 
190 
113 


20 
20 


243 
230 


5 


41 


26 

8 

16 

10 


x6o 
60 

160 
65 


23 
20 

XX 

16 
x6 


215 
150 
82 
96 

lOX 


15 
4 


135 
46 


14 
30 


171 
260 


8 

7 

9 

16 


103 
149 


2 


12 


22 
31 

17 


X30 
263 
Z02 


20 


280 


15 


200 


5 


44 


10 


55 


2 


25 


8 


98 



3 


'f.C.* Lloyd!! !! 
J.F.Matthews .. 


1893 
1890 


L.C. 
L.C. 
L.C. 


7 
4 

I 

X 


S. W. Bowser, B. A. 
E. Peake .. .. 
R. Frame . . . . 
J. Davies . . . . 


1881 
1894 
1894 
1884 


L.C. 

L.C. 
DFM 


7 
3 


J. B. Morgan . . 
W. Povey.. 


1889 
1895 


L.C. 


.. 


M.F.Wynne .. 


Z889 


DFM 


2 


W. Hughes . . . . 


1890 


L.C. 


2 
2 


J. Thomas .. .. 
J. Lister . . . . 


1893 
1893 


L.C. 
L.C. 


•• 


A. Gordon, M. A... 
A. H. Sayers (C.) 

'j. S.Hughe^' !! 


1888 
1894 

1893 


L.C. 
L.C. 
L.C. 
L.C. 
LC 


•• 


C. Andrew 
J. Aldis, Jun. 


1895 


L.C. 
L.C. 


2 

X 


E. A. Hobby . . 
J. R. Mitchell .. 


1891 
1894 


L.C. 
LC. 


X 
X 

X 


E. Morley .. .. 
G.Walker !! !! 


1894 
1862 


L.C. 
L.C. 
L.C. 








DFM 


2 
Z 


A. Bowden . . . . 
C. Rushby . . . . 


1886 
1881 


L.C. 

L.C. 


8 




•• 


L.C. 


X 

X 






L.C, 


.. 


J. Davenport • . 


1879 




T 






L.C 











2o8 



LIST OF CHURCHES 



CORNWALL {Pop., 322,571) 
(C, Cornwall. D., Devon. 



Calstockand.. .. 

Metherill .. .. 
Falmouth : — 

Market-street .. 



Hayle 



Helston, Wendron-st. . 



lAunceston 

GreystoM:,. 
Liakeard, Dean-street. 
Newquay, Ebenezer . 
Penzance (12,432) : — 

Clarence-street. . • 
Redruth, Ebenezer . 
St. Austell, Ebenezer. 
Saltash 

Burraton . . . 

Carkele 

Truro (11,131) .. . 



i8z6 



1772 



1856 

1804 

1876 
1850 
X876 
1822 



x8o2 
1802 

1833 
1790 



1789 



220 ) 

150] 
900 

300 

400 
130 

80 
350 

xoo 

600 
400 
400 
400 



500 



4 



92 

272 

31 
32 

22 

15 
61 

14 



68 



17 



^1 
^1 



175 
542 
73 
81 
31 
165 



75 
290 
130 



248 



1 



A. Pidgeon . . . 

C. T. Johnson . 
M. L. Gaunt, of 
Helston, and 
F.W.Reynolds, 
of Redruth 
M. L. Gaunt 

f H. Small, See ] 
I also Devon ) 

G. F. Payn 



F. W. Reynolds . . 
£. Osborne . . 

G. McFadyean 



z886 
1888 

1893 
1891 

1895 



1894 
1893 
1879 



D. 

C. 

C. 

C. 
D. 
C. 



c. 

C. 
C. 

D. 



CUMBERLAND {Pop,, 266,549). 
(L. C, Lancashire and Cheshire.) 



Broughton, Gt. . . 
Carlisle (39,176) .. 
Maryport, Trinity 

GrassM . • . « 
Fumau-road • • 

Millom 

Workington (23t49o) 

Marsh Side .. 



X648 
x88o 
1808 



1879 
1882 



200 

450 
700 

150 
280 
400 



39 
82 

183 

23 

66 

170 



70 

"3 
480 



150 
382 

40I 



A. Greer 

F. C. Haggart 

W. H. Elliott 



J. Hodgson . . . , 
J. H. Brooksbank. 



1887 
890 
1889 



1894 
1894 



DERBYSHIRE. 



209 



DERBYSHIRE {Pop,, 528.033). 
(E. M.. East Midland. Y.. Yorkshire.) 



I 



Belper 

Birches-lane (Alfreton) 
CauldweU {see Stafford 
Chellaston . . . . 
Chesterfield (22,009) 
Clay Cross . . . . 
Cotmanhay {see Notting 

Crich 

Derby (94.146) :— 

Green Hill, Trinity 

Osmaston-road.. 
Pear Tree . . 

St. Mary's-gate 
WiUington . . 
Littleaver 
Junction-strut 
Boyer-street .. 

Watson-street .. 
Dronfield . . . . 

Dttffield 

Heanor 

Ilkeston (19,744) : — 

Queen-street . . 

South-street . . 
Kilbourne . . . . 
LangleyMill(nr.Nottm.) 
Long Eaton : — 

Station-street .. . 

Chapel-street . . . 

Loscoe 

Measham and .. . 

Netherseal.. .. . 
Melbourne and . . . . 

Ticknall 

Milford 

New Whittington . . . 
Riddingsand 

Swanwick 

Ripley 

Sawley , 

Smalley , 

Stooebroom (AlfretonJ 

Swadlincote , 

Hartskome .. . 

Wirksworth 

Shottls 

BonstM 



x8x8 
X864 
shir 
1868 
1861 
1863 
ham 
1838 

1795 
1831 

1873 
1797 



1867 
X846 
1810 
x86x 

1784 
i88x 
1832 
1837 

1877 
X887 

1783 
x8ii 
1840 
1750 



1849 
1862 
1806 
1796 
1833 
1783 
1785 
X877 
1867 



1818 

X8l2 

X823 



600 

200 
xoo 

350 

210 

shire) 

250 

400 
900 

180 

X200 
120 
200 
400 
250 
200 
300 
200 
450 

500 
200 
X30 
300 

450 

room 
400 

500 1 
200) 

450 



150 
350 
400 
500 

450 
270 
300 
250 
500 



300 
150 
X50 



24 



X94 
529 

386 
27 
42 

132 

X2 

102 

159 
40 
90 

53 
91 
41 
50 

XXX 

92 
78 

X26 

X62 

9 
19 



68 
67 

143 
96 
68 
38 

158 
3 

144 



80 



204 
150 

X04 

352 

794 

455 

311 

40 

70 

900 

160 

300 

300 

72 

360 

150 

222 

75 
260 

202 

150 
206 

223 

290 
40 
50 



130 
190 
413 
160 

80 
"3 
367 

23 
223 



13 



E.M. 



R. I. Mesquitta 



x886 



E.M. 
E.M. 
E.M. 



W. F. Harris 
J. Mursell .. 

A.Mills 



P. A. Hudgell 



X884 
1891 

, X889 



1895 



E.M. 
E.M. 



E.M. 



C. J. Rendell 
Je£fcoat 



X892 



E.M. 

Y. 
E.M. 



Jg.d.; 



X895 



E.M. 



E. Webb . . 

W. S. Lord . . 
I D. Chixmery 



- 1893 
, X891 
. 1894 



E.M 
E.M 

E.M. 
E.M. 
E.M. 

E.M. 



E.M. 
E.M. 



rW. C. Sage. 
1 M.A.. B.D. 
S. S. AUsop.. , 



E. Hilton . . 
k. H.Bond.*! 
B.Noble .. 



1894 
. 1895 

! X884 

xS^ 
, 1889 



Y. 

E.M. 

E.M. 
EM. 
E.M. 
E.M. 
E.M. 

E.M. 



2IO 



LIST OF CHURCHES. 



DEVONSHIRE {Pop., 631,808). 



(D., Devon.) 



'i 



li 



^i 






Appledore 

Westward Ho! . . 
Ashwater 

HalwiU 

Gerntanswuk 

HalwiU Station .. 

Muckworthy .. .. 
Bampton 

Shillingford .. .. 
Barnstaple (13.058) : — 

Boutport-street 
Bideford 

Abbotsham .. .. 
Bishop's Teignton 
Bovey Tracey . . , . 

Lustleigh . . . . 

Bradninch 

Brayford 

Bratton Fleming . . 

Stow/ord . . . . 
Brixham 

Broad Clyst 



1823 
1887 
1820 



1885 
1886 
1690 



1833 
183 1 
1852 
1885 
1772 500 



400 

140 

80 

200 

X20 
ZXO 
80 
300 
ZOO 

800 
500 

Z20 



18I4 
1815 
1850 



Budleigh Salterton . 

Chudleigh^ 

Combmartin 

Kentisbury . . . 

Croyde and 

Georgeham . . . 

Collompton 

Ashill 

Dartmouth 

Devonport (54i8o3) :— 
Hope Chapel . . . 
Morice-square . . . 
Pembroke-street . 

Dolton 

Bea/ord 

Kingscote . . . 
Exeter (37.404) :— 
Bartholomew-street 

South-street . . . 



Christow 
Duns/ord 

Wonford 

Exmouth 1891 

Frithelstock 1833 

Newton ^1830 

Caute ;i84o 

Tythecott .. ..7840 



1797 

1880 

1844 
Z848 
1850 
1850 
1824 
[j 

1745 
1832 
1600 

1852 
1798 
1789 
1839 



1817 
1656 



270 
140 
150 
100 
600 

210 

300 

200 
300 
150 

Z20 
270 
100 

850 
650 
430 
200 
Z20 
X20 

800 
700 



60 

Hall 

150 
80 
70 
60 



76 


20 


z68 


2 


96 


45 


Z70 


13 


30 


zx 


95 


3 


•• 


2 


40 




203 


31 


370 


z 


185 


26 


328 


ZO 




6 


38 




x8 


4 


30 


.. 


37 


9 


84 


3 




I 


z8 




75 


z6 


142 


2 


Z98 


46 


6zo 


2 


26 


.. 


.. 


.. 


32 


5 


25 


2 


27 


Z2 


70 


2 


144 


ZO 


Z09 


•• 


20 


7 


65 


3 


20 


7 


41 


z 


86 


19 


2ZO 


5 


53 


15 


146 


I 


ZIO 


2Z 


Z36 


, , 


158 


24 


290 


2 


54 


17 


Z69 


2 


49 


6 


37 


5 




2 


33 




•• 


2 


z8 




68 


15 


Z20 


3 


258 41 


4Z0 


13 


z8 






19 






29 .. 


, , 


, . 


15 6 


42 


9 


7 6 


35 




Z2 6 


30 




8 


1 







W. L. Crathern . . 



E. Scott 



G. R. Hern . . 

F. Durbin . . 

G. Duckett. . 
W. H. Payne 

R. C. Lemin 
T. Breewood 



W. A. Barker . . 
IG. Keen, of ) 
t Thorverton i 



C. «itovell . . 
W. Ewens . . 

I W. Leyshon 
J. Home 

J. G. Scott .. 

Albert Braine 
H. N. Mitchell 
Colporteur .. 
G. J. Whiting 



E. Francis . . . 
(D. P. McPher- 
t son, B.D. 



R. A. Good . . 
A. O. Shaw . . 



Z876 



1894 
1894 

X89Z 
Z895 

Z892 
X895 



Z89Z 
1893 



z888 



1889 
Z885 

Z889 
Z892 

1894 

Z883 
X890 



Z892 



D 
D. 

D. 



D. 
D. 



D. 
D. 



D. 

D. 

D. 
D. 
D. 

D. 
D. 



D. 
D. 
D. 
D. 



1894 D. 
1894! D. 



1895, 
Z89ZI 



D. 
D. 



DEVONSHIRE. 



211 



DEVONSHIRE— continued. 



^1 



Hatherleigh . . . . 

Sheepwash . . 

Inwardleigh .. 
Hemyock and 
Saint HiU . . . . 

Bolham Water 
Honiton 

Luppitt .. .. 

Awliscombe .. 
Ilfracombe, High-street 
Kilmington & Loughwd 
Kingsbridge .. .. 



Lifton 

Thomecross .. 

spry town 
Malborough and .. 
Salcombe .. .. 
Modbury . . . . 

Lupridge 

St. Ann's 
Moretonhampstead 
Newton Abbot. East-st. 

Denbury 

Okehampton and. . . 

Sourton 

Ottery St. Mary . . . 
Paignton 

Stoke Gabriel 
Plymouth (84,248) :— 
George-street . . . 

Car-green . . . 

Ford 

Hooe 

Lower-street . . . . 

Mutley 

Buckland Mona 
Chorum . . . . 

Meavy 

MiUbrooh . . . . 

West Hill • . . . . 
South Molton . . . . 
Stonehouse, Ebenezer 
Teignmouth . . . . 

Shaldon 

Thorverton 

Bramford Speke . . 
Tiverton (10,892) 

Ash Thomas . . . . 

B utter leigh . . . . 



1835 



1833 
1803 

1817 
1859 
1869 
1851 
1650 
1640 

1850 
1881 

1839 
1867 
1791 
1873 
1888 

1819 



250 

X20 

100 

200 ) 

150) 
60 

350 
Z20 
130 

340 
350 

200 

100 

200 
290 
260 
60 
60 
140 
500 



1882 180 

i860 

1874 

1886 

1823 

1640 



1849 
1876 

1850 
1840 
1821 

1841 

873 
1865 
1883 
1832 

1607 
1890 



120 
350 
300 
200 

lOOO 

100 

200 
100 

200 
860 

250 
280 
380 
150 

i6s 

120 

860 

80 



53 
181 

166 

58 
119 

X4 
7 

48 

32 

103 



15 
"3 



90 



547 
41 
90 
13 

276 

16 
10 
22 

12 
24 
50 
9 
35 



50 
15 
22 

58 

156 
70 

x6o 
69 
131 



18 

z6 

360 



X02 
40 



ZOI 

40 

638 

51 
247 

60 
500 

603 



85 
16 
60 

506 
20 



13 



C. L. Gordon 

J. L. Smith . . . . 
A.Stock,B.A..B.D, 

T. Philpot .. .. 
R. Bastable . . . . 
W.T. Adey.. .. 
f Henry Smart \ 
\ {see also Corn- \ 
i wall) ) 



[ G. W. BaU 
£. Spanton . . 



1892 



1886 



1887 



1894 
1876 
1893 

1891 



1894 
1891 



S. Lyne 

J E. C. Monk 

H. Davis . . 
W. F. Price.. 



S. Vincent . . . . 

A. T, Head .. 

Benwell Bird . . 

,H. Henderson .. 



W. Trotman 
S. J. Thorpe 

G. Keen . . . . 

J. F. Toone, B.A. 



1884 

1895 
1876 
1892 

1883 

1878 

£876 
1894 



D. 
D. 



D. 
D. 



D. 



1879 
894 

1893 
1888 



D. 

D. 
D. 
D. 



O 2 



212 



LIST OF CHURCHES. 



DEVONSHIRE— «>»<in««d. 



Torquay (25,534) :— 
Upton Vale . . . 

Barton .. .. . 

Compton,. .. 

HeU 

Torrington, Great 
Totnes, Fore- street 

Little Hempstone 

Tuckenhay . . , 
Uffculme and Prescott 

Lamb . . . . 

Culmstock 
pottery, Newhouse 

Churchinford 
Varcombe . . . . 



1832 



1820 
1873 
1874 
1874 
1743 
1885 
1889 
1655 

1829 




W. Emery 



G. F. Owen . . 
G. D. Evans 



W. GUlard . 

W. Gliddon . 
J. Powell . 



1885 



189X 
1891 



X889 

1894 
1874 



D, 
D, 



DORSETSHIRE {Pop., 194.517). 
(W.. Western. W. E. S., Wilts and East Somerset. S., Southern.) 



ChurchM. 



si 

n 



Bridport 1830 

Buckland Newton . . 1862 
Dorchester Dorford . . 1648 
Gillingham 1840 

EastStour .. ... 

Fifehead 

Iweme Minster .. ..1831 
Lyme Regis, Silver-st. 1655 

Harcombe .. ... 
Parkstone, Upper. . . . 1888 
Poole (15.438) :— 
Hill-street 1805 

Cor/e Mullen,, .. 181 3 

Heatherland . . . . 1877 

Sherborne 1884 

Weymouth (13,866) :— 
Bank-buildings.. .. 18x3 

Button 1862 

Wimborne, Grove-road 1882 
Mission Stations : — 

PiddUtrenthide .. 

WinterbourneAbbas 

MuckU/ord .. .. 



300 
150 
300 
400 
xoo 
100 

150 

350 

50 

4x8 

400 
X40 
240 
200 

500 

200 

180 

300 
100 
130 



XI9 
24 

66 
8x 



22 
57 

77 

194 

'58 
168 



165 
27 

65 
122 



175 

202 
61 

195 
56 

263 



R. B. Clare . . 
T. Hayden . . 

J. E. Evans.. 

E. Marks . . 

R. B. Morrison 
R. Walker .. 

S. Flemington 

F. J. Walkey 

G. Robinson 



I- Evangelist. 



1891 
1876 



W. 

W. 

W. 

W.E.S 



X892 
x88x 

1891 

i88x 

1892 
1894 

1890 



W.E.S 
W. 



S. 
S. 

W. 
W. 
S. 

W. 



DURHAM. 

DURHAM {Pop,, 1,0x6,559). 

(N., Nortbem. D. F. M.. Denbigh, Flint, and Merioneth.) 



213 



Qmrchet. 


1 


1 


i 


en 




i 


FWton. 


n 






Bishop Auckland. . . . 

Witton-park.. .. 

Consett, Front-street . . 

Crook 

Darlington (38,060) :— 
Grange-road . . . . 
Gateshead (85.692):— 
Durham-nMui . . • . 
OakweUgate .. .. 


1873 
1857 
1870 
1892 

Z846 

1877 


300 
200 
300 
220 

650 

850 


35 
II 
65 
43 

248 

300 


8 
4 
10 
14 

31 

24 
20 

5 

6 

20 

20 

16 

35 

19 

47 
42 

12 
12 

27 
25 


67 
35 
120 
171 

272 

390 
220 
50 
47 
260 
298 
130 

253 

202 

450 
480 

XOO 

60 

380 
293 


. 2 

I 

8 

I 
*8 

12 

2 

4 

z 

4 

4 
4 


1 A. Westwood . . 

T. Durant . . . . 
A. G. Barton 

J. Duncan, M. A... 

D. P. Packer .. 

W.H.Rowling .. 
C.W. Vaughan .. 
A. W. Curwood . . 
J. Charter .. .. 

E.W.Jenkins .. 

E.Mason .. .. 

D. A. Spenoe . . 
W. H. Gorham . . 


1893 
1885 
189c 

1889 

1894 
1890 

1890 
1889 
1880 

1878 
1893 

X894 
1892 


N. 

N. 
N. 

N. 

N. 


Cato-street . . . . 










Hamsterley 

Hartlepool (2 1 ,27 1) . . 
Hartlepool, W. (42,710) 
Middleton-in-Teesdale 
Egglesbum . . . . 

Forest 

Rowley and BUckhiU.. 
Shotley Field .. .. 
Shields, South (78,391): 
Imeary-st, Emanuel 
Laygate-lane, Taber- 
nacle 

Westoe-road . . . . 
Anderson' s-lafu .. 
Percy 'Street .• .. 

Spennymoor 

Spennymoor (Welsh) . . 
Stockton (49.708):— 
Wellington Street .. 
Northcote-street 
St. Ann's-road(W.).. 


1652 

1845 
1862 
1827 
1873 
1833 
1652 

1893 

1841 
182X 

1876 

1741 
1887 
X864 

1790 

1834 
1871 
x88x 
1882 

1830 


200 
500 

?iS 

120 
130 
450 

900 

750 

250 

Sch. 

500 
250 
450 

750 

750 

200 

60 

60 

250 


39 
83 

144 
X02 

208 

162 

192 
128 

49 
34 

373 
161 


N. 
N. 
N. 
N. 

N. 

N. 

N. 

N. 


W.Hughes.. .. 

T.L. Edwards .. 
D. Ross . . . . 


1874 

1884 
1890 


DFM 

N. 
DFM 


Sunderland (131,015) : — 
Lindsay-road . . . . 
Monkwearmouth : 
Barclay-street 

Waterhouses 


124 

77 
180 

46 


26 

x8 
38 

12 


268 

152 
350 

XIO 


X 

4 
x8 


H. C. Bailey . . 
G.Wilson .. .. 


1889 
1890 


N. 

N. 
N. 


LangUy Park 
UshawMoor.. .. 
LangUy Moor 
Wolsingham 






N. 











214 



LIST OF CHURCHES. 



ESSEX {Pop,, 785.445)- 

For other Churches in Essex see " METROPOLITAN," pp. 233—241. 

(E., Essex Union. C, Cambs. H. C, Home Counties. M., Metropolitan.) 



OuardMS. 



Ashdon 

Radwinter . . . . 
Barking, Linton-road . . 

Blackmore 

Braintree : — 
Coggeshall-road 

Brentwood 

Bumham-on-Crouch .. 

Althome 

Chelmsford (ix,oo8) : — 

London-road . . . . 

Clacton-on-Sea (U.) . . 

Coggeshall 

Colchester (34.559) J— 
Eld-lane 

Parson's Heath . . 
St. John's Green . . 

Elmstead Heath .. 
Dunmow, The Ark . . 
Earl's Colne 

Colne Engain 
Farnham {See Hertford- 
shire) 

Grays : — 

The Grove 

Tabernacle . . . . 

Tilbury Docks 

Pur/leet . . 
Halstead : — 
North-street . . , . 

Harlow 

Harlow, Potter-street . . 

Homchurch 

Langham 

Stratford 5. Mary 
Langley 

Mensden {Herts) . . 

Leigh 

Maldon :— 

Crown-lane 
Manor Park . . . . 
Mark's Tey .. .. 
Matching Green .. 

Fyfield 
Rayleigh . . . . 
Romford . . . . 
Saffron Walden:— • 
High-street 

Sewards End 
Sampford, Great 

New Sampford 



1809I 300 

.. I 150 

1850, 640 

18431 150 

1550 550 

1 8861 300 

1673I 350 

1834I Z20 

1803! 370 

1887 500 



1829 

1689 
1879 
1872 

1823 
1786 



1878 
1885 



1678 
1662 
Z662 
1882 
1754 

1828 
1893 

1872 
1890 
1824 
1885 



1796 
1836 

1774 
1805 



400 

700 
150 
220 

XOO 
750 
150 



200 

550 
100 
150 

550 
500 
300 
220 
400 

256 

150 

320 
350 
150 

z8o 



400 
400 

560 
100 
360 



90 

265 
15 



109 
78 
39 

285 

51 
12 

13 



15 
138 



X19 

83 
22 

64 
62 



38 



173 
'65 



63 

415 
30 



95 

178 

30 

80 

126 
60 

420 

130 

127 

24 



19 
3x0 

50 
70 

195 
90 
90 

130 
65 



35 

103 
125 

75 

32 

100 



201 

63 
125 



D. H. Moore 
G. Stevens . . 

A. Curtis . . 
W. Walker.. 
C. D. Gooding 



C. J. Gayler(C.).. 
G. H. F. Jackman 

E. Spurrier . . 

W. ChisnaU.. 



T. Heywood 



A. B. Preston . 

J. W. Butcher . 
A. P. McKenzie . 

A. W. Holden . 

W. Crosby . . . 

W. Franklin . 

A. C. Sidey 

F. C. Morris 

F. D. Robbins . 

H. G. Polley . 

J. K. Walker . 



J. M. Steven 
A. Rollason . . 
G. Hider . . 



1877, E. 



1892' E. 
1883 



1890 
1886 



X890 
1889 

1866 

1895 



X892 



1893 
1893 
x888 
1894 
1892 

1892 

1893 



X892 

xr 

1892 

1888 



1879 
1874 
189X 



E. 
E. 



M. 

E. 



E. 
E. 
E. 
E. 
E. 

E. 

H.C. 

E. 



890E&HC 



E. 
E. 

E. 

E. 



ESSEX — GLOUCESTERSHIRE. 



215 



ESSEX— continued. 



Southend (12,333) : — 
Clarence-road 
Hamlet-rd. Tabemcle 

Thaxted, Park-street . . 

Tbeydon Bois . . . . 

Thorpe-le-Soken . . . . 

Waltham Abbey. Foun- 
tain-place. Ebenez^r 

Walthamstow : — 
Higham Hill . . . . 
Maynard-road .. .. 

Woodford, George-lane 



1883 


400 


120 


1876 


530 


128 


1832 


400 


88 




xoo 


25 


1802 


330 


39 


1824 


120 


55 


1894 


220 


85 


1874 


150 


31 


1883 


620 


130 



ZI6 

190 

60 

60 

46 

100 

250 
93 
150 






F. A. Hogbin 
E.Dyer 
W. Goacher 



J. R. Cox 



x888 
1889 
1887 



M. 



M. 
1886 H.C. 



GLOUCESTERSHIRE {Pop,, 599.947) • 
(G. H., Gloucestershire and Herefordshire. O., Oxfordshire. B., Bristol.) 



Arlington (Fairford) . 
Ayeniqg 

Leighterton .. . 

Blakeney 

Bourton-on-the- Water 

Aston 

Clapton 

Rissington . . . 

Slaughter . . . 
Bristol (221.578):— 
Bedminster : 

Philip-street . . . 

East-street . . . 
Broad mead . . . 

City-road 

Clifton, Buckingham 
Cotham-grove .. 

Freestone-road 
Counterslip : — 

Victoria-street 
Tower-street 
Horfield .. .. 
Hotwells :— 

Buckingham Hall 
Old King-street 
Maudlin-street (W.) 
Redland, Tyndale 

Deanery-road 
St George's, Mount 

Pleasant 
Stapleton-road, 

Kensington .. 
Totterdown 



1839 
1819 
Z828 
1818 



1650 320 



1856 
1884 
1640 
1835 
1847 
1872 
18S0 

1804 
1878 
1893 

1886 
1650 
1820 
1869 
x88i 

1872 

1832 
i88x 



200 

320 

80 

320 



800 
750 
1500 
900 
476 
500 



850 
90 
X40 

430 
1000 
300 
620 
400 

250 

1000 
600 



4 


1 = 
i^^ 


0^ 


6 = 


rz 




^' 


r 


"* 



I 



82 



77 
135 



245 
251 

lOII 

478 
184 
245 



403 

28 

X29 

129 
579 



307 
xoo 

69 

282 

265 



x6 X85 



159 

288 

58 

30 

25 



626 
527 
633 
447 
167 
269 
366 

505 
310 
200 

614 
256 



189 
479 

141 

460 
425 



W. E. Frost. 
S. J. Robins. 



H. Moore . . 
T. Davies . . 
D. J. Hiley . . 
J. T. Briscoe 
T. R. Williams 
R. Richard . . 



H. Knee . . 

R. C. Griffin 

W.Tucker .. 
J. M. Logan 



R. Glover, D.D. 



R. H. Coe . 

C. Griffiths . 
G. Jarman . 



1879 
1895 



x886 
1893 
1893 
1895 
1893 
1887 



1883 

1895 

X871 
1891 



1869 



1891 

x88i 
x88z 



O. 
B. 



G.H. 
O. 



B. 
B. 
B. 
B. 
B. 
B. 



B. 
B. 



2l6 



LIST OF CHURCHES. 
GLOUCESTERSHIRE-H:(m/tfiMMf. 



Bristol (coHtd,y- 
Stations of the Bristol 
Baptist Itinerant 
Society: 

Backwell 

Barrow Gumey 
Bedminster, Victoria 
Park, John's Lane 

Blagdon 

Breach Hill . . . . 

Chariton 

Chew Magna 

Dundry . « . . 
Eastviile . . . . 
Hallen .. .. 
Littleton . . . . 
Nempnett . . . . 
Patchway .. .. 
Rickford . . . . 
Ridgehill .. .. 
St. George 
Winford .. .. 
Chalford, Tabernacle 

Frampton Mansel 
Charlton Kings . 
Cheltenham (42,9x4): — 

Cambray 

ElmstoHS . . . . 

Birdlip 

UckingtoH . . . . 
Clarence-parade, 

Salem 

Brockhampton 
Gas-green . . . . 
Lezkhampton 
Naunton-parade. 

Providence 

St. James'-square . . 

Chipping Campden . . 

Broad Campden ., 

Chipping Sodbury 

Acton-lane .. .. 

Cinderford 

Steam Mills .. .. 
Greenbottom 
Cirencester. Coxwell-st. 

Coleford 

Joy ford 

Symonds Yat 

Downend 

Eastcombe (Stroud) .. 

Fairford 

Kemps/ord . • . . 

MaUeykampton . . 

Fishponds (Bristol) . . 



140 



1850 

1845 
X858 
1829 
X828 
1889 
1850 
1889 
1842 
1888 
1854 
1851 
1846 
1824 
1740 

1875 
1843 



1833 



836 



1870 
1746 
1780 

656 
1873 
1843 



200 
50 
zoo 

190 

300 

70 

100 

80 
100 
220 
200 

85 
150 

150/ 
500 
100 
250 

1000 
100 
140 



1300 

120 
280 
160 

300 
650 
300 

270 
80 
920 
280 
100 
400 
800 



1635 
1799 

X893 
180I 
1700 
1876 

1841' 420 



250 
630 
250 
150 



356 



96 



224 

53 
43a 

620 



26 

25 
40 

6x 

413 



86| 
261 



37 
X32 



114X 



145 24 29X 



280 
102 
397 



357 

78 

350 

145 



70 
88 

155 
1580 



137 
450 



73 
X30 



15 



D. R. Morgan 



187 1 



H.A. B. PhiUips. 



R.G.Fairba'm,B.A 



W. Brooke . 
P. Lewis 
A. Lemon . 
J. George 

W.Ross' ! 



G.A.Webb.. ..1893 
J. Evans . . . . 1890 
A. R. Morgan . . X890 



X895 
1890 

X890 

1895 
Z885 
X890 

189Z 



T. S. Campbell . . 1890 B. 



G.H. 
G.H. 
G.H. 

G.H. 



O. 

B. 

G.H. 



G.H. 
G.H. 



B. 

G.H. 

O. 



GLOUCESTERSHIRE. 



217 



GLOUCESTERSHIRE— coM^'nMi. 



Gloucester (39.444) :— | 
Bmnswick-road ...18x3 

LUtU Witcombe 

Barton-terrace 

Suffolk-street 

South End .. 
Com Exchange ...1893 Hall 

Hanham 11714 350 

Hillsley (Wotton) ..1730 350 

Kingstanley |x640 400 

Lechlade ;i8z9! 250 

Longhope, Zion .. ..11846 aao 

Lydbrook '1857 

Lydney I1834 

Bowlash 
Minchinhampton . . ! 1824 
Nailsworth, Shortwood 1715 

Nymphsfield . . . . 1760 
Naunton and Guiting. . 1800 

Nupend 1827 

Old Sodbury 1835 

LittU Sodbury 

Codrington . . 

Parkend . . . . 



i860 150 



Ruardean Hill . . 
Slimbridge (Stone- 

house) 
Stapleton . . . 
Stow-on-the-WoId 

DonningtoH . 
Stroud :— 
John-street 

Painsvick . . ... 

Pagan HiU .. --^ 

Tetbury 

Tewkesbury . . . . 

Twyning 
Thombury . , . . 

Morton .. .. 

Tytherington 

Woodford . . 

Uley 

Wickwar . . . . 

Yate Rocks . . 
Winchcombe 

Winstone . . . . 

Woodchester 
Wotton-under-Edge 
Yorkley 



1845 

1834 
1890 
t66o 



450 
350 

650 
700 
160 
400 
200 
150 
120 
80 



350 



350 



1824 750 
1832' 150 



1720, 320 

1655I 400 

1780 300 

1839 100 

1842 140 

.. I 70 

1820, 400 

1863 200 

188 I 50 

1874 230 



1822 

1833 
1717 
T860 



150 
250 
450 
230 



294 



138 
Z08 



119 

35 
107 

93 

98 
266 

80 
70 
46 



30 

30 

14 
27 
90 

163 
19 



30 
xo 
24 

19 
66 
80 
54 



16 



24 



783 



320 
150 



15 



192 

X40', 2 

3 

2 



x6 
14 


275; 
180 


15 


z8o 


35 


299 


X2 


X23 


1 


102 
60 


14 


90 


8 


120 


6 
8 


50 
80 


z6 


262 


26 


190 


zo 
5 


55 
48 



2X I 150 
27 219 



67 

36 

175 



60 
Z20 
150 



W. E. Rice , 



J. E. Barton 
P. H. Michael 



1894 



..I1890 



W. J. McKittrick |i886 



A. W. Latham 
E. Davis 

H.J. Wicks.. 
A. M. Nickalls 



G.H. 



G.H. 

B. 

B. 
G.H. 



.!i883 
.;x88i 

1889 
. 1890 



A. J. Parker 



( S. J. Elsom, ) 
I of Yorkley f" 

G. Neighbour . . 

G. Steele . . . . 
J. E. D. Beresford 
F. E. Blackaby 



I C. A. Davis 

T. N. Smith 
J. E. Brett . . 

G. Rees 



1888 

1891 

1895 

1864 
1890 
x88i 

1895 

1895 
1890 

1872 



O. 
G.H. 
G.H. 
G.H. 

B. 
B. 

O. 
G.H. 



T. Whittard.. 
( J. Evans, of 
1 Eastcombe 



S. Mann 
S. J. Elsom . 



1873 
1890 



1891 
1887 



B. 

G.H. 
G.H. 



B. 
O. 



G.H. 



G.H. 
G.H. 



G.H. 
B. 



G.H. 
G.H. 



B. 
G.H. 



2l8 



LIST OF CHURCHES. 



HAMPSHIRE {Pop., 690.974). 
(S., Southern. B., Berks. H. C, Home Counties.) 



Aldershot 

Ash VaU {Swrrw) 

AUbrook 

Andover 

Smannell . . . 

Ashley (Lymington) . . ' 

Beaulieu Rails . . . 

Blackfield Common 

(Fawley) 

Boscombe 



Bournemouth (37,781): 

Lansdowne 

West Cliif Tabernacle 

Brockenhurst .. 

Broughton . . . . 

Winterslow, Wilts 

Stockhridge 

Christchurch.. .. 

Cosham, East 

Cove 

East Parley . . . . 

Emsworth . . . . 

Prinstead .. 

Fleet 

Gosport :— 
Avenue-road . . 
Grove-road, Hard way 
Brockhurst . . . 

Forton , 

Stoke-road (U.) 

Hartley Row , 

Isle of Wight :— 

Colwell 

Cowes, West .. ., 

Newport (10.216): — 

Castlehold . . . 

Niton 

Roud 

Ryde (10,952) :— 
George-st., Christ 
Church 
Oddfellows' HaU 
Park-road 
Oakfield . . 
Sandown . . . . 
Ventnor . . . . 
Wcllow . . . . 
Yarmouth .. .. 



1883 
z86o 
1894 
1824 
1828 
1817 
18x7 

1833 
1875 

1875 
1880 
1841 

1655 
1866 
1885 
1875 



1856 
1827 
X848 
1852 
Z846 

1883 
i860 
1858 
1811 
1865 
1807 

1836 



450 
250 

65 
450 
xoo 
250 
300 

300 
300 

650 

560 

200 
200 
xoo 
xoo 
200 
200 

120 

230 

50 

300 

550 

120 
250 

350 

250 
200 

150 



1866 300 

1809! 650 

I835I 230 

1830 X20 



18491 550 

1890 250 

1866 400 

x88i| 40 

I882I 300 

1866 350 



1804 
I82X 



200 
zoo 



66 


14 


120 


9 


6 


50 


20 






97 


24 


125 




8 


45 


63 


13 


92 


38 


5 


63 


60 


10 


75 


128 


19 


174 



2551 15 



216 
26 

51 
10 

*48 
24 
3 
25 
35 

'48 

X42 
29 
33 
55 



zo 



21 

XIX 



83 
15 

178 
xoo 

69 

49 
50 
zo 



65 

62 
80 

30 

xai 

35 
80 

202 
92 
75 

135 



40 

70 
104 

2X2 

95 

32 



153 
84 
67 

40 

68 



2331 5 

2071 9 

95| 3 

50 3 



E. P. Connor 



E. Edginton 
H. New.. ., 



(W. V. Robin-) 
i son. B.A. J 

W. C. Minifie 
G. Wainwright 



}„., 



A. Tree.. 
W. H. Barham 



A. G. Barley 
T. S. Fidge.. 

J. S. Wyard 

B. French . . 
J. S. Haggett 
J. Pitman.. 



G. Sparks . 

A. E. Johns . 
J. Bateman . 



E. B. Pearson 

E. Haggis . . 

A. G. Short . . 
J. N. Rootham 



II 
^5 



X893 



, 1892 
. 1887 



, X891 

1893 
, 1888 



1894 



,1893 
1895 

, 1890 

. 1876 
1894 
1894 



,1867 

1890 
, 189X 



, 1888 

1893 

, X889 
.1887 



H.C. 

S. 

S. 

s. 
s. 

s. 
s. 

s. 
s. 
s. 

S. 

S. 



s. 

s. 

s. 
s. 



s, 
s. 

s. 
s. 



s, 

s. 

s. 
s. 
s. 
s. 



HAMPSHIRE. 



219 



H AMPSH I REr-continued. 



Lockericy, Ejj.iezjj 
Loch^rley Green 
Mottis/ont . . 
Lymington . . . . 
Lyndburst . . . . 

Milford 

Tiptoe^ Jireh, . 

O Jiham 

Portsmouth (159,251): — 
Southsea — 

Elm-grove . • . . 
Denmead {Cosham) 
Castle-road, 

Immanuel . . . . 
WeUington-strut 
Landport, 

Commercial-road 
Portsea. Kent-street 

Lake-road 

Alfred-street ,. .. 

London-road. . . . 

Westboums .. .. 

Poulner (Ringwood) .. 

Romsey, Bell-street . . 

Ashfield 

Sholing 

Southampton (65,325): 

Carlton 

East-street . . . . 

Portland 

Eastleigh . . . . 

Shirley (U.) 

Sway 

Waterlooville (Cosham) 

Whitchurch 

5/. Mary Bourne . . 

Winchester (19,073) : — 

City-road 



18791 150 
i860 ZOO 

i688| 620 

1700, 150 

1816! 300 

1820 100 



1877 



1854 
1881 

1892 
1893 

1798 
1704 
18x8 
1870 
1894 
1889 
1840 
1750 
1889 
1879 

1861 
1689 
1840 
1888 
1852 
1827 
1856 
1690 
1842 



x6o 



950 
150 

300 

200 

550 
800 
1250 
200 
250 
ZOO 
Z20 
250 

200 



700 
600 
750 
250 
300 
100 

350 
220 
100 




z86z 300 



09 


13 


62 


, , 


15 


7$ 


145 


22 


Z98 


32 


12 


85 


51 


3 


18 




7 


48 


24 


4 


26 


505 


.. 


.. 


34 


6 


45 


238 


20 


135 


•• 


zz 


83 


139 


26 


349 


167 


z8 




895 


51 


851 




13 


256 


•• 


30 


466 


21 


7 


70 


87 


xz 


94 


•• 


3 


34 


186 


25 


246 


145 16 


X42 


312; 33 


320 


701 13 


ZXO 


i07i 31 


333 


11 5 


47 


32 






41 


8 


74 


lOI 


z6 


ZXI 









2 

Z 

3 

5 
3 


J.Collins .. .. 
T. W. Scamell .. 
G. R. Taaswell . . 

J.T.Lane .. .. 
J. P. WilUams . . 
J. Kemp . . . . 
J. Harrison . . . . 


1879 
1890 
Z89X 

189Z 
1882 
Z892 
Z89Z 


II 

I 
8 


C. Joseph . . . . 

D. B. Griggs 

E. Diflfey .. .. 


Z889 
1895 
Z892 








'6 

xa 

1 


N. T. Jones-Miller 

B. J. Gibbon 
Carey Bonner . . 

C. A. Fellowes . . 
E. R.PuUen .. 


1890 
1892 
1895 
1895 
1889 




C. H. Thomas . . 


1885 


7 


A. W. Wood . . 


X893 



s. 
s. 
s. 

B. 
S. 
S. 



220 LIST OF CHURCHES. 

HEREFORDSHIRE {Pop,, 1 15.949)- 

(G. Hm Gloucestershire and Herefordshire. B., Breconshire.) 

(M. E., Monmouthshire English.) 



Ewias Harold . . . . 

Foothog (Cymyoy, nr. ] 

Abergavenny), Y 

Tatx^acle . . . . j 

Fownhope, Old Way . . 

Common Hill. • . . 

Garway and 

Orcop 

Gorsley 

CrowhiU 

Kempiey 

Four Oaks . . . . 
Hereford (20,267) : — 

Commercial-road . . 
Kington 

LyoHshall . . . . 

Ljedbury 

Leominster 

Kingsland . . . . 
Longtown, Salem 
Peterchurch . . . . . . 

Bredwardine,, .. 

Preston-on-Wye .. 
Ross, Broad-street 

Layshill 

Ryeford (Ross) .. .. 

Whitestonc (Withing- 

ton) 




X862 

1837 
1826 



1817 
Z820 
X831 

1837 
1856 



1829 
1805 
1862 
X836 
1656 



1843 
1820 



X819 
1832 
X662 

1817 



200 

200 
XOO 
130) 
200 ) 
465 
X65 
100 



650 

500 

200 

280 
300 



150 

250 

150 

X20 
X5O 

200 



60 XO 



z86 



216 
59 

23 
57 
14 
37 
93 



157 
20 
82 

26 



30 
10 
54 

90 

no zx 

60 



294 
70 

27 
30 

57 



157 
60 

35 



T. Williams 
(J.N. Smith (see] 
{ also pp. 267 and 
I 285) J 

W. Pontifex. . . 



J. Hook 
E. Ashton 



J. Meredith . . 
W. B. Nichols 

J. Haurper 



. Cole . 



J. Beard .. 

}j. J. Knight 
E. Watkins . . 

W. Price . . 



^1 
^1 



1876 G.H. 
X890 B. 
X893 G.H. 



X887 
x88z 



G.H. 
G.H. 



1892 
1893 

1893 
1892 



1864 



Z894 



G.H. 
G.H. 

G.H. 
G.H. 

M.E. 
G.H. 



G.H. 



X876 G.H 
Z884 



HERTFORDSHIRE. 



221 



HERTFORDSHIRE {Pop., 220,162). 
For oiher Churches in Hertfordshire, see " METROPOLITAN," pp. 233—241. 
^ (H. U., Herts Union. M., Metropolitan.) 



Bedmond . . . . 
Berkhamsted 
Frithsden 
Bishop's Stortford 
Farnham (U.) 
{Esstx) 
Bovingdon . . . . 
Bozmoor . . . . 
Breachwood Green 
Chipi>erfield . . . . 
Flaunden (U.) . . 
Hemel Hempstead 

Leversioch-grten 
Hitchin:— 
Mount Zion 
Tilehouse-street 
Preston .. .. 
Stondon . . . . 
WymondUy .. 
Datckworth .. 
Walsworth-road 
WhUwell . . 
King's Langley . . 
Abbotts Langley 
Bedmond 
Long Marston 
Markyate Street . . 
Mensden {see Essex) 
Mill End .. .. 
Northchurch.. .. 

Aldbury 

Redboum Tabernacle 

Rlckmansworth . . . 

St. Albans (12,898):— 

Dagnall-street . . 

London Colney 

Park-street . . 

Tittenhanger . . 

SopwellLane.. 

Essendon 

Tabernacle 

Verulam-road .. 

Sarratt 

Tring:— 
Akeman-street. . 
Aldbury . . . . 
Wigginton 
WUstone . . . . 
High-street 
New Mill .. .. . 
Marsworth {Buek- 
inghamshire) 
Waltham Cross .. 



1854 
1678 
1835 
1819 

1879 
1872 
1826 
1825 
1820 
1836 
1679 
184 1 

X856 
1669 



1893 
1869 



1875 

1893 
1891 
1862 
1813 

1799 
1841 



1843 

1675 
1797 
1813 
1858 
Z889 
1885 
1880 
1853 
1844 

1808 



X655 



1895 



Z20 
650 
XOO 
300 

350 
500 
400 
400 

150 

350 
700 
150 

x6o 
120 
X40 

567 
X50 
150 
120 

150 
500 

250 

XOO 



1870 250 



350 

450 
150 

120 

80 
150 

Z40 

500 

100 

300 

850 
120 

80 



1750 450 



600 



X20 
170 



35 
190 

X03 



40 

214 

X59 

84 

23 

250 



7 
208 



215 

*6o 
23 

X9 
75 



50 



250 



133 
149 



X8 



30 



X20 24 



38 
260 

250 



70 
367 
X84 
83 
21 
250 
60 



40 

300 8 



163 

129 

78 

39 

40 
150 

80 
53 

83 
145 

4x8 
X04 
150 
57 
45 



140 
187 



90 



W. Wood . . 
J. F. Smythe 

W. Walker . . 



Evangelist .. . 
F. J. Flatt . . . 
M. Ashby .. . 

}j. Pringle .. . 

W. W. Robinson 



C. S. Hull 



Evangelist 
T.H.Smith .. 

I D. Macmillan . . 



J. S. Bruce . . 
J. W. Thomas 



W. Fisk .. 
C. M.Hardy, B. A. 

Evangelist 

Evangelist 
H. W. Taylor 
H. J. Wileman 



C. Pearce . . 
H. j. Martin 



1874 
1883 

1893 



X894 
1889 

x886 
X895 



1894 

X890 
z88i 

x888 
1894 



X893 
1886 



z88o 
1894 



1876 
X895 



H.U. 



H.U. 
H.U. 
H.U. 

H.U. 

H.U. 



H.U. 

H.U. 
H.U. 

H.U. 
H.U. 



H.U. 
H.U. 



H.U. 

M. 

H.U. 



H.U. 
H.U. 



222 



LIST OF CHURCHES. 



HERTFORDSUlBE-^ontinutd, 



^i 



^i 






Watford:— 
Beechen Grove 

Hunton Bridge 

Leavesden 
New Bushey . . 
Derby-road, Tabncle 



1707 



1870 
1868 



850 
150 
135 
550 
550 



55a 



160 
84 



583 



3001 

240I 



12 I J. Stuart 



H. T. Spufford 
G. W. Thomas 



1880 H.U. 



1878 
1892 



H.U. 

M. 



HUNTINGDONSHIRE (Po^, 57.761). 
(H.. Hunts.) 



Bluntisham .. .. 
Earith .. .. 
"•"' Coins . . . . 
Bythorn {see Northamp 
Catworth, Great . . 
Fenstanton (U.) .. 



1787 
1841 
1870 
tons 
1834 



Gidding, Great . . 
Godmanchester : — 
Silver-street (U.) 
Gransden, Great . . 
Hail Weston.. .. 
Houghton (U.) .. 

Broughton 

Hemingford .. 
Huntingdon Trinity(U.) 

Brampton . . . . 

Buchden 

Offordd'Arcy 

Hartford . . . . 

LittU Stukeley . . 

Perry 

Siaughton, Gt. . . 

Wistow 

Kimbolton (U.) . . . . 
New Fletton {see North 
Ramsey :— 
Great Whyte . . . . 

Mereside . . . . 

High-street, Salem . . 

St.Ives,FreeChurch(U.) 

Winwick . . . . 

Wistow 

Woodhurst .. .. 
St. Neots :— 
East-street . . . . 
New-street . . . . 
Somersham, Old Mtg. . 
Stanground {see North 
Spaldwick (U.) . . . . 

Warboys 

Yelling 



1793 

1862 
1732 
1668 



1823 
1844 



1692 
amp 

1810 
X833 
1887 

1844 



1866 
1800 
1818 
amp 
1692 
1829 
183 1 



500 
50 
zoo 
hire) 
250 
300 

300 

250 

280 
450 
300 
150 
150 
850 
300 
250 
170 
120 
250 
200 
200 
xoo 

300 

tons 

350 
120 
500 
800 

20O 



300 
700 
350 

tons 
350 
600 
200 



155 



15 



19 



271 



15 



48 
zoo 

43 



W. S. Rowland, 

[m.a, 



S. Burkitt . . 
H. G. Lewis. b.a. 

(C.) 
C. Thew 



34 



50 
hire) 



40 



26 
103 

22 

hire) 
26 
131 



13 



76 
50 



348 



15 



! J. Morton . . . 

W. E. Davies . 
H. Bell (C.) 

R. F. Guyton . 

J. Parr (C.) . . . 

I G. Brown . . . 
I Evangelist. 
\ Evangelist. 

T. G. Gathercole 

S. H. Firks . . . , 



28 

145 
70 

30 
300 



J. N. Throssell . . 
D.Macfadyen b.a 

[(C.) 



J.Clark.. .. 
G. Sneesby . . 

B. J. Holland 
J. Lambourne 



1893 



1890 
1893 

1894 



1887 
1883 
X875 



1890 
1892 

1879 



1889 



1893 

1892 
1891 



1891 
1895 

z886 
1868 



KENT. 



223 



KENT (Po^., 1,142,324). 

For other Churches in Kent, see " METROPOLITAN," pp. 233—241. 

(K. S., Kent and Sussex. M., Metropolitan.) 



Cburches. 



Ashford : — 

Marsh-street . . 
Bessels Green 

Coathurst Common 
Borough Green . . 

Braboume I 

Elmsted | 

Brasted 

BrasUd Chart 

French-street 

Hawley Comer 

Moorhouse . . 

Broadstairs, Providence 

Canterbury (23.062) : — 

Burgate Lane . . . . 

St. George' s-place . . 

TyUr HUl . . . . 

Chatham (31,657) :— 

Clover-street, Zion . . 

Blue BeU HiU . . 

Luton Road .. .. 

Borstal 

Best Street . . . . 

Nelson Road, Enon. . 

Crockenhill (U.) . . . . 

Dial, Victoria-road . . 

Ripple 

Dover (33.300) :— 

Pentside 

Uiggin-street, Salem 

Ewell .. .. 

Ewell Minnis 

St, Margaret's 

Priory-rd. Tabernacle 

Down ('''arnborough) . . 

Eden Bridge 

MarlM Hill 

Haxied 

Eltham, High-street . . 
Krith, Bexley-road . . 

Eynsford 

Kingsdown . . . . 

Eythome 

Adisham .. .. 

Ashley 

Barfrestone .. .. 
Bamsxvell .. .. 

Eastry 

Woodnesborough .. 

Woolwich Green .. 

Famborough, Beulah.. 

PratVs Bottom . . 



1653 650 
1770 210 
1892 . . 



1804 
1818 
1868 
1877 
1882 

1887 



1844 

1845 
1823 



1644 



1842 
1801 
1814 



1820 

1839 
1876 
1878 
1880 
1873 
185 1 
1847 



450 
250 
xoo 
264 

90 
40 
90 

100 
250 



650 
100 

800 
80 



200 
200 

600 



500 
700 
140 

70 
70 

320 

100 

360 

150 

50 



1859 X20 

I792I 340 

X860' 140 

1550 600 

.. , 80 

50 
150 



.. 80 

.. : 100 

i846> 250 

.. I 100 



278 
75 

'60 
67 

115 



25 2 
310 31 



260 



34 

80 

192 



62 

337 



z8; 
181 24 



14 3 
28: 9 



"5 
198 



39 



310 
125 
120 
X40 
87 
15 
240 



12 
262 



X164 



65 
140 
380 



65 
504 



280 



38 
88 
70 
36 
342 



J. Whitaker 
J. Cattell . 



A. F. Cotton 
W. Burnett . . 

J. W. Carter 

J. House 

W. Townsend 

W. Osborne. . 



J. H. Marshall 
N. Dobson . . 



W. E. Palmer 
E. J. Edwards 



W. A. Martin 
I 
9 R. H. Powell 



G. Stanley 



Isaac Ballard 



'1887 K.S. 
11876' 



1895 
1877 

1878 

1892 
1883 

1892 



1889 
1873 



1892 
1877 



1890 
1882 



1892 
1880 



K.S. 
K.S. 



K.S 
K.S. 

K.S. 

K.S. 

K.S. 
K.S. 



M. 
M. 
K.S. 

K.S. 



1866 M. 



224 



LIST OF CHURCHES. 



KENT— «)n/»n««4. 



Faversham (10,478) . 

Brents 

Folkestone (23>90S) • 

UphiU(U.) .. . 

North Street., .. 

Foot's Cray 

Goudhurst 

Gravesend (23,876) :— 
Peacock-street . . . 

Hawkhurst 

Headcom 

Heme Bay 

Lessness Heath . . . 

Loose (Maidstone^ 

Maidstone (32,145) :— 

Providence . . . 

Union-street . . . 

Leeds 

Margate (18,417):— 
Mount Ephraim 
New Cross-street . 
Meopham 

Ash 

New Brompton . . . 
New Romney . . . 

Lydd 

Orpington 

Ford Croft . . . 

Crofton 

Plumstead, East, 

Station-road . . . 
Ramsgaie (24,733) '•— 
Ellington (U.) .. • 
Cavendish 

St. George's Hall . 
Reading-st. ^t. Peter's) 
Rochester (26,290) 

Strood 
St. Mary Cray, Zion 
St. Peter's .. .. 
Sandhurst . . . . 
Sevenoaks . . . . 

Seal. . 
Sheerness-on-Sea : — 
Strode-crescent 

Hal/way.. .. 
Sittingboume 

Bayford-road 

MUton .. .. 

BapchUd .. 
Smarden, Zion . • 
Stttton-at-Hone .. 

j>mtHS Bottom 



1867 
1750 



1836 
1864 

1847 
1891 
1675 
1879 
1805 
1880 

1820 
1833 



1875 
1762 
1832 
1843 
1879 
1888 

1849 



1S80 

1873 
1840 

1871 
1888 

1887 
1710 
1730 
1748 



1868 
1870 
x866 



1744 
1842 
1879 



350 
800 



400 
200 

250 
238 
140 
420 
100 
280 

300 
450 



160 
700 
250 
100 
638 
240 

300 



500 

300 
750 

120 
300 

200 
300 
400 
580 



370 
150 
750 



350 
X40 
40 



^1 



97 

380 
66 



99 
44 

107 
45 
47 
71 
10 
38 

43 
161 

XX 

2X 

216 
92 

283 
58 

176 



163 

72 
290 

19 
139 

36 
84 
X30 
X67 



69 



351 



275 
540 

74 
X30 
231 
180 

79 
121 
35 
75 
41 
60 

56 

30 

60 

306 

75 

531 
130 

362 
70 
50 

714 

125 

222 

43 
155 

76 
90 

1x8 

I20 



60 

40 

588 

80 

86 
45 



41 



T. T. Minchin 
R. F. Jefl&rey 



E. A. Tydeman . 
J. J. Kendon 



S. T. Henman 
J. Watmough 
A. D. Brown 



G.Walker .. 



