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Full text of "A brief historical sketch of the town of Vinalhaven"

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]{ Brief historical Slietcl? 

of tl^e 

tTOWN»OF.VINALHAVEN,f 

FROM ITS EARLIEST KNOWN SETTLEMENT. 



•|-^ 



^Fdparcd by ©pdep ot fr^e H'^owr), 



ON THE OCCASION OF ITS 



Q|n1E: |-|J[NlDREDJh| y^^jMlNllVERSARy. 




ROCKLAND, ME. 

PRINTED AT THE FREE PRESS OFFICE. 

1889. 



INTRODUCTION. 

In writing this brief sketch of the town, we are (owing 
to the limited means at our disposal, and the short time 
allotted us in which to prepare it,) compelled to confine 
ourselves to such published references as can be most 
readily obtained, and to such information, traditional and 
otherwise, as can be gleaned from those who are now living, 
and records that are easily accessible. No doubt many will 
be disappointed that notice of their ancestors does not 
appear here, but to those we can only say that we did the 
best we could under the circumstances, and hope this brief 
sketch, crude as it is, may be, may prove an incentive to 
the town, or some enterprising individual, to take measures 
for having published a more extended and complete work. 
Nor can we vouch for the absolute correctness of all that 
is herein written, but judging from the source of our 
information, and by careful comparisons, we think that on 
the whole it may be taken as authority. It is a lamentable 
fact that scarcely a tradition even, exists here of events 
that must have occurred during the first quarter century 
of settlement here. The first settling of any country is 
generally beset with dangers, a battle for subsistence, a 
period of hardships, suffering and privations, and those 
who first came here must have had their full share. 
Coming as they did to a wilderness, with miles of old ocean 
between them and other settlements, exposed at first to the 
missiles of the Indians, and later to the indignities of the 
British, their lot must have been a hard one. No records 
of those stirring times have been preserved, at least we 
have not learned of any. That the people displayed a 



4 HJSTOKY OF VINALHAVEN. 

military s[)irit, and were organized for their own protection 
seems evident, but when such companies were formed, how 
officered, etc., we have not been able to . ascertain. The 
only evidence we have seen that a military organization 
existed here previous to 1789, is a commission as Lieutenant 
of Militia to James Calderwood, signed by John Hancock, 
Governor of Massachusetts, dated 1787, the original of 
which is now in possession of Kufus Calderwood. Many 
of the settlers here were men of learning, some of whom 
attained distinction in the war for independence. This 
little work is not classed as a history in the strict sense 
of the term, but that it may lead to further developments 
is the sincere wish of those who have undertaken to compile 
it. 



DESCRIPTION AND POPULATION. 

The town of Vinal Haven, in the county of Knox, State 
of Maine, is situated in Penobscot Bay, and is the largest 
of the group formerly called the " Fox Islands." The 
village, (Carver's Harbor), is in about 44 N. latitude, 
and is, by the route traveled, about 15 miles east from 
Rockland. Its greatest length from N. W. to S. E. 
extremity is seven and one-half miles, and about five miles 
in width, but so cut into by Mother Ocean that no point is 
distant more than one mile from salt water. According to 
the survey made by Rufus Putnam in 1785, the island 
contains about 10,000 acres, and there are several small 
fresh ponds, namely ; Cedar, Otter, Folly, Long, and Round 
Ponds. The climate of the place, surrounded as it is by 
waters that mingle with those of every zone, and which 
have a considerable effect in equalizing temperature, is 
mild, compared with that more inland ; the mercury though 
rauQ'ino- from 10 deg-rees below zero to 90 deg-rees above in the 
shade, seldom reaches those points. There are numerous 
small islands and ledges in the vicinity, which are often visited 
by our sportsmen after sea-fowl, which are not so plenty as 
formerly. These birds were very abundant in the early 
days of settlement here, and was one source of supply upon 
which the inhabitants relied for sustenance. One manner 
of capturing them aside from the usual mode of shooting, 
was called " duck driving," and was certainly novel and 
exciting, though it would not be considered sportsman-like 
in our day. A brief description of how it was done may 
not be out of place here. For several days in the month 
of August the birds could not fly, as they were then 
shedding their feathers, a fact which was well known to 
the settlers, and at such times a sufificient number would 



6 HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 

get together in boats, and proceeding to the rendezvous of 
the birds, would form a circle partially surrounding them, 
and in that way they were driven into some cove or creek, 
up onto the shore, where they were overtaken and killed. 
Capt. Heuben Carver has informed us that his father was 
one of a party tluu captured 2,100 birds in a single drive. 

Granite, of which there are several varieties, is found 
here in inexhaustible quantities, and is the principal 
geological feature of the town. 

It is said that at one time, bears, foxes, otter, and mink 
were quite numerous here, but as the settlers multiplied, 
and the land became cleared, those animals grew less in 
numbers, until at present there is scarcely a vestige of 
them to be found. The last bear killed here was shot b}- 
William Vinal, Jr., and Silas Mills, in the swamp a short 
distance to the westward of W. H. Vinal's residence. As 
near as we can learn, it occurred about 75 years ago. An 
occasional sly Reynard is all that remains of the specie that 
caused Pring to give these islands th-e primitive name by 
wliicli they are often called at the present time. 

The population of the town in 1790 was 855, and in 
1880, 2,855. The former included Noith Haven (set off 
in 1846), Hurricane (set off in 1878), and all islands 
within three miles. The combined population in 1880 of 
the islands originally within the jurisdiction of Vinal 
Haven was o,830. According to the Assessors' returns, 
there were, on the first of April this year, 2,712 inhabitants 
.in tills town, a loss since 1880 of 1-43. 

DISCOVERY. 

In the year 1603, Martin Pring, with two vessels, sailed 
from England for the new world, and on the 7th of June 
of the same year entered Penobscot Bay. He was well 
pleased with the scenery of the bay, the excellent anchorage, 
and abundance of fish in its waters. He probably landed 
upon one of the ishmds in this locality to obtain water and 
game, and seeing a number of silver grey foxes he named 



HISTOKY OF VINALHAVP:N. • i 

the group the " Fox Islands." This appears to be the first 
reference in history to these islands up to the year 1603, It 
is said that in the year 1556 Theret, a French explorer, 
entered the Penobscot and landed in the vicinity of 
Islesboro. He must have seen tlie islands to the southeast 
of him, but if he did it does not appear that he made any 
record of it. There are accounts of earlier visits to the 
coast of Maine, but no mention is made of this particular 
locality. To Martin Pring, then, belongs the honor of 
having been the first to discover and name the " Fox 
Islands." History records that he did not stay long in this 
vicinity, but, sailing farther south, procured a valuable 
cargo and returned to England. His dealings with the 
natives appear to have been honorable, a fact of which is 
not recorded of several of his countrymen who subsequently 
visited these shores. 

SETTLEMENTS, ETC. 

It has been said that the first permanent settlement liere 
was made in 1765, but by whom we have not been able to 
learn. As will be noted, Francis Cogswell, of Ipswich, 
Mass., is supposed to have been here as early as 1760, but 
as we understand it,his was only a temporary residence. He 
was probably attracted by the growth of timber near the 
shore, and having erected a saw mill, he for several years, 
in the spring and summer, manufactured into boards, etc., 
such as could be felled near the water. About 1760 there 
were several who attempt^ed to establish themselves in tlie 
north island, but were driven away by the Indians. It 
appears that David Wooster was the first permanent settler 
on the north island, having come there in 1762, and we are 
also informed that a son of his was the first white child 
born in town. About 1766 the Carvers came, and up to 
the year 1775 a great advance in settlements was made. 
The first year of the Revolution was a period of distress 
for the inhabitants, says the historian. They were unable 
to raise corn and grain sufficient for support, and there 



8 • HISTORY OF VTNALHAVEN. 

were few calls for wood and lumber, and with other 
settlements petitions were sent to the Provincial Congress, 
asking for food, ammunition and arms. All, or nearly all 
of the settlers here were friendly to the cause of the 
colonies, and during the war a number left here, some to 
seek quarters less exposed and others to take up arms in 
defense of their rights. All through the war the people 
suffered much from the ravages of marauding Tories, who 
went about in boats called " shaving mills " robbing them 
of their crops and stores. During the occupancy of Castine 
by the British, many of the inhabitants were compelled to 
leave their families and to work upon the fort, and other 
indignities were heaped upon them. After the peace, new 
settlers began to arrive, and some of those who had left 
during the war returned again. A meeting was held in 
March, 1785, when it was voted by the inhabitants to 
petition the General Court praying to be quieted in full 
possession of the lots they occupied. It was also voted 
that if the prayer of their petition was answered favorably 
each man should stand by his buts and bounds, and no 
landmarks should be removed. Following is a copy of the 
petition and response thereto : 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

To tJie Honorable Senate ovd H()i(s(' (if Rei)rescntat'tv(;s hi General 

Court assembled : — 

The petition of th^ inhabitants of Fox Islands, in the 
County of Lincoln, Humbly Sheweth that your Petitioners 
of their Ancestors, did about twenty years since. Settle on 
the small Island known by the name of the Fox Islands, 
which was then in the State of Nature, and not claimed by 
any Power, Potentate or Individual, in any other way than 
the Crown of England laid claim to the whole Common- 
wealth. That your Petitioners removed with their families 
to the said Islands, which they divided into lots and have 
cleared the Land in part. That when the British Troops 
took possession of Bagaduce, the inhabitants of said Islands 



HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 9 

(not choosing to be under the tyrany of the British King) 
removed Avith their families, within the Protection of the 
Commonwealth, and did serve during the Expeditions to 
the Penobscot, bearing arms against the enemy ; but upon 
the defeat of the Troops of this Commonwealth, the greatest 
part of your Petitioners were obliged to abandon their 
possessions to the Mercy of the enemy who came on to the 
Island and burnt their houses, plundered them of all the 
substance that they were obliged to leave upon the Islands, 
and many of the inhabitants they (out of rev^enge) took 
from their families and obliged them to work upon their 
Fortifications at Bagaduce, and cruelly treated those who 
sliowed any reluctance at it. 

Your Petitioners are now peaceably resettled upon the 
said Islands, have erected huts, until they can rebuild their 
houses, and are determined, soon as circumstances will 
admit, to erect a building for Public Worship, and to settle 
a minister of the Gospel among them, and also to found a 
Public School for the education of their children. The 
Petitioners now entreat your Honors to take into your wise 
consideration their peculiar ciicumstances and sufferings, 
and quiet them in full possession of the said Islands that 
the}' nv'iy enjoy privilege and Immunity with the rest of 
their fellow citizens in the Commonwealth, and under that 
government they ardently wish to be su[)ported in their 
person and property. They tlierefore pray that your 
Honors would relinquish any claims that this Commonwealth 
may have to the said Islands, to all the inhabitants and 
their Heirs and Assigns forever, and your Petitioners as in 
duty bound will ever Pray. 

(Signed) George White, i Attorneys for 

John CaldeuWOOD, S t/tc Inliahltants. 



whose names are as follows : 

John Calderwood, William Vinal, James Stinson, James 
Calderwood, Increase Leadbetter, Job Philbrook, James 
Jewell, John Leadbetter, Anthony Coombs, Joseph Green, 



10 HISTORY OF VINALHAVEK. 

James Douglas, Thos. Brown, Maiy Coombs (widow), 
Reuben Brown, Jeremiah Philbrooks, John Burgess, Increase 
Leadbetter, Jr., Isaac Air3% John Smith, John Hambleton, 
Israel Carver, Thaddeus Carver, Caleb Carver, Jona. 
Foster, Sam'l Calderwood, Penelope Winslow (widow), 
Isachar Lane, Wm. Cooper, John Burgess, Jr., James 
Cooper, Ji'., Ephraim Perry, Benjamin Bobbins, James 
Beveridge, Thomas Cooper, Mark Eames, William Bassick, 
Cnshen Thomas (a minor), Thomas Beveridge, Joseph 
Woster, Jr., James Cooper, James Heard, Joseph 
Waterman, James Dunham, Anthony Dyer, John Perry, 
Wm. Dyer, James Wlialing, Stephen Carver, Wm. Perry, 
Justus Eames, Benjamin Kent, Archibald McMullen, 
Nathl Woster, Jona. Bobbins, Benjamin Carr, Sam'l 
Thomas, Thomas Gray, Sam'l Thomas, Jr., Joseph Woster, 
Joel Philbrooks, Ebenezer Crabtree, Luthei' Leadbetter, 
Matthew Beveridge (a minor), William Calderwood (a 
minor). 

A foot note added the information that one of them was 
a negro. 

In response to the foregoing petition, a survey was made 
by liufus Putnam, and the following resolutions were 
passed by the General Court : 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, / 
In Sp:nate, March 11th, 1786. j 

Whereas, it appears to this court from a survey and plan 
of certain Islands lying in the Penobscot Bay, within the 
County of Lincoln, called Fox Islands, taken by Kufus 
Putnam in the year 1785, that said Islands contained 
16,527 acres, (and that not more than one-half of said 
islands is of any value) whereon were seventy-five settlers 
before the first day of January, 1784; and wdiereas John 
Calderwood and other settlers on said Islands have 
petitioned this court for a grant of the same to tliem, their 
heirs and assimis : 

Therefore, resolved. That all the Islands belonging to and 
composing the division of tlie Fox Islands, as described in 



HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 11 

the aforesaid plan, viz.: Bounded westerly and northerly 
l)y Penobscot Bay, easterly by Fox Island Bay (which 
separates these Islands from the Isle au Haut and Deer 
Island division of Islands) and southerly by the Atlantic 
Ocean, be and are hereby granted and coniirmed, with all 
the privileges and appurtenances to the same, belonging to 
John Calderwood and the other settlers who settled there 
before the first day of January, 1784, their heirs and assigns, 
on condition that the said Calderwood and others interested 
as aforesaid, appropriate (of good land) two hundred acres 
for the use of the Ministry, and two hundred acres for the 
use of a grammar school ; and that they pay into the 
treasury of this Commonwealth within one year from this 
date, on interest the sum of one hundred and eight pounds 
in specie, for the expense of surveying the said Islands and 
other charges, and also the sum of sixty-six pounds, seven 
shillings, in consolidated securities of this Commonwealth. 

Provided, that where any original settler has sold, or 
otherwise disposed of his improvements to any other person, 
the purchaser of such improvements, his heirs or assigns, 
shall hold the same lands which such original settler would 
have held by virtue of this resolve, if there had been no 
such sale or disposition. 

Sent down for concurrence. 

Sam'l Phillips, Jij., Frcs'uTt. 

In the House of Representatives, March 13th, 1780. 
Read and concurred. 

Approved, Akteaius Waiid, Spcaler. 

True copy, — Attest : JoHX BowDOiN. 

John Aveijy, Jr., Secirfanj. 

MUNICIPAL. 

The first meeting of which we have seen any record was 
held March lltli, 1785, at the house of Benjamin Kent, on 
the north island. Tliomas Beverage was chosen Clerk. It 
appears that previous to this a petition had been sent out 



12 HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 

• 

to the General Court, by the settlers, praying for a grant 
of the land which they then occupied, but at this meeting it 
was voted to withdraw the first petition and present a new 
one, and Capt. George White was chosen to forward it to 
the General Court. The latter is probably the one known 
as the Calderwood petition, and was exhumed from the 
Massachusetts Archives by Dr. J. F, Pratt, and a copy is 
printed on a preceding page. The meeting also voted to 
raise the sum of twelve pounds to pay for forwanling said 
petition. The same year a survey of the islands was made 
b}' Rufus Putnam. A meeting was held in March, 1786. 
Captain George White was chosen Moderator, and Abner 
C. Lunt, Clerk. The resolve of the General Court, 
relative to granting the land to the settlers here, Avas read 
and accepted, and it was voted to pay Mr. John Yinal, of 
Boston, the sum of thirty-six pounds for his sei'vices in 
obtaining" leg-islation in their favor. 

At the meeting held October 28th, 1788, Thomas 
Beverage was elected Plantation Clerk, and Capt. Joseph 
Waterman, William Vinal, Esq., and Capt. George White 
were chosen Assessors. On February 2-lth, 1789, the 
inhabitants voted that the Assessors employ Mr. John 
Vinal, of Boston, to petition the General Court, in behalf 
of tliis plantation for an abatement of taxes. At the annual 
meeting in March, Thomas Beverage was chosen Clerk, 
and Capt. Josepli Waterman, William Vinal, Esq., and 
Stephen Carver, Assessors. Committees were appointed 
to lay out roads on the South and North Islands. 

TOWN MEETINGS. 

Following is the act of incorporation. 
Ax Act to incorporate the islands in Penobscot Bay 

commonly called the North and South Fox Islands, in 

the County of Lincoln, into a town by the name of Vinal 

Haven. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives 
in General Court assembled, and by the authority of the 



HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 13 

siuiie, that the ishands in the Penobscot Bay, in the County of 
Lincoln, commonly called the North and South Fox Islands, 
Ijounded as follows : Westerly and northerly on Penobscot 
Bay, easterly on Fox Island Bay, which separates the 
islands from the Isle of Holt and Deer Island, division of 
islands, and southerly on the Atlantic Ocean, together 
with the inhabitants thereon, be and they are hereby 
incorporated into a town by the name of Vinal Haven ; and 
the inhabitants of tlie said town are hereby invested with all 
the powers, privileges and immunities which the inhabitants 
of towns within this Commonwealth do, or may by law 
enjoy. 

