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COMMISSIONERS' 
REPORT 



Goinmission to Locate ttiBPoiion 
of Iowa Troops 



IN THE 



SIEGE OF VI6KSBUR6 



J. K. P. THOMPSON, Chairman 



IQOl 



DES MOINES: 
B. Murphy, State Piuntbr 
1902 



COMMISSIONERS' 
. REPORT 



Bommission to Locate ttiB Position 
of Iowa Troops 



IN THE 



^ 9 W ««. 

SIEGE OF VIGKSBURO -^-^^--- 



J. K. P. THOMPSON, Chairman 



IQOl 



DES MOINES: 

B. Murphy, State Printer 

igoi 






n. OF n. 



COMMISSION TO LOCATE THE POSI- 
TIONS or IOWA TROOPS IN THE 
siE,GE or VICnSBUKG. 

FINAL RI:P0KT. 



COMMISSIONERS: 

Colonel James K. P. Thompson, chairman, commissioner at large. 
Captain Ellas B. Bascom, commissioner at large. 
Col. David J. Palmer, commissioner at large. 



Colonel Cornelius A. Stanton. 
Captain Warren Beckwith. 
Senator Joseph A. Fitchpatrick. 
Captain Henry G. Ankeny. 
Captain Wra. Dean. 
Colonel Eugene C. Haynes. 
Captain Frederick P. Kettering. 
Colonel Alonzo Abernethy. 
Representative Mahlon Head. 
Colonel Benjamin Beach. 
Abner Dunham . 
Ex-Speaker Wm. O. Mitchell. 
Marinus Rhynsburger. 
First Lieutenant Chas. Mehl. 
Captain Samuel Daughters. 
John W. Morton. 



Major Edward Coulter. 

John W. Stahl. 

Hon. Elmer J. C. Bealer. 

James H. Dean. 

Captain Chas. A. Lucas. 

Col. J. Whitfield Garner, "secretary. 

Major Joseph D. Fegan. 

Senator Lucian C. Blanchard . 

Frank Critz. 

Senator Jeremiah S. Alexander. 

Colonel Warren S. Dungan. 

Philip J. Murphy. 

John R. Cook. 

Ex-Lieut. Gov. Frank T. Campbell. 

Elliott Frazier. 

Judge Joseph R. Reed. 



To His Excellency , Leslie M . Shaw., Governor of the State of Iowa: 

Sir: Pursuant to the provisions of chapter 178, laws of 1900, the com- 
mission for the location of the positions of Iowa troops in the siege of Vicks- 
burg, has the honor to submit herewith its final report. 
Your obedient servant, 

J. K. P. Thompson, Chairman. 
Rock Rapids, Iowa, December 10, 1901. 



The Vicksburg National Military Park was established by act of congress, 
approved by the president February 21, 1899. Its provisions are as follows: 

(Public No. 62.) 

An Act to establish a National Military Park to commemorate the cam- 
paign, siege and defense of Vicksburg. 

Be it Enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United 

States of America in Congress assembled: 

That in order to commemorate the campaign and siege and defense of 
Vicksburg, and to preserve the history of the battles and operations of the 
siege and defense on the ground where they were fought and were carried 
on, the battle field of Vicksburg, in the State of Mississippi, is hereby 
declared to be a national military park whenever the title to the same shall 
have been acquired by the United States and the usual jurisdiction over the 
lands and roads of the same shall have been granted to the United States by 
the State of Mississippi; that is to say, the area enclosed by the following 
lines, or so much thereof as the commissioners of the park may deem neces- 
sary, to-wit: Beginning near the point where the graveyard road, now 
known as the City Cemetery road, across the lines of the confederate earth- 
works, thence north about eighty rods, thence in an easterly direction about 
120 rods, thence in a southerly direction, and keeping as far from the line of 
the confederate earthworks as the purposes of the park may require and the 
park commission, to be hereinafter named, may determine, but not distant 
from the nearest line of confederate earthworks more than 160 rods at any 
part, to a point about 40 rods south and from 80 to 160 rods east of 
Fort Garrott, also known as the "Square Fort;" thence in a westerly direc- 
tion to a point in the rear of the said Fort Garrott, thence in a northerly 
direction across the line of the confederate earthworks and to a point 
about 200 feet in the rear of the said line of confederate earthworks, 
thence in a general northerly direction, and at an approximate distance of 
about 200 feet in the rear of the line of confederate earthvrorks as the confir- 
mation of the ground may require, to the place of beginning. This to con- 
stitute the main body of the park. In addition thereto a strip of land about 
264 feet in width along and including the remaining part of the confederate 
earthworks, namely, from the north body of said north body of the park to 
and including Fort Hill or Fort Nogales on the high hill overlooking the 
national cemetery, and from the south part- of said main body of the park 
to the edge of the bluff at the river below the city of Vicksburg; and also in 
addition thereto a strip of land about 264 feet in width, as near as may be- 
along and including the Federal lines opposed to the Confederate lines herein , 
above named and not included in the main body of the park; and in further 



addition thereto such points of interest as the commission may deem neces- 
sar>' for the purposes of the park and the secretary of war may approve; the 
whole containing about one thousand two hundred acres, and costing not to 
exceed forty thousand dollars. 

Sec. 2. That the establishment of the Vicksburg National Military Park 
shall be carried forward under the control and direction of the secretary of 
war; and the secretary of war shall, upon the passage of this act, proceed to 
acquire title to the same by a voluntary conveyance or under the act 
approved August 1st, 1888, entitled "An act to 'authorize the condemnation 
of land for sites of public buildings, and for other purposes," or under act 
approved February 22d, 1867, entitled "An act to establish and protect 
national cemeteries," as he may elect or deem practical; and when title is 
procured to all of the lands and roads within the boundaries of the pro- 
posed park, as described in section one of this act, he may proceed with the 
establishment of the park; and he shall detail an officer of the engineer corps 
of the army to assist the commissioners in establishing the park. 

Sec. 3. That the secretary' of war is hereby authorized to enter into 
agreements of leasing upon such terms as he may prescribe, with such occu- 
pants or tenants of the lands as may desire to remain upon it, to occupy and 
cultivate their present holdings upon condition that they will preserve the 
present buildings and roads and the present outline of field and forest, and 
that they will only cut trees or underbrush under such regulations as the 
secretary of war may prescribe, and that they will assist in caring for and 
protecting all tablets, monuments, or such other artificial works as may 
from time to time be erected by proper authority; provided, that the United 
States shall at all times have and retain, full right, power and authority to 
take possession of any and all parts or portions of said premises and to 
remove and expel therefrom any such occupant, tenant, or other person or 
persons found thereon whenever the secretary of war or the commissioners 
shall deem it proper or necessary; and such right, power and authority shall 
be reserved in its expressed terras in all leases and agreements giving or 
granting such occupant or tenant the right to remain in possession as herein 
contemplated; and thereupon said occupant or tenant or other persons who 
may be required to vacate said premises shall each and all at once surrender 
and deliver up the possession thereof. 

Shc. 4. That the affairs of the Vicksburg National Military Park shall, 
subject to the supervision and direction of the secretary of war, be in charge 
of three commissioners, to be appointed by the secretary of war, each of 
whom shall have served at the time of the siege and defense, in one of the 
armies engaged therein, two of whom shall have served in the army com- 
manded by General (irant and one in the army commanded by General 
Peraberton. The commissioners shall elect one of their number chairman; 
they shall also elect, subject to the approval of the secretary of war, a sec- 
retary, who shall be historian, and who shall possess the requisite qualifica- 
tions of a commissioner, and they and the secretary shall have an office in 
the city of Vicksburg, Mississippi, or on the grounds of the park, and be 
paid such compensation as the secretary of war shall deem reasonable and 
just. 

Skc. 5. That it sliall be tlie duty of the commissioners named in the 
p.'fc eding section, under the direction of tlie secretary of war, to restore the 



— 9 — 

forts and the lines of fortification, the parallels and the approaches of 
the two armies, or so much thereof as may be necessary to the purposes 
of this park; to open and construct and to repair such roads as may be 
necessary to such purposes, and to ascertain and mark with historical tablets 
or otherwise, as the secretary of war may determine, the lines of battle of 
the troops engaged in the assaults and the lines held by the troops during 
the siege and defense of Vicksburg, the headquarters of General (irant and of 
General Pemberton, and other historical points of interest pertaining to the 
siege and defense of Vicksburg within the park or its vicinity; and the said 
commissioners in establishing this military park shall also have authority 
under the direction of the secretary of war to do all thmgs necessary to the 
purposes of the park, and for its establishment under such regulations as he 
may consider best for the interests of the government, and the secretary of 
war shall make and enforce all needful regulations for the care of the park. 

Sec. 6. That it shall be lawful for any state that had troops engaged in 
the siege and defense of Vicksburg to enter upon the lands of the Vicksburg 
National Military Park for the purpose of ascertaining and marking the 
lines of battle of its troops engaged therein; provided, that before any such 
lines are permanently designated the position of the lines and the proposed 
methods of marking them by monuments, tablets, or otherwise shall be 
submitted to and approved by the secretary of war, and all such lines, 
designs, and inscriptions for the same shall first receive a written approval 
of the secretar}' of war, which approval shall be based upon formal written 
reports which must be made to him in each case by the commissioners of the 
park; and no monument, tablet, or other designating indication shall be 
erected or placed within said park or vicinity without such written authority 
of the secretary of war. Provided, that no discrimination shall be made 
against any state as to the manner of designating lines, but any grant made 
to any state by the secretary of war may be used by any other state. The 
provisions of this section shall also apply to organizations and persons; and 
as the Vicksburg National Cemetery is on the ground partly occupied by 
Federal lines during the siege of Vicksburg, the provisions of this section, as 
far as may be practical, shall apply to monuments or tablets designating 
such lines within the limits of that cemetery. 

Sec. 7. That if any person shall, except by permission of the secretary 
of war, destroy, mutilate, deface, injure, or remove any monument, 
column, state, memorial structure, tablet, or work of art that shall be 
erected or placed upon the grounds of the park by lawful authority, or shall 
destroy or move any fence, railing, enclosure, or other work intended for 
the protection or ornamentation of said park, or any portion thereof, or 
shall destroy, cut, hack, bark, break down, or otherwise injure any tree, 
bush, or shrub that may be growing upon said park, or shall cut down or 
fell or remove any timber, battle relic, tree, or trees growing or being upon 
said park, or hunt within the limits of the park, or shall remove or destroy 
any breastworks, earthworks, walls, or other defenses or shelter on any part 
thereof constructed by the armies formerly engaged in the battles, on the 
lands or approaches of the park, any person so offending and found guilty 
thereof, before any United States commissioner, or court, justice of the 
peace of the county in which the offense may be committed, or any court of 
competent jurisdiction, shall for each and every such offense forfeit and pay 



— 10 — 

a tine in the discretion of the court of the United States or justice of the 
peace, according to the aggravation of the offence, of not less than five nor 
more than five hundred dollars, one-half for the use of the park and the 
other half to the informant, to be enforced and recovered before such United 
States commissioner, or court, or justice of the peace or other court in like 
manner as debts of like nature are now by law receivable in the several 
counties where the offense may be committed. 

Sec. 8. That to enable the secretary of war to begin to carry out the 
purposes of this act including the condemnation or purchase of the necessary 
land, marking the boundaries of the park or opening or repairing necessary 
roads, restoring the field to its condition at the time of the battle, maps and 
surreys, material, labor, clerical, and all other necessary assistance, and the 
pay and expenses of the commissioners and their secretary and assistants, the 
sum of sixty-five thousand dollars, or such portion thereof as may be nec- 
essary, is hereby appropriated, out of any moneys in the treasury not other- 
wise appropriated and disbursements under this act shall require the approval 
of the secretary of war, and he shall make -annual reports of the same to 
congress. 

Approved February 21, 1899. 

Authority to mount guns was given by a subsequent act of congress. 

In accordance with the provisions of the act, commissioners were appointed 
by the honorable secretary of war, March 1st, 1899. The commission con- 
sisted of Gen. Stephen B. Lee of Mississippi, chairman; Capt. Wm. T. 
Rigby of Iowa; and Col. Jas. G. Everest of Illinois, with Gen. John S. Kountz 
of Ohio as secretary and historian, and Capt. Chas L. Longley of Iowa, 
clerk of the commission. This commission acts under the direction of the 
honorable secretary of war, and had in November 1900, progressed so far 
with its work as to be able to co-operate with the commissions appointed by 
the several states, and who accordingly invited the Iowa commission to visit 
the park for the purpose of locating the position of her troops. March 29th, 
1900, the state of Iowa, by act of legislature, authorized the appointment of 
a commission to ascertain and exactly determine the position of Iowa troops 
at Vicksburg. Its provisions are as follows: 

CHAPTER 178. 

COMMISSION TO LOCATE THE POSITIONS OF IOWA TROOPS IN THE SIEGE OF 

VICKSBURG. 

S. F. 102. 

A.N Act authorizing the appointment of a commission to ascertain and 
exactly determine the positions of Iowa troops in the siege of Vicksburg, 
and to make an appropriation to pay the necessary traveling expenses of 
the members of tlic commission. 

Bf it enacted by the General Assembly of the State of Iowa: 

Section 1. Commission— How Appointed — Ilxpensei. That the gov- 
ernor of the state be and is hereby authorized to appoint a commission con- 
sisting of thirty-five members, being erne member for each Iowa organization 
participating in the campaign and siege of Vicksburg, namely, the 3rd, 4th, 



— 11 — 

5th, 6th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th 12th, 13th, 15th, 16th, 17th. 19th, 20th, 21st, 
22nd, 23rd, 24th, 25th, 26th, 28th, 30th, 31st, 34th, 35th, 38th, and 40th 
infantry regiments, the 3rd and 4th regiments of cavalry, and the 1st and 
2nd batteries of light artillery, and three at large from said organizations. 
Each member of said commission shall have served with honor in the cam- 
paign and siege of Vicksburg with the organization which he is appointed to 
represent, and shall serve on the commission without pay except as to neces- 
sary traveling expenses. 

Sec. 2. Duties. — That it shall be the duty of the commission to co-ope- 
rate with the national park commission in ascertaining and exactly deter- 
mining the positions of each Iowa organization in the siege of Vicksburg, 
and also to recommend to the Governor of the state such subsequent legisla- 
tion as will, in the opinion of the commission, permanently and suitably 
mark the positions thus ascertained, and worthily commemorate the valor 
and services of Iowa soldiers in the campaign and siege of Vicksburg. 

Sec. 3. Amount Appropriated — Vouchers. — That the sum of two thou- 
sand dollars, or so much thereof as may be necessary', be and the same is 
hereby appropriated out of the funds of the state treasury not otherwise 
appropriated, to be drawn and used by said commission to pay the necessary 
traveling expenses of the members thereof in the discharge of the duties 
aforesaid on the presentation of such certified vouchers as the auditor of 
state shall direct. 

Sec. 4. Report. — Said commission shall make a full report of the execu- 
tion of its trust to the Governor on or before the 15th day of January', 1902. 

Approved March 29, 1900. 

Under the provisions of said act of the legislature, His Excellency, Gov. 
Leslie M. Shaw, appointed a commission consisting of the following named 
gentlemen, to wit: 

COMMISSIONERS AT LARGE. 

Col. James K. P. Thompson Rock Rapids, 21st Infantry. 

Capt . Ellas B . Bascom Waukon , 5th Infantry. 

Col. David J. Palmer Washington, 25th Infantry-. 

Col. Cornelius A. Stanton Centerville, 3d Cavalry. 

Capt. Warren Beckwith Mt. Pleasant, 4th Cavalry. 

Senator Joseph A. Fitchpatrick Nevada, 3d Infantry. 

Capt . Henry G . Ankeny Corning , 4th Infantry . 

Capt. Wm. Dean Tipkon. 5th Infantry. 