B. Brigg 
A. B. HaU . . 

W. W. Blocksidge 

C. A. Ingram 

W. Usher, M.D.. 



T. Henson . . . 

W. J. S. Wall . 
T. Hancocks 

C. Denniss . . . 

G. A. Miller. . . 

R. W.Clark.. . 

J. T. Castle . . . 
T. G. Atkinson. 

C. Rudge . . . 



J. R. Hadler 
J. Doubleday 

G. E. Ausden 






1895 

i88x 



K.S 
K.S 



1890 K.S. 



1861 



1891 
1888 
1895 



1895 
1882 

1893 



K.S. 



K.S. 

K.S. 
M. 

K.S. 



1875 



X89X 
1888 

x88x 
1895 

1893 



K.S. 



K.S. 



K.S. 
K.S. 

K.S. 



1886 

1892 
1892 

1871 
1889 

1891 
X894 
1888 
X885 



K.S. 
K.S. 

K.S. 
K.S. 



K.S. 
K.S. 
K.S. 



K.S. 
K.S. 



K.S. 
M. 



KENT — LANCASHIRE. 



225 



KENT— con/ifi«Af. 



1 



Tenterden : — 
High-street, Zion 
Biddenden .. 
Tonbridge :— : 
High-street 
TiinbridgeWells(27,895) 
Calverley-rd., Taber- 
nacle . . . . 
Rusthall(U,).. 
Frant . . . . 
West Mailing 
IVhitstable .. .. 
Woolwich : — 
Anglesea-road 
High-street, Enon 
Queen-street . . 

Yalding 

Wateringbury 



1767^ 270 
100 



1868 



450 



1874 650 



1837' 270 
1869: 350 

1852- 800 

1754! 250 

X78& 500 

1892I 350 



85 



142 



361 

10 

87 
40 

120 
124 
155 
55 



136 
99 

250 



250 

30 
164 
130 

200 

ao4 
300| 

30 



. . ; J. Glaskin . 
5 J. H. Blake . 
10 J. Smith 



3 D. Mace . . . 
. . H. R Passmore. 

A 

.. I E. White .. . 
. . i T. Jones • . . 
5 I D. C. Chapman . 



1881 
X892 
1881 



1889 
1891 



1891 
1877 
1892 



K.S. 
K.S. 
K.S. 



K.S. 
KSs 



M. 

K.S. 



LANCASHIRE tPop,, 3.926,760). 
(L. C^ Lancashire and Cheshire. D. F. M., Denbigh, Flint, and Merioneth.) 



Churches 


1 


f 

1 




(A 


•3| 


1^ 


Piuton. 


n 


J 


Accrington (38,603):— 

Cannon-street . . . . 
Huncoat 


1760 


1900 


588 


51 

21 
38 
29 

36 
31 
13 

34 
33 
100 
I 
31 
x8 
II 
10 
45 


484 

127 
500 
244 

218 
415 
150 

445 

253 

553 

68 

350 

77 

90 

75 
425 


20 

I 

2 
2 

2 
2 


J C, Williams 
IF. J. Kirby.. .. 


185 1 
1895 


}l.c. 


Royds-siTcsi . . • • 










Barnes-street . • • . 


1858 

1836 
1833 
1891 

1889 
1867 
X710 


700 

500 
580 
270 

500 
350 
1000 


1X2 

132 

154 

36 

143 

XX9 
300 


L.C. 


Ashton-under-Lyne 
(40,463) :— 

Welbeck-street. . . . 
Atherton 

Dangerous Comer .. 
Bacup (23,498) :— 

Acre Mill 

Doals, Weir-terrace. . 

Ebenezer 

New Gate .. ., 


E. Hopkins . . . . 
H.V.Thomas .. 


1893 
1890 


L.C. 
L.C. 
L.C. 


G.Charlesworth.. 

A. Harrison 

F. Overend . . . . 

T.B. Field.. .. 


1895 
1893 
1884 

1892 


L.C. 
L.C. 
L.C. 


Irwell-terrace .. .. 
Lane Head-lane 
South-street . . . . 


1821 
1880 
1851 
1851 
1821 


800 
300 
300 

Wo 


177 
62 

51 

40 

240 


L.C. 
L.C. 


South-st., Providence 
Zion 


,, ,, , 


• " 


L.C. 











226 



LIST OF CHURCHES. 



LANCASHIRE— con^mtMif. 



>!l 



Barrow-in-Fumess 
(51.712):— 
Abbey-road 

Blackburn (120,064): — 
Islington . . . . 
Leamington-street 
Montague-street 

Blackpool (23,846) 

Bolton (1x5,002) : — 
Claremont 
Astley Bridge . . 
St. John-street, Zion 
Farnworth 

Briercliffe, Hill-lane . 

Burnley (87,016) : — 

Enon 

Mount Olivet . . . 
Yorkshire-street 
Colne-rd., Ebenezer 
Mount Pleasant 
Haggate(Sc.) .. . 
Angle-strut .. . 
Brierjield . . . 

Bury (57.212J :— 
Knowsley-street 
Chesham 

Church (Accrington) . 

Clayton-le-Moors 

Clitheroe (10,815).. .. 

Cloughfold 

Cloworidge (Burnley) 

Colne 

Coniston 

Dal ton- in- Fumess 

Darwen (34,192) .. . 

Edgeside (Manchester) 

Garston, Tabernacle 

Goodshaw (Rawtenstall) 

Goodshawfold (Rawten 
stall 

Haslingden (18,225) ' — 

Bury-road 

Chapel-st, Adullam 
Trinity 

Haydock 

Hey wood (23,185) : — 
Rochdale-road .. . 

Horwich 

Hurstwood (Burnley) 

Inskip (near Preston) 
Great Eccleston 

Lancaster (3 1 ,038) 
Catofi . . . . 

Leigh 

L.ittleborough 



1875 
1726 

1853 
1858 

1821 
1845 
1883 
1886 
Z840 

1850 
1893 
1828 
1787 
1868 
1767 



1845 
i88x 
1870 
1888 
1888 
1675 
1844 
1769 
1836 
1878 
1858 
1853 
1893 
1753 

1854 

1842 
1855 
i8zi 

1845 

183 1 
1890 
1876 
1815 
1872 
1862 



1872 
1861 



920 

200 
800 
550 
700 

xooo 

550 
300 
340 
350 

750 
300 
700 
750 

650 
850 



300 
160 
750 
300 
200 

750 
500 

760 

300 
350 
480 

650 
350 
780 

172 
410 

200 
830 
250 

240 

250 

320 

80 

520 

500 



x68 
60 



380 
150 
93 
69 
147 

248 
40 
173 
415 
160 

456 



149 
157 
235 
100 

43 
254 

78 
204 

13 

77 
157 
1X9 

73 
205 

19 

x66 
25 

376 
16 

133 
63 
37 
6z 

X32 



69 



35 



502 

200 
X50 
550 
i8z 

441 
320 
x8o 

200 

x8o 

348 

20 
333 
753 
328 
423 
527 

X2I 

z66 
154 
438 
270 
x6o 
279 
195 
440 
48 
136 
245 
166 
170 
436 

134 

358 
50 

560 
90 

292 
120 
42 
50 

x88 

200 
132 



L.C. 



W.A. Morsell .. 



1895 



L.C. 
L.C. 
L.C. 



Chas. Cole . . . 
G. WilUams.. . 
W. L. Williams . 
S. Jones . . . 
A. Gray . . . 

J. Heath . . . 

T. A. Plant, B.A. 
S. C. Allderidge. . 
J. P. Newman 
R. Shoesmith 



B. Bowker . . . . 
F. J. Greening . . 
E. M. Durbin . . 
S.Caldwell.. .. 
R. A. Boothman. . 
W. C.Davies,B.A 



J. G. Anderson 

R. Heyworth 
J. Thomas . . 
T. Thomas . . 



M. Gledhill . . 



Z892 
1878 
1890 
1890 
1895 

1893 

X892 
1893 
1895 



1885 
1894 
1895 
1887 
1891 
1887 



1878 

1882 
893 
1884 



1895 



L.C. 
L,C. 
L.C. 
L.C. 
L.C. 

L.C. 
L.C. 
L.C. 
L.C. 
L.C. 



L.C. 
L.C. 
L.C. 
L.C. 
L.C. 
L.C. 
L.C. 
L.C. 
L.C. 
L.C. 
L.C. 
L.C. 
L.C. 
L.C. 



L.C. 
L.C. 



I. H. James.. 

O. Maden . . 
J. Baxandall 

G. W. Brooker 

E. Towler . . 



1891 

1892 

1873 

1890 
1894 



L.C. 
L.C. 
L.C. 
L.C. 

L.C. 

L.C. 
L.C. 



LANCASHIRE. 



227 



LANCASHIRE— con«nu«<f. 



Charehes. 


1 


1 


No. of 

Sunday School 
Teachers. 


0*1 

S5w 


i 


Pastors 


II 


1 




1 w 






• 




< 


Liverpool (517,980) :— 




















Bootle (49.217) :— 




















Brasenose-rd. (W.) 


1868 


175 


155 


16 


166 


, , 


[.H.Hughes .. 


x888 


DFM 


Derby-road . . . . 


1846 


585 


95 


XZ 


90 


, , 


S.Moore .. .. 


1894 


L.C. 


Bousfield-street (W.) 


1840 


500 


131 


13 


100 


, , 


P. Jones . . . . 


1893 


DFM 


Byrom Hall . . . . 


1861 


1000 


152 


II 


160 


6 


F.G.West.. .. 


1892 


L.C. 


Cottenham -street and 


1875 
1886 


iiol "7 


.. 


.. 


7 






L.C. 


Empire-street 








Edge-lane (W.) 
Evcrton Village (W.) 


X858 
1815 


200 


65 
194 


5 

X2 


50 
IIO 








DFM 


650 


I 


b. Poweli !! \\ 


X889 


DFM 


Everton-road, Fabius 


1863 


560 


159 


22 


185 


4 


C. R. Green 


1888 


L.C. 


Kensington . . . . 

Old Swan . . . . 

Kirkdale. Stanley-pk. 


1825 


1300 


416 


43 


700 


7 


E. E.Walter .. 


1872 


L.C. 


1875 


550 


263 


«5 


400 


6 


H. Cordon . . . . 


1875 


L.C. 


Knowsley-rd. (W.) . . 


1869 


Hall 










L. W. Lewis . . 


1876 


DFM 


Myrtle-street . . . . 


1800 


1800 


527 


71 


610 


, , 


J. Thomas, M.A. . 


X893 


L.C. 


Solway-street 


1867 


260 
















MiU-street .. .. 


1849 


260 
















Spekefidds .. .. 


1878 


70 


47 


19 


236 










5. Helens. Park-rd 


1869 
1875 


500 
303 


1X2 


20 


220 


5 

2 






L.C. 


•*• ** •••*r»*j 1 A 9mw WW w 9m» 

EarUsiown . . . . 


97 


20 


200 


*F.E.' Miller!! !! 


xsi^ 


L.C. 


Brynn 


1887 


200 


6z 


15 


224 










AuRhton 


1874 


200 


40 


10 


70 










Golborm . . . . 




, , 


23 














Pembroke 


1838 


1 150 


380 


24 


209 


3 


C. F.Aked .. .. 


1890 


L.C. 


Walnut-street 


1850 


150 




18 


X47 










Prince's Gate .. .. 


1881 


1000 


188 


30 


350 


, , 


R. Lewis . . . . 


1885 


L.C. 


Richmond 


1865 


900 


399 


54 


590 


., 


J.H.Atkinson .. 


1883 


L.C. 


Leadenhall-street . . 








x8 


300 










Tozteth Tabernacle 


1869 


1200 


600 


40 


550 


xo 


S. J. Jones . . . . 


1895 




MUUr-street 




400 




18 


180 










MiU-street . . . . 




250 
250 


44 


24 
20 


210 
250 


5 


J. C. Elder.. .. 
W. Bathgate . . 


1894 




Tue Brook . . . . 


1876 


L.C. 


Walton, Carisbrooke 


'875 


450 


X52 


24 


320 




X875 


L.C. 


Walton, Rice-lane . . 


1878 


450 


37 


5 


80 




C. F. Perry . . . . 


1895 


L.C. 


Windsor-st. (Welsh) 


1830 


380 


143 


10 


112 


X 


W. Samuel . . . . 


X878 


DFM 


Lumb (Rossendale) . . 


1828 


800 


265 


33 


5x4 


2 


B. T. Davies 


1895 


L.C. 


Manchester (505,368):— 
Brighton-grove 
Broughton, 


1874 


200 


on 


4 


25 








L.C. 


■ 










Gt. Clowes-street 


1880 


400 136 


21 


239 


, , 


J. D. Bray . . . . 


1893 


L.C. 


Coupland-street 


1886 


800 146 


27 


237 6| 


J.O'Neill Campbell 


X893 


L.C. 


Eccles(29,633)Peel-st. 


1878 


270 


80 


18 


X30 


2 


E. K. Everett . . 


1886 


L.C. 


Gorton, West, Birch- 




















street 


1878 


600 94 


34 


750 


, , 




, , 


L.C. 


Clowes-street (U.) 


1868 


600 1 73 


34 


552 




W. A. Livingstone 


X895 


L.C. 


Gorton, Wellington- 




.| 














street 


1861 


550 122 23 1 


262 


I 


T. Armstrong . . 


X893 


L.C. 


Grosvenor - street, 


















Chorlton . . . . 


1845 


750 182 


21 


256 


3 


E. B. Woods, B.A. 


1894 


L.C. 


Hamer-street .. .. 


1894 


300 60 


10 


230 




J. A. Jamieson . . 


1889 


L,C. 


Longsight, Rushford 


















Bar 


1888 


250 1 46 


12 


160 


^ 






L.C. 











P 2 



228 



LIST OF CHURCHES. 



ULNCASHlRE—continued. 



Manchester (contd.): — 
Moss Side 

HalUstreet . 
Openshaw, Higher . . 

Oxford-road (U.) 
WUmott'Strut 
Rusholme, Nelson-si 
Pendleton, Nursery- 
street 

Queen's Park (U.) .. 

Salford (198,139), Gt 

George-st . . . . 

Stretford , Edge-ki( U . ) 

Up.Medlock-st(W.) 

Upper Brook-street, 

Emmanuel . . . . 

Withington . . . . 

Middleton (22,162) 

Millgate (Rochdale) . . 

Mills-hill (Chadderton) 

Morecambe 

Nelson (22,7oo),Carr-rd. 

Ogden 

New Hey . . . . 
Oldham (131,463) : — 

Pitt-street 

King-street .. .. 

Manchester-street .. 

Hollinwood, Beulah 

Oswaldtwistle . . . . 

Cockerbrook . . . . 

Padiham, Burnley-road 

Pendle-street . . 
Preston (107,573) '- — 
Ashton-on-Ribble 
Fishergate . . . . 
Pole-street. . . . 
St. George's-road 

Radcliffe 

Ramsbottom . . . . 

Bank-lane 
Rawtenstall (29,507) 
Rochdale (71,401) : — 
Drake-street . . 
Newbold, Milnrow-rd 
West-street 
Cutgate .. .. 
Shaw . . . . 
CastUton 
Royton : — 
Oldham-road . . 
Rochdale-road . . 

Sabden 

Billington 



1818 
1885 
1873 

1842 
1870 



1873 
1854 

1840 
1865 
1830 

1891 
1892 
1862 
1876 

1853 
1875 
1874 
1783 



1876 
1816 
1863 
1891 
1840 



185a 
1866 

1881 
1783 
1854 
1877 
1880 
1851 
1865 
1872 

1863 
1887 
1773 



1875 
1775 
1798 
1882 



850 
250 
200 

1360 
860 



300 
700 

600 
325 
350 

550 
Hall 
300 
750 
350 
260 
500 
630 



560 
1000 
500 
324 
700 
150 
350 
400 

212 
500 
450 

200 
350 
500 
300 
300 

650 
700 
900 
250 



220 
350 
600 
120 



563 


67 


100 


20 


646 


26 


, , 


54 


• • 


18 


114 


19 


176 


37 


128 


25 


98 


16 


132 


10 


84 


13 


50 


6 


84 


15 


73 


28 


67 


24 


60 


9 


280 


37 


233 


42 


150 


30 


449 


45 


121 


18 


73 


10 


177 


39 




12 


54 


20 


71 


22 


74 


17 


116 


20 


136 


13 


21 


14 


75 


20 


350 


55 


79 


18 


38 


25 


276 


46 


346 


54 




21 


95 


26 


25 


24 


161 


40 


20 


6 



944 
180 

352 
679 
140 

108 
630 

230 
130 
60 

123 

55 
220 

309 
260 
58 
555 
350 



390 

415 
145 
250 

419 
40 

65 
200 

141 
200 

150 
118 
402 
570 

143 

160 
400 
667 
"5 



280 

142 

238 

40 



n 



A. W. H. Streuli 

L. M. Thomas . . 

(A. Maclaren, d.d. 
J. E. Roberts, 
M.A., B.D. 



J. G. Skemp, M.A. 
T. W. Thomason 

J.J. Hargreaves.. 
G. N. WilUams . . 



W. Owen 



C.Deal 

J. Evans .. . 

H. C. Wagnell ! 
D. McCallum . 
W. S. Llewellyn. 



W.Hughes.. 

L. Morris . . 
T. Smedley . . 
A. Woodward 



J.Lee .. .. 

B. A. Evans 
W. H. Harris 
A. Priter . . 
John Snalam 
Isaac Watson 
J. McCleery. . 



S. H. Taylor 
D. O. Davies 



1891 

1894 
1858 

1890] 



1884 
1879 

1893 
1888 



1892 

1894 
1893 

1895 
1889 
1880 



L.C. 
L.C. 
L.C. 

L.C. 

L.C. 

DFM 

L,C. 

L.C. 
UC. 
L.C. 
L.C. 
L.C. 
L.C. 



i88z 

1891 
1891 
1895 



1894 

1891 
1879 

1895 
1877 
1892 
1889 



L.C. 
L.C. 
L.C. 
L.C. 
L.C. 

L.C. 
L.C. 

L.C. 
L.C. 
L.C. 
L.C. 
L.C. 
L.C. 

L.C. 



W. B. Suttle 



1893 
1883 



L.C. 
L.C. 
L.C. 



1889 



L.C. 
L.C. 



LANCASHIRE. 



229 



LANCASHIRE— coHimuAf. 



1 



18B4 



1885 
1888 



St. Anne's-cm-the-Sea 
St. Helen's (71,288):— 

Boundary-road, 
Jubilee 

Hall-street . . . 

Park-road {See Liverp ool.) 
Southport (41.406) :— 

Hoghton-street. . . . 

Princes-street .. .. 

Scarisbrick New-rd. 
Sunnyside (Rawtenstl.) 



Tottlebank , 

Tyldesley (W.) .. . 

Ulverston 

Vale, near Todmorden 
Warrington (52,743):— 

Golbome-street 
Waterbam 

(Stacksteads) .. 
Waterfoot . . . . 

Widnes 

Wigan (55.0x3):— 

King-street 

Scarisbrick-street 
Bottling Wood 



1861 
1876 
1887 
1847 
1669 



187 1 
1851 

1869 

1847 
1854 
1871 

X826 
1796 



350 



400 
300 



750 

200 
950 
500 

200 

Hall 
400 
750 

350 

700 
600 
250 

550 
550 



49 



X37 
109 



3x9 

9 

320 

X39 
34 
28 
48 

158 

56 

324 
152 
56 

169 

137 



70 



147 
245 



158 

300 
240 

47 
no 
100 
291 

X20 
786 

447 
150 

400 

270 

35 



J. W. Varley 

N. Macleod.. 
W. Holroyd.. 

J. J. Fitch ., 



A. Tildsley . • 
T. Taylor • . 
A. M. Ridden 
J. Lewis 
R. L. Houston 



A. D. Garrow 
£. L. Jones . . 

G.J. Cliflf .. 
F. G. Kemp 



1894! L.C. 



1893 
1888 



1883 



1894 
184X 
1894 
1890 
1894 



L.C. 
L.C. 

L.C. 

L.C. 

|l.c. 

DFM 
L.C. 
L.C. 

L.C. 



1895 
1893 

1895 
1886 



L.C. 
L.C. 
L.C. 

L.C. 
L.C. 



LEICESTERSHIRE {Pop., 373.584)- 
(E.M.. East Midland.) 



II 



Appleby 

Amsby 

Bruntingthorpe 

SaddingtoH . . 
Ashby-de-la-Zouch 
and Packington 
Barrow-on-Soar .. 
Barton Fabis(Nuneaton) 

Bagworth 

Barlestone 

Bosworth 

Congerstone .. 

Desford .. .. 

Newhold Verdon 
Billesdon :— 
Back-street 
West-lane.. .. 
Blaby 

Whetstone . . 



X820 
1667 



1807 

1820 
1745 



x8x3 
1846 
X807 
X855 



200 

500 

80 

60 

500) 

250 [ 

300 
400 
300 
250 
xoo 
xoo 

288 
120 

x6o 

X50 

500) 

270J 



15 
93 

180 
47 

263 



30 

4 

X90 



27 
92 

14 
x8o 

X20 



383 

30 
450 



17 



( W. S. Lord,on 
t Measham.. ) 
G. Hirst . . . . 



J. D.T.Humphreys 
J. D. Alford.. .. 

( J. R. Godfrey . . 
IG. E.Payne 



J. B. Field .. 
Geo. Barker 



1893 
X885 

1893 
1896 



E.M. 
E.M. 

E.M. 
E.M. 



1885 1 
1888 I 



X887 
X879 



E.M 



E.M. 



330 



LIST OF CHURCHES. 



LEICESTERSHIRE— «>n«nfi«rf. 



I 



Castle Donington 
(Derby) .. .. 
Weston .. .. 
Coalville :— 
London-road . . 
Ashby-road 
Countesthorpe . . 
Earl Shilton (Hinckley) 

Fozton 

Hathem 

Hinckley 

Hose. Chapel-street . . 
Long Clawson 

Httgglescote 

CoUorion . . . . 
Husband's Bosworth . . 

Walton 

North KUworth .. 

Ibstock 

Kegworth and . . ) 
Diseworth (Derby) ) 
Leicester (174,624) : — 
Archdeacon-lane . . 

Smeeton 

Belgrave (U.) . - • . 

Belgravc-rd. Tabncle. 

Belvoir-street .. .. 

Ahh^ Gate .. .. 

AyUstone . . . . 

Harvey-lane . . . . 

Huncote 

Cropstone . . . . 
Carley-street . . • . 
Charles-street .. .. 
West Humberstone 
Clarendon Hall 
Dover- street .. .. 

Friar-lane 

FUekney 

Croft 

Melbourne Hall 
Paradise-place . . 
ChristoW'Street . . 
Palfnerston-street, . 
New Park-street, 
Emanuel (U.) 

Victoria-road . . 

Long Whatton . . 
Lougbboro' (18,196):— 
Baxter-gate 

Moira-strut .. 

Wymeswold .. 



X774 



500 

600 
650 
350 
320 
200 
150 



X835 

1879 

1836 

1758 

1716 

1840 

Z766 600 

Z850 210 

1845 

1798 

1823 

1793 

1833 

1856 

X878 



120 
625 
200 
200 
xoo 

80 
320 



1760 500 



1790 



1875 
1869 
1760 

Z878 



Z864 

1876 
1850 



950 

150 
500 

600 
1300 
250 
200 
700 

150 
70 



Z876 520 

I83Z 

Z876 

1894 

Z823 

z66s 



Z878 
1879 



1873 
1866 
1799 

1770 



800 
250 

zooo 
750 

zooo 

Z30 

zoo 

Z250 

z8o 



800 

zzoo 
230 

Z250 

400 



Z30 



205 
Z30 

69 

57 
40 
48 

2Z5 

79 
8 

195 

28 



Z14 
Z70 

4X2 



Z28 

515 



X95 
"6 

2ZZ 
318 

ZZ9 
345 
330 
65 
9 
743 



158 

312 
34 

462 
22 



450 

250 

Z22 

z8o 
35 
90 

561 
65 
30 

450 

90 



295 
240 



959 



328 
660 
310 

70 
382 

44 

36 
365 
323 
Z50 
400 
314 
401 
126 

68 

2XZ3 



495 

325 
78 

652 
80 
45 



F. Pickboume 
J. H. Grant . . 
E. Yexnm . . 



Price Williams 



E.M. 



Z882 

1895 
z88x 



X892 



E.M. 
E.M. 
E.M. 
E.M. 
E.M. 
E.M. 
E.M. 
E.M. 



Chas. Barker 
B. Dickizis . . 

A. E. Johzison 
T. Adamson 

W. Bishop . . 

R. Y. Roberts 
W. Priestnall 
J. Thew .. 

J. Cornish . . 



J. C. Forth . . 
R. Caven, B.A. 

F. J. Feltham 
W. Evans . . 
J. Evans 



W. Y. FuUerton. 



(G. S. S, Saun-1 
1 ders(C.) ..I 
( J. G. Green- ) 
t hough. M.A. J 



Z889 
1894 

1895 
X892 

Z869 

1879 
z888 
Z872 



X885 



1875 
1875 

Z892 
Z87Z 
Z890 



1894 

1894 
Z879 



E.M. 
E.M. 

E.M. 

E.M. 



E.M. 

E.M. 
E.M. 
E.Mv 



E.M. 



E.M. 
E.M. 

E.M. 
E.M. 
E.M. 



E.M. 



E.M. 

E.M. 
E.M. 



E. Stevenson . 
R. F. Handford. 



1893') 






LEICESTERSHIRE — LINCOLNSHIRE. 



231 



LEICESTERSHIRE— con««f<e<f. 



I 



Loughboro' {conid.}: — 

Wood-gate 1846 

Market Harboroug^ . . 1830 
Melton Mowbray. . . . 1867 
Mount Sorrel . . . . 1820 

Oadby 1795 

Overseal {see Siaffordsh ire.) 
Quomdon .. .. .. 1770 

Rothley 1800 

Shepshed, Chamwood- 

road 169s 

Belton-street .. .. 1822 

Sileby 1800 

Stttton-in-the-Elms .. 1650 

Cosby 1830 

Syston 1869 

Thurlaston (Hinckley) 1787 

Whitwick 1832 

Woodhouse Eaves . . 1807 



830 
300 
400 
300 
224 

400 
300 

550 

250 

90 

350 
160 
200 
200 
300 
260 



352 
80 

53 
54 
88 

56 
35 

126 
81 

94 

80 
23 
44 
53 



360 
132 
85 
145 
174 

102 
65 

233 
219 

'56 
90 

120 
26 

z8o 
47 



S. P. Carey, M.A. 
C. A. Slack . . . . 
J. Ney 



W. G. Branch 



E. M. Andrews. 

w.'buu,'b.a! 

W. Maynard 



1893 
892 
1891 

1892 



1890 

1857 
1895 



E.M. 
E.M. 
E.M. 
E.M. 
E.M. 

E.M. 
E.M. 



E.M. 
E.M. 
E.M. 
E.M. 

E.M. 
E.M. 
E.M. 
E.M. 



LINCOLNSHIRE {Pop,, 472.878). 
(E.M., East Midland. Y., Yorkshire.) 



Boston (14.593) '— 
High-street 

Witham Green 
Liquorpond-st. , Salem 

Cowbridge . . 

Holland Fen . . 
Bourne 

Dyke . . . . 

Hacconby 

Morton .. .. 

GedneyHiU .. 

StainfUld 
Burgh & Monksthorpe 
Coningsby (Boston) . . 
CrowIe (Doncaster): — 

MUl-road 

Epworth & Butterwick 
Fleet, Hargate-street . 

Gedney Broadgaie 

Gosberton 

Grantham (16,746) : — 
Wharf-road .. 

BotUsford . . 



X653 
1770 



1646 



Z820 

1669 
1651 

1599 
1599 
1681 

z666 

1859 
1789 



600 

350 
100 
120 
450 
150 
100 
200 
150 

350 
200 

150 
400 
450 
120 
212 

500 
X50 



z86 
86 



224 



21 
28 

45 
41 
100 

42 

97 



294 

75 

20 

60 

456 



50 
40 

150 
40 

X04 
60 
96 

178 





Pastors. 


If 


1 


I 


C. Waterton 


1888 


E.M. 


2 


W. Sexton .. .. 


1880 


E.M. 


12 


G. H. Bennett . . 


1882 


E.M. 


•• 


G.F.Pitts .. .. 
A. Evans . . . . 


1893 
1894 


E.M. 


7 
2 


W.Rowton-Parker 
G. Camp . . . . 
W. F. Dart.. .. 


1887 
1894 
1893 


Y. 

E.M. 
E.M. 


.. 


F. Todd . . . . 


1894 


E.M. 


4 


G. B. Bowler 


1866 


E.M, 



232 



LIST OF CHURCHES. 



LINCOLNSHIRE— a)«/m««*. 



a 


1 


4 


h 


& 


1 


n 


II 




'^ 




CO 



Grimsby (51.934) i— 
Victoria-street 
Freeman-st., Zion . . 

NewClee 

Holbeach 

Homcastle 

Kirton-in-Lindsey 
Lincoln (41 491):— 
Thomas Cooper 

Memorial . . . . 

Mint-street . . . . 

Monk's-road . . . . 

Long Sutton . . . . 

LouUi (10,040) : — 

Northgate 

Asterhy 

Donnington .. .. 

Eastgate 

MtMbv-U-Marsh .. 
Lutton, Chapel Bridge.. 

Skegness 

Spalding 

Podehole . . . . 
Spending Common 

Sutterton 

Sutton St. James. . . . 
Tydd St. GiUs . . 



1826 
1868 
1880 
1879 
1767 
1663 



1652 
1767 
1881 
1840 

Z802 



1761 

1849 
1696 

1700 

1894 
1646 



1813 
1792 



1 100 
700 

150 
230 
250 
230 



600 
590 

400 

380 
500 

xoo 
75 
375 
120 
120 
500 
650 
x6o 
200 
340 
250 
120 



320 
85 
35 
24 
21 
59 



140 
105 
x66 



131 

80 

4 

X3 

40 

297 



18 



510 

141 

200 

18 

25 
no 



243 
168 

185 



80 

23 

90 

530 



50 

120 



8 I J. Edmonds.. . 
.. I R. C. Ford, M.A. 
6 



I. 



W. Smith 



F. A. Jackson 
A. A. SavUle 



E. H. Jackson 



F. Norwood. 



W.J. Pond.. .. 
5 G. Goodchild . . 
17 J. C.Jones, M. A.. 



J. Britton . . 
A. E. Cawdron 



II 



1894 
1894 



1895 



1895 
1894 



E.M. 

E.M. 
E.M. 
E.M. 



E.M. 
E.M. 
E.M. 
E.M. 



1877 



X887 

Z890 

1893 
1846 



X895 
1894 



E.M. 



E.M. 



E.M. 
E.M 



E.M. 
E.M. 



METROPOLITAN. 



233 



METROPOLITAN. 

Includes all Churches within the limits op the Metropolitan Postal 
District, and also Churches outside that District which are con- 
nected WITH THE London Baptist Association. 

{Population of Administrative County of London, including the Cityt 4,232,1x8.) 

(L., London. M., Metropolitan. E., Essex Union. H. U., Herts Union. 
H. C, Home Counties. C. C, Carmarthenshire and Cardiganshire.) 



Acton, Church-road . . , 
Acton-lane Tabernacle 

Alperton (Sudbury) . . , 

Balham, Ramsden-road 

Barnes : — 
Stanton-road .. .. , 
Roehampton .. .. , 



Bamet, New . . . . 
Henry Road .. .. 
Battersea : — 

York-road 

Battersea Pk. Tabernacle 
Raywood'Street School 
Beckenham, Elm-road 

Belle Isle 

Blundell-strut . . 

Belvedere 

Bermondsey : — 
Dmmmond-road . . , 
Lynton-road .. .. . 
Abbey-street .. .. , 

Spa-road , 

Bethnal Green, Norton- 
street , 

Bezley Heath, Trinity 
Blackheath :~ 
Shooter's-hill-road .. , 

Bloomsbury , 

Meard'Strut, Soho 
Keppel-street .. .. 
Bow:— 

Bow Road 

Dj if t Mission 
Burdett-rd., East London 
Tabdmade . . . . 
Mamham Hall 
Devonport'Street .. 
Tfyphena Hall . . 
Empson-street 




1874 750 



1868 



1873 



1736 
1870 



X884 
1877 
1879 
1863 

x866 
1813 
1878 
1845 

1854 
1823 

1866 
1849 

1795 

1785 



300 



387 



900 
1200 



x86i 
1881 
1888 



400 
550 
300 
240 

668 
-400 
450 
300 

250 
460 

400 
1440 

650 

1000 
130 

3200 

350 

800 



»85 



200 
327 



152 



399 
63 

75 
40 

94 
"3 

227 



103 
223 

2388 
2x9 



23 



485 
563 
180 
194 



703 

190 

210 

80 

X20 
250 

185 



190 
500 

1542 



70 ,1060 



W.A.Davis.. 
W.Archer .. 
A. J. W. Back 
T. Greenwood 



A. E. Jones.. •• 1888 



W. Hamilton . . 1885 
W. Stott . . . . 1892 

R. S. Fleming.M.A. 1892 
J. Benson . . . . 1872 

A. C. Chambers. . 1891 

H. A. Burleigh 

B. T. Dale . . 
A. V. G. Chandler 



G. W. Shepherd. . 1892 
G. K.Smith.. .. 1877 

W. L. Mackenzie..! 1894 
J. Baillie .. ..1 1886 

H. T. Chilvers ..I1895 



A. G. Brown 



1866 



234 



LIST OF CHURCHES. 
METROPOLlTAN-^ontinusd. 



Bow Common . . . , 
Blackthorn-street, , 
Workmens' Home . , 
Brixton : — 
Barrington-road, Gresham 

Solon-road 

Cornwall-road Hall . . 
Stockwell-road Taber- 
nacle 

Wynne-road 

Brixton Hill :— 
New Park-road . . . . 
Long-lane, Southwark. 

Raleigh Park 

Brockley-road 

Cruk'Street, Deptford. . 

New-street 

Trinity HaU 

Brompton : — 

Onslow 

Bromley, Kent : — 

Park-road 

S Herman' s-road . . . . 

Brondesbury 

Camberwell : — 
Camber well New-road, 

Clarendon 

Cottage-green 

Denmark-place . . . . 
Edmund-street . . . . 

Leipsic-road 

Dugdale-street . . . . 

Mansion House-square . . 

Camberwell-gate, Arthur-st. 

Camden-road 

Goodinge-road . . . . 
Camden Town (i68, Cam- 
den street), High Schools 
Canning Town, Shirley- 
street 

Catford-hill 

Bell Green 

Chadwell Heath 

Chalk Farm, Berkley-road 
Chelsea, Lower Sloane-st.. 

Child's-hill 

Clapham : — 

Bedford-road 

Courland-grove . . . . 

Graf ton-square 

Clapham Junction, Meyrick- 
road 



1867 



1869 
1885 



1884 
1875 

1840 
1880 
1889 
1867 
1878 
1879 



1852 
1863 
1879 



1865 
1854 
1823 



1835 
1880 
1824 
1854 
1884 



1878 
1878 
1883 
1846 
1870 
1817 
1877 

1858 
1841 
1787 

1876 



^J 



700 
630 



650 
950 
500 

600 
700 

500 
400 
400 
870 
400 
150 

650 
500 
780 



900 

350 
720 



520 
600 
820 

IIOO 
Z20 



Z20 

230 
130 

960 
400 

300 
1000 

350 



198 
308 



105 
292 



240 



50 

459 



224 

156 
303 



139 
196 
470 



85 
136 
534 
478 



41 

Z2 
295 

22 

87 
302 

"5 

38 
83 
140 

78 



409 
550 



100 
214 

235 
200 
70 
365 
343 
140 



273 
143 
635 



300 

575 
672 

300| 
Z20 
150 
147 
583 
420 



2 

23 
30 
14 

27 206 
27 254 



143 

12 
267 

43 

140 

205 



37 
106 
220 

300 



T. J. Ha zard 



F.G.Wheeler .. 
J. Douglas, M.A. . 

C. Comwell.. .. 
Z.T.Dowen, M.D. 

W, Pettman 

A. Dickerson 
J. Lewis 



J. Garden 
R. Silvey 
C. W. Vick 



W. B. Haynes 
J. A. Brown . . 
W. R. Skerry 



J. Waite . . . 
G. W. Linnecar , 
R. A. Elvey . . . 
G. Hawker . . . 



W. J. N. Vanstone 



J. Spence 

J.s.~ ■ 



Poulton 



H. Dadswell 
T. Hanger , . 

R. E. Sears 



1889 



1894 
1884 



1871 
1887 

Z889 

1895 
1889 



1889 
1895 
1893 



1892 
1883 
1889 



1894 
1880 

1893 
1885 



M. 

L. 



H.C. 
L. 



L. 
L. 



L. 
L. 
L. 



1895 



1894 
1894 



1893 
x886! 



M. 

M. 

L. 

L.&E. 
L. 
L, 
L. 

M. 
M. 

L. 



1895' M, 



METROPOLITAN. 



235 



METROPOLITAN— con/tntt«i. 



Clapton :— 

Downs Chapel . . . . 
Bendlesham Rooms 
Waterloo Rooms .. 
Chatsworth-road Taber- 
nacle 

Clerkenwell : — 
Chadwell-street 
Spencer-place, Goswell-rd 
Commercial-road East 

Crajrford, Kent 

Saw Mills 

Dart/ord Heath .. .. 

Wilmington 

Croydon (102,695) • — 
South Croydon, Croham- 
road (U.) 

West Croydon 

BosUm-road 

Manorial Hall . . . . 
Dalston :— 

Queen's-road 

Dalston Junction, Ashwin- 

street 

Dartford, Highfield-road . . 
Deptford : — 

Octavius-street 

New Cross-road Zion . . 
Dulwich, Lordship-lane . . 

Bany-road 

Ealing Dean 

Ealing, Haven-green . . . . 
Edmonton, Lower . . . . 

Marsh Side 

Enfield Highway :— 

Totteridge-road . . . . 

Enfield, Tabernacle .. .. 

Erith, Queen-street . . . . 

Northumberland Heath 

Finchley, North 

Dale-grove 

Finchley, East, High-road 

Pinsbury, Eldon-street (W.) 

Do. do. Seventh- 
Day Baptist {late M illyard) 
Forest-gate, Woodgrange 
Forest-hill, Sydenham 
Folham, Dawes-road . . 
Llllie-road. Ebenezer 



1869 
1872 
1877 

Z864 

1851 
1815 

1653 
1810 
1885 



1893 
1869 



183 1 

1871 
18671 

1863 
1842 
1870 
1876 
1864 
x88i 
1859 



X008 

240 

80 

800 

500 
1000 
629 
360 
150 



1868 
1867 
1875 



500 
850 
300 
300 

750 

1250 
350 

580 
650 
570 
320 
400 
824 
400 



400 

417 
650 



1868 



1877 
1822 



400 



250 
450 



16171 •• 

1883 800 

1858) 500 

1889I 700 



t 



526 



203 

255 
150 

2; 



72 
441 



47 

550 
148 

268 
265 
260 

180 
326 
272 



99 
274 
236 



175 



105 
III 



90 



19 
274 49 
163I 26 
175' 38 

4I| 7 



799 



353 

240 
350 
264 



92 
983 
200 

221 
276 



280 
250 
320 
175 

205 
Z20 



578 

190 

472 

80 



I 



670 .. 
210 2 



480 
398 
469 

355 

220 

321 

70 



£. Medley, B.A.. 



W. Moxham 

E. Mitchell . . 
P. Cast.. ., 
J. Fletcher . . 



A. J. Reid 

J. A. Spurgeon, 

[D.D 



R. O. Johns 
H. Spendelow 

D. Honour . . 
T. Jones 

E. T. Mateer 
A. J. Grant . . 
W. L. Gibbs 
Evan Thomas 
D. Russell . . 



A. W. Welch . . 
G. W. White . . 
J. E. Martin 

A. B. Middleditch 

J.J. Bristow 



II 



1891 



1887 

1889 
1861 
1874 



1896 
1869 



J. H. French 
J. C. Foster . . 
R. C. Evill . . 
H. D. Sandell 



1895 
1892 

1867 
1894 
1891 
1882 
1893 
1893 
1863 



1895 
1870 

1875 
1888 
1894 



L. 
L. 

L. 
M. 

L. 

L. 

H.C. 

L. 
L. 



L. 
L. 
L. 



L. 

C.C. 
.&L. 



1882 
1885 
1893 
1894 



L.&E. 



236 



LIST OP CHURCHES. 



METROPOLITAN— cofi««««rf. 



Ch iu cbe*. 



Greenwich : — 
Lewisham-road 
South-street . . . , 
East Greenwich : — 
Azof-street . . . . 
Gunnersbury . . . . 
Hackney : — 
Mare-street . . . < 
Ann's-piace .. ., 
Lauriston-road, Hampden 

Oval 

Hammersmith, West End. . 
Hampstead : — 

Heath-street 

New End 

Hanwell(U.) 

Green/ord 

Horsington 

NorthoH 

Yeading 

Harlesden, Acton-lane 

Harlington 

Harringay, Emmanuel 
Harrow-on-the-Hill . . . . 
Hendon, Finchley-lane 

New Hendon . . . . 

Highbury-hill 

RiversdeUe-road . . . . 
Highgate, Southwood-lane 

Archway-road 

Highgate-road 

Falkland-road . . . . 

Holbom : — 

Kingsgate-street . . . . 

LitUe Wild-street .. .. 

Brooke-street t Holborn 

Drury-lane 

Earl-street, Seven Dials 
Neal-streett Long Acre 
Prison Ground, 

HoUoway 

Prison Ground, 

Wandsworth . . . 

Caledonian-road .. . 

John-st., Theobald's-rd. 

HoUoway, Hornsey-road . 

HoUoway, Upper 

Rupert-road 

HoUoway, ToUington-park 

Homerton-row 

Honor Oak, Mundania-road 
Hornsey : — 
Ferme Park-road . . . . 
Campstoume-road 



1838 
1879 

892 
Z887 

1798 
1882 
1825 
1840 
1793 

i860 
1827 
1867 



600 
950 

250 
650 

1 100 
200 

450 
250 
750 

700 
250 
600 



1890 
1798 
1888 
18x0 
1874 
1884 
1871 



l8l2 

1894 
1878 
1882 

1735 
1867 



157' 30 
640 60 

69i 17 
70 II 



I 280 
'1300 

250 
90 



II 



827 
550 
400 
250 
600 

200 
1050 



335 
702 
850 



800 
1000 



489 89 989 



160 

56 

258 



456 
31 
126, 26 



I 



300 

70 

504 

508 

230 



176 

105 
108 

95 
242 

20 
251 



84 
129 
683 



148 



1818 

1893 
1868 
1878 
z88o 
x8ao 
1890 

1875 



1300 
300 

1340 
300 

350 
650 

630 
250 



283 
280 
120 
130 
250 
100 
350 

50 
124 
120 
709 

70 

230 



252 49 I 490 



31 
918 

21 
78 
155 

390 



30 
730 
254 
50 
100 

305 

224 
350 



C. Spurgeon . . 1879 

W.E. Wells ..1892 
J. P. Clark, M. A. 11892 

J. E. Bennett, B. A. 1 1894 



J. HiUman . . 
H. Myerson. . 
W. Page, B.A. 

W. Brock . . 

G. R. Lowden 



Evangelist 

B. Thomas . . . . 
W. F. Edgerton . 
W. Frith . . . 
W. Dyson . . . 



W. Stevenson . . 

J. H. Barnard . . 

A. F.Riley 

J. Stephens, M.A, 



H. Thomas . . 



1881 

. 1861 

1875 

/1860 

1867 



L. 
H.C. 



H.C. 
L. 



L. 
M. 



1894 

1895 
1888 
1889 



1892 

1864 
894 
1878 



1892 



E. Smart . . 
J. R. Wood . . 

J. J. Cooler . . 
S. T. Belcher 
G. H. Heynes 

C. Brown . . 



1893 
1874 

1894 
189X 
1892 

1890 



L. 

L. 

H.C. 






L. 



L. 

H.C. 
L. 

M. 
M. 



METROPOLITAN. 
hLETROPOLlT M^—eaniinued, 



237 



Chtvchca. 



^1 



Homsey Rise: — 

Eltbome-road 

Hazellville-road . . . 
Ilford, High-street . . . 
Islington : — 

Cross-street 

Salters' Hall, Baxter-rd. 

Wall-street 

Highbury- place . . , 

Wilton-square 

Kentish Town, Bassett-st 
Kilbum, Canterbury-road . 
Kings Cross: — 

Arthur-street 

Vernon-square 

Handel-st. (Henrietta-st.) 
Lambeth : — 
Lambeth-road, Upton 
OakUy-street . . . . 
Waterloo-road . . 
Ethelred-street, Regent 
Leer- 
High-road 

Burnt Ash, Bromley-road 
Sutntner/ield-street 
Hither Green . . . . 
Dacre-pk., Kingswood-pl 
Lewisham, College Park 
Leyton, Vicarage-road 

Lea Bridge Mission . . 
I^eytonstone, Fairlop-road 

AshvUleHaU 

Cann Hall-road . . . . 

Edith-road 

Limehouse, East India-rd. 
Pekin-st., Elira . . . . 

Loughton (U.) 

Marylebone : — 

Church-street 

Hill-st., Dorset-square . . 
Tohn-street, Trinity 

John-street 

Shouldham-street . • . . 
Oxford Market, Castle- 
street, (W.) 

KensaUroad 

Willoughby-road .. .. 
Newington : — 
Metropolitan Tabernacle 
Twenty - two Mission 

Stations .. . 
Twenty - eight Sunday 
and Ragged Schools 



1864 
1871 
1801 

1840 
1821 

1850 

1857 
X862 
X863 

1646 
1861 
18x9 

1785 



182 J 

1855 
1877 



185 1 
1873 
876 
1887 
1878 



1887 



1870 
1817 

1831 
1826 
1800 
1869 
1870 

i«59 



1719 



350 
500 
500 

650 
850 

600 
400 
270 
569 

750 
1300 
400 

800 



500 



400 
200 



350 
200 
400 
150 
650 



700 
250 

300 
425 

650 
600 
800 
300 
500 

450 



4880 
3905 



44 
139 
296 

214 

'S7 
119 



65 
626 



57 



T40 
132 



87 

52 

220 

430 



333 



100 

187 

140 

319 
200 

45 
128 

322 



4965 



451 



208 



114 

200 
450 

230 

I64 
286 



130 
500 

x8o 
100 
170 

306 
200 



105 
130 
300 
120 

363 

200 

1000 

200 

170 
223 

136 
353 

241 
138 
118 

X20 



3660 



4787 



130 



R. D. Darby 
J. Parker, M.A. 

F. A. Jones . . 
A. Bax.. .. 

P. Reynolds 
W. Flack . . 
M. H. WUkin 
H. B. Murray 



J. Love. . . . 
J. T. Mateer 
G. Curtis . . 



W. Williams 



D. Henderson 

F. G. French 
J. W, Davies 



J. H. Lynn . . 
J.Crook 
G. T. Bailey 

J. Bradford . . 



F. C. Holden 
J. A. Jones . . 

J. Tucker . . 



I 

I 

] 



J. C. Carlile 
W. T. Russell . 
E. Beecher . . . 

R. E. WilHams . 



T. Spurgeon 



1895 
1892 

1878 
1876 

. 1880 
> 1857 
, 1869 
, X889 

1895 

, 1888 

1895 

. 1877 



1895 

1894 
, 1886 



M. 

L. 
L. 

L. 
L. 



M. 



L. 
L. 
L. 



H.C. 
H.C. 



1894 
1890 
X890 

1878 



M. 
M. 
L. 

L.&E. 

L. 



1878 
1889 

, X895 



1894 

1871 

, X890 

. X890 



M. 
L.&E. 

L. 
M. 
L. 

M. 
(L.& 

tec. 



1894 



H.C. 



238 



LIST OF CHURCHES. 
METROFOLlTAiJ— continued. 



;;l 



Norwood, West, Chats 

worth-road 

Gipsy-road 

Auckland-hill 

Norwood, South, Holmes- 
dale-road 

Norwood, Upper :— 

Central-hill 

Notting-hill :— 

Ladbroke-grove Chapel, 
Cornwall-road . . . 
Notting-hill-gate :— 

Kensington-place. . . 
Nunhead, Edith-road . . . 
Old Kent-road, Maze Pond 
Paddington : — 

Westbourne-park 

Praed-street .. 

Bosworth-road 

St. Peter's Park 
Peckham : — 

Peckham Park-road 
66, Peckham Park-road 

Rye-lane 

Sumner-road 

Relf-road 

S. London Tabernacle . . 
Linnell-road 

Heaton-road 

James Grove 

Peckham Rye Tabernacle 
Penge, Maple-road 
Pimlico : — 

Westboume-street 

Princes-row 
Plaistow, Barking-road Tab. 
Plumstead : — 

Conduit-road 

Park-road 

Ponder's End 

Poplar & Bromley Tabncle 
Poplar : — 

Cotton-street 

High-street, Bethel 

Potter's Bar 

Putney : — 

Werter-road 



*l 



1878 
1877 
1878 

1887 

1852 

1865 

1866 
1871 
1692 

1836 
1871 
1854 



1 100 
900 
200 

400 

480 



850 

250 
500 
1000 

1050' 
600 
400, 
300 

800 



l8l8;IOOO 



880 
1882 
1880 



1878 
1870 
1887 
1866 

1830 
1871 
1871 

I86I 
1885 
1877 
1888 

1805 
1855 
1795 

1877 



80 

90 

800 



350 
360 
1250 
1130 

400 

175 
500 

400 
300 
500 

I2I2 

750 
300 
250 



232 27 



z6 

133 



94 
170 
208 



1 162 

69 
412 
750 



438 



39 

43 

112 

624 

70 
21 



131 
12 



84 19 



2051 17 



800 186 



26 



195 



56 
186 



57 
480 
580 



1344 

150 

692 
171 
825 



566 
108 
75 
193 
230 
600 

50 



197 



380 
no 
75 

259 



J. L. Stanley 
Walter Hobbs 



J. Chad wick 
S. A. Tipple 



J. F. Shearer 



C. P. Sawday 



J.Clifford,M.A.,D.D, 
J. Briggs . . . . 
J. Heap . . . . 
J. M. Cox .. .. 

F. James • . . . 
J. W. Ewing, M.A. 

E. Roberts . . 

H. S. Boulton 

G. S. Read 
H; ]. Knight 
J. W. Boud . . 

J. Kingston. . 

G. T. Edgley' 



J. W. Cole 



W. K. Chaplin . 

W. Joynes . . . 
H. F. Noyes 
Jesse Dup6e 

S. H. Wilkinson. 



II 



1892 
1880 



1887 
1854 

1894 

1893 



1885 
1888 



1893 
1882 
1883 

1892 



L. 
M. 

L, 

L. 



M. 



1858 ' 

1895 
1895 
1871 

1894 
1896 

1887 

1894 
1895 
1895 
1881 

1893 

18^3 



L 



L. 

M. 

M. 
L. 

L. 
L. 
L. 
L. 

L. 
M. 

L. 

L. 



METROPOLITAN. 
METROPOLITAN— co«««ii«<i. 



239 



Regent's-pk., Park-sq. East 
, Drummond-strut Hall 
Richmond (22,684) : — 

Duke-street 

Rotherhithe : — 

Bush-road, Midway-place 
Rotherhithe New-road 
Shepherd's Bush-road 
Shoreditch Tabernacle 
Kingsland-road . . . . 

Shop-street 

Gibraltar-walk . . . . 

Sidcup 

Silvertown 

Soho:— 

Shaftesbury Avenue 
Southgate, Chase-side 

Soutbgate, New 

Pembroke-road, Muswell 

HUl 

Southwark : — 

Borough-road . . . 
Stepney. Wellesley-street. . 
Stockwell :— 

South Lambeth-road 
Stoke Newington : — 
Bouverie-road .. .. 
Stoke Newington-road 
( Devonshire-square) 
St. John's Wood, Abbey-rd. 
Henry-street, Portland 

Town 

St. Luke's, James-street 
Stratford :— 
The Grove . . . . 
Gumey-road . . . . 
Carpenter's-road . . . . < 

Major-road I 

West Ham -lane . . . . I 

Streatham, Lewin-road . . ' 

Lonesome Mission HaU\ 

Stroud - green. Stapleton 1 

Hall-road 



1855 



1870 

1835 
1882 
1890 



1500 



320 

200 

320 
470 



1835 2000 



1880 
1880 
1883 
1890 
1887 

1791 
1886 

1863 



1673 
r83i 

1866 

1838 

1638 
1863 



1850 

1854 
1870 
1877 
1885 
1844 
1866 



Snrbiton-hill, Oaklands 



1874 



Sutton '1869 

Tooting, Lwr, Longley-road,i88o 
Tooting Upper, Trinity 

road 1870 

Tottenham : — 

High-road 1827 

West-green 1868 



150 
100 
500 

350 

400 
250 

300 



700 
300 



300 



1050 
1250 



130 

520 
470 
820 
400 
240 
761 



475 

500 

550 
340 

550 



700 
450 



o| 



718 



^r! 



120 

80 



140 
897 



72 
105 

157 
65 

303 



197 
3» 



25 
132 



393 
340 



120 
230 



266 

1740 



71 
320 

165 
50 

380 



23 245 
8 140 



49 
792 



51 



103 
142 



142 
75 



113 

190 24 
100 21 



132 

260 
248 



27 



70 
780 



17 180 
22 430 



350 
250 



E. G. Gange, 

F,R.A.S. 