And be it further enacted, that William Vinal, Esq., is 
hereby authorized and empowered to issue his warrant 
directed to some suitable inhabitant of the said town of 
Vinal Haven, directing him to notify the inhabitants of the 
said town, to meet at such time and place as he shall 
appoint, to choose such officers as other towns are 
empowered to choose at their annual meetings, in the 
months of March or April annually. 

Tliis act passed June 25th, 1789. 

A meeting was held December 15th, when Stephen 
Carver, Anthony Dyer and Mark Fames were chosen 
Selectmen to lay out roads on the North Island, and Israel 
Carver, Thomas Brown and James Jewell for the same 
purpose on the South Island. For labor on the roads it 
was voted to pay three shillings per day for men, and one 
shilling and sixpence for oxen, and also voted that roads 
should be eighteen feet wide. 

In the following description of town meetings, it should 
be noted that they were held alternately each year on the 
North and South Island, and a majority of the selectmen 
were generally chosen in the same way. In the matter of 
appropriations, each island raised its own school money 
until about 1820, but we give only the total amount, with 
a few exceptions. The tax collecting was always given to 
the lowest bidder, and was paid from the town charges, 
but we give it separate as an item of interest. 



14 HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 

1790. — This year it was voted to hire two schoolmasters 
for the ensuing year. Voted to hire Michael Brown to 
teach school on the North Island, and the selectmen were 
instructed to make a contract with Brown for salary. 
The sum of four pounds eight shillings was raised to pay 
assessors' salaries for the previous year, and ten pounds 
was voted to defray town charges. 

1791. — This year, James Stinson and Anthony Dyer 
were chosen Church Wardens, and three pounds was 
raised for town charges, and one pound for a record book. 
At a meeting in May, three pounds six shillings was voted 
to pay for collecting taxes ; eleven pounds to pay Michael 
Brown for teaching school the previous year, and three 
pounds to purchase a standard of weights and measures. 

1792. — This year, Anthony Dyer and Stephen Carver 
were chosen Church Wardens, and seven pounds was voted 
for town charges. In May it was voted to hire a minister 
for four months and sixteen pounds was raised for that 
purpose. It was also voted to have the preaching at the 
house of James Calderwood, on the South Island, and 
Eleazar Crabtree and Samuel Thomas on the North Island. 

1793. — This year, Mark Eames and Benjamin Daggett 
were chosen Church Wardens, and eighteen pounds 
thirteen shillings was raised for town charges. At a 
subsequent meeting it was voted to raise thirty-six pounds 
to pay Mr. John Vinal for past services as agent. Voted 
to buy one and one-half acres of land of Joseph Waterman, 
for a meeting house lot and burial ground. 

1794. — This year Abel Whitman and James Calderwood 
were chosen Church Wardens. Ten pounds was raised 
for town charges, and four pounds for collecting taxes. It 
was voted to divide the town into two districts, viz.: the 
North and South Districts. Voted to hire a school master 
for twelve months in the North District. At a later 
meeting it was voted to raise forty-six pounds ten shillings 
in the North District, to pay Michael Brown for teaching 
school. The article relative to hiring a minister was 
passed over. 



HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 15 

1795. — This year it was voted to pay tour pounds for 
collecting taxes ; and Stephen Carver and James Stinson 
were chosen Church Wardens. Fifteen pounds was raised 
for town charges. At a meeting held in October, it was 
voted to raise six pounds to pay for having a plan of the 
town transcribed from a plan originally made by Rufus 
Putnam, Esq. 

1796. — This year John Day and Tliomas Brown were 
chosen Church Wardens, and forty pounds was raised for 
town charges. 

1797. — This year it was voted to hire a minister, and 
forty pounds was raised for that purpose ; sixty pounds for 
town charges ; thirty-two pounds, nine shillings and 
sixpence for support of poor ; and twelve pounds five 
shillings for collecting taxes. 

1798. — This year one hundred pounds was voted for 
support of preaching ; two hundred pounds for schools ; 
lifty pounds for town charges, and forty-eight pounds for 
support of poor. James Glover and Ezekiel Burgess were 
chosen Church Wardens, and it was voted that any balance 
remaining from town charge appropriations of former years 
be devoted to support of schools and preaching. 

1799. — This year it was voted not to raise any money 
for preaching. Jf^lOO was voted for support of schools ; $60 
for town charges ; and f 140 to John Day for support of 
poor the previous year. The collection of taxes was bid 
off by Ebenezer Eames for -foO, and %'2F) Avas voted to 
William Vinal, Esq., for past services. 

1800. — This year it was voted to divide the town into 
eight districts, four on the North and four on the South 
Islands ; and the article relating to raising money for 
preaching was negatived. It was voted not to raise any 
money for support of schools on the North Island, but it 
was agreed to engage a schoolmaster for the South Island, 
and a committee of three, namely : William Vinal, James 
Calderwood and Cyril Brown, were appointed for that 
purpose. It was voted that each island draw their 



16 HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 

proportion of all moneys in the treasury and that each 
island repair their own roads. Voted to raise $200 for 
repairs of roads on the South Island. The collection of 
taxes was bid off to Mark Calderwood for 'f 30, and |230 
was raised for town charges. 

1801. — This year the following sums were raised : for town 
charges, •li'200 ; roads, f 100 ; schools, 1320 ; collecting taxes, 
$25 ; preaching on North Island, $60. The following matters 
were carried : To pay a .bounty of three cents on crows' 
heads ; not to engage a minister on the South Island ; not 
to allow Matinicus to pay taxes to this town. At the 
meeting in May, William Vinal, Esq., was chosen 
Representative to the General Court, the first chosen from 
this town. 

1802. — Voted this year not to hire any minister, and 
also to prosecute any person cutting down trees on the 
town's land. $100 was raised for roads ; $150 for town 
charges ; $280 for support of schools ; and $24 for 
collecting taxes. No representative this year. 

1803. — This year James Calderwood and Samuel Glover 
were chosen Overseers of the Poor, and it was voted not to 
hire a minister. Support of schools, $320 ; town charges, 
$100 ; poor bills $51 ; ammunition for town, $70 ; collecting 
taxes, $25.50 ; and school arrearages on South Island, $56. 

1804. — This year the articles relating to hiring a minister 
and building a meeting house were passed over. The 
following sums were raised : Support of schools, $330 ; 
town charges, $100 ; poor, $20 ; roads, $50 ; collecting 
taxes, $23.25 ; and for weights and measures, $40. 

1805. — This year it was voted not to have any school on 
the North Island, and the article to raise money for preaching 
was passed over. Voted to have schools on the South 
Island and $230 was raised for that purpose. $150 was 
voted for roads ; $125 for town charges ; $20 for support 
of poor ; and $21 for collecting taxes. At the meeting 
held for election of State officers Uriah Norton received 
several votes for governor. 



HISTOllY OF VINALHAVEN. 17 

1806. — This year a motion was carried to pay a bounty 
of ten cents on crows and bluejays and twenty cents a 
head on eagles. Tliere was voted for town charges -^300 ; 
c-ollecting taxes, $20, and for support of schools on the 
South Island, >^'2'^0. 

1807. — This year on the question of separting Maine 
from Massachusetts, there were 84 votes against and none 
for. Voted not to have any schools on the North Island. 
The following sums were raised : Town charges, $250 ; 
roads, $250 : poor, $20 ; collecting taxes, $28 ; and $260 
for support of schools on the South Island. It was voted 
to pay one shilling per hour for labor on the highway, and 
the same for oxen. 

1808. — This year the following amounts were raised : 
For support of schools. North Island, $200 ; South Island, 
$200; roads, North Island, $500; South Island, $200; 
town charges, $250 ; and collecting taxes, $32. William 
Vinal, Esq., was chosen Representative. 

1809. — The appropriations this year were : Roads, $600 ; 
schools, $400 ; town charges, $240 ; and collecting taxes, 
$43. At the meeting in May, William Vinal was chosen 
Representative. 

1810. — This, as in previous years, the town's poor were 
taken l)y individuals, at a stated sum per week. Voted 
not to have a school on the North Island. Two collectors 
of taxes were chosen, one each for the vSouth and North 
Islands, the former to receive $28 and the latter $11. It 
was voted to raise $240 for town charges, $600 for roads, 
and $230 for schools on the South Island. Several 
meetings were held in May, when the vote of the annual 
meeting to raise $230 for schools on the South Island was 
reconsidered, and it was voted not to have any schools this 
year. William Vinal, Esq., was chosen Representative. 

1811. — This year David Woster, Stephen Delano and 
Ezekiel Dyer were chosen Assessors of Taxes, and it was 
voted not to raise any money for the support of the gospel. 
There were voted for schools $400 ; roads, $200 ; town 



18 HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 

charges, -1150 ; and collecting taxes, •144. For labor on 
the roads it was voted to pay twelve cents per hour for 
men, twelve cents for oxen, twelve cents for ploughs, and 
six cents for carts. William Vinal, Esq., was chosen 
Representative. 

1812. — Tliis year the following sums were raised : For 
roads, -fSOO ; schools, •'1400 ; town charges, -ijfSOO ; and for 
collecting taxes, $40. It was voted not to raise any money 
for support of a minister. Cyril Brown was elected 
Representative. At a meeting held on the 17th of July 
!|100 was voted to purchase powder for the town. A 
committee, consisting of Cyril Brown and William Vinal, 
was chosen to confer with the towns Thomaston, Camden, 
Islesboro and Lincolnville as to the expediency of petitioning 
the government to send an armed vessel to cruise in 
Penobscot Bay. A committee of safety was also chosen. 

1813. — This 3'ear it was voted not to have any schools, 
and $400 was voted for roads, $350 for current expenses, 
and '$43 for collecting taxes. At the meeting in May 
Cyril Brown was elected Representative, and a committee 
was chosen to remonstrate against the removal of the courts 
from Castine. At a subsequent meeting it was voted that 
exempts form themselves into a company of militia. It 
was also voted that the town make application to the State 
government for sixty guns and a supply of powder. In 
this, the second year of the war with England, our mariners 
were greatly harassed by the enemy and the coast was so 
beset by their war ships that it was unsafe for any vessel 
to put to sea. In June or July an occurrence, of which 
the Wliite Island was tlie scene of action and the settlers 
of those islands the actors, will be of interest to the readers 
of this little volume. The British schooner ^ FI3'," while 
lying in the roadstead at Owl's Head, flying American 
colors, had captured five or six coasters, two or three of 
wliich managed to escape, by being run upon the beach, 
after having received orders from the Britisher to get under 
weigh and follow. Eaton, in his history of Thomaston, 



HISTOKY OP VINALHAYEN. 19 

etc., says : With her three prizes, the privateer stood out 
of the harhor and stretched across the bay towards the 
southern extremity of the South Fox Ishmds, where, in 
one of the most romantic harbors (White Island) on our 
coast, they all came to anchor. The sun had now set, and 
a brisk northeast wind, which had been sweeping all day 
over the water, had died away, leaving a long ground swell 
heaving in upon this rock-bound and apparently uninhabited 
island. In this secluded spot, in anticipation of uninter- 
rupted security, (a small whale-boat only being seen to 
enter the harbor), the privateer commenced putting on 
board the Oliver (one of the prizes) the goods taken from the 
other two prizes. But, by means of that boat, it afterwards 
appeared, the inhabitants, notwithstanding the ominous 
silence that prevailed, had been warned of their close 
proximity to a British privateer, and, as soon as the dusk 
of evening had begun to gather, men collected from every 
nook and corner with musket, pusee, and fowling-piece, 
ready to give her battle at early morn. At its coming, the 
men of the privateer were busily engaged in finishing the 
transfer of the goods, while the fishermen fi-om their well 
selected positions were watching unconcernedly these 
operations. " What'schooner is that ? " cried, at length, a 
voice from the shore. " The Shear Water, of Baltimore ; 
won't you come on board ? " replied the captain of the 
privateer. "■ No ; but we invite you to come ashore." 

" I'll see you d d first," replied the officer. This abiiipt 

answer caused a simultaneous fire from the land in all 
directions. The captain of the privateer fell at the fii-st 
discharge, having two balls shot through his body. Taken 
so completely were the officers and crew by surprise that 
they sought safety below ; while their boat was ordered 
ashore and captured. There they were, seventy-five in 
number, driven from the deck ; and not a solitary being- 
could show his head without being shot. But the inventive 
genius of man, always greatest when put to the severest 
test, was called into requisition, and one man, stimulated 



20 HISTORY OF VTNALHAYEN. 

by the dying injunction of the captain " not to be taken," 
volunteered his services to cut the cable. He accordingly 
ventured on deck, and, by creeping along under the 
hammock nettings, succeeded in accomplishing his object. 
But while in the act of passing below the halliards of the 
jib and mainsail, he dearly paid for his temerity, for the 
bullet of some correct-sighted fisherman shattered his under 
jaw. He fell, but succeeded in creeping below. 
Changeable as fortune had thus far been to this luckless 
vessel, a ra}^ of hope yet lingered among her crew, and an 
attempt at escape was resolved on. To keep in check in 
some measure the continual pelting which they were 
receiving, it was proposed to open a fire from the main hatch ; 
but, in the first attempt to do this, a well-directed bullet 
grazed the beard and lip of the venturesome Englishman 
and lodged in the combings of the hatch. The plan was then 
abandoned as futile in the extreme. But a gentle breeze 
and favorable current came to their assistance, and, by 
hoisting the jib and mainsail and managing to steer the 
vessel by means of a bayonet and musket thrust through 
the sky-light, the3^ at length got out of harm's way, and 
finally made their escape, leaving the brave and hardy 
fishermen of Fox Islands the successful captors of their 
boat's crew and the three prize vessels. The same writer 
says that Captain B. Webb, who gave an account of this 
adventure, was a prisoner witli four others on board the 
privateer, and that subsequently they were given their 
liberty, and landed on Matinicus rock. 

1814. — This year a vote was passed not to allow minors 
and men exempt from taxation to work on the roads, and 
also voted not to raise any money for the support of the 
gospel or schools. tflOO was voted for roads ; |550 for 
town charges ; and |)38.50 for collecting taxes. At tlie. 
May meeting it was voted not to send a representative to 
the General Court. 

1815. — This year the following amounts were raised : 
Support of schools, $24:0 ; town charges, #500 ; roads and 



htstory of vtnalhaven. 21 

bridges, |400 ; and collecting taxes, $-47.50. It was voted 
to pay for labor on the roads twenty-five cents per hour for 
men, twenty-five cents for ploughs, and twelve and a half 
cents for oxen. The article to raise money for support of 
the gospel was negatived. No representative chosen this 
year. 

181(3. — This year it was voted to pay the same sum for 
labor on the roads as the preceding year. Appropriations : 
Roads, 1600 ; town charges, $350 ; schools, $400 ; collecting 
taxes, $31 ; and $50 was voted to purchase ammunition. 
At the May meeting there were fourteen candidates for 
representative. Neither having a majority, the meeting- 
was adjourned to the first Monday in May, 1817. In the 
early part of September Thomas Beverage was chosen to 
attend a convention held at Brunswick on the last Monday 
of the same month. On the question of separating Maine 
from Massachusetts there were given for the separation, 
none ; against it, thirty-three votes. 

1817. — The sums raised this year were : For support of 
schools, $400 ; roads, $400 ; town charges, $500 ; collecting- 
taxes, $24.75. In May Cyril Brown was chosen 
Representative. 

1818. — This year it was voted to pay four cents per hour 
for labor on the roads, the same for oxen and ploughs, and 
two cents for carts. $500 was voted for town charges ; 
$400 for support of schools ; $100 for roads ; and $30 for 
collecting taxes. No representative was chosen this year. 
A special meeting was held in June, when the article 
relative to building a schoolhouse in the southern district 
was passed over. 

1819. — This year it was voted not to raise any money 
for support of the Gospel, and the poor were auctioned oft" 
to the lowest bidder. A list of such as were disposed of 
under this vote are given. The following sums were 
raised : Roads, $500 ; schools, $430 ; town charges, $750 ; 
and collecting taxes, $33.50. At the May meeting it Avas 
voted not to choose any representative, and voted to assess 



22 HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 

a tax on the Matinicus Island, and John Green was chosen 
Collector for that island. A meeting was held in September 
when Benjamin Beverage was chosen a delegate to' attend 
a convention at Portland, for the purpose of forming a 
State constitution, and in December the constitution was 
voted upon. The number in favor was thirty-two, and 
opposed two votes. 

1820.— This year |4D0 was raised for roads ; .t400 for 
schools ; !i<250 for town charges ; and 't29.25 for collecting 
taxes. The poor were auctioned off to the lowest bidder, 
and the article relative to selling unoccupied lands was 
passed over. Thomas Waterman was elected Representa- 
tive. 