Col. Eugene C. Haynes Centerville, 6th Infantry. 

Capt. Frederick P. Kettering DeWitt, 8th Infantry. 

Col. Alonzo Abernethy Osage, 9th Infantry. 

Hon . Mahlon Head Jefferson , 10th Infantry. 

Col. Benjamin Beach Muscatine, 11th Infantry. 

Abner Dunham Manchester, 12th Infantry. 

Ex-Speaker Wm. O. Mitchell Corning, 13th Infantry. 

Marinus Rhynsburger Orange City, 15th Infantry. 

Lieut. Chas. Mehl Dubuque, I6th Infantry. 

Capt. Samuel Daughters Keokuk, 17th Infantry. 

John W. Morton Washington , 19th Infantry. 

Maj. Edw. Coulter Cedar Rapids, 20th Infantry. 



— 12 — 

John W. Stahl Cedar Rapids, 21st Infantry 

Elmer J. C. Bealer Cedar Rapids, 22d Infantry 

James H . Dean Des Moines, 23d Infantry 

Capt. Chas. A. Lucas Iowa City, 24th Infantry 

Col. J. Whitfield Garner Columbus City, 25th Infantry 

Maj . Joseph D . Fegan Clinton , 26th Infantry 

Senator Lucin C. Blanchard Oskaloosa, 28th Infantry 

Lieut . Frank , Critz Riverside , 30th Infantry 

Senator Jeremiah S. Alexander Marion, 31st Infantry 

Col . Warren S . Dungan Chariton , 34th Infantry 

Philip J. Murphy Muscatine, 35th Infantry 

John R. Cook West Union, 38th Infantry 

Ex-Lieut. Gov. Frank T. Campbell. . Des Moines, 40th Infantry 

Elliot Frazier Morning Sun , 1st Batter>' 

Judge Joseph R. Reed Council Bluflfs, 2nd Battery 

Pursuant to notice, the members of the commission assembled in the 
Governor's parlors at the state house in Des Moines, vSeptember 18, 1900, 
and organized by the election of Col. J. K. P. Thompson, formerly of the 
Twenty-first Regiment, chairman, and Col. J. Whitfield Garner, of the 
Twenty-fifth, secretary. 

On invitation of the United States commission, the Iowa commissioners 
visited the battle-field at Vicksburg, November, 1900, for the purposse of 
carrying out the provisions of the act of the legislature under which they 
were appointed . 

To better enable them to perform their duties in recommending ''to the 
Governor of the state such subsequent legislation as will, in the opinion of 
the commission, permanently and suitably mark the positions thus ascertained 
and worthily commemorate the valor and services of the Iowa soldiers at 
Vicksburg," the commission, on its way south, visited the national park at 
Chickamauga and Lookout Mountain, and spent one day in examining the 
monuments and markers found thereon. The Shiloh commissioners accom- 
panied it and great good resulted from an interchange of opinions, and much 
needed information was obtained from their experiences. Under the pro- 
visions of the act of congress establishing tlie park and the appointment of a 
(jommission, twelve hundred thirty-two and twenty-eight hundreths (1232.28) 
acres of land has been deeded to the government of the United States, at a 
cost of $51,000. The tract is shown on the accompanying map, and is fully 
discribcd in section one of the act of congress establishing the park, which 
is set out on page one of this report. 

The state of Mississippi has ceded jurisdiction to the United States over 
the land included within the jiark limits, and to the public highways within 
its limits. 

There will be more than twenty-five miles of costly avenues and drives 
constructed, the precipitous hillK graded, and deej) ravines .spanned by 
costly ma.sonry and modern steel bridges, thus affording easy access to all 
parts of the park. The principle avenues are as follows: ' 'An avenue just 
in the rear of the line of the Confederate earthworks, eight miles long, which 
is now under construction; an avenue along the main line of Union works 
through the main body of the park about five miles in length, an avenue 
along the north Union wing, connecting with the Union avenue at its east 



— 13 — 

end and running thence west and southwest to the east gate of the national 
cemetery; an avenue along each of the four spurs which constitute the south 
Union wing; an avenue from the Union avenue to General Grant's headquar- 
ters; an avenue along the public roads running through the park or along 
its boundaries; an avenue, probably a dirt road only, on the north ridge 
road. The markers monuments and historical tablets of the Confederate 
organizations engaged in the defense, will be placed on the line of the first 
named avenue. 

Beginning at the east gate of the National Cemetery those in the Union 
army in the siege will be placed in the order of their service." (See map 
attatched thereto.) Especial attention is called to section five of the act of 
congress establishing the park . 

Troops from the following states participated in the campaign and siege 
of Vicksburg viz: 



b-S 






V c4 fl 

u a 

> 4> 

"5 So 

(J 



a a. 

■sa 



Indiana 



f2nd, Cavalries A, C, E, F, G, H; 3rd, 
I companies A, E, D, G, K, L; 4th, 
I company A; 5th, apparently all; 7th, 

Illinois \ company B; 10th, companies A, D, G, 
K; 11th, company G; 15th, companies 
F, I; Thieleman's companies A, B; 

. Kane county, Ind . , I Co 

(Company C, 1st cavalry; company C, 
\ 4th cavalry 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

y.. ' ./ 6th cavalry , 7 companies; 4th cavalry, 

Missouri I (^^ F; 10th cavalry, Co. C 

New Hampshire 

New York 

Ohio , 4th company , Ohio cavalry 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

U. S. Regulars 

West Virginia •. 

Wisconsin 

Louisiana, 5 regiments infantry, African brigade. . 

Mississippi, 2 regiments infantry, African brigade. 

Arkansas, 1 regiment infantry, African brigade .. 



15 

2 
2 



1 

11 

1 



Grand Total. 



46 



10 

2 
2 



19 



52 

24 
28 
1 
3 
3 
7 
3 

15 
3 
3 

26 
4 
1 
2 
1 

13 



189 



77 

28 
32 
1 
4 
3 
9 
4 

26 
3 
4 

38 
5 
1 
3 
1 

17 



256 



Commissioners from the following states have visited Vicksburg and 
located the positions of their troops, viz.: Massachusetts, Iowa, Rhode 
Island, Ohio, Mississippi, Minnesota, and Missouri, and those from the 



— 14 — 

states of Texas, Tennessee, Wisconsin and Illinois are expected to do so in 
November and December, 1901. 

In accordance with the act providing for the appointment of a commis- 
sion, all the members with the exception of ex-Gov. Campbell, of the 40th, 
proceeded to Vicksburg, where they arrived November 24, 1900. Several 
days were spent in association with the United States commissioners, and 
the positions occupied by the different regiments and batteries were duly 
located, and a complete record thereof made by G. C. Haydon, C. E., 
under the direction of the member of the commission making the location, 
and of Capt. Ri^by, of the national commission. The locations are desig- 
nated on the field by iron stakes or pieces of gas pipe securely driven into 
the ground, numbers having been cut into the same, and a record thereof 
made by the engineer in a book kept for that purpose. To illustrate: 

"No. 5 point, at which the left of the 25th Iowa rested, as established by 
Col. D. J. Palmer and Col. J. W. Garner, 25th Iowa, November 27, 1900." 

"No. 6 point, at which the right of the 31st Iowa infantry rested, as 
established by Capt. J. S. Alexander, 31st Iowa, November 27, 1900." 

"No. 30, the right of the line of the 5th Iowa infantry for pickets and 
shaqjshooter's duty May 23 to June 24, 1863. Located November 27, 1900, 
by Capt. E. B. Bascomb, Co. K, and Capt. Wm. Dean, Co. A, both of the 
5th Iowa infantr\- . ' ' 

A copy of this record, together with a copy of the map of the grounds, 
with the several positions duly marked thereon, was furnished the chairman 
of the commission by the United States commission, copies of which are 
filed herewith, marked respectively A and B, and made a part of this 
report. 

IOWA'S interest IX THE VICKSBURG NATIONAL PARK. 

The conspicuous part taken by the troops from Iowa in the Vicksburg 
campaign and the famous siege, is known to most of her citizens, and needs 
not to be referred to to compel admiration of their brilliant achievements. 
It forms a radiant chapter in our history; a concise statement of the part 
taken by each regiment, and of the privations endured and losses sustained, 
will, we believe, be of interest to every citizen, and a worthy contribution to 
the imperishable war history of the state 

As already stated, Iowa had twenty-eight regiments of infantry, two of 
cavalr>' and two batteries engaged in the campaign and siege of Vicksburg. 
In the sixteen divisions composing the Array of the Tennessee May 13 to 
July 4, Iowa had troops in ten, and in the forty-six brigades, she had troops 
in fourteen. 

THIRD INFANTRY. 

This regiment was attached to the 1st brigade — 4th division— 16th army 
corps. The brigade left Memphis on the 17th of May, for Vicksburg, and 
was landed at Snyder's Bluff on the Yazoo, in rear of the right of the line of 
investment on the 20th. On the 24th the division was moved to the left, 
prolonging the line of investment and for a time constituted the left division 
f)f the line. 

Owing to the late date of its arrival in the rear of Vicksburg, it did not 
participate in any of the preliminary battles of the campaign, nor in the 
assaults of the 14th and 22d of May. On its way down the river, however. 



— 16 — 

on the 18th of May, the boat on which it was embarked was attacked by a 
force of infantry and artillery, protected behind the levee on the east side of 
the river. Two companies were on board at the time of this attack and they 
promptly returned the fire of the enemy. The boat, however, soon passed 
beyond the range of the enemy's guns. In this affair the casualties of the 
regiment were fourteen wounded. 

The first position of the regiment in the line of investment was about one 
mile west of the Hall's Ferry road. But on the 30th of May it was moved 
to that road, and advanced to within a short distance of the enemy's line. 
On the evening of June 1st two companies were detailed to support a section 
of artillery which was placed in an advanced position. At eleven o'clock 
that night the enemy made a .sortie in strong force, with the intention of 
capturing the guns — but were given a very warm reception by the two sup- 
porting companies as well as by the artillery, and were driven back into 
their works with considerable loss. 

On the evening of June 4th , the five companies then occupying the brigade 
picket line were ordered to attack the enemy's entrenched picket line on a 
ridge in front of the brigade. The men went forward with great gallantry, 
driving out the pickets of the enemy and occupying the ground. The enemy 
made repeated efforts during the night to retake the position, but were on 
every occasion defeated. 

On the night of June 24th a detail of 300 of the regiment, under Major 
Crosley, were at work in the trenches when they were attacked by a heavy 
force of the enemy. The guards were down in and the enemy advanced 
close to the trenches. But the men of the working party seized their guns 
and poured into them so hot a fire that they were driven back to their own 
lines. 

From the time the regiment was placed in the line of investment until the 
surrender, its experience was similar to that of other regiments in the lines. 
It was constantly under fire and daily details were made from it for picket 
duty and for work in the trenches. 

After the surrender it went with Sherman to Jackson, where, on the 12th 
of July, it became the victim of a stupid blunder by the division commander. 
In violation of orders he sent the brigade to which the regiment belonged 
against an impregnable position. The men did all that men could have 
done to reach the enemy's line. But they could not accomplish the impossi- 
ble, and they were needlessly and foolishly sacrificed. The regiment left 
more than one-half its number on the field, but those who escaped the awful 
carnage retired without panic, and rallied to their colors at the first position 
they found covered from the fire of the enemy. 

FOURTH IOWA. 

The 4th regiment Iowa infantry was organized at Council Bluffs, 
Iowa, in July 1861, in response to the President's call for 300,000 men. 
Grenville M. Dodge was appointed colonel; John Galligan, lieutenant-colonel; 
William R. English, major, and James A. Williamson, adjutant. 

The regiment embarked for St. Louis, Mo., August 9th, where it was 
mustered into the service on the 15th, and one week later went into camp at 
Rolla, Mo. January 23, 1862, it joined the army of the southwest under Gen. 
Curtis, marching to Springfield, Mo., and upon its evacuation by the Con- 



— 16 — 

federate General Price, pursued his army to Pea Ridge, Ark., and took a 
conspicuous part in that great battle and victory on March 7th and 8th, where 
the regiment won ''immortal honors," but ''lost in killed and wounded 
almost one-half of those actually engaged." Colonel Dodge, who commanded 
the brigade, was immediately promoted brigader-general for conspicuous 
gallantry on the field, and Adjutant Jas. A. Williamson was promoted 
ieutenant- colonel, and a month later became colonel of the regiment. 

After a most difficult and hazardous march of 630 miles the regiment 
reached Helena, Arkansas, July 14th. From this point expeditions were 
made to White and St. Francis rivers and into Mississippi, where large sup- 
plies of horses, mules and cattle were secured, also to Coldwater in aid of 
General Grant's movements. 

In December the regiment was assigned to Thayer's brigade of Steele's 
division of the 15th corps to aid in the attack on Vicksburg, under General 
Sherman, It was engaged in the battle of Chickasaw Bayou on December 
27th and 29th, and for its gallant part in that disastrous assault General Grant 
ordered to be inscribed on its banner: "The first at Chickasaw Bayou." 
January 11, 1863, it took part in the capture of Arkansas Post, and in the 
following April went with the division under General Steele, on the Greene- 
ville and Deer Creek expedition. 

May 2d the regiment started on the march to the rear of Vicksburg, 
reaching Jackson on the 14th, and was one of the first regiments to enter the 
city; remained two days destroying railroads and bridges, and resumed the 
march to Vicksburg, taking position on the right of our lines before the city 
on the afternoon of the 18th, after some skirmishing; joined in the assault 
on the 19th, losing thirteen men wounded, was also assigned to the assault- 
ing column with Thayer's brigade on the 22d, but owing to its exposed 
position and the impossibility of securing protection, was withdrawn to Iowa 
Hill, and acted as sharpshooters. 

During the remainder of the siege the regiment was ordered to the right 
to support the 1st Iowa battery with large details constantly on duty as 
sharpshooters. 

After the capitulation of Vicksburg the 4th was in General Sherman's 
pursuing army in the second siege of Jackson and later at Brandon, Miss. 

The 4th Iowa was a representative regiment. Its ranks were filled with 
as fine a body of stalwart, patriotic young men as ever wore the blue; 
prompt to respond to the call of duty, they never shrunk'from any command, 
whether for training, marching, digging or fighting; nor ever complained of 
any hardship, privation or duty. The true soldier, spirit infused by their 
first typical leader never left them. 
The loss in the siege was 5 killed, 32 wounded, total .57. 

THE S'llI AND 10th infantry. 

* These regiments .served during the campaign with the 3d brigade, 7th 
division, 17th army corps. The division crossed the Mississippi at Bruins- 
burg on the first day of May, and was advanced during the day and following 
night to Port Gibson, but did not arrive at the latter place early enough to 
take part in the engagement. 

It was present at the battle of Raymond, but was not seriously engaged. 
On the 14th of May, the division was at the head of the 17th army corps in 



— 17 — 

the approach to Jackson on the Clinton road. The head of the column 
encountered the enemy, occupying a strong position about three miles west of 
the town , from which they were driven by a charge of^the whole division . The 
5th and 10th regiments were in the line as it advanced but suffered but slight 
loss. On the 16th the division was the rear of the column as it approached 
the field of Champion Hill, and for some time after the opening of the battle 
was held in reserve. Later in the day, however, when the left division in the 
line of battle (Hovey's) became hard pressed by the heavy reinforcements 
sent by the Confederates against it, the brigade to which the Sth and 10th 
belonged was sent forward to its assistance. It went into the field with the 
greatest gallantry, and the desperate character of the fighting is evidenced 
by the losses sustained by these regiments. In the Sth two officers and 
seventeen men were killed and three officers and seventy-two men were 
wounded. In the 10th 3 officers and 33 men were killed and 6 officers and 
125 men were wounded. But they held their line and assisted in driving the 
enemy in rout and confusion from the field. The report of losses in the Con. 
federate regiments on their front show that their fire was terribly destructive. 
At both Jackson and Champion Hill the division was commanded by that 
gallant Iowa soldier, Brig. -Gen. M. M. Crocker. 

