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Full text of "Bulletin of the American Library Association"

L I B 

OF THE 
UNIVERSITY 
OF ILLINOIS 



020.6 

AMB 
v. 13 




OF THE 



AMERICAN LIBRARY 
ASSOCIATION 



VOLUME XIII 

MARCH-NOVEMBER, 1919 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 

78 E. WASHINGTON STREET 

CHICAGO 

1919 



CONTENTS 

1919. 

March MISCELLANEOUS 

May MISCELLANEOUS 

v/July PROCEEDINGS -OF THE ASBURY PARK CONFERENCE 

September HANDBOOK, 1919 

November . MISCELLANEOUS 



030. 



BULLETIN 



OF THE 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 

Entered as second-class matter December 27, 1909, at the Post Office at Chicago, 111., under 

Act of Congress of July 16, 1894. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage 

provided for in section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized on July 8, 1918. 



VOL 13, No. 1. [Jan., 1919, omitted.] CHICAGO, ILL. 



MABCH, 1919 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Library war service: The situation and the opportunity 1 

Asbury Park Conference 5 

Preliminary travel announcement 5 

What then? Compton 6 

College and university catalogs, reports and announcements Hanson .... 11 

Executive Board 14 

A. L. A. Publishing Board 19 

Gifts and bequests to libraries, 1918 24 

Committee of Five 32 

Committee notices 33 

Sale, exchange, wants, offers 34 



LIBRARY WAR SERVICE: THE SITUATION 
AND THE OPPORTUNITY 



To the boneyard of discarded slogans 
which resulted from the close of the fight- 
ing in Europe, the library war service of 
the American Library Association has 
made its contribution. "A book for every 
man" was the aim of the Association in 
its overseas shipments while the war was 
in progress; the phrase has been forgot- 
ten. 

The slogan has been outgrown. When 
the flow of American forces to European 
shores was at its height, the Association 
was not able to keep pace in the shipment 
of books. Now, with 400,000 men returned 
from France and approximately 1,600,000 
still abroad, the total number of books sent 
overseas has passed the two-million mark. 
To meet the tremendous demand which 



exists, it must continue to expand for 
some time to come. 

"At least million more fiction and mis- 
cellaneous books demanded within next 
six months to maintain army morale," was 
the significant statement in a cablegram 
recently received at the Washington head- 
quarters of the library war service from 
Dr. Herbert Putnam, Librarian of Con- 
gress and general director of the Associa- 
tion's war service, now in France to di- 
rect the work for the forces overseas. Dr. 
Putnam urges that everything possible be 
done to stimulate book and magazine do- 
nations, and declares that the need was 
never greater than at present. 

Earlier cablegrams from Dr. Putnam 
and from Burton E. Stevenson, European 






AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



representative of the Association, have had 
a similar import. "Demand for books un- 
believably great rush all possible ship- 
ments" was the substance of one received 
from Mr. Stevenson. "All badly needed 
now" was the comment of General Persh- 
ing himself in a cable to the War Depart- 
ment in which he asked that everything 
possible be done to expedite the shipment 
of books. 

The increased demand for books of all 
sorts is not confined to the overseas arm 
of the service alone. In camps and hos- 
pitals in America as well, the armistice 
meant heightened activity for the library 
war service. There was a brief period of 
excitement, when study stopped complete- 
ly in the camp and hospital libraries, and 
even recreational reading dwindled al- 
most to the vanishing point. The phase 
was one in which the library war service 
lost wholly its martial character; when 
the demand for books revived in a few 
days, becoming brisker than ever. There 
no longer was interest in the military 
manuals and the personal war narratives. 
Practically every vocational book on the 
shelves, however, was working overtime. 

In this period, the A. L. A. library war 
service reversed its direction. Its chief 
effort no longer was directed to the task 
of shaping an army and building up a navy. 
The man who a few days before had been 
intent on the study of military subjects, 
with his eye on a commission or a ser- 
geantcy, had suddenly become a bee keep- 
er, or a salesman, or perhaps a carpen- 
ter. Every book which pointed the way 
back to the "home job" was now eagerly 
sought out. 

It was now the function of the American 
Library Association to enable the mem- 
bers of the military organization to return 
to civil life with their usefulness unim- 
paired; to send them back more fit in the 
quality of their mental training than they 
had been when they entered the service. 

In the new situation, it has been the 
aim of the A. L. A. to have available for 
any man, at any stage of the demobiliza- 



tion process, the precise technical or voca- 
tional book he needs to prepare him for 
the return to civil life. The range and 
quantity of t'u- vocational Moks has been 
increased and thtfj "ivvb'bet given a uni- 
form distribution throughout the service, 
being provided uiuet plentifully where con- 
ditions are most favorable for intensive 
study. 

In the overseas service, the A. L. A. has 
provided the reference libraries for the 
use of the schools which are being estab- 
lished by the Army Education Commission. 
For the five hundred libraries which it has 
been estimated these schools will require, 
more than 300,000 volumes have been pur- 
chased in this country and shipped to 
France on special tonnage granted by the 
War Department. These books cover a 
range of more than 900 titles, approxi- 
mately 400 of which have been purchased 
in lots of 500 or 1,000 each. 

In addition to the 300,000 volumes pur- 
chased especially for these reference libra- 
ries, 340,000 volumes of a miscellaneous 
nature were ordered for the use of the 
overseas forces during December and Janu- 
ary. The shipments for the two months 
show a combined total of 389 tons 219,- 
455 volumes in December and 298,919 vol- 
umes in January. Transportation prob- 
lems have now been sufficiently overcome 
to enable a shipment to be delivered to the 
Paris headquarters of the A. L. A. twenty- 
five days after leaving Hoboken. 

A reference library and reading-room is 
maintained at the Paris headquarters, 
from which books are sent out on indi- 
vidual requests, under the franking priv- 
ilege granted by General Pershing, and to 
points not served by the central regional 
libraries, of which there are fourteen. The 
mailing division of the Paris headquarters 
sent out 5,000 packages during the month 
of December. The fourteen regional libra- 
ries have been placed at the points of the 
greatest concentration of troops, and serve 
also as traveling library stations. Book 
collections are supplied to the huts of all 



BULLETIN 



organizations and in many cases to the 
military units themselves. 

Library service to the Army of Occupa- 
tion is being developed from Coblenz by 
Judson T. Jennings, of the Seattle Public 
library. 

A special library building has been con- 
structed at St. Aignan, and three others 
are being erected at Le Mans and Brest, 
the construction in each case being in the 
hands of army engineers. 

The overseas staff of the A. L. A. now 
numbers almost fifty persons, more than 
one-third of whom are librarians who had 
gone to France for other organizations and 
have been transferred to the A. L. A. The 
staff includes Mary E. Ahern, Mary J. 
Booth, Annie S. Cutter, W. A. Daggett, 
W. D. Davies, O. C. Davis, L. L. Dickerson, 
Asa Don Dickinson, T. T. Dougherty, M. S. 
Dudgeon, Rhea E. Egolf, Ralf P. Emerson, 
Louisa K. Fast, Kate D. Ferguson, Pauline 
Fullerton, Blanche Galloway, Eleanor Glea- 
son, Alice Goddard, Mrs. Lillian Baker 
Griggs, Julia Ideson, Mary F. Isom, Mrs. 
Grace Jekyll, Judson T. Jennings, Willis 
H. Kerr, Mrs. Willis H. Kerr, Helen Lath- 
rop, Harriet C. Long, Anna MacDonald, 
Earl N. Manchester, Anne Mulheron, Mrs. 
Elsie M. Palmer, Mrs. Elizabeth Potter, 
Marian Potts, J. W. Powell, Louise Prouty, 
Shirley Putnam, Samuel H. Ranck, E. E. 
Ruby, Alida Stephens, Burton E. Steven- 
son, Mrs. Burton E. Stevenson, R. R. Still- 
well, Elizabeth Thurston, Mary L. Wallace, 
Elizabeth Webster, Mary F. Wilson. 

Dr. Herbert Putnam, general director of 
the library war service, has been in France 
since January 1. 

Service to American troops in Siberia is 
given from Vladivostok as a center, under 
the direction of Harry demons, formerly 
of the University of Nanking, China. More 
than 12,000 volumes have been shipped to 
Vladivostok from San Francisco and the 
Philippines, and recent reports indicate 
that the library service is assuming very 
satisfactory proportions. 

For the men returning on transports 
from France, books and magazines are be- 



ing provided in the form of permanent 
transport libraries, placed on the boats by 
the A. L. A. dispatch agents at Hoboken, 
Newport News and Boston. Books are 
supplied in the ratio of at least one to 
every five men of the boat's capacity. 
When the vessel docks at an American 
port, the A. L. A. dispatch agent goes 
aboard to overhaul and renew the library 
and to stock the ship with fresh maga- 
zines. Each transport library contains vo- 
cational books on the more important sub- 
jects. 

At the close of January, 46 large camp 
libraries were still in operation in Amer- 
ica, only two having been entirely discon- 
tinued as a result of the closing of the 
camp. Even with diminished numbers in 
some of the camps, January has been the 
banner month for circulation in the his- 
tory of the service. One camp reports: 

"We are having the most interesting and 
busiest days in the camp library we have 
ever had. The new books on trades and 
vocations are going like hot cakes and we 
are feeling repaid for our efforts to adver- 
tise them all over the camp. And we have 
never had as much response from com- 
manders, who are all glad now to have the 
barracks collections for their men." 

Another camp reports the vocational 
books to be going like "Salvation Army 
doughnuts at Chateau Thierry," a popu- 
larity perhaps equaled in one of the de- 
barkation hospitals, from which the libra- 
rian writes: "One of the supervisors re- 
turned a book on gas engines the other 
day with the remark, 'Well, every man in 
the ward had this book and we almost had 
a free fight because one man hid it under 
his mattress while he went out one after- 
noon.' " 

With the change following the signing 
of the armistice, it was evident that there 
was need of an aggressive advertising cam- 
paign to establish the vocational study 
idea among the men who had not been 
library users, the men who had never 
realized that libraries contain books able 
to render so practical a service. 

Book lists were issued on twenty-four of 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



the more important vocational subjects, 
each one listing, with brief, understand- 
able annotations, a number of titles on 
that subject available in the camp or hos- 
pital library. These are displayed in 
racks, placed in centers wherever men 
congregate. Every man, no matter how 
brief his stay in the camp or hospital, ob- 
serves one of the racks. Above it is a 
placard which queries, "What Job?" This 
usually finds a vulnerable spot. When a 
man has looked over the titles of the lists, 
even if he has not found one on his own 
work, he has decided that the library will 
prove a profitable place for him to invest 
some of his time. 

Posters and placards, slides in motion 
picture theaters, talks by a member of the 
library staff to men assembled for lec- 
tures, and other advertising mediums are 
being employed to further the usefulness 
of the war service libraries in the period 
of demobilization and reconstruction. 

In hospitals, the books on technical and 
vocational subjects are sharing the popu- 
larity of the western "thrillers" which 
seem so definitely to satisfy a certain need 
in a sick man. One hospital librarian 
writes about distributing a small leaflet 
which called attention to some of the 
trades and occupations on which books 
Avere available: 

"I decided to give it out up and down 
each side of a ward, in advance of my li- 
brary truck of books and magazines, think- 
ing thus each lad would have a chance to 
read and digest the leaflet before the books 
followed. Almost before I could get back 
to my truck an avalanche of questions and 
limping young veterans was upon me . . . 
'Where do we get these books it tells about 
here? ... I want something about motor 
trucks ... I was a bookkeeper before; I 
want to learn something different now.' 
The eager finger of a Portland shipyard 
worker pointed to the word 'Shipbuilding.' 
In fact, eager fingers pointed to every con- 
crete item on that list from 'Automobiles' 
to 'Toolmaking.' 

"Before I left that first ward, I had been 



consulted on every possible trade from 
moving picture photography to mechan- 
ical dentistry. I gave out every technical 
book on the book wagon, took down re- 
quests for a dozen more, and made up my 
mind that the A. L. A. had started some- 
thing that it would have to see through if 
it took every dollar in the U. S. Treasury 
also that every public library from Po- 
dunk to Wahoola will have to wake up to 
the demands of New America when these 
boys come home." 

The work which the war service libra- 
ries are now carrying on in America and 
overseas is only a beginning; as the men 
are returned to civil life, the public libra- 
ries must be ready to realize the perma- 
nent benefits. The men who have learned 
to use a library for practical assistance in 
the solving of workaday problems must 
find the facilities at hand in their home 
communities which will enable them to 
continue their studies. The public library 
must reach those men whom the library 
war service has missed. 

The present industrial situation affords 
an unexampled opportunity. Practically 
every man returning from the service 
brings back with him a broader outlook; 
his mind is ready to reach out for new 
things; many a man has been fired with 
ambition for the first time. If the public 
library fails to implant its seed now, it 
will not be because the ground has not 
been prepared for the sowing. 

The vocational book lists which have 
proved so effective in camps and hospi- 
tals have been issued in a special edition 
for public libraries, and can be secured in 
any quantity, at the cost of printing and 
mailing, by application to the headquar- 
ters of the library war service. Many of 
the other advertising methods employed 
in camps and hospitals are thoroughly ap- 
plicable to the average civilian commu- 
nity, and the library war service will be 
glad to pass on to any library evincing an 
interest the benefit of experience gained 
in the field. M. W. M. 



BULLETIN 

ASBURY PARK CONFERENCE 



THE FOBTY-FIBST ANNUAL CONFERENCE of 
the American Library Association will be 
held at Asbury Park, New Jersey, June 23- 
28, 1919. Headquarters will be at the New 
Monterey Hotel. 

The policy of returning to a point where 
we met so recently is a new one, but there 
are reasons that seemed to make it not 
only justifiable but advisable. The high 
railroad rates seemed to make a trip to 
the Rockies or further west entirely out 
of the question; the important reports and 
business of the war service make it ad- 
visable to hold the meeting nearer the 
center of library population than any point 
west of the Mississippi would be; the 
Executive Board sought in vain for an ade- 
quate resort between the Alleghanies and 
the Mississippi (Mackinac being quite out 
of the question due to its distance from 
library centers), and few favor a mid-west 
city in summer; furthermore Asbury Park 
has proved by actual experience a very 
satisfactory place of meeting. By a com- 
bination of circumstances, moreover, the 
New Monterey was able to offer better 
rates than could ordinarily be expected in 
these days of high costs of a hotel of its 
standard of excellence. 

New Monterey rates will be as follows: 
Two persons in a double room with double 
bed, $4.00 each daily; two persons in a 
double room with twin beds, $4.50 each 
daily; four persons occupying two double 
connection rooms with bath, $5.50 each 
daily; two persons occupying a double 



room with double bed and private bath, 
$5.50 each daily, and two persons in a 
double room with twin beds and private 
bath, $6.00 each daily. 

The New Monterey can care comfort- 
ably for about 500, assuming that there 
will be about the usual amount of "dou- 
bling up." The other hotels and boarding 
houses which we used in 1916 will again 
be available. Rates have not yet been 
settled with all these, but they will for the 
most part be less than those of the New 
Monterey. An attempt will be made to 
accommodate all purses and so make it 
possible for a large number of the inade- 
quately paid librarians and assistants to 
attend. 

The general sessions will be held, as in 
1916, in the Auditorium across the street 
from the New Monterey, and the meet- 
ings of the sections and affiliated societies 
in the New Monterey and adjacent hotels. 

Those who attended the 1916 conference 
need no reminder of the charm of Asbury 
Park the invigorating ocean air, the fine 
stretch of beach, the board walk, the fresh- 
water lakes so accessible for rowing and 
canoeing, the smooth auto roads, and the 
broad hotel porches so conducive to in- 
formal conferences and renewal of ac- 
quaintances. 

Needless to say the New Jersey librarians 
are promising their help in every way pos- 
sible to make the conference a success. 

More definite information on hotel rates, 
travel, program and other matters will be 
given in a later issue. 



PRELIMINARY TRAVEL ANNOUNCEMENT 



Asbury Park is very accessible by rail 
from all parts of the country, being reached 
from points west either via Philadelphia 
or New York City. There is a possibility 
of running a special train, or Pullmans 
through to the meeting place, but if such 
an arrangement is not provided for, a sin- 



gle change of cars will be necessary. 

North Asbury Park is the nearest sta- 
tion to the hotels which the A. L. A. will 
occupy, and is used jointly by the Penn- 
sylvania railroad and the Central railroad 
of New Jersey. 

Ordinarily a summer service from New 



6 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



York City by steamer to Atlantic High- 
lands and thence by rail to Asbury Park is 
operated at frequent intervale, and this 
will probably be resumed next June. This 
makes a delightful variety and gives a 
good view of New York harbor and the 
Jersey shore. The boat trip takes about 
an hour, in sight of land all the way. 

From Boston the Fall River boat to New 
York, and the Sandy Hook steamer, thence 
to Atlantic Highlands, is 1 the most at- 
tractive route, leaving Boston Sunday eve- 
ning and arriving at Asbury Park Monday 
forenoon. 

It is planned to organize a special party 
from Chicago, but concerning rates and 
schedules to prevail in June no definite 
information can be offered at this time. 
The present railroad fare from Chicago 
to Asbury Park is $29.32; Pullman charge, 
$4.96 lower berth, $3.96 upper. 



It is not possible at present to ascer- 
tain whether any special excursion rates 
from distant points can be had. The pres- 
ent rate each way is about three cents a 
mile, rates from various points being now 
quoted as follows, including war tax: 

From Cincinnati, $24.15; Cleveland, 
$16.98; Denver, $63.04; Detroit, $20.90; 
Kansas City, $42.04; Omaha, $44.44; St. 
Louis, $33.42; St. Paul, $41.01. 

From New York and Boston the pres- 
ent cost of the trip one way (including 
war tax) is as follows: 

From New York, $1.75 via Pa. R. R.; 
$1.62 via Central R. R. of New Jersey or 
by steamer and rail. 

From Boston, $7.27 via boat; $9.17 via 
all rail N. Y. N. H. & H. and Pa. R. R. 

Further information will be given in the 
May Bulletin. 



WHAT THEN?* 
CHABLES H. COMPTON, Reference Librarian, Seattle Public Library 



Peace has come. The machinery of war 
will in due time 'be largely scrapped or 
adapted to other uses. In addition to ma- 
terial equipment, we shall have at our dis- 
posal new habits of thought, new meth- 
ods of action. Shall we scrap these also 
or shall we adapt them to new needs? 
We could not scrap them if we would. 
What then? 

This is the question I want to ask re- 
garding library war service. It is a large 
question but it ie interesting to try to an- 
swer it. I shall base this answer upon my 
experience of the past few months. It 
has been a limited experience, not out in 
the field but at headquarters. However, 
it has been the biggest experience I have 
ever had and perhaps it is only natural 
that I should wish to attempt to interpret 
it to you in terms of the future. 



Abridgment of an address before the 
Puget Sound Library Club, December 27, 
1918, at Seattle, Washington. Printed in 
full in Library Journal. February, 1919 



Library war service started as an idea 
in someone's mind, perhaps in a number 
of minds simultaneously. What is more 
interesting than to watch an idea origi- 
nate and grow, become the common idea of 
a group or a profession, and take form in 
an organization which in turn is modified 
by coming into contact with the people it 
serves? Such an idea is library war serv- 
ice. 

On April 6, 1917, many in the library pro- 
fession as in other professions began to 
ask themselves what they could do to 
help win the war. It is significant of how 
blind we were to the opportunity at our 
very doors when we recall that the Execu- 
tive Board some eighteen months ago con- 
sidered seriously whether.it was desirable 
for the American Library Association to 
hold its annual conference during war 
time. Nevertheless, when the Association 
met at Louisville, the idea of library war 
service had already been conceived and 



BULLETIN 



all other plans gave way to it. A social 
idea thrives on enthusiasm and such was 
the enthusiasm at Louisville that the plans 
for library war service, which at the be- 
ginning ef the conference were in a nebu- 
lous state, at the end had taken rather 
definite form. Still at best we saw only 
through a glass darkly the development 
that would come. The consensus of opin- 
ion seemed to be that the American Li- 
brary Association was the best agency to 
provide reading matter for the soldiers. 
It was recreation, however, that was to be 
provided and nothing else, the recreation 
that comes from light, cheerful, exciting 
books, and our whole purpose would be 
served if life for the men in service was 
made more endurable thereby. 

This simple conception has been radical- 
ly changed as the work of library war serv- 
ice has progressed. I hope to show how 
on the one hand library war service is 
tending to modify deep-seated traditions 
of the men and women of the profession 
and on the other I wish to suggest that 
the attitude of the men who have been 
drafted is apt to be changed by their use 
of and contact with camp libraries. 

Let us consider the effect upon libra- 
rians of the magnitude of library war 
service, not perhaps the absolute magni- 
tude but the relative magnitude in com- 
parison with any institution with which 
librarians have been connected hitherto. 
In the past, many of us have been accus- 
tomed to doing small things in a small 
way. Library war service has been a big 
accomplishment both in organization and 
in things done. We as librarians have the 
right to be, not unduly proud, but reason- 
ably proud, of the record of fourteen 
months up to November 1, 1918. Here it 
is: 45 library buildings in operation; 164 
hospitals and Red Cross houses supplied 
with books, 271 librarians in the service; 
191 naval and marine stations and 301 
vessels supplied with libraries; 1,608 
branches and stations placed in Y. M. C. A. 
and K. of C. huts, barracks, and mess 
halls; 844,262 books purchased, largely 



technical; 1,361,034 books shipped over- 
seas; 3,394,643 gift books in service. Ap- 
proximately 450 librarians have to a late 
date made up the personnel of library war 
service. Everyone of them from this ex- 
perience should have a larger outlook, a 
capacity for thinking in larger terms. Li- 
brarians have the habit of wearing a veil 
of modesty. In spite of warning against 
taking ourselves too seriously, I maintain 
that our most serious fault has been our 
evident incapability of seeing in a large 
way the possibilities of library service. 
The service which has been rendered to 
the men in the camps and on shipboard, 
in hospital and "Y" hut, has been a real 
service it has met a real need upon the 
part of the men in helping them to pre- 
pare themselves for war and to meet the 
stress of war. Their appreciation has 
been expressed and has been sincere. It 
has, I judge, torn away the veils from the 
faces of many librarians and has made 
them realize that the book is no small 
factor either in warfare or life in general. 

Camp librarians will receive a broader 
outlook also from associating with the 
men of other war work organizations, es- 
pecially the Y. M. C. A. I have little sym- 
pathy with criticism of the Y. M. C. A., 
but whatever faults may have been 
charged to it, I never heard anyone say 
that it was an organization that did not 
place sufficient importance upon its mis- 
sion. I am not wishing for librarians ex- 
actly the same species of outlook that 
"Y" men have, but we need decidedly a 
downright conviction like theirs as to our 
place in the sun.* 

There is another influence that will in 
time have its effect on library personnel 
that is the influence of military men and 
organization. Four hundred and fifty libra- 
rians can not associate with military men 
without getting something of their quick 
decision which brings immediate action. 
This is greatly to be desired. We librarians 
must have Spanish blood in our veins for 
we are constantly saying "manana" to- 
morrow, tomorrow. We are so prone to 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



want to do things completely not neces- 
sarily well that when they are done the 
need is apt to be past. In addition to the 
veil of modesty that prevents a clear view 
of the task in hand, we have been bound 
round and round with indecision and delib- 
eration which at best may be called con- 
servatism. In library war service on the 
other hand we have been compelled to do 
things quickly if we would do them at all 
and the momentum of the war machine as 
a whole has driven us on. This should 
have its due effect in energizing the library 
profession and in stimulating librarians at 
times to take a chance even at the risk of 
losing the hitherto too carefully guarded 
reputation of the profession. 

Turning from the effect upon librarians 
themselves, let us consider what effect 
library war service will have upon the sol- 
diers and sailors. What have books real- 
ly done for them during the war? Some 
men perhaps will have acquired a taste 
for good reading, but probably to most of 
them the fiction and even the poetry they 
have read will be a pleasant memory only. 
The influence that books of another char- 
acter would have is more evident. It has 
seemed to me that perhaps part of the 
reason why Americans fought so intelli- 
gently and so well is because more than 
in any previous war, they were better in- 
formed and knew for what they were 
fighting. The American Library Associa- 
tion has supplied approximately 200,000 
war books, including personal narratives, 
books on the causes of the war. books on 
the Allies and their countries, books on 
the dangers to democracy. These books 
have been read and have been in great de- 
mand by the men. It is reasonable to 
infer that such books have been read by 
the more thoughtful, by the leaders both 
among the officers and the men. The ideas 
in these books have been spread by these 
selfsame leaders and certainly must have 
had some weight in tipping the scales for 
democracy. 

But if we want to look at the matter in 
the most practical way imaginable, let us 



consider the books on actual warfare that 
have been supplied to the men. Approxi- 
mately 900,000 books were purchased by 
the American Library Association previous 
to the signing of the armistice; fully sev- 
enty-five per cent of the amount expended 
was for strictly military books and for 
books on technical subjects that have a 
direct bearing on warfare books on ma- 
chine guns, explosives, strategy, aviation, 
topography, trench warfare, submarines, 
bridge building, roads, railroads, plumbing, 
sanitation. The men in the army and 
navy who used these books did so with 
one purpose, to make themselves better 
fighters. By studying they have ad- 
vanced from privates to noncoms, from 
lieutenants to captains and further. 
Probably most of the men who have thus 
advanced had never used libraries before 
and they are going to have a due respect 
for books. 

Library war service should prove of 
even more vital value during the period 
of reconstruction and demobilization than 
during the war itself. I wish I could give 
you more definite information regarding 
this, but I know that we are now going 
ahead with the purchase of approximately 
a half million books especially to meet 
the needs of the educational program that 
the Y. M. C. A. has under way in France. 
There will be approximately 1,000 libraries 
of 500 titles each. Some of these books 
are being especially manufactured for this 
purpose. Even before I left Washington, 
we were ordering for overseas books on 
many vocational subjects, such as factory 
management, agriculture, bee-keeping, for- 
estry, and many technical trades. These 
were for men who wished to keep up to 
date on the work which they had done 
previous to entering the army or for men 
to whom the army had opened up new 
trades or occupations. 

Many books describing European coun- 
tries have already been sent overseas and 
I hope and expect that many more will 
follow. These are the countries with which 
in the future we will have the closest re- 



BULLETIN 



9 



lationship. There is much discussion as to 
the influence that two million returned 
soldiers will have on the body politic. 
It is perfectly possible to imagine that 
they would not bring back much, at least 
little that is desirable, unless they came 
to understand and sympathize with the 
thought'and customs of other peoples. On 
the other hand, their contact with the men 
and women of France, England, and Italy, 
supplemented with books of the right na- 
ture, should enable them to return to 
America with a great contribution in fresh 
views of life, of literature, of art, things 
which America to a large degree has not 
even recognized that she needed. 

If we establish libraries among the two 
million soldiers in France, is it not pos- 
sible that the public library as we know 
it will establish itself in France and other 
countries? France, ever since the begin- 
ning of the war in 1914, has been looking 
towards the establishment of public li- 
braries following the close of the war. 
We should have the opportunity of demon- 
strating such an institution in their midst 
during the next year. In this day when 
all the world has become predominantly 
democratic and a community of nations 
bids fair to become a reality, an institu- 
tion like the public library common to all 
countries should prove par excellence a 
medium for the exchange of national and 
international ideals. In every country the 
library should be known as an institution 
where knowledge is as free as the air 
itself and with the library's reputation, 
already pretty well established, of being 
an institution that does not restrict 
thought but encourages its dissemination, 
it should perhaps prove a bulwark for so- 
ciety in the structure of international de- 
mocracy that is now erecting itself. 

Whether librarians are equal to the op- 
portunity which is theirs will largely 
depend on two things organization and 
morale. Two departments have been de- 
veloped in library war service which I 
think have possibilities for libraries as a 
whole. The first one is a central book pur- 



chasing agency for libraries. This is in 
reality what is being maintained by the 
A. L. A. for camp libraries. Although the 
problem for public libraries would be more 
complicated, still I think it could be 
worked out with considerable saving and 
increased efficiency. Let me explain the 
organization of the book department of 
the library war service at the present 
time and see if it would not appear fea- 
sible to adopt it: Sample copies of new 
books are examined and such as are 
deemed desirable are ordered, one copy for 
each large camp library. After receiving 
the one copy, it is left to the individual 
camp librarian to order additional copies. 
It seems to me that it would be possible 
to extend the service of the staff of the 
Booklist so that in many cases it could 
thus make the actual selection of many 
new titles for public libraries. 

The bulk of the orders coming to head- 
quarters were not for new books but 
rather requests from camp librarians for 
actual titles of the best books on subjects 
specified. With actual titles requested it 
was merely a question of eliminating those 
which it was deemed inadvisable to pur- 
chase. However, in selecting the best 
books on subjects, much of which work -we 
did, I feel that a central purchasing agency 
could be of great assistance to public libra- 
ries. For many libraries without adequate 
bibliographical aids it is extremely diffi- 
cult to make selections intelligently. A 
staff of experts in book selection, espe- 
cially those with a knowledge of technical 
books, would be of great aid to libraries 
that are trying to meet the needs of tech- 
nical men but that do not have library 
assistants specially trained for technology 
library work. 

Librarians are always trying to get more 
liberal discounts from book publishers and 
book dealers. If there were a purchas- 
ing agency in New York, which is the "pub- 
lishers' center of the country, we would 
be in a position to obtain the lowest pos- 
sible discounts. Library war service has, 
as you know, received from most publish- 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



ers fifty per cent discount. This is lib- 
eral on their part and probably does not 
give them sufficient margin for a perma- 
nent basis, but nevertheless publishers 
can fill orders in New York at appreciably 
less than in other cities, on account of 
the cost of traveling salesmen and other 
overhead expenses. Libraries in the 
United States at the present time are 
spending annually about three million dol- 
lars for books. To get liberal discounts 
books must be bought in quantity. This 
would be possible by having a dispatch 
office in New York such as library war 
service now maintains. At the present 
time the New York Dispatch Office keeps 
in stock available for camp libraries about 
20,000 books. For libraries as a whole the 
number of titles would need to be en- 
larged, but I see no reason why such a 
dispatch office should not prove practical 
for public libraries. Take for example the 
popular copyrights of Grosset and Burt 
that libraries use in great numbers. I went 
to New York to purchase $20,000 worth of 
these at one time and later we placed an 
additional order of $40,000. From this ex- 
perience I feel sure that libraries could 
get quantity prices if we would purchase 
in large quantities. I think it is possible 
that from $200,000 to $500,000 might be 
saved annually by dealing with publish- 
ers through a central purchasing agency 
with a dispatch office maintained by it. 

The other point in organization is that 
of a central publicity bureau for libraries. 
I think I can take it for granted that you 
are all familiar with this idea, as it origi- 
nated here in the Pacific northwest. Li- 
brary war service has done much to dem- 
onstrate the value of such a publicity bu- 
reau. The publicity during our two finan- 
cial campaigns and the publicity carried 
on continuously by the publicity depart- 
ment at headquarters has done more in 
one ^ear to bring libraries to the attention 
of the public than has been done in the 
past ten years. Several of the men who 
have been at headquarters, a number of 
whom are members of the Publicity Com- 



mittee of the A. L. A., have felt that it 
would be thoroughly regrettable if we 
should lose the value of this publicity. 
We should go ahead rather than lag be- 
hind now that peace is here. I am more 
than ever convinced that if libraries are 
ever to come to their own we must have 
such a bureau, which will constantly be 
spreading the news of the service which 
libraries can render. 

The matter of organization is important 
to an army to librarians but what of 
morale? I hope library war service will 
be a leaven which will leaven the mass of 
librarians as a whole. Why should I hesi- 
tate to express my feelings, when to think 
of my experience at headquarters is to 
thrill with the pleasure of it? To a casual 
observer nothing thrilling would be seen 
by looking in upon the headquarters staff. 
There we were, fifty of us, a dozen type- 
writers, and as many electric fans making 
their customary noise; desks piled with 
correspondence and work being carried on 
with a rush and under pressure no time 
to waste, as we must keep ahead of the 
game. Much of the work was detail not 
especially interesting, some might think, 
but it was the spirit of the work which 
made it all so fascinating. Some of us 
often worked twelve hours a day, seven 
days a week, not because we were driven 
but 'because we could not resist the push 
and go. 

The headquarters organization was di- 
vided into departments as follows: Large 
camps, small camps, hospital libraries, 
publicity, overseas, and book departments. 
Many of the problems were entirely new 
and the organization had to be built up as 
new problems arose, as new opportunities 
for service offered. There were no hard 
and fast rules. Never have I worked in 
an organization where the spirit was so 
splendid, the cooperation so perfect. It 
was a joy to work there, it was an in- 
spiration that I hope will stay with me 
always. The spirit was there, not espe- 
cially because of the personnel of the 
headquarters staff, but because of the big- 



BULLBTIN 



11 



ness of the work in hand. The thing it- 
self that we were trying to do was so 
large, the opportunities so tremendous, the 
need for service so urgent, that it seemed 
impossible for pettiness to raise its head 
among us. There was the same spirit, the 
same enthusiasm, shown by the camp 
librarians at the Saratoga conference. 
They were interested, they were tremen- 
dously interested, which was shown at their 
round table meetings. They were doing 
vital things; they knew it and their work 
was enlarging their own capabilities. 

I .have called this paper "What then?" 
Perhaps it should be called "What now?" 
for probably it will be a matter of only a 
few months until library war service is a 
thing of the past. We as librarians have 
the largest opportunities that have ever 
faced us. We more nearly have the public 
confidence than ever before. The time is 
ours if we can only grasp the possibilities, 
if we can only see things big enough. If 
we can only see things big enough I be- 
lieve we will be equal to the work at 
hand. 

I want to quote from "In the fourth 
year," by H. G. Wells. This was written 
before peace had come but there is the 
same clear vision now as then: 

"I am a man who looks now towards the 
end of life; fifty-one years have I scratched 
off from my calendar, another slips by, and 



I cannot tell how many more of the sparse 
remainder of possible years are really 
mine. I live in days of hardship and pri- 
vation, when it seems more natural to feel 
ill than well; without holidays or rest or 
peace; friends and the sons of my friends 
have been killed; death seems to be feel- 
ing always now for those I most love; the 
newspapers that come into my house tell 
mostly of 'blood and disaster, of drownings 
and slaughterings, of cruelties and base 
intrigues. Yet never have I been so sure 
that there is a divinity in man and that a 
great order of human life, a reign of jus- 
tice and world-wide happiness, of plenty, 
power, hope, and gigantic creative effort, 
lies close at hand. Even now we have 
the science and the ability available for a 
universal welfare, though it is scattered 
about the world like a handful of money 
dropped by a child, even now there exists 
all the knowledge that is needed to make 
mankind universally free and human life 
sweet and noble. We need but the faith for 
it, and it is at hand; we need but the cour- 
age to lay our hands upon it and in a lit- 
tle space of years it can be ours." 

We as librarians need but the faith for 
it and it is at hand we need but the cour- 
age to lay our hands upon it and in a lit- 
tle space of years it can be ours. Books 
can help win the war, the war for univer- 
sal and true democracy, a democracy 
based upon intelligence, based upon the 
service which public libraries are even 
now rendering, but which they should 
render more abundantly. 



COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY CATALOGS, REPORTS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS* 
J. C. 'M. HANSON, Associate Director, University of Chicago Libraries 



As a result of pressure, chiefly from ad- 
ministrative offices in the University of 
Chicago, for the extension and development 
of the collection of catalogs of colleges, uni- 
versities and other institutions of higher 
learning, an effort was made in April, 1918, 
to learn something of the principles and 
practice obtaining in other large universi- 



Notes assembled as a basis for discus- 
sion by the College and Reference Section at 
the Saratoga Springs Conference. For lack 
of time the topic was not then considered. 



ties with respect to this particular class 
of publications. 

A circular letter was accordingly sent 
out, containing three questions: 

1. Is it your practice to collect, catalog, 
and preserve the catalogs of as many 
colleges, universities and other higher 
schools as possible, or only those of a 
limited number, e. g., from 50 to 100 
of the more important? 

2. Approximately how many feet of actual 
books are shelved under the class 
"Universities and colleges," assum- 



12 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



ing that your college and university 
catalogs are shelved together? 
3. Are catalogs of minor colleges and 
universities cataloged and classified 
in full or treated according to some 
cheaper method, e. g., classified with 
shelf list or serial record entry, and 
a mere reference or other incomplete 
or temporary entry in the public 
catalog? 

The purpose of these questions was 
-therefore to secure information particu- 
larly as regards the following points: 

(a) The principle of selection followed. 

(b) How the University of Chicago col- 
lection compared with that of other 
similar institutions as to size and 
scope. 

(c) How far "short-cut" methods of 
cataloging and classification had 
been applied. 

(d) Methods of shelving and preserva- 
tion. 

A brief summary of the answers re- 
ceived was prepared, in part for the pur- 
pose of submitting it as a basis for a 
round table discussion in the College and 
Reference Section at the Saratoga Springs 
Conference of the A. L. A. Due to lack of 
time, the section was unable to consider 
it, and at the suggestion of some of the 
librarians interested, it is presented now 
with a view to elicit further suggestions, 
as also to facilitate a discussion of the 
problem should the College and Reference 
Section at one of its future meetings de- 
cide to take it up. 

SUMMARY 
Columbia 

A great number of college catalogs in- 
cluding current issues of most American 
and of some foreign institutions are re- 
ceived. They are obtained by the secre- 
tary of the University, not by the library. 
Questions on catalogs which come to the 
library are referred to the secretary's of- 
fice, or the catalogs are sent for. In the 
periodical room are kept the current is- 
sues of the catalogs of institutions which 
give graduate work; also current issues 
of foreign catalogs received by gift or ex- 
change. All these catalogs are sent to 
the Teachers' 'College when superseded. 
They are not cataloged. In the reading 
room is found a good selection of bio- 



graphical and general catalogs, latest is- 
sue as a rule. 

Cornell 

There is no record of the number of 
shelves or the number of catalogs. It is 
the practice to classify, catalog and shelve 
the catalogs of all the colleges and uni- 
versities included in the American Asso- 
ciation of Universities, similarly also the 
catalogs published by educational insti- 
tutions in the State of New York. Of the 
minor colleges not included in the above 
groups, the latest catalogs are preserved 
and kept on the shelves In alphabetical or- 
der without classification or cataloging. 

Harvard 

There are about 1,500 running feet of 
catalogs, presidents' reports and announce- 
ments. This is exclusive of miscellaneous 
historical and descriptive material relat- 
ing to colleges. Cataloging labor is re- 
duced to a minimum by placing in the 
public and official catalogs cards bearing 
the name of the college and its publica- 
tion, but not indicating the extent of the 
file and not to be changed as new num- 
bers come in. An attempt is even made 
to make the continuation record on cards 
serve as a shelf list record so that when 
new numbers are received they jieed to 'be 
recorded in one place only and may then 
be sent directly to the shelves. 

University of Illinois 

The catalogs occupy about 1,030 feet of 
shelving. Catalogs, reports, administra- 
tive circulars, etc., are sent directly to the 
shelves and arranged in alphabetical or- 
der of names of institutions. The same 
holds true of colleges and publications of 
foreign universities. A check list main- 
tained for several years and showing ex- 
actly the numbers received has been aban- 
doned, except in the case of more impor- 
tant universities or of unusually long runs 
of catalogs, reports, etc., which are cata- 
loged fully as there is time. 

University of Michigan 

Approximately 400 feet of books bound 
and unbound are shelved in the class 
"American colleges and universities." It 
is the purpose to gather complete collec- 
tions of the catalogs and other university 
publications of 

1. American universities, members of 
the American Association of Univer- 
sities. 

2. American state universities. 

3. Colleges of Michigan. 

4. Other important colleges and uni- 



BULLETIN 



13' 



versities in America and elsewhere. 
Catalogs and bulletins of minor colleges 
are not fully cataloged unless bound. They 
have- shelf list and check list records. 

University of Minnesota 

The entire collection of college catalogs 
occupies from 700 to 1,000 feet of shelf 
space. The catalogs of state institutions 
and of the larger and more important col- 
leges are bound, cataloged and listed in the 
general catalog. The bulletins of minor 
institutions are kept in uniform paste- 
board boxes with a card entry in the se- 
rial record. 

University of Nebraska 

The collection fills about 250 feet of 
shelving. Catalogs of minor colleges are 
not cataloged, but kept on the shelves in 
order of classification. 

Princeton 

The collection covers approximately 700 
feet of shelving. Only the catalogs of the 
more important institutions are kept up 
in complete sets. A great many other 
catalogs are collected, cataloged, and pre- 
served, but no special pains are taken to 
follow up any except the more important. 

University of Wisconsin 

There are two collections covering ap- 
proximately 770 feet of shelving. The first 
is in wooden pamphlet boxes arranged al- 
phabetically by names of institutions. 
Here are kept the latest catalogs of about 
600 American colleges, universities and 
other higher schools. The other collec- 
tion contains the older catalogs, business 
reports, etc. Neither collection is cata- 
loged: or classified. On the back of the 
mailing card in the accessions department 
are recorded catalogs as received from the 
various institutions. This record serves 
as a rough catalog and also as a guide for 
making claims. 
Yale 

The collection, including catalogs of 
preparatory schools, covers about 561 feet 
of shelving. Not any of these have been 
cataloged with the exception of Harvard, 
which has been cataloged and classified ac- 
cording to the Library of Congress scheme. 



All other catalogs are arranged alphabet- 
ically. 

University of Chicago 

The collection covers about 1,113 feet of 
shelving. With few exceptions the cata- 
logs and other publications are entered on 
the serial record with reference entries in 
the public catalog and the shelf list. A 
number of the more important are cata- 
loged fully in all catalogs. The entire 
collection is classified according to the 
Library of Congress scheme. (Cf. Sched- 
ules LD LG.) 

Among the questions likely to suggest 
themselves to those reading the above 
summary are the following: 

1. Should universities and colleges in 
general try for large and representative 
collections of the above class of publica- 
tions, or leave this to certain institutions 
which have already acquired comparatively 
strong collections, e. g., Library of Con- 
gress; the United States Bureau of Educa- 
tion in Washington; Teachers' College, New 
York City; 'New York State Library, Al- 
bany; Harvard University, Cambridge, 
Massachusetts; Worcester Antiquarian 
Society, Worcester, Massachusetts; Uni- 
versity of Chicago; John Crerar Library, 
Chicago; University of Illinois, Urbana; 
Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio, etc.? 

2. Is it sufficient to preserve these pub- 
lications in pamphlet boxes or tied up in 
bundles, either in alphabetical order of in- 
stitutions or according to the regular class- 
ification of each library with a mere rec- 
ord entry in the serial or continuation 
catalog stating what each set contains, a 
reference or memorandum entry in the 
public catalog and slielf list directing the 
inquirer to the serial catalog or the shelves 
for full information, specially important 
sets being bound and regularly cataloged 
from time to time? 



14 AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 

Buffalo, N. Y., January 11, 1919 

A meeting of the Executive Board of the The minutes of the meetings of Sep- 
American Library Association was held in tember 24 and 25, 1918, also those cover- 
Buffalo, N. Y. (Hotel Statler), Saturday, ing the correspondence votes of Decem- 

January 11, 1919, first session 10 a. m. 

ber 3 and 6, 1918, were read and approved. 
Present: President Bishop, Vice-Presi- 

dent Belden, Miss Rathbone, Miss East- The treasurer's report for the year 1918 
man, Miss Doren, Mr. Bailey, Mr. Strohm, was read by tne secretary. The report 
and Mr. Utley, secretary. was as follows: 

REPORT OF THE TREASURER 

January-December, 1918 
Receipts 

Balance, Union Trust Co., Chicago, Jan. 1, 1918 $ 4,780.17 

G. B. Utley, secretary, membership dues 8,619.05 

G. B. Utley, secretary, life memberships 175.00 

Trustees Carnegie fund, income 4,500.00 

Trustees Endowment fund, income 400.00 

A. L. A. Publishing Board 2,800.00 

Interest on bank balance, Dec., 1917-Dec., 1918, inclusive 85.51 



$21,359.73 
Expenditures 

Checks Nos. 114-127 (Vouchers Nos. 1706-1887, inclusive) $11,581.33 

Distributed as follows: 

Bulletin $1,817.58 

Conference 776.62 

Committees 282.43 

Headquarters: 

Salaries 6,100.00 

Additional services 899.00 

Supplies 327.30 

Postage and telephone 546.00 

Miscellaneous 405.99 

Travel 251.41 

Trustees Endowment fund 175.00 

A. L. A. War Service Committee, subscription 1,000.00 

A. L. A. Publishing Board, Carnegie fund income 4,500.00 17,081.33 



Balance, Union Trust Co., Chicago $ 4,278.40 

G. B. Utley, secretary, balance National Bank of the Republic 250.00 

Due from A. L. A. Publishing Board, balance headquarters expense, 1918 800.00 



Total balance $ 5,328.40 

James L. Whitney Fund 

Principal and interest, Dec. 31, 1917 $ 345.84 

Interest, Jan. 1, 1918 5.10 

Tenth installment, Jan. 31, 1918 29.89 

Interest, July 1, 1918 5.62 

Eleventh installment, July 18, 1918 27.47 



Total $ 413.92 

A. L. A. War Service Fund 

Total deposits with American Security & Trust Co., Jan. 20-May 31, 1918 1 $69,738.50 

Balance on hand and undeposited, May 31 (deposited thereafter) 1,893.13 



BULLETIN 15 

Receipts, June 1-July 31, 1918: 

Campaign subscriptions $11,945.69 

Monthly subscriptions 74.00 

One $50 3%% Liberty Loan bond, representing, 50.00 $12,069.59 



Total deposits and assets passing through hands of treasurer, A. L. A., Jan. 

20-July 31, 1918 $83,701.22 

Interest on one $50 3%% Liberty Loan bond (annual) 1.75 

Interest on bank balance, American Security & Trust Co., Jan. 1-June 30, 1918 3,574.16 
Interest on bank balance, Chicago Savings Bank & Trust Co 9.75 



Grand total $87,286.88 



1 Exclusive of Carnegie Corporation contribution of $112,300 deposited directly with 
American Security & Trust Co. 

Chicago, Jan. 3, 1919. Respectfully submitted, 

C. B. RODEN, 

Treasurer. 

It was voted that the foregoing report Committee was presented by the Chair- 

of the treasurer for the year 1918 be man, Mr. A. L. Bailey, the accompanying 

adopted. budget exhibiting the probable income and 

The following report of the Finance expenditures during 1919: 



The income of the Association during 1918 was as follows: 

Membership dues (annual) .'.. $ 8,619.05 

Membership dues (life) 175.00 

Income Endowment fund 400.00 

Income Carnegie fund 1 4,500.00 

Interest, January-December, 1918 81.18 

Sale of publications 10,306.13 

Sale of books (review copies) 810.00 



$24,891.36 
BUDGET, 1919 
Estimated Income 

Membership dues $ 8,750.00 

Income Endowment fund 400.00 

Income Carnegie fund 4,500.00 

Interest 80.00 

Sale of publications 10,000.00 

Sale of books (review copies) 900.00 



$24,630.00 

Estimated Expenditures 
Executive Office: 

Bulletin $ 1,600.00 

Conference 700.00 

Committees: 

Public documents $ 25.00 

Cooperation with educational associations 25.00 

Library administration 50.00 

Library training 25.00 

Book binding 50.00 

Federal and state relations , 25.00 

Travel 175.00 

Work with the blind 10.00 

Decimal classification 50.00 

Institution libraries 25.00 

Importations 40.00 



16 



AMERICAN 7 LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Publicity 100.00 

Miscellaneous - 50.00 



650.00 



Salaries : 

Secretary $3,600.00 

Assistant secretary 1,800.00 

General assistant 1,300.00 6,700.00 



Additional services 

Supplies 

Postage, telephone, etc. . 

Miscellaneous 

Contingencies 

Travel (Executive Board) 
Travel (others) 



600.00 
350.00 
450.00 
350.00 
80.00 
200.00 
350.00 



$12,030.00 

Publishing Board: 

Carnegie fund interest 4,500.00 

Sale of publications (estimated at $10,000) and sale of review copies of 

books ($900) less $2,800 appropriated to executive office expenses 8,100.00 



Your committee is prepared to approve 
appropriations, in accordance with this 
budget, of the sum of $12,030 to the gen- 
eral expenses of the Association, and to 
the use of the Publishing Board the sum 
of $4,500 and the total amount received 
from the sale of publications, except the 
$2,800 agreed upon by the Publishing 
Board as its appropriation toward the sup- 
port of the Executive Offices, the total for 
the Publishing Board being estimated at 
$12,600. 

At the request of the chairman, Dr. 
C. W. Andrews has audited the accounts of 
the treasurer, and of the secretary as as- 
sistant treasurer. His audit finds these 
accounts correct and properly vouched for 
so far as can be determined before the re- 
ceipt of the report of the trustees of the 
Endowment fund. His final report to- 
gether with a report on the audit of the 
accounts of the trustees, which will be 
made by Mr. Graver, will be given in the 
formal report of this committee to the 
Association at its annual meeting. 

Dr. Andrews has also examined the ac- 
counts of the treasurer, as treasurer of 
the Publishing Board. He finds that the 
receipts as stated agree with the transfers 
of the assistant treasurer and with the 



$24,630.00 

entries of interest in the bank statements. 
The expenditures as stated are accounted 
for by properly approved vouchers and 
the balance shown agrees with the bank 
statements of December 31, 1918. 

Since the Proceedings and Handbook 
for 1918 have not been issued, the Finance 
Committee recommends that the unex- 
pended balance for the appropriation of 
the Bulletin be held to meet the expenses 
of publications of Proceedings and Hand- 
book. A similar treatment of other items 
properly chargeable to 1918 might also be 
made. 

In February the members of the Finance 
Committee examined the accounts of the 
chairman of the War Finance Committee, 
which raised the first War Service fund. 
The report of this examination, showing 
that the accounts were correct, may be 
found on page 53 of the Report of the War 
Service Committee for the year ending 
June 30, 1918. 

At the request of the Finance Commit- 
tee, the firm of Marwick, Mitchell, Peat 
and Company made an audit of the War 
Service fund from its inception to May 31, 
1918, and a further audit for the six 
months ending November 30, 1918. The 
reports of the auditors found the accounts 



BULLETIN 



17 



correct and all expenditures properly 
vouched for. 

Respectfully submitted, 
A. L. BAILEY, 
Chairman. 

Upon motion it was voted that the re- 
port of the Finance Committee, including 
the accompanying budget for 1919, be 
adopted. 

Publicity Committee 

A letter having been read from Mr. 
Charles E. Rush, chairman of the Publicity 
Committee, setting forth the urgent need 
of a more nearly adequate appropriation 
for that committee, it was 

Toted, That the balance of the funds in 
the 1918 budget remaining after all out- 
standing obligations for the year 1918 have 
been paid, be appropriated to the use of 
the Publicity Committee. 

Appropriation to the Publishing Board 

Voted, That in accordance with the re- 
port of the Finance Committee there be 
appropriated for the use of the A. L. A. 
Publishing Board the income of the Car- 
negie fund, estimated at $4,500, and all 
proceeds from sales of publications and 
of review copies of books, estimated at 
$10,900, excepting the amount of $2,800 
agreed upon by the A. L. A. Publishing 
Board as its appropriation toward the sup- 
port of the Executive Offices of the Asso- 
ciation. 

(Note: The A. L. A. Publishing Board 
at a meeting held on December 13, 1918, 
voted the above mentioned $2,800 toward 
the support of the Executive Offices. 
Appropriation to Brett Memorial 

Voted, That the sum of $100 which the 
Executive Board at Lake Placid voted to 
contribute toward the William Howard 
Brett memorial be paid from unexpended 
balances of 1918, if they prove adequate, 
otherwise from reverted balances from 
previous years, now in the hands of the 
treasurer. 

Nominating Committee 
A Nominating Committee appointed in 
accordance with Section 2 of the By-laws 



to the Constitution was named as follows: 

Alice S. Tyler, Western Reserve Univer- 
sity Library School, Cleveland, chairman. 

Margaret Mann, Carnegie Library, Pitts- 
burgh. 

Mary E. Hazeltine, University of Wis- 
consin Library School, Madison. 

Andrew Keogh, Yale University Library, 
New Haven. 

Herbert S. Hirshberg, Public Library, 
Toledo. 

Conference of 1919 

The place and date for the next annual 
conference of the Association being under 
consideration it was 

Voted, That the Forty-first Annual Con- 
ference of the Association be held at 
Asbury Park, New Jersey, June 23-28, 1919. 

Proposed Revision of Adams' "Manual of 
Historical Literature" 

A letter having been read from the 
President of the Association, at a meeting 
of the A. L. A. Publishing Board held in 
Chicago, December 13, 1918, calling atten- 
tion to the steps being taken by the Amer- 
ican Historical Association to encourage 
the publishers to issue a revised edition of 
Adams' "Manual of historical literature," 
and suggesting that it might be well for 
the Publishing Board to appoint a special 
committee to serve jointly with a similar 
committee of the American Historical As- 
sociation to consider the project and per- 
haps to assist in editorial compilation; 
and the Publishing Board having voted 
that the subject be referred to the Execu- 
tive Board, inasmuch as the Publishing 
Board did not understand it to be one in 
which a publication by that Board is in- 
volved, it was by the Executive Board 

Voted, That the matter be referred to 
the President of the Association with 
power to appoint a committee to represent 
the Association in the project. 

Cooperation with Atlantic Monthly 

A communication having been received 
from Mr. M. S. Dudgeon, outlining the plan 
of cooperation agreed upon between him- 



18 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



self and the editor of the Atlantic Monthly 
for the review in the pages of that journal 
of a limited number of the best of the 
new books, it was 

Voted, That the Executive Board ap- 
proves the plan agreed upon by Mr. M. S. 
Dudgeon and Mr. Ellery Sedgwick for co- 
operation in the review of books between 
certain libraries and the Atlantic Monthly. 

(The plan agreed upon is as follows: 
Each month the five institutions named be- 
low will furnish to the editor of the At- 
lantic Monthly a list of books published 
during the preceding month which each 
deems worthy of mention and review in 
that journal. The institutions on this list 
are: The Booklist of the American Libra- 
ry Association; Springfield (Mass.) City 
Library Association; Newark (N. J.) Free 
Public Library; Wisconsin Library Com- 
mission; 'Cleveland Public Library. 

The editor of the Atlantic Monthly will 
provide a competent reviewer who will 
promptly review the books for the pages 
of that magazine, which have been selected 
as a result of this vote from the various 
librarians). 

The Board took recess, convening again 
at 2:30 p.m., with same members present; 
also by invitation, Mr. J. I. Wyer, Jr., in 
his capacity as chairman of the War Serv- 
ice Committee. 

Mr. Wyer discussed with the Board cer- 
tain matters relating to the war service 
which are soon to come before the War 
Service Committee. No action taken. 

Committee of Eleven 

The memorandum of the Committee of 
Eleven, 1 as further revised and adopted by 
that committee on December 24, 1918, was 
approved in the following form: 

Resolved, (1) To adopt and confirm in 
the form adopted by the Committee of 
Eleven, December 24, 1918, the memoran- 
dum regarding expenditure of funds raised 
in connection with the United War Work 
Campaign. 

(2) To immediately restudy the budget 
of this organization and forthwith submit 
the same to the War Department at the 
earliest possible moment. 



x The Committee of Eleven was appointed 
at the instance of the Secretary of War, 
by Mr. Raymond B. Fosdick, to act under 
Mr. Fosdick's chairmanship in directing the 
United War Work Campaign. 



The text of the memorandum, as now 
adopted, is as follows: 

Memorandum regarding Expenditures of 

Funds Raised in Connection with the 

United War Work Campaign 

The signing of the armistice having up- 
set the calculations upon the basis of 
which the budgets of the seven cooperating 
organizations were submitted to the War 
Department through the Commission on 
Training Camp Activities, and uncertainty 
concerning the Government plans of de- 
mobilization making it impossible to re- 
state at this time with any degree of ex- 
actness the full budget estimates of the 
organizations, the following principles and 
regulations are agreed upon: 

(1) The United War Work Campaign 
fund was raised to make possible the serv- 
ing, by the seven cooperating organiza- 
tions in the present war emergency, of sol- 
diers and sailors and of certain other 
classes of men and women affected by the 
present war conditions, and this purpose 
is to be a governing principle in its use. 

(2) Each of the seven organizations 
shall restudy its budget, and in so doing 
will welcome the cooperation of the War 
and Navy Departments in connection 
therewith, and shall adjust its expendi- 
tures to the demobilization plans of the 
Government. 

(3) The several organizations shall sub- 
mit quarterly statements, certified by char- 
tered accountants, which statements shall 
be subject to the examination of an ac- 
countant appointed by the Committee of 
Eleven, and the reports thereof shall be 
sent to the chairman of the Commission 
on Training Camp Activities, to each mem- 
ber of the Committee of Eleven, and to the 
president of each of the societies. 

(4) The seven organizations shall sever- 
ally assume as nearly as may be their re- 
spective proportionate shares of responsi- 
bility for work to be done and all expendi- 
tures of money shall be strictly in accord 
with their respective war work activities 
and none of the fund shall be expended for 
general non-war work, or for permanent 
structures of establishments or for endow- 
ments. 

(5) The national treasurer of the United 
War Work Campaign, Inc., shall distribute 
to the cooperating organizations of the 
aforesaid fund, in the percentages hereto- 
fore agreed upon substantially as and when 
received by him and capable of distribu- 
tion by him; it being understood that the 



BULLETIN 



19 



cooperating organizations shall be gov- 
erned, in their use of funds so received, 
by the foregoing regulations and principles. 
(6) The Committee of Eleven shall be 
continued for the purposes expressed in 
Article Eleven of the cooperating agree- 
ment of the seven organizations, dated Sep- 
tember 4, 1918, and in this agreement. 

Audit of War Service Accounts 
Mr. A. L. Bailey, as chairman of the 
Finance Committee, having reported the 
satisfactory completion of an audit of the 
war service accounts for the six months 
ended November 30, 1918, a copy of which 
audit he submitted to the Board, it was 
Voted, That the report of audit of the 
accounts of the Library War Service for 
the six months ended November 30, 1918, 
made by Marwick, Mitchell, Peat and Com- 
pany at the direction of the A. L. A. Fi- 
nance Committee be adopted. 

Committee on Importations 
A letter having been presented from 
Dr. M. L. Raney, calling attention to the 
desirability of a trip overseas by him in 
the interests of the A. L. A. Importations 
Committee, and the Board looking with 
favor on such a trip, it was 

Voted, That Dr. Raney's expenses for a 
trip to Europe in the interest of the Com- 
mittee on Importations be underwritten 
from reverted balances in the hands of 
the treasurer of the Association with the 
understanding that the benefiting libraries 
will pay their proportionate share of the 



expenses and thus eventually reimburse 
the Association for any sum advanced. 

Committee on Readjustment Program 
The Board, taking under consideration 
the national readjustment program and its 
effect upon libraries and library service 
and the steps that libraries and library 
organizations should take to work in co- 
operation with other organizations and 
with City, State and Federal Governments, 
Voted, That the President be empowered 
to appoint a committee of five to make a 
survey of library conditions in the United 
States, particularly under present condi- 
tions, and to suggest a program under 
which libraries can work to the best ad- 
vantage in the immediate future. 

Committee on Library Salaries 
The special committee appointed at Lake 
Placid to make a preliminary survey upon 
which a plan for a report on librarians' 
salaries and library conditions can be 
based, made a report of progress, through 
Mr. Strohm, chairman, submitting for dis- 
cussion by the Board a proposed question- 
naire to be put to certain libraries. Mr. 
Strohm reported that he and Mr. Perry 
had completed the committee by the ap- 
pointment by them of Mrs. Harriet P. 
Sawyer as the third member. 

There being no further business, the 
Board adjourned, subject to the call of the 
President. 



A. L. A. PUBLISHING BOARD 

Chicago, December 13, 1918 



A meeting of the A. L. A. Publishing 
Board was held at A. L. A. headquarters, 
Chicago, Friday afternoon, December 13, 
1918. 

Present: Acting-chairman Arthur E. 
Bostwick, Mrs. H. L. Elmendorf, M. S. 
Dudgeon and Miss Josephine A. Rathbone; 
also Secretary Utley, and, for a part of the 
session, Miss Massee, editor of the Booklist, 



and Mr. Merrill, editor of periodical cards. 

Upon motion it was 

Voted, That Dr. Arthur E. Bostwick be 
elected chairman of the Board for the 
coming year. 

Voted, That the chairman be authorized 
to approve and sign voucher-checks on be- 
half of the Board. 

The treasurer submitted an informal - 
statement of receipts and expenditures to 



20 AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 

November 30, 1918, which by vote of the when received, be submitted to the mem- 
Board was received and referred to the bers of the Board and incorporated into 
Finance Committee for audit, with the un- the minutes of this meeting. The com- 
derstanding that the complete report for plete report for the year 1918, as later 
the fiscal and calendar year of 1918 would, prepared, is as follows: 

TREASURER'S REPORT 

January 1-December 31, 1918 

Receipts 

Balance Union Trust Co., Chicago, Jan. 1, 1918. $ 1,319.04 

Sales of publications 11,116.13 

American Library Association, Carnegie fund income 4,500.00 

Interest on bank balance, Dec., 1917-Dec., 1918, inc 30.89 



Expenditures $16,966.06 

Checks Nos. 100-112 (Vouchers Nos. 2129-2342) $16,179.90 

Distributed as follows: 

Salaries .- 5,249.62 

Publications 5,157.64 

Supplies 416.22 

Postage and express 964.08 

Advertising 237.85 

Incidentals 366.98 

Travel 487.51 

A. L. A. (last payment 1917 a/c $ 800.00) 

(first payment 1918 a/c 2,000.00) 2,800.00 

Royalties 500.00 16,179.90 



Balance, Union Trust Company. $ 786.16 

G. B. Utley, secretary, balance, NationaF Bank of the Republic 250.00 



$ 1,036.16 

Respectfully submitted, 

Chicago, Jan. 3, 1919. C. B. RODEX, Treasurer. 

The following budget for 1919 was upon motion duly adopted: 

BUDGET, 1919 
Estimated Income 

Balance, December 1, 1918 $ 1,162.81 

Carnegie Endowment fund, interest 4,500.00 

Sales of publications 10,000.00 

Accounts receivable, Dec. 1, 1918 1,667.17 

Sales of books review copies 900.00 



$18,229.98 
Estimated Expenditures 

Salaries 1 $ 5,520.00 

Printing Booklist, including Index 2,400.00 

Periodical cards 2 300.00 

Advertising 300.00 

A. L. A. appropriation, 1919 2,800.00 

A. L. A. appropriation, balance of 1918 yet due. 800.00 

Express and postage 900.00 

Supplies 500.00 

Incidentals 400.00 

Travel 500.00 

Balance available for publications, etc 3,809.98 



Total estimated expenditures $18,229.98 

(1) No provision here made for another assistant, necessary if a French list is to be 
added to the Booklist. 

(2) Will be eliminp.ted (likewise corresponding income) if work discontinued. 



BULLETIN 



21 



Audit 

The secretary informed the Board that, 
at the recommendation of the Executive 
Board, the accounts of the Publishing 
Board would henceforth be audited annu- 
ally by the Finance Committee. 

Revision of Steam's "Essentials" 
The secretary, having informed the 
Board that Miss L. N. Steams' "Essen- 
tials in library administration" is out of 
print, and should be revised before it is 
again printed, and that Miss Steams had 
informed him she would be unable herself 
to find time for the necessary revision, it 
was 

Voted, That Miss Ethel F. McCullough 
be invited to revise Miss Stearns' "Essen- 
tials in library administration," with a 
view to its being reprinted in revised 
form. (NOTE: Miss McCollough accepted 
the above commission.) 

Revision of Plummer's "Training for 
Librarianship" 

The attention of the Board having been 
directed to the very urgent need for a 
revision of Plummer's "Training for 11- 
brarianship" (A. L. A. Manual of library 
economy, chap. 13), it was 

Voted, That Mr. Frank K. Walter be in- 
vited to revise Miss Plummer's "Training 
for librarianship." (Mr. Walter accepted 
the commission.) 

Increased Price of The Booklist 
The editor of the Booklist and the secre- 
tary both having presented to the Board 
the extreme necessity for increasing the 
price of the Booklist to offset, in part at 
least, the increasing deficit which would 
soon necessitate discontinuance of publi- 
cation, it was 
Voted, 

(1) That the price of the Booklist be 

increased to a flat rate of $1.50 
to all subscribers. 

(2) That it is the opinion of the Pub- 

lishing Board that more income 
is needed by the Board to meet 
the expenses of the Booklist. 

(3) That it is the sense of the Board 

that if the editor of the Booklist 
finds it advantageous to insert 



advertisements other than those 
of publishers, the Board author- 
izes her to obtain such adver- 
tisements. 

The president of the Association, Mr. W. 
W. Bishop, having in a written communica- 
tion strongly advocated a return to the 
former practice of sending the Booklist 
free to all members of the Association, it 
was 

Voted, That although appreciating fully 
the desirability of so doing, the Board 
finds itself with great regret financially 
unable to carry the burden. 

Periodical Cards 

The editor of the periodical cards, Mr. 
William Stetson Merrill, having presented 
certain correspondence between himself 
and the H. W. Wilson Company, in which 
the latter offered to take over entirely the 
service now being performed by the 
A. L. A. periodical cards and incorporate 
the material in its "Readers' Guide" Sup- 
plement, it was 

Voted, That the secretary be instructed 
to circularize the libraries now subscrib- 
ing to the periodical cards, informing them 
of the offer made by the H. W. Wilson 
Company, and of the disposition of the 
Board to accept it; and if in his judgment 
no serious objection is brought forward, 
the Board accepts the proposal of the 
H. W. Wilson Company to take over this 
work entirely. 

Revision of Adams' "Manual of Historical 
Literature" 

A communication having been read from 
President Bishop, calling attention to the 
steps being taken by the American His- 
torical Association to encourage the issue 
of a revised edition of Adams' "Manual of 
historical literature," and suggesting that 
if the proposal seems feasible, it might be 
well for the Publishing Board to appoint 
a special committee to serve jointly with 
a similar committee of the American His- 
torical Association to consider the project 
and perhaps to assist in editorial compi- 
lation, it was 

Voted. That the subject be referred to 



22 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



the Executive Board, inasmuch as the Pub- 
lishing Board does not understand it to 
be one in which a publication by the Board 
is involved. 

After-War Reading Lists 

Recurring to the subject of certain war 
time reading lists, later termed "After-war 
reading lists," to be prepared under the 
editorial supervision of Joseph L. Wheeler, 
the secretary informed the Board that the 
War Service Committee, at the request of 
the subcommittee of the Board (the secre- 
tary and Mr. Milam, appointed at the Sara- 
toga Springs meeting to consider possible 
sources from which funds for this purpose 
can be obtained) had voted (November 30, 
1918) an appropriation of fifteen hundred 
dollars ($1,500), the text of that commit- 
tee's vote being as follows: 

Voted, That the War Service Committee 
hereby appropriates the sum of fifteen 
hundred dollars ($1,600) from available 
unexpended balances of the first war serv- 
ice fund to the A. L. A. Publishing Board, 
to be expended in the preparation of 
"After-war reading lists," under the di- 
rection of Mr. Joseph L. Wheeler; and that, 
after approval by the Executive Board of 
the American Library Association, the 
American Security and Trust Company, of 
Washington, D. ~C., is authorized and re- 
quested from the A. L. A. war service 
moneys of the first library war fund in its 
hands, to transfer to the credit of Carl B. 
Roden, treasurer of the American Library 
Association Publishing Board, the sum of 
fifteen hundred dollars ($1,500). 

Whereupon the Publishing Board 

Voted, That the A. L. A. Publishing 
Board hereby authorizes and instructs its 
secretary to arrange for the transfer of 
fifteen hundred dollars ($1,500), being the 
sum voted by the War Service Committee 
of the American Library Association to- 
ward the preparation of certain lists un- 
der the editorial supervision of Mr. Joseph 
L. Wheeler, from the American Security 
and Trust Company, of Washington, D. C., 
to the treasurer of the A. L. A. Publishing 
Board. 



It was furthermore 

Voted, That each of these lists be sub- 
mitted.' in advance of printing to the chair- 
man of the Board, who is hereby given 
power to act on each list, and to call to 
his aid such assistance as he may need 
either from within or without the Board. 

New Publications 

Considering new publications, which the 
Board felt were needed in the library field, 
it was 

Voted, That Miss Rathbone be author- 
ized to prepare a subject bibliography of 
"Travel"; and that Miss Rathbone and 
Mrs. Elmendorf be appointed a committee 
of the Board to consider the preparation, 
with a view to publication by the Board, 
of a group of similar bibliographies that 
have in mind the reading of books rather 
than their selection or their reference use; 
such bibliographies to group books inti- 
mately by subject rather than by formal 
arrangement. 

Voted, That Mrs. Elmendorf be appointed 
a committee of the Board to consider the 
preparation of an index of material con- 
tained in books whose subject or title does 
not suggest the inclusion of such material. 

Voted, That the preparation and publi- 
cation of an index to debates be referred 
to Miss Rathbone for consideration and 
report. 

Handbook on Business Methods 
The suggestion having been received 
that the Publishing Board issue a hand- 
book on business methods in the library, 
it was 

Voted, That Dr. Bostwick be appointed a 
committee to prepare or to secure the 
preparation of a "Handbook on business 
methods in the library." 

Reading List on Industrial Democracy 
The secretary of Library Employees' 
Union 15590, of New York City, having 
informed the secretary of the Board of 
the desire of the Committee on Publica- 
tions of the Union to submit a reading list 
on "Industrial democracy," with a view to 



BULLETIN 



23 



its being considered for publication by the 
Publishing Board, it was 

Voted, That the secretary of the Board 
be asked to obtain from the secretary of 
the Union a copy of the list, with the 
name of the author, so that it can prop- 
erly be considered. 

Uniformity of Style in Manual 
Voted, That the Committee on Manual 
of Library Economy be requested to pre- 
scribe rules for uniformity of style, and 
that these rules be observed in future 
chapters or revisions of chapters of the 
Manual. 

Library Efficiency Test 
Miss Julia A. Robinson, at the invita- 
tion of the secretary, having submitted 



manuscript of a "Library efficiency test," 
prepared by her, with a view of possible 
publication by the Board, it was 

Voted, That Mr. Dudgeon be asked to ar- 
range to have the League of Library Com- 
missions pass on Miss Robinson's "Libra- 
ry efficiency test" with reference to its 
value to library commissions if published 
and made available by the Publishing 
Board. 

A. L. A. Catalog Supplement 

Voted, That the printer of the A. L. A. 
Catalog, 1904-1911, be informed that he 
may destroy the type of that book, which 
he has been holding up to the present 
time for purposes of reprinting. 

There being no further business the 
Board adjourned. 



24 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



GIFTS AND BEQUESTS TO AMERICAN LIBRARIES, J9J8 



The following list of gifts and bequests 
to American libraries includes gifts of 
money, buildings, sites, books, and miscel- 
laneous and undescrlbed items as report- 
ed for the year 1918. 

The gifts from the Carnegie Corporation 
aggregate $98,000. From other sources the 
gifts of money (or of property whose 
value has been definitely estimated in 
money) amount to $7,118,505. 

This report does not cover the country- 
wide contributions to the A. L. A. war 
service. There have been two appeals for 
money for this purpose, the first in Sep- 
tember, 1917, which yielded about $1,800,- 
000; and the second in November, 1918. In 
this campaign the American Library Asso- 
ciation was one of the seven organizations 
participating in the United War Work 
campaign. A total of about $205,000,000 
was subscribed, of which the share of the 
American Library Association is approxi- 
mately $4,000,000. As actual collections 
have not been completed it is impossible at 
this time to report the actual amount ac- 
cruing from this campaign. 

The largest single gift of the year was 
an art collection valued at over $5,000,000, 
presented to the Minneapolis Public libra- 
ry by T. B. Walker. The donor also gave 
a site, estimated to be worth $150,000, for 
a building" to house the collection, which 
comprises more than 400 paintings of great 
value, besides jades, porcelains, bronzes, 
carved ivories, gems and other objects of 
art. 

Another important gift was the bequest 
of $800,000 from Mrs. Russell Sage to the 
New York Public library. The John H. 
Wrenn library, valued at $225,000, was 
presented to the University of Texas li- 
brary by Maj. George W. Littlefield. 

Other notable gifts were the presenta- 
tion to the Western University library. 
London, Ontario, Canada, of the private 
library of J. Davis Bennett, comprising 
40,000 volumes, including Shakespearean 
and early Canadian collections; and the 



gift to the University of Pittsburgh library 
of 8,000 volumes of rare and valuable 
Americana, presented by the daughters of 
William M. Darlington and Mary O. Dar- 
lington, as a memorial to their parents. 

The following is the annual financial 
summary: 

From the Carnegie Corporation. .$ 98,000 
From other donors (not including 
gifts for the library war serv- 
ice) 7,118,505 



Total $7,216,505 

In addition to these gifts the following 
were reported, their money value not be- 
ing quoted: 

Number of volumes 105,046 

Sites for library buildings 11 

Buildings for library purposes 5 

Miscellaneous and undescribed items 39 

Unless otherwise stated the gift is to 
the public library of the place indicated. 
ALABAMA 

Birmingham. A collection formerly 
loaned to the library, comprising 1,462 
vols., valued at $3,500, including 1,000 vols. 
of the best literature in foreign languages, 
many being in fine bindings, presented as 
a memorial to Dr. C. C. Ferrell, by his 
wife; 300 Italian books, valued at over 
$300, from the Dante Society of New York 
City. 

CALIFORNIA 

Berkeley. University of California li- 
brary. 1,235 vols., comprising the philo- 
sophical collection of Prof. George Holmes 
Howison, presented by his widow; Chinese 
books numbering 13,000 vols., presented' by 
Prof. S. C. Kiang of the Department of 
Oriental Languages. 

Corning. 4,900 vols. valued at more than 
$5,000, donated by Dr. E. P. Case in mem- 
ory of his wife, Mrs. Emily A. Case, one of 
the early founders of the library. 

Hemet. Wrought iron andirons and 
fireplace implements, and also a number 
of attractively illustrated children's books, 
donated by Mrs. Samuel Ritchie. 

Long Beach. Two paintings presented 



BULLETIN 



by Mr. and Mrs. William Preston Harri- 
son. 

Redding. Women's rest room installed 
in the library by the Women's Improve- 
ment Club, at a cost of $135. 

Red lands. A. K. Smiley Public library. 
Museum case and valuable collection of 
Egyptian relics, donated by Mr. iCharles 
Putnam, president of the Board of Trus- 
tees. 

San Francisco. French Family Library, 
presented by the French Government; a 
Spanish collection, from Mr. J. C. Cebrian. 

San Rafael. Mount Tamalpais Military 
Academy library. A portion of the private 
library of the late headmaster, Dr. Arthur 
Crosby, presented by his heirs. 

Tulare County. A site for a Carnegie libra- 
ry building at Orosa, donated by towns- 
people. 

GEORGIA 

Atlanta. Carnegie library. 300 vols. of 
history relating to Georgia and the South, 
from E. H. Hinton; 50 vols. of genealogy, 
from the late Dr. H. P. Mell. 

. Technical High School. 500 vols., 

and material valued at $100 for construc- 
tion of cases, to establish a school library, 
presented by the senior class in the school. 

Savannah. $500 from William Minot, to 
aid in establishing a branch library at 
Port Wentworth. 



ILLINOIS 
Chicago. University of 

ries. The William Vaughn 

tion of American literature, 

ward Morris. 
Clinton. $200 by will of 

Kent. 

Dixon. $1,000 by will of 
Ogden. $700 from W. G. 
Wyoming. $500 by will of 



Chicago libra- 
Moody collec- 
from Mrs. Ed- 
Mrs. Elizabeth 

A. L. Haskell. 

Pulliam. 

Dr. Copestake. 



INDIANA 

Cambridge City. $1,000 to strengthen 
the book collection, from Mr. and Mrs. 
Laymon, in honor of their parents. 

Columbia City. $25,000 from S. G. Pea- 
body. 



Evansville. Emma Roach Building. Fine 
editions of 200 children's books, valued at 
$300, from J. L. and T. N. Roach, as a 
memorial to their sister, for whom the 
building is named. 

. Public library. The Charles L. 

Wedding library of 2,293 vols. valued at 
$6,000, presented by his son. 

Indianapolis. State library. The John 
H. Holliday civil war collection of 1,200 
books and pamphlets, valued 1 at $2,000. 

Jennings County (North Vernon). $20,000 
from Carnegie Corporation. 

Lowell Town and Cedar Creek and West 
Creek Township. $12,500 from Carnegie 
Corporation. 

New Albany. Painting by Prof. F. G. 
Walker, valued at $350, presented by the 
artist. 

Westville. Country Poor Farm. $1,000 
by the will of A. O. Orr, for a library for 
the inmates of the county poor farm. 

IOWA 

Des Moines. Drake University. The 
private library of Dr. O. H. Longwell, com- 
prising 1,000 vols. 

Mount Ayr. 150 vols from Roy W. Sul- 
livan, in honor of his mother. 

Mount Pleasant. Wesleyan College. 
$1,000 from the Ladies College Guild, for 
books and equipment. 

Nashua. $150 for books, from Mr. and 
Mrs. Max Friend. 

Osage. $1,000 for books, by the will of 
Senator James A. Smith. 

Washington. Reproductions depicting 
the "Evolution of the book," valued at 
$200. 

KANSAS 

Topeka. $2,000 from Scott Hopkins, in 
memory of his wife, as a fund for pur- 
chase of children's books. 

Wichita. $500 for book purchase, from 
the estate of Mrs. Lula Berry Burke. 

KENTUCKY 

Louisville. A piano, presented by friends 
of the library, for one of the colored 
branch libraries. 



26 



AMBRICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



MAINE 

Auburn, f 1,000 and an extensive private 
library, bequeathed by Chief Justice A. R. 
Savage. 

Baldwin. East Baldwin library. 300 
vols. presented by Mrs. Seba S. Brown. 

Bangor. Public library. Several hun- 
dred volumes and pamphlets of a scientific 
character, principally on photography and 
microscopy, from the estate of James C. 
Stodder. 

. Theological Seminary library. 

2,000 vols. and pamphlets, especially rich 
in comparative religion, from Mrs. Henry 
L. Griffin. 

Belfast. $1,000 Liberty bond, presented 
by Mrs. Walter B. Kelley, of Minneapolis; 
525 accessions, comprising bound volumes 
of music, grand opera scores and sheet 
music, presented by Augustus 'C. Knight, 
of West Medford; 100 sheets of music and 
several bound volumes of music, from 
Maud Gammans. 

Brunswick. Bowdoin College library. 
600 vols., chiefly on political economy, 
from Mrs. Thomas Laughlin and Mrs. 
James A. Clarke; 600 vols. of poetry and 
classical works, bequeathed by Isaac Bas- 
sett Choate. 

Camden. 200 vols. from the estate of 
Mrs. E. A. Bower. 

Eastport. Peavey library. $500 from 
the F. A. Birben estate. 

Jay (North). Niles Memorial library. 
$5,000 for library maintenance, from the 
donors of the library, the sons and daugh- 
ters of Veranes and Mehitable Niles. 

Machias. Porter Memorial library. $3,- 
796 from Henry H. Porter, of Chicago. 

Paris (South). $3,000 from Charles Deer- 
ing, of Chicago. 

Portland. $1,000 bequeathed by Henry 
Deering. 

Steuben. Henry D. Moore library. $15,000 
bequeathed by Vida F. Moore to the 
parish house, of which the library is a 
part. 

MARYLAND 

Baltimore. Enoch Pratt Free library. 
A site for Branch 20, in the suburb of 



Hamilton, from the Hamilton Improvement 
Association. 

. Peabody Institute library. The 

Richard D. Fisher collection of Bibles. 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Abington. $80,000 hy will of Marietta E. 
Dyer, for a library of historical literature, 
to be erected on land owned by the tes- 
tatrix, who also bequeathed the residue 
of her estate as a trust fund for library 
purposes. 

Abington (North). $1,500 worth of Lib- 
erty bonds, from the North Abington Uni- 
tarian Society, which is disbanding. 

Acton. $200 by the will of H. J. Hap- 
good. 

Amherst. $500 by the will of Myra C. 
Morehouse. 

Andover. $100 by the will of Rev. C. C. 
Carpenter. 

Barre. $2,000 from Fanny Young, as a 
fund for book purchase, in memory of 
Caroline James Young, the mother of the 
donor. 

Bernardston. A librarian's desk, and 
small table and chairs for the children's 
corner from Dr. and Mrs. W. H. Pierce, 
in memory of their daughter, Roxy Pierce, 
librarian for five years. 

Boxford. $400 from Mary iCleaveland. 

Boylston. $2,700 from the Daniel H. 
Maynard estate; $500 by will of Alvin S. 
Dearth. 

Burlington. A desk, table and chairs 
purchased with money received from the 
lodge of Good Templars, which has dis- 
banded. 

Cambridge. Harvard University library. 
By the will of Daniel Butler Fearing, his 
entire private library. 

Dover. By the will of Irene F. Sanger. 
$1,000 as a fund to be known as the Rev. 
Ralph Sanger fund. 

Dracut. A bequest from Dr. Moses 
Parker, of Lowell, for a building, prob- 
ably to cost not more than $15,000; a site, 
from the sister of Dr. Parker, Mrs. Leon- 
ard H. Morrison. 



BULLETIN 



Duxbury. $300 from an anonymous do- 
nor. 

Eastham. By the will of Timothy Smith, 
of Roxbury, a trust fund of $25,000, to 
terminate in one hundred years, the in- 
come to be used in the purchase of books 
for the public library, for the support of 
needy persons, and to assist young men 
and women in obtaining an education. 

Everett. Parlin Memorial library. $2,- 
500 from Mr. Parlin, of Danvers, this be- 
ing one-half the amount necessary to pur- 
chase land adjacent to the library includ- 
ing a building which was sold and re- 
moved. 

Fitchburg. $10,000 to be expended for 
paintings for the art gallery of the libra- 
ry, by the will of Henry A. Willis. 

Hancock. $4,500 and a site for a new 
building, by the will of Jane A. Taylor. 

Hanover. $300 by the will of Morton V. 
Bonney. 

Hanson. A residuary interest in his es- 
tate, to be shared equally with two Brock- 
ton institutions, by the will of George Tol- 
man; $100 by the will of Morton V. Bon- 
ney. 

Hingham. $5,000 by the will of Mar- 
garet Burr, the money to be invested as 
a permanent fund; $1,000 by the will of 
Helen R. Blackmar. 

Hopedale. $10,000 by the will of Mrs. 
Frances Colburn. 

Kingston. Half an acre of land adjoin- 
ing the library, from Betsey T. Beal, and 
half an acre from Mrs. L. C. Marshall. 

Lee. 100 books on drama from the li- 
brary of G. N. Black of Springfield, 111., 
given in his memory by his son and daugh- 
ter. 

Lenox. A fund for a new electric light- 
ing system from the Carnegie Corpora- 
tion; a fund for recataloging from F. Au- 
gustus Schermerhorn; and money for the 
restoration of the library building to its 
original colonial design, from Grenville L. 
Winthrop. 

Maiden. A sum of money, the income 
of which is to purchase contemporary po- 



etical works, from Sylvester Baxter, in 
memory of his wife. 

Natick. $200 from Maretta Rice, for the 
purchase of some artistic object in mem- 
ory of her parents. 

Plainfield. A site of three acres, for a 
school and library, from Clara E. Hudson; 
a building to cost $15,000 promised by 
George Hallock and Mrs. Ethel Du Pont; 
$1,000 from former residents, toward ex- 
cavation, etc. 

Plainville. 200 vols. from the estate of 
J. H. Shannon. 

Plymouth. 1,000 vols., comprising the 
botanical and scientific collection of the 
donor, bequeathed by Benjamin M. Wat- 
son. 

Plympton. $10,000 for library and mu- 
seum maintenance, and $5,000 for the erec- 
tion of a fireproof addition to the library, 
to be used as a museum for curios given 
by her, bequeathed by Maria L. H. Pierce, 
whose estate, however, is unequal to the 
total amount of her bequests. 

Princeton. 100 copies of Blake's "His- 
tory of Princeton," from Francis E. Blake. 

Reading. 116 vols. from Jacob Mitchell. 

Rutland. $200 by the will of Horace H. 
King. 

Scituate. $1,000 from George O. Allen. 

Stockbridge. $1,500 from T. W. Wood- 
ward estate; $1,500 from Helen Butler. 

Stoughton. $1,000 from Mrs. Eliza C. 
Baker, of St. Louis. 

Swansea. $500 added to the Frank S. 
Stevens book fund, by Mrs. F. S. Stevens 
and Mary A. Case. 

Uxbridge. $100 by the will of Mary A. 
Goldthwaite. 

Wareham. Tobey Memorial library. 
$1,000 by the will of Sarah Sproat. 

Warren. $1,000 as a fund for book pur- 
chase, by the will of Laura C. Blair. 

Westboro. $500 by the will of Elmer P. 
Howe. 

Westfleld. $100 by the will of Mrs. 
Frances Abbott. 

Weston. $500 bequeathed by Justin E. 
Gale, to be expended for some one class 
of books. The trustees have decided to 



28 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



use the money for the history department 
and the books will be kept in a small 
room and used largely for reference. 
MICHIGAN 

Belding. Alvah N. Belding library. $1,- 
000 from Fred N. Belding, and $100 a year 
for ten years, from Mrs. Florence Belding 
Knuckols, both gifts being for book pur- 
chase for the library given by their father. 

Highland Park. Land valued at $100,000 
as a site for a public library, from Mrs. 
Tracy McGregor, of Detroit, under express 
provision that the city provide books and 
maintain the library. 

Marlette Township (Marlette). $7,500 
from Carnegie Corporation. 

Nashville. At the death of his widow, 
the residence of Charles M. Putnam, for a 
public library, and $10,000 as an endow- 
ment fund for its maintenance. 

Plainwell. By the will of Mrs. M. B. 
Ransome, her residence and the sum of 
$5,000, the money to be used for altering 
and equipping the building to adapt it to 
library purposes. 

MINNESOTA 

Alexandria. 386 vols. bequeathed from 
the library of Major Fred von Baumbach. 

Little Falls. $250 for books. 

Minneapolis. A collection valued at over 
$5,000,000, comprising more than 400 paint- 
ings of great value, besides jades, porce- 
lains, bronzes, carved ivories, gems and 
other objects of art, accumulated during 
the past forty years by the donor, T. B. 
Walker, who also presented a site valued 
at $150,000, for a building to house this 
collection. 

St. Paul. 150 vols. and 600 pamphlets 
dealing with the subjects of engineering 
and river improvement, from the Missis- 
sippi Riyer Improvement Association. 
MONTANA 

Blaine County (Chinook). $15,000 from 
Carnegie Corporation. 

NEBRASKA 

Fremont. $500 bequeathed by Jacob 
Kent May. 



Oakland. Woman's Club. A lot to be 
held as a site for a public library. 

Table Rock. $100 as the proceeds of an 
entertainment given for the benefit of the 
public library. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Sunapee. By the will of Martha H. Ab- 
bot, property estimated to be worth over 
$12,000, for a public library in memory of 
her husband. 

NEW JERSEY 

Bradley Beach. A site for a public li- 
brary, from James A. Bradley. 
NEW YORK 

Albany. State library. 735 vols., 6,561 
pamphlets and 1,730 manuscripts from the 
G. M. Ingalsbee estate; 38 vols. of early 
Sandy Hill Herald, from the John Dwyer 
estate; 393 bookplates from T. L. Cole; 
313 vols. and 668 pamphlets from Dr. 
Erastus Corning; 200 vols. and 800 pam- 
phlets from Dr. W. G. Tucker; 300 vols. 
from J. H. Brooks. 

Amsterdam. $100 from Jessie S. Greg- 
ory. 

Beacon. Holland library. $5,000 by the 
will of Mrs. Joseph Holland. 

Bovina Center. Building and lot and 
$2,700 endowment, by the will of J. W. 
Coulter. 

Brooklyn. Long Island Historical So- 
ciety library. $400 from anonymous 
source. 

Buffalo. Grosvenor library. Permanent 
deposit and use of Bishop Coxe's library 
of 5,300 vols., granted by the Cathedral 
Chapter of the Diocese of Western New 
York. 

Cambridge. $100 from Mrs. A. W. Peter. 

Canajoharie. $200 from Bartlett Arkell. 

Clinton. Hamilton College library. 230 
vols. from Dr. F. W. Pulman. 

. Kirkland Town library. $200 
from the R. C. Lombard estate. 

Cold Spring Harbor. $1,000 by will of 
W. H. White. 

Dobbs Ferry. Rent of library quarters, 
valued at $500, from F. Q. Brown. 






BULLETIN 



Dunkirk. $2,000 by will of I. M. Hequem- 
bourg. 

Edwards. Library building and site, 
valued at over $25,000, and $20,000 endow- 
ment, from Hon. A. Barton Hepburn. 

Eldred. $200 from W. R. Proctor; $100 
from Mrs. B. Fearey. 

Endicott. $17,100 for remodeling build- 
ing and for library operations, and perma- 
nent use of building valued at $100,000, 
from Endicott, Johnson and Company. 

Geneseo. Wadsworth library. $1,900 
for library operations, from the Wads- 
worth family. 

Geneva. $100 from Sarah R. M. Burrall. 

Gloversville. $100 Liberty bond from 
Frank Burton. 

Goshen. $15,000 from anonymous do- 
nor, as part cost of new building. 

Granville. $1,200 for library operation, 
from Mr. and Mrs. F. T. Pember. 

Hempstead. $500 by will of Charlotte 
Davis; $200 from anonymous donor, for 
debt on building. 

Hermon. New building and site, valued 
at over $25,000, and $20,000 endowment, 
from Hon. A. Barton Hepburn. 

Highland. $300 from Mrs. Maude 
Adams. 

Highland Falls. $800 from Mrs. J. P. 
Morgan for library operations. 

Hillsdale. $30,000 for library site, build- 
ing and permanent endowment, by will 
of Miss Bristol. 

Hudson Falls. $280 from Woman's Civic 
League. 

Johnson City. $11,746 for library opera- 
tions, from Endicott, Johnson and Com- 
pany. 

Jordan vi lie. $4,000 by will of Douglas 
Robinson; $100 from Mrs. T. D. Robinson. 

Kingston. $1,000 by will of Mrs. Mary 
Dimmick. 

Locust Valley. $100 from anonymous 
donor. 

Lowville. $1,100 from several donors. 

McGraw. $1,200 for operating expenses 
and piece of land adjoining library build- 
ing to be made into park, from Elizabeth 
Lamont. 



Massapequa. Floyd-Jones library. $150 
trom anonymous donor. 

Millbrook. $900 from H. H. Flagler. 

Mt. Kisco. 500 vols from Col. Frederick 
Feigl. 

New Berlin. $500 by will of Byron Bee- 
be. 

New York City. Columbia University 
library. $175 from James Loeb; $250 
from W. G. Low; 328 vols. from Mrs. 
Samuel Thorne. 

. Engineering Societies library. 

9,000 vols. from the Westinghouse Electric 
and Manufacturing Company and the Gen- 
eral Electric Company; 370 vols. from 
J. M. Smith; 309 vols. from L. W. Rosen- 
thai. 

. New York Society library. $10,- 

000 by will of Susan Mount. 

. Public library. $800,000 by will 

of Mrs. Russell Sage; $20,000 from per- 
sons not named; 100 vols. or more from 
the following donors: American Associa- 
tion for International Conciliation, 282 
vols.; American Metal Market Company, 
115 vols.; Barnett Company, 100 vols.; 
Boekelman, B., 347 vols; Butler, Mrs. W. 
A., 513 vols.; Cooper Union, 378 vols.; 
Crane, Elsie S., 286 vols.; Davis, Donohue, 
Thompson and Dietz, 120 vols.; Doane, 
Mrs. G. W., 777 vols.; Emerson, Mrs. M. 
B. H., 1,214 vols.; Ess Ess Publishing 
Company, 1,194 vols.; Finn, Dr., 101 vols.; 
Gas Age, 106 vols.; Hitchcock, Mrs. Rip- 
ley, 111 vols.; Jackson, Florence L., 420 
vols.; Janvier, Mrs. T. A., 157 vols; Libra- 
ry Journal, 425 vols.; Livermore, G. L., 
122 vols.; Long Island Historical Society, 
666 vols.; McGraw-Hill Publishing Com- 
pany, 398 vols.; Marshall, Mrs. S. M., 150 
vols.; Nash, A., 144 vols.; New York Tele- 
phone Company, 177 vols.; Norton, Mrs. 
Eliot, 238 vols.; Onderdonk, A. F., 112 vols.; 
Publishers' Weekly, 386 vols.; Russell Sage 
Foundation, 158 vols.; Scientific American, 
208 vols.; Smith, Mrs. Nelson, 695 vols.; 
Tribus and Massa, 352 vols.; Union League 
Club, 240 vols.; University Club of New- 
York, 101 vols.; Van Home, Mrs., 422 vols.; 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Westinghouse, Church, Kerr and Company, 
221 vols.; Whitridge, Mrs. F. W., 239 vols. 

Norfolk. New building and site, costing 
over $25,000 and $20,000 endowment, from 
Hon. A. Barton Hepburn. 

Ogdensburg. Works of art and Indian 
relics, belonging to the late Frederick 
Remington; also property valued at $75,- 
000, subject to the life interest of two sis- 
ters, bequeathed by Mrs. Frederick Rem- 
ington. 

Oneonta. $250 from Hon. G. W. Fair- 
child. 

Owego. Coburn library. $3,000 by will 
of George Stebbins. 

Palmyra. Rent of library quarters from 
Hon. Pliny T. Sexton; $200 from anony- 
mous source. 

Patchogue. 212 vols. of pedagogic books, 
from Dr. W. E. Gordon. 

PleasantvHIe. $100 from anonymous do- 
nor. 

Pocantico Hills. $100' from J. D. Rocke- 
feller. 

Port Jefferson. Property worth $3,000 
by will of Adelaide H. Wilson. 

Rhinebeck. Starr Institute Free libra- 
ry. $200 from anonymous source. 

Richfield Springs. Memorial hall, cost- 
ing $10,000 or over, from Mr. and Mrs. T. 
R. Proctor and Mr. Frederick Proctor; 
property valued at $9,000, left jointly to 
library and a local church, by will of S. D. 
Styles. 

Rochester. University library. $3,000 
from Mrs. J. P. Hooker, $500 from C. M. 
Williams; $150 from H. W. Sibley. 

Roxbury. $700 for cost of operation, 
from Helen Gould Shepard. 

Rye. $300 from anonymous donor. 

Saranac Lake. $100 from Emily D. 
Proctor; $100 from Redfield Proctor; 
$100 from Mary R. Prescott. 

Saugerties. Oil painting worth $700, 
from Mrs. Eleanor Barritt. 

Say vi lie. Site for new building, from 
Ida F. Gillette; library of the late G. R. 
Brush, numbering 3,000 vols., from Ida 
F. Gillette and C. R. Brown. 



Schoharie. 300 vols. of children's books, 
from Ida Morrison. 

Scottsville. $550 from anonymous do- 
nor. 

Sherburne. $5,000 from Carrie E. Pratt 
for library endowment. 

Southold. $250 from Edward Cahoon. 

Spafford. Bookcases and 190 vols., from 
G. K. Collins. 

Ticonderoga. Receipts of entrance fees 
of Museum of Fort Ticonderoga, given by 
the owner of the property, Mrs. Stephen 
H. P. Pell. 

Troy. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 
library. $1,800 from the Association of 
Graduates. 

Waddington. New building and site, 
valued at over $25,000, and $20,000 for en- 
dowment of library, from Hon. A. Barton 
Hepburn. 

Warrensburg. $900 for cost of opera- 
tion, from Clara Richards and Mrs. Mary 
Richards Kellogg. 

Watertown. Flower Memorial library. 
Historical records and relics of Napoleon, 
from Mrs. Emma Flower Taylor. 

Wayland. $100 from Mrs. Wiley W. 
Capron. 

OHIO 

Cleveland. Western Reserve University 
library. $10,000, to be used as a fund for 
the purchase of reference books, from Mrs. 
Solon L. Severance, in memory of her 
husband. 

OREGON 

La Grande. $100 from the Neighborhood 
Club. 

Portland. $1,000 for technical books, 
from S. Benson. 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Ambridge. Two lots, from a citizen. 

Chester. By will of George B. Lindsay, 
a fund for erecting a building and main- 
taining a library to be known as the Lind- 
say Law library. 

Conshohocken. $10,000 from Mrs. Alan 
Wood, Jr. 

Falls! ngton. $2,000 for maintenance, 
from the Mary Gillingham estate. 



BULLETIN 



31 



Montrose. $2,000 as a book fund, from 
Miss Drinker. 

Parkesburg. $200 from a citizen. 

Philadelphia. $2,000 as a fund for pur- 
chase of books for the blind, from Mrs. 
George Frederick Klemm, as a memorial 
to her father, Thomas B. Shriver; a large 
collection of books, by the will of Mrs. 
Jennie B. Kinsey. 

Pittsburgh. Pennsylvania College for 
Women. 500 vols. of English literature, 
including some first editions, from Dr. 
E. J. Bailey; 300 vols. from Mrs. John Bid- 
die Clark. 

. University of Pittsburgh library. 

8,000 vols. of rare and valuable Americana, 
as a memorial to William M. Darlington 
and Mary O. Darlington, presented by their 
two daughters. 

TEXAS 

Austin. University of Texas library. 
The John H. Wrenn library, valued at 
$225,000, presented by Maj. George W. Lit- 
tlefield; also a special fund of $5,000 from 
the same donor, for the collection of south- 
ern history; $8,000 from Col. George W. 
Brackenridge, toward the expense of print- 
ing the catalog of the Wrenn library. 
UTAH 

Lehi. $10,000 from Carnegie Corpora- 
tion. 

Smithfield. $9,000 from Carnegie Cor- 
poration. 

VERMONT 

Barre. Aldrich Public library. 269 vols. 
from the library of the late Rev. S. N. 
Jackson. 

Barton. Orleans Public library. $176 
from the Book and Thimble Club. 

Brookfield. 335 vols. from W. P. Abbott. 

Burke (East). A site, and building now 
under construction, to cost $30,000, for a 
library and community house, to be known 
as the Burke Mountain Club, presented by 
E. A. Darling. 

Charleston. 162 vols. from Mrs. Cor- 
nelia Bixby. 

Ferrisburg (North). From Dr. E. A. 
Lane, in memory of his wife, a plot of 
ground on which to erect a library build- 



ing, presented to the King's Daughters, 
who maintain the Mt. Philo Free library. 

Grafton. $100 by the will of Myron Tay- 
lor. 

Newport. Goodrich Memorial library. 
$15,000 by the will of ex-Governor G. H. 
Prouty. 

Pittsford. Maclure library. $100 from 
Mrs. E. A. Walker, the income to be used 
for books; $100 for books, from Dr. H. F. 
Walker, and $647.50 toward increasing the 
librarian's salary. 

Swanton. $1,000 by the will of the late 
James M. Bell. 

Underhill Center. A building from Mrs. 
Theodore de Laporte, of Rhinebeck, N. Y., 
on. condition that it be repaired and put 
into suitable condition for the use of the 
library and Red Cross (which provision 
has been complied with). 

Williamstown. $2,000 from Mrs. Laura 
Ainsworth, a resident. 

VIRGINIA 

Leesburg. A modern library building to 
cost $10,000, from Thomas Willing Balch, 
in memory of his father, Thomas Balch, a 
native of Leesburg. 

WISCONSIN 

Berlin. $100 from George 1C. Hicks. 

Lake Geneva. $10,000 by the will of Mrs. 
Jennie Buckley. 

Ripon. 1,000 vols., chiefly of Americana, 
and comprising many rare books, be- 
queathed by W. S. 'Crowther. 

CANADA 
MANITOBA 

Winnipeg. $7,000 additional from Car- 
negie Corporation, for repairs needed on 
account of damage by flood. 
ONTARIO 

London. Western University library. 
From J. Davis Bennett, his private library 
of 40,000 vols., including Shakespearean 
and early Canadian collections. 

Tilbury. $2,000 additional from Carnegie 
Corporation. 

Toronto. A collection of bibles, with 
examples of early printing and binding, 
from Dr. George D. Porter. 



32 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



BULLETIN 

OP THE 

AMERICAN LIBRARY 
ASSOCIATION 



Issued in 

JANUARY, MASCH, MAT, JULY, SKFTBMBB* AKD 
NOVBIIBR 

There is no subscription price and the 
Bulletin is sent only to members of the 
Association. 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 

President William W. Bishop, University of 
Michigan Library, Ann Arbor. 

First Vice-President Charles F. D. Belden, 
Boston Public Library. 

Second Vice-President Burton E. Stevenson, 
Public Library, Chillicothe, Ohio. 

Executive Board The President, vice-presi- 
dents and Josephine A. Rathbone, Pratt In- 
stitute, Brooklyn; A. L. Bailey, Wilming- 
ton Institute Free Library, Wilmington. 
Del.; Electra C. Doren, Public Library, 
Dayton, Ohio; Frank P. Hill, Public Li- 
brary, Brooklyn; Linda A. Eastman, Pub- 
lic Library Cleveland; Adam Strohm, Pub- 
lic Library, Detroit. 

Secretary George B. Utley, 78 E. Washing- 
ton Street, Chicago. 

Treasurer Carl B. Roden, Public Library. 
Chicago. 

Executive Offices 78 E. Washington Street, 
Chicago. 



A. L. A. CONFERENCE, 1919 
The program of the Asbury Park Con- 
ference of the A. L. A. general and sec- 
tional sessions and meetings of affiliated 
organizations will appear in the May Bul- 
letin. 



The mid-winter library meetings again 
were omitted this year. Sessions of the 
Council will be held at the Asbury Park 
Conference. 



FRENCH WAR LIBRARY AND MUSEUM 

The French Government has decided to 
establish in Paris a Bibliotheque et Mus6e 
de la Guerre, intended to comprise all 



material which will be needed by future 
historians of the world war. 

Prof. Adolphe Conn, of Columbia Uni- 
versity, has been commissioned by the 
Government of France to collect all the 
material that has emanated from Ameri- 
can sources since the beginning of the 
war in August, 1914. 

Any persons having material which may 
be of value to future historians, such as 
back numbers or clippings of newspapers, 
posters, circulars from patriotic societies, 
or similar matter, are earnestly requested 
to communicate with Professor Cohn, in 
order that he may decide as to the ad- 
visability of adding such material to the 
collection which he will ship to France. 

COMMITTEE OF FIVE: ON A LIBRARY 
SURVEY 

President Bishop has, with the author- 
ization of the Executive Board, appointed 
a Committee of Five, consisting of Arthur 
E. Bostwick, chairman, St. Louis Public 
Library; Linda A. Eastman, Cleveland 
Public Library; Carl H. Milam, Library- 
War Service, Washington; Azariah S. 
Root, Oberlin College Library; and C. C. 
Williamson, New York Public Library, to 
make a general survey of American libra- 
ry service, particularly in view of the post- 
war conditions of readjustment. The fol- 
lowing letter, addressed by Mr. Bishop to 
those whom he invited to serve, expresses 
very clearly what he has in mind for this 
committee to accomplish: 

The Executive Board at its meeting on 
January 11 authorized the president to ap- 
point a committee to survey the whole field 
of American library service, particularly in 
view of the after-war period of readjust- 
ment. This committee is to present a 
preliminary report at the Asbury Park 
Conference in June, 1919. 

The president feels that a survey an- 
alogous to the famous "Reports on second- 
ary education and primary education" 
made by the Committee of Eleven and of 
Fifteen of the National Educational Asso- 
ciation is the sort of thing wanted now. 
There is crying need for a survey of actual 
library service, for a statement, concrete 
and actual, of just how American libraries 
are meeting or failing to meet their op- 



BULLETIN 



33 



portuuuies, and for a program setting 
forth in plain and simple words the great 
possibilities that lie before us. In other 
words, we librarians want a plan of op- 
eration, a norm with which we can meas- 
ure our own efforts. 

Such a survey will perhaps help us to 
keep the swing and momentum gained in 
our American Library Association war 
service. It should be divided among va- 
rious groups should be most concrete, 
rather than hortatory or theoretical. It 
should tell what the field is, how far it is 
being filled, and how much remains to be 
done. If successfully carried out, there 
should result standards for libraries 
standards of equipment, buildings, service 
of all sorts, salaries and income generally. 
In short, we should do consciously and 
objectively the sort of thing the Carnegie 
Foundation has done for legal and med- 
ical education, and should do it better, 
because this survey would be made sym- 
pathetically by competent persons actu- 
ally working in the fields discussed. 

Will you accept membership on the 
Committee of Five? The committee has 
power to appoint subcommittees from 
within and without its own membership. 

It is hoped that the committee will be 
prepared to make a preliminary informal 
report at the Asbury Park Conference in 
June, which can be discussed by the As- 
sociation at large. This is one of the most 
important movements under way in the 
library field and librarians everywhere will 
await with interest the conclusions of the 
committee. In the meantime the libra- 
rians of the country are urged to co- 
operate with the committee in furnishing 
it with whatever information it may need. 

COMMITTEE ON 
LIBRARY ADMINISTRATION 
The librarians who recently received a 
questionnaire from the Committee on Li- 
brary Administration are earnestly re- 
quested to return it to the chairman as 
soon after April 1 as possible, instead of 
by April 15 as previously requested. 
GEORGE F. BOWERMAN, 
Chairman. 

COMMITTEE ON LIBRARY SALARIES 

Mr. E. R. Perry, of Los Angeles, has 

been appointed by President Bishop as 



chairman of the special committee author- 
ized by the Executive Board to make a 
survey and report on the salaries of libra- 
rians and library assistants. Mr. Perry 
takes the place of Mr. Adam Strohm, of 
Detroit, whose other duties compelled him 
to resign as chairman. Mr. Strohm will, 
however, remain a member of the commit- 
tee. Mrs. Harriet P. Sawyer, of St. Louis, 
is the third member. 