1821. — This year it was voted to pay 12 1-2 cents per 
hour for labor on the roads, the same for oxen, and the 
surveyors were instructed to procure carts and ploughs as 
cheap as possible. Raised .^400 for roads ; -f 400 for 
schools ; -tSOO for town charges ; and |'27 for collecting 
taxes. Ezekiel Dyer was chosen Representative. 

1822. — This year it was voted to re-district the South 
Island, and two districts were constituted, making six in 
all. Several bills against the town were presented and 
allowed ; and voted for roads, f 400 ; schools, f 523.20 ; 
town charges, $250 ; collecting taxes, #24.50. A committee 
was chosen to consider the feasibility of establishing an 
ale wive fishery on the North Island, for the benefit of the 
town. A petition remonstrating against a division of the 
town was not acted upon. Ezekiel Philbrooks was chosen 
Representative. 

1823.— This year #400 was voted for roads ; $520.20 for 
schools ; $350 for town charges ; and $22.90 for collecting 
taxes. It is presumed that the committee appointed at 
the last annual meeting to consider the feasibility of 
establishing an alewive fishery for the benefit of the town 
reported favorably, for at this meeting another committee 
was appointed and given discretionary power to act in the 
matter. John Glover was elected Representative. 



HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 23 

1824. — This year a committee of three, namely : 
Mahxtiah Luce, George Dyer and David Woster, were 
chosen to superintend the alewive fishery, and it was voted 
not to allow any of said fish to be taken this year. The 
following sums were raised : Roads, >ii'400 ; schools, 
$523.20; town charges, 1450; collecting taxes, 118.50. 
At the annual election in Septeml)er, Ebenezer Calderwood 
was chosen Representative. 

1825. — This year there was voted for schools, -^524 ; 
roads, $400 ; town charges, $650 ; collecting taxes, $24.75 ; 
The alewive privilege was sold to Ethelbert Lindsay for 
$16, for one year, with the understanding that he sell the 
fish to the inhabitants of the town, at a price not exceeding 
33 cents per hundred. At a subsequent meeting, the 
selectmen were instructed to offer a reward of $20 for the 
apprehension and conviction of the person or persons who 
had destroyed the dam at the outlet of the fresh pond. 
George Dyer was chosen Representative. 

1826. — This year the sum of $650 was voted for town 
charges ; $400 for roads ; $524 for schools ; and $35 for 
collecting taxes ; and the article relative to paying the 
poor bills semi-annually was passed over. At the annual 
election, Rufus Calderwood was elected Representative. 

1827. — This year, voted to improve the alewive fishery, 
and a committee was appointed to superintend the same, 
and constables were instructed to post certified copies of 
warrants according to law. Voted that the treasurer have 
for services one per cent, of all moneys paid to him, and 
$650 was voted for town charges ; $525 for schools ; $400 
for roads and bridges ; $27 for collecting taxes ; and $40 
for repairing bridge at the outlet of Carvers' Pond. 
Nathaniel Beverage was chosen Representative. 

1828. — This year the privilege of taking alewives was 
sold to Ephraim Luce for $2.50 ; and $523.23 was voted 
for schools ; $400 for roads ; $450 for town charges ; and 
$100 to build a bridge across Carver's mill stream ; for 
collecting taxes on the South Island, $10 ; North Island, 



24 HISTORY OF VINALHAVEK. 

•t4. The assessors were instructed to take the valuation 
this year. At the annual election John Carver was chosen 
llepresentative. 

1829. — This year the town voted to grant licenses to sell 
spirituous liquors, and also to exempt those living- on 
Green's, Lane's and Dyer's Islands from paying highway 
tax. Raised •|!524 for schools ; -^400 for roads and bridges ; 
•1600 for town charges : and -120 for collecting taxes. 
Benjamin Cral)tree was elected Representative, having a 
majority of two votes. A special meeting was called in 
October to vote on the questions of building a bridge 
across Vinal's Falls, and entering a protest to the 
Legislature against the election of Benjamin Crabtree as 
Representative. The contract for building said bridge was 
taken by John Vinal for -fl-jQ, and there were in favor of 
the protest twenty-one, and against, eighty-nine votes. 

1830. — This year it was voted to pay the collectors two 
per cent, for collecting, with the understanding that they 
collect all of the taxes committed to tliem in one year from 
date of commitment, otherwise they were to have nothing 
for services. Voted to pay the selectmen and other town 
officers seventji'-five cents per day. Raised- #600 for roads 
and bridges ; 1523.20 for support of schools ; and |850 for 
support of poor and other town charges. At the annual 
election Perez Babbidge was chosen Representative. 

1831. — This year the following amounts were raised: 
Roads and bridges, -1600 ; schools, 1628.40 ; support of 
poor, #650 ; and 120 to build a bridge across Old Harbor 
Falls, and also $39 for collecting taxes. At the annual 
election John Carver was chosen Representative, and the 
selectmen were chosen a committee to remonstrate to the 
Legislature against the removal of the courts from Castine 
to Ellsworth. 

1833. — This year Josiah Beverage, Benjamin Crabtree 
and Samuel Young were elected S. S. Committee, and tlie 
choosing of school agents was left with the several districts. 
Voted $600 for roads and bridges ; $628.40 for schools ; 



HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 25 

!|600 for town charges ; and i|45.50 for collecting taxes. 
Joseph Wooster was chosen Representative. 

1884. — This year there was voted for schools f628.40 ; 
roads and bridges, -fBOO ; town charges, $500 ; collecting 
taxes, -^41. All of the town's poor were taken to support 
for one year by Samuel Young, for which he was to i-eceive 
•f2o0. Francis McMuUen was elected Representative. 

1885. — This year the town's poor were taken by 
Benjamin Coombs to support, for ■'$264, and there was 
voted for the support of schools 1628.40 ; roads and bridges, 
$600 ; town charges, -1400 ; and collecting taxes, $41.50. 
It was voted to pay constables $1.50 for warning town 
meetings. At the September meeting, James Smith was 
elected Representative. 

1836. — This year there was voted for roads, $600 ; town 
charges $600 ; support of schools, $628.40 ; collecting 
taxes, $48. At the annual election, David Smith was 
chosen Representative. The vote for shire town was, 
Castine, 158 ; Ellsworth, 1 vote. In October occurred that 
frightful disaster, which is still remembered by many of 
our people, the burning of the steamer " Royal Tar." The 
story as related to us by Mrs. Roxanna Dyer, whose husband 
was captain of the Castine cutter " Veto," that rescued all 
who were saved, is as follows : The Royal Tar was bound 
to Boston from St. Johns, having on board a number of 
passengers, and a caravan of wild animals. In the midst 
of a severe gale (that was blowing off shore) while heading 
for the thoroughfare, the steamer was anchored off Coombs' 
Head. Captain Edward Waite, of Portland, who was a 
passenger, was below at the time, but happening to come 
on deck some time afterwards discovered that the ship was 
on fire and that the crew had left in the boats. Captain 
Waite managed to have the cable slipped and to hoist the 
mainsail, and would probably have succeeded in beaching 
the steamer had not the sail caught fire. The ship was 
fast drifting seaward when the cutter arrived. About 
sixty were saved, including those in the boats. Among 



26 HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 

tlie passengers were sixteen women and twelve children, 
and all but four of the former and one of the latter 
perished. Captain Dyer cared for a number of the rescued 
at his home on the North Island, expending one way and 
another several hundred dollars for which he was never 
reimbursed. In these days of frequent marine disasters 
we get accustomed to such appalling recitals, but fifty 
years ago an occurrence of this kind was talked over for 
many days. 

1837. — At the annuiil meeting there was voted for 
support of schools $628.40 ; roads and bridges, -$600 ; 
town charges, "1600 ; collecting taxes, i29. This year the 
surplus revenue was divided among the towns in the State 
by the Legislature, and it was voted that this town receive 
its proportion of such money. Benjamin Crabtree was 
chosen to receive it from the State Treasurer, and to 
conform to all the requirements of the act, which shall be 
obligatory upon the town. The management of said money 
was left with the selectmen and treasurer, and in loaning 
any of it they were not to charge more than six nor less 
than five per cent, interest. At a meeting in May the 
boundary lines of Districts 2, 3, 4 and 5 were re-established. 
James Smith was chosen Representative. A meeting in 
October voted -f 100 to build a new road in District No. 5* 

1838. — This year there was raised for support of schools, 
$628.40 ; town charges, $800 ; collecting taxes, $48 ; roads 
and bridges, $600, and an additional $100 that was voted 
at a previous meeting. It was voted to make a per capita 
division of the surplus, so that each person should receive 
two dollars. At the September meeting David Smith was 
chosen Representative. 

1839. — This year the territory from John Creed's cove 
northerly to Otis Shaw's line was set off from District No. 
4 and constituted as District No. 7, and there was raised 
for roads $600 ; support of schools, $720 ; town charges, 
$800 ; collecting taxes, $30. The articles in the warrant 
relative to erecting gates instead of bars, and building a 



HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 27 

bridge across Carver's mill stream large enough to allow 
teams to cross were passed over. At a subsequent meeting- 
it was voted that certain loans due the town from 
individuals be paid to the treasurer to cancel notes held 
against the town, and also voted not to pay the assessors 
more than one dollar for services. James Smith was 
elected Representative. On the question of amending the 
constitution to make the terms of all judicial officers seven 
years there were for, 136 ; against, 15 votes. 

1840. — This year the town's poor were taken to support 
by Samuel Young, for -f600. A vote passed, prohibiting 
the treasurer from paying any further claims on account of 
the surplus, unless b}' order of the selectmen. The vote 
of last annual meeting, dividing District No. 4, was 
re-considered, and a committee appointed to re-district and 
report at a future meeting. There was voted for town 
charges, 1800 ; support of schools, f 630 ; roads and bridges, 
$600 ; collecting taxes,$39.50. At the September meeting 
David Vinal was chosen Representative. 

1841.— This year -$780 was voted for schools ; |700 for 
town charges ; !f!600 for roads and bridges, and $50 for 
collecting taxes. Two new districts were set off from No. 
4, viz.: 8 and 9, and one from No. 3, viz.: No. 7. At the 
September meeting, William Thomas was elected 
Re})resentative ; and on the question of biennial elections 
there were, for, 31 ; against, 116. It appears that this 
year a number of citizens petitioned the county commis- 
sioners, praying to have a town way laid out over the 
tide waters of " Carver's Mill stream," and a town meeting 
held in December appointed a committee to remonstrate to 
the Legislature against said petition. A vote was carried 
to instruct the representative from this town to use all 
honorable means to restrain the Legislature from favoring 
said petition. 

1842. — This year the article relative to licensing retail 
dealers of spirituous liquors, was indefinitely postponed, 
and -f 600 was voted for roads and bridges ; |500 for 



28 HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 

support of schools ; fSOO for town charges ; and -117.50 for 
collecting taxes. At a meeting in May an additional sum 
of |>280 was voted for schools. James Crockett, Jr., Avas 
chosen Representative. At a subsequent meeting in 
November 'fl25 was voted to remove school house in 
District No. 4, and l|545 to Samuel Young for support of 
poor. 

1843. — This year the following sums were raised : -f 600 
for schools ; -f 600 for roads and bridges ; $800 for town 
charges, and 135.50 for collecting taxes. On the question 
of setting off the North Island into a separate town, there 
were in favor 62 ; against, 83 votes. Fifty dollars was 
voted to repair the bridge at Vinal's mill. At the annual 
election William Thomas was chosen Representative. 

1844. — This year there was raised for town charges, 
.1900 ; schools, -f600 ; roads and bridges, |400 ; and 
collecting taxes, $*54. Green's Island was made a school 
district. Dexter Farnam, of Islesboro, was elected 
Representative. 

1845. — This year the article in the warrant relative to 
building a town house was passed over, and |<900 was 
voted for town charges ; $780 for support of schools ; $600 
for highways, and $40 for collecting taxes. At the 
September meeting David Vinal was chosen Representative. 

1846. — An article in the warrant relative to settino- off 
the North Island, on the strength of a petition from James 
Beverage, 2nd, and 178 others, was passed over. 
Notwithstanding this action, the North Island was set off, 
and incorporated June 30tli of this year. There was raised 
for roads $600 ; schools, $780 ; town charges, $750 ; 
collecting taxes, $41.21. At the September meeting 
David Ames, of Fox Island, was elected Representative. 

1847. — A meeting was held in March at which a 
committee was appointed to settle the accounts, make a 
division of the poor, etc., between this town and Fox Isle, 
and at the annual meeting the report of the commiitee was 
adopted. Raised for support of schools, $470 ; roads, 



HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 29 

|)400 ; town charges, $400 ; collecting taxes, $20. Joseph 
Boardman, of Tslesboro, was elected Representative. 

1848. — This year there was voted for roads and bridges, 
'f 500 ; town charges, 1500 ; support of schools, !|470 ; 
collecting taxes, $S2. At the September meeting David 
Smith was chosen Representative. 

1849. — This year the following amounts were raised : 
For support of schools, $410 ; roads and bridges, -1400 ; 
town charges, $500 ; collecting taxes, $34. The contract 
for building a bridge across Carver's mill stream was 
awarded to John Carver, for $300. The piers (five in 
number) of said bridge were to be 12 feet in length, and G 
feet wide, built of stone. At a subsequent meeting the 
bridge was accepted, and a sum sufficient to pay for it, 
raised. For representative, David Ames, of North Haven, 
was chosen. 

1850. — This year there was voted for schools $470 ; 
roads and bridges, $400 ; town charges, $350 ; collecting 
taxes, $35.50. The article relating to setting off District 
No. 6 into a separate town was passed over. For 
representative, Joseph Boardman, of Islesboro, was chosen. 
At a meeting held in November, William Vinal, Esq., was 
chosen an agent to ascertain if the town was obliged to pay 
a bill presented by the county commissioners for laying out 
a road the previous year, and he was vested with power to 
authorize the selectmen to settle said bill, or take measures 
for defence in law. 

1851. — The special act of the Legislature granting 
permission to owners of land to erect gates across the town 
roads was read and approved, and it was voted to have 
open roads from the 20th of November to the 20th of 
March. For schools there was voted $501 ; town charges, 
$350 ; highways, $400 ; collecting taxes, $38.50, and $75 
to build a bridge across the carrying place (so called). 
The contract for building said bridge was awarded to F. 
A. Hunt, for which he was to receive $73. No representa- 
tive elected this j^ear. 



30 HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 

1852. — This year 1)200 in money was voted for highways, 
to be expended under the supervision of the selectmen ; 
$501 for support of schools ; $400 for town charges, and 
$44.50 for collecting taxes. At the September meeting it 
was voted to abate the highway tax of those living on 
adjacent islands. Elisha Smith was elected Representative. 

1853. — This year the articles in the warrant relative to 
establishing a liquor agency, and also to prosecute for 
selling liquors contrary to law, were passed over, and $501 
Avas raised for support of schools ; $350 for town charges ; 
$400 for roads and bridges ; $40 for collecting taxes, and 
$100 for building a bridge across Vinal's Falls. The 
contract for building said bridge was awarded to F. A. 
Hunt. Jonathan Woster, of North Haven, was chosen 
Representative. 

1854. — This year there was an article in the warrant to 
see what method the town would take to build a town 
house, but the meeting passed it over. For schools there 
was voted $G2G ; roads, $400 ; town charges, $550 ; 
collecting taxes, $G0 ; repairing carrying place bridge, $30, 
and an additional $50 for roads in Districts 5 and 6. The 
treasurer was authorized to obtain a loan of $100. Calvin 
Fames, of Islesboro, was chosen Representative. 

1855. — This year the following amounts were raised : 
Support of schools, $752 ; roads and bridges, $350 ; town 
charges, $750 ; collecting taxes, $55, and the treasurer was 
authorized to obtain a loan of $125. At the September 
meeting F. A. Hunt was elected Representative. 

1856. — This year the matter of collecting money from 
the town of Gouldsboro* for support of poor was left with 
the town agent, and the question of building a bridge 
across the Little Basin Falls was indefinitely postponed. 
There was voted for town charges, $800 ; support of 
schools, $752 ; roads and bridges, $400 ; and collecting 
taxes, $43.25. Lewis Leadbetter, of North Haven, was 
chosen Representative. 



HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 31 

1857.— This year $752 was voted for schools ; *750 for 
town charges ; '$59 for collecting taxes ; -f 400 for liighways 
and bridges, and #25 to build a road around Folly Brook 
Hill. It was voted to buikl a town house, and -flOO was 
raised for that purpose. The selectmen were made a 
committee to provide a suitable location for said house. 
At a subsequent meeting the contract for building town 
house was bid off at auction to F. A. Hunt. His figures 
were t|499.50. It was voted to open the town house for 
religious, temperance and political meetings. Nelson 
Gilkey, of Islesboro, was elected Representative. 

1858. — This year there were ten collectors of taxes, and 
the total sum voted for collecting was $22, and $752 was 
raised for support of schools ; $450 for highways, and 
$1,000 for town charges. At a meeting held in June it 
was voted to pay Thomas Arey, of Gouldsboro' $100 per 
year for the support of his father and mother for a term of 
five years. At the same meeting there were four votes for 
the license law of 1856, and twenty-six votes for the 
prohibitory law of 1858. Moses Webster was chosen 
Representative. 