E. Matthews 

H. E. Inman 



G. W. Pope . 
W. Cuff.. . 



G. Simmons 



J. Box .. . 
G. Freeman 



F. C. Hughes 
J. Pamell . . 

A. Mursell .. 

W.Mitchell.. 

G. P. McKay 
H. E. Stone. . 



1893 



1892 



i88c L. 

.. I H.C. 

1890 L. 

1872 L. 



1875 
1892 



L. 
H.C. 

M. 

H.C. 
(L. ft 
IH.C 



1893 L. 
1895 M. 



1887 

1895 

1891 
1891 



80 

329 

280 

285 

566 
520 



W. H. Chillman. 

W. H. Stevens . 
E. Marsh . . . 



T. Maycock. . 
J. Ewen 



W. Baster .. 

G. Turner . . 
G. H. Rumsey 

H. Oakley .. 

W. W. Sidey 
E. H. Howard 



L. 
H.C. 



L. 
L. 



1891 L. 

1895 L. 
1893 M. 



1885 
Z891 



L.&E. 



H.C. 
M. 

L. 



L. 
(L. & 



'«74|H.C 
1893 L. 
1888I H.C. 

18951 L. 

1885I L. 
1893, L. 



240 



LIST OF CHURCHES. 
METROPOLITAN— con/fn««rf. 



Cbtirches. 


1 


1 


^1 


1 


2I 


^1 


Putors. 


II 


1 


Tottenham (contd.) : 




















Napier-road. Philip-lane 


1887 


230 




8 


Z20 .. 


T. House . . . . 


1885 




Westerfield-road . . . . 


1887 


300 


38 


12 


Z40 2 


R. H. Eastty .. 


Z887 


H.C. 


Upton. Upton Cross . . . . 


1883 


350 


Z28 


20 


200 .. 


J.Wilkinson .. 


Z883 


L. 


Vauxhall, Kennington-Iane 


1864 


700 


173 


28 


350 


z 


C. Pummell 


Z895 


H.C. 


Victoria-park :— 




















Grove-road .. .. .. 


z868 


793 




.. 




. , 


W. Thomas. . . . 


Z887 


L. 


Green-street 




















WaUington 


1876 


600 


206 


28 


250 


6 


J.E.Jasper.. .. 


z88o 


L. 


Randon Hill 




70 




6 


50 










Waltham Abbey. Paradise- 
















row • • •• •• •• •• 


1729 


500 


Z4I 


2Z 


153 


12 


G. H.Kilby.. .. 


Z892 


L. 


Victoria HaU, Honey- 














Icine It >t •» t« 




70 




2 


40 










Walthamstow :— 
















Wood-street (U.) . . . . 


Z851 


600 


200 


35 


440 


5 


W. Hetherington 


Z889 


L. 


Boundary-road . . . . 


1876 


550 


270 


29 


500 




W.Murray.. .. 


z892 


L.ftE 


Walworth-road 


1805 


800 


542 


34 


492 


4 


W.J.Mills.. .. 


Z882 


L. 


Victory-place Institute 


1884 


400 




36 


432 










„ Ragged School 


.. 


.. 


. . 


20 


380 










Walworth, East-street . . 


1791 


387 


Z2I 


20 


250 


, , 


E. T. Davis . . . . 


1895 


L. 


Wandsworth:— 




















East Hill 


1859 


900 


542 


41 


476 


5 




, , 


L. 


Onward Mission . . . . 








14 
41 


Z^O 










Northcote-road . . . . 


1875 


1000 


490 


497 4 


J. Felmingham . . 


Z892 


L. 


H Mk^vwtll-rodd . . . . 








11 


KA.^ 








West Hill 


1821 


350 


'86 


9 


70 








M. 


Wandsworth-road (Vict.) 


1873 


950 


427 


85 


Z020 


, , 


E. Henderson . . 


Z873 


L. 


RenshaW'Strut Hall .. 




















Westboume Grove . . . . 


1853 


1460 


300 


25 


2ZZ 


7 


JohnTuckwell .. 


i88z 




Westminster, Romney-st. . . 


1807 


600 


150 


24 


z8o 


z 


G. Davies . . . . 


z886 


L. 


Whitechapel :— 




















Commercial-street • . . . 


1633 
1753 


600 
500 


132 
108 


6 
zo 


50 
92 








L, 


Little Alie-street . . . . 








M. 


Willesden Green :— 








Huddleston-road . . . . 


1882 


250 


62 


.. 




4 


W.J. Sears.. .. 


Z894 L. 


Wimbledon, Queen's-road. . 


1871 


400 


333 


31 


507 


19 


C. Ingrem . . . . 


1880 


(L. A 
IH.C. 


Morden 


1885 


80 




zo 


62 








Merton 


1886 


200 


. « 


14 


Z9O 










Finsbury-road 




















1870 


420 


359 


54 


780 


zo 


W.W.Haines .. 


Z883 


L. 


Bowes Park 


1884 


220 
















Green Lanes 


z886 


80 
















Park Ridings, Mayes-road 




250 


43 


9 


98 




J.E.Flegg.. .. 


1893 


M. 



METROPOLITAN — MIDDLESEX. 



241 



M ETROPOLITAN-^ort/inwrf. 



i 


'^i 


i 


«i 


1 


d| 


(0 


4 


900 


559 


5** 


543 


700 


1254 


<>s 


X127 


300 


.. 


«5 


205 






13 


185 



Woodberry Down 
Woolwich, Parsoos-hill 

New Btckton • • 

Joseph'Strui 

North Woolwich . . 



X883 
1873 



G.H.MorgaiiB.Sc. 
J. Wilson .. 



1890 
1877 



L. 
L. 



For Churches around London which are not within the Metropolitan Postal 
District, nor connected with the London Baptist Association, see the various Home 
Counties. 



MIDDLESEX.— Bbyond the Metropolitan Postal District. 

(Pop, for th* whole county, 3,251,671.^ 

For other Churches in Middlesex, see " METROPOLITAN," pp. 233—241. 

(H. U., Hertfordshire Union. H. C, Home Counties. M. Metropolitan.) 



»i 



Bamet, Tabernacle 
Bedfont . . . . 
Brentford,01d, North-rd 
Brentford.New,Park Ch 
Chiswick,Annandale-rd, 

Feltham 

Hayes, High-road 
Hounslow : — 

Providence • • 

Staines-road . • 
Pinner and . • . • 

Harefield .. .. 
Ponders End, Eden 

Southall 

Teddington .. .. 
Twickenham Green 

and St. Margaret's 
Uxbridge .. .. 
Wealdstone .. .. 



1891 


300 


"3 


14 


80 


i88z 


100 


X9 


8 


80 


1819 


300 


89 


22 


420 


Z802 


500 


95 


23 


350 


1866 


300 


152 


24 


295 


1894 


xoo 


13 


.. 


.. 


X847 


X50 


»5 


13 


Z20 


1872 


300 


79 


13 


175 


1864 


200 


67 


12 


X30 


1863 
X834 


x8o 
120 


1- 


6 


45 


., 


xoo 


14 


6 


42 


Z889 


250 


35 


x8 


1x2 


1883 


600 


20I 


20 


x6o 


1852 


250 

X40 


190 


. «5 
10 


450 


X885 


200 


37 


6 


30 


1875 


200 


84 


aa 


2x6 



P.T.I 
J.E.. 



Smart . . 

Johxison 
R. Mutimer. . 
T. G. PoUard 
A. G. Edgerton 
J. W. Avis .. 



J. E. Barnes 
J.Curtis 

T. Antill .. 



T. G. Williams . 
R. J. WiUiamion 

E. H. Brown • 

J. R. Scoones • 
J.G.Wells.. . 



1893 
x88x 

X893 
1895 
1892 
1894 



X894 
X878 

X892 



1894 
Z892 



Z894 



H.C. 

H.C. 

M. 

H.C. 

H.C. 

H.C. 

M. 

H.C. 
M. 

H.U. 

M. 

H.C. 
H.C. 

H.C. 

H.C. 
H.C. 



2^2 



LIST OF CHURCHES. 



NORFOLK {Pop 454.51^- 

(Nm Norfolk. S. N., Suffolk and Norfolk Association. S. U.. Suffolk and Norf 

Tnion ) 



?i 



51 



i 



Attleborough 
Aylsham . . . 

Bacton 

Bnckenham, Old . 



CarletonRode<AtUboro) 
BunweU Low Comn 

Clazton 

Cossey and . . 

Drayton 

Dereham. E., High-st. . 
Diss. Denmark-street. . 
Diekeiburgh .. .. 
Downham Market 

Stowbridge . . . . 
EUingham, Great 

Fakenham 

TittUshaU .. .. 

Felthorpe 

Foulsham 

Kenninghall 

Lynn (18,360) : — 

Stepney 

West Lynn,. .. 
Magdalen .. .. 

Union 

Martham 

Mundesley 

Knapton., >•• .. 
Neatishead (Norwich). 

Necton 

Norwich (100.970) :— 

Gildencroft . . . . 

Orford-hill . . . 

St. Clements .. .. 



1835 
1780 
1833 
X831 
1796 
1812 

1750 
1822 
1847 
1784 
1788 
1882 
1800 
1817 
1699 
z8oi 

1831 



350 
450 
250 
300 
300 
500 

650 
150) 
130) 
650 
650 
230 

335 
xoo 

300 
350 

z8o 



1820 350 
1810 400 



1689 



St. Mary's . . . . 

Sayer-st. Heigham.. 

PotUrgaU'Strt4t 
Unthank's-road 
Plilham St. Mary 
Saxlingham (Thorpe) 
Shelfanger . . . . 

Bressingham . • 
Stalham 

Ludham . . . . 

Patting .. .. 



1817 
1856 
1800 
1850 

1809 
1789 

1877 
1833 
1670 

1669 



1778 
1788 
184 

l802 

1765 



800 

X20 



X653 
182I 

z86o 



550 
250 
400 

400 
250 

400 
600 
800 

800 



150 
650 
250 
300 
400 
100 
450 
xoo 

130 



42 

99 
38 
50 
31 
59 

51 
25 
106 

3X4 

66 



35 
33 
42 

178 



70 21 

24 6 
58 



Z08 

77 
72 

50 
30 

45 

80 
xox 

X28 
Z20 

80 

55 
39 

41 

48 
77 
40 



47 
58 

182 

X20 



449 
95 

X31 
42 
20 
42 

Z22 

17 



185 10 
50 

14 

175 

65 

67 



40 

45 

430 
80 



473 

305 

205 

320 

20 

x6 

24 

X09 
35 
25 



E. J. Bqziows 



G. Pilgrim . . , 
A. K. Davidson , 



H. W. Clabbum. 

T. L. Sapey 

A. E. Saxby . . 

R. J. Layzell . 
J.Easter .. . 

S. Howard . . . 

T. H. Sparham . 
A. J. Causton . 



1894 



X878 
1887 



N. 
N. 

N. 
S.U. 
N. 
N. 



1894 

1893 
1894 
X89X 
X890 N. 

1874 N. 



N. 
N. 



1893 
z886 



H. Vinoe 



i88t 



-I 



T. Perry 



C. Houghton 
G. Bass . . . 
T. R. Matthews . 

C. B. Chapman . 
J. Porter .. . 

T. Bullimore 

W. Ruthven 
T.H.Shakespeare, 

M.A. 
G. Pring . . . 

H. H. Youlden . 



1890 



X889 
1894 
Z889 

X894 
X893 

1877 
X890 
X883 
X890 

1895 



A. J. larrett 
B.V. Bird .. 



X893 
X894 



N. 
N. 

N. 
N. 
S.N. 



N. 



N. 
N. 
N. 

N. 
N. 

N. 

S.N. 

N. 

N. 



N. 
S.N. 



NORFOLK— NORTHAMPTONSHIRE. 
NORFOLK— con^m«Ai. 



243 



ri 


Jr! 


1 




s 




s 


§•" 



Paston. 



^S 



Swaffham . . • • ~ • 

Castteacrt . • . 

Petttmy 

Spcrle 

Thetford, King-street. 

Upwell 

Worstead ..' .. . 
Wymondham • • • 
Yarmouth (49.334) :— 
Tabeinacle, Welles- 

ley-roiul . . 
The Park .i 

Ormssby St. Mar- 

York-road . . 



'.ILBS2 



1859 
Z840 
1717 
z8oo 



1754 
z86i 

1876 
1841 



550 

250 

80 

TOO 
280 
350 
600 
200 



500 

132 

250 



207 



46 
311 

14 
23 



19 



231 



50 

ZI2 

86 
97 

80 
856 

74 
72 









2 

X 


W. Fitch .. .. 
A. C. Batts.. .. 
J. Jacksozi .. .. 


1894 
z888 
z88o 


ZI 


T. B. Curry . . . . 
J.H.Jozies.. .. 

J. Muskett .. .. 


Z884 
Z892 

z88z 



N. 



S.U. 



N. 



NORTHAMPTONSHIRE {Pop., 302.Z83). 
(E.M., East Midlazid. N.. Northamptonshire. O., Oxfordshire.) 



a 



;l 



Aldwinckle . . 

Blisworth . .. 

Braunston .... 

Braybrook9 •^^ 

Brington 

Bttckby, Long 

Bugbrook 
Hwford .. 

Bulwick Lodges 

Burton Latimer 

Clipston . . • . 
Oxendon 
Sibbertoft 

Deanshanger 

Desborough .. 

Earl's Barton 

Ecton . . . . 

Gretton .. .. 

Guilsborough 
HoilowM 
CotdAshby 



Z822 
Z825 
Z7Z0 
Z796 
z82S 
1759 
Z805 



z88z 
1744 
Z778 



Z848 

1793 
i8z5 
Z786 



365 

340 

250 

200 

280 

600 

275 

130 

80 

420 

520 

60 

80 



350 
300 
zoo 

300 



Z77q 500 
zoo 



.29 
17 
39 
z6o 
98 

23 
83 
Z56 



40 

155 
40 
z8 

91 
220 

58 
40 

420 
80 



62 
350 
294 
60 
70 
36 



O. Thompson 
H. Wyatt .. 
T. Brimley .. 



J. H. Bath . . . 
A. C. G. Rendell 
W. Adams . . . 

W.Gays .. . 
T. Collings • . . 



Isaac Near . 
H.A.Hunt. 
J. Field.. . 



1887 

1893 
z886 



X894 



Z890 N, 



[891 



z888 N. 



Z885 



Z89Z 
Z891 
Z864 



N. 



Q 2 



244 



LIST OF CHURCHES. 



NORTHAMPTONSHIRE— cojiittiKfti. 



! 



«s 



Hackleton . . . . 
Bravfteld 
CookHM .. .. 
Denton .. ., 

Harpole , 

Irthlingborougb .. 

Kettering : — 

Fuller Chapel .. 

OakUy Street , , 

Nelson-street • . 

King's Sutton 

Kin^sthorpe • • • , 

Kislingbury .. ., 

Rothersth09fe 

Middleton Cheney 

Milton 

Moulton, Carey . . 

Pits/ord.. ., 

Northampton(6 1 ,ox 2):— 

College-street .. .. 

Barrack-road 

Compton-street 

Duston 

Great Houghton .. 
Hardingstone 
Harlestone . . • . 
Far Cotton . . . . 
Grafton-street .. .. 
Mount Pleasant 
Market Strut .. 
KingsUy Park 
Princes-street .. .. 
St. Michael's-rd. (U.) 

Pattishall 

Peterborough(25, z7 x):— 
Queen-street . 

Sergeant-street Hall 
New Fletton, Hunts 
Stangroundt Hunts 



1781 



Z822 
1723 

1696 



Z846 
1823 
1810 



1740 
1825 
1783 

Z802 

1693 



270 
zoo 
zoo 
z8o 
200 
450 

1035 

500 
250 
400 
350 



1893 
X840 
Z872 



1834 
Z884 
Z838 

X653 



400 
250 
300 
z8o 

X20O 
200 

200 
ZOO 

z8o 
z8o 
200 
340 
600 



700 

XO66 

150 

800 

250 
350 
200 



Z24 



560 Z25 



Z08 

74 
Z30 

75 



659 



84 

93 

326 



297 

Z20 

43 
675 



X05 



86 
32 
65 
31 
53 
zgz 

Z462 

350 

Z40 

326 

87 

30 

57 

26 

X52 



1749 



270 
360 
702 
50 
52 
420 



70 
995 



14 



z6 



14 



W.V.Phillips , 

A. Parker . . . 

T. Phillips, B.A.. 

D. John • • . 
J. ChurchiU.. , 
G. W. Robert . 
R. T.Lewis.. . 

C. Saville . • . 
E. R. Broom 
F.C. Watts.. . 

P. H. Smith 



R.A.Selby.. 
S.Needham.. 
F. T. Smythe 



A. A. Morgan 
H.Bradford.. 



( T. Barrass . . 
Ij.H.Jackman 



. W, ElUott 



Z89Z 



, z888 



. Z89Z 

.1894 
. Z89Z 
. Z89X 
.1894 

1894 
.1873 



1894 



•1893 
. z88s 
. X889 



Z894 
1884 



N. 
N. 
N. 



N. 
N. 
N. 



1852 ( 
. X895 I 
► 1894 



E.M 



NORTHAMPTONSHIRE — NORTHUMBERLAND. 



245 



NORTHAMPTONSHIRE- con«fi««*. 



ChurclMt. 



Raonds: — 

Rotteo-row 
Ringstead . . . . 
Roade 

Hanslope (Bucks), 
Long-strut 
Rushden : — 
Old Chapel .. 

CHelveston • . 

Hinwick {Bids.) 
Spratton and 

Ravensthorpe .. 
Stanwick . . • • 
Sulgrave . . . . 

Helmdon.. .. 

Cidworth 
Thrapston . . . . 

Bythom {Hunts) 
Towcester . . . . 

Duncote . . . . 
Walgrave, Gold-street.. 
Wellingboro*. Taber'cle 
West Haddon (Rugby).. 
Weston-by-Weedon . 

Wood End .. . 

Morton Pinkney . 
Wollaston, Zion . . . 
Woodford (Thrapston) 

Great Addington . 



z8ox 
1714 
x688 

1845 
X727 



Z840 
1819 
1842 
1835 



1797 
i8zo 
1784 



1700 
1863 

Z82Z 

i68z 
18x4 
1837 
1835 
1822 

1874 



400 
300 
450 

zoo 

600 



60 

200 
x6o 
200 
200 
200 
x8o 
500 
250 
3x0 
xoo 
250 

450 
300 
300 

150 

xoo 

290 
350 
150 



57 
70 

50 

13 

26z 



zo 
x6 
4X 
53 



96 

26 

X04 
63 
84 



8o| Z4 

2 



Z04 

"3 

40 

81 

560 4 
37 



56 
44 
36 

Z25 



X40 

X2 
Z20 

62 
Z50 
80 

35 

55 

z8o 

83 



H. E. Sadler 
J.Bates.. •• 
F. G. Masters 



W. J. Tomkins 

I R. W. Ayrea 
W. J. Young ' 



H. E. Roberts 

W. Fidler .. 

F. Cunliffe . . 
F. G. Burgess 
E. E. Lovell 
J. T. Schofield 

A.Hewlett .. 
J.Tyrrell .. 



1894 
1893 
1893 



1885 

X895 
X889 



1894 

X87Z 

1890 
1894 
1888 
1894 



1892 
X872 



N. 
N. 
N. 



N. 

N. 

N. 



N. 

N. 

N. 

N. 
N. 

N. 



NORTHUMBERLAND {Pop., 506,030). 
(N., Northern.) 



Churches. 


1 


1 

1 


^1 

q 
47 


7 


"si 

45 


1 


FlRftton. 


1892 


j 


Ahiwick.; 


Z884 


200 


W.W.Wilks .. 


N. 


Rosebrough .. .. 




















Berwick (x3,377):— 




















CasUegate • .. .. 


z8o8 


330 


165 


14 


80 


zo 


J. L. Harvey 


1895 


N. 



246 



LIST OF CHURCHES. 



NORTHUMBERLAND— o(m/«n«Ai. 



I 



"sS 



Broomhaugh and 

Broomley ,. •« 
F<M!d Forge .« • • 
Newcastle (186.300): — 
Westgate-zx>ad 

Elswick . . . . 
Osbome-rd. Jesmond 
D^nmark-st., By her 
Rye-hill . . . . 
N. Shields, Howard-st. 
SUphenson-street 



1652 
1806 

1650 

1650 

1817 
1799 



100 
xoo 

850 

450 

220 
1200 

420 



452 

250 

197 
182 



30 



X049 
332 
369 

180 



T.D.LandeLs,M.A 

B. Gawthrop 
W.Walsh .. .. 

C. Stanley . . . . 



N. 
N. 



1892 
X894 
1888 
1893 N. 



N. 



NOTTINGHAMSHIRE {Pop., 445,823). 
(E.M., East Midland.) 



1 


1 


4 

le 


tl 




if 




6 


s 


r 




£ 



Arnold . 
Beeston, 



Nether-street 



Houghton (Newark) 
Carlton (nr. Nottingm.) 
Collingham . . . . 



East Leake 

IVysaU 

Eastwood 

Hucknall Torkard 
Kimberley .. .. .. 

Kirkby-in-Ashfield .. 
Kirkby, East . . . . 

Mansfield (15.925) 

Mansfield Wdhouse. 
Newark (x4,457) :— 
Albert-street . • . . 
CarUon-UrMoorland 
Newthorpe . . . . 



X822 
1804 

1827 

X876 

1670 

1700 



1876 
1849 
X878 
X820 

1873 
X820 
1874 

x8io 
1788 
X828 



600 
400 

xoo 

1x0 

250 

450 



450 
800 

X20 
20O 
600 
450 
150 

400 
250 
350 



70 
X28 



53 
32 

28 
2 

27 
276 

17 

48 
203 
222 

X06 

17 
28 



280 
253 



x8o 



150 

562 

76 

77 
40X 
440 



X62 
185 



R. Pursey . . . . 
( S. Skingle, ) 
I of Retford )•• 



( E. B. Shepherd, ) 
i of Newark j 
J.J. Berry .. .. 



T. Cutts 



A. Firth 



£. B. Shepherd . 



X884 



X887 
1894 

X891 

x88o 
1876 



e.m: 

E.M. 
E.M. 
E.M. 
E.M. 
E.M. 

E.M. 
E.M. 
E.M. 
E.M. 
E.M. 
E.M. 



E.M. 
E.M. 



NOTTINGHAMSHIRE. 
NOTTINGHAMSHIRE— conifottAi. 



247 



Nottingham(2i3,8i7) :— 
Arkwright-street . . 
Basford, Old— 

High-street .. .. 

Queensbury-street 
Basford, New — 

Chelsea-street 

Palm-street . . , 
Broad-street . . . , 

Edwin-street 

Daybrook . . . , 
RedhiU .. ., 

Bulweil , 

Carrington , 

Derby-road . . . , 

Radford, Indepen- 
dent-street . 
George-street . 

Woodboroygh 
Hyson-green . 
Lenton, New, 

Church-street 
Mansfield- road 

Leen Side 
Radford. Prospect-pl. 
Tabernacle 

Herbert-strut 

Cross-street, Arnold 

Cotmanhay, Derby- 
shire . . . . 
Woodborough-road 
Retford (10,603) and 

Gamston 

Haddington 

Scmthwell, Park-street. 
Calverton 



Stanton-hUI (Mansfield) 

Stapleford . . . . 

Sutton Bonnington 

Sntton-in-Ashfield, 

Eastfield Side . . 

Wood-street . . 
Satton-on-Trent .. 



1775 

1857 
1890 

1861 
1829 
1818 

1847 



X862 
1846 
1847 

1875 
1740 
X832 
1878 

1851 
1849 



1868 
1868 
x88o 
1840 



1875 

1692 
1823 
181 1 
1832 

1876 

1875 
1704 

1770 
z8zi 

1818 



500 

700 
350 

350 
270 

515 
200 
209 



750 
500 
800 

200 

700 
200 
500 

500 
600 



220 

2200 

240 

400 

300 
980 

400 
250 
270 
200 

300 

300 
zoo 

250 
300 

250 



265 

2X8 

X34 

X65 
80 

260 
69 
99 



X95 
139 
373 



246 
175 

94 
X67 



XXX 

756 



276 

80 

40 
70 

20 

40 

74 
'5 

35 
X32 

24 



350 

358 
450 

469 
2x0 

175 
200 
209 

X20 

275 
423 

229 

302 

30 

300 

220 
52 

230 
X40 

994 



379 

X04 
xxo 
68 
26 

96 

140 

73 

145 
351 
40 



W. R. Jones.. 
R. Jenkins . . 



X892 
1893 



E. E. Coleman . 
C. G. Croome . 

[ J. Douglas, B.A. 



W. Slater .. . 
J. F. Makepeace. 
G. Hill, M.A. . 



L.C. Parkinson, 

[B.A. 
R. Silby . . . . 



1888 
X895 

X89Z 



1891 
1892 
X893 

X895 
x88x 



EM. 

E.M. 
E.M. 

EM 
E.M. 

E.M. 



EM. 

E.M. 
E.M. 



(G. M.McElwee,> 
I M.A.,B.SC. f 

" J. Clark' \\ \\ 

G.H.James.. .. 
S. Skingle . . . . 



E.M. 
E.M. 
E.M. 



X887 
Z891 

x88x 
x88z 



E.M. 

E.M. 
E.M. 



E.M. 

E.M. 
E.M. 



I J. H. Plumbridge 



X876 



A. Firth, ) 
Mansfield ) ' ' 



E.M. 

E.M. 

E.M. 



M. Fox 

j J. Cornish, ) 
I of Leicester, j 
I E. B. Shepherd, 
1 of Newark 



X889 
X893 
X887 



E.M. 

E.M. 

E.M. 



248 



LIST OF CHURCHES. 



OXFORDSHIRE {Pop., 185.669). 
(O., Oxfordshire. B., Berkshire.) 



n 



Banbury (12,768) : — 

Bridge-street . . 

Bloxham . . . . 

MUeombe 
Barford 

Shilton .. .. 

Caversham, Free . . 

Chadlington and . . 

CharlDury .. .. 

Chipping Norton.. 

Great Rollright 
Coate 

Aston .. .. 

Bampton 

Buchland 

Duchlington .. 

Standlake . . 
Henley-on-Thames 

Bcyn HiU . . 
Hook Norton 
Leafield (Witney) 
Little Tew and . . 
Cleveley . . . . 
Milton (C. Norton) 

Ascott .. .. 

ShiptoH .. .. 

Lyneham 
Oxford (45.742) :— 
Commercial-road 
New-road .. 

LittUmore 

Hcadington 

Osney 

Wolvercote 

Charlton,, 

Eynsham 

Hincksey 

Botley .. 

St. Thomases 
Sydenham . . 
Thame .. .. 
Woodstock .. 

Thrupp .. 



1700 
1830 
1872 
Z842 
1866 
1694 

1657 
1805 



1865 
1832 
X876 



X840 
x8o8 



1645 
1875 
1778 
1864 
1837 



1867 
1600 
1804 
1805 
1883 
1884 

1843 
1815 



X826 
1825 
1827 
X876 



420 
200 

60 
250 

80 
600 
250 
250 
500 

70 
400 
150 
200 
150 

Z20 
170 
300 



300 
250 
150) 

8of 
250 

X20 
120 



500 
500 
100 
120 
100 

160 



200 

220 
80 



126 

h7 
37 

145 
44 
34 

X96 

zz6 



27 



95 
643 



27 



XI 

100 



210 
62 
38 

198 
45 
44 

260 

232 



79 
240 



132 
zooo 



30 
60 
40 



Isaac Watts.. .. 
( J. Churchill, of) 
I King's Sutton ) 
W.Clarke .. .. 

S. H. Case. M.A. 
i R. Parkin . . . . 
T. Bentley . . . . 

J. Stanley . . . . 



C. E. Shearman. 



45 



R. B. Wallace . 
G. W. Davidson. 



H. B.Case 
J. Dann 



C. Duxbury. 



1893 
1893 
1892 

1888 
1892 
1869 

1895 



1895 



1893 



1888 
X884 



1890 
1882 



RUTLANDSHIRE — SHROPSHIRE. 



249 



RUTLANDSHIRE {Pop., 20,659). 
(E. M., East Midland. N., Northamptonshire.) 



CbaRhei; 


1 






h 

gH 


^1 


^1 


FiMton. 


II 


■ 




Belton (Uppingham) . . 


1843 
17x0 

1770 
1854 


120 
300 

280 
200 


30 
37 

66 


4 
8 

II 
8 


34 
55 

lOO 
TOO 


2 
I 




• • 


E.M. 
E.M- 


Oakham :— 

Melton-road . • . . 
Langham . . . . 


H.J. A. Suter .. 


1892 


N 


. 



SHROPSHIRE {Pop., 236,339). 
(S., Shropshire. D. F. M., Denbigh, Flint, and Merioneth. O. W., Old Welsh.) 



Aston-on-Clun 
Bettws .. .. 



Bridgnorth .. .. 

ChorUy .. .. 
Brockton and Rowley 
Broseley.Birch Meadow 

Ironbridge . . 



Coxall 



Craven Arms . . . . 

Dawley 

Lord's-hill, Snailbeach 

TankerviUe • . . . 

Bromlow . . . . 

Madeley, High-street. . 

Shifoal, Zion . • . . 

Broseley, Old Chapel 

Market Drayton • . . . 

Oakengates 

Donnington Wood 
Oswestry : — 
Salop-road 

Sweeney 

Mtushrooh . . . . 

Llandrinio . . . . 
Castle-street, <W.) .. 

Pontesbury 

Shrewsbury (26,967) : — 

Claremont 

Wellington 

Wem 

Whitchurch 

Ight/Uld 

Prees Heath •• .. 



1830 

1803 

1700 
1878 
1876 
1803 

1870 

1872 
1846 
1818 
1879 



1857 
1891 

1749 
1817 
1866 
1820 

1806 
X831 
1844 
1829 
i860 
1828 

1620 
1807 
1815 
1808 

1843 
1856 



60 

xoo 

600 
150 

200 

300 



130 

150 
500 
500 

200 



250 
300 
300 
260 
200 
200 

500 
70 
80 

xoo 

150 

250 

600 
320 
280 
250 
X40 



6 

8 

88 

10 
36 

36 

15 
109 

89 

5 
6 

9 
6 

51 
21 

17 

86 
2 

xo 
3 

84 

48 

206 

94 

60 

67 

7 



18 



8 
7 

lOI 

50 
20 

XOO 



48 

35 

260 

80 



150 
60 
40 

107 



76 
60 

160 
160 
90 
72 
14 
17 



W. G. Mansfield) 

of Velindre, Rdnr. j 

J. J. Griffiths . . 



A. Shinn 



(W. Williams,) 
< of Knighton, j- . . 
i Radnorshire J 



W. Williams,' 

Knighton 
Radnorshire , 
M. Matthews 
A. Lester ., 
W. L. Jones 



V Evangelist . 

T. Clark , 
Evangelist . 



D. Rees 

T. Evans . . 

W. Maurice. . 
H. Reid 



S. T. Williams 



1891 
1894 



1887 



1879 

1872 
X892 
1892 



1861 



1893 
x866 

1891 
1889 



1893 



S. 

O.W. 

S. 



O.W. 

O.W. 
S. 
S. 



S. 

s. 



s. 



DFM 
S. 



250 



LIST OF CHURCHES. 



SOMERSETSHIRE {Pop,, 484.337). 

For Stations of Bristol Itinerant Society, see "GLOUCESTERSHIRE." 

(B.. Bristol. W.. Western. W. E. S., Wilts and East Somersetshire. 






Banwell • . . 

Bath (51.844):— 
Lower Bristol-road . . 
Manvers-street 
Dunkerton . . . . 
Walcot, Bethesda 

Hay-hill 

Beckington 

Boroughbridge . . . . 
Northmoor Green 

Statht 

Bridgwater (12,436)'— 

St. Mary's-street . . 

Union Strut, . . . 

Bumham 

Burton (Stogursey) . . 

WhitneU .. .. 

Stol/ord . . . . 

Chard, Holy rood- street 

Blind Moor . . . . 

Marsh 

Tatworth . . . . 
Wadeford . . . . 

Cheddar 

Allerton 

Crickham 

Rooksbridge • . . . 
Rodney Stoke . . . . 

Rowberrow . . • . 

Winscombe . • . . 

CUwer .. .. .. 

Crewkeme,North-street 

Misterton 
Fivehead (Taunton) and 

Isle Abbots 
Frome : — 
Badcox-Iane 

Lock's Lane . • 
Sheppard's Barton 
Hatch Beauchamp 
Curry MaUett 
Windmill HiU 
Highbridge, Hope 
Keynsham, Ebenezer.. 
Merriott(U.).. . 
Minehead . . . 
Montacute . • . 
Odcomb .. . 



1892 

1840 

1752 
1828 
1883 
1871 
1786 

1837 
1836 
1887 

1600 

1845 
1833 
1837 
1885 

1653 



1832 



Z820 
1866 
1868 
1808 

1669 

1705 
1742 
1874 
1883 
1817 
1807 
X883 
X817 
1824 



150 

400 

634 
250 
150 
560 
350 
230 
xoo 



520 

350 
150 

zoo 

80 

500 

80 

90 

zzo 

80 
300 
150 
150 

100 
130 
zoo 
z8o 

70 
500 

z6o 
22a) 
180) 

600 

500 
250 
200 
150 
300 
340 
200 
200 
300 
100 



28 

55 

394 

II 

x6i 
73 
73 



282 

146 
31 



195 



185 



84 



243 
89 



45 



42 



53 



45 

150 
308 

12 
126 
156 

94 
150 



718 

130 
83 



348 



435 



302 
"5 

346 

380 
102 



79 
X31 
106 

60 
128 



14 



E. Carr. . . . 
H. F. Gower 



1893 
1887 



T. R. Dann . 
A. Sprague . 



1890 
1884 



C. H. M, Day 

H. V. Hobbs 
W, S.Wyle.. 



A. MacDonald 



J. W. Padfield 



J. Cniickshank 
E. S. Hadler 

J. S. Paige .. 

J.Walker .. 
E. Curtis • . 



B. 

WES 

W. 



1886 

X893 
1892 



1881 



1895 



1877 
1895 

1894 

1877 
1861 



B. 



B. 
B. 



W. 



B. 
W. 



W. 



W. Mann . 
T. Hawkins. 
W. Burton • 
H. Hardin . 



W. 
W. 

WES 

WES 
W. 



1884 
1888 
1894 
1870 W. 



B. 
B. 
W. 
W. 



SOMERSETSHIRE. 



251 



SOMERSETSHIRE— con/intM^. 



North Curry and.. .. 


1828 


Stoke St. Gregory . . 


Z869 


Panlton 


1655 


Welton 




Pill 


1815 
1844 


Radstock 


Road 


1783 


Radge (Frome) • . . . 


1845 


Shepton Mallet .. .. 


«875 


Shirehampton . . . . 


1890 


Stognmber 


1680 


Croweofkbe . . . . 


18QO 


Street 


1813 


Taunton (18,026) :— 




Albemarle . . • . 


1875 


Silver-street . . . . 


1814 


Creech St. Michael 


183 1 


Twerton-on-Avon • • 


1828 


Watchet and Williton 


1808 


Doni/ord .. .. 


1883 


Wedmore 


1600 


Mark •• k. .. 




Wellington, South-st. 


1739 


Rockwell Grun . . 


z8go 


HolywMLaht .. 


. a 


HoUomb€Roeus .. 


, , 


SampfordMoor .. 


Z87I 


WeUs. Union-street .. 


i8z4 


W9st Harrington . . 


1875 


Wook^ 


1870 


Weston-super-Mare :— 




Bristol-road • . • . 


1866 


Wadham-street 


1847 


Puxton 


Z890 


Wincanton 


1829 


Bourton 


T834 


Brewham . . . . 


1870 


Charlton Musgrove 


1830 


Holton 


1873 


Yeovil, South-street .. 


1688 


TintinhuU .. .. 

* 


X862 



300 
230 
370 
150 

200 

254 

300 
80 

Z20 
200 
170 
60 
200 

500 
700 
172 

450 
50 
230 
150 
650 
400 
Z20 
100 

80 

450 
60 

ZIO 

600 
850 

Z20 

360 

200 

80 

60 

50 

800 

60 



62 

45 

X28 

57 

63 
30 
23 
20 
14 
37 

39 

"5 
230 

45 
96 
98 

60 

402 



49 



22 

229 

66 



24 



44 



69 

85 
250 
Z06 

159 
z6o 
41 
40 
34 
30 
72 

83 

805 

358 

65 

Z46 

273 

Z05 

X0Z9 



52 



zoo 

396 

Z23 



500 



li 



B. W. Osier. 
J. Keznpton. . ' 



jJ.Culross,M.A..l 

I D.D r 

W. H. Buller .. 



1894 
Z872 

Z882 



F.T. White 

J. Bartlett .. .. 

L. Palzner . . • . 

}.J. P.TeUey .. 

B. Oriel . . . . 
W.White .. .. 

W. W. Reed 

[D.A. 
G. W. Huznphreys, 

O. R. Gibbon . . 

W. Owen . . . . 



W. P. Davies . 
T. J. Longhurst . 



J. Brown 



S. Newziazn. 



W. 
B. 

B. 
B. 

WES 
B. 
B. 
W. 

W. 

W. 
W. 

B. 

W. 



1895 
Z89Z 

1877 
1874 
Z891 
1894 



Z893 B. 

I 
X862 W. 

1895 
189Z B. 



X895 B. 
Z8951 B. 

Z887 W. 



X883 



W. 



252 



LIST OF CHURCHES. 



STAFFORDSHIRE {Pop., 1,083.408). 

(W. M., West Midland. £. M.. East Midland. L. C. Lancashire and Cheshire. 
D. F. M. Denbigh. Flint, and Merioneth.) 



Churches. 



4 



X859 
1798 
1776 
z8o6 



Baddeley Edge . 
Bilston :— 

Broad-street . 

Wood-street . 
Brierley-hill, South-st 
Burslem (31.999) 
Burton-on-Trent 

(46,047) :— 

Station-street .. 
Waltan-or^-Trent 
Castle GresUy 

Derby-street . . 

New-street 
CauldwM {Derby- 
shire) 

Overseal {Leicester- 
shire) 

Butt Lane 

Chadsmoor (Cannock) 
Coseley :— 

Darkhouse . . . . 

Providence . . . . 

Ebenezer 

Cradley Heath . . . . 
Croxton (Eccleshall) . . 

Fenton 

Hanley (54.946) :— 

New-street . . . . 

Gt. York-street (W.) 

Eastwood Vale. . . . 
Latebrook (Stoke-on- 
Trent) 

Longton (34.327) . . . . 
Newcastle-under-Lyme 

(18,452) 

Prince's End (Tipton) 
Smethwick {see Birmin^ha 
Stafford (20,270) : — 

Water-street . . 
Stoke-on-Trent (24,027) 
Tamworth, Tabernacle 
Walsall (71,789) :— 

Goodall-street .. 

Stafford-street . . 

Vicarage-walk .. 
Dudley'Strut 



1792 
1877 
1877 
1871 
1824 

1785 

1854 
1880 
1879 

1783 
1809 

1857 
1834 
i860 
z88i 

1789 

1855; 
1877 

1877 
1853 

1872 
1846 



1858 
184X 
z8ai 

1831 
1845 
1881 



80 

250 

550 
400 
370 



630 
zoo 
200 
600 

840 1 

looj 
120 

Z50 

200 

750 
500 
400 

250 
120 

370 
350 

100 
200 

zoo 

600 

220 
540 

m) 

450 
500 
260 

400 
700 
675 



26 

no Z5 

59 20 

81 z6 



150 
263 



35 
50 
34 

90 

Z23 

19 
74 

'} 
27 

87 
37 



Z2 
250 



Z28 
137 

39 



270 
256 



12 

ZOO 
200 
2Z6 
160 



250 
360 

65 

93 
Z50 

499 
298 
190 
z6o 
12 
90 

145 
35 



60 
310 



z8 ; 180 



D. Smith 



W.B. Bliss.. 
J. C. Taylor 



J. Askew 
J. Porteous 



J. Shelley . 
P. Miller . 

G. Buckley , 

J. Williams . 



214 
304 

X20 

230 
370 
470 
100 



J. C. Whitaker 



1882 



z88o 
z892 



W.M. 
W.M. 

L.C, 



E.M. 



1874 



E.M. 
E.M. 



W.M, 
W.M. 



W.M. 
W.M. 
W.M. 
W.M. 



z86o 
1894 

z892 
1882 



.W.M. 

W.M. 

DFM 
W.M. 



W.M. 



W. Springthorpe. 
F. Samuels . . . 



Z870 



1894 
1893 



W.M. 
W.M. 



W.M. 
W.M. 
W.M. 



B. A. Millard 
G. Barrans .. 
A.H.Lee .. 



Z890 
1884 
z88o 



W.M. 
W.M. 



STAFFORDSHIRE — SUFFOLK. 
STAFFORDSHIRE— «m«fMierf. 



253 



GUBCftM. 


1 


! 

1 


'bJ 


1 


^1 


i 


Fkstnta. 


II 


1 


Wednesbury (25.347).. 
W. Bromwich (59.474):- 

High-street .. .. 
WUlenhall :— 

Uttle London.. .. 

Lichfield-street 


1856 

1835 

1792 
Z871 

X830 

• • 


500 
500' 

900 
650 

800 
300 


86 
154 

54 
82 

^53 


22 

36 

24 
26 

16 
8 


3x0 
205 

240 

220 
xoo 


• • 

I 


W. Williams 

A. W.Oakley .. 

G. Banks . . . . 


1892 
x886 
1884 


W.M. 

W.M. 

W.M. 


Wolverhampton 

(83,662) :-^ 
Waterloo-road . . • . 
Cannon-strut 


•• 


F. C. Player, B.A. 


X894 


W.M. 



SUFFOLK {Pop., 37^335). 

(S N., Suffolk and Norfolk Association. S. U., Suffolk and Norfolk Union. 

N.. Norfolk.) 



.i 



)l 



Aldeburgh . • . • 

Aldringham .. .. 

Aldthurgh •• 

LHston .. •• 

Bardwell . . . . 

Beocles, Martyrs' Mem. 

Bildeston . • • . 



Bradfield St. George 

Hesutt .. .. 
Brandon . . . • 
Brockley .. •• 

Bungay 

Bures St. Mary . . 

Lamarsh 
Bury St Eds. (X6.630):— 
Garland-street • . 

Barton 

Htgham 

Whepstead 
Westgate-road, Reho- 

both .. .. 
Charsfield .. •• 

Clare 

Ciansf ord . . . . 
EarlSoham(Wkm.Mkt) 
Eye 



1822 

X8Z2 

I8I2 
x88o 
X824 
x8o8 

»737 
1870 
1844 
X890 
x866 
184X 
1846 
1831 



x8oo 



X840 
X804 
X803 
1838 
1821 
x8xo 



430 
400 

X20 
80 
300 
800 
400 
200 
250 
X50 
350 
250 
3x0 
400 
X30 

900 



X50 
400 
400 
400 
400 
500 



XO5 

128 
26 
72 

48 

19 

64 

X24 



534 



24 
40 
90 
36 
69 
81 



45 



107 
68 



72 
X72 
128 
24 
5x 

345 
60 
36 
98 



450 



60 
87 

IXX 

3x 
62 
X30 



L. E. Bartlett 



G. F.Wall .. 

F. W. Walter' 

W. Dixon . . 

W.T. Lea .. 
W. Rumsey.. 
J. D. Bowtell 

G. Monk 

S. J. Baker •• 



W. Tooke 



A. B. Tettmar 
F. E. Cossey 



X894 



X883 
X893 
X877 

1888 
X89X 
X889 
z88i 



X895 

X895 
1894 



189X 



S.U. 
S.N. 



S.U. 
S.N. 
S.U. 
S.N. 

S.N. 

S.U. 

S.N. 
S.U. 



S.U. 



S.N. 



S.N. 
S.U. 
S.U. 



254 



LIST OF CHURCHES. 
SUFFOLK— coniifiM^^. 



4 



4 


i| 


40 




38 


.. 


77 


•• 


145 


z 


80 


• • 


z8o 


.. 


1x6 


, , 


. . 


. , 


90 


•• 


20 


.. 


80 


2 


78 


•• 


654 


zo 


130 


.• 


174 


, , 


435 


4 


470 


zo 


20 




200 


, , 


35 


- 


288 


4 


75 


2 


85 


.. 


50 


.. 


30 


.. 


50 


, , 


z6o 


, , 


75 


.. 


37 


X 


80 


^ , 


58 


3 


XOI 




78 


I 


469 


3 


20 




Z12 


, , 


37 




zoo 


•• 


47 




71 


3 


85 




178 


6 



Framsden 

Fressingfield • • . 

Friston 

Glemsford : — 

Ebenezer .« .. . 

HuxitsHill .... 

Gorleston (Yarmouth) 

Brenston . . , 

Grundisburgh . . . 

Halesworth .. .. . 

Hadleigh 

HadUigh HetUh . 

HaverhiU 

Horham 

Hoxne 

Ipswich (57,360) :— 

Burlington. ... . 
Washhrook . . . 

David-street, Zoar , 

Founereau-road, Be- 
thesda . . . 

Stoke-green 
Rushnurg 
Witnesham . 

Turret-green.SUent-st 

Levington . • . 

Laxfield.. .. •;• , 

Little Stouham . . . 

Lowestoft (23,347) :— 

London-road . . 

Tonning-st. * .. 
Mendlesham Green 
Mildenhall .. .. 
Norton .. ..' .. 

Occold 

Otley .. .. .. 

Rattlesden .. .. 

Rishangles .. .. 

Somersham .. .. 

Stowmarket, Bury-st... 

Stoke Ash 

Stradbroke .V .. .. 
Sudbury : — 

Church-street .. *, 

Borliy 

Cross-strut • • . . 

Ebenezer .. .. .. 

Sudboume 

Sutton 

Tunstall Common 

BqytoH • 

Eyk4 

Waldringfield 

Walton 

Watttsham 

West Row (MildenhaU) 



1835 
1839 
Z830 

X830 

J859 
z868 

1798 
Z819 
1815 
Z823 
Z870 
1799 
1843 

1856 
X883 
X841 

Z829 
1757 



Z842 



1808 
1858 

1813 
1894 
1839 
1875 
r834 
1832 



Z813 

1849 
1815 

1795 
1805 
1817 

1834 



185 X 



X804 



1823 
z8o8 



Z804 



230 
700 
350 

350 
400 
350 

800 
274 
400 
200 
200 
700 
500 

1020 
z6o 
400 

800 
800 
200 
250 
800 



800 
600 

450 
300 
400 
300 
300 
300 



z8oo 500 



300 
480 
400 
580 
600 
450 

567 



300 



z86o X50 
x8zo 300 



550 



1876 Z20 
1880 ZOO 



300 
420 



Z763 500 



4OQ 



25 
50 
62 

66 
34 
60 

ZZ2 

35 
77 

6 
146 
61 

418 

X54 

225 
283 



345 



Z72 
20 

152 
22 

41 
28 

35 
42 

1x2 

95 
66 

50 
69 

172 
80 

222 



46 

28 

xxo 



40 

97 

87 

100 



E.Ward .. 
R. Franklazid 



R. Page 

A. A. Savage 

H. D. Tobke 
H. b; Berry.. 
A. Morling . • 



G. Firbank .. 
Debnam 
Denmee 



k^ 



T. M. Morris 

R. C. Bardens 

W. Kern .. 
R.E. Willis.. 



C. E. P. Antram 

A. J.Ward.. .. 
J. Grimwood 

J. M.Hamilton.. 

D. Bennett, B.A. 
D. Dickerson 
H.M.Burt.. ., 
H. Alexander . . 
S. H. Haddock.. 

F. J. Harsant . . 
W.H.Evans. .. 

G. Harris . . . . 
W. H. Ranson . . 



C.Hill.. .. 
F. W.. Rumsby 

Robt. Jones . . 



W. Large . 
W. Glasgow. 



T. Evans . , 
J. Hazelton . . 
C. J. Fowler 



x88o| S.U. 
S.N. 
X89Z S.N. 



Z878 
1893 

1894 
Z892 
Z89Z 

z88x 

1879 
Z895 

Z858 

Z89Z 

1877 
Z889 

Z896 

Z893 
Z875 

X887 
1894 

Z877 
1893 
1893 
Z893 
Z890 
1849 



1849 
1895 

Z885 



Z863 
Z883 



1884 
Z893 
Z892 



SURREY. 



^55 



SURREY {Pop., 1.731.343). 
For other Chnrches in Surrey, see *' METROPOLITAN/* pp. 233 — 241. 

(B. Berks. H. C. Home Counties. K. S., Kent and Sussex. M., Metropolitan. 

S., Southern.) 



Pastors. 



^5 



Addlestone 1828 

Statu HiU ... 

Alfold 1883 

Bumifigfold . . . . 1886 

Duns/old ., . . 1892 

Ash Vale {ses Hamp- 

shire) 

Cheam 1862 

Claygate 1861 

Cranleigh Common . . 1826 
Croydon (102,695) • — 

Derby-road .. ..1876 
Tamworth-road .. 1722 
Croydon, South — 

Brighton-road .. 1894 

Croydon, West — 
Windmill-road .. 1881 

Dorking 1869 

Esher, Park-road. . . . 1852 

Oxshoti 1873 

Godstone 1882 

Guildford (14.316):— 

Castle-street . . . . 1689 

Commercial-road • . 1824 

Chiddingfold.. ..1889 

Horley 1881 

FertirhiU .. ..1880 

Horsell, Anthonys • . 1888 

Kingston (27,059). . . . 1790 

HampUm Wick 

Richmond-road 

Lingfield : — 

Dorman's Land • . 1792 
Maiden, New . . . . 1862 
Mitcham, Upper . . . . 1882 

Molesey, East • . . . 1885 

Norbiton, London-st.. 1856 
Bunyan 1882 

Outwood (Redhill) ..1879 

Redhill and Reigate 
(22.646) : — 
London-road(Rednill) 

Richmond (22,6iB4) : — 
Salem, Parkshot 

Tadworth 

Thornton Heath . . . 

Woking. Goldsworth-rd 

York Town 



Z864 

1861 
1822 
1888 
1879 
18x3 



330 
270 
150 



150 

125 

250 



350 

650 

250 
250 
200 
100 
250 

200 
220 
120 
320 
200 
100 
760 
100 
150 

400 
350 
200 

300 

160 
850 
150 



500 

174 
150 
300 
350 
250 



III 
16 
48 

32 
70 

139 

41 
83 
57 



74 
80 
26 
71 

25 
270 

51 

42 
86 
69 
58 
27 

254 

20 



190 

40 

10 

155 

73 
84 



294 
60 
70 
50 



73 

80 

140 

300 
x6o 



390 

61 

89 
70 
48 
45 

"5 
100 

49 

X20 

• 53 

70 

330 

x66 

61 
150 

X20 
50 
22 

400 
48 



150 

76 

25 

273 

130 

170 



13 



H. Bayley 
F. Joseph 



T.G.Griffiths .. 
T. Rush . . . . 
C. B. Bar ringer . . 

J. Copeland.. .. 
E. Wilmshurst .. 

R. E. Chettle- ) 



borough 



W. Horton .. 
T. F. Waddell 
T.G. Head.. 



J. Rankine . . 

B. Marshall.. 

E. W. Tarbox 
G.Wright .. 



1888 
1885 



1895 

1895 
1870 

1892 
1892 

1893 

1885 
X892 
1893 



H.C. 



H.C. 
M. 



M. 



M. 

H.C. 
H.C. 

H.C. 



1879 H.C. 
K.S. 



1890 
1883 



R. Wilson .. .. 
S. H. Moore 
J. T. Figg . . . . 
I G. Wright, of ) 
\ Kingston.. ) 



1891 
1883 
1891 

1893 



D. Thompson 
T. Green . . 



G. Davies . 
R. Sampson. 



T. Lardner . . 
E.J.Page .. 
J. M. Bergin 



1892 
1863 



X890 
1895 



1892 
1895 
1895 



H.C. 
H.C. 

M. 

H.C. 
H.C. 
H.C. 

H.C. 

M. 

H.C. 
H.C. 



H.C. 

M. 
M. 

H.C. 
S. 
B. 



256 



LIST OF CHURCHBS. 



SUSSEX {Pop,, 550.446). 
(K. S.. Kent and Sussex.) 



Battle 1780 

Brighton (1x5.873) :— 
Florence-road . . . . 1894 
Holland-road . . . . 1887 
Mighell-strect .. .. 1878 
Queen's-square .. 1856 
Btaconsfield-road. . 
Upper Gardner-si. . . 
Sussex Street . . . . 1863 
West Brighton, Provi- 
dence 1878 

Burgess Hill 1874. 

Crawley : — 
Station-terrace . . 1883 
TemperanceReading 

Room 

Crowborough : — 

Forestfold 1845 

Wit)wham, Motts 

MUl 

South View, Geth- 

semane 1871 

Cuckfield, Zion .. ..1845 
Eastbourne (34.969) '— 
Ceylon-place . . . . 1870 

Forest Row 

Hailsham i795 

Magham Down . . 

Handcross 1887 

Hastings (52,223) •— 
Wellington-square . . 1838 

Haiton 1871 

Heathfield 1850 

Horsham 1895 

Lamberhurst . . . . 185 
Lewes (10.997):— 

Eastgate 1781 

Portslade-by-Sea . . 1872 
Rye:— 
Mermaid-street . . x7SO 

Shoreham X870 

St. Leonards : — 
Chapel Park-road . . x88d 

Uckfield 1792 

Wadhurst.Shover'sGm. x8x6 

Wivclsfield X763 

Worthing (16.606) , . 1879 

Arundel 1843 

SmaUDoU x88o 



350 

524 
900 
400 
424 



400 

X20 
230 

335 



280 



100 
650 
340 
220 



750 
200 
340 
Hall 



400 
400 



220 

350 

500 

250 

300 

aoo 

500 
180 
130 



49 
339 

30 
232 



114 

39 
34 

63 



47 



X93 
36 
65 



293 

57 
36 
18 



79 

32 
73 

97 
29 

23 
30 
187 



34 



54 

60 
240 

XOO 

XX5 

160 
175 

103 
73 

150 



100 
40 

X87 
73 



90 
260 

X20 

36 



172 
245 

60 

xx8 

105 
35 
50 
30 

347 



G. B. Richardson 

D. J. Llewellyn . , 
D. Davies • . . . 
G. Virgo . . . . 
J. S. Geale . . . . 



T. S. Burros 

W. S. Turner 
E. Standing 

J. McAuslane 



E. Littleton. 



J. Whatford. 



W. J. Harris 
J. Nunn 



W. R. Peacock 
G. Mockford 



W. Boorman 

[B.A. 
W. K. Armstrong, 
H. J. Dyer ,. .. 