COMMITTEE ON PUBLICITY 

The name of Mr. J. C. Dana, librarian of 
the Newark (N. J.) Free Public library, 
was through an unfortunate clerical error 
omitted from the Committee on Publicity 
in the November (Handbook) issue of the 

A. L. A. Bulletin. 

LIBRARIANS I*N WAR WORK 

Librarians who have been in war work, 
either in Washington or elsewhere, and 
who have been or are soon to be released, 
and have no library position to which to 
return, are invited to confer with George 

B. Utley, secretary of the American Li- 
brary Association (present address, Libra- 
ry of 'Congress, Washington) who is fre- 
quently asked to make recommendations 
for vacancies. 

LIBRARY ASSISTANTS WANTED 

A college library in the north-central 
section of the country has open the fol- 
lowing positions: Cataloger, $1200; engi- 
neering librarian, $960; assistant in cata- 
log department, $840. Applications may 
be addressed to D, care American Libra- 
ry Association, 78 E. Washington street, 
Chicago . State training, position held, 
references. 

AMERICAN LIBRARY INSTITUTE 
PROCEEDINGS 

Proceedings of the American Library In- 
stitute for 1917 may be purchased at the 
Executive Office of the American Library 
Association, 78 East Washington street, 
Chicago. Price, $2.00. 



34 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



SALE, EXCHANGE, WANTS 
(Any library member of the Association 
may insert, without cost, a ten-line notice 
of books or periodicals wanted, for sale or 
exchange.) 

WANTS 

Illinois University Library, Urbana, III. 

U. S. Bureau of Education, bulletins, 
1906, nos. 1-2; 1907, no. 4; 1908, nos. 3-5; 
1909, no. 6; 1910, nos. 4, 6; 1911, nos. 2, 3, 
10, 11, 12, 16, 18; 1912, no. 16 (2 cops.); 
1913, nos, 10, 56, 57. 
Minnesota State Normal School Library, 

Mankato, Minn. 

Journal of Geography, May, 1917. 

Primary Education, October, 1915. 

National Workmen's Compensation Service 
Bureau Library, 13 Park Row, New York 
City. 

New York. Bulletin of Industrial Com- 
mission, Oct., 1915. 

New York. Department of Labor, bul- 
letin 71. 

Maryland. Report of Industrial Acci- 
dent Board, 1914-15. 

Illinois. Report of Industrial Board, 
1913-14. 

Massachusetts. Board of Labor, reports, 
1913, 1914. 

Hawaii. Report of Industrial Accident 
Board, 1915. 

American Library Association, 78 E. Wash- 
ington St., Chicago. 
A. L. A. Booklist, Jan., 1917. 
The Booklist, Oct., 1917, March, 1918. 

FOR SALE 

Birchard Library, Fremont, Ohio. 

Library of the world's best orations; 
edited by Brewer. 10 vols. Pub. by Kai- 
ser, 1900, at $3.50 each. Good as new, will 
sell set for $15.00. 

The Survey, v. 30, April-Sept., 1913. 
Black buckram, good as new, price $1.50, 
or make offer. 



J. C. M. Hanson, 5227 Ingleside Ave., Chi- 
cago. 

American Historical Association, papers, 
1889-1902. 15 vols., bound in half roan. 

American Library Association, papers 
and proceedings. 1893-94, 1896-97, 1900, 
1902, 1905-08, 1911-18. 17 vols., unbound. 

Library Journal, v. 23-30, bound in half 
morocco; v. 31-37, v. 38, nos. 2-11, unbound. 

Library World, v. 13, v. 14, nos. 2-12, un- 
bound. 

Public Libraries, v. 16-17, v. 18, nos. 1-7, 
unbound. 

Bibliographical Society of America, bul- 
letin, v. 1-4, unbound; papers and proceed- 
ings, v. 1, pt. 2, v. 2-12, unbound. 

Norske Turistforenings, Aarbok, 1875-77; 
79-80, 1882-92, 94-96, 98-04, 07, 12-15. 33 
vols., unbound. (Only two other sets of 
this important geographical serial known 
in America. Profusely illustrated.) 
Illinois University Library, Urbana, III. 

Journal des debats politiques et lit- 
teraires, 29 Aug., 1789-Dec., 1791; 9 Aug., 
1792-31 Mar., 1793; 23 Nev., 1804-21 Dec., 
1804; 25 Nov., 1841; 18 Nov., 1842; 2 Dec., 
1843. 

Offers for these volumes should be ad- 
dressed to the librarian. Attention is 
called to the Revolutionary period items. 
Virginia Polytechnic Institute Library, 

Blacksburg, Va. 

Living Age, July-Sept., 1860; Jan.-June, 
1871; July-Sept, 1871; Oct.-Dec., 1871; 
Jan.-Dec., 1873; Jan.-Mar., 1874; July-Dec., 
1884; Jan.-Mar., 1884; July-Dec., 1886; 
Jan.-Sept, 1887; Jan.-Mar., 1888; July- 
Sept., 1888; Jan.-Dec., 1889; July-Dec., 
1890; Jan.-Dec., 1891; Jan.-Dec., 1892; Jan.- 
Dec., 1893; Jan.-Mar., July-Dec., 1894. 

FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE 

Plumb Memorial Library, Shelton, Conn. 

Encyclopedia of biography: Representa- 
tive men of Connecticut, 1917. 4 vols., 
new, fifth and last volume not yet pub- 
lished. 



BULLETIN 



35 



EXCHANGE 

National Workmen's Compensation Serv- 
ice Bureau Library, 13 Park Row, New 
York City. 

American Economic Association, bulle- 
tin, and American economic review, 1909- 
1917, incomplete, unbound. 

Compensation and labor reports of va- 
rious states. 

OFFERS 

Cleveland Public Library. 
Williams, Ralph D. The honorable Peter 



White; a biographical sketch of the Lake 
Superior iron country. Cleveland, 1907. 
Penton pub. co. 286 p. illus. 

Will be sent to libraries for cost of post- 
age. (Weight a little over two pounds). 
Council of Women for Home Missions, 

Room 1011, 156 Fifth avenue, New York 

City. 

McLean, Robert, and Williams, G. P. 
Old Spain in new America. (Interdenomi- 
national home mission study course.) N. 
Y., Ass'n press. 161 p. Will be sent to 
libraries for cost of postage. 



VI O 



BULLETIN 



OF THE 

AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 

Entered as ^second-class matter December 27, 1909, at the Post Office at Chicago, 111., under 

Act of Congress of July 16, 1894. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage 

provided for in section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized on July 8, 1918. 

. VOL 13, No. 2 CHICAGO, ILL. MAY, 1919 

CONTENTS 

Page 

Asbury Par,k Conference: 

Program f 37 

Schedule of Sessions 39 

Program of Sections and Affiliated Societies 40 

Hotels . , . .".... 44 

Travel Announcement * 45 

Reports of Officers and Committees 47 

Report of Committee' on Nominations 91 

Shall a Permanent Endowment be Undertaken for Peace Time Work 

of the A. L. A.? 92 

An A. L. A. Book Service 93 

Miscellaneous 94 

Sale, Exchange, Wants 95 



ASBURY PARK CONFERENCE 
PROGRAM 

GENERAL SESSIONS Second Session, Tuesday, June 24, 
First Session, Monday, June 23, 8 p. m. 9:30 a. m. 
( (President Bishop presiding.) (President Bishop presiding.) 
Greetings on behalf of New Jersey libra- Business: Second final vote on amend- 
rians-M. Taylor Pyne, chairman New ment to Const itution, Sect. 12 (see Sara- 
Jersey Public Library Commission. toga gprings . Confere nce Proceedings, p. 
Address Speaker to be announced. 281) 

President's address: The American Li- How the army libraries have helped our 

brary Association at the crossroads fighting men The Honorable Frederick 

William Warner Bishop, librarian Uni- P. Keppel, Third Assistant Secretary of 

versity of Michigan. War. 

Informal reception following adjournment, The Library War Service: Report of the 

in the ball room of the New Monterey War Service Committee J. I. Wyer, Jr., 

Hotel. chairman. 



38 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Reports of officers and committees, stand- 
ing and special. 

Many of these reports will be in print and 
presumably will have been read by 
members present. There will be oppor- 
tunity for discussion. 

Third Session, Tuesday, June 24, 8 p. m. 
(Carl H. Milam presiding.) 
The Library War Service: 

Six months at headquarters and in the 
field: a few impressions Theresa 
Hitchler, Brooklyn Public Library. 

Organizing hospital libraries in France 
Mary Frances Isom, librarian Port- 
land (Ore.) Library Association; in 
service overseas November to May. 

Further glimpses of our service over- 
seas; some photographs just received 
from France and the Rhine country 
(stereopticon) Asa Don Dickinson. 

Overseas experience Mary Eileen 
Ahern, editor Public Libraries; Or- 
lando C. Davis, librarian Waltham 
(Mass.) Public Library. 

The service: A statement from the 
general director Herbert Putnam, 
Librarian of Congress. 

Fourth Session, Wednesday, June 25, 
9:30 a. m. 

(President Bishop presiding.) 

What books and library service have 
meant to the Navy The Honorable 
Josephus Daniels, Secretary of the 
Navy. 

Libraries and reading as an aid to morale 
Brigadier General E. L. Munson, Gen- 
eral Staff, Chief Morale Branch. 

Our war service and some things it has 
taught Chalmers Hadley, librarian Den- 
ver Public Library (recently field repre- 
sentative of the Library War Service). 



Fifth Session, Thursday, June 26, 

9:30 a. m. 

(Vice-President Belden presiding.) 
Survey of actual conditions in American 

libraries: 

Our library resources as shown by some 
government needs in the war An- 
drew Keogh, librarian Yale University. 

Some present-day aspects of the library 
training problems C. C. Williamson, 
New York Public Library. 

Actual salaries of librarians and assist- 
ants and standards; summary of re- 
port of the Committee on Salaries 
Everett R. Perry, librarian Los Ange- 
les Public Library. 

A library survey; preliminary report of 
the Committee of Five on Library 
Service Arthur E. Bostwick, libra- 
rian, St. Louis Public Library. 

Discussion. 

Sixth Session, Friday, June 27, 9:30 a. m. 

(President Bishop presiding.) 

The future of library work in America: 
The library's task in reconstruction 
Paul M. Paine, librarian Syracuse 
Public Library. 

School libraries of the next decade 
Jesse B. Davis, principal Central High 
School, Grand Rapids, Michigan, and 
late head of junior employment serv- 
ice, U. S. Department of Labor. 
Reaching all classes of the community 
John H. Leete, director Carnegie 
Library, Pittsburgh. 

Memorial resolutions for William Howard 
Brett and Samuel Swett Green. 

Reports of the Committee on Resolutions. 

Reports of the tellers of election. 

Unfinished business. 

Induction of the incoming president. 

Adjournment sine die. 



BULLETIN 



39 



TENTATIVE SCHEDULE ASBURY PARK CONFERENCE 





Morning 


Afternoon 


Evening 


MONDAT 

June 23 




5 :30 Executive Board (3) 


8 :00 First General Session 
(1) 
10 :00 Reception (2) 


TUESDAY 
June 24 


9 :30 Second General 
Session (1) 


2 :30 Council (open meeting) 
(1) 
Am. Assn. Law Lib. ( 5 ) 
School Libraries Sec- 
tion (2) 
Camp Lib. Rd. Table 
(4) 
Special Lib. Assn. (3) 


8 :00 Third General Session 
(1) 


WEDNESDAY 
June 25 


9:30 Fourth General 
Session 
(Photograph a t 
close of session) 


2 :30 -League of Lib. Com. (1) 
Am. Assn. Law Lib. ( 5 ) 
Profess. Train. Sec. (2) 
Special Lib. Assn. (4) 
Normal Sch. Lib. Rd. 
Table (3) 


8 :00 Trustees Sec. (2) 
Catalog Sec. (1) 
Am. Assn. of Law Lib., 
Nat. Assn. State Lib. 
Joint session (5) 
Camp Lib. Rd. Table 
(4) 
Hosp. Lib. Rd. Table 
(3) 


THURSDAY 
June 26 


9 :30 Fifth General Ses- 
sion " 


2 :30 Council (open meeting) 
(1) 
Agric. Lib. Sec. (2) 
Am. Assn. Law Lib. ( 5 ) 
High Sch. Lib. Rd. Ta- 
ble (3) 
Train. Class Teach. 
Rd. Tb. (4) 
Hospital Lib. Rd. Ta- 
ble (Asbury Park 
Pub. Lib.) 


8 :00 College and Ref. Sec. 
(2) 
Children's Lib. Sec. (1) 
Nat. Assn. State Lib. 
(5) 
Special Lib. Assn. (8) 


FRIDAY 
June 27 


9 :30 Sixth General Ses- 
sion 
Council (after ad- 
journment gen- 
eral session) 


2 :30 League of Lib. Com. 
(2) 
Pub. Doc. Rd. Table 
(5) 
Libraries of Relig. and 
Theol. Rd. Table (4) 
Lending Dept. Rd. Ta- 
ble (1) 
Hospital Lib. Rd. Ta- 
ble (3) 


6 :00 Lib. Sch. Dinners. 
8:30 Children's Lib. Sect. (2) 
Nat. Assn. State Lib. 
(6) 
Camp Lib. Rd. Table 
(4) 



Figures in parentheses refer to meeting halls as indicated in the 
following key : 

1. Auditorium. 

2. Ball Room, New Monterey. 



3. Palm Room, New Monterey. 

4. Lounge, New Monterey. 
6. Parlor, Columbia. 



40 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



COUNCIL 

There will be two meetings of the Coun- 
cil at Asbury Park, both open to all mem- 
bers of the Association. 

The first session on Tuesday afternoon, 
June 24, will be entirely devoted to discus- 
sion of the advisability of attempting to 
raise a permanent endowment for peace 
time work of the Association. Further 
particulars of this meeting are printed 
elsewhere in this issue. 

The second session will be held on 
Thursday afternoon, June 25. The pro- 
gram will include (1) a discussion of the 
Educational Bill which will be introduced 
into the next Congress, particularly those 
features which affect libraries and library 
work; (2) plans for an international 
bibliography of humanistic studies, discus- 
sion opened by Prof. F. J. Teggart, of the 
University of California and secretary of 
the International Bibliographical Con- 
gress; (3) a statement by Miss Edith 
Guerrier regarding plans for "National 
library service." 

Five new members will be elected to 
the Council by the Council at this session. 

There will be in addition a brief meet- 
ing of the Council following adjournment 
of the last general session on Friday morn- 
ing, June 27, if there is business to be 
brought before that body. 

AGRICULTURAL LIBRARIES SECTION 
Thursday Afternoon, June 26 

The work of the California county libraries 
in agricultural extension Milton J. Fer- 
guson, librarian California State Library. 

Bibliographical opportunities in horticul- 
ture Marjorie F. Warner, bibliographi- 
cal assistant, U. S. Department of Agri- 
culture. 

A union check list* of agricultural period- 
icalsCharles R. Green, librarian Mass- 
achusetts Agricultural College. 
Discussion led by Henry O. Severance, 
librarian University of Missouri. 

Agricultural lantern slides and motion 
pictures. 

Reports of committees. 

Election of officers. 



CATALOG SECTION 
Wednesday Evening, June 25 
The general matter for consideration 
will be the report of the A. L. A. Commit- 
tee on Library Administration. 

Discussion led by Dr. George F. Bower- 
man, chairman, librarian Public Library of 
the District of Columbia, Washington, 
D. C. 

CHILDREN'S LIBRARIANS SECTION 
First Session, Thursday Evening, June 26 

The immigrants' contribution to American 
culture Charles Pergler, Czecho-Slovak 
Commissioner to the United States. 

The true Americanization of the foreign 
child Herbert A. Miller, secretary of 
the Mid-European Union, formerly pro- 
fessor of sociology, Oberlin College, 
Oberlin, Ohio. 

Second Session, Friday Evening, June 27 

Problems in the production of books for 
children, with special references to some 
wider needs Franklin S. Hoyt, editorial 
supervisor, Houghton Mifflin Company, 
Boston, Mass. 

COLLEGE AND REFERENCE SECTION 
Thursday Evening, June 26 

The binding and arrangement of the Brit- 
ish Blue Book William Teal, superin- 
tendent of delivery, The John Crerar 
Library, Chicago. 

The collection of war books and the ar- 
rangement of other war material, es- 
pecially pamphlets and posters; a dis- 
cussion, introduced by H. H. B. Meyer; 
H. M. Lydenberg; Charles J. Barr; 
Joseph D. Ibbotson; A. J. Wall. 

Report of A. L. A. Committee on Importa- 
tions Dr. M. Llewellyn Raney, libra- 
rian The Johns Hopkins University, Bal- 
timore, Md. 

PROFESSIONAL TRAINING SECTION 

Wednesday Afternoon, June 25 
Advanced library training for research 
workers Andrew Keogh, librarian Yale 
University. 

New plans for the training of apprentices 
Julia A. Hopkins, principal training 
class, Brooklyn Public Library. 



BULLETIN 



41 



Training teacher-librarians in normal 
schools Mary E. Robbins, instructor in 
library science, Rhode Island Normal 
School. 

Training librarians for high school libra- 
ries Sarah . N. Bogle, principal Car- 
negie Library School, Pittsburgh. 

Training librarians for business libraries 
or branches 'Frank K. Walter, vice- 
director New York State Library School. 

Clerical course for library assistants 
Bertha R. Barden, supervisor apprentice 
class, Cleveland Public Library. 

SCHOOL LIBRARIES SECTION 

Tuesday Afternoon, June 34 
The high school library and tomorrow's 

needs: Book selection: 

Standardization of book selection In 
high school libraries Earl R. Glenn, 
Lincoln School, Teachers College, 
New York City. 

Science Edith Erskine, librarian Car- 
ter Harrison High School Branch, Pub- 
lic Library, Chicago. 

Industrial arts Edith L. Cook, librarian 
East Technical High School Branch, 
Cleveland Public Library. 

Domestic science (speaker to be an- 
nounced). 

TRUSTEES SECTION 
Wednesday Evening, June 25 
The program for this section has not 
been completed. 

CAMP LIBRARIANS ROUND TABLE 
Tuesday Afternoon, Wednesday Evening 
and Friday Evening, June 24, 25, 27 
Informal round tables for discussion of 
problems relating to both large and small 
camp libraries. Miss Theresa Hitchler 
will preside. 

HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARIANS ROUND 

TABLE 

Thursday Afternoon, June 26 
Informal discussion of problems peculiar 
to high school libraries. (Program not 
completed, and suggestions requested by 
Helen S. Babcock, chairman, librarian 
Austin High School Branch, Chicago 
Public Library.) 



HOSPITAL LIBRARIANS ROUND 

TABLE 

Wednesday Evening, Thursday Afternoon 
and Friday Afternoon, June 25, 26, 27 
Informal round tables. Miss Caroline F. 
Webster in charge. It is hoped that Miss 
Mary Frances Isom, who has recently re- 
turned from hospital library work in 
France, will be present at these meetings 
and conduct one of them. 

LENDING DEPARTMENT ROUND 

TABLE 

Friday Afternoon, June 27 
Paper by Josephine A. Rathbone, vice- 
director School of Library Science, 
Pratt Institute. 

The training of assistants for lending de- 
partment work Mrs. Jessie S. McNiece, 
St. Louis Public Library. 
Labor saving in the lending department; 
(and) Forms for the small libraries 
Ada J. McCarthy, librarian library sup- 
plies department, Democrat Printiag 
Company. 

ROUND TABLE OF THE LIBRARIES OF 

RELIGION AND THEOLOGY 

Friday Afternoon, June 27 

A brief annotated list of books of out- 
standing importance on the history of 
the Protestant Episcopal Church in the 
U. S. A. Dr. George D. Brown, General 
Theological Seminary, New York City. 

The library of a missionary periodical 
Maud I. Stull, World Outlook, New York 
City. 

The relative strength of mission collec- 
tions in some theological and allied li- 
braries Dr. Frank G. Lewis, Crozer 
Theological Seminary, Chester, Pa. 

Some administrative problems in a theo- 
logical library Glenn B. Ewell, Roches- 
ter Theological Seminary, Rochester, 
N. Y. 

Discussion. 

NORMAL SCHOOL LIBRARIANS 

ROUND TABLE 
Wednesday Afternoon, June 25 
The topics for discussion at the round 

table have not been chosen. 



42 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



PUBLIC DOCUMENTS ROUND TABLE 
Friday Afternoon, June 27 

Paper by H. H. B. Meyer, chief bibli- 
ographer, Library of Congress. 

Popularizing government documents - 
Edith Guerrier, chief of National Library 
Service, Bureau of Education. 

Recent tendencies in state publications 
Dena M. Kingsley, division of docu- 
ments, Library of Congress. 

TRAINING CLASS TEACHERS ROUND 

TABLE 

Thursday Afternoon, June 26 
The suojeots for consideration have not 
been determined. (Chairman, Lucy L. 
Morgan, Detroit Public Library.) 

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF STATE 

LIBRARIES 

Wednesday, Thursday and Friday Even- 
ings, June 25-27 

The programs for the various sessions 
of the National Association of State Li- 
braries have not been completed. The 
first session, on Wednesday evening, will 
be held jointly with the American Asso- 
ciation of Law Libraries. 

LEAGUE OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONS 

First Session, Wednesday Afternoon, 

June 25 

The commission and the library: 
A look ahead for the small library Dr. 
C. C. Williamson, chief division of 
economics, New York Public Library. 
Discussion.' 

How the commission works in the small 
public library Margaret A. Wade, as- 
sistant organizer, Indiana Public Li- 
brary Commission. 

The commission and the high school or 
rural school library Elizabeth B. 
Wales, secretary Missouri Library 
Commission. 

Second Session, Friday Afternoon, June 27 
Necessary league policies for new prob- 
lems: 

What can the league do for its mem- 
bers? Mrs. Minnie Clarke Budlong, 
secretary North Dakota State Library 
Commission. 



What can the league do for states which 
need organized commissions? Mary 
E. Downey, library secretary and or- 
ganizer, Department of Public Instruc- 
tion, Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Place of the commission in child welfare 
Work Elva L. Bascom, in charge of 
library co-operation, Children's Bu- 
reau, Washington, D. C. 
Business meeting and election of officers. 

SPECIAL LIBRARIES ASSOCIATION 
First Session, Tuesday Afternoon, June 24 
Address by the president Guy E. Marion, 
director of record section, Community 
Motion Picture Bureau, New York City. 
Report of secretary-treasurer Caroline E. 
Williams, librarian experimental station 
laboratory, E. I. du Pont de Nemours 
and Company, Wilmington, Del. 
Report of editor of Special Libraries J. H. 
Friedel, librarian National Industrial 
Conference Board, Boston, Mass. 
Report of executive board (by the vice- 
president) Edward H. Redstone, libra- 
rian Massachusetts State Library, Bos- 
ton, Mass. 

Reports of committees. 
New 'business. 

Appointment of Nominating Committee. 
Adjournment to formal program. 
Papers, Group A Representing general 
interests of all specialists: 
(Title of first paper to be supplied) 
John Cotton Dana, librarian Free Pub- 
lic Library, Newark, N. J. 
Documentation in the field of rehabilita- 
tion of the disabled Douglas McMur- 
trie, Red Cross Institute for Cripples, 
New York City. 

Library and statistical work with the 
Prudential F. S. Crum, assistant 
statistician of Prudential Insurance 
Company, Newark, N. J. 
Discussion. 

Second Session, Wednesday Afternoon, 

June 25 

Papers, Group B Representing engineer- 
ing and technical libraries: 
Special librarians, not special libraries 
Edward D. Tweedell, assistant libra- 



ncutu 




BULLETIN 



43 



rian, The John Crerar Library, Chi- 
cago. 

A technology department as a business 
investment D. Ashley Hooker, tech- 
nology librarian, Public Library, De- 
troit, Mich. 

Aids to magazine routing systems 
Edith Phail, librarian Scovill Manu- 
facturing Company, Waterbury, Conn. 
Papers, Group C Representing commer- 
cial and financial libraries: 

How the special library can help build 
industry F. M. Faiker, editorial di- 
rector, McGraw-Hill Company, Inc., 
New York City. 

Some whys and hows of our library, and 
a few don'ts Leon I. Thomas, editor 
of Factory, Chicago. 

The literature of foreign trade Dr. E. 
E. Pratt, president of E. E. Pratt and 
Company, Inc., New York City, former 
chief of U. S. Bureau of Foreign and 
Domestic Commerce. 

(Title of financial paper to be supplied.) 

Third Session, Thursday Evening, June 26 
Papers, Group D Representing municipal 

and civic libraries: 

Good government and better citizenship 
via the civic library Dorsey W. 
Hyde, librarian Municipal Reference 
Library, New York City. 

The library and the League of Munici- 
palities Homer Talbot, executive sec- 
retary, New Jersey State League of 
Municipalities. 
Papers, Group E Representing welfare 

and industrial libraries: 

Humanitarianism in industry (illus- 
trated with slides) Gertrude Beeks 
Easley, director welfare department, 
National Civic Federation, New York 
City. 



Americanization by indirection (illus- 
trated with motion pictures) Leslie 
Willis Sprague, industrial service di- 
vision, Community Motion Picture Bu- 
reau, New York City. 

Fourth Session, Friday Morning, June 27 

Unfinished business. 
Election of officers. 

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF LAW 

LIBRARIES 

Tuesday Afternoon, June 24 
Pennsylvania side reports Luther E. 
Hewitt, librarian Law Association of 
Philadelphia. 
Law library binding in war time Dr. G. 

E. Wire, deputy librarian, Worcester 
County Law Library. 

Wednesday Afternoon, June 25 

Shelf classification of foreign law books 

F. B. Crossley, librarian Elbert H. Gary 
Law Library; F. O. Poole, librarian, As- 
sociation of the Bar, New York City; 
Elsie L. Basset, Columbia University 
Law Library, New York City. 

Wednesday Evening, June 25 
Shelf arrangement of law reports; a dis- 
cussion. 

(The meeting on Wednesday evening 
will be a joint session with the National 
Association of State Libraries.) 

Thursday Afternoon, June 26 
Revisions and compilations of the laws of 
New York John T. Fitzpatrick, law li- 
brarian, New York State Library. 
Other subjects on which there will be op- 
portunity for discussion are: Law 
library architecture; Inter-library loans 
between law libraries; Guide cards for 
law library catalogs; Indexes to legal 
periodicals. 



44 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



ASBURY PARK CONFERENCE 



HOTELS 

The fine and commodious New Monterey 
Hotel, where we had our headquarters in 
1916, will again be our headquarters. The 
management is able to offer exceptionally 
favorable rates, because we come at what 
would otherwise be a dull week, filling in 
a period between a convention just before 
ours and the Fourth of July. We will have 
practically the exclusive use of the New 
Monterey as well as the other hotels used 
as overflow. 

HOTEL RATES 

(Rates quoted include both room and 
meals in all cases) 

New Monterey. Two in double room, 
with double bed, $4.00 each daily; two In 
double room with twin beds, |4.50 each 
daily; four persons occupying two double 
connecting rooms with bath, $5.50 each 
daily; two occupying a double room with 
double bed and private bath, $5.50 each 
daily; two persons in a double room with 
twin beds and private bath, $6.00 each 
daily. The New Monterey can comfort- 
ably care for about 500, assuming there 
will be about the usual amount of "dou- 
bling up." 

Hotel Columbia. (Capacity about 300.) 
Just across the street from the New Mon- 
terey; the most convenient and most com- 
fortable hotel for those who are unable to 
obtain accommodations at the New Mon- 
terey. Two in room, on fourth floor, and 
in Harvey Cottages adjoining Hotel, $3.00 
each daily; two in room on first, second 
and third floors, if facing court, $3.50 each 
daily, if facing street, $4.00 each daily; 
four persons in two double connecting 
rooms with bath, $4.50 each daily; two 
persons in double room with bath, $5.00 
each daily; one in room, $4.00 and up, de- 
pending on location and whether with or 
without bath. 

Thedford. (Capacity about 150.) Across 
the street from Columbia, consequently 
only a few steps from New Monterey, 
$3.00 to $3.50 each daily, room without 



bath, according to location; $4.00 to $5.00 
each daily, room with bath, according to 
location. A few single rooms. 

Seabreeze. (Capacity about 100.) Diag- 
onally opposite New Monterey. Two in 
room, without bath $3.00 each daily; one 
in room, $3.50 daily. 



There are other hotels and boarding 
houses in the vicinity available if needed. 
Arrangements have been made with those 
here listed by special reason of their close 
proximity to the New Monterey. 

HOW TO MAKE RESERVATIONS 

Reservations for rooms in ALL. hotels 
will be in charge of a representative of the 
American Library Association, who should 
be addressed, American Library Associa- 
tion Representative, Care Asbury Park 
Public Library, Asbury Park, New Jersey. 
Reservations of rooms will be begun on 
May 21 and applications reaching the 
above address previous to that date will 
be considered as having been received on 
that day. We are pleased here to state 
that Miss Adeline J. Pratt, formerly as- 
sistant librarian of the Asbury Park Public 
Library, and consequently thoroughly con- 
versant with all Asbury Park conditions 
has been fortunately secured as our A. L. A. 
representative for this work. In writing 
state definitely your desire as to hotel and 
maximum price you are willing to pay, 
your arrangements as to room-mate if you 
have made any, and whether you authorize 
the local representative to make assign- 
ment according to her best judgment if 
you are too late to obtain the particular 
space specified. 

Arrangements can be made if desired 
for a library to engage one or more rooms 
to be occupied successively for portions of 
the week by members of the staff. 

Be sure that letter is signed legibly; 
also that it states whether writer is a man 
or a woman. 

All the hotels listed above have agreed 
to extend their Conference rates up to 



BULLETIN 



45 



July 3, for the benefit of those who wish 
to remain a few days after the adjourn- 
ment of the meetings. 

AMUSEMENTS AND ATTRACTIONS 
There are no end of attractions at As- 
bury Park; the ocean, the Board Walk, 
the fine beaches, the auto drives, boating 
on Deal Lake, tennis, golf, and the wide 
spacious verandas of the New Monterey, 
to which all are welcome whether they are 
staying at the hotel or not. 

There will be an informal reception on 
Monday evening in the ball room of the 
New Monterey, following adjournment of 
the first general session. 

The hotel orchestra will play every even- 
ing from ten to twelve for informal danc- 
ing. 

We have given the New Jersey libra- 
rians distinctly to understand that this 
time the A. L. A. has "invited itself" to 
Asbury Park and that therefore they are 
not to feel responsibility as local hosts and 
arrange for our entertainment as they did 
so lavishly three years ago. 
MEETINGS 

The general sessions will be held in the 
Auditorium just across the street from the 
New Monterey; meetings of sections, 
round tables, and affiliated associations in 
the parlors of the New Monterey and Co- 
lumbia, except that some of the large sec- 
tion meetings will be held in the Audito- 
rium. 

EXHIBITS 

A spacious room at the New Monterey 
has been assigned for commercial exhib- 
its. For rates, space and information, ap- 
plications should be made direct to the 
Manager, New Monterey Hotel, Asbury 
Park, N. J. 

Space has also been reserved for Ameri- 
can Library Association committees which 
may wish to present exhibits. Address the 
Secretary of the A. L. A., 78 E. Washing- 
ton St., Chicago. 

TRAVEL ANNOUNCEMENT 
At the present date no notice has been 
given of any reduced excursion rates to 
Asbury Park, except from near-by points 



such as New York City and Philadelphia. 
The flat rate of three cents a mile one way 
now applies from eastern, central and 
southern points. The war tax is 8 per cent 
on both railroad ticket and Pullman berth. 

Special parties will be arranged from 
New England, and from Chicago, for 
those who find comfort and enjoyment by 
such method of travel. (See following 
section on travel arrangements for de- 
tailed information.) 

Baggage should be checked to Asbury 
Park, but passengers will find North As- 
bury Park station nearer the hotels, and 
busses will meet trains there. 

From New York City 

As there are twelve trains a day from 
New York to Asbury Park and frequent 
boat service no arrangements will be made 
for a special party. Those who wish can 
arrange to join the Boston party. The 
following details are given for the benefit 
of those who wish to travel separately. 
All information is subject to change, how- 
ever, and it should be verified at local 
offices. 

The Sandy Hook boats leave at frequent 
intervals from the foot of West Forty-sec- 
ond street and the foot of Cedar street. 
Those who have not seen New York har- 
bor are strongly recommended to take this 
trip. Vessels are continually returning 
from Europe with troops, the harbor is 
busy and well worth seeing. The Sandy 
Hook boats are scheduled to leave West 
Forty-second street at 8:50, 9:55, 12:40, 
3:50, 4:55 and 7:50, and Cedar street 
twenty minutes later, going direct to At- 
lantic Highlands, where a change is made 
to a train for Asbury Park. The time re- 
quired is about two hours. The fare is ap- 
proximately the same as the railroad fare 
given below. The hours of leaving as 
given are subject to change, to conform 
with later timetables. 

Trains leave at frequent intervals from 
Pennsylvania Station and Hudson Ter- 
minal Building for Asbury Park, the Penn- 
sylvania and the Central Railroad of New 
Jersey operating the trains jointly. At 



46 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



present about twelve trains a day are 
scheduled but the definite schedule for 
June has not yet been announced. The 
round trip fare to Asbury Park and back 
from the Hudson Terminal is $2.92, from 
Pennsylvania Station $3.16. The one way 
fare from Hudson Terminal Building is 
$1.62, from the Pennsylvania Station $1.75. 
About two hours is required for the trip. 
Mr. C. H. Brown, of the Travel Commit- 
tee, 26 Brevoort place, Brooklyn, will be 
glad to answer any inquiries or give any 
further information. 

New England Party 

It is to be noted that those desiring to 
join this party should make reservation 
with Mr. F. W. Faxon, 83 Francis street, 
Back Bay, Boston, not later than June 16. 

A personally conducted party for Asbury 
Park will leave Boston, Sunday, June 22, at 
5 p. m., from India Wharf, on the Eastern 
Steamship Company's Cape Cod Canal line. 
This will make a delightful inland water 
trip, with a view of the Cape Cod Canal by 
daylight between 8 and 9 p. m. Evening 
meal (a la carte) and breakfast (special 
club) may be had on the steamer at in- 
dividual expense. Boat is due to arrive in 
New York between 8 and 8:30 a. m. Mon- 
day, June 23, at Pier 18, foot of Murray 
street. Party will then, transfer about five 
blocks south to the Sandy Hook boat, leav- 
ing Pier 10, foot of Cedar street, at about 
9:10 a. m. Arrangements will be made for 
transfer of hand baggage between the two 
piers. The Sandy Hook boat furnishes a 
pleasant sail of about one hour along the 
Jersey shore to Atlantic Highlands, where 
train for North Asbury Park is taken. 
Party will be due at Asbury Park about 
11 a. m. (The times given are subject to 
change, as later timetables will be issued.) 

Those desiring to join this party will 
send money for ticket and stateroom (price 
includes two in each stateroom, if whole 
stateroom is wanted add $1.35) to F. W. 
Faxon, 83 Francis street, Back Bay, Bos- 
ton, if possible before June 7, but not later 
than June 16, as staterooms cannot be held 
at this time of year. All staterooms will 



be outside and on the starboard, giving 
view of shore all the way. 

Price of ticket, including war tax, Bos- 
ton to Asbury Park, and half stateroom 
on Boston steamer, $8.75. If a trunk or 
bag Is to be checked through, add 75 cents 
for transfer in New York City. 

Chicago Party 

Arrangements have been made with the 
Pennsylvania railroad to provide special 
Pullman sleepers between Chicago and As- 
bury Park. 

Train will leave the Union Station Sun- 
day morning, June 22, at 10:20 o'clock, ar- 
riving in Asbury Park at 4:22 the follow- 
ing afternoon. 

Members in the vicinity of Chicago and 
the middle west who expect to attend the 
conference are urged to join the special 
party out of Chicago. 

Railroad and Pullman Fares 

The present regular one way fare Chi- 
cago to Asbury Park is $29.32, including 
war tax. A round trip rate of $56.22, in- 
cluding war tax, is in effect, making a 
slight saving over double one way fare. 
Lower berth rate is $4.86 and upper berth 
$3.89, including war tax. 

Meals will be served in dining cars, a la 
carte service. 

Check baggage through to Asbury Park, 
giving hotel and room number to facilitate 
delivery. 

A deposit of $5.00 is required to secure 
reservation in special cars. Reservation 
should be made not later than June 16, 
earlier if possible. Address communica- 
tions concerning railroad rates and sched- 
ules to John F. Phelan, Chicago Public 
Library. 
GENERAL RAILROAD INFORMATION 

Information concerning travel to Asbury 
Park will be given on request by the 
Travel Committee: 
New England: F. W. Faxon, 83 Francis 

St., Back Bay, Boston. 
North Atlantic C. H. Brown, 26 Brevoort 

States: Place, Brooklyn. 

Central States J. F. Phelan, Chicago Pub- 
and West: lie Library, Chicago. 



BULLETIN 



47 



RAILROAD RATES TO ASBURY PARK 
Below are given the one-way through 
railroad fares on standard lines, as at pres- 
ent in force, war tax of eight per cent In- 
cluded. 

Boston (via boat to New York) $ 7.27 

(all rail) 9.17 

New York (from Pennsylvania sta- 
tion) 1.75 

(Round trip |3.16) 

(from Hudson Terminal) 1.62 

(Round Trip $2.92) 

(via Sandy Hook steamer) 1.62 

(Round trip $2.92) 

Philadelphia 2.62 

Washington 7.03 

Chicago 29.32 

Cincinnati 24.15 

Cleveland 16.98 



Denver 63.04 

Detroit 20.90 

Kansas City 42.04 

Omaha 44.44 

St. Louis 33.42 

St. Paul and Minneapolis 41.01 

Travel Information at the Conference 
Some member of the Travel Committee 
will be at A. L. A. Headquarters daily, to 
give information regarding tickets, routes 
and possible stop-overs returning. 

Post-Conferenve Trip Omitted 
There will be no special post-conference 
trip this year. It is suggested that all who 
find it possible to do so stay on after the 
conference for a few days of rest and 
recreation. The hotels will continue their 
special reduced rates until July 3 for all 
who stay. 



REPORTS OF SECRETARY, TREASURER, TRUSTEES OF ENDOWMENT FUNDS 
PUBLISHING BOARD AND COMMITTEES, 1918-19 



SECRETARY'S REPORT 
A Peace Time Program: The approach- 
ing close of another conference year and 
consequently the time for another annual 
statement by the secretary finds the Asso- 
ciation facing a peculiar and unparalleled 
situation. Two years ago in conference 
at Louisville, we were asking: What can 
libraries do to help win the war? Can 
libraries readjust their lines of work and 
find a place of usefulness in this national 
emergency? How are we going to find 
the funds to do the work if there is work 
for us as librarians to do? 

These questions have been answered in 
the Library War Service which the libra- 
rians of the United States have, through 
their national organization and under its 
name, been conducting for the past twenty 
months. Libraries did readjust their 
work; they did find a task peculiar to 
their own fitness; and they did find the 
necessary funds to the undreamed-of 
amount of practically five millions of dol- 
lars, by showing the public they had a 



piece of work to do that justified the ex- 
penditure and then by asking the Ameri- 
can people for the money. 

Soon the war work of the Association 
will be a thing of the past. It has been 
the most far-reaching work the Associa- 
tion has ever done and its influence and 
effect should be the most far-reaching ^ex- 
perience in the history of the Association 
or of libraries from their beginning to the 
present time. How are we going to use 
this remarkable experience? Are we go- 
ing to write up its history and then re- 
turn to our before-the-war status unmind- 
ful that the world has changed and that 
the war has left new problems and 
brought new opportunities? Or are we 
going to rise to the emergencies of peace 
as well as, or better than, we rose to the 
emergencies of war? And what are these 
emergencies and opportunities? And can 
we find the necessary funds to "carry on" 
and if so, how, and where? These are 
the most important questions before the 



48 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Association to-day, and we must try to 
answer them at our coming conference at 
Asbury Park. 

What ought the Association to do if it 
can get the money? Here are a few of 
the things; others will occur to all of us: 

(1) We ought to have field representa- 
tives to assist in the establishment of 
libraries in states lacking library commis- 
sions, not only tax-supported libraries 
reaching all classes of the community, but 
libraries in industrial plants, in hospitals, 
in prisons and other charitable and cor- 
rectional institutions. 

(2) The headquarters office ought to 
conduct a full-fledged free employment 
agency to help trustees find good libra- 
rians and to help librarians and assistants 
find positions. There is need for it as evi- 
denced by the measure of success attend- 
ing what the office has been able to do 
with inadequate assistance and equipment, 
and by the recent establishment of com- 
mercial bureaus, either independent or in 
connection with teachers' agencies. 

(3) The Association ought to assist 
libraries, state library commissions and 
other national organizations in their 
Americanization work, one of the most 
vital tasks and problems facing the coun- 
try to-day. 

(4) The Association ought to do a great 
deal more publicity work than it has done 
in the past; publicity that keeps the pub- 
lic informed of the service that libraries 
are prepared to give; and publicity that 
keeps libraries informed of the co-opera- 
tive agencies and avenues open to them to 
promote their work and lessen the expense 
of doing it. To carry out this program a 
publicity expert should be employed. 

(5) Library privileges should be ex- 
tended to the vast rural population, now 
for the most part without access to pub- 
lic books, and the Association and the 
state library commissions should work in 
close touch with the Federal and State 
governments to this end. 

(6) All committee work ought to be 
vitalized by the grant of adequate appro- 
priations, so that committees shall not be 



called on to "make bricks without straw." 
In particular the Committee of Five on 
Library Service ought to have money 
enough at its command to conduct a thor- 
ough survey the only kind of a survey 
that will be worth doing and then to pub- 
lish its investigations and conclusions and 
give them proper distribution. 

(7) The headquarters office should col- 
lect and tabulate statistical information, 
that particularly which is helpful in mak- 
ing budgets and in financial statements to 
a library's constituents, and should be in 
fact what it now tries to be a veritable 
clearing house of library information. 

All these things, and more, might well 
be undertaken and energetically pushed, 
in addition to what the Association now is 
doing, if it had the means. And the per- 
formance of such work would bring a rec- 
ognition of libraries as an integral part of 
the educational fabric that would in turn 
open other doors of- opportunity and use- 
fulness. 

With the consciousness of these needs 
and these opportunities a meeting of the 
Council has been called at Asbury Park 
to consider the advisability of attempting 
to conduct a campaign for funds for peace 
time work of the Association a meeting 
of the Council because that is the body 
to which, according to our constitution, 
are referred matters of policy, but an 
open meeting, because many other mem- 
bers of the Association should be and will 
be interested in these Important matters. 

Absence of the Secretary: For the 
greater part of the time since the Sara- 
toga Springs Conference the secretary has 
been in Washington, continuing to serve 
as executive secretary of the Library War 
Service. He spent four weeks in Chicago 
in November and December, and returned 
again the 5th of May to remain until the 
time of the Asbury Park Conference. It 
is his present expectation to return to 
Washington after the Conference and be 
there probably the remainder of the sum- 
mer at least. 

The routine work at the Chicago head- 
quarters during the year has been in 



BULLETIN 



49 



charge of Miss Eva M. Ford, assistant 
secretary, and to her, and to Miss Gwen- 
dolyn Brigham, the secretary wishes to 
express his appreciation of faithful and 
efficient service. 

Chicago Headquarters: For nearly ten 
years, since September, 1909, the Chicago 
Public Library has generously provided 
free and commodious quarters for the As- 
sociation, and to the Board of Directors 
and to the librarian of that institution our 
thanks and our appreciation in no un- 
stinted measure are again cordially given. 
Not only free space, admirably situated, 
but free light, free heat, free janitor serv- 
ice and innumerable other courtesies have 
been ours, as well as the bibliographical 
resources of the library and the assistance 
of the staff in many appreciated respects. 

Membership Campaign: Feeling that 
the time was appropriate for increasing 
the membership of the A. L. A., that 
many trustees and persons interested in 
but not connected with library work, as 
well as librarians, heads of departments, 
branch librarians and assistants, would 
welcome an invitation to join the national 
organization a membership campaign 
was launched in April on a larger scale 
than any heretofore attempted. 

Mr. Charles E. Rush, of Indianapolis, 
chairman of the A. L. A. Publicity Com- 
mittee, spent two weeks with the secre- 
tary, helping him "put on" the campaign, 
and Miss Emma V. Baldwin, of the Brook- 
lyn Public Library, who had had much 
practical experience with both of the 
Library War Service campaigns, spent 
four days with the secretary in helping 
him plan the campaign previous to Mr. 
Rush's coming. 

New letterheads, especially printed for 
the occasion, were employed, and litera- 
ture was prepared and sent to over 15,000 
trustees, 2,400 small libraries, and to over 
800 of the chief librarians of the United 
States and Canada who were already 
members of the Association, asking for 
their help in placing the membership ap- 
peal before the members of their staffs. 
A supply of circulars for distribution, ade- 



quate to meet the needs, varying in quan- 
tity according to the size of the library, 
was sent with each of these letters. 
The library commission and the library 
schools were also asked to help and of 
course the library periodicals to give pub- 
licity. This report is written too early 
to permit of a full report of the result of 
the campaign. To the present date 
(May 27) new members for 1919, most 
of whom result from the campaign are as 
follows: 

Institutional members 16 

Annual personal members: 

Trustees 57 

Librarians and assistants 276 

Life members (previously annual 

members) 8 

Life members (new) 5 

Total 362 

The campaign has been worth while, but 
there are certainly a large number of men 
and women engaged in library work who 
ought to be, but are not yet members of 
the Association. Many of these would 
join if the matter were brought to their 
attention particularly if they were in- 
vited by a colleague who is a member. 
Will not each member of the Association 
consider himself or herself, a member of 
the Membership Committee? The cam- 
paign is not over. New members are as 
warmly welcomed and needed as ever. 
Can not each member who reads this ap- 
peal obtain at least one new member be- 
fore the Asbury Park Conference? 

Not only do these additional members 
increase the Association's financial re- 
sources. More important even than that, 
they increase its influence, they furnish it 
with new friends and more friends, they 
give it the support that comes only with 
numbers, and the prestige that comes only 
through the general knowledge that the or- 
ganization is truly representative of the 
men and women engaged in the work It 
endeavors to promote. 

The total membership of the A. L. A. at 
the first of this year was only 3,380. 



50 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Can we not double it before the next 
Handbook is printed? 

Publicity: Practically no publicity work 
has been done at the Chicago office during 
the year, except in the past two or three 
weeks when the secretary has been at 
headquarters working on the Asbury Park 
Conference. But more publicity for the 
general Association has been given it 
through the Library War Service than it 
has ever had before. This publicity has 
not only included articles in newspapers 
and in a number of the most widely read 
magazines but in several books as well as, 
for example, in Allen's "Keeping our fight- 
ers fit," where a chapter is devoted to the 
A. L. A. War Service, and in Koch's "War 
libraries and allied studies," where the 
greater portion of the book deals with our 
war work. The result is that the Ameri- 
can Library Association is better known 
to-day than ever before. But the public 
has a short memory, and if library work 
and the work of the Association are to be 
kept before the public, continuous pub- 
licity is necessary. This can not be ac- 
complished as it should be until the Asso- 
ciation has a paid publicity expert, and as 
soon as funds warrant, steps to employ 
one should be taken. 

Miss Marion Humble, of the Detroit 
Public Library, a member of the A. L. A. 
Publicity Committee, is spending several 
weeks with the Library War Service, in 
special publicity work, helping the public 
and university libraries to avail them- 
selves of what the Library War Service 
offers in relation to the rehabilitation and 
re-employment of discharged soldiers and 
sailors. 

Indirectly the work is linking up the 
libraries of the country with publicity 
work of the Association, and it would be 
most fortunate if some arrangement could 
be made for the permanent continuance of 
a representative of the A. L. A. Publicity 
Committee at the headquarters office, or, 
to say the same thing another way, to ob- 
tain an A. L. A. publicity expert and have 
him (or her) keep in very close touch 
with the A. L. A. Publicity Committee. 



Publishing Board: As reported in pre- 
vious years the work of the A. L. A. Pub- 
lishing Board has occupied a considerable 
part of the time of the staff. The secre- 
tary has, however, spent little time on the 
Publishing Board's work, because of his 
absence from the headquarters office for 
the greater part of the year. The sale of 
publications and the necessary bookkeep- 
ing in connection therewith have been car- 
ried on as usual. Sales have kept up 
nearly to normal, notwithstanding the lack 
of new publications. Particulars regard- 
ing these activities are given in the report 
of the Publishing Board. 

High School Library Scrapbooks: The 
A. L. A. collection of scrapbooks represent- 
ing the library work as carried on in high 
schools in all parts of this country has 
been in constant use the past year. Dur- 
ing the summer they were used at Colum- 
bia University in connection with the high 
school library course. In September the 
collection was divided into two groups in 
order that more people could benefit from 
them, one being scheduled in the east and 
middle-west, and the other in the south 
and west. In all, twenty-three different 
sections have had the books. The ex- 
pressions from those having used them 
are that they have been most helpful in 
arousing interest and enthusiasm for this 
special line of work, and in many cases 
they were the means of solving knotty 
problems. In two cases they have been 
used in outlining plans and equipment for 
libraries soon to be opened. 

The books will be in the high school 
library exhibit of the A. L. A. at Asbury 
Park. Requests for the books should be 
sent to Miss Helen S. Babcock, Austin 
High School, Fulton and Lotus Sts., Chi- 
cago, 111., before September 1st in order 
that the itineraries may be made out with 
the idea of having the distances between 
places as short as possible. The books 
are packed in iron-bound trunks, and 
travel by express, C. O. D., so that each 
user pays the expressage but one way. 
The time limit varies from two weeks to 
a month. 



BULLETIN 



51 



Addresses and Lectures: The secretary 
has been able to accept few of the invita- 
tions extended to him to speak to organ- 
izations or library schools. He attended 
the meeting of the Michigan Library Asso- 
ciation, at Mt. Clemens, September 17, and 
spoke on the Library War Service; and 
lectured at Western Reserve University 
Library School, December 20, and at the 
Library School of the New York Public 
Library, April 4, and has accepted invi- 
tation to give two lectures at the Uni- 
versity of Illinois Library School the last 
wesk in May. He attended "New York 
Library Week" at Lake Placid in Septem- 
ber and the Atlantic City meetings in 
March. 

Necrology The Association has lost by 
death twenty-one of its members since the 
last 'Conference, and their participation 
and interest in its affairs will be greatly 
missed. The number includes two ex- 
presidents of the Association, Mr. Brett 
and Mr. Green, the latter being a charter 
member and a life fellow, and two life 
members, James G. Barnwell and Edith M. 
Morgan. The list follows: 

ABBOTT, ALVABETTA P., librarian Free 
Public Library, Atlantic 'City, New Jersey, 
died April 23, 1919. 

BARNWELL, JAMES G., ex-librarian, Li- 
brary Company of Philadelphia, Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania, died February 23, 1919. 
Life member. 

BRETT, WILLIAM HOWARD, librarian Public 
Library, Cleveland, Ohio, died August 24, 
1918. 

BROOKS, L. MAY, supervisor of serial de- 
partment, Leland Stanford, Jr., University, 
Stanford University, California, died Janu- 
ary 7, 1919. 

BUSHFIELD, MINNIE L., reference assist- 
ant, Western Reserve Historical Society, 
Cleveland, Ohio, died December 7, 1918. 

COLLAR, HERBERT C., head cataloger, Gros- 
venor Library, Buffalo, New York, died 
March 14, 1919. 

FOITI.K, WILSON M., state historian and 
archivist and ex-officio chief, Library of De- 
partment of Archives and History, Charles- 
ton, West Virginia, died January 25, 1919. 



GREEN, SAMUEL SWETT, librarian emeri- 
tus Free Public Library, Worcester, Massa- 
chusetts, died December 8, 1918. Life fel- 
low. 

HEDGE, FREDERICK HENBY, ex-librarian 
Public Library, Lawrence, Massachusetts, 
died November 16, 1918. 

JAYNE, NANNIE W., librarian Public Li- 
brary, Bluffton, Indiana, died March 28, 
1919. 

LEHMAN, REBA F., librarian Lebanon Val- 
ley College Carnegie Library, Annville, 
Pennsylvania, died October 3, 1918. 

MALTBY, MBS. ADELAIDE BOWLES, librarian 
in charge St. George Branch and Staten Is- 
land Traveling Libraries office, Public Li- 
brary, New York City, died February 21, 
1919. 

MORGAN, EDITH MARIAN, formerly of the 
Chicago Theological Seminary, Chicago, Illi- 
nois, died December 1, 1918. Life member. 

ROBERTSON, J. P., librarian Provincial 
Library, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, died 
April 11, 1919. 

SHOEMAKER, HELEN R., librarian in charge 
Oak Lane Branch, Free Library, Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania, died January 8, 1918. 

STOOD ARD, GRACE M., formerly librarian 
Public Library, Missoula, Montana, died 
January 5, 1919. 

STRANGE, JOANNA GLEED, assistant in docu- 
ments and economics division, the New 
York Public Library, died August 23, 1918. 

VAUGHT, SALLIE MCCOBMICK, assistant 
cataloger, University of Illinois Library, 
Urbana, Illinois, died October 22, 1918. 

WHITE, ALICE G., formerly librarian of 
the Thomas Crane Public Library, Quincy, 
Massachusetts, died December 29, 1918. 

WILCOX, ETHAN, librarian emeritus, Me- 
morial and Public Library, Westerly, Rhode 
Island, died February 14, 1919. 

WINSLOW, MARY E., children's librarian, 
Washington Heights Branch, Public Li- 
brary, New York City. 



The following persons had formerly be- 
longed to the association, although not 
members at the time of their death: 

DAVIS, PROF. THOMAS K., died December 
24, 1918. 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



FAIRBANKS, EDWARD T., librarian St. 
Johnsbury Athenaeum, St. Johnsbury, Ver- 
mont, died January 12, 1919. 

GANLEY, MARIE, superintendent catalog- 
ing department, Public Library, Detroit, 
Michigan, died March 22, 1919. 

HAYDEN, REV. HORACE EDWIN, assistant 
librarian Wyoming Historical and Geo- 
graphical Society, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsyl- 
vania, died August, 1917. 

HINRICHSEN, SAVILLA I., formerly libra- 
rian of the Illinois State Library, Spring- 
field, Illinois, died August 27, 1917. 

LAWRENCE, HANNAH M., superintendent 
of branches, Public Library, Buffalo, New 
York, died October 7, 1918. 

MURRAY, NICHOLAS, librarian of Johns 



Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, 
from 1890 to 1908, died December 9, 1918. 

ONAHAN, WILLIAM J., formerly member 
Board of Directors, Public Library, Chica- 
go, Illinois, died January 12, 1919. 



The secretary wishes to express to the 
Executive Board, the Publishing Board, 
and to the various committees and to the 
membership of the Association at large, 
his very sincere appreciation of the 
courtesies extended to him and for the 
cordial relations that make his duties a 
pleasure. 

GEORGE B. UTLEY, 
Secretary. 



BULLETIN 53 

REPORT OF THE TREASURER 

January 1 to April 30, 1919 
Receipts 

Balance, Union Trust Co., Chicago, Jan. 1, 1919 $ 4,278.40 

G. B. Utley, secretary, membership dues 6,492.80 

Trustees Carnegie fund, income 2,000.00 

Interest on bank balance, Jan.-April, 1919 , 28.22 

$12,799.42 
Expenditures 

Checks Nos. 128-135 (Vouchers Nos. 1888-1956, incl.) $5,871.15 

Distributed as follows: 

Bulletin $1,841.54 

'Committees 66.25 

Headquarters: 

Salaries 1,633.32 

Additional services 266.65 ? 

Supplies 270.63 

Postage and telephone 163.34 

Miscellaneous 90.50 

Travel 338.92 

Trustees' endowment fund (Life memberships) 100.00 

Committee on Importations (Loan) 1,000.00 

Subscription to W. H. Brett Memorial 100.00 

A. L. A. Publishing Board, Carnegie fund income 2,000.00 

7,871.15 



Balance, Union Trust Co., Chicago $ 4.928.27 

G. B. Utley, secretary, balance, National Bank of the Republic 250.00 



Total balance $ 5,178.27 

James L. Whitney Fund 

Principal and interest, Dec. 31, 1918 $413.92 

Interest, Jan. 1, 1919 6.12 

Twelfth installment, Jan. 30, 1919 28.72 



Total $448.76 

A. L. A. War Service Fund 

Receipts, Feb. 10 to April 30, 1919: 

Campaign subscriptions $ 778.96 

Sale of camp library buildings and equipment 4,957.13 

Sale of waste, refunds and miscellaneous 2,801.62 

Interest on deposits 4.14 



Total, on deposit with Chicago Savings Bank & Trust Co $8,541.85 

Respectfully submitted, 
Chicago, May 21, 1919. C. B. RODEN, Treasurer. 



54 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE 

CARNEGIE AND ENDOWMENT 

FUNDS 

The Trustees of the Endowment Fund 
beg leave to submit the following state- 
ment of the accounts of their trust for the 
fiscal year ending January 15, 1919: 

The only change in investments during 
the year occurred through the investment, 
on May 7, 1918, of the balance of $350 in 
the surplus account in United States of 
America Third Liberty Loan 4^4% bonds, 
due 1928, by subscription at par. 



The usual audit of the investments and 
accounts of the trust was, at the request 
of the chairman of the Finance Commit- 
tee of the American Library Association, 
made by Mr. Harrison W. Graver, director 
of the Engineering Societies Library, of 
this city. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDWARD W. SHELDON, 
WM. W. APPLETON, 
M. TAYLOR PYNE, 

Trustees, Carnegie and Endowment Funds. 
New York, May 15, 1919. 



Cash donated by Mr 
Invested as follows: 
Date of Purchase 
June 1, 1908 5,000 



June 1, 1908 10,000 
June 1, 1908 15,000 

June 1, 1908 10,000 

June 1, 1908 15,000 
June 1, 1908 

15,000 

June 1, 1908 

15,000 

May 3, 1909 13,000 
Aug. 6, 1909 1,500 
July 27, 1909 1,000 



CARNEGIE FUND, PRINCIPAL ACCOUNT 
. Andrew Carnegie $100,000.00 

Cost Book Value 

American Telephone and Telegraph Com- 
pany 4% Bonds due July 1, 1929, inter- 
est January and July 96% $ 4,825.00 

American Telephone and Telegraph Com- 
pany 4% Bonds due July 1, 1929, inter- 
est January and July 94% 9,437.50 

Cleveland Terminal and Valley Railroad 
Company First Mortgage 4% Bonds 
due November 1, 1995, interest May 
and November 100 15,000.00 

Seab'oard Air Line Railway (Atlanta- 
Birmingham Division) First Mortgage 
4% Bonds due May 1, 1933, interest 
March and September 95% 9,550.00 

Western Union Telegraph Company Col- 
lateral Trust 5% Bonds due January 
1, 1938, interest January and July 108% 15,000.00 

15,000 New York Central and Hudson 
River Railroad Company, Lake Shore 
Collateral 3%% Bonds were exchanged 
February 10, 1916, for 

New York Central Railroad Company 
Consolidation Mortgage Gold 4% 
Bonds, Series "A," due February 1, 
1998, interest February, and August... 90 13,500.00 

15,000 Missouri Pacific Railroad Company 
Collateral Trust 5% Bonds were ex- 
changed for 

Missouri Pacific Railroad Company First 
and Refunding Mortgage Gold 5% 
Bonds due 1923, Series "B," interest 
February and August 104% 15,000.00 

United States Steel Corporation Sink- 
ing Fund Gold 5% Bonds due April 1, 
1963, interest May and November 104 13,000.00 

United States Steel Corporation Sinking 
Fund Gold 5% Bonds due April 1, 1963, 
interest May and November 106% 1,500.00 

United States Steel Corporation Sinking- 
Fund Gold 5% Bonds due April 1, 1963, 
interest May and November 102% 1,000.00 



BULLETIN 



55 



May 11, 1916 1,000 United States Steel Corporation Sinking 
Fund Gold 5% Bonds due April 1, 1963, 
interest May and November 105% 

May 2, 1917 1,000 United States Steel Corporation Sinking 
Fund Gold 5% Bonds due April 1, 1963, 
interest May and November 



1,000.00 



1,000.00 



Jan. 15, 1919 



102,500 



United States Trust Company on Deposit.... 



99,812.50 
187.50 

$100,000.00 



The surplus account was increased $100. 00- during 1917 by Premium received on 
one United States Steel Corporation Sinking Fund Gold 5% Bond called in at 110, mak- 
ing the surplus account $350.00, invested in Liberty Bonds May 7, 1918, Third Liberty 
Loan, 



CARNEGIE FUND, INCOME ACCOUNT 

1918 

January 15 Balance ........................................... $1,421.62 

February 1 Int. New York Central. ............................ 300.00 

February 1 Int. Missouri Pacific ............................... 375.00 

March 1 Int. Seaboard Line ................................ 200.00 

May 1 Int. Cleveland Terminal ........................... 300.00 

May 1 Int. United States Steel ............................ 437.50 

July 1 Int. Western Union ................................ 375.00 

July 1 Int. American Telephone & Telegraph .............. 300.00 

August 1 Int. New York Central ............................. 300.00 

August 1 Int. Missouri Pacific ............................... 375.00 

September 3 Int. Seaboard Line ................................ 200.00 

September 16 Int. United States Bonds ............................ 5.21 

November 1 Int. Cleveland Terminal ........................... 300.00 

November 1 Int. United States Steel ............................ 437.50 

December 1 Int. On deposit .................................... 66.72 

1919 

January 2 Int. Western Union ................................ 375.00 

January 2 Int. American Telephone & Telegraph .............. 300.00 

- $6,068.55 

Disbursements 

1918 

May 3 C. B. Roden, treasurer .............................. $2,000.00 

September 23 'C. B. Roden, treasurer .............................. 1,500.00 

December 1 United States Trust Co. Commission ................ 75.00 

December 10 C. B. Roden, treasurer .............................. 1,000.00 

January 15, 1919, Cash on hand, United States Trust Co .......... 1,493.55 

- $6,068.55 



1918 

January 15 

September 9 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

January 



ENDOWMENT FUND, PRINCIPAL ACCOUNT 



On hand, bonds and cash $8,436.84 



Life Membership, L. Weed 

Life Membership, A. F. Whitcomb. . 

Life Membership, H. H. B. Meyer. . . 

Life Membership, S. Crampton 

Life Membership, C. E. Rush 

Life Membership, C. A. Ross 

Life Membership, F. P. Stockbridge. 



25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 



5,611.84 



56 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Invested as follows: 

Date of purchase Cost 

1908 

June 1 2 U. S. Steel Corporation Sinking Fund Gold 

5% Bonds 98% $1,970.00 

October 19 2 U. S. Steel Corporation Sinking Fund Gold 

5% Bonds 102% 2,000.00 

November 5 1% U. S. Steel Corporation Sinking Fund Gold 

5% Bonds 101 1,500.00 

1910 

July 27 1% U. S. Steel Corporation Sinking Fund Gold 

5% Bonds 102% 1,500.00 

1913 

December 8 1 U. S. Steel Corporation Sinking Fund Gold 

5% Bond 99% 991.25 

January 15, 1914, Cash on hand, United States Trust Co 650.59 

$8,611.84 

ENDOWMENT FUND, INCOME ACCOUNT 
1918 

May 3 Int. U. S. Steel Bonds $200.00 

November 3 Int. U. S. Steel Bonds 200.00 

$400.00 

Disbursements 

1918 

May 3 C. B. Roden, treasurer 200.00 

November 3 C. B. Roden, treasurer $200.00 

$400.00 



BULLETIN 



57 



A. L. A. PUBLISHING BOARD 

Report for J9J8-J9 



The Publishing Board is the only per- 
manently endowed agency of the Ameri- 
can Library Association. Its endowment, 
although small, enables it to issue useful 
material that could not see the light 
through ordinary commercial channels be- 
cause of the practical certainty of finan- 
cial loss. If any members of the Associa- 
tion have assembled such material, or 
know of its existence, or if they have real- 
ized or heard of a library need that could 
be filled by a publication, it is their duty 
to inform the Publishing Board at once. 
The Board does have occasional aid of 
this kind but not in the degree that it 
ought to expect. 

Owing to the continuance of the war 
work and the absence of the secretary 
from Chicago headquarters during the 
greater part of the year, the activities of 
the Board have been comparatively small 
since the Saratoga Springs Conference. 
Only one meeting has been held, that at 
Chicago, December 13, at which a consid- 
erable amount of business was transacted, 
and plans discussed for future work. The 
undersigned was elected chairman for the 
ensuing year. The minutes of this meet- 
ing were printed in full in the Bulletin for 
March. 

The publications of the Board have 
maintained a steady sale, as shown by the 
appended statement in fact, a surprising 
sale in view of the inactivity of the other 
features of the work and the natural 
stimulation always provided in previous 
years. 

The Booklist The increasing deficit 
which threatened soon to necessitate dis- 
continuance of publication, compelled the 
Board to increase the price of The Booklist 
at the beginning of the year. The sub- 
scription price was accordingly raised 
from $1.00 to $1.50 a year. A further and 
more radical step was taken in the discon- 
tinuance of discount for bulk subscrip- 



tions received through state library com- 
missions or otherwise. Not only did the 
financial situation seem to require this ac- 
tion, but it was believed tfcat the small 
library, heretofore receiving The Booklist 
free from its state commission, and con- 
sequently in many instances regarding it 
in the complacent attitude bestowed upon 
free acquisitions, would, if it had to pay 
the market price, value it and make more 
use of it than under the former dispensa- 
tion. Several library commissions filed 
protest at this discontinuance of reduced 
rates for bulk subscriptions, but the Board 
felt that a fair trial should be made of the 
new arrangement, and that to ascertain 
whether the measure was a success or a 
failure would require at least a year. A 
number of state commissions have con- 
tinued to subscribe for the small libraries 
of the state, although in practically all in- 
stances the number of copies has been 
materially reduced. 

The total subscriptions to The Booklist 
now are as follows: Bulk to commissions 
and libraries, billed April 1 to December 
31, 1918 (bulk subscriptions being discon- 
tinued at end of 1918), 775; retail sub- 
scriptions at $1.00, 1,044; retail subscrip- 
tions at $1.50, the rate beginning January 
1, 1919, 2,436; sent to library members and 
affiliated state associations as part of 
their membership perquisites, 554; free 
list, 171; total, 4,980 (as against 5,515 re- 
ported last year; bulk subscriptions being 
greater and retail subscriptions less). 

A statement from Miss Massee, the edi- 
tor of The Booklist, is appended to this 
report. 

Periodical Cards During the year the 
H. W. Wilson Company offered to take 
over the indexing of all the serial publi- 
cations which have for a number of years 
been indexed on cards by the Board, in- 
corporating the indexed material in their 
Readers' Guide Supplement. The Board 
looked with favor on the proposal and in- 



58 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



structed the secretary and the editor of 
periodical cards to ascertain the senti- 
ment of subscribers, authorizing them to 
accept the offer if reports from subscrib- 
ers and further negotiations with the 
H. W. Wilson Company seemed to make 
this step advisable. Out of a total of 19 
complete subscribers only two disap- 
proved; and of the 51 partial subscribers 
only four opposed the plan. Negotiations 
were therefore concluded, and the Board 
is henceforth relieved of all responsibility 
and connection with this work. The pres- 
ent collaborators in the preparation of in- 
dexed material have all promised their 
continued cooperation in a greater or less 
degree, and Mr. Merrill will continue as 
editor. 

A report by Mr. Merrill, as editor, is ap- 
pended. 

New Publications Several new publica- 
tions or revised editions are in prepara- 
tion. 

Miss Stearns' "Essentials in library ad- 
ministration," which has been out of print 
for some two years, and for which there is 
a steady call, and which the author has 
not time to revise, is being revised by 
Miss Ethel F. McCollough, librarian of the 
Evansville public library. It will probably 
be on the market again before the end of 
the year. 

Miss Plummer's "Training for librarian- 
ship" (A. L. A. Manual of Library Econ- 
omy, Chap. 13), considerably out of date 
since its appearance in 1913, is being re- 
vised by Mr. Frank K. Walter, of the New 
York State Library School. 

Mr. Vitz has recently revised his Manual 
chapter on "Loan work," and it is ready 
for the printer. 

"Library administration," Chapter 12 of 
the Manual, is in the hands of Dr. Bost- 
wick for revision. 

The form of the chapters of the Manual 
as at first issued differed considerably 
from each other, especially with regard to 
the arrangement of material and head- 
ings. The Committee on the Manual has 
now formulated rules for standardization 
in order that differences may no longer 



exist when all the chapters have been re- 
vised. 

The New York State Library is soon to 
print a new edition of Zaidee Brown's 
"Buying list of books, for small libraries." 
The Board will arrange, as in the case of 
the previous edition, to take over a part 
of the edition and handle it as a Board 
publication. 

Miss Rathbone is preparing a subject 
index of some of the more popular books 
of travel, and she and Mrs. Elmendorf con- 
stitute a committee of the Board to con- 
sider the preparation of a group of similar 
bibliographies that have in mind the read- 
ing of books rather than their selection or 
their reference use. 

The chairman of the Board, by its re- 
quest, has in hand the preparation of a 
handbook on "Business methods in the 
library." 

After-war Reading Lists Mr. J. L. 
Wheeler, librarian of the Youngstown Pub- 
lic Library, has in preparation a series of 
about fifty reading lists, which he terms 
"After-war reading lists," which are to be 
printed and distributed by the U. S. Bu- 
reau of Education, and for which the War 
Service 'Committee of the A. L. A. has ap- 
propriated $1,500. The money is being 
used for the most part in furnishing Mr. 
Wheeler with clerical assistance. Changes 
of plan on the part of the Bureau have 
delayed the lists, but several of them will 
probably be issued by the time of the As- 
bury Park Conference. 

Reprints The following publications 
have been reprinted: 

A. L. A. Catalog, 1904-1911. 1,000 copies. 
A. L. A. List of subject headings. 1,130 

copies. 
A. L. A. Manual of library economy: 

Chap. 1, American library history, 2,000 
copies. 

Chap. 10, Library buildings (revised). 
3,000 copies. 

'Chap. 20, Shelf department (revised). 

3,000 copies. 
Periodicals for the small library, by Frank 

K. Walter (revised 3d edition). 2,000 

copies. 



BULLETIN 



59 



Standard library organization and equip- 
ment for secondary schools, by C. C. 
Certain (reprint from N. E. A. Proceed- 
ings, 1918). 500 copies. 
Popularizing music through the library, by 
Arthur E. Bostwick (reprint from Music 
Teachers' National Association Proceed- 
ings, 1918). 200 copies. 

ARTHUR E. BOSTWICK, 

Chairman. 
THE BOOKLIST 

In summing up the year's work of The 
Booklist we find the same report to make 
that is made each year "The books came 
and The Booklist went." 

While all the other library activities 
seemed to change and enlarge their scope 
The Booklist simply carried on. This 
appears like retrogression until we stop to 
think that The Booklist is a reflection of 
all the interests, all the currents of 
thought which find expression in print. 

We believe in the power of books, per- 
haps as librarians we are actually meas- 
ured by our belief, and The Booklist is the 
printed record of our faith in books. As 
that faith grows by better understanding, 
by clearer expression, so The Booklist 
grows in interest and power. 

This faith of ours is a constant force 
so that in the crisis when library staffs 
were depleted by war work, when special 
readers departed, when professors were ab- 
sorbed in S. A. T. C. work, when everybody 
was busy at something else, still the notes 
came in, the tentative lists were checked 
and The Booklist was made.. It must be ad- 
mitted that this is in some measure due to 
the continued and unimpaired activities of 
The Booklist office staff. But our efforts 
would be nothing except for the work of 
hundreds of librarians with whom we are 
proud to be associated in this appraise- 
ment of books for library needs. 

MAY MAS SEE, 
Editor The Booklist. 
A. L. A. PERIODICAL CARDS 
The present report, covering the work 
of indexing the A. L. A. serials since May 
31, 1918, is also my final report upon the 



printed cards. 

Two shipments, numbered 334 and 335, 
have been sent out to subscribers; they 
included 402 titles, issued on 28,880 cards, 
of which 22,950 cards were distributed and 
5,930 cards were surplus. 

In a communication dated November 22, 
1918, from the H. W. Wilson Company, 
New York, through its president, ad- 
dressed to me as editor of the A. L. A. 
cards, an offer was made to include in the 
Readers' Guide Supplement and also in the 
cumulated volumes, the entries for serials 
indexed by the A. L. A. Publishing Board 
on printed cards. The Board, as you 
know, at a meeting held in Chicago De- 
cember 13, 1918, at which the matter was 
submitted, after consideration decided to 
endorse the plan provided there should not 
be serious objection, on the part of the 
subscribers, to dropping the work of print- 
ing cards. Circular letters were accord- 
ingly sent out to the subscribers and from 
about one-half of the number replies were 
received; out of ten complete subscribers 
replying only two objected to the change 
proposed, and out of 24 partial subscribers 
replying four preferred the cards. 

No more indexing of the A. L. A. serials 
will be done, therefore, under the auspices 
of the Board. Mr. Wilson has asked the 
present collaborators and the editor to sup- 
ply copy for inclusion in the Readers' 
Guide Supplement and arrangements to 
that effect are in progress. 

I may state in brief, now that this work 
has come to an end, that the indexing of 
serials upon printed cards was begun by 
the American Library Association in 1898. 
Serials not elsewhere analyzed on cards 
and monographic in character have been 
kept upon the list since that date; serials 
for which the Library of Congress has, 
from time to time, begun to issue cards, 
have been dropped; those also which were 
indexed elsewhere or were not mono- 
graphic were dropped January 1, 1916. 
The latest list includes 231 serials, but of 
these many have not been received by the 



60 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



indexing libraries since the war began, 
and have hence not been indexed. 

My connection with the work as editor 
began in February, 1911, and shipments 
268 to 335, a total of 68 shipments, have 
been edited during that period. 

I beg now to offer my resignation as 
editor of the A. L. A. periodical cards. In 
doing so I wish to express my appreciation 
of the uniform courtesy and kindness of 



the A. L. A. Publishing Board as expressed 
toward me from time to time by its mem- 
bers past and present, and especially by 
the secretary, Mr. George B. Utley, whose 
advice and assistance have been most 
helpful. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WM. STETSON MERRILL, 
Editor, A. L. A. Periodical Cards. 



A. L. A. PUBLISHING BOARD FINANCIAL REPORT 
Cash Receipts May 1, 1918, to April 30, 1919 

Balance, May 1, 1918 -. $ 1,802.99 

Interest on Carnegie Fund (May, 1918 $2,000.00) 

(Sept., 1918 1,500.00) 
(Dec., 1918 1,000.00) 
(Apr., 1919 2,000.00) 6,500.00 
War Service Committee (appropriation for "After-war reading lists") 1,500.00 

Receipts from publications 12,131.08 

Interest on bank deposits 32.27 $21,966.34 

Payments May 1, 1918, to April 30, 1919 
Cost of publications: 

A. L. A. Catalog, Supplement, 1904-11 (reprinted) $ 920.00 

A. L. A. Catalog, Supplement, 1904-11, storage on plates... 187.50 

A. L. A. Publishing Board reports 13.20 

A. L. A. List of subject headings, 3d edition (reprinted) 
($664.40 paid on above stock and work to date Oct., 

1917) 642.58 

A. L. A. List of subject headings, storage on 500 copies. . . 8.00 

Booklist 2,462.07 

Guide to reference 'books, 3d edition, binding 985 copies.. 177.30 
Manual of library economy: Chaps. 1 (reprinted), 10 and 

20 (revised), (including storage on plates) 274.83 

Periodical cards 228.16 

Periodicals for the small library, 3d edition 181.85 

Popularizing music through the library, Arthur E. Bost- 

wick (reprint from M. T. N. A. Proceedings, 1918) 15.00 

Reading lists: 

Books about America for new Americans 93.90 

Foreign people in the United States 64.75 

League of Nations 46.91 

President's Fourteen peace points 318.77 

Some popular books on the great war 314.99 

Standard library organization and equipment for second- 
ary schools, C. C. Certain (reprint from N. E. A. Pro- 
ceedings, 1918) 50.00 $5,999.81 

Addressograph supplies i 85.72 

Advertising 164.60 

Editing publications 39.70 

Expense, headquarters (1918 a/c) 2,000.00 

Postage and express 1,070.77 

Royalties 500.00 

Salaries 5,861.18 

Supplies 978.04 

Travel 486.79 

Balance on hand April 30, 1919 4,779.73 $21,966.34 



BULLETIN 



61 



SALES OF A. L. A. PUBLISHING BOARD PUBLICATIONS 
April 1, 1918, to March 31, 1919 

The Booklist: 

Regular subscriptions at $1.00 1,044 $1,044.00 

Regular subscriptions at $1.50 (rate beginning Jan. 1, 1919) .. 2,436 3,654.00 

Bulk subscriptions (billed between April 1, 1918, and De- 
cember 31, 1918, reduced rates for bulk subscriptions be- 
ing discontinued at end of 1918) 660 330.00 

Additional subscriptions at reduced rate of 50c (rate dis- 
continued at end of 1918) 115 57.50 

Extra copies 1,532 243.70 $ 5,329.20 

Handbook 5, Binding for libraries 188 21.55 

Handbook 6, Mending and repair of books 330 44.65 

Handbook 7, U. S. Government documents in small libraries. 338 46.15 

Handbook 8, How to choose editions 118 16.11 

Handbook 9, Normal library budget :. '. 90 12.42 

Handbook 10, Manual for institutional libraries 24 5.68 146.56 

Tract 2, How to start a library 76 3.55 

Tract 4, Library rooms and buildings 177 15.19 

Tract 5, Notes from the art section 10 .50 

Tract 8, A village library 11 .55 

Tract 9, Library school training 10 .49 

Tract 10, Why do we need a public library 195 6.93 27.21 

Foreign lists, French 21 5.15 

Foreign lists, French fiction 16 .80 

Foreign lists, French literature, recent 64 14.96 

Foreign lists, German 8 3.90 

Foreign lists, Hungarian 8 1.11 

Foreign lists, Polish 10 2.43 

Foreign lists, Russian 10 4.80 

Foreign lists, Swedish 9 2.19 35.34 

Reprints, Bostwick, Public library and public school 7 .65 

Reprints, Inspirational influence of books in the life of children 31 1.48 

Reprints, Library statistics 6 .29 

Reprints, Making maps available 21 .99 

Reprints, N. E. A. List of books for rural school libraries. .. . 763 18.26 
Reprints, N. E. A. Standard Library organization and equip- 
ment for secondary schools 145 29.21 

Reprints, Standard library organization for accredited high 
schools, from North Central Association of Colleges and Sec- 
ondary Schools 1,359 69.43 

Reprints, Some recent features in library architecture 7 .34 

Reprints, Some popular books on the great war 31,384 361.30 

Reprints, Reading list: President's fourteen peace points... 3,173 33.40 $ 515.35 

Reed's Modern eloquence (cards for) 4 sets 9.75 

Warner's Library of the world's best literature (cards f or) . . . 61 sets 469.00 478.75 

League publications:' ' . 

Aids in library work with foreigners 33 3.11 

Directions for librarian of a small library 100 9.18 

League handbook, 1916 17 8.30 20.59 

A. L. A. Manual of library economy, chapters as follows: 

1, American library history 173 8.24 

2, Library of Congress 50 3.42 

3, The state library 73 5.06 

4, College and university library 89 4.86 

5, Proprietary and subscription libraries 43 2.72 



62 AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 

6, The free public library 81 4.92 

7, The high school library 259 14.73 

8, Special libraries 235 11.30 

10, The library building 367 24.44 

11, Furniture, fixtures and equipment 187 9.55 

12, Library administration 61 4.37 

13, Training for librarianship 107 7.36 

14, Library service 87 5.46 

15, Branch libraries 144 10.06 

16, Book selection 192 12.77 

17, Order and accession department 254 15.09 

18, Classification 340 18.35 

20, Shelf department 424 36.48 

21, Loan work 223 12.29 

22, Reference department 101 5.45 

23, Government documents (state and city) 190 10.06 

24, Bibliography : 195 10.19 

25, Pamphlets and minor library material 294 22.92 

27, Commissions, state aid, etc 57 4.04 

29, Library work with children 118 8.99 

30, Library work with the 'blind 15 1.40 

32, Library printing 90 4.91 279,43 

A. L. A. Catalog, 1904-11 195 277.13 

A. L. A. Index to General Literature 8 43.20 

A. L. A. Index to General Literature, Supplement 1900-10 12 43.20 

Apprentice course for small libraries 884 597.52 

Books for boys and girls 234 43.72 

Catalog rules 498 271.31 

Cataloging for small libraries 180 211.20 

Collection of social survey material 64 5.98 

Graded list of stories for reading aloud 175 16.31 

Guide to reference books, Supplement 1909-10 2 .46 

Guide to reference books, Supplement 1911-13 1 .36 

Guide to reference books, 3d edition 560 1,282.63 

High school list 67 31.95 

Hints to small libraries 29 20.90 

Hospital list 39 9.20 

Index to kindergarten songs 9 12.45 

Index to library reports 2 1.90 

Library buildings 4 .39 

List of economical editions 4 1.00 

List of music and books about music 23 5.51 

List of subject headings, 3d edition 477 1,036.01 

List of 550 children's books 23 3.37 

Lists of material to be obtained free or at small cost 281 52.69 

Periodicals for the small library, 2d edition 1,809 204.36 

Scientific management, List of books on 11 1.03 

Shakespeare, Brief guide to the literature of 11 5.10 

Special indexes in American libraries 157 15.38 

Subject headings for catalogs of juvenile books 102 140.10 

Subject index to A. L. A. Booklist, v. 1-6 2 .50 

Subject index to A. L. A. Booklist, v. 7 2 .20 

Vocational guidance through the library 25 2.38 

A. L. A. Bulletin and Proceedings 116 46.65 4,384.09 

$11,216.52 



BULLETIN 



63 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE 
ON LIBRARY ADMINISTRATION 



Short Cut Methods and Eliminations 
The scope of this report of your Com- 
mittee on Library Administration may best 
be indicated by quoting the introductory 
portion of the letter sent out to all Amer- 
ican and Canadian libraries represented in 
the Association, as follows: 

The records of the A. L. A. Library 
War Service indicate that the librarians 
and some library assistants of a number of 
the libraries represented in the Association 
have seen service in the camp and hospital 
libraries. Many short cut methods have 
been used in these libraries serving our 
soldiers and sailors. It is believed that 
in some cases at least such briefer 
methods have been carried back and 
adopted into the practice of the home 
libraries, or have modified the methods 
formerly in use. The shortage of help in 
home libraries has likewise in some cases 
forced the adoption of simplified methods 
and the elimination of some well estab- 
lished processes considered essential in 
pre-war days. The Committee on Library 
Administration considers it highly import- 
ant to collect, digest, and place before the 
Association information concerning the 
adoption in our libraries of such briefer 
methods and the eliminations effected 
either under the stress of war conditions 
or for other reasons within recent years. 

Your cooperation is therefore asked to 
the extent of furnishing the committee 
with a clear statement of exactly what 
changes, if any, in your practice the war 
experience (or other stress) has brought 
to your library. In order to indicate new 
practice, former practice should also be 
designated. Please also send illustrative 
f<:rms. 

Although this questionnaire was sent 
to over 500 libraries, more than 50 of the 
larger of which had a second letter, replies 
were received from only 93 libraries; of 
these 4 reported that they had never re- 
ceived the questionnaire, but have not yet 
responded to the second sending; 35 had 
nothing to report or reported that no spe- 
cial changes had in recent years been made 
in their routine; and only 54 sent substan- 
tive reports. Practically all such reports 
are from free public libraries. Appar- 
ently college and reference libraries have 



been but little affected by the war; at 
least not to the extent of abbreviating 
their methods. Many of the libraries re- 
porting stated that they had habitually fol- 
lowed the shortest and simplest methods 
consistent with efficiency. Such libraries 
reported that the war stress had forced a 
curtailment of work, that is, diminished 
service to the public, since no further sim- 
plification of method seemed possible, and 
that the effort must now be directed to a 
restoration of discontinued service. 

The straits to which the need for pinch- 
ing economy has driven librarians is illus- 
trated by this statement of the librarian 
of a large library who says: "I personally 
go about the building turning out lights, 
and make similar small savings." 

That the camp library experience is not 
producing as many suggestions for the 
simplification of method in normal library 
work as was expected is illustrated by the 
report of Mr. J. L. Wheeler of Youngs- 
town, who was largely responsible for the 
routine employed in most camp libraries. 
He found that the minimum necessary for 
efficiency in the camp libraries was much 
larger than was originally expected, and 
now that he has gone back to his own li- 
brary after long experience in several 
camp libraries and at A. L. A. Library War 
Service headquarters he feels the condi- 
tions are so different in bis home library 
from a camp library that practically none 
of the camp library practice is applicable 
to his own home library. 

A concrete instance of the difference be- 
tween camp and city libraries is given by 
Mr. Purd B. Wright, who says: "The loss 
of books in any camp library would simply 
bankrupt a town library." 

In spite of the foregoing limitations it 
is believed that the questionnaire has 
brought out a substantial body of sugges- 
tions that may profitably be summarized 
for the use of the members of the Asso- 
ciation. To give the names of reporting 
libraries in every instance would unduly 
lengthen the report. Such identification 
will be made in cases where it is thought 
likely that other libraries may wish to 



64 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



write direct for further details and where 
a mention of the name of the library will 
strengthen the argument for the practice. 
This material is arranged according to the 
outline that formed a part of the question- 
naire and is as follows: 
(1) Book Selection, Ordering, Accessioning 

Several libraries report that the need for 
economy in book purchases with less time 
to give to book selection has led to still 
greater dependence on the A. L. A. Book- 
list. Two librarians who have served in 
camp libraries state that they have been 
led to duplicate more liberally technical 
books and books on Americanization. 
Brooklyn has bought more of the so-called 
western type of fiction and more from sec- 
ond-hand dealers. New York has not re- 
duced titles, but has reduced the number 
of copies, especially of the poorer grades 
of fiction and has materially reduced re- 
placement orders, believing that too much 
money had been spent in keeping alive 
titles no longer needed. Evansville re- 
ported an ingenious plan by which clipped 
copies of the Booklist, reviews, and other 
material are first used in selection and 
later as aids for classification, cataloging, 
newspaper publicity, and staff information. 

An increasing number of libraries re- 
port the discarding of the accession book; 
others retain it, but with simplification 
and elimination of items. For example, 
Newark says that the time of one person 
has been saved by discontinuing the ac- 
cession book. Several report that the 
order cards ultimately become accession 
cards, numerically arranged, while others 
(e. g. Denver) are able to use the order 
card as a combination shelf list card and 
accession card. Los Angeles uses order 
sheet numbers, followed by consecutive 
numbers given to titles on each sheet, in 
place of accession numbers. Syracuse uses 
an abbreviated form of loose leaf acces- 
sion book. Grand Rapids uses accession 
sheets written on long carriage typewriter. 
Indianapolis has adopted (with credit to 
Kansas City) an order card that gives 
designation of copies to various branches 



and departments. New York stamps ac- 
cession number on book and on invoice 
and considers that a sufficient accession 
record. This has resulted in a tremen- 
dous saving. Omaha now keeps accession 
records by bills only. 

Easy books for little children are only 
temporarily accessioned at Cleveland. The 
accession number is stamped in one place 
only in the book and in the temporary ac- 
cession book only the inclusive numbers 
for the books accessioned at one sitting 
are added. Gift acknowledgments are 
usually sent only once a year, even if gifts 
have been received frequently; acknowl- 
edgments of annual library reports have 
been discontinued. 

(2) Periodicals, Ordering, Checking, Miss- 
ing Numbers, Making Up Sets 

The congestion of the mails has re- 
sulted in much irregularity of periodicals, 
and many losses which libraries have 
found great difficulty in having supplied. 
Several libraries have discontinued during 
the war the making up of sets and the 
searching for missing numbers. Several 
libraries have also cut down their periodi- 
cal lists, eliminated duplicates, and cut 
out newspapers altogether. Some libraries 
with branch systems are binding few or 
no periodicals for them. Cleveland finds 
it easier to check and follow up shorts by 
receiving all periodicals at the central li- 
brary rather than directly at the branches. 

It was supposed that most libraries had 
long since adopted the plan of ordering 
practically all of their periodicals through 
agents. The report of at least one library 
seemed to indicate that it still ordered all 
its periodicals direct from the publishers, 
a practice which involves separate checks 
in payment for each publication and other 
wasteful methods and probably does not 
secure as low rates as can be had through 
agents. The advance in club rates that 
takes place each year about November 1 
has led several libraries to secure quota- 
tions and place orders in October that best 
pricer may be secured. 

The Newark Public Library has worked 



BULLETIN 



65 



out an ingenious simplified method for 
checking periodicals, which cannot well be 
described more briefly than in the words 
of the report to the committee: 

Sheets of cardboard Il"xl5" are covered 
on both sides with cross-section paper, 5 
squares to the inch. The edges of these 
cards are bound with black passe partout, 
and on one side of each sheet is bound in 
a sheet of plain brown paper to prevent 
rubbing of the pencil marks. These card- 
board sheets are laid loosely in a binder. 
The width of the sheet permits two col- 
umns to the page of names of magazines, 
each followed by 12 small squares, one for 
each month of the year and for one or more 
additional squares in which may be indi- 
cated by symbols the source from which 
the magazine is obtained, how distributed, 
etc. The initials to indicate the months 
are written across the top, the center and 
the base of each page as guides in making 
entries. For a monthly magazine which is 
received in the current month, the date of 
receipt only is entered in the proper col- 
umn. For a magazine received before or 
after the current month, the entry con- 
sists of the date and the initial for the 
month in which it is received; that is, 
for a March magazine received April 3 we 
would write in the March square A3. 

For a quarterly magazine a line is drawn 
across the three appropriate squares, and 
in this space is written the day and month 
on which it is received. 

For weeklies the date of issue of the 
first number of each month is written in 
the upper left hand corner of one of the 
small squares. The second issue is indi- 
cated by a dot in the upper right hand 
corner, the third issue by a dot in the lower 
left hand corner, the fourth issue by a dot 
in the lower right hand corner, and when- 
ever there is a fifth issue, by a dot in the 
center of the square. 

Where more than one copy of a maga- 
zine is taken, the title of the magazine is 
preceded by the number of copies, and two 
squares are left for monthly journals and 
five for weeklies. 

By this means about 100 magazines are 
entered on a single sheet, or 1,000 maga- 
zines on 5 sheets. 

(3) Classification, Shelf Listing, Cataloging 

The European War classification worked 
out by the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh 
is serving its purpose as an excellent short 
cut aid in many libraries using the D. C. 

Los Angeles reports extremely close 
classification in 300's, 500's and 600's and 



the European War. It, as well as many 
other libraries, is omitting Cutter num- 
bers, except where absolutely essential. x 
There is an increasing tendency to drop 
call numbers in the case of fiction. Many 
libraries are also discontinuing the use of 
copy numbers. 

As noted in section 1, many libraries 
are using their order cards ultimately in 
their shelf lists. Los Angeles reports the 
use of a shelf list card with inventory 
spaces for 11 years' checking. 

There appears to be constantly increased , 
use of L. C. cards; in some cases they are 
even used in the shelf list. In the case 
of branch systems the multigraphing of 
cards is common and more of the catalog- 
ing work is being done at main libraries. 
Where a large number of analyticals are 
required, duplicates of the main card are 
used, with analyticals typed in. East 
Orange has duplicate catalog cards typed 
by untrained assistants (business high 
school pupils). Washington reports the 
elimination of many non-essential series 
cards and added entries. 

At Cleveland easy books for little child- 
ren have been made a separate class and 
are not shelf-listed, since they are too 
shortlived to justify full record treatment. 
Cleveland also omits from the public cat- 
alog certain subject entries (music, maps, 
folk-lore, Orientalia) substituting therefor 
blanket references to special catalogs in 
which such material is fully covered. 
Cleveland also reports increased use of the 
multigraph in making catalog, book and 
shelf list cards, and in inserting call num- 
bers and subject headings. 

Pratt Institute has adopted a plan by 
which copies of author cards with simpli- 
fications serve as bulletin entries. 

Evansville reports that it is able to put 
books into circulation as soon as they are 
received and to complete cataloging and 
other processes when books are not in 
active demand. Pomona also follows this 
practice. 

(4) Marking, Plating, Pocketing, Carding 
In the place of pasted labels the use of 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



white ink on dark books and black ink on 
light books for call numbers has become 
very common. Los Angeles paints with 
India ink a band one inch wide on the 
backs of books where the call number would 
not otherwise be legible. Some librarians 
having their own binderies, e. g., Omaha 
and Washington, report that nearly all call 
numbers are put on by bindery finishers. 
St. Louis has discontinued all stamping 
of plates in books, except in special cases. 

There is an increased use of rubber 
stamps in place of bookplates, especially 
in the case of fiction and juveniles. Denver 
uses no bookplates except in the case of 
gifts. Newark reports a plan for the rapid 
pasting of bookplates. A smooth board, 
12"xl8"xl", is used. Paste is spread evenly 
and quickly on this board with a large 
brush, plates are laid on, face up, pressed 
down all at once and picked up with a 
scratcher. By this means 100 plates may 
be pasted in twenty minutes. Brooklyn 
and Washington use pasting machines for 
the rapid and even application of paste to 
bookplates; 

Los Angeles strengthens book pockets 
by doubling in at the top. Newark puts in 
double pockets in the case of fiction, both 
being pasted at the bottom; when upper 
pocket is filled it is quickly removed, leav- 
ing a fresh one available at once. Several 
libraries stamp dates directly on fly leaf, 
instead of on book pockets or date slips. 
Newark also reports that in the case of 
all seven day and pay duplicates, rubber 
stamps reading "Lent for 7 days only" and 
"Lent for 1 cent a day" are used to mark 
such fiction at the beginning of the story, 
on last fly leaf, below title and above 
pocket; when such books are transferred 
the words stamped are blocked out, thus 
saving the original labor of pasting and 
labeling and the final removal of such 
labels. 

Cleveland reports that formerly when 
books were rebound pockets were torn out 
and discarded; now they are carefully re- 
moved, filed with book cards and later re- 
placed in books when they are returned 
frpin bindery. 



(5) Binding, Materials, Methods, Records 
The excessive increase in cost of leather 

has driven most libraries practically to 
abandon its use except for very heavy 
books. In its place buckram and fabrikoid 
are being used. Cedar Rapids reports that 
resewing in publishers' cloth has not paid. 
Pittsburgh, however, reports increased re- 
casing; in rebinding, whenever possible, 
books are lettered with ink instead of gold 
leaf. This library also reports using 
fewer colors in end papers. Boston uses 
fewer paneled backs. Many libraries are 
using book cards for bindery records and 
do not enter binding record in accession 
book or shelf list as formerly. 

(6) Withdrawal Records 

From the reports submitted, the infer- 
ence is drawn that the separate withdrawal 
book formerly kept in many libraries has 
long since been discontinued. Denver and 
Omaha report that the only record made of 
withdrawals is the total. Several libraries 
state that the fact of withdrawal, without 
giving the cause, is recorded in the shelf 
list only. Some libraries simply record 
the date of withdrawal. Cedar Rapids 
enters date and cause in shelf list and in 
remarks column of accession book. Wash- 
ington keeps an author catalog of books 
the last copies of which have been with- 
drawn and not immediately replaced, for 
consultation in case it is proposed to re- 
store a given title. 

(7) Circulation, Charging Systems, Over- 
due Notices, Messenger Work 

Indianapolis has simplified all of its 
loan rules, issues but one card and permits 
any reasonable number of books which 
may be kept 30 days, without renewal, not 
including current fiction and circulating 
magazines which are limited to seven days. 
But one overdue notice is sent and that 
an oversize post card containing no writ- 
ing except name and address and requiring 
but one cent postage (adapted from 
Kansas City form). Messenger sent three 
weeks after book becomes due. Fines, 
two cents a day, plus 25 cents for messen- 
ger service. 



BULLETIN 



67 



Washington has changed to one card for 
all borrowers and issues five books, two 
of which may be fiction (books issued for 
two weeks) ; also one current magazine 
and an unlimited number of pay dupli- 
cates (seven days). Seven-day books are 
not renewable. One seven-day notice 
(sealed letter) in place of five-day (post 
card) and ten-day (sealed letter) notices 
formerly sent. Messenger sent v/hen book 
is 14 days overdue. Delivery automobiles 
are used by messengers in collection work, 
some of which is done evenings in order 
to find readers at home. Utica follows the 
foregoing plan as far as its notices are 
concerned. 

Brooklyn sends overdue notice at end of 
seven days instead of three as formerly; 
limits books to two for adults and one 
for children; charges for reserves increased 
from two cents to five cents. Pittsburgh 
sends notices after five days instead of 
three as formerly. 

Newark has discontinued overdue notices 
and sends messenger with motorcycle side 
car after three weeks. 

Omaha has abolished messenger service; 
after a second notice list of overdue books 
is sent to city attorney, who apparently 
gets the books, since the results are re- 
ported as good. 

Milwaukee and several other libraries 
use the telephone largely to secure the 
return of overdue books. Houston has 
discontinued the renewal of books by tele- 
phone. 

Racine reports the adoption of the Sioux 
City charging system, with modifications. 

Waterloo reports the installation of the 
camp library self-charging system in one 
deposit station and that the plan will be 
extended to others. 

Any review of short cuts and elimina- 
tions in circulation methods is bound to 
bring to mind the often expressed longing 
that some accurate mechanical device may 
be invented for the rapid charging and dis- 
charging of books, one that would reduce 
to the minimum the use of human being's 
in a process that is largely mechanical and 



rather deadening, in order to set them 
free for intelligent, expert, educational 
service, at once helpful to readers and 
stimulating to the mental growth of li- 
brary workers. Is this not, perhaps, the 
time for the A. L. A. to seek a solution 
of this problem, by putting the matter 
clearly before the library world, asking for 
working plans of a mechanical device, and 
if results are not forthcoming within the 
profession, taking the matter up with some 
inventor? 

(8) Registration, Records, Guarantors 

The practice of issuing cards to men in 
uniform, without other identification, seems 
to have been quite general. Libraries in 
smaller towns have rather generally abol- 
ished the requirement of a guarantor. 
Many libraries in larger cities, though re- 
quiring guarantors in the case of minors 
fifteen to eighteen years of age, require 
no guarantor where the applicant can be 
identified from the city directory or comes 
with a note of introduction from employer. 

Cleveland uses a form of membership 
application requiring merely a reference 
instead of a guarantor and finds it some- 
what more expeditious than the guarantor 
form. 

Omaha reports registration kept in a 
loose leaf ledger, all entries typewritten. 

Washington arranges all original appli- 
cations alphabetically and also keeps a 
numerically arranged file giving digest of 
information on application. This is needed 
for overdue notice work, etc. It has dis- 
continued the street directory file, the 
value of which consisted chiefly in the pro- 
tection against the return of books from 
homes where there had been contagious 
diseases. 

(9) Reference, Pamphlets, Clippings, Fil- 
ing, Records 

There appears to be increased utiliza- 
tion of pamphlets and clippings in refer- 
ence work. The vertical file method of 
storage is growing in favor, with arrar.re- 
ment either alphabetically by subject cr 
according to the D. C. A number of li- 
braries continue to keep such material m 



68 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



pamphlet boxes with the books on a given 
subject. 

Newark keeps an information file, con- 
sisting of both pamphlets and clippings, 
self indexing and so marked that obsolete 
material may be eliminated by a junior 
assistant; also a separate pamphlet library 
classified by the D. C. by means of color 
bands. Economy of space and the elimina- 
tion of the cost of the vertical file cab- 
inets are claimed for this plan of color 
band filing. 

The University of Chicago Library has 
found it necessary to draw up rules for 
the rating and selection of pamphlets and 
other ephemera with particular reference 
to their retention in that library, and if 
retained, the amount of cataloging, classi- 
fication and binding to be expended on 
them. 

East Orange instances the fact that the 
TJ. S. Bureau of Education bulletins are 
now indexed in the Readers' Guide; they 
are therefore no longer cataloged but kept 
in pamphlet boxes in the 370's. 

At Cleveland, a file of references previ- 
ously looked up is maintained, including 
chiefly debate and club topics. 

There seems to be a general disposition 
x to cut down reference room statistics of 
readers, books used, etc. 

(10) Picture Collection 

The reports do not indicate much change 
in method in handling pictures. An in- 
creasing number of libraries are establish- 
ing picture collections, though some have 
been forced to give them less attention 
during the war. The Virginia State Li- 
brary has collected much pictorial material 
on Virginians in the war. Oakland has 
subdivided subject headings more closely 
for quicker reference and has specialized 
on material on different industries. 

Newark, where picture work has been 
developed to a high degree, reports a plan 
for the storage of miscellaneous picture 
collection material not for immediate use. 
Large storage cases have been installed in 
spaces formerly occupied by book shelves 
in closed stacks. Built of lumber and 



compo board, they occupy the usual space 
of a book stack. They have partitions of 
varying widths and heights to suit ma- 
terial of various classes and sizes, and 
have fronts that lift out in one piece but 
are dust proof. Material is stored under 
the same subject headings as in the main 
picture collection. Material wanted for 
seasonal use, such as holiday pictures and 
other reserves, are stored in such a way 
as to be quickly available. Newark has 
also applied its ingenious color band 
method of filing to its fine prints. By 
this method it is possible to find a given 
print by looking only at the edge of the 
mount without disturbing any other print. 
Washington stores its picture collection 
for the most part in vertical filing cabi- 
nets. Gray and brown mounts in two 
sizes, 9^"xlO%" and Il"xl4", are used and 
pictures are tipped at each corner with 
paste. Pictures are filed alphabetically by 
subject, which is stamped on upper right 
hand corner of face of mount. Unmounted 
material is kept in filing boxes in same 
order as in main collection. For charg- 
ing, two record slips are written by the 
use of carbon paper; one is sent with the 
pictures and the other is filed in record 
tray under the date tht, pictures are due. 

(11) Reports and Statistics 

There seems to have been a general dis- 
position to abridge reports and statistical 
tables, annual, monthly and daily. Sev- 
eral libraries that formerly published elab- 
orate annual reports with many tables of 
statistics have reduced such reports to a 
few pages and in some cases have omitted 
publication altogether. The scarcity of 
paper and the costliness of printing are 
no doubt partly responsible for this. In 
some cases the various statistics have been 
kept by the libraries for their own infor- 
mation but not given to the public; in 
others this need for economy in printing 
has resulted in a diminution of statistics 
kept. 

Your committee believes that too many 
useless or non-significant statistics have 
been kept in many libraries. In the prun- 



BULLETIN 



69 



ing process your committee urges that the 
schedule of uniform statistics adopted by 
the A. L. A. on the recommendation of 
this committee be kept in mind and that 
the statistical activities of libraries be di- 
rected along the pathway of the Associa- 
tion's schedule. May we also again urge 
upon each library publishing a report that, 
whatever other tables it may publish, it 
should not neglect to employ the A. L. A. 
table so far as it is applicable to its par- 
ticular type of library? It is believed 
that the figures required do not impose an 
arduous burden. Comparison between li- 
braries is, we believe, worth while and, 
although figures are not infallibly truthful, 
they come as near to truth as we can get. 

(12) Staff, Training, etc. 

A large proportion of the libraries com- 
menting on this item report a serious situa- 
tion in their staffs due to the war, the high 
cost of living and the resulting reduced 
purchasing power of library salaries, al- 
' ready almost universally too low before 
'the war. In some places conditions have 
been somewhat mitigated by general in- 
creases in salaries (e. g., Pomona, $10 to 
$15 monthly throughout the staff) or by 
bonuses (e. g., Minneapolis, $100 to those 
paid $900 or more, and $60 to those re- 
ceiving less than $900). In many cases 
the story is like that of East Orange, where 
professional standards have been unavoid- 
ably lowered in filling vacancies and where 
other vacancies remain unfilled. This is 
also the case at Cedar Rapids. Brooklyn, 
habitually having high standards of pro- 
fessional equipment, reports that it has 
been obliged to have two training classes 
each year instead of one, that it has em- 
ployed many more untrained assistants 
and has increased its clerical force through 
inability to obtain trained people. It has 
also been obliged to use substitute help, 
school teachers, high school boys, for part 
time to cover rush hours. It has modified 
its scheme of service to permit more rapid 
promotions than formerly. Washington 
has temporarily reduced its training class 
period from eight months to one or two 



months and even so has been able, be- 
cause of low statutory salaries, to get al- 
most nobody to enter its classes and has 
even had difficulty in getting untrained 
people to take library positions. 

Cleveland reports that a definitely recog- 
nized clerical staff is being developed to 
relieve the regular library staff of much of 
the desk and routine work. 

Pittsburgh is so fortunate as to be able 
to report that it is increasing the propor- 
tion of its staff having library school train- 
ing and Milwaukee says that it is raising 
its standard as fast as the City Civil Serv- 
ice Commission can be persuaded to per- 
mit. It has its own training class. 
Indianapolis reports the establishment of 
a training class more thorough and inclu- 
sive than the average apprentice course, 
designed to give instruction to the mem- 
bers of the staff who have not had similar 
training as well as the usual number of 
beginners. Indianapolis has also started 
a staff bulletin printed on the multigraph. 
New York has issued in pamphlet form a 
new scheme of service, containing careful 
and elaborate provisions for appointment, 
promotional examinations, etc. Newark 
appears to have been able to stiffen its 
standards for messengers and pages, re- 
quiring that all shall have the equivalent 
of high school graduation and shall take 
a junior staff training course, the instruc- 
tion on library time. 

During the war, St. Louis has employed 
women as elevator conductors, but expects 
to change to discharged soldiers. Wash- 
ington was obliged to employ several 
women as janitors during the war. 

It is altogether evident to your commit- 
tee that the low salaries prevailing in li- 
brary work and not the war are responsi- 
ble for the present demoralized condition 
of library service. This committee looks 
eagerly for the report of the Special Com- 
mittee to Investigate Salaries and for the 
constructive work that should follow such 
a report. 
(13) Miscellaneous Suggestions 

Under this heading the reports included 



70 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



several features showing reduced service 
and suggestions for improvements. 