1859. — This year Leadbetter's Island was set off into a 
district and $1,300 was voted for town charges ; $800 for 
support of schools ; $450 for roads and bridges ; $58 for 
collecting taxes, and $25 to repair the bridge across Carver's 
mill stream. Harrison Beverage, of North Haven, was 
chosen Representative. A special meeting was held in 
December to choose a representative in place of Harrison 
Beverage, who resigned. Lewis Leadbetter was elected. 

1860. — This year it was voted to allow a discount of five 
per cent, on taxes paid before the 20th of August, and 
three per cent, on all taxes paid before the 20th of 
November. Leadbetter's Island and adjacent land were 
constituted as District No. 11. This town's interest in the 
fishery privilege at North Haven was sold to H. C. Lane 
for six dollars. $1,200 was voted for town charges ; $700 
for schools ; $500 for highways and bridges ; $57 for 



32 HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 

collecting taxes, and $25 for a bridge across Old Harbor 
Falls. It was also voted to expend $25 of the money 
voted for highways on said bridge. Andrew P. Gilkey, of 
Islesboro, was chosen Representative. 

1861. — This year there was raised for support of schools 
$1000.20 ; town charges, $1000 ; roads and bridges, 1500 ; 
collecting taxes, $68. At a subsequent meeting Isaac 
Murch was chosen selectman in place of Willard Calderwood^ 
deceased. At the September meeting David Vinal was 
elected Representative. 

1862. — This year there was voted for schools $800 ; 
roads and bridges, $200 ; town charges, $900 ; collecting 
taxes, $49.37. By vote of the town the overseers of poor 
were instructed to purchase a stock of cheap, wholesome 
food, to be used for such of the poor as were not boarded 
out by the year. At a special meeting -140 was voted to 
repair the bridge at the Harbor, and 1300 for roads in 
addition to the amount raised at the annual meeting. At 
a meeting held July 26th to provide for filling the town's 
quota ; it was voted to pay each volunteer a bounty of 
■$100 when mustered into the service ; and a committee of 
three, namely, David Vinal, Martin N. Hopkins and S. B. 
Perry, were chosen to negotiate for and enlist volunteers. 
Voted to give*three cheers for the first volunteer, which, a 
little later, were given for James P. Mills. On the 27th 
of August a vote was passed to pay each volunteer -flOO ; 
twenty in cash and a note or town order for the balance, 
payable in five years or sooner if the town so directs. Jesse 
Sleeper, Jr., of South Thomaston, was chosen Representative. 

1863. — This year the article relating to raising money 
for State aid was passed over, and -f 1,600 was voted for 
town charges ; -1800 for support of schools ; 1200 for roads 
and bridges ; 173.50 for collecting taxes, and |30 to build 
a bridge at Dyer's Island. At a town meeting held August 
24th it was voted to pay $300 to every drafted man who 
might be accepted by the United States, and the selectmen 
were authorized to borrow money for the same. On the 



HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 33 

4th day of September the town voted to pay a bounty of -f 300 
to each drafted man or substitute, when mustered into the 
U. S. service from this town. William Thomas, of North 
Haven, was chosen Representative. At the town meeting 
held November 21st, it was voted to pay $'200 to each 
volunteer who shall be mustered in tlie United States 
service from this town, and an additional $15 to each man 
tliat enlists, or to any person that induces another to enlist, 
and the selectmen were authorized to borrow a sum 
sufficient for the purpose. Another meeting was held 
December oth. It was voted to pay -IjIOO in addition to 
the amount voted at the last meeting for volunteers 
entering the service from this town. 

1864. — This year it was voted totax dogs, and to raise 
the amount required by law for support of schools. There 
was voted for town charges, •'§'1,800 ; roads and bridges, 
I IrOO : collecting taxes, 84.75, and !|oO to be expended on 
the road between the town house and Carver's Harbor. 
At the September meeting Reuben Carver was chosen 
Representative. A town meeting was held November the 
8th. It was voted to pay |300 to each drafted man or 
substitute who shall be mustered into the service of the 
United States from this town. A town meeting was held 
January the second, 1865, to provide measure for filling 
town's quota, under the last callof the President for troops. 
The selectmen were authorized to hire a sum sufficient for 
filling such quota, and that notes for said sum, of the 
denomination of •*#25 and upwards, be issued by the 
selectmen, payable in from three to five years, and said 
loans were to be exempt from taxation. Robert L. 
Crockett was chosen an agent to assist the selectmen in 
hiring monej^ and enlisting recruits. 

1865. — This year it was voted to raise the amount 
required by law for support of schools ; ^2,500 for town 
charges ; •1200 for roads and bridges ; $142 for collecting 
taxes, and •l5l,400 for war debt. James Newhall, of South 
Thomaston, was elected Representative. 



34 HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 

1866. — This year the article in the warrant relative to 
taxing small open boats, nets and lobster gear was passed 
over, as was the article to have open roads from Carver's 
Harbor to the Thoroughfare. Voted to set off John Vinal 
and W. H. Vinal from District No. 4 and that they be 
allowed to draw their proportion of school money. The 
following amounts were raised : Town charges, (|2,500 ; 
roads and bridges, $450 ; war debt, $8,000 ; collecting 
taxes, 1192.50, and $100 to build a foot bridge over the 
Little Basin Falls. For schools, the amount required by 
law was voted. At the September meeting Simon G. 
Webster was chosen Representative. 

1867. — This year $2,000 was voted for town charges ; 
$1,000 for roads and bridges ; $1,500 for war debt ; $187 
for collecting taxes, and $75 for the bridge over Little 
Basin Falls. A vote was taken in June on the act for the 
suppression of " drinking houses, and tippling shops." 
There were in favor, 18 ; against, 7 votes. James Newhall, 
of South Thomaston, was elected Representative. 

1868. — This year there was voted for town charges, 
$2,000 ; schools, $1,500 ; roads and bridges, $1,000 ; war 
debt, $1,000 ; and $243.50 for collecting taxes. It was 
voted that persons chargeable to the town be employed 
breaking rocks in the winter time. Hanson T. Carver, of 
North Haven, was chosen Representative. Upon the 
amendment to the constitution, authorizing a limited 
reimbursement of war expenses, by loaning the credit of 
the State, there were 301 votes in favor of and none 
against. 

1869. — This year a committee of three was chosen to 
ascertain the probable cost of a soldiers' monument for this 
town, and to report at next annual meeting. The 
committee were John Carver, F. A. Hunt and S. G. 
Webster. $2,500 was voted for town charges ; $1,700 for 
support of schools ; $500 for roads and bridges ; $2,500 for. 
war debt, and $200 for collecting taxes. At the September 
meeting William H. Paige was chosen Representative. 



HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 35 

At a meeting held P'ebruary first, 1870, E. R. Graffamwas 
elected Representative in place of W. H. Paige, deceased. 

1870. — This year it was voted to allow a discount of 
eight per cent, on all taxes paid on or before the first day 
of August ; six per cent, on all paid by the 1st of October, 
and four per cent, on all paid by the first of December, and 
it was also voted to add six per cent, to all taxes remaining 
unpaid after the first day of January, 1871. There was 
raised for town charges •'12,500 ; roads and bridges, -1700 ; 
war debt, •'$500 ; collecting taxes, -$145, and one dollar per 
capita for support of schools. There was voted for a 
soldiers' monument -"^SOO, and for widening the stone work 
on Carver's bridge •i'lOO, John A. Emery, of South 
Thomaston, was chosen Representative. 

Representatives since 1870, with years of election: 

1871 — Israel C. Glidden, Vinal Haven. 

1872 — Simon G. Webster, Vinal Haven. 

1873— Nelson Mullin, North Haven. 

1874— Martin H. Kiff, Vinal Haven. 

1875 — David H. Sawyer, South Thomaston. 

1676 — Horace M. Noyes, Vinal Haven. 

1877 — Bushrod H. Clay, South Thomaston. 

1878 — Albert G. Beverage, Not-th Haven. 

1879 — Levi W. Smith, Vinal Haven. 

1880 — Joseph T. McKellar, South Thomaston. 

1882— Levi W. Smith, Vinal Haven. 

1884 — George F. Lewis, North Haven. 

1886 — Thomas J. Lyons, Vinal Haven. 

1888 — Robert A. Harrington, South Thomaston. 

Following is a list of those who have held the office of 
town clerk, treasurer, and selectman, each year for the past 
century, the names appearing in the order given : 

* resigned; t died. 

1790 — Thomas Beverage ; Joseph Waterman ; George 
White, Eleazer Crabtree, Samuel Young. 

1791 — Thomas Beverage ; Joseph Waterman ; George 
White, William Vinal, Stephen Carver. 



36 HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 

1792 — Thomas Beverage ; Joseph Waterman ; William 
Vinal, George White, Stephen Carver. 

1793 — Thomas Beverage ; Joseph Waterman ; George 
White, Stephen Carver, William Vinal. 

1794 — Thomas Beverage ; Joseph Waterman ; William 
Vinal, Stephen Carver, Anthon}^ Dyer. 

1795 — Thomas Beverage ; Joseph Waterman ; *William 
Vinal, Cyril Brown, Samuel Thomas, Benjamin Daggett. 

1796 — Thomas Beverage ; Joseph Waterman ; William 
Vinal, George White, Uriah Norton. 

1797 — Thomas Beverage ; Samuel Thomas ; George 
White, Uriah Norton, Thomas Beverage. 

1798 — Thomas Beverage ; Anthony Dyer : Stephen 
Carver, Uriah Norton, Thomas Waterman. 

1799 — John Beverage ; Anthony Dyer ; Samuel Thomas, 
Cyril Blown, George White. 

1800 — John Beverage ; Anthony Dyer ; Cyril Brown, 
George White, William Vinal. 

1801 — John Beverage ; Anthony Dyer ; Cyril Brown, 
George White, Cushing Thomas. 

1802 — John Beverage : Uriah Norton : George White, 
Cyril Brown, Cushing Thomas. 

1808 — John Beverage ,•• Uriah Norton ; Cyril Brown, 
George White, Cushing Thomas. 

1804 — John Beverage ; Uriah Norton ; George White, 
Cyril Brown, Cushing Thomas. 

1805 — John Beverage ; Uriah Noi'ton ; William Vinal, 
Stephen Carver, Cyril Brown. 

1806 — John Beverage ; Uriah Norton ; Benjamin 
Beverage, Cyril Brown, Stephen Carver. 

1807^.Iohn I)everage ; Uiiah Norton: (3yril Biown, 
Benjamin Beverage, David Wostcn'. 

1808 — John Beverage ; Uriah Norton ; Cyril r>rown, 
Benjamin Beveiage, David Woster. 

1809 — lolni Beverage; Uriah Norton; Cyril Biown, 
Benjamin Beveiage, Thomas Watei'man. 



HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 37 

1810 — John Beverage ; Uriah Norton ; Benjamin 
Beverage, Cyril Brown, Thomas Beverage. 

1811 — John Beverage ; Uriah Norton ; James Calder- 
wood, John Vinal, Thomas Waterman. 

1812 — John Beverage ; William Norwood ; Cyril Brown, 
Nathaniel Beverage, Benjamin Beverage. 

1813 — George Dyer ; Nathaniel Beverage ; Cyril Brown, 
Samuel Young, Jr., David Woster. 

1814 — George Dyer ; Nathaniel Beverage ; Cyril Brown, 
Thomas Waterman, David Woster. 

1815 — George Dyer ; Nathaniel Beverage ; Cyril Brown, 
Benjamin Beverage, David Woster. 

1816 — George Dyer ; Nathaniel Beverage ; Benjamin 
Beverage, Thomas Waterman, Ebenezer Calderwood. 

1817 — George Dyer : Nathaniel Beverage ; Benjamin 
Beverage, Ebenezer Calderwood, David Woster. 

1818 — George Dyer ; Nathaniel Beverage ; Ebenezer 
Calderwood, Nathaniel Beverage, Zebulon Stanly, 

1819 — George Dyer; Nathaniel Beverage; Benjamin 
Beverage, Ebenezer Calderwood, Cyril Brown. 

1820 — George Dyer; Samuel Thomas; Ezekiel Phil- 
brooks, Benjamin Crabtree, Benjamin Beverage. 

1821 — George Dyer ; Samuel Thomas ; Benjamin 
Beverage, Benjamin Crabtree, Ebenezer Calderwood. 

1822 — George Dyer ; Samuel Thomas ; James Babbidge, 
Benjamin Beverage, Benjamin Crabtree. 

1823 — George Dj^er ; Samuel Thomas ; Benjamin 
Crabtree, Ebenezer Calderwood, James Babbidge. 

1824 — George D3'er ; Samuel Thomas ; Benjamin 
Crabtree, Ebenezer Calderwood, Josiah Thomas. 

1825 — George Dj^er ; Samuel Thomas ; Ebenezer 
Calderwood, William Vinal, Benjamin Crabtree. 

1826 — George Dyer ; Ebenezer Calderwood ; Benjamin 
Crabtree, Wilham Vinal, John Glover. 

1827 — George Dyer ; James Thomas ; William Vinal, 
John Carver, Benjamin Crabtree. 



38 HISTORY OF VESTALHAVEN. 

1328 — George Dyer ; Ebenezer Caldervvood ; John 
Carver, George Dyer, Nathaniel Beverage. 

1829 — George Dyer ; Ebenezer Caklerwoocl : Riifus 
Caklerwood, Benjamin Crabtree, Willliam Vinal. 

1830 — John Vinal ; Ebenezer Caklerwood ; George 
Dyer, David Woster, John Carver. 

1831 — John Vinal ; Ebenezer Caklerwood ; John Carver, 
David Woster, William Vinal. 

1832 — John Kent ; Ebenezer Calderwood ; David 
Woster, Francis McMullin, John Kent. 

1833 — Rufus Calderwood : Ebenezer Calderwood; 
Francis McMullin, William Vinal, James Beverage. 

1834 — Rufus Calderwood ; Ebenezer Calderwood ; 
Francis McMullin, Joseph Woster, 2nd, James Beverage. 

1835 — Rufus Calderwood ; Ebenezer Calderwood ; 
Francis McMullin, Joseph Woster, David Woster. 

1836 — Rufus Caklerwood ; David Wostei- ; Joseph 
Woster, Benjamin Beverage, Reuben Carver. 

1837 — Rufus Calderwood ; David Woster ; Benjamin 
Beverage, Luther Calderwood, Rufus Calderwood. 

1838 — Rufus Calderwood ; David Woster ; James Smith, 
David Vinal, Perez Babbidge. 

1839 — Rufus Calderwood ; David Woster ; John Carver, 
Benjamin Beverage, James Crockett, Jr. 

1840 — Rufus Calderwood ; David VVoster ; James 
Crockett, Jr., Levi Dyer, Perez Babbidge. 

1841 — Rufus Calderwood ; f David Woster, James 
Crockett; James Crockett, Jr., Francis McMullm, Levi 
Dyer. 

1842 — Rufus Calderwood ; James Crockett ; Hiram 
Woster, James Crockett, Jr., James Beverage. 

1843 — Rufus Calderwood; Joseph Woster; James 
Crockett, Jr., Perez Babbidge, Francis McMullin. 

1844 — Rufus Calderwood; Joseph Woster; Perez 
Babbidge, James Crockett, Jr., David Woster. 

1845 — Rufus Calderwood ; Joseph VVoster ; Rufus 
Calderwood, Francis McMullin, David Ames. 



HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 39 

1846 — Rufus Calclerwood ; Joseph Woster ; Francis 
McMullin, Josiali Beverage, Lewis Leadbetter. 

1847 — Rufus Calderwood ; James Fernald ; David 
Vinal, Rufus Calderwood, Joseph Ginn. 

1848 — Rufus Calderwood ; David Vinal ; Reuben 
Carver, Ezra Calderwood, Isaiah Pierce. 

1849— Watson H. Vinal ; David Vinal ; William Vinal, 
John Carver, Ebenezer Calderwood. 

1850 — Watson H. Vinal; David Vinal; John Carver, 
Francis McMullin, Luther Calderwood. 

1851 — Watson H. Vinal ; William Vinal ; Elisha Smith, 
Rufus Calderwood, Joseph Ginn. 

1852— Watson H. Vinal ; William Vinal ; Fitz A. Hunt, 
Elisha Smith, Watson H. Vinal. 

1853 — Watson H. Vinal; William Vinal; Joseph Ginn, 
Ezra Calderwood, Elisha Smith. 

1854— Watson H. Vinal ; William Vinal ; Watson H. 
Vinal, Nathan H. Carver, Joel Philbrooks. 

1855— Watson H. Vinal ; William Vinal ; Watson H. 
Vinal, F. A. Hunt, Joel Philbrooks. 

1856— Watson H. Vinal ; William Vinal ; Joel 
Philbrook, F. A. Hunt, Seth Calderwood. 

1857— Watson H. Vinal ; William Vinal ; Watson H. 
Vinal, James Roberts, Rufus Calderwood. 

1858— Watson H. Vinal; William Vinal; Rufus 
Calderwood, David Smith, 3rd, F. A. Hunt. 

1859 — Watson H. Vinal ; John Vinal ; Reuben Carver, 
Elisha Smith, Willard Calderwood. 