E. Compton 



H. Rodger . • . 
H. Gardner . . . 
A. Boonxum 
(G. Virgo, of 
t Brighton 

A. W. L. Barker . 



1895 
X894 



X887 K.S. 
1892 
x88o K.S 



X894 



Z887 
1879 K.S. 



Z883 



z868 



x868 



X894 
x86o 



x86o 
x88i 



K.S. 
K.S. 



K.S. 



K.S. 



K.S. 
K.S^ 



K.S. 
H.C. 



1879 K.S. 
1893 K.S. 

X882 



K.S. 
K.S. 



1895 
1894 
1883 

1873 

X895 K.S. 



WARWICKSHIRE. 



257 



WARWICKSHIRE {Pop., 805,072). 



(W.M.. West Midland. E.M.. East Midland. W.. Worcestershire. 
Denbigh, Flint, and Merioneth.) 



D. F. M. 



A 



Aloester 

Attleborough . . . 

Austrey (Atherstone) . 



Bedworth 

Birmingham (478,113):- 
Aston-park, Christ 
Church . . . . 
Victoria-road^ 

Handsworth . . 
Burlington-street 
Aston .. .. 
Bwington-road, . 
Balsall Heath-road . . 
Bristol-road, Wycliffe 
(Cannon-street), Gra- 
ham-street. . . . 
AlvechMrch .. .. 
Anderton Strut .. 
King's Norton 

Shirty 

Slade-lane . . . . 
Colmore-row, No. 116 

eSoh:: :: 

Great King-street 

Guildford-street 

Hagley-road 



Z640 
1840 

z8o8 

1884 



Carter4ane 



Ellen-street, Brook- 
fields .. .. 

Handsworth, Ham- 
stead-road . . 

Harbome .. .. 



Beech-lanes 



Heneage-street 

HighgatePark.. 
AUester-streei 
LittU Sutton 

Lodge-road 

Longmore-street 



1866 
Z884 
1884 



1872 
i86x 

1737 
1828 

1842 

1845 
x888 

1870 
X878 
1848 
x88x 
Z828 



X882 
1854 



X842 
X775 



1858 
z888 



380 
260 

500 

350 



900 
200 
250 



350 
950 

X700 
200 

150 
80 

ICO 

room 
500 
550 
250 

xooo 

200 



250 

780 
390 

X50 

750 
700 

200 
X20 
500 
300 



457 



1x8 
203 



551 



19 
X69 
281 

70 
383 



156 

X23 



390 
207 



135 

X4I 



30 



160 

220 



625 
150 
667 

60 

200 

6x9 

8x0 



197 
678 

320 

989 
60 



400 

915 
350 

83 
673 

253 
50 
40 

2x4 

200 



E. J. Crofts • • • . 
W. Satchwell .. 

1J. R. Godfrey,) 
of Barlestone, V 
Leicestershire j 



X884 
1887 

1895 



W. 
W.M. 

E.M. 

W.M. 



14 



27 



W. A. Wicks 



S. Nield 



W. Hackney, M.A 



M. Morgan . . . 
J. Dawson . . . 

J. Bradford . . . 
J. M. G. Owen . 

1G. Duzmett, 
of Halesowen, 
Worcestershire . 



H. Bozmer. . . 
W. W. B. Emery 

1G. Duimett, of 
Halesowen, 
Worcestershire 
G. West .. 
E. W. CantreU 



D. E. Evans. . 
C. Beaumont 



1894 

X892 
1887 



W.M. 

w.m: 

W.M. 



1895 

x88x 

X883 
X895 

1895 



DFM 
W.M. 
W.M. 
W.M. 
W.M. 



X883 
x888 

1895 

X884 
Z882 



W.M 
W.M. 



W.M. 
W.M. 



1880 W.M. 
1895 



258 



LIST OF CHURCHES. 



WARWICKSHIRE—cofUimiAf. 



} 



Binniogham {eontd,) : — 

Moseley, Oxford-rd' 

King's Heath 

Newhall-street . . . 

SalUey 

Selly Park 

Small Heath :~ 
Coventry Road 
Victoria-street . 

Smethwick . . . 

Sparkbrook, Strat- 
ford-road 

Spring-hill 

Warwick-street 
Pfnn-strui . . 

Yates-street 
Blkiwion-street 
Coventry (52,724):— 

Queen's-road . . 
Cow-lane 
Lord-strut . • 
WolstoH . . . . 

Gosford-street .. 

St Michael's .. 

Dunchurch (Rugby) 

Henley-in-Arden • . 

Yamingale . . 

Leamington (26.930): — 

Clarendon (U.) 



Radford 
Warwick-street 
Satehwett'Street 



klem 

Walsgravt-onSowe 
Union-place 
Monk's Kirby ft PaUton 
Nuneaton . . . . 
Polesworth . . . . 
Rugby 

Draycott 

HiUmortoH .. 
Stratford-on-Avon 

Timpie Grafton 

Prestonron-Stour 

Studley 

Umberslade . . . . 

HoekUy Heath 
Warwick (11,903) :— 
CasUeHill .. 
Wolvey (Hinckley) 
Wyken-sq. (Coventry) 

Shilton 



1835 

1814 
X893 
1878 

1873 
X891 
1866I 



1880 1000 



Z887 
1869 



1859 



1626 



1814 
1822 
1855 
1844 
x688 
1873 

1859 
1830 



1773 
X830 
X826 
18x7 
X846 
X828 
1808 
1884 
X682 
X832 
184X 
X867 
1848 
X877 
X877 

1640 
1815 
18x7 



i570 
I300 
300 

400 

750 
450 
830 



700 
300 



250 



xooo 

700 
400 
300 
708 
700 

200 
200 

60 



500 

650 



830 
100 
400 
300 
460 
350 
350 
X03 
X50 
350 
150 

XOO 

250 
200 

80 

400 
400 

200 



[282 

56 
51 



178 

XOO 

157 

315 
X98 

97 



104 



440140 



235 

14 
40 



X02 

la 

208 



250 
40 



3i 

XOO 

59 
118 



X49 

lOI 

55 



60 
50 
69 



40 



460 •• 
136 



350 
145 

350 
491 
260 

800 
422 
300 

85 
300 
2x9 

2024 



376 
20 
45 
20 

220 
XOO 

137 



336 



x8 
263 

Z20 

X20 

23 

31 

202 

x6 
33 
150 
64 



75 
ixo 

45 
14 



f R. Gray . 
tj.CoUctt . 

P. C. Fuchs. 



T. Dowse .. 
H. Singleton 

J.Hulme .. 
T. E. Titmuss 
S. W. Martin 

P. M Young 



rW.E.Blomfield,] 
1 B.A., B.D. ] 



1874 
x888 



1894 



1891 
X694 



X892 



P. Morrison 
E. Edginton 



G.A.Willis.. 
A. Phillips . . 

J. Spanswkk 



E. Gilbert 
J. Young 



[.Read.. 
[. Mann 



H. W. Meadow 



15 



x886 



[WM 

W.M. 
W.M. 
W.M. 

W.M. 
W.M. 
W.M. 



1880 W.M. 



W.M. 



X869 W.M. 



W.M. 



1895 



1895 
X892 



Z884 
X892 

1889 



X884 



1894 



1890 



W.M. 



W.M. 

W.M. 

W.M. 

W. 



W.M. 

W.M. 

W.M. 



W.M. 
E.M. 
W.M. 
W.M. 
E.M. 



W. 



W. 



X893 
x888 W.M. 



W.M. 
W.M. 



WESTMORLAND —WILTSHIRE. 



259 



WESTMORLAND {Pop., 66,098). 
(N.. Northern.) 



II 



Kirkby Stephen 

Crost^ Garrett 

Brough .. 

Gnat Ashy 

Winton .. 



X890 
1856 
X834 
1839 
1864 



150^ 
100 



150 



83 18 



146 



C. G. Jones. 



z888 



N. 



WILTSHIRE {Pop., 264.997). 
(W. E. S., Wilts and East Somerset. B., BristoL S.. Southern.) 



Bearfield (Bradford) . 
Bradford-on-Avon : — 
Cooigre, Zion . . • 
Bratton (Westbury) . 

Couistone . . . 

StupUAsJUon . 

Tinkead 

GnatChevriU . 

Bromham 

Calne:— 
Castle-street . . . 

YaUsbwy . . • 

Ratford Bridge . 
Chapmanslade . . . 
Chippenham : — 

Station Hill . . . 
Corsham: — 
Prioi y -street • • 

Biddestone • • . 

Moor Green .. . 

VelUy 

Atvaorth 

Cotton 

Crockerton 

Damerham 

Rockboume .. . 
Devises: — 
Maryport-street 
Sheep-street • . . 

SUrt 

Pewsey 

Afor^fen 



Z858 

1844 
1667 



1828 

1660 
1874 
1887 
1788 

1857 

1823 
1832 
X833 
1857 
i860 
1827 
1669 
1828 
1802 

1649 
1649 
1887 



100 

480 
300 
no 
no 
120 
120 

300 

350 
100 

140 

300 

350 
150 
150 

X20 
120 
150 
200 
140 
100 

300 

650 

80 

100 

70 



15 

80 
167 



12 
102 

23 
240 



60 
130 



80 



220 
162 



60 

125 

40 
40 

120 

3X2 



48 
26 
70 
40 

120 
290 

35 



E. E. Smith. 
W. Fty.. . 



W. H. J. Page 



Evangelist .. 
J. E. Tranter 
J. Smith 



Evangelist 
L. Eamey 



C. Hemington 
J.Day.. .. 



1890 
1894 



B. 

WES 



X893 



1892 
1891 



1895 



WES 
WES 

WES 

WES 

B. 



WES 

WES 

S. 



1871 
1895 



WES 



R 2 



26o 



LIST OF CHURCHES. 



VflUTSHlRK— continued 



•i 



II 



1 



Downton: — 
South-lane 

Gravel Close . . 

Redfynch 
Grittleton (Chippnhm.^ 
Hilperton (Trowbridge) 

Imber 

Limpley Stoke .. 
Littleton Panell 

(Devizes) 
Melksham : — 
Broughton-road 

Forest . . . . 

Beanacre 
North Bradley . . 
Salisbury (i5,533) :— 
Brown-street . . 

Coombe Bissett 

Porton . . , . 

Bodenham . . 
Semley 



Sherston Magna , 



Shrewton 

Tilshead . . . . 

Chitteme .. .. 
Southwick(Trowbridge) 

2nd Church 
Stratton, Upper . . 



1735 
1666 
1858 
1720 
x8o6 

1839 
i88q 

Z848 

1669 

1839 
X840 

1775 

1657 

1665 
i860 
1817 

1837 

Z8X2 

1851 

X859 
1655 
i860 

i86x 



3501 
120) 
xoo 
200 
88 
180 
130 

150 

380 
150 
100 
500 

600 
150 
100 
100 
250 

150 

500 
130 
120 
300 

200 



Stratton Green . . . . 

Swindon : — 
Tabernacle . . . . 

Cambria 

Gorse Hitt . . . . 
Trowbridge : — 
Back-street . • . . 
St%tdliy Green 
Westwood, Lower. . 
Yambrook • . • . 

Bethesda 

Zion 

Warminster, North-row 

Upton Scudamore 
Westbuiy :— 

Leigh 

Storwore • • 
Penknap, Providence 

West End 

Whitboume (Corsley) 
Winterslow, (Su 

Bronghton, Hanti) 



1750 



1855 LOOO 

1882 

Z878 



250 
200 



1736 
1850 
1865 
1874 
1821 
I813 

i8xx 



1662 
1826 
1810 
1825 
181 X 



860 
no 

90 
230 

700 
700 
370 



500 

X20 
500 
350 
200 



5 
25 
29 
20 

25 
177 

144 
272 



394 



479 



253 

165 
74 



139 

141 
X04 
45 



58 



135 
68 

34 
97 

25 

93 
300 

82 

341 
30 
39 
40 
50 

x6 

85 
60 

45 
104 
xxo 
x6o 

40 
750 



362 
80 
65 
42 
320 
220 
92 



151 

156 
130 
60 



W.Evans 



. 1892 



S. 



Wm. Smith . . 



G. Short, B.A. 



T. Yauldren 
(A. J. Parker, of) 
\ Old Sodbury, [ 
I Glos. j 



1891 

1868 

1895 
1892 



WES 
B. 

WES 

WES 



fR. W.Mansfield. 
\ of Bourton, 



Berks. 



>ld.| 



F. Pugh 



1892 
X877 



S. 

WES 
B. 

WES 
WES 
WES 
WES 

WES 
WES 



H. Sanders . . . 
G. W. Roughton. 

W.Price .. . 



1890 
I 



WES 
ES 



W. P. Laurence . 
Evangelist •• . 



890W 



. Z889WES 



WES 
WES 
WES 



1876 



WORCBSTERSHIRB. 



261 



WORCESTERSHIRE {Pop., 413.760). 
(W., Worcestershire. W.M.. West Midland. O.. Oxfordshire.) 



4 



Astwood Bank . . . . 

Atch Lench and . • . . 

Dunnington • • . . 

Hdrvingion .. .. 

Bewdley .. 

Blockley 

Draycott 

Paxford 

Bromsgrove, New-road 

CeUshiU 

Dodford 

Cinderbank 



CookhiU (Alcester) . 

Cutsdean 

Stanton 

Droitwich, Hill End . 
Dudley (45.740) :— 

New-street 

Evesham. Cowl-street 

Aldington .. . 

Ashton 

Bengeuforth .. . 

Offenham . • . 

Bret/orton . . . 

Charlton . . . 
Goose-hill (Droitwich) 

Halesowen 



Inkberrow District 

Mission . . . . 

Kidderminster (24,803) : 

Church-street .. .. 

MUtonHaU .. .. 
Malvern, Great . . . . 
Netherton : — 

Ebenezer 

Sweet Turf . . . . 
Pershore. Broad-street 

Bishampton .. .. 
Redditch, Ipsley-street 

Web Heath .. .. 
Shipston-on-Stour 

Stretton-on-Fosse. . 
Stourbridge, Hanbry-hl 

Stourport 

Tenbury, Cross-street. . 
Upton-on-Sevem. • . . 

Naunton 

Westmancote . . . . 
Worcester (42,908) : — 
Sansome-wsilk .. .. 

Kempsiy 

RedHiU 

Rainbow HiU . . 



1813 700 
1825' 165) 

.. '200[ 
1886: 180 
1649I 260 
1820 320 
50 

75 
500 
100 
100 



x666 
1830 
1865 
Z820 400 

1841 

1839 
X842 
1874 

1772 

1732 
i88z 
x88i 
1874 



1866 
X878 



1889 



200 

150 
100 
180 

400 
550 
120 
200 
150 

60 
100 
120 

50 
170 



1808 600 
1890 400 
1886, 300 

X864 500 
i8o3| 200 
1658 550 

1862 280 
70 

178 J 200 
60 

1837 365 
X875 300 
1816 200 
1693 460 
1 863 1 100 
X779 180 



1641 
x86o 
1879 
1881I 



850 
200 

85 
200 



, , 


66 


505 


, , 


117 


10 


xxo 


3 


30 


10 


97 


2 


69 


26 


160 


•• 


167 


30 


298 


12 


28 


X2 


X20 


3 




8 


55 




108 


33 


450 


4 


74 


20 


100 


3 


49 


xo 


•• 


4 


34 


7 


50 


I 


109 


15 


165 


. . 


144 


52 


505 


12 


XX 

26 








9 


xoo 


2 


.. 


6 


40 


•• 


274 


31 


375 


I 


. . 


20 


270 




69 


5 


30 


3 


50 


32 


240 


I 


60 


15 


200 


3 


102 


21 


170 


3 


165 


28 


180 


5 




7 


68 




44 


10 


89 


4 


71 


19 


x6o 


, , 


69 


X4 


150 


3 


t8 


3 
xo 


24 
40 


I 


52 






5 


50 




50 


5 


60 


•• 


397 


91 


889 


xo 



J. R. Russell 
i C. Chrystal 
1 G. Towler 

F. J. Aust . . 
E.G. Lo veil.. 



J. Ford . 



T. Lewis . . 
rj. R. Russell 
1 (see above). 
C. Sirett 



J. Lord.. 
E. Milnes 



( G. Dunnett . . i 
I see also p. 257. j 



Evangelist .. .. 

j T. Fisk . . . . 

1 L. T. Harry . . 

W. J. Povey, M.A 

A. Griffiths . . . . 

J. H. Feek .. .. 

E. W. Berry 

J. Butler . . . . 

T. Woodhouse . . 

R. Evans . . . . 



W. T. Shepherd. 
E. Balmford 



1895 
x888 
1895 

X89X 
1894 



W. 
W. 



w. 
o. 



1893 

1872 

1895 
1884 

I89I 

X893 



W.M. 

W.M. 
W. 
O. 

W. 

W.M. 
W. 



1895 



1862 
1892 

Z889 

1895 
1873 

1886 

1895 

1892 
1877 



189* 
1889 



w. 

W.M. 

w 

[w. 
w. 

W.M. 

W.M. 

W. 

W. 

O. 

W.M. 

W. 

W. 

W. 

W. 

W. 



262 



LIST OF CHURCHBS. 



YORKSHIRE {Pop,, 3.208,828) 

(Y., Yorkshire. N., Northern. L.C., Lancashire and Cheshire. D. F. M., Denbigh 
Flint and Merioneth.) 



^1 



I 



Armley, Carr Crofts 
Bamoldswick 

Bethesda . . . . 
Bamsley (35.427) :— 

Parker-street . . 

Sheffield-road .. 
Batley (28,719) : — 

Park-road .. .. 

Bedale 

Beverley (12,539) ' — 

Well-lane .. .. 
Woadmansiy . . 
Bingley :— 

Park-road . . . . 
BirchclifTe (Hebden Bg) 
Bishop Burton • . 
Blackley (Elland) 
Boroughbridge . . 

Dishforth 
Bradford (2x6,361) : — 

Allerton, Bethel 
Central .. .. 

Girlington .. .. 

Haimeld .. .. 

Heaton .. .. 

Infirmary-st., Bethel 

Leeds-road . . . . 

Marshfield 

Ripley-street, Eben. 

Sion Jubilee 

Caledonia-street .. 

Tetley-street . . . . 

Trinity 

Westgate 

Bramley : — 

Zion 

Salem .. .. .. 

firearley, Luddenden- 

foot 

Bridlington 

Clayton 

Cononley 

Cowlinghill 

MiddUton Cowling 
Crigglestone . . , 
CuUingworth. . .. , 
Denholme (Bradford), 
Dewsbury (29,847) : — 

Leeds-road . . . 



Z848 
1661 
T661 

1894 
X845 

1877 
1836 

1833 



1760 
1763 
1764 
1793 
1822 



1824 
1873 
X882 
1863 
X862 
1850 



X892 
1867 
1824 



600 
588 
600 

X50 
500 

400 
230 

500 
xoo 

680 

700 
250 

750 

x6o 



500 
488 

1000 
950 
360 
200 
825 
350 
714 

1200 



1832 
1857 
1753 

1774 
X878 

X846 
X698 
1828 
x86i 
1744 

1879 
1836 
X851 

1865 



600 
800 
840 

650 
450 

400 
500 
750 
240 
400 

250 
400 
430 

410 



149 40 



137 
M5 



X72 

57 
27 

145 



X2X 
352 

46 
178 

27 



123 
128 

254 

143 

180 

76 

352 



233 
5" 



273 
380 

196 
77 



40 
222 

37 
41 

23 
62 

83 
143 



45 



33 



248 
305 
430 

294 
500 

1x6 
45 

304 



204 

367 

40 

240 

24 



226 

183 
6x7 
2x6 
250 
X05 
643 



478 
850 
319 

2X8 

367 
360 

273 

X20 
1X2 

94 

358 

70 

60 

70 
140 
174 

260 



W. Sumner . 



W. R. Ponton 
John Young 

F. Wynn .. 



E. R. Lewis. 
J. Gay .. . 



R. Briggs 
Evangelist 



A. T. Walker 
R. Evans . . 
T. G. Hunter 
R. Howarth.. 



R. Herries . . 
G. Edmondson 
A. C. Perriam 
G. C. Williams 



S. Kent. . . . 
C. Rignal .. 
C. W. Skemp 



F. Allsop . . 
J. Scilley . . 
J. W, Hambly 



J. Davis 
C. Payne 



X884 



1893 
x88i 

X895 



X893 
1894 



1874 



1892 
x888 
1894 
1877 



x892 
X892 
189X 
1S94 

1889 
i88x 
x88x 



X883 
X892 
z88i 



X892 
1892 



Y. 
Y. 

Y. 

Y. 
Y. 

Y. 
Y. 



Y. 
Y. 
Y. 
Y. 
Y. 



Y. 
f. 
Y, 
Y. 
Y. 
Y. 
Y. 
Y. 
Y. 
Y. 

Y. 
Y. 
Y. 

Y. 
Y. 

Y. 
Y. 
Y. 
Y. 
Y. 

Y. 
Y. 
Y. 



YORKSHIRE. 



263 



YORKSHIRE— continued. 



Camp-road 
Barley-road 
Kirkstall 



Doncaster (25,933) :— 
Chequer-road .. .. 1889 300 

Driffield 1786 440 

Cranswick .. .. 1876 140 
Earby-in-Craven . . ..18x9 650 
Eccleshill. Undercli£f-rd 1885 220 

Elland 1863 450 

Parsley 1777 1050 

Calveriey .. .. 1874 140 

Gildersome 1707 700 

Golcar 1835 1 150 

Leymoor .. .. 1884 170 

Guiseley.> 1884 250 

Halifax (89,832):— 
North-parade .. .. 1774 668 
Lee Mount . • . . 1892 600 
Pellon-lane .. .. 1755 600 

Pellon 1840 350 

Trinity-road .. ..i 851 1000 
Harrogate (131917) . . 1880 600 
Haworth : — 

West-lane 1752 500 

Hawksbridge .. .. 200 
Hebden Bridge . . . . 1777 'ooo 

HeUifield 1833 200 

Heptonstall Slack . . 1807 550 

Broadstone 300 

Blahedean 80 

Horkinstone(Ox'nhope) 1837 200 

Horsforth. Cragg Hill ..1802 500 

Huddersfield (95,420):— 

New North-road . . 1846 800 

Birkby 1879 120 

Lindley 1864 670 

Lockwood 1795 720 

Rehoboth 1835 .. 

Primrose Hill . . . . 1889 700 
Hull (200.044) : — 

George-street .. .. 1795 500 

Hedon 

South-street .. .. 1736 800 

Beverley-road .. .. 1885 450 

Idle 1808 850 

Keighley (30,810) :— 

Albert-street .. .. 18 10 700 

Worth 1873 250 

Leeds (367»505) :— 

Blenheim 1848 720 

300 



1848 

- 1877 .- 
.1877 650 
J1877I 300 



zoi x6 
47 9 



234 
44 
91 

3x9 

124 
303 

39 

300 
X67 
239 

320 

M5 

209 

264 

19 
220 

83 

II 

42 

141 

315 

157 

245 
42 
75 

2x9 

134 
122 
169 

322 



259 



42 
12 
30 
84 

20 
73 
19 
21 

42 
36 
34 
45 
45 
16 

32 
48 
40 
10 
29 
24 

46 
30 

35 
16 

31 
61 
30 
27 

15 

22 
13 
34 

71 



25 
26 

2091 34 
.. I 8 



140 
60 

400 
120 
226 
405 

200 

445 

67 

no 

298 

399 
273 
273 
375 
1X8 

172 
178 

379 
68 

183 
67 
x6 
72 

227 

268 
184 

480 

462 
230 
X96 

152 

196 

215 
230 

522 



J. F. Porteous 
F. D. Tranter 

W. Wynn .. 
T. £. Rawlings, oi 

[Idle 

H. Ellis, M.A. 

J. Haslam . . 
W. Gay .. 

R. Scott 

C.Hood .. 
J. H. Robinson 
F. Slater . . 

H. Davis . . 



I D. Arthur . , 
W. Jones . , 
J. K. Archer 



238 
306 

390I 3 



X890 
1893 

1893 
X889 

1890 

1862 
1882 

1895 

1888 

1893 
X895 

X892 



F. J. Benskin . . 

fW. H. Holds-) 
( worth, M.A. ) 

G. Archer . . . . 

W, J. Dyer.. .. 
J. E. Shephard . . 
J. M. Murphy . . 
T. E. Rawlings . . 
J. Alderson . . • . 



f P. T. Thomson, 

I M.A. 

J. H. McKeracher 



X889 
Z891 
1895 



1884 

X895 
1893 
1893 
X895 
1892 
1889 
1886 

1895 
1895 



Y. 

Y. 

Y. 
Y. 
Y. 
Y. 

Y. 
Y. 



Y. 
Y. 
Y. 

Y. 
Y. 



Y. 
Y. 
Y. 



Y. 
Y. 



Y. 
Y. 

Y. 

Y. 

Y. 
Y. 
Y. 



264 



LIST OF CHURCHES. 



YORKSHIRE— con/tniiAf. 



ll 



Leeds {conid.): — 
Hunslet Tabernacle 
North-street . . • 
South-parade .. . 
Meanwood-road . 
BeesianHiU.. . 
Wintoun-street 
York-road 

Lineholme. (Todmor- 
den) 

Long Preston . . . . 

Lydgate (Todmorden) . . 

Malton, Wells-lane . . 

Masham 

Meltham 

Middlesboro' (75,532): — 
Brentnall-street (W.) 
Linthorpe-road 
Marton-road . . 
Newport-road .. 
North Ormesby 

Milnsbridge .. .. 

Mirfield 

Morlcy (aI,o68):— 
Commercial-8treet 

Nazebottom (Hebden 
Bridge) . . . . 

Norland • . . . 

Normanton .. .. 

Northallerton 
Brampton 

Ossett (10,984) ., 

Ossett. Central . . 

Polemoor . . . . 
Clou^h Head. . 
Outlane .. .. 

Pudsey 

Queensbury (Bradford) 

Rawdon 

Redcar 

Rishworth 

Rodley 

Rotherham (42,061) : — 
Wes^ate 

Salendine Nook (Hud- 
dersfield) 

Salterforth (Bamldswk) 

Scapegoat Hill .. ., 

Scarboro' (33,776) :— 
Albemarle . . . , 
West Gate (Eben) 
Bumiston . . . . 



1837 700 
18441 550 



1779 
X834 
1874 
1850 
i86z 

1818 
1833 
1859 
1822 
1815 
1814 

1876 
1849 
1886 
1856 
1884 
1843 
1825 

1872 

1872 
1864 
1878 
1845 

1834 
1894 
1790 



1848 
1773 
1715 
1889 
1803 
1892 

1837 

1743 
iR6r 
1871 

1865 
1771 



900 

200 
200 
600 

750 

500 
200 
300 
350 
200 
560 

350 
250 
520 
1000 
400 
800 
750 

400 

300 

750 
250 

400 

640 
300 
300 
200 

550 
500 
320 
350 
350 

500 

900 
250 
240 

670 
450 



320 
118 
507 

30 

102 

164 

TT 


47 
25 
104 

10 
31 

34 
4 

30 

10 
9 

32 


530 
246 
697 

60 

346 

285 

20 

204 

X20 

30 
178 


8 
5 

X 

2 


A. E. Greening . . 
F. W. W. Pugh . . 


1880 
1894 


1 G. W. Bonell . . 

A, E. 0. Jones . . 
C. Riseborough . . 

G. M. Rice . . . . 


1888 

1895 
1894 

X890 


137 

74 
37 
x6o 


2 

2 


W. L. Stevenson 
J.O. Ogilvy.. .. 


1884 
1894 


X 


F. Oliver . . . . 


1893 


58 
135 
276 

262 

168 

129 

^0 


15 
24 
63 

51 
33 

42 

x6 

14 
20 

I 

24 

6 

98 

22 

50 

34 

2 

23 

18 

125 

16 
60 

44 
13 
6 


220 
260 

756 

350 
180 

370 

152 
76 
300 
25 

X3O 

30 

320 

141 
332 
242 

15 
142 

50 

458 
120 
247 

440 


5 
3 


R. Ensoll . . . . 
J. R. Fawcctt .. 
C. E. Stone . . . . 

A. J. Da\nes 
J. Kitchener 

C. Welton .. .. 


1894 
1887 
1892 

1892 
1887 

1888 


t8 








78 
8 


2 

2 


i.T. Heselton .. 
Evangelist . . 


1885 


64 

T9 


E. Greenwood . . 


1882 


219 


3 

3 

2 






67 

204 

200 

20 

96 

51 

"5 

324 
77 
176 

226 

68 

9 


F. W. Turner . . 
A. C. Carter 
A. P. Payers 
J. Horn . . . . 


1893 
1885 
X883 
1893 








4 


J. Collinson 
D.W.Jenkins .. 


z888 
X895 


X 

4 

2 


T.R. Lewis.. .. 

R.Wood .. .. 
J. H.P.Smith .. 


1889 

x892 
X887 



Y. 
Y. 
Y. 



Y. 
Y. 

L.C. 
Y. 
Y. 
Y. 
Y. 
Y. 

DFM 
Y. 
N. 

N. 



Y. 

Y. 

Y. 
Y.- 
Y. 
Y. 

Y. 
Y. 
Y. 



YORKSHIRE. 



265 



YORKSHlKE^^eontinued. 



^i 



Sheffield (324,243) :— 

Attercliffe 

Treeton 

Cemetexy-road 

Glossop-road . . . . 

Hillsborough • . . . 

Port MahoQ . . . . 

Townhead-street . . 

Walkley 

Shipley :— 

Bethel 

Charlestown . . . . 

Rosse-street . . . . 
Shore (Todmorden) . . 
Skipton, Otley-street . . 

Belmont 

Slack-lane (Keighley).. 
Slaithwaite (Hddrsfld) : 

Providence . « . . 

Zion 

South Bank, Norman- 
by-road . . . . 
Sowerby Bridge . . 
StainclifTe . . . . 
Stanningley, Salem 
Steep-la. (Sowerby Bge) 
Sunny Bamk (Golcar) 
Sutton-in-Craven. . 

Glusburn 
Thomaby-on-Tees 

^ -. ^ ^'5.637) 

Todmorden : — 

Wellington-road 

Room field . . . . 
Wainsgate (Hebden 

Bridge) .. .. 
Wakefield (33.146):- 

George-street . . 
West Vale, near Halifax 
York (67.004):— 

Priory-street . . 



1874 
1885 
1839 
1871 
1893 
1834 
1813 
1880 

1758 
1890 
1866 
1777 
1850 
1890 
X819 

1816 
1886 

1877 
X884 
1821 
1828 
1779 
1883 
1741 
1875 

1881 

1845 
x8o8 



750 
60 
680 
800 
350 
600 
650 
250 

500 
200 
1000 
750 
350 
180 
650 

470 
450 

300 
300 
300 
500 
600 
250 
850 
100 

400 

450 
750 



X750 420 



1838 
X871 

X862 



500 
500 

650 



175 


38 




6 


271 


44 


284 


35 


79 


20 


364 


46 


236 


31 


X02 


30 


209 


22 


39 


17 


304 




214 


31 


91 


30 


42 


13 


161 


45 


62 


22 


3c^ 


20 


89 


16 


28 


17 


100 


15 


X22 


25 


151 


50 


41 


34 


382 


70 


•• 


32 


84 


15 


243 


48 


254 


47 


X26 


30 


134 


18 


106 


33 


151 


20 



470 

70 

330 

273 

200 
520 
170 
320 

257 
64 

2X8 

208 
130 

x6o 

X26 
220 

200 
79 
158 
251 
290 
X07 

525 
x6o 

155 

274 
420 

140 

121 
210 

140 



J. G. Williams 
E. Carrington 



H. Trotman 
Isaac A. Ward 
A 3. Haste. . 



J. F. Archer 
W. Judge .. 
J. S. Griffiths 
H. Davies . . 



E. Evans . . 
D. M. Pryse 



J. Rigby .. 
W.Haigh !! 
F.W. Pollard 



H. W. H. Winsor 

T. Cotes . . . . 
H. Briggs . . . . 



J. Cottam .. 
D. R. Lewis 

C. Pates 



X887 
X883 



'893 
1887 

1893 



X894 
1878 
1892 
1888 



Y. 
Y. 
Y. 
Y. 
Y. 
Y. 

Y. 
Y. 
Y. 
L.C 
Y. 
Y. 
Y. 



1886 
1894 
1893 
1864 
x892 



1881 

1888 
X871 



1894 
1895 

1895 



Y. 

N. 
Y. 
Y. 
Y. 
Y. 
Y. 
Y. 



Y. 
Y. 



266 



LIST OF CHURCHES. 



(Aggregate Population, 1,771,451.) 



The letter (E.) in brackets after the name of a Church signifies that the service is in 

English. 

An asterisk prefixed to the name of a Pastor indicates that he is Pastor of more 

than one Church. 



ANGLESEY {Pop., 50,098). 
(A., Anglesey. N.W.. North Wales English Union.) 



Chnrches. 



II 



Amlwch, Salem . . 

Llaneilian, Bethania 
Beaumaris . . . . 

Belan 

Bodedeyrn . . . . 

Ainon 

Bontripont . . . . 
Brynsiencyn Tab'nacle 
Caerceiliog, Siloh 
Capel Gwyn . . . . 
Capel Newydd, Peny- 

graigwen 

Cemaes, Bethlehem . 
Gaenven, Moriah.. . 

Garegfawr 

Gwalchmai 

Holyhead : — 

Edmond-st, Bethel. 
Porthy/elin, Salem 

Hebron 

New Park - street, 
(Newry-street) (E.) 

Siloh 

Llandegfan, Seion 
Llanddeusant : — 

Horeb 

Llanerchymedd . . 
Llanfachreth.. .. 
Llanfaethlu, Zoar 
Llanfair-Math 
Llaogefni, Ebenezer 

Pisgah . . . . 
Llangoed, Jerusalem 
Llanwenllwyfo, Sardis 
Menai Bridge 
Newburgh . . • . 
Pencameddi . . . . 

Pensarn 

Rhosybol. Bethel.. 
Rhydwyn , . . . 
Traethcoch . . . . 
Valley 



1796 

1784 
1833 
1824 



1828 
1804 
1848 
1796 

1796 
1823 
1850 
1815 
1889 

1790 
1865 
Z862 

Z862 
1844 
1815 

18x6 
1818 
1796 
1820 
1782 
1779 
1875 
1804 
1833 
1884 
1849 
1784 
1837 
184X 
1791 
1816 
z868 



500 
100 
195 
150 
120 
100 
250 
140 
240 
100 

122 

300 
X20 



1060 

201 

250 
350 
250 

185 
350 
400 
200 
250 
300 
X50 

193 
250 
200 
200 
400 
250 
400 
124 
131 



146 
20 
42 
58 
40 
28 

55 
14 
67 
48 

33 
33 
40 
24 
9 

333 

91 

58 
58 
50 

45 
53 
80 

77 
35 
140 

43 
48 
37 

7 
38 
88 
56 
79 

6 
38 



X40 
30 
38 
36 
61 
39 
55 
26 
90 
40 

38 
34 
50 
6 
25 

350 
60 
100 



X20 
52 
23 

35 
90 
70 
55 
30 
145 

50 
50 



[ G. Williams 
T. Hughes . . 



J. G. Williams 



•J. C. Rees 



•T. E. Williams 



T. M. Rees . 

W. Price , 
G. Evans . 



H. Edwards. . 



■D.Lloyd .. 
'E. W. Lewis 
T. Frimston 



•J. C. Rees 



12 
60 
70 
50 
1x9 
14 
50 



•T. E. Williams 
•J. C. Rees . . 

E. E. Jones. . 
•D.Lloyd .. 

E. W. Lewis 



1895 
i88x 



X895 



X893 



1891 



Z892 
X887 
1894 



X89X 



1894 
1895 
1893 



X893 



1891 
1893 
1875 
1894 
1895 



A. 

A. 
A. 
A. 
A. 
A. 
A. 
A. 
A. 

A. 
A. 
A. 
A. 
A. 

A. 

A. 

N.W. 
A. 
A. 

A. 
A. 
A. 
A. 
A. 
A. 

A 
A. 
A. 
A. 
A. 
A. 
A. 
A. 
A. 
A. 



BRECKNOCKSHIRE. 



267 



BRECKNOCKSHIRE {Pop., 57,031). 

(B., Breconshire. M., Monmouthshire Welsh. M.E., Monmouthshire English 
G.C.E., Glamorganshire and Carmarthenshire English.) 



s' 


\ 


"sj 


ll 


& 


I 


»l 


f 



Beaufort. Zcar (W. ft E.) 1853 
Siloam (E.) . . . . 1862 

Brecon: — 
Watergate .. .. 1819 
Kensington (E.) . . 18x7 

Brynmawr : — 
King-street, Calvary 1837 
Tabor .. .. [(E.) 1835 
Zion 1846 

Builth, Ebenezer (E.). . 1787 

CapelyFfin(E.).. .. 1663 

Crickhowell 1839 

Cwmdwr (nr.Trecastle), 

Horeb 1820 

Erwood, Hephzibah . . 1829 
and Ramah . . . . 1855 
Garth, Pisgah . . . . 1827 
Gilwern (E.), Hope . . x86i 
Glasbury (£.) and . . 1862 
PenyrheoUE.) .. .. 1819 
Hay (E.), Salem . . . . 18x5 

Bronith 

Uanelly :— 
Bethlehem (W. ft E.) 1837 
Darrenfelen (W. ft E.) X842 
Nazareth (E.) . . . . 1853 
JLlanfihangel, Zoar . . X827 
Bethel Lower . . . . 184X 

Sardis 1824 

Llanfrynach, Mizpah . . 1834 
Llangamarch, Salem . . 1847 

Llangorse 1823 

LJangynidr, Sardis .. x8i2 
Llanwrtyd, Zion . . • . 1863 

Sugar Loaf 

Maesyberllan . . . . 1700 
Nantyffin (Ystradgyn- 

lais) 1796 

Colbren 

Pantycelyn 1806 

Pontestyll x8x9 

Seimy Bridge . . . . 1843 
Talgarth, Tabernacle . . 1836 
Trgvil {SeeMonmoHthsh ire.) 
Ynysfelin, Bethel. . . . 1798 



700 
140 

350 
500 

500 
800 
700 
300 
150 

300 

140 
200 
»50 
260 
200 

350 
250 
400 



560 
500 
250 
250 
200 
150 
200 
150 
X40 
400 
200 



350 



200 



200 
150 
150 
350 

150 



90 
20 

172 
114 

z6o 
120 

27 
163 

13 

128 

28 

52 
16 

71 
61 

71 
58 
69 



127 
40 

120 
244 

190 
150 

45 
100 

16 

1x6 

20 

68 

15 
30 

X20 
30 
24 

74 



25 
70 
130 
24 
30 
25 

28 
22 
30 
70 
60 
20 
70 

90 

55 
40 
M 
9 
70 



D. S. Jones • . 
A. Tovey . . 

D. B. Edwards 
S. Jones 

John Williams 
H. J. Evans. . 
J. L. Bowen 
H. Evans •• 
•J. N. Smith {see 
also pp. 220&2S5) 



John Morgan 

•T. Harries .. 
S. Howells . . 

I J. Lloyd Williams 

C. Morgan . . 



M- 



L. Evans 



•J. W. Humphreys 

•T. Harries .. .. 

W.Llewellyn .. 

•J. W. Humphreys 

G. H. Llewelyn . . 

*D. H.Jones.. .. 

S. Thomas . . . . 



•D. H. Jones. . 
J. B. Thomas 



1890 
X892 

1868 
1893 

1876 
1892 

»895 
X892 
X890 



1^85 

XS89 
XS90 

X.*^2 

1895 



x86z 



x888 



1895 
x888 

1872 

187X 

Z885 



1887 
1895 



M. 

M.E. 

B. 
GCE 

M. 
M. 
M. 

B. 
B. 

B. 

B. 
B. 

B. 

M. 

B. 
B. 



M. 
M. 
M. 

B. 

B. 
B. 
B. 
B. 
B. 
B. 

B. 



268 



LIST OF CHURCHES. 



CARDIGANSHIRE {Pop., 62.630), 
(CO. Carmarthenshire and .Cardiganshire.) 




Aberayron 

Aberystwyth : — 
Baker-street . . . . 
Alfred-place (E.) . , 
Moriah 

Capel Gwndwn (Car- 
digan) 

Cardigan : — 

Betbania 

Blaenwenen . . . . 
Mount Zion (E.) 

Cwmsymlog, Tabemcle 

Goginan, Jezreel . . 

Lampeter : — 

Silian. Bethel . . 
Caersalem.. .. 



Llanrhystid .. .. 
Llandyssil, Ebenezer 
Llwyndafydd.. .. 
New Quay. Bethel 
Penrhyncoch.. .. 
Penyparc (Cardigan) . . 
Pontrhydfendigaid 
S>vyddffynnon, Bethel 
Talybont (Glandovey) 
Tabernacle . . . 
Siloh, Pontprengei/r 
Verwig (Cardigan) 



1881 


300 


28 


1789 


750 


272 


1870 


400 


70 


1829 


240 


36 


1844 


120 


11 


1799 


900 


524 


1838 


200 


69 


I88I 


300 


57 


1865 


300 


74 


I82I 


350 


45 


1829 


200 


, , 


1873 


350 


97 


I82I 


Z20 


16 


1832 


250 


80 


1796 


300 


50 


1854 


260 


55 


1788 


500 


III 


1780 


600 


223 


1835 


350 


75 


182 1 


120 


41 


I8I7 


600 
60 


140 


1796 


500 


118 



15 



30 


I 


J. Davies .. .. 


1894 


CO. 


250 
40 

20 


z 


J.A.Morris.. .. 
T. WiUiams. B.A. 


1873 
1893 


CO. 
CO. 
CO. 






•R. Jones .. .. 


1895 


CO. 


250 

40 

75 




J.Williams.. .. 


1880 


CO. 
CO, 


2 


G. Hughes . . . . 


z88x 


C.C. 


bo 
40 


,, 


j I. Thomas , . . . 


1894 


CO. 


30 
59 

35 
60 




(•H. James ) 

^ {see A berduar, [ 

Carm.) J 


1880 


CO. 

CO. 
CO. 


47 
^0 


::i 


•R. Jones .. .. 


1895 


CO. 


129 

84 




W. T.Francis !! 


isii 


CO. 
CO. 


50 
37 


I 


|t.R. Morgan .. 


1887 


CO, 


145 


.. 


E. R. Williams . . 


1895 


C.C. 


73 








c.c. 











CARMARTHENSHIRE {Pop., 130.566). 

(C. C, Carmarthenshire and Cardiganshire. G. C. E., Glamorganshire and 
Carmarthenshire English. W.G., West Glamorganshire.) 



Churches. 


1 


1 






h 




^1 


FSMton. 


11 


1 


Aberduar 


1742 


500 


314 


•• 


.68 




♦H. James {see 
Cardiganshire) 


i8do 


C.C. 


Ammanford, Ebenezer 


1848 


500 


320 


., 


370 


.. 


T.F.Williams .. 


1867 


c.c. 


Dorwen 




















Brynamman 


1873 


600 


278 


27 


232 




J. L. Davies. . . . 


1893 


W.G 



CARMARTHENSHIRE. 



269 



CARMARTHENSHIRE— con/tnk«rf 



II 



Bcynhafod (Llany- 

byther) 

Bwlchyrhiw and . . . « 

Seion 

Caio, Bethel . . . . ) 

Salem ) 

Cannarthen (10,300) :— 

Tabernacle • . . . 

Pelinwen 

Prioiy-street, Fennel 

Talog, Bethauny 

Lammas-street (E.) 
Cross Hands, Tabor . . 
Bethel Tumble . . 
Cwmdu (Talley) . . . . 

Cwmduad 

Cwmfelin 

Cwmifor 

Cwnisarnddu 

Drefach (Llandyssil) . « 

Elim Park 

Felingwm, Sittim 
Ferryside, Salem . . . . 

Llandefeilog, 

Ebenezer 
Ffynnonhenry . . . . 
Foelcwan, Nodd£a 
Cunn Mydrim 
Glanamman, Bethesda 
Kidwelly. Siloam.. .. 
Llandilo-vawr : — 

Ebenezer .. .. .. 

Llandovery 

Llandybie, Saron . . . . 

Carmel 

Llandyfan. Zoar . . . . 
Llandyssil, Hebron . . 

Penybont 

Pencadtr . • . . 
Llanedi, Sardis . . . . 
Llanelly : — 

Bethel 

Caersalem 

Calfieuria 

Emmanuel (E.) 

Felinfoel 

Greenfield (£.)•• •• 

Horeb 

Llwynhendy, Soar . . 
Salem, SpUfy 
Tabor t Bryn . . . . 

Moriah 

New Dock, Bethany 

Zion 

Cwmbach • . . . 



1861 
1817 
1827 

1741 

1763 
1834 
1763 

1839 
x868 
1871 

1893 
1779 
187 1 
1798 
1774 
X814 
1793 
1850 
x8i6 
1806 

x868 

1737 
i88x 

1844 
1834 

183X 
1844 
x8x4 

1859 
x8i8 
183 1 
1776 



350 

84) 

too J 

740 1 

800 
300 
800 

250 

400 
300 

150 
350 
450 
500 
400 
200 

550 
150 

250 

500 

140 

600 
250 
180 
500 
550 

450 
350 
500 
300 
314 
300 

x8o 



1849 

1840 
X894 
x88x 
1894 
X700 
X858 
x832 
1830 
1870 
1874 
1872 
1870 
1822 
X846 



300 

800 
800 
860 

900 
700 
350 
900 
250 
200 
xooo 

800 
1500 

200 



52 

X23 

130 
122 

418 
50 

480 
92 

153 
80 
40 
109 
172 

i6x 

90 

70 

277 
59 
83 

xio 

46 

209 

87 

32 

220 

136 

X69 
137 
260 
88 
107 
130 

X20 



6x 

606 
259 
327 
91 
757 



584 

615 
298 
790 



60 

81 

50 
93 

400 
40 

480 
60 

zio 

65 

30 

75 
xoo 

108 
60 
30 

200 

52 
60 
X32 

33 
85 
57 
36 
X70 
105 

152 
65 

140 
60 

3^ 
80 
70 
30 
45 

500 
230 
280 
X19 
400 



80 
550 



400 
314 
625 



•E. PhiUips 



x88o 



C.C. 
C.C. 



}J.E. 



Thomas 



E. U. Thomas . 

J. C. Griffiths . 

♦D. Roberts . . . 

A. F. MUls .. . 

*D. M. Morgan . 

•LM.Pughe.. . 

D. Richards. . , 

^D. S. Davies 

D. J. Davies 

D. W. Waters . 

W. E. Davies . 

T. Thomas . . . 

•J.Herbert .. . 

■W.A.WiUiams 



T. John 
♦D. Roberts . 

H. Jones 
J. Reynolds . 

•D. James . 

D. P. Evans. 

D. S. Davies 
*D. M Morgan 
*M. Jones 

Joseph Jones 



X891 

1892 
1890 

X879 
X892 
X871 

1874 
x88i 
187 1 
1894 

1893 
1887 
189X 
1889 

1887 

1882 
x88i 

1894 
1879 

X877 
1892 
1892 
X876 
1878 

1895 



C.C. 

C.C. 
C.C. 
C.C. 
C.C. 
GCE 
C.C. 

C.C. 
C.C. 
C.C. 
C.C. 
C.C. 
C.C. 
C.C. 
C.C. 

C.C. 

C.C. 
C.C. 

W.G. 
C.C. 

C.C. 
C.C. 
C.C. 
C.C. 
C.C. 

C.C. 
C.C. 



T. Idwal Jones 
R. B. Jones . . 
R. M. Humphreys 
E. George . . 
B. Humphreys 
R. Evans . . 
•Owen John • • 
J. R. Evans . . 



J. Rowlands, D.D. 

W. T. Jones 

J. R. Morgan, D.D. 



1894 
1895 
189X 
1894 
1889 
1874 
X887 
1889 



C.C. 
C.C. 
C.C. 
C.C, 
C.C. 
GC E 
C.C. 
C.C. 



X873 
1893 
1855 



C.C. 
C.C. 
C.C. 



270 



LIST OF CHURCHES. 
CARMARTHENSHIRE— cofiiMfMif. 



i 



Fumac4 . . . . 
Llanfynydd .. .. 
Llangadock. Zion 
Llangendeim, Bethel 

BankffosfeUn 
Llangennech, Salem 
Llangunog, Ebenezer 
IJannon. Hermon 
Llanstephan 
Maescanner .. .. 
Meinciau(Llangennech) 
Carway, Siloh 
Pedairheol . . 
Mydrim, Salem . . 

Bryn Llangining 
Newcastle Emlyn : — 

Graig 

Rehoboth .. .. 
Ciawddcoch .. 
New Court, Sion . . 
Pembrey : — 

Tabernacle 
Board School 
Penrhiwgoch 
Pontbrenaraeth, (Llan- 

dilo) Bethel 
Ponthenry, Bethesda 
Porthyrhyd : — 

Bethlehem 

Smyrna . . . . 
Pwll(LlaneUy):— 

Bethlehem 
Rhydaivaeau 
Khydwilym .• .. 
St. Clears :— 

JEnon . . . . 

Bwlch^'wynt 

Bwlchnewydd and 

Laughame, Bethel. 

Zion 

'^^Imsaran, Noddfa 
Waundyndaf 
Whitland, Nazareth 

Login, Calvaria 



1829 
1805 
1797 
X874 
1840 
179X 



1850 400 



X833 
X864 
X865 
1891 



1870 510 

1795 
1868 



X775 
X696 
1867 
X820 



1668 

1847 
1765 
X803 
x86i 
1849 
X879 
1798 
X851 
1873 



170 
350 
360 
70 
300 
250 



200 
500 
300 
250 



450 
xoo 

450 
500 

xoo 
250 

800 



X799 275 



X822 
1836 

x8x8 
X835 

X838 
1720 250 



200 
450 

550 

X20 
600 



500 

300 
210 
X40 
140 
450 
X40 
400 
400 
500 









62 


.. 


35 


245 


14 


120 


245 


25 


260 


146 


7 


67 


9» 


3 


32 


60 


8 


45 


225 


20 


220 


320 


•• 


226 


169 


10 


90 


278 


x6 


160 


120 


IX 


80 


83 


7 


80 


367 


99 


300 


22 


6 


50 


72 


6 


50 


24 


2 


2X 


143 


9 


XOO 


X19 


^ ^ 


65 


67 


3 


30 


187 


24 


x6o 


65 


7 


53 


245 


•• 


X67 




5 


47 


X05 


. . 


40 


80 


7 


70 


70 


6 


70 


155 


10 


100 


36 


10 


52 


51 


• • 


20 


x8o 


14 


X40 


211 


x6 


X89 



J 


M.M. Pughe 
•D.J. Davies 
R. P. Thomas . . 

P.Phillips .. .. 
E.Watkins.. .. 


X894 
X892 

X864 
X889 




D.WiUiams .. 


1895 


X 


E T. Jones . • . . 
*D. Williams 
O.M.Pritchaid.. 


1895 
1850 
X889 


X 

X 

XX 

X 

• • 
X 


•E.Phillips .. .. 

W. E.Watkins .. 

•T. Thomas . . . . 

•D.James .. .. 
•Owen John . . . . 

•J.Herbert .. .. 
•D.W. Waters .. 

•T.John" !! V. 
J.J.Evans.. .. 

•D.Williams .. 
•Daniel Jones .. 

|l. Davies.. .. 

R. H.Jones.. .. 

L. R. WiUiams .. 
•M.Jones .. .. 
•Daniel Jones 
•D.S. Davies .. 


x88o 

1873 

X891 

X883 
1887 

1889 
1893 

X883 
1889 

1879 
X885 

1872 
X878 
X894 
1895 
1885 
187 X 



C.C. 
CO. 
C.C. 

CO. 
C.C. 
C.C. 
C.C. 
C.C. 
CO. 



CO. 



CO. 

C.C. 

C.C. 

C.C. 

C.C. 
C.C. 

c.a 

C.C. 

C.C. 
C.C. 
C.C. 

C.C. 
C.C. 

C.C. 

C.C. 
C.C. 
C.C. 
C.C. 
C.C. 



CARNARVONSHIRE. 

CARNARVONSHIRE (Pap,, 1x8,204) 

(C, Carnarvonshire. N.W., North Wales English Union.) 



271 



Bangor : — 
Pennel • • • • • • 

Hirael, Calvaria . . 

Penrallt-rood (E.) . . 

Bethesda, near Bangor 
CaeUwyngrydd, 
Bethsl .. . 
Capel y Beirdd . . . 

Carnarvon 

Clwtybont, Libanus . 
Conwajr, Bethesda 
Dinorwic, Sardis . . . 

Galltraeth 

Gam (Dolbenmaen) . 

Ainon 

GilCach (Bangor) . . . 

Glanadda 

Glanwydden 

Groeslon (Liandwrog) 

Pisgah 

Llanaelhaiam 
Llanberis, Coed-y-Ddol 

Sion 

Llandudno : — 
Tabernacle 
Gt. Orme*t Head, 

Horeb 

Adelphi-sL, SaUm 
Mostyn-street ^E.) . 
LJanSairfechan.LibaLnus 
Pgnmaenmawr 



X8X2 

1880 

X875 
X835 
1885 



18x5 
1877 
1846 
1820 



Uanllyfhi 



Uanllyfhi 
Llithfaen . . . . 
Nevin, Sion . . . . 
Penygrooi, Calvaria 
Pontllyfiii .. •• 
Port Dinorwic, Salem. . 
Port Madoc, Zion 

Berea(Sc.) 
PorthyxiUeyn 
Pwllheli and . • . . 