Several libraries (e. g. East Orange and 
Washington) reported that they had been 
obliged to omit annual or biennial inven- 
tories. Minneapolis was obliged to shorten 
hours and close stations. New York was 
forced to cut down branch hours, close cer- 
tain reading rooms, discontinue the reser- 
vation of fiction, require borrowers to call 
for cards, charge five cents when books 
were returned without cards, and charge 
ten cents for readers' lost cards. 

Indianapolis reports that it has arranged 
with the Western Union messengers for 
the quick delivery of books to down town 
business men, the fee of fifteen cents to 
be borne by the reader. 

St. Paul purchased a stencil outfit (No. 
9, manufactured by the National Sign 
Stencil Company) the use of which in mak- 
ing library bulletins has cut down the time 
at least one-half and improved them 
artistically. 

From several interesting suggestions sent 
by Cleveland the following are extracted: 

For the past two summers, and regu- 
larly since January 1, 1919, our branches 
have been closing for the weekly half-hol- 
iday, some closing at 1 p. m. on Friday 
and some at the same hour on Saturday, 
the entire staff taking their half-holiday on 
this day. This enables the branches to 
operate on a slightly smaller staff and also 
makes a schedule which is less wearing 
on the staff. Branches are now all closed 
on Sundays. All branches post prominent 
signs stating that the main library is open 
on all week days and on Sunday. 

Window envelopes are used for prac- 
tically all form letters sent out by the 
library. 

In printing we have been trying to use 
less ruling, to avoid the use of two colors 
and to effect a further standardization of 
forms. The power multigraph and also a 
recently acquired multicolor press are still 
further reducing printing costs, as is the 
use of electrotypes for standard blanks 
and forms. 

The librarian of Louisville, who has^lso 
been librarian at Camp Zachary Taylor, 
draws the following conclusion: 

This experience proves that too much 
time is given to technical details in pub- 



hc library work. At Camp Zachary Taylor 
there were no permanent branch collections 
nor were any books designated as belong- 
ing to any one branch or station. Books 
were cataloged and accessioned as one col- 
lection and sent to branches and stations 
as the demand justified and changed as 
the demand changed. Requests from 
branches and stations were considered sep- 
arately but placed in the general collection 
and sent to the branch or station and 
changed when the demand ceased. Camp 
Zachary Taylor experience teaches that 
this is the proper way to conduct a city 
library system. It would save time, labor 
and records in ordering and cataloging if 
books were bought for one general collec- 
tion and accessioned and cataloged as one 
collection, and books sent to branches and 
stations and returned as the demand is 
felt. This means that people living in 
communities supplied by branch libraries 
would not see the same books on the 
shelves from month to month. Of course, 
many books would never -return to the 
main library, such as popular fiction and 
juveniles which would be worn out, and 
reference books and standards which would 
remain indefinitely unless conditions 
changed. 

The librarian of Des Moines after sev- 
eral months of camp library service, de- 
scribes as follows one plan put into effect 
as the result of that experience: 

You know the work of the officer of the 
day in an army camp. Last summer our 
governing council of department heads 
adopted the officer,-of-the-day plan, assign- 
ing a different department head each day 
for inspection and report of conditions in 
all departments of the library. The re- 
ports submitted were read weekly at our 
regular meetings of department heads and 
resulted in greatly improved conditions in 
all parts of the building. By following the 
army plan and having the inspection made 
by a different person each day, the reports 
were naturally varied in character. All 
reports submitted were fair and impartial, 
as the department head would have an op- 
portunity to "come back"JiL her later re- 
port. Incidentally through these enforced 
trips of inspection every department head 
gained a better appreciation and under- 
standing of the work and problems of the 
other departments. 

The chief value of this report will per- 
haps be to show some librarians that they 
are still keeping an excessive number of 
elaborate records, and that there is good 



BULLETIN 



71 



precedent in the practice of progressive 
libraries for the elimination of many rec- 
ords and processes formerly considered es- 
sential. 

Can Libraries Capture and Hold Returned 

Soldiers? 

It had been originally expected to cover 
in this report not only the subject of short- 
cut methods and eliminations but also to 
investigate the question of what the home 
libraries were going to do to make sure of 
capturing and holding the boys as they 
come back from the war, after having 
made, in many cases, large use of the camp 
libraries either under the stress of a de- 
sire to fit themselves to be efficient fight- 
ing men, or because of loneliness. Also 
the further question as to how we are go- 
ing to capture and hold other boys of the 
same general type, most of whom, we must 
confess, never come near our libraries. 
Although we have not investigated this 
subject by means of our questionnaire, we 
should like to throw out the following 
suggestions: 

American libraries have been advertised 
for the past year or more as never before. 
The library idea comes nearer being on 
the map than it has ever been. Our hope is 
to get it firmly planted there. To that 
end we wish to ask ourselves and our col- 
leagues the following questions: 

1. Are all of our American libraries pre- 
pared to produce the goods? 

2. Are regulations as liberal as possible 
so that unnecessary restrictions will not 
interfere with securing library privileges 
without too much red tape, etc.? 

3. Are books supplied in response to a 
demand without delay? 

4. Are technical and trade books ready 
in advance of the expected demand? 

5. Books of travel unrelated to the war 
ought to be supplied and advertised, on 
England, France, Germany, etc.; are they? 

It would seem that libraries will un- 
doubtedly be much more generally used 
and not only by soldiers and sailors, but 
by all those that have seen the A. L. A. 
advertisements. This means that our own 



home libraries should advertise more than 
ever, while attention is being drawn to 
them advertise not only books which may 
seem obvious to most people, but pam- 
phlets, maps, magazines, etc. 
What are we going to do about it? 
Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE F. BOWEBMAN, Chairman, 

C. SEYMOUR THOMPSON, 

BEATRICE WINSEB. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE 
TO INVESTIGATE SALARIES 

The report of the Committee to Investi- 
gate Salaries consists of four parts, as 
follows: 

I. City and County Libraries, and Gen- 
eral Observations, by Everett R. 
Perry, chairman of the committee. 
II. The College and University Library, 
by Azariah S. Root (prepared at 
the request of Adam Strohm, mem- 
ber of the committee.) 

III. State, Mercantile and Endowed Li- 

braries, by Mrs. Harriet P. Sawyer. 

IV. Government Department Libraries, 

by George F. Bowerman. 
I 

CITY AND COUNTY LIBRARIES AND GENERAL 
OBSERVATIONS 

By Everett R. Perry, Chairman 
Before the great war broke out, there 
was a tendency toward higher prices for 
all the necessaries of life, and with the 
opening of hostilities this tendency be- 
came accentuated. But the full effect was 
not produced in this country until the 
United States entered the war. Then the 
cost of living rose by leaps and bounds. 
It is conservatively estimated that we pay 
from 60 to 70 per cent more today to meet 
the expense of food and clothing and 
other essentials than we did five years 
ago. 

The classes whose incomes have been 
advanced most by the war are those en- 
gaged in the numerous war industries, 
both capitalists and laborers the former 
on account of unusual profits, the latter 
because their services have been in such 
demand to produce the material with 



72 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



which, the war was waged that they could 
insist on relatively high pay. According 
to a well known economic law, it is the 
salaries of the professional classes which 
in such times rise most slowly, and the 
reason is not hard to find. When a coun- 
try is engaged in a struggle for existence, 
the importance of the contribution made 
by such a class as librarians is not so 
readily perceived, though in this war 
what we have done in helping to maintain 
the morale of the men during training in 
this country and even close up to the 
lines in France has brought quick and 
cordial recognition from the military au- 
thorities. 

It certainly can not be said that during 
the war librarians have unduly pressed 
upon public attention the fact that some 
of their assistants were earning barely 
enough to sustain life. Now that the war 
has closed they may perhaps be pardoned 
if they attempt to bring out a few of the 
significant facts concerning the cost of 
living and what they are given to live on. 
The report of this committee represents 
such an effort. From various kinds of 
libraries, 219 replies were received to a 
questionnaire sent out. Those from city 
libraries will first be considered. 

City Libraries 

Question 1. Please state amount of li- 
brary appropriation for the last fiscal year, 
and indicate whether it has proved ade- 
quate to extend book service to all parts 
of the city. State percentage of salaries 
in total appropriation. 

The purpose of this question was two- 
fold to determine whether library appro- 
priations are large enough to place books 
within easy reach of people in all parts of 
the town or city served and at the same 
time pay employees a fair wage. That is, 
to ascertain whether it is possible for a 
library to meet the double obligation to- 
ward the citizens who support it and to- 
ward its employees who make or mar its 
work. In coming to conclusions the com- 
mittee necessarily had to depend for the 
most part on the opinions expressed by 



the librarians replying, though it was re- 
luctant to accept such opinions in all 
cases. When for instance a librarian pro- 
fesses herself satisfied with her appropria- 
tion, though it is obviously small for a 
city of the size she is serving, the commit- 
tee wonders whether she is fully alive to 
the opportunities for educational and so- 
cial work open on all sides. Yet more than 
a quarter of the city librarians so report. 
Some librarians, too, seem to be content- 
edly paying their assistants salaries so 
small as to make the problem of living by 
no means a simple one. . At least, it seems 
a fair conclusion that salaries are insuffi- 
cient when from 30 to 40% only of a 
moderate appropriation is used for this 
purpose instead of the 50 to 60% com- 
monly recognized as required. Happily the 
cases of this kind are not numerous. 

Of the 119 city libraries replying to 
Question 1, 84 pay out 50% or more of 
their appropriations for salaries; 34 spend 
less than 50% for this purpose. The low- 
est salary percentage reported was 28; 
the highest 78. Low percentages were 
more commonly found among the small 
> cities; high among the large cities. This 
would indicate that administration tends 
to become more costly as the system de- 
velops and becomes more complex to meet 
the needs of the great metropolitan cities. 
Summing up the data supplied in an- 
swer to Question 1, it appears that those 
libraries paying 50% or more of their 
income for salaries do not at the same time 
have a large enough appropriation to per- 
mit universal book service. For, dividing 
the returns into four classes: (1) libra- 
ries paying 50% or more of their income 
for salaries and reporting such income in- 
adequate; (2) libraries paying 50% or 
more of their income for salaries and re- 
porting such income adequate; (3) libra- 
ries paying less than 50% of their income 
for salaries and reporting such income in- 
adequate; and (4) libraries paying less 
than 50% of their income for salaries and 
reporting such income adequate, we find 
that the first is by far the largest class 



BULLETIN 



73 



and includes 60 libraries; that the last 
class comes next in number and includes 
28; while in the second class there are but 
12 libraries and in the third 19. At least 
if the figures above are not absolutely con- 
clusive, they constitute strong presump- 
tive evidence. The remedy obviously is 
only through an increase in the total ap- 
propriation, for a reduction of salaries in 
the face of the high cost of living is not to 
be thought of. On the contrary, in the 
case even of this class of libraries the 
schedules of salaries so far as furnished 
point clearly to the need of a higher 
scale, as will be brought out later. 

Question 2. How is library appropria- 
tion obtained, through budget appropria- 
tion of city council, or through rate fixed 
in charter or state law, or from endow- 
ments or other revenue? 

The answers to this question show that 
the prevailing method of obtaining finan- 
cial support for our public libraries con- 

sists of laying before the city council a 
budget with a full statement of needs. 
That body usually has complete power of 
decision, though sometimes the state law 
or city charter prescribes a minimum rate 
which the council is bound to observe. 
More often, however, when a rate is men- 
tioned it is a maximum and it is optional 
with the council whether the maximum is 

. assessed. Quite generally the library in- 
come furnished through the budget of the 
council or by tax rate is supplemented by 
the fines accruing from overdue books. 
Relatively few of our public libraries have 
endowment funds. 

But this account does not purport to be 
a complete statement of the different ways 
in which libraries obtain their support. It 
is rather concerned with finding or rec- 
ommending the best way, for it is evident 
that the prevailing method is none too 
successful in providing funds large enough 
for the proper maintenance of our libra- 
ries. No better plan has been presented 
than that outlined in the "Report of the 
Committee on Relations between the Li- 
brary and the Municipality" which ap- 



peared in the Bulletin of the American Li- 
brary Association for 1913, pages 243-5. 
This committee puts itself on record as 
follows: 

The library should be assured of reason- 
able and sufficient financial support, either 
through the operation of a special-tax pro- 
vision or by the requirement of a minimum 
appropriation by the authorities. In no 
case should the existence or value of the 
library be placed in jeopardy by making 
possible a capricious withdrawal or less- 
ening of support by the local authorities. 

Without such safeguards a library is 
likely to suffer loss of income from time 
to time, for members of city councils fre- 
quently fail to appreciate its value and 
practice economy at its expense. 

Question 3. How many attendants (in- 
cluding children's librarians) are library 
school graduates? How many graduates 
of training or apprentice classes? How 
many are college graduates or have had 
partial college training? How many had 
no training before entering library work? 

NOTE This inquiry refers to Heads of 
Departments and assistants of full attend- 
ant grade; not to those of lower grade per- 
forming only clerical work such as check- 
ing of bills, accounting or bookkeeping. 

We frequently hear the expression in li- 
brary circles that librarianship is a pro- 
fession. If this means that the members 
of library staffs are supposed to have had 
universally the advantage of either a col- 
lege or library school course or both, then 
the saying will have to be revised. For re- 
turns from this question would indicate 
that only about two-fifths of those on li- 
brary staffs filling the positions of head 
librarians, heads of departments and as- 
sistants of full attendant grade have taken 
such courses. Of the remaining three- 
fifths a little more than half have had the 
training given in summer courses, in train- 
ing classes or in courses selected from the 
curriculum of library schools. Something 
less than half of this three-fifths, or ap- 
proximately one-third of the entire num- 
ber got their training by actually doing 
the work, that is, had no preliminary 
training. We think of Massachusetts as 



74 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



the radiating point of education for the 
country, but in the libraries of this state 
there Is a surprisingly large proportion of 
untrained assistants. 

It is evident from the preceding that 
library schools still have ample scope for 
their activities. It seems also an unavoid- 
able conclusion that thorough training for 
librarianship must prevail more generally 
among our assistants before we can ex- 
pect the same standard of wages to be 
reached in our profession as in that of 
teaching. For it is undoubtedly true that 
the proportion of teachers completing a 
two- or three-year normal course before 
beginning to teach is greater than the pro- 
portion of librarians finishing a one-year 
library school course before entering libra- 
ry work. However, the proportion of li- 
brary school graduates having college de- 
grees probably exceeds that of normal 
school graduates who have gone through 
college. With many teachers the normal 
course has taken the place of college, while 
many library school graduates had to 
present a college degree in order to ob- 
tain admission to the library school where 
they were trained or their library school 
course itself counted toward the degree 
finally obtained. 

Question 4. What would be the cost of 
room and board in your town for a woman 
who should be in a position to enjoy the 
social station and amenities worthy of and 
necessary in the life of the professional 
class? 

This was an easy question to answer 
and only two libraries replying to the 
questionnaire failed to supply the infor- 
mation requested. The nature of the ques- 
tion was such that an exact result could 
be reached. The average cost of board and 
room in 124 cities was found to be $49.50 
a month. The significance of this fact will 
become more apparent in the discussion of 
the replies to the next question, which 
concerns salaries. 

Question 5. What are the salaries of 
public school teachers in your city? What 
are the salaries of your own library em- 



ployees? Please affix schedules graded 
and classified. 

When this question was sent out, it was 
hoped that the replies would come back in 
such form that it would be possible to 
compile from them a comparative table of 
teachers' and librarians' salaries, this ta- 
ble also to include the cost of room and 
board, thus bringing out in the clearest 
fashion the proportion of salary paid, it 
might be said, to keep alive. But on ex- 
amining the statistics furnished it soon 
became evident that they could not be 
simplified sufficiently and reduced to such 
form as would permit of any close com- 
parison. There were too many classifica- 
tions and variations of classification in the 
different grades of both the school and 
library service. In a certain proportion 
of cases, too, the answers were incomplete, 
rendering any kind of comparison out of 
the question. Nevertheless, after making 
allowance for all this, enough information 
was at hand to enable the committee to 
reach some general conclusions which will 
be of interest to librarians. 

First, there will be presented the salary 
figures for certain cities which may be re- 
garded as typical, and in the case of which 
all the data is set forth so definitely that 
comparisons are not difficult. The cities 
chosen are not confined to any one section, 
but cover the whole country. 

Comparison between library assistants 
and elementary school teachers and be- 
tween heads of departments and high 
school teachers is fair. That is, from the 
point of view of value of service rendered 
to the community, there is approximate 
equality in these cases. It will be inter- 
esting to keep these comparisons in mind 
in going over the statistics which follow. 

Take first one of the smaller cities of a 
state on the Atlantic Coast. Here the 
grade teachers have a salary schedule of 
$850 to $1,500 yearly; library assistants, 
from $600 to $700; high school teachers, 
from $1,000 to $3,000; heads of library de- 
partments, from $1,000 to $1,500. 

In a city of about 200,000 population in 
the same section of the country, elemen- 
tary school teachers receive from $675 to 



BULLETIN 



75 



$1,050 annually; library assistants from 
$650 to $975; high school teachers from 
$1,000 to $2,200; first assistants in the 
library (presumably heads of depart- 
ments), from $1,000 to $1,550. Principals 
of high schools receive nearly as much as 
the head librarian, the figures being for 
them $3,250 to $3,750; for him, $3,800. It 
is not stated how much the superintendent 
of schools is paid. 

A city in the south reports salaries for 
elementary teachers of $720 to $900; for 
library assistants of $720 to $780; for high 
school teachers, $960 to $1,800; for heads 
of departments, $900. 

In a city of Texas the following sched- 
ules prevail: For grade teachers, $816 to 
$1,056; for library assistants, $660 to $960; 
for high school teachers, $1,176 to $1,464; 
fcr heads of departments, $900 to $1,080. 

In a middle western city of about 100,- 
000 people, the schools pay their grade 
teachers, $600 to $1,200; the library pays 
its assistants, $600 to $840. High school 
teachers' pay begins at $1,000 and reaches 
a maximum at $2,000; heads of library de- 
partments, $1,080 to $1,380. 

In a large city of the Mississippi valley, 
grade teachers receive $725 to $1,500; li- 
brary assistants, $660 to $960; high school 
teachers, $1,320 to $2,480; heads of library 
departments, $1,200 to $1,880. 

In one of the Iowa cities, the schedules 
run as follows: Grade teachers, $900 to 
$1,200; library assistants, $660 to $900; 
high school teachers, $1,200 to $1,600; 
while the head children's librarian has a 
salary of $1,080 and the librarian herself 
but $1,500. 

The next comparison is from a city in 
the Rocky Mountain region, where the ele- 
mentary school teachers are paid from 
$840 to $1,260; library assistants, from 
$600 to $1,080; high school teachers from 
$1,000 to $2,200; heads of library depart- 
ments from $1,020 to $1,680. 

In two small California cities, grade 
teachers enjoy a schedule of $680 to $1,260; 
while library assistants receive from $600 
to $780; high school teachers are paid 
from $1,200 to $2,000, and heads of library 
departments from $780 to $1,080, the last 
named figure representing also the pay of 
the head janitor. 

A large city on the Pacific Coast rewards 
its teachers and librarians as follows: To 
grade teachers, $921.60 to $1,440; to libra- 
ry assistants, $780 to $1,080; to high school 
teachers, $1,200 to $1,680; to heads of li- 
brary departments, $1,080 to $1,560. 

TRe comparison might be continued in- 
definitely, but those selected will answer 



as well as a larger number. They show 
that for work of much the same degree of 
responsibility and needing as much prep- 
aration, if justice is to be done the work, 
the salaries paid to teachers largely ex- 
ceed those received by librarians, the per- 
centage of difference varying greatly; and 
an examination of the data supplied by 
other libraries would only strengthen this 
conclusion. Now school boards in all parts 
of the United States are actively engaged 
at the present time in campaigns designed 
to secure larger appropriations, a generous 
portion of which are intended for the 
advancement of teachers' salaries. This is 
only right, for the pay of teachers has al- 
ways been small enough and with the in- 
crease in cost of living necessities it has 
become insufficient. But if the teachers 
feel pinched and find it difficult to make 
both ends meet, what about the unfortu- 
nate library assistants who are attempting 
to eke out a living on much smaller pay? 
Who is to take up arms in their behalf and 
secure the much needed advances? 

So far as reported by about 125 city li- 
braries, the average minimum monthly 
wage paid to young women entering libra- 
ry work is $57 a month. The same libra- 
ries place the cost of board and room at 
$49.50 a month. Assuredly this leaves lit- 
tle for clothing, to say nothing of recrea- 
tion and self-education. If attendants that 
have training could be separated from 
those that have none before becoming li- 
brarians, it would be found that the un- 
trained are receiving less than the cost of 
board and room, while the initial salary of 
the trained would probably not exceed $65. 
Stenography with its far less searching 
requirements and shorter period of prep- 
aration yields a larger return. It cannot 
be expected that librarianship will attract 
the type of young women who will make a 
success of it in the fullest measure and 
place the service of libraries on the high 
plane that will insure efficiency and popu- 
lar support until the rate of compensation 
corresponds more nearly with the value of 
the work performed for the community. 



76 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



There are some measures which, if 
adopted, would clearly substantiate our 
claim that librarianship is a profession 
and as such worthy of higher pay, and 
these can, perhaps, more easily be put 
into force in the large libraries where the 
effect of them would be more far-reaching. 
For instance, if a distinction could be 
made between the purely clerical work in 
large libraries and that of a higher grade 
such as reference, children's work, and 
the more responsible postions in the cat- 
alog department, and if our claims for pro- 
fessional recognition were based on the 
higher type of work, it could not be said 
that librarianship does not demand profes- 
sional attainments. For it is evident that 
all the knowledge acquired in a college 
course, and all the skill in the use of the 
books gained at a library school is needed 
by the reference librarian, by the worker 
with children or by the cataloger, who 
works with the needs of the scholar in 
mind. The value of distinguishing be- 
tween true professional work and clerical 
duties has been emphasized quite forcibly 
in the paper read by Miss Emma V. Bald- 
win, of the Brooklyn Public Library, at the 
recent meeting at Atlantic City, and is 
further dwelt upon by an editorial in the 
May number of Public Libraries which re- 
views Miss Baldwin's paper. 

Another aid would be the adoption of 
certain standard requirements for admis- 
sion to library work. So long as the idea 
is allowed to persist that no special train- 
ing is needed for this work and that it is 
entirely possible to master it in a few 
months by performing the routine tasks, 
no general recognition of its value can be 
expected from the taxpayers. It must be 
raised to a higher plane by the demand on 
the part of librarians themselves for a 
more thorough preparation by their as- 
sistants. 

In what has preceded, little has been 
said about the salaries of chief librarians 
and it is not the intention to discuss them 
at length in this report, in which the em- 
phasis is placed on the poor rate of pay 



prevailing in the lower grades where the 
need of relief is the greatest. But rela- 
tive to the responsibilities which chief 
librarians have to carry, the pay is most 
inadequate, and this is true both at the 
top and the bottom of the scale. Cer- 
tainly, our national librarian with his com- 
plicated duties of serving Congress, ad- 
ministering a highly specialized institu- 
tion with many departments, and organ- 
izing undertakings of national scope 
should receive something more than the 
nominal salary of $6,500. Again, it must 
be conceded that the services of librarians 
at the other end of the scale, in the 
smaller cities of 25,000 to 75.000 1 people, 
though the field of action is not extensive, 
are not adequately recognized by a salary 
of from $1,200 to $2,000. 

It cannot be claimed that chief libra- 
rians have as heavy an executive burden 
as superintendents of schools. Therefore 
their compensation should not be as large. 
It is surprising, however, to learn that 
more often than not they receive less than 
the principals of high schools. Devotion 
to librarianship may keep many of our 
able executives in the ranks, but the sal- 
aries now being paid will not attract the 
type of man who has the force and initia- 
tive not only to make a success in his own 
city, but with the margin of energy neces- 
sary to make his contribution to the ad- 
vance of the profession in general. 
County Libraries 

Eighteen county libraries filled out the 
questionnaire, all with one exception lo- 
cated in California. This section of the 
report, therefore, becomes a brief survey 
of conditions in county libraries in Cali- 
fornia so far as they are covered by the 
questions. 

One does not have to examine the re- 
plies from these libraries very closely to 
see that here the situation is more favor- 
able. Without being obliged to pay so 
large a percentage of the total appropria- 
tion for salaries, not only are the salaries 
themselves better but in a greater propor- 
tion of cases the county librarians report 



BULLETIN 



77 



the appropriation as adequate. The aver- 
age county library appropriation for sal- 
aries is only 40% of the whole. Thus 
larger sums become available for the pur- 
chase of books and other essentials than is 
true with city libraries. 

The county library law permits of a levy 
by the supervisors, the governing body of 
the counties, of a tax not to exceed one 
mill on the dollar of the assessed valua- 
tion upon all property in the county out- 
side those portions already maintaining 
public libraries. The supervisors appear 
to take fully as much interest in the coun- 
ty libraries as the average library board 
in city libraries, and grant a fair measure 
of support, in one case, at least, allowing 
the maximum. The revenue of county li- 
braries may also be increased by action 
of the school districts whenever these see 
fit to turn over their book collections and 
funds to the county libraries for the sake 
of the better service thereby obtained. 
Several of the county librarians report 
such additions to their funds. County li- 
brary appropriations, it should be ob- 
served, are not drawn upon to pay the sal- 
ary of the county librarian herself, the 
law specifying that this should come out 
of the general salary fund of the county. 
This provision, of course, reduces the per- 
centage of the total appropriation used in 
salaries. 

A somewhat higher proportion of the 
county library assistants have received 
training than in the case of the city libra- 
ries, though there are more who have had 
the advantage of a training class or sum- 
mer school preparation only than are grad- 
uates of a full library school course. There 
is a considerable proportion, too, who had 
no training until they had entered upon 
the work. More assistants with a thor- 
ough preparation are needed here as well 
as in city libraries. 

The average cost of room and board per 
month as reported by the county libra- 
rians, is $44.45, while the salary of the 
trained assistants is close to $75, many of 
the county libraries adhering strictly to 



this salary standard. But the salaries of 
the county librarians themselves are not 
yet on as high a scale as those of the high 
school teachers, though it would seem that 
the responsibility that they carry would 
entitle them to at least equal remunera- 
tion. After all, this is one of the most at- 
tractive fields of library work, not only in 
respect to the salary schedule in force, but 
in the opportunity for pioneer and con- 
structive work. 



II 

THE COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 

By Azariah S. Root, librarian Oberlin Col- 
lege, who compiled this part of the re- 
port at the request of Adam Strohm, 
member of the Committee. 
The questions sent out to college and 
university libraries were varied from the 
preceding questions to adjust them to the 
different conditions prevailing in this class 
of libraries. 

Question 1. Please state the amount of 
library appropriation for the last fiscal 
year and indicate whether it has proved 
adequate to give satisfactory service to 
all departments of the college or univer- 
sity. State percentage of salaries in total 
appropriation. 

The purpose of this question was the 
same as the question sent out to other li- 
braries, to ascertain whether the library 
appropriations were large enough to pro- 
vide adequate book stock and at the same 
time to pay satisfactory wages. It seems 
apparent from the answers that the libra- 
rians for the most part answered only with 
reference to the first aspect of the ques- 
tion. Of the 34 replies received, nine ex- 
pressed no opinion as to whether the 
amount received was adequate or not. 
Eleven regarded the amount available as 
adequate and 14 as inadequate. 

As in the case of city libraries, the li- 
braries paying 50% or more for salaries 
were the ones which for the most part 
felt their appropriations inadequate, nine 
reporting this to be the situation and only 
two expressing the feeling that the 



78 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



amounts available were adequate. Of li- 
braries paying less than 50% of their ex- 
penditures for salaries, eight reported the 
amount available as adequate and only two 
as inadequate. 

Some light is thrown on this situation 
by a comparison of the location of the li- 
braries from which the responses came. 
Of the 11 reporting their funds as ade- 
quate, six were located in the New Eng- 
land states. These libraries, in many 
cases, reported a very considerable 
amount of their income as being derived 
from permanent endowment funds. It is 
easy to see that the earliest settled section 
of the country with the older institutions 
located in it is much more likely to pos- 
sess libraries with book endowments than 
are the more newly settled portions of the 
country. In this section, e. g., are found 
libraries where 88%, 75%, 73% 59%, etc., 
of the income of the library is derived 
from permanent library endowment funds. 

Viewing the question, therefore, as pri- 
marily asking whether book funds were 
adequate, there seems to be very good rea- 
son why such institutions should report 
themselves as having sufficient appropria- 
tion for their needs. 

It is interesting, however, on the other 
hand, to note that it is these very institu- 
tions in which the salary per cent is the 
lowest. Thus the library showing the low- 
est per cent of salary expenses in rela- 
tion to the whole income 33%, reports 
73% of its income as being derived from 
permanent library endowment funds, while 
the institution reporting the highest per 
cent of salary expense 79% is entirely 
dependent upon legislative appropriations. 

Of the institutions reporting, two spend 
from 30 to 40% of their total income on 
salaries; eleven, 40 to 50%; nine, 50 to 
60%; four, 60 to 70%; three, more than 
70%. It should be noted, however, in con- 
sidering this percentage that practically 
all the institutions reporting did not in- 
clude their ordinary running expenses, 
such as light, heat, janitor service, etc., 
as a part of their expenses, since these are 



paid not from the library account but from 
the general college or university fund. 

Question 2. How is library appropria- 
tion obtained, from the income of the col- 
lege or university, from endowments or 
other revenues, or from gifts? State rela- 
tive proportions. Omitting extraordinary 
expenses, such as those for new buildings, 
etc., what proportion does the library in- 
come bear to the total income of the in- 
stitution for ordinary current expenses? 

The answer to this question has been 
partly summarized in the discussion of the 
preceding question. In general it may be 
said that a state supported institution is 
dependent almost exclusively upon state 
appropriations, very few reporting any 
considerable part of their income as de- 
rived from a permanent endowment fund. 

The privately supported institution, on 
the other hand, makes a fairly good show- 
ing of library endowment. Out of the 18 
such institutions reporting, 13 reported 
some part of their income as derived from 
this source, the amounts ranging from 3% 
to 100%. 

The percentage of the library expense 
to the entire expense of the institution is 
reported upon as follows: From 1 to 2%, 
1; from 2 to 3%, 5; from 3 to 4%, 4; from 
4 to 5%, 4; from 5 to 6%, 4; from & to 
7%, 1; from 7 to 8%, 1; from 8 to 9%, 2; 
from 9 to 10%, 2; 10%, 1. Here again 
the possession of large endowment funds 
plays an important part, for all the insti- 
tutions reporting 8% or more are institu- 
tions which reported the possession of 
large endowments. 

Between 5 and 6% seems to be about 
the proper rate of expenditure. Institu- 
tions receiving less than 4% find their in- 
come as a rule inadequate. 

The conclusion from the study of these 
statistics would seem to be that institu- 
tions possessing small or no endowment 
funds for library purposes should expend 
at least 5 to 6% of their total income upon 
the library if that library is to have an 
adequate book fund and pay adequate sal- 
aries. 

Question 3. How many attendants are 



BULLETIN 



79 



library school graduates? How many 
graduates of training or apprentice classes ? 
How many are college graduates or have 
had partial college training? How many 
had no training before entering library 
work? Note (This inquiry refers to heads 
of departments with full attendant grade, 
not to those of lower work, such as check- 
ing of bills, accounting, or bookkeeping.) 

Apparently in making answers to this 
question, little regard was paid to the ac- 
companying note, for the replies would in- 
dicate that all library employees outside 
of the janitorial service were included. 

The 34 libraries reporting, reported 198 
employees who were library school gradu- 
ates, 65 who had had summer school 
courses or apprentice class or training 
class course and 87 who had had no train- 
ing whatever, except in the library in 
which they were employed. This would 
indicate that in the college and univer- 
sity libraries reporting, library school 
graduates are in. the ratio of 4 to 3 who 
had had their training in a brief appren- 
tice or training course or in the library 
itself. It must be confessed that the 
showing is a disappointing one. It cannot 
be determined positively from the reports, 
but the data seem rather to indicate that 
those parts of library work which require 
somewhat detailed and technical training 
such as cataloging, have been largely 
cared for by people with library school 
experience. This to some extent also 
seems to be true of reference work, while 
order department work, delivery desk 
work, and the like, are more likely to be 
handled by people with lesser training. 

As to the question of how far the em- 
ployees of college libraries are themselves 
college graduates, the returns are not 
definite enough to indicate, the majority 
of libraries putting together college gradu- 
ates and those who have had partial col- 
lege training. The very fact that this was 
so largely done indicates, we fear, that 
the percentage of college graduates in the 
service of college libraries is not as large 
as it ought to be. The reason for this as 



well as the reason for the small propor- 
tion of library school graduates in the 
staff will perhaps be discovered when we 
examine the replies to Question 5. 

Question 4. What would be the cost of 
room and board in your town for a woman 
who would be able to enjoy the social sta- 
tion and amenities worthy of and neces- 
sary to the life of the professional class? 

The replies to this question confine 
themselves almost exclusively to the cost 
of room and board. Here naturally the 
difference between rural and urban con- 
ditions plays a considerable part. Five, 
all in rural communities, report that board 
and room can be had for somewhat less 
than a total of $500 for the year. Seven- 
teen reported the cost of room and board 
to be between $500 and $600, 10 between 
$600 and $700, and 2 (in city or suburban 
districts), $700. 

Assuming that the cost of board and 
room should not exceed one-half of the in- 
come of a single woman, this figure should 
be borne in mind when we come to con- 
sider salaries which are discussed in the 
next question. It seems apparent that in 
the great majority of the institutions $600 
is the approximate sum required for room 
and board if the library attendant is to en- 
joy the social station and amenities which 
should go with her profession. 

Question 5. What are the salaries of pub- 
lic school teachers in your vicinity? What 
are the salaries of your own. library em- 
ployees? What are the salaries of assist- 
ants or instructors in other departments 
of the institution? 

It is very difficult to summarize the re- 
sults of the replies of this questionnaire, 
particularly as they relate to library as- 
sistants. A marked hesitancy to give de- 
tails and a tendency to generalize are very 
much in evidence. Facts are given for 
the most part in relative statements, $720 
to $900, etc. If, however, we take the 
minimum given in all cases, we have a 
fairly exact basis of comparison, as a li- 
brary is pretty likely not to report the 
minimum any lower than it actually is. 
Two report the minimum salary paid as 



80 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



between $500 and $600; eight, as between 
$600 and $700; eleven, as between $700 
and $800; six, between $800 and $900; 
while one each reported $900, $1,000 and 
$1,100 as their minimum. The average 
minimum salary would seem to be between 
$700 and $800. 

When we consider that these same in- 
stitutions reported that the average cost 
of board and room per year is somewhere 
in the vicinity of $600, we see at once the 
situation in which beginners in library 
work find themselves. If it be true that 
board and room should approximate one- 
half of one's living expenses, it is obvious 
that beginners in our college libraries can, 
at the prevailing salaries, "enjoy the so- 
cial station or the amenities worthy and 
necessary to the life of the professional 
class" only by the most rigid economy; by 
denial of many of the opportunities which 
a college environment offers; by adding to 
their regular work, home responsibilities; 
by spending their out-of-work time in the 
manufacture of their own garments and 
by other forms of economy which do not 
make for a large and growing life. 

When library assistants reach higher 
places, such as reference librarians, head 
cataloger, the average salary would seem 
to be about $1,200 and this would seem to 
be more nearly adequate to the demands of 
the position, although certainly permitting 
no great degree of free spending. In this 
respect the department heads would seem 
to be in about the situation of instructors. 
The average minimum salary here seems 
to be $1,000. As instructors are in the 
main single men or single women, just 
beginning the work of instruction and 
with prospects of advancement, their con- 
dition would seem to be better on the 
whole than it is for heads of departments 
in libraries who have in many cases ap- 
proximately attained the maximum salary 
which they are likely to receive. In the 
larger institutions, however, this salary 
will continue to rise and the figures sub- 
mitted would seem to indicate that, in the 
main, department heads in these institu- 



tions correspond roughly in salary to peo- 
ple holding the rank of instructor. 

Comparisons with salaries paid in pub- 
lic schools, on the other hand, seem to in- 
dicate that grade school teachers average 
as the minimum salary $100 less than li- 
brary assistants, while high school teach- 
ers average as a minimum salary about 
$200 more than the minimum salary given 
to library assistants. It should be stated, 
however, that in the case of graded 
schools the average is brought down by 
the extraordinarily low salaries reported 
by most of the New England states. As 
one proceeds west, salaries increase for 
grade teachers until in the far west they 
seem to equal, if they do not exceed, sal- 
aries paid to library assistants. The in- 
evitable conclusion from all this data 
seems to be that college and university 
library salaries, particularly the beginning 
salaries, are inadequate and that in many 
cases there ought to be a decided increase 
in the wage offered. 

Ill 

STATE, MERCANTILE AND ENDOWED LIBRARIES 

By Mrs. Harriet P. Sawyer 

State Libraries Of the 12 state libra- 
ries filling out questionnaires, only one 
spends less than 50% of the appropriation 
for salaries, while only two report an in- 
adequate allowance. The lowest salary 
percentage reported was 40% and the 
highest 70%. 

Sources of income were naturally the 
same appropriations granted by state leg- 
islatures, fees and fines. 

Of 110 assistants in 11 state libraries 
42, or two-fifths, had library school train- 
ing. 

Of 68 remaining, 12 had some library 
training. 

Many reported law or other special 
training, especially necessary in state li- 
braries, which are largely legislative refer- 
ence. One librarian said that stenography 
was so necessary in their library that they 
found it more satisfactory to get an assist- 
ant with that training and teach research 



BULLETIN 



81 



work than to get one with library training. 

Replies concerning board and room ran 
the gamut from a minimum of $420 to a 
maximum of $1,2'00, the average being 
$54.14 per month, which would indicate 
that living in college towns is higher than 
in other places. 

The salaries of library assistants vary 
as greatly in state as in public libraries, 
ranging from $600 to $1,800, the average 
minimum being $842.66, or $70.21 per 
month. 

The minimum salary for librarians or 
heads of departments was $960, and the 
maximum $2,700, for the eight libraries re- 
porting on this point. 

The information concerning teachers' 
salaries was too incomplete for making 
any comparisons. 

Miscellaneous Libraries Under this 
head are included certain libraries func- 
tioning as free public libraries, either gen- 
eral, as the Pratt Institute Library, or spe- 
cial, as the John >Crerar Library, but sup- 
ported by endowment, either separately or 
in connection with some institution; and 
also certain libraries, public in the sense 
that their services are at the disposal of 
all under the same conditions, but not 
free. These latter include many institu- 
tions of the so-called "mercantile" type. 
All these are treated below in two groups 
"Endowed libraries" and "Subscription 
libraries." 

Mercantile or Subscription Libraries 
Only one of the six libraries reporting 
uses 50% of its income for salaries and 
the librarian reports it as inadequate. The 
other five report the use of from 12 to 
46% for this part of the budget. 

The problem of the libraries supported 
by subscription is in most cases very dif- 
ferent from that of a city library. The 
former are responsible only to a definite, 
limited group of people of less widely 
varying demands than is the public library 
which is expected to serve the needs of 
the composite growing city population. In 
a subscription library the growth of the 
expenses of the library is more nearly pro- 
portionate with the growth of the patron- 



age, and a smaller percentage is needed 
for salaries. 

The sources of income for this group 
are mainly a combination of endowment 
and subscription. 

About one-fourth of the assistants in 
these six libraries had received library 
school training and about the same num- 
ber were college graduates. The remain- 
der had taken no special training before 
joining the staff. 

The information was not sufficiently 
complete for any definite conclusion re- 
garding living expenses. 

Only two questionnaires included in- 
formation regarding teachers' salaries, 
hence comparison is out of the question. 
The minimum salary for the library as- 
sistant was about $500 a year and the 
largest mentioned $1,800. The heads of 
departments received from $1,000 to $2,500 
per year. 

Endowed Libraries Reports were re- 
ceived from only seven libraries of this 
group, and their size and situation vary 
greatly. The only one using less than 
50% of its income for salaries was the 
John Crerar Library, which has a very 
large income, out of which a large rental 
is paid. One reports its income inade- 
quate. Endowed libraries may be handi- 
capped in the same way as city libraries 
are, as they are usually endowed with a 
definite duty to perform with their money. 

Four of the seven endowed libraries re- 
porting have no library school graduates 
in their service. One states that it pre- 
fers to take young persons and train them 
in its own methods and the others have 
apparently followed that principle, with 
the exception of one library, which em- 
ploys only library school graduates but 
draws on its own school for assistants. 

In the cities reported upon by these 
libraries, the minimum paid the grade 
teacher is $450, $30 lower than the min- 
imum paid the library assistant, but four 
of the libraries start their assistants at 
$720 or $800, other assistants at lower 
salaries probably being entirely untrained. 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



IV 

GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENT LIBRARIES 

By George F. Bowerman 
The chairman of the Committee to In- 
vestigate Salaries has asked me to report 
on the "Special Washington Situation," 
that is, on the salary conditions peculiar 
to the group of twenty-five or more libra- 
ries of the departments, bureaus, and 
offices of the federal government. This 
special report does not cover the Library 
of Congress, which as the National Li- 
brary may be considered in a class by it- 
self or may be grouped with the reference 
departments of other great libraries, like 
the New York Public Library; nor the 
Public Library of the District of Columbia, 
which is in the same class with other 
municipal public libraries. Both these 
libraries fall in other classifications cov- 
ered by other parts of this report. The li- 
braries here reported upon are only small 
fractions of great government offices, and 
since their functions differ widely from 
ordinary libraries their disabilities are to 
a large extent unknown and little con- 
sidered by other librarians. 

These libraries fall into two main 
classes. In the first group, the functions 
of the libraries are little differentiated 
from the work of the departments or bu- 
reaus with which they are connected and 
their staffs are for the most part, at least, 
considered and perhaps properly consid- 
ered simply as parts of the expert clerical 
staffs of those offices. The technical work 
in them does not involve any unusual com- 
plexities and the collections are used al- 
most exclusively by the administrative 
and expert staffs of the departments. 
Typical of this group are the libraries of 
the Departments of State, Navy and Jus- 
tice Their collections consist mostly of 
legal and historical material. Satisfactory 
work in such libraries requires good gen- 
eral educations, the more knowledge of 
the special subjects contained in the libra- 
ries the better, and on the part of some 
members of the staff first class technical 
knowledge of the ordinary problems of 
cataloging and classification. If I rightly 



understand their work such libraries do 
not involve highly complex technical 
library problems nor participation in com- 
plicated research problems. 

The other group includes libraries con- 
nected with highly specialized govern- 
mental offices, devoted for the most part 
to scientific, sociological, statistical and 
similar advanced research work. Typical 
libraries are those of the Departments of 
Agriculture, Labor and Commerce. Their 
collections are in many languages and on 
minute subjects, including a large propor- 
tion of pamphlet material, thus requiring a 
high degree of expertness in classifica- 
tion, cataloging and bibliography to make 
them available. The library staffs of such 
libraries serve as research assistants to 
the experts in the departments; indeed, in 
some cases, at least, the chief librarians 
act substantially as directors of research, 
coordinating the work of investigators en- 
gaged in cognate fields. Such libraries 
are also used somewhat largely by schol- 
ars from outside the government service, 
including students who propound problems 
by mail. 

How are such librarians considered by 
Congress? By the Civil Service Commis- 
sion? By the officers of the departments 
in which they work? And what substan- 
tial recognition in the form of salaries are 
they receiving? 

Judging by the debates in Congress and 
in hearings before Appropriation Commit- 
tees when library salaries are under con- 
sideration and still more by the statutory 
salaries of librarians fixed by Congress in 
appropriation acts, most members of Con- 
gress seem to have a rather low opinion of 
the education, training and ability neces- 
sary for librarians, and do not have a just 
idea of the character, complexity and im- 
portance of our work and of the necessity 
for staffs of considerable size, nor do they 
seem to understand why members of such 
staffs need a high degree of education, 
technical training and first rate general 
ability. 

To be labeled a "librarian" seems almost 
to constitute a handicap in the matter of 



BULLETIN 



83 



statutory salaries. In the case of a num- 
ber of government libraries, a single "li- 
brarian" (so specifically appropriated for) 
is provided at a salary altogether incom- 
mensurate with the responsibility of the 
post. In hardly any case is a "librarian" 
(so-called) provided for a government de- 
partment library in excess of $2,000. The 
remainder of the library staff is made up 
of those who are provided for in appro- 
priations as so many clerks of the first 
grade ($1,200), so many of the second 
grade ($1,400), so many of the third grade 
$1,600) and so many of the fourth grade 
($1,800) in addition to clerks appropriated 
for at $1,000, $900 and sometimes at 
smaller salaries. In a number of instances 
these additional members of the staff are 
assigned to the library by administrative 
acts and it is perhaps not known to the 
appropriating body that they are so as- 
signed. By comparison with chief libra- 
rians, their salaries are in some instances 
fairly good. When in certain instances 
the other members of the library staff are 
specifically appropriated for as "cata- 
logers," "library assistants," etc., their 
salaries usually rank lower than is the 
case where corresponding additional mem- 
bers of the staff are rated as "clerks" of 
various grades. In other words, it appears 
to be more pecuniarily advantageous to do 
library work and be paid as a "clerk" than 
to do library work and be paid as a "libra- 
rian." 

Another handicap against which trained li- 
brarianship contends in these departmental 
libraries is the long-standing lack of appre- 
ciation of expert librarianship on the part 
of the U. S. Civil Service Commission. 
This condition is well described In an arti- 
cle entitled "The Status of Trained Libra- 
rians at Washington" (Public Libraries 
23:430-31, and Library Journal 43:882-83) 
designed to describe the experience of 
trained librarians who came to serve the 
Government during the war. Although 
somewhat accentuated during war time, the 
situation there described is not essentially 
different from the normal. Practically all 
librarians who enter the government serv- 



ice through civil service examinations 
(and most of them enter it through such 
examinations) are poured through one 
grade of "library assistant" with salaries 
ranging from $900 to $1,200 and seldom 
more. Although the 'Civil Service Com- 
mission plan seems to make insufficient 
allowance for the technical expertness 
needed to handle complicated technical 
material on the one hand or for the re- 
search ability needed to help scholars in 
using it on the other, yet its requirements 
are none the less preposterous in compari- 
son with the salaries attached to the po- 
sition. Its announcements of the qualifica- 
tions for the position of "library assist- 
ant" require examinations in library econ- 
omy, 30 points, cataloging, classification 
and bibliography, 35 points, German and 
either French or Spanish, 10 points, edu- 
cation and experience, 25 points, such 
training and experience to include at least 
one year's training in a recognized library 
school or one year in a training class in a 
library using modern methods, plus one 
year's experience, or as an alternative for 
such training, three years' experience in 
a library using modern methods. For all 
this the salary is from $900 to $1,200. Con- 
trast with these high requirements and 
low salaries, the Civil Service Commis- 
sion's announcements covering the grades 
of "minor clerk" ($900 with promotion to 
$1,000) and "first grade clerk" ($1,000 to 
$1,200). Information from the commission 
is to the effect that persons who have com- 
pleted the sixth grade of public school can 
easily qualify as minor clerks and that 
persons who have completed the seventh 
grade can readily qualify as first grade 
clerks. Other recent Civil Service Com- 
mission announcements for examinations 
calling for educational requirements com- 
parable to those needed to pass the libra- 
ry assistant examination include statistical 
clerk, $900 to $1,400, accounting and sta- 
tistical clerk, $1,200 to $1,620, special agent 
and research assistant, $1,200 to $1,680, 
assistant inspector, child labor division, 
$1,200 to $1,680 and editorial clerk, $1,200 
to $1,600. 



84 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



That there is often a better appreciation 
of the expert character of library work in- 
side the department is shown by the ex- 
perience of the Department of Agricul- 
ture libraries, that is, its main library and 
its group of several bureau libraries. The 
salaries of the main library are fixed by 
law and efforts to increase them have not 
been very successful. The bureau libra- 
rians and library assistants are in many 
cases either paid out of bureau lump sum 
appropriations or are in part, at least, 
staffed by assistants who stand on the 
rolls of the bureaus as clerks of the vari- 
ous grades. The greater freedom per- 
mitted to the bureau chief has been util- 
ized to pay somewhat more adequate sal- 
aries to the bureau librarians and library 
assistants. This has, however, resulted 
in an anomalous situation by which the 
chief librarian of the Department of Agri- 
culture, with the entire administrative re- 
sponsibility of the main library (35 em- 
ployees), and the responsibility for the 
book collections in the bureau libraries 
(30 employees) is paid but $2,000, whereas 
one or two of the branch librarians in 
charge of the collections in bureaus are 
paid higher salaries. 

It is believed that one of the big handi- 
caps of all government library work is the 
fact that practically all salaries are statu- 
tory. This means that unless a salary is 
definitely increased in an appropriation 
act there is no opportunity for promotion 
except by the death or resignation of 
somebody higher up and promotion to that 
position or the difficult process of creat- 
ing a new position at a higher salary. 

At the last session of Congress there 
was created a Joint Congressional Com- 
mission on the Reclassification of Sal- 
aries. This commission is expected to 
make recommendations for the entire gov- 
ernment service in Washington, including 
libraries. It is greatly to be hoped that 
this commission will recommend a change 
from the absolute rigidity of the statutory 
salaries and will introduce the element of 
longevity increases, conditioned on satis- 
factory efficiency ratings and other evi- 



dences of progressive improvement. In 
the case of librarians, these elements 
should include steady improvement in gen- 
eral education and knowledge of current 
affairs, and increased technical efficiency. 
Only by keeping the door of hope open 
can librarians, like other human beings, 
keep most thoroughly alive and progres- 
sive. 

The returns from the questionnaires 
sent to the government librarians indicate 
that the minimum cost of room and board 
in Washington is from $55 to $70 a month. 
One return puts it at $90 to $100. When 
the United States Government itself went 
into the housing business and erected a 
number of dormitories for war workers, it 
fixed $45 a month for room and two meals. 
This made no provision for luncheons, 
clothing, laundry, medical attendance, etc., 
and it is understood that the government 
is making no profit, but operating at a 
loss. 

The returns show that a very large pro- 
portion of librarians, and particularly 
those engaged in work of a research na- 
ture, are college graduates, and many of 
them library school graduates. 

In view of the foregoing facts, I believe 
that the minimum salary for library work 
in Washington should be $1,200. Many 
trained librarians are working for less 
than this amount. I also believe that the 
salaries should range very much higher 
than the $2,000 limit, which is exceeded 
in but one or two instances. 

To arrive at proper salary figures for 
trained librarianship in Washington, I be- 
lieve it is necessary to make comparisons 
not with library salaries elsewhere which 
also range too low, but with positions re 
quiring comparable education, training 
and experience in the business world and 
in government administrative and re- 
search work. If such standards are taken, 
government librarians would now be re- 
ceiving from 50% to 100% higher salaries 
than at present. 

In the case of chief librarians of major 
government departments the comparison 
should be either with the bureau chief or 



BULLETIN 



85 



at the very least with the division chief. 
If with the bureau chief, the librarians of 
the Departments of Agriculture and of La- 
bor, for instance, would receive $4,500 or 
$5,000 in place of the present salaries of 
$2,000. If the rating is with the division 
chief, the salary of such posts would be 
$2,500 to $4,000. 



REPORT OF THE BOOKBINDING 
COMMITTEE 

During the year the Bookbinding Com- 
mittee has prepared (a) a leaflet of sug- 
gestions on the treatment and care of 
books in libraries so as to avoid the need 
of rebinding and repairing; (b) an in- 
struction card with samples showing how 
to letter library books legibly and with 
the least expenditure of time, this ques- 
tion seeming to fall within the scope of 
the committee and one which deserves at- 
tention in nearly every library; (the two 
foregoing items are now in press, May 15) ; 
(c) a report of the problems of increased 
cost of binding, prepared by Miss Whee- 
lock with some assistance from Miss 
Stiles. This statement is appended to this 
report. 

The committee has also answered a num- 
ber of inquiries from publishers and li- 
braries, in regard to bookbinding. The 
American Institute of Electrical Engineers 
has agreed to use a heavy lining cloth in 
binding their "Transactions," and to fol- 
low other methods which will give the 
series a more durable binding. 

The publishers of the "Encyclopedia 
Americana" have now submitted samples 



in accordance with the specifications pre- 
pared by the Bookbinding Committee and 
forwarded to them January 22, 1917. Fur- 
ther announcement of this will be made by 
the publishers rather than by the Book- 
binding Committee. 

The committee has not had the time to 
prepare a new exhibit of bookbinding work 
similar to that shown at Louisville in 
1917. The requests that still come for 
this indicate the need of a new exhibit 
and it is hoped to prepare one during the 
next year. Most of the work of the com- 
mittee this year has been done by the 
other two members rather than by the 
chairman. 

Respectfully submitted. 

JOSEPH L. WHEELEE, Chairman, 

GERTRUDE STILES, 

MARY E. WHEELOCK. 

Appendix to Report of Bookbinding 

Committee 

The increase in expense of binding, con- 
sistent as it is with increases in most 
lines, affects all libraries at a vital source 
of supply. Books must be rebound or the 
collection deteriorates rapidly. The ques- 
tion of rebinding as compared to the cost 
of replacing with new copies as books be- 
come unusable, must still be decided in 
favor of binding, because of the smaller 
initial expense and the greater durability 
of properly rebound books. Besides, the 
labor of withdrawing worn-outs, of order- 
ing new books in their places and prepar- 
ing for issue, and the necessary delay be- 
tween withdrawal from circulation and the 



Comparative Table Showing Increases in Prices of Representative Binding Supplies 

1914 to 1919 
1914 1916 1917 1918 1919 



Buckram 

(38 in.) 
Cover board 
Gold leaf 
Leather 

Cowhide 
Morocco 
(Fiction grade) 
Muslin 

Thread, Hayes' 



$ .25 per yd. .27 .35$ .52 .75 .70$ .70 

39.00 per ton $72.00 to 80.0084.00 to 75.0072.50 to 90.00 90.00 
6.75 per pack 7.25 to 8.00 9.00 9.75 to 11.75 10.75 



to .66 
to 78.00 
to 10.00 



.20 per sq. ft. 
.24 to .30 

.06 per yd. 

(bolt lots) 

1.20 per Ib. 



.25 to .35 
.09 



.43 
.45 



to 
to 



.47 
.55 



.15 .22% to .17% .13% to .11% 



1.75 to 1.85 2.20 to 2.902.90 to 3.30 



3.30 



86 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



appearance of the new book ready for use, 
must be taken into account. 

Secretary Glass is authority for the 
opinion "that while there will be, undoubt- 
edly, a moderate declining tendency in 
prices of foodstuffs" (which seems to be the 
basis of the whole economic situation), no 
permanent adjustment can be looked for 
until self-sustaining conditions are re- 
stored in Europe. For the present, there- 
fore, there seems to be little choice left 
us but to make the best of the difficult 
situation. 

The accompanying table (p. 85) of prices 
of several kinds of binding materials show- 
ing increases during the past five years, 
has been compiled from sources repre- 
senting various sections of the country. 

Prices of most materials apparently 
reached the limit in 1918, all of the larger 
items having declined perceptibly in cost 
during the last few months. Prices of 
occasional articles paper and glue, for 
example still fluctuate with some real or 
pretended economic or local conditions. 

The price of Hayes' thread, which is 
made in England, has remained station- 
ary at its highest point for several months. 



Needles, also largely made in England, 
and which were very scarce for two years, 
are now again obtainable. 

The scarcity and high cost of leather 
and the increased cost of the extra labor 
necessary to bind in leather has made its 
use practically prohibitive in many libra- 
ries. Moreover, the prospect for larger 
supplies of available stock and a decrease 
in price are still very remote, according 
to leather dealers. 

The average per cent in increase in 
cost of binding materials is estimated at 
far over 100%, and probably not less than 
120%. 

However, the materials represent only 
about one-fifth (or even less) of the cost 
of binding, the other four-fifths being rep- 
resented by labor. A comparison of bind- 
ers' union wages scales for four large 
cities shows that the increases during the 
period from 1914 to 1919 average from 
35% to 40%. While the scale for the 
western section cannot be given at this 
time, it is probable that the figures for 
the four cities, a compilation of which 
follows, may be fairly representative: 



Bookbinders' Union Scale of Wages for Finishers, Forwarders and Sewers 

1914 to 1919 
1914 iyl6 1917 1918 1919 



CHICAGO: 
Finishers 


. . $22.50 per week 


$2250 


$24.00 


$26.50 


$33.50 


Forwarders 


. . 22 50 " " 


22 50 


24 00 


26.50 


33.50 


Sewers 


9.00 " " 


9.00 


10.50 


11.50 


14.50 


CLEVELAND:* 
Finishers 








22.00 


27.50 


Forwarders . . . . 








22.00 


27.50 


Sewers 








11.00 


15.40 


NEW YORK:t 
Finishers 






28.00 


30.00 


36.50 


Forwarders 






22.00 


25.00 


31.50 to $33.50 


Sewers 






12.00 


13.00 


18.00 


ST. LOUIS: 
Finishers 


. . 23.00 per week 


24.00 


25.00 


27.50 


27.50 


Forwarders 


.. 19.00 " " 


2000 


21.00 


23.10 


24.20 


Sewers .. 


9.00 " " 


9.50 


10.50 


11.55 


11.55 



*No definite scale for lack of a strong union, 1914 to 1917. 

tNo definite scale due to rival strikes between three different unions, 1914 to 1919. 



BULLETIN 



87 



The union wage scales of the different 
cities are probably indicative of the de- 
mand for and scarcity of labor and of the 
cost of living in those particular sections, 
the highest wages being paid in New 
York. Unlike prices of materials, how- 
ever, the cost of labor is likely to increase 
still further during the coming year. Thus 
it will be seen that no appreciable de- 
crease in cost of binding can be expected 
with present conditions as to prices of 
materials and labor. 

In consideration of the situation, sev- 
eral measures of economy may be sug- 
gested, some of which it should be pos- 
sible for every library to act upon: (1) 
The purchase of many replacements of 
fiction and children's books in the popular 
copyrights; (2) the resewing of new ju- 
venile and fiction replacements, to be re- 
turned to the original publishers' covers 
after these have <been strengthened in the 
upper and lower folds of backs with strips 
of binding cloth; (3) the intelligent re- 
pair of books and the avoidance of over- 
repair which handicaps the binder or 
ruins the book; (4) the selection of a ca- 
pable binder and of practical binding ma- 
terials. 

The second suggestion seems worthy of 
emphasis. A few of the large libraries 
for several years have been resewing new 
children's books and fiction replacements 
and returning them to the original pub- 
lishers' covers which are strengthened by 
strips of binding cloth inserted in the up- 
per and lower folds of the backs. The 
experience of these libraries is that a fair 
proportion of these books wear out in the 
publishers' covers following resewing, 
thus saving a considerable amount of la- 
bor and cover material which would have 
been necessary if entirely rebound. 

Resewing publishers' covers is a com- 
paratively simple proposition for libra- 
ries operating or controlling binderies, and 
is by no means impossible for libraries 
having their binding done locally. There 
would seem to be no reason why libraries 
buying 100 to 300 fiction replacements and 
children's books per month should not 



consider this method, which has been tried 
with satisfactory results in several libra- 
ries. The first cost must be somewhat 
more than if books were allowed to cir- 
culate until rebinding became necessary, 
but after a year's trial the saving will be- 
come apparent in the gradual reduction 
and postponement of binding among these 
classes of books, as well as in the advan- 
tage of having the books in their usually 
attractive publishers' covers for a longer 
period, and the satisfaction of keeping 
them in circulation when new instead of 
withdrawing them for rebinding after a 
few issues and when in the height of 
popularity, with covers still in fair condi- 
tion. The binder would not care to con- 
sider work of this kind in lots of less than 
100 volumes, the price ranging from 30 
cents to 40 cents per volume for the aver- 
age lot of books, not including extreme 
sizes, large or small. 

The committee is prepared to furnish 
detailed instructions as to tested meth- 
ods of. this class of work. 

Mere reinforcing of the covers of new 
books as practiced in several libraries 
some years ago is now such an uncertain 
proposition owing to the heavy paper used 
in some books and the spongy paper used 
in others, that the method has been large- 
ly superseded by the overcast sewing, 
which accomplishes far more for these 
difficult books than any former methods. 

The above report was prepared by Mies 
Wheelock of the St. Louis Public Library 
with assistance from Miss Stiles of the 
Cleveland Public Library, both members 
of the Bookbinding Committee of the 
A. L. A. 

REPORT ON COMMITTEE 
ON CO5RDINATION 

As coming well within the activities of 
the Committee on Coordination the follow- 
ing letter received by the chairman from 
Mr. T. Franklin Currier, of Harvard Uni- 
versity Library, is herewith presented: 

Since the Library of Congress has 
proved the practicability of printing cata- 
log cards for bibliographers and institu- 



88 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



tions it seems a pity that there should 
be so many independent card printing 
jobs, especially since these independent 
schemes with the exception of the John 
Crerar Library have the disadvantage of 
not being able to produce extra copies of 
the cards after the title is once out of 
print. 

My idea is that if each library now 
printing cards could pay to the Library of 
Congress what it is at present paying its 
own printer these cards would mechanic- 
ally fall within the scope of stock of the 
Library of Congress, and be accessible to 
all in just the way that Library of Con- 
gress cards are now accessible. There 
would be no harm it seems to me in leav- 
ing these series of cards out of the 
Library of Congress depository sets and 
having them specially subscribed for. 

The difficulties are, first, those of ob- 
taining uniformity in preparation to the 
title and in assignment of subject head- 
ings. Looking at it from the point of view 
of our own staff there is, of course, the 
possibility in editing our cards of making 
them fit the Library of Congress stand- 
ards. This would, of course, decrease our 
production, and I do not feel entirely sure 
that it would sufficiently improve the 
cards. The alternative would be the ac- 
ceptance by the Library of Congress of 
any title, assuming that it had been pre- 
pared with normal accuracy and scholar- 
ship. Second, there is the mechanical diffi- 
culty of handling and storing the cards at 
Washington. 

Under present circumstances I presume 
these difficulties are real. The card sec- 
tion has none too much space, and it 
might necessitate the moving of the sec- 
tion into another building. Personally I 
see no harm in this, though of course I 
do know the inside workings of the mat- 
ter. After all, I feel that the proposition 
is too big to be thrown down by mere 
mechanical difficulties of the nature I have 
referred to. 

Mr. Roden was somewhat interested in 
the plan and said that he would talk it 
over with Dr. Andrews. He even sug- 
gested that political action might be taken 
in view of the advisability of having in 
Washington a subject union catalog. 

International cooperation among libra- 
ries, as part of a movement of still wider 
scope, has naturally been receiving much 
thought during the past year. In proof 
of this, one needs not do more than refer 
to the meetings of the American Library 
Institute held In March last, when an en- 



tire session (the greater part of a day) 
was devoted to the subject of interna- 
tional cooperation, four papers in parti- 
cular (by F. K. Walter; T. F. Currier; 
J. C. M. Hanson, and F. J. Teggart) hav- 
ing been devoted specifically to the sub- 
ject of international catalogs. It is note- 
worthy that all four of these papers were 
constructive. While admitting the formid- 
able obstacles to an international reper- 
tory or catalog arising out of divergence in 
the cataloging practice of different coun- 
tries, the three authors first mentioned, 
though approaching the subject at different 
angles, were in virtual agreement, (1) that 
such divergence ought not to present any 
insuperable barrier to the successful com- 
pilation of an international catalog, (2) 
in suggesting remedies for at least some 
of the difficulties which now confront 
workers in the international field. Thus, 
Mr. Currier points out both the desirabil- 
ity and the practicability of making con- 
cessions in the Anglo-American rules, in 
so far as these relate to corporate entry, 
title entry, and place names and fore- 
names which appear in different forms in 
different languages all, it will be seen, 
sufficiently puzzling questions. 

The paper by Mr. Teggart, which comes 
almost as an answer or supplement to the 
other three, takes the form of an outline 
of a plan for an international catalog of 
humanistic literature, and is issued by Mr. 
Teggart in his capacity of chairman of 
Committee V of the American Asso- 
ciation of University Professors (on ap- 
paratus for productive scholarship). 

With^Mr. Teggart's permission part of 
his paper is here quoted. Even at the risk 
of repeating what may already be well 
known to some of the readers of the pres- 
ent report, it is felt that a certain amount 
of repetition is justifiable in a matter of 
such importance. The quotation follows: 

The first step in the program of the as- 
sociation involves the publication of cur- 
rent bibliographies in the various fields 
of scientific work. At the present time 
the Royal Society of London is engaged 
upon a revision of the "International cata- 
logue of scientific literature," and hence 



BULLETIN 



89 



any new project in the major field covered 
by this index is not now called for. There 
exists, however, no corresponding inter- 
national catalog of humanistic litera- 
ture, and this the association believes 
should be undertaken forthwith. 

The subjects to be embraced in the new 
index are archaeology, history, geography, 
philology and literary history, classical 
and oriental studies, anthropology, ethnol- 
ogy, folklore, religion, philosophy, educa- 
tion, economics, political science, sociol- 
ogy in a word, the varying aspects of one 
comprehensive and coordinated study of 
man. That there should be an index to 
the literature of man is all the more ob- 
vious at the present time, when the ab- 
sorbing interest of thinking people is fo- 
cussed upon the outstanding problems 
which confront mankind. Indeed, it is ex- 
traordinary that there should be no avail- 
able bibliographical source to which we 
may turn in order to follow the interna- 
tional literature of the discussions now 
occupying the attention of the world. No 
more substantial contribution to the fur- 
therance of knowledge could be made by 
American efforts than the publication of a 
full and complete index of this character. 

The aim of the association is the crea- 
tion of an index, international in scope, 
which will take the place of all such bibli- 
ographical aids as have been issued in the 
field of humanistic study. The index will 
be inclusive and comprehensive in the 
fullest sense, both in regard to subject 
matter and to language. The list of pe- 
riodicals, society publications and govern- 
mental publications to be analyzed will be 
submitted for the criticism and approval 
of librarians and specialists. The index 
will be cumulative, a form of publication 
rendered familiar by the Readers 1 
guide to periodical literature, comprising 
monthly parts, with an annual bound vol- 
ume and a final volume covering a term 
of years. By this means the inevitable 
tendency of all "annual" bibliographies 
to fall increasingly into arrears will be 
avoided, and the literature will be made 
available when most desired that is, 
when it has just appeared. 

The work will be carried out under the 
immediate critical supervision of special- 
ists in the various fields of study repre- 
sented, with the advice and coopera- 
tion of librarians and those engaged in 
reference work. 

The great obstacle which confronts all 
American efforts toward scholarly produc- 
tion is the great cost of printing and pub- 
lishing in this country as compared with 
Germany and other parts of Europe. If, 



however, the United States is to take its 
place in the new world of the future, and 
to share in the responsibility of intellec- 
tual leadership, we must undertake to do 
by cooperation what in Germany would 
be done with governmental supervision 
and support. The American Association 
of University Professors asks, therefore, 
for the assistance of the librarians of our 
great university and public libraries in 
making possible the publication of the in- 
ternational catalog of humanistic liter- 
ature. What is needed, at the outset, is 
a guarantee of five hundred dollars* a 
year, for five years, from fifty institutions, 
an expenditure which may be expected to 
be reduced as the sales of the index are 
extended. It is manifestly upon the con- 
tributions of the larger institutions that 
this important international enterprise can 
be undertaken, and the association urges, 
therefore that this plan for a distinc- 
tively American contribution to the study 
of man should receive your early and fa- 
vorable consideration. 

The importance of Mr. Teggart's project 
and the assistance it will afford to schol- 
arly research must be evident. 

C. H. GOULD, Chairman. 

COMMITTEE ON FEDERAL AND 
STATE RELATIONS 

The Committee on Federal and State 
Relations respectfully reports that dur- 
ing the year it has continued to be watch- 
ful in regard to library matters. 

In July we took up the question of the 
free distribution of copies of newspapers 
to libraries, the continuance of which dis- 
tribution was threatened by the War In- 
dustries Board. 

We have also continued our efforts in 
the interest of the repeal of the zone sys- 
tem of postage, and the return to the two 
cent postage upon letters, and one cent 
for post cards. The latter change has 
been made in the law, but the zone system 
has not yet been abolished. We recom- 
mend that efforts to achieve this result 
be continued during the coming year. 

We were informed that the Official Bul- 
letin was no longer to be sent to public 



This may be regarded as equivalent to 
five subscriptions to the index at the rate of 
one hundred dollars, which is approximately 
the cost per copy of the subsidized "Inter- 
national catalog of scientific literature." 



90 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



libraries, and we took up the matter in 
December, with satisfactory results. The 
appropriation for the publication of this 
bulletin not having been renewed by Con- 
gress, its free distribution ceased upon 
April 1. 

In January we were asked to protest 
against a ruling by the Post Office De- 
partment that they would not admit to 
second-class postal privileges the bulletin 
of the Vermont Library Commission, be- 
cause it published the names of publish- 
ers and the prices of the books, such pub- 
lication being considered an advertise- 
ment. We endeavored to secure the re- 
versal of this action by the Post Office 
Department, and filed a brief with them. 
We were informed that the names of pub- 
lishers would be permitted, but not the 
insertion of prices. We hope that a fur- 
ther revision of this order may be ob- 
tained, inasmuch as the insertion of the 
price of a book is, by no fair contention, 
the advertisement of the publication. The 
Library Journal printed an account of this 
matter in the spring. 

We were informed in February that 
there was an organization calling itself 
the American Library Association of Cali- 
fornia, and we recommended that proper 
legal proceedings be instituted by the exec- 
utive board, acting for the Aesociation, to 
restrain the continuance of such proceed- 
ings, inasmuch as this organization, 
through a similarity of name, was induc- 
ing people to pay money to it, and because 
our Association had recently been raising 
money by popular subscription, for war 
service purposes, and might in the future 
desire again to raise money, and find it- 
self incommoded therein, because of the 
action of this other organization. We felt 
that it was very dangerous to allow any 
continuance of what appeared to be an 
encroachment upon our legal rights. After 
the matter was brought to the attention of 
the president of the Association, and 
through his vigilance, the American Li- 
brary Association of California agreed to 
stamp on all stationery and publicity mat- 



ter, the phrase, "Not connected with the 
American Library Association," or words 
to that effect. This will be a useful prece- 
dent, in case of any future infringement 
upon our name. 

BERNARD C. STEINER, Chairman. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON WORK 
WITH THE BLIND 

At the request of the Commission on 
Uniform Type for the Blind, transmitted 
through its executive secretary, H. R. Lati- 
mer, the Committee on Work with the 
Blind has undertaken to keep a complete, 
up-to-date list of bibliographical data of 
all embossed publications in Revised 
Braille, grade one and a half, recently 
chosen as the uniform embossed type for 
the United States. 

The Perkins Institution and Massachu- 
setts School for the Blind at Watertown, 
Mass., having been enrolled by the A. L. A. 
as sponsor for the subject of "Blindness 
and the blind," will be the depository for 
these records, and the author card catalog 
will be in care of the librarian, Miss Laura 
M. Sawyer. 

The committee plans to issue, from time 
to time, printed lists of additional publica- 
tions available for purchase. 

Mrs. Gertrude T. Rider has supervised 
the work of volunteers in preparing hand- 
written articles in Revised Braille for the 
use of blinded soldiers and sailors at the 
Red Cross Institute for the Blind in Balti- 
more, Md., and Miss Lucille A. Gold- 
thwaite and Mrs. Rider have edited the 
May and June numbers respectively of the 
Matilda Ziegler Magazine for the Blind. 

All special libraries for the blind have 
been called upon to render material as- 
sistance to those wishing information and 
instruction to equip themselves to be use- 
ful to those returning from the war 
blinded. 

New publications: "Five lectures on 
blindness," by Kate M. Foley, home teach- 
er of the blind, California State Library, 
issued in pamphlet form. In a foreword 
Mr. Milton J. Ferguson, state librarian, 
says: "They were addressed not to the 



BULLETIN 



91 



blind, 'but to the seeing public, for the 
benefit that will accrue to the blind from 
a better understanding of their problems." 

"The Blind; their condition and the 
work being done for them in the United 
States," by Harry Best (Macmillan, 1919). 
Contains chapter entitled "Libraries for 
the blind," pp. 442-449 inclusive. 

The committee suggests and recom- 
mends that libraries of embossed books 
standardize their catalogs in two respects: 
(1) In the designation of types; (2) in the 
division of subjects. 

Years of observation and experience 
convince the chairman that attention 
should be given to the needs of the semi- 
blind and that suitable reading matter in 
large clear type should be provided for 
them. Many of this large class have no 
inclination to undertake the laborious task 
of finger reading, and are therefore de- 
prived of the pleasure of reading. 

For the Committee, 
EMMA R. N. DELFINO, Chairman. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON NOM- 
INATIONS 

The Committee on Nominations has pre- 
sented its report to the Executive Board, 
and nominates the following members to 
the elective positions to be filled at the 
Asbury Park Conference: 

For President: Chalmers Hadley, libra- 
rian Denver Public Library. 

For First Vice-President: George H. 
Locke, librarian Toronto Public Library. 

For Second Vice-President: Cornelia 



Marvin, librarian Oregon State Library. 

For Members of Executive Board (for 
term of three years each): 

Carl H. Milam, director Birmingham 
Public Library (associated with the Li- 
brary War Service since January, 1918). 
Edith Tobitt, librarian Omaha Public 
Library. 

For Trustee of the Endowment Fund 
(for term of three years) : E. W. Sheldon, 
trustee New York Public Library. 

For Members of Council (for term of five 
years each) : 

Miriam E. Carey, field representative, 
Library War Service. 

Bessie Sargeant Smith, supervisor of 
smaller branches and high school libra- 
ries, Cleveland Public Library. 

Phineas L. Windsor, librarian Univer- 
sity of Illinois. 

Lloyd W. Josselyn, librarian Jackson- 
ville Public Library. 

C. C. Williamson, chief division of eco- 
nomics, New York Public Library. 
The Committee on Nominations com- 
prised the following: 

Alice S. Tyler, chairman; Mary E. Hazel- 
tine, Margaret Mann, Andrew Keogh, 
Herbert S. Hirshberg. 

The report, in compliance with Section 2 
of the Bylaws to the Constitution, has been 
adopted by the Executive Board, and its 
publication in this special Bulletin com- 
plies with the constitutional requirement 
that it be published in the Bulletin at least 
one month prior to the annual meeting of 
the Association. 



92 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



BULLETIN 

OF THE 

AMERICAN LIBRARY 
ASSOCIATION 



Issued in 

January, March, May, July, September and 
November 



There is no subscription price and the 
Bulletin is sent only to members of the 
Association. 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 

President William W. Bishop, University of 
Michigan Library, Ann Arbor. 

First Vice-President Charles F. D. Belden, 
Boston Public Library. 

Second Vice-President Burton E. Stevenson, 
Public Library, Chillicothe, Ohio. 

Executive Board The President, vice-presi- 
dents and Josephine A. Rathbone, Pratt In- 
stitute, Brooklyn; A. L. Bailey, Wilming- 
ton Institute Free Library, Wilmington, 
Del.; Electra C. Doren, Public Library, 
Dayton, Ohio; Frank P. Hill, Public Li- 
brary, Brooklyn; Linda A. Eastman, Pub- 
lic Library Cleveland; Adam Strohm, Pub- 
lic Library, Detroit. 

Secretary George B. Utley, 78 E. Washing- 
ton street, Chicago. 

Treasurer Carl B. Roden, Public Library, 
Chicago. 

Executive Offices 78 E. Washington Street, 
Chicago. 



SHALL A PERMANENT ENDOWMENT 
BE UNDERTAKEN FOR PEACE TIME 

WORK OF THE A. L. A.? 
An open meeting of the Council of the 
American Library Association has been 
called for Tuesday afternoon, June 24, at 
Asbury Park, to discuss the advisability of 
attempting to raise a permanent endow- 
ment for peace time work of the Associa- 
tion, the need for it and the possible ways 
and means of obtaining it. 

The following communication has re- 
cently been sent to members of the Coun- 
cil by the secretary of the Association: 

Does not every member of the American 
Library Association strongly feel that we 
must "carry on" into our peace time organ- 
ization and readjustment what we have 
gained during the war and the work which 



the Association has been conducting dur- 
ing the war? 

Does not every librarian realize that the 
opportunities in the coming days of peace, 
though perhaps less dramatic, are fully as 
important as our work in the war, and per- 
haps even more important and far-reach- 
ing? 

Do we not all feel that it is unthinkable 
for the Association to throw aside these 
great opportunities for usefulness and go 
back to its <before-the-war status? 

The problem facing us all is not: What 
is there to do? It is: What means have 
we with which to do it? With these prob- 
lems before us and with this question, 
the most important one for us at the pres- 
ent time to answer, should not the 'Council 
of the Association, as a body to which mat- 
ters of policy are referred, carefully con- 
sider at the Asbury Park Conference the 
work which the Association ought to do 
and whether ways and means can be de- 
vised for raising an endowment fund ade- 
quate to prosecute these activities? 

The president and secretary have re- 
cently discussed this situation consider- 
ably in detail and have reached the conclu- 
sion that these matters should be laid 
before the Council. An open meeting of 
that body will be held at Asbury Park on 
Tuesday afternoon, June 24. It is planned 
to devote the entire session to this one 
subject, namely: A permanent endow- 
ment for peace time work of the A. L. A.., 
the need for it, and a discussion of ways 
and means. Two or three members will 
be asked to set forth the need for taking 
advantage of our war time opportunities. 
Several members will be asked to speak 
briefly of definite lines of activity that the 
A. L. A. needs money for, such for exam- 
ple as the following: 

(a) Greater publicity Co-operative pub- 

licity Employment of a publicity 
expert. 

(b) Libraries for industrial plants, pris- 

ons, hospitals; books for the mer- 
chant marine, coast guards, light- 
house keepers, etc. 

(c) Organizing libraries and doing other 

Association work in states lack- 
ing library commissions. 

(d) An adequate library survey What 

it would accomplish What It in- 
volves What it will cost. 

(e) Extending library privileges to rural 

communities. 

A member will be asked to speak briefly 
(5 minutes) on each of these five heads. 
This list could easily be expanded to twice 
this length but it is unnecessary. The 
above examples are illustrative of the kind 



BULLETIN 



93 



of work the A. L. A. as a "going concern" 
ought to do and can do if it can find the 
means. 

The next and most important question 
of all which the members will be asked to 
consider is: Can an adequate endowment 
be raised? If so, how? Two or three 
members will be asked in advance to be 
prepared to give their opinion and then 
the meeting will be thrown open to all in- 
terested members of the Association 
whether they are members of the Council 
or not. 

This preliminary memorandum is being 
sent to the members of the Council and to 
a few other members of the Association 
for their opinion and advice. The presi- 
dent and the secretary will appreciate 
hearing from you, and as promptly as pos- 
sible, because we want to give pre-con- 
ference publicity to this program so that 
all members of the Association will come 
to Asbury Park knowing that this matter 
is to be discussed and ready to express his 
or her opinion. 

There may be a divergence of opinion 
as to whether it is best to attempt to raise 
an endowment fund, but there certainly is 
no question but that all members of the 
Association are agreed that the war has 
opened remarkable opportunities for use- 
fulness and that steps in some way should 
be taken to carry on the work the Asso- 
ciation ought to do. We hope there will 
be a frank and full discussion of all phases 
of this important subject, so that if there 
is a committee appointed to represent the 
Association and carry out plans which the 
Council recommends, the members of It 
may have a very clear view of the atti- 
tude of the membership of the Association 
toward the project. 

AN A. L. A. BOOK SERVICE 

The war service of the American Li- 
brary Association will soon be brought to 
an end. The Association, however, will 
not be at all content to reduce its activ- 
ities to the ante-bellum scale. If any 
promising field of service as extensive and 
taxing as the Library War Service could 
be found and cultivated, there are many 
workers who would welcome the task. 

A number of persons familiar with the 
administration of the war service have on 
different occasions suggested the estab- 



lishment of a central book agency for the 
benefit of American! libraries. Among 
them Mr. Compton and Mr. Vail have pro- 
posed, in the February and March num- 
bers of the Library Journal, that a na- 
tional book purchasing headquarters be 
organized, somewhat similar to the en- 
tirely successful book department of the 
Library War Service. 

This is a matter which the Asbury Park 
Conference will do well to consider. The 
potentialities of such a project are very 
great. What a book headquarters might 
become, presently or eventually, is indi- 
cated below, in the form of a prospectus. 
Name. A. L. A. Book Service. 
Place. New York. 
Purposes. 

(1) To relieve libraries, by a central or- 
ganization, of part of the expense of 
money and time connected with book buy- 
ing and the preparation of books for use. 

(2) To assist libraries in book selection 
and in the extension of the use of books. 
Activities. 

The A. L. A. Book Service: (1) Will buy 
for libraries books in print and out of 
print, new and second-hand, in all lan- 
guages, from publishers and dealers both 
domestic and foreign, and will secure 
for libraries the largest possible discounts. 

(2) Will classify and catalog books so 
bought and will prepare them for the 
shelves of the patronizing library, pro- 
vided, and so far as, the details of all this 
work can be adjusted to suit the library's 
requirements. 

(3) Will classify and catalog books sent 
to its offices which are in out-of-the-way 
languages or otherwise difficult to treat. 

(4) Will provide durable bindings as re- 
quested at the smallest possible expense, 
and in general will undertake binding, re- 
binding, and fine binding for libraries. 

(5) Will evaluate new books and recom- 
mend them for different types of libraries, 
for this purpose taking over and modify- 
ing the Booklist of the A. L. A. 

(6) Will give to individual libraries 
upon request expert assistance in book 
selection: e. g., among technical books. 

(7) Will prepare and print timely book 
lists and bibliographies, and will print or 
reprint useful lists prepared elsewhere. 

(8) Will form reference collections in 
its office of the best books on subjects of 
special importance, of good editions of 
standard authors, of children's books, and 
of bibliographies of all kinds. 



94 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



(9) Will undertake to provide, partly 
through other library organizations, read- 
ing matter of all kinds to communities, 
groups, and individuals that are not in 
touch with local library facilities. 

(10) Will act as an agent for inter-li- 
brary loans. 

(11) Will act as an agent for subscrip- 
tions to periodicals and serials, both Amer- 
ican and foreign, and upon request will 
supply editions of these specially bound 
for circulation. 

(12) Will act as a receiving and dis- 
tributing agent for duplicate and discarded 
books. 

(13) Will serve as an information clear- 
ing-house. 

(14) Will be the national headquarters 
for cooperative library publicity such 
publicity being more easily maintained in 
connection with a book headquarters than 
elsewhere. 

Several considerations should be borne 
in mind which bear upon the project pro- 
posed. First, the organization must be- 
come self-supporting. The financing of 
the service at its inception and in its early 
days is its main problem. 

Both the smallest and the largest libra- 
ries should benefit by the various services 
offered. 

The saving of expense to libraries by 
the proposed organization would be as 
much indirect as direct. 

The present Library War Service head- 
quarters organization and machinery are 
in many respects suitable or adaptable for 
the proposed undertaking. 

In order that book-shops might not per- 
ish from the land by reason of the com- 
petition of a library book organization, 
libraries would be obliged to work for an 
increased patronage of local booksellers 
by the public. 

GEORGE F. STRONG. 

ROSTER OF LIBRARIANS IN SERVICE 

A year ago the American Library Asso- 
ciation headquarters attempted to compile 
a list of all libraries and assistants in li- 
braries who had entered the military, 
naval or marine corps service. We suc- 
ceeded in learning of 297 and a service 
flag with that number of stars was dis- 
played at the Saratoga Springs Confer- 



ence. This list was printed in the Library 
Journal, August, 1918. Several names have 
been sent in since, but without doubt our 
record is far from complete. A. L. A. 
headquarters office wants a complete list 
of every man who went directly from li- 
brary work into the service. Those who 
had been engaged in library work at some 
previous period, but who were not so en- 
gaged at the time of their enlistment for 
service, do not, we consider, come within 
the scope of this list. 

Will libraries of the United States and 
Canada, therefore, send to the office of the 
American Library Association, 78 East 
Washington Street, Chicago, the following 
information relative to any man in the 
service of the United States or her allies, 
whose name does not appear in the list 
printed in the Library Journal of August 
last: 

(1) Name. 

(2) Library in which he served. 

(3) Library position he held immediately 

prior to entering service. 

(4) When did he enter the service. 

(5) In what branch of the service. 

(6) Mention offices he held, promotions, 

citations, medals, wounds, death, all 
items of interest worthy of perma- 
nent record. 

AMENDMENT TO CONSTITUTION 

Formal notice is hereby given, in com- 
pliance with the provision of the Constitu- 
tion (Sec. 25), that at the Asbury Park 
Conference the Association will be re- 
quested to vote for the second and final 
time on the amendment of Section 12 of 
the Constitution. 

Attention was called, at the Saratoga 
Springs Conference in 1918, to the fact 
that the Finance Committee was not in- 
structed by the Constitution to audit the 
accounts of the Publishing Board, and that 
there were other auditing duties of the 
Finance Committee which should properly 
be stated in the Constitution. The Asso- 
ciation therefore voted that Section 12 be 
amended by changing the last sentence 
to read as follows: 



BULLETIN 



95 



"The Finance Committee shall audit the 
accounts of the secretary, treasurer, trus- 
tees of the endowment fund, treasurer of 
the Publishing Board, and all other ac- 
counts, and report to the Association at 
the annual meeting." 

According to the Constitution of the As- 
sociation the Constitution may be amended 
by a three-fourths vote of those present 
and voting at two successive meetings of 
the Association, provided that notice of the 
amendments be sent to each member of 
the Association at least one month before 
final adoption. 

If therefore the Association at the forth- 
coming Conference again votes in favor of 
the above amendment the change will be 
officially and finally accomplished. 

ADVANCE ATTENDANCE REGISTER 

An advance attendance register will be 
printed as usual. We want this to include 
all those who will attend the Conference. 
The list will be compiled from hotel 
bookings made through the A. L. A. rep- 
resentative at Asbury Park. All who ex- 
pect to attend and who do not make their 
hotel reservation through the above 
agency should send name, library position, 
home address and Asbury Park address 
not later than June 16' to American Li- 
brary Association representative, Public 
Library, Asbury Park, N. J. 

LIBRARY SCHOOL DINNERS 
All the library school dinners and re- 
unions will be held on Friday evening, 
June 27. Dinners at 6:30 at the New 
Monterey. Price to those not stopping at 
the hotel, $1.50. 

Those in charge of these dinners should 
confer with the secretary of the A. L. A. 
at once, notifying me that a dinner will be 
held, who is in charge and how many (ap- 
proximately) will be present. 

SALE, EXCHANGE, WANTS 

(Any library member of the Association 
may insert, without cost, a ten-line notice 
of books or periodicals wanted, for sale or 
exchange.) 



WANTS 
Illinois University Library, Urbana, III. 

Monthly catalog of U. S. Public Docu- 
ments No. 288 (December, 1918). 

St. Joseph (Mo.) Public Library. 

Athenaeum, March and Sept., 1916, Nos. 
4603 and 4609. 

Dramatic League Monthly, v. 2, no. 1, 
April, 1917; v. 1, no. 1 and 4, April and 
July, 1916. 

Editor, Sept. 9, 1916. Index to v. 44. 

Review of Reviews (English), Jan. and 
Feb., 1914, v. 49, nos. 289, 290; Dec., 1914, 
v. 50, no. 300; Index. 

School Arts, May, 1917. 

FOR SALE 

John Crerar Library, Chicago, III. 

4,000 volumes on natural history, chiefly 
on geology. (These are duplicates re- 
ceived in the transfer to the John Crerar 
Library of the library of the Chicago 
Academy of Sciences.) 

Providence (R. I.) Public Library. 

Dozy. Histoire des Musulmans d'Es- 
pagne, 711-1110, Leyde, 1861. 4 vols. 

L. E. Taylor, 5 Auburn Courts, Brookline, 
Mass. 

Massachusetts soldiers and sailors of the 
Revolutionary War; a compilation from 
the archives, prepared and published by 
the Secretary of the Commonwealth. 
1896-1908, 17 vols., bound. Good as new. 
$17.00 and transportation charges from 
Athol, Mass. 

OFFERS 

Harper's Monthly Magazine. Bound vol- 
umes from Vol. 1 to about the year 1888 
will be donated to a library having use for 
them, upon application to the librarian of 
the Commonwealth Edison 'Company, 72 
W. Adams Street, Chicago. 



BULLETIN 



""" 







OF THE 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 

Entered as second-class matter December 27, 1909, at the Post Office at Chicago, 111., under 

Act of Congress of July 16, 1894. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage 

provided for in section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized on July 8, 1918. 

VOL. 13, No. 4. CHICAGO, ILL. SEPTEMBEB, 1919 



HANDBOOK, 1919 

CONTENTS 

Charter 432 

Purposes of the Association, membership and dues * . . 433 

Constitution and by-laws 434 

Members classified 438 

Past meetings and attendance ... 440 

Honor roll of attendance at conferences 441 

Past officers 442 

Present officers 444 

Council 445 

Standing committees 447 

Special committees 450 

Endowment funds 453 

Publishing board 454 

Sections and section officers 459 

Affiliated organizations 461 

Affiliated state library associations . . . 462 

Other library organizations 462 

Library periodicals 463 

State library commissions 463 

State library associations * 464 

Library clubs 466 

List of members 468 

Necrology 559 



CHARTER 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Be it known, that whereas Justin Winsor, C. A. 
Cutter, Samuel S. Green, James L. Whitney, Mel- 
vil Dui, Fred B. Perkins and Thomas W. Bicknell, 
have associated themselves with the intention of 
forming a corporation under the name of the 
American Library Association for the purpose of 
promoting the library interests of the country by 
exchanging views, reaching conclusions, and in- 
ducing co-operation in all departments of biblio- 
thecal science and economy ; by disposing the pub- 
lic mind to the founding and improving of libra- 
ries ; and by cultivating good will among its own 
members, and have complied with the provisions 
of the statutes of this Commonwealth in such case 
made and provided, as appears from the certifi- 
cate of the President, Treasurer and Executive 
Board of said corporation, duly approved by the 
Commissioner of Corporations, and recorded in 
this office: 

Now, therefore, I, Henry B. Peirce, Secretary 
of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, do here- 
by certify that said Justin Winsor, C. A. Cutter, 
Samuel S. Green, James L. Whitney, Melvil Dui, 
Fred B. Perkins and Thomas W. Bicknell, their 
associates and successors, are legally organized 
and established as, and are hereby made an exist- 
ing corporation under the name of the American 
Library Association, with the powers, rights, and 
privileges, and subject to the limitations, duties, 
and restrictions, which by law appertain thereto. 

Witness my official signature hereunto sub- 
scribed, and the seal of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts hereunto affixed this tenth day of 
December in the year of our Lord one thousand 
eight hundred and seventy-nine. 

HENRY B. PEIRCE, 
Secretary of the Commonwealth. 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 

Organized Oct. 6, 1876; Incorporated Dec. 10, 1879 

This national body was organized in Philadelphia, October 6, 1876, as the immediate 
result of a three days' library conference held in connection with the Centennial exhi- 
bition. 

Its purposes are the promotion of library interests, the interchange of experience 
and opinion, the obtaining of larger results from library labor and expenditure, and 
the advancement of the profession of librarianship. 

In addition to advancing library interests generally, the Association aims: 

1. By organization and force of numbers to effect needed reforms and improve- 
ments, most of which could not ibe brought about by individual effort. 

2. By cooperation, to lessen labor and expense of library administration. 

3. By discussion and comparison, to utilize the combined experiments and experi- 
ence of the profession in perfecting plans and methods, and in solving difficulties. 

4. By meetings and correspondence, to promote acquaintance and esprit de corps. 

Offices of the Association 

The executive and publishing offices of the Association are at 78 East Washington 
St., Chicago, on the second floor of the Chicago public library building. They are open 
daily from nine to five and members visiting Chicago may have mail sent here and are 
cordially invited to use the rooms. Any changes of address or position should be re- 
ported promptly to the executive office so that the membership list in the Handbook 
may be up-to-date and all publications may reach members promptly. 

Membership and Dues 

Any person or institution engaged in library work may become a member. The 
annual dues are Two dollars for individuals and Five dollars for institutions, payable 
in advance on January 1. An entrance fee of One dollar must be paid by individuals 
upon joining or rejoining if membership has lapsed. Any individual member may 
become a life member exempt from dues on payment of Twenty-five dollars. 

All applications for membership and remittances for dues should be made to the 
American Library Association, 78 East Washington St., Chicago, by money orders or 
drafts on New York or Chicago. If local checks are sent, 10 cents exchange should 
be added. 

Benefits of Membership 

Individual members receive the Bulletin of the American Library Association, pub- 
lished bi-monthly and forming an annual volume of over 400 pages, one number of 
which is the official Handbook and another the Proceedings of the annual meeting; they 
enjoy special travel and hotel rates, all conference privileges and hospitalities, and are 
entitled to vote for officers of the Association. Every library worker whose name is on 
the membership list and who pays the annual fee, helps thereby to more effective work 
by the Association, which in turn will accrue to the benefit of the individual member. 

Institutional (library) members, in addition to the Bulletin, will receive the Book- 
list (10 issues a year), an annotated buying list of current books suitable for large 
and small libraries. Every library member may send one delegate to all meetings 
of the Association, who shall ibe entitled to all privileges of an individual member. 

Libraries may ask Headquarters for information on any library subject. 



CONSTITUTION OF THE AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 

Adopted 1909 



Object 

Sec. 1. The object of the American Li- 
brary Association shall be to promote the 
welfare of libraries in America. 



shall be elected. No money from the en- 
dowment fund shall be invested or ex- 
pended except on check signed by a ma- 
jority of the trustees. 



Membership 

Sec. 2. Members. Any person or insti- 
tution engaged in library work may be- 
come a member by paying the annual 
dues; and others, after election by the 
Executive board; but no member shall be 
entitled to vote at a business meeting of 
the Association or for the election of offi- 
cers until the annual meeting of the calen- 
dar year following his accession to mem- 
bership. The annual dues of the Associa- 
tion shall be two dollars for individuals 
and five dollars for libraries and other in- 
stitutions, payable in advance in January, 
save that for the first year the dues for 
individuals shall be three dollars. 

Sec. 3. Honorary Members. On nomi- 
nation of the Council, honorary members 
may be elected by unanimous vote at any 
meeting of the Association. 

Sec. 4. Life Members and Fellows. Any 
individual member may become a life 
member, exempt from dues, by paying $25. 
On payment of $100 any individual mem- 
ber may become a life fellow. An individ- 
ual life member may become a life fel- 
low on payment of $75. 

Endowment Fund 

Sec. 5. All receipts from life and per- 
petual memberships and life fellowships, 
and all gifts for endowment purposes, shall 
constitute an endowment fund, which shall 
be invested and the principal kept forever 
inviolate. The interest shall be expended 
as the Executive board may direct. The 
endowment fund shall be in the custody of 
three trustees, one of whom shall be 
elected by ballot at each annual meeting, 
to hold office for three years from the date 
of his election and until his successor 



Management 

Sec. 6. The business of the Association, 
except as hereinafter specifically assigned 
to other bodies, shall be entrusted to the 
Executive board. But the Association may, 
by a three-fourths vote of those present 
and voting, take direct action, or revise 
the action of the Executive board or Coun- 
cil, or give them mandatory instructions. 

Officers and Committees 

Sec. 7. The officers of the Association 
shall be a president, first and second vice- 
presidents, a secretary, and a treasurer. 
The president and vice-presidents shall be 
elected at each annual meeting of the As- 
sociation. The secretary and treasurer 
shall be chosen by the Executive board, 
shall hold office at its pleasure, and re- 
ceive such salaries as it shall fix. 

Sec. 8. President and Vice-Presidents. 
The president shall be the representative 
head of the Association. In case of his 
death, resignation, or inability to serve, 
the ranking vice-president shall become 
president. 

Sec. 9. Secretary. The secretary, sub- 
ject to the general authority of the presi- 
dent and of the Executive board, shall be 
the active executive officer of the Associa- 
tion. He shall keep a record of the at- 
tendance and proceedings at each meet- 
ing of the Association, Council or Execu- 
tive board, and serve as agent for. the 
treasurer in collecting membership dues. 

Sec. 10. Treasurer. The treasurer shall 
record all receipts and disbursements, pay 
bills, on approval of the chairman of the 
finance committee or of a member desig- 
nated by that committee, and make an an- 



HANDBOOK 



435 



nual report to the Association covering the 
calendar year. 

Sec. 11. Executive Board. The president 
and vice-presidents, together with six other 
members elected as hereinafter specified, 
shall constitute the Executive Board. At 
the annual meeting of 1909 there shall be 
elected by ballot six persons to serve as 
the above mentioned elective members of 
the Executive board. Immediately after 
their election they shall by lot divide them- 
selves into three equal classes, of which 
the term of the first shall expire in 1910, 
of the second in 1911, and of the third in 
1912. In 1910 and at each annual meeting 
of the Association thereafter, there shall 
be elected by ballot for a three years' 
term, two members of the Executive board 
to take the place of those whose term will 
thus expire. The Executive board shall 
administer the business affairs of the As- 
sociation except those specifically assigned 
to other bodies, or dealt with by direct 
vote of the Association as hereinbefore 
provided. It shall appoint the non-elective 
and assistant officers, and all standing 
committees; and fix the salaries of all 
paid officers of the Association. It shall 
have authority to arrange the program for 
the annual meeting and to decide upon the 
presentation and printing of papers and 
reports. It shall have authority to include 
in the publications of the Association so 
much of the program, notices, ~ circulars, 
and proceedings of affiliated associations 
as it may deem advisable. 

Sec. 12. Finance Committee. There shall 
be a finance committee of three, the chair- 
man of which shall be chosen from the 
Executive board. The finance committee 
shall prepare annual and supplementary 
budgets, within which appropriations shall 
be made by the Executive board, and no 
expense shall be incurred in behalf of the 
Association by any officer or committee in 
excess of the authorized appropriation. 
The finance committee shall audit the ac- 
counts of the secretary, treasurer, trus- 
tees of the endowment fund, treasurer of 
the Publishing Board, and all other ac- 



counts, and report to the Association at 
the annual meeting. 

Sec. 13. Votes by Correspondence. Ap- 
proval in writing by a majority of a board 
or committee voting shall have the force 
of a vote, provided no member expresses 
disapproval. 

Council 

Sec. 14. Membership. The Council shall 
consist of the Executive board, all ex- 
presidents of the Association who con- 
tinue as members thereof, all presidents of 
affiliated societies who are members of the 
Association, twenty-five members elected 
by the Association at large, and twenty- 
five elected by the Council itself and one 
member from each state, provincial and 
territorial library association or any asso- 
ciation covering two or more such geo- 
graphical divisions which complies with 
the conditions for such representation set 
forth in the by-laws. The elected mem- 
bers shall be chosen five each year by the 
Association and Council respectively, to 
hold office for five years, except that at 
the annual meeting of 1909 the existing 
Council shall elect twenty-five and shall 
divide them by lot into five classes to hold 
one, two, three, four and five years re- 
spectively. 

Sec. 15. Meetings. The Council shall 
hold at least two meetings a year, one of 
which shall be at the time and place of 
the annual meetings of the Association. 
Other meetings shall be called upon re- 
quest of twenty members. 

Sec. 16. Duties. The Council may con- 
sider and discuss library questions of pub- 
lic and professional interest, and by a two- 
thirds vote adopt resolutions on these or 
any other matters of library policy or prac- 
tice, and no resolutions, except votes of 
thanks and on local arrangements shall be 
otherwise adopted. In particular it shall 
consider and report upon questions which 
involve the policy of the Association as 
such; and no such questions shall be voted 
upon by the Association, except upon a 
three-fourths vote of the Association de- 
ciding for immediate action, without a pre- 
vious reference to the Council for consid- 



436 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



eration and recommendation. It may by 
two-thirds vote affiliate with the American 
Library Association, upon suitable condi- 
tions, other organizations kindred in pur- 
pose and by the same vote establish sec- 
tions of the Association. It may nominate 
honorary members. 

Terms of Office 

Sec. 17. All officers, members of the 
Council and members of the Executive 
board elected by the Association shall 
serve until the adjournment of the meet- 
ing at which their successors are chosen. 
Publishing Board 

Sec. 18. The publishing board shall con- 
sist of five members appointed by the 
Executive board for terms of not more 
than three years, one of whom shall be 
chosen from the Executive board. Its ob- 
ject shall be to secure the preparation and 
publication of such catalogs, indexes and 
other bibliographic and library aids as it 
may approve. 

Sec. 19. The publishing board shall an- 
nually appoint its chairman and secretary. 

Sec. 20. No work involving the expen- 
diture of money shall be undertaken ex- 
cept by a vote of a majority of the whole 
board, and the Association shall not be 
liable for any debts incurred by the pub- 
lishing board. The treasurer of the Asso- 
ciation shall serve as treasurer of the pub- 
lishing board, but shall keep separate ac- 
counts. With the approval of the finance 
committee, money may be apportioned by 
the Executive board from the treasury of 
the Association for the running expenses 
of the publishing board. 

Sec. 21. The publishing board shall re- 
port in print at each annual meeting of the 
Association. 

Meetings 

Sec. 22. Annual Meeting. There shall 
be an annual meeting of the Association 
at such place and time as may be finally 
determined by the Executive board. 

Sec. 23. Special Meetings. Special meet- 
ings of the Association may be called by 
the Executive board, and shall be called 
by the president on request of twenty 
members of the Association. At least one 



month's notice shall be given, and only 
business specified in the call shall be 
transacted. 

Sec. 24. Quorum. Forty members shall 
constitute a quorum of the Association 
and twenty of the Council. 

Amendments and By-Laws 

Sec. 25. Amendments. This constitution 
may be amended by a three-fourths vote 
of those present and voting at two suc- 
cessive meetings of the Association, pro- 
vided that notice of the amendments be 
sent to each member of the Association at 
least one month before final adoption. 

Sec. 26. By-Laws. By-laws may be 
adopted by vote of the Association upon 
recommendation of the Executive board or 
after reference to and report from the 
Executive board. Any by-laws may be sus- 
pended by a three-fourths vote of those 
present and voting at any meeting of the 
Association. 

BY-LAWS 

Sec. 1. Any person renewing member- 
ship shall pay all arrears of dues or dues 
required of new members. Members whose 
dues are unpaid at the close of the annual 
conference and who shall continue such 
delinquency for one month after notice of 
the same has been sent by the treasurer, 
shall be dropped from membership. 

Each new member shall be assigned a 
consecutive number in the order of first 
joining and paying dues. A delinquent 
member rejoining shall receive his orig- 
inal number. It shall be the duty of mem- 
bers to inform the secretary promptly of 
any change of address. 

The fiscal year of the Association shall 
be the calendar year. 

Sec. 2. At least three months prior to 
the annual meeting of the Association the 
Executive board shall appoint a commit- 
tee of five, no one of whom shall be a 
member of the Board, to nominate the 
elective officers and other members of the 
Executive board, trustees of the Endow- 
men fund, and such members of the Coun- 
cil as are to be chosen by the Association 






HANDBOOK 



437 



under the provisions of Sec. 14 of the 
constitution. 

This committee shall report to the Ex- 
ecutive board, which shall after adoption 
of the report publish its nominations in 
the Bulletin at least one month prior to 
the annual meeting of the Association and 
shall place such nominations before the 
Association on a printed ballot which shall 
be known as the "Official Ballot." The 
Board shall also include on such ballot 
other nominations filed with the secretary 
by any five members of the Association at 
least twenty-four hours before election, 
provided that with the petition containing 
such nominations or noted upon it, shall 
be filed the consent of the person or per- 
sons so nominated. 

In general, nominations to the Council 
shall be made with a view of having it 
representative of all sections of the coun- 
try and of the principal classes of libja- 
ries included in the Association. No. per- 
son shall be nominated as president, first 
or second vice-president or councilor of 
the Association for two consecutive terms. 
No more than the required number of 
nominations shall be made by the commit- 
tee. The position and residence of each 
nominee shall be given on the official bal- 
lot. 

Sec. 3. At the first meeting of the Coun- 
cil at each annual conference, there shall 
be designated a committee of five to nomi- 
nate the new members of the Council 
which the Council itself is to elect for the 
next ensuing term. This committee shall 
report to the Council, and the election by 
the Council shall be by ballot. The pro- 
hibition in Sec. 2 of the re-election of a 
councilor for two consecutive terms shall 
not apply to the councilors elected .by 
the Council itself. 

Sec. 3a. Each state, territorial and pro- 
vincial library association (or any associ- 
ation covering two or more such geo- 
graphical divisions) having a membership 
of not less than fifteen members, may be 
represented in the Council by the presi- 
dent of such association, or by an alter- 
nate elected at the annual meeting of the 



association. The annual dues shall be $5.00 
for each association having a membership 
of fifty or less, and ten cents additional 
per capita where membership is above 
that number. The privileges and advan- 
tages of the A. L. A. conferences shall be 
available only to those holding personal 
membership or representing institutional 
membership in the Association or to mem- 
bers of other affiliated societies. 

Sec. 4. In case of a vacancy in any 
office, except that of president, the Execu- 
tive board may designate some person to 
discharge the duties of the same pro tern- 
pore. 

Sec. 5. The president and secretary, 
with one other member appointed by the 
Executive board, shall constitute a pro- 
gram committee, which shall, under the 
supervision of the Executive board, ar- 
range the program for each annual meet- 
ing, and designate persons to prepare pa- 
pers, open discussions, etc., and shall de- 
cide whether any paper which may be of- 
fered shall be accepted or rejected, and if 
accepted, whether it shall be read entire, 
by abstract or by title. It shall recom- 
mend to the Executive board printing ac- 
cepted papers entire or to such extent as 
may be considered desirable. Abstracts of 
papers to be presented at annual confer- 
ences shall be in the hands of the pro- 
gram committee at least two weeks before 
the conference. 