I860— Watson H. Vinal ; John Vinal; W. B. Calder- 
wood, Elisha Carver, Moses Webster. 

1861— Watson H. Vinal ; John Vinal ; Moses Webster, 
Elisha Carver, fW. B. Calderwood, Isaac Murch. 

1862 — Watson H. Vinal ; John Carver ; Reuben Carver, 
Elisha Smith, Isaac Murch. 

1863— Watson H. Vinal ; John Carver ; S. G. Webster, 
Reuben Carver, Elisha Smith. 



40 HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 

1864— Watson H. Vinal ; F. A. Hunt ; Simon G. 
Webster, Elislia Smith, Jesse Calderwood. 

1865— Watson H. Vinal ; F. A. Hunt ; F. A. Hunt, 
James Roberts, E. P. Walker. 

1866 — Watson H. Vinal; F. A. Hunt; James Ginn, 
Jr., F. A. Hunt, Elisha Smith. 

1867— Watson H. Vinal; F. A. Hunt; F. A. Hunt, 
Elisha Smith, James Ginn, Jr. 

1869— Watson H. Vinal ; F. A. Hunt ; William H. 
Paige, VV. H. Vinal, L. J. Calderwood. 

1870 — Watson H. Vinal ; F. A. Hunt ; John B. Carver, 
Freeman C. Carver, James C. Calderwood. 

1871 — Watson H. Vinal ; F. A. Hunt ; James C. 
Calderwood, Freeman C. Carver, Otis Mills. 

1872— Watson H. Vinal; F. A. Hunt; James C. 
Calderwood, Freeman C. Carver, Otis Mills. 

1873— Watson H. Vinal; F. A. Hunt; James C. 
Calderwood, Otis Mills, Ezekiel Burgess. 

1874— Watson H. Vinal ; F. A. Hunt ; Martin H. Kiff, 
Calvin Smith, Martin N. Hopkins. 

1875— Watson H. Vinal ; F. A. Hunt ; Martin H. Kiff, 
Calvin Smith, Charles B. Vinal. 

1876— Watson H. Vinal ; William B. Kittredge ; Martin 
H. Kiff, Calvin Smith, Charles B. Vinal. 

1877— Watson H. Vinal ; Calvin Smith, Mark Arey, 
Thaddeus C. Creed. 

1878— Watson H. Vinal; F. A. Hunt ; Charles B. Vinal, 1 
Levi W. Smith, Daniel H. Glidden. 

1879— Watson H. Vinal; F. A. Hunt; Levi W. Smith, 
Daniel H. Glidden, David L. (Carver. 

1880— Watson H. Vinal; F. A. Hunt; Daniel H. 
Glidden, David L. Carver, Charles B. Vinal. 

1881— Justin S. Hopkins ; F. A. Hunt ; David L. 
Carver, Charles B. Vinal, Jonas Mills. 

1882— Justin S. Hopkins ; F. A. Hunt ; Daniel H. 
Glidden, Jonas Mills, Levi W. Smith. 



HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 41 

1883— Justin S. Hopkins; F. A. Hunt; Daniel H. 
Glidden, Tliaddeus C. Creed, Jonas Mills. 

1881— * Justin S. Hopkins, F. S. Walls ; F. A. Hunt, 
Levi W. Smith, O. P. Lyons, F. B. Vinal. 

1885— F. S. Walls ; F.A.Hunt; O. P. Lyons, F. V. 
Crocker, F. B. Vinal. 

1886— F. S. Walls ; F. A. Hunt ; O. P. Lyons, F. V. 
Crocker, F. B. Vinal. 

1887— E. W. Arey ; F. A. Hunt ; Fred J. Ware, Leroy 
Calderwood, C. E. Boman. 

1888— Daniel H. Glidden ; William V. Hunt ; Fred J. 
Ware, Lerby Calderwood, C. E. Boman. 

1889— Daniel H. Glidden; William V. Hunt; C. E. 
Boman, C. H. Healey, J. C. Calderwood. 



NOTICES OF FIRST SETTLERS AND EARLY 
INHABITANTS. 

Thomas Ginn was a native of Liverpool, England, 
where he was born in 1762. When seven years old, he 
with his parents, emigrated to this country and settled in 
Maryland. He afterwards lived for some years in 
Bucksport, Me., and came here about 1785. He was a 
mariner, and ran a freighter between here and Boston. In 
1786 he married Miss Sarah Young, of Old York, and the 
same year built a frame house (which is standing at 
present) on Green's Island. Mr. Ginn was the father of 
ten children, only one of whom is now living. He died at 
the age of 52 years. 

Peter Smith came here at an early date, what year is 
not known. He occupied a small tract, on Calderwood's 
Neck, and was probably one of the very first to settle in 
that part of town. It is said that after living there several 
years he sold out to John Calderwood, and moved away. 
Nothing more is known of him. 

John Smith, son of the former, was one of the first 
settlers here. He located on what is now called Roole's 
Hill, and his tract contained about 320 acres. He married 
twice, his first wife being a Miss Philbrook, by whom he 
had six children. His second wife was Mary Calderwood, 
daughter of John and Elizabeth Calderwood, and eight 
children were born to them. He was one of those who, 
during the Revolutionary War, was compelled by the 
British to work upon the fortifications at Castine. Mr. 
Smith used to relate that the English got but very little 
benefit from his labor, as he would pound his axe on a rock 
at every opportunity, so that it took him about all the time 



HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 43 

to grind it. He was a noted sportsman, and many stories 
are told of his exploits with the gun. There are a large 
number of his descendants living here, some of whom are 
past fourscore. During the last years of his life, he and 
his wife lived with their son Levi, in the town of Knox, 
Waldo County, where they died at a ripe old age. 

James Roberts was born in Liverpool, England, in the 
year 1770. When about nine years old he ran away from 
home and shipped as cabin boy on a vessel bound to the 
West Indies. About the year 1789 he met Captain Isachar 
Lane, at Annapolis, N. S., with whom he shipped and came 
here. He finally purchased Capt. Lane's place, (the 
Roberts homestead) where he passed his life. In 1792 he 
married Sarah Hall, of Matinicus Isle, and nine children 
were born to them. Mrs. Susan Coombs, who now resides 
in Wisconsin, was the youngest child and is the only one 
living. He died at an advanced age, within a few rods of 
where he first landed. 

William Roberts, oldest son of the above, was born 
October, 1792. He was married in 1815 to Susanna 
Coombs, daughter of Anthony Coombs, by whom he had 
14 children, several of whom are now living here. He 
always lived on the old homestead, and was highly respected 
by all who knew him. For a number of years before his 
death, at each succeeding anniversary of his birth, his 
descendants, of whom there are many here, would gather 
at his home, and it was always a feast of pleasure for the 
old gentleman as well as a day of enjoyment for those 
present. He died March 26th, 1888, in his 96th year. 

Doctor Theophilus Hopkins was born in 1757, and 
came here from Starks, Me., about 1805. It is said that 
he was a skillful physician, and was the first settled doctor 
of whom we have seen any record. He was also an assistant 
surgeon in the Revolutionary army. Doctor Hopkins was 
married four times, his first wife having died in less than a 
week after marriage. He at first resided on Calderwood's 
Neck, but afterwards purcliased from a Mr. Conery the 



44 HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 

place occupied by the late M. N. Hopkins. He was the 
first of that name in town, and a number of his descendants 
are now living here. He died in 1836, aged 79 years. 

Francis McMullin was born on the North Island in 
1796. He married Lavina Hopkins, a daughter of 
Theophilus, and four children were born to them, all of 
whom are living. He was prominent in town affairs, 
having served several years as selectman, and also a term 
in the Legislature. He was a carpenter by trade, and 
lived on the place now occupied by Thomas Perry, where 
he died, aged 61. 

James Stinson settled on the place now occupied by 
J. R. Merrithew. He was one of the seventy-two who 
obtained a grant of their lots from the General Court in 
1786. He was somewhat prominent in the early affairs of 
the town, but we have not learned anything more 
concerning him. 

IsACHAR Lane was one of the early settlers here. He 
married Susan Hall, of Matinicus, and lived on what is 
now the Roberts homestead. While gunning on Malcolm's 
Ledge an accidental discharge of a gun so mangled one of 
his hands that amputation was necessary. He went at 
once to Rockland, where the operation was performed by 
Dr. Barnard. He afterwards followed the sea for awhile, 
and then moved away from here. 

Benjamin Lane, brother of the above, was born 1762. 
He was probably a native of Massachusetts, and came here 
after the Revolutionary War, His wife was Margaret 
Hall, of Matinicus, and they had seven children. He 
settled on Griffin's (Lane's) Island, which he purchased 
from Thaddeus Carver. He died in 1842, his wife having 
passed away five years before. 

Joseph Lane, son of Benjamin, was born 1800. He 
married Abagail, daughter of Joseph Arey, and four 
children were born to them. He settled on the place now 
owned by Capt. Emery Smith, where he carried on quite 
an extensive business curing fish, etc. About 1834 he 



HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 45 

began furnishing outfits for fishing vessels, the first one 
here to start this branch of the business. He died 1871. 
His wife survived him a few years. 

Timothy Lane, brother of the above, was born in 1805. 
He married Rebecca, daughter of William Smith, and they 
had six children born to them. He resided on Lane's 
Island, and about 1850 commenced curing fish and 
furnishing outfits. He carried on a large business, and at 
one time was owner in from twenty to twenty-five vessels. 
He accumulated a considerable property, and in 1865 paid 
the largest tax ever assessed against any one person in 
town, amounting to $1,328.73. Besides this, the firm of 
Timothy Lane and Sons paid -1238.95. He died in 1871, 
aged 6Q years. His wife died in 1888, aged 81 years. 

Samuel Pease was a native of JMartha's Vineyard, and 
probably came here about 1790. In 1798 he married Miss 
Jane Rich, and eleven children were born to them. He 
was a fisherman, and resided near the Old Harbor. Isaiah 
is the only child of his now living here. He died aged 
about 80. 

Havilla Pease, brother of Samuel, came here about 
1790, and in 1793 married Abagail Norton. He lived on 
the place now occupied by J. R. Merrithew, and sometime 
afterwards resided in Rockland. 

Thomas Pierce was probably a native of Provincetown, 
and came here about 1796. He was a fisherman, and 
resided near the Old Harbor. Two of his twelve children 
are now living. Mrs. Sally Arey, wife of the late Capt. 
Mark Arey, resides here, and one other in Aroostook 
County. He died aged about 79. 

Isaac Arey was a native of Cape Cod, and in the year 
1770, while on his way to Mount Desert, with his wife and 
one child, he put into what is now called " Arey's Harbor," 
and being pleased with the surroundings, he bought a tract 
of land, comprising about 700 acres, for the sum' of -fiSO, 
from a man named Wheeler, who was then living there. 



46 HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 

He lived for a while at the head of the harbor, but 
afterwards moved onto the island now owned by Smith 
Hopkins. He is said to have owned the first horse ever 
brought to this town, Mr. Arey was drowned while 
crossing to Isle au Haut in a small boat. Mrs. Arey was 
a skilled midwife, and had been called to Isle au Haut, 
and it was while going after her that he lost his life. He 
was the first of that name to come here. His grandson, 
John Arey, is the oldest person of that name in town. His 
age is 86. 

Thaddeus Caeveu was born December 7th, 1751. In 
1766, when 15 years old, he came here from Marshfield, 
Mass., with his father and an elder brother. The father 
and brother left here sometime after, but Thaddeus 
remained. He worked for Francis Cogswell, of Ipswich, 
Mass., who at that time had a double sawmill here on the 
site of the present polishing works. In 1776 he bought 
Cogswell's interest here, which consisted of seven hundred 
acres of land, sawmill, etc., and for which he paid two 
liundred and sixty pounds. He married Hannah Hall, of 
Matinicus, and ten children were born to them, only one 
of whom is now living. He died in 1832, aged 81 years. 

John Carver, oldest son of Thaddeus, was born April 
12, 1793. He lived until his death on the old homestead, 
which is now occupied by his daughter, Mrs. H. S. Hopkins. 
He at times was engaged in fishing and coasting. Once, 
while fishing off shore, his vessel was run down by a 
coaster. Captain Carver was below at the time, and barely 
escaped with his life. One man named Reuben Brown 
was drowned. He was also prominent in town affairs, 
having served several years on the board of selectmen, 
besides representing his townsmen in the Legislature. He 
married Rhoda Arey, second daughter of Ebenezer Arey. 
They- had 13 children, nine of whom are now living. He 
died in 1877. His wife survived him several years. 



• HISTORY OF VESTALHAVEN. 47 

Reuben Carver, son of Thadcleiis, was born August 
27th, 1797. When 23 years old he married Hannah 
Calderwood, daughter of James Calderwood, who at that 
time owned the late Jere Hall estate, near the carrying 
place. He built a log hut on the site where now stands 
the late Moses Webster residence, and after living there 
six years he erected the house where he now resides and 
which has been his home ever since. Mr. Carver's has 
been a busy life. He early engaged in trade, but about 
1826 commenced building vessels, which has been his 
principal occupation, though largely interested in other 
business, such as lumbering, curing dry and smoked fish, 
running sawmills, erecting buildings, etc. At one time he 
and his brother John built a lime kiln near where the post 
ofifice is now located. It was the first and only one ever 
built in town, but it did not prove a paying venture. He 
was several years one of the board of selectmen, postmaster 
six years, and has served one term in the Legislature. He 
is now in his 92nd year, surrounded by relatives, who 
attend to his every comfort. His wife died in 1856, and 
two years later he married Mrs. Diana Coombs, of Belfast. 
Some four years ago she died. There were nine children 
born to him by his first wife, and all but one are now 
living. 

Anthony Coombs came here from Pemaquid Point 
about 1775, and purchased what is now called Coombs' 
Neck, and settled there. Whom he bought from is not 
known. It is said that he first occupied himself in cutting 
a passage through the woods from his hut so that he could 
see the thoroughfare. He afterwards built a frame house 
where his grandson, B. R. Coombs, now resides. It is one 
of the oldest houses in town. His wife was Anna Stinson, 
daughter of James Stinson, who is mentioned in this work. 
Fourteen children were born to them, two of whom, 
Anthony and Sylvanus, were twins. 



48 HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 

John Caldekwood. The Calderwoods are said to be 
of Scotch origin but emigrated to Ireland at an early date, 
where John was born February 15th, 1725, and the same 
year his parents emigrated to this country and settled in 
Londondery, N. H. In 1850 he was in Warren, Me., 
where he purchased a farm. He married Elizabeth 
McCurdy, a lady of superior intellect, and to them thirteen 
children were born. In 1769 he sold his place in Warren 
and came to this town, settling on the North Island, near 
where the Baptist meeting house now stands, but soon 
after (1770) exchanged with Major White for a lot on the 
" Neck " (so called) on the South Island to where he 
removed and built a house, where his grandson Jonathan 
now resides, and where he lived at the time of his death in 
1808. He was the first of that name to come here, and his 
was probably the first frame house built in this town. 

John Vinal was a resident of Boston, Mass., and it is 
not known that he ever visited this town, but we mention 
his name because of his relations with the early settlers 
here. Being a man of influence, he was employed by the 
inhabitants to obtain legislation for them from the General 
Court, and it was also in compliment to him that the town 
received the beautiful name by which it is known. 

William Vinal, son of the above was born in Boston, 
in 1762, and was among those who settled here previous to 
1786. He owned a large tract of land here which he 
purchased from a Mr. Philbrooks, and he also owned land 
on the North Island where he lived several years. His 
first wife was Peggy Woster, by whom he had three 
children, John, William and David. (The latter enlisted 
in the United States service in the war of 1812, and died 
in the hospital at Burlington, Canada, in 1814.) His wife 
died in 1791, and seven years later he married Penelope 
Dyer, and they had two children, Peggy and Charlotte. 
He was a man of decided ability and was a justice of the 
peace as early as 1785. It was under his warrant that the 
first town meeting was held. He was also a member of 



HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 49 

the board of selectmen ii iiuniber of years, and in 1801 was 
elected to the General Court, the first representative from 
this town. In later life he was a judge of the Court of 
Common Pleas for Hancock Co. He died at his father's 
house in Boston, January 21st, 1821. His real estate here 
was divided between liis two sons, John, born 1788, and 
William, Jr., born 1789. John married Susanna Carver, 
and they had five children (two are living, Watson H. and 
William). He lived on that part of the estate where his 
son W. H. Vinal now resides. He died January 25th, 
1838. William Vinal, Jr., who for many years was known 
as 'Squire Vinal, was a prominent figure in town affairs, 
having held several positions of trust. He was justice of 
the peace, and at the time of his death was town treasurer. 
His wife was Sally Carver, by whom he had nine children. 
Three are living, George at Rockland, Me.; Charles B, 
and John here. His residence was on the north side of 
Vinal's bridge, where he died January 23d, 1859. 