On the 17th these regiments marched with their division to the Big Black' 
but were not engaged in the battle at that place . On the 18th they crossed the 
stream and marched to a point near Vicksburg, and on the 19th took posi- 
tion in the line of investment, between the Jackson road and the railroad. 
On the 22d they were engaged in the assaults on the enemy's works ordered 
toy General Grant in the hope that the works could then be carried and the 
campaign brought to a successful end. The advance of these regiments in 
the morning was against the works immediately in their front, but they were 
brought to a standstill — as was the whole army — by the terriffic fire to 
which they were exposed. Later in the day they, with the balance of their 
brigade, were withdrawn from that position and sent to support a division of 
the 13th army corps, which had been reported as having gained some 
advantage in the assault in the morning. They went forward again only to 
meet a bloody repulse. Their losses in both assaults were heavy. The 
brigade commander. Colonel Boomer, was killed in the last assault. They 
were returned to their original position in the line of investment, where they 
remained, constantly engaged until the end of the siege. The total losses of 
the regiment during the campaign were: Sth, killed, 22; wounded, 98; total, 
120. 10th, killed, 38; wounded, 159; total, 197. 

THE 11th, 13th, ISth and 16th infantry. 

These "regiments constituted the 3d brigade, sixth division, 17th army 
corps. The brigade was formed on the 17th of April, 1862, immediately 
after the battle of Shiloh, in which the regiments performed important and 
distinguished service — the brigade organization was maintained until the end 
of the war. It is known as the Crocker Brigade, its first commander being 
Col. M. M. Crocker of the 13th regiment, and its great efficiency during its 
subsequent history was due in a great measure to the stern discipline which 
he imposed upon it. 

During the operations immediately following the investment of Vicksburg 
the brigade was assigned to the very important duty of maintaining and 



— 18 — 

gfuarding the line from Milliken's Bend to Hard Times Landing and Granc? 
Gulf, which was the only line of supply for the array until the base was- 
established at Hayne's Bluff on the Yazoo, about the 20th of May. On the 
21st it was disembarked at Warranton, below Vicksburg, and on the 22d its 
position was on the left of the 13th army corps— it being the extreme left 
brigade of the army. The orders for the day did not contemplate any assault 
upon the works of the enemy by that part of the line, and none waS' 
attempted. The brigade, however, was advanced to a position near the 
defensive line of the enemy; its skirmishers approaching at different points: 
to within forty yards of the works, and the whole force was engaged in a 
sharp skirmish during the day. In the evening it was withdrawn from its 
advanced position and moved to the right to near the center of the 13th 
corps. On the next day it moved back and reoccupied the ground of the 
22d, where it remained under a constant fire from the enemy until the 26th, 
when being relieved by other troops, it joined the 17th corps, which was the 
center of the army. On the 27th it was sent with General Blair on the expe- 
dition to Mechanicsburg where it had a sharp skirmish with the enemy,, 
driving them beyond the town. On its return to the main army it was not 
placed in the line of investment, but was camped one mile in the rear. 
One of the regiments, the 11th, was sent four miles to the rear on picket 
duty for three days. On the 20th of June the other three regiments were- 
advanced to the main line and placed in position on the left of Ransom's 
Division, but on the same evening returned to their camp. 

During the siege they furnished daily details for duty on the skirmish line 
and for work in the trenches. If they did not participate in the desperate 
fighting of the campaign, it was because they were not present at the points 
where the fighting occurred. But they performed every duty to which they 
were assigned and did it well. Their labors were constant and arduous. 

Col. William Hull of the 11th, commanded the brigade up to the 4th 
of June. After that it was commanded by Col. Alexander Chambers of the 
16th. 

THE IfTH INFANTRY. 

This regiment served in the 2d brigade, 7th division, 17th army corps, 
and in the early stages of the campaign its experiences were almost identical' 
with tho.se of the 5th and 10th regiments. Its first serious engagement was 
at Jackson on the 14th of May. It led in the attack which drove the Con- 
federates from their strong position on the Clinton road, and its losses 
amounted to 23 per cent of the men present for duty. It then moved for- 
ward and entered the defensive line in front of the city, capturing four pieces- 
of artillery. On the 16th after a march of twelve miles over hot, dusty 
roads, it was thrown at double quick into the line of battle of Champioo 
Hill. During the day it made a number of brilliant charges against the 
enemy, driving them in every instance from their positions. In one of its 
charges it cajjtured a battery of four guns, which had been captured early 
in the day by another regiment, which later had been driven back by the 
enemy, abandoning the guns to them. In another it gathered in as prison- 
ers, the 31st Alabama with its colors and field ofiicers. It was sent into the 
battle at a critical time and by its splendid fighting contributed very largely 
t< the magnifitient results of the engagement. Its conduct, both here and 
at Jackson was highly commended by General Crocker, who commanded 



— 19 — 

the division. Its position in the line of investment was south of Jackson 
road. On the 22d it participated in the general assault on the works of the 
enemy, but like the balance of the army it found those works too strong and 
too stoutly defended to be carried by assault. 

It continued in the line of investment until the surrender of the 4th of 
July, engaging the enemy every day. On the 25th of June a mine was 
exploded in front of Logan's division near the Jackson road. The explosion 
destroyed a strong Confederate work, leaving a crater where it had stood. 
At 11 o'clock that night, the Seventeenth was sent in to hold this crater. 
The space was so narrow that but about seventy men could be put in at one 
time, and they were sent in in reliefs of that number. They held the place 
for three hours, exposed during all the time to a hot fire from the enemy. 
The loss of the regiment during the night was thirty-seven killed and wounded. 
Soon after the investment of Vicksburg was complete. Col. I). B. Hillis, 
who up to that time had commanded the regiment, resigned on account of 
failing health. He was succeeded by that magnificient soldier. Col. Clark 
R. Weaver, who up to that time had been Lieutenant-colonel of the regi- 
ment. 

The total loss of the regiment during the campaign, was, killed, 43; 
wounded, 136; total, 179. 

THE 6th infantry. 

The Sixth Infantry participated in the siege of Vicksburg as a part of 
Gen. William Sooy Smith's division, which arrived in the Yazoo River 
steamers and disembarked at Snyder's Bluff, on June 11, 1863, and at once 
entered into operations then being inaugurated to resist the forces of Gen. 
Joseph E. Johnston, gathering at Jackson and on the line of the Big Black 
river in order to raise General Pemberton'sarmy, then hermetically sealed up 
in the city of Vicksburg by General Grants' besieging lines. 

General Smith's division was soon advanced out to the line of the Big Black 
river together with other forces, where the 48th Illinois and the 6th Iowa 
were stationed on the Adam's plantation at Oak Ridge postoffice, and 
engaged in blockading the wagon roads leading out to the interior, with 
felled trees and erecting earthworks for defending the approaches, doing 
picket duty, scouting to the front where an abundance of blackberries, 
peaches, apples, figs, roasting ears, and vegetables were secured. The posi- 
tion was maintained without particular incident until the surrender of General 
Pemberton's army, on July 4th, 1863, when the regiment joined in the 
expedition to Jackson, under the command of Gen. W. T. Sherman to drive 
General Johnston and his forces out of the state. The 6th was engaged with 
the enemy at Jones' Ford on the Big Black river, July 6th; participated in 
the engagement while approaching the capital city and was led by General 
Corse, then commanding the regiment, in an assualt on the main fortifica- 
tions of the enemy, which resulted in the evacuation of the place during the 
night following. The losses sustained by the regiment during the campaign 
were: 9 killed, 51 wounded, 12 missing in action; total, 72. 

THE 8th, 12th and 35th infantry. 

These regiments constituted the 3d brigade, 3d division, 15th army corps. 
As the regiments constituted an organization, the history ot their services in 
the campaign may be covered by a single paragraph of this report. 



— 20 — 

When the campaign commenced the brigade was commanded by Brig. 
Gen. Charles L. Matthies, a citizen of Iowa. On the 1st of June he was 
assigned to the command of a brigade in the 17th army corps, and the com- 
mand of this brigade devolved upon Col. Joseph J. Woods of the 12th Iowa, 
the senior officer pre.sent. The Sth and 12th were veteran regiments, each 
having fought at Donaldson and Shiloh, and their casualty lists in the latter 
battle were as great, perhaps, as those of any other regiments on the field, 
and they had there so demeaned themselves as to command the respect of 
their enemies as well as their comrades. The 3Sth was comparatively a new 
regiment, and its first active service in the field was in this campaign, in 
which i: received its baptism of fire at Jackson on the 14th of May. But 
there, as well as at every other post of duty during the campaign, its officers 
and men showed the qualities of true soldiers. They were brave, alert, and 
constant in the performance of every duty. 

The subsequent service of the 12th and 35th regiments until the close of 
the war was with the same division, which afterwards was known as the first 
division of the 16th army corps. In the division were regiments from every 
western state except Kansas and Michigan. Each of its regiments proved 
its courage and devotion in many fields, and each bore inscribed upon its 
banners the names of many battles in which it had participated, but none 
when their arms were stacked for the last time, could look feack upon a 
prouder record than these two Iowa regiments had made for themselves. 

After the campaign was ended the Sth regiment was assigned to duty in 
the city of Memphis, where its patience and courage were often put to the 
test in the government of a disloyal and uneasy population. It subsequently 
returned to duty in the field with another division, and in the last engage- 
ment of the war it added lustre to its glorious record by carrying the strong 
works of Spanish fort on Mobile Bay with the bayonet. 

The brigade left its encampment at Duckport on the west side of the 
Mississippi river above Vicksburg on the 2d of May, and arrived at Hard 
Times landing on the 7th. During the afternoon of that day and the fol- 
lowing night it crossed to Grand Gulf, and on the morning of the Sth 
started on the march for Jackson without transportation, the men carrying 
three days' rations in addition to sixty rounds of ammunition on their per- 
son. On the 14th at about noon they arrived in front of Jackson and were 
in the engagement which resulted in the capture of the city which is described 
in the paragraph devoted to the 2d battery. They were posted in support of 
the two batteries of the division and were exposed to the same fire. The 
conduct and bearing of the men was very gratifying to General Matthies, who 
that day, for the first time commanded them in action. During the 15th and 
the forenoon of the IGth they were engaged in destroying the railroad south 
of the city. About noon of the IGth they started on the march to Vicksburg, 
crossing the big lilack river at Messenger's early in the morning of the 18th, 
and arriving within six hundred yards of the defensive works of the city that 
evening. Loaded as the men were with their arms, ammunition and rations, 
the march was very trying upon them. They bore up, however, with won- 
derful cheerfulness and spirit and there were but few stragglers from their 
ranks. On the afternoon of the 22d, when Moore's brigade of the same 
division, was .sent on a desperate but bloody and fruitless charge upon the 
enemy's works, they were drawn in support. They were exposed to a heavy 



— 21 — 

fire of artillery but fortunately were not advanced far enouj^h to receive 
much of the fire from the infantry. On the 23d they and the whole array 
settled down to the work of the siege. Their position was on the north side 
of the graveyard road and they were in the reserve of the 15th array corps. 
Their encampments were in ravines, well protected by the ground from the 
fire of the enemy. Daily details were made from the regiments for the 
skirmish lines and for work in the trenches, and much of the labor in the 
construction of the covered way and sap, which at the end of the siege had 
reached the outer ditch of Stockade Fort, was done by the men of this 
brigade. At a latter day during the siege the 8th regiment occupied a riilge 
parallel with the enemy's line and within one hundred yards of it, where 
they covered themselves by strong works, from which their fire covered the 
Confederate line for a long distance. They also constructed a sap which 
extended from near the left of their position nearly to the Confederate works. 
From that sap a mine was extended under Stockade Fort, which was nearly 
ready to be sprung at the time of the surrender. On the 22d of June the 
brigade was withdrawn from the line of investment and took position on the 
line, between the Yazoo and Big Black, which was established by General 
Sherman for the purpose of meeting the threatened attack in the rear of 
Gen. Joseph E. Johnston. Immediately after the surrender they marched 
with Sherman to Jackson, where they were placed in the line of investment 
and were constantly engaged until the place was evacuated by the Confeder- 
ates. The losses sustained by these regiments during the campaign were 
not great, but every duty to which they were assigned was performed with 
courage and faithfulness. 

During the campaign the 8th regiment was commanded by Col. J. L. 
Geddes, the 12th by Col. J. J. Woods until he assumed command of the 
brigade, after that by Lieut. Col. Samuel R. Edgington, and the ;55th by 
Col. Sylvester G. Hill. 

After the capture of Jackson the brigade advanced with other forces as 
far east as Brandon, where they had a lively skirmish on the 19th of July, 
in which they drove a force of the enemy from their position. The next day 
they destroyed the railroad between Brandon and Jackson , after which they 
marched to the Big Black and were there encamped during the balance of 
the summer. 

NINTH iow.\. 

In July, 1861, in response to President Lincoln's call for volunteers, Hon. 
Wm. Vandever, a representative in congress, went to his district to raise 
and equip a regiment for immediate service. September 26th the 9th Iowa 
mfantry, numbering thirty-eight officers and 939 enlisted men, with Wm. 
Vandever, colonel; Frank J. Herron, lieutenant-colonel; and Wm. H. 
Coyle, major, left Camp Union, near Dubuque, for Benton Barracks, Mo. 
Its first service was in Missouri guarding railroa-d bridges. Its first battle 
was at Pea Ridge, Ark., where, on the 7th of March, 1862, after an all 
day's fierce encounter, 273 were either killed or wounded. A summer's 
campaign over the Ozark mountains brought the regiment to Helena. Ark. 

December 18, 1862, having been assigned to Thayer's brigade of Steele's 
division , the regiment embarked on transports for service under General Sher- 
man down the Mississippi toward Vicksburg, for the attack on Chickasaw 
Bayou. A second expedition brought it in line for assault before Arkansas 



— 22 — 

Post, January 11, 18G3, where the Confederate white flag announced the 
surrender without a charge. 

During the two months of February and March around Young's Point, 
La., the regiment suffered greater loss from disease and sickness than can 
be told. The health of many of the men was already undermined. Scores 
of them hitherto stout and rugged were prostrated, many past recovery. 
They were buried in the shallow graves about the hospitals, while others 
only recovered long afterwards in the mountains of Tennessee and Georgia 
or on the sandy plains of the Carolinas. 

January 2Sth the regiment began work on the canal below Vicksburg, 
and continued until the Gth of March, when the Mississippi had risen so high 
that the canal and all the surrounding country were flooded. 

April 2d the 9th accompanied Steele's division to Greenville, Miss. , and 
the Deer Creek swamps, returning to camp April 28th. 

May 2d the regiment began its march around Vicksburg, and by the 14th 
had entered Jackson, where it remained two days tearing up railroads. 
The second day after leaving Jackson it was in front of the outer works 
which environed Vicksburg, having in seventeen days marched 175 miles on 
about six days' rations. General Thayer's brigade, containing the 4th, 9th, 
26th and 30th Iowa, took position May 18th on the left of Wood's brigade, 
which held the right of the investing army. 

May 19th, after severe skirmishing, the regiment succeeding in getting a 
position about seventy-five yards from the enemy's line of works, protected 
by a semi-circular ridge. It was supported on the right by the 26th Iowa, 
and on the left by the 30th. At first no one could leave the ranks in day- 
light without exposing himself to the Confederate sharpshooters. In a few 
days covered ways were constructed which made the passage reasonably 
safe. On the 22d of May, in line with the whole army, the 9th went up to 
the assault. Its colors went down a few feet from the Confederate works after 
the last one of the color guard had fallen, either killed or wounded. In the 
few terrible moments of this assault the regiment lost seventy-nine killed and 
wounded, nearly one-third the number in action. The men found them- 
selves lying in ravines, behind logs, close up to and under the protection of 
the Confederate works. There they lay until darkness gave them a cover 
under which to escape. Captains Kelsey and McSweney and Lieutenants 
Jones, Wilber, Little, Tyrrell and Kemery fell while leading their companies 
to the assault, and Captain Washburn was mortally wounded at the head of 
the regiment. 