Sec. 6. The Executive board shall ap- 
point a committee of eight on library train- 
ing, which shall from time to time investi- 
gate the whole subject of library schools 
and courses of study, and report the re- 
sults of the investigations, with its recom- 
mendations. The membership of this com- 
mittee shall be as follows: one member 
of a state library commission, one librari- 
an of a free public library of at least 
50,000 volumes, one librarian of a college 
or reference library, one library trustee, 
four library school graduates, including 
one from the faculty of a library school; 
one school graduate and one other mem- 
ber to retire each year. 



438 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Sec. 7. The Executive board shall ap- 
point annually a committee of three on li- 
brary administration to consider and re- 
port improvements in any department of 
library economy, and make recommenda- 
tions looking to harmony, uniformity and 
cooperation, with a view of economical ad- 
ministration. 

Sec. 8. The Executive board shall at 
each annual meeting of the Association 
appoint a committee of three on resolu- 
tions, which shall prepare and report to 
the Association suitable resolutions of ac- 
knowledgment and thanks. To this com- 
mittee shall be referred all such resolu- 
tions offered in meetings of the Associa- 
tion. 

Sec. 8a. Petitions for the establishment 
of sections shall be presented only by 
members actively engaged in the work of 
the proposed section and by not less than 
twenty such members. Before such a pe- 
tition be granted by Council, it shall be 
referred to a special committee to be ap- 
pointed by the president, which committee 
after investigating the grounds for the pe- 
tition and the conditions regarding it, shall 
report to the Council as to the desirability 
of such section. Council shall have power 
to discontinue a section when, in the opin- 
ion of Council, the usefulness of that sec- 
tion has ceased. 

Sec. 9. The objects of sections which 
may be established by the Council under 



the provisions of Sec. 16 of the constitu- 
tion, shall be discussion, comparison of 
views, etc., upon subjects of interest to 
the members. No authority is granted any 
section to incur expense on account of the 
Association or to commit the Association 
by any declaration of policy. A member 
of the Association eligible under the rules 
of the section may become a member 
thereof by registering his or her name 
with the secretary of the section. 

Sec. 10. Provision shall be made by the 
Executive board for sessions of the vari- 
ous sections at annual meetings of the As- 
sociation, and the programs for the same 
shall be prepared by the officers of sections 
in consultation with the program commit- 
tee. Sessions of sections shall be open to 
any member of the Association, but no 
person may vote in any section unless 
registered as a member of the same. The 
registered members of each section shall, 
at the final session of each annual meet- 
ing, choose a chairman and secretary, to 
serve until the close of the next annual 
meeting. 

Sec. 11. The vote of institutional mem- 
bers shall be cast by the duly designated 
representative whose credentials are filed 
with the secretary. In the absence of 
such designation or of such delegate the 
vote may be cast by the chief librarian 
or ranking executive officer in attendance 
at the meeting. 



MEMBERS CLASSIFIED 

MEMBERSHIP BY POSITION 

Institutional Members 547 

Affiliated State Associations 24 

Trustees 115 

Library Commissions 79 

Chief Librarians -. . .1,097 

Heads of Departments and Branch Librarians 845 

Assistants 1,001 

Library School Instructors 45 

Library School Students 12 

Editors 23 

Commercial Agents 70 

Others 320 



Total 4,178 



HANDBOOK 
MEMBERSHIP BY STATES 



439 



1917 1918 1919 



1917 1918 1919 





25 


22 


27 


Virginia 


18 


21 


29 


Arizona 


6 


8 


9 


Washington 


67 


69 


101 


Arkansas 


7 


5 


9 


West Virginia 


3 


4 


6 


California 


150 


151 


175 


Wisconsin 


109 


108 


115 


Colorado 


28 


39 


52 


Wyoming 


6 


10 


8 


Connecticut 


75 


79 


113 


Canada 


42 


41 


24 




7 


10 


19 


Alberta 


5 


5 


2 


District of Columbia.. 


119 
9 


131 
9 


157 
16 


British Columbia . . 
Manitoba 


6 
3 


5 
4 


3 
1 


Georgia 


26 


33 


39 


New Brunswick. . . 


2 


2 


1 


Idaho 


6 


5 


7 


Nova Scotia 


1 


1 


1 


Illinois 


307 


287 


325 


Ontario 


17 


18 


14 




106 


103 


160 


Quebec 


7 


6 


1 


Iowa 


80 


76 


85 


Saskatchewan .... 


1 


1 


1 




38 


42 


44 










Kentucky 


67 


32 


29 


Total 


3312 


3337 


4114 


Louisiana 


8 


10 


8 










Maine 


22 


23 


28 










Maryland 


25 


26 


40 


FOREIGN 








Massachusetts 


270 


287 


336 


(Including U. S. De- 








Michigan 


114 


127 


196 










Minnesota 


77 


69 


92 










Mississippi 


3 


4 


5 








' 


Missouri 


78 


74 


91 




1 








Montana 


16 


17 


19 


Australia 


1 


2 


3 


Nebraska 


22 


20 


27 


Canal Zone 


1 


2 


4 


Nevada 


1 


1 


1 


China 


2 


2 


6 


New Hampshire 


31 


35 


45 


Denmark 


1 


1 


1 


New Jersey 


110 


109 


151 


England . ... 


7 


9 


8 


New Mexico 





3 


2 


Finland 





1 


1 


New York 


561 


583 


685 


France . . ... 


1 


1 


6 


North Carolina 


16 


18 


21 


Hawaii 


6 


6 


7 


North Dakota 


22 


23 


20 


Holland 





1 


1 


Ohio 


196 


186 


235 


India 


2 


5 


5 


Oklahoma 


18 


17 


23 


Japan . . 


3 


3 


3 


Oregon 


47 


44 


85 


New Zealand 


1 


1 


2 


Pennsylvania 


214 


208 


245 


Norway 








2 


Rhode Island 


34 


38 


45 


Philippine Islands 


4 


3 


10 


South Carolina 


6 


8 


17 


Porto Rico . . . 


1 


1 


1 


South Dakota 


12 


12 


17 


Scotland 


1 


1 


1 


Tennessee 


31 


22 


30 


Sweden 


1 


2 


1 


Texas 


44 


53 


65 


Union of South Africa 


1 


2 


2 


Utah 


12 


11 


14 










Vermont 


21 


24 


22 


Grand Total 


3346 


3380 


4178 



MEMBERSHIP BY CLASSES 

1917 1918 1919 

Honorary Members 4 4 4 

Life Fellows 2 1 2 

Life Members 115 120 141 

Perpetual Members 3 3 3 

Institutional Members 505 522 547 

Affiliated State Associations 23 24 24 

Annual Members 2694 2706 3457 

Total ..53346 3380 4178 



PAST MEETINGS AND ATTENDANCE 



Date 


Place 


Attend- 
ance 


Membership 
Nos. in order 
of joining 


Added 
each 
year 


1876 Oct. 4-6 


Philadelphia 


103 


1- 69 


69 


1877 Sept 4-6 


New York 


66 


70- 122 


53 


1877 Oct 2-5 


London (international) 


21 






Ig7g 


No meeting . 




123- 196 


74 


1879 June 30- July 2.. 


Boston 


162 


197- 385 


189 


IggQ 


No meeting 




386- 397 


12 


1881 Feb 9-12 


Washington 


70 


398- 413 


16 


1882* May 24-27 


Cincinnati . 


47 


414- 454 


41 


1883* Aug. 14-17 


Buffalo 


72 


455- 470 


16 


1884 


No meeting . 




471- 476 


6 


1885 Sept. 8-11 


Lake George N Y 


87 


477- 513 


37 


1886 July 7-10 


Milwaukee 


133 


514- 594 


81 


1887 Aug. 30-Sept. 2. 


Thousand Islands, N Y 


186 


595- 700 


106 


1888 Sept. 25-28 


Catskill Mts., N. Y 


32 


701- 725 


25 


1889, May 8-11 


St Louis 


106 


726- 771 


46 


1890 Sept 9-13 


Fabyans (White Mts ) 


242 


772- 884 


113 


1891 Oct 12-16 


San Francisco 


83 


885- 939 


55 


1892 May 16-21 


Lakewood Baltimore Washington 


260 


940-1081 


142 


1893 July 13-22 


Chicago 


311 


1082-1230 


149 


1894 Sept 17-22 


Lake Placid N Y 


205 


1231-1315 


85 


1895, Aug 13-21 


Denver and Colorado Springs 


147 


1316-1377 


62 


1896, Sept. 1-8 


Cleveland 


363 


1378-1550 


173 


1897 June 21-25 


Philadelphia 


315 


1551-1684 


134 


1897, July 13-16 


London (international) 


94 






1898 July 5-9 


Lakewood-on-Chautauqua 


494 


1685-1825 


141 


1899, May 9-13 


Atlanta, Ga 


215 


1826-1908 


83 


1900, June 6-12 


Montreal, Canada 


452 


1909-2116 


208 


1901, July 3-10 


Waukesha, Wis 


460 


2117-2390 


274 


1902, June 14-20 


Boston and Magnolia Mass . . 


1018 


2391-2735 


345 


1903, June 22-27 


Niagara 


684 


2736-2975 


240 


1904, Oct. 17-22 


St Louis 


577 


2976-3239 


264 


1905, July 4-8 


Portland, Ore 


359 


3240-3497 


258 


1906, June 29- July 6.. 


Narragansett Pier, R I 


891 


3498-3979 


482 


1907, May 23-29 


Asheville, N. C 


478 


3980-4325 


346 


1908, June 22-27 


Minnetonka Minn 


658 


4326-4557 


232 


1909, June 28-July 3.. 


Bretton Woods, N. H 


620 


4558-4704 


147 


1910, June 30-July 6.. 


Mackinac Island, Mich 


533 


4705-5010 


306 


1910, Aug. 28-31 


Brussels (international) 


46 






1911, May 18-24 


Pasadena, Cal 


582 


5011-5217 


207 


1912, June 26- July 2. . 


Ottawa, Canada 


704 


5218-5628 


411 


1913, June 23-28 


Kaaterskill, N. Y 


892 


5629-6018 


390 


1914, May 25-29 


Washingon, D. C 


1366 


6019-6486 


468 


1915, June 3-9 


Berkeley, Cal 


779 


6487-6862 


376 


1916, June 26-July 1. . 


Asbury Park, N. J 


1386 


6863-7260 


398 


1917, June 21-27 


Louisville, Ky . . 


824 


7261-7622 


362 


1918, July 1-6 


Saratoga Springs, N. Y 


620 


7623-7928 


306 


1919, June 23-27 


Asbury Park, N. J 


1168 


7928-8843 | 


915 



HONOR ROLL OF ATTENDANCE AT CONFERENCES 

COMPILED BY MRS. HENRY J. CARR 

For earlier honor rolls and other statistics, see Library Journal, 1892 Conference, p. 24, 

vol. 23, pp. 238-9 ; and previous Handbooks. 

The following members have attended the number of Conferences indicated: 

36 Henry James Carr. 

32 Mrs. Henry James Carr. 

29 Richard R. Bowker, Frank P. Hill. 

28 Mary Eileen Ahern, George E. Wire. 

27 Clement W. Andrews. 

26 Frederick Winthrop Faxon. 

25 Thomas Lynch Montgomery. 

24 Melvil Dewey, Mrs. Alice G. Evans. 

23 Tessa L. Kelso, Ernest C. Richardson, Bernard C. Steiner. 

22 Gardner M. Jones, Edward J. Nolan, William T. Peoples. 

21 Nina E. Browne, John Cotton Dana, Josephine A. Rathbone, James I. Wyer, Jr. 

20 Linda A. Eastman, William E. Foster, Herbert Putnam, Willis K. Stetson. 

19 Arthur E. Bostwick, Johnson Brigham, George S. Godard, Purd B. Wright. 

18 Edwin H. Anderson, Walter S. Biscoe, George F. Bowerman, Caroline M. Hewins. 

17 Walter L. Brown, Mrs. H. L. Elmendorf, M'arilla W. Freeman, J. C. M. Hanson, 
C. H. Hastings, Mary Emogene Hazeltine, Washington T. Porter, Edith Tobitt, 
Alice S. Tyler, Sula Wagner, Hiller C. Wellman, Lizzie A. Williams. 

16 Eliza G. Browning, Mrs. Salome Cutler Fairchild, Electra C. Doren, Mrs. E. C. Earl, 
John G. Moulton, Frank C. Patten, Franklin O. Poole, Samuel H. Ranck, Lutie 

E. Stearns, Caroline M. Underbill. 

15 Arthur L. Bailey, William Beer, William Warner Bishop, Edith E. Clarke, George 
Watson Cole, Mrs. Emma R. Neisser Delfino, C. B. Galbreath, Alfred Hafner, 
William C. Lane, Mary E. Robbins, Carl B. Roden, Willis F. Sewall, Bessie 
Sargeant Smith, Rose G. Stewart, George B. TJtley, Halsey W. Wilson, William 

F. Yust. 

14 Anna R. Dougherty, Mary E. Downey, William R. Eastman, Caroline H. Garland, 
Irene A. Hackett, Mary E. Hawley, Jane P. Hubbell, Judson T. Jennings, 
B. Pickman Mann, Harriet L. Matthews, Azariah S. Root, Abby L. Sargent, 
A. J. Small, Mrs. Jessie Palmer Weber, F. Mabel Winchell. 

13 John R. Anderson, Cedric Chivers, Theodore L. Cole, Harrison W. Graver, Mrs. 
F. W. Faxon, Frank B. Gay, Sarah E. Coding, Chalmers Hadley, Helen E. 
Haines, N. D. C. Hodges, Jessie F. Hume, R. H. Johnston, Andrew Keogh, George 
Winthrop Lee, Margaret Mann, Charles Alex. Nelson, Effie L. Power, Mrs. G. E. 
Stechert, Adam Strohm, Agnes E. VanValkenhurgh, Beatrice Winser. 

12 Clara F. Baldwin, Silas H. Berry, Robert P. Bliss, Mrs. R. R. Bowker, Herbert O. 
Brigham, Gratia A. Countryman, Emma R. Engle, Jennie D. Fellows, Adelaide 
R. Hasse, Theresa Hitchler, Theodore W. Koch, Isabel E. Lord, Annie Carroll 
Moore, W. C. Rowell, Mary L. Titcomb, Adelaide Underbill, Mrs. George B. 
Utley, Elizabeth B. Wales. 

11 Emma V. Baldwin, Mrs. Rena M. Barickman, Charles H. Brown, Demarchus C. 
Brown, Mrs. Melvil Dewey, Frances E. Earhart, Julia E. Elliott, Mary P. Fair, 
E. A. Feazel, James T. Gerould, J. Leroy Harrison, W. E. Henry, Luther E. 
Hewitt, Anna G. Hubbard, W. Dawson Johnston, Mary L. Jones, A. G. S. Joseph- 
son, Ella M. McLoney, Charles Martel, Carl H. Milam, Glen Parker, Katharine 
Patten, Nina K. Preston, J. L. Peacock, Edith A. Phelps, Charles E. Rush, 
Thorvald Solberg, Mrs. Laura Speck, Helen Sperry, Peter Wolter. 

10 Sarah B. Askew, Willard Austen, Edna D. Bullock, Mrs. D. P. Corey, June R. Don- 
nelly, Miriam S. Draper, Charles A. Flagg, Elizabeth L. Foote, Charlotte H. 
Foye, Mary Francis, Franklin F. Hopper, George lies, Henry F. Jenks, Ada 
Alice Jones, Mrs. Gardner M. Jones, Willis Holmes Kerr, Minnie M. Kohler, 
May Massee, Andrew H. Mettee, Isadore G. Mudge, John F. Phelan, Flora B. 
Roberts, Rev. L. M. Robinson, William F. Sanborn, Mary S. Saxe, Frances 
Simpson, Elizabeth P. Thurston, William R. Watson, Frank H. Whitmore, 
Mrs. G. E. Wire, Charles E. Wright. 



PAST OFFICERS 

The following tabulation of officers of the American Library Association has been 
compiled by Mrs. Henry J. Carr. For additional particulars see Library Journal, vol 
23: 569-570, 614-615, 660-661. 

Presided at the following con- 
ferences: 

PRESIDENTS Year Philadelphia; New York; Bos- 
Justin Winsor 1 1876^85 ton; Washington; Cincinnati; 

Buffalo; Lake George. 

William Frederick Poole 2 1885-87 Milwaukee; Thousand Islands. 

Charles Ammi Cutter 1 1887-89 Catskill Mts.; St. Louis. 

Frederick Morgan Crunden 4 1889-90 Fabyans (White Mountains). 

Melvil Dewey 1890- July, 1891 

Samuel Swett Green 18 July-Nov., 1891 San Francisco. 

William Isaac Fletcher 10 1891-92 Lakewood, N. J., Baltimore and 

Washington. 

Melvil Dewey 1892-93 Chicago. 

Josephus Nelson Lamed 5 1893-94 Lake Placid, N. Y. 

Henry Munson Utley* 1894-95 Denver. 

John Cotton Dana 1895-96 Cleveland. 

William Howard Brett" 1896-97 Philadelphia. 

Justin Winsor 1 July-OcU 1897 

Herbert Putnam Jan.-Aug., 1898 Lakewood (Chautauqua), N. Y. 

William Coolidge Lane 1898-99 Atlanta, 

Reuben Gold Thwaites 7 1899-1900 Montreal. 

Henry James Carr 1900-01 Waukesha, Wis. 

John Shaw Billings' 1901-02 Boston and Magnolia, Mass. 

James Kendall Hosmer 1902-03 Niagara Falls. 

Herbert Putnam 1903-04 St. Louis. 

Ernest Gushing Richardson 1904-05 Portland, Ore. 

Frank Pierce Hill 1905-06 Narragansett Pier, R. I. 

Clement Walker Andrews 1906-07 Asheville, N. C. 

Arthur Elmore Bostwick ;. 1907-08 Lake Minnetonka, Minn. 

Charles Henry Gould" 1908-09 Bretton Woods, N. H. 

Nathaniel Dana Carlile Hodges 1909-10 Mackinac Island, Mich. 

James Ingersoll Wyer, Jr 1910-11 Pasadena, Cal.* 

Mrs. Theresa West Elmendorf 1911-12 Ottawa, Canada. 

Henry Eduard Legler" 1912-13 Kaaterskill, N. Y. 

Edwin Hatfield Anderson 1913-14 Washington, D. C. 

Hiller Crowell Wellman 1914-15 Berkeley, Cal. 

Mary Wright Plummer 8 1915-16 Asbury Park, N. J.** 

Walter Lewis Brown 1916-17 Louisville, Ky. 

Thomas Lynch Montgomery 1917-18 Saratoga Springs, N. Y. 

William Warner Bishop 1918-19 Asbury Park, N. J. 

Chalmers Hadley 1919- 

*Died. Oct. 22. 1897. 

Died March 1, 1894. 

a Died Sept. 8, 1903. 

*Died Oct. 28, 1911. 

"Died Aug. 15, 1913. 

Died March 11, 1913. 

7 Died Oct. 22, 1913. 

8 Died Sept. 21, 1916. 

"Died Feb. 16, 1917. 
10 Died June 16, 1917. 
"Died Sept. 13, 1917. 
"Died Aug. 24. 1918. 
"Died Dec. 8. 1918. 
"Died July 30, 1919. 

President absent. General sessions presided over by ex-presidents Green, Hill, Carr, 
Andrews, Bostwick and ex-vice-president Alice S. Tyler. 

President absent. General sessions presided over by vice-presidents Brown and Hadley. 






HANDBOOK 



443 



SECRETARIES 

Melvil Dewey, 1876-90. 

William E. Parker and Mary Salome Cut- 
ler, 1890-July 1891. 

Frank Pierce Hill, 1891-95. 

Henry Livingston Elmendorf, 1895-96. 

Rutherford Platt Hayes, 1896-97. 

Melvil Dewey, 1897-98. 

Henry James Carr, 1898-1900. 

Frederick Winthrop Faxon, igOO-OS. 

James Ingersoll Wyer, Jr., 1902-09. 

(Edward Clarence Hovey, Executive Offi- 
cer, 1905-07.) 

Chalmers Hadley, 1909-11. 

George Burwell Utley, 1911- 

RECORDERS 

Ernest Cushing Richardson, 1887-89. 
George Thomas Little, 1889-92. 
Henry Munson Utley, 1892-93. 
Henry James Carr, 1893-95. 
Charles Alexander Nelson, 1895-96. 
Gardner Maynard Jones, 1896-97. 
Helen Elizabeth Haines, 1897-1907. 
Lutie Eugenia Stearns, 1907-08. 
Mary Eileen Ahern, 1908. 
Alice Bertha Kroeger, 1908-09. 

REGISTRAR 

Nina E. Browne, 1889-1909. 



TREASURERS 

Melvil Dewey, Oct. 1876-April 1877. 
Charles Evans, April 1877-Sept. 1878. 
Melvil Dewey, 1897-98. 
Frederick Jackson, April 1879-July 1880. 
Melvil Dewey, July 1880-Dec. 1880; Chair- 
man Finance Committee, Dec. 1880- 

March 1881. 
Frederick Jackson, March 1881-May 1882; 

Chairman Finance Committee, May 1882- 

Sept. 1882. 
James Lyman Whitney, Sept. 1882-Oct. 

1886. 

Henry James Carr, Oct. 1886-Sept. 1893. 
George Watson Cole, Sept. 1893-Aug. 1895. 
Edwin Hatfield Anderson, Aug. 1895-Aug. 

1896. 

George Watson Cole, Sept.-Nov. 1896. 
Charles Knowles Bolton, Dec. 1896-June 

1897. 
Gardner Maynard Jones, June 1897-Sept. 

1906. 
George Franklin Bowerman, Sept. 1906- 

Aug. 1907. 
Anderson Hoyt Hopkins, Aug. 1907-July 

1908. 

Purd B. Wright, July 1908-Jan. 1910. 
Carl B. Roden, Jan. 1910- 



OFFICERS, W9-J920 

President 
Chalmers Hadley, Public Library, Denver, Colo. 

First Vice-President 
George H. Locke, Public Library, Toronto, Can. 

Second Vice-President 
Cornelia Marvin, Oregon State Library, Salem, Ore. 

Executive Board 
The president, vice-presidents and six other members as- follows: 

For term expiring 1920 

Electra C. Doren, Public library, Dayton, O. 

Frank P. Hill, Public library, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

For term expiring 1921 

Linda A. Eastman, Public library, Cleveland, O. 
Adam Strohm, Public library, Detroit, Mich. 

For term expiring 1922 

John Cotton Dana, Free Public library, Newark, N. J. 
- Edith Tobitt, Public library, Omaha, Neb. 



Secretary 
George B. Utley, 78 East Washington St., Chicago. 

Treasurer 
Carl B. Roden, Public library, Chicago. 

Trustees of the Endowment Fund 

W. W. Appleton, New York. (Term expires 1920.) 

M. Taylor Pyne, Princeton, N. J. (Term expires 1921.) 

E. W. Sheldon, New York. (Term expires 1922.) 



COUNCIL OF THE AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 

J9J9-J920 



The Executive Board 
Chalmers Hadley, Public library, Denver, 

Colo. 
George H. Locke, Public library, Toronto, 

Can. 
Cornelia Marvin, Oregon State library, 

Salem, Ore. 
Electra C. Doren, Public library, Dayton, 

Ohio. 
Frank P. Hill, Public library, Brooklyn, 

N. Y. 

Linda A. Eastman, Public library, Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 
Adam Strohm, Public library, Detroit, 

Mich. 
J. C. Dana, Free public library, Newark, 

N. J. 
Edith Tobitt, Public library, Omaha, Neb. 

Ex-Presidents Now Members 

Melvil Dewey, Lake Placid Club, N. Y. 
J. C. Dana, Free public library, Newark, 

N. J. 
Herbert Putnam, Library of Congress, 

Washington, D. C. 
W. C. Lane, Harvard university library, 

Cambridge, Mass. 
H. J. Carr, Public library, Scranton, Pa. 

E. C. Richardson, Princeton university li- 
brary, Princeton, N. J. , 

F. P. Hill, Public library, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
C. W. Andrews, The John Crerar library, 

Chicago. 

A. E. Bostwick, Public library, St. Louis, 
Mo. 

N. D. C. Hodges, Public library, Cincin- 
nati, Ohio. 

J. I. Wyer, Jr., State library, Albany, N. Y. 

Mrs. H. L. Elmendorf, Public library, Buf- 
falo, N. Y. 

E. H. Anderson, Public library, New York 
City. 

H. C. Wellman, City library, Springfield, 
Mass. 

Walter L. Brown, Public library, Buffalo, 
N. Y. 

Thomas L. Montgomery, Pennsylvania 
State library, Harrisburg, Pa. 



William Warner Bishop, University of 
Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. 
Presidents of Affiliated Organizations 

Elias J. Lien, National association of state 
libraries, Minnesota State library, St. 
Paul, Minn. 

Frederick C. Hicks, American association 
of law libraries, Columbia University, 
New York City. 

Julia A. Robinson, League of library com- 
missions, Iowa library commission, Des 
Moines, Iowa. 

Maud A. Carabin, Special libraries asso- 
ciation, Detroit-Edison Company, De- 
troit, Mich. 
Elected by the Association at Large 

Term expires 1920 

Carl H. Milam, American Library Associa- 
tion, New York City. 

Herbert S. Hirshberg, Public library, To- 
ledo, Ohio. 

Mary L. Jones, South Pasadena, Cal. 

C. E. Rush, Public library, Indianapolis, 
Ind. 

Sarah C. N. Bogle, Carnegie library school, 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Term expires 1921 

Mary F. Isom, Library Association, Port- 
land, Ore. 

Willard Austen, Cornell University li- 
brary, Ithaca, N. Y. 

J. C. M. Hanson, University of Chicago li- 
braries, Chicago. 

Gratia A. Countryman, Public library, 
Minneapolis, Minn. 

Linda A. Eastman, Public library, Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 

Term expires 1922 

Edna B. Pratt, Public library, Passaic, 
N. J. 

Louisa M. Hooper, Public library, Brook- 
line, Mass. 

Mary Emogene Hazeltine, University of 
Wisconsin library school, Madison, Wis. 

Willis K. Stetson, Free public library, New 
Haven, Conn. 



446 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Malcolm G. Wyer, University of Nebraska 
library, Lincoln, Neb. 

Term expires 1923 

W. Dawson Johnston, Public library, St. 
Paul, Minn. 

Joseph L. Wheeler, Public library, Youngs- 
town, Ohio. 

Mary G. Saxe, Public library, Westmount, 
P. Q., Can. 

Jessie Fremont Hume, New York City. 

Henry N. Sanborn, Public library, Bridge- 
port, Conn. 

Term, expires 1924 

Miriam E. Carey, Minnesota State Board 
of Control, St. Paul, Minn. 

Bessie Sargeant Smith, Public library, 
Cleveland, Ohio. 

P. L. Windsor, University of Illinois li- 
brary, Urbanaj 111. 

Lloyd W. Josselyn, Public library, Birm- 
ingham, Ala. 

C. C. Williamson, Public library, New York 
City. 

Elected by the Council 
Term expires 1920 

George F. Bowerman, Public library, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

W. N. C. Carlton, Newberry library, Chi- 
cago. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Claypool Earl, Indiana pub- 
lic library commission, Connersville, 
Ind. 

Mary E. Hall, Girls' High School library, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Harold L. Leupp, University of California 
library, Berkeley, Cal. 

Term expires 1921 
Gertrude E. Andrus, Seattle, Wash. 
Chalmers Hadley, Public library, Denver, 

Colo. 

Isadore G. Mudge, Columbia University li- 
brary, New York City. 



W. T. Porter, 708 Fourth National Bank 

Building, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
A. S. Root, Oberlin College library, Ober- 

lin, Ohio. 

Term expires 1922 

George T. Settle, Free public library, Lou- 
isville, Ky. 

Marilla W. Freeman, Goodwyn Institute 
library, Memphis, Tenn. 

George W. Fuller, Public library, Spokane, 
Wash. 

Frances E. Earhart, Public library, Duluth, 
Minn. 

Walter M. Smith, University of Wisconsin 
library, Madison, Wis. 

Term expires 192S 

M. Llewellyn Raney, The Johns Hopkins 
University, Baltimore, Md. 

Pauline McCauley, Morganfield, Ky. 

Milton J. Ferguson, California State li- 
brary, Sacramento, Cal. 

Agnes Van Valkenburgh, Public library, 
Bay City, Mich. 

R. R. Bowker, Library Journal, 62 W. 45th 
St., New York City. 

Term expires 1924 

Clara F. Baldwin, Minnesota state depart- 
ment of education, library division, St. 
Paul, Minn. 

June R. Donnelly, Simmons College li- 
brary, Boston, Mass. 

Everett R. Perry, Public library, Los An- 
geles, Cal. 

Alice S. Tyler, Western Reserve Universi- 
ty library school, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Purd B. Wright, Public library, Kansas 
City, Mo. 
Affiliated State Library Associations 

(Entitled to representation in the Council 
by the president or by an alternate 
elected at the annual meeting. For list 
of affiliated associations see page 462.) 



STANDING COMMITTEES, J9J9-20 



Work with the Blind 

Mabel R. Gillis, California State library, 
Sacramento, Cal. 

Mrs. Emma N. Delfino, Free library, Phil- 
adelphia, Pa. 

Lucille A. Goldthwaite, Public library, 
New York City. 

N. D. C. Hodges, Public library, Cincin- 
nati, Ohio. 

Mrs. Gertrude T. Rider, Library of Con- 
gress, Washington, D. C. 

Laura M. Sawyer, Perkins Institute, Wa- 
tertown, Mass. 

S. C. Swift, Canadian free library for the 
Blind, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. 

Book Buying 

Franklin F. Hopper, Public library, New 
York City. 

Charles H. Compton, American Library 
Association, New York City. 

Anna G. Hubbard, Public library, Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 

Bookbinding 

Gertrude Stiles, Public library, Cleveland, 
Ohio. 

Judson T. Jennings, Public library, Ta- 
coma, Wash. 

Everett R. Perry, Public library, Los An- 
geles, Cal. 

Mary E. Wheelock, Public library, St. 
Louis, Mo. 

Co-ordination 

Andrew Keogh, Yale University library, 
New Haven, Conn. 

William W. Bishop, University of Michi- 
gan Library, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Mrs. H. L. Elmendorf, Public library, Buf- 
falo, N. Y. 

D. N. Handy, The Insurance Library Asso- 
ciation, Boston, Mass. 

N. D. C. Hodges, Public library, Cincin- 
nati, Ohio. 

W. Dawson Johnston, Public library, St. 
Paul, Minn. 

William C. Lane, Harvard College library, 
Cambridge, Mass. 



E. C. Richardson, Princeton University 

library, Princeton, N. J. 
H. O. Severance, University of Missouri 

library, Columbia, Mo. 

Education 

W. H. Kerr, Kansas State Normal School 
library, Emporia, Kas. 

M. E. Ahern, editor Public Libraries, Chi- 
cago. 

C. C. Certain, Cass Technical High School, 
Detroit, Mich. 

Mary E. Hall, Girls' High School, Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. 

W. E. Henry, University of Washington 
library, Seattle, Wash. 

John H. Leete, Carnegie library, Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. 

Charles E. McLenegan, Public library, 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

Guy E. Marion, Community Motion Pic- 
ture Bureau, New York City. 

Joy E. Morgan, New York State Library 
School, Albany, N. Y. 

Marie Amna Newberry, Public library, 
Toledo, Ohio. 

William Orr, 347 Madison Ave., New York 
City. 

EfHe L. Power, Carnegie library, Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. 

Ralph L. Power, College of Business Ad- 
ministration, Boston University, Bos- 
ton, Mass. 

J. W. Searson, Kansas State Agricultural 
College, Manhattan, Kas. 

Federal and State Relations 

Edward H. Redstone, Massachusetts State 

library, Boston, Mass. 
George F. Bowerman, Public library, 

Washington, D. C. 

D. C. Brown, Indiana State library, Indi- 
anapolis, Ind. 

Walter L. Brown, Public library, Buffalo, 
N. Y. 

George S. Godard, Connecticut State li- 
brary, Hartford, Conn. 

George T. Settle, Free public library, 
Louisville, Ky. 



448 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Mary L. Titcomb, Washington County 
free library, Hagerstown, Md. 

Finance 

Linda A. Eastman, Public library, Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 

C. W. Andrews, John Crerar library, Chi- 
cago. 

H. W. Graver, Engineering Societies li- 
brary, New York City. 

International Relations 

Herbert Putnam, Library of Congress, 
Washington, D. C. 

E. H. Anderson, Public library, New York 
City. 

R. R. Bowker, Library Journal, New York 
City. 

W. N. C. Carlton, Newberry library, Chi- 
cago. 

John Cotton Dana, Free public library, 
Newark, N. J. 

T. W. Koch, Northwestern University li- 
brary, Evanston, 111. 

George H. Locke, Public library, Toronto, 
Ontario, Canada. 

E. C. Richardson, Princeton University 
library, Princeton, N. J. 

Library Administration 

George F. Bowerman, Public library, 
Washington, D. C. 

H. S. Hirshberg, Public library, Toledo, 
Ohio. 

Beatrice Winser, Free public library, New- 
ark, N. J. 

Library Training 

Alice S. Tyler, Western Reserve Univer- 
sity Library School, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Clara F. Baldwin, Library Division, Min- 
nesota Department of Education, St. 
Paul, Minn. 

Sarah C. N. Bogle, Carnegie Library 
School, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

George O. Carpenter, trustee Public libra- 
ry, St. Louis, Mo. 

Louise B. Krause, H. M. Byllesby and 
Company, Chicago. 

Henry N. Sanborn, Public library, Bridge- 
port, Conn. 



F. K. Walter, General Motors Corporation, 

Detroit, Mich. 
Malcolm G. Wyer, University of Nebraska 

library, Lincoln, Neb. 

Program 

Chalmers Hadley, Public library, Denver, 

Colo. 
George H. Locke, Public library, Toronto, 

Ontario, Canada. 
George B. Utley, A. L. A. Executive Office, 

Chicago. 

Public Documents 

H. H. B. Meyer, Library of Congress, 
Washington, D. C. 

Tommie Dora Barker, Carnegie library, 
Atlanta, Ga. 

Gratia A. Countryman, Public library, 
Minneapolis, Minn. 

W. O. Carson, Department of Education, 
Toronto, Ontario, Canada. 

Milton J. Ferguson, California State li- 
brary, Sacramento, Calif. 

Clarence B. Lester, Wisconsin free libra- 
ry commission, Madison, Wis. 

Thomas M. Owen, Department of Ar- 
chives and History, Montgomery, Ala. 

S. H. Ranck, Public library, Grand Rapids, 
Mich. 

Publicity 

C. H. Compton, American Library Asso- 
ciation, New York City. 

L. J. Bailey, Public library, Gary, Ind. 

J. C. Dana, Free public library, Newark, 
N. J. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Claypool Earl, Connersville, 
Ind. 

H. S. Hirshberg, Public library, Toledo, 
Ohio. 

Marion Humble, American Library Asso- 
ciation, New York City. 

L. W. Josselyn, Public library, Binning 
ham, Ala. 

W. H. Kerr, Kansas State Normal School 
library, Emporia, Kan. 

M. W. Meyer, American Library Associa- 
tion, New York City. 

C. H. Milam, American Library Associa- 
tion, New York City. 



HANDBOOK 



449 



Paul M. Paine, Public library, Syracuse, 
N. Y. 

S. H. Ranck, Public library, Grand Rapids, 
Mich. 

Charles E. Rush, Public library, Indian- 
apolis, Ind. 

Forrest B. Spaulding, American Library 
Association, New York City. 

George B. Utley, A. L. A. Executive Office, 
Chicago. 



J. L. Wheeler, Public library, Youngs- 
town, Ohio. 

William F. Yust, Public library, Roches- 
ter, N. Y. 

Travel 

P. W. Faxon, 83 Francis St., Boston, Mass. 

C. H. Brown, Sixth Division, Bureau of 
Navigation, Navy Department, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

John F. Phelan, Public library, Chicago. 



SPECIAL COMMITTEES J9J9-J920 



Committee to Assist in Revision of Adams' 
Manual of Historical Literature 

(Appointed by Executive Board.) 

A. H. Shearer, Grosvenor library, Buf- 
falo, N. Y. 

H. H. B. Meyer, Library of Congress, 
Washington, D. C. 

C. W. Reeder, Ohio State University li- 
brary, Columbus, Ohio. 

Co-operative Book Buying 

(Appointed by Executive Board.) 

Walter L. Brown, Public library, Buf- 
falo, N. Y. 

C. H. Compton, American Library Asso- 
ciation, New York City. 

Anna G. Hubbard, Public library, Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 

Paul M. Paine, Public library, Syracuse, 
N. Y. 

J. L. Wheeler, Public library, Youngs- 
town, Ohio. 

Promotion and Co-operation in the Devel- 
opment of Printed Catalog Cards in 
Relation with International Arrange- 
ments 

(Appointed by Council.) 

W. C. Lane, Harvard College library, 
Cambridge, Mass. 

E. H. Anderson, Public library, New 
York City. 

C. W. Andrews, John Crerar library, 
Chicago. 

J. C. M. Hanson, University of Chicago 
libraries, Chicago. 

C. H. Hastings, Library of Congress, 
Washington, D. C. 

Catalog Rules 

(Appointed by Executive Board.) 

William W. Bishop, University of Michi- 
gan library, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

T. F. Currier, Harvard College library, 
Cambridge, Mass. 

J. C. M. Hanson, University of Chicago 
libraries, Chicago. 

Sophie K. Hiss, Public library, Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 



A. G. S. Josephson, John Crerar library, 

Chicago. 
Andrew Keogh, Yale University library, 

New Haven, Conn. 
Margaret Mann, library of the United 

Engineering Societies, New York 

City. 
Charles Martel, Library of Congress, 

Washington, D. C. 
Axel Moth, Public library, New York 

City. 

Civil Service Relations 

(Appointed by Council.) 

Purd B. Wright, Public library, Kansas 
City, Mo. 

Mary Eileen Ahern, "Public Libraries," 
Chicago. 

Claribel R. Barnett. U. S. Department 
of Agriculture library, Washington, 
D. C. 

W. Dawson Johnston, Public library, St. 
Paul, Minn. 

John H. Leete, Carnegie library, Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. 

Carl P. P. Vitz, Public library, Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 

Code for Classifiers 

(Appointed by Executive Board.) 

Wm. Stetson Merrill, Newberry library, 
Chicago. 

J. C. Bay, John Crerar library, Chicago. 

W. S. Biscoe, New York State library, 
Albany, N. Y. 

Letitia Gosman, Princeton University li- 
brary, Princeton, N. J. 

J. C. M. Hanson, University of Chicago 
libraries, Chicago. 

Charles Martel, Library of Congress, 
Washington, D. C. 

Julia Pettee, Union Theological Semi- 
nary library, New York City. 

P. L. Windsor, University of Illinois li- 
brary, Urbana, 111. 

Revision of Constitution 

(Appointed by Executive Board.) 
William W. Bishop, University of Michi- 
gan library, Ann Arbor, Mich. 



HANDBOOK 



451 



Chalmers Hadley, Public library, Den- 
ver, Colo. 

George B. Utley, A. L. A. Executive 
Office, Chicago. 

Decimal Classification Advisory Committee 

C. W. Andrews, John Crerar library, 
Chicago. 

Corinne Bacon, care H. W. Wilson Co., 
New York City. 

W. S. Biscoe, New York State library, 
Albany, N. Y. 

Jennie D. Fellows, New York State li- 
brary, Albany, N. Y. 

Charles A. Flagg, Public library, Ban- 
gor, Me. (Secretary of Committee.) 

George Winthrop Lee, Stone and Web- 
ster, Boston, Mass. 

Julia Pettee, Union Theological Semi- 
nary library, New York City. 

Mary L. Sutliff, Library School, Public 
library, New York City. 

Enlarged Program 

(Appointed by Executive Board.) 

Frank P. Hill, Public library, Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 

Walter L. Brown, Public library, Buffalo, 
N. Y. 

J. C. Dana, Free public library, Newark, 
N. J. 

Carl H. Milam, American Library Asso- 
ciation, New York City. 

Caroline Webster, American Library As- 
sociation, New York City. 

Work with the Foreign-born 

(Appointed by Executive Board.) 
John Foster Carr, Immigrant Publica- 
tion Society, New York City. 
A. L. Bailey, Wilmington Institute free 

library, Wilmington, Del. 
Annie P. Dingman, 1009 First National 

Bank Building, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Frances E. Earhart, Public library, Du- 

luth, Minn. 
Mrs. Eleanor E. Ledbetter, Broadway 

Branch public library, Cleveland, Ohio. 
Anna A. MacDonald, Library Extension 

Div., Pennsylvania State library, Har- 

risburg, Pa. 



Compilation of Reading List on Home 
Economics 

(To serve jointly with a committee from 
the Home Economics Association.) 
(Appointed by Executive Board.) 
Elva L. Bascom, Library School, Texas 

University, Austin, Texas. 
Elizabeth Doren, Public library, Dayton, 

Ohio. 

Linda A. Eastman, Public library, Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 

Mrs. S. H. Ranck, Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Mary L. Titcomb, Washington County 
free library, Hagerstown, Md._ 

Library Work in Hospitals and Charitable 
and Correctional Institutions 

(Appointed by Executive Board.) 

Caroline Webster, American Library As- 
sociation, New York City. 

Miriam E. Carey, Minnesota State 
Board of Control, St. Paul, Minn. 

W. J. Hamilton, Indiana Public Library 
Commission, Indianapolis, Ind. 

E. Kathleen Jones, 517 State House, 
Boston, Mass. 

Julia A. Robinson, Iowa Library Com- 
mission, Des Moines, Iowa. 

Charlotte Templeton, Georgia Library 
Commission, Atlanta, Ga. 

Committee on Preparation of a Bibliogra- 
phy of Humanistic Literature 

(In conjunction with a committee from 
the American Association of Univer- 
sity Professors.) 

(Appointed by Executive Board.) 

William W. Bishop, University of Michi- 
gan library, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

E. H. Anderson, Public library, New 
York City. 

Andrew Keogh, Yale University library, 
New Haven, Conn. 

H. H. B. Meyer, Library of Congress, 
Washington, D. C. 

Investigation of Fire Insurance Rates for 
Libraries 

(Appointed by Council.) 
M. S. Dudgeon, Wisconsin Free Library 
Commission, Madison, Wis. 



452 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Chalmers Hadley, Public library, Den- 
ver, Colo. 

S. H. Ranck, Public library, Grand Rap- 
ids, Mich. 

Legislation 

(Appointed by Council.) 

Clarence B. Lester, Wisconsin Free Li- 
brary Commission, Madison, Wis. 

John B. Kaiser, Public library, Tacoma, 
Wash. 

William R. Watson, University of the 
State of New York, Albany, N. Y. 

Committee of Five on Library Service 
(Appointed by Executive Board.) 
Arthur E. Bostwick, Public library, St. 

Louis, Mo. 

Carl H. Milam, American Library Asso- 
ciation, New York City. 
A. S. Root, Oberlin College library, 

Oberlin, Ohio. 
C. C. Williamson, Public library, New 

York City. 
(One vacancy.) 

Manual of Library Economy 

(Appointed by A. L. A. Publishing 

Board.) 
J. I. Wyer, Jr., New York State library, 

Albany, N. Y. 
Mrs. Harriet P. Sawyer, Public library, 

St. Louis, Mo. 
P. L. Windsor, University of Illinois 

library, Urbana, 111. 

Investigation of Manner in which Muni- 
cipalities are Meeting Obligations to 
Donors 

(Appointed by Executive Board.) 

Walter L. Brown, Public library, Buf- 
falo, N. Y. 

George B. Utley, A. L. A. Executive 
Office, Chicago. 

Malcolm G. Wyer, University of Ne- 
braska library, Lincoln, Neb. 
Deterioration of Newsprint Paper 

(Appointed by Executive Board.) 

H. M. Lydenberg, Public library, New 
York City. 

Cedric Chivers, 911 Atlantic Ave., Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. 



Frank P. Hill, Public library, Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 

Committee to Investigate and Encourage 

Better Salaries 
(Committee not yet appointed.) 

Service Basis of Publication 

(Appointed by Executive Board.) 

Harrison W. Graver, Engineering So- 
cieties library, New York City. 

A. L. Bailey, Wilmington Institute free 
library, Wilmington, Del. 

M. S. Dudgeon, Wisconsin Free Library 
Commission, Madison, Wis. 

H. H. B. Meyer, Library of Congress, 
Washington, D. C. 

Walter M. Smith, University of Wiscon- 
sin library, Madison, Wis. 

Sponsorship for Knowledge 

(Appointed by Council.) 

Charles F. D. Belden, Public library, 
Boston, Mass. 

George W. Lee, Stone and Webster li- 
brary, Boston, Mass. 

John G. Moulton, Public library, Haver- 
hill, Mass. 

George H. Tripp, Free public library, 
New Bedford, Mass. 

Hiller C. Wellman, City library asso- 
ciation, Springfield, Mass. 

Frank H. Whitmore, Public library, 
Brockton, Mass. 

Standardization of Libraries and Certifica- 
tion of Librarians 

(Appointed by Council.) 

P. L. Windsor, University of Illinois 
library, Urbana, 111. 

Electra C. Doren, Public library, Day- 
ton, Ohio. 

Jessie F. Hume, New York City. 

Adam Strohm, Public library, Detroit, 
Mich. 

Hiller C. Wellman, City library asso- 
ciation, Springfield, Mass. 

Union List of Serials 
(Appointed by Council.) 
C. W. Andrews, John Crerar library, 
Chicago. 



HANDBOOK 



453 



Arthur E. Bostwick, Public library, St. 
Louis, Mo. 

Ventilation and Lighting of Public Library 
Buildings 

(Appointed by Council.) 

S. H. Ranck, Public library, Grand Rap- 
ids, Mich. 

C. W. Andrews, John Crerar library, 
Chicago. 

E. D. Burton, University of Chicago li- 
braries, Chicago. 

D. Ashley Hooker, Public library, De- 
troit, Mich. 

H. M. Lydenberg, Public library, New 
York City. 



War Service 

(Appointed by Executive Board.) 

J. I. Wyer, Jr., New York State library, 

Albany, N. Y. 
E. H. Anderson, Public library, New 

York City. 
C. F. D. Belden, Public library, Boston, 

Mass. 
R. R. Bowker, Library Journal, New 

York City. 

Electra C. Doren, Public library, Day- 
ton, Ohio. 
Frank P. Hill, Public library, Brooklyn, 

N. Y. 
Mary L. Titcomb, Washington County 

free library, Hagerstown, Md. 
Executive Secretary: George B. Utley, 

A. L. A. Executive Office, Chicago. 



ENDOWMENT FUNDS 



Following the meeting of 1890 and 
through the efforts of the Trustees section 
to collect a permanent fund "for publish- 
ing the proceedings of the association," 
the Endowment fund (see sec. 5 of Con- 
stitution) was established. It amounts 
now to $8,611.84. To this fund was added 
in 1902 the Carnegie fund of $100,000 
given by Andrew Carnegie as a special 
fund, the income of which shall be applied 
to the preparation and publication of such 
reading lists, indexes and other bibliograph- 
ic and literary aids as would be espe- 



cially useful in the circulating libraries 
of the country. By a vote of the Coun- 
cil, the Carnegie fund has been placed in 
charge of the trustees of the Endowment 
fund. Special mention should be made of 
the benefactions of George lies in financ- 
ing several publications which the Asso- 
ciation would not have been able to have 
published without such financial aid. Full 
information as to the investment and con- 
dition of these funds will be found in the 
reports of the Trustees as printed each 
year in the Conference Proceedings. 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION PUBLISHING BOARD 



Chairman, Arthur E. Bostwick, Public li- 
brary, St. Louis, Mo. (Term expires 
1921.) 

M. S. Dudgeon, Wisconsin free library 
commission, Madison, Wis. (Term ex- 
pires 1921.) 



Josephine A. Rathbone, Pratt Institute Li- 
brary School, Brooklyn, N. Y. (Term 
expires 1920.) 

Carl B. Roden, Public library, Chicago, 111. 
(Term expires 1922.) 

Edith Tobitt, Public Library, Omaha, 
Neb. (Term expires 1920.) 



History. The Publishing Section of the 
American Library Association was organ- 
ized in 1886 to further cooperation among 
libraries in preparing and publishing bib- 
liographies, indexes and special catalogs. 
In 1900 the organization was changed and 
the work placed in charge of a Publishing 
Board of five members, appointed by the 
executive committee of the Association. 
In 1902 Mr. Andrew Carnegie gave a fund 
of $100,000, the income from which is to 
be applied to the preparation and publi- 
cation of desirable library aids. 

Publications. On the following pages is 
a list of the books now in print. A special 
feature of the bibliographic work is the 
annotations made by specialists. 

Prices. Strictly net, unless otherwise 
indicated; postage extra on book publica- 
tions. 

BOOK PUBLICATIONS 
Guide to reference books, by Alice B. 

Kroeger. Revised, 1917, by Isadore G. 

Mudge. Cloth, $2.50 (postage extra). 

Designed to help library assistants, li- 
brary school students, college and normal 
students, teachers, etc., in gaining a knowl- 
edge of reference books quickly. It also 
serves as a guide to the selection of ref- 
erence books for a library. A full index 
shows where to find in the various books 
of reference many topics of general inter- 
est to which there is ordinarily no clue. 

Since the preceding edition of the Guide 
was issued in 1908 many important refer- 
ence books have been issued on all sub- 
jects, and many of the old standards have 
been thoroughly revised. This new edi- 
tion lists over one and a half times as 



many titles as the old and the notes are 
much more critical and minutely descrip- 
tive. 

The new edition is so completely differ- 
ent from the old that it is necessary to 
all libraries making effort at careful ref- 
erence work, and is recommended for pur- 
chase to all libraries having five thousand 
\olumes or more. 
A. L. A. Catalog, edited by Melvil Dewey, 

May Seymour and Mrs. H. L. Elmen- 

dorf. Paper, $1. 

Can be obtained from the Superintend- 
ent of Documents, Washington, D. C., by 
sending a money order for $1 in advance. 

A catalog of 8,000 volumes, suitable for 
a popular library. Designed as a guide in 
buying books for public and private libra- 
ries, as a guide to readers in choosing the 
best books on a given subject, etc. Pub- 
lished 1904. 
A. L. A. Catalog, 1904-11; edited by Elva 

L. Bascom. Cloth, $1.50. 

A selection of about 3,000 titles cover- 
ing the years of 1904-11. Contains a list 
of books in the A. L. A. Catalog of 1904 
which were out of print in 1911, and a list 
of those in the 1904 Catalog now issued in 
new editions. Children's books listed sep- 
arately. 
A. L. A. Index to general literature. Edited 

by W. I. Fletcher. Cloth, $6. 

It does for general literature what Poole 
has done for periodicals, indexing some 
6,000 volumes; collections of essays and 
critical biographic monographs; books of 
travel, general history, etc., in which chap- 
ters or parts are worthy of separate refer- 
ence; reports and publications of boards 



HANDBOOK 



455 



and associations dealing with education, 
labor, health, statistics, etc.; many miscel- 
laneous books, including some volumes of 
the U. S. public documents. 
Supplement to above. Cloth, $4. 

Consists of a cumulation, under one 
alphabet, of the analytics of composite 
books and publications of societies and 
bureaus, indexed in the Annual Library 
Index, 1900 to 1910, inclusive, and of 125 
books never before analyzed in print. 
A. L. A. Portrait index, edited by William 
C. Lane and Nina E. Browne. Cloth, $3. 
Can be obtained from the Superintend- 
ent of Documents, Washington, D. C., by 
sending in advance a money order for $3. 
An index to portraits (about 120,000) 
contained in printed books and periodicals, 
compiled with the cooperation of many 
librarians and others for the A. L. A. Pub- 
lishing board. 

Index to library reports. By Katharine T. 
Moody. 185p. Cloth, $1. 
Opens up a vast amount of library econ- 
omy heretofore buried in library reports. 
A tool for the librarian's office. 
Index to kindergarten songs. By Margery 
C. Quigley. 286p. Cloth, $1.50. 
Plan is similar to that of the well- 
known Granger index to recitations. Three 
types of books are indexed: those contain- 
ing only kindergarten songs, those con- 
taining both kindergarten and folk songs, 
and those including folk songs only. 
Hints to small libraries, by Mary Wright 
Plummer. Fourth edition, thoroughly 
revised. Cloth, 75c. 

Apprentice course for small libraries. By 
the faculty of the Library School of the 
University of Wisconsin. Cloth. 75c. 
Outlines of lessons, with suggestions for 
practice work, study and required reading. 
Revised articles from Wisconsin Library 
Bulletin, v. 10-11. 

Brief guide to the literature of Shakes- 
peare. By H. H. B. Meyer. Paper, 50c. 
"This brief guide to the literature of 
Shakespeare was undertaken at the re- 
quest of the Drama League of America. 
Its object is to provide information con- 
cerning the various elitions of Shakes- 



peare's writings, and to point out at least 
a few of the biographies, commentaries, 
and criticisms which have contributed to 
our knowledge of the poet and his works. 
It is hoped that it will enable the libra- 
rian, the teacher or anyone who may be 
interested, to select the books best suited 
to his particular needs, with the least ex- 
penditure of time and money." Preface. 

Viewpoints in travel; an arrangement of 
books according to their essential inter- 
est. By Josephine Adams Rathbone. 
Paper, 50c. 

"The list aims to present a selection of 
those books usually classed with the litera- 
ture of travel that are interesting for other 
than merely geographical reasons. They 
may appeal to readers for their style of 
presentation, for their associations, for the 
subjects emphasized, as hunting, folk lore, 
nature, or for the personalities revealed. 
Much of this material has been lost be- 
cause the usual geographical arrangement 
has given no clue to the wealth of subject 
matter in books of travel, and people have 
often failed to find among them the sort 
of thing that they are interested in ad- 
venture, art, rural life, analysis of na- 
tional character because there has been 
no grouping of travel literature by these 
essential interests." Preface. 

Lists of material which may be obtained 
free or at small cost. By Mary Joseph- 
ine Booth. Paper, 25c. 
"The aim in compiling this list has been 
to provide for small and medium sized 
libraries a selected list of material which 
will prove of use in supplementing at 
small expense the books and magazines 
already on the shelves. It is hoped that 
it will also be found useful by teachers, 
especially by those who have not access 
to a public library." Extract from Preface. 
A large part of the material listed can 
be had by libraries free for the asking 
from the publishers. The balance Is ob- 
tainable for from five to fifty cents. 
Geography is not included because a list 
on this subject, by Miss Booth, has al- 
ready been issued. 



456 



PERIODICAL 
The Booklist, monthly except in August 

and September. $1.50 a year. 

A magazine on book selection, listing 
monthly from 175 to 200 of the best of the 
current books. Thoroughly annotated with 
descriptive and evaluating notes. Class- 
ified and with index in each number. 

Subject index to the Booklist, v. 1-5, paper, 

25c; v. 7, paper, lOc. 

Substantially a subject guide to the best 
books from 1905 to 1911. Useful as an 
order list in rounding out collections and 
as a subject headings guide to the cata- 
loger. 

A. L. A. MANUAL OF LIBRARY 
ECONOMY 

The following chapters, each forming a 
separate pamphlet, have been printed. 
Price lOc. each; 4c. each in lots of 25 or 
more of one kind. 

1 American library history, by C. K. 

Bolton. 

2 Library of Congress, by W. W. Bishop. 

3 State library, by J. I. Wyer, Jr. 

4 College and university library, by 

J. I. Wyer, Jr. (Revised edition in 
preparation.) 

5 Proprietary and subscription libraries, 

by C. K. Bolton. 

6 The free public library, by Isabel Ely 

Lord. 

7 The high school library, by G. O. 

Ward. 

8 Special libraries, by R. H. Johnston.. 

10 The library building, by W. R. East- 

man. (Revised 1918.) 

11 Furniture, fixtures and equipment, by 

Linda A. Eastman. 

12 Library administration, by A. E. Bost- 

wick. (Revised 1919.) 

13 Training for librarianship, by Mary 

W. Plummer. 

14 Library service, by Emma V. Baldwin. 

15 Branch libraries and other distribut- 

ing agencies, by Linda A. Eastman. 

16 Book selection, by Elva L. Bascom. 



17 Order and accession department, by 

F. F. Hopper. (Revised 1916.) 

18 Classification, by Corinne Bacon. 

20 Shelf department, by Josephine A. 

Rathbone. (Revised 1918.) 

21 Loan work, by Carl P. P. Vitz. (Re- 

vised 1919.) 

23 Government documents (state and 

city), by J. I. Wyer, Jr. 

24 Bibliography, by Isadore G. Mudge. 

25 Pamphlets and minor library material, 

by J. I. Wyer, Jr., and others. 
27 Commissions, state aid and state 
agencies, by Asa Wynkoop. 

29 Library work with children, by Frances 

J. Olcott. 

30 Library work with the blind, by Mary 

C. Chamberlain. 

32 Library printing, by F. K. Walter. 
(Revised edition in preparation.) 

CATALOGER'S AIDS 

Subject headings for use in dictionary cat- 
alogs. Third edition, thoroughly revised 
by Mary J. Briggs. Contains narly 
three times the material of second edi- 
tion. Cloth, $2.50. 

Subject headings for use in dictionary cat- 
alogs of juvenile books. By Margaret 
Mann. Cloth, $1.50. (Bound uniform 
with "List of Subject Headings," by 
Mary J. Briggs.) 

"The subjects and references are those 
used in the dictionary catalog of juvenfle 
books in the Carnegie Library of Pitts- 
burgh, but the style and form have been 
made consistent with the A. L. A. list, 
thus allowing additions to be taken from 
that volume without loss of uniformity. 
"While there has been no attempt made 
to supply an exhaustive list of subjects for 
use in any other than the juvenile catalog, 
it is hoped that the headings may be found 
helpful for cataloging most school libra- 
ries and that they will furnish many sug- 
gestions in the selection of minute head- 
ings for the small public library, where 
it is often found necessary to do exten- 
sive analytical work." Extract from the 
Preface. 



HANDBOOK 



407 



A. L. A. Catalog rules: author and title 
entry. Cloth, 60c. Compiled by commit- 
tees of the American Library Associa- 
tion and the (British) Library Associa- 
tion. 

Cataloging for small libraries. By Theresa 
Hitchler. New edition and entirely re- 
written matter. Enlarged from 84p. to 
316p. Cloth, $1.25. 

This book is the clearest, simplest and 
most comprehensive aid to the untrained 
cataloger of any tool extant. Especially 
designed for the small public library and 
the library of the high school, the normal 
school and the small college. Helpful also 
in cataloging special collections and pri- 
vate libraries. 

FOREIGN BOOK LISTS 

1 German books, compiled by Emma Gat- 

tiker. 50c. 

2 Hungarian books, compiled by J. Maud 

Campbell. 15c. 

3 French books, compiled by J. C. Barcq, 

25c. 

5 Swedish books, compiled by Valfrid 

Palmgren. Paper, 25c. 

6 Polish books, compiled by Mrs. Josefa 

Kudlicka. Paper, 25c. 

7 Russian books, compiled by J. Maud 

Campbell. 50c. 
List of French fiction, by Mme. Sophie 

Cornu and William Beer. Paper, 5c. 

Comprises 186 titles, and is intended as 

a guide to reading for the young and 

for the family /circle. 
Recent French literature, compiled by 

Sarah Graham Bowerman. Paper, 25c. 

An annotated list including "principally 
books of literary merit, by authors of 
standing, which are at the same time suit- 
able for public library readers." It con- 
tains no works translated into French 
from other languages. 

LIBRARY TRACTS 

On subjects pertaining to the establish- 
ment and maintenance of public libraries. 
The tracts are intended to be of service 
especially to small libraries and to be help- 
ful in stimulating an interest in the estab- 
lishment of libraries. Special reduced 



prices when ordered in lots of 50 or more 
copies. 
2 How to start a library, by G. E. Wire. 

Revised edition. 5c. 

5 Notes from the art section of a library, 
with hints on selection and buying, 
by C. A. Cutter. 5c. 
8 A village library, by Mary A. Tarbel'. 

5c. 

10 Why do we need a public library? Ma- 
terial for, a library campaign, by 
Chalmers Hadley. 5c. 

LIBRARY HANDBOOKS 

On subjects pertaining to practice. The 
handbooks, like the tracts, are intended to 
be of service to small libraries and io 
trustees and committees in charge of li- 
braries. Special reduced prices when or- 
dered in lots of 50 or more copies. 
5 Binding for small libraries, by A. L. 
Bailey. New edition, 1915. 15c. 

7 U. S. Government documents in small 

libraries, by J. I. Wyer, Jr. New 
edition, 1914. 15c. 

8 How to choose editions, by William E. 

Foster. 15c. 

9 A normal library budget and its units 

of expense, by O. R. Howard Thom- 
son. 15c. 

10 Manual for libraries in hospitals, pris- 
ons, reformatories and other institu- 
tions, by Carrie E. Scott. 25c. 

MISCELLANEOUS PUBLICATIONS 
Books for boys and girls. By Caroline M. 
Hewins. 112p. Paper, 20 cents. 
Contains a careful selection from the 
last ten years' crop of children's literature 
and a re-weighing of the older books. 
Through it all run the author's spice of 
annotation, the inimitable sparkling quota- 
tions gathered here and there, and her 
original and judicious grouping of the 
various related subjects. 
Graded list of stories for reading aloud. 
Compiled by Harriot E. Hassler and Car- 
rie E. Scott. New edition, revised. Pa- 
per, 10 cents. 

There are 15 stories for each grade and 
some late books have been introduced. 
Annotations and suggestions as to what 



458 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



parts of book should be read. Special 
features are list of books for the story- 
teller and some story hour cycles Story 
of the Cid, Heroes of the crusades, Cuchu- 
lain, Hebrew tales, The Iliad, The Odyssey, 
Tales of American Indians, Robin Hood, 
and Rustem. 

A thousand books for the hospital library. 
Selected from the shelf-list of McLean 
Hospital, Waverley, Mass., by Edith 
Kathleen Jones. With annotations by 
Miriam E. Carey, Florence Waugh and 
Julia A. Robinson. 25c. 
Although this list was primarily com- 
piled for institution libraries, it will be 
useful in public libraries as a reading list 
of bright, breezy and interesting books, 
especially adapted to sick, convalescent 
and tired readers. 

Special indexes in American libraries. A 
list of subjects separately cataloged or 
so arranged as to be readily accessible. 
Paper, 10 cents. 

Useful in reference work, where it will 
often save duplication of effort. 
Selected list of music and books about 
music, for public libraries, by Louisa M. 
Hooper. Paper, 25c. 

Popularizing music through the library; 
by Arthur E. Bostwick. 
Reprinted from Proceedings of Music 
Teachers National Association, 1918. Pa- 
per, lOc. 

Books for high schools, compiled by Mar- 
tha Wilson. Paper, 50c. 
About 1,400 titles; very thoroughly an- 
notated. Suited especially to town and 
small city high schools. Recommended to 
puhlici libraries as a purchase list for 
young people of high school age. Adapted 
from list printed for Minnesota school li- 
braries. 

Aids in library work with foreigners; by 
Marguerite Reid and John G. Moulton. 
List of books for learning English; 
grammars and handbooks in foreign lan- 
guages; books about the United States 
for foreigners, in various languages; and 
aids in selecting foreign books. Price, 10 
cents; special price for 25 or more. 



Collection of social survey material. By 

Florence R. Curtis. Paper, lOc. 

An outline giving a suggestion as to the 
material for a social survey which may be 
gathered and filed by the local public 
library. 
The public school and the social center 

movement, by A. E. Bostwick. Paper, 

lOc. 

Reprint of address at the Chicago, 1912, 
meeting of the National Education Asso- 
ciation. 

Standard library organization and equip- 
ment for secondary schools of different 

sizes, by C. C. Certain. Paper, 25c. 
Periodicals for the small library, by Frank 

K. Walter. Revised 1919. Price, 15c. 
Some recent features in library architec- 
ture. By Chalmers Hadley. Paper, 5c. 

Reprinted from Berkeley Conference 
Proceedings. 
Inspirational influence of books in the life 

of children. By Mrs. Edna Lyman Scott. 

Paper, 5c. 

Reprinted from Berkeley Conference 
Proceedings. 
Statistics of libraries. Paper, 5c. 

Reprinted from Asbury Park Conference 
Proceedings, 1916. 
Making maps available. By Beatrice Win 

ser. Paper, 5c. 

Reprinted from Asbury Park Conference 
Proceedings, 1916. 
550 children's books: a purchase list for 

public libraries. Compiled by Harriet 

H. Stanley. Paper, 15c. 
Library rooms and buildings, by Charles 

C. Soule. Paper, lOc. 

Reprinted by special request from the 
edition of 1902. These building sugges- 
tions are still timely and valuable. 
List of books on scientific management, 

by C. Bertrand Thompson. (Reprinted 

by courtesy of the Harvard University 

Press.) Paper, lOc. 
Analytical cards for Warner's Library of 

the world's best literature. Price, $8. 

By special request these cards have been 
reprinted. Every author and many sub- 
jects are brought out clearly, making the 



HANDBOOK 



459 



Warner Library of incalculably greater 
service. Over 1,000 cards in the set. This 
will undoubtedly be the last reprint of 
these cards. Large libraries would do 
well to order them for their branches. 

LEAGUE OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONS 
PUBLICATIONS 

(For sale by the A. L. A. Publishing Board.) 
Directions for the librarian of a small 
library. By Zaidee Brown. Compiled for 
the Free public library commission of 
Massachusetts. Price, lOc each, 50 or 
more copies to one address, 4c each. 

Handbook of the League of Library Com- 
missions, 1916. New edition, thoroughly re- 



vised. Compiled by Henry N. Sanborn, 

Secretary of the League. Paper, 50c. 

A. L. A. PAPERS AND PROCEEDINGS 

Proceedings for 1885, 1887, 1892, 1894, 
1895, 1897, 1898, 1899, 1908, 1909, 1910, $1.00 
each. 

Proceedings for 1900, 1901, 1902, 1904, 
1906, 1907, 1911, 1912, 1913, 191*. 1915, 
1916, 35c each. 

Proceedings for 1917, 1918, $1.00 each. 

Proceedings for years other than the 
above are out of print. 

For all information regarding the publi- 
cations of the Board, address 
AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, 
78 East Washington St., Chicago. 



SECTIONS OF THE ASSOCIATION 



By means of a system of sections the 
practical usefulness of the A. L. A. meet- 
ings has been considerably enlarged. The 
section meetings, while open to all, pro- 
vide especially for the needs of each class 
of workers, and afford more opportunity 
for the discussion of details. The general, 
or undivided, sessions are thus left free 
for subjects of general interest and the 
consideration of routine matter concerning 
the entire association. 

Seven of these sections maintain a for- 
mal organization from year to year, and 
take under consideration questions relat- 
ing more particularly to their own prov- 
ince. They are as follows: 

COLLEGE AND REFERENCE SECTION 

which dates from a first meeting of the 
college librarians held in 1889. Since then, 
meetings have been held regularly. 

No election of officers was held at the 
1918 meeting. 

The members of the committee on ar- 
rangements are: George Parker Winship, 
Widener library, Harvard University, 
Cambridge, Mass, (for one year) ; Au- 
gustus H. Shearer, Grosvenor Library, 
Buffalo, N. Y. (for two years); Charles J. 



Barr, Yale University, New Haven, Conn, 
(for three years). 

TRUSTEES SECTION 

has had a permanent organization since 
the meeting of 1890. 

More boards of trustees are each year 
recognizing the practical value of having 
their librarians attend the meetings, allow- 
ing them not only the time, but also neces- 
sary expenses in many cases. Equally 
significant is the increasing number of 
trustees who find that it pays to attend 
the A. L. A. meetings each year. By com- 
paring views, and advising with each other 
on their peculiar duties, mutual aid is ren- 
dered toward the efficient discharge of the 
public trust committed to them. Some of 
the meetings of trustees are held jointly 
with the librarians interested in supervis- 
ory problems; others with trustees only 
present; thus favoring the joint and sep- 
arate discussion of salaries, laws, vaca- 
tions, rules for the staff, and other ques- 
tions in which librarians have a personal 
interest that modifies their judgment. 

Officers for 1919-20 are: Chairman, 
Washington T. Porter, Cincinnati, O.; sec- 
retary, T. L. Montgomery, State library, 
Harrisburg, Pa. 



460 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



CATALOG SECTION 

was established by action of the Council in 
1900 and has met at each conference since 
the Waukesha meeting in 1901, excepting 
at St. Louis in 1904, when no section meet- 
ings were held. 

At the Mackinac Island conference 
(1910) the Catalog section completed its 
organization by the adoption of a consti- 
tution and by-laws. Officers for 1919-20 
are: Chairman, Charles A. Flagg, Public 
library, Bangor, Me.; secretary, Mary E. 
Hyde, New York State Library School, 
Albany, N. Y. 

CHILDREN'S LIBRARIANS SECTION 

At the Montreal conference in 1900 an 
informal meeting was held for the purpose 
of personal acquaintance and cooperation 
among those actively engaged in library 
work with children. As a result of this 
meeting the Club of children's librarians 
was formed, and, in recognition of this 
movement for closer organization and 
wider discussion in this field than was af- 
forded at the general sessions of the 
A. L. A., the executive board, in November, 
1900, established this section, which held 
its first meeting at Waukesha in 1901. 

Officers for 1919-20 are: Chairman, 
Elisabeth Knapp, Public library, Detroit, 
Mich.; vice-chairman, Alice I. Hazeltine, 
Public library, St. Louis, Mo.; secretary, 
Adah F. Whitcomb, Public library, Chi- 
cago. 

PROFESSIONAL TRAINING SECTION 

This section was established by vote of 
the Council of A. L. A. on June 26, 1909, 
upon petition signed by the members of 
the Committee on library training. Its 
first meeting was held at the Bretton 
Woods conference and its second meeting 



took place at the Mackinac Island confer- 
ence, when constitution and by-laws were 
adopted. 

Officers for 1919-20 are: Chairman, 
Frances Simpson, University of Illinois 
library school, Urbana, 111.; vice-chairman, 
June R. Donnelly, Simmons College libra- 
ry school, Boston, Mass.; secretary, Rena 
Reese, Public library, Denver, Colo. 

AGRICULTURAL LIBRARIES SECTION 
At the Mackinac Island conference a 
round table of librarians of agricultural 
libraries was held, at which it was voted 
to request the Council of the A. L. A. to 
create an agricultural libraries section. 
Conditions having been complied with, this 
was done at the Pasadena conference in 
1911. Officers for 1919-20 are: Chairman, 
Grace E. Derby, Kansas State Agricultural 
College library, Manhattan, Kas.; secre- 
tary, Elizabeth Forrest, College of Agri- 
culture and Mechanic Arts library, Uni- 
versity of Montana, Bozeman, Mont. 

SCHOOL LIBRARIES SECTION 

At the conference of 1913 and 1914 in- 
formal round table meetings of high and 
normal school librarians were held, and at 
the latter conference a formal petition was 
made to the Council that a section for 
school libraries be established. The Coun- 
cil in January, 1915, authorized the organ- 
ization of the section, and the first meet- 
ing was held at the Berkeley conference. 

Officers for 1919-20 are: Chairman, Mar- 
tha C. Pritchard, State Normal School li- 
brary, Bridge water, Mass.; vice-chairman, 
Evelyn A. Steel, Oakland Technical High 
School library, Oakland, Calif.; secretary, 
Mary H. Pooley, East High School libra- 
ry, Cincinnati, Ohio. 



AFFILIATED ORGANIZATIONS 



Acting under Section 16 of the Consti- 
tution and upon applications formally 
made by the proper officers, the Council 
has regularly affiliated with the American 
Library Association the following na- 
tional organizations of kindred purpose. 
These societies meet annually at the time 
and place of meeting of the A. L. A., their 
members enjoy all privileges of members 
of the larger body as to railroad and hotel 
rates and conference hospitalities, their 
proceedings are included in the A. L. A. 
conference volume and they are often for- 
mally represented by designated delegates 
upon the program of the Association. 

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF STATE 
LIBRARIES 

Officers for 1919-20 are as follows: Pres- 
ident, Elias J. Lien, Minnesota State li- 
brary, St. Paul, Minn.; first vice-president, 
Edward L. Redstone, Massachusetts State 
library, Boston, Mass.; second vice-presi- 
dent, Mrs. Maud Barker Cobb, Georgia 
State library, Atlanta, Ga.; secretary- 
treasurer, Mrs. Eva May Fowler, Illinois 
State library, Springfield, 111. 

LEAGUE OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONS 

Officers for 1919-20 are as follows: Presi- 
dent, Julia A. Robinson, Iowa library com- 
mission, Des Moines, Iowa; first vice-presi- 
dent, Charlotte Templeton, Georgia library 
commission, Atlanta, Ga.; second vice- 
president, Mrs. J. A. Thompson, Oklahoma 
library commission, Chickasha, Okla.; sec- 
retary-treasurer, Anna May Price, Illinois 



library extension commission, Springfield, 
111.; three members of the executive board 
for one, two and three year periods, re- 
spectively, Grace E. Kingsland, New Hamp- 
shire public library commission, Concord, 
N. H.; Matthew S. Dudgeon, Wisconsin 
free library commission, Madison, Wis.; 
Elizabeth B. Wales, Missouri library com- 
mission, Jefferson City, Mo. 

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF LAW 
LIBRARIES 

Officers for 1919-20 are as follows: 
President, Frederick C. Hicks, Columbia 
University, New York City; first vice- 
president, Sumner Y. Wheeler, Essex Bar 
Association library, Salem, Mass.; second 
vice-president, Mary K. Ray, Nebraska 
State library, Lincoln, Neb.; secretary, 
Agnes R. Wright, Wyoming State library, 
Cheyenne, Wyo.; treasurer, Anna M. Ryan, 
Supreme Court library, Buffalo, N. Y.; ex- 
ecutive committee: the above officers and 
Edward H. Redstone, John T. Fitzpatrick 
and George S. Godard. 

SPECIAL LIBRARIES ASSOCIATION 

Officers for 1919-20 are as follows: 
President, Maud A. Carabin, Detroit-Edi- 
son Company, Detroit, Mich.; vice-presi- 
dent, E. H. Redstone, Massachusetts State 
library, Boston, Mass.; secretary-treasurer, 
Estelle 'L. Liebmann, The Ronald Press, 
New York City; executive board, the fore- 
going officers and E. H. McClelland, Car- 
negie library, Pittsburgh, Pa.; J. H. Frie- 
del, Boston, Mass. 



STATE LIBRARY ASSOCIATIONS AFFILIATED WITH THE A.L. A. 

(Under conditions of Section 3a of the By-laws to tue Constitution.) 



California: President, C. B. Joeckel, Pub- 
lic library, Berkeley. 

Colorado: President, Manly D. Ormes, 
Colorado College, Colorado Springs. 

Connecticut: President, Grace A. Child, 
Normal School library, Willimantic. 

District of Columbia: President, Herbert 
Putnam, Library of Congress, Washing- 
ton. 

Illinois: President, Helen A. Bagley, Pub- 
lic library, Oak Park. 

Indiana: President, Margaret Wade, Pub- 
lic library, Anderson. 

Iowa: President, Maria C. Brace, Public 
library, Waterloo. 

Kansas: President, Julius Lucht, City li- 
brary, Wichita. 

Kentucky: President, Frank Kavanaugh, 
State library, Frankfort. 

Maine; President, Annie L. Barr, Free li- 
brary, Belfast. 

Michigan: President, Annie A. Pollard, 
Public library, Grand Rapids. 

Minnesota: President, Mrs. J. L. Blanch- 
ard, Public library, Little Falls. 

Missouri: President, Harold L. Wheeler, 
School of Mines, Rolla. 



Montana: President, Josephine M. Haley, 
Public library, Helena. 

Nebraska: President, May Ingles, Univer- 
sity Place. 

New York: President, Caroline Webster, 
American Library Association, N. Y. 
City. 

North Dakota: President, Alfred D. Kea- 
tor, University of North Dakota library, 
University. 

Ohio: President, Joseph L. Wheeler, Pub- 
lic library, Youngstown. 

Oklahoma: President, Alma R. McGlenn, 
Tulsa. 

Pacific-Northwest: President, Charles W. 
Smith, Washington University library, 
Seattle. 

South Dakota: President, Helen Miner, 
Yankton College library, Yankton. 

Tennessee: President, Mary U. Rothrock, 
Lawson McGhee library, Knoxville. 

Utah: President, Grace Harris, Public li- 
brary, Ogden. 

Wisconsin: Acting President, Frances A. 
Hannum, Public library, Racine. 



OTHER LIBRARY ORGANIZATIONS 

(Not affiliated with the A. L. A.) 



AMERICAN LIBRARY INSTITUTE 

Officers for 1919-20: President, W. N. 
C. Carlton, Newberry library, Chicago; 
secretary, Andrew Keogh, Yale University, 
New Haven, Conn. 

ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN LIBRARY 
SCHOOLS 

Officers for 1919-20: President Frank 
K. Walter, General Motors Corporation, 
Detroit, Mich.; secretary, Florence R. Cur- 
tis, University of Illinois Library School, 
Urbana, 111. These officers, together with 
the retiring president, Alice S. Tyler, 
Western Reserve University Library 



School, Cleveland, Ohio, constitute the 
Executive Committee. 

BIBLIOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY OF 
AMERICA 

Officers for 1919-20: President, George 
Watson Cole, 4 E. Fifty-seventh St., New 
York City; secretary, A. H. Shearer, Gros- 
venor library, Buffalo, N. Y. 

NATIONAL EDUCATION ASSOCIATION 
LIBRARY DEPARTMENT 

Officers for 1919-20: President, O. S. 
Rice, supervisor of School Libraries, 
Madison, Wis.; secretary, Irma Walker, 
High School library, Biwabik, Minn. 



HANDBOOK 



463 



LIBRARY PERIODICALS 

The Booklist. An annotated buying list 
of current books suitable for small and 
larger public libraries. Published month- 
ly, except in August and September, by 
the A. Li. A. Publishing Board, 78 East 
Washington St., Chicago. Price $1.50 a 
year, 20c a copy. Sent free to all libraries 
that are members of the Association. 

Bulletin of the American Library Asso- 
ciation. The official organ of the Asso- 
ciation, sent without charge to members 
only. Published bi-monthly, one issue 
being the "Proceedings" of the annual con- 
ference and another being the Handbook. 
Additional copies of any number except 
the "Proceedings" may be furnished at 25 
cents each, and the "Proceedings" at $1, 
plus postage; to non-members, $2, plus 
postage. 



The following periodicals are not offi- 
cially connected with the A. L. A.: 

Library Journal. A semi-monthly expon- 
ent of library progress whose volumes con- 
stitute a bibliothecal work now recognized 
as a necessity in every progressive library 
and as unexcelled in any language. It is 
published at 62 West Forty-fifth St., New 
York. The subscription price is $5 per 
year. Special rate to small libraries on 
application. 

Public Libraries. A monthly journal 
dealing with every phase of library prog- 
ress. It aims to meet the needs of libra- 
rians in their every-day work by discus- 
sion of library methods, to further general 
ideas, and to give interesting news from 
the library field. Published by Library 
Bureau, 6 North Michigan Ave., Chicago, 
$2 per year. 



STATE AND PROVINCIAL LIBRARY COMMISSIONS 



Alabama Department of Archives and 
History, Division of Library Extension: 
Director, Thomas M. Owen, Montgom- 
ery. 

Arkansas Library Commission: Chairman, 
Hon. George B. Rose, Little Rock. 

British Columbia Library Commission: 
Secretary, Herbert Killam, Provincial 
library, Victoria. 

California State Library: State librarian, 
Milton J. Ferguson, Sacramento. 

Colorado State Library Commission: Sec- 
retary, Charlotte A. Baker, Fort Collins. 

Connecticut Free Public Library Commit- 
tee: Secretary, Caroline M. Hewins, 
Public library, Hartford; visitor and in- 
spector, Mrs. Belle H. Johnson, Hartford. 

Delaware Free Library Commission: Sec- 
retary, Earle D. Willey, State library, 
Dover. 

Georgia Library Commission: Secretary, 
Charlotte Templeton, Atlanta. 

Idaho State Library Commission: Secre- 
tary, Ethel E. Redfield, Boise; librarian, 
Marie M. Schreiber, Boise. 

Illinois Library Extension Commission: 
secretary, Anna May Price, Springfield. 



Indiana Public Library Commission: Sec 
retary, William J. Hamilton, State House, 
Indianapolis. 

Iowa Library Commission: Secretary, 
Julia A. Robinson, State Historical 
Building, Des Moines. 

Kansas Traveling Libraries Commission: 
Secretary, Mrs. Adrian Greene, Topeka. 

Kentucky Library Commission: Secretary, 
Fannie C. Rawson, Frankfort. 

Maine Library Commission: Secretary, 
Henry E. Dunnack, State library, Au- 
gusta. 

Maryland Public Library Commission: 
Secretary, Mrs. M. A. Newell, State Nor- 
mal School, Towson. 

Massachusetts Free Public Library Com- 
mission: General secretary and library 
adviser, E. Louise Jones, State library, 
Boston. 

Michigan State Board of Library Commis- 
sioners: Secretary, Mrs. M. C. Spencer, 
State library, Lansing. 

Minnesota Department of Education, Li- 
brary Division: Library director, Clara 
F. Baldwin, St. Paul. 

Missouri Library Commission: Secretary, 
Elizabeth B. Wales, Jefferson City. 



464 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Nebraska Public Library Commission: 
Acting secretary, Nellie Williams, Lin- 
coln. 

New Hampshire Public Library Commis- 
sion: Secretary, Grace E. Kingsland, 
State Library Building, Concord. 

New Jersey Public Library Commission: 
Librarian, Sarah B. Askew, Trenton. 

New York, The University of the State of 
New York, Educational Extension Divi- 
sion: Chief, William R. Watson, State 
Education Bldg., Albany. 

North Carolina Library Commission: Sec- 
retary, Mary B. Palmer, Raleigh. 

North Dakota Library Commission: Dep- 
uty librarian, Anne Evelyn Peterson, 
Bismarck. 

Ohio Library Organization Department: 
Secretary, J. H. Newman, State library, 
Columbus. 

Oklahoma Library Commission: Secre- 
tary, Mrs. J. R. Dale, Oklahoma City. 

Ontario Department of Education: Pro- 
vincial superintendent of public libra- 
ries, W. O. Carson, Toronto. 



Oregon State Library: State librarian, 
Cornelia Marvin, Salem. 

Pennsylvania State Library, Library Ex- 
tension Division: Chief, Robert P. Bliss, 
Harrisburg. 

Rhode Island State Committee of Libra- 
ries: Secretary, Walter E. Ranger, 
State House, Providence. 

South Dakota Free Library Commission: 
Field librarian, Leora J. Lewis, Pierre. 

Texas State Library: Librarian, Eliza 
beth H. West, Austin. 

Utah Department of Public Instruction: 
Library secretary and organizer, Mary 
E. Downey, Salt Lake City. 

Vermont Free Library Commission: Sec 
retary, Ruth L. Brown, Montpelier. 

Virginia State Library: Librarian, H. R. 
Mcllwaine, Richmond. 

Washington State Library Commission: 
Secretary, J. M. Hitt, Olympia. 

Wisconsin Free Library Commission: 
Secretary, Matthew S. Dudgeon, Madi- 
son. 



STATE LIBRARY ASSOCIATIONS 



Alabama Library Association: President, 
Thomas M. Owen, Montgomery; secre- 
tary, office vacant. 

Arkansas Library Association: President, 
C. W. L. Armour, Fort Smith; secretary, 
Julia Vaulx, State University, Fayette- 
ville. 

British Columbia Library Association; 
President, Miss A. B. Jamieson, 1584 
Sixth Avenue, West, Vancouver; secre- 
tary, Miss Green, Public library, Van- 
couver. 

California Library Association: President, 
C. B. Joeckel, Public library, Berkeley; 
secretary, Alice J. Haines, State library, 
Sacramento. 

Colorado Library Association: President, 
Manly D. Ormes, Colorado College, Colo- 
rado Springs; secretary, Mrs. Alice L. 
Rathborne, Colorado State library, Den- 
ver. 



Connecticut Library Association: Presi- 
dent, Grace A. Child, Normal School 
library, Willimantic; secretary, Dorothy 
Whiting, Beardsley library, Winsted. 

District of Columbia Library Association: 
President, Herbert Putnam, Library of 
Congress, Washington; secretary, Thom- 
as P. Ayer, Federal Trade Commission, 
Washington. 

Georgia Library Association: President, 
David C. Barrow, University of Georgia 
library, Athens; secretary, Tommie Dora 
Barker, Carnegie library, Atlanta. 

Idaho Library Association: President, 
Ruth Cowgill, Boise; secretary, Mar- 
guerite Boardman, Public library, Poca- 
tello. 

Illinois Library Asociation: President, 
Helen A. Bagley, Public library, Oak 
Park; secretary, Josie B. Houchens, 
University of Illinois "library, Urbana. 



HANDBOOK 



465 



Indiana Library Association: President, 
Margaret Wade, Public library, Ander- 
son; secretary, Lulu Miesse, Public li- 
brary, Noblesville. 

Indiana Library Trustees Association: 
President, H. F. Kepner, Corydon; sec- 
retary. M. H. Krauss, Hammond. 

Iowa Library Association: President, 
Maria C. Brace, Public library, Water- 
loo; secretary, Eleanor M. Fawcett, 
Iowa Traveling library, Des Moines. 

Kansas Library Association: President, 
Julius Lucht, City library, Wichita;, 
secretary, Ida M. Day, City library, Hut- 
chinson. 

Kentucky Library Association: President, 
Frank Kavanaugh, Kentucky State li- 
brary, Frankfort; secretary, Alice F. 
Gilmore, Free public library, Louisville. 

Keystone State Library Asociation: Pres- 
ident, John H. Leete, Carnegie library, 
Pittsburgh; secretary, Miss M. E. Crock- 
er, James V. Brown library, Williams- 
port. 

Maine Library Association: President, 
Annie L. Barr, Free library, Belfast; 
secretary, Marion Brainerd, Maine State 
library, Augusta. 

Maritime Library Association: President, 
E. J. Lay, Amherst, Nova Scotia; secre- 
tary, Mrs. Mary K. Ingraham, Acadia 
University, Wolfville, Nova Scotia. 

Massachusetts Library Club: Actinv presi- 
dent, John G. Moulton, Public library, 
Haverhill; secretary, Orlando C. Davis, 
Waltham. 

Michigan Library Association: President, 
Annie A. Pollard, Public library, Grand 
Rapids; secretary, Mary E. Dow, Pub- 
lic library, Saginaw. 

Minnesota Library Association: Presi- 
dent, Mrs. J. L. Blanchard, Public li- 
brary, Little Falls; secretary, Marie A. 
Todd, Public library, Minneapolis. 

Mississippi Library Association: Presi- 
dent, Mrs. Helen D. McClurg, Green- 
wood; secretary, Beulah Culberston, 
Columbus. 

xissouri Library Association: President, 
Harold L. Wheeler, School of Mines, 



Holla; secretary, Jane Morey, Public 
library, Sedalia. 

Montana Library Association: President, 
Josephine M. Haley, Public library, 
Helena; secretary, Elizabeth B. Powell, 
Public library, Missoula. 

Nebraska Library Association: President, 
May Ingles, University Place; secretary, 
Florence Oshorne, Public library, Oma- 
ha. 

New Hampshire Library Association: 
President, Elsie Gaskin, Derry; secre- 
tary, Sarah G. Gilmore, Claremont. 

New Jersey Library Association: H. B. 
Van Hoesen, Princeton University li- 
brary, Princeton; secretary, Mary P. 
Parsons, Morristown library, Morris- 
town. 

New York Library Association: Presi- 
dent, Caroline Webster, American Li- 
brary Association, New York City; sec- 
retary, Lucia Henderson, Prendergast 
library, Jamestown. 

North Carolina Library Association: Act- 
ing president, Cornelia Shaw; secre- 
tary, Carrie L. Broughton, State library, 
Raleigh. 

North Dakota Library Association: Pres- 
ident, Alfred D. Keator, University of 
North Dakota library, University; secre- 
tary, Helen Griffiths, Public library, 
Valley City. 

Ohio Library Association: President, 
Joseph L. Wheeler, Public library, 
Youngstown; secretary, Ida E. Sloan, 
Public library, Niles. 

Oklahoma Library Association: Presi- 
dent, Alma R. McGlenn, Tulsa; secre- 
tary, Ruth Brown, Bartlesville. 

Ontario Library Association: President, 
D. M. Grant, Sarnia; secretary, E. A. 
Hardy, 81 Collier St., Toronto. 

Pacific Northwest Library Association: 
President, Charles W. Smith, Washing- 
ton University library, Seattle; secre- 
tary, Ethel Sawyer, Library Association, 
Portland. 

Rhode Island Library Association: Presi- 
dent, William D. Goddard, Deborah Cook 
Sayles Public library, Pawtucket; secre- 



466 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



tary, Gertrude E. Robson, John Carter 
Brown library, Providence. 

Saskatchewan Library Association: Pres- 
ident, A. H. Gibbard, Public library, 
Moose Jaw; secretary, J. R. C. Honey- 
man, Public library, Regina. 

South Carolina Library Association: 
President, R. M. Kennedy, University of 
South Carolina library, Columbia; secre- 
tary, Louise M. McMaster, Public li- 
brary, Marion. 

South Dakota Library Association: Presi- 
dent, Helen Miner, Yankton College li- 
brary, Yankton; secretary, Ethel Else, 
Free Library Commission, Pierre. 

Tennessee Library Association: Presi- 
dent, Mary U. Rothrock, Lawson Mc- 
Ghee library, Knoxville; secretary, Arra- 
lee Bunn, Lawson McGhee library, 
Knoxville. 

Texas Library Association: President, 
Martha Snitzer, Public library, Hous- 
ton; secretary, Miss Altgeld, Public li- 
brary, San Antonio. 



Upper Peninsula Library. Association: 
President, Lydia Olson, Northern State 
Normal School library, Marquette; secre- 
tary, Abigail D. Lyon, Spies Public li- 
brary, Menominee. 

Utah Library Association: President, 
Grace Harris, Public library, Ogden; 
secretary, Vivian B. Wallace, Public li- 
brary, Murray. 

Vermont Library Association: President, 
Mary K. Norton, Proctor; secretary, 
Elizabeth C. Hills, Lyndonville. 

West Virginia Library Association: Presi- 
dent, Miss S. S. Page, Clarksburg; secre- 
tary, Mrs. Elizabeth F. Meyers, Marshall 
College, Huntington. 

Wisconsin Library Association: Acting 
president, Frances Hannum, Public li- 
brary, Racine; secretary, Caroline Vos- 
winkel, Public library, Tomah. 

Wyoming Library Association: President, 
Mrs. Bertha K. VanDevender, Carnegie 
library, Basin; secretary, Agnes R. 
Wright, State library, Cheyenne. 



LIBRARY CLUBS 



Ann Arbor (Mich.) Library Club: Presi- 
dent, Esther Betz, University of Michi- 
gan General library; secretary, Jean 
Sharpe, University of Michigan General 
library. 

Bay Path Library Club: President, Vir- 
ginia M. Keyes, Town library, Lancas- 
ter, Mass.; secretary, Mabel E. Knowl- 
ton, Public library, Shrewsbury, Mass. 

Cape Cod Library Club: President, C. E. 
Harris, Hyannis, Mass.; secretary, Mrs. 
Maurice Crocker, Osterville, Mass. 

Chicago Library Club: President, May 
Massee, The Booklist, 78 East Washing- 
ton Street; secretary, Margaret Furness, 
John Crerar library. 

Columbia (Mo.) Library Club: President, 
Mrs. Emma K. Parsons, University of 
Missouri library; secretary, Hazel Lud- 
wig, 805 Virginia Avenue. 

Des Moines (Iowa) Library Club: Presi- 
dent, Julia A. Robinson, Iowa Library 



Commission; secretary, Minnie Hess, 
Iowa State library. 

Hudson Valley Library Club: President, 
John Sickley, Adriance Memorial libra- 
ry, Poughkeepsie, N. Y.; secretary, Mrs. 
Isobel T. Hallock, Milton-on-Hudson, N. Y. 

Iowa City Library Club: President, Grace 
Wormer, University of Iowa library; 
secretary, Helen Hummer. 

Milwaukee (Wis.) Library Club: Presi- 
dent, Lillian Carter, 501 Newton Ave- 
nue; secretary, Mamie Rehnquist, 1073 
Maryland Avenue. 

Missouri Valley Library Club: President, 
Grace Hill, Public library, Kansas City, 
Mo.; secretary, Mabel C. True, Public 
library, Kansas City, Mo. 

Multnomah (Ore.) Library Club: Presi- 
dent, Nelly Fox, Library association, 
Portland; secretary, Mrs. Alice W. 
Jones, Library association, Portland. 

New York High School Librarians' Asso- 
ciation: President, Elizabeth B. Me- 



HANDBOOK 



467 



Knight, Bay Ridge High School, Brook- 
lyn; secretary, Julia G. Robeson, Rich- 
mond Hill High School, Richmond Hill. 

New York Library Club: President, Isa- 
dore G. Mudge, Columbia University li- 
brary; secretary, Alice I. Vail, 92 Gates 
Avenue, Brooklyn. 

Northern New York Library Club: Presi- 
dent, Mary K. Hasbrouck, Ogdensburg; 
secretary, Miss Bodman, Philadelphia, 
N. Y. 

Old Colony Library Club: President, 
Frank H. Whitmore, Public library, 
Brockton, Mass.; secretary, Helen A. 
Brown, Branch library, Montello, Mass. 

Pennsylvania Library Club: President, 
Luther E. Hewitt, City Hall, Philadel- 
phia; secretary, Martha L. Coplin, Free 
library, Philadelphia. 

Rochester (N. Y.) District Library Club: 
President, Glenn B. Ewell, 10 Brighton 
Street; secretary, Ruth Norton, 119 
North Union Street. 

San Antonio Library Club: President, 
Mrs. F. H. Manker, Upland, Calif.; secre- 
tary, Mrs. Anna Robinson, Claremont, 
Calif. 

Southern Tier Library Club: President, 
Mrs. Ralph W. Kirby, Free library, Bain- 



bridge, N. Y.; secretary, Margery Quig- 
ley, Free library, Endicott, N. Y. 

Southern Worcester Library Club: Presi- 
dent, Mrs. Beatrice Putnam Sprague, 
Uxbridge, Mass.; secretary, Rosalie E. 
Williams, East Douglas, Mass. 

Southwest Missouri Library Club: Presi- 
dent, Alice R. Gladden, Public library, 
Carthage; secretary, Blanche Trigg, 
Public library, Joplin. 

Twin City Library Club: President, Lucy 
Powell, Public library, Minneapolis, 
Minn.; secretary, Josephine Mann. Pub- 
lic library, St. Paul, Minn. 

University of Illinois Library Club: Presi- 
dent, Anne M. Boyd, University of Illi- 
nois library school, Urbana; secretary, 
Grace M. Murray, 305 Davidson Drive, 
Champaign, 111. 

University of Texas Library Club: Presi- 
dent, E. W. Winkler, 1907 Guadalupe 
Street, Austin; secretary, Lena Megee, 
100 E. Twenty-sixth Street, Austin. 

Western Massachusetts Library Club: 
President, Robert Fletcher, Amherst 
College library, Amherst; secretary, 
Marion Bowler, Public library, West 
Springfield. 



MEMBERS 



This list has been prepared at A. L. A. Headquarters, and is, so far as possible, cor- 
rect to Dec. 31, 1919. The names of honorary members are printed separately, names 
of libraries and other institutional members in Gothic type and of life members in 
capitals. 

The number following each name is the registration number in the order of joining. 



* died during the year 
Asst. assistant 
Br. branch 
Catlgr. cataloger 
Child. children 
Circ. circulating or circula- 
tion 
Class. classifier 



ABBREVIATIONS 

Dir. director 
Ed. editor 
P. Free 
Inst. institute 
Jr. junior 
L. Library 
Ln. librarian 
Mem. memorial 



Mgr. manager 
P. Public 
Ref. reference 
Sen. School 
Sr. senior 
Stud. student 
Treas. treasurer 
Trus. trustee 



HONORARY MEMBERS 

Charles William Eliot, LL.D., Cambridge, Mass. 372. 
Ezekiel A. Harris, Jersey City, N. J. 2504. 
Frank A. Vanderlip, Scarborough-on-Hudson, N. Y. 8747. 
Bishop John H. Vincent, Chicago, 111. 1817. 



A. Herr Smith Memorial L. See Lancaster, 

Pa. 

A. K. Smiley P. L. See Redlands, Cal. 
Abbot, George Maurice, In. and treas. Li- 
brary Co. of Phila., Philadelphia, Pa. 611. 
*Abbott, Alvaretta P., In. F. P. L, Atlantic 

City, N. J. 7676. 
Abbott, Mabel Louise, asst. P. L., Seattle, 

Wash. 5692. 
Abraham, Effie G., asst. In. P. L., Muncie, 

Ind. 6776. 
Abrams, Dorothy A., In. sec'y Kansas State 

Normal School L., Emporia, Kan. 7760. 
Ackerly, Mary Belle, asst. In. Vassar Coll. 

L., Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 5854. 
Ackley, Gabriella, In. Yorkville Br. P. L., 

N. Y. City. 3533. 

Adams, Arthur, In. Trinity Coll. L., Hart- 
ford, Conn. 7680. 
Adams, Benjamin, Yale Club, N. Y. City. 

2529. 
Adams, Edna C., asst. Wis. State Hist. 

Soc., Madison, Wis. 3357. 
Adams, Edward B., In. Harvard Law L., 

Cambridge, Mass. 4760. 
Adams, Eleanor J., In. L. Medical Dept. 

Univ. of Texas, Galveston, Tex. 7980. 
Adams, Ellen Frances, supervisor Circ. 

and Shelf. Dept. Dartmouth Coll. L, 

Hanover, N. H. 6895. 



Adams, Leta E., head L. Supplies Dept. 
Gaylord Brothers, Syracuse, N. Y. 4352. 

Adamson, Ruth E., In. West Side Br. P. L., 
Evansville, Ind. 7193. 

Adelbert Coll. L., Western Reserve Univ., 
Cleveland, O. (George F. Strong, In.) 
5631. 

Adler, Cyrus, pres. Dropsie Coll. for He- 
brew & Cognate Learning, Broad and 
York Sts., Philadelphia, Pa. 1122. 

Adrian (Mich.) P. L. (Margaret F. Jewell, 
In.) 4763. 

Ahem, Eileen, asst. Child. Dept. P. L., In- 
dianapolis, Ind. 8352. 

AHERN, MARY EILEEN, ed. Pub. Li- 
braries, Library Bureau, 6 No. Michigan 
Ave., Chicago, 111. 1676. Life member. 

Aiken, Gertrude E., In. P. L., Geneva, 111. 
7357. 

Ainey, Kathleen, asst. executive Bronson 
L., Waterbury, Conn. 8221. 

Ainsworth, Harry, trus. P. L, Moline, 111. 
8049. 

Akers, Susan G., In. dept. of hygiene, Wel- 
lesley Coll. L, Wellesley, Mass. 6028. 

Akron (Ohio) P. L. (Mary P. Edgerton, 
In.) 4754. 

Alabama State Dept. of Archives & Hist., 
Montgomery, Ala. (T. M. Owen, direct- 
or.) 4092. 



HANDBOOK 



469 



Alameda (Cal.) F. P. L. (Marcella H. 

Krauth, In.) 4275. 

Aldrich, Grace L., central child. In. Car- 
negie L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 7932. 
Alexander, Hon. Charles B., Regent TJniv. 

of State of N. Y. and member of Com- 
mittee on State L. of that Board, 120 

Broadway, N. Y. City. 7650. 
Alexander, Laura, In. Dallas High Sen. 

L,., Dallas, Tex. 7015. 
Alexander, Mabel, asst. L. Assoc., Port- 
land, Ore. 8471. 
Alford, Helena B., ref. In. P. L., Hartford, 

Conn. 8699. 
Allegheny Carnegie F. L. See Pittsburgh, 

N. S., Pa. 
Alleman, Helen G. ( child. In. P. L., Har- 

risburg, Pa. 8502. 
Allen, Anita M., In. St. George Br. and 

Staten Island Extension Div. P. L., N. Y. 

City. 8793. 
Allen, Carrie S., 1st asst. P. L., Milton, 

Mass. 4063. 
Allen, Edith E., asst. P. P. L., Englewood, 

N. J. 7016. 
Allen, Harriet Luella, In. P. L., Houghton, 

Mich. 4930. 
Allen, Mary S., In. The Provident Life 

and Trust Co. L., Philadelphia, Pa. 8544. 
Allen, Mary T., asst. iff. P. L., Asbury 

Park, N. J. 8193. 

Allen, Mary Warren, bibliographer Rocke- 
feller Foundation L., N. Y. City. 2430. 
Allen, Maude Eliza, Michigan State L. 

Commission, Lansing, Mich. 6917. 
Allen, Mrs. Philip Loring, head catlgr., 

Queen's Univ. L., Kingston, Ont., Can. 

5958. 

Allison, Evie, In. P. L., Valdosta, Ga. 7949. 
Allison, Gladys B., In. Southwest Texas 

State Normal Sch. L., San Marcos, Tex. 

6247. 
Altgelt, Henrietta W., child. In. Carnegie 

L., San Antonio, Tex., 7470. 
Amann, Dorothy, In. Southern Methodist 

Univ. L., Dallas, Tex., 7341. 
Ambler, Sarah, In. Pub. Documents office, 

Washington, D. C. 2796. 
AMBROSE, LODILLA, 1. research in 

medicine, Box 918, New Orleans, La. 

895. Life member. 



American Social Hygiene Assoc. L., 106 

West 40th St., N. Y. City. (Janet Mel- 
vain, In.) 8028. 
Ames, Harriet Howe, In. Hoyt L., Saginaw, 

Mich. 267. 
Amherst (Mass.) Coll.' L. (Robt. 8. 

Fletcher, In.) 3514. 
Amos, Mrs. Maybelle, A. L. A. Mexican 

Border Travel. L., San Antonio, Texas. 

(Address Carnegie L.) 8123. 
Amundsen, Margit Smith, Elvrum, Nor- 
way. 8270. 
Anaconda (Mont.) Hearst F. L. (Elizabeth 

L. Thomson, In.) 5790. 
Anderson, Mrs. Alexandra K., Apt. 64, 1757 

K St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 7988. 
Anderson, Anna M., child. In. Yesler Br. 

P. L., Seattle, Wash. 6852. 
Anderson, Augusta, child. In. P. L., Seattle, 

Wash. 8748. 
Anderson, Edna E., asst. P. L., Long 

Beach, Calif. 8396. 
Anderson, Edwin Hatfield, director P. L., 

N. Y. City. 1083. 
Anderson, Frank V., asst. In. Bureau of 

Nndustrial Research L., 289 4th Ave., 

N. Y. City. 7217. 

Anderson, Mrs. Frank V., mgr. Biblio- 
graphical Br. of Research and L. Dept. 

Interchurch World Movement, N. Y. 

City. 5221. 
Anderson, John R., bookseller, 31 W. 15th 

St., N. Y. City. 2944. 
Anderson (S. C.) Library Association 

(Mrs. S. W. Geiger, In.) 4094. 
Andover, Mass. See Phillips Academy L. 
Andrew, Mrs. Kate Deane, In. Steele Me- 
morial L., Elmira, N. Y. 2760. 
Andrew, Nell, In. Texas Christian Univ. 

L., Fort Worth, Tex. 7204. 
ANDREWS, CLEMENT WALKER, In. 

The John Crerar L., Chicago, 111. 796. 

Life member. 
Andrews, Evelyn R., In. Muhlenberg Br. 

P. L., N. Y. City. 6487. 
Andrews, Gertrude H., In. P. L., Morris, 

111. 6001. 
Andrews, Gladys May, In. Stephenson P. 

L., Marinette, Wis. 6792. 
Andrews, Mrs. Vaughn B., asst. Stations 

Dept. P. L., Indianapolis, Ind. 8353. 



470 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Andrus, Gertrude E., buyer, Bookshop for 

Boys and Girls, Frederick and Nelson, 

Seattle, Wash. 5116. 

Ann Arbor (Mich.) P. L. (Nellie 8. Lov- 
ing, In.) 4761. 
Annable, Dorothy, 3 Willow Ave., Salem, 

Mass. 8764. 
Annett, Sarah E., In. Washington Irving 

High Sch. L., N. Y. City. 5952. 
Ansonia (Conn.) L. (Anne Richards, In.) 

4798. 
Ansteinsson, John, Norges tekniske hois- 

skoles bibliotek, Trondhjem, Norway. 

8271. 
Anthony, Irene B., head catlgr. P. L., Fall 

River, Mass. 8124. 
Appleton, William W., trus. P. L., N. Y. 

City (Address, 35 W. 32d St.) 4554. 
Appleton (Wis.) F. P. L. (Ruth D. McCol- 

lough, In.) 6572. 

Archer, Frances Randolph, In. State Nor- 
mal Sch., Carnegie L., Athens, Ga. 4708. 
Arizona State L., Phoenix, Ariz. (Con. P. 

Cronin, In.) 7947. 
Arizona Univ. L., Tucson, Ariz. (Estelle 

Lutrell, In.) 5015. 
Arkansas City (Kan.) P. L. (Mrs. A. B. 

Ranney, In.) 6130. 
Arlington (R. I.) P. L. (Mary F. Walker, 

In.) 8744. 
Arms, Jessie L., head catlgr. Iowa State 

Univ. L., Iowa City, la. 5201. 
Armstrong, Alice E., In. North Oakland 

Br. F. L,, Oakland, Cal. 5436. 
Arnett, Lonna D., In. Univ. of W. Va. L., 

Morgantown, W. Va. 4797. 
Arney, Mary, asst. Loan Dept. P. L., Ta- 

coma, Wash. 8503. 
Arnold, Florence W., sr. asst. Catalog Dept. 