John Burgess was probably a native of Cape Cod, 
Mass. The time of his coming here is not known, but it 
must have been previous to 1785. He settled on what is 
now Dyer's Island, but years afterwards moved to Belfast, 
Me., where he died, aged 91. Of his children, two are 
known to have resided here, Ezekiel, who died on 
Matinicus Isle, aged 75, and Edward, who, it is said, died 
at Belfast at an advanced age. Capt. Thomas E. Burgess, 
of the schooner P. M. Bonnie, plying between here and 
Belfast, is a grandson of Ezekiel. 

Joseph Green was the first to settle Green's Island, 
and is said to have come there not far from 1768. His 
father, David Green, was killed by Indians at the siege of 
Louisburg, in 1745, and his stepfather, Ebenezer Hall, was 
killed by Indians on Matinicus Isle, in 1757. He married 
Dorcas Young, a sister of liis lialf brother, Ebenezer Hall, 
Jr.'s, wife, and they had fourteen cliildren born to them. 
He took up the whole of Green's Island, but gave part of 
it to one Eben Pierce in order that he might have a 



50 HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 

neighbor. Pierce some years later sold his interest to 
Joseph Ginn, whom we have noticed. Mr. Green and his 
wife were past fourscore when they died. 

Cyril Browx came here at an early date, probably 
from Rhode Island. He was long a prominent man in 
town affairs, was several years one of the selectmen, and 
also represented the town in the General Court. His 
place was in the vicinity of Brown's Head Light, which 
probably derived its name from his. Several of his 
grandchildren are living here. He lived to an advanced 
age. 

Uriah Norton was one of the early settlers here. He 
came from Cape Cod. His place was located at the 
thoroughfare, and until the last two or three years 
occupied by Geo. D. Hopkins. He was a trader, and had 
a small store on his place. He was honest and upright, 
and was for a number of years town treasurer. He had 
two daughters, one of whom married a son of Dr. Hopkins, 
and Geo. D. Emery, Jr., and the late M. N. Hopkins were 
children of theirs. Mr. Norton died 1811. 

THE NORTH ISLAND. 

The North Island was probably permanently settled 
before the South Island, and for a number of years their 
population was greater. In 1784 there were 68 tax payers 
on the North Island, and their tax amounted to X103, 13s., 
5d., while the South Island had but 42 tax payers and their 
total tax was X32 Os. 2d. We regret not being able to 
give a more extended account of those who settled the 
North Island, as many of them were men of prominence in 
town affairs, but the brief time at our disposal for the 
preparation of this work compels us to confine ourselves to 
such information as we could hurriedly obtain. 

Thomas Winslow was born in Old York in 1729, and 
it is said was here as early as 1760, remaining but a short 
time. He returned again in 1765 and settled on what is 
now the Samuel Carver farm. The Widow's Island was 
also included in his tract. 



HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 51 

Caleb Carver was among the first to come liere, and 
his lot, containing about 200 acres, was located in the 
northeast part of town. His business was principally 
farming. 

Benjamin Kent came here from Marshfield, Mass., 
when a boy. An apple tree he brought with him and 
planted here is still standing, and has withstood the 
elements for more than a hundred years, some seasons 
bearing 25 bushels of fruit. He was a farmer, and his 
place joined that of Cashing Thomas. 

John Newbury was born in Newbury, Mass., and came 
here in 17G8, settling in the northeast part of town. He 
was a soldier in the Revolutionary War and was once 
taken prisoner, but escaped fi'om his captors. His 
occupation was farming, fishing and boat building. He 
died about 1832, at the age of 95 years. 

Benjamin Carr was a native of Wellfleet, Mass., where 
he was born in 1738. He came here when about 30 years 
old, and settled on the northeast side of Pulpit Harbor. 
He was a farmer and his place contained about 500 acres. 

Jonathan Robbins came here in 1766 from Dedham, 
Mass., and settled on what is called Indian Point. He 
was a well-to-do farmer and a worthy citizen. 

William Banks was a native of Rhode Island, where 
he was born in 1726. He came here at an early date, and 
for a time lived on Eagle Island . He was a soldier in the 
French and Indian War, and while in the service had a 
very severe attack of smallpox. 

JosiAH Hastings was among the first to come here. 
He settled on a large tract in the vicinity of Fresh Pond, 
but sometime afterwards sold his place and moved to Hope. 

CusHiNG Thomas was born 1769 in Marshfield, Mass., 
and came here with his father and brother Samuel, about 
1789. His place was wliat is now the Henry L. Smith 
farm. He was deacon of the Baptist church, and led the 
choir several years. 



52 HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN, 

James Glover came here when a young man. He was 
born in Marshfield, Mass., in the year 1751. His phice was 
in the vicinity of Southern Harbor, and his occupation was 
farming. 

Thomas Waterman was a native of Marshfield, Mass., 
where he was born in 1740. He was here in 1760 but did 
not remain long-. Returnino- ao-ain in 1765, he settled in 
the vicinity of Iron Point. His lot contained about 400 
acres. He also took up what is now called Stimpson's 
Island. 

David Wostek was a native of England, and was born 
1732. He emigrated to this country when about 12 years 
old, and in 1762 settled here. He took lip land on the 
southeast side of Southern Harbor, where he settled. 

Mark Ames was born in Marshfield, Mass., in 1742 and 
came here about 1765. He took up land about midway 
between Pulpit Harbor and Crabtree's Point. His time 
was employed farming, fishing and building boats. We 
have information that his son Benjamin was ordained 
Baptist minister at this place in 1809. 

Justice Ames, a brother of the above, was born in the 
year 1744. His place included what is now called Pigeon 
Hill. He was a farmer and boat builder. His second wife 
was the Widow Orr, whose husband was killed in the 
Revolutionary War. It is said that he was one of the 
party that in 1813 attacked the British cruiser " Fly '"near 
the shores of the White Island. 

John Lindsay was a native of Old York, where he was 
born about 1735. He came here in 1765, but did not 
remain long. Selling his place to Capt. Crabtree, he 
removed to Thomaston (now Rockland). His son George 
was afterwards proprietor of the Lindsay House, Rockland. 

William C()0peii was born 1740, in Marshfield, Mass., 
and came here at an early date. He is said to have been 
a very eccentric man. He at first settled near the head of 
Southern Harbor, but afterwards removed to the .extreme 
northeast part of the Island. 



HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 53 

Captain Thomas Beverage was a native of Topsham 
and was born 1750. He came here when a young man 
and settled near the southeast part of Pulpit Harbor 
stream. He was a very intelligent man and was engaged 
in farming and logging. 

Benjamin Robbins was born in Newbury, Mass., in 
the year 1741. He was one of the early settlers, and 
owned what is called the Oak Hill farm. He was a farmer 
and boat builder and was often engaged hunting and 
trapping. 

Richard Heath was born 1711 in Harpswell, Me. 
The date of his coming here is not known. His lot was 
what is now the Thurston farm. He lived here a few 
years and then returned to his native place. He was a 
man of intelligence, a thorough-going church member. 
He was at one time a land serveyor and also a soldier 
in the Revolution. 

Stephen Carver belonged in Marshfield, Mass., and 
was born there in 1710. He was one of the early settlers, 
and was noted for his piety. He lived on what is now the 
W. O. Waterman farm. 

Archibald McMullin was a native of Dedham, 
Mass. He was born about 1756. He came here in 1781, 
and settled on a lot which he purchased from his 
father-in-law, Jonathan Robbins. He was a soldier in the 
Revolutionary army and was with Washington at Valley 
Forge. 

Michael Bowen was a native of Cork, Ireland, and 
was educated in the Dublin University. When a young 
man he emigrated to this country, and afterwards joined 
the Colonial forces in the war for independence. He 
served with distinction during the war and was promoted 
to the rank of major. After peace was declared he settled 
here. His business was farming and teaching school. In 
1790 he married Sarah Carr, who survived him. The first 
teacher in town of whom we have seen any record was 
John O'Brien, who was employed as such by Mr. Beverage, 



64 HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN, 

by whose aid he escaped from the British service. He was 
here but a short time. Aside from this, Bowen appears to 
have been the first school teacher in this town and the only 
one for several jea,rs after his coming here, his engagements 
alternating between the North and South Islands. He was 
well educated, and his pupils made rapid progress under 
his tutorage. It is said that he was a great lover of rum 
and that when any of the boys in his charge had advanced 
as far in mathematics as the " Rule of Three," they were 
obliged to furnish him with a gallon of his favorite beverage. 

John Brown came here in 1760. He was a native of 
Marshfield, Mass., and was born in 1740. His lot joined 
Caleb Carver's on the southwest side. He was a carpenter 
and blacksmith. 

Bethuel Luce was born in Martha's Vineyard in the 
year 1730. He was a soldier in the French War, and came 
here in 1765, bringing with him his three sons Maltiah, 
Elijah and Uriah. His was the lot known as the Luce and 
Hooper farms. He was engaged farming, fishing and 
curing fish. 

James Heard came here about 1766 and took up a lot 
joining that of Bethuel Luce and Benjamin Carr. Years 
afterward he moved away, so we have been informed, to 
South Thomaston. 

George White was a native of Georgetown, and we 
have been informed, settled on " Calderwood's Neck " on 
the South Island, but about 1770 exchanged with John 
Calderwood for a lot on the North Island, where the 
Baptist meeting house is now located. He enlisted as a 
private in the war for Independence and was promoted to 
the rank of major. He was highly respected for his 
sterling qualities, and was one of the first board of 
selectmen. 

Samuel Thomas was born in Marshfield, Mass., 1741, 
and came here at an early date. He purchased from one 
Rufus Candish a lot of land located between Kent's Cove 



HISTORY OF VtNALHAVEN. 55 

und the Cubby Hole (so called) where he settled. He was 
by trade a carpenter. 

William Dyer was a native of Marshfield, Mass., where 
he was born in 1739. He came here previous to the 
Revolution, and settled on a lot, part of which is now North 
Haven village. His occupation was farming and lishing, 
and he is said to have been an expert at shooting sea-fowl. 

Benjamin Dyer, brother of the above, was a native of 
Marshfield, Mass., and came here with his brothers. He 
settled on the lot adjoining Capt. Joseph Waterman's, and 
extendino; to the east shore of Southern Harbor. 

Anthony Dyer, brother of Benjamin, settled on the 
lot now known as the Crockett and Cabot farm. His 
occupation was farming. He was also prominent in town 
affairs. 

Captain Eleazer Crabtree was a native of New York 
State, and was born 1738. He was here in 1760, but the 
Indians being troublesome he was obliged to leave. He 
returned again in 1784, and settled on a lot at the head of 
Southern Harbor. He also bought of John Perry the lot 
known as Crabtree's Point. He was a master mariner and 
shipbuilder. In 1804 he was cast away on the coast of 
Ireland, the vessel (ship Lucy and Nancy, built here by 
him the year previous) becoming a total loss. Capt. 
Crabtree and crew were picked up by a passing vessel and 
landed at Liverpool, England. He was one of the first 
board of selectmen, and was well advanced in years when 
he died. His grandson, E. C. Crabtree, Esq., is living 
here. 

John Perry was born in Duxbury, Mass., in the year 
1741, and came here about 17(J4. He settled on what is 
now Crabtree's Point. He also took up a lot between 
Perry's Creek and Seal Cove on the South Island. His 
first wife was a Miss Woster, and after her death he married 
a widow named Perry. He was father of sixteen children. 
About 1779 he was living on the South Island where he 
cultivated a small patch of land. He was one of those who 



56 HISTORY OF VIKALHAVEN. 

suffered from foragers during the occupanuy of Castine by 
the Britisli. One day a party of these foragers Linded at 
his phice and were helping themselves to his corn, etc., 
thinking probably that one man alone would not dare 
resent their actions (it is said there were fifteen of them), 
but Perry secured his guns and selecting a favorable spot 
shot two of the party and then fled into the woods. The 
rest of the party pursued him, but he evaded them by 
hiding in an old hollow tree. He remained in his hiding 
place about forty-eight hours and when it appeared that 
the coast was clear he hurried to the shore, sprang into 
his dug-out and paddled to Owl's Head. From there he 
went to Boston. He returned here shortly after, and 
when it came to the British strenuous efforts were made to 
capture him, but without success. Several times he came 
near falling into the hands of the enemy, but always 
managed to escape. Once, while picking up some birds that 
he had shot in the vicinity of Crockett's River, he was ordered 
to come ashore by some British who happened to be there. 
He answered that he would as soon as he gathered all of 
the birds. His would-be captors stood carelessly watching 
him, a fact which he probably noticed, and while pretending 
to be getting ready to go ashore he suddenly and with all 
his might paddled in the opposite direction. A shower of 
bullets followed him, but he escaped unharmed. He is 
said to have been a man very small in stature but full of 
pluck and endurance. He at one time owned a farm in 
Northport, but in his declining years resided here. He 
died at the age of ninety-three. Mr. James Smith, now 
living here, and Mrs. Roxanna Dyer on the South Island, 
are grandchildren of Perry's, and both are past fourscore. 

MATINICUS ISLE. 

Matinicus seems to have been regarded as an integral 
part of this town, though it does not appear to have been 
included in the act of incorporation. Taxes were assessed 
upon its estates by this town, but whether it was done by 



HISTORY OF VLNALHAVEN. 57 

direction of the State, petition of its inhabitants, or an 
assumption of authority, we have not learned. In 1794 
there were seven resident tax payers, and the total tax was 
£5 13s. 4d. In 1801 it was voted not to allow Matinicus 
to pa}^ tax to this town, and in 1819 it was voted to assess 
a tax on Matinicus. This is all the reference we have seen 
to the municipal relations between the two islands. The 
iirst permanent settler was Ebenezer Hall, who came to the 
Island about 1751. His wife having died, he married the 
Widow Mary Bloom Green, who resided at Pemaquid and 
who had one son named Joseph. Hall had two daughters 
and a son by his Iirst Avife. The daughters he brought to 
the Island, having put his son to learn a trade. For the 
first two years his relations with the Indians (who were 
often in that vicinit}^ egging and fowling) were friendly 
but having burnt over the Green Island (a small island 
north of Matinicus) in order to laise a better crop of hay 
for his cattle, and being warned by the Indians not to do 
it again, as it interfered with their egging and fowling, he 
paid no attention to the warning but did burn it again, 
which seems to have excited their anger. He also appears 
to have bothered them in their sealing and fishing. The 
following is an extract of a letter to Governor Phips from 
four Penobscot Indians, in behalf of their tribe. It is dated 
April 25th, 1753, and was furnished to us by Mr. J. F. 
Calderwood, of Warren : 

Brother, you did not barken to us about the Englishman 
on the Island, he hunts us in our seiling and fishing, its 
our livelihood and others too, for what we get we bring to 
your Truck Master, we don't hinder him from fisliing ; if 
you don't remove him in two months we shall be obliged 
to do it ourselves. We have writ to you before and have 
had no answer, if you don't answer we shan't write again, 
its our custom if our letters are not answered not to write 
again. We salute you and all the Council in behalf of the 
Penobscot Tribe. 



58 HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 

(Signed) fCosEMES, 

J MODOBT, 

'\ Chebnood, 
( mugdumbawit. 

They did not remove liiiii in two months, as threatened, 
but in June, 1757, a party of them made their appearance 
on the island, and finding Hall absent they retired to a 
distant part of the island to await his return. He returned 
unobserved by them, and when it became known that he 
was at home they immediately laid siege to his house. 
The siege continued several days, when they finally 
succeeded in killing him. The boy Joseph Green made 
his escape through a back window and hid in some tall 
o-rass, where he remained until after the Indians had left. 
He was on the island two or three days, when he was taken 
off by a passing fishing vessel. Mrs. Hall and the two 
daughters were taken captives by the Indians, and it is 
said that the mother and daughters were separated at some 
point on the Penobscot and never afterwards met. Mrs. 
Hall was taken to Canada, where she was eventually 
ransomed, sent to England, and afterwards returned to 
Portland. In July, 1765, she married Mr. Chipman Cobb, 
and about 1775 moved to Gorham, where she died at the 
age of 89. Hall's son, Ebenezer, married Miss Susannah 
Young, of Old York, and moved to the island about 1763. 
There were fifteen children born to them, all of whom 
lived to marry and raise families. The Carvers, Lanes 
and Roberts are descendants of Hall's on the maternal side. 
Joseph Green married a sister of Mrs. Hall's, and 
afterwards applied to Hall for a share of the island. Mr. 
Hall would allow him but a small portion on the west side, 
which he refused, and then moved to Green's Island, as 
previously mentioned. The seven resident tax payers in 
1794 were : Ebenezer Hall ; Ebenezer Hall, Jr., who 
married a Miss Calderwood of this town ; Abraham Young, 
whose wife was a sister to Mrs. Hall, and who moved to 
the island about 1765 ; Jonathan Allen, who was an officer 



HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 59 

in the Revolutionaiy army; Josepli Young, son of 
Abraham, mairied Peggy Tolman ; John Crie, native of 
Scotland, majried Polly Hall, daughter of Ebenezer, Sr.; 
and Jeremiah Tolman. 

Matinicus organized as a plantation 1 840. 

ECCLESIASTICAL. 