During the siege Thayer's approach was cut through the lines on the 
9th. each regiment making regular details for the work. It was concealed 
from the enemy chiefly by fascines made of bundles of cane stocks. 

The 9th had seen hard service from the beginning. More than 125 had 
already been killed or mortally wounded, but as comrade after comrade 
dropped out, those who were left steadily closed up the ranks, ready always 
for any service or sacrifice. 

Loss during the siege was: Killed, 47; wounded, 72: total, 119. 

TIIK 21.ST AND 22l) IMANTKV. 

These regiments served during the campaign in the 2d brigade, 14th 
division, 13th army corps, and as their history is almost identical will be 



— J3- 

treated together. The brigade from its organization April 6th, 18G3, was 
commanded by Colonel Stone of the 22d Iowa, Colonel Merrill of the 21.st 
Iowa, and Brigadier-General Lawler respectively. Brigadier-General Carr 
commanded the division, and Major-General McClernand the corps until 
relieved, and succeeded by Major-General Ord. These regiments remained 
in camp at Milliken's Bend, Louisiana, until April I2th, when the great 
movement having been commenced, they broke camp and took up the line 
of march. 

April 30th, they together with the rest of tlie division, embarked on 
transports and gunboats and moved down and across the Mississippi river, 
landing at Bruinsburg, when, after^drawing three days' rations, which were 
destined, however, to last many times three days, they moved out on the 
Port Gibson road. The troops had in the meantime been engaged both day 
and night in making and repairing roads, restoring levees, making, getting 
together and navigating boats and barges of different kinds. Much of the 
time the labor and movements were made in the most drenching rains and 
inky darkness ever experienced . 

BATTLE OF PORT C.IBSON, 

In the early evening of the 30th when the division was on its march from 
Bruinsburg to Port Gibson, Col. Wm. M. Stone of the 22d Iowa took com- 
mand of the brigade. The 21st was in the advance. Two companies under 
the command of Lieutenant-Colonel Dunlap were deployed as skirmishers, 
and two others under command of Major Van Anda as supports to the 
howitzers; the balance of the brigade, the 21st, under the command of 
■Colonel Merrill, leading, moved forward in supporting distance. The 
advance was rapid and at about one o'clock a. m. the advance guard came 
iipon the enemy's pickets. The skirmish lines soon encountered the 
-enemy, and the engagement became general. The brigade fought in the 
center of our line, and was advanced for the purpose of charging the 
enemy's columns, which, after sustaining our fire for a short time, broke and 
retreated in confusion. These regiments displayed great courage and 
travery. and received the commendation of the commanding general. 
General Carr, in his report of this battle, refers to the 21st as ''the first in 
battle and one of the last to leave the field." He also commends the 22d in 
strong terms. 

The 21st lost 17 wounded and 2 missing, total, 19; the 22d lost 2 killed 
21 woimded, total, 23. 

Colonel Merrill commanded the brigade for awhile during the day, owing 
to the illness of Colonel Stone, and received a slight wound; his horse was 
shot, and a portion of his saddle was shot oft". Lieutenant-Colonel Dunlap 
received a wound in the foot. These regiments did not participate in the 
battle of Raymond, or the first attack on Jackson, but were in supporting 
distance, having advanced within seven miles of the capital, and were 
hastily countermarched toward Edward's Station, and while not actively 
.engaged at Champion Hill nevertheless performed valuable service as a 
reserve, until late in the afternoon. The 22d being in advance, the 
whole line moved forward under a heavy fire of musketry and artillery, 
but the enemy soon broke and fled, pursued by the brigade, which made a 
£arge capture of prisoners and small arms. Next day the 21st led the 



— 24 — 

advance again in pursuit of the enemy, which was strongly posted on both 
sides of 

BLACK RIVER. 

The 21st and 23d Iowa, supported by the 11th Wisconsin, charged across- 
the bottom lands through a bayou, under a murderous cross-fire from the 
enemy's rifle-pits, which were defended by 4,000 men, and carried them, 
by assault. 

The reiult of this engagement' was the capture of 1751 prisoners, 18 
guns and a number ol small arras. Colonel Merrill, gallantly leading his 
regiment, fell with a bullet through both hips, a wound at the time thought 
to be mortal. General Grant, who witnessed the charge, characterized it as 
"ft brilliant and daring movement." The loss in the 21st was 13 killed and 
70 wounded, total 83. 

The 22d, although actively engaged on the extreme right, did not suffer 
so severely, losing but two wounded. 

The command remained in the field until the 18th, engaged in hurrying 
the dead, caring for the wounded, and collecting arms and property aban- 
doned by the enemy. The brigade arrived in the rear of Vicksburg on the 
afternoon of the next day, joined in the attack, "with rifle, pick and spade," 
and were conspicuous in the 

ASS.MLT ON THE FORTIFICATIONS ON THE 22d OF MAY. 

Under cover of the night the 22d regiment, which was to lead the column. 
of attack, had moved up the ravines and taken position under shelter of the 
bluffs or hills and awaited the hour of assault. The 21st, under Major 
Van Anda, formed in the rear of the 22d, which it supported, at about 100 
yards from the enemy's works and parallel to them. Promptly at the hour 
designated for the assault, the 22d, Col. Wm. Stone commanding, occupy- 
ing the the right, with the 21st supporting it, moved forward again.=t the 
enemy's fort directly in front. As soon as they reached the crest of the hill 
a terrible fire from the enemy in front and on both flanks swept the ground 
with fearful execution. Officers and men fell on every side. Reaching the 
enemy's works, the width and depth of the ditch in front, combined with 
the heavy fire poured into them by the Confederates, checked the main 
advance. A few brave men of the 22d, however, leaping into the ditch, 
clambered up the sides of the fort, rushed into it, engaged in a hand to hand 
conflict with the Confederates occupying the outer wing of the fort, over- 
came them, killing many and compelling the remainder to surrender. Thu« 
a portion of their works was in our possession, with the flag of the 22d 
planted upon the walls. 

The loss of the brigade in the course of the day's fighting was heavy. 
Out of the three regiments composing it, 375 were killed, wounded and miss- 
ing. Among the killed were Lieutenant-Colonel Dunlap of the 21st, Lieu- 
tenant Robb and Privates Arthur, Albian and Hezikiah Drummond, Ander- 
son and Lloyd of the 22d; those of the 22d being killed within the fort. 
Among the wounded were Col. Wm. M. Stone and Lieutenant-Colonel Gra- 
ham of the 22d, Major Van Anda, Captains Harrison and Graves; Lieuten- 
ants Roberts, Adams, Childs and Bates of the 21st. Graham was also 
taken prisoner. Sergt. Joseph E. Grifllth of the 22d distinguished himself 
particularly in the charge on tlie fort, and was the only survivor, but two, 



— 25 — 

of the men who took it in the morning. For this daring feat (Griffith was- 
promoted and afterwards sent to West Point to represent the captured dis-^ 
trict of Mississippi. 

The loss of the 21st was 113, and of the 22d 164, total 277. The largest 
percentage of loss, perhaps, sustained by any regiment during the cam- 
paign, was suffered by the 22d. Colonel Graham reports the strength of 
the regiment on the day of the charge at 200, (official records. Vol. 24, part 
1, page 178,) and the loss is given at 1G4, or 82 per cent. Eighty-one of these 
were either killed or mortally wounded. We find no report of the strength 
of the 21st on the day of the charge, but assuming it to be the same as that 
of the 22d, its loss of 113 would be 56 percent., sixty-five of whom were 
either killed or mortally wounded. 

Between the 22d day of May and the surrender July 4th, the 21st regi- 
ment was on duty in the rifle pits 13 days and 8 nights, and repeatedly 
lay all night in line of battle. It also furnished its proportion for work- 
ing parties, guard and picket duty. The 22d also furnished its quota 
for such duty, and "labored day after day, night after night, creeping upon 
the enemy slowly by lines of entrenchment, living pent up, enduring many 
hardships and uttering no word of complaint." On the morning of July 2d 
Lawler's brigade, of which these regiments formed a part, was ordered out 
to meet and repulse a reported movement of Johnston's across the Big Black 
river, for the relief of Vicksburg. ''The march was a forced one, the day 
hot and sultry, roads dusty, water scarce, men unused to marching, gen- 
eral on horseback with no thought of the soldiers in the ranks. Suffering 
was intense, men falling out with blistered feet, parched throats, swollen 
veins and bloodshot eyes, and with execration on their tongues." V/hen 
late at night, the halt was made with less than a hundred men to the regi- 
ment, no enemy was in sight. Next day they marched back over the same 
road to find an armistice arranged preparatory to the surrender of the city. 

The total loss during the campaign and siege was as follows: 

Twenty-first — 2 missing, 38 killed, 27 mortally wounded, 150 wounded: 
total, 217. 

Twenty-second— 1 missing, 42 killed, 39 mortally wounded, 109 wounded.:, 
total, 201. 

TWENTY- THIRD INFANTRY. 

This regiment served in the second brigade, 14th division of the 13th- 
army corps, and in the early stages, of the Vicksburg campaign its 
experiences were nearly identical with those of the 21st and 22d regiments, 
belonging as it did to the same brigade. It was with its brigade on the 
march into the interior, which brought on the 

BATTLE OF PORT GIBSON. 

The 23d, under the command of Lieutenant Colonel Glasgow, fought wiih 
uncommon gallantry in this its first battle, and suffered more heavily than any 
other regiment in its brigade, losing in killed, wounded and missing, 35. 
It took part in the subsequent movements of the brigade, and reached 
Champion Hill in time to witness that severe engagement, and to take part, 
as a reserve, and participate in the hot pursuit of the confederates. In the 



— 26 — 

BATTLE OF HI.ACK RIVER 15RIDGE, 

on the following day, May 17, 1863, it took a most conspicuous part, and 
suffered more than any other regiment engaged. The enemy was found 
strongly posted on both sides of Black river. The regiment in conjunction 
with the 21st charged across the bottom and through a bayou under a most 
terrific and murderous cross-fire from the enemy's riflepits, and from the 
artillery and sharp-shooters posted on the high land across the river. The 
assault lasted but a few minutes and was successful, but at what a sacrifice. 
General Peraberton, in his report, says that the line was manned by 4,000 
men , and that the position was so strong that his only apprehension was a 
fiank movement above or below, but he had no fear of a successful 
assault. When the charge was over, it was found that the 23d had lost in 
killed and wounded, 101. Among the killed was the brave Colonel Kins- 
man, who fell mortally wounded while leading his regiment in the charge. 
Illustrative of the fearful ordeal through which the assaulting column 
passed, it may be stated, ''that of the thirty-seven members of Captain 
■Goclman's company who were engaged in the charge, 22 (60 percent.) were 
hit, his two lieutenants and his orderly sergeant being among the slain." 

3y order of General Grant the 23d was here awarded the duty of guard- 
ing the prisoners, whom they took as far north as Memphis, returning in 
-time to participate in the sanguinary 

BATTLE OF MILLIKEN'S BEND, 

which was fought on the 7th of June. That part of the regiment engaged 
in this action was under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel Glasgow, and 
according to statements of members of the regiment who were present at 
the battle, numbered but 118 men, but was joined by 80 men who had 
been left behind, after the close of the engagement. They were, with the 
exception of a small force of cavalry, the only command of white troops 
jiresent. The total number engaged, including a small brigade of 
untrained colored troops, was about 1,100. Opposed to this little band of 
almost entirely untrained men, the Confederates brought 2,700 hardy and 
experienced troops. 

The 23d arrived at Milliken's Bend on the evening of the Gth from 
Young's Point in response to orders to reinforce the raw force at Milliken's 
Bend. Just at earliest dawn on the morning of the 7th, Colonel Glasgow, 
though not senior in command, acted without orders and hurriedly disem- 
barked his men. This was scarcely done before aheavy line of Confederates 
was seen charging forward only a short distance away. Instantly the men 
■ol the 23d sprang forward at double-quick, loading and fixing bayonets as 
they ran. A few hundred feet away lay the levee, and the race was for its 
possession. Neither won, for they met upon its crest. The contestants 
were so clo.se that they were scorched by the blaze from the muzzle of each 
;>thers guns; but in the fierce hand-to-hand encounter that ensued, bayonets 
and clubbed muskets were used. In five minutes more than half of the men 
of the 23d were killed or wounded. With only a handful of his regiment 
left, and with a foe of overwhelming numbers in his front, Glasgow gave 
the order to retreat to the protection of the river bank. When this was 
accomplished it uncovered the enemy to the fire of a gunboat, which, up to 
flhis time, had been i)Owcrless to aid without annihilating our own men; it 



— 27- 

uow swept the field with grape and cannister, driving the enemy back until 
they abandoned all effort to take the position. Thus Milliken's Bend, with 
its great stores of supplies, was saved to Grant's army. 

According to C. A. Dana, the regiment lost 26 killed and GO wounded, or 
'36 in all, which on the basis of 118 engaged, gives a loss of 72 per cent. The 
same authority gives the Confederate loss 342 killed and wounded and 266 
•missing, and that we buried 130 Confederates on the field. The Adjutant- 
'General's reports, however, show 24 killed and only 19 wounded, a proportion 
scarcely likely to be correct. The men fought with unsurpassed courage and 
tenacity, and elicited unstinted praise of their commanding general. 

After the battle the 23d returned to its brigade, taking its place in the 
Sine of investment around Vicksburg June 18th, where it performed its full 
share of duty until the conclusion of the siege. 

The regiment sustained, during the Vicksburg campaign, a loss of 223. 

24th and 28th. 

These regiments were a part of the 2d brigade, 12th division, 13th army 
<;orps. The brigade was commanded by Colonel James R. Slack of the 47th 
Indiana Infantry, and the division by Brig. -Gen. Alvin P. Hovey. The 
Torigade marched from Milliken's Bend April 16, 1863, under orders to leave 
all camp and garrison equipage behind. General Hovey says in his report, 
that his ' 'division built four bridges over about 1,000 feet of water, and cut 
two miles of road through the woods, in the space of four days, and thus 
opened up the great military route through the overflowed lands from Milli- 
ken's Bend to the Mississippi river below Vicksburg." He says that "many 
of my men worked for hours up to their necks in w.\ter. "These reg- 
iments, together with their division, disembarked at Bruinsburg, Miss., in 
the afternoon of the 30th of April, and took up their line of march for the 
■interior, arriving on the battlefield of Port Gibson about three o'clock in the 
morning of May 1st. 

The 24th was commanded by Col. E. C. Bryan, and the 28th by Col. 
John Connell, and was moved forward to the support of Benton's brigade, 
•early in the action. 

In the charge upon a Confederate battery, three companies of the 28th 
participated, who, rushing up to the very muzzles of the guns, drove the 
gunners and the support from them, capturing them and some 200 prisoners, 
after which the regiment was sent to the extreme left in support of General 
Osterhaus, where it remained until nearly dark, then being relieved, it 
joined its brigade and encamped for the night on the field of battle, tired, and 
exhausted after twelve hours fighting and following "an all night march, 
loaded down with three days' rations and 100 rounds of cartridges to the 
man. " The 24th lost in this engagement, 6, and the 28th, 20. 