P. L., Chicago, 111. 7233. 
Arnold, Gladys, head asst. Catalog Dept. 

P. L., Chicago, 111. 7234. 
Art Institute, Ryerson L. See Chicago, III. 
Asbury Park (N. J.) P. L. (Josephine W. 

Porter, In.) 6131. 
Asheville (N. C.) Pack Mem. L. Assn. 

(Ann Talbot Erwin, In.) 3656. 
Ashhurst, John, In. F. L., Philadelphia, Pa. 

1678. 
Ashley, Frederick W., supt. Reading Room, 

L. of Congress, Washington, D. C. 6095. 



Ashley, Grace, sec'y to In. F. P. L., New- 
ark, N. J. 1992. 

Ashley, Mabel, In. P. L., Everett, Wash. 
8749. 

Ashley, May, In. P. L., Greenfield, Mass. 
2031. 

Ashman, Katharine C., asst. In. N. J. Zinc 
Co. of Pa., Palmerton, Pa. 8545. 

Ashmore, Mrs. Laura M., 6 Crescent Place, 
Takoma Park, Md. 

Askew, Mary M., br. asst. P. L., N. Y. City. 
8794. 

Askew, Sarah B., In. N. J. P. L Commis- 
sion, Trenton, N J. 3641. 

Atlanta (Ga.) Carnegie L. (Tommie Dora 
Barker, In.) 4286. 

Atlanta (Ga.) Carnegie L. Training Sch. 
(Tommie Dora Barker, director.) 3418. 

Atlantic City (N. J.) F. P. L. (Jessie 
French Adams, acting In.) 3317. 

Attleboro (Mass.) P. L. (Mrs. Lucinda 
Field Spofford, In.) 7326. 

Atwood, Alice C., bibliographical asst. Bu- 
reau of Plant Industry, U. S. Dept. of 
Agriculture, Washington, D. C. 2641. 

Auburn (N. Y.) Seymour L. (Theodora 
Kellogg, acting In.) 5218. 

Aulls, Ina T., head Circ. Dept. P. L., Den- 
ver, Colo. 7736. 

Aurora (III.) P. L*. (James Shaw, In.) 5415. 

Austen, Willard, In. Cornell Univ. L., 
Ithaca, N. Y. 1120. 

Autry, James L., trus. P. L., Houston, 
Tex. (Address, 1402 Carter Bldg.) 8125. 

Averill, Frank L., supt. L. Bldg. and 
Grounds L. of Congress, Washington, 
D. C. 8021. 

Avery, Emma L., F. L., Philadelphia, Pa. 
8251. 

Avery, Harriet K., In. Keystone State Nor- 
mal Sch. L., Kutztown, Pa. 6773. 

Avery, Jessie R., In. Lincoln Br. P. L., 
Rochester, N. Y. 5735. 

Avery, Maurice H,, asst. Order Div. L. of 
Congress, Washington, D. C. 5634. 

AVEY, E. GERTRUDE, chief child. In. 
P. L., Cincinnati, Ohio. 4896. Life mem- 
ber. 

Axtell, Frederic G., In. Macalester Coll. 
L., St Paul, Minn. 4370. 



HANDBOOK 



471 



Ayer, Winslow B., pres. L. Assoc., Port- 
land, Ore. 2706. 

Ayers, Louise, research asst. P. L., Chi- 
cago, 111. 7241. 

Ayres, Mary Armstrong, child. In. 115th 
St. Br. P. L., N. Y. City. 8546. 

Ayres, Olla Rebecca, supervisor of Cata- 
loging Cornell Univ. L., Ithaca, N. Y. 
8504. 

Ayres, Samuel Gardiner, In. in charge Gar- 
rett Biblical Institute, Evanston, 111. 976. 

Azzara, Vincent, In. Morris County Law 
L., Morristown, N. J. 8547. 

Babcock, Helen S., In. Austin High Sch. 
Br. P. L., Chicago, 111. 5629. 

Babcock, Mrs. Julia G., In. Kern County 
F. L., Bakersfield, Cal. 2950. 

Bacheller, J. H., trus. F. P. L., Newark, 
N. J. 6562. 

Backus, Helen L., Nantucket, Mass. 7960. 

Bacon, Corinne, lecturer L. Sch. of N. Y. 
P. L. and editor H. W. Wilson Co., N. Y. 
City. 2536. 

Baechtold, Elsie L., principal Science and 
Industry Dept. P. L., Los Angeles, Calif. 
6396. 

Baensch, Emil, chairman Wis. F. L. Com- 
mission, 610 North 7th St., Manitowoc, 
Wis. 8050. 

Baer, Harriet Irene, 3809 Gladys Ave., 
Chicago, 111. 5526. 

Bagley, Helen A., In. P. L., Oak Park, 111. 
6777. 

Bailey, Arthur Low, In. Wilmington Inst. 
F. L., Wilmington, Del. 1999. 

Bailey, Beulah, asst. N. Y. State L., Al- 
bany, N. Y. 7793. 

Bailey, Loa E., In. East Portland Br. L. 
Assn., Portland, Ore. 6002. 

Bailey, Louis J., In. P. L., Gary, Ind. 3642. 

Bailey, Sarah R., In. Crunden Br. P. L., 
St. Louis, Mo. 4880. 

Bailey, Serena C., In. P. L., Palatka, Fla. 
7667. 

Bailey, Thomas D., Library Bureau, N. Y. 
City. 5278. 

Baillet, May E., In. F. P. L., Irvington, 
N. J. 6149. 

Baillie, Herbert, In. P. L., Wellington, 
N. Z. 3409. 

Baird, Mabel E., asst. In. Technical L., 



E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Co., Wil- 
mington, Del. 8548. 

Baker, Adaline Maitland, reviser Catalog 
Dept. Newberry L., Chicago, 111. 4396. 

Baker, Asa George, life member of Corpo- 
ration City L., Springfield, Mass. (Ad- 
dress, 6 Cornell St.) 6295. 

Baker, Charles Melville, asst. In. Univ. of 
North Carolina, Chapel Hill, N. C. 7712. 

BAKER, CHARLOTTE A., In. Colo. State 
Agric. Coll. L., Fort Collins, Colo. 1345. 
Life member. 

Baker, Edith M., asst. In. Clark Univ. L., 
Worcester, Mass. 8536. 

Baker, Julia A., In. Austin Br. P. L., Chi- 
cago, 111. 5443. 

Baker, Laura M., asst. Book Order Office 
P. L., N. Y. City. 8549. 

Baker, M. Lillian, sr. asst. Yorkville Br. 
P. L., N. Y. City. 8551. 

Baker, Marion C., In. South Division Br. 
P. L., Milwaukee, Wis. 7218. 

Baker, Mary Ellen, head Catalog Dept. 
Carnegie L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 4731. 

Baker, Mary Neikirk, In. Univ. Br. P. L., 
Seattle, Wash. 5351. 

Baker Univ. L., Baldwin, Kan. (Hattie 
Osborne, In.) 6044. 

Balch, Ruth, asst. Acquisition Dept. Univ. 
of Chicago L., Chicago, 111. 5639. 

Balderston, Edith C. C., child. In. Gins- 
burg Br. P. L., Detroit, Mich. 8286. 

Baldwin, Bessie Russell, In. James Memo- 
rial L., Williston, N. D. 4389. 

Baldwin, Clara F., director L. Div. Minn. 
State Dept. of Education, St. Paul, Minn. 
1872. 

Baldwin, Elizabeth G., In. Bryson L. Teach- 
ers Coll., N. Y. City. 828. 

Baldwin, Emma V., 3 Beech St., East 
Orange, N. J. 2718. 

Baldwin, Rachel, 199 Hazel Ave., Highland 
Park, 111. 6496. 

Ball, Fanny D., In. Central High Sch. L., 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 4808. 

Ball, Rose, In. Albion Coll. L., Albion, 
Mich. 4034. 

Ballard, Harlan Hoge, In. and curator 
Berkshire Athenaeum and Museum, 
Pittsfield, Mass. 2423. 

Baltimore (Md.), See Enoch Pratt F. P. L. 



472 



Maryland Medical and Chirurgical Fac- 
ulty L., and Peabody Inst. L. 
Balz, Leonard, Jr., chief of Stations Dept. 

P. L., St. Louis, Mo. 7740. 
Bamford, William B., pres. Board of Trus- 
tees F. P. L., Belmar, N. J. 8552. 
Bancroft, Anna M., trus. Bancroft Mem. L., 

Hopedale, Mass. 3420. 
Bancroft, Edna H., In. Saratoga Br. P. L., 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 3684. 
Bancroft and Sons Co., Joseph, Wilming- 
ton, Del. (Nora R. Thorne, In.) 7461. 
Banes, Mary, asst. Allegheny High Sch. JL., 

Pittsburgh, N. S., Pa. 7407. 
Bangalore (India) P. L. (H. V. Krishnaiya, 
. officer in charge.) 7717. 
Bangs, William S., In. Camp L., Camp 

Jackson, S. C. 8051. 
Bankard, Florence R., cashier, Peabody 

Institute L., Baltimore, Md. 6297. 
Barbee, James Cecil, Rice Lake, Wis. 

5327. 
Barden, Bertha R., supervisor of Inventory 

Records and Apprentice Class P. L., 

Cleveland, O. 5804. 
Bargar, Frances A., asst. P. L., Columbus, 

Ohio. 7472. 
Barickman, Mrs. Rena M., In. P. L., Joliet, 

111. 4426. 
Barker, Alta M., In. F. P. L., Montclair, 

N. J. 6176. 
Barker, Beatrice J., head catlgr. Univ. of 

Ore. L., Eugene, Ore. 3029. 
Barker, Ruth McClintock, head Circ. Dept. 

Cossitt L., Memphis, Tenn. 6207. 
Barker, Tommie Dora, In. Carnegie L. and 

director L. Sch., Atlanta, Ga. 4575. 
Barkley, Mrs. A. J., mem. Iowa L. Com., 

and pres. Board Ericson P. L., Boone, 

Iowa. 4427. 
Barmby, Mary, In. Alameda County F. L., 

Oakland, Cal. 3160. 
Barnes, Charlotte, In. Greendale Br. F. P. 

L., Worcester, Mass. 8700. 
Barnes, Clara M., child. In. North Br. P. 

L., Minneapolis, Minn. 7868. 
Barnes, Cornelia S., Bureau of Markets, 
-U. S. Dept. of Agriculture, Washington, 

D. C. 3710. 
Barnes, Elizabeth, sr. asst. P. L., Chicago, 

111. 7242. 



Barnes, Grace, In. High Sch. L., Drum- 
right, Okla. 6395. 

Barnett, Claribel Ruth, In. Dept. of Agri- 
culture L., Washington, D. C. 1434. 

Barnett, Helen, 32 Gushing St., Provi- 
dence, R. I. 7877. 

Barnum, Thomas Rossiter, curator of Yale 
Memorabilia, New Haven, Conn. 792. 

*BARNWELL, JAMES G., ex-ln., 2010 
Green St., Philadelphia, Pa. 24. Life 
member. 

Barr, Annie L., In. F. L., Belfast, Me. 4231. 

Barr, Charles J., asst. In. Yale Univ. L., 
New Haven, Conn. 2565. 

Barr, M. Kathryn, asst. Classification Div. 
L. of Congress, Washington, D. C. 8553. 

Barrette, Lydia M., In. P. L., Jacksonville, 
111. 4428. 

Barrow, Trotman Campbell, child In. P. L., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 5439. 

Barry, Kathleen E., vice-pres. Chivers 
Book Binding Co., 911-13 Atlantic Ave., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 3913. 

Bartholomew, P. A., N. J. Zinc Co. of Pa. 
L., Palmerton, Pa. 8505. 

Bartlett, Louise L., In. F. L., South Man- 
chester, Conn. 1076. 

Bartlett, Sarah R., acting In. F. P. L., Con- 
cord, Mass. 8554. 

Bartram, Mary S., trus. P. L., Kennett 
Square, Pa. 8840. 

Bascom, Elva L., principal Sch. of L. 
Science Univ. of Texas, Austin, Tex. 
2477. 

Bastin, Dorothy, In. Riverview Br. P. L., 
St. Paul, Minn. 5946. 

Batchelor, Winifred, asst. P. L., Detroit, 
Mich. 7903. 

Bates, Anna L.; In. High Sch. L., Hart- 
ford, Conn. 8555. 

Bates, Flora J., asst. In. Chicago Normal 
Coll. L., Chicago, 111. 2214. 

Bates, Helen C., ref. In. P. L., Detroit, 
Mich. 1469. 

Bates, Mary R., asst. In. Vermont Univ. L., 
Burlington, Vt. 5431. 

Batterson, Mary A., In. Green Lake Br. P. 
L., Seattle, Wash. 8506. 

Bauman, Eva M., McPherson Sq. Br. F. L., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 8332. 



HANDBOOK 



473 



Bauman, Ida G., head In. Guaranty Trust 
Co. L., 140 Broadway, N. Y. City. 7887. 

Baumler, Jane I., sen. ref. In. P. L., Utica, 
N. Y. 8556. 

Baus, Esther L., asst. Br. Dept. P. L., In- 
dianapolis, Ind. 8354. 

BAXTER, CHARLES NEWCOMB, In. 
James Blackstone Memorial L., Bran- 
ford, Conn. 2737. Life member. 

Bay City (Mich.) P. L. (Agnes Van Val- 
kenburgh, In.) 103. 

Baylor University L., Waco, Tex. 6495. 

Beach, Bessie Baldwin, In. U. S. Indian 
Sch. L., Chilocco, Okla. 2239. 

Beach, Mrs. David N., 319 Union St., Ban- 
gor, Me. 2411. 

Beal, H. Marjorie, In. Oneida Community 
Ltd. L., Kenwood, Oneida, N. Y. 6519. 

Beale, Helen M., asst. In. Adelbert Coll. 
L., Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, 
Ohio. 3116. 

Beall, Mrs. Rachel H., asst. In. Tremont 
Br. P. L., N. Y. City. 6150. 

Beattie, Mabelle B., catlgr. Univ. of Neb. 
L., Lincoln, Neb. 7261. 

Beatty, Irene, head Loan Dept. P. L., St., 
Joseph, Mo. 7431. 

Beaver Falls (Pat) Carnegie F. L. (Elsie 
Rayle, In.) 5748. 

Becker, Helen, head Open Shelf Dept. P. 
L., Buffalo, N. Y. 6609. 

Bedinger, Margery, In. Technical L. Chem- 
ical Dept. E. I. du Pont de Nemours and 
Co., Wilmington, Del. 7743. 

Beebe Town L. See Wakefield, Mass. 

Beecroft, Lillian J., chief Newspaper Dept. 
Wis. State Historical Society, Madison, 
Wis. 7021. 

BEER, WILLIAM, In. Howard Memorial 
L., New Orleans, La. 747. Life member. 

Belden, Charles F. D., In. P. L., Boston, 
Mass. 4656. 

Bell, Bernice W., head Child. Dept. F. P. 
L., Louisville, Ky. 4874. 

Bell, Florence C., file clerk and In. Bu- 
reau of Efficiency, Washington, D. C. 
7626. 

Bell, Lillian E., In. F. P. L., Kaukauna, 
Wis. 5961. 

Bell, Mary I., In. Va. State Normal Sch. 
L., Harrisonburg, Va. 8795. 



Bell, Minnie M., In. Tulane Univ. L., New 

Orleans, La. 3667. 
Belleville (III.) P. L. (Bella Steuernagel, 

In.) 7318. 

Belser, Amanda M., head Order and Acces- 
sions Div. Univ. of Mich. General L., Ann 

Arbor, Mich. 7790. 
Bement, Constance, In. P. L., Port Huron, 

Mich. 6504. 
Bemis, Dorothy, 248 S. Broadway, Yon- 

kers, N. Y. 7022. 
Bendikson, Dr. Lodewyk, bibliographer 

Henry E. Huntington L., N. Y. City. 

7023. 
Benedict, Inez, Travel. L. Dept. Mo. L. 

Commission, Jefferson City, Mo. 8831. 
Benjamin, Anna, In. Butman-Fish Mem. L., 

Saginaw, W. S., Mich. 3155. 
Bennett, Norma B., In. P. L., Madison, 

N. J. 2016. 

Bennett, Stella, sr. asst. Univ. of Califor- 
nia L., Berkeley, Calif. 4067. 
Benson, Frances, Prospect Br. P. L., 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 8194. 
Benson, Robert D., pres. trustees P. L., 

Passaic, N. J. (Address, 11 Broadway, 

N. Y. City.) 3455. 
Bercaw, Louise Oldham, In. Carnegie L., 

Cordele, Ga. 6882. 
Berger, Grace, ref. asst. P. L., Kansas 

City, Mo. 6676. 
Berkeley (Calif.) P. L. (C. B. Joeckel, In.) 

6066. 
Bernhardt, Caroline, head asst. Order 

Dept. P. L., Chicago, 111. 6186. 
Bernstein, Adaline, asst. in Adult Circ. 

Dept. Carnegie L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 8195. 
Berrier, Mildred, In. F. L., Emporia, Kan. 

S661. 
Berry, Francis B., asst. Order Dept. P. L., 

Detroit, Mich. 8507. 
Berry, Silas H., In. Bedford Br. Y. M. C. 

A. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 587. 
Best, Charlotte Stuart, asst. Catalog Dept. 

P. L., Seattle, Wash. 5118. 
Bethlehem's F. L., Bethlehem, Pa. (Eliza- 
beth D. Burrows, In.) 4774. 
Betteridge, Grace L., head Travel. L. and 

Study Club Section Div. of Educational 

Extension, Albany, <N. Y. 3388. 



474 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Betts, Gladys J., L. Assoc., Portland, Ore. 
8443. 

Betz, Esther, catlgr. Univ. of Mich. L., Ann 
Arbor, Mich. 6976. 

Beust, Nora, child. In. P. L., La Crosse, 
Wis. 6837. 

Bickel, Lucile Clark, 208 Sweitzer St., 
Greenville, Ohio. 8508. 

Biddeford (Me.) McArthur L. (Emma 
Hatch, In.) 7319. 

Biddle, Robert, pres. F. L. Assoc., River- 
ton, N. J. 8126. 

Bien, Corabel, ref. and periodical In. Univ. 
of Oregon L., Eugene, Ore. 7025. 

Biethan, Sue, asst. in charge Upper Read- 
ing Room Univ. of Mich. L., Ann Arbor, 
Mich. 7981. 

BIGELOW, FRANK BARNA, In. N. Y. So- 
ciety L., 109 University Place, N. Y. 
City. 1326. Life member. 

Bigelow, Mary C., asst. Loan Desk P. L., 
Rockford, 111. 4824. 

Bigley, Winifred H., In. Merced County F. 
L., Merced, Calif. 6677. 

Billings (Mont.) Parmly Billings Mem. L. ' 
(Mrs. Elizabeth Abbott Garber, In.) 
7354. 

Billingsley, Mary P., In. Kansas City Rail- 
ways L., Kansas City, Mo. 4814. 

Bingham, Jessie W., In. P. L., Rhinelander, 
Wis. 5694. 

Binghamton (N. Y.) P. L. (W. F. Seward, 
In.) 4230. 

Birchard L. See Fremont, O. 

Bircholdt, Harriet N., chief Bureau of Pub- 
lic Discussion Extension Div. Univ. of 
Indiana, Bloomington, Ind. 8557. 

Birdsall, Mrs. Grace H., care E. and R. 
Officer, Army Headquarters, Eastern 
Dept, Governor's Island, N. Y. 7026. 

Birge, Anna G., Madison, Wis. 7454. 

Birmingham (Ala.) P. L. (Lloyd W. 
Josselyn, director.) 7254. 

Birmingham (Eng.) Central F. L. (Walter 
Powell, chief In.) 4310. 

Birtwell, Frances M., file clerk Interde- 
partmental Social Hygiene Board, 1800 
Virginia Ave., Washington, D. C. 1388. 

Biscoe, Walter Stanley, senior In. N. Y. 
State L., Albany, N. Y. 80. 



Bishop, Clara N., 1st asst. City Br. Dept. 

F. L., Oakland, Calif. 6678. 
Bishop, Jessie E., 1st asst. Circ. Dept. P. 

L., Seattle, Wash. 7006. 
Bishop, Ruth L., asst. P. L., Pomona, 

Calif. 8196. 
Bishop, William Warner, In. Univ. of 

Mich. General L., Ann Arbor, Mich. 1435. 
Bishop, Mrs. William Warner, care Univ. 

of Mich. L., Ann Arbor, Mich. 8558. 
Bixby, Alice Persis, Army War Coll. L., 

Washington, D. C. 2472. 
Black, Miss M. J. L., In. P. L., Fort Wil- 
liam, Ont., Canada. 4746. 
Black, Susan Edith, In. in charge Tacony 

Br. F. L., Philadelphia, Pa. 6977. 
Blackall, Mrs. Elizabeth W., In. P. L., One- 

onta, N. Y. 6299. 
Blackburn, R. T., member Okla. State L. 

Commission, Muskogee, Okla. 8782. 
Blackstone Memorial L. See Branford, 

Conn. 
Blair, Mrs. E. S., In. P. L., Wayne, Neb. 

8127. 
Blair, Mellicent F., In. Central Br. Y. W. 

C. A. L., 610 Lexington Ave., N. Y. City. 

4632. 
Blair, Mirpah G., head catlgr. and ref. In. 

Oregon State L., Salem, Ore. 3089. 
Blair, Rosannah G., In. Salem Coll. L., 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 8559. 
Blaisdell, Frank C., chief Issue Dept. P. 

L., Boston, Mass. 2499. 
Blake, Mrs. Elveretta S., La Grange, Me. 

5916. 
Blake, Maude, In. West North Ave. Br. P. 

L., Chicago, 111. 8454. 
BLAKELY, BERTHA ELISA, In. Mount 

Holyoke Coll. L., South Hadley, Mass. 

1383. Life member. 
Blanchard, Alice A., 38 School St., Mont- 

pelier, Vt. 3470. 
Blanchard, Grace, In. P. L.. Concord, N. 

H. 2438. 
Blanchard, Linn R., head Catalog Dept. 

Newberry L., Chicago, 111. 5053. 
Blanchard, M. Gertrude, In. Homewood Br. 

Carnegie L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 5161. 
Blanchard, Sarah Eliot, Pres. L. Bd. Dean 

Hobbs Blanchard Mem. L., Santa Paula, 

Calif. 6520. 



HANDBOOK 



475 



Blanton, Mrs. E. R. (Minnie W. Leather- 
man), P. O. Box 773, Greenville, S. C. 
4057. 

Blessing, Arthur Reed, In. Navy L. Serv- 
ice, Washington, D. C. 6896. 

Bliss, Henry E., deputy In. Coll. of City of 
New York, N. Y. City. 5194. 

Bliss, Leslie E., asst. Henry E. Huntington 
L., N. Y. City. 5358. 

BLISS, ROBERT P., chief L. Extension 
Div., State L. and Museum, Harrisburg, 
Pa. 1553. Life member. 

Blodgett, Evelyn M., head catlgr. Univ. of 
Wash. L., Seattle, Wash. 6099. 

Blum, Ethyl May, asst. Univ. of 111. L., Ur- 
bana, 111. 6398. 

Blumberg, Theresa, P. L., N. Y. City. 4422. 

Blunt, Florence T., instructor L. Science, 
Simmons Coll. L. Sch., Boston, Mass. 
2722. 

Boardman, Alice, asst. In. Ohio State L., 
Columbus, Ohio. 1677. 

Boardman, Clark, 33 Park Place, N. Y. 
City. 8560. 

Boardman, E. W., pres. L. Board P. L., Par- 
sons, Kan. 8128. 

Boardman, Marguerite, asst. In. Stuyve- 
sant High Sch. L., N. Y. City. 6989. 

Boerlage, Louise M., asst. P. L., N. Y. 
City. 8561. 

Boette, Louise H., child. In. Carondelet Br. 
P. L., St. Louis, Mo. 8701. 

Bogle, Sarah C. N., principal Carnegie L. 
Sch., Pittsburgh, Pa. 3065. 

Bolles, Barbara M., 1st asst. Catalog Dept. 
Univ. of Wash. L., Seattle, Wash. 7686. 

Bolles, Marion P., child. In. St. Agnes Br. 
P. L., N. Y. City. 5233. 

Bond, Ethel, instructor Univ. of 111. L. 
Sch., Urbana, 111. 5739. 

Boody, David A., pres. Bd. of Trus. P. L., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. (Address, 111 Broad- 
way, N. Y. City.) 7028. 

Bookmyer, Lenore, general asst. P. L., De- 
troit, Mich. 8413. 

Booth, Mrs. Ida, asst. Clipping Dept. P. L., 
Kansas City, Mo. 8444. 

Booth, Mary Josephine, In. Eastern 111. 
State Normal Sch., Charleston, 111. 3119. 

Borden, Fanny, ref. In. Vassar Coll. L., 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 2213. 



Borden, William Alanson, Morris Cove, 

Conn. 488. 
Borresen, Lilly M. E., In. P. L., La Crosse, 

Wis. 5119. 
Boston (Mass.) P. L. (Charles F. D. 

Belden, In.) 3521. 
Bostwick, Arthur Elmore, In. P. L., St. 

Louis, Mo. 1805. 
Boswell, Harriett, In. P. L., Paducah, Ky. 

6883. 
Boswell, Jessie Partridge, In. Legislative 

Ref. Dept., State House, Indianapolis, 

Ind. 3251. 
Bosworth, Edward J., acting president 

Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio. 7926". 
Bourne, F. A., Dept. of Fine Arts P. L., 

Boston, Mass. 8805. 
Bowen, Lila, head Extension Dept P. L., 

Omaha, Neb. 4912. 
Bowen, Louise, asst. In. P. L., Derby, Conn. 

8404. 
BOWERMAN, GEORGE F., In. P. L. of the 

District of Columbia, Washington, D. C. 

1270. Life member. 
Bowers, Ethel F., In. St. John's Br. L. 

Assoc., Portland, Ore. 7594. 
Bowker, 'Carolyn T., 274 Lafayette Ave., 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 6733. 

BOWKER, RICHARD ROGERS, ed. Li- 
brary Journal, 62 W. 45th St., N. Y. City. 

52. Life member. 
Bowker, Mrs. Richard Rogers, 33 W. 12th 

St., N. Y. City. 3166. 
Bowler, Marion, In. P. L., West Spring- 
field, Mass. 8129. 
Bowman, Frances E., child. In. P. L., St. 

Louis, Mo. 3467. 
Bowne, Jacob T., In. International Y. M. 

C. A. Coll. L., Springfield, Mass. 1203. 
Boyd, Anne M., instructor Univ. of 111. L. 

Sch., Urbana, 111. 8130. 
Brabandt and Valters Book Binding Com- 
pany, 3827-29 E. Ravenswood Ave., Chi- 
cago, III. 7728. 
Brace, Maria C., In. P. L. Waterloo, Iowa. 

7475. 
Brace, Marion, general asst. P. L., Detroit, 

Mich. 8414. 
Brackbill, Anna Lucile, asst. catlgr. Union 

Theological Seminary L., N. Y. City. 

6978. 



476 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Brackett, Helen E., asst. Carnegie L., At- 
lanta, Ga. 7668. 

Brackett, Marian W., In. Brighton Br. P. 
L., Boston, Mass. 8562. 

Braddock (Pa.) Carnegie F. L. (George H. 
Lamb, In.) 5180. 

Bradford, Faith, asst. Card Div. L. of Con- 
gress, Washington, D. C. 7029. 

Bradford (Pa.) Carnegie P. L. (Susan L. 
Sherman, In.) 3495. 

Bradish, Amy E., 1430 Bridge St., Grand 
Rapids, Mich. 8563. 

Bradley, Ella R., asst. principal High 
School, Mercersburg, Pa. 7762. 

Bradley, Florence, Nat'l Organization for 
Public Health Nursing, N. Y. City. 7982. 

Brainerd, Jessie F., In. High Sch. L., Hack- 
ensack, N. J. 3590. 

Brainerd, Marion, asst. In. Maine State L., 
Augusta, Me. 8564. 

Braley, Esther, asst. in charge of Gradu- 
ate Reading Room in Modern Lan- 
guages, Univ. of Mich. Gen. L., Ann 
Arbor, Mich. 2765. 

Branda, Gertrude, P. L., Detroit, Mich. 
8324. 

Brandenburg, S. J., In. Miami Univ. L., 
Oxford, Ohio. 6003. 

Branford, Conn. Blackstone Mem. L. 
(Charles N. Baxter, In.) 6645. 

Branham, Irene, asst. Delivery Dept. P. L., 
Indianapolis, Ind. 8355. 

Branham, Kate V., readers' asst. Ref. Dept. 
P. L., Indianapolis, Ind. 8356. 

Brashear, Roma, asst. in charge Loan 
Desk, State L., Austin, Tex. 6891. 

Braslau, Charlotte, Beissner Apts., Gal- 
veston, Tex. 7610. 

Bray, Dorothy A., asst. Circ. Dept. P. L, 
Detroit, Mich. 7456. 

Breedlove, Joseph Penn, In. Trinity Coll. 
L., Durham, N. C. 4114. 

Brennan, M. Louise, asst. P. L. Cam- 
bridge, Mass. 6432. 

Bresnahan, Nellie, 206 S Street, N. E., 
Washington, D. C. 7961. 

Brett, Clara Amelia, asst. In. P. L., Brock- 
ton, Mass. 1998. 

Brettell, Elizabeth, asst. Kent Br. P. L, 
Toledo, Ohio. 8787. 



Brevoort, Carson, In. Commercial High 
Sch. L, Brooklyn, N. Y. 6853. 

Brewitt, Theodora R., In. P. L., Alhambra, 
Calif. 4412. 

Brewster, Mary B., asst. Order Section N. 
Y. State L., Albany, N. Y. 8131. 

Brewster, William L., trus. L. Assn., Port- 
land, Ore. (Address, Title and Trust 
Bldg.) 3305. 

Briber, Florence A., In. Dickinson Br. P. 
L., Denver, Colo. 7729. 

Bridgeport (Conn.) P. L. (Henry N. San- 
born, In. 4213. 

Briggs, Elizabeth D., In. Alta Br. P. L., 
Cleveland, Ohio. 5219. 

Briggs, Elizabeth V., In. Royal Oak Town- 
ship L, Royal Oak, Mich. 6151. 

Briggs, Mary J., catlgr. P. L., Buffalo, N. 
Y. 1512. 

Briggs, Walter B., asst. In. Harvard Coll. 
L., Cambridge, Mass. 2597. 

Brigham, Clarence Saunders, In. American 
Antiquarian Soc., Worcester, Mass. 2139. 

Brigham, Herbert Olin, In. R. I. State L, 
Providence, R. I. 2446. 

Brigham, Johnson, In. Iowa State L., Des 
Moines, Iowa. 1717. 

Brightman, Mary F., chief catlgr. F. L., 
Worcester, Mass. 8132. 

Brinkman, Anna W., 1821 North St., Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 2018. 

Brinsmead, R., In. Camp L., Camp Pike, 
Ark. 7993. 

Brinton, Margaret, asst. Yale Univ. L., 
New Haven, Conn. 8407. 

Britton, Jasmine, supt. Child. Dept. P. L., 
Los Angeles, Calif. 5606. 

Brock, Genevra, In. U. S. Naval Hospital 
L., Fort Lyon, Colo. 8012. 

Brockett, Paul, In. Smithsonian Institu- 
tion, Washington, D. C. 6031. 

Brockton (Mass.) P. L. (Frank H. Whit- 
more, In.) 5852. 

Bronk, C. Louise, catlgr. P. L., East Cleve- 
land, O. 8052. 

Bronxville (N. Y.) P. L. (Mary D. Sher- 
man, In.) 7337. 

Brook, Eva, Princeton Sch. L., Princeton, 
N. J. 8565. 

Brooker, Rosalie A., In. Alta Br. P. L., 
Cleveland, O. 7358. 



HANDBOOK 



477 



Brooker, Winifred E., 1st asst. 79th St. 
Br. P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 8509. 

Brookes, Mary L., acting In. Chauncy Hurl- 
but Br. P. L., Detroit, Mich. 8287. 

Brookline (Mass.) P. L. (Louisa M. Hoop- 
er, In.) 3450. 

Brooklyn (N. Y.) P. L. (Frank Pierce 
Hill, In.) 1060. 

Brooks, John H., chairman L. Board P. L., 
Scranton, Pa. (Address, 423 Spruce St.) 
8133. 

Brooks, Maud D., In. P. L., Olean, N. Y. 
4635. 

Broomell, Ellyn Chapin, In. Camp L., Camp 
Grant, 111. 6248. 

Brotherton, Jane W., Delphos, Ohio. 3570. 

Brotherton, Nina C., supervisor Schools 
Div. Carnegie L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 4994. 

Brower, Kate W., F. L., Orange, N. J. 8566. 

Brown, Agnes Elizabeth, In. Univ. of Cali- 
fornia Farm Sch. L., Davis, Calif. 7230. 

Brown, Alice Harris, 99 South Union St., 
Rochester, N. Y. 2611. 

Brown, Mrs. Arthur M., trus. and sec'y F. 
P. L., Keyport, N. J. 8053. 

BROWN, ARTHUR N., In. and prof, of 
English, U. S. Naval Academy, Annapo- 
lis, Md. 206. Life member. 

Brown, Bertha L., In. P. L., Reading, Mass. 
3501. 

Brown, Charles H., library specialist, New 
Navy Bldg., Bureau of Navigation, Sixth 
Div., Navy Dept., Washington, D. C. 
2409. 

Brown, Delia E., In. P. L.., Salina, Kan. 
6267. 

Brown, Demarchus C., In. Indiana State 
L., Indianapolis, Ind. 4091. 

Brown, Dorothy, asst. Central Circ. Dept., 
Carnegie L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 8272. 

Brown, Edna Adelaide, In. Memorial Hall 
L., Andover, Mass. 2024. 

Brown, Ethel Seymour, In. Central Br. 
Y. M. C. A. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 4898. 

Brown, Flora, sec'y to In. P. L., Washing- 
ton, D. C. 7794. 

Brown, Flora M., 1st asst. Walker Br. P. L., 
Minneapolis, Minn. 6821. 

Brown, George H., trus. Ayer L., Ayer, 
Mass. 3967. 



Brown, Gertrude LeRoy, acting In. P. L., 

Evanston, 111. 1812. 
Brown, Gladys, asst. L. Assoc., Portland, 

Ore. 8472. 
Brown, Gwendolen, In. Williamsburgh 

Br. P. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 5683. 
Brown, Helen D., sr. asst. catlgr. John 

Crerar L., Chicago, 111. 4963. 
Brown, Henry John, B. F. Stevens & 

Brown, 4 Trafalgar Square, London, W. 

C., England. 1758. 
Brown, Jane H., asst. P. L., Harrisburg, 

Pa. 5280. 
Brown, Lincoln Doty, 7535 Hampton Ave., 

Los Angeles, Calif. 7869. 
Brown, Mabel W., In. Nat'l Com. Mental 

Hygiene L., N. Y. City. 5779. 
BROWN, MARGARET W., A. L. A. L. War 

Service, L. of Congress, Washington, D. 

C. 4405. Life member. 

Brown, Marie T., In. Carnegie P. L., Con- 
neaut, Ohio. 7342. 

Brown, Philip G., trus. P. L., Portland, Me. 
8i34. 

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Bronx, N. Y. City. 5305. 

Brown, Reginald W., In. Academy of the 
New Church L., Bryu Athyn, Pa. 7719. 

Brown, Ruth L., sec'y "Vt. F. L. Commis- 
sion, Montpelier, Vt. 7276. 

BROWN, WALTER L., In. P. L., Buffalo, 
N. Y. 620. Life member. 

Brown, Mrs. Walter L., care of P. L., Buf- 
falo, N. Y. 1534. 

Brown, William L., disbursing officer A. 
L. A. Library War Service, Washington, 

D. C. 7614. 

Brown, Zaidee, In. P. L., Long Beach, 

Calif. 2428. 
Brown Univ. L. (Harry L. Koopman, In.) 

Providence, R. I. 3598. 
Browne, D. R., bookseller, 471 Fifth Ave., 

N. Y. City. 8567. 
BROWNE, NINA ELIZA, 44 Pinckney St., 

Boston, Mass. 716. Life member. 
Brownell, Lena V., 1st asst. Catalog Dept. 

L. Assoc., Portland, Ore. 6537. 
Browning, Earl W., In. P. L., Jackson, 

Mich. 6979. 
Browning, Eliza Gordon, asst. In. P. L., 

Indianapolis, Ind. 1081. 



478 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Brownne, John Smart, In. N. Y. Academy 

of Medicine, 17 W. 43d St., N. Y. City. 

588. 
Bruer, Mrs. Christine M., catlgr. P. L., 

Detroit, Mich. 7763. 
Brunot, Eugenie, in charge Child. Reading 

Room, Soho Community House, Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. 6246. 
Brush, Ella M., In. The Greenwich L., 

Greenwich, Conn. 3873. 
Bryan, Earl C., In. Camp L., Camp Dodge, 

Iowa. 8022. 
Bryan, Sarah Elizabeth, loan asst. Univ. 

of 111. L., Urbana, 111. 6865. 
Bryant, Marion E., In. P. L., Chippewa 

Falls, Wis. 7290. 

Bubb, M. Ethel, child. In. P. L. of the Dis- 
trict of Columbia, Washington, D. C. 

6114. 

BUCHER, MRS. PAUL (ETHEL SHER- 
WOOD), Information Div. P. L., N. Y. 

City. 5253. Life member. 
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L., Missoula, Mont. 3132. 
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Y. City. 3850. 
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(Address, Times Bldg.) 7916. 
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In.) 1065. 
Bugbee, Mary F., catlgr. Pub. Documents 

Office, Washington, D. C. 6060. 
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L., Washington, D. C. 8550. 
Bull, Mrs. Louise P., asst. In. Mott Haven 

Br. P. L., N. Y. City. 7914. 
Bullock, Edna Dean, In. Neb. Legislative 

Reference Bureau, Lincoln, Neb. 1170. 
Bullock, Waller Irene, head Adult Lending 

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Bulmer, Jeanie M., head catlgr. Guaranty 

Trust Co., L., 140 Broadway, N. Y. City. 

5433. 



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of Calif. L., Berkeley, Calif. 4348. 

Bundy, Irving R., In. State Normal Sch. L., 
Kirksville, Mo. 5398. 

Bunker, May T., catlgr. P. L., Cleveland, 
Ohio. 3511. 

Bunn, Arralee, catlgr. Lawson McGhee L., 
Knoxville, Tenn. 7418. 

Bunnell, Mrs. D. L., In. Dept. L. Coll. of 
Agric. Univ. of California, Berkeley, 
Calif. 6023. 

Bunting, Alice, asst. P. L., N. Y. City. 8197. 

Burbank, Jane Lord, chief Circ. Dept. P. 
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Burck, Edna W., general asst. P. L., Den- 
ver, Colo. 8796. 

Burgess, Mrs. Ralph Lake, 740 Marian St., 
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Burgy, Florence, Ginsburg Br. P. L., 
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Burke, Laurance Charles, asst. In. Univ. 
of Wis. L., Madison, Wis. 7687. 

BURMEISTER, LAURA E., State Univ. 
L., Missoula, Mont. 8114. Life mem- 
ber. 

Burnet, Duncan, In. Univ. of Georgia L., 
Athens, Ga. 2286. 

Burnet, Martha Alice, In. F. P. L., Dover, 
N. J. 2836. 

Burnet, Philip, member Board of Manag- 
ers, Wilmington Inst. F. L., Wilmington, 
Del. (Address, 182 Du Pont Bldg.) 7917. 

Burnham, Alice E., asst. L. of Hawaii, 
Honolulu, T. H. 8041. 

Burnham, Mary, head of Loan Desk P. L., 
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Burns, Ida A., asst. Child. Dept. P. L., 
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Burrage, Edith May, asst. Ref. Catalog 
Div. P. L., N. Y. City (Address, 691 
Rugby Rd., Brooklyn, N. Y.) 3575. 

Burroughs, Olive C., chief Readers' Dept. 
P. L., Berkeley, Calif. 5780. 

Burrows, Dorothy E., In. F. P. L., Ruth- 
erford, N. J. 2465. 

Burrows, Marion, catlgr. P. L., Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 2741. 

Burt, Lillian, In. Pacific Unitarian Sch. for 
The Ministry L., Berkeley, Calif. 3353. 

Burton, Ernest D., director University of 
Chicago Libraries, Chicago, 111. 6421. 



HANDBOOK 



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Burwash, Mary G., asst. in charge Agric. 

L. Univ. of 111., Urbana, 111. 7591. 
Burwell, Ethel Irene, ref. In. Western 
Reserve Historical Society iL., Cleve- 
land, O. 7034. 
Butcher, Elizabeth, catlgr. Wesleyan Univ. 

L., Middletown, Conn. 8274. 
Butler, A. Earle, Ranger, Tex. 7865. 
Butler, Emma E., In. Camp Washington 

Br. P. L., Cincinnati, Ohio. 6422. 
Butler, Harold L., In. The American Law 

L., N. Y. City. 8568. 
Butler, Mrs. Louise C., Burton Historical 

Collection P. L,, Detroit, Mich. 8289. 
Butler, Pierce, sr. asst. Newberry L., Chi- 
cago, 111. 7933. 
Butlin, Iva M., associate In. Beloit Coll. 

L., Beloit, Wis. 4435. 
Butterworth, Jeanne, 1st asst. Child. Room 

F. P. L., New Haven, Conn. 8750. 
Buttler, Grace E., In. Base Hospital L., 

Camp Merritt, N. J. 8703. 
Byers, Mrs. Frances, In. P. L., East Chi- 
cago, Ind. 5764. 
Byrne, Mary Aloysia, ref. In. P. L., San 

Francisco, Calif. 4158. 
Byrne, Paul R., asst. Libraries Section 
War Plans Div. Educational and Recrea- 
tional Br. War Dept., Washington, D. C. 
7271. 

Cadillac (Mich.) P. L. (William F. San- 
born, In.) 6067. 
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L., Syracuse, N. Y. 8569. 
Cahn, Betty, asst. P. L., Denver, Colo. 

6980. 
Cain, Mary J., In. West Indianapolis Br. 

P. L., Indianapolis, Ind. 8357. 
Cairo (III.) P. L. (Lizzie L. Powell, In.) 

6233. 
Caldwell, Bessie, In. P. L., Martinsville, 

Ind. 5409. 
Caldwell, Gladys, asst. F. P. L., Santa 

Barbara, Calif. 8766. 
Caldwell, Hazel G., In. P. L., Lakewood, 

Ohio. 7479. 

Calfee, Margaret E., In. Ensley Br. and 
supervisor High Sch. L's P. L., Birming- 
ham, Ala. 8198. 

Calhoun, Alexander, In. P. L., Calgary, 
Alberta, Canada. 5279. 



Calhoun, Annie H., head Fine Arts Div. 

P. L., Seattle, Wash. 3372. 
Calhoun, Kathleen, In. Dept. of Soldiers 
Civil Re-establishment, Ottawa, Canada. 
6628. 
California State L., Sacramento, Calif. 

(Milton J. Ferguson, In.) 3512. 
California Univ. L., Berkeley, Calif. (Har- 
old L. Leupp, In.) 5033. 
CALKINS, RUTH HELEN, ref. asst. Mon- 
tague Br. P. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 8242. 
Life Member. 
Callahan, Lilian, In. Albany F. L., Albany, 

N. Y. 5025. 
Callow, Harriet M., In. Quincy Br. P. L,, 

Cleveland, O. 1410. 
Cambria F. L. See Johnstown, Pa. 
Cambridge (Mass.) P. L. (Thomas H. 

Cummings, In.) 3629. 
Cameron, Rose, In. Bush Terminal Rail- 
way L., 130 W. 42nd St., N. Y. City. 
8704. 
Camp, Elizabeth H., In. F. L. Wellesley, 

Mass. 6939. 
Campbell, Clara Evelyn, child. In. P. L., 

Cleveland Ohio. 7036. 
Campbell, Donald K., asst. In. Associa- 
tion of the Bar L., N. Y. City. 6963. 
Campbell. Eleanor H., In. George V. N. 
Lothrop Br. P. L., Detroit, Mich. 6652. 
Campbell, Ella S., asst. In. Colo. Coll. L., 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 7601. 
Campbell, Helen M., In. Byers Br. P. L., 

Denver, Colo. 8705. 

Campbell, Homer C., field representative 
Navy Dept. Commission on Training 
Camp Activities, Washington, D. C. 
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Campbell, J. Maud, dir. Work with For- 
eigners, Mass. F. P. L. Com., Boston, 
Mass. 2606. 
Cannon, Carl L., chief of Order Div. P. L., 

N. Y. City. 6898. 

Cannon, Lucius H., In. Municipal Ref. Br. 

P. L., 206 City Hall, St. Louis, Mo. 6767. 

Canon, Eva T., asst. P. L., Detroit, Mich. 

7219. 
Canton, Ruby, In. Central State Normal 

Sch. L., Edmond, Okla. 6139. 
Carabin, Maud A., In. The Detroit Edison 
Co. L., Detroit, Mich. 8570. 



480 



Carey, Alice V., In. Westwood Br. P. L., 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 4738. 

CAREY, MIRIAM E., supervisor of Insti- 
tution Ls. Minn. State Board of Con- 
trol, St. Paul, Minn. 2141. Life mem- 
ber. 

argill, Joseph V., asst. In. P. L., Milwau- 
kee, Wis. 3709. 

Carl, Beulah Miller, asst. L. Assoc., Port- 
land, Ore. 8473. 

Carleton, Helen F., field sec'y and 1. or- 
ganizer Md. P. L. Commission, State 
Normal Sch., Towson, Md. 6490. 

Carlson, Corinne J., P. L., Detroit, Mich. 
8290. 

Carlton, William Newnham Chattin, In. 
Newberry L., Chicago, 111. 3845. 

Carlton, Mrs. W. N. C., care Newberry L., 
Chicago, 111. 4059. 

CARNEGIE, ANDREW, 2 E. 91st St., N. 
Y. City. 1902. Honorary member. 

Carnegie-Stout L. See Dubuque, Iowa. 

Games, Katharine P., In. Wesleyan Coll. 
for Women L., Macon, Ga. 6077. 

Carney, Frank, supt. of Widened Mem. L. 
Bldg., Harvard Coll., Cambridge, Mass. 
2126. 

Carothers, Wilhelmina E., head Catalog 
Dept. L. Assoc., Portland, Ore. 3001. 

CARPENTER, GEORGE O., pres. Board 
of Directors P. L., St. Louis, Mo. (Ad- 
dress, 12 Portland Place.) 3430. Life 
fellow 

CARPENTER, MRS. GEORGE O., 12 Port- 
land Place, St. Louis, Mo. 3431. Life 
member. 

Carpenter, Mary Frances, catlgr. L. of 
Hawaii, Honolulu, T. H. 2143 

Carpenter, Sara E., Cloverland, Ind. 8222. 

Carr, Flora F., acting In. Wasco County 
L., The Dalles, Ore. 7283. 

CARR, HENRY J., In. P. L., Scranton, Pa. 
215. Life member. 

Carr, Mrs. Henry J. (Edith Wallbridge), 
ex.-ln., 919 Vine St., Scranton, Pa. 448. 

Carr, John Foster, dir. Immigrant Publica- 
tion Society, 241 Fifth Ave., N. Y. City. 
6940. 

Carre, Henry Beach, faculty In. Wesley 
Hall L., Nashville, Tenn. 7480. 



Carroll, Ethel, In. P. L., Oxnard, Calif. 

5159. 
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P. L., Chicago, 111. 7243. 
Carson, Helen K., 1st asst. Lawrenceville 

Br. Carnegie L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 8135. 
Carson, W. O., provincial supt. of P. L's. 

of Ontario, Dept. of Education, Toronto, 

Ont, -Canada. 7231. 
Carter, Albert F., In. Colo. State Teachers' 

Coll. L., Greeley, Colo. 7350. 
Carter, Bertha, In. Oak Park and River 

Forest Township High Sch. L., Oak 

Park, 111. 5384. 
Carter, Mrs. Edward S., In. Gates Mem. 

L., Port Arthur, Tex. 7272. 
Carter, Lillian M., head catlgr. P. L., Mil- 
waukee, Wis. 3307. 

Carter, Mrs. Maud Russell, In. State Nor- 
mal Sch. L., Spearfish, S. D. 4445. 
Carter, Sylvester J., ref. In. P. L., Milwau- 
kee, Wis. 5332. 
Carver, Mrs. William, in charge Modern 

Language L. Univ. of Chicago, Chicago, 

111. 7753. 

Gary Memorial L. See Lexington, Mass. 
Casamajor, Mary, In. Bedford Br. P. L., 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 2099. 
Case, Flora M., In. P. L., Salem, Ore. 

6014. 
Casey, Nelka V., In. St. Louis Medical L., 

St. Louis, Mo. 7444. 
Castle, Carolyn M., In. Exposition Park Br. 

P. L., Rochester, N. Y. 6308. 
CASTOR, FLORENCE R., 800 East Elm 

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Caswell, Caroline, 1st asst. Ridgewood Br. 

P. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 8825. 
*Caswell, E. A., 99 John St., N. Y. City. 

7764. 
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treas. P. L., Toronto, Canada. 5496. 
Catholic Univ. of America L., Washington, 

D. C. (Rev. Dr. William Turner, In.) 

5347. 
Caton, Laura S., child. In. P. L., Racine, 

Wis. 7983. 

Cavanaugh, Eleanor S., In. Standard Statis- 
tics Company L., N. Y-. City. 7795. 
Cawley, Reba S., head Catalog Dept. 



HANDBOOK 



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Princeton Univ. L., Princeton, N. J. 

6734. 

Cebrian, J. C., 1801 Octavia St., San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 6874. 
Cedar Rapids (la.) P. L. (Joanna Hagey, 

In.) 4245. 
Chamberlayne, Ellen F., In. Central High 

School L., Binghamton, N. Y. 5781. 
Chamberlin, Edith J., In. Bixby Mem. L., 

Vergennes, Vt. 3854. 
Champaign (III.) P. L. (Ethel G. Kratz, 

In.) 5076. 
Champion, Marietta Kay, 215 N. 3rd St., 

Camden, N. J. 2769. 
Champlin, George G., asst. Ref. Dept. N. Y. 

State L., Albany, N. Y. 1254. 
CHANDLER, ALICE GREENE, advisory 

In. and trus. Town L., Lancaster, Mass. 

47. Life member. 
Chandler, Ellen M., head Catalog Dept. P. 

L., Buffalo, N. Y. 1099. 
Chandler, Ruth, Chicago, 111. 7957. 
Channon, Mrs. Harry, chairman L. Com. 

Bibliotheque de 1'Alliance Franeaise, 406 

Fine Arts Bldg., Chicago, 111. 5602. 
Chapin, Artena M., 710 W. Wayne St., 

Fort Wayne, Ind. 2378. 
Chapin, Ernest W., 82 Munroe St., Somer- 

ville, Mass. 8571. 
Chapin, Esther S., catlgr. Ohio State Univ. 

L., Columbus, Ohio. 6990. 
Chapman, Effie Louise, sec'y to In. P. L., 

Seattle, Wash. 5070. 
Chapman, Lila May, vice-director P. L., 

Birmingham, Ala. 4243. 
Charles, Adrienne B. ( In. Nat'l Catholic 

War Council L., Washington, D. C. 8572. 
Charleston (III.) See Eastern Illinois State 

Normal Sch. L. 
Charleston (S. C.) L. Assoc. (Ellen M. 

FitzSimons, In.) 5075. 
Chase, Arthur Horace, In. N. H. State L., 

Concord, N. H. 1319. 
Chase, Frank H., custodian of Bates Hall 

and Ref. Dept. P. L., Boston, Mass. 6447. 
Chase, George E., Walnut Creek, Calif. 

7962. 
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Detroit, Mich. 1468. 
Chase, Kate Barclay, In. Hardin Sq. Br. P. 

L., Chicago, 111. 5449. 



Chase, L. Nell, asst. Oberlin Coll. L., Ober- 
lin, Ohio. 8136. 

Chase, Mary Alice, ref. In. F. P. L., New 
Bedford, Mass. 3292. 

Chase, Mrs. Mildred H., 73 Elm Road, 
Newtonville, Mass. 5857. 

Chattanooga (Tenn.) P. L. (Margaret S. 
Dunlap, In.) 5760. 

Chelsea (Mass.) P. L. (Medora J. Simpson, 
In.) 3975. 

Chenery, Winthrop Holt, Washington 
Univ. L., St. Louis, Mo. (Address, N. Y. 
State L. Sch., Albany, N. Y.) 5622. 

Cheney, George N., In. Court of Appeals 
L., Syracuse, N. Y. 5545. 

Cheney, Nellie Mae, In. F. P. L., Ilion, N. 
Y. 7797. 

Chevalier, Samuel A., chief of Catalog and 
Shelf Dept. P. L., Boston, Mass. 1979. 

Cheyenne, Wyo., Laramie County P. L. 
(Luella Moore, In.) 6587. 

Chicago (III.) Art Institute. Ryerson L. 
(Sarah Louise Mitchell, In.) 4779. 

Chicago (III.) P. L. (Carl B. Roden, In.) 
4209'. 

Chicago (III.) Univ. of Chicago L. (Ernest 
DeWitt Burton, director, J. C. M. Han- 
son, assoc. director.) 5188. 

Chicago University Press, Chicago, III. 
3652. 

Chicago (III.) See also John Crerar L., 
McCormick Theological Seminary L., 
Newberry L., Pullman Free School of 
Manual Training L., Pullman P. F. L., 
University Club of Chicago L., and Uni- 
versity of III. Coll. of Medicine L. 

Chicopee (Mass.) P. L. (Anne A. Smith, 
In.) 7320. 

Chidester, Maud, child. In. P. L., Evans- 
ton, 111. 4437. 

Child, Emily E., catlgr. P. L., Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 4633. 

Child, Grace A., In. Normal Sch. L., Willi- 
mantic, Conn. 2528. 

Chilocco Indian Sch. L., Chilocco, Okla. 
(Bessie B. Beach, In.) 8048. 

Chipman, Frank E., president Boston Book 
Co., 83 Francis St., Boston, Mass. 4083. 

Chippewa Falls (Wis.) P. L. (Marion E. 
Bryant, In.) 7288. 



482 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Chisholm, R. A. J., Camp L., Camp Meade, 

Md. 8199. 
Chivers, Cedric, pres. and treas. Chivers 

Book Binding Co., -911-913 Atlantic Ave., 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 2862. 
Christopher, Katharine M., In. Nat'l Board 

Y. W. C. A., 600 Lexington Ave., N. Y. 

City. 5840. 
Church, Sarah N., child. In. Silas Bronson 

L., Waterbury, Conn. 6433. 
Cilley, Lillie, head catlgr. Kan. State 

Agric. Coll. L., Manhattan, Kan. 7737. 
Cilley, Mabel, In. The Davis L. Phillips 

Exeter Academy, Exeter, N. H. 8054. 
Cincinnati (Ohio) P. L. (N. D. C. Hodges, 

In.) 1810. 
Claflin, Alta B., In. Federal Reserve Bank 

L., Cleveland, Ohio. 4697. 
Clancey, Elena A., head Order Dept. P. L., 

Tacoma, Wash. 5147. 
Clapp, Clifford B., catlgr. Henry E. Hunt- 

ington L., 4 East 57th St., N. Y. City. 

3588. 
Clark, Alvan W., 898 S. 8th St., San Jose, 

Calif. 7620. 
Clark, Annette L., In. P. L., New Albany, 

Ind. 4236. 

Clark, Clara M., In. Bible Teachers' Train- 
ing Sch., N. Y. City. 4689. 
Clark, Elizabeth K., chief catlgr. P. L., 

Duluth, Minn. 4438. 
Clark, Elizabeth V., 146 N. 12th St., Cor- 

vallis, Ore. 2247. 
Clark, Etta M., In. Howe L., Hanover, N. 

H. 3857. 
Clark, George Thomas, In. Leland Stanford 

Jr. Univ. L., Stanford University, Calif. 

629. 
Clark, Hazel C., asst. Foreign Dept. P. L., 

Detroit, Mich. 6823. 
Clark, Isabelle, acting In. G-rinnell Coll. 

L., Grinnell, Iowa. 7688. 
Clark, Janet M., In. Citizens' F. L., Wash- 
ington, Pa. 6125. 
Clark, Josephine Adelaide, In. Smith Coll. 

L., Northampton, Mass. 2309. 
Clark, Mrs. Martha B., 33 S. Gore Ave., 

Webster Groves, Mo. 3045. 
Clark, Mary H,, municipal ref. In. P. L., 

Cleveland, Ohio. 6779. 



Clark, Minnie S., In. Hiram Kelly Br. P. 
L., Chicago, 111. 6538. 

Clark, Norah M., In. Brooklyn Br. P. L., 
Cleveland, O. 7781. 

Clark, William Edwin, trus. P. L., Sharon, 
Mass. (Address, 69 Newbury St., Bos- 
ton.) 8055. 

Clark Univ. L., Worcester, Mass. (Louis 
N. Wilson, In.) 4030. 

Clarke, Edith E., 112 'Comstock Ave., Syra- 
cuse, N. Y. 711. 

Clarke, Elizabeth P., Travel. L. Dept. P. 
L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 1517. 

Clarke, Emma Leonore, In. Town L., Fram- 
ingham, Mass. 2588. 

Clarke, Frances, asst. In. Central Child. 
Room P. L., N. Y. City. 8573. 

Clarke, Ida, pres. Board of Trustees P. L., 
Youngstown, Ohio. 7291. 

Clarke, Jeannette A., In. F. P. L., Winona, 
Minn. 2200. 

Clarke, Mary E., sr. asst. P. L., N. Y. City. 
7706. 

Clatworthy, Linda M., N. H. State L., Con- 
cord, N. H. 2196. 

Clawson, Cortez R., In. Alfred Univ. L., 
Alfred, N. Y. 6959. 

Clayton, Herbert Vincent, law asst. Kan. 
State L., Topeka, Kan. 7798. 

Cleaveland, Margaret, In. South High Sch. 
L., Cleveland, Ohio. 8707. 

Cleaves, Edith L., asst. Circ. Dept. P. L., 
Seattle, Wash. 8706. 

Cleavinger, John S., associate, Univ. of 
111. L. Sch., Urbana, 111. 4829. 

Cleland, Ethel, In. Business Br. P. L., In- 
dianapolis, Ind. 4883. 

Clement, Caroline B., 1st asst. City L., 
Manchester, N. H. 5275. 

Clement, Ina, catlgr. Municipal Ref. L., 
N. Y. City. 7038. 

Cleveland (Ohio) P. L. (Linda A. East- 
man, In.) 3880. 

Clinton, Mabel, general asst. P. L., De- 
troit, Mich. 8415. 

Clinton (la.) F. P. L. (Mary A. Egan, In.) 
6530. 

Clizbee, Azalea, catlgr. American Art Gal- 
leries, N. Y. City. 7039. 

Clonney, Mrs. Josephine W., ex-ln., 302 W. 
79th St., N. Y. City. 1590. 



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483 



Cloquet (Minn.) P. L. (Mildred E. Riley, 
In.) 4440. 

Cloud, Josephine P., asst. P. L., Minneapo- 
lis, Minn. 2030. 

Cloues, Rev. William Jacob, In. Hills L. 
Newton Theol. Inst., Newton Centre, 
Mass. 7627. 

Clough, Margaret V., asst. Child. Room 
P. L., Indianapolis, Ind. 8358. 

Coast Artillery School L., Fort Monroe, 
Va. (R. R. Welshimer, In.) 8776. 

Cobane, Lydia A., In. L. Assoc., Skan- 
eateles, N. Y. 6471. 

Cobb, Edith H., asst. F. P. L,., New Bed- 
ford, Mass. 2636. 

Cobb, Mary Elizabeth, In. N. Y. State Coll. 
for Teachers L., Albany, N. Y. 7040. 

Cochran, Jennie Owen, head of Stations 
and Extension Dept. P. P. L., Louisville, 
Ky. 6472. 

COCHRAN, MARY RUDD, Div. of Soci- 
ology P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 3509. Life 
member. 

Cochran, Ruth S., ref. In. P. L., Racine, 
Wis. 7984. 

Cochrane, Jennie M., catlgr. Maine State 
L., Augusta, Me. 5725. 

Cocker, Clara J., P. L., Detroit, Mich. 8291. 

Cocroft, Ada Marion, 204 Columbia Heights, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 7963. 

Coddington, Hester, asst. In. Univ. of Wis- 
consin L., Madison, Wis. 1156. 

Coe, Mrs. Frances Rathbone, head Cata- 
log Dept. Mass. State L., Boston, Mass. 
1533. 

Coe College L., Cedar Rapids, la. (Jessie 
B. Weston, In.) 6866. 

Coffin, Helen, legislative ref. In. Conn. 
State L., Hartford, Conn. 6199. 

Coit, Emily S., asst. In. U. S. Public Health 
Service* Hosp. L., Greenville, S. C. 2480. 

Colby, Adah Marie, chief of Circ., Mon- 
tague Br., P. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 1301. 

COLBY, MRS. W. S. (INEZ F. SACHS), 
sr. asst. Catalog Dept. Univ. of Calif. L., 
Berkeley, Calif. 4571. Life member. 

Colclazer, Sarah E., In. in charge Oak 
Lane Br. F. L., Philadelphia, Pa. 8428. 

Colcord, Mabel, In. Bureau of Entomology, 
Dept. of Agriculture, Washington, D. C. 
2517. 



Coldwell, Margaret V., child. In. N. Port- 
land Br. L. Assoc., Portland, Ore. 8474. 

Cole, Agnes M., sr. asst. Univ. of Calif. 
L., Berkeley, Calif. 3234. 

Cole, Eva Alice, asst. Sociology Dept. P. 
L., Los Angeles, Calif. 6988. 

COLE, GEORGE WATSON, In. Henry E. 
Huntington L., 4 E. 57th St., N. Y. City. 
500. Life member. 

Cole, Theodore Lee, law bookseller, 715 
Colorado Bldg., Washington, D. C. 737. 

Colegrove, Mrs. Mabel E., head Periodical 
Dept. F. P. L., Newark, N. J. 6312. 

Colerick, Margaret M., In. P. L., Fort 
Wayne, Ind. 2266. 

Colgate Univ. L., Hamilton, N. Y. (D. F. 
Estes, In.) 6503. 

Colgrove, Vivian G., asst. Card Section, L. 
of Congress, Washington, D. C. 8032. 

*Collar, Herbert C., head catlgr. Gros- 
venor L., Buffalo, N. Y. 5751. 

Collier, Mary E., head Bindery Cossitt L., 
Memphis, Tenn. 8574. 

Collins, Anne Ross, In. Reynolds L., 
Rochester, N. Y. 5330. 

Collins, Elsie, In. North Br. P. L., New 
Bedford, Mass. 6449. 

Collmann, Sophie Marie, chief Foreign Lit. 
Dept. P. L., Cincinnati, Ohio. 3507. 

Colorado Springs (Colo.) P. L. (Lucy W. 
Baker, In.) 4843. 

Colorado State Agricultural Coll. L., Fort 
Collins, Colo. (Charlotte A. Baker, In.) 
4379. 

Colorado University L., Boulder, Colo. (C. 
Henry Smith, In.) 7395. 

Colt, Alice M., In. The Ferguson L., Stam- 
ford, Conn. 8343. 

Columbia University L., N. Y. City. (Wil- 
liam H. Carpenter, In.) 8029. 

Columbus Memorial L. See Pan-American 
Union, Washington, D. C. 

Columbus (Ohio) P. L. (John J. Pugh, In.) 
4942. 

Colwell, Anna, In. Charlotte Br. L., Char- 
lotte, N. Y. 8137. 

Comings, Marian E., asst. in charge Burn- 
ham Architectural L., Ryerson L. Art 
Inst., Chicago, 111. 

Compton, Charles H., A. L. A., N. Y. City. 
3728. 



484 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Compton, Nellie Jane, asst. In. Univ. of 
Nebraska L., Lincoln, Neb. 3048. 

Conat, Mabel L., 1st asst. Ref. Dept. P. L., 
Detroit, Mich. 6399. 

Cone, Jessica G., catlgr. Goodwyn Inst. L., 
Memphis, Tenn. 1302. 

Congdon, Ferae L., catlgr. P. L., Superior, 
Wis. 8138. 

Congdon, Mrs. William M., 1. visitor and 
director of Traveling L's. for R. I. State 
Board of Education, 455 Cranston St., 
Providence, R. I. 5414. 

Conneaut (Ohio) Carnegie P. L. (Marie 
T. Brown, In.) 7338. 

Connecticut State L., Hartford, Conn. 
(Geo. S. Godard, In.) 4233. 

Connor, Elizabeth, In. Mount Wilson Ob- 
servatory L., Pasadena, Calif. 8765. 

Conover, Juliana, trus. P. L., Princeton, 
N. J. 8056. 

Conover, Mary, chief Intermediate Div. 
P. L., Detroit, Mich. 8292. 

Converse, M. Louise, In. Central State 
Normal Sch. L., Mount Pleasant, Mich. 
4403. 

Conway, Hester, child. In. Columbus Br. 
P. L., N. Y. City. 8336. 

Conway, Mass., Field Memorial L. (Cora 
M. Hassell, In.) 4229. 

Cook, Agnes C., sr. asst. Child. Dept. P. L., 
Worcester, Mass. 8278. 

Cook, Dorothy E., In. Business Technical 
Dept., L. Association, Portland, Ore. 
6867. 

Cook, Edith L., In. East Technical High 
Sch. Br. P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 5766. 

Cook, Ella B., asst. In. N. J. P. L. Commis- 
sion, Trenton, N J. 7043. 

Cook, Lillian E., In. State Dept. of Educa- 
tion, L. Div., St. Paul, Minn. 5714. 

COOK, RUTH V., In. School of Architec- 
ture Harvard Univ., Cambridge, Mass. 
8243. Life member. 

Cooley, Genevieve S., catlgr. L. of Con- 
gress, Washington, D. C. 4149. 

Coolidge, Elsie Winchester, catlgr. P. L., 
Boston, Mass. 3692. 

Coolidge, J. Randolph, Jr., trus. Boston 
Athenaeum, Boston, Mass. (Address 89 
State St.) 2520. 



Coon, B. Mildred, acting In. West Fort St. 

Br. P. L., Detroit, Mich. 6505. 
Cooper, Agness B., head Documents Div. 

P. L., Kansas City, Mo. 8445. 
Cooper, Isabella Mitchell, In. in charge 

Central Circ. P. L., N. Y. City. 4381. 
Cooper, Louise B., chief Circ. Dept. F. L., 

Philadelphia, Pa. 1560. 
Copeland, Lora A., asst. P. L., Brockton, 

Mass. 3668. 
Coplin, Martha Lee, chief Pub. Doc. Dept. 

F. L., Philadelphia, Pa. 7044. 
COREY, MRS. DELORAINE PENDRE 

(Isabella Holden), 2 Berkeley St., Mai 

den, Mass. 1925. Life member. 
Cornell Univ. L., Ithaca, N. Y. (Willard 

Austen, In.) 7387. 
Cornew, Elsie M., Information and Files 

Dept. U. S. Shipping Board, Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 5304. 
Cornwall, May M., Shedd Park Br. P. L., 

Chicago, 111. 8798. 
Corona (Cal.) P. L. (Helen L. Coffin, In.) 

6663. 
Corwin, Belle, In. N. Y. Univ. L., N. Y. 

City. 4758. 
Corwin, Ella F., In. Carnegie L., Elkhart, 

Ind. 4444. 
Corwin, Euphemia Kipp, In. Berea Coll. L., 

Berea, Ky. 1723. 
Coshocton (Ohio) P. L. (Eleanor Olney, 

In.) 7352. 

Cossitt L. See Memphis, Tenn. 
Cotton, Willia D., In. P. L., Marietta, Ohio. 

7046. 
Couillard, Ada S., acting ref. In. Univ. of 

Minnesota L., Minneapolis, Minn. 6631. 
Coulter, Edith M., ref. In. Cal. Univ. L., 

Berkeley, Calif. 3799. 
Council Bluffs (la.) F. P. L. (Cora Hen- 
dee, In.) 4248. 

Countryman, Gratia A., In. P. L., Minneap- 
olis, Minn. 1766. 
Courteau, Stella, catlgr. P. L., St. Paul, 

Minn. 8708. 
Cowing, Agnes, supt. of Child. Work P. L., 

Seattle, Wash. 3584. 
Cowing, Herbert L., head Loan Dept. F. P. 

L., New Haven, Conn. 3866. 
Cox, Fannie, In. P. L., Janesville, Wis. 

6518. 



HANDBOOK 



485 



Cox, Frances S., catlgr. and ref. In. Metro- 
politan Life Ins. Co. L., N. Y. City. 8511. 

Cragin, Emma F., supt. of Cataloging Of- 
fice, Circ. Dept. P. L., N. Y. City. 5000. 

Craig, Clara Louise, 421 S. 28th St., Lin- 
coln, Neb. 3821. 

Craig, Edmund L., sec'y P. L. Board, Ev- 
ansville, Ind. (Address, American Trust 
Bldg.) 6121. 

Craig, Florence M., catlgr. Leland Stan- 
ford Jr. Univ. L., Stanford University, 
Calif. 7575. 

Craig, Helen M., asst. Engineering Dept. 
L. Western Electric Co., 453 West St., 
N. Y. City. 7047. 

Craig, Jane Adah, catalog reviser Univ. of 
111. L., Urbana, 111. 5348. 

Craig, Mayme, In. Dulany P. L., Paris, 
Mo. 7841. 

Craine, Mura M. H., 1st asst. Miles Park 
Br. P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 8751. 

CRAMPTON, SUSAN C., Concord, Mass. 
2710. Life member. 

Crandall, Annabel, in charge Ref. Catalog 
Public Documents L., Washington, D. C. 
3306. 

Crandle, Inez, In. Dimmick Memorial L., 
Mauch Chunk, Pa. 5711. 

Crane, Helen M., In. N. D. State Normal 
Sch. L., Valley City, N. D. 6780. 

Cranmer, Gladys R., asst. catlgr. Syracuse 
Univ. L., Syracuse, N. Y. 8512. 

GRAVER, HARRISON WARWICK, di- 
rector L. of the United Engineering So- 
cieties, 29 West 39th St., N. Y. City. 
2229. Life member. 

Crawford, Clara M., In. State Normal Sch. 
L., Fredericksburg, Va. 7669. 

Crawford, Mary Royce, State Normal Sch. 
L., Lewiston, Idaho. 8139. 

Credille, Ruth, In. Carnegie L., Valdosta, 
Ga. 7410. 

Crenshaw, May V., University, Va. 6154. 

Crevecoeur, Pierre B. de, In. Fraser Insti- 
tute F. P. L., Montreal, Canada. 1976. 

Criswell, Lois, sr. asst. Univ. of Califor- 
nia L., Berkeley, Calif. 5135. 

Critzer, Helena M., asst. P. L., Berkeley, 
Cal. 5767. 

Crocker, Ruth E., In. North Portland Br. 
L. Assoc., Portland, Ore. 6781. 



Croft, Samuel M., in charge Mail and De- 
livery Div. L. of 'Congress, Washington, 
D. C. 4446. 

Crofts, George D., In. Law L. Eighth Judi- 
cial District, Buffalo, N. Y. 7484. 

Cromwell, Mrs. William, 624 State St., 
Frankfort, Ky. 7429. 

Crone, Albert, Library Journal, 62 W. 45th 
St., N. Y. City. 7485. 

Cronin, Con. P., In. Ariz. State L., Phoenix, 
Ariz. 7934. 

Crooks, Muriel A., Schools Div. Carnegie 
L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 8140. 

Crosby, Harriet L., In. Nevins Memorial 
L., Methuen, Mass. 2130. 

Cross, Anne G., In. L. of the Dept. of 
Commerce, Washington, D. C. 7791. 

Cross, Leora M., In. West High Sch. Br. 
P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 5364. 

Crossley, F. B., In. Northwestern Univ. 
Law L., Chicago, 111. 3987. 

Grouse, Charles W., Camp L., Camp Meade, 
Md. 8141. 

Crowne, Helen S., in charge Ref. Room 
Univ. of Pennsylvania L., Philadelphia, 
Pa. 7048. 

Cruice, Mary Z., In. American Catholic 
Historical Society, Philadelphia, Pa. 
1598. 

Cruikshank, Catherine, In. U. S. General 
Hospital no. 26 L., Fort Des Moines, 
Iowa. 8496. 

Cruikshank, Ernest, In. St. Mary's Sch. 
L., Raleigh, N. C. 2658. 

Crumley, Susie Lee, asst. In. Carnegie L., 
director L. Sch. and organizer Georgia 
L. Commission, Atlanta, Ga. 5283. 

CRUNDEN, MRS. F. M., 518 W. lllth St., 
N. Y. City. 727. Life member. 

Cudworth, Warren H., Camp L., Camp 
Upton, N. Y. 8142. 

Culkins, J. Paul, 3414 Montieth Ave., Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio. 8429. 

Culver, Essae M., In. Butte County F. L., 
Oroville, Cal. 5485. 

Cummer, W. E., trus. F. P. L., Jackson- 
ville, Fla. 5074. 

Cummings, Alice Twiss, asst. In. P. L., 
Hartford, Conn. 1927. 

Cummings, T. Harrison, In. P. L., Cam- 
bridge, Mass. 7689. 



486 



Cunningham, Jesse, In. P. L., St. Joseph, 
Mo. 5265. 

Currie, Florence B., head catlgr. Univ. of 
Mo. L., Columbia, Mo. 5695. 

CURRIER, THOMAS FRANKLIN, asst. 
In. Harvard Coll. L., Cambridge, Mass. 
1712. Life member. 

Curry, Mrs. Belle, In. P. L., Parsons, Kan. 
6555. 

Curtis, Florence Rising, asst. professor 
Univ. of Illinois L. Sen., Urbana, 111. 
4364. 

Curtis, Gail, ref. In. Mich. State L., Lans- 
ing, Mich. 7677. 

Curtis Memorial L. See Meriden, Conn. 

Curtiss, Clara Louise, child. In. Browns- 
ville Children's Br. P. L., Brooklyn, N. 
Y. 8575. 

Curtiss, Frances E., inventory clerk P. L., 
Detroit, Mich. 3220. 

Gushing, Helen G., asst. P. L., Boston, 
Mass. 4626. 

Cushing, Helen Grant, N. H. Coll. L., Dur- 
ham, N. H. 7744. 

Cushman, Esther C., asst. P. L., Provi- 
dence, R. I. 7787. 

Custead, Alma D., In. P. L., Patchogue, 
N. Y. 6155. 

Cutter, Annie Spencer, supervisor Grade 
Schools Libraries, P. L., Cleveland, O. 
4699. 

Cutter, Marian, Children's Bookshop, 2 E. 
31st St., N. Y. City. 6956. 

Daggett, William A., 1094 Cherry St., 
Springfield, Mo. 7194. 

Daley, J. J., In. Law Soc. of Upper Can- 
ada L., Toronto, Canada. 6122. 

Dallas (Tex.) P. L. (Betsy T. Wiley, In.) 
4328. 

Dallas, Tex. See also Southern Methodist 
Univ. L. 

Dalton (Mass.) P. L. (Mrs. C. R. Flickin- 
ger, In.) 4028. 

Dame, Katharine, subject catlgr. N. Y. 
State L., Albany, N. Y. 2391. 

Damon, Lalia May, catlgr. Mass. Agric. 
Coll. L., Amherst, Mass. 2434. 

Dana, John Cotton, In. F. P. L., Newark, 
N. J. 773. 

Danbury (Conn.) L. (Mary P. Wiggin, In.) 
7251. 



Daniells, William N., asst. Univ. of Texas 

L., Austin, Tex. 5858. 
Daniels, Joseph F., In. P. L., Riverside, 

Cal. 4151. 
Darby, M. Claire, asst. Technology Div. 

P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 5599. 
Darling, Frances C., asst. Bookshop for 

Boys and Girls, Boston, Mass. 7628. 
Darlow, Gertrude Ellen, Dept. of Literary 

Advancement P L., Los Angeles, Cal. 

5412. 
Darrach, Marjorie J., Circ. Dept. P. L., 

Detroit, Mich. 8293. 
Dart, Izella M., asst. Univ. of Minn. L., 

Minneapolis, Minn. 7205. 
Dartmouth Coll. L., Hanover, N. H. (Na- 
thaniel L. Goodrich, In.) 4244. 
Darwin, Gertrude, catlgr. P. L., N. Y. City. 

6924. 

Datz, Harry R., Library Bureau, 316 Broad- 
way, N. Y. City. 4589. 
Davenport (Iowa) P. L. (Grace D. Rose, 

In.) 4373. 
Davidson, Adeline T., sec'y and asst. to 

In. F. P. L., East Orange, N. J. 8576. 
Davies, John F., Box 81, Great Falls, Mont. 

455. 
Davis, Carrie H,, asst. Ref. Dept. Columbia 

Univ. L., N. Y. City. 7051. 
Davis, Earl H., chief Applied Science 

Dept. P. L., St. Louis, Mo. 7405. 
Davis, Edna E., ref. In. Syracuse Univ. L., 

Syracuse, N. Y. 4134. 
Davis, Elizabeth H., In. 'Washington High 

Sch. L., Portland, Ore. 5302. 
Davis, Esther M., In. Brooklyn Training 

Sch. for Teachers L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

2674. 
Davis, F. L., 684 Leonard St., Brooklyn, 

N. Y. 6242. 
Davis, Georgia Sylvia, acting head Order 

Dept. P. L., Grand Rapids, Mich. 4390. 
Davis, Jennie Louise, asst. In. Cossitt L., 

Memphis, Tenn. 2977. 
Davis, Letty Lucile, In. Arbor Press L., 

N. Y. City. 5667. 

Davis, Mary G., child. In. Fort Washing- 
ton Br. P. L., N. Y. City. 5917. 
Davis, Mary H., high sch. In. P. L., Brook- 
line, Mass. 4570. 



HANDBOOK 



487 



Davis, Mary I., In. Lorain Br. P. L., Cleve- 
land, O. 5232. 
Davis, Mary Louise, In. P. L., Troy, N. Y. 

1037. 
Davis, Mildred, 1st asst. Ref. Dept. L. 

Assoc., Portland, Ore. 8475. 
Davis, Mildred E., supervisor of Circ. and 

Training P. L., Utica, N. Y. 5460. 
Davis, Miriam Maude, ref. In. P. L., Min- 
neapolis, Minn. 1807. 
Davis, Olin Sylvester, In. P. L., Laconia, 

N. H. 493. 
Davis, Mrs. Olin Sylvester, Laconia, N. H. 

4676. 
Davis, Orlando C., In. P. L., Waltham, 

Mass. 5013. 
*Davis, Prof. Raymond C., In. emeritus 

Univ. of Mich. General L., Ann Arbor, 

Mich. 170. 
Davis, Reba, In. Univ. of Wyoming L., 

Laramie, Wyo. 5203 
Davis, S. Irene, supervisor of Child. Dept 

Ferguson L., Stamford, Conn. 6813. 
Davis, Sarah D., 1st asst. catlgr. Univ. of 

Indiana L., Bloomington, Ind. 8709. 
Davis, Mrs. Winifred L., chief State 

Travel. L. Dept. Wis. L. Commission, 

Madison, Wis. 8842. 
Davison, Mrs. Hannah P., In. emerita P. 

L., San Diego, Calif. 333. 
Dawley, Frank Fremont, Cedar Rapids, la. 

1215. 

Dawson, Annie Maude, asst. P. L., Birm- 
ingham, Ala. 7670. 
Dawson, Loleta I., stud. Western Reserve 

Univ. L. Sch., Cleveland, O. 7720. 
Day, Edward, In. Camp L., Kelly Field, 

Tex. 7994. 
Day, Mrs. Gladys Judd, In. Hartford Bar 

L., Hartford, Conn. 7052. 
Day, Mary Bostwick, In. National Safety 

Council L., Chicago, 111. 5803. 
Dayton, H. Irene, In. High Sch. Br. P. L., 

Passaic, N. J. 5715. 
Dayton (Ohio) P. L. and Museum (Elec- 

tra C. Doren, In.) 4314. 
De Angelis, Annina, P. L., Utica, N. Y. 

8577. 
De Moss, Rose E., br. In. P. L., Cleveland, 

Ohio. 8578. 



De Puy, Almena Rebecca, catlgr. P. L., 

Jackson, Mich. 4785. 
De Ridder, Gustave, notary, 4 Rue Per- 

rault, Paris, France. 3528. 
Deaderick, Mrs. Inez, asst. Lawson Me 

Ghee L., Knoxville, Tenn. 8579. 
Dean, Alice C., acting In. Rice Inst. L., 

Houston, Tex. 7574. 
Dearborn, James M., chief Order Dept. 

Boston Athenaeum L., Boston, Mass. 

6801. 
Deborah Cook Sayles P. L. See Pawtucket, 

R. I. 
Decatur (III.) F. P. L. (Mrs. Alice G. 

Evans, In.) 172. 
Decker, Cora M., asst. In. P. L., Scranton, 

Pa. 2311. 
Decorah (Iowa) P. L. (Mrs. Alice Gris- 

wold, In.) 8777. 
Dedham (Mass.) P. L. (Anna P. Holland, 

In.) 5777. 
Deemer, Catharine Jane, P. Documents 

Dept. F. L., Philadelphia, Pa. 8333. 
Deighton, Bina, In. P. L., Great Bend, Kan. 

8143. 

Dela Fosse, Frederick M., In. P. L., Peter- 
borough, Ont., Canada. 5703. 
Delephant, Frances, In. Swinney Br. P. L., 

Kansas City, Mo. 8710. 
DELFINO, Mrs. LIBORIO (Emma R. 

Neisser), Traveling Libraries F. L., 

Philadelphia, Pa. 952. Life member. 
Democrat Printing Company, Madison, 

Wis. 7282. 
Dennis, Elizabeth G., chief of Juvenile 

Div. P. L., St. Paul, Minn. 8711. 
Denver (Colo.) P. L. (Chalmers Hadley, 

In.) 1073. 
Denver Univ. L., Denver, Colo. (Mrs. 

Elisabeth McNeal Galbreath, In.) 5121. 
DERBY, GRACE EMILY, assoc. In. Kan. 

State Agric. Coll. L., Manhattan, Kan. 

4069. Life member. 
Derby (Conn.) Harcourt Wood Mem. L. 

(Emma E. Lessey, acting In.) 5761. 
Derman, Mrs. Henriette, asst. Catalog Div. 

Slavic Section L. of Congress, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 7611. 
Des Moines (Iowa) P. L. 4303. 
Deshon, Corinne A., In. Curtis Memorial 

L., Meriden, Conn. 4020. 



4S8 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Dess, M., book binder, Eagle Art Book 
Bindery, 333 Fourth Ave., N. Y. City. 
7801. 

Detroit (Mich.) P. L. (Adam Strohm, In.) 
4777. 

DEVENEAU, GEORGE A., Federal Board 
for Vocational Education, 220 South 
State St., Chicago, 111. 6787. Life 
member. 

Devine, Kate F., In. Carnegie L., San An- 
tonio, Tex. 8580. 

Dew, M. S., In. John Marshall High Sch. 
L., Richmond, Va. 8513. 

DEWEY, MELVIL, ex-ln., Lake Placid 
Club, N. Y. I. Life fellow. 

DEWEY, MRS. MELVIL (Annie R. God- 
frey) ex-ln., Lake Placid Club, N. Y. 29. 
Life member. 

Dexter, Lydia A., 2920 Calumet Ave., Chi- 
cago, 111. 782. 

Dice, J. Howard, L. Sub-Section, War 
Plans Div. Educational and Recreational 
Br. War Dept., Washington, D. C. 5359. 

Dick, Christian R., asst. In. Univ. of N. D. 
K, University, N. D. 6994. 

Dick, Grace Isabella, Tulare Co. F. L., 
Visalia, Calif. 6995. 

Dickerson, Luther L., in charge Library 
Subjection, War Plans Div. Educa- 
tional and Recreation Br. War Dept., 
Washington, D. C. 4588. 

Dickey, Helene Louise, In. Chicago Nor- 
mal Coll. L., Chicago, 111. 2152. 

Dickey, Philena A., In. Sinclair Con. Pe- 
troleum Corp., Exploration Dept., N. Y. 
City. 7054. 

Dickinson, Asa Don, In. Univ. of Pennsyl- 
vania L., Philadelphia, Pa. 2903. 

Dickinson, Sarah S., periodical clerk John 
Crerar L., Chicago, 111. 1465. 

Dickson, C. G., Copyrights Div., L. of Con- 
gress, Washington, D. C. 1864. 

Diefenderfer, Vivien, In. Sears, Roebuck 
and Co. L., Chicago, 111. 7432. 

Dielman, Louis Henry, executive sec'y 
Peabody Institute of Baltimore, Balti- 
more, Md. 2426. 

Dieserud, Juul, reviser L. of Congress, 
Washington, D. C. 2433. 

Dietz, C. N., pres. L. Board P. L., Omaha, 
Neb. (Address, 428 S. 38th St.) 8057. 



Dilks, Sara Elizabeth, child. In. Lehigh 
Ave. Br. F. L., Philadelphia, Pa. 7056. 

Dill, Minnie A., asst. In. and catlgr. F. P. 
L., Decatur, 111. 1632. 

Dillard, Florence, In. P. L., Lexington, 
Ky. 7300. 

Dillon, Dorothy, substitute Carnegie L., 
Atlanta, Ga. 7950. 

Dills, Clara B., In. Solano County F. L., 
Fairfield, Cal. 6634. 

Dimmick Mem. L. See Mauch Chunk, Pa. 

Dimmitt, Le Noir, In. Extension Loan L. 
Univ. of Tex., Austin, Tex. 6802. 

Dingman, Anne P., Immigration and For- 
eign Community Sec'y Ohio and West 
Va. Field, Y. W. C. A., Cincinnati, Ohio. 
5820. 

Dinsmoor, Kate E., In. Kansas City Poly- 
technic Ins-t. L., Kansas City, Mo. 3860. 

Dinwiddie, Edna J., In. Davenport L., Bath, 
N. Y. 8446. 

Dippel, Clara, head Reading Room P. L., 
Indianapolis, Ind. 2345. 

Diven, Lou Gertrude, supt. Wash. State 
Traveling L., Olympia, Wash. 5604. 

Dixon, Edna A., asst. In. Harlem Br. P. L., 
N. Y. City. 6231. 

Dixon, Vera M., asst. In. in charge Iowa 
State Coll. L., Ames, la. 5783. 

Dixon (ill.) P. L. (Mary F. Wynn, In.) 
7327. 

Doane, Dorothea De Witt, In. Carnegie F. 
L., Alliance, Ohio. 8712. 

Doane, Stella T., In. State Normal Sch. 
L., Mansfield, Pa. 7057. 

Dodd, Elizabeth J., asst. P. L., Derby, 
Conn. 8405. 

Dodd, Mary Lillian, In. Franklin Br. F. P. 
L., East Orange, N. J. 8581. 

Dodge, Cleveland H., trus. P. L., N. Y. 
City. (Address, 99 John St.) 3962. 

Dodge, Melvin Gilbert, printer-publisher, 
806 Union St., Utica, N. Y. 1263. 

Dodgen, Lily M., 636 Chestnut St., Gads- 
den, Ala. 5745. 

Donald, Crete M., In. Lents Br. L. Assoc., 
Portland, Ore. 8476. 

Doncourt, Amy E., asst. Child. Dept. P. L., 
Seattle, Wash. 7058. 

Donnelly, J. W., pres. Bd. P. L., Birming- 
ham, Ala. 7918. 



HANDBOOK 



489 



DONNELLY, JUNE RICHARDSON, prof, 
of L. Science, dir. of Simmons Coll. 
L. Sch., and In. of Simmons Coll., Bos- 
ton, Mass. 2427. Life member. 

Donovan, Katharine A., principal asst. 
Registry Dept. P. L., Chicago, 111. 7235. 

Doo, Ding U., stud. Univ. of the Philippines 
L. Sch., Manila, P. I. 7931. 

Doran, Jennie E., head Order Dept. P. L., 
Denver, Colo. 5854. 

Dore, Margaret M., 2862 28th St. N. W., 
Washington, D. C. 7964. 

Doren, Electra C., In. P. L., Dayton, Ohio. 
1275. 

Doren, Elizabeth B., head Book Ord. Dept. 
P. L., Dayton, O. 2933. 

Dorrance, Frances, chief Circ. Dept. Oster- 
hout P. L., Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 7707. 

Doster, J. B., sec'y H. W. Wilson Co., N. 
Y. City. 4365. 

Doty, Margaret, ref. In. L. Div. Minn. Dept. 
of Education, St. Paul, Minn. 8531. 

Doty, Marion F., asst. Technology Dept. 
P. L., N. Y. City. 8582. 

Doubleday, F N., Doubleday, Page and Co., 
Publishers, Garden City, N. Y. 8058. 

Dougan, Alice M., head catlgr. Purdue 
Univ. L., Lafayette, Ind. 5136. 

Dougherty, Anna R., chief Art and Music 
Dept. F. L., Philadelphia, Pa. 1563. 

Dougherty, Harold Taylor, In. P. L., New- 
ton, Mass. 3044. 

Douglass, Matthew Hale, In. Univ. of 
Oregon L., Eugene, Ore. 2133. 

Dousman, Mary E., child. In. P. L., Mil- 
waukee, Wis. 1537. 

Dover (N. H.) P. L. (Caroline H. Garland, 
In.) 4264. 

Dow, Madalene, In. Barringer High Sch. 
L., Newark, N. J. 7060. 

Dow, Mary Edith, In. P. L., Saginaw, E. S., 
Mich. 5243. 

Downes, Mrs. William F. (Lucy Deane), 
In. P. L., Canton, Mass. 3689. 

DOWNEY, MARY ELIZABETH, 1. sec'y 
and organizer Dept. of P. Instruction, 
Salt Lake City, Utah. 2294. Life mem- 
ber. 

Dowse, George James, managing director, 
Edward G. Allen & Son, Ltd., 14 Grape 
St., Shaftesbury Ave., London, Eng. 5109. 



Doxsee, Roberta M., Pratt Institute F. L., 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 8447. 
Drake, Jeannette M., In. P. L., Pasadena, 

Calif. 3732. 
Drake, Ruth B., In. Chazy Rural Sch. L., 

Chazy, N. Y. 5659. 
Drake Univ. L., Des Moines, la. (Rae 

Stockham, In.) 4594. 
Drane, Millie K., In. Prospect Br. P. L., 

Indianapolis, Ind. 8359. 
Draper, Anne Elizabeth, In. Bureau of 

Chemistry L., Washington, D. C. 2463. 
Draper, Miriam S., In. Children's Museum 

L., Brooklyn Institute, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

1639. 
Drew, Mrs. Ernest C., 34 Cricket Ave., 

Ardmore, Pa. 7171. 
Drew, Nettie V., asst. Sch. Dept. L. Assoc., 

Portland, Ore. 8477. 
Drexel Institute L., Philadelphia, Pa. (J. 

Peterson Ryder, In.) 4260. 
Drum, Mrs. Adele H., In. Alexander Mit- 
chell L., Aberdeen, S. D. 6564. 
Drury, Francis K. W., asst. In. Brown 

Univ., L., Providence, R. I. 2781. 
Drury, Mrs. Gertrude G., instructor L. 

Sch. P. L., St. Louis, Mo. 8779. 
Drury, Ruth L., catlgr. Yale Univ. L., New 

Haven, Conn. 8217. 
DuBols, Isabel, asst. to Library Specialist 

Bureau of Navigation, Sixth Div., New 

Navy Bldg., Navy Dept., Washington, 

D. C. 5752. 
Dubuque (Iowa) Carnegie-Stout L. (May 

M. Clark, In.) 7321. 

DUDGEON, MATTHEW S., sec'y Wiscon- 
sin F. L. Commission, Madison, Wis. 

4812. Life member. 

Dudley, Ruth C., ref. In. City L., Man- 
chester, N. H. 6540. 
Dudley, William Henry, asst. In. Univ. of 

Wis. L., Madison, Wis. 7690. 
Duffield, G. Vinton, supt. Photostat Dept. 

Princeton Univ. L., Princeton, N. J. 

8583. 
Dulin, Roberta, asst. ref. In. Univ. of Texas 

L., Austin, Tex. 8408. 
Dullard, John P., Trenton, N. J. 6141. 
Dulles, Joseph Heatly, In. Princeton Theo- 
logical Seminary L., Princeton, N. J. 

3432. 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Duluth (Minn.) P. L. (Frances E. Earhart, 
In.) 4266. 

Dunbar, Margaret, head of Dept. of L. 
Science, Kent State Normal Soh., Kent, 
O. 5448. 

Dunbar, Mary E., 553 Lincoln PI., Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. 6219. 

Dunbar, Ralph M., In. Portsmouth Naval 
Prison L., Portsmouth, N. H. 6423. 

Duncan, Barbara, custodian Music Dept. P. 
L., Boston, Mass. 6498. 

Duncan, Eleanor, ffolliott, managing editor 
Library Journal, 62 West 45th St., N. Y. 
City. 8059. 

Duncan, Margaret Lilian, child. In. P. L., 
Jacksonville, Fla. 7802. 

Dunham, Franklin G., Educational Staff 
Victor Talking Machine Co., Camden, 
N. J. 8584. 

Dunlap, Alice M., asst. In. P. L. Duluth, 
Minn. 8585. 

Dunlap, Fanny, asst. in charge Circ. Dept. 
Univ. of Mo. L., Columbia, Mo. 6772. 

Dunmore, Delia, asst. P. L., Newark, N. J. 
8586. 

Dunn, Abigail D., In. Young Men's Inst. 
L., New Haven, Conn. 5795. 

Dunn, Florence E., trus. P. L., Waterville, 
Me. 2541. 

Dunne, Mary Kelley, 10 3rd St. N. E., 
Washington, D. C. 8060. 

Dunton, Florence E., instructor Sch. of L. 
Science, Univ. of Tex., Austin, Tex. 
5255. 

Durango (Colo.) P. L. (Sadie K. Sullivan, 
In.) 6051. 

Duren, Fanny, In. Naval Hospital L, Naval 
Training Station, Great Lakes, 111. 3190. 

Durham, Josephine E., In. F. P. L., Dan- 
ville, 111. 1103. 

Dutcher, Harriet S., ref. In. P. L., Duluth, 
Minn. 6803. 

Duvall, Louise, asst. In. Bureau of Chemis- 
try L., U. S. Dept. of Agriculture, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 6101. 

Dwight, Agnes Lucy, Picton, Ont, Can. 
2114. 

Dwight, Franklin B., vice-pres. Morris- 
town L., Morristown, N. J. 7062. 

Dye, Eleanor M., child. In. Herbert Bowen 
Br. P. L, Detroit, Mich. 5808. 



Bales, Laura A., asst. In. P. L., Bridgeport, 
Conn. 8223. 

Eaman, Mabel, order asst. John Crerar L., 
Chicago, 111. 5258. 

Eames, Wilberforce, bibliographer P. L, 
N. Y. City. 1374. 

Earhart, Frances E., In. P. L. Duluth, 
Minn. 2651. 

Earl, Mrs. Elizabeth Claypool, pres. In- 
diana P. L. Commission, Connersville, 
Ind. 1862. 

East Cleveland (Ohio) P. L. (Edith L. 
Eastman, In.) 8495. 

East Orange (N. J.) F. P. L. (Louise G. 
Hinsdale, In.) 4066. 

East St. Louis (III.) P. L. (J. Lyon Wood- 
ruff, In.) 4176. 

Eastern Illinois State Normal Sch. L., 
Charleston, III. (Mary J. Booth, In.) 
4326. 

Eastern Kentucky State Normal Sch. L., 
Richmond, Ky. (Mary Estelle Reid, In.) 
7592. 

Eastman, Annie W., child. In. Williams- 
burgh Br. P. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 7652. 

Eastman, Edith L., In. P. L, East Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 4673. 

Eastman, Jessie M., sub. asst. Loan Desk 
Girls' High Sch. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
8587. 

EASTMAN, LINDA A., In. P. L., Cleve- 
land, O. 1188. Life member. 

Eastman, Mary Adelaide, asst. N. J. Zinc 
Co. Research L, Palmerton, Pa. 7063. 

Eastman, Mary H., ref. In. Wilmington In- 
stitute F. L, Wilmington, Del. 8588. 

Eastman, William R., 94 Linden St., New 
Haven, Conn. 958. 

Easton, Valeria, In. U. S. Public Health 
Service Hospital L., Greenville, S. C. 
6814. 

Easton (Pa.) P. L. (Henry F. Marx, In.) 
4270. 

Eastwood, Mary E., head Book Selection 
Sec. N. Y. State L., Albany, N. Y. 3725. 

Eaton, Alice Rhea, In. P. L., Harrisburg, 
Pa. 4667. 

Eaton, Annie T., In. Lincoln Sch. Teach- 
ers' Coll., 646 Park Ave., N. Y. City. 
3638. 



HANDBOOK 



491 



Eccles, Mary W., child. In. Price Hill Br. 
P. L., Cincinnati, Ohio. 7891. 

Echols, John Warnock, In. Camp L., Camp 
Gordon, Ga. 8061. 

Eckman, Emma, head Circ. Dept. Wilming- 
ton Inst. F. L., Wilmington, Del. 6187. 

Eddy, Mary A., In. South Shore Country 
Club, Chicago, 111. 597. 

Edgerton, Frederick William, In. P. L., 
New London, Conn. 6877. 

Edmonds, C. K., asst. Henry E. Hunting- 
ton L., 4 East 57th St., N. Y. City. 8589. 

Edmonton (Alta., Canada) P. L. (E. L. 
Hill; In. 5627. 

Edwards, Eleanor M., asst. Information 
Div., P. L., N. Y. City. 6921. 

Edwards, Gertrude, kindergarten dir. Pub- 
lic Schools, 'Billings, Mont. 6654. 

Edwards, Nineveh, br. In. P. L., Detroit, 
Mich. 8416. 

Edwards, Susie, asst. Ref. Dept. P. L., De- 
troit, Mich. 8144. 

Edwards, Virginia S., In. F. P. L., Law- 
rence, Kan. 7658. 

Egan, Mary A., In. P. L., Clinton, la. 6286. 

Egbert, Mabel, Printz Dwellings, Frank- 
lin, Pa. 4642. 

Eggers, Edward E., In. Allegheny Carnegie 
F. L., Pittsburgh, N. S., Pa. 3143. 

Eggert, Elisabeth M., Editorial Section H. 
W. Wilson Co., 958 University Ave., N. 
Y. City. 3500. 

Ehle, Mary E., In. East Utica Br. P. L., 
Utica, N. Y. 5860. 

Einstein, Alice F., chairman L. Board 
Emanuel Einstein Mem. L., Pompton 
Lakes, N. J. 7643. 

El Centre (Cal.) P. L. (Agnes Ferris, In.) 
7355. 

El Paso (Tex.) P. L. (Mrs. Maud D. Sulli- 
van, In.) 6096. 

Eldridge, Bessie L., asst. In. N. Y. State 
Normal Sch. L., Geneseo, N. Y. 8590. 

ELIOT, CHARLES WILLIAM, Cambridge, 
Mass. 372. Honorary member. 

Elizabeth (N. J.) F. P. L. (C. A. George, 
In.) 4905. 

Elliott, Carrie L., ref. In. P. L., Chicago, 
111. 1175. 

Elliott, Julia E., In. and director The In- 



dexers, 5526 So. Park Ave., Chicago, 111. 
1667. 

Ellis, George R., chairman Board of Trus- 
tees Boyden P. L., Foxboro, Mass. 8430. 

Ellis, Hannah C., In. 67th Street Br. P. L., 
N. Y. City. 6450. 

Ellis, Mrs. J. D., In. Avondale Br. P. L., 
Birmingham, Ala. 8713. 

Ellis, Roland E., Thomas Nelson & Sons, 
Publishers, 381 Fourth Ave., N. Y. City. 
7065. 

Elmendorf, Mrs. H. L. (Theresa West), 
vice-In. P. L., Buffalo, N. Y. 417. 

Elmore, Laura Martin, In. L. Assoc., Mont- 
gomery, Ala. 2425. 

Elsbree, Anna, asst. Syracuse Univ. L., 
Syracuse, N. Y. 8514. 

Else, Ethel E., ref. In. S. D. F. L. Com- 
mission, Pierre, S. D. 7067 

Elsworth, Mrs. Edward (Louise Arm- 
strong), Penn Yan, N. Y. 3250. 

Elwood (Ind.) P. L. (Elizabeth McMullen, 
In.) 4767. 

Ely, Margaret, In. Lake View High Sch. 
Br. P. L., Chicago, 111. 6825. 

Elyria (Ohio) L. (Grace M. Peterson, In.) 
4035. 

Emeline Fairbanks Memorial L. See Terre 
Haute, Ind. 

Emerson, Martha F., head catlgr. Dart- 
mouth Coll. L., Hanover, N. H. 4331. 

Emerson, Ralf P., care P. E. Emerson, 
Newark, N. Y. 7209. 

Emmanuel Missionary College L., Berrien 
Springs, Mich. (Bertha E. Allen, In.) 
8835. 

Emsley, Marion J., In. Sprague House Br. 
P. L., Providence, R. I. 8397. 

Encking, Louise F., asst. Sch, Dept. Coun- 
ty F. L., Los Angeles, Cal. 4456. 

Endicott, Grace, In. East Liberty Br. Car- 
negie L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 6435. 

Endicott, Louise, P. L., Washington, D. C. 
8037. 

Endicott (N. Y.) F. L. (Margery C. Quig- 
ley, In.) 8285. 

Engell, Mrs. Jennie C., In. Panama Canal 
L., Balboa Heights, Canal Zone. 6971. 

England, Grace A., chief of Civics Div. P. 
L., Detroit, Mich. 6400. 

Engle, Emma R., supervisor of Child. 



492 



Work F. L., Philadelphia, Pa. 2021. 

Engstfeld, Mrs. Caroline, head catlgr. P. 
L., Birmingham, Ala. 6287. 

Enoch Pratt F. L., Baltimore, Md. (Bern- 
ard C. Steiner, In.) 4214. 

Erb, Prank C., supervisor Shelf Dept. Co- 
lumbia Univ. L., N. Y. City. 6188. 

Erb, Frederick W., asst. In. and supervisor 
Loan Division Columbia Univ. L., N. Y. 
City. 3923. 

Erie (Pa.) P. L. (Mrs. Jean Ashley Hard, 
In.) 4277. 

Ernst, Gertrude E., asst. Ref. Dept. P. L., 
Detroit, Mich. 4960. 

Erskine, Edith, In. Harrison Tech. High 
Sch. Br. P. L., Chicago, 111. 5493. 

Erskine, Mary Louise, In. Wilson Coll. L., 
Chambersburg, Pa. 6494. 

Estabrook, Lillian O., In. F. L., Newburgh, 
N. Y. 3290. 

Estabrooke, Mrs. Kate C., Maine L. Com- 
mission, Orono, Me. 2890. 

Estey, Helen G., In. Bureau of Statistics 
L., Boston, Mass. 8591. 

Estill, Alice G., asst. George V. N. Lothrop 
Br. P. L., Detroit, Mich. 8294. 

Eustis, George H., trus. P. L,, Winchester, 
Mass. 2800. 

Evans, Adelaide F., chief Catalog Dept. 
P. L., Detroit, Mich. 2695. 

Evans, Mrs. Alice G., In. F. P. L., Decatur, 
111. 8062. 

Evans, Charles, ex-ln., 1413 Pratt Ave., 
Rogers Park, Chicago, 111. 2. 

Evans, Charlotte E., catlgr. P. L., Erie, 
Pa. 3753. 

Evans, George H., In. P. L., Somerville, 
Mass. 7804. 

Evans, Lawrence B., Cosmos Club, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 7805. 

Evans, Margaret Hunt, head Child. Dept. 
P. L., Buffalo, N. Y. 5888. 

Evans, Orrena Louise, In. Dept. Civilian 
Relief American Red Cross, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 7491. 

Evanston (III.) P. L. (Ida F. Wright, In.) 
4175. 

Evansville (Ind.) P. L. (Ethel F. McCol- 
lough, In.) 7328. 

Eveleth (Minn.) P. L. (Margaret Hick- 
man, In.) 7786. 



Everett, Raymond, asst. Prof. Drawing and 
Painting Univ. of Texas, Austin, Tex. 
8592. 

Everett, Violet B., head Stations Dept. P. 
L., Indianapolis, Ind. 8360. 

Everett, Mass. Frederick E. Parlin Memo- 
rial L. (Ellen L. Johnson, In.) 4705. 

Ewell, Glenn B., In. Rochester Theol. Sem. 
L., Rochester, N. Y. 7806. 

Exeter (N. H.) P. L. (Carrie W. Byington, 
In.) 4753. 

Eyerly, Beulah Katherine, asst. Washing- 
ton Co. F. L., Hagerstown, Md. 6318. 

FAILING, MARY F., 201 Fifth St./ Port- 
land, Ore. 3248. Life member. 

Fair, Ethel Marion, "Melrose," Harrisburg, 
Pa. 7197. 

Fairbanks, Frances, desk asst. Wilming- 
ton Institute F. L., Wilmington, Del. 
8593. 

Fairchild, C. B., Jr., executive asst. Rapid 
Transit Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 4873. 

Fairchild, Charlotte L., In. East 79th St. 
Br. P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 8714. 

FAIRCHILD, MRS. MILTON (Salome Cut- 
ler), 3730 McKinley St., N. W., Wash- 
ington, D. C. 480. Life member. 

Fairhaven, Mass. Millicent L. (Galen W. 
Hill, In.) 3542. 

Fall River (Mass.) P. L. (George W. Ran- 
kin, In.) 4250. 

Falley, Eleanor W., In. Goucher Coll. L., 
Baltimore, Md. 5642. 

Fanti, A., In. Bureau of Standards L., 
Washington, D. C. 6115. 

Fargo, Lucile F., East Sound, Wash. 4768. 

Fargo (N. D.) P. L. (Winnie Bucklin, In.) 
6598. 

Farnham, Mrs. Lynn (Vera Hungerford), 
Manila, P. L 6104. 

Farnum, Mrs. Howard W., trus. Manton F. 
P. L., Chepachet, R. I. 7807. 