Probably many of the earl}^ settlers here were religious 
people, but we have not learned that for the first quarter 
of a century any measures were adopted by them to secure 
the services of a preacher of the Gospel. In 1785 the 
General Court directed that religious teachers be employed 
half the year, for the destitute plantations in Lincoln 
County, to be paid from the State tax collected from the 
inhabitants. As the people here had suffered severely 
during the Revolution, it is to be presumed came under 
that category, and were favored with a portion of such 
teachings. The first action taken in religious matters by 
the settlers was in 1792, when the town voted sixteen 
pounds to hire a minister four months. In 1797 forty 
pounds was raised, and in 1798 one hundred pounds for 
support of preaching. Since the latter year it does not 
appear that any aid was given by the town for religious 
purposes, except that for several years church wardens 
and tithing men were elected at town meetings. The first 
clergyman's name appearing on the town records is that of 
Rev. John Haines, who solemnized marriages in 1805. 
The North Island seems to have been ahead in religious 
matters, for about 1805 the Baptist Church was organized 
there, and in 1808 a meeting house was erected by them, 
which is still standing. Their first settled preacher was 
Rev. Nathaniel Haines. We have not been able to learn 
at what time the Methodist Church was established here, 
(South Island), but it appears that their teachers were the 
spiritual guides of the inhabitants up to the year 1835. 
About this time, Mormonism was preached here, and it is 
said held sway for several years, during which time a 



60 HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 

iiuml)er of the leading members of the hitherto prevailing- 
faith were converted to its ranks. Rev. Ephraim Whitney, 
a Methodist clergyman, preached here in 1841, and was 
followed by others of the same persuasion until about the 
year 1860. During all the preceding years, so far as we 
can learn, no attempt had been made to erect a place for 
public worship, the meetings having been held in the 
several schoolhouses and at private residences. In the 
early part of the year 1860 a niimber of prominent citizens 
formed a society, the object of which was to build a 
meeting house. A code of by-laws were adopted, and a 
building committee, consisting of Reuben Carver, Timothy 
Lane and Moses Weljster, were chosen and authorized to 
borrow sufficient funds and go aliead with the work. It 
was also decided that the new building when finished 
should be a Union meeting house. The building was 
completed the same year, at a cost of $2,850, and the pews 
were appraised at a sum sufficient to cover the cost of the 
house. The trustees of tlie building were David Vinal, 
Ezekiel Burgess, Elisha Carver, Chancy Noyes and 
Nathaniel Ames. The first three have been laid away 
from earthly labors. The Free Will Baptist Church was 
organized here in 1863 by Rev. W. H. Littlefield, (who 
was. subsequently their pastor for several years), and since 
that time up to the present year the pulpit as a rule has 
been supplied by preachers of that faith. The Uni(m 
society was organized February 12th, 1863, and its first 
officers were James Roberts, chairman ; and David Vinal, 
Secretary ; S. G. Webster, David Vinal and Benjamin 
Lane, Executive Committee. This society virtually 
controls the preaching at Union Church, and among its 
first members were such well known names as Timothy 
Lane, John Carver, David Vinal, Moses Webster, S. G. 
Webster and John De Laski. There has been no settled 
pastor here tlie past year. A meeting was held April 5th, 
1889, when, in order to raise funds for support of preaching 
the original pew holders consented to have their pews sold 



HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 61 

for one ye;ir. Sonietliiiig over -fSOO was I'ealized from the 
sale, and the executive committee, namely : T. G. J^ibby, 
H. M. Noyes, and J. A. Babbidge, were authorized to 
negotiate for the services of a clergyman. Several were 
brought here on trial, and the society at a meeting held 
May 28th, (1889), voted to accept the services of Rev. 
Warren Applebee, at a salary of f|l,000 a year, and the use 
of tlie parsonage. Mr. Applebee is a Congregationalist 
minister, and we understand, the first of that faith to 
preach in this town. The only other religious society in 
town are the Second Advents, whose church was organized, 
about seven years ago, and two years ago their chapel was 
built. Their pulpit is supplied by laymen, with an 
occasional preacher from abroad. There are also a few 
Catholics, whose spiritual wants are attended to by the 
resident pastor at Rockland, Maine. 

SOCIETIES. 

There is probably not a town in the State of the same 
population, with as many organizations, that are any better 
supported than those in Vinal Haven. Nearly all of those 
we shall mention are in existence at present, and have a 
substantial membership. 

MASONIC. 

Moses Webster Lodge, so named in compliment to the 
late Hon. Moses Webster, was organized January 17th, 
1868, by E. E. Wortman, D. D. G. M. The charter 
members were : George Roberts, Charles Littlefield, E. L. 
Roberts, Edwin Lane, A. A. Dolham, Eben Roberts, H. 
K. Webster, James Thompson, W. E. Avery, J. F. Talbot, 
Moses Webster, W. H. Paige, W. H. Paige, Jr., James 
McDonald, E.- H. Lyford, Smith Hopkins, Ezekiel Burgess, 
E. R. Graffam, F. C. Carver, B. J. Richards, J. D. Arey, 
Michael Carlin, J. R. Merrithew. The first officers 
appointed by the G. M. were George Roberts, W. M.; W. 
E. Avery, S. W.: Charles Littlefield, J. W. Tlie first 



62 HISTORY or VINALHAVEN. 

meeting was held on the upper floor of the hiulding now 
occupied by A. P. Green, and others, but afterwards a hall 
was fitted for their use in the same building, where their 
meetings were held for Jabout twelve years. The Masonic 
block was built in 1879, at a cost of 111,615.12, and the 
lodge moved into their new quarters in January, 1880. 
The present n)embership is 170. 

Atlantic, R. A. Chapter, was instituted June 14th, 1876, 
with seventeen charter members ; J. B. Courrier, H. P.; 
John A. Miller, Treasurer; E. A. Mudgett, Secretary. 

DeValois Commandery, K. T., was instituted October 
14th, 1886, with twenty-four charter members. The first 
E. C. was Frederick S. Walls ; Calvin B. Vinal, Treasurer, 
and Charles Littlefield, Secretary. The present membership 
is tliirty-eight. 

1. (). o. F. 

Star of Hope Lodge was instituted November 23rd, 1874, 
by F. M. Laughton, M. W. Grand Master, and the charter 
members were : John Lowe, A. A. Beaton, M. H. Kiff, 
William H. Johnson, and John A. Miller. The first 
officers were : A. A. Beaton, N. G.; John Lowe, V. G.; 
M. T. Fitzsimmons, Secretary, and John A. Miller, 
Treasurer. The lodge held their meetings for several 
years in the hall over M. H. Kiff's store. They finally 
purchased the building, with the one adjoining, and in 
1885 both were united, and a fine hall arranged on the 
upper floor. The total cost of the building was about 
#8,000. This lodge has paid in benefits about 1^4,000, and 
up to the present time 207 members have been initiated. 

Island Home Encampment was instituted July 26th, 
1883, with seven charter memberr. The first officers were : 
A. A. Beaton, C. P.; Everett Mills, S., and J. S. Black, 
Treas. 

Canton Vinal Haven, Patriarchs Militant, was mustered 
April 25th, 1889, a wai'rant having been obtained by 



HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 63 

thirty-four members of Island Home Eiieampmeiit. The 
first ofhcers were : Fred Hinckley, Captain ; C. E. Boman, 
Clerk ; Everett Mills, Accountant. 

TEMPERANCE. 

Granite Lodge, I. O. G. T., was organized February 2nd, 
1866, with twenty charter members, and Reuben T. Carver, 
was the first W. C. T. This was at one time the banner 
lodge of the State, having had upwards of four hundred 
members. 

Saint Joseph's C. T. A. S. was organized in the latter 
part of 1874, and was successful for a time, but finally 
disbanded. M. Maker was President, and John Murphy, 
Secretary. 

Vinal Haven Reform Club organized in 1875. M. H. 
Kiff was the first President. This club flourished for 
several years. 

There have been at different times several juvenile 
temperance societies, but none exist at present. 

G. A. R. 

Lafayette Carver Post was granted a charter November 
26th, 1881, and there were twenty-four charter members. 
Henry C. Day was the first Commander. 

Thomas G. Libby Camp, Sons of Veterans, was instituted 
December 10th, 1887, with seventeen charter members. 
James H. McLitosh was Captain. 

Woman's State Relief Corps organized December 18th, 
1883, with thirty charter members. Mrs. Celeste Carver 
was the first President. 

LABOR SOCIETIES. 

Rock Bound Assembly, K. of L., was organized January 
30th, 1885. There were twenty charter members, and T. 
J. Lyons was the first Master Workman. 



61 HISTOKY OF VINALHAVEN. 

Viiiiil Haven Biaiicli, (j. C. N. U., organized February 
lOtli, 1877. Alexander Davidson was the lirst President. 
Lapsed in 1879, and re-organized in 1887, with Fred J.' 
Ware, President. 

Vinal Haven Branch, Paving Cutters' Union, organized 
May 21st, 1888, with seven charter members. George 
Bettie was the first President. 

INSURANCE SOCIETIES. 

Ishmd City Lodge, K. of H., instituted September -1th, 
1878, and there were nine charter members. George 
Roberts was the first Dictator. 

Subordinate Council No. 307, United Friends, had their 
charter granted March 26th, 1888. There were forty-six 
charter members, and Mrs. Emma Roberts was the first 
Chief Councilor. 

VINAL HAVEN LIBRARY AND BEADING ROOM. 

The idea of establishing a reading room here was first 
suggested by the late Governor Bodwell, and upon his 
proposal to furnish free, a room with all necessary fixings^ 
a collection was taken up among the workmen and others, 
and something over $100 raised to purchase reading- 
material. A citizens' meeting was held August 11th, 1887, 
when John Lowe, T. G. Libbj^ F. V. Crocker, T. J. Lyons, 
J. A. Babbidge, Alexander Davidson and O. P. Lyons were 
elected Trustees, with T. J. Lyons Librarian. At the 
annual town meeting following, the amount of money 
allowed by law was raised to purchase books for a free 
public library, and in 1889 a similar amount was voted. 
The library has a fine selection of books, is well patronized, 
and it is hoped has become one of the fixed institutions of 
the town. 



HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 



65 



WAR EXPENSES AND LIST OF SOLDIERS. 

The total expenses of the town for war purposes, 
exclusive of interest, was 138,322, or nearly one-lifth of 
the value of property as fixed by the State valuation, and 
the amount received from the State was $9,341.67. The 
number of men who were paid a bounty, and for whom the 
town was reimbursed by the State, 132, and the total 
number of men furnished by this town was, as near as can 
be ascertained, about 180 
enlisted that were residents of the town 



Following is a list of those who 



Arey, Richard R., 
Arey, Rufus, 2nd, 
Arey, Hiram F., 
Arey, Benjamin, 
Arey, William H., 
Arey, Robert E., 
Allenwood, Ephraim F., 
Burns, Geo. W., 
Brown, Freeman, 
Brown, Thomas, 
Brown, Joseph, 
Bradstreet, Hiram M., 
Brewster, Robert, 
Burgess, Benjamin, 
Bray, Francis E., 
Colburn, Stephen S., 
Carver, Francis S., 
Carver, Reuben T., 
Carver, Lafayette, 
Conway, Orrin T., 
Coombs, Isaiah, 
Carver, George S., 
Conway, John M., 
Creed, Henry E., 
Calderwood, James C, 
Colby, George, 



Coombs, George E., 
Clayton, John R., 
Calderwood, Luther J. 
Calderwood, Eben S., 
Carnes, William, 
Creed, William R., 
Coombs, Lewis H., 
Coombs, John, 
Colby, Warren, 
Carnes, Simeon, 
Carver, William E., 
Colby, James, 
Carver, Thaddeus C, 
Douglas, Chester R., 
Dyer, Thomas A., 
Dyer, Freeman, 
Dyer, Daniel, 
Dyer, James C, 
Dyer, Melzer T., 
Duncan, Daniel, 
Dunphy, Alexander, 
Dushane, Francis, 
Garrett, Silas A., 
Garrett, Freeman F., 
Gavett, Samuel A., 
Graffam, Joseph F., 



66 



HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 



Gray, William C, 
Ginn, David R., 
Ginn, James, Jr., 
Green, Israel, 
Hall, Timothy, 
Hall, George, 
Hopkins, Henry S., 
Jacobs, George T., 
Kittredge, William W., 
Kiff, Martin H., 
Littlefield, Ivory C, 
Lane, Rodney, 
Linnekin, Robert E., 
Myrick, Rinaldo, 
Mills, Flavious, 
Mills, Stephen, 
Mills, Elisha, 
Mullin, David S., 
Murch, Isaac, 
Mcintosh, Henry, 
Mcintosh, James H., 
Myrick, Martin V., 
Mills, James P., 
Mills, Cyrus, 
Mullin, John, 
Mills, Willard C, 
Mills, Albion, 
Norton, Jonas, 
Norton, Joseph H., 
Norton, Paris, 
Norton, Vincent, 



Neal, James, 
Orne, Amos, 
Pierce, Freeman G., 
Pierce, Horatio B., 
Pool, George, 
Rooney, David, 
Robbins, Oliver W., 
Roberts, Eben, 
Roberts, Edgar L., 
Roberts, Edwin R., 
Roberts, Joseph J., 
Smith, Levi W., 
Slater, John, 
Shirley, Christopher, 
Sanborn, James, 
Swears, Charles, 
Smith, Franklin, 
Smith, Charles V., 
Twitchell, Isaac J., 
Tewilliger, Gilbert, 
Tobin, Manford, 
Vinal, Reuben, 
Vinal, Woster S., 
Vinal, Calvin B., 
Vinal, John, 
Webber, Abel, 
Webber, Franklin, 
West, Samuel, 
West, William T., 
Young, Lorenzo, 
Young, Alexander, 



HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 



67 



NAMES OF THOSE FROM THIS TOWN WHO WERE KII^LKD 
OR DIED IN THE SERVICE. 

Murcli, Isaac, Lieut., Smith, Charles V., 

Carver, Lafayette, 2iid Lieut., Sanbor, James, 



Colburn, Stephen, 
Carver, Thacldeus C, 
Shirley, Christo[)her, 
Hall, George, 
Calderwood, Eben S., 
Brewster, Robert, 
Gavett, Samuel, 
Webber, Franklin, 
Coombs, George, 
Conway, Orrin T., 



Bray, Francis E., 

West, Samuel, 
Conway, John M., 
Coombs, Isaiah, 
Brown, Freeman, 
Tobin, Manford, 
Young, Alexander, 
Mills, Flavious, 
Roberts, Eben, 



NAMES OF THOSE, AS NEAR AS WE COULD ASCERTAIN, 
WHO WERE IN THE WAR OF 1812. 
Steward, Cushing, 
Steward, Charles, 



Ingerson, Josiah, 
Arey, James, 
Vinal, David, 
Philbrooks, Daniel, 
Brown, Cyril, Jr., 
Merrithew, Roger, 
Wooster, Joseph, 
Thayer, Lemuel, 
Thayer, Samuel, Jr., 



Grant, William, 
White, Matthew, 
Pendleton, Alexander, 
Lewis, Samuel, Jr., 
My rick, Paul, 
Are}', Eben, 2nd. 



I 



68 



HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 



A LIST OF PERSONS RESIDING IN TOWN WHO WILL BE 
AGED 80 YEARS OR MORE, SOMETIME DFIMNG THE 
PKESENT YEAR. 



Reuben Carver, 

Mrs. Phebe Daily, 

Elislia Smith, 

Thaddeus Smith, 

William Banks, 

Samuel Smith, 

Mrs. Mary Bradstreet, 

Mrs. Sarah McKellar, 

Mrs. Clementina Brown, 

Timothy Dyer, 

John Arey, 

Mrs. Sally Norwood, 

Phillip Arey, 

Mrs. Jane Calderwood, 

Mrs. Susan Dyer, 

Mrs. Rebecca Rider, 

Mrs. Jane Collamore probably, 82 

Mrs. Clarissa Arey, 

Mrs. Roxanna Dyer, 

Aaron Merrithew, 

Mrs. Josie Ann Merrithew, 

Mrs. Emily Poole, 

Isaac Lawry, 

James Carver, 

Mrs. Lucy Crockett, 



92 y 


ears. 


August, 


89 


ii. 


March, 


88 


Cl 


October, 


86 


Li 


November, 


86 


ik 


May, 


86 


l( 


June, 


86 


(C 


October, 


86 


(I 


June, 


86 


i(. 


May, 


86 


u 


December, 


84 


il. 


March, 


84 


a 


May, 


84 


a 


May, 


84 


(.i 


July, 


82 


u 


September, 


82 


;( 


April, 


82 


u 




81 


n 


September, 


81 


1.1, 


April, 


81 


a 


October, 


81 


ii, 


September, 


81 


(I 


March, 


80 


ii. 


Octobei-, 


80 


ii 


October, 


80 


li 


June, 



1889 



HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 69 

INDUSTRIES. 