These regiments participated in all the subsequent movements of the 
13th corps, and at the 

battle of ciiami'ION hill 

bore the brunt of the battle for hours and won the greatest renown by their 
gallantry and distinguished services. The 24th charged upon and took a 
Confederate battery of five guns at the point of the bayonet; at the same 



— 28 — 

time the 2Sth was for several hours engaged against most powerful odds., 
»nd drove the enemy back for at least half a mile, when being reinforced th© 
enemy rallied and drove them back over the ground they had gained. At 
this critical juncture reinforcements arrived and they were enabled to hold 
their position. 

The commanding general characterized this engagement as most. 
sanguinary, and in point of terrific fierceness and stubborn persistency, it 
has but few parallels in the history of civilized warfare. Major Edward 
Wright of the 24th was severely wounded while leading his men. 

The losses in this engagement were severe. The 24th lost in killed, 75^ 
wounded, 80; missing, 34; total, 189. 

A loss of over 45 per cent, of those engaged, and it may be truthfully said 
that nowhere, in all the dreadful four years struggle, was Iowa more, 
honored by the patriotic valor of its sons than at Champion Hill by the 
24th regiment. 

The 28th lost in killed, 21; wounded, 62; missing, i4; total, 97. 

Four companies of the 28th came out of this engagement, without a com- 
missioned officer. These regiments took positions in the investment line on 
the 25th of May (they, with their brigade, having been ordered to guard the 
crossing of Black river bridge from May 21st to 24th inclusive), where they 
remained in performance of heavy duty until the capitulation; much sick- 
ness prevailed and many died, and several were killed and wounded. 

The ?4th losing during the siege in wounded, 7; the 28th losing during, 
the siege in killed, 3; wounded, 7; total, 10; making a total loss during the 
campaign for the 24th of 202, and for the 28th, of 127. 

19th, 20th, 34th and 38th infantry. 

These regiments were in Herron's division. After the investment of 
Vicksburg the division was sent as a reinforcement of the investing army 
from the department of Missouri. Herron was an Iowa man and had won. 
renown by the celerity of his movements immediately before the battle of 
Prairie Grove in the preceding December and by the splendid qualities he 
then exhibited. The 19th and 20th regiments were there in his command 
and did magnificent fighting in the engagement. The 34th was at Haine's 
Bluflf under Sherman in December, 1862, and later at Arkansas Port. la 
both of which engagements the soldierly qualities of its officers and men 
were exhibited. After the capture of Arkansas Port it was sent in charge of 
the captured Confederates to Chicago. Long confinement on the tran.'^ports 
in midwinter and the sudden changes of climate had a disastrous effect on 
the health of the men, and when the regiment returned to duty in the field, 
its ranks were thinned and its numbers much reduced. 

The 3Sth was a new regiment and had seen but little service in the field. 
It had been stationed at New Madrid, Mo., since December, and was picked 
up by Herron on his way down the Mississippi. 

The division reached Vicksburg about the 13th of June and took position 
on the left of the army, its left extending to the river. It closed Pemberton's 
last avenue of communication with the outside. The ground occupied by 
the division was the low, sandy bottom of the Mississippi where every move- 
ment was in plain view of the enemy, and where the contour of the ground 
afforded but little cover for the men. They were compelled literally to dig 



— 29 — 

their way for every advance. Notwithstandintj their disadvantages, however, 
Herron pushed his lines forward with great energy and at the time of the 
•surrender was well up to the defensive line of the enemy. To accomplish 
that an immense amount of work had to be done in which the men of these 
regiments did their full share. They did not suffer greatly from the fire of 
the enemy, but owing to the unfavorable surroundings they did suffer very 
greatly from disease. The region was malarious and they were compelled 
to use the stagnant and unwholesome waters of the pools bordering the 
river. The 38th was particularly unfortunate in this respect. Its losses 
from disease exceeding those of any other regiment in the army, and no 
other regiment from the state ever suffered such a "great loss from any cause 
in so short a period of time. 

During the siege a detail of men from the 34th regiment was assigned to 
•the duty of working a battery of heavy guns which were brought from one 
of the gunboats on the river and placed in position in the division line. The 
battery was commanded by an officer of the navy. General Herron, in his 
report, speaks in high terms of the efficiency of its services. 

It is worthy of remark that Iowa troops held both flanks of the army 
during the siege. Our 25th regiment extended to the river above the city, 
•while the 34th held the corresponding position at the other extremity of the 
line below. 

TWENTY-FIFTH IOWA. 

The 25th Iowa Infantry was organized at Mt. Pleasant in August and 
"September, 1862, by Col. George A. Stone, who was commissioned colonel. 
The regiment was ordered to the front soon after its muster in, and in the 
following December was assigned to Steele's division for the first attack on 
Vicksburg. January 11, 1863, under command of Colonel Stone, it was in 
the assaulting column at Arkansas Post, and suffered severely in the assault, 
losing more than 60 men in killed and wounded. 

The camp of the 25th at Young's Point was nearest the canal of any of 
Grant's army, the location being very undesirable on account of the low 
ground, causing much sickness. When the movement to the rear of Vicks- 
burg was commenced, the 25th in company with th« 30th Missouri, was sent 
to garrison Richmond, La., Colonel Stone being in command of the post. 
When all but a portion of the 15th corps had passed that point, the regiment 
was ordered to Hard Times Landing to do similar duty. On crossing the 
river to Grand Gulf, Colonel Stone was placed in command of the supply train 
of 200 wagons, which the regiment escorted to the front, meeting the I5th 
corps on its return from Jackson. General Grant speaks of this train in his 
"Memoirs" as follows: ' 'On this day, May 14th, Blair reached New Auburn 
■and joined McClernand's 4th division. He had with him 200 wagons loaded 
with rations, the only commissary supplies received during the campaign." 

On the approach to Vicksburg the 25th was in advance of the 1st division, 
ISth corps. On the night of the 18th of May, General Sherman took two 
■companies of the regiment, company A, commanded by Capt. D. J. Pal- 
mer, and company F, commanded by Capt. W. G. Allen, and advanced to 
the bluff, overlooking the road leading from Vicksburg to Haines' Bluff in 
■order to ascertain whether the enemy was evacuating Vicksburg, learning 
that they were withdrawing the garrison from Haines' Bluff. On the 19th, in 



— 30 — 

closing in around the defense of Vicksburg, the regiment was sharply 
engaged, losing a number of killed and wounded. 

The regiment participated in the memorable charge of May 22d, being 
with the 31st Iowa, in support of the 9th, 26th and 30th. In fact the five 
regiments occupied the same line. The nature of the ground was such that 
the five organizations occupied a ridge in front of the confederate works, all 
suffering severely, the 2,Sth losing 5 killed and 27 wounded, total 32. 

On the night of the 22d the regiment was moved to its permanent position 
on the extreme right of the array, occupying the trenches at that point until 
the surrender on the 4th of July. 

During the siege the regiment dug numerous trenches and rifle pits, one 
to the river and one to the mound now occupied by the Grant-Pemberton 
monument in the Vicksburg National Cemetery. The one to the mound 
enabled the sharpshooters practically to control the enemy's water batters^- 
It will be remembered that "Whistling Dick" was not heard often the latter 
part of the siege. 

Loss in the siege, killed 14, wounded 31, missing 4, total 49. 

THIRTIETH IOWA. 

The 30th regiment Iowa infantry was mustered into service at Camp Lin- 
coln, Keokuk, Iowa, August 23, 1862, its field officers being Col. Chas. H, 
Abbott, Lieut. -Col. W. M. G. Torrence and Maj. Lauren Dewey. 

In the following December the regiment was assigned to Thayer's brigade 
of the 15th corps, and remained in this brigade during the march around 
Vicksburg and the following siege. 

On the 18th of May, about 4 p. ai., the regiment was formed in line of 
battle and moved forward, very soon engaging the enemy, whose line gradu- 
ally gave way. It continued the advance until dark, and remained on the 
ground in line of battle during the night. On the morning of the 19th it was 
found that the enemy had retreated into his line of entrenchments a half a 
mile south. In the afternoon it was again ordered forward in line, and after 
sharp skimishing over the ridge and through a valley, under fire from the 
confederate forces, reached a second spur running down toward the creek 
on the right, remaining there till night, and then ordered forward a short 
distance to its final position during the siege. Seven men were wounded in 
this advance. During the assault on the 22d, Colonel Abbott was killed^ 
almost as he rose to lead his men forward, next, acting Major Milliken and 
Lieutenant Lenter fell mortally wounded in rapid succession. Thirteen 
men were killed and thirty-seven wounded. The regiment was at the left 
of the 9th Iowa and the left of Thayer's brigade. 

P'rom the 19th until after the assault, the regimental and brigade camp 
was on the line of battle about 100 yards from the main Confederate line of 
entrenchments. On the 23d, camp was established a half mile to the rear, 
from which large details were made to fill the trenches and for digging in 
the tunnel, called "Thayer's Approach," where details from the ditlerent 
regiments of the brigade were kept regularly at work during the night, 
extending the approach up toward the Confederate works. 

After arduous and exhausting duties of the siege the regiment left Vicks- 
burg on the night of July 4th to take part in the second capture of Jackson, 



— al- 
and after following as far east as Brandon, Miss. , returned to camp with the- 
brigade at Black River, Miss. 

Loss in the siege, killed, 23; wounded, 45; total GS. 

TWKNTV-SIXTII IOWA. 

The 26th Iowa infantry was enrolled in Clinton county during July and 
August, 1862. It rendezvoused at Camp Kirkwood, Clinton, and wa-^ 
mustered in by Capt. H, B. Ilendershot, September .30th, numbering 
915 men. 

The field officers were as follows: Milo Smith, colonel; Samuel G. Ma^ill, 
lieutenant colonel, and Samuel Clark, major. 

The regiment left camp October 20th for Helena, Ark., and in the fol- 
lowing two months joined in expeditions up the White river, and to the 
Tallahachie, under Generals Hoveyand Washburn. 

Having been assigned to Thayer's brigade of Steele's division of the 13th 
corps, it took part in General Sherman's first attack on Vicksburg at 
Chickasaw Bayou, December 28th and 29th. Starting up the Mississippi 
January 3, 1863, in the same organization now under General McClernand , 
the regiment took part in the capture of Arkansas Post, with its 5,000 
prisoners, an auspicious beginning of the new year in the west, and the 
first of that series of victories won by Grant and Sherman, later at Jackson 
and Vicksburg, and crowning the year at Lookout Mountain and Missionary 
Ridge, in all of which the 26th Iowa took a prominent part. 

At Napoleon, Ark., at the mouth of the Arkansas river. Sherman's 
15th corps was organized January 18tb, with the Iowa brigade containing 
the 4th, 9th, 26th and 30th regiments and the 1st Iowa battery as the 3d 
brigade of the 1st division . The regiment returned with the army to Young's 
Point, remaining there until April 1st, when it was again ordered np the 
river to Greenville, Miss. , from which point an excursion was made into the 
Deer Creek valley, driving out a confederate brigade and destroying large 
quantities of corn and cotton, in which this .section abounded. 

When at last the dreary winter ended, spent mostly in the muddy camps 
opposite Vicksburg, much of the time furnishing large details for digging in 
the canal below the city, the regiment marched with its command first to 
Grand Gulf, by way of Richmond, Perkin's plantation and Lake St. Joseph, 
thence, crossing the river, through Hankinson's ferry and Raymond to 
Jackson where, on the 14th, it entered the city in line of battle with the 
brigade from the south. 

After remaining 48 hours, destroying railroads and other contra- 
band property, the regiment started for Vicksburg, and by rapid marches 
followed the Confederate army under Pemberton closely into his line of 
works, investing the city. The lines were deployed early in the afternoon of 
the 18th of May, and while advancing to develop the Confederate position 
the regiment received a sharp fire from their entrenchments, in which two 
officers and six enlisted men were severely wounded. After changing posi- 
tion to the left and further advance with an assault on the afternoon of the 
19th, took final position that night close up to the Confederate line, from 
which the assault was made on the 22d, and where the regiment remained 
on duty to the end of the siege, the camp being moved half a mile to the 
rear after the assault of the 22d. During the siege the regiment was con 



— 32 — 

?inually engaged skirmishing during the day, and furnishing details for 
entrenching and mining the enemy's works at night. 

In the early dawn of the 5th of July the regiment was again placed on 
the march for the second siege of Jackson, which was re-entered on the 
17th. A rapid chase and a little fighting at Brandon, 14 miles east, ended 
the campaign. Loss in the assault and siege was, killed, 8; wounded, 35; 
total, 43. 

THIRTY-FIRST IOWA. 

The services of the 31st Iowa commenced with the campaigns for the cap- 
'ture of Vicksburg and the opening of the Mississippi river. November 27, 
1S62, it started from Helena, Ark. , with the expedition under General Steele 
to Coldwater, which returned without accomplishing favorable results 
.except in discipline and experience, teaching the soldier that it was impossi- 
ble while campaigning in the field to carry the heavy loaded knapsack, 
-double blanket, overcoat, three days' rations in a haversack, gun, bayonet 
and forty rounds of ammunition, when on the march against the enemy. 
It was the hard cruel awakening of the new recruit to the transformation 
that had to take place before he could become the veteran soldier. Return- 
ing to Helena, the regiment later became a part of the river army that Gen- 
.eral Sherman was taking down the Mississippi, the Yazoo and Chickasaw 
bayou, for an assault upon the defenses of Vicksburg at Haines' blufif. 
"It was not a part of the assaulting column, but was held in reserve under 
the f^re of the enemy. The night after the assault, the regiment stood in 
line of battle all night long in a drenching rain with the guns of the enemy 
sending shot and shellover their heads, with everything hidden from sight by 
the intense darkness, the knowledge that only a short distance in front the 
dead and wounded were lying drenched with the steady dowmpour of the 
waters, makes this night one never to be forgotten as long as any member 
.of the regiment survives. 

At Arkansas Post the regiment had its first battle with the enemy January 
11, :S63. Its position was well to the right of our lines, and its fire was 
.only partially obstructed by the enemy's works. The capture of Arkansas 
Post with 5,000 prisoners lifted the gloom which the failures of the Chicka- 
saw Bayou campaign had put upon the army, but it was raining incessantly, 
and further military operations had to cease until the roads could be used 
again. The boats carried the regiment to Young's Point, and it went into 
camp just out out of the range of the guns of Vicksburg. The men were 
detailed to work on the canal, but soon the water almost coming to the 
surface, together with the hardships which the men had suflfered for weeks 
on the transports and in the swamps with no opportunity to properly cook 
their food or dry their clothing and blankets, wet with the incessant rains, 
all proved too much for the health of the men, and sickness and death began 
to decimate the ranks. The little dog tents furnished no protection for the 
sick soldiers, medical and sanitary supplies were wholly inadequate, and for 
days the regiment was without medical attendance, owing to the sickness of 
physicians. The levee, the only place where graves could be dug on 
account of water, was soon honeycombed with the bodies of the soldier dead. 
Relief finally came in April, the regiment being transferred to Milliken's 
Bend and camped on dry, healthy ground. The sick soon regained their 
hea'ith and strength, the dead could not be recalled, and the levee which had 



— 33 — 

contained their bodies has long since been washed into the river, and their 
dust now reposes in the great ocean beyond the river's mouth, but the 
monuments to be erected on the battlefields of Vicksburg must perpetuate 
their memory, their heroic devotion and sacrifice, just as much as they will 
those who died on the battle field. 