Tvddynshon . . 
Roshirwaen .. .. 
Roewen (Conway) 
Talysam, Salem . . 
Tyndonen (Pwllheli) 



1786 
X862 
1820 
X862 
1799 
X884 
1878 
X790 

X869 

x8x8 



X876 
1878 

X784 
X826 



X759 

1822 
1862 

x8oo 
1854 
x8x6 
1784 
1835 
1785 
1862 

1797 



800 
200 



700 

250 
220 
750 
200 
200 
x8o 
xoo 
500 
90 
220 
200 
350 
350 
350 
350 

400 

750 



700 
250 
200 
200 
250 
150 
400 
250 
x6o 
300 
300 
X50 
160 
420 
X40 
250 

96 
500 
220 



59 

X22 



48 
263 

34 



69 
x8 

14X 
xo 

31 

66 
95 
36 
19 
78 

67 
256 



85 
75 

23 
65 
24 
77 
7X 
20 

53 



24 
38 
128 
48 
29 

9 
xx8 

19 



300 

76 
X3X 

60 

250 

60 



40 
80 
X40 

45 
32 
84 

59 

350 



90 
84 

19 
80 

2X 

85 
70 
22 

55 



x6 



•C. Roberts 



*John Griffiths 



2X 

30 
1x6 
55 
35 
xo 
130 
24 



Edwd. Evans . 

W. R. Saunders . 
T. P. Davies . 



X894 

X878 
1877 



Owen Davies, D.D, 



W. Edwards 



}. Thomas 



•J. Fximston. 
*H. Hughes . 



D. Davies 



J. Raymond.. 
John Griffiths 

•C. Roberts . . 
M. J. WilUaxns 
*H. Hughes .. 



•J. J. Williams 



Stephen Jones 



S. P. Edwards.. x888 



1877 
X89X 
X892 



x88x 
X893 



1889 
x888 



x888 



X878 
1878 

X892 
x888 
x888 



x888 



X884 



C. ft 
N.W 
C. 



c. 
c. 
c. 
c. 
c. 
c. 
c. 
c. 
c. 
c. 
c. 
c. 
c. 
c. 



W.Evans 



X89X 



•J. Frimston. 
*C. Roberts • 



x888 
X892 



C. 
C. 



N.W 

C. 

C. 
C. 
C. 

c. 
c, 
c. 
c. 
c. 

c. 

a 

c. 
c. 
c. 
c. 



272 



LIST OF CHURCHES. 



DENBIGHSHIRE {Pop,, 117,872). 

(D.F.M., Denbigh, Flint, and Merioneth. N.W., North Wales English Union. 
S., Shropshire.) 



4 



Abergele • • • . 
Bodgynwch .. .. 
Bontnewydd (St. Asaph) 

Brymbo 

Penrhos .. .. 

Lodge (E.).. .. 

Cefnbychan .. .. 



X870 
1866 
1826 
1836 



300 
150 
130 
500 



Ce£nmawr,Ebenezer(E.) 
Acre/air,, 

Sion 

Tabernacle 

Codau 

Coedpoeth : — 

Tabernacle 

Bethesda .. .. 
Colwyn, 01d(E.).. 
Colwyn, CalfiEuria . . 
Colwyn Bay . . . . 

Colwyn Bay (E.) . . 

Denbigh 

Doljrwern.. 
Eglwysbach .. .. 
Fforddlas, Glan Conway 
Fron (Llangollen), 

Carmel 

Garth 

Gefailyrhyd 

Glynceiriog 

Garth 

Nantyr 

Pandy 

Groes (E. ) 

Llanddulas, Bethesda 
Uanddoget, Soar 

Llandyrnog 

Llanelian 

Llanfair Dyfftyn Clwyd, 

Zion . . • . 

Llanfairtalhaiam. . 
Llangernyw .. .. 
Llangollen : — 

Castle-street • . 

Penybryn(E.) •• 
Llannefydd .. •• 
Llanrhaiadr .. •• 
Llanrwst •• •• 
Uansanan .. •• 
Llansilin .. •• 
Uysfaen, Tabor .. 



i860 
1786 

Z862 

1805 
x86o 
z886 

Z864 
1891 
1891 
1862 
1888 

1890 

X8Z2 



1786 

1830 
1850 
1831 
1750 



160 
250 

178 

500 
800 
220 

2x2 
200 
200 
350 
466 

300 

500 
180 
150 
200 

230 
350 
100 
600 



1874 
X836 
1861 
1836 
X832 

1873 
1862 
1830 

X815 
x86x 
x8x5 
1855 



150 
200 
200 
200 
300 

100 
200 
140 

550 
3x0 
200 
120 



X790 220 
X828 100 
1832 
1884 



X50 
150 



70 



17 
X71 



68 



249 
171 
41 

50 
39 

X2 

93 
78 

37 

77 
66 
28 
70 

X2I 
50 
20 

212 



38 

45 
22 
40 

15 
54 
33 

233 
60 
8x 
II 
55 
36 
45 
46 



90 



25 
388 

35 



90 



234 

200 

60 

xoo 

62 

X2 
108 
81 

52 

»16 
80 

25 
70 

190 
X05 
24 
230 
40 
X5 
64 



74 
68 
28 
31 



38 

305 
70 
68 
12 
60 
50 
45 
35 



T. Roberts > • 



E. K.Jones.. 



R. E.Williams .. 



W. A. Jones 



J. B. Blasted 



H. T. Cousins 
B. Williams.. 



•T. Morris 
*T. Morris 



J. L. Jones . 



'D. H. Jenkins 



O. Jones 



D.Williams.. 
H. Rees • • 



X889 



1891 



X894 



1894 
1893 



1894 
X893 



1893 
1893 



1895 

X895 
1894 



1881 
1894 



DFM 
DFM 
DFM 
DFM 

DFM 
DFM 
DFM 
&NW 

DFM 
DFM 
DFM 

DFM 
DFM 
N.W. 
DFM 
DFM 
DFM 
&NW 
DFM 
DFM 
DFM 
DFM 

DFM 
DFM 
DFM 

DFM 



N.W. 

DFM 
DFM 
DFM 
DFM 

DFM 
DFM 
DFM 

DFM 
N.W, 
DFM 
DFM 
DFM 
DFM 
DFM 
DFM 



DENBIGHSHIRE FLINTSHIRE. 



273 



DENBIGHSHIRE— continued. 



11 



Moelfre (Oswestry) 
Moss.Salem (Wrexham) 
Penycae, 3alem . . 
Ponkey, Zion . . , 

Ponkey (E.) 

Ruabon 

Rhosllanerchnigog 

Ruthin 

Wrexham (12,552) : — 

Chester-street (E.) 
Holt .. .. 

Rhos.ddu(W.).. 



1829 
1850 
1791 
i88x 



X894 
X815 
X795 

1630 
1827 
1872 



120 
200 
400 
250 

250 

150 
700 
400 

35a 
200 
900 



36 

70 

195 
156 



29 

275 

90 

F36 

13 

131 



40 
106 
400 
X85 



49 
'600 

135 

197 
125 
220 



J. Pritchard.. 
W. B. Jones 
E. Mitchell . . 

*D. H. Jenkins 



W. Jones 
E. Willi 
Isaac James 

J. H. Thomas 

Isaac James 



1894 
1895 
1884 

1895 

1894 
1894 
1873 

Z892 
1892 



DFM 
DFM 
DFM 
DFM 
DFM 
&NW 
DFM 
DFM 
DFM 

S. 

DFM 



FLINTSHIRE {Pop. 77,277). 
(D.F.M.. Denbigh. I<lint, and Merioneth. N.W., North Wales English Union.) 



I 



I 



«i 



Axtyn (Holywell).. 

BagiUt 

Bod£Eari 

Buckley (E.) . . . . 

Nantmawr . . . . 

Caerwys 

Coedllai 

Flint 

Ffynongroew 

Helygen 

Holywell .. .. 
Leeswood (Mold) 
Lixwm (Holywell) 
Maesglas (Holywell) 

MUwr 

Mold 

Penyfron (Mold) . . 
Penygelli . . . . 
Rhuddlan, Zion . . 
Rhyl:— 

Water-street . . 

Brighton-road .. 

Sussex-street (E.) 
St. Asaph . . . . 
Treuddyn, Berea. . 



Z82X 

X854 
1848 
X876 
X890 
1890 
z868 
X870 
X890 
X827 
X820 
X863 
1813 
1894 
X846 
X827 
X823 



Z824 

X856 
X890 
1869 
X821 
x86i 



200 
200 
80 
200 
X50 
160 



200 
200 
450 
300 
120 

100 

300 

50 



350 

500 

400 
150 
250 



15 
60 



80 
57 
42 
18 
33 
56 
40 



•T. Davies . 

W.Jenkins 

*T. Davies . 



E. Bellis 



24 
51 
79 
iz 
1x7 
26 
ao 
90 

X20 
50 
40 
25 

45 



T. Morgan 



•T. Davies . . 
B. Evans . . 

T. Shankland 
E. T. Davies 
D. G. Lewis. . 



X894 
1892 
1894 



X889D 



DFM 
DFM 
DFM 
DFM 
&NW 
DFM 
DFM 
DFM 
DFM 
FM 
DFM 



X894 



1894 
X876 



DFM 
DFM 
DFM 
DFM 
DFM 
DFM 
DFM 



X89X 

I 

Z892 



893 D 



DFM 
FM 

N.W. 
DFM 
DFM 



S 



274 



LIST OF CHURCHES. 



GLAMORGANSHIRE {Pop,, 687.2x8). 

(C.C., Carmarthenshire and Cardiganshire. E.G., East Glamorganshire. W.G., 
West Glamorganshire. G.C.E.. Glamorganshire and Carmarthenshire 
English. M., Monmouthshire Welsh.) 



*l 



Aberavon : — 

Ebenezer .. .. 

Water-street (E.) 
Abercanaid . . . . 
A herd are : — 

Aberaman . . . . 

Aberaman (E.) . . 

Abercwmboye .. 

Abernant, Bethel 

Calvaria . . . . 

Carmel (E.) 

Cwmdare^tNebo 

Cwmbach .. .. 

Gadlys . . . . 

Trecynon, Mill-street 
Aberdare Junction 
Abcrdulais (Neath) . . 
Aberfan, Smyrna 
Abergwynfi (Maesteg) 

Caersalem 

Abergwynfi (E.) . . . . 
Barry District : — 

Barry, Bethel . . . . 

Barry Dock, Holton 
road 

Cadoxton, Mount 
Pleasant.. .. 

Cadoxton, Phila- 
delphia 

Barry Dock. Salem . 
Berthlwyd (Treharris) 
Bettws (Bridgend) 
Birchgrove. Ainon 
Blaenclydach, Noddfa 
Blaenclydach . . . 

Blaengarw 

Blaenrhondda . . . 
Blaenycwm 

Zoar 

Bridgend : — 

Blackmill, Paran . 

Ruamah 

Hope (E.) 

Brithdir, Siloh . . . 

Brithdir 



Briton Ferry : — 

Jerusalem (E.) . . . . 

Rehot>oth 

Salem . . ' 

Bryncethin, Nazareth. . 
Bryntroedgam (Cmvn.) 



784 
872 
841 

853 
884 
860 
863 
813 
856 
858 
844 
866 

855 
894 
856 
891 

881 
887 

891 

892 

887 

814 
890 
851 
839 
884 
891 
894 
887 
885 
868 
890 

823 
789 
850 
859 
875 



863 
848 
875 
877 
852 



850 
200 
500 

900 

350 
400 
600 

1200 
700 
750 
700 
700 

1000 

400 
150 

500 

70 

400 
300 
300 



500 
250 
250 
750 

720 
140 
800 
500 

300 
500 
350 
250 



500 

1000 

550 

70 

200 



310 

78 
173 

262 
74 
89 
263 
518 
302 
106 

334 
265 
386 

134 
70 

129 



133 

70 
66 

148 
48 
95 

300 

39 
205 

82 
192 

86 

58 

1X2 
Z46 



62 Z2 



Z02 

288 

127 

23 

z8 



3x5 
no 
2x0 

250 
xoo 
109 
271 
400 
300 
100 
250 

'95 
380 

225 
70 

z6o 



140 

430 
250 

65 

160 

41 
zoo 
230 

65 

z8o 

Z20 
230 
Z50 

60 

"5 
250 



240 

340 

140 

50 

35 



D. Griffiths . . 
W.Jones ., 
H. J. Harris 

T. Davies . . 



H. N. Richards 
J. Mills. . . . 
J. Griffiths . . 
T. Jones 
W. Thomas.. 

D. Thomas . . 
B. Evans . . 
W. Harris . . 
'W. D. Nicholas 

E. Parry 
D. Rees 

W. G. Jones. . 
D. Thomas . . 

H. J. Horn . . 

T.P.John ,. 



M. Isaac 



•W. Griffiths 
•J. E. Griffiths 
O. W. James 



W. Morgan 
G. Matthews 



•W. Griffiths 
G. James 
J. S. Johns 



(•R. Owen (see) 
\ Hkymwy, Mon.) ) 

Rees Powell 
H.Hughes.. .. 



D. C. Evans 



1887 
1894 
Z895 



W.G. 

GCE 

E.G. 



Z875 E.G. 
GCE 
Z895 E.G. 
Z876; E.G. 
Z889; E.G. 
Z873 GCE 



Z882 
z888 
Z876 
Z862 
1894 
Z892 
Z892 

Z883 
1894 

1894 

X893 



Z892 



X89Z 
Z883 
Z892 



Z887 
z888 



E.G. 
E.G. 
E.G. 
E.G. 
GCE 
W.G. 
E.G. 

W.G. 
GC E 

GCE 

GC E 

GC E 

E.G. 
E.G. 
E.G. 
W.G. 
W.G. 
E.G. 
GCE 
W.G. 
E.G. 
E.G. 
E.G. 



Z889 W.G. 

Z877 W.G. 

z892iG C E 

.. E.G. 



z894| 



M. 



Z895.G C E 
Z883 W.G. 

.. 'W.G. 
Z895I W.G. 

.. I W.G. 



GLAMORGANSHIRE. 



275 



GLAMORGANSHIRE-^^^OfiiiniMJ. 



.«. 


1 


{ 


J 


Is 




i| 


PUtOft. 


II 


* 




CaerphiUy, Tonyfelin. . 


1784 


600 


126 


15 


X40 




J. P. Davies., ., 


1878 


E.G. 


Caerphilly, Mt. Carmel 
(E.) .. 




















1874 


400 


69 


xo 


100 


X 


J. G. Hopkins . . 


1890 


GC E 


Cardiff (128,915) :— 




















Bethany (E.) . . . . 


x8o6 


943 


434 


28 


286 


3 


W.E. Winks .. 


1876 


GCE 


Bute Docks, Mount 




















Stuart-sq.. Siloam 


x86o 


600 


141 


M 


95 


X 


D.E.Roberts .. 


X884 


E.G. 


Bethel (E.) .. ,. 
Canton (W.) . . . . 


1855 


750 


163 


24 


389 


3 


T. Davies .. .. 


X878 


GCE 


1859 


600 


130 


17 


150 


I 


Z.H.Lewis.. .. 


X89X 


E.G. 


Hope(E.) .. .. 


1858 


600 


303 


40 


436 


4 


T. W. Medhurst.. 


X889 


GC E 


Grange-Town (E.) . . 


1881 


500 


128 


29 


673 


2 


J. Williams . . . . 


1893 


GCE 


Lnngcross-st., Zion. . 


1883 


600 


, , 








W.T.Lee .. .. 


X895 


GCE 


Riverside (E.) .. .. 


1886 


320 


154 


21 


290 


3 


T. L. Evans. . . . 


1895 


GC E 


Roath. Salem . . . . 


1861 


650 


35 » 


18 


200 




T. T. Jones . . . . 


x88x 


E.G. 


Pearl-st., Ebenezer 


1882 


450 


47 


IX 


x6o 








GC E 


Splott-road (E.) 


1884 


XIOO 


275 


28 


50X 


, , 


*C. H.witki'nis !! 


1893 


GCE 


Tabernacle , . . . 


1822 


950 


512 


45 


250 


7 


C. Davies . . . . 


x888 


E.G. 


Tredegarville (E.) .. 
Maindy 


1861 


1000 


557 


35 
7 


350 
X40 


X2 






GCE 


1879 


270 










Rumn^ 


1882 


60 




9 


85 










Llanishen . . . . 




















Merihyr-sireet , . 


. . 


, , 




6 


120 










Walker's-road, Ainon 


1894 


300 


159 


17 


180 


X 


T. Morgan . . . . 


1895 


E.G. 


Woodville-road (E.) 


1881 


800 


293 


41 


551 


3 


C. Griffiths . . . . 


1883 


GC E 


Cefocribwr 


1848 


450 


88 


xo 


80 






^ , 


W.G. 


Cilfynydd (Pontypridd) 
Rehoboth . . 




















1890 
1889 
1844 




189 


24 


150 








E.G. 


English 

Clydach, Calvaria 


200 






" 


GC E 


750 


381 


32 


377 




't.v.e^s!! !! 


X882 


W.G. 


Colwinstone (Cowbridg) 


1852 


300 


28 


3 


25 








W.G. 


Corntown 


1839 
1820 


250 
800 


35 
180 


5 

24 


25 
X90 








W.G. 


Cowbridge, Ramoth . . 




0. Jones . . . . 


X884 


E.G. 


Crai^Cefn Park, Elim 


1880 


373 


164 


x6 


X40 




Rhys Lewis. . . . 


X889 


W.G. 


Croesyparc (Cardiff) .. 


1777 


500 


62 


8 


50 








E.G. 


Cwmaman, Zion . . . . 


1861 


750 


213 


37 


2X8 




T. Humphreys , . 


x868 


E.G. 


Cwmavon, Penuel 


1845 


1000 


378 


27 


250 




R. S.Morris ., 


1894 


W.G. 


Cwm Clydach, Calvaria 


1880 


750 


248 


17 


21X 




W. E. Davies . . 


1880 


E.G. 


Cwmfelin. Salem . . . . 


1834 


800 


175 


18 


170 


3 


W.Morton.. .. 


189X 


E.G. 




1843 


300 


107 


15 


X30 




T. B. Phillips . . 


1895 


W.G. 


Cwmgors 


1894 




70 


10 


60 




J. E. Thomas . . 
D.C.Jones.. .. 


1894 


W.G. 


Cwmpark ,' Bethel . . . . 


1874 


600 


222 


20 


230 


• • 


X876 


E.G. 


Cwmtwrch, Bculah . . 


1834 


500 


222 


44 


237 


2 


B. James . . , . 


1894 


W.G. 


Cyramer 


1893 


335 


45 


7 


50 








W.G. 


Cymmer (Porth), Pisgah 


1895 


400 


109 


20 


250 




*J.m! Lewis!! !! 


1895 


E.G. 


Deri, Tabernacle. . . . 


1866 


350 


144 


22 


132 




H. B. Thomas . . 


X892 


E.G. 


Dowlais : — 




















Beulah (E.) . . . . 


1856 


700 


212 


26 


266 


3 


J. Williams . . . . 


1874 


GC E 


Pantyscallog . . . . 


1877! 150 
















Caersalem 


1829 800 


262 


20 


250 


2 






E.G. 


Hebron 


1849 1000 
1857 830 


301 


35 


250 


I 


"w.C. Thom'as !! 


1890 


E.G. 


Moriah 


348 


48 


300 


, , 


B. Davies . . . . 


1888 


E.G. 


PontsticiU .. .. 


1878 


150 


18 


xo 


50 










Evanatown (Gilfach 




















Goch) 


1894 


•• 


68 


10 


95 


•• 


•W.Griffiths.. .. 


1895 


E.G. 


















S ' 


2 





276 



LIST OF CHURCHES. 



GLAMORGANSHIRE^-con^wfMif 



>!l 



Femdale, Nazareth 

Bethel (E.) 

Salem Newydd.. 

Poohriw 

Gelligaer, Horeb . • 
Gil£ach Goch 
Glais, Peniel . . . • 
Glaocynon . . . . 
Gwaelodygarth . . 
Glyncorrwg . • • • 
Glyn Neath :~ 

Bethel 

Goneinon . . . . 
Hengoed . . • . 

Clawr-yr-Ystrad 
Hirwain, Ramoth. . 
Killay, SUoam .. 
Knelstone (E.) . . 
Laleston, Bethel . . 
Lancarvan (Cowbridge) 

Landocha 

Lantwit-major, Bethel 
Lantwit-vardre, Salem 
Lisvane (Cardifi) . . . 
Capel Gwilym 
rfelach : — 



Llem 

Gerizim 

Liansamlet, Adullam . 
Llantrissant : — 

Tabor 

Llwynypia, Jerusalem 
LoQS^or, Penuel . . . 

Llwydcoed 

Maerdy, Zion . . . 
Maesteg : — 

Bethania 

Bethel (E.) .. . 

Caersalem 

Calvaria 

Castle-street, Zion . 

Salem 18501150 

Nodd/aBUuncaerau .. 300 

Tabernacle . . . . 1864 600 
Melincry than (Neath).. 1882 450 
Merthyr Tydvil :— 

George Town, Bethel x86o| 300 

Ainon (E.) 1856 400 

Cefncoedycymmer, 
Carmel .. •• .. 1856 



1867 
1871 
1878 
i88x 

1849 
1872 
189X 
1888 
1863 
x868 

1849 
X890 
1650 

X83X 
X832 
X858 
1892 
1822 
x86x 
X823 

1853 
X831 
1836 

1779 
1830 
1859 

1859 
X872 
1850 
1876 
X878 

1827 
X848 
1890 
X877 
1883 



600 
450 
800 
260 
250 
700 
200 
900 
350 
350 

700 
500 
600 

600 
240 
130 
200 
200 
300 
400 
750 
400 

XOO 

600 
140 
600 

300 

800 
750 

200 
650 

xooo 

500 
500 

650 

600 



223 
309 



99 20 



59 
89 
91 

122 

68 



166 20 



X82 
X-I9 



269 30 



X13 
35 
33 
55 
17 
74 
68 

107 



125 

90 

22 X 

X06 

474 
2x9 

IXO 

x8o 

412 
121 

95 
X90 
150 
300 

124 
39 

189 
92 



240 
xxo 
210 

90 
50 
87 
98 

140 

84 



x8o 
X40 
150 

200 
80 
30 
40 
60 
40 
90 

XOO 

135 

96 
96 
186 

135 
320 

175 
70 
x8o 

416 
150 
X90 
X50 
130 
329 

120 
160 2 

200 
x6o .. 

170 



T. Humphreys 



Isaac Jones. . 
L. John 

J. Jenkins . . 



J. F. Williams . 

James L. Jones . 

T. C. Harries 
J. S. Hopkin 
R. Evans . . . 



D. Collier 
J. Davies 
S. Jones 



Owen Davies 
T. Richards 
D. Davies 



B. Lewis 
Danl. Davies 
J. D. Harries 

J. Jones 

E. T. Jones . . 

T. M. Reed.. 

D. Jones 
J. Evans 

E. Jones 

I. Uoyd . . 
J. C. WiUiams 
R. Allen 
W. Harries . . 
D. C. HoweUfi 

J.Williams.. 
T. W. George 

H. I. Jenkins 
H. Jenkins . . 

W. B. Griffiths 



, X89X 



x88x 
1890 

', X885 

. X892 

! 1876 

X893 
. X891 
. 1878 

. 1892 
, X872 
. 1872 



, X884 
, 1889 

, x88i 



E.G. 
GC E 
E.G. 
E.G. 
E.G. 
E.G. 
W.G. 
E.G. 
E.G. 
W.G. 

W.G. 
W.G. 
E.G. 

E.G. 

W.G. 
GCE 
W.G. 

E.G. 

E.G. 

E.G. 

E.G. 

E.G. 



1889 
X887 
X878 

1894 
1892 
X892 
1876 

X894 
X888 

1893 
1893 
X889G 
x892 



W.G. 
W.G. 
W.G. 

E.G. 
E.G. 
W.G. 
E.G. 
E.G. 

W.G. 
GCE 
W.G. 
W.G. 
CE 
W.G. 



X893 



W.G. 



1886GCE 



. 1894 
X893 

, X890 



E.G. 
GCE 



E.G. 



GLAMORGANSHIRE. 



277 



GLAMORGANSHIRE--c<m/tn«e(l. 



il 



MerthyrTydvil (contd.): 

Ebenezer .. . 
Pgntrebach 

High-street (E.) 

Morlais . . . 

Tabernacle 

Zion 

Merthyr Vale, Zion (E.) 

Calfaria .. .. 
Mountain Ash (Rhos) 
Ctfnpennar . . 
Ffrwd .. .. , 

Nazareth (E.) .. , 
Miskin .. .. , 
Mumbles, W. Cross (E.) 
Nantyoioel, Saron 

Horeb (E.). . . 
Navigation, MountZion 
Neath (11,1x3):— 

Bethany . . . . 

Christchurch . . 

Orchard-place (E.) 
Ogmore VaJe': — 

Calvary (E.) . . 
Pantywaen (Dowlais) 
Penarth,Tabemacle(E.) 

Penuel 

Stanwell-road (E.) . 
Penclawdd, Trinity . 

Pengam 

Penprysg, Penuel 
Penrhiwceiber, Beth- 
esda (E.) . . . 
Tynte Toum . . . 

Jerusalem 

Penrhiwfer, Zion. . . 
Pentre : — 

Moriah 

Zion(E.) 

Pentyrch, Penuel 
Penydarren, Elim 
Penyfai (Bridgend) . 
Penygraig, Dinas.. . 
Ponurdawe, Adullam 

Elim 

Pontarddulais . . . 

Hendy, Calfaria 
Pontbrenllwyd (Abdre.) 
PontUy w, Carmel . . . . 
PonUottyn, Bethel (E.) 

Zoar 



1793 

X839 
1885 
1856 
1791 
1876 
1885 
1855 



z866 

1843 
1878 
1879 
1893 

1789 
1884 
1855 

X877 
1870 



1868^000 



1878 
1886 
1814 
1881 
1862 

X885 



1885 
X884 

1875 
1878 
1838 
1856 
1706 
X831 
1849 
X887 
1871 
1885 
1823 

1843 
1870 

1837 



800 

750 
400 
Z500 

I200 
700 
240 
950 



600 

240 
650 
500 
350 

800 
500 
750 

290 
229 



200 

300 
450 
350 
150 

300 



700 
200 

2000 
500 
600 
620 
400 
900 

144 
450 
600 
400 
251 
20G 
850 



132 

227 
194 
364 
325 
156 
150 
470 



319 48 



74 
205 
1x3 

35 

260 

60 

x68 

28 

30 
237 

51 
86 
138 
98 
87 

94 



152 
69 

247 
157 

92 
346 

81 
333 
153 

69 
253 
X40 

56 
129 



218 



ixo 
250 

200 
370 
330 
280 

382 



7x0 2 

120 

200 

280 

70 



220 

70 
295 

61 
70 

344 
40 
123 
190 
90 
60 

"5 
20 

193 
50 

250 

240 

90 

380 

XX2 
255 

95 
56 
230 
150 
52 
X30 



256 



J. Lewis 

A. Hall.. .. 
E. G. Thomas 

D. Price 
W.A.Jones 
H. P. Jones.. 

E. H. Evans 
T. T. Hughes 



T. Davis 

J. Hughes . . 

T. D. Matthias 



D. W. Hopkins 
W. Davies . . , 

E. R. Evans. . . 



M. Jones 
W. G. Davies 



L O. Stalberg 
John Thomas 
J. M. Jones . . 



D. Howells . 
W.R. Jones. 



, X892 

. 1894 
1893 
1893 
X892 
1884 
1895 
1893 



E.G. 

GC E 
GCE 

E.G. 

E.G. 
GC E 

E.G. 

E.G. 



1885 
x88i 
1885 



GC E 

GC E 
W.G. 

GC E 
E.G. 



1895 
1895 
X893 



1894 
1882 



1889G 

1874 

1895 



W.G. 
GC E 

GC E 
E.G. 

OC E 
E.G. 



C E 
W.G. 
E.G. 
W.G. 



1894 
1894 



D. G. Morris 
J. Jenkins . . 
Jason James 
W. E. Harries 

E. R. Evans 
D. Davies . . 
D. D. Hopkins 
J. Y. Jones . . 

S. F. Roberts 



. 1895 
. 1890 
. X885 
, X894 

\ x888 

1893 
. 1888 
. 1892 

^18^5 



GC E 

E.G. 
E.G. 

E.G. 
GC E 
E.G. 
E.G. 
W.G. 
E.G. 
W.G. 
W.G. 
W.G. 
C.C. 
E.G. 
W.G. 
GC E 
E.G. 



278 



LIST OF CHURCHBS. 



GLAMORGANSHIRE— co«/miM^. 



ll 



Pootrhydycyff (near 

Maesteg), Ainon 
Pontrhydyfen 

Argoed .. .. 
Pontyclun (E.) . . 
Pontycymmer, Noddfia 

Zion 

Pontygwaith . . . . 
Tylorstawn . • 
Pontypridd : — 

Carmel (E.) 

Coedpenmaen .. 

Rhondda . . . . 

Tabernacle 

Temple . . . . 

Vestry Hall .. 
Perth. Salem.. .. 

Tabernacle (E.) 
Porthcawl . . . . 
Port Talbot, Smyrna 
Pyle, Pisgah . . . . 
Resolven, Bethania 

Sardia . . . . 
Rhydfelen, Bethlehem- 
Seven Sisters . . . . 
Skewen, Horeb . . . . 

Bethlehem . . . . 
St. Brides Major, Horeb 
Swansea (90,349) :— 

Bethesda .. .. 

Brynhyfryd 

Caersalem Newydd. . 

Capel Gomer . . . . 

Carmarthen-road (E.) 

Cwmbwrla, Libanus. 

Danygraig 

Foxhole 

Gorse-lane 

Gowerton, Bethania.. 

Herbert-place (late 
St. James) 

Landore, Salem 
* Dinas Noddfa . 

Morriston, Sion 
Ainon .. .. . 

Calfaria 

Clydach Road 
Tabernacle . . . 

Mount Pleasant (£.). 
Ha/od ,. . 

Mount Zion (E.) 

Newtown 

Philadelphia . . . 



X887 
X856 

1876 
1884 
1887 
1877 



1868 
1887 
X862 
1813 
1888 
1895 
1855 
1874 
1868 
1866 
i860 
1854 
1876 
1858 

1895 
1869 

1895 
X864 

X649 
1881 
X840 
1878 

1875 
x866 
1883 

X843 
1892 
1874 
X89X 

1884 
X846 
X846 
1880 
x888 
x888 
x886 
X825 

x866 
1888 
1862 



150 
400 

250 
700 
500 
560 



750 
600 
800 

450 

950 
600 
500 
400 
500 
700 
130 
300 

550 

200 

XX50 
856 
850 

1000 
600 
650 
300 
300 

500 



300 
840 

X4OO 
200 
700 
200 
300 

1X50 

500 

x8o 
800 



30 

59 
3 

48 
340 

75 
372 

29 

251 
xoo 

186 

301 

63 

68 
563 
213 

1x2 
72 
81 
48 
71 
20 
182 
103 
13 

476 
312 
504 
479 
1x6 

307 
78 
46 

102 
109 

43 

X64 
277 



103 
311 
41 
148 
549 

134 



x6 



36 
90 
20 
80 
340 
120 
400 
70 

298 
200 
200 
250 
140 

88 
473 
340 

88 

«33 
60 

1x8 
90 

xoo 

32 
200 
160 

xo 

391 

265 

500 
235 
150 

360 

280 

60 

288 

125 



220 

360 



X40 
200 
100 

158 
805 

160 

x6o 



L. T. Evans 
T. Davies . ■ 
J. Lamb 
J. D. Hughes 



E. E. Probert . 

Joshua Thomas . 

W. Rees . . . 

J. R. Jones . . . 

G. G. Cule . . . 

Dan Davies.. . 

O. Owens . . . 
J. H. Miles 
D. D. Davios 



1895 
X884 
1888 
1885 



W.G. 
W.G. 

GCE 
W.G. 

GC E 
E.G. 



x888 
1890 
1893 



X891 
880G 

1893 
X883 



D. C. Davies 



J. S. Morgan 
•D. J. Da^es 

G. A. Hague 
*J. E. Griffiths 



GCE 
GC E 

E.G. 

E.G. 
1889GC E 

E.G. 

E.G. 
C E 

W.G 

W.G 

W.G. 

W.G. 
GC E 

E.G. 

W.G. 

W.G. 

W.G. 

W.G. 



1894 
1895 
1894 
1895 



E. Edmunds 
D. B. Richards . 
L Thomas .. . 
J. G. Lewis, D.D. 



X887 



W.G. 



1890 W.G. 



187X 
X878 



W. E. Prince 
D. R. Davies 
C. E. Shipley 
W.J.John .. 
A. W. Pay .. 



1894 
1874 
X892 
1895 
1894 



W. P. Williams . 

R. Roberts . . . 

D. Samuel . • , 
J. W. LewU.. . 
W.John .. . 

E. G. Thomas . 
J. Owen . . . 

D. Thomas . . , 

B. O. James. . , 



1876 

1874 

X893 

X892 

X888G 

X890 

1870 



W.G. 

W.G. 
GCE 

W.G. 
GC E 

W.G. 
GCE 

W.G. 
GCE 

GCE 

W.G. 

W.G. 
GCE 

W.G. 
CE 

W.G. 
GCE 



. 1892 
1894 



GCE 
GCE 
W.G. 



GLAMORGANSHIRE. 



279 



GLAMORGANSHIRE— am/mtfAf. 



J 



i 



Swansea (conid,); — 

Raven Hill, Calfaria.. 1862 

St. Helen's 1873 

York-place (E.). . • . 1830 

Walter's-road. Me- 
morial (E.) . • . . 1873 
Tirphil, Tabernacle (E.) 1869 
Tondu (Bridgend) Jeru- 
salem • • .. .. 1849 

Carey (E.) 1876 

Cefn 1877 

Tongwynlais.Salem (E.) 1880 

Ainon 1838 

Tonypandy (E.), Bethel 1870 
Tonyre£adl, Ainon • . 1861 
Tonystrad, Hebron . . 1868 

Gelly, Siloam . . . . 1887 
Trealaw, Bethlehem . . 1877 
Treforest le— 

Calvary (E.) . . . . 1859 

Libanus 1858 

Trehafod 1884 

Treharris, Bethel (E.). . 1877 

Brynhyfiyd . . . . z88o 
TYeherbert Bethany(E.) x868 

Libanus 1849 

Hope 1890 

Treorky, Noddfiei . . . . |x869 
Ainon 

Horeb (E.) . . . . 1870 
Troedyrhiw : — 

Bethel (E.) .. ..x886 

Carmel 1852 

Troedrhiwfuwch . . . . 1874 
Twynyrodyn (Cardiff).. 1843 
Tynewydd (Ogmore 

Vale)t Bethlehem . . 1872 

Wattstown 1894 

Waanarlwydd : — 

Zion x86o 

English 1873 

Wauntrodau, Ararat . . 1828 

Bethel (E.) X867 

Ynyshir, Ainon .. .. X884 

English 1885 

Ynyslwyd 1862 

YnysUwe. Moriah . . z888 
Ynysybwl, Zion (E.) . . 1887 

Nodd£a x886 

Ystalyfera, Caenalem 1857 

Zoar . . 1849 

Ystrad, Nebo . . . . X785 

Tabernacle (E.) . . 1874 
Yttrad-gynlais • • • . 1849 



550 
380 
650 

900 
300 

200 
250 
50 
500 
650 
650 
650 
900 
700 
750 

350 
400 
650 
260 
850 
500 
800 
350 
1500 



450 

600 
600 
300 
500 

650 
600 

650 
X50 
350 
280 
750 
365 
750 
550 
350 
800 
600 
800 
750 
300 
250 



157 
82 

165 

254 
124 

134 
109 

12 
X26 

86 
265 
1x7 

343 
142 
20Z 

75 
88 
X42 

122 
296 
170 
294 
84 
606 



146 

"5 
209 

33 
33 

156 
"5 

154 

53 
1x6 

46 
"5 

60 
235 
198 

80 
148 
126 
123 
258 

34 
124 



200 

251 
420 

220 

x6o 

130 

120 

50 

200 

X20 
240 
200 
350 
X20 

x8o 

X82 
130 

X35 
2x1 
250 
X85 
360 
120 
769 
251 
150 

135 
190 

75 
40 

X70 
190 

150 
100 
ISO 
94 
130 
100 
240 
240 
X40 
X50 
X30 
150 
250 

X20 

"5 



E. Evans . . 
W. Causton 
B. Davies 



h. 



1886 
1893 
1893 



W.G. 
GCE 
GC E 



J.W.Williams, D.D. 
H.G.James.. . 

R. John . . . 
W. W. Richards. 

C. Rees . . . 
R. A. Tames 

Daniel Davies . 

. Prichard . . . 

W. Davies . 
S. G. Bowen 



1893 GC E 
1894 E.G. 



k 



1883 

x88s 

1893 
1895 
1884 

1877 
1889 
X889 



Evan Lewis 
Samson Jones . 
T. Davies . . . 
•W. D. Nicholas . 
W. Jones 



H. Harries 

W. Morris 

E. D. Lewis 

W. Thomas.. 
W. G. Owen 



X895 
X891 
X890 
X889 
1885 



X889 

1869 

X895 

1893 
1894 



W.G. 
GC E 

GC E 

E.G. 
GC E 

E.G. 

E.G. 

E.G. 

E.G. 

GCE 

E.G. 

E.G. 
GC E 

E.G. 
GC E 

E.G. 

E.G. 

E.G. 

GC E 

GC E 
E.G. 
E.G. 
E.G. 



J. A. Humphreys 
E. O. Parry 

T. J. Davies 

J. Bevan . . . . 



1894 
1894 



1895 
1885 



J. H. Lamb 
Robt. E. Williams 
R. D. PhiUips 
W. Parry ,. 
J. WiUUms.. 
J. Evans 
W.Jones .. 
A. Williams 
M. H. Jones 
'D.J. Davies.. 



W.G. 
E.G. 

W.G. 
GC E 

E.G. 
GC E 

E.G. 



1893 
1878 
X890 
X891 

1895 
1865 
1890 
X879 
1877 
X892 



GC E 

E.G. 

W.G. 
GC E 

E.G. 

W.G. 

W.G. 

E.G. 
GCE 

W.G. 



28o 



LIST OP CHURCHES. 



MERIONETHSHIRE (Po^.. 49.913). 
(D.F.M., Denbigh, Flint, and Merioneth. C, Carnarvonshire.) 



I 



Putots. 






Bala , 

Barmouth . . . . 
Cefiicymerau (Llanbdr) 

Corwen , 

Cynwyd . . . , 

Trerddol 
Dolgelly. Capel Judah 

Llwyngwril ,, 
Festiniog, Sion . , 

Calfaria • . . , 

Moriah . . . , 
Glyndyfrdwy 
Harlech (Sc.), Rehoboth 
Engedi . . . , 

Ainon , 

Llanelidan . . . < 
Llanfrothen : — 

Brondanw, Ramoth 
(Sc.) ., .. 
LlansantfTraid, Salem 
Llanuwchllyn 
Pandyr'capel 
Penrhyndeudraeth 

Bryngwyn (Sc.) 
Ragged Schools 
Towyn 



1839 
1877 
1829 
1865 
1832 
1865 
1820 



260 

220 
250 

z6o 
xoo 

500 



z86o 



1877 



1872 
1845 



1794 
1853 



750 
300 
250 
x8o 
400 
106 

X20 
200 



XOO 
140 



1826 
1879 



180 

z8o 
x6o 



1887 ^ 



40 
70 
30 
77 
46 



1x6 



192 

103 

23 

54 



46 IX 
23 
78 X3 



55 
86 

90 
135 
90 



156 
14 
270 
x66 
46 
90 
48 
42 
86 
75 



45 
105 

12 

Z20 

30 

45 

30 

xo 



*R. R. Jones . . 
T. J. Roberts 



H. C. Williams. 



M. Roberts . . 
A. Morris . . 



•W. G. Owen 



fD. Davies . . 
•W. T. Davies 



S Pierce .. 
•W. G. Owen 
*R. R. Jones.. 
^W. T. Davies 



•S. Pierce 



X893 
1894 



x868 



DFM 
DFM 
DFM 

DFM 

DFM 



X8921DFM 
x89sDFM 
DFM 
Z890DFM 



X895 D F M 
1870 DFM 



1882 
1890 
X893 
1870 



1882 



DFM 

DFM 

DFM 

C. 



DFM 



t Also pastor of Talsamau {page 297). 



MONTGOMERYSHIRE {Pop., 58,003). 

(O.W.. Old Welsh. D.F.M., Denbigh, Flint, and Merioneth. C.C., Carmarthen- 
shire and Cardiganshire.) 



Beulah(E) nr Llanidloes 

Caersws(E.) .. .. 
Cwmbelan . . . . 
Kerry (E.) . . . . 
Llanfair-Caeremion 

Llanllugan 
Llanfyllin . . . . 

Bethel . . . . 
Llanidloes . . . . 

Caemcoed 
Machynlleth, Bethesda 
Mochdre (E.) 
Newchapel (E.) . . 



185 1 

1824 
1824 
1840 
1823 
1840 



X836 
1826 
1808 

1800 
1830 
1796 



140 

220 
X50 
150 
270 

90 
150 
130 
650 

250 

txo 
250 



73 
90 
56 
68 
51 
9 
39 
27 
190 

64 
60 

lOI 



55 
80 
50 
70 
85 



66 

50 

272 

68 
40 
60 



( 'T. D. Jones.s«« ) 
( Radnorshire j 

•b. E.Hughes !! 
J. Harrison . . . . 



[ W. H. Jones . 

J. Griffiths . . . 

D. H. Hughes . < 

•J. Roberts .. ., 

D. E. Hughes . . 



1894 

1884 
1885 



1893 
X885 

X893 
Z894 
1886 



O.W. 
O.W. 

O w. 

O.W. 
O.W. 
O.W. 



D FM 
O W. 

CC. 
O.W. 
O.W, 



MONTGOMERYSHIRE — ^PBMBROKESHIRB. 



281 



MONTGOMERYSHIRE— con^KAf. 



Newtown (E.) . . . . 
New Weill (E.) .. .. 
PontUogell (near Llan- 

fyUin) 

Rhydfelin (E.) .. .. 
Sam(E,) 

Cwm (E.) 



Staylittle and Tanlan. 

Dylife 

Talywern, Sion . . . 
Welshpool (E.) . . . 



1736 
1838 



1791 
1786 



1805 
1813 
1824 
1837 



1250 
200 

zoo 

XX2 
200 
80 
Z98 
120 

250 



320 40 

39( 3 



410 
30 



12 

16 

125 



14 2 
16, 3 
90 Z I 

90; .. 

102 12 ZZO 

I?! 4 : 21 

86: 8 62 

51: 6 I 76; 



T. E. Williams 
•J. Roberts . . 



894 



O.W. 
O.W. 



DFM 
O.W. 



I A.G.Jones, Ph.D. 



Z895 



O.W. 



T. Rowson 



Z892 



O.W. 

C.C. 
O.W. 



PEMBROKESHIRE {Pop. 89.133). 
(P., Pembrokeshire. G.C.E., Glamorganshire and Carmarthenshire English.) 



Chofchet. 



1 


i 
1 


^1 









II 



Blaenconin Clynderw'n 
Blaenffos . . . . 

Bethabara 
Blaenllyn and 

Newton . . . . 

Blaenywaen .. .. 

Beihsaida 

St.Dogmell's, Gerizim 

Broadhaven,Hephzibah 

(E.) 

Camrose (E.) 
Cemaes, Penuel . . 
Cilfowyr . . . . 
Cilgerran, Penuel. . 
Clarbeston, Carmel 

Gelly 

Cold Inn (E.) 
CresswellQuay Pisgah 

(E.) 

Cioesgoch 

Trevine 

Dinas Cross. Tabor . 
Eglwyswrw, Ebenezer 
Ftynnon (Narbeth) and 

Glanrhyd 

Fishguard, Hermon , . 
Goodwick . . . . 
Lower Fishguard, . 

Seleddy 

Haverfordwest : — 

Bethesda(E.) .. .. 

Machpelah (E.) .. 

Prtndergast .. .. 

Hill Park (W.&E.).. 



1846 
Z785 
Z827 
1842 
1862 
1745 



1841 
Z838 
Z824 
1704 
Z820 
Z804 
Z858 
z86z 

Z820 
i8z6 

1798 
1768 

1779 
i8zi 
Z807 
1873 

1859 

1769 
z842 

1857 



500 
800 
500 
250) 

2ZO) 
800 
650 
250 

z8o 
250 
200 
600 
250 
300 
200 
250 

300 
600 

600 
600 
400 
250 
640 
360 

200 

950 
zoo 



250 

328 
155 
236 



72 

76 

X22 

214 

165 

96 

Z2I 

Z26 
332 

373 
169 
zx8 
54 
521 



340 



550 ■ 228 



z8 



186 
X90 
98 
X30 



40 

zo6 

75 
Z30 

137 

TOO 
70 

86 

X22 

ZZO 
Z20 

Z52 
ZO3 
ZZO 

67 
350 



226 



27 ' z86i 



A. Morgan . . 
•W. J. Lewis. . 

Theo. John . . 
I Hugh Jones 

T. R. Lewis.. 
•J. Williams . . . 



W. C. Williams . 



J. D. Thomas 



I 
) 
T. Gravel! . . 

J. Roberts ,. 
D. Phillips . . 

J. W. Maurice 
•W.J. Lewis.. 



O. D. Campbell, 
M.A. 

John Jenkins 



1892 
X89Z 

1873; 
1894 



Z892 
1889 



1895 



1895 
z888 

Z895 
1857 

z88s 
Z89Z 



P. 
P. 
P. 



P. 
P. 
P. 
P. 
P. 

P. 

P. 

P. 
P. 

P. 
P. 

P. 

P. 



Z895; P. 
i87z' P. 



382 



LIST OF CHURCHES. 



PEMBROKESHIRE— coH^tNfMJ. 



Honeyborough : — 
Hephzibah (E.) 

Lanteague, Zoar (E.) 

Letterston, Saron 

UtUeNewca8tle,Beulah 

Llanfymach, Hermon 

Llanglof&n 

St. Nicholas, Bithel 
Mathry, N$bo 

Uangwm, Galilee (E.) 

Llanychllwydog 
(Cwmgwaen), Jabez 

Maenclochog, Horeb . 

Manorbier, Penuel (E.) 

Marloes (E.) 

Martletwy (Narbertb) 
(E.) 

Middlemill 

Milford. North-road (E.; 

Mole8ton(Narberth)(E.; 
Lovest<m{E.),. .. 

Mynachlogddu, Bethel 

Narberth(E.) .. .. 

Nevem, Caersalem . . 

Newport : — 
Bethlehem . . . . 

Newtonpants : — 

Bethlehem 

Salem 

Neyland, Bethesda (E.) 
Sardis(EO 

Pembroke (E.) (14,978) 
Coshest<m . . . 

Pembroke Dock : — 
Bush-st., Bethel (E.) 
High-st.. Bethany (E.) 
Pennar. Gilgal (E.) . . 

Pencaer. Harmony . 

Penybryn (Cilgerran) . 

Pope Hill. Horeb (E.). 

Puncheston, Smjrma . 

Roch Castle, Penuel (E.) 

St. David's, Zion. . . 

SandyhtU (E.) . . . 

Saundersfoot, Hebron 
(E.) 

Southdairy (E.) .. . 

Star 

Sutton (E.) (Haverford- 
west) •• .. .. 

Tenby (E.), South- 
parade . . . . 

Thornton (E.) (Milford 
Haven) . . . . 



840 

854 
828 
817 
808 

745 
866 

833 
801 

864 
850 

821 

840 
794 
828 
667 

794 
816 
841 

793 

820 

827 
863 
822 
830 
840 

843 

818 
862 
828 
808 

817 
827 
822 
840 

8X2 

854 
832 
831 

834 

830 

867 



250 
120 

500 

400 
400 
750 

200 

250 

400 

400 
300 
350 

400 

1000 

600 

350 

Z20 

450 
600 
400 

600 

300 
150 
250 
250 
600 
150 

750 
650 
450 
320 
290 
200 
350 
250 
300 
250 

200 
200 
350 

180 
600 
216 



167 
19 
292 
100 
197 
239 

90 
204 

37 
X04 

103 
293 
"5 
132 

20G 

307 
206 

462 

13a 
94 
144 
118 
284 



188 
292 
158 
218 

94 

58 
x86 

52 
X50 

66 

64 
24 

120 

49 
x6o 

20 



130 
15 

X2I 
70 

X70 

132 



95 
174 
107 
50 
50 

120 
150 
140 

X20 
60 
X50 
220 
100 

x6o 

80 

52 

220 

120 

230 

x8o 
330 
206 
xoo 

60 

35 
100 
30 
70 
30 

46 
17 
79 

40 
195 

20 



D. Lewis 



B.Thomas , 
Jacob John , 



E. Davies . . 

W.Davies .. 

•J. U. Morris 

•W.Davies .. 

J. Harrington 

•D. T. Richards 

W. Reynolds 
W. Roberts 
W. H. Prosser 
T. Evans . . 

W.Griffith .. 
J. A. Thomas 
»J. LI. Morris 

J. Jenkins . . 

I D. O. Edwards 

B. C. Evans. . 

•E. I^wrenoe 

E. Thomas . . 



R. C. Roberts 
J. D. Jones . . 
D. Davies • . 
W. Rees .. 



*E. Lawrence 
•W.Davies .. 



J. S. Jones 
•D. T. - - 



Richards 



•J.Williams.. 



1895 



X865 
1885 



X874 

1883 
1883 

1875 
x888 
X891 



X888G 



1890 
1890 
1891 
1879 

X867 
1894 
1853 

X852 

X878 

X894 
X895 
1875 



1895 
1875 



1895 



P. 
P. 
P, 
P. 
P. 
P. 



P. 
P. 
P. 

rC E 
P. 

P. 
P. 
P. 
P. 

P. 
P. 
P. 



P. 
P. 
P. 



1876 
1880 P. 
1894 
1887 



P. 

P. 

P. 

P. 

P. 

P. 

X89O P. 
1891 



RADNORSHIRE. 



283 



RADNORSHIRE (Pop., 3i.79i)- 
(O W.. Old Welsh. B.. Brecknockshire.) 



II 



Bwlchysamau (E.) 

Cascob 

Cefinpole (E.) 
Dolau, Nantmel (E.) 
Dolau, Uanfihangel (E.) 
Evenjobb (E.) 

Gladestry (E.) .. 

New Radnor . . 
Firanksbridge (E.) 

Glascwjn (E.) . . 
Glyn-Elan, Bethany 
Giavelf Llanbister-road, 

(E.) 

Howey(E.),LIandrindod 
Knighton (E.) . . 



1829 
z86o 



Uandilo, Moriah(E.).. 
Uandrindod Wells (E.) 
Maesyrhelem ^E.) 
Nantgwyn (E.) .. 

Newbridge-on-Wye (E.) 
Painscastle.Adullam(E) 
Presteign (E.) 
Stan -batch 
Rhayader (E.) . . 
Rock (Penybont) (E.) 
Velindre(E.).. .. 



1761 
X872 
X841 
1840 
i860 
1824 
1867 
1834 

1844 
X853 
X864 

1830 
X876 
180X 
1766 

1727 
1836 
1824 
x86x 
X840 
X72X 
1852 



230 

170 
250 

200 
250 
200 
200 
200 
50 

200 
X50 
400 

250 
350 
250 
300 

400 
X50 
200 
300 
200 



X25 

25 
42 

71 

79 
53 
62 
40 
x6o 

XZ 

49 



51 

X19 
76 



6x' 6 

61 3 

2x2; 24 

41! 4 

1x4 6 

248! X7 
129 

137 
55 
158 



60 
x6 
7 
45 
60 
40 
60 
40 
60 



47 

80 

30 

240 

50 
60 

335 

8x 

62 
50 
169 



30 

134 

62 



*D. S.Evans.. .. 
*D, S. Evans . . . . 
•W.D. Young !! 
Ig. p. Edwards.. 

|c. Harris .. .. 
T. Rees 

•W. D. Young . . 

•W.Williams' !! 

(sM Shropshire) 

•T. James . . . . 

Ji Jones . . . . 

D. Davies . . . . 

^T. D. Jones {see 

Montkomeryshire) 

H.C.Edwards .. 

•T. James . . . . 

I W. Skinner . . 

D. Thomas . . . . 

'W.G.Mansfield.. 

{Su Shropshire.) 



1892 
1892 
X889 
1895 

1895 
Z887 

X889 

1878 

1886 
1876 
1876 
1893 

1895 
1886 

1893 

1895 
1891 



O.W. 

o.w. 

O.W. 

o.w. 
o.w. 

o.w. 
o.w. 

B. 

o.w. 
o.w. 
o.w. 

o.w. 
o.w. 
o.w. 
o.w. 

o.w. 
o.w. 

o.w. 

o.w. 
o.w. 
o.w. 



284 



LIST OP CHURCHES. 



MONMOUTHSHIRE {Pop., 252^16) 

(M., Monmouthshire Welsh. M.E., Monmouthshire English. E.G., East 
Glamorganshire. B., Breoonshire.) 



*| 



Puton. 



(E.) 



Abercarn (E.) 
Abercam (W.) . . 

Chapel of Ease 
Abergavenny : — 

Frogmore-street 

Bethany (E.) . 
Abersychan (E.) . . 

Noddfa (W. ft E.) 
Abertillery : — 

King-street (E.) 

Blaina Gwent(W.ftE.) 
Workmen's HaU 

Ebenezer(E.) .. 

Argoed(W.ftE.^. 

HoUyBush .. 

Bargoed , Caersalem( W .) 

Cwmsyfiog^Bethania 

Bassaleg. Bethel (W. ft 

E.) .. .. 

Bethesda (E.) 
Bedwas(W.).. 
Blackwood. Libanus(W) 

Mount Pleasant (E.) 
Blaenavon : — 

Horeb (E.) 
Blaenycwm . . 

Ebenezer(£.) .. 

Broad-street (E.) 

Forge Side, Zion (E.) 

King-street (E.) 
Blaina, Salem (W. ft E.) 
Caerleon (E.) . . . . 
Caerwent (Chepstow) 

(E.) 

Castletown (Cardiff) 

(W.&E.) 

Chepstow (E.) . . . 

Bowlash 

Cross Keys (Newport) 

(E.) 

Cwmbran, Siloam, 

(Newport) (W. ft E.) 
Cwm,Tirzah(E.).. .. 