Farnum, Jessica L., sec'y L. of Congress, 
Washington, D. C. 6054. 

Farquhar, Alice M., In. Woodlawn Br. P. 
L., Chicago, 111. 5729. 

Farr, Alice N., In. State Normal Sch. L., 
Mankato, Minn. 4458. 

Farr, Helen E., In. High Sch. L., Sioux 
Falls, S. D. 8145. 



HANDBOOK 



493 



Farr, Mabel, In. Adelphi Coll. L., Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 2172. 

PARR, MARY PARRY, In. in charge 
Southwark Br. F. L., Philadelphia, Pa. 
1594. Life member. 

Farrar, Ida F., head Catalog Dept. City L., 
Springfield, Mass. 1733. 

Fast, Louise K., 115 N. Sandusky St., Tif- 
fin, O. 8594. 

Fatout, Nellie B., In. Carroll Park Br. P. L., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 2156. 

Faurote, F. L., Curtiss Aeroplane and 
Motor 'Corporation L., Garden City, N. Y. 
8595. 

Fauteux, Aegidius, chief In. Bibliotheque 
Saint Sulpice, Montreal, Canada. 5705. 

Fawcett, Eleanor M., In. Iowa Traveling 
L., Des Moines, Iowa. 5612. 

FAXON, FREDERICK W1NTHROP, pro- 
prietor F. W. Faxon Company, 83 Fran- 
cis St., Boston, Mass. 1139. Life mem- 
ber. 

Faxon, Mrs. Frederick Winthrop, 41 Lor- 
raine St., Roslindale, Mass. 2069. 

Faxon, Mrs. Marcus, 86 Huntington Ave., 
Boston, Mass. 4385. 

Fay, Adra M., br. In. P. L., Minneapolis, 
Minn. 8767. 

Fay, Lucy E., head of Bibliographic Course, 
Carnegie L. Sch., Pittsburgh, Pa. 3990. 

Fearey, Charlotte S., trus. Cragsmoor (N. 
Y.) F. L., Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 793. 

Feazel, E. A., In. Cleveland Law L., Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 7070. 

Feddersen, Pearl E., Bessemer Park Br. 
P. L., Chicago, 111. 8449. 

Federal Reserve Bank L., N. Y. City. (Mrs. 
M. H. Robinson, In.) 6646. 

Fegan, Ethel S., In. Girton Coll. L., Cam- 
bridge, England. 5829. 

Fehrenkamp, Winifred, In. Ricker L. of 
Architecture, and lecturer in L. Sch. 
Univ. of 111., Urbana, 111. 5308. 

FEIPEL, LOUIS N., editor of publications, 
P. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 5329. Life mem- 
ber. 

Feldkamp, Cora L., In. Office of Farm Man- 
agement U. S. Dept. of Agriculture, 
Washington, D. C. 6637. 

Fell, Emily J., In. Chemists' Club L., 52 
East 41st St., N. Y. City. 2805. 



Fellows, Jennie Dorcas, sub. In. Classifica- 
tion, N. Y. State L., Albany, N. Y. 1430. 

Felsenthal, Emma, 542 Roscoe St., Chi- 
cago, 111. 5307. 

FELT, ANNA E., financial sec'y P. L., 
Galena, 111. 2329. Life member. 

Fenton, Polly, reviser L. Sch. Calif. State 
L., Sacramento, Cal. 4869. 

Ferguson, John B., trus. Washington 
County F. L., Hagerstown, Md. 8806. 

Ferguson, Kate D., A. L. A. headquarters, 
10 Rue de rfilys<e, Paris. 6782. 

Ferguson, Lucretia H., asst. Accessions 
Div. Cornell Univ. L., Ithaca, N. Y. 7637. 

Ferguson, Milton James, In. California 
State L., Sacramento, Cal. 2564. 

Ferguson L. See Stamford, Conn. 

FERNALD, LOUISE M., In. P. L., Great 
Falls, Mont. 3560. Life member. 

Ferris, Angela B., child. In. P. L., Salt 
Lake City, Utah. 7198. 

Ferris, Katharine Post, In. Glenn Co. F. L., 
Willows, Calif. 5148. 

Ferry, Genevieve, catlgr. Cambria F. L., 
Johnstown, Pa. 7072. 

Field, Katharine W., 1318 Spruce St., Phil- 
adelphia, Pa. 6177. 

Field, Pauline, 1st asst. Ref. Dept. P. L., 
Minneapolis, Minn. 4460. 

Field, Pearl I., chief Circ. Dept. P. L., Chi- 
cago, 111. 4989. 

Field Mem. L. See Conway, Mass. 
Fihe, Pauline J., In. Walnut Hills Br. P. 
L., Cincinnati, O. 5273. 

Fink, Julia M., asst. ref. In. P. L., Aurora, 
111. 8466. 

Finley, Louise, In. Univ. of the South L. 
Sewanee, Tenn. 7208. 

Finney, Byron A., ref. In. emeritus Univ. 
of Michigan L., Ann Arbor, Mich. (Ad- 
dress, 849 Tappan St.) 1192. 

Finney, Mrs. Byron A., trus. Ladies' L. 
ASS.OC., Ann Arbor, Mich. (Address 849 
Tappan St.) 1200. 

Finney, Grace B., chief of Circulation 
Dept. P. L. of District of Columbia, 
Washington, D. C. 2756. 

Finster, Robert R., clerk Board of Trus- 
tees and sec'y to Director, P. L., N. Y. 
City. 5988. 



494 



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Firebaugh, W. C., The Tribune L., Chicago, 

111. 7244. 
Firmin, Kate M., head Catalog Dept. P. L., 

Seattle, Wash. 5610. 
Fisher, Edith G., sr. asst. F. L., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 8337. 
Fisher, Edna, asst Delivery Dept. P. L., 

Indianapolis, Ind. 8361. 
Fisher, Marie L., In. Lawrenceville Br. 

Carnegie L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 6320. 
Fisher, Marjorie, asst. Catalog Dept. P. L., 

Bridgeport, Conn. 8268. 
Fisher, N. Mignon, br. In. L. Association, 

Portland, Ore. 8044. 
Fiske, Wilbur A., In. Chaffey L., Ontario, 

Calif. 8325. 
Fison, Herbert W., In. P. L., Maiden, Mass. 

2448. 
Fitch, Edith O., In. Lenox L., Lenox, Mass. 

7199. 
Fitch, Ethel H., Ellsworth Station, Ohio. 

5661. 
Fitch, Eva L., catlgr. Drake Univ. L., Des 

Moines, Iowa. 5769. 

Fitch, Gladys, asst. Ref. Dept. P. L, In- 
dianapolis, Ind. 8362. 

Fitchburg (Mass.) P. L. (George E. Nut- 
ting, In.) 3976. 
Fitzpatrick, John T., law In. N. Y. State 

L., Albany, N. Y. 7073. 
Fjeldstad, Nina, In. High Sch. Br. P. L, 

Fond du Lac, Wis. 6842. 
Flagg, Burton S., trus. Memorial L., An-% 

dover, Mass. 8146. 
Flagg, Charles Allcott, In. P. L., Bangor, 

Me. 1741. 
Fleek, Lotta L., asst. Ref. Dept. L. Assoc., 

Portland, Ore. 5051. 
Fleischner, Otto, asst. In. P. L., Boston, 

Mass. 1710. 
Fleming, Esther F., asst. Albina Br. L. 

Assoc., Portland, Ore. 6684. 
Fleming, Ruth, 1538 Saginaw St., Salem, 

Ore. 7007. 
Fletcher, Fanny B., trus. Fletcher Mem. L., 

Proctorsville, Vt. 4258. 
Fletcher, Robert Stillman, In. Amherst 

Coll. L, Amherst, Mass. 2149. 
Fletcher, Sheldon, child. In. P. L., Kala- 

mazoo, Mich. 7602. 



Flexner, Jennie M., head of Circ. Dept. F. 

P. L, Louisville, Ky. 4048. 
Flickinger, Mrs. Caroline R., In. F. P. L., 

Dalton, Mass. 3490. 
Flynn, Marcella, In. N. Goodman St. Br. P. 

L., Rochester, N. Y. 6321. 
Foik, Paul J., In. Univ. of Notre Dame L., 

Notre Dame, Ind. 7343. 
Foley, Edna Helen, P. L, Youngstown, 

Ohio. 8147. 
Foley, Margaret Baker, In. Conn. Coll. for 

Women L., New London, Conn. 3721. 
Foley, R. W., educational director Balti- 
more Dist. Nat'l War Work Council Y. 

M. C. A., 8 West Saratoga St., Baltimore, 

Md. ' 7971. 
Fontaine, Everett O., In. U. S. Naval Air 

Station L., Pensacola, Fla. 8596. 
Foote, Elizabeth Louisa, In. Aguilar Br. P. 

L., N. Y. City. 957. 
Foote, Frances R., principal Registration 

Dept. P. L., Los Angeles, Calif. 3958. 
Foote, Mary S., In. New Haven County 

Bar L, New Haven, Conn. 6322. 
Foote, William W., In. Wash. State Coll. 

L., Pullman, Wash. 6499. 
Forbes, Leila G., In. Randolph-Macon Wo- 
man's Coll. L., Lynchburg, Va. 5395. 
Forbes L. See Northampton, Mass. 
Forbush, Rachel B., 525 Forest Ave., Oak 

Park, 111. 7683. 
Ford, Amy M., stud. L. Sch. of N. Y. P. L., 

N. Y. City. 8799. 
Ford, Edith H., asst. In. Armour Inst. L., 

Chicago, 111. 5821. 

Ford, Eva M., asst. sec'y American Libra- 
ry Association, Chicago, 111. 7888. 
Fordyce, George L, trus. P. L., Youngs- 
town, O. 7292. 
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Haven, Conn. 6970. 
Forman, Helen H., In. McKinley Park Br. 

P. L, Chicago, 111. 8326. 
Forrest, Elizabeth, In. Coll. of Agric. and 

Mechanic Arts L. Univ. of Montana, 

Bozeman, Mont. 3476. 
Forrest, Gertrude Emmons, Milton, Mass. 

2410. 
Forrester, Mrs. May K., In. Chapman Br. 

P. L., Salt Lake City, Utah. 7497. 
FORSTALL, GERTRUDE, asst. catlgr. 



495 



John Crerar L., Chicago, 111. 2136. Life 

member. 
Forsyth, John, Provincial L., Victoria, B. 

C., Canada. 6765. 
Forsyth, Walter G., custodian Barton- 

Ticknor Dept. P. L., Boston, Mass. 1005. 
Fort Collins (Colo.) P. L. (Elfreda Steb- 

bins, In.) 6573. 
Fort Dodge (la.) F. P. L. (Isabella C. 

Hopper, In.) 4902. 
Fort Wayne (Ind.) P. L. (Margaret M. 

Colerick, In.) 7428. 
Fort Worth (Texas) Carnegie P. L. (Mrs. 

Charles Scheuber, In.) 5231. 
Forward, Mildred R., In. City Normal Sch. 

L., Rochester, N. Y. 6983. 
Foss, Calvin W., ref. In. P. L., Brooklyn, 

N. Y. 4688. 
FOSSLER, ANNA, Chesterburg Hotel, 

Portland, Ore. 1989. Life member. 
Foster, Helen Miller, In. Deering High Sch. 

L., Portland, Me. 7898. 
Foster, Mary Stuart, ref. In. Wis. State 

Hist. Society, Madison, Wis. 1994. 
Foster, William Eaton, In. P. L., Provi- 
dence, R. I. 22. 
Fowler, Mrs. Eva M., acting In. Illinois 

State L., Springfield, 111. 6040. 
FOX, HANNAH, pres. Foxburg F. L. As- 

soc., Foxburg, Clarion county, Pa. 1900. 

Life member. 
Fox, Nelly, supervisor of Branches L. As- 

soc., Portland, Ore. 4128. 
Foye, Charlotte Henderson, 5602 Kenwood 

Ave., Chicago, 111. 2007. 
Framingham (Mass.) Town L. (Emma L. 

Clarke, In.) 5749. 
FRANCIS, MARY, 101 Elm St., Hartford, 

Conn. 1148. Life member. 
Frank, Esther E., asst. P. L., Detroit, 

Mich. 8295. 
Frank, Mary, supt. Extension Div. P. L., 

N. Y. City. 6436. 

Franklin, Mrs. Viola Price, In. P. L., Al- 
bany, Ore. 7872. 
Franklin, Mrs. Wirt, Carnegie L., Ardmore, 

Okla. 8063. 
Franklin Institute L., Philadelphia, Pa. 

(Alfred Rigling, In.) 6599. 
Frantz, Cora, In. Gilbert M. Simmons L., 

Kenosha, Wis. 5068. 



Frederick, Mrs. Eva G., In. F. L., Carthage, 

N. Y. 8016. 
Frederick, Frances, general asst. P. L., 

Detroit, Mich. 8417. 

Frederick E. Parlin Memorial L. See Ev- 
erett, Mass. 
Frederickson, Esther M., head Catalog 

Dept. F. P. L., St. Joseph, Mo. 7935. 
Freeman, Florence M., head catlgr. P. L., 

Long Beach, Calif. 4465. 
Freeman, Marilla Waite, In. Goodwyn 

Inst. L., Memphis, Tenn. 1135. 
Freeport (III) P. L. (Harriet Lane, In.) 

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Freidus, Abraham S., chief Jewish Div. P. 

L., N. Y. City. 5862. 
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Knapp, In.) .595. 
French, Anna L., asst. In. Western State 

Nor. Sch. L., Kalamazoo, Mich. 4974. 
French, L. Ruth, head Serials Dept. Iowa 

State Coll. L., Ames, Iowa. 4891. 
French, Marguerite M., In. P. L., Alexan- 
dria Bay, N. Y. 7738. 
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Portland, Ore. 8478. 

Fresno County R. L. (Fresno, Calif.) (Sar- 
ah E. McCardle, In.) 6531. 
Frick, Eleanor Hurley, care Amer. Soc. 

of Civil Engineers, 29 W. 39th St., N. Y. 

City. 4332. 
Friedel, Esther, In. P. Sch. L., Bisbee, 

Ariz. 6793. 

Friedel, J. H., editor in chief "Special Li- 
braries," 108 Jersey St., Boston, Mass. 

7809. 
Frodsham, Jane, In. Washington Park Br. 

P. L., St. Joseph, Mo. 8760. 
Firost, Alice A., asst. Iowa L. Commission, 

Des Moines, Iowa, 7684. 
Frost, Pattie, Chief of Circ. Dept. and 

catlgr. P. L., Jacksonville, Fla. 6033. 
Frothingham, Mrs. L. A., trus. P. L., North 

Easton, Mass. 8467. 
Frothingham, Theodore L., trus. P. L., 

Brooklyn, N. Y. (Address 32 Liberty 

St., N. Y. City.) 6142. 
Fuchs, Florence C., asst. catlgr. Grosve- 

nor L., Buffalo, N. Y. 7425. 
Fulham Libraries, London, S. W., England. 

(Walter S. C. Rae, In.) 5957. 



496 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Fuller, Edith Davenport, In. Episcopal 

Theological School L., Cambridge, Mass. 

1303. 
Fuller, George W., In. P. L., Spokane, 

Wash. 5438. 
Fullerton, Caroline Q. ( ref. In. F. P. L., 

Louisville, Ky. 4834. 
Fullerton, Robert S., In. Post L., Fort 

Bliss, Tex. 7995. 

Fulton, Edith, 621 South 42nd St., Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 5863. 
Furbish, Alice C., In. P. L, Portland, Me. 

1523. 
Furnas, Marcia M., chief Circ. Dept. P. L., 

Indianapolis, Ind. 7499. 
Furness, Margaret, asst. Catalog Dept. 

John Crerar L., Chicago, 111. 2166. 
Furniss, Mabel E., In. Mount Washington 

Br. Carnegie L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 7270. 
Furst, Mrs. Elisabeth H., In. P. L., Ever- 
ett, Mass. 5230. 
Gage, Laura Jane, catlgr. P. L., Oak Park, 

111. 6869. 
Galantiere, Lewis, L. Sub-Section, War 

Plans Div., Educational and Recreational 

Br., War Dept, Washington, D. C. 8148. 
Galbreath, Charles B., 223 Tulane Rd., 

Columbus, O. 1510. 

Gale, Ellen, In. P. L, Rock Island, 111. 211. 
Galesburg (III.) F. P. L. (Anna F. Hoover, 

In.) 4764. 
Gallaway, Irene D., In. Nicholas P. Sims 

L., Waxahachie, Tex. 2704. 
Gallaway, Margaret, In. Arkansas Agric. 

Coll. and Experiment Station L., Fayette- 

ville, Ark. 7443. 

Galloway, Blanche, A, L. A. headquar- 
ters, 10 Rue de I'iilyse'e, Paris, France. 

7810. 
Galpin, Stella Belle, loan asst. Univ. of 

Illinois L., Urbana, 111. 7501. 
Galveston, Texas. Rosenberg L. (Frank 

C. Patten, In.) 2947. 
Galvin, Mrs. John M. (lone Armstrong), 

808 Seventh Ave., Council Bluffs, la. 

5004. 
Ganser, Helen A., In. State Nor Sch. L., 

Millersville, Pa. 5266. 
Gantt, Edith, In. P. L., Pocatello, Idaho. 

7789. 
Garaghty, Louise M., asst. Divie B. Duf- 



fleld Br. P. L, Detroit, Mich. 8296. 

Gardiner, Jacquetta, In. Massey L. Ontario 
Agric. Coll., Guelph, Ont., Can. 7427. 

Gardner, Blanche, head Art Dept. F. P. L., 
Newark, N. J. 7721. 

Gardner, Henry B., professor of Econom- 
ics, Brown Univ., Providence, R. I. 7920. 

Gardner, Jane E., art ref. In. F. P. L., New 
Bedford, Mass. 2819. 

Gardner, Julia M., asst. in 58th St. Br. P. 
L., N. Y. City. 6392. 

Gardner, Mary Craig, 1st asst. Rosenberg 
L, Galveston, Tex. 3142. 

Gardner (Mass.) Lev! Heywood Mem. L. 
(Barbara H. Smith, In.) 7682. 

Garfield, Mrs. James A., West Mentor, O. 
7076. 

Garland, Caroline Harwood, In. P. L, Dov- 
er, N, H. 619. 

Garneau, Hector, In. P. L., Montreal, P. Q., 
Canada. 6911. 

Garner, Margaret, asst. in charge West 
End Br. P. L, Ottawa, Ont., Canada. 
7691. 

Garten, Bess, asst. Child. Dept. P. L., In- 
dianapolis, Ind. 8363. 

Garton, May W., In. in charge F. P. L., 
West New York, N. J. 8597. 

Garver, Willia, order asst. Univ. of 111. L., 
Urbana, 111. 8715. 

Garvin, Ethel, custodian Special Libraries, 
P. I,., Providence, R. I. 1749. 

Gary (Ind.) P. L. (Louis J. Bailey, In.) 
4781. 

Gaskin, Elsie, In. P. L., Deny, N. H. 8598. 

Gaston, Ethelwyn, In. Engineering Dept. 
L. Western Electric Co., 463 West St., 
N. Y. City. 5864. 

Gates, Alice J., asst. In. Main L. General 
Electric Co., Schenectady, N. Y. 7074. 

Gates, Anna L., In. Social Science Div. P. 
L, St. Paul, Minn. 6220. 

Gates, Edith M., circ. In. F. P. L., Worces- 
ter, Mass. 4680. 

Gates, Frances E., ref. asst. Woodstock 
Br. P. L., N. Y. City. 8800. 

Gates, Marguerite L., asst. F. P. L., New- 
ark, N. J. 5889. 

GAULT, BERTHA HORTENSE, catlgr. 
Mount Holyoke Coll. L, South Hadley, 
Mass. 4316. Life member. 






497 



Gavit, Joseph, head Shelf Section N. Y. 
State L., Albany, N. Y. 7708. 

Gay, Alice M., asst. Conn. Hist. Soc., Hart- 
ford, Conn. 1964. 

Gay, Anne, sr. asst. P. L., Detroit, Mich. 
8418. 

Gay, Frank Butler, In. Watkinson L., Hart- 
ford, Conn. 789. 

Gaylord Brothers, Library Supplies, Syra- 
cuse, N. Y. 4799. 

Gebauer, Emma C., Quincy Br. P. L., Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 8716. 

Geddes, Helen Corey, In. Second Nat'l 
Bank L., Boston, Mass. 5293. 

Gentry, Irene, sec'y to In. P. L., Kansas 
City, Mo. 6685. 

George, C. A., In. F. P. L., Elizabeth, N. J. 
4653. 

George, Lillian M., in charge of continua- 
tions Ore. Agric. Coll. L., Corvallis, Ore. 
3003. 

George Peabody Coll. for Teachers L., 
Nashville, Tenn. (Charles H. Stone, 
In.) 7322. 

Georgia University L., Athens, Ga. (Dun- 
can Burnet, In.) 8697. 

German, Clara L., sr. asst. George Walker 
Br. P. L., Chicago, 111. 8224. 

Germond, Mrs. Jas. W., Wellsville, N. Y. 
8448. 

Gerould, James Thayer, In. Univ. of Min- 
nesota L., Minneapolis, Minn. 2008. 

Gerow, Irma, asst. United Engineering So- 
cieties L., 29 West 39th St., N. Y. City. 
8599. 

Gettys, Cora M., ref. In. Harper Reading 
Room, Univ. of Chicago, Chicago, 111. 
6424. 

Gibb, Mary Walker, asst. A. L. A. Dispatch 
Office, Newport News, Va. 8034. 

GIBBS, LAURA RUSSELL, 449 W. 123rd 
St., N. Y. City. 2644. Life member. 

Gibson, Emily M., chairman Book Com- 
mittee Alexandria L., Alexandria, Va. 
8398. 

Giele, Nora H., 1419 E. 109th St., Cleve- 
land, O. 5753. 

Giffin, Etta Josselyn, director and In. Na- 
tional L. for the Blind, Washington, D. 
C. 2522. 

Gifford, C. H., treas. Drama League of 



America, 305 Rigga Bldg., Washington, 
D. C. 8008. 

Gifford, Florence M., aBSt. P. L. Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 6326. 

Gifford, William Logan Rodman, In. Mer- 
cantile L. Assoc., St. Louis, Mo. 1690. 

Gilbert M. Simmons L. See Kenosha, Wis. 

Gilfillan, Emily M., In. Union Medical Coll., 
Peking, Rockefeller Foundation L., N. 
Y. City. 7075. 

Gilkey, Malina A., asst. Catalog Division, 
L. of Congress, Washington, D. C. 1727. 

Gill, Anna, In. South Br. P. L., Cleveland, 
Ohio. 5488. 

Gillette, Fredericka B., acting ref. In. Univ. 
of Michigan General L., Ann Arbor, 
Mich. 5003. 

Gillis, Mabel R., asst. In. California State 
L., Sacramento, Cal. 7232. 

Gilmore, Alice F., asst. Ref. Dept. F. P. L., 
Louisville, Ky. 7277. 

Gilpin, Margaret, In. P. L., Nashwauk, 
Minn. 8515. 

Gilson, Luella, In. Mott Br. P. L., Toledo, 
Ohio. 8788. 

Gilson, William H., trus. P. L., Charles- 
town, N. H. 8064. 

Gladden, Alice Romaine, In. P. L., Car- 
thage, Mo. 4382. 

Glasgow, Ellen, 1 West Main St., Rich- 
mond, Va. 5556. 

Glasgow, Stella R., In. "Youngstown Tel- 
egram" L., Youngstown, Ohio. 6950. 

Glasier, Gilson G., In. Wisconsin State L., 
Madison, Wis. 7502. 

Glass, Jessie J., In. Lincoln High Sch. L., 
Lincoln, Neb. 7873. 

Gleason, Celia, In. Los Angeles County F. 
L., Los Angeles, Cal. 1846. 

Gleason, Eleanor, In. Mechanics' Inst. L., 
Rochester, N. Y. 3018. 

Gleason, Eleanor, In. Hartford Sch. of Re- 
ligious Pedagogy, Hartford, Conn. 6224. 

GLENDENING, ELIZABETH, class, and 
1st asst. catlgr. P. L., Indianapolis, Ind. 
8364. Life member. 

GLENN, WILLIAM L., Emmorton, Har- 
ford Co., Md. 1224. Life member. 

Gloucester, Mass. Sawyer F. L. (Rachel 
Sawyer Webber, In.) 6070. 



498 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Godard, George Seymour, In. Connecticut 
State L., Hartford, Conn. 2142. 

Godard, Mrs. George Seymour, Hartford, 
Conn. 2622. 

Goddard, William Dean, In. Deborah Cook 
Sayles P. L, Pawtucket, R. I. 1983. 

Coding, Sarah E., 1st asst. F. L., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 1464. 

Goeks, Hedwig Marta, In. Epiphany Br. P. 
L., N. Y. City. 3659. 

Goeppinger, Eva C., 1st asst. and catlgr. 
P. L, South Norwalk, Conn. 5920. 

Goetz, Antoinette, class. Univ. of Minne- 
sota L., Minneapolis, Minn. 8252. 

Gold, Louise E., In. U. S. Naval Operating 
Base Hospital L., Hampton Roads, Va. 
7077. 

Goldberg, Bessie, P. L., Chicago, 111. 4733. 

Goldthwaite, Lucille A., In. L. for Blind, P. 
L., N. Y. City. 5941. 

Gooch, Harriet Bell, instructor, Sch. of L. 
Science, Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
1993. 

Goodell, Frederick, agent, A. L. A. Dis- 
patch Office, Newport News, Va. 5866. 

Goodier, Edna A., In. Thornton Mem. L., 
Saco, Me. 7011. 

Goodison, Alice D., 1st asst. East Br. P. L., 
Camden, N. J. 8600. 

Goodman L. See Napa, Calif. 

Goodnow, Mildred F., In. P. L., Plymouth, 
Ind. 8516. 

Goodrich, Dorothy Allen, sec'y to chief of 
Circ. Dept. P. L., N. Y. City. 5805. 

GOODRICH, FRANCIS L. D., asst. In. in 
charge of Ref. Dept. Univ. of Mich. Gen- 
eral L., Ann Arbor, Mich. 3729. Life 
member. 

Goodrich, Nathaniel L., In. Dartmouth Coll. 
L., Hanover, N. H. 4686. 

Goodrich Company, B. F., General L., 
Akron, Ohio. (Ida B. Campbell, In.) 
8696. 

Goodson, Mary Allen, asst. F. P. L., Louis- 
ville, Ky. 8601. 

Goodwin, John Edward, In. Univ. of Texas, 
Austin, Tex. 3535. 

Goree, Edwin Sue, 1914 David St., Austin, 
Tex. 7996. 

Gorham, Eva A., In. Elmhurst Br. Queens 



Borough P. L., Long Island City, N. Y. 

5034. 
Gosman, Letitia Nassau, asst. Princeton 

Theological Seminary L., Princeton, N. 

J. 6601. 
Goss, Edna L., catlgr. Univ. of Minnesota 

L., Minneapolis, Minn. 3043. 
Gottlieb, Mildred, sch. and extension In. 

P. L., Gary, Ind. 6260. 

Goucher College L., Baltimore, Md. (Elea- 
nor W. Falley, In.) 6973. 
Goudy, Ethel M., asst. L. Assoc., Portland, 

Ore. 8479. 
*Gould, Charles Henry, In. McGill Univ. 

L., Montreal, Canada. 1182. 
Gould, Emma C., ref. In. P. L., Portland, 

Me. 3561. 
Gould, Florence, child. In. P. L., Tacoma, 

Wash. 8517. 

Goulding, Myrtle A., child, In. P. L., De- 
troit, Mich. 8419. 
Goulding, Philip Sanford, head catlgr. 

Henry E. Huntington L., 4 E. 57th St., 

N. Y. City. 2167. 
Grace, Louise C., In. in charge Magnus 

Butzel Br. P. L., Detroit, Mich. 4946. 
Grad, Sarah Belle, asst. Hebrew Union 

Coll. L., Cincinnati, Ohio. 7452. 
Grady, Emma Alberta, ref. asst. F. P. L, 

Newark, N. J. 6474. 
Graffen, Jean E., chief Periodical Dept. F. 

L., Philadelphia, Pa. 1564. 
Graham, Alice Clark, In. Carnegie F. L., 

Ottawa, Kan. 8717. 
Graham, Audiene, In. Price, Waterhouse 

and Co. L., N. Y. City. 8602. 
Graham, Emma, In. P. L., Sidney, Ohio. 

2020. 
Graham, Mary B., asst. L., Walter Reed U. 

S. General Hospital, Takoma Park, D. 

C. 8065. 
Grand Rapids (Mich.) P. L. (Samuel H. 

Ranck, In.) 3817. 
Grant, Mary, In. State Normal Sch. L., 

W T inona, Minn. 4469. 
Grant, Thirza E., head instructor Western 

Reserve Univ. L. Sch., Cleveland, Ohio. 

5519. 
Gratiaa, Josephine, In. Soulard Br. P. L., 

St. Louis, Mo. 2996. 



HANDBOOK 



499 



Graves, C. Edward, In. Minn. Historical So- 
ciety, St. Paul, Minn. 5326. 

Graves, Eva W., head Periodical Div. P. 
L., Seattle, Wash. 6036. 

Graves, Francis Barnum, In. Mechanics- 
Mercantile L., San Francisco, Cal. 1916. 

Gravett, Nettie K., supt. Travel. L. Dept. 
Ohio State L., Columbus, Ohio. 6522. 

Gravez, Mary Clara, asst. catlgr. P. L. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 7080. 

Gray, Adasa Hopper, In. P. L., Liverpool, 
N. Y. 8244. 

Gray, Blanche, In, P. L., Mattoon, 111. 7301. 

Gray, Elizabeth P., supt. of Binding, P. L., 
Washington, D. C. 5948. 

Gray, Myra, asst. Loan and Catalog Depts. 
P. L., Jacksonville, Fla. 8066. 

Gray, Norman D., West Chester, Pa. 3149. 

Great Bend (Kan.) P. L. (Bina Deighton, 
In.) 8119. 

Great Falls (Mont.) P. L. (Louise M. Fer- 
nald, In.) 4796. 

Green, Anna M., charge Order and Acces- 
sion Depts. Syracuse Univ. L., Syracuse, 
N. Y. 7081. 

Green, Carrie P., ref. In. and asst. catlgr. 
L. of Hawaii, Honolulu, T. H. 5770. 

Green, Charles R., In. Mass. Agricultural 
Coll. L., Amherst, Mass. 4645. 

Green, Edna Sue, In. Divie B. Duffield Br. 
P. L., Detroit, Mich. 6794. 

Green, Ethel Averil, In. W. Va. Dept. of 
Archives and History L., Charleston, W. 
Va. 7082. 

Green, Henry S., 1714 Darst St., Charles- 
ton, W. Va. 7504. 

Green, Janet M., In. Lewis Inst. Br. P. L., 
Chicago, 111. 2330. 

Green, Lola M. B., catlgr. anl indexer 
Legal Dept. American Telephone & Tele- 
graph Co., 195 Broadway, N. Y. City. 
4834. 

Green, Margaret Duncan, Octavia Apt., 
.Columbia and Quarry Road, Washington, 
D. C. 6855. 

Green, Margaret S., chief of Book Order 
Dept. Queens Borough P. L., Far Rock- 
away, L. I., N. Y. 7083. 

Green, S. S., sec'y L. Board P. L., Bartow, 
Fla. 8149. 



Green Bay (Wis.) Kellogg P. L. (Deborah 
B. Martin, In.) 5722. 

Greene, Charles S., In. F. L., Oakland, 
Calif. 1903. 

Greene, Doris, catlgr. Univ. of Wyoming, 
Laramie, Wyo. 5613. 

Greene, Ernest R., departmental educa- 
tional director Northeastern Dept. Nat'l 
War Work Council Y. M. C. A., 321 Lit- 
tle Bldg., Boston, Mass. 8014. 

Greene, Helen Holcombe, In. High Sch. L., 
Stamford, Conn. 7084. 

Greene, Lenore, child. In. 96th Street Br. 
P. L., N. Y. City. 6960. 

Greene, Margaret, In. F. P. L., Minot, N. D. 
6045. 

Greene, Marian P., child. In. Morrisania Br. 
P. L., N. Y. City. 6961. 

Greene, Sara E., asst. U. S. General Hos- 
pital No. 41 L., Fox Hills, N. Y. 7692. 

Greenman, E. May, asst. Visual Instruction 
Div. N. Y. State Education Dept, Al- 
bany, N. Y. 2073. 

Greensboro (N. C.) P. L. (Bettie D. Cald- 
well, In.) 4142. 

Greer, Agnes F. P., In. Yale and Towne 
Works L., Stamford, Conn. 5382. 

Greer, Margaret R., In. Central High Sch. 
L., Minneapolis, Minn. 7880. 

Gregory, Winifred, chief Tech. Dept. P. L., 
St. Paul, Minn. 6804. 

Grierson, Mrs. E. S., In. P. L. of Calumet 
& Hecla Mining Co., Calumet, Mich. 1787. 

Griffin, Georgia S., asst. P. L., Milwaukee, 
Wis. 5229. 

Griffin, Glenn F., A. L. A. Dispatch Office, 
Newport News, Va. 8253. 

Griffin, Jeanne, asst. In. P. L., Kalamazoo, 
Mich. 4847. 

Griffith, Florence I., asst. In. Red Cross In- 
stitute L., N. Y. City. 8603. 

Griffith, Pauline, asst. Wells Coll. L., Au- 
rora, N. Y. 7278. 

Griffiths, Helen, In. P. L. Valley City, N. 
D. 7220. 

Griggs, Mrs. A. F., In. P. L., Durham, N. C. 
5049. 

Griggs, Lillian L., 216 S. Park St., Streator, 
111. 5583. 

Grimm, Minerva E., In. Morrisania Br. P. 
L., N. Y. City. . 5962. 



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AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Grinnell Coll. L., Grinnell, la. (Isabelle 

Clark, acting In.) 458. 
Grolier Club, New York. (Ruth S. Gran- 

niss, In.) 4315. 
Grosh, Myra S., Queen Anne Br. P. L, 

Seattle, Wash. 8225. 
Grosvenor L. See Buffalo, N. Y. 
Ground, Mrs. Izora, In. City L., Okmulgee, 

Okla. 8718. 
Ground, Jessie L., asst. City L., Okmulgee, 

Okla. 8719. 
Grover, Arlene, asst. In. Univ. of Wis. L., 

Madison, Wis. 7693. 
Grover, C. C., Supt. of Schools, Winslow, 

Ariz. 8150. 
Gruener, Henry R., asst. Yale Univ. L., 

New Haven, Conn. 8497. 
Guerrier, Edith, supervisor of Circ. P. L., 

Boston, Mass. 2576. 

Gugel, Katherine L., asst. In. P. L., Colum- 
bus, Ohio. 6004. 
Guller, Alice Adelaide, loan In. Colgate 

Univ. L., Hamilton, N. Y. 7730. 
Gunter, Lillian, In. P. L., Gainesville, Tex. 

5921. 
Guntermann, Bertha, with G. E. Stechert 

and Co., N. Y. City. 4881. 
Gunthorp, Pauline, head catlgr. Univ. of 

California L., Berkeley, Calif. 2135. 
Guthrie (Okla.) Carnegie L. (Lucile Burke, 

In.) 4889. 
Guyer, Margaret G., In. Carnegie L., Lew- 

iston, Idaho. 3316. 
Gwartney, Edith, In. Irvington Br. P. L., 

Indianapolis, Ind. 8365. 
Gymer, Rosina C., head asst. P. L., Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 3970. 
Haagen, Cordelia L., Univ. of Michigan L., 

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Hackett, Irene A., In. F. P. L., Englewood, 

N. J. 1774. 

Hackley P. L. See Muskegon, Mich. 
Hadden, Anne, In. Monterey County F. L., 

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Hadden, Elizabeth, chief of Order Dept. 

Leland Stanford Jr. Univ. L., Stanford 

University, Cal. 6582. 
Hadley, Chalmers, In. P. L., Denver, Colo. 

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brary, Denver, Colo. 7.811. 



Haferkorn, Henry E., In. U. S. Army En- 
gineer Sch. L., Washington Barracks, 
Washington, D. C. 6236. 

HAFNER, ALFRED (G. E. Stechert & 
Co.), 151-155 W. 25th St., N. Y. City. 
1860. Life member. 

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Iowa. 2931. 

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kane, Wash. 6016. 

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gomery, Ala. 7263. 

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Cal. State L., Sacramento, Cal. 3332. 

Haines, Helen E., 1175 N. Mentor Ave., 
Pasadena, Cal. 1265. 

Haines, Mabel R., supervisor Home Serv- 
ice Pacific Div. American Red Cross, 
San Francisco, Calif. 3875. 

Haley, Lucia, loan desk and ref. In. Univ. 
of Montana L., Missoula, Mont. 3623. 

Hall, Agnes Skidmore, head catlgr. P. L., 
Denver, Colo. 5789. 

Hall, Anna Gertrude, organizer Educa- 
tional Extension Div. N. Y. State L., 
Albany, N. Y. 5172. 

Hall, Drew B., 20 Georganna St., South 
Braintree, Mass. 2395. 

Hall, Ernest S., In. P. L., Plattsburg, N. Y. 
3059. 

Hall, Eva S. W., child. In. Brumback L. of 
Van Wert County, Van Wert, Ohio. 7842. 

Hall, Mrs. Marion A., asst. Cossitt L, 
Memphis, Tenn. 8604. 

Hall, Mary E., In. Girls' High Sch., Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. 4569. 

Hall, Sophia, clerk Municipal Ref. Bureau 
Minn. General Extension Div. Univ. of 
Minn., Minneapolis, Minn. 7285. 

Halliday, Sara L., In. Public Health Div. 
Municipal Ref. L., N. Y. City. 8605. 

Hallsted, Sarah, In. National Bank of Com- 
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Halpert, Freda, child. In. Carnegie F. L., 
Duquesne, Pa. 5843. 

Halsey, Alice, 517 East 77th St., N. Y. City. 
3890. 

Ham, Mrs. Thomas, Pullman, Wash. 7655. 

Hamilton, Theodosia, catlgr. P. L., Indian- 
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Hamilton, William J., sec'y and state or- 



HANDBOOK 



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ganizer Ind. P. L. Commission, Indian- 
apolis, Ind. 6250. 

Hamilton (Ohio) Lane P. L. (Mrs. Hattie 
S. James, In.) 7578. 

Hamm, Mrs. A. K., In. P. L., Meridian, 
Miss. 7507. 

Hammond, Laura, In. Ga. Sen. of Technol- 
ogy, Atlanta, Ga. 2044. 

Hammond, Otis G., supt. N. H. Hist So- 
ciety L, Concord, N. H. 5675. 

Hammond, Ruth, asst. In. City L., Wichita, 
Kan. 7694. 

Hammond, Sarah S., In. P. L., Glencoe, 111. 
5523. 

Hance, Emma, chief of Order and Acces- 
sions Div. P. L. of the District of Co- 
lumbia, Washington, D. C. 4624. 

Hand, Thomas W., In. P. L., Leeds, Eng- 
land. 6029. 

Handerson, Juliet A., asst. P. L., Cleveland, 
Ohio. 6143. 

Handley L. See Winchester, Va. 

Handy, D. N., In. and sec'y The Insurance 
L. Assn. of Boston, 141 Milk St., Bos- 
ton, Mass. 5771. 

Hannan, William E., legislative ref. In. 
N. Y. State L., Albany, N. Y. 7902. 

Hannigan, Francis' J., custodian Period- 
ical Dept. P. L., Boston, Mass. 8720. 

Hannum, Frances A., In. P. L. Racine, 
Wis. 7329. 

Hansen, Agnes, in charge work with for- 
eigners P. L., Seattle, Wash. 6329. 

Hanson, James Christian Meinich, asso- 
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land, Ore. 8480. 

Harcourt, Alfred, Harcourt, Brace and 
Howe, 1 West 47th St., N. Y. City. 7812. 

Harcourt Wood Memorial L. See Derby, 
Conn. 

Harden, Walter L., Houghton Mifflin & 
Company, N. Y. City. 7088. 

Harden, William, In. Georgia Historical 
Society L., Savannah, Ga. 55. 

Harding, Elizabeth Boyd, chief Circ. Dept. 
la. State Teachers' College L., Cedar 
Falls, la. 8518. 

Harding, Henrietta H., asst. In. Bay Ridge 
Br. P. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 7089. 



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Collier St., Toronto, Canada. 1834. 
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ids, Mich. 5394. 

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Wash. 6583. 

Harlan, Margaret, asst. Mending Dept. P. 
L., Indianapolis, Ind. 8367. 

Harned, Robert E., In. Drew Theological 
Seminary, Madison, N. J. 6288. 

Harper, Wilhelmina, asst. *A. L. A. Dis- 
patch Office, 31 W. 15th St., N. Y. City. 
7881. 

Harris, Mrs. Ellen C., The Northumber- 
land Apt., Washington, D. C. 7965. 
D. C. 7965. 

HARRIS, EZEKIEL A., ex-ln., Jersey City, 
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ber of Librarians' Convention of 1853.) 

Harris, Helen Margaret, 1620 S. Kentucky 
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Harris, Mildred A., catlgr. P. Documents 
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Harris, Rachel Agnes, asst. Univ. of North 
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Harris Institute L. See Woonsocket, R. I. 

Harrisburg (Pa.) P. L. (Alice Rhea Eaton, 
In.) 5824. 

Harrison, Joseph Le Roy, In. Forbes L., 
Northampton, Mass. 1011. 

Harrison, Marion V., asst. Ref. Dept. P. L., 
N. Y. City. 7090. 

Harter, Helen H., asst. Readers' Dept. 
Univ. of Chicago L., Chicago, 111. 8807. 

Hartmann, Bertha U., In's sec'y, P. L., In- 
dianapolis, Ind. 8368. 

Hartmann, Charlotte E., In. John Marshall 
High Sch. Br. P. L., Chicago, 111. 8399. 

Hartog, Alfred, mgr. Lemcke and Buech- 
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Hartwell, Mary A., catlgr. P. Documents 
Office, Washington, D. C. 1606. 

Harvard Coll. L., Cambridge, Mass. (Wil- 
liam C. Lane, In.) 4100. 

Harvey, Mrs. Esther Finlay, In. and in- 
structor Newcomb Coll. L., New Orleans, 
La. 5421. 

HARVEY, LE ROY, Manager and Treas. 
Wilmington Institute F. L., Wilmington, 
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Harvey, Marion, sub. asst. Allegheny Car- 
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Hasbrouck, Dudley C., sec'y Board of Trus- 
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Haseltine, Elizabeth A., In. Sch. of Com- 
merce L, 32 Waverly Place, N. Y. City. 
8721. 

Haskell, Emma E., child. In. P. L., Colo- 
rado Springs, Colo. 8783. 

Haskell, Col. H. S., pres. Haskell F. L., 
Derby Litre, Vt. 3685. 

HASSE, ADELAIDE R., Tuckahoe, N. Y. 
779. Life member. 

Hassler, Harriot E., In. Public Health Serv- 
ice Hospital L, Perryville, Md. 3392. 

Hastings, C. H., chief Card Section, L. of 
Congress, Washington, D. C. 1644. 

Hatch, Alice K., child. In. F. P. L, Clin- 
ton, Iowa. 7091. 

Hatch, Grace Linn, asst. P. L., Haverhill, 
Mass. 3894. 

Hatfield, Thomas F., In. F. P. L., Hoboken, 
N. J. 5730. 

Hathaway, C. Eveleen, N. Y. State L., Al- 
bany, N. Y. 8226. 

Hatton, W. H., New London, Wis. 5370. 

Baught, Myrtle A., In. Wilson and Com- 
pany L, Chicago, 111. 7856. 

Haverhill (Mass.) P. L. (John Grant Moul- 
ton, In.) 3518. 

Hawaii L., Honolulu, T. H. (Edna I. Allyn, 
In.) 5825. 

HAWES, CLARA S., catlgr. Allegheny Car- 
negie F. L., Pittsburgh, N. S., Pa. 1171. 
Life member. 

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ton Inst. F. L., Wilmington, Del. 7745. 

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Hawley, Emma A., documentary In. and in- 



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Hawley, Helen F., In. East Bridgeport Br. 
P. L., Bridgeport, Conn. 5844. 

Hawley, Margaret B., In. Norwood Br. P. 
L, Cincinnati, Ohio. 4639. 

Hawley, Marjory L, asst. In. P. L., Dan- 
bury, Conn. 7766. 

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5315 Drexel Ave., Chicago, 111. 5785. 

Hayes, John Russell, In. Swarthmore Coll. 
L, Swarthmore, Pa. 3843. 

Hayes, Margaret A., F. L., Geneva, N. Y. 
8338. 

Haynes, Emily M., In. Worcester Poly- 
technic Inst., Worcester, Mass. 2652. 

HAYNES, FRANCES E., asst. In. Mount 
Holyoke Coll. L., South Hadley, Mass. 
1689. Life member. 

Hayues, Mrs. Rosalie J., asst. Hospital L., 
Cape May, N. J. 8400. 

Haynes, Susan L., In. Joshua Hyde P. L., 
Sturbridge, Mass. 4616. 

Hays, Alice N., ref. In. Leland Stanford 
Jr. Univ. L., Stanford University, Cal. 
4661. 

Hayward, Celia A., head catlgr. P. L. Ber- 
keley, Cal. 6686. 

Hayward, Ruth P., asst. catlgr. Wis. His- 
torical Society L., Madison, Wis. 5662. 

Hazeltine, Alice I., supervisor child, work 
P. L., St. Louis, Mo. 3694. 

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25 Park Place, N. Y. City. 7458. 



HANDBOOK 



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Healy, Mrs. W. C., 20 Summit Road, Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 8046. 
Mean, Clarence S., In. Coll. of Agriculture 

L. Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. 

4369. 

Hearst F. L. See Anaconda, Mont. 
Hedges, Annette Jane, asst. in charge of 

Medical Collection P. L., Indianapolis, 

Ind. 8369. 

Hedrick, Ellen A., classifier Univ. of Cali- 
fornia L., Berkeley, Cal. 4126. 
Heezen, Helen M., head catlgr. Enoch 

Pratt F. L., Baltimore, Md. 8606. 
Hefron, Josephine M., ref. In. Reference 

L. Guaranty Trust Co., N. Y. City. 8607. 
Heilman, Lura F., In. U. S. General Hos- 
pital no. 11 L., Cape May, N. J. 8608. 
Heim, M. Stella, In. E. F. Houghton and 

Co. L., 240 W. Somerset St., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 8455. 
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Heins, Dorothea, In. East Side Br. P. L., 

Evansville, Ind. 5754. 
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unk Br. F. L., Philadelphia, Pa. 5263. 
Hemphill, Helen E., asst. In. Engineering 

L. Western Electric Co., 463 West St., 

N. Y. City. 8519. 
Hendee, Cora, In. P. L., Council Bluffs, 

Iowa. 8067. 
Henderson, Fanchon Isabel, In. Douglas 

Park Br. P. L., Chicago, 111. 7713. 
Henderson, Mrs. John, In. P. L., Edgerton, 

Wis. 8254. 
Henderson, Mrs. Lois White, In. Post L., 

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dergast F. L., Jamestown, N. Y. 1625. 
Henderson, Lucien G., Ronald Press Co., 

20 Vesey St., N. Y. City. 8610. 
Henderson, Robert William, chief of 

Stacks P. L., N. Y. City. 5217. 
Henderson (Ky.) P. L, (Susan Starling 

Towles, In.) 7579. 
Hendrickson, Harriet, In. Piedmont Coll. 

L., Demorest, Ga. 7951. 
Ilendry, Donald, head of Applied Science 

Dept. Pratt Inst. F. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

6183. 
Henley, Eunice D., index and catalog clerk 



Nat'l Advisory Com. for Aeronautics, 
Washington, D. C. 3213. 

Henley, Lillian, editor Public Affairs In- 
formation Service, 11 W. 40th St., N. Y. 
City. 4885. 

Henley, Margaret D., head Sch. Ref. Div. 
P. L., Indianapolis, Ind. 8370. 

Henry, Atta L., asst. Br. Dept. P. L., In- 
dianapolis, Ind. 8371. 

Henry, Edward A., asst. head of Readers' 
Dept. Univ. of Chicago L., Chicago, 111. 
8819. 

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111. 6689. 

Henry, Mrs. H. L., sec'y F. L. Assoc., Ge- 
neva, N. Y. 8152. 

Henry, Jane A., In. Eastern Laboratory 
L. E. I. du Pont de Nemours Co., Ches- 
ter, Pa. 8611. 

Henry, W. E., In. Univ. of Wash. L., 
Seattle, Wash. 2533. 

Henshall, Mrs. May D., Sch. L. organizer 
Cal. State L., Sacramento, Cal. 6783. 

Henze, Hermine, child. In. P. L., Detroit, 
Mich. 8420. 

Hepburn, William M., In. Purdue Univ. L., 
Lafayette, Ind. 2732. 

Herbert, Clara W., dir. Work with Child, 
and dir. Training Class P. L. of District 
of Columbia, Washington, D. C. 2668. 

Herdman, Margaret M., asst. office execu- 
tive and employment sec'y Nat'l Board 
Y. W. C. A., N. Y. City. 6020. 

Herff, William L., San Antonio, Tex. 7929. 

Hering, Hollis W., In. Missionary Research 
* L., N. Y. City. 8045. 

Herr, Hardin H., Inter-Southern Life Bldg., 
Louisville, Ky. 6475. 

Herr, Mary E., In. Brearley Sch. L., N. Y. 
City. 6103. 

Herrick, Grace Emma, In. Western Coll. 
for Women, Oxford, Ohio. 5198. 

Herrington, Elizabeth, In. Post L., Van- 
couver Barracks, Wash. 6477. 

Herrman, Jennie, In. San Diego County L., 
San Diego, Cal. 3861. 

Herron, Leonora E., In. Hampton Inst L., 
Hampton, Va. 1194. 

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Bindery, 1751 E. Belmont Ave., Chicago, 
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Herzog, Alfred C., ex-ln., 13 Troy St., Jer- 
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ford, Conn. 263. Life member. 

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Carnegie L, Pittsburgh, Pa. 5343. Life 
member. 

Hewitt, Luther E., In. Law Assn. of Phila., 
Room 600, City Hall, Philadelphia, Pa. 
1079. 

Hiatt, Maude L., In. P. L., Phoenix, Ariz. 
7852. 

Hibbard, Edith A., Idaho State Normal 
Sch. L., Lewiston, Idaho. 8153. 

Hibbard, Mrs. Rosa M., In. Kansas City 
Medical L. Club, Kansas City, Mo. 7440. 

Hibbert, Norma D., In. West Div. High 
Sch. L., Milwaukee, Wis. 6843. 

Nibbing (Minn.) P. L. (Dorothy Hurlbert, 
In.) 8120. 

Hickin, Eleanor Maude, asst. Oberlin Coll. 
L., Oberlin, O. 3666. 

Hickman, Margaret, In. P. L., Eveleth, 
Minn. 7779. 

Hicks, Frederick C., law In. Columbia 
Univ. L., N. Y. City. 3416. 

Hicks, Mrs. Frederick C., 530 West 123rd 
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Hicks, Mary Lydia, Executive Citizens' 
Mohawk-Brighton Social Unit Organiza- 
tion, 1820 Freeman Ave, Cincinnati, O. 
5709. 

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Cincinnati, O. 7313. 

Hifton-King, Harriette J., asst. Copyright 
Office L. of Congress, Washington, D. C. 
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naeum, Boston, Mass. 4419. 

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Br. P. L., N. Y. City. 8613. 

Hill, Clara B., catlgr. P. L., St. Louis, Mo. 
8498. 

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ada. 5069. 

Hill, Edith M., In. Temple Br. P. L., Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 4919. 

Hill, Eleanor N., P. L., Detroit, Mich. 8297. 



Hill, Frank Pierce, In. P. L., Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 459. 

Hill, Galen W., In. Millicent L., Fairhaven, 
Mass. 5215. 

Hill, Gertrude P., in charge of periodicals 
Order Div. P. L., N. Y. City. 6999. 

Hill, Grace, head Catalog Dept. P. L., Kan- 
sas City, Mo. 5574. 

Hill, Mrs. Norman C. (Ruth L. Carlisle), 
Indian Head, Md. 7037. 

Hillebrand, Ruth C., asst. P. L., Detroit, 
Mich. 8614. 

Hillmantel, Viola C., In. North Avenue Br. 
P. L., Milwaukee, Wis. 7225. 

Hills, Elizabeth C., In. Cobleigh L, Lyn- 
donville, Vt. 4634. 

HINCKLEY, GEORGE LYMAN, In. Red- 
wood L., Newport, R. I. 2432. Life 
member. 

Hinesley, Pearl, catlgr. Chemical Dept. E. 
I. du Pont de Nemours and Co., Wil- 
mington, Del. 7513. 

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Orange, N. J. 4871. 

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In.) 7298. 

Hirshberg, Herbert S., In. P. L., Toledo, 
Ohio. 3583. 

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City. 8227. 

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Hitchcock, Jeannette M., 1st asst. Catalog 
Dept. P. L., Tacoma, Wash. 8017. 

Hitchler, Theresa, supt. of Catalog Dept. 
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Hitt, Eleanor, In. Yolo County F. L., Wood- 
land, Cal. 6541. 

Hitt, Katherine, In. P. L., Winchester, 111. 
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3245. 



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HANDBOOK 



505 



Hobart Coll. L., Geneva, N. Y. (Milton 

Haight Turk, In.) 4773. 
Hobbs, Mrs. Frank, Hasbrouck Heights 

L., Hasbrouck Heights, N. J. 8615. 
Hobbs, Harold W., Morristown Sch., Mor- 

ristown, N. J. 8154. 
Hoboken (N. J.) F. P. L. (Thomas F. Hat- 

field, In.) 5182. 
Hodgdon, Clarence R., In. Richard Sugden 

L., Spencer, Mass. 8245. 
Hodgdon, Waldo C., trus. P. L., Dedham, 

Mass. 8409. 
Hodge, Cordelia B., head of Traveling L., 

F. L. Commission, Harrisburg, Pa. 5573. 
Hodge, George B., mgr. Y. M. C. A. His- 
torical L., 347 Madison Ave., N. Y. City. 

7675. 
Hodges, Clara D., trus. P. L., Petersham, 

Mass. 8155. 
HODGES, NATHANIEL DANA CARLILE, 

In. P. L., Cincinnati, Ohio. 1941. Life 

member. 
Hodges, Mrs. N. D. C., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

4172. 
Hodges, Virginia, trus. P. L., Petersham, 

Mass. 8228. 

Hodgkins, Mabel, 19 Exchange St., Glou- 
cester, Mass. 4560. 

Hodgson, James, Lone Creek, la. 6901. 
Hodnefield, Jacob, Ellsworth, Wis. 4476. 
Hoffman, Ellen, In. P. Sch. L., Ypsilanti, 

Mich. 7330. 
Hoffman, Mildred, station asst. P. L. 

Waterloo, Iowa. 8431. 
Hoffman, Ruth, child. In. "Your Home" L., 

Johnson City, N. Y. 7767. 
Holt, Doris L., asst. Circ. Dept. P. L., 

Seattle, Wash. 8722. 
HOLDEN, FREDRIKA G., trus. F. L., 

Proctor, Vt. 8775. Life member. 
Holding, Anna L., 63 N. Maple Ave., East 

Orange, N. J. 6190. 
Holdridge, Anna. P., 2715 P St. N. W., 

Washington, D. C. 6928. 
Holland, Mary E., in charge Periodical 

Dept. City L., Manchester, N. H. 7295. 
Holland (Mich.) P. L. 7636. 
Hollingsworth, Josephine B., 1. asst. U. S. 
Shipping Board, Washington, D. C. 6611. 
Hollins College. Cocke Mem. L., Hollins. 
Va. (Marian S. Bayne, In.) 4740. 



Holloway, Jessie D., 1st asst. Lincoln Br. 

P. L., Rochester, N. Y. 8616. 
Holmes, Dagmar O., catalog and file clerk, 

U. S. Zone Finance, Washington, D. C. 

4710. 
Holmes, Louise, In. Queen Anne Br. P. L., 

Seattle, Wash. 6557. 

Holton, Mary W., ref. In. Research Lab- 
oratory L. Aluminum Co. of America, 

New Kensington, Pa. 8617. 
Holyoke (Mass.) P. L. (Frank G. Willcox, 

In.) 6774. 
Holzberg, Ethel F., In. Hughes High Sch. 

L., Cincinnati, O. 7768. 
Homestead (Pa.) Carnegie L. (William F. 

Stevens, In.) 4375. 
Honeyman, J. R. C., In. and sec'y-treas. P. 

L., Regina, Sask., Canada. 5466. 
Hood, Ida Richardson, asst. In. American 

Museum Natural Hist. L., N. Y. City. 

5676. 
Hood, Lucille, In. Idaho Tech. Inst. L., 

Pocatello, Idaho. 7678. 
Hoofnagle, A. Raye, asst. P. L., Harris- 
burg, Pa. 8618. 
Hooker, D. Ashley, technology In. P. L., 

Detroit, Mich. 3993. 
Hooper, Blanche H., asst. In. Tufts Coll. 

L., Tufts College, Mass. 4735. 
HOOPER, LOUISA M., In. P. L., Brook- 
line, Mass. 1952. Life member. 
Hoover, Anna F., In. P. L., Galesburg, 111. 

2297. 
Hoover, Mary E., In. Alliance Br. P. L., 

Cleveland, Ohio. 8401. 
Hoover, Merle M., Army "Y," Camp Upton, 

N. Y. 8023. 
Hopkins, Alice L., asst. In. Simmons Coll. 

L., Boston, Mass. 6764. 
Hopkins, Florence May, In. Central High 
Sch. and Junior Coll. L., Detroit, Mich. 

1691. 
Hopkins, Jessica, acting In. Tompkins Sq. 

Br. P. L., N. Y. City. 4477. 
Hopkins, Julia Anna, prin. Training Class 

P. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 2098. 
Hopkins, Ruth G., child. In. P. L., Youngs- 
town, Ohio. 8768. 

Hopper, Franklin F., chief of Circ. Dept. 
P. L., N. Y. City. 2798. 



506 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Horak, Irma H., In. St. Gabriel's Park Br. 
P. L., N. Y. City. 8619. 

Home, Lulu, In. Lincoln City L., Lincoln, 
Neb. 2354. 

Horton, Mabel T. T catlgr. P. L., Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 3864. 

Horton, Marion L., principal L. Sen. P. L., 
Los Angeles, Calif. 6763. 

Horwitz, Frances M., asst. Sterling Br. P. 
L., Cleveland, Ohio. 8620. 

Hosie, Clara M., sec'y to In. P. L., Detroit, 
Mich. 8421. 

Hotchkiss, Muriel C., child. In. P. L., 
Bridgeport, Conn. 7936. 

Hotchkiss, S. R., trus. A. K. Smiley P. L., 
Redlands, Calif. 8229. 

Houchens, Josie Batcheller, lecturer in L. 
Sch. and binding In. Univ. of 111. L., 
Urbana, 111. 4070. 

Houghton, Cecile F., In. Quinsigamond Br. 
F. P. L, Worcester, Mass. 8432. 

Houghton, Celia M., In. High Sch. L., Al- 
bany, N. Y. 2493. 

Houghton Mifflin Co., publishers, 4 Park 
St., Boston, Mass. 115. 

Houston, Marie, child. In. North East Br. 
P. L., Los Angeles, Calif. 8723. 

Houston (Tex.) Lyceum and Carnegie L. 
(Julia Ideson, In.) 3983. 

HOVEY, EDWARD CLARENCE, Green- 
ville, S. C. 832. Life member. 

Howard, Anna, Purchase Storage and Traf- 
fic Div., Room 2424, Munitions Bldg., 
Washington, D. C. 7769. 

Howard, Clara E., teacher-ln. Schenley 
High Sch. L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 2274. 

Howard Mem. L. See New Orleans, La. 

Howard Whittemore Memorial L. See 
Naugatuck. Conn. 

Howe, Ellen Ford, asst. ref. In. and in- 
structor in L. Economy, TJniv. of Wash- 
ington, Seattle, Wash. 7618. 

Howe, Harriet E., asst. professor L. Sci- 
ence Simmons Coll. L. Sch., Boston, 
Mass. 3355. 

Howe, Mrs. Henry J., member Lowa L. 
Commission, Marshalltown, Iowa. 2983. 

Howe, Mabel A., asst. P. L., Greenwich, 
Conn. 7937. 

Howell, Edward A., In. P. L., Reading, Pa. 
4561. 



Howell, Isabel McD., chief Order Dept. F. 

P. L., Newark, N. J. 3735. - 
Howell, Sarah L, asst. Technology Dept. 

Carnegie L, Pittsburgh, Pa. 6640. 
Howes, Frank H., trus. P. L., Newton, 

Mass. (Address, 4 Liberty Sq., Boston.) 

8069. 
Howson, Roger, asst. In. Columbia Univ. 

L., N. Y. City. 8070. 
Hoxie, Louise M., asst. Civics Dept. P. L., 

Detroit, Mich. ' 8298. 
Hoyer, Helen M., 525 Philadelphia Ave., 

Chambersburg, Pa. 8071. 
HUBBARD, ANNA G., order In. P. L., 

Cleveland, Ohio. 1991. Life member. 
Hubbard, Mrs. Georgia M., R. F. D. No. 9, 

Grand Rapids, Mich. 4811. 
Hubbard, Mary, instructor L. Sch. of the 

P. L., N. Y. City. 6017. 
Hubbard, Mrs. R. A., A. L. A. Border Serv- 
ice, El Paso, Texas. (Address, 411 Texas 

St.) 8156. 
Hubbell, Jane P., In. P. L, Rockford, 111. 

1760. 
Hubbert, Frances, general asst. 58th St. 

Br. P. L., N. Y. City. 8621. 
Huebner, C. F., sec'y Bd. of Trustees, P. 

L., Iowa City, la. 6394. 
Hughes, Mrs. H. L. D., Danville, Ga. 4709. 
Hughes, Howard L., In. F. P. L, Trenton, 

N. J. 5254. 
Hughes, Mary, in charge Child. Dept. P. L., 

Seattle, Wash. 6856. 
Hughes, Ruth, indexer and catalog clerk, 

Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign 

and Domestic Com., Washington, D. C. 

7279. 

Hughes, Ruth P., child. In. P. L., Free- 
port, 111. 8752. 
Hulburd, Anna A., head catlgr. Syracuse 

Univ. L., Syracuse, N. Y. 3994. 
Huling, Caroline A., 428 Belden Ave., Chi- 
cago, 111. 7654. 
Hulings, Florence, In. Brumback L. of 

Van Wert Co., Van Wert, Ohio. 6331. 
Hull, Carl W., asst. to In. Carnegie F. L., 

Duquesne, Pa. 8808. 

Humble, Marion, A. L. A., N. Y. City. 6414. 
Hume, Jessie Fremont, 626 Lexington 

Ave., N. Y. City. 2612. 



507 



Humphrey, Erin, asst. P. L., Dallas, Tex. 

7402. 
Humphrey, Mary B., ref. In. State Coll. L., 

Pullman, Wash. 4065. 
Humphrey, Mrs. V. G., Ocean Springs, 

Miss. 7998. 
Humphreys, Florence G., Corn Exchange 

National Bank, Philadelphia, Pa. 1879. 
Humrichouse, J. W., trus. Washington 

County F. L., Hagerstown, Md. 8230. 
Hunt, Clara Whitehill, supt. Child. Dept. 

P. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 1782. 
Hunt, M. Louise, head of Lending Dept. F. 

P. L., Newark, N. J. 3698. 
Hunt, Mabel L., asst. East Washington Br. 

P. L., Indianapolis, Ind. 8372. 
Hunt, May, asst. catlgr. Los Angeles 

County F. L., Los Angeles, Cal. 6690. 
Huntington, Mary E., In. P. L., New 

Rochelle, N. Y. 2791. 
Huntington, Stella, In. Santa Clara Co. L., 

San Jose, Cal. 3364. 
Huntington (Ind.) City F. L. (Winifred F. 

Ticer, In.) 4806. 
Huntington F. L. and Reading Room. See 

Westchester, N. Y. 

Huntting, Henry R., bookseller, Spring- 
field, Mass. 4152. 
Hurd, Carol, 99 Grove Terrace, Dubuque. 

la. 6201. 
Huse, Mary B., child. In. Soulard Br. P. L., 

St. Louis, Mo. 7096. 
Husenetter, Gertrude L., In. Rogers Park 

Br. P. L., Chicago, 111. 8157. 
Hussey, Blanche E., asst. Circ. Dept. P. L., 

Milwaukee, Wis. 7644. 
Husted, Harriet F., head catlgr. Pratt Inst. 

F. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 1709. 
Hutcheson, David, 1221 Monroe St. N. E., 

Brookland, Washington, D. C. 48. 
Hufrchins, Margaret, ref. In. Univ. of Illi- 
nois L., Urbana, 111. 4830. 
Hutchinson, Adria A., in charge of Exten- 
sion Work, P. L., Davenport, la, 8024. 
Hutchinson, Mrs. Crete P., New Berne 

Apts., Washington, D. C. 8072. 
Hutchinson, Helen, In. Am. Medical Assn., 

535 N. Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. 4478. 
Hutchinson, Lura C., dir. of Training Class 

P. L., Minneapolis, Minn. 7519. 
Hutchinson, Mary D., In. and instructor 



Cleveland Normal Training Sell. L., 
Cleveland, Ohio. 5926. 

Hutchinson, Susan A., In. and curator of 
prints Brooklyn Inst. of Arts and 
Sciences Museum L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
2122. 

Hutchinson, Wil, In. Arleta Br. L. Assoc., 
Portland, Ore. 8481. 

Hutton, Natalie, In. Hosmer Br. P. L., De- 
troit, Mich. 6332. 

Huxley, Florence A., office editor Library 
Journal, 62 W. 45th St., N. Y. City. 
6333. 

Hyde, Dorsey W., In. Municipal Ref. L., 
512 Municipal Bldg., N. Y. City. 7901. 

Hyde, Mary E., instructor N. Y. State L. 
Sch., Albany, N. Y. 290'2. 

Hygen, Dorthea H., catlgr. Univ. of Chi- 
cago L., Chicago, 111. 6425. 

Ibbotson, Joseph D., In. Hamilton Coll. L., 
Clinton, N. Y. 5830. 

Ideson, Julia, In. Lyceum and Carnegie L., 
Houston, Tex. 3492. 

ILES, GEORGE, journalist, Park Ave. Ho- 
tel, N. Y. City. 946. Life member. 

Ilion (N. Y.) F. P. L. (Nellie Mae Cheney, 
In.) 7577. 

Illinois Legislative Reference Bureau L., 
Springfield, III. (E. J. Verlie, sec'y.) 
7600. 

Illinois L. Extension Commission, Spring- 
field, III. (Anna M. Price, sec'y.) 8116. 

Illinois State L., Springfield, III. (Mrs. Eva 
May Fowler, acting In.) 7404. 

Illinois University, College of Medicine L., 
Chicago, III. (Meta Loomis, In.) 7653. 

Illinois Univ. L., Urbana, III. (Phineas L. 
Windsor, In.) 4117. 

Imai, Kwan-ichi, director L., Osaka, Japan. 
5539. 

IMHOFF, MRS. HOWARD (ETHELWYN 
CRANE), North Bend, Ore. 4840. Life 
member. 

Indiana Public Library Commission, Indi- 
anapolis, Ind. (William J. Hamilton, 
sec'y.) 3660. 

Indiana State L., Indianapolis, Ind. (De- 
marchus C. Brown, In.) 1086. 

Indiana State Normal Sch. L., Terre 
Haute, Ind. (Arthur Cunningham, In.) 
4317. 



508 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Indiana Univ. L., Bloomington, Ind. (Wil- 
liam E. Jenkins, In.) 4299. 
Indianapolis (Ind.) P. L. (Charles E. 

Rush, In.) 5065. 
Ingersoll, Alma H., In. in charge Edwin F. 

Conely Br. P. L., Detroit, Mich. 7904. 
Ingersoll, Helen F., supervisor of Child. 

Work P. L., Denver, Colo. 3148. 
Ingham, Roena A., In. P. L., Lakewood, 

Ohio. 1795. 
Ingram, Lottie Nell, In. P. L., Maywood, 

111. 6827. 

Inman, Grace E., 135 Parade St., Provi- 
dence, R. I. 5446. 
Iowa State Coll. L., Ames, Iowa. (Vera M. 

Dixon, asst. In. in charge.) 5187. 
Iowa State L., Des Moines, Iowa. (Johnson 

Brigham, In.) 4285. 
Iowa State L. Commission, Des Moines, 

Iowa. (Julia A. Robinson, sec'y.) 5826. 
Iowa State Teachers' Coll. L., Cedar Falls, 

Iowa. (Anne S. Duncan, In.) 6123. 
Iowa State Univ. L., Iowa City, Iowa. (Jane 

E. Roberts, In.) 4392. 
Isbister, Jennie E., asst. Public Square Br. 

P. L., Cleveland, O. 1413. 
Ishpeming (Mich.) Carnegie P. L. (Mrs. 

Nellie E. Brayton, In.) 4900. 
Ishphording, Alice Louise, In. Winton Place 

Br. P. L., Cincinnati, Ohio. 8073. 
ISOM, MARY FRANCES, In. L. Assoc., 

Portland, Ore. 2043. Life member. 
Ives, Mary, In. J. C. Fremont High Sch. L., 

Oakland, Cal. 5965. 
Jackson, Annie Brown, trus. P. L., North 

Adams, Mass. 787. 

Jackson, Fanny R., In. West. 111. State Nor- 
mal Sch., Macomb, 111. 2777. 
Jackson, Henrietta E., asst. In. Carnegie 

L., Winnipeg, Man. 2799. 
Jackson, Margaret, instructor L. Sch. of 

the New York P. L., N. Y. City. 6227. 
Jackson, Marion M., sec'y Commission on 

Training Camp Activities, Navy Dept., 

Washington, D. C. 8009. 
Jackson (Mich.) P. L. (Earl W. Brown- 
ing, In.) 4702. 
Jacksonville (Fla.) F. P. L. (Joseph F. 

Marron, In.) 5038. 
Jacob, William F., In. Main L. General 

Electric Co., Schenectady, N. Y. 7770. 



Jacobsen, Anna, catlgr. Iowa State Coll. 

L., Ames, Iowa. 8074. 
Jacobsen, Ethel C., In. Carnegie L., Pierre, 

S. D. 8018. 

Jacobsen, Karl T., Stoughton, Wis. 5641. 
Jacobus, Alma B., In. Milwaukee Leader 

L., Milwaukee, Wis. 6845. 
Jacobus, Sarah M., In. P. L., Pomona, 

Calif. 7741. 
Jaeger, Emily, asst. Bushwick Br. P. L., 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 8339. 
Jaggard, Louise, ref. In. City L., Wichita, 

Kan. 7464. 
James, Gordon, trus. F. P. L., Caldwell, 

N. J. 8158. 
JAMES, WILLIAM JOHN, In. Wesleyan 

Univ. L., Middletown, Conn. 892. Life 

member. 
James Jerome Hill Reference L., St. Paul, 

Minn. (J. G. Pyle, In.) 8520. 
James Memorial L. See Williston, N. D. 
James Millikin Univ. L, Decatur, III. (Eu- 
genia Allin, In.) 5517. 
James V. Brown P. L. See Williamsport, 

Pa. 
Jameson, Mary Ethel, asst. Science Div. 

P. L., N. Y. City. 5893. 
Jamieson, Mrs. M. M., member L. Board 

P. L., Trinidad, Colo. 8159. 
Jamison, Anna Ruth, asst. Sch. Div. Car- 
negie L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 7857. 
Janes, Leila A., In. P. L., Fond du Lac, 

Wis. 7462. 
Janvrin, Charles E., departmental In. 

Natural Hist. L. Univ. of 111., Urbana, 

111. 2734. 
Japan Imperial L., Tokio, Japan. (I. Tan- 

aka, In.) 4272. 
Jeffers, Anna C., ref. In. P. L., Kalamazoo, 

Mich. 7582. 
Jeffers, Le Roy, mgr. Book Order Office P. 

L., N. Y. City. 4911. 
Jeffrey, Maud D., ref. In. Ohio State Univ. 

L., Columbus, Ohio. 2232. 
Jenkins, Frederick W., In. Russell Sage 

Foundation L., N. Y. City. 3930. 
Jenkins, Marjorie, asst. P. L., Cleveland, O. 

7754. 
Jenkins, William E., In. Ind. Univ. L., 

Bloomington, Ind. 3661. 



HANDBOOK 



509 



Jenkinson, Richard C., trus. F. P. L., New- 
ark, N. J. 3971. 
JENKS, REV. HENRY F., Canton, Mass. 

259. Life member. 
Jenks, Lorette, asst. The Booklist, 78 E. 

Washington St., Chicago, 111. 6037. 
Jennings, Anna Vivian, In. Nebraska State 

Normal Sch. L., Kearney, Neb. 3060. 
Jennings, Jennie Thornburg, chief Catalog 

Div. and head Training Class P. L., St. 

Paul. Minn. 1830. 
Jennings, Judson Toll, In. P. L., Seattle, 

Wash. 1012. 
Jermain, Sylvanus P., trus. John Jermain 

Mem. L., Sag Harbor, N. Y. (Address, 

P. O. Box 362, Toledo, Ohio.) 8075. 
Jerome, Janet, In. Fullerton Sch. Br. P. L., 

Cleveland, O. 4730. 
Jersey City (N. J.) F. P. L. (Edmund W. 

Miller, In. and sec'y.) 1061. 
Jessup, Mrs. Jennie B., In. P. L.., La Porte, 

Ind. 1431. 
Jessup, Maud M., stenographer in charge 

Periodical Records P. L., Grand Rapids, 

Mich. 5838. 
Jewett, Alice L., registrar State Coll. for 

Teachers, Albany, N. Y. 6558. 
Jewett, Mary B., chairman L. Com. P. L., 

Winter Haven, Fla. 7645. 
Joeckel, Carleton B., In. P. L., Berkeley, 

Cal. 4962. 
Johannesburg (South Africa) P. L. (S. B. 

Asher, In.) 6647. 
John Crerar L., Chicago, III. (Clement W. 

Andrews, In.) 2702. 
Johnes, Dorothy, asst. P. L., Asbury Park, 

N. J. 8200. 
Johns Hopkins Univ. L., Baltimore, Md. 

(M. Llewellyn Raney, In.) 7339. 
Johnson, Agnes V., In. P. L., Hoquiam, 

Wash. 6659. 
Johnson, Alice Sarah, ref. In. Univ. of 

111. L., and lecturer L. Sch., Urbana, 111. 

4407. 
Johnson, Mrs. Belle H., 1. inspector Conn. 

P. L. Committee, Hartford, Conn. 2895. 
Johnson, Cornelia, asst. Camp L., Camp 

Travis, Tex. 8000. 

Johnson, Edith, Matawan, N. J. 3648. 
Johnson, Elsie Evelyn, asst. In. Dept. of 

Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institu- 



tion of Washington, Washington, D. C. 

7666. 
Johnson, Dr. Frank S., chairman of Book 

Committee John Crerar L., Chicago, 111. 

(Address, 829 Adella Ave., Coronado, 

Calif.) 4226. 
Johnson, Jeanne F., head of Catalog Dept. 

P. L., Tacoma, Wash. 5949. 
JOHNSON, MILDRED NO6, acting editor, 

Public Affairs Information Service, 11 

W. 40th St., N. Y. City. 7210. Life 

member. 
Johnson, Roxana G., head catlgr. Los 

Angeles County F. L., Los Angeles, 

Calif. 4483. 
Johnson, Mrs. W. S., 54 N. Church St., 

Carbondale, Pa. 5408. 
Johnson, Wendla N., asst. P. L., Dallas, 

Tex. 7256. 
Johnson, Wilbur, trus. P. L., East Orange, 

N. J. 8201. 

Johnston, Charles D., In. Cossitt L., Mem- 
phis, Tenn. 1849. 
Johnston, Mrs. Charles D., care of Cossitt 

L., Memphis, Tenn. 6208. 
Johnston, Esther, In. Seward Park Br. P. 

L., N. Y. City. 4415. 
Johnston, Lilian, asst. Lothrop Br. P. L., 

Detroit, Mich. 8299. 
Johnston, Peter N., asst. P. L., N. Y. City. 

6084. . 

Johnston, Richard H., In. Bureau of Rail- 
way Economics L., Washington, D. C. 

1191. 
Johnston, Stella G., asst. 96th St. Br. P. L., 

N. Y. City. 4040. 
Johnston, W. Dawson, In. P. L., St. Paul, 

Minn. 2969. 
Johnstone, Ursula K., supervisor Filing 

Dept. Haskins and Sells, 469 5th Ave., 

N. Y. City. 3711. 
Johnstown, Pa. Cambria F. L. (L. Helen 

Berkey, In.) 8284. 
Jonas, Frieda, child. In. 67th St. Br. P. L., 

N. Y. City. 4728. 
Jones, A. Marshall, book publisher, 212 

Summer St., Boston, Mass. 7345. 
Jones, Ada Alice, head catlgr. N. Y. State 

L., Albany, N. Y. 770. 
Jones, Mrs. Alice Walker, asst. L. Assoc., 

Portland, Ore. 6691. 



510 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Jones, C. Olive, In. P. L., Plattsmouth, 
Neb. 8344. 

Jones, Caroline L., field rep. A. L. A. L. 
War Service, 31 West 15th St., N. Y. 
City. 7771. 

Jones, Clara B., In. P. L., Osgood, Ind. 
7521. 

Jones, E. Kathleen, A. L. A. field rep., 517 
State House, Boston, Mass. 2755. 

Jones, Eleanor Louise, general sec'y Mass. 
F. P. L. Com., Boston, Mass. 2479. 

Jones, Eleanor Ruth, In. Ind. State Nor- 
mal Sch. L., Terre Haute, Ind. 7938. 

Jones, Florence L., head Ref. Dept. P. L., 
Indianapolis, Ind. 4888. 

JONES, GARDNER MAYNARD, In. P. L., 
Salem, Mass. 605. Life member. 

JONES, MRS. GARDNER MAYNARD 
(Kate Emery Sanborn), ex-ln., 119 Fed- 
eral St., Salem Mass. 781. Life mem- 
ber. 

Jones, Hannah M., In. Friends' F. L., Ger- 
mantown, Pa. 2171. 

Jones, Linn, 1st asst. and child. In. P. L., 
Oak Park, 111. 8328. 

Jones, Louise E., In. Rivington St. Br. P. 
L., N. Y. City. 7099. 

Jones, Mabel M., child, In. Gray Br. P. L., 
Detroit, Mich. 8300. 

Jones, Mary Letitia, 1407 Garfield Ave., 
South Pasadena, Calif. 962. 

Jones, Olive, In. Ohio State tJniv. L., 
Columbus, Ohio. 1104. 

Jones, Thomas D., vice-pres. John Crerar 
L., Chicago, 111. 4222. 

Jordan, Alice M., supervisor Work with 
Child. P. L., Boston, Mass. 2550. 

JORDAN, FREDERICK P., asst. In. Univ. 
of Mich. General L., Ann Arbor, Mich. 
593. Life member. 

Jordan, Horace M., asst. In. L. of Congress, 
Washington, D. C. 3425. 

Jordan, John W., In. Hist. Soc. of Penn., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 3565. 

Jordan, Lois M., head Order Dept. P. L., 
Minneapolis, Minn. 4380. 

Jorgensen, Anna, In. High Sch. L., Daven- 
port, Iowa. 7782. 

Josenhans, Marie Alma, asst. P. L., Detroit, 
Mich. 5798. 

Josephson, Aksel G. S., catlgr. John Crerar 



L. and sec'y Index Office, Chicago, 111. 

1708. 
Josephson, Mrs. A. G. S., 2239 Greenleaf 

Ave., Chicago, 111. 7101. 
Joslyn, Rosamond, In. Jamaica High Sch. 

L., Jamaica, N. Y. 3995. 
Josselyn, Lloyd W., director P. L., Birming- 
ham, Ala. 5055. 
Jubal Howe Memorial L. See Shrewsbury, 

Mass. 
Judd, Lewis S., asst. Information Desk P. 

L., N. Y. City. 2041. 
Jutton, Emma Reed, loan In. Univ. of 111. 

L., and lecturer in L. Sch., Urbana, 111. 

2320. 
Kaercher, Frances, 18 Tremont St., Potts- 

ville, Pa. 6160. 
Kahau, Rose, catlgr. L. Assoc., Portland, 

Ore. 6161. 
Kaiser, John Boynton, In. P. L., Tacoma, 

Wash. 5142. 
Kalispell (Mont.) Carnegie F. P. L. 

(Elizabeth P. Ritchie, In.) 6244. 
Kamenetzky, Elizabeth L., asst. In. Wood- 
stock Br. P. L., N. Y. City. 6162. 
Kammerling, Edith, head asst. Civics 

Room P. L., Chicago, 111. 5851. 
Kane, Annise Boyd, catlgr. Yale Univ. L., 

New Haven, Conn. 8076. 
Kansas City (Kansas) p. L. (Sarah Judd 

Greenman, In.) 4216. 
Kansas City (Mo.) P. L. (Purd B. Wright, 

In.) 1087. 
Kansas State Hist. Soc., Topeka, Kan. 

(William E. Connelley, sec'y.) 4166. 
Kansas State L., Topeka, Kan. (Winfield 

Freeman, In.) 4224. 
Kansas State Manual Training Sch. L., 

Pittsburg, Kan. (Odella Nation, In.) 

7334. 
Kansas State Nor. Sch. L., Emporia, Kan. 

(Willis H. Kerr, In.) 5379. 
Kansas Univ. L., Lawrence, Kan. (Carrie 

M. Watson, In.) 5791. 
Karlson, Judith E., In. Tottenville Br. P. L., 

N. Y. City. 6202. 

Kayser, Vera W., Bellevue, Neb. 6625. 
Keane, Mary G., asst. In. P. L., East St. 

Louis, 111. 5427. 

Keating, Kathleen M., asst. P. L., Berke- 
ley, Cal 5716. 



HANDBOOK 



511 



Keator, Alfred D., In. Univ. of N. D., Uni- 
versity, N. D. 5271. 

Keefer, Jessie G., asst. In. P. L., Scranton, 
Pa. 2011. 

Keen, Gregory Bernard, curator Penn. 
Hist. Soc., Philadelphia, Pa. 622. 

Keenan, John Joseph, chief Registration 
Dept. P. L., Boston, Mass. 2587. 

Keeney, Mary E., asst. Green Lake Br. P. 
L., Seattle, Wash. 5968. 

Keep, Chauncey, trustee John Crerar L., 
Chicago, 111. (Address, 112 W. Adams 
St.) 4205. 

Keith, Effie A., head catlgr. Northwestern 
Univ. L., Evanston, 111. 5755. 

Keith, Mrs. Nellie E., In. P. L., South Pasa- 
dena, Calif. 6693 

Keller, R. Louise, In. Independence Bureau 
L., 137 S. 5th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 6193. 

Kelley, Grace, class. John Crerar L., Chi- 
cago, 111. 5114. 

Kelley, Helen Whitney, In. F. P. L., Con- 
cord, Mass. 4865. 

Kelling, Lucile, In. Carnegie L., Centralia, 
Wash. 7746. 

Kellogg-Hubbard L. See Montpelier, Vt. 

Kellogg P. L. See Green Bay, Wis. 

Kelly, Frances Hamerton, In. South Side 
Br. Carnegie L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 6451. 

Kelly, Gertrude, In. P. L., Hancock, Mich. 
8422. 

Kelly, Karl D., Georgetown, Ind. 8077. 

Kelso, Tessa L., In. Baker & Taylor Co, 
354 Fourth Ave., N. Y. City. 562. 

Kelsoe, Stephen H., asst. P. L., St. Louis, 
Mo. 8537. 

Kemmerer, Leila, asst. charge of Loan 
Desk Bureau of Plant Industry U. S. 
Dept. of Agriculture, Washington, D. C. 
7102. 

Kendall, Alice W., asst. F. P. L., Newark, 
N. J. 6466. 

Kennedy, Helen Theresa, principal Br. 
Dept. P. L., Los Angeles, Calif. 3092. 

Kennedy, Kathleen A., 1st asst. P. L., 
Lynn, Mass. 8521. 

Kennedy, Nellie Roberts, In. English Sem- 
inar Univ. of 111. L., Urbana, 111. 6405. 

Kennedy, Robert McMillan, In. South Car- 
olina Univ. L., Columbia, S. C. 5637. 



Kenney, Josephine E., In. North End 

Br. P. L., Boston, Mass. 6426. 
Kenosha, Wis. Gilbert M. Simmons L. 

(Cora Frantz, In.) 3865. 
Kent, Sadie T., In. Mo. State Normal Sch. 

L., Cape Girardeau, Mo. 7103. 
Kentucky L. Commission, Frankfort, Ky. 

(Fannie C. Rawson, sec'y.) 5028. 
KEOGH, ANDREW, In. Yale Univ. L., New 

Haven, Conn. 1822. Life member. 
Keokuk (la.) P. L. (Nannie P. Fulton, In.) 

5736. 

Keppell, Nina M., In. McCarty Br. P. L., In- 
dianapolis, Ind. 8373. 

Kercheval, Margaret McEwen, In. Carne- 
gie L., Nashville, Tenn. 2375. 
Kerr, Lilian Calhoun, In. P. L., Plymouth, 

Mass. 3174. 
Kerr, Willis Holmes, In. State Normal Sch. 

L., Emporia, Kan. 2312. 
Kerr, Mrs. Willis Holmes, Dean of Women, 

State Normal Coll., Emporia, Kan. 2265. 
Kerschner, Constance, catlgr. L. of Con- 
gress, Washington, D. C. 3955. 
Kersten, Maude M. E., Gift Dept. John 

Crerar L., Chicago, 111. 8622. 
Kerswill, Mrs. Harriet D., In. American 

Red. Cross, Northern Div., Minneapolis, 

Minn. 8623. 
Kesler, Mary, 1st asst. in charge Circ. 

Dept. P. L., Toledo, Ohio. 8789. 
Kessel, George, pres. L. Bcrard P. L., Cres- 

co, Iowa. 8078. 
Ketcham, Earle H., asst. to ref. In. Univ. 

of Michigan L., Ann Arbor, Mich. 6529. 
Ketcham, Ethel B., Bellport, L. I., N. Y. 

3032. 
Ketler, William H., In. F. P. L., Camden, 

N. J. 3417. 
Kewanee (III.) P. L. (Grace Shellenber- 

ger, In.) 5827. 
Kidder, Mrs. Ida A., In. Oregon Agric. Coll. 

L., Cowallis, Ore. 3474. 
KIDDER, NATHANIEL T., chairman 

Board Trustees P. L., Milton, Mass. 

3969. Life member. 
Kieffer, John B., trus. Washington County 

F. L., Hagerstown, Md. (Address, P. O. 

Drawer no. 204.) 8820. 
Kiemle, Katherine, In. Benson Polytechnic 

Sch. L., Portland, Ore. 6812, 



512 



Kil Gour, M. Belle, In. F. P. L., Kearny, N. 

J. 3052. 
KiLbourn, Katharine, in charge Cataloging 

and Classifying Mechanics Inst. L., San 

Francisco, Calif. 8255. 
Kilburn, Mrs. M. F., In. Carnegie L., Talla- 

dega, Ala. 7413. 

Kimball, Arthur R., asst. in charge Bind- 
ing Div. L. of Congress, Washington, 

D. C. 862. 
Kimball, Mrs. Caroline Frances, ref. In. 

Withers P. L., Bloomington, 111. 2220. 
Kimball, Florence B., catlgr. P. L., Central 

Falls, R. I. 3996. 

KIMBALL, MARTHA S., trus. P. L., Ports- 
mouth, N. H. 8743. Life member. 
Kimball, Mary B., order and exchange 

asst. Minn. Historical Society L., St. 

Paul, Minn. 7302. 
Kindorf, Leona, asst. L. Assoc., Portland, 

Ore. 8482. 
King, Effalene Holden, art In. City L., 

Springfield, Mass. 5294. 
King, Florence, Immigrant Publication 

Co., N. Y. City. 8624. 
*King, James L., In. Kansas State L., To- 

peka, Kan. 3196. 
King, Margaret I., In. Univ. of Kentucky 

L., Lexington, Ky. 6222. 
Kingsland, Grace Edith, sec'y N. H. P. L. 

Commission, Concord, N. H. 7816. 
Kingsley, Dena M., asst. Div. of Documents 

L. of Congress, Washington, D. C. 6337. 
Kinkeldey, Otto, P. L., N. Y. City. 6655. 
Kinsman, Annis Louise, asst. to A. L. A. 

Field Representative, 517 State House, 

Boston, Mass. 8079. 
Kirk, Tillie M., Y. W. C. A. Hostess House, 

Camp Logan, Tex. 7999. 
Klrkland, Marian P., In. Gary Memorial 

L., Lexington, Mass. 1977. 
Kite, Anna A. W., asst. In. H. Josephine 

Widener Br. F. L., Philadelphia, Pa. 

7008. 
Klager, Karoline, asst. U. S. Bureau of 

Labor Statistics, Washington, D. C. 6338. 
Klingholz, Johanna, In. P. L., Stevens 

Point, Wis. 8821. 
Klumb, Anna M., In. Woodland Br. P. L., 

'Cleveland, Ohio. 8038. 
Knapp, Alice Louise, asst. Theological 



Sem. L., Geneva, N. Y. 6996. 

Knapp, Charles C., catlgr. Henry E. Hunt- 
ington L., 4 E. 57th St., N. Y. City. 6105. 

Knapp, Elisabeth, chief of Child. Dept. 
P. L., Detroit, Mich. 5423. 

Knapp, Ethel Marjorie, County Normal 
Instructor, Mich. State Bd. L. Commis- 
sioners, Lansing, Mich. 7534. 

Knapp, M. Winifred, catlgr. in charge Ind. 
Univ. L., Bloomington, Ind. 6008. 

Kneeland, Jessie, catlgr., L. United Engi- 
neering Societies, N. Y. City. 5366. 

Kneil, Margaret M., asst. to In. Girls' High 
Sch. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 7817. 

Knight, Marion A., Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 2661. 

Knodel, Emma, In. Guiteau L., Irvington- 
on-Hudson, N. Y. 7818. 

Knowles, Leah M., sec'y to In. F. P. L., 
Trenton, N. J. 5872. 

Knox, Rozella F., In. Montavilla Br. L. As- 
soc., Portland, Ore. 8483. 

Kobetich, Mary R., asst. Ref. Dept. P. L., 
Seattle, Wash. 7843. 

KOCH, THEODORE W., In. Northwestern 
Univ. L., Evanston, 111. 1752. Life 
member. 

Kohler, Minnie M., In. P. L., Moline, 111. 
2386. 

Kohn, Lydia E., catlgr. photographs and 
slides Art Institute Ryerson L., Chica- 
go, 111. 7638. 

Konert, Paul M., In. F. P. L., West Hobo- 
ken, N. J. 6656. 

Koopman, Harry Lyman, In. Brown Univ. 
L., Providence, R. I. 482. 

Kornhauser, Henrietta M., catlgr. Carnegie 
L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 8150. 

Kosek, Anna A., catlgr. Lincoln L., Spring- 
field, 111. 6795. 

Koster, Gail J., 1st asst. Hosmer Br. P. L., 
Detroit, Mich. 8423. 

Kostomlatsky, Zulema, asst. In. L. Assoc., 
Portland, Ore. 5894. 

Kramer, Katherine, 1858 Columbia Road, 
Washington, D. C. 7966. 

Kratz, Ethel G., In. P. L., Champaign, 111. 
6788. 

Krause, Louise B., In. H. M. Byllesby & 
Co., Engineers, Chicago, 111. 3041. 

Krauss, Bertha K., catlgr. P. L. Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 7466. 



HANDBOOK 



513 



Krouse, Edna L., In. F. P. L., Scottdale, 
Pa. 5608. 

Krug, Julia, chiei of Traveling L. Dept. P. 
L., St. Louis, Mo. 1349. 

Krull, Dorothea, asst. West Indianapolis 
P. L., Indianapolis, Ind. 8374. 

Krum, Gracie B., In. Burton Historical 
Collection P. L., Detroit, Mich. 2880. 

Kuhns, Jane I., 1st asst. P. L., Walla Wal- 
la, Wash. 7588. 

Kurtz, Emilie W., In. South Side Br. P. L., 
Youngstown, O. 7819. 

La Grange (III.) F. P. L. (Louise E. De- 
witt, In.) 5220. 

La Porte (Ind.) P. L. (Mrs. Jennie B. Jes- 
sup, In.) 6580*. 

LaSalle (III.) P. L. (Kathryne 'Coleman, 
In.) 7406. 

Lacy, Mary G., agricultural In. Iowa State 
Coll. L., Ames, Iowa. 3556. 

Lafayette (Ind.) P. L. (Mrs. Virginia Stein, 
In.) 5721. 

Laidlaw, Elizabeth, asst. In. State Normal 
Univ. L., Normal, 111. 7986. 

Laing, Hazel D., In. P. L., Buhl, Minn. 7731. 

Lake Forest Coll. L., Lake Forest, III. 
(Mabel Powell, In.) 6026. 

Lake Forest (III.) P. L. (Frances E. Kemp, 
In.) 6575. 

Lamar, Sarah, asst. Univ. of Ga. L., 
Athens, Ga. 7952. 

Lamb, Eliza, asst. classifier Univ. of Chi- 
cago L., Chicago, 111. 2548. 

Lamb, George H., In. Carnegie F. L., Brad- 
dock, Pa. 2750. 

Lamb, Lucy L, asst. Ref. Dept. City L., 
Springfield, Mass. 5321. 

Lammers, Sophia J., ref. In. Univ. of Neb. 
L., Lincoln, Neb. 5832. 

Lamprey, Mary Lavinia, In. Ames F. L., 

North Easton, Mass. 2452. 
Lancaster, Pa., A. Herr Smith Memorial 
L. (Helen E. Meyers, In.) 5014. 

Lancefield, Hilda M., asst. L. Association, 
Portland, Ore. 8625. 

Landon, Mrs. Linda E., In. Mich. Agricul- 
tural Coll. L., East Lansing, Mich. 5204. 

Lane, Agnes Sells, asst. Mending Dept. 
P. L., Indianapolis, Ind. 8375. 

Lane, Harriet, In. P. L., Freeport, 111. 2264. 



Lane, Mary E., In. Talladega Coll. L., Tal- 
ladega, Ala. 4933. 

Lane, William Coolidge, In. Harvard Coll. 
L., Cambridge, Mass. 472. 

Lane P. L. See Hamilton, Ohio. 

Langdon, Amelia E., catlgr. P. L., N. Y. 
City. 8626. 

Langdon, Grace T., catlgr. P. L., Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 7105. 

Lanquist, Ada M., In. Humboldt Br. P. L., 
Chicago, 111. 8256. 

Lansden, Effie A., sr. asst. P. L., Cairo, 111. 
7589. 

Lansing, Pauline D., chief Order Dept. P. 
L., Buffalo, N. Y. 5687. 

Laramie County P. L. See Cheyenne, Wyo. 

Larson, Mrs. Emily T., head asst. Catalog 
Dept. P. L., Chicago, 111. 6184. 

Lathrop, Helen, A. L. A. headquarters, 
10 Rue de 1'^lysee, Paris, France. 3719. 

Lathrop, Olive C., In. Detroit Bar Assoc. 
L., Detroit, Mich. 4860. 

Lathrop, Ruth M., In. High Sch. L., Rock- 
ford, 111. 8834. 

Lathrope, Eunice, 1630 Jefferson Ave., 
Scranton, Pa. 7772. 

Latimer, Louise P., director of Work with 
Children, P. L. of the District of Co- 
lumbia, Washington, D. C. 5235. 

Lauman, Caroline, asst. U. S. Marine Bar- 
racks L., Parris Island, S. C. 5145. 

Laurson, Edla, In. Carnegie L., Mitchell, 
S. D. 4393. 

Law, Marie Hamilton, asst. to the Princi- 
pal Carnegie L. Sch., Pittsburgh, Pa. 
5532. 

Lawler, Mrs. T. R., sec'y P. L., Rochester, 
Minn. 8202. 

Lawrence, Edith C., catlgr. Univ. of Chi- 
cago L., Chicago, 111. 7453. 

Lawrence, Juliet, P. L., Detroit, Mich. 8301. 

Lawrence, Mary S., child. In. L. of Hawaii, 

Honolulu, T. H. 7304. 

Lawrence (Kan.) F. P. L. (Virginia S. Ed- 
wards, In.) 4318. 

Lawrence (Mass.) P. L. (William A. 
Walsh, In.) 4148. 

Lawrenceville Sch. L. Lawrenceville, N. J. 
(Luella Colwell, In.) 7885. 

Laws, Anna C., asst. in charge of Shelf 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Listing L. of Congress, Washington, D. 

C. 4042. 
Laws, Mrs. Charles W., In. P. L., Park 

Ridge, N. J. 8627. 
Laws, Helen Moore, catlgr. Wellesley Coll. 

L., Wellesley, Mass. 7722. 
Lawson, Mildred H., catlgr. Trinity Coll. 

L., Hartford, Conn. 6941. 
Layman, Joseph D., In. Univ. of Nevada L., 

Reno, Nev. 924. 

Le Crone, Anna L., Faribault, Minn. 1642. 
Le Fevre, Helena S., In. Spies P. L., Me- 

nominee, Mich. 8628. 
Lea, Jessie, 1st asst. Contra Costa Co. F. 

L., Martinez, Cal. 6696. 
Leach, Hazel M., asst. N. Y. State L. Sch., 

Albany, N. Y. 7747. 
Leach, Howard Seavoy, ref. In. Princeton 

Univ. L., Princeton, N. J. 5874. 
Leaf, Grace M., In. State Nor. Sch. L., 

Ellensburg, Wash. 5605. 
Learned, Mrs. Walter (Helen Gay), 145 

East 49th St., N. Y. City. 1653. 
Lease, Evelyn S., In. Kellogg-Hubbard L., 

Montpelier, Vt. 2656. 
Leatherman, Marian, In. Camp L., Camp 

Eustis, Va. 6010. 

Leavenworth (Kan.) F. P. L. (Elsie Ev- 
ans, In.) 6664. 
Leavitt, Luella Katharine, In. People's L., 

Newport, R. I. 3742. 
Leavitt, Maria V., in charge Gifts P. L., 

N. Y. City. 5814.' 
Ledbetter, Mrs. Eleanor E., In. Broadway 

Br. P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 1751. 
Ledyard, Winifrid E., asst. P. L., Long 

Beach, Calif. 6452. 
Lee, Mrs. Blewett, 30 E. 60th St., N. Y. 

City. 3301. 
Lee, Emma, child. In. Houston Lyceum and 

Carnegie L., Houston, Tex. 7878. 
Lee, George Winthrop, In. of Stone & Web- 
ster, Boston, Mass. 2440. 
Lee, Marion, catlgr. Yale Univ. L., New 

Haven, Conn. 8257. 
Lee, Mary Cornelia, In. Carnegie F. P. L., 

Manhattan, Kan. 2759. 
Leechman, J. D. Technology Dept. P. L., 

Seattle, Wash. 8456. 
Leeds, Charles, chairman Bd. of Trustees 

P. L., Chelsea, Mass. 6769. 



Leete, John H., director Carnegie L., Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. 8231. 

Lefler, Grace, P. L., Los Angeles, Cal. 3063. 

Lehigh Univ. L., South Bethlehem, Pa. 
(John Lammey Stewart, director.) 4306. 

Lehmann, Elsie M., sr. asst. Morrisania 
Br. P. L., N. Y. City. 8629. 

Leighton, Edna M., asst. P. L., Long Beach, 
Calif. 8402. 

Leighton, Mrs. Flora H., in charge Circ. 
Millicent L., Fairhaven, Mass. 3597. 

Leipziger, Pauline, In. in charge 58th St. 
Br. P. L., N. Y. City. 2244. 

Leitch, Harriet E., In. Lakeside Hospital 
L., Cleveland, O. 4833. 

Leland Stanford Jr. Univ. *L., Stanford Uni- 
versity, Cal. (George T. Clark, In.) 5344. 

*Lemcke, Ernst, importer and bookseller, 
Lemcke & Buechner, 30-32 W. 27th St., 
N. Y. City. 1131. 

Lemcke, Hildegarde, 36 Fuller Terrace, 
Orange, N. J. 2842. 

Lemon, Mary Dyer, asst. in charge of Pub- 
licity P. L., Indianapolis, Ind. 8376. 

Lenox (Mass.) L. Assoc. (Edith O. Fitch, 
In.) 3957. 

Leonard, Grace Fisher, In. Providence 
Athenaeum, Providence, R. I. 1368. 

Leonard, Mary A., In. Hudson Park Br. P. 
L., N. Y. City. 4052. 

Lerch, Alice Hollister, "Reserve" Room 
American Hist. Div. P. L., N. Y. City. 
6965. 

Lesch, Rudolf, Art Publisher, N. Y. City. 
7107. 

Leslie, Eva G., child. In. Broadway Br. P. 
L., Cleveland, O. 5451. 

Lessey, Emma E., acting In. P. L., Derby, 
Conn. 8406. 

Lester, Clarence B., chief Dept. of Leg. 
Ref. Instruction Wis. F. L. Com., Madi- 
son, Wis. 4492. 

Letherman, Dorothy, catalog asst. P. L., 
Gary, Ind. 7526. 

Letson, Helen F., In. Bloomingdale Hospi- 
tal L., White Plains, N. Y. 6698. 

LEUPP, HAROLD L., In. Univ. of Cali- 
fornia L., Berkeley, Calif. 3033. Life 
member. 

Levi Heywood Mem. L. See Gardner, Mass. 



HANDBOOK 



515 



Levin, Emma, In. Logan Sq. Br. P. L., Chi- 
cago, 111. 7858.- 
Levin, Nathan R., div. chief Deposits Dept. 

P. L., Chicago, 111. 7236. 
Levy, Martha, In. William H. Smiley Br. 

P. L., Denver, Colo. 6934. 
Lewinson, Leah, In. 115th St. Br. P. L., 

N. Y. City. 5697. 
Lewis, Edwin T., trus. Cache County L., 

Logan, Utah. (Address, Box 506.) 8327. 
Lewis, Eleanor F., ref. In. and head of 

Circ. Dept. Northwestern Univ. L., Ev- 

anston, 111. 5546. 
Lewis, Frank G., In. Bucknell L. Crozer 

Theol. Sem. and American Baptist Hist. 

Soc., Chester, Pa. 5129. 
Lewis, George Lothrop, In. Northland Coll. 

L., Ashland, Wis. 3997. 
Lewis, Harriet R., In. P. L., Thompson, 

Conn. 5259. 
Lewis, Katherine, 4426 Lake Park Ave., 

Chicago, 111. 6401. 
Lewis, Mrs. Lottie M., catlgr. Carnegie F. 

L., Braddo<:k, Pa. 7009. 
Lewis, Marion B., City L. Assoc., Spring- 
field, Mass. 8334. 
Lewis, Sarah Virginia, supt. Circ. Dept. 

P. L., Seattle, Wash. 5362. 
Lewis, Willard P., In. N. H. State Coll. L., 

Durham, N. H. 5669. 
Lexington (Ky.) P. L. (Florence Dillard, 

In.) 3980. 

Lexington, Mass., Cary Memorial L. (Ma- 
rian P. Kirkland, In.) 4056. 
Ley, Rubie, 434 W. 120th St., N. Y. City. 

8080. 
L'Hommedieu, Alma J., In. Dayton St. Br. 

P. L., Cincinnati, O. 7331. 
Lhotka, Charles, div. supt. P. L., Chicago, 

111. 6226. 
Libbie, Frederick J., book auctioneer, 597 

Washington St., Boston, Mass. 2534. 
Libbie, Mrs. Frederick J., 35 Allston St., 

Dorchester Center, Mass. 2868. 
Library of Congress, Washington, D. C. 

(Herbert Putnam, In.) 3239. 
Liebergeld, Emily Z., In. N. Y. State Nor- 
mal Sch. L., New Paltz, N. Y. 8630. 
Liebmann, Estelle L., In. The Ronald 

Press L., 20 Vesey St., N. Y. City. 6087. 



Lien, Elias J., In. State L., St. Paul, Minn. 

5171. 
Lilley, Mrs. Adelaide, In. P. L., Eugene. 

Ore. 3389. 
Lilliequist, Lillie C., In. P. L., Aberdeen, 

Wash. 7303. 

Lilly, Elizabeth, child. In. F. P. L., Bur- 
lington, Iowa. 8631. 

Lincoln City L. See Medicine Lodge, Kan. 
Lindale, Grace, acting In. Haverford Coll. 

L,, Haverford, Pa. 8809. 
Lindberg, Thure H., Snead and Company 

Iron Works, Jersey City, N. J. 7761. 
Lindgren, Elin J., asst. ref. In. Pratt Inst. 

F. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 5876. 
Lindley, Walter, trus. P. L., Los Angeles, 

Calif. (Address, 1414 S. Hope St.) 8161. 
Lindsey, Eliza, ref. In. P. L., Fall River, 

Mass. 2820. 
Lindsey, Sadie, head Documents Div. Ref. 

Dept. P. L., Tacoma, Wash. 8030. 
Line, Sarah Ruth, catlgr. P. L., Indian- 
apolis, Ind. 8538. 
Lingenfelter, Mary Rebecca, In. U. S. 

Navy Yard L., Philadelphia, Pa. 7108. 
Linn, Mrs. Frances B., In. F. P. L., Santa 

Barbara, Cal. 4256. 

Linn, June, In. Woodbury Br. P. L., Den- 
ver, Colo. 3037. 
Linnemann, Rev. A., In. St. Joseph's Coll. 

L., Collegeville, Ind. 7434. 
Lippincott Co., J. B., Philadelphia, Pa. 5792. 
Little, C. A., pres. Board of Trustees 

Washington Co. F. L., Hagerstown, Md. 

(Address, 206 First Nat'l Bank Bldg.) 