May 6th the regiment marched southward, struck the river at (irand 
Gulf, crossed on a steamer that had been riddled with the shot of the Vicks- 
burg batteries, marched east to Jackson, helped destroy the railroads and 
Confederate stores, then turned west and with the rest of the army joined 
in the movement to drive the enemy within the entrenchments of Vicksburg. 
Crossing the Black river in the night. May 16th, two days later found the 
regiment close to the Confederate lines in a position at the base of the bluffs 
where it suifered from enfilading fire from the Confederate forts. On the 22d 
the regiment moved a mile and a half to the left and participated in the 
assault as support for the 9th, 26th and 30th Iowa. Lieutenant-Colonel 
Jenkins and Lieutenant Dawson were wounded, but the losses of the regi- 
ment were not heavy. During the night the regiment was withdrawn to its 
former position, where it took its place in the Union line to the left of the 
2Sth Iowa. Here for the six weeks of the siege the regiment was on duty 
day and night until the white flag appeared on the morning of July 4th, 
announcing the surrender. No words can describe the joy of the Union sol- 
diers over the great victory which had been won, breaking the backbone of 
the rebellion and permitting the Mississippi to flow once more and forever 
*'unvexed to the sea." 

Loss in the siege, killed, 7; wounded, 17; total, 2-4. 

FORTIETH IOWA. 

On the 31st of May, 1863, the 40th Iowa infantry, 1,000 strong, Col, 
John A. Garret commanding, broke camp at Paducah, Ky., and boarded 
the steamer "Alvin Adams, " with orders to join the Union army in the rear of 
Vicksburg. The trip down the Mississippi and up the Yazoo was interrupted 
by frequent guerilla attacks along the banks , but the command disembarked at 
Satartia, Miss. , 35 miles in the rear of Vicksburg, and marched 6 miles to 
Mechanicsburg and went into camp. The town was fired that night by 
unknown parties and st:ffered seriously. 

The 4th of June, General Kimball ordered a forced march of 35 miles 
to Snyder's Bluff in the rear of Vicksburg, and 24 hours after a 
skeleton of that magnificent regiment of a few days before, straggled into 
camp, the fatigue, sunstrokes, and prostrations paralyzing the [regiment, 
leaving the men scattered along the route for many miles to be gathered up 
in ambulances and carried to the hospital boats on the river, many of them 
never to return. Fear of being cut off by Wirt Adams' cavalry was the 
only reason assigned for this inhuman treatment of as fine a regiment 
of men as Iowa sent to the front. The 40th manned a line of fortifications 
on Snyder's Bluff, until ordered to Haynes' Bluff, where it erected a stock- 
ade, and camped on the Yazoo bottoms, forming a part of the defensive line 
against General Joseph E. Johnston and 35,000 Confederates who were 
attempting to relieve General Pemberton and his Confederates, whom Gen- 
eral Grant had tightly bottled up in Vicksburg. The sufferings of the men 
from malaria, caused by drinking stagnant water, burning sands and hard 



— 3t — 

duty, developed fevers and other diseases, and the funeral dirge with mufif- 
led drums marked the daily duty of burying many brave boys who fell vic- 
tims to their ravages. On the evening of the 3d of July the firing of rockets 
and other signals, indicated that the long expected had happened, that Gen- 
eral Pemberton and his 33,000 confederate soldiers had surrendered; then 
bedlam broke loose in camp. The 4th of Juty was celebrated with a zeal 
and enthusiasm such as was never before witnessed, and the victory which 
insured the opening of the Mississippi to its mouth was the occasion of much 
rejoicing. 

For two days and nights the steady tramp of the Butternut brigades, 
half star\'ed and thoroughly disheartened, was heard along our camp line^ 
but not a word of insult nor shout of the victors grated on their ears. The 
boys in blue maintained a dignified and impressive silence as the 33,000 
paroled Confederates marched by toward their homes, demoralized and 
humiliated by their terrible defeat. 

Soon after the surrender the 40th was attached to the 7th corps, under 
General Steele, and brigaded with the 3d Minnesota and 27th Wisconsin, 
and 43d Illinois and ordered to Helena, preparatory to a march against 
General Price, Little Rock being the objective point. 

''On the 27th of July our forces marched out of Helena, leaving 3,000 
sick and disabled soldiers lying in the streets waiting transportation to the 
general hospital at Memphis and Cairo. All our regimental officers and 
over half our men were on the sick list. Captain Campbell being in com- 
mand of the 40th. 

The Vicksburg campaign was a most disastrous one to the 40th, and 
when it arrived at Clarendon, August 1st, only 214 men were reported able for 
duty. The camp on the Yazoo, in the rear of Vicksburg, was a veritable 
graveyard, where we lost the greater part of the 211 men who fell in battle, 
by disease and accident during our three years of service." 

THE THIRD IOWA CAVALRY. 

Six companies of this regiment, A, B, C, D, I and K, served with Gene«^l 
Grant's army at Vicksburg, and were engaged in the operations which 
resulted in the surrender of the Confederate forces under General Pemberton, 
and the Federal occupation of Vicksburg. 

The regiment, under command of Col, Cyrus Bussey, arrived at Snyder's 
blufiF, near Vicksburg, June 8, 1863, and was at once assigned to duty with that 
part of General .Sherman's command which was opposing the advance of 
the Confederate forces which Gen. Joseph E. Johnston was concentrating 
along the line of the Big Black with the intention of attacking General Grant's 
array in the rear. 

Soon after the arrival of the regiment at Vicksburg, Colonel Bussey was 
made chief of all Grant's cavalry, and the command of the 3rd Iowa was 
next assumed by Maj. O. H. P. Scott, and later by Maj. John W. Noble, 
who, soon after, was promoted to colonel of the regiment. 

From June 8th until the surrender of Vicksburg on July 4th, the regi- 
ment was constantly engaged in out-post duty, scouting and skirmishing 
through the country along the Big Black, guarding fords and ferries, patrol- 
ling roads, watchful and vigilant night and day to discover and help repel 
the advance of the hostile forces. 



— 35 — 

After the surrender of Vicksburg the 3cl Iowa served with Cieneral Sher- 
man's corps on the march against the Confederate array under General 
Johnston, and the capture of Jackson, Miss. On this expedition the 3d 
Iowa participated in several engagements and was active and efficient in 
helping to destroy railroads, depots, cars, locomotives, guns, ammunition, 
and other Confederate property of all kinds and in immense quantities. 

At Vicksburg General Grant's army presented two fronts, one facing the 
Confederate forces under General Pemberton in the line of works around the 
city; the other front toward the Confederate army underGeneral Johnston along 
the line of Big Black river. 

The 3d Iowa cavalry was not in the line of investment around Vicksburg, 
but it was at the front with that part of General (xrant'sarmy which opposed 
General Johnston's advance, and its work contributed to the success of that 
grand result which was attained. 

The soldiers of the 3d Iowa performed every duty which was assigned to 
them; their faithful services helped to win the final victory and entitles them 
to share whatever honors the generous state of Iowa may award to her 
soldiers who took part in that great campaign. 

THE FOURTH lOW.'V CAVALRY. 

' ' The 4th cavalry embarked at Helena, Ark., on the 28th of April, 1863, 
and landed at Milliken's Bend on the evening of the 30th of April. Marched 
on the 5th of May by way of Richmond and Lake St. Joseph, to Hard Times 
Landing in Louisiana, arriving on the 8th of May. Crossed the Mississippi 
on the 9th and on Sunday, the 10th, the regiment overtook General Grant 
near Cayuga and was assigned to the 15th corps and placed in the advance. 
Company G was left at Young's Point. On the 12th the regiment in front of 
Sherman came upon the enemy at Fourteen Mile Creek (Wirt Adams' Cav- 
alry) , who had burned the bridge and lay concealed in the woods beyond. 
In the skirmish here the regiment lost one man killed, three wounded, and 
four horses killed. May 13th, marched in heavy rain directly on Jackson, 
with light skirmishing. 14th, still raining; Sherman pressed on toward 
Jackson and entered the city after a brisk fight. The 4th Iowa crossed 
Pearl river that evening, and encamped near Brandon, twenty miles east. 
Remained east of Pearl river until the 16th, when it followed Sherman as 
rear guard, toward Clinton, and bivouacked near Bolton. On Sunday, the 
17th, the regiment was detached and sent north to learn if Johnston was 
moving west. At Brownsville, after sharp skirmishing with a small force of 
cavalry, they learned that he was not moving west. Moved back to Sher- 
man's rear near Bridgeport. 18th marched to Haines' Bluff. Captain 
Peters in advance, rode into the main fort and received its surrender with 
about twenty of the enemy. There were in the fort fourteen heavy guns and 
a full equipment of smaller ones with a large supply of ammunition and 
material. Captain Peters moved on to Snyder's Bluff, which he found 
abandoned, but found nine heavy guns and a large quantity of ammuni- 
tion. Admiral Porter's report of May 20th claims these captures, but Sher- 
man gives the credit to the 4th Iowa cavalry. Captain Peters signaled to 
Porter's fleet to come up after getting into the forts." 

That night the regiment bivouacked at Clear Creek, on'Jackson road, ten 
miles from Vicksburg. Remained in this camp several days, maintaining 



— 36 — 

several strong picket posts towards the Big Black, and sending out scouting 
and reconnoitering parties day and night. Until about the middle of June 
the regiment was the only cavalry with the army; there were about 150 of 
Wright's battalion, 6th Missouri, and these, with the 4th cavalry, were 
relied upon to furnish all the cavalry pickets along the line of the Big Black 
and all scouting parties. Even after there were several more additional 
regiments of cavalry, there was as much to be done as ever, because the 
outer lines were more extended, and there was more apprehension of John- 
ston's advance. From the 1st of May to the 1st of July scarcely an hour's 
rest was possible. During the fifty-four days and many of the nights within 
these two months the effective force of the regiment was in the saddle. The 
service was all in the country between the Yazoo and the Big Black as far 
north as Yazoo City. Every road and lane was well known to nearly every 
man in the regiment. The regular camps of the cavalry were at different 
points during this time, and a few miles ea^t of Grant's investing lines, but 
were only used for baggage and for men and horses unfit for duty. The 
men on active duty had no camp. The weather became very hot, the roads 
were very dusty, the water scarce, and consequently the men fell out until 
only about 300 out of the 800 were fit for duty. Skirmishes often occurred 
and some more important engagements, viz.: On the 24th of May near 
Mechanicsburg; on the 29th near the same place; on the 4th of June near 
Sateria. 

June 22d 130 men who were felling trees to blockade the road near Birdsong 
Ferry at Hill's plantation, were attacked b}- Wirt Adams' brigade and lost 
eleven men killed and fourteen captured, total twenty-two. The enemy left 
behind fifteen killed and one mortally wounded, the latter an officer. Major 
Harris. On the same day Sherman moved out in heavy force and threw up 
works from the Big Black to the Yazoo, and held Johnston until the capitu- 
lation of Vicksburg. 

FIRST IOWA BATTERY. 

I'he 1st Iowa battery was mustered into the United States service at 
Burlington, Iowa, August 17, 1861. It numbered, including officers and 
enlisted men, 117, to which were afterwards added 32, making a total 
of 149. At the beginning of the Vicksburg campaign it was commanded 
by Capt. H. S. Griffith, with Lieuts. W. H. Gay, A. S, Curtis, James 
Williams and W. H. Harbach and 125 non-commissioned officers and 
privates. 

There were four six-pounder brass guns and two twelve pounder howitzers. 
The battery left Milliken's Bend, La., with General Carr's division of the 
13th corps on the 20th of April, 1863, crossed the Mississippi at Hard Times 
Landing on the 30th, and took part in the battle of Port Gibson; on the fol- 
lowing day. May 4th the battery was transferred to the 1st division of the 15th 
corps, and took part in the battle of Jackson May 14th. On the 18th it took 
position on the line before Vicksburg near the center of the 1st division and 
on a commanding elevation from which the Confederate line was plainly 
visible, along which had been placed several Confederate batteries. 

Capt. Harry Griffith's battery rendered effective service throughout the 
siege, and especially during the assaults of the 19th and 22d of May. At 
the close of the siege it had fired 7,500 rounds of shot and shell. 



— 37 — 

Immediately after the surrender on the morning of July 4th, the battery 
was ordered to join General Sherman's forces in the rear of Vicksburg, and 
before night was on the march to Jackson, to take part in the second siege 
of that city. 

Loss in the siege, killed 1, wounded 7, total 8. 

THE SECOND BATTERY. 

The 2d battery was attached to the 2d brigade, 3d division, I5th 
army corps. At the beginning of the campaign it had present for duty, two 
officers and about eighty men. Its armament consisted of two six pounder 
guns and two twelve pounder howitzers. 

On the 2d of May it left its encampment at Duckport on the west side of 
the river above Vicksburg and marched with the division to Hard Times 
Landing, where it arrived on the 7th, and during the night it crossed the 
river to Grand Gulf. On the morning of the 8th the division marched in the 
direction of Jackson, the capital of Missisisppi, where it arrived on the 14th. 
All transportation, except ambulances, was left behind. Three days' rations 
were issued at Grand Gulf, which the men were required to carry on their 
persons. The next issue of rations was made on the 21st in the rear of 
Vicksburg after a base of supply had been established on the Yazoo. How- 
ever, there was no lack of food in the meantime, for the country through 
which the march was made abounded in all the necessaries of life. The 
forage necessary for the animals was also gathered in the country. The 
inhabitants may have suffered inconveniences and want after the army had 
passed, but the soldiers had abundant supplies.- 

Nothing of moment occurred on the march from Grand Gulf to Jackson 
until the vicinity of the latter place was reached. On that day the 3d divis- 
ion was at the head of the corps, and the 2d brigade was in the lead of the 
division. The position of the battery in the column was in the rear of the 
leading regiment of infantry. The advance guard of the column consisted 
of a battalion of the 4th Iowa cavalry. When the head of the column 
approached a creek about three miles out of the city, it was brought to a 
stand by the fire of a battery on the east side of the creek. The battery was 
well supported by infantry, one regiment being deployed as skirmishers 
under the bank of the creek. Its fire commanded the road and bridge as 
well as the bluffs on the west side of the creek. The leading regiments of 
infantry were deployed as skirmishers and sent forward, and the battery was 
ordered into position on the high ground nearest the creek. It went forward 
at a run, deploying from column into battery, reaching the assigned position 
ahead of the skirmish line, and under the concentrated fire of the hostile 
battery, and by its fire drove it, as well as the support, from the position. 
The position occupied was about 800 yards distant from that occupied by the 
Confederates, and was entirely covered by their fires. In this affair one man 
of the battery was mortally wounded 

Soon afterwards it moved forward with the line of battle until it came 
under the fire from the works by which the city was defended, when it was 
again put into position and returned the enemy's fire until their line was 
captured by a turning movement to the right. 

It remained in Jackson until the afternoon of the 16th, when it marched 
with the division in the direction of Vicksburg. It crossed the Big Black at 



— 38 — 

Messenger's at daylight on the 18th and at dark that evening it camped 
within six hundred yards of the enemy's line of defense. 

On the night of the 19th it was placed in the position which it continued 
to occupy until it was withdrawn from the line of investment. That posi- 
tion was on the graveyard road in front of what was called the Stockade 
Fort and about 350 yards distant from it. 

On the morning of the 22d it joined with all the other batteries on the 
line in the terrific cannonade which preceded the assaults of that day, and 
on every other day until the 22d of June it was engaged with the enemy. 
There are now no data from which the number of shots fired can be deter- 
mined. But its light guns were»entirely worn out by the service and were 
never afterwards used inaction. On the night of the 23d one section was 
withdrawn from the line and sent, under command of Second Lieutenant 
Charles F. Reed, on the expedition under (General Blair to Mechanicsburg. 
After his return, which was June 3d, Lieutenant Reed with the same sec- 
tion, was advanced to a position within 100 yards of the Stockade Fort, 
which he held until June 22d; the headquarters of the battery remaining at 
the position assumed on the 19th of May. About the 27th of May the arma- 
ment was increased by a 30-pounder Parrot gun, which was placed in 
position at the main position of the battery. The fire of that gun was 
exceedingly destructive to the enemy. Many of the projectiles fired from it 
penetrated the earthen embankment of Stockade Fort and exploded inside the 
fort. 