Cwmmera 

Ebbw Vale :— 

Briery-hill, Zion (E. 

Brynhyfryd(W.&E.; 

Newtown, Providence 
(E.).. 

Nebo (W.) 

Victoria, Caersalem 
(W. ft E.) 



1876 
1847 
1895 

1807 
Z828 
1827 
Z846 

1852 
x66o 



750 
650 



750 
380 
400 
500 

500 
500 



1877 
1818 
1884 
1852 
i860 

1831 
1742 
1851 

1835 
1876 

1823 
1870 
1825 
1846 
1875 
1878 
1841 
1771 

z8i6 

1823 
x8t6 



1882 

X839 
1879 
1856 

1841 
1853 

i860 
1827 

1840 



800 
450 
125 
650 
200 

53a 
600 
450 
250 
600 

600 
150 
500 
650 
350 
500 
800 
400 

150 

700 
350 



700 

300 
150 
140 

500 
700 

300 
800 

550 



371 
158 

76 

250 
123 

189 
108 

168 
324 



278 
147 

205 



150 

239 

167 

35 

158 

282 

136 
141 
III 
160 
297 
90 

28 

203 
67 



244 

71 
64 
28 

153 
'59 

54 
135 

192 



361 
140 

160 

283 
130 
350 
195 

180 

350 

80 

285 

2ZO 
245 



140 
300 
150 
40 
190 

420 

130 
220 
2x4 
300 
400 
ZOO 

33 



132 



600 

1x2 
140 
40 

350 
190 

Z30 

X20 
300 



T. A. Thomas 



1884 



T.E.Cozens 
S. R. Young 
J. O. Hughes 



Cooke 1883 



Z856 
Z893 



T. Griffiths . . 
T. T. Evans 

D. Hussey . . 
Evan George 



1878 
Z882 

Z890 
1879 



W. Morgan . . 
T. G. James 
Morgan James 



1894 
Z892 
1873 



J. Johzis 

loan Meredyth 
T. Phillips . . 



Z894 

1894 
1895 



W. E. Stephens . 
J. Gimblett . . . 
D. B. Jones . . . 

*]. Berryman 

R. Lloyd . . . 
C. Thomas . . . 



W. Evans 



1895 
1894 
1866 

1888 

z86i 
Z892 



1894 



J. J. Young . . 
•B. Davies . . 

W. Powell . . 

L. M.Roberts, M.A 

E. Edwards.. 
J. A. Evans . . 

T. Thomas . . 



1894 
1892 

z88o 
z886 

z888 
1893 

X895 



M. 
M. 
M. 

M.E. 

M.E. 

M.E. 

M. 

M. 
M. 

M. 
M. 



M. 
M. 
M. 
M. 

M.E. 



M. 

M. 

M.E. 
M. 
M. 

M. 
M.E. 

M.E. 

M. 
M.E. 



M. 



M.E. 
M. 
M. 

M.E. 
M. 

M. 
M. 

M. 



MONMOUTHSHIRE. 



285 



MONMOUTHSHIRE— «M*<<mi«l. 



i 



Glascoed (Pontypl.)(E.) 
Goytrey.Sharon (W.ftE) 
Griffithstown, Newport 

(E.) 

Henllan (E.). Cwmyoy, 

near Abergavenny 



HenUys, Zoar (W. & E.) 
Llanddewi Rhydderch 

(E.) 

Llannhangel Cmcomey 

Zoar(E!) .. ., 
Llanfihangel Ystem 

Liewem (E.) . . . . 
Llangibby (E.) . . . . 
Uangwtn (Usk) (E.) .. 
UanhiUeth(W.ftE.).. 
Liantamam (E.) . . . . 
Llanvaches, Betnany(E) 
Uanwenarth (W. ft E.) 
Pwlddu . • • • • . 
Macben.Siloamrw.ftE.) 
Maesycwromer (E.) 
Magor (Newport) (E.). . 
Micbaelstone - y - Vedw 

(Cardifn, Tirzah (E.) 
Monmouth, Monnow- 

street (E.) 

Nantyglo : — 

Hermon(W.) .. .. 

Bethel (E.) 

Bethlehem (E.).. .. 

Na8h(E.) 

Lisweny • . . . 

Newbridge (E.) • . • . 

Crumlin . . . . . , 

Beulah(W.) .. .. 
Newport (54.707) :— 

Alexander-road (E.) 

Alma-street (E.) 

Charles-street (E.) .. 

Commercial-st. (E.). , 

Commercial-road (E.) 

Dnckpool-road (E.) . . 
Maindee^ 
Durham-road . . 

East Usk-road . . . . 

Maindee (E.) . . . . 

St Mary-street (E.).. 

Stow Hill (E.) .. .. 

Temple (W.) . . . . 
New Tredegar, Saron 

(W.) 



1817 
1826 

X876 

1878 

1843 
1828 

1837 

1829 

1837 
1772 

1837 
1862 
1809 
1696 

1830 
1863 
x8i6 

x86i 

1818 



1871 
1880 
1821 

X864 



1823 

X884 
x866 
X817 
X829 
x86i 
1875 



20C 
250 

400 

xoo 

300 

250 

X50 
150 

200 

400 
350 
500 

120 
400 

700 
300 
300 

300 



1830 xooo 



500 

X40 
250 

550 

300 

500 

500 
500 
500 

xooo 
850 
800 



X889 
1862 
1868 

x86o 
1842 



X50 
600 
660 
xooo 

800 



54 
46 



30 
50 



x86o 500 



26 

52 
66 

58 

9 
23 
49 
123 
X36 
25 
132 

137 
82 

99 
94 
63 

179 

83 
xxo 

31 

34 
368 

319 



90 X2 
26 

9 



200 

139 

25 X 



394 



52 8 

213 35 

307 39 

X76 24 

58 



167 



X4 



24 
60 
70 
40 
x8 



30 

X20 

2X2 

40 

X67 

XOO 

130 
xox 

90 
30 

249 
173 
235 
30 
X30 
370 
X30 
250 

277 

300 
X28 
230 
570 

395 



144 
409 
508 
X70 
30 

X41 



f'T. N. Smith) 

{see also p.p. V . 
I 220 a«u< 267) j 
R. L. Morris 



W. Rees 



X890 
X894 
X892 



•T. C. Powell . 

B. Davies .. . 
*B. Davies . . . 

J.Lloyd .. . 

W. E. Robinson . 

T. H. Williams ! 



T. Batstone.. 
O. Tidman . . 



H. Williams 
John G. Williams 
D. Lewis . . 
T. Delahaye 

J. M. Jones . . 

J. Edwards . . 



J. P. Thomas 
Daniel Davies 



G. Evans . . 
A. T. Jones. . 



A. Purnell . . 
G. H. Cook . . 

C. Ayliffe . . 
H. Abraham 

D. Evans . . 

W. WiHiams 



M. 
M. 

M.E. 

B. 

M. 

M. 

M.E. 



X87X 
X892 
X892 
x88o 
X892 

X884 



x88o 
X893 



X879 
X890 
x88o 
X872 

X884 



M.E. 
M.E. 

M. 

M. 

M. 
M.E 

M. 

M. 

M.E. 
M.E. 

M. 

M.E. 

M. 

M.E 
M. 

M.E. 



M. 
M. 



x866 
x88o 



M.E. 

M.E. 
M. 

M.E. 
X895 M. 
1876 M.E. 



X889 M.E. 



X876 



M.E. 



1870 M.E. 



1886 
1895 

X890 



M.E. 
M. 



E.G. 



286 



LIST OF CHURCHES. 



MONMOUTHSHIRE— con/tnMAf. 



I 



II 



Norton (E.) (Skenfrith) 

Penalt (Monmouth) (E.) 
Penheolybadd (Cwni' 

bran)(E.) 

Peterstone (W. ft E.) . , 

Ponthir (E.) 

Pontllanfraitta, Elim 

(W. &E.) .. .. 
Pontnewydd {E.) . . 
Pontnewynydd (E.) 

ZionHill .. .. 
Pontrhydyryn (E.) 
Pontypool : — 

Crane-street (E.) 

Penygarn Tabernacle 

(E.) • •• 

Bridge-street, Tros- 
nant (E.) .. .. 
Raglan. Usk-road (E.) 
Kingcoed . . . . 

Redwick(E.) 

Rhymney.: — 
Penuel(W.) .. .. 
Tafamaubach (W.).. 
Jerusalem (W.).. .. 

Beulah (E.) . . . . 

Risca, Moriah (W. & E.) 

Cwp^nant . . . 
Risca. Bethany (E.) . 
Sirhowy : — 

Carmel(W.) .. . 

Tabernacle (W & E) 
St. Bride's (Newport) 

(W. &E.) 

St. Mellon's (Cardiff) 

(W.&E.) 

Talywain, Pisgah (W 

&E.) 

Tintcm (E.) 

Tredegar : — 

Church-street (E.) . . 

Shiloh(W.) .. .. 
Trevil, Breconshire 

George Town. Bethel 
(E.) 

Armageddon . . 
Twyngwyn (W. & E.) 

Usk(E.) 

Whitebrook & Dandogo 

(E.) 



184 1 
1838 

1883 
1874 
1800 

1892 
1877 
1877 
i88z 
1815 

1836 



150 

130 

200 
100 
400 

830 
300 

350 
200 
600 

600 



1720 700 

17761 680 

1818 300 

1845 80 

1830! 100 



1828 
1856 
1844 
1 861 

1835 
X87O 

1855 

1836 
1847 

1843 
1843 
1828 
1884 



1200 
280 
800 

800 

150 
1000 



700 
500 

150 

600 
200 



1833 500 
1798 



1200 
100 



1868 
1859 

1829I 300 
1840 300 



250 



1839 



36 



91 7 



41 
28 

175 

42 
75 

169 
20 

196 

213 

207 

123 
79 

27 



340 43 
73 
X98 



321 

449 

173 
39 

46 
109 
126 

15 



250 x8 



400 



299 



145 
25 
70 
70 

30 



40 



50 

40 

70 

14 

142 

50 
186 

343 
121 
x8o 

320 

406 

312 
87 

32 

390 
80 
126 



490 

794 

130 
60 

50 

80 

274 

25 

300 
250 



271 
80 

100 
80 

50 



J. Hook,ofGarway 
(p. 220) 
•T. C, Powell . 

•T. Cocker . . . 

W.V.James" ! 

D. Lewis . . • 

T. Cocker .. . 

J. G. Watts.. . 

O.Jenkina .. . 

J. D. Rees .. . 

J. WiUiams . . . 



D. R. Jenkins . . 



•J. Berryman 

G. Griffiths . . . . 
D. E. Davies 
W. Saunders 
(•R. Owen {See) 
IBrithdir.Glam.)] 
J. O. Jenkins 

T. Thomas . . . . 

D. Mathias . . . . 



J. Morgan . . . 
IC. Thomas, of] 
I Chepstow . . J 

W. Evans . . . 
P. Williams 



M. H. Matthews. 



1889 
1879 
1883 
Z891 



1894 
1877 
z886 
x886 
i88c 

X878 



1893 



M.E. 

M.E. 

M.E. 
M. 

M.E. 

M. 

M.E. 

M.E. 

M. 

M.E. 

M.E. 
M. 

M. 

M.E. 



1891 

1882 

1893 
X895 

Z889 

1893 

1874 

1894 



M.E. 

M. 
M. 
M. 

M. 

M. 



1892 
1894 



X894 
1886 



M. 
M 

M. 

M. 

M. 

M.E. 

M.E. 
M. 



1895 



M. 
M. 

M. 
M.E 

M.E. 



SCOTLAND — ABERDEENSHIRE— CAITHNESS-SHIRB. 



287 



(Aggregate Population, 4,025,647.). 



(B. U. S., Baptist Union of Scotland.) 



N.B.— The populations of towns and cities of over 10,000 inhabitar.ts are 
either for the Parliamentary or Police burghs. 

ABERDEENSHIRE {Pop., 281,332). 



Ctuirches. 



Aberdeen (121,623) '• — 
Academy-street 
Crown-terrace . . . 
Gitcomston Park . 
Longacre . . . 
Union Grove . . . 

Fraserburgh . . . . . 

Peterhead (12,195) : — 
King-street . . . 



X803 
X821 
z886 



280 
388 
600 



1892 
1840 

1859 



300 
300 



300 



53 


8 


^44 


z8 


265 


16 




10 


75 


13 


90 


9 


123 


9 



40 
153 

240 

63 

160 

100 

87 



W. S.Chedburn. 
A. Bisset, M.A. . 

S. G. Woodrow . 
E. Hughes . . . 

A. J. Payne . . . 



ARGYLLSHIRE {Pop., 75.003). 



Dunoon . . . . 
Lochgilphead 



118831 360 
,|i8i5l 250 



io6[ 
40! 



70 

I2| 



D. Macgregor 
John Knox . . 



AYRSHIRE {Pop., 226,283). 



Ayr (23,826) . . . . 
Irvine, Bank-street 
Kilmarnock (28,447) * 

Fowlds-street .. 
Old Cumnock 
New Cumnock 



1 8861 500 
1808I 320 

1866. 300 
1875 200 



44 
36 



118 14 
28 3 
.. 15 



25 
41 

130 

28 

124 



H. D. Brown 
A.Kerr .. 

W. Donald . . 
J. Adair 



1879 BUS 
i883|B U S 

1893'B U S 
i895jB U S 

i89i!b U S 



.(i885|B U S 
.11880 B U S 



i892,B U S 
i894,B U S 

1884 BUS 
X894B US 



BANFFSHIRE {Pop., 64,190). 
Aberchirder ji8o6| 200 f 30I .. i .. i 2 (.. .. 

BERWICKSHIRE {Pop., 32.406). 

BUTESHIRE {Pop,, 18,404) 



.1 .. IB US 



Millport |z836| 150 I I2| 6 1 25! 

Rothesay, Ardbeg ..I1855I 450 | 75] 8 | 40I 



J. Black, M.A. 
S. Crabb . . 



|i895,B U S 
I1869IBUS 



CAITHNESS-SHIRE {Pop., 37,177). 



Keiss 

Freswick . . . . 
Scarfskerry 

Sttonui • « • • . . 


1750 
1868 


260 
300 


55 
15 
84 


Wick 


1809 


400 



5 


51 


5 


47 


5 


60 


2 


M 


14 


X79 



J. McPherson 

I Jas. Scott . . 

W. H. Millard 



1893 
1883 
1893 



BUS 
BUS 
B US. 



288 



LIST OF CHURCHES. 



CLACKMANNANSHIRE {Pop, 28^32). 



^1 



Alloa (XO.71X) 
Tillicoultry . . 



X838 500 193 » I 
1893 •• 77 " 



85 .. J. D. Robertson.. 1895 B ^ S 
105 3 J. Holden .. ..< 1893)8 US 



DUMBARTONSHIRE {Pop., 94.495). 



Clydebank . . . . 
Dalmuir . . . . 
Dumbarton (16,908) 
Helensburgh 
Kirkintilloch 



Dumfries (17,821) 



X89Z 

1876 
1881 
1887 



350 

500 
280 
250 


99 
136 


19 

12 

7 

X4 


x6z 
120 

ZOI 


2 
4 
5 



J. Bums 

P. McLeod .. 
G. A. Wilson 
W.B.Nicolson.M.A 



X89X B U S 

X891 B U S 
X883 BUS 
1890IB US 



DUMFRIES-SHIRE {Pop., 74.22X). 
• .I1872I 430 I S2{ 5 ) 4o| .. I A. Bremner. 



..I1889IB U S 



EDINBURGHSHIRE {Pop., 434.159). 



Dalkeith 1x852 150 106 

Edinburgh (261,225):— 



Bristo-place . . . . 
PotUrrow . . . . 

Dublin-street . . . . 
Canon Mills . . • . 

Duncan-street .. .. 

Marshall-street 

Morningside • . . . 

Rose - street, Char- 
lotte-square .. .. 
Leith (67,700) :— 

North Leith, Madeira- 
street 

South Leith • • . . 



1765 



x8io 
X883 

1779 
1846 
1894 

x8o6 



x868 
X891 



570 



850 
150 
350 
650 
600 

500 



500 
500 



562 



128 

228 

40 

2x7 



U5 
247 



4 


40 


•• 


38 
10 

2X 


354 
66 
t6i 


3 


15 

8 
14 
4 


253 
50 

125 
27 


2 


13 


143 


•• 


16 


x6o 




2X 


221 


•• 



H. McLean . . . . 

(W.Grant .. .. 
\ A. Cromar . . . . 

J. T. Forbes. M.A. 

P. Fleming . . . . 
A. Wylie, M.A. .. 
J. C. Brown. . . . 

T. W.Way.. .. 



W. Richards 
David Tait .. 



X891 

1870 
x888 

1895 

X894 
x88o 
X894 

x888 



X880B 



X895 
X89X 



BUS 



BUS 



BUS 
U S 
BUS 



BUS. 



BUS 
BUS 



FIFESHIRE {Pop., x87,346). 



Anstruther . . • . 

Pittenwum . . 
Cowdenbeath 

Cupar 

Dunfermline (19,647) : — 

Viewfield-place 
Kirkcaldy (17,324) :— 
Whyte's Causeway 

Thistle-street 

Mill-street . . 
Largo 

Buckhaven . . 

Leslie 

Leven 

St. Andrews . . . . 



x86o 

X875 
i8z6 

X842 

X852 



1868 



x88o 
x892 
X841 



430 


xx6 


30 


235 


250 
500 


141 
87 


12' 

6 


98 

29 


600 


331 


30 


330 


500 


287 


32 


234 


x6o 
400 


40 
34 
X08 


7 
8 
8 


60 
128 
60 


250 
200 


i; 


7 
xo 


11 



• • 


H. Edwards 


X893 


9 


J.M. Munro 


1893 


.. 


J.T.Hagen.. .. 


1875 


6 


W. J. Hunter . . 


1893 


3 


W.Pulford.. .. 


1893 


2 
2 

X 


D. Kerr . . . . 
A.Piggot .. .. 
S. Hirst .. .. 


1893 
1893 
X890 



BUS 

BUS 
BUS 

BUS 

BUS 

BUS 

BUS 
BUS 
BUS 



FORFARSHIRE — LANARKSHIRE. 



289 



FORFARSHIRE {Pop., 277,773). 



^1 



Arbroath (22,800) :— 
Market-place . . 

Broughty Kerry . . 

Dundee (153,051) : — 
Ward-road.. .. 

WaigaU HaU 

Rattray-street .. 

MUUn Pend 

Forfar (12,057) • • 

Lochee 



1810 300 
250 



876 
1874 



1872 
1865 



650 
500 



103 
54 



417 
379 



400 
330 



83 
130 



92 

75 

172 
100 

X20 
50 

79 
174 



G. Menzies . . 
G. P. Craise. . 

D.Clark .. 

T. W. Lister 

G. Lauder . . 



HADDINGTONSHIRE {Pop., 37.485). 

INVERNESS-SHIRE {Pop., 89,3x7). 

KINCARDINESHIRE {Pop., 35,647). 

KINROSS-SHIRE {Pop., 6,280). 

KIRKCUDBRIGHTSHIRE {Pop., 39,985). 



Airdrie (15,133) •— 
Graham-street .. . 

Bellshill 

Cambuslang 

Coatbridge (30,034) . 
Glasgow (564,981) :— 
Adelaide-place 
St. Clair-sireet . 
Brown-street 
Bridgeton, Sister-st. 
Cambridge-street . 
John Knox-street . 
North Frederick-st. 

Hillhead 

Partick 

Port Dundas 
Hutchesontown 



North John-street 
ShUohHaU .. 



Queen's-park . . 

South Side (Gorbals) 
GovanhUl 

Springbum 
Govan (62,063) .. 
Hamilton (24.859) 



LANARKSHIRE {Pop., 1,046,040). 



Motherwell (18.726) 
Rutherglen . , . • 
Wishaw (15,252) .. 



1842 
1894 
1881 
1868 

1829 



x886 
1862 
1845 
185 1 
1883 



1883 
1768 



1878 
1876 



1892 
1872 
1886 

1887 
1892 
1872 



430 



500 
500 



450 
450 
630 
700 
800 



450 



575 
450 



650 

450 

372 
Hall 
300 



155 

37 

262 

X50 

489 



40S 
380 
311 
321 
474 



90 



347 



239 
291 



1x7 

284 

75 

59 



24 


200 


.. 


29 


248 


, , 


X2 


103 


4 


45 


546 


•• 


25 


285 




26 


233 


X2 


40 


404 


.. 


54 


480 


.. 


30 


225 


17 


22 


267 




x6 


206 




17 


200 


•• 


20 


378 


12 


25 


235 


6 


21 


220 


6 


12 


80 




23 


249 


. . 


27 


336 


, . 


9 


86 


5 


8 


69 


3 


IX 


95 


.. 


17 


150 


.. 



W. Macintosh 
J. Bruce 
A. A. Milne 
H. Gunn . . 

T. H. Martin 



W. J. Millar. . 
E. Last.. .. 
P.J. Rollo .. 

E. Aubrey . . 

F. H. Robarts 



1893 
189X 



BUS 
BUS 

BUS 



X890 
X89X 



BUS 
BUS 



T. Collins . . 
/ R. Watson . . 
; G. McCrie 
, R. Coats . . 
{7. Todd .. 

H.Wright .. 
J. Mcl^ean . . 

J. Home 

J. Coats, M.A. 

J. R. Chrystal, 

[M.A.. b.D., 
J.Connor ,. ..1888BUS 
J.Young .. ..X894BUS 
G. Whittet .. ..!x876BUS 



1892 B U S 
1894 

X892 BUS 
189018 U S 

x888!B U S 



18848 U S 
x89i,B US 
1879, B U S 
X895IB U S 
X883 BUS 
I 

I 
i895;B U S 

18701 
1885I 
1895; 
1895! 

1892' B u s 
i89o;B U S 

x892'B U S 
x872 B U S 
1886 BUS 



ago 



LIST OF CHURCHES. 



LINLITHGOWSHIRE {Pop,, 52,808) 



MORAYSHIRE {Pop., 43.453). 



Elgin, Reidhaven-street 

Forres 

•Grantown . . . . 

Lossiemouth.. .. 

Hopeman 



1808 
i860 
1805 
1861 



400 
240 
250 
360 



133 



149 



6g 



50 
155 



R. £. Glendening 



W. H. Davies 
B. J. Cole .. 



1884 



1891 
1892 



BUS 
BUS 
BUS 
BUS 



NAIRN {Pop,, 10,019). 



Peebles . 



PEEBLES-SHIRE {Pop,, 14,761). 



.1889 



15 



( 



A. M. Crooks ..18 

I 



BU 



PERTHSHIRE {Pop., 126,199). 



^Crieff 

Perth (29,899) :— 
Tay-street . . . 



1 881 1 I20 

i8o8'x200 

1 

Z881I 286 
'Tullymet 1806! 320 



Pitlochry 



31 
287 

70 
69 



35 
180! 



10 
251 



W. R. Simpson . . i889|B U S 

J. A. G. RobinsonJi890 BUS 

[M.A.I 
J. W. Kettle .. 1895B US 
L. S. Steedman . .I18941B U S 



'Greenock (63,096) :— 
George-square . . . 
Orangefield-place . 
J>aisley (66,418) :— 
Thomas Coats' 

Memorial . . , 
George-street .. . 
Victoria-place .. . 
Barr-strut 



RENFREWSHIRE {Pop., 290,798). 



1884 

x8o6 


500 
650 


lOX 

266 


15 
19 


"5 
175 


1795 
1795 
1866 


1000 
450 
500 


319 
283 


26 
26 

33 


329 
105 
224 



W. H. Griffith 
A. Corbet . . 



J. Farquhar, M.A. 
J. Crouch . . 



X894 
X887 



X887 
x866 



BUS 
BUS 



BUS 
BUS 
BUS 



ROSS AND CROMARTY {Pop., 77,810). 



Hawick (19,204) 



.118461 300 

.1886 Hall 

Cclso |x878l 340 



ROXBURGHSHIRE {Pop., 53,741). 
3 



142 


22 


132 


34 


6 


50 


45 


5 


36 



W. Seaman. 
J. McKean . 
2 I W. Shearer . 



i88o)BUS 
1886BUS 
1893 B U S 



SBLKIKKSHXRE — WESTERN ISLES. 



291 



SELKIRKSHIRE {Pop., 27,353). 



^1 



Oalashiels (i7»a52) :— 

Victoria-street . . . 

Stirling-street .. . 
Br§wtry HaU 
Selkirk 



1804 


300 


152 


20 


116 


4 


1804 


350 


297 


36 

7 


*g 


7 


x88o 


xte 


74 


9 


54 


4 



1A. Thomson 
if eniy Fleming 
D. Craighead 
J.B.Johnston, M.A 

J. Brown 



X852 
1881 
1894 
X887 

x88o 



BUS 
BUS 



Alva .. .. 
FaUdrk (16,620) 
Stirling (16,776) 



STIRLINGSHIRE {Pop., x25,6o8). 



1882 


200 


56 


15 


140 4 


1867 


375 


X32 


12 


96 .. 


X805 


400 


X62 


xo 


81 .. 



D. W. Laing .. 
A. Paterson, M.A. 
G. Yuille . . . . 



1882 
1889 
X870 



BUS 
BUS 
BUS 



SUTHERLANDSHIRE {Pop., 21,896). 



WIGTOWNSHIRE {Pop., 36,062). 



ORKNEY ISLES (Post-town, Kirkwall) {Pop., 30.453). 



Burray .. 
Eday 

Sunday 
Westray.. 



1826 170 
X827 150 

1803 230 



49 


4 


31 


•• 


S. Lindsay . . . . 


1895 


45 


5 


45 


.. 


J. Yeomans . . . . 


X895 



BUS 
BUS 

BUS 



SHETLAND ISLES (Post-town, Lerwick) {Pop., 28,7x1). 



Dunrossness 

Burra Jsie • • 

Lerwick 

Lnnnasting and .. 
Sandsting . . . . 

West Burrajlrth 



x86x 
1840 



400 



350 
150 

X20 



193 
42 

87 

33 
51 



8 


100 


2 


3 


40 




13 


70 


X 


2 


36 


•• 



J. McCallum 

C. J. Jackman 
[ T. Young . . 



i893|B U S 
X894B U S 



X859 



BUS 



WESTERN ISLES {Populaiions included in the counties). 



Colonsay • . . • 
Port CharlotU 

Gortan .. .. 

Kilehoman . . 

Kilnave .• •. 
IsUy:— 

Bowinore .. •• 
Mull :— 

Bimessan •• .. 

Tobermory • • 
Skye:— 

Broadford • . . . 

Tfree 



^l' 



x8i8 


150 


26 
15 


2 


12 


2 


X819 


400 


62 


XO 


XIO 


• • 


X822 
x8i6 


200 
250 


47 
33 


3 

5 


37 

25 


, , 


1828 
1816 


200 
300 


24 
87 


2 


20 


•• 



Alex. Macdougall 



D. Ross . . . . 

A. Brown . . . . 
D.Bell 

Allan Macdougall 
D. M'Farlane . . 



1891 



x88i 

x892 
x886 



1886 
X879 

T 2 



BUS 



BUS 

BUS 
BUS 



BUS 
BUS 



292 



LIST OF CHURCHES. 



(Aggregate Populatioo, 4,704,750.} 

(I., Baptist Union of Ireland.) 

ANTRIM {Pop., 438,128). 



ClHirclMt. 


1 


f 


il 


ll 


4 


11 


Pteiots. 


II 


- 


Ballymena, Hill-Btreet.. 1859 
and Clough . . . . 1872 


500 
200 


69 
40 


5 

5 


58 
50 


5 


•} T. Whiteside .. 


1881 


1 

I. 


Belfast:— | 












i 


Great Victoria-street 1847 


500 


153 


II 


135 


.. A.Walker .. .. 


1893 I. 


Mount Pottinger . . ' 1 891 


500 


174 


15 


164 


6 R.Clark .. .. 


189Z I. 


BaUyhackamore .. 






1 






Regent-street . . . . 1867 


500 


374 


44 387 


30 C. S. Donald 


1891 I. 


Fair/aX'Strut ,.\ 






1 




j 


Carrickfergus . . . . 1862 


200 


6z 


5 36 


.. M. V. F. Dawson, 

1 rM.A. 


x895j I. 


Grangecomer . . . . 


z8iz 


200 


80 


4 


30 


2 


H.Phillips.. .. 


,1879 


I. 



ARMAGH {Pop., 143,289). 



Fivemile Hill 
Lurgan .. .. 
Pojmtz Pass . . 
Tandragee . . 



i89(^ 


, , 


65 


6 


80 


3 


1885 


150 


58 


4 


46 


4 


1894 


150 


32 


4 


34 


4 


1864 


250 


85 


5 


40 


2 



J. H. Boyd 
A. Jardine 
J. Taylor 



1891 

1895 
1863 



CORK {Pop., 438,432). 
Cork ii89oi 240 | 44) 4 I 20J .. j W. L. Tweedie 

DERRY {Pop., 152,009). 
Meeting 



Coleraine, 

House-street 

Cool HOI 

Tubbermore . 



1795 
1805 



220 

400 



103 


6 


50 


4 


16 








222 


13 


138 


.. 



P. H. Blaikie 
G. Marshall 



1895 
X894 



DONEGAL {Pop., 185,635). 
Letterkenny • • •• • .118101 150 | 12) 6 | iioj i | J.Storey •• 
DOWN {Pop., 267,059). 



Ballykeel 

Banbrid^e 

Derryneil 



I89I 


120 


39 


5 


19 1 


1846 


260 


87 


8 


90 4 


1864 


300 


37 


2 


i6| .. 



James Hodge 
J. Bennett ,. 
G. Rock 



DUBLIN {Pop., 419.216). 



Dublin:— 
Harcourt-street 
Lower Gardifur-st. 
Dundrum . . . . 
Phibsboro'-avenue . . 



1640 
1891 



800 
140 



401 



62 



210 
50 



55 



H. D. Brown, 

[M.A., B.L. 

Fenton E. Bury. 



1891 

»895 
1891 



1887 
1891 



I1894I I. 



I. 
I. 



.1x8591 I. 



I. 

I. 
I. 



Urannoxtown 



KILDARE {Pop., 70,206). 
.)i873{ 120 I 50 I 3 I 30 1 •• 1 J* !>• Gilmore ..I1893I 



CHANNEL ISLANDS — ISLE OP MAN. 



293 



LIMERICK {Pop., 158.9x9). 



a 



Limerick, Military-road 



1891 



210 26 



Alez.G.Gibb,M.A. 



TYRONE {Pop., 171,401). 



Dungannon 

Lisnagleer (Donagh- 

more) 

Knockconny 

MuUycar . . . 



1884 
1866 

1807 


Hall 

160 
200 


17 

63 
42 


6 
7 


68 

TOO 


I 



A. Patterson 

J. W. Pcarce 
M. Simpson 



WATERFORD {Pop., 98,251). 



Waterford, Catherine-i 
street w. 1652 



150 


27 


9 


84 


X 



J. Lloyd 



WESTMEATH {Pop., 65,109). 



Athlone, Scotch-parade 
and Moate . . . . 
Ferbane . . . . 



1825 120 ) 
1650 120 J 



52 



J. S. Flook 



1892 



1884 

'1891 
1884 



1895 



1895 I 



{Population 92,234.) 



Jersey:— 

St. Helier, Vauxhall 
Guernsey : — 
St. Peter's Port 
St. Saviour's. Beth- 
lehem 

Castel, Si. Luke's . . 







(S., 


Southern 


) 


1864 


700 


130 


20 


170 


' I 


1888 


420 


100 


13 


90 


X 


1829 
1884 


250 
100 


50 

12 


40 
15 


X40 
85 


XO 

xo 



J. Gard .. .. 
I C. J. Bottgourd I 



X893 

1880 
X883 



3«fe of (S[t<t!n. 

{Population 55,608.) 



Douglas . 



(L.C., Lancashire and Cheshire.) 
I1893I 300 I .. I .. I .. ( .. |F.T.B.Westlake..|x893|L.C. 



294 



LIST OF CHAPBLS. 



III.— LIST OF CHAPELS 

Not connected with Associations, and from which cetarns cannot be obtained. 
See note on page soi. 

Where it is known that a Church does not exist, an asterisk is prefixed to the name 
of the Chapel. 

The figures indicate the sitting accommodation. 



ENGLAND. 



Bbdfordshirb. 

Biggleswade :— 

Providence .. .. 300 
Blunham: Providence 150 

Clifton 500 

Cranfield : Church End 100 
Dunstable: St. Mary-st 300 
Eaton Bray (Dunstable) 350 
Luton : Dumfries-st . . 500 1 

Potton 400 

Shambrook : — 

Bethlehem 150 

High-street .. .. 420 

Southill 

Westoning . . . . 
WUden 



Berkshire. 

*Sutton Courtney 

Swallowfield 

WalUngford: Wood-st. 



300 



Z20 
200 



Buckinghamshire. 

Amersham : — ' 

Upper Meeting . . 200 | 
Askett (Princes' Ris- 

borough) 300 I 

Aston Clinton . . • . 200 
Brickhill, Great . . . . 100 

Chalkshire 100 , 

Chesham: Townfield.. 350 i 

Colnbrook 275 

Long Ford .. .. 100 { 



Datchet 50 

Ivinghoe 350 

Linslade 150 

Nash (Stony Stratford) 140 
Newport Pagnel . . . . 150 
Northall (Dunstable) . . 272 
Olney : and Church .. 150 
Penn : Beacon Hill . . 200 
Prestwood (Missenden) 300 
Waddesdon Hill .. ..200 
Waddesdon .. .. zoo 
Wycombe : Bridge-st. . . 400 



Cambridgeshire. 

Bottisham Lode . . . . 400 
Chatteris :— 

Hive-lane 

Cottenham : Rook's-lane 700 

Dry Drayton 150 

Elsworth 250 

Kirtling 

Littleport 

Mepal (U^ 150 

Oakington 230 

Stretham (Ely) . . . . 350 

Sutton (Ely) 400 

Whittlesea:— 
Gracious-street .. 350 
Windmill-street .. 300 
Wilburton 220 



Cheshire. 

Birkenhead, Clifton-park.. 
Cheadle Hulme, Grove- 
lane 250 



Chester '.— 




Hamilton-place 


.. 300 


Lymm : — 




Cherry-lane 


.. 150 


Higher-lane . . 


.. 150 


MiUington .. 


• • •• 



Derbyshire. 

Charlesworth (Man- 
chester) 300 

Windley 100 

Devonshire. 

Ashburton 

Atherington (Bamstple) lao 

Aveton Gifford 

*Brent, South .. .. 50 
Harbeton Ford, Zion's- 

hill 100 

Littlehill (Chapelton) . . . . 

Plymouth: York-street 300 
Swimbridge .. .. .. 50 

Tawstock 

Eastcombe 

HiscoU 

Lovacott 

Durham. 

Jarrow, Grange-road . . 750 
Hebbum, New Town . • 

Essex. 

Billericay 

Braintree: Albert-road 
Chesterford 



200 
TOO 



LIST OF CHAPELS. 



295 



LIST OF CHAPELS—coHtinutd. 



Kpping IOC 

Halstead: Head-street 250 
Harwich, King's Head- 
street 350 

Mersea, East 

Saffron Walden :— 

London-road .. .. 350 
Sible Hedingham :-^ 
Old Chapel . . . . 400 
Swan-street .. .. 300 

Newtown 

Southminster .. .. 200 

Tillingham .. .. .. 200 

White Colne . . . . 150 

Witham 250 

Yeldham, Great . . . . 300 

Gloucestershire. 

Acton Turville .. .. 90 
Bristol: West-street .. 130 
Cubberley: F.benezer.. aoo 
Hawkesbury Upton . . 200 
Maiseyhampton .. ..120 
Nallsworth Tabernacle 380 

Hampshire. 

•Barton Cliff (U.) 

(Ljrmington) .. .. 220 

Basingstoke 150 

Hedge End (Botley) .. .. 

Long Parish 

Portsmouth: Salem .. 200 

Wallop 200 

GraieUy xoo 

Yateley: Cricket Hill.. 100 

Hertfordshire. 

Hertford : Park- street . . 270 
Hitchin : — 

Queen-street, Bethel 

Redboume: Zion .. 200 

Stevenage 300 

Tring: Chapel-street.. 300 

Walkem 120 

Ware: New-road.. .. 50 
Watford, Queen's-road, 

Mount Zion . . . . 2x0 



Huntingdonshire. 

Alconbury Weston . . 150 

Ellington, Jireh . . . . 220 
Godmanchester : — 

Cambridge-street .. 500 

Needingworth .. .. 350 



St. Ives:— 

Crown-yard .. .. 350 

Woodhurst .. .. 230 

Yaxley (U.) 250 

Jiieh 150 

Kent. 

Ashford: Norwood-st.. X20 

Bethersden (U.) 

Cranbrook xoo 

Egerton Fostal . . . . aoo 
Gravesend, Windmill- 
street 750 

Hadlow 200 

Hailing 107 

Matfield Grn.( Brenchley)40o 
Pembury (U) .. .. 209 

Aiders 

Ramsgate : — 

Camden-road .. .. 350 
Ryarsh (Maidstone) . . 125 

Sellinge (Hythe) 

Sheemess-on-Sea : — 
Mile Town, Russell-st. 200 
Minster . . . . . . 250 

Smarden, Tilden. . . . 330 

Staplehurst 400 

Sturry (Canterbury) . . . . 
Tenterden : 2nd Church . . 
Tunbridge Wells :— 
Hanover-road .. .. 400 

Lancashire. 

Accrington : — 
Blackburn-road, Zion 300 
Frederick-street .. 300 
Peel-street, Ebenezer . . 

Burnley : — , 

Boot-street, Jireh . . 200 

Freetown (Bury) . . . . 400 

Heywood : — 
*Starkye-8treet .. 250 

Hindley (Wigan) . . 150 

Liverpool : — 

Cazneau-street 

Kirkdale, Sharon Hall 850 
Shaw-street .. .. 600 
Waterloo 

Love Clough (Rawtenstall) 

Manchester : — 
Patricroft. Byron-st. . , 150 
Rochdale-road.. .. 900 

Nateby (Garstang) . . 200 

Pemberton (Wigan) . . 150 

Pendlebury (Manchester). . 

Preston, Vauxhall-rd. 350 



Rochdale, Hope . . . . 700 

Fishwick-strut 

Warrington, Leigh-st. 250 

Leicestbbshirb. 

Cropstone 

Knipton (Grantham) .. 100 

Leicester : — 
Erskine-street, Zion 
Newark-street . . . . 400 
St. Peter'8-lane . . 400 

•Lutterworth 

Queniborough .. .. 100 

Wigston Magna . . . . 80 

Lincolnshire. 

•Billingboro': Bridge-st. 150 

Billingnay 

Boston : — 
Liquorpond-st.,Eben. 170 

Whyberton 

Deeping Market 

Eckmgton, Bank-st . . xoo 

Pinchbeck 300 

Quadring 150 

Sleaford, New 

Sleaford, Old . . . . 150 
Swineshead .. i, .. aoo 



Metropolitan. 

Bethnal Green-rood . . 850 
Hope Town HaU . . . . 
Bishopsgate : — 

Artillery-street.. .. 300 
Bow, Botolph-road . . 225 
Brixton : St. Anne's-rd. . . 
Brompton : — 

Grove Chapel .. .. 

Camden Town : — 

Pratt-st, Avenue . . . • 
Clapham : — 

Wirtemberg-st . . .. 350 
Clerkenwell : — 

Spencer-street . . . . X50 

*Clerkenwell-road .. 350 
Euston-sq, Gower-st . . 800 
Hoxton : — 

Newton-street .. ..150 
Kilbum Vale, Ebeuezer aoo 
King's-cross : — 

Lavina-grove .. .. xao 
Marylebone : — 

Riding House-street, 
Rehoboth 



996 



LIST OP CHAPELS. 



LIST OF CHAPELS— con/tift»«l. 



Nunhead Green 

Paddington : — 

Harrow-road, Beulah 120 
Peckham : — 

Gordon-road .. .. 200 
Tootin^-grove : — 

Providence .. ,. X20 
Tottenham, Manor-road xoo 
Victoria-park : — 

*Parnell-road .. 450 

Whitechapel :— 

Zoar 600 

Winchmore-hill .. .. 90 



Middlesex. 

'Crantord 250 

Enfield Highway :— 

Pulteney-road .. ..150 
Hayes:— 

*Woodend Green . . 300 

Staines 180 

West Drayton, Money- 
lane 150 

Norfolk. 

Brooke 

Moulton 150 

Fomcett 120 

Salhouse (Norwich) . . 250 
Wortwell 150 

Northamptonshire. 

Earl's Barton : — 

Rehoboth 200 

Northampton : — 

Abington-street .. 550 

Oundle, Zion 

Rushden, Succoth . • 450 
Towcester : — 

North End 280 



Nottinghamshire. 

Broughton and Wil- 
loughby 340 

Kirkby Woodhouse . . 170 

Normanton 

Nottingham : — 
Whitemoor, Basford soo 



Shropshire. 
^.«udlow 



Somersetshire. 

Bath:— 

Widcombe 750 

Frome : — 

*Naish's-st.. Ebenezer400 
Horsington . . . . 300 
Laverton 120 



Staffordshire. 

'Chesterton 200 

Coseley : Coppice . . 350 

Gomal 

Rowley Regis 

*Tun8tall, Market-sq. . . 200 
Willenhall : New-road . . 
Wolverhampton : — 
Temple-street . . . . 200 



Suffolk. 



Barton Mills 500 

Ciowfield . . . . 220 

Kedington 250 

Saxmundham . . . . 200 
Walsham-le-Willows .. 450 

Surrey. 

Brockham-green .. .. 200 
Croydon : — 

West-street .. .. 500 
Famham : — 

Park-lane 200 

Hungry-hill .. .. xoo 

Haslemere X30 

Horley, Victoria-road.. 150 
Hors^l Common.. .. X50 

Leatherhead 100 

Lingfield : — 
Plaistow-street.. .. 150 

*Merstham 250 

Redhill:— 
Station-road .. .. 300 
Reigate-road .. .. 260 
Richmond: Rehoboth 150 

Ripley X20 

Ripley-green xoo 



Sussex. 



Balcombe 

Brighton : — 
Bond-street, Salem. 



60 
830 



Dane Hill xoo 

Eastbourne : — • 

South-street 

Hastings : East Hill . . 600 
Horsham, New-street.. 150 

Mayfield x6o 

*MidhuFSt 200 

Southwick 

Wadhurst :— 

Pell Green 

Warwickshire. 

Birmingham : — 

* Hope-street .. .. 450 
Coventry : Rehoboth . . 300 
*Kenilworth 



Wiltshire. 

Aldbourne 80 

Avebury (Calne) 

Blunsden 

Bradford : xst Church 600 
Broughton Gifford . . . . 

Calne: Zion 

Chippenham : — 

High-street .. .. 30a 
Clack (Lyneham) .... 

Colerne 200 

Corsham : 2nd Church . . 
Crudwell (Cirencester) xoo 

Dauntsey 

Devizes, Salem . . . . 450 

Enford 

Hillmarton (Calne) .... 
Langley Fitzurse . . X50 
HuUavingtoH .. X50 
Marlborough .. .. 83 

Malmesbury 300 

Netheravon 300 

Ogbourne 150 

Rushall xoo 

Salisbury : — 

*Harcourt 280 

Sandy-lane 120 

Studley (Calne) . . . . 120 

Upavon .. 

Wootton Bassett . . . . seo 



Worcestershire. 



Bromsgrove : — 

Worcester-street . . 
*Buckridge Forest, 

Rock, near Bewdley 



Richmond-st., Ebenzr 600 | *Cradley, High-street . . 



250 



50 

200 



LIST OF CHAPELS. 



297 



LIST OF CHAPELS— con«»n««^. 



Dudley: Salop-street 

Oldbury 400 

Wythall Heath . . . . 200 

Yorkshire. 
Beverley : — 

Dyer-lane (Sc.) .. 250 
Bradford :— 

Darfield-street . . . . 200 
Halifax:— 

Butts Green .. ..126 

Siddal 500 

Haworth: Hall Green 500 

Kilham 300 

Leeds : St James's-st. 250 

Masborough 250 

Newbald 

•South Bank 

Thomhill(Dewsbury).. 240 



WALES. 



Glamorganshire. 

Cardiff:— 
Windsor-road, Zoar 



Swansea : — 

•Tontine-street 
Tirphil , 



FiFESHIRE. 

3<^ Newburgh 280 

' ' , Tayport . . 100 



Merionethshire. 
Llanfair, Caersalem 

(Sc.) 90 , 

Talsarnau (Sc.) .. .. 100 I 

Tanygrisiau (Sc.) . . 250 ' 

Trawsfynydd (Sc.) .. 120 1 



Monmouthshire. 
Caldicot 200 



Kincardineshire. 
•Luthermuir .. .. 60 

Perthshire. 

•Blair Athol X20 

•Glenlyon 



Renfrewshire. 
•Johnstone . . . . 



SCOTLAND. 

Aberdeenshire. 
St. Fergus 80 

Argyllshire. 
Lismore 



CHANNEL ISLANDS. 



Guernsey. 

Catel Landes . . . . 325 
St. Martin Fosse . . 250 



298 



SUMHARY OF STATISTICS. 



FOR 



SUMMARY OF STATISTICS 
ENGLAND, WALES, SCOTLAND, IRELAND, 
CHANNEL ISLANDS, ETC. 

These figures include the Sutistics from only such Baptist Churches— associated and 
non-associated— AS have sent returns for the year 1896. except that the Chapels and 
Sittings on pages 294—197 are given here. 

ENGLAND (excluding Monmouthshire). 



Bedfordshire ... 

Berkshire 

Backinghamshire 
Cambridgeshire.. 

Cheshire 

Cornwall 

Cumberland 

Derbyshire 

Devonshire 

Dorsetshire 

Durham 

Essex 

Gloucestershire ... 

Hampshire 

Herefordshire ... 
Hertfordshire ... 
H untingdonshire 

Kent 

Lancashire 

Leicestershire ... 

Lincolnshire 

Metropolitan 

Middlesex 

Norfolk 

Northamptonshire 

Northumberland 

Nottinghamshire 

Oxfordshire 

Rutlandshire 

Shropshire 

Somersetshire .. 
Staffordshire 

Suffolk 

Surrey 

Sussex 

Warwickshire .. 
Westmorland 

Wiltshire 

Worcestershire .. 
Yorkshire 



Totals 



30 
ax 
4t 
36 
3« 

13 

6 
33 
55 



Chapels. 



6z 
54 

z6 

8 



54 


78 


15 


U 


31 
X9 


u 


64 


xa7 


141 


i«9 


53 


90 


ar 


54 


aas 


336 


i6 


as 


41 


61 


5» 


8a 


8 


la 


4a 


55 


18 


41 


3 


4 


21 
51 


y 


35 


tt 


59 


31 
4^ 


79 


z 

4X 


a 


9b 


53 


136 


172 



Sittuijfs 

in 
Clupels. 



ai,i75 
10,230 

18,367 
22,777 
X3.399 
4»930 
2,z8o 
14,2x0 
36,105 
4.708 
10,650 
18.366 
36,141 

82,123 
5.630 
15.997 
13.190 
29,416 
84,196 
31,197 
I4,ZI2 

157.339 
5.320 

29,242 
24,021 

3,870 
20,894 

8,070 

900 
7,140 

22,320 
17,285 
29,691 

12.739 
13.093 
a9.37i 
700 
20,2x3 
z 2,800 
78.449 



3.509 
24*6 
3.036 

807 

563 

3.549 

'td 

a,8o4 
a,8is 
10.21 1 
5.575 

X,X22 
3400 

7,296 
21,892 
7.948 
2463 
49.695 
1,254 
3469 
5,874 
1,307 
5,609 
1.845 
133 
X.179 
4.797 
3,165 
5.744 

2r435 

2,374 

83 

'3.974 

2,387 

20,670 



Sundty- 
School 
Teachers 



551 

404 
636 
608 

% 

129 
724 
970 
130 

121 

f§ 

1.249 
3.805 
1,482 

6,444 
242 

1,168 
312 
31 

£3 

^5 
463 

375 

••'?! 

763 

630 

4,426 



Sunday 
Scholars. 



5,715 
3.795 
4.705 
6.oo< 
5.231 
1,825 
1.235 
8,2x9 
9.764 
1451 
5.158 
4.721 

'7.859 
7.700 
X.164 
5.5a4 
1,5x0 

»2,390 

40,913 

X4.977 
4,228 

78,045 
2,705 
5.532 

X 1,810 
2,085 

10,697 

1.715 
9.565 
6,928 
7.MO 
4.658 
3.398 
17,573 
146 
6,170 
5.750 
34.241 



Anglesey ... .■• 


36 


Brecknockshire... 


36 


Cardiganshire ... 


22 


Carmarthenshire 


77 


Carnarvonshire ... 


37 


Denbighshire ... 


50 


Flintshire 


24 


Glamorganshire... 


a57 


Merionethshire ... 


20 


Montgomeryshire 


22 


Pembrokeshire... 


63 


Radnorshire 


25 


Monmouthshire... 


107 


Totals ... 


776 



1,704 2,770 902,588 216,650 36,928 375,570 

WALES AND MONMOUTHSHIRE. 

8,981 2,117 

2,402 

2,192 

14.250 



Local 
Prchrs. 


^ 


Bapdms. 


.?i 


26 


"3 


17 


"3 


X27 


M 


X13 


73 


30 


xa9 


52 


n 


117 


a3 


43 


u^ 


i 


5a 


89 


u 


19a 


a»3 


ao6 


16 


.§ 


79 


74 


ao3 


52 


27 


ao5 


a43 


48 


633 


"3 


38 


390 


33 


13 


36 


100 


ax 


X27 


18 


13 


8 


206 


49 


391 


304 


"i 


957 


"7 


286 


4§ 


2a 

190 


ia4 
a,2 5 


i' 


14 


121 


H 


31 


x'S 


1x8 


44 


264 


y 


6 

2X 


81 

411 


94 


xa 


55 


3 


X 


2- 


47 


XX 


49* 


57 


36 


186 


g 


ao 


138 


47 


215. 


46 


as 

23 


[^ 


34 


357 


xo 


X 


3 


xoa 


17 


161 


80 


22 


143 


19a 


93 


765 


3.895 


i.a39 


10,033 



38 

40 
23 
91 

27 

a3 
75 



11.040 
8,070 
35,233 
12.476 
13,736 
4.540 
135,966 
5.526 

37,636 

5.750 

51.517 



86z , 326,091 



2,539 

3.685 

746 

41.371 
1,213 
1.653 

10,42a 
2,179 

14.858 

99.627 



277 
232 
X02 



207 
595 

221 

186 
797 
159 



10.267 



a.313 


a3 


13 


2,431 


8 


20 


xo^i^x 


5 

33 
39 


XZ 


5.42a 


32 


ax 


1.099 


5 


8 


t^i 


"1 


195 
9 


1.758 


XX 


9 


7468 


22 


39 


1,718 


13 


14 


ao,o86 


75 
441 


71 


[07,0x8 


476 



?! 
78 
560 

no 
ao9 
47 

65 
443 

XX2 
641 



SUMMARY OF STATISTICS. 



299 



SUMMARY OF STATISTICS— cofi«n««rf. 
SCOTLAND. 



Counties. 


Chrchs. 


Chapels. 


.Sittings 

In 
Chapels. 


Members 


Scho<H 
Teachers 


Sunday 
Schotars. 


Local 


Pastors Baptisms. 


Aberdeenshire ... 


6 




a.a48 


950 


83 


^ 


5 




48 


Argyllshire 


a 




6zo 


146 


II 






9 


Ayrshire 




S 


i,3ao 


226 


42 


348 


4 




II 


Banffshire 






900 


^ 






2 






Buteshire 






600 


14 


65 








Caithness-shire ... 






960 


154 


3> 


351 


I 




2 








500 


'2 


23 


190 


3 




18 


Dumbartonshire 






1,380 


52 


419 


II 




45 








X 


C2 


5 


40 








Edinburghshire ... 


9 




1,673 


16^ 


z,6oo 


5 


10 


124 


Fifeshire 

Forfushire 


1 




3.670 


1;!66 


X18 


'•^ 


23 
25 




it 


Kincardineshire . . . 






... 














ao 




8.707 


4.81 1 


5x3 


5.295 


65 


23 


377 


Morayshire 




■ 


1,250 


382 


33 


265 


4 




15 


Peebles-shire ... 








15 


3 


30 






4 


Perthshire 






9.046 


457 


27 


250 


4 




35 


Renfrewshire ... 






3.100 


1.C64 


119 


948 


12 




47 


Roxburghshire ... 
Selkirkshire ... 






640 
810 


211 

5«3 


33 
72 


218 
503 


5 
15 




17 
27 


Sdrlingshire ... 






975 


350 


37 


317 


4 




14 


Orkney Isles 




4 


550 


^ 


9 


76 








Shetland Isles ... 


4 


6 


1,030 


36 


346 


3 


1 


9 


Western Isles ... 


6 


xo 


1,500 


29* 


32 


204 


4 


'3 


Totols ... 


103 


137 


39.8a6 


14.907 


1.587 


14.458 


195 


103 


992 



Antrim ... 
Armagh... 
Cork ... 
Dcrry ... 
Donegal 
Down ... 
Dublin ... 
Kildare ... 
Limerick 
Tyrone ... 
Waterford 
Westmeath 



IRELAND. 
3,600 
550 
340 






130 




51 








25 












43 


















I 


6 


24 


368 



Totals 



Isle of Man ... 



England 

Wales and Mon- 
mouthshire .. 

Scotland 

Ireland 

Channel Islands.. 
Isle ot Man 



Totals of Report- 
ing Churches ... 



1.704 


3,770 


776 


861 


105 


137 


27 


34 


4 


6 


I 


I 


3,617 


3.809 



2,045 292 

ISLE OF MAN. 

300 ... I 

TOTALS. 

902,588 316,650 



I 

21 


"3 


18 
30 


22 


3 


48 



326,091 

39.826 

7,060 

2,045 

300 



99.627 

14.907 

2,491 

292 



10^167 
X.587 



375.570 3.<*95 

10^,018 441 

14.458 195 

3,107 92 

485 32 



1,239 

476 
103 
24 

3 
I 



10,033 

4.454 

2^ 

48 



1,277.9x0 333.967 49.079 499.638 4.645 ' 1.845 15.795 
(See next page for Grand Totals.) 