Mills. — We have not been able to ascertain at what 
time the first mill was built here, but judging from what 
information we have received, it must have been as early 
as 1760. It was a double saw mill, erected by Francis 
Cogswell, of Ipswich, Mass., on the site of the polishing 
mill now occupied by the Bodwell Granite Co. Mr. 
Cogswell, previous to this, had undertaken to erect a mill 
at the Basin Falls, but after expending several hundred 
dollars, was obliged to abandon his purpose. In 1776, 
Cogswell sold his plant to Thaddeus Carver, and a few 
years after the mill was destroyed, probably fell down. It 
was rebuilt about 1840, by Reuben Carver, and later a grist 
mill was added. After the war, this mill was sold to Mr. 
Chaney Noyes, and about 1873 or '74 the whole site 
(except the grist mill, which is still owned by Mr. Noyes) 
was purchased by the Bodwell Granite Co. The first grist 
mill in town, it is said, was erected by Mr. Thomas 
Beverage, on Pulpit Harbor stream, but at what time we 
have not learned. There was at one time a grist mill at 
Arey's Harbor, occupied by Benjamin Coombs. Mr. John 
Calderwood erected a saw mill near the carrying place (so 
called) maybe as early as 1775, and a grist mill was 
afterwards added. There was a saw mill near the head of 
Crockett's River, built by Benjamin and Sylvanus Coombs, 
wdiich was occupied for a number of years by Mr. John 
Whitmore, of Deer Isle. William Vinal, Sr., erected mills 
at Mills Creek and Vinal's Falls. The latter was occupied 
by John and William Vinal after their father's death. 

Fishing Industry. — It is doubtful if, for at least the 
first quarter of a century, the early settlers here engaged 
to any extent in curing fish for the market. Fish were 
plenty and literally swarmed the waters, but the chief 
difiiculty was in obtaining salt, an article most of which 
used here at that time was of home manufacture. 
Salt-works Avere estal)lished at several places in town, 
namely : At Indian Creek, Calderwood's Neck, Dodge's 



70 HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 

(Smith's) Point, The Basin, Oak Hill (North Haven) and 
probably at other points. Salt was made by boiling 
sea water, of which only a small per cent, is salt. It was 
a slow and tedious process, as it required al)Out four 
hundred gallons of water to make a bushel of salt. But 
as years passed on, the population increased and more 
frequent intercourse was established with the outside 
world, the fishing industry grew, until in 1820, it is said 
that 700 tons of shipping were owned in town, most of 
which were engaged in the fisheries. P^or many years this 
l)usiness was the chief support of the inhabitants, and at 
any one time there were stands for curing hsh at Indian 
Creek, Carver's Cove, Arey's Harbor, Coombs' Head, 
Smith's Cove, Thoroughfare, Bartlett's Harbor, Northern 
Harbor, Crockett's Cove, Leadbetter's Island, Creed's 
Cove, Carver's Harl)or, and Lane's Island. In the palmy 
days of fishing, it is estimated that the amount of fish 
cured at those yaids exceeded seventy-five thousand 
quintals. The business of curing the fish, until about 1870, 
was conducted on the per centage plan ; that is, the 
fishermen would pay a certain per cent, of their earnings 
for curing. At one time from 75 to 100 vessels were 
owned here, and engaged in the fisheries ; and four 
freighters were almost continually employed carrying fish 
to Boston. Up to the year 1860, this industry held its 
own, and even through the first years of the war. At the 
close of the war and until 1870 there was a falling off, and 
for eight years after there was comparatively little fishing- 
done. In 1878, Edwin Lane and T. G. Libby commenced 
buyijig and curing fish for the Boston and Gloucester 
markets ; the first year handling about 3,000 quintals. 
Their business has increased each j^ear, until in 1888 they 
cured about 18,000 quintals, besides manufacturing some 
350 barrels of fish oil, and curing about 14,000 pounds of 
liake sounds. Their fish find a market not only in Boston, 
but all through the west, and even in the West Indies. 
About 1879 F. M. Brown located at the Sands, started 



HISTORY OF VTNALHAVEN. 71 

buying and curing fish, and for several 3^ear8 carried on 
(^uite an extensive business. In 1881, H. V. Lane, J. H. 
Sanborn and F. S. Walls, in partnership commenced 
business on Lane's Island. They cured from 6,000 to 
8,000 quintals each year, until 1885, when they discontinued 
business. 

Lobster Fishing is an important brancli of this 
industry, as it furnishes employment for many of our 
people, though lobsters are not so plenty as in former 
years. Until within a few years the fishermen found a 
ready sale for their catch at the local factory. In 1884 
Messrs. Johnson & Young, of Boston, erected a large 
lobster pound at the Basin, and from eighty to one hundred 
and fifty thousand lobsters are stored there annually, and 
are bought mostly from the fishermen hereabouts. They 
are taken out in the winter months and shipped to Boston, 
where they bring from $5 to -114 per barrel of 140 pounds. 
Lane & Libby, J. H. Sanborn, and R. T. Carver buy large 
quantities of lobsters each year, which they send away. 
There are several fish weirs about the Island, in which 
thousands of bushels of herring are caught. They are sold 
to fishermen for bait, and also to canning factories on the 
coast. The weir at " Wreck Ledge " was built in 1884 by 
R. R. Arey and George Roberts, and in 1886 the one at 
Lane's Island was erected by John Rogers and F. M. Lane. 

CANNING FACTORIES. 

The lobster canning business was first commenced in 
this town about 1847, by Messrs. Johnson & Hamlin, of 
Boston. The factory was located near the steamboat 
wharf, and was owned by Mr. William Smith. The above 
firm continued business for several years, and were followed 
by Rice and Carker, of Boston, and later by Wells and 
Prevost, of N. Y. This factory was destroyed by fire just 
after the war, and has never been rebuilt. About 1866 a 
large factory was built at the Reach, and was occupied 
several years by Shenck and Romaine, of New York ; then 



72 HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 

by U. li. Dudley, of New York, and last by J. W. Jones, 
of Portland, Me. This building was demolished two 
years ago. The large factory owned by Lyford & Ginn 
was built in 1884, and large quantities of lobsters, clams 
and mackerel were put up by them, but for several years 
past the premises have been vacant. It is to be regretted 
that this industry has been allowed to die out here, as it 
furnished employment for many hands. 

SHIP BUILDING. 

This business, in former years, was carried on quite 
extensively here, and besides the numerous small craft 
there were many of quite large dimensions. The ship 
Lucy and Nancy was built at the head of Southern Harbor 
(North Island) in 1803, by Captain Eleazer Crabtree, and 
later there were vessels built by Joshua Thomas, James 
Fernald, William Vinal, Jr., Mark Calderwood, and others. 
In 1826 Captain Reuben Carver built the schooner 
Plymouth Rock for parties in Boston, and since that time 
twelve others (one a brig) have been constructed by him, 
the last one being the schooner Island Home, built in 1866. 

GRANITE QUARRYING. 

It is not known at what time the quarrying of granite 
was first commenced here, but from the most authentic 
information obtainable, operations were first begun in 1826. 
This year a man named Tuck, of New Hampshire, quarried 
a cargo of stone at Arey's Harbor for a Massachusetts 
prison, and chartered the schooner Plymouth Rock, (a 
vessel built the same year by Capt. Reuben Carver), to 
carry it to Boston. Two years later Capt. Nelson Spear, 
of Rockland, Me., quarried a small cargo at Dyer's Island. 
This, with probably an occacional small job for local 
purposes, was the extent of the business until about 181:6, 
when work was begun on Leadbetter's Island by the 
Messrs. Carlton. Work was commenced on East Boston 
quarry in 1849, by Joseph Kittredge and Enoch Carlton, 



HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 73 

and the next year Joseph and his brother, William B. 
Kittredge, continued work at the same place. Moses 
Webster came here in 1851, and in 1852 he, with the late 
Gov. Bodwell, and S. G. Webster, operated the East 
Boston quarrj. At the end of the year S. G. Webster 
retired from the firm, and the former two continued in 
business under the iirm name of Bodwell and Webster, 
until the Bodwell Granite Company was organized. 
About 1853, Joseph Kittredge and S. G. Webster opened 
what is now called Diamond Rock quarry, and contniued 
in business there for about six years. The quarry on east 
side of Kittredge Hill (so called) was opened by Wm. B. 
Kittredge and S. G. Webster in 1860, and they operated 
there in partnership for about eleven years. At the same 
time the quarry on west side of the hill was opened by 
Joseph Kittredge, Samuel Clay and Ezekiel Sargent. In 
1863, work was commenced on Dyer's Island by Garrett 
Coughlin, Edward Russell and James Sprague. After 
Sprague retired from tlie firm Messrs. Bodwell and 
Webster obtained an interest and work was continued 
there until about 1875. The Harbor quarry was first 
operated by Thornton Webber, the year we have not 
learned. Other quarries that have been worked but on 
which nothing is being tlone at present are the Wliarff 
quarry, in Mills District ; Carver and Graffam quarry, in 
Zion, (so called) ; Dogie Point and City Point quarries, 
owned by the B. G. Co.; and the John S. Hopkins quarry, 
on Granite Island. The quarries on Hurricane Isle were 
tirst started in 1870 by Gen. Tillson, Garrett Coughlin, 
John Hogan and Patrick McNamara. The Bodwell 
Granite Co. was incorporated in 1871, and since that time 
some immense contracts have been filled, some years 
employing from twelve to fifteen hundred men, with a 
monthly pay roll of from $45,000 to -1560,000. The most 
notable contract completed by this company (though but a 
cipher compared to others from a pecuniary standpoint) 
was the General Wool monument, erected at Troy, N. Y., 



74 HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 

which was quarried and cut in the year 1878, the length 
of the shaft alone being 60 feet, and weighed in the rough 
about 185 tons ; probably the largest granite shaft ever 
quarried in this country. The monument contains seven 
stone, the bottom base measuring 17.6, 17.6 by 2.0. It 
was shipped from here on the barge Jemima Leonard, 
August 16th, 1879, and weighed when on board, including 
foundation, about 650 tons. For several years past the 
firms of Booth Bros., J. S. Black, Kittredge and Smith, 
and J. P. Ambrust have engaged in the manufacture of 
paving blocks, giving employment to about 125 men, and 
many thousands of these stones are annually shipped from 
here. 

NET BUSINESS. 

An important branch of industry, here, and one that in 
past years has furnished employment in almost every 
family, is knitting horse nets. This business was begun 
about 1848 by James Fernald, first on a small scale ; later 
a factory was erected, and the business conducted for 
several years by Benjamin Lane. From about 1852, until 
1867, this industry was carried on successively by John 
Carver, his son Thaddeus and daughter Josephine. The 
dwelling houses now owned by Israel Green and Lewis 
Hopkins were built by Mr. Carver, and first used as net 
factories. This business was taken up by Mr. E. L. 
Roberts in 1867 and has been conducted by him ever since. 
The nets are all made for the American Net Co., of 
Boston, Mass. At one time knitting and weaving nets 
was carried on the year round, employing more than four 
hundred persons, but at present not so many are employed 
and nothing is done during the summer months. 

ADDITIONAL SETTLERS. 

(Settlers of whom we have learned since placing first 
installment of this work in the printer's hands.) 



HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 75 

Inckea.se Leadbettek, Jk., came here I'roni Massachu- 
setts about 17G7, aud took up a hirge tract in vicinity of 
Crockett's River. He married Elizabeth Calderwood, and 
they had thirteen children. About 1788 he removed to 
the town of Leeds, where he died. 

John Leadbettek, brother of the above, was one of 
the early settlers. He owned the place now occu[)ied l)y 
William Lawry, which he purchased from his brother 
Increase. In 1780 he married Miss Mercy Brown. His 
second wife was the Widow Lucy Pool. He lived to a 
very old age. 

Increase Leadbettek, father of the above, came here 
about 1769, and resided with his sons. He was by trade a 
blacksmith. 

Thomas Bkown, familiarly known as Doctor Brown, 
was born in Wellfleet, Mass., and came here about 17 07. 
He owned the land now occupied by Isaiah Pease and 
others. He married three times and had a family of 
twenty-one children. His occupation was farming and 
fishing. 

Israel Carvek came here in 1700, from Marshtield, 
Mass., and settled on the place now occupied by James C. 
Calderwood. Samuel Carver, residing at North Haven, 
and James Carver living here, in his eightieth year, are 
grandchildren of Israel. 

Samuel Young came here from Cape Cod. He was 
one of the early settlers here, and occupied the place now 
owned by his grandson, James M. Young. He was 
probably the first of that name to come here. He died 
aged 63. 

Job Philbkooks was born in 1729, probably in 
Biddeford, Me. About 1744, when 15 years old, he was 
taken by the Indians, and carried to Canada, but was 
ransomed, and settled at Job's Island, in Penobscot Bay. 
• He came here some years afterwards, but nothing more is 
known of him, probably did not remain long here. Two 
of his sons settled here, Jeremiah, who married Sarah 



76 HISTORY OF VINALHAVEK. 

Leadbetter, daughter of Increase, settled on the east side 
of Crockett's River, and Joel, who settled near Poole's 
Hill, in the Eastern District. Joel, after living here a 
number of years, moved away to Ohio. During the 
Revolutionary War, Jeremiah removed to Bath, where he 
remained until peace was declared, when he returned. 
Joel Philbrooks, living here at present, is a grandson of 
Jeremiah. 

We cannot appropriately close this work without 
noticing one who, though not among the first settlers, Avas 
so intimately connected with the upbuilding of this town : 

Moses Webster was born in Pelham, N. H., November 
ITtli, 1817, and at the age of twenty-four married Lydia 
M. Baker, of Manchester. He first learned the shoemaker's 
trade, and in early life became a granite cutter. He came 
here in 1851 and commenced business on the East Boston 
quarry. Durino- his thirty years of residence here, he 
took an earnest part in everything that served to advance 
the interests of tlie town and its people. He served 
several years as one of the selectmen, was one of the 
Legislature in '59, and State Senator for Knox County in 
'73 and '74. Mr. Webster was a descendant of John 
Webster, who came from England in 1684. He died 
January 15th, 1887, aged B9 years, his wife and one 
daughter, (Mrs. F. S. Walls) surviving him. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

There is a tradition here that many years before the 
first settlers came a party of fishermen were killed by 
Indians, on a ledge near the Old Harbor, and that they 
were afterwards buried on a small island near by. We 
have tried to learn when this tragedy might have occurred 
but have been unable to do so. The only reference in history 
that we have seen which might justify this tradition, was 
when the Indians in 1724 raided the coast, taking 22 
vessels, eight of which were captured in the vicinity of 
this island. 



HISTORY OF VINALHAVEK. 77 

There are large beds of clam shells near the Basin Falls 
about which there is no tradition, but they were probably 
made b}' Indians who came here at certain seasons, and as 
the place mentioned is a romantic spot, made it their 
camping place. 

The schooner Greyhound was built in 185;"), and in 
August of the same year commenced running as a packet 
between this place and Rockland. 

The Carver block was built by Reuben Carver in 1857. 

The first steamboat to ply between this place and 
Rockland was the " Pioneer." She was placed on the 
route in June, 1868. 

The Vinal Haven Band was organized in the fall of 
1870, and on the National Independence Day following 
headed the procession on a wagon drawn by 72 yoke of 
oxen. 

The first fire engine in town was the Lion, an ancient 
relic brought here in '70. In the early part of '71 the 
"■ Ellsworth "' was purchased by a local company, and in 
the latter part of the same year the fine hand engine 
(named here the E. P. Walker) Putnam was bought by a 
local company. The latter engine was afterwards sold in 
Marlboro, Mass. In 1888 the town purchased the steam 
fire engine " Reuben Carver," and the total cost for engine, 
ladder truck, hose, hose cart, etc., was '14,989.61. The 
Vinal Haven Volunteer Fire Dept. was organized in June 
of the same year. 

The John Carver Cemetery Association was formed in 
May, 1871, with F. A. Hunt President. The Trustees 
were F. A. Hunt, Moses Webster, Charles Littlefield, 
James Ginn, Jr., and Benjamin R. Richards. The total 
cost of this cemetery to the association, for land, fences, 
etc., was #1,726.00. The original survey made 121 lots, 
but some more have since been added. The first interment 
was Mrs. Rachel Smith, wife of William Smith, and the 
second one (buried same day) Miss Alvira McKellar. 



78 HISTORY OF VINALHAVEN. 

At a special town meeting held October 18tli, 1878, it 
was voted to purchase the building now used as a Town 
Hall. The price paid was 'tl,300. 

The first nevv^s paper published in town was a non-political 
sheet, named the " Wind." It was commenced January 
5th, 1884, and the proprietors were O. P. Lyons and C. H. 
Healey. 

The Granite Hotel was destroyed by tire March 30th, 
188(3, and the E. F. Allenwood House January 16th, 1888. 

REFERENCES. 

In compiling this brief work we have availed ourselves 
of information contained in Eaton's excellent histories of 
Warren, Thomaston and Rockland; Williamson's valuable 
History of Maine ; Hosmer's History of Deer Isle, and 
other printed works. We are also much indebted for 
valuable information to Dr. J. F. Pratt, of Chelsea, Mass.; 
J, T. Calderwood, of Warren ; E. C. Crabtree, of North 
Haven ; Reuben Carver and many others of this town, to 
whom we here express our sincere thanks. 

O. P. LYONS. ^ 

L. W. SMITH, I Centennial 

T. G. LIBBY, } 

GEORGE ROBERTS, | CommUtee. 
D. H. GLIDDEN, ) 



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