On the night of the 13th of June the enemy opened an embrasure and 
planted a gun which would have commanded the covered way and sap, 
which was then advanced to within a few feet of the outer ditch of the 
fort. This was discovered by the men of the batterj'at the first dawn of day 
and they opened upon it with the 30-pounder. Their first shot displaced the 
revetment on both sides of the embrasure and the fifth shot dismounted the 
gun. The next night the enemy closed the breach in the work and from 
that time to the surrender, not a cannon shot was fired from the fort Later 
a second 30-pounder was turned over to the battery and was placed in posi- 
tion in the advanced work occupied by Lieut. Chas. F. Reed and was 
manned by the men under his command. 

On the 22d of June the battery was withdrawn from the line of investment 
and sent to a position on the line in the rear, which was intended as a defense 
against the advance of Gen. Joseph E. Johnston, who was seeking, by an 
attack in the rear, to raise the siege or eflfect the deliverance of the beleagured 
garrison. It remained in that position until the surrender on the 4th of July, 
when it again advanced on Jackson with the army under General Sherman . It 
was placed in a position on the line of investment and was engaged in 
skirmishes which occurred daily until the place was evacuated by the eneaiy 
on the night of July 16th. 

Its losses during the siege were: Killed, 1; wounded, 5; total, 6. 



■4 

The state of Iowa responded jjromptly to every call for -help during the 

civil war. Her citizen soldiers contributed their full share of the burden and 

sacrifice recjuired to save the Union. From a population of less than 700,000 

Iowa furnished more than 75,000 volunteers for the three years' service— 



— 39 — 

nearly one-half of all the men in the state subject to military duty. More 
than one-fifth of this great company of patriots (1G,304;, were in their 
graves before the surrender of Appomattox. A grateful posterity will not 
fail to cherish and honor either the courage displayed, or the sacrifice made. 

Of the hundreds of battlefields where Iowa blood was shed, congress has 
designated three in the west for the erection of memorial monuments. At 
Shiloh eleven Iowa regiments and battery organizations took part; at Chat- 
tanooga, ten; at Vicksburg there were twenty-eight infantry regiments, two 
of cavalry and two batteries engaged in the siege, and four infantry and one 
cavalry in the expeditionary campaign prior to the siege, a total of thirty- 
seven, 70 per cent of her infantry regiments, and 63 per cent ,of the whole 
number furnished by the state. At Vicksburg alone there was a siege, with 
extensive and formidable lines of entrenchments. 

Vicksburg, situated as it is upon a lofty bluff of the Mississippi, is on one 
of our greatest highways of commerce. The completion of the Isthmian 
canal will place it on the greatest international thoroughfare in the country. 

The Vicksburg National Military park, the scene of one of the earliest 
and most decisive victories of the Civil War, is destined, therefore, to be and 
remain one of the most beautiful, prominent and easily accessible commem- 
orative parks in the world, and was the conception of Iowa men. 

Iowa had a larger percentage of her troops at Vicksljurg than any other 
state, and should be equally prominent in the development and completion 
of the park. 

Of the 9,362 casualties in the Union forces during the operation against 
Vicksburg, May 1 to July 4, 1863, Iowa sustained a loss of 2,124, or 22.8 
per cent of the whole loss, and from its inception November, 1862, to the 
evacuation of Jackson, July 17, 1863, 2,417, or almost 25 per cent. An Iowa 
regiment, the 21st, was the first to march from the Mississippi river below 
Grand Gulf, — an Iowa regiment, the 4th cavalry, was the first to water its 
horses in the Yazoo above Vicksburg. 

IOWA \V.\S .\T VICKSBURG. 

We. desire to call especial attention to the severe and almost unprece- 
dented percentage of loss of some of her regiments. On page thirty-six of 
"Fox's regimental losses in the civil war" there is given a table of maximum 
percentage of casualities of 64 regiments, based on the total of killed, 
wounded and missing, in which the 1st Minnesota, with 262 engaged, is 
credited with, killed, 47 wounded, 168; total 215, or 82 per cent, and the 
11th Illinois with 500 engaged a loss of killed, 70; wounded, 181; total, 251 or 
50.1 per cent. The percentage of losses running thus from 50 per cent to 82 
per cent down through the 64 regiments enumerated. 

It is shown herein that the 21st lo.st on May 22, 1863 56 per cent of those 
engaged, while the 22d lost 82 per cent, and the 23d 72 per cent of those 
engaged at Milliken's Bend. 

Iowa's part in the conflict for the perpetuity of the Union was costly in 
precious lives. Her soldiers toiled in almost every campaign, fought in 
almost every battle, and made honorable history and were distinguished 
wherever engaged, and yet upon no field did she win such renown as at 
Vicksburg, where such monuments should be erected as will honor the 
state and properly commemorate the heroic valor and patriotism of her fallen 



— 40 — 

heroes. In the judgment of your commission this cannot be done with less 
sum than one hundred and fifty thousand dollars. 

In view of the foregoing, and in conformity to the provisions 
of the act of the legislature creating this commission, we would 
respectfully recommend an appropriation by the General Assembly of Iowa, 
of a sum not less than one hundred and fifty thousand dollars ($150,000) , to 
become available biennially, to be expended in the payment of the small 
balance due the commission, and the expenses and service of the commission, 
to be hereafter named, and in the erection of one elaborate state monument, 
and one monument for each regiment and battery engaged in the campaign 
and siege, and for the erection of such historical tablets, monuments and 
markers as may be deemed wise by the commission to be named for that 
purpose. And that the governor be authorized to appoint such commission, 
to consist of five (5) members, and that only those who saw service in said 
campaign shall be eligible to appointment on said commission. 

It becomes my sad duty to report the death of Col. D. B. Hillis, repre- 
senting the 17th infantry, and that of Major Fred R. Kittering of the 8th. 
The death of Colonel Hillis occurring soon after his appointment and before 
he entered upon the discharge of his duties. Captain Daughters was 
appointed to succeed him. That of Major Kittering occurred after the loca- 
tion of his regiment had been established by him; hence the vacancy has not 
been filled. 

The necessary expenses of the commission exceeded the appropriation 
by $314.12, as shown by the financial report which appears below, 
and made a part of this report. In addition to this there was a small 
expense incurred in visiting Lookout Mountain and Chickamauga, which I 
should recommend be paid. I cannot close this report without bearing wit- 
ness to the conscientious and efficient manner in which every member of this 
commission, with the one exception, performed his duties. 

We beg to acknowledge our indebtedness to the United States Commis- 
sion for courtesies received. 

For the painstaking and thorough manner in which our itineracy south 
was arranged and carried out, we are indebted to Capt. J. F. Merry of the 
Illinois Central Railway. 

I desire also to acknowledge many favors at the hands of Adj. -Gen. M. 
H. Byers, Hon. E. J. C. Bealer, and Col. J. Whitfield Garner, secretary 
of the commission. 

I am under special obligation to Judge Joseph R. Reed, Col. Alonzo 
Abernethy, Hon. W. O. Mitchell, and Capt. Warren Beck with, for their 
valuable assistance in the preparation of this report. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

J. K. P. THOMPSON, Chairman. 



FINANCIAL REPORT. 



By the act of the legislature of Iowa authorizing the appointment of this 
commission, the sum of $2,000.00 was appropriated to pay the necessary 
expenses of the same. 



— 41 — 

Thirty-four members of the commission were present and performed their 
duties, and their expenses while so engaged, were as follows: 

Railway fare, and necessary traveling expenses, 

including hotel $2,314.12 

Paid by the state 2,000.00 

Expenses in excess of appropriation $ 314. 12 

An itemized account of which, together with vouchers, has been filed: 
with the auditor of state. 



EXHIBIT A. 



No. 1. Site of a battery of two forty-two pounder rifle guns borrowed of 
the navy taken from the Benton, under command of Acting Master J . Frank 
Reed, of the Benton. The men working this battery were a detail from the 
34th Iowa; July 1, 1863, about 10 A. m. a shell from a mortar in ''South 
Fort" exploded in this battery, wounding eight men of the 34th Iowa, two 
mortally. These guns were returned to the Benton the night of July 1st. 
Located and the above information given November 26, 1900, by Lieut. Col. 
Warren S. Dungan, 34th Iowa. 

No. 2. Site of one section of battery F, 1st Missouri light artillery, 
Capt. Nelson Cole and possibly the site for the tablet of the 38th Iowa 
infantry. As established by John R. Cook, November 26, 1900. Company 
F, 38th Iowa. 

No. 3. Site of one section of battery F, 1st Missouri light artillery, 
Capt. Nelson Cole. As established by John R. Cook, November 26, 1900, 
Company F, 38th Iowa. 

No. 4. Center of the line of the 25th Iowa and point at which the advance 
trench running to the top of the mound in front, leftthe line. As established 
by Col. J. W. Garner and Col. D. J. Palmer November 27, 1900, 25th Iowa. 

No. 5. Point at which the left of the 25th Iowa rested as established hy 
Col. D. J. Palmer and Col. J. W. Garner, 25th Iowa, November 27, 1900. 

No. 6. Point at which the right of the 31st Iowa infantry rested, as 
established by Capt. J. S. Alexander, 31st Iowa. November 27, 1900. 

No. 7. Center of the line of 31st Iowa infantry, as established by Cap- 
tain J. S. Alexander of that regiment, November 27, 1900. 

No. 8. Point at which the left of the 31st Iowa rested as established by 
Captain J. S. Alexander, 31st Iowa, November 27, 1900. 

No. 9. Position of a thirty pounder Parrot gun placed and served by the 
2d Iowa battery, Second Lieutenant Charles F. Reed commanding, and 
having its fire directed against the 3d Louisana redan. This gun was- 
placed in position about the 5th of June, 1863. Its position is located by 
First Lieutenant Joseph R. Reed, who commanded the battery during the 
siege, November 27, 1900. 

No. 10. Site of a twelve pounder, brass howitzer of the 2d Iowa battery- 
placed in this position June 5, 1863, and commanded by Second Lieutenant 
Charles F. Reed, having its fire directed against the stockade redan imme- 
diately in its front. Located November 27, 1900, by First Lieutenant Joseph, 
R. Reed, commanding 2d Iowa battery. 



— 42 — 

No. 11. Site of a six pounder brass gun of the 2d Iowa battery placed 
in this position June 5, 1863, and commanded by Second Lieutenant Charles 
F. Reed, 2d Iowa battery, having its fire directed against the stockade redan. 
Located November 27, 1900, by First Lieutenant Joseph R, Reed, command- 
ing 2d Iowa battery. 

No. 12. Position of two guns of the 2d Iowa battery, May 22, 1863, 
placed here immediately after the failure of the infantry assault on the stock- 
.ade redan in front. Four charges were fired by each piece, when the guns 
were withdrawn. Located November 27, 1900, by First Lieutenant Joseph 
R. Reed, commanding 2d Iowa battery. 

No. 13. Position of a thirty pounder Parrot gun of the 2d Iowa battery, 
•commanded by First Lieut. Joseph R. Reed, and having its fire directed 
against the stockade redan in its front. Placed in this position about 

Located November 27, 1900, by First Lieut. Joseph R. 

Reed, commanding 2d Iowa battery. 

No. 14. Position of a twelve pounder howitzer of the 2d Iowa battery, 
First Lieut. Joseph R. Reed commanding, having its fire directed against 
the stockade redan in its front, and against the lines adjacent thereto. 
Located November 27, 1900, by First Lieut. Joseph R. Reed, commanding 
2d Iowa. 

No. 15. Position of a six pounder brass gun of the 2d Iowa battery, 
commanded by First Lieut. Joseph R. Reed, having its fire directed against 
the stockade redan in its front and against the lines adjacent thereto, located 
November 27, 1900, by First Lieut. Joseph R. Reed, commanding 2d Iowa 
battery. 

No. 16. Right of the line of the 8th Iowa infantry from May 23d to June 
22, 1863, established November 27, 1900, by Second Lieut. Fred P. Kitter- 
ing, company B, 8th Iowa infantry. 

No. 17. Left of the line of the 8th Iowa infantry. The trench from this 
line to the front was used by the regiment in going to the front for picket 
and sharpshooting duty. This point is located and the above information 
given November 27, 1900, by Second Lieut. Fred P. Kittering, company B, 
8th Iowa infantry. 

No. 18. Left of the line of the bivouac of the 12th Iowa infantry from 
the evening of May 22 to June 22, 1863. While occupying this line the reg- 
iment furnished heavy details for all the work at the front and in the trenches. 
Located, and the above information given November 27, 1900, by Sergt. 
Abner Dunham, company F, 12th Iowa infantry. 

No. 19. Right of the line of the bivouac of the 12th Iowa infantry and 
left of the line of the bivouac of the 3Sth Iowa infantry from the evening of 
May 22 to June 22, 1863. Located November 27, 1900, by Sergeant Abner 
Dunham, company F, 12th Iowa infantry and by Philip Murphy, corporal, 
company E, 35th Iowa infantry. 

No. 20. Right of the line of the bivouac of the 35th Iowa infantry from 
the evening of May 22 to June 22, 1863. While occupying this line the regi- 
ment furnished heavy details for all kinds of duty at the front and in the 
trenches. Located and the above information given November 27, 1900, by 
Corporal Philip Murphy, company E, 35th Iowa infantry. 

No. 21. The right of the 5th Iowa infantry the forenoon of May 22, 
1863, and the right of lioomer's brigade and of the 5th Iowa infantry, in the 



— 43 — 

investment line from May 23 to June 24, 1863. Located and the above 
information furnished by Capt. E. B. I^ascom, November 27, 1900, company 
K, 5th Iowa infantry; Capt. Wm. Dean, company A, 5th Iowa infantry, 
and Second Lieut. Mahlon Head, company F, 10th Iowa infantry. 

No. 22. The left of the line of the 5th Iowa infantry, the forenoon of 
May 22d and the left of the line of the 5th Iowa infantry in the investment line 
from May 23 to June 24, 1863. Located by Capt. Wm. Dean, company A , 
5th Iowa infantry, and Capt. E. B. Bascom, company K, Sth Iowa infantry 
November 27, 1900. 

No. 23. The right of the 10th Iowa infantry in the investment line from 
May 23 to June 24, 1863. Located November 27, 1900, by vSecond Lieut. 
Mahlon Head, company F, 10th Iowa infantry. 

No. 24. The left of the 10th Iowa infantry in the investment line from 
May 23 to June 24, 1863. Located November 27, 1900, by Second Lieut. 
Mahlon Head, company F, 10th Iowa infantry. 

No. 25. The right of the line of the 17th Iowa infantry, the forenoon of 
May 22, 1863. Located November 27, 1900, by Corp. S. Daughters, company 
I, 17th Iowa infantry. 

No. 26. The left of the above regiment the forenoon of May 22, 18G3, 
as above. 

No. 27. The left of Boomer's brigade, the right of Holmes' brigade, 
and the right of the 17th Iowa infantry in the investment line from May 23d 
to June 24, 1863, for Boomer's brigade, and from May 23d to end of siege 
for Holmes' brigade, and the 17th Iowa infantry. Located November 27, 
1900, by Capt. E. B. Bascom, company K, Sth Iowa; Capt. Wm. Dean, 
company A, 5th Iowa infantry; SecondLieut. Mahlon Head, company F,10th 
Iowa; and Corp. S. Daughters, company I, 17th Iowa. 

No. 28. The left of the line of the 17th Iowa infantry in the investment 
line from May 23, 1863, to the end of the siege. Located November 27, 
1900, by Corp. S. Daughters, company I, 17th Iowa infantry. 

No. 29. The left of the line of the 5th Iowa infantry for picket and 
sharpshooters' duty from May 23 to June 24, 1863. Located November 27, 
1900, by Capt. E. B. Bascom, company K, 5th Iowa, and Capt. Wm . 
Dean, company A, Sth Iowa infantry. Second Lieut. Mahlon Head, company 
F, 10th Iowa infantry, states that the picket and sharpshooters' line of his 
regiment was to the left and somewhat in front of the line of the Sth Iowa 
infantry. He is not now, November 27, 1900, able to exactly locate the line 
of his regiment for picket and sharpshooters' duty. 

No. 30. The right of the line of the Sth Iowa infantry for picket and 
sharpshooters' duty from May 23 to June 24, 1863, located November 27, 
1900, by Captain E. B. Bascom, company K, Sth Iowa, and Captain Wm. 
Dean, company A, Sth Iowa infantry. 

No. 31. The center of the 10th Iowa infantry the forenoon of May 22, 
1863, the regiment was formed in column by division, having a front of two 
companies. Companies A and F formed the front line. From this point 
companies A and F advanced to and across the ravine in front. When they 
had advanced part way up the opposite slope, they were ordered to retreat. 
Returning to this point, they found that the rest of the regiment had retired 
to the hollow in the rear, where these two companies joined them. Captain 
Albert Head, commanding the two companies, and of company F. was 



— u — 

severely wounded at this point. (He was unconscious from his wound, 
which was in the head, about three weeks.) Located and the above infor- 
mation given November 27, 1900, b}' Second Lieutenant Mahlon Head, com- 
pany F, 10th Iowa. 

Nos. 32, 33, 34. Designate the line occupied July 3, 1863, by a detail 
from the 17th Iowa infantry. This line of rifle pits was constructed by the 
17th Iowa infantry and used by it for several days previous to July 3, 1863. 
Corporal S. Daughters, of company I, this regiment, who located the line 
November 27, 1900, cannot state exactly the date at which the line was con 
structed, and first used by the regiment. 

No. 33. Corporal Daughters occupied the middle rifle pit, marked by 
No. 33, July 3, 1863, which he and his squad dug about four rods to the 
front, a few days previous to July 3, and at the suggestion of General 
McPherson. 

No. 35. This point marks the right of the 3d Iowa infantry from June 
24, 1863 to the end of the siege, about forty yards to the south and rear of 
this point. Colonel Gan, 14th Illinois was captured about June 22, 1863. 
This point also marks the left of the 53d Illinois infantry. Located and 
the above information given by Priv. J. A. Fitchpatrick, compan^^E, 3d 
Iowa, November 28, 1900. 

No. 36. This point marks the left of the 3d Iowa infantry, and the 
right of the 33d Wisconsin from June 24, 1863 to end of siege. Located 
November 26, 1900 by Mr. J. A. Fitchpatrick, company E, 3d Iowa infantry. 

No. 37. This point marks the crest of the ridge where five companies of 
the 3d Iowa infantry and twenty men and one oflScer of the 33d Wisconsin 
charged and captured the confederate pits, June 4, 1863, this also marks 
the site of battery No. 3. Located and the above information given by Mr. 
J. A. Fitchpatrick, company E, 3d Iowa, November 28, 1900. 

No. 38. This point marks the right of the first position of the 19th infan- 
try, June 14, 1863, until June 16 or 17, 1863. Located November 28, 1900, 
by Mr. J. W. Morton, company C, 19th Iowa. 

No. 39. This point marks the left of the first position of the 19th Iowa 
infantry, June 14 until June 16 or 17, 1863. Located November 28, 1900, 
by J . W. Morton, company C, 19th Iowa. 

No. 40. The right of the second and last position of the 19th Iowa infan- 
try from June 16 or 17 to the end of the siege. Also either the left of 
the 94 Illinois infantry, or 20th Wisconsin infantry , also the site of one 
section, two guns company B, 1st Missouri light artillery, about sixty yards 
to the right and rear. Located and the above information given November 
28, 1900, by Mr. J. W. Morton, company C, 19th Iowa. 

No. 41. This point marks the left of the second and last position of the 
19th Iowa infantry from June 16 to 17 to the end of the siege. Located 
November 28, 1900, by Mr. J. W. Morton, company C, 19ih Iowa. 

No. 42. This point marks the right of the 20th Iowa infantry. 

No. 43. Marks the middle of the 20th Iowa. 

No. 44. This point marks the left of the 20th Iowa infantry. Located 
November 28, 1900, by Capt. Edward Coulter, company V, 20th Iowa infantry. 

No. 45. The right of Boomer's brigade and the 5th Iowa infantry, as 
formed by charge about 4 p. m., May 22, 1863. Located November 28, 



— 45 — 

1900, by Capt. E. B. Bascom, company K, 5tli Iowa, and Capt. Wni . I)ean, 
•company A, 5th Iowa infantry. 

No. 46. The left of Boomer's brigade and the left of the 2f)th Missouri 
as formed for charge about 4 p. m., May 22, 1863. Located November 28, 
1900, by Capt. E. B. Bascom, company K, Sth Iowa, and Capt. ^\'illiam 
Dean, company A, Sth Iowa infantry. Captain Head, 10th Iowa, assisted in 
locating numbers 45 and 46. 

No. 47. The right of Boomer's brigade and the 5th Iowa on the line 
where it halted and re-formed brigade and laid down for further orders. 

No. 48. The left of Boomer's brigade and the left of the 26th Missouri 
infantry on line where it halted and re-formed brigade aud laid down for fur- 
ther orders. Located and the above information given November 28, 1900, by 
Capt. E. B. Bascom, company K, 5th Iowa, and Captain Dean, company 
A 5th, and Captain Head, 10th Iowa. 

No. 49. Marks the place where Colonel Boomer was killed. 

No. SO. The right of the line of the 21st Iowa infantry during the siege 
on the investment line. The camp of the regiment was on the site of the 
hill immediately in the rear of the center of its line. 

No. 51. The left of the line of the above regiment. These points are located 
and the above information given November 26, 1900, by Private J.W. Stahl, 
company D, 21st Iowa infantry, assisted by Second Lieutenant G. Cooley, 
company D, 21st Iowa infantry, and by Col. J. K. P. Thompson, formerly 
of said company and regiment. Stahl and Cooley state that two guns of the 
Peoria battery were located near the center of the line of the regiment, and 
that two guns of the same battery were placed on the knoll about 300 feet to 
the left of the regiment. 

No. 52. The right line of the 22d Iowa infantry in the investment line 
during the siege. Located November 28, 1900, by E. J. C. Bealer, com- 
pany A, 22d Iowa. 

No. 56. This point marks the position of the right of the 9th Iowa, and 
left of the 26th Iowa, where Col. Milo ismith, 26th Iowa, and First Lieut. 
Alonzo Abernethy, 9th Iowa, also Ord. J.W. Gwin, 9th Iowa, and twenty- 
two men reached about 3 p. ]\t., May 22, 1863, and remained until dark. 
Located, and the above information given November 29, 1900, by First Lieu- 
tenant Abernethy, company F, 9th Iowa. 

No. 57. This point marks the position where the 9th Iowa flag fell after 
the last of four color guards had fallen, either killed or wounded. May 22, 
1863. Located and the above information given November 29, 1900, by First 
Lieutenant Abernethy, company F, 9th Iowa. 

No. 58. This marks the position of the terminal of Thayer's sap. 
Located November 29, 1900, by First Lieut. A. Abernethy, company F, 9th 
Iowa, and Lieut, J. D. Fegan, Adjt. 26th Iowa. 

No. 59. This marks the advance position of the 30th Iowa infantry on the 
assault May 12, 1863. Located November 29, 1900, by Lieut. Frank Critz, 
company. K, 30th Iowa. 

No. 60. This marks the advance position of the 26th Iowa in the asFault 
May 22, 1863. Located November 29, 1900, by J. D. Fegan, adjutant 26th 
Iowa. 

No. 61. This marks the advance position of the 25th Iowa infantry in 
the assault May 22, 1863, supporting the 30th Iowa. Located November 29, 
1900, by Col. D. J. Palmer, 25th Iowa. 



— 46 — 

No. 62. This marks the advance position of the 31st Iowa infantry, in 
the assault May 22, 18G3, supporting the 30th Iowa. Located November 29, 
1900, by Capt. J. S. Alexander, company A, 31st Iowa. 

No. 63. This marks the place where Col. Charles A. Abbott, 30th Iowa 
infantry, was killed. May 22, 1863, in the assault. Located November 29, 1900, 
by Lieut. Frank Critz, company K, 30th Iowa. 

No. 64. This marks the left of Thayer's brigade, and the 30th Iowa in 
the a^ault. May 22, 1863. Located November 29, 1900,byFrank Critz, com- 
pany K, 30th Iowa; A. Abernethy, 9th Iowa; and J. D. Fegan, 26th Iowa. 

No. 65. The right of the 30th and the left of the 9th Iowa infantry as 
formed in column for the assault. May 22, 1863. Located November 29, 1900, 
by Frank Critz, company K, 30th Iowa, and Alonzo Abernethy, company 

F, 9th Iowa. 

No. 66. The right of the 9th Iowa and the left of the 26th Iowa as 
formed in column for the assault, May 22, 1863. Located November 29, 1900, 
by Lieut. Alonzo Abernethy, company F, 9th Iowa, and J. D. Fegan, 
adjutant, 26th Iowa. 

No. 67. This marks the right of Thayer's brigade and the right of the 
26th Iowa, as formed in column for the assault, May 22, 1863. Located 
November 29, 1900, by J . D. Fegan, adjutant, 26th Iowa; Lieut. A. Aber- 
nethy, company F, 9th Iowa; and Frank Critz, company K, 30th Iowa. 

No. 68. This marks the line of sap of Thayer's brigade. 
No. 69. This marks the left of the line of the 4th Iowa infantry during 
the siege. Located November 29, 1900, by Capt. H. G. Ankeny, company 
H, 4th Iowa. 

No. 70. The right of the line of the 4th Iowa infantry supporting the 
1st Iowa battery during the siege. Located November 29, 1900, by Capt. H. 

G. Ankeny, company H, 4th Iowa. 

No. 71. The left of the line of the 1st Iowa battery during the siege. 
Located November 29, 1900, by Elliott Frazier, 1st Iowa battery. 

No. 73. Battery Ransom. Largely built by Chambers' Iowa brigade. 
If the state erects regimental monuments, the four regiments composing this 
brigade desire to place a brigade monument on the summit of this ridge, 
and near the Battery Ransom, historical tablets, giving the history of the 
brigade during the siege are also desired at this place. Located November 
29, 1900, by Private W. O. Mitchell, company G, 13th Iowa infantry. 

No. 74. About 125 men of the 22d Iowa infantry, which led the assault 
May 22, 1863, and about 50 men of the 21st Iowa infantry, which followed 
the 22d, reached the Confederate' ditch marked by 74. A few men of 
the 22d Iowa were killed in the ditch, 23 men of the 22d were 
captured at dusk by the enemy, the others escaped and joined the regiment. 
Two men of the 21st were at dark captured in this ditch, the others escaped, 
and joined the regiment, from this ditch, and at a point near the railroad. 
Two men of the 21st climbed the parapet and entered the fort. The above 
information given November 29, 1900, by E. J. C. Bealer for the 22d regi- 
ment and by J. W. Stahl for the 21st and J. K. P. Thompson of the 21st 
Iowa. 

No. 75. Marks the terminal of the sap pushed by Lawler's brigade, 
against the Confederate fort in its front, this point is located November 29, 




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— 47 — 

1900, by J. W. Stahl, company D, 21st Iowa Infantry, and J. K. P. 
Thompson of the 21st Iowa. 

No. 76. Marks the terminal of the sap pushed by Lawler's brij^ade 
against the Confederate fort in its front. At this point, the sap ended and a. 
tunnel was begun and was pushed to within thirty feet of the ditch of the fort 
immediately in front of this point. This point was located November 29, 
1900, by E. J. C. Bealer, company A, 22d Iowa. 

No. 11 . Marks the place near which were fifteen men of the 22d Iowa infan- 
try, who climbed the parapet of the fort at the southeast angle thereof, in 
the assault May 22, 1863. Five of these men, including Lieutenant Robb, 
killed on the top of the angle of the parapet were killed near this point, the 
other ten remained in the fort but a few minutes, except Sergeant Griffith, 
who stayed perhaps thirty minutes. On retiring, all took position on the out- 
side slope of the parapet. 

No. 78. Marks the place at which Captain Robinson, company I, 22d 
Iowa infantry was killed in the assault May 22, 1863. These points located 
and the above infoi'mation given by E. J. C. Bealer, company A, 22d Iowa, 
infantry. 

No. 79. Marks the place at which the color bearer, Wra. Jlonlx, of the 
21st Iowa infantry, fell severely wounded in the assault May 22, 1863. He 
laid there forty-eight hours, when he was carried away by his captain, 
Elester Boardman, and three men. 

No. 80. Marks the point at, or very near, which Lieutenant-C'olonel \y. 

D. Dunlap, 21st Iowa infantry was killed in the a.ssault, May 22, 1863. His 
last words were: ''Boys, direct your fire more to the right." Numbers 79 
and 80 were located and the above information given November 29, 1900, by 
J. W. Stahl, company D. 21st Iowa infantry. 

No. 81. Marks the beginning of the approach, or sap, pushed by Law- 
ler's brigade, against the R. R. redoubt. Located November 29, 1900, by 
J. W. Stahl, company D. 21st Iowa. 

No. 82. Marks the line of the approach, or sap pushed by Lawler's 
brigade, against the R. R. redoubt. 

No. 83. Stands on the line of the advanced rifle pits, or parallel of 
Lawler's brigade and near the point where a place was made for one or two 
guns which were not mounted. Located and the above information given 
by E. J. C. Bealer, company A. 22d Iowa. 

No. 84. Stands on the line of the advanced rifle pits, or parallel of 
Lawler's brigade. It was located and the above information given by private 

E. J. C. Bealer, company A. 22d Iowa. 

No. 85. Marks the point where the flag of the 22d Iowa was placed in 
the a.ssault May 22, 1863. Located and the above information given Novem- 
ber 29, 1900, by private E. J. C. Bealer, company A. 22d Iowa. 

No. 86. Marks the left of the line of the 28th Iowa infantry in the 
investment line. Located and information given by L. C. Blanchard, 
November 29, 1900. 

No. %1 . Marks the right of the line of the 28th Iowa infantry in the 
left of the line of the 24th Iowa inf:-ntry in the investment line. Located 
and information given November 29, 1900, by L. C. Blanchard and Chas. 
A. Lucas. 



— 48 — 

No. 88. Marks the right of the line of the 24th Iowa infantry in the 
investment line. Located and information given November 29, 1900, by 
Chas. A. Lucas. Nos. 86, 87 and 88 are located and the information given 
November 29, 1900, by Second Lieut. C. A. Lucas, company D, 24th Iowa 
infantry, and private L. C. Blanchard, 2Sth Iowa infantry. 

My dear Colonel Thompson: — I am able to mail you to-night the transcript 
of the notes made for the Iowa Commissioners. 

No. 53 will mark the left of the 22d regiment. Nos. 54 and 55 will mark 
respectively the right and left of the 23d regiment. The three pipes thus 
marked have not been driven; hope to mail the map to-morrow. 
With best wishes, Very truly yours, 

(Signed) Wm. T. Rigby, 

December 1, ISOO. 

No. 90. Marks the right of the advanced position of the 23d Iowa infan- 
try from about June20th, 1863, to the end of the siege. Located Decembers, 
1900, by private James H. Dean, company C, 23d Iowa infantry. 

No. 91. Marks the center of the advanced position of the 23d Iowa 
infantry from about June 20, 1863, to the end of the siege. 

No. 92. Marks the left of the advanced position of the 23d Iowa infantry 
■from about June 20, 1863, to the end of the siege. Located December 5, 
1900, by private James H. Dean, company C, 23d Iowa infantry. 

Dear Colonel Thompson: — The above were located this morning and are 
sent to complete your records. Cordially yours, 

Wm. T. Rigby. 

Decembers, 1900. 



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