SUMMARY OF STATISTICS. 



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PART VII. 



ARCHITECTURAL. 



I.— DESCRIPTIONS AND ILLUSTRATIONS OF NEW 
CHAPELS, &c. 



ILDERTON ROAD CHAPEL. BERMONDSEY. S.E. 



This is the Chapel for 1894 of the London Baptist Association, and is situated 
in the midst of a dense population, mainly of the working classes. The 
internal dimensions are 49 feet wide by 59 feet long, including two front 
entrance lobbies to the ground floor and two side entrances and staircases to 
the galleries on three sides of the chapel. The total seating accommodation 
is for over 700. The roof is in three spans, and the central span is carried up 
higher than the sides, with clerestory windows and an open timber roof. The 
front has two bold arched doorways surmounted by stone moulded pediments, 
and flanked by two pilasters carried up as pinnacles on either side of the 
central gable, which has a bold two light stone tracery window in the centre, 
with a single light on each side. This gable is flanked by staircase wings with 
return gables at the sides. All the gables have moulded brick cornices finished 
with stone coping. The contract was let to Messrs. Battley, Sons & Holness 
for /3,777. The architect is Mr. George Baines, F.R.I.B.A., 4. Great Win- 
chester-street, London. E.C. 



HEATON CHAPEL, BRADFORD. 



Minister — R. Howarth. 



The site for the new chapel was secured and paid for so far back as 
1886. Plans were subsequently obtained by open competition, and about a 
dozen Bradford architects and several from a distance sent in designs. In 
September. 1893, the old chapel was removed, and from the foundation, some 



302 



ARCHITECTURAL. 



Stone of good colour, suitable for the outside walls of the new building, was 
quarried. The cost of the new building; exclusive of land and some material 
supplied by the trustees, is about £3*500. The contracts, including boundary 
walls, flagging. &c., have been let tor /'3,447. Towards this sum the Building 
Committee have had promised or have received /i,2oo. The property is 
very valuable, comprising nearly 10,000 square yards of land, and including 
the burial-ground, the Sunda) school, and the chapel. The new building is 
in the Gothic style of architecture. It was designed by Mr. John Jackson, of 
Bradford, and is of commanding aspect. It is at the junction ot Highpite 
and Leylands-lane. and the architect has specially sought to keep the whole 
of the rooms above the levd of the street. On the ground floor there is a 
mortuary chapel, with a minister's vestry and a mortuary for use in connec- 
tion with the cemetery. On the same floor there are also two large general 




class-rooms, two cloak-rooms, a young men's class-room and a young women's 
class-room, a heating chamber, and stairs for access to the chapel floor level. 
The chapel is 60 feet long, 44 feet wide, and the height about 32 feet. There 
are a large front entrance, a vestibule, and a gallery over the vestibule, with 
staircases in the wings. The seating of the chapel is on the circular principle. Oa 
one side there is a minister's vestry, and on the other side a deacons' vestry, and 
there are men's and women's vestries for use at baptisms. All the interior 
wood-work is of pitch pine, stained and varnished, with an open timber roof. 
The building is of stone, with ashlar dressings. The contracts were let as 
follows : — Mason's work, Mr. Thomas Patefield, Manningham ; joiner's work, 
Messrs. Foster & Fortune, Ingrow; plumber's work, Sc. Mr. Job Wood ; 
slater's work. Mr. James Smithies ; plasterer's work, Messrs. C. Howroyd 
& Sons ; painter's work. Mr. Walker Priestley. Allerton. 



ARCHITECTURAL. 



303 



SPLOTT ROAD CHAPEL, CARDIFF. 



Paitor—C. H. Watkins. 



This chapel has been recently erected in a very commanding position 
at the comer of Splott-road and Railway-street, Splottlands, Cardiff. It is 
in what is chiefly a working-class district, very thickly populated and 
increasing rapidly. For some years thie congregation had been worshipping 
in a schoolroom now at the rear of the new cli^pel. Messrs. Habershon & 
Fawckner, of 39. Bloomsbury-square, London, W.C., and Pearl-street, Cardiff, 



^ ^ 







prepared plans and specifications in June, 1894. The tender of Messrs. 
Lattey & Co. was accepted at /4.378, but subsequently it was decided to 
add some additional classrooms, which increased the cost. The building 
is in the Gothic style of architecture, and is of local stone faced with Bath 
stone. Two turrets carried up on either side of the main entrance form the 
orincipal feature. The seating capacity is 1,100. i.e.. for 616 on the ground 
fljor, and 48^ in the gallery, which is on three sides of the chapel. At the 
opposite end from the entrances is a handsome rostrum with a baptistery in 
front, which is supplied with hot and cold water. The chapel is heated 
throughout with hot water. There is a lecture hall to seat 150, a minister's 
vestry and eight classrooms. Provision is also made tor an organ at the 
back of the rostrum. 



304 



ARCHITECTURAL. 



WALKERS ROAD CHURCH. CARDIFF. 



Minittif — T. Morgan. 



The new chapel, the coDtract price of which is ;f 2,560. will accoinmodate 
800 worshippers. Messrs. Habershon & Fawckner are the architects, and 
Mr. George Haywood, Moorland-gardens, is the contractor. The building 




will be mainly of blue local stone, with Bath stone dressings. An'octagonal 
turret at the junction of the two streets in which the building [will have 
frontages, will be an attractive feature. 



ARCHITECTURAL. 



305 



ANNADALE ROAD CHURCH, CHISWICK. 



Pastor. — A. G. Edgerton. 



The new church is to be erected oq the site now occupied by the iron 
building. Unfortunately it is restricted, and therefore the schools and class- 
rooms must be in the basement. Accommodation can be provided in the 
church for 493 adults, or a mixed congregation of 625 persons, and in the 




schools and classrooms for 300 children. The buildings will consist of 
church, assembly room, two vestries, aod five classrooms, together with 
lavatories. &c., &c. The material to be used is brick, with stone drrasings, 
and the internal ^fittings are to be of pitch pine. The church will have a 
gallery at one end and on the two sides, witn the choir gallery on a lower 
level behind the pulpit. The organ will be placed in a comer with arched 



306 ARCHITECTURAL. 



gs into the choir gallery and into the side gallery, an arrangement very 

ffective in appearance and in saving of space. The cost is estimated to he 
/2,75o, exclusive of architect's fees. The architect is Mr. John Wills. F.S.Sc., 
Derby and London. 



WEST STREET SCHOOLS, CREWE. 



Pastor. — W. Hughes. 



Thbsb buildings are erected on part of a site in West -street, where it is 
proposed ultimately to erect a chapel for the use of the Victoria-street 
congregation. The plan allows of the opening of two rooms (a lecture room 
and a classroom), one on each side of the rostrum, into the assembly room, 
while all the other rooms are entirely separated by brick walls. This ensures 
perfect isolation and quietness— conditions necessary to successful Sunday 
School work. There are an assembly room, a lecture room, six classrooms. 




a library, a kitchen and a lavatory, together with the usual offices, and ample 
accommodation is provided for 550 scholars. The premises are light and 
airy, and are warmed with hot water. Special provision is made for ingress and 
egress. The boys can assemble apart from the girls, and the junior separately 
from the senior scholars. There is direct communication between every room 
and the porches and lobbies, and thence to the street. The cost, exclusive of 
architect's fees, is ;f 1,350. The architect is Mr. John Wills, F.S.Sc, of Derby 
and London, and the builder is Mr. Gresty, of Willaston, Nantwich. 



WOOLWICH LOWER ROAD CHAPEL, EAST GREENWICH. 



Pastor— V/. E. Wells. 



This chapel is now being erected upon a corner site in Woolwich Lower- 
road. Its internal dimensions are 48 feet wide by 68 feet long, including front 
entrance lobbies and two staircases to the galleries which are on three sides 
of the chapel. It will accommodate about 520 persons on the ground floor, 
and 410 in the galleries ; total. 930. The roof will be in a single span. There 
will be bold three-light windows at the sides of the chapel, under and over 
the galleries, and the upper windows are to be semicircular-headed. In the 
front gable there will be a handsome stone three-light window, with a single 
light on either side of it. and bold pilasters terminating in pinnacles. Each 
window will have tinted leaded lights. The staircase roofs will have 







3 
o 
o 

C 



2 

Si 



s3 

if4 









ARCHITECTURAL. 



307 



battlemented parapets. The main entrances are in the centre of the front 
gable and consist of two boldly-arched double doors, between pilasters, and 
surmounted by a moulded pediment with carved spandrel. The baptistery 
will be lined with white glazed tiles. The facing of the chapel will be of 
stock bricks, with stone bands and dressings, and the bunding will be 
surrounded by dwarf walls, with wrought-iron railings and gates. There are 
two vestries, a kitchen, and a heating chamber. The heating will be by hot- 
water pipes, and the chapel will be well ventilated. The contract is taken by 
Mr. I. Barden, of Maidstone, at jfs.ygo. The architect is Mr. George 
Baines, F.R.I.B.A., 4 Great Winchester-street, London, E.G. 



CAMPSBOURNE MISSION CHAPEL, HORNSEY, N. 



Minister— C. Brown. 



This freehold chapel ^which is in connection with the Ferme Park Church| 
is^uilt at the comer of the Gampsboume.and Pembroke-roads. The total 
length of the building is 66 feet by 29 feet wide, and accommodation is 




provided in the body of the chapel for 250, and in the gallerv for fifty, 
worshippers. The back of the ffallery can be curtained off and used as a 
class-room, 23 feet by 15 feet. There is another classroom of similar size at 
the opposite end of the building, to seat fifty persons, and beneath it (on the 
ffrouna floor) are a minor classroom, a vestry, and a kitchen. The building 
b well lighted by means of large windows at the sides, and also from the 
roof. The ventilation is by inlet tubes on the Tobin principle, with hinged 
lids or valves for closing, and an " exhaust " in the roof. The premises are 

u a 



308 ARCHITECTURAL. 



efficiently warmed on Neville's patent high-pressure system with small bore 
pipes. The internal faces of the walls are plastered, the roofs are boarded 
and stained, and the windows are filled in with tinted lead glazing ; the gallery 
front, vestibufe. and other pannelled woodwork are painted in suitable tones, 
and the floor is of pitch-pme wood-block paving. There is a large central 
light, and there are wrought iron ornamental gas brackets on the walls, &c. 
The seats, vrhct are of pitch-pine, are movable. Ample cupboard and other 
fittings are provided. The exterior of the building is of red brick and 
stucco, finished with stone dash, and the roofs are covered with green slate 
The principal front has a stone entrance i)orch, and the^ gable is filled in with 
timber framing. The whole has a pleasing efifect, and, although possessing 
no strikingly ornate architectural features, everything accords with the 
purpose for which the building is designed. The arclutect is Mr. G. A. 
Foster, of Tottenham, under whose supervision the work has been carried out by 
Messrs. John Willmott & Sons, of Homsey and Hitchin, at a total cost of ;f 1,300. 
A friend has lent /700, free of interest, for seven years, and the balance has 
been almost extinguished by donations and by an amount which had 
accumulated for the purchase of the fireehold, before the work passed into the 
hands of the Church at Ferme Park. 



CLUMBER STREET CHAPEL. LONG EATON. 



Minister — E. Wbbb. 

This building consists of chapel 50 ft. by 32 ft. and 26 ft. high, two class- 
rooms, two vestries, lobby, platform and baptistery under the platform, with 
necessary outbuildings. It is of the modem style of architecture, and is faced 
with red dressed brick and stone dressings, and slated roof. The inside is 
similarly treated, and is picked out in white brick. There is an open roof 
with framed principals. A wood dado to window-sill level is continued round 
the inside of the chapel. The woodwork and the fittings are of rich stained 
deal. The lighting is effected by means of large square-headed windows filled 
in with obscure glass. There are also four dormer windows in the roof. This 
building will eventually be used as a schoolroom, as further ground has 
been reserved for a chapel on a more extensive scale. The building \kas 
designed by Mr. Ernest R. Ridgway , of Long Eaton, and Mr. Youngman was 
the contractor. 



LONDON ROAD CHURCH, LOWESTOFT. 



Paitor—J. M. Hamilton. 

A COMMANDING site facing London-road, has been purchased on which it is 
proposed to erect the new chapel from the designs of Mr. George Baxnes. 
F.R.I.B.A., 4 Great Winchester-street. London, E.C. The building wiU seat 
450 persons on the ground floor, and about 150 in the gallery over the front 
end of the chapel and the choir gallery behind the pulpit. The seats will be 
arranged in a semi-circular plan, so that the whole coujg^regation will directly 
face the minister. There will be a nave and aisles divided by columns and 
brick arches, with clerestory windows above. Two spacious entrances will 
be provided in the front, and in the rear there will Be an entrance to the 
lecture hall and the two vestries on the ground floor, with stairs to the choir, 
the organ gallery, and two classrooms above. There will also be a class- 
room over one and a cloak-room over the other, front lobby. The internal 
dimensions of the chapel are 49 feet wide by 59 feet long, with 15 feet 



THE NEW YORK 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 



A6T0R, LENOX AND 
TILDE N FOUNDATIONS. 



5C^' 






I 



ARCHITECTURAL. 



309 



additional length for the organ-chamber which will be open to the chapel 
under a bold moulded arch. The baptistery is to be lined with white glazed 
tiles, and the heating will be by hot-water pipes. Fresh air inlet flues and 
foul air exit ventilators will be provided. The estimated cost is ;f 3,100. 
The front will be of split flints, with red brick dressings and stone sparingly 
used. The style is decorated Gothic, simply treated. 



WARWICK STREET CHURCH. LEAMINGTON. 



MinisUr^A. Phillips. 



The improvements and additions recently carried out were elaborate and 
extensive. The schoolroom, which has been urgently needed for years, is a 
handsome structure. The open wooded roof and sides are lined with 
varnished pitch pine. The length is 45 ft., and the width z6 ft. On the 
ground floor at the south end of the schoolroom is the infants' classroom, 21 ft. 




in length and 13 ft. in width. Adjoining this, ladies*, deacons', and minister's 
vestries have been built. These, with the exception of the minister's, have 
been arranged for l»ptismal purposes. In the basement a new kitchen, 
lavatories, and heating chamb^ have been constructed, while upstairs, on 
either side of the organ chamber, are the church vestry and the ladies' 
vestry. Intemallv, the chapel has been almost reconstructed. A handsome 
apse nas been built at the south end of the building, in which the organ and 
thechoir stalls have been placed. Formerly the organ faced the preacher 
and blocked up the prindpal window. About one hundred additional sittings, 
which were greatly needed, have been provided, and also new gas-fittings. 
The interior has been decorated with bright and cheerful tints. The whole 



3IO 



ARCHITECTURAL. 



of the premises is heated with a high-pressure hot-water system. Messrs. 
Ingall & Son, Birmingham, were the architects, and Messrs. Small wood & Co., 
of woolen, Wawen, were the bailders. The total cost was abont :f 1.735, and 
the present debt is about /850. 

PRITCHARD MEMORIAL CHURCH. LLANGOLLEN. 



Pastor^H. Rsbs. 



The new building, which occupies a very comnumding site near the railway 
station, is designed in the Early Gothic style. It b built of Rnabon brick, 
with Monk's Park stone dressings. It is 54 feet 6 inches long and 30 feet 8 inches 
wide inside, and seats 233 adults or a mixed congregation of 310 persons. A 
schoolroom, which opens into the church at right angles, provides a hundred 







additional sittings, or a total of 410. The plan of the church consists of 
nave with chancel and organ chamber. In the chancel is placed the baptistery. 
It is open, lined with marble, and fenced with pitch pine Gk>thic balustrading. 
The pews are of pitch pine with solid bencn ends. The pulpit is idso of 
pitch pine. The roof is partially open, with arched timbenng, and a pitch 
pine ceiling. The front nas a gable with a four-light window and traioery, 
flanked on one side with tower and spire rising to 70 feet. There is one door- 
way in the tower and one in the opposite flank, and at the sides of the chut^ 
there are single light-pointed windows. The windows throughout are of 
cathedral glass, in special designs, and all are memorial gifts. There are 
two vestries and lavatories, and there is space at the rear for a caretaker's 
lodge. The plan for this is drawn, but the cost is not included in the present 
contract, which is for /x.900, exclusive of architect's fees. The architect is 
Mr. John Wills. F.S.Sc., of Derby and London, and the builder is Mr. W. H. 
Thomas, of Oswestry. 



ARCHITECTURAL. 



3" 



GRACEY MEMORIAL CHURCH, NEW SOUTHGATE N. 



Pastor— G. Freeman. 




The style of the new building will be Gothic, and the material, brick with 
stone dressings. The front will have a main gable and a handsome four-light 
wUidow with geometrical tracerv. This will be flanked on the left with a 
dwarf tower and on the right with a tower and spire, each containing a main 



312 



ARCHITECTURAL. 



entrance door, porch, and stairs to gallery. The spire will terminate at 
eighty feet above the street level. The plan of the chnrch is cruciform, with 
nave, transepts and chancel. In addition to an organ chamber, there are 
two large vestries with lavatories, &c. There is a g^Iery at one end, and. 
the tot^ accommodation will be for 647 adults, or for a mixed congregation 
of 860 persons. The roof is partially open, with arched timbers and a ceiling 
of pitch pine. The chancel arch is richly moulded and supported with carved 
corbels. The side windows will be pointed and the chancel window will be 
circular with geometrical tracery, and the windows throughout will be glazed 
with rolled cathedral glass in leadwork of special design. The seating and 
the pulpit will be of pitch pine. The cost, exclusive of architect's fees, is 
expected to be /3.000. The architect is Mr. John Wills, F.S.Sc., of Derby 
and London. 



WOODBOROUGH ROAD CHURCH, NOTTINGHAM. 



Minister—G. H. Jambs. 

The general style of the new building may be described as arch-round 
Gothic. The chapel is erected over the schoolrooms built seventeen years 




ago. Consequently the old lines have governed, and to some extent ham- 
pered, the planning of the new structure. But the difficuhies of fitting 
the new work to the old structure have been successfully overcome without 
sacrificing in any way the convenience of either the school or the chapel, and 
the result, so far as the plan is concerned, is a nave of seven bays, divided 
from aisles of slightly unequal width by iron columns which support a semi- 
circular arcade and clerestory. One end, that next to Alfred-street, is a 
portion of a many-sided polygon, and the other is a semi-octagon containing 



ARCHITECTURAL. 



313 



the cboristry and platform, with the pulpit in the centre and the organ 
behind. The choir is slightly elevated on either side of the jpulpit, and there 
is room for about forty persons. The roof of the choristry is circular. The 
pulpit is of wood, and just in front is the baptistery. There is rather a novel 
feature about the baptistery, in that there is a passage into the dressing-rooms 
through a door beneath the pulpit, and therefore no need for candidates to 
ascend into the open chapel. There are galleries over the aisles and one at 
the end opposite the pulpit which provide 284 sittings. Five new class-rooms 
have been added in connection with the school, and three of the old class- 
rooms have been enlarged and improved. In length the chapel occupies the 




whole site and is 109 feet, and the width inside is 49 feet. It will accom- 
modate 990 worshippers. There are ample exits and staircases of fireproof 
construction. The main entrances are from the comer of Woodborough-road 
and from Alfred-street. All the doors open outwards, and each entrance 
leads to every department of the church. The main ceilings are boarded and 
stained and varnished, as is also the interior woodwork. The walls inside are 
of red brick, relieved with blue and buff bricks in bands. Nearly all the 
windows will have small squares of glass of suitable tints in lead work. 
Those over the Woodborough-road side gallery are of stone tracery having 
iron casements. The windows on the opposite side, facing the Co-operative 
Stores, are not so elaborate. The principal feature of the exterior is an 



314 ARCHITECTURAL. 



octagonal tower aboat ninety feet high at the juncture of the four roads, 
four sides of which are occupied by a clock £aoe in the upper part. Red 
brick relieved with blue brick bands is used for the exterior, but the plinth is 
of rock-faced Derbyshire stone with terra cotta bands. The roof is of red 
tiling. At the Alfred-street end is a lobby connecting the two principal 
entrances. The entrance to the school is by a flight of steps at the comer of the 
two roads. The light In the school is provided as before, and additional light 
is obtained from Alfred-street. There are nine class rooms altogether, besides 
minister's and deacons' vestries. The plans have been prepared by Mr. 
Watson Fothergill, of Clinton-street. 



FAR COTTON CHAPEL. NORTHAMPTON. 



MinUUr—K. A. Sblby. 



This chapel, which will be an ornament to the district, was built from 
plans prepared by Mr. Stevenson and Mr. Dorman, A.R.I.B.A., Demgate, 
Northampton. New Duston stone, from Mr. Goldby's quarries, has been 
used. Including the windows and tracery, the style is Perpendicular Gothic. 
A view of the building suggests an English parish church, minus the tower 
and steeple. The mam entrance fronts Abbey-road, from which the chapel is 
recessed a few feet, and protected by a dwarf wall and ornamental iron railing. 
Above the entrance is a gallery ; the platform over the baptistery and tSe 
pulpit and organ chamber are at the other end. Two choir gaUtfies flank 
the organ, and on one side is a second gallery for members of the congregation. 
The floor, laid with solid wood blocks, slopes towards the pulpit end, and 
gives the worshippers a fuller and more comfortable view of the preacher. 
The windows are glazed in lead, with tinted cathedral glass, and the open 
timbered roof is tiled. By the side are the schoolrooms, including a large 
assembly room, and a number of daaarooms. This rairt of the building is 
treated like the chapel, though it is not so ornate. The classrooms for the 
boys and girls are all on the first floor, the infants' classrooms are on the 
ground floor behind the chapel. In all, ei^ht classrooms are provided. The 
floors of the large hall are laid with solid blocks, and this portion of the 
buUdiag will be practically fireproof. There are also kitchens and other 
offices, and the place will be heated with hot water. The chapel— the internal 
dimensions of which are 70^ ft. by 37 ft. — ^will seat about five hundred 
worshippers, the hall measures 40 ft. by 21} ft., and the schools will accom- 
modate about six hundred children. Mr. William Heap is the builder, and 
the cost, including site, is about /3,5oo. 



PLASSEY STREET CHAPEL, PENARTH. 



MinisUr^VJ, G. Davibs. 



This chapel is in the Italian Renaissance style of architecture. The dressings 
are of Box ground Bath stone, with intermediate spaces of Newbridge paving 
cuts. The floor is approached by two flights of steps above the pavement, 
and the building is entered by three sets of teak doon. The porch is divided 
from the chapel with a wood-paiielled screen, and the upper panels are fitted 
with ornamental glass. Adjoming the porch are two cloak-rooms, on each 
side of which are staircases to the galleries. The interior of the chapel has a 



3 1 6 ARCHITECTURAL. 



eallery on each side and one on the front. The three large front windows are 
fitted with stained glass lead lights designed specially to suit the style of 
architecture. The galleries are supported by cast-iron columns with carved 
ornamental caps, above which are semicircular arches supporting the 
clerestory. The clerestory is lighted by a series of semicircular windows 
with panelled pilasters dividing them. The building is ventilated by means 
of ornamental perforated centre flowers connected with extracting ventilators 
on the roof, and is decorated with richly-moulded plaster arches, friezes, and 
panelled work. A bold arch, 23 ft. diameter, divides the chapel from the 
orchestra (the ceiling of which forms a dome), in which is placed a large organ. 
The seating is framed in figured pitch pine» with panelled sloping backs. 
Foot rests, hat rails and book casing, with solid worked ends, are provided. 
The baptistery is on a raised platform in front of the rostrum, and is built 
of white glazed bricks with marble steps, and fitted with hot and cold water. 
The rostrum is richly designed, and made of teak and figured pitch pine ; it 
will accommodate twdlve persons in addition to the minister. On each side 
of the orchestra are vestries and lavatories. The chapel will accommodate 
a thousand persons and the orchestra will accommodate seventy sinsers. 
Underneath the chapel there are a large schoolroom and lecture hall, fifteen 
classrooms, library, kitchen, storeroom and room for heating apparatus. 
The kitchen is fitted up with every requisite for large or small tea meetings. 
The schoolroom is paved with wood block flooring, and together with the 
classrooms it will accommodate 700 scholars. The premises are heated by 
means of low-pressure hot-water pipes, supplemented with fireplaces in 
vestries and classrooms. The buildings were designed and carried out under 
the supervision of Messrs. Jones & Thomley, St. Mary-street. Cardiff, and 
Mr. D. G. Price, of Hickman-road. Penarth, was the contractor. 



STANWELL ROAD CHAPEL, PENARTH. 



Pastor — I. O. Stalberg. 



On nth September, 1895, ^^^ memorial stone of the new building was laid 
by Mr. F. H. Jotham, CC. The chapel is built of blue stone with Bath 
stone dressings, in the perpendicular Gothic style of architecture, and was 
designed by Messrs. J. P. Jones, Richards and Budgen, Cardiff. The 
principal features of tne front elevation are the entrance lobby and a 
large cusped window over the lobby, occupying nearly the whole of the gable, 
which is flanked by buttresses carried up above the roof and terminating in 
octagonal turrets surmounted with crocketted finials. At each side of the 
front gable are boldly conceived hipped wings slightly receding from the face 
of the lobby with a range of windows lighting the gallery. Internally the 
chapel is 49 ft. wide by 65 ft. long, excluding the choir chamber. There are 
490 sittings on the ground floor : and a minister's vestry, men and women's 
retiring rooms, smsdl lecture room, lavatories, &c., are arranged at the rear. 
The gadlery is across the front, over the entrance lobbies, and has ninet]^-four 
sittings. The total accommodation is therefore 38^ sittings. The building of 
side galleries is deferred for the present. The roof is in one span with opea 
framed trusses and chamfered collar beams, purlins. &c., and is ceiled with 
matchboarding. The aisles are laid with wood blocks and the lobbies with 
tiles. The former are on an incline from the entrance to the platform, in order 
that every person may easily see the minister. The chapel and lobbies are 
warmed by hot-water pipes. The baptistery is situated under the floor of the 
platform and is lined with glazed bricks in two colours. The retiring rooms 
are on the same level. The windows are glazed with cathedral glass in 



3'8 



ARCHITECTURAL. 



neutral tints, and the various shades in combination have a very pretty e£fect. 
Special attention has been given to the ventilation ; the fresh air is brought 
into the building by means of tubes built up in the walls, and the vitiated air 




is extracted by Banner's cowls fixed on the roof. At an angle of the site is a 
neat cottage for the caretaker. At the rear of the new chapel is the Sunday 
schoolroom, erected in 1887, with class-rooms added in 1889 and 1893, at a 
total cost of /i,222, which has been defrayed. Before the erection of the 
chapel the scnoolroom was used for public worship. The whole of the 
building operations in connection with the new chapel have been very satis- 
factorily carried out by Mr. Thomas Bevan, Contractor, Penarth. The cost 
of th^ chapel buildings, caretaker's cottage, front railings, heating apparatus. 
&c„ is ;f 3,328, so that the value of the whole property is /4.5SO. Tovrards 
this new effort the church and congregation had contribute, raised and 
promised, up to October 1895, about £1,500, of which ;^ 1,000 is already in 
nand. The site is one of the best in the town, on a main road, in a com- 
manding position, within sight of the railway station. The immediate 
nd^hbournood is a rapidly rising one, and comprises high-class private 
residences and the new Intermediate School, as well as a very promising 
populous Quarter ; and it is believed that the provision of a commodious and 
comfortable Baptist Chapel will meet with general acceptance on the part cf 
the residents and of the increasing number of visitors to this attractive 
seaside town. 



ARCHITECTURAL. 



319 



SOUTH WOODFORD CHAPEL, ESSEX 



Minister—]. R. Cox. 



The bite is in front of the existing School-Chapel in George- lane. The 
bailding will be in the Gothic of the thirteenth century, and will consist of a 
nave 62 ft. long, 35 ft. 6 in. wide, inside ; transepts, each measuring 13 ft. 6 in. by 
20 ft., and a chancel arrangement containing baptistery, &c., and on one side 




of the chancel an organ chamber. The chancel will be separated from the 
rave by a richly moulded arch and carved corbels. The front of the church 
will have a gabled central doorway, over which will be a handsome four-light 
tracery window flanked with buttresses, terminating with octagonal pinnacles. 
There will be entrances at the sides and rear, so that the provision for ingress 
and exit is very complete. The pewing will be all of pitch pine, with solid 
bench ends. There will be a gallery at the front end, with a pitch pine panel 



320 



ARCHITECTURAL. 



and cusped front. The windows throughout will be glazed with rolled 
cathedral tinted glass in squares and margins, with a special design for the 
chancel window, which is circular. There will be two vestries at the rear. 
The church will seat 464 adults or a mixed congregation of 620 persons. The 
cost of the undertaking, including the builder's contract and architect's fees, 
will be ;£2,55o. The architect is Mr. John Wills, of Derby and London ; the 
builder is Mr. Samuel J. Scott, of South Woodford. 



HAWTHORN ROAD CHAPEL, HILLSBOROUGH, SHEFFIELD. 



This chapel has recently been erected in the centre of therapidfy increasing 
population of Hillsborough, and occupies a prominent position at the comer 
of Hawthorn and Taplin roads. As the area of the site is limited, the building 
ha? been designed for two floors, the school to occupy the ground floor and 




the chapel the first floor. It is the lower portion which has just been com- 
pleted. The floor is rather below the level of the roads in order that the floor 
of the proposed* chapel, which will be approached by two broad external 
flights of stone steps, may not be too elevated. The present building is 
used for both school and chapel purposes. It is in the form of a square, 
measuring internally 46 feet by 46 feet, with the angles next the entrances cut 
ofi* so as to form a semi-octagonal end. In front, and opposite the angle 
formed by the two roads is a vestibule 30 feet by 6 feet, at eaich end of which 
is an entrance door. In the rear are two vestries communicating with the 
chapel by means of two doors, one on each side of the rostrum and the 
baptistery. From one of them there is communication also with a lobby and 
a back entrance. There are also a kitchen with tea boiler, a heating chamber, 
and the necessary offices. The building provides accommodation on loose 
benches and chairs for 450. It is faced externally with Crooke's '* rockies'* 
with Grenoside stone dressings, and is in a free Renaissance style of architec- 
ture. It has been erected from the designs and under the superintendence of 
Messrs. HemsoU & Paterson, of Norfolk-row, Sheffield, and Mr. Thos. 
Roper, of Broomhill, was the contractor. The cost, exclusive of site, is /x,ooo 



ARCHITECTURAL. 



321 



WESTWARD HO! MISSION CHAPEL. 



Pastor— VJ, Crathbrn, Appledore. 

This chapel is the only NoncoDformist place of worship at this seaside resort. 
It is a substantial structure of weU-dres»sd local stone, with an open roQf of 
pitch pine polished, as are also the platform, pulpit and other fittings. The 
chapel will seat over two hundred, and is supplied with very comfortable 
chairs. It is declared to be an ornament to the locality. Mr. A. Lander, of 



HP 




Barnstaple, is the architect, and Mr. J. Tamlin, of Appledore, the builder. 
The entire cost is ;f 400. The stone was given by the gentleman from whom 
the freehold was purchased. The chapel was opened on 31st July, 1893, ^y 
the president of the Devon Association. 



CALLOW LAND CHAPEL, WATFORD. 



MinisUr—]. Stuart. 

This chapel, now in course of erection, is the outcome of a desire on the 
part of the minister and members of the Church worshipping at Beechen-grove, 
Watford, to take their due share in providint; for the spiritual necessities of a 
rapidly increasing industrial population which has sprung up within the last five 
or six years on the N.E. side of the town in consequence of the removal from 
Leighton Buzzard to Watford by the London and North-Western Railway 
Company of the staff of workmen employed upon the maintenance of their 
permanent way and station buildings south of Rugby. The railway company 
built a large number of houses, and a still larger number was built by private 
speculators, so that the present population is estimated at upwards of 2,500. 
The new chapel occupies a prominent position in Leavesden-road at its 
jtinction vrith Garfield-street, and it is anticipated that it will be opened early 
in the new year, at a cost for land, buildings, and fittings of about ;f 1,600. 
There is also a site for a school, but for the present the chapel will be used for 



ARCHITECTURAL. 323 

school purposes,and,consequently, only seats with reversible backs are provided. 
The style of architecture is Early English Gothic, freely treated, and the 
stmcture is of brick, with roof of Broseley tiles. The internal dimensions are 
59 feet by 31 feet 6 inches, in addition to the minister's vestry, classroom. &c., at 
the rear. The exterior is faced with Leverstock Green (grey) bricks, and 
the interior, above the panelled dado, with Beart's (Arlesey) white facing 
bricks, whilst the arches and reveals of doors and windows and the angles of 
buttresses, quoins, &c., are of red Leverstock Green facing bricks. The 
roof is open timbered in five bays, and has pitch pine trusses with arched ribs 
terminating on stone corbels. The windows are filled with quarried lights in 
subdued tints, popularly known as cathedral glazing. Due provision has been 
made for the ventilation of the chapel, and also for heating by hot water pipes 
on the low pressure system. The work is being carried out by Messrs. 
Andrews & Sons, builders, of Watford, under the superintendence of Mr. 
K. J. Beecham. architect, of Bushey. It is an interesting fact that architect 
ana builders are all members of the Church at Beechen-grove. 



WOOLWICH TABERNACLE. 



Minister— J. Wilson, M.L.S.B. 

This building is now being erected in Beresford* street, Woolwich. The 
Building Committee experienced considerable difficulty in securing a site, and 
eventually obtained one which permits of the builaing fronting on to both 
Beresford-street and Ropeyard Rails. The accompanying sketch, which is a 
reduced copy of the architect's drawing, exhibited in this year's Royal 
Academy, shows the front to Beresford-street, and is a bold and ornate treat- 
ment in the Georgian style of architecture. The front is to be erected in best 
red bricks, with Monk's Park Bath stone dressings, cornices. &c. The Chapel, 
which will seat 2,000 people, is raised some seven feet above the level of the 
pavement, and the main entrance to it is approached by an arcade vestibule, 
with entrances from both streets. Beneath the chapel there is a large school- 
room or lecture hall to seat 1,200 people, which is partially below the level of 
the pavement. The gallery is reached by separate entrances and surrounds 
the interior of the building in the form of an amphitheatre. There is a large 
church parlour, which can be used as a separate room or thrown into the 
chapel by the raising of revolving shutters. In addition, there are vestries, 
classrooms, &c., to the number of six, all well lighted and ventilated. The 
roof inside the chapel is formed of open woodwork in pitch pine, with bold 
curved trusses projecting below the panelling of the roof, and the appearance 
is elegant. The walls are to be treated inside with pale straw-coloured facing 
bricks, and bands and patterns are to be in red and brindled bricks. All the 
pews are to be of best pitch pine, stained and varnished. The glazing of the 
windows will be in leaded lights, and cathedral glass of various designs will 
be used. The heating and ventilation have been well considered by the archi- 
tect, and the system adopted will be by extract tubes and cowls fixed in the 
ridge of the roof, with Tobin tubes for the admission of fresh cold air in 
summer and ventilating radiators for the admission- of warm fresh air in 
winter. It is proposed to heat the building by hot water under ordinary low- 
pressure, with pipes and radiators dispersed about the building at regular 
intervals. The electric light will be used, and pendants will be suspended 
from the roof, wall brackets, &c. The chapel floor and staircases are of fire- 
proof construction, and all the doors are arranged to open outwards, so as 
to be easily used in case of emergency. The building, exclusive of the 
site, is to cost /z 1,000. The builders are Messrs. James Smith and Sons, 
South Norwood, and the architect is Mr. W. H. Woodroflfe. A.R.I.B.A., 214, 
Great Dover-street, London, S.E. 

X 2 



324 



NEW CHAPELS. 



II.— NEW CHAPELS. 



County. 



Sittings. 



England 

Berkshire .. 

Devonshire 

Essex 
Gloucestershire 

Hampshire 



Hertfordshire 

Huntingdonshire . . 
Lancashire 



Metropolitan 



Northamptonshire 

Nottinghamshire . . 
Sussex 
Wiltshire .. 



Wales and Monmouth- 
shire. 



Anglesey . . 
Carmardienshire . 



Carnarvonshire 

Denbighshire 
Glamorganshire 



Newbury, North Brook- street— Mis- 
sion Chapel in Long-lane . . 

Thorverton — Mission Chapel at Bram- 
ford Speke 

South Woodford, George-lane. . 

Stroud, John-street — Mission Chapel 
at Pagan Hill 

Portsmouth, Lake-road — Mission Hall 

in London-road 

Southsea, Elm Grove — Mission 
Chapel at Denmead 

Bishop's Stortford — Mission Hall at 
Farnham (Essex) 

Ramsey, Great Whyte 

Blackburn, Leamington-street 

Liverpool : Bootle, Derby-road (Tem- 
porary Iron Building) 

Leytonstone, Cann Hall-road — Mis- 
sion Hall in Edith-road 

Silvertown.. 

Rushden, Old Chapel — Mission 
Chapel at Hinwick {Beds.) . . 

Nottingham, Woodborough-road 

Burgess Hill 

Salisbury, Brown - street — Mission 
Chapel at Coombe Bissett . . 



150 



Holyhead, Edmond-street .. .. 1,060 
Foelcwan, Noddfa— Mission Chapel at 

Cwm Mydrim 180 

Llanelly, Caersalem ; 800 

Llanfairfechan — Mission Chapel at ' 

Penmaenmawr 200 

Llangollen, Penybryn . . . . 3x0 

Cardiff, Splott-rcad 1,100 

Cymmer (Porth), Pisgah . . 400 

Glancynon . . . . . . 900 

Penarth, Tabernacle 1,000 

Pontypridd, Rhondda 800 

Tonyrefail 650 

Troedyrhiw, Bethel 600 

Wattstown 600 

Wauntrodau, Bethel 280 



450 



120 

620 


250 
2,550 


• • 


170 


250 


2,500 


150 


135 


150 
350 
800 


5.263 


200 


200 


250 


643 
1,100 


60 
980 
230 


50 
5,000 
1,100 



350 



2,700 

420 
2,200 

1.035 

2,300 
4,700 

868 
2,000 
3.000 

1,520 
1,800 
2,000 
1,025 



NEW CHAPELS. 



325 



County. 

Pembrokeshire • • 
Monmouthshire .. 

Scotland. 

Porfiurshire • • 

I^aoarkshire 

Shetland Isles . . 

Ireland. 
Limerick . • 



Cemaes, Penuel 

Llaxigloffiui — Mission Chapel at Mathry 
Ebbw Vale, Providence 
Newbridge (E.) — Mission Chapel at 
Cnimlin 



Dundee. Ward-road 
Cambuslang 
Coatbridge 
Hamilton .. 
Lerwick . . 



Limerick 



Totals 



Sittingt. 


Coft 


aoo 

• • 


£ 

500 

280 


300 




300 


— 


650 
500 
500 
450 
380 


4.300 
3,500 
1,250 
850 
1.070 



1 210 


2,500 


17,150 


59.604 







326 



CHAPEL IMPROVEMENTS, ETC. 



III.— CHAPEL IMPROVEMENTS, NEW SCHOOL 
ROOMS, CLASS ROOMS, &c. 



County. 



I 



England. 

Bedfordshire 
Berkshire . . 
Buckinghamshir 

Cambridgeshire . 



Cheshire .. 
Cornwall .. 
Derbyshire 
Devonshire 



Durham 
Essex 



Gloucestershire . 
Hampshire 

Hertfordshire . 
Huntingdonshire 

Kent 
Lancashire 



Leicestershire 
Lincolnshire 



Cotton End 

Reading, WyclifTe. . 
Chesham, Broadway 
Wendover . . 
March, Centenary Church 

Waterbeach 

Altrincham 

St. Austell . . • . . 

Sawley 

Ashwater 

Bideford 

Croyde 

Totnes 



Waterhouses . . ^. . 
Grays, Tabernacle 

Rayleigh 

Bristol, Old King-street . . 

Hanham 

Blackfield Common 
Emsworth 

Poulner 

St. Albans, Verulam-road 

Huntingdon, Trinity (U.) 



Gravesend, Peacock-street 
Sittingboume 

Blackburn, Montague- 
street 

Clayton-le-Moors . . 



Manchester, Moss Side . . 

Hinckley 

Burgh and Monksthorpe 



New Schoolroom . . 

New Infants' Schoolroom 

New Schoolroom . . 

New Schoolroom . . 

Renovation and Enlarge- 
ment of Chapel . . 

Renovation of Chapel 

Improvement to Chapel 
Premises 

Enlargement of School- 
room 

Enlargement of School- 
room 

New Schoolroom . . 

Enlargement of Class- 

: rooms 

I Enlargement of School- 

I room 

I Renovation of Chapel, and 

I Enlargement of Vestry 

and Infants' Schoolroom 

Enlargement of Chapel 

Enlargement of School 
room 

Renovation of Chapel 

Restoration of Chapel, &c 

Enlargement of Chapel 

Improvements to Chapel 

New School and Class- 
rooms 

New Windows 

Enlargement of Chapel 
&c 

Enlargement of Hartford 
Chapel, and reseating 
of Chapel at Little 
Stukeley 

Renovation of Chapel . . 

New Mission Room at 
Bapchild 

New Organ 

Erection of Gallery and 
alteration to Class- 
rooms- 

Enlargement of Chapel .. 

New Schoolroom . . 

Cleaning and Repairing 
Chapel 



450 

2x0 

1,129 

442 

300 
450 

30 

xoo 

50 

xoo 

46 
90 



X20 

220 

40 

40 

2,500 

220 

35 

300 

4 

250 



249 
62 



450 

120 

1,000 

25 



CHAPEL IMPROVEMENTS, ETC. 



327 



County. 


Place. Work done. 


Cott. 


Metropolitan , . 


Blackheath, Shooter's 


£ 




Hill-road Enlargement of Chapel .. 


2ao 




Camberwell,Cottage-green Renewal of Heating Ap- 






paratus 


25 




Catford Hill . . , . , Purchase of additional 






1 land 


196 




Leytonstone, Fair lop-road New Classrooms and Insti- 






; tute 


950 




Tottenham,\Vesterfield-rd. Purchase of Hall . . 






Wood Green, Finsbury-rd. Improvements to Chapel 


200 


Norfolk .. 


Stalham New Manse 


500 


Northamptonshire 


Kettering, Fuller Chapel ' Purchase of land . . 
Northampton, College- ' Enlargement of Compton 


400 




street 


Street Schooh-oom 


320 




St. Michael's-road (U.) 


New Schoolroom . . 


600 


Nottinghamshire 


Kirkby, East 


Acquisition of new Pro- 
perty 

Restoration of Chapel . . 






Nottingham : Lenton, New 


300 
100 




Wood borough-road 


Enlargement of School- 








room 


-_ 


Rutlandshire 


Oakham, Melton-road . . 


New Schoolrooms 


500 


Somersetshiie .. 


Pill 


Enlargement of Chapel . . 


309 


Staffordshire 


Burton-on-Trent, New-st. 


Enlargement of School- 
room, additional work, 








&c 


500 


Suffolk .. 


Bury St. Edmund's, Gar- 


New Schoolroom at 






land-street 


Whepstead 


65 




Gorleston 


New Schoolroom . . 


300 




Ipswich, Burlington 


New Classrooms . . 




Sussex 


Brighton, Florence-road.. 


New Schoolroom (used for 








Worship at present) 


— 




Crawley 


Enlargement of School- 








room 


X20 




Worthing 


Enlargement of Chapel .. 


300 


Warwickshire . . 


Learn ingto 1, Warwick-st. 


Enlargement of Chapel 








and New Schoolroom . . 


1.747 


Wiltshire . . 


Bratlon 


New Baptistery . . 


60 


Worcestershire .. 


Inkberrow 


New American Organ, and 








porch to chapel.. 


29 




Kidderminster 


Renovation of Church-st. 
chapel and new organ 








for Lome street . . 


592 


Yorkshire 


Blackley 


Renovation of Chapel and 






1 new Organ 


750 




Cullingworth . . . . 1 New Classrooms . . 


30 




Ossett ; New Schoolroom . . 


570 




Polemoor 


Purchase of property for 
extension of Burial 




! 




Ground 


450 


Walks and Mon-J 








MOUTHSHIRE. 








Anglesey 


Holyhead, Edmond-street 


New Schoolroom . . 


^ 


Brecknockshire . . ; 


Brynmawr, King-street . . ' New Porch to Chapel . . 


22 


Cardiganshire 


Lampeter— 






Silian, Bethel . . . . New Schookoom . . 


X50 


Carmarthenshire 


Landovery ' Renewal of front of Chapel, 






&C 


28 




Llanelly, Caersalem 


New Schoolroom . . . . | 


500 



328 



CHAPEL IMPROVEMENTS, ETC. 



County. 


PUce. 


Work done. 


C-. 


Carnarvonshire .. 


Port Madoc, Berea (Sc.).. 




i 130 


Denbighshire . . 


Llangollen, Penybryn . . 


New Schoohroom . . 






Penycae 


New Gallery to Chapel .. 


— 




Rhosllanerchrugog 


New Minister's House .. 


400 


Flintshire .. .. 


Axtyn(W.) 


Repairs to Chapel 


3 


Glamorganshire. . 


Aberdare, Abemant 


Enlargement of Chapel 








and Schoolroom 


1,920 




Abergwynfi, Caersalem . . 
Cardiff. Tabernacle (W.). . 


Enlargement of Chapel . . 


96 




Renovation of Chapel, &c. 


250 




Hengoed 


New Schoolroom at Llan- 








bradach 


400 




Maesteg, Bethania 


New Schoolroom . . 


6zo 




Merthyr Tydvil, Cefin Coed 


Renovation of Chapel . . 


— 




Neath, Bethany . . 


Repairs to Chapel 


zz 




Penydarren 


Boundary wall and repairs 








to Chapel 


90 




PontUyw 


Enlargement of School- 








room 


— - 




Pontrhydycyff (Maesteg). . 


Repairs to Chapel 


32 




Pontrhydyfen 


Alterations to Chapel . . 


122 




Wauntrodau. Ararat 


Enlargement of Burial 








Ground 


ZO5 


Pembrokeshire . . 


Fishguard, Hermon 


Enlargement of School- 








room at Lower Fishguard 


80 


Radnorshire 


Nantgwyn 


New Vestry 


100 


Monmouthshire 


Cross Keys (Newport) . . 


Purchase of house for 








Minister 


800 




Newport, St. Mary-street 


New Classrooms ... 


425 




Stow Hill 


New Organ, ftc 


172 


Scotland. 








Ajrrshire . . 


Ayr 


Improvements to 








Baptistery 


4 


Lanarkshire 


Cambuslang 


New Schoolroom . . 


— 


Perthshire 


Crieff 


Enlargement of School- 








room 


53 


Shetland Isles . . 


Lerwick .. .. ... 


New Schoolroom . . 
Total . . 






/a5.658 



CHAPEL DEBTS PAID OFF OR DIMINISHED. 



329 



IV.— CHAPEL DEBTS PAID OFF OR DIMINISHED. 



Flac«. 



Amount, y 



ENGLAND. 



Bedfordshire— 

ArapthilI(U.) 

Bedford, Rothsay-road 

Luton, Wellington-street 

Stevington 

Berkshire— 

Maidenhead 

Newbury, North Brook-street 

Reading, King*s-road . . 
Buckinghamshire— 

Fenny Stratford 

Newton Longville 

Olney 

Quainton 

Stony Stratford and Loughton 

Wendover 

Wycombe, Union Church 
Cambridgeshire— 

Histon 

March, Centenary Church 

Waterbeach 
Cheshire— 

Crewe, Union Street . . 

New Brighton . . ... 
Cornwall— j 

Calstock and Metherill 

Hayle 

Launceston 
Cumberland— 

Carlisle 

Millom 

Derbyshire — 

Crich ' 

Derby, Watson-street . . . . ' 

Heanor ' 

Ilkeston, Queen-street . . { 
South Street 1 

Long Eaton, Station-street . . | 

Measham and Netherseali 
{Manse) | 

Ripley ..' 

Swadlincote 1 

Swanwick | 

Devonshire— 

Ashwater 

Bideford 

BoveyTracey ! 

Devonport, Pembroke-street. . 

Ilfracombe 



£ 

40 
200 
200 

30 

50 

379 

70 

228 

5 
Z02 
21 

30 

306 

20 

97 
220 

350 

40 
20 

4 
10 
20 

30 
20 

7 
10 
20 
10 
10 
18 

Z20 
20 
20 
20 

20 
320 

5 

10 
62 



Devonshire {contd.)— 

Okehampton . . 

Sourton 

Stonehouse 

Torrington. Great 

Totnes 

Durham— 

Bishop Auckland 

Crook 

Hartlepool, West 

South Shields, Tabernacle 

Sunderland, Lindsay-road 

Waterhouses . . 
Essex — 

Barking 

Brentwood 

Clacton-on-Sea (U.) . . 

Coggeshall 
I Colchester, Eld Lane 

I Grays, Tabernacle 

I I Safiron Walden 
i Southend, Clarence-road 
,: Gloucestershire— | 

Cirencester , 

Coleford 

Longhope, Zion 

Lydbrook 

Old Sodbury : 
Codrington . . 

Stroud, John Street . . 

Thombury : 
i' Tytherington., 

li Hampshire — 

Aldershot 
I Andover 

Boscombe 
,1 Bournemouth, Lansdowne 
I West Cliff Tabernacle 
' Cosham, East . . 
' Fleet 

Gosport, Avenue-road 
Brockhurst . . 

Isle of Wight : 
Ryde, Park-road 
Ventnor ; 

Odiham 

Portsmouth : ' 

j Landport, Commercial-road 
Southsea, Castle-road 

i Elm-grove 

I Denmead 

Southampton, Portland 



£ 

5 

10 
60 

7 

35 
37 
12 
30 
50 
220 

85 

20 

250 

75 
X70 
40 
90 
50 

134 
30 
65 
20 

139 
zio 

60 

xoo 
xo 

45 

55 
460 

5 

25 
75 
25 

30 

28 

3 

25 

zo 

350 

"3 

50 



330 



CHAPEL DEBTS PAID OFF OR DIMINISHED. 



Herefordshire — 
Hereford, Commercial-road.. 

Leominster 

Hertfordshire — 
Breachwood Green . . 
King's Langiey 
St. Albans, Verulam-road . . 
Huntingdonshire— 

Bluntisham 

Bythom 

Kent— 

Brabourne 

Hawkhurst 

Heme Bay 

Loose 

New Brompton 

St. Peter's 

Sheemess, Strode-crescent . . 

Yalding 

Lancashire — 
Blackburn. Montague-street. . 
Burnley, Colne-road . . 

Mount Pleasant 

Clayton-lc-Moors 

Dalton-in- Fumess 

Edgeside 

Garston 

Heywood 

Hurstwood 

Leigh 

Liverpool : 

Myrtle-street : 
Earlestown 
St. Helen's, Park-road . . 

Prince's Gate 
Nelson, Carr-road 
Oldham : 

HoUinwood, Beulah 

King-street 

Preston, Ashton-on- Kibble . . 

Pole-street 

Southport, Scarisbrick New 

road 

St. Helen's, Boundary-road . . 

Hall-street 

Tyldesley (W.) 

Vale, near Todmorden 

Widnes 

Wigan, Scarisbrick-street . . 
Leicestershire — 
Barrow-on-Soar 
Coalville, Ashby-road. . 

London-road 

Earl Shilton 

Hathem 

Hinckley • 

Hose 

Hugglescote 

Ibstock 



£ 

263 
xo 

15 

250 
170 

190 

10 

8 

25 
30 
90 

275 
50 
22 

X40 

200 
300 
50 
40 
30 
25 
30 
60 
20 
575 



X29 

17 

250 

40 

20 

210 

5= 

30 

I.XOO 

30 

I20 
18 

xco 

15 

X40 

25 

40 

200 

25 

xo 

300 

10 

85 

250 



i Leicestershire {contd.) — 
Leicester : 
Belgrave-road Tabernacle. . 
Belvoir-street: 
Harvey-lane : 
Cropstone 

Huncote 

Carley-street 

Clarendon Hall 
Loughborough, Baxter Gate. . 

Mount-Sorrel 

Shepshed, Belton-street 
Charnwood-road 

Syston 

Lincolnshire — 

Fleet 

Gt. Grimsby, Victoria-street. . 
Louth, Eastgate 

Sutterton 

Metropolitan — 
Battersea : 
Battersea Park Tabernacle 

York-road 

Beckenham 

Blackheath, Shooter's Hill-rd. 
Brixton, Barrington-road . . 
Stockwell-road Tabernacle 
Brixton Hill, New Park-road 
Bromley (Kent), Park-road 

Brondesbury 

Camberwell : 
Camberwell New - road. 

Clarendon 
Mansion House-square . . 

Catfordhill 

Clapham Junction, Mejrrick 

road 

Ealing, Haven-green . . 
Erith, Queen-street . . 
Finchley, North 
Forest-hill. Sydenham Ch. . . 
I Hackney, Lauriston-road . . 
Hanwell(U.) .. 

' Harlesden 

Hendon, Finchley-road 
I Holloway. Upper 

Honor Oak 

I Lee. Bromley-road . . 

' Leyton, Vicarage-road 

I Leytonstone. Cann Hall-road 

I Fairlop-road 

Limehouse: East India-road 

Pekin-street 

Nunhead, Edith-road.. 
Peckham, South London 

Tabernacle .. 
Penge, Maple-road . . 
Plumstead, Park-road 
Putney, Werter-road . . . . 1 
Richmond, Duke-street 



£ 
220 



105 

X2 

30 
2,000 

15 
15 
36 
20 
20 

60 

70 

XO 

XOO 



300 

37 

XOO 
XOO 

150 

XOO 

138 

100 
380 



X27 

20 

850 

X40 

1,000 

162 

400 
30 
50 
40 
50 

97 
200 

50 
240 

30 
100 
450 

XOO 

475 

50 
50 
30 

X25 

X50 



CHAPEL DEBTS PAID OFF OR DIMINISHED. 