8810. 
Little, Edna M., 1st asst. Broadway Br. 

P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 8753. 
Little, Elizabeth W., asst. Ref. Dept. P. L., 

Detroit, Mich. 8302. 

Little, Vivian Gray, In. F. P. L., Water- 
town, Wis. 7258. 
Little Rock (Ark.) P. L. (Beatrice Prall, 

In.) 6132. 
Littlejohn, Gertrude W., asst catlgr. P. L., 

Berkeley, Cal. 3610. 
Livesey, Bertha W., In. Hyde Park Br. P. 

L., Cincinnati, Ohio. 8724. 
Livingston, Martha E., In. Hearst F. L., 

Lead, S. D. 7844. 



516 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Lochbihler, Florence A., asst. P. L., De- 
troit, Mich. 8303. 

Locke, George H., chief In. P. L., Toronto, 
Can. 4605. 

Locke, Margaret S., asst. In. Boston Univ. 
Coll. of Business Administration L., Bos- 
ton, Mass. 7630. 

Lockhart, Zella M. ( In. P. L, Owensville, 
Ind. 7527. 

Lockwood, John S., library agent Library 
Bureau, 43 Federal St., Boston, Mass. 
351. 

Loewenberg, Zerlina, In. South Portland 
Br. L. Assoc., Portland, Ore. 8484. 

Logansport (Ind.) P. L. (Alice D. Stevens, 
In.) 4251. 

Lomer, G. R., In. McGill University L, 
Montreal, Canada. 8836. 

London, Eng. See Fulham L. 

London (Ont., Can.) P. L. (Fred Landon, 
In.) 4904. 

Long, Elizabeth V., asst. In. P. L., Jack- 
sonville, Fla. 6034. 

LONG, MRS. F. A., trus. P. L., Madison, 
Neb. 8785. Life member. 

Long, Harriet C., Madison, Neb. 4599. 

Long Beach (Cal.) P. L. (Zaidee Brown, 
In.) 4805. 

Longdon, Mrs. Mary E., In. Hawkes F. 
Children's L., Griffin, Ga. 7939. 

Longshore, Alice, In. Agnes Scott Coll. L, 
Decatur, Ga. 6889. 

Loomis, Nellie A., In. P. L., Columbus, Wis. 
4494. 

LORD, ISABEL ELY, director Sch. of 
Household Science & Art, Pratt Inst., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 1429. Life member. 

LORING, KATHARINE P., trus. P. L, 
Beverly, Mass. (Address, Prides Cross- 
ing, Mass.) 3071. Life member. 

Los Angeles County F. L., Los Angeles, 
Cal. (Celia Gleason, In.) 7335. 

Los Angeles (Cal.) P. L. (Everett R. Per- 
ry, In.) 2085. 

Loud, Abbie L., In. Tufts L., Weymouth, 
Mass. 53W. 

Louisville (Ky.) F. P. L. (George T. Set- 
tle, In.) 4274. 

Love, Cornelia S., asst. In. Univ. of North 
Carolina L., Chapel Hill, N. C. 5972. 



Love, Florence D., ref. In. P. L., Decatur, 
111. 6846. 

Love, Gladys E., In. Business Br. P. L., 
Municipal Bldg., Rochester, N. Y. 6262. 

Loveland (Colo.) P. L. (Mrs. Anna V. 
Duffield, In.) 7977. 

Lovell, Mildred Gould, child. In. Pratt In- 
stitute F. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 8522. 

Lovi, Henrietta, 3141 Warren Ave., Chi- 
cago, 111. 5469. 

Lovis, Marion, In. Stadium High Sch. Br. 
P. L., Tacoma, Wash. 7109. 

Lowe, John Adams, asst. In. P. L., Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. 3765. 

Lowell, Mrs. Albert Fay, trus. Levi Hey- 
wood Mem. L., Gardner, Mass. 8162. 

Lowes, Fanny E., In. Washington and Jef- 
ferson Coll. L, Washington, Pa. 8081. 

Lowry, Elizabeth, In. A. K. Smiley P. L, 
Redlands, Calif. 6700. 

Lucero, Isaac, Bureau of Science L., Man- 
ila, P. I. 7942. 

Lucht, Ida C., 1st asst. Carnegie West Br. 
P. L., Cleveland, O. 7571. 

Lucht, Julius, In. City L., Wichita, Kan. 
4732. 

Ludey, Mrs. Metta R., In. Jarvie Mem. L., 
Bloomfield, N. J. 2742. 

Luehrs, Nellie M., acting head Literature 
Div. P. L., Cleveland, O. 5399. 

Lund, Mrs. C. H., 1131 Tenth St., Douglas, 
Ariz. 3562. 

Lunt, Georgiana, In. P. L., Auburn, Me. 
7892. 

Lupfer, Mrs. C. M., Balboa Heights, Canal 
Zone. 5058. 

Lupton, Adele Wiley, 247 Belleville Ave., 
Newark, N. J. 8725. 

Luther, Mrs. Jessie W., ref. In. P. L., Su- 
perior, Wis. 8218. 

Lutkemeyer, Georgia, Southern Dept. 
Army Headquarters, Ft. Sam Houston, 
Tex. 6507. 

Luttrell, Laura Elizabeth, 1407 White Ave., 
Knoxville, Tenn. 6857. 

Lydenberg, Harry M., chief ref. In. P. L, 
N. Y. City. 2181. 

Lyman, Bertha H., ref. In. P. L, Provi- 
dence, R. I. 2447. 

Lyman, Frank, trus. P. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
(Address, 14 Wall St., N. Y. City.) 6144. 



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Lyman, Mary Elizabeth, trustee Lev! E. 

Coe P. L., Middlefield, Conn. 1227. 
Lynch, Julia T., asst. In. and catlgr. F. P. 

L., Salt Lake City, Utah. 7529. 
Lynn (Mass.) P. L. (Clarence Edgar Sher- 
man, In.) 160. 
Lyon, Eveline Crandall, In. Medical Sell. 

L., Univ. of Minn., Minneapolis, Minn. 

1703. 
Lytle, Josephine, In. P. L., Warren, Ohio. 

8726. 
Lytle, Mary, asst. In. P. L., Tacoma, Wash. 

4750. 
McAfee, Georgia G., head Extension Dept. 

P. L., Evansville, Ind. 7530. 
McArthur L. See Biddeford, Me. 
McBrearty, Kathleen, child. In. Divie B. 

Duffleld Br. P. L., Detroit, Mich. 8304. 
McBride, George M., asst. In. American 

Geographical Soc. L., N. Y. City. 7723. 
McCabe, Olivia, In. Highland Park Br. P. 

L., Des Moines, Iowa. 7821. 
McCardle, Sarah E., In.. Fresno Co. F. L., 

Fresno, Cal.. 5173. 
McCarnes, Mabel F., In. Longstreet L. of 

Peddie Inst., Hightstown, N. J. 6340. 
McCarthy, Ada Josephine, In. L. Supplies 

Dept. Democrat Printing Co., Madison, 

Wis. 4496. 
McCarthy, Charles, chief In. Leg. Ref. L., 

Madison, Wis. 2815. 
MacCarthy, Mary M., La Crescenta, Calif. 

7264. 
McCarthy, Mrs. William C., 225 E. Iliff 

Ave., Denver, Colo. 6902. 
McCauley, Pauline, Morganfleld, Ky. 6829. 
McChesney, Rosalie, asst. P. L., N. Y. City. 

8632. 
MacClean, E. A., In. Commission Co., N. 

Y. City. 3682. 
McClelland, Delphine Z., 808 Shelby St., 

Seattle, Wash. 5437. 
McClelland, Ellwood H., technology In. 

Carnegie L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 4567. 
McClelland, Maud, asst. In. 115th Street 

Br. P. L., N. Y. City. 7110. 
McCloud, Imri L., law-book seller Statute 

Law Book Co., 715 Colorado Bldg., Wash- 
ington, D. C. 6341. 
McCloy, Elizabeth J., asst. Oberlin Coll. L., 

Oberlin, Ohio. 8633. 



McClung, Quantrille D., In. Warren Br. P. 
L., Denver, Colo. 7742. 

McClure, Anne B., 561 Belleview PL, Mil- 
waukee, Wis. 8163. 

McClure, Mrs. Donald C., Denver, Colo. 
6610. 

McClure, John P., Camp L., Camp Travis, 
Tex. 8001. 

McClure, Mary 'N., asst. City L., Manches- 
ter, N. H. 7709. 

McCollough, Ethel F., In. P. L., Evans- 
ville, Ind. 2929. 

McCollough, Ruth Dorothy, In. F. P. L., 
Appleton, Wis. 6237. 

McCombs, Charles F., 1st asst. Readers' 
Div. P. L., N. Y. City. 5640. 

McCombs, Nelson W., In. Federal Reserve 
Board L., Washington, D. C. 8634. 

McConnell, Ruth L, general asst. P. L., De- 
troit, Mich. 8424. 

MacCormick, Emily C., asst. In. Winthrop 
Normal and Indus. Coll. L., Rock Hill, 
S. C. 8801. 

McCormick Theological Seminary, Virginia 
L., Chicago, III. (Rev. John F. Lyons, 
In.) 5636. 

McCoy, Helen R., ref. asst. P. L., Denver, 
Colo. 7905. 

McCoy, Raymond J., 2158 S. Sinton Ave., 
Cincinnati, O. 8258. 

McCracken, Helen E., child. In. Wylie Ave. 
Br. Carnegie L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 7639. 

MoCrea, Bess, A. L. A., N. Y. City. 6442. 

McCulloch, Frances S., acting br. In. 
Chauncy Hurlbut Br. P. L., Detroit, 
Mich. 8305. 

McCulloch, R. W., In. Sweet Briar Coll. L., 
Sweet Briar, Va. 8232. 

McCullough, Emma K., In. Fremont Br. 
P. L., Seattle, Wash. 6456. 

McCurdy, Robert M., editorial asst. Dou- 
b'leday, Page and Co., Garden City, N. Y. 
2787. 

McDaniel, Arthur S., asst. In. Assoc. of 
the Bar, 42 W. 44th St., N. Y. City. 
1961. 

Macdonald, Mrs. A. C., In. P. L., St. 
Thomas, Ont, Can. 5506. 

MacDonald, Anna A., consulting In. L. Ex- 
tension Div., State L. and Museum, Har- 
risburg, Pa. 1793. 



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AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



MacDonald, Anne C., asst. P. L., Detroit, 

Mich. 8306. 

McDonald, Jeannette, head Dept. of Eng- 
lish High Sch. of Commerce, Omaha, 

Neb. 8635. 
McDonnell, Pearl, periodical In. Univ. of 

Washington L., Seattle, Wash. 2314. 
McDonough, Mrs. J. H., trus. P. L., Dallas, 

Tex. (Address, 3009 Maple Ave.) 8164. 
McDonough, M. F., 223 S. Front St., Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 3615. 
McDowell, Ella R., In. Camp L., Camp 

Devens, Mass. 7238. 
MacDowell, Ethel, In. P. L., Ashtabula, 

Ohio. 8523. 
McDowell, Grace E., In. Eastern Parkway 

Br. P. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 2669. 
McEwen, J. H., vice-pres. P. L., Youngs- 
town, Ohio. 7297. 
McGahen, Mrs. Rebecca B., 50 Linden Ave., 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 7113. 
McGarvey, Marie F., asst. In. Logan Br. F. 

L., Philadelphia, Pa. 8524. 
MacGill, Bessie, asst. In. Austin Br. P. L., 

Chicago, 111. 8786. 

McGirr, Alice T., asst. ref. In. Carnegie L., 
* Pittsburgh, Pa. 3998. 
McGlenn, Alma Reid, In. P. L., Tulsa, Okla. 

5970. 
McGovern, Frances, In. Technical L. B. F. 

Goodrich Co., Akron, Ohio. 8636. 
McGuffey, Margaret, social worker Christ 

Church Parish House, Cincinnati, O. 

1084. 
McHale, Daisy I., In. Fuller Park Br. P. L., 

Chicago, 111. 6935. 
Machen, Lewis, director Leg. Ref. Bureau, 

Richmond, Va. 6342. 
Mcllroy, Ellen C., In. Kensington Br. P. L., 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 6453. 
Mcllwaine, Henry R., In. Virginia State L., 

Richmond, Va. 4295. 
Mclntire, Ella, In. Huron Coll. L., Huron, 

S. D. 5018. 
Mclntosh, Margaret, head Book Section 

and Order Dept. P. L., Milwaukee, Wis. 

5367. 
McKay, Elsie, asst. In. P. L., Evansville, 

Ind. 7447. 

McKay, Mabel, In. Y. M. A. Pruyn L., Al- 
bany, N. Y. 2786. 



Mackay, Margaret S., asst. in charge 
Regional Bureau for Canada, Internat'l 
Catalog of Scientific Literature, McGill 
Univ. L., Montreal, Canada. 1543. 

McKay, Mary Nell, ref. In. Mich. State L., 
Lansing, Mich. 6919. 

McKee, Alice D., ref. asst. Ohio State 
Univ. L., Columbus, Ohio. 6272. 

McKee, Syrena, 517 Chestnut St., Leaven- 
worth, Kan. 2254. 

McKillop, Samuel A., dir. of Extensions P. 
L., Milwaukee, Wis. 4603. 

MacKinnon, Mrs. Elizabeth McNeish, Ber- 
wick, Nova Scotia. 2419. 

McKinnon, Nell, asst. Carnegie L., Atlan- 
ta, Ga. 7953. 

McKinstry, Laura L., trus. P. L., San 
Francisco, Calif. (Address, 2988 Pacific 
Ave.) 8165. 

McKinstry, Ruth E., In. World's Student 
Christian Federation L., 347 Madison 
Ave., N. Y. City. 8525. 

McKnight, Elizabeth B., In. Bay Ridge 
High Sch. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 4399. 

McLachlan, Honora C., child. In. Franklin 
Br. P. L., Minneapolis, Minn. 8727. 

MacLachlan, Margaret, head of Circ. Dept. 
L. Assoc., Portland, Ore. 3397. 

McLachlan, Nancy Caldwell, In. F. P. L., 
Hannibal, Mo. 5504. 

McLean, Bessie C., 1223 Vermont Ave., 
Washington, D. C. 8203. 

McLean, Ruth B., catlgr. Conn. State L., 
Hartford, Conn. 8457. 

McLenegan, Charles E., In. P. L., Milwau- 
kee, Wis. 5054. 

McLoney, Ella M., head of Book Promotion 
Dept. P. L., Des Moines, la. 1181. 

McMahon, Eva I., asst. In. Northern 111. 
Normal Sch. L., DeKalb, 111. 6847. 

McMahon, Lillian J., In. Schermerhorn Br. 
P. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 3853. 

McManis, Rumana K., In. Camp L., Camp 
Jackson, S. C. 6912. 

McMillen, James A., In. Washington Univ. 
L., St. Louis, Mo. 6254. 

McMullen, Elizabeth, asst. Iowa State 
Coll. L., Ames, la. 6903. 

McNaier, Emilie, asst. .A. L. A. Dispatch 
Office, 31 W. 15th St., N. Y. City. 8166. 



HANDBOOK 



519 



A.acNair, Mary W., asst. Catalog Div. L. of 
Congress, Washington, D. C. 2744. 

MacNair, Rebecca S., asst. catlgr. Los An- 
geles County F. L., Los Angeles, Cal. 
6568. 

McNamara, H. Katherine, asst. to In. Sch. 
of Landscape Architecture L. Harvard 
Univ., Cambridge, Mass. 8637. 

MCNEIL, LAILA ADELAIDE, Middiebury 

Coll. L., Middiebury, Vt. 3635. Life 

member. 
McNeill, Norah, In. P. L., Richmond, Calif. 

7940. 
McNiece, Mrs. Jessie Sargent, chief Circ. 

Dept. P. L., St. Louis, Mo. 5372. 
MacPherson, Harriet D., catlgr. Columbia 

Univ. L., N. Y. City. 8638. 
Macpherson, Maud R., acting In. Oregon 

State L., Salem, Ore. 4498. 
McQuigg, Mrs. Kate Meade, In. Lord and 

Thomas L., Chicago, 111. 7617. 
McRaith, Helen, In. P. L., Iowa City, la. 

6770. 
McShane, L. L., mgr. Kansas City Office, 

Dodd, Mead & Company, Kansas City, 

Mo. 7255. 
MacTarnaghan, Mrs. W. G., 308 W. 107th 

St., N. Y. City. 4696. 
Macurdy, Theodosia Endicott, chief Order 

Dept. P. L., Boston, Mass. 1707. 
McVeety, Mrs. Ethel, In. N. D. Agric. Coll. 

L., Fargo, N. D. 4499. 

McVittie, Mrs. J. A., 436 Eighth St., Rich- 
mond, Cal. 5913. 

McWilliams, Edith M., Continental Guar- 
anty Corporation, 248 Madison Ave., N. 

Y. City. 6913. 
Madden, Pauline, In. Chouteau County F. 

L., Fort Benton, Mont. 8042. 
Madison (N. J.) P. L. (Norma B. Bennett, 

In.) 3609. 
Magill, H. N. W. asst. A. L. A. Dispatch 

Office, 31 W. 15th St., N. Y. City. 8082. 
Maginn, Gertrude, sec'y to In. Univ. of 

Michigan L., Ann Arbor, Mich. 8167. 
Mahoney, Ann, assj;. Spades Park Br. P. L., 

Indianapolis, Ind. 8377. 
Mahony, Bertha E., dir. The Bookshop 

for Boys and Girls, Women's Educa- 
tional and Indus. Union, 264 Boylston 
St., Boston, Mass. 7533. 



Maiden, Grace, In. North End Br. P. L., 
Bridgeport, Conn. 8233. 

Maine State L., Augusta, Me. (H. E. Dun- 
nack, In.) 5996. 

Maine University L., Orono, Me. (Ethel 
G. Wigmore, asst. In. in charge.) 4289. 

Major, Antoinette V., 2nd asst. Lending 
Dept. P. L., New Rochelle, N. Y. 8168. 

Makepeace, Mary E., In. R. I. State Nor- 
mal Sch. L., Providence, R. I. 7117. 

Maiden (Mass.) P. L. (Herbert W. Fison, 
In.) 4076. 

Malone, Eva E., head catlgr. Trinity Coll. 
L., Durham, N. C. 5971. J 

Malone, Marcella. br. In. Queens Borough 
P. L., Jamaica, N. Y. 5896. 

Malone, Maud, sr. asst. P. L., N. Y. City. 
8843. 

Malone, Tennessee, In. West Tex. State 
Normal Coll. L., Canyon, Tex. 5387. 

Man, Mary Louise, asst. L. Assoc., Port- 
land, Ore. 6701. 

Manche, Helene, asst. P. L., Cleveland, 
Ohio. 5477. 

Manchester, Earl N., head Read. Dept. 
Univ. of Chicago L., Chicago, 111. 3986. 

Manchester (England) P. F. Libraries. 
(Charles W. Sutton, In.) 4388. 

Manchester (N. H.) City Library. (F. Ma- 
bel Winchell, In.) 4167. 

Manhart, George B., 706 S. Locust St., 
Greencastle, Ind. 8002. 

Manitoba, Provincial L. of, Winnipeg, Can 
ada. 7289. 

Mankato (Minn.) F. P. L. (Flora F. Carr, 
In.) 5132. 

Manley, Marian C., head of Office F. P. L. 
Newark, N. J. 7118. 

Manly, W. H., vice-pres. L. Board P. L., 
Birmingham, Ala. (Address, Birming- 
ham Trust and Savings Co.) 8169. 

Mann, Anne I., catlgr. Columbia Univ. L., 

N. Y. City. 4629. 

MANN, BENJAMIN PICKMAN, bibliog- 
rapher, 1918 Sunderland Place, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 200. Life member. 
Mann, Elizabeth E., head catlgr. Smith 

Coll. L., Northampton, Mass. 4630. 
Mann, Gertrude E., In. P. L.. Bartow, 
Fla. 8811. 



520 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Mann, Laura N., In. Central High Sch. L.. 

Washington, D. C. 5928. 
Mann. Leonora C., asst. Art Book Room 

P. L., Minneapolis, Minn. 8204. 
Mann, Margaret, head catlgr. United En- 
gineering Societies L., 29 W. 39th St., 

N. Y. City. 1527. 
Manning, Anna L., 1st asst. Child. Room 

P. L., Boston, Mass. 8769. 
Manning, Ethelwyn, head catlgr. Amherst 

Coll. L., Amherst, Mass. 8526. 
Manning, Harriet, In. Riverside Br. P. L., 

Indianapolis, Ind. 8378. 
Maplewood (N. J.) P. L. (Mrs. Nicholas 

Arrowsmith, In.) 8527. 
Marion, Guy E., director Records Section 

Community Motion Picture Bureau, 46 

W. 24th St., N. Y. City. 4846. 
Marion (Ohio) P. L. (Helen L. Kramer, 

In.) 4343. 
Markham, Hildreth Dana, asst. Juvenile 

Dept. P. L., Pasadena, Calif. 7710. 
Markowitz, Augusta, In. Woodstock Br. 

P. L., N. Y. City. 5846. 
Marks, Mary E., asst. In. Univ. of Wyo- 
ming L., Laramie, Wyo. 6263. 
Marlboro (Mass.) P. L. (John P. McGee, 

In.) 6930. 
Marquand, Fanny E., reviser Ref. Catalog 

Dept. P. L., N. Y. City. 3999. 
Marquette, Mich. Peter White P. L. (Alma 

A. Olson, In.) 4793. 

Marron, Joseph F., In. F. P. L., Jackson- 
ville, Fla. 7426. 
Marsh, Margaret B., acting In. F. L., Port 

Jervis, N. Y. 8025. 
Marshall, Jane R. G., asst. state organizer 

Ind. P. L. Commission, Indianapolis, Ind. 

8829. 
Marshall, Mabel E., asst. In. Ind. State 

'Normal Coll. L., Terre Haute, Ind. 6789. 
Marshall, Mary L., head catlgr. P. L., Kala- 

mazoo, Mich. 6524. 
Marshalltown (Iowa) P. L. (Gallic Wieder, 

In.) 4305. 
Marston, Maud W., child. In. Magnus But- 

zel Br. P. L., Detroit, Mich. 8425. 
Martel, Charles, chief of Catalog Div. L. 

of Congress, Washington, D. C. 1685. 
Martin, Arabel, head of Circ. Dept. P. L., 

Minneapolis, Minn. 4501. 



Martin, Deborah Beaumont, In. Kellogg P. 
L., Green Bay, Wis. 2328. 

Martin, Helen, child. In. P. L., East Cleve- 
land, O. 7651. 

Martin, I. J., trus. P. L., Sullivan, 111. 8083. 

Martin, Lena, In. P. L., Gadsden, Ala. 3979. 

Martin, Marjorie H., asst. to A. L. A. Hos- 
pital L. Representative, 31 W. 15th St., 
N. Y. City. 8335. 

Martin, Mary P., In. P. L. ABSOC., Canton, 
Ohio. 1739. 

Martin, May Louise, 1st asst. Carnegie 
West Br. P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 3039. 

Martin, Phyllis McF., reviser Ref. Catalog 
Dept. P. L., N. Y. City. 5973. 

Marvin, Cornelia, In. Oregon State L., Sa- 
lem, Ore. 1514. 

Marx, Henry F., In. P. L., Easton, Pa. 3643. 

Maryland Medical & Chirurgical Faculty 
L., 1211 Cathedral St., Baltimore, Md. 
(Marcia C. Noyes, In.) 5131. 

Mason, Alfred D., sec'y Board of Directors 
Cossitt L., Memphis, Tenn. 7437. 

Mason, Mrs. Anna P., In. Barr Br. P. L., St. 
Louis, Mo. 6543. 

Mason, Julia A., In. P. L., Franklin, Ind. 
5405. 

Mason City (la.) P. L. (Mrs. Bertha S. 
Baird, In.) 6621. 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
Cambridge, Mass. (Robert P. Bigelow, 
In.) 5691. 

Massachusetts State L., Boston, Mass. (Ed- 
ard H. Redstone, In.) 6413. 

Massee, May, editor The Booklist, 78 E. 
Washington St., Chicago, 111. 3695. 

Mast, Clara, in charge South High Sch. Br. 
P. L., Grand Rapids, Mich. 7536 

Masterson, F. Adele, child. In. Prospect 
Br. P. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 6749. 

Mather, Edith, In. F. P. L., Bound Brook, 
N. J. 8340. 

Mather, Rose M., Plainfield, 111. 6668. 

Mathes, Mary E., 655 Milwaukee St., Mil- 
waukee, Wis. 5126. 

Mathews, Jeanette, 1st asst. Delivery Dept. 
P. L., Indianapolis, Ind. 8379. 

Mathews, Mary E., In. Macon Br. P. L., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 2100. 

Mathiews, Franklin K., chief scout In. Boy 



521 



Scouts of America, 200 Fifth Ave., N. Y. 

City. 6343. 
Mathis, Floy Gladys, asst. P. L., Seattle, 

Wash. 8728. 
Mattern, Johannes, asst. In. Johns Hopkins 

Univ. L., Baltimore, Md. 6249. 
Matthews, Charles Grant, In. Ohio Univ. 

Carnegie L., Athens, O. 3260. 
Matthews, Etta L., asst. In. U. S. Forests 

Products-Laboratory L. Madison, Wis. 

5742. 
Matthews, Evelyn L., In. State Normal Sch. 

L., Indiana, Pa. 8468. 
Matthews, Harriet Louise, Lynn, Mass. 

807. 
Matthews, Irene Estella, In. High Sch. L., 

Dubuque, la, 6657. 
Matthews, Mary, Atlanta, Ga. 7954. 
Mattoon (III.) P. L. (Blanche Gray, In.) 

6614. 
Mauch Chunk, Pa. Dimmick Memorial L. 

(Inez Grand le, In.) 7324. 
Maurice, Nathalie Adams, 185 E. Post Rd., 

Mamaroneck, N. Y. 3781. 
Mawson, C. O. S., 35 Hampden Hall, Cam- 
bridge, Mass. 7823. 
Maxwell, Louise, asst. In. Indiana Univ. 

L., Bloomington, Ind. 1816. 
Mayes, Olive, In. Alabama Girls' Tech. 

Inst. L., Montevallo, Ala. 6228. 
Maynard, George S., technical In. P. L., 

Boston, Mass. 8469. 
Maynard, Glyde, In. Polytechnic High Sch. 

L., Long Beach, Calif. 8275. 
Maynard, Mildred, juvenile supervisor P. 

L., Waterloo, Iowa. 8433. 
Mead, Elizabeth L., catlgr. Greenwich 

High Sch. L., Greenwich, Conn. 8639. 
Mead, Herman Ralph, catlgr. Henry E. 

Huntington L., 4 E. 57th St., N. Y. City. 

2749. 
Meadville Theological Sch. L., Meadville, 

Pa. (Walter C. Green, In.) 5256. 
Medford (Mass.) P. L. (Abby L. Sargent, 

In.) 3604. 
Medicine Lodge (Kan.) Lincoln City L. 

(Mrs. M. B. Kathrens, In.) 7867. 
Medlicott, Mary, ref. In. City L., Spring- 
field, Mass. 780. 

Meehan, Lina, asst. A. L. A. Dispatch 
Office, Newport News, Va. 8039. 



Meigs, Emily B., asst. Brownsville Chil- 
dren's Br. P. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 3645. 
Meisel, Max, 16 Linden St., Brooklyn, N. 

Y. 6893. 
Melbourne, Australia, P. L. of Victoria. 

See Victoria. 
Melcher, Frederick G., vice-president R. 

R. Bowker Co., 62 W. 45th St., N. Y. 

City. 7893. 

Melcher, Mary M., Laconia, N. H. 3767. 
Melchers, Nelle C., head Circ. Dept. Univ. 

of Minnesota L., Minneapolis, Minn. 8040. 
Melnikow, Esther, P. L. Detroit, Mich. 

8307. 
Melvill, Jessie D., asst. L. Assoc., Portland, 

Ore. 2262. 
Memphis, Tenn. Cossit L. (Charles D. 

Johnston, In.) 4210. 
Menig, Alma, In. L. of Medical Society of 

the City and County of Denver, Denver, 

Colo. 6942. 
Mensel, Mary, child. In. P. L., Brooklyn, N. 

Y. 8640. 

Merced County F. L., Merced, Cal. (Win- 
ifred H. Bigley, In.) 6757. 
Meredith, Roberta, Oskaloosa, la. 8031. 
Meriden (Conn.) Curtis Mem. L. (Corinne 

A. Deshon, In.) 5719. 
Merrill, Bertha H., book buyer and catlgr. 

P. L. of Calumet & Hecla Mining Co., 

Calumet, Mich. (Address, 12 Ashburton 

Place, Boston, Mass.) 1786. 
Merrill, Julia Wright, instructor Univ. of 

Wis. L. Sch., and field visitor Wis. F. L. 

Commission, Madison, Wis. 2350. 
Merrill, William Stetson, head of Ref. 

Service Div. Newberry L., Chicago, 111. 

1166. 

Merry, Mrs. Mildred McAfee, child. In. (Ex- 
tension Div.) P. L., N. Y. City. 7864. 
Merwin, Mrs. N. H., Jr., 2428 Hillman St., 

Youngstown, O. 7912. 
Messer, Angie, In. P. and Sch. L., Manis- 

tee, Mich. 4932. 
Mestre, Rosa, catlgr. Metropolitan Museum 

of Art L., N. Y. City. 6345. 
Metcalf, Keyes D., executive asst. P. L., 

N. Y. City. 5670. 
Metropolitan Museum of Art L., N. Y. City. 

(William Clifford, In.) 6819. 
Mettee, Andrew H., In. L. Company of Bal- 



522 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



timore Bar, 329 Court House, Baltimore, 
Md. 4103. 

Metz, Corinne A., 20 North, 1st St., New- 
ark, O. 3828. 

Meulendyke, Marie, attendant Exposition 
Park Br. P. L., Rochester, N. Y. 8641. 

Meusdorffer, Carrie, In. Peninsula Br. L. 
Assoc., Portland, Ore. 8485. 

Meyer, Amy L., P. L., Detroit, Mich. 8308. 

MEYER, HERMAN H. B., chief bibliog- 
rapher L. of Congress, Washington, D. 
C. 715. Life member. 

Meyer, Milton W., A. L. A., N. Y. City. 
7967. 

Miami Univ. L., Oxford, O. (S. J. Branden- 
burg, In.) 4766. 

Michigan State L., Lansing, Mich. (Mrs. 
Mary C. Spencer, In.) 4144. 

Michigan State Normal Coll. L., Ypsilanti, 
Mich. (G. M. Walton, In.) 4815. 

Michigan Univ. General L., Ann Arbor, 
Mich. (W. W. Bishop, In.) 4341. 

Middleton, Jean Y., catlgr. Forbes L., 
Northampton, Mass. 941. 

Milam, Carl H., director Enlarged Pro- 
gram of the A. L. A., N. Y. City. 4023. 

Millar, Ethel Key, In. Hendrix Coll. L., 
Conway, Ark. 8170. 

Millener, Mrs. Jessie Scott, with Y. M. C. A., 
Plymouth, England. 7121. 

Miller, Agnes, In. F. P. L., Princeton, N. J. 
6346. 

Miller, Clara, In. McClymonds P. L., Mas- 
sillon, O. 4882. 

Miller, Edmund W., In. F. P. L., Jersey 
City, N. J. 6974. 

Miller, Edyth L., In. Rockefeller Founda- 
tion, N. Y. City. 4695. 

Miller, Emily Van Dora, ref. In. P. L., 
Birmingham, Ala. 6241. 

Miller, Eunice H., asst. Economics Div. P. 

L., N. Y. City. 7631. 
Miller, Grace, In. D. A. Wells Econ. L., 

City L., Springfield, Mass. 2455. 
Miller, Jeannette, asst. P. L., Asbury Park, 

N. J. 8205. 
Miller, Louise V., In. F. L., Dobbs Ferry, 

N. Y. 8084. 
Miller, Mabel V., In. High Sch. L., South 

Bend, Ind. 7773. 



Miller, Mrs. Minnie Dearing, In. Jefferson 
Br. F. P. L., Louisville, Ky. 7377. 

Miller, Ruth B., asst. Washington Park Br. 
P. L., St. Joseph, Mo. 8206. 

Miller, Ruth T., child. In. Normal Training 
Sch. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 5897. 

Miller, Sarah E., 1st asst. P. L., East Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 8085. 

Miller, Wharton, asst. In. P. L., Syracuse, 
N. Y. 6055. 

Miller, Zana K., In. Library Bureau, 6 N. 
Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 2752. 

Millicent L. See Fairhaven, Mass. 

Mills, M. Eleanor, 1st asst. Extension Div. 
P. L., N. Y. City. 2206. 

Milner, Ange V., In. Illinois State Normal 
Univ. L., Normal, 111. 1185. 

Miltimore, Louise, In. Am. Inst. of Ac- 
countants L., N. Y. City. 7014. 

Milton (Mass.) P. L. (Carrie S. Allen, In. 
in charge.) 3984. 

Milwaukee (Wis.) P. L. (Charles E. Mc- 
Lenegan, In.) 1509. 

Miner, Helen E., In. Yankton Coll. L., 
Yankton, S. D. 5393. 

Minier, Mrs. A. L., member L. Board P. L., 
Tyndall, S. D. 8219. 

Minneapolis (Minn.) P. L. (Gratia A. Coun- 
tryman, In.) 4363. 

Minnesota Department of Education, L. 
Division, St. Paul, Minn. (Clara F. 
Baldwin, library director.) 4739. 

Minnesota Hist. Soc., St. Paul, Minn. (C. 
Edward Graves, In.) 6532. 

Minnesota State Normal Sch. L. Moor- 
head, Minn. 4995. 

Minnesota Univ. L., Minneapolis, Minn. (J. 
T. Gerould, In.) 5727. 

Minot (N. D.) P. L. (Margaret Greene, In.) 
5747. 

Mirick, Lilian, In. State Sch. -of Science L., 
Wahpeton, N. D. 2916. 

Missionary Research L., 25 Madison Ave., 
N. Y. City. (Hollis W. Hering, In.) 4344. 

Mississippi State L., Jackson, Miss. (Mrs. 
W. F. Marshall, In.) 6391. 

Missouri Univ. L., Columbia, Mo. (Henry 
O. Severance, In.) 5019. 

Missouri University School of Mines and 
Metallurgy L., Rolla, Mo. (Harold L. 
Wheeler, In.) 5811. 



HANDBOOK 



523 



riitchell, Emily Burns, asst. Manuscripts 
Div. L. of Congress, Washington, D. C. 
5338. 

Mitchell, Ethel L., asst. In. Univ. of Utah 
L., Salt Lake City, Utah. 7332. 

Mitchell, Marguerite, assoc. In. Ohio Wes- 
leyan Univ. L., Delaware, Ohio. 6784. 

Mitchell, Sarah Louise, In. Ryerson L., Art 
Inst., Chicago, 111. 6462. 

Mitchell, Sydney B., asst. In. U. of Gal. L., 
Berkeley, Gal. 2646. 

Moderwell, Mabel C., sr. asst. Butler House 
Br. P. L., Chicago, 111. 8234. 

Moehlman, Lillian, catlgr. F. L., Madison, 
Wis. 7697. 

Molleson, Susan M., sr. Asst. P. L., N. Y. 
City. 6966. 

Molnar, Ida B. L., In. Melrose Br. P. L., N. 
Y. City. 7124. 

Monchow, Carlina Mavis, In. F. L., Dun- 
kirk, N. Y. 3757. 

Monrad, Anna M., reviser Yale Univ. L., 
New Haven, Conn. 5525. 

Montague, H. Ruth, In. Gresham Br. L. 
Assoc., Portland, Ore. 8486. 

Montana State Hist. & Miscellaneous L., 
Helena, Mont. (W. Y. Pemberton, In.) 
4262. 

Montclair (N. J.) F. P. L. (Alta M. Barker, 
In.) 4775. 

Montfort, Frank P., In. Carnegie L., 
Greensburg, Ind. 8770. 

Montgomery, Edna Lois, asst. Schermer- 
horn Br. P. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 8259. 

Montgomery, Lueva, In. Albany County P. 
L., Laramie r Wyo. 5260. 

Montgomery, Ruth, sub. In. Leg. Ref. Sec. 
N. Y. State L., Albany, N. Y. 7748. 

MONTGOMERY, THOMAS L., In. and di- 
rector Stale L. and Museum, Harris- 
burg, Pa. 853. Life member. 

Montgomery, Mrs. Thomas L., care of 
State L., Harrisburg, Pa. 3831. 

Montgomery L. Assoc., Montgomery, Ala. 
(Laura M. Elmore, In.) 4628. 

Montilla, Luis, chief Catalog Div., Philip- 
pine L. and Museum, Manila, P. I. 7393. 

Montpelier, Vt. Kellogg-Hubbard L. (Eve- 
lyn S. Lease, In.) 4776. 

Montross, S. Elizabeth, sr. asst. John 
Crerar L., Chicago, 111. 2366. 



Moody, Grace A., asst. University of Min- 
nesota L., Minneapolis, Minn. 8837. 
Moody, Katharine T., ref. In. P. L., St. 

Louis, Mo. 1686. 

Moon, Edith C., Morrisville, Pa. 6348. 
Mooney, Clara M., In. Ginsburg Br. P. L., 

Detroit, Mich. 8309. 
Moore, Adelaide, asst. Delivery Dept. P. 

L., Indianapolis, Ind. 8380. 
Moore, Annie Carroll, supervisor of Work 

with Child., P. L., N. Y. City. 1428. 
Moore, Dora, catlgr. Colgate Univ. L., 

Hamilton, N. Y. 4000. 
Moore, Edna G., class. P. L., Detroit, Mich. 

7845. 
Moore, Mabel B., child. In. P. L., Detroit, 

Mich. 6705. 
Moran, Nina M. K., asst. in charge Rhodes 

L. Station P. L., Tacoma, Wash. 6545. 
Morgan, Ella S., In. Lincoln High Sch., Los 

Angeles, Cal. 6706. 

Morgan, Helen Harrison, sr. asst. Jack- 
son Sq. Br. P. L., N. Y. City. 7127. 
Morgan, Joy E., stud. N. Y. State L. Sch., 

Albany, N. Y. 7632. 
Morgan, Lucy L., instructor apprentices P. 

L., Detroit, Mich. 5990. 
Morgan, Nettie V., In. Piedmont Br. F. .L., 

Oakland, Cal. 6707. 
Morley, Linda H., In. Business Br. F. P. 

L., Newark, N. J. 4590. 
Morris, Alice S., ref. asst. Ohio State Univ. 

L., Columbus, Ohio. 8540. 
Morris, Deborah, architectural In. Univ. 

of Pennsylvania L., Philadelphia, Pa. 

8642. 
Morris, F. M., bookseller, 24 N. Wabash 

Ave., Chicago, 111. 2212. 
MORRIS, LOUISE R., Summit, N. J. 3484. 

Life member. 
Morris, May, asst. to circ. and ref. In. 

Bryn Mawr Coll. L., Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

7698. 
Morrison, Mrs. H. D., 146 Broad St., 

Charleston, S. C. 7968. 
Morrison, Noah Farnham, bookseller, 314- 

318 West Jersey St., Elizabeth, N. J. 

3453. 
Morse, Alice W., In. F. P. L., Edgewood, 

R. I. 3096. 



524 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Morse, Edith R., In. Ballard Br. P. L., 
Seattle, Wash. 8458. 

Mortimer, Emma T., asst. F. P. L., Vine- 
land, N. J. 7846. 

Mortimer, Mignonette S., trus. P. L., Graf- 
ton, Mass. 8345. 

Morton, Gertrude, catlgr. Iowa Masonic L., 
Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 5309. 

Morton, Joy G., catlgr. Cossitt L., Mem- 
phis, Tenn. 7422. 

Morton, Mary E., 1730 Middlefleld Road, 
Palo Alto, Cal. 5698. 

Morton, Nellie, In. Brandywine Br. Wil- 
mington Inst. F. L., Wilmington, Del. 
6454. 

Morton, Richard L., Camp L., Camp Lee, 
Va. 8171. 

Moser, Mary, In. Lincoln Center Br. P. L., 
Chicago, 111. 7572. 

Mosher, Lovila M., In. State Normal Sch. 
L., River Falls, Wis. 4401. 

Mosher, Marion Dix, In. Genesee Br. P. L., 
Rochester, N. Y. 5352. 

Moth, Axel, chief of Ref. Catalog Div. P. 
L., N. Y. City. 5088. 

Moulton, Carrie O., 75 Park St., West Rox- 
bury, Mass: 7989. 

Moulton, John Grant, In. P. L., Haverhill, 
Mass. 1172. 

Mudge, Isadore Gilbert, ref. In. Columbia 
Univ. L., N. Y. City.' 2219. 

Mueser, Emilie, Catalog Dept. United En- 
gineering Societies L., 29 West 39th St., 
N. Y. City. 7130. 

Mulford, Fanny A., pres. Hempstead L., 
Hempstead, N. Y. 6525. 

Mulheron, Anne Morton, L. Association, 
Portland, Ore. 6905. 

Mullen, Mary R., asst. Ala. Dept. of Ar- 
chives and History, Montgomery, Ala. 
4713. 

Mumford, E. W., care Penn Pub. Co., 927 
Filbert St., Philadelphia, Pa. 6418. 

Mumford, Rosalie, chief Order Dept. P. L., 
Detroit, Mich. 2785. 

Muncie (Ind.) P. L. (Mary Torrance, In.) 
4802. 

Munroe, Emma F., Committee on Libra- 
ries Woman's Education Assoc., 17 Traill 
St., Cambridge, Mass. 5929. 



Munson, Sarah L., P. L., Detroit, Mich. 

8310. 
Murch, Philura Eveline, P. L., N. Y. City. 

8528. 
Murdoch, John, 1st asst. Catalog Dept. P. 

L., Boston, Mass. 6641. 
Murdoch, Mrs. John, care P. L., Boston, 

Mass. 6759. 
Murray, Annie May, Hilltop, Tenafly, N. J. 

5704. 
Murray, Katherine M., sch. In. F. P. L., 

Worcester, Mass. 3628. 
Murray, Margaret E., In. Filene Ref. L., 

Boston, Mass. 5562. 
Muscatine (la.) P. M. Musser P. L. (Ellen 

G. Stocker, In.) 4217. 
Muse, Benonine, asst. N. Y. State L., 

Albany, N. Y. 8276. 
Muskegon (Mich.) Hackley P. L. (Lulu F. 

Miller, In.) 4097. 
Muskogee (Okla.) P. L. (Sarah A. Noble, 

In.) 5850. 
Muzzy, A. Florence, asst. P. L., N. Y. City. 

5806. 

Myers, Helen E., In. A. Herr Smith Memo- 
rial L., Lancaster, Pa. 5027. 
Myers, Ira J., Geronimo, Okla. 8172. 
Myers, John P., director Field Work War 

Dept. Commission on Training Camp 

Activities, Washington, D. C. 8010. 
Myers, Mrs. W. C., In. P. L., Helena, Ark. 

8173. 
Mysore University L., Mysore, India. (C. 

Nagappa, In.) 7861. 
Nachman, Selma, catlgr. Chicago Univ. 

L., Chicago, 111. 4508. 
Nagappa, C., In. Mysore Univ. L., Mysore, 

India. (Address, care The P. T. I. Book 

Depot 155, IV Main Road, Chamarajapet, 

Bangalore City, India.) " 8015. 
Napa (Cal.) Goodman L. (C. B. Seeley, In.) 

6620. 
Nash, Allene F., 1st asst. Circulation Dept. 

P. L., Tacoma, Wash. 7724. 
Nashua (N. H.) P. L. (Sarah P. Barker, 

In.) 7356. 
Nashville (Tenn.) Carnegie L. (Margaret 

McE. Kercheval, In.) 4219. 
Nason, Sabra L., In. Umatilla Co. P. L., 

Pendleton, Ore. 2867. 
National Aniline and Chemical Co., Inc., 



HANDBOOK 



525 



Research L., Buffalo, N. Y. (C. G. Der- 
ick, In.) 8841. 

National Library Bindery Company, Spring- 
field, Mass. 7948. 

National L. for the Blind, 1729 H Street 
N. W., Washington, D. C. (Etta J. Gif- 
fin, dir.) 7593. 

Naugatuck, Conn. Howard Whittemore 
Mem. L. (E. M. Goodyear, In.) 4903. 

Neale, Minnie, head Fiction Dept. P. L., 
Kansas City, Mo. 6710. 

Nebraska Univ. L., Lincoln, Neb. (Malcolm 
G. Wyer, In.) 5001. 

Nelms, Marie, asst. P. L., Dallas, Tex. 8220. 

Nelson, Charles Alexander, head ref. In. 
emeritus Columbia Coll. L., N. Y. City. 
(Address, 505 W. 142nd St.) 83. 

Nelson, Dorothea, Marshfleld Hills, Mass. 
3809. 

Nelson, Esther, In. Univ. of Utah L., Salt 
Lake City, Utah. 3262. 

Nelson, Martha F., In. N. J. State Normal 
Sch. L., Trenton, N. J. 725. 

Nelson, Peter, head of Manuscripts Sec- 
tion N. Y. State L., Albany, N. Y. 2663. 

Nesbit, Maude E., asst. in charge Art Col- 
lection P. L., Indianapolis, Ind. 8381. 

Nethercut, Mary B., In. Rockford Coll. L., 
Rockford, 111. 6025. 

Neuhauser, Anna M., In. Bureau of Mu- 
nicipalities, Dept. o-fi Internal Affairs, 
Harrisburg, Pa. 6848. 

New Bedford (Mass.) P. L. (George H. 
Tripp, In.) 3274. 

New Hampshire State L., Concord, N. H. 
(Arthur H. Chase, In.) 6761. 

New Haven (Conn.) F. P. L. (Willis K. 
Stetson, In.) 4319. 

New Jersey, Public Service Corporation 
of, Technical L., Newark, N. J. (Alma C. 
Mitchell, In.) 6863. x 

New Orleans, La. Howard Mem. L. (Will- 
iam Beer, In.) 6039. 

New Orleans (La.) P. L. (Henry M. Gill, 
In.) 4084. 

New Rochelle (N. Y.) P. L. (Mary E. Hunt- 
ington, In.) 5206. 

New South Wales P. L., Sydney, Austra- 
lia. 7978. 

New York Hist. Soc., N. Y. City (Robert 
H. Kelby, In.) 4786. 



New York Library Club. (Pres., Isadore 

G. Mudge, Columbia Univ. L., N. Y. City; 

sec'y, Alice I. Vail, 92 Gates Ave., Brook- 
lyn.) 3513. 
New York Mercantile L., Astor Place, N. 

Y. City. (Charles H. Cox, In.) 4029. 
New York (N. Y.) P. L. (E. H. Anderson, 

director.) 2733. 
New York (N. Y.) P. L., Library School 

of. (Ernest J. Reece, principal.) 789S. 
New York Society L., 109 University Place, 

N. Y. City (Frank B. Bigelow, In.) 4278. 
New York. See also Brooklyn P. L., Gro- 

lier Club, Queens Borough P. L., and 

Y. M. C. A. L. 
New York State College for Teachers L., 

Albany, N. Y. (Mary E. Cobb, In.) 8745. 
New York State L., Albany, N. Y. (James 

I. Wyer, Jr., director.) 4335. 
New York State Library School, Albany, 

N. Y. (James I. Wyer, Jr., director.) 

4336. 
Newark (N. J.) F. P. L. (John Cotton Dana, 

In.) 1078. 
NEWBERRY, MARIE AMNA, supervisor 

of Training, P. L., Toledo, O. 4897. 

Life member. 
Newberry L., Chicago, III. (W. N. C. Carl- 

ton, In.) 1075. 

Newburyport (Mass.) P. L. (John D. Par- 
sons, In.) 5380. 
Newcomb, Florence S., head Mending 

Dept. P. L., Indianapolis, Ind. 4937. 
Newell, Etta Mattocks, asst. In. Dartmouth 

Coll. L., Hanover, N. H. 2023. 
Newhall, Mrs. Henry E., 472 Brookline 

Ave., Boston, Mass. 2672. 
Newhard, Mabel, In. Armour and Company 

L., Chicago, 111. 7619. 
Newkirk, Bessie H., 1st asst. F. P. L., Cam- 
den, N. J. 8643. 
Newman, Margaret E., asst. Kern County 

L., Bakersfield, Cal. 8729. 
Newport, R. I. Redwood L. and Athenaeum. 

(George Lyman Hinckley, In.) 7213. 
Newth, Clara M., 1st asst. Catalog Dept. 

P. L., Detroit, Mich. 5833. 
Newton, Elizabeth J., In. Robbins L., Ar- 
lington, Mass. 2788. 
Newton, Lesley, child. In. P. L., Lakewood, 

Ohio. 6351. 



526 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Newton, Ora Lee, asst. Ref. Dept. Cossitt 
L., Memphis, Tenn. 7423. 

Newton (Mass.) F. L. (Harold T. Dough- 
erty, In.) 3577. 

Nicholasville, Ky. Withers L. (Mrs. Bessie 
Porter, In.) 7635. 

Nichols, Albert Rodman, asst. In. P. L., 
Providence, R. I. 4647. 

Nichols, F. W., member L. Board P. L., 
Evanston, 111. (Address, 504 Lee St.) 
8086. 

Nichols, Gladys, asst. P. L., South Bend, 
Ind. 6806. 

Nichols, Ruth G., In. City Club of Chicago, 
Chicago, 111. 3299. 

Nicholson, Delia W. S., asst. P. L., Kansas 
City, Mo. 8329. 

Nickerson, Mrs. Essie C., In. Tainter Me- 
morial F. L., Menomonie, Wis. 5299. 

Nijhoff, Martinus, Lange Voorhout 9, The 
Hague, Holland. 7890. 

Nis-bet, Lillian F., In. Winchester Repeat- 
ing Arms Co. L., New Haven, Conn. 
7314. 

Noble, Sarah A., In. P. L., Muskogee, Okla. 
8026. 

Noel, Jacqueline, acting ref. In. P. L., Ta- 
coma, Wash. 6595. 

Nolan, Dr. Edward J., In. Academy of Nat- 
ural Sciences L., Philadelphia, Pa. 6. 

Nolan, Isabel, child. In. P. L., Kansas City, 
Mo. 8434. 

Noll, Amy Wentworth, 334 Woodford Ave., 
Missoula, Mont. 6943. 

Nordyke, Lucile, In. Madison Ave. Br. P. 
L., Indianapolis, Ind. 8382. 

Norman, Mollie, In. L. Union Springs, Ala. 
6352. 

Norman, Oscar E., In. Peoples Gas Light 
& Coke Co. L., Chicago, 111. 4024. 

Norman Williams P. L. See Woodstock, 
Vt. 

Norris, Helen, In. Commonwealth Edison 
Company L., Chicago, 111. 7132. 

North Adams (Mass.) P. L. (Mabel Tem- 
ple, In.) 3525. 

North Attleborough, Mass., Richards Me- 
morial L. (Ada M. Perry, In.) 4296. 

North Carolina Legislative Reference L., 
Raleigh, N. C. (H. M. London, In.) 8121. 

North Carolina State L., Raleigh, N. C. 



(Carrie L. Broughton, In.) 6110. 
North Dakota P. L. Commission, Bismarck, 

N. D. (Anne Evelyn Peterson, In.) 4664. 
North Dakota State Normal Sch. L., Valley 

City, N. D. (Helen M. Crane, In.) 4509. 
North Dakota University L., University, N. 

D. (Alfred D. Keator, In.) 5257. 
Northampton, Mass. Forbes L. (J. L. Har- 
rison, In.) 4800. 
Northern Illinois State Normal School, 

Haish L., De Kalb, III. (Josephine M. 

Jandell, In.) 7240. 
Northey, Delia F., In. P. L., Marshfield, 

Ore. 5197. 
Northrop, Helen, In. Columbia Inst. for the 

Deaf, Gallaudet Coll., Washington, D. C. 

5127. 
Northwestern University L., Evanston, III. 

(Theodore W. Koch, In.) 4321. 
Norton, Edith M., asst. Bibliographical and 

Order Depts. Grosvenor L., Buffalo, N. 

Y. 7825. 
Norton, Margaret, asst. In. Smith Coll. L., 

Northampton, Mass. 6894. 
Norton, Margaret Cross, asst. Ind. State 

L., Indianapolis, Ind. 6526. 
Norton, Ruth, In. Washington Jr. High 

Sch. L., Rochester, N. Y. 6952. 
Norval, Florence C., general asst. L. As- 

soc., Portland, Ore. 8487. 
Norwich, Conn. Otis L. (Imogene A. Cash, 

In.) 100. 
Noyes, Fanny A., 1428 Peoples Gas Bldg., 

122 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 5976. 
Nunns, Annie A., asst. Supt. Wis. State 

Hist. -Soc., Madison, Wis. 2289. 
Nutting, George E., In. P. L., Fitchburg, 

Mass. 1721. 

Nye, Lucie C., chief Br. Dept. F. L., Oak- 
land, Cal. 6478. 
Oahu Coll. L., Honolulu, T. H. (Mabel M. 

Hawthorne, In.) 4221. 
Oak Park (III.) P. L. (Helen A. Bagley, 

In.) 4832. 
Oakland (Cal.) F. L. (Charles S. Greene, 

In.) 3758. 
Oakley, Sylvia, In. Burr. Sch. Br. P. L., 

Chicago, 111. 8797. 
Oaks, Catharine, catalog In. Univ. of Minn. 

L., Minneapolis, Minn. 5315. 



HANDBOOK 



527 



Oberlin College L., Oberlin, O. (Azariah S. 

Root, In.) 4765. 
Oberly, Eunice Rockwood, In. Bureau of 

Plant Industry, Dept. of Agric., Wash- 
ington, D. C. 3713. 
O'Brien, Richard, chairman L. Bd., F. P. 

L., St. John, N. B., Canada. 2002. 
O'Connell, Frances, In. High. Sen. L., 

Little Rock, Ark. 4724. 
O'Connor, Alice Keats, child. In. Seward 

Park Br. P. L., N. Y. City. 5817. 
O'Connor, Mary T., In. Price Hill Br. P. 

L., Cincinnati, O. 7396. 
Oerth, Ena, In. P. L., Forest Park, 111. 

7859. 
Ogden, E. Jane, 1st asst. Art Dept. F. L., 

Philadelphia, Pa. 5773. 
Ogden, E. Lucy, In. State Relations Serv- 
ice U. S. Dept. of Agric., Washington, 

D. C. 1745. 

Ogden, Mrs. Luther, Cape May, N. J. 8813. 
Ogden (Utah) Carnegie F. L. (Grace W. 

Harris, In.) 6576. 
Ohio State Univ. L., Columbus, O. (Olive 

Jones, In.) 4346. 
Ohio Wesleyan University L., Delaware, 

Ohio (Russell B. Miller, In.) 4565. 
Ohr, Cerene, supt. of Branches P. L., In- 
dianapolis, Ind. 7541. 
Ohr, Elizabeth, head Sch. L's. Div. P. L., 

Indianapolis, Ind. 7542. 
Oklahoma City (Okla.) Carnegie L. (Mrs. 

Mabel H. Peacock, In.) 5361. 
Oklahoma College for Women L., Chick- 

asha, Okla. (Eliza Jane Rule, In.) 7623. 
Oklahoma Library Commission, Oklahoma 

City, Okla. (Mrs. J. R. Dale, sec'y.) 8818. 
Oklahoma Univ. L., Norman, Okla. (J. L. 

Rader, In.) 5077. 
Oko, Adolph S., In. Hebrew Union Coll. L., 

Cincinnati, O. 4890. 
Olcotf, Emma McElroy, In. Prospect Br. P. 

L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 7755. 
Olcott, Florence, head Science Dept. P. L., 

Milwaukee, Wis. 5800. 
Olcott, Frances Jenkins, 1270 Ocean Ave., 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 1839. 
Olcott, Margaret T., asst. U. S. Dept. of 

Agriculture L., Washington, D. C. 8812. 
Olean (N. Y.) P. L. (Maude D. Brooks, In.) 

6762. 



Oliphant, C. J., pres. C. J. Oliphant Adver- 
tising Agency, 1 West 34th St., N. Y. 
City. 5900. 

Oliphant, Mary Campbell, sr. asst. F. P. 
L., Trenton, N. J. 7133. 

Oliver, Mrs. E. E., asst. F. P. L., Collings- 
wood, N. J. 8644. 

Olney, Eleanor, 160 S. 10th St., Coshocton, 
Ohio. 8346. 

Olschewsky, Johanna L., In. Red. Cross 
Inst. for Crippled and Disabled Men, 
N. Y. City. 7134. 

Olsen, Laura M., In. P. L., Eau Claire, Wis. 
. 6658. 

Olson, Nelle A., In. U. S. General Hospital 
No. 28L., Fort Sheridan, 111. 4511. 

Omaha (Neb.) P. L. (Edith Tobitt, In.) 
4668. 

O'Meara, Ellen M., In. 67th St. Br. P. L., 
N. Y. City. 4136. 

Ophiils, Louise, medical In. Lane Medical 
L. of Stanford Univ., San Francisco, Cal.. 
5385. 

Oregon Agric. Coll. L., Corvallis, Ore. 
(Mrs. Ida A. Kidder, In. ) 6502. 

Oregon Univ. L., Eugene, Ore. (M. H. 
Douglass, In.) 6417. 

Ormes, Manly D., In. N. P. Coburn L., Colo- 
rado Coll., Colorado Springs, Colo. 4564. 

Orr, Edna Dearth, In. P. L. Merrill, Wis. 
7975. 

Orr, Marion C., In. P. L., Idaho Falls, Ida- 
ho. 8174. 

Osborn, George A., In. Rutgers Coll. L., 
New Brunswick, N. J. 1901. 

Osborn, Lyman P., trus. Peabody Inst. L., 
Peabody, Mass. 1731. 

Osborne, Florence M., P. L., Lynn, Mass. 
8529. 

Osborne, Frances S., ref. In. P. L. Wash- 
ington, D. C. 8175. 

Osborne, Lucy Eugenia, head catlgr., Wil- 
liams Coll. L., Williamstown, Mass. 
6948. 

Osborne, Ruth Blagge, catlgr. P. L., Pasa- 
dena, Cal. 5432. 

Osgood, Mrs. Edward L., trus. Bancroft 
Mem. L., Hopedale, Mass. 5699. 

Osgood, Mary A., In. Westport Br. P. L. 
Kansas City, Mo. 3534. 



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AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



O'Shaughnessy, Margaret C., prin. asst. P. 

L., Chicago, 111. 5447. 
Oshkosh (Wis.) P. L. (Edith K. Van Eman, 

In.) 4757. 

Osterhout, F. L. See Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 
O'Sullivan, Mary I., Bryn Mawr Coll., L., 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. 8235. 
Otis, Mabel L., supervisor of Branches 

Queens Borough P. L., Jamaica, N. Y. 

5950. 

Otis L. See Norwich, Conn. 
Ott, Emmy, asst. P. L., Denver, Colo. 8730. 
Ottawa (Canada) Carnegie L. (W. J. 

Sykes, In.) 5207. 
Ottawa, III., Reddick's L. (Vera J. Snook, 

In.) 4844. 
Overfield, Mrs. C. P., dir. L. Board P. L., 

Salt Lake City, Utah. 8207. 
Overton, Clara L., In. High Sch. L., White 

Plains, N. Y. 8761. 
Overton, Florence, supervisor of branches 

P. L., N. Y. City. 3605. 
Overton, Jacqueline M., asst. Walter Reed 

U. S. General Hospital L., Takoma 

Park, D. C. 8087. 

Ovitz, Delia G., In. Normal Sch. L., Mil- 
waukee, Wis. 4512. 
Owen, Adelaide, asst. Henry M. Utley Br. 

P. L., Detroit, Mich. 8311. 
Owen, Esther B., 33 Niles St., Hartford, 

Conn. 2516. 
Owen, Ethel, sr. asst. Municipal Ref. Br. 

P. L., Chicago, 111. 6217. 
OWEN, ETHEL, catlgr. Pub. Documents 

Office, Washington, D. C. 3115. Life 

member. 
Owen, Thomas McAdory, director Dept. of 

Archives and History, Montgomery, Ala. 

3121. 
Owens, Alpha, professor of French and 

Spanish Baker Univ. L., Baldwin City, 

Kan. 5559. 
Owens, Belle M., Charge Information 

Desk Circ. Dept, P. L., St. Paul, Minn. 

8260. 

Oxford, O. See Miami Univ. L. 
Oxley, Mary, child. In. West Seattle Br. 

P. L., Seattle, Wash. 6828. 
P. M. Musser P. L. See Muscatine, la. 
Pack Memorial L. See Asheville, N. C. 



Packard, Ella E., ref. In. P. L., Dallas, 
Tex. 6205. 

Paddock, Alice M., In. P. L., Jamestown, 
N. D. 4001. 

Paducah (Ky.) Carnegie P. L. (Harriet 
Boswell, In.) 4157. 

Paine, Fantine, asst. Child. Dept. P. L., 
Providence, R. I. 8279. 

Paine, Paul M., In. P. L. Syracuse, N. Y. 
5731. 

Palm, Elizabeth, asst. In. Mich. Agricul- 
tural Coll. L., East Lansing, Mich. 8019. 

Palmer, Mrs. Harriet L., asst. In. and 
catlgr. James Blackstone Memorial L., 
Branford, Conn. 2406. 

Palmer, Margaret, In. P. L. Chisholm, 
Minn. 3300. 

Palmer, Mary Bell, sec'y and dir. N. C. 
L. Commission, Raleigh, N. C. 4582. 

Palmer, W. Millard, member Mich. State 
Board L. Comm'rs, Grand Rapids, Mich. 
1525. 

Palo Alto, Cal., P. L. (Frances D. Patter- 
son, In.) 5750. 

Faltsits, Victor Hugo, chief of Div. of 
American History and keeper of Manu- 
scripts P. L., N. Y. City. 4202. 

Pan American Union, Columbus Memorial 
L., Washington, D. C. (Charles E. Bab- 
cock, acting In.) 5208. 

Panama Canal L., Balboa Heights, Canal 
Zone. (Mrs. Jennie E. Engell, In.) 
6592. 

Panjab University L., Lahore, India. (A. 
C. Woolner, In.) 7013. 

Paoli, Mrs. Minnie B., In. Public Square 
Br. P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 1498. 

Pardee, Edna, 1st asst. N. Goodman St. 
Br. P. L., Rochester, N. Y. 8645. 

Pardoe, A., In. Legislative L., Toronto, 
Canada. 2251. 

Parham, Nellie E., In. Withers P. L., 
Bloomington, 111. 2221. 

Park, Charles V., 1155 Ramona St., Palo 
Alto, Calif. 7774. 

Parker, Cora, In. P. L., Bisbee, Ariz. 7714. 

Parker, Elizabeth Leete, In. Hudson Park 
Br. P. L., N. Y. City. 4333. 

Parker, Glen, Baker & Taylor Co., 354 
Fourth Ave., N. Y. City. 3908. 



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629 



Parker, John, In. Peabody Inst., Baltimore, 
Md. 5472. 

PARKER, PHEBE, catlgr. Brown Univ. 
L., Providence, R. I. 2050. Life member. 

Parkinson, Herman O., F. P. L., Newark, 
N. J. 8646. 

Parmenter, James Parker, trus. Robbins 
L., Arlington, Mass. (Address Court 
House, Boston, Mass.) 859. 

Parmenter, Majel, in charge Drexel Hut 
L. U. S. Naval Training Station, New- 
port, R. I. (Address, 28 Mt. Vernon 
St.) 8822. 

Parmly Billings Mem. L. See Billings, 
Mont. 

Parsons, Mrs. Emma K., ref. In. Univ. of 
Missouri L., Columbia, Mo. 5648. 

Parsons, Francis H., asst. in charge of 
Smithsonian Div. L. of Congress, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 903. 

Parsons, Harrison M., head of Buildings 
and Equipment Dept. Queens Borough 
P. L., Jamaica, N. Y. 8647. 

Parsons Harry N., supt of Circ. P. L.., Buf- 
falo, N. Y. 5357. 

Parsons, Henry S., acting chief clerk 
Copyright Office L. of Congress, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 2754. 

Parsons, Mary Prescott, In. Morristown 
L., Morristown, N. J. 7002. 

Partch, Isa L., In. Osius Br. P. L., Detroit, 
Mich. 2882. 

Parvin, Newton R., In. Iowa Masonic L., 
Cedar Rapids, la. 4377. 

Pasadena (Cat.) P. L. (Jeannette M. 
Drake, In.) 3568. 

Passaic (N. J.) P. L. (Edna B. Pratt, In.) 
5738. 

Paterson (N. J.) F. P. L. (George F. Win- 
chester, In.) 514. 

Patten, Frank Chauncy, In. Rosenberg L., 
Galveston, Tex. 543. 

Patten, Katharine, In. Minneapolis Athe- 
naeum, Minneapolis, Minn. 1871. 

Patterson, Edith, In. F. P. L., Pottsville, 
Pa. 5881. 

Patterson, Edith M., child. In. P. L., Cleve- 
land, O. 7137. 

Patterson, J. Ritchie, supt. Binderies Div. 
P. L., Chicago, 111. 5590. 



Patterson L. See Westfield, N. Y. 
Patton, Adah, catalog In. Univ. of Illinois 

L., Urbana, 111. 2321. 
Patton, John S., In. Univ. of Va. L., Uni- 
versity, Va. 3663. 
Patton, Mollie M., catlgr. Yale University 

L., New Haven, Conn. 8838. 
Pauli, Adolph F., stud. Univ. of 111., Ur- 
bana, 111. 8246. 
Pawtucket, R. I., Deborah Cook Sayles P. 

L. (William Dean Goddard, In.) 403. 

Perpetual member. 
Peabody Institute L., Baltimore, Md. (John 

Parker, In.) 164. 
Peacock, Joseph L., In. Memorial and P. 

L., Westerly, R. I. 4671. 
Pearson, Harriet, asst. In. N. D. Agric. 

Coll. L., Fargo, N. D. 6021. 
Peaslee, Mildred, J., P. L., Franklin, N. H. 

8450. 
Peck, Edith M., In. P. L., Rockville, Conn. 

5986'. 
Peck, Eunice E., In. U. S. Rubber Co. L., 

New Haven, Conn. 8648. 
Peck, Eva R., Business and Municipal 

Dept. P. L., Fort Wayne, Ind. 8088. 
Peck, George M., ref. In. Princeton Univ. 

L., Princeton, N. J. 8649. 
PECK, HARRIET R., In. Rensselaer Poly- 
technic Inst., Troy, N. Y. 3657. Life 

member. 
Peck, Kate Strong, catlgr. P. L., Bingham- 

ton, N. Y. 2442. 
Peck, Norma L., child. In. L. Association, 

Portland, Ore. 6830. 

Peek, Zona, asst. Univ. of Texas L., Au- 
stin, Tex. 6890. 
Peers, Esther, asst. Ref. Dept. Univ. of 

Mich. L., Ann Arbor, Mich. 8459. 
Peffer, Lillian, asst. P. L., Denver, Colo. 

8460. 
Pegan, Patience, In. North Side High Sch. 

L., Denver, Colo. 7140. 
Pendry, Eliza Ruth, In. Englewood High 

Sch. Br. P. L., Chicago, 111. 5600. 
Penniman, Jennie C., In. P. L., Windsor, 

Vt. 8176. 
Pennington, Catherine E., catlgr. U. S. 

Dept. of Agric., Washington, D. C. 6356. 



530 



Pennock, Mrs. Elizabeth E., In. P. L,., Car- 
thage, 111. 8089. 

Pennock, Maude M., In. P. L., Weston, 
Mass. 2978. 

Pennsylvania College for Women L., Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. (Georgia Proctor, In.) 7886. 

Pennsylvania Institution for the Instruc- 
tion of the Blind. (O. H. Burritt, Prin- 
cipal.) 6389. 

Pennsylvania Library Club (Pres., Luther 
E. Hewitt, City Hall, Philadelphia; sec'y, 
Martha L. Coplin, F. L., Philadelphia.) 
3537. 

Pennsylvania State Coll. L., State College, 
Pa. (Erwin W. Runkle, In.) 6024. 

Pennsylvania State L. and Museum, Har- 
risburg, Pa. (Thomas L. Montgomery, 
In.) 3504. 

Pennsylvania University L., Philadelphia, 
Pa. (Asa Don Dickinson, In.) 3520. 

Penrose, Alma, In. Carleton Coll. L., North- 
field, Minn. 6403. 

Penrose, Kate A., 1st asst. Epiphany Br. 
P. L., N. Y. City. 8650. 

Peoples, William Thaddeus, In. emeritus 
Mercantile L., N. Y. City. 3. 

Peoria (III.) P. L. (Samuel P. Prowse, In.) 
6552. 

Pepper, William, trus. F. L., Philadelphia, 
Pa. 8192. 

Perez, Damaso P., Philippine Normal 
Sch. L., Manila, P. I. 7945. 

Perkins, Caroline B., In. in charge Chest- 
nut Hill Br. F. L., Philadelphia, Pa. 
3153. 

Perkins Institution for the Blind L., Wa- 
tertown, Mass. (Laura M. Sawyer, In.) 
5110. 

Perley, Clarence Warner, chief classifier 
L. of Congress, Washington, D. C. 2259. 

Perley, Edward E., asst. P. L., N. Y. City. 
8261. 

Perrine, Cora Belle, head Purchasing Div. 
and Acquisition Dept. Univ. of Chicago 
L., Chicago, 111. 1155. 

Perry, Everett Robbins, In. P. L,., Los An- 
geles, Cal. 2474. 

Perry, George Murdock, ex-ln. Holden, 
Mass. 936. 

Pershing, James H., Equitable Bldg., Den- 
ver. Colo. 7921. 



Perth Amboy (N. J.) F. P. L. (Helen M. 

Grannis, In.) 7216. 
Pertuch, Walter A. R., asst. In. Franklin 

Inst., Philadelphia, Pa. 6997. 
Peru (Ind.) P. L. (Gertrude H. Thiebaud, 

In.) 5828. 

Feter White P. L. See Marquette, Mich. 
Peters, Florence, asst. in charge Circ. 

Dept. Univ. of Michigan L., Ann Arbor, 

Mich. 7142. 
Peters, Orpha Maud, asst. In. P. L., Gary, 

Ind. 2926. 
Petersen, Agnes J., ref. In. Milwaukee 

Journal L., Milwaukee, Wis. 5992. 
Petersen, Grace Mary, In. Elyria L., 

Elyria, O. 7853. 
Peterson, Haldora, asst. A. L. A., N. Y. 

City. 8280. 
Peterson, M. Leona, In. P. and Sch. L., 

Kane, Pa. 5901. 

Peterson, Olivia, In. P. L., Galva, 111. 7359. 
Pettee, Julia, head catlgr. Union Theo- 
logical Sem. L., N. Y. City. 2511. 
Petterson, Esther L., asst. Butzel Br. P. 

L., Detroit, Mich. 8312. 
Pettitt, Carol, In. P. L., Gorham, N. Y. 

8762. 
Petty, Annie F., In. State Normal Coll. L., 

Greensboro, N. C. 3230. 
Phail, Edith, In. Scovill Mfg. Co. L., Wa- 

terbury, Conn. 7144. 
Phelan, John F., chief of Branches P. L., 

Chicago, 111. 4681. 
Phelps, Edith Allen, catlgr. P. L., Kansas 

City, Mo. 3058. 

Phelps, Edith M., editor and correspond- 
ent H. W. Wilson Co., N. Y. City. 7145. 
Philadelphia (Pa.) Commercial Museum L. 

(John J. Macfarlane, In.) 5125. 
Philadelphia (Pa.) F. L. (John Ashhurst, 

In.) 1837. Perpetual member. 
Philadelphia (Pa.) See also Drexel Insti- 
tute L. 
Philbrick, Hazel, asst. Univ. of Ga. L., 

Athens, Ga. 7955. 
Philippine Library and Museum, Manila, 

P. I. (E. V. Filamor, acting dir.) 5039. 
Phillips, Phyllis, 408 West 20th St., N. Y. 

City. 8651. 

Phillips, Viola B., asst. In. P. L., Youngs- 
town, O. 6929. 



5'31 



Phillips Academy L., Andover, Mass. 
(Sarah L. Frost, In.) 5290. 

Phinney, H. K., asst. In. Univ. of Roches- 
ter L., Rochester, N. Y. 607. 

Phoenix (Ariz.) Carnegie P. L. (Maude L. 
Hiatt, In.) 6111. 

Pickett, Amelia T., In. Sarah Sargent 
Paine Mem. L., Painesdale, Mich. 8090. 

Pickett, Frances, In. Judson Coll. Carnegie 
L., Marion, Ala. 4716. 

Pidgeon, Marie K., asst. Bureau of Plant 
Industry L,. U. S. Dept. of Agriculture, 
Washington, D. C. 5831. 

Pierce, Anne, In. Carnegie L., Charlotte, 
N. C. 5287. 

Pierce, Frances M., asst. In. Forest Park 
Br. City L., Springfield, Mass. 2873. 

Pierce, Mrs. Nellie M. G., In/Cushman L., 
Bernardstown, Mass. 8347. 

Pierson, Harriet Wheeler, asst. Catalog 
Division L. of Congress, Washington, 
D. C. 2743. 

Pillsbury, Mary B., catlgr. Vassar Coll. L., 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 7459. 

Pillsbury, Mary M., In. General Theolog- 
ical L., Boston, Mass. 7012. 

Pillsbury, Olive E., In. Blackstone Br. P. 
L., Chicago, 111. 3792. 

Pinkerton, Helen M., 1st asst. ref. In. P. 
L., Tacoma, Wash. 7305. 

Pinneo, Dorothy A., asst. In. F. P. L., 
Elizabeth, N. J. 7756. 

Pinneo, Dotha Stone, In. P. L., Norwalk, 
Conn. 1670. 

Pittsburgh (Pa.) Carnegie L. (John H. 
Leete, director.) 1458. 

Pittsburgh (Pa.) Carnegie L. Sch., a dept. 
of the Carnegie Inst. (John H. Leete, di- 
rector; Sarah C. N. Bogle, principal.) 
3217. 

Pittsburgh, N. S. F Pa. Allegheny Carnegie 
F. L. (E. E. Eggers, In.) 5812. 

Pittsburgh Univ. L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 
(Blanche A. Swope, In.) 6134. 

Place, Frank, Jr., asst. N. Y. Academy of 
Medicine L., 17-21 West 43d St., N. Y. 
City. 5638. 

Plainfield (N. J.) P. L. (Florence M. Bow- 
man, In.) 4263. 

Plass, Joseph, asst. L. of Congress, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 6357. 



Platte County P. L., Wheatland, Wyo. 

(Beatrice Lucas, In.) 7909. 
Plumb Memorial L. See Shelton, Conn. 
Plummer, Honor L., cor. S. University and 

Harvard Ave., Denver, Colo. 5313. 
Plympton, Ruth H., catlgr. L. Assoc., 

Portland, Ore. 8281. 
Poland, Myra, In. Osterhout F. L., Wilkes- 

Barre, Pa. 2026. 
POLK, MARY, In. Bureau of Science, 

Manila, P. I. 4249. Life member. 
Pollard, Annie Archer, 2d asst. In. P. L., 

Grand Rapids, Mich. 2190. 
Pomeroy, Edith Mary, head Order Dept. 

Pratt Inst. F. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 973. 
Pomeroy, Elizabeth, In. Public Health 

Service Hospital L., 47th St. and Drexel 

Blvd., Chicago, 111. 7665. 
Pomeroy, Phebe G., 1st asst. Schenley 

High Sch. L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 7360. 
Pomona (Cal.) P. L. (Sarah M. Jacobus, 

In.) 4309. 
Pond, Elizabeth Maltby, In. Stevens Mem. 

L., North Andover, Mass. 1968. 
Pond, Martha E., In. P. L., Manitowoc, 

Wis. 6796. 
Poole, Franklin Osborne, In. Assoc. of the 

Bar L., N. Y. City. 1761. 
Pooley, Mary H., In. East High Sch. L., 

Cincinnati, Ohio. 5663. 
Pope, Mildred H., In. Broadway High Sch. 

L., Seattle, Wash. 6907. 
Port Huron (Mich.) P. L. (Constance Be- 

ment, In.) 4780. 
Porter, Annabel, head Child. Dept. P. L., 

Tacoma, Wash. 2942. 
Porter, Anne S., asst. P. L., Savannah, 

Ga. 8530. 
Porter, Mrs. Cora Case, In. P. L., Enid, 

Okla. 6005. 
Porter, Josephine W., In. P. L., Asbury 

Park, N. J. 8208. 

Porter, Washington T., trus. P. L., Cincin- 
nati, Ohio. (Address, 708 Fourth Na- 
tional Bank Bldg.) 2307. 
Porter, William K., In. Camp L., Camp 

Sherman, Ohio. 8003. 
Portland (Ore.) L. Assoc. (Mary Frances 

Isom, In.) 3954. 
Porto Rico Carnegie Library, San Juan, 



532 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Porto Rico. (Manuel Fernandez Juncos, 
In.) 5211. 

Post, Orpha L., child. In. Carnegie West 
Br. P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 5363. 

Potter, Alfred Claghorn, asst. In. Harvard 
Coll. L., Cambridge, Mass. 1600. 

Potter, Alice E., asst. Acquisition Dept. 
Per. Record Univ. of Chicago L., Chi- 
cago, 111. 5708. 

Potter, Mildred B., 1st asst. Duffleld Br. 
P. L., Detroit, Mich. 8313. 

Potts, Edith W., Loan Desk Carnegie L., 
Braddock, Pa. 6106. 

Powell, Elizabeth B., In. P. L., Missoula, 
Mont. 5688. 

Powell, Mrs. F. W., Book Selection Dept. 
L. Sub-Section War Plans Div., War 
Dept., Washington, D. C. 8771. 

Powell, Mrs. L. L., In. P. L., Cairo, 111. 
8262. 

Powell, Lucy Lee, asst. Order Dept. P. L., 
Minneapolis, Minn. 7546. 

Powell, Mary, chief of Art . Dept. P. L., 
St. Louis, Mo. 8609. 

Power, Effie L., head of Child. Dept. 
Carnegie L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 1453. 

Power, Ralph L., In. Coll. of Business Ad- 
ministration L. Boston Univ., Boston, 
Mass. 6944. 

Powers, William H., In. So. Dak. Agric. 
Coll. L., Brookings, S. D. 4342. 

Prall, Beatrice, In. P. L., Little Rock, Ark. 
8236. 

Prall, Helen Y., In. P. L., Keewatin, Minn. 
7827. 

Pratt, Ada M., In. P. L., Watertown, S. D. 
7265. 

Pratt, Adelene J., In. Manual Training 
High Sch. L., Kansas City, Mo. 5577. 

Pratt, Anne S., sr. asst. Univ. of Califor- 
nia L., Berkeley, Cal. 5333. 

Pratt, Edna B., In. P. L., Passaic, N. J. 
5413. 

Pratt Institute F. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. (Ed- 
ward F. Stevens, In.) 4362. 

Prescott, Annie, ex-ln., 2 Union St., Au- 
burn, Me. 1240. 

Prescott, Harriet Beardslee, supervisor 
Catalog Dept. Columbia Univ. L., N. Y. 
City. 733. 



Preston, Nina Kate, visitor State Bd. of 

L. Com'rs, Ionia, Mich. 3897. 
Pretlow, Mary Denson, In. and sec'y P. L., 

Norfolk, Va. 7633. 
Prevost, Marie Louise, head catlgr. F. P. 

L., Newark, N. J. 5214. 
Price, Anna M., sec'y 111. L. Extension 

Com., Springfield, 111. 2288. 
Price, Franklin H., Binding and Exchanges 

F. L., Philadelphia, Pa. 4867. 
Price, Helen L., In. Univ. High Sch. L., 

Oakland, Cal. 2300. 
Price, Marian, In. Carnegie L., McKees- 

port, Pa. 5250. 
Princeton Univ. L., Princeton, N. J. 

(Ernest Gushing Richardson, In.) 1077. 
Printup, Mrs. D. L., member L. Board 

P. L., Britton, S. D. 8091. 
Pritchard, Martha O., stud. Teachers' 

Coll., Columbia Univ., N. Y. City. 6120. 
Pritchett, Betty H., Base Hospital L., Camp 

Pike, Ark. 623. 
Proctor, Emily D., trus. Fletcher Mem. L., 

Proctor, Vt. 8247. 
Proctor, Frederick T., trus. P. L., Utica, 

N. Y. 2201. 

Proctor, Thomas R., Utica, N. Y. 8177. 
Proudfoot, Helen, child. In. P. L., Dea 

Moines, Iowa. 7547. 
Prout, Vera, child. In. P. L., Detroit, Mich. 

8426. 
Prouty, Edythe A., supervisor L. Stations 

P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 7149. 
Prouty, Helen G., asst. Brooklyn Br. P. L., 

Cleveland, Ohio. 7150. 
Prouty, Louise, asst. P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 

3705. 
Providence Athenaeum, Providence, R. I. 

(Grace F. Leonard, In.) 4238. 
Providence (R. I.) P. L. (William E. Fo* 

ter, In.) 4283. 

Public Service Corporation of N. J. Tech- 
nical L. See N. J. Public Service Cor- 
poration Technical L. 
Pugh, John J., In. P. L., Columbus, Ohio. 

6006. 

Pugsley, Maud M., 100 Gainsboro St., Bos- 
ton, Mass. 2445. 
Pullman Free School of Manual Training 

L., Pullman, Chicago, III. 8122. 



HANDBOOK 



533 



Pullman P. F. L., Pullman, Chicago, III. 

(Bertha L. Ludlam, In.) 8746. 
Purdue Univ. L., Lafayette, Ind. (W. M. 

Hepburn, In.) 5020. 
Purer, William A., supt. Delivery Station 

Dept. P. L., Chicago, 111. 7441. 
Putnam, Elizabeth G., In. South Br. P. L., 

Salem, Mass. 8772. 

Putnam, Herbert, In. L. of Congress, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 558. 
PYNE, M. TAYLOR, chairman N. J. P. L. 

Commission, Princeton, N. J. 3463. 

Life member. 
Quaife, M. M., supt. Wis. State Historical 

Society, Madison, Wis. 6225. 
Queens Borough P. L., 402 Fulton St., 

Jamaica, N. Y. 3947. 
Quigley, Margery C., In. F. L., Endicott, 

N. Y. 8092. 
Quimby, Cora A., In. P. L., Winchester, 

Mass. 1735. 
Quinby, M. Gladys, child. In. F. L., Orange, 

N. J. 8652. 

Quincy, Mass. Thomas Crane P. L. (Tru- 
man R. Temple, In.) 5823. 
Quinn, Marietta, P. L., Detroit, Mich. 8314. 
Quire, Joseph H., law and leg. ref. In. 

State L., Sacramento, Calif. 7840. 
Racine (Wis.) P. L. (Frances A. Hannum, 

In., 5944. 
Rackett, Maud B., In. Green F. L., Wells- 

boro, Pa. 6850. 
Rademaekers, William H. and Son, L. 

Binders, Newark, N. J. 7979. 
Rader, J. L., In. Univ. of Okla. L., Nor- 
man, Okla. 7306. 
Radford, Mary R., 58 Union St., Oshkosh, 

Wis. 5774. 

Rahn, Lucy F., asst. Post. L. U. S. Gen- 
eral Hospital no. 2, Fort McHenry, Md. 

2717. 
Rains, Mary D., child. In. P. L., Cleveland, 

O. 6815. 
RANCK, SAMUEL H., In. P. L., Grand 

Rapids, Mich. 949. Life member. 
Randall, Bertha T., asst. P. L., Seattle, 

Wash. 2938. 
Randall, Elinor Edna, 1st asst. South Side 

Br. Carnegie L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 7725. 
Randall, Louise, In. P. L., Whiting. Ind. 

6797. 



Raney, M. L., In. Johns Hopkins Univ. L., 
Baltimore, Md. 4558. 

Rank, Zelia, class. P. L., St. Louis, Mo. 
6480. 

Rankin, Mrs. Eliza J., In. U. S. General 
Hospital no. 19 L., Oteen, N. C. 5303. 

Rankin, George W., In. P. L., Fall River, 
Mass. 1423. 

Rankin, Helen G., asst. Stations Dept. P. 
L., Indianapolis, Ind. 8383. 

Rankin, Ina H., 277 Windermere Road, 
Walkerville, Ont., Can. 5566. 

Rankin, Rebecca B., asst. In. Municipal 
Ref. L., N. Y. City. 8653. 

Rathbone, Georgia W., In. Y. W. C. A. L., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 2768. 

Rathbone, Josephine A., vice-director Sch. 
of L. Science, Pratt Inst., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
961. 

Rawson, Fannie C., sec'y Kentucky L. 
Commission, Frankfort, Ky. 5021. 

Ray, Ella G., P. L., Detroit, Mich. 8315. 

Ray, Mary Katherine, deputy In. Nebraska 
State L., Lincoln, Neb. 3454. 

Ray, Richard, Jr., In. B. Y. M. C. Union L., 
48 Boylston St., Boston, Mass. 2138. 

Rayle, Maurine, asst. Br. Dept. P. L., In- 
dianapolis, Ind. 8384. 

Read, Charles Albert, In. Univ. of Cincin- 
nati L., Cincinnati, Ohio. 5269. 

Read, Jennie M., child. In. City L., Man- 
chester, N. H. 7699. 

Reading (Pa.) P. L. (Edward A. Howell, 
In.) 2233. 

Reavis, W. Elmo, mgr. Pacific L. Bind- 
ing Co., 210 E. Washington St., Los An- 
geles, Calif. 6035. 

Reddick's L. See Ottawa, III. 

Redlands, Cal. A. K. Smiley P. L. (Eliza- 
beth Lowry, In.) 5186. 

Redstone, Edward H., In. State L., Bos- 
ton, Mass. 7151. 

Redwood L. and Athenaeum. See New- 
port, R. I. 

Reece, Ernest J., principal L. Sch. of the 
New York P. L., N. Y. City. 5530. 

Reed, Amy Louise, In. Vassar College L., 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 4852. 

Reed, Jessie E., br. In. P. L., Chicago, 111. 
7249. 



534 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Reed, Katherine, In. Lombard Coll. L., 

Galesburg, 111. 6493. 
Reed, Lois A., In. Bryn Mawr Coll. L., 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. 3034. 
Reed, Lulu Ruth, asst. In. Iowa State 

Teachers' Coll. L., Cedar Falls, Iowa. 

7750. 
Reed, Susan H., asst. Seward Park Br. 

P. L., N. Y. City. 2782. 
Reeder, Charles W., ref. In. Ohio State 

Univ. L., Columbus, Ohio. 4863. 
Reese, Rena, asst. In. P. L., Denver, Colo. 

4968. 
Regnart, Mrs. Ora Marie, asst. Santa 

Clara County L., San Jose, Calif. 8541. 
Reich, Pauline, In. Carnegie West Br. P. 

L., Cleveland, Ohio. 5902. 
Reichert, Mary L., ref. In. P. L., St. Jo- 
seph, Mo. 6671. 
Reid, Adelia, in charge Delivery Hall City 

L., Manchester, N. H. 4931. 
Reider, Joseph, asst. In. Dropsie Coll. L., 

Philadelphia, Pa. 6931. 
Reilly, Genevieve, In. P. L., Bloomsburg, 

Pa. 8209. 
Reinecke, Clara M., senior asst. P. L., 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 3731. 
Reinke, Caroline E., chief of Useful Arts 

Room P. L., Cincinnati, Ohio. 5665. 
Reins, Alice W., In. Baltimore City Coll. 

L., Baltimore, Md. 5611. 
Remann, Henry C., In. Lincoln L., Spring- 
field, 111. 4021. 
Remley, Elsie Jeannette, asst. Iowa State 

Univ. L., Iowa City, la. '7584. 
Reque, Anna C., classifier P. L., Chicago, 

111. 5467. 
Resor, Marguerite Burnet, head catlgr. 

Univ. of Cincinnati L., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

7548. 
Rex, Frederick, In. Mun. Ref. Br. P. L., 

Chicago, 111. 6463. 
Reynolds, Helen M., Ginsburg Br. P. L., 

Detroit, Mich. 6359. 
Reynolds, Margaret, In. First Wisconsin 

National Bank L., Milwaukee, Wis. 4135. 
Reynolds, Marion J., In. Swift and Com- 
pany L., Chicago, 111. 8654. 
Rhode Island State L., Providence, R. I. 

(Herbert O. Brigham, In.) 4257. 



Rhodes, Gertrude, In. High Sch. L., Fond 

du Lac, Wis. 8532. 
Rhodes, Isabella K., ref. asst. N. Y. State 

L., Albany, N. Y. 4355. 
Rice, Beth Clark, head of Young People's 

Room P. L., Syracuse, N. Y. 6923. 
Rice, Edith, In. Hunter High Sch. L., N. Y. 

City. 2236. 
Rice, Mrs. J. Merritt, Lakewood, White 

Bear Lake, Minn. 5765. 
Rice, O. S., supervisor Sch. L's., Dept. of 

Public Instruction, Madison, Wis. 6864. 
Rice, Paul North, ref. asst. P. L., N. Y. 

City. 5331. 

Rich, Frank K., Hyannis, Mass. 8093. 
Rich, Mrs. Frank K., Hyannis, Mass. 2856. 
Rich, Lora, principal asst. P. L., Chicago, 

111. 6264. 

Richards, Clara Alida, In. in charge Ma- 
sonic Grand Lodge L., Fargo, N. D. 6360. 
Richards, Elizabeth M., acting In. Coll. 

for Women L., Western Reserve Univ., 

Cleveland, Ohio. 5274. 
Richards Memorial L. See North Attle- 

borough, Mass. 
Richardson, Carrie L., sec'y Board of 

Trustees P. L., Ilion, N. Y. 8094. 
Richardson, Ernest Gushing, In. Princeton 

Univ. L., Princeton, N. J. 395. 
Richardson, Frances, asst. L. Assoc., Port- 
land, Ore. 8488. 
Richardson, Helen K., asst. Catalog Dept. 

P. L., Indianapolis, Ind. 8385. 
Richardson, Louise, In. Florida State Coll. 

for Women L., Tallahassee, Fla. 8435. 
Richardson, Margaret, asst. catlgr. P. L., 

Bridgeport, Conn. 6717. 
Richardson, Mary C., In. Normal Sch. L., 

Geneseo, N. Y. 6243. 
Richardson Memorial L. See Sugar Hill, 

N. H. 
Richie, Emily M., Camp L., Camp Jesup, 

Ga. 8823. 
Richie, Herbert E., head Magazine and 

Documents Dept. P. L., Denver, Colo. 

7624. 
Richmond, Lucy C., head Circ. Dept. City 

L. Assoc., Springfield, Mass. 2451. 
Rider, Mrs. Gertrude T., in charge Room 



HANDBOOK 



535 



for Blind L. of Congress, Washington, 

D. C. 6089. 
Ridgway, Amy, In. Spring Garden Br. F. 

L., Philadelphia, Pa. 6752. 
Ridington, John, acting In. Univ. of Brit- 
ish Columbia, Vancouver, B. C., Canada. 

7153. 
Ridlon, Margaret, In. P. L., Highland Park, 

111. 5746. 
Kigali, Camille C., In. Shedd Park Br. P. 

L., Chicago, 111. 7463. 
Riggs, Henrietta S., head catlgr. Card Div. 

L. of Congress, Washington, D. C. 6056. 
Riggs, Winifred, head Catalog Dept. P. L., 

Toledo, O. 3035. 
Rigling, Alfred, In. Franklin Inst. L., 15 

So. 7th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 771. 
Ringo, Lois Margaret, asst. Delivery Dept. 

P. L., Indianapolis, Ind. 8386. 
Ripley, Lauren William, In. City F. L., 

Sacramento, Cal. 3336. 
Risser, Josephine E., R. R. no. 2, Hopkins, 

Minn. 8043. 
Ritchie, Elizabeth P., In. Carnegie F. P. 

L., Kalispell, Mont. 7640. 
RITCHIE, JOHN, JR., Back Bay, Boston, 

Mass. 2694. Life member. 
Ritter, Clement V., bookseller, 830-835 Old 

Colony Bldg., Chicago, 111. 6501. 
Ritter, Jessie L., asst. P. L., Cleveland, 

Ohio. 1411. 
Riverside (Cal.) P. L. (Joseph F. Daniels, 

In.) 4253. 
Robb, Mary G., In. Kent Br. P. L., Toledo, 

Ohio. 8790. 

Robbins, Mary Esther, principal L. Instruc- 
tion R. I. State Normal Sch. L., Provi- 
dence, R. I. 963. 
Robert, Grace Louise, reviser Catalog 

Dept. P. L., Detroit, Mich. 8348. 
Roberts, Blanche C., vice- and child. In. 

P. L., Columbus, Ohio. 4966. 
Roberts, Mrs. Blanche W., In. Bates Coll. 

L., Lewiston, Me. 4683. 
Roberts, Effie I., In. Carnegie L., Wabash, 

Ind. 5834. 
Roberts, Ethel Dane, In. Wellesley Coll. 

L., Wellesley, Mass. 4003. 
Roberts, Etta M., In. P. L., Wheeling, W. 

Va. 8655. 



Roberts, Flora B., In. P. L., Kalamazoo, 
Mich. 2115. 

Roberts, Jane E., In. State Univ. of Iowa 
L., Iowa City, Iowa. 4391. 

Roberts, Katharine Olcott, child. In. P. L., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 7315. 

Roberts, Louise, 2124 Avenue I., Birming- 
ham, Ala. 6514. 

Roberts, Mary Hilda, asst. ref. In. Ind. 
State L., Indianapolis, Ind. 5323. 

Roberts, Mrs. Minna L., In. Carnegie L., 
Jennings, La. 5461. 

Robertson, Blanche, 920 S. Kline, Aber- 
deen, S. D. 6406. 

Robertson, Florence R., In. in charge 
Dwight Br. and Alfred E. Burr Br. P. L., 
Hartford, Conn. 8451. 

*Robertson, J. P., In. Provincial L., Win- 
nipeg, Man., Canada. 5547. 

Robertson, Josephine Chester, head catlgr. 
Univ. of Chicago L., Chicago, 111. 1619. 

Robertson, Nellie M., asst. Colo. State Ag- 
ricultural Coll. L., Fort Collins, Colo. 
5822. 

Robertson, Mrs. William G., owner and 
In. Robertson Circ. L., Roanoke, Va. 
8035. 

Robeson, Julia G., In. Richmond Hill High 
Sch. L., N. Y. City. 3020. 

Robie, Amelia H., child. In. Carnegie L., 
Atlanta, Ga. 6491. 

Robinson, Elizabeth, head of Sch. Div. P. 
L., St. Paul, Minn. 6719. 

Robinson, Gertrude H., asst. In. Social 
Service L., Boston, Mass. 7854. 

Robinson. Julia A., sec'y Iowa L. Com- 
mission, Des Moines, Iowa. 5026. 

Robinson, Rev. Lucien Moore. In. Phila- 
delphia Divinity School, 5000 Woodland 
Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 3314. 

Robinson, Lydia G., ed. of Publications 
P. L., Chicago, 111. 2316. 

Robinson, Mabel Frances, asst. catlgr. 
Osterhout F. L., Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 2053. 

Robinson, Morgan P., state archivist Va. 
State L., Richmond, Va. 7775. 

Robinson, Sylvia H., catlgr. P. L., Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. 3852. 

Rochester (N. Y.) P. L. (William F. Yust, 
In.) 5618. 



538 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Rochester University L., Rochester, N. Y. 
(Donald B. Gilchrist, In.) 4267. 

Rock, Katharine H., asst. In. Skidmore 
Sch. of Arts L., Saratoga Springs, N. Y. 
8781. 

Rock Island (III.) P. L. (Ellen Gale, In.) 
6577. 

Rockford (III.) P. L. (Jane P. Hubbell, 
In.) 7394. 

Rockport (Mass.) P. L. (Mabel L. Wood- 
fall, In.) 6112. 

Rockwell, Anna G., In. New Britain Inst., 
New Britain, Conn. 809. 

Rockwell, Elizabeth L., In. P. L., Goshen, 
Ind. 6063. 

Rockwell, Helen E., organizer L. Exten- 
sion Div., State L. and Museum, Harris- 
burg, Pa. 6427. 

Rockwood, Eleanor Ruth, ref, In. L. As- 
soc., Portland, Ore. 3393. 

Rodemeyer, Gesine M., Delta Laboratory 
E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Co., Ar- 
lington, N. J. 8656. 

Roden, Carl B., In. P. L., Chicago, 111. 2283. 

*Roden, Mrs. C. B., care P. L., Chicago, 
111. 5542. 

Rodier, Ruth E., In. U. S. General Hospital 
no. 41 L., Fox Hills, S. L, N. Y. 8814. 

Roe, Clara Strong, town and county sec'y 
Finance Dept. Nat'l Board Y. W. C. A., 
600 Lexington Ave., N. Y. City. 6428. 

Roeder, Alice E., In. P. L., Wyomissing, 
Pa. 8657. 

Roelke, H. E., asst. ref. In. John Crerar 
L., Chicago, 111. 6046. 

Roeseler, Edna, br. In. P. L., Superior, 
Wis. 8499. 

Rogan, Alice B., In. P. L., Freeport, N. Y. 
7280. 

Rogan, Octavia Fry, leg. ref. In. State L,, 
Austin, Texas. 5251. 

ROGERS, MRS. FORD H., member Board 
of Directors, chairman Book Com. and 
asst. In. Carnegie P. L, Ocala, Fla. 8115. 
Life member. 

Rogers, Jane Grey, In. Medical Dept. Tu- 
lane Univ., New Orleans, La. 5400. 

Rogers, Katharine B., ref. In. N. J. State 
L., Trenton, N. J. 5932. 

Rogers, Mary Edith, child. In. Aguilar Br. 
P. L, N. Y. City. 8658. 



Roghe", Hedwig, br. In. P. L., Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 8659. 

Rolland, Anna P., In. P. L, Dedham, Mass. 
3620. 

Romig, Lida, In. F. P. L., Abilene, Kan. 
3188. 

Ronan, Elizabeth C., asst. state organizer 
Ind. P. L. Commission, Indianapolis, 
Ind. 7550. 

Roosa, Howard, pres L. Board, Evans- 
ville, Ind. 8660. 

ROOT, AZARIAH SMITH, In. Oberlin 
Coll. L., Oberlin, Ohio. 736. Life mem- 
ber. 

Root, Elizabeth de W., stud. N. Y. State 
L. Sch., Albany, N. Y. 8277. 

Root, Harriet T., In. Hazelwood Br. Car- 
negie L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 7641. 

Root, Marion Metcalf, asst. P. L., N. Y. 
City. 8661. 

Root, Mrs. Mary E. S., child. In. P. L., 
Providence, R. I. 2080. 

Roper, Eleanor, In. Flushing Br. Queens 
Borough P. L., Flushing, N. Y. 1486. 

Ropes, Bessie P., In. Peabody Institute L., 
Danvers, Mass. 7992. 

Rose, Alice L., In. Financial L. of the Na- 
tional City Bank, N. Y. City. 2403. 

Rose, Ernestine, A. L. A. headquarters, 
10 Rue de 1'filyse'e, Paris, France. 4691. 

Rose, Grace Delphine, In. P. L., Daven- 
port, la. 1720. 

Rosenberg L. See Galveston, Tex. 

Rosengarten, J. G., 1704 Walnut St., Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 2169. 

Rosentreter, Martha, In. Albina Br. L. 
Assoc., Portland, Ore. 8489. 

ROSS, CECIL A., Harvard Univ. L., Cam- 
bridge, Mass. 7863. Life member. 

Ross, Evelyn T., child. In. Albina Br. L. 
Assoc., Portland, Ore. 849.0. 

Ross, Ora Thompson, trus. P. L, Rensse- 
laer, Ind. 4090. 

Rossell, Mary E., child, In. P. L., N. Y. 
City. 5672. 

Rothrock, Mary U., In. Lawson McGhee 
L, Knoxville, Tenn. 6927. 

Rowe, Alice T., ref. In. East Portland Br. 
L. Assoc., Portland, Ore. 8267. 

Rowe, Miltanna, head In. Maryland State 
Coll. L., College Park, Md. 8662. 



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537 



Rowell, Joseph Cummings, In. emeritus 

Univ. of Cal., Berkeley, Cal. (Address, 

3415 West St., Oakland, Cal.) 923. 
Rowell, Warren C., vice-pres. The H. W. 

Wilson Co., N. Y. City. 3901. 
Rowland, Dunbar, dir. Miss. Dept. of Ar- 
chives and History, Jackson, Miss. 

7928. 
Rowley, Edith, In. Allegheny Coll. L., 

Meadville, Pa. 3722. 
Roy, Myrtle I., 1423 Magnolia Ave., Los 

Angeles, Cal. 5740. 
Royall, Rebecca, In. Carnegie L., Cleburne, 

Tex. 3489. 
Royce, Elizabeth, ref. and catalog asst. 

P. L., Waterloo, Iowa. 8436. 
Ruby, Edward E., acting In. Whitman Coll. 

L., Walla Walla, Wash. 7604. 
Ruckteshler, N. Louise, In. Guernsey Mem. 

L. and David N. Follett Mem. Law L., 

Norwich, N. Y. 4212. 
Rugg, Harold Goddard, asst. In. Dart- 
mouth Coll. L., Hanover, N. H. 6968. 
Rugg, Helen, catlgr. P. L., St. Paul, Minn. 

8731. 
Rule, Elizabeth Elkins, asst. In. P. L., 

Lynn, Mass. 3054. 
Rulon, Elva E., In. State Normal School 

L., Peru, Neb. 3067. 
Runcie, J. E., In. U. S. Military Academy 

L., West Point, N. Y. 6363. 
Runkle, Erwin W., In. Pennsylvania State 

Coll. L., State College, Pa. 8178. 
Runyan, Walter L., 5742 Maryland Ave., 

Chicago, 111. 6481. 
Ruotolo, Dominic, catlgr. P. L., N. Y. City. 

6975. 
Rupp, Julia, In. La Salle Extension Univ. 

L., Chicago, 111. 3047. 
RUPPENTHAL, JACOB C., pres. Board 

of Directors, Carnegie P. L., Russell, 

Kan. 4156. Life member. 
RUSH, CHARLES E., In. P. L., Indiana- 
polis, Ind. 4005. Life member. 
Rush, M. Gladys, ref. In. la. State Coll. 

L., Ames, Iowa. 7154. 
Russ, Nellie M., Pasadena, Cal. 3315. 
Russel, John R., member State Board of 

L. Commissioners, Real Estate Exchange 

Bldg., Detroit, Mich. 8117. 



Russell, Alma M., chief catlgr. Provincial 
L., Victoria, B. C., Canada. 3277. 

Russell, Etta Lois, asst. In. P. L., Cam- 
bridge, Mass. 3599. 

Russell, Florence, ref. In. F. P. L., New 
Haven, Conn. 3760. 

Russell, Frances B., In. L. Assoc., Strat- 
ford, Conn. 8237. 

Russell, Helen A., In. Jubilee Br. P. L., 
Buffalo, N. Y. 7155. 

Russell, Mabel L., acting chief Child. 
Dept. P. L., Cincinnati, Ohio. 7316. 

Rutherford, Drusil'la D., stud. Simmons 
Coll. Sen. L. Science, Boston, Mass. 8210. 

Ruzicka, Joseph, bookbinder, 106 Clay St., 
Baltimore, Md. 5635. 

Ryan, Anna M., asst. In. Supreme Court 
Law L., Buffalo, N. Y. 8663. 

Ryan, Charlotte, 305 Goliad St., San An- 
tonio, Tex. 7608. 

Ryan, Ella V., 1st asst. Documents Div. 
Wis. State Hist. Soc. L., Madison, Wis. 
6808. 

Ryan, Gertrude, In. East Washington St. 
Br. P. L., Indianapolis, Ind. 7229. 

Ryan, M. Lillian, principal asst. Branches 
Dept. P. L., Chicago, 111. 5375. 

Ryder, Olive M., In. P. L., Hanover, Pa. 
7157. 

Ryerson L., Art Inst. See Chicago. 

Ryland, Rosamay, in charge Story Hour 
and Juvenile Sch. Br. L's. Young Peo- 
ple's Room P. L., Stockton, Cal. 6721. 

Sabin, Daisy B., In. Evander Childs High 
Sch. L., N. Y. City. 3036. 

Sabin, Lilian, Grand Junction, Colo. R. F. 
D. 2. 7777. 

*Sachse, Julius F., In. Grand Lodge A. F. & 
A. M. of Penn., Masonic Temple, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 3946. 

Sacramento (Cal.) City F. L. (Lauren W. 
Ripley, In.) 391. 

St. Charles (III.) P. L. (Mabel L. Case, In.) 
8778. 

St. John, Edna H., in charge Periodical 
Dept. Syracuse Univ. L., Syracuse, N. Y. 
7828. 

St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, St. Johnsbury, 
Vt. (Cornelia F. Fairbanks, asst. In. in 
charge.) 5378. 



538 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



St. Joseph (Mo.) P. L. (Jesse Cunning- 
ham, In.) 4273. 

St. Louis (Mo.) Mercantile L. Assoc. (Wil- 
liam L. R. Gifford, In.) 3606. 

St. Louis (Mo.) P. L. (Arthur E. Bostwick, 
In.) 128. 

St. Paul (Minn.) P. L. (W. Dawson John- 
ston, In.) 5237. 

St. Petersburg (Fla.) P. L. (Emma M. 
Williams, In.) 6416. 

Salem (Mass.) P. L. (Gardner Maynard 
Jones, In.) 1063. 

Saleski, Mary Agnes, In. 125th St. Br. P. 
L., N. Y. City. 2927. 

Salt Lake City (Utah) P. L. (Joanna H. 
Sprague, In.) 4340. 

Sample, Jean G., general asst. P. L., Su- 
perior, Wis. 8452. 

Sampson, E. Elizabeth, asst. L. Science 
Simmons Coll., Boston, Mass. 8664. 

Samson, Mary, child. In. Lincoln Br. P. L., 
Rochester, N. Y. 8665. 