331 



METROPOLITAN {contd.)— 

Sidcup 

Silvertown 

Upton, Upton Cross . . 
Wallington 

Wandsworth, Northcote-road 
Wood Green, Finsbury-road : 
Bowes Park 
Norfolk— 
Carleton Rode (Attleboro*) . . 
Lynn, Union Chapel . . 
Swafiham 

NORTHAMPTONSHIRB — 

Brington 

Burton Latimer 

Kingsthorpe 

Northampton: College-street, 
Compton-street . . 

Mount Pleasant 

Towcester 

Walgrave 

Northumberland— 
Newcastle, Jesmond : 

Byker 

Nottinghamshire— 

Arnold 

Eastwood 

Hucknall Torkard 

Kimberley 

Kirkby, East 

Newark 

Nottingham : 

Basford, New, Chelsea-st. . . 

Hyson Green 

Radford 

Woodborough-road 

Retford 

Stapleford 

Sutton Bonnington . . 
Sutton-in-Ashfield : 

Eastfield-side 

Wood-street 

Oxfordshire— 

Oxford, New-road 
Shropshire— 

Whitchurch 

Somersetshire— 

Bath. Hay-hill 

Highbridge 

Pill 

Twerton-on-Avon 
Staffordshire- 

Brierley-hill 

Burslem 

Coseley, Ebenezer 

Tamworth 

Wednesbury 

West Brorawich 

Willenhall, Little London . . 



100 
200 

15 

50 

200 

50 

xo 
30 
90 

20 
X70 
130 

193 

156 

20 

10 



30 

»5 
10 
40 

13 
20 
26 

20 
40 
10 
3,210 
20 
15 
5 

30 
20 

50 

15 

90 

25 

154 

xoo 

20 

X20 

4 

15 

50 

200 

50 



Suffolk— 
BurySt. Edmunds, Westgate-rd 
Gorleston 

Ipswich, Burlington . . 
Sussex— 
Brighton, Queen' s-square 
St. Leonards . . 
Warwickshire— 
Birmingham : 

Aston Park, Christ Church 

Great King-street . . 
I Hagley-road . . 

Handsworth,Hamstead-road 

Highgate-park 

Small Heath, Coventry-road 

Smethwick 

Nuneaton 

Stratford-on-Avon 
Wiltshire— 
Devizes, Sheep-street. . 

Limpley Stoke 

Swindon, Tabernacle 
Worcestershire— 

Kidderminster 

Netherton, Ebenezer . . 

Stourbridge 

Yorkshire — 
Armley, Carr Crofts . . 

Barnoldswick 

Bamsley, Sheffield-road 

Batley 

Blackley 

Bradford, InArmary-street . . 

Ripley-street 

Clayton 

Doncaster 

Driffield 

I Earby-in-Craven 
EUand .. 

Gildersome 

Huddersfield, New North-rd. 
Hull, Beverley-road . . 
Leeds, Blenheim 

Burley-road 

York-road 

Lydgate 

Middlesbro', Marton-road .. 

Nazebottom 

Polemoor 

Rodley 

Scarborough : West Gate, 

Ebenezer 

Sheffield. Attercliffe . . 

Hillsborough 

Walkley 

Skip ton, Belmont 
Slaithwaite, Zion 

Stanningley 

Thomaby-on-Tees . . 



£ 

It 31 

240 

850 

40 
60 



50 
50 
82 
300 
37 
77 
30 
xo 
ao 

67 
8 

133 

2X2 

10 
15 

65 
80 
60 

25 
300 

12 
400 

80 
X40 
150 
20a 
XOO 

135 

450 

70 

226 

X70 

20 

80 

50 

5 

200 

50 

ao 

75 
560 

15 

220 

450 

90 

20 



-332 



CHAPEL DEBTS PAID OFF OR DIMINISHED. 



WALES AND MONMOUTH- 
SHIRE. 



Brecknockshire— 

Hay 

Talgarth 

•Cardiganshire— 

Aberystwyth, Alfred-place . . 
Lampeter : 

Silian, Bethel 

Llanrhystid 

Carmarthenshire— 

Cwmsamddu 

Foelcwan, Noddfa: 

Cwm Mydrim 
Llanelly, Caersalem . . . . 
PwU (Llanelly). Bethlehem . . 
Carnarvonshire-^ 
Bangor, Penrallt-road 

Galltraeth 

Gam, Horeb 

Llandudno, Most]rn-street . . 
Llaniiadrfechan, Libanus 

Penmaenmawr 

Penygroes 

Denbighshire— 
Coedpoeth, Bethesda . . 

Tabernacle 

Colwyn, Cal£aria 

Glynceiriog 

Llangollen, Castle-street (W.) 

Penybryn 

Llanrwst 

Moss, Salem 

Ponkey, Zion 

RhosUanerchnigog . . 
Wrexham, Chester-street . . 

Rho9-ddu 

Flintshire— 

Caerwys 

Lixwm (Holywell) 

Rhuddlan 

Treuddyn 

'Glamorganshire- 
Aberavon, Ebenezer • • 

Water-street 

■Aberdare : 

Aberaman (W.) 

Abercwmboye . • 

Abemant .. 

Cwmbach 

Trecjmon, Mill-street 

Aberfan 

Barry District : 

Barry, Bethel 
Bettws (Bridgend) 
Birchgrove 



£ 

TO 

50 

270 

100 
TOO 

5 

100 

75 

80 

4 
zo 

300 
15 

635 
20 

5 

zo 
z8 

39 
400 

850 

Z02 
20 

zo 

ZOO 

5 

28Z 
30 

5 
3 

Z2 

Z70 
30 

70 

55 
320 
Z30 
50 
50 

30 
10 
50 



Glamorganshire {contd.)— 
Blaeziclydach • . . . 
Bridgend, Ruaznah .. 
Bryncethin 
Cardifif: 

Canton (W.).. 

Grange Town 

Taberziacle .. 

Woodville-road 
Clydach, Calvaria 
Craigcefoparc, Elim • • 
Croesyparc (Cardiff) . . 
Cwmaman 
Cwzziavon 

Cwm Clydach, Calvaria 
Cwmfelin 
Cwmgors 
Cwmpark 
Deri, Taberziacle 
Dowlais, Beulah 

Caersalem . . 

Hebron 

Moriah 
Femdale, Salem Newydd 

Fochriw 

Gil£ach Goch . . 
Glais, Peniel . . 
Glyn Neath, Bethel . . 
Lantwit-vardre 
Maesteg, Bethel 

Caersalem • • 

Calvaria 

Zion 

Merthyr Tydvil, Ainon 

George Town 

Zion 

Merthyr Vale, Cal£aria 

Zion 

Mountain Ash (Rhos). . 
Nantymoel, Horeb . . 
Penarth, Penuel 
Penrhiwceiber, Jerusalem 
Pentre, Moriah 

Zion 

Penydarren 
Penygraig 
Pontardawe, Elim 
Pontllyw 

Pontrhydycyff (Maesteg) 
Pontrhydyfen .. 
Pontycymmer, Noddfia 
Pontypridd, Rhondda. . 
Forth, Salem .. 

Taberziacle .. 
Resolven, Bethaziia . . 
Swansea: 

Caersalem Newydd 

Cwmbwrla • • 

Danygraig . . 

Landore, Salem 



£ 

«35 
50 
10 

12 

ao 

150 

50 

70 

66 

12 

190 

40 

zoo 

30 
40 

Z90 
50 
70 
90 
40 
90 

122 
35 
25 
25 
40 
30 
50 
80 
20 
30 
26 

30 
zoo 

50 
200 

50 
500 

85 

15 
zoo 

30 

75 
206 

34 
30 
20 

42 

90 
100 
242 

too 

22 

215 
50 

25 

30 



CHAPEL DEBTS PAID OFF OR DIMINISHED. 



333: 



lUce. 



Glamorganshire (contd,)^ 
Swansea (conid.) — 

Mount Pleasant 

Philadelphia . . 

York Place .. 
Tongwynlais, Ainon (W.) 

Salem 
Tonyrefail .. ,. 
Treharris, Bethel 

Brynhyfiryd .. 
Treorky, Noddfa 

Horeb 

Tyncwydd (Ogmore Vale) 
Wauntrodau, Ararat . . 
Ynyshir, Ainon 
Ynyslwyd 
Ynysybwl, Noddfa 
Vstalyfera, Caersalem 

Zoar 

Ystrad, Nebo .. 

Tabernacle .. 
Merionethshire — 

Bala 

Barmouth 
Festiniog : 

CaUaria 

Moriah 

Sion 

Glyndyfrdwy . . 
Harlech, Ainon 

MONTGOME RYSH I RE— 

Caersws 

Newtown 
Pembrokeshire — 
Creswell Quay, Pisgah 
Fishguard : Hermon, Lower 

Fishguard 

Llangloffan, Mathry . . 

Maenclochog 

Marloes 

Pembroke Dock, Bush Street 

High Street 

Pennar 

Radnorshire— 

Presteign 

Monmouthshire— 

Abercarn (W.) 

Abergavenny, Flrogmore-st. 
Blackwood, Mount Pleasant. . 
Blaenavon : 

Broad-street 

Horeb 

Ebbw Vale, Newtown 
Goytrey, Sharon 
Machen, Siloam 

Nash 

Newport, St. Mary-street . . 
New Tredegar (W.) .. 

Penheolybadd 

Pontnewynydd (E.) . . 



£ 
158 

96 
250 

70 

15 
347 
xxo 

337 

365 

28 

15 
90 
xxo 

90 
90 
25 

xo 

220 

20 

7 
25 

29 
14 
44 
40 
6 

15 
2,000 

36 

50 
200 

87 
80 

75 

X20 
50 



90 

450 

50 

50 

5 

5 

25 

15 

xo 

275 
60 
xo 

38 



Monmouthshire (contd.)- 
Pontypool, Bridge-street 
Sirhowy(W.) .. 
St. Mellon's . . 
Tredegar, George Town 

SCOTLAND. 



Aberdeenshire — 

Aberdeen, Gilcomston-park 
Union-grove . . 
Argyllshire— 

Lochgilphead .. 
Ayrshire— 

Irvine . . . . ',, 

Kilmarnock 
Dumbartonshire— 

Clydebank 

Kirkintilloch .. 
Fifeshire — 

Cowdenbeath . . 

Kirkcaldy, Whyte's Causeway 

Leven { 

Forfarshire — | 

Dundee, Ward-road . . . . 1 
Lanarkshire — 

Airdrie . . 

Cambuslang 

Glasgow : 
Bridgeton 
John Knox-street 
Queen's Park 
Springburn . . 
Morayshire — 

Elgin . . 
Perthshire — 

Perth . . 
Renfrewshire— 

Greenock, Orangefield-place 

Paisley : 
George-street 
Victoria-place 
Roxburghshire — 

Hawick . . 
Selkirkshire- 

Selkirk .. 
Shetland Isles — 

Len\'ick . . 
Western Isles— 

Mull, Bunessan 



CHANNEL ISLANDS. 

jERSEY-r 
St. Helier 



Total 



£ 
20 
20 
50 
15 



202 
30 

65 

30 
5 

40 
17 

8 

X20 
70 

4.096 

40 
1,700 

x6 
45 
30. 

42 

30 
50 
75 

400. 
45 

lO 

45 

529 
9 



62 



!/57.392 



PART VIII. 



LIST OF BAPTIST MINISTERS 
IN THE BRITISH ISLES. 

FOR THE YEAR COMMENCING JANUARY x, 1896. 



*,• Names are placed on this, List by an annual vote of the Counc 
OF the Baptist Union. The Council require recommendations 
either (i) by Tutors of Colleges, or (2) by Committees of 
Associations, or (3) by Three Members of the Council. Such 
Recommendations must be in the hands of the Secretary not 
Later than September 15TH. 

The names op Evangelists are not included in this List unless they 
have served previously as Pastors. 

In cases where the Pastor does not live in the town or village in 
which his chapel is situated, the name of the church is inserted 
IN brackets after the postal address, in order to facilitate 
reference to the List of Churches (pages aoi— 293). The name 

OF THE church IS INSERTED ALSO IN THE CASE OF EACH PASTOR IN THE 

" Metropolitan " section (pages 233 — 241). 

The same Institution is in each case comprised in the "CcJLlege" 
column under the designations :—<i) "Stepney" and "Regent's 
Park"; (2) "Bradford" and "Rawdon"; (3) "Bury" and "Man- 
chester"; (4) "Chilwell," "Nottingham" and "Midland"; (5) 
"Llangollen" and "Bangor"; (6) " Pontypool" and "Cardiff"; 
AND (7) " Bap. Th. In. Edin.," " B.U.S.," and " Bap. Th." (Glasgow) ; the 
last-named places being the present locations. 

" Metropolitan" means Pastors' College, Metropolitan Tabernacle. 



Name and Postal Address. CoUcr*. cimi^eacMl 

Abbott, W., 25, Argyle-street, Bedford 1S44 

Abraham. Harry, 35 York-place, Newport, Mon Metropolitan . . 1877 

Acomb, Wm. Jas., 26 Welford-road, Handsworth, Bir- 
mingham Metropolitan .. 1871 

Adams. William, Bugbrook, Weedon Metropolitan . . 1891 

Adamson, Thomas, Derby-road, Kegworth, Derby . . . . Metropolitan . . 1889 
Adey, William Thomas, 41, Fore-street, Kingsbridge .. Regent's Park .. 1864 
Aikenhead, Robert, 203, Mary-street, Balsall Heath, Bir- 
mingham Bradford .. 1847 

Aitken, James Richmond, M.A. (Glas.), Siriol House, Olney, /Reg. Pk., Edin. 

S.O„ Bucks \ U. & Glas. U. i893 



MINISTERS IN THE BRITISH ISLES. 335 



Ministry 



Name and Postal Address. College. 

Aked, Charles Frederic, 53, Bedford-street North, Liverpool Midland . . 1886 

Alderson, James, 52, Devonshire-street, Keighley . . . . Manchester . . 1873 

Aldis, John, Beckington, Bath Bradford . . 1830 

Aldis, John, jun.. Little Leigh, near Warrington . . . . Bristol . . . . 1862 
Aldridge, Stephen Robinson. B.A., LL.D. (Dublin), 32, ( Reg. Pk. & Tr. 

Lethbridge-road, Southport . . ( Coll., Dub... 1877 

Alford, James Drewitt, Barrow -on- Soar, Loughborough 1864 

AUderidge, Saml. Charles, 17, Lawn-street, Thursby-square, 

Burnley Midland .. 1887 

Allen, Charles Thomas, Cottenham, Cambridge • . . . Metropolitan . . 1883 

Allen, Robert, Maesteg, Bridgend 1879 

AUsop, Frederick, Brearley, Luddendenfoot, via Manchester Rawdon . . . . 1883 

Allsop, Solomon Smithee, Ripley, Derby x86o 

Almy, John Thomas, Vectis Villa, Brixham R.S.O., 

S.Devon Metropolitan .. 1873 

Ambrose, George Arthur, Wantage Metropolitan . . 1892 

Anderson, John George, Crossgates House, Dalton-in- 

Fumess S.O., Lanes Metropolitan .. 1878 

Anderson, Wm. Milroy, The Grange, Epworth, Doncaster . . Bap.Th. In.Edin. 1851 

Andrews, Edgar Manning, Shepshed, Loughborough . . Regent's Park . . 1890 

Andrews, James A., Drayton Parslow, Bletchley Station 1869 

Andrews, John, xo6, Spring-road, Ipswich 1859 

Andrews, John R., Maulden, Ampthill Regent's Park .. 1894 

Angus, Joseph, M.A. (Edin.), D.D. (U.S.), 5, Ellerdale- 

road, Hampstead, London, N.W Step. & Edin. Un. 1839 

Antill, Thomas, Pinner S.O., Middlesex 1885 

Antram, Charles EdNKr'ard Potts, Ipswich Rawdon . . . . 1890 

Archer, George, Thornton Lodge-road, Lockwood, Hudders- 

field Manchester .. 1882 

Archer, John Kendrick, Heptonstall Slack, Manchester . . Midland . . 1891 

Archer, John Francis. Shore Manse, near Todmorden . . Midland . . 1889 

Archer, William Elisha, 4, Warwick-place, Leeds .. .. Bradford .. 1841 

Armstrong, Thomas, 848 Hyde-road, Gorton, Manchester . . Metropolitan .. x88x 

Armstrong, Wm. Kingo, B.A. (Glas.), Newcastle Ho., Lewes Brad.&Glas. Un. X851 

Arthur, David, Haworth, Keighley Glas. U.&B.U.S. 1887 

Ashby, Martin, Breachwood Green, Welwyn, Herts .. .. Metropolitan .. 1889 
Ashdown, Eli, 43, Endwell-road, Brockley, London, S.E. 

{Zoar, Whitechapel) x88i 

Ashton, Edward, Gorsley, near Ross, Herefordshire . . . . Metropolitan . . x88x 

Askew, John, 80, Derby-street, Burton-on-Trent .. .. Metropolitan .. X870 

Atkinson, Henry Clapham, 47, Otley-road, Bradford.. .. Manchester .. 1871 

Atkinson, James Hudson, 3, Oakfield, Anfield, Liverpool . . Midland . . . . 1866 

Atkinson, Thomas George, Sandhurst, Hawkhurst x86o 

Aubrey, Edwin, 34, Garthland-drive, Dennistoun, Glasgow. . Haverfordwest . . 1882 

Aubrey, Jesse, xo, St. Mark's-road, Windsor Metropolitan .. X885 

Aust, Francis John, Severn View, Bewdley Metropolitan . . 1876 

Avery, William J., X9, Furnival-street, London, E.C. {Baptist 

Union) Chilwell .. X877 

Ayliffe, Charles, York-place, Newport, Mon X870 

Ayres, Richard Willie, Ravensthorpe, Northampton.. .. Metropolitan .. 1874 

Bailey, George Thomas, 2, Florence-villas, Grange Ps^k- 

TOSid, Ijeyton, Ks&ex (Vicarage-road, Ley ton) .. .. Metropolitan .. 1876 

Bailey, Henry Charles, I, Athol-terrace, Sunderland .. .. Bristol .. .. 1878 

Bailey, John, B.A. (LoN.), 44, Dover-road, Sheffield . . . . Regent's Park . . 1872 

Baily, Robert, Cranbrook, Boston-road, Brentford . . . . Metropolitan . . 189X 

Baillie, James, 67, Oakley-square, London, N.W. (Bloomsbury) Bristol . . . . x 877 

Baker, Stephen James, Brown-road, Bury St. Edmunds . . Metropolitan . . x888 
Baker, Thomas, B.A. (LoN.), 62, Western-road, Lewes .. Bristol .. ..1854 

Baker, Thomas, LlandafT-yard, Cardiff Haverfordwest . . X875 

Ball, George Woodvine. Devon-road, Salcombe, Kingsbriige Metropolitan .. 1889 

Ballard, Isaac. Beulah Villa, Farnborough R.S.O., Ken 1844 



336 MINISTERS IN THE BRITISH ISLES. 



Name and Pvistel Addi«». College. cu^jSSd 

Balmford, Edward, Westmancote, Tewkesbury . . . . Rawdon . . . . 1871 

Banfield, James Hawkey, 50, Hamfrith-road, Stratford, 

London, E. {Stratford-grove) Metropolitan . . 1875 

Banks, George, I z,Cemetery-road,Wzllenhall,VVolverhamptGD 1879 

Banks, Samuel James, Craig Fernie-terrace, Lisburn-road, 

Belfast 1857 

Bardens, R. C, 36 Palmerston-road, Ipswich 1891 

Bardwell, Henry Bagley, Orwell House, Chippenham, Wilts Metropolitan . . x866 
Barker, A. W. Leighton, 6, Montague-place, Worthing .. Metropolitan .. 1884 
Barker, Charles, Belvoir-road, Coalville, Lieicester {HuggU- 

scote) Midland .. 1875 

Barker, George, Blaby, near Leicester Bristol . . . . 1870 

Barker, William Alfred, Braeside, Brixham R.S.O., Devon . . Regent's Park . . 1884 

Barley, A. G., Etnsworth Metropolitan . . x886 

Barnard, John H., 1x9, North Hill. Highgate, London, N. 

{Southwood'lane, Highgate) Metropolitan . . z86a 

Barnes, George, 63 Castle-street, Great Berkhamsted {Weston 

TurvUle) 1891 

Barnes, J. E., Bristow-road, Hounslow Metropolitan .. 1894 

Barrans, George, zz, Westboume-street, Walsall .. .. Rawdon.. .. 1867 

Barrass, Thomas, Peterborough Midland . . 1850 

Barringer, Charles Barclay, The Cottage, Cranleigh, Guildford 1870 

Bartlett, James, Street S.O., Somerset 189Z 

Bartlett, Lewis, Hartington Villas, Aldburgh . . . . . . Bristol . . . . 1889 

Barton, Alexander Graham, Crook R.S.O., co. Durham 1885 

Barton, Joseph Edwin, Tuffleigh-avenue, Gloucester 1871 

Bastable, Richard, Kilmington, Axminster, Devon 1872 

Bascer, William, May field, Southborough.Surbiton {Surhiton 

Hilt) Metropolitan .. 1874 

Bateman, John, Niton, Isle of Wight Metropolitan . . 1867 

Bates, John, Ringstead, Thrapston 1884 

Bathgate, Walter, 19, Carisbrooke-road. Walton, Liverpool 1875 

Batstone,Thomas, Oakley House, Maesycwmmer, near Cardiff 1880 

Batts, Arthur C, Upwell, Wisbech Metropolitan . . 1884 

Bax, Alfred, 23, Burma-road, Stoke Newington, London, N. 

{Salter's Hall, Islington) Metropolitan . . i86x 

Baxandall, John, 68, Parkfield-terrace, Lancaster . . . . Rawdon . . . . 1862 

Bayley, Henry, Oakside, Addlestone, Surrey Regent's Park . . 1861 

Bayly, Richard Howard, Blackpool Bradford . . 1855 

Beard, Joseph, Peterchurch, Hereford 1859 

Beecliff, R. J., 52 Tredegar-road, Bow, London, E Metropolitan . . 1867 

Bell, Donald, Tobermory R.S.O., Argyllshire . . . . Glas. U. & B.U.S. 1881 

Bell, John, 50, Bank Side-street, Roundhay-road, Leeds 1870 

Bellis, Edward, Halkin, Holywell 1889 

Belsham, Richard A., Melbourn, Cambridge Metropolitan . . 1889 

Bennett, Daniel, B.A. (Cantab.), 3 Beach-road, Lowestoft Camb. Univ. . . 1894 

Bennett, George Henry, Bourne, Lincolnshire Midland .. 1882 

Bennett, John Ebenezer, B.A. (Roy. Un.L), 54, King Edward- 
road, Hackney, London, N.E. (Af arc- 5/rtfc^ Hac*ney) 1884 

Benskin, Frederick John, 3, Belmont-street, Huddersfield . . Metropolitan . . 1870 
Benson, Joseph, 55, Hilldrop-road, London, N. {Belle Isle) . .' - . . . . 1872 

Bentley, Thomas, Chipping Norton Rawdon . . . . 1864 

Bentley, William, 227a, Brooke-road, Upper Clapton, 

London, N.E Stepney . . . . 1853 

Beresford, James E. D., Stapleton, Bristol 1890 

Bergin, J. Marmaduke, Yorklown, Camberley Regent's Park .. 1867 

Berry, Edward William, Mount Pleasant, Redditch .. .. Metropolitan .. 1886 

Berry, Herbert B., Halesworth 1884 

Berry, John James, East Leake. Loughborough 1858 

Berryman, James, Caerwent, Chepstow, Mon Pontypool . . 1872 

Betts, Henry John, The Elms, Thurmaston, Leicester 1847 

Betts, Thomas, 5, Hosier-street, Reading 1875 



MINISTERS IN THE BRITISH ISLES. 337 

Name and Postal Address. College. commeDCBd 

Bavan, James, i Brook - villas, Whitchurch, Cardiff 

{Wauntrodau) 1870 

Billings, Daniel Dunneley, 23, Little Francis-street, Blooms- 
bury, Birmingham 1836 

Birch. Charles Boardman, xo, Sampson-road, Sparkbrook, 

Birmingham Rawdon . . . . 1891 

Bird, Benwell, Wychbury, Mannamead, Plymouth z86i 

Bird, Benwell Vernon. Stalham S.O., Norfolk Midland.. .. 1893 

Birt, Isaiah, B.A. (LON.), 20, The Crescent, Hertford-road. 

Lower Edmonton Bristol . . . . 1856 

Bishop, William, zxo. Laurel-road, Leicester Midland.. .. 1867 

Bisset, Alexander, M.A. (Abbrdeen), 24, Ostome-place, 

Aberdeen , Aber. & Edin. U. 187a 

Black, James. M.A. (Edin.), Windsor-terrace. Millport 

R.S.O., Buteshire Reg.Pk.&B.U.S. Z895 

Blackaby, Frederick Edward. Stow-on-the-Wold S.O., 

Gloucestershire Metropolitan .. i88z 

Blaikie, Peter Hatton, Coleraine Metropolitan . . 1881 

Blake. James Henry, Salisbury Villa, Tunbridge 1S59 

Blake, Joseph, 68, Nightingale-road. Clapton, London, N.E. Metropolitan . . 1858 

Bland, S. K., Warrington-road, Ipswich 1853 

Blinkhom, Rayner Rootham, 56, Alpha-road, Chesterton, 

Cambridge • .. .. z84a 

Bliss, William B., South-street. Brierley Hill. Staffordshire. . Stepney . . . . Z848 
Blocksidge, Walter William, 26, Green-street, New Brompton, 

Chatham Metropolitan .. z88z 

Blom field, William Ernest, B.A. (LoN.), B.D. (St. An- 
drew's), Regent-street, Coventry Regent's Park . . Z884 

Bloom, William Knighton, 331, West Green-road, South 

Tottenham Metropolitan .. 1865 

Bond, Kenneth Herbert, Swadlincote, Burton-on-Trent .. Midland.. .. 1890 

Bonell, George W., 118, Beeston-road, Leeds Rawdon.. .. 1888 

Bonner. Carey, Oakfield. Wilton-avenue, Southampton . . Rawdon . • • . Z884 
Boimer, Henry, Z22, Hamstead-road, Handsworth, Bir- 
mingham Rawdon . • • • Z873 

Booth, Samuel Harris, D.D. (U.S.), {Secretary Baptist 

C/nion), 19, Fumival-street, London, E.C.^ .. .. Stepney.. .. Z848 
Bosher, Alexander, Oak Cottage, Shotley-bridge R.S.O., 

CO. Durham Regent's Park . • X882 

Bond, John Wesley, 28, Jasmine-grove, Anerley, London, S.E. 

{Penge) Z871 

Boulsher, George, 48, Hawthorne-road. Bootle. Liverpool . . Metropolitan . . 1867 

Bourgourd. Charles John, Les Hubits, St. Martin, Guernsey Z877 

Bourn, Henry Hugh, 24, Claremont-road, Tunbridge Wells X849 

Bowden, Andrew, Staly bridge-road, Ashton-under-Lyne 

{Stafybridge) Bradford .. Z856 

Bowen, Samuel Glannedd, Z4, Alexandria-street, Gelli, Pentre, 

R.S.O. Gi&m. {Tonystrad) Llangollen .. 1885 

Bowker, Benjamin, 199, Rochdale-road, Bury. Lanes. . . Bury . • . . Z873 
Bowler, George Benson, Dudley-road, Grantham .. .. Metropolitan .. 1863 
Bowman, William Robert, B.A. (LON.), 44, Langdon Park- ( U. Col. Lond. and 

road, Highgate, London, N ( Cheshunt . . 1884 

Bowser, Sidney William, B.A. (LON.), 19. Alfred-road, j U. Col. Lond. and 

Birkenhead ( Regent's Park 1879 

Bowtell, James Daniel, Bungay 1873 

Box, John, 26, Flodden-road, Camberwell, London, S.E. 

(Shaftesbury Avenue, Soho) Z872 

Boyd, James H., 5, Marion-terrace, Hill-street, Lurgan 189X 

Bradford,Heziry, Kingsley-road, Northampton .. .. Metropolitan .. z868 

Bradford, John, Ivy Bank, Leytonstone, London, N.E. 

{Fairk^road, Leytonstone) Metropolian . . 1878 

Braine, Albert, 23, Trafalgar-place, Stoke, Devonport .. Bristol .. .. 187Z 

Y 



338 MINISTERS IN THE BRITISH ISLES. 

Name and Postal Address. Colkwe. c.^«7*d 

Branch, William George, Oadby, Leicester Midland . . 1892 

Brandon, Alfred, loi, Beaufort- street, Chelsea, London, S.W. 

{Grove, Brompton) 1852 

Brasted, John Bangley, Mount Clear, Old Colwyn R.S.O.. 

Denbighshire 1850 

Bray, John Dyer, 164, Great Clowes -street. Broughton, 

Manchester Rawdon.. .. 1889 

Breewood, Thomas, Brayford. South Molton Metropolitan . . 1876 

Bremner, Alexander, Casile Braes, Dumfries 1889 

Brett, John Edward, 69 Barton-street, Tewkesbury . . . . Metropolitan . . 1869 
Bridge, Isaac, 184, Brooke-road, Clapton, London, N.E. . . Metropolitan . . 1864 
Brigg, Benjamin, Saltwood House, Hawley-square, Margate Metropolitan . . i88x 

Briggs, Henry, Roomfield, Todmorden Manchester .. 1871 

Briges, James, 23, Honiton-road, Kilbum, London, N.W. * 

{Praed'Strut, Paddington) Metropolitan . . 1883 

Briggs, Roger, Blackley, EUand, Yorks . . Bury . . . . 1874 

Bright, Henry, 77, Hanley-road, Crouch-hill, London, N. 

{Evangelist) 1872 

Brimley, Thomas, Braunsion, Rugby 1886 

Briscoe, John Thomas, 26, Woodstock-road, Redland, Bristol 1868 

Bristow, John James, Rushton Villa, Leicester-road, East 

Finchley. N. {East Finchley) Metropolitan . . 1894 

Brock. William, 16. Ellerdale-road, Hampstead, London, N.W. 

{Heath-street, Hampstead) Edinburgh Univ. x86o 

Brooker, G. Whitfield, 43, Church-street, Leigh, Lanes. . . Manchester . . 1890 
Broom, Edward Richard, Milton, near Northampton . . Rawdon . . . . 1873 

Broome, Caleb, Bridge-street, Stowmarket z86x 

Brown, Alexander, Bunessan, Oban Glasgow Univ. . . 189a 

Brown, Archibald Geikie, 22, Bow-road, London, E. {East 

London Tabernacle, Bow) Metropolitan . . 1863 

Brown, Charles, 25, Ridge-road« Hornsey, London, N. {Ferme 

Park, Hornsey) Bristol . . . . t882 

Brown, Edward Heath, Brathay Lodge, The Green, 

Tvdckenham 1873 

Brown, Edwin, St. Anne's-on-the-Sea, Preston .. .. Rawdon.. .. 1865 

Brown, George, Mill-road, Offord D' Arcy, Huntingdon Z879 

Brown, Henry David, Carrick View, Ajrr Rawdon . . • . 1872 

Brown, Hugh Dunlop, M.A., B.L. (Dublin), Glengyle, 

Rathgar, Dublin Dublin Univ. . . 1884 

Brown, J. Gumming, 3, Marchiston Bank-avenue, Edinburgh Reg.Pk.&Edin.U. 1859 

Brown, James, 4, Hallidays-park, Selkirk t88o 

Brown, James Jones, Church-street, Cromer 1856 

Brown, John, High-street, Wincanton, Bath Bristol . . . . Z869 

Brown, John Alexander, Coombe Lodge, Peckham, London, 

S.E. {Cottage Green, Camberwelt) Metro. & Edin.. . z866 

Brown, John Jenkyn, 3, Priory-road, Edgbaston, Birmingham Bristol . . • . 1844 
Brown, John Turland, Lebanon, Kingsley-road, Northampton Bristol . . . . 1838 

Brown, Joseph, Upwell, near Wisbech Melksham . . 1849 

Brown, Walter, i, Mersea-road, Colchester 1874 

Bruce, David, Great Shelford, Cambridge Metropolitan .. 1876 

Bruce, Francis William Clark, 22, Connaught-road, Ken- 
sington, Liverpool i86a 

Bruce, Joseph Stevens, 17, Adolphus-road, Finsbury Park, 

Ijondon,!^. {Markyate-street, Herts) Metropolitan .. 1878 

Bryan, Wyndham Colin, Hunstanton R.S.O., Norfolk . . Metropolitan • . 1883 
Bryce, W. Kirk, West Park-street, Chatteris, S.O. Cambs. . . Metropolitan • . 1894 
Buchanan, William J., 5, Lion-terrace, Portsea, Portsmouth Regent's Park • . 1892 
Buckley, George, 33, Rectory-road, Shelton, Stoke-on-Trent 

{Hanley) Manchester .. 1892 

Bull, William. B.A. (Lon.), Sutton-in-the-Elms, near Rugby Bris. & U.C. Lon. 1857 
BuUer, William Hutchings, Radstock, Bath 1868 



MINISTERS IN THE BRITISH ISLES. 339 

Name uidPosul Address. College. o^SSSd 

Bullimore, Thomas, Montrose House, Hellesdon-road, 

Norwich 1877 

Burbridge, R., 9, Eaton-terrace, St.John*s Wood.London, N.W. 

{Avenue, Pratt'Street, Camden Town) 1884 

Burgess, Frederick George, Park-road, Wellingborough 1870 

Burnett, William, Brasted S.O., Kent 1874 

Bumham, John, Fern Bank, Brentford (JSvan^e/isO • < •• Metropolitan .. 1874 
Bums, Dawson, M.A., D.D. (U.S.), X2, Foxmore-street, 

Battersea. London, S.W .. .. ..Midland.. ..1851 

Bums, Joseph, Crescent-place, Dalmuir, Glasgow {Clydebank) 1891 

Burrell, George, 48, Gladstone-road, Watford 1869 

Burrows, Edward John, London-road, Attleborough, Norfolk Metropolitan . . 1894 
Burrows, Robert Alanson, X2, Almond-street, Faraworth 

R.S.O., Lanes Manchester . . 1886 

Burton, William, Minehead R.S.O., Som Bristol . . . . X857 

Burt, Henry Matthew, Mildenhall S.O., Suffolk . . . . Metropolitan . . 1877 
Bury, Fenton Ernest, Rockefeller House, Harcourt-street, 

Dublin Dublin Univ. . . 1891 

Butcher, Joseph William, Harlow .. .. .. ,. Regent's Park . . 1871 

Butlin, James, M.A. (OxoN.), 15, Beauchamp-avenue, 

Leamington . . Oxford Univ. . . 1879 

Butterworth, Joseph Croucher, M.A. (Edin.), Surbiton T.S.O., 

Kingston-on-Thames Bristol .. .. 1843 

Byard, Henry Kerby, Winslow Metropolitan . . 1892 

Caldwell, Stuart, Clayton-le-Moors, Accrington . . . . Manchester . . 1887 

Callaway, Joseph Hall, Wendover, Tring Richmond (Wes.) 2877 

Camp, George, Epworth, Doncaster Midland . . . . 1883 

Campbell, John, 32^^, King-street, Dundee 1875 

Campbell, John O'Neill, 60, Femleaf-street. Moss Side, 

Manchester Metropolitan .. 2885 

Campbell, John W.. Queen's-road. Wisbech Metropolitan . . i88a 

Campbell, Owen D., M.A. (Cantab.), The Grove, Haver- (Rawdon&Camb. 

fordwest . . ( Univ 1877 

Campbell, Thomas Simpson, Fishponds. Bristol • . . . Glas. U. & B. U.S. 1887 

Cantrell, Edwin Wykes, 34, ClareiAOnt-road, Sparkbrook, 

Birmingham .... Midland.. .. 1867 

Carey, Samuel Pearce, M.A. (LON.), ix, Gregory-street, 

Loughborough.. Regent's Park .. 1887 

Carlile, John Charles, 37, Reverdy-road. Bermondsey, 

London, S.E. {Trinity, John-street, Marylehone) . . Metropolitan • , 1884 

Carrington, Elijah, 8, Grange Crescent-road, Sharrbw 

Sheffield Midland . . . . x88t 

Carryer, Thomas Haddon, 2, St. Stephen's-road, Highfields, 

Leicester Bradford .. 1863 

Carson, Robert Haldane, Tubbermore, CO. Derry X845 

Carter, Arthur Charles, Queensbury, near Bradford . . . . Midland . . . . 1885 

Carter, Edwin Alfred, Oreston, Bolingbroke-grove, Wands- 
worth-common, London, S.W Metropolitan . . i88a 

Carter, Frederick, 173, Brixton-hill, London, S.W. {Raleigh- 
Park, Brixton-hiV^ Metropolitan .. 1889 

Carter, James William, 7, Belmont-road, Broadstairs R.S.O., 

Kent * 1861 

Carter, Lawrence George, 8x Waterside, Chesham R.S.O., 

Bucks Rawdon . . . . x868 

Carvath, James, Willingham R.S.O., Cambs Shebbear B.C. . . x886 

Carver, Thomas Albert, 29, Thurleigh-road, Wandsworth 

Common, London, S.W Metropolitan .. x88o 

Case, Harry B., 5, Stockmore-street, Oxford Metropolitan . . X890 

Case, Sydney Henry, M.A. (OxoN.), Caversham, Reading . . Bris.&Ox. Uxxiv. X877 

Castle, John T., 28, Osborne-road, Broadstairs, R.S.O. Keht, 

' {St, Peters) Metropolitan . . 1894 



340 MINISTERS IN THE BRITISH ISLES. 

Name and Postal Address. Collcce. Mmiatry 



Cattell, James, Park Lodge, Bessels Green, Sevenoaks 1865 

Causton, Alfred James, Fakenham, Norfolk 1870 

Causton, John William, 4, St. Helen's-crescent, Swansea .. Bristol .. .. 1893. 

Cave, James, Oxford House, Wokingham Regent's Park . . 1867 

Caven, Robert, B.A. (LON.). 56, St. Peter's-road, Leicester . . Rei^ent's Park . . 1859^ 
Chadwick, John, Holmesdale.Tennison-road, South Norwood, 

London, S.E. {HolmesdaU-roiul, South Norwood) .. Metropolitan .. 1866 

Chambers, Arthur Clarence, Lyndhurst, Woolwich-road, 

Belvedere {Belvedere) Metropolitan . . 1884 

Chambers, Clarence, 172, Choumert-road, Peckham, London, 

S.E Metropolitan .. 1863 

Chambers, William, 33, Queen's-place, Shoreham, Sussex.. Metropolitan .. x878> 

Chandler, George, Thurleigh. Bedford x866 

Chaplin, W. Knight. 26, Venn^-street, South Bromley, 

London, £. {Poplar and Bromley Tabernacle) i88x 

Chapman, Charles Bell, Neatishead, Norwich 187ft 

Chapman, David Charles, Yalding, near Maidstone . . . . Metropolitan . . 1875 
Chapman, William, 3, Northwick-terrace, Cookham-road, 

Maidenhead Midland.. .. 1843 

Chappelle, J. K., Roughton, Homcastle Manch. (Ind.) .. z86x 

Charlesworth, G., Newchurch-road, Stacksteads, MaLn- 

chester {Acre Mill, Bacup) 1869 

Charlesworth, Vernon J., Orphanage, Stockwell, London, S.E 1864 

Charter, John, Middleton-in-Teesdale, via Darlington 1862 

Chedburn, William Stewart, 86. Beech - grove - terrace, f Edin. Univ. & 

. Aberdeen \ Rawdon . . z86ft 

Chenery. Richard, 19, Greame-street. Moss Side, Manchester Bap. Evan. Soc. . 1849 
Cheshire, Stephen, The Green, Stony Stratford . . . . Regent's Park . . 1885 
Chettleborough, Robert Edward, Chelsham-road, South 

Croydon Metropolitan .. 1878 

Chinnery, David, Melbourne, Derby Metropolitan . . z886 

Chrystal, CoUn, Dunnington, Alcester, Redditch . . . . | ^'jf ^^^ g^^' jgg^ 

Chrystal, James Robert, M.A., B.D. (ST. Andrew's), 

Almada Grange, Hamilton St.And.&Glas.U. z886 

Clare, Robert Bone, Dorchester z86fr 

Clark, Charles, St. Kilda, Durdham-park, Bristol .. .. Midland.. .. 1862 

Clark, David, 4, Airlie-terrace, Dundee Pont. & Glas. U. 1889 

Clark, Henry, M.A. (Edin.), Durley Dean Mansions, Bourne- 
mouth Stepney.. .. 1844 

Clark, James, New-street, St. Neots Z85S 

Clark, John Pearce, M.A. (Edin.), Gunnersbury, London, 

\W.{Gunnersbury) Edin. A Bristol.. 1877 

Clark, Joseph, Mountford-house, Carrington, Nottingham . . Metropolitan . . 1882 

Clark, Robert, 7, Ravenscrott-avenue, Connswater, Belfast 1889 

Clark, Thomas, 9, Hardinge-road, Ashford, Kent x8sz 

Clark, Thomas, Market Driyton. Salop Pontypool . . z86i 

Clark. William. Brooke, Norwich Z882 

Clarke, Charles, B.A. (LoN.), Ashby-de-la-Zouch .. .. Bradford .. z8sS 
Clarke, James Bosworth, 9, Coimaught-avenue, Mutley, 

Plymouth 1885 

Clarke. William. Burford R.S.O., Oxon X892 

Cliff, George James, 3, Colinfield, Douglas-road, Wigan . . Rawdon . . . . 189Z 
Clifford, John, M.A., LL.B., B.Sc. (LON.). D.D. (U.S.), F.G.S. 

50, St. Quintin's-avenue, N. Kensington, London, W. 

{Westbourne Park^ Praed-street, and Bosworth-roadt 

Paddington) Midland&Lon.U. z8s$ 

Goats, Jervis, M.A. (Glas.), 8, Ibrox-terrace, Govan . . . . Glas. U. & B.U.S. 1872 

Cobb, George, 4, Queen's-road, Bury St. Edmunds i86» 

Cocker, Thomas. Redland House. Pontnewydd, Newport, 

Mon. •• . .. ,• .. .» .. Pontypool .. 1867 



MINISTERS IN THE BRITISH ISLES. 34I 



Name and Postal Address Collei^e. coiD'm\iced 

Cockerton, Frederick Murfit, Limpsfield S.O., Surrey .. Metropolitan .. 1857 

Cockett, John, The Chestnuts. Walsoken, Wisbech (If^is&ec/t^ 1859 

Cole, Benjamin James, Lossiemouth Metropolitan .. 1892 

Cole, Charles, 157, Park-road, Bolton Metropolitan . . 188a 

Cole, John, Leominster Haverfordwest . . 1869 

Cole, John William, 44, Macoma-road, Plumstead, London, 

aE. {Park-road, Plumstead) 1859 

Cole, Thomas John, 41, St. Marys-road, Peckham, London, S.E 1853 

Coleman, Edward Ernest, 87, Burford-road, Nottingham . . Rawdon . . . . 1878 

CoUett, James, Woodfield-road, King's Heath, Birmingham Rawdon . . . . z888 

CoUey, John William, Ho])e House, High-street, Amersham Metropolitan . . 1887 

Collier, David, Hirwain, Aberdare Pontypool and 

Cardiff U.C. ..1892 
Collier, John Thomas, i, Cranbourne Villas, Wilton-road, 

Salisbury Bristol .. .. 1847 

Collings, Harry, Lawn House, Castle-street, Luton .. .. Bristol .. .. 1880 

Collings, Thomas, Burton Latimer, near Kettering 1883 

Collins, John, Ingleside, Lymington Metropolitan . . 1863 

Collins, Thomas, 99, St. Andrews-road, PoUockshields, ( Glas. U.&Free 

Glasgow 1 Church Coll. 1895 

CoUinson, James, 6, Broom Bank-villas, The Broom, 

Rotherham Rawdon . . . . 1882 

Colls, Lazarus Henry, Tring 1884 

Colman, Robert, J. P., Leehurst, Wyndham Park, Salisbury. . Regent's Park . . 1870 

Colsell, T., x8, Lower Ford-street, Coventry 1868 

Comfort, Jabez Ambrose, Witney College, Witney, Oxon . . Regent's Park . . i86i 

Compton, Edward, 9, Wellington-square, Hastings (i?y«) .. Metropolitan .. 1863 

Connor, E. Poole, Cambridge-road, Aldershot. . ' 1893 

Connor, John, Cathcraig, Motherwell Glasgow Univ. . . z888 

Cook, George H., 31, Summer Hill-road, Maindee, Newport, 

Mon Bristol .. .. 1876 

Cook, George Smith, 82, Tredegar-road, Bow, London, E 1847 

Cooke, John Hunt, Ramleh, Coolhurst-road, Crouch End, 

London, N. • Stepney.. .. 1856 

Cooke, Thomas Edward Cozens, Western-road, Abergavenny Regent's Park . . 1865 

Coombs, William, 180, Cambridge-road, Aylesbury .. .. Metropolitan .. z86o 

Cooper, James Lewitt, Long Crendon, Thame . . . . Bristol . . . . 1876 

Cooper, John, Smeeth, Ashtord 1877 

Corbet, Alexander, 85, Finnart-street, Greenock .. ,. Metropolitan .. 1887 

Cordon, Henry, 61, Rockfield-road, Anfield, Liverpool 1875 

Cork, Daniel, Marengo-villa, Budleigh Salterton S.O., Devon x868 

-Cornish, Joseph, 19, Hastings-street, Leicester . . . . Regent's Park . . 1885 
Comwell, Charles, Brixton Tabernacle, Stockwell-road, 

Jjondon, S.y/.{StockweU'road, Brixton) 1863 

Cossey, Francis Edward, Eye, Suffolk Bury . . . . 1869 

Cotes, Thomas, 24, Byrom-street, Todmorden .. .. Glas U.& Midland 1888 

Cottam, James, 5, Newstead-road, Wakefield Metropolitan . . 1883 

Cotton, Arthur Frederic, Brabourne, Ashford, Kent . . . . Metropolitan . . 1878 
Cousins, Henry Thomas, Abergele-road, Colwyn Bay R.S.O., 

Denbighshire .'. .. E. London Inst. . . x88o 

Cowdy, Samuel, LL.D. (U.S.), 26, Lorn-road, Brixton, London, 

S.W 1840 

Cowell, Josiah, Coriantum, Rushton-crescent, Bournemouth 1849 

Cox. James Mitchell, 108. Shiriand-road, London, W. {St, 

Peter's Park, Paddifigton) Metropolitan .. 1866 

Cox, James R., 2, Lincoln-villas, Cleveland-road, South 

Woodford, Essex 1867 

Crabb, Samuel, Glen Islay Villa, Ardmory-road, Rothesay, 

Bute Metropolitan .. 1865 

Craise, George Philp, Caenlochan-terrace, Broughty Ferry 

R.S.O., Forfarshire Regent's Park ,. 1887 

Crassweller, Harris, B.A. (LON.), 21, Hermon-hill, Dundee . . Stepney . . . . 1853 



342 MINISTERS IN THE BRITISH ISLES. 



Nunc and Potul Addresi . CoOeirft. coaunwaoed 

Crathem, William Luke, 8, Alpha-place, Appledore R.S.O., 

Devon 187ft 

Crofts, Edmund James, Alcester, Redditch Rawdon.. .. 1884 

Croome, Charles George, Highfield, Wiverton-road, Sher- 
wood Rise, Nottingham Metropolitan . . 1882 

Crouch, John, Janefield-place, Paisley . . Metropolitan . . 1866 

Cruickshank, James, Crewkeme, Somerset Metropolitan . . 1867 

Cuif, William, Amesbury House, Lordship-road, Stoke 

Newington, London, N. {Shareditch Tab§macU) . . Metropolitan . . 1865 

Cule, George Griffiths, Dynevor House, Pontypridd . . . . Llangollen . . 1883 
Cuhross, James, M.A., D.D. (St. Andrew's), Joint President, ( St. Andrew's & 

The College, Stokes Croft, Bristol ( Edinburgh Univ. 1850 

Cunliffe, Frederick, Walgrave, Northampton Midland . . 1885 

Curry, Thomas Burton, Apsley House East, Britannia-road, 

Great Yarmouth Metropolitan .. 1884 

Curtis, Alfred, Coggeshall-road, Braintree Metropolitan . . 1890 

Curtis, Edward, Hatch Beauchamp, near Taunton . . . . Rawdon . . . . i86x 
Curtis, George, 41, Acton-street, Gray's-inn-road, London, 

V/.C-iHandelstreet [Henrietta-street], King's Cro3s) .. Metropolitan .. 1889 
Curtis, James, Ashburton Villa, Uxbridge-road, Hanwell, 

London, W. {Staims-road, Hounslow) . . 1878 

Curwood, Alfred William, Hylton-terrace, South-parade, 

West Hartlepool Mutropoliian . . 1889 

Cutts, Thomas, 64, Derbyshire-lane, Hucknall Torkard, 

Nottingham - x86x 

Dann, James, 3, Tackley-place,-Oxford 1865 

Dann, Thomas Ruffell, Oriel Villa,' Bloomfield-avenue, 

Bath Rawdon.. .. 1890 

Darby, R. D., 17, Harberton-road, Whitehall Park, London, 

N. {HaMeUviHe-road, Homsey Rise) 1886 

Dart, William Francis, Fleet, Holbeach 1875 

Davidson, Alfred Knight, Old Buckenham, Attleboro', Norfolk Metropolitan . . 1871 

Davidson, George W., Milton, Chipping Norton . . . . Metropolitan .. 1884 
Davies, Alfred Jones, Cowlersley House, Milnsbridge, 

Huddersfield Manchester . . 1883 

Davies, Benjamin, 12, Kemeys-street, Griffithstown, Newport, 

Mon. {Cwmmera) Pontypool . . 1887 

Davies, Benjamin, 19, Bryntirion-street, Dowlais . . . . Haverfordwest . . x88a 

Davies, Benjamin, 29, Richard -street, Pontypridd . . . . Haverfordwest . . 1854 

Davies, Benjamin, 85. Belgrave-road, Darwen Manchester .. z888 

Davies, Benjamin T., Lumb, Manchester Haverfordwest.. 1882 

Davies, Charles, 31, Glynrhondda-street, Cardiff .. .. Llangollen .. 1870 

Davies, Dan, Porth R.S.O., Glam. Pontypool . . 1879 

Davies, Daniel, 9. Ombersley-road, Newport, Mon Haverfordwest . . 1864 

Davies, Daniel, 2, Gellydeg Cottages, Tonypandy, Llwynpia 

R.S.O., Glam . . Pontypool . . 1866 

Davies, Daniel, 24, Stepney-place, Llanelly, Carm 1841 

Davies, Daniel, Felinfoel, Llanelly, Carm. (Llangf/elach, Glam.) 1885 

Davies^ Daniel James, Ivor Towy, Manordilo R.S.O., Carm. 

(Cwmi/or) 1873 

Davies, David, Brook Cottage, Llanbister, Penybont R.S.O., 

RaidnoTshire (Maesyrhelem) 1876 

Davies, David, Lisvane, near Cardiff Haverfordwest . . 1867 

Davies, David, Oakhurst, Llandudno Llangollen . . 1874 

Davies, David, Laws-street, Pembroke Dock Pontypool . . 1853 

Davies, David, 63, Wilbury-road, Hove, Brighton . . . . Bristol . . . . 1873 

Davies, David, Harlech R.S.O., Merioneth x886 

Davies, David Burwyn, 23, Cradock-street, Swansea . . Pontypool . . 1886 

Davies, David Charles, Resolven, Neath Haverfordwest . . 1889 

Davies, David Dyvan, Brjmdilo, Port Talbot, Glam Pontypool . . 1866 



MINISThRS IN THE BRITISH ISLES. 343 

NaiM and Postal Address. Comg:^. JH^nll^ 

Davies, David James, Gough-buildings, Ystradgjrnlais, 

Swansea Llangollen .. 1892 

Davies. David Morgan, B.A. (LoN ), Rhiw-road, Colwyn Bay f Pontypool and 

R.S.O.. Denbighshire ( Bristol 1895 

Davies, David Owen, 89, Milnrow-road R.O., Rochdale . . Manchester . . 1881 

Davies, David Rees, Brynhyfryd T.S.O., Swansea • . . x868 

Davies, David Saunders, Pleasant View, Llanboidy, Whitland 

R.S.O.. Carm. ( Whitland) . . . . • • • • . . Pontypool . . 1867 
Davies, David Stephen, Saron, Llandybie R.S.O., Carm. . . Pontypool . . x863 
Davies, Evan, Peny-Bryn House, near Monmouth . . . . Haveribrdwest . . 1849 

Davies, Evan, Llangloffan, Letterston R.S.O., Pem Haverfordwest . . 1865 

Davies, Evan Thomas, 4, Church-street, Rhyl Llangollen . . 1873 

Davies, Evan Wicliflfe, 9, Church-street, Ton Pentre, Pentre 

R.S.O., Glam. {Tonystrad) Haverfordwest . . x88l 

Davies, George, 164, Grosvenor-road, Westminster, London, 

S.W. {Romfuy 'Street, Westminster) Metropolitan . • x886 

Davies, George, I, Prospect- villas, Ridgeway-road, Redhill ' .. 1890 

Davies, Gethin, D.D. (U.S.), Principal, The College, Bangor Bristol . . . . 1870 

Davies, Hugh, Slack lane, Keighley Manchester . . 1875 

Davies, James Phillips, Mill-road, Caerphilly, Cardiff . . Haverfordwest . . 1863 
Davies, James Waite, 2, Bromley-road, Lee, London, S.E. 

{Burnt Ash, Lee) Metropolitan .. 1886 

Davies, John, Alban-square, Aberayron R.S.O., Card. 185a 

Davies, John, Killay, Swansea '. . . . Haverfordwest . . 1867 

Davies, John Lee, Brynamman R.S.O., Carm. .. .. Pontypool .. 1893 

Davies, Joseph, II, Lowwood-grove, Birkenhead .. .. Llangollen .. 1873 
Davies, Joseph Morlais, M.A. (LON.), Classical Tutor, The J Pont., Reg. Pk., 

College, Cardiff I & U. Coll. Lond. 1885 

Davies, Lewis, Roger's Well, St. Clear's, Carm. 1873 

Davies, Owen, D.D. (U.S.), Cefnfaes, Carnarvon .. .. Llangollen .. 1865 
Davies, Owen, Greenfield House, Llantwit Major, Cowbridge Pont5rpool . . 1884 

Davies,