San Anselmo (Cal.) P. L. (Alice Kirch- 
mann, In.) 8758. 

San Antonio (Tex.) Carnegie L. (Kate F. 
Devine, acting In.) 5183. 

San Diego (Cal.) F. P. L. (Althea H. War- 
ren, In.) 6533. 

San Francisco (Cal.) Mechanics'-Mercan- 
tile L. (Francis B. Graves, In.) 4345. 

San Francisco (Cal.) P.. L. (Robert Rae, 
In.) 734. 

Sanborn, Alice Evelyn, In. Wells Coll. 
L., Aurora, N. Y. 2424. 

Sanborn, Henry Nichols, In. P. L., Bridge- 
port, Conn. 5502. 

Sanborn, William F., In. P. L., Cadillac, 
Mich. 3837. 

Sanders, Dora L., In. Vanderbilt Univ. L., 
Nashville, Tenn. 7576. 

Sanderson, Edna M., registrar N. Y. State 
L. Sch., Albany, N. Y. 3724. 

Sandusky (Ohio) L. Assoc. (Claire Graefe, 
In.) 6185. 

Sanford, Delia C., classifier Univ. of Wis- 
consin L., Madison, Wis. 3051. 

Saniel, Isidore, Bureau of Science L., 
Manila, P. I. 794"4. 

Sankee, Ruth, asst. ref. In. Kan. State 
Agric. Coll. L., Manhattan, Kan. 6878. 



Sano, Tomo-Saburo, chief In. P. L., Yama- 
guchi, Japan. 3935. 

Santa Barbara (Cal.) F. P. L. (Frances 
Burns Linn, In.) 5762. 

Santa Rosa (Cal.) F. P. L. (Margaret A. 
Barnett, In.) 6534. 

Santes, Marie, catlgr. Univ. of Minn. L., 
Minneapolis, Minn. 7783. 

Sargent, Abby L., In. P. L., Medford, Mass. 
614. 

Sartorius, Joseph J., asst. Ref. Desk Gros- 
venor L., Buffalo, N. Y. 8095. 

Sattinger, Fanny Ruth, In. Brightwood 
Br. P. L., Indianapolis, Ind. 8341. 

Sault Ste. Marie (Mich.) Carnegie P. L. 
(Adah Shelly, In.) 5720. 

Saunders, Mrs. Mary L., In. P. L., Lom- 
poe, Cal. 8754. 

Savage, Agnes, In. Bowen Br. P. L., De- 
troit, Mich. 2879. 

Savage, Elta-Virginia, In. Western Society 
of Engineers L., 1735 Monadnock Block, 
Chicago, 111. 5787. 

Savannah (Ga.) P. L. (C. Seymour Thomp- 
son, In.) 5190. 

Sawyer, Anna L., In. Margaret Carnegie 
L., Mills College, Cal. 3186. 

Sawyer, Elizabeth M., asst. to supervisor 
of Smaller Brs. and High Sch. L's., P. 
L., Cleveland, Ohio. 6211. 

Sawyer, Ethel R., dir. of Training Class L. 
Assoc., Portland, Ore. 3785. 

Sawyer, Frances C., asst. Post L. U. S. 
General Hospital no. 6, Fort McPher- 
son, Ga. 8096. 

SAWYER, MRS. HARRIET P., principal 
St. Louis L. Sch. P. L., St. Louis, Mo. 
3021. Life member. 

Sawyer, Mrs. Jeanie L., In. P. L., Ham- 
mond, Ind., 6064. 

Sawyer, Kate E., P. Sch. L., Lansing, 
Mich. 8248. 

Sawyer F. L. See Gloucester, Mass. 

Sayers, Alfred H. P., ref. asst. P. L., Chi- 
cago, 111. 8784. 

Sayre, Ethel F., catlgr. Rochester Theo- 
logical Sem. L., Rochester, N. Y. 3022. 

Scanlan, Madaline M., L. Assoc., Port- 
land, Ore. 8815. 

Scarth, Helen M., In. Farmington L., 
Farmington, Conn. 8211. 



HANDBOOK 



539 



fechabacker, Muriel J., catlgr. Ohio Univ. 
L., Columbus, O. 7860. 

Schall, B. F., In. Parsons Coll. L., Fair- 
field, Iowa. 8802. 

Schantz, Carolyn R., asst. Technical L. 
E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company. 
Wilmington, Del. 8666. 

Schapiro, Israel, in charge Semitic Div. 
L. of Congress, Washington, D. C. 6146. 

Schaub, Emma, asst. In. P. Sch. L., Colum- 
bus, Ohio. 6283. 

SCHENK, FREDERICK WILLIAM, In. 
Univ. of Chicago Law L., Chicago, 111. 
3804. Life member. 

Scheuber, Mrs. Charles, In. Carnegie P. L., 
Fort Worth, Tex. 2498. 

Schilling, Julia Anita, asst. In. P. L., Sa- 
vannah, Ga. 6516. 

Schmidt, Alfred F. W., chief asst. classi- 
fier L. of Congress, and In. George Wash- 
ington Univ. L., Washington, D. C. 2209. 

Schmidt, Dorothea C., in charge Sch. of 
Commerce and Administration L. Univ. 
of Chicago, Chicago, 111. 3061. 

Schmidt, Willy, ex-ref. In. P. L., Milwau- 
kee, Wis. (Address, 502 Oakland Ave.) 
4820. 

Schneider, Bertha M., head catlgr. Ohio 
State Univ. L., Columbus, Ohio. 4826. 

Schnitzer, Martha, asst. In. Carnegie L., 
Houston, Texas. 7726. 

*Scholefield, Ethelbert Olaf Stuart, In. Pro- 
vincial L., and Archivist, Victoria, B. C., 
Canada. 3276. 

Schott, Chara M., P. L., Washington, D. C. 
8238. 

Schrage, Jennie T., 513 Washington 
Court, Sheboygan, Wis. 7882. 

Schulte, Theodore E., bookseller, 80-82 
Fourth Ave., N. Y. City. 1809. 

Schulze, Alma E., child. In. P. L., Cincin- 
nati, Ohio. 8461. 

Schwab, Gertrude A., general asst. P. L., 
Superior, Wis. 8501. 

Schwab, Marion F., child. In. De Kalb Br. 
P. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 7159. 

Schwarten, William H., supt. Printing and 
Binding Div. P. L., N. Y. City. 3436. 

Schwedes, Henry A., trus. P. L., Irving- 
ton, N. J. (Address, 40 Coit St.) 8179. 



Schwind, Dorothea, asst. In. F. P. L., Jer- 
sey City, N. J. 6871. 

Scott, Carrie Emma, chief child. Dept. P. 
L., Indianapolis, Ind. 3727. 

Scott, Edna Lyman, story-teller and lec- 
turer on literature for children, 905 
Olympic Way, Seattle, Wash. 2263. 

Scott, Mrs. Frances -Hanna, In. Mich. Coll. 
of Mines L., Houghton, Mich. 2117. 

Scott, Jennie F., head catlgr. State L., In- 
dianapolis, Ind. 4887. 

Scranton, Henriette L, 318 Barbeau St., 
Sault Ste Marie, Mich. 5943. 

Sears, Minnie E., 1st asst. Ref. Catalog 
Div. P. L., N. Y. City. 2227. 

Sears, Rose Roberts, 1305 Astor St., Chi- 
cago, 111. 5391. 

Searson, J. W., Dept. of English Kan. 
State Agricultural Coll., Manhattan, 
Kan. 7922. 

Seattle (Wash.) P. L. (Judson Toll Jen- 
nings, In.) 4047. 

Seaver, William N., In. P. L., Woburn, 
Mass. 6366. 

Secombe, Annabell C., In. F. L., Milford, 
N. H. 4649. 

Sedalia (Mo.) P. L. (Margaret Hodges, 
asst. In. in charge.) 4168. 

See, Alice, In. Phillips Univ. L., East Enid, 
Okla. 5903. 

Seed, Lucille B., asst. Ref. Dept. P. L., 
Detroit, Mich. 8316. 

Seelman, Helen L., P. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
8239. 

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2060. 
Stuart, Theresa C., 1. organizer Maine L. 

Commission, Augusta, Me. 8671. 
Stuart, William H., Leary, Stuart & Co., 

9 So. 9th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 1659. 
Stuart, Mrs. William H., 443 Carpenter 

St., Germantown, Philadelphia, Pa. 2729. 
Stull, Maud I., supervisor of Brs. and 

head of Training Class P. L., Kansas 

City, Mo. 6945. 
Sturgis, Sarah Louise, 1st asst. and ref. 

In. P. L., Fort Wayne, Ind. 7556. 
SUBERS, HELEN D., 1. organizer, Ash- 
bourne, Pa. 5270. Life member. 
Sucgang, Catalina, Bureau of Science L., 

Manila, P. I. 7946. 
Sugar Hill, N. H. Richardson Mem. L. 

(Jerusha E. Parker, In.) 7855. 
Sugden, Frances W., 229 W. Main St., 

New Britain, Conn. 8103. 
Suggett, Mrs. Allen H., In. Sutro Br. Cal. 

State L., San Francisco, Cal. 5098. 
Sullivan, Clara G., In. J. Sterling Morton 

High Sch. L., Cicero, 111. 8263. 
Sullivan, Mrs. Maud D., In. P. L., El Paso, 

Tex. 8734. 
Suminsbey, Inez, In. Jesup Mem. L., Bar 

Harbor, Maine. 8104. 
Summers, Mary A., In. in charge Moore 

Mem. L., Greene, N. Y. 6644. 
Summit (N. J.) F. L. (Emilie Hill, In.) 

4372. 
Sumner, Clarence W., In. P. L., Sioux City, 

la. 5935. 
Superior (Wis.) P. L. (Blanch L. Unter- 

kircher, In.) Superior, Wis. 5238. 



546 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Sutherland, Lillian A., sec'y and treas. 
Washington Sem., Washington, Pa. 
6833. 

Sutliff, Helen B., head catlgr. and class. 
Leland Stanford Jr. Univ. L., Stanford, 
University, Cal. 2770. 

Sutliff, Mary Louisa, instructor L. Sch. of 
the New York P. L., N. Y. City. 1002. 

Suttle, Mrs. Oscar M., In. Loose Leaf L., 
Shelby, N. C. 7894. 

Sutton, Elisabeth, chief catlgr. F. P. L., 
Paterson, N. J. 4108. 

Svedberg, Vera G.. asst. Greendale Br. 
P. L., Worcester, Mass. 8735. 

Swain, Allene R., 19 W. 84th St., N. Y. 
City. 8672. 

Swami, Brahma Nath Sidhasram, founder 
Sarswati Bhandar L., Etawah City, U. 
P., India. 5702. 

Swanwick, Mary B., In. F. P. L., Joplin, 
Mo. 2998. 

Sweet, Belle, In. Univ. of Idaho L., Mos- 
cow, Idaho. 3009. 

Sweet, Louise, U. S. General Hospital no. 
31 L., Carlisle, Pa. 4010. 

Sweet, May M., br. In. P. L., Cleveland, 
Ohio. 8500. 

Swem, Earl Gregg, asst. In. Virginia State 
L., Richmond, Va. 2237. 

Swerig, Mabel B., asst. Ref. Dept. Colum- 
bia Univ. L., N. Y. City. 7849. 

Swerig, Vivian P., asst. P. L., N. Y. City. 
7758. 

Swift, Lindsay^ editor Library Publica- 
tions, P. L., Boston, Mass. 643. 

Swift, S. C., sec'y-general and In. Canadian 
Nat'l L. for the Blind, Toronto, Ontario, 
Can. 7595. 

Swingle, Mary H., 30 West North St., 
Newark, Ohio. 8105. 

Switzer, Grace Elizabeth, asst. P. L., Cleve- 
land, O. 3010. 

Swope, Blanche A., In. Univ. of Pittsburgh 
L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 7268. 

Sydney Univ. L., Sydney, N. S. W., Aus- 
tralia. (J. Le Gay Brereton, In.) 7718. 

Sykes, W. J., chief In. Carnegie P. L.. Ot- 
tawa, Canada. 5373. 

Syracuse (N. Y.) P. L. (Paul M. Paine, 
In.) 69. 



Syracuse Univ. L., Syracuse, N. Y. (E. E. 
Sperry, In.) 6279. 

Taber, Fanny T., head Child. Work P. L., 
Birmingham, Ala. 6377. 

Taber, Josephine, supt. of Branches, P. L., 
Seattle, Wash. 2539. 

Tacoma (Wash.) P. L. (John B. Kaiser, 
In.) 47C6. 

Tafel, Leonore A., N. J. Zinc Company L., 
160 Front St., N. Y. City. 8249. 

Taggart, Anne Van Cleve, F. P. L., Mill- 
brook, N. Y. 4837. 

Tai, Tse-chien, In. Tsing Hua Coll. L., 
Peking. China. 7752. 

Talcott, Bessie, In. P. L., Sidney, N. Y. 
8212. 

Talcott, Frances S., In. Lewis Institute L., 
Chicago, 111. 5031. 

Tandy, Mrs. C. S., trus. chairman Book 
Committee P. L., Vevay, Ind. 7492. 

Tandy, Jennette Reid, Vevay, Ind. 6062. 

Tapley, L. Idelle, catlgr. Harper Mem. L. 
Univ. of Chicago, Chicago, 111. 7715. 

Tappert, Katherine, vice-In. Washington 
County F. L., Hagerstown, Md. 4538. 

Tarr, Anna M., head Circ. Dept. P. L., 
Youngstown, 0. 4855. 

Tate, Blanche M., In. Gray Br. P. L., De- 
troit, Mich. 6107. 

Tatom, Will Ella, asst. Carnegie L., Nash- 
ville, Tenn. 8411. 

Taunton (Mass.) P. L. (J. E. Crane, In.) 
4803. 

Tawney, Mary Adele, In. 'Franklin Ave. 
Br. P. L., Minneapolis, Minn. 6908. 

Taylor, Alice M., chief Periodical Dept. L. 
Assoc., Portland, Ore. 8491. 

Taylor, Mrs. Knox, member Board of Di- 
rectors P. L., High Bridge, N. J. 8183. 

Taylor, Laura, In. Bay Ridge Br. P. L., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 7172. 

TAYLOR, LUCIEN EDWARD, Catalog 
Dept. P. L., Boston. Mass. 3337. Life 
member. 

Taylor, Mrs. Mary P., 161 Princeton Ave., 
Providence, R. I. 8470. 

Taylor, Wm. B. A., chief Ref. Accessions 
Div. P. L., N. Y. City. 3586. 

TEAL, WILLIAM, supt. of Delivery John 
Crerar L., Chicago, 111. 5999. Life mem- 
ber. 



HANDBOOK 



547 



Teeter, Paul B., 5000 Crystal St., Chicago, 

111. 8004. 
Tefft, Bessie, head of Br. and Sch. Dept. 

Cossitt L., Memphis, Tenn. 8673. 
Teggart, Frederick J., 419 West 117th St., 

N. Y. City. 1672. 
Temple, Mabel, In. P. L., North Adams, 

Mass. 1001. 
Temple, Truman R., In. Thomas Crane P. 

L., Quincy, Mass. 7202. 
Templeton, Charlotte, sec'y Ga. L. Com- 
mission, Atlanta, Ga. 3302. 
Templeton, Louise, In. P. L., Porterville, 

Cal. 6626. 
Tennessee Univ. L., Knoxville, Tenn. 

(Agnes R. Williams, acting In.) 65SO. 
Terre Haute, Ind. Emeline Fairbanks 

Memorial L. (Mrs. Sallie C. Hughes, In.) 

4254. 
Terry, Daisy, In. South Br. P. L., Toledo, 

Ohio. 8736. 
Terry, Elizabeth R., In. in charge King- 

sessing Br. F. L., Philadelphia, Pa. 8264. 
Texas Coll. of Industrial Arts L., Denton, 

Tex. (Ida M. Gangstad, In.) 6860. 
Texas State L., Austin, Tex. (Elizabeth 

H. West, In.) 4722. 
Texas Univ. L., Austin, Texas. (John E. 

Goodwin, In.) 4102. 
Teyen, Gerald M. W., 4228 N. Tripp Ave., 

Chicago, 111. 5268. 
Thackray, Mary J., In. Dept. of Travel. 

L's. P. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 3748. 
Thayer, Anna W., In. Armour Sq. Br. P. 

L., Chicago, 111. 8184. 
Thayer, Charles S., In. Case Mem. L., Hart- 
ford, Conn. 2904. 
Thayer, Edna, In: North End Br. P. L., 

Providence, R. I. 8438. 
Thayer, Gordon W., In. John G. White 

Collection P. L., Cleveland, O. 5744. 
Thibou, Anna E., In. Holmes L., Boonton, 

N. J. 7174. 
Thiebaud, Gertrude, In. P. L., Peru, Ind. 

5609. 
Thienes, Rose C., In. Haughville Br. P. L., 

Indianapolis, Ind. 8388. 
Thomas, Anna B., catlgr. P. L., Youngs- 
town, Ohio. 6946. 
Thomas, Edith, in charge L., Extension 



Service, U. of Mich. General L., Ann Ar- 
bor, Mich. 7899. 

Thomas! Harriet J., chief Per. Div. P. L., 
Detroit, Mich. 4977. 

Thomas, Mabel W., asst. In. F. L., Oak- 
land, Cal. 6483. 

Thomas Crane P. L. See Quincy, Mass. 

Thompson, Arthur J., in charge Dept. of 
Archives and History, Charleston, W. 
Va. 8674. 

Thompson, Blanche, In. P. L., Ripon, Wis. 
4539. 

Thompson, C. Seymour, In. P. L., Savan- 
nah, Ga. 3680. 

Thompson, Dorothy H., head catlgr. State 
Coll. of Wash. L., Pullman, Wash. 4857. 

Thompson, Golda M., general asst. P. L., 
Detroit, Mich. 8427. 

Thompson, Helen Morton, catlgr. Dept. of 
Agriculture L., Washington, D. C. 2494. 

Thompson, Mrs. Joseph A., Chickasha, 
Okla. 3486. 

Thompson, Laura A., In. TJ. S. Dept. of La- 
bor, Washington, D. C. 3886. 

Thompson, Laura E., principal Playground 
Brs. Los Angeles County F. L., Los An- 
geles, Cal. 4644. 

Thompson, Louise, 1st asst. Circ. Dept. 
P. L., Detroit, Mich. 8737. 

Thompson, Ruth E., asst. Circ. Dept. P. 
L., Los Angeles, Cal. 6257. 

Thomson, Frances Danner, In. P. L., Mt. 
Vernon, N. Y. 1829. 

Thomson, O. R. Howard, In. James V. 
Brown L., Williamsport, Pa. 2006. 

Thome, Elizabeth G., instructor Syracuse 
Univ. L. Sch., Syracuse, N. Y. 1695. 

Thorne, Emilie H., 1700 Pine St., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 6379. 

Thorpe, Helene, P. L., Detroit, Mich. 8319. 

Throop, George R., asst. In. P. L., St. Louis, 
Mo. 7850. 

Thuman, Jane Ellis, child. In. F. P. L., 
New Bedford, Mass. 5325. 

Thurman, William R., foreman Bindery P. 
L., N. Y. City. 5679. 

Thurston, Ada, J. P. Morgan L., 33 East 
36th St., N. Y. City. 2712. 

THURSTON, ELIZABETH PEABODY, 16 
Fountain St., West Newton, Mass. 732. 
Life member. 



548 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Thyng, May Clayton, In. P. L., Roselle, 

N. J. 7176. 
Ticer, Winifred Fleming, In. City F. L., 

Huntington, Ind. 7287. 
Tichenor, Barcus, asst. Catalog Dept. Pur- 
due Univ. L., Lafayette, Ind. 8675. 
Tiemann, Edith W., registrar L. Sen. of 

the New York P. L., N. Y. City. 5320. 
Tilton, Edward L., architect, 52 Vanderbilt 

Ave., N. Y. City. 4347. 
Tilton, Mrs. Edward L., 126 Archer Ave., 

Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 8676. 
Timmerman, Hazel B., child. In. South 

Side Br. P. L., Omaha, Neb. 8677. 
Timmins, George, pres. Board of Trustees 

P. L., Syracuse, N. Y. (Address, 1540 

E. Genesee St.) 8763. 
Tinkham, Mabel, catlgr. and ref. In. P. L., 

Gary, Ind. 5140. 
Titcomb, Mary Lemist, In. Washington 

County F. L., Hagerstown, Md. 1096. 
Tobey, Grace E., asst. supt. Catalog Dept. 

P. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 3856. 
Tobias, Ella F., 1st asst. Catalog Dept. 

P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 5455. 
Tobitt, Edith, In. P. L., Omaha, Neb. 1168. 
Todd, Marie A., art ref. In. P. L., Minne- 
apolis, Minn. 2352. 
Todd, Nancy Helen, 1st asst. Homewood 

Br. Carnegie L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 7759. 
Toledo (Ohio) P. L. (Herbert S. Hirshberg, 

In.) 4143. 
Tolman, Frank Leland, ref. In. N. Y. State 

L., Albany, N. Y. 3193. 
Tompkins, Hamilton B., director and mem- 
ber of book committee, Redwood L., 

Newport, R. I. (Address, 11 Redwood 

St.,) 3639. 
Tompkins, Jessie E., chief of Schools Div. 

P. L., Detroit, Mich. 8320. 
Tones, Laura C., asst. Serials Dept. Iowa 

Coll. L., Ames, Iowa. 7732. 
Topping, Blanche Debar, asst. In. Hoyt P. 

L., Saginaw, Mich. 5324. 
Topping, Elizabeth R., stud. N. Y. State 

L. Sch., Albany, N. Y. 7603. 
Tornudd, Allan V., In. L. of Abo Academy 
(Swedish Univ. of Abo), Abo, Finland. 

6170. 

Toronto (Canada) P. L. (George H. Locke, 
In.) 6509. 



Toronto Univ L., Toronto, Canada. (Hugh 

H. Langton, In.) 4337. 
Torrance, Mary, In. P. L., Muncie, Ind. 

5200,. 
Torrence, Mrs. Crown, catlgr. Agric. L., 

Clemson Coll., Clemson College, S. C. 

7416. 
Torrington (Conn.) .L. (Louise T. Mason, 

In.) 7711. 
Tourtellot, Harriet A., asst. child. In. P. L., 

Providence, R. I. 3654. 
Tower, Ralph W., curator of books and 

publications, American Museum Natural 

Hist. L., N. Y. City. 5680. 
Towns, Alexander, Library Bureau, Bos- 
ton, Mass. 7835. 
Townsend, Mrs. Ingeborg V., Milton Mills 

L., Milton Mills, N. H. 8833. 
Townsend, S. D., Educational Dept. Victor 

Talking Machine Co., Camden, N. J. 

8678. 

Toy, Mary C., P. L., Boston, Mass. 8738. 
Tracey, Catharine S., Seminole Ave., Ca- 

tonsville, Md. 3303. 
Tracy, Angle E., catlgr. Redwood L. and 

Athenaeum, Providence, R. I. 4684. 
Traver, Louis B., 295 Hamilton Ave., Tren- 
ton, N. J. 7836. 
Traverse City (Mich.) P. L. (Alice M. Wait, 

In.) 6212. 
Trenton (N. J.) F. P. L. (Howard L. 

Hughes, In.) 4312. 
Trimble, Katherine M., asst. Drexel Inst. 

L, Philadelphia, Pa. 7177. 
Tripp, George H., In. F. P. L., New Bed- 
ford, Mass. 2664. 

Trowbridge, Arthur C., assoc. dir. Educa- 
tional Bureau Y. M. C. A., 347 Madison 

Ave., N. Y. City. 7972. 
Troy, Cecilia M., asst. Brs. Dept. P. L, 

Chicago, 111. 6835. 
Troy, Zeliaette, organizer and In. W. A. 

Gilchrist Business L., 128 E. Ohio St., 

Chicago, 111. 6811. 
Troy (N. Y.) P. L. (Mary L. Davis, In.) 

4324. 
True, Ellen L, 20 Highland St., Hammond, 

Ind. 7625. 
True, Mabel C., supervisor Child. Work 

P. L, Kansas City, Mo. 8412. 



HANDBOOK 



549 



TUCKERMAN, ALFRED, 1509 16th St., N. 

W., Washington, D. C. 1599. Life mem- 
ber. 
Tufts, Percy H., asst. Harvard Coll. L., 

Cambridge, Mass. 1716. 
Tufts Coll. L., Tufts College, Mass. (Ethel 

M. Hayes, act. In.) 4745. 
Tufts L. See Weymouth, Mass. 
Tunison, Fay, asst. P. L., Long Beach, Cal. 

7733. 
Turner, Elizabeth T., asst. Extension Div. 

P. L., N. Y. City. 7558. 
Turner, Emily, 1. organizer, North 24th St., 

Quincy, 111. 2147. 
Turner, Ethel M., asst. Mass. State L., 

Boston, Mass. 3674. 
Turner, Harriet P., In. Switzerland Co. L., 

Vevay, Ind. 7590. 
Turner, Isabel McC., In. F. L., Allentown, 

Pa. 5979. 
Turrill, Margaret S., asst. Post. L., U. S. 

General Hospital no. 6, Fort McPherson, 

Ga. 8739. 

Turvill, Helen, Instructor Univ. of Wiscon- 
sin L. Sch., Madison, Wis. 4417. 
TUTT, HELEN, 1st asst. catlgr. P. L., St. 

Louis, Mo. 1715. Life member. 
Tutt, Virginia M., In. P. L., South Bend, 

Ind. 3448. 
Tuttle, Winifred, in charge Open Shelf 

Room City L., Manchester, N. H. 7296. 
Twaddle, Mrs. Bessie Herrman, In. Tulare 

Co. F. L., Visalia, Cal. 5706. 
Tweedell, Edward D., asst. In. John Crerar 

L., Chicago, 111. 2698. * 
Twells, Geneva A., asst. East Side Br. 

P. L., Evansville, Ind. 7884. 
Tyler, Alice S., director Western Reserve 

Univ. L. Sch., Cleveland, O. 765. 
Tyler, Amelia W., asst. In. Smith Coll. L., 

Northampton, Mass. 6549. 
Tyler, Anna C., charge of Story-Telling 

Dept. P. L., N. Y. City. 3304. 
Ulrich, Carolyn F., head of Circ. Dept. and 

Branches, P. L., Bridgeport, Conn. 6993. 
Umatilla County P. L., Pendleton, Ore. 

(Sabra L. Nason, In.) 6213. 
Underbill, Adelaide, assoc. In. Vassar Coll. 

L., Poughkeepsie, 'N. Y. 1017. 
Underbill, Caroline M., In. P. L., Utica, 

N. Y. 712. 



U. S. Department of Agriculture L., Wash- 
ington, D. C. (Claribel R. Barnett, In.) 
6651. 

U. S. Soldiers' Home L., Washington, D. 
C. (Mrs. Grace V. Evans, In.) 5240. 

University Club of Chicago L., Monroe St. 
and Michigan Blvd., Chicago, III. (Wal- 
ter R. Spofford, In.) 5120. 

Unterkircher, Blanch L., In. P. L., Supe- 
rior, Wis. 5022. 

Upham, Warren, archaeologist Minn. Hist. 
Soc., St. Paul, Minn. 4542. 

Upland (Cal.) P. L. (Mrs. F. H. Manker, 
In.) 6648. 

Upleger, Margaret C., In. Coll. of Liberal 
Arts L. Univ. of Philippines, Manila, 
P. I. 7943. 

Usher, Robert James, ref. In. John Crerar 
L., Chicago, 111. 5623. 

Utah Univ. L., Salt Lake City, Utah. 
(Esther Nelson, In.) 5100. 

Utica (N. Y.) P. L. (Caroline M. Under- 
bill, In.) 1755. 

UTLEY, GEORGE BURWELL, sec'y 
American Library Association, Chicago, 
111. 2827. Life member. 

Utley, Mrs. George B., 1306 E. 54th St., 
Chicago, 111. 5060. 

Vail, Alice L, In. Carter, Ledyard and Mil- 
burn (Attorneys), N. Y. City. 5849. 

Vail, R. W. G., ref. asst. Information Div. 
P. L., N. Y. City. 6955. 

Vail, Mrs. R. W. G., auditor A. L. A. Dis- 
patch Office, 31 West 15th St., N. Y. City. 
8679. 

Vaile, Lucretia, ref. In. P. L., Denver, Colo. 
6550. 

Valentine, Amy, 1st asst. George Bruce 
Br. P. L., N. Y. City. 5937. 

Vallejo (Cal.) P. L. (L. Gertrude Doyle, 
" In.) 6581. 

Van Buren, Maud, civic organizer, Owa- 
tonna, Minn. 3038. 

Van Cleave, Jessie G., child. In. Wilming- 
ton Institute F. L., Wilmington, Del. 
6290. 

Van Cleef, Antoinette W., catlgr. P. L., 
N. Y. City. 6932. 

Van Deene, G. B., representing National 
L. Bindery Co., Springfield, Mass. 7778. 

Van Deusen, Marjorie H., In. Los Angeles 



550 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



High Sch. L., Los Angeles, Cal. 6240. 
Van Eman, Edith K., In. P. L. ( Oshkosh, 

Wis. 6957. 
Van Hoesen, Henry B., asst. In. Princeton 

Univ. L., Princeton, N. J. 7179. 
Van Home, Irene, child. In. Chauncy Hurl- 
but Br. P. L., Detroit, Mich. 8321. 
Van Keuren, Mary K., In. Thrall L., Mid- 

dletown, N. Y. 3655. 
Van Laer, Arnold J. F., archivist Div. of 

Archives and Hist. N. Y. State Educa- 
tional Dept, Albany, N. Y. 1711. 
Van Meter, Elizabeth, asst: Ref. Dept. P. 

L., Indianapolis, Ind. 8389. 
Van Name, Addison, In. emeritus Yale 

Univ. L., New Haven, Conn. 39. 
Van Sant, Clara, In. P. L., Medford, Ore. 

7727. 
Van Valkenburgh, Agnes, In. P. L., Bay 

City, Mich. 1098. 
Van Wagenen, Mary, ref. asst. Economics 

Div. P. L., N. Y. City. 7837. 
Van Winkle, M. C., In. Stone Ridge L., 

Stone Ridge, N. Y. 8759. 
Van Zandt, Margaret, supervisor emeritus 

Columbia Univ. L., N. Y. City. 487. 
VANDERLIP, FRANK A., chairman L. 

War Council, 1917; representative of 

A. L. A. on Committee of Eleven, United 

War Work Campaign, inc., 1918-1919, 

Scarborough-on-Hudson, N. Y. 8747. 

Honorary member. 
Vasbinder, Lida C., ref. In. Colgate Univ. 

L., Hamilton, N. Y. 5758. 
Vassar Coll. L., Poughkeepsie, N. Y. (Amy 

Louise Reed, In.) 5184. 
Vater, A. Eugenie, ref. asst. Purdue Univ. 

L., Lafayette, Ind. 6909. 
Vaughan," Estelle M. A., In. F. P. L., St. 

John, N. B., Canada. 6489. 
Veblen, Gertrude, In. General Engineering 

L. Univ. of Minn. L., Minneapolis, Minn. 

8350. 

Vencill, Cornelia C., 401 Whitney Ave., 
Wilkinsburg, Pa. 8106. 

Venn, Florence, ref. In. Indiana State L., 

Indianapolis, Ind. 4886. 
Venn, Mary C., asst. Business Br. P. L., 

Indianapolis, Ind. 8390. 
Ver Nooy, Winifred, asst. in charge Circ. 



and Information Univ. of Chicago L., 
Chicago, 111. 6258. 

Vermont State L., Montpelier, Vt. (George 
W. Wing, In., and E. Lee Whitney, asst. 
In.) 1985. 

Vermont Univ. L., Burlington, Vt. (Helen 
B. Shattuck, In.) 4279. 

Verona (N. J.) P. L. (Jennie A. Rich., In.) 
8804. 

Victoria P. L., Melbourne, Australia. (Ed- 
mund La Touche Armstrong, In.) 4301. 

Vinall, Mary A., 147 R St., N. E., Washing- 
ton, D. C. 7970. 

VINCENT, BISHOP JOHN H., 5700 Black- 
stone Ave., Chicago, 111. 1817. Honorary 
member. 

Vincent, W. D., trus. P. L., Spokane, Wash. 
(Address, The Old Nat'l Bank.) 8185. 

Vineland (N. J.) P. L. (Minnie G. Clark, 
In.) 7862. 

Virginia Polytechnic Inst. L., Blacksburg, 
Va. (Eleanor I. Jones, In.) 4235. 

Virginia (Minn.) P. L. (Grace Stevens, 
In.) 5239. 

Virginia State L., Richmond, Va. (H. R. 
Mcllwaine, In.) 5189. 

Vitz, Carl P. P., 2nd vice-In. P. L., Cleve- 
land, O. 3675. 

Voge, Adolf Law, Intelligence Div. E. I. 
du Pont de Nemours and Co., Wilming- 
ton, Del. 5910. 

Vogleson, Helen E., 2nd asst. In. Los An- 
geles Co. F. L., Los Angeles, Cal. 6440. 

Voigt, Clara Louise, Columbia, S. C. (Ad- 
dress care of A. G. Voigt, Southern 
Theol. Seminary.) 7181. 

von Noe", Adolf Charles, classifier Univ. of 
Chicago L., Chicago, 111. 6047. 

von Schlechtendal, Mrs. B., In. P. L., 
Charleston, W. Va. 8542. 

Vosper, Zaidee B., asst. P. L., Detroit, 
Mich. 7701. 

Voswinkel, Caroline W. D., In. P. L., To- 
mah, Wis. 5336. 

Vought, Sabra W., inspector Sch. Libra- 
ries Div. Univ. of the State of N. Y., Al- 
bany, N. Y. 3902. 

Vuylsteke, Folmina, asst. In. Gates Mem. 
L., Port Arthur, Tex. 8214. 

Waddell, Irene, In. Pleasant Ridge Br. P. 
L., Cincinnati, Ohio. 8439. 



HANDBOOK 



551 



Wade, Margaret A., In. P. L., Anderson, 
Ind. 8680. 

WADLEY, MRS. MOSES, Sand Hills, Au- 
gusta, Ga. 703. Life member. 

Wadlin, Horace G., In. emeritus P. L., Bos- 
ton, Mass. 2835. (Address, 118 Woburn 
St., Reading, Mass.) 

Wagner, Florence, In. Manufacturers Air- 
craft Assoc. L., N. Y. City. 8681. 

WAGNER, SULA, chief catlgr. P. L., St. 
Louis, Mo. 1118. Life member. 

Wait, Marie Fox, In. F. P. L., Somerville, 
N. J. 1841. 

Wait, Maud A., In. Tremont Br. P. L., N. 
Y. City. 4032. 

Waite, Frank A., chief Information Div. 
P. L., N. Y. City. 3104. 

Wakefield, Mass. Beebe Town L. (H. Ger- 
trude Lee, In.) 6232. 

Wald, Emma, asst. catlgr. Burton Histor- 
ical Collection P. L., Detroit, Mich. 6851. 

Wales, Edna McClymonds, trus. McCly- 
monds P. L., Massillon, Ohio. 8351. 

Wales, Elizabeth B., sec'y Missouri L. 
Commission, Jefferson City, Mo. 1516. 

Walker, Mrs. Caroline Burnite, Easton, 
Md. 1557. 

Walker, Catherine P., asst. In. Nat'l Or- 
ganization for Public Health Nursing. 
N. Y. City. 5657. 

Walker, Dorothea S., stud. Simmons Coll. 
Sch. of L. Science, Boston, Mass. 8107. 

W T alker, F. Grace, head Order Dept. P. L., 
Indianapolis, Ind. 8391. 

Walkley, Anna N., P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 
8543. 

Walkley, Raymond L., asst. In. P. L., Min- 
neapolis, Minn. 5633. 

Wall, A. J., asst. In. N. Y. Historical So- 
ciety L., N. Y. City. 8682. 

Wallace, Marian K., asst. Child. Dept. 
Carnegie L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 8740. 

Wallace, Ruth, head Order Dept. P. L., 
Evansville, Ind. 6383. 

Waller, Florence M., technology In. P. L., 
Seattle, Wash. 5802. 

Waller, Mary E., In. Carnegie P. L., Wash- 
ington, Ind. 7559. 

Waller, Olga, Kewanee, 111. 8683. 

Walmsley. Grace Hope, asst. Ferguson L., 
Stamford, Conn. 7649. 



WALTER, FRANK KELLER, In. Central 
L. and Technical Information Service, 
General Motor's Corp., Detroit, Mich. 
3633. Life member. 

Waltham (Mass.) P. L. (Orlando C. Davis, 
In.) 4153. 

Walton, G. M., In. Mich. State Nor. Coll. 
L., Ypsilanti, Mich. 1190. 

Wappat, Mrs. Frederick W. (Blanche K. 
S.), In. Sch. of Applied Design L. Car- 
negie Inst. of Technology, Pittsburgh, 
Pa. 7605. 

Ward, Aline, asst. P. L., Washington, D. 
C. 8684. 

Ward, Ama Howard, In. Harris Inst. L., 
Woonsocket, R. I. 1277. 

WARD, ANNETTE P., In. Alma Coll. L., 
Alma, Mich. 2521. Life member. 

Ward, Gilbert O., technical la. P. L., Cleve- 
land, O. 5133. 

Ward, Helen M., chief of Circ. P. L., De- 
troit, Mich. 2881. 

Ward, Langdon L., supervisor of Branches 
P. L., Boston, Mass. 1926. 

Ward, Ruth L., In. Central High Sch., L., 
Newark, N. J. 3803. 

Warner, Marjorie Fleming, bibliographical 
asst. Bureau of Plant Industry, U. S. 
Dept. of Agric., Washington, D. C. 3717. 

Warner, Philip W., bookseller with Leary, 
Stuart & Co., 9 So. 9th St., Philadelphia, 
Pa. 5690. 

Warner, Rebecca P., In. Takoma Park Br. 
P. L., Washington, D. C. 6148. 

Warnock, Lucile, stud. Univ. of 111. L. 
Sch., Urbana, 111. 6408. 

Warrack, Mary E., asst. L. Assoc., Port- 
land, Ore. 8492. 

Warren, Althea H., In. P. L., San Diego, 
Cal. 5242. 

WARREN, IRENE, dir. Chicago Sch. of 
Filing and Indexing, The Globe-Wer- 
nicke Co., 11 N. Wabash Ave., Chicago, 
111. 1756. Life member. 

Warren, Katherine, asst. Harvard Coll. L.. 
Cambridge, Mass. 8685. 

Warren, Mabel C., asst. Delivery Dept. 
P. L., Indianapolis, Ind. 8392. 

Warren (Pa.) P. L. (Mary C. Weiss, In.) 
4794. 



652 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Warrick, Ruth E., clrk in charge Travel. 
L's, Neb. L. Commission, Lincoln, Neb. 
7784. 

Washburn, Winifred, asst. Ref. Dept. P. 
L., Seattle, Wash. 8020. 

Washington County F. L., Hagerstown, 
Md. (Mary L. Titcomb, In.) 5793. 

Washington (D. C.) P. L. of the District 
of Columbia (Geo. F. Bowerman, In.) 
3952. 

Washington (D. C.) See also Catholic 
Univ. of America L., L. of Congress, Na- 
tional L. for the Blind, Pan-American 
Union L., U. S. Dept. of Agriculture L., 
U. S. Soldiers' Home L. 

Washington State Coll. L., Pullman, Wash. 
(W. W. Foote, In.) 5030. 

Washington State L., Olympia, Wash. (J. 
M. Hitt, In.) 6660. 

Washington State Normal Sch. L., Ellens- 
burg, Wash. (Grace M. Leaf, In.) 6098. 

Washington University L., St. Louis, Mo. 
(James A. McMillen, In.) 5621. 

Washington Univ. L., Seattle, Wash. 
(William E. Henry, In.) 4648. 

Waska, Frank E., chief Arts and Crafts 
Div. P. L., Chicago, 111. 7237. 

Waterloo (la.) P. L. (Maria C. Brace, In.) 
4778. 

Waterman, Lucy D., 38 State St. Portland, 
Me. 1675. 

Waters, Caroline S., county In. San Ber- 
nardino County F. L., San Bernardino, 
Cal. 6672. 

Waters, Mrs. Chester C., 3 Pine Ave., 
Washington, D. C. 6276. 

Watertown (Mass.) P. L. (Lydia W. Mas- 
ters, In.) 4311. 

Waterville (Me.) P. L. (Jennie M. Smith, 
In.) 7400. 

Watkins, Donna Louise, 2nd asst. Tech. 
Dept. P. L., Detroit, Mich. 7702. 

Watsabaugh, W. R., Center Point, la. 8005. 

Watsabaugh, Mrs. W. R., Center Point, 
la. 8006. 

Watson, Carrie M., In. Univ. of Kansas L., 
Lawrence, Kan. 1608. 

Watson, Cecile A., 1730 Q St., N. W., 

Washington, D. C. 6607. 
Watson, Iva C., asst. Colo. State Agric. 
Coll. L., Fort Collins, Colo. 8108. 



Watson, Jessie McLeish, asst. Catalog Div. 

L. of Congress, Washington, D. C. 1176. 

Watson, Marion P., asst. Extension Div. 

P. L., N. Y. City. 8282. 
Watson, Mary L., ref. asst. Newberry L., 

Chicago, 111. 4384. 

Watson, William R., chief Div. of Educa- 
tional Extension Univ. of the State of 
N. Y., Albany, N. Y. 1297. 
Watts, Florence A., asst. In. Osterhout F. 

L., Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 2393. 
Watts, Irma A., chief catlgr. Legislative 

Ref. Bureau, Harrisburg, Pa. 3681. 
Waukegan (III.) P. L. (Laura J. Perrin, 

In.) 5945. 

Wead, Eunice, asst. curator of Rare Books 

Univ. of Mich. L., Ann Arbor, Mich. 7703. 

Wead, Katherine H., asst. Bureau of Plant 

Industry, Dept. of Agric. Washington, 

D. C. 6182. 

Weaver, Margaret E., In. West High Sch., 

Rochester, N. Y. 4313. 
Webb, Mrs. James A., Jr., trus. P. L., Mad- 
ison, N. J. 3452. 
Webb, K. Louise, as&t. L. of Am. Society 

of Civil Engineers, N. Y. City. 5911. 
Webb, Maria M., catlgr. P. L., St. Louis, 

Mo. 8741. 

Webb, William, with Friends Reconstruc- 
tion Unit in France. (Address care 
Mrs. E. G. Webb, Ursinus College, Col- 
legeville, Pa.) 7214. 
Webber, Anna Louise, In. Silsby F. L., 

Charlestown, N. H. 5603. 
Weber, Mrs. Jessie Palmer, In. 111. State 

Hist. Soc., Springfield, 111. 1874. 
Webster, Caroline, A. L. A., N. Y. City. 

4173. 

Webster, Laurence J., trus. P. L., Holder- 
ness, N. H. 8186. 

WEED, LILLA, associate In. Wellesley 
Coll. L., Wellesley, Mass. 6506. Life 
member. 
Wefel, Emelia E., asst. P. L, Cleveland, 

Ohio. 7361. 
Weidinger, Enid M., asst. Genealogy Div. 

P. L, N. Y. City. 6266. 
Weinstein, Minnie, 1st asst. Child. Room 
Hamilton Fish Park Br. P. L., N. Y. 
City. 8742. 



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553 



Weis, Norma, acting child. In. Crunden 
Br. P. L., St. Louis, Mo. 7941. 

Weitenkampf, Frank, chief Art and Prints 
Div. P. L., N. Y. City. 797. 

Welch, Mrs. Lina H., financial sec'y P. L. t 
Lynn, Mass. 8686. 

Welker, Helen, child. In. P. L., Toledo, 
Ohio. 8791. 

Welles, Jessie, instr. Univ. of Wis. L. Sch., 
and visitor Wis. F. L. Commission, Madi- 
son, Wis. 2582. 

Wellington, B. W., member L. Board F. 
L., Corning, N. Y. 8109. 

Wellington (Kan.) P. L. 7221. 

Wellman, Hiller Crowell, In. City L. Assn., 
Springfield, Mass. 1425. 

Wellman, Ruth, asst. Extension Div., P. L., 
N. Y. City. 7985. 

Wells, Anna E., child. In. Adriance Mem. 
L., Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 7184. 

Wells, C. Edwin, In. Mo. State Normal 
Sch. L., Maryville, Mo. 6987. 

Wells, Emma C., catlgr. P. L., Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 1905. 

Wells, Mrs. Katherine (Adams), trus. 
Adams Memorial L., Wheaton, 111. 1141. 

Wells, Louise M., asst. P. L., Denver, Colo. 
8463. 

Wells Coll. L., Aurora, N. Y. (Alice E. 
Sanborn, In.) 4276. 

Wennerstrum, Winnifred, ref. In. F. P. L., 
Trenton, N. J. 7704. 

Wentworth, Ethel, asst. L. Assoc., Port- 
land, Ore. 8493. 

Werrey, Edna M., asst. In. Hamilton Fish 
Park Br. P. L., N. Y. City. 5011. 

Wesby, Maude Earle, sr. asst. Ref. Dept. 
F. P. L., Worcester, Mass. 8828. 

Wescoat, Lula M., auditor of Board of Di- 
rectors P. L., St. Louis, Mo. 2279. 

Wescott, Florence Archer, 130 Englewood 
Ave., Brookline, Mass. 6443. 

Wesleyan Univ. L., Middletown, Conn. 
(William J. James, In.) 4378. 

Wessmann, A. C., pres. J. F. Tapley Co., 
531 W. 37th St., N. Y. City. 5234. 

Wesson, Elizabeth Howland, In. F. L., Or- 
ange, N. J. 3545. 

West, Elizabeth H., In. Tex. State L., 
Austin, Tex. 6561. 



West, Mary E., 1st asst. Columbus Br. P. 
L., N. Y. City. 6214. 

Westchester, N. Y., Huntington F. L. and 
Reading Room. (Emma K. Volz, In.) 
5181. 

Western Kentucky State Normal Sch. L., 
Bowling Green, Ky. (Florence Ragland, 
In.) 5029. 

Western Reserve Univ. See Adelbert Coll. 
L. 

Western Reserve University L. Sch., Cleve- 
land, Ohio. (Alice S. Tyler, dir.) 4086. 

Westfield (Mass.) Atheneum F. P. L. 
(Harold A. Wooster, In.) 6197. 

Westfield (Ind.) P. L. (Eva Wells, In.) 
8036. 

Westfield, N. Y. Patterson L. (Sarah H. 
Ames, In.) 4323. 

Westmount (P. Q. Can.) P. L. (Mary 8. 
Saxe, In.) 1898. 

Weston, Jessie B., In. Coe Coll. L., Cedar 
Rapids, Iowa. 6873. 

Weyerhaeuser, Mrs. C. A., member L. 
Board P. L., Little Falls, Minn. 8250. 

Weymouth, Mass. Tufts L. (Abbie L. 
Loud, In.) 4787. 

Wharton, Miriam B., In. F. P. L., Burling- 
ton, Iowa. 2647. 

Wheeler, Florence Ethel, In. P. L., Leo- 
minster, Mass. 2397. 

Wheeler, Harold L., In. Univ. of Mo. Sch. 
of Mines and Metallurgy L., Rolla, Mo. 
5995. 

Wheeler, Horace L., head Dept. of Statis- 
tics and Documents P. L., Boston, Mass., 
and In. of American Statistical Assoc. 
3743. 

Wheeler, Joseph L., In. P. L., Youngstown, 
Ohio. 3736. 

Wheeler, Lucy K., head Circ. Dept. P. L., 
Kalamazoo, Mich. 7583. 

Wheelock, Julia, chief asst. Circ. Dept. 
Pratt Inst. F. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 3025. 

Wheelock, Mary E., supervisor of Binding 
Dept. P. L., St. Louis, Mo. 2255. 

Whipple, Mrs. J. R., founder James R. 
Whipple Mem. L., Thane, Alaska. (Ad- 
dress, Niles, Cal.) 7239. 

Whitbeck, Mrs. Alice G., In. Contra Costa 
Co., F. L., Martinez, Cal. 5102. 



554 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



WHITCOMB, ADAH FRANCES, dir. Train- 
ing Class P. L., Chicago, 111. 3469. Life 
member. 

White, Andrew Curtis, asst. In. Cornell 
Univ. L., Ithaca, N. Y. 945. 

White, Ann D., In. for W. A. Gilchrist, 122 
S. Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 6818. 

White, Cornelia Gushing, asst. John Crerar 
L., Chicago, 111. 1705. 

White, Genevieve C., asst. Catalog Dept. 
L. of Congress, Washington, D. C. 7673. 

White, Grace M., prin. of Sociology Dept. 
P. L., Los Angeles, Cal. 3195. 

White, Grace M., 1st asst. Henry M. Utley 
Br. P. L, Detroit, Mich. 8322. 

White, Percy M., chairman of Municipal 
L. Commission, Carnegie L., New Ply- 
mouth, N. Z. 8817. 

White, William A., trus. P. L., Brooklyn, 
N. Y. (Address, 158 Columbia Heights.) 
509. 

White Plains (N. Y.) P. L. (Clara F. Hop- 
per, In.) 6113. 

Whiteman, Edna A., supervisor story-tell- 
ing, Child. Dept. Carnegie L., and in- 
structor in story-telling, Carnegie L. 
Sch., Pittsburgh, Pa. 5474. 

Whiteman, Margaret M., In. Carnegie F. 
L, Connellsyille, Pa. 6528. 

Whitfield, Eva L., Carnegie L., San An- 
tonio, Tex. 8110. 

Whiting (Ind.) P. L. (Louise Randall, In.) 
6072. 

Whitmore, Frank Hayden, ln^ P. L., Brock- 
ton, Mass. 2667. 

Whitney, Anna H., trus. Town L., Lancas- 
ter, Mass. 874. 

Whitney, Mrs. E. M., trus. P. L., Winchen- 
don, Mass. 8187. 

Whitney, Edwina M., In. Conn. Agric. Coll. 
L., Storrs, Conn. 6925. 

Whittemore, Mrs. Everard (Grace M.), In. 
P. L., Hudson, Mass. 4666. 

Whittemore, Gettrude, In. U. S. Public 
Health Service Hospital L., New Ha- 
ven, Conn. 4012. 

Whittemore, J. Eleanor, ref. attendant 
Thomas Crane P. L., Quincy, Mass. 7734. 

Whittlesey. Julia M., 2126 E. 93rd St., 
Cleveland, Ohio. 2544. 



Whyte, Mrs. Flora H., Peachland, B. C., 
Can. 8464. 

Wichita (Kan.) City L. (Julius Lucht, In.) 
4374. 

Wickersham, Ruth, asst. P. L., Denver, 
Colo. 7911. 

Wieder, Callie, In. P. L., Marshalltown, 
Iowa. 6810. 

Wiese, Mrs. E. Robert, 206 W. North Ave., 
Pittsburgh, N. S., Pa. 6317. 

Wiggin, Frances S., 1. organizer Mass. F. 
P. L. Commission, Boston, Mass. 3046. 

Wiggin, Mary P., In. Danbury L., Dan- 
bury, Conn. 8687. 

Wigginton, May W., head Catalog Dept. 
F. P. L, Louisville. Ky. 6430. 

Wightman, Dorothy, In. Yardley L., Yard- 
ley, Pa. 8688. 

Wightman, Mary D., asst. Maps and Charts 
Division, L. of Congress, Washington, 
D. C. 3080. 

Wigley, Laura M., br. In. Queens Borough 
P. L., Jamaica, N. Y. 8689. 

Wilbur, Amey C., dir. of Circ. P. L., Provi- 
dence, R. I. 2913. 

Wilbur, Mary L., asst. Sociology Div. P. 
L., Cleveland, Ohio. 8283. 

Wilby, Eleanor S., asst. catlgr. P. L., Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio. 7976. 

Wilcox, Beatrice C., asst. Ref. Catalog 
Dept. P. L., N. Y. City. 8690. 

Wilcox, Fannie M., asst. In. and catlgr. 
Tex. L., Austin, Tex. 7642. 

Wilcox, Jessie M., vice-pres. Board of 
Trustees L. Assoc., Sandusky, Ohio. 
8265. 

Wilcox, Ruth, head Fine Arts Div. P. L, 
Cleveland, O. 6385. 

Wilcoxson, Mrs. Emily M., asst. In. Field 
Museum of Natural History, Chicago. 
111. 4617. 

Wilde, Alice, asst. F. P. L., Newark, N. J. 
3443. 

Wilder, Edna Hinman, In. Russell L, Mid- 
dletown, Conn. 7186. 

Wilder, Gerald G., In. Bowdoin Coll. L, 
Brunswick, Me. 3503. 

Wildes, Marjorie, head catlgr. Minn. His- 
torical Society L., St. Paul, Minn. 7187. 

Wiley, Betsy Thomas, In. P. L.. Dallas, 
Tex. 5350. 



555 



Wiley, Edwin, In. U. S. Naval War Coll. 

L., Newport, R. I. 1033. 
Wilkes, Marjorie, In. Hospital L., Camp 

Merritt, N. J. 8188. 
Wilkes-Barre Pa. Osterhout F. L. (Myra 

Poland, In.) 1080. 
Wilkie, Florence, In. U. S. Bureau of Mines 

L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 6937. 
Wilkin, Ralph H., In. Supreme Court L., 

Springfield, 111. 7562. 
Wilkins, Ernest H., professor of Romance 

Languages Univ. of Chicago, Chicago, 

111. 7991. 
Wilkins, Lydia K., asst. U. S. Dept. of 

Agriculture L., Washington, D. C. 5404. 
Wilkinson, Mary S., asst. Records Dept. 

Ryerson L., Art Inst., Chicago, 111. 5306. 
Will, Edith, In. Rose City Park Br. L. 

Assoc., Portland, Ore. 8494. 
Willard, Elisa May, 864 Francisco St., San 

Francisco. Cal. 1387. 
Willard, Ruth M., In. Northeast Br. P. L., 

Kansas City, Mo. 6729. 
Williams, Agnes R., acting In. Univ. of 

Tenn. L., Knoxville, Tenn. 8440. 
Williams, Alice, order clerk L. Assoc., 

Portland, Ore. 7259. 
Williams, Caroline E., In. E. I. du Pont de 

Nemours & Co., Experimental Station 

L., Wilmington, Delaware. 7615. 
Williams, Carrie L., 663 S. 13th St., East. 

Salt Lake City, Utah. 5403. 
Williams, Carrie T., s&c'y L. Sch., Car- 
negie L., Atlanta, Ga. 7674. 
Williams, Edward C., In. Howard Univ. 

L., Washington, D. C. 1494. 
Williams, Elizabeth T., 15 Woodland St., 

Hartford, Conn. 6173. 
Williams, Lizzie A., ex-ln., 16 Arlington St., 

Cambridge, Mass. 513. 
Williams, Mabel, in charge Work with 

Schools P. L., N. Y. City. 6915. 
Williams, Mabel McDowell, In. East Port- 
land Br. L. Assoc., Portland, Ore. 6441. 
WILLIAMS, MARGARET STUART, ref. 

In. and lecturer in L. Science Univ. of 

111. L., Urbana, 111. 6410. Life member. 
Williams, Mary, In. N. Y. State Labora- 
tories, Albany, N. Y. 2235. 
Williams, Nellie, acting sec'y Neb. P. L. 

Commission, Lincoln, Neb. 6916. 



Williams, Sherman, chief Sch. L. Div. N. Y. 

State Education Dept., Albany, N. Y. 

5625. 
Williams College L., Williamstown, Mass. 

(Christine Price, In. in charge.) 5037. 
Williams (Mont.) Community Club L. 

(Lydia F. Mattke, In.) 7621. 
Williamson, C. C., chief of the Div. of 

Economics P. L., N. Y. City 5732. 
Williamsport, Pa. James V. Brown L. (O. 

R. Howard Thompson, In.) 4322. 
Willigerod, Alice, In. P. L., Hazleton, Pa. 

5246. 

Wiiliston, N. D. James Memorial L. (Bes- 
sie R. Baldwin, In.) 5360. 
Wilmington (Del.) Institute F. L. (Arthur 

L. Bailey, In.) 3977. 
Wilson, Clara G., in charge Art Dept. City 

L., Manchester, N. H. 7657. 
Wilson, Clydia, asst. Madison Ave. Br. P. 

L., Indianapolis, Ind. 8393. 
Wilson, Elizabeth E., asst. John Crerar L., 

Chicago, 111. 4707. 
Wilson, Eunice C., In. 58th Street Br. P. L., 

N. Y. City. 3708. 
WILSON, HALSEY W., publisher H. W. 

Wilson Co., 958 University Ave., N. Y. 

City. 2282. Life member. 
Wilson, Harry G., sec'y Board of Directors 

P. L., Chicago, 111. 4913. 
Wilson, Hoyland Lee, In. Carnegie P. L., 

Clarksdale, Miss. 8832. 
Wilson, Josie, jr. asst. Brownsville Br. P. 

L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 5224. 
Wilson, Lillie M., In. Shelby Park Br. P. 

L., Indianapolis, Ind. 8394. 
Wilson, Lilly M., general asst. Carnegie L., 

San Antonio, Tex. 7563. 
Wilson, Louis N., In. Clark Univ. L., Wor- 
cester, Mass. 2586. 
Wilson, Louis Round, In. Univ. of North 

Carolina L., Chapel Hill, N. C. 3626. 
Wilson, Martha, supervisor Smaller Brs. 

High Sch. Ls. P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 

4191. 
Wilson, Ralph, bookseller, 30 Church St., 

N. Y. City. 3841. 
Wilson, Mrs. Ralph, bookseller, 30 Church 

St., N. Y. City. 2617. 
Winans, Frances W., In. P. L., Avon-by- 

the-Sea, N. J. 8691. 



556 



Winchell, F. Mabel, In. City L., Manches- 
ter, N. H. 1724. 

Winchester, George F., In. F. P. L., Pater- 
son, N. J. 475. 

Winchester, Va. Handle/ L. (C. Vernon 
Eddy, In.) 6049. 

Windsor, Grace E., In. Wylie Ave. Br. 
Carnegie L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 6386. 

WINDSOR, PHINEAS LAWRENCE, In. 
Univ. of Illinois L., Urbana, 111. 2116. 
Life member. 

Wing, Alice L., organizer Mich. State L. 
Commission, Lansing, Mich. Address, 
705 E. Ludington Ave., Ludington, Mich. 
4929. 

Wing, Florence S., In. Wis. State Normal 
Sch. L., La Crosse, Wis. 2301. 

Wing, Jessie E., asst. P. L., Passaic, N. J. 
8692. 

Winnetka (III.) F. P. L. (Mary E. Hewes, 
In.) 4804. 

Winning, Margaret, asst. In. Wasco Co. 
L., The Dalles, Ore. 6411. 

Winnipeg, Canada. See Manitoba, Pro- 
vincial L. of. 

Winser, Beatrice, asst. In. F. P. L. New- 
ark, N. J. 1019. 

Winship, George P., In. Widener Collection 
Harvard Coll. L., Cambridge, Mass. 7564. 

Winslow, Amy, acting ref. In. P. L., In- 
dianapolis, Ind. 7705. 

Winston-Salem (N. C.) Carnegie P. L. 
(Pamela Bynum, In.) 8698. 

Winthrop Nor. and Ind. Coll. L., Rock Hill, 
S. C. (Ida J. Dacus, In.) 4095. 

Winthrop (Mass.) P. L. (Sabina M. Nel- 
son, In.) 6137. 

WIRE, DR. G. E., deputy In. Worcester Co. 
Law L., Worcester, Mass. 608. Life 
member. 

Wire, Mrs. G. E. (Emma Clark), 46 Wil- 
liam St., Worcester, Mass. 2779. 

Wisconsin F. L. Com., Madison, Wis. 
(Mathew S. Dudgeon, sec'y.) 5417. 

Wisconsin State Historical Society L., 
Madison, Wis., (M. M. Quaife, supt.) 
5346. 

Wisconsin State Normal Sch. L., Milwau- 
kee, Wis. (Delia G. Ovitz, In.) 4721. 

Wisconsin Univ. L., Madison, Wis. (Wal- 
ter M. Smith, In.) 5236. 



Wise, Rabbi Jonah B., trus. L. Assoc., Port- 
land, Ore. (Address, 466 19th St.) 8189. 

Witham, Eliza, In. Greenpoint Br. P. L., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 2684. 

Withers L. See Nicholasville, Ky. 

Withington, Mary, asst. Yale Univ. L., New 
Haven, Conn. 8441. 

Woburn (Mass.) P. L. (William N. Seaver, 
In.) 4672. 

Woerner, Frieda L., In. Spades Park Br. 
P. L., Indianapolis, Ind. 8395. 

Wolcott, Mrs. F. D., pres. L. Board P. L., 
Hutchinson, Kan. (Address, 100 West 
20th St.) 8190. 

Wolcott, John D., In. U. S. Bureau of Edu- 
cation, Washington, D. C. 4816. 

Wolf, Estella, asst. i-ef. In. Univ. of In- 
diana L., Bloomington, Ind. 7565. 

Wolf, Gustave E., member State Board of 
L. Commissioners, 216-7 Houseman 
Bldg., Grand Rapids, Mich. 8111. 

Wolf, Ida, classifier Univ. of Indiana L., 
Bloomington, Ind. 7566. 

Wolfe, Fannie, asst. In. P. L., Cedar Rap- 
ids, Iowa. 8112. 

Wolfe, Ida, head Per. Dept. P. L., Kansas 
City, Mo. 8535. 

Wolff, Ellen, asst. Carnegie L., Atlanta, 
Ga. 7956. 

Wolhaupter, Alice C., Red Cross Home 
Service, Wilmington, Del. 6586. 

Wolpaw, Eda L., asst. Temple Br. P. L., 
Cleveland, O. 7907. 

Wolpaw, Sarah J., asst. Woodland Br. P. 
L., Cleveland, O. 7908. 

Wolter, Peter, mgr. L. Dept. A. C. McClurg 
& Co., Chicago, 111. 4552. 

Woltz, Mrs. L. O., Burton Historical Col- 
lection P. L., Detroit, Mich. 8323. 

Wommer, Elizabeth, asst. P. L., Long 
Beach, Calif. 8403. 

Womrath, Frederick H., mgr. A. R. Worn- 
rath, Inc., 15 E. 28th St., N. Y. City. 
8693. 

Wood, Ella Sites, index and catalog work 
Navy Dept., Washington, D. C. 1234. 

Wood, Florence M., in charge Order Dept. 
Univ. of Pennsylvania L., Philadelphia, 
Pa. 8694. 
Wood, Frances E., In. Richmond Hill Br. 



HANDBOOK 



557 



Queens Borough P. L., Richmond Hill, 
L. I., N. Y. 5914. 

Wood, Frederick C., ex-ln. Grosvenor L., 
Buffalo, N. Y. (Address, 56 Cottage St.) 
2421. 

Wood, Harriet Ann, supervisor Sch. and 
P. Ls. Minn. Dept. of Education, St. Paul, 
Minn. 1911. 

Wood, Mabel, In. West Tech. High Sch. 
Br. P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 6731. 

Wood, Mabel Gertrude, In. Dean Hobbs 
Blanchard Mem. L., Santa Paula, Cal. 
7188. 

Wood, Mary E., In. Boone Univ. L., Wu- 
chang, China. 4112. 

Wood, Mary G., In. Manitoba Agric. Coll. 
L., Winnipeg, Man., Canada. 7876. 

Woodall, Mrs. John, member Board of Di- 
rectors, Abington L. Society, Jenkin- 
town, Pa. 8113. 

Woodcock, Mabel E., purchase asst. N. Y. 
State L., Albany, N. Y. 5759. 

Woodford, Jessie M., head asst. in charge 
of Documents P. L., Chicago, 111. 4813. 

Wooding, Charles L., In. P. L., Bristol, 
Conn. 3649. 

Woodruff, Clinton Rogers, ed. National 
Municipal Review and trus. Phila. F. L., 
141 S. Broad St., Philadelphia, Pa. 7785. 

Woodruff, Eleanor B., ref. In. Pratt Inst. 
F. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 1602. 

Woodruff, Helen R., catlgr. P. L., South 
Bend, Ind. 6947. 

Woods, Mrs. Harriet de Krafft, chief Cer- 
tificate Sec. Copyright Office L. of Con- 
gress, Washington, D. C. 2987. 

Woods, Lois M., catalog asst. Leland Stan- 
ford Jr. Univ. L., Stanford University, 
Cal. 7467. 

Woodstock, Vt. Norman Williams P. L. 
(Alice L. Eaton, In.) 6059. 

Woodward, Emma, 210 N. 2nd St., Wil- 
mington, N.- C. 8191. 

Woodward, Frank Ernest, Wellesley* Hills, 
Mass. 3872. 

Woodward, William F., trus. L. Assoc., 
Portland, Ore. (Address, care Clarke, 
Woodward Drug Co., Alder at West 
Park.) 8215. 

Woodworth, Florence, director's asst. N. Y. 
State L., Albany, N. Y. 783. 



Woonsocket, R. I. Harris Inst. L. (Ama 
Howard Ward, In.) 1064. 

Wooster, J. Ethel, child. In. City L., Spring- 
field, Mass. 7838. 

Worcester County Law L., Worcester, 
Mass. (T. S. Johnson, In.; G. E. Wire, 
deputy In.) 4237. 

Worcester. (Mass.) F. P. L. (Robert K. 
Shaw, In.) 3602. 

Worden, Ruth, In. Missoula County L., 
Missoula, Mont. 6836. 

Wormer, Grace, general asst. Iowa State 
Univ. L., Iowa City, la. 4952. 

Wright, Agnes R., In. Wyo. State L., Chey- 
enne, Wyo. 7659. 

Wright, Charles Edward, In. Carnegie F. 
L., Duquesne, Pa. 1757. 

Wright, Edith I., Interchurch World Move- 
ment, N. Y. City. 7190. 

Wright, Eleanor E., In. State Normal Sch. 
L., Towson, Md. 8453. 

Wright, Ethel Connett, dir. of Child. Work 
P. L., Toledo, O. 7839. 

Wright, Ida F., In. P. L., Evanston, ill. 
4553. 

Wright, Margaret E., acting supervisor 
Grade Sch. Ls. P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 
6387. 

Wright, Muriel, Western Reserve L. Sch., 
Cleveland, O. 8774. 

Wright, Purd B., In. P. L., Kansas City, 
Mo. 1652. 

Wright, Rebecca W., asst. Vt. Historical 
Society L., Mcntpelier, Vt. 4759. 

Wright, Ruth M., head of Sch. Dept. F. P. 
L., Newark, N. J. 5397. 

Wrigley, Eva, 76 N. Broad St., Atlanta, 
Ga. 3949. 

Wrisley, Margaret, trus. P. L., Belmont, 
Mass. 8266. 

Wroth, Lawrence C., asst. In. Enoch Pratt 
F. L., Baltimore, Md. 3756. 

Wuchter, Sue M., In. Continental and 
Commercial Nat'l Bank L., Chicago, 111. 
8824. 

Wulfekoetter, Lillie, chief br. In. P. L., 
Cincinnati, O. 3125. 

Wyche, Benjamin, care of N. Y. Life In- 
surance Co., Charlotte, N. C. 1832. 

WYER, JAMES INGERSOLL, JR., direc- 
tor N. Y. State L. and N. Y. State L. 



558 



Sch., Albany, N. Y. 1484. Life member. 

Wyer, Malcolm Glenn, In. Nebraska Univ. 
L., Lincoln, Neb. 2372. 

Wyeth, Ola M., L. War Service, L. of Con- 
gress, Washington, D. C. 4831. 

Wykes, Sadie P., asst. Catalog and Br. 
Depts. P. L., Grand Rapids, Mich. 5700. 

Wynkoop, Asa, state inspector of P. L's. 
N. Y. State L., Albany, N. Y. 3676. 

Wyoming Univ. L., Laramie, Wyoming. 
(Reba Davis, In.) 4150. 

Yaeger, Clement L., asst. F. P. L., New 
Bedford, Mass. 3794. 

Yale, Charles, br. In. P. L., Minneapolis, 
Minn. 7568. 

Yale University L., New Haven, Conn. 
(Andrew Keogh, In.) 5066. 

Yeargain, Harriet, 1258 N. State St., Chi- 
cago, 111. 6388. 

Yocum, Mrs. Emma, trus. P. L., Mentone, 
Ind. 8756. 

Yoder, Bertha, 1st asst. In. Kent Br. P. L., 
Toledo, Ohio. 8792. 

Yonkers (N. Y.) P. L. (Helen M. Blodgett, 
In.) 6579. 

Young, Bertha T., asst. Bloomingdale Br. 
P. L., N. Y. City. 5045. 

Young, Betty Scott, 391 Lafayette Ave., 
Buffalo, N. Y. 8011. 

Young, Iva M., In. High Sch. L., Manches- 
ter, N. H. 5340. 



Young, Laura A., asst. McGill Univ. L., 
Montreal, P. Q., Canada. 8757. 

Young, Mrs. Olive P., In. John Jermain 
Mem. L., Sag Harbor, N. Y. 6284. 

Young, Susanna, asst. in charge Central 
Lending L., Carnegie L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 
7879. 

Young, W. R. K., trus. P. L., San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. (Address, 230 California 
St.) 8216. 

Young Women's Christian Assoc.. Central 
Br. L., N. Y. City. (Mellicent F. Blair, 
In.) 4801. 

Youngstown (Ohio) P. L. (J. L. Wheeler, 

In.) 3515. 
YUST, WILLIAM FREDERICK, In. P. L., 

Rochester, N. Y. 2407. Life member. 
Zachert, Adeline B., supt. of L. Extension 

P. L., Rochester, N. Y. 4124. 
Zelenko, Alexander, professor L. Sch. 

Moscow City Univ., Moscow, Russia. 

(Address, 136 Liberty St., N. Y. City.) 

8695. 
Zeller, Helen C., child, In. Hyde Park Br. 

P. L., Cincinnati, Ohio. 8442. 
Zinkie, Marjorie, asst. Circ. Dept. P. L., 

Seattle, Wash. 8465. 
Zolin, Etta, In. Lapham Park Br. P. L , 

Milwaukee, Wis. 7648. 



NECROLOGY 



The following list, prepared by Mrs. 
Henry J. Carr, is the necrological record 
of A. L. A. members, 1919. 

The number following the year of en- 
rollment is that of accession in the nu- 
merical registration of the Association. 
Alvaretta P. Abbott, librarian Free Public 
Library, Atlantic City, New Jersey, died 
April 23, 1919. Having represented her 
library at the conferences of 1902, 1913 
and 1915, she became a member of the 
A. L. A. in 1918 (No. 7676). 
James G. Barnwell, ex-librarian of the Li- 
brary Company of Philadelphia, Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania, died February 
23, 1919. A life member of the A. L. A., 
he had joined the Association in 1876 
(No. 24) and attended the conferences 
of 1876, '97, '98, and 1900. 
L. May Brooks, supervisor of serial de- 
partment, Leland Stanford, Jr., Univer- 
sity, Stanford University, California, 
died January 7, 1919. She joined the 
A. L. A. in 1906 (No. 3567) and attended 
the conferences of 1906, '08, '09, '11. 
Minnie L. Bushfield, reference assistant, 
Western Reserve Historical Society, 
Cleveland, Ohio, died December 7, 1918. 
She joined the A. L. A. in 1913 (No. 
5723) and attended the conferences of 
1916 and 1917, 

Andrew Carnegie, elected an honorary 
member of the A. L. A. in 1899 (No. 
1902), died August 11, 1919. He had 
never been present at a conference. 
E. A. Caswell, 99 John Street, New York 
City, died June 25, 1919. He joined the 
A. L. A. in 1918 (No. 7764) and attended 
the conference of that year. 
Herbert C. Collar, head cataloger, Grosve- 
nor Library, Buffalo, New York, died 
March 14, 1919. He joined the A. L. A. 
in 1913 (No. 5751) and attended the con- 
ferences of 1916 and 1918. 
Raymond C. Davis, librarian emeritus of 
the University of Michigan Library, 
Ann Arbor, Michigan, died June 10, 1919. 
He joined the A. L. A. in 1878 (No. 170) 
and attended the conferences of 1879, 
'86, '93. 



Wilson M. Foulk, state historian and ar- 
chivist and ex-offlcio chief, Library of 
Department of Archives and History, 
Charleston, West Virginia, died Janu- 
ary 25, 1919. He joined the A. L. A. in 
1918 (No. 7924) but had attended no 
conferences. 

Charles Henry Gould, librarian of the Mc- 
Gill University Library, Montreal, Can- 

ada, died July 30, 1919. Joining the 
A. L. A. in 1893 (No. 1182) he served as 
its president in 1908-09. He had attended 
the conferences of 1893, '94, '96, '98-'00, 
'02, '03, '06-'10, '12-'14, '16 (seventeen in 
all) and the International Conference at 
London in 1897. 

Frederick Henry Hedge, ex-librarian Pub- 
lic Library, Lawrence, Massachusetts, 
died November 16, 1918. He joined the 
A. L. A. in 1879 (No. 261) and attended 
the conferences of 1879, '85, '90, 1902. 
'04, '06. 

Nannie W. Jayne, librarian Public Libra- 
ry, Bluffton, Indiana, died March 28, 
1919. She joined the A. L. A. in 1910 
(No. 4877) and attended the conferences 
of 1917 and 1918. 

James L. King, librarian Kansas State 
Library, Topeka, Kansas, died October 
20, 1919. He joined the A. L. A. in 1904. 
(No. 3196) and attended the confer- 
ence of that year. 

Ernst Lemcke, importer and bookseller, 
of New York City, died July 8, 1919. 
Joining the A. L. A. in 1893 (No. 1131) 
he attended the conferences of 1893- 
1900, '03, '06, '07, '09, '13, '14, '16, '19 
(sixteen in all). 

Mrs. Adelaide Bowles Maltby, librarian in 
charge St. George Branch and Staten 
Island Traveling Libraries Office, Pub- 
lic Library, New York City, died Febru- 
ary 21, 1919. She joined the A. L. A. in 
1900 (No. 2084) and attended the con- 
ferences of 1900, '02, '03, '08, '13, '14, 
'16, '18. 

J. P. Robertson, librarian Provincial Li- 
brary, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, 
died April 11, 1919. He joined the 



560 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



A. L. A. in 1912 (No. 5547) and attended 
the conferences of 1912 and 1916. 

Mrs. Carl B. Roden, wife of the librarian 
of the Chicago Public Library, died 
August 13, 1919. She joined the A. L. A. 
in 1912 (No. 5542) and attended the 
conferences of 1912 and 1919. 

Julius Sachse, librarian Grand Lodge A. F. 
& A. M. of Pennsylvania, died Novem- 
ber 14, 1919. He joined the A. L. A. in 
1906 (No. 3946) and attended the con- 
ference of 1914. 

Ethelbert O. S. Scholefield, librarian of 
the Provincial Library, Victoria, B. C., 
died December 25, 1919. He joined the 
A. L. A. in 1905 (No. 3276) and attended 
the conference of 1905, '11, '13. 

Helen R. Shoemaker, librarian-in-charge 
of Oak Lane Branch, Free Library, 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, died Janu- 
ary 8, 1918. She joined the A. L. A. in 
1916 (No. 6984) and attended the con- 
ferences of 1916 and 1917. 

Grace M. Stoddard, formerly librarian 
Public Library, Missoula, Montana, died 
January 5, 1919. She joined the A. L. A. 
in 1912 (No. 5369) and attended the 
conference of 1915. 

Ethan Wilcox, librarian emeritus, Memo- 
rial and Public Library, Westerly, Rhode 
Island, died February 14, 1919. He 
joined the A. L. A. in 1906 (No. 3690) 
and attended the conferences of 1906 
and 1909. 



The following persons had formerly be- 
longed to the Association, although not 
members at the time of their death: 

Mrs. Lewis Lazelle Beeken (Kate Keith), 
formerly children's librarian, Carnegie 
Library of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Penn- 
sylvania, died in 1914. She joined the 
A. L. A. in 1912 (No. 5533) and attended 
the conference of that year. [This in- 
formation not of record at A. L. A. head- 
quarters when Handbook for 1914 was 
published.] 

Irene E. Blair, librarian of the Public Li- 
brary of Sedalia, Missouri, died April 
29, 1919. She joined the A. L. A. in 1915 



(No. 6838) and attended the conference 
of the following year. 

William Savage Burns, trustee of the 
Davenport Library of Bath, Maine, and 
formerly actively engaged in library 
work in various institutions, died May 
2, 1919. He joined the A. L. A. in 1893 
(No. 1206) and attended the confer- 
ences of 1893, '96, '98, 1903, '07, '08. 

Mary Jane Calkins, a former librarian of 
the Public Library, Racine, Wisconsin, 
died November 24, 1919. She joined 
the A. L. A. in 1901 (No. 2183) and at- 
tended the conferences of 1901, '08, '10. 

Mrs. Jesse Cunningham (Else Miller), 
wife of the librarian of the Public Li- 
brary, St. Joseph, Missouri, died De- 
- cember 21, 1919. She joined the A. L. A. 
in 1896 (No. 1444) and attended the 
conference of that year and also in 1901, 
'04, '10. 

Thomas K. Davis, of Wooster, Ohio, 
died December 24, 1918. He joined the 
A. L. A. in 1882 (No. 418) and attended 
the conference of that year. 

Edward T. Fairbanks, librarian St. Johns- 
bury Athenaeum, St. Johnsbury, Ver- 
mont, died January 12, 1919. He joined 
the A. L. A. in 1903 (No. 2804) and at- 
tended the conference of that year, hav- 
ing also attended in 1902. 

Marie Ganley, superintendent cataloging 
department, Public Library, Detroit, 
Michigan, died March 22, 1919. She 
joined the A. L. A. in 1890 (No. 811) 
and attended the conferences of 1890, 
'96, '98, 1901, '02, '04, '05, '07, '10. 

Mrs. Katherine A. Hahn, formerly libra- 
rian of the Stout Institute Library, 
Menominee, Wisconsin, died October 2, 
1919. She joined the A. L. A. in 1915 
(No. 6500) but had attended no confer- 
ences. 

Horace Edwin Hayden, librarian of the 
Wyoming Historical and Geological So- 
ciety, of Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, 
died August, 1917. He joined the 
A. L. A. in 1898 (No. 1698) but had at- 
tended no conferences. [This informa- 
tion not of record at A. L. A. headquar- 



HANDBOOK 



561 



ters when Handbook for 1917 was pub- 
lished.] 

Dunkin V. Johnston, at one time reference 
librarian of the New York State Libra- 
ry, died December 22, 1919. He joined 
the A. L. A. in 1890 (No. 778) and at- 
tended the conferences of 1890, '91-94, 
1902, '18. 

Mrs. George Albert Moore (Mabel Ethe- 
lind Scrlpps), children's librarian, 
Christopher House Settlement, Chicago, 
died in 1912. She joined the A. L. A. in 
1905 (No. 3466) but had attended no 
conferences. [This information not of 
record at A. L. A. headquarters when 
Handbook for 1912 was published.] 

William J. Onahan, formerly member 
Board of Directors, Public Library, Chi- 



cago, died January 12, 1919. He joined the 
A. L. A. in 1886 (No. 525) but had at- 
tended no conferences. 

Mary E. Ryan, an assistant in the Public 
Library, Chicago, died February 7, 
1919. She joined the A. L. A. in 1916 
but had attended no conferences. 

Jonathan Trumbull, historian, and libra- 
rian of the Otis Library, Norwich, Con- 
necticut, died May 22, 1919. He joined 
the A. L. A. in 1902 (No. 2461) and at- 
tended the conference of that year. 

Mary E. Winslow, children's librarian, 
Washington Heights Branch, Public Li- 
brary, New York City, died April 11, 
1919. She joined the A. L. A. in 1914 
(No. 6174) and attended the conferences 
of 1914 and 1916. 







BULLETIN 



OF THE 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 

Entered as second-class matter December 27, 1909, at the Post Office at Chicago, 111., under 

Act of Congress of July 16, 1894. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage 

provided for in section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized on July 8, 1918. 



VOL. 13, No. 5 



CHICAGO, ILL. 



NOVEMBEK, 1919 



CONTENTS 



Page 



Special meeting of the A. L. A Al 

Official Call Al 

Hotels A2 

Schedule of Hotel Rates A3 

Midwinter Meetings A2 

Schedule of Meetings A3 

Proposed Revision of Constitution A4 

Explanation of Paging, November Bulletin . . A8 

Sale, Exchange, Wants, Offers A8 



SPECIAL MEETING OF THE A. L. A. 



To Members of the American Library As- 
sociation: 

At the session of the Executive Board 
of the American Library Association, held 
in Richfield Springs, N. Y., September 9, 
1919, it was voted, in view of the necessity 
for amendments to the Constitution and 
By-Laws, made necessary by the proposed 
enlarged program for A. L. A. library 
service, that the president be authorized 
to call two special meetings of the Asso- 
ciation for the purpose of considering pro- 
posed amendments to the Constitution and 
By-Laws and such other matters as the 
president may name in the call, one meet- 



ing to be held in Chicago and the other 
later, at some point on the Atlantic Coast. 



OFFICIAL CALL 

The president of the A. L. A. hereby 
calls a special meeting of the American 
Library Association to be held in Chicago, 
Illinois, January 1, 2 and 3, 1920, to con- 
sider a proposed revision of the Constitu- 
tion and to have as the basis of this con- 
sideration the report of the special com- 
mittee appointed to make recommenda- 
tions for revision; and also to consider any 
matters connected with the proposed en- 
larged program for American Library As- 
sociation library service. 



In considering the proposed enlarged 



A2 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



program, the Executive Board of the As- 
sociation may ask for a vote on some of 
its features in order to obtain some defi- 
nite approval or disapproval of them by 
the Association at large before the Board 
Itself takes definite action regarding them. 
A large attendance at the special meet- 
ing is urged and it is hoped members of 
the Association will be ready to pass judg- 
ment on these important questions now 
before the A. L. A. Two sessions will be 
held on January 1, morning and afternoon, 
and sessions on the mornings both of 
January 2 and 3. 

CHALMERS HADLEY, 
President. 

MIDWINTER MEETINGS 
The midwinter meetings, omitted in the 
past two years on account of the war, 
will be resumed this season and will be 
held December 31 to January 3, inclusive, 
at Chicago. 

CALLED MEETING OF THE A. L. A. 

A specially called meeting of the Amer- 
ican Library Association, the first it is 
believed in the history of the organization, 
will be held to consider the enlarged pro- 
gram and the proposed revision of the 
Constitution and By-laws. The official call 
of the president of the Association is 
printed elsewhere in this number. The 
preliminary report of the Committee on an 
Enlarged Program has already reached 
the members of the A. L. A. through the 
library periodicals, and, probably before 
this number of the Bulletin is distributed, 
through the draft sent out by the commit- 
tee itself. It is intended through this 
called meeting to give members of the As- 
sociation an opportunity thoroughly to con- 
sider and discuss all phases of the pro- 
posed enlarged program and the revision 
of the Constitution. The draft of the lat- 
ter, prepared by the committee appointed 
by the Executive Board to make recom- 
mended changes, is printed in this num- 
ber of the Bulletin, and it is hoped all 
members will study it carefully in advance 
of the meetings. 



MEETINGS 

The Association will hold four sessions 
(January 1, morning and afternoon; Jan- 
uary 2, morning; and January 3, morn- 
ing). 

The Council will meet on the afternoon 
of January 1, after adjournment of the 
general session, and again on the morning 
of January 3, if there are matters for it to 
consider. A plan for cooperative book- 
buying in European markets, which will 
be of interest to all large libraries, will be 
presented at an open meeting of the 
Council. 

The League of Library Commissions, the 
Association of American Library Schools, 
the Bibliographical Society of America, 
the university librarians, the librarians of 
the small colleges of the north central 
states, the Executive Board and the Pub- 
lishing Board of the A. L. A. all will hold 
meetings. 

A schedule setting forth time for these 
various meetings is printed in this num- 
ber of the Bulletin. All meetings will be 
in the Hotel La Salle. 

HOTELS 

Headquarters will be at the Hotel La 
Salle, but as that hotel may not be able to 
supply all rooming accommodations 
needed, arrangements for a possible over- 
flow have been made with other adjacent 
hotels. A list of these hotels with rates 
is appended. 

Reservations should be made directly 
with the hotel management, and it is ex- 
tremely important that all members plan- 
ning to be present make their hotel reser- 
vations at the earliest possible date, for 
Chicago hotels are very crowded, and un- 
less reservations are obtained in advance 
it may be difficult to find a satisfactory 
place to stop. Request reply assuring you 
that room will be reserved. 

REGISTRATION 

Promptly on making hotel arrangements 
please notify A. L. A. Headquarters, 78 
East Washington Street, Chicago, naming 
hotel at which you expect to stop and 
probable date of your arrival. 



BULLETIN 



A3 



INFORMATION BUREAU 
The Chicago Library Club will maintain 
an information bureau at the Hotel La 
Salle to give information about meetings, 
meeting places, location of Chicago points 
of interest, theaters, opera, libraries, etc. 



OTHER MEETINGS 

If any library organizations or groups 
other than those here scheduled wish to 
meet, those in charge should confer at 
once with the Secretary of the Association, 
78 East Washington Street, Chicago. 



HOTELS AND RATES 





Single 
without bath 


Single 
with bath 


Double 
without bath 


Double 
with bath 


La Salle (headquarters) 
(La Salle and Madison) .... 
Sherman 
(Randolph and Clark) 


$2.50 $4.00 
2 50 3 00 


$3.50 $5.00 
3 50 5 00 


$3.50 $5.00 


$5.00$ 8.00 
5 00 8 00 


Morrison 
(Madison and Clark) 




3 50 5 00 




5 00 7 00 


Fort Dearborn 
(Van Buren and LaSalle) . . 
Auditorium 
(Michigan Blvd. and Con- 
gress) 


2.25 
2.00 4 00 


2.75 
4 00 


3.50 
4 00 


4.00 5.00 
6 00 7 00 


Congress 
(Michigan Blvd. and Con- 
gress) . 


3.00 5.00 


4.00 8.00 


4.00 6.00 


6.00 10.00 





Morning, 10-12 


Afternoon, 2:30-5:30 


Evening, 8-10 


Wednesday, 
December 31 


Assn. of Am. Lib. 
Schools 
Small College Lib. 
Round Table 


Assn. of Am. Lib. 
Schools 
Small College Lib. 
Round Table 


Executive Board 




University Lib. 
Round Table 


University Lib. 
Round Table 




Thursday, 
January 1 


American Library 
Association 


American Library 
Association 
(General Session) 


Bibliographical 
Society 




(General Session) 


2:30-4:30 
Council 4:30-5:30 


Executive Board 


Friday, 


American Library 
Association 


League of Library 
Commissions 


League of Library 
Commissions 










Saturday, 
January 3 


American Library 
Association 
(General Session) 


Executive Board 






2:30-4:30 
Council 4:30-5:30 







A4 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



CONSTITUTION OF THE AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



A Proposed Revision by the 
Committee on Revision of Constitution 
CHALMERS HADLEY, Chairman. 
WM. W. BISHOP. 
GEORGE B. UTLEY. 

(In preparing this proposed revision the 
committee has availed itself of the sug- 
gested draft made by the Committee on 
Enlarged Program.) 

Object 

Sec. 1. The object of the American Li- 
brary Association shall 'be to promote 
library service and librarianship. 

Membership 

Sec. 2. Members. Any person or insti- 
tution may become a member on paying 
the annual dues. 

Sec. 3. Honorary Members. Any per- 
son may be made an honorary member 
with full privileges of membership by the 
unanimous vote of the Association at any 
meeting. 

Sec. 4. Contributing and Sustaining 
Members. Any person or institution may 
become a contributing or a sustaining 
member on payment of the required an- 
nual sums. 

Sec. 5. Life Members and Fellows. Any 
person may become a life member or a life 
fellow by paying the required amounts. 

Meetings 

Sec. 6. Annual Meetings. There shall 
be an annual meeting of the Association 
at such place and time as may be deter- 
mined by the Executive Board. 

Sec. 7. Special Meetings. Special meet- 
ings of the Association may be called by 
the Executive Board, and shall be called 
by the president on request of forty mem- 
bers of the Association. At least one 
month's notice shall be given, and only 
business specified in the call shall be 
transacted. 

Sec. 8. Votes by Institutional Members. 
The vote of an institutional member shall 



be cast by the duly designated representa- 
tive whose credentials are filed with the 
secretary. In the absence of such designa- 
tion or of such delegate the vote may be 
cast only by the chief librarian of the in- 
stitution. 

Sec. 9. Quorum. Fifty members shall 
constitute a quorum. 

Management 

Sec. 10. Executive Board. The admin- 
istration of the affairs of the Association, 
including its publishing activities, shall be 
vested in the Executive Board, which shall 
consist of the president, vice-president, 
treasurer and eight other members. The 
members of the Executive Board, other 
than the president, the vice-president and 
the treasurer, shall be elected as here- 
after specified. At the annual meeting 
of 1920 there shall be elected by ballot 
four persons to serve as new members of 
the Executive Board. Immediately after 
their election they shall divide themselves 
by lot into two equal classes, of which the 
terms of the first class shall expire in 
1923 and of the second class in 1924. At 
each annual meeting thereafter two mem- 
bers shall be elected to the Executive 
Board to serve for four years. 

Sec. 11. The Executive Board shall 
have power to fill all vacancies in office, 
except that in the case of the death, resig- 
nation or inability to serve of the presi- 
dent of the Association, the vice-president 
shall become president. 

Sec. 12. Meetings of the Executive 
Board may be called by the president at 
such times and places as he may desig- 
nate, and shall be called upon request of 
six members of the Board. 

Sec. 13. Quorum. Six members shall 
constitute a quorum of the Executive 
Board. 

Sec. 14. The Executive Board shall pre- 
pare and adopt annual and. supplementary 
budgets within which all its appropriations 



BULLETIN 



A5 



shall be made, and.no expense shall be in- 
curred in behalf of the Association iby any 
officer or committee in excess of the au- 
thorized appropriation. 

Sec. 15. Policy. No question involving 
the policy of the Association as such shall 
be voted upon by the Association until 
said question has been referred to the Ex- 
ecutive Board, and a report thereon made 
by the Board to the Association; but the 
Board shall make a report upon every 
question so referred to it not later than at 
the next session of the Association held 
after such reference. 

Sec. 16. Votes by Correspondence. Ap- 
proval in writing by a majority of a board 
or committee shall have the force of a 
vote, if conducted under the conditions 
specified in the by-laws. 

Officers and Committees 

Sec. 17. The officers of the Association 
shall be a president, vice-president, secre- 
tary, treasurer, and assistant treasurer. 
The president and vice-president shall be 
elected at each annual meeting of the As- 
sociation. The secretary, treasurer and 
assistant treasurer, who shall be a trust 
company, shall be chosen by the Executive 
Board, shall hold office at its pleasure, 
and receive such salaries as it shall fix. 

Sec. 18. Officers. The president, vice- 
president, secretary, treasurer, and assist- 
ant treasurer shall perform ithe duties 
usually pertaining to their respective of- 
fices. 

Sec. 19. The Executive Board shall ap- 
point all other officers and standing com- 
mittees and shall fix the salaries of all 
paid officers and employees. 

Sec. 20. Terms of Office. All officers 
and all elected members of the Executive 
Board shall serve until the adjournment 
of the meeting at which their successors 
are chosen. 

Council 

Sec. 21. Membership. The Council 
shall consist of the Executive Board, all 
ex-presidents of the Association who con- 
tinue as members thereof, all presidents 
of affiliated societies, fifty members 



elected by the Association at large, and 
one member from each state, provincial, or 
regional library association or club which 
complies with the conditions for such rep- 
resentation set forth in the by-laws. The 
elected members shall be chosen, ten each 
year, by the Association, to hold office for 
five years. 

Sec. 22. Meetings. The Council shall 
hold at least two meetings a year, one of 
which shall be at the time and place of 
the annual meetings of the Association. 
Other meetings shall be called upon re- 
quest of twenty members. 

Sec. 23. Duties. The Council shall con- 
sider and discuss library questions of pro- 
fessional and public interest, and shall 
from time to time issue reports thereon; 
and it may by a two-thirds vote adopt 
resolutions on these or any other matters 
of library policy or practice. 

Endowment Fund 

Sec. 24. All receipts from life member- 
ships and life fellowships, and all gifts 
for endowment purposes, shall constitute 
an endowment fund, which shall be in- 
vested and the principal kept forever in- 
violate. The interest shall be expended 
as the Executive Board may direct. The 
endowment fund shall be in the custody 
of three trustees, one of whom shall be 
elected by ballot at each annual meeting, 
to hold office for three years from the date 
of his election and until his successor shall 
be elected. No money from the endow- 
ment fund shall be invested or expended 
except on check signed by a majority of 
the trustees. 

Affiliated Organizations 

Sec. 25. (This section not yet framed 
by the committee.) 

By-laws 

Sec. 26. By-laws may be adopted and 
amended by vote of the Association upon 
recommendation of the Executive Board 
or of a special committee appointed by the 
Association to report thereon. Any by- 
law may be suspended by a three-fourths 
vote of those present and voting at any 
meeting of the Association. 



A6 



Amendments 

Sec. 27. This Constitution may be 
amended by a three-fourths vote of those 
present and voting at two successive 
meetings of the Association, provided that 
notice of the proposed amendments be 
sent to each member of the Association at 
least one month before final adoption. 

BY-LAWS 
Dues 

Sec. 1. Amounts for Annual Dues, (a) 
The annual dues of the Association shall 
be two dollars for individuals and five dol- 
lars for libraries and other institutions, 
payable in advance in January, (b) On 
payment of $25 annually any person or in- 
stitution may become a contributing mem- 
ber; on payment of $100 or more annually 
any person or institution may become a 
sustaining member. 

Sec. 2. Life Members and Fellows. On 
payment of $25 any individual member 
may become a life member; on payment 
of $75 a life member may become a life 
fellow; on payment of $100 any individual 
member may become a life fellow. 

Sec. 3. Unpaid Dues. Members whose 
dues are unpaid at the close of the an- 
nual conference and who shall continue 
such delinquency for one month after no- 
tice of the same has been sent by the 
treasurer, shall be dropped from mem- 
bership. 

Sec. 4. Each new member shall be as- 
signed a consecutive number in the order 
of first joining and paying dues. A delin- 
quent member rejoining and paying his 
arrears of annual dues shall receive his 
original number. 

Sec. 5. Fiscal Year. The fiscal year of 
the Association shall be the calendar year. 
Nominations 

Sec. 6. At least three months prior to 
the annual meeting of the Association the 
Executive Board shall appoint a commit- 
tee of five, no one of whom shall be a 
member of the board, to nominate the 
elective officers and other members of the 
Executive Board, trustees of the endow- 



ment fund, and members of the Council. 

This committee shall report to the Ex- 
ecutive Board, which shall after adoption 
of the report publish its nominations in 
the Bulletin at least one month prior to 
the annual meeting of the Association and 
shall place such nominations before the 
Association on a printed ballot which shall 
be known as the "Official Ballot." The 
board shall also include on such ballot 
other nominations filed with the secretary 
by any five members of the Association at 
least twenty-four hours before election, 
provided that with the petition containing 
such nominations or noted upon it, shall 
be filed the consent of the person or per- 
sons so nominated. 

No person shall be nominated as presi- 
dent or vice-president for two consecutive 
terms. No more than the required num- 
ber of nominations shall be made by the 
committee. The position and residence of 
each nominee shall be given on the official 
ballot. 

State Representation in Council 

Sec. 7. Each state, provincial or re- 
gional library association or club having 
a membership of not less than fifteen 
members, may be represented in the Coun- 
cil by the president of such association, or 
by an alternate elected at the annual 
meeting of the association. The annual 
dues shall be five dollars for each associa- 
tion having a membership of fifty or less, 
and ten cents for each person additional 
Where membership is above that number. 
The privileges and advantages of the A. L. 
A. conferences shall be available only to 
those holding personal membership or rep- 
resenting institutional membership in the 
Association or to members of affiliated so- 
cieties. 

Sections 

Sec. 8. A petition for the establishment 
of a section shall be referred to a special 
committee to be appointed by the presi- 
dent, which shall report to the Executive 
Board on the desirability of such section. 
The Executive Board shall have power to 
discontinue a section when, in its opinion, 



BULLETIN 



A7 



the usefulness of that section has ceased. 

Sec. 9. Any existing organization of li- 
brarians having not less than twenty-five 
members may on vote of the Executive 
Board become a section of the Association. 

Sec. 10. Sections may, if they so elect, 
charge annual dues, limit their own mem- 
bership, issue publications, and in general 
carry on activities along the line of their 
own interest, accounting for their own 
funds solely to their own members. 

Sec. 11. No authority is granted any 
section to incur expense on behalf of the 
Association or to commit the Association 
as such by any declaration of policy. 

Sec. 12. Provision shall be made by the 
Executive Board for sessions of the vari- 
ous sections at annual meetings of the As- 
sociation, and the programs for the same 
shall be prepared by the officers of sec- 
tions in consultation with the program 
committee. Sessions of sections shall be 
open to any member of the Association, 
but no person may vote in any section 
unless registered as a member of the 
same. The registered members of each 
section shall, at the final session of each 
annual meeting, choose officers to serve 
until the close of the next annual meeting. 

Standing Committees 
Sec. 13. The standing committees of 
the Association, which are to be appointed 
by the Executive Board, shall 'be as fol- 
lows: Auditing, (to consist of three mem- 
bers, to audit the accounts of the Execu- 
tive Board, secretary, treasurer, assistant 
treasurer, trustees of the endowment fund 



and all committees having expenditure of 
money); editorial (a committee of five, 
whose duty shall be to secure and pass 
upon material for publication by the Asso- 
ciation, especially catalogs, indexes and 
other bibliographic and library aids) ; 
public documents; cooperation with 
'other educational associations; library 
administration; library training; inter- 
national relationos; bookbuying; book- 
binding; federal and state relations; pub- 
licity; library work in hospitals and char- 
itable and correctional institutions; work 
with the foreign born; standardization of 
libraries and certification of librarians; 
travel; coordination; work with the 
blind; program (to consist of the presi- 
dent, secretary and one other member to 
be appointed by the president) ; improve- 
ment of conditions of library workers. 

Sec. 14. The Executive Board shall at 
each annual meeting of the Association 
appoint a committee of three on resolu- 
tions, which shall prepare and report to 
the Association suitable resolutions of ac- 
knowledgment and thanks. 

VOTES BY CORRESPONDENCE 

Sec. 15. Approval in writing by a ma- 
jority of a board or committee shall have 
the force of a vote, provided not more 
than one member expresses dissent. If 
one member dissents, the vote shall not be 
effective until such member has had op- 
portunity to communicate his views to the 
other members and a second vote has been 
taken. If two members, on the second 
mail vote, dissent, the action shall fail. 



A8 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



OF THE 



AMERICAN LIBRARY 
ASSOCIATION 



Issued in 

January, March, May, July, September and 
November 

There is no subscription price and the 
Bulletin is sent only to members of the 
Association. 

AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 

President Chalmers Hadley, Public Library, 
Denver, Colo. 

First Vice-President George H. Locke, Pub- 
lic Library, To^nto, Can. 

Second Vice-President Cornelia Marvin, 
Oregon State Library, Salem. 

Executive Board The President, vice-presi- 
dents and Electra C. Doren, Public Li- 
brary, Dayton, O.; Frank P. Hill, Public 
Library, Brooklyn, N. Y.; Linda A. East- 
man, Public Library, Cleveland, O.; Adam 
Strohm, Public Library, Detroit, Mich; 
J. C. Dana, Free Public Library, Newark. 
N. J.; Edith Tobitt, Public Library, 
Omaha, Neb. 

Secretary George B. Utley, 78 E. Washing- 
ton St., Chicago. 

Treasurer Carl B. Roden, Public Library, 
Chicago. 

Executive offices 78 E. Washington Street, 
Chicago. 

EXPLANATION OF PAGING 
Owing to the fact that it is necessary to 
issue the November number of the Bulle- 
tin in advance of the Handbook (which is 
the September number) we have had to 
resort to the expedient of paging this No- 
vember issue Al, A2, A3, etc. 

The July (Asbury Park Conference) 
number of the Bulletin is in press and 
will be mailed to members at the earliest 
date possible. 

LEAGUE OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONS 
Suggested topics for discussion at the 
sessions of the League of Library Commis- 
sions, to be held on Friday afternoon and 
evening, January 2, are the following: 
Certification of librarians; the part of the 
state library commission in high school 
library work; the A. L.. A. survey as re- 
lated to the small libraries of the coun- 
try; and the enlarged program of the A. 
L. A, as it will affect small libraries. 



SALE, EXCHANGE, WANTS, OFFERS 
(Any library member of the Association 



may insert, without cost, a ten-line notice 
of books or periodicals wanted, for sale or 
exchange.) 

WANTS 

Yale University Library, New Haven, 
Conn. 

Fortnightly Review, no. 613, Jan., 1918. 

Mind, new ser., v. 10, 1901. 
Public Library of the District of Columbia, 
Washington, D. C. 

The Booklist, v. 14, no. 6, March, 1918. 

Journal of Political Economy, v. 4, no. 4, 
Sept., 1896. 

Political Science Quarterly, v. 2, no. 3, 
Sept., 1887. 

Engineer School Library, Washington Bar- 
racks, D. C. 

Agamemnon, a tragedy taken from 
Aeschylus, by E. Fitzgerald. Woodstock, 
Vt., 1906. 

Brunner, Moritz von. Permanent forti- 
fication. 7th rev. ed., London, 1911. 

Dialogues of Plato, tr. into English by 
B. Jowett. N. Y., Oxford Univ. Press. 5 
vols. 

Lossing, Pictorial history of the civil 
war. Hartford, T. Belknap, 1868. Only 
volume 1, original half calf. 

Totten. Report of J. G. Totten on sub- 
ject of national defences. Wash., D. C. 
A. B. Hamilton, 1851. 5 copies. 
Public Library, St. Joseph, Mo. 

Dramatic Monthly, vol. 2, no. 1, April 
1917; vol. 1, no. 1 and 4, April and July, 
1916. 

Editor, Sept. 9, 1916. Index to voL 44. 

Review of Reviews (English) Jan. and 
Feb., 1914, vol. 49, nos. 289, 290; Dec., 
1914, vol. 50, no. 300. Index. 
American Library Association, 78 E. Wash- 
ington St., Chicago. 

A. L. A. Bulletin, March, 1919. 

A. L. A. Booklist, Dec., 1916; Jan., 1917; 
Index to v. 13. 

The Booklist, Oct., 1917; March, 1918. 

OFFERS 

Howard Townsend, 27 Cedar St., New 
York City. 

Complete set of Rebellion Records free 
to any library willing to pay transporta- 
tion charges. 



INDEX 

A separate detailed index to the Proceedings of the Asbury Park Con- 
ference is on pages 427-430 and its entries are not repeated here. 

Library war service: the situation and the 

opportunity, 1 

Members, classified, 438; list of, 468 
Military, naval or marine corps service, 

roster of librarians, 94 
Necrology, 559 

Nominating Committee, report of, 91 
Officers, past, 442; present, 444 
Paging of November Bulletin, explanation, 

A8 
Permanent endowment for peace time 

work (Strong), 92-94 

Perry, Everett R., City and county libra- 
ries and general observations (salaries), 
71-77; report of committee to investi- 
gate salaries, 71-85 

Publication of after-war reading lists, 22 
Publishing board, meeting, 19-23; report, 
57-62; members, 454; list of publica- 
tions, 454 
Root, Azariah S., College and university 

library (salaries), 77-80 
Salaries, report of committee (Perry), 71- 
85; city and county libraries, report 
(Perry), 71-77; college and university 
library, report (Root), 77-80; state, mer- 
cantile and endowed libraries, report 
(Sawyer), 80-81 

Secretary, report (Utley), 47-52 
Sections and section officers, 459 
Special meeting of the A. L. A., announce- 
ments, Al-3 

Sawyer, Mrs. Harriet P., State, mercan- 
tile and endowed libraries (salaries), 
80-81 

State library associations, 464 
State library commissions, 463 
Steiner, Bernard C., report of Committee 

on Federal and State Relations, 89-90 
Strong, George F., Shall a permanent en- 
dowment be undertaken for peace time 
work of the A. L. A.? 92-94 
Treasurer, report (Roden), 14-15; 53 
Trustees of Carnegie and endowment 

funds, report, 54-56 
United war work campaign, memorandum 

regarding expenditures, 18 
Wheeler, Joseph L., report of Bookbind- 
ing Committee, 85-87 



Affiliated organizat ' _ns, 461 

Asbury Park conference, statement about, 
5; program, 37-43; announcements, 44- 
47 

Atlantic Monthly, cooperation in book re- 
views, 18 

Blind, work with, report of committee 
(Delfino), 90-91 

Bookbinding Committee, report (Wheel- 
er), 85-87 

Bowerman, George F., report of commit- 
tee on library administration. 63-71; 
Government department libraries (sal- 
aries), 82-85 

Charter, 432 

Chicago, special A. L. A. meeting, an- 
nouncements, Al-3 

Committee of Eleven, 18 

Committee of Five on a Library Survey, 
appointment, 32 

Committees, standing, 447; special, 450 

Compton, Charles H., What then? 6-11 

Constitution, amendment to, 94; constitu- 
tion and by-laws, 434; proposed revision, 
A4-7 

Coordination, report of committee (Gould), 
87-89 

Council, members, 445 

Delfino, Emma R. N., report of Committee 
on Work with the Blind, 90-91 

Endowment funds, 453 

Executive board, meeting, 14-19 

Federal and state relations, report of com- 
mittee (Steiner), 89-90 

Finance committee, report, 15-16' 

French war library and museum, 32 

Gifts and bequests, 1918, 24-31 

Gould, C. H., report of Committee on Co- 
ordination, 87-89 

Hanson, J. C. M., College and university 
catalogs, reports and announcements, 
11-13 

Honor roll of attendance at conferences, 
(Carr), 441 

Library administration, report of commit- 
tee (Bowerman), 63-71 

Library clubs, 466 

Library organizations (not affiliated), 462 

Library periodicals